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TINGIRA BRUCE

Climbs his Calgary

TINGIRA TRIBUTE International Fleet Review GREG READ New President’s Vision BERET BOYS Unite Again SYDNEY’S Tingira Challenge JOHN VARCOE, DSM Cenotaph Connection Page 1

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2013


TINGIRA Tribute

100 years later ... Tinny boys still ready to greet and meet! TINGIRA AUSTRALIA

Congratulation to Greg Read our new President and the

Tingira members who were elected and have stepped across the ‘Tingira gangway’ to keep us afloat at our first AGM. First gig ... International Fleet Review!

Committee 2013 - 2014

PATRON Vice Admiral Russ Crane AO CSM RANR P RE S I DE NT Greg Read SC VI CE P RE S I DEN T David Ruckert S E CRE TARY Mark Lee E tingirasec@gmail.com TREASURER Peter Stephenson OA COMMITTEE Bob Dobson Lance Ker Chris Parr

DISTRIBUTION ADVERTISING CORRESPONDENCE M

TINGIRA AUSTRALIA ANZAC House 245 Castlereagh Street Sydney NSW 2000

E

tingirasec@gmail.com

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tingira.org

All official communication and correspondence to be sent to the Association Secretary via email or mail, address above. No other correspondence in any format will be recognised.

Wow another big celebration and commemoration, the first of many over the next few years. We have plenty in store after our first committee meting, however we will concentrate on IFR as we know so many members will sojourn to Sydney for the event. The arrival of the first Australian Naval fleet into Sydney Harbour on Friday 3rd October 1913 was a very nostalgic event in its day. 100 years later the foresight by the men and women at the helm of our navy in 2013 to repeat the same event are to be congratulated. This will no doubt become a very significant part of Sydney’s naval history. Recruiting is sure to rocket in the next 12 months! And we the Tingira Boys, 100 years onwards will again be part of the action on the foreshores of Sydney. Many Tingira members will join former shipmates at reunions and on cruises boats around Sydney Harbour over the period. For others, they may just be foreshore spectators from the many vantage points. The spectacular lazer light and fireworks show on Saturday evening will be the best live event ever since the first Sydney fireworks display on Sydney Harbour at our 75th naval anniversary back in 1987. To bring us all together as the ‘navy family’, Tingira Australia Association invites all past and present RAN sailors to join us at the ANZAC Memorial for a ‘Sunset Dedication Service’ to commemorate all former shipmates of the RAN on the evening before the Fleet entry. (invite on page 4) In 1913 as the Australian naval fleet entered Sydney, ‘Tingira’ was here in Sydney. 100 years later, the ‘Tingira Boys’ are still here in Sydney carrying out our great traditions of all things navy.

MARK LEE Editor - Voice Pipe

Voice Pipe is published on behalf of the Committee for the Tingira Australia Association Inc, for past members of HMAS Leeuwin Junior Recruit Training Scheme. Not for sale as a publication Copyright Tingira Australia Inc. 2011

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FRONT COVER Tingira Boy BRUCE ENGERT journeyed to Calgary in Canada last ANZAC Day. Photo by Debbie Engert

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Special Veteran Tickets ‘Navy Spectacular’ from Cahill Expressway ...

Saturday evening 5th October 2013 ... Sydney Harbour 7.30 pm the lights of the city are dulled, air raid sirens sound, aircraft buzz the foreshores and the greatest show of ‘smoke and mirrors’ will be before us from the Harbour Bridge to Bradleys Head. The warships will be at anchor, some under sail and become part of the showcase with images projected onto them as has been done with the Opera House in the past, and the great white sails don't miss out either! Transport NSW have been very generous to block of the ‘Cahill Expressway’ and make this a special viewing platform just for the ‘Veteran Community’ and their families for this event.

Send your name, address and phone details via email to: tingirasec@gmail.com Confirm how many tickets you may need (approx 4 per family) as this is a wristband ticket event and they will be sent to you. Cut off point is Friday 13th September. First in best dressed!

At this stage we just need your name and contact details if you are interested, but if you take four tickets and don’t use them, it means four others will miss out, the tickets are limited and Tingira members will have first priority on our allocation. Only apply if you are going! The city of Sydney will be in lock down from all corners as per a typical New Years Eve event. Train is the only option here and Circular Quay is under the expressway viewing area we are talking about here. Page 3

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¥

TINGIRA TRIBUTE

µ

To The

SHIPS & SAILORS of the International Fleet Review

SUNSET DEDICATION SERVICE 1730 Thursday 3rd October 2013

ANZAC MEMORIAL Hyde Park South, Sydney, Australia. Special Guests Welcome by Tingira Australia Assoc Patron Vice Admiral Russ Crane AO, CSM, RANR RSL Corp of Guards REFRESHMENTS ON COMPLETION Hyde Park Inn - Forum Centre - First floor - RSVP for entry - Numbers limited Dress: Suit with Association Tie, Medals, Ladies equivalent EMAIL ONLY RSVP: T I N G I R A S E C @ G M A I L . C O M Friday 20th September 2013 Event conducted by T I N G I R A A U S T R A L I A A S S O C I AT I O N Page 4

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Tingira Tribute Ready to ‘kick start’ IFR ...

So who is going to ‘welcome’ the former members of the RAN to Sydney to enjoy the spectacle of the International Fleet Review? 40 days to go and there is nothing official in the announcement columns ... so step up Tingira Australia Association. When the RAN Fleet entered Sydney Harbour 100 years ago, it was the good ship HMAS Tingira that was here in Sydney with the ‘Tinny Boys’ ready to welcome their shipmates. The Tinny Boys are still alive and well under way to make the RAN Fleet with their international visitors welcome again. Rounding up former members through their RAN associations it’s all hands to first meeting the ‘TINGIRA TRIBUTE’ at the ANZAC Memorial at 1730 hours on the evening before the fleet entry on Friday 4th October.

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A solemn ‘Sunset Dedication Service’ with Tingira Patron Vice Admiral Russ Crane at the helm. Recapture the moments of today and the 101 years when our navy was born, prepared for war and HMAS Tingira was at anchor in Rose Bay for that first 17 years of RAN naval training for many young boys before joining the fleet. Make your way to the ANZAC Memorial on Thursday 3rd October at 1730 to pay your respects to our former and present shipmates of the RAN. Catch up with many former shipmates and ex service community stakeholders, Tingira Boys young and old at the first function of many on one of Sydney's longest weekends ever with over 10,000 sailors over 10 days ready to embrace Sydney!

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DefenceCare is a charity and not-forprofit organisation helping current and ex-serving members of the Australian Defence Force and their families in times of injury, illness or crisis.

