Issuu on Google+

Iron Tribe 2011


2

Table of Contents


Curator’s Statement pg 4 Catalog pg 6 Events: Reception pg 84 Performance pg 98 Production pg146


4

dAVID lOBDELL


Curator's Statement for Iron Tribe 2011 This exhibition began as a way of showing my appreciation for those who taught me something about iron casting during a sabbatical in 2000. My goal in establishing Iron Tribe was to bring what I learned that year back to Highlands to share it with my students and the people of northern New Mexico, as well as those in other western states participating in the cast iron art movement. Over the years, Iron Tribe has evolved into a comprehensive learning experience; in addition to the gallery exhibit, the Iron Tribe experience includes a performance pour, a symposium and a production pour. This year marks the sixth edition of the exhibition that has become a biennial event for the New Mexico Highlands University campus. It is a multi media exhibit that features traditionally cast sculpture, photography, video, and forged and fabricated steel. Artists participating range from the well seasoned veteran to those recently graduated from art programs. International artists have been included in each edition by casting patterns sent from overseas. It has been my greatest professional pleasure to curate and organize this exhibit which has made NMHU one of the learning centers for this growing art movement.


6

Aaron Juarros


Flywalker Insect and human shelter evolution are quite similar. The universal shapes of shelter are perceivable in both. A current path of exploration within my practice has to do with finding links between indigenous people and insects. My interests lie primarily within the boundaries of the architecture that evolve from each. A subtle link is based in migration or nomadic cultures. Insects and birds can relocate and rebuild according to resources available for shelter and subsistence.


8

Aaron McCaffery


Crank Weight 2


10

Alison Ouellette-kIRBY


Take All you can carry


12

Bernie Carreno


Slow Motion


14

Bill Raney


Mild Mannered Molcajete In 2007 my impacted wisdom tooth was surgically removed on a Friday. On Sunday I was on a plane to Poland for an iron symposium with artists and students. By Monday it was deemed necessary for me to see a dentist. Four trips to the dentist later and unable to say impetus, I started to carve a tooth in Styrofoam to pour in iron. I continue to make “teeth�. Most of my sculptures are symbols for events in my life, although never truly narrative. I do not believe that perceptions and interactions with real space that make up our existence have to produce literal narratives or be strictly representational.


16

Chris Collins


Obsolescent Being #2 In this day of technological advancement, one is overwhelmed with the mechanisms of manipulation. Technology is moving faster than the machines that utilize such, thus creating a wasteland of obsolescent things. These things, once used to store information, turn on, and tune in only exist as empty visages of their own utility. Upon our own obsolescence, it is these things that will be used to understand us as a culture, serving as hollow reliquaries containing an undecipherable language of past data. These machines serve as libraries of information sealed by their own devices. This obsolescence totem presents itself as a fetish to obsolescent technologies and obsolescent ideas to be deciphered in the future.


18

Christopher Keating


Skull


20

Corina Mensoff


Off Into the Distance of Still Waters


22

D'Jean Jawrunner


Attack Jacks


24

Daniel Hunt


Woodland Security/Three Shall be the Count


26

David Horner


Gratitude


28

David Jones


Diorama with Slag


30

Elizabeth Kronfield


Hide


32

Francis Fox


BeanKeep Been Keep implies a paradox in containing something fundamental. Content is fugitive no matter how elemental or fortified the container. Yet the remaining fossil can offer intriguing glimpses into its original.


34

Harry Leippe


Argonaut Underway Cast at UC Berkley in Julius Schmidt’s first iron foundry, September 1961.


36

Jeremy Colbert


It's a Way of Walking With Earth Instead of Upon It


38

James Wade


Pocket Lansdcape


40

Joe Short


Violin


42

John Hachmeister


Two Vessels of Creation


44

Kaisa Uusoksa


Macho


46

Kate Hobby


The Bobin and the Shuttle - Explorations 2010


48

Lance Wadlow


Chicken Scratch


50

Matt C. Wicker


A boat for Erik


52

Meredith Jack


Billis Many years ago, in the last century for that matter, the Houston Chronicle had an article about societal specific psychoses. It turns out that when my mother used to yell at me to “Stop running Amok!” she was referring to a Malaysian malady that was characterized by violent outbursts of activity. Evidently I resembled the symptoms. Billis is a psychosis particular to Latinos that is characterized with nervous tension, headache, trembling, screaming, stomach distress, and many other things, but doesn’t it sound like academia to you? Anyway I was working on a series of smallish pieces at the time that were to be cast. It took quite awhile to get them all cast and patina-ed and the piece you have is one of those. There are 20 or so of them, with a few left to be cast, some left to be chased and finished. I take a long view about finishing pieces. You can research it and similar conditions in the “Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders”, 4th Ed.


