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APRIL 2014

Platinum Edition

20 Years of Aviation

BLOEMFONTEIN CAPE TOWN DURBAN EAST LONDON GABORONE GEORGE HOEDSPRUIT JOHANNESBURG KIMBERLEY LUBUMBASHI LUSAKA MAPUTO NELSPRUIT PORT ELIZABETH PIETERMARITZBURG RICHARDSBAY WALVIS BAY WINDHOEK HARARE


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This Month's Best Reads APRIL 2014 Events:

12 North | 14 South | 16 In Between

Bits & Pieces:

18 Travel Tips & Gorgeous Goodies

Bites:

22 Restaurants

& Taste Experiences Travel: 31 Kicking Around in Kimberley | 40 Democratic Durbs | 68 Total Time Out – Tofo | 78 South Africa’s Hidden Gems Feature: 26 Behind Every Great Organisation | 59 Up-to-the-Minute Décor and Design | 63 Breaking Down the Final Frontier | 72 Freedom on the Dance Floor | 97 When All Else Fails, Tri, Tri, Triathlon! Motoring: 82 Volkswagen Golf 7 2.0 R DSG | 93 A Motoring Success Story – New Toyota Corolla Gadgets: 106 Must Haves for Technophiles

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SA EXPRESS 1 1 1 1 1 1

0 1 1 1 1 1

3 4 5 6 9

CEO Letter SA Express Fleet We Fly For You: Our Visions & Values Safety and Route Map Flight Schedule Passenger Letters

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Special Feature: 34 Free for All – South Africa’s First Democratic Elections Features: 50 Looking Back and Looking For ward – 20 Years of Democrac y | 55 The Evolution of SA Express | 102 Inspiring Pilots of the Future

Business: 87 Raising Children to be Entrepreneurs Books: 108 New releases and Must Reads

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SA EXPRESS Divisional Manager: Communications and PR Keitumetse Masike Tel: +27 11 978 2540 kmasike@flyexpress.aero Customer Care Department Tel: 0861 729 227 customercare@flyexpress.aero Twitter: @flySAexpress Facebook: SA Express Airways

F I R S T

INDWE Indwe is published by TCB Media (Pty) Ltd In association with Tauro Creations and June Communications Tel: 0861 THE MAG (843 624) COVER IMAGE ŠSA Express Publisher Bernard Hellberg | bernard@tcbmedia.co.za Editor Nicky Furniss | nicky@tcbmedia.co.za Senior Designer Lindsey Steenkamp | design@tcbmedia.co.za DIRECTORS Publishing Director: Bernard Hellberg Production and Distribution Advisor: Obed Sealetsa | nolo@tcbgroup.co.za Communications Advisor: Pam Komani | pam@junecommunications.co.za ADVERTISING SALES Tel: +27 12 425 5800 National Sales Manager Bryan Kayavhu | bryan@tcbmedia.co.za +27 83 785 6691 Senior Account Managers Chantal Barton +27 83 459 3086 chantal@tcbmedia.co.za Calvin van Vuuren + 27 82 582 6873 calvin@tcbmedia.co.za Nikki de Lange +27 83 415 0339 nikki@tcbmedia.co.za Gertjie Meintjes +082 757 2622 gertjie@tcbmedia.co.za DISCLAIMER: All material is strictly copyrighted. All rights are reserved. Reproduction in whole or part is prohibited without prior permission from the publisher. Opinions expressed in Indwe Magazine are not necessarily those of SA Express.

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Happy 20th Birthday SA Express On 24th April, SA Express will be celebrating its 20th anniversary. It was just days before our first democratic elections in 1994 that a group of entrepreneurs formed the company with a vision of connecting small cities to bigger ones, thus serving as a regional feeder airline. As per this month’s cover, our logo and brand have gone through a number of evolutions throughout the 20 years, but our mission has stayed the same. The aviation sector is one of the most challenging ones in the global economy. It is vulnerable to many factors, including fuel prices and the general state of the economy. Over time, the barriers to entry have been significantly lowered. This has made competition fierce, which is good for passengers. The South African airline industry is littered with stories of failed airlines. However, it is pleasing that SA Express has survived the trials and tribulations of this industry, and lived to tell a good story of 20 years of success. As we look back over the past 20 years, we do so with satisfaction at the many achievements we have scored. For this, I am grateful to all of my predecessors for their vision and contributions. I am also grateful to the employees who have contributed positively over the years. Some of them like Naledi Kgaphola and David Ramonti have been with the airline since its inception. Meet them through the People of SA Express feature. Moreover, the airline has had some heart warming moments in the past 20 years. Who can forget the historic moment when SA Express was appointed by Government to collect Monique and Callie Strydom in Libya after they were freed from a hostage situation? Or beaming with national pride as we transported the FIFA teams during the first World Cup on African soil? Additionally, we have remained committed to transformation. The very first female pilot employed by SA Express in 1994 was Captain Romy Dippenaar. Captain Aloma Stevens became the first female commercial airline captain, and she subsequently commanded the first all female

commercial airline crew in South Africa. Moreover, in this issue, you can read about Boni Dibate who was the first female CEO of an airline. What is even more endearing is that all three of these pioneering women are still involved with the airline. We also salute Isaac Nombo as the first black commercial airline captain in South Africa. As we start the journey of the next 20 years guided by our 20:20 vision, we have ambitious growth aspirations. In the last two years, we have opened about a dozen new routes to destinations in and around Southern Africa. More new routes are on the cards, and will be launched in coming months to ensure greater choice for passengers. This will also help to make air travel more accessible to as many people as possible. Over the next 20 years, we will invest considerable resources into forging smart and mutually beneficial partnerships with all of our stakeholders. Our aspiration is to ensure that our relationship with our stakeholders is less transactional, and more multi-faceted and strategic. I am hugely indebted to all of my colleagues for their contributions. We are especially grateful for the support of the Board and Shareholder all of these years. Finally, SA Express would not be able to celebrate this important milestone without the support of millions of our loyal passengers. Enkosi!

Regards

Inati Inati Ntshanga CEO


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EVENTS | NORTH 5

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Ding Dong, The Bells Are Going to Chime THE WEDDING EXPO, COCA-COLA DOME, JOHANNESBURG The Wedding Expo is South Africa’s most comprehensive wedding show. Future brides and grooms can look forward to VWDQGVRILQVSLUDWLRQDOWDEOHVHWWLQJVDQG¾RUDOGHVLJQVFDNHVRI every shape and design, and wedding planners to suit any style or budget. Wedding venues, stationers, and photographers will also be among the 300 wedding industry suppliers who will be showcasing at the expo, the highlight of which will be several fashion shows of both locally and internationally designed gowns. Tickets are available from the door.

//WWW.WEDDING-EXPO.CO.ZA

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-0 3w51," '%%*#1 PROUDLY COLOURED COMEDY, GOLD REEF CITY, JOHANNESBURG Proudly Coloured Comedy (PCC) is unapologetic comedy from a uniquely Coloured perspective. It is a must see for a look into the hilarious insights of what being Coloured in South Africa means. From the hilarities of funny woman Shimmy Isaacs, the refreshingly honest and intelligent humour of Neil Green, and the mystical illusions of comic illusionist, Magic Man, to the surprise twist of satirical musical humour by Deep Fried Man, the PCC line-up is guaranteed to send comedy fans into a spin with some of the funniest comedians from all corners of South Africa. Proudly Coloured Comedy is a no-swearing show, making it accessible for the whole family to enjoy. Tickets are available from Computicket.

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An Extravaganza of Dance FULL MOON, JOBURG THEATRE, JOHANNESBURG Gracing stages from France to the USA, the Vuyani Dance Theatre will be celebrating its 15th anniversary by premiering a new show at the Joburg Theatre. The acclaimed Johannesburg based contemporary African dance company will bring the largescale production Full Moon to the Joburg Theatre’s Mandela stage. Featuring 25 South African dancers and the South African National Youth Orchestra, it has been described as “certainly the biggest contemporary dance production produced in Johannesburg to date�. Tickets are available from //WWW.JOBURGTHEATRE.COM, or by calling 0861 670 670.

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EVENTS | SOUTH 25

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Design Your Life DECOREX CAPE TOWN, CAPE TOWN ICC South Africa’s most comprehensive dĂŠcor, design and lifestyle exhibition will include everything from fine home finishes to beautiful dĂŠcor accessories, as well as bathroom, appliance, garden and kitchen fittings, all under one roof. The theme this year is “Design your Lifeâ€?, and showcases an array of dĂŠcor solutions to suit everyone. This year’s exhibition has a number of exciting additions, including the Craft Collective and the world renowned international design exhibition 100% Design South Africa. The line-up also includes interactive demos, designer popup restaurants and bars, plus the ever popular Plascon Colour Forecast.

//WWW.DECOREX.CO.ZA

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Fabulous Fromage SA CHEESE FESTIVAL, SANDRINGHAM Cheese lovers in Cape Town can look forward to an unrivalled culinary expedition of cheeses and other mouth-watering products brought together in celebration of the good life. Visitors to the SA Cheese Festival will experience a star-studded selection of gourmet gurus in the various theatres, as well as cheese masters in the new Cheese Studio, while the Cooking Pot will simmer with super culinary ideas throughout the weekend. There will also be entertainment available to occupy the little ones. Tickets are available from Computicket. For more information, contact AgriExpo at +27 21 975 4440 or email cheese@agriexpo.co.za.

// WWW.CHEESEFESTIVAL.CO.ZA

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An Artistic Outing CEDERBERG ROOIBOS ARTS FESTIVAL, CLANWILLIAM The picturesque town of Clanwilliam, situated in the heart of Rooibos country and one of the ten oldest towns in the country, is celebrating its 200 year anniversary this year. One of the highlights of the celebrations will be the Cederberg Arts Festival. Here, visitors can expect an exciting line-up of fun activities, great music, and entertaining live acts and plays, WRJHWKHUZLWKWKH´QHVWORFDOFXLVLQHWRFHOHEUDWHWKLV momentous occasion. For more information, bookings DQGXSGDWHVFRQWDFWWKHIHVWLYDORI´FHRQ +27 27 482 1090.

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// WWW.CEDERBERGFEES.CO.ZA


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EVENTS | IN BETWEEN 12

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Full Steam Ahead STARS OF SANDSTONE STEAM HERITAGE FESTIVAL, FICKSBURG Steam enthusiasts from across the globe will be gathering at Sandstone Estates near Ficksburg. Here they will celebrate the many steam-driven vehicles and machines that have been restored to pristine condition by Wilfred Mole and his team in celebration of the origins of transportation. Military vehicles, steam lorries, traction engines, locomotives, old buses and cars will again be taking centre stage against the backdrop of impressive Eastern Free State landscape. Old tractors and other agricultural relics will also be exhibited at the 2014 festival. For more information, call +27 11 805 4692/6530. //WWW.SANDSTONE-ESTATES.COM 14

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Celebrate Passover in Style PASSOVER PROMOTION, PREMIER HOTEL KNYSNA: THE MOORINGS, KNYSNA One of South Africa’s leading independent hotel groups, Premier Hotels and Resorts, has launched a new package exclusively for Passover. The package will be offered at Premier Hotel Knysna: The Moorings and includes a kosher kitchen (supervised by an on-site Rabbi) for the duration of Pesach. The full programme includes: Seder accoutrements including Shemurah Matza, wine and more; a Shul on the premises; a tour of the Garden Route during Chol HaMoed; and children’s entertainment daily. Packages are available from 14th – 23rd April and include the long weekend, Seder only or the full week. Contact +27 43 705 5033 for more information and bookings. //WWW.PREMIERHOTELS.CO.ZA 25

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Bottoms Up! FNB WHISKY LIVE SHOWROOM, DURBAN AND NELSPRUIT The team at the FNB Whisky Live Festival has created a much more intimate, hand-crafted show for 2014 which will enable them to present world class whiskies and knowledgeable experts (in order to showcase whisky at its best). The festival will be a platform for whisky brands from DVFORVHDV:HOOLQJWRQLQWKH&DSHWRDVIDUD´HOGDV7DLZDQ.HHSHUVRI the Quaich, whisky experts and those in the know will be ready to engage with discerning whisky lovers who will attend these events knowing that they will leave with more whisky knowledge than they arrived with. The FNB Whisky Live Showroom kicks off at the Suncoast Casino’s Sun Zone on 25th and 26th April, followed by Nelspruit at the Emnotweni Casino on 16th and 17th May. //WWW.WHISKYLIVEFESTIVAL.CO.ZA

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BITS & PIECES Go for Gold Amarula Gold is a smooth,

Put Your Best Face Forward

stylish spirit with a bold and

Juliette

totally unexpected new taste

Cream Mask is an innovative,

from Amarula. Fun and daring,

Armand’s

Vitality

´QHO\ WH[WXUHG PDVN WKDW

with seductively spicy notes

revitalises,

and a silky smooth palate, it

moisturises

is designed for mixing. It is

contains

tones tired

Spirulina

and skin.

It

extracts

at its best on ice, with soda,

WKDW KDYH ´UPLQJ HIIHFWV DV

Appletiser or ginger ale.

well as vitamins C, E and F.

Made from hand-harvested

It also provides the skin with

marula fruit, Amarula Gold is

amino acids and essential fatty

double distilled and aged in

acids for the preservation of

oak for 24 months to enhance

its natural moisture balance.

LWVDURPDWLFIUXLW\ÂľDYRXUDQG

European

contains 30% alcohol, but no

Armand’s products are designed

cream. Amarula Gold

brand

Juliette

to slow the effects of time and provide an alternative

from

to painful cosmetic surgery procedures. Scientists at

leading liquor outlets

Juliette Armand have developed personalised skincare

is

available

nationwide

for

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between

R139

sensitive, dry and oily. Juliette Armand’s Vitality Cream

and R149 per

Mask (R365) is available at top spas and salons nationwide.

750 ml bottle.

//WWW.JULIETTEARMAND.CO.ZA

Cape Town Gets Stamp of Approval To celebrate the fact that Cape Town is the first city in both Africa and the Southern Hemisphere to be given the title of “World Design Capital�, the South African Post Office will be producing a set of five stamps to mark the occasion. The stamps were designed by Tamryn Elliot, winner of a stamp design competition held in 2013. Her

striking

designs

reflect

five different themes aimed at igniting the imagination of the public, and contributing towards a greater understanding of the multi-faceted nature of design. She says that the concept of her stamp design is to inspire fellow South Africans to greatness through the words of well-known South Africans from history. 100,000 stamp sheets have been printed and are available at Post Offices around the county. To order these stamps online, visit

//WWW.VIRTUALPOSTOFFICE.CO.ZA

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BITS & PIECES An Indian Ocean Idyll Desroches Island, a remote and luxurious Seychelles destination, has been named one of the top hotels in Africa in Trip Advisor’s 2014 Travellers’ Choice Awards. These awards are based on the reviews and ratings of millions of Trip Advisor travellers around the world. The island, which has also been listed as one of Forbes’ Top Ten Remote Destinations in the World, is considered to be one of the most pristine and untouched islands on the planet. Desroches Island’s modern Luxury Beach Suites and Beach Villas are tastefully decorated and provide opulent, yet understated indulgence. The island offers a space of beauty and tranquillity, and has become well known for its excellent service. Blessed with one of the world’s healthiest climates and miles of unblemished beaches, Desroches Island is a refuge for romance, adventure, pampering and relaxation. For more information, email info@seasonsinafrica.com.

