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PORTFOLIO Architecture

selected works by Timothy Tay Zhi Wei

design ideation | final design


ACADEMIC QUALIFICATIONS 2017 - Present

NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF SINGAPORE

- Masters of Architecture

- Bachelors of Arts (Architecture) (Distinction) - BCA-Industry Sponsorship Recipient

2012 - 2015 SINGAPORE POLYTECHNIC - Diploma in Architecture

2008 - 2011

- Certificate in Sustainability (Diploma Plus)

VICTORIA SCHOOL

WORK EXPERIENCES MAY - AUG 2019 DP ARCHITECTS PTE LTD - Feasibility Study of The National Library, Singapore

- Revit 3D Modelling - Photoshopping & Rendering of Interior Perspectives

JUN - SEP 2014 CPG CONSULTANTS PTE LTD (AIRPORT DIV) - Tender Detail Drawings

TIMOTHY TAY ZHI WEI PERSONAL INFORMATION +65 81829315

timothy_zw_tay@yahoo.com.sg

https://sg.linkedin.com/in/timothy-tay

- Revit 3D Modelling - Concept Design Proposal & Design Reports

JAN - APR 2012

A. ALLLIANCE DESIGN INTERNATIONAL

- Graphics & Formoatting of a Planning Study Report - Graphics Team for the SIP World Congress Conference - Design Team for a Proposed Resort & Hotel Development

EXPERTISE HANDS - ON SOFTWARES AUTOCAD MODEL- MAKING REVIT HAND DRAWING SKETCHUP PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTOSHOP LIGHTROOM LANGUAGE ILLUSTRATOR ENGLISH INDESIGN CHINESE MICROSOFT OFFICE


CONTENT Living with Water

6

The Perpetual Construction Site

38

Re-Life

52

Makers’ Union

66

re-Intensify

80

Stack-A-Tainer

92

The Coalesce

100

Nekkid (Revamped)

114

OGE²

124

The Hideout

144


LIVING WITH WATER NUS Architecture I Masters Thesis

Project Type

: Climate Change: Response to Rising Sea Levels

Project Site

: Marine Parade Central, Singapore

Supervisor

: Mr Teh Joo Heng


Living with Water

Mapping of Land Inundated in Marine Parade

A Better Quality of Life

During the 2019 National Day Rally, Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong highlighted the urgent need for Singapore to tackle Rising Sea Levels. He mentioned that although Singapore is already making plans for new developments to be at least 4m above the mean sea level, existing buildings are still at risk of flooding, suggesting mitigation measures such as dykes & polders to be implemented. This thesis aims to explore the possibility of embracing water, allowing floodwaters into Singapore’s coastal areas, instead of resisting it. As an alternative to the government’s plan of building dykes and polders on reclaimed land, it reimagines how coastal districts can integrate water into its urban landscape. With incoming water, there will be a loss in public spaces and greenery, impacting our quality of life. Hence, this thesis focuses on restoring public spaces and greenery as well as enhancing the quality of life through embracing incoming seawater. It aims to create a better living, playing and sustainable environment for all with new forms of water-based public spaces, bringing people and water together.

Flood Prone Areas

Year 2030 (+0.2m) Sea Level Rise: +0.3m Land Area Affected: 700km2

Sea Level Rise: +0.7m Land Area Affected: 651.8km2

Sea Level Rise: +1m Land Area Affected: 586.2km2

Varying Tide Levels & Heights Year 2050 (+0.3m)

Year 2080 (+0.7m)


Living with Water I Master Thesis

Urban Strategies

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Living with Water I Master Thesis

Phasing of East Coast Masterplan

Archipelago Critical buildings like residential, malls, places of worship etc are protected by being clustered into islands with waterway flowing through

Year 2030 (+0.2m)

Lush Greenery With incoming water, most trees will be submerged and removed. Mangroves & wetlands will be the new form of green populating around and within each island Year 2050 (+0.3m)

Cut and Fill After identifying location of mounds, roads and selected areas are dug up, forming basins. The sane will then be used to create new landforms for newer activities

Year 2065 (+0.4m)

Year 2080 (+0.7m)


Living with Water I Master Thesis

EAST COAST MASTERPLAN Marine Parade 2080

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Living with Water I Master Thesis

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Living with Water I Master Thesis

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Living with Water I Master Thesis

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14 12

11

13 8

7

10 2

6 9

1

5 3

4

Embrace

Float

Elevate

1

Floating Food Stalls

4

Live Fish Market

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2

Floating Hydroponic Pods

5

Recreational Fishing

9 Elevated Void Decks

3

Floating Cabanas

6

Harbour Bath

10 Sky Gardens

7

Urban Lagoon

Highline Walkway

Defend 11

MARINE PARADE DIVISION NEWS

Float

Food Stalls

Hydroponics

Cabanas

Boardwalks

Embrace

Live Fish Market

Recreational Fishing

Habour Bath

Urban Lagoon

Elevate

Highline Walkway

Void Decks

Greenery

Defend

Pier

Shops

Wetlands

Docking Pier

12 Commercial Shops 13 Constructed Wetlands 14 Performance Platform

Performance Plaform


Living with Water I Master Thesis

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Living with Water I Master Thesis

Live Fish Market

PLAY Imagine a beach within the city centre, a pool at what used to be a road and a market that allows you to catch your own fish. These are new forms of play that embraces incoming seawater.

Harbour Bath

Urban Lagoon


Living with Water I Master Thesis

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Living with Water I Master Thesis

Fishing Platform

Fishing Platform

Live Fish Market The live fish market is unlike a traditional wet market. It is one which uses the incoming seawater to keep live and fresh fishes to be sold. Vendors will surround a central fish holding area, which are divided into compartments by fishing nets. Water will be constantly filtered with oxygen pumped into the holding area to keep the fishes alive and fresh.

Kitchen

Kitchen

Water Filtration & Pump Room

Water Filtration & Pump Room

Fish Stall

Kitchen

Fish Stall

(Wet Kitchen)

Kitchen

Restroom (M)

Restroom (M)

(Wet Kitchen)

Live Fish Area

The fish holding area allows customers to walk down to have a closer look at the fishes before purchasing in which the fish monger will help catch and descale. The customer will then have the option to either take the fresh fish home or have it consumed immediately at the second level, a bar-styled restaurant, where they can watch the chef prepare their meal.

