Indwe December 2014

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GEORGE

B LO E M F O N T E I N KIMBERLEY

CA P E TOW N LUBUMBASHI

DURBAN LUSAKA

E A S T LO N D O N WINDHOEK

GABORONE HOEDSPRUIT JOHANNESBURG P O RT E L I Z A B E T H RICHARDS BAY W A LV I S B A Y HARARE

Indwe December 2014

The Niceties of Knysna YOUR FREE COPY

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contents

Features 29

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A Fitting Legacy Madiba’s Memorial Garden

A Merry Green Christmas to All Tips for an Eco-Friendly Festive Season

A Shopping Expedition Less Ordinary Finding Treasure in Your City

Underground Wonderland Caving In

Marvellous Markets Shopping Delights

A Rabbi and a Sangoma Go Into a Bar… Will the Real Nik Please Stand Up?

Tipples to Toast With The Best Drinks of the Festive Season

Make Your Medical Aid Work for You Selfmed Medical Scheme

Whichever Way the Wind Blows Kitesurfing

Here’s to Healthy Holidays How to Survive the Festive Season

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Food: Friend or Foe? Food Allergies

Airline Content

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CEO Letter

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Meet the Crew

SA Express Fleet

We Fly For You: Our Visions & Values

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Safety and Route Map

Flight Schedule

Passenger Letters



contents

Regulars

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The Niceties of Knysna It’s Always Lekker by the Sea

71

The Falls Call The Jameson Vic Falls Carnival

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12 Events North, South, and In Between

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Bits & Pieces Travel Tips & Gorgeous Goodies

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Bites Restaurants & Taste Experiences

164

Gadgets Must Haves for Technophiles

Paradise Just Around the Corner White Pearl Resorts, Mozambique

Business 111

Enduring Entrepreneurs South Africa’s Entrepreneurs Embrace Resilience

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Debt Disasters Household Debt Swallows Majority of Income

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Save a Penny, Save a Pound Spend Wisely This Festive Season

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#CommunicatingDigitally Tech Etiquette

166

Motoring

Travel

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Books New releases and Must Reads

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Summer Splashes Getting Beachy in Joburg

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Road Trip Delights Padstalle Worth Stopping For

47

Simply Celestial Sodwana

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Road Warriors The Car of the Year Finalists

132

Putting the Hilux Dakar Team to the Test

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A Serious Contender for Your Shopping List Infiniti Q50 2.0t

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Smooth as Silk Lexus ES 250 and ES 300h



ceo

SA EXPRESS Divisional Manager Communications and PR Keitumetse Masike Tel: +27 11 978 2540 Email: kmasike@flyexpress.aero Customer Care Department Tel: 0861 729 227 Email: customercare@flyexpress.aero Twitter: @flySAexpress Facebook: SA Express Airways Reservations Support Tel: +27 11 978 9905 Email: groupsales@flyexpress.aero

A Moment of Reflection, A Moment of Contemplation BY THE TIME you read this edition of Indwe, your in-flight magazine, most of you would have wound down an eventful year and are, hopefully, preparing to take your well-deserved break with loved ones. As we close this momentous year, I thought I should reflect on the last 12 months. Together, we have accomplished much, and for this I extend my heartfelt gratitude. Your support in consistently choosing us as a carrier of choice has been wonderful and appreciated. Around the world, in January 2014, the industry observed exactly 100 years since the first paying passenger boarded a commercial airline in the US – a flight that would fundamentally transform the world economy in decades to come. Locally, SA Express marked its 20th anniversary alongside the country’s 20th anniversary of democracy and freedom. SA Express’ first flight, which took off from Johannesburg to Kimberley in the Northern Cape in 1994, altered the face of aviation in the subsequent 20 years, and is projected to continue to be a key role-player in the next 20 years. Furthermore, I am pleased that we have been able to maintain our excellent safety record. We have had no significant safety incidents during the year. SA Express’ team continues to embrace the airline’s core values which include Safety First, which is a value that as an entity we never compromise on, no matter what! We will continue to believe and ensure that all customers who we fly for are acknowledged as our most important investors. During the year, we moved our

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headquarters from OR Tambo International Airport to Airways Park. We share Airways Park with South African Airways and SAA Technical, so this move was designed to reduce outlays and also to increase collaboration among the state’s aviation interests. This is over and above our code-sharing arrangements with SAA. We are planning to maximise our cooperation in the coming months and, hopefully, we will be able to pass on some of the benefits of this increased collaboration to you, our valued customer. As per our two additional values, the airline will carry on striving for continuous improvements and will ensure that we continue to keep our operations and all customer engagements as simple as possible. Finally, as we look towards 2015, the local airline industry is envisaged to grow, with new entrants entering the growing domestic market. Undoubtedly some of these new entrants will be targeting SA Express’ passenger base. This is beneficial to our travelling passengers, and we welcome this competition. The key differentiator will, however, not be price, but rather the service we provide to you. SA Express will continue to implement our Vision 20/20 strategy, our board- and shareholder-approved long term corporate strategy. Once more I thank you for your loyal support during the year, and may you have a restful break and a prosperous 2015! I look forward to “flying for you” in 2015, our 21st year of existence, and we will continue to offer our valued customers strategic connectivity and a safe and enjoyable flying experience. Regards, Inati

Group Reservations Tel: +27 11 978 5578 Email: reservationslist@flyexpress.aero Sales Office Email: sales@flyexpress.aero INDWE Images © iStockphoto.com, 123RF & Quickpic General Manager and Associate Publisher Letlhogonolo Sealetsa | nolo@tjtmedia.co.za Publisher Bernard Hellberg | bernard@tjtmedia.co.za Marketing and Communications Manager Pam Komani | pam@tjtmedia.co.za Editor Nicky Furniss | nicky@tcbmedia.co.za Senior Designer Lindsey Steenkamp | design@tcbmedia.co.za DIRECTORS Bernard Hellberg l bernard@tjtmedia.co.za Obed Sealetsa | nolo@tjtmedia.co.za Pam Komani | pam@tjtmedia.co.za ADVERTISING SALES Tel: +27 12 425 5800 National Sales Manager Bryan Kayavhu | bryan@tcbmedia.co.za +27 83 785 6691 Manager: National Sales & Business Development Chantal Barton | chantal@tcbmedia.co.za +27 83 459 3086 Senior Account Managers Nikki de Lange | nikki@tcbmedia.co.za +27 83 415 0339 Calvin van Vuuren | calvin@tcbmedia.co.za +27 82 5826873 Gertjie Meintjes | gertjie@tcbmedia.co.za +27 82 757 2622 André Scharneck | andre@tcbmedia.co.za +27 72 739 8855 Noel Sands | noel@tcbmedia.co.za +27 74 428 7604 DISCLAIMER: All material is strictly copyrighted. All rights are reserved. Reproduction in whole or part is prohibited without prior permission from the publisher. Opinions expressed in Indwe Magazine are not necessarily those of SA Express.



Events North A Trip to Ancient Egypt

Dec

02nd

From 2nd December

Tutankhamun – His Tomb and His Treasures, Silverstar Casino, Muldersdrift The internationally acclaimed exhibition Tutankhamun – His Tomb and His Treasures takes centre stage at Silverstar’s impressive new 2,000 m² entertainment venue throughout the festive season. A first for South Africa and the continent, this captivating exhibition gives visitors the unique opportunity to experience the treasures of the tomb at their moment of discovery. Seen by over five million people worldwide, the exhibition has faithfully reconstructed the tomb of Tutankhamun to scale, presenting a realistic impression of the overwhelming opulence of the treasures intended to serve the famous young pharaoh on his magical journey to the Underworld.There are over 1,000 exquisitely reconstructed burial treasures produced by the finest Egyptian craftsmen under scientific supervision. These exact replicas coupled with state-of-the art technology and video material provide a vivid illustration of the culture and spiritual world of the ancient Egyptians. Visitors will also discover what these magnificent historical finds reveal about the religion, deities, dynasties, and mysterious hieroglyphics of the empire on the Nile. Tickets are available from www.tut-exhibition.co.za or www.silverstarcasino.co.za.

Tickled Pink During Summer

Summer Seafood Sensation, Aarya, Montecasino Summer has arrived at Aarya restaurant in Montecasino with a sensational splash of pink in the menu. Run by Deena Naidoo, winner of the first season of MasterChef South Africa, Aarya has been a phenomenal success since it opened in 2012. The new Summer Seafood Sensation dishes – designed to complement the menu that reflects the multi-cultural South African nation – has a playful pink theme and includes: a prawn curry that reflects Deena’s Durban heritage, with succulent queen prawns cooked with Aarya’s special blend of traditional Durban spices simmered in a fragrant onion and tomato based curry sauce; a fresh salmon salad; salmon pizza, with salmon, cream cheese, and sturgeon caviar; and line fish of the day, served with wasabi mash and drizzled with pickled ginger mayonnaise. Deena says that the fresh new Summer Seafood Sensation menu items are already in high demand, with the salmon pizza topping the list. For reservations, contact +27 11 557 7007.

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Events South Luxurious Lifestyles Le Kap Lifestyle Fair, Blaauwklippen Wine Estate, Stellenbosch

Dec

06th

Born out of the appreciation of the finest things in life, the Le Kap Lifestyle Fair takes place at the recently revamped Blaauwklippen Wine Estate. This rather luxurious affair promises visitors a day of indulgence with a jam-packed roster of activities, including a high fashion show featuring top designers, musical horses, show jumping, luxury vehicles and helicopters. Celebrated South African chefs will showcase their talents as visitors enjoy gourmet food, artisanal drinks and extraordinary wines. Tickets cost R350 and include wine tasting and a meal coupon. www.lekaplifestylefair.com.

Knead to Know 13th and 22nd December

Bread Making Courses, Môreson Wine Farm, Franschhoek What is more homely than filling your kitchen with that lovely freshly baked bread smell? And what could be more rewarding than spoiling your guests this festive season by serving your own home baked bread at the table? At Bread & Wine Vineyard Restaurant on Môreson Wine Farm in Franschhoek, you can learn this craft in an interactive and fun session, which culminates in a tasting of Môreson’s delicious wines. Their Bread & Wine bread making courses will teach you how to make different types of dough for various breads, with the final product served with lunch at the Bread & Wine Vineyard Restaurant. Choose from a full bread making course at R700 per person, or a mini bread making course at R425 per person. Bookings can be made by calling +27 21 876 3692 or emailing breadandwine@moreson.co.za. www.moreson.co.za

Trees and Tunes 23rd November 2014 – 05th April 2015

Summer Sunset Concerts, Kirstenbosch National Botanical Garden, Cape Town Get out your diaries, tell your friends, and make sure you don’t miss one of the concerts in the 2014/2015 Kirstenbosch Summer Sunset Concert series. With popular artists Just Jinjer, Hot Water and Oliver Mtukudzi taking the stage this side of the year, as well as a special performance by Barbara Hendricks and the National Youth Orchestra, all musical tastes are catered for. Mango Groove and Arno Carstens bring in the New Year, while Prime Circle,The Parlotones, Matthew Mole and Jimmy Nevis make January your happening month. Freshlyground, Johnny Clegg, Goldfish and Mi Casa also feature in this stellar line-up of local talent. Picnic on the lawn in the shadow of Table Mountain in the most magnificent “concert hall” in Africa, as Kirstenbosch brings you the music you love to round off summer weekends.Tickets are available from www.webtickets.co.za. www.sanbi.org.za

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CONNECT TO CAPE TOWN THIS SUMMER G

et your myconnect card at Cape Town International Airport’s MyCiTi station and the city is yours. From the V&A Waterfront, to Camps Bay beach, Hout Bay to Big Bay – even Table Mountain Cableway station. It’s just R35 for the card. Then load and go, with big savings on fares outside of peak hours and on weekends. NEW – From 18 October 2014, MyCiTi introduces a single-trip ticket. R75 from the Airport to the Civic Centre with free transfers to any destination on the MyCiTi network. Single-trip tickets are also available for routes not including the Airport for just R30. MyCiTi is the way to go.

For more info call the Transport Information Centre (toll-free 24/7) 0800 65 64 63. Visit www.myciti.org.za


Events In Between A Hilarious Magic Carpet Ride 5th December to 11th January

Aladdin, Elizabeth Sneddon Theatre, Durban The annual KickstArt pantomime is a much-anticipated event on Durban’s calendar, and this year the company is set to dazzle old and young alike with the magical adventures of Aladdin and his enchanted lamp. Featuring popular songs, jokes galore, glamorous costumes, and sumptuous sets ranging from a Cave of Wonders full of dancing jewels to a golden Chinese palace, Aladdin is a must-see. Starring popular performers Bryan Hiles (Wishee Washee), Darren King (Widow Twankey), Iain Robinson (Abanazar, the evil magician), Georgina Mabbett (Princess Jasmine) and Rory Booth (Genie of the Ring), Aladdin also introduces exciting newcomer Nathan Kruger as Aladdin.Tickets are available from Computicket.

Christmas Cheer & Splashes 5th and 14th December

Dolphins by Starlight, uShaka Marine World, Durban Guaranteed to be the highlight of the festive calendar, Dolphins by Starlight will be themed around popular singing greats Mary J Blige (played by Londiwe Dhlomo), Kenny G (played by Andrew Young) and Michael Bublé (played by Lyle Buxton), while the dolphin stars will provide the splash and the sparkle. The show is jam packed with Christmas favourites for a great sing-along, while the cast will be backed by a 12 piece band featuring the KZN Youth Choir.The audience can also look forward to a special guest appearance by Father Christmas, who is rumoured to be bringing “snow” with him this year! To add to the Christmas spirit, uShaka will set up a collection box for new toys to be donated to the East Coast Radio Toy Story Campaign.The toys will be donated to children at government hospitals, crèches, orphanages, and to child-headed households around the province.Tickets are available from Computicket or through uShaka ticketing on +27 31 328 8000.

Hit the Dance Floor Ibiza World Tour, Gateway Centre, Umhlanga When it comes to electro and house music DJs, the pinnacle of success is playing in one of the famous clubs on Ibiza. Eight of the ten DJs on the Ibiza World Tour coming to South Africa in December have had that privilege. If tearing up the dance floor for 12 hours straight is your kind of heaven, you had better rush off to Computicket now to have a chance of seeing some of the hottest and most famous international DJs in the world, including Klingande, Michael Calfan, De Cat, Peyton, Pascal & Pearce, Kool & Kabul and C Delgado. The Ibiza World Tour will also be making a stop in Cape Town on 29th December. http://ibiza-world.com

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Bits & Pieces

Turtle-tastic! Every summer, hundreds of leatherback and loggerhead turtles complete their breeding cycle and emerge from the Indian Ocean to lay their eggs, incredibly returning to the exact beach on which they themselves hatched. From midOctober until mid-March, guests at Rocktail Beach Camp in Maputaland can join the turtle monitors on one of their nightly patrols and witness this amazing spectacle. During the excursions, the turtle monitors look for nesting females or hatchlings (depending on the time of year), recording GPS details, taking measurements, and tagging those they locate. For more information, contact www.wilderness-safaris.com.

Luscious Lindt

A Spot of Polo and Shopping Val de Vie Estate invites visitors to take in its relaxed and welcoming atmosphere while browsing delightful offerings, from food and wine to clothing and jewellery, at its monthly Sunday market. Furthermore, visitors can look forward to a unique experience as polo matches are held at each event. Set in the exquisite Paarl-Franschhoek Valley, and only 40 minutes from Cape Town, the market is the perfect outing for families to enjoy a refreshing change of scenery. The market is held on the Polo Pavilion’s terrace, and offers shady spots and an indoor space where visitors can unwind and enjoy the melodies of a live band and the excitement of the polo match while sipping bubbly. There is also entertainment for children to look forward to, and the fun remains a surprise as activities change each month. The next markets will take place on 7th December and 25th January. www.valdevie.co.za

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Christmas is a time for love, gifts, and family celebration, and the Lindt Bear is the most heart-warming way to show you care this Christmas. The Lindt Swiss Maîtres Chocolatiers have created the Lindt Bear using the finest Lindt chocolate. Dressed in a golden coat and adorned with a red heart and ribbon, the Lindt Bear represents everybody’s favourite cuddly childhood toy, a loveable figure and symbol of care for all to enjoy at Christmas. Christmas 2014 sees the Lindt Bear family grow with the addition of the large 500 g Lindt Bear, as well as the middle sized Lindt Bear (200 g). Another exciting new Lindt Christmas offering is the launch of the Lindor and Lindt Bear Tree Decorations, which include ten mini Lindt Bear and Lindor tree ornaments made from the finest Lindt milk chocolate to decorate your Christmas tree over the festive period. These ranges are available from leading retail stores nationwide.



Bits & Pieces

Cosmic Jewels Tapping into the current fascination with the faraway allure of distant galaxies and cosmic wonders, Pandora has recently launched an enigmatic set of cosmic-inspired jewellery. Inspired by the seemingly infinite night skies and their enduring mystery, the cosmos is explored in an explosion of sparkling stones and textured surfaces on sterling silver and 14 k gold. Starstudded jewels twinkle brightly on sterling silver cocktail rings, wide band rings, stud earrings, and statement pendants. Midnight blue faceted Murano glass charms appear as if sprinkled with stardust, shimmering like the enigmatic sky. The abstract openwork charms in silver or gold evoke the beauty and fascination of shooting stars and their winding, sparkling trails. Bracelets are priced from R895 and charms from R445.

For Retail Wining and Dining If you are puzzled about what to give the special woman in your life this festive season, look no further than D’Oré. This opulent multi-brand fashion house – home to some of the world’s top designer fashion brands – offers a new standard of luxury shopping experience. Purchase a D’Oré gift voucher, which offers a bespoke personal shopping experience, the ultimate indulgence. Attentive staff will tend to every whim and desire, hosting clients in one of the sumptuous private suites, like the Champagne Room or Ballgown Room. Expert in-house stylists will present key looks picked from the world’s best brands, using their knowledge of current trends and styles as the champagne and refreshments flow freely. Every consultation is personally tailored, and the service includes all the stylish collections in store from classic to contemporary, as well as accessories, handbags and shoes. www.dorefashion.co.za

Cultural Tourism Avid travellers and intrepid explorers in search of more inspirational encounters off the beaten track can now engage with the vibrant locals of the Kayamandi Township through fun-filled tours on foot by Stellenbosch 360, as part of their Route 360 cultural tourism initiative. Rather than being a geographical route, Route 360 is a “people’s route” that paves the way into the hearts and homes of six Stellenbosch communities through authentic cultural experiences. These offer visitors a colourful slice of the locals’ unique lifestyle, traditions, and tastes. The Route 360 Kayamandi Township Tours offer tailor-made packages which range from performing and visual arts to hands-on cooking and baking experiences, coupled with distinctive customs, traditions, and an integrated lifestyle experience. To book a half or full day tour email ann@stellenbosch360.co.za.

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bites Mouth Watering Menus for Non-Meat Eaters Executive Chef Christo Pretorius at The Twelve Apostles Hotel and Spa has introduced two unique tasting menus to cater for vegetarians and for seafood fans. Using only the very best quality local fresh produce and seasonal products, his innovative “Taste of the Sea” and “Taste of the Earth” tasting menus (four courses at R425 per person) are set to take dining at Azure restaurant, as one of the few fine dining establishments to cater specially for nonmeat eating diners, to a new level. The veggie option includes cauliflower terrine, potato gnocchi and crunchy milk chocolate mousse. The seafood menu features salmon trout, prawn dhal, and coconut milk custard with sorbet and basil and coconut oil cake. Email reservations1@12apostles.co.za for bookings.

Picnic Perfection Make the most of summer and head out to Hartenberg Wine Estate for the ultimate dining experience. Choose a table under the trees or lounge on cushions on the lawn with a beautifully packed picnic basket. All ingredients are locally sourced, free-range and complemented by home baked breads. This season the picnic basket includes snoek pâté, and a selection of the finest local cheeses and charcuterie. Tuck into freshly baked caramelised onion and goat’s cheese tart with a new potato or caprese salad. End off your picnic experience with seasonal fruit served with crushed white chocolate meringue. The picnic costs R175 per person and includes a bottle of estate wine to share between two. For reservations contact +27 21 865 2541 or email info@hartenbergestate.com.

A Decade of Delicious Dining Celebrating a decade of culinary excellence in the heart of South African Wine Country, The Restaurant at Grande Provence in Franschhoek is guided by the culinary mastery of Executive Chef Darren Badenhorst, who has been at the helm of The Restaurant since 2012. By making use of the best seasonal produce and placing the focus on creating perfection on every plate, The Restaurant’s latest summer menu boasts an array of dishes bursting with invigorating flavours. For starters, think paper thin slices of tuna carpaccio or asparagus mousse. Entrées include wild pigeon and duck rillettes and farmed white sea bass, while guests can look forward to rose and white chocolate macaroons for dessert, among other mouth watering options. The Restaurant at Grande Provence is open daily for lunch and dinner. For reservations, contact +27 21 876 8600.

Festive Treats for Fido Your pet deserves a treat this festive season too, and Hill’s Ideal Balance treats are the ideal stocking-filler, combining the finest natural ingredients with perfectly balanced nutrition. For dogs, we love the Oven Baked Naturals with Turkey and Cranberries for real Christmas flavour, while cats will love Crunchy Naturals Treats with Real Tuna. Available from veterinary outlets around South Africa.

