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Indwe April 2017 YOUR FREE COPY

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B LO E M F O N T E I N

MAHIKENG

CAPE

GEORGE

TOW N

DURBAN

KIMBERLEY

SA’s GIN

EAST

LUBUMBASHI

LO N D O N

LUSAKA

GABORONE

HOEDSPRUIT

PO RT E L I ZA B E T H

revolution

JOHANNESBURG

RICHARDS BAY

P I LA N E S B E RG

W A LV I S B A Y

HARARE


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Contents Features 27/

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The Tonic of Life

Songs of Freedom Bongeziwe Mabandla

The First National Status Report on Biological Invasions

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Give Us a Smile!

Disappearing Natural Importance

South Africa’s Craft Gin Revolution

The Conversation Starter Tsoku Maela

Getting Your Smile Selfie-Worthy

43/ Invaders Beware

World Heritage Sites Under Threat

75/ Flutter Guts

Why Do We Get Butterflies in Our Stomachs?

93/ Turn Hundreds Into Thousands How to Ace Your First 100 Days

85/ Be a More Efficient Runner New Research

101/ Waste Not, Want Not

How to Reuse Household Water in Your Garden

Slam the Spam!

Why Are You Being Spammed?

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Why Sitting is Not the ‘New Smoking’

There’s No Need for a Standing Desk Just Yet

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111/ Green Is the New Black Eco-fying Your Home


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Contents / Regulars

/ Travel

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Need to Know

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Where the Herons Rest – Velddrif

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Bits & Pieces

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Travelling for Work? It Isn’t All Glitz and Glamour

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Dinner & A Movie

Exploring the Friendly N6 Route

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Turn it Up!

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Books

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Gadgets

/ Airline Info 10/

CEO Letter

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SA Express Turns 23!

130/ Airline Information 132/ Flight Schedule 135/ Passenger Letters

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Cruising the Desert – Namibia

/ Motoring 96/ 105/

Alfa Romeo 4C Spider Jeep Renegade 1.4 L Turbo Limited


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Ceo SA EXPRESS Customer Care Department Tel: 0861 729 227 Email: customercare@flyexpress.aero Twitter: @flySAexpress Facebook: SA Express Airways

Welcoming the New Financial Year

Reservations Support Tel: +27 11 978 9905 Email: groupsales@flyexpress.aero Group Reservations Tel: +27 11 978 5578 Email: reservationslist@flyexpress.aero Sales Office Email: sales@flyexpress.aero

Dear passengers Welcome aboard your SA Express flight. April is a special month for us as it is not only the start of a new financial year, it is also our birthday month and this year SA Express turns 23! I am proud to state unequivocally that in our 23 years of existence we have kept a spotless safety record. This is important to any airline but more so to SA Express, as it reaffirms one of our core values: “We never compromise on safety, no matter what!” We have recently been in the media regarding our company’s performance. The aviation industry is a fiercely competitive and dynamic one, known for its many challenges. Even the tremendously successful Sir Richard Branson once said: “If you want to be a millionaire, start with a billion dollars and launch an airline.” I am sure many of my colleagues in the industry can echo this sentiment. That said, it is no secret that SA Express is currently facing challenges – which are part of the landscape of any business – however, these will never impact the quality of our operations. Through this period, which is only temporary, there will be no compromises regarding safety, your comfort or the service excellence you have come to expect of SA Express. Together with our Shareholder Representative, the Department of Public Enterprises, the airline is committed to operational improvements that are required to set the company on a sustainable path. My management team and I are steadfast in improving governance as that is at the core of reform of all StateOwned Companies (SOCs) and remains an important part of any SOCs’ performance assessment. To reach our envisioned sustainable future, the airline developed the SAX 20/20 Vision Strategy that is aligned to SAA’s Long-term Turnaround Strategy (LTTS) and supports government’s “Whole State of Aviation” approach. SA Express aims to be a sustainable airline which retains the best skilled professionals to drive technology and compliance, in order to ensure customer satisfaction and effective stakeholder management, as well as to be a leader in aviation training. I firmly believe that our efforts now will enable us to continue to fulfil our core purpose of connecting people in the future. By providing the best possible service we are able to connect people in order for them to do business, see family and, of course, so that they can explore this beautiful country of ours. The team and I understand that turbulence is part of what we do, and that if we continue to work tirelessly, SA Express will continue to play a significant role in

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the country’s hospitality, travel and tourism industry for generations to come. While doing so, SA Express will remain a vital contributor to the country’s socio-economic, education and skills development programmes – provided that we remain agile in an ever-changing market. You, our customers, are our most important investors, and I am pleased to give you a few highlights to reassure you of our ongoing commitment to sustainability. As a company, we wish to demonstrate to all citizens of the Republic that we continue to work hard to meet your standards of excellence, and that the airline is indeed a strategic asset of the government of South Africa. SA Express prides itself on its role as a developmental hub in the aviation industry in South Africa. For instance, an area where we are the clear leaders in our field nationally – and within our industry – is our commitment to transformation and developing a pipeline of competent transformational leaders as part of continuity strategy and succession planning. Part of that commitment is also building a talent pool for critical and scarce skills through our SA Express Cadet Pilot Programme and the SA Express Aeronautical Technicians Programme, both launched in 2005. These programmes have successfully created a career path for pilots and technicians to address the imbalance in the industry which was created by the country’s past. SA Express has trained and employed 66 cadets through the SA Express Cadet Programme and in the past five years 31 aircraft mechanics, seven aircraft avionicians and three structural engineers were trained and placed at our hangars at the airport and at Heavy Maintenance Engineering for long-term checks. In this coming financial year, we will continue to forge strategic partnerships with key external stakeholders and contributors to further our position as an incubator for critical skills and training in the industry. As always I look forward to your thoughts, inputs and comments at inati@flyexpress.aero and wish you many happy miles on SA Express as we enjoy our freedom of movement! On behalf of South African Express Airways, we would like to congratulate Zimbabwe on their 37 years of independence as they celebrate on 18th April 2017, and wish South Africa a happy Freedom month as we celebrate our 23rd Freedom Day on 27th April 2017.

Yours in aviation Inati Ntshanga CEO of SA Express

INDWE Cover Image © iStockphoto.com Images © iStockphoto.com & Quickpic Publisher Bernard Hellberg | bernard@tcbmedia.co.za Marketing and Communications Manager Pam Komani | pam@junecommunications.co.za Editor Nicky Furniss | nicky@tcbmedia.co.za Layout and Design Ryan Abbott | ryan@tcbmedia.co.za Features Writers Julie Graham | julie@tcbmedia.co.za DIRECTORS Bernard Hellberg l bernard@tcbmedia.co.za Pam Komani | pam@junecommunications.co.za ADVERTISING SALES Tel: +27 12 425 5800 National Sales Manager (Regional & SADC) Bryan Kayavhu | bryan@tcbmedia.co.za +27 83 785 6691 Manager: National Sales & Business Development Chantal Barton | chantal@tcbmedia.co.za +27 79 626 0782 Senior Account Managers Nikki de Lange | nikki@tcbmedia.co.za +27 83 415 0339 Calvin van Vuuren | calvin@tcbmedia.co.za +27 82 5826873 Gertjie Meintjes | gertjie@tcbmedia.co.za +27 82 757 2622 DISCLAIMER: All material is strictly copyrighted. All rights are reserved. Reproduction in whole or part is prohibited without prior permission from the publisher. Opinions expressed in Indwe Magazine are not necessarily those of SA Express. Information has been included in good faith by the publisher and is believed to be correct at the time of going to print. No responsibility can be accepted for errors and omissions.


SA Express

Turns 23! Freedom of movement is enshrined in the Constitution of South Africa: “Every citizen has the right to live anywhere in South Africa, to have a passport, and to enter and leave the country.” As South Africa celebrates 23 years of freedom, so does Africa’s second largest regional airline, South African Express Airways SOC Limited.

Text & Images © SA Express

Since April 1994, SA Express has seamlessly connected primary and secondary domestic and regional destinations in the SADC region and boasts an untainted safety record for all 23 years! South African Express initially launched with a modest two aircraft and in 2017 has grown to a superior fleet comprising 22 Bombardier aircraft. As a feeder airline to South African Airways (SAA) as well as a full-service regional airline, SA Express focuses on regional and niche routes for the business market.

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It’s true that aviation is the least transformed industry in the country and that is why SA Express prides itself in its role as a developmental hub in the aviation industry of South Africa. An area where we are the clear leaders in our field nationally and within our industry is our commitment to transformation, and developing a pipeline of competent transformational leaders as part of our continuity strategy and succession planning. Part of that commitment is also building a talent pool for critical and

scarce skills through our SA Express Cadet Pilot Programme and the SA Express Aeronautical Technicians Programme, both launched in 2005. SA Express can proudly claim that we are now the most transformed airline in the country, with 72 % of the airline’s staff coming from previously disadvantaged communities. To date we have trained 66 cadet pilots and 41 technicians! The airline’s maintenance, repair and operations (MRO) is conducted by SA


Express Technical, which has an unassailable reputation for the high quality of its work, and has been a major contributor to the airline’s untainted safety record. SA Express Technical was appointed the first Bombardier Service Facility in Africa in 2012, and our highly skilled technicians are in demand – so much so, that they have on occasion been poached by international airlines with similar fleets. Working together we can continue to face challenges, explore opportunities and collaborate for greater value for our most important investor, our customers. We look forward to future successes. Team SA Express


Need to Know

A

Groundbreaking

Event

22nd April ISPS Handa ‘Art of Polo’ Cup Invitational, Val de Vie Estate, Paarl

Africa meets the world with the inaugural ISPS Handa Art of Polo Cup Invitational event. The event, a new concept in the world of polo and a first of its kind on the continent, will combine the aristocratic sport of polo with the arts, classical music and fine dining. Picture a late afternoon occasion bringing together leaders in business, sports and the arts to celebrate music and sport, culminating in a four-course Afro-Asian-fusion dinner experience paired with Val de Vie Estate’s spectacular Rhone-style wines. The high-goal polo tournament will see teams comprising of Africa’s best polo talent compete against an international team of players from Europe and Asia. Guests will be able to purchase tickets in tables of ten.

// www.artofpolocup.co.za

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A HighFlying Event 13th to 14th June Aviation Festival Africa, Sandton, Johannesburg

As the Roman philosopher, Seneca, once wrote, “Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity.” Be prepared to get lucky this June and attend the Aviation Festival Africa at the Sandton Convention Centre in Johannesburg. If you are looking for your big break in the African aviation industry, then this the perfect platform for you. Over 200 airlines and airports will be represented at the event, which will host 1500 attendees from 45 countries, 60+ conference speakers, 300 conference delegates and 30 exhibition booths. This festival is the perfect opportunity to make connections with top executives and learn more about the industry.

// www.terrapinn.com/avfestafrica

Afrikaans Artistry 8th to 15th April KKNK, Oudtshoorn

Celebrating its 23rd birthday this year, the Klein Karoo National Arts Festival (KKNK) is a signature event on the Afrikaans cultural calendar, broadening its importance in English circles too, and this year includes talent from Europe as well. The KKNK packs in eight days of theatre, drama, music, art, performance and literature, and for a week hosts thousands of visitors from across South Africa and abroad. Stalls, a funfair and rides are available for young and old throughout the day at the Rivierbuurt, while the Huisgenoot stage kicks off the evening music programme with some of South Africa’s biggest musos, including Kurt Darren and Bobby van Jaarsveld. Festivalgoers can also look forward to acclaimed theatre productions, comedy, literature discussion, book launches and visual art. Tickets are available at Computicket.

//

www.kknk.co.za


Need to Know

Silver Screen Scenes

Fantastic Fromage

Techie Tipple

23rd & 30th April April Screenings at Fugard Bioscope, Cape Town

28th to 30th April The SA Cheese Festival, Sandringham, Western Cape

06th April – 6th July Glenfiddich Independent Bar, Braamfontein, Johannesburg

The Fugard Bioscope presents screenings of the best of world theatre, opera and ballet productions from companies such as the National Theatre, the Royal Ballet, the Bolshoi Ballet and the Royal Opera House. The films are screened in the Fugard’s state-of-the-art Bioscope, which boasts a 7.1 Dolby Digital surroundsound system and full-size high-definition cinema screen. On 23rd April, patrons can look forward to The Royal Opera House’s production of Madama Butterfly, Puccini’s beloved opera known for its ravishing music and heart-breaking story of a geisha deserted by her American husband. On 30th April, Tony Award-winning director Ivo van Hove returns to National Theatre Live screens with a modern production of Ibsen’s masterpiece Hedda Gabler – about a couple who have just returned from their honeymoon and already their relationship is in trouble. The Fugard foyer bar will be serving a range of delicious light snacks and drinks. Tickets are available from Computicket.

Cheese, cheese, glorious cheese! The ever popular South African Cheese Festival showcases the widest variety of cheese and complementary products like superb wines, spicy preserves, fresh fruit, indigenous teas and exotic drinks. The festival will be celebrating 16 years of existence in 2017, and will be featuring not only well-known and popular cheeses, but also exotic, handmade boutique cheeses. Entertainment includes outstanding music, presentations by celebrity chefs and fun activities for kids and teens. Tickets are available from Computicket and Shoprite or Checkers stores for R160 per person per day.

Famed single malt whisky, Glenfiddich, is launching an exclusive luxury Independent Bar in Johannesburg this April to create a premium whisky experience using biometric technology in a way that has never been done before. Using smart technology, whisky cocktails will be engineered and customised to each person’s voice. By asking guests to speak into a special audio device, their voice is captured onto a system, and the data from this will be used to create a flavour profile and serving unique to that person. The Independent Bar further engages the senses with opulent design and an impressive display of interior creativity, characterised by touches of copper, stone and brass. As space is limited to 50 guests per night, Glenfiddich invites South Africans to join the experience of the new Independent Bar by signing up at www.glenfiddich.com/za/independent-bar/.

// www.thefugard.com

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// www.cheesefestival.co.za

//www.facebook.com/GlenfiddichSA


Need to Know

Jurassic Park Until 17 th April DinosAlive Exhibition, Forest Hill City Shopping Centre, Centurion

DinosAlive is South Africa’s biggest dinosaur exhibition. The showcase includes 25 lifelike animatronic dinosaurs which can move their limbs, blink and emit lifelike sounds. Visitors can expect to see familiar faces like the Tyrannosaurus Rex and Triceratops, and if you’re a dinosaur lover, you’ll be able to spot more obscure names like the Spinosaurus and Ankylosaurus on show too. Even if you aren’t that clued up on dinosaur trivia, there is ample information available. Information boards explain the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous periods in full detail in a fun and interactive way. Kids can get up close and personal with the Apatosaurus and go for a ride on its back, become any dinosaur they want to be at the face painting station, or get their hands dirty digging up “real” dinosaur bones in the excavation sand pit.

// www.dinosalive.co.za

Hair Catch Me If Today, Gone You Can Tomorrow 7 th May Wings for Life World Run, Centurion

22nd April Barrels & Beards Festival, Bot River, Western Cape

Now in its seventh year, the Barrels & Beards festival has become an institution to celebrate the new harvest of Bot River wine and welcomes lovers of all things fun and delicious to a sumptuous dinner spread, complete with the latest vintage wines. The winemakers of this close-knit wine region deliberately undertake a selfimposed shaving ban during the harvest period. Once the grapes are in, the shaving ban ends. But not before the barrels are rolled out for a homegrown harvest party and the shaggy growth goes on display. To great mirth all round, the annual Beard Parade is a hairy highlight of the event. Here, judges pluck, pull and measure to finally announce the winner of the esteemed title of Best Bot Beard. This is followed by an auction of special Bot River wines, which benefits various school-level educational projects in the region.

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For the fourth year the Wings for Life World Run (WFLWR) will return to South Africa. This unique global sports event takes place simultaneously in 24 locations across 23 countries, in varying light and weather conditions. This is the world’s only race that has no finish line – instead, a “catcher” car chases down participants, ending their race as the car overtakes them, until one male and one female World Champion remains. 100 % of all entry fees globally go to the Wings for Life Foundation, which funds research projects to improve treatment and therapies for spinal cord injuries and ultimately to find a cure. Last year, around 2,300 South Africans joined over 130,000 runners worldwide for the third WFLWR, raising about R112 million for the Wings for Life Foundation.

// www.wingsforlifeworldrun.com


Bits & Pieces

No More Lost Luggage Missing or permanently lost luggage is a nightmare for any traveller – which is why Samsonite’s innovation team has been working on solutions to mediate this problem. Samsonite is currently trialling a new, longer battery life, wider range technology called Narrowband-IoT (NBIoT) with Vodafone, as an additional option for their Track&Go solution. Track&Go is a device that can be placed in your travel or business bag and can be easily and privately tracked by its owner. This technology will allow a new generation of telemetry tags to be built which are less intrusive and more efficient, using less power so that they can accommodate smaller batteries with a longer life. Thanks to proximity alerts and geolocation, this technology will make it possible to track your valuables, anytime, anyplace. In the event that your bag gets lost, you will be able to see its current location as well as the necessary contact details in order to get your belongings back. Say goodbye to lost luggage nightmares!