Restroom (F)

Restroom (F)

Fish Stall

Fish Stall

Live Fish Area

(Wet Kitchen)

(Wet Kitchen)

Fish Stall

Seafood Dining Counter

Seafood Dining Counter

Seafood Dining Counter

Seafood Dining Counter

Seafood Dining Counter

Fish Stall

(Wet Kitchen)

Veg

Seafood Dining Counter

(Wet Kitchen)

Live Fish Area

Veg

Poultry

Poultry

Veg

Veg

Docking & Delivery

Poultry Veg

Veg

Poultry Veg

Veg


Living with Water I Master Thesis

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Living with Water I Master Thesis

SALTWATER FISHES START FREE

The market will also have a recreational fishing area, where visitors will be able to go through a unique experience of catching their own fish to be eaten fresh at the restaurant above as well as a roof top garden.

�2

CATCH your Own FISH

Buy

Cod Fish

Grouper

Anchovies Fishing Photo

Handover

Hake

Mackerel

Snapper Sushi

Salmon

Sardine

Cook

Fillet

Pomfret Eating!!

Highline Urban Lagoon

Recreational Fishing

Dining Market

Fish


Living with Water I Master Thesis

The design of the live fish market is inspired by the traditional kelongs that filled the East Coast area in the past, with the pitch roofs providing ample shade and shelter as well as breezy natural ventilation through the market. The market is supported by steel structures cladded in aluminium composite panels with a timber look and intentionally exposed to resemble a traditional kelong. On the ground level, due to the changes in tide, the steel columns are resting on concrete footings which can be exposed to water without any damage. The ground floor uses a timber deck, placed above the concrete structures, while the top floors uses natural stone tiles.

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Living with Water I Master Thesis

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Living with Water I Master Thesis

Aerial view of Floating Public Spaces

LIVING How would residential public spaces within a HDB cluster change with the incoming water? Living will be better with the introduction of 3 water-based programs, the floating food stalls, floating hydroponic pods and floating cabanas. It will not only bring essential services closer to residents, it too will add vibrancy within the estate.

Floating Food Stalls

Floating Hydroponic Pods & Cabanas


Living with Water I Master Thesis

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Living with Water I Master Thesis

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Floating Food Stalls Due to incoming waters and the lack of land to hold huge crowds, the Marine Parade Central model have been decentralised with the food stalls relocating to the HDB estates. Not only does it bring essential services closer to residents, it adds vibrancy within the estate, with the 3 programs platforms to foster strong community bonds between residents. The floating food stalls are modular pods located within each HDB estate cluster, with the potential for implementation in other locations when flooding arises. The stalls are resting on concrete-coated Styrofoam pontoon with its base connected to a concrete sinker to keep it in position. With seawater right beneath, the floating food stalls uses a desalination system to produce freshwater, which can be used for food preparation and consumption.

Concrete-coated Styrofoam Pontoon

Concrete Sinker

Adjustable Pile

Floating Hydroponics Pod

Floating Pontoon

Desalination System

Floating Boardwalk


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Living with Water I Master Thesis

Roof Detail of Floating Food Stalls

1 Exploded Axonometric of Floating Food Stalls The canopy for each pod is a wave-like sheath of PTFE glass fibre fabric with flexible Solar PV films attached above it, allowing diffused natural light through the gaps. Shaped as a wave, the canopy is designed to shed water and create maximum surface area to capture solar rays. The extruded beam structure is curved down to act as a rainscreen during times of heavy rain

2 Detail of Floating Boardwalk

3 4 1

Flexible PV Solar Film

2

PTFE Coated Glass Fibre Fabric

3

Perimeter Steel Ring Beam

4

Stainless Steel Support Column

5

Food Stalls

6

Floating Boardwalk

7

Pontoon

5

7 6


Living with Water I Master Thesis

Floating Hydroponic Pods Beside the floating food stalls are the hydroponic pods. It replaces the current urban farms and creates a new farming experience for residents. With seawater beneath, the hydroponics pods uses solar radiation to evaporate seawater into water droplets, generating fresh water to be used in the hydroponics system.

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Living with Water I Master Thesis

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Living with Water I Master Thesis

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Living with Water I Master Thesis

CONNECTIVITY Due to incoming seawater, there will be a loss of land and connectivity will be an issue. The highline will be a new form of linkway to connect critical buildings, HDBs and MRT exits within the area, creating easy accessibility for all.

Aerial view of Highline and Promenade

The highline is an elevated pedestrian highway that is stable and provides amazing waterway views. Pockets of activity spaces and lounges are found along the highline to encourage gatherings and events, turning it into an events playground, beaming with life. With East Coast Park submerged, the highline will be part of the park connector network, connecting Marine Parade to the rest of East Coast. Hence, it will be filled with lush greenery to not only replace the lost greenery but adds even more to provide more shade as well as promoting wellness for all. The wood from trees cut down due to incoming water will be used to make both the planters and seats on the highline, promoting sustainability practices.

Water Promenade

Highline


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Living with Water I Master Thesis

LANDSCAPE

Playground Fitness Area Outdoor Lounge

Sky Garden

Sports Arena

However, not all existing buildings are able to adapt to incoming waters and critical buildings have to be protected. Both soft and hard-edge strategies are adopted along the promenade which includes constructed wetlands, piers, stepped terraces, lookout decks and commercial shops.

HIGHLINE

PROTECTION

Food Stalls

Amphitheatre Heritage Gallery

Trampoline Park

Foot Pools

The constructed wetland is a soft edge strategy that not only replaces the greenery that is lost, it is an opportunity for visitors and children to get close to water in a safe way. The constructed wetlands also serve as a bioswale, filtering and absorbing seawater and using a tank beneath converting it to freshwater for functional use.

PROMENADE

As part of the new decentralised model, commercial shops from Marine Parade Central will be relocated along the waterway, not only acting as a protection, but also bringing it closer to the residents and various MRT exits spread out along the waterway. Solar panels and wave convertors will contribute to the electrical operations of the commercial shops in which waves will be generated by the constant flow of amphibious vehicles along the waterway.

