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timothy logan academic + professional work 2010-2012

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level 39_585 feet roof plan_3/64” = 1’-0” level 38_570 feet office private roof deck

level 37_555 feet

level 36_540 feet

level 35_525 feet

level 34_510 feet

level 33_495 feet hotel roof plan_3/64” = 1’-0”

hotel rooftop lounge/bar

level 32_ 480 feet

level 31_465 feet residential pool

level 30_450 feet

level 29_435 feet residence roof/pool plan_3/64” = 1’-0” level 28_420 feet

hotel rooftop lounge/bar

level 27_405 feet hotel + office sky garden

public sky gardens

office space

level 26_390 feet

level 25_375 feet

residential pool 1 br

level 24_360 feet hotel pool plan_3/64” = 1’-0”

studio

level 23_345 feet

hotel pool

2 br

communal library

office space

level 22_330 feet

level 21_315 feet

fitness center + spa

sauna

hotel/open access sky garden

storage/ maint.

hotel pool

level 20_300 feet

bar

level 19_285 feet

communal event space

communal library + sky garden

level 18_270 feet level 17_255 feet hotel room

level 16_240 feet residential library_greenspace_meeting space 3/64” = 1’-0”

hotel room hotel room hotel room

live/work access sky garden

hotel suite

hotel suite

hotel room

level 15_225 feet conference room

level 14_210 feet

level 13_195 feet

level 12_180 feet

level 11_165 feet

level 10_150 feet

level 09_135 feet

public park

public event space

atrium private (green) vs. public (blue) atrium program diagram section with plan stack


projects academic work

professional work

misc

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m o d u l a r c ons tr u c tiv is m : a s tu d y

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e c h o pa rk c om mu nit y c e nte r

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g r a f ting a n u r b a n l a n d s c a pe

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th e r m a l kin e tic s : to p fu e l 2 0 1 1

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s c a tte re d in fil tr a tion: l on g b e ac h w a te r front

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a b s o r ption w a l l

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b a tita t

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th e a rc h ipe l a go

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ne w ke e l u ng h a r b o r s e r v ic e te r m ina l

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pir ae u s c u l tu r a l c o a s t mu s e u m o f u nd e r w a te r a ntiqu itie s

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hand

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e ye

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01 academic work usc school of architecture

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bcn:22@

Fall 2011 | Kim Coleman + Mark Cigol l e Bar c elona St udy A br oa d P r og ra m

Located in the 22 Aroba district of Barcelona, the project aims to provoke the development of an urban strand reclaimed from the areas industrial past in order to unify programmatic concentrations within its proximity. Experimenting on a single city block as a catalyst for future growth, the projects focus turns its attention to the sensual perception of the railroad and the manner in which it bisects the site. Gallery, commercial, residential, and communal programs are placed in a dialogue of cause and effect between solid and void. 7


While networks of public circulation are reclaimed and expanded on the ground floor, a new circuit of activity is given to the residential units at a higher level. Seeking to create suburban amenities in a dense, urban context, programs such as a fitness center and preschool are combined with landscaped, outdoor community rooms.


Green Roof with Jogging Track green roof/jogging track Sculpture Garden (Gallery Extension) sculpture garden/gallery extension Preschool/Daycare Center preschool/daycare center Center fitnessFitness center Hardscaped Communal Space hardscaped communal space Softscaped Communal Space softscaped communal space

communal program circuit

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promenade as a connection

strands of activity

cultural, residential, nightlife hubs

The cause-and-effect, push and pull dialogue occuring at the building scale is translated into the human scale in the development of the promenade. Light wells, cutouts, and landscaping communicate a reading of the path of the underlying railroad, allowing phenomena of light and movement to occur as


trains pass through the block. Public seating, landscape, bicycle circulation, and commercial program are distributed along the trajectory of the promenade.

sloped landscape public green space bike path transportation link public seating street performances

light wells visual train interaction

bench boxes public utility cafe seating

restaurant seating promenade activation

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pla n s

l a you t

residential

p r o g ram

retail

community

exhibition

public


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modular constructivism and the built e nvir onm e nt

u s c pr o v o s t ’s u nde rg ra du ate r esear ch f el l o wship | su mme r 2011


a h i sto r ic m o vement Modular constructivism is a sculptural style that developed primarily in the 1950’s and 1960’s, exploring the creation of modular units thoughtfully developed to construct articulate and often infinite multidimensional surfaces. However, the movement also demonstrates great potential to be translated into the field of architecture and improve our built environment. The preliminary phase of research focused on the study of precedent designs, notably the works of exemplar modular constructivism artists Erwin Hauer and Norman Carlberg. The analysis of geometry, visual effect, tessellation, and structural performance through diagramming and reproduction provided the foundations for the process.