BBQ

with g old donati coin on

Veterans’ Health Week 3km or 6km Fun Run-Walk Saturday 19 October 2013 Cronulla Park, 8:30am Registration: $10 single, $25 family W: www.defencecare.org.au/fun-run P: (02) 8088 0388 DefenceCare is proudly part of RSL NSW Page 6

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International Fleet Review Sydney’s longest weekend ...

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Late 2011, the Chief of Navy Vice Admiral Ray Griggs, AO, CSC, RAN extended an invitation to over 50 nations to send a warship and/or tall ship to participate in an International Fleet Review (IFR) to be held in Sydney from 3 - 11 October 2013. The Review is being held to commemorate the centenary of the first entry of the Royal Australian Navy's Fleet into Sydney.

The IFR is a high profile international event and Navy's signature commemorative event for 2013. Planned in partnership with the NSW State Government and the City of Sydney, it is anticipated that approximately 40 warships and 20 tall ships will participate in this historic event. The RAN Sea Power Conference 2013 and Pacific 2013 International Maritime Congress and Exposition, are also scheduled to take place at Darling Harbour from 7 October 2013 to coincide with the IFR.

Thursday 3 October 2013 ■ 1100 Tall ships entry. Location: Sydney Harbour. ■ 0900 Warships depart for passage to Sydney. ■ 1730 Tingira Tribute - IFR Welcome ANZAC Memorial, Hyde Park South, Sydney ■ 1830 Tall ships welcome reception. Location: Australian National Maritime Museum (ANMM). ■ Friday 4 October 2013 ■ 0600-1600 Warships enter Sydney Harbour ■ 1000 Ceremonial Fleet Entry and 21 Gun Salute. HMA Ships Sydney, Darwin, Perth, Parramatta, Bundaberg, Diamantina and Yarra. Location: Sydney Harbour. ■ 1100-1600 Australian Surf Rowers League luncheon. Location: Sydney Opera House. ■ 1830-2030 Visiting Ships Welcome Reception. Location: Onboard HMAS Choules (at Garden Island). Saturday 5 October 2013 ■ Dress ship. Location: Sydney Harbour. ■ Royal Australian Navy Band recitals. ■ 1100-1430 Ceremonial Fleet Review. Location: Sydney Harbour. ■ Formation flypast by rotary and fixed winged aircraft. Location: Sydney Harbour. ■ 1400-1900 Military demonstrations. ■ 1830-2030 Combined IFR Official Reception. Location: Sydney Opera House Forecourt. ■ 1930-2000 Pyrotechnics and Lightshow. Location: Sydney Harbour.

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Sunday 6 October 2013 ■ 1000-1130 HMAS Sydney Memorial Service. Location: Naval Memorial, Bradley's Head. ■ 1300-1800 Tall ships open to the general public. Location: Cockle Bay/Darling Harbour (TBC). ■ 1300-1800 Warships Open Day. Location: Fleet Base East, Garden Island/Barangaroo. ■ 1400-1530 Ecumenical Service. Location: St Mary's Cathedral. Monday 7 October 2013 ■ 0730-1015 Opening of Sea Power Conference 2013 and Pacific 2013 International Maritime Exposition. Location: Sydney Conference and Exhibition Centre, Darling Harbour. ■ Royal Australian Navy Band recitals. ■ 0800-1800 Warships Open Day. Location: Fleet Base East, Garden Island/Barangaroo. ■ 0800-1800 Tall ships open to the general public. Location: Cockle Bay/Darling Harbour (TBC). Tuesday 8 October 2013 ■ Sea Power Conference 2013 and Pacific 2013 International Maritime Exposition continue. Location: Sydney Conference and Exhibition Centre, Darling Harbour ■ Royal Australian Navy Band recitals. ■ 1000-1500 Combined Navies Golf Competition. Location: The Coast Golf Club. ■ 1230-1400 HMAS Penguin Freedom of Entry to Mosman. Location: Mosman Central Business District (CBD). ■ 1230-1400 Navy Memorial Service. Location: Cenotaph, Martin Place. ■ 1300-1430 HMAS Parramatta Freedom of Entry to Parramatta. Location: Parramatta Central Business District (CBD). ■ 1830-2030 Vice Regal Reception. Location: Government House, Botanic Gardens. Wednesday 9 October 2013 ■ 1030-1100 Sea Power Conference 2013 Closing Ceremony. Location: Sydney Conference and Exhibition Centre, Darling Harbour. ■ 1230-1430 Combined Navies Parade. Location: George Street - The Rocks to Town Hall. ■ 1430-1630 Lord Mayor's Reception. Location: Sydney Town Hall. ■ Pacific 2013 IFR Ships Companies Lunch - Exhibition Floor ■ Closing of Pacific 2013 International Maritime Exposition. Location: Sydney Conference and Exhibition Centre, Darling Harbour. ■ 1500-1730 Twilight sailing with RAN Sailing Association. Location: Sydney Harbour. Thursday 10 October 2013 ■ Tall ships depart. Location: Sydney Harbour. ■ 1000-1500 Combined Navies Sporting Competition. Location: Randwick Barracks/Macquarie Park. Friday 11 October 2013 ■ Warships depart. Location: Sydney Harbour.

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Festivals

Hobart

Fremantle, Adelaide, Melbourne, Hobart, Sydney and Auckland will host the fleet for International Tall Ship Festivals during August, September and October 2013. For updates on the festival program, voyage details and information on where to see the Tall Ships, subscribe to the Australian Sail Training Association monthly e-newsletter.

Friday 20 Sept - Wednesday 25 Sept Tall Ships Hobart 2013 will be held on the waterfront over four days in September, and will be an opportunity to welcome tall ships into Hobart, to celebrate our rich maritime heritage and appreciate the contribution that the maritime industry still makes to the Tasmanian economy today. Hosted by the Australian Wooden Boat Festival organisation, the event will include a range of shore-based activities including displays and food in Princes Wharf No 1, as well as nautically-themed entertainment on Parliament House lawns.

Fremantle Saturday 27 July - Monday 29 July The Australian Tall Ships Leeuwin II and Duyfken will sail to meet the Dutch vessels Oosterschelde, Europa and Tecla off the coast of Fremantle, escorting them to Victoria Quay to join the accessible British vessel Lord Nelson. Visit the Tall Ships, meet the crews and find out how to join a voyage to the spectacular Abrolhos Islands, or along the South West Coast, around Cape Leeuwin and across the Great Australian Bight to Adelaide.

Adelaide Wednesday 28 Aug - Sunday 1 Sept The biggest gathering of Tall Ships in South Australia in 25 years will take place in Port Adelaide! The Dutch ships Oosterschelde, Europa and Tecla and the British vessel Lord Nelson will be joined by the Maritime Museum's Falie and One & All to fill the Inner Harbour at Port Adelaide with sailing vessels of another era. The South Australian Maritime Museum will present a Festival of Maritime Trades in celebration, and the Tall Ships will be open to the public on August 31, before sailing on to Sydney via Hobart.

