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TIPPING POINT COMMUNITY 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


Key Metrics

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost to donors)

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

80% of students are first in family to pursue post-secondary education

Supported launch of East Oakland site

80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students

Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma

In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

Despite very poor prior school attendance, studentsDear maintain 82% average rate Tipping Pointattendance Community,

Assisted with director of development hire

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning

75% of GED test takers earned certification

Helped develop and implement new client database

Over the past seven years, we have focused relentlessly on Helped develop first Bay Area donor event TONY BATES measurement. We use data to quantify the need around us and Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter 85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders ZACHARY BOGUE are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students inform our investments. We know that 1.3 million people in the KATE HARBIN CLAMMER Funded full-time career planning position 90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide Bay Area are too poor to meet their basic needs and that twoPHAEDRA ELLIS-LAMKINS thirds of poverty-fighting organizations in California are unable MICHAEL J. HOLSTON Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up 81% of clients who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs to meet the demand for services. CHRIS JAMES BOARD OF DIRECTORS

87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month

Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area

Of the 88% of clients whoLAMOND completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs DAVID

Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

THOMAS LAFFONT

Model. Methods. Impact.

Total Clients Served 3,460

1

486

2

731

3

300

4

681

5

307

6

2,459

7

412

8

1,751

9

3,767 10

Thanks to you, Tipping Point raised $12 million last year, every Currently identifying needs and resources 0% penny of which will go out the door as flexible, unrestricted DANIEL LURIE, CEO + Founder After building flooded, secured HP compter donation 69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school funds to the most effective education, employment, housing and KATIE SCHWAB PAIGE Assisted with development manager search and hire Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs wellness groups in the Bay Area. ALEC PERKINS, Chair RONNIE default rate since 2007LOTT

46

11

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

266

15

133

16

629

17

Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour

Referred expert on minimizing client aggression

3,219

18

Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services ERIC ROBERTS

Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area

6,486

19

392

20

2,250

21

GINA PETERSON

Numbers motivate us; they are a critical part of what we do. Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise Of 313 were placed into jobs But ultimately, our work is about people, about lives changed GIDEON YU Helped develop corporate engagement strategy 78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements and whole communities transformed. DAVID ZIERK YORK clients whoJED completed training, 56%

In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30%

Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee

Increased average income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557

Provided executive coaching during leadership transition

In this year’sorreport, and the impact funding for Silicon Valley expansion Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed in schoolwe bring you both the dataProvided of our model on those who are working tirelessly to break the cycle of poverty for good. Funded relocation and remodel of family shelter 287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing; 608 avoided homelessness 90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing

267 22 81

23

160

24

3,200

25

Placed expert from finance industry on board

2,023

26

Invested in creation of client database

3,522

27

Provided homeless families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights

Advised on business plan in preparation for merger

3,539

28

89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured All mystable best,housing

Advocated for 24 new units of housing

4,130

29

81% of families moved to stable long-term housing as compared with 65% nationally

Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff

6,517 30

Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services

Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site

Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients

Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer

Coming soon

Provided funding, planning, legal and real estate expertise

Thank you fordrug being 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born free a

part of our community.

Daniel Lurie, CEO + Founder

866

31

3,634

32

0

33

75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes

Participated on Strategic Planning Committee

1,777 34

Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

Funded data entry training for patient services and billing

11,221

35

Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2,098

36

70% of juvenile offenders who completed ACT program were off probation six months later

Currently identifying needs and resources

1,812

37

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Please leave this panel open.

 FUNDRAISING  

 COMMUNICATIONS  

 TECHNOLOGY  

 MENTAL HEALTH  

 STRATEGY  

 STAFFING  

 BOARD PLACEMENT  

 EXPANSION  

 GOAL SETTING

$12M Thank you

78,937


Key Metrics

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost to donors)

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

80% of students are first in family to pursue post-secondary education

Supported launch of East Oakland site

80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students

Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma

In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

Despite very poor prior school attendance, studentsDear maintain 82% average rate Tipping Pointattendance Community,

Assisted with director of development hire

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning

75% of GED test takers earned certification

Helped develop and implement new client database

Over the past seven years, we have focused relentlessly on Helped develop first Bay Area donor event TONY BATES measurement. We use data to quantify the need around us and Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter 85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders ZACHARY BOGUE are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students inform our investments. We know that 1.3 million people in the KATE HARBIN CLAMMER Funded full-time career planning position 90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide Bay Area are too poor to meet their basic needs and that twoPHAEDRA ELLIS-LAMKINS thirds of poverty-fighting organizations in California are unable MICHAEL J. HOLSTON Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up 81% of clients who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs to meet the demand for services. CHRIS JAMES BOARD OF DIRECTORS

87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month

Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area

Of the 88% of clients whoLAMOND completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs DAVID

Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

THOMAS LAFFONT

Model. Methods. Impact.

Total Clients Served 3,460

1

486

2

731

3

300

4

681

5

307

6

2,459

7

412

8

1,751

9

3,767 10

Thanks to you, Tipping Point raised $12 million last year, every Currently identifying needs and resources 0% penny of which will go out the door as flexible, unrestricted DANIEL LURIE, CEO + Founder After building flooded, secured HP compter donation 69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school funds to the most effective education, employment, housing and KATIE SCHWAB PAIGE Assisted with development manager search and hire Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs wellness groups in the Bay Area. ALEC PERKINS, Chair RONNIE default rate since 2007LOTT

46

11

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

266

15

133

16

629

17

Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour

Referred expert on minimizing client aggression

3,219

18

Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services ERIC ROBERTS

Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area

6,486

19

392

20

2,250

21

GINA PETERSON

Numbers motivate us; they are a critical part of what we do. Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise Of 313 were placed into jobs But ultimately, our work is about people, about lives changed GIDEON YU Helped develop corporate engagement strategy 78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements and whole communities transformed. DAVID ZIERK YORK clients whoJED completed training, 56%

In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30%

Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee

Increased average income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557

Provided executive coaching during leadership transition

In this year’sorreport, and the impact funding for Silicon Valley expansion Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed in schoolwe bring you both the dataProvided of our model on those who are working tirelessly to break the cycle of poverty for good. Funded relocation and remodel of family shelter 287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing; 608 avoided homelessness 90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing

267 22 81

23

160

24

3,200

25

Placed expert from finance industry on board

2,023

26

Invested in creation of client database

3,522

27

Provided homeless families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights

Advised on business plan in preparation for merger

3,539

28

89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured All mystable best,housing

Advocated for 24 new units of housing

4,130

29

81% of families moved to stable long-term housing as compared with 65% nationally

Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff

6,517 30

Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services

Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site

Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients

Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer

Coming soon

Provided funding, planning, legal and real estate expertise

Thank you fordrug being 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born free a

part of our community.

Daniel Lurie, CEO + Founder

866

31

3,634

32

0

33

75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes

Participated on Strategic Planning Committee

1,777 34

Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

Funded data entry training for patient services and billing

11,221

35

Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2,098

36

70% of juvenile offenders who completed ACT program were off probation six months later

Currently identifying needs and resources

1,812

37

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Please leave this panel open.

 FUNDRAISING  

 COMMUNICATIONS  

 TECHNOLOGY  

 MENTAL HEALTH  

 STRATEGY  

 STAFFING  

 BOARD PLACEMENT  

 EXPANSION  

 GOAL SETTING

$12M Thank you

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Key Metrics

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost to donors)

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000

On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000

80% of students are first in family to pursue post-secondary education

Supported launch of East Oakland site

2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000

80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students

Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma

2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000

Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate

Assisted with director of development hire

2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc. Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

 north bAY  

75% of GED test takers earned certification

Helped develop and implement new client database

87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month

Helped develop first Bay Area donor event

2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000

85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students

Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter

2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide

Funded full-time career planning position

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

81% of clients who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs

Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000

Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area

2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000

Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs

Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

1

486

2

731

3

300

4

681

5

307

6

2,459

7

412

8

1,751

9

3,767 10 46

11

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

0% default rate since 2007

Currently identifying needs and resources

266

15

2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000

69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school

After building flooded, secured HP compter donation

133

16

2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000

Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs

Assisted with development manager search and hire

629

17

2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000

Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour

Referred expert on minimizing client aggression

3,219

18

2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000

Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services

Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area

6,486

19

2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000

Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs

Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise

392

20

2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000

78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements

Helped develop corporate engagement strategy

2,250

21

2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000

In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30%

Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee

2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000

Increased average income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557

Provided executive coaching during leadership transition

2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school

Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000

287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing; 608 avoided homelessness

2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000 2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000 2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000

267 22 81

23

160

24

Funded relocation and remodel of family shelter

3,200

25

90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing

Placed expert from finance industry on board

2,023

26

87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free

Invested in creation of client database

3,522

27

Provided homeless families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights

Advised on business plan in preparation for merger

3,539

28 29

2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000

89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing

Advocated for 24 new units of housing

4,130

2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

81% of families moved to stable long-term housing as compared with 65% nationally

Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff

6,517 30

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services

Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site

2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000

Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients

Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer

866

31

3,634

32

0

33

Coming soon

Provided funding, planning, legal and real estate expertise

2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000

75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes

Participated on Strategic Planning Committee

2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000

Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

Funded data entry training for patient services and billing

11,221

35

2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000

Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2,098

36

2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

70% of juvenile offenders who completed ACT program were off probation six months later

Currently identifying needs and resources

1,812

37

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

1,777 34

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Please leave this panel open.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

3,460

2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

**2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000

Total

2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000 2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000

Model. Methods. Impact.

Total Clients Served

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

$12M Thank you

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Key Metrics

When we say “poverty,” here’s what we mean …

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost to donors)

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000

On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

Bay $76,906 80% of students are firstArea in family to pursue post-secondary education Self-Sufficiency 80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students Standard

Supported launch of East Oakland site Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma

In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000

Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate

Assisted with director of development hire

2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California $66,822

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning

75% of GED test takers earned certification

Helped develop and implement new client database

2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000

2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000

87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month

Helped develop first Bay Area donor event

2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000

85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students

Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter

2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide

Funded full-time career planning position

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

81% of clients who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs

Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000

Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area

2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000

Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs

Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

Total Clients Served 3,460

1

486

2

731 By federal guidelines a family of four earning less than 300 $22,350 per year is poor. But when you consider what it 681 costs to survive in the Bay Area, those numbers just 307 don’t add up. There are 1.3 million people in the Bay Area2,459 who can’t meet their basic needs—we are fighting for them.412 1,751

$60,457

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

3,767 10

$49,074

46

11

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

0% default rate since 2007

Currently identifying needs and resources

266

15

2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000

69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school

After building flooded, secured HP compter donation

133

16

2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000

Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs

Assisted with development manager search and hire

629

17

2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000

Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour

Referred expert on minimizing client aggression

3,219

18

2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000

Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services

Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area

6,486

19

2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000

Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs

Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise

392

20

2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000

78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements

2,250

21

2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000

$28,281 In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30%

Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee

2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000

Increased average income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557 $22,350 Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school

Provided executive coaching during leadership transition

2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

$30,286Helped develop corporate engagement strategy

267 22 81

23

160

24

$14,710and remodel of family shelter Funded relocation

3,200

25

Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion

$18,530

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000

$14,710608 avoided homelessness 287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing;

2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000

90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing

Placed expert from finance industry on board

2,023

26

Invested in creation of client database

3,522

27

Provided homeless families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights

Advised on business plan in preparation for merger

3,539

28 29

2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000

$10,890 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free

2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000

$10,890

2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000

89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing

Advocated for 24 new units of housing

4,130

2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

81% of families moved stable long-term housing as compared with 65% nationally 2011toFederal

Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff

6,517 30

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000

Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services Alameda San Francisco Contra Costa Marin Santa Clara San Mateo Family Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients family of 4: single adult single adult single father, family of 3: single mother, Composition Provided funding, planning, legal2and real estate expertise Coming soon 2 adults, 1 teenager adults, 1 infant 2 infants child Participated on Strategic Planning 1Committee 75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes

2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000

Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

Poverty Line

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000

2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

Total  north bAY  

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

209,533 151,902 People Who Can’t Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression

317,668

Meet Their Basic

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

3,634

32

0

33

11,221

35

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2,098

36

Currently identifying needs and resources

1,812

37

46,183

374,614

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

31

1,777 34

Funded data entry training for patient services and billing

170,663

70% of juvenile offenders completed Needswho (by county)ACT program were off probation six months later

866

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Key Metrics

When we say “poverty,” here’s what we mean …

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost to donors)

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000

On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

Bay $76,906 80% of students are firstArea in family to pursue post-secondary education Self-Sufficiency 80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students Standard

Supported launch of East Oakland site Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma

In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000

Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate

Assisted with director of development hire

2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California $66,822

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning

75% of GED test takers earned certification

Helped develop and implement new client database

2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000

2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000

87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month

Helped develop first Bay Area donor event

2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000

85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students

Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter

2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide

Funded full-time career planning position

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

81% of clients who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs

Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000

Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area

2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000

Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs

Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

Total Clients Served 3,460

1

486

2

731 By federal guidelines a family of four earning less than 300 $22,350 per year is poor. But when you consider what it 681 costs to survive in the Bay Area, those numbers just 307 don’t add up. There are 1.3 million people in the Bay Area2,459 who can’t meet their basic needs—we are fighting for them.412 1,751

$60,457

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

3,767 10

$49,074

46

11

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

0% default rate since 2007

Currently identifying needs and resources

266

15

2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000

69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school

After building flooded, secured HP compter donation

133

16

2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000

Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs

Assisted with development manager search and hire

629

17

2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000

Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour

Referred expert on minimizing client aggression

3,219

18

2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000

Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services

Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area

6,486

19

2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000

Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs

Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise

392

20

2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000

78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements

2,250

21

2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000

$28,281 In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30%

Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee

2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000

Increased average income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557 $22,350 Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school

Provided executive coaching during leadership transition

2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

$30,286Helped develop corporate engagement strategy

267 22 81

23

160

24

$14,710and remodel of family shelter Funded relocation

3,200

25

Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion

$18,530

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000

$14,710608 avoided homelessness 287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing;

2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000

90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing

Placed expert from finance industry on board

2,023

26

Invested in creation of client database

3,522

27

Provided homeless families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights

Advised on business plan in preparation for merger

3,539

28 29

2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000

$10,890 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free

2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000

$10,890

2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000

89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing

Advocated for 24 new units of housing

4,130

2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

81% of families moved stable long-term housing as compared with 65% nationally 2011toFederal

Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff

6,517 30

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000

Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services Alameda San Francisco Contra Costa Marin Santa Clara San Mateo Family Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients family of 4: single adult single adult single father, family of 3: single mother, Composition Provided funding, planning, legal2and real estate expertise Coming soon 2 adults, 1 teenager adults, 1 infant 2 infants child Participated on Strategic Planning 1Committee 75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes

2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000

Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

Poverty Line

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000

2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

Total  north bAY  

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

209,533 151,902 People Who Can’t Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression

317,668

Meet Their Basic

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

3,634

32

0

33

11,221

35

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2,098

36

Currently identifying needs and resources

1,812

37

46,183

374,614

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

31

1,777 34

Funded data entry training for patient services and billing

170,663

70% of juvenile offenders completed Needswho (by county)ACT program were off probation six months later

866

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Key Metrics

When we say “poverty,” here’s what we mean …

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost to donors)

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000

On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

Bay $76,906 80% of students are firstArea in family to pursue post-secondary education Self-Sufficiency 80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students Standard

Supported launch of East Oakland site Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma

In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000

Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate

Assisted with director of development hire

2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California $66,822

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning

75% of GED test takers earned certification

Helped develop and implement new client database

2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000

2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000

87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month

Helped develop first Bay Area donor event

2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000

85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students

Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter

2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide

Funded full-time career planning position

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

81% of clients who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs

Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000

Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area

2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000

Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs

Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

Total Clients Served 3,460

1

486

2

731 By federal guidelines a family of four earning less than 300 $22,350 per year is poor. But when you consider what it 681 costs to survive in the Bay Area, those numbers just 307 don’t add up. There are 1.3 million people in the Bay Area2,459 who can’t meet their basic needs—we are fighting for them.412 1,751

$60,457

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

3,767 10

$49,074

46

11

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

0% default rate since 2007

Currently identifying needs and resources

266

15

2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000

69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school

After building flooded, secured HP compter donation

133

16

2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000

Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs

Assisted with development manager search and hire

629

17

2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000

Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour

Referred expert on minimizing client aggression

3,219

18

2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000

Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services

Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area

6,486

19

2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000

Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs

Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise

392

20

2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000

78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements

2,250

21

2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000

$28,281 In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30%

Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee

2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000

Increased average income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557 $22,350 Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school

Provided executive coaching during leadership transition

2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

$30,286Helped develop corporate engagement strategy

267 22 81

23

160

24

$14,710and remodel of family shelter Funded relocation

3,200

25

Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion

$18,530

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000

$14,710608 avoided homelessness 287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing;

2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000

90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing

Placed expert from finance industry on board

2,023

26

Invested in creation of client database

3,522

27

Provided homeless families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights

Advised on business plan in preparation for merger

3,539

28 29

2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000

$10,890 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free

2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000

$10,890

2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000

89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing

Advocated for 24 new units of housing

4,130

2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

81% of families moved stable long-term housing as compared with 65% nationally 2011toFederal

Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff

6,517 30

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000

Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services Alameda San Francisco Contra Costa Marin Santa Clara San Mateo Family Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients family of 4: single adult single adult single father, family of 3: single mother, Composition Provided funding, planning, legal2and real estate expertise Coming soon 2 adults, 1 teenager adults, 1 infant 2 infants child Participated on Strategic Planning 1Committee 75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes

2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000

Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

Poverty Line

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000

2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

Total  north bAY  

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

209,533 151,902 People Who Can’t Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression

317,668

Meet Their Basic

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

3,634

32

0

33

11,221

35

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2,098

36

Currently identifying needs and resources

1,812

37

46,183

374,614

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

31

1,777 34

Funded data entry training for patient services and billing

170,663

70% of juvenile offenders completed Needswho (by county)ACT program were off probation six months later

866

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Key Metrics

When we say “poverty,” here’s what we mean …

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost to donors)

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000

On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

Bay $76,906 80% of students are firstArea in family to pursue post-secondary education Self-Sufficiency 80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students Standard

Supported launch of East Oakland site Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma

In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000

Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate

Assisted with director of development hire

2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California $66,822

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning

75% of GED test takers earned certification

Helped develop and implement new client database

2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000

2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000

87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month

Helped develop first Bay Area donor event

2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000

85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students

Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter

2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide

Funded full-time career planning position

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

81% of clients who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs

Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000

Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area

2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000

Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs

Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

Total Clients Served 3,460

1

486

2

731 By federal guidelines a family of four earning less than 300 $22,350 per year is poor. But when you consider what it 681 costs to survive in the Bay Area, those numbers just 307 don’t add up. There are 1.3 million people in the Bay Area2,459 who can’t meet their basic needs—we are fighting for them.412 1,751

$60,457

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

3,767 10

$49,074

46

11

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

0% default rate since 2007

Currently identifying needs and resources

266

15

2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000

69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school

After building flooded, secured HP compter donation

133

16

2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000

Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs

Assisted with development manager search and hire

629

17

2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000

Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour

Referred expert on minimizing client aggression

3,219

18

2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000

Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services

Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area

6,486

19

2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000

Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs

Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise

392

20

2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000

78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements

2,250

21

2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000

$28,281 In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30%

Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee

2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000

Increased average income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557 $22,350 Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school

Provided executive coaching during leadership transition

2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

$30,286Helped develop corporate engagement strategy

267 22 81

23

160

24

$14,710and remodel of family shelter Funded relocation

3,200

25

Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion

$18,530

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000

$14,710608 avoided homelessness 287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing;

2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000

90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing

Placed expert from finance industry on board

2,023

26

Invested in creation of client database

3,522

27

Provided homeless families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights

Advised on business plan in preparation for merger

3,539

28 29

2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000

$10,890 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free

2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000

$10,890

2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000

89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing

Advocated for 24 new units of housing

4,130

2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

81% of families moved stable long-term housing as compared with 65% nationally 2011toFederal

Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff

6,517 30

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000

Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services Alameda San Francisco Contra Costa Marin Santa Clara San Mateo Family Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients family of 4: single adult single adult single father, family of 3: single mother, Composition Provided funding, planning, legal2and real estate expertise Coming soon 2 adults, 1 teenager adults, 1 infant 2 infants child Participated on Strategic Planning 1Committee 75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes

2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000

Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

Poverty Line

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000

2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

Total  north bAY  

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

209,533 151,902 People Who Can’t Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression

317,668

Meet Their Basic

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

3,634

32

0

33

11,221

35

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2,098

36

Currently identifying needs and resources

1,812

37

46,183

374,614

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

31

1,777 34

Funded data entry training for patient services and billing

170,663

70% of juvenile offenders completed Needswho (by county)ACT program were off probation six months later

866

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Key Metrics

We do the homework for you.

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost to donors)

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000

On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000

80% of students are first in family to pursue post-secondary education

Supported launch of East Oakland site

2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000

80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students

Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma

2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000

Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate

Assisted with director of development hire

2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

Total  north bAY  

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

2 3 4 5 6 7

75% of GED test takers earned certification

Helped develop and implement new client database

412

8

87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month

Helped develop first Bay Area donor event

1,751

9

2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000

85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students

Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter

3,767 10

2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide

Funded full-time career planning position

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

81% of clients who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs

Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000

Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area

2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000

Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs

Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

0% default rate since 2007

Currently identifying needs and resources

2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000

69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school

After building flooded, secured HP compter donation

2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000

Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs

Assisted with development manager search and hire

2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000

Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour

Referred expert on minimizing client aggression

2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000

Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services

Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area

2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000

Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs

Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise

2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000

78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements Site visits conducted at qualified nonprofits In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30%

Helped develop corporate engagement strategy Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee

2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000

43 by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557 Increased average income

2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school

Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000

Data-driven nonprofits with strong leaders and clean financials 287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing; 608 avoided homelessness

2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000

90% of youth exited into207 safe, permanent housing

2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000

87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free

2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000 2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000

providing direct Provided homeless families and individuals overNonprofits 32,400 shelter-nights services to low-income clients 89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing

2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

81% of families moved to stable long-term housing as compared with 65% nationally

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services

Poverty-fighting nonprofits Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site

2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000

Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients

Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer

1,500

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

266

15

133

16

629

17

3,219

18

6,486

19

392

20

2,250

21

267 22 160

24

Funded relocation and remodel of family shelter

3,200

25

Placed expert from finance industry on board

2,023

26

Invested in creation of client database

3,522

27

Advised on business plan in preparation for merger

3,539

28

Advocated for 24 new units of housing

4,130

29

Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff

6,517 30

6,000

Coming soon

Provided funding, planning, legal and real estate expertise

75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes

Participated on Strategic Planning Committee

2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000

Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

Funded data entry training for patient services and billing

2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000

Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

70% of juvenile offenders who completed ACT program were off probation six months later

Currently identifying needs and resources

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

10

11

23

2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

Grantees added to the Tipping Point portfolio

46

81

Provided executive coaching during leadership transition

866

31

3,634

32

0

33

1,777 34

Total nonprofits in the11,221 Bay Area 2,098

36

1,812

37

15,000

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

1

2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000

**2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000

3,460 Last year, Tipping Point’s program team conducted 486 more than 2,000 hours of intensive due diligence at no cost731 300 to donors. Our board underwrites 100% of operating costs so every dollar donated goes to the most-effective 681 307 poverty-fighting groups in the Bay Area. 2,459

2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000

2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

Total Clients Served

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937

35


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Key Metrics

When we say “poverty,” here’s what we mean …

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost to donors)

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000

On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

Bay $76,906 80% of students are firstArea in family to pursue post-secondary education Self-Sufficiency 80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students Standard

Supported launch of East Oakland site Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma

In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000

Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate

Assisted with director of development hire

2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California $66,822

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning

75% of GED test takers earned certification

Helped develop and implement new client database

2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000

2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000

87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month

Helped develop first Bay Area donor event

2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000

85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students

Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter

2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide

Funded full-time career planning position

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

81% of clients who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs

Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000

Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area

2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000

Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs

Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

Total Clients Served 3,460

1

486

2

731 By federal guidelines a family of four earning less than 300 $22,350 per year is poor. But when you consider what it 681 costs to survive in the Bay Area, those numbers just 307 don’t add up. There are 1.3 million people in the Bay Area2,459 who can’t meet their basic needs—we are fighting for them.412 1,751

$60,457

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

3,767 10

$49,074

46

11

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

0% default rate since 2007

Currently identifying needs and resources

266

15

2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000

69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school

After building flooded, secured HP compter donation

133

16

2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000

Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs

Assisted with development manager search and hire

629

17

2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000

Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour

Referred expert on minimizing client aggression

3,219

18

2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000

Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services

Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area

6,486

19

2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000

Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs

Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise

392

20

2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000

78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements

2,250

21

2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000

$28,281 In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30%

Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee

2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000

Increased average income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557 $22,350 Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school

Provided executive coaching during leadership transition

2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

$30,286Helped develop corporate engagement strategy

267 22 81

23

160

24

$14,710and remodel of family shelter Funded relocation

3,200

25

Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion

$18,530

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000

$14,710608 avoided homelessness 287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing;

2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000

90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing

Placed expert from finance industry on board

2,023

26

Invested in creation of client database

3,522

27

Provided homeless families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights

Advised on business plan in preparation for merger

3,539

28 29

2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000

$10,890 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free

2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000

$10,890

2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000

89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing

Advocated for 24 new units of housing

4,130

2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

81% of families moved stable long-term housing as compared with 65% nationally 2011toFederal

Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff

6,517 30

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000

Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services Alameda San Francisco Contra Costa Marin Santa Clara San Mateo Family Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients family of 4: single adult single adult single father, family of 3: single mother, Composition Provided funding, planning, legal2and real estate expertise Coming soon 2 adults, 1 teenager adults, 1 infant 2 infants child Participated on Strategic Planning 1Committee 75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes

2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000

Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

Poverty Line

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000

2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

Total  north bAY  

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

209,533 151,902 People Who Can’t Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression

317,668

Meet Their Basic

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

3,634

32

0

33

11,221

35

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2,098

36

Currently identifying needs and resources

1,812

37

46,183

374,614

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

31

1,777 34

Funded data entry training for patient services and billing

170,663

70% of juvenile offenders completed Needswho (by county)ACT program were off probation six months later

866

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Key Metrics

We do the homework for you.

