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Timothy Khalifa

Selected Work


Contents The projects presented represent the architectural design and research work of Timothy Khalifa, a fourth year B.Arch student at Carnegie Mellon University. With a focus on sustainability and the future of environmental practice, the work presented lives at the intersection of the tangible and intangible architectural discourse. Timothy is intrigued with the cognitive understanding of the built environment. His work is inspired by research and experimentation that probe how the political, environmental and social aspects of building can change the way humans live and interact with their surroundings. Timothy aims to design sensible human centered interventions that envision and promote a closer and stronger relationship between space and its occupants.


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LaGuardia Airport

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Environmental Charter School

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Eco-Morphologies

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Navice

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Center for Experimental Media

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Saco Lake Wellness Center

Systems Integration Studio

Advanced Construction Studio

Environment, Form & Feedback Studio

Epic Metals Competition

Elaboration Studio

Elaboration Studio


Timothy Khalifa

www.timothykhalifa.com tkhalifa@andrew.cmu.edu 646.515.8115

Skillset

Professional Experience

Digital AutoCAD Rhinoceros 3D VRay for Rhino Grasshopper for Rhino Solid Works Photoshop InDesign Illustrator Adobe After Effects

HWKN Architecture Intern Manhattan, New York . June- August 2017 Concentrated on SD and DD on residential project, assisting with design work while producing drawings, models, and diagrams. Worked on international competition assisting with design and producing models and drawings

Analog Perspective Drawing Rendering Drafting Model Building Fabrication Laser Cutter CNC Router 3D Printing Woodshop Power Tools Languages English Arabic

AESuperlab Architects Architecture Intern Brooklyn, New York. May - August 2016 Assisted with the conceptual design, project development and finalization for a series of projects contributing diagrams, drawings and design work raafat.miller.consulting architects Architecture Intern Cairo, Egypt. July - August 2015 Worked as part of a project team for the Emaar Misr integrated community project, Mivida, supporting finalization of digital work on AutoCAD


Education

Involvement

Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA Graduation 2019 Bachelor of Architecture Dean’s List

Carnegie Mellon University Programs American Institute of Architecture Students Member Inter-Punct Student Journal Member Freedom By Design Member Architecture Peer Mentor Program Peer mentor for architecture student

Cairo American College Cairo, Egypt. June 2014 H.S. Diploma IB Higher Level Visual Arts and Design Technology University of Southern California Los Angeles, CA. Summer 2013 Exploration of Architecture Summer Course

Swimming Awards CAC Male Athlete of the Year Award. May 2014 27 Time ISST medalist Egyptian National Championships medalist

Awards

Academic Experience

Epic Metals Competition 1st Place Pittsburgh, PA. March 2017

Carnegie Mellon University Teaching Assistant Pittsburgh, PA. August 2016 - Present B.Arch Digital Media Course B.Arch Case Studies Course

Aqua Pavilion Competition 1st Place Pittsburgh, PA. October 2015


01

LaGuardia Airport Systems Integration Studio

Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA Professor Hal Hayes Fall 2017 Critical Questions How do we create a unique sense of place within our increasingly globalized society through a large infrastructural project like an airport? How do the systems and structure of a project integrate with the user experiance?

1' = 1/8" Section Model

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LaGuardia Airport 01

“Airport that is worthy of the city and state of New York. It’s the perfect metaphor for w the ambition and optimism and energy that made this the Empire State in the first pla To understand what really made New York great, the backbone of the city of Manhattan The grid has offered a framework for centuries of growth, a skeleton built for uses Taking inspiration from the rigor and ration of the Manhattan grid, the grid as a conc manifested into a building. The design concept revolves around the creation of 10 s in size. Four equally located cores support the 10 divisions. The rigidity of the archi sequencing through it, guaranteeing a long life with a loose fit. Within this grid exists a variance within the system, and space living within the grid that asserts its power building. The park and circulation spaces are open to full height spaces while the ho to create a more comfortable and intimate space reserved primarily for seating and


what we can achieve with ace.� – Governor Cuomo n, the grid, predominates. to evolve and take root. cept can be successfully sliced divisions, all equal itecture allows for a fluid s a disruption, an offbeat, r, the central park of the oldroom lowers in height boarding.

