Indwe February 2015

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GEORGE

B LO E M F O N T E I N KIMBERLEY

CA P E TOW N LUBUMBASHI

DURBAN LUSAKA

E A S T LO N D O N WINDHOEK

GABORONE HOEDSPRUIT JOHANNESBURG P O RT E L I Z A B E T H RICHARDS BAY W A LV I S B A Y HARARE

INDWE February 2015

Soweto Swag YOUR FREE COPY








contents

Features 24 Romance Yourself Fall in Love With You First

56 Repurposing Paper A Call to Recycle

91 Wicket Good Fun! The ICC Cricket World Cup

February 2015

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Cover Image:

Š mediaclubsouthafrica.com

On the Cover The vast township of Soweto, once the centre of violence and turmoil in the struggle against apartheid, has become something of a scenic tourist attraction in the 20 odd years since the end of National Party rule.

Airline Content 10 CEO Letter

98

Meet the Crew

105 SA Express Fleet

106 We Fly For You: Our Visions & Values

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107 Safety and Route Map

108 Flight Schedule

111 Passenger Letters



contents

Regulars 12 48 African Experience in the Big City The Farm Inn Country Hotel & Wildlife Sanctuary

50 From Struggle to Suburbia Seeing Soweto Through New Eyes

Events North, South, and In Between

18 Bits & Pieces Travel Tips & Gorgeous Goodies

22 Bites Restaurants & Taste Experiences

58 From Windhoek to Walvis Bay Exploring Namibia

Business 67 A Machiavellian Mentor Ten Top Leadership Lessons

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75

102

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Gadgets Must Haves for Technophiles

Books New releases and Must Reads

It All Adds Up Have You Factored in These Home-Buying Costs?

Identifying Identity Fraud Be Card Cautious

Travel

Motoring

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71

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Long Waves and a Lighthouse Cape St Francis

The Little Town With a Big Heart Rosendal

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To Your Garage and Beyond! InďŹ niti Q50 2.0t

Finishing Strong Dakar Podium Finish for Toyota



ceo

SA EXPRESS Communications and PR Manager Lerato Ramango Tel: +27 11 978 3854 Email: lramango@flyexpress.aero Customer Care Department Tel: 0861 729 227 Email: customercare@flyexpress.aero Twitter: @flySAexpress Facebook: SA Express Airways Reservations Support Tel: +27 11 978 9905 Email: groupsales@flyexpress.aero Group Reservations Tel: +27 11 978 5578 Email: reservationslist@flyexpress.aero

The buzz of the December holiday season seems a distant memory as we now address the repercussions of our exuberant shopping. We are by now back into the work routine. Students are back at school and have probably settled into their daily routines of homework, chores and sports. The resolutions we made on 31st December will either be reviewed or clarified this February. We still continue with our gym visits and diets, hard work and friendliness as we resolved. The entire SA Express staff and I hope that all of your resolutions and visions for 2015 will come to fruition. February is the only month that is impacted by the phenomenon of a leap year. This marks February as a month of transition and change. In keeping with this we are happy to announce that SA Express will be increasing our number of flights between Johannesburg and Walvis Bay in response to customer demand. We aim to offer incomparable service standards. In addition to building on our motto of “We Fly For You”, it is imperative that we consistently improve the service offered to you to be world class at all times. To express excellence and consistently strive to provide the best service, we know that you are the most important aspect of our airline. You can expect a comfortable, quality air travel experience, with the added benefits of frequency, reliability and value for money when travelling on our route network. As we celebrate our 21st year of existence, we commit ourselves to keeping you safe and making air travel hassle free. We have invested considerable effort in ensuring that our excellent track record isn’t compromised. I want to assure you that we will do all we can to maintain this record and are ready to seize new opportunities. This year the aviation industry celebrates 101 years since the first commercial flight took place in St. Petersburg, Florida. That 23 minute journey would mark the birth of the global airline industry. Commercial aviation has transformed the world in unimaginable ways and today, billions of passengers and tonnes of cargo reach their

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destination through the wonder of flight. SA Express will continue to play a significant role in the country’s hospitality, travel and tourism industry by linking you to major local and regional cities through our extensive route network. We are implementing all components of the SAX 20/20 turnaround plan. This plan was a holistic plan which enabled management and shareholders to review the entire business. With this implementation, we have seen improvements in all spheres of the business, including the airline’s on-time performance which is of great importance. In addition, the airline is realising improvements in passenger numbers, improved customer service and experience by focusing on our core values of safety and service. This success illustrates that the SA Express business model works. We are also a vital contributor to the country’s socio-economic development, and have fostered a Corporate Social Investment (CSI) strategy which will ensure that we play a major role in improving the quality of living of people in previously disadvantaged communities. This month we will be launching our “Adopt a School” project, which will see us adopting various schools in previously disadvantaged communities around South Africa along our route network to provide support by meeting some of their needs as they arise. February is the month of love, so let us be your airline of choice to fly you to your loved ones. We would also like for you to “Show Your Love for SA Express” this February by sharing pictures (selfies) of your best SA Express flight experience. We’ll be sharing these selfies on our various social media platforms. Post your pictures on the following social networks:

Insta

www.facebook.com/FlySAExpress www.twitter.com/flySAExpress www.instagram.com/flysaexpress

Regards, INATI

Sales Office Email: sales@flyexpress.aero INDWE Images © iStockphoto.com & Quickpic General Manager and Associate Publisher Letlhogonolo Sealetsa | nolo@tjtmedia.co.za Publisher Bernard Hellberg | bernard@tjtmedia.co.za Marketing and Communications Manager Pam Komani | pam@tjtmedia.co.za Editor Nicky Furniss | nicky@tcbmedia.co.za Senior Designer Lindsey Steenkamp | design@tcbmedia.co.za DIRECTORS Bernard Hellberg l bernard@tjtmedia.co.za Obed Sealetsa | nolo@tjtmedia.co.za Pam Komani | pam@tjtmedia.co.za ADVERTISING SALES Tel: +27 12 425 5800 National Sales Manager Bryan Kayavhu | bryan@tcbmedia.co.za +27 83 785 6691 Manager: National Sales & Business Development Chantal Barton | chantal@tcbmedia.co.za +27 83 459 3086 Senior Account Managers Nikki de Lange | nikki@tcbmedia.co.za +27 83 415 0339 Calvin van Vuuren | calvin@tcbmedia.co.za +27 82 5826873 Gertjie Meintjes | gertjie@tcbmedia.co.za +27 82 757 2622 André Scharneck | andre@tcbmedia.co.za +27 72 739 8855 Noel Sands | noel@tcbmedia.co.za +27 74 428 7604 DISCLAIMER: All material is strictly copyrighted. All rights are reserved. Reproduction in whole or part is prohibited without prior permission from the publisher. Opinions expressed in Indwe Magazine are not necessarily those of SA Express.


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Events North

Home Grown 26th February – 1st March

Johannesburg Homemakers Expo, The Dome, Northgate Johannesburg’s trendiest home, décor and home lifestyle exhibition is back for its 22nd year, and will present the latest trends on the home front to create, decorate and renovate your home. The Builders DIY Theatre features renowned experts giving visitors DIY ideas and solutions when it comes to renovating and decorating their gardens and homes, while the new Cinema Experience will allow visitors to engage with the experts and hosts, Cinema Architects and AV Gurus. Also look out for the popular Gauteng Barista Championships at the Coffee Lovers’ Theatre, where top baristas and coffee experts will entertain, inform and inspire visitors with their impressive performances and knowledgeable insights into coffee preparation and serving. www.homemakersonline.co.za

Explore the Night 6th, 7th & 14th February

Campus House Tour, Richards Bay & Gauteng Campus House Tour invites you to Explore the Night with a three-stop tour in February. Richards Bay will host the first Campus House Tour on 6th February, before heading inland to Vaal University on 7th February. The trio of shows will wrap up in Pretoria on 14th February.The line-up will include performances by Shimza, Black Coffee, Oskido, Crazy White Boy, Skeelo and Holly at all of the shows, backed by some of the choicest house DJs from each campus and region. Tickets are available from www.plankton.mobi, the Plankton Portal on Mxit and from the event Facebook Page (Campus House Tour). www.campusinvasion.co.za

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Events South Toast the harvest 1st March

Weintaufe Harvest Festival, Eikendal Estate, Stellenbosch Get your summer groove on and head out to Eikendal, when this beautifully appointed wine estate livens up with its annual Weintaufe Harvest Celebration of superb wines, good food and al fresco family fun. A new attraction at this year’s wine christening will be the Cucina di Giovanni restaurant which now calls Eikendal its home, and which will lend mouth-watering market style fare to the event, ranging from gourmet pizzas and shwarmas to dreamy desserts. Other attractions include live music, tractor rides through the vineyards, golfing action at the water’s edge, cheetah viewing, and lucky draws, while the little ones will be kept busy with a jumping castle, a jungle gym and face painting. Tickets are available at the gates on the day and include a free glass and tasting from the barrel. For more information, email info@eikendal.co.za.

Bike Hike 28th February to 1st March

Cape Town Cycle Tour Mountain Bike Challenge, Stellenbosch

Music for the

Heart

Valentine Under the Stars 2015, Castle of Good Hope, Cape Town This elegant open-air concert will feature internationally acclaimed musicians who will perform alongside the Cape Philharmonic Orchestra to create a “classic-meets-pop” concert filled with love and romance, all under the magnificent Cape Town night sky with Table Mountain as a backdrop. Performances will include internationally recognised South African soprano Magdalene Minnaar, who has entertained audiences across the globe with her exceptional voice, and Selim Kagee, South Africa’s premier classical crossover artist. There will also be a unique performance to introduce Sing the Change, an initiative that empowers youth via music and the arts. Tickets, which include a glass of bubbly, wine or a soft drink, are available from Computicket.

www.opulentliving.co.za

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The 14th annual Cape Town Cycle Tour Mountain Bike Challenge will return to the mountainous surrounds of Le Bonheur Wine Estate in the Greater Simonsberg Conservancy in Stellenbosch at the end of the month. Mountain biking enthusiasts can choose from four spectacular, specially designed routes, catering across all skill and fitness levels. Saturday’s event offers a fun-filled family day out, with two shorter routes of 14 km and 22 km available. These two routes are perfect for younger or less experienced riders looking to enjoy an exciting day of cycling. On the Sunday, more seasoned riders will be given the chance to tackle the more challenging 38 km or 55 km routes. Keep informed of developments at www.facebook.com/cycletour. www.cycletour.co.za FEB

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Events In Between A Romantic Evening Out 14th February

Kahn and the Durban City Orchestra, Durban Botanic Gardens The 2015 series of the Old Mutual Music at the Lake concerts kicks off with an incredible love theme: Kahn (lead singer of The Parlotones) and the Durban City Orchestra join forces for a Valentine’s Day concert at the Durban Botanic Gardens. All children are welcome at the KidZone for some extra fun and games, while adults are free to bring in their own drinks, cooler boxes and picnic baskets. Tickets are available from www.webtickets.co.za or from the gate on the day, and kids under eight may enter for free. Follow @OM_Concerts and @dbnbotgardens on Twitter for all the action on the day, and like the Old Mutual Music in the Gardens page on Facebook for more information.

Stepping Out for a Good Cause 15th March

SASA amaShuga Walk for Wellness, Durban Diabetes SA is stepping out with the launch of the aptly named amaShuga Walk for Wellness to raise awareness about diabetes, which is currently the third highest cause of death in KwaZulu-Natal. It will start from the Amphitheatre on Lower Marine Parade and will be accompanied by a wellness expo where free blood sugar and blood pressure checks will take place. The walk will cover a distance of 5 km and dogs on leashes are welcome. The entry fee for the event is R50 per person, and further information can be found on Facebook under amaShuga Walk for Wellness – Durban.

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Bits & Pieces

Mixology Matchmaking Amarula Gold is an adventurous new expression of the original African taste of the wild-harvested marula fruit. Fragrant, tangy and smooth, it contains 30 % alcohol by volume and no cream. Mix it with sparkling wine and discover its aromatic fruitiness and seductively spicy notes. Otherwise, love it over ice, or with soda, Appletiser, cranberry juice or passion fruit. You can also say “be my Valentine” with a delicious sparkling Pink Gold cocktail:

Pink Gold 50 ml Amarula Gold 125 ml dry sparkling wine ( JC Le Roux Brut) 5 ml Cassis Maraschino cherry or fresh berries Pour the Cassis, followed by the Amarula Gold into a champagne flute. Top with sparkling wine. Garnish with a maraschino cherry or fresh berries.

For Starlit Dreams Wilderness Safaris has introduced a new Star Bed option for guests staying at Little Makalolo Camp in Zimbabwe’s Hwange National Park. Situated on a raised platform overlooking Madison Pan, the Star Bed is just a 20 minute drive away from camp, and offers a truly secluded, up-close-and-personal wilderness experience with the opportunity of sleeping under the stars. The Star Bed is set up complete with a comfortable bed roll and mosquito netting, a sitting area, and basic ablution facilities. A highly qualified guide will be on standby to ensure guests’ safety at all times and in case they need any assistance during the night. Madison Pan attracts a wide variety of wildlife, is known for its incredible sunsets, and with a novel pizza oven on site, it is a favourite spot for sundowners. Guests enjoying the sleep-out experience will be treated to a range of night sounds as they drift off to sleep, as well as an array of sightings as they wake up to a beautiful sunrise over the waterhole.