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost to donors)

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000

On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000

80% of students are first in family to pursue post-secondary education

Supported launch of East Oakland site

2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000

80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students

Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma

2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000

Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate

Assisted with director of development hire

2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

Total  north bAY  

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

2 3 4 5 6 7

75% of GED test takers earned certification

Helped develop and implement new client database

412

8

87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month

Helped develop first Bay Area donor event

1,751

9

2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000

85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students

Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter

3,767 10

2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide

Funded full-time career planning position

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

81% of clients who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs

Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000

Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area

2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000

Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs

Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

0% default rate since 2007

Currently identifying needs and resources

2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000

69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school

After building flooded, secured HP compter donation

2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000

Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs

Assisted with development manager search and hire

2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000

Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour

Referred expert on minimizing client aggression

2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000

Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services

Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area

2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000

Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs

Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise

2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000

78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements Site visits conducted at qualified nonprofits In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30%

Helped develop corporate engagement strategy Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee

2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000

43 by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557 Increased average income

2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school

Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000

Data-driven nonprofits with strong leaders and clean financials 287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing; 608 avoided homelessness

2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000

90% of youth exited into207 safe, permanent housing

2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000

87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free

2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000 2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000

providing direct Provided homeless families and individuals overNonprofits 32,400 shelter-nights services to low-income clients 89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing

2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

81% of families moved to stable long-term housing as compared with 65% nationally

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services

Poverty-fighting nonprofits Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site

2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000

Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients

Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer

1,500

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

266

15

133

16

629

17

3,219

18

6,486

19

392

20

2,250

21

267 22 160

24

Funded relocation and remodel of family shelter

3,200

25

Placed expert from finance industry on board

2,023

26

Invested in creation of client database

3,522

27

Advised on business plan in preparation for merger

3,539

28

Advocated for 24 new units of housing

4,130

29

Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff

6,517 30

6,000

Coming soon

Provided funding, planning, legal and real estate expertise

75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes

Participated on Strategic Planning Committee

2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000

Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

Funded data entry training for patient services and billing

2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000

Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

70% of juvenile offenders who completed ACT program were off probation six months later

Currently identifying needs and resources

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

10

11

23

2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

Grantees added to the Tipping Point portfolio

46

81

Provided executive coaching during leadership transition

866

31

3,634

32

0

33

1,777 34

Total nonprofits in the11,221 Bay Area 2,098

36

1,812

37

15,000

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

1

2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000

**2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000

3,460 Last year, Tipping Point’s program team conducted 486 more than 2,000 hours of intensive due diligence at no cost731 300 to donors. Our board underwrites 100% of operating costs so every dollar donated goes to the most-effective 681 307 poverty-fighting groups in the Bay Area. 2,459

2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000

2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

Total Clients Served

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937

35


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Key Metrics

When we say “poverty,” here’s what we mean …

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost to donors)

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000

On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

Bay $76,906 80% of students are firstArea in family to pursue post-secondary education Self-Sufficiency 80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students Standard

Supported launch of East Oakland site Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma

In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000

Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate

Assisted with director of development hire

2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California $66,822

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning

75% of GED test takers earned certification

Helped develop and implement new client database

2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000

2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000

87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month

Helped develop first Bay Area donor event

2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000

85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students

Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter

2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide

Funded full-time career planning position

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

81% of clients who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs

Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000

Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area

2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000

Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs

Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

Total Clients Served 3,460

1

486

2

731 By federal guidelines a family of four earning less than 300 $22,350 per year is poor. But when you consider what it 681 costs to survive in the Bay Area, those numbers just 307 don’t add up. There are 1.3 million people in the Bay Area2,459 who can’t meet their basic needs—we are fighting for them.412 1,751

$60,457

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

3,767 10

$49,074

46

11

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

0% default rate since 2007

Currently identifying needs and resources

266

15

2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000

69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school

After building flooded, secured HP compter donation

133

16

2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000

Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs

Assisted with development manager search and hire

629

17

2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000

Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour

Referred expert on minimizing client aggression

3,219

18

2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000

Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services

Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area

6,486

19

2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000

Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs

Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise

392

20

2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000

78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements

2,250

21

2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000

$28,281 In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30%

Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee

2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000

Increased average income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557 $22,350 Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school

Provided executive coaching during leadership transition

2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

$30,286Helped develop corporate engagement strategy

267 22 81

23

160

24

$14,710and remodel of family shelter Funded relocation

3,200

25

Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion

$18,530

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000

$14,710608 avoided homelessness 287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing;

2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000

90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing

Placed expert from finance industry on board

2,023

26

Invested in creation of client database

3,522

27

Provided homeless families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights

Advised on business plan in preparation for merger

3,539

28 29

2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000

$10,890 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free

2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000

$10,890

2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000

89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing

Advocated for 24 new units of housing

4,130

2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

81% of families moved stable long-term housing as compared with 65% nationally 2011toFederal

Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff

6,517 30

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000

Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services Alameda San Francisco Contra Costa Marin Santa Clara San Mateo Family Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients family of 4: single adult single adult single father, family of 3: single mother, Composition Provided funding, planning, legal2and real estate expertise Coming soon 2 adults, 1 teenager adults, 1 infant 2 infants child Participated on Strategic Planning 1Committee 75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes

2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000

Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

Poverty Line

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000

2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

Total  north bAY  

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

209,533 151,902 People Who Can’t Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression

317,668

Meet Their Basic

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

3,634

32

0

33

11,221

35

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2,098

36

Currently identifying needs and resources

1,812

37

46,183

374,614

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

31

1,777 34

Funded data entry training for patient services and billing

170,663

70% of juvenile offenders completed Needswho (by county)ACT program were off probation six months later

866

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Key Metrics

78,937 clients served.

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost to donors)

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000

2 level On average, 2/3 grade gain in reading and math in six weeks BELL

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000

80% of students are first in family to pursue post-secondary education

Supported launch of East Oakland site

2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000

80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students

Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma

2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000

6 Gateway Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate to College

Assisted with director of development hire

2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc. Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

Total  north bAY  

NEW

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

1 2 3 4 5

307

6

2,459

7

2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000

75% of GED test takers earned certification

Helped develop and implement new client database

412

8

87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month

Helped develop first Bay Area donor event

1,751

9

2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000

85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students

Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter

3,767 10

2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide

Funded full-time career planning position

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

12 The Bread 81% of clients who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs Project

Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000

13job Over 1,500 full-time placements were made nationally in 2011 Center for Employment Opportunities

2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000

46

11

NEW

160

12

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area

NEW

89

13

14who Of the 88% of clients completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs JobTrain

Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

NEW

6,084

14

2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

0% default rate since152007 Mission Asset Fund

Currently identifying needs and resources

NEW

2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000

69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school

After building flooded, secured HP compter donation

2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000

17who Placed 76% of clients completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs Opportunity Junction

Assisted with development manager search and hire

629

17

2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000

Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour

Referred expert on minimizing client aggression

3,219

18

2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000

Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services

Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area

6,486

19

2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000

Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs

Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise

392

20

2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000

78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements

Helped develop corporate engagement strategy

2,250

21

2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000

In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30%

Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee

2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000

Increased average income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557

Provided executive coaching during leadership transition

2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school

Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000

287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing; 608 avoided homelessness

2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000 2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000 2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000

267 22 160

24

Funded relocation and remodel of family shelter

3,200

25

90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing

Placed expert from finance industry on board

2,023

26

87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free

Invested in creation of client database

3,522

27

Provided homeless families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights

Advised on business plan in preparation for merger

3,539

28

4,130

29

2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000

89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing

Advocated for 24 new units of housing

30 to 81% of families moved stable long-term SHELTER Inc. housing as compared with 65% nationally

Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services

Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site

2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000

Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients

Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer

Coming soon

33

Center for Youth Wellness

Provided funding, planning, legal and real estate expertise

2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000

75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes

Participated on Strategic Planning Committee

2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000

Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

Funded data entry training for patient services and billing

2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000

Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

37 Sunny 70% of juvenile offenders who completed ACT program were off probation six months later Hills Services

Currently identifying needs and resources

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

15 16

23

2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

NEW

266 133

81

6,517 30

NEW

NEW

866

31

3,634

32

0

33

1,777 34

NEW

11,221

35

2,098

36

1,812

37

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

3,460 Last year, Tipping Point grantees served over 78,000 low486 income people at 175 sites across six Bay Area counties. 731 300 We proudly welcomed 10 new poverty-fighting organizations 681 to Tipping Point Community.

2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000

**2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000

NEW

Total Clients Served

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Key Metrics

When we say “poverty,” here’s what we mean …

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost to donors)

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000

On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

Bay $76,906 80% of students are firstArea in family to pursue post-secondary education Self-Sufficiency 80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students Standard

Supported launch of East Oakland site Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma

In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000

Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate

Assisted with director of development hire

2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California $66,822

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning

75% of GED test takers earned certification

Helped develop and implement new client database

2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000

2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000

87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month

Helped develop first Bay Area donor event

2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000

85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students

Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter

2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide

Funded full-time career planning position

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

81% of clients who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs

Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000

Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area

2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000

Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs

Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

Total Clients Served 3,460

1

486

2

731 By federal guidelines a family of four earning less than 300 $22,350 per year is poor. But when you consider what it 681 costs to survive in the Bay Area, those numbers just 307 don’t add up. There are 1.3 million people in the Bay Area2,459 who can’t meet their basic needs—we are fighting for them.412 1,751

$60,457

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

3,767 10

$49,074

46

11

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

0% default rate since 2007

Currently identifying needs and resources

266

15

2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000

69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school

After building flooded, secured HP compter donation

133

16

2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000

Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs

Assisted with development manager search and hire

629

17

2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000

Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour

Referred expert on minimizing client aggression

3,219

18

2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000

Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services

Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area

6,486

19

2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000

Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs

Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise

392

20

2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000

78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements

2,250

21

2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000

$28,281 In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30%

Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee

2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000

Increased average income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557 $22,350 Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school

Provided executive coaching during leadership transition

2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

$30,286Helped develop corporate engagement strategy

267 22 81

23

160

24

$14,710and remodel of family shelter Funded relocation

3,200

25

Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion

$18,530

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000

$14,710608 avoided homelessness 287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing;

2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000

90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing

Placed expert from finance industry on board

2,023

26

Invested in creation of client database

3,522

27

Provided homeless families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights

Advised on business plan in preparation for merger

3,539

28 29

2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000

$10,890 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free

2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000

$10,890

2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000

89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing

Advocated for 24 new units of housing

4,130

2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

81% of families moved stable long-term housing as compared with 65% nationally 2011toFederal

Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff

6,517 30

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000

Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services Alameda San Francisco Contra Costa Marin Santa Clara San Mateo Family Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients family of 4: single adult single adult single father, family of 3: single mother, Composition Provided funding, planning, legal2and real estate expertise Coming soon 2 adults, 1 teenager adults, 1 infant 2 infants child Participated on Strategic Planning 1Committee 75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes

2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000

Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

Poverty Line

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000

2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

Total  north bAY  

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

209,533 151,902 People Who Can’t Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression

317,668

Meet Their Basic

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

3,634

32

0

33

11,221

35

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2,098

36

Currently identifying needs and resources

1,812

37

46,183

374,614

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

31

1,777 34

Funded data entry training for patient services and billing

170,663

70% of juvenile offenders completed Needswho (by county)ACT program were off probation six months later

866

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Key Metrics

78,937 clients served.

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost to donors)

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000

2 level On average, 2/3 grade gain in reading and math in six weeks BELL

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000

80% of students are first in family to pursue post-secondary education

Supported launch of East Oakland site

2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000

80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students

Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma

2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000

6 Gateway Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate to College

Assisted with director of development hire

2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc. Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

Total  north bAY  

NEW

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

1 2 3 4 5

307

6

2,459

7

2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000

75% of GED test takers earned certification

Helped develop and implement new client database

412

8

87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month

Helped develop first Bay Area donor event

1,751

9

2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000

85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students

Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter

3,767 10

2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide

Funded full-time career planning position

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

12 The Bread 81% of clients who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs Project

Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000

13job Over 1,500 full-time placements were made nationally in 2011 Center for Employment Opportunities

2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000

46

11

NEW

160

12

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area

NEW

89

13

14who Of the 88% of clients completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs JobTrain

Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

NEW

6,084

14

2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

0% default rate since152007 Mission Asset Fund

Currently identifying needs and resources

NEW

2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000

69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school

After building flooded, secured HP compter donation

2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000

17who Placed 76% of clients completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs Opportunity Junction

Assisted with development manager search and hire

629

17

2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000

Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour

Referred expert on minimizing client aggression

3,219

18

2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000

Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services

Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area

6,486

19

2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000

Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs

Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise

392

20

2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000

78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements

Helped develop corporate engagement strategy

2,250

21

2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000

In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30%

Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee

2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000

Increased average income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557

Provided executive coaching during leadership transition

2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school

Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000

287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing; 608 avoided homelessness

2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000 2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000 2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000

267 22 160

24

Funded relocation and remodel of family shelter

3,200

25

90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing

Placed expert from finance industry on board

2,023

26

87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free

Invested in creation of client database

3,522

27

Provided homeless families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights

Advised on business plan in preparation for merger

3,539

28

4,130

29

2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000

89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing

Advocated for 24 new units of housing

30 to 81% of families moved stable long-term SHELTER Inc. housing as compared with 65% nationally

Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services

Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site

2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000

Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients

Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer

Coming soon

33

Center for Youth Wellness

Provided funding, planning, legal and real estate expertise

2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000

75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes

Participated on Strategic Planning Committee

2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000

Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

Funded data entry training for patient services and billing

2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000

Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

37 Sunny 70% of juvenile offenders who completed ACT program were off probation six months later Hills Services

Currently identifying needs and resources

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

15 16

23

2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

NEW

266 133

81

6,517 30

NEW

NEW

866

31

3,634

32

0

33

1,777 34

NEW

11,221

35

2,098

36

1,812

37

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

3,460 Last year, Tipping Point grantees served over 78,000 low486 income people at 175 sites across six Bay Area counties. 731 300 We proudly welcomed 10 new poverty-fighting organizations 681 to Tipping Point Community.

2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000

**2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000

NEW

Total Clients Served

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Key Metrics

When we say “poverty,” here’s what we mean …

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost to donors)

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000

On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

Bay $76,906 80% of students are firstArea in family to pursue post-secondary education Self-Sufficiency 80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students Standard

Supported launch of East Oakland site Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma

In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000

Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate

Assisted with director of development hire

2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California $66,822

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning

75% of GED test takers earned certification

Helped develop and implement new client database

2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000

2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000

87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month

Helped develop first Bay Area donor event

2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000

85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students

Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter

2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide

Funded full-time career planning position

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

81% of clients who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs

Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000

Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area

2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000

Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs

Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

Total Clients Served 3,460

1

486

2

731 By federal guidelines a family of four earning less than 300 $22,350 per year is poor. But when you consider what it 681 costs to survive in the Bay Area, those numbers just 307 don’t add up. There are 1.3 million people in the Bay Area2,459 who can’t meet their basic needs—we are fighting for them.412 1,751

$60,457

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

3,767 10

$49,074

46

11

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

0% default rate since 2007

Currently identifying needs and resources

266

15

2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000

69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school

After building flooded, secured HP compter donation

133

16

2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000

Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs

Assisted with development manager search and hire

629

17

2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000

Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour

Referred expert on minimizing client aggression

3,219

18

2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000

Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services

Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area

6,486

19

2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000

Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs

Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise

392

20

2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000

78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements

2,250

21

2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000

$28,281 In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30%

Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee

2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000

Increased average income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557 $22,350 Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school

Provided executive coaching during leadership transition

2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

$30,286Helped develop corporate engagement strategy

267 22 81

23

160

24

$14,710and remodel of family shelter Funded relocation

3,200

25

Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion

$18,530

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000

$14,710608 avoided homelessness 287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing;

2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000

90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing

Placed expert from finance industry on board

2,023

26

Invested in creation of client database

3,522

27

Provided homeless families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights

Advised on business plan in preparation for merger

3,539

28 29

2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000

$10,890 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free

2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000

$10,890

2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000

89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing

Advocated for 24 new units of housing

4,130

2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

81% of families moved stable long-term housing as compared with 65% nationally 2011toFederal

Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff

6,517 30

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000

Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services Alameda San Francisco Contra Costa Marin Santa Clara San Mateo Family Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients family of 4: single adult single adult single father, family of 3: single mother, Composition Provided funding, planning, legal2and real estate expertise Coming soon 2 adults, 1 teenager adults, 1 infant 2 infants child Participated on Strategic Planning 1Committee 75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes

2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000

Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

Poverty Line

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000

2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

Total  north bAY  

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

209,533 151,902 People Who Can’t Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression

317,668

Meet Their Basic

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

3,634

32

0

33

11,221

35

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2,098

36

Currently identifying needs and resources

1,812

37

46,183

374,614

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

31

1,777 34

Funded data entry training for patient services and billing

170,663

70% of juvenile offenders completed Needswho (by county)ACT program were off probation six months later

866

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Key Metrics

Data drives us.

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost to donors)

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000

On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000

80% of students are first in family to pursue post-secondary education

Supported launch of East Oakland site

2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000

80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students

Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma

2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000

Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate

Assisted with director of development hire

2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc. Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

 north bAY  

75% of GED test takers earned certification

Helped develop and implement new client database

87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month

Helped develop first Bay Area donor event

2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000

85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students

Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter

2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide

Funded full-time career planning position

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

81% of clients who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs

Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000

Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area

2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000

Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs

Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

rates, job retention, housing placements and positive 681 307 health outcomes all impact the ability to earn a living 2,459 wage. These are just a few of the things we track and 412 analyze to ensure our grantees are getting results in the1,751 3,767 fight against poverty. 46

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

0% default rate since 2007

Currently identifying needs and resources

266

15

2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000

69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school

After building flooded, secured HP compter donation

133

16

2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000

Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs

Assisted with development manager search and hire

629

17

2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000

Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour

Referred expert on minimizing client aggression

3,219

18

2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000

Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services

Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area

6,486

19

2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000

Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs

Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise

392

20

2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000

78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements

Helped develop corporate engagement strategy

2,250

21

2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000

In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30%

Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee

2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000

Increased average income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557

Provided executive coaching during leadership transition

2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school

Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000

287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing; 608 avoided homelessness

2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000 2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000 2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000

267 22 81

23

160

24

Funded relocation and remodel of family shelter

3,200

25

90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing

Placed expert from finance industry on board

2,023

26

87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free

Invested in creation of client database

3,522

27

Provided homeless families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights

Advised on business plan in preparation for merger

3,539

28 29

2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000

89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing

Advocated for 24 new units of housing

4,130

2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

81% of families moved to stable long-term housing as compared with 65% nationally

Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff

6,517 30

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services

Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site

2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000

Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients

Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer

866

31

3,634

32

0

33

Coming soon

Provided funding, planning, legal and real estate expertise

2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000

75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes

Participated on Strategic Planning Committee

2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000

Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

Funded data entry training for patient services and billing

11,221

35

2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000

Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2,098

36

2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

70% of juvenile offenders who completed ACT program were off probation six months later

Currently identifying needs and resources

1,812

37

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

1,777 34

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

Measuring impact is complicated, but the logic behind 3,460 486 it is simple: The more someone earns, the more likely he or731 she is to break the cycle of poverty for good. Graduation 300

2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

**2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000

Total

2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000 2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000

Total Clients Served

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Key Metrics

When we say “poverty,” here’s what we mean …

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost to donors)

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000

On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

Bay $76,906 80% of students are firstArea in family to pursue post-secondary education Self-Sufficiency 80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students Standard

Supported launch of East Oakland site Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma

In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000

Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate

Assisted with director of development hire

2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California $66,822

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning

75% of GED test takers earned certification

Helped develop and implement new client database

2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000

2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000

87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month

Helped develop first Bay Area donor event

2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000

85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students

Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter

2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide

Funded full-time career planning position

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

81% of clients who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs

Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000

Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area

2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000

Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs

Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

Total Clients Served 3,460

1

486

2

731 By federal guidelines a family of four earning less than 300 $22,350 per year is poor. But when you consider what it 681 costs to survive in the Bay Area, those numbers just 307 don’t add up. There are 1.3 million people in the Bay Area2,459 who can’t meet their basic needs—we are fighting for them.412 1,751

$60,457

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

3,767 10

$49,074

46

11

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

0% default rate since 2007

Currently identifying needs and resources

266

15

2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000

69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school

After building flooded, secured HP compter donation

133

16

2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000

Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs

Assisted with development manager search and hire

629

17

2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000

Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour

Referred expert on minimizing client aggression

3,219

18

2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000

Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services

Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area

6,486

19

2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000

Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs

Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise

392

20

2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000

78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements

2,250

21

2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000

$28,281 In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30%

Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee

2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000

Increased average income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557 $22,350 Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school

Provided executive coaching during leadership transition

2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

$30,286Helped develop corporate engagement strategy

267 22 81

23

160

24

$14,710and remodel of family shelter Funded relocation

3,200

25

Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion

$18,530

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000

$14,710608 avoided homelessness 287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing;

2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000

90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing

Placed expert from finance industry on board

2,023

26

Invested in creation of client database

3,522

27

Provided homeless families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights

Advised on business plan in preparation for merger

3,539

28 29

2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000

$10,890 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free

2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000

$10,890

2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000

89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing

Advocated for 24 new units of housing

4,130

2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

81% of families moved stable long-term housing as compared with 65% nationally 2011toFederal

Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff

6,517 30

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000

Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services Alameda San Francisco Contra Costa Marin Santa Clara San Mateo Family Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients family of 4: single adult single adult single father, family of 3: single mother, Composition Provided funding, planning, legal2and real estate expertise Coming soon 2 adults, 1 teenager adults, 1 infant 2 infants child Participated on Strategic Planning 1Committee 75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes

2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000

Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

Poverty Line

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000

2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

Total  north bAY  

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

209,533 151,902 People Who Can’t Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression

317,668

Meet Their Basic

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

3,634

32

0

33

11,221

35

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2,098

36

Currently identifying needs and resources

1,812

37

46,183

374,614

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

31

1,777 34

Funded data entry training for patient services and billing

170,663

70% of juvenile offenders completed Needswho (by county)ACT program were off probation six months later

866

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Key Metrics

Data drives us.

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost to donors)

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000

On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000

80% of students are first in family to pursue post-secondary education

Supported launch of East Oakland site

2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000

80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students

Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma

2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000

Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate

Assisted with director of development hire

2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc. Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

 north bAY  

75% of GED test takers earned certification

Helped develop and implement new client database

87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month

Helped develop first Bay Area donor event

2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000

85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students

Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter

2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide

Funded full-time career planning position

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

81% of clients who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs

Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000

Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area

2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000

Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs

Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

rates, job retention, housing placements and positive 681 307 health outcomes all impact the ability to earn a living 2,459 wage. These are just a few of the things we track and 412 analyze to ensure our grantees are getting results in the1,751 3,767 fight against poverty. 46

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

0% default rate since 2007

Currently identifying needs and resources

266

15

2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000

69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school

After building flooded, secured HP compter donation

133

16

2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000

Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs

Assisted with development manager search and hire

629

17

2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000

Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour

Referred expert on minimizing client aggression

3,219

18

2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000

Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services

Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area

6,486

19

2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000

Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs

Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise

392

20

2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000

78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements

Helped develop corporate engagement strategy

2,250

21

2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000

In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30%

Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee

2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000

Increased average income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557

Provided executive coaching during leadership transition

2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school

Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000

287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing; 608 avoided homelessness

2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000 2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000 2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000

267 22 81

23

160

24

Funded relocation and remodel of family shelter

3,200

25

90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing

Placed expert from finance industry on board

2,023

26

87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free

Invested in creation of client database

3,522

27

Provided homeless families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights

Advised on business plan in preparation for merger

3,539

28 29

2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000

89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing

Advocated for 24 new units of housing

4,130

2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

81% of families moved to stable long-term housing as compared with 65% nationally

Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff

6,517 30

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services

Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site

2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000

Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients

Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer

866

31

3,634

32

0

33

Coming soon

Provided funding, planning, legal and real estate expertise

2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000

75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes

Participated on Strategic Planning Committee

2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000

Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

Funded data entry training for patient services and billing

11,221

35

2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000

Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2,098

36

2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

70% of juvenile offenders who completed ACT program were off probation six months later

Currently identifying needs and resources

1,812

37

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

1,777 34

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

Measuring impact is complicated, but the logic behind 3,460 486 it is simple: The more someone earns, the more likely he or731 she is to break the cycle of poverty for good. Graduation 300

2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

**2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000

Total

2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000 2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000

Total Clients Served

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Key Metrics

When we say “poverty,” here’s what we mean …

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost to donors)

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000

On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

Bay $76,906 80% of students are firstArea in family to pursue post-secondary education Self-Sufficiency 80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students Standard

Supported launch of East Oakland site Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma

In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000

Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate

Assisted with director of development hire

2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California $66,822

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning

75% of GED test takers earned certification

Helped develop and implement new client database

2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000

2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000

87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month

Helped develop first Bay Area donor event

2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000

85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students

Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter

2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide

Funded full-time career planning position

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

81% of clients who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs

Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000

Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area

2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000

Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs

Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

Total Clients Served 3,460

1

486

2

731 By federal guidelines a family of four earning less than 300 $22,350 per year is poor. But when you consider what it 681 costs to survive in the Bay Area, those numbers just 307 don’t add up. There are 1.3 million people in the Bay Area2,459 who can’t meet their basic needs—we are fighting for them.412 1,751

$60,457

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

3,767 10

$49,074

46

11

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

0% default rate since 2007

Currently identifying needs and resources

266

15

2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000

69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school

After building flooded, secured HP compter donation

133

16

2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000

Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs

Assisted with development manager search and hire

629

17

2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000

Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour

Referred expert on minimizing client aggression

3,219

18

2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000

Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services

Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area

6,486

19

2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000

Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs

Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise

392

20

2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000

78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements

2,250

21

2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000

$28,281 In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30%

Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee

2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000

Increased average income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557 $22,350 Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school

Provided executive coaching during leadership transition

2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

$30,286Helped develop corporate engagement strategy

267 22 81

23

160

24

$14,710and remodel of family shelter Funded relocation

3,200

25

Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion

$18,530

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000

$14,710608 avoided homelessness 287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing;

2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000

90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing

Placed expert from finance industry on board

2,023

26

Invested in creation of client database

3,522

27

Provided homeless families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights

Advised on business plan in preparation for merger

3,539

28 29

2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000

$10,890 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free

2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000

$10,890

2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000

89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing

Advocated for 24 new units of housing

4,130

2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

81% of families moved stable long-term housing as compared with 65% nationally 2011toFederal

Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff

6,517 30

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000

Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services Alameda San Francisco Contra Costa Marin Santa Clara San Mateo Family Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients family of 4: single adult single adult single father, family of 3: single mother, Composition Provided funding, planning, legal2and real estate expertise Coming soon 2 adults, 1 teenager adults, 1 infant 2 infants child Participated on Strategic Planning 1Committee 75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes

2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000

Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

Poverty Line

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000

2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

Total  north bAY  

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

209,533 151,902 People Who Can’t Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression

317,668

Meet Their Basic

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

3,634

32

0

33

11,221

35

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2,098

36

Currently identifying needs and resources

1,812

37

46,183

374,614

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

31

1,777 34

Funded data entry training for patient services and billing

170,663

70% of juvenile offenders completed Needswho (by county)ACT program were off probation six months later

866

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Key Metrics

Money alone is not enough.

