T International April 2021

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PHOTOSYNTHESIS

SWIMWEAR WITH DESIGN AND QUALITY OF THE MADE IN PORTUGAL SEAL P 12 &13

N U M B E R 9 A P R I L 2 021

I N T E R N AT I O N A L DIRETOR: MANUEL SERRÃO

DIGITALIZATION

RIOPELE INVESTED 35 MILLION TO BE THE MOST MODERN IN EUROPE P3

RUI MARTINS Inovafil CEO

“THIS IS OUR BEST YEAR EVER” P&9

OPINION

SUSTAINABILITY

THE COSTS OF SEA TRANSPORTATION AND THE LACK OF CONTAINERSS

ADALBERTO INVESTS HALF MILLION EURO IN SOLAR PANELS

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CERTIFICATION

FLM AND UNIVERSITY OF MINHO TOGETHER TO DEFINE A SUSTAINABLE SCRIPT P6


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RIOPELE INVESTED 35 MILLION TO BE THE MOST MODERN

n EDITORIAL By: Manuel Serrão

DIGITAL TRANSPARENCY

The 35 million euro investment plan drawn up in 2010 by Riopele for the company’s modernization is in its final stage. Focused on digital transition and sustainability, the goal is to transform the historic textile, founded in 1927, into the most modern factory in Europe. “We want to be a reference in Europe by investing not only in cutting-edge technology – equipment automation and efficiency, construction of a digital platform, monitoring the shop floor and implementing an artificial vision system on looms – but also through optimization processes and reinforcing internal skills”, explains José Alexandre Oliveira, President of Riopele. According to the company, “in the last decade, the number of employees increased by 23%, to 1039 at the end of 2020. In the techni-

cal, research and development, logistics, commercial and sustainability areas, Riopele already employs more than 150 employees, around 18% of the company’s total. A growth of over 20% since 2010”. Another relevant data is the number of professionals with an university degree, which now stands at 118, an increase of 46% since 2010, and that now represent more than 10% of the workforce. Founded in 1927, Riopele is an international reference in fabric production for prestigious international brands. After eight years of growth, it is now investing in other business areas such as the automotive industry, and strengthening its position in the workwear and military segments. t

ERT PRESENTED ACTIVE TNT PROJECT FOR NEW GENERATION EPI’S The ERT group has just presented the results of the Active TNT project, created with the aim to innovate and provide answers in the fight against the pandemic. The results are a set of personal protection equipment such as new-generation masks, caps, cuffs, shoes and surgical gowns. The goal of the Active TNT project was to obtain perso-

nal protective equipment with antimicrobial and antiviral characteristics, and increased durability and resistance. An example is the surgical gowns made from a bi-laminate with TNT and protective film, with the TNT being on the inside to allow greater comfort, and the film acting as an external barrier to the droplets. The products are certified by CITEVE.

ERT also presented an innovative mask capable of detecting if someone has a fever. The lining is made of cotton to ensure comfort during long and repetitive contact against the skin; protection is ensured by TNT, which does the filtering; and the outer part is made of thermo and hydrochromatic materials that change colour when in contact with heat. t

The Municipality of Famalicão, in collaboration with the Textile Cluster, put together a very interesting webinar dedicated to digitization in the textile industry and business. The contributions of Manuel Gonçalves, from TMG, Rui Oliveira, from Riopele, and Joaquim Sousa, from Somelos (and Fluxdata),was the key to the success of the webinar. It was very enlightening to listen to them, but much more important was their willingness to give examples of what they are already doing in their companies in terms of digitizing the various processes of the textile business. When companies of this dimension are transparent with their peers, we all realize that competition is no longer from our neighbours, but the worldwide companies that are taking advance of the new technologies. However, no less relevant was the conclusion that digitalizing the textile and clothing industry is not dehumanizing the companies or the business. People will continue to make a difference. Along with a smart digitalization, they can even increase the difference they make. t

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Property: ATP - Associação Têxtil e de Vestuário de Portugal NIF: 501070745 Editor: Mário Jorge Machado Director: Manuel Serrão Adress: Rua Fernando Mesquita, 2785, Ed. CITEVE 4760-03164 Vila Nova de Famalicão Telephone number: +351 252 303 030 Email: tdetextil@atp.pt Subscription e Advertising: Cláudia Azevedo Lopes Telephone number: +351 969 658 043 - mail: cl.tdetextil@gmail.com ERC Provisional Registration: 126725 Circulation: 1000 copies Print Shop: Grafedisport Adress: Estrada Consiglieri Pedroso, 90 - Casal Santa Leopoldina - 2730-053 Barcarena Legal Deposit Number: 451405/19 Editorial Status: Available in: http:// tjornalinternational.com/editorial-statute/

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CANTÊ EXPANDS COLLECTION TO WOMEN’S CLOTHING Celebrating ten years of existence, Cantê has just launched the Alma collection, inspired by the Portuguese coast. The big novelty is the launch of the brand’s first women’s clothing line, which can be combined with the usual bikinis and bathing suits in floral and cheerful patterns. In addition to the swimwear collection, Alma includes dresses, skirts, overalls and even sets of light and fluid tops and shorts for use on and off the beach, together with accessories already featured in previous collections.