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r e m m Su s e h

s a l p S

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Getting Beachy in Joburg Text: Iga Motylska Images © Supplied

J

ust because you aren’t going to the coast these holidays doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy the summer sun with the sand beneath your feet, a swim, and a drink in hand under a beach umbrella.

SIZZLING summer days are best enjoyed by the poolside. Whether you’re spending the day with family at a water park, swim training for that summer body, or simply want to go to a beach party with friends, Johannesburg has it all.

Family Fun With all there is to do at Wild Waters in Boksburg, it’s ideal for a summer family outing. The water park has a wave pool, a 500 m long supertube, three speed slides, and a raging rapids river ride, which is best experienced on tubes. Younger children can splash around in the baby pool, while teens play volleyball in the sand area. While mom relaxes or reads in the shade of a thatched gazebo, dad can challenge the kids to a round of putt-putt. For lunch, pack a picnic basket, let dad show off his braaing skills or – if you’re not worrying about your waistline – buy fast food and snacks from the canteen. Although you can’t bring glassware or alcohol to Wild Waters, the cash bar sells

beers and ciders. Opening times: Saturdays and Sundays 10h00 to 17h00. Mondays – Fridays for private events of at least 80 people. Cost: R70 (2 to 7 years old), R130 (8 years +), R80 (seniors). Body boards and tubes are supplied upon entrance. Address: Jan Smuts Avenue, Boksburg. Call: +27 11 826 6736 Website: www.wildwatersboksburg.co.za Email: wildwaters@mweb.co.za

Luxury Take an invigorating swim in the infinity pool at the Southern Sun Hyde Park Hotel and dry off in the sunshine on the loungers. They offer panoramic views of Johannesburg’s green north-western suburbs through the glass balustrades. At sundown, the sun melts into the pool’s water, but is soon replaced by the city lights. The Island Bar has a selection of unusual cocktails, imported

Southern Sun Hyde Park Hotel Indwe Indwe 27


Plenty of Public Pools The City of Johannesburg maintains 53 public swimming pools across seven regions. To find the one nearest to you, type “swimming pools” in the www.joburg.org.za search box.

whiskeys, craft beers and ciders. For a unique combination, try the elderflower and basil spritz or the signature Hyde Park Momo – it contains raspberry puree, that’s all I’m saying! Snack on something from the sushi and tempura bar or stay for dinner at the adjoining Luce Italian restaurant. Welcome the weekend each Friday night on the al fresco, wooden deck dance floor as you dance to the tunes of the resident DJ and share a jug of your favourite cocktail with friends. Opening times: Daily from 07h00 to 23h00 Cost: Free for restaurant and bar patrons. Address: 1st Road, Hyde Park, Sandton. Call: +27 11 341 8080 Website: www.tsogosunhotels.com/hotels/hyde-park-sandton/ Email: sshydepark.reservations@tsogosun.com

Young at Heart The Beach is just that: a rooftop beach in the heart of Johannesburg. The golden sand, beach umbrellas and deck chairs make you forget that you’re really hundreds of kilometres away from the ocean. The venue may only be 15m2, but there’s enough space to sun bathe or dance under the gaze of the new Nelson Mandela mural by American street artist Fairey Shepard. You’ll receive a welcome cocktail, but I recommend trying their signature Aqua Marine – orange peel infused Bacardi Rum, Gordon’s Gin, cranberry bitters and soda water, which is served in a Ziploc bag complete with an edible goldfish made from grapefruit – to keep with the beach theme.

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Wild Waters

The Beach

While The Beach doesn’t serve food, Neighbourgoods artisanal market is across the road on Juta Street. Go there first to indulge in seafood paella, Balkan burgers and vegetarian quiches, as well as homemade pastries and cakes. Opening times: Saturdays from 12h00 to 19h00, Monday – Friday for private functions. Cost: R50 for ladies, R100 for gents. Address: 6 De Beer Street, Braamfontein. Call: +27 11 403 0413 Website: www.playbraamfontein.co.za/the-beach/ Email: venues@playbraamfontein.co.za

Peace and Quiet Despite the lively city bustle outside, calm reigns once you step inside the four-star Mapungubwe Hotel in central Johannesburg. A wooden deck necklaces the swimming pool, which is located on the ground floor in the centre of the hotel grounds and surrounded by the building. Entrance is free as long as you buy something to eat or drink from the bar or Twist restaurant. I suggest you taste the Twist Crush, which is spiced rum churned with muddled lime, peach extracts, fresh pineapple juice and mint. Dig into the daily food specials by the poolside – they make awesome burgers, by the way – as you read under the umbrellas. Most of the hotel’s guests are businesspeople, so the pool doesn’t get too busy, even during peak season or on a weekend, which makes it the perfect place to relax.


The Mapungubwe Hotel

Opening times: Daily from 10h00 to 18h00 Cost: Free for restaurant and bar patrons. Address: 50-54 Marshall Street, Marshalltown, Johannesburg. Call: +27 11 429 2600 Website: www.mapungubwehotel.co.za Email: gm.mapungubwe@faircity.co.za

Swimmers Why not visit the oldest public swimming pool in Johannesburg this summer? Ellis Park swimming pool was opened in 1904 along with the kiddies’ pool. It’s one of two Olympic-size public swimming pools in the city – the other is Newclare – making it one of the largest as well. It remains popular and welcomes between 2,000 and 4,000 swimmers each month. If you’re a swimmer, trying to get fit for summer, want to join the underwater hockey club, or have children who are learning to swim, then be sure to buy season tickets for discounts. After all that exercise you may want to eat burgers and slap chips from the Take a Break tuck shop. It sells cold drinks and hot beverages and just about any type of candy under the sun. Opening times: Weekdays: 07h00 to 19h00, Saturdays: 07h00 to 17h00 and Sundays/public holidays: 09h00 – 17h00 Cost: R12 for adults, R8 for children, free for senior citizens. Season tickets (September to March or March to August): R278 (adults) and R135 (children) Address: Corner North Park Lane and Erin Street, New Doornfontein, Johannesburg. Call: +27 11 402 5565 Email: ellisparkswimmingpool@webmail.co.za



g n i t A Fit

y c a Leg

n e d r a G l a i r o m e M s ’ a b i Mad

t yn Wainwrigh Text: Bronw ga en ro Hav Straw & Han ages © Greg

Im

passing s of Madiba’s ew n e th s a l oment, standstil e. For a rare m ica came to a d fr si A r ou th y ou b S d , oo world st l A year ago one of us. The ligion or socia y re er , ev ce d ra n a of ch ss ce. , regardle touched ea en in his absen umanity united ev h , er gh th ou ge th to s le a it seemed bring peop ad the power to h l il st a el d an status. M Indwe 31


AS WE COMMEMORATE the first anniversary of his death, we look back on his life and his achievements. Yet, how do you pay tribute to the man who was father to a family and father to a nation? This was a question that in reality was asked long before Nelson Mandela passed away. As he approached his final years, his children and grandchildren knew the day would come when they would need to answer this pivotal question. His death would not only be theirs to mourn, but also an entire nation’s and the world’s. It would only be fitting, then, that a memorial garden be created in which to honour and remember him. In Long Walk to Freedom, Mandela recalls the hills above his childhood village of Qunu. He describes how they were dotted with large, smooth rocks that he and his friends transformed into their own roller-coaster: “We sat on flat stones and slid down the face of the large rocks. We did this until our backsides were so sore we could hardly sit down.” It was here that Mandela wanted to be laid to rest when the time came. The Mandela family heeded his wish and called on South Africa’s greatest and most talented landscape architects to tender their designs for the memorial garden. The mandate was to encapsulate all that Madiba means as an icon, a leader and a legend to our country and the world. Landscape architect Greg Straw, owner of

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Earth Outdoor Living, flew to Qunu and walked the land surrounding the Mandela farmstead as he drew inspiration. Straw recalls the experience: “The Mandela family initially approached me to build a memorial garden on the farm. It was unbeknown to me that the garden was going to serve as Madiba’s final resting place. When I eventually discovered the magnitude of what I was doing, I think I did the most amount of research I’ve ever done in my entire life – out of respect, out of needing to know exactly what was going on and had taken place in his life so that I could personify his garden.” He studied the memorial gardens of Princess Diana, Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr., John F. Kennedy, and many more icons of the past. None seemed appropriate for the father of our democracy. Paying tribute would need to be bigger than a courtyard statue, and bigger than a fountain, and bigger than an avenue of poplars down which you could stroll to leave a bunch of flowers. Straw realised from the outset that the garden needed to be as magnificent as the man himself, yet at the same time, it needed to respect the land and the community of Qunu. Straw worked closely with the Mandela family in Qunu for six years to create the memorial garden and final resting place. He recalls sharing lunches and teas with Madiba as they explored how he wanted the remembrance garden to benefit the community around his

First Page: Landscape architect Greg Straw was tasked with creating a garden that would best encapsulate Madiba’s incredible legacy This Page: Straw used plants indigenous to Madiba’s childhood home of Qunu to ensure that the garden’s design fits in harmoniously with the surrounding landscape Next Page: The garden overlooks the green hills of Qunu which Madiba fondly described in his book Long Walk to Freedom


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homestead in Qunu and draw the people of South Africa to his childhood home. “So the remembrance garden became a walk through his life. It’s a journey. Those who come to pay their respects can learn about and remember who Madiba was and what he achieved for South Africa,” Straw describes. “This garden is not about his death, it is about his entire life. “It allows visitors to consider the milestones from his birth, through the struggle and his presidency of the new South Africa, to his retirement and final years, before arriving at a deeply personal symbol of his legacy.” Straw created a 1.2 km pathway leading towards Madiba’s final resting place that reflects moments in his life, while the plants and rocks tell stories. “As there was turmoil in his life, so the pathway winds and bends. When the pathway turns up a steep hill, visitors will walk through a difficult time in Madiba’s life, such as his imprisonment or the final struggle against apartheid. A dark tunnel symbolises his arrest. As the pathway reaches the crest of the hill, his release from Robben Island is portrayed as visitors stand and look over the vast landscape,” he adds. The design uses the relief and the natural lay of the land to create a pathway that stretches over a kilometre. At the centre, Straw’s design includes the emblem of the Mandela clan, an enormous bee, built of stone collected from the family farm. A stream leads to a pond where the water rests surrounding the bee, allowing visitors to pause and

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reflect. The water gently flows out through the bee, and stepping over the water means accepting the passage of time. As visitors walk away, the water seems to follow them, or perhaps even guide them. There is much to discover and embrace, and true to Tata’s style, the remembrance garden is not filled with pomp and grandeur. It is almost natural, despite being designed so carefully. The plants are endemic to the area, and there is no sense of symmetry or formality. “It’s been an incredible and humbling experience, and one that is not yet complete. There were so many challenges, from the planning and building to politics and media. I think the biggest challenge was probably keeping the garden a secret for so long. Journalists tried to bribe my staff and people broke into my on-site office looking for images or clues. It was a huge responsibility to the family.” The garden has yet to be competed and will likely open to the public over the next couple of years. In the meantime, as we remember Madiba’s passing and celebrate his life and the legend he leaves behind, the remembrance garden will encourage us to remember that Nelson Mandela was once a simple rural boy, a family man, a father, grandfather and husband. He was a revolutionary. A man who fought courageously for equal rights. A man who became the first president of democratic South Africa when the world believed it would fall to civil war. The true beginnings of our democratic nation will always be remembered.




p i r T Road t s h g i l De pping o t S h t r o W e l l Pa d s t a Text & Images

Š Keri Harvey

S

For

vey.com)

(www.keri-har

f th e ca l tr ea ts is h al lo e st ta d an y th e e w ay to b u e T ow n an d u p ap C to p p in g al on g th of t ou d ip . If yo u h ea t fo u r fu n of a ro ad tr ca n vi si t at le as u yo r, te os n er oa st ld to P at u n iq u e W es t C R 45 vi a H op ef ie h it w ch ea ), si d e st al ls p a d st a ll e (r oa d ri n gs . ch ar m an d of fe

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Stopping along the way to buy and taste local treats is half the fun of a road trip. If you head out of Cape Town and up the R45 via Hopefield to Paternoster, you can visit at least four padstalle (roadside stalls), each with unique West Coast charm and offerings. Die Plaasmol, R45 Near Hopefield When Fransie Koekemoer says when she opened Die Plaasmol in 2011, she simply sold recycled junk. “I am in favour of recycling, and one person’s junk is another person’s joy, so that’s how I started.” Even the paths are paved with upturned bottles collected by Fransie and her children, and old rusty mattress springs have been transformed into unusual wall décor. “Anything goes here,” adds Fransie, “as long as it makes people happy.” This is a true roadside stall and an interesting spot in which to refresh on a road trip. Breakfasts reflect the farming priorities of the area and are named after tractors – such as Massey Ferguson and John Deer – but jaffles, venison pies and farm bread with biltong are also firm favourites among patrons. While parents browse, shop and dine, there’s a comfy couch and a TV in the corner to keep the kids entertained. There is also a collection of farm animals strutting their stuff outside, including black pigs, geese, ducks, and chickens. You can also buy plants for your garden here, as well as locally produced fynbos honey. Contact +27 74 924 8478 or visit www.plaasmol.co.za for more information. Closed Christmas day.

Weskus Spens, R27 About 10 km Before Vredenburg As you cross over the R27 West Coast road towards Vredenburg, a short left and then a right lands you at Weskus Spens. This establishment, marked by a boat wheelhouse raised high above the ground, has been in business for over 20 years, and owner Annemarie Thom still bakes the bread for her padstal every day. She says she knows of four loaves that were taken all the way back to New York. Built to resemble an old farmhouse, with low-beamed ceilings and a kitchen hearth, Annemarie believes it’s the warm atmosphere of the place that draws people back again and again. And the offerings are all locally produced too, from traditional pickles and preserves to honey body products and T-shirts with quirky West Coast slogans. It’s more than worth stopping for coffee

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Alexander and Charmaine Pieters had a dream, and they made it a reality. “We wanted to open a padstal with a difference,” explains Charmaine, “a place that is an experience and more than simply somewhere to stop and shop or have a light meal.” They got this completely right at Mondvol. About 4 km off the R45 that links Vredenburg and Paternoster, a sand road leads to Mondvol, with sweeping views of rolling hills and the Atlantic just beyond. Mondvol is a taste of stylish country living, with sheep and cattle grazing in the surrounding fields while you enjoy freshly ground coffee and red velvet cake on a sunny stoep adorned with antique and reclaimed furniture. Just imagine it. The menu is ever changing, but the decadent quiche will hopefully be served forever. Before hitting the road, shop for handmade cheeses, local seasonal delicacies like slangbessie konfyt, carrot jam or veldkool. There’s beautiful needlework too, as well as linen and trinkets personally created by Charmaine. What’s sure is that you won’t leave hungry or empty handed, and next time you visit there will be completely

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Jêm en Pantoffels, Paternoster “Lots of the local fishermen’s wives wear slippers all day. They even fetch their children from school wearing slippers or ‘pantoffels’ and big plastic curlers,” says owner Amanda Verwey. “So that’s where the shop name comes from. And ‘jêm’ is simply ‘jam’ in the local dialect.” The name is welcoming and homely and Jêm en Pantoffels – along the main thoroughfare in Paternoster – proudly promotes locally produced fare from the West Coast. “We don’t sell any commercial lines,” adds co-owner Antoinette Barnard, “but believe in supporting the local farmers, because then they in turn can provide employment to more people to support their families.” The Rattle Snake and Lord of the Rings are two favourite lines for chilli lovers, but the homemade rusks, apricot jam, and cookies are also wildly popular and made by Amanda on site. Gifts for sale also reflect the off-beat West Coast humour, and local specialities like crayfish and potjiekos can also be enjoyed. It’s a shop full of one-off buys and tastes. Contact +27 76 265 5653 for more information. Closed on Christmas day.

s e e f l i g ht s c he d ul e f o r m o r e i nf o r m at i o n.

Mondvol, Off the R45 at Trekoskraal

new offerings. Contact +27 22 715 3096 or visit Mondvol Padstal en Koffiewinkel on Facebook for more information. Closed Mondays and 22nd to 26th December 2014.

S a e xpre ss con n e ct s you t o cap e t o wn

and home-baked cake or breakfast or lunch, and the bobotie is a favourite. You can also choose dishes with bokkoms (dried fish) and biltong if you prefer. Contact +27 22 715 4400 or +27 82 774 0450 for more information. Closed Christmas day.

First Page: Die Plaasmol has an unusual name and sells unique products too Second Page Top: Unique signage welcomes visitors to Jem en Pantoffels Second Page Bottom: Mondvol is renowned for its delectable breakfasts and lunches as well as magnificent handmade craftwork This Page Left: Weskusspens has a cosy interior filled with homemade products from the surrounding area This Page Right: Jem en Pantoffels has a quirky shop front that looks onto the main road through Paternoster




A Merry

to All

s a m t is r h C n Gree dly Festive Season

Tips for an Eco-Frien

Text: Lesley Stones m Images Š iStockphoto.co

T

he amount of waste we generate during the festive season is astonishing. Heaps of discarded wrapping paper, empty boxes that once held gifts, a mountain of empty wine bottles, and piles of uneaten food because you over-catered again. It is not just us who have a hangover. The poor planet is also groaning at our overindulgence after its Christmas trees are felled and our fairy lights burn up electricity. Nobody wants to be Scrooge at Christmas, but there are definitely ways of having fun without creating quite so much waste.

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THESE DAYS Christmas has become so commercialised that the festive spirit often vanishes altogether. You are frazzled because you cannot find the perfect present, and the costs mount because there are so many gifts to buy. This year, don’t let Christmas becomes a commercial trauma instead of the happy, caring family occasion it ought to be. Instead, make a pledge to focus on what matters – your family, friends and the world around you – and, with a little planning, you can enjoy the warmth of giving and receiving without it being a commercial free-for-all. This approach is ultimately good for the planet too!

Feel-Good Gifts Everybody loves getting presents, but this year agree to set a limit on the value of the gifts you exchange. Then set a challenge to see who can be the most creative, not the most extravagant. Instead of a physical gift, why not make a present of adopting an animal at your local zoo? Johannesburg Zoo has various adoption packages that include entrance tickets, an adoption certificate and species information. Details are available on www.jhbzoo.org.za. Order presents from ethical Fair Trade catalogues where you know the gifts are not made in sweat shops and the raw materials come from suppliers who pay their workers fairly. Charities like the World Wildlife Fund have gift catalogues where you can use your money to benefit nature or the needy. Craft markets are a fun place to find unusual gifts made by independent artisans. This way your gifts will be different and you will also be supporting the local community. Try making homemade presents out of dried fruit snacks or sweets, or by mixing various goodies in a bowl and then decanting them into interesting old jars or containers. You can scour the charity shops for unique containers. This is not only cheaper than buying from normal shops, but also supports the needy. There is also just about time to grow your own flowers or plants to give as gifts by placing them in unusual bowls or pots sourced from junk shops.

Revising Old Traditions Visit your local nursery and buy a real Christmas tree that you can plant in the garden afterwards. It’s far more authentic than some gaudy plastic and tinsel creation, and it also smells nice. If you still receive real Christmas cards in this era of email, cut out the jovial Santas or cute robins from the prettiest cards and make them into tree hangings for next year. Since shop-bought

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sandton square


Christmas cards are expensive and waste a lot of natural resources, set an afternoon aside for a fun session of making your own. They will not be as professional, but they will certainly be a lot more personal. You can also get the whole family involved in making decorations for hanging on the tree and around the house, rather than buying mass produced offerings. To decorate your living tree, try baking biscuits to hang from the branches. Bake lots, because they look pretty, and when you are peckish, you can surreptitiously remove some as a little snack! Take a family romp in a park to track down natural decorations like pinecones and ivy to add to your tree. Unwanted CDs are also great for tree decorations or as an unusual wind chime, and you can add beads and ribbon to turn them into ornaments. Instead of wasting electricity with strings of fairy lights, look for energy-saving lights made with LEDs which are far more efficient than traditional lights. For your Christmas meal, the most obvious eco-friendly solution is to buy meat that has been organically reared. Afterwards, instead of scraping leftovers into the bin, plate them up on paper plates or wrap them in tinfoil and hand them out to vendors at the traffic lights to share the Christmas spirit. It is probably a long time since they had a lovingly cooked homemade meal. Finally, use separate bin bags for waste glass, plastic, paper, and tin, so you can take them to the recycling tip afterwards and do your bit to share a little festive spirit with the planet.




Simply Celestial Sodwana Bay

Text & Images Š Adam Cruise

T

his is a timeless place, perhaps even a heavenly kingdom. I’ve been visiting Sodwana Bay since the antique colour photo-world of the mid-1970s. Not much has changed, if one omits the progress of photographic technology, a coterie of lodges and campsites, and a new tar road that only recently replaced the lumpy, muddy tracks through the mangrove swamps my father had to negotiate in his rickety old Series II Land Rover, a bucking and bronking chunk of metal which threatened to set off the high-pressure diving cylinders ricocheting around the bak at the back. The beach, though, looks exactly the same.