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost to donors)

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000

On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000

80% of students are first in family to pursue post-secondary education

Supported launch of East Oakland site

2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000

80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students

Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma

2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

5 100% In San Mateo County, eligible seniors graduated or earned GED FreshofLifelines for Youth

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate

Assisted with director of development hire

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000 2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000 2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000 2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000 2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000 2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up

2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000

Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs

Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

0% default rate since 2007

Currently identifying needs and resources

2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000

16 New 69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school Door Ventures

After building flooded, secured HP compter donation

Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs

Assisted with development manager search and hire

2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000 2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000 2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000 2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000

Total

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area

2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000

“Consulting money is so precious. Tipping Point has Referred expert on minimizing client aggression connected us to phenomenal fundraising and mental Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services health professionals who have helped our board Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs and staff sharpen their skills and do the work better. Helped develop corporate engagement strategy 78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements As a result, we’ve more than doubled our fundraising Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30% and strengthened our impact.” Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour

Increased average income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557

tess reynolds,

Provided executive coaching during leadership transition

CEO, New Doorfunding Ventures Provided for Silicon Valley expansion

2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000

287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing; 608 avoided homelessness

2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000

90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing

Placed expert from finance industry on board

2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000

87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free

Invested in creation of client database

2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000

Provided homeless families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights

Advised on business plan in preparation for merger

2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000

89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing

Advocated for 24 new units of housing

2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff 81% of families moved to stable long-term as compared with 65% nationally katiehousing albright, Executive Director, San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000 2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000 2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000

 north bAY  

81% of clients who completed traininggannon, in 2011 were placed into jobs Fresh Lifelines for Youth (FLY) christa Executive Director, Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011

2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000

2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

“Some of FLY’s most significant transformations are a direct result Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning of Tipping Point’s support—our strategic plan, a database to track our Helped develop and implement new client database 75% of GED test takers earned certification results and standardized trainings for our staff. They even connected Helped develop first Bay Area donor event 87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month us with NBBJ to secure discounted furniture for our new Redwood Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter 85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students City office. Every day, Tipping Point’s support helps FLY maximize ourFunded full-time career planning position 90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide potential and impact on our community.”  

Funded relocation and remodel of family shelter

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

CORPORATE PARTNERS

2600hz The Abernathy MacGregor Group, Inc. BuildingBlox Consulting Burberry The CAC Group Cisco Systems Credit Suisse Deloitte Fenton fuseproject Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Hewlett-Packard Company Jawbone Kidder Mathews Korn/Ferry International Latham & Watkins LLP McKinsey & Company NBBJ Plant Construction Company Tom Eliot Fisch VolunteerMatch

3,460

1

486

2

731

3

300

4

681

5

307

6

2,459

7

412

8

1,751

9

3,767 10 46

11

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

266

15

133

16

629

17

3,219

18

6,486

19

392

20

2,250

21

267 22 81

23

160

24

3,200

25

2,023

26

3,522

27

3,539

28

4,130

29

6,517 30

“For the longest time, our technology was either outdated or nonexistent, but, Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site thanks to Tipping Point, we received a product donation from Hewlett-Packard. Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients Now that we have amazing technology and strong resources, we can spend Provided funding, planning, legal and real estate expertise Coming soon our time doing what we’re really good at—working one on one with families Participated on Strategic Planning Committee 75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes and taking care of kids.” Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services

866

31

3,634

32

0

33

1,777 34

Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

Funded data entry training for patient services and billing

11,221

35

2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000

Mothers in Positive 36 Parenting program reported decrease in depression San Francisco Child45% Abuse Prevention Center

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2,098

36

2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

70% of juvenile offenders who completed ACT program were off probation six months later

Currently identifying needs and resources

1,812

37

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

Last year, our partners provided $1.6 million in pro-bono technology, communications, fundraising and strategic support to maximize your philanthropic investment.

Total Clients Served

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Key Metrics

When we say “poverty,” here’s what we mean …

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost to donors)

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000

On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

Bay $76,906 80% of students are firstArea in family to pursue post-secondary education Self-Sufficiency 80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students Standard

Supported launch of East Oakland site Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma

In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000

Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate

Assisted with director of development hire

2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California $66,822

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning

75% of GED test takers earned certification

Helped develop and implement new client database

2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000

2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000

87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month

Helped develop first Bay Area donor event

2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000

85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students

Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter

2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide

Funded full-time career planning position

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

81% of clients who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs

Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000

Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area

2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000

Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs

Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

Total Clients Served 3,460

1

486

2

731 By federal guidelines a family of four earning less than 300 $22,350 per year is poor. But when you consider what it 681 costs to survive in the Bay Area, those numbers just 307 don’t add up. There are 1.3 million people in the Bay Area2,459 who can’t meet their basic needs—we are fighting for them.412 1,751

$60,457

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

3,767 10

$49,074

46

11

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

0% default rate since 2007

Currently identifying needs and resources

266

15

2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000

69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school

After building flooded, secured HP compter donation

133

16

2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000

Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs

Assisted with development manager search and hire

629

17

2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000

Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour

Referred expert on minimizing client aggression

3,219

18

2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000

Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services

Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area

6,486

19

2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000

Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs

Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise

392

20

2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000

78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements

2,250

21

2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000

$28,281 In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30%

Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee

2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000

Increased average income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557 $22,350 Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school

Provided executive coaching during leadership transition

2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

$30,286Helped develop corporate engagement strategy

267 22 81

23

160

24

$14,710and remodel of family shelter Funded relocation

3,200

25

Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion

$18,530

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000

$14,710608 avoided homelessness 287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing;

2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000

90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing

Placed expert from finance industry on board

2,023

26

Invested in creation of client database

3,522

27

Provided homeless families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights

Advised on business plan in preparation for merger

3,539

28 29

2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000

$10,890 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free

2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000

$10,890

2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000

89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing

Advocated for 24 new units of housing

4,130

2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

81% of families moved stable long-term housing as compared with 65% nationally 2011toFederal

Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff

6,517 30

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000

Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services Alameda San Francisco Contra Costa Marin Santa Clara San Mateo Family Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients family of 4: single adult single adult single father, family of 3: single mother, Composition Provided funding, planning, legal2and real estate expertise Coming soon 2 adults, 1 teenager adults, 1 infant 2 infants child Participated on Strategic Planning 1Committee 75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes

2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000

Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

Poverty Line

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000

2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

Total  north bAY  

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

209,533 151,902 People Who Can’t Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression

317,668

Meet Their Basic

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

3,634

32

0

33

11,221

35

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2,098

36

Currently identifying needs and resources

1,812

37

46,183

374,614

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

31

1,777 34

Funded data entry training for patient services and billing

170,663

70% of juvenile offenders completed Needswho (by county)ACT program were off probation six months later

866

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Key Metrics

Money alone is not enough.

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost to donors)

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000

On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000

80% of students are first in family to pursue post-secondary education

Supported launch of East Oakland site

2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000

80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students

Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma

2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

5 100% In San Mateo County, eligible seniors graduated or earned GED FreshofLifelines for Youth

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate

Assisted with director of development hire

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000 2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000 2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000 2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000 2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000 2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up

2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000

Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs

Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

0% default rate since 2007

Currently identifying needs and resources

2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000

16 New 69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school Door Ventures

After building flooded, secured HP compter donation

Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs

Assisted with development manager search and hire

2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000 2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000 2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000 2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000

Total

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area

2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000

“Consulting money is so precious. Tipping Point has Referred expert on minimizing client aggression connected us to phenomenal fundraising and mental Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services health professionals who have helped our board Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs and staff sharpen their skills and do the work better. Helped develop corporate engagement strategy 78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements As a result, we’ve more than doubled our fundraising Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30% and strengthened our impact.” Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour

Increased average income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557

tess reynolds,

Provided executive coaching during leadership transition

CEO, New Doorfunding Ventures Provided for Silicon Valley expansion

2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000

287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing; 608 avoided homelessness

2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000

90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing

Placed expert from finance industry on board

2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000

87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free

Invested in creation of client database

2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000

Provided homeless families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights

Advised on business plan in preparation for merger

2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000

89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing

Advocated for 24 new units of housing

2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff 81% of families moved to stable long-term as compared with 65% nationally katiehousing albright, Executive Director, San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000 2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000 2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000

 north bAY  

81% of clients who completed traininggannon, in 2011 were placed into jobs Fresh Lifelines for Youth (FLY) christa Executive Director, Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011

2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000

2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

“Some of FLY’s most significant transformations are a direct result Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning of Tipping Point’s support—our strategic plan, a database to track our Helped develop and implement new client database 75% of GED test takers earned certification results and standardized trainings for our staff. They even connected Helped develop first Bay Area donor event 87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month us with NBBJ to secure discounted furniture for our new Redwood Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter 85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students City office. Every day, Tipping Point’s support helps FLY maximize ourFunded full-time career planning position 90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide potential and impact on our community.”  

Funded relocation and remodel of family shelter

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

CORPORATE PARTNERS

2600hz The Abernathy MacGregor Group, Inc. BuildingBlox Consulting Burberry The CAC Group Cisco Systems Credit Suisse Deloitte Fenton fuseproject Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Hewlett-Packard Company Jawbone Kidder Mathews Korn/Ferry International Latham & Watkins LLP McKinsey & Company NBBJ Plant Construction Company Tom Eliot Fisch VolunteerMatch

3,460

1

486

2

731

3

300

4

681

5

307

6

2,459

7

412

8

1,751

9

3,767 10 46

11

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

266

15

133

16

629

17

3,219

18

6,486

19

392

20

2,250

21

267 22 81

23

160

24

3,200

25

2,023

26

3,522

27

3,539

28

4,130

29

6,517 30

“For the longest time, our technology was either outdated or nonexistent, but, Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site thanks to Tipping Point, we received a product donation from Hewlett-Packard. Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients Now that we have amazing technology and strong resources, we can spend Provided funding, planning, legal and real estate expertise Coming soon our time doing what we’re really good at—working one on one with families Participated on Strategic Planning Committee 75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes and taking care of kids.” Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services

866

31

3,634

32

0

33

1,777 34

Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

Funded data entry training for patient services and billing

11,221

35

2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000

Mothers in Positive 36 Parenting program reported decrease in depression San Francisco Child45% Abuse Prevention Center

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2,098

36

2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

70% of juvenile offenders who completed ACT program were off probation six months later

Currently identifying needs and resources

1,812

37

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

Last year, our partners provided $1.6 million in pro-bono technology, communications, fundraising and strategic support to maximize your philanthropic investment.

Total Clients Served

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Key Metrics

When we say “poverty,” here’s what we mean …

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost to donors)

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000

On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

Bay $76,906 80% of students are firstArea in family to pursue post-secondary education Self-Sufficiency 80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students Standard

Supported launch of East Oakland site Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma

In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000

Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate

Assisted with director of development hire

2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California $66,822

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning

75% of GED test takers earned certification

Helped develop and implement new client database

2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000

2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000

87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month

Helped develop first Bay Area donor event

2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000

85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students

Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter

2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide

Funded full-time career planning position

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

81% of clients who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs

Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000

Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area

2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000

Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs

Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

Total Clients Served 3,460

1

486

2

731 By federal guidelines a family of four earning less than 300 $22,350 per year is poor. But when you consider what it 681 costs to survive in the Bay Area, those numbers just 307 don’t add up. There are 1.3 million people in the Bay Area2,459 who can’t meet their basic needs—we are fighting for them.412 1,751

$60,457

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

3,767 10

$49,074

46

11

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

0% default rate since 2007

Currently identifying needs and resources

266

15

2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000

69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school

After building flooded, secured HP compter donation

133

16

2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000

Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs

Assisted with development manager search and hire

629

17

2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000

Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour

Referred expert on minimizing client aggression

3,219

18

2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000

Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services

Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area

6,486

19

2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000

Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs

Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise

392

20

2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000

78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements

2,250

21

2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000

$28,281 In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30%

Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee

2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000

Increased average income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557 $22,350 Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school

Provided executive coaching during leadership transition

2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

$30,286Helped develop corporate engagement strategy

267 22 81

23

160

24

$14,710and remodel of family shelter Funded relocation

3,200

25

Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion

$18,530

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000

$14,710608 avoided homelessness 287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing;

2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000

90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing

Placed expert from finance industry on board

2,023

26

Invested in creation of client database

3,522

27

Provided homeless families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights

Advised on business plan in preparation for merger

3,539

28 29

2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000

$10,890 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free

2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000

$10,890

2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000

89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing

Advocated for 24 new units of housing

4,130

2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

81% of families moved stable long-term housing as compared with 65% nationally 2011toFederal

Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff

6,517 30

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000

Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services Alameda San Francisco Contra Costa Marin Santa Clara San Mateo Family Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients family of 4: single adult single adult single father, family of 3: single mother, Composition Provided funding, planning, legal2and real estate expertise Coming soon 2 adults, 1 teenager adults, 1 infant 2 infants child Participated on Strategic Planning 1Committee 75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes

2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000

Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

Poverty Line

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000

2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

Total  north bAY  

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

209,533 151,902 People Who Can’t Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression

317,668

Meet Their Basic

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

3,634

32

0

33

11,221

35

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2,098

36

Currently identifying needs and resources

1,812

37

46,183

374,614

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

31

1,777 34

Funded data entry training for patient services and billing

170,663

70% of juvenile offenders completed Needswho (by county)ACT program were off probation six months later

866

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Key Metrics

Client Name

First Generation in College

LivingWage

Stable Management Active Tipping + Point Notes Value Add Housing AssistanceHealthy (at no cost to donors)

Total Thank you for allowing us toClients Served turn your good intentions into 3,460 life-changing results.

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

1 accepted into a four-year college 100% of graduates

Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000

On average, 2/32grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000

80% of students3 are first in family to pursue post-secondary education

Supported launch of East Oakland site

731

3

2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000

4 80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students

Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma

300

4

2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

5 In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

681

5

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000

6 prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate Despite very poor

Assisted with director of development hire

307

6

2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000

7 Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California 75% of KIPP King

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning

2,459

7

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc. Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

Total  north bAY  

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

2

2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000

8 takers earned certification 75% of GED test

Helped develop and implement new client database

412

8

87% of students9 gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month

Helped develop first Bay Area donor event

1,751

9

2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000

85% of Mateo 10 Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students

Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter

3,767 10

2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

90% retention 11 of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide

Funded full-time career planning position

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

81% of clients 12 who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs

Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000

13 Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area

2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000

14 Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs

Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

0% default rate15 since 2007

Currently identifying needs and resources

266

15

2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000

16 69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school

After building flooded, secured HP compter donation

133

16

2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000

Placed 76% of 17 clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs

Assisted with development manager search and hire

629

17

2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000

18 into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour Placed 400 clients

Referred expert on minimizing client aggression

3,219

18

2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000

19received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services Bay Area clients

Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area

6,486

19

2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000

Of 313 clients20 who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs

Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise

392

20

2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000

21who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements 78% of veterans

Helped develop corporate engagement strategy

2,250

21

2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000

22 of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30% In first six months

Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee

2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000

23 income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557 Increased average

Provided executive coaching during leadership transition

2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

24 graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school Four months after

Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000

25 Point families secured permanent housing; 608 avoided homelessness 287 Connecting

2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000 2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000

46

11

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

267 22 81

23

160

24

Funded relocation and remodel of family shelter

3,200

25

26 90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing

Placed expert from finance industry on board

2,023

26

87% of babies 27 born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free

Invested in creation of client database

3,522

27

2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000

28 families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights Provided homeless

Advised on business plan in preparation for merger

3,539

28

2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000

29 89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing

Advocated for 24 new units of housing

4,130

29

2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

81% of families30moved to stable long-term housing as compared with 65% nationally

Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff

6,517 30

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

31 Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services

Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site

2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000

32tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients Completed 439

Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer

Coming soon 33

Provided funding, planning, legal and real estate expertise

2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000

34made significant learning gains in ESL classes 75% of students

Participated on Strategic Planning Committee

2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000

35 Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

Funded data entry training for patient services and billing

11,221

35

2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000

36 Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression Mothers in Positive

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2,098

36

2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

70% of juvenile37 offenders who completed ACT program were off probation six months later

Currently identifying needs and resources

1,812

37

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

866

31

3,634

32

0

33

1,777 34

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

1

2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000

**2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000

486

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Key Metrics

When we say “poverty,” here’s what we mean …

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost to donors)

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000

On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

Bay $76,906 80% of students are firstArea in family to pursue post-secondary education Self-Sufficiency 80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students Standard

Supported launch of East Oakland site Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma

In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000

Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate

Assisted with director of development hire

2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California $66,822

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning

75% of GED test takers earned certification

Helped develop and implement new client database

2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000

2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000

87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month

Helped develop first Bay Area donor event

2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000

85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students

Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter

2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide

Funded full-time career planning position

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

81% of clients who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs

Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000

Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area

2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000

Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs

Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

Total Clients Served 3,460

1

486

2

731 By federal guidelines a family of four earning less than 300 $22,350 per year is poor. But when you consider what it 681 costs to survive in the Bay Area, those numbers just 307 don’t add up. There are 1.3 million people in the Bay Area2,459 who can’t meet their basic needs—we are fighting for them.412 1,751

$60,457

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

3,767 10

$49,074

46

11

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

0% default rate since 2007

Currently identifying needs and resources

266

15

2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000

69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school

After building flooded, secured HP compter donation

133

16

2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000

Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs

Assisted with development manager search and hire

629

17

2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000

Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour

Referred expert on minimizing client aggression

3,219

18

2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000

Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services

Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area

6,486

19

2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000

Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs

Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise

392

20

2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000

78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements

2,250

21

2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000

$28,281 In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30%

Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee

2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000

Increased average income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557 $22,350 Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school

Provided executive coaching during leadership transition

2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

$30,286Helped develop corporate engagement strategy

267 22 81

23

160

24

$14,710and remodel of family shelter Funded relocation

3,200

25

Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion

$18,530

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000

$14,710608 avoided homelessness 287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing;

2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000

90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing

Placed expert from finance industry on board

2,023

26

Invested in creation of client database

3,522

27

Provided homeless families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights

Advised on business plan in preparation for merger

3,539

28 29

2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000

$10,890 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free

2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000

$10,890

2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000

89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing

Advocated for 24 new units of housing

4,130

2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

81% of families moved stable long-term housing as compared with 65% nationally 2011toFederal

Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff

6,517 30

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000

Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services Alameda San Francisco Contra Costa Marin Santa Clara San Mateo Family Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients family of 4: single adult single adult single father, family of 3: single mother, Composition Provided funding, planning, legal2and real estate expertise Coming soon 2 adults, 1 teenager adults, 1 infant 2 infants child Participated on Strategic Planning 1Committee 75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes

2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000

Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

Poverty Line

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000

2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

Total  north bAY  

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

209,533 151,902 People Who Can’t Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression

317,668

Meet Their Basic

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

3,634

32

0

33

11,221

35

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2,098

36

Currently identifying needs and resources

1,812

37

46,183

374,614

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

31

1,777 34

Funded data entry training for patient services and billing

170,663

70% of juvenile offenders completed Needswho (by county)ACT program were off probation six months later

866

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Key Metrics

Client Name

First Generation in College

LivingWage

Stable Management Active Tipping + Point Notes Value Add Housing AssistanceHealthy (at no cost to donors)

Total Thank you for allowing us toClients Served turn your good intentions into 3,460 life-changing results.

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

1 accepted into a four-year college 100% of graduates

Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000

On average, 2/32grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000

80% of students3 are first in family to pursue post-secondary education

Supported launch of East Oakland site

731

3

2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000

4 80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students

Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma

300

4

2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

5 In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

681

5

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000

6 prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate Despite very poor

Assisted with director of development hire

307

6

2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000

7 Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California 75% of KIPP King

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning

2,459

7

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc. Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

Total  north bAY  

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

2

2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000

8 takers earned certification 75% of GED test

Helped develop and implement new client database

412

8

87% of students9 gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month

Helped develop first Bay Area donor event

1,751

9

2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000

85% of Mateo 10 Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students

Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter

3,767 10

2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

90% retention 11 of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide

Funded full-time career planning position

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

81% of clients 12 who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs

Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000

13 Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area

2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000

14 Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs

Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

0% default rate15 since 2007

Currently identifying needs and resources

266

15

2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000

16 69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school

After building flooded, secured HP compter donation

133

16

2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000

Placed 76% of 17 clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs

Assisted with development manager search and hire

629

17

2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000

18 into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour Placed 400 clients

Referred expert on minimizing client aggression

3,219

18

2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000

19received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services Bay Area clients

Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area

6,486

19

2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000

Of 313 clients20 who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs

Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise

392

20

2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000

21who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements 78% of veterans

Helped develop corporate engagement strategy

2,250

21

2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000

22 of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30% In first six months

Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee

2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000

23 income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557 Increased average

Provided executive coaching during leadership transition

2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

24 graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school Four months after

Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000

25 Point families secured permanent housing; 608 avoided homelessness 287 Connecting

2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000 2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000

46

11

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

267 22 81

23

160

24

Funded relocation and remodel of family shelter

3,200

25

26 90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing

Placed expert from finance industry on board

2,023

26

87% of babies 27 born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free

Invested in creation of client database

3,522

27

2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000

28 families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights Provided homeless

Advised on business plan in preparation for merger

3,539

28

2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000

29 89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing

Advocated for 24 new units of housing

4,130

29

2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

81% of families30moved to stable long-term housing as compared with 65% nationally

Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff

6,517 30

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

31 Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services

Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site

2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000

32tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients Completed 439

Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer

Coming soon 33

Provided funding, planning, legal and real estate expertise

2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000

34made significant learning gains in ESL classes 75% of students

Participated on Strategic Planning Committee

2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000

35 Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

Funded data entry training for patient services and billing

11,221

35

2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000

36 Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression Mothers in Positive

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2,098

36

2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

70% of juvenile37 offenders who completed ACT program were off probation six months later

Currently identifying needs and resources

1,812

37

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

866

31

3,634

32

0

33

1,777 34

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

1

2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000

**2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000

486

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Key Metrics

When we say “poverty,” here’s what we mean …

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost to donors)

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000

On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

Bay $76,906 80% of students are firstArea in family to pursue post-secondary education Self-Sufficiency 80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students Standard

Supported launch of East Oakland site Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma

In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000

Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate

Assisted with director of development hire

2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California $66,822

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning

75% of GED test takers earned certification

Helped develop and implement new client database

2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000

2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000

87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month

Helped develop first Bay Area donor event

2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000

85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students

Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter

2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide

Funded full-time career planning position

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

81% of clients who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs

Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000

Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area

2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000

Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs

Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

Total Clients Served 3,460

1

486

2

731 By federal guidelines a family of four earning less than 300 $22,350 per year is poor. But when you consider what it 681 costs to survive in the Bay Area, those numbers just 307 don’t add up. There are 1.3 million people in the Bay Area2,459 who can’t meet their basic needs—we are fighting for them.412 1,751

$60,457

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

3,767 10

$49,074

46

11

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

0% default rate since 2007

Currently identifying needs and resources

266

15

2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000

69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school

After building flooded, secured HP compter donation

133

16

2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000

Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs

Assisted with development manager search and hire

629

17

2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000

Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour

Referred expert on minimizing client aggression

3,219

18

2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000

Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services

Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area

6,486

19

2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000

Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs

Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise

392

20

2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000

78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements

2,250

21

2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000

$28,281 In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30%

Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee

2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000

Increased average income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557 $22,350 Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school

Provided executive coaching during leadership transition

2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

$30,286Helped develop corporate engagement strategy

267 22 81

23

160

24

$14,710and remodel of family shelter Funded relocation

3,200

25

Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion

$18,530

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000

$14,710608 avoided homelessness 287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing;

2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000

90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing

Placed expert from finance industry on board

2,023

26

Invested in creation of client database

3,522

27

Provided homeless families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights

Advised on business plan in preparation for merger

3,539

28 29

2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000

$10,890 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free

2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000

$10,890

2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000

89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing

Advocated for 24 new units of housing

4,130

2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

81% of families moved stable long-term housing as compared with 65% nationally 2011toFederal

Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff

6,517 30

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000

Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services Alameda San Francisco Contra Costa Marin Santa Clara San Mateo Family Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients family of 4: single adult single adult single father, family of 3: single mother, Composition Provided funding, planning, legal2and real estate expertise Coming soon 2 adults, 1 teenager adults, 1 infant 2 infants child Participated on Strategic Planning 1Committee 75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes

2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000

Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

Poverty Line

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000

2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

Total  north bAY  

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

209,533 151,902 People Who Can’t Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression

317,668

Meet Their Basic

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

3,634

32

0

33

11,221

35

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2,098

36

Currently identifying needs and resources

1,812

37

46,183

374,614

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

31

1,777 34

Funded data entry training for patient services and billing

170,663

70% of juvenile offenders completed Needswho (by county)ACT program were off probation six months later

866

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Key Metrics

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000

On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks

2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000

80% of students are first in family to pursue post-secondary education Year Up

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

Aspire Public Schools In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate

2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California

2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000

75% of GED test takers earned certification

2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000

87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month

2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000

85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students

2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

81% of clients who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000

Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011

2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000

Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs

that was funded with an extra

grant from Tipping Point and it is going to change the way we

0% default rate since 2007

2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000 2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000 2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000 2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000 2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000 2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000 2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000 2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

Total

gic communications project

69% of youth completed the “Thanks internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school

2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000

concluded a strate-

2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000

2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

“We

2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000

Supported launch of East Oakland site Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000

2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

 north bAY  

80% of alumni graduate JAMES from collegeWILLCOX, 10 percentage points higher than similar students

2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

SCOTT DONOHUE ,

2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000

2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000

The power of flexible funding …

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost XOCHITL SANCHEZ-ZARAMA , to donors) Guardian Scholars Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

engage with our com-

to TippingJob Point’s Placed 76% of clients who completed Training and Placement program into jobs

munities.”