For the Kids One of South Africa’s premier safari destinations – Londolozi Private Game Reserve in Sabi Sand, Mpumalanga – has recently released an iBook entitled Junior Big Five Tracker, aimed at younger family members set to YLVLWWKH´YHVWDUJDPHUHVHUYH,WDLPVWRKHOSFKLOGUHQXQGHUVWDQGDQG engage with the animals, people, culture and world of the game reserve, and is available on iTunes. Londolozi offers luxury safaris, child and young adult wildlife programmes, and also a full-time child development specialist and naturalist to guide the educational experience of young guests on their African adventure. Londolozi Private Game Reserve is also WKH´UVWJDPHUHVHUYHLQWKHZRUOGWREHDFFRUGHG5HODLV &KkWHDX[VWDWXV

//WWW.LONDOLOZI.COM

History Through Music Due to popular demand, African Cream Music is proud to announce the re-issue of The Winds of Change, a double album that celebrates and honours the life of Nelson Mandela. A moving journey through the key music and moments that gave birth to a free and democratic South Africa, The Winds of Change tells the special story of our nation with the creative use of music and narrative. All of the songs chosen for this unique collection somehow speak of the miraculous journey to democracy, either through their lyrics or their time in history. The album includes such iconic songs as Sipho Hotstix Mabuse’s “Burnout”, Johnny Clegg’s “Asimbonanga”, and “The Power of Africa” by Yvonne Chaka Chaka, LQWHUVSHUVHG ZLWK H[WUDFWV IURP VLJQL´FDQW SROLWLFDO VSHHFKHV 7KLV DPD]LQJ FRPSLODWLRQWUDFHVWKHLQFUHGLEOHELUWKRIDQDWLRQWKDWGH´HGDOOH[SHFWDWLRQV

//WWW.AFRICANCREAMSTORE.COM.

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BITES

WHAT’S HOT As Belvedere Vodka once revolutionised the world with the creation of the ´UVW VXSHU SUHPLXP YRGND EUDQG now Belvedere Vodka raises the benchmark once again with the introduction of Belvedere Citrus. Belvedere Citrus is macerated with fresh limes from Brazil and Mexico, and then balanced with spring and winter lemons from Southern Spain.

WINTER WINE WARMERS

There is nothing more refreshing

The Cape Royale Luxury Hotel and Spa’s Bistro 1800 will be hosting

than experiencing the invigorating

delicious food and wine pairing evenings monthly until July. These

lemon-enhanced and zesty lime

will feature a selection of the Western Cape’s leading wine farms

infused taste of Belvedere Citrus,

paired to perfection with four fabulous courses. The cuisine will vary

whether you’re out on the town

each month, complemented by paired cultivars from each estate.

or relaxing at home, enjoying it

Bistro 1800’s sommelier, Ardiel Norodien, and chef Bevan Webb will

in one of Belvedere’s signature

be hosting the pairing alongside the cellar master representing each

cocktails.

times,

month’s selected estate. The four course dinners will commence

Belvedere is also sugar, fat and

with an amuse-bouche and a glass of MCC, followed by a choice of

carb free for a guilt free indulgence.

two starters and their accompanying white wine blends, an option

For

of two main dishes with a glass of red, and rounded off with sweets

Distilled

more

four

information,

visit

//WWW.BELVEDEREVODKA.COM

and a dessert wine. For reservations call +27 21 430 0506, or email

//INFO@18HUNDREDDEGREES.CO.ZA

CHOCOLATEY CHOCOLAT A GOODNESS There is something about Easter chocolate that captures the imagination, no matter mat what your age. Maybe it’s the ceremony of unwrapping the bright b foil, or the satisfying crack as your teeth break the glossy chocolate cho shell. Whatever it is, Easter just wouldn’t be Easter without chocolate. This year, Beyers Chocolates will make over two million m hollow chocolate eggs and one million hollow chocolate bunnies, using 200 tons of chocolate to fill its Easter orders fro from major retailers around the country. Beyers Chocolates will w also be producing thousands of Easter gift boxes wit with hand-decorated chocolates and truffles brand this Easter, to ensure that there under its own o is an Easte Easter treat for all ages. To experience the joy of Beyers’ de delicious own-brand Easter treats, shop online at www.beyerschocolates.com www.be b for all the latest creations from one of South Africa’s greatest chocolatiers.

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Behind Every Great Organisation… THE PEOPLE OF SA EXPRESS TEX T: MOHLOMI MAUBAN E I MA G E S © BE RNARD HE LL BE RG J N R

This month SA Express celebrates its 20 year anniversary. It is an achievement worth celebrating, and one that would not have been possible without the thousands of people who have worked tirelessly, both past and present, to make the airline what it is today. We spoke to a few of them to find out their stories.

Naledi Kgaphola “I am part of the foundation here; I have been around since the beginning,” says Naledi Kgaphola with pride. Currently a shop steward for SATAWU, Naledi started working at SA Express on 24th April 1994; three days shy of the birth of the democratic South Africa. Starting as a Junior Cabin Crew member, she was then promoted to a Senior Cabin Crew member. Naledi was on the very first SA Express flight, from Johannesburg to Kimberley, and as she is an honours student, studying Human Relations. She would like to work in SA Express’ HR department in the future.

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Lettie Mathosela Having started at SA Express in 2003, Lettie Mathosela’s career evolution at SA Express has been incredible. She started as a receptionist, and then gradually moved her way up in the company to her current post as payroll administrator in the HR department. To say that SA Express has changed her life is an understatement. In 2009, she was selected by her peers as the winner of the CEO Award. The prize was a house, the first she has ever owned. The single mother is eternally grateful to SA Express for the company’s kind appreciation of her work ethic. “When I arrived here at SA Express, I was wet behind the ears and not that knowledgeable. Now I have a house for myself and my two children and I have developed skills-wise since joining the firm,” she says.

Yvonne Johannes Fourteen years after joining SA Express, Yvonne Johannes beams with pride when she reflects on the decade and a half she has spent with the airline. When Yvonne started as a foreign creditors administrator, there was no system in place to deal with her duties, so she had to set up the working system herself. She is currently working as a debtor administrator and is proud of the fact that she was the one who implemented the financial system that SA Express uses for their accounting services.

Katlego Marokane Katlego Marokane has been with SA Express since 2011 and works in customer care. A self-declared people’s person, there is nothing that Katlego enjoys more that assisting others in her line of work. “It does not matter what a person visits my desk for; whether it’s a complaint or a compliment, I want make sure that when they leave my desk they leave with the impression that they have been helped by a caring person,” she says. What she has enjoyed most about working at SA Express is the spirit of ubuntu and camaraderie among her colleagues.

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Mavis Bongi Matukane Originally from Mpumalanga, Mavis Matukane has been with SA Express for ten years and currently works as a team leader in industry travel. Her highlights of her time with SA Express have been her own personal growth, as well as when the company proved their faith in her by appointing her as a department leader. “I am very proud of my achievements; I just wanted to work and did not expect to be given such a great responsibility.”

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David Radinamane Ramonti A 20-year SA Express veteran, David Ramonti started working at the airline in August 1994. For him, the biggest highlight has been witnessing the equitable transformation in the company which has afforded people like him the opportunity to progress career-wise within the airline. “It is a great thing that people from previously disadvantaged backgrounds are given opportunities. There are people who came in as cleaners and today they are technicians, so there is plenty of personal growth,” he says. David is also very happy that the number of young people being trained at the company is growing.

Alex Allers Alex Allers joined SA Express in 2009 and works as a Product and Catering Specialist. 2010 was his most memorable year at the company. Thanks primarily to his attention to detail, Alex managed to save the company R15 million that year. As a result, he won the CEO’s award, which came in the form of an all-expensespaid wedding. “It was a great gift; I got married at the Westcliff Hotel and was dressed by David Tlale. Going forward, I would like to see SA Express spreading its wings and getting more routes.”


Monde Mkhwanazi 22-year-old Monde Mkhwanazi is an economics graduate who started working at SA Express as an intern in 2013 and now works as a junior business manager. His tasks include evaluating gaps in the market and the organisation, as well as monitoring key performance indicators. SA Express will always have a special place in his heart because it gave him his first job, and exposed him to aviation. “Prior to working at SA Express, I was not well informed at all about aviation. Now that I have experienced the industry, I plan to study for my master’s and further my career in this field,� says Monde.


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Kicking Around in Kimberley TEXT & IMAGE S © KE RI H ARVE Y

The city is renowned for its plentiful diamonds, but Kimberley in the Northern Cape is lesser known for its unusual wildlife and ancient rock engravings. And these are more than enough reason to visit. Wildebeest Kuil’s Petroglyphs His name sounds like the job was made for him. Petrus Wilson is the original guide to the petroglyphs at Wildebeest Kuil (www.wildebeestkuil.itgo.com), situated just 16 km from Kimberley. Here the San spent busy days creating over 400 rock engravings that depict the wildlife they saw in the area. The !Xun and Kwe San people own the surrounding land, but have set aside the area sprinkled with petroglyphs to allow the public to view them up close. Starting from the visitors’ centre, an 800 m walk

weaves up a low hill and through the ancient outdoor art gallery. Guides provide commentary and there are also information boards along the way. The experience is a little like game spotting in stone, and you will see a variety of animals – from elephant and hippos to rhino and wildebeest – all frozen in time on the rocks. Some of the engravings are also believed to relate to rain and rainmaking. Only discovered in the late 1800s, the exact age of the petroglyphs is still not known. Some have been dated at between 1,200 and 1,800 years old, but many are even older than this.

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Unusual Wildlife One of our newest national parks, proclaimed in 2007, is just 80 km from Kimberley. Mokala (www.sanparks.org.za) is an unusual predator free park. Here you can see buffalo, black and blue wildebeest, tsessebe, and rare sable and Roan antelope, along with eland and gemsbok. There are three different accommodation options, and the park has about 70 km of roads on which to explore the park and view game. Mokala is Setswana for "camel thorn trees", which are plentiful in the area. This is the perfect place to visit for a sense of true wilderness. Dronfield (www.diamondroute.com) is just 8 km outside the city of Kimberley, and is a choice game viewing spot with excellent self-catering

accommodation. Prolific bird life – around 200 species – can be seen on the reserve, plus there’s a vulture hide on the property which offers close encounters with these fascinating birds. A little further from Kimberley (about 50 km down the N8) is one of the country’s oldest conservation areas. Rooipoort was set aside for conservation in 1893 and almost a century later was declared a Natural Heritage Site. This massive 40,000 hectare reserve boasts Kalahari, Karoo and Grassland vegetation, as well as all the birds and animals that choose to call these habitats home. There are also Roan and sable antelope, African wild cats and shy brown hyena. The reserve runs for over 30 km along the Vaal River, and offers guests a range of beautiful self-catering accommodation.

Birding at Kamfer’s Dam Who would believe that Kimberley hosts one of only four breeding colonies of lesser flamingos in Africa? (The others are located in Namibia, Botswana and Tanzania.) It is one of the few permanent water sources in the Northern Cape and attracts over 180 bird species, of which flamingos are just one. The flamingos, however, can number over 50,000 at times, and now have an artificial island on which they can breed undisturbed, and also be seen year round. Kamfer’s Dam is just 6 km from the city.

Heritage Stops There are some notable “must sees” when in Kimberley, and The Big Hole (www.thebighole. com) is top of the list. It’s the largest hand-dug hole

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First Page: Undoubtedly Kimberley’s Big Hole, and the attractions surrounding it, is still the city’s biggest tourist attraction This Page Top Left: Mokala National Park, just outside Kimberley, is home to rare Sable and Roan antelope This page Top Right: Kimberley’s Kamfer Dam plays host to the only breeding colony of lesser flamingos in South Africa This Page Bottom Left: The petroglyphs at Wildebeest Kuil are thousands of years old and offer fascinating into the lives of the indigenous !Xun and Kwe San people

SA EXPRESS CONNECTS KIMBERLEY TO JOHANNESBURG AND CAPE TOWN. SEE FLIGHT SCHEDULE FOR MORE I N F O R M AT I O N .


in the world and has yielded 2,700 kg of diamonds to date. The museum and guided tour of the area is fascinating and extremely well presented. Then step out onto the viewing platform that extends over The Big Hole and see just how big it really is. Also stop in at the Sol Plaatje Museum, which is housed in his former home. Plaatje was born near Kimberley, wrote the first South African novel in an ethnic language, and translated numerous Shakespeare plays into Tswana. He was also an actor and a singer and the first person to record Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika, as well as being a powerful force for political change. Visitors should also make a point of visiting Galeshelwe with Galeshelwe Tours (+27 53 832 0037), one of the oldest townships in the country, to see the home of Pan African Congress leader Robert Sobukwe, and to visit a local shebeen. Alternatively you can enjoy a sundowner at the Star of the West – the oldest pub in the city of Kimberley and an institution among locals. Kimberley may be located in a distant, dry corner of the country, but its attractions are enticing and diverse, much like the diamonds in the rough for which it is famous.

SA Express’ First Choice When SA Express first started flying 20 years ago, Kimberley was the airline’s very first destination, and continues to be a popular route for the airline over two decades later.


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Free for All SOUTH AFRICA’S FIRST DEMOCRATIC ELECTIONS

TE XT: BRON W YN WAIN W RIGH T IM AGE S © GALL O IM AGE S/RAPPORT ARCHIVES, 123 RF & ISTOCKPHOTO.COM

South Africa celebrates Freedom Day on 27th April each year in commemoration of the first democratic elections held in South Africa in 1994. Freedom Day is a reminder of the struggle against apartheid that culminated in the mark of an “X” on ballot forms from every South African over the age of 18 who participated in the making of our new country.

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Two decades on and the 1994 elections remain as clear in memories of the 22 million South Africans who voted for the beginning of a new era, as though it were yesterday. The Born Free Generation is privileged with a different perspective: 1994 is a history lesson at school, and a dinner-table story from parents. Yet, for every South African, the first democratic elections are a reminder that voting is the only key to the future of democracy in our country.

A New Day On 27th April 1994, the divided queues of apartheid merged in the long, flowing lines of voters from all race groups. Never had there been a time of greater equality. Leaders such as Nelson Mandela and Desmond Tutu cast their votes for the first time alongside supporters and detractors alike. Such would be the nature of democracy. The now unmistakeable flag of the new Republic of

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South Africa had been adopted just days before the election. Nineteen political parties participated and, despite uncertain fears of how the day would unfold, the voting stations were peaceful, festive, and filled with optimistic smiles and elated national pride. A new picture of South Africa began to emerge. Elections to the provincial legislatures were held at the same time as elections to the National Assembly. The African National Congress (ANC) gained an overwhelming

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majority vote with 62.6% to the National Assembly, headed by Nelson Mandela who became the first black president of the country. The National Party (NP) took 20.39 % of the vote, followed by the Inkatha Freedom Party (IFP) with 10.54 %, the Freedom Front (FF) with 2.2 %, the Democratic Party (DP) with 1.7 %, the Pan African Congress (PAC) 1.2 % and the African Christian Democratic Party with 0.5 %. At a provincial level, the ANC won seven of the nine provinces; the NP


gained the majority in the Western Cape, and the IFP secured KwaZulu-Natal.