Noble Adornments Wellness and lifestyle expert, Lisa Raleigh, recently launched the Noble Collection, her new jewellery and accessories range. The originality of these jewellery creations is ensured by the unmistakeable use of colour, earthy influence and craftsmanship. Lisa’s passion for fine metals and precious stones is inspired by her travels around the globe, particularly to the East. The Noble Collection is the realisation of many years of searching, selection and inspiration, and most of all a heartfelt love for accessories and what makes one feel and look good. The collection is varied in its offerings, from interchangeable gemstone rings to bracelets, earrings, necklaces, pendants, and dual purpose necklaces that can be worn as headpieces. There’s even a titanium necklace that can be stretched and shaped according to one’s mood. WWW.ANOBLESPACE.COM

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Bits & Pieces

Shining

a Light of Hope Capetonians and visitors to the city are being encouraged to express their hope for the country’s future with the unveiling of a dramatic sculpture, which will stand as a shining symbol of hope for the future. The 24 m high sun-shaped sculpture, named the SunStar, was recently unveiled on Signal Hill. The sculpture was conceptualised and designed by Cape Town artist and founder of the Robben Island Art Company and Trust (RIACT), Christopher Swift. It was constructed in large part from the steel from the original fence once surrounding Robben Island. The site for the SunStar sculpture was chosen for its impressive views over the city and to allow locals and tourists easy access to it. Swift’s design also takes the environment and sustainability into account. The sculpture features a solar powered light system made up of low-power LED strip-lighting and flood light support which will light up the sculpture at night, ensuring that it is visible from the air both during the day and at night.

Paddle Power Guests to the Wilderness section of the Garden Route National Park (GRNP) can now canoe down its meandering pictureperfect lakes and rivers. The Wilderness and Swartvlei lake systems form the core conservation area of the Wilderness section of the GRNP. It comprises three lakes, and these, along with the Serpentine wetlands, form part of an internationally proclaimed RAMSAR site (wetlands of global significance for biodiversity conservation). Visitors to the park can enjoy a canoe trip down the Touw and the Serpentine Rivers right up to Island Lake. By paddling up the Touw River, visitors have the opportunity to pass through thick indigenous forests and spot a wide variety of indigenous birds, while the Serpentine River meanders through dense wetland reed banks to Island Lake, which offers breathtaking views of the interconnected waterscapes. Bookings can be made by calling +27 44 877 0046.

WWW.SANPARKS.ORG/PARKS/GARDEN_ROUTE/

In the Mood for Love This Valentine’s Day, treat that special someone in your life to a romantic trip to De Hoek Country Hotel in the beautiful Magaliesburg. Couples can look forward to a one-night stay package, which includes a romantic picnic basket for two upon arrival before checking in to one of the beautiful rooms on offer. Next, enjoy a pre-dinner drink before a romantic five-course dinner of elegant, flavourful food, paired with delicious selected wines from the Cape vineyards. End off your stay with the most important meal of the day, the legendary De Hoek breakfast, as you enjoy the hotel’s magnificent surroundings. This package is valid from 1st to 28th February and costs R4,935 per couple for a one night stay. For reservations, email reservations@dehoek.com.

WWW.DEHOEK.COM

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bites Infused With Fine Flavours Skyy Vodka has recently launched a delicious new variant to its popular infused range: Skyy Infusions Vanilla Bean. Featuring decadent notes of creamy vanilla, luscious white chocolate, and slightly toasted caramel, Skyy Infusions Vanilla Bean delivers a sexy, indulgent treat reminiscent of the finest, rich vanilla bean ice-cream in cocktail form. This delicious infusion can be enjoyed on its own or with simple mixers to create a delectable cocktail, and is available from leading liquor retailers for R189 a bottle.

www.facebook/sky yvodkasa

Rosy Sipping Obikwa Pinotage Rosé is a refreshing summer quaffer. This crisp and dry wine is perfect for winding down on an outing with no-fuss padkos bites. Obikwa cellarmaster, Michael Bucholz enjoys sipping this easy drinking rosé on its own, or while tucking into fresh roasted tomato tartlets. Obikwa Pinotage Rosé is available at leading outlets countrywide. For more information, visit www.obikwa.com, join the Obikwa tribe on Facebook or follow them on Twitter @ObikwaWines.

Win! Indwe is giving away three Obikwa picnic hampers, including a bottle of Obikwa Pinotage Rosé with each. Simply SMS the words INDWE OBIKWA plus your NAME and EMAIL to 35131 to enter the draw. Cost per SMS is R1.50. Competition closes 28th February 2015. T&Cs apply.

Sweet Pairings Those with a sweet tooth now have a tempting reason to visit Robertson’s Klipdrift Distillery, where award-winning brandies have been paired with delicious confectionary. Klipdrift Export, which has fresh, fruity flavours of apricots and peaches and toasty notes of hazelnut, is paired with raspberry fudge, which supports the natural fruity notes found in the brandy. Klipdrift Premium, an amber brandy with tobacco and spicy cedar notes, is paired with a creamy, warmly spiced milk tart fudge, while the peaches, chocolate and tobacco flavours of Klipdrift Gold mingle beautifully with a dark chocolate and salted caramel-covered marshmallow. The recently released Klipdrift Black Gold, a luscious coffee and chocolate liquor, is paired with a homemade date ball. The Klipdrift Sweet Treats pairing is available at the distillery for R55 per person.

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e c n a m o R f l se

r u o Y

Fall in Love With You First Text: Bronwyn Wainwright Images g © iStockphoto.com p

D

ear Me, will you be my Valentine? Today and every day until death us do part? I would love you so very much…

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THIS YEAR I think it’s time for a different take on the month of love, Valentine’s Day and all that commercial hype that encourages us to make a proper spectacle of love. We spend so much of our time focusing on finding someone to love, or waiting for someone to love us, that many of us never stop to think about the one person we need to love first: ourselves. Perhaps society has taught us that loving ourselves equates vanity, narcissism, egotism, or even arrogance. Yet, how can you expect to love anyone else if you can’t start with appreciating your own self-worth and being kind to yourself? Brené Brown, American research professor and acclaimed author of The Gifts of Imperfection, explains: “Love is not something we give or get; it is something that we nurture and grow, a connection that can only be cultivated between two people when it exists within each one of them – we can only love others as much as we love ourselves.” Struggling with her own sense of self-worth, Brown decided to do what she does best and research the things that plagued her most: vulnerability, courage, worthiness, and shame. In an interview with Oprah, Brown explains: “Of all the thousands of people I’ve interviewed and studied over the years – looking for patterns in the data – only about 15 to

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20 % were folks living with their whole hearts, folks who were really all in when it came to their relationships. “When I examined my research, I discovered that these were people who deeply believed that they were worthy of love and belonging. These folks believed this regardless of the circumstances, unlike the majority of us who think: ‘Okay, I’m worthy of love and belonging a little bit, but I’ll be super worthy if I get promoted. Or I’ll be super worthy if I lose 20 pounds.’ These folks believed that they were loveable and that they had a place in the world, and those beliefs translated into specific choices they made every day. They were aware. They recognised shame, and they knew how to deal with it. They recognised vulnerability, and they were willing to feel it – rather than ignore or numb it.” Brown – like so many life coaches, mentors, psychologists and the plethora of self-help books out there – suggests that there are practical changes you can make in your life which encourage a deeper, more loving sense of wholeheartedness for yourself. Most often, you’ll get whacked with a long list – or pages upon pages – of changes you can make, things to do, and things not to do. Perhaps the reason the other 80 to 85 % of people struggle


to love themselves is because there’s just too many changes to make, which can be overwhelming, rather than encouraging. So if you are going to dedicate this month of love to yourself, I’d suggest starting with just three gentle steps:

Be Kind to Yourself How harsh are you when you make a mistake, do something “stupid”, fail or embarrass yourself? We tend to treat others the way we treat ourselves, which can be pretty eye-opening when we realise we’re most often unforgiving towards our own failures. Learning to accept yourself – shortcomings and all – means focusing on your strengths and admirable qualities. Appreciate your values and the things you do that make you happy. Allow yourself to have faults and forgive yourself more willingly. Corporate Consciousness Coach Kumi Sooku says: “When we understand that we cannot look outside ourselves for happiness and that change happens from within, we are better able to set our sails to follow the sun.” Ok, so maybe you don’t want to follow the sun, but if you are to love yourself, the only place to start is from within yourself.

Be Grateful Gratitude is probably the most powerful lesson I have learnt in my own short 34 years. It is the single most transformative attitude that has the ability to change the perception of a negative state into the complete opposite, and suddenly the world doesn’t seem so dark. Rhonda Byrne, author of The Magic, captures this simply: “When you’re grateful for the things you have, no matter how small they may be, you will see those things instantly increase.” Choosing to be grateful for everything you are is like having an instant makeover. The trick is that it requires daily practice to maintain that makeover towards a more loving you.

Breathe Loving yourself means allowing yourself to become calm. Brown suggests letting go and accepting that exhaustion doesn’t have to be a status symbol in your life. Indeed, calmness isn’t something that only a few hippy souls have within them. Being calm means feeling connected, confident and in control of yourself throughout the day. We all have the ability to be calm; chances are you’re just too stressed out to remember how. Start by letting go and turning your focus to your breathing. Do this when you are feeling good, when you are driving, or working on a task. Don’t wait for a stressful situation to come along. If you consciously focus on relaxing your breathing throughout the day, you will be able to maintain your sense of calm in stressful situations. These three steps may seem small, but small things put into practice can make a big difference to your sense of self-love and worth. The search for love should end with finding yourself.





Long Waves and a Lighthouse Cape St Francis Text & Images Š Keri Harvey

Known for its wild coastline, shipwrecks, surfing, seals and sandy dune beaches, Cape St Francis is a melting pot for nature lovers and fishermen, sun seekers and those enchanted by rugged beauty. It’s even inspired a cult movie.

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SE E F L I GH T SCH E DU L E F OR MORE IN F ORMAT ION .

“We are so far south that we get all the bad weather,” he says, “but when the weather is good here, there’s nowhere better. Even one good day a month is worth it for me, because when it’s calm, it’s absolutely perfect.” John owns a landscaping business and also runs a successful taxidermy operation specialising in fish mounts. “”People have woken up to the catch and release way of fishing,” says John, “so they match what they catch as closely as possible to the selection of moulds I have. But John has also created a fish species of his own. His Croconoster is renowned in fishing circles and is a grab bag of fish parts, combining bits of four different fish species into one. “The funny thing,” he laughs, “is that some people see the Croconoster and claim to have caught one.” What is definitely caught in abundance off Cape St Francis is calamari, or “chokka” in local lingo. “Some nights it looks like a floating city out to sea, there are so many chokka boats,” says fisherman turned entrepreneur, Wayne Stanley. He’s also lived in St Francis for around 20 years and owns the successful Seal Point Lures. Wayne’s handcrafted lures can be found from Australia to the Gulf of Oman and he says that some of the lures are called “GT Ice-creams”, “because they’re white and game fish eat them like ice-cream”. Cape St Francis is also legendary amongst the international surfing fraternity. It’s said to have the longest wave in the world, and in ideal weather conditions a single wave can span the entire width of the bay. Not surprising, then, that Cape St Francis acquired international surfing

S A E X PR E S S C O NN EC T S Y O U T O P O RT E LI Z A BE T H

A LONG, slender beam of light sweeps over the rooftops in rhythmic intervals, like an outstretched arm caressing the village of Cape St Francis. From dusk until dawn, every night since 1878, the lighthouse on Seal Point has kept watch over this rugged coastline. The round, white tower of the lighthouse also represents the tallest masonry lighthouse along our seaboard. Over 20 shipwrecks dot the immediate coast flanking Cape St Francis, bearing silent testimony to the harshness of this stretch of Indian Ocean coastline. Many street names in the village commemorate these shipwrecks, such as Queen of the West, Osprey, Bender and Panaghia. It is said that Seal Point, where the lighthouse is, is one of the “corners” of the South African coastline where ships have to alter course, so they often choose to come close inshore to save time… And sometimes they come just a little too close. Even since the lighthouse was lit, ships have still come to grief here, more recently the yacht, Genesis, which struck rock and sank off Cape St Francis point in the early nineties (sadly, three lives were lost). Now a flashing beacon marks this Cape. More comedic was the 20 ton fishing boat Barcelona that simply drifted onto the beach one quiet night. The sea was so calm, the crew had no idea they were no longer afloat until they were woken by an amused angler the following morning. It’s said a good party was to blame. “Weather is part of the allure of Cape St Francis,” says long-time local John Hay, who has lived in and around Cape St Francis for over 20 years.



acclaim after featuring in the movie Endless Summer. But the cult status of St Francis amongst surfers is really as old as the waves. They fondly call this spot “Seals”. It’s paradise too for nature and outdoor lovers. The Irma Booysen Flora Reserve is an area of magnificent coastal fynbos, and a walk along the wide sandy beach between Seal Point and Cape St Francis Point winds past ancient shell middens. An amble along the Wild Side, or Rocky Coast Farm, is again a completely different perspective of the area – it’s unspoiled and rugged. The fisherman’s path here hugs the coastline for miles, and the scenery of high rocks and deep Indian Ocean is just beautiful. Along the entire coastline of St Francis, birdlife is prolific, with terns and Cape gannets diving for fish, while gulls, cormorants, and oyster catchers are also in abundance. Offshore, frolicking Southern Right whales are plentiful in winter and huge schools of dolphins surf the waves throughout the year. And then, of course, there’s the lighthouse… And those who live under its beam simply never want to be anywhere else in the world.

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Contacts St Francis Tourism – Tel: +27 42 294 0076; email: info@stfrancistourism.co.za John Hay’s fish taxidermy and landscaping – Tel: +27 84 513 4913; email: rustic@mtnloaded.co.za Seal Point Lures – Tel: +27 42 298 0003; email: sealpointlures@yahoo.com



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The Little Town with a

Big Heart

Rosendal Text: Keith Bain Images © Michèle Nigrini, Terry Westby-Nunn, Westby Nunn, Marzahn Botha, Sybrandus Adema

The eastern Free State is big sky country, yet one of its bestkept secrets is among South Africa’s tiniest towns.

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Where to Stay Rosendal has plenty of places to stay. There are a couple of B&Bs, and many self-catering houses, where you can either rent a room or have the entire place to yourself. Graffie (gaffie.co.za) is directly opposite Rosa Restaurant, and gives a good feel for village life, while Yvonne’s House, Huka Tuka House, and eco-friendly Wessell’s House are all self-catering cottages at the edge of town, overlooking the dam. House Beautiful (housebeautiful.co.za) lives up to its name and offers both self-catering and B&B options. Moolmanshoek (moolmanshoek.co.za) is a 3,300-hectare game farm and horse stud offering a variety of activities, including game-viewing on horseback. Mosamane Guest Farm (mosamaneguestfarm.com) has affordable digs for hikers, and has both walking and MTB trails. This is also where Barry Sergeant makes the most fantastic goat cheese. More accommodation options and all booking details can be found at rosendalinfo.co.za.