"It is essential to innovate, constantly. The only solution is to stay ahead" Luís Cristino Sampedro’s President

FOURSOUL’S NEW LINE IS ALL ABOUT FREEDOM

The expression “Come out of the closet” served as a motto for FourSoul new collection. Thanks to materials such as linen and cotton, the “Come Out” collection brings light and relaxed suggestions, where vibrant colours – green, blue and lilac – are the stars. With this collection, the brand celebrates freedom: of gender, ethnicity and identity. “It embodies the growing desire to take clothes out of the closet and proudly show them on the street”, explains the brand. t

TOP TRENDS INCREASINGLY CONCERNED ABOUT THE FUTURE In the year that marks its 30th birthday, Top Trends is increasingly concerned about the planet’s future. The company, which two years ago adopted the WE CARE ABOUT THE FUTURE motto as a decisive commitment to sustainability, recently acquired another licence from LENZING, now for ECOVEROR, related to the use and production of garments made from sustainable viscose. The concern with the Planet and with environmental causes is relentless in the company’s policies and strategy, which, among its customers, employees and partners, has been raising awareness, implementing and reinforcing a culture of environmental care, as highlighted in a note signed by the admi-

nistrator Daniel Simões. “After becoming an expert and a reference in the use and production of articles made from Lyocell TENCEL – both in terms of circular knits and fabrics – and becoming licensed by Lenzing to use the TENCEL brand, Top Trends achieved one more licence, also from LENZING, now for ECOVEROR”, explains the note. Along with the new licence, “which is related to the use and production of garments with sustainable viscose”, the company adds that “it’s already implementing other projects that will further increase the company’s level of sustainability”, not only regarding production but also in performance, both in terms of time and costs. t

FASHION BRANDS ARE R MAIA’S NEXT GREATEST BET Specialized in the import of lace and embroidery, R Maia is now betting on communicating directly with both Portuguese and international fashion brands. The company’s new strategy is a direct result of the changes enforced by the pandemic. “The pandemic forced us to be faster and more efficient”, says the managing partner Raul Maia, who feels

that this is the key moment for the company to bet on new strategies and to get closer to fashion brands. “Times change, and wills change”, he summarizes. With that goal in mind, R Maia, which provides lace and embroidery for Portuguese private label companies, is developing a new strategy and communication plan. “If the brands know us, they can

ask the manufacturers to buy our products”, he explains. With a 26-year-old history, R Maia is specialized in importing lace and embroidery, and essentially supplies the Portuguese private label market. The company’s expectation is to increase its business volume in 2022, through a rebranding process and by participating in international sourcing fairs. t

XNFY LAB LINKS FASHION WITH ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

EMOH’S BEACH TOWELS ARE MADE FROM ORGANIC COTTON

The XNFY Lab is one of the first companies in Portugal to produce fashion pieces thought and designed by artificial intelligence. The program uses Microsoft’s Azure Machine Learning platform, and according to the brand “does not copy images or movements. Instead, it learns about the subject, and which details can be used to create original content”. The products will be available for purchase on Indiegogo.

Thinking about the long beach days spent with family, Emoh has just launched a collection of beach towels. There are 11 models available, all in XXL size, and some named after some famous holiday islands. The towels are made from organic cotton, are light and dry quickly. This is the second collection of the Portuguese brand as created by JF Almeida, after launching a homewear and home textiles line in March.

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thousand pairs of jeans are manufactured daily at Salsa

DITCHIL WANTS TO TAKE ITS OWN BRAND TO ALL OF EUROPE The Portuguese company Ditchil wants to assert its own women’s sportswear brand and increase its presence in international markets. After the Iberian Peninsula, Ditchil now wants to take its brand to the rest of the European market, and is studying new strategies to travel to other geographies. The brand, which inherits the name of the mother-company devoted to private label production, was born six years ago and already has a strong presence in the Portuguese market and in Spain. “We want to reach new markets in 2022, and therefore we are considering participating in international fashion fairs”, says Carla Macedo, CEO of the company.


