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Kirsten Heming Architecture Selected Works 2009-2012

www.tinkeringMesh.com

kirsten.heming@gmail.com 562.987.2507


Lima Aqualogy Museum Park (L_AMP) SP 2009 / CED UC Berkeley professor : Rene Davids

studio : Museum for the unBuilt Environment site : Bueno Aris, Lima, Peru program : museum

Lima and the Rimac Deemed a city in crisis, the scarcity of water for Lima, Peru is increasing to the point where future stability is questionable. Located in one of the driest parts of the world, this cool desert climate has supported life for thousands of years by tapping into its glacier fed rivers. Rapid development has dramatically transformed the landscape, separating people’s relationship to their sources of water.

Imprints of Lima

Farm land which was made possible through canals has become an impermeable surface of concrete. Water levels are further diminishing from the overuse of wells and a reduction of glacier melt by 22% in the past 30 years. Cutting though the center of Lima, the Rimac River is one of the most important water sources for the city. The Rimac provides 60% of the city’s potable water and yet is used as a dumping ground carrying mining waste, sewage, and trash into the Paci�ic Ocean.

Neighborhood pedestrian connection


0 1 mile

PACIFIC OCEAN

Rimac River urban trash

suburban sewage

mining runoff

Lima’s major water source

L_AMP

LIMA

Lima Aqualogy Museum Park

La Artajea

Lima water treatment facility

Rimac Watershed

Wetland cells to museum

5


San Cristobal Hill

pedestrian bridge

Rim ac R iver

WATER + ACCESS PATHS

L_AMP former landfill

N

DEVELOPMENT STAGES

Existing conditions

STAGE 4

pedestrian extension connecting Bailey Park & Barrios Altos

STAGE 3

sports facility

STAGE 2

neighborhood redevelopment

STAGE 1

pedestrian extension


HYDROLOGICAL FLOW

waste

L_AMP cont.

productivity

to river from river marsh (sedimentation)

marsh (infiltration, wildlife habitat)

residential wastewater

urban farm (0.5 acres)

wetland cells (filtration, stalk harvesting)

orchard (0.65 acres)

Lima Aqualogy Museum Park It is along the Rimac River’s edge that L_AMP’s intervention takes place. The site exists on a former land�ill surrounded by an informal settlement. L_AMP is a demonstration project that forms an exposed system to treat and reuse polluted water from the Rimac River. Reclaiming Land for Habitat

The once channelized edge of the river is softened with marshlands to accommodate for �loods, allow for in�iltration, and provide needed wildlife habitat. Reclaiming Land for Agriculture

Water is �iltered using constructed wetlands. From here, the �iltered water �lows into an agriculture �ield and then back into the river. Future stages will include wastewater from the proposed adjacent redevelopment project.

walking path

Reclaiming Land for Public Space gravity fed flow through forms

CONSTRUCTED WETLAND CELLS

The landscape terraces become public space providing amenities such as an amphitheater, plaza, �lex spaces. As a retaining wall and pedestrian bridge, the museum continues the topography of the hill and links the surrounding neighborhoods across the Rimac.


AA

BB

DD CC


water flow

water from Rimac River


Amphitheater

Main level sheltered passage

Lower level passage


L_AMP cont.

native plants

7

residential wastewater in

+7.5’

+7’ +6.5’

2

orchards

1

+6’

3

MAIN LEVEL +4’

constructed wetland cells plaza amphitheater agriculture field L_AMP Center 5a research 5b storage 5c water pollution/filtration 5d agriculture 6 pedestrian bridge 7 parking 8 service road

+5.5’

5a 5c

+2’

0’

+7’

B

+7.5’

-10’

A

marsh

river water IN via pump

100’

-20’

river

6

C

50’

1

D

0

4

treated water out to field

5

Exposed +6.5’

5b

5d

N

8

+4’

urban agriculture

1 2 3 4 5

The museum is open to the elements yet is sheltered with woven bamboo to allow for maximum ventilation. Within the space, systems of water treatment facilitate ancient to modern experimental methods of agriculture. Aiming at altering the perception of what is pollution is, L_AMP provides needed amenities along with addressing environmental degradation.