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S E E F L I G HT S C HE D UL E F O R M O R E I NF O R M AT I O N.

people are the town’s lifeblood. “We play cards a lot,” says Michèle. “We make time to play. We arrange dinners, or theme parties. We play boules in the streets. It’s a town of happenings.” “It’s not for everybody, though,” she says. “You either love it or hate it, find it depressing or absolutely exhilarating. After the city, I found it was like being in a fairytale – a bit unreal.” Michèle isn’t alone in thinking Rosendal is a special place. She’s one of six artists in the village who have galleries where they exhibit and sell their own work. Her gallery, Meerkatkolonie, shares space with Dahla Hulme, who fashions exquisite functional art and furniture using recycled wood and old farm implements. There may not be supermarkets, but there are a few quirky shops, such as Turksvy Trading. It started as an antique shop and has evolved into a museum-like store, filled with all kinds of vintage marvels, including many throwbacks to a completely different era. Beyond browsing the galleries and poking through its offbeat shops, visitors need to be comfortable doing relatively little, says Michèle, because Rosendal’s appeal doesn’t lie in any “overt” activities. There are no tour guides or people who can take time out of their busy days to show you around. “And because there’s no sense of chasing the next attraction,” she says, “people can just relax and enjoy being here – and you can be here for two days and feel like you’ve been here for a week.” Turksvy’s owner, Sandra Lemmer, says Rosendal’s great appeal is for walkers. The area is rife with flowers and it’s possible to find beautifully patterned gem stones lying in the dirt roads. There are good hikes into the mountains on some of the farms, and visitors need only get permission from the farmers before setting off. Moolmanshoek is a nearby game farm with horse-riding

SA E XPRE SS CON N E CT S YOU T O BL OE MF ONT E I N

PRECISELY midway between Ficksburg and Senekal, and just two hours from Bloemfontein, some folks like to say the tiny town of Rosendal is set to become the next Clarens. Its residents, though, find the notion absurd. They say their village is way too small to become that kind of tourist hub, and in any case they prefer its status as a low-key, off-the-radar gem. Besides, they say, Rosendal is just slightly further from Johannesburg than the regular weekend out-of-town crowd wants to travel. But for those who make the effort to push on for an extra half-an-hour – especially if they prefer their getaways peaceful and unadulterated by commercialism and big crowds – Rosendal is a godsend. Situated amid the foothills of the Maluti Mountains in the midst of remote, rugged farmlands, there are many who consider it to be one of the prettiest places in the country, blessed with big skies that stretch towards eternity. And it has a distinctive personality that’s unique and totally disarming. “It’s impossible to pinpoint what’s special about this place,” says artist Michèle Nigrini, who was the first “outsider” to move to Rosendal 11 years ago. She says when she arrived in the eastern Free State, it took her by surprise. She’d never heard much about the place, but picked the small village for a year-long sabbatical from the city. After a couple of days it had grown on her so much, she decided she’d never leave. Like many who’ve since moved here, she says it’s the kind of place that gets under your skin and into your blood. Life, she says, is simple, but busy. The lack of facilities means everyone has to keep active in order to sustain themselves. With no supermarkets (there’s one farmer’s coop and three spaza shops for basic provisions), no malls, and not even an ATM, people need to be quite self-reliant. Most residents grow their own vegetables, and there’s incredible socialising, since connections between



and a superb sandstone dam to swim in, while many visiting nature lovers are astonished by the birdlife. But, as every resident will tell you, it’s important to be okay with your own company – there’s no popping into malls and coffee shops. You need to enjoy taking walks, reading, or hopping on a bicycle to go exploring the village, which is quite spread out. Bikes can be hired from Studio Ben, where Andre Loots makes candles and is well-known for her all-natural toiletries which she produces using coconut and olive oil. Andre says she moved to Rosendal with her husband to escape the pretence, noise and excess of city life. One of the town’s main attractions is its only restaurant, Rosa, owned by Tracy Rudling. It is known for its unusual menu, incredible locally sourced produce, and popular pizza night on Wednesdays, when locals pile in. People also travel from all over the eastern Free State for Sunday brunch, and every two months, there is a special 11-course tasting event focused on unusual foods such as lamb testicles and frogs’ legs. Attached to the restaurant is the rustic and quite magical theatre started by stage and TV actor Chris van Niekerk. Performances typically happen on the last Saturday of each month. Tracy says that the venue has drawn some incredible artists, and even if there’s a bit of a battle to get them to come the first time, they always want to return. “The town has that impact on people,” she says. “It’s the most peaceful part of the country I know. It’s very different from the rest of the Free State. There’s peace and quiet, and it leaves you feeling content so that you can achieve pretty much anything. And the people really care about their neighbours and take care of one another.” Known for her organisational skills, one of Rosendal’s movers and shakers is Sam Yeowart, one of the main drivers behind February’s

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annual Love Rosendal Festival (13th – 15th February), an event that’s become so legendary among those who’ve experienced it, that there are European travellers who make a point of returning each year – just to experience the special atmosphere, incredible energy and sense of togetherness that the festival generates. “It’s about us celebrating what Rosendal is,” says Sam. “It’s an extraordinary spectacle and very un-Free State.” It’s a three-day weekend event, coinciding with Valentine’s Day, and – besides lots of food and craft stalls and events such as a fun run and music performances in the theatre – is highlighted by a marvellous parade that includes musicians and gumboot dancers, drum majorettes, Sotho horse-riders, jugglers, and lots of people in costume getup. It’s quite a symbolic trek, starting outside Rosa and ending at Waya Waya Tavern in the township of Mautse. The parade really gets everyone together and serves as an act of solidarity between the two communities. Waya Waya is owned by a local policeman, Jacob Mallane, who says Rosendal’s social integration is years ahead of other parts of the country. When the parade reaches his tavern, he entertains with a DJ-fuelled shisa nyama, with plenty of old school music, he says, mixing it up between Brenda Fassie and boere music. There’s something for everyone, and festivities continue deep into the night. This is not to say that Rosendal is perfect. Its weather can be extreme: very cold in winter, and the wind can blow like nobody’s business. Some joke that it reaches hurricane levels. But even when there’s a gale force blowing and storms are raging, its beauty is astonishing. And there’s always calm – and peace – after the storm. “I still exhibit overseas and all over the country,” says Michèle. “But it’s always a joy to come back here and call this place home. Living here, I feel privileged every single day.”

First Page: View across Rosendal Dam Previous Page: Big skies above little Rosendal This Page: Celebrations during the annual Love Rosendal Festival, which happens again this month




Une petite ville au

grand cœur Rosendal R osend sendal al

Text: Keith Bain Images © Michèle Nigrini, Terry Westby-Nunn, Marzahn Botha, Sybrandus Adema

L

’État libre de l’est est la région des grands horizons mais c’est aussi là-bas que se trouve l’une des plus petites villes sudafricaines, un bijou jalousement gardé.

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EXACTEMENT à mi-distance entre Ficksburt et Senekal, et à deux heures de Bloemfontein se trouve la toute petite ville de Rosendal que certains appellent déjà la nouvelle Clarens (surnommée le “Joyau de l’État libre de l’est”). Ses résidents trouvent cela ridicule. Ils pensent que leur petite ville est bien trop petite pour devenir un tel centre touristique et en tout état de cause, ils préfèrent garder leur statut de perle cachée. Rosendal est située au pied des montagnes de Maluti dans une région isolée au relief accidenté, et est considérée par certains comme étant l’une des plus jolies villes du pays, dotée d’un ciel à perte de vue. Sa personnalité est unique et désarmante. « Il est impossible de mettre le doigt dessus » dit l’artiste Michèle Nigrini qui fut la première “étrangère” à s’installer à Rosendal il y a 11 ans. Elle raconte que l’État libre de l’est la prit par surprise lors de sa première visite. Elle ne savait pas grand-chose de la petite ville mais elle décida néanmoins de s’y installer, ayant pris une année sabbatique loin de la ville. Après y avoir passé quelques jours l’endroit lui plut tellement qu’elle décida de ne jamais en repartir. La vie y est simple mais il y a beaucoup à faire, expliquet-elle. Le manque d’installations fait que tout le monde est occupé à subvenir à ses propres besoins. Il n’y a pas de supermarché (seulement une coopérative agricole pour les fermiers et trois épiceries pour les produits de base), pas de centre commercial et même pas de guichet automatique bancaire et de ce fait, chacun doit être autonome et débrouillard. La plupart des habitants ont un potager et les gens se rencontrent beaucoup, les relations humaines étant la force vive du village. « On joue beaucoup aux cartes », dit Michèle. « On prend le temps de s’amuser. On organise des dîners, ou des soirées à thème. On joue

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à la pétanque dans la rue. C’est un endroit formidable. » L’oisiveté ne doit pas faire peur aux visiteurs parce qu’à part des galeries d’art ou des magasins un peu excentriques à visiter, il a peu à faire, dit Michèle. « Et comme les gens n’ont pas besoin de courir d’une attraction touristique à une autre ils peuvent se relaxer et apprécier le coin. » Sandra Lemmer, la propriétaire de Turksvy, pense que les chemins de randonnée de Rosendal sont parmi ses plus grands attraits. La région déborde de fleurs et l’on peut trouver sur les chemins de terre de magnifiques pierres fines aux motifs ravissants. La ferme à gibier de Moolmanshoek propose de l’équitation et offre l’opportunité de nager dans un réservoir creusé dans le grès, ainsi qu’un éventail superbe d’oiseaux pour les amoureux de la nature. L’une des attractions principales de la ville est son unique restaurant, Rosa, dont Tracy Rudling est propriétaire. Il se caractérise par un menu peu commun, des produits du coin et des pizzas appréciées de tous. Les gens viennent de toute la région pour le brunch du dimanche, et tous les deux mois, Tracy propose un repas de dégustation de 11 plats inhabituels tels les amourettes (testicules) d’agneau et les cuisses de grenouille. On trouve, rattaché au restaurant, un petit théâtre rustique et enchanteur qui fut établi par l’acteur de théâtre et de télévision Chris van Niekerk. On y performe en général le dernier samedi du mois. Tracey raconte que le théâtre attire des artistes hors du commun qui ont toujours envie d’y revenir. « C’est l’impact que la ville à sur les gens », dit-elle. « C’est un endroit paisible et tranquille qui vous apporte la sérénité nécessaire pour vous permettre d’atteindre vos objectifs. » La dynamique Sam Yeowart, bien connue pour ses compétences en matière d’organisation, est l’un des


principaux moteurs qui anime le festival annuel qui se tient en février et qui s’intitule Love Rosendal (13 – 15 février). Cet évènement est devenu une telle légende que même des touristes européens reviennent d’année en année pour s’imprégner de l’atmosphère, de l’énergie et du sens de communauté qui émane du festival. « On célèbre l’essence même de Rosendal », explique Sam. « Le festival se déroule sur trois jours : on y trouve de nombreux étals de nourriture et d’artisanat local et on peut participer à des courses à pied ou assister à des représentations musicales, mais le point fort est sans aucun doute la parade qui commence devant le restaurant Rosa et finit dans le township de Mautse à la taverne Waya Waya. Waya Waya appartient à Jacob Mallane, un policier local qui nous explique que pour ce qui est de l’intégration sociale, Rosendal est très en avance sur le reste du pays. Quand la parade arrive à la taverne, c’est la fête : on y vend de la viande au barbecue (shisa nyama), et le DJ joue des vieux classiques, aussi bien que la musique de Brenda Fassie (chanteuse afropop anti-apartheid) ou de la musique traditionnelle afrikaans (boere music). Il y en a pour tous les goûts et l’on fait la fête toute la nuit. Cela ne veut pas dire que Rosendal soit un endroit parfait. Le climat y est rude : les hivers sont très froids et il peut y avoir un vent de tous les diables. Mais malgré le vent qui souffle et les éléments qui se déchaînent, la beauté du paysage reste extraordinaire. Et comme on le sait, le calme et la paix viennent toujours après la tempête.

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African Experience

in the Big City The Farm Inn Country Hotel & Wildlife Sanctuary Text: Bernard Hellberg Images © The Farm Inn Country Hotel & Wildlife Sanctuary

The Farm Inn, an idyllic natural retreat, is the realisation of a couple’s dream to create a natural haven for visitors in the heart of Pretoria’s outlying eastern suburbs. In 1979, husband and wife team, Pedro and Rose Michaletos, bought a patch of land on the outskirts of Pretoria, intending to establish stables to breed Arabian horses. At the time, the city had not yet expanded to its current extensive footprint, so the land was bare, save for a single storey thatched house. Although there were almost no services, Pedro believed in their dream and re-planted several palm trees from the Hellenic Hotel, which his family owned at the time, declaring: “If the trees grow, then we’ll grow.” Several years of planning, building and, later, the conversion of the stables they had originally built, and permission to open a small inn was finally granted to the pair. Sadly disaster struck soon after, when in 1984 most of the ten bedroom guesthouse was destroyed in a massive fire. Not to be beaten, Pedro and Rose immediately began rebuilding their dream and reopened The Farm Inn within a year, laying the foundation for a rural retreat in the city which has since grown exponentially to include 83 bedrooms, 17 function venues, two chapels and three bomas. Still privately owned today – in its fourth

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generation of ownership – The Farm Inn is an easy 20 minute drive from the centre of Pretoria, 45 minutes from OR Tambo International airport, and a touch longer from Johannesburg itself. The Farm Inn’s history of unequalled hospitality is trumped only by its reputation as a great getaway from the hustle and bustle. As a wildlife sanctuary in the city, it adds a special dimension that no other retreat can emulate, let alone improve upon. The natural beauty of the setting and surrounds creates a special ambience that is ideal for personalised weddings, while the abundance of venues makes conferencing at The Farm Inn a relaxed, yet productive experience. The wildlife sanctuary is certainly the inn’s most inimitable offering. Amid the surrounding suburban sprawl, the serenity of Farm Inn’s park-like grounds offers an easy introduction to the magic of a wildlife sanctuary with 23 indigenous species, including lion, leopard and cheetah. Guests can enjoy daily game drives accompanied by experienced rangers, or enjoy an once-in-a-lifetime cheetah interaction under the watchful eye of a trained professional.