Melbourne Friday 6 Sept - Sunday 15 Sept Tall Ships Victoria will host the Melbourne International Tall Ship Festival 2013. Ten tall ships are expected to gather in Port Phillip, bringing to the city their crews of sail trainees, the majority young people, experiencing the thrills and disciplines of life under sail. The fleet will begin gathering in Melbourne on 6 September and will be open to the public at scheduled times until they sail for Hobart on 14 September. A week-long series of events is planned in association with the Festival.

Sydney - International Fleet Review Thursday 3 Oct - Thursday 10 Oct The Royal Australian Navy is celebrating 100 years since the Navy Fleet first arrived at Sydney, and has invited an international fleet of Tall Ships to join the celebration! The Sydney Tall Ship Festival will commence on Thursday 3 October 2013 when a fleet of Tall Ships sails through Sydney Heads and into Darling Harbour. A fleet of warships will follow on Friday 4 October 2013 for a week of events. The ships on Sydney Harbour for the International Fleet Review on Saturday 5 October 2013 will be supported by formation fly-pasts, naval displays and demonstrations, naval gun salutes, dragon boat races and naval band performances. The day will culminate in a spectacular evening pyrotechnics and light show on the harbour. Join a voyage, book a day or evening sail on the harbour or visit the ships in Darling Harbour for a spectacular day out!

Auckland Friday 25 Oct - Monday 28 Oct A fleet of Tall Ships and hundreds of sailors will cross the Tasman for a three-day festival to be hosted by the Voyager New Zealand Maritime Museum. Ten Tall Ships will race from Sydney to Opua in the Bay of Island and from there sail in company down the East Coast stopping at Kawau Island before entering Auckland Harbour at 1:00pm on Friday 25 October 2013. Labour Weekend 2013 will see Auckland’s waterfront come alive with thousands of Aucklanders and visitors expected to explore the vessels and witness the spectacle of a tall ships fleet.

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Hosted by the RAN and organised by the Sea Power Centre – Australia, the theme of the RAN Sea Power Conference 2013 is 'Naval Diplomacy and Maritime Power Projection: The Utility of Navies in the Maritime Century’. The Conference will offer an intensely fulfilling program for all those with a professional interest in maritime affairs with a distinguished group of speakers invited to present their views. Registration for the Sea Power Conference, which includes free access to the Pacific 2013 International Maritime Exposition is available at www.seapowerconference2013.com.au

TINGIRA TIES

Available form TINGIRA website www.tingira.org $25 each

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IFR

‘Spectacular’ is for all ...

The Royal Australian Navy International Fleet

Review is without doubt one of the largest and most exciting public events held on Sydney Harbour since the Sydney Olympics in 2000. With a full program of events on the Harbour and on land for over a week, Sydney-siders will be able to take part in one of many unique activities, but the jewel in the crown of the International Fleet Review will be the Spectacular held on Saturday 5 October at 7:30pm. The Spectacular will be the most complex, highly choreographed fireworks, projection, lighting and live action show ever seen in Australia, or even the world, and centres around Sydney’s famous Harbour and Opera House. The Spectacular will see Sydney Harbour come alive as never before in a 30-minute show that celebrates over 100 years of proud history of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN), and in particular, commemorates the original seven warships that entered Sydney Harbour in 1913.

Harbour Bridge, and for the first time ever, from the decks of RAN warships. This will all be joined by a lightshow from land, warships and Harbour Bridge positions, and a full projection show telling the history of the Royal Australian Navy on the Opera House sails, and the Harbour Bridge Pylons. Live action scenes will also take place on and off ships and support boats, plus choreographed flyovers from Navy and Air Force aircraft. The entire show will be choreographed to a soundtrack created in collaboration with the Royal Australian Navy’s Director of Music, Lieutenant Commander Paul Cottier. The IFR Spectacular will be a show that Sydney and the world will never forget. The Royal Australian Navy and Imagination Australia are creating a fireworks and lightshow that is bigger and better than anything ever attempted in Australia. The Spectacular is something that will live in the memories of every officer, sailor and the rest of Sydney for many years to come, and we urge everyone to come down to the Harbour and watch this once in a lifetime event.

Fireworks will be launched from city rooftops, barge positions from Cockatoo Island to Fort Denison, the

IFR SPECTACULAR - KEY INFORMATION ■ ■ ■ ■

Show time – 7:30pm-8.30pm Saturday 5 October 2013 Best public vantage points – Dawes Point, Overseas Passenger Terminal, Bradfield Park, Mrs Macquarie’s Chair, Circular Quay, Sydney Opera House IFR Smartphone App – Download it for live maps, more info on all of the IFR, and to be part of the show on the night Radio simulcast – Listen to the soundtrack via live radio simulcast (radio station details TBC)

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TINGIRA BRUCE Climbs his Calgary ...

“The service in Calgary was not what I

expected. It was held in the park in the city centre at the Cenotaph complete with catafalque party, colour party, and band. I was also surprised at the number of people that attended as it attracted attention from the local & passing population as well as the local expat Kiwis & Aussies. There would have been over 100 people in attendance.

Tingira Boy BRUCE ENGERT journeyed to Calgary in Canada last ANZAC Day and was on hand to fly the Tingira flag with an old shipmate in a private reunion that was hatched in Fremantle back in 2010. Bruce files a diary note from his event.

Expat servicemen from other Commonwealth countries & the US were also in attendance. This was arranged by the DUC (Down Under Club) of Calgary, and followed the programme of the day from back at home in Australia - without the parade. Held at 1900 hours in Central Memorial Park, Calgary on the afternoon of the 25th April, (Canadian time) amid fine, but cool weather. It was only just before the service began that I realised that I was (unofficially) the Australian representative at the occasion, invited as the guest speaker, so I was a little nervous, and extremely proud to be so. I was accompanied by my wife Debbie, who took the photos, and Alan (McDonald). We joined the RAN together in January 1967 - JRTE 18th Intake. With Alan was his wife Jann, his son Sean and daughter Teigan, with their respective partners Stevie & Garry. Alan told me that it was the first time his kids had attended an Anzac Day service, and were very touched by it. The ANZAC Day Ceremony was organised by Mrs. Pat Guillemaud, who was also the MC. The officiate was The Reverend Eric V. Haffenden, and the other official speaker was

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Alan and Bruce at the Calgary monument in Calgary for their ANZAC Day service.