// www.houseofsamsonite.co.za

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A New Look for a Namibian Landmark Gustav Voigts shopping centre in Namibia’s capital city of Windhoek is to undergo a multimillion-dollar phased refurbishment which starts this year. The three-level complex, built in the 1970s and located beneath the four-star Avani Hotel and Casino, was the country’s very first mall. It is home to established brands such as Mr Price, Totalsports, Queenspark, as well as brands like Nakara, Wecke & Voigts and Safariland. Oryx Properties has appointed Stauch + Partners as the architect and principal lead on the project. Andy Chase, architect at Stauch + Partners, says: “We want to create a fantastic new look for Gustav Voigts and enhance shoppers’ experience, while ensuring that the centre remains an iconic landmark in the CBD.” The first phase of the development will include the construction of a new roof to let in more natural light, the extension of shopfronts and the replacement of balustrades. New escalators will be installed and two additional parking decks will also be added.

I Love You x 100 The Browns Blossom Dress Ring holds exactly 100 diamonds and precious gemstones – each one a symbol of your love for that special someone in your life. While undoubtedly glamorous, the design is also characterised by a delicate and feminine nature. The Browns Blossom Dress ring is the one bouquet you will receive that will last as long as your love – forever. A flower set in diamonds echoes the joy of all the flowers you’ve ever received and with five flowers in the band, the rhyme will always end on: “He loves me.” These gorgeous rings can be stacked with Browns eternity rings for an even bolder look. The collection is available in a variety of looks: black and white diamonds, ruby, emerald and sapphire, or all white diamonds set in 18ct rose, yellow or white gold.

// www.brownsjewellers.com


Dinner & A Movie

The Dining Destination

Cavalli Estate is the Ferrari of wine farms – they even share the same emblem of status, the iconic stallion. Sleek, sophisticated, and sought after, Cavalli Estate has quickly become a recognised and respected South African lifestyle experience. Located on the R44 near Stellenbosch in the Cape Winelands, the estate offers breathtaking vistas of the Stellenbosch mountain range as a backdrop to its 26 hectares of vineyards, as well as 10 hectares of indigenous gardens. The restaurant at Cavalli, which

has established itself as a must-visit dining destination in the Western Cape, recently welcomed Calum Anderson as Executive Chef. Anderson’s “Everyday Gourmet” menu is all about celebrating real food that nourishes and excites. Delicious, wellpresented plates of gastronomical delight await all hungry guests at Cavalli. As the first Green-star-rated restaurant in South Africa, Cavalli is also the environmentally responsible way to spend a luxurious day out.

// www.cavalliestate.com

Going in Style Oscar winners Morgan Freeman, Michael Caine and Alan Arkin team up as lifelong buddies Willie, Joe and Al who decide to buck retirement and step off the straight-andnarrow for the first time in their lives when their pension fund becomes a corporate casualty. Desperate to pay the bills and come through for their loved ones, the three risk it all by embarking on a daring bid to knock off the very bank that absconded with their money. The film also stars two-time Oscar

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nominee Ann-Margret as Annie, a grocery cashier who’s been checking Al out in more ways than one. Joey King stars as Joe’s whipsmart granddaughter, Brooklyn, with Oscar nominee Matt Dillon as FBI Agent Hamer, and Christopher Lloyd as the guys’ lodge buddy, Milton. John Ortiz also stars as Jesus, a man of unspecified credentials who agrees to show the guys the ropes, and Peter Serafinowicz as Joe’s former son-in-law, Murphy, whose pot clinic connections may finally prove useful.

Gin That’ll Make You Grin Malfy Gin is infused with Italian lemons from the Amalfi Coast (hence its name), while Italian juniper and five other botanicals – including coriander, angelica, and cassia bark – help to create this special gin’s delicious and refreshing bite. Malfy Gin is produced at the distillery in Moncalieri, just outside of Torino, an area famous for its wines and spirits. It was established in 1906 and is run by the Vergnano family. Lively colours of blue and yellow are central in its bottle design and brand identity. Blue represents the Mediterranean, while the yellow pays homage to the citrus used in making this gin. Malfy’s bottle is decorated using traditional Italian glass-design techniques and the stopper is made in Italy from real oak. Malfy Gin lends itself to many delicious cocktails and mixed drinks and is available nationwide for approximately R350 per bottle.


Turn it Up!

Depeche Mode

Iconic, multi-platinum selling musical pioneers Depeche Mode recently released their latest album Spirit, the band’s 14th studio album and their first new music in four years. One of the most influential, beloved and best-selling musical acts of all time, Depeche Mode have sold over 100 million records and played live to more than 30 million fans worldwide. Formed in 1981, Depeche Mode – Martin Gore, Dave Gahan and Andy Fletcher – continue to win critical and commercial acclaim around the world, both in the studio and on the road, with innumerable artists citing them as inspirations and innovators. The band’s 13 studio albums have reached the Top

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Ten in over 20 countries, including the US and UK. Spirit marks the band’s first collaboration with producer James Ford of Simian Mobile Disco (Foals, Florence & The Machine and Arctic Monkeys) and serves as the follow-up to the band’s blockbuster 2013 album Delta Machine which debuted at #1 in 12 countries. The album has already garnered critical acclaim in early previews, with Q Magazine calling Spirit “the most energized Depeche Mode album in years”. Depeche Mode will support the release of the LP with an extensive world tour, giving both new and lifelong fans alike a chance to experience the band’s stunning live shows.


Fine Food, Fine Wine

Luxury in every way Great Mediteranean cooking is something to be savoured, treasured and remembered. For no other cuisine can match the exotic, yet subtle flavours that make up the favourite dishes of the region. Fortunately East London is blessed with Grazia fine food & wine, a perfect venue with a superb view over the Indian Ocean just as you might expect from a world-class restaurant with a reputation for serving the finest authentic dishes, accompanied by a wide selection of wines. Te l : 0 4 3 7 2 2 2 0 0 9 ¡ 0 4 3 7 2 2 2 0 1 0 w w w. g r a z i a f i n e f o o d . c o. z a


The Tonic

of Life

South Africa’s Craft Gin Revolution Following in the tradition of South Africa’s award-winning wine, whisky and brandy industries, local craft gin is increasingly making an appearance in bars across the world.

Text: Lisa Witepski Images © Supplied

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It’s been some time since gin nudged out craft beer to become the drink everyone wants to be seen holding. But according to Jacqueline Grobler of Ginifer, a Johannesburg-based distiller, while the gin scene is already in full swing overseas, South Africa is only just catching up. We’re doing so in a hurry, though. Such is the popularity of the drink that in 2015, Shimmy Beach Club in Cape Town launched High Afternoon GnT, a celebration of all things gin. The festival was hosted for the second time this year, with even more local exhibitors. Why the surge in popularity? “Gin is easy to serve and easy to drink. People are looking for more complex cocktails, and gin is a perfect fit for sophisticated and intricate drinks. Each gin has a

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particular taste profile and a unique scent, and that makes gin cocktails interesting,” Grobler says. Curtis van Biljon agrees. His brand, Still 33, launches in August this year. “There has been a shift towards craft products all over the world, but South Africa has lagged slightly. Although we have quite a few craft breweries, the craft spirit revolution has been in place in other countries for some years already, and the appreciation for creativity in spirits is just starting in South Africa. Small batch hand-crafted spirits will be a significant niche market going forward. It’s not just about gin, but it started there because it’s the spirit class that lends itself to maximum creativity from the distiller.”

That’s clearly evident from the sheer variety of botanicals (the plants that give gin its distinctive flavour) that South African distillers are experimenting with. At Ginifer, the distillers have sifted through Johannesburg’s famous Faraday Muti Market on Eloff Street to find herbs usually used by traditional healers. In contrast, Jenever Montane looks to Table Mountain for inspiration, as befits a Cape Town brand, incorporating fynbos botanicals to create a floral flavour. Then there’s Musgrave Pink Gin, the first pink gin in South Africa with an appropriate rose taste inspired by the flower as the symbol of a bygone era of romance and love. It also speaks to rosewater’s reign as one of the flavours du jour. Even citrus growers have edged their way onto the scene, with


ClemenGold (a locally owned citrus brand) introducing a warmly-spiced gin with a flavour profile of ClemenGold, orange peel, cinnamon and honey. If it seems like there’s something for everyone, that’s probably because there is. Van Biljon believes that the strength of the South African gin industry lies in the country’s abundance of indigenous flora – many specific to a certain region – which can be used as unique botanicals. “This makes for endless creativity in flavour and aroma. We’ll be seeing more interesting gins coming out of South Africa in the next few years. Some of them will be very good, while some will taste interesting rather than delicious.” Even the saturated overseas markets are showing an appetite for South African gin. Van Biljon says that many brands have started exporting, and Rolf Zeitvogel, master distiller and director of Blaauwklippen and the Triple Three Estate Distillery, reports that our gin is even making a mark at international awards ceremonies. “Our African Botanicals Gin was recently chosen as one of the 50 best gins in the world by a UK ranking. There were two other SA brands on the list, both with local ingredients like buchu,” he says. That’s impressive for an industry which both Van Biljon and Grobler believe to be in its infancy. “There are 35 local brands currently available. We also know of 17 other brands that are in development and will go to market within the next two years. There are 43 craft distilleries, and about 50 in planning – if talks at the recent SA Craft Distillers Institute conference is anything to go by,” says Von Biljon. “That said, craft distillers currently contribute less than half a percent of spirit sales in South Africa. It is a fast growing market, but it’s coming off a very low base. As appreciation and demand for all things craft continues to grow, particularly in the spirit market, we believe there is still a lot of room for new entrants in this niche market.” Indeed, it would appear that the gin market is limitless. According to Grobler, there’s no such thing as the “typical” gin drinker. So if your imagination is stuck on a Panama-wearing gent twirling his cane while sipping a G&T in the colonies, think again. Ditto if you’re picturing a hipster, complete with flannel shirt, beard and man bun. “Gin drinkers are wine fans keen on trying something new, whiskey drinkers wanting to explore a new taste – and, of course, die-hard gin fans.”

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She observes that the local market is very different to its international counterparts. But, while she applauds the creative spirit of our distillers, and gives credit to the veritable pantry of botanicals they’re able to work with, she believes that South Africans still need to work on the quality of the base spirit used. “Happily, this is improving with every new gin that enters the market.”

She’s looking forward to seeing the industry grow from strength to strength. “The passion of our distilleries is what makes us different. Each brand has a unique story to tell, each has a special flavour related to the part of the country where it has been distilled. It’s really encouraging, and quite beautiful, to see small distilleries fighting their way onto the market and succeeding.”


songs of

freedom This month sees the release of Mangaliso, the long-awaited second album from SAMA-nominated urban-folk musician Bongeziwe Mabandla.

Text: Keith Bain Images © Jonx Pillemer, Supplied

Known for his unique ability to weave traditional elements into his very personal brand of acoustic music, Afro-folk musician Bongeziwe Mabandla is about to release Mangaliso, his first album since signing a record deal with Universal Music. He sings with a soul-stirring voice, performing with a depth and presence that have him earmarked for greatness. And yet the critically acclaimed singer-songwriter says that, growing up in the rural Eastern Cape town of Tsolo, he never imagined he had the right gifts to make it as a musician. “My voice is unconventional,” he says. “I had a sheltered childhood and although I always wanted to sing, I didn’t think I had the kind of voice people would want to listen to.” He says coming from an aspirational family helped. Encouraged by his mother, he attended Lady Grey Arts Academy and learnt to play the guitar as a teenager. “My mother was very influential in my becoming an artist. She encouraged me from a very young age, telling me I could become whoever I wanted to be in life, and she pushed me in the right direction. I started playing guitar to impress my friends. When everyone was

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sitting around I would play [Bob Marley’s] ‘Redemption Song’. I started jamming this one song, but within three months I could play 20 songs.” It was while studying live performance at AFDA film school in Johannesburg that Bongi discovered that he had something unique to offer. “I knew I had something inside,” he reflects, “something to say and something to give. It worried me that I might grow old without ever expressing those things I felt inside. I was fortunate to receive the odd nudge from people who said they recognised my potential. I needed to hear those words of encouragement with my own ears. “I really discovered my love of music when I listened to Lauryn Hill and Tracy Chapman for the first time. They struck me because their music really spoke about things that I thought and felt, but that I hadn’t yet realised people spoke about or wrote songs about. They showed me the link between music and deep thoughts and feelings – music as a way of conveying a deeper message.” He wrote his first piece of music while still a student – the song ‘Freedom for Everyone’, which would eventually appear

on his first album, Umlilo, which means “Fire”. It was released in 2012 and earned Bongi a pair of SAMA nominations, including one for Best Newcomer. “All I ever wanted was a record deal. But the business side of that isn’t always smooth. So many young black artists have tremendous talent and seem set for great things, but for some reason, their careers never reach their potential.” Like many South Africa artists, Bongi also discovered that his talents often seemed to have more value overseas than at home. With the release of Umlilo, he took his heartfelt style and authentic delivery on tour and caused a sensation wherever he went: Germany’s Africa Festival; the Primavera Sound Festival in Barcelona, Spain; and the Gwangju World Music Festival in South Korea. He was part of a music incubator programme in the US, and had very successful tours of Canada and Australia. His debut album, in fact, was released in Japan while he was there for Sukiyaki Meets the World, a festival of world music. “I don’t struggle getting international gigs and tours,” he says. “When you perform at those events, your music speaks for the place from which you


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come. I think I’m very fortunate to have the kind of sound that really is uniquely African – because I perform mostly in Xhosa and my music includes quite traditional elements. And that’s precisely what appeals to audiences overseas.” He says that it’s not always quite so easy on his home turf, though. Although he’s performed with the likes of Joss Stone and Vieux Farka Touré on their South African tours, and has appeared on the main stages at such major festivals as Oppikoppi, Rocking the Daisies, and Swaziland’s Bushfire, he says that black musicians making soulful acoustic music frequently fail to get the recognition they deserve. “I sometimes get the sense that if you want to make it big as a black musician in this country, you need to be making kwaito-style house. “It’s still a struggle for young black musicians,” he adds. “When you’re talented and from the township or some rural setting, success is often far away for us.” Now in his early 30s, seemingly with the world at his feet and that coveted record deal in his hands, he says he’s learnt a lot on the bumpy road to where he’s at. “I’m starting to understand that everything I’ve gone through and dealt with to get where I am now is because of what I’ve put out there – my own actions and efforts. It’s taken a while, but I have begun to understand my own power. I think it’s important to be aware of your own strengths and use those to achieve what you want in life.” It’s these kinds of insights that one feels in his music, too. Even if you’re unable to understand the lyrics, there’s a power, a persuasiveness, and a genuineness in his songs that all speak directly to the soul. “I describe my music as ‘folk’ because it’s story-oriented,” he says. “It’s about what’s going on around us – everyday situations.

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The word ‘folk’ itself refers to the people, and my music deals with issues a lot of people can relate to.” In the build-up to Mangaliso’s release, Bongeziwe has done a few gigs showcasing his new band, which includes Tiago CorreiaPaulo, who is the guitarist for 340 ml and Tumi and the Volume, and Mike Wright of Zebra & Giraffe. The response has been extremely positive. The first single, “Ndokhulandela”, has been described as lush and hypnotic, and wonderfully showcases Bongi’s angelic voice. “I find that the message in my second album is quite different from the first,” Bongi says. “I guess the message is always evolving as I grow older, as I understand

more about what I want to say. I believe in freedom: freedom to be, freedom to speak your mind, freedom to live your life, freedom to dream. I think that’s the message that I want for my own life – to be completely free. And that’s the place that I write from. In a way, I’m writing and singing about trying to find happiness, trying to find meaning in life. That’s something that I think resonates with a lot of people, because I think we’re all engaged in this struggle to make our lives better. Whether that means loving ourselves more, or loving other people more, it’s always from that point of view – of trying to be more human, and to be more free.”


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Chants

de liberté Reconnu pour son aptitude unique à incorporer des éléments de musique traditionnelle africaine à sa sonorité musical très personnelle, le musicien Afro-folk Bongeziwe Mabandla est sur le point de sortir un album intitulé Mangaliso, son premier depuis la signature d’un contrat avec le label Universal Music.