S.

Stacked

Va ll

ey Fw y

FA 2009 / UC Berkeley, CA

professor : Harrison Fraker

(8 2) +

studio : Sustainable Neighborhoods

Ca

ltr

a in

site : former Hitachi Campus, San Jose, CA

Access The U-shaped blocks consolidate green space into public and semi-public courtyards. Public connections provide pedestrian and bicycle paths to the neighborhood network.

Units are not separated by vehicular roads, instead parking and access become semi-subterranean, as an internalized woonerf. In this lower level, each unit has access to their �lex space which is zoned for mixed use and can be used as a workshop, garage, or additional living space. Water

Surrounding these paths, gently rolling native landscapes, like those in the distance, direct runoff into the bioswales. As part of the water recycling program, greywater is treated using living machines elevated within these bioswales. Bioswales connect and �low down into the retention basin park that surrounds the West Valley Freeway.

Cottle Rd

program : med. density residential

Hitatchi Campus

W. V al

ley F wy ( 85)

San Jose

+ li g

ht ra

il

semi-private courtyard semi-manicured landscape [ bioswale / orchard ]


to retention basin

rainwater

public

bioswale semi-private commercial cooler bioswale/orchard

waste water

water collection

flexible zone

internal woonerf permeable surface [ hardscape play ]

landscape zones

flexible zone lower level

public courtyard native landscape [ bioswale / living machine ]

circulation / access


flex

unit types

external / internal access

top left : south elevation top right : section [ 1 ] bottom : north elevation

1 RMS

2 RMS

3 RMS


Stacked cont.

Connecting Circulation Internal stairs are pushed out of the unit's frame and becomes the platform for external access. Units interweave together such that internal and external staircases aid each other structurally. Open Plan

Open �loor plans allow for daylight penetration mitigated by above decks. Units are staggered to create private balconies for each bedroom.

roof deck

section [ 2 ]

integrated solar panels


unit program g garden L living room D dining room K kitchen b bathroom B bedroom + balcony

ground floor

below flexible work / live space

B2

K

b

B3

D b

L B1

g

floor 1

floor 2


B2 b K

B1

b K

b

B1 D

D

L

L

g

g

floor 3

floor 4


left : between right : inside


Salvage Landscape

[E] existing material

removed material

salvaged material

FA 2010 / UC Berkeley, CA professor : Jill Stoner

studio : Architecture by Subtraction

site : 828 Airport Blvd, Burlingame, CA program : research facility

access water channel

Boundary Conditions, Layers in Time The waters edge, an area of contingent transition, has been hardened to accommodate development. With the onset of climate change, this of�ice park adapts as their surroundings erode away into marshland.

pedestrian bridge receiving dock demonstration space

site

1m sea level rise

Future > 2060

performance space

site

Proposed

Ground Floor Plan with demolition

SF SFO site

BUR

Current

Historical <1760

fre e

sh a llo w b d ee ay p b ay tid al fla d ev ts elo ped bay fil l

way

sh a

llo w b ay p b ay tid tid al f l al m ar ats sh dee

Entrance

facing east


San Francisco Bay -3’ LT

0’

3’

6’

Burlingame

Site Plan

future conditions

HT

MT


N

North Elevation

West Elevation

EXPOSE [landscape]

PROTECT [lab]


Salvage Landscape cont.

6

Deconstruction & Controlled Decay

4 3 3

Guiding and monitoring this transition, Salvage Landscape is a public research facility that explores the use of salvage building materials to reclaim natural environments. As the foundation is inundated with water, access to the lab is maintained.