The Farm Inn’s culinary experience is also not to be missed. At the top of the culinary food chain, the Tugela à la carte restaurant is open seven days a week to hotel guests and public visitors, and has won numerous prizes for its cuisine. Boasting typically African dishes, Tugela’s romantic setting and truly flavoursome meals make this a Pretoria landmark and must be tried. Breakfast is a hearty affair that perfectly rounds off a night at The Farm Inn. Friendly waiting staff, a selection of cold and warm dishes, and (my personal favourite) a delectable filter coffee blend developed especially for the inn, make the most important meal of the day a memorable experience. The Farm Inn’s distinctive setting on a rocky outcrop under the African sun is a must-do adventure for local visitors and international guests alike. This country hotel’s genuine hospitality blends perfectly with the warmth of its thatch and stone milieu, making it a luxury “home away from home” that begs to be experienced. For more information, visit www.farminn.co.za.

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e l g g u r t S m Fro

a i b r u b u S to Seeing Soweto Through New Eyes Text: Romaana Naidoo/mediaclubsouthafrica.co.za g © mediaclubsouthafrica.co.za Images

T

he vast township of Soweto, once the centre of violence and turmoil in the struggle against apartheid, has become something of a scenic tourist attraction in the 20 odd years since the end of National Party rule.

GETTING ITS NAME from the apartheid designation of South Western Townships, Soweto was built as a shantytown on the edge of Johannesburg. It was essentially a dumping ground for black citizens, far from work and the white suburbs. Between 1955 and 1958 the government, vigorously implementing its apartheid policies, moved thousands of black South Africans from the city to Soweto. As with all townships, it was ignored by the former regime. Its dusty roads were unpaved and tiny matchbox houses were built out of a mix of iron, wood and brick. Backyard shacks and informal settlements marked the place, which, at over 200 km², is the largest township in the country. By 2003, Greater Soweto consisted of 87 townships. Today it is almost unrecognisable. It has become an economic hub of activity with a fully fledged upper, middle

and lower social class. Its roads are tarred and trees shade its many green spaces.

Rebuilding the Township Since 1994, a huge amount of work has gone into developing Soweto and reintegrating it into the Great Johannesburg. More than 100,000 houses have been built or refurbished in the township over the past 20 years, according to the Presidency’s Twenty Year Review, and all outstanding water, electricity and sanitation connections to thousands of houses have been completed. Sowetan residential property is now booming, with the highest average prices in the affordable housing market segment countrywide. Some 314 km of gravel roads have been tarred, and all other roads resurfaced, kerbed, pedestrianised, linked to a

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new cycleway, provided with street lights, and integrated into a comprehensive storm water system. Soweto is also home to Africa’s biggest healthcare facility, Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital. Over the past 20 years retail space has grown from fewer than 60,000 m² to 220,000 m². Five new major shopping malls with major retail anchor tenants have been established, including the flagship Maponya Mall. A new tourism spine has brought in over one million visitors keen to explore and understand Soweto’s role in the struggle against apartheid. The spine links the Vilakazi Street precinct, where tourists can see the house museums of Soweto’s two Nobel Peace Prize winners, Nelson Mandela and Emeritus Archbishop Tutu. Also included in the area are the Hector Pieterson Memorial and Museum, the 12 km June 16th Route, and the Regina Mundi Parish Church, before the route loops back to Kliptown, where the Freedom Charter was signed. Other tourist attractions include the Oppenheimer Tower, Credo Mutwa Cultural Village, and Orlando Towers, former cooling towers which are colourfully painted and now offer spectacular views of the city, as well as heart-stopping bungee jumps. The township also hosts the Soweto Open tennis tournament, the Soweto Marathon, and the Soweto Wine Festival.

The Home of South African Soccer Soweto has produced the highest number of professional soccer teams in the country. Orlando Pirates, Kaizer Chiefs

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and Moroka Swallows were all born there, and remain among the leading teams in the Premier Soccer League. Sport is big in the area. FNB Stadium, the country’s largest stadium, is in Soweto. Known as Soccer City during the Fifa Soccer World Cup in 2010, for which it was purpose built, it is the centre of soccer in South Africa. It is the home ground of the national soccer team, Bafana Bafana, as well as Kaizer Chiefs, and the preferred venue for major concerts.

Converting Hostels Into Homes Apartheid’s migrant labour system relied on men transported far from their homes into the city, where they would live and work. These labourers were often housed in single-sex hostels, but today, the Johannesburg Housing Company is busy converting these structures into comfortable family homes. Once such development is Orlando Ekhaya, an affordable rental housing project. Here the City of Johannesburg has invested some R130 million in good quality, high-density family flats in the Soweto suburb of Orlando. Hostels elsewhere in Soweto are getting the same treatment.

Half a Million Trees Johannesburg is known as the world’s largest manmade urban forest, with some of its trees dating back to the early 1900s. But while the city itself was green, for decades Soweto was drab and dusty, with only a few trees planted in the 1950s. The Greening of Soweto Project, launched in 2006 with the planting of 6,000 trees – and an ultimate aim of half a million – is perhaps the city’s biggest


green revolution. Since its inception, more than 200,000 new trees have been planted and six new ecoparks built. In 2008, Nelson Mandela planted the 90,990th tree, on his 90th birthday. The aim is for a further 300,000 to be planted by 2016. The greening project has received two separate gold awards at the UN Liveable Community Awards, one in 2008 and another in 2010.

Transport Upgrades Given the almost total lack of investment in public transport by the previous government, minibus taxis and rail were for decades the main means of getting around Soweto and into Johannesburg. The township’s transport hub is the Bara Bus and Taxi Rank, opposite the Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital. The rank, the biggest and busiest bus and taxi rank in Soweto, was given a massive facelift in 2003 thanks to a R60 million government investment over a three year period. According to the City of Joburg Property Company, R100 million was spent on the Bara Central Redevelopment, which aimed to transform the public environment, and upgrade the area into a vibrant high-density, mixeduse destination with an underground parkade, a new public square with artwork, and an upgrade of the streets. Twenty years of freedom have seen heavy investment in Soweto’s public transport. The City of Johannesburg’s Rea Vaya bus rapid transit system was first rolled out in the township to provide affordable transport.


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First Page: Freedom Square was the site of the adoption of the Freedom Charter in 1955 Second Page: A mural conveying messages on HIV/Aids and woman abuse on a wall outside Baragwanath Hospital Previous Page: Originally the site of a coal fired power station, the Orlando Towers have become one of the most distinctive landmarks in Soweto and the site of the world’s first bungee jump between two cooling towers. This Page: Public artwork at the Baragwanath minibus taxi rank on Old Potchefstroom Road, Soweto

S EE F L I G HT S CH E DU L E F OR MORE IN F ORMAT ION .

A number of neighbourhood shopping centres were developed in the 1980s around Soweto, but it was only in 1994 that Soweto’s first major shopping complex was built, in Dobsonville. In 2005, the Protea Gardens Mall opened, followed by the Bara Mall in Diepkloof, adjacent to the hospital and taxi rank, and in 2006 the Jabulani Mall. The following year, Soweto’s homegrown millionaire, Richard Maponya, opened the township’s first mega mall, the 65,000 m², R650 million Maponya Mall on Chris Hani Road. In 2012, the City of Johannesburg opened the stateof-the-art Soweto Theatre as part of a multimillionrand investment in Jabulani. It includes a R320 million shopping mall, the 300-bed Jabulani Provincial Hospital, and a residential area with three- to five-storey walk-up blocks of flats. Business facilities in Soweto are also being considered, and in her State of the Province address in 2013, Gauteng Premier Nomvula Mokonyane said the provincial government had partnered with Century Property Development Company to establish a R1.6-billion industrial park in Diepsloot. The once dusty and desperate streets of Soweto are being turned into a tidy city, complete with all the facilities and amenities needed for modern life.

S A E X PR E S S C O NN EC T S Y O U T O JO HA NN ES B UR G

Shopping Malls, Businesses and a Theatre



Repurposing Paper A Call to Recycle Text: PAMSA Image: © Tetra Pak

It is estimated that only 5 % of South African households recycle their paper products. So what is the other 95 % doing? Unfortunately, their paper goes into the refuse bin and off to landfill. WE CONNECT with paper products every day: at home in the kitchen and bathroom; at the office; at the airport. You are even reading a paper magazine. Locally produced paper is made from plantation-grown trees (those innumerable rows of green that you see as you fly over KwaZulu-Natal), recycled paper fibre, or sugar cane fibre.

Today a Magazine, Tomorrow a Newspaper Recycled paper is a valuable resource for paper and packaging manufacturers. While 62% of paper is recovered in South Africa, just less than one million tonnes still ends up in landfills, degrading with food waste and adding to greenhouse gas levels in the air we breathe. By recycling paper, the carbon (absorbed as carbon dioxide by the trees) remains “locked up” in the paper and out of the atmosphere for longer.

Get It Collected or Drop It Off Visit www.mywaste.co.za for collection programmes or drop-off sites in your area. Keep recyclables aside for an informal collector who walks your neighbourhood every week, or contract the services of a small recycling business.

Sort Your Rubbish From Your Recyclables The first step to recycling paper is getting to know your paper recyclables:

YES

NO

UÊ >}>â iÃÊ> `ÊLÀ V ÕÀiÃ]Ê V Õ` }Ê} ÃÃÞÊÛ>À iÌ ià UÊ iÜë>«iÀÃÊ UÊ "vv ViÊ> `Êà Ài``i`Ê«>«iÀÊ> `Êi Ûi «ià UÊ >À`L >À`Ê vÊ> ÞÊ `ÊqÊ`ÀÞÊv `ÊL ÝiÃ]ÊV à iÌ VÊ and medicine boxes, roll cores, packing cartons UÊ *>«iÀÊ} vÌÊÜÀ>«« }Ê UÊ ]ÊLiÛiÀ>}iÊ> `Êv `ÊV>ÀÌ ÃÊ

UÊ 1Ãi`Ê«>«iÀÊ« >Ìià UÊ 1Ãi`Ê` ë Ã>L iÊ >«« ià UÊ 1Ãi`ÊÌ ÃÃÕiÃÊ> `ÊÌ iÌÊ«>«iÀ UÊ 7>Ý V >Ìi`]Êv i`Ê ÀÊ > >Ìi`ÊL ÝiÃÊ UÊ 1Ãi`ÊVi i ÌÊL>}ÃÊ> `Ê` }Êv `ÊL>}à UÊ Ê} vÌÊÜÀ>«« }]ÊV>ÀL Ê> `Ê > >Ìi`Ê«>«iÀ

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Fro mW indh oek

Wal vis to Bay Exploring Namibia Text & Images Š Jacqueline Cochrane

Jacqui Cochrane discovers that Namibia is so much more than just desert and dunes.

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I HAVE a fear of getting lost in the desert. This is because when I was six years old, I watched a South African movie called Dirkie. (That was its Afrikaans title. The English title was Lost in the Desert.) Directed by Jamie Uys, it’s the tale of eight-year-old Dirkie who, along with his dog Lollie, must survive in the Kalahari when his uncle’s light aircraft crashes in the desert. Bravely carrying his little suitcase, Dirkie plods through thick desert sand and encounters snakes, hyenas and scorpions. In fact, one stings him and our diminutive hero is rendered delirious. Thankfully, a kind Bushman and his son find him and offer him shelter and water out of an ostrich egg. When he wakes up, the generous desert dwellers give Dirkie some meat, but his gratitude turns into horror when he realises that Lollie is missing. The Bushmen believe him to be possessed by bad spirits and, even after the boy finds his dog, they abandon him. Dirkie and Lollie are eventually rescued: His father finds the child unconscious but alive, half buried in the desert sand like a discarded boy mannequin. What was supposed to be a happy ending did little to quell my new fear of the desert, hyenas and potentially dog-eating strangers, and I took an unusual interest in outdoor survival skills. Recently, I was invited on a media trip to Namibia – the very country where Dirkie was filmed (only then it

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was known as South West Africa). It would be my second visit to the land of sand. Despite my childhood misgivings, I had rather liked the place and the people on my first visit. Namibia is the most sparsely populated nation in Africa, and one of the most desolate countries in the world. It is easy to see why the country is typically described with words like “rugged”, “stark” and “barren”, but also “enchanting”, “authentic” and “breathtaking”. As if it had donned a gigantic, 825,000 km2 sized invisibility cloak, Namibia seems oddly outside of time. With a population of only 2,3 million, many of the people I encountered appeared a little out of sync with things that were happening elsewhere in the world, but also entirely unflappable. Harsh terrain, vast distances and extreme temperatures aren’t exactly conducive to human comfort, but the result, even for tourists, is that you become less concerned with the latest iPhone operating system and more interested in acquiring a decent hat and SPF70 sunscreen. It’s not difficult to romanticise the lifestyle of Namibians who survive off the land, whether they be farmers of European descent or Himba herders. They seem to have an intimate and ancient knowledge of life and death, of nature at her cruellest and also at her most beautiful. Our tour kicks off in Windhoek, the country’s capital. The history of the city, and indeed the country, can be read in its layout and architecture. Sights like Alte Feste (the old fortress, now a museum) and the Lutheran Christus Kirche

This Page: Edible plants, hunting techniques and ingenious ways to store water are pointed out to tourists on the ‘Bushman Walk’ at the Camelthorn Kalahari Lodge Next Page Top: Go for a camel ride with Desert Explorers outside of Swakopmund, and find out why they are called the ships of the desert Next Page Bottom: Walvis Bay is incredibly rich in Marine life. Take a day cruise to spot seals, dolphins and other sea creatures