The Build-up Yet the first democratic elections did not simply fall into place one fine day. In February 1990, FW de Klerk lifted the restrictions against 33 opposition groups, including the ANC, the PAC and the Communist Party. Nine days later, Mandela was released from Victor Verster Prison after 27 years ofincarceration. The dismantling of apartheid was in full swing. Violent outbreaks across the country threatened to smother the seeds of democracy that were just beginning to sprout, while leaders worked together to smooth the way forward. In 1993, the old and new regimes were united under an agreement to form the Government of National Unity. It was decided that the new government would comprise representatives of all parties securing more than 5 % of the vote, and decisions would be made by consensus. The Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) was also established to ensure the free and fair administration of the elections. As quickly as optimism grew with the old and the new leaders working together, it was just as quickly shattered by the devastating assassination of Chris Hani, the secretarygeneral of the Communist Party. The country suddenly hovered on the brink of civil war. In a televised address to the nation that same day, Nelson Mandela appealed for calm and for black and white South Africans to stand together. It was a glimpse of the charismatic leader’s ability to speak to the heart of people across all cultures. Riots erupted but the two sides quelled any further uproar by swiftly agreeing that democratic elections would follow so that, as Mandela put forward, “an elected government of the people, by the people and for the people” would come to power. At the end of 1993 an interim constitution was agreed to by 21 political parties and elections were set to take place on 27th April the following year.

Leading South Africa Following the success of the democratic elections, the National Assembly unanimously elected Nelson Mandela President of South


Africa on 9th May 1994. He was inaugurated on 10th May, along with Deputy Presidents Thabo Mbeki and FW de Klerk. Mandela’s presidency was characterised by massive steps to restructure the country and create a true democracy. He facilitated the successful negotiation of the new Constitution of 1996; the restructuring of civil services and the creation of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission to investigate the wrongs of the past. Mandela entrenched the rule of law, freedom of speech and free and fair elections – all of which we as South Africans vote for with every democratic election that has followed this first and most historic one.

How the South African Electoral System Works Prior to the 1994 elections, an interim Electoral Commission was established to ensure that the 1994 election process was in fact fully democratic. When the new Constitution was established LQWKH,(&ZDVRI´FLDOO\HVWDEOLVKHGDVD permanent supervisory body over all elections – national, provincial or municipal. The South African electoral system works on D´YH\HDUF\FOHZKHUHDQ\RQHDJHGRUROGHU is entitled to register and vote. Votes are cast for political parties, and based on the results thereof, parties appoint members to sit in parliament in direct proportion to the number of votes that they receive. The IEC (Independent Electoral Commission) is responsible for the impartial running of the elections, from logistics and voting stations, to WKHFRXQWLQJDQGYHUL´FDWLRQRIWKHUHVXOWV:KLOH the IEC reports to Parliament, their purpose is to deliver free and fair elections and as a result, they are completely independent of Government.


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Democratic Durbs FINDING FREEDOM IN AFRICA’S PLAYGROUND TEXT & IMAGE S © K E IT H BAIN

Durban is consistently thought of as a place for sunshine and warm Indian Ocean surf, of dawdling and shopping, of dabbing sunscreen and unfurling beach towels. With around 300 days of sunshine a year, it’s easy for this warm-hearted East Coast metropolis to get under your skin. Discovering it properly, though, means looking beyond its surface temptations. The slow, sure-footed trudge up the stairs on the basket handle seems to stretch on forever. There’s a chunky safety harness slowing us down, requiring adjustment every few steps. But once we hit the top, there is a sense of satisfaction at having climbed instead of taking the SkyCar, which involves merely stepping inside for the steady, lazy elevator-crawl to the top. Climbing each of the 550 steps makes us feel like we have earned the 360 degree high-altitude vista of Durban that is unfurled far beneath our feet. From atop the sculptural arches of Moses Mabhida Stadium (mmstadium.com), the city spreads out like a tapestry softened by patches of subtropical jungle and mangrove, and bookended by caramel-coloured beaches and rolling hills tumbling away into the

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misty KZN interior. Bravehearts don’t just ogle the view, but instead check their nerves at the door and sign up for the bungee jump (bigrush.co.za), where the uphill stair climb culminates with a leap into the abyss from the world’s tallest swing (88 m), with a 60 m freefall and top speed of 120 km/h. A mellower way to explore the stadium is on a guided Segway tour (segwayglidingtours. co.za). You’re given a helmet and a quick lesson in controlling the machine, and then set off to check out the stadium’s key design features. Longer Segway tours cover the entire beachfront promenade, stretching all the way to the Golden Mile’s southern end.


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If you’d rather control your own tour, get to the beach at sunrise, grab a coffee and hire a bicycle from The Bike & Bean (bikebeandurban. com). Then spend the morning wending between the joggers and power-walkers who frequent Durban’s beachfront. At the ends of the piers, just beyond the breakers, we’re metres away from bronze-bodied surfers waiting for the next wave. Watching them bobbing on the water is borderline soporific, and when they finally leap to their feet and ride towards the beachfront, we can’t help but feel a rush of shared energy. Lifeguards set up their flags and boats for the day, fishermen cast their lines, and youngsters on skateboards and BMXes head for the graffiti-covered

skate park. Durban’s beachfront changes its mood throughout the day, but it’s always alive and intoxicating. As we weave our way south towards the harbour, we pass rickshaw pullers, curio sellers, volleyball players, jubilant children splashing in the public pools, out-of-towners frolicking in the waves like they’ve never seen the sea, and enterprising sculptors carving their one-of-a-kind sand monuments, posing for tourist photos alongside their clever creations. We slow to a crawl to take in the details as the carnival atmosphere steadily evolves, enhanced by the effervescent whizz and whir of the funfair rides and carousels at North Beach. We know we’ve reached the beachfront’s

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far south when we hit uShaka Marine World (ushakamarineworld.co.za), the epicentre of Durban’s family scene. While there’s plenty of kitsch and clutter and a sprawl of shops flogging everything from cheap T-shirts to aromatic curry powers, the Sea World aquarium is packed with unique opportunities for visitors unfamiliar with oceandwelling animals. You can ogle cute penguins, watch seals demonstrating their intelligence, dive with sharks from within the safety of a clear-walled glass tube, or walk on a simulated ocean floor among rays and sand sharks. And what child wouldn’t savour the chance to meet a dolphin up close? Having witnessed the city’s beachfront in all its glory, we opt the following day to experience Warwick Junction, where the country’s liveliest markets pulse with humanity and commerce. We join a tour offered by Street Scene (streetscene.co.za) and arrive at Victoria Street Market ready to get under its skin. Guides Richard and Sthembiso are gifted storytellers, not only peppering our walk with history and cultural insights, but introducing us to some of the local characters who hawk everything from spices for potent curries to hand-carved Shembe staffs. We watch tailors putting finishing touches on wedding outfits, and guess at the sheer number of wood and stone ornaments being offered for sale. Every kind of curio and trinket is available for purchase and shopkeepers happily tell the stories behind their wares. Nearby, the Herb Market provides thrilling insight into the traditional apothecary ingredients

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prescribed by healers (inyanga) and diviners (sangoma) to cure all manner of ailment. Here, scores of stalls sell everything from medicinal barks, roots and leaves, to dried sea creatures, snake skins, and many more gruesome bits and pieces, including wild animal organs and bones, entire skulls, and grisly bits of flesh and fur. Many of the stall keepers explain what kinds of relief each powder or potion can bring, so it’s as enlightening as it is bewildering to those of us who have always put our faith in Western medicine. If your diet includes meat, it’s worth sampling the cuts of beef served up at the Bovine Head Market. Here, tourists stare wide-eyed as ladies pound through skulls and carcases to carve off tender bits of flesh, the cheeks especially prized and tasty. Along with a mound of steaming pap, the grilled meat is served to us with a few pieces of raw chilli. Staving off the assumption that Durban’s taste for spicy-hot food arrived with the Indians who came to work the sugar cane fields in the mid-1800s, Sthembiso explains that chilli was growing here already, and had long been part of the Zulu diet. Back in the city, as we drive from Warwick Junction towards the City Hall, Sthembiso and Richard point out the decaying frame of Aboobaker Mansions, a gorgeous building where Gandhi had law offices more than a century ago. And across the road stands the Juma Masjid, the largest mosque in the southern hemisphere, right next door to a red-brick Christian church. But when we stop in the city centre, we’re shown the facade of the old court

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building where Gandhi was once instructed by a magistrate to remove his turban. Considered one of the turning points in the Mahatma’s life, his refusal to take off his traditional headgear helped fire up what would eventually become his passive resistance movement that ultimately led to India’s freedom from colonial rule. Today, one has only to descend on Durban’s buzzing, exuberant beachfront to get a strong sense of that same freedom on our own shores, finally achieved merely two decades ago, thanks to the sacrifices of great men and women. At weekends, the swirling mass of people is sufficiently intoxicating to suggest that this surely is South Africa’s playground, reminding us that being able to relax and enjoy oneself is a fundamental part of human liberty.


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DURBAN LA DÉMOCRATE

LA LIBERTÉ DANS LA COUR DE RÉCRÉATION DE L’AFRIQUE TEXT & IMAGE S © KE IT H BAIN

Quand on pense à Durban on imagine toujours le soleil, les vagues tièdes de l’océan indien, la crème solaire et les draps de bain étalés sur le sable. Durban, avec ses 300 jours de soleil par an, est une métropole chaleureuse de la côte est qui vous colle à la peau. Pour vraiment la découvrir il faut cependant regarder au-delà des tentations évidentes. Indwe

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La lente et pénible progression le long de l’escalier de l’arche (du stade Moses Mabhida) semble ne jamais prendre fin. Cependant, on arrive au sommet avec un grand sentiment de satisfaction. Une fois que l’on arrive à bout des 550 marches, on a vraiment l’impression d’avoir mérité la superbe vue de 360 degrés de Durban qui s’offre à nous depuis le ciel. Ceux qui n’ont pas froid aux yeux ne font pas que regarder : ils laissent leur peur au vestiaire et se lancent dans le vide en saut à l’élastique (bigrush.co.za). La montée de l’arche culmine en un saut vers l’abysse depuis la plus grande balançoire du monde (88 m), avec une chute libre de 60 m et atteignant une vitesse maximale de 120 km/h. Pour explorer le stade de façon un peu plus sereine on peut faire une visite guidée en Segway (segwayglidingtours.co.za). On peut aussi faire des ballades plus longues en Segway sur le front de mer jusqu’au point le plus au sud de la Golden Mile. Si vous préférez vous promener au gré de vos envies, pourquoi ne pas arriver à la plage au lever du soleil, prendre un café et louer un vélo chez The Bike & Bean (bikebeandurban.com). Ainsi vous pourrez passer la matinée à pédaler parmi les joggers et les marcheurs rapides qui fréquentent le front de mer de Durban. Les sauveteurs plantent leurs drapeaux sur la plage et organisent leurs bateaux pour la journée, les pêcheurs jettent leurs lignes à l’eau et les skateboarders et les adeptes du VTT roulent vers le planchodrome recouvert de graffitis. Le front de mer de Durban change d’ambiance au cours de la journée, mais il n’en reste pas moins un lieu dynamique et enivrant. Alors que nous avançons lentement vers le sud en direction du port, nous apercevons des pousse-pousse, des vendeurs de souvenirs, de joueurs de volley-ball, des enfants radieux jouant dans les piscines publiques, des 48

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touristes s’amusant dans les vagues comme si c’était leur première fois à la mer et des sculpteurs de sable audacieux posant près de leur créations artistiques d’un jour pour des photos. À l’extrémité sud du front de mer se trouve uShaka Marine World (ushakamarineworld. co.za), l’épicentre des sorties en famille à Durban. À l’aquarium de Sea World on peut admirer des pingouins craquants, on peut aussi plonger en toute sécurité avec les requins dans un tube en verre transparent ou bien marcher avec les raies et les requins taureau sur un fonds sous-marin simulé. Y a-t-il un enfant qui n’adorerait pas l’opportunité d’une rencontre avec un dauphin ? Après avoir eu le plaisir de voir le front de mer dans toute sa splendeur, on décide d’aller visiter les marchés de Warwick Junction qui est complexe dynamique commercial très animé. On opte pour une visite guidée avec Street Scene (streetscene.co.za) et l’on arrive à Victoria Street prêt à s’imprégner de son atmosphère. Richard et Sthembiso sont nos guides et aussi des conteurs de grand talent. Ils agrémentent notre ballade de leurs connaissances locales et de leur perspective culturelle, et nous font rencontrer des personnages du coin qui vendent de tout, allant d’épices fortes pour le curry à des bâtons Shembe sculptés. On peut y trouver n’importe quel bibelot et babiole, et les vendeurs ont toujours une histoire à raconter à propos de leur marchandise. Le Marché aux herbes qui se trouve tout près, nous donne un aperçu fascinant des ingrédients utilisés pour fabriquer les potions des guérisseurs traditionnels (inyanga) et des sourciers (sangoma) pour soulager toutes sortes de maux. Sur les nombreux étals à votre disposition vous pouvez trouver pratiquement n’importe quoi allant d’écorces médicinales, de racines et de feuilles, de créatures marines séchées, de mues de serpent à des choses moins ragoutantes telles des organes


et des os d’animaux sauvages, des cranes entiers et des morceaux de fourrure et de peau. De nombreux étalagistes vous expliqueront comment leurs poudres et potions peuvent vous soigner, et pour la plupart d’entre nous habitués à la médecine occidentale, leurs révélations peuvent être instructives aussi bien que déconcertantes. Si vous aimez la viande allez faire un tour au Bovine Head Market (Marché de la tête de bovin) pour y gouter leur bœuf. Les femmes dépiautent des cranes et des carcasses pour y trouver les meilleurs morceaux, plus particulièrement les joues très prisées, ce qui laisse les touristes y bouche bée. La viande grillée, qui nous est servie avec une sorte de polenta locale appelée pap, est agrémentée de morceaux de piments crus. De retour en ville, Sthembiso et Richard nous montrent les ruines des superbes Aboobaker Mansions qui logèrent, il y a plus de cent ans, les bureaux du cabinet d’avocats de Gandhi. De l’autre cote de la route s’élève Juma Masjid qui se trouve être la plus grande mosquée de l’hémisphère sud. Après cela ils nous montrent la façade du vieil édifice de la Cour où il fut un jour requis que Gandhi enleva son turban sur ordre d’un magistrat. Cet épisode est vu comme l’un des moments cruciaux de la vie du Mahatma puisque son refus d’enlever son couvre-chef traditionnel contribua au démarrage de son processus de résistance passive qui en définitive conduira l’Inde vers son indépendance. Aujourd’hui l’effervescence et l’exubérance du front de mer de Durban sert à nous remémorer le fait que la liberté acquise en Afrique du Sud il y a seulement une vingtaine d’années le fut au prix du sacrifice d’hommes et femmes extraordinaires. Le weekend, la présence enivrante de la foule nous suggère que Durban est en fait la cour de récréation de l’Afrique du Sud et nous rappelle constamment que se relaxer et s’amuser sont des libertés humaines fondamentales.