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PROCHEF GROUP LAUNCHES UNIFORM LINE FOR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS The Prochef group, a specialist in uniforms for the hospitality sector, has a new business area: uniforms for healthcare professionals. Called ProHealth line, it consists of gowns, tunics, pants, operating room equipment and shoes, which can be fully customized by the customer. When “the crisis hit the hotel and restaurant sectors”, the owner of the Prochef group, Orquídea Silva, decided to expand its offer to healthcare professionals, with the same standards that distinguishes the company’s production.

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"We have to follow the path of innovation and quality,so that cost won´t be the pivotal issue" João Rui Pereira Pafil’s Administrator

CASUALWEAR MAKES MARJOMOTEX GROW 30% The textile company Marjomotex MJM had great expectations for 2020, with the culmination of an internationalization project that started four years earlier. The pandemic came to mess up the plans, but the company still managed to be successful in some of its bets. The investment in casual wear, and the partnership with brands focused on online sales allowed the company to increase sales by 30%. “Without Covid it would be even better”, says the general director, Mónica Afonso.

FLM JOINS UMINHO TO DEFINE SUSTAINABLE SCRIPT FML Têxtil, specialized in the production of high-end activewear, swimwear and underwear, has just established a partnership with the University of Minho in order to adopt the requirements of the Global Recycled Standard certification. The goal is to ensure that the company’s production has the minimum environmental impact possible. About to celebrate its tenth birthday, the company founded and led by Filipe Marinho recently invested in laser cutting technology, and has practically completed the ISO 9001 certification, in an effort to anticipate the future and go with the market trends. The next step was to establish a connection with the University of Minho, in order to obtain the “Global Recycled Standard” certification. Reducing the impact of production on people and on the environment – ensuring that products are processed sustainably –, increasing the percentage of recycled content in products, and waste control along the pro-

duction chain are FLM’s goal. “This partnership will allow students to contact directly with the business reality, while FLM Têxtil will have access to one of the most qualified generations ever, capable of creating innovative solutions to the companies’ problems”, says Filipe Marinho.

Along with the improvement in the employees’ quality of life, waste reduction and recycling, the improvement of the material storage process and the automation of logistics and packaging processes are the other goals that FLM wants to achieve with the partnership.t

LURDES SAMPAIO, RECUTEX AND FIAVIT TOGETHER AT RFIVE Recutex, Fiavit and Lurdes Sampaio teamed up to create Rfive, a circular economy project that combines knowledge, experience and skills of the three partners to embody the concept of sustainability: reduce, reuse, recycle, renew and restore. The process is simple: Recutex recycles textile fibres from unused or old garments, and Fiavit uses those fibres to make new yarn. Then, Lurdes Sampaio uses that yarn, which has a high

percentage of recycled fibres, to make new knits that will be transformed into fresh textile products. “This is a turnkey project that incorporates more than half a century of experience in the production of recycled fibres”, states the administrator of Recutex and Fiavit, João Valério, while Conceição Sampaio, CEO of Lurdes Sampaio, highlights the sustainable potential of the partnership. The process begins by collecting

of textile waste, followed by selection, separation and preparation of textile fibres. Then it’s time to spin the recycled fibres, and it all ends with the production of knits with recycled cotton. “Therefore, our production has zero CO2 emission, and it doesn’t use water or chemical products. We have closed a circular economy cycle”, concludes the administrator of Recutex and Fiavit, adding that Rfive’s goal is to offer a high quality final product.t

TINTEX LAUNCHES HATA TO CONCENTRATE KNIT PRODUCTION With the inauguration of Hata’s new facilities, Tintex group takes a giant leap forward in terms of production capacity, bringing together all the company’s knitting into a single unit. The new facilities, with close to three thousand square meters, represent an investment of more than three million euros. Mário Jorge Silva, founder and chairman of the group’s board of directors, stated that this investment “represents not only a reinforcement of the group’s innovation, sustainability, performance and transparency, but is also a confirmation of excellence of the Portuguese textile industry”. With the inauguration of the new unit, Hata closes the temporary facilities where it has been operating since 2017. At the same time, it concentrates and considerably increases its knitwear production capacity, adding eight new machines to the 16 that came from the old unit. At the inauguration, the founder of Tintex also paid tribute to his father, Ramiro Martins da Silva, by unveiling a statue located near the entrance to the new unit. Mário Jorge Silva highlighted the symbolic aspect of the ceremony, not only because the new unit is located in the place where the company was born, but also because the inauguration took place one week after Tintex’s 23rd anniversary. t


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n INTERVIEW Rui Martins 47 years old, a textile engineer, CEO and at the same time shareholder of Inovafil – which also encompasses Mundifios – and member of the United Nations Global Compact (UNGC), the largest corporate sustainability initiative in the world, supported by the UN. With a postgraduate degree in Industrial Management, he has always been connected to the yarn business (his father was a director of a spinning mill), and started at António Almeida & Filhos, where he entered as an intern and left as an administrator (at Moretextile).