di g i ta l man u fa ct ur ing New understanding gained from precedent analysis was then applied to an installation design derived from the same principles. While modular constructivism is grounded in the art world, the intent of this exercise is to employ these principles in connection to the human scale through the constraints of modular construction, material receptivity, recyclability, production efficiency, and required product display. The project was designed, fabricated, and constructed specifically for a 60 square foot window space at Roark Graphic Supplies, a store local to the USC area, where it existed as the store’s window display for the remainder of the year.

120 de g.

For the design of a storefront art installation derived from the same principles of interwoven surfaces and potential infinity, I looked towards tessellating patterns as a source of surface relationships. By rethinking the dynamics of a common paving block pattern, three interwoven surfaces emerged, providing the basis upon which the rest of the project would be designed. For visual effect and surface distinction, digital model scripting was used to create variation in the sizes of the interlocking holes of each surface. The “static” or unchanging surface provides a consistent surface of the pattern against which the viewer can compare the remaining two surfaces, which increase and decrease in size opposite of each other. The vertical alignment of points on each surface allowed for a simple method of hanging and structurally stabilizing the design. The pieces were hung from a series of hanging threads, with each surface getting two points of support from each thread. Each thread was hung from a wood beam, connections between individual pieces as well as to each thread was achieved using binder clips. Overall, 90 sheets of chipboard and nearly 1300 binder clips were used.

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S3P1

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TESSELL ATIONPATTERN

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LAYER SE PARATION

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INTE RWEAVING SUR FACES

S3P24

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echo park community center site massing courtyard typology density green space


A mapping of local courtyard typologies determines the basic form of the civic center. The hybrid public market program allows interaction amongst the diverse population of Echo Park. An initial schematic design began with the aforementioned courtyard shape, grounded at each end by the two major programmatic elements of the civic center: the social hall and council chamber. The council chamber is lifted up to create the canopy of the market, also allowing public passage through the ground plane. The difference between the open, flexible space of the social hall and the specific, introverted nature of the council chamber are expressed by a stark contrast in form.

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above: ground floor/landscape plan right: second floor plan far right: marketplace perspective and precedent timeline


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Historical and Contemporary Precedents

A number of precedents of permanent public markets and large, structural canopies were researched. Projects were chosen based on a display of intriguing relationships between structure, market organization, and light, as well as for demonstrating creation of public space, unique methods of market stall placement, or extreme accomplishments in structural development. Development of the adjacent lot into a landscaped public green space allows the site to become an extension of the famous park. Punctures through the perimeters of the form on the ground level create a continuous public circuit consisting of the new green space, the civic center courtyard, the public market, and the park beyond. Subtle ground manipulations distinguish each of these spaces. Visitors may slowly ramp up through the new park, enter the building’s courtyard, and step down into the market space before rising back to the street level. The role of the courtyard as the central hub of activity in the community center is reinforced in the landscaping strategy. Ripples from the courtyard’s center are interrupted within the courtyard to demarkate circulation to public program, become means of circulation between different ground levels, and are extruded to become walkways, planters and other landscaping elements, and even the stalls of the market themselves. 23


ele va t i o n s

northwest elevation

southeast elevation

southwest elevation


se c t i o n s

section a

section b

section c

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Secondary Steel Section Member

Panel Support Frame

s

s

Te rtiary Cr oss Bracing Member

s

Primary T ubular Steel T russ Member s

Connections to steel framing system ( make with gusset plate connections (

Focus changed from a schematic level to a detailed scale in a tectonic exploration of structure, environmental systems, enclosure, and materiality.