Peter Hauenstein CDF. I was a little concerned when Peter started his speech, as it seemed he had copied my notes, luckily he concentrated on the story of ANZAC, whereas mine focused on the Spirit & Legend of ANZAC. The Colour Party represented:- Royal Alberta United Services Institute, Royal Canadian Legion, Royal Canadian Air Force Assoc. 783 Wing, Royal Canadian Naval Assoc, Calgary Branch Post 20, American Legion, Vietnam Veterans, Canadian Assoc. of Veterans in UN Peace Keeping, Calgary Police Service Ceremonial Unit. The band consisted of members from: Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corps Undaunted 604 Squadron (Moose), Royal Canadian Air Cadets and they played with enthusiasm the anthems of Canada, Australia, New Zealand, British C'wealth & the US. On completion, we shared drinks and refreshments at a local Canada Legion service club catered by the DUC. From the feedback I have since received it was the best Anzac Day speech they have had. Whew!! Mission accomplished. It was great to catch up with Alan again after the 50th Junior Recruit Reunion in Fremantle back in 2010, where this plan was hatched. Prior to that it had been 1971 since we had served together (HMAS Vendetta - gunline tour 69-70, and FESR 70-71). I was an ABUC and Alan the navigators Yeoman as an ABMET. The Tingira Association has really given us all something to now belong to, Alan will be joining soon!

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“I was a little concerned when Peter started his speech, as it seemed he had copied my notes, luckily he concentrated on the story of ANZAC, whereas mine focused on the Spirit & Legend of ANZAC.” We spent the next couple of days sightseeing around Calgary with Alan, and exploring Alberta prior to taking off on the Rockie Mountaineer for an amazing train ride through the Rockies, to be followed by an equally gobsmacking cruise to Alaska via the Inside Passage, then on to Las Vegas, San Francisco & home. Not bad for what started out as a reunion in Fremantle, to be a few thousand miles north of the homeland for a quiet ANZAC Day reunion drinks with an old shipmate in Canada! Looking forward, I will most likely be attending ANZAC Day 2014 in Sydney, and I'm planning to be in Europe in 2015, hopefully to attend a centenary service at a site to be decided (maybe Villiers-Bretonneux) and incorporate some touring and a cruise down one of the great rivers of Europe”.

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Bruce Engert’s Speech

How was it created?

The ANZAC Spirit In 1914 the world went to war. The ‘War to end all Wars’ The British War Council had a plan. That plan was to secure the Gallipoli Peninsula, allowing access to the Dardanelles & force Turkey to capitulate thus shortening the conflict. The Australian and New Zealand Army Divisions, that were training in Egypt, were reformed in to the Australian & New Zealand Army Corps – the ANZACs. At dawn on April 25 1915, the ANZACs landed north of Gaba Tepe (the landing area later named Anzac Cove) while the British forces landed at Cape Helles on the Gallipoli Peninsula. The campaign was a heroic but costly failure and, by December plans were drawn up to evacuate the entire force from Gallipoli. By 20 December the evacuation of Anzac Cove was complete ANZAC casualties for the Gallipoli campaign amounted to 33622, 10572 (31%) men were killed in action, died of wounds or succumbed to disease. Eleven Victoria Crosses were awarded to soldiers in ANZAC units. While the campaign is considered a military failure, Gallipoli became a household name in Australia & New Zealand and with it the ANZAC legend was created, and places called Lone Pine, The Nek, Quinn’s Post & Shrapnel Gully became familiar names in both countries. What is the legend? In theory, the legend is that the Australian and New Zealand troops helped to establish their countries' reputations in the world through qualities of strength and bravery when faced with adversity. In fact, it is much more than that. The legend of these men who endured so much has given something of which Australians and New Zealanders can be proud. It put Australia's mark on the world as something other than a nation descended from convicts.

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It is not uncommon for the characteristics of soldiers to mirror the characteristics commonly found in the society from which they come. This has resulted in the emergence of a number of stereotypes for soldiers from each nation. The soldiers, who had not had a chance to prove themselves on an international front prior to Gallipoli, found that their strong characteristics were revealed in the most challenging of times. It was through events such as the landing at Anzac Cove and the battle at The Nek (where ANZACs were slaughtered in their masses), that they acquired the image that has become synonymous with the word 'digger.' Digger has come to embody the stereotype of a patriotic family man who has temporarily become a soldier and has spent his civilian life in a rural area. More importantly, it suggests a soldier with certain moral qualities, such as a good sense of humour and an overriding belief in mateship and equality. There were five particularly 'digger-like' qualities which emerged from the ANZACs when faced with hardship during the Gallipoli Campaign. These qualities set them apart from soldiers from other nations and were said to be attributable to their rural backgrounds. Many of the World War I diggers were third generation settlers from the early days of pioneering. Their particular attributes included: 1. The ability to remain cheerful with a good sense of humour, even in the most difficult of times 2. The ability to be resourceful when they had no supplies, for example by making hand grenades from empty tin cans 3. The spirit of mateship in which a soldier would risk his own life for his mate's 4. Courage, which was shown on the very first landing at Anzac Cove where the soldiers continued to charge up on to the beach straight into the line of Turkish fire 5. The notion that people all deserve the same amount of respect, no matter what their background is.

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It is precisely this type of person and this type of soldier who gave the ANZACs their reputation which, in turn, instilled a new national pride in Australia and New Zealand. After the evacuation from Gallipoli the ANZACS were sent to France. The divisions were organised into I ANZAC II ANZAC Corps. Throughout all the WW1 campaigns the fighting spirit and abilities of the ANZACs were utilised to great effect at those places with the familiar French/Belgian names of Ypres, Fromelle, Pozieres, Villiers-Bretonneux, Passchendaele, The Somme and many, many more. In March 1916, the ANZAC Mounted Division was formed in Egypt from the Australian Light Horse Brigades and the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade. It was commanded by Major General Harry Chauvel. The strategic town of Beersheba was captured on 31 October 1917 by the Light Horse in what is popularly, but erroneously, believed to be one of the last great cavalry charges in history, the Lighthorsemen armed only with rifles and bayonets. With the outbreak of WW2 the ANZACS were again in the thick of things in all theatres of operations, with all three services, Navy, Army, Air Force involved, either as independent units or on secondment to their British equivalent.

Why is the ANZAC spirit important? The Gallipoli Campaign was a particularly significant event in history because it came at a time when Australia had only just become a federal commonwealth, trying to assert her place alongside a collection of nations with thousands of years of history. In the eyes of the rest of the world, neither Australia, nor New Zealand had an eminent military history and no distinct cultural characteristics as a nation. Gallipoli was the first opportunity for the two countries to earn the respect of other nations and to show the world their strong national character. The ANZAC legend is also important because it encourages us to remember the soldiers who sacrificed their lives for their country. The legend has made such an impression that we continue to commemorate the landing of the ANZAC soldiers on the shores of Gallipoli on 25 April each year. The spirit of ANZAC was born on those bloodied slopes 98 years ago and has been carried forth with pride ever since. LEST WE FORGET.