Lookout Decking Stepped Terrace

Commercial Shops

Constructed Wetlands

Pier

Habour Bath


Living with Water I Master Thesis

Section of Harbour Bath & Open Plaza

Section of Wave Converter & Pier

Section of Constructed Wetlands & Lookout Deck

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Living with Water I Master Thesis

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THE PERPETUAL CONSTRUCTION SITE NUS Architecture I Y3S1 Project Type

: Urban Injection - Mini Prototype

Project Site

: St Joseph’s Church, Singapore

The Team

: Timothy Tay Loo Quan Le

Supervisor : Dr Zdravko Trivic Dr Junko Tamura

*Featured at Singapore Archifest 2020*


The Perpetual Construction Site Construction Material as Public Resource

Situated at the fence surrounding St Joseph’s Church under renovation, this prototype aims at converting the edge of a construction site into an accessible and safe social space. Inspired by Nan Ellin’s Integral Urbanism (2006), it integrates the ideas of hybridity, connectivity, porosity, authenticity and vulnerability to create a symbiotic relationship between the temporarily inaccessible site and its physical and social context.

WHERE? Where should we insert our prototype at the site such that it will benefit both the public and the ones involved in the construction?

1. Public deprived of the public space due to the seemingly endless construction

3. or.. should it be placed outside the construction site? But it will look like its catering more to the

2. There maybe safety concerns if the intervention is within the construction site

4. Perhaps, the best place is somewhere in between and the prototype will be the barrier. It could

public and the workers in the construction may not benefit from it.

be a space which seperates the inside and the outside.


The Perpetual Construction Site I Y3S1

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The Perpetual Construction Site I Y3S1

In order to make it easier for these materials to be moved around, they will be carried on wooden pallets. The wooden pallet will act as a base that prevents the materials from coming into contact with the ground. We have also given ourselves guidelines and constraints to work with by designing based on the exact sizes of the materials.

The prototype will not only serve as a barrier (that does not obstruct the view) but also as a space with a meaningful function to satisfy the needs of users on both realms. The barrier that people hate now becomes a usable space that people will get to enjoy.

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The Perpetual Construction Site I Y3S1

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The Perpetual Construction Site I Y3S1

Proposed Layout

Unlimited Variations To ease the building process, the prototype consists of different modules, whereby the wooden pallets form the base of each module. The design has a total of 5 module variations, where multiple modules are assembled together to form the entire prototype. As such, the prototype can be easily expanded, dismantled and rebuilt, creating various permutations that can suit any construction site. The materials used in the construction will be prepared off-site and packaged in a way that allows them to serve a different function (eg: as a bench or shelter) Here are the suggested modules that we will be using to explore various configurations.

This is the proposed layout. There are, however, many other possible configurations. In this layout, spaces are arranged in a way that allows the less important spaces to be removed first and the main public space will remain until the end of construction.

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The Perpetual Construction Site I Y3S1

The amount of public space decreases over the period of construction, as more and more modules are disassembled and used in the construction. By the end of the construction, all these little pockets of public spaces around the site would have disappeared and the site will be accessible once again - but this time, with a brand new look.

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The Perpetual Construction Site I Y3S1

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The Perpetual Construction Site I Y3S1

At the start of every construction, these modules which are made of the materials used in the construction will be placed on its periphery to create public spaces. It is a way to make it up to the public for depriving them the chance to access and use the main site when it is under construction. Here are two other possible configurations.

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The Perpetual Construction Site I Y3S1

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For alternative layout 2, we propose to replace the existing fence with rotating panels. This will blur the boundaries between the outside and the church compound, creating multiple entrances into the prototype. When the construction is over and the entire prototype is removed, the rotating panels can still act as an entrance to the church compound, rather than just limiting the entrances from the main gate. For security reasons, it can also be rotated back to its original position and be locked.


The Perpetual Construction Site I Y3S1

While the prototype is designed for the site at St. Joseph’s Church, the same idea could be applied to other construction sites as well. Just imagine.. wouldn’t it be nice if the event of construction is something that people actually look forward to? They will look forward to the pop-up spaces, pop-up stores or pushcarts that come together with the construction site and construction becomes something that is less negative from the public point of view.

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The Perpetual Construction Site I Y3S1

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RELIFE NUS Architecture I Y4S2 Project Type : Sharing Cities NUS -Tsinghua - DPA Joint Studio Project Site

: Pearl’s Hill, Singapore

The Team

: Bernie Ang Tan Yan Ni Zhao Yue Timothy Tay

Supervisor : Dr Zhang Ye Mr Seah Chee Huang *To be Featured at Venice Biennale Singapore Pavilion 2021*


Re-Life Engaging the New Aged

The site Pearl’s Hill is situated in the Central of Singapore, sandwiched between the Fort Canning Hill and the relatively new Duxton Park stretch as part of the government’s greening efforts. It is also in close proximity to Singapore’s traditional and culturally rich districts of Tiong Bahru and Chinatown.

Another issue was how Pearl’s Hill Park is so prominent but rarely does anyone use it. This is mainly due to its steep terrain and multiple road networks that interrupt the pedestrian flow from one side to another. Currently there is no link between the 3 parks identified here and linking them to the greater Park Connector Network of Singapore is something we aim to achieve in the masterplan.

ISTANA

FORT CANNING HILL BAY EAST GARDEN

PEARL’S HILL

GARDENS BY THE BAY

Upon closer inspection, we have identified the isolation of two prominent demographics on site; namely the elderly and foreign students. These two groups of people share very similar living conditions in both financial and physical terms due to their low accessible income as well as their residing dimly lit and cramped living space.

