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During the elementary years, Montessori focuses on the development of strong writing skills and library research. The curriculum does not depend on textbooks, as much as on primary and secondary resource materials found in classroom library collections, media centers, public libraries, and on the Internet. Elementary Montessori students commonly use reference materials and public records to seek out additional information when they are doing research. Students write every day, learning to organize increasingly complex ideas and information into well-written stories, poems, reports, plays, and student publications. They begin a systematic study of the English language: vocabulary, spelling rules, and linguistics. Montessori schools commonly teach elementary and middle school students how to use the computer to write, illustrate, and lay out their work. Literature

(Above) Montessori students often make dioramas of books they have read to help make the story come alive. Look at the detail in this young lady’s effort.

The key to the Montessori language arts curriculum is the quality of the material children are given to read. Very young students are introduced to first-rate children’s literature and fascinating reference materials on science, history, geography, and the arts. In an increasing number of Montessori schools, students begin the Junior Great Books Program in kindergarten, and literary studies continue every year thereafter.

©Tomorrow’s Child Magazine Montessori 101: Special Issue • www.montessori.org

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Montessori 101 and Guided Tour of Montessori Classroom  

This is a special issue of our magazine, Tomorrow's Child intrbasic principles of Montessori education and offering an illustrated introduct...

Montessori 101 and Guided Tour of Montessori Classroom  

This is a special issue of our magazine, Tomorrow's Child intrbasic principles of Montessori education and offering an illustrated introduct...