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LOOKING BACK AND LOOKING FORWARD 20 YEARS OF DEMOCRACY

TEXT: MOHLOMI MAUBANE IMAGES © ISTOCKPHOTO.COM & 123RF

“!ke e: /xarra //keis”. Directly translated, this motto, which is written in the Khoisan language of the /Xam people, means “diverse people unite” and is inscribed in the South African Coat of Arms. It would be easy to casually dismiss it as a throwback to South Africa’s now romanticised early years as a democratic state; however, a glimpse at our history abruptly reminds us why such a motto was an inspired idea. 52

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Ours, after all, is a past where the exploitation of human beings by others was accepted and legal custom. For example, the Glen Grey Act of 1894 reduced the number of black people who could live on and own land, reducing many of them to poverty. The Mines and Works Act of 1911 established an employment quota that prohibited black people from competing for skilled work. Laws like the Group Areas Act dictated that only people of the same race could live side by side, while the Prohibition of Mixed Marriages Act made marriage between people of different races illegal. Naturally, despotic laws of this kind elicited opposition. This protracted struggle had many episodes and by the early 1980s, South Africa was a country teetering on the brink of civil war and financial bankruptcy. Something had to give. On 2nd February 1990, after years of covert negotiations, FW de Klerk announced that national liberation movements were unbanned and that the world’s most famous political prisoner would be released. On 12th February 1990, Nelson

Mandela was freed after nearly three decades behind bars. His release can be euphemised as the beginning of the labour pains that gave birth to modern-day South Africa.

The Birth of Democracy By late 1991, South African political parties began negotiations under the guidance of the Convention of a Democratic South Africa (CODESA) where the groundwork for a democratic state was being laid. After lengthy debates, the country finally held its first free and fair elections on 27th April 1994 with Nelson Mandela elected as the country’s first democratic president. Mandela’s tenure as head of state can be described as one of peace and reconciliation. Madiba had tea with the widow of the architect of apartheid as well as the state prosecutor who sought to have him executed. He simultaneously allayed fears and won the hearts of many when he attended the 1995 Rugby World Cup final clad in Indwe

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a Springbok jersey. These symbolic gestures were necessary for a society with such a fractured past, but they had to be accompanied by tangible action to effect real change. In April 1996, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission began formal hearings to deal with violations of human rights during apartheid. Later that year, on 10th December 1996, Mandela signed into law South Africa’s new democratic and globally revered Constitution, transforming South Africa from a former pariah to a role-model state. Nelson Mandela served only one term as president and was succeeded by Thabo Mbeki on 16th June 1999.

Refining the Running of a Country Mbeki was a contrast to his predecessor. While Mandela was charismatic and genial, Mbeki was a reserved technocrat more adept at gradually building the various organs of state and fine-tuning the ruling party’s policies, than wooing a crowd. This was very necessary, however, for as much as South Africa was christened a miracle, there was no magic wand to wave away its inherent and fundamental problems, and Mbeki clearly enjoyed and excelled in identifying and interrogating these challenges. South Africa’s incumbent president, President Jacob Zuma, was elected in 2009 and as the country gears towards its fifth democratic elections, it is worth pointing out a few of the strides it has made in the 20 years since its liberation.

Strides Made and Strides Still to Make Over 8 million school children are now benefitting from no-fee policies. This has ensured that secondary school enrolment has risen from

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51 % in 1994, to 80 % in 2014. More than 1,500 basic healthcare facilities have been built and refurbished over the same period. The number of households that use electricity for lighting increased from 58,2% in 1996 to 84,7% in 2011. Every single sphere of South African life has been transformed after the dawn of the democratic dispensation and statistics do not fully capture the many ways in which South African citizens have been liberated. Arguably, most important, is that today every South African has the right to freedom of expression, association, conscience, religion, thought, belief and opinion. Our democratic Constitution also instructs that we all enjoy freedom of movement, the right to own property, the right not to be detained without trial, and the freedom of sexual orientation, all which were unimaginable just a few decades ago. All of these are notable achievements that are worthy of being celebrated. However, as South Africa celebrates 20 years of democratic rule and liberation from apartheid, it must charter a way forward very much aware that its future lies, literally in its future and not in its recent past. No success story is driven by a narrative of a glorious past, and if the South African storyline is going to continue to be a successful one, it is going to be determined by how the country confronts its emerging problems on an ongoing basis. With the apartheid beast slain, the country must now ensure it rids itself of its standing as the most unequal country in the world. This inequality is the biggest threat to a prosperous and peaceful South Africa, because a man who does not have running water in his house will not always accept being a neighbour to a man with a swimming pool.


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The Evolution of SA Express IN CONVERSATION WITH BONI DIBATE T E XT: M OH L OM I M AU BAN E IM AGE S Š SA E XPRE SS

1994 will always be a special year for South Africans. This was the year when this country finally succeeded in freeing itself from the shackles of repression and elected its first democratic government. Freedom Day (27th April 1994) marked the dawn of this new era in our country and just three days prior to this, another significant event occurred. Thebe Investments, a pioneering black-owned company in partnership with the Deloisse brothers from Canada, established South African Express. Indwe

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The airline’s first flight took off on 24th April 1994 with a trip from Johannesburg to Kimberley, a clear indicator of the airline’s founding priority of connecting passengers to secondary hubs, as fittingly espoused by its founding pay-off line: “We’ve got good connections”. From a layman’s perspective, aviation seems a complex, technical and highly regulated industry to partake in. So just how does one enter such a field? “Firstly, by virtue of the nature of the business that it is, to start an airline you need to have a passion for the industry,” Boni Dibate, a member of the SA Express Board of Directors and Chairperson of its Remuneration Committee explains. “You must first identify a need for a route and then check the distance of that route. It is the distance of that route that will inform you what kind of aircraft you need to deploy as well as the fuel consumption traits of the aircraft you need. Then you have to consider communication and legal obligations. For an aircraft to be able to land it has to be able to communicate with people on the ground. So both the aircraft and airport must have the prerequisite equipment. Legally, not all airports can handle commercial aircrafts, so the airports that are on your routes must have the prerequisite landing strips and infrastructure for your aircraft. It involves a lot of work, but when you work with people who are as passionate about the airline industry as I am, it's all worth it when it finally comes to fruition.” Dibate is on her second stint at the airline, having previously served as its Chief Executive Officer. Her first tenure was during the airline’s first decade when SA Express was still finding its feet, while also making its mark in South Africa. In 1996, two years after its formation, SA Express added to its number of routes by acquiring the Skukuza, Richards Bay and Gaborone routes from Comair. Two years later, the airline had its first ever flight manned by an all-female crew and in 1999, the airline grew further when it began operating in Windhoek and opened a base in Cape Town. “My first task when I joined the airline was to try to stabilise things. When the initial deal was signed with the Canadians, the exchange rate of the Rand to the US Dollar was 1 to 4. When I joined it was 1 to 11. This had a negative

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impact on the company’s financials. We had to renegotiate the deal at a diplomatic level, and by the time I stepped aside as CEO, revenues were good operationally and expenses were low,” says Dibate. Amid the compulsory growing pains, SA Express continued to make strides in its sphere of business. In 2001, transport parastatal, Transnet, bought the airline from Thebe Investments. “Aviation can be a very fickle and expensive industry. Our costs are related to foreign exchange as our aircraft, equipment and fuel are all dollar based. Plus the airline industry is very sensitive to major world events, like the tragic events of 9/11, or the bird flu outbreak – all of these events have a bearing on us,” explains Dibate. 2004 marked the first decade of SA Express’ operations, and over the next decade it continued to expand into new territories, including Kruger Mpumalanga Airport in 2005. The airline also boasts a fair number of awards and accolades that it has racked up over the years, including the Annual Airline Reliability Award from Bombadier, the AFRAA Regional Airline of the Year Award and the Allied and Aviation Corporate Business Award. From that initial flight from Johannesburg to Kimberley, SA Express’ itinerary now includes flights to Zambia, Mozambique and Botswana. One of the airline’s founding philosophies is to create an internal culture of “service before self”. If it continues with this outlook, it will be able to easily fulfil its ambitions to continue connecting passengers to an ever growing list of local and regional destinations.


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Up-to-the-Minute DĂŠcor and Design

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and have multiple uses. Homes are also becoming places of refuge, with more attention being paid to the decoration of sleep areas to allow people to rest, recuperate and recover in a nurturing space. Another popular trend is the need to move closer to nature. Outdoor spaces are becoming indoor rooms or are now an extension of an indoor space. This is where fashion meets functionality. Consumers need fabrics that are treated for outdoor use, or require more resilient materials like leather or vinyl for heavy-duty or child-friendly spaces. Favour is also being given to products made from natural materials. This has brought about the need for finishes that can withstand outdoor weather conditions but not compromise on luxury. We are also acknowledging the need for greener furniture. As environmental concerns grow, the demand for locally manufactured furniture over imported furniture, which has a bigger impact on our carbon footprint, increases. Technology and our constant obsession with it has impacted hugely on furniture design. This is most obvious in the design of entertainment centres and home theatres, which now need to accommodate all of our electronic devices, gadgets and gaming consoles. The constant advances in technology also allow the supply of furniture that is more

complex but simpler to manufacture. Mass production has reduced the cost of furniture and sophisticated supply chains have made it easier to meet the demand in both the number of pieces available as well the cost. Despite these changes, clients are now seeing a greater value in investing in one quality piece of furniture. They are leaning towards a “less is more” approach in their purchasing decisions. Added to this, there has also been a mass movement away from furniture that is produced on a large scale. Clients want to express their individuality with pieces of furniture that are created to suit their needs. This is where Bakos Brothers and their bespoke offering come to the fore, by offering clients the individual pieces of furniture that they seek. In essence, Bakos is more than just a furniture store; it is a place that offers turnkey décor solutions with everything from fabric libraries, wallpaper and paint options to furniture and any other product or service required to help customers create their ideal homes. For more information, or to make an appointment for a consultation to discuss your décor needs, contact the Bakos Brothers Head Office on +27 11 448 2410 or chat to a consultant in any branch. Bakos Brothers stores are open seven days a week.

With 20 years of experience in interior design and furniture design and manufacture, as well as having run her own décor consultancy business, Joanne Taylor has what it takes to head Bakos’ incredibly creative and talented team of decorators.

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BREAKING DOWN THE FINAL FRONTIER THE WORLD’S FIRST BLACK AFRICAN ASTRONAUT TEXT: MELISSA JANE COOK/MEDIACLUBSOUTHAFRICA.COM IMAGES © AXE APOLLO & ISTOCKPHOTO.COM

It is an extraordinary dream come true. Like music to Mandla Maseko’s ears, this part-time DJ will blast off into space… literally. No-one in Maseko’s family has ever stepped outside South Africa, but now this 25-year-old is preparing to rocket into space in 2015. Maseko won the global Axe Apollo Space Academy competition for an hour long sub-orbital trip of 62 miles, or about 100 km. Handpicked for the trip on the Lynx Mark II Spaceship, Maseko is one of only 23 civilians from around the world to win a seat on the space mission. He saw off a million other entrants to emerge victorious. The son of a toolmaker and a cleaning supervisor, he hails from Mabopane Township near Pretoria. He will be the first black African, and the only other South African besides billionaire Mark Shuttleworth, to have

gone into space. (Shuttleworth is an entrepreneur and philanthropist who bought a seat on a Russian Soyuz capsule for £12 million and spent eight days on board the International Space Station in 2002.) “Excitement does not begin to describe how I feel right now,” Maseko told the Pretoria News. “If there was a better word than ‘excitement’ I would use it.” Maseko was forced to put his civil engineering studies on hold because he could no longer pay the fees, but now he will get to experience zero gravity and a journey that normally comes with a $100,000 price tag.

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Entering the Competition In August 2013, Maseko heard an advertisement for the competition on the radio and decided to enter, along with thousands of other South Africans. “I needed to send in a picture of myself jumping off something, so I jumped off the wall in the backyard. I had to do it three times before I was happy with the picture.” Hopefuls from more than 105 countries competed for a spot on the shuttle. Only 30 entrants from South Africa were selected from a field of 85,000 determined individuals for the first set of challenges, which took place in the Free State. Then they were cut down to three, who went to the US for further gruelling preparations. For a week in December last year, Maseko and fellow South Africans Dean Roddan and Haroon Osman faced arduous challenges at the Kennedy Space Center in Orlando, Florida. The challenges were designed to test their resolve, strength and courage. These missions gave the recruits a taste of the trials faced by real astronauts, including learning to pilot an Air Combat USA aircraft, and bracing themselves for the strength of blast off in a G-Force Simulator at the Kennedy Space Centre Visitor Complex. Other challenges included skydiving, building and launching a rocket, and conquering obstacle courses. “Unfortunately we could not get our rocket to launch, but we made up points because we were judged on bravery, enthusiasm and teamwork,” says Maseko. “We faced things head on. I knew I had to learn, master and excel at the challenges, so I did.” Buzz Aldrin, the second man to walk on the moon, was one of the competition’s judges. Maseko had the opportunity to meet Aldrin when he was announced a winner. “I got to shake his hand three times." Aldrin is among 12 people – all American, all men, and all white – to have walked on the moon. But Africa has growing space ambitions: The majority of the Square Kilometre Array, the world’s biggest and most powerful radio telescope, will be spread across South Africa and eight other countries on the continent.

Destined for Greatness He was a “typical ekasi (township) boy” who still lived at home with his parents and four siblings, says Maseko. His father, who grew up in such poverty that he only got his first pair of shoes when he was 16, was determined that his children would never go hungry. “My dad provided for us. He is my hero, and then Nelson Mandela comes after. “I’m not trying to make this a race thing, but we blacks grew up dreaming to a certain stage. You dreamed of being a policeman or a lawyer, but you knew you wouldn’t get as far as pilot or astronaut.

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Then I went to space camp and I thought, ‘I can actually be an astronaut’.” But he had known since he was a boy that he was destined for greatness. “We were not brought up to believe that we could be bigger than big, but I always knew I would be.” His mom, Ouma Maseko, agrees: “When I was pregnant with him in 1988, I knew I would give birth to a star,” she says. The young Maseko’s imagination was fired by the science fiction series Star Trek, as well as films such as Armageddon and Apollo 13. “No matter what life throws at you, you can use it and come out on top. My life has taken a total turn, and this is my big break. People will be telling their children and grandchildren that I was the first black South African youth in space.”

Plans for the Future During the long wait before his trip, Maseko hopes to complete his civil engineering qualification. His longterm plans are to study aeronautical engineering and qualify as a space mission specialist, with the ultimate dream of planting the South African flag on the moon. “South Africa has come a long way. We have reached a stage where we are equal and we are one. This year is the 20th anniversary of democracy, and what better way to celebrate than by sending the first black South African into space? “The vision of all youths here in Mabopane is to drive a taxi, do drugs or work on houses. It’s good to be a solution to your township, rather than a problem. I want to break that system and this is a nice way to go down in history. I believe that will motivate me. The sky is not the limit.” Science and Technology Minister Derek Hanekom sees Maseko as a role model for “the future generation of space professionals and enthusiasts”. His experience could not have come at a better time than “when Africa is gearing up its space ambitions” as host to the world’s biggest and most powerful radio astronomy telescope, says Hanekom. The director of that project, Bernie Fanaroff, also hails Maseko as an ambassador for science. “Anything that raises the profile of science must be good, because it brings to the attention of young people what they can achieve in science and engineering.” It is a big responsibility, but the last word must go to the spaceman himself: “I have had to learn so much about astronomy and space to teach others. It’s been a dream, a lifetime dream come true, and I don't want to stop here. When I come back, I want to become an astronaut, and I will work hard to get there”.