54

Michael Brohman


Baptism


56

Mike Feeney


oog lap


58

Noah Martin Kirby


I, ae ou


60

Nyar Sinoduar


Twin Towers


62

Riane Kerrane


Ballyoughan Bound

The work is a re-presentation and integration of familiar images and, as with much of my work; it entails recognizable imagery with the intent of providing viewers a focus on the visual poetry of the overlooked and mundane. I have used birds in my work on a number of occasions as I have horses and other toys. I look for plastic cast forms easily replicated in the casting process that also bring rich symbolism and narrative qualities to my work. Incorporating found objects provides a creative outlet for my collector instincts and pays homage to my respect for material, form and recycling. The work is named after a beach near my grandmother’s house in Ireland. The railway is integral to this place that I visited often with my Grandmother Nancy. In recent years, as I get older, I have explored place, identity, memories, and the subconscious in relation to being an immigrant and in self-imposed exile from family.


64

Rich Stewart


Right Tool for the Job The “Right Tool for the Job� uses symbols of western popular culture to explore the marketing of ideals and how that becomes separated from the original underlying values.


66

Roddy Mathieson


We Are The Monster This sculpture replicates an ancient Pictish carving “The Mail Stone” from Mail at Cunningsburgh in the Shetland Isles, between Scotland and Norway. I have been interested in Pictish Art for a long time, attracted by its naïve style, its simplicity of form and complex geometric designs, mixed with a strong connection to nature and more sinister undertones. It stubbornly refuses to be interpreted or understood by contemporary culture, it is entirely of another time. It is Scotland’s tribal art, created by the so called “Picti” or painted people, the culture which grew out of the original Iron Age tribes. Believed to date from the seventh century AD, the animal headed human is a reoccurring image in Pictish Art, and the contextualization covers all potential meanings from portraits to symbolic shamanic figures, gods, tribal symbols of power, or supernatural beings. Whatever the intentions of the Pictish artists it appears surprising to our eyes, almost humorous, yet sinister, and disturbingly intriguing. Whilst making the pattern people commented that it appeared to be Egyptian, Aztec, or even African, however on closer inspection it is unmistakably Scottish. The figure


68

Roddy Mathieson


carries a variety of weapons - possibly implying Glaswegian roots, and has the type of face that scared off the Roman Army - who all ran away and hid behind a big wall, he is wearing a skirt - and clearly thinks there is nothing wrong with that, and you just know his breath stinks of whisky. Yet this mixture of human and monster appears strikingly relevant to me today, regarding our consumption of resources, global environmental impact, ability to conduct morally corrupt warfare to secure more resources, etc. Perhaps it is not these events in themselves but our conscience that they are not healthy pursuits, yet we persevere. We are complex animals, capable of doing wrong in the name of doing right. The title “We are the monster” comes from this type of observation - the human dichotomy, we are essentially good individuals, “mostly harmless” according to Douglas Adams, yet collectively we are incredibly destructive.


70

Ryan Lamfers


Unsubstantiated


72

Stacey M. Holloway


Lilliput As a contemporary artist, I am interested in creating scenes of intimate moments that exhibit my emotions and memories. I am motivated by my experiences and the subjects that surround me to proudly bestow the perception of a specific landscape, the Midwest. The moments that I construct combine my ideas about displacement with identity and home. Home is no longer a physical place; it now exists in my heart and memories. I use a personal narrative that embodies a developed vocabulary of symbols to illustrate the struggle that exemplifies any individual as they mature. I strive to depict a world of anxieties and fears that collide with a world of ambiguous sub consciousness. I use my own life experiences to construct associative memoirs and scenes that explore the dynamic impact of transformation and growth. “Lilliput� utilizes the familiar imagery of Gulliver’s Travels as a way to exhibit a reluctance to mature. Since the Lilliputians are one-twelfth the size of human beings, I use a miniature scale to communicate an innocence that is unwilling to surrender. A plane attempts to escape and journey off, but it is unable to do so without a struggle. The Midwestern landscapes (fields left with track marks from pivot irrigation systems) are transformed into archery bull-eyes, which then postpone the targeted plane from continuing onto its chosen course.


74

Tobias Flores


The Backbone of the Iron Industry “The Backbone of the Iron Industry” is a piece I made for “All Aboard Sculpture Exhibit” that took place at the Hattiesburg, Mississippi Train Depot. The exhibit had a train theme that honored one the hundred year anniversary of the depot. I thought of the symbiotic relationship of the railroad and the pig iron industries of the South instantly because I had recently read “Sloss Furnaces and the Rise of the Birmingham District” and I have the poster from the 2003 Southern Conference on Cast Iron Art hanging on the backside of my office door. The poster contains an old photograph of the two blast furnaces running in the background while the foreground is filled with trains, train cars, piles of coke, iron ore and limestone.