However, one potential we spotted on site is the extremely rich cultural and historical significance of the site’s adjacent plot - Chinatown. The People’s Park Complex stands out amongst the rest, serving as a notable entrance to site from the low lying shophouses in Chinatown. However, the cultural richness seems to come to an unfortunate dead end at the PPC. We saw this as an opportunity to spread the richness of the Chinese Traditions beyond Chinatown to the rest of the Site


Re-Life I Y4S2

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Re-Life I Y4S2

Vision:

P P EE O OP P LL EE II N N S S II N NG GA AP PO OR R EE 2.7 OUTRAM

~ 20,000 residents

2018

46.8

23% above 65

median

2030

Pearl’s Hill

China Square

2020

People’s Park

42.2 median

China Town

7.4 37.9 median

23

29

19

30

2000

22

Percentage of residents above 65 by subzones

China Square

2010

34.8 median

China Town

10.5 29.3 2000

2005

2010

2015

2020

2000

2005

2005

2010

2015

2020

median

1990

People’s Park

Pearl’s Hill

2000

2010

2015

2020

2000

2005

2010

2015

2020

Percentage of elderly in the past 2 decades

OUTRAM

~ 25,000 residents

2030

1980

24.5 median

30% above 65

13.5

MOH MOH action action plan plan for for SUCCESSFUL SUCCESSFUL AGEING AGEING LIFELONG LEARNING

19.7 median

active learning engages the minds of elderly and helps them stay in touch with societal happenings.

1970 OLD AGE SUPPORT RATIO

SENIOR VOLUNTEERISM

volunteering opportunities give elderly platforms to engage their skills and experties, empowering them to be valuable assets of the society.

1960

18.8 median

SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT & INCLUSION

social spaces near homes allow for encounters with neighbours and reduces boredom and loneliness amongst elderly.

20 median

1950

Looking ahead to 2030, Singapore’s population will continue to grow with its decreasing old-age support ratio. Over the years, the old-age support ratio has seen a drastic drop from 13.5 in 1970 to the projected 2.7 in 2030. The situation in Outram is far more substantial due to its proportionately higher percentage of elderly and low average income in the area. In 10 years’ time, the proportion of elderly in Outram will rise from 23% to 30%. Meanwhile, URA has been driving its two main objectives over the years; connecting the land with more green as well as generating more mixed use neighbourhoods. Projecting into 2030, we therefore see the opportunity for our masterplan to focus on the aspects of new aged, nature and tradition which are unique features of our site

SPATIAL STRATEGY

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Re-Life I Y4S2

Integrated System Diagram LIFESTYLE CHOICES

1. Beginner Engaging in experiential consumption through small scale workshops

2. Intermediate These skills can be learnt at a greater depth in a school which will be run by existing business owners on site.

3. Career Centralised and large scale production of traditional products on site, e.g. traditional clothing and handicraft. for elderlies to consider a second career and work full time again in the production facilities both onsite and off site.

4. Participate The products of these sub system can be celebrated in permanent programs such as theatre, market place and expo. Younger visitors to the site can be exposed to the beauty of the rich cultural heritage.

STAKEHOLDERS & OTHERS This system is not exclusive to the residents living on site. Business owners in the conservation zone can be part of this shared system. One observation on site is the amount of waste collected in the area. Innovative way of recycling can be used to power the system onsite. For example, food waste can be made into fabric dye.

CO-LIVING In order to address the site issue mentioned earlier, existing residential clusters will be renovated into affordable, co living units that support communal living for both elderly and students. By participating in urban farming and community kitchen, the elderly can do simple farming and cook meals for the students, in return, students contribute more in growing their own food for more sustainable living.

PHYSICALLY ACTIVE The second aspect of wellness is to remain physically active through activities such as urban farm. Sports facilities will be provided in the vicinity. Aligning with the national agenda, national step challenge will also be integrated into the the new housing

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Re-Life I Y4S2

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Re-Life I Y4S2

Masterplan

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Re-Life I Y4S2

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Re-Life I Y4S2

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Sub-Systems 1. We first decided the location of our residential clusters based on the existing programmes on site. The coliving blocks have remained at pretty much where they were to minimise disruption. Projecting into 2030, new residential clusters will be built near outram MRT, aligning with the land use planning by URA. Each cluster is introduced with an unique character following the existing programmes on site. 2. Co living units are above ground. Small scale workshops distributed all around the site in the vicinity of co living units, occupies the podium for experiential learning. Each cluster will have a predominant type of workshop to give each cluster a more distinct character. Schools are located in between clusters, at strategic locations facing the streets to encourage interactions between clusters. 3. The main green link will be established following URA’s plan in this area. Urban agriculture will be introduced both at the foot of the hill and within in co-living blocks to activate the entry point to green link. 4. Public gathering spaces intended for different programs with varying scale will be distributed through the site. Street life will now be more vibrant, for example with fitness facilities and urban farm which requires regular visit. Podium space will also be activated for more community interactions. In this way, the new aged can remain engaged both socially and physically. 5. Most of the region within pearl’s hill will now be pedestrianised. An alternative mode of transport will be introduced on site. Projecting into 2030, automated vehicles will be serving the site. To Transport products, wastes as well as residents in the area

Re-Life I Y4S2

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Re-Life I Y4S2

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Re-Life I Y4S2

Urban Sections

Aerial Perspectives

Outram

Kreta Ayer

Upper Cross Street

York’s Hill


MAKERS’ UNION NUS Architecture I Y4S2 Project Type : Sharing Cities NUS -Tsinghua - DPA Joint Studio Project Site

: Pearl’s Hill, Singapore

Size

: 26 Hectares

Supervisor : Dr Zhang Ye Mr Seah Chee Huang


Makers’ Union

Upskilling through Co-Production With an objective of preparing the local community to embark on their 2nd Career ambitions, 3 Schools and a Makerspace are proposed in the developed masterplan of Chinatown. These facilities are provided to upskill and equipt individuals with the necessary skillsets related to the making of Traditional Chinese Cultural Products. As a strategy to encourage movement across the site, each school is placed between 2 clusters, which are of similar charateristics. The various schools are: 1. School of Arts & Artefacts 2. TCM & Culinary School 3. Handicraft & Fashion School

These facilities then become platforms for various people to interact with one another, learning from each other, exchanging ideas as well as learning more about the rich Chinese culture. Upon upskilling at the schools, one can either move on to the MakerSpace (a central production hub, speacialising in the production of traditional chinese goods) or they can display their works at the Festive Plaza, Heritage Gallery and Expo, or sell them at the respective Market Places throughout the site. Individuals working in the MakerSpace will be working hand-in-hand with the existing businesses, who will provide additional materials and mentorship to the makers.