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vertical urban studio | david gerber + scott johnson | spring 2011

grafting an urban landscape

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grafting an concept, urbansite,landscape and program Drawing from the process of skin and bone grafting in which cells or tissue fill in a mesh or framework based on growth conditions, the different programs of the tower are organized will be “grafted� into the tower. In keeping with the biological language, program is broken down into its elementary cells or components and arranged according to conventional organizations, aggregated texture, and forces of the physical environment. Just as a skin mesh is gradually filled in with tissue, these cells are plugged into a structural/infrastructural framework. Similarly, the different formal and physical conditions surrounding the site are negotiated as the tower grafts itself to the urban fabric Counter to the anonymity of the conventional prismatic glass tower, the project seeks to give unique formal identity to each program based on their cellular aggregation and the allocation of private exterior space. The vertical organization of the office, hotel, and residential programs results in three very different textures (comprised of lines, grids, and pixels, respectively) that converge and diverge as they ascend, creating communal outdoor spaces and linking shared programs. Open office floor plates, hotel rooms organized into a loosely defined grid, and residential units heavily punctuated with private outdoor patios are shifted and disintegrated to create public outdoor spaces and link shared programs. Orientation to views and sunlight will also give the tower its overall form. While the tower unites three unique programs and their respective textures, the site borders three very unique urban conditions. The quiet, finer scale of the adjacent historical residential neighborhood is met by a new public green space that slopes up across the site. A new pedestrian corridor draws from the courtyard procession of the original studio building from sunset boulevard on the southern side, while the northwest corner opens up to the new infrastructure and entertainment-oriented attractions located along hollywood boulevard. While los angeles often contrasts its natural surroundings with the steel and concrete towers of downtown and century city, a new model of urban densification and vertical green space will instead reflect the surrounding hills of hollywood.

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“urban textures� | site diagram

retail space existing studios

office lobby

large corridor

public park hotel lobby

residential lobby

hotel retail space

office plazas

vehicle access

urban conditions


public park

bicycle parking

mechanical

cafe/food stand seating

support

bicycle parking

lobby retail: dining support space

plaza

front desk

lobby/lounge from parking

to parking circulation from parking level

bar/lounge

lobby

security/mechanical

outdoor theater with projection screen

retail secondary courtyard/ circulation

retail

cbs studio courtyard

site plan 33


level 39_585 feet roof plan_3/64” = 1’-0” level 38_570 feet office private roof deck

level 37_555 feet

level 36_540 feet

level 35_525 feet

level 34_510 feet

level 33_495 feet hotel roof plan_3/64” = 1’-0”

hotel rooftop lounge/bar

level 32_ 480 feet

level 31_465 feet residential pool

level 30_450 feet

level 29_435 feet residence roof/pool plan_3/64” = 1’-0” level 28_420 feet

level 27_405 feet hotel + office sky garden office space

level 26_390 feet

level 25_375 feet

1 br

level 24_360 feet hotel pool plan_3/64” = 1’-0”

studio

level 23_345 feet 2 br

office space

level 22_330 feet

level 21_315 feet sauna

storage/ maint.

hotel pool

level 20_300 feet

bar

level 19_285 feet communal library + sky garden

level 18_270 feet level 17_255 feet hotel room

level 16_240 feet residential library_greenspace_meeting space 3/64” = 1’-0”

hotel room hotel room hotel room

hotel suite

hotel suite

hotel room

level 15_225 feet conference room

level 14_210 feet

level 13_195 feet

level 12_180 feet

level 11_165 feet

level 10_150 feet

level 09_135 feet


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hotel rooftop lounge/bar public sky gardens residential pool

hotel pool

communal library

fitness center + spa

hotel/open access sky garden communal event space

live/work access sky garden

public park

public event space

base structure

residential

hotel


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section b_1/64” = 1’-0”

section aerial rendering exploded program diagram + breakdown


offices - 40 floors - public + private sky gardens, meeting spaces - access to hotel and residential amenities hotel - 100 keys - rooftop bar/lounge - pool + bar - spa + fitness center - meeting spaces - outdoor restaurant residential - 50 units - private library - private meeting spaces - rooftop pool - private sky gardens - day care/pre school

retail space - retail - dining

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thermal kinetics top fuel workshop | spring 2011

As a team of five students, we were challenged to design and construct a full scale mock-up of a performative building skin system. The movement of the facade is enacted by pistons filled with pentane that expands and contracts with variances in temperature. As the piston moves, the apertures that populate the skin transform from one state to another. During cooler morning and night temperatures, the apertures contract to let in maximum sunlight. Alternatively, the modules expand in warmer afternoon temperatures to provide maximum shading while still allowing the passage of natural light. As the modules change form over the course of the day, PV panels mounted on the aperture faces follow the movement of the sun, allowing for efficient energy collection at all times.


