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ARCHITECTURE

CV & PORTFOLIO TingTing Ng


Contents

1

ACHSE : Berlin Experimentalism Third Year Individual Project

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CRUX : Continuum Third Year Group Project

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Infant School Second Year Individual Project

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Post-Industrial Landscapes : Cha Gwo Ling 2016 AAVS Summer Course

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OBJET TROUVE : Exhibition Stand First Year Individual Project

6

Career Discovery in Architecture University of Hong Kong Summer Course


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ACHSE : Berlin Experimentalism Third Year Individual Project

Surrounding the significance of history in Berlin, the brief to design a building that houses 3 non-verbal, experimental theatres, certainly proved to be a challenge. The site is located on a famous turning point of the old Berlin Wall, a zone adjacent to “The Death Strip” that represented hope and chance for escaping from Socialist East Germany to West. “Achse”, meaning axis in German, emphasizes the driving force throughout my design; the axis that defined the divide in Berlin. Exhibited through wall axes, floor lights, roof lights, lamp posts and exterior landscaping, the axis runs consistently throughout the building. The immersive theatre has a steel structure and is clad in perforated corten, mimicking the same material language as the the existing memorial exhibitions of the Berlin wall towards the east of the site. The perforations cause the occupants to experience a scattered light effect through the internally glazed upper area behind the cladding. On the opposite end of the building, sits the cuboid, absurdist theatre, with two fully glazed facades and an timber cladding system, 750mm further out from the glass. The glazed facades face the direction of most sunlight on site, creating an extravagant experience of the sunlight leaking through the shadows.A distinct slit of light runs along the ceiling, bringing attention to the axis of the Berlin Wall. The open theatre sits in the ground of the glazed foyer; an area of the building that challenges the boundary of indoor and outdoor space. This attracts pedestrians and encourages them to enter the building, demonstrating that theatre is for all people, contrary to the evident divide that the wall brought.


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CRUX : Continuum

Third Year Group Project

The A12 highway runs through Poplar, London, the location of our site for a community centre and foot/bicycle bridge. Thus, the greatest challenge with this brief was battling the various types of pollution (sound, air, visual) that the A12 creates. The building programmes sit around a central atrium and a clear passageway that has circulation stations at each end. These circulation cores are clearly defined from the exterior as there is a physical separation in the external wall, allowing the building to be shut off when necessary, and the bridge service to continue at all times. The central atrium runs through the all three floors, allowing the option of natural ventilation and daylighting, With a standard steel frame structure, the facade is brick which slowly disintegrates by each floor, revealing the glazing that sits behind, generating a more transparent facade at the top. The steel truss bridge is ramped on both ends, but also provides lift and staircase access. All three forms of pollution are dealt with through one mechanism; a hydroponic vertical vegetation system that sits within the frames of the bridge. This solution is able to improve the air quality in the area, reduce the intense engine noises for pedestrians and cyclists, and brings colour to the grey surroundings. A key concept maintained throughout the design is the distinction in tempo variations at different areas of the design. The bridge focuses on movement as it floats above the chaotic A12, the design is simple and linear, encouraging a quick pace. The ease of circulation is maintained through the clear passageway in the main building, but the programmes that surround it slow the pace down. On the western ramp, the exit from the bridge creates a transition from linear paths to more abstract shapes and green landscaping with areas for seating and socializing. Essentially, the bridge is linking two areas that bring the community together.