PHOTO: RUI APOLINÁRIO

"WE HAVE THE BEST TEXTILE CLUSTER IN EUROPE"


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nnovation is a word that it’s part of the company's name, but mainly is it engraved in the company’s DNA. The supranational projects in which Inovafil is involved are the most revolutionary in terms of textile yarns and their properties. What are the company size indicators?

In terms of turnover, we hold to separate two areas: the productive – which is our core, the production of yarn – and the business, buying and selling yarn, which greatly influences our invoicing values, but it's not core. Because we are associated with Mundifios, we have a lot of synergies, and this area is one of them. We have a turnover of around ten million euros. Last year, in a perfectly abnormal situation, we had a very good first quarter, I would say one of the best ever, and then we had an abrupt stop.

This year, will you exceed the 10 million mark?

We hope to surpass it, but we don't want to make too many predictions. We will definitely have a better year than 2020 and even better than 2019, we believe. You employ 120 people. In terms of exports, how are you?

The exports were a pleasant surprise. Inovafil is a project that was designed to support the Portuguese industry and the textile cluster in the north of the country, which needs a spinning mill like Inovafil making differentiated and value-added products. And suddenly the foreigners came…

It was said that European textiles were dead, but we realized that Europe itself needs yarn and differentiating products, not commodities, and installed capacity. The new programs that are being implemented in Europe will not stop the globalization process, but will change it. The dogmas that said that production would move entirely to Asia and that Europe would limit itself to buying and selling things with margins – design, conception... And the seal…

Did you stop production?

We decided to stop production for a month. It wasn't exclusively due to lack of orders, it was due to instability, which could have had several outcomes: default, delivery delays for orders already placed by customers... We began working in June at 50% of our capacity, and the activity resumed fully from September on. It has been a huge surprise: 2021 is our best year ever, which does not cease to amaze us, given the international situation, the drop in consumption and the confinements. We know that the online market paid off – but it didn't make up for all the closed stores and drop in consumption. The recovery is underway?

Demand has been extremely high – we've stopped trying to figure out why. We have been managing in the short and medium term, always attentive because everything can change at a moment's notice – it only takes a mutation [of the virus] that is resistant to the vaccines and everything is derailed. We have to be alert and reactive, as we did last year. What are the 10 million of 2020 worth compared to 2019?

Even with the stop and with us working three months at 50%, we managed – also through the sale of some stock – to close 2020 with a 2% or 3% decrease in turnover in comparison with the previous year.

The European seal. This past year has clearly exposed Europe to the risk of its dependence on Asia, and of the giants that are beginning to dominate the world's economy. There was a political risk clearly negotiated by Europe, don't you think?

Yes, we are talking about the pandemic, but in the future we are going to talk about other circumstances that will be similar to this one, be it storms, political decisions, system changes... We believe that because we have the best European textile chain, even better than Italy, we can serve the best and work for them. We export about 50% of production essentially to Europe, France and Germany, and to the United States – to non-conventional markets.. Furthermore, we are involved in various research and development projects. When it is said that Inovafil is innovation, it’s about this we’re talking about. Let's get to that part. Yarns for thermal energy, vitamin E release, anti-ageing, healing accelerators, moisture management, thermoregulation. Are we in a textile company or in an alchemy laboratory?

We are in a textile company, believe it. If we ever put our team to work in a monoproduct, they would lose their motivation easily. The team is addicted to new products, new tasks. Mundifios realized that: if it wanted to respond to new challen-

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ges, such as sportswear and workwear, it would have to produce small quantities, without stocks, and the response time had to be fast. This all results from your investment in the development area?

We knew from the beginning that our products had to speak for ourselves, and that our service had to be flawless. We are RDI certified, but we wanted to go further: we created a project with the University of Minho and formed an R&D group whose function is to search for materials – in connection with partners, whether they are suppliers, licence holders or customers. We map the level of suppliers and existing fibres, we work closely with a group of fibre producers who come to test at Inovafil at an early stage, and we have a great connection with producers and their developments. Universities, technology centres, CITEVE, CeNTI, and customers are part of it all. What is hiding in Inovafil's labs right now?

From what can be revealed, we are part of a giant step towards the sustainability of the global textile industry. An European project led by H&M and Adidas put together a European consortium – from companies to universities, which we integrate – is working with fibres developed in Northern Europe, which are at the forefront of all that is sustainability related. The Nordic countries, which have a lot of know-how in wood, are the leaders in cellulosic fibres. In other words: from wood pulp, we go to cellulosic pulp, and then to fibres. The process is to dissolve the clothes, extract the cellulose, and make fibres again, such as Infinitive Fibre. We are also part of a consortium led by TMG that is studying non-Newtonian fluids – together with CITEVE and CeNTI. What is your annual investment in R&D?