SAM COBBS,

Assisted with director of development hire

First Place for Youth

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning Helped develop and implement new client database

“The

Helped develop first Bay Area donor event Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

dollars than ever before.

1,751

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

3,767 10

flexible general Funded full-time career planning position operating support

study with Harvard on client follow-up Tipping PointLeading provides

is invaluable. It allows us

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

to be innovative; it allows us

Currently identifying needs and resources

to try to improve theflooded, services After building secured HP compter donation

Assisted with development manager search and hire we have for young Referred expert on minimizing client aggression

“You “This don’t walk into a Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30% is cutting-edge restaurant and say, ‘I’m willing Provided executive coaching during leadership transition Increased average income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557 to pay for the food, but not for philanthropy.Provided Tipping Point is funding for Silicon Valley expansion Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school the chef, the waiter or the other. different. They know we’re Funded relocation and remodel of family shelter 287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing; 608 avoided homelessness people whose hard work went effective. They want to Placed expert from finance industry on board 90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing into preparing and serving it.’ know what need Investedwe in creation of client database 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free Tipping Point trusts us and they business plan in preparation for merger Provided homeless families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights so theyAdvised canon help believe in us; they are willing to Advocated for 24 new units of housing 89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing make us even Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff 81% of families moved to stable long-term housing as compared with 65% nationally fund the essential structures stronger.” that make our programPlaced two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services ming great.” Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients

46

11

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

266

15

133

16

629

17

3,219

18

6,486

19

392

20

2,250

21

267 22 81

23

160

24

3,200

25

2,023

26

3,522

27

3,539

28

4,130

29

6,517 30 866

31

3,634

32

0

33

Coming soon

Provided funding, planning, legal and real estate expertise

2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000

75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes

Participated on Strategic Planning Committee

2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000

Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

TOM Funded dataWILSON, entry training for patient services and billing

11,221

35

2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000

Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2,098

36

2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

70% of juvenile offenders who completed ACT program were off probation six months later

Currently identifying needs and resources

1,812

37

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

1,777 34

Canal Alliance

JANE FISCHBERG, Rubicon Programs, Inc.

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

3,460 Only two in every ten grants made across the country 486 are unrestricted. Most funding supports program costs, 731 but Tipping Point funds more than just one piece of the pie. 300 681 We are willing to invest in the operations, strategy and 307 staffing our grantees need to fight poverty more effectively. 2,459 Last year, thanks to you, we raised more unrestricted 412

“We people.” have vision, they give received thebenefits, only 1%tax raise they’ve Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public refunds and other services us the strategy and they help had since 2007.” Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs us accomplish the work 78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements that we need to do.” Helped develop corporate engagement strategy

Aspire Placed 400 clients into jobs support, with a median wageteachers of $12.00/hour

Total Clients Served

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Key Metrics

When we say “poverty,” here’s what we mean …

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost to donors)

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000

On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

Bay $76,906 80% of students are firstArea in family to pursue post-secondary education Self-Sufficiency 80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students Standard

Supported launch of East Oakland site Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma

In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000

Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate

Assisted with director of development hire

2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California $66,822

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning

75% of GED test takers earned certification

Helped develop and implement new client database

2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000

2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000

87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month

Helped develop first Bay Area donor event

2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000

85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students

Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter

2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide

Funded full-time career planning position

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

81% of clients who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs

Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000

Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area

2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000

Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs

Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

Total Clients Served 3,460

1

486

2

731 By federal guidelines a family of four earning less than 300 $22,350 per year is poor. But when you consider what it 681 costs to survive in the Bay Area, those numbers just 307 don’t add up. There are 1.3 million people in the Bay Area2,459 who can’t meet their basic needs—we are fighting for them.412 1,751

$60,457

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

3,767 10

$49,074

46

11

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

0% default rate since 2007

Currently identifying needs and resources

266

15

2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000

69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school

After building flooded, secured HP compter donation

133

16

2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000

Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs

Assisted with development manager search and hire

629

17

2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000

Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour

Referred expert on minimizing client aggression

3,219

18

2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000

Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services

Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area

6,486

19

2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000

Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs

Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise

392

20

2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000

78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements

2,250

21

2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000

$28,281 In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30%

Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee

2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000

Increased average income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557 $22,350 Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school

Provided executive coaching during leadership transition

2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

$30,286Helped develop corporate engagement strategy

267 22 81

23

160

24

$14,710and remodel of family shelter Funded relocation

3,200

25

Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion

$18,530

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000

$14,710608 avoided homelessness 287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing;

2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000

90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing

Placed expert from finance industry on board

2,023

26

Invested in creation of client database

3,522

27

Provided homeless families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights

Advised on business plan in preparation for merger

3,539

28 29

2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000

$10,890 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free

2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000

$10,890

2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000

89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing

Advocated for 24 new units of housing

4,130

2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

81% of families moved stable long-term housing as compared with 65% nationally 2011toFederal

Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff

6,517 30

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000

Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services Alameda San Francisco Contra Costa Marin Santa Clara San Mateo Family Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients family of 4: single adult single adult single father, family of 3: single mother, Composition Provided funding, planning, legal2and real estate expertise Coming soon 2 adults, 1 teenager adults, 1 infant 2 infants child Participated on Strategic Planning 1Committee 75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes

2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000

Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

Poverty Line

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000

2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

Total  north bAY  

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

209,533 151,902 People Who Can’t Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression

317,668

Meet Their Basic

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

3,634

32

0

33

11,221

35

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2,098

36

Currently identifying needs and resources

1,812

37

46,183

374,614

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

31

1,777 34

Funded data entry training for patient services and billing

170,663

70% of juvenile offenders completed Needswho (by county)ACT program were off probation six months later

866

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Key Metrics

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000

On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks

2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000

80% of students are first in family to pursue post-secondary education Year Up

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

Aspire Public Schools In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate

2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California

2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000

75% of GED test takers earned certification

2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000

87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month

2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000

85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students

2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

81% of clients who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000

Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011

2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000

Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs

that was funded with an extra

grant from Tipping Point and it is going to change the way we

0% default rate since 2007

2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000 2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000 2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000 2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000 2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000 2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000 2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000 2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

Total

gic communications project

69% of youth completed the “Thanks internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school

2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000

concluded a strate-

2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000

2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

“We

2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000

2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000

Supported launch of East Oakland site Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000

2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

 north bAY  

80% of alumni graduate JAMES from collegeWILLCOX, 10 percentage points higher than similar students

2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000

Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area

SCOTT DONOHUE ,

2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000

2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000

The power of flexible funding …

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost XOCHITL SANCHEZ-ZARAMA , to donors) Guardian Scholars Preserved 11 student-support staff positions

engage with our com-

to TippingJob Point’s Placed 76% of clients who completed Training and Placement program into jobs

munities.”

SAM COBBS,

Assisted with director of development hire

First Place for Youth

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning Helped develop and implement new client database

“The

Helped develop first Bay Area donor event Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

dollars than ever before.

1,751

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

3,767 10

flexible general Funded full-time career planning position operating support

study with Harvard on client follow-up Tipping PointLeading provides

is invaluable. It allows us

Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff

to be innovative; it allows us

Currently identifying needs and resources

to try to improve theflooded, services After building secured HP compter donation

Assisted with development manager search and hire we have for young Referred expert on minimizing client aggression

“You “This don’t walk into a Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30% is cutting-edge restaurant and say, ‘I’m willing Provided executive coaching during leadership transition Increased average income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557 to pay for the food, but not for philanthropy.Provided Tipping Point is funding for Silicon Valley expansion Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school the chef, the waiter or the other. different. They know we’re Funded relocation and remodel of family shelter 287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing; 608 avoided homelessness people whose hard work went effective. They want to Placed expert from finance industry on board 90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing into preparing and serving it.’ know what need Investedwe in creation of client database 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free Tipping Point trusts us and they business plan in preparation for merger Provided homeless families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights so theyAdvised canon help believe in us; they are willing to Advocated for 24 new units of housing 89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing make us even Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff 81% of families moved to stable long-term housing as compared with 65% nationally fund the essential structures stronger.” that make our programPlaced two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services ming great.” Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients

46

11

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

266

15

133

16

629

17

3,219

18

6,486

19

392

20

2,250

21

267 22 81

23

160

24

3,200

25

2,023

26

3,522

27

3,539

28

4,130

29

6,517 30 866

31

3,634

32

0

33

Coming soon

Provided funding, planning, legal and real estate expertise

2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000

75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes

Participated on Strategic Planning Committee

2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000

Served 2,140 dental patients in first year

TOM Funded dataWILSON, entry training for patient services and billing

11,221

35

2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000

Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2,098

36

2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

70% of juvenile offenders who completed ACT program were off probation six months later

Currently identifying needs and resources

1,812

37

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

1,777 34

Canal Alliance

JANE FISCHBERG, Rubicon Programs, Inc.

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

3,460 Only two in every ten grants made across the country 486 are unrestricted. Most funding supports program costs, 731 but Tipping Point funds more than just one piece of the pie. 300 681 We are willing to invest in the operations, strategy and 307 staffing our grantees need to fight poverty more effectively. 2,459 Last year, thanks to you, we raised more unrestricted 412

“We people.” have vision, they give received thebenefits, only 1%tax raise they’ve Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public refunds and other services us the strategy and they help had since 2007.” Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs us accomplish the work 78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements that we need to do.” Helped develop corporate engagement strategy

Aspire Placed 400 clients into jobs support, with a median wageteachers of $12.00/hour

Total Clients Served

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education ++ youth youth education

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25

housing housing

26 27 28 29 30

31

family wellness wellness family

32 33 34 35 36 37

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000 $ 0.8M $ 250,000 2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 $ 2.3M $ 200,000

 NORTH  north BAY   bAY  

2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate

Assisted with director of development hire

2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000 $ 23.7M $ 500,000

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning

2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000 $ 0.4M $ 60,000

75% of GED test takers earned certification

Helped develop and implement new client database

2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000 $ 3.0M $ 300,000

Helped develop first Bay Area donor event 87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month $1,000,000+ San Francisco 49ers Foundation Koret Foundation Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter 85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students The Brin Wojcicki Foundation Sarlo Foundation Cathy and Blake Krikorian Funded 90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide Fiona and Stanley Druckenmiller Susie and Gideon Yu Foundation Caroline Fromm Lurie andfull-time Rabbi career planning position Mimi and Peter Haas Fund Brian Lurie Charles and Helen Schwab $50,000+ Kristin and David MacKnight Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up 81% of clients who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs Anonymous Leigh and Bill Matthes $500,000+ All Stars Helping Kids Celeste and Anthony Meierseed funding for expansion to Bay Area Provided Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011 Laszlo N. Tauber Family William J. B. Brady III Nicola Miner and Robert Mailer Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff Of the 88% of clientsFoundation, who completed placedHealthCare into permanent jobs Inc. coursework, 76% were California Anderson Foundation Jessica and Jason Moment Currently identifying needs and resources 0% default rate since 2007 $250,000+ Criterion Capital Management Anna and Mason Morfit After building flooded, secured HP compter donation 69% of youth completed internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school Coatuethe Foundation Catherine and John Debs Morgan Stanley Hewlett-Packard Company Emerson Collective Mary O’Neal and Bob Wilson Assisted with development manager search and hire Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs James Family Foundation Goldman, Sachs and Co. Katie and Matt Paige Referred expert on minimizing client aggression Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour Elizabeth and Thomas Laffont George Lee Serena and Alec Perkins seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area Karyn and Jack$18 Newman Mick McGuire, Marcato K. Robbins Bay Area clients received nearly million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services Nancy and RichardProvided JaMel and Tom Perkins Family Susan and Bill Oberndorf Mary Beth and David Shimmon Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs Foundation Susan and Jim Swartz Elizabeth and Andrew Spokes Helped develop corporate engagement strategy 78% of veterans who training achieved six months' at Voorhis job placements TPG Lisacompleted and John Pritzker Grace retention and Steven Dawn and David Zierk Danielle and Jed York Alexis and Trevor Traina Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30% Susan and David Tunnell executive coaching during leadership transition Increased average$100,000+ income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557 $25,000+ Jennifer and OwenProvided Van Natta Anonymous (2) Anonymous Sue and David Viniar Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school Cori and Tony Bates Delores and Gary Arabian Dede Wilsey BlackRock Inc. Artis Capital Management, L.P. Jill and Nicholas Woodman Katefamilies Harbin Clammer and AT&T California Funded relocation and remodel of family shelter 287 Connecting Point secured permanent housing; 608 avoided homelessness Adam Clammer Sloan and Roger Barnett $10,000+ 90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing Jill and Gordon Dyal Tina and Joe Bou-Saba Anonymous (2) Placed expert from finance industry on board Mrs. Donald G. Fisher Devon and Peter Briger Apex Capital, LLC Invested in creation of client database 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free Randi and Bob Fisher BTIG, LLC Barbara and Gerson Bakar AdvisedSimon on business plan in preparation for merger Provided homelessThe families andW. individuals over 32,400Burberry shelter-nights Horace Goldsmith Foundation Hilary Bates and Jerome Dan and Stacey Heather and John Advocated Botti for 24 new units of housing 89% of youth exitingFoundation transitional housing program secured stable housingCase Foundation Nancy and Stephen Grand Jean-Pierre Conte Suzanne and George Bull Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff 81% of families moved to stable long-term with nationally Philanthropic Fund housing as compared Gayle and Ron65% Conway Carolyn and Preston Butcher Beth and Brian Grossman Abby and Egon Durban Elaine and Joseph Camarda Jane and Wyatt Gruber Lesa and Greg Faulkner The Capital Group Companies Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services Jawbone Laura and John Fisher Charitable Foundation Sonia and Paul Tudor Jones Michelle and Bob Friend Mei and Herald Chen Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients Kelsey and David Lamond Massimiliana Boyer Glynn and Citigroup Provided funding, planning, legal and real estate expertise Coming soon Coltrane and Christopher Lord David Glynn Credit Suisse Marissa Mayer and Zachary Dr. Nadine Burke Harris and Deutsche Bank Participated on Strategic Planning Committee 75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes Bogue Arno Harris Sarah and Jason DiLullo Funded data entry training for patient services and billing Served 2,140 dental patients in first year Peery Foundation Julia and JJ Healy Patricia Swig Dinner Gina and Stuart Peterson Brendainand Mike Holston Natasha and DavidFunded Dolbycreation of performance evaluation framework Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease depression Eric Roberts Kathy and Rick Kimball Douglas Durkin Currently identifying needs and resources 70% of juvenile offenders who completed ACT program were off probation six months later The Rotasa Foundation Kohlberg Kravis Roberts Barbara and Bill Edwards

2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000 $ 0.2M $ 100,000 2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000 $ 4.8M $ 100,000 2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000 $ 4.3M $ 225,000 2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000 $ 1.2M $ 75,000 2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000 $ 13.9M $ 300,000 2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000 $ 1.7M $ 200,000 2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000 $ 2.4M $ 150,000 2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000 $ 8.4M $ 100,000 2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000 $ 0.8M $ 125,000 2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000 $ 0.9M $ 125,000 2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000 $ 4.3M $ 275,000 2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000 $ 7.7M $ 200,000 2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000 $ 10.9M $ 300,000 2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000 $ 5.1M $ 250,000 2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000 $ 9.0M $ 300,000 2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000 $ 14.6M $ 125,000 2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

Total

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000 $ 1.0M $ 270,000

2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000 $ 22.4M $ 300,000

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000 $ 0.8M $ 150,000 2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000 $ 1.9M $ 100,000 2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000 $ 13.1M $ 175,000 2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost to donors)

2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 $ 5.5M $ 150,000

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

Donors

We gratefully acknowledge the gifts and pledges Preserved 11 student-support staff positions Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks made by the honor roll of donors between July 1, 2011, Supported launch of East Oakland site 80% of students are first in family to pursue post-secondary education Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma andfrom June 2012. points higher than similar students 80% of alumni graduate college30, 10 percentage

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

Key Metrics

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M $ 0.8M

 EAST  EAST BAY   BAY  

 SAN  san FRANCISCO  francisco 

$5,000+ Anonymous (7) Ann and Chris Aristides Richard Barker

Johanna and Tom Baruch Nancy and Joachim Bechtle Carol and Shelby Bonnie Frish Brandt David Bruscino Sabrina Buell and Yves Behar Paula and Bandel Carano Kathy and Bob Ceremsak Jean and Sandy Colen Virginia and Murray Davis Hadley and Ethan Dettmer Michele and Doug Dillard Ray and Dagmar Dolby Jessica and Matthew Farron Lauren and James Ford Jessica Goldman Foung and Alejandro Foung Frank and Grossman Landscape Contractors, Inc. Barbara and David Fromm Danielle and Enrico Gaglioti Gap Foundation Robyn and Frank Ghali Marcia and John Goldman Richard E. Goldman Kirsten and Michael Green Marritje and Jamie Greene Daniel S. Haas Fund Shauna and Michael Harden Shyla and Doug Hendrickson Anne Irwin Mary Jo and Dick Kovacevich Nessia and Taylor Kushner Jill and Mike Latham Rachel Menell and Ned Topham, Jr. Phyllis Moldaw Bibi and Eric Moore Erin and Timothy O’Donovan Shawn Pattison Ed Perks Eleanor Phipps Price Lori and Bob Pryt Peter Read Julie Rognas and Joseph Sinnott III Kelly and John Shuhda The Honorable and Mrs. George P. Shultz Levi Strauss Foundation Roselyne C. Swig Tenney Family Charitable Fund Judith Thompson and Cindy Brooks, Thompson Brooks Inc. Yvette Tom and Adriel Lares Lynn Ursic and Frank Edie U.S. Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth Management Ashley Watson and Karen Twait Patrice and Michael Wilbur Lisa and Ted Williams Steve and Chris Wilsey Mary Zlot and Associates

Total $1,000+ Clients Anonymous (11) Barbara and Fred Abbott Served Sabrina Adriani and 3,460 Jeremy Scherer Katie Albright and Jake Schatz 486 Leigh and Steve Allocca 731 Beth and Trent Baalke Polly and Chris Bade 300 Pam and Larry Baer 681 Brittany Bagley and David Gliklich 307 Swift Barnes Connie Goodyear Baron and2,459 Barry Baron 412 Christopher Bass 1,751 Keith Belling Meg and Craige Bertero 3,767 Catherine Bettis Jennifer and Doug Biederbeck 46 Robin Boggs Julia and Peter Bromka Rossana and Gabriel Buigas 160 Brian Bunch 89 Lesley Bunim 6,084 Jennifer Caldwell and John H.N. Fisher 266 Vinny Cancelliere and 133 Tony Kolish Liza Heldfond Cannata and 629 Joey Cannata 3,219 Dr. Christine Carter 6,486 Carol and Lyman Casey Heidi and Caley Castelein 392 Jean Chang Margery and Donald Cherin 2,250 Rebecca Cherin 267 Kevin Chessen Claremont McKenna College 81 The Clorox Company 160 Kathy and Jeffrey Congdon Michele and Ronny Conway Topher Conway 3,200 Phyllis and David Cook 2,023 CPMC Foundation Suzanne and J.T. Crandall 3,522 Beth and Andy Daecher 3,539 Jane and Tyler Dann Kerry Dantzig 4,130 Nicole DeAvilla-Whiting and 6,517 Ken Whiting Robert Debs Kelly and Shams Deitrick 866 Drew Denbo Ann and Robert Devens 3,634 Megan and Ian DeWeerdt 0 Molly and Andrew Dodson Liz and Chris Dressel 1,777 Jessica and Mark Edelen 11,221 Phaedra Ellis-Lamkins Jennifer Ely and Vince Mellet2,098 Emporio Armani 1,812 Nancy and Phil Estes

** Does Does not not include include $3.5M $3.5M allocated allocated for for fulfillment fulfillment of of previous previous Be Be aa Tipping Tipping Point Point packages. packages. ** Funded in ** Funded in 2010 2010 as as aa Tipping Tipping Point Point Initiative. Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which which doesn’t doesn’t always always coincide coincide with with grantee grantee fiscal fiscal year year and and reporting reporting periods. periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M $ 12.0M

 SOUTH  SOUTH BAY   BAY  

Carla Emil and Rich Silverstein First Republic Bank Tamara Fritz Gibson, Dunn and Crutcher LLP Walter and Elise Haas Fund Alicia and Philip Hammarskjold Heffernan Group Foundation Carolen and Douglas Herst Ironwood Capital Management Kathleen and Ted Janus JP Morgan Chase Puja and Samir Kaul Heidi and David Kerko Adrianne and Sheldon Kimber Nellie and Max Levchin Anne and Colin Lind Karen and Ronnie Lott Caroline and Graham Low Connie and Bob Lurie Dr. Bettina McAdoo and Gordon Russell Amy and Drew McKnight Krista and Aaron Moatz Stephen Neal Oak Creek Foundation Barbro and Barney Osher Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health Liebe Patterson Lauren and Paul Picciani Catherine and Michael Podell Qatalyst Partners Mary and MacGregor Read Recurrent Energy Kerry Landreth Reed and Creighton Reed Robin and Jake Reynolds Mary Richerson Manizeh and Daniel Rimer Rivinus Family Foundation Roberts Shoes Fund Jeanne and Sanford Robertson Demi and Fred Seguritan Silicon Valley Community Foundation Stifel Nicolaus Julie and Dorian Stone Levi Strauss and Co. Lisa and Brian Sugar Dianne and Tad Taube Kat Taylor and Tom Steyer University of San Francisco Michael Uytengsu Ingrid von Mangoldt Hills Kay Kimpton Walker and Sandy Walker Wells Fargo Securities Zynga

$12M Thank you

 FUNDRAISING    Fundraising  

 COMMUNICATIONS    Communications  

 TECHNOLOGY    Technology  

 MENTAL  Mental HEALTH   Health  

 STRATEGY    Strategy  

 STAFFING    staffing  

 BOARD  board PLACEMENT   placement  

 EXPANSION    Expansion  

 GOAL  goal SETTING setting

78,937

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26 27 28 29 30

31 32 33 34 35 36 37


Grantee Organization

1 2

education ++ youth youth education

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25

housing housing

26 27 28 29 30

31

family wellness wellness family

32 33 34 35 36 37

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000 $ 0.8M $ 250,000 2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 $ 2.3M $ 200,000

 NORTH  north BAY   bAY  

2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000 $ 2.6M $ 225,000

In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED

Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant

Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate

Assisted with director of development hire

2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000 $ 23.7M $ 500,000

75% of KIPP King Collegiate seniors passed an AP exam versus 21% of seniors in California

Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning

2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000 $ 0.4M $ 60,000

75% of GED test takers earned certification

Helped develop and implement new client database

2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000 $ 3.0M $ 300,000

Helped develop first Bay Area donor event 87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month $1,000,000+ San Francisco 49ers Foundation Koret Foundation Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter 85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students The Brin Wojcicki Foundation Sarlo Foundation Cathy and Blake Krikorian Funded 90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide Fiona and Stanley Druckenmiller Susie and Gideon Yu Foundation Caroline Fromm Lurie andfull-time Rabbi career planning position Mimi and Peter Haas Fund Brian Lurie Charles and Helen Schwab $50,000+ Kristin and David MacKnight Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up 81% of clients who completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs Anonymous Leigh and Bill Matthes $500,000+ All Stars Helping Kids Celeste and Anthony Meierseed funding for expansion to Bay Area Provided Over 1,500 full-time job placements were made nationally in 2011 Laszlo N. Tauber Family William J. B. Brady III Nicola Miner and Robert Mailer Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff Of the 88% of clientsFoundation, who completed placedHealthCare into permanent jobs Inc. coursework, 76% were California Anderson Foundation Jessica and Jason Moment Currently identifying needs and resources 0% default rate since 2007 $250,000+ Criterion Capital Management Anna and Mason Morfit After building flooded, secured HP compter donation 69% of youth completed internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school Coatuethe Foundation Catherine and John Debs Morgan Stanley Hewlett-Packard Company Emerson Collective Mary O’Neal and Bob Wilson Assisted with development manager search and hire Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs James Family Foundation Goldman, Sachs and Co. Katie and Matt Paige Referred expert on minimizing client aggression Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour Elizabeth and Thomas Laffont George Lee Serena and Alec Perkins seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area Karyn and Jack$18 Newman Mick McGuire, Marcato K. Robbins Bay Area clients received nearly million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services Nancy and RichardProvided JaMel and Tom Perkins Family Susan and Bill Oberndorf Mary Beth and David Shimmon Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs Foundation Susan and Jim Swartz Elizabeth and Andrew Spokes Helped develop corporate engagement strategy 78% of veterans who training achieved six months' at Voorhis job placements TPG Lisacompleted and John Pritzker Grace retention and Steven Dawn and David Zierk Danielle and Jed York Alexis and Trevor Traina Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30% Susan and David Tunnell executive coaching during leadership transition Increased average$100,000+ income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557 $25,000+ Jennifer and OwenProvided Van Natta Anonymous (2) Anonymous Sue and David Viniar Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school Cori and Tony Bates Delores and Gary Arabian Dede Wilsey BlackRock Inc. Artis Capital Management, L.P. Jill and Nicholas Woodman Katefamilies Harbin Clammer and AT&T California Funded relocation and remodel of family shelter 287 Connecting Point secured permanent housing; 608 avoided homelessness Adam Clammer Sloan and Roger Barnett $10,000+ 90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing Jill and Gordon Dyal Tina and Joe Bou-Saba Anonymous (2) Placed expert from finance industry on board Mrs. Donald G. Fisher Devon and Peter Briger Apex Capital, LLC Invested in creation of client database 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free Randi and Bob Fisher BTIG, LLC Barbara and Gerson Bakar AdvisedSimon on business plan in preparation for merger Provided homelessThe families andW. individuals over 32,400Burberry shelter-nights Horace Goldsmith Foundation Hilary Bates and Jerome Dan and Stacey Heather and John Advocated Botti for 24 new units of housing 89% of youth exitingFoundation transitional housing program secured stable housingCase Foundation Nancy and Stephen Grand Jean-Pierre Conte Suzanne and George Bull Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff 81% of families moved to stable long-term with nationally Philanthropic Fund housing as compared Gayle and Ron65% Conway Carolyn and Preston Butcher Beth and Brian Grossman Abby and Egon Durban Elaine and Joseph Camarda Jane and Wyatt Gruber Lesa and Greg Faulkner The Capital Group Companies Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services Jawbone Laura and John Fisher Charitable Foundation Sonia and Paul Tudor Jones Michelle and Bob Friend Mei and Herald Chen Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients Kelsey and David Lamond Massimiliana Boyer Glynn and Citigroup Provided funding, planning, legal and real estate expertise Coming soon Coltrane and Christopher Lord David Glynn Credit Suisse Marissa Mayer and Zachary Dr. Nadine Burke Harris and Deutsche Bank Participated on Strategic Planning Committee 75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes Bogue Arno Harris Sarah and Jason DiLullo Funded data entry training for patient services and billing Served 2,140 dental patients in first year Peery Foundation Julia and JJ Healy Patricia Swig Dinner Gina and Stuart Peterson Brendainand Mike Holston Natasha and DavidFunded Dolbycreation of performance evaluation framework Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease depression Eric Roberts Kathy and Rick Kimball Douglas Durkin Currently identifying needs and resources 70% of juvenile offenders who completed ACT program were off probation six months later The Rotasa Foundation Kohlberg Kravis Roberts Barbara and Bill Edwards