They were there for; The Battle of Britain, North Africa (Tobruk & El Alamein), The Mediterranean the European theatre of operations including DDay, the Pacific War they fought and died in Singapore, The Solomon Islands, New Guinea & Japan. Post WW2; The ANZACs have stood side by side in Korea, The Malayan Emergency, Borneo and Vietnam. More recently the ANZAC spirit has been taken on United Nations peacekeeping duties in the Arabian Gulf, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Afghanistan, Gulf of Aden, Kosovo, Egypt Lebanon, Timor-Leste & Tonga, Solomon Islands, Iraq & Sudan

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Alan makes a great picture with the colourful backdrop delivering his ANZAC Day speech.

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‘TINNY BOYS’ United again ...

TINGIRA AUSTRALIA

‘Tinny Boys’ ‘proudly display their Berets!

‘Tingira

Boys’ of the Tingira Australia Association united for their inaugural AGM at Sydney’s Club Rose Bay on the afternoon of April 24th 2013. Electing a new President, Greg Read, they then paid their respects to the fallen boys and men of HMAS Tingira and Leeuwin with a moving service conducted by immediate past President Chris Perrin at the Tingira Memorial. A reunion dinner followed, hosted by Association Patron, Admiral Russ Crane (RET). Stories were as many as was the ringing of the mighty ‘Tingira Bell’ by Secretary Mark Lee. A great night was had by all, very pleasing to see many of the partners join their husbands.

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ANZAC DAY, April 25th, 0900 hours, Castlereagh Street, Sydney. Suits pressed, shoes and medals polished, Tingira ties and Remembrance Poppies gleaming. 50 Tinny Boys with their ‘Blue badged Berets’ led by their newly elected President Greg Read Displaying their proud dedication to the past and present naval shipmates, the Tingira Boys stepped off for the 2013 ANZAC Day March heading towards Martin Place and then down George Street. A refreshing afternoon at the Crown hotel followed, till next year, united we march onwards boys!

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Patron and President ... Russ Crane and Greg Read at the March. This year Russ marched behind Tingira boys with the Clearance Divers branch.

Young sailors from HMAS Watson continue their many years of connection with Tingira as our flag bearers for ANZAC Day. With banner and flag flying high they did us al proud.

‘Tinny Boys’ in full uniform with their new ties and many more beret’s amongst the ranks this year! P a g e 17

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GREG READ President Tingira Australia Association

TINGIRA ...

TINGIRA

Our Future - Looking Good!

AUSTRALIA

Greg Read front left, at the inaugural Tingira AGM where he was voted to the position of President.

Talking with Tingira Secretary Mark Lee about the

status of the Association in late March this year, I was immensely impressed by what the steering committee had achieved in their first two years. I was surprised when Mark told me my good friend Chris Perrin was standing down due to business and family commitments. Mark then asked me to take a nomination for President, the rest is history! What a proud history Tingira has. When I took the helm, or rather the bell from former Tingira President, Chris Perrin on that wonderful dinner evening at Rose Bay, I was a very proud former Junior Recruit. Blessed with an Association that has been extremely active, the team also rallied some really good blokes together to team up as the new Committee. Reading the first Annual Report I can see they have a very workable strategic plan in their thinking, growing our membership into the future is the number one item. After our first recent committee meeting I can confirm the Committee has strength and vision with some great ideas to implement over the next 12 months. We stand proud as a group to deliver the best we can, the lads are proud to wear the black and yellow ties, there is vision in our ranks as nothing seems to stand still on our upper deck!

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Chris Perrin had the brilliant idea introducing the ‘Foundation Life Memberships’, this has been a real success, with numbers and setting a financial future for our association, setting us apart from many others. However there was another former JR who also contributed to this plan of growing our future membership base in these very early days in 2011. ‘JR’ Russ Crane, as he likes to be known, had an idea with plenty of merit! The day Russ stepped down as RAN Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Russ Crane (Retired) wrote a detailed eight page letter to the incoming Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Ray Griggs. Planting a seed of suggestion that the name ‘TINGIRA’ could be reinstated into the naval community, primarily at HMAS Cerberus training facility. The only place Tingira is active apart from our association is ‘TS Tingira’ the Cerberus based Naval Cadet unit. Our first RAN training ship HMAS Tingira carried the name proudly for 16 years. Tingira as a shoulder patch carried across 10,000 Junior Recruits at HMAS Leeuwin for another 24 years, the name Tingira has become folk law with the training of young naval sailors.

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My first official duty ...

Second official duty ...

As the Tingira Australia Association President I will attend HMAS Cerberus in late September to witness the naming of one of the new divisions and a new class group to be known as ‘Tingira’, brilliant!

October - The International Fleet Review is a huge event for many former and present sailors of the RAN. We, the ‘Tinny Boys’ were there 101 years ago when our ship HMAS Tingira was moored at Rose Bay, the day the first RAN fleet entered Sydney, and this year we will be there again.

‘Bravo Zulu’ Russ Crane and the two men that helped Russ drive home the idea and plant the seeds inside the Cerberus naval community, Tingira secretary, Mark Lee and HMAS Cerberus stalwart CMDR John Goss. Another great team effort from our former JR’s. This is another direct avenue to grow our future membership, to acknowledge a new breed of Tingira sailors coming through our ranks in the modern day navy, more members to our ranks in the short and long term future. Many associations drift away and die off. Some merge, some just fade. We picked Tingira up off the deck and had it up and running before original Tingira old salt Dan Bowden passed away late 2011. The motto of the original Tingira Old Boys Association was ‘we will never die’. They went close but the tradition continues. We have a duty to them and ourselves! We now have Life Members and Associates. It’s important to show our families our pride and share the JR Tingira story with them. ANZAC Day - we can now march behind our flag and banner, we have a history that can last another century.

I urge all Tingira Boys to try and make the ‘Tingira Tribute’ at the ANZAC Memorial. The IFR is sure to become one of the greatest naval events to be seen in Australia. Moving on from here, I pledge to you the Committee’s two most important tasks over the next 12 months. Firstly to cement a firm relationship with the TS Tingira cadet unit at HMAS Cerberus. Secondly to have another group of ‘Tingira Boys’ gather on ANZAC Day and march in another capital city outside of the present Sydney group! Step up LJR’s ... we need a leader in Brisbane, Melbourne, Hobart, Adelaide and Perth. We have Tingira flags and banners just waiting to be hurled!

Greg Read President TINGIRA AUSTRALIA

TINGIRA A U S T R A L I A A S S O C I AT I O N

ANNUAL REPORT 2011 & 12

FIRST ANNUAL REPORT AVAILABLE FROM WEBSITE

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TINGIRA BOY ...