It's hard to quantify, but it's always by hundreds of thousands of euros. You have talked about University of Minho, CITEVE and CeNTI. How do you assess the Portuguese research abilities?

They are clearly at top level, full of very capable people, and above all very accessible. Inovafil's path is a path of innovation and partnerships, with customers, suppliers and with science – in order to launch cutting-edge products. And we still have to learn how to create and protect our products, and learn how to form value chains between Portuguese companies. t

the questions of Raul Fangueiro UMinho Professor and Fibrenamics Coordinator How do you foresee the development of the conventional spinning sector given the new sustainable needs?

Conventional spinning will be decisive in creating high-performance and value-added products when working with recycled fibres. The main evolution in this technology will be in terms of compaction processes (Compact Ring), which will ensure products’ greater durability, and less fibre release. How important is Inovafil's relationship with Universities on the path towards innovation?

It is a close relationship that allows knowledge exchange between Universities and the industry. We are available for them to test their products at Inovafil and share their know-how. For us, investigating and testing state-of-the-art products and raw materials is a research tool.

José Morgado Director of CITEVE’s Department of Technology and Engineering Inovafil, as well as other Portuguese spinning mills, continues to deliver. What strategy has been followed?

The single-product spinning model is out in Europe. At Inovafil, where exports are a reality, we are focused on supporting the development of new products for our Portuguese customers. We are talking about the best Textile and Clothing Industry in Europe, and spinning has a very important role in keeping the sector at the forefront. What is the importance of R&D entities for Inovafil, and how do you foresee the future of this collaboration?

Along with the Universities, the relationship with the technological centres is vital for Inovafil. In the future, it will have to be based on even more proximity, more collaboration, more sharing and total openness. Partnerships are fundamental to what Inovafil intends to represent for its customers: cutting-edge technology, vanguard, innovation, added value, and development.


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MÖM(E) NOMINATED TO THE JUNIOR DESIGN AWARDS The Portuguese children’s fashion brand Möm(e) was nominated by the British magazine Junior Design for the Junior Design Awards, in the Best Children’s Eco Fashion category. “I am truly proud to be able to take the ‘made in Portugal’ brand abroad, and see the talent and quality of our artisans made known”, explains to T Jornal the designer and founder of the brand, Inês Camaño Garcia. This is not the first time that Möm(e) has been shortlisted by the Junior Design Awards. Last year, with the Autumn-Winter 2020 collection, the brand won the bronze medal in the same category. “We are hoping to get the bronze one more time or maybe even better”, concludes Inês.

"Sustainability is here to stay, and will continue to be a fast growing area" Paulo Augusto de Oliveira Paulo de Oliveira's Administrator

VALÉRIUS HUB AND GYM COFFEE TOGETHER

Valérius Hub recently collaborated with Gym Coffee in the development of a 100% sustainable collection – the Kinetic Capsule. “We are thrilled to have the innovative Valérius bring these designs to life, and we look forward to working even more closely with the company in the future,” explained Diarmuid McSweeney, co-founder of the Irish sportswear brand. The partnership arose from Valérius’ geographic proximity, but also due to the company’s good practices, namely the recycling of textile waste, the use of renewable energy sources, and its chemical-free processes. t

“EUROPE MUST ENFORCE EQUAL RULES FOR ALL” The ATP - The Portuguese Textile and Clothing Association is aware is aware of the dangers associated with textiles coming from outside the European Union, a problem that could get worse with the European Strategy for Sustainable Textiles. The solution, says the president of ATP, is to request from imported products the same circular economy requirements that will be placed on the products made in the European Union. “We cannot have a clean Europe and a dirty world”, warns Mário Jorge Machado. In addition to the competitiveness problem, which has long been faced regarding products coming from countries without any kind of sustainability requirements, the ATP leader alerts for the consequences

of the new rules that will be enforced in the EU as of 2025, when the incineration of textiles will be prohibited and recycling mandatory. “We will be introducing imported textiles with heavy metals into the chain, spreading harmful chemicals to hundreds of others pieces”, concludes the president of ATP. Mário Jorge Machado fears, on the other hand, that “the non-polluting rules applied to the European industry will affect its competitiveness”, especially when compared to Asian production. For the president, the solution is to adopt measures identical to those enforced in the automotive sector: if a manufacturer wants to sell his cars in Europe, has to comply with the same safety criteria practised within the EU. t

SCUSI WANTS TO GROW IN THE ITALIAN MARKET It is with the dream of finding a sales representative to cover the entire Italian territory that the Portuguese company Scusi is negotiating with an Italian group. “The pandemic didn´t help, but we’ve been courting for some time now”, jokes José Brito, the head of the women’s fashion company. The growth in the export volume, currently 8% of the company’s turnover, is a priority for Scusi, which is already represented in the Spanish and Canadian markets and, to a lesser extent, in Israel and Morocco.