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Total Time Out TOFO T OF O

TEX T & IMAGE S Š J ANE BARRY

The recipe for a great holiday usually involves all, if not some of the following: a beautiful setting, exciting activities, space to relax, and a break from the norm. Tofo Beach in Southern Mozambique has all of this. And if you throw a good measure of the local rum Tipo Tinto into the mix and combine it with a healthy spirit of adventure, Tofo and its surrounds will surpass all expectations.

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SA EXPRESS CONNECTS CAPE TOWN TO MAPUTO. SEE FLIGHT SCHEDULE FOR MORE I N F O R M AT I O N .

Mozambique has a very long coastline. Covering almost 2,500 km, and with a tourism infrastructure that is still relatively underdeveloped, there are idyllic beaches and tropical bays aplenty. While there are many stunning sites and beaches scattered along the coast, in recent years Tofo has become something of a traveller’s paradise. Tofo is roughly 450 km north of Maputo, in Inhambane Province, and unlike many of the beaches in Mozambique, the stretch of road to the town is tarred the entire way. This makes it easily accessible from the capital city, as well as particularly appealing to those among us who do not own a 4x4. Along the way, you will pass endless towering coconut trees, with the characteristic palm-frond houses of the region sitting neatly below them. You will see the colourful and friendly Mozambicans going about their daily lives, and eventually arrive at Tofo Beach. Tofo, although attracting large volumes of travellers, is still pretty basic which can be a bit intimidating, but the minute you step onto the wonderfully white beach with the postcard perfect sea lapping the shores, whether or not you can buy AA batteries becomes completely irrelevant. Taking your first plunge into the temperate waters of the Indian Ocean and washing off the dirt and heat of the drive, is exquisite – even more so with a 2M, Laurentina or Manica (local beer) waiting for you

on the sand. Tofo boasts excellent scuba diving and snorkelling opportunities, including the thrilling opportunity of snorkelling with the gentle giant of the ocean, the whale shark. Tofo is also a good surf spot for both beginners and professionals. The sheltered bay is perfect for first timers who can enlist the help of one of the local surf schools, while there are also some decent breaks for more experienced surfers. As the sun goes down, Tofo’s thriving nightlife is yet another reason why people flock to this coastal town. The full moon parties are legendary and Dino’s Bar and Restaurant is the place to get stuck into Tipo Tinto and shooters, dancing the night away, or sitting on the beach and meeting new people. Live music, dancing, drinks and beach bonfires take you late into the night. And, if partying up a storm is not your idea of fun, simply relax and enjoy the peace and quiet of a long walk on the beach. Tofo provides everything you could ever want from a holiday, so it is hardly surprising that it continues to attract visitors all year round. So, the next time you are in need of a break and a little beach time, rather than heading down to Plettenberg Bay again, venture slightly off the beaten track and whet your palate with an exotic taste of Mozambique.

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Freedom on the Dance Floor 20 YEARS OF TRANCE

TEX T: KE IT H BAIN I MA G E S © ST U SHAPIR O PH OT OGRAPH Y ( W W W.ST U SH APIRO.COM)

Cape Town’s psychedelic trance scene combines magical outdoor locations, synapse-tweaking beats, free-flowing hedonism, and revellers with an insatiable desire to dance. Now in its 20th year, local trance culture is also a vivid expression of individual freedom and interpersonal connectivity. It’s broad daylight and I’m surrounded by thousands of like-minded people, all caught up in the moment, stomping their feet, unleashing anatomical rhythms improvised to the throb of what’s cascading out of megawatt speakers. It’s hypnosis by beats-per-minute as inhibitions are scattered to the wind in the name of unhinged dancing, bodies writhing and bouncing to music they call psychedelic trance. As I take a moment to take it all in, a girl, beaming ear-to-ear, notices the concentration on my face, skips across, and throws her arms around me. “Smile!” she orders, then plants a kiss on my cheek and disappears into the crowd, leaving a trail of goodwill and shaking hips in her wake. I don’t

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merely smile, but burst out laughing as I witness a dude wearing a watermelon helmet and green tights come whizzing by. Partying in the outdoors, without dress codes or concern for mainstream convention, is all part of the inherent beauty of the scene. Anything goes, in fact, as long as the vibe is positive and the mood upbeat. Adam Metcalfe, who goes by the stage name Headroom, is among the most respected and talented trance DJs in South Africa. He probably plays as many international events as he does local ones, racking up considerable hours commuting to assorted venues around the world, from Japan to Brazil, and Australia to Germany. Adam describes


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psy-trance as a kind of “sonic hypnotism”, blending “high-tempo looping grooves, complex synth rhythms, tribal percussion, and otherworldly sounds” to take the listener on a journey. This explanation gives some idea of the kind of technology-driven atmosphere of the genre. It’s pretty intense, fast-paced music, relentless in its delivery of beats, and complex in its arrangement of different sounds and rhythms. Often, in lieu of lyrics, you notice entire monologues or bits of dialogue quoted from science-fiction movies, frequently delivering thought-provoking philosophical inferences that keep the mind active while the body yields to the beat. While creating trance music can be quite

technical, it’s clear the music has a spiritual dimension. “My dream is to write music that touches as many people as possible,” says Adam, “and trance music is able to take people to a place where they feel a resurgence of their primal spirit.” This transcendent style of dance music landed on South African shores some 20 years ago – more or less at the same time as democracy. Its roots are in Goa, a former-Portuguese enclave in India where, since the ’60s, hippie culture and fullmoon beach parties have resulted in the evolution of experimental music genres. “DJs playing psychedelic rock started fusing it with electronic genres such as techno, electroindustrial, and acid house. This slowly morphed

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into a sound known as Goa trance,” says Adam. Globe-trotting DJs started exporting Goa trance to the rest of the world, and by November 1994, a Cape Town-based outfit called Vortex held its first psy-trance event, called “Essence of Fluorescence”. By February 1995, the first outdoor party was held in Scarborough, and the rest is history. What started as intimate events for people keen to combine the magic of open-air settings with the type of hedonism that had taken off at rave clubs and warehouse parties, evolved into a culture that nowadays guarantees at least one outdoor party every weekend throughout summer, with occasional indoor events during colder months. Some of these last for several days, with scores of local and international DJs on the bill. While the scene has flourished around Cape Town, smaller movements have sparked off in other parts of the country. Robyn Van Zyl, one half of Festivals of Light, the team that organised last month’s Freedom Festival near Durban, says that although KZN’s trance culture is in its infancy, it’s

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already developing a similar sense of community that’s found at parties in the Cape. And what’s gratifying, she says, is the “spirit of freedom” that infuses the dance floor. “Psy-trance isn’t just music,” says Robyn. “It’s a way of life. There’s a certain code you take on when you attend these festivals. The most important thing is that you’re encouraged to be yourself, to not feel judged for baring your soul. We’re not about ego or conformity. We aim to create a space that reflects how we’d like our society to be: Considerate, compassionate, natureconscious. Besides, dancing on a heaving dance floor has immense healing energy.” These underlying tenets of the scene are in many ways linked to the aspirations of old-school hippie culture. Party organisers fill their websites with messages of love and tolerance, broadcasting their adherence to principles of open-mindedness, community, mutual respect, and a commitment to the planet. Around us, the throb continues. I wonder out


loud if a party can in fact serve as a vehicle for idealistic enlightenment. “Connection,” answers Adam. “It’s as simple as connecting with people. All kinds of people you might never otherwise get to know. Not merely online via the Internet, but in ways that are meaningful and real. It’s a sense of freedom rarely realised in today’s world. The music brings us together on a dusty dance floor, and we connect while dancing in these incredible locations, focused on nothing more than this very moment.” I look up again, reminded that we’re enfolded by mountains and crisp blue skies, dazzling natural beauty that’s mirrored by the energetic pulse of the shiny, happy people all around us on the dance floor. And I thank God that I am free. Headroom will perform on the final afternoon of Vortex Parallel Universe, a four-day trance festival just outside Caledon from 18th to 21st April. Visit www.intothevortex.co.za for more information.


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South Africa’s Hidden Gems OFF THE BEATEN TRACK DESTINATIONS TEX T & IMAGE S © ADAM CRU ISE

South Africa has a landmass of over 1.2 million km2, which means that there is quite a lot of space to go exploring. I have spent half a lifetime travelling around this wonderful country and still I continue to uncover gems – destinations both surprising in their natural beauty and their quirkiness. These are a few of my favourites. Paternoster Named by a group of marooned Portuguese sailors who survived a shipwreck here in the 15th Century, this quaint fishing village epitomises life on the wind-kissed West Coast. Its white crescent beach is lined with brightly coloured fishing boats and backed by a series of fishing cottages. Here, among the whitewashed walls, are some of the region’s finest and quaintest seafood restaurants, mingled together with a clutch of guesthouses and charming inns. The Atlantic sunsets are sublime and the weather bracing, and it is the perfect place for a romantic getaway.

The Towns of the Great Karoo Like Lewis Carroll’s Through the Looking-Glass, the vast lunar-like landscape of the Great Karoo seems distorted and surrealistic. The transforming interplay between light and space in this part of the world is dramatic, and plays out by the hour. Pick any Karoo town, such as Nieu-Bethesda, Prince Albert, Calvinia, Sutherland, Craddock or Middelpos. All are bizarre kaleidoscopes of colour and culture, at

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once rich and unusual. The people that inhabit such outposts are civilization’s outré culture and include a wonderfully eclectic mixture of volunteer outcasts, doomsday fanatics, recluses, artists, and even ex-CEOs of multinationals who become culinary geniuses with skills that would not be out of place in Europe’s best restaurants. Yet they prefer the role of Karoo village postman to eke out a living among a variety of other eclectic mavericks displaying everything that is outlandish, quirky and off-beat.

Kgalagadi Only the Kalahari (a European mispronunciation of the San word Kgalagadi) rivals the Karoo in limitlessness and light. Its flowing flaxen fields of desert grass among deep ochre dunes are interspersed here and there by emerald green camel thorn trees and white barked shepherd’s bushes. It makes for the most striking of scenes, especially when the white-hot light of the day softens into muted pink and orange hues at dawn and dusk. Tucked away in the farthest flung corner of the country is the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park, an

expansive reserve that spills over into Botswana and combines virgin landscape with the original inhabitants of the country, the wildlife. Here the mighty lion still reigns supreme, his roar thundering through the crystal clear starry nights, while during the day a menagerie of other species go about their daily routines in a place that encapsulates the Biblical Eden.

Rocktail, Thembe & Ndumo Take a beeline due east from the Kgalagadi all the way to the coast, and one discovers another far-flung corner of the country. Tucked away behind the mountains of Swaziland and wedged between Mozambique and the Indian Ocean are three choice pearls: Rocktail Bay and the twin parks of Ndumo and Thembe. Rocktail Bay is a little lodge situated among the forested dunes that dominate this stretch of unspoilt coastline. Beyond the crashing surf abound the finest and most pristine coral reefs you will find in South Africa, and only a select few are given permission to sample this underwater paradise. During the summer months visitors to Rocktail are treated to another spectacle – the nesting and hatching of the mighty

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Leatherback and Loggerhead turtles. Ndumo, further inland and bordering Mozambique, boasts an unbelievable concentration of bird species, while Thembe next door is distinguished for its great herds of Loxodonta africani (or elephants for the Latin-shy among us).

Fugitives Drift South Africa is crammed with historical episodes. One of the most compelling is the epic clash between the forces of the British and the Zulus at Isandlwana during the Anglo-Zulu War. The victorious Zulus called it the “Day of the Dead Moon”, because the battle took place in the eerie twilight of a partial

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eclipse. The British prefer to highlight the sideshow to that battle (which annihilated their entire force): the defence of Rorke’s Drift. This occurred further away from the main battle, where a small reserve company of Welsh engineers and invalided soldiers successfully repelled a sustained 11 hour attack. That day (22nd January 1879) is brought to life today by the raconteurs-extraordinaire of Fugitives Drift Lodge, a continuation of the heritage that began with the great late David Rattray. Be warned: This is an intensely gripping and mesmerising experience. Regrettably, these are but a few of the hundreds of wonderful far-flung nooks that are scattered throughout this glorious country. All the more reason to start exploring!

Previous Page: Visitors to the quaint town of Paternoster, on the West Coast, can look forward to breathtaking scenery and friendly locals This Page Top Left: Travel back to the dark days of the AngloZulu war at Fugitives Drift This Page Top Right: Spectacular sunsets, seemingly limitless space and magnificent wildlife are the calling cards of the Kgalagadi This Page Bottom: Rocktail Bay is famous for its pristine beaches and superb scuba diving


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THE HALO EFFECT VOLKSWAGEN GOLF 7 2.0 R DSG TEXT: BERNARD HELLBERG IMAGES © VOLKSWAGEN SOUTH AFRICA

Just when you thought the Golf Mk7 GTI parked in your driveway was Das ultimate Auto Volkswagen, the second “R” version of VW’s Golf nameplate is now making its way to local dealers.

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Although only the second “R” badged Golf ever created, this super hot hatch is indeed the third power Golf to be slotted above the GTI – the first being the Mk5 VR6. So why a more powerful GTI? Forgetting for the moment that GTI owners everywhere have just developed a fair amount of kilowatt envy, manufacturers actually have a good reason to offer upgraded versions of even their most successful and most popular cars. By piling an additional 44 kW on top of the GTI’s already special 162 kW, Volkswagen aims to add to the allure of the GTI, as opposed to inspiring buyers in their numbers to abandon the GTI in favour of the R. Why? Because of the little-known concept of the “halo model”. In a nut shell, a halo model exists purely to showcase how far a manufacturer could push the technology and performance envelope, with the happy coincidence that it lifts the profile of other cars in a model range. For example, you want an R but can’t quite afford the additional R100,000, so you buy a GTI. You’re happy and everyone wins. Of course Volkswagen expects that the 2 litre Golf R will still sell as many units in this market for other reasons. And why shouldn’t they, considering the Golf R is every good thing that the GTI is and more? For a start there’s the 206 kW that a Golf 7 R DSG delivers between 5,550 and 6,200 r/min, and the 380 Nm of torque

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pushed out between 1,800 and 5,500 r/min – that’s 18% more kilowatts and 8% more torque than the Mk6 R car. With so much power on tap, it’s rather reassuring that Volkswagen has also added its fifth generation Haldex all-wheel drive coupling system to the mix. 4Motion sends power to the car’s front wheels, but will calculate a balanced redistribution of up to 100% to the rear wheels when needed. Since front/rear power distribution is only half of the equation, a four-wheel electronic differential lock system (EDS) manages left/ right power sharing by braking the slipping wheel and sending torque to opposite wheels that have more grip. Volkswagen’s XDS+ torque vectoring system also comes standard, and adds noticeable cornering ability by braking the inside wheels during high-speed cornering. The Golf R’s suspension features a MacPherson strut setup in front and multi-link system at the rear. While the R carries all of Golf’s legendary handling DNA, the optional Adaptive Chassis Control system adds an exciting element of control between modes, including Eco, Individual and Race. A recent drive around the highways and byways of the Eastern Cape gave ample opportunity to test the R’s

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promising handling and acceleration properties. Even alternating between typical freeway conditions and winding rural roads – some with questionable surface characteristics – couldn’t unsettle the R. Cornering is tight and controlled, even in wet conditions, and the ride quality is well-balanced between being necessarily firm and comfortable enough for everyday liveability. Jumping on the accelerator with launch control engaged will send the DSG-equipped R to 100 km/h in a flatlining 5.0 seconds and on to a limited 250 km/h at the top end. Despite imposing performance figures, the R delivers noticeable improvements in both fuel consumption as well as carbon emissions from the R Mk6. By applying a host of their BlueMotion technologies – including engine stop/start with brake energy recuperation – Volkswagen claim a combined fuel consumption figure of 6.9 l/100km (was 8.5 l/100km on the previous model) and 159 g/km of CO2 versus 199 g/km before. Overall, the Golf 7 R DSG is a compelling buy for the precision-inspired driver who appreciates sophisticated technology in a compact form. For its R486,200 price tag the R provides as much thrill per buck as its closest spiritual rival, the Audi S3 Sportback.