Sub-Systems Diagram

In each school, various educational programs such as classrooms and more hands-on workshop studios are integrated with social spaces and community events, which brings different groups of people together, students, residents and even the tourists visiting Chinatown.

Location of Schools & MakerSpace

MakerSpace Studio


Makers’ Union I Y4S2

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Makers’ Union I Y4S2

School of Arts & Artefacts

Spatial Breakdown

The School of Arts & Artefacts is the first of the 3 schools designed in the Masterplan. With the overarching concept of spreading the Chinese culture beyond Chinatown, the school consist of programs to educate and share the knowledge of the Arts & Artefacrs aspects of the Chinese Culture to all.

1. Wayfinding: Helping visitors identify specific programs as they navigate around 2. Community: Introducing programs to bring students, visitors and residents together 3. Enhancement: Help boost business opportunities for the

Massing Diagram

Heritage Gallery Overlooking Atrium

existing retail shops in People’s Park Complex

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Makers’ Union I Y4S2

Sharing Food: How fresh produce are grown on site and distributed to supply all f&b outlets throughout the site

Sharing Amenities: How various social programs are injected at key nodes to brings people together

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Makers’ Union I Y4S2

Sharing Knowledge: How the various schools & workshops are avenues to promote the exchange of ideas

Sharing Culture: How the rich Chinese Culture in Chinatown is extended all over the site

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Makers’ Union I Y4S2

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Section Perspective This Section Perspective shows abit more clearly how the school and makerspace relate to each other and its surrounding components. By placing the artefact studios at the facade of the school, there will be constant visual connection between students and makers which really enhances learning beyond just verbal interaction and also illustrating my earlier explanation of activating the atrium space of the School for Arts & Artefacts

Makers’ Union I Y4S2

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Makers’ Union I Y4S2

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Makers’ Union I Y4S2

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MakerSpace - Relation between Spaces The plan show the relation between the different maker studios, public social spaces and surrounding programs on the same and across different levels. The overarching concept was to create a very open plan, where makers of different specialities can access different studio spaces and interact with all users. For example, The Ceramic Maker Studios and Fabrication Labs are placed directly opposite its related program such as the ceramic and woodworks workshop. The intention is to create a visual connectivity to enhance learning on both ends.

Variety of Studios

Handicrafts

Ceramic

Chinese Paintings

Woodworks

With a refurbished residential block situated directly above the makerspace, the section shows the relation between both programs and how the interface AV Resi link not only serves the AV to distribute essentials around the site, but is also a platform to bring both residents and makers together as seen in the circulation path in yellow


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Handicraft & Fashion School The handicraft and fashion school is located at the intersection between the fashion, handicraft and f&b clusters. Being the intersection point, programs that relates to all 3 areas such as design studios, central cafes and also an exhibition space are introduced in the school.

Makers’ Union I Y4S2

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TCM & Culinary School The Section Perspective shows how the TCM School, which is also a clinic, and the Culinary School integrates with other programs in the same cluster. Urban Farming is integrated within the complex of both schools and plays a key role in how the programs of both schools can relate to each other through food. Not only is food tying both schools together, it also relates to the communal kitchen and the residential blocks surrounding the schools

Sharing Food Cycle ‘Makeshift Runway’ 1 of the 4 sharing aspects implemented across all schools, The exhibition space, which can also become a makeshift runway during events, is an example of Sharing Amenities, where everyone, from students to the public will gather around the school to watch the spectacular.

1 of the 4 sharing aspects implemented across all schools, the idea of Sharing Food is illustrated in the diagram below. Herbs and fresh vegetables are grown in the urban farms, before being stored and sold in the organic produce market. Students from both schools together with residents can use these fresh produces in their culinary lessons, communal kitchen and also a student-run food centre. The fresh produce can also be distributed to the rest of the site via AVs and the food waste will be transported to the recycling center, coming back as organic fertilizers and the whole cycle repeats itself


re INTENSIFY TUM Exchange Studio I Y4S1 Project Type

: Urban Remix, Sustainable Urbanism

Project Site

: Munich, Germany

Size

: 26 Hectares

Supervisor

: Professor Mark Michaeli


re-Intensify An Urban Remix

Site Documentation

Our project area is framed by four large, busy streets, which inevitably create huge intersections at the corners of the area. In the north the Mittlerer Ring B2R / Chiemgaustraße runs along the area and in the east the Balanstraße leads into the city. In the south, the 5-lane Ständlerstraße represents an important east-west connection in the urban space. The Schwansseestraßein the west is an important infrastructure, especially with the tram link, which connects our area publicly to the inner city areas and the centre of Giesing, located approx. 500 metres to the north. In a north-south direction, the S-Bahn track crosses the area.

On the approx. 26 hectare area, there are very different uses and building structures in close proximity to each other. The western part, located between Schwanseestraße and railroad line, is predominantly occupied by residential buildings with up to 10 floors. To the north, extensive parking areas and one-story industrial halls, a supermarket and greenhouses dominate the site. The areas to the east of the railway line and along Ständlerstraße are characterized by crafts. Here, for example, uses such as a carpentry, a coffee roast house, a trade yard and a municipal gardening firm find space for business and production. In addition, supermarkets and beverage markets with large parking spaces are also expanding within this area. In terms of building structures, this section is very heterogeneous and ranges from large building volumes to 9 floors, through small one-story warehouses to commercial buildings of various sizes. Small streets provide access to a sparsely developed residential area consisting mainly of detached and semi-detached houses. The tendency towards further densification in these areas can already be seen in a number of multistory residential buildings upon the site. The new middle school currently under construction on Aschauer Strasse points to a high proportion of residential units in the area and the surrounding neighborhoods. While a centrally located public playground is currently the only public meeting place within our whole urban remix site.