100%

of Twintex's production is directed towards exports

TORRES NOVAS RETURNS, THIS TIME IN A SUSTAINABLE VERSION

CLS INVESTS 4.5 MILLION IN NEW FACTORY Specializing in safety clothing and individual protection, CLS Brands – Coelhos Têxteis Comércio e Indústria will invest 4.5 million euros in a new manufacturing unit. The company currently makes around 15 million euros in turnover, and will double the workforce of 20 workers when the new facilities start operating.

The project will include a production unit, a logistics centre, a packaging unit, an administrative centre, and a commercial space for customer service, all in five thousand square meters. At the investment presentation ceremony, the head of the financial department at CLS Brands, José Pimenta, stated that the family bu-

siness is showing “growth and positive results”, pointing to an annual turnover of around 15 million euros. In addition to solving the company’s lack of space, “the construction of a new building aims to increase the work capacity and the number of workers”, according to the statement made by CLS Brands.t

Torres Novas, the historic Portuguese bath towel brand, is back on the market: born in 1845 and after a nine-year interlude, entrepreneurs Inês Vaz Pinto, Nuno Vasconcellos e Sá and Miguel Castel-Branco, together with the company’s largest shareholder, Adolfo de Lima Mayer, intend to revive this emblematic brand – this time with clear sustainability concerns. To (re)start, Torres Novas revisited its historical archive, recovering three lines, “all of them with high quality cotton and impeccable construction, to ensure comfort and durability”: the Almonda, Luxus and Elegance lines.


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Anuncio T Internacional 235x295(241x301)cm ER 2021 quarta-feira, 13 de janeiro de 2021 10:30:58


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2. CANTÊ REINFORCED ITS RANGE OF BASIC BIKINIS, AND CHOSE LAVENDER AND BLACK AS THE COLOURS FOR THE SEASON

PHOTOSYNTHESIS by: Cláudia Azevedo Lopes

1. ACTRESS CLÁUDIA VIEIRA CREATED AN EXCLUSIVE SWIMWEAR LINE FOR LATITID, AND THE FEEDBACK COULDN'T BE BETTER

THE MADE IN PORTUGAL SWIMWEAR

Hot weather calls for the beach, walks on the countryside, and refreshing dips – activities that go perfectly together with the Portuguese brand’s swimwear collections. From the classic models to the most irreverent, there is no lack of options, all with the made in Portugal quality and design seal

7. SPEAKING OF BABIES, IT’S IMPOSSIBLE TO RESIST TO THIS DELICATE MODEL WITH FRILLS FROM THE CHILDREN'S FASHION BRAND KNOT

6. FOR THOSE WHO CAN'T DO WITHOUT A MATCHY MATCHY CHOICE, THIS CAIA SWIMSUIT RANGES FROM BABY TO ADULT

12. LINKED FROM THE BEGINNING WITH SUSTAINABILITY, WETHEKNOT RETURNED TO WHERE IT ALL STARTED: SWIM TRUNKS MADE FROM FABRIC OF DISCARDED UMBRELLAS

11. FOR THOSE WHO PREFER COLOUR AND PATTERNS, THIS BACKLESS SWIMSUIT FROM OIÔBA, DEVELOPED FROM PLASTIC COLLECTED FROM THE SEA, IT’S A MUST


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4. AND BECAUSE EVERYTHING STARTS FROM A YOUNG AGE, DCK ALSO HAS A KIDS RANGE WITH FATHER AND SON MATCHING OPTIONS

5. FOR GIRLS, OPTIONS ARE MANY AND GOOD, SO IT’S NOT SURPRISING THAT THIS FLORAL BIKINI FROM CANTÊ IS THE DELIGHT OF MOTHERS AND DAUGHTERS

3. FOR MEN, DCK OFFERS SURFER-STYLE SWIM SHORTS FOR A SUMMER SPENT CATCHING THE BEST WAVES

9. GLAMOUR AND ELEGANCE ARE THE MOTTO OF THE CAPSULE COLLECTION THAT ACTRESS SOFIA ARRUDA DESIGNED WITH KITESS FOR CONFIDENT WOMEN. ALL MODELS ARE IN GOLDEN TONES

8. FOR OLDER GIRLS (AND FOR ALL WOMEN) NORTADA HAS GREAT OPTIONS, WITH MORE IRREVERENT PATTERNS AND MODELS THAT ADJUST TO DIFFERENT AGES, SUCH AS THIS SWIMSUIT AND TRIKINI