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Scanned by CamScanner


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Infant School

Second Year Individual Project

Safe-guarding, circulation and environmental design were the foci I selected for this project. The material palette, I chose to use Bath stone, timber and dark tiles for roofing; matching the vernacular context. Each pair of classrooms look like a regular house in the surrounding neighbourhood, with pitched roofs and chimneys, allowing the pre-school children to feel less intimidated by the transition from a home environment to school. The chimneys allow the classrooms and corridor to be naturally ventilated through Bernouill’s principle. The diagonal orientation of the classrooms allows for both north and south light to enter, this maximizes the daylight factor and decreases the need for artificial lighting and heating. The courtyard provides a safe space for the students to utilize during their free time, away from the classrooms, defining a boundary between play and study spaces; encouraging children to spend their free-time outside. The idea of sharing space is also incorporated inside the classrooms; each year group shares a coat room, workshop, bathroom and back porch area; these are placed between each classroom, providing easy circiulation for the students. In attempt to present the library as more of a resource centre, where children are able to read aloud and play board games quietly. I wanted the transition between indoor and outdoor to be subtle, creating an informal L-shape library as part of the courtyard. The main entrance to the school is strategically placed on the north side; away from the busy road junction for safety purposes. Whilst the back entrance is for visitors who only require access to the hall outside of school hours. All public facing facades are wrapped to a certain height with bath stone, for safeguarding purposes. The spaces closest to the pavement are staff and for shared, private/public use, maintaining a safe zone past the courtyard.


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Post-Industrial Landscapes : Cha Gwo Ling AAVS Summer Course 2016

Cha Gwo Ling is a squatter village in Hong Kong, inhabiting approximately 2500 locals and immigrants. Like any other slum area, the village experiences a vast range of quality of life issues. By interviewing the inhabitants, we were able to find out what their main issues were, as well as what they saw for the future of their village. Issues included sanitation, lack of services, drainage/flooding etc. The majority of the villagers were over 50 years old, their feedback was that the younger generations would come back to visit the slum, but lived elsewhere and were unlikely to return to the village. Many of the houses were burnt and deserted, proving the decrease in population, and thus the decrease in need for housing. The group was separated into 3, each sub-group was responsible for presenting a specific year for our long-term proposal and vision for the future of the village. The exhibition was left up and maintained for 2 weeks, many backpackers and student groups came to see the exhibition. Unfortunately the villagers were unable to attend, however we did go back to the village at the end and explain our plans and ideas to them.

2016 : an imitation of the houses that currently reside in the slum, using a simple timber frame, planks, netting and corrogated steel and other scrap materials that can be found acting as exterior facades. 2026 : an attachment of a drainage system onto the existing facade of the houses, incorporates the existing farming idea executed by the villagers. Encouraging the villagers to take advantage of the water issue that they deal with, by increasing the absorption of rainwater, the severity of flooding will decrease. 2066 : an adaptation of the existing burnt down and deserted houses, it includes a natural drainage system that can feed a supported tree growing system for each house. Creating a whole network of trees that can continue to exist after the village ceases to. Embracing the power of nature, and the concept of how it always takes back over what initially replaced it.


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Objet Trouve : Exhibition Stand First Year Individual Project

My brief for this project was to design an exhibition space for a standard pair of ‘Fiskar’ Scissors. I wanted the design to accompany the display as opposed to being the actual display; thus designing a simple dome shape structure, formed by 3mm plywood and attached with hinges. Whilst the exterior of the structure shows off the classic orange plastic handles of the product, the metal blades inside create a completely different experience, especially with the fresnel lights reflecting beams of light in multiple directions. The hinges create the illusion of dotted lines in between the ply boards, relating back to the theme of scissors.


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Scanned by CamScanner


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Career Discovery in Architecture

University of Hong Kong Summer Course

This project, had no restrictions other than the maximum volume of space, and an undefined site, the volume we design was to sit inside a space that had absolutely no context.

I used the volume given to generate a space that experiments with light. By dividing the box into 4, each zone has a varying level of brightness through slits in the walls. A roof light shared among the spaces within creates a downlight on the walls.

The given site was a cliff adjacent to the sea, with forestry sitting above. I chose to create a work/ individual office space for two. The first space sits into the cliff ground, and has a large skylight and view towards the forest. The second, hangs over the cliff edge, with a large glass facade facing the water. Although each space has a separate entrance, they are connected through slits in the floor/ceiling, allowing communication when necessary. The main concept was using the building as a medium to connect all the varying forms of nature on site.

Profile for TingTing Ng

Architecture CV & Portfolio  

Architecture CV & Portfolio  

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