Obergiesing

Neuperlach

A district that has many industrial and trade companies. With its central location and cheap rent, it is a popular residential area which attracts many young families and the working class

Called the ‘relief city’ and built to alleviate the housing shortage in Munich as the city is faced with enormous population growth, hence the increasing number of multi-storey residentials

Site Location

Site Treasure Map


With the number of multi-storey residential housing increasing in the Obergiesing and Neuperlach districts, our project lies in accordance to the Munich state’s future plans for further densification

As such, this urban remix project aims to re-intensify the site by integrating the living houses with more public spaces, while incorporating the elements of work, live and play in all programs


WORK, LIVE, PLAY TERRACES

Garden Terraces Live, Work and Play

In order to re-intensify the site, the intention of the garden terraces is not only to keep existing communal activities on the horizontal plane, but place more on the vertical axis as well. 300 more affordable housing units are also added to the neighbourhood, catering to the further densification of the area.


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re-INTENSIFY I Y4S1

Communal Gardens Gardens are a common sight in most residential units in Munich. Not only does it add greenery to the urban landscape, it is also a place for residents and even the public to gather. Unlike Singapore, the weather in Munich is relatively cooling most times of the year, hence the community tend to use these communal gardens as recreation spots which plays host to gardening events, cultural activities etc. Keeping to the culture of the Munich residents, our design incorporates multiple communal gardens both on the ground and the upper levels. The gardens on the ground are semi-public, mainly for residents but open to public. While the gardens on the upper levels are public, for residents and visitors to commune and participate in events together, boosting the community spirit in the district.

Main Entrance

Roof Garden

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re-INTENSIFY I Y4S1

Various Housing Typologies

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re-INTENSIFY I Y4S1

Circulation Axonometric

2ND FLOOR PLAN 1:500

CIRCULATION PATH

4TH FLOOR PLAN 1:500

GARDEN SPACES


STACK-A-TAINER NUS Architecture I Y3S2 Project Type

: Architecture for Reused Furniture

Project Site

: Commonwealth, Singapore

Size

: 1500sqm

Supervisor

: Mr Liang Lit How


Stack-A-Tainer

The Essence of Modularity

Design Concept

Design Strategy

As the demands of the reuse furniture business is always changing, adaptability and modularity are key aspects of the design

Repurposing recycled shipping containers as a component to form the structure, as well as using its modularity to create multiple variations of expansion through stacking.

Sequence of Container Operation

20ft shipping containers are brought into site & unloaded

The Reachstacker lifts the empty containers & stacks them at the

by a Reachstacker

central holding area

Empty containers are transported from the central holding area to the designated area for furniture to be loaded & installed

Industrial velcro will be sticked to the base of each furniture, which will then be stuck to the velcro mat. This is to ensure that the furniture does not move around during transportation

The Reachstacker will then transport the furniture-loaded container and freely stack it on the retail section of the entire complex


Stack-A-Tainer I Y3S2

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Stack-A-Tainer I Y3S2

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The retail complex is broken down to 2 components: the fixed containers (silver) & the movable furniture-loaded containers (coloured) The fixed containers consists of a service core located at the back & 2 circulation blocks, which serve as the entry into the multi-coloured retail section, filled with recycled furniture

Exploded Axonometric of Retail Complex The 2 ends of the retail complex are active, where the facade is ever-changing. It can be stacked in different ways with different levels, which is based on the demand of the recycled furniture to be sold

First Storey Plan

Stacking Variations Even though the facade can be stacked in many different ways, it can also be stacked in a logical manner. The stacking of shipping containers creates to effects: An overhang effect, where a sheltered space is created beneath a container & a terracing effect, where the roof of a container can be used as a platform The diagrams below show 3 variations of how the containers can be stacked to achieve these 2 effects

Second Storey Plan

Overhang

Third Storey Plan

Terrace

Fusion


Stack-A-Tainer I Y3S2

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Stack-A-Tainer I Y3S2

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Photos of Final Model

Section A-A (Workshop & Warehouse)

Section B-B (Retail Complex)

South Elevation (Entrance View)

Precast Steel Deck & Skylight Detail

Container Connection Twistlock


THE COALESCE NUS Architecture I Y3S1 Project Type

: Social Gathering Space

Project Site

: Little India, Singapore

Size

: 2000sqm

Supervisor

: Dr Cho Im Sik


The Coalesce

Co-existence of tradition and modernity, migrants and locals

Re-modelled after a traditional shophouse, with features extracted from the original design, while injecting modernity with programs and materials. The design aims to alter the perceptions locals and migrant workers have of each other, through programs that involve interaction and observation.


The Coalesce I Y3S1

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The Coalesce I Y3S1

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The Meridian

Design Issue Currently, the Meridian acts as a ‘dividing border’, separating the locals and the migrants, with both parties consciously not crossing into each other’s ‘territory’.

Design Concept The Site Analysis phase was a collaboration of 5 students working together, identifying different locations around the Little India precinct to place our individual projects. With an emphasis on creating an impact on an urban scale, all 5 individual ‘acupuncture points’ will work together to potentially activate the Little India district positively. With that, the group identified a Meridian, a ‘vein’ within the site with the potential to be activated, and placed all our interventions along the Meridian.

site analysis | design concept | final design | model shots

The locals have developed a certain social peception of the migrants and that has shown in their actions and behaviours towards them. The intention of my design is to subtly integrate both parties, with an aim to alter the stereotypes they have amongst themselves. Furthermore, with the project site located amongst shophouses, it is also my aim to respond to the urban context, ensuring that the building blends in with the immediate surroundings.

site analysis | design concept| final design | model shots


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The Coalesce I Y3S1

Analysis of Traditional Shophouse The traditional shophouse is analysed by zoning, extracting out the different elements and its spatial breakdown

The Coalesce I Y3S1

General Circulation

Comparison between 5 Foot Walkway & Back Alley As Little India is filled with shophouses, the 5 foot walkway & back alleys are the main circulation routes for pedestrians. I tried to incorporate the spatial qualities of these 2 starkly different circulation paths in the design. Hence, I compared both paths & extracted the key features that is unique to each of them

One will experience both the spatial qualities of the 5 foot walkway & the back alley, seemlessly bypassing a series of programs, not knowing what program lies ahead of them, like in the shophouses