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SE E FL IG HT SCH E DU L E F OR MORE IN F ORMAT ION . S A EX P RE S S C O NNE C T S Y O U TO W IND HO E K

(Christchurch) are reminders of the German rule, which lasted from the late 1800s until the end of World War I. When the war ended, the League of Nations mandated the country to South Africa, and the apartheid government also left its impression on the country and its people. One example of this is Katutura, the city’s largest township. The name, according to one source, is said to mean “we do not have permanent habitation”. According to another, it translates as “the place where people do not want to live”. Either way, it is an unambiguous reference to the forced removals that had taken place under South African rule. Before heading out of town, we visit the Katutura meat market at the Single Quarters. A carnivore’s dream, this is where locals and tourists come to savour kapana, or braaied meat. Next, our white Toyota Quantum takes us to the Kalahari Desert, where one of our activities is a Bushman walk. Lithe and sure-footed, our San guides point out plants with medicinal properties and show us how water is stored in an ostrich egg. That night, the stars are impossibly close and bright and I feel small and safe in the desert. From there we head south. We pass Quiver trees that stand starkly against the cobalt sky, their geometric shapes like a hipster’s doodles. Rehoboth, Mariental, Seeheim… the names of places read like poetry. We crisscross the endlessly rocky !Karas Region, glimpse the majestic Fish River Canyon and the pools at the Ai Ais hot springs, travel to Lüderitz, then east and north to the bright red dunes of Sossusvlei and Solitaire – which one cannot pass without trying the apple crumble – and then finally back to the coast. The vehicle drones softly over the road, which disappears into a shimmery grey-blue mirage on the horizon. Walvis Bay remained under South African control until 1994, four years after the rest of the country had gained independence. “It must have been for the seafood,” I think to myself as I dip an exquisitely soft calamari ring into a tangy sauce at one of the restaurants on the town’s jetty. The real reason, however, probably has more to do with its natural deepwater harbour, the only one of its kind on miles of coastline between South Africa and Angola. This stretch of coast is also incredibly rich in marine life, which can be appreciated in a restaurant (the oysters are incredible), or on one of the harbour cruises (seals, dolphins, pelicans, flamingos and – true to its name – whales, can be sighted). In the silvery dunes that hug the area from Walvis Bay to Swakopmund and beyond, Izak the camel helps me to conquer my childhood fears of the desert. His easy lope across the dunes is interrupted every so often when he spots green succulents – delicious snacks for hard-working camels. As our plane takes off from Walvis Bay, I glance down at the endless sand beneath us, which stretches out like a giant cloth the colour of raw silk as far as the eye can see.






A Machiavellian

Mentor

Ten Top Leadership Lessons Text: Egene Yiga/Finweek Images © iStockphoto.com

Call someone “Machiavellian” and they might take offence, but there’s a lot more to Niccolò di Bernardo dei Machiavelli’s teachings than just being cut-throat.

MACHIAVELLI wrote The Prince after he was dismissed from office around 500 years ago. He dedicated it to Lorenzo di Piero de’ Medici, Duke of Florence, in the hope that it would help him regain his political status. Alas, it’s not clear whether De’ Medici ever read or even received the book. That’s why we’re covering ten teachings from the book here – so that you don’t make De’ Medici’s mistake.

2. But Always Think of War

1. Be a Resource to Foster Peace

3. Identify Problems While They Are Still Small

“A wise prince ought to adopt such a course that his citizens will always in every sort and kind of circumstance have need of the state and of him, and then he will always find them faithful.” As long as you support and defend your people, their minds will be kept “steadfast from first to last”.

“If he who rules a principality cannot recognise evils until they are upon him, he is not truly wise.” Stay close to the ground to spot troubles as they arise. Don’t let small threats grow into large ones − by the time everyone can see them, it’s already too late. Make it clear to the people in your

“When princes have thought more of ease than of arms they have lost their states.” It’s easy to hold on to power if you don’t upset the status quo. But never be complacent. Stay vigilant, because even the honest people who love you when times are good can turn against you in a heartbeat.

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life that you’re open to the truth and don’t want to be flattered with inconsequential fluff.

4. And Crush Them With One Blow “The injury that is to be done to a man ought to be of such a kind that one does not stand in fear of revenge.” As soon as you’ve spotted potential obstacles, deal with them swiftly and thoroughly so that there is no chance of them bothering you again. Hit hard but don’t go overboard.

against the other, which course will always be more advantageous than standing neutral.” Nobody likes people who are “fickle, frivolous, mean-spirited or irresolute”. Don’t sit on the fence. Take a side and stand by your position.

8. But Don’t Be Afraid to Change “He will be successful who directs his actions according to the spirit of the times.” Learn to adapt to what’s happening around you and be prepared to change as circumstances change too.

5. Build the Image of a Nice Guy “Everyone sees what you appear to be, few really know what you are, and those few dare not oppose themselves to the opinion of the many.” Make your reputation known as “great and remarkable”. Don’t let anything slip from your lips that could give you away as less than that.

6. But Be Tough When You Need to Be “Love is preserved by the link of obligation which, owing to the baseness of men, is broken at every opportunity for their advantage; but fear preserves you by a dread of punishment which never fails.” Try to be nice whenever possible, but don’t overdo it. Otherwise people will take advantage of you and disorder will arise. Punish when punishment is due, but make sure you do it with just cause.

7. Know Yourself and Be Yourself “A prince is also respected when he is either a true friend or a downright enemy; when, without any reservation, he declares himself in favour of one party

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9. Learn From Others “A wise man ought always to follow the paths beaten by great men, and to imitate those who have been supreme, so that if his ability does not equal theirs, at least it will savour of it.” The Prince is full of actual examples from Machiavelli’s extensive study of the past and present of his time. He understood that there’s no need to reinvent the wheel when someone else can show you how it’s done.

10. But Don’t Be Afraid to Go Your Own Way “There is nothing more difficult to take in hand, more perilous to conduct, or more uncertain in its success, than to take the lead in the introduction of a new order of things.” Even though people may show little support for your vision, and even attack you so that they can maintain the status quo, you must persist. Listen to advice, but be determined to bring about the changes you want. Copy courtesy of ‘Finweek’. Call 0860 103 911 to subscribe.




To Your Garage

and Beyond! 1VÅVQ\Q 9 \ Text: Bernard Hellberg Images © Infiniti SA

T

he recently introduced Infiniti Q50 2.0t adds a new entry-level dimension to the brand’s growing line-up of premium sedans. Watch out, Ingolstadt, Stuttgart and Munich!

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THERE are many good reasons why South African executives buy German sedans. Among others, they’re great cars with great pedigrees and have extensive dealer and parts backup in this country. But are these reasons (and our often blind brand loyalty) still reason enough to shrug our shoulders at the rising premium brands from the East? As relative newcomers to the market, Infiniti still has some work to do to win over the hearts and minds of South African car buyers. Not work to their cars, however, as is exhibited by the Q50 sedan which is technically as good as any other premium brand, nor to their pedigree (they have been making luxury automobiles for 25 years), and certainly not to their available local backup, considering Nissan’s extensive local support system extends to the four Infiniti Centres that have already opened. Two more will follow in 2015/’16. Considering also that the car itself is a work of surprising detail – as is plain in the build quality, the ride and handling, interior, and brisk performance of the Mercedes-Benz-sourced 2.0 litre turbo powerplant – we’re fast running out of reasons why the Q50 shouldn’t be on every exec’s shopping list. This powerful and economical new turbocharged engine adds more choice to the powertrain options available in the range. The modern, lightweight, 4-cylinder turbocharged petrol unit develops 155 kW of power and 350 Nm of torque (that’s usable from a low 1,250 r/min), sending drive to the rear wheels via a seven-speed automatic transmission. The result of a deal between Renault/Nissan and Daimler (Infiniti execs seem to avoid using the Mercedes’

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name when referring to their partnership), the powerplant uses Euro 5 certified technology and has been tuned by Infiniti engineers for service in the Q50. With quite inspiring throttle response, the 2.0 litre direct injection petrol engine joins the 2.2 litre direct injection turbodiesel, and the high-performance 3.5 litre V6-hybrid powertrain in the brand’s compact sedan line-up. The introduction of the 2.0 litre turbo not only adds an engine option to the line-up, it also adds dimension to the brand’s local offering. While it is no mean feat for such a comparatively small brand to offer such a choice of engines, Infiniti means to double the number of available powertrains and increase its mode range by 60 % over the next five years. The Q50 is available in two specification levels, Premium and Sport, with the former beginning at R430,000. For this amount, a host of features are standard, including performance and comfort features. Stop/start engine management with drive mode selector lets you choose between fuel-saving driving or a more spirited performance. Halogen headlights, parking sensors and a rear view camera also enhance the driving experience, while the raft of interior add-ons includes an Infiniti Touch infotainment system, a multi-function steering wheel, leather upholstery with heated front seats, dual touch screens with Bluetooth connectivity and cruise control. The standard spec also includes keyless entry, a tyre pressure warning system, and rain sensing wipers. At R477,000 the Sport derivative also gets some external cosmetic enhancements, including 18” triple spoke alloy


wheels with run flat tyres (not our favourite in a South African context), LED headlights with daytime running lights and welcome lighting. A power-adjusted steering wheel, sporty electrically operated front seats that link to Infiniti’s intelligent key system, and aluminium trim enhancements also get the nod. Not to be outdone by the Germans, Infiniti does offer several additional enhancements to personalise your Q50 experience, but conveniently group these together in five “packs” of optional equipment. Just about anything can be added, from adaptive steering and active lane-keeping assistance in the “Steering” pack (standard on the Sport model or an additional R12,000 for the Premium), to intelligent cruise control with lane departure prevention, predictive forward collision warning and reverse collision intervention as part of the “Safety Shield” pack that retails for R27,000. If you require navigation and a rather fancy Bose sound system with 14 speakers, the “Multimedia” pack can be had for an additional R30,800. All Q50 models benefit from a five-year/100,000 km maintenance plan and a three-year/100,000 km warranty, which does kick some dust in the face of its German rivals who offer less attractive assurances. With the compact premium sedan playing field widening every day, Infiniti is clearly positioning itself to grab some market share from competitor brands. With its rear-wheel drive layout, premium look and feel (both inside and out) and serious value for money offering, the Q50 2.0 litre petrol is a serious car to watch, and an even more serious one to consider buying.



It All Adds Up Have You Factored in These Home-Buying Costs? Text: Property24.com Images © iStockphoto.com

Wouldn’t it be great if homes came with price tags, similar to kitchenware and electronics in chain stores? Buying an item like this can either be a spur-of-themoment decision or a calculated one, unlike buying your first or tenth property, which requires a good deal of research, proper planning, financial security, and being on top of things when it comes to all the hidden and not-so-hidden costs. BUYING a property is one of the biggest financial commitments you can make, and many first-time home buyers are caught off guard by the various expenses that need to be factored in when budgeting for transfer costs, their monthly home loan repayments, and additional monthly expenses. Before signing on the dotted line, here are a number of expenses that would-be homeowners should plan for.

The Unavoidable Bond Registration and Transfer Costs Apart from the actual sale price, these

are probably the biggest costs associated with buying a property. The transfer costs include the value due to SARS for the transfer duty, as well as the transfer attorney’s fee. Should you require a bond, you will be required to pay bond registration costs, a bond initiation fee due to the bank, as well as the bond attorney’s fee. Unlike agents’ commission or compliance certificate inspections, which are the seller’s responsibility, transfer and bond registration costs are for the buyer’s account, so make sure that you have funds available for these vital aspects of the home buying process.

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Also ensure that you have sufficient funds available should you be required to pay a deposit for your new home, as being granted a 100 % bond by a bank is not guaranteed. Use Property24.com’s advanced bond or affordability calculator to calculate bond and interest payments, as well as estimated bond registration fees and transfer duty costs.

Moving Costs You’ve now found your new home, so all the packing and moving begins. Depending on where you have been living, and how many household items you currently have, you may need to hire a moving company to package, collect and transport your items to your new home. Most companies offer a small discount if you move during the week or in the middle of the month, when the demand is lower. If you can, avoid moving on a Saturday or at the end of the month, as this will almost certainly cost you more. You could also consider hiring a bakkie or minivan, which might save you money, but will require more hands to make the workload lighter.

General Maintenance and Repairs While some properties are in perfect condition on the day of transfer, you may still have to do some cleaning, repainting and general repairs to make your new house feel like home. Also, remember that your home will need ongoing maintenance and a few repairs as the years go by, so always keep funds available for unexpected expenses.

Property Utilities Are Key If you are buying a freehold property, you may need to register for your water and electricity connection, as well as your telephone and internet

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lines if need be. These costs vary from one region to the next, so make sure to contact your local municipality representative for further information and assistance.

Prepare for Rates and Taxes If you are buying a freehold property, you will be responsible for rates and taxes, which can cost you anything from a couple of hundred rand to a few thousand per month, depending on the value of your property. Rates cover sewer usage and rubbish removal, while your taxes are calculated against the value of your property. If you are buying into a sectional title, the apartment block or complex’s body corporate will have a set levy to pay every month for general upkeep of the buildings. This usually includes security services, as well as the maintenance of common areas and facilities. These are monthly costs and should be considered carefully, as they will affect your monthly bond affordability. Should you be buying into a sectional title, be sure to ask if there are any special levies due in the foreseeable future, as these can be costly and unexpected.

Don’t Forget the Insurance Don’t forget to apply for homeowners insurance, which insures your property against structural damage, including fire damage, storm damage, and a burst geyser. Should you have a bond on your property, your bank may insist on homeowners insurance before they grant your bond. In addition, it is wise to also factor in home insurance which protects the contents of your home from damage or theft. Bond insurance covers the outstanding amount of the bond owed to the bank should anything happen to the homeowner, and should you be a co-owner repaying a bond, it is advisable to consider life insurance to protect each other, should something happen to one of you. Keep in mind that the higher the value of the property, the higher the insurance premiums will be. It is therefore advisable to thoroughly research and compare quotations from insurance providers to ensure that you receive the best cover at the best rate.