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scattered infiltration long beach terminal + waterfront la identity | chris warren | fall 2011 Exploring the ways in which the layering or embedding of networks and activity can improve an urban landscape currently disconnected by a series of large-scale programs and fragmented infrastructures.


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identityspace flux + function in los angeles Outshined by its domination of the entertainment industry, los angeles has assumed a role as the birthplace and physical setting for the creation of alternate realities aculture glorifies the hollywood lifestyle, while even physical locations such as the hollywood sign and sunset strip are given a level of iconicity that in turn creates a los angeles that exists outside of the reality of the physical city. While the city seeks to inspire, it also inevitably seeks to disconnect. Architectural barriers divide the city at all scales, often with the element of image coming into play. Nightclub entrances, valet parking spaces, and entire neighborhoods are partitioned from the rest of the world in order to create an image of luxury. Paired with a recognized lack of city infrastructure to connect its numerous disparate neighborhoods, this condition only amplifies the stratification of class within the city’s demographics. This behavior seems counter to the current aspirations of architecture that seek to forge new relationships and reconnect currently disunited elements in the urban landscape. In this sense, los angeles has become a city of image, expressed in a dishonesty of surface in both its built and social environments. While this superficiality is often critiqued socially, its translation into the city 49


fabric architecturally may hold a potential to achieve the rediscovery of under-engaged urban spaces. The identity of the physical city is often transformed just as the identities of actors and studio sets are constantly shuffled to create surface-deep illusions. Historic cemeteries and museums become concert venues, traffic heavy streets are blocked off and given back to the pedestrian, and temporary buildings take on forms suggestive of inanimate objects or foreign places. While this divorce of program and envelope would be critiqued in the design of a new building, it has become effective in the renewal of underutilized locations and exposure of the public to cultural events. In these instances, building and function are developed independently and combined in a way complementary to the human experience. Image and phenomenal experience allow an arguably shallow yet undeniably

powerful impact on the way a person interprets their environment. The desired reconnection to place is therefore achieved through memory, by immersing the user in a spectacle-based environment that ceases to physically exist otherwise. 51


A E

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SECTION B_CRUISE SHIP TERMINAL AND LONG BEACH SPORTS ARENA

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A. LONG BEACH SPORTS ARENA MAIN HALL B. TERMINAL/ARENA SHARED FACILITY SPACES C. TERMINAL WAITING AREAS D. TERMINAL/ARENA LOADING AREA E. BICYCLE/JOGGING PATH F. TERMINAL PARKING G. PASSENGER DROPOFF/LOADING AREA H. BAGGAGE SCREENING AREA I. MAIN TERMINAL SPACE J. LONG BEACH CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS K. METRO BLUE LINE TERMINUS L. MIXED USE RESIDENTIAL/COMMERCIAL/HOTEL PROGRAM

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B

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SECTION A_RESIDENTIAL WATERFRONT A. SUBMERGED VEHICLE CIRCULATION B. MIXED RESIDENTIAL/COMMERCIAL PROGRAM C. FARMER’S MARKET/PUBLIC EVENT SPACE D. COMMUNITY CENTER E. PUBLIC PARK SPACE F. BICYCLE/JOGGING PATH

SECTION E_PARK AND RECREATION A. QUEEN MARY B. BICYCLE/JOGGING PATH C. WALKING/EXERCISE PATH D. QUEENSWAY BAY LIGHTHOUSE E. WILDLIFE REFUGE

SECTION D_RESIDENTIAL A. MIXED RESIDENTIAL UNIT TYPES B. RETAIL PROGRAM C. COMMUNAL COURTYARD D. COMMUNAL ROOFTOP SPACE E. ELEVATED PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE F. ROOFTOP ACCESS G. BURIED RESIDENTIAL PARKING

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C F E

SECTION C_CONVENTION CENTER A. METRO BLUE LINE/LONG BEACH BOULEVARD B. LONG BEACH CONVENTION CENTER MEETING ROOMS AND BALLROOMS C. HOTEL PROGRAM D. RETAIL PROGRAM E. MIXED USE COMMERCIAL/RESIDENTIAL PROGRAM F. LONG BEACH CONVENTION CENTER EXHIBIT HALLS G. CONVENTION CENTER/ARENA PARKING H. RESIDENTIAL PARKING I. PEDESTRIAN WALKWAY/GATHERING SPACE