5 Foot Walkway

Incorporation of Shophouse Elements

Incorporation of Spatial Porosity

The building can be seen as a row of shophouses lined up beside each other as the sequence of 5 foot walkway, program and backalley is illustrated in the axo below

The building can also be seen as 1 shophouse, with the public spaces closer to the meridian (where most people enter) and the private spaces located closer to the HDBs

Narrow (1.5m)

Standard Height

Entrance to Programs

Lively

Exposed Columns

Transitory Space

Back Alley

site analysis | design concept| final design | model shots

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Wider Path (3m)

Open to Air

Back Entrance to Programs

Tranquil

Hidden Columns

Resting & Transitory Space

site analysis | design concept| final design | model shots


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The Coalesce I Y3S1

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The Coalesce I Y3S1

Indoor Performance Space

Ground Level Plan

Second Level Plan

Mezzanine Level Plan

Visual Connectivity from Gallery to MPH

Third Level Plan Visual Connectivity from Gallery to Cafe

site analysis | design concept| final design | model shots

site analysis | design concept| final design | model shots


The Coalesce I Y3S1

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The Coalesce I Y3S1

Section A-A Section A-A is cut along the long axis of the building, showing the different heights of the program spaces. Similar to the shophouse, the spaces facing the 5 foot walkway / meridian (right) tend to have a higher ceiling / double volume height as compared to the more private spaces (left). This is evident in the height difference as seen on the second level of the section.

Likewise in a shophouse, the second level spaces tend to have the highest height as compared to the other levels, which also can be seen in the section below. The section also shows how visual connectivity is achieved with the spaces being very porous and how the central gallery space can be seen from surrounding spaces on both the second and third level or vice versa.

Sectional Perspective

site analysis | design concept| final design | model shots

site analysis | design concept| final design | model shots


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The Coalesce I Y3S1

Micro Detailings

The Coalesce I Y3S1

Interior Shots

Skylight & Aluminium Mechanised Louver Detail

Timber Connection & Timber Decking Detail

Variations of Mechanised Louvers

Exterior Shots

site analysis | design concept| final design | model shots

site analysis | design concept| final design | model shots

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NEKKID (REVAMPED) NUS Architecture I Y2S2 Project Type

: A & A of Existing Restaurant

Project Site

: Gillman Barracks, Singapore

Size

: 120sqm

Supervisor

: Mr Thomas Wong


NEKKID (REVAMPED)

Original Design

A Shed in the Tropics

This project calls for a re-design of an envelope of a bar space & patio, turning an air-conditioned space into one with ceiling fans & passive ventilation. The overall building profile & scale should be maintained, with an introduction of new materials & construction methods.

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Current Design Issues 1. Enclosed Polyethlyene Facade (Air-Conditioned) 2. Corrugated Metal Roof with No Openings 3. Too few Steel Rafters as Direct Sunlight buffers 4. Polycarbonate Roof has no overhang (Rain can easily enter patio space)

design ideation | final design

design ideation | final design


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NEKKID (REVAMPED) I Y2S2

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NEKKID (REVAMPED) I Y2S2

Proposed Design

Addressing the main environmental issues, the proposed design made use of various strategies to bring in both natural light & natural ventilation into the space. Due to Singapore’s tropical climate, heat was also another factor that had to be addressed.

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㐀倀䴀

Indoor Dining & Bar

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㈀ ㌀ 㐀

Design Strategies 1. Mechanised Aluminium Louvers 2. Polycarbonate Roof with Timber Bracing 3. Shrubs & Gravel-covered drains as rain buffer 4. Vertical Timber Louvers & Pivot Door 5. Clerestory Opening

design ideation | final design

Entrance View

design ideation | final design


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NEKKID (REVAMPED) I Y2S2

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NEKKID (REVAMPED) I Y2S2

Environmental Design Strategies 12PM

Mechanised aluminium louvers and a corrugated polycarbonate roof are used as buffers of direct sunlight and allows diffused sunlight as well as excessive heat into the space. To achieve the heat stack effect, the main roof is raised which creates an opening for the heated air to escape. Openings are also created facing North, as that is the direction the predominant wind comes from.

Not only is the main pitched roof used to create an opening for hot air to escape, it is also intended to create an overhang which prevents rain from entering.

design ideation | final design

Horizontal louvers are also sloped outwards to block out both morning sun and heavy rain. In the event of strong winds, tall planters are used as the initial buffer to keep out the rain. The second layer of buffer is a drain placed beside the vertical louvers, with gravels place above it.

design ideation | final design


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NEKKID (REVAMPED) I Y2S2

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NEKKID (REVAMPED) I Y2S2

Section Perspective Addressing the main environmental issues, the proposed design made use of various strategies to bring in both natural light & natural ventilation into the space. The revamped design incorporated a lot of timber such as its rafters, louvers and flooring, which was the intention of adhering to the theme of tropicality.

design ideation | final design

design ideation | final design


OGE

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NUS Architecture I Y2S1 Project Type

: 3D Printing Facade Design

The Team

: Azriel Yeo Leu Wei Wong Chi Khay Tyler Lim Hock Siang Dillon Kho Bo Sheng Timothy Tay Zhi Wei

Supervisor

: Mr Thomas Wong


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OGE I Y2S1

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OGE I Y2S1

Light Shelfs

Ideal Office

The light shelf is a horizontal facade device typically added to reflect natural daylight deeper into office interiors The common use of curtain walls for office buildings creates unfriendly interior spaces, resulting in occupants having to install secondary shading devices such as blinds to protect themselves from glare. The extensive use of glass also results in additional building heat gain, driving up A/C load and electricity costs. Through the use of 3D printing technology, the project seeks to propose an alternative facade solution to a modern office tower by studying the section of an ideal office working space to incorporate the following:

Natural Daylight

Light Shelf & Shading

Views

Ideal Office Section

design ideation | design iterations | final design | model shots

design ideation | design iterations| final design | model shots


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OGE I Y2S1

Preliminary Design

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OGE I Y2S1

Section

Using the idea of a curved light shelf as the generator for a single facade module, different stacking configurations were considered to achieve the section of an ideal office space. Our initial design features 2 types of modules, one acting as the light shelf while the other serving as the shade panel, interlocking and transferring load in a pattern resembling fish scales.