Dressing Up Your Home Once you have found and bought your perfect home, you’ll be excited to dress it up to make it your own. Although it may be considered a luxury, making your house a home with all the finishing touches is what will add much needed comfort for you and your family. Owning a home is liberating, but the financial commitments can feel like a burden at times. With thorough planning, saving and sound advice, you can budget for any form of expense and still have a feeling of confidence and being in control as you settle into your new home. For more advice and home buying tips, visit www.property24.com.



Finishing Strong

Dakar Podium Finish for Toyota Text: Ferdi de Vos Images © Quickpic

It was pure elation for the Imperial Toyota Dakar team when Giniel de Villiers and German navigator Dirk von Zitzewitz drove onto the podium in Buenos Aires to accept their trophies for second place overall. AFTER more than 9,000 gruelling kilometres through the wastelands of Argentina, Chile and Bolivia, the pair finished 35 minutes and 34 seconds behind Qatari driver Nasser AlAttiyah (Mini), who claimed his second overall victory on the event (his first being in 2011). Interesting to note are the similarities between this year’s route and that of 2011, as well as the result: De Villiers was also second that year, trailing AlAttiyah by a margin of 49 minutes and 41 seconds. A smiling De Villiers described this year’s race as a great one for the Imperial Toyota team. “We were right there, in the thick of the fight. Our Hilux ran without missing a beat, and we have shown everybody that we are more than capable of taking on the biggest names out there.” Both Toyota Imperial Hilux bakkies completed the world’s toughest motor race. De Villiers and Von Zitzewitz brought the Toyota Imperial Hilux (#303) home just under an hour ahead of

third placed driver Krzysztof Holowczyc (Mini) from Poland. After the race, Imperial Toyota Dakar team principal Glyn Hall said: “There were moments when we were within striking distance of the lead, but we had a couple of small hiccups along the way. While they weren’t serious, they stopped us from ever really challenging for the top spot.” With that said, Toyota was in an extremely strong position for most of the race. Bad luck on stage nine – when dust swirled up by a low-passing helicopter blinded De Villiers and he hit a rock as a consequence – as well as difficulty in finding an elusive waypoint on stage 10, stunted their challenge. Meanwhile the Saudi privateer Yazeed Al-Rahji, in an identical machine to those fielded by the South African Dakar Team, was running a strong race in third place, thereby helping De Villiers to split Al-Attiyah from the rest of the Mini armada. Only an electronic problem halted the talented driver, who

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was clearly headed for a podium finish in his first ever Dakar. “We are very proud of what Yazeed achieved,” said Hall. “His experience in the World Rally Championship was a great help, and it was a pity to see him forced out just three stages from the end.” For Leeroy Poulter and Rob Howie (#327) in the second Toyota Imperial Hilux, Dakar 2015 had moments of extreme pleasure as well as moments of disappointment. The pair showed exceptional pace throughout the race, but early on a broken suspension part cost them significant time. They also missed a waypoint during the event, costing the duo 40 minutes. They were showed their pace and were on course to win the final stage – between Rosario and Buenos Aires – before it was halted by the organisers after just one waypoint because of flooding. This meant that American Robby Gordon, who was leading at the time of the cancellation, was awarded the stage win, with Poulter/Howie posting a time just 25 seconds off his pace. The pair also lost time in stage 11 waiting for De Villiers and Von Zitzewitz to pass them so that they could back them up, should anything go wrong. As a result they finished in 16th position overall. “We had a good race, and learnt a lot this year,” said Poulter. “This isn’t a race you win on your debut and not in your second year either. It takes time to understand the workings of the Dakar, but I really feel we’ve grown a lot this year.” For the Toyota Imperial South African Dakar Team, it was the third podium finish in four years: third in 2012, second in 2013, and now second again in 2015. In 2014 De Villiers and Von Zitzewitz missed out on the podium, but still brought their Hilux home in fourth place overall. “For us Dakar 2015 was a fantastic experience. Another podium finish just serves to underscore how competitive we have been since entering this amazing race,” said Hall, the father of the Dakar Hilux vehicles. “All credit goes to the team that has worked tirelessly to develop, build and test these machines. Without them there would simply not have been such good results for the Toyota Imperial SA Dakar Team.”


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Identifying Identity Fraud Text: Supplied Images Š iStockphoto.com

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R

ecent statistics provided by the Southern African Fraud Prevention Service (SAFPS) reveal that identity fraud is on the increase in South Africa. This is a concerning trend in a country where consumers rely strongly on credit.

BASED on the year-to-date figure, 1,370 cases had been reported to the SAFPS as at the end of April 2014. There was a 16 % increase of this crime from a total of 3,327 cases in 2012 to a total of 3,873 cases in 2013, with over 4,000 expected when data for the whole of last year is collated. However, these statistics indicate the cases that have been recorded, and the actual numbers are presumed to be much higher. In South Africa, it is estimated that identity theft costs the local economy R1 billion each year. According to the latest National Credit Regulator Credit Bureau Monitor, there were 20.64 million creditactive consumers in South Africa as at the end of December 2013, and each one of these consumers are urged to pay close attention to the threat of fraudulent activity that could affect their credit records. One of South Africa’s leading credit bureaus, Compuscan, has been keeping a close watch on the situation, and is endeavouring to educate consumers and assist them in preventing the negative impact that fraud can have on their credit reports. It must be

noted that as technology and access to information evolves, fraudsters are continuously changing their approaches and coming up with new scams. Frank Lenisa, Director at Compuscan, comments: “It’s concerning to see that there is an increase in identity fraud. What worries us even more is that consumers are often unaware that they have fallen victim to such a crime, and this could have a severe negative knock-on effect in their ability to obtain credit in future.” Every account that is opened and every credit transaction that takes place under a consumer’s identity is recorded on their credit report. This report serves as a reference to credit providers, indicating how well consumers manage their account repayments. Often consumers only find out that they have been a victim of impersonation when checking their credit report to apply for a home loan, store finance, or car finance, or when their request for credit is denied. Consumers who keep their repayments up to date may assume that they have a healthy credit record, but it is imperative to check that this has not been compromised

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at the hands of a fraudster. Every South African citizen is entitled to one free credit report annually according to the National Credit Act 34 of 2005, yet despite the high number of credit-active consumers in the country, only approximately 14,000 South Africans request their free report from Compuscan each year. Lenisa continues: “It’s important for credit-active consumers to keep a close eye on account activity under their name to prevent and recover from identity fraud. This is one of the steps that can be taken to protect the health of their credit records.” As a solution for consumers to easily and conveniently keep up to date with their financial standing, Compuscan has launched the first personal online credit report portal, called My Credit Check (www.mycreditcheck.co.za). This is a user-friendly way for South African consumers with valid identity numbers to monitor the complete record of their financial history, their borrowing and spending, payment trends and contact details, and to ensure that this information is correct. My Credit Check allows users to select whether they would like to view a once-off report or unlimited reports on an affordable three, six or 12 month subscription basis. A comprehensive alerts system that notifies creditactive consumers of any changes on their credit reports is also offered by Compuscan to those who register

with the credit bureau. Credit-active consumers can safeguard themselves by obtaining a copy of their credit reports as regularly as possible and carefully examining every piece of information. It is recommended that this is done once a month. Consumers should also carefully examine their statements, keep their passwords and identity numbers secure, and shred receipts and statements before discarding them. It must also be stressed that personal information should never be given over the phone, and the authenticity of websites should be checked before entering any personal information. If a consumer’s credit report does reflect that their identity has been used fraudulently to open accounts, consumers should contact the credit providers that have listed them immediately and request a copy of the application form which was allegedly signed when the account was opened. Should this prove to be unsuccessful in resolving the matter, consumers can contact Compuscan to log a dispute free of charge. According to the National Credit Act 34 of 2005 consumers have the right to dispute any factually incorrect information on their credit report and have the information corrected. The SAFPS furthermore provides free assistance to consumers who have been victims of identity fraud. Visit www.compuscan.co.za for more information or www.mycreditcheck.co.za to access your credit report.




Wick

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Text: Stuart Wainwright Images © iStockphoto.com

V

alentine’s Day is set to be a little less romantic than normal in 2015, as many could find themselves competing for the attention of their significant other. Don’t worry, though, it is for a good reason, as 14th February sees the start of the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015, which will run for six joyous weeks thereafter. Stock up on the cashew nuts and biltong, stack the beers in the fridge and prepare for some serious TV time to take place in lounges around the world!

AUSTRALIA and New Zealand will be hosting this edition of the World Cup and both will undoubtedly have set their sights on becoming the first host nation to keep the silverware. Obviously, our boys will be there and are keen to make some changes to our, thus far, rather dismal World Cup track record (sorry guys). India will be fighting to keep their hands on the 11 kg trophy, having won it in Sri Lanka in 2011, and in turn Sri Lanka are certainly looking to improve on their performances in the last two World Cups. Both times the team finished so close, yet so far, as runners-up. Hopefully the Proteas will make their first appearance in the World Cup final, which will be taking place on 29th March. Track record aside, the statistics paint a different picture for this year: We have the second highest percentage of games won at World Cups, and we are currently ranked third on the ICC One Day International rankings. Perhaps we are in with a good shot this year.

All Eyes on the Cup The ICC Cricket World Cup is the world’s third largest sporting event, only exceeded by the FIFA World Cup and the Summer Olympics. Tickets for the match scheduled for 15th February between India and Pakistan sold out in a mere 12 minutes! For those who couldn’t snatch up a front row seat, over 200 countries will receive the broadcasts and 2.2 billion viewers are expected to tune into the action.

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Top Pick The 2015 edition will see 14 teams batting and battling it out, including a first appearance for Afghanistan. The first round will consist of two pools of seven teams each in a round robin format, from which the top four teams from each pool will progress into the elimination rounds for the quarter-finals, semi-finals and the final. Each team is guaranteed at least six games before they can be knocked out. This is the second time that Australia and New Zealand are jointly hosting the tournament, and visitors can expect to see games at some of the finest cricketing grounds in the world. Australia will host 26 of the 49 games (including the final in Melbourne) and New Zealand will cater for the remaining 23 games. Fourteen different venues will be used, which will ensure that visitors have plenty of excuses to see a wide variety of Australian and New Zealand sights and cities.

More Than Cricket Both countries are so pleased to host the event that their respective governments have even agreed to waive some tax and customs regulations during the tournament. Now that’s what I call hospitality! Australia is known for its hot weather, stunning beaches and spectacular desert landscapes, as well as some rather dangerous snakes, spiders and other creatures that go bump in the night (far from the cities, of course...). There also has a fascinating range of animals Saffas aren’t


accustomed to, such as the emu, wombat, kookaburra, platypus and kangaroo which are unique to Australia. Vital to any visit is an encounter of a softer kind, so be sure to cuddle a koala at the Featherdale Wildlife Park on the fringes of Sydney. Kangaroo Island will allow you to get close to wallabies, koalas, and kangaroos, as well as penguins, dolphins, sea lions, fur seals, and whales. With the 2,000 km of coral gardens along the Great Barrier Reef, the ancient Aboriginal sacred site of Uluru (Ayers Rock), and the Opera House at Sydney Harbour, you may forget that you are there for the cricket. Its neighbour New Zealand lies 1,500 km west of Australia, and has been geographically isolated for 80 million years. As a result, the flora and fauna is unique and spectacular, such as the kiwi and kakapo, two flightless birds that had no need to take to the sky (until the Europeans arrived, at least). Home to the film set of the Lord of the Rings film series, New Zealand boasts scenery that is hard to match. The country is also home to the Maori tribes, which will delight visitors with their vivid attire and traditions such as the Haka. Whether you plan to enjoy the tournament from the comfort of your own home, or you are one of the lucky travellers planning to catch a live match, the ICC Cricket World Cup promises to deliver the best sporting action of an oh-so-civilised nature in the first half of 2015.


Business hub

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Meet the

Crew Text & Images © Supplied

H

ave you ever wondered who is flying the plane when you travel on SA Express? Or wanted to know more about what a job as a cabin crew member is like? Well, now’s your chance! Every month we will introduce a few members of our SA Express family, because

by getting to know them, you become part of the SA Express family too. Iain Findlay Chief Pilot

Length of service at SA Express: Over 14 years Please tell us briefly what your job involves: There are so many aspects to the job. I occasionally get to “fly the line”; doing a normal flight from A to B, enjoying the crew, the view, interaction with passengers, and the time out of the office. I also do a fair number of Route Checks, which involves sitting on the flight-deck jump-seat and observing the

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Captain and First Officer at work, ensuring that they are following procedures correctly, identifying and resolving problems, and operating the aircraft safely and efficiently. Occasionally I also get to conduct Line Training of new Captains and First Officers, which can be immeasurably satisfying. Most of my week is spent in the office, though. My primary role in the company is to ensure that we have a safe operation and that the required standards for our flight-deck crew are maintained. What do you find most challenging about your job? Time! Trying to find the time to listen to


everyone’s opinion, gripe or idea, respond to emails, do research, get some family time, and even the chance to fly. What is your favourite part of your job? Seeing a plan come together or an issue being resolved. What do you like about working for SA Express? Working with a fantastic bunch of gents and ladies in Flight Operations. The pilots in SA Express are a group of efficient and dedicated people who try hard, and put up with the day to day challenges of trying to keep a complex system running as smoothly as possible with absolute aplomb. There are many, many unsung heroes out there who make the job of Flight Operations Management easier. Have you ever had any funny incidents or encounters while on the job? We recently had a passenger who thought he was travelling from Gaborone to Cape Town, and only realised as we were about to land that he actually booked Gaborone to Johannesburg!

