Issuu on Google+

Tanah Lot ­ Temple in the Ocean ­ Bali

When the sun is setting creating a the mixture of magenta and orange colors on the sky  and the tide rises, the beauty of Tanah Lot is a very spectacular sight. The temple is one of the seven famous sea temples in Bali. It is said that each of these  temples was to be within eyesight of the next and were made to give a level of protection  to the island. Dated in16th century, the shrine was built by Dang Hyang Nirartha (a priest  from Java) during his travels through south­west coast of Bali. He saw a small island  nearby the main land where spent the night. The next morning he asked the local  fisherman to build a shrine to worship God of the Sea on the rock as he felt a holy  atmosphere on the rocky island. Tanah Lot means Land in the Middle of the Sea, is part of Tabanan Regency in the  western part of Bali. It is only 33 km from Denpasar. I took the Canggu route because the  line of rice fields on both sides of the road is beautiful. Otherwise there is also another  route passing the Ubung bus terminal heading to West Bali and turn left at the  roundabout in Kediri. In 1998, I first visited the temple. At that time I could see the temple from the road side  before I enter the parking area.This time when I revisited the temple, I could see nothing  from the main road because the area has been commercialized and developed. Some  hotels were built due to market demand. Every visitor and car has to pay for entrance. I  had to walk to the temple area where before in those passed years we could park our  vehicle next to the seashore. The lines of handicraft sellers on the way to the temple are  arranged orderly in one space and also on both sides of the pedestrian track to the temple.


The temple is considered as one of the most sacred places in Bali. It is not accessible to  visitors but reserved for pilgrimage only. However, superb views of the temple backed by  the glowing sunset can be seen from so many points nearby. There is a line of souvenir  shops and also a line of cafes where Es Kelapa Muda (Fresh young coconut with ice) and  a variety of food and beverages are served. Some cafes even have panoramic sunset  views from their terrace. When it is ebb tide, the crowd usually is centered at the beach between the rock where the  temple is laid and the cliff of the mainland. The caves which form part of the cliff also become another famous attraction in the site.  It is said that a giant snake lives in one of the caves. It is also believed that at the base of  the rocky island there are poisonous sea snakes guarding the temple from evil spirits and  intruders. The myth said that the snake was the scarf of Nirartha. Well sometimes when the tide rises the rocky island and the main land are separated by  water, and boats are the only way for the pilgrimage to reach the temple. High tide or ebb  tide, the beautiful setting is always there. The small rocky island looks like a huge boat  with a shrine and trees on it anchored to the seabed in the vast ocean during high tide. The metamorphosis of the surrounding area of Tanah Lot hopefully won't detract from  the classical beauty of the historic temple.The magnificent view of the temple in the  evening color continues to be the most popular printed on postcards. The temple is one of  Bali's prominent icons.


Tanah Lot