76

Tom Fox


Patterned Vessel This form comes from a deviation in mold making process. The idea resides as a biochemically produced mental image of a model or final form. Once this vessel form was envisioned, a mold was built to create a cavity to capture molten iron. The core and exterior surfaces of the mold are built from blocks of sand. The blocks are locked into position with a tight fitting drywall flask and core wire. I remember at one iron pour someone saw one of my molds and asked me if I was trying to kill everyone. I pick up patterns for the sand blocks from everyday objects that are often overlooked. Many of these things work to insulate us from the hardscapes of our built environment. Lovely patterns from our real world; what do you see in there? I recycle old mold parts or carve my own freehand composition. These patterns, wherever they might come from usually get cut up and reconnected in ways other than how they started out. The deep textured surfaces have been treated with an old school patina sequence. The casting is quite heavy with jagged brittle edges ready to bring harm.


78

Tony Richards


Heavencent The need to create a votive art work runs throughout the world. The world is full of effigies to the Gods; some ask for health and others for prosperity. They constitute a physical prayer, and help take you to the place you wish to go.


80

Vivenne LeCourtois


Sheep("Moronity") Sheep are natural followers, move in flocks and are easily domesticated. In this piece, the sheep are metaphors for humans: they follow each other without thinking. The random grouping of sheep is a gathering of nonsense. This piece was titled “moronity� after observing the behavior of people at a shopping mall. It represents people with poor education, no commonsense, bad taste, and lack of personal identity. However, each sheep is innocent and unique. The intense and time-consuming process of iron casting makes this piece ridiculously obsessive. The final piece will include 100 iron sheep. My work often includes process and repetition and indirectly criticizes social and political behaviors.


82

Wayne Potratz


Turtle Paddle


84

Iron Tribe 2011


Reception


86

Iron Tribe 2011


Reception


88

Iron Tribe 2011


Reception


90

Iron Tribe 2011


Reception


92

Iron Tribe 2011


Reception


94

Iron Tribe 2011


Reception


96

Iron Tribe 2011


Reception


98

Iron Tribe 2011


Performance


100

Iron Tribe 2011


Performance


102

Iron Tribe 2011


Performance


104

Iron Tribe 2011


Performance


106

Iron Tribe 2011


Performance


108

Iron Tribe 2011


Performance


110

Iron Tribe 2011


Performance


112

Iron Tribe 2011


Performance


114

Iron Tribe 2011


Performance


116

Iron Tribe 2011


Performance


118

Iron Tribe 2011


Performance


120

Iron Tribe 2011


Performance


122

Iron Tribe 2011


Performance


124

Iron Tribe 2011


Performance


126

Iron Tribe 2011


Performance


128

Iron Tribe 2011


Performance


130

Iron Tribe 2011


Performance


132

Iron Tribe 2011


Performance


134

Iron Tribe 2011


Performance


136

Iron Tribe 2011


Performance


138

Iron Tribe 2011


Performance


140

Iron Tribe 2011


Performance


142

Iron Tribe 2011


Performance


144

Iron Tribe 2011


Performance


146

Iron Tribe 2011


Production


148

Iron Tribe 2011


Production


150

Iron Tribe 2011


Production


152

Iron Tribe 2011


Production


154

Iron Tribe 2011


Production


156

Iron Tribe 2011


Production


158

Iron Tribe 2011


Production


160

Iron Tribe 2011


Production


162

Iron Tribe 2011


Production


164

Iron Tribe 2011


166

Iron Tribe 2011 Credits

NMHU Iron Tribe class participants: Rachelle Bonett - hospitality, food donations Chris Branchal - performance, gallery Colin Gonzales - furnace operations Marques Jackson - furnace operations Kirk Naegele - administrative assistant, t shirt and poster design, gallery Max Ramirez - international patterns, mold assistant Fred Turner - furnace preparations Performance: Tobias Flores and the Fort Hays State University crew - furnace operations Lance Wadlow


John Hackmeister and the University of Kansas crew - Thermite Tree David Lobdell - Fire Arch Food Donations: Abraham’s Charlie’s Spic and Span Domino’s Pizza Hillcrest Restaurant Landmark Gril La Piedra Grill Little Saigon Lowe’s Grocery Poncho’s Café Traveler’s Café


168

Iron Tribe 2011 Poi performers: Amanda Melendrez Shanna McCartney Photographers: Joshua Phillips Deanna Threadgill Megan Jacobs Catalog Designer: Keisha Brathwaite


Special thanks to: Melissa Williamson for her administrative work in the NMHU Fine Art Program Chris Branchal for securing the atrium for our Friday night slide roulette program


170

www.irontribe.wordpress.com


Iron Tribe 2011