Nicci Butler Senior Cabin Crew Member Length of Service at SA Express: 11 years Please tell us briefly what your job involves: I am a safety officer and provide excellent customer service, comfort and satisfaction to our passengers

on a daily basis as part of a team. What is your favourite part of your job? I am proud of being part of a great team at SA Express and enjoy interacting with unique people from different walks of life, with new challenges daily. What do you find most challenging about your job? Dealing with irate passengers due to delayed flights and missed connections, and changing these adversities into customer satisfaction. What awards function did you recently take part in? I was nominated to be part of the International Tourvest Ambassadors and Sales Persons Awards. I was nominated in the top four for Product Knowledge, as well as for Sales and Merchandising, and I won the category for Managing Adversities and Teamwork. How do you feel about these achievements? I feel a great sense of achievement and pride going up against people from the bigger airlines and holding my own. I’m inspired and motivated by the achievements of the SA Express team. How do you plan to grow with these achievements in your current position? Now that I have a bigger view of onboard sales and have gained invaluable knowledge and experience in my current position, I can only hope to serve as an inspiration to encourage greater teamwork amongst my colleagues to make duty free sales work for the benefit of SA Express and the crew.

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gadgets Athletic Audio The Powerbeats Powerbeats2 Wireless headphones have been specifically created to beat the odds by bringing perfection perfect to those who strive hardest to achieve it: athletes. Athletes are able to do what they d do best with as much vigour as they like, without having to compromise. The Powerbeats2 W Wireless headphones are compact and lightweight, making them an effortless addition to your you workout session. They feature flexible ear hooks, to provide a comfortable and secure fit th that holds them in place; they pair easily with your Bluetooth device; and have a no-slip gr grip in-line mic for remote calls. Taking into account the nature of working out, these earphone earphones have also been designed to be sweat and water resistant. The Powerbeats2 Wireless headphones are available at all major retail stores nationwide for a retail price of R2,999. www.phoenixdistribution.co.za www.phoenixdistrib

Time Share Printstagram is now offering wall clocks that can be designed using your own photographs, art, and ideas. These personalised wall clocks come in a rectangular or square shape in a striking aluminium format and feature a “stand off”, which allows the clocks to stand away from the wall, making them even more eye-catching. Prices range from R199 to R299. For more information and to order your personalised wall clock, visit www.printstagram.co.za.

Gear Up Your Golf Game Garmin Southern Africa has a comprehensive range of Golf GPS products which are designed to help golfers get the most out of each round. Golfers can choose from a range of golf watches which display key data (including key distances to the green), and advanced handheld devices with touchscreen and interactive maps of each hole on the course. All the units in the Approach range can be used anywhere in the world, because each device is preloaded with over 30,000 worldwide courses, with no additional data fees or roaming charges. The Approach Range is ideal for golfers who enjoy travelling, playing unfamiliar courses, or those who want to better understand their regular courses at home and improve their scores. Garmin’s current Approach Range consists of the wrist worn Approach S2, S4 and S6 and the handhelds, which include the Approach G7 and G8. Approach devices are available at selected Pro Shop and Golfers Club stores nationwide, or online from www.garminonline.co.za.

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books Mission to South Africa: Diary of a Revolution By Robin Renwick

Must Read

This is an insider’s blow-by-blow account of the release of Nelson Mandela and the dismantling of apartheid by the ambassador who was in the midst of these events. Appointed to South Africa as Margaret Thatcher’s envoy, Lord Renwick became a personal friend of Nelson Mandela, FW de Klerk and Mangosuthu Buthelezi, acting as a trusted intermediary between them. He paints a vivid portrait of Mandela, describing his meetings with him immediately after his release, inviting him to his first meal in a restaurant in Johannesburg for 27 years, and rehearsing him for his meeting with Margaret Thatcher – and telling Thatcher that she must not interrupt him! Mission to South Africa is Renwick’s account based on hitherto unpublished Foreign Office and 10 Downing Street records at the time.

Tales From the Cross by David Marcus Tales From the Cross is a fictionalised account of author David Marcus’ remarkable experiences as an air ambulance pilot, shared through eight self-contained stories. Readers are whisked on a thrilling journey through Africa’s dangerous and unforgiving landscape, while the book explores South Africa’s history. It is written with unique insight from the author, as well as extensive research he conducted in order to write it. Each story offers adventure and a fast-paced tale of bizarre circumstances, bearing witness to the triumph of the human spirit over hatred and adversity.

Annie Sloan’s Room Recipes for Style and Color By Annie & Felix Sloan Following more than 20 bestselling books on decorative painting, Annie Sloan has just released her first book about interior design. Co-authored by Annie’s son, Felix, this comprehensive book examines nine popular styles, including: Neoclassical, French Elegance, Traditional Swedish, Coastal, Rustic Country, and Warehouse. Featuring hundreds of beautiful images showing the homes of selected interior enthusiasts and designers throughout Europe, the background of each of the nine styles is explained. As you would expect from the “Queen of Paint”, the book also contains “paint your own” ideas and sketches, plus mood boards and a host of practical tips on how to achieve these looks in your own home.

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Airline information SA Express fleet Canadair Regional Jet 200 BER Manufacturer: Bombardier Maximum cruising speed: 474 knots/545mph/879kmph Engines: Two General Electric CF34-3B1 Range: 1,662miles/3,080km Maximum altitude: 41,000ft/12,496m Seating capacity: 50

Crew: Two pilots, two cabin crew Wing span: 69ft 7in/21.21m Overall length: 87ft 10in/26.77m Overall height: 20ft 5in/6.22m Maximum take-off weight: 51,000lb/23,134kg Minimum runway length: 6,295ft/1,919m

De Havilland Dash 8 Series Q400 Turboprop Manufacturer: Bombardier Maximum cruising speed: 360knots/414mph/667kmph Engines: Two Pratt & Whitney Canada PW150A Range: 1,565 miles/2,519km Maximum altitude: 25,000ft/7,620m Seating capacity: 74 Crew: Two pilots, two

cabin crew Wing span: 93ft 3in/28.42m Overall length: 107ft 9in/32.83m Overall height: 27ft 5in/8.34m Maximum take-off weight: 64,500lb/29,257kg Minimum runway length: 4,580ft/1,396m

Canadair Regional Jet 700 Manufacturer: Bombardier Maximum cruising speed: 473 knots/544mph/875kmph Engines: Two General Electric CF34-8C5B Range: 1,477m/2,794km Maximum altitude: 41,000ft/12,496m Seating capacity: 70 Crew: Crew: Two pilots, two

cabin crew Wing span: 76ft 3in/23.2m Overall length: 106ft 8in/32.51m Overall height: 24ft 10in/7.57m Maximum take-off weight: 72,750lb/32,999kg Minimum runway length: 4,580ft/1,396m

SA Express’ aircraft are made by Bombardier Aerospace

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We fly for you About us SA Express is a fast-growing airline business operating primary and secondary hubs between domestic and regional destinations within Southern Africa. Our objective of improving intra-Africa travel is in line with South Africa’s mandate to increase aviation’s contribution towards sustainable economic growth and job creation. The flexibility and reliability presented by the airline’s FACT principle (Frequency, Availability, Competitive rate and Timing of flights) affords both consumers and service providers a unique and convenient service. The FACT principle is important to us as it enhances the country’s prospect as a preferred air travel destination and major trade and tourism capital. Our vision is supported by the airline’s aspirations and strategy. Also underpinning this vision is our set of core values and unique selling propositions that drive profitability. Vision To be a sustainable world-class regional airline with an extensive footprint in Africa. Purpose A sustainable, integrated regional airline connecting secondary and main airports.

CORE VALUES Safety first We never compromise on safety, no matter what. Customers Our customers are our most important investors. Partners We partner with people across all operations. Speed & Quality We deliver with speed without compromising on quality. Improvement We strive for continuous improvement. Simplify We keep it simple.

108 INDWE

SPECIAL SERVICES Special Meals Passengers with special dietary requirements are provided for through the following special meals: kosher, halal, Muslim, Hindu, low-fat and vegetarian meals. Orders for special meals should be placed at the time of making flight reservations. The airline requires a minimum of 48 hours’ notice prior to departure in order to assist with confirmation of requests. Passengers requiring special attention Requirements for unaccompanied minors (passengers under the age of 12 years) or passengers requiring wheelchairs should be stated at the time of making the reservation. Owing to the size of the cabins on our aircraft types, the airline is not in a position to carry stretcher passengers or incubators. Cabin baggage SA Express will accept one piece of cabin baggage not exceeding a total dimension of 115cm and 7kg in weight. For safety reasons, cabin baggage must fit into approved stowage spaces: either the overhead luggage bin or under the seat. Owing to limited storage space in the aircraft cabin, cabin baggage may be placed in the Skycheck at the aircraft for hold stowage.

We Fly For You SA Express Airways prides itself on aiming to offer incomparable service standards. In addition to building on our motto to express excellence and consistently striving to provide the best service, we know that “you” is the most important word in our airline. SA Express proudly launched its new brand on 2 December 2009 at OR Tambo International Airport. The new brand is set to ensure that it’s distinctive and positioned to build awareness and affinity in the domestic and regional markets. The new proposition “We Fly for You” is set to position SA Express as a premier intraregional African brand. The main objective of the re-brand is to ensure that SA Express is distinctive yet still aligned to the country’s mainline carrier. SA Express’s unique positioning as an airline that provides a bespoke, personalised travel experience was the rationale behind the proposition “We Fly for You”. The new brand mark is in line with the symbol and colours of the national flag, encouraging national pride. The new brand will be applied to all brand touch-points throughout the operation as well as the staff uniform.

Skycheck This is the airline’s special hand-luggage facility that assists with in-flight comfort, speedy boarding and disembarking. When boarding one of our flights, simply place any hand luggage that will not be required during the flight on to the Skycheck cart at the boarding steps of the aircraft. Your hand luggage will be waiting for you as you disembark from the aircraft at your destination. Baggage liability Valuable items such as cameras and accessories, computers – including laptops and notebooks – mobile telephones, perfumes, aftershaves, colognes, legal and company documents and legal tender – including cash, credit cards and cheques – bullion, leather jackets, all types of jewellery and any other items with a value in excess of R400 must be removed from either checked-in or Skycheck baggage as the airline is not liable for loss or damage to these items. Verified baggage claims are settled on the basis adopted by IATA (International Airlines Transport Association): payment of US$20 per 1kg of checked-in luggage, to a maximum of 20kg ($400).

Awards SA Express has won the AFRAA Regional Airline of the Year Award at the end of 2009, and the Allied and Aviation Business Corporate Award. Our airline was also the recipient of the Annual Airline Reliability Award from Bombardier at the end of 2007. Other previous awards include the International Star Quality Award, which indicates our commitment to service excellence, while our prominence as one of the top 500 best managed companies is proof of our success as a business. Onboard service The airline’s onboard service is unique and offers passengers a variety of meals or snacks. The airline pioneered its unique meal-box concept, and meal choices are frequently updated and designed using balanced food criteria: appearance, taste and nutritional value. Passengers can also enjoy a wine and malt service on specified flights as well as refreshments on all flights. Our customers can expect a safe, comfortable, quality air-travel experience, with the added benefits of frequency, reliability, on-time departures and unmatched value for money.


Safety Information Health regulations Health regulations at certain airports require that the aircraft cabin be sprayed. The spray is harmless, but if you think it might affect you, please cover your nose and mouth with a handkerchief. Remain seated As a safety precaution, passengers are requested to remain seated with seatbelts fastened after the aircraft has landed, until the seatbelt sign has been switched off by the captain. Portable electronic equipment The use of personal electronic devices (PED’s) will apply to all domestic and regional flights on the CRJ700/200 and DH8 Q400.

Passengers will be permitted to use PED’s such as cell phones, e-readers and electronic tablets in flight-mode.

Cellular telephones Cellular telephones may be used on the ground while passenger doors are open. Cellular telephones, smartphones or any device with flight mode must be switched off as soon as the cabin doors are closed and when the senior cabincrew member makes an announcement on the public-address system. Laptop computers Laptops with CD ROM and DVD drive, handheld calculators, electric shavers and portable personal listening devices may not be used on the ground during taxi but may be used during the flight when the seatbelt signs are switched off and with permission from the captain. Should circumstances dictate otherwise, a public-address announcement cancelling this concession will be made by a crew member.

Prohibited equipment Portable printers, laser pointers, video equipment, CB/ AM/FM/FHF/satellite receivers, two-way radios, compact disc and mini-disc players, scanners, remote-controlled toys and power converters are prohibited for use at any time. Safety pamphlet Read the safety pamphlet in the seat pocket in front of you and take note of your nearest emergency exit. Smoking In accordance with international trends, smoking is not permitted on board any SA Express flights. Seat belts Please fasten your seat belt whenever the seat belt signs are illuminated. For your own safety we suggest that you keep it fastened throughout the flight. Important When in doubt, please consult our cabin crew.