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CREATING A SUCCESSFUL TOMORROW RAISING CHILDREN TO BE ENTREPRENEURS TEXT: COLETTE SYMANOWITZ/FINWEEK IMAGES Š ISTOCKPHOTO.COM

For generations, we were raised to go to school, matriculate, and get a degree in order to get a job. But the world has changed. Job security no longer exists. We cannot depend on anyone else but ourselves for financial and career security. We as parents should be training our kids to be entrepreneurs, so that they can create their own jobs. We should be teaching them to be resourceful, resilient and creative, so that they can create their own successful tomorrow and not depend on someone else for their future. In his TEDx talk, entrepreneurship leader Cameron Herold puts forward a compelling business case for parenting and education that unlocks the potential of would-be entrepreneurs, as kids and as adults. The traditional schooling system teaches kids to

aspire to be professionals in specific fields. The media teaches them to become pop stars and celebrities. Most MBA programmes teach MBA students to aspire towards high-paying corporate jobs. However, there are two big flaws with this approach:

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1. Many of the jobs that are commonplace today won’t be around tomorrow, and the jobs that will be around tomorrow, don’t even exist today. 2. What if your child is bored in school, failing their subjects, or has a knack for selling things to their classmates? Traditional schooling would label a child with this cluster of symptoms as a problem child or a weak student. And the typical school approach would be to give the child extra lessons in the subjects in which they are weak, or to clamp down on their break-time selling activities. A fantastic home-grown entrepreneurship story is that of 13-year-old Je-Mé Baartjes and her 7-year-old brother Viam, who live in Johannesburg. At the tender age of three, Je-Mé started her own business breeding and selling dwarf rabbits. Her parents, Charlaine and Neale Baartjes, helped Je-Mé to get the business up and running. Their sage advice to their children: Choose a business venture that is fun, because then it will never feel like work. Her parents also taught her the value of having goals and dreams to strive for. From age four Je-Mé’s big dream was to go to Disney World and see her favourite character, Goofy. Fast forward to 2011, when, after seven years of breeding and selling dwarf rabbits in her business, Je-Mé had earned enough revenue to pay for a trip to Disney World for herself and her younger brother, Viam. In 2005 she built her own website, www.dwarfrabbits.co.za. “Today the site gets 2,500 visits per day from around the world,” she says. The business brings in a steady annual income of R60,000. Not bad for a 13-year-old, and far better than a few rand of pocket money a week! Younger brother Viam is also earning his entrepreneurial colours: With his dwarf rabbit hotel, he takes care of dwarf rabbits when their owners are away or on holiday. In 2013, their parents also created the R8,000 challenge for Viam and Je-Mé. Each child was given R1,000, with the goal of converting this into R8,000 each by September 2014. So far the two have generated R13,000 altogether, and they are well on their way towards beating the R16,000-mark. After each child gives back the R1,000 seed-money to their parents and puts R8,000 into a trust, they can keep whatever is left over. The kids want to be millionaires by age 18, and what better way than to start young? Already working on her own book, big sister Je-Mé is quick to credit

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her mom for their visionary thinking. “My mom says I must ‘keep having dreams a size too big so that you can grow into them',” she explains. These kids are the ones who will come up with creative, new ways of solving the world’s problems in ways that previous generations never thought possible.

How to Make it Happen Every day, all around us there are many opportunities to develop our kids into budding entrepreneurs. œHg[c]legf]ql]Y[`]kca\kl`]ojgf_ habits, says Herold. It teaches kids to think about a job from a young age. An entrepreneur doesn’t expect a regular salary. Even if it is tied to chores, pocket money trains kids to expect a regular salary. Even worse, they come to expect hand-outs if they get pocket money without having to work for it. Cameron has come up with a better way to develop entrepreneurial traits, which he uses with his own kids: He teaches them to walk around the house looking for things that need to be done. Then the kids can negotiate with the parents as to how much they’ll pay them to do the things they need done. This teaches them about supply and demand. Also, instead of giving them a regular fixed allowance, they get more opportunities to earn more money. It also teaches them how to negotiate and how to spot new opportunities. œ:]\lae]klgja]kYdkghjgna\]Y wonderful opportunity to develop entrepreneurial traits in your children. Instead of reading them bedtime stories seven nights a week, cut this down to four nights a week, and on the other three nights let them tell the stories. Give them four random objects to weave into the story. This teaches them creativity, the ability to improvise and think on their feet, and the ability to tell stories, which is a key skill in getting people to buy into what you’re selling. œ9fgl`]j^YflYkla[l][`faim]aklgl]Y[` your child to make a plan. If they are battling with a challenge, don’t jump in and tell them how to solve it, as tempting as it may be. Let them come up with their own solution to the problem. This teaches them improvisation, resourcefulness and creativity, and empowers them to become problem-solvers instead of helpless victims.


œ=f[gmjY_]qgmj[`ad\j]flgklYf\mh in front of others and talk. This could mean doing plays or dress-up stories in front of their friends or family. This will help them to become confident and comfortable speaking to an audience from a young age. œL`]Afl]jf]lhjgna\]kaf[j]\aZd] opportunities for kids to develop entrepreneurial ability. Over the years our 9-year-old son, Jayden, has collected piles of books, many of which he has outgrown. After giving a good deal of them to charity, he came up with the idea of selling the rest to younger kids. So we taught him how to create his own website for free on Weebly.com, and he started selling his second-hand books online via the website that he built himself. œ9\Yqafl`]da^]g^Yf]flj]hj]f]mj&Cell C created the “Take a girl child to work day”. Why not extend this to both boys and girls? But instead of letting them see what a job is like, let them experience what an entrepreneur does during his or her work day? My husband, Gavin, did this with our two kids, Jayden and Kayla (age 7). Gavin had an idea for a product to stop adults having to nag their kids. He involved our kids in the creation process. He also brought them along to a meeting with a patent lawyer and industrial designer, so the kids could better understand the legal and practical design aspects of bringing a new product or service to life. Only a child could get excited about a meeting with a lawyer, but needless to say, they were! Colette Symanowitz is Founder/MD of www.MBAconnect.net. Copy courtesy of ‘Finweek’. Call 0860 103 911 to subscribe.


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A MOTORING SUCCESS STORY

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NEW TOYOTA COROLLA TEXT: BERNARD HELLBERG IMAGES © TOYOTA MOTORS SA

It is the motoring success story of the 20th century, and it is continuing unabated in the 21st as the brand new Toyota Corolla drives off the production line. The word Corolla refers to “a group of flower petals”, and was used to name the world’s most successful car after the original brief to the very first Corolla Chief Engineer was to create a car that would cause full-scale, global motorisation to blossom.

And blossom it did, as the numbers show. The first generation Corolla started production at Toyota’s Takaoka facility in Japan in November 1966 with around 240,000 vehicles produced. Today, 11 generations on, with customers in more than 150 countries and with 16 global

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manufacturing sites (in America, Brazil, Canada, China, India, Japan, Pakistan, South Africa, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, Vietnam and Venezuela), Corolla has clocked up more than 40 million sales worldwide, making it the best selling car in history. Although a global success story, Toyota South Africa can also claim a part of that accolade, as over 1 million Corollas had been produced and about 980,000 sold in South Africa alone by the end of November 2013. And you don’t have to go far to see any number of those Corollas happily being driven around. Over the years the Corolla has been the catalyst that created and sustained Toyota’s reputation for reliability. Yes, many other Toyota products are enjoyed by many thousands of South Africans, but none have quite the chutzpah of the Corolla. The one thing that Corolla could perhaps have brought to the motoring party a long time ago was

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more exciting looks, but that has changed with the introduction of the 11th generation car. As Toyota SA describes it: “The all-new 2014 Corolla is ready to shake off its point-A-to-point-B image with expressive styling, a premium interior, and extrovert driving dynamics.” The new Corolla certainly takes a massive leap forward in terms of its looks. With sweeping lines, an aggressive forward stance and handsome light and grille setup, the Corolla has real presence. Expect Toyota to continue its domination of the B-segment sedan with the new Corolla. According to Corolla’s Chief Engineer Shinichi Yasui: “I believe this new model clearly breathes the Corolla DNA that has been inherited over a period of more than 47 years. That DNA sets forth the mission of the Corolla to constantly provide concepts and technologies that lead the times, and to create the world’s best selling car, and that DNA has now been


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inherited for a new era.� Toyota introduces the 2014 Corolla with four distinctive variants that include bringing back the Sprinter nameplate to its sporty 1.6 litre, as well as a brand new 1.4 litre diesel powerplant. The base model features the existing 1.3 litre petrol powerplant (a frugal, yet competent intro model that is a perfect fit for the fleet market) and tops out the range with its proven 1.8 litre motor. Paying homage to the 11 generations of Corolla, the model line-up across these four engines includes 11 variants that offer different levels of trim. From the 1.3 Esteem to the 1.8 Exclusive Multidrive (with sequential shift gearbox), the new Corolla is available with trim and options to suit your heart’s content. The new Corolla benefits from a threeyear/100,000 km warranty and comes with a standard five-year/90,000 km service plan.

New Corolla Pricing 1.3 Esteem 1.3 Prestige 1.4 D Esteem 1.4 D Prestige 1.6 Esteem 1.6 Prestige 1.6 Prestige Multidrive S 1.6 Sprinter 1.8 Prestige 1.8 Exclusive 1.8 Exclusive Multidrive S

R214,900 R232,900 R237,900 R249,900 R225,900 R241,900 R252,900 R248,900 R251,900 R272,900 R283,900

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WHEN ALL ELSE FAILS, TRI, TRI, TRIATHLON!

P L A Y

IRONMAN TEXT: STUART WAINWRIGHT IMAGES © CHRIS HITCHOCK PHOTOGRAPHY

Almost 40 years ago, the debate around which sport boasted the fittest athletes was at its peak. Which sport took the title as the most hardcore? Was it swimming, cycling or running? I would have to say running, but then that’s a little biased, as it’s my favourite sport. And I wouldn’t want to debate this with a cyclist either. At least the swimmers won’t be able to hear the debate underwater. Of course, then you get triathletes who simply choose all three. I think therein lies the answer. No mass participation sporting event to date can trump Ironman.

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Pick Your Battle There are 26 Ironman races around the world, including ones in Australia, Norway and Canada. Only one takes place on the African continent, right here in Nelson Mandela Bay, Port Elizabeth. Now in its 10th year, Ironman South Africa takes place in early April, when chiselled athletes, their families, and thousands of supporters, volunteers and media descend upon this small coastal city. For five days, the average body fat percentage in the city is halved, and there is a buzz of energy and excitement as the athletes register and relax before the big challenge. For those keen on getting less of a sweat going, there is also the Iron Girl South Africa (a ladies only 8.5 km fun run), the Vodacom Corporate Triathlon Challenge, and the Spur Ironkids. There is also a three-day long Health and Fitness expo that precedes the event, bringing the newest triathlon and sporting equipment to our shores. Or, you can always join the 70,000 plus screaming spectators who line the roads, to witness just what the human body is capable of achieving. The race sets off from Hobie Beach at 07h00 on 6th April this year. The swim is a single 3.8 km circular lap in the Indian Ocean. Athletes then head out of the water and into Transition 1 (T1), where it’s time to get cossies off and cycling kit on for two laps of 90 km each. On this leg, there are strict rules about drafting (riding in someone else’s slipstream), and it really is every triathlete for themselves. By now the African sun is out, and

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there is little respite from the elements. However, some comfort can be found in the natural beauty that the Eastern Cape has to offer along the route. This is said to be the most scenic leg of all of the Ironmen events worldwide. Upon completing the two laps on the bike, athletes reach T2, and prepare for the marathon ahead. This is often the point that makes or breaks an athlete’s day. After hours of working their legs on the bike, running can be painful and incredibly taxing. The running route is flat and

After the Race The Eastern Cape boasts numerous private and national game reserves, including the renowned Addo Elephant and Tsitsikamma National Parks. These would serve as the perfect place to recover after a hard event. On the adventurous side, horse riding, KLNLQJVQRUNHOOLQJDQGVXU´QJDUH commonplace, and not far away is the highest bungee in the world, the Bloukrans Bridge bungee. The Eastern Cape takes pride in its clean beaches and warm waters, and as a result, quaint towns worth visiting are dotted along the numerous bays. Take some time out to enjoy the slower pace of life in the Eastern Cape.


consists of three loops of 14 km each, allowing for dense crowd support to keep spirits high. Still, many athletes will struggle into the late hours of the night with cramps, dehydration and exhaustion, before finally claiming their right to the title: Ironman. There are probably few other sporting groups that are as fanatical about their chosen activity than Ironmen, but when you consider the enormity of their challenge, possibly a little fanaticism is required.


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INSPIRING PILOTS OF THE FUTURE SA EXPRESS HOSTS AVIATION DAY IN IVORY PARK Text & Images © SA Express

SA Express hosted an aviation career day on 4th February as part of its “Back to School” campaign to identify future pilots at Ponelopele Oracle High School in Ivory Park, Tembisa. The initiative forms part of the airline’s Corporate Social Investment (CSI) programmes. It was started last year at Fumana High School in Katlehong and targeted Grade 11 and 12 Maths and Science learners on Mandela Day. This year’s career day also afforded the learners of Ivory Park a deeper understanding of the numerous career opportunities available in the aviation industry. Speaking at the career day, Inati Ntshanga, SA Express CEO, said: “We are pleased to be making available the opportunities of the aviation industry to learners in Ivory Park. We are based in the City of Ekurhuleni and are committed to giving back to this community. Hopefully, through this career day, we will be able to inspire, identify and support future pilots and engineers who will shore up our strong credentials of the

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most transformed airline in South Africa. Our pilot complement far surpasses that of our peers and it’s through resolute commitment to training that we are now in a position to make more pilots available to our sister airlines. This wouldn’t be possible if we didn’t deliberately prioritise this aspect of the business. As part of our commitment to making a difference, we will be encouraging our employees to contribute their skills and time to their communities throughout 2014.” The aviation career day signals the airline’s strong intent to create awareness of the industry among disadvantaged communities in South Africa. SA Express helps connect small and bigger cities and through identifying more pilots, it can better service these areas.


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The event also formed part of the airline’s commitment to supporting the Department of Basic Education’s “Back to School” campaign. “This is the start of a journey in partnership with the Ekurhuleni community and the education fraternity. We are not fly-by-nights! We are here to make a difference to the community though education. For now, this humble gesture will include distributing scientific calculators, stationery and aviation booklets to encourage learners to pursue careers in aviation. Through this gesture, we are saying: ‘We care!’ We want you to know we are not indifferent to your daily struggles,” said Ntshanga. Ntshanga also indicated that the involvement with the Ekurhuleni community will continue and that the airline’s CSI programme will be rolled

out to other parts of the city to create awareness of aviation opportunities. “In coming months, we will further engage with this community to ensure that we continue to look for imaginative ways of identifying pilots in the area. Our aspiration is to deepen our engagement with the community of Ekurhuleni and to be actively involved in their lives. “Our philosophy is that community upliftment is at the heart of our values and we believe real development will only come when we join hands with like-minded partners; both state and non-state actors. This is why we found Ponelopele High School an ideal partner,” concluded Ntshanga.