Varcoe Link to Sydney Cenotaph

‘Tingira Boy’ - Leading Signalman John William Varcoe, DSM,

Mr Fred Davidson, the then metropolitan vice

president of the RSL, conceived the idea of having a suitable memorial to the dead erected in Martin Place – the site of Armistice Day ceremonies. He was a short story writer who, as such, knew Mr H.D. McIntosh – the managing director of the Sunday Times – whom he induced to provide publicity. As a result there appeared, in that paper on 16th November, 1924, an article which read in part: "Let us keep holy our most sacred place. New South Wales should raise a Cenotaph or Memorial Stone in Martin Place. On Armistice Day (five days previously) thousands of Australians assemble in Martin Place to honour the memory of heir Glorious Dead. What other spot so fitting? Martin Place – where our thoughts and our steps turned so often during four years of sorrow and triumph. Martin Place – where in all the days that are to come, we, or those who will stand in our places, will gather in times of stress or joy – a place consecrated by its associations with the days when our worthwhileness as a people was being tried in the Furnace of War.

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The sacred places of a Nation are not made – they are like a Nation’s songs, they come to their own without design or plan. Martin Place has come. Therefore, let us now further consecrate it by raising a memorial stone or Cenotaph – to those who died for us. Let us keep hold this most sacred and hallowed spot." Ten prominent people accepted an invitation from Mr W.J. Stagg, the state secretary of the RSL, to join the 'Sydney Cenotaph Citizens' Committee, of which Mr Justice Ferguson became the chairman. On 13th May, 1925, the committee decided that a deputation should wait on the premier (Sir George Fuller), the leader of the opposition (Mr J.T. Lang) and the leader of the Progressive Party (Colonel M.F. Bruxner) in order to obtain their assurances of support of the project – assurances which were subsequently received. Shortly afterwards an election resulted in Mr Lang becoming premier, causing the committee to send a further deputation to him on 30th October, 1925. At his suggestion a planning committee of three was formed, comprising the Hon. Sydney Smith (nominated by the Citizens' Committee) as chairman, Mr Davidson (nominated by the RSL) and Mr McIntosh (nominated by the government). It was called the 'Sydney Cenotaph Permanent Committee' and had Mr Stagg as its honorary secretary.

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At the time the expatriate Australian sculptor, Sir Bertrand Mackennal, was visiting and, when asked he agreed to design and erect the Cenotaph. On 4th March, 1926, the premier was asked to commission Sir Bertrand, and four days later he agreed to provide a maximum amount of £10,000 in order to do so. The Permanent Committee met in Sir Bertrand's studio on 11th March, 1927, and approved the design; it also decided to appoint Dr J.J.C. Bradfield to supervise the construction work. Dorman Long and Co. was the contractor for the work and its Moruya quarry was the source of the granite from which the Cenotaph is made. It took a team of 20 horses to haul the 17 tonne main stone up from Sydney Harbour. On the southern side of the Cenotaph is inscribed 'TO OUR GLORIOUS DEAD', and on the northern 'LEST WE FORGET'. The southern side is the 'official' side so that the Australian flag is flown on the left side (western) side and Union Jack on the right hand (eastern) side. The Cenotaph incorporates bronze soldier and sailor statues superior figure. Both figures are standing rigidly in the 'at ease' position, with rifle and fixed bayonet. The soldier figure wears a tin hat and the rough, unironed serge uniform with puttees of the Australian Imperial Force (AIF). Superior figure during the Great War the Australian Flying Corps was a part of the Australian Army; also, those women who served did so in the navy or the army; consequently the only two figures are a soldier and a sailor. Its model was Corporal William P. Derby, who, despite his age, had the physique of an athlete of 30 and was a popular artists' model. He was Irish born and had served in the Spanish-American War, but had migrated to Australia and joined the AIF in which he served on Gallipoli and up the Western Front, first as a 15th Battalion stretcher bearer and then in 4 Field Ambulance. He lost his hearing and ended his AIF service as a medical orderly at the Randwick (NSW) Military Hospital. He would later be critical of the figures saying they should have been 'at rest on arms reversed'. He died in January 1936 in Brisbane at the age of 66 years. The sailor figure is in the old traditional uniform of jacket and bell bottom trousers with belt and gaiters; on his sleeve are two inverted stripes representing eight years good conduct. It model was 3059 Leading Signalman John William Varcoe, DSM, who had been born at Bakers Swamp, NSW, on 20th July, 1897 and educated at Dubbo Public School. He joined the Royal Australian Navy on 3rd June, 1913 as a 'Boy Second Class'. On 22nd September, 1914 he completed his initial training in the three masted sailing ship HMAS Tingira (previously the NSS Sobraon) and was posted as a signal boy to first HMAS Cerberus and then HMAS Pioneer. On 14th April, 1917 he was transferred

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“He completed his initial training in the three masted sailing ship HMAS Tingira” to HMAS Parramatta as a signalman. When, on 15th November, 1917 the Italian steamer Orione was torpedoed in the Mediterranean, the Parramatta took it in tow and Varcoe was placed aboard, where his efforts in maintaining communications earned him the Distinguished Service Medal on 17th May, 1918. He remained in the navy until 8th April, 1928 and died in October, 1948. On 8th August, 1927 the Cenotaph was dedicated, although the soldier and sailor statues were still being manufactured in England by A.B. Burton. Sir Dudley de Chair, the state governor, presided over the ceremony and gave an address; Mr Lang delivered the speech of dedication; the Lord Mayor of Sydney, Alderman Mostyn, accepted the Cenotaph on behalf of the people of Sydney; and Lieutenant General Sir Harry Chauvel spoke on the significance of the day's date – 8th of August, the German Army's 'black day'. Two Victoria Cross holders - Messrs W.E. Brown and G.J. Howell – were the two flagmen on the day. The governor laid the only wreath (of laurel); it carried the words: 'A symbol of national homage superseding and consummating all private tributes'. After the statues were fitted on their pedestals there was an unveiling ceremony on 21st February, 1929 – the anniversary of the entry into Jericho by the Australian Light Horse. Again Sir Dudley de Chair presided; the dean of Sydney read a prayer of dedication; the premier, Mr T.R. Bavin, delivered an address and performed the unveiling; and General Sir John Monash gave an address. Messrs G.J. Howell and Bede Kenny, both Victoria Cross holders, were the two flagmen. In July, 1938, it was decided to plant a poplar tree at each end of the Cenotaph. In the event Wagga Wagga City Council donated six Lombardy Poplars, two of which were planted on 21st July. In the following year the Cenotaph was flood-lit. Later (in 1955) extensions were made at each end of the Cenotaph to prevent vehicles from encroaching on it. Since 1928 a person nominated by the RSL has been appointed by the Sydney City Council as 'Custodian of the Cenotaph' to control activities associated with it and to ensure that it is properly maintained. In addition the City Council's By-Law No. 18 under the Sydney Corporation Act of 1932-3 (published in New South Wales Government Gazette No. 24 of 19th February, 1937) regulates conduct in the vicinity of the Cenotaph.