Texte : Keith Bain Images © Jonx Pillemer, Fournies

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Il interprète ses chansons de façon bouleversante, d’une voix profonde et avec une présence sur scène qui le mèneront loin. Mais bien qu’il soit encensé par la critique, ce chanteur-compositeurinterprète ayant grandi dans un coin rural du Cap oriental explique qu’il n’avait jamais imaginé disposer du talent nécessaire pour devenir musicien. « J’ai eu une enfance protégée et malgré ma constante envie de chanter, je ne pensais pas avoir le genre de voix que les gens auraient envie d’écouter, » dit-il. Le fait d’être né dans une famille exigeante l’a beaucoup aidé. Il fut encouragé par sa mère à poursuivre des études à la Lady Grey Arts Academy où il apprit à jouer de la guitare quand il était adolescent. « Ma mère fut une influence déterminante sur ma carrière d’artiste. Elle m’encouragea dès mon plus jeune âge en me disant que le monde m’appartenait, et elle me poussa dans la bonne direction. » C’est alors qu’il étudiait l’interprétation en direct à l’école de cinéma AFDA de Johannesburg que Bongi découvrit qu’il avait quelque chose d’unique à offrir. « Je savais que j’avais des choses à dire et à donner, » dit-il, « et j’étais tourmenté à l’idée de vieillir sans pouvoir exprimer ce que j’avais au fond de moi. J’ai vraiment découvert mon amour de la musique le jour où j’ai découvert Lauryn Hill et Tracy Chapman. Elles m’ont fait découvrir le lien entre la musique et les pensées et les sentiments profonds– la musique comme véhicule d’un message fort. » Il écrivit son premier morceau de musique - la chanson « Liberté pour tous » qui se retrouva finalement sur son premier album intitulé Umlilo qui signifie « Feu » - alors qu’il n’était encore qu’étudiant. L’album sortit en 2012 et valut à Bongi deux nominations à SAMA (South African Music Awards) dont une pour Meilleure Révélation. Malgré tout, comme de nombreux artistes sud-africains, Bongi a bien vite découvert que son talent semblait souvent plus apprécié à l’étranger qu’en Afrique du Sud. Après la sortie de Umlilo il partit en tournée et son style authentique fit sensation partout : au Festival Afrique en Allemagne ; au Festival du son de Primavera à Barcelone en Espagne ; et au Festival de musiques du monde de Gwangju en Corée du Sud. Il prit part à un programme de « music incubator » (d’aide aux artistes émergents) aux État-Unis et fit des tournées très réussies au Canada et en Australie.

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Il explique que ce n’est cependant pas toujours aussi facile ici même, en Afrique du Sud. Bien qu’il ait partagé la scène avec des artistes tels Joss Stone et Vieux Farka Touré lors de leurs tournées sud-africaines, et qu’on l’ai vu sur la scène principale de grands festivals comme Oppikoppi, Rocking the Daisies et le Swaziland Bushfire, il explique que les musiciens noirs faisant de la musique acoustique empoignante ont tendance à ne pas toujours recevoir la reconnaissance qu’ils méritent. « J’ai parfois l’impression que si un musicien noir veut connaître le succès dans ce pays il faut qu’il fasse de la musique « house » du style Kwaito. » Il a maintenant une trentaine d’années, de toute évidence le monde à ses pieds et un contrat avec une maison de disques,

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et il dit qu’il a beaucoup appris. « Je commence à me rendre compte que tout ce que j’ai vécu et ce à quoi j’ai eu affaire pour arriver où je suis aujourd’hui sont le résultat du mal que je me suis donné – de mes propres actions et de mes propres efforts. Cela a pris un bon moment mais je commence à comprendre que je dispose d’une certaine influence. Je pense qu’il est important de reconnaître ses propres points forts et de les utiliser pour arriver à ses fins dans la vie. » C’est ce genre de discernement qui ressort dans sa musique. Même si l’on ne comprend pas les paroles de ses chansons, elles ont une sorte de pouvoir, de pertinence et d’authenticité qui font que sa musique parle directement à l’âme. Durant la période précédant la sortie de Mangaliso Bongeziwe a fait quelque

concerts afin de présenter son nouveau groupe qui inclut Tiago Correia-Paulo, guitariste de 340 ml et de Tumi and the Volume, et Mike Wright du groupe Zebra & Giraffe. Le public a réagi très positivement. « Je pense que le message de mon second album est assez différent de celui du premier, » explique Bongi. « Je suppose que le message est en constante évolution puisqu’en avançant en âge j’appréhende mieux ce que j’ai envie d’exprimer. J’écris et je chante la quête de la liberté et du sens de la vie. C’est quelque chose qui trouve un écho chez un grand nombre de gens parce que nous sommes tous alliés dans la lutte pour une vie meilleure. Que cela implique plus s’aimer ou bien plus aimer les autres, il s’agit toujours de la même perspective – tenter d’être plus humain et le désir d’être plus libre. »


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Invaders

Beware

The First National Status Report on Biological Invasions The South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI) formally launched a process to develop the first National Status Report on Biological Invasions in South Africa, due for publication in October 2017. The launch took place at the Kirstenbosch National Botanical Garden in Cape Town on 31st January 2017. Text & Image © SANBI

Sanbi board chairperson Ms Nana Magomola, National status report lead Dr Sebataolo Rahlao and Sanbi CEO Dr Tanya Abrahamse at the official launch of the National Status Report. Many alien species are beneficial. Almost all agriculture and forestry in South Africa is dependent on organisms deliberately introduced by humans, and many species have also been introduced as pets, as well as for horticulture, aquaculture or mariculture purposes. Preserving the benefits from these introduced species while limiting potential negative impacts from invasions that might result as a consequence, is a major challenge. However, this new report will be addressing the status of the relatively small number of problematic species listed in the NEM:BA Alien and Invasive Species lists as invasive; prohibited species (species not yet in the country); and species that have been subjected to risk assessments (listed or unlisted). The report will be structured around four aspects: • Pathways of introduction and spread. • The status, distribution and impacts of individual alien species.

• The degree to which areas are invaded and impacted upon. • The effectiveness of interventions, including current control operations and regulatory tools. A range of measurable indicators have been developed for each of these aspects. Invasive alien species threaten our constitutional right to a safe environment, therefore it is necessary to quantify their status in order to improve our intervention measures. The status report informs the development and ongoing adaptation of appropriate policies to reduce the negative impacts of invasive alien species on natural ecosystems, the economy and society. Dr Sebataolo Rahlao, Director: Biodiversity Pressures and Responses, leads the SANBI team, which has partnered with the DST-NRF Centre of Excellence for Invasion Biology at Stellenbosch University to compile the

report. The team relies heavily on inputs from experts from around the country and is thus engaging with relevant experts, the public and different government offices. The National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act (NEM:BA Act No. 10 of 2004) requires SANBI to submit a report at least every three years on the status of biological invasions, including reporting on the effectiveness of control measures and regulations, to the Minister of Environmental Affairs. The official launch of the report took place at Kirstenbosch National Botanical Garden during the Parliament’s Portfolio Committee on Environmental Affairs oversight visit and presentation on the second quarter report 2016/17 by CEO of SANBI, Dr Tanya Abrahamse. For more information, visit www.sanbi.org or contact +27 12 843 5200.

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Where the

Herons Rest Away from the boisterous city life, HeronsRest in Velddrif on the West Coast is where the soul finds peace.

Text: Monique Vanderlinden Images Š Supplied

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Combine one car, four people, a great playlist, a warm Friday afternoon, and you are ready for an uninterrupted weekend of pure bliss on South Africa’s West Coast. The location: Velddrif, situated on an estuary where the Berg River flows into St Helena Bay. When entering Velddrif, you are welcomed by a wonderful view of saltpans and flamingos. The ocean is not directly in sight from the entrance of the town, but the river mouth, playing host to rich birdlife as well as some fisherman’s boats scattered about, lets you know that you are definitely close to the ocean. From there, the OK store – another indicator that you are visiting one of the myriad tiny towns in the country – serves as a landmark for drivers. Turn left, and you’ll find neighbouring Laaiplek and Port Owen; turn right, and the road will take you further into Velddrif. With the sun setting fast over the dusty plains of the platteland, we arrived at HeronsRest homestead – our home away from home for the weekend. Situated comfortably on a private piece of land on the banks of the Berg River, HeronsRest is a restored farmhouse and cottage fitted with all the modern amenities. It is the perfect spot to have a true “West Coast experience”, with open spaces, peace, privacy, tranquillity and breath-taking views of the Berg River. The main house has four comfortable and stylishly decorated en-suite bedrooms, each sleeping two people, while the cottage, with a separate entrance, sleeps

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four. The amenities include a plunge pool, DStv, a fireplace, a shared lapa with a braai, a jungle gym for the kids to enjoy, and a landscaped garden where guests can enjoy a picnic or just sit and take in the peaceful surroundings. Guests have the option of staying on a self-catering or B&B basis, with the breakfasts on offer being as hearty as the famed West Coast hospitality. Expect a scrumptious spread to get you ready for a day full of relaxation. Get up early for a morning walk to watch the sun rise or relax in your comfortable bed with a book and a cup of tea in hand. Alternatively, enjoy a family braai, a picnic on the grass under the trees, relaxing by the pool on a warm summer’s day, or enjoying board games in front of the indoor fireplace on a cold evening – there truly are many ways to relax while at HeronsRest. If you are an adventurer at heart, then venturing beyond the gates of the property is a fantastic idea, as the fauna and flora of Velddrif is an exploration in itself, and the

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destination is also a birder’s haven. Velddrif’s estuary supports exceptional populations of plant and animal species, and is home to around 30,000 birds, including up to 80 species which are endemic to the Cape coast. Well over 350 different species of sea, river and land birds can be seen here. The large freshwater pan at Rocherpan Nature Reserve attracts 183 species of birds. Great White pelicans as well as Greater and Lesser flamingos, all listed in the Red Data book for endangered species, are often spotted here alongside the rare African Black oystercatcher. From June to September, Southern Right whales lounge in the rich coastal waters of the Atlantic, while the nature reserve is also home to many mammals, reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates. What’s more, in spring a spectacular carpet of wild flowers covers large parts of the reserve. The beach extends into what seems like infinity, stretching from Laaiplek to Elands Bay, and long, leisurely walks are a popular activity. Angling from the shore is allowed with the

proper permits, and there are also two bird hides, plus several picnic and braai areas. Another stop close to Velddrif is the West Coast Fossil Park, which gives visitors insight into the world as it was five million years ago. A fascinating range of extinct animals are displayed and the many thousands of fossil bones excavated here have attracted international interest, with many scholars from all over the world doing research at this site. HeronsRest truly encapsulates the relaxed atmosphere as well as the warm hospitality that South Africa’s West Coast is known for. So, next time you plan to take a trip to the West Coast, stop over at HeronsRest to experience the charming seaside town of Velddrif and its beautiful surroundings. Velddrif forms part of West Coast Way’s Berg and Foodie Routes. For more information on the West Coast Way, visit www.westcoastway.co.za. For more information on HeronsRest, please visit www.heronsrest-velddrif.co.za, or call +27 71 141 7313.


The Conversation

Star ter Fresh, daring, provocative, surreal and metaphorical. These are just a few ways one could describe the work of visual artist and photographer, Tsoku Maela, who is garnering attention both locally and internationally with his striking portraits. His distinctive knack for creating stimulating, dreamlike moments with rather serious undertones is a true gift and his work points out the very real, and sometimes difficult, conversations that we ought to be having amongst ourselves.

Text: Julie Graham Images Š Tsoku Maela

Return to innocence, lost (Abstract peaces 2014)

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Family portrait, from Broken Things (2015)

Maela’s arresting work is an exploration and documentation of his own personal struggles. His depression, anxiety, the issue of colonialisation, self-acceptance and culture have inspired several bodies of work that, through no specific intention of his own, are de-stigmatising serious issues like mental illness and cultural differences through visually exciting photography. This charming and humble artist had his first solo show at the 99 Loop Gallery in Cape Town where he exhibited his photo series, Broken Things, a conceptual work that dealt with the idea of self-love. Roughly 18 months ago he revealed his self-portrait series, Abstract Peaces, which was born out of his own personal struggles with depression. Maela’s journey into the world of visual art and photography, which only started in 2014, has been astounding and his raw, natural talent for the craft is something he cherishes and hopes will inspire meaningful change amongst others. Born in Lebowakgomo, a small town 30 minutes from Polokwane in Limpopo, in 1989, Maela left his hometown after high school to study a biochemistry degree at the University of Cape Town (UCT). Coming from a small town, he struggled to assimilate into a culture that highlighted the very real issues that still existed regarding class, gender and race, and he soon realised that the environment he found himself in restricted him psychologically and brought many self-worth issues to the foreground. During this challenging time, he questioned many of his own beliefs and ideas about the world and found that he was, in fact, on a very lonely path and didn’t exactly know what it was he was supposed to do with his life. As a result, he left UCT in 2010, during his third and final year of studies, and moved to Johannesburg to live with his sister. He fell into a deep depression in Johannesburg, questioning his purpose in life. He knew he wanted to write, so he enrolled in filmmaking, scriptwriting and screenwriting courses at The South African School of Motion Picture Medium and Live Performance (AFDA) in Johannesburg. “AFDA opened my eyes to what I could do as a storyteller. I learnt how to write scripts for film, I learnt how to edit, and I learnt how to direct. A new world opened up to me in that year,” he explains. “But I was

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mind, body, spirit (Barongwa, 2016)


Appropriate I (Roman numeric, From Appropriate 2016)

When I was apart (Abstract peaces 2014)

still extremely unsatisfied because I’d been conquered by Cape Town and I felt like I had failed.” And so, in 2012, with a new path laid out before him, he returned to Cape Town, his old haunt, to tackle his demons and finish his degree at the AFDA branch in the Mother City. Maela completed his degree and bought his first camera in 2013 with the intention to shoot films. He was, however, still deep in the throes of depression and found that he was also still unsatisfied with what he was doing. The camera gathered dust for almost a year until something that can only be described as a perplexing medical emergency shook him out of his slump. After suffering from strange anxiety-fuelled episodes which eventually landed him in the ER, Maela spent five days in the hospital with doctors puzzling over his condition. With no real answers, he realised that he had to get back out into the world and tackle his demon of depression head on, as well as open himself up to the possibilities of a life with a real, meaningful purpose that he could touch and feel. And so, in 2014, he picked up his camera again. This time, to shoot images.

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Photographs. Documenting his own journey. Bringing his dreams to life. “When I picked up the camera after that, I don’t know what happened. It just made sense,” he recalls. “I just knew what to do. It’s weird. That’s why I don’t take it for granted.” With a head full of ideas, an imagination that challenges, provokes and inspires, and a natural gift that changed his life, Maela started shooting. And the world started listening to what he had to say through his arresting images. When asked how he would define himself at this point in his short but action-packed career, Maela has this to say: “If you’d asked me that question last year, I’d have had some crazy philosophical, deep answer. But I’ve realised now that I don’t really identify with anything. I don’t identify as a photographer or a filmmaker or a scriptwriter or a creator or anything. I’m just a person with a function. I am living life, and life is giving me images. And I am doing what I was destined to do.” And the purpose of this destiny is simple. To tell the truth. “Despite the fact that the work comes from a personal voice, it has a universal message. The message of truth,” Maela explains. “I see reflections of myself in the past and the present and

who I want to become in all my work. I’m telling the truth and revealing the truth so that someone can take it, rationalise it, and go and do something or make something for themselves. I want my work to create a ripple effect.” Inspiring people to engage in “difficult conversations” is something that really inspires this young photographer. “We need to have these conversations in open spaces. We can’t just be having them on social media. It’s not enough,” he says. “People are talking and talking and talking but there is no action. So when I say the ‘conversations we need to have’, I am hoping that they will spark an action.” Tsoku Maela is a beautiful example of how finding one’s true path can save one’s life and it is not something he takes for granted. Learning each and every day, his humble gratitude for his journey so far is inspiring and his motivation to evoke change in the world, encouraging. This extremely talented photographer is truly a conversation starter and a budding artist who is destined for great things. Follow Tsoku Maela’s journey on Instagram – @tsocu.


Travelling for Work? It Isn’t All Glitz and Glamour For those who don’t often travel for business, it’s easy to glamourise it. But we know it’s not all it’s made out to be.

Text & Images © Flight Centre Business Travel

Myth 1: Business travel is always fun and glamorous There’s nothing glamorous about getting off a 12-hour flight, waiting in queues to get your rental car, rushing to a three-hour meeting, attending the obligatory work dinner with potential business partners, and getting back to the airport to catch the red-eye home again. Or perhaps it was a quick trip this time to a local destination where you were at the airport at 04h00 to catch the first flight out. After a busy day of meetings you race back to the airport – only to get stuck in terrible traffic, miss your flight and spend hours on the phone trying to re-book an alternative, or even book another night in a nearby hotel. Not anyone’s idea of fun or glamour! Wouldn’t it be more glamorous if you had a travel management partner to costeffectively plan and book your travel and a dedicated account manager available 24/7 to update and change your travel needs as they arise, no matter where you are in the world? Myth 2: You get to see the world While you might get to travel to different countries and cities, you will more than likely spend most of your time in meetings and hotel rooms. Unless you plan ahead and add some leisure time to your business trip, your experience of exotic countries will probably be what you see from the inside of taxis on your way to the hotel or back to the airport. Your solution? Partner with a travel specialist who will plan ahead for you!