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GADGETS Music on the Go The Soundcast Melody is the ultimate take-anywhere wireless speaker. It delivers omni-directional, beautifully precise sound with the latest Bluetooth v3.0 technology from Soundcast’s portable all-weather music system. The Melody pairs up perfectly with all your favourite Bluetooth-enabled smartphones and portable devices. It allows you to stream music from the cloud, your personal music collection, or to use a wide variety of apps including Pandora, Spotify, Rhapsody and TuneIn. The Melody’s small size and durable construction make it very portable. It also has a built-in highcapacity lithium-ion battery pack that provides up to 20 hours of playtime on a single charge. The Outcast Melody is distributed by HFX Systems and retails for R6,990. Visit www.hfxsystems.co.za or call +27 11 907 9092 for more information.

Your Fitness Witness 7KH*DUPLQYtYR´WLVDVW\OLVKOLJKWZHLJKWZHOOQHVVEDQGGHVLJQHG WRWXUQJRRGLQWHQWLRQVLQWROLIHORQJKDELWV9tYR´WLVWKHRQO\ wellness band that greets users with a personalised daily goal, tracks their progress and reminds them when it’s time to move. )HDWXULQJDXQLTXHFXUYHGGLVSOD\YtYR´WDOVRVKRZVVWHSVJRDO countdown, calories, distance and time of day. What differentiates YtYR´WIURPWKHUHVWLVLWVEDWWHU\OLIH¨LWVUHSODFHDEOHEDWWHULHV last for more than a year, so users don’t have to constantly charge or change the battery. It is also water-resistant up to 50 m and can be paired with an ANT+ compatible heart rate monitor to measure daily heart rate and calories burnt. Whether taking a 6XQGD\VWUROOJRLQJIRUDUXQRUSOD\LQJZLWKWKHNLGVWKLV´WQHVV band will keep you on the move, at your own pace.

//WWW.GARMIN.CO.ZA/VIVO

Lose Yourself in the Music 7KH30RELOH+L)L+HDGSKRQHVDUH%RZHUV :LONLQ­V´UVWRYHUWKHHDUKHDGSKRQHVDQG KDYHEHHQGHVLJQHGWRUDLVHWKHEDUIRUPRELOHVRXQGTXDOLW\ZLWKDKL´ORXGVSHDNHU approach to headphone drive units. Designed to sound great on the go, an over-the-ear design means that the P7 headphones immerse you in sound, so nothing interferes with the music. An ingenious folding mechanism and case offer maximum portability. New drivers, designed more like traditional loudspeakers, deliver precise, controlled movement. This ensures that the P7 headphones perform more like a traditional, audiophile speaker, and less like other headphones. The end result is stunning, natural sound. Brushed stainless steel and DOHDWKHUHQFDVHGKHDGEDQGDQGHDUSDGVJLYHDKLJKTXDOLW\KLJKFRPIRUW´QLVK7KH% : 3PRELOHKL´KHDGSKRQHVUHWDLOIRU5SHUSDLU //WWW.BWLOUDSPEAKERS.CO.ZA

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@ W O R K

BOOKS The Chicken Thief BY FIONA LEONARD $ORLV LV WKH FKLFNHQ WKLHI D EULJKW \RXQJ PDQ VWUXJJOLQJ WR ´QG KLV way in a southern African country wracked by political unrest and a crumbling economy. Through a chance encounter, Alois is set to make some fast money. But the enterprise goes horribly wrong, and KH ´QGV KLPVHOI LQ D FRPSOLFDWHG DQG SHULORXV VWUXJJOH WR UHVFXH D war hero and transform the political landscape. Though an unlikely hero, Alois discovers, in this charming and fast-paced adventure, that both dreams and justice are within his grasp. Described as a cross between Dan Brown and Alexander McCall Smith, The Chicken Thief reads at a cracking pace, is dramatic and colourful, and will appeal to ORYHUVRITXDOLW\´FWLRQ

5,-30

,"31207ĹŽ -52- Position Yourself as an Expert BY DOUGLAS KRUGER This book is a guide to no fewer than 50 practical things you can do to position yourself as the guru, the thought leader and the “goto nameâ€? in your industry. If you aspire to becoming widely revered as the thought leader in your sphere, you will need to learn how to frame issues in the media, how to communicate complex ideas through particular structures, and the ways in which your fee structure may peg you as a beginner or a valued veteran. Douglas Kruger explains how to develop a title, become a face and a voice in the minds of key industry players, and use simple positioning techniques to cut through the marketing clutter of your competitors.

&# 0#2#%#,#02'-,Ŏ -5 ,12'232'-,1 Decay and Economies Die BY NIALL FERGUSON The decline of the West is something that has long been prophesied. Symptoms of decline are all around us today: slowing growth, crushing debts, aging populations. But what exactly is amiss with Western civilisation? The answer, renowned historian Niall Ferguson argues, is that our institutions – the intricate frameworks within which a society FDQ¾RXULVKRUIDLO¨DUHGHJHQHUDWLQJ5HSUHVHQWDWLYHJRYHUQPHQWWKH free market, the rule of law, and civil society were once the four pillars of Western European and North American societies. In our time, however, these institutions have deteriorated.

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URBAN HOTELS


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Airline information SA Express fleet Canadair Regional Jet 200 BER Manufacturer: Bombardier Maximum cruising speed: 474 knots/545mph/879kmph Engines: Two General Electric CF34-3B1 Range: 1,662miles/3,080km Maximum altitude: 41,000ft/12,496m Seating capacity: 50

Crew: Two pilots, two cabin crew Wing span: 69ft 7in/21.21m Overall length: 87ft 10in/26.77m Overall height: 20ft 5in/6.22m Maximum take-off weight: 51,000lb/23,134kg Minimum runway length: 6,295ft/1,919m

De Havilland Dash 8 Series Q400 Turboprop Manufacturer: Bombardier Maximum cruising speed: 360knots/414mph/667kmph Engines: Two Pratt & Whitney Canada PW150A Range: 1,565 miles/2,519km Maximum altitude: 25,000ft/7,620m Seating capacity: 74 Crew: Two pilots, two cabin crew

Wing span: 93ft 3in/28.42m Overall length: 107ft 9in/32.83m Overall height: 27ft 5in/8.34m Maximum take-off weight: 64,500lb/29,257kg Minimum runway length: 4,580ft/1,396m

Canadair Regional Jet 700 Manufacturer: Bombardier Maximum cruising speed: 473 knots/544mph/875kmph Engines: Two General Electric CF34-8C5B Range: 1,477m/2,794km Maximum altitude: 41,000ft/12,496m Seating capacity: 70

Crew: Crew: Two pilots, two cabin crew Wing span: 76ft 3in/23.2m Overall length: 106ft 8in/32.51m Overall height: 24ft 10in/7.57m Maximum take-off weight: 72,750lb/32,999kg Minimum runway length: 4,580ft/1,396m

SA Express’ aircraft are made by Bombardier Aerospace Indwe Indwe

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We fly for you About us SA Express is a fast-growing airline business operating primary and secondary hubs between domestic and regional destinations within Southern Africa. Our objective of improving intra-Africa travel is in line with South Africa’s mandate to increase aviation’s contribution towards sustainable economic growth and job creation. The flexibility and reliability presented by the airline’s FACT principle (Frequency, Availability, Competitive rate and Timing of flights) affords both consumers and service providers a unique and convenient service. The FACT principle is important to us as it enhances the country’s prospect as a preferred air travel destination and major trade and tourism capital. Our vision is supported by the airline’s aspirations and strategy. Also underpinning this vision is our set of core values and unique selling propositions that drive profitability.

Vision To be a sustainable world-class regional airline with an extensive footprint in Africa.

Purpose A sustainable, integrated regional airline connecting secondary and main airports.

CORE VALUES Safety first We never compromise on safety, no matter what. Customers Our customers are our most important investors.

Partners We partner with people across all operations.

Speed & Quality We deliver with speed without compromising on quality. Improvement We strive for continuous improvement.

Simplify We keep it simple.

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SPECIAL SERVICES

in the aircraft cabin, cabin baggage may be placed in the Skycheck at the aircraft for hold stowage.

Special meals Passengers with special dietary

Skycheck This is the airline’s special hand-

requirements are provided for through the following special meals: kosher, halal, Muslim, Hindu, low-fat and vegetarian meals. Orders for special meals should be placed at the time of making flight reservations. The airline requires a minimum of 48 hours’ notice prior to departure in order to assist with confirmation of requests.

luggage facility that assists with in-flight comfort, speedy boarding and disembarking. When boarding one of our flights, simply place any hand luggage that will not be required during the flight on to the Skycheck cart at the boarding steps of the aircraft. Your hand luggage will be waiting for you as you disembark from the aircraft at your destination.

Passengers requiring special attention Requirements for unaccompanied minors (passengers under the age of 12 years) or passengers requiring wheelchairs should be stated at the time of making the reservation. Owing to the size of the cabins on our aircraft types, the airline is not in a position to carry stretcher passengers or incubators.

Cabin baggage SA Express will accept one piece of cabin baggage not exceeding a total dimension of 115cm and 7kg in weight. For safety reasons, cabin baggage must fit into approved stowage spaces: either the overhead luggage bin or under the seat. Owing to limited storage space

We Fly For You SA Express Airways prides itself on aiming to offer incomparable service standards. In addition to building on our motto to express excellence and consistently striving to provide the best service, we know that “you” is the most important word in our airline. SA Express proudly launched its new brand on 2 December 2009 at OR Tambo International Airport. The new brand is set to ensure that it’s distinctive and positioned to build awareness and affinity in the domestic and regional markets. The new proposition “We Fly for You” is set to position SA Express as a premier intra-regional African brand. The main objective of the rebrand is to ensure that SA Express is distinctive yet still aligned to the country’s mainline carrier. SA Express’s unique positioning as an airline that provides a bespoke, personalised travel experience was the rationale behind the proposition “We Fly for You”. The new brand mark is in line with the symbol and colours of the national flag, encouraging national pride. The new brand will be applied to all brand touch-points throughout the operation as well as the staff uniform.

Baggage liability Valuable items such as cameras and accessories, computers – including laptops and notebooks – mobile telephones, perfumes, aftershaves, colognes, legal and company documents and legal tender – including cash, credit cards and cheques – bullion, leather jackets, all types of jewellery and any other items with a value in excess of R400 must be removed from either checked-in or Skycheck baggage as the airline is not liable for loss or damage to these items. Verified baggage claims are settled on the basis adopted by IATA (International Airlines Transport Association): payment of US$20 per 1kg of checked-in luggage, to a maximum of 20kg ($400). Awards SA Express has won the AFRAA Regional Airline of the Year Award at the end of 2009, and the Allied and Aviation Business Corporate Award. Our airline was also the recipient of the Annual Airline Reliability Award from Bombardier at the end of 2007. Other previous awards include the International Star Quality Award, which indicates our commitment to service excellence, while our prominence as one of the top 500 best managed companies is proof of our success as a business. Onboard service The airline’s onboard service is unique and offers passengers a variety of meals or snacks. The airline pioneered its unique meal-box concept, and meal choices are frequently updated and designed using balanced food criteria: appearance, taste and nutritional value. Passengers can also enjoy a wine and malt service on specified flights as well as refreshments on all flights. Our customers can expect a safe, comfortable, quality air-travel experience, with the added benefits of frequency, reliability, on-time departures and unmatched value for money.


Safety information Health regulations Health regulations at certain airports require that the aircraft cabin be sprayed. The spray is harmless, but if you think it might affect you, please cover your nose and mouth with a handkerchief.

Remain seated As a safety precaution, passengers are requested to remain seated with seatbelts fastened after the aircraft has landed, until the seatbelt sign has been switched off by the captain.

Portable electronic equipment The use of personal electronic devices (PED’s) will apply to all domestic and regional flights on the CRJ700/200

and DH8 Q400. Passengers will be permitted to use PED’s such as cell phones, e-readers and electronic tablets in flight-mode.

Cellular telephones Cellular telephones may be used on the ground while passenger doors are open. Cellular telephones, smartphones or any device with flight mode must be switched off as soon as the cabin doors are closed and when the senior cabin-crew member makes an announcement on the publicaddress system.

Laptop computers Laptops with CD ROM and DVD drive, handheld calculators, electric shavers and portable personal

listening devices may not be used on the ground during taxi but may be used during the flight when the seatbelt signs are switched off and with permission from the captain. Should circumstances dictate otherwise, a public-address announcement cancelling this concession will be made by a crew member.

Prohibited equipment Portable printers, laser pointers, video equipment, CB/AM/FM/ FHF/satellite receivers, twoway radios, compact disc and mini-disc players, scanners, remote-controlled toys and power converters are prohibited for use at any time.

Safety pamphlet Read the safety pamphlet in the seat pocket in front of you and take note of your nearest emergency exit. Smoking In accordance with international trends, smoking is not permitted on board any SA Express flights.

Seat belts Please fasten your seat belt whenever the seat belt signs are illuminated. For your own safety we suggest that you keep it fastened throughout the flight. Important When in doubt, please consult our cabin crew.