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bisected perpendicularly at intervals by deep canyons. These canyons are so deep that it has been rumoured German World War II submarines used to park there, safe from the radars of the Royal Navy ploughing the waves above. The canyons are also home to Sodwana’s most timeless and otherworldly of residents, the Coelacanth. This is a creature from the age of dinosaurs. They were only discovered here in 2000 by daredevil divers who risked – and some lost – their lives in a deep-water expedition to find them. Coelacanths have somehow survived deep in these dark watery gullies, far removed from the violent changes of successive eons of evolutionary change. Unfortunately, these “dino-fish” are only accessible to the brave and foolhardy, but thankfully they are just a sideshow to the full extravaganza. The coral reefs are named after the distance each measures from the lighthouse on top of the Casuarina-lined berm. My first ever scuba dive was on Two-Mile Reef. In those days there was a resident honeycomb moray eel called Monty. He was semi-tame, because divers had been feeding him boiled eggs – a practice that thankfully was banned by marine park authorities – but he was the star attraction back then. These days Monty’s progeny are still in abundance, as are giant green morays, stingrays, and elusive electric rays. There are big, laborious-looking potato bass, a kaleidoscope of colourful critters and, on occasion, schools of dolphin and pods of colossal whale sharks. Two-Mile, due to its closer proximity to Jesser Point, is popular among beginner divers, but for the more experienced,

Sa e xp r es s co nn ec t s y o u t o r i c ha rd s bay

THE CASUARINAS on the sandy berm still sigh in a fresh North-Easter. They are an alien anomaly that forms part of the ancient virgin forested dunes – some of the world’s highest – that sweep up the coast all the way to Mozambique and beyond. Here, at the base of these unspoiled dunes, giant Leatherback turtles and their smaller Loggerhead cousins return each year to lay their eggs as they have for centuries. So have the curling breakers that thunder over the rocky promontory of Jesser Point, before dissipating in the protection of the turquoise half moon bay that gives Sodwana its fame as a launch site to a string of underwater coral reefs nearby. In 1822 the Royal Navy commissioned a number of boats to survey this remote stretch of coastline which, despite the modest protection of the bay behind Jesser Point (named after an officer who died of malaria on the voyage), they surmised was completely inaccessible for their wooden sailboats. Even by the 1970s, my father and his pals would prefer to swim through the thunderous surf in full scuba gear, rather than risk a tricky boat launch. Luckily, when I came of scuba diving age during the eighties, ski boat technology, in the form of more engine power and semi-rigid inflatable hulls, really unlocked Sodwana’s aquatic world. Due to an epoch of rising sea levels, an old coastline forms a prominent underwater ridge parallel to the new one about a mile offshore. This shallow, calcified ridge allowed coral and its attendant fish life to develop in sublime abundance. Possibly from ancient river valleys, the reefs are



the delicate plate coral beds of Five-Mile Reef are unarguably home to some of the finest specimens on the planet. And if one doesn’t mind the long boat ride to my favourite, NineMile Reef, there is dramatic coral topography and even richer marine life. There are other reefs too, like little Stringer Reef between Jesser and Two-Mile. It’s famous for its camouflaged leaf fish, as well the extremely rare iridescent electric-blue moray eel. Finally, the reefs just beyond the surf at Jesser play host in mid-summer to legions of female ragged-tooth sharks. They are here to gestate, and hardly move out of a diver’s way as they are on a strict fast when pregnant. It is little wonder that Sodwana is regarded as one of the best scuba diving destinations on offer. Sodwana was named after the local Zulu tribes of the region. It means “The Little One on Its Own”, a name that epitomises this place. As far as scuba diving destinations go, Sodwana may not be a Barrier Reef or a Caribbean archipelago. It’s small in comparison, but it’s also unique, unspoilt and, above all, home to a distinctive marine diversity and variety that sets it apart as my best-loved diving destination. It’s a cliché to say this, but when it comes to scuba diving, Sodwana is simply celestial.

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In the Eye of the Beholder Finding Treasure in Your City Text: Lisa Witepski Images Š Hadeda & KZNSA Art Gallery

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Forget bargain hunting and go searching for treasure instead! THERE WAS A TIME when “going to the shops” meant stopping at an emporium, where you’d be greeted by name and asked the state of your family’s health before the shopkeeper handed over your goods and sent you on your way. How quaint such stores seem in an age of billionrand hypermarket mall complexes and retail brands that swept away local quirks as they crossed international borders. But how comforting to know that we haven’t been left alone with shelves and shelves of cookiecutter goods. Search your city and you will find unique stores, where their specialist products are as eccentric as their personalities.

Finding Gold in Johannesburg Feel like a cuppa? Bypass the sidewalk cafes and head into Cyrildene or, as it’s more widely known, Chinatown. With everything from street posters to product names written in Mandarin, you’d be forgiven for feeling as though you’ve fallen through a rabbit hole. But keep focused! Your mission here is to find Tian Fu Tea Shop (+27 11 622 9236). With more than 300 different types of Chinese tea, as well as medicinal and herbal brews and even tea sets, you’re bound to find something to suit your tastes. Speaking of taking a trip without leaving the country, browsing through Hadeda (www.hadedashop.com) in Parkwood’s famous gallery precinct is like walking through Frida Kahlo’s private boudoir. From bright blankets to heavy pewter frames, every item in the shop has been sourced from Mexico and carries with it the irresistible colour of this culture. If you subscribe to the belief that the past is another country, your retail travel adventure can continue. Start with a sojourn at the Collectors Treasury (+27 11 334 6556). Lined with volumes and volumes of first editions and maps, glassware, silver and records, stepping into this cubbyhole is like taking a trip in a time capsule, or entering the hideaway of a mad professor. Next, it’s time to live your own Downton Abbey fantasy at Melville’s Reminiscene (+27 11 726 7905). Since “vintage” seems to have become an acceptable term for everything from the scruffy T-shirt you bought six years ago to your mom’s fake pearls, it’s refreshing to browse through a wardrobe containing authentic flapper dresses.

Down in Durbs Paris has Shakespeare & Company; Durban has Ike’s Book Shop and Collectables (+27 31 303 9214). If you’re the kind of person who gets lost in the smell of old books, this is for you. It is a haven where you can find rarities and oddities so unique Lonely

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Planet called it “more museum than book shop”. And, while we’re on the subject of unique: The KZNSA Art Gallery (www.kznsagallery.com) isn’t merely a home to leading local artists. The adjoining shop – recently revamped – is a showcase of exquisite design, from baskets and ceramics to glassware. Best of all, shopping here means shopping local, as the store has nixed international stockists.

The Cape of Good Shopping Looking for the latest from Jeremy Loops? Or an obscure track by Congolese musician Mapumba? Then your first stop should undoubtedly be the African Music Store (+27 21 426 0857) in the heart of Cape Town. Boasting an astonishing array of albums from musicians across our continent, this Long Street institution is the place to head when next you have a yearning for djembe. Since mainstream beer became passé, craft has been the word on everyone’s lips. Some enthusiasts have gone beyond scouting for back-of-beyond breweries that have only one other supporter and have started mixing up their own lagers in their own backyards. And for these people, Beerguevara (www.beerguevara.com) is more than a shop, it’s a revelation (although you could equally call it a revolution). Beyond simply stocking different varieties of hops, Beerguevara also hosts weekly workshops, but for those who can’t make it to Cape Town, there’s always the online store. If you’re cursing George R.R. Martin because he won’t confirm the release date of the next instalment of A Song of Ice and Fire, of if you have more Superman figurines than your five-year-old nephew and you would gladly miss out on the Currie Cup final if the dates clashed with Comic Con, you’re a prime candidate for shopping at Readers Den Comic Shop (www.readersden.co.za). Whether you’re looking for a contemporary comic, a classic from the Golden Age, a graphic novel or action figure, you’ll find it here. Good news if you’re based elsewhere in the country is that Readers Den also has an online store.

Dullstroom’s Surprising Gem Ok, so it’s not exactly in a major South African centre, but since it claims to have the largest whisky collection in the world, Wild About Whisky (www.wildaboutwhisky.co.za) definitely deserves a mention. If ever you’ve wanted to try a Japanese or Indian whisky or wondered about a particular malt, this should be your first stop. Definitely worth leaving home for!

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f o s e i t e c i N e h T

a n s y Kn

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Text: Stuart Wainwright Images Š Knysna Tourism & Nicky Furniss

A

t a time when most South Africans are a little worn at the edges from a busy year, there is perhaps no place more wonderful for a revitalising holiday than the picturesque town of Knysna. Nestled amid lush indigenous forests and only an hour’s drive from George, Knysna caters for all types of holidaymakers, from families with tiny tots or school-going youngsters, grandparents and extended families to newlyweds, dinkies and groups of varsity mates. Indwe 61


BEING ONE of the last towns along the world famous Garden Route, it is as if the Western Cape was simply saving the best for last. Beauty can be found in all directions, whether it be the pristine lagoon, white beaches and blue ocean, or the deep green of the surrounding forests, in which you may stumble across hidden lakes and waterfalls. Who knew that even the name “Knysna” means “ferns” in Khoikhoi? It just goes to show that the natural beauty of the area has been making an impact on people for thousands of years! The small but bustling town is famous not only for its forests, but also the estuary on which it is situated. The Knysna estuary is South Africa’s largest and most ecologically important estuary. According to SANParks, it hosts almost half of the country’s estuarine species, and is home to the endangered Knysna seahorse, which can only be spotted in three estuaries in the world (the other two are Swartvlei and Keurbooms). While the seahorse has become an iconic symbol for the local community, not everyone is into odd little critters. Fortunately, there’s plenty to do and more than enough places to eat, drink and be merry. The small town allows for a leisurely way of life where visitors can browse quaint shops and enjoy lazy afternoon coffees at sidewalk cafes, or let time pass gently over gourmet food and good conversations. The locals are known for being friendly and cheerful, and they are always happy to share a smile and a laugh with their guests.

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For those who enjoy water, the lagoon and ocean offer an opportunity to escape the summer heat and go paddling, sailing, surfing or fishing, or even whale, dolphin or seal watching if you’re there from winter through spring. Charter a boat and head off to the Featherbed Nature Reserve, or possibly around the Knysna Heads to witness some of the most gorgeous scenery that the South African coastline has to offer. Heading inland, there is even more to entertain.



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for motor enthusiasts, Gastronomica and the Pick n Pay Knysna Oyster Festival is held in July, and then the Pink Loerie Mardi Gras and the Rastafarian Earth Festival have all chosen to return on an annual basis. The Pick n Pay Knysna Oyster Festival is arguably the town’s biggest annual event, as it encompasses a range of sporting competitions over its ten day period, as well as arts and other cultural activities and displays. Roughly 200,000 of the world’s tastiest oysters are consumed over the event! If you plan to stay in the town itself, there are some great shopping options. Whether you wind your way through smaller arts and crafts shops, or visit the slightly larger malls, the hidden treasures are all worth a little bit of digging – and they are numerous! There are also nearby markets that open on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays and are well worth a visit. Wash it all down after a hard day of holidaying with one of the locally brewed beers or a sundowner, and the town’s renowned oysters for dinner. Sit by the quay-side and watch the boats go by, drink in hand. The finer joys in life are in abundance in Knysna. If you’re heading elsewhere for your December holiday this year, don’t get caught up in holiday-envy. Book your trip over Easter, or a mid-year winter break for the Oyster Festival, because dis altyd lekker by die see. For more information and assistance in planning your next holiday, contact Knysna Tourism on +2744 382 5510, or email info@knysna-info.co.za.

S a ex p re s s c o nne c t s y o u to GEORGE

The forests offer their own adventures, including hiking or mountain biking trails, 4x4 drives, abseiling, bird watching (where you might even see the elusive Knysna Loerie), and horse riding. The forest is still home to many bird species, antelope, monkeys, and even elephant (though these are rarely spotted by humans). Kids will also have plenty to keep them busy, including treetop canopy tours, Monkey Land, or mashie golf. You can also get a round of golf in at any of the area’s three magnificent courses: Simola Golf Course designed by Jack Nicklaus, Pezula Champion Golf Course, or the Knysna Golf Course. Of course, if you look to the skies, there is always more to do for those daring enough to play among the clouds. You can test your bravery with microlighting, skydiving, or the world’s highest bungee jump at Bloukrans – if you’re keen to trust your ankles attached to an elastic rope as you plummet toward the face of the earth. As the activities cater for all types in Knysna, so does the accommodation. Hostels and five star luxury hotels are fairly common in terms of the normal tourist accommodation options, but you could also try houseboats, tree houses, log cabins, or even experience “township living” to really experience home-grown hospitality in every possibly way. Weather wise, Knysna is warm all year round. In fact, Knysna is so idyllic that it has become a perfect place to showcase South Africa’s activities and to host events. The Knysna Speed Festival is held




d n u o r g r e d Un d n rla

e d n Wo In g n i v a C umbe ill Edgc Text: W Supplied Š Images

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The Maropeng Visitor Centre

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aves don’t tend to leave room for indifference. For some people, they’re either the epitome of foreboding, claustrophobic terror, while for others they imbue a sense of real adventure, calling one deeper to a final frontier few have trod, to see sights few have seen.

SOUTH AFRICA is home to a lot of caves, many unexplored. From deep, labyrinthine systems with cathedral-like caverns, to little more than overhangs and shallow crevices adorned with rock art, our caves have fascinated people down the ages, and drawn us to excavate the secrets they hide.

Sterkfontein Caves Part of the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site just 50 km north of Joburg, untold archaeological and palaeoanthropological riches have been unearthed at the Sterkfontein Caves (www.maropeng.co.za). They were discovered in 1896 when an Italian prospector unceremoniously blasted through the surface openings while searching for lime, which was needed for the extraction of gold on the Witwatersrand. Unfortunately, many of the cave’s incredible stalactites and stalagmites were removed or broken by mining activities, but nevertheless, the caves are still stunning and complex. The caves are most famous for their fossil finds, and it is here where “Mrs Ples”, a pre-human skull dating back more than two million years, and “Little Foot’”, an almost complete skeleton dating back some three million years, were discovered. There are six chambers in the caves, and the largest of these is 91 m long and 23 m high. Fittingly, it’s called the Hall of Elephants. Experiencing it is something quite special, and guided tours are led deep into the caves every half hour, seven days a week. As cave tours go, it’s fairly easy going, though there are a few tight bits to get through. While you’re there, it’s worth

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Sudwala Caves



Cango Caves spending time in the Maropeng Visitor Centre, housed in the striking Tumulus building, where you can explore the history of humankind and take in the 2,500 m2 hall of exhibits and the underground boat ride. Maropeng operates the Sterkfontein Caves tourist site. Only 10 km away, why not get a combined ticket and experience the best of both?

Cango Caves Arguably South Africa’s most famous cave system, the Cango Caves (www.cango-caves.co.za) near Oudtshoorn in the Western Cape are utterly enchanting. Home to evocative dripstone formations and vast halls, the caves go 5.3 km deep and their halls are unparalleled. The Heritage Tour (which departs on the hour, every hour) will show you places that are scarcely believable. Van Zyl’s Hall is almost the size of a soccer field (it is 50 m wide, 90 m long and 18 m high in some places). Inside the hall are Cleopatra’s Needle, a 150,000year-old stalagmite, and the Organ Pipes, a gorgeous dripstone/flowstone feature. Inside Botha’s Hall are two columns which soar towards the ceiling, and further on are the Rainbow, Bridal and Fairyland Chambers… We’ll leave you to discover why they’re named as such. If you’re feeling brave, there’s also the Adventure Tour, which takes you further into the caves and involves scaling ladders, crawling through tight spaces, and squirming through steep shafts. It’s hard work, but well worth the effort for the awesome crystals and formations you’ll come across.

Sudwala Caves A lesser-known cave system, Sudwala Caves (www.sudwalacaves.co.za) in Mpumalanga are estimated to extend for more than 40 km. It’s a place of mystery and history: a Swazi prince took refuge

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here when fleeing from his brother; they were used as an ammunition store during the Second Boer War; and Paul Kruger’s gold bullion was supposedly stored here and then disappeared in the area, perhaps waiting to be discovered in some unexplored passage or cranny. Most fascinating is that there is a flow of fresh air, the source of which has yet to be found. One-hour tours take visitors 600 m deep and are suitable for people of all ages, although there is also the option of the five-hour Crystal Tour, which takes visitors through 2,000 m of the system – and includes a bit of crawling and squeezing – ending at a sparkling crystal chamber. Dominating the cave system is Owen Hall, a spectacular chamber 70 m in diameter and 37 m high. The acoustics are superb, and so the chamber has actually been used as a venue for orchestras and plays!

Cave Dwelling If the idea of sleeping in a cave appeals to you, you can do this quite easily in the uKhahlamba-Drakensberg Park, a World Heritage Site covering 242,813 hectares. Hiking in the ’Berg is spectacular enough, but overnighting in a cave is a truly memorable experience, with nothing separating you from the elements. Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife (www.kznwildlife.com) has a list of caves in which you’re allowed to sleep, some of which are tiny and sleep only two, while others sleep up to 12 people. You’ll need to book in advance to ensure availability, and might have to share your cave with another hiking group, but the stars, sunsets and sunrises are spectacular, with views that go on seemingly forever. Just remember a few basic rules: no fires, don’t litter, and if you come across any rock art, respect it by looking at it only. And as with any visit to a mountainous region, dress for all weather conditions, as temperatures can plummet even in summer.




The Falls Call The Jameson Vic Falls Carnival Text: Keith Bain Images © Wild Horizons, Greg Ewing & Jameson Vic Falls Carnival

Had David Livingstone known, when he first set eyes on the plumes of spray rising from the depths of the Batoka Gorge, that Victoria Falls would one day host Africa’s most exhilarating three-day New Year’s extravaganza, he might have had second thoughts before renaming it after his tight-lipped queen.

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THE SETTLEMENT of Victoria Falls is Zimbabwe’s only town situated within a national park, so it’s ill advised to walk around after dark. Wild animals do roam. Hippos use the roads as shortcuts, buffalos appear out of nowhere, and you might accidentally bump into elephants who prefer not to have their personal space invaded. This makes the little village on the edge of the world’s biggest waterfall sound a lot more sinister than it actually is. The most dangerous thing you’re likely to spot from your hotel terrace is gangs of warthogs hoovering up the manicured lawns or cavorting in muddy pools. Come New Year’s Eve, though – and over the days leading up to the big switch-over to 2015 – there’ll be another kind of wildlife swinging into town. The annual Jameson Vic Falls Carnival – serving up three days of music, dancing and high energy fun – now draws thousands of party animals to play in Africa’s adrenaline capital. While Vic Falls village is unmatched for its full-on views of the most powerful water show on earth, it’s hardly renowned for its nightlife, which generally comes down to displays of traditional dancing accompanied by dinner in one of the hotel restaurants. Not that Vic Falls is immune to loud, cacophonous, rumbling noises. There’s fair reason that the great natural wonder at the heart of it all is known locally as Mosi Oa Tunya, or “The Smoke That Thunders”. The falls give off a deep-bellied

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roar as millions of litres of water torrentially plummet 100 m into the depths of Batoka Gorge, kicking up tremendous plumes of mist and spray. When water levels are at their peak, the resulting white cloud is visible from 80 km away. And all around this gigantic wall of falling water exists a natural wonderland of coursing rivers with fast churning rapids, huge skies, and an immense animalpopulated landscape where safaris promise astonishing animal encounters. Which is why you’ll struggle to find such an awesome and awe-inspiring setting for an end-of-year celebration elsewhere. Three days’ worth of entertainment, in fact, has been lined up to herald the New Year, starting with a Vic Falls classic: A ride on a vintage steam train, with contemporary electronic dance music as a sound track. Gliding through Victoria Falls National Park, the train mixes a party atmosphere with the chance to spot animals in the bush. It then arrives at a secret location for a DJ-fuelled extravaganza under a canopy of stars. The following day the open-to-the-sky dance floor at Vic Falls Farm School fills with revellers flinging fistfuls of coloured powder at one another, followed by several different official after-parties scattered through the town. All this, though, is really a warm-up to the big night when the main stage will be graced by legendary Zimbabwean musician, Oliver “Tuku” Mtukudzi, and South Africa’s most successful electronic duo, Goldfish. Also on the evening’s bill are Harare’s dancehall reggae

First Page: David Poole (left) and Dominic Peters are the Goldfish electric wizards who’ll be playing in the New Year at Vic Falls this month This Spread: The wildest animals will be on the dance floor; although there are plenty of big surprises in this African Eden (right). Last Page (Top to bottom): the festival offers something for everyone, from microlighting above the Falls, a steam train party on day one and several of southern Africa’s finest artists


A Few Essentials

• Tickets for the Jameson Vic Falls Carnival

are available from www.vfc.nutickets.co.za. Visit vicfallscarnival.com for travel package details. • You can book experiences in and around Vic Falls with Wild Horizons, which also handles all-inclusive packages for trips to Zimbabwe for the three-day festival. Wild Horizons also has its own accommodation, the luxurious Wild Horizons Elephant Camp. Visit wildhorizons.co.za. • Even if you don’t stay at the most well-known and old-fashioned hotel in town, be sure to enjoy high tea on the terrace of the legendary Victoria Falls Hotel. Visit africansunhotels.com.

king, Winky D, and Cape Town band Beatenberg. The first such music festival started as a fairly small event in 2009 and by 2012 transformed into the Vic Falls Carnival, but struggled to find its feet. That year, Craig Bright, co-founder of Seed Experiences, the events company responsible for Rocking the Daisies, came to have a look, saw its enormous potential, and decided to climb on board. They invested heavily, brought in Jameson as a sponsor, and set about transforming the event into what Craig envisions as a global bucket list festival. “My dream is for Vic Falls Carnival to be the kind of once-in-a-lifetime travel-to-party destination event that people from around the world will plan a year in advance to get to. There’s no other location in the world that can offer this kind of New Year’s experience,” he says. Craig and his team are also known for his company’s commitment to fostering a spirit of green, sustainable festivals. Seed Experiences is the first African company to win a global award for its festivals’ ecological initiatives, and the Carnival is another platform where they’ll be raising awareness of conservation issues, including anti-poaching. “Victoria Falls is not only a magical place because of the presence of one of Africa’s most exhilarating natural wonders, but also for the incredible adventures on offer. You come to celebrate New Year, for sure, but you can add on many unique adventures, experienced in one of the world’s most incredible locations.”