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LaGuardia Airport

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Aerial

The integration of systems and structure are key to the overall concept. The building aims to establish a closer relationship between the user and the building itself. Airports are often places with little to no exposure, with the aim being to cover as much of the building as possible. The design aims to challenge this understanding by exposing the internal structure of the building and allowing the 10 blocks to be clearly defined. The systems of the building, primarily located within the four concrete blocks, are opened up to the users through a glazed wall on the inwards facing sides of the cores. The city of Manhattan offers a lens to the relationship between hard and soft; hard as the city, the built and the man made; soft as the person, the park and the light. The materials used within the building, with the floors in a wood and the cores in a raw concrete explore this relationship. Atrium

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LaGuardia Airport 01


Exterior

Holdroom

Mezzanine

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LaGuardia Airport

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The further integration of active and passive systems is key to the design of the concourse. The building uses its four cores for all of the systems serving the building.

Water Supply from Central Heating/ Cooling Plant

Full Building Systems

Refrigerant Loop kept between 60F & 90F

A

Sun

B Double Skin

Stack Effect

Structure

Structural Module

The further integration of active and passive, the roof is also utilized for water collection that will be used as grey water. Around 2,334,400 gallons will be collected per year and will offset almost 40% of the existing concourse water usage. A double skin faรงade on the southern faรงade of the building reduces heat exposure in the summer and allows for passive heating in the winter. The facades are all operable allowing for a stack effect to help circulate air within the building. 05

LaGuardia Airport 01


The full roof space is utilized for the implementation of evacuated solar tubes, which are around 20% more efficient than solar panels. The tubes are estimated to produce around 5,147,199 KwH/Year of energy. The active systems are based on the supply of hot and cold water from the central plant. The usage of a refrigerant loop kept between 60F & 90F allows each of the four cores to Core house a full ERV and heat Module pump system supplying each respective zone.

Cold Air Supply Exhaust Air Return Hot Water Cold Water Grey Water Refrigerant Loop Evacuated Solar Tubes Supply/Exhaust Unit Radiant Floor

B

C

D

ERV

Systems

2,334,400 Gallons Collected Per Year 40% reduction in water usage

Water Collection

Radiant Floor

5,147,199 KwH/YearProduced 18 KwH / Sq Ft 1.47 KwH / Passenger

Hot Water Cycle

Evacuated Solar Tubes

Axonometric Building Framing 01

LaGuardia Airport

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Transverse Section A

The airport has the potential to become more human as airports are often designed for everyone but the users. The human scale is completely lost; the importance of the human being is lost. How can an airport empower the user as we witness more radical approaches to the street? Using the grid as a system of order and auctioning off the program pieces to be plugged in allows for a variety of program uses, which is fundamental to the success of a space.

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LaGuardia Airport 01

First Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan


1' = 1/8" Section Model

Transverse Section B

Longitudinal Section

How do structure and systems integrate with the user?

Manhattan Grid

Grid

Hard / Soft

Systems + Structure

Manifested Building

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LaGuardia Airport

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02

Environmental Charter School Advanced Construction Studio

Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA Professors Steve Lee and Jeff Davis Spring 2017 Critical Questions How can a building envelope represent the goals of an Environmental Charter School? Can a fast, lightweight building perform efficiently?

The vision of any particular project must follow the vision of its users. The Environmental Charter School promises to “foster knowledge, love of and respect for the environment and the will to preserve it for future generations.� The building serves as an emblem in school design through its progressive timber strategy and passive energy focus. The opportunity to innovate with timber not only pushes construction systems forward but also allows for the children and the city of Pittsburgh to believe and participate in a more sustainable future. Exposing structure to the outside and using the open space to articulate visual and physical relationships defines the honesty of the building. An understanding of how the structure being exposed can begin to integrate into a system and become a poetic flow of integrated structure and systems ties the building together. Encouraging engagement and spurring curiosity, the program structure and systems try to avoid a static feel and push concurrently to create a constant sense of movement. The series of interior atriums flow upwards opening up onto each other, suggesting a constant sense of dynamism. The primary structure is constantly pivoting and shifting upwards in different directions. These components begin to create a space defined by the gestural motions that compose that space, giving the building a more humane connection. In a push to promote progressive educational strategies, the curriculum will highlight student growth through three streams: knowing, doing, and being. 09