2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000 $ 0.2M $ 100,000 2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000 $ 4.8M $ 100,000 2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000 $ 4.3M $ 225,000 2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000 $ 1.2M $ 75,000 2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000 $ 13.9M $ 300,000 2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000 $ 1.7M $ 200,000 2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000 $ 2.4M $ 150,000 2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000 $ 8.4M $ 100,000 2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000 $ 0.8M $ 125,000 2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000 $ 0.9M $ 125,000 2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000 $ 4.3M $ 275,000 2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000 $ 7.7M $ 200,000 2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000 $ 10.9M $ 300,000 2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000 $ 5.1M $ 250,000 2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000 $ 9.0M $ 300,000 2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000 $ 14.6M $ 125,000 2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

Total

100% of graduates accepted into a four-year college

2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000 $ 1.0M $ 270,000

2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000 $ 22.4M $ 300,000

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000 $ 0.8M $ 150,000 2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000 $ 1.9M $ 100,000 2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000 $ 13.1M $ 175,000 2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

Management Tipping Point Value Add Assistance (at no cost to donors)

2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 $ 5.5M $ 150,000

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

Donors

We gratefully acknowledge the gifts and pledges Preserved 11 student-support staff positions Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks made by the honor roll of donors between July 1, 2011, Supported launch of East Oakland site 80% of students are first in family to pursue post-secondary education Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma andfrom June 2012. points higher than similar students 80% of alumni graduate college30, 10 percentage

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

Key Metrics

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M $ 0.8M

 EAST  EAST BAY   BAY  

 SAN  san FRANCISCO  francisco 

$5,000+ Anonymous (7) Ann and Chris Aristides Richard Barker

Johanna and Tom Baruch Nancy and Joachim Bechtle Carol and Shelby Bonnie Frish Brandt David Bruscino Sabrina Buell and Yves Behar Paula and Bandel Carano Kathy and Bob Ceremsak Jean and Sandy Colen Virginia and Murray Davis Hadley and Ethan Dettmer Michele and Doug Dillard Ray and Dagmar Dolby Jessica and Matthew Farron Lauren and James Ford Jessica Goldman Foung and Alejandro Foung Frank and Grossman Landscape Contractors, Inc. Barbara and David Fromm Danielle and Enrico Gaglioti Gap Foundation Robyn and Frank Ghali Marcia and John Goldman Richard E. Goldman Kirsten and Michael Green Marritje and Jamie Greene Daniel S. Haas Fund Shauna and Michael Harden Shyla and Doug Hendrickson Anne Irwin Mary Jo and Dick Kovacevich Nessia and Taylor Kushner Jill and Mike Latham Rachel Menell and Ned Topham, Jr. Phyllis Moldaw Bibi and Eric Moore Erin and Timothy O’Donovan Shawn Pattison Ed Perks Eleanor Phipps Price Lori and Bob Pryt Peter Read Julie Rognas and Joseph Sinnott III Kelly and John Shuhda The Honorable and Mrs. George P. Shultz Levi Strauss Foundation Roselyne C. Swig Tenney Family Charitable Fund Judith Thompson and Cindy Brooks, Thompson Brooks Inc. Yvette Tom and Adriel Lares Lynn Ursic and Frank Edie U.S. Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth Management Ashley Watson and Karen Twait Patrice and Michael Wilbur Lisa and Ted Williams Steve and Chris Wilsey Mary Zlot and Associates

Total $1,000+ Clients Anonymous (11) Barbara and Fred Abbott Served Sabrina Adriani and 3,460 Jeremy Scherer Katie Albright and Jake Schatz 486 Leigh and Steve Allocca 731 Beth and Trent Baalke Polly and Chris Bade 300 Pam and Larry Baer 681 Brittany Bagley and David Gliklich 307 Swift Barnes Connie Goodyear Baron and2,459 Barry Baron 412 Christopher Bass 1,751 Keith Belling Meg and Craige Bertero 3,767 Catherine Bettis Jennifer and Doug Biederbeck 46 Robin Boggs Julia and Peter Bromka Rossana and Gabriel Buigas 160 Brian Bunch 89 Lesley Bunim 6,084 Jennifer Caldwell and John H.N. Fisher 266 Vinny Cancelliere and 133 Tony Kolish Liza Heldfond Cannata and 629 Joey Cannata 3,219 Dr. Christine Carter 6,486 Carol and Lyman Casey Heidi and Caley Castelein 392 Jean Chang Margery and Donald Cherin 2,250 Rebecca Cherin 267 Kevin Chessen Claremont McKenna College 81 The Clorox Company 160 Kathy and Jeffrey Congdon Michele and Ronny Conway Topher Conway 3,200 Phyllis and David Cook 2,023 CPMC Foundation Suzanne and J.T. Crandall 3,522 Beth and Andy Daecher 3,539 Jane and Tyler Dann Kerry Dantzig 4,130 Nicole DeAvilla-Whiting and 6,517 Ken Whiting Robert Debs Kelly and Shams Deitrick 866 Drew Denbo Ann and Robert Devens 3,634 Megan and Ian DeWeerdt 0 Molly and Andrew Dodson Liz and Chris Dressel 1,777 Jessica and Mark Edelen 11,221 Phaedra Ellis-Lamkins Jennifer Ely and Vince Mellet2,098 Emporio Armani 1,812 Nancy and Phil Estes

** Does Does not not include include $3.5M $3.5M allocated allocated for for fulfillment fulfillment of of previous previous Be Be aa Tipping Tipping Point Point packages. packages. ** Funded in ** Funded in 2010 2010 as as aa Tipping Tipping Point Point Initiative. Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which which doesn’t doesn’t always always coincide coincide with with grantee grantee fiscal fiscal year year and and reporting reporting periods. periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M $ 12.0M

 SOUTH  SOUTH BAY   BAY  

Carla Emil and Rich Silverstein First Republic Bank Tamara Fritz Gibson, Dunn and Crutcher LLP Walter and Elise Haas Fund Alicia and Philip Hammarskjold Heffernan Group Foundation Carolen and Douglas Herst Ironwood Capital Management Kathleen and Ted Janus JP Morgan Chase Puja and Samir Kaul Heidi and David Kerko Adrianne and Sheldon Kimber Nellie and Max Levchin Anne and Colin Lind Karen and Ronnie Lott Caroline and Graham Low Connie and Bob Lurie Dr. Bettina McAdoo and Gordon Russell Amy and Drew McKnight Krista and Aaron Moatz Stephen Neal Oak Creek Foundation Barbro and Barney Osher Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health Liebe Patterson Lauren and Paul Picciani Catherine and Michael Podell Qatalyst Partners Mary and MacGregor Read Recurrent Energy Kerry Landreth Reed and Creighton Reed Robin and Jake Reynolds Mary Richerson Manizeh and Daniel Rimer Rivinus Family Foundation Roberts Shoes Fund Jeanne and Sanford Robertson Demi and Fred Seguritan Silicon Valley Community Foundation Stifel Nicolaus Julie and Dorian Stone Levi Strauss and Co. Lisa and Brian Sugar Dianne and Tad Taube Kat Taylor and Tom Steyer University of San Francisco Michael Uytengsu Ingrid von Mangoldt Hills Kay Kimpton Walker and Sandy Walker Wells Fargo Securities Zynga

$12M Thank you

 FUNDRAISING    Fundraising  

 COMMUNICATIONS    Communications  

 TECHNOLOGY    Technology  

 MENTAL  Mental HEALTH   Health  

 STRATEGY    Strategy  

 STAFFING    staffing  

 BOARD  board PLACEMENT   placement  

 EXPANSION    Expansion  

 GOAL  goal SETTING setting

78,937

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26 27 28 29 30

31 32 33 34 35 36 37


Grantee Organization

1 2

education ++ youth youth education

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25

housing housing

26 27 28 29 30

31

family wellness wellness family

32 33 34 35 36 37

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000 $ 0.8M $ 250,000 2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000 $ 2.6M $ 225,000 2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000 $ 1.0M $ 270,000 2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000 $ 23.7M $ 500,000 2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000 $ 0.4M $ 60,000 2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000 $ 3.0M $ 300,000 2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000 $ 22.4M $ 300,000 2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000 $ 0.2M $ 100,000 2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000 $ 4.8M $ 100,000 2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000 $ 4.3M $ 225,000 2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000 $ 1.2M $ 75,000 2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000 $ 13.9M $ 300,000 2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000 $ 1.7M $ 200,000 2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000 $ 2.4M $ 150,000 2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000 $ 8.4M $ 100,000 2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000 $ 0.8M $ 125,000 2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000 $ 0.9M $ 125,000 2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000 $ 7.7M $ 200,000 2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000 $ 10.9M $ 300,000 2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000 $ 5.1M $ 250,000 2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000 $ 9.0M $ 300,000 2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000 $ 14.6M $ 125,000 2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000 $ 0.8M $ 150,000 2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000 $ 1.9M $ 100,000 2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000 $ 13.1M $ 175,000 2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

Total  NORTH  north BAY   bAY  

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M $ 0.8M

Key Metrics

Management Tipping Stephen Evans Susan Lowenberg and Joyce Marissa Shipman and AndrePoint Value Add Assistance Farella Braun + Martell Newstat Fund of Horizons Hakkak (at noShumway cost Carolyn Zecca Ferris Foundation Brooks to donors) Alex Fisher Chelsea and Casey Lynch Stacey Silver and Jon Yolles Preserved 11 student-support staff positions 100% of graduatesTomoko accepted into a four-year college Fortune Alex and David Lyon Danielle and Gil Simon KT and Michael Foust Melanie and Peter Maier Staci and James Slaughter Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks Maria and Gene Frantz Kevin Marchetti Blythe and Zandy Smith Supported launch of East Oakland site 80% of students are first in family to pursue post-secondary education Gregory Freemon Sue and Phil Marineau Kristi and William Smith Tad Freese Rashmi and Varun Marya Cordy Snyder Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma 80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students Richard Fried Betsy and Ed McDermott Jane and Larry Solomon In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduatedStewart or earned GED Jeff Garelick McDowell Source Capital LLCSuccessfully nominated for national capacity-building grant Gattiattendance, students maintain Cynthia McKee Assisted with director of development hire Despite very poor Stanlee prior school 82% average attendance rate Jenny and Will Stegall Sissy and Ted Geballe Michael Meade Amanda and Bart Stephens Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning 75% of KIPP King Dan Collegiate seniors passed an AP examPaulette versus 21% of seniors in California German J. Meyer and David A. Brad Stephens Christine Glastonbury and Friedman Christina B. Stephens Helped develop and implement new client database 75% of GED test takers earned certification Michael Feldman Mary and Jeffrey Miller Linda Sue and Don Strand Helped develop first Bay Area donor event 87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month Erin Glenn Ann-Ferrell and Stephen Marjorie Swig Google Matching Gifts Program Millham Swig Foundation Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter 85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students Lauren and Jason Greenfield Gale Mondry and Bruce Cohen Meredith and David Thacker Funded full-time career planning position 90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide Anthony Grumbach Katy Mooney Toni Thomas and David Colleen and Bob Haas Braden More Shepardson Katherine and David Hahn McKenna Moreau Beth Sutkus Thompson and Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up 81% of clients whoMarcia completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs and Russell Hansen Brit and Dave Morin Blake Thompson Juliejob B. placements Harkins Malia and Jonny Moseley Megha and Nirav Tolia Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area Over 1,500 full-time were made nationally in 2011 Sarah Shanti Hart and Joanne and Christopher Cathy and Ned Topham Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff Of the 88% of clientsJudson who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs Holt Mosellen Katie and Todd Traina Margi and Lucas Heldfond Sally and Bill Neukom Deanne Tucker Charitable CurrentlyFund identifying needs and resources 0% default rate since 2007 Simmone and Nicholas Catherine Norman Erica and Brian Tucker After building flooded, secured HP compter donation 69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school Heldfond OakCare Medical Group Alison Sonsini Turner and Assisted with development manager search and hire Emilia and Jim Hodel Mauri Okamato-Kearney Alex Turner Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs Alex and Jordan Hoffner Tara and Geoff Oltmans Nathan Tyler Referred expert on minimizing client aggression Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour Anahita Homayoun Shannon and Shawn O’Neill Laurie and Jeff Ubben Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area Bay Area clients received $18House million in public benefits, tax refunds Kristen nearly and Mike Stephanie Oshana and andother services U.S. Trust Jeff Hull Tyler Mitchell Susan and Jack Wadsworth Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs Leslie and George Hume Monica and David Pauli Marilyn and Murry Waldman Helped develop corporate engagement strategy 78% of veterans who training achieved six months' Thecompleted James Irvine Foundation Robertretention Pedrero at job placements Danielle and Brooks Walker Heather and Eric Johnson Leola and Summer and Brooks Walker III Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goalKenneth by 30% Perkins Susan and Jason Johnson Kathryn M. Peters Melody and Jerry Weintraub Increased averageThe income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557 Kaplan Family Anne Marie and Wylie Peterson Fred Westheimer Provided executive coaching during leadership transition Tonia and Adam Karr Debbie and Tom Piliero Justine and Stephen Williams Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school Barbara and Ronald Kaufman Mary and Gary Pinkus Kathy and John Williams Jennifer and Steve Kawaja Jen and John Pleasants Brian Wilsey Christina andsecured John Keker Carrie and Gary Pomerantz Stephanie and Charles Withers Funded relocation and remodel of family shelter 287 Connecting Point families permanent housing; 608 avoided homelessness Kristen and Jim Kelly Anne Popkin Dorlon Wood and Dylan Placed expert from finance industry on board 90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing Renuka Kher and Sandeep N. Prospect Creek Foundation Simonds Solanki Becca Prowda and Daniel Lurie Reed Woodson Invested in creation of client database 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free Sloan and Robert Klein Barbara Ravizza and Betsy and Paul Zeger Advised on business plan in preparation for merger Provided homelessKarl families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights Knight John Osterweis Mary and Harold Zlot Christina and Daryl Kost Joanna and John Hamm Advocated for 24 new units of housing 89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stableRees housing Lisa and Scott Kovalik Salvador Rivera $500+ 81% of families moved to stable housing as compared with 65% nationally Elizabeth and long-term Solomon Kumin Allison and Dan Rose Anonymous (7) Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff Sara and Andy Kurtzig Sally and Toby Rosenblatt Abbot Downing Shannon and Jim Lanzone Jaclyn and Dan Safier Carolyn and John Ajie Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site Provided 866 children 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services Sarahwith Leary Sand Hill Foundation Katie and Josh Amoroso Carol and Doug Lee Kate Sanger and Brandon Yoder Jamie Austin and Ray Schreiber Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients Feralee and Charles Levin Yvonne and Angelo Sangiacomo Ethan Ayer Provided funding, planning, legal and real estate expertise Coming soon Nate Levine, BuildingBlox Gabriella Sarlo Sarah and Nathan Ballard Consulting Susie Sarlo Sylvia and John Barry Participated on Strategic Planning Committee 75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes Alicia Lieberman Philip Schlein Susan Beech Funded data entry training for patient services and billing Served 2,140 dental patients in first year Celeste and Samuel Liversidge Chara Schreyer and Tina and Bill Borden Funded Kristin and Ronn Loewenthal Gordon Freund Lynne Bosworth and Kevincreation of performance evaluation framework Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression James Lord and Roderick Wyllie Beatrix and Michael Seidenberg Kranzusch Currently identifying needs and resources 70% of juvenile offenders who completed ACT program were off probation six months later Rita Louh and Rolland Ho Mona and Nihir Shah Jill Bourne

 EAST  EAST BAY   BAY  

 SAN  san FRANCISCO  francisco 

Maryon Davies Lewis Lindsay and Jacob Lief Amy Lit and Andy Rittenberg Kathy and John Lucas Sonia Lurie Eric Lutkin Renske and Russell Lynde Maria Makela and Neal Benezra Laurence Mathews Kasey and Jamie McJunkin Kathy and Stephen McLin Pam and Gregg Melinson Mary Mewha and Henry Pilger Noelle and John Micek Charles Michaels Matt Mochary Timothy and Natasha Monahan Jon Moscone Candice and Ryan Murray Kelly and Michael Natenshon Irene Neuwirth Michelle and Paul Odland Matt Overman Dana Pace Amarnath Pai Parthenon Capital Foundation Stacy Pasko Jenny Pearlman and Jack McDonald Michelle and Andrew Peirona Jen Pitts and Jordan Overby Cheryl Polk Kelly Porter Malcolm Post Eva and Bill Price Sherry Prowda Melissa Pulling and Ross Berger Ali and Matt Reeder Rachel and John Rosenberg Kathy and John Salmanowitz Lisa and Jeff Sanguinet The Schuh Family Allen and Amanda Scott Katie and Maz Sharafi Dana and Christopher Sheldon Marcie and Andrew Sherman Shooting Star Audrey and Bob Sockolov Sacha and Joshua Steinberger Allison Stephens Rebecca Sternthal and Andrew Schiffin Abigail Stewart-Kahn and Matt Kahn Darian and Rick Swig Liz Terzo and Ben Elkin Clayton Timbrell Doug Tom Laura Tyson and Erik Tarloff Maria Nash Vaughn Jeanne and Spencer Wang Stephanie and John Warren Angela and David Weiden

Total Monique Weil Alyson and Richard Welch Clients Served Wetherby Asset Management Katy and Michael Williams 3,460 Ryan Wilsey Rachel and Van Wilshire 486 Anne Wintroub and 731 Alex Hansen Alex Witherill 300 681 Up to $500 Anonymous (17) 307 Chad Abbott 2,459 Jennifer Abernathy Noah Abrahamson and 412 Michael Bergen 1,751 Laura Adams Matt Aguiar 3,767 Jennyfer Aguilera 46 Sundeep Ahuja Amy Albright Karen Alderete Marina and Cesare Alessandrini160 Nicholas Alexander 89 Virginia Alexander 6,084 Amy Alfano Laura and Neil Alford 266 Kathleen Alioto 133 Beverly Alkire Cara Brennan Allamano 629 Amy Allen 3,219 Rafael Alvarez 6,486 Heather Amarel Holly Amarel 392 Amgen Foundation 2,250 Samir Amrute Kip Andersen 267 Carl Anderson 81 Kelly and Sigurd Anderson Azania Andrews and 160 Martin Gilliard Eric Antebi Jonathan Apostoles 3,200 Francesca and Max Applegarth Paige and Anthony Arata 2,023 Jessica Areen 3,522 Patricia Arellano 3,539 Kathy Armbruster William Armenta 4,130 Scott Arnold 6,517 Avin Arumugam Connor Ashenbrucker Joe Ashenbrucker 866 Dean Atchison Raj Atluru 3,634 Kevin August 0 Elizabeth Austin Cheryl Bailey 1,777 Clinton Bailey 11,221 Sasha and Matthew Bainer Rosemary and Ed Baker 2,098 Lonnie Barbach and 1,812 David Geisinger

** Does Does not not include include $3.5M $3.5M allocated allocated for for fulfillment fulfillment of of previous previous Be Be aa Tipping Tipping Point Point packages. packages. ** Funded in ** Funded in 2010 2010 as as aa Tipping Tipping Point Point Initiative. Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which which doesn’t doesn’t always always coincide coincide with with grantee grantee fiscal fiscal year year and and reporting reporting periods. periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M $ 12.0M

 SOUTH  SOUTH BAY   BAY  

Daphne Bransten Claire and Ralph Brindis Carolyn and Keao Caindec Paola and Charlie Casey Paige and Charles Cattano Sung Hee Choe and Adam Ring Wayee Chu and Ethan Beard Anne Colby and William Damon Douglas Conklyn Anne and Dan Conlan Daniel Conway James Costos Nicole Curran and Joe Lacob Margaret and Jonathan DeGooyer Deloitte Mary Denton Adam Dodge Alexandra and Michael Downing Derek Dukes Michelle and Gordon Fallone Sara Fenske and Roy Bahat Holly Finn Tanya and Mark Forbes Rebecca Fowler Fraenkel Gallery Ryan Frick Alison Geballe Global Philanthropy Group Donna and Steven Gothelf Matthew Goudeau Paige and Mike Graziano Greer Family Foundation Johanna and Mike Gridley Margie and David Guggenhime Susan Hamilton and Royal Hansen Laura and Scott Harrison Julia and Kevin Hartz Karla Haynes Maryellen and Frank Herringer Donna Hoghooghi and Ted Bartlett Gwendolyn Holcombe and Carl Kawaja Sarah Shanley Hope and Robert Hope Ron Huddleston IDEO Erik Johnson Melinda and Kevin Johnson Deborah and Scott Kay Bonnie and Pat Kearns Susan Kempler Pam and Dick Kramlich Martine Krumholz and Jonathan Abrams Sara and Peter Lardner Jeannie Leahy and Tom Anderson Maribelle and Steve Leavitt Julie and David Levine Robert G. Levy

$12M Thank you

 FUNDRAISING    Fundraising  

 COMMUNICATIONS    Communications  

 TECHNOLOGY    Technology  

 MENTAL  Mental HEALTH   Health  

 STRATEGY    Strategy  

 STAFFING    staffing  

 BOARD  board PLACEMENT   placement  

 EXPANSION    Expansion  

 GOAL  goal SETTING setting

78,937

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26 27 28 29 30

31 32 33 34 35 36 37


Grantee Organization

1 2

education ++ youth youth education

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25

housing housing

26 27 28 29 30

31

family wellness wellness family

32 33 34 35 36 37

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000 $ 0.8M $ 250,000 2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000 $ 2.6M $ 225,000 2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000 $ 1.0M $ 270,000 2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000 $ 23.7M $ 500,000 2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000 $ 0.4M $ 60,000 2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000 $ 3.0M $ 300,000 2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000 $ 22.4M $ 300,000 2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000 $ 0.2M $ 100,000 2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000 $ 4.8M $ 100,000 2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000 $ 4.3M $ 225,000 2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000 $ 1.2M $ 75,000 2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000 $ 13.9M $ 300,000 2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000 $ 1.7M $ 200,000 2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000 $ 2.4M $ 150,000 2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000 $ 8.4M $ 100,000 2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000 $ 0.8M $ 125,000 2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000 $ 0.9M $ 125,000 2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000 $ 7.7M $ 200,000 2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000 $ 10.9M $ 300,000 2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000 $ 5.1M $ 250,000 2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000 $ 9.0M $ 300,000 2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000 $ 14.6M $ 125,000 2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000 $ 0.8M $ 150,000 2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000 $ 1.9M $ 100,000 2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000 $ 13.1M $ 175,000 2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