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s ee f l ig h t sch e du l e f or more in f ormat ion . S a e x pr e ss c on ne ct s yo u t o ha ra r e

This tiny village has developed a welldeserved reputation as Africa’s adrenaline capital, and with New Year traditionally a time when caution is thrown to the wind, there’s plenty here to get the blood pumping. Thrill seekers take pleasure in diving off the bridge connecting Zimbabwe with Livingstone on the Zambian side of the border attached to a bungee cord – understandably one of the world’s most famous and exciting jumps. The gorge swing is the other way to experience the heart-pounding jolt that comes with freefalling towards the Batoka Gorge, this time harnessed to the world’s highest commercial high wire. Daredevils step off the cliff and – bombs away – savour the sensation of freefalling for 70 m before swinging peacefully above the river. They’ll also happily flip your feet over your head if you’d like to launch from a handstand position. It’s your party, after all. And, of course, while you’re flying high on end-of-year spirit, you might as well head into the clouds for a real flight above the Falls. The quietest experience is aboard a microlight, which also brings with it the sense of freedom you get from having the wind in your face. There are also ways to get even closer to the water. Here you’ll find some of the world’s most challenging commercial white water rafting. Or, for the bone-idle, mellow sunset cruises on the Zambezi River, where the hardest you’ll work is lifting drinks to your lips while watching the waters radiate goldenred hues as the sun sinks on paradise. Away from the water, there are zipline tours through the forest canopy, elephant back safaris, and more conventional vehicle based game viewing. Or you could throw caution and sense to the wind and roam the village streets after dark. I wouldn’t recommend it, though. Far better to be enjoying the party, where the wildest creatures you’ll encounter will be party animals celebrating their hearts out, just like you.




Marvellous

Markets Text: Julia Lamberti Images Š Kim Speer, Cyan Brown & supplied

Local food markets are becoming increasingly popular as many South Africans are getting in touch with their inner gourmand. We explore the country’s most popular markets and the delicious delicacies they have on offer.

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Market Magic in Mzansi Gauteng’s food markets offer the residents of South Africa’s financial epicentre respite from the hustle and bustle of city life. For example, Sundays see many citizens of the City of Gold flock to Market on Main (www.marketonmain.co.za) in Johannesburg’s fashionable Maboneng Precinct. Situated in the heart of the city, this world-class food market boasts over 100 stalls, and offers a relaxed space for food lovers, culinary experts and food entrepreneurs to mingle and munch. Another inner city gem is the hugely popular Neighbourgoods Market (www.neighbourgoodsmarket.co.za), which takes place every Saturday in Jozi’s creative hub of Braamfontein. This atmospheric area is a local hotspot over weekends and offers goods from artisanal producers, gourmet merchants, specialty cooks, and regional farmers. With over 600 stalls and voted as Johannesburg’s premier market for ten consecutive years, the Rooftop Market (www.rosebankmarket.co.za) at the Rosebank Mall attracts local and international patrons alike. In addition to the wide array of arts and crafts on offer, shoppers can also enjoy an eclectic mix of mouth-watering delights at this lively location. Dubbed the “definitive food market in Gauteng”, the Blubird Wholefood Market (www.blubird.co.za) offers a true epicurean adventure with delicacies like designer cupcakes, specialist deli items, homemade sweets, and delectable baked goods. The market is based at the Blubird Shopping Centre in Illovo and takes place every Sunday between 09h00 and 14h00. Away from the buzz of the city and neatly nestled in the Northern suburbs of Johannesburg, the Bryanston Organic Market (www.bryanstonorganicmarket.co.za) is Joburg’s original outdoor market. Here shoppers can enjoy earthy energy and purchase a variety of hand crafted wares, homemade foods and delicious organic produce on Thursdays, Saturdays and public holidays. A few miles away from Bryanston and situated beneath a thick canopy of tall trees, the Fourways Farmers’ Market (www.ffmarket.co.za) takes place every Sunday and features around 50 carefully selected vendors. Here sociable market goers relish local and seasonal produce, homemade goods, a champagne bar, artisanal beers and live music, all while surrounded by birdsong and butterflies. However, one of the most beautiful markets in the Gauteng region is the charming Irene Market (www.irenemarket.co.za), which is an hour’s drive from Johannesburg. Held on the second and last Saturday of every month, this child-friendly market offers a fully licensed tea garden, numerous quality food

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stalls, as well as over 300 interesting stands for the whole family to enjoy.

Shopping Escapes in the Cape The Neighbourgoods Market at the Old Biscuit Mill in Woodstock is considered to be Cape Town’s original gourmet market and takes place between 09h00 and 14h00 every Saturday. Baked goods, organic produce, fresh seafood, premium roasted coffee and gourmet goodies draw Cape crowds to this bustling market. Housed in an old fish factory at the water’s edge, the Bay Harbour Market (www.bayharbour. co.za) in Hout Bay is another well-loved market which offers visitors an eclectic South African celebration of culture and creativity, as well as a uniquely social shopping experience in a vibrant and authentic environment. It offers home-made crafts, great food, flowing drinks, and live music over weekends. A massive indoor fireplace adds to the allure of this lively location in the cooler winter months. Cape Town’s V&A Waterfront complex features the V&A Market on the Wharf (www.marketonthewharf.co.za), which opens its doors from Monday to Sunday every week and is the Mother City’s first permanent bazaar. With over 50 traders, this gourmet fair treats food lovers to lush harbour views and food styles from around the world. If traditional African dishes make your mouth water, pay a visit to the Khayelitsha Craft Market, which is held every weekday in the vibrant township of Khayelitsha. This market also aims to alleviate poverty, and all goods sold are made by members of the community, making it well worth a visit if soaking in


African culture and giving less privileged appeals to you.

back

to

those

Delightful Durban Markets Situated just outside of Durban, the Shongweni Farmers Market (www.shongwenimarket.co.za) attracts hoards of Durbanites every Saturday morning between 06h00 and 10h30. A relaxed country vibe and a wide selection of handmade food, spices, clothing, art and crafts makes this market one of the coastal city’s most enjoyable and best known shopping meccas. Alternatively, a visit to the Stables Lifestyle Market (www.stableslifestylemarket.co.za), along Jaco Jackson Drive, makes for a fun family outing in a vibrant equestrian-themed environment. A large selection of food outlets, dÊcor, antiques, crafts and live music keep local crowds returning to this market from 18h00 to 22h00 on Wednesdays to Fridays, and throughout the day on Sundays. Fabulous falafels are the biggest sellers at the Essenwood Craft Market (www.essenwoodmarket.com) in Musgrave, but food fundis can also purchase fresh goods like fruit, vegetables, pancakes, cheeses, baked treats and gourmet sandwiches at this charming kidfriendly spot. Nearly 20 years old, this market is held every Saturday between 09h00 and 14h00 under lush evergreen trees.

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e s i d a r PJusat Around the Corner

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White Pearl Resorts, Mozambique Text & Images © White Pearl Resorts

W

hat comes to mind when you hear the phrase “beach holiday”? An exotic destination far away requiring months of planning and hours of flying, or spending all your savings just to share a tiny spot of beach sand with hundreds of others while barely even having a view of the ocean? White Pearl Resorts will change the way you think about traditional beach holidays, and the best part is that it’s just around the corner.

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Exclusive Offer for SA Residents Receive 30 % off regular rates during selected periods in the year. Email reservations@whitepearlresorts.com, call +27 11 026 2674/7178 or visit www.whitepearlresorts.com for reservations and more information.

OFTEN, being beautiful goes hand in hand with being “inaccessible”. This is far from the truth when it comes to this five-star jewel. Situated along the southern coast of Mozambique, a mere one hour drive from the South African border at Kosi Bay, or a quick fixed-wing flight from the country’s capital, Maputo, this luxury resort is not only beautiful, but easily accessible. From the moment you step into reception, greeted by the warmest smiles and spectacular views, until when your private butler serves you a glass of champagne on the deck of your Pool Suite, you instantly realise that this holiday will be unlike any other. Each new day is yours to spend however you wish. Craving some much needed relaxation? Take in the Indian Ocean views while lounging on one of many luxurious day beds. Swim up to the Pool Bar to enjoy a signature cocktail, or listen to the gentle sounds of nature as all tension is eased away with a full body massage. Up for some ocean adventure? The secluded bay at White Pearl Resorts, also a protected marine reserve, is home to a variety of world renowned dive spots and spectacular sea life. Diving and snorkelling expeditions come highly recommended,

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and offer guests the opportunity to experience Mozambique from within its tranquil, clear waters. On an ocean safari, guests can jump in and swim with bottlenose dolphins, an experience that should be on any traveller’s bucket list. And now for the pièce de résistance: the pristine White Pearl beach. Due to its remoteness, the resort is blessed with an immaculate stretch of private beach that is uncrowded and untouched. The beach provides an unmatched natural setting for basking in the sun, taking endless walks, or galloping into the sunset on horseback. From November, beaches in this area are visited by endangered Loggerhead and Leatherback turtles laying their precious eggs in the soft white sands. In the new year, these eggs hatch, and baby turtles embark on a journey back to the ocean. Throughout turtle nesting season, guests at White Pearl Resorts may be lucky enough to witness this natural miracle in action on a guided turtle walk. The resort is actively involved in conservation and monitoring initiatives in the area. As for the little ones, White Pearl Resorts has an exciting kids skipper programme, called Pirates of Ponta, that will keep them occupied for hours. Guided by the resort’s experienced activity team, the programme is filled with fun, as well as educational


activities that encourage children to explore the mysteries and wonders of Ponta Mamoli’s land and sea. From beach sports and sandcastle building to baking with the chef and treasure hunting, there is no shortage of fun for all ages at White Pearl Resorts. Let’s not forget the authentic and highly celebrated culinary experience which offers a gastronomic explosion of the senses. With fresh, quality ingredients grown on-site and sourced from the community, every meal is sure to deliver the true tastes of Mozambique. Guests can wake up to a breakfast tray of fresh fruit, pastries and continental treats set out on the sunny deck. The trendy Beach Bar is the ideal spot to indulge in mouth-watering tapas lunches and signature cocktails. Dinner is an extravagant affair with a three course menu that offers something for every discerning palette. Each night the chef entices guests with a special Mozambican option, appealing to those guests who love trying something new and unique to the destination. The resort is also designed to host spectacular events, weddings and exclusive conferencing for up to 42 guests. Tailor-made packages are available on request. Whether you are seeking a relaxing escape, a family vacation, or an executive retreat, White Pearl Resorts is the ideal destination to escape the ordinary and experience a truly distinctive beach holiday.

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Food: Friend or Foe? Food Allergies Text: Thermo Fisher Scientific Image © iStockphoto.com

What Is a Food Allergy? The job of the body’s immune system is to identify and destroy germs that make you sick. A food allergy results when the immune system mistakenly targets a harmless food protein – an allergen – as a threat and attacks it. Unlike other types of food disorders, such as intolerances, food allergies are “IgE mediated”. This means that your immune system produces abnormally large amounts of an antibody called immunoglobulin E (IgE for short). IgE antibodies fight the “enemy” food allergens by releasing histamine and other chemicals, which trigger the symptoms of an allergic reaction.

Symptoms An allergic reaction to food can affect the skin, the gastrointestinal tract, the respiratory tract, and, in the most serious cases, the cardiovascular system. Reactions can range from mild to severe, including the potentially life-threatening condition known as anaphylaxis. Food allergies can cause digestive problems such as stomach pain, diarrhoea and vomiting in adults as well as in children. Food allergies are a growing, serious public health problem that affects both adults and children. Today, a wide range of foods have been reported to cause food allergies, and there has been a true rise in the prevalence of these. With food allergies, knowing what to avoid will not only help you or your child feel better today, but it may also help in avoiding more serious food

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allergy symptoms in the future.

Testing for Food Allergies There are dangers to leaving allergies untreated. Allergies may have serious implications on your quality of life. But that does not mean that they should rule your life. Many people misdiagnose themselves when it comes to allergies. This is because the symptoms often overlap with other diseases. The concern is that when these conditions are misdiagnosed, they are not treated appropriately – which is hardly ideal and could lead to unnecessary medication and incorrect treatment. This is why it’s so important to consult your doctor if you think you might have an allergy. Based on a physical examination, your case history and a blood test, the doctor will be able to make a proper diagnosis. A blood test will measure the presence of IgE antibodies in the blood to specific foods. Adults and children of any age can take a blood test and it can be performed irrespective of skin condition, medication, symptoms, disease activity, and pregnancy. The test results will help you and your doctor customise a treatment approach that’s right for you. Reducing exposure to one or more of your allergic triggers can help reduce your symptoms and your need for medication. Speak to your doctor about an allergy blood test. Treat the cause, not the symptoms. Visit http://info.thermoscientific.com/SouthAfricaAllergyReport to download your free Allergy e-book.




A Rabbi and A Sangoma

Go Into

a Bar

Will the Real Nik Please Stand Up? Text: Keith Bain Images © Supplied

Nik Rabinowitz is among South Africa’s most beloved and accomplished standup comedians, enjoyed for his frank take on the nation’s hodge-podge culture and appreciated for being the world’s only Xhosa-speaking Jewish comedian. On the occasion of his new one-man show, What the EFF?, we asked him to explain himself. Here’s what he had to say… Indwe 91


THE OBVIOUS point of stand-up comedy is to make people laugh, but maybe there are some by-products of that, like being able to make people think about something, or reconsider an issue, or laugh at themselves, or laugh at each other. Or just come together and be human beings sharing our common humanity. Obsession with race is a common thread running through South African comedy, but I think that we’re growing away from that a bit. We also have this richness of language and culture that infuses the work of many South African comics. It’s something that makes our humour funnier to South African audiences and incomprehensible to non-South Africans. So, it’s a challenge as well as a blessing: the fact that we have this unique stuff that we can talk about here, but which often has to be translated if you take it elsewhere. Growing up as an only child, I used to talk to myself a lot. That may have been where it all started. When I was in high school I memorised my godfather’s comedy material. He didn’t do stand-up, but he was an actor and told jokes. I had a book where I wrote down what he said and memorised his stories, some of which were in Afrikaans. I used to take my friends camping up on the slopes of a mountain on the farm where we lived, and then I’d tell those stories around the fire. I think that’s when I realised I could make people laugh. Doing professional stand-up comedy never even occurred to me. My first job was as a

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handlanger (general helper) for a rafting operation on the Orange River. Part of my job description included “entertaining the guests”. Also, I had to do other jobs, such as carrying the guests’ human waste in a black bag on my canoe. After four days, making them laugh was definitely the easier part of the job. My second job was as a handlanger for a theatre company. It was one step up. I still had to dig the longdrop, but I didn’t have to take anything out of it. I’d drive the cars, pitch the tents, type the scripts, and I did the lights. I also had to cook the books. I remember one night while on tour, I spent an hour in the bath in a shady hotel in Lusaka performing a 45-minute monologue to myself, pretending to be some or other weird character. Initially I did stand-up as something to try out – I had no career ambitions. But it kind of worked. The first year when you get discovered is quite easy – everyone notices you and you’re suddenly a new commodity on the market. But it’s often after that, when you have to do your “second album” so to speak, that it becomes more challenging, when you need to start writing and producing material consistently, maintaining your edge. In the beginning, I performed as a character. Then I realised that you can’t pretend too much. The character had to be dropped because a stand-up comedian really thrives on authenticity and being quite real with the audience. It was difficult for a while because I had to work out how to just be “Nik”.



Our three main cities have different personalities. Cape Town makes me think of Germans in socks and sandals climbing Lion’s Head, and hippies in Noordhoek rubbing their chords together to generate solar power. You also hear people saying Cape Town’s got this laidback cosmopolitan vibe going on – so laidback you can buy a flat in Clifton for 60 million Euros. Joburg is like a different country, where South Africans are actually integrated and get on with the business of operating with each other. A few years ago when Table Mountain was voted one of the New Wonders of the World, Joburg responded by saying: “This is Joburg, we don’t vote for mountains; we work – for money.” I’ve recently really fallen in love with Durban. It used to be a slightly weird place that seemed as though somebody forgot about it in 1982. But there’s an explosion of creativity and possibility and all sorts of interesting stuff that’s happening there now. It’s the city I get most excited about visiting in this country. Also, the water’s warm, so I don’t have to wear a wetsuit when I surf there. Which is really kiff. My childhood holidays were mostly in the Cederberg, where my dad spent about 30 years exploring for rock art. We used to camp in these caves. Those mountains remain a special place for me; they’re deep and cavernous like Pamela Anderson’s bosoms. You can get lost in them. But don’t tell my wife!

Actually, my wife knows everything about me. Except, I think, this romantic incident from my childhood. I was about 13 years old and went on a date with the second girl I ever had a crush on. (The first girl I had a crush on is now my wife, but we didn’t really talk back then.) My attempt at courtship involved me reading out sexual terms from the dictionary and then explaining what those terms meant. I don’t think she understood the words at all, because after the dictionary incident she still put her hand on my knee when we went to the movies. It was Pretty Woman and at about the hour mark, she put her hand on my knee. I was too nervous to hold hands with her, so I just waited until she took her hand away. And then we never saw each other again. It’s really a story of love and disappointment and embarrassment. For New Year’s Eve, we’ve planned to do a variety concert at home. This is my wife’s idea of fun, in which I’ll probably be forced to sing. Secretly, I’m on standby to do my show, though, so there’s some debate over whether or not I will in fact be singing. She’ll find out eventually, but please don’t tell my wife! Nik presents “The Week that Wasn’t” for Cape Talk and 702, and plays various characters in the satirical online puppet series, “ZA News”. “What the EFF?” is his ninth one-man show and has its first run at Cape Town’s Fugard Theatre from 16th to 30th December. www.computicket.com.



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Un rabbin et une guerisseuse vont dans un bar... Nik Rabinowitz Texte : Keith Bain Images © Supplied

Nik Rabinowitz fait partie des comédiens-humoristes les plus talentueux et aimés d’Afrique du Sud. Il est particulièrement apprécié pour son franc-parler et sa vision de l’amalgame culturel du pays, aussi bien que parce qu’il est le seul comédien juif à parler le langage Xhosa. À l’occasion de son nouveau one-man show, What the EFF? (C’est quoi ce foutoire ?[*]), on lui a demandé de nous éclairer un peu [*le titre en anglais fait référence au parti politique nommé EFF ou Economic Freedom Fighters (Combattants pour la Liberté Économique) de Julius Malema qui sème la panique au Parlement sud-africain]. Voici ce qu’il avait à dire…

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L’objectif à atteindre quand on est comédienhumoriste c’est de faire rire les gens, mais on peut par la même occasion arriver à leur ouvrir l’esprit, à leur faire voir des problèmes sous un angle différent, et à les faire se moquer d’eux-mêmes et des autres. Ou bien on les fait se rencontrer, et on leur permet de partager l’humanité qui nous rallie. J’étais enfant unique alors j’ai l’habitude de beaucoup parler tout seul. C’est peut-être bien comme ça que tout a commencé. Quand j’étais au lycée je mémorisais tous les textes comiques de mon parrain. Il n’était pas comédien-humoriste mais il était acteur et aimait raconter des blagues. J’avais un cahier dans lequel j’écrivais toutes les histoires qu’il racontait, certaines d’entre elles étant en afrikaans. J’allais souvent camper avec mes amis dans la ferme ou j’habitais, à flanc de montagne, et là je leur racontais ces histoires autour du feu. Je pense que c’est à ce moment-là que j’ai réalisé que je pouvais faire rire les gens. Une carrière professionnelle de comédienhumoriste en solo ne m’était jamais venue à l’esprit. Mon premier job était assistant cum homme à tout faire dans un centre de rafting sur la rivière Orange. Une de mes fonctions était de « divertir les hôtes ». Mais j’avais d’autres trucs à faire comme par exemple transporter les déjections des hôtes dans un sac poubelle sur mon canoé. Au bout de quatre jours, je peux vous dire que les faire rire était ma tâche la plus facile. Mon second job était assistant pour une compagnie théâtrale. C’était un cran plus haut. Il fallait quand même que je creuse la fosse pour les latrines couvertes mais au moins personne ne me demandait d’en sortir quoi que ce soit. J’étais chauffeur, je montais les tentes, je tapais les scriptes et je m’occupais des lumières. Il fallait aussi que je trafique les comptes. Je me souviens d’une nuit de tournée où j’ai passé une heure dans le bain dans une chambre d’hôtel louche de Lusaka à me faire un monologue de 45 minutes, prétendant être un personnage bizarre. Au départ j’ai fait de la comédie sur scène juste pour voir – je n’avais pas vraiment d’ambitions professionnelles. Et puis ça a marché. Quand on est « découvert », la première année est relativement facile : tout le monde vous remarque et tout d’un coup, vous êtes un peu comme un nouveau produit sur qui vient de sortir. Mais c’est après que ça devient difficile, quand les gens attendent votre prochain spectacle et qu’il faut écrire et produire des textes régulièrement tout en restant compétitif. Nos trois villes principales ont des personnalités différentes. Le Cap me rappelle des allemands en chaussettes et sandales qui font des randonnées sur la Tête de Lion et les hippies de Noordhoek qui s’occupent de trucs de hippies. On entend aussi dire que les gens du Cap sont super relax – tellement relax qu’on peut y acheter un appartement à Clifton pour 60 millions d’Euros.