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Flight Centre Business Travel (FCBT) will assign you a dedicated account manager to give you a fast turnaround, who knows your business needs and thinks ahead, giving you options for “bleisure travel” so you can mix your business travel with some leisure time. Myth 3: It’s easier to book everything yourself It may seem easier and cheaper to make bookings yourself or instruct your PA to handle it, but it’s not. Organising flights, hotel bookings, airport transfers, lounge passes, insurance, car rental and loyalty points and then sorting it all when things go awry takes a lot of time – time you don’t have. Research done by FCBT shows that travel arrangements for almost 45 % of all business trips are changed at least once. Working with FCBT means you’ll have 24/7 access to a dedicated account manager who will adjust your travel bookings and assist you at the drop of a hat. It also means that your PA doesn’t have to log onto her laptop at midnight to help rearrange your travel plans. If you’re nodding your head and smiling in agreement, you probably already know the challenges of work travel. In fact, you probably have a PA who handles all this for you. Make her life easier, save your business money on last minute travel changes, and put the glamour back into business travel. For more information, please visit www.fcbt.co.za or call Flight Centre Business Travel on 0877 40 5160.


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s s e L s d a o R

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ly utilitarian. they’re strict t bu e, os rp ried eir pu ey traverse va They have th emselves: Th g from A to B. th in n tt io me ge at so of in in st ns k e the de ns stuc are a mea any ways ar eet little tow Some roads m sw in d a at an th , ke s as ta , sive vist e pace ere are road to reveal mas ease up on th to And then th en g op in s ill er w rn If you’re while tight co an old rope. landscapes, find. like knots in em th g e is loads to hu er cade se a bit – th no ur forgotten de yo w follo as a loop and umbe district road Text: Will Edgc s of tin ar M te Tourism, Ru an ric Af en h oy ut orné van Ro Edgcumbe, So ryl Keith & M ar D Images © Will y, ph ra Leoa’s Photog

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The N6, stretching between Bloemfontein and East London, is one of these special roads. It’s not the most heavily trafficked of routes, meaning that for long stretches the road feels like it was laid for you alone. Its character also changes depending on the season or part of road you find yourself on. In autumn, for example, on the stretch between Aliwal North and Queenstown, you’ll find large pockets of trees whose leaves are such a bright yellow that they look like flowers. In winter, the wind whistling down from the Drakensberg is so cold the light takes on a clarity that reveals in detail the crags of mountains far away. The N6 is a shade under 600 km long, so it covers a diverse series of landscapes, starting from the lush coastal and scarp forests near East London, and the rolling hills and grasslands so commonly associated with the Wild Coast, to mountain passes with views that should be famous, and the hard-bitten Karoo farmland of the Free State. There’s also a spider’s web network of district and provincial roads looping off the route, giving one access to little towns one only hears about when there’s been a particularly brutal winter and the weatherman mentions the coldest places in the country. To do the route any kind of justice, you’ll want to take at least three or four days to

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explore it, staying in a different place each night. Stutterheim, sandwiched between the Wriggleswade Dam to the east and indigenous forest to the north and the west, is a sweet little town with easy access to picturesque hiking trails and crisp mountain streams. The Kologha Forest, on the slopes of the Amathola Mountains, boasts gorgeous yellowwoods, white stinkwoods and Cape chestnuts. Its well-marked forest trails are ripe for exploration, and if you’re alert you may even spot the endangered Cape parrot. About 100 km north along the N6 is Queenstown, known as the “Rose Capital of South Africa” – you can see this for yourself in the spring months when the town is awash with colour. You’ll want to check out the Walter Everitt Sunken Gardens on the eastern side of town – its two lakes and lush vegetation are tranquil and pretty, and are home to loads of water birds. The town itself is laid out in a hexagon pattern and was planned to enable the town to be defended along each street, with canon or rifle fire able to be directed down six thoroughfares radiating from a central hexagonal area. Fittingly, the cannon sites have now been replaced with gardens.

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The small town of Aliwal North, situated on the banks of the Orange River, is a sweet, clean little town oozing with laidback charm. It’s a great base from which to spend a day or two exploring the surrounding villages, mountain passes and the nearby Gariep Dam.

Due east of Aliwal North on the R58 is Lady Grey, a lovely town tucked away in a valley below the Witteberg mountain range. In winter, under thick snow, it has a distinctly alpine feel, and the Victorian architecture and quaint sandstone church have been lovingly cared for, making it feel like a place


First Page: The Gariep Dam wall is 88 m high and has a crest length of 914 m. Driving along it tends to make one feel a little insignificant. Second Page Top: Entering Aliwal North on the R58. Second Page Middle: It’s hard not to stop and take in the view on every bend of the Barkly Pass. Second Page Bottom: Victorian architecture so typical of Lady Grey. This Page Top: Joubert’s Pass, reached through Lady Grey, is the third highest in the country, with views to prove it. This Page Bottom: The NG Kerk in Lady Grey is a beautiful example of sandstone architecture.

that exists out of time. Bring your fly fishing rod, because the streams in the area are teeming with trout and yellow mouth. If you own a 4x4 and are adept at using it, you could give Joubert’s Pass a go. With a gradient of 1:6, this gravel road (the P3224) is the third highest pass in the country, offering views of gorges and mountains that are postcard perfect. Speaking of passes, if you head south of Lady Grey on the R58 and go through the town of Barkly East towards Elliot, you’ll be able to descend the Barkly Pass, a 10 km stretch of good tar road with an altitude variance of 572 m. It’s an easy drive, and the views are to die for, so take it slow and be prepared to stop wherever it’s safe for a photo opportunity. While you’re there, if you turn east onto the R56 at Elliot, you can enjoy one of the newest passes in the country. Connecting Ugie and Mthatha, the Langeni Pass is a marvel of modern engineering. With a gradient of 1:11 it’s really steep, and there’s a 235 m long viaduct which goes over the indigenous yellowwood forest. It’s a little surreal, and worth driving down the pass and then back up again to experience it in full. The beauty of the N6 route is in the sheer diversity of its towns, roads, vistas and trails – if you follow your nose and aren’t too precious about your fuel bill, there’s so much to uncover. Our recommendation is to take it slow, stop in the small towns, eat some local melktert (milk tart), breathe in the fresh mountain air and chat to the locals. It’s not called the Friendly N6 for nothing.

Useful Contacts Eastern Cape Tourism – +27 43 705 4400 / visiteasterncape.co.za Free State Tourism – +27 51 409 9900 / freestatetourism.org


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Give Us a

SMILE

Getting Your Smile Selfie-Worthy A smile is the universal expression of happiness and one of the first things people notice and take away from an encounter. But in a society where people are obsessed with appearances, it can be rather daunting flashing a toothy smile, particularly if it’s not a trademark “Colgate smile”.

Text: Julie Graham Images © Philips

It may not be the most glamorous of subjects but tooth discolouration, stains and yellow hues are real and not an uncommon problem. There are a huge number of reasons our pearly whites may not always be, well, pearly white. Of course, there are the obvious elements like aging, genetics and poor oral hygiene that are key contributors to yellow teeth, but slightly less

obvious reasons like diet and lifestyle also play a huge role in what we reveal to the world when we flash a smile. If, like me, you enjoy a cup or two (or three) of good java every morning to get you revved up for the day and similarly a glass or two (or three) of red wine to ease your nerves in the evenings, you may find that over time your teeth

start to show signs of discolouration. Another major contributor (and time for another yucky confession) is smoking. Now, I wouldn’t go so far to say that I smoke a lot, but that doesn’t matter. Nicotine and tar in tobacco, no matter how infrequently it is used, can lead to staining, plaque build-up and eventually, yellow teeth.

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I had heard of teeth whitening before and, though my teeth weren’t a serious cause for concern and certainly didn’t hinder my confidence, they weren’t quite the pearly whites of my dreams. Despite being slightly nervous of the dentist, I signed up for a session of Philip’s Zoom Whitening – a professional teeth-whitening solution that I had heard great things about. Emma King, an oral hygienist based in Cape Town, is referred to on social media as the Tooth Fairy and I soon found out why. Within seconds of lying down in the dreaded dentist’s chair, I was completely at ease. Her gentle approach and vast knowledge on the subject is amazing, and soon she was wrist-deep in my mouth giving my teeth an extensive professional clean (essential before the whitening procedure). After that, the entire procedure lasted less than an hour, with a short preparation to cover the lips and gums, leaving the teeth exposed. I was given a pair of protective glasses to wear, after which the special Zoom hydrogen peroxide whitening gel was applied. It works with the advanced Zoom LED light to penetrate teeth and break up stains and discolouration. Each session is only 15 minutes long during which, if any sensitivity is felt, the light is removed or the strength lowered. It is a pain-free procedure and one only needs three sessions in total. I couldn’t believe the difference after the procedure. My teeth were noticeably whiter and brighter and I couldn’t stop flashing my new luminous smile. It really works. I was given a personalised home-use touch-up kit which had a custom-fitted tray for my teeth as well as whitening gel, and I was told to avoid any food or beverages that would stain my teeth (in other words, anything that when dropped on a white shirt would cause a stain) for 24 hours. Smoking was, of course, something I would have to refrain from, but with my new set of sparkling gnashers, that was a walk in the park. I wasn’t about to do anything to hinder the results and stuck strictly to my 24-hour regime. The end result: the perfect “Colgate smile” I had always dreamed of. It is really no wonder that Philip’s Zoom Whitening is a global hit. Using the most advanced, tried-and-tested technology on the market, together with well-informed professional oral hygienists, this revolutionary procedure is changing lives and providing newly discovered confidence amongst clients around the world. It is worth every single cent and is a must for those wanting to brighten their teeth and share more smiles. For more information, please visit www.zoomwhitening.co.za.

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Best & Worst Foods for Your Teeth Worst • Citrus fruits and tomatoes: These erode enamel and expose yellow coloured dentin – the tissue beneath the enamel. • Coffee and tea: The tannins (acidic polyphenols) in these drinks lead to staining and discolouration. • Sweets: The sugar in sweets latch onto teeth and become food for bacteria in your mouth which release acids that cause tooth decay. • Sodas: Much the same as sweets, these sugar-laden beverages also provide food for nasty bacteria. Plus – due to their acidic carbonated nature – can cause holes in your teeth, even if they’re sugar-free. • Berries: Blackberries, blueberries and pomegranates are serious strainers. Just think of how hard it is to remove these stains from your clothes, never mind your teeth. • Red and white wine: While white wine may not necessarily be a culprit for stains, its high acid content creates

holes on the surface of the tooth that allow other beverages’ harmful tannins to sink even deeper. Best • Fibrous fruits: Apples and pears boost saliva flow and their high fibre content removes stains by scrubbing the surface of the tooth. • Baking soda: Baking soda can work wonders for whitening teeth naturally. Simply scrub with some of the powder on your toothbrush. Once a week is recommended. • Strawberries: Strawberries contain something called malic acid which works as a natural whitening agent for teeth and is great for removing plaque. • Cheese: Munching on cheese leads to a higher pH level in the mouth which lessens the risk of developing cavities. • Nuts: Because of their high protein content, nuts are great for strengthening teeth, keeping them healthy and strong. • Water: Drinking lots of water keeps teeth and gums healthy.


Disappearing

Natural Importance Earth’s Natural World Heritage Sites are threatened – and we humans are the ones doing the most damage.

Text: Paula Rabeling Images © iStockphoto.com

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Earth really is full of wonders. Just think of some of the splendour we are blessed with because of Mother Nature: Yellowstone National Park in the United States, the Great Barrier Reef in Australia, and the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania – all Natural World Heritage Sites. These are just a few spots that have been recognised to have significant importance, with over 200 more around the world. If you love being in nature, chances are that you would love to experience a few of these sites yourself. But a recent study has shown that human activity is having a vastly negative impact on over 100 Natural World Heritage Sites – so much so, that soon they could no longer fit the criteria to be World Heritage Sites. Natural World Heritage Sites are selected by UNESCO (the United Nations Education, Scientific, and Cultural Organisation) for their beauty and biological importance. Many of these sites are home to diverse species of fauna and flora meaning that they are not just beautiful, they are essential to the survival of these species. This past February, a study published by Biological Conservation – entitled “Recent increases in human pressure and forest loss threaten many Natural World Heritage Sites” – states that many of these sites are feeling the pressure of human activity. The

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study, which is the first global quantitative assessment of how humans are negatively affecting Natural World Heritage Sites, explains that the sites “are becoming isolated by substantial increases in human pressure and forest loss in the landscapes surrounding them”. Yellowstone National Park in one of the United States’ natural jewels, thanks to its sheer size, four mountain ranges, an abundance of waterfalls and hot springs, as well as animal species including grizzly bears, wolves, and bison. Unfortunately, due to human interference, the country’s first national park and its inhabitants are under serious threat. In the article “The Battle for Yellowstone: Morality and Environmental Conflict ”by Kevin Dennehy, Yale University professor Justin Farrell explains that the conflict raging over the animals that call the park home is of major concern. While wolves, for example, do kill livestock, Farrell found that the presence of wolves is more advantageous than not having them at all. “The wolves definitely kill livestock, but to make an economic argument that says that they shouldn’t be there because of economic costs just doesn’t stand up. Yes, ranchers are losing some money, but if you compare that with how much money wolves bring in, including through tourism, it just doesn’t compare, and besides, many are compensated for their losses.” Climate change is also impacting Yellowstone. According to the United States’ National Park Service, scientists have been monitoring the park’s climate for years, and have found that the average temperature of the park is higher now compared with 50 years ago. “A continued rise in temperature will fundamentally alter Yellowstone’s ecosystem, likely affecting the composition of plants and animals throughout the park. Altering the amount and timing of spring snowmelt, which affects water levels, vegetation growth, and the movement of wildlife from migrating bison to spawning trout to the arrival of pollinators. As headwaters to significant water basins, any change in the rivers flowing out of Yellowstone affects downstream users like ranchers, farmers, towns, and cities. Fire frequency and season length could increase.” So, a

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change in climate is not just bad news for fauna and flora, but for people too. In Africa, the Serengeti in Tanzania is made up of over a million hectares of savannah, and is home to at least four globally threatened or endangered animal species, including black rhino, elephant, wild dog, and cheetah. The annual migration of herds of herbivores to waterholes, followed by their predators, is one of the most impressive natural events in the world. However, according to UNESCO, “The major management concerns include poaching, tourism pressure, wildfires, and lack of adequate capacity in resource monitoring. Another important management challenge is water: despite numerous sources of water during the rainy season, there is only one perennial river (the Mara) which is transnational. However, this river currently faces multiple human-mediated cross-boundary threats.” It is not only land-based Natural World Heritage Sites which are suffering – the watery ones, too, are bearing the brunt of human activity. A major drawcard for many to visit Australia is the Great Barrier Reef – when you think of Australia, many immediately picture the vast, mind-blowing colours of the coral, surrounded by crystal clear ocean and incredible inhabitants swimming around. This is fast becoming something people can only picture in their minds, though. According to the Great Barrier Reef Foundation, global warming has resulted in coral bleaching – this not only means that the corals no longer have their bright colours, it also means that they are dying. The foundation also states that, “The Reef

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receives runoff from 35 major catchments draining 424,000 km² of coastal Queensland. Most sediment entering the Great Barrier Reef comes from catchments in major pastoral areas such as the Burdekin, Herbert and Fitzroy Rivers.” This runoff vastly impacts the quality of the water surrounding the reef. Overfishing and coastal development are also impacting the Great Barrier Reef, turning it into a graveyard. Thankfully, according to the Great Barrier Reef Foundation, the future of the world’s largest reef is looking up thanks to dedicated people who are working to protect it. However, you do not have to be a marine biologist to help the ocean – everyone has a part to play when it comes to preserving our world’s oceans. According to The Nature Conservancy, there are a number of ways for everyone to help. Conserving water is a big one: “The less water you use, the less runoff and wastewater will pollute our oceans.” Ensure that the businesses you support are reefand ocean-friendly. Also, of course, always dispose of your rubbish properly. Plastic is a big problem. Reduce the amount you use, and recycle wherever possible, as plastic is causing serious harm to our oceans. Global warming is a major threat to the environment – and it does not just affect fauna and flora, but humans too. We all need to take the threat of climate change seriously, and actively work towards lowering our carbon footprint. Even little actions can add up to a big difference, such as: reducing the number of things we throw away; recycling; saying “no” to one-use items such as takeaway coffee cups and plastic utensils; carpooling; and making your home energy efficient.