10. FOR THE SWIMSUIT LOVERS, THERE IS NO SHORTAGE OF OPTIONS. AN EXAMPLE IS “MACEDA” BY BOHEMIAN SWIMWEAR, IN A NEUTRAL TONE AND A TOUCH OF ROMANTIC FRILLS

14. FAMILY IS ALSO ONE OF THE KEYWORDS OF LATITID MINI, WITH OPTIONS FOR BABIES AND CHILDREN WORN HERE BY ACTRESS CLÁUDIA VIEIRA AND HER DAUGHTERS

13. BIKINIS THAT STAND ASIDE FOR THEIR ORIGINALITY ARE BOW'S MAIN PROPOSALS, HERE WITH ONE OF THE BESTSELLERS OF THIS COLLECTION, IN A PATTERN AVAILABLE FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY


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FATEXTIL MAKES THE FIRST CARBON NEGATIVE HOODIE It is with the help of Portuguese company Fatextil that British brand Sheep Inc launched what it claims to be the first clothing article with a negative carbon footprint. We are talking about a hoodie manufactured by Fatextil, a knitting specialist with more than three decades of experience. The achievement was reported by Drapers magazine, which says that Fatextil’s factory is equipped with solar energy and 3D knitting machines, so each clothing piece ends up removing more CO2 from the atmosphere than what it emitted in the whole manufacturing process.As raw material, Sheep Inc uses extra-fine Merino wool from New Zealand sheep, which is then spun by the German Südwolle, which applies a chlorine-free treatment to the yarn called Eternity X-Care.

975

is the number of Parfois stores spread across 72 countries

GREENIN, THE SUSTAINABLE BRAND BORN TO BE GLOBAL

Created last year with the goal of being global, the Portuguese brand Greenin wants to bring a more sustainable side to the sportswear market. The raw materials are organic or recycled, originating from industrial or textile waste, such as recycled polyester and polyamide. The polyester is Portuguese and the polyamide is recycled in Italy, “through a high temperature process, without chemicals, which saves energy and water, compared to normal polyamide”, explains CCO Pedro Graça. t

ADALBERTO INVESTS HALF MILLION EURO IN SOLAR PANELS Adalberto is investing half million euro in solar panels for its headquarters. With this investment, the textile company will reduce its electric bill and become more sustainable. Within the same goal, Adalberto is also replacing its car fleet with new electric models. “We are aiming to become carbon-neutral. Since we decided to use only green energy, it’s also important to replace our fuel fleet with a more ecological alternative, in order to close the circle”, explains Susana Serrano, the company’s CEO. For that, Adalberto resorted to the services of Acciona, a company that develo-

pped the GreenChain system, which allows clients to track the sources of energy used and estimate its ecological footprint. “Acciona was the only company that presented us a solution that fits our strategy. One of the main goals of our sustainability plan was to achieve green energy”, says Susana Serrano. Reuse materials, diminish waste, reduce water consumption, and manufacture textiles with new sustainable fibres are Adaberto’s other goals for the near future. The company is focused on reducing the overall footprint of its textile production. t

EURATEX DEMANDS FIRMNESS AGAINST UNFAIR COMPETITION Euratex wants the European Commission to fight unfair competition and demands the use of structural funds into the reindustrialization process. The confederation that brings together the European textile industry also calls for the establishment of “conditions for future competitiveness and resilience” in the textile sector. In total, the textile industry aggregates around 16 thousand companies in the EU, provides more than 1.5 million jobs, and generates 162 billion euros in turnover per year.

"Nobody wants stocks, so there must be alliances between companies" Luís Guimarães Polopique’s President

BREEZE: KALIMERA’S MINIMALIST AND SUSTAINABLE SWIMWEAR

OSDM BETS ALL ON SUSTAINABILITY The textile and clothing company OSDM – O Segredo do Mar is implementing a sustainability commitment strategy, which is based, on one hand, in the recent adhesion to the Organic Cotton Accelerator (OCA) and, on the other hand, in ‘in house’ research of several product development projects. José Cardoso, the company’s administrator, told T Jornal that “entering the OCA is essential” to obtain “traceable and of kno-

wn origin” organic cotton, at a time when serious doubts are raised about the provenance of such a scarce raw material. “Forgery of certificates in India, forced labour in China, an exponential increase in prices in the last 14 months and great difficulties in distribution due to the pandemic” are some problems the sector is facing. Inside the factory’s walls, the company has several product development projects under-

way regarding sustainable raw materials – recycled and regenerated cotton – and their use, particularly in the sports area. “Despite doing ‘in house’ investigation, we resorted to CITEVE several times to overcome doubts. The research centre is always available to help”, he says. About 90% of OSDM’s production in 2020 was made with sustainable materials, a percentage that this year is already on its way to 95%.t

Kalimera, a 100% Portuguese swimwear brand, has just launched Breeze, an uncomplicated collection suitable for all bodies. This collection entails a swimsuit model, three tops and three bottoms, designed to match each other, regardless of colour. The goal is to offer “timeless pieces that can be used for many years and on several occasions”. The garments are resistant to chlorine and tanning oil, and also have UV protection.