Environmental Charter School 02


Exterior Render

02 Environmental Charter School

10


The design externalizes the structure to minimize interior structure and provide more open space. The curriculum prioritizes ecological literacy by directly integrating the building systems into the curriculum. The building’s programmatic strategy allows for the looping of subjects, which will overlap subjects to create greater opportunity for greater perspective. The building becomes a mediator for the neighborhood, with each of the studio hubs relating to existing parcels across the street. The school focuses heavily on the use of passive systems to reduce the use of mechanical systems and eventual maintenance. These systems will minimize the school’s footprint and help with the economic sustainability of the school as a public entity. A double skin façade provides thermal insulation and allows for ventilation in an effort to reduce heating and cooling loads. Plans

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Environmental Charter School 02


Site Plan

Sectional Perspective

Exploded Axonometric

02 Environmental Charter School

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The structure extends through the roof allowing for PV panels to collect energy as well as rainwater. Minimizing the structure’s footprint and extending outwards from the ground allows for more outdoor space surrounding the building. The prefabricated glu-lam timber beams and CLT floor slabs significantly reduce the amount of onsite fabrication and in return reduce the amount of construction waste. The timber-framed building acts as an emblem for future construction and is intended as a tool to educate about the properties and possibilities of wood construction. The school promotes sustainable design and upholds the cultural sustainability of the neighborhood through careful consideration for its context and use of innovative sustainability practices.

Systems Diagram

Program Loop

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Environmental Charter School 02

Interior Render


Wall Section

Final Model

02 Environmental Charter School

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Section

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Eco-Morphologies 03


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Eco-Morphologies

Environment, Form & Feedback Studio

Awarded studio design commendation | collaboration with Adam Kor full collaboration on all aspects of the work throughout the semester

Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA Professors Dana Cupkova, Eddy Man Kim and Gretchen Craig Visiting Professor Marco Poletto Fall 2016 Critical Questions How can we build on a positive relationship with water? Is the sharing movement the key to successful environmental engagements?

By the year 2100, global warming, increasing sea levels and lack of land resources have prompted a shift of inhabitation to the waterfront. Living with a constant state of flooding and inundation is a necessity as well as an opportunity to rethink the housing project, the return to the notion of the commons and the collective. As the city that remains on land becomes over-populated, segregated and too susceptible to the climatic fluctuations of the apocalyptic scenario, we propose a network of water settlements that is not tied to ownership of land, territory or rights; promoting the sharing movement of collectivity for new social and environmental engagements. Imagining the event of a flooded Pittsburgh river edge, we extract environmental data of the Strip District site and overlay the underground combined sewage network with layers of floodplain to identify convergences of storm water overflow. Out of these pollution outflows develop networks of bioswales for water filtration. The filtered water is extracted underground through infrastructural coils that subsequently get developed into a collective housing scheme. The coil essentially operates as a communal vertical street, allowing for program to be plugged in as needed. The street serves as the connective tissue between the plug-ins and becomes the heart of the sharing movement. Plan

03 Eco-Morphologies

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Experiential Axonometric

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Eco-Morphologies 03


Along with the resettlement of population comes the need for food and agriculture. As floodwater inundates land, agricultural real estate is lifted above the ground forming a farmscape canopy network between the housing coils. Supported by the water pumped from underground, growing pipes sprawl out from various levels of the coils, connecting to higher grounds on the un-flooded land. While providing new territory for vegetation these pipes also serve to regenerate existing soil. The result is a constant fluctuation of ground between the softscape of the canopy and the hardscape of existing landform. 03 Eco-Morphologies

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Throughout the semester we’ve been investigating bioswales and related landform typologies, looking at how various land conditions can start relating to each other as well as begin to inform the built environment. We began by playing with these hypothetical landscapes informed by water flow and polluted areas. This information can begin to inform acupunctures and dictate the porosity and fluctuation of the landscape. Site Plan

We’ve also researched the conventional norm of rejecting water and are interested in celebrating the collection of water as well as using filtration systems as an integrated part of the daily experience. Looking at environmental data of the site, we look at how contours and flow lines can start informing density and create a larger networked system. process model depicting an acupuncture related organism used to explore land relationships

Sectional Model

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Eco-Morphologies 03

Process model exploring fluctuation of landscape

Process model exploring layered patterns of water collection


unfolded section investigating a self sustained modular living system dependent on individual water collection while encouraging the integration of water as part of daily life

03 Eco-Morphologies

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04

Navis

Three Day Epic Metals Competition

1st Place | collaboration with Gunn Chaiyapatranun full collaboration on all aspects of the work

Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA Spring 2017 Critical Questions How does a temporary structure facilitate celestial flows?