Total  NORTH  north BAY   bAY  

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M $ 0.8M

Key Metrics

Management Tipping Stephen Evans Susan Lowenberg and Joyce Marissa Shipman and AndrePoint Value Add Assistance Farella Braun + Martell Newstat Fund of Horizons Hakkak (at noShumway cost Carolyn Zecca Ferris Foundation Brooks to donors) Alex Fisher Chelsea and Casey Lynch Stacey Silver and Jon Yolles Preserved 11 student-support staff positions 100% of graduatesTomoko accepted into a four-year college Fortune Alex and David Lyon Danielle and Gil Simon KT and Michael Foust Melanie and Peter Maier Staci and James Slaughter Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks Maria and Gene Frantz Kevin Marchetti Blythe and Zandy Smith Supported launch of East Oakland site 80% of students are first in family to pursue post-secondary education Gregory Freemon Sue and Phil Marineau Kristi and William Smith Tad Freese Rashmi and Varun Marya Cordy Snyder Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma 80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students Richard Fried Betsy and Ed McDermott Jane and Larry Solomon In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduatedStewart or earned GED Jeff Garelick McDowell Source Capital LLCSuccessfully nominated for national capacity-building grant Gattiattendance, students maintain Cynthia McKee Assisted with director of development hire Despite very poor Stanlee prior school 82% average attendance rate Jenny and Will Stegall Sissy and Ted Geballe Michael Meade Amanda and Bart Stephens Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning 75% of KIPP King Dan Collegiate seniors passed an AP examPaulette versus 21% of seniors in California German J. Meyer and David A. Brad Stephens Christine Glastonbury and Friedman Christina B. Stephens Helped develop and implement new client database 75% of GED test takers earned certification Michael Feldman Mary and Jeffrey Miller Linda Sue and Don Strand Helped develop first Bay Area donor event 87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month Erin Glenn Ann-Ferrell and Stephen Marjorie Swig Google Matching Gifts Program Millham Swig Foundation Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter 85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students Lauren and Jason Greenfield Gale Mondry and Bruce Cohen Meredith and David Thacker Funded full-time career planning position 90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus 75% university-wide Anthony Grumbach Katy Mooney Toni Thomas and David Colleen and Bob Haas Braden More Shepardson Katherine and David Hahn McKenna Moreau Beth Sutkus Thompson and Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up 81% of clients whoMarcia completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs and Russell Hansen Brit and Dave Morin Blake Thompson Juliejob B. placements Harkins Malia and Jonny Moseley Megha and Nirav Tolia Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area Over 1,500 full-time were made nationally in 2011 Sarah Shanti Hart and Joanne and Christopher Cathy and Ned Topham Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff Of the 88% of clientsJudson who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs Holt Mosellen Katie and Todd Traina Margi and Lucas Heldfond Sally and Bill Neukom Deanne Tucker Charitable CurrentlyFund identifying needs and resources 0% default rate since 2007 Simmone and Nicholas Catherine Norman Erica and Brian Tucker After building flooded, secured HP compter donation 69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school Heldfond OakCare Medical Group Alison Sonsini Turner and Assisted with development manager search and hire Emilia and Jim Hodel Mauri Okamato-Kearney Alex Turner Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs Alex and Jordan Hoffner Tara and Geoff Oltmans Nathan Tyler Referred expert on minimizing client aggression Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour Anahita Homayoun Shannon and Shawn O’Neill Laurie and Jeff Ubben Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area Bay Area clients received $18House million in public benefits, tax refunds Kristen nearly and Mike Stephanie Oshana and andother services U.S. Trust Jeff Hull Tyler Mitchell Susan and Jack Wadsworth Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs Leslie and George Hume Monica and David Pauli Marilyn and Murry Waldman Helped develop corporate engagement strategy 78% of veterans who training achieved six months' Thecompleted James Irvine Foundation Robertretention Pedrero at job placements Danielle and Brooks Walker Heather and Eric Johnson Leola and Summer and Brooks Walker III Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goalKenneth by 30% Perkins Susan and Jason Johnson Kathryn M. Peters Melody and Jerry Weintraub Increased averageThe income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557 Kaplan Family Anne Marie and Wylie Peterson Fred Westheimer Provided executive coaching during leadership transition Tonia and Adam Karr Debbie and Tom Piliero Justine and Stephen Williams Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school Barbara and Ronald Kaufman Mary and Gary Pinkus Kathy and John Williams Jennifer and Steve Kawaja Jen and John Pleasants Brian Wilsey Christina andsecured John Keker Carrie and Gary Pomerantz Stephanie and Charles Withers Funded relocation and remodel of family shelter 287 Connecting Point families permanent housing; 608 avoided homelessness Kristen and Jim Kelly Anne Popkin Dorlon Wood and Dylan Placed expert from finance industry on board 90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing Renuka Kher and Sandeep N. Prospect Creek Foundation Simonds Solanki Becca Prowda and Daniel Lurie Reed Woodson Invested in creation of client database 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free Sloan and Robert Klein Barbara Ravizza and Betsy and Paul Zeger Advised on business plan in preparation for merger Provided homelessKarl families and individuals over 32,400 shelter-nights Knight John Osterweis Mary and Harold Zlot Christina and Daryl Kost Joanna and John Hamm Advocated for 24 new units of housing 89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stableRees housing Lisa and Scott Kovalik Salvador Rivera $500+ 81% of families moved to stable housing as compared with 65% nationally Elizabeth and long-term Solomon Kumin Allison and Dan Rose Anonymous (7) Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff Sara and Andy Kurtzig Sally and Toby Rosenblatt Abbot Downing Shannon and Jim Lanzone Jaclyn and Dan Safier Carolyn and John Ajie Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site Provided 866 children 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive support services Sarahwith Leary Sand Hill Foundation Katie and Josh Amoroso Carol and Doug Lee Kate Sanger and Brandon Yoder Jamie Austin and Ray Schreiber Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients Feralee and Charles Levin Yvonne and Angelo Sangiacomo Ethan Ayer Provided funding, planning, legal and real estate expertise Coming soon Nate Levine, BuildingBlox Gabriella Sarlo Sarah and Nathan Ballard Consulting Susie Sarlo Sylvia and John Barry Participated on Strategic Planning Committee 75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes Alicia Lieberman Philip Schlein Susan Beech Funded data entry training for patient services and billing Served 2,140 dental patients in first year Celeste and Samuel Liversidge Chara Schreyer and Tina and Bill Borden Funded Kristin and Ronn Loewenthal Gordon Freund Lynne Bosworth and Kevincreation of performance evaluation framework Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in depression James Lord and Roderick Wyllie Beatrix and Michael Seidenberg Kranzusch Currently identifying needs and resources 70% of juvenile offenders who completed ACT program were off probation six months later Rita Louh and Rolland Ho Mona and Nihir Shah Jill Bourne

 EAST  EAST BAY   BAY  

 SAN  san FRANCISCO  francisco 

Maryon Davies Lewis Lindsay and Jacob Lief Amy Lit and Andy Rittenberg Kathy and John Lucas Sonia Lurie Eric Lutkin Renske and Russell Lynde Maria Makela and Neal Benezra Laurence Mathews Kasey and Jamie McJunkin Kathy and Stephen McLin Pam and Gregg Melinson Mary Mewha and Henry Pilger Noelle and John Micek Charles Michaels Matt Mochary Timothy and Natasha Monahan Jon Moscone Candice and Ryan Murray Kelly and Michael Natenshon Irene Neuwirth Michelle and Paul Odland Matt Overman Dana Pace Amarnath Pai Parthenon Capital Foundation Stacy Pasko Jenny Pearlman and Jack McDonald Michelle and Andrew Peirona Jen Pitts and Jordan Overby Cheryl Polk Kelly Porter Malcolm Post Eva and Bill Price Sherry Prowda Melissa Pulling and Ross Berger Ali and Matt Reeder Rachel and John Rosenberg Kathy and John Salmanowitz Lisa and Jeff Sanguinet The Schuh Family Allen and Amanda Scott Katie and Maz Sharafi Dana and Christopher Sheldon Marcie and Andrew Sherman Shooting Star Audrey and Bob Sockolov Sacha and Joshua Steinberger Allison Stephens Rebecca Sternthal and Andrew Schiffin Abigail Stewart-Kahn and Matt Kahn Darian and Rick Swig Liz Terzo and Ben Elkin Clayton Timbrell Doug Tom Laura Tyson and Erik Tarloff Maria Nash Vaughn Jeanne and Spencer Wang Stephanie and John Warren Angela and David Weiden

Total Monique Weil Alyson and Richard Welch Clients Served Wetherby Asset Management Katy and Michael Williams 3,460 Ryan Wilsey Rachel and Van Wilshire 486 Anne Wintroub and 731 Alex Hansen Alex Witherill 300 681 Up to $500 Anonymous (17) 307 Chad Abbott 2,459 Jennifer Abernathy Noah Abrahamson and 412 Michael Bergen 1,751 Laura Adams Matt Aguiar 3,767 Jennyfer Aguilera 46 Sundeep Ahuja Amy Albright Karen Alderete Marina and Cesare Alessandrini160 Nicholas Alexander 89 Virginia Alexander 6,084 Amy Alfano Laura and Neil Alford 266 Kathleen Alioto 133 Beverly Alkire Cara Brennan Allamano 629 Amy Allen 3,219 Rafael Alvarez 6,486 Heather Amarel Holly Amarel 392 Amgen Foundation 2,250 Samir Amrute Kip Andersen 267 Carl Anderson 81 Kelly and Sigurd Anderson Azania Andrews and 160 Martin Gilliard Eric Antebi Jonathan Apostoles 3,200 Francesca and Max Applegarth Paige and Anthony Arata 2,023 Jessica Areen 3,522 Patricia Arellano 3,539 Kathy Armbruster William Armenta 4,130 Scott Arnold 6,517 Avin Arumugam Connor Ashenbrucker Joe Ashenbrucker 866 Dean Atchison Raj Atluru 3,634 Kevin August 0 Elizabeth Austin Cheryl Bailey 1,777 Clinton Bailey 11,221 Sasha and Matthew Bainer Rosemary and Ed Baker 2,098 Lonnie Barbach and 1,812 David Geisinger

** Does Does not not include include $3.5M $3.5M allocated allocated for for fulfillment fulfillment of of previous previous Be Be aa Tipping Tipping Point Point packages. packages. ** Funded in ** Funded in 2010 2010 as as aa Tipping Tipping Point Point Initiative. Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which which doesn’t doesn’t always always coincide coincide with with grantee grantee fiscal fiscal year year and and reporting reporting periods. periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M $ 12.0M

 SOUTH  SOUTH BAY   BAY  

Daphne Bransten Claire and Ralph Brindis Carolyn and Keao Caindec Paola and Charlie Casey Paige and Charles Cattano Sung Hee Choe and Adam Ring Wayee Chu and Ethan Beard Anne Colby and William Damon Douglas Conklyn Anne and Dan Conlan Daniel Conway James Costos Nicole Curran and Joe Lacob Margaret and Jonathan DeGooyer Deloitte Mary Denton Adam Dodge Alexandra and Michael Downing Derek Dukes Michelle and Gordon Fallone Sara Fenske and Roy Bahat Holly Finn Tanya and Mark Forbes Rebecca Fowler Fraenkel Gallery Ryan Frick Alison Geballe Global Philanthropy Group Donna and Steven Gothelf Matthew Goudeau Paige and Mike Graziano Greer Family Foundation Johanna and Mike Gridley Margie and David Guggenhime Susan Hamilton and Royal Hansen Laura and Scott Harrison Julia and Kevin Hartz Karla Haynes Maryellen and Frank Herringer Donna Hoghooghi and Ted Bartlett Gwendolyn Holcombe and Carl Kawaja Sarah Shanley Hope and Robert Hope Ron Huddleston IDEO Erik Johnson Melinda and Kevin Johnson Deborah and Scott Kay Bonnie and Pat Kearns Susan Kempler Pam and Dick Kramlich Martine Krumholz and Jonathan Abrams Sara and Peter Lardner Jeannie Leahy and Tom Anderson Maribelle and Steve Leavitt Julie and David Levine Robert G. Levy

$12M Thank you

 FUNDRAISING    Fundraising  

 COMMUNICATIONS    Communications  

 TECHNOLOGY    Technology  

 MENTAL  Mental HEALTH   Health  

 STRATEGY    Strategy  

 STAFFING    staffing  

 BOARD  board PLACEMENT   placement  

 EXPANSION    Expansion  

 GOAL  goal SETTING setting

78,937

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26 27 28 29 30

31 32 33 34 35 36 37


Grantee Organization

1 2

education ++ youth youth education

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25

housing housing

26 27 28 29 30

31

family wellness wellness family

32 33 34 35 36 37

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000 $ 0.8M $ 250,000 2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000 $ 2.6M $ 225,000 2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000 $ 1.0M $ 270,000 2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000 $ 23.7M $ 500,000 2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000 $ 0.4M $ 60,000 2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000 $ 3.0M $ 300,000 2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000 $ 22.4M $ 300,000 2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000 $ 0.2M $ 100,000 2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000 $ 4.8M $ 100,000 2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000 $ 4.3M $ 225,000 2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000 $ 1.2M $ 75,000 2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000 $ 13.9M $ 300,000 2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000 $ 1.7M $ 200,000 2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000 $ 2.4M $ 150,000 2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000 $ 8.4M $ 100,000 2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000 $ 0.8M $ 125,000 2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000 $ 0.9M $ 125,000 2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000 $ 7.7M $ 200,000 2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000 $ 10.9M $ 300,000 2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000 $ 5.1M $ 250,000 2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000 $ 9.0M $ 300,000 2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000 $ 14.6M $ 125,000 2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000 $ 0.8M $ 150,000 2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000 $ 1.9M $ 100,000 2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000 $ 13.1M $ 175,000 2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

Total  NORTH  north BAY   bAY  

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M $ 0.8M

Key Metrics

Management Ted Barbeau Sharon Campbell Rafael C. Davis Tipping Point Value Add Assistance Rabbi Michael Barenbaum Amy Candido Abby and Ross Davisson (atInvestors no cost Chris Barideaux Kristin Carbray DBL to donors) Nicole and Michael Barker Jamie Carlson Alan Deal and Kevin Grawey Preserved 11 student-support staff positions 100% of graduatesKatherine accepted Barnard into a four-year college Christianne Carney Amy Deck The Barry Family Casey Carr James Deitrich Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks Jennifer and Nick Bartle James Carriere Kevin Delaney Supported launch of East Oakland site 80% of students are first in family to pursue post-secondary education Vicki and Edward Bass Effie Casella Stefanie Demong Neill Bassi Dylan Casey Jennifer and Mario DiPrisco Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma 80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students Kelly Bathgate Jenny Casey Raquel DiSabatino In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduatedAimee or earned GED Caryn Baudoux Caton Molly Hanks DoyleSuccessfully nominated for national capacity-building grant Global Management Payal and Chadha rate Emily Dreblow Assisted with director of development hire Despite very poor Bayshore prior school attendance, students maintain 82%Harpreet average attendance Meg Beaudet Jessie Chamberlin Jonaca and William Driscoll Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning 75% of KIPP King Darren Collegiate seniors passed an AP examSarah versusChandler 21% of seniors Bechtel and in California Katie Duffy Emilyearned Beck certification Matt Theobald Matt Duffy Helped develop and implement new client database 75% of GED test takers Kristen Beck Annabel Chang Patsy Dugger and Isaac Newton 87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per and month Robert J. Begley Hyun Kun Soon Jung Chang Meredith Dunn Helped develop first Bay Area donor event Reed Bement Celena Chen Morgan and Bryan Successfully Duquette testified in Sacramento for SF charter 85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students Annie Berry Ivy Chen Kathryn Duryea Funded full-time career planning position 90% retention of students inBielawski fall of 2010 versusCece 75% university-wide Jennifer enrolled and Todd Cheng Jim East Martina Bill Rachel Chibidakis Timothy Edge Benjamin Black Denise Chilow Lisa Edwards Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up 81% of clients whoJim completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs Black Kate Christiaanse Jamie Edyvean Marc Claire Cichy Lisa Ehrlich Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area Over 1,500 full-time jobBlakeman placements were made nationally in 2011 Jason Blatter Paul Cifka Allison and Jesse Eisenhardt Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs Hannah Blitzer Christopher Clark Erik Elder Mara Blitzer John Clauss Jamison Ely Currently identifying needs and resources 0% default rate since 2007 Merav Bloch Lance Clemons Evan Epstein After building flooded, secured HP compter donation 69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school Zachary Blume John Clifford Susan Epstein Assisted with development manager search and hire Thomas Boardman Job Training and Placement Abbie Coffee Ryan Erickson Placed 76% of clients who completed program into jobs Emily Bobel Carrie Coffee Maria Esteve Referred expert on minimizing client aggression Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour Jennifer Boffi Andy Cohen Laurie Fabiano and Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services Joe Della Fave Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area Jenny and Travis Bogard David Cohen Julie Bohannon Mike Cohen Mathea Falco and Peter Tarnoff Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs Christine Bohle Travis Cohen Kanin Falk Helped develop corporate engagement strategy 78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements Maria Falls Danny Bowman Stacy Colby-King Deborah Boyer Deborah Colitti Luke Farley Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30% Jeri Bracey Lisa Congdon Liz and Mark Farrell Provided executive coaching during leadership transition Increased averageSam income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557 Brasch Mimi Connery Susan and Leland Faust Jon Brelig Eloise and Ryan Connolly Lea and Carl Feinstein Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school Sean Bricmont Greg Consiglio Lauren Fennema Cortney Bro Blake Conway Emily Arnold Fernandez Heather and secured Anthonypermanent Brookfieldhousing; Anne608 Cook and Jeremy Rob Fetherstonhaugh Funded relocation and remodel of family shelter 287 Connecting Point families avoided homelessness Claire Browder Solterbeck Camilla and Matthew Field Placed expert from finance industry on board 90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing Edward Brown Margaret Cooley Nancy Field and Kyle Anderson Tyler Brown Fernando Corredor Tyler Fields Invested in creation of client database 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free Wendy-Lynn Brown Rose Costello Stephen Finno Advised on business plan in preparation for merger Provided homelessMatthew families and individuals over 32,400Pamela shelter-nights Brumberg Covington Jane Fischberg Ryan Brumberghousing program secured Maryann and Bill Coyne Arthur B. Fisher Advocated for 24 new units of housing 89% of youth exiting transitional stable housing Brigitte Brunner Rebecca Gwynne Craig Andrea Fitanides 81% of families moved to stable with 65% nationally Heather Brycelong-term housing as compared Robert Crea Jennifer Flannery Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff Lynn B. Bunim Valerie Crocitto Matt Fluke Paula and Ted Burke Robert Cromwell FMC Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site Provided 866 children withBurnett 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive Carolyn Elizabeth Curtis support services Kimberly Ford Burns & Associates Cate Czerwinski and Aaron Best Joshua Forman Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients Enies Burton Jan D’Alessandro Jennifer Forster Provided funding, planning, legal and real estate expertise Coming soon Elizabeth Button Jill D’Alessandro Chris Fortescue Lee Bycel Christie Dang Erica and Greg Fortescue Participated on Strategic Planning Committee 75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes Brian Byers Alexandra Daniels Jeffrey Fraenkel and Alan Mark Funded data entry training for patient services and billing Served 2,140 dental patients in first year Joseph Caccamo Angela and Daniel D’Arcy Courtney Frager Funded creation of performance evaluation framework Art Caisse program reported 45% decrease Amy and Scott Darling Jean Francese Mothers in Positive Parenting in depression Justin Caldbeck Justin Davidson Jeremy Frank Currently identifying needs and resources 70% of juvenile offenders who completed ACT program were off probation six months later Roderic Cambell Alisa Davis Bryce Fraser

 EAST  EAST BAY   BAY  

 SAN  san FRANCISCO  francisco 

Dave Hauser Jacqueline Hawk Daniel Hayes Hollie Haynes Caroline Hayward and Robin Brinckerhoff Carel Hearon Danielle Hedden Erin Hedley Laura Henry Mary and William Henson Brooks Hering Jonathan Hering Jennifer Herman Pamela Herzig John Hession Bree Heyne Eden Hildebrand Richard Hoblock Parker Hobson Jason Hoffman Sarah Hoffman Kursten Hogard Kelly Hohla and Scott Standridge Tawny Holguin Stephanie Holm Hamilton Holt Simon Hong Catherine Hopkins Nathaniel Houghteling Todd Hovey Janet Howell Anthony Hsieh Shih-Wen Hsu Elaine Hudson Paul Huelskamp Jenna Liddell Hunt and Bryan Hunt Mara and Matt Hunt Matt Hunter Fran and Don Huston Jared Hyatt Morgan Irving Seth Israel Kate Israels Isthmus Industries Katherine and David Jamieson Bixby Jamison Bobby Jaros Sujay Jaswa Jay Jeffers and Michael Purdy Jennifer Jerde Zem and James Joaquin Carin Johnson Don Johnson Mary and Brent Johnson Michael Johnson Bill Johnston Tobias Jordan Shashank Joshi Charu Juneja Lindsay and Jeff Jurow Dustin Kahler

Total Ian Kalman Clients Nancy Kamerer Served Abiah Folger Karthauser and Colin Karthauser 3,460 Anna Keaney Brendan Keenan 486 Jennifer Kelly 731 Kate Kelly Jenny Kempenich 300 Aaron Kennedy 681 Tracy Keyser James Kim 307 David Kimmel Mary and Peter Klabunde 2,459 Suzanne McKechnie Klahr and412 Josh Klahr 1,751 Lauren Klapper Niko Klein 3,767 Anders Klemmer 46 Kimberley Klinedinst Elizabeth Knopf Laura Kreitler 160 Eric Kroll Laura Kroneberger 89 Tim Kueht 6,084 Darren Kuiper Alexander Kvamme 266 Michael Lake 133 Gerard Lambert Heather Larkey 629 Jennifer Larsen 3,219 Alvin Lau 6,486 Carol and Herb Lau Molly Laub 392 Caitlin Law 2,250 J`aime Law Ethan Leavy and Matthew 267 Kernkraut 81 Courtney Lechner Libby Leffler 160 Lisette and Greg Lehman Sarah Lent Naomi and Rob Leonard 3,200 Patricia Leung 2,023 Madeline Levine and Lee Schwartz 3,522 Zdenka Levy 3,539 Andrew Lindsay Dana Linker and Rich Steele 4,130 Michelle and Bryan Lipa 6,517 Hilary and Drew Lipner Ling Woo Liu Xiang Liu 866 Kristofor Lofgren Boris Logvinskiy 3,634 Claudia Lombana 0 Julie Loza Tim Luceno Patsy and James Ludwig Genevieve Lydstone Adam Lynch Whitney Lynch Jonathon Lyn-Shue

$12M Thank you

 FUNDRAISING    Fundraising  

 COMMUNICATIONS    Communications  

 TECHNOLOGY    Technology  

 MENTAL  Mental HEALTH   Health  

 STRATEGY    Strategy  

 STAFFING    staffing  

 BOARD  board PLACEMENT   placement  

 EXPANSION    Expansion  

 GOAL  goal SETTING setting

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26 27 28 29 30

31 32 33

1,777 34

11,221

35

2,098

36

1,812

37

** Does Does not not include include $3.5M $3.5M allocated allocated for for fulfillment fulfillment of of previous previous Be Be aa Tipping Tipping Point Point packages. packages. ** Funded in ** Funded in 2010 2010 as as aa Tipping Tipping Point Point Initiative. Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which which doesn’t doesn’t always always coincide coincide with with grantee grantee fiscal fiscal year year and and reporting reporting periods. periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M $ 12.0M

 SOUTH  SOUTH BAY   BAY  

Fresh SF Jennifer Friedland Mali Friedman Eric Frothingham Nicolas Fuentes Ane and Chris Gardner Rita Garg Alicia Gavello Martin Gedalin Drue and Art Gensler Amanda Gerrie Elizabeth Gerstung Tim Getz Jesse Gillette Suzanne and Robert Gilley Leslie Gillman Alexis Ginas Pamela and Paul Ginocchio Sebastian Gladney Leslie Glaser and Ben Kjome Dave Glazer David Goldblatt Anthony Goldbloom Alisa Golson Seth Gondek Joanna Gonsalves Melinda Gonzalez Emilie Gordo Adam Gothelf Charles Gough Christell Grace Mercedes Grandin Granite Chief Philanthropic Fund Lindsey Gravelle Joan Graves Katharine and David Greenbaum Alison and Jerry Greenberg Haley and Craig Grevelding Daniela Greville John Griffin Brian Gulotta Kristin Hagan Annie Hagbom Rosalind Hain Nassim Hakim Marissa Halbrecht Katie Hall and Tom Knutsen Nicola Hall and Stephens Moody Colby Hallen Doris and Claude Ham Marcie Hamilton Andre Hamrah Lindsay and Hunt Hanover Susan Rickard Hansen Timothy Harmon Christine and Chris Haroun Jennifer Harris Jordan Harris Louis Harrison Elizabeth Hart Kim Hart Laura and Colin Harter Andrew Hartman

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education ++ youth youth education

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25

housing housing

26 27 28 29 30

31

family wellness wellness family

32 33 34 35 36 37

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000 $ 0.8M $ 250,000 2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000 $ 2.6M $ 225,000 2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000 $ 1.0M $ 270,000 2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000 $ 23.7M $ 500,000 2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000 $ 0.4M $ 60,000 2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000 $ 3.0M $ 300,000 2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000 $ 22.4M $ 300,000 2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000 $ 0.2M $ 100,000 2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000 $ 4.8M $ 100,000 2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000 $ 4.3M $ 225,000 2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000 $ 1.2M $ 75,000 2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000 $ 13.9M $ 300,000 2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000 $ 1.7M $ 200,000 2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000 $ 2.4M $ 150,000 2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000 $ 8.4M $ 100,000 2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000 $ 0.8M $ 125,000 2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000 $ 0.9M $ 125,000 2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000 $ 7.7M $ 200,000 2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000 $ 10.9M $ 300,000 2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000 $ 5.1M $ 250,000 2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000 $ 9.0M $ 300,000 2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000 $ 14.6M $ 125,000 2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000 $ 0.8M $ 150,000 2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000 $ 1.9M $ 100,000 2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000 $ 13.1M $ 175,000 2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