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101 Years on ...

Tingira Team Challenge Continues

Scores of paddlers took to the water on the last Sunday in July for the ‘Tingira Teams Challenge’, an event that the original “Tingira Sailor Boys’ treasured as part of their routine back in the 1920’s on Rose Bay. Organised by Rose Bay’s Shark Island Paddlers, the kayaking race was launched from Tingira Reserve, Rose Bay, and tracked a course to Watson's Bay and back again. Participants – including head Waverley lifeguard Bruce Hopkins – were faced with an extra obstacle, with the club reintroducing the traditional portage, where paddlers have to reach the shore, pick up their boats and run several hundred metres on the sand before reaching the finishing line. ‘‘Money we raise from the event will go towards Marine Rescue,’’ race organiser Tony Haines said. ‘‘In 2011, we raised $ 1,000 that went towards purchasing a defibrillator for the volunteer group and that piece of equipment has already saved two lives.’’

Representing the Tingira Australia Association, committee member Bob Dobson presented the ‘Tingira Bell’ 2013 winning trophy to Paul Smith.

Marine Rescue is a volunteer-run organisation that provides on- water emergency response assistance, boating education courses and continuous coastal radio overage.

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¥

TINGIRA TRIBUTE

µ

To The

SHIPS & SAILORS of the International Fleet Review

SUNSET DEDICATION SERVICE 1730 Thursday 3rd October 2013

ANZAC MEMORIAL Hyde Park South, Sydney, Australia. Special Guests Welcome by Tingira Australia Assoc Patron Vice Admiral Russ Crane AO, CSM, RANR RSL Corp of Guards REFRESHMENTS ON COMPLETION Hyde Park Inn - Forum Centre - First floor - RSVP for entry - Numbers limited Dress: Suit with Association Tie, Medals, Ladies equivalent EMAIL ONLY RSVP: T I N G I R A S E C @ G M A I L . C O M Friday 20th September 2013 Event conducted by T I N G I R A A U S T R A L I A A S S O C I AT I O N P a g e 23

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Many former Junior Recruits and family members often enquire how many boys entered and departed through the gates of HMASLeeuwin. Many of our members had trouble remembering the dates when asked, we hope this official Navy Office chart can answer many questions. Intake 50 with 229 graduating was the largest intake with intake 85 the smallest with 36 graduates.

Date of Entry

Date of Graduation

Number of Boys Entered

Number of Boys Graduated

Leeuwin 1 Leeuwin 2 Leeuwin 3 Leeuwin 4 Leeuwin 5 Leeuwin 6 Cerberus 1 Leeuwin 7 Leeuwin 8 Cerberus 2 Leeuwin 9 Leeuwin 10 Leeuwin 11 Leeuwin 12 Leeuwin 13 Leeuwin 14 Leeuwin 15 Leeuwin 16 Leeuwin 17 Leeuwin 18 Leeuwin 19 Leeuwin 20 Leeuwin 21 Leeuwin 22 Leeuwin 23

13 July 1960 10 January 1961 7 January 1962 11 July 1962 9 January 1963 17 March 1963 10 July 1963 8 January 1964 6 April 1964 8 July 1964 6 January 1965 7 April 1965 14 July 1965 13 October 1965 5 January 1966 6 April 1966 13 July 1966 12 October 1966 2 January 1967 5 April 1967 12 July 1967 11 October 1967 3 January 1968 3 April 1968

16 June 1961 13 December 1961 15 June 1962 12 July 1961 12 June 1963 11 December 1963 26 March 1964 10 June 1964 9 December 1964 1 March 1965 9 June 1965 8 December 1965 30 March 1966 8 June 1966 4 October 1966 7 December 1966 29 March 1967 7 June 1967 3 October 1967 6 December 1967 27 March 1968 4 June 1968 2 October 1968 11 December 1968 25 March 1969

155 151 155 154 179 180 125 201 205 200 201 204 102 204 104 203 104 207 104 207 105 208 100 209 110

142 142 143 134 142 162 123 187 162 198 181 175 86 182 89 177 92 194 89 189 82 179 83 201 86

Leeuwin 24 Leeuwin 25 Leeuwin 26 Leeuwin 27 Leeuwin 28 Leeuwin 29 Leeuwin 30 Leeuwin 31 Leeuwin 32 Leeuwin 33 Leeuwin 34

10 July 1968 9 October 1968 8 January 1969 9 April 1969 16 July 1969 15 October 1969 7 January 1970 15 April 1970 15 July 1970 13 October 1970 6 January 1971

10 June 1969 23 September 1969 9 December 1969 24 March 1970 9 June 1970 22 September 1970 8 December 1970 23 March 1971 8 June 1971 21 September 1971 7 December 1971

210 100 200 110 210 110 252 183 191 145 250

197 76 181 97 168 87 193 140 140 103 175

Intake

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Intake Leeuwin 35 Leeuwin 36 Leeuwin 37 Leeuwin 38 Leeuwin 39 Leeuwin 40 Leeuwin 41 Leeuwin 42 Leeuwin 43 Leeuwin 44 Leeuwin 45 Leeuwin 46 Leeuwin 47 Leeuwin 48 Leeuwin 49 Leeuwin 50 Leeuwin 51 Leeuwin 52 Leeuwin 53 Leeuwin 54 Leeuwin 55 Leeuwin 56 Leeuwin 57 Leeuwin 58 Leeuwin 59 Leeuwin 60 Leeuwin 61 Leeuwin 62 Leeuwin 63 Leeuwin 64 Leeuwin 65 Leeuwin 66 Leeuwin 67 Leeuwin 68 Leeuwin 69 Leeuwin 70 Leeuwin 71 Leeuwin 72 Leeuwin 73 Leeuwin 74 Leeuwin 75 Leeuwin 76 Leeuwin 77 Leeuwin 78 Leeuwin 79 Leeuwin 80 Leeuwin 81 Leeuwin 82 Leeuwin 83 Leeuwin 84 Leeuwin 85 Leeuwin 86 Totals 88

Date of Entry 13 April 1971 14 July 1971 16 October 1971 3 January 1972 10 April 1972 10 July 1972 9 October 1972 10 January 1973 16 April 1973 16 July 1973 15 October 1973 2 January 1974 22 April 1974 15 July 1974 14 October 1974 8 January 1975 1 April 1975 14 July 1975 13 October 1975 7 January 1976 20 April 1976 14 July 1976 11 October 1976 3 January 1977 12 April 1977 11 July 1977 11 October 1977 11 January 1978 10 April 1978 10 July 1978 10 October 1978 10 January 1979 9 April 1979 15 July 1979 9 October 1979 9 January 1980 8 April 1980 14 July 1980 1 October 1980 7 January 1981 7 April 1981 14 July 1981 1 October 1981 1 January 1982 14 April 1982 12 July 1982 6 October 1982 4 January 1983 6 April 1983 5 July 1983 10 January 1984 3 April 1984