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Johannesburg c’est comme un pays étranger, un pays ou les sud-africains sont bien intégrés et savent vivre et fonctionner les uns avec les autres. Il y a quelques années, quand la Table de la montagne est devenue l’une des nouvelles Merveilles du monde Johannesburg a rétorqué « À Johannesburg, on ne vote pas pour des montagnes ; on bosse – on fait de l’argent. » Je suis récemment tombé amoureux de Durban. Durban, c’est une ville un peu étrange qui avait l’air d’être figée dans les années 80. Maintenant elle fait preuve de créativité, tout y semble possible et plein de choses intéressantes s’y produisent. Je suis toujours enthousiaste à l’idée d’y aller. Il y a aussi le fait que la mer y est chaude et que comme ça je n’ai pas besoin de combinaison de plongée pour faire du surf. Ça c’est vraiment cool. Quand j’étais enfant nous passions principalement nos vacances dans le Cederberg, à l’endroit même où mon père passa 30 ans de sa vie à rechercher des œuvres d’art rupestre. On campait dans les grottes. Ces montagnes occupent une place spéciale dans mon cœur ; elles me rappellent l’ample poitrine de Pamela Anderson. On pourrait s’y perdre. N’allez pas raconter ça à ma femme ! Pour le Nouvel an, on a prévu de faire un spectacle de variété à la maison. Ça amuse ma femme, et je vais probablement être forcé de chanter. Ce qu’elle ne sait pas c’est que je suis en stand-by pour faire un show alors le débat se poursuit pour ce qui est de ma participation au spectacle familial. Elle l’apprendra bien assez tôt mais s’il vous plait, ne lui dites pas ! Nik présente “La semaine qui n’en n’était pas une” sur radio Cape Talk et 702, et joue des rôles variés dans la série satirique à marionnettes en ligne “ZA News” (similaire aux « Guignols de l’info » de Canal +). « What the EFF? » est son neuvième oneman show et se produit pour la première fois au Théâtre Fugard du Cap du 16 au 30 décembre. Billets disponibles sur www.computicket.com.








Tipples to

Toast With

The Best Drinks of the Festive Season Text & Images Š Supplied & Istockphoto.com

W

ith December finally here, there is much to celebrate, and whatever your drink of choice, there are plenty of delicious tipples to toast with this festive season. Here are just a few of our favourites.

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Mountain Whisky together with a variety of gifts, including glassware, ice buckets, water carafes and ice rocks, all beautifully packaged in a bespoke box. Bain’s Cape Mountain Whisky owes its exceptional smoothness and distinctive flavour profile to a double maturation process in carefully selected oak barrels previously used for maturing bourbon. The result is a delicious combination of floral, banana, honey, toasted hazelnut and toffee aromas, and by adding a splash of water the whisky opens up to include wood, vanilla and spice.

Bottega Prosecco Gold

Appleton Estate Jamaica Rum Crafted by the world’s first female Master Blender, Joy Spence, Appleton Estate Jamaica Rum should ideally be enjoyed neat or on the rocks. The smooth, spirited Appleton Estate Extra 12 Year Old (R350) and Appleton Estate 21 Year Old (R1,400) are both presented in beautiful canisters. Appleton Estate 12 Year Old has woody, fruity, and nutty notes such as delicate molasses, vibrant orange peel, rich vanilla, subtle coffee and cocoa, and toasted oak with a hint of almond. Appleton Estate 21 Year Old has powerful, yet delicate citrus, spice, nutty and woody notes such as mellow orange peel, deep vanilla, rich nutmeg and almond, and warm coffee and cocoa notes.

Bain’s Cape Mountain Whisky Gift Sets Bain’s Cape Mountain Whisky gift sets (R220) include a bottle of Bain’s Cape

Prosecco is an Italian sparkling white wine made predominantly of the Glera grape cultivar, and its production is limited to the premier winemaking region of DOC Prosecco in north-eastern Italy. Bottega Prosecco Gold (R379.99), regarded as the Ferrari of Proseccos, is distributed in a striking gold-plated bottle. The wine is notable for its persistent foam and fine bubble. Expect aromas of fruit and flowers, scents of Golden Delicious apples, Williams pears, and Lily of the Valley flowers. Bottega is available at leading retailers nationwide.

Cruz Vintage Black Vodka Cruz Vintage Black vodka is handcrafted and developed in New York, five times distilled, and three times charcoal filtered. It is made with the finest American winter wheat grown extra slowly for optimum quality, and blended with water emanating thousands of metres below the earth’s surface, to produce a vodka of excellence. Cruz Vintage Black is available in all leading night clubs, premium bars and restaurants, and retails at approximately R199 in leading liquor stores.

De Krans Moscato Perlé Summer is here and what better way to enjoy the glorious weather than with a glass of chilled De Krans Moscato Perlé 2014 (R40). Winemaker Louis van der Riet describes the De Krans Moscato Perlé 2014 as a fullflavoured, natural sweet perlé wine made to be enjoyed throughout the year. This lightbodied wine displays tones of honey and exotic spice, with a fresh aftertaste. It is best enjoyed chilled and is the perfect partner to apple desserts, fresh berries, summer salads, meringue pies, and hazelnut based desserts.

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Frangelico Gift Set Just in time for the festive season, Frangelico have released a special gift box (R189.99) which includes a bottle of Frangelico and two glass tumblers. Frangelico’s irresistible taste starts with some very special hazelnuts, Tonda Gentile, which are delicately blended with cocoa and vanilla extracts, to create the rich texture and flavour of Frangelico liqueur. As a classic liqueur, Frangelico is perfect after a meal, neat, with ice, or as a complement to coffee.

Hendrick’s Gin Festive Pack Hendrick’s Gin introduces its Dreamscape Festive Pack, featuring a limited edition Hendrick’s teacup and saucer decorated in startling artwork. It is the perfect gift for the vanguard of gin, and is available at selected Makro stores nationwide for R380 per pack.

Groote Post Brut Rosé A classic blend of 70 % Chardonnay and 30 % Pinot Noir, Groote Post Brut Rosé (R107) is an elegant, salmon-hued Cap Classique with a fine, creamy mousse, delicious notes of crushed strawberries and raspberries, and a silky smoothness on the palate.

Krone Night Nectar 2011 Krone Night Nectar (R110) is a sophisticated Cap Classique which is charmingly drinkable, fruity and generous, with a satisfying touch of sweetness. This bottle-fermented and lees-matured sparkling wine, a blend of the traditional Champagne varieties Chardonnay and Pinot Noir, is named in honour of the once practised Krone tradition of night harvesting. It has a creamy, fine mousse, and shows expressive aromas of baked golden apples and almonds. Refreshing lemon curd and subtle marzipan flavours fill the palate and linger in the aftertaste.

Muratie Lady Alice Méthode Cap Classique 2011

Muratie’s Cap Classique honours Lady Alice Sarah Stanford, a 20th century high society lady connected to the estate who was adept at

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tuGlenfiddich Gift Pack Celebrate with the world’s most awarded single malt Scotch whisky, Glenfiddich, with their limited gifting pack which includes a set of beautiful glass tumblers. Available exclusively at Makro stores for R379, the Glenfiddich exclusive pack is a perfect way to toast to your festive season.

JC Le Roux Scintilla 2008 Encased in a limited edition, beautifully faceted gift pack dusted with gold, Scintilla 2008, the signature Méthode Cap Classique from The House of JC Le Roux, is a musthave on your wish list this festive season. A gold medallist at the 2014 International Wine & Spirit Competition in London, Scintilla 2008 is celebrated for its regal character. This classic blend of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir is only produced in exceptional vintages, and spends a minimum of five years on the lees to develop its rich complexity. The limited edition gift pack is available exclusively at Makro for R175.

Desiderius Pongrácz Cap Classique Desiderius Pongrácz 2008 (R360) is an elegant blend of the classic

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Champagne varieties, Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. It owes its definitive yeasty character, wonderful foaming mousse and persistent bead to the prolonged maturation of at least four years on the lees. As this Cap Classique matures further, it will continue to develop wonderful creamy, nutty characteristics on the nose to complement its full-bodied texture, which lingers on the palate. Presented in a signature fluted bottle encased in a stylish black presentation pack, this flagship Pongrácz is the ultimate summer pairing with fresh oysters, smoked salmon, and steamed mussels.

Muratie Lady Alice Méthode Cap Classique 2011 Muratie’s Cap Classique honours Lady Alice Sarah Stanford, a 20th century high society lady connected to the estate who was adept at turning every event into a dance party, with jazzy tunes in the background and the notes of fine wine on the nose. Muratie’s Lady Alice Méthode Cap Classique (R120) is a classic blend of 85 % Pinot Noir and 15 % Chardonnay, and displays a lovely acidic backbone and a long, smooth finish underlined with fuller biscuit flavours.



Make Your

Medical Aid Work for You

Text: Selfmed Medical Scheme Images Š Shutterstock and iStockphoto.com

Choosing the right medical aid plan for yourself and your family can be a daunting task.

MEDICAL SCHEME benefits seem to get more complicated year after year, and it appears we are getting fewer benefits for the amount of money we pay. That is why it is important to ensure you choose a plan that is tailored to best suit your needs. Although medical aid schemes differ greatly from scheme to scheme and from plan to plan, they can still be divided into two main types: new generation medical schemes and traditional medical schemes. It is vitally important to consider the advantages and disadvantages of each before making a final decision on which type of medical aid to make use of.

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New Generation Medical Aid Schemes Ever heard of a medical savings account (MSA)? A medical savings account is a separate account, in which a predetermined amount (5 % to 25 % of your monthly premium) is available to you for payment of medical expenses. This (set) medical savings amount is available up-front, at the beginning of a calendar year. You decide how and when to use the funds available to you, for anything from GP visits, chronic medication, and optometry to dentistry. Once exhausted, you have to self-fund the rest of your


Did You Know? If you have never been a member of a medical scheme and sign up after the age of 35 your premiums could be loaded by 50 % to 100 %. This means you could pay up to double the price for your medical aid. It is regulatory and an acceptable rule across all medical schemes in South Africa. The legal term is “Late Joiner Penalty”. If you are below the age of 35 it is advisable that you join a medical scheme before penalties kick in.

day-to-day medical expenses. It takes self-discipline to not overspend at the beginning of the year, which could result in no cover for day-to-day expenses later on in the year.

Traditional Medical Aid Schemes In the case of traditional schemes, out of hospital expense limits and benefits are determined by the scheme. This means that fixed amounts are allocated to, for example, GP visits, specialist visits, chronic medication, optometry and dentistry. The benefit of having a set amount (or maximum cover option per category) available to you is the fact that you immediately know how much of your cost will be covered by the scheme. In essence, choosing a traditional scheme will give you more control over each specific benefit limit available in respect of your day-to-day medical expenses. It is important to note, however, that once you have exhausted your benefits, you will have to pay out of your pocket for the rest of the year.

Last Words In addition to the above, sufficient benefits coupled with affordability plays a vital role in making a final informed decision. Before you choose a medical aid scheme, be sure of all the benefits available to you so that you may choose a medical aid that best suits your needs. It is important to make sure that you can afford the monthly premium before you join a scheme, even if you have to cut other costs to do so. Remember that obtaining medical cover is not only about disease management, but also about the unforeseen events such as violent crime and accidents which could cost you your life. This article was provided by Selfmed Medical Scheme, a traditional scheme. For more information contact us on 0860 73 53 63 or SMS “INDWE” to 45738.

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sub sahara


Enduring Entrepreneurs

South Africa’s Entrepreneurs Embrace Resilience Text: Tom Stilwell, Head of Mercantile Private Bank Images © iStockphoto.com

S

outh Africa’s entrepreneurs need to be commended for their ability to continue running successful businesses in a challenging economic environment. But what established companies need now is a business environment that is conducive to growth. Our entrepreneurs require support from Government, financial institutions, and regulators, as well as corporate South Africa.

THE COUNTRY is struggling with low growth – the slowest since the 2009 recession* – and this is putting direct and indirect pressure on business owners. In addition, consumers are reluctant to spend money, debt levels remain high, and interest rates are rising. Amid these conditions, established entrepreneurs continue to make a meaningful contribution to economic growth and employ a significant number of people. In a country with an official 25.50 % unemployment rate, this is no small feat, considering that many

business owners are forced to cut costs by downsizing operations. But South African entrepreneurs are resilient and are considered to be among the best in the world. Even with lacklustre economic conditions, we still have entrepreneurs who are building thriving businesses. Local companies are making a global impact in sectors such as information technology. South Africa also has many success stories of bright young minds who are building successful companies nationally and internationally.

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The country also has sound economic and investor friendly policies, and we are known for our favourable legal and banking environment.

Economic and Regulatory Realities for Business Owners Removing unnecessary red tape, providing access to more robust business solutions, and becoming a more innovative economy will allow for faster and more sustainable economic growth. It is critical that the entrepreneurial sector receives the support it needs, otherwise South Africa will struggle to meet its job creation targets. We need more entrepreneurs who can grow, develop, create employment, and deliver on their potential. Economic growth forecasts have been revised downwards and the impact on business is significant. Disposable income is increasingly coming under pressure and the average consumer is spending less, as they have a hard time keeping their heads above water. Unprotected industrial action is sending a negative message about the stability of the country. Strikes also have a direct impact on manufacturing and related services industries, as some entrepreneurs exist solely to supply and service such sectors. Established business owners also face regulatory challenges and operate in one of the most highly regulated labour environments in the world. According to the 2013 SME Growth Index, published by research specialists SBP, 12 % of business owners indicated that they are overburdened by excessive legislation. Labour regulation is also cited as one of the main factors that negatively affects the ease and cost of doing business in South Africa. It is a difficult challenge

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to navigate, because restrictive labour legislation does not ease up when the economy creates less opportunity for jobs, and this makes trading conditions even harder for entrepreneurs.

So Where Does This Leave the Entrepreneur? Right now business owners must keep a close watch on cash flow, as this is what determines if an entrepreneur stays in business or not. Hold off on embarking on large capital projects, which will place additional pressure on the business. While it is important to prepare for the next positive business cycle, always ensure that the business can survive the wait while the market turns. Public-private partnerships are another avenue to explore to improve competitiveness and the business environment in South Africa. Such partnerships could lead to an increase in private investment, but also help Government achieve its economic targets. A successful business owner must have an in-depth understanding of the industry they operate in, as well as their market. Hire forward-thinking employees who can help the business grow. Compensate staff well, and offer opportunities for growth. This will help a business to retain valuable skills, which means it will be ready for expansion when the business environment is positive again. Entrepreneurs can thrive in tough times if they look for opportunities to diversify, stock new product lines, expand their market reach, or even look to buy other businesses in distress. Despite challenging conditions, there will be more than enough opportunity for businesses to pursue their expansion ambitions once the economy recovers. *Financial Mail economic commentary.



www.fairtrade.travel


Fair Trade Tourism has been operating the world’s first and still the only Fair Trade Tourism certification programme for the past ten years. In December 2011 the programme became the first tourism certification programme in Africa to be recognised by the Global Sustainable Tourism Council. FTT promotes responsible and sustainable tourism in southern Africa and beyond. To mark this important milestone FTT partners and friends had this to say about them:

“It has been great and rewarding to be part of FTT’s journey. The trademark is something that all tourism establishments should aspire to have to really make a sustainable impact. Congratulations to everyone involved in the growth of FTT. May you continue to be a trailblazer not only in South Africa but in the African continent at large. “ – Xolile Titus, FTT Board Member “Congratulations on all that Fair Trade Tourism has accomplished in a short ten years. I remember well your keynote address at the First IIPT African Conference in Nelspruit, Mpmulanga Province as you had just launched Fair Trade Tourism South Africa – and since then, Fair Trade Tourism is having positive contributions in other countries as well. Please know that IIPT will support your continued growth and positive influence in Africa. Best wishes for continued growth and successes in the next ten years. With best regards” – Dr. Louis D’Amore, IIPT Founder and President, (International Institute for Peace through Tourism)

“We congratulate our friends and colleagues from FTT on their 10 year anniversary and especially for the work done in establishing the first fair trade model for the tourism industry in the world! We work closely together developing the market for fair trade and increasing awareness among consumers. It has been wonderful to work with likeminded organisations like FTT, who have a vision to transform the world into a more equal and sustainable place! Cheers to another 10 years!” – Arianna Baldo, Fairtrade Label South Africa (FLSA) “It has been a joy and privilege to work with FTT – collaborating and consulting on their international sales and marketing strategy, conducting market segmentation and research for them. It is not often that you get the opportunity to work with a client whose vision, ethics, focus and objectives are inspirational, noble and credible. I firmly support responsible and sustainable tourism as THE ONLY way businesses should be operating and believe that the consumer is moving to demand credible certification in this area. FTT is the label to provide this and it is a pleasure to be associated with them.” - Fiona Buchner, Fiona Buchner Consulting “Congratulations on celebrating 10 years of being global leaders in Responsible and Sustainable Tourism. Wishing you added success and many more decades to celebrate as you fly the FTT flag high”. - Itumeleng Khutsoane, Former FTT Jen Caldwell Intern



Road

s r o i r r a W

s t s i l a n i F r Yea e h t f o r a C The

Hellberg Snr Text: Bernard J Images © SAGM

N

ow in its 30 th year, the South African Car of the Year (COTY) competition has always generated much interest, as well as some passionate controversy.

GERMAN CARS top the list of winners with 17, followed by Japan which has produced six winners, France with two, and Korea, Britain, Sweden and Italy with one winner each. Individual manufacturers which have produced two or more winners include BMW (six), Volkswagen/Audi (six), Opel (three), and two winners each for Porsche, Renault, and Honda. Remarkably, Porsche is the only manufacturer to have taken the title in successive years, with the Boxster last year and the Cayman this year. Now it’s up to the Macan to go for an unprecedented third-in-a-row win. But as to who will end up victorious at next year’s awards ceremony, it’s anyone’s guess at this stage. We take a closer look at the field of 11 finalists.

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BMW M4 Coupé Auto Iconic German carmaker BMW has a proud record in the Car of the Year competition, having taken the title outright on five occasions and sharing it with VW in 2011. The mighty M4 Coupé has all the bells and whistles, as well as a traditional straight-six, twin-power sixcylinder that develops an awesome 317 kW, and is poised to challenge strongly for the title.

Although the emphasis is on power (0-100 km/h in 4.1 seconds), the M4 also offers substantial levels of safety and comfort, even protecting pedestrians with a shock absorber in the front bumper. It’s a grand, high-performance tourer in the BMW tradition and, with claimed fuel figures of just 8.8 l/ 100 km, this could be the car to beat in the 2015 competition.

Citroën C4 Picasso E-HDi 115 Intensive Powered by a 1.6-litre 85 kW turbodiesel, the Picasso is a stylish, economical and aspirational fiveseater MPV featuring a new light weight platform and generous use of aluminium and a rear hatch of composite material to bring the car’s mass down to just 1,298 kg, while retaining excellent structural rigidity.

A relaxing long-distance tourer, the Picasso continues the French tradition of providing business class travel in a medium-sized body. The Citroën Picasso is fully specced in terms of safety and luxury features and, in my view, has a fair chance of taking the title.



Honda Accord 3.5 V6 Exclusive As one of the most underrated mid-sized luxury sedans in South Africa, the Accord has built up a loyal following over the years when the engine of choice was either a 2-litre or a 2.4-litre. In order to add some muscle, and to compete with the mid-range German Trio, the Accord is now available with a 3.5-litre V6 which produces 207 kW, accelerates from 0-100 km/h in 7.2 seconds, and yet only consumes 9.2 l/100 km.

Everything about the Honda Accord is sophisticated and stylish, from the beautiful interior to the fully independent suspension. It also offers stable and responsive handling. Should the Accord take the 2015 title, it will join the Honda Civic (2007) and the Accord (2009) on the podium. Given the car’s overall quality, it could very well be the winner.