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OPINION SEA TRANSPORT AND CONTAINERS João Peres Guimarães Member of ATP Advisory Board

PORTUGAL AND THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY IN THE POST-COVID Luís Mira Amaral Engineer, Economist and member of ATP Advisory Board

How can it be justified that the fare of a 40-foot container went from four thousand to 14 thousand dollars in less than a year? We are being affected by rising shipping costs, travel times and a shortage of containers. How did we get to this situation, which seems contradictory, it’s a mystery. In a period of lesser transactions, the offer of transport should be greater and prices lower. Usually, ships have a lifespan of 40 years. After that period, maintenance costs outweigh the gains. The older they are, the more inefficient, fuel-consuming, and in need of more crew they are. The trend is to make bigger and larger ships that are more efficient, much more automatic and operate with a reduced crew. The most recent reach 360 meters in length and carry around 380 tons of cargo. Another category, smaller to be able to transit through the Panama Canal, has less than 275 meters and carries around 100 tons. The pandemic has completely changed the life of societies. The multiple confinements led to a significant reduction in transactions and transport needs. As the price of oil initially plummeted, smaller ships began to be used due to lower demand. However, when fuel prices recovered in the middle of last year, that advantage disappeared and the use of larger boats returned. As the transport needs were lower, the cruising speed was reduced, which allowed fuel savings, and this was the main reason for the increase in transport time. On the other hand, the pandemic forced suc-

The speed and scale of the American economic support packages contrasts with the slowness with which the European Union (EU) is trying to implement its 750 million euros aid package. This cannot fail to have consequences on the economic recovery processes, and in the confidence of economic agents. Portugal is going through the biggest economic crisis in the last hundred years, with high destruction of economic activity and profound social consequences, putting the GDP below the Potential GDP due to the Covid-19 pandemic. The increase in bad debts may also cause problems in the banking system. And when the European Commission returns to the strictness of the Stability Pact, the ECB changes its accommodative low interest policy and the financial

cessive controls in some ports: more wasted time. Cargo movements were also hampered by the lack of workers in the docks, due to illness and confinement: a third reason for delays. However, the dissimilar evolution of the pandemic between China and the West also affected the normal flow of cargoes, leaving empty containers on one side that were missing on the other. More delays and higher costs. To make matters worse, China's solution to keep its economy afloat and maintain jobs was to massively invest in infrastructure. That increased the demand for iron, which tripled in price at a time when shipping was down. The result was to send boats to scrap, and make some capital that would allow them to withstand the losses caused by the lack of activity, hoping to invest in larger and more efficient ships when the global economy recovered. Hundreds of large ships made their final voyage to Chittagong, Bangladesh, where this operation is less expensive. As economies improve, the demand for transport has increased, but now there are no boats available. The lower cruise speed is here to stay, as the fuel benefits outweigh the personnel costs, and the pressure to reduce pollution is huge. In the medium or long term, the trend will be for things to return to normal, and transport should even drop in price, with larger ships, smaller crews and more efficient engines. Unfortunately, experts think that before 2023 the situation will stay the same. t

markets – in a context of interest rate hikes – return to analysing the sustainability of public debts, we will have another “stress” moment in our public finances. We are the fifth country in the European Union (EU) with the biggest drop in GDP in 2020, and we will be among the three (Portugal, Spain and Italy) with the biggest joint drop in the 2020-2021 period. The three economies' dependence on tourism helps explain this position, which shows the importance of reindustrialization. Our Textile and Clothing Industry (TCI) is essential for the country’s economic recovery, and our reindustrialization process must be financed by European funds. Gone are the days when we fought a battle against those who thought that the Portuguese TCI was obsolete because it was traditional.

The export success of our TCI in the pre-Covid phase shows that we were right, and now we have an industry ready to respond to the challenges of the 4.0 industry, but also of energy and ecological transitions. Covid only came to accelerate a digitization process that already existed. The challenge of the circular economy will be crucial in an industry that generates a lot of waste. The challenge of sustainability will not only be environmental, energetic, economic and financial, but also of growing transparency in operation and production: in how and where the product is made. ATP is working hard to help this all-important industrial sector to overcome the challenges of the “Strategic Vision for the Textile and Clothing Sector” that the European Union will launch. t


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