For your comfort and security, please comply with the above safety regulations at all times while on board

Route map SA Express: Johannesburg Bloemfontein Cape Town Durban East London Gaborone George Hoedspruit

Kimberley Lubumbashi Lusaka Harare Port Elizabeth Richards Bay Walvis Bay Windhoek

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Flight schedule

JOHANNESBURG - BLOEMFONTEIN FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1001 1003 1003 1005 1011 1013 1017 1021 1023

DEP 06:15 08:00 08:00 11:20 13:50 14:55 16:50 17:55 18:30

ARR 07:15 09:05 09:05 12:25 14:55 16:00 17:50 18:55 19:35

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 CR7 CR7 DH4 DH4

M

T

W

JOHANNESBURG - EAST LONDON FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1403 1403 1403 1405 1407 1413 1409 1411

DEP 07:15 08:30 08:30 09:10 13:15 15:40 17:30 18:40

ARR 08:45 10:00 10:15 10:40 14:45 17:10 19:00 20:10

A/C CR8 CR7 DH4 CR2 CR2 CR8 CR2 CR7

M

JOHANNESBURG - GEORGE FLT SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1501 1503 1503 1505 1509

DEP 07:20 08:55 08:55 11:25 15:25

ARR 09:10 10:45 10:50 13:15 17:15

A/C CR7 CR7 CR2 CR7 CR7

M

DEP 10:15 12:15

ARR 11:20 13:20

A/C DH4 DH4

M

JOHANNESBURG - DURBAN FLT NO SA 1285

DEP 12:20

ARR 13:30

A/C CR2

M

NO 1101 1103 1105 1107 1113

DEP 06:50 09:20 13:10 14:40 17:15

ARR 08:00 10:35 14:25 15:55 18:30

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4

M

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

F

S

S

JOHANNESBURG - KIMBERLEY FLT SA SA SA SA SA

F

T

JOHANNESBURG - HOEDSPRUIT FLT NO SA 1225 SA 1227

T

T

JOHANNESBURG - PORT ELIZABETH FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1453 1455 1457 1457 1459 1459

DEP 07:10 10:00 17:50 17:50 19:35 19:55

ARR 08:45 11:35 19:25 19:45 21:15 21:30

A/C CR8 CR8 DH4 CR7 CR8 CR7

M

T

W

T

BLOEMFONTEIN - JOHANNESBURG FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1024 1002 1004 1004 1006 1012 1014 1018 1022

DEP 06:20 07:45 09:35 09:35 12:55 15:25 16:30 18:20 19:30

A/C DH4 DH4 CR2 DH4 DH4 DH4 CR7 CR7 DH4

M

T

W

EAST LONDON - JOHANNESBURG FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1412 1404 1404 1404 1404 1406 1408 1414 1410

DEP 06:45 09:15 09:50 10:50 10:30 11:10 15:30 17:00 19:40

ARR 08:25 10:45 11:30 12:30 12:10 12:40 17:00 18:30 21:10

A/C CR7 CR8 DH4 DH4 CR7 CR2 CR2 CR7 CR7

M

GEORGE - JOHANNESBURG FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1502 1504 1504 1506 1506 1510

DEP 09:45 11:25 11:25 14:05 14:10 18:10

ARR 11:35 13:05 13:15 15:45 15:50 19:50

A/C CR7 CR7 CR2 CR8 CR7 CR8

M

FLT SA SA

NO 1226 1228

DEP 12:00 13:55

ARR 13:00 14:55

A/C DH4 DH4

M

DURBAN - JOHANNESBURG FLT SA

NO 1286

DEP 17:15

ARR 18:25

A/C CR2

M

NO 1102 1104 1106 1106 1108 1114

DEP 08:25 11:10 14:55 15:00 16:25 19:00

ARR 09:30 12:25 16:10 16:10 17:40 20:15

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4

M

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

F

S

S

KIMBERLEY - JOHANNESBURG FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA

T

T

HOEDSPRUIT - JOHANNESBURG

T

PORT ELIZABETH - JOHANNESBURG FLT SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1460 1454 1456 1458 1458

DEP 06:10 09:20 12:45 20:00 20:45

*Please note that SA Express may deviate from the published schedule over the holiday period and will operate reduced schedules in December and January

SA EXPRESS RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE, SUSPEND OR AMEND THIS PUBLISHED SCHEDULE WITHOUT PRIOR NOTIFICATION EVERY EFFORT WILL BE MADE TO OPERATE AS PER THE PLANNED SCHEDULE

110 INDWE

ARR 07:25 08:40 10:40 10:40 14:00 16:30 17:35 19:20 20:30

ARR 07:45 10:55 14:20 21:35 22:40

A/C CR7 CR8 DH4 CR7 DH4

M

T

W

T


Flight schedule

JOHANNESBURG - RICHARDS BAY FLT SA SA SA SA

NO 1201 1203 1207 1213

DEP 06:00 08:30 13:15 16:55

ARR 07:15 09:45 14:30 18:10

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

JOHANNESBURG - WALVIS BAY FLT SA SA SA

NO 1703 1701 1705

DEP 09:00 11:55 13:00

ARR 11:25 14:10 15:25

A/C CR2 CR7 CR7

M

T

JOHANNESBURG - WINDHOEK FLT NO SA 1733 SA 1731

DEP 06:00 06:00

ARR 08:10 08:10

A/C CR2 CR2

M

T

JOHANNESBURG - GABORONE FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1761 1763 1765 1765 1767 1767 1767 1775 1775 1783 1781

DEP 07:10 07:55 09:55 09:55 11:40 11:55 11:55 13:30 14:30 15:50 18:10

ARR 08:05 08:50 10:45 10:50 12:35 12:45 12:45 14:25 15:25 16:40 19:05

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 CR2 DH4 DH4 CR2 CR8

M

T

JOHANNESBURG - LUBUMBASHI FLT NO SA 1797

DEP 09:20

ARR 11:45

A/C CR7

M

T

CAPE TOWN - BLOEMFONTEIN FLT SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1081 1083 1087 1091 1091

DEP 06:00 08:00 13:15 16:15 17:15

ARR 07:30 09:30 15:00 18:00 18:45

A/C CR2 CR2 DH4 CR2 CR2

M

CAPE TOWN - EAST LONDON FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1361 1363 1363 1371 1371 1371 1375

DEP 06:00 08:00 08:00 13:30 13:30 16:00 17:20

ARR 07:55 09:25 09:55 14:55 15:10 17:30 19:15

A/C DH4 CR2 DH4 CR2 CR2 CR2 DH4

M

RICHARDS BAY - JOHANNESBURG FLT SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1202 1204 1208 1214 1214

DEP 08:05 10:30 15:05 18:40 18:40

ARR 09:20 11:45 16:20 20:00 20:10

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

WALVIS BAY - JOHANNESBURG FLT SA SA SA

NO 1704 1702 1706

DEP 12:00 14:45 16:00

ARR 14:15 16:55 18:15

A/C CR2 CR7 CR2

M

T

WINDHOEK - JOHANNESBURG FLT SA SA

NO 1734 1732

DEP 09:30 09:30

ARR 11:30 11:30

A/C CR2 CR2

M

T

GABORONE - JOHANNESBURG FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1762 1764 1766 1766 1768 1768 1768 1776 1776 1784 1782 1780

DEP 08:30 09:25 11:25 11:25 13:10 13:10 13:10 14:50 16:05 17:20 19:45 19:45

ARR 09:25 10:20 12:15 12:20 14:00 14:05 14:05 15:45 17:00 18:10 20:40 20:40

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 CR2 DH4 DH4 DH4 CR8 DH4

M

T

LUBUMBASHI - JOHANNESBURG FLT SA

NO 1798

DEP 12:30

ARR 15:00

A/C CR7

M

T

BLOEMFONTEIN - CAPE TOWN FLT SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1082 1084 1088 1092 1092

DEP 08:15 10:30 15:40 18:30 19:25

ARR 10:00 12:15 17:40 20:30 21:10

A/C CR2 CR2 DH4 CR2 CR2

M

EAST LONDON - CAPE TOWN FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1362 1364 1364 1364 1372 1372 1374 1376 1376

DEP 08:00 09:00 10:25 10:45 15:00 16:20 18:30 19:20 19:50

ARR 19:35 10:40 12:25 12:25 16:40 18:00 20:10 21:00 21:30

A/C CR2 CR2 DH4 DH4 CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

M

*Please note that SA Express may deviate from the published schedule over the holiday period and will operate reduced schedules in December and January

SA EXPRESS RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE, SUSPEND OR AMEND THIS PUBLISHED SCHEDULE WITHOUT PRIOR NOTIFICATION EVERY EFFORT WILL BE MADE TO OPERATE AS PER THE PLANNED SCHEDULE

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Flight schedule CAPE TOWN - HOEDSPRUIT FLT NO SA 1241 SA 1241

DEP 09:40 10:10

ARR 12:20 12:50

A/C CR2 CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

CAPE TOWN - PORT ELIZABETH FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1801 1805 1807 1809 1813 1813 1813 1819 1821 1821 1823

DEP 06:00 09:00 10:10 12:20 13:00 13:00 13:45 15:00 16:00 16:30 18:30

ARR 07:30 10:30 11:40 13:30 14:10 14:30 14:55 16:30 17:30 17:40 20:00

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 CR2 CR2 DH4 CR2 DH4 DH4 CR2 DH4

M

CAPE TOWN - WALVIS BAY FLT NO SA 1721 SA 1721

DEP 08:00 11:15

ARR 10:10 13:25

A/C CR2 CR2

DURBAN - EAST LONDON FLT SA SA SA SA

NO 1301 1303 1305 1309

DEP 06:00 08:30 12:00 16:50

ARR 07:05 09:35 13:05 17:55

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

M

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

DURBAN - PORT ELIZABETH FLT SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1330 1334 1336 1340 1348

DEP 06:00 09:15 11:55 13:35 17:40

ARR 07:20 10:35 13:15 14:55 19:00

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

DURBAN - CAPE TOWN FLT SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1850 1852 1854 1858 1854

DEP 06:10 08:00 12:00 15:35 15:00

ARR 08:25 10:15 14:15 17:50 17:15

DURBAN - LUSAKA FLT NO SA 1601

DEP 10:10

ARR 13:00

DURBAN - HARARE FLT SA SA SA

NO 1611 1613 1611

DEP 10:20 13:55 14:00

ARR 12:45 16:20 16:25

HOEDSPRUIT - CAPE TOWN FLT SA SA

NO 1242 1242

DEP 12:45 13:20

A/C CR2 CR2

M

T

PORT ELIZABETH - CAPE TOWN FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1826 1802 1806 1808 1810 1814 1814 1814 1820 1822 1822 1824

DEP 07:00 08:00 11:00 12:10 14:00 15:00 15:00 15:25 17:00 18:00 18:10 20:30

ARR 08:40 09:40 12:40 13:50 15:20 16:20 16:40 16:45 18:40 19:40 19:30 22:10

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 CR2 CR2 CR4 CR2 DH4 DH4 CR2 DH4

FLT SA SA

NO 1722 1722

DEP 10:30 14:00

ARR 12:30 16:00

NO 1302 1304 1306 1310

DEP 07:35 10:05 13:35 18:25

ARR 08:35 11:05 14:35 19:25

NO 1331 1335 1337 1341 1349

DEP 07:50 11:05 13:40 15:35 19:55

ARR 09:05 12:20 14:55 16:50 21:10

NO 1851 1853 1855 1859 1855

DEP 09:05 10:45 15:00 18:15 17:45

ARR 11:05 12:45 17:00 20:15 19:45

LUSAKA - DURBAN FLT SA

NO 1602

DEP 13:40

ARR 16:30

HARARE - DURBAN FLT SA SA SA

NO 1612 1614 1612

DEP 13:25 17:00 17:00

SA EXPRESS RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE, SUSPEND OR AMEND THIS PUBLISHED SCHEDULE WITHOUT PRIOR NOTIFICATION EVERY EFFORT WILL BE MADE TO OPERATE AS PER THE PLANNED SCHEDULE

ARR 15:50 19:25 19:25

S

S

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2 CR2

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

CAPE TOWN - DURBAN FLT SA SA SA SA SA

F

W

PORT ELIZABETH - DURBAN FLT SA SA SA SA SA

T

T

EAST LONDON - DURBAN FLT SA SA SA SA

W

M

WALVIS BAY - CAPE TOWN

*Please note that SA Express may deviate from the published schedule over the holiday period and will operate reduced schedules in December and January

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Passenger Letters Good day, Please forward my sincere thanks to Mr OJ Sebogodi for his outstanding customer service. In December I was booked on a flight from Kimberley to Johannesburg. The flight was delayed for more than two hours due to bad weather and technical difficulties with the plane from OR Tambo. I had a connecting flight from OR Tambo to Port Elizabeth, and was thus very nervous that I may miss my connecting flight (which was the last flight for the day from Johannesburg to PE). With this mindset I approached Mr Sebogodi and asked for updates on the delays. Mr Sebogodi immediately offered to collect my baggage that was booked through to Johannesburg and send it directly to PE to save time when having to change flights. This was promptly done. He followed up and kept me informed on all changes and updates until we departed. This kind of customer service is no longer the norm in any industry, and I commend Mr Sebogodi for going the extra mile for his customers. Well done sir, I thank and salute you! You are an asset to your airline and I hope your positive energy and professionalism sets an example for and rubs off on all those who come in contact with you. Best Regards Zelda Brown Congratulations to Zelda Brown, who wrote our winning letter this month. She has won an American Tourister 55 cm spinner carry on case valued at R1,399.

Good day I would just like to express my sincere gratitude for a smooth and slick flight to Cape Town recently. This flight was a surprise from my bridesmaids, as they had planned my bachelorette party in Cape Town. Needless to say, I was very excited! Your staff were so friendly and helpful and made me even more excited. Upon arriving at Bram Fischer Airport, I went straight to the counter to check in. The lady (I wish I remembered her name) started off my flight with jokes and laughter – what a joy! It’s not often that I am greeted in such a friendly manner when checking in for a flight. So, thank you for making my experience with SA Express such a fantastic one. Regards An Excited Bride

Do You Have Something to Say? Let us know what is on your mind by sending an email to customercare@flyexpress.aero. Letters may be edited, shortened or translated from their original language.

The writer of the winning letter in the February edition of Indwe will receive an American Tourister San Francisco 66cm spinner, valued at R1,199. With American Tourister, you can have stylish, high quality luggage without dipping into your spending money. With its own distinctive design DNA and a young, casual look, the American Tourister San Francisco range of suitcases comes in black, blue and red. Ultra practical, value added features include a large U-shaped front pocket, translucent piping corner protection, a comfortable integrated top handle, a stitched bumper for base protection, and lockable zippers on the main compartment and front pocket. Inside, you’ll find a large mesh zipper pocket and two webbing packing straps with a buckle closure. The American Tourister San Francisco is available from top luggage outlets. To locate a stockist, call +27 31 266 0620.

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Africa’s Talent Revealed

Leopard after it had stalked and caught a squirrel, by Rob White

A European BeeEater, taken in the Kruger National Park by Mariana de Klerk

View over the V&A Waterfront by Werner Janse van Rensburg

If you think you have what it takes, send your photos (1MB each), details of where they were taken and your contact details to nicky@tcbmedia.co.za, with the words “Indwe Photo” in the subject line. We can’t wait to show them off!

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