When it comes to holidaying, always support responsible tourism. Look out for lodges that support or have their own anti-poaching initiatives, and are eco-conscious. While many of these places may seem far away, and therefore the condition of them does not affect you personally, this is a short sighted approach. These Natural World Heritage Sites are a huge part of what makes the world so amazing, and, as citizens of this world, it is our duty to do our best to preserve this planet, not only for our own benefit, but also for the other species that call it home, as well as future generations. To read the whole study, please visit www.sciencedirect.com.

First Page: A cheetah surveys the wilderness that is the Serengeti National Park – one of the World Heritage Sites that is currently under threat. Second Page: Deforestation is placing many of these habitats under increasing stress. Third Page Top and Bottom: Ranchers claim that wolves in Yellowstone National Park are responsible for too many stock losses, although research shows that they generate more money through tourism than is lost by farmers. Third Page Middle: The Great Barrier Reef Foundation is fighting hard to protect the world’s largest reef. Last Page: The Serengeti’s mass migration is one of the wonders of the natural world, but the Serengeti National Park is threatened by such things as poaching, tourism pressure and wildfires.


Flutter Guts If you have ever been nervous about something that is about to happen, then you may have felt the sensations of nausea and “fluttering” – the recognisable and odd sensation deep in your gut known as having “butterflies in the stomach”.

Text: Bradley Elliott, Lecturer in Physiology, University of Westminster / www.theconversation.com Images © iStockphoto.com

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Perhaps you were about to give a speech to a large audience, were in the waiting room for a big interview, were about to step up and take a key penalty shot, or about to meet a potential love interest. Rather than actual butterflies bouncing around your large intestine, of course, there is something far more scientific going on – and it’s all down to your nervous system. Clever Body Systems The human body is capable of looking after itself without too much voluntary thought. It quite happily regulates heart rate, blood flow and the distribution of nutrients around the body without you having to consciously intervene in any way. This is a process which is run by the autonomic nervous system (ANS).

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The ANS can be split into two roughly equal branches. These are the sympathetic and the parasympathetic, or, as it is memorised by every first year medical student, the “fight-or-flight” and the “restand-digest” branches. Both branches of the ANS are constantly active, and act in opposition to each other. The sympathetic (“fight-or-flight”) system is responsible for increasing your heart rate, while the parasympathetic (“rest-and-digest”) system decreases it. So, the rate at which your heart is beating is the balance of the activity of the two branches of the ANS. The dominance of the parasympathetic branch is why you feel content and sleepy after a giant lunch. Quite a bit of blood flow from the heart is directed to the stomach, and your ANS encourages you to sit down for a bit to let digestion take place.

Fight-or-Flight So what’s this got to do with butterflies? One of the major roles of the ANS is to prepare you for what it thinks is about to happen. This gives you an evolutionary advantage, since if you see a sabre-toothed tiger about to pounce, you don’t want your valuable oxygen-filled blood to be busy with your last meal. Ideally you would want this blood to be temporarily redirected to muscles in your legs so that you can run away slightly faster. So, your “fight-or-flight” sympathetic system kicks in and becomes dominant over parasympathetic activity. This also causes a release of adrenaline, which increases your heart rate (to pump more blood and to do it faster than normal), releases huge amounts of glucose from the liver, and shunts blood away from the


www.theconversation.com gut. The blood is redirected towards the muscles in the arms and legs which makes them ready to either defend you, or run away faster. However, this acute shortage of blood to the gut does have side effects – slowed digestion being the main one. The muscles surrounding the stomach and intestine slow down their mixing of their partially digested contents. The blood vessels in this region also constrict, reducing blood flow through the gut. While adrenaline contracts most of the gut wall to slow digestion, it relaxes a specific gut muscle called the “external anal sphincter”, which is why some people report a pressing need to visit a bathroom when they’re nervous. This reduction in blood flow through the gut in turn produces the oddly characteristic “butterflies” feeling in the pit of your stomach. It senses this shortage of blood, and oxygen, so the stomach’s own sensory nerves are letting us know it’s not happy with the situation. So why do we call it butterflies? It certainly does feel like and get described as “fluttering” by a lot of people, and I guess “jaguars in your jejunum” just doesn’t sound as plausible.


Cruising the

Desert While the desert is an unforgiving place, in Namibia, this harshness has created a land of beauty that inspires awe in many who traverse it. From towering dunes that grant panoramic views to all who conquer them and cruising along the sand during an adrenaline-fuelled quad-biking escapade, to sipping on champagne and slurping down oysters while boating on the ocean, Namibia is an adventure not to be missed.

Text: Paula Rabeling Images Š Paula Rabeling, Desert Homestead Outpost, Desert Horse Inn

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Dune 45 Imposing towers of sand dot Namibia’s landscape, and are awe-inspiring to behold. One of the country’s most popular dunes is Dune 45. Located in the Sossusvlei region of Namibia, Dune 45 is a popular stopping point for those visiting Namibia and is one of the most photographed dunes in the world – it’s 170 m tall, after all! Kick off your shoes and make your way up the sandy side of this giant. It is worth the hike, as upon summiting, your aching legs will be long forgotten in light of the spectacular views from the top. Sossusvlei A salt and clay pan surrounded by high red dunes, located in the southern part of the Namib Desert in the Namib-Naukluft National Park of Namibia, Sossusvlei is one of Namibia’s most strikingly picturesque areas. Dead trees stretch their sun-bleached branches into the blue sky, completing the picture postcard desert scene. Set at the base of a mountain in Sossusvlei is the Desert Homestead Outpost, an ideal place to base yourself in the region. The 12 separate villas all offer luxury facilities for ultimate comfort, as well as views over the desert where the open plains play host to wildlife such as cheetah and oryx. Each villa also has a flat section of roof to climb onto and from which to watch the awe-inspiring night sky, scattered with stars. With a drink in hand, we took a short hike along a path up to a lookout point to watch as the sun said its goodnights – the perfect way to end off a day in the desert. For more information, visit www.deserthomesteadoutpost.com.

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Walvis Bay While the unforgiving desert is normally what comes to mind when thinking of Namibia, the country also has a coastline that will delight. When traversing Namibia, Walvis Bay cannot be overlooked. This stretch of coast includes a myriad of boutique stores and restaurants to visit – but you need to go out onto the ocean to have a true Walvis Bay experience. Mola-Mola, a local tour company, offers boat cruises out from the harbour. On the way to the seal island, past the oyster farms, a friendly seal followed our boat and hopped on board, where the captain gave him a fishy snack and explained that he was a regular on the

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boat. The seal was joined by a friendly pelican who also wanted her share of the fishy snacks. We received our own lunch of fresh oysters (some of the most delicious I have ever had) and champagne – accompanied by a delightful performance by the many seals languishing and jumping about in the ocean around the boat. For more information, visit www.mola-namibia.com. Quad Biking While dunes are quite a sight to behold, what is even better than just looking at them is speeding along them. Hop on a quad bike for a serious adrenaline rush – depending on your experience, you

could race along the dunes for a thrill ride of note. Halfway between Swakopmund and Walvis Bay, Dare Devil Adventures offers quad-biking excursions in the Namib Desert. For more information, visit daredeviladventures.com. Quiver Tree Forest and Giant’s Playground Travel down the M29 highway and you will come across a forest like no other: Namibia’s Quiver Tree Forest. Thirteen kilometres from Keetmanshoop, this forest boasts tree upon tree of ancient kokerbome – in fact, it is such a unique setting that it was proclaimed a National Monument.


Just next to the Quiver Tree Forest is Giant’s Playground, so named because the massive rocks that make up this area look as if they were the building blocks of giants. The dolomite rock formations date back about 180 million years, and walking along the paths with these imposing rocks on either side, you will marvel at the wonders of what Mother Nature (or giants) can do. Wild Horses While the precise origin of Namibia’s wild horses is known, the Namibia Wild Horses Foundation’s theory is that the horses were left behind during World War I to fend for themselves once the soldiers returned home. Decades later, there are still horses roaming the harsh expanse of the Namib Desert. To see these majestic animals, head over to Garub, where the horses are part of the ecosystem. There is a viewpoint overlooking a watering hole that some of the horses frequent, and you will also be able to spot them on the side of the road. For more information on the wild horses, please visit www.wild-horses-namibia.com. Near the territory of the wild horses is Klein Aus Vista’s Desert Horse Inn, an ideal place to stop and relax while traversing the desert. Nestled in the rocky Aus Mountains, with gorgeous views, this hotel is a relaxed setting with a farmhouse aesthetic in which to unwind. For more information, visit www.klein-aus-vista.com. Fish River Canyon Namibia has the Southern Hemisphere’s largest canyon, the Fish River Canyon. Viewing it from above reveals an expanse of cliffs and rocky formations – the canyon is 161 km long, up to 27 km wide, and almost 550 m at its deepest. Head down into the canyon for an epic, multi-day hiking adventure. While the desert may be a harsh place, the beauty of Namibia, along with the adventures it offers, makes for a trip of epic proportions. This trip was sponsored by Namibian Tourism (www.namibiatourism.com. na) and its partners. Our tour across Namibia was conducted by Impala Tours (www.impalatours.com). For more information, contact +27 21 422 3298 or email naminfo@soal.com.

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Be a More Efficient

Runner Running burns more calories than any other mainstream exercise. But despite the fact that running has been proven to reduce your risk of chronic illnesses, such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes and stroke, there has been a lot of debate around whether our bodies truly can adapt to running long distances, such as marathons. It is known that the heart and lungs can become stronger and more efficient to help propel you forward. But what about your muscles and tendons? Can they too adapt to make the act of running more efficient?

Text: Jasper Verheul, PhD Candidate in Biomechanics, Liverpool John Moores University; Adam Clansey, Lecturer in Human Movement Science, Nottingham Trent University; Mark Lake, Reader in Biomechanics, Liverpool John Moores University / www.theconversation.com Images Š iStockphoto.com

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The marathon got its name from the legend of Pheidippides, who ran slightly less than 26 miles from Marathon to Athens, Greece, to announce the Athenian army’s victory over the Persians. Once poor Pheidippides had arrived he proclaimed: “Rejoice, we conquer.” After which he is said to have fallen over dead. Could this simply have been the sorry result of his lack of long-distance training? The medical community is still largely in the dark as to how our bodies react to long-distance running, but new research shows that, for regular runners, the beneficial adaptations are substantial. Through adaptations that happen gradually as you run further and more often, the tendons of the legs can be used more efficiently in propelling you forward, which means that your muscles don’t need to work as hard. And that’s not all. The benefits of these

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changes in muscle-tendon behaviour become more important at higher speeds. Because we need more energy to propel us forward at higher speeds, the advantage of efficient tendons becomes even greater the faster you go. How We Adapt We conducted a study, published in the Journal of Applied Physiology, at Liverpool John Moores University, on two groups of runners with very different levels of training: one group consistently ran 30 or more miles per week (approximately 48 km) and the other less than 10 miles per week (approximately 16 km). From this, we have been able to draw important conclusions about the changes that come with increased running training. We measured the firing patterns of thigh muscle groups and the knee-joint motion of the runners using a combination of

electromyography (EMG), 3D motion capture cameras, and a platform that measured the force during foot contact with the ground. The volunteers ran trials at four different speeds between five and 12 mph (approximately 8 km/h to 19 km/h). Our study detailed how those who regularly ran 30 miles or more a week showed neuromuscular changes that improved their running efficiency, meaning that they needed to do less work to cover the same distance. This is due to changes in the muscles and tendons triggered by high-mileage training – and these adaptations are enhanced the faster you go. The leg muscles of the high-mileage runners did not have to work as hard as the same muscle groups of the runners we studied who were less trained. The better trained runners also demonstrated more spring-like behaviour


in their lower leg tendons, which helped propel the body forward more efficiently. In short, adaptations that come with running training permit muscles to not work as hard due to a more efficient use of the tendons – and these advantages become even greater at faster running speeds. It appears that training can enhance the elasticity of the leg muscles and tendons and this can be important for running performance as well as being able to complete a marathon. These findings agree with direct measurements of the behaviour of individual muscles and tendons in running animals but, up until now, very little research focused on training effects in running humans. This clearly shows that preparing for running events doesn’t just improve fitness – it changes the very way you run. In fact, the more running training you do, the more efficient you are likely to become. So, the next time you get out the door and run down the street, remember that it will eventually get easier and that your muscles and tendons can become more spring-like, thereby helping to propel you towards your marathon goal.

www.theconversation.com


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Why Sitting Is Not the

‘new smoking’ Sitting has been branded ‘the new smoking’ for its supposed health risks, especially for people with sit-down office jobs. But is sitting really that risky?

Text: Emmanuel Stamatakis, Associate Professor; Physical Activity, Lifestyle, and Health Behaviours, University of Sydney / www.theconversation.com Images © iStockphoto.com

Over the past 15 years or so sitting has been linked to cancer, heart disease, diabetes and even depression. This has led to a surge in media stories on the risks of sitting, even for people who do a lot of exercise. Then there’s the rise in the popularity of standing desks to encourage people to get off their chairs and to improve their health. But is sitting really that risky? And do we really need standing desks? What Does the Evidence Say? In our latest study we investigated if not only the total amount of sitting, but also different types of sitting were linked with developing type 2 diabetes. We wanted to see if there was any difference between sitting watching TV, sitting at work, or sitting at home but not watching TV.

We measured the sitting behaviours of 4,811 British public servants, who were on average 44 years old and didn’t have diabetes, heart or circulatory problems at the start of the study. Over the next 13 years, 402 people developed diabetes. Once we took into account obesity, physical activity, and other factors contributing to developing type 2 diabetes, total sitting time, sitting at work, nor sitting at home but not watching TV were linked with developing diabetes. We found only a weak association with the time spent sitting watching TV and an increased risk of developing diabetes. This contrasts with a recent review combining the results of five older TV studies that showed a stronger link. But hardly any of the included studies accounted for

obesity, which is a major cause of diabetes. For people who are physically inactive, though, the story’s different. Two recent studies show that the total time spent sitting a day is linked with developing diabetes, but only in people who are physically inactive or both physically inactive and obese. That’s not the whole story, though. At least two factors determine if sitting is a risk factor in its own right: the type and context of sitting. Type and Context of Sitting We’re most likely to sit at work, at play and while travelling. And a growing body of evidence suggests that not all sitting is equal. For example, sitting down at work isn’t strongly linked with long-term health risks. Perhaps that’s because higher-status

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jobs involve more sitting, and a higher socioeconomic position is linked with a lower risk of chronic disease. It’s a different case for sitting watching TV, the type of sitting most consistently linked with long-term health risks such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease and an early death. People who watch a lot of TV tend to be of lower socioeconomic status, unemployed, have poorer mental health, eat unhealthy foods and are exposed to unhealthy food advertising. Each of these aspects of watching TV increases the chances of poor physical and mental health. But studies cannot account for all these complex influences. In other words, TV involves a constellation of health risks that go uncounted. So TV studies only tell us that excessive TV viewing is a behaviour that needs to be reduced, but tell us practically nothing about the health risks of sitting.

One possible explanation for the weak links between sitting and diabetes we observed is that participants were protected by their high levels of physical activity. This suggests that it’s particularly important to find ways to allow office workers forced to spend many hours a day in front of a computer to add physical activity to their daily routine. As well as individuals changing their behaviour, governments need to provide infrastructure for active commuting – such as bike lanes and secure bike racks at stations – and encourage people to use public transport. Employers could provide incentives and facilities for active commuting, like providing showers at work, promoting lunchtime walks, encouraging the use of stairs instead of lifts, and even organising walking meetings when convenient.

Physical Activity and Sitting An important aspect of our study was that participants said they were physically active, reporting an average of 43 minutes of walking a day, plus more than two hours of other physical activity a day. A large recent review combining data from over one million participants found 60-75 minutes of physical activity a day eliminated the harms of sitting when it came to measuring death from cardiovascular disease or death by all causes.