By the year 2100, global warming, increasing sea levels and lack of land resources have prompted a shift of inhabitation to the waterfront. Living with a constant state of flooding and inundation is a necessity as well as an opportunity to rethink the housing project, the return to the notion of the commons and the collective. As the city that remains on land becomes over-populated, segregated and too susceptible to the climatic fluctuations of the apocalyptic scenario, we propose a network of water settlements that is not tied to ownership of land, territory or rights; promoting the sharing movement of collectivity for new social and environmental engagements. Imagining the event of a flooded Pittsburgh river edge, we extract environmental data of the Strip District site and overlay the underground combined sewage network with layers of floodplain to identify convergences of storm water overflow. Out of infrastru

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Navice 04


N

Situate

40.4406 N, 79.9959 W rie Hen

Sunrise View

treet tta S enue n Av

Milto

Southern Sky

Frick Park

Assemble Modularity

1

2

Glulam structural ribs Toris floor deck (with flat interior surface) Plywood sleeping deck removable for reorganization of space and replacements

3

4

Structural columns & beams (end beams rest on Toris 7 in step 6)

Toris metal roof deck with camera obscura opening punctured, is attached to the bottom side of beams

Sliding glass window panels

5

6

Toris 7 epic metal wall panels (EW)

PV array

Corrugated polycarbonate roof

Clear Twinwall Polycarbonate (NS)

04 Navice

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Navice 04


04 Navice

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Rise

Enlighten

Loosing oneself as the universe opens up above, a series of operable windows slide open to allow for the eventual exit of the universe and accentuate the vertical relationship. Steel flashing

Photovoltaic panels Toris EPIC metal roof deck Sliding (operable) glass window roof Corrugated polycarbonate roof Celestial camera obscura opening

Sliding tracks Glulam beam 6” @4’ O-C Sliding (operable) glass window roof

Camera Obscura Detail

Complimenting this sense of curiosity with a greater understanding of its origins, a camera obscura allows for the entrance of the universe through a projection onto the floor providing an opportunity to use the space as a dynamic learning environment. This brings the wonders of the universe into the confines of a classroom where students can feel their presence amongst the stars.

Window Detail

Immerse Enhancing a sense of continuity and constant awareness of being in a vessel, a single plane swoops from the entrance of the universe to its exit. The plane forms the space, acting as a floor system, an enclosure system and a structural system.

Navice

Sextant

Photovoltaic panels Toris EPIC metal roof deck Sliding (operable) glass window roof Corrugated polycarbonate roof JCPenney Home™ Mirage Blackout Cordless Cellular Shade Single-glazed window

Clear twinwall polycarbonate Toris EPIC metal floor deck Glulam ribs 6” @ 4’ O-C

Wall to Roof Detail Competition Model

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Navice 04

4.00”

Ship Hull


Drainage holes (metal perforations)

Toris 7 EPIC metal wall panel Toris EPIC metal floor deck

Glulam columns 6” @ 4’ O-C Glulam ribs 6” @ 4’ C-C 1 1/2” plywood sleeping deck

Camera obscura projection surface

Clear twinwall polycarbonate 1/2”

N 7.00”

04 Navice

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Center for Experiential Media 05


05

Center for Experimental Media Elaboration Studio

Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA Professors Jeremy Ficca and Mick McNutt Spring 2016 Critical Questions Can a dynamic relationship exist between art and user?

The notion of a system composed of a constant and a multitude of changing variables serves as the basis behind the Center. Highlighting the stairs regularity curates a sequence, with the stair functioning as a familiar controlled and measured entity. Circulation is utilized as the constant with the changing idea of new media as the variable. A conventional black box relies on a static user relationship based primarily on seating and a one-way transfer of information. Here, the black box is reinvented through a slight rotation, transforming it into a modern day instrument for media and utilizing circulation to articulate a more dynamic user relationship. The rotation allows for the activation of the outdoor space, ushers a flow of light into the lower floor, and constructs a visual connection with the existing conditions. This gesture compliments the existing open space in front of the adjacent church as well as forms a connection between the existing and newer urban fabrics. The exterior ribs increase in size to accentuate their directionality and elongate the dialogue between the spaces. The program is separated into three levels of exposure, which serve as the primary organizational drivers. The visible, which is seen but not accessible to outsiders, the accessible, which contains the primary open spaces of the program, and the hidden, which is concealed.