5

2

Facade Detail 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Existing fins Operable window Fixed window Plant screen Planter box Bracing frame

Existing

1 1

Water remove lower level s

s

2

w

w

4

Light remove south faces

1

Ramp Split Detail

3

5

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Perforated metal deck Concrete columns [E] Encaged rubble Concrete w/rubble fill Drainage holes 1â&#x20AC;&#x2122; dia


-3’ low tide

-1.5’

0’

+1.5


5’

+3.0’ high tide

+4.5’

+6.0’


Light Court

temporary installation, May 11-20 2010 professor : Rene Davids

seminar : Landscape Urbanism

site : Light Court, Wurster, UC Berkeley

design : Sean Flanagan, Kirsten Heming, Justin Short

The installation itself is a “gridded �ield” of ping pong balls. Their height and spacing relate to the environmental conditions that exist within the courtyard, mainly light, wind, and the planters (which became a bird nesting ground).

Leaf infiltration

Woven planes

Planting planes

Analysis of the court’s access to sunlight at the day of installation determined the lengths of the string - following the light as it entered the space. A grid spacing of 1.5 feet with water �illed ping pong balls was needed to dampen movement enough to prevent entanglement while still allowing for the entire �ield to capture the wind in sinusoidal waves.

Lullaby Garden, 2004, Cao Perrot Studio

Living Moss Graf�iti, 2008 Edina Tokodi

Straw Wattle Sculpture, 2009 The Canelo Project

Plan view of gridded field

Axon view of gridded field


1/16â&#x20AC;? steel cable self tightening knot varies

cotton thread self tightening knot

steel wire anchor 1.5â&#x20AC;? dia. ping pong ball water (weight)

Plan view of wind flows


Open Space Parameters

Courtyard Typologies

SP 2011 / UC Berkeley, CA professor : Renee Chow

studio : Horizontal Densities

site : Lot 10, Wudadao Proper, Tianjin, China design : Kat Cong & Kirsten Heming

Open Space Parameters for Fine-Grain Block Design As developments prioritize vertical superblocks, the impact of block-scale design has dramatically changed the urban grain from one of local conditions to an enlarged, singularized and simpli�ied fabric. Open space and access become the by-products of performative metrics. The courtyard in particular is now so large that identifying and relating to a collective space on a personal level is lost.

t1 Extension

t2 Staggered

t3 Linear

t4 Enclosed

t5 Stacked

(public) commercial historic

(private) residential

(semi-private) residential commercial

(public) institutional historic

(public) mixed-use recreation

Courtyard

It is the courtyard which is held as the essential component in creating a socially sustainable environment. Courtyard typologies de�ine varying grains of fabric that respond to the site. Courtyards are manipulated to achieve higher density while preserving open space. Water

Each courtyard territory acts as a local watershed for stormwater management and non-potable reuse. During excessive rain events, the territories form a system connected to the main over�low line which then is used for groundwater recharge.

t2: Staggered

terraces provide privacy for small-scaled residential units


3 0m

38 m

[ M i n 60% Bu i lt]

2m

Parameters

wall

16 m

[Buil t ]

[M ax . 20% Built]

25m

25m

[Bu ilt ]

[ M ax . 40 % Buil t ]

min 60% open space

green wall Xiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

an

new ground through site

Av e

40% open space new ground beginning

built existing estate figures built

1 06 m

wall

Territories & Program recreation institutional commercial

residential

t4

t2 t3

4 2m

mixed-use

t5

t1 21

Lot 11

m

public

[New G ro u nd ]

Access

semi-public Lot 11

service

Changsha Rd

vehicular

61m

Courtyard Type landscape public plaza

stadium

Local Watersheds 22 m

15m

[ Half Bel o w ]

small dry basin bioretention cell groundwater recharge

C hengdu Ave

New Ground Plan

t1: Extension

historic fabric merges with new

[ New Grou n d ]

overflow

+6 m


t5: Stacked

recreation facilities utilize the larger open space requirements for taller buildings, outside and below

wind scoops (natural ventilation)

channeled surface (slow+collect water)

rec center

swimming pool

t5: Courtyard Section

entrance to New Ground

green wall (thermal barrier)

t5: High-Density Residential Facade


t3: Linear

medium-scale residential complexes run parallel to a main retail road, Changsha Road

channeled angled roof (slow+collect water, sun)

outdoor corridor balcony (natural ventilation)

double skin (noise, sun)

t3: Med-Density Residential Facade

dry basin

t3: Courtyard Section

bioretention cell


Architecture Selected Works