How About Standing Desks? Adjustable desks that allow a sitting and standing option (sit-stand desks) could be a good first step, especially for very sedentary and unfit workers. But these aren’t a complete solution as people don’t expend much energy, or exert themselves, using them. Even well-designed studies of people using sit-stand desks found replacing sitting with standing for 40-45 minutes each work day didn’t provide any measurable health

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benefits. And people who use them may think they’ve done their bit and tend to be less physically active after work. Reducing the amount of time spent sitting can be a useful option if people don’t want to walk or cannot walk, cycle or exercise. But you would have to cut back your sitting by many hours a day to achieve the same reduced risk of dying from cancer and cardiovascular disease from doing even one or two exercise sessions a week. Although we tend to assume it’s easier to reduce sitting time than to promote physical activity, unfortunately, they are equally hard to tackle. Where to Now? Rather than being the “new smoking”, we need to think of sitting as an important part of the wider problem of physical inactivity. We also need to read behind the headlines of how the media covers sitting. Recently published research shows 30-40 % of media stories on sedentary behaviour promote misleading messages, such as the claim that sitting undoes the benefits of exercise. So, the first priority is to reinforce the most evidence-based message: Move as often as possible, and huff and puff sometimes.

www.theconversation.com


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Turn Hundreds

Into Thousands How to Ace Your First 100 Days

You have a small window of opportunity to make your mark in a new leadership position. Here’s how to have the best possible start.

Text: Helena Wasserman/finweek Images © iStockphoto.com

The first 100 days in a top job have become an important milestone, with everyone from South Africa’s public protector to the new US president currently being scrutinised on their performance during this key period. In fact, the milestone dates back to another US president. When Franklin D. Roosevelt took office in 1933, he faced the Great Depression, a banking catastrophe and a devastated economy. Within 100 days, he established key initiatives (including a famed jobs programme) that would reverse the ruin. Since then, the 100day standard has become a key measure of success. Here’s how to make your mark in the early days:

1. Learn names. “Remember that a person’s name is to that person the sweetest and most important sound in any language,” Dale Carnegie famously said. “Respect and acceptance stem from simple acts such as remembering a person’s name and using it whenever appropriate.” In fact, this should be part of your homework before you start a new job. Along with learning as much as you can about the company’s positioning (particularly its pricing and strategy, and what its competitors are doing) before you join, compile a photo book with the names and profile pictures of the people you will work with. 2. Be clear on what you are supposed

to achieve by confirming your goals with your new boss or the board. If the company is in crisis, you will be expected to move fast and take drastic action. 3.  Don’t focus on fire-fighting. You will be faced by an onslaught of immediate problems and urgent tasks. Getting caught up in dayto-day management is tempting, because from the outside you look busy and dynamic. Resist this, however, and focus instead on the bigger picture. You need to make sure that the company is on the right track. Step back, and spend most of your time in the first 100 days devising a clear strategy for the

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future. Spend time with your team members and ask them for their input on how costs can be reduced, performance improved, and revenue increased. Ask stupid questions. This will give your new colleagues a chance to demonstrate their domain knowledge. Also do your own onthe-ground research before you formulate a strategy. 4. Once you have a clear strategy, set up concrete targets for the short, medium and long term. Make sure that your team understands what the strategy is, and why these targets are important. Repeat the strategy over and over again – it is only with repetition that people will internalise what they need to achieve. Make sure the goals are achievable, and celebrate success. Set up quick wins (for example, lowering the costs on a project) for the first 100 days. Success is energising. Also, break down problems into smaller, more digestible projects, to avoid people becoming overwhelmed by all the challenges. 5. Accept that you won’t be universally loved. Your new approach and strategy probably won’t be roundly welcomed and there will be plenty of detractors. Stay calm when encountering criticism. 6.  Show that you trust your team. Once you have conveyed your strategy, don’t micro-manage the implementation, says Professor Tommy du Plessis, director of the North-West University School of Business and Governance.

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7.  Establish solid relationships. This should be your top priority. Understand what motivates each person on your team and work hard to connect with them. Without strong relationships, you won’t be able to rally people behind your strategy and create an environment where information flows freely. Build trust with each person and don’t show favouritism. 8.  Create a communication channel. Consider sending a weekly email to your team with some of your personal experiences. This can be an important platform to reinforce the new strategy, and will also help you counter rumours and make you more accessible to employees. 9. Get out of your office. Connecting with people where they work will give you a clear idea of operational challenges. 10.  Accentuate the positive. Avoid negative language and fearmongering. Celebrate what has been built in the business and don’t criticise those things that make employees most proud. 11. Don’t dither. The first rule of swimming with sharks: don’t bleed. After gathering all the facts, take decisive action and don’t backtrack. 12.  Make the hard calls as soon as possible. If retrenchments or closing a department is unavoidable, do it within the first 100 days. Also, get rid of the dissidents. While it may sound cruel, your first priority is to rally your team around a strategy and not to accommodate naysayers

and armchair critics, Du Plessis says. Make changes within your team before you get bogged down with the weight of relationships. Don’t delay the inevitable – get it behind you as quickly as possible. 13. Whatever you do, don’t redecorate your office or spend company money on making things more comfortable for yourself. This sends out the wrong message in these straitened times. Instead of buying new furniture for your office, focus on things that will make life better for your team members. 14. Don’t forget your clients. Often in the transition process during the first 100 days, employees are so distracted by the internal changes that clients are neglected, Du Plessis says. “From the start, make sure that employees stay focused on clients.”

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Car or

Go-Kart? Alfa Romeo 4C Spider

The Alfa Romeo 4C Spider is a small, lightweight (1,050 kg), rear-wheel-drive sports car which makes use of very expensive manufacturing techniques and exotic materials to keep weight down and price up.

Text: Bernard K Hellberg Images Š Quickpic

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It certainly looks like a compact supercar, which makes the asking price of R1.34 million seem fully justified. But the proof of the pudding, as the saying goes, lies in the eating – and, in my view, this pudding has many more negatives than positives. Never before have I driven a car which promised so much, yet delivered so little. As a product from the House of Alfa Romeo, a revered name in the motoring world with a string of Grand Prix titles to their credit, the 4C Spider certainly has the bloodline to be a runaway success. Why, then, did not a single 4C find its way into the hands of a buyer in February this year, while its most direct rival, the Porsche Boxster/Cayman 718 sold 17? Engine and Transmission The mid/rear mounted engine is a turbocharged, direct injection 1,750 cc petrol unit which develops an impressive 177 kW at 6,000 r/min and is said to reach a top speed of 256 km/h. Acceleration figures – important because this is, after all, a mini-supercar – is 4.1 seconds for the 0-100 km/h sprint. The engine itself is a dual overhead cam, 16-valve aluminium alloy block with intercooler to protect the turbo. At maximum speed, which translates as 6,500 r/min, the fuel cut-off kicks in to protect the engine. Chassis The entire car is a carbon-fibre monocoque unit with aluminium front and rear subframes, while the body panels consist of sheet-moulded compound material. Obviously, it’s enormously strong and rigid, while doing wonders for road holding. Interior The interior is a work of art, but not necessarily a comfort zone. Seats are leather-trimmed with accent stitching,

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and are only adjustable for fore and aft movement, which is limited. They are extremely “grippy” and supportive under vicious cornering, but will most certainly not be up to the task on a long-distance road trip. The dashboard itself is functional and undramatic, and even the radio is a stock standard “get it from Dion Wired and pop it in” version. Given the 4C’s noisy interior at speed, one wonders why the designers even bothered to have a radio fitted. The 4C certainly enjoys a high level of comfort features with gear-shift paddles, cruise control, Bluetooth connectivity, electric windows and a 12V power socket. Two airbags protect the driver and passenger, and the brakes (discs on all four wheels) are kitted out with ABS, brake assist, and EBD (electronic brake distribution). Paradoxically, the calipers on all four wheels are rather small, with the result that brake fade was easily induced under repeated track conditions.

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Driving the Beast I wish I could report that the 4C Spider was a fun performance car with lots of inherent sophistication. Unfortunately, it came across as more of a go-kart than a true-blue sports two-seater with supercar pretensions. The 4C doesn’t come with power steering, and normal steering becomes extremely light and even unpredictable on dodgy road surfaces. The interior noise (and the engine right behind your back) is also a serious design flaw. It’s accepted that adding sound-absorbing material increases the car’s weight, but these kind of noise levels at this price are ridiculous. The Alfa Romeo 4C Spider looks like a car worth every cent of its price tag.

It’s a tour de force by the Alfa Romeo Centro Stile, and draws admiring glances wherever one takes it. However, the reality is that, even for the young and agile, it’s difficult to get in and out of, its high speed handling is a white knuckle affair, and it will probably only be bought by the ultra-wealthy who don’t mind paying so much for so little. Waiting in the wings, the Porsche Boxster S is a supremely stylish two-seater (like the 4C) which produces 220 kW, has (probably) the best seven-speed automatic gearbox available, a civilised interior and – best of all – will save you R406,000 in the bargain. This is a one-sided race, and the Porsche wins hands down.


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Waste Not,

Want Not How to Reuse Household Water in Your Garden

As weather patterns change and water restrictions become more frequent, gardens are drying out and, now more than ever, homeowners need to be smart about collecting and reusing every drop of water possible.

Text: Property24 Images © iStockphoto.com

According to Colin Priem, CEO of AfriServ and Afrilandscapes, homeowners in the Western Cape are currently not allowed to water their gardens using a hose or irrigation system unless they have a borehole or are using a watering can. But this doesn’t necessarily spell death for your prize roses because Priem has

a few household tips to recycle water for the garden. Hot water always takes a bit of time to get from the geyser to your tap: Don’t let this water go to waste. Instead, use a small bucket to catch the cold water which you can then use to water your plants, lawn or flower pots.

Shower with a plastic basin: This will catch the water as you shower. Once you are done, you can reuse it in the garden. Backwashing your pool: A rudimentary tank with a tap can save 90 % of this water. The backwashed water goes into the tank where it will sit and let the dirt flocculate for a few days. The water can then be piped

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back into the pool using a pump or gravity. The dirty water at the bottom of the tank can be used in the garden. Save pool water by using a pool blanket: Organise to have a professional measure your pool and then have a blanket made to the exact specifications. There are various pool blanket options available, including roll-up systems or blankets that allow you to simply lay the cover on the side of the pool when you want to swim. If you have small children, you will still need to use a pool safety net, while the cover will reduce the amount of water lost through evaporation, and will limit the need to top up your pool. Install greywater systems: It is not always easy to retrofit a greywater system but wherever this is possible, it should be done. This water can then be piped into your garden or onto your lawn. Boreholes: Investigate whether it would be feasible to dig your own borehole. If it is, this can also assist with not using drinking water for irrigation purposes. Attend to leaks as soon as possible: To determine if you have a leak, turn off all the taps on your property and examine the water meter. Leaks can cost you thousands of rands over time and can result in a huge amount of wasted water. If the meter is still turning while all your taps are closed, this means that there is a leak somewhere which needs to be attended to immediately. For more tips on how to save water, as well as other lifestyle topics, visit Property24.com.

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Cute

Capable Jeep Renegade 1.4 L Turbo Limited

At first glance, I found the Jeep Renegade – with its relatively tiny 1.4 turbo engine – rather difficult to evaluate. Was this a real 4X4, I wondered, or was it just a Suzuki Jimny which had paid a visit to a Russian Olympic team doctor for some size-enhancing chemicals?

Text: Bernard K Hellberg Images © Jeep SA

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There’s a certain resemblance between the vertical grille slats found on the Renegade and on the Jimny. Other similarities are also to be found in the interior, where the front passenger can use a dashboard-mounted grab handle which is also featured in the Suzuki. In fairness, though, this has always been a standard Jeep feature, much copied by the Japanese. The exterior design is chunky and certainly non-aerodynamic in visual terms, but still manages to entrance with its angular good looks, ease of entry, and comfy interior. But those taillights! Apparently the designer wanted to make sure that they were placed in the right spot and chose a design based on “X marks the spot.” It certainly doesn’t get much bolder than that. Highlights & Lowlights If exclusivity is important when choosing a vehicle, the Jeep Renegade certainly fits the profile. Unlike Toyota Fortuners, they are not to be found around every corner,

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since the fairly steep price of R488,900 could be off-putting. Countering this would be the impressive list of safety and luxury features, good build quality, a supple ride which makes it a great long-distance tourer, and an ergonomically friendly interior with buttons and knobs which make sense and are easy to operate – with the exception of the radio, which makes finding a station a rather tricky affair. Signal strength (reception) can also be dodgy, and you may be tempted, instead, to use your iPhone’s music selection in isolated areas. Other goodies include USB ports, Bluetooth for your smartphone, full climate control (which works really well), as well as 12V power points. The grippy Bridgestone Potenza 215/60 R17 tyres provide good road-holding and a pleasant, fairly soft ride. Parking was a dream, thanks to the rearview camera and audio warning, while the fully adjustable steering (rake and reach), central locking, electric windows and the impressive nine-speed (yes, nine! automatic gearbox linked up seamlessly with the engine, which punches way above its own weight by producing 125 kW and 250 Nm. This enables a 0 to 100 km/h sprint time of 8.8 seconds and claimed fuel

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consumption figures of 6.9 l/100 km under normal conditions. Paradoxically, the gearbox seemed incapable if using all nine of its gears, managing only eight despite my best efforts. The headlight spread and reach was acceptable without being outstanding, and the speedo over-read to some extent with an indicated 120 km/h being a true 113 km/h. Last Say Would I recommend the Jeep Renegade as a value-for-money proposition? Compared with the Subaru Forester 1.5 XS which produces 126 kW and

235 Nm, and retails at R475,000, I’m afraid that the Subaru will win hands down. It just seems so much more car for the money. The Renegade, on the other hand, offers cute styling (it’s prettier than the Subaru) and the magic of the Jeep name – a name which has enjoyed respect since the days of World War II, and which offers a fresh take on interior comfort and ease of operation, as well as rattle-free build quality. It will also be significantly more fuel efficient than the Subaru – at nearly R14 to the litre making it worthy of consideration.


Green

Is the new black Eco-fying Your Home South Africa is a water scarce country and the recent drought conditions have brought the need for water conservation and environmental awareness into sharp focus, highlighting the responsibility we all have to use available resources sensibly. Every home can easily be made greener and the impact is vast. From lightening the load on natural resources and preserving our environment, to improving your family’s health and saving money, going green in 2017 is the way to go.

Text: Supplied Images Š iStockphoto.com

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Harvest Every Drop of Rainwater Collecting every drop of water reduces your home’s dependence on municipal systems, empowering you to have more water available while minimising expenditure. Install rainwater harvesting systems to collect rainwater from roofs and store it in a tank. Rain barrels are easy to install, low-cost and an effective method to make sure you don’t miss a drop. The collected water can then be used for various purposes such as filling up toilet cisterns and swimming pools, car-washing and watering the garden. Investing in water harvesting and water recycling technology will pay dividends for years to come. Create a Low Flow Reducing the amount of water your household uses is the easiest way to going greener. There are a variety of ways to reduce water wastage in your home. Some are simple habits like turning off the water when you brush your teeth and shave, taking shorter showers and flushing minimally. Additionally you can also install a low-flow showerhead, an aerator on your sink and a low-flow toilet. Together, these technologies can reduce your household water usage by up to 50 %. Ditch the Plastic Bottles The production of plastic is costly for the environment and your wallet – it takes more water to make a plastic bottle than the bottle itself provides, and even though bottled water does not differ much from tap water, it costs you a lot more. Keeping the health and taste benefits of purified water while cleansing your life of damaging plastic bottles is now easier than ever before with amazing new organic products, such as KURO-Bō Activated Charcoal. This is a 100 % natural, recyclable and plastic-free filter, and the only eco-friendly product in South Africa to soften, purify, mineralise and remove E. Coli from your tap water. Requiring no bulky system, jug or expensive monthly cartridges, KURO-Bō offers three months of filtered water per stick (just over R1 per litre) and is extremely simple and family-friendly to use – simply boil, drop into any jug you have at home, and allow to filter. The result is naturally purified water that is enriched with minerals, while being delicious and refreshing. Eco-friendly Landscaping Shady landscaping can protect your home from direct sunlight during summer and allows more sunlight to reach your

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home through windows during the winter. Planting trees on the southern and western sides of your home can keep your home cooler as they will block sunlight from falling directly on your home. During winter, when trees lose their leaves, they will allow more sunlight to reach your home. Alternatively, plant a green roof. Studies have found that a green roof habitat reduces the heat flow through the roof by providing shade, insulation, and evaporative cooling. This can reduce a home’s daily energy demand for cooling by a massive 95 %. Convert to an Eco-Pool South Africans all love a beautifully blue outdoor swimming pool, but the large quantity of chlorine needed to keep it clear is costly and not environmentally friendly.

By creating an eco-pool you will get the sensory benefits of water that is bursting with life and colour. By mimicking natural healthy water systems you can avoid the toxic effects of chlorine, and instead nourish your skin and hair while benefiting the environment and soothing the soul. If you can, surround your eco-pool with a vertical garden. These beautiful arrangements have a host of eco-benefits, such as helping with climate control, providing a sound-proof barrier and – if you are in an urban area – creating habitats for birds and beneficial insects, increasing biodiversity and filtering air. KURO-Bō is currently available online at Wellness Warehouse, Faithful to Nature or directly from KURO-Bō’s website at www.kuro-bo.com. One stick retails from R215 (ex VAT and shipping).