Light Shelf

Shading View

Adding the 3rd Dimension The initial design however functions very 2 dimensionally, having only considered sun shading in terms of the vertical section. To add depth to the design, the angle to which the building is orientated and exposed to the sun was considered, directing the design to think in terms of the horizontal plane.

Privacy Light Shelf

Shading View

Privacy

design ideation | design iterations | final design | model shots

design ideation | design iterations| final design | model shots


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OGE I Y2S1

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OGE I Y2S1

Refining the Module

Scaling the Module

Exploring with the horizontal axis, the module is extruded with thickness to a hollow rectangular block, then twisted to counter the different sun angles, forgoing the idea of a curved light shelf.

With reference to the preliminary design, if 2 modules were placed per level, the resulting facade will become extremely dense and aesthetically daunting. Hence, to lighten it up, the design was reduced to 1 module per level.

Light Shelf

View Privacy Light Shelf

View Privacy

2 Modules per Level

Light Shelf

View Light Shelf

View

1 Module per Level

design ideation | design iterations| final design | model shots

design ideation | design iterations| final design | model shots


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OGE I Y2S1

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OGE I Y2S1

Transferring of Load To achieve a more continuous load transfer and visual continuity within the whole facade, the flat light shelf top is broken down to arch and follow the natural twist profiles of the module.

Test Printed Module 1

design ideation | design iterations| final design | model shots

Test Printed Module 2

design ideation | design iterations| final design | model shots


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OGE I Y2S1

Design of Final Module

North East View

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Isometric View of Facade

North West View

Varied Treatment

West Sun

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OGE I Y2S1

Plan

East Sun

In response to the building’s orientation and sun path, facade modules that are exposed to the east & west sun are orientated differently as compared to the north & south facade modules. This difference in orientation allows the modules to meet seamlessly at the corners, creating a coherent facade that wraps around the building continuously. The curvature of the module is also calibrated to create varied degrees of openings that respond differently to the east & west sun respectively.

design ideation | design iterations| final design | model shots

design ideation | design iterations| final design | model shots


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OGE I Y2S1

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OGE I Y2S1

South Elevation

The final facade design consists of a single module replicated in 3 different heights to accommodate to the ground floor & topmost level. Keeping true to the original design intent, the designed module helps to achieve the ideal office working environment, incorporating the light shelf, while providing shade with its depth, without compromising occupants’ views out to the surroundings.

Sectional Perspective

design ideation | design iterations| final design | model shots

design ideation | design iterations| final design | model shots


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OGE I Y2S1

East Facade Module to Slab Detail

design ideation | design iterations| final design | model shots

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OGE I Y2S1

South Facade Module to Slab Detail

design ideation | design iterations| final design | model shots


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OGE I Y2S1

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OGE I Y2S1

Facade reacts flexibly to both A/C & N/V spaces

Street View of Facade

design ideation | design iterations| final design | model shots

Elegant modules lend character to lobby interior

design ideation | design iterations| final design | model shots


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OGE I Y2S1

design ideation | design iterations| final design | model shots

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OGE I Y2S1

design ideation | design iterations| final design | model shots


THE HIDEOUT Diploma in Architecture I FYP Project Type

: Community Centre

Project Site

: Joo Chiat, Singapore

Size

: 2000sqm

Supervisor

: Ng Wen Yi


The Hideout

Co-existence of tradition and modernity, migrants and locals

design ideation | final design

The Hideout is a dwelling place for visitor`s of Joo Chiat to go after completing their errands around the area. A place where every individual will be able to chill and relax either by themselves or with their family and friends, through varies means such as sports, family activities or spending some quiet time alone

design ideation | final design


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THE HIDEOUT I Y3 FYP

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THE HIDEOUT I Y3 FYP

Design Issue Joo Chiat is a place which is very active & busy throughout the day, as many Singaporeans travel to Joo Chiat for its wide variety of local delicacies. However, after having their meal, there is no reason for these people to remain in Joo Chiat, as there is no place for them to chill and relax.

Design Strategy When asked if one prefers to chill in a quiet or loud environment, most people would prefer the former. Hence, sound became the driver for the design, where programs are arranged to accomodate the noise situation on site. The main aim of the design was to move away from the noise along the main road and towards the quieter residential blocks at the back of the site.

The aim was achieved by 2 methods:

Vertically

(As the level increases, the spaces become more tranquil)

Horizontally

(The deeper into the site, the quieter the spaces) Programs are also arranged based on how frequent the spaces are being used and categories into:

Short, Medium & Long Term spaces

design ideation | final design

design ideation | final design


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THE HIDEOUT I Y3 FYP

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THE HIDEOUT I Y3 FYP

Floor Plans

Badminton Hall Entrance to Movie Lounge

Ground Level Plan

Second Level Plan

Third Level Plan

Fourth Level Plan

Fifth Level Plan Library

design ideation | final design

design ideation | final design


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THE HIDEOUT I Y3 FYP

Water Feature Skylight & Greenwall Detail

design ideation | final design

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THE HIDEOUT I Y3 FYP

Curtain Wall & Vertical Louver Detail

design ideation | final design


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THE HIDEOUT I Y3 FYP

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THE HIDEOUT I Y3 FYP

Section Perspective Section A-A is cut along the long axis of the building, showing the different heights of the program spaces. Similar to the shophouse, the spaces facing the 5 foot walkway / meridian (right) tend to have a higher ceiling / double volume height as compared to the more private spaces (left). This is evident in the height difference as seen on the second level of the section.

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䘀刀䔀匀䠀 䄀䤀刀 匀唀倀倀䰀夀 䌀伀一䐀䔀一匀伀刀 伀一 㔀吀䠀 匀吀伀刀䔀夀 䈀䔀匀䤀䐀䔀 䰀䤀䘀吀 䌀伀刀䔀

design ideation | final design

design ideation | final design


Profile for Timothy Tay

Timothy Tay Zhi Wei - Architecture Portfolio  

Timothy Tay Zhi Wei - Architecture Portfolio  

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