Lexus ES 250 EX As an amply equipped luxury sedan, the Lexus ES is priced at R471,800, and offers a virtually full complement of luxury and safety features for which buyers of rival models would have paid up to R30,000 more. The ES 250 has been kitted out with additional safety features such as Rear Cross Traffic Alert (RCTA), which could play a major role when backing out of a parking

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bay without the “help” of a car guard. Interior trim, ride quality and whisper-quiet long distance touring have always been Lexus hallmarks, but only the final evaluation days will show whether the Lexus ES 250 has enough class to outwit its rivals. Should it take the title, it will be a first for this quality Japanese brand.



Mercedes-Benz C-Class C200 Auto The world’s oldest carmaker must be wondering if it will win the coveted award this year after last having won the competition in 1987. With the superlative C 200 Auto, Mercedes-Benz has an excellent chance of doing just that, because its entrant is a comprehensively equipped car with that elusive pride of ownership as an added bonus. Powered by a fuel efficient 135 kW 4-cylinder petrol

engine, the seven-speed automatic transmission in the C200 is an excellent example of Mercedes’ on-going research into making their cars environmentally efficient without compromising on performance. Given its overall performance capabilities, as well as its excellent fuel economy (5.6 litres per 100 kilometres), the C200 Auto has an excellent chance of walking away with the coveted Car of the Year title.

Nissan Qashqai 1.6 dCi Acenta Auto Described as the world’s favourite crossover, Nissan’s Qashqai has a huge following in South Africa, with more than 20,000 sales having been recorded. Engineered in Europe and built in Britain, the rangetopping 1.6 dCI produces 96 kW and 320 Nm of torque from its advanced turbodiesel 4-cylinder. The automatic CVT gearbox directs power to all four wheels.

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A premium quality interior and striking exterior design have made the Qashqai a serious contender, since it offers the practicality of an SUV with the ease of use provided by a compact hatchback. Should it take the title, the Qashqai will follow in the footsteps of the Nissan Maxima 300 SE, which won the competition in 1992.


Merc


Renault Duster 1.5 DCi Dynamique 4WD Surrounded by a range of exotic and, in some cases, pricey competitors, the modestly priced Renault Duster 1.5 DCi Dynamique 4WD could be described as the surprise entrant of this year’s COTY competition. Yet, since its launch a year ago, the Duster has fulfilled Renault’s expectations by recording more than 4,500 sales in this period, placing it in the top five SUV sales figures in the country.

Described as the perfect fit for South African conditions, the Duster’s 1.5-litre turbodiesel delivers 80 kW and 240 Nm of torque at an impressively low 1,750 r/min. Fitted with a manual six-speed gearbox, the result is a fuel economy claim of a mere 5.3 l/100 km. It may be somewhat Spartan and basic when measured against its rivals, but the asking price of under R200,000 may be a title clincher.

Subaru WRX 2.0 Premium Manual The Subaru WRX is a performance icon and, as a wolf in sheep’s clothing, offers all the comfort, leg room and luggage space that only a four-door sedan can provide. At the heart of the WRX, as with virtually every other Subaru, is a flat-four 2-litre turbo that develops

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197 kW driving through a manual six-speed gearbox to all four wheels for superlative road holding, virtually unmatched in its class. Is the Subaru WRX good enough to be crowned in the winner this time? I certainly think so.



Toyota Corolla 1.4 D-4D Prestige As the world’s most produced car – an incredible 40 million units spanning several decades – the Corolla 1.4 D-4D Prestige is a 66 kW turbodiesel mated to a six-speed gearbox driving through the front wheels. The latest generation Corolla is a roomy, mid-sized sedan that fulfils its role as a comfortable and stylish people carrier, backed by the Toyota reputation for longevity and value for money.

Featuring all-round disc brakes and every conceivable safety system, the Corolla remains a serious contender. Should it take the title, it will join the original Toyota Corolla Twin Cam, which took the crown in 1986 when the competition was launched. The brand’s only other success was in 1989 when the GLi Executive was declared the winner.

Audi A3 Sedan 1.4T SE S-Tronic As the best seller in the Audi range, the Audi A3 sedan offers a vast range of safety and performance enhancements for the discerning buyer. Building on a proud tradition with COTY victories in 1996, 2002 and 2006, VW’s Audi division is poised for a serious challenge thanks to its sporty design, light body (1,250 kg) mass and 92 kW engine that

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sets new standards in terms of all-round performance and economy. Added features include Bluetooth, rain sensors, stunning 17” alloy wheels, driver information system, and a long wheelbase which enhances rear legroom comfort for passengers. The Audi A3 has a fair chance of taking the title.



SASRIA


Debt

Disasters

Household Debt Swallows Majority of Income By Justine Olivier/Finweek Images © iStockphoto.com

South African households are using, on average, 76 % of their disposable income to pay off debt, thereby putting their financial stability at risk.

WITH the cost of living steadily increasing, salary increases not keeping pace with the rate of inflation, and a job market that remains weak, deeply indebted consumers are struggling to pay off their debts. While the percentage of disposable income dedicated towards the paying of household debt has decreased somewhat over the past five years, it remains at shockingly high levels, according to the South African Reserve Bank (SARB). Over the past 14 years, household debt has continued to escalate steadily. The latest TransUnion Consumer Credit

Index (CCI) says that nominal household disposable income growth is “barely keeping pace” with the rise in prices of nondiscretionary consumer goods and services. “Real household disposable income growth is around 0 % year on year, indicating that prices of everyday goods and services are rising faster than aggregated incomes. This means that households will face increasing financial challenges and budget constraints,” states the TransUnion report for the second quarter of this year. With households already struggling and prices steadily increasing, what is a consumer to do? Paul Slot, director at debt counselling and financial wellbeing company Octogen,

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says most consumers fall into the trap of taking out more debt to repay existing debt. “The average person that applies for debt review has between 11 and 14 credit agreements. The result is that the percentage of monthly income required to repay debt is simply too high. “A consumer who uses less than 35 % of takehome pay is unlikely to have any problem repaying debt. However, consumers who use more than 50 % to pay off debt are in trouble; they cannot make repayments while at the same time having enough money left for normal household expenses.” The CCI further shows that there are still millions of consumers in arrears for payments for three to nine months who are already written off, under judgment or in debt counselling. “Given the recent employment trends, the sharp decline in inflation adjusted household income and yet another

interest rate increase by the South African Reserve Bank in July 2014, it appears unlikely that the rate of defaults will fall in the short to medium term,” TransUnion says. According to the Reserve Bank’s Financial Stability Review for the period March 2014, unemployment remains one of the major economic challenges in South Africa and has the potential to negatively affect financial stability. Slot points out the following steps that you can take if you are in over your head in debt and struggling to cover your day-to-day expenses: “Early identification and action by the consumer and credit provider remains the most effective solution. Consumers should tackle the real problem and implement an action plan to reduce dependence on debt. “This can be done by focusing on one debt and accelerating repayment, and once the account has been repaid, close it and then tackle the next account.” As an example, suspend your DStv for six months and use that money to repay the debt, he says. Unfortunately, a large number of those in debt expect their financial situation to sort itself out. The chances of a windfall, an inheritance or a bonus happening are slim and should not be counted on. With an action plan in place, and the right daily habits, consumers may diminish the financial strain they currently feel. Copy courtesy of ‘Finweek’. Call 0860 103 911 to subscribe.



Dakar Team to the Test Text: Ferdi de Vos Images © Quickpic

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ompared to previous years, the Toyota Imperial Hilux crew of Giniel de Villiers and German co-driver Dirk von Zitzewitz started their preparations for the 2015 Dakar Rally in a very different manner.

BEFORE tackling Dakar in the past, most of the Imperial Hilux team’s tests were completed in the dunes of the Namib Desert. But this year an international off-road event in Morocco was chosen to complete the definitive tests on Toyota Motorsport’s Hilux Dakar challenger. The decision to participate in the Rally of Morocco shows the seriousness and the level of commitment with which the team is approaching the 2015 Dakar event. Nearly 160 vehicles participated in Morocco this year. “The conditions in Morocco are similar to large parts of the Dakar,” De Villiers said. “And since this was also quite a long race, it was an ideal opportunity to test components and settings, and also to get reacquainted with the Hilux.” The Hilux team completed six

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successful days of testing during the rally, which ended in Marrakech on 9th October. It formed part of a programme that has seen more than 4,000 km covered in the Hilux over the course of the year. “We tested around 15 specific items in Morocco,” said team principal Glyn Hall, “including gear ratios, cooling, brakes, suspension and more. “The good news is that the Hilux ran perfectly during the event,” Hall said after the race. “The problem we had with the steering was a combination of bad luck and tough terrain, and we have already ensured that it won’t happen on the new vehicles we are building for Dakar 2015.” The steering problem on the fourth day saw the crew elect to bypass a tricky dune crossing, which may well have been impossible with the damaged steering system. This resulted in a time penalty of three-and-


a-half hours, dropping the Toyota Imperial Hilux down to 20th overall, effectively taking De Villiers and Von Zitzewitz out of the running. “But most importantly, we completed all the tests we set out to do, so for us the Rally of Morocco was a great success,” said de Villiers after the race. With the experience gained in Morocco, the team can now focus on solving the problems encountered to prepare two brand new Hilux race vehicles for Dakar. Construction of the new vehicles is already well underway at Toyota Motorsport’s Hallspeed headquarters in Barbeque Downs, Gauteng, with final shakedown tests to start imminently. Fans can follow the Dakar action via Toyota’s social media: www.twitter.com/toyotasa and www.facebook.com/toyotasouthafrica.


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A Contender for Your

Shopping List Infiniti Q50 2.0t Text: Bernard Hellberg & Images © Infiniti SA

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he recently introduced Infiniti Q50 2.0t adds a new entry-level dimension to the brand’s growing line-up of premium sedans. Watch out, Ingolstadt, Stuttgart and Munich.

THERE ARE many good reasons why South African executives buy German sedans. Among others, they’re great cars with great pedigrees, and have extensive dealer and parts backup in this country. But are these reasons (and our often blind brand loyalty) still reason enough to shrug our shoulders at the rising premium brands from the East? As relative newcomers to the market, Infiniti still has some work to do to win over the hearts and minds of South African car buyers. Not work to their cars, however. This is obvious from the Q50 sedan, which is technically as good as any other premium brand, nor work to their pedigree (they have been making luxury automobiles for 25 years), and certainly not to their available local backup, considering Nissan’s extensive local support system extends to the four Infiniti Centres that

have already opened. Two more will follow in 2015/’16. Considering also that the car itself is a work of surprising detail – as is plain in the build quality, the ride and handling, interior, and the brisk performance of the Mercedes-Benz-sourced two-litre turbo powerplant – we’re fast running out of reasons why the Q50 shouldn’t be on every exec’s shopping list. This powerful and economical new turbocharged engine adds more choice to the powertrain options available in the range. The modern, lightweight, fourcylinder, turbocharged petrol unit develops 155 kW of power and 350 Nm of torque (that’s usable from a low 1,250 r/min), sending drive to the rear wheels via a sevenspeed automatic transmission. The result of a deal between Renault/Nissan and

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Daimler (Infiniti execs seem to avoid using the Mercedes name when referring to their partnership), the powerplant uses Euro 5 certified technology and is tuned by Infiniti engineers for service in the Q50. With quite inspiring throttle response, the 2.0-litre, direct injection petrol engine joins the 2.2-litre, direct injection turbodiesel, and the high-performance 3.5-litre, V6-hybrid powertrain in the brand’s compact sedan line-up. The introduction of the 2.0-litre turbo not only adds an engine option to the line-up, it also adds dimension to the brand’s local offering. While it is no mean feat for such a comparatively small brand to offer such a choice of engines, Infiniti means to double the number of available powertrains and increase its mode range by 60 % over the next five years. The Q50 is available in two specification levels, Premium and Sport, with the former beginning at R430,000. For this cash a host of features are standard, including performance and comfort features. Stop/start engine management with drive mode selector lets you choose between fuel-saving driving or a more spirited performance. Halogen headlights, parking sensors and a rear view camera also enhance the driving experience, while the raft of interior add-ons includes Infiniti Touch infotainment system, a multi-function steering wheel, leather upholstery with heated front seats, dual touch screens with Bluetooth connectivity, and cruise control. The standard spec also includes keyless entry, a tyre pressure warning system, and rain sensing wipers. At R477,000 the Sport derivative also gets some external cosmetic enhancements, including 18” triple spoke alloy wheels with run flat tyres (not our favourite in a South African context), LED headlights with daytime running lights, and welcome lighting. A power-adjusted steering wheel, sporty electric-operated front seats that link to Infiniti’s intelligent key system, and aluminium trim enhancements also get the nod. Not to be outdone by the Germans, Infiniti does offer several additional enhancements to personalise your Q50 experience, but conveniently group these together in five “packs” of optional equipment. Just about anything can be added, from adaptive steering and active lane-keeping assistance in the “Steering” pack (standard on the Sport model or for an additional R12,000), to intelligent cruise control with lane departure prevention, predictive forward collision warning and reverse collision intervention as part of the “Safety Shield” pack, that retails for R27,000. If you require navigation and a rather fancy Bose sound system with 14 speakers, the “Multimedia” pack can be had for an additional R30,800. All Q50 models benefit from a five-year/100,000 km maintenance plan and a three-year/100,000 km warranty, which does kick some dust in the face of its German rivals, who offer less attractive assurances. With the compact premium sedan playing field opening wider every day, Infiniti is clearly positioning itself to grab some market share from competitor brands. With its rearwheel drive layout, premium look and feel (both inside and out), and serious value for money offering, the Q50 2.0-litre petrol is a serious car to watch, and an even more serious one to consider buying.



Save a Penny, Save a Pound Spend Wisely This Festive Season Text: Property24.com Images Š iStockphoto.com

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With a few weeks left to the much anticipated year-end festivities, many have already been enticed by the jingles and sparkles, and oh-so-lovely charm of the plastic card that controls our lives. And if you’re lucky enough to receive a bonus, the next few weeks will have you waiting with bated breath! But before your hard-earned rands vanish like mist before the sun, and the temptation of spending on gifts and festivities overwhelm you, avoid falling behind on your bond repayments and municipal bills with these money-saving tips from Property24.com. Budget, Budget and More Budget Although many of us feel a sense of confusion when hearing all the figures, percentages and averages from the annual budget speech, yours doesn’t have to be as complicated. Draft a basic holiday budget in advance, and make sure to include entertainment, fuel for travelling, accommodation, gifts, as well as the more important factors such as rent, municipal bills, bond or vehicle repayments, as well as school fees, school uniforms and stationery for the following month. Be financially smart. The best way to ensure that you won’t overspend this season is by saving for it. Use a monthly debit order to put away a fixed amount to use for end-of-the-year expenses. Understand how much money you’ll receive from your employer, and strictly apply amounts to your budget categories. If there’s a shortfall, decide where you need to scale back and adjust your budget where necessary. Be strong willed. Remember, only you are in charge of your finances!

Sensible Shopping Research product prices before taking a trip to what many think of as “the most dreaded place in the world”, especially during the festive season. The biggest culprit is shopping and spending time in malls, so choose the option of rather staying out of busy malls and doing your shopping online. Plan before buying, compare prices, and shop wisely on the internet. This will not only help with the temptation of spending more money at the shops, but it will save on fuel as well, as most online shopping websites provide delivery of goods for free or at a minimal fee. And if you have the option to do so, you can even pay your municipal and bond repayments online, making this one less thing to worry about. Enjoy the convenience of shopping and paying bills online without the unnecessary hustle and bustle.

The Gift of Giving When it comes to giving gifts to your family and friends, stick to your budget. Your family and friends will still love you if you’re unable to buy them gifts, but if you forget about your bond repayments,

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your bank won’t. Decide beforehand what you’d like to buy for family and friends and make it a family project. Agree to buy gifts together with your partner or siblings, which will help to share large costs. Nothing shows greater love and care than homemade or handmade gifts. Bake a batch of cookies and package them beautifully in a mug, or make cushion covers. These cost much less, and mean much more. Or try the “Secret Santa” strategy. Everyone can agree on an amount to spend, and in this way, everyone will be responsible for buying only one gift. Afraid that your friends or family members won’t like the gift you purchased? Opt for gift vouchers. They are hassle free and in this way you’re ensured that your gift will not be re-gifted to someone else, or hidden behind the other goodies in the TV cabinet. Another great way of saving this festive season is to buy gifts after Christmas, if you’re sure that you’ll only be seeing family or friends then. This will help save you all the crazy trips to the malls, as well as a few rands!

Avoid Being Crushed by Credit Always pay off your monthly expenses heaped on your credit card. If you pay it back within the required period, your credit is interest free. Make sure you understand what your banking activities will cost you. Familiarise yourself with all the bank charges, terms and conditions before swiping and choosing to pay large amounts on credit. Be proactive and double up on your regular bond and municipal payments if you’re able to. Also avoid opening unnecessary store accounts. No one wants to start a new year with bills and debts. By using your card wisely and being financially smart during the festive season, you’ll enjoy a responsible, pain-free and welldeserved festive season. Remember to stay safe and spend wisely. For more advice, visit www.property24.com.




Communicating

Digitally Tech Etiquette Text: Toni Muir Images Š iStockphoto.com

While etiquette is generally ingrained in society, etiquette in technology is a fairly new concept. As email, instant messaging and social media become more popular ways to connect, so the rules around communication are changing.

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I RECENTLY looked into buying a new home. Using a local property finding website, I perused the listings, found a few that looked suitable, and used the available tool to send emails to the agents listed for each property. I did not get a single email reply. Despite giving my phone number in the email, I did not get a single call, either. I decided to take a different tack, and called each agent instead. Almost all of these calls ended in my leaving a voicemail with my details. Of these, just two agents called me back. A third SMS’d me. Repeatedly. I tried to call him several times and, although he never once answered his phone, his SMS’s came in fast and furiously. His messages were abrupt and never answered the questions I posed to him, and each time I called, he simply ignored the call and SMS’d again. This back-andforth continued for about a week before I gave up, deciding his conduct was unprofessional. Here I was, about to spend a lot of money buying a new home, and this chap could not even spend two minutes talking to me on the phone. This got me thinking about what is and is not acceptable “tech” behaviour. Is it acceptable

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to try and do a deal with a new client over SMS? Is it okay for your boss to WhatsApp you asking for something, or to SMS you alerting you to an important email (though it is likely you already got the email alert to your phone anyway)? Is it considered rude to send an email invite (evite) for a birthday party, bridal shower or wedding? What about social media? Is a mass invite to an upcoming event good enough? Personally, I find it easier to decline an invitation if it is sent over social media. And while I do not mind evites to birthday parties or baby or bridal showers, I think it is inappropriate to send wedding invitations in this manner. Group chats can be fun, but if you wish to discuss something with just one person in the group, rather send a direct message than involving everybody in your chinwag. As far as the workplace or conducting business is concerned, perhaps a good rule of thumb is to err on the side of caution. Being polite is a nonnegotiable, and using shorthand or “text” speak is a no-no. Consider asking the person with whom you are working if they mind occasional communication over more informal channels, such as WhatsApp


or Viber. While I do not necessarily mind replying to work-related WhatsApps or text messages, this does depend on the relationship I have with the person. If they are okay with it, then I am okay with it. Something else to consider is when you communicate. Do not conduct a text conversation with someone while trying to have an actual conversation with another, as it is disrespectful. Never use your phone in the cinema or at the theatre. If you are at the dinner table, put your cell on silent. In a work context, be mindful of the time of day when you call or message someone, especially if you work with international associates. Another important element to consider is tone, as electronic communication misses out on body language, facial expressions, intonation and other vital cues. It is much easier to seem flippant or rude and to offend someone. Miscommunications are also much more common. In short, when communicating electronically, spend a minute or two thinking about what you want to say and how best to say it. And remember that there is a person on the other end of what you are saying. If you are mindful of that, you should be fine.

Important Tips for Communicating Digitally • Do not communicate electronically if face-to-face communication would be better suited, such as with personal or serious business matters. • Remember: Once you have said it in cyberspace or sent it to cyberspace, you cannot undo it. • Be overly courteous, as facial cues are missing and what you say can easily be misconstrued. • Type your emails in full (no Caps Lock) and save “SMS speak” for casual text messages between friends. • Be sure to greet people by name when emailing. Similarly, sign off your email properly. • Perhaps most importantly, proofread and spell check your mails and messages before sending.


Smooth as Silk

Lexus ES 250 and ES 300h Image Š Quickpic

Now in its sixth generation and credited with being the top-selling Lexus sedan globally, the ES in 250 and hybrid 300h guise presents unrivalled value in the premium segment of the South African market.