Slam the

spam Back in the day, when email first became widely available, every time you heard that tell-tale ‘ping’ it was usually followed by a note from a friend or family member, or at least someone you knew. Nowadays though, that ping is just as likely to indicate spam, and for some of us, the spam emails now far outnumber the legitimate ones we receive. So just what can we do about it?

Text: Colin Thornton, CEO, Dial a Nerd Images © iStockphoto.com

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To better understand what can be done about receiving spam, it is important to understand how spammers send mail and why they may target one specific address over another. There are two primary ways that spammers choose which email addresses to send spam to: Dictionary Harvest Attack: A dictionary harvest attack is when spammers attempt to find valid email addresses by randomly sending mail to common mailbox names for a domain, such as info@mydomain.com or admin@mydomain.com. You can minimize spam that is generated this way by ensuring that your email account names are unique and specific, for example: mycompany. admin@mydomain.com, or mydepartment. info@mydomain.com. Email Harvesting: Email harvesting is when spammers use a number of techniques for finding valid email addresses to send spam to. Once an email has been harvested and identified as valid and responsive, the email address then goes on a spam list. Spam lists may then be traded or sold in bulk, making the email address available to more and more spammers as time goes on. Of these two methods, email harvesting is by far the more devastating. An email that is known to be active and vulnerable to attack may be traded and added to more lists, resulting in the delivery of thousands of spam messages. The best way to avoid receiving large quantities of spam is to never be placed on these lists in the first place. To do that it is helpful to know how a spammer can harvest your email address. How Spammers Get Email Addresses The following is a list of some of the ways spammers can get your email address without you giving it to them directly: • You provided your email address to a website, such as when you signed up or commented on a post, and they gave your email address to spammers (intentionally or unintentionally). Their website could also have been hacked through a security exploit. • You signed up for a mailing list and forgot you signed up. • You signed up for a mailing list, and they gave your email address (intentionally or unintentionally) to spammers. • You sent an email to someone, and they forwarded it to someone else who harvested your email. • Someone sent you an email also addressed to other recipients, and they used TO or CC instead of BCC, making

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your email address visible to anyone who received the email (or who was forwarded the email thereafter). Any of the recipients could have made your email available to spammers. • You used your email on a discussion list that reveals your email address to other users. Any of the other users could have harvested your email address. • Your email address is on your business card (or posted online where people can find it), and someone decided to add you to their mailing list without your permission. While you may not have given your address directly to spammers, making it available and public makes it vulnerable to them. Other Methods of Harvesting Email Addresses People often volunteer their email address unknowingly or leave it out absentmindedly, available for a spammer to pick up. Spammers also have more aggressive and invasive techniques for gathering email addresses without you ever having posted them online: • Your computer could have a virus or malware on it that records keystrokes (everything you type), “sniffs packets” (reads everything going over your Internet connection), or directly reads active email accounts from popular email software. • Another computer or workstation on your network or workgroup could have a virus or malware that collects email addresses and other information passing through the network. • A script on your website could have a security vulnerability that allows a hacker to access information on your hosting account, including your email addresses. • Since emails are relayed from server to server until they reach their destination, one of the servers your email passed through could have packet-sniffing software installed. • Your Internet service provider (ISP) could be gathering emails and selling them. • A hacker could have guessed or obtained hosting control panel login information and retrieved your email addresses that way.

• Spammers may use sophisticated techniques to identify when a spam message has been read, and so looking at a spam message after it has been received may confirm that your email address is active. How to Prevent Spam There is no way to completely prevent spam, but here are some precautions that can be taken to reduce the likelihood of spammers getting your email address: • Be careful who you give your email address to. This includes websites and anyone you might email. • Create and use disposable email addresses to sign up for websites or services that you do not absolutely trust. • Be sure not to open spam when you do receive it. • Make sure your computer as well as the computers on your network are virus and malware free. • Make sure your website is free of malware and security vulnerabilities. If you are using a third-party script or code on your site, this usually means running the latest secure version. • Use secure passwords for your email and hosting account to prevent hackers from guessing them and logging in. • If your friends are sending you emails that have been sent to a large recipient list, request that they use BCC instead of TO or CC, so that other recipients cannot see your email address – or request that they stop including you if you do not want to receive the emails. • Do not list your email address on your website or anywhere the public can access it.


By using these precautions, you can greatly mitigate what spam you do receive and prevent most spam from ever happening. Already Have Spam? What to Do About It There are a few paid-for options that will help prevent and filter spam more easily and with less configuration and setup. Dial a Nerd recommends the ESET Nod. This has a spam filter that gets 95 % of spam. It also updates its virus signature database every day in order to ensure your computer is always protected. If you have tried all other options and have reached the point where you are extremely dissatisfied with the experience of checking your mail every day, then you may wish to consider deleting the email account and creating an email account with a different name. This option is extreme, and not recommended due to the importance of being able to have access to email addresses you have used to sign up for important services or used for contact information. With a wide variety of products, skills and levels of support available, Dial a Nerd can offer the optimal solution to maximise IT value for any person, business or school. Visit www.dialanerd.co.za for more information.


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2017/02/14 10:09 AM


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conferencing

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Books Must Read

Dancing the Death Drill By Fred Khumalo Paris, 1958. A skirmish in a restaurant leaves two men dead and the restaurant staff baffled. Why did the head waiter, a man who’s been living in France for many years, lunge at his patrons with a knife? Gradually, the extraordinary story of Pitso Motaung, a young South African who volunteered to serve with the Allies in World War I, emerges. Through a tragic twist of fate, Pitso found himself on board the SS Mendi, a ship that sank off the Isle of Wight in February 1917. Dancing the Death Drill is a personal tale that spans continents and generations, moving from the battlefields of the Boer War to the front lines in France and beyond. With a captivating blend of pathos and humour, Fred Khumalo brings to life a historical event, honouring both those who perished in the disaster and those who survived.

The Upstarts By Brad Stone Ten years ago, the idea of getting into a stranger’s car or walking into a stranger’s home would have seemed bizarre and dangerous, but today it’s as common as ordering a book online. Uber and Airbnb are household names: redefining neighbourhoods, challenging the way governments regulate business and changing the way we travel. In the spirit of iconic Silicon Valley renegades like Steve Jobs and Bill Gates, a new generation of entrepreneurs is sparking yet another cultural upheaval through technology. They are among the Upstarts, idiosyncratic founders with limitless drive and an abundance of self-confidence. Young, hungry and brilliant, they are rewriting the traditional rules of business, changing our day-to-day lives and often sidestepping serious ethical and legal obstacles in the process. The Upstarts is the definitive account of a dawning age of tenacity, creativity, conflict and wealth.

Not Dead Yet: The Autobiography By Phil Collins Phil Collins gained fame as both the drummer and lead singer for Genesis and continues to enjoy worldwide success today. He’s one of only three recording artists who have sold over 100 million albums both as solo artists and separately as principal members of a band – the other two being Paul McCartney and Michael Jackson. Revered as a drummer, he is the creator of numerous worldwide hits, and is an Oscar winner for the song You’ll Be in My Heart from the Disney film Tarzan. Phil Collins’ life has also been rich with experience outside of music, starting with his career as a child actor. In his memoir, Phil talks honestly about his three failed marriages, his alcoholism and his ill health. He also describes the highs and lows of his career, and what it is like to work with other rock legends, from Eric Clapton to Robert Plant.

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FACEBOOK t h e a r a b e l l a way

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Gadgets

For Fit Families Garmin’s new Vívofit Jr is an activity tracker to encourage kids to stay on the move. The kid-friendly design is comfortable, durable, swim-friendly and features a one-year battery life for 24/7 wearability. In addition to tracking steps, sleep and kids’ activity on the way to their recommended 60-minute daily play goal, the Vívofit Jr comes with a free, parent-controlled mobile app3. The app motivates kids with fun and educational mobile adventures, and also includes helpful tools for parents to motivate kids, who can assign responsibilities and agreed-upon rewards for completed tasks. With the Vívofit Jr, kids have their very own activity tracker to help create healthy habits while they are young.

The Smart Choice

Google’s first Chromecast was an odd little stick that served an important purpose: At under R1,000, it was about the cheapest way to make a plain old TV “smart”, letting people get Netflix, Hulu, YouTube and movies from Google Play on their televisions with zero fuss. With 4K Smart TVs becoming more commonplace, Google has introduced the 2nd generation Chromecast that adds support for 4K high dynamic range (HDR) streaming and lets you cast video from any compatible device (smartphone, laptop or tablet) or app to your TV. It comes in three different colours – red, yellow and black.

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Have a Wanderful Winter Winter calls for hot chocolate, great books and atmospheric fireplaces. This winter, look no further than Wanders for top quality stoves and fireplaces to warm your home. The elegant Black Pearl is a beautifully suspended stove with a striking design. It is wall-mounted and has an oval shape, which makes it suitable for any type of room. Developed and made in-house, the stove’s all-round glass ensures that the flames are visible from any angle in the room. Only the best materials are used to create each stove in the Wanders factory in Holland, and all of the stoves have high efficacy and low emission values. The Wanders Black Pearl Stove has a recommended retail price of R49,995 and is available from selected retailers nationwide.


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Meet the Crew Have you ever wondered who is flying the plane when you travel on SA Express? Or wanted to know more about what a job as a cabin crew member is like? Well, now’s your chance! Every month we will introduce a few members of our SA Express family, because by getting to know them, you become part of the SA Express family too. Text & Image © Supplied

Lynne Hendricks Cabin Crew Member, Durban Length of Service With SA Express: Nine Years Tell us about yourself. On an average day I enjoy running, being outdoors in nature and reading a good book. On a busy day, I travel through cities, and feed my soul interacting with wonderful strangers, friends and family. What do you find exciting about your job? Every single flight is memorable. The interaction with different crew members and passengers brings the routine of flying to life. What is the most challenging part of your job? Cabin crew licensing must be renewed each year. Unlike most careers, we are tested annually to ensure that we offer the highest level of safety, service and care in-flight. This examination time can be stressful though. Why do you like working for SA Express? Contrary to public perception, the SA Express cabin culture breeds humility, passion, and high standards of excellence. Our smaller aircraft allow for a more personalised experience with our passengers. What would people find surprising about your job? That we can save a life because we are trained nurses, that we can douse a fire because we are trained firefighters, and that we can rescue a drowning person because we are trained lifeguards – and yet we are only ever seen as “Trolley Dollies”. What words of wisdom do you live by? We cannot direct the wind, but we can adjust the sails.

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Airline information SA Express fleet

Safety Information Health regulations Health regulations at certain airports require that the aircraft cabin be sprayed. The spray is harmless, but if you think it might affect you, please cover your nose and mouth with a handkerchief.

Canadair Regional Jet 200 BER Manufacturer: Bombardier Maximum cruising speed: 474 knots/545mph/879kmph Engines: Two General Electric CF34-3B1 Range: 1,662miles/3,080km Maximum altitude: 41,000ft/12,496m Seating capacity: 50

Crew: Two pilots, two cabin crew Wing span: 69ft 7in/21.21m Overall length: 87ft 10in/26.77m Overall height: 20ft 5in/6.22m Maximum take-off weight: 51,000lb/23,134kg Minimum runway length: 6,295ft/1,919m

De Havilland Dash 8 Series Q400 Turboprop Manufacturer: Bombardier Maximum cruising speed: 360knots/414mph/667kmph Engines: Two Pratt & Whitney Canada PW150A Range: 1,565 miles/2,519km Maximum altitude: 25,000ft/7,620m Seating capacity: 74

Crew: Two pilots, two cabin crew Wing span: 93ft 3in/28.42m Overall length: 107ft 9in/32.83m Overall height: 27ft 5in/8.34m Maximum take-off weight: 64,500lb/29,257kg Minimum runway length: 4,580ft/1,396m

Remain seated As a safety precaution, passengers are requested to remain seated with seatbelts fastened after the aircraft has landed, until the seatbelt sign has been switched off by the captain. Portable electronic equipment The use of personal electronic devices domestic and regional flights on the Q400. Passengers will be permitted cell phones, e-readers and electronic

(PED’s) will apply to all CRJ700/200 and DH8 to use PED’s such as tablets in flight-mode.

Cellular telephones Cellular telephones may be used on the ground while passenger doors are open. Cellular telephones, smartphones or any device with flight mode must be switched off as soon as the cabin doors are closed and when the senior cabin-crew member makes an announcement on the publicaddress system. Laptop computers Laptops with CD ROM and DVD drive, handheld calculators, electric shavers and portable personal listening devices may not be used on the ground during taxi but may be used during the flight when the seatbelt signs are switched off and with permission from the captain. Should circumstances dictate otherwise, a public-address announcement cancelling this concession will be made by a crew member. Prohibited equipment Portable printers, laser pointers, video equipment, CB/AM/FM/FHF/satellite receivers, two-way radios, compact disc and mini-disc players, scanners, remote-controlled toys and power converters are prohibited for use at any time. Safety pamphlet Read the safety pamphlet in the seat pocket in front of you and take note of your nearest emergency exit. Smoking In accordance with international trends, smoking is not permitted on board any SA Express flights. Seat belts Please fasten your seat belt whenever the seat belt signs are illuminated. For your own safety we suggest that you keep it fastened throughout the flight.

Canadair Regional Jet 700 Manufacturer: Bombardier Maximum cruising speed: 473 knots/544mph/875kmph Engines: Two General Electric CF34-8C5B Range: 1,477m/2,794km Maximum altitude: 41,000ft/12,496m Seating capacity: 70

Crew: Two pilots, two cabin crew Wing span: 76ft 3in/23.2m Overall length: 106ft 8in/32.51m Overall height: 24ft 10in/7.57m Maximum take-off weight: 72,750lb/32,999kg Minimum runway length: 4,580ft/1,396m

SA Express’ aircraft are made by Bombardier Aerospace

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Important When in doubt, please consult our cabin crew.

For your comfort and security, please comply with the above safety regulations at all times while on board


Special services Special Meals Passengers with special dietary requirements are provided for through the following special meals: kosher, halal, Muslim, Hindu, low-fat and vegetarian meals. Orders for special meals should be placed at the time of making flight reservations. The airline requires a minimum of 48 hours’ notice prior to departure in order to assist with confirmation of requests. Only available on selected flights. Passengers requiring special attention Requirements for unaccompanied minors (passengers under the age of 12 years) or passengers requiring wheelchairs should be stated at the time of making the reservation. Owing to the size of the cabins on our aircraft types, the airline is not in a position to carry stretcher passengers or incubators. Cabin baggage SA Express will accept one piece of cabin baggage not exceeding a total dimension of 115cm and 7kg in weight. For safety reasons, cabin baggage must fit into approved stowage spaces: either the overhead luggage bin or under the seat. Owing to limited storage space in the aircraft cabin, cabin baggage may be placed in the Skycheck at the aircraft for hold stowage. Skycheck This is the airline’s special hand-luggage facility that assists with in-flight comfort, speedy boarding and disembarking. When boarding one of our flights, simply place any hand luggage that will not be required during the flight on to the Skycheck

cart at the boarding steps of the aircraft. Your hand luggage will be waiting for you as you disembark from the aircraft at your destination. Baggage liability Valuable items such as cameras and accessories, computers – including laptops and notebooks – mobile telephones, perfumes, aftershaves, colognes, legal and company documents and legal tender – including cash, credit cards and cheques – bullion, leather jackets, all types of jewellery and any other items with a value in excess of R400 must be removed from either checked-in or Skycheck baggage as the airline is not liable for loss or damage to these items. Verified baggage claims are settled on the basis adopted by IATA (International Airlines Transport Association): payment of US$20 per 1kg of checkedin luggage, to a maximum of 20kg ($400) We Fly For You SA Express Airways prides itself on aiming to offer incomparable service standards. In addition to building on our motto to express excellence and consistently striving to provide the best service, we know that “you” is the most important word in our airline. SA Express proudly launched its new brand on 2 December 2009 at OR Tambo International Airport. The new brand is set to ensure that it’s distinctive and positioned to build awareness and affinity in the domestic and regional markets. The new proposition “We Fly for You” is set to position SA Express as a premier intra-regional African brand. The main objective of the re-brand is to ensure that SA Express is distinctive yet still aligned to the country’s mainline carrier. SA Express’s unique positioning as an airline that

provides a bespoke, personalised travel experience was the rationale behind the proposition “We Fly for You”. The new brand mark is in line with the symbol and colours of the national flag, encouraging national pride. The new brand will be applied to all brand touch-points throughout the operation as well as the staff uniform. Awards SA Express has won the AFRAA Regional Airline of the Year Award at the end of 2009, and the Allied and Aviation Business Corporate Award. Our airline was also the recipient of the Annual Airline Reliability Award from Bombardier at the end of 2007. Other previous awards include the International Star Quality Award, which indicates our commitment to service excellence, while our prominence as one of the top 500 best managed companies is proof of our success as a business. Onboard service The airline’s onboard service is unique and offers passengers a variety of meals or snacks. The airline pioneered its unique meal-box concept, and meal choices are frequently updated and designed using balanced food criteria: appearance, taste and nutritional value. Passengers can also enjoy a wine and malt service on specified flights as well as refreshments on all flights. Light snacks will be served on selected flights. Our customers can expect a safe, comfortable, quality air-travel experience, with the added benefits of frequency, reliability, on-time departures and unmatched value for money.