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Date of Graduation 21 March 1972 6 June 1972 19 September 1972 12 December 1972 27 March 1973 12 June 1973 25 September 1973 11 December 1973 26 March 1974 11 June 1974 24 September 1974 10 December 1974 25 March 1975 10 June 1975 23 September 1975 9 December 1975 23 March 1976 8 June 1976 21 September 1976 7 December 1976 22 March 1977 7 June 1977 20 September 1977 13 December 1977 21 March 1978 6 June 1978 6 June 1978 19 September 1978 12 December 1978 20 March 1979 12 June 1979 18 September 1979 11 December 1979 18 March 1980 10 June 1980 16 September 1980 9 December 1980 9 March 1981 9 June 1981 15 September 1981 8 December 1981 16 March 1982 9 June 1982 14 September 1982 7 December 1982 15 March 1983 8 June 1983 20 September 1983 6 December 1983 13 March 1984 18 September 1984 4 December 1984

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Entered 209 192 129 207 189 196 188 254 200 224 100 190 163 142 151 276 172 215 143 252 188 197 164 260 205 173 120 120 60 61 90 120 120 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 80 80 90 90 90 90 71 70 71 40 40 13,000

2013

Graduated 142 153 95 167 158 157 135 205 176 178 86 164 128 121 117 229 119 188 113 211 131 168 131 207 145 142 99 96 53 54 79 107 104 53 57 51 54 57 57 48 52 66 67 80 80 83 76 61 66 60 36 37 10,875


Junior Recruit

Mark Bryant Another JR Done Good! Mark Bryant was born in Stanthorpe,

southeast Queensland and started life on a mixed farm including dairy, pigs and small crops. Later the family moved into town and his father worked as a contract fencer before taking up a position with the NSW Department of Agriculture and Fisheries. Mark was involved with the local Pony Club for many years and competed in equestrian events up until he joined the Royal Australian Navy in January 1977. After a life changing 12 months as part of ‘Marks 58th Division’, Mark along with many friends, was posted to HMAS CERBERUS for initial category training as a communicator. In August 1978 with basic Radio Operator training completed, Mark was then posted to HMAS KUTTABUL awaiting his first sea posting. This is an extremely uncertain time as the difference in ships was fairly extreme and there were lots of opportunities to get some great trips.

Joining the HMAS MELBOURNE (CVS21) in the Captain Cook dry dock on the 8th January 1979, four days before his 18th birthday. This was the start of a large number of sea postings including: BAYONET, BETANO, DUBBO, FLINDERS, TORRENS, FREMANTLE, IPSWICH, ADELAIDE, DARWIN and WESTRALIA. Despite being prone to sea sickness Mark loved the sea life and responsibility of service in single operator ships and after posting from the MELBOURNE to MORETON spent the next 10 years almost exclusively in Patrol Boats and Landing Craft.

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The highlight during this time was a deployment to the Solomon Islands in 1983 in HMAS BETANO with AUS CDT 1 embarked. For a single Radio Operator this was an extremely busy time with a full four months on the CW (morse) Broadcast A13B without any reduced schedules of guard sites available which meant the longest time away from the ship at any time was around 3 hours. Promoted to Petty Officer on-board HMAS IPSWICH during K89 exercises off Darwin. During this time IPSWICH suffered a mechanical breakdown and the Commanding Officer and PO Bryant were loaned to the USS OLDENDORF for the remainder of these exercises. Posted to HMAS ADELAIDE for RIMPAC 1992 spending some great time in Hawaii and San Diego. After promotion to CPO on-board HMAS WESTRALIA spent some time as an Instructor at HMAS CERBERUS Communications school before being posted to his final posting as OIC NAVCALS Cairns in Far North Queensland.r Remaining in this position until discharge in January 2001. After retiring from the Navy, Mark reignited his association with the agricultural sector and joined the Cairns Agricultural Show Society as a volunteer Ring Steward and eventually Ring Master, continuing his involvement with regional Australia. This sparked the organisational side in Mark who soon accepted the position of Manager of Australia’s largest regional agricultural show and led the show to successive record gate figures in 2006 and 2007.

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“After retiring from the Navy, Mark reignited his association with the agricultural sector and joined the Cairns Agricultural Show Society”

As the full time Chief Executive Officer of Queensland Shows in 2009 he has enjoyed the experience of working with a fantastic team of volunteers across Queensland and Australia ever since. This role has seen him representing Queensland at all of Australia’s Royal Shows and he represents Australia at Commonwealth agricultural conferences with the most recent being in Edinburgh, Scotland 2010 and Livingstone Zambia in 2012. He has an unwavering belief in Agricultural Australia and the role that our Agricultural and Show Societies play in this industry. Mark, along with his partner Debbie Jewlachow have raised their combined four children in the Cairns area and now have four grandchildren all living in Cairns. Marks highlights are numerous and include initial training in Leeuwin, serving in our last aircraft carrier, the Solomon Islands deployment in BETANO and working with great friends and colleagues over a 24 year career with the RAN. The Australian Agricultural Show movement has also had it’s highlights including a number of audiences with the ‘Princess Royal’ and working closely with volunteers from every community across Queensland to ensure that each and every community has it’s own identity. Great people, fantastic friends. Another JR done good!

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TINGIRA AUSTRALIA

When you get to know some of your former shipmates from Leeuwin you can learn that many of them have gone on from the navy and ‘Done Good.' These page’s are dedicated to those who are in that category and we welcome submissions to Voice Pipe If you know of a ‘Tingira Boy Done Good’ Please share the story!

DITS & STORIES All contribution, stories and dits, pictures and cartoons, all welcome as a publication contribution.

Editor Mark Lee E: tingirasec@gmail.com


Tingira Australia Association - Our History

President’s Pass the Weight Ring their Bell ... What other fine tradition could we at Tingira envisage to hand over the President’s role. April 24th, 7pm, Club Rose Bay, Sydney. Outgoing Tingira President Chris Perrin ‘rings the bell’ and pass’s the weight to incoming President Greg Read. Tingira Secretary Mark Lee holds the middle ground in this image!

Returned & Services League

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Of Australia “ Yo u r We l f a r e I s O u r B u s i n e s s ” C2 o0 1n3t a c t Yo u r S t a t e B r a n c h W I N TE R w w w. r s l . o r g . a u

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