LEXUS is no stranger to presenting vehicles of exceptional quality and prestige, as recently proven by the selection of the ES 250 as a finalist in the prestigious 2015 WesBank/SAGMJ Car of the Year competition. This addition to the local Lexus range effectively combines affordability with premium luxury, reliability and performance. In truth, this imposing newcomer redefines the entrypremium segment, with pricing of the ES 250 (R471,800) slotting in just below the performance-oriented IS range, but when it comes to interior space, it offers roominess closer to that of the super-executive GS. Performance is ample on the ES 250, with peak output of 135 kW delivered at 6,000 r/min and 235 Nm of torque cresting at 4,100 r/min. The silky smooth four-cylinder

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engine featuring dual-VVTi technology is mated with a sixspeed automatic transmission. Considering its generous proportions, the ES 250 manages the sprint from zero to 100 km/h in less than 10 seconds and achieves a maximum speed of 207 km/h, with a combined fuel consumption figure of 8 l/100 km and a CO2 emissions figure of 188 g/km. Key to the ES range’s flexible driving characteristics is the Drive Mode selector, which allows for driving in Normal, Eco and Sport driving modes. Providing a blend of performance and efficiency, Normal is suited to everyday driving conditions, while Eco mode favours fuel economy. Sport mode increases powertrain and steering responsiveness, supported by the stiffer body, wider track and an upgraded suspension, to deliver


commendable handling properties. The elegance of the interior complements the graceful L-Finesse-inspired exterior design, and boasts standard features that include the second-generation Remote Touch interface with an 8” full-colour monitor, a navigation system, leather trim with high-quality stitching, and tasteful ambient lighting. Additional standard equipment includes a moonroof, smart entry system with push-button start, power seats with seat heaters (with driver’s seat memory), electrochromatic rear view mirror, heated and electrically adjustable side mirrors (with memory), a reverse view display, and parking sensors front and rear. Cruise control, tilt-and-reachadjustable steering column, an electric rear sunshade, EMV Display with eight-speaker audio system incorporating a radio, CD/DVD player, Bluetooth, as well as auxiliary and USB inputs, are also standard. True to its premium nature, the ES provides a wealth of advanced passive and active safety features, including ten airbags, Blind Spot Monitoring with Lane Change Assist, Vehicle Stability Control (VSC), ABS with EBD and Brake Assist, as well as Isofix child seat anchorages. A significant new standard feature is Rear Cross Traffic Alert (RCTA). Particularly useful when reversing, this function

uses the Blind Spot Monitor (BSM) radar to detect vehicles approaching behind the vehicle. When a hazard is detected, RCTA alerts you with a visual display in the door mirrors with a buzzer. The ES 300h marks the first petrol-electric hybrid powertrain offering in the ES range. It is powered by a 2.5 litre single VVT-i petrol engine (118 kW at 5,700 r/min and 213 Nm at 4,500 r/min), twinned with a 105 kW electric motor fed by a 650 V nickel-metal hydride battery, for a combined output of 151 kW. The ES 300h is equipped with an eCVT transmission and accelerates to 100 km/h from standstill in 8.5 seconds, but offers a level of combined fuel consumption (5.5 l/100 km) similar to more compact vehicles. The ES 300h features a hybrid-specific front grille and rear spoiler. As with the ES 250, drive mode select is standard on the ES 300h, but there is an additional EV mode, while this model is also equipped with a hill-start-assist system and a revised instrument cluster that includes hybridspecific instrumentation. The addition of batteries for the ES 300h’s electric motor does encroach on the car’s boot space, but still leaves more than enough room (the luggage capacity is 425 dm3 as opposed to the 490 dm3 of the ES 250 model).


r e v e h c i h W

e h t Way

s w o l B d n i W

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Kitesurfing Text: Keith Bain Images © Red Bull King of the Air

Twenty years ago, kitesurfing (aka kiteboarding) had barely been invented. Now it’s easily the most awe-inspiring watersport, combining wave-riding with the ability to launch high into the air and dance on the wind. Each summer, Cape Town’s Big Bay plays host to one of the sport’s defining events, Red Bull’s King of the Air. Designed to push the limits of the sport, it draws a slate of top-drawer international kitesurfers, including South Africa’s own young champion, Oswald Smith.

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“SURE IT’S SCARY,” says Oswald Smith. “Jumping 40 meters into the air will definitely get your adrenaline going. But it feels so good. Being up there and just looking down at everything. It’s definitely all about freedom. When you’re up there you don’t have to think about anything else.” Not yet 19, Oswald has now been the country’s top kiteboarder for several years, and is today the bestperforming South African on any world tour. Encouraged by his windsurfing parents, he started kiteboarding when he was 11, and explains that it came naturally to him. “The first time I got up on the board, it was like I’d been born for this. I got it immediately. My first session on the board I was cruising up and down. I even landed a jump.” The easygoing Capetonian decided fairly early on that he wanted to take his talent beyond using it to perform cool tricks to pass the time. He won his first junior title when he was 15, and although he’s only just completed high school, he has for some time been combining a professional kiting career with scholarly responsibilities, maintaining a daunting international competition schedule, and using every spare moment to train. He says when there’s no wind, you’ll probably find him surfing, wakeboarding, skateboarding, or on a stand up paddle (SUP) board. Watching him attached to a kite, though, it’s easy to understand the appeal of his primary sport. Done right, kiteboarding is a graceful dance on – and above – water. Kiteboarding’s great appeal lies in its threedimensionality; it enables riders to soar through the air as though flying, but without

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mechanised assistance. “What makes it great,” explains Martin Kooger, who has been active in the sport since it took off in 1999, “is that your kite is actually 20 meters away from you. So, while you’re steering it with the control bar and there are lines in between, you don’t notice them. So you can see everything around you, whereas with windsurfing, you always have a sail in front of your face.” Martin, who manages Windtown, South Africa’s first dedicated kitesurfing hotel, says one of the biggest assumptions about the sport is that kitesurfers require strong, muscular arms. “People have this idea that the kite and equipment are very heavy. But it’s quite light, actually.” He explains that most of the strain is through the legs and core, via the harness secured to the waist. The arms only pull on the control bar in order to steer the kite. The real key to kitesurfing, he says, is being able to read the wind and fly the kite. Still, he says, most people are surprised by the kite’s tremendous pulling power. Weird laws of aerodynamics mean a kite is able to generate pulling power exponentially greater than the wind force acting on it – which explains why kiteboarders can launch with as little as five knots of wind. That combination of force and strength and resultant speed also means that kitesurfers are able to lift high off the water and perform acrobatic tricks, the likes of which you’d expect from aerial gymnasts and trapeze artists. “Not only does kitesurfing give a sense of spatial freedom,” says Martin, “but the wind force means there’s considerable speed and power. So once you’ve got the



basics, it’s quite easy to jump, and there are a lot of cool tricks to do when you’re in the air.” Martin says, though, that most accidents happen when people underestimate the force of the wind and the kite. He believes it’s essential to start with a few proper lessons – about 20 hours’ worth – to learn the basics of kite control, and to learn how to steer within the “wind window”, a 180-degree arc in which the kite flies. Oswald adds that a year’s experience should enable you to start doing handle passes, where you spin around and pass the control bar from one hand to the other. Like any of us watching from the outside, what initially attracted Oswald to the sport was seeing the enormous jumps kiteboarders are capable of. “That’s what got me into it. And that’s still what I really enjoy,” he says, “just hanging up there, looking down on the world.” It was this awe factor, in fact, that launched kitesurfing as a mainstream sport. Back when kitesurfing was still very much a fringe activity, Red Bull noticed a small event held in Maui in 1998. With just 25 kiters, it had been christened the “Kitesurfing World Championship”, a tongue-incheek appellation denoting the aspirations of the sport’s early stars, most of whom were freshly converted from windsurfing. The following year, the event became the “Red Bull King of the Air”, propelling the sport into global consciousness. It’s been growing in leaps and bounds ever since. The competition went into hibernation in 2005, to be resuscitated in 2013, finding a new home in Cape Town, regularly touted as one of the best locations in the world for kitesurfing. According to organisers, King of the Air is about compelling kiters to explore the limits of possibility, testing their potential in each of the three areas of kitesurfing: big air (high jumps), handle passes (rotation control), and mega loops (power). “It is not just a freestyle competition, or a high-jump competition,” says competition director, Sergio Cantagalli. “King of the Air demands extreme skill and a level of danger. More than technique and precision, it’s also about height and extremity, style and execution, variety and difficulty. We’re looking to show where the future of the sport lies. We’re testing the limits of kiteboarding.” “There’s no other competition like it,” says Oswald. “It’s really extreme.” Oswald adds he’s familiar with the dangers of his chosen career. “Yes, there’s a lot of risk,” he says. “I’ve had a couple of incidents.” The “incidents” he describes include dislocating the vertebrae in his back, breaking his nose, and biting through his tongue. Despite the injuries and mishaps, he remains in awe of the wind and the waves and their power, and with his pro career firmly on track, prospects for the future are looking bright. Discussions are also afoot to admit kiteboarding as an Olympic sport. If the bid pans out, the wind may just be blowing Oswald Smith all the way to Tokyo in 2020. Red Bull King of the Air (redbullkingoftheair.com) happens at Big Bay over several days between late January and early February (exact dates depend on prevailing wind conditions).

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Take flight! On the Cape West Coast, Langebaan is an ideal kiteboarding training ground, due to flat water on the lagoon and frequent wind, especially during the peak season (October through March). Windtown (www.windtown-sa.com) is a small-scale resort in Langebaan with in-house kiteboarding instructors and water sport equipment available for rent.




Here’s to Healthy

Holidays

How to Survive the Festive Season Text: Beth Cooper Images: © iStockphoto.com

It is easy to let yourself go over the December holidays, with lazy hours spent on South Africa’s hot, summery beaches, and rich food and alcohol doing the rounds at parties. Holiday wellness, however, is the best Christmas gift to give your body, mind and soul this season, as the consequences of overindulgence may follow you into the New Year and beyond. POOR NUTRITION, bad drinking habits, stress and minimal sleep take their toll on your vital organs. Your liver and kidneys take a beating, as they are forced to continually flush toxins from your system. Your brain battles to function optimally, and you are at risk of developing a predisposition towards lifestyle diseases that are the scourge of modern living. Depressed? Do not be! It is quite acceptable to relax your good habits a little during the festive season, just

balance out “bad” days with plenty of good ones and tune in to when your body and mind need a break.

Eat Right Feeding yourself wisely – especially when takeaways, chips and dips and party foods are constant temptations – is the first good habit to cultivate now. Without enough healthy fats (olive oil, a little butter,

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avocado, fatty fish, and raw nuts), loads of fresh fruit and vegetables, seeds and free range protein, we cannot be healthy, says top clinical nutritionist SallyAnn Creed. When shopping or throwing a dinner party, watch out for too much sugar and a menu high in simple carbohydrates such as white bread and cake. Avoid fizzy drinks and rather dilute fresh fruit juices with water – as long as you drink plenty of plain water too! Breakfast is sacred, so don’t skip it, only to binge at the buffet later on! Think light, unprocessed and energysustaining foods, such as rolled oats with fruit and seeds, a fruit smoothie, or an egg on wholegrain bread, with some chopped tomatoes and a little feta cheese. For meals in general, combine a protein with a complex carbohydrate (such as brown rice with chicken, or a baked potato with tuna) and plenty of vegetables. By eating carbs and protein together, you will balance blood sugar, which is vital when you are on the move or partying up a storm. Snack attacks are common during the Christmas season, so eat smart by downing a glass of water and then attacking the raw food first, such as cruditÊs and salads. Stock up on super-foods to keep at home and take with you. Blueberries, goji berries, tomatoes, broccoli, apples, seeds, nuts, green tea, and garlic are among the best nibbles for tip-top health. A common problem during the holidays is heartburn. Instead of popping antacid tablets, stop the burn before it begins! Snack on smaller meals instead of three heavy courses at one sitting; chew food well before swallowing; drink a glass of water before you eat; and avoid caffeine, fry-ups and sugary treats as much as possible. Try not to mix alcoholic drinks and always stay hydrated with water between refills. If you are a wine lover, how about a spritzer (half wine, half soda water)? Or choose a low-alcohol beer if possible (but do not cheat by drinking more).

Deal With Stress Mental fitness may take a nosedive now because of late nights, family fights, and overspending on gifts and festive food. Prepare yourself properly before the party season sets in. Red flags signalling stress include lowered immunity, sleeplessness, feeling irritable or ratty, forgetfulness, lack of enjoyment or enthusiasm, over- or under-eating, and a constant sense of being rushed. To cope naturally with stress, go to bed early, take Rescue Remedy drops, pop a whole-food vitamin B and calcium complex supplement, revisit childhood pursuits such as cloud-gazing or building sandcastles, and schedule some downtime every single day, no matter how busy you are. A relaxed environment is soothing and helps you to remember your priorities. Between social engagements, party shopping and last minute deadlines, make a date with yourself to work in the garden, do some yoga or meditation, or

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to walk on the beach or in a safe nature area. Plan ahead by making lists and enjoy ticking off tasks as you complete them. Some people use their mobile phone reminders, while others prefer Post-it or sticky notes. Another sure-fire way to keep yourself in good shape is to exercise, even if you are not sticking to your regular regimen. As any good doctor or fitness instructor will tell you, walking the dog, playing with your kids or climbing stairs does count as physical activity. It is especially important to get moving now, as excess food, drink, and stress wreak havoc with both muscles and peace of mind. Lastly, learn the value of saying no. It is impossible to please everybody and you absolutely do not have to accept every invitation, or work long hours of overtime, just to keep the boss or your best friend happy. Take a holiday from the holidays by nurturing yourself first.



Business hub

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Business hub

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Business hub

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Business hub

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Meet the

Crew Text & Images © Supplied

H

ave you ever wondered who is flying the plane when you travel on SA Express? Or wanted to know more about what a job as a cabin crew member is like? Well, now’s your chance! Every month we will introduce a few members of our SA Express family, because

by getting to know them, you become part of the SA Express family too. Gwynneth Roberts

Lingesperi Moodley

Senior Cabin Crew Member

Senior Cabin Crew Member

Length of service at SA Express: Seven years. What is your favourite part of your job? I have the privilege of being an ambassador for my airline and country. I also get to meet people from different walks of life. What do you find most challenging about your job? Trying to please all passengers, especially in situations beyond your control, is very difficult. What do you like about working for SA Express? It is a very professional airline and they look after their staff very well. There are lots of opportunities for growth within the company. What would people find surprising about your job? Well, it’s not as glamorous as people might think. It comes with challenges and sacrifices. We sometimes miss Christmas lunch with our loved ones so our passengers can have lunch with theirs. But we do it with love because we fly for you. What would you miss most about your job if you stop working for SA Express? The crew. In Cape Town we are like a family. We laugh our hearts out and create great memories on board. However, we also become a shoulder to cry on for each other when times get tough in our personal lives.

Length of service at SA Express: 16 years Please tell us briefly what your job involves: I’m firstly and most importantly a safety officer. If we encounter an emergency in the cabin it is my responsibility to make sure that the situation is under control. What is your favourite part of your job? For me it’s being able to create a more positive air travel experience for people. I think flying is amazing, but many people have lost sight of that because of all the stresses we have to deal with while flying. I also love meeting all sorts of wonderful people. Being in this industry for so many years I have met many amazing people, from statesmen and sportsmen to actors. Best of all, I met my husband while working here. What do you find most challenging about your job? Maintaining a professional image, irrespective of the type of day I’m having. Why do you like working for SA Express? For me it’s the people I work with; my fellow colleagues, the ground staff and our engineers, because together we make SA Express a success. What would people find surprising about your job? The most surprising I would say is that I’ve got no control over the weather (only joking). But seriously, we all are comedians and we have a great

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sense of humour. We deal with a lot on a daily basis and still come out smiling. Have you ever had any funny incidents or encounters in your job? One day in Johannesburg we had a weather delay, so I made an announcement to the passengers that they can now use their phones to let people know of the delay. I then had a passenger ask if she could use my public address handset to make a call – she had thought that whenever I was making announcements that I was actually making telephone calls! What would you miss the most if you ever stopped working for SA Express? I would miss the family ethos, as well as our beloved “turbo profits” aeroplanes.

Qaanita Abrahams

Line Check Cabin Crew Member Length of service: 13 years What is your favourite part of your job? The flexibility and seeing different parts of our country. What do you find most challenging about your job? Maintaining and receiving communication from Head Office. What do you like about working for SA Express? I enjoy the security the job offers me. Have you ever had any funny incidents or encounters in your job? Yes, sometimes people don’t know that there is a toilet on board!

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gadgets

A New Look in Cooking Forget everything you think you know about microwaves, because LG South Africa has just released the new SolarDOM, an eco-friendly lightwave oven which is not only eye-catching and modern, but promises to cook food that is tastier, healthier and faster. Easy and convenient, the SolarDOM allows you to make wholesome meals, such as a roast chicken with vegetables, in just 25 minutes, depending on weight. Now food can be cooked four times faster than a conventional oven and with 50 % less energy consumption. Special features, such as the Charcoal Heater, ensure food is crispy on the outside and juicy on the inside, with high power density and fast responding time. It uses powerful halogen lights to cook the outside of food, much like conventional radiant heat, but also penetrates the surface, so the inside is cooked at the same time. This unique form of cooking is uncommonly fast, but keeps food moist, tender and bursting with flavour. www.LG.com.

Italian Flair and Flavour Any budding home cook is proud to say: “I made it from scratch.” A good pasta maker is an essential secret weapon they’ll be most thankful for. The Italian made Imperia Pasta Machine is the original way of producing fantastic homemade pasta by hand. The machine consists of two rollers that can be adjusted to roll the pasta into thinner sheets (for lasagne) and then fed through the spaghetti or tagliatelle cutter. Just turn the handle, and feel your Italian heritage flow, even if you don’t have any! The set includes the machine, table clamp, handle, and an instruction booklet, and is available from Yuppiechef.com for R1,099.

EAR-resistable! Verbatim just made it easier for you to listen to music, watch movies and have conversations when using your smartphone, tablet or portable media player with their Active Earphones. These Active Earphones enhance the quality of sound, and make business or entertainment on the move easier and more personal. Verbatim Active Earphones were made for busy people, allowing you to make business calls, participate in Skype calls, and even keep you tuned in to your favourite playlist while waiting for your flight. Sound is isolated with an in-ear design, while a built-in microphone allows you to take and end calls and control your music while providing ultimate sound privacy. Available in red or blue, Verbatim’s Active Earphones include a 1.2 m flat cable that ensures no more tangles.

Win! Indwe and distributor Drive Control Corporation are giving away five Verbatim Active Earphones! Simply SMS the words INDWE VERBATIM plus your NAME and EMAIL to 35131 to enter the draw. Cost per SMS is R1.50. Competition closes 31st December 2014. T&Cs apply.

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books Insider’s Guide: How and Where to Photograph Birds in Southern Africa By Isak Pretorius This is the most comprehensive guide on bird photography available, written by the first South African to win the Bird Behaviour category of the BBC Wildlife Photographer of the Year Award. Whether you are new to bird photography or are already a passionate hobbyist, this guide will teach you all the tools, techniques and creative ideas required to take your bird photography to the next level. Covering everything you need to know, this book tells you how to choose the right equipment, where to look for birds and how to predict their movements, how to get close enough to your subject, and how to produce sharp images.

More Fool Me By Stephen Fry Stephen Fry invites readers to take a glimpse at his life story in the unputdownable More Fool Me. It is a heady tale of the late Eighties and early Nineties, in which Stephen – ever more driven to create, perform, and entertain – burned bright and partied hard with a host of famous and infamous friends, regardless of the consequences.This electric and extraordinary book reveals a new side to Mr Fry.

Must Read

Weeping Waters By Karin Brynard Inspector Albertus Beeslaar has left the ruthless city, only to have his hopes of finding peace and quiet in the Kalahari shattered by the brutal murder of artist Freddie Swarts and her adopted daughter. But Freddie’s journalist sister Sara is not convinced that this was a typical farm attack. Amid a spate of stock thefts, Beeslaar must solve this high-profile crime, all the while training his two rookie partners, Ghaap and Pyl.After more murders, the disturbing puzzle grows increasingly sinister, as age-old secrets and hostilities surface, spurring the local inhabitants to violent action. No one is above suspicion.

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Airline information SA Express fleet Canadair Regional Jet 200 BER Manufacturer: Bombardier Maximum cruising speed: 474 knots/545mph/879kmph Engines: Two General Electric CF34-3B1 Range: 1,662miles/3,080km Maximum altitude: 41,000ft/12,496m Seating capacity: 50

Crew: Two pilots, two cabin crew Wing span: 69ft 7in/21.21m Overall length: 87ft 10in/26.77m Overall height: 20ft 5in/6.22m Maximum take-off weight: 51,000lb/23,134kg Minimum runway length: 6,295ft/1,919m

De Havilland Dash 8 Series Q400 Turboprop Manufacturer: Bombardier Maximum cruising speed: 360knots/414mph/667kmph Engines: Two Pratt & Whitney Canada PW150A Range: 1,565 miles/2,519km Maximum altitude: 25,000ft/7,620m Seating capacity: 74 Crew: Two pilots, two

cabin crew Wing span: 93ft 3in/28.42m Overall length: 107ft 9in/32.83m Overall height: 27ft 5in/8.34m Maximum take-off weight: 64,500lb/29,257kg Minimum runway length: 4,580ft/1,396m

Canadair Regional Jet 700 Manufacturer: Bombardier Maximum cruising speed: 473 knots/544mph/875kmph Engines: Two General Electric CF34-8C5B Range: 1,477m/2,794km Maximum altitude: 41,000ft/12,496m Seating capacity: 70 Crew: Crew: Two pilots, two

cabin crew Wing span: 76ft 3in/23.2m Overall length: 106ft 8in/32.51m Overall height: 24ft 10in/7.57m Maximum take-off weight: 72,750lb/32,999kg Minimum runway length: 4,580ft/1,396m

SA Express’ aircraft are made by Bombardier Aerospace

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We fly for you About us SA Express is a fast-growing airline business operating primary and secondary hubs between domestic and regional destinations within Southern Africa. Our objective of improving intra-Africa travel is in line with South Africa’s mandate to increase aviation’s contribution towards sustainable economic growth and job creation. The flexibility and reliability presented by the airline’s FACT principle (Frequency, Availability, Competitive rate and Timing of flights) affords both consumers and service providers a unique and convenient service. The FACT principle is important to us as it enhances the country’s prospect as a preferred air travel destination and major trade and tourism capital. Our vision is supported by the airline’s aspirations and strategy. Also underpinning this vision is our set of core values and unique selling propositions that drive profitability. Vision To be a sustainable world-class regional airline with an extensive footprint in Africa. Purpose A sustainable, integrated regional airline connecting secondary and main airports.