05 Center for Experiential Media

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Sectional Perspective

unfolded section highlighting the continuity and intention of the stair. The users constant movement within the space mimics the dynamic performance and installations occurring throughout.

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Center for Experiential Media 05


Plan

05 Center for Experiential Media

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Traditional Black Box

Threshold

Rotated Black Box

Directionality of Ribs

Natural Light

Degrees of Exposure

Visible Hidden Accesible

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Center for Experiential Media 05


1' = 1/16" Model

Detail Model

Exploded Axonometric

05 Center for Experiential Media

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06

Saco Lake Wellness Center Elaboration Studio

Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA Professors Jeremy Ficca and Mick McNutt Spring 2016 Critical Questions Can a slight disconnect allow for greater connection?

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Saco Lake Wellness Center 06


The Wellness Center's location, secluded deep within the vast forest of the northern Appalachian Mountains, aims at uniting the material palette of the structure with the materials often found in the forest by creating multifaceted spaces defined by degrees of elevation, light and comfort. The structure is disconnected from the ground and relies on a series of ribbon like apertures to vary the comfort levels throughout the program. Several changes in height allow spatial features to further adjust degrees of comfort and privacy. It’s heavy concrete base acts as a stem and is used to elevate the structure allowing it to become one with the high rising trees of the forest. The apertures create a distinct dialogue between the density of the forest and the entry of light into the structure. Sequence serves as the main organizational driver behind the program. The Bath House departs from conventional linear approaches to the sequential layout of baths and chooses to wrap the program around a central node.

Circulation Concept Model

06 Saco Lake Wellness Center

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Experiential Collage

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Saco Lake Wellness Center 06


warm pool

hot pool

cold pool

entrance cold

hot pool

typical ritual

pool

ool

pool

p cold

entrance

warm

ol

m po

war

enhanced ritual

Sectional Perspective

Entering from deep within the forest, the user is taken through a dark base and is brought up into the main area. The disconnect between the ground and the space abruptly becomes apparent. Lifting the space above the ground creates a greater bond between the user and the layering of the forest. As one circulates through the space, the rooms vary in height and openings to the outside, representing the different qualities of the individual rooms. Floor Plan

06 Saco Lake Wellness Center

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Exploded Axonometric Drawing

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Saco Lake Wellness Center 06


Experiential Collage

Final Model

Final Model

06 Saco Lake Wellness Center

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Biography Timothy Khalifa (Cairo,1995) is a fourth year architecture student set to graduate in 2019 with a B.Arch degree from the Carnegie Mellon University School of Fine Arts, where he is on the Dean's List. Timothy spent the summer of 2017 working at New York based practice HWKN. He worked primarily on schematic design and design development for a residential home, an international skyscraper competition and a residential development, concentrating on design work and producing drawings, models, and diagrams while preparing for and attending client meetings. Timothy previously worked at AESuperlab, a cross-disciplinary creative design studio, located in Brooklyn, New York. As an intern, he assisted with the conceptual design, project development and finalization for a series of projects contributing diagrams, drawings and design work. Projects include Halo NYC, a kinetic 11-ride structure proposed above Penn Station; Infinicities, an evolving parametric digital metropolis; and Solar Charging Stations for Totem Power. During 2015, Timothy interned with raafat.miller.consulting architects in Cairo, Egypt on the project team for the Emaar Misr integrated community project, Mivida, supporting finalization of digital work on AutoCAD. Timothy has worked as a teaching assistant at Carnegie Mellon for the B. Arch Case Studies in Architecture course, Digital Media course, and Materials and Assembly course. He has been involved in a series of award winning proposals including the 2017 Epic Metals Competition and the 2015 Aqua Pavilion Competition. He enjoys competitive swimming, running and traveling.


Timothy Khalifa 2018 Portfolio  
Timothy Khalifa 2018 Portfolio  
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