Total  NORTH  north BAY   bAY  

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M $ 0.8M

Key Metrics

Management Ted Barbeau Sharon Campbell Rafael C. Davis Tipping Point Value Add Assistance Rabbi Michael Barenbaum Amy Candido Abby and Ross Davisson (atInvestors no cost Chris Barideaux Kristin Carbray DBL to donors) Nicole and Michael Barker Jamie Carlson Alan Deal and Kevin Grawey Preserved 11 student-support staff positions 100% of graduatesKatherine accepted Barnard into a four-year college Christianne Carney Amy Deck The Barry Family Casey Carr James Deitrich Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks Jennifer and Nick Bartle James Carriere Kevin Delaney Supported launch of East Oakland site 80% of students are first in family to pursue post-secondary education Vicki and Edward Bass Effie Casella Stefanie Demong Neill Bassi Dylan Casey Jennifer and Mario DiPrisco Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma 80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students Kelly Bathgate Jenny Casey Raquel DiSabatino In San Mateo County, 100% of eligible seniors graduatedAimee or earned GED Caryn Baudoux Caton Molly Hanks DoyleSuccessfully nominated for national capacity-building grant Global Management Payal and Chadha rate Emily Dreblow Assisted with director of development hire Despite very poor Bayshore prior school attendance, students maintain 82%Harpreet average attendance Meg Beaudet Jessie Chamberlin Jonaca and William Driscoll Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning 75% of KIPP King Darren Collegiate seniors passed an AP examSarah versusChandler 21% of seniors Bechtel and in California Katie Duffy Emilyearned Beck certification Matt Theobald Matt Duffy Helped develop and implement new client database 75% of GED test takers Kristen Beck Annabel Chang Patsy Dugger and Isaac Newton 87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per and month Robert J. Begley Hyun Kun Soon Jung Chang Meredith Dunn Helped develop first Bay Area donor event Reed Bement Celena Chen Morgan and Bryan Successfully Duquette testified in Sacramento for SF charter 85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students Annie Berry Ivy Chen Kathryn Duryea Funded full-time career planning position 90% retention of students inBielawski fall of 2010 versusCece 75% university-wide Jennifer enrolled and Todd Cheng Jim East Martina Bill Rachel Chibidakis Timothy Edge Benjamin Black Denise Chilow Lisa Edwards Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up 81% of clients whoJim completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs Black Kate Christiaanse Jamie Edyvean Marc Claire Cichy Lisa Ehrlich Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area Over 1,500 full-time jobBlakeman placements were made nationally in 2011 Jason Blatter Paul Cifka Allison and Jesse Eisenhardt Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed into permanent jobs Hannah Blitzer Christopher Clark Erik Elder Mara Blitzer John Clauss Jamison Ely Currently identifying needs and resources 0% default rate since 2007 Merav Bloch Lance Clemons Evan Epstein After building flooded, secured HP compter donation 69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school Zachary Blume John Clifford Susan Epstein Assisted with development manager search and hire Thomas Boardman Job Training and Placement Abbie Coffee Ryan Erickson Placed 76% of clients who completed program into jobs Emily Bobel Carrie Coffee Maria Esteve Referred expert on minimizing client aggression Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour Jennifer Boffi Andy Cohen Laurie Fabiano and Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, tax refunds and other services Joe Della Fave Provided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area Jenny and Travis Bogard David Cohen Julie Bohannon Mike Cohen Mathea Falco and Peter Tarnoff Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs Christine Bohle Travis Cohen Kanin Falk Helped develop corporate engagement strategy 78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements Maria Falls Danny Bowman Stacy Colby-King Deborah Boyer Deborah Colitti Luke Farley Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30% Jeri Bracey Lisa Congdon Liz and Mark Farrell Provided executive coaching during leadership transition Increased averageSam income by over 100%, from $9,844 before employment to $20,557 Brasch Mimi Connery Susan and Leland Faust Jon Brelig Eloise and Ryan Connolly Lea and Carl Feinstein Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school Sean Bricmont Greg Consiglio Lauren Fennema Cortney Bro Blake Conway Emily Arnold Fernandez Heather and secured Anthonypermanent Brookfieldhousing; Anne608 Cook and Jeremy Rob Fetherstonhaugh Funded relocation and remodel of family shelter 287 Connecting Point families avoided homelessness Claire Browder Solterbeck Camilla and Matthew Field Placed expert from finance industry on board 90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing Edward Brown Margaret Cooley Nancy Field and Kyle Anderson Tyler Brown Fernando Corredor Tyler Fields Invested in creation of client database 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free Wendy-Lynn Brown Rose Costello Stephen Finno Advised on business plan in preparation for merger Provided homelessMatthew families and individuals over 32,400Pamela shelter-nights Brumberg Covington Jane Fischberg Ryan Brumberghousing program secured Maryann and Bill Coyne Arthur B. Fisher Advocated for 24 new units of housing 89% of youth exiting transitional stable housing Brigitte Brunner Rebecca Gwynne Craig Andrea Fitanides 81% of families moved to stable with 65% nationally Heather Brycelong-term housing as compared Robert Crea Jennifer Flannery Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff Lynn B. Bunim Valerie Crocitto Matt Fluke Paula and Ted Burke Robert Cromwell FMC Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site Provided 866 children withBurnett 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive Carolyn Elizabeth Curtis support services Kimberly Ford Burns & Associates Cate Czerwinski and Aaron Best Joshua Forman Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients Enies Burton Jan D’Alessandro Jennifer Forster Provided funding, planning, legal and real estate expertise Coming soon Elizabeth Button Jill D’Alessandro Chris Fortescue Lee Bycel Christie Dang Erica and Greg Fortescue Participated on Strategic Planning Committee 75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes Brian Byers Alexandra Daniels Jeffrey Fraenkel and Alan Mark Funded data entry training for patient services and billing Served 2,140 dental patients in first year Joseph Caccamo Angela and Daniel D’Arcy Courtney Frager Funded creation of performance evaluation framework Art Caisse program reported 45% decrease Amy and Scott Darling Jean Francese Mothers in Positive Parenting in depression Justin Caldbeck Justin Davidson Jeremy Frank Currently identifying needs and resources 70% of juvenile offenders who completed ACT program were off probation six months later Roderic Cambell Alisa Davis Bryce Fraser

 EAST  EAST BAY   BAY  

 SAN  san FRANCISCO  francisco 

Dave Hauser Jacqueline Hawk Daniel Hayes Hollie Haynes Caroline Hayward and Robin Brinckerhoff Carel Hearon Danielle Hedden Erin Hedley Laura Henry Mary and William Henson Brooks Hering Jonathan Hering Jennifer Herman Pamela Herzig John Hession Bree Heyne Eden Hildebrand Richard Hoblock Parker Hobson Jason Hoffman Sarah Hoffman Kursten Hogard Kelly Hohla and Scott Standridge Tawny Holguin Stephanie Holm Hamilton Holt Simon Hong Catherine Hopkins Nathaniel Houghteling Todd Hovey Janet Howell Anthony Hsieh Shih-Wen Hsu Elaine Hudson Paul Huelskamp Jenna Liddell Hunt and Bryan Hunt Mara and Matt Hunt Matt Hunter Fran and Don Huston Jared Hyatt Morgan Irving Seth Israel Kate Israels Isthmus Industries Katherine and David Jamieson Bixby Jamison Bobby Jaros Sujay Jaswa Jay Jeffers and Michael Purdy Jennifer Jerde Zem and James Joaquin Carin Johnson Don Johnson Mary and Brent Johnson Michael Johnson Bill Johnston Tobias Jordan Shashank Joshi Charu Juneja Lindsay and Jeff Jurow Dustin Kahler

Total Ian Kalman Clients Nancy Kamerer Served Abiah Folger Karthauser and Colin Karthauser 3,460 Anna Keaney Brendan Keenan 486 Jennifer Kelly 731 Kate Kelly Jenny Kempenich 300 Aaron Kennedy 681 Tracy Keyser James Kim 307 David Kimmel Mary and Peter Klabunde 2,459 Suzanne McKechnie Klahr and412 Josh Klahr 1,751 Lauren Klapper Niko Klein 3,767 Anders Klemmer 46 Kimberley Klinedinst Elizabeth Knopf Laura Kreitler 160 Eric Kroll Laura Kroneberger 89 Tim Kueht 6,084 Darren Kuiper Alexander Kvamme 266 Michael Lake 133 Gerard Lambert Heather Larkey 629 Jennifer Larsen 3,219 Alvin Lau 6,486 Carol and Herb Lau Molly Laub 392 Caitlin Law 2,250 J`aime Law Ethan Leavy and Matthew 267 Kernkraut 81 Courtney Lechner Libby Leffler 160 Lisette and Greg Lehman Sarah Lent Naomi and Rob Leonard 3,200 Patricia Leung 2,023 Madeline Levine and Lee Schwartz 3,522 Zdenka Levy 3,539 Andrew Lindsay Dana Linker and Rich Steele 4,130 Michelle and Bryan Lipa 6,517 Hilary and Drew Lipner Ling Woo Liu Xiang Liu 866 Kristofor Lofgren Boris Logvinskiy 3,634 Claudia Lombana 0 Julie Loza Tim Luceno Patsy and James Ludwig Genevieve Lydstone Adam Lynch Whitney Lynch Jonathon Lyn-Shue

$12M Thank you

 FUNDRAISING    Fundraising  

 COMMUNICATIONS    Communications  

 TECHNOLOGY    Technology  

 MENTAL  Mental HEALTH   Health  

 STRATEGY    Strategy  

 STAFFING    staffing  

 BOARD  board PLACEMENT   placement  

 EXPANSION    Expansion  

 GOAL  goal SETTING setting

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26 27 28 29 30

31 32 33

1,777 34

11,221

35

2,098

36

1,812

37

** Does Does not not include include $3.5M $3.5M allocated allocated for for fulfillment fulfillment of of previous previous Be Be aa Tipping Tipping Point Point packages. packages. ** Funded in ** Funded in 2010 2010 as as aa Tipping Tipping Point Point Initiative. Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which which doesn’t doesn’t always always coincide coincide with with grantee grantee fiscal fiscal year year and and reporting reporting periods. periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M $ 12.0M

 SOUTH  SOUTH BAY   BAY  

Fresh SF Jennifer Friedland Mali Friedman Eric Frothingham Nicolas Fuentes Ane and Chris Gardner Rita Garg Alicia Gavello Martin Gedalin Drue and Art Gensler Amanda Gerrie Elizabeth Gerstung Tim Getz Jesse Gillette Suzanne and Robert Gilley Leslie Gillman Alexis Ginas Pamela and Paul Ginocchio Sebastian Gladney Leslie Glaser and Ben Kjome Dave Glazer David Goldblatt Anthony Goldbloom Alisa Golson Seth Gondek Joanna Gonsalves Melinda Gonzalez Emilie Gordo Adam Gothelf Charles Gough Christell Grace Mercedes Grandin Granite Chief Philanthropic Fund Lindsey Gravelle Joan Graves Katharine and David Greenbaum Alison and Jerry Greenberg Haley and Craig Grevelding Daniela Greville John Griffin Brian Gulotta Kristin Hagan Annie Hagbom Rosalind Hain Nassim Hakim Marissa Halbrecht Katie Hall and Tom Knutsen Nicola Hall and Stephens Moody Colby Hallen Doris and Claude Ham Marcie Hamilton Andre Hamrah Lindsay and Hunt Hanover Susan Rickard Hansen Timothy Harmon Christine and Chris Haroun Jennifer Harris Jordan Harris Louis Harrison Elizabeth Hart Kim Hart Laura and Colin Harter Andrew Hartman

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education ++ youth youth education

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25

housing housing

26 27 28 29 30

31

family wellness wellness family

32 33 34 35 36 37

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000 $ 0.8M $ 250,000 2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000 $ 2.6M $ 225,000 2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000 $ 1.0M $ 270,000 2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000 $ 23.7M $ 500,000 2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000 $ 0.4M $ 60,000 2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000 $ 3.0M $ 300,000 2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000 $ 22.4M $ 300,000 2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000 $ 0.2M $ 100,000 2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000 $ 4.8M $ 100,000 2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000 $ 4.3M $ 225,000 2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000 $ 1.2M $ 75,000 2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000 $ 13.9M $ 300,000 2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000 $ 1.7M $ 200,000 2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000 $ 2.4M $ 150,000 2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000 $ 8.4M $ 100,000 2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000 $ 0.8M $ 125,000 2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000 $ 0.9M $ 125,000 2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000 $ 7.7M $ 200,000 2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000 $ 10.9M $ 300,000 2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000 $ 5.1M $ 250,000 2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000 $ 9.0M $ 300,000 2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000 $ 14.6M $ 125,000 2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000 $ 0.8M $ 150,000 2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000 $ 1.9M $ 100,000 2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000 $ 13.1M $ 175,000 2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

Total  NORTH  north BAY   bAY  

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M $ 0.8M

Key Metrics

Management Tipping Point Value Add Stephanie Lyras Dana Murray Nancy Prowitt Assistance Candice Macario Kiel Murray Kevin Puil (at no Purdy cost Emily MacDonald Seth Murray Thomas to donors) Alex Mack Christina and Rene Nam-Hee Anne and Steve Puricelli Preserved 11 student-support staff positions 100% of graduatesCaryn accepted into a four-year college Macri Elizabeth Narde Robert Purvis Kevin Mahaffey Danielle Nash Cara Quibell Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks Susan and Jay Mall Rich Nepomuceno Kim Qvale Supported launch of East Oakland site 80% of students are first in family to pursue post-secondary education Jules Maltz Ellen and Walter Newman Gary Rabkin Brittany Maly Jeffrey Niblack Danny Raja Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma 80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students Craig Mangan Liz Nichols Priya and Ashok Raju Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant In San Mateo County, 100% ofand eligible seniors or earned GED Lisa Manter Rohan TalipgraduatedClarissa Nicosia Chris Rathbun and Haig Mardikian Alexandra Read with director of development hire Despite very poor Connie prior school attendance, students maintain 82% Niederauer average attendance rate Tatem and MorganAssisted Hillary Marino Fiffi Nilsson Bret Recor Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning 75% of KIPP King Emily Collegiate seniors passed an AP examNomura versus 21% of seniors in California Nick Reggars and Christopher Marlowe Securities Michael Martello Lauren and Matt Nussbaum Brian Reilly Helped develop and implement new client database 75% of GED test takers earned certification David Martin Kasey O’Connell Gwenn Ellyn Rein Helped develop first Bay Area donor event 87% of students gained 1.3Martins months of proficiency, on average, month Jennifer Erin andper John O’Hara Amy Reinhorn Kris Marubio Sarah Ohle Jeannette Revel-Mauro and testified in Sacramento for SF charter Successfully 85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students Pedro Mascaro Gina and Chris Olsen Tancredi Mauro 90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versusAlan 75% Omand university-wide Scott Matagrano Joshua Reynolds Funded full-time career planning position Chris Matute Amy and Cory Omand Teresa and Timothy Reynolds Philip Mauritz Taryn O’Neill Anna Richardson Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up 81% of clients whoSola completed into jobs Maya training in 2011 were placed Alexandra Ordowskij Bradford Richardson Joshjob McAdam Scott Heather Richardson Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area Over 1,500 full-time placements were made nationally in Orn 2011 Jason McBriarty Susan Orosz Mike Righetti Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed Sarah McBride Cheryl Orr into permanent jobs Arielle Ring John McDermott Molly Osborn and Julie Ritchey Currently identifying needs and resources 0% default rate since 2007 Colleen McGee and Dan Brown RC Hildebrand Richard Ritzel After building flooded, secured HP compter donation 69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school Kelly McGonigle Eliza Osborne Cameron and David Rivinus Megan Kate O’Sullivan andinto Kurtjobs Bauer Assisted with development manager search and hire Ghufran Rizvi Placed 76% of clients whoMcKinley completed Job Training and Placement program Taylor McKinley Mary Jane Otto Shannon Rodelander Referred expert on minimizing client aggression Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour Adelaide McKinney Jamie Ousman Nyla Rodgers Caitlin McMahon Maryly tax Ousman Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, refunds and other services Liz and Bill RodoniProvided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area Betsy McMullin Holly and Steve Overman Dana Ross Rogers and Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs Moses Mederos Marc Paletta Todd Rogers 78% of veterans who completed retention at job placements Katherine Rogers Helped develop corporate engagement strategy Amitt Mehgzertraining achieved six months' Blair Palmer Jeff Menashe Allison Pardee Leigh Rogers Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30% Janey Michaelsen Paymon Parsia Kristy and Zack Rogers Increased averageThespina income byMichelakis over 100%, from $9,844 before Joanneemployment Pasternack to $20,557 Jonathan Roman Provided executive coaching during leadership transition James Michels Kata Patton Marilyn and Lee Rosenbaum Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school Microsoft Matching Gifts Anh Payton Aliisa Rosenthal Program Regina Perham Kristen Rosseau Chrisfamilies Milam secured permanent housing; James Perkins Amy Rothstein Funded relocation and remodel of family shelter 287 Connecting Point 608 avoided homelessness Denitsa Milanova Sonja Perkins Joanie and Jesse Rothstein Placed expert from finance industry on board 90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing Matthew Miller Mark Perutz Oliver Roup Philip Miller Christy and Jon Peterson Shannon Rovnak Invested in creation of client database 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free Seth Miller Tom Pickard Beth and Jonathan Rutchik Advised on business plan in preparation for merger Provided homelessTracie families over 32,400Steve shelter-nights andand Jayindividuals Miller Pickering Holly and Marc Ruxin Sandy and Halhousing Miller-Jacobs Heather Heidi Ryan and Mike Araiza for 24 new units of housing Advocated 89% of youth exiting transitional program secured stable Piper housing Katherine Mindel and Christina Pitts Kerianne Ryan Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff 81% of families moved to stable with Tripp Jones long-term housing as compared Karen and Jon65% Pittsnationally Pat Ryan Kris Miszler Melissa Pitts Susan Sack Ann Mitchell Teresa and Michael Pitts Praful Saklani Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive Kerrin Mitchell Joshua Piuma support services Salesforce.com Foundation Brett Mock Mary and Bill Poland Theresa Sandholdt Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients Sarah Montoya Ann Poletti Jocelyn and David Sandler Provided funding, planning, legal and real estate expertise Coming soon Gordon and Betty Moore Robert Pollak Deborah Santana Foundation Maria E. Porras Rahmin Sarabi Participated on Strategic Planning Committee 75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes Karina Moreno and Becky Porter The Sargeant Family Funded data entry training for patient services and billing Served 2,140 dentalJoel patients in first year Gonzales Carolyn Press Jan and David Sargent Kate and Ames Morison Vanessa Prieto Michael Saunders Funded creation of performance evaluation framework Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in Merino depression Alexandra Moser Rodman Primack Jordan Savage Currently identifying needs and resources 70% of juvenile offenders who completed ACT program were off probation six months later Michael Mullally Josh Proctor Joseph Scanlon Jennifer Munak Zach Prowda Nicole Scarborough

 EAST  EAST BAY   BAY  

 SAN  san FRANCISCO  francisco 

Drew Taylor Idan Tepman Nadine and Alex Terman Barbara Terrell Laura and Blake Thibault Margaret Thompson Susan and Paul Tierney Allison Tom Carol Toppel Andrew Torre Charlotte and Doug Tracy Becky Trinh Becca Truitt Cindy and Rob Truitt Catherine Tunney and Gavin McDowell Ken Turner Virginia and Greg Tusher Tuesday Uhland Julia Umnov Rebecca and Mark Unter Scott Uyeda Jared Vandercook Pete Van Dorn Tom Van Dyck Carl Van Haren Victoria van Roijen Emilie Vasu Jehan Velji and Eric Cicourel Sara and Conrado Vellve Sierra Versaggi Julia Violich John Vipiana Lana Volftsun Michael Vollmer Cady Vortmann Tedi Vriheas Chip and Courtney Wadsworth Mandy Walis Mallary and Jonathan Walker Brendan Wallace Bret Wallace Jan Warnock Patricia Wassman-Law Betty Weaver Genevieve Weber Jesse Wedler Jocelyn Weiler Anna Weinberg Elana and Daniel Weinberg Eduardo Weinstein Lauren Weinstein Marianna Weis Michael Weisenberger Palmer Weiss Interior Design Abby and Mike Welch Jeremy Wenner Christi Wharton Amy Whiteside and Arthur Haubenstock William Wick Janet Wilks Wendy Willbanks Jaclyn Williams

Total Jasper Williams Clients Sandra Williams Served Avondina Wills Kurt Wilms 3,460 William Winkelstein Franklin Winokur 486 Marc Wolfe 731 Katherine Woo Kevin Wright 300 Jennifer Wu 681 Thu Zar Wynn Kate and Josh Wyss 307 Grace Yang 2,459 Clinton Yara Frank Yellin and Mark Showalter412 Rebecca Youngs 1,751 Megan Zapala David Zierler 3,767 Dan Zoll 46 In Honor or Memory Bianca and Jamie Alexander 160 Mary and Mark Anson Connor Ashenbrucker 89 Zach Baer 6,084 Tonia and Jim Baker Temy Barbach* 266 The Barber Family 133 Bay Grove Capital 629 Aaron Bell* Jeanne and Dan Benatar 3,219 Alexandra and David Bizer 6,486 The Bloomers Staff Maura and Brook Bowman 392 Daphne Boyle and Gary Sitzman 2,250 Julia and Peter Bromka Carter Graydon Brookfield 267 Jenn Brown The California Orchards Staff 81 Bridget Cannata 160 Catherine Cannata and Jim Murphy Teressa Cannata 3,200 Tim Carter 2,023 Angie Chan Chelsea and Mike Cherin 3,522 Virginia Cole 3,539 Suzanne and J.T. Crandall The Dana Family 4,130 Edward and Candy DeBartolo Nikki DeBartolo and Chad 6,517 Chronister Ruth K. Debs 866 Tessa DeFranco Rachel Drobot 3,634 Betsy and Roy Eisenhardt 0 The Evanschen Family Frank Farella 1,777 Ella Genevieve O’Neill Feeney 11,221 Finn Joseph O’Neill Feeney The Fiscus Family 2,098 The Sue Fisher King Staff 1,812 Judy Fishner* Lindsay and Matt Folk

** Does Does not not include include $3.5M $3.5M allocated allocated for for fulfillment fulfillment of of previous previous Be Be aa Tipping Tipping Point Point packages. packages. ** Funded in ** Funded in 2010 2010 as as aa Tipping Tipping Point Point Initiative. Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which which doesn’t doesn’t always always coincide coincide with with grantee grantee fiscal fiscal year year and and reporting reporting periods. periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M $ 12.0M

 SOUTH  SOUTH BAY   BAY  

Wendy and Henry Scarisbrick Maria Schell Anthony Schiller Paula and George Schlesinger Amy Schmerl David Schneider Amy and Harry Schoening Jennifer Schoolfield Aaron Schweifler Robert Scott Elizabeth Scully Ameilia Sechman Farnoosh Seifoddini Audrey Seybert Alexa Shankles Leo J. Shapiro and Associates Emily Shepard Justin Shreve Eric Silman Kristin Simcox Gail and Bud Simpson Shawn Simpson Kara Singleton Erin Sink Julie Skaff Narda and Andy Skov Ashley Smith Gay and Archibald Smith Suzanne Smith Roger Snyder Allison and Dave Solomon Rachel Souki Christina Spaulding and George Berridge Nicolas Spicer Phil Spiegel William Spina Robert Spiro Paige Sprincin Jeff Squires Frances Stark Kathleen Stark Bridget Starkey Elenitsa Staykova Ethel and David Steinberger Julia Stenson Lane Stephens Beth and Brian Stetter Elizabeth Stevens Elizabeth and James Steyer Megan Storey The Stout Family Kelly and Scott Stratman Kirsten Strobel William Studebaker Jill Sturm Philippe Suchet Laura Sullivan Beth and Stephen Sutro Mimi and Steve Swank Matt Swanston Michelle Tandler Lies Tarpley Katherine Tassi

$12M Thank you

 FUNDRAISING    Fundraising  

 COMMUNICATIONS    Communications  

 TECHNOLOGY    Technology  

 MENTAL  Mental HEALTH   Health  

 STRATEGY    Strategy  

 STAFFING    staffing  

 BOARD  board PLACEMENT   placement  

 EXPANSION    Expansion  

 GOAL  goal SETTING setting

78,937

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26 27 28 29 30

31 32 33 34 35 36 37


Grantee Organization

1 2

education ++ youth youth education

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25

housing housing

26 27 28 29 30

31

family wellness wellness family

32 33 34 35 36 37

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000 $ 0.8M $ 250,000 2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000 $ 2.6M $ 225,000 2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000 $ 1.0M $ 270,000 2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000 $ 23.7M $ 500,000 2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000 $ 0.4M $ 60,000 2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000 $ 3.0M $ 300,000 2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000 $ 22.4M $ 300,000 2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000 $ 0.2M $ 100,000 2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000 $ 4.8M $ 100,000 2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000 $ 4.3M $ 225,000 2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000 $ 1.2M $ 75,000 2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000 $ 13.9M $ 300,000 2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000 $ 1.7M $ 200,000 2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000 $ 2.4M $ 150,000 2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000 $ 8.4M $ 100,000 2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000 $ 0.8M $ 125,000 2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000 $ 0.9M $ 125,000 2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000 $ 7.7M $ 200,000 2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000 $ 10.9M $ 300,000 2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000 $ 5.1M $ 250,000 2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000 $ 9.0M $ 300,000 2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000 $ 14.6M $ 125,000 2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000 $ 0.8M $ 150,000 2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000 $ 1.9M $ 100,000 2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000 $ 13.1M $ 175,000 2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