For your comfort and security, please comply with the above safety regulations at all times while on board

Route map SA Express: Johannesburg Bloemfontein Cape Town Durban East London Gaborone George Hoedspruit Kimberley

Lubumbashi Lusaka Maputo Port Elizabeth Richards Bay Walvis Bay Windhoek Pietermaritzburg Nelspruit

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FLIGHT SCHEDULE JOHANNESBURG - BLOEMFONTEIN FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1001 1003 1005 1011 1011 1013 1017 1021 1023

DEP 05:55 08:00 11:20 13:55 13:50 14:55 16:35 17:55 18:30

ARR 06:55 09:05 12:25 14:40 14:55 16:00 17:35 19:00 19:35

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 CR7 DH4 DH4

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BLOEMFONTEIN - JOHANNESBURG

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JOHANNESBURG - EAST LONDON FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1403 1403 1403 1405 1407 1413 1409 1411

DEP 07:15 07:30 08:30 09:10 13:15 15:40 17:30 18:45

ARR 08:45 09:15 10:00 10:40 14:45 17:10 19:00 20:15

A/C CR8 DH4 CR7 CR2 CR2 CR7 CR8 CR7

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NO 1501 1503 1503 1505 1505 1509

DEP 06:50 08:55 08:55 11:25 11:00 15:25

ARR 08:40 10:45 10:45 13:15 13:15 17:15

A/C CR8 CR8 CR2 CR7 DH4 CR8

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DEP 10:15 12:15

ARR 11:20 13:20

A/C DH4 DH4

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DEP 12:20 14:35

ARR 13:35 15:50

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JOHANNESBURG - KIMBERLEY FLT SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1101 1103 1105 1107 1113

DEP 05:45 09:20 13:10 14:25 17:10

ARR 07:00 10:35 14:25 15:40 18:25

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4

M

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NO 1453 1455 1457 1457 1459 1459

DEP 07:10 10:00 17:50 18:05 19:35 19:55

ARR 08:45 11:55 19:45 20:00 21:15 21:35

A/C CR7 DH4 DH4 DH4 CR7 CR7

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JOHANNESBURG - RICHARDS BAY FLT SA SA SA SA

NO 1201 1203 1207 1213

DEP 06:10 08:30 13:15 16:55

ARR 07:25 09:45 14:30 18:10

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4

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ARR 16:05 16:00

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EAST LONDON - JOHANNESBURG FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1412 1404 1404 1404 1406 1408 1414 1410

DEP 06:40 09:15 09:50 10:30 11:10 15:30 17:40 19:40

ARR 08:20 10:45 11:30 12:10 12:40 17:00 19:10 21:10

FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1502 1504 1504 1506 1506 1510

DEP 09:10 11:25 11:25 14:10 13:50 17:50

ARR 10:50 13:05 13:05 15:50 15:50 19:30

FLT SA SA

NO 1226 1228

DEP 12:00 13:55

ARR 13:00 14:55

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FLT SA

NO 1286

DEP 17:15

ARR 18:25

A/C CR7 CR8 DH4 CR7 CR2 CR2 CR7 CR8

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A/C CR2

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KIMBERLEY - JOHANNESBURG FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1102 1102 1104 1106 1108 1114

DEP 07:30 07:50 11:10 14:55 16:10 18:55

ARR 08:45 09:05 12:25 16:10 17:25 20:10

FLT SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1460 1454 1456 1458 1458

DEP 06:10 09:20 12:45 20:40 20:45

ARR 07:45 10:55 14:20 22:35 22:40

FLT SA SA SA SA

NO 1202 1204 1208 1214

DEP 08:05 10:30 15:05 18:40

ARR 09:20 11:45 16:20 20:00

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4

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CAPE TOWN - JOHANNESBURG FLT SA SA

NO 1586 1588

DEP 18:20 18:50

ARR 20:30 21:00

SA EXPRESS RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE, SUSPEND OR AMEND THIS PUBLISHED SCHEDULE WITHOUT PRIOR NOTIFICATION EVERY EFFORT WILL BE MADE TO OPERATE AS PER THE PLANNED SCHEDULE

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RICHARDS BAY - JOHANNESBURG

JOHANNESBURG - CAPE TOWN FLT NO SA 1585 SA 1587

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 CR7 DH4

PORT ELIZABETH - JOHANNESBURG

JOHANNESBURG - PORT ELIZABETH FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA

ARR 07:25 08:20 08:25 10:40 14:00 16:30 17:35 19:20 20:40

DURBAN - JOHANNESBURG

JOHANNESBURG - DURBAN FLT NO SA 1285 SA 1287

DEP 06:20 07:20 07:25 09:35 12:55 15:25 16:30 18:20 19:40

HOEDSPRUIT - JOHANNESBURG

JOHANNESBURG - HOEDSPRUIT FLT NO SA 1225 SA 1227

NO 1024 1002 1002 1004 1006 1012 1014 1018 1022

GEORGE - JOHANNESBURG

JOHANNESBURG - GEORGE FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA

FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

A/C CR2 CR2

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FLIGHT SCHEDULE JOHANNESBURG - KRUGER FLT NO SA 1231 SA 1237

DEP 07:10 15:55

ARR 08:10 16:55

A/C CR2 CR2

KRUGER - JOHANNESBURG

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JOHANNESBURG - PIETERMARITZBURG FLT SA SA SA

NO 1271 1273 1277

DEP 07:20 11:20 16:45

ARR 08:25 12:25 17:50

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4

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FLT NO

DEP

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A/C

SA

11:55

14:10

CR8

1701

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FLT NO

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SA SA

06:10 06:15

08:15 08:15

CR2 CR2

1733 1731

M

T

NO 1761 1763 1765 1767 1767 1767 1775 1775 1783 1779 1781

DEP 05:55 07:55 09:55 11:55 11:05 11:40 13:30 14:30 15:15 18:10 18:10

ARR 06:50 08:50 10:50 12:45 12:00 12:35 14:25 15:25 16:04 19:05 19:05

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 CR2 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 CR2 DH4 DH4

M

T

T

F

S

S

DEP 09:20

ARR 11:45

A/C CR8

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

NO 1081 1083 1087 1089 1091

DEP 06:00 08:00 13:15 14:20 17:15

ARR 07:45 09:30 15:00 16:05 19:00

A/C DH4 CR2 DH4 DH4 DH4

M

NO 1361 1363 1363 1371 1371 1375

DEP 06:00 08:00 08:00 13:30 13:30 17:20

ARR 07:55 09:40 09:55 15:10 15:25 19:00

A/C DH4 CR2 DH4 CR2 DH4 CR2

DEP 06:20 13:00

ARR 07:20 14:00

A/C CR2 CR2

CAPE TOWN - HOEDSPRUIT FLT NO SA 1241

DEP 09:30

ARR 12:10

A/C CR2

M

W

T

F

S

S

FLT SA SA SA

NO 1272 1274 1278

DEP 09:00 13:00 18:25

ARR 10:15 14:15 19:40

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

FLT

NO

DEP

ARR

A/C

SA

1702

14:45

16:55

CR8

EFFECTIVE 1 SEPTEMBER NAMIBIAN TIME REVERTS TO

M

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

FLT

NO

DEP

ARR

A/C

SA SA

1734 1732

09:15 09:15

11:15 11:15

CR2 CR2

EFFECTIVE 1 SEPTEMBER NAMIBIAN TIME REVERTS TO

M

T

FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1762 1764 1766 1768 1768 1768 1776 1776 1784 1780 1782

DEP 07:45 09:25 11:25 12:35 13:10 13:10 14:50 16:05 16:40 19:45 19:45

ARR 08:40 10:20 12:20 13:30 14:05 14:05 15:45 17:00 17:30 20:40 20:40

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 CR2 DH4 DH4 DH4 CR2 DH4 DH4

M

T

FLT SA

NO 1798

DEP 12:30

ARR 15:00

A/C CR8

M

T

FLT SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1082 1084 1088 1090 1092

DEP 08:15 10:30 15:40 16:35 19:40

ARR 10:15 12:15 17:40 18:35 21:40

A/C DH4 CR2 DH4 DH4 DH4

M

EAST LONDON - CAPE TOWN

CAPE TOWN - GEORGE FLT NO SA 1531 SA 1533

T

BLOEMFONTEIN - CAPE TOWN

CAPE TOWN - EAST LONDON FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA

M

LUBUMBASHI - JOHANNESBURG

CAPE TOWN - BLOEMFONTEIN FLT SA SA SA SA SA

A/C CR2 CR2

GABORONE - JOHANNESBURG W

JOHANNESBURG - LUBUMBASHI FLT NO SA 1797

ARR 09:40 18:35

WINDHOEK - JOHANNESBURG W

JOHANNESBURG - GABORONE FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

DEP 08:40 17:35

WALVIS BAY - JOHANNESBURG

JOHANNESBURG - WINDHOEK EFFECTIVE 1 SEPTEMBER NAMIBIAN TIME REVERTS TO

NO 1232 1238

PIETERMARITZBURG - JOHANNESBURG

W

JOHANNESBURG - WALVIS BAY EFFECTIVE 1 SEPTEMBER NAMIBIAN TIME REVERTS TO

FLT SA SA

FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1362 1364 1364 1372 1372 1376

DEP 08:25 10:25 10:45 16:00 16:20 20:05

ARR 10:25 12:25 12:25 18:00 18:00 21:45

A/C DH4 DH4 CR2 DH4 CR2 CR2

M

GEORGE - CAPE TOWN FLT NO SA 1532 SA 1534

DEP 07:50 14:30

ARR 08:55 15:35

A/C CR2 CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

HOEDSPRUIT - CAPE TOWN FLT SA

NO 1242

DEP 12:45

ARR 15:20

A/C CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

SA EXPRESS RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE, SUSPEND OR AMEND THIS PUBLISHED SCHEDULE WITHOUT PRIOR NOTIFICATION EVERY EFFORT WILL BE MADE TO OPERATE AS PER THE PLANNED SCHEDULE

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119 19


FLIGHT SCHEDULE CAPE TOWN - KIMBERLEY FLT SA SA SA SA

NO 1151 1157 1155 1155

DEP 05:50 12:50 14:00 15:55

ARR 07:20 14:20 15:30 17:25

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

CAPE TOWN - PORT ELIZABETH FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1801 1805 1807 1809 1813 1813 1819 1821 1821 1823

DEP 06:00 09:00 10:10 10:45 13:00 13:45 15:00 16:00 16:30 18:30

ARR 07:30 10:30 11:40 12:15 14:30 14:55 16:30 17:10 17:40 20:00

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 CR2 DH4 DH4

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

CAPE TOWN - WALVIS BAY FLT NO SA 1721 SA 1721

DEP 08:00 11:15

ARR 10:00 13:15

A/C CR2 CR2

DEP 06:15

ARR 08:20

A/C CR2

DEP 07:45

ARR 10:10

A/C CR2

NO 1301 1303 1305 1309

DEP 06:00 08:30 12:00 16:50

ARR 07:05 09:35 13:05 17:55

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

DURBAN - PORT ELIZABETH FLT SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1330 1334 1336 1340 1348

DEP 06:00 09:15 11:55 13:35 17:40

ARR 07:20 10:35 13:15 14:55 19:00

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

DURBAN - CAPE TOWN FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1850 1852 1854 1858 1854 1862

DEP 06:10 08:00 13:40 15:35 16:30 18:50

ARR 08:25 10:15 15:55 17:50 18:45 21:05

DEP 10:10

ARR 13:00

NO 1611 1611 1613

DEP 10:20 14:00 13:55

ARR 12:45 16:25 16:20

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

PORT ELIZABETH - CAPE TOWN FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1802 1806 1808 1810 1814 1814 1820 1822 1822 1824

DEP 08:00 11:00 12:10 12:45 15:00 15:25 17:00 18:00 18:00 20:30

ARR 09:40 12:40 13:50 14:25 16:40 16:45 18:40 19:20 19:40 22:10

FLT SA SA

NO 1722 1722

DEP 10:30 14:00

ARR 12:30 16:00

FLT SA

NO 1752

DEP 09:00

ARR 11:05

FLT SA

NO 1786

DEP 10:40

ARR 13:15

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 CR2 DH4 CR2 DH4 DH4

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2 CR2

A/C CR2

A/C CR2

EAST LONDON - DURBAN FLT SA SA SA SA

NO 1302 1304 1306 1310

DEP 07:35 10:05 13:35 18:25

ARR 08:35 11:05 14:35 19:25

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

PORT ELIZABETH - DURBAN FLT SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1331 1335 1337 1341 1349

DEP 07:50 11:05 13:40 15:35 19:55

ARR 09:05 12:20 14:55 16:50 21:10

FLT SA SA SA SA SA SA

NO 1851 1853 1861 1855 1859 1855

DEP 09:05 10:45 16:15 16:30 18:15 19:15

ARR 11:05 12:45 18:15 18:30 20:15 21:15

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

LUSAKA - DURBAN FLT SA

NO 1602

DEP 13:40

ARR 16:30

FLT SA SA SA

NO 1612 1612 1614

DEP 13:25 17:00 17:00

ARR 15:50 19:25 19:25

SA EXPRESS RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE, SUSPEND OR AMEND THIS PUBLISHED SCHEDULE WITHOUT PRIOR NOTIFICATION EVERY EFFORT WILL BE MADE TO OPERATE AS PER THE PLANNED SCHEDULE

1 2 01 2 0 Indwe Indwe

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

HARARE - DURBAN

DURBAN - HARARE FLT SA SA SA

ARR 09:50 16:50 17:40 19:35

CAPE TOWN - DURBAN

DURBAN - LUSAKA FLT NO SA 1601

DEP 08:10 15:10 16:00 17:55

MAPUTO - CAPE TOWN M

DURBAN - EAST LONDON FLT SA SA SA SA

NO 1152 1158 1156 1156

WINDHOEK - CAPE TOWN

CAPE TOWN - MAPUTO FLT NO SA 1785

FLT SA SA SA SA

WALVIS BAY - CAPE TOWN

CAPE TOWN - WINDHOEK FLT NO SA 1751

KIMBERLEY - CAPE TOWN


@

PASSENGER LETTERS Good day

W O R K

llent service he at the George Airport for the exce appreciation to Mr Leon Hufke fly to Johannesburg to be to I would like to extend a word of ed need ntly urge I and away father had unexpectedly passed offered me earlier this year. My all the flights were fully booked. ays, holid ol scho the of t resul a then went that extra with my mother. As date me on a flight that day but however, to not only accommo Mr Hufke went out of his way, r flight. managed to put me on an earlie mile to phone me back as he had . ured treas long be will His assistance in this difficult time Kind regards Marianne Alberts

this month. She has won rts who wrote our winning letter Congratulations to Marianne Albe ed at R995. Samsonite B’Lite Beauty Case valu

a

Good day SA Express also forget about the be quite tedious. Sometimes we travelling and it can sometimes time of lot a d spen us of e Som ld be sharing them instead. good experiences when we shou from Cape Town to Durban. of your crew on my recent flight one d men com was too much to like ld wou So I istent smile on her face. Nothing cons a with s, ded to all of our need excellent job an g doin for d Her name was Bronwyn. She atten gnise reco be to needs al and I definitely feel that she ssion profe very was she her; for trouble , as more people with for SA Express. an opening for her on my team Antalis South Africa, that I had for tor Direc Sales as , wish I only inly improve our results. an attitude like hers would certa good work she does. again and recognise her for the her onto ks than my pass e Pleas Best regards Nick Gillings

Dear SA Express l all over Africa recent Durban-Harare flight. I trave l treatment we received on our . work A big thank you for the wonderfu good is excellent. Keep up the the best service and your food oles and power cuts! and, without a doubt, you give and relaxed to face the Zim poth fresh e hom ed arriv we ay, holid Instead of detracting from our See you again later this year. Dr Doug McClymont Harare

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING

TO SAY? ding an email to

mind by sen Let us know what is on your customercare@flyexpress.aero.

inal language.

d or translated from their orig

Letters may be edited, shortene

G LETTER IN THE APRIL THE WRITER OF THE WINNIN EIVE A SAMSONITE LAPTOP EDITION OF INDWE WILL REC BACKPACK VALUED AT R995. temporary range of business

on is a con The Samsonite Network Collecti and op backpacks, tablet cross-overs lapt s, bag op bags, including lapt the and ves cuti exe y bus for companion messenger bags. It is the ideal oks. The laptop sizes, as well as Ultrabo st late the of all fit s bag op lapt players, ia med zipped front pocket for laptop backpack offers a handy Visit e. mov the on e ing it ideal for thos cell phones or sunglasses, mak . tion informa www.samsonite.co.za for more

Indwe Indw In dwe

121


PA R TING SHO T

Africa's talent revealed

This month, in honour of SA Express’ 20th anniversary, we are featuring an image of a SA Express plane taken by Jan Henning. It is of a CRJ200 in front of the SA Express Hanger at OR Tambo International Airport. If you think you have what it takes, send your photos (1 MB each), details of where they were taken and your contact details to nicky@tcbmedia.co.za, with the words “Indwe Photo” in the subject line. We can’t wait to show them off!

12 2

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Indwe April 2014