We fly for you About us SA Express is a domestic and regional, passenger and cargo carrier which was established on 24th April 1994. The airline has since become one of the fastest growing regional airlines in Africa with route networks covering major local and regional cities. SA Express plays a significant role in the country’s hospitality, travel and tourism industry and is a vital contributor to the country’s socioeconomic development. SA Express prides itself in aiming to offer incomparable service standards. In addition to building on our motto to express excellence and consistently striving to provide the best service, we know that “you” is the most important word in our airline. With our consistent and seamless service, our customers can be assured of stellar customer service that will exceed their expectations. Vision To be a sustainable world-class regional airline with an extensive footprint in Africa. Purpose A sustainable, integrated regional airline connecting secondary and main airports.

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Flight schedule Johannesburg - Pilanesberg Flt No SA 1131

Dep 12:30

Arr 13:05

A/C em2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

F

S

S

Johannesburg - Bloemfontein Flt sa SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

No 1001 1003 1005 1011 1013 1017 1021 1023

Dep 06:10 08:00 11:20 13:50 15:30 16:45 17:55 18:30

Arr 07:10 09:05 12:25 14:55 16:30 17:45 19:00 19:30

A/C cr8 DH4 DH4 DH4 dh4 dh4 cr2 DH4

M

T

W

Johannesburg - East London Flt No SA 1409

Dep 17:30

Arr 19:00

A/C CR8

M

Johannesburg - George Flt SA sa sa

No 1501 1503 1509

Dep 06:40 08:20 15:50

Arr 08:35 10:15 17:40

A/C cr8 cr2 cr8

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

Johannesburg - Hoedspruit Flt No SA 1225 SA 1227

Dep 10:15 12:15

Arr 11:20 13:20

A/C DH4 DH4

M

T

Johannesburg - Kimberley Flt SA SA sa SA sa sa

No 1102 1103 1105 1107 1111 1113

Dep 06:20 09:20 13:10 14:35 16:45 17:30

Arr 07:30 10:25 14:15 15:45 17:50 18:40

A/C dh4 cr8 cr8 dh4 cr2 cr8

M

T

Johannesburg - Port Elizabeth Flt SA SA SA

No 1457 1457 1457

Dep 17:30 18:10 18:40

Arr 19:15 20:10 20:40

A/C cr8 dh4 dh4

M

T

Johannesburg - mahikeng Flt No SA 1123 sa 1125

Dep 07:10 14:55

Arr 07:55 15:40

A/C em2 em2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

T

F

S

S

Johannesburg - Richards bay Flt SA SA SA SA

No 1201 1203 1207 1213

Dep 06:10 08:30 13:15 16:55

Arr 07:25 09:45 14:30 18:10

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4

M

T

W

pilanesberg - Johannesburg Flt sa

No 1132

Dep 13:40

A/C em2

M

T

W

Bloemfontein - Johannesburg Flt SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

No 1024 1002 1004 1006 1012 1014 1018 1022

Dep 06:30 07:40 09:35 12:55 15:25 17:00 18:20 19:30

Arr 07:30 08:40 10:40 14:00 16:30 18:00 19:20 20:30

A/C DH4 cr8 dh4 dh4 DH4 DH4 dh4 dh4

M

T

W

East London - Johannesburg Flt sa SA

No 1410 1410

Dep 19:20 19:40

Arr 21:10 21:10

A/C dh4 CR8

M

George - Johannesburg Flt SA SA sa

No 1502 1504 1510

Dep 09:20 10:50 18:10

Arr 11:10 12:40 19:50

A/C cr8 CR2 cr8

M

Flt SA SA

No 1226 1228

Dep 12:00 13:55

Arr 13:00 14:55

A/C DH4 DH4

M

No 1102 1104 1106 1108 1112 1114

Dep 08:00 10:55 15:05 16:15 18:15 19:05

Arr 09:10 12:00 16:10 17:25 19:20 20:10

A/C DH4 CR8 cr8 dh4 CR2 cr8

M

F

S

S

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

T

Kimberley - Johannesburg Flt SA SA SA sa SA sa

T

T

Hoedspruit - Johannesburg

T

Port Elizabeth - Johannesburg Flt SA SA sa

No 1460 1458 1458

Dep 07:00 20:00 21:10

Arr 08:50 21:40 22:50

A/C DH4 cr8 dh4

M

T

mahikeng - Johannesburg Flt sa sa

No 1124 1126

Dep 08:20 16:10

Arr 09:05 16:50

A/C em2 em2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

T

F

S

S

Richards bay - Johannesburg Flt SA SA SA SA

No 1202 1204 1208 1214

Dep 08:05 10:30 15:05 18:40

*Please note that SA Express may deviate from the published schedule over the holiday period and will operate reduced schedules in December and January

SA EXPRESS RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE, SUSPEND OR AMEND THIS PUBLISHED SCHEDULE WITHOUT PRIOR NOTIFICATION. EVERY EFFORT WILL BE MADE TO OPERATE AS PER THE PLANNED SCHEDULE

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Arr 14:15

Arr 09:20 11:45 16:20 20:00

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4

M

T

W


Johannesburg - walvis bay Flt No SA 1701

Dep 11:55

Arr 14:10

A/C CR8

M

T

Johannesburg - Gaborone Flt SA SA SA sa SA SA SA SA SA

No 1761 1763 1765 1767 1775 1775 1779 1779 1783

Dep 06:55 07:55 09:55 11:30 12:40 14:30 15:45 18:10 18:45

Arr 07:50 08:50 10:50 12:20 13:35 15:25 16:40 19:05 19:40

A/C dh4 DH4 DH4 dh4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 erj

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

Johannesburg - Lubumbashi Flt No SA 1797

Dep 09:20

Arr 11:45

A/C 735

M

T

CAPE TOWN - bloemfontein Flt SA SA sa SA SA

No 1081 1083 1087 1087 1091

Dep 06:00 08:00 11:45 13:20 16:30

Arr 07:30 09:30 13:15 14:50 18:00

A/C CR2 CR2 cr2 cr2 cr2

M

CAPE TOWN - east london Flt sa sa sa SA sa sa SA sa sa

No 1361 1363 1371 1371 1371 1373 1375 1375 1375

Dep 06:00 08:00 10:35 12:25 13:05 16:40 17:20 17:20 17:30

Arr 07:25 09:25 12:00 13:50 14:30 18:10 18:45 19:05 19:15

A/C CR2 cr2 cr2 CR2 cr2 cr2 cr2 dh4 dh4

M

Cape Town - Pilanesberg Flt No SA 1255

Dep 11:30

Arr 13:40

A/C CR2

M

T

No 1801 1803 1803 1807 1813 1813 1819 1821 1821 1827 1823

Dep 06:00 07:00 07:30 10:10 10:40 14:20 15:00 16:45 17:00 17:20 18:30

Arr 07:30 08:15 08:40 11:40 12:10 15:50 16:30 17:55 18:10 18:30 20:00

A/C dh4 cr2 cr2 dh4 DH4 dh4 DH4 cr2 CR2 cr2 dh4

M

Flt sa

No 1702

Dep 14:45

Arr 16:55

A/C cr8

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

T

T

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

Gaborone - Johannesburg Flt SA SA SA sa SA SA SA SA SA

No 1762 1764 1766 1768 1776 1776 1784 1780 1780

Dep 08:30 09:20 11:25 12:55 14:15 16:05 17:15 19:45 20:10

Arr 09:25 10:15 12:20 13:50 15:10 17:00 18:10 20:40 21:05

A/C dh4 DH4 DH4 dh4 dh4 DH4 erj DH4 erj

M

T

Lubumbashi - Johannesburg Flt SA

No 1798

Dep 12:30

Arr 15:00

A/C 735

M

T

bloemfontein - CAPE TOWN Flt SA SA SA SA SA SA

No 1082 1084 1088 1088 1092 1092

Dep 08:15 10:15 14:00 15:30 18:30 18:40

Arr 10:00 11:55 15:40 17:15 20:20 20:20

A/C CR2 CR2 cr2 cr2 CR2 CR2

M

east london - CAPE TOWN

CAPE TOWN - port elizabeth Flt SA sa sa SA SA sa SA SA SA SA sa

walvis bay - Johannesburg

Flt SA sa SA sa sa SA sa SA sa

No 1362 1364 1372 1372 1372 1374 1376 1376 1376

Dep 08:00 10:00 12:35 14:20 15:10 18:40 19:40 19:50 19:50

Arr 09:40 11:40 14:15 16:00 16:50 20:20 21:40 21:30 21:50

A/C CR2 cr2 CR2 cr2 cr2 CR2 cr2 cr2 dh4

M

Pilanesberg - cape town Flt SA

No 1254

Dep 14:10

Arr 16:30

A/C CR2

M

port elizabeth - CAPE TOWN Flt SA sa SA sa sa sa SA sa SA SA SA sa

No 1826 1802 1804 1804 1808 1804 1814 1820 1822 1822 1828 1824

Dep 07:00 08:00 08:40 09:20 12:10 12:40 16:20 17:00 18:30 18:40 19:00 20:30

Arr 08:40 09:40 10:10 10:40 13:50 14:20 18:00 18:40 19:50 20:00 20:20 22:10

A/C DH4 dh4 cr2 cr2 dh4 dh4 DH4 dh4 cr2 cr2 cr2 dh4

M

T

*Please note that SA Express may deviate from the published schedule over the holiday period and will operate reduced schedules in December and January

SA EXPRESS RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE, SUSPEND OR AMEND THIS PUBLISHED SCHEDULE WITHOUT PRIOR NOTIFICATION. EVERY EFFORT WILL BE MADE TO OPERATE AS PER THE PLANNED SCHEDULE

Indwe /133


Flight schedule Cape Town - Hoedspruit Flt No sa 1241

Dep 09:10

Arr 12:30

A/C dh4

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2 CR2 cr2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2 CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

Cape Town - Walvis Bay Flt No SA 1721

Dep 10:55

Arr 13:05

A/C CR2

durban - East London Flt SA SA SA sa

No 1301 1305 1305 1309

Dep 06:00 11:30 12:00 16:50

Arr 07:05 12:45 13:05 17:55

A/C CR2 CR2 erj erj

durban - Port Elizabeth Flt SA SA sa SA SA sa SA

No 1330 1334 1334 1336 1340 1340 1348

Dep 06:00 08:25 09:15 09:50 13:35 13:35 17:40

Arr 07:20 09:45 10:35 11:10 14:55 15:05 19:00

A/C CR2 CR2 cr2 CR2 CR2 erj CR2

durban - CAPE TOWN Flt SA SA sa

No 1850 1854 1858

Dep 06:10 15:00 15:35

Arr 08:25 17:15 17:50

durban - lusaka Flt No SA 1603

Dep 07:10

Arr 11:10

durban - Harare Flt No SA 1603 SA 1611

Dep 09:10 10:20

Arr 11:35 12:45

Hoedspruit - Cape Town Flt sa

No 1242

Dep 13:10

A/C dh4

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2 CR2 cr2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2 CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

walvis Bay - Cape Town Flt SA

No 1722

Dep 13:35

Arr 15:35

A/C CR2

East London - DURBAN Flt SA sa SA SA

No 1302 1306 1306 1310

Dep 07:35 13:20 13:35 18:25

Arr 08:35 14:35 14:35 19:25

A/C CR2 cr2 CR2 CR2

Port Elizabeth - DURBAN Flt SA SA sa sa SA sa SA sa

No 1331 1335 1335 1337 1341 1341 1349 1349

Dep 07:50 10:15 11:05 11:45 15:35 15:35 19:55 20:30

Arr 09:05 11:30 12:20 13:00 16:50 17:05 21:10 22:00

A/C CR2 CR2 cr2 cr2 CR2 erj CR2 erj

CAPE TOWN - DURBAN Flt SA SA sa

No 1851 1855 1859

Dep 09:05 17:45 18:15

Arr 11:05 19:45 20:15

lusaka - durban Flt SA

No 1604

Dep 11:40

Arr 15:40

Harare - durban Flt SA SA

No 1612 1604

Dep 13:25 15:15

*Please note that SA Express may deviate from the published schedule over the holiday period and will operate reduced schedules in December and January

SA EXPRESS RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE, SUSPEND OR AMEND THIS PUBLISHED SCHEDULE WITHOUT PRIOR NOTIFICATION. EVERY EFFORT WILL BE MADE TO OPERATE AS PER THE PLANNED SCHEDULE

134/ Indwe

Arr 16:20

Arr 15:50 17:40


Passenger Letters Dear SA Express I would like to compliment your airline on such a lovely experience. It was my first time flying with SA Express, and the airline staff were very friendly and welcoming. They showed great care for our safety and attended promptly to any of our needs. They also paid close attention to the small details. For example, when it became apparent that the tea I had ordered was too hot for my hands, I was immediately offered a cup holder. I booked two flights through SA Express, which were very reasonably priced for a student such as myself and, although my flights were very brief, I was offered a complimentary beverage and snack with a smile. Previous airlines I have flown with have been double the price and never offered anything complimentary. It really is the small things that can make a customer feel special – which SA Express achieves. Furthermore, both my flights were punctual and their timing was exact. I would like to add the quote by Greg Anderson: “Focus on the journey, not the destination.” I thoroughly enjoyed my flights, they were great value for my money, and I look forward to booking my next flight with SA Express. Thank you to SA Express and all the airline staff, with a special mention to Tumi, the air hostess on my return flight. Warm Regards Amber Burns Congratulations to Amber Burns who wrote our winning letter this month, and walks away with a Samsonite Octolite 55 cm spinner valued at R3,495.

Hello I have recently returned from a trip to Australia. It seems that hospitality and traveling standards all over the world have dropped, but I just want to let you know that I am a proud flyer of SA Express and that your standards remain of the highest quality. Kind regards Reanka Jacobs

Do You Have Something to Say? Let us know what is on your mind by sending an email to customercare@flyexpress.aero. Letters may be edited, shortened or translated from their original language.

The writer of the winning letter in the May edition of Indwe will receive a Samsonite Octolite 55 cm spinner valued at R3,495. Taking a progressive approach to luggage design, Octolite offers what frequent travellers demand: lighter weight, increased durability, and maximum manoeuvrability. Octolite’s eye-catching exterior is modern, with a striking geometric design and a matte finish. Available in red, white or black, it also features an integrated carry handle, built-in address tag and fixed combination lock. The interior is divided into two halves: one featuring crossed ribbons, while the other is secured with a zip-in divider featuring a convenient side pocket. To maximise manoeuvrability, Octolite has a double-wheel design that provides smooth alldirection movement. The Octolite Collection is available at leading luggage stores nationwide. To locate a stockist near you, visit www.houseofsamsonite.co.za, follow @HouseofSamSA on Twitter and @houseofsamsonite on Instagram, or call +27 31 266 0620.

Indwe /135


Afric a ’ s Ta l e n t R e v e al e d Tiny inhabitant of Addo Elephant Park Annelize van Niekerk

Views of Hermanus

Riccardo Giovanoli

Dew covered flower bud John Rayner

If you think you have what it takes, send your photos (1MB each), details of where they were taken and your contact details to nicky@tcbmedia.co.za, with the words “Indwe Photo” in the subject line.

We c a n’t wa it to s how t hem off ! 136/ Indwe


Do not let costs take the fun out of Summer. Book with Thrifty Car Rental

VW Polo Vivo Sedan or Similar

R279*

per day

100km/Day. Standard Waiver

VW Polo Vivo Hatch or Similar

R239*

per day

100km/Day. Standard Waiver

30 APRIL 2017

Rental per day includes standard waivers and 100km’s, vehicle protection plan, airport surcharge and VAT. Contract fee is NOT included. Rates only subject to availability of vehicle category. Terms and conditions apply.

NB: Rates applicable to Credit Card rentals from airport locations only. Please produce your airline boarding pass at the time of making your reservation. The rental to take place on the same date as your boarding pass. Offer valid until 30 April 2017 E&OE.


138/ Indwe

Indwe april 2017  
Indwe april 2017  

In this issue: SA's Gin Revolution The Coversation Starter Flutter Guts Turn Hundreds Into Thousands Green is the New Black Give Us a Smile!