Total  NORTH  north BAY   bAY  

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M $ 0.8M

Key Metrics

Management Tipping Point Value Add Stephanie Lyras Dana Murray Nancy Prowitt Assistance Candice Macario Kiel Murray Kevin Puil (at no Purdy cost Emily MacDonald Seth Murray Thomas to donors) Alex Mack Christina and Rene Nam-Hee Anne and Steve Puricelli Preserved 11 student-support staff positions 100% of graduatesCaryn accepted into a four-year college Macri Elizabeth Narde Robert Purvis Kevin Mahaffey Danielle Nash Cara Quibell Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks Susan and Jay Mall Rich Nepomuceno Kim Qvale Supported launch of East Oakland site 80% of students are first in family to pursue post-secondary education Jules Maltz Ellen and Walter Newman Gary Rabkin Brittany Maly Jeffrey Niblack Danny Raja Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma 80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students Craig Mangan Liz Nichols Priya and Ashok Raju Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant In San Mateo County, 100% ofand eligible seniors or earned GED Lisa Manter Rohan TalipgraduatedClarissa Nicosia Chris Rathbun and Haig Mardikian Alexandra Read with director of development hire Despite very poor Connie prior school attendance, students maintain 82% Niederauer average attendance rate Tatem and MorganAssisted Hillary Marino Fiffi Nilsson Bret Recor Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning 75% of KIPP King Emily Collegiate seniors passed an AP examNomura versus 21% of seniors in California Nick Reggars and Christopher Marlowe Securities Michael Martello Lauren and Matt Nussbaum Brian Reilly Helped develop and implement new client database 75% of GED test takers earned certification David Martin Kasey O’Connell Gwenn Ellyn Rein Helped develop first Bay Area donor event 87% of students gained 1.3Martins months of proficiency, on average, month Jennifer Erin andper John O’Hara Amy Reinhorn Kris Marubio Sarah Ohle Jeannette Revel-Mauro and testified in Sacramento for SF charter Successfully 85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students Pedro Mascaro Gina and Chris Olsen Tancredi Mauro 90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versusAlan 75% Omand university-wide Scott Matagrano Joshua Reynolds Funded full-time career planning position Chris Matute Amy and Cory Omand Teresa and Timothy Reynolds Philip Mauritz Taryn O’Neill Anna Richardson Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up 81% of clients whoSola completed into jobs Maya training in 2011 were placed Alexandra Ordowskij Bradford Richardson Joshjob McAdam Scott Heather Richardson Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area Over 1,500 full-time placements were made nationally in Orn 2011 Jason McBriarty Susan Orosz Mike Righetti Provided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff Of the 88% of clients who completed coursework, 76% were placed Sarah McBride Cheryl Orr into permanent jobs Arielle Ring John McDermott Molly Osborn and Julie Ritchey Currently identifying needs and resources 0% default rate since 2007 Colleen McGee and Dan Brown RC Hildebrand Richard Ritzel After building flooded, secured HP compter donation 69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school Kelly McGonigle Eliza Osborne Cameron and David Rivinus Megan Kate O’Sullivan andinto Kurtjobs Bauer Assisted with development manager search and hire Ghufran Rizvi Placed 76% of clients whoMcKinley completed Job Training and Placement program Taylor McKinley Mary Jane Otto Shannon Rodelander Referred expert on minimizing client aggression Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour Adelaide McKinney Jamie Ousman Nyla Rodgers Caitlin McMahon Maryly tax Ousman Bay Area clients received nearly $18 million in public benefits, refunds and other services Liz and Bill RodoniProvided seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area Betsy McMullin Holly and Steve Overman Dana Ross Rogers and Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise Of 313 clients who completed training, 56% were placed into jobs Moses Mederos Marc Paletta Todd Rogers 78% of veterans who completed retention at job placements Katherine Rogers Helped develop corporate engagement strategy Amitt Mehgzertraining achieved six months' Blair Palmer Jeff Menashe Allison Pardee Leigh Rogers Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30% Janey Michaelsen Paymon Parsia Kristy and Zack Rogers Increased averageThespina income byMichelakis over 100%, from $9,844 before Joanneemployment Pasternack to $20,557 Jonathan Roman Provided executive coaching during leadership transition James Michels Kata Patton Marilyn and Lee Rosenbaum Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school Microsoft Matching Gifts Anh Payton Aliisa Rosenthal Program Regina Perham Kristen Rosseau Chrisfamilies Milam secured permanent housing; James Perkins Amy Rothstein Funded relocation and remodel of family shelter 287 Connecting Point 608 avoided homelessness Denitsa Milanova Sonja Perkins Joanie and Jesse Rothstein Placed expert from finance industry on board 90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing Matthew Miller Mark Perutz Oliver Roup Philip Miller Christy and Jon Peterson Shannon Rovnak Invested in creation of client database 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free Seth Miller Tom Pickard Beth and Jonathan Rutchik Advised on business plan in preparation for merger Provided homelessTracie families over 32,400Steve shelter-nights andand Jayindividuals Miller Pickering Holly and Marc Ruxin Sandy and Halhousing Miller-Jacobs Heather Heidi Ryan and Mike Araiza for 24 new units of housing Advocated 89% of youth exiting transitional program secured stable Piper housing Katherine Mindel and Christina Pitts Kerianne Ryan Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff 81% of families moved to stable with Tripp Jones long-term housing as compared Karen and Jon65% Pittsnationally Pat Ryan Kris Miszler Melissa Pitts Susan Sack Ann Mitchell Teresa and Michael Pitts Praful Saklani Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site Provided 866 children with 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive Kerrin Mitchell Joshua Piuma support services Salesforce.com Foundation Brett Mock Mary and Bill Poland Theresa Sandholdt Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients Sarah Montoya Ann Poletti Jocelyn and David Sandler Provided funding, planning, legal and real estate expertise Coming soon Gordon and Betty Moore Robert Pollak Deborah Santana Foundation Maria E. Porras Rahmin Sarabi Participated on Strategic Planning Committee 75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes Karina Moreno and Becky Porter The Sargeant Family Funded data entry training for patient services and billing Served 2,140 dentalJoel patients in first year Gonzales Carolyn Press Jan and David Sargent Kate and Ames Morison Vanessa Prieto Michael Saunders Funded creation of performance evaluation framework Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease in Merino depression Alexandra Moser Rodman Primack Jordan Savage Currently identifying needs and resources 70% of juvenile offenders who completed ACT program were off probation six months later Michael Mullally Josh Proctor Joseph Scanlon Jennifer Munak Zach Prowda Nicole Scarborough

 EAST  EAST BAY   BAY  

 SAN  san FRANCISCO  francisco 

Drew Taylor Idan Tepman Nadine and Alex Terman Barbara Terrell Laura and Blake Thibault Margaret Thompson Susan and Paul Tierney Allison Tom Carol Toppel Andrew Torre Charlotte and Doug Tracy Becky Trinh Becca Truitt Cindy and Rob Truitt Catherine Tunney and Gavin McDowell Ken Turner Virginia and Greg Tusher Tuesday Uhland Julia Umnov Rebecca and Mark Unter Scott Uyeda Jared Vandercook Pete Van Dorn Tom Van Dyck Carl Van Haren Victoria van Roijen Emilie Vasu Jehan Velji and Eric Cicourel Sara and Conrado Vellve Sierra Versaggi Julia Violich John Vipiana Lana Volftsun Michael Vollmer Cady Vortmann Tedi Vriheas Chip and Courtney Wadsworth Mandy Walis Mallary and Jonathan Walker Brendan Wallace Bret Wallace Jan Warnock Patricia Wassman-Law Betty Weaver Genevieve Weber Jesse Wedler Jocelyn Weiler Anna Weinberg Elana and Daniel Weinberg Eduardo Weinstein Lauren Weinstein Marianna Weis Michael Weisenberger Palmer Weiss Interior Design Abby and Mike Welch Jeremy Wenner Christi Wharton Amy Whiteside and Arthur Haubenstock William Wick Janet Wilks Wendy Willbanks Jaclyn Williams

Total Jasper Williams Clients Sandra Williams Served Avondina Wills Kurt Wilms 3,460 William Winkelstein Franklin Winokur 486 Marc Wolfe 731 Katherine Woo Kevin Wright 300 Jennifer Wu 681 Thu Zar Wynn Kate and Josh Wyss 307 Grace Yang 2,459 Clinton Yara Frank Yellin and Mark Showalter412 Rebecca Youngs 1,751 Megan Zapala David Zierler 3,767 Dan Zoll 46 In Honor or Memory Bianca and Jamie Alexander 160 Mary and Mark Anson Connor Ashenbrucker 89 Zach Baer 6,084 Tonia and Jim Baker Temy Barbach* 266 The Barber Family 133 Bay Grove Capital 629 Aaron Bell* Jeanne and Dan Benatar 3,219 Alexandra and David Bizer 6,486 The Bloomers Staff Maura and Brook Bowman 392 Daphne Boyle and Gary Sitzman 2,250 Julia and Peter Bromka Carter Graydon Brookfield 267 Jenn Brown The California Orchards Staff 81 Bridget Cannata 160 Catherine Cannata and Jim Murphy Teressa Cannata 3,200 Tim Carter 2,023 Angie Chan Chelsea and Mike Cherin 3,522 Virginia Cole 3,539 Suzanne and J.T. Crandall The Dana Family 4,130 Edward and Candy DeBartolo Nikki DeBartolo and Chad 6,517 Chronister Ruth K. Debs 866 Tessa DeFranco Rachel Drobot 3,634 Betsy and Roy Eisenhardt 0 The Evanschen Family Frank Farella 1,777 Ella Genevieve O’Neill Feeney 11,221 Finn Joseph O’Neill Feeney The Fiscus Family 2,098 The Sue Fisher King Staff 1,812 Judy Fishner* Lindsay and Matt Folk

** Does Does not not include include $3.5M $3.5M allocated allocated for for fulfillment fulfillment of of previous previous Be Be aa Tipping Tipping Point Point packages. packages. ** Funded in ** Funded in 2010 2010 as as aa Tipping Tipping Point Point Initiative. Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which which doesn’t doesn’t always always coincide coincide with with grantee grantee fiscal fiscal year year and and reporting reporting periods. periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M $ 12.0M

 SOUTH  SOUTH BAY   BAY  

Wendy and Henry Scarisbrick Maria Schell Anthony Schiller Paula and George Schlesinger Amy Schmerl David Schneider Amy and Harry Schoening Jennifer Schoolfield Aaron Schweifler Robert Scott Elizabeth Scully Ameilia Sechman Farnoosh Seifoddini Audrey Seybert Alexa Shankles Leo J. Shapiro and Associates Emily Shepard Justin Shreve Eric Silman Kristin Simcox Gail and Bud Simpson Shawn Simpson Kara Singleton Erin Sink Julie Skaff Narda and Andy Skov Ashley Smith Gay and Archibald Smith Suzanne Smith Roger Snyder Allison and Dave Solomon Rachel Souki Christina Spaulding and George Berridge Nicolas Spicer Phil Spiegel William Spina Robert Spiro Paige Sprincin Jeff Squires Frances Stark Kathleen Stark Bridget Starkey Elenitsa Staykova Ethel and David Steinberger Julia Stenson Lane Stephens Beth and Brian Stetter Elizabeth Stevens Elizabeth and James Steyer Megan Storey The Stout Family Kelly and Scott Stratman Kirsten Strobel William Studebaker Jill Sturm Philippe Suchet Laura Sullivan Beth and Stephen Sutro Mimi and Steve Swank Matt Swanston Michelle Tandler Lies Tarpley Katherine Tassi

$12M Thank you

 FUNDRAISING    Fundraising  

 COMMUNICATIONS    Communications  

 TECHNOLOGY    Technology  

 MENTAL  Mental HEALTH   Health  

 STRATEGY    Strategy  

 STAFFING    staffing  

 BOARD  board PLACEMENT   placement  

 EXPANSION    Expansion  

 GOAL  goal SETTING setting

78,937

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26 27 28 29 30

31 32 33 34 35 36 37


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000 2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000 2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000 2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000 2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000 2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000 2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000 2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000 2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000 2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000 2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000 2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000 2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000 2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000 2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000 2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000 2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000 2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000 2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000 2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000 2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000 2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000 2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000 2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000 2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000 2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

Total  north bAY  

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

Staci and Jonathan Friesel Nicholas Stephens Kate Harbin Clammer Management Tipping Point Value Add The Ganter/Samuel Family Kjerstine Storey* Assistance Phaedra Ellis-Lamkins (at noJ.cost Roman Grace Roselyne Swig Michael Holston to donors) Crystal, Mieke and Jennifer, Swig Company Staff Chris James Grand-Jean Thomas Laffont Preserved 11 student-support staff positions 100% of graduates accepted intoCapital a four-year college Ingrid Tauber Management, Inc. Tipping Point Community Staff David Lamond Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks Charlotte and Jeff Grodinger Cindy and Rob Truitt Ronnie Lott Philip Melissa Wang and Daniel Lurie, CEO +Supported Founder launch of East Oakland site 80% of students are firstR. in Gustlin family toand pursue post-secondary education Evelyn Gustlin* Zoran Martinovic Katie Schwab Paige Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma 80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students Paige and Pat Healy Dody Westheimer Alec Perkins, Chair Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant Scott100% Heldfond In San Mateo County, of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED Katy Williams Gina Peterson Warren Hellman* Sheila and Mark Wolfson Eric Roberts Assisted with director of development hire Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate The Hinman Family Danielle and Jed York Jed York Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning 75% of KIPP King Moses Collegiate seniors passed an AP examChris versus 21% of seniors in California Gideon Yu M. Johnson Young Sara LaBoskey* Zelda Zeger* David Zierk Helped develop and implement new client database 75% of GED test takers earned certification Elizabeth and Thomas Laffont The Zink Family Helped develop first Bay Area donor event 87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month Kelsey and David Lamond * deceased Leadership Council J`aime Law Lesa Faulkner Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter 85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students Jackie Lonaker In-Kind David Glynn Funded full-time career planning position 90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus2600hz 75% university-wide Ronnie Lott Wyatt Gruber, Chair Lexy and Ari Lurie Abernathy MacGregor Arno Harris Taya Prowda Lurie Group, Inc. Matthew Kahn 81% of clients whoJanet completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs MacLeod and Paul Levine Armani Hosain Rahman Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up Johnjob G.placements Manter* were made nationally ArtainTequila, Dorian Stone Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area Over 1,500 full-time 2011 LLC Dmitry Margolin Bauer Of the 88% of clients completed into permanent jobs Thewho Martin Family coursework, 76% were Blue placed Angel Vodka Advisory CouncilProvided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff James Martini BuildingBlox Consulting Amy Arbreton, Ph.D. Currently identifying needs and resources 0% default rate since 2007 Marissa Mayer and Zack Bogue Burberry Priya Patil, Ph.D. After building flooded, secured HP compter donation 69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school Nader Meykadeh Burns & Associates Todd Rogers, Ph.D. Tiffany and Jeff Mills The CAC Group Jesse Rothstein, Ph.D. Assisted with development manager search and hire Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs Eleanor Mitsuye and Richard Cisco Systems Sharon Rowser, M.A. Referred expert on minimizing client aggression Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour Yukio Okamoto Francis Coppola Winery Sara Schwartz, Ph.D. Paulina nearly and Lance Crown tax Imports, LLC Ph.D. seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area Provided Bay Area clients received $18 Morrison million in public benefits, refunds and other services Amy Conley Wright, Dr. Ruth Hilson Pace Deloitte Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise Of 313 clients who completed training, into jobs Katie and Matt Paige 56% were placed Fenton Communications Staff List Papa Joe* fuseproject Helped develop corporate engagement strategy 78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements Meredith Ainsworth James B. Pattison* Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Nick Arevalo Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30% JaMel and Tom Perkins Grand Dynamics International Connor Ashenbrucker Alec100%, Perkinsfrom $9,844 before Hewlett-Packard Provided executive coaching during leadership transition Jamie Austin Increased averageSerena incomeand by over employment to $20,557 Tom Perlite Jawbone Kelly Bathgate Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school Gina and Stuart Peterson Kidder Mathews Margaret Cooley Kristina and George Phipps Korn/Ferry International Rebecca Cherin Stefanie Pisarczyk Latham & Watkins LLP Stefanie Demong Funded relocation and remodel of family shelter 287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing; 608 avoided homelessness Jen Pitts Marine Layer Renuka Kher Placed expert from finance industry on board 90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing Michael Pitts* McKinsey & Company, Inc. J`aime Law Becca Prowda and Daniel Lurie Meadowood Jackie Lonaker Invested in creation of client database 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free The Prowda Family NBBJ Daniel Lurie Advised on business plan in preparation for merger Provided homelessSally families and individuals over 32,400NetJets shelter-nights Prowitt Karina Moreno Aza Raskin Plant Construction Company Amy Omand Advocated for 24 new units of housing 89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing Andreas Rivera PlumpJack Jen Pitts Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff 81% of families moved to stable long-term housing as compared with 65% nationally Leanne Roberts* Rockstar Inc. Elena Chavez Quezada Victoria Robinson Shooting Star Blythe Smith Gert Rosner* SLO VIP Services Becca Truitt Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site Provided 866 children 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive Rosewith Roven Levi Strauss & Co.support services Melissa Wang The San Francisco 49ers Jennifer Tolo Pierce Katy Williams Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients Foundation Tom Eliot Fisch Lindsey Yeung Provided funding, planning, legal and real estate expertise Coming soon Jennifer and David Scott Uber Scotty* Virgin America Participated on Strategic Planning Committee 75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes Maiya Shaw and Dan Higgins VolunteerMatch Funded data entry training for patient services and billing Served 2,140 dental patients Jane Singer in first year Key Metrics

Robert L. Skaggs* Boardinofdepression Directors Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease Blythe Smith Tony Bates 70% of juvenile offenders who completed ACT programZachary were offBogue probation six months later Christina Stephens

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

3,460

1

486

2

731

3

300

4

681

5

307

6

2,459

7

412

8

1,751

9

3,767 10 46

11

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

266

15

133

16

629

17

3,219

18

6,486

19

392

20

2,250

21

267 22 81

23

160

24

3,200

25

2,023

26

3,522

27

3,539

28

4,130

29

6,517 30 866

31

3,634

32

0

33

1,777 34 11,221

35

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2,098

36

Currently identifying needs and resources

1,812

37

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

Total Clients Served

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937


Grantee Organization

1 2

education + youth

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15

employment

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26

housing

27 28 29 30

31

family wellness

32 33 34 35 36 37

Areas Served

Grantee Since

FY12 Bay Area Budget ($)

FY12 General Operating Grant

Aspire Public Schools BELL BUILD Eastside College Preparatory School Fresh Lifelines for Youth Gateway to College KIPP Bay Area Schools Next Step Learning Center Reading Partners Rocketship Education SF State Guardian Scholars Program

2010 $ 26.7M $ 518,000

The Bread Project Center for Employment Opportunities JobTrain Mission Asset Fund New Door Ventures Opportunity Junction Rubicon Programs Inc. Single Stop The Stride Center Swords to Plowshares Upwardly Global WAGES Year Up

2012 $ 1.2M $ 100,000

2012 $ 0.8M $ 250,000 2006 $ 2.3M $ 200,000 2011 $ 5.5M $ 150,000 2006 $ 2.6M $ 225,000 2012 $ 1.0M $ 270,000 2006 $ 23.7M $ 500,000 2007 $ 0.4M $ 60,000 2008 $ 3.0M $ 300,000 2011 $ 22.4M $ 300,000 2007 $ 0.4M $ 110,000

2012 $ 0.2M $ 100,000 2012 $ 4.8M $ 100,000 2012 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 2007 $ 4.3M $ 225,000 2012 $ 1.2M $ 75,000 2006 $ 13.9M $ 300,000 2010 $ 1.7M $ 200,000 2009 $ 2.4M $ 150,000 2011 $ 8.4M $ 100,000 2010 $ 0.8M $ 125,000 2010 $ 0.9M $ 125,000 2009 $ 4.3M $ 275,000

Compass Family Services First Place for Youth Homeless Prenatal Program InnVision Shelter Network Larkin Street Youth Services SHELTER Inc.

2007 $ 7.7M $ 200,000 2006 $ 10.9M $ 300,000 2006 $ 5.1M $ 250,000 2008 $ 9.0M $ 300,000 2011 $ 14.6M $ 125,000 2012 $ 8.3M $ 100,000

Bayview Child Health Center Canal Alliance Center for Youth Wellness Good Samaritan Family Resource Center Ravenswood Family Health Center San Francisco Child Abuse Prevention Center Sunny Hills Services

2007 $ 1.0M $ 100,000 2007 $ 2.8M $ 200,000 **2012 $ 0.8M $ 150,000 2007 $ 1.9M $ 100,000 2010 $ 13.1M $ 175,000 2009 $ 3.9M $ 125,000 2012 $ 7.8M $ 75,000

Total  north bAY  

Total General Operating Grant Management Assistance One-Time Investments Mental Health Initiative

$ 7.1M $ 0.9M $ 3.2M $ 0.8M

Staci and Jonathan Friesel Nicholas Stephens Kate Harbin Clammer Management Tipping Point Value Add The Ganter/Samuel Family Kjerstine Storey* Assistance Phaedra Ellis-Lamkins (at noJ.cost Roman Grace Roselyne Swig Michael Holston to donors) Crystal, Mieke and Jennifer, Swig Company Staff Chris James Grand-Jean Thomas Laffont Preserved 11 student-support staff positions 100% of graduates accepted intoCapital a four-year college Ingrid Tauber Management, Inc. Tipping Point Community Staff David Lamond Provided funding to help launch BELL in Bay Area On average, 2/3 grade level gain in reading and math in six weeks Charlotte and Jeff Grodinger Cindy and Rob Truitt Ronnie Lott Philip Melissa Wang and Daniel Lurie, CEO +Supported Founder launch of East Oakland site 80% of students are firstR. in Gustlin family toand pursue post-secondary education Evelyn Gustlin* Zoran Martinovic Katie Schwab Paige Secured expert to train staff on childhood trauma 80% of alumni graduate from college 10 percentage points higher than similar students Paige and Pat Healy Dody Westheimer Alec Perkins, Chair Successfully nominated for national capacity-building grant Scott100% Heldfond In San Mateo County, of eligible seniors graduated or earned GED Katy Williams Gina Peterson Warren Hellman* Sheila and Mark Wolfson Eric Roberts Assisted with director of development hire Despite very poor prior school attendance, students maintain 82% average attendance rate The Hinman Family Danielle and Jed York Jed York Facilitated McKinsey & Company growth planning 75% of KIPP King Moses Collegiate seniors passed an AP examChris versus 21% of seniors in California Gideon Yu M. Johnson Young Sara LaBoskey* Zelda Zeger* David Zierk Helped develop and implement new client database 75% of GED test takers earned certification Elizabeth and Thomas Laffont The Zink Family Helped develop first Bay Area donor event 87% of students gained 1.3 months of proficiency, on average, per month Kelsey and David Lamond * deceased Leadership Council J`aime Law Lesa Faulkner Successfully testified in Sacramento for SF charter 85% of Mateo Sheedy’s 5th graders are proficient in English versus 44% of similar students Jackie Lonaker In-Kind David Glynn Funded full-time career planning position 90% retention of students enrolled in fall of 2010 versus2600hz 75% university-wide Ronnie Lott Wyatt Gruber, Chair Lexy and Ari Lurie Abernathy MacGregor Arno Harris Taya Prowda Lurie Group, Inc. Matthew Kahn 81% of clients whoJanet completed training in 2011 were placed into jobs MacLeod and Paul Levine Armani Hosain Rahman Leading study with Harvard on client follow-up Johnjob G.placements Manter* were made nationally ArtainTequila, Dorian Stone Provided seed funding for expansion to Bay Area Over 1,500 full-time 2011 LLC Dmitry Margolin Bauer Of the 88% of clients completed into permanent jobs Thewho Martin Family coursework, 76% were Blue placed Angel Vodka Advisory CouncilProvided self-care mental health training for 35+ staff James Martini BuildingBlox Consulting Amy Arbreton, Ph.D. Currently identifying needs and resources 0% default rate since 2007 Marissa Mayer and Zack Bogue Burberry Priya Patil, Ph.D. After building flooded, secured HP compter donation 69% of youth completed the internship program; 38% were employed; 72% were in school Nader Meykadeh Burns & Associates Todd Rogers, Ph.D. Tiffany and Jeff Mills The CAC Group Jesse Rothstein, Ph.D. Assisted with development manager search and hire Placed 76% of clients who completed Job Training and Placement program into jobs Eleanor Mitsuye and Richard Cisco Systems Sharon Rowser, M.A. Referred expert on minimizing client aggression Placed 400 clients into jobs with a median wage of $12.00/hour Yukio Okamoto Francis Coppola Winery Sara Schwartz, Ph.D. Paulina nearly and Lance Crown tax Imports, LLC Ph.D. seed funding to bring Single Stop to the Bay Area Provided Bay Area clients received $18 Morrison million in public benefits, refunds and other services Amy Conley Wright, Dr. Ruth Hilson Pace Deloitte Hosted funder meeting to explore new social enterprise Of 313 clients who completed training, into jobs Katie and Matt Paige 56% were placed Fenton Communications Staff List Papa Joe* fuseproject Helped develop corporate engagement strategy 78% of veterans who completed training achieved six months' retention at job placements Meredith Ainsworth James B. Pattison* Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Nick Arevalo Serve on Knowledge Management Steering Committee In first six months of 2011, trained 162 new clients, exceeding goal by 30% JaMel and Tom Perkins Grand Dynamics International Connor Ashenbrucker Alec100%, Perkinsfrom $9,844 before Hewlett-Packard Provided executive coaching during leadership transition Jamie Austin Increased averageSerena incomeand by over employment to $20,557 Tom Perlite Jawbone Kelly Bathgate Provided funding for Silicon Valley expansion Four months after graduation, 91% of participants were employed or in school Gina and Stuart Peterson Kidder Mathews Margaret Cooley Kristina and George Phipps Korn/Ferry International Rebecca Cherin Stefanie Pisarczyk Latham & Watkins LLP Stefanie Demong Funded relocation and remodel of family shelter 287 Connecting Point families secured permanent housing; 608 avoided homelessness Jen Pitts Marine Layer Renuka Kher Placed expert from finance industry on board 90% of youth exited into safe, permanent housing Michael Pitts* McKinsey & Company, Inc. J`aime Law Becca Prowda and Daniel Lurie Meadowood Jackie Lonaker Invested in creation of client database 87% of babies born to clients were of healthy weight; 97% were born drug free The Prowda Family NBBJ Daniel Lurie Advised on business plan in preparation for merger Provided homelessSally families and individuals over 32,400NetJets shelter-nights Prowitt Karina Moreno Aza Raskin Plant Construction Company Amy Omand Advocated for 24 new units of housing 89% of youth exiting transitional housing program secured stable housing Andreas Rivera PlumpJack Jen Pitts Secured pro bono sexual harassment training for staff 81% of families moved to stable long-term housing as compared with 65% nationally Leanne Roberts* Rockstar Inc. Elena Chavez Quezada Victoria Robinson Shooting Star Blythe Smith Gert Rosner* SLO VIP Services Becca Truitt Placed two UCSF-trained trauma experts on-site Provided 866 children 3,238 primary care visits and comprehensive Rosewith Roven Levi Strauss & Co.support services Melissa Wang The San Francisco 49ers Jennifer Tolo Pierce Katy Williams Connected with bilingual motivational interviewing trainer Completed 439 tax returns, generating $577,237 in tax refunds for clients Foundation Tom Eliot Fisch Lindsey Yeung Provided funding, planning, legal and real estate expertise Coming soon Jennifer and David Scott Uber Scotty* Virgin America Participated on Strategic Planning Committee 75% of students made significant learning gains in ESL classes Maiya Shaw and Dan Higgins VolunteerMatch Funded data entry training for patient services and billing Served 2,140 dental patients Jane Singer in first year Key Metrics

Robert L. Skaggs* Boardinofdepression Directors Mothers in Positive Parenting program reported 45% decrease Blythe Smith Tony Bates 70% of juvenile offenders who completed ACT programZachary were offBogue probation six months later Christina Stephens

 EAST BAY  

 san francisco 

3,460

1

486

2

731

3

300

4

681

5

307

6

2,459

7

412

8

1,751

9

3,767 10 46

11

160

12

89

13

6,084

14

266

15

133

16

629

17

3,219

18

6,486

19

392

20

2,250

21

267 22 81

23

160

24

3,200

25

2,023

26

3,522

27

3,539

28

4,130

29

6,517 30 866

31

3,634

32

0

33

1,777 34 11,221

35

Funded creation of performance evaluation framework

2,098

36

Currently identifying needs and resources

1,812

37

* Does not include $3.5M allocated for fulfillment of previous Be a Tipping Point packages. ** Funded in 2010 as a Tipping Point Initiative. Numbers represent data provided in Tipping Point’s FY12 (7/ 1/2011–6/30/2012), which doesn’t always coincide with grantee fiscal year and reporting periods.

Total FY12 Grantmaking* $ 12.0M

 SOUTH BAY  

Total Clients Served

$12M Thank you

 Fundraising  

 Communications  

 Technology  

 Mental Health  

 Strategy  

 staffing  

 board placement  

 Expansion  

 goal setting

78,937


220 MONTGOMERY STREET, SUITE 850

SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94 104

T 415. 348 .1240

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2012 Tipping Point Annual Report