G H

I B D A


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absorption wall

environmentally

responsive facade

thesis studio | doris sung | spring 2012

Water-based science experiments were the departure points for the development of a building envelope system that would itself house water. The process began by identifying the key components of absorption: the absorptive element, the absorbed element, a physical embedding, and physical or nonphysical exchange between the two elements. The facade employs SAPs, or “super absorbent polymers,� to collect rainfall on a diagrid of scale-like petals that populate a wall or roof surface. Surface contours on each module direct water towards a small SAP housing unit that absorbs the weight of the water, tipping the module to a downward position in order to shield rain in the wet climate of the Virgin Islands. As the SAP samples dry on the facade, counterweights at the back of each module eventually bring the pieces into their original positions as the weather changes.


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UNUSED Vs. EXPANDED DIAPERS

WEIGHT GAINED FROM WATER ONLY

DIAPER WITH WATER: 982.1 grams

8 CUPS REMAINING

SUBMERSION WITHIN 12 CUPS OF WATER

DIAPER: 30.2 grams


Experiments began studying the vertical absorption capabilities of different textile materials, including yarn, jersey fabric, and diaper samples. These experiments warranted a focus on testing the weight and volume capacity of “super absorbent polymer,� a material used in diapers and oil cleanup to absorb liquids

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FASTENER PLASTIC SCREEN CONTAINER SUPER ABSORBENT POLYMER LAYER

SCREEN LAYER

DRYING AIR FLOW

MOVING COMPONENT

sap housing detail


DRY SUPER ABSORBENT POLYMER COMPONENTS

OPEN LOUVER SYSTEM

ACTIVATED SAP AS KINETIC FACADE ACTUATOR

CLOSED WATERSHED SHINGLE SYSTEM

“HORIZONTAL” PANEL DISTRIBUTION FOR CONVEX WALL PROFILES, LARGE AND MORE HORIZONTALLY-ORIENTED CREATE BROAD OVERHANGING SHINGLES THAT TAPER down IN SIZE AND INCREASE IN VERTICALITY, ALLOWING water to be shed from the building skin.

FOR CONCAVE WALL PROFILES, LARGER shingles at higher elevations taper down to smaller, broader units to slow the speed of COLLECTED RAINWATER.

“VERTICAL” PANEL DISTRIBUTION

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physical model


wall section

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batitat

responding to environmental stimuli thesis studio | doris sung | spring 2012

The study of absorption used in the previous facade development becomes applied and expanded here; this project seeks to “absorb” the inputs of its surroundings to preserve wildlife habitats and expand human knowledge within a symbiotic relationship between building and environment. Located in the rich Salt River Bay natural preserve in the Virgin Islands, the building acts simultaneously as an ecotourism destination, guano production plant, and study laboratory of one of the country’s only native species: the fisherman bat. Scales of development, moving from micro to macro, explore ways to architecturally accomodate the bats, from the scale of surface texture to the collection and export of guano (seabird waste) for fertilizer. Further expanding the direct interface between the bat population, visiting tourists and students, resident researchers, and guano collection workers, basic experiential conditions for each are established.

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{

physical manifestation of social constructs human cohabitation + interference mating behavior

august-winter: breeding november-january: pregnancy january-february: young kept in roost females permanent, males nomadic food source contamination (water pollution) extermination by commercial fishermen

familial structure

harems: one male to several females females form nurseries bachelor males roost alone exclusion (resulting abandonment of young)

hunting behavior

females hunt socially males hunt alone devour 30-40 fish per night several trips per night habitat destruction (deforestation, coastal development) guano extraction

scales of building absorption dictated by bat life cycle frequencies actuated by cyclical inputs


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fig. 01: annual life cycle mapping relationships between the greater bulldog bat lifecycle and environmental inputs over the course of a year, investigating conditions such as the wet season, daylight hours, rainfall inches, bat mating season, and bat reproductive cycle

fig. 02: daily life cycle mapping relationships between the greater bulldog bat lifecycle and environmental inputs over the course of a day, investigating conditions such as high and low tide hours and peak nocturnal hunting activity

fig. 03: siting the project is located on the northea side of the peninsula, receptive to in precipitation in a steeply inclined sea location favorable to fisherman bat c


f ig. 01

astern ncoming aside colonies f ig. 02

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fig. 04: building section

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f ig. 05

f ig. 06


fig. 05: communal lab spaces and exhibition entry

fig. 06: “dark� laboratory and exhibition plan

fig. 07: ground floor dwelling plan

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fig. 08: scale a.i: surfaces the bat talon’s naturally clenched position requires the animal to be consistently locked onto a textured surface

fig. 11: observation space types


fig. 09: scale a.ii: pockets different “family� constructs are accomodated for in scaling, flexible groups of pockets dictated by familial structure and actuated by the physical presence of the animal

fig. 10: scale b.i: cavities materiality dictated by function

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fig. 12: scale b.ii: guano extraction; layout for the vertical settling, study, and collection of guano samples


fig. 13: plans; top to bottom: guano laboratory observation and bat egress level, guano collection level, guano distribution level

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02 professional work

platform for architecture + research labtop rendering series et series

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the arch

leeuwarden, nl | platform for architecture + resear Our proposal for the leeuwarden kanaalzone provides a new framework for an urban geography where the best elements from both the natural landscape and project program create a unique condition for living on the water. The framework enables an organization of housing program that is flexible and varied, envisioning a district where history and future, density and openness, identity and diversity coexist. The resulting spatial experience fluctuates between variation and continuity while relating to the canalized way of life in the frysl창n region.


hipelago

rch

In order to cultivate our emphasis on diversity, we imagine the archipelago as a multifunctional district. In addition to mixing-in retail, restaurant and leisure functions, our strategy avoids mono-programmatic qualities commonly found in nearby suburban communities by encouraging experimentation with new housing and building typologies. Drawn from a study of waterfront cities, a collection of 9 housing typologies, each with it’s own individual character, create neighborhood identities based on their distinctive interrelationships with water. Differing roofscapes and a range of building volumes form the spatial identity and variety of a village. 87


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Keelung is a gateway that through its history, climate and the customs of its inhabitants, is predestined to make use of its exterior space. For this reason, we decided instead of planning the building as an independent object within an open space, we would propose buildings that will generate and structure this open space. To become a landmark, this project adopts a form that resists easy classification to free-associate with successive symbols of the utilitarian, the industrial, the poetic. It combines maximum artistry with maximum efficiency. The harbor tower is a clearly identifiable landmark. It’s portal becomes a framing devise for the city while providing passage at the plaza. Given it’s location and placement, the figure of the tower takes a geometrical stand in relation to the mountains and transit network. Oriented to true north with the widest elevation on the land-sea axis, the tower becomes a hinge between harbor and city. A global gateway, the tower represents taiwan’s cultural progress, innovation, and modern commerce.


new keelung harbor service building keelung, taiwan | series et series with par

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We believe in the effect of the extraordinary, that the key to a successful Museum of Underwater Antiquities lies in the ability of the building to inspire visitors, to create wonder, and enhance one’s own experience to look beyond the common, the materialistic, and the easily consumed in favor of the stimlating, the daring and the whimsical. We see this project as a signal of hope for the future of the city, by introducing a tangible energy.

1-ORIGINAL

2-EXPOSE

3-EXCAVATE

4-BREACH

5-INSERT PROGRAM


a post industrial sustainable retooling 6-COMBINE

7-ASCEND

piraeus museum of underwater antiquities

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101


STRUCTURAL DIAGRAM

CIRCULATION DIAGRAM Raking Column (Diagonal Truss) Vertical Hanger Typical Floor Slab on Metal Deck w/ Composite Beams and Girders Concrete Cores (cores braced laterally by Existing Silo Structure)

THEMATIC DIAGRAM Thematic Scheme

Grey Water Collector The Grey Water shaft collects storm water and grey water used from sinks and toilets which are naturally filtered through phytoremediation and emptied into the bioswale which is then released to the public dry docks

Thematic Scheme

Thematic Scheme

Thematic Scheme

Natural Daylighting

Thematic Scheme

Existing Silo Structure

Natural Ventilation

South Facing Facade with UV Reflective Screen The UV reflective screen for the museum space allows for proper daylighting throught the museum. The screen is connected by metallic frame with a double glazing e-coat insulated lglass unit with a microperforated gold mylar sun device.

Conceptual diagram The museum space will be structured through raking columns and a truss system that is adjacent to the cores to allow for proper load distribution throughout the interior space.

Thematic Scheme Book Store / Gift Shop

it Ex e nc tra En

The thematic sequence allows the visitor to experience the museum beginning at the entrance on the ground level. They float to the main floor where they are directly underneath the overhead ship. Visitors take the elevator to the top level where they submerge themselves into the historical exhibitions ending back at the main lobby space. The exhibition spaces are multi-functional and can change according to new thematic exhibitions

Bioswale

BUILDING FORM

STRUCTURAL DIAGRAM

CIRCU Raking Column (Diagonal Truss) Vertical Hanger Typical Floor Slab on Metal Deck w/ Composite Beams and Girders Concrete Cores (cores braced laterally by Existing Silo Structure)

Natural Daylighting Existing Silo Structure

Natural Ventilation

South Facing Facade with UV Reflective Screen

DOUBLE GLAZING

DOUBLE GLAZING E-coating glazing.

NORTH FACADE

Conceptual diagram The museum space will be structured through raking columns and a truss system that is adjacent to the cores to allow for proper load distribution throughout the interior space.

The UV reflective screen for the museum space allows for proper daylighting throught the museum. The screen is connected by metallic frame with a double glazing e-coat insulated lglass unit with a microperforated gold mylar sun device.

SOUTH FACADE

Opaque, super-insulated metal panel. Double glazing, low-e panels

Opaque, super-insulated metal panel. Double glazing, low-e panels

70% indirect light 30% Opaque

Sensors detect the optimal shading height of the exterior sun screen.

FRAMED MYLAR SKIN

E-coating glazing.

MOTORIZED MYLAR SKIN

70% Opague mylar. 20/30% in

Rolled mylar skin lowers and lifts by a rotary motor depending on the amount of heat affecting the museum, which is determined by sensors.

Mylar skin is stretched on metallic frame with valuable percentage perforation.

WEST FACADE Opaque, super-insulated metal panel. Double glazing, low-e panels

EAST FACADE Opaque, super-insulated metal panel. Double glazing, low-e panels

GRAY WATER Gray water is collected through the buildings two planted vertical cores.

RADIANT FLOOR SYSTEM

CLEAN WATER

Tube system circulates fresh water from the port to the radiant floor system in the museum, cooling or heating the building depending on the temperature, and keeping the interior temperature consistent.

Clean water is pumped back to the public park.

BIO SWALE

TREATED WATER

A system of bio-swales filtrates gray water and distributes the water to the phytoremediation aviary.

PHYTOREMEDIATION AVIARY Gray water is further filtrated through the aviary and stored for later use.

PUMP + COOLER/HEATER Boosts the system when necessary.

Grey Water C The Grey storm wate used from which are through ph and emptie which is th to the publ


The challenge of the Piraeus Cultural Coast starts with its urban scale: a global redevelopment. The public benefits of its reclaimed access to the port, as it was at the very birth time of the city. In order to encourage the public to engage the port in a new and innovative way, it is only fair to give them the kind of visible signals that it needs to understand what is happening. Only by examining our history may we start to break our old habits and consider a radically new, more environmentally responsible future. We believe that the redevelopment of the waterfront into a new built-natural environment that truly inspires radical new perceptions calls for the opportunistic retrofitting of the existing environment. A key part of our strategy consists of creating an architectural richness and tension generated by extraction rather than by pure addition. Most of the time retooling an industrial construction consists of over-expressing the new and masking the old. We decided here to unveil the existing beauty of the silos, its industrial roughness, its brutal, almost modern simplicity, its industrial functionality and its history. The conveyor belt structure extending from the building is punctuated with new program and circulation, providing a new means of traversing a re-purposed infrastructure. 103


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TRANSVERSE SECTION / SCALE 1:250

LONGITUDINAL SECTION / SCALE 1:250


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03 analog/digital hand + eye

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analog: freehand drawing

“batitat� drawing and design process; a constant dialogue between hand-drawn and computer generated design and rendering drove the investigation of a corresponding aesthetic for representation

109


Barcelona Study Abroad Fall 2011: Toledo, Seville, Madrid

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Rafael Moneo, Roman Art Museum | Merida, Spain


Inaki Aspiazu, Bodegas Baigorri Winery | La Rioja, Spain Geographical Section | San Sebastian, Spain

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photography


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ches

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timothy logan tim.othy.log@gmail.com

Timothy Logan_Portfolio  

Academic + Professional Work

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