Core values Safety first We never compromise on safety, no matter what. Customers Our customers are our most important investors. Partners We partner with people across all operations. Speed & Quality We deliver with speed without compromising on quality.

Improvement We strive for continuous improvement. Simplify We keep it simple.

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Special services Special Meals Passengers with special dietary requirements are provided for through the following special meals: kosher, halal, Muslim, Hindu, low-fat and vegetarian meals. Orders for special meals should be placed at the time of making flight reservations. The airline requires a minimum of 48 hours’ notice prior to departure in order to assist with confirmation of requests. Passengers requiring special attention Requirements for unaccompanied minors (passengers under the age of 12 years) or passengers requiring wheelchairs should be stated at the time of making the reservation. Owing to the size of the cabins on our aircraft types, the airline is not in a position to carry stretcher passengers or incubators. Cabin baggage SA Express will accept one piece of cabin baggage not exceeding a total dimension of 115cm and 7kg in weight. For safety reasons, cabin baggage must fit into approved stowage spaces: either the overhead luggage bin or under the seat. Owing to limited storage space in the aircraft cabin, cabin baggage may be placed in the Skycheck at the aircraft for hold stowage.

We Fly For You SA Express Airways prides itself on aiming to offer incomparable service standards. In addition to building on our motto to express excellence and consistently striving to provide the best service, we know that “you” is the most important word in our airline. SA Express proudly launched its new brand on 2 December 2009 at OR Tambo International Airport. The new brand is set to ensure that it’s distinctive and positioned to build awareness and affinity in the domestic and regional markets. The new proposition “We Fly for You” is set to position SA Express as a premier intraregional African brand. The main objective of the re-brand is to ensure that SA Express is distinctive yet still aligned to the country’s mainline carrier. SA Express’s unique positioning as an airline that provides a bespoke, personalised travel experience was the rationale behind the proposition “We Fly for You”. The new brand mark is in line with the symbol and colours of the national flag, encouraging national pride. The new brand will be applied to all brand touch-points throughout the operation as well as the staff uniform.

Skycheck This is the airline’s special hand-luggage facility that assists with in-flight comfort, speedy boarding and disembarking. When boarding one of our flights, simply place any hand luggage that will not be required during the flight on to the Skycheck cart at the boarding steps of the aircraft. Your hand luggage will be waiting for you as you disembark from the aircraft at your destination. Baggage liability Valuable items such as cameras and accessories, computers – including laptops and notebooks – mobile telephones, perfumes, aftershaves, colognes, legal and company documents and legal tender – including cash, credit cards and cheques – bullion, leather jackets, all types of jewellery and any other items with a value in excess of R400 must be removed from either checked-in or Skycheck baggage as the airline is not liable for loss or damage to these items. Verified baggage claims are settled on the basis adopted by IATA (International Airlines Transport Association): payment of US$20 per 1kg of checked-in luggage, to a maximum of 20kg ($400).

Awards SA Express has won the AFRAA Regional Airline of the Year Award at the end of 2009, and the Allied and Aviation Business Corporate Award. Our airline was also the recipient of the Annual Airline Reliability Award from Bombardier at the end of 2007. Other previous awards include the International Star Quality Award, which indicates our commitment to service excellence, while our prominence as one of the top 500 best managed companies is proof of our success as a business. Onboard service The airline’s onboard service is unique and offers passengers a variety of meals or snacks. The airline pioneered its unique meal-box concept, and meal choices are frequently updated and designed using balanced food criteria: appearance, taste and nutritional value. Passengers can also enjoy a wine and malt service on specified flights as well as refreshments on all flights. Our customers can expect a safe, comfortable, quality air-travel experience, with the added benefits of frequency, reliability, on-time departures and unmatched value for money.


Safety Information Health regulations Health regulations at certain airports require that the aircraft cabin be sprayed. The spray is harmless, but if you think it might affect you, please cover your nose and mouth with a handkerchief. Remain seated As a safety precaution, passengers are requested to remain seated with seatbelts fastened after the aircraft has landed, until the seatbelt sign has been switched off by the captain. Portable electronic equipment The use of personal electronic devices (PED’s) will apply to all domestic and regional flights on the CRJ700/200 and DH8 Q400.

Passengers will be permitted to use PED’s such as cell phones, e-readers and electronic tablets in flight-mode.

Cellular telephones Cellular telephones may be used on the ground while passenger doors are open. Cellular telephones, smartphones or any device with flight mode must be switched off as soon as the cabin doors are closed and when the senior cabincrew member makes an announcement on the public-address system. Laptop computers Laptops with CD ROM and DVD drive, handheld calculators, electric shavers and portable personal listening devices may not be used on the ground during taxi but may be used during the flight when the seatbelt signs are switched off and with permission from the captain. Should circumstances dictate otherwise, a public-address announcement cancelling this concession will be made by a crew member.

Prohibited equipment Portable printers, laser pointers, video equipment, CB/ AM/FM/FHF/satellite receivers, two-way radios, compact disc and mini-disc players, scanners, remote-controlled toys and power converters are prohibited for use at any time. Safety pamphlet Read the safety pamphlet in the seat pocket in front of you and take note of your nearest emergency exit. Smoking In accordance with international trends, smoking is not permitted on board any SA Express flights. Seat belts Please fasten your seat belt whenever the seat belt signs are illuminated. For your own safety we suggest that you keep it fastened throughout the flight. Important When in doubt, please consult our cabin crew.

For your comfort and security, please comply with the above safety regulations at all times while on board

Route map SA Express: Johannesburg Bloemfontein Cape Town Durban East London Gaborone George Hoedspruit

Kimberley Lubumbashi Lusaka Harare Port Elizabeth Richards Bay Walvis Bay Windhoek

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Flight schedule

Johannesburg - Bloemfontein Flt SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

No 1001 1003 1003 1005 1011 1013 1017 1021 1023

Dep 06:15 08:00 08:00 11:20 13:50 14:55 16:50 17:55 18:30

Arr 07:15 09:05 09:05 12:25 14:55 16:00 17:50 18:55 19:35

A/C DH4 CR2 DH4 DH4 DH4 CR7 CR7 DH4 DH4

M

T

W

Johannesburg - East London Flt SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

No 1403 1403 1403 1405 1407 1413 1409 1411

Dep 07:15 08:30 08:30 09:10 13:15 15:00 17:30 18:40

Arr 08:45 10:00 10:15 10:40 14:45 16:30 19:00 20:10

A/C CR8 CR7 DH4 CR2 CR2 CR7 CR2 CR7

M

Johannesburg - George Flt SA SA SA SA SA

No 1501 1503 1503 1505 1509

Dep 07:20 08:55 08:55 11:25 15:25

Arr 09:10 10:45 10:50 13:15 17:15

A/C CR7 CR7 CR2 CR7 CR7

M

Dep 10:15 12:15

Arr 11:20 13:20

A/C DH4 DH4

M

Johannesburg - durban Flt No SA 1285

Dep 12:20

Arr 13:30

A/C CR2

M

No 1101 1103 1105 1107 1113

Dep 06:50 09:20 13:10 14:25 16:60

Arr 08:00 10:35 14:25 15:40 17:55

A/C dh4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4

M

S

S

W

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T

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S

S

W

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S

S

F

S

S

Johannesburg - Kimberley Flt SA SA SA SA SA

F

T

Johannesburg - Hoedspruit Flt No SA 1225 SA 1227

T

T

Johannesburg - Port Elizabeth Flt SA SA SA SA SA SA

No 1453 1455 1457 1457 1459 1459

Dep 07:10 10:00 17:50 17:50 19:35 19:55

Arr 08:45 11:35 19:25 19:45 21:15 21:30

A/C CR8 CR8 DH4 cr7 cr8 CR7

M

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W

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Bloemfontein - Johannesburg Flt SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

No 1024 1002 1004 1004 1006 1012 1014 1018

Dep 06:20 07:45 09:35 09:35 12:55 15:25 16:30 18:20

A/C DH4 DH4 CR2 DH4 DH4 DH4 CR7 CR7

M

T

W

T

East London - Johannesburg Flt SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

No 1412 1404 1404 1404 1404 1406 1408 1414 1410

Dep 06:45 09:15 09:50 10:50 10:30 11:10 15:30 17:00 19:40

Arr 08:25 10:45 11:30 12:30 12:10 12:40 17:00 18:30 21:10

A/C CR7 CR8 DH4 DH4 Cr7 CR2 CR2 CR7 CR8

M

George - Johannesburg Flt SA SA SA SA SA

No 1502 1504 1504 1506 1510

Dep 09:45 11:25 11:25 14:10 17:50

Arr 11:35 13:05 13:15 15:50 19:30

A/C CR7 CR7 CR2 CR7 CR7

M

Flt SA SA

No 1226 1228

Dep 12:00 13:55

Arr 13:00 14:55

A/C DH4 DH4

M

durban - Johannesburg Flt SA

No 1286

Dep 17:15

Arr 18:25

A/C CR2

M

No 1102 1104 1106 1106 1108 1114

Dep 08:25 11:10 14:55 15:00 16:10 18:25

Arr 09:30 12:25 16:10 16:10 17:25 19:30

A/C dh4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4

M

No 1460 1454 1456 1458 1458

Dep 06:10 09:20 12:45 20:00 20:45

SA EXPRESS RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE, SUSPEND OR AMEND THIS PUBLISHED SCHEDULE WITHOUT PRIOR NOTIFICATION EVERY EFFORT WILL BE MADE TO OPERATE AS PER THE PLANNED SCHEDULE

Arr 07:45 10:55 14:20 21:35 22:40

A/C cr7 CR8 DH4 cr7 DH4

M

S

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

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S

W

T

F

S

S

F

S

S

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Port Elizabeth - Johannesburg Flt SA SA SA SA SA

S

W

Kimberley - Johannesburg Flt SA SA SA SA SA SA

F

T

Hoedspruit - Johannesburg

*Please note that SA Express may deviate from the published schedule over the holiday period and will operate reduced schedules in December and January

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Arr 07:25 08:40 10:40 10:40 14:00 16:30 17:35 19:20

T

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Flight schedule

Johannesburg - Richards bay Flt SA SA SA SA

No 1201 1203 1207 1213

Dep 06:00 08:30 13:15 16:55

Arr 07:15 09:45 14:30 18:10

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

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S

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S

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S

Johannesburg - walvis bay Flt No SA 1701

Dep 11:55

Arr 14:10

A/C CR7

M

T

Johannesburg - windhoek Flt No SA 1733 SA 1731

Dep 06:00 06:00

Arr 08:10 08:10

A/C CR2 CR2

M

T

Johannesburg - Gaborone Flt SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

No 1761 1763 1765 1765 1767 1767 1767 1775 1775 1783 1779

Dep 07:10 07:55 09:20 09:55 11:05 11:55 11:55 13:30 14:30 15:50 18:10

Arr 08:05 08:50 10:15 10:50 12:00 12:45 12:45 14:25 15:25 16:40 19:05

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 CR2 DH4 DH4 CR2 DH4

M

T

Johannesburg - Lubumbashi Flt No SA 1797

Dep 09:20

Arr 11:45

A/C CR7

M

T

CAPE TOWN - bloemfontein Flt SA SA SA SA SA

No 1081 1083 1087 1091 1091

Dep 06:00 08:00 13:15 16:15 17:15

Arr 07:30 09:30 15:00 18:00 18:45

A/C CR2 CR2 DH4 CR2 CR2

M

CAPE TOWN - east london Flt SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

No 1361 1363 1363 1371 1371 1371 1375

Dep 06:00 08:00 08:00 13:30 13:30 16:00 17:20

Arr 07:55 09:25 09:55 14:55 15:10 17:30 19:15

A/C DH4 CR2 DH4 CR2 CR2 cr2 DH4

M

Richards bay - Johannesburg Flt SA SA SA SA SA

No 1202 1204 1208 1214 1214

Dep 08:05 10:30 15:05 18:40 18:40

Arr 09:20 11:45 16:20 20:00 20:10

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

walvis bay - Johannesburg Flt SA

No 1702

Dep 14:45

Arr 16:55

A/C CR7

M

T

windhoek - Johannesburg Flt SA SA

No 1734 1732

Dep 09:30 09:30

Arr 11:30 11:30

A/C CR2 CR2

M

T

Gaborone - Johannesburg Flt SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

No 1762 1764 1766 1766 1768 1768 1768 1776 1776 1784 1780

Dep 08:45 09:25 10:45 11:25 12:35 13:10 13:10 14:50 16:05 17:20 19:45

Arr 09:40 10:20 11:40 12:20 13:30 14:05 14:05 15:45 17:00 18:10 20:40

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 cr2 DH4 DH4 CR2 DH4

M

T

Lubumbashi - Johannesburg Flt SA

No 1798

Dep 12:30

Arr 15:00

A/C CR7

M

T

bloemfontein - CAPE TOWN Flt SA SA SA SA SA

No 1082 1084 1088 1092 1092

Dep 08:15 10:30 15:40 18:30 19:25

Arr 10:00 12:15 17:40 20:30 21:10

A/C CR2 CR2 DH4 CR2 CR2

M

east london - CAPE TOWN Flt SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

No 1362 1364 1364 1372 1372 1372 1376

Dep 08:25 10:25 10:45 16:00 16:20 18:00 19:45

Arr 10:25 12:25 12:25 18:00 18:00 19:40 21:45

A/C DH4 DH4 CR2 DH4 CR2 CR2 dh4

M

*Please note that SA Express may deviate from the published schedule over the holiday period and will operate reduced schedules in December and January

SA EXPRESS RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE, SUSPEND OR AMEND THIS PUBLISHED SCHEDULE WITHOUT PRIOR NOTIFICATION EVERY EFFORT WILL BE MADE TO OPERATE AS PER THE PLANNED SCHEDULE

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Flight schedule

Cape Town - Hoedspruit Flt No SA 1241 SA 1241

Dep 09:30 09:40

Arr 12:10 12:20

A/C CR2 CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

CAPE TOWN - port elizabeth Flt SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

No 1801 1805 1807 1813 1813 1819 1821 1821 1823

Dep 06:00 09:00 10:10 13:00 13:45 15:00 16:00 16:30 18:30

Arr 07:30 10:30 11:40 14:30 14:55 16:30 17:30 17:40 20:00

A/C dh4 dh4 DH4 DH4 dh4 DH4 DH4 CR2 DH4

M

Cape Town - Walvis Bay Flt No SA 1721 SA 1721

Dep 08:00 11:15

Arr 10:10 13:25

A/C CR2 CR2

durban - East London Flt SA SA SA SA

No 1301 1303 1305 1309

Dep 06:00 08:30 12:00 16:50

Arr 07:05 09:35 13:05 17:55

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

M

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

durban - Port Elizabeth Flt SA SA SA SA SA

No 1330 1334 1336 1340 1348

Dep 06:00 09:15 11:55 13:35 17:40

Arr 07:20 10:35 13:15 14:55 19:00

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

durban - CAPE TOWN Flt SA SA SA SA SA

No 1850 1852 1854 1858 1854

Dep 06:10 08:00 12:00 15:35 15:00

Arr 08:25 10:15 14:15 17:50 17:15

durban - lusaka Flt No SA 1601

Dep 10:10

Arr 13:00

durban - Harare Flt SA SA SA

No 1611 1613 1611

Dep 10:20 13:55 14:00

Arr 12:45 16:20 16:25

Hoedspruit - Cape Town Flt SA

No 1242

Dep 12:45

A/C CR2

M

T

port elizabeth - CAPE TOWN Flt SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

No 1826 1802 1806 1808 1814 1814 1820 1822 1822 1824

Dep 07:20 10:30 11:00 12:10 15:00 15:25 17:00 18:00 18:10 20:30

Arr 08:40 12:10 12:40 13:50 16:40 16:45 18:40 19:40 19:30 22:10

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 CR2 DH4 dh4 CR2 DH4

Flt SA SA

No 1722 1722

Dep 10:30 14:00

Arr 12:30 16:00

No 1302 1304 1306 1310

Dep 07:35 10:05 13:35 18:25

Arr 08:35 11:05 14:35 19:25

No 1331 1335 1337 1341 1349

Dep 07:50 11:05 13:40 15:35 19:55

Arr 09:05 12:20 14:55 16:50 21:10

No 1851 1853 1855 1859 1855

Dep 09:05 10:45 15:00 18:15 17:45

Arr 11:05 12:45 17:00 20:15 19:45

lusaka - durban Flt SA

No 1602

Dep 13:40

Arr 16:30

Harare - durban Flt SA SA SA

No 1612 1612 1614

Dep 13:25 17:00 17:00

SA EXPRESS RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE, SUSPEND OR AMEND THIS PUBLISHED SCHEDULE WITHOUT PRIOR NOTIFICATION EVERY EFFORT WILL BE MADE TO OPERATE AS PER THE PLANNED SCHEDULE

Arr 15:50 19:25 19:25

S

S

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2 CR2

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

CAPE TOWN - DURBAN Flt SA SA SA SA SA

F

W

Port Elizabeth - DURBAN Flt SA SA SA SA SA

T

T

East London - DURBAN Flt SA SA SA SA

W

M

walvis Bay - Cape Town

*Please note that SA Express may deviate from the published schedule over the holiday period and will operate reduced schedules in December and January

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Arr 15:20


Passenger Letters Dear SA Express Recently I had the great pleasure of flying from Gaborone to Johannesburg. I was accompanied by my nine-year-old son, Chaim. I was very impressed with the quality and cleanliness of the plane and by the professionalism and friendliness of the staff on board. My son has had a long-standing dream to be shown around a cockpit, so I took a chance and asked one of the flight attendants if this would be a possibility. She came back to us a short while later to say that once we’d landed, he would be allowed to visit the cockpit. He was so excited that he could hardly stay in his seat. Upon landing, off he went and he came back a short while later with such a glow that we could easily have switched off all the cabin lights and it would have been just as bright. Thank you for making a little guy’s dream come true. Yours M Greenhouse

Congratulations to M Greenhouse, who wrote our winning letter this month. They have won a High Sierra Tushar backpack valued at R895.

To whom it may concern, I was on a flight recently from East London to Durban. I had a busy morning and no time for lunch, and as an insulin dependent diabetic I was looking forward to having a snack on the plane. Upon boarding the flight I saw this petite flight attendant and was wondering how she was going to cope with the full flight. I was pleasantly surprised, though, as she handed out the snack boxes efficiently, and immediately after that arrived with the drinks trolley. What amazed me was that, as she offered us our drinks, she enquired if the snack was enough and if anyone would like seconds. I hope I am not getting her into trouble for being so generous! I often travel the Durban, East London and Durban, Port Elizabeth routes and I always see flight attendants just going about their duties, but Ayanda went the extra mile and should get an employee of the month award (if you have a programme like that). Kind regards, Morgan Naidu

Do You Have Something to Say? Let us know what is on your mind by sending an email to customercare@flyexpress.aero. Letters may be edited, shortened or translated from their original language.

The writer of the winning letter in the January edition of Indwe will receive a High Sierra Aggro backpack valued at R1,095. Outdoor luggage brand High Sierra has recently launched in South Africa. This robust travel luggage will inspire your everyday adventures in life, whether you’re out enjoying nature or doing daily urban activities. The range offers a wide assortment of active outdoor gear, urban backpacks, and rugged luggage. The High Sierra Aggro backpack features a large, multi-compartment design with a fully padded Cushion Zone compartment that fits most 16.4” laptops, and an integrated Tech Spot tablet compartment. High Sierra is available at leading luggage stores nationwide. For a stockist near you, call +27 31 266 0620.

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Africa’s Talent Revealed

Beautiful Aloes in Queenstown by Dr Engela le Roux

Mother and baby in the Addo Elephant Park by Ilse Gerlach

The Cape Town Yacht and Power Boat Club, Cape Town Harbour by Hugo Klaasen

If you think you have what it takes, send your photos (1MB each), details of where they were taken and your contact details to nicky@tcbmedia.co.za, with the words “Indwe Photo” in the subject line. We can’t wait to show them off!


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