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Ready-Ed

Write And Connect

Publications

Write And Connect

Book 2

Write And Connect Book 2 is part of a three part series are not writing at their expected level of competency. It focuses on reteaching basic writing skills and concepts through high interest texts and activities which abandon time limits and break down tasks into manageable parts. As your students’ writing skills

Book 2 Ages 11 - 14 years

success will also grow. Answers are provided at the back of the book.

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As Smart As Einstein Building The Bridge Vote At 16 Codename: White Mouse Into The Rainforest The Kraken: Fiction Or Fact? Think Like An Inventor 

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Write and Connect Book 2 ISBN 978 186 397 884 2

© istock.com/Slobodan Vasic

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CUL U

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  

By Margaret Warner


This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Title: Write And Connect - Book 2 © 2013 Ready-Ed Publications Printed in Australia Author: Margaret Warner

Acknowledgements i. Clip art images have been obtained from Microsoft Design Gallery Live and are used under the terms of the End User License Agreement for Microsoft Word 2000. Please refer to www.microsoft.com/permission. ii. Front cover photograph: istock.com/ Slobodan Vasic ©

Copyright Notice The purchasing educational institution and its staff have the right to make copies of the whole or part of this book, beyond their rights under the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (the Act), provided that: 1.

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Copies are made only by reprographic means (photocopying), not by electronic/digital means, and not stored or transmitted;

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Copies are not sold or lent;

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Every copy made clearly shows the footnote, ‘Ready-Ed Publications’.

Any copying of this book by an educational institution or its staff outside of this blackline master licence may fall within the educational statutory licence under the Act. The Act allows a maximum of one chapter or 10% of the pages of this book, whichever is the greater, to be reproduced and/or communicated by any educational institution for its educational purposes provided that

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ISBN: 978 186 397 884 2 2


Contents

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Teachers' Notes Australian Curriculum Links

4 4

Punctuation Grammar

5 6

As Smart As Einstein l  Examining A Narrative l  Check The Text 1 l  Check The Text 2 l  Plan A Narrative l  Review Your Writing

9 10 11 12 13

Building The Bridge l  Examining A Report l  Check The Text 1 l  Check The Text 2 l  Plan A Report l  Review Your Writing

16 17 18 19 20

Vote At 16 l  Examining An Exposition l  Check The Text 1 l  Check The Text 2 l  Plan An Exposition l  Review Your Writing

23 24 25 26 27

Codename: White Mouse l  Examining A Biography l  Check The Text 1 l  Check The Text 2 l  Plan A Biography l  Review Your Writing

30 31 32 33 34

Into The Rainforest

l  Examining A Description l  Check The Text 1 l  Check The Text 2 l  Plan A Description l  Review Your Writing

37 38 39 40 41

The Kraken: Fiction Or Fact? l  Examining An Explanation l  Check The Text 1 l  Check The Text 2 l  Plan An Explanation l  Review Your Writing

44 45 46 47 48

Think Like An Inventor l  Examining A Report l  Check The Text 1 l  Check The Text 2 l  Plan A Report l  Review Your Writing

51 52 53 54 55

Is Graffiti Art Or Vandalism? l  Examining A Discussion l  Check The Text 1 l  Check The Text 2 l  Plan A Discussion l  Review Your Writing l  Answers

58 59 60 61 62 63-66

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Teachers’ Notes

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Write And Connect - Book 2 is written for lower secondary students who are struggling to keep up with their peers, and is therefore linked to the Year 5 English curriculum. Researchers and teachers know that students' written literacy skills improve when they write more often, and experience success.

It is important to remember that secondary students experiencing difficulty with writing must be retaught basic written literacy skills that they may have had difficulty processing in earlier years. When they acquire these skills, they will begin to gain confidence with their writing. Students at lower secondary level who are not writing confidently at their expected level of competency are more likely to engage with interesting texts that teach them about the writing process. In Write And Connect - Book 2, students will engage with a range of texts that are likely to be of interest to them and will complete writing activities related to these texts. How you could use this book: • model effective writing strategies and discuss the writing process as you compose a text or discuss a written text; • discuss the topic knowledge, awareness of intended audience and the purpose of a particular piece of writing; • actively teach the technicalities of writing, e.g. sentence construction, complex sentences, paragraphing, vocabulary development, spelling, text coherence, editing and proofreading skills; • encourage students to work with a partner or in a group to develop their ability to discuss and then improve their writing and to develop editing and proofreading skills; • develop students’ written literacy skills so that when they write they will know the expected format for different genres, they will know their intended audience and they will know the purpose of their writing and they will have the skills to write with confidence.

Australian Curriculum Links Year 5

Language ACELA1797 ACELA1500 ACELA1502 ACELA1504 ACELA1505 ACELA1506 ACELA1508

ACELA1512 ACELA1513 Literacy ACELY1701 ACELY1702

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Literature ACELT 1608 ACELT1609


Punctuation

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. It is important that students understand and use the correct language relating to punctuation when talking about their writing.

APOSTROPHE: an apostrophe is used when something has been left out of a word, e.g. it is/ it’s, she will/she’ll or to show ownership, e.g. Jack’s bike, Lily’s pen.

CAPITAL LETTERS: these are used to start a sentence, and for the names of: people, places, days, months, festivals, organisations and for the titles of books and movies, e.g. On Monday, Rose went to Canberra then to Mount Kosciuszko to the Snowtime Festival. COMMA: a comma separates items in a list, e.g. I bought carrots, beans, potatoes, fruit and drinks. It also separates one part of a sentence from another to make the meaning clear, e.g. Outside, the grass was covered in frost. COLON: this is used to separate the main part of a sentence from an explanation or list, e.g. The wildlife sanctuary cared for a number of species: koalas, possums, kangaroos, wombats and bandicoots. It can also be used when quoting what a person says, e.g. He said: “Don’t worry, be happy.” DASH: this indicates added emphasis, an interruption or change of thought, e.g. You are my friend - my best friend - the only one who helped me with the assignment. It is also used between numbers, e.g. pages 1 – 10. ELLIPSES: a series of three dots to show that you have left out a word, phrase, line, paragraph or more, from a quotation or to indicate an unfinished thought, e.g. I didn’t expect to see him there but when I looked across the room … EXCLAMATION MARK: this is used to indicate a command, e.g “Get out! Get out now!” or to indicate strong feelings such as surprise or fright, e.g. “Congratulations!” or “Oh no!” FULL STOP: this marks the end of a sentence except where a question mark or exclamation mark is used, e.g. They went to the beach to surf the big waves. HYPHEN: use a hyphen when two adjectives are joined together to form a single idea, e.g. The Great Houdini performed death-defying tricks. PARENTHESES: these are used to enclose words or figures or are used to add extra information, e.g. When he rang (after finally finding a public phone) he explained what had happened. QUESTION MARK: use a question mark when asking a direct question, e.g. Where is Sam? QUOTATION MARKS: use these to show the exact words spoken, e.g. “Where do you live?” Other punctuation must be placed inside the quotation marks.

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SEMICOLON: can be used to join related sentences that could stand alone, e.g. It was soon completely dark; he decided to stay hidden.

5


Grammar

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. It is important that students understand and use the correct language relating to grammar when talking about their writing. ADJECTIVE: a word that adds description to a noun, e.g. It was a clear, sunny day.

ADVERB: a word that adds to a verb, adjective or another adverb, e.g. He walked away quickly from the shop.

CLAUSE: a group of words with a subject, a verb and a comment that adds to the information. The girl painted a beautiful picture. Compound and complex sentences have more than one clause. The girl painted a beautiful picture when she went to art class. CONJUNCTION: a word that joins other words, phrases or clauses, e.g. ‘and’ or ‘but’. I saw my teacher and friends but I didn’t see my cousin. CONNECTIVE: words that connect sentences and paragraphs in logical sequence, e.g. ‘first’, ‘second’, ‘because’, ‘furthermore’, 'although’, ‘in fact’. First you brainstorm ideas, second you start to write notes. NOUN: a word that names a person, place, things and ideas. A proper noun refers to people, places, days, months and festivals and always starts with a capital letter, e.g. On Monday we went to Darwin. A collective noun refers to a group, e.g. a pod of whales, a mob of kangaroos. All other nouns are common nouns. NOUN GROUP: a group of words that add to a noun, e.g. Mountain biking is a tough, exciting sport. PHRASE: a group of words usually without a verb. He left the backpack on the train. PREPOSITION: a preposition is a positional word, e.g. above, near, on. A prepositional phrase contains a preposition, e.g. He ran across the road. PRONOUN: a word that stands for a noun, e.g. I, she, him, it, them. I gave the bag to Sam then he gave it to them. SENTENCE: a group of words that form a complete statement, question or exclamation. He kicked the ball. Compound and complex sentences have more than one clause. He kicked the ball when he ran past his mate who had injured his leg. VERB: a word that describes what someone or something is doing or feeling. He sat on the chair while he waited for the doctor. Verbs can be used in the past, present or future tense, e.g. I like ice cream (present tense), I liked ice cream when I was little (past tense), I will like ice cream even when I’m very old (future tense).

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6


This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. • As Smart As Einstein •

This section covers the following Australian Curriculum Links: Year 5 Language ACELA 1504 ACELA 1508 ACELT 1611 ACELT 1798 ACELY 1698 ACELY 1701 ACELY1704 ACELY 1705

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 As Smart As Einstein is a narrative. It is an imaginative tall story written to interest and entertain readers.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' • As Smart As Einstein • book preview. Jack liked living in the bush. He liked that the cockatoos flew down and helped him to pick the beans in his vegetable garden. He liked the kangaroos that hopped up each afternoon to deliver the mail tucked into their pouches and he liked the wombats that ambled into the house at night to watch Wildlife Rescue with him. Most of all, he liked his best mate, Bluey a blue heeler. The morning after the fierce storm Jack jumped in his ute with Bluey beside him to check on any damage in the back paddock. When he saw a gum tree branch hanging down across the road, he stopped the ute, climbed the tree as quickly as a monkey and started to saw off the branch. Suddenly, there was a crack as loud as thunder. Jack fell to the ground like a sack of potatoes. For a moment he was as still as a log and as white as a sheet. Then he saw the blood and felt a pain flash through his leg. “Bluey, race home, find the First Aid kit and bring me the bandages,” he said to his dog. Bluey understood and was soon back with the bandages. She took the bandage in her paws and as gentle as a lamb she wound it round Jack’s injured leg.

“Bluey, I need you to race home and ring triple zero. The person who answers will ask if you need the fire brigade, police or ambulance. When you hear ‘ambulance’, bark three times. When the person asks for your address, bark twice. They will check caller ID and find the address.” As quick as a flash, Bluey raced to the house, rang triple zero and waited for the ambulance at the gate. It wasn’t long before she heard the siren. When the ambulance stopped and the driver got out to open the gate, Bluey jumped into the passenger seat, sat up, barked twice and pointed left with her paw to show him where to go. In minutes the ambulance officers had located Jack, helped him onto a stretcher and moved him into the ambulance. Bluey watched as Jack waved goodbye and soon they were on their way to the hospital. Bluey headed for home. She knew that her work wasn’t yet finished for the day. First she rounded up the twenty freerange chooks into their hen house so that they were safe from any foxes. Then she collected the eggs in a basket. Finally, she went inside, took a tin of Tasty Tucker from the cupboard, opened it, tipped it onto her plate and ate it. Last of all she switched on the TV, jumped up on the lounge and tuned in to her favourite program Working Dogs.

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“Bluey, fetch that big stick near the fence post. I’ll see if I can stand up.” Bluey delivered the stick to Jack but as soon as he tried to stand up he knew that he couldn’t as the pain was too great. 8


• As Smart As Einstein•

l  Examining A Narrative

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Re-read As Smart As Einstein and answer the questions below.

LLA narrative usually has three parts: an orientation which describes the main character and the setting, a complication which describes a problem or challenges that the main character has to face, and a resolution which shows how a character solves the problem and usually learns something from the experience.

1. Who is the main character?___________________________________________________ 2. Who is the secondary character?_ _____________________________________________ 3. What are the settings?_______________________________________________________ 4. What time of day is it? _ _____________________________________________________ 5. What was the first problem that Jack faced?

_________________________________________________________________________

6. What was the second problem that Jack faced?

_________________________________________________________________________

7. What was the third problem that Jack faced?

_________________________________________________________________________

8. How did Jack resolve the problems?

_________________________________________________________________________

9. What do you think that Jack learnt from this experience?

_________________________________________________________________________

10. Is this story believable? Give reasons for your answer.

_________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________  Continue the story by writing the next scene. It could begin in the following way ... After a good night’s sleep in Jack’s bed Bluey got up, went into the kitchen …

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_________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ 9


• As Smart As Einstein•

l  Check The Text 1

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. A  Read As Smart As Einstein on page 8 again, then answer the questions below.

LLAs Smart As Einstein is a tall tale. This type of narrative usually contains exaggerations, similes, metaphors and descriptive language. The story is told as if it were true even though the reader knows that what happens in the story is not believable.

 What is the first example in the story of something that you know couldn’t be true?

________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________

B

 List five examples of events in the story that you know couldn't be true.

1. ______________________________________________________________________ 2. ______________________________________________________________________ 3. ______________________________________________________________________ 4. ______________________________________________________________________ 5. ______________________________________________________________________ LLThis story tells the reader about something that has already happened so the writer uses verbs in the past tense.

C

 Underline the verbs in the past tense in the following excerpt from the story.

In minutes the ambulance officers had located Jack, helped him onto a stretcher and moved him into the ambulance. Bluey watched as Jack waved goodbye and soon they were on their way to the hospital. Then Bluey headed for home. She knew that her work wasn’t yet finished for the day. First she rounded up the twenty free-range chooks into their hen house so that they were safe from any foxes. Then she collected the eggs in a basket. Finally, she went inside, took a tin of Tasty Tucker from the cupboard, opened it, tipped it onto her plate and ate it. Last of all she switched on the TV, jumped up on the lounge and tuned in to her favourite program Working Dogs. LLA simile is a figure of speech that writers use to create imagery. A simile compares two people or objects to draw attention to their similarities. Similes often use ‘as’ or ‘like’, e.g. as brave as a lion, as quick as a flash.

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Extra! Complete in your workbooks.

 Find five examples of similes in the story. 10


• As Smart As Einstein•

l  Check The Text 2

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' A book preview.  Read As Smart As Einstein on page 8 again, then answer the questions below.

 Complete these similes using your own ideas. There is no correct answer.

1. As tall as_______________________________________________________________ 2. As fast as______________________________________________________________ 3. As rough as____________________________________________________________ 4. As heavy as_ ___________________________________________________________ 5. As mean as_ ___________________________________________________________ 6. As tired as_ ____________________________________________________________

7. As cold as______________________________________________________________ 8. As light as_ ____________________________________________________________ 9. As old as_ _____________________________________________________________ 10. As colourful as__________________________________________________________ LLIt’s important when quoting direct speech to add quotation marks at the beginning and end of the words spoken and also to include any punctuation within the quotation marks. Check the examples of direct speech in the text.

B

 Add quotation marks (speech marks) to these sentences. Remember that all punctuation must go inside the quotation marks.

1. Bluey, race home and get the First Aid kit. 2. Bluey, fetch that big stick near the fence. 3. Bluey, I need you to ring triple zero, Jack said. 4. When you hear the word ‘ambulance’ bark three times, added Jack. 5. It’s been a big day! Bluey exclaimed to the wombat.

C

 Checking your writing for errors is very important. Check this writing and underline three spelling errors, three punctuation errors and four grammatical errors.

In minits the ambulance officers had located jack, help him ontoo a stretcher and moved

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him onto the ambulance? Bluey watched as Jack waved goodbye and soon they was on their way to the hospital. Then bluey headed from home. She knew that her work wasn’t yet finish for the day. 11


• As Smart As Einstein•

l  Plan A Narrative

 Create your own narrative. Make some notes about the characters and the plot before you start the first draft. Think about the challenges that your main character will face and how he/she will solve the challenges.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' �  Title book preview. Brainstorm a few different titles before choosing the one that works best. Sometimes a title isn’t decided until after the story has been written.

�  Orientation �  Who

�  When

Main character’s name, age, description. Main character’s friend or foe.

�  Where

When does the story take place? Is it now or in the past or in the future?

Describe the setting where your story takes place. Is it at school, at a beach, in a haunted house, in the desert, in another universe, etc.?

�  Complication

�  Resolution

List the challenges or complications that your character faces. There is often more than one and each new challenge usually gets tougher.

How did your character solve the problems or deal with the challenges or complications? What did your character learn about him/ herself?

Go to www.readyed.net  Write the first draft of your narrative. You might need to write several drafts before you start the final edit and proofread. 12


• As Smart As Einstein•

l  Review Your Writing

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Many famous writers talk about writing several drafts of scenes or chapters in their novels to get the story ‘just right’. When you have written your final draft, edited it and have done a final proofread, your work should be ready to be read and enjoyed. Check the following points and rate your writing.

Yes

No

Is the title interesting? Is your main character believable and described well? Have you introduced the main character and the setting in the first paragraph? Are the ideas in the story clear? Do you develop the storyline and include challenges to test the main character? Do you use descriptive language? Do you use a range of verbs in the past tense? Is the conclusion satisfactory and believable? Did you edit your narrative so that it was well-structured? Have you proofread your work so that there aren't any errors?

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Did you connect with your intended readers?

Did you position the readers in a particular way? 13


This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. • Building The Bridge •

This section covers the following Australian Curriculum Links: Year 5 Language ACELA1504 ACELA1506 ACELA1508 Literacy ACELY1701 ACELY1704 ACELY1705

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 Building The Bridge is a report about the construction of the Sydney Harbour Bridge. Reports are informative.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' • Building The Bridge • book preview. The Sydney Harbour Bridge, one of Australia’s most famous landmarks, celebrated its 80th birthday in 2012. Sydneysiders call it ‘The Coathanger’ because of its distinctive shape. It holds the record for being the world’s largest (but not the longest) steel arch bridge. As early as 1815, the architect Francis Greenway put forward the idea of building a bridge across Sydney Harbour. However, although there was interest in the idea over the years, it wasn’t until after WW1 that engineer, Dr John Bradfield’s plans for the design of the Bridge were accepted. Construction finally started in 1924. The Bridge took eight years to construct and over 2,000 men worked in various teams to complete the project. Among the men were: engineers, surveyors, architects, blacksmiths, boilermakers, carpenters, concreters, stonemasons, riggers, crane drivers, painters and labourers. Sixteen men died during the Bridge’s construction although not all died on site. The official opening of the Bridge on Saturday 19th March 1932 was a very important event - several hundred thousand people crowded around the harbour foreshores. The New South Wales Premier, the Honourable John ‘Jack’ Lang officially declared the Bridge open. However, before he could cut the ribbon, Captain Francis De Groot rode forward and slashed the ribbon with his sword. Some people found this entertaining but others were very upset. The ribbon was retied and the Premier then officially cut it.

The celebrations included a colourful parade and various bands that marched through the city and across the deck of the Bridge. There was a gun-salute, fireworks and parties. After the official opening the public were allowed to walk across the deck of the Bridge. The next time that this event took place was on the Bridge’s 50th anniversary in 1982. When the Bridge was opened it cost six pence for a car to cross and three pence for a horse and rider. Today horses and riders are banned from using the Bridge and it’s more expensive for a car to cross it but people can still walk across it for free and bikes can cross using a special lane. In 1932 the average daily traffic totalled about 11,000 cars. Now it’s over 150,000 vehicles per day. In 1998, a new tourist attraction, the Bridge Climb, began. Locals and tourists were so enthusiastic about seeing the amazing view from the top of the Bridge that there were, and still are, day, twilight and night climbs available. It’s a challenging climb but climbers say it is definitely worth it for the breathtaking sight from the top. ‘The Coathanger’ might be 80 years old but today it is just as popular as ever.

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• Building The Bridge •

l  Examining A Report

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Re-read Building The Bridge and answer the questions.

LLA report introduces a topic then gives factual information and descriptions of the topic. It consists of an introductory statement which introduces the topic, a description which gives a description and factual information about the topic, and a conclusion which sums up the information about the topic.

1. What does the introductory statement say about the topic?

_________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________

2. Who actually designed the Bridge and when did construction start?

_________________________________________________________________________

3. What is the nickname for the Bridge and why do you think it is called this?

_________________________________________________________________________

4. Why do you think that the construction of the Harbour Bridge was so important?

_________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________

5. Explain why the opening of the Bridge was of interest to so many people in 1932.

_________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________

6. What record does the Sydney Harbour Bridge hold?

_________________________________________________________________________

7. How do you think that people felt about the person who cut the ribbon before the Premier?

_________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________

8. Sum up the final statement.

_________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________

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9. Would you like to do the Bridge Climb? Give reasons for your answer.

_________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________

16


• Building The Bridge •

l  Check The Text 1

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' A book preview.  Re-read Building The Bridge and answer the questions.

LLA report is informative and usually contains facts, the names of people or places, dates, statistics and technical information.

 Name two important people connected with the design and the opening of the Bridge.

__________________________________

B

__________________________________

 The report contains many facts and figures.

1. When did construction of the Bridge start?

_______________

2. How many men worked on the Bridge?

_______________

3. How many men died during the construction?

_______________

4. How long did it take to build the Bridge?

_______________

5. When was the Bridge officially opened?

_______________

6. How many cars on average crossed the Bridge each day in 1932?

_______________

7. How many cars on average use the Bridge daily now?

_______________

8. When did the Bridge Climb start?

_______________

9. How old is the Sydney Harbour Bridge now?

_______________

10. How old will you be when the Bridge is 100 years old?

_______________

LLCapital letters are used to start a sentence and also for the names of: people, places, titles, days, months, festivals, organisations and for the titles of books and movies, e.g. the Sydney Harbour Bridge.

C

 Proofread these sentences and add capital letters where necessary.

1. the Sydney harbour bridge is one of australia’s most famous landmarks. 2. it wasn’t until after wwI that dr john bradfield’s plans were accepted. 3. the nsw premier, john ‘jack’ lang officially opened the sydney harbour bridge. 4. in 1998 a company started the bridge climb, which is very popular.

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5. ‘the coathanger’ is now 80 years old and still an important landmark.

Extra! Complete in your workbooks.

 List five examples of the use of capital letters in the report. 17


• Building The Bridge •

l  Check The Text 2

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. A  Complete the tasks below.

LLNoun groups provide a description of a person, place or thing. They add extra details and information to a report.

 Add an adjective to these nouns taken from the text.

1._ famous landmark

2._ __________________________ shape

3._ _________________________ bridge

4._ __________________________teams

5._ __________________________ event

6._ _________________________ parade

7_ ___________________________ lane

8._ __________________________ traffic

9._ ___________________________ view

10.____________________________sight

LLIn paragraph three there is a list of teams of workers involved in the Bridge’s construction. The list follows punctuation called a colon. A colon is used to separate the main part of a sentence from an explanation or list, e.g. Among the men were: engineers, surveyors, architects, blacksmiths, etc.

B

 Add a colon to these sentences.

1. The wildlife sanctuary cared for a number of species koalas, possums, kangaroos, wombats and bandicoots. 2. When you go camping you need a tent, sleeping bag, cooking equipment, food, water, warm clothes and strong boots. 3. This is my shopping list apples, oranges, bananas, strawberries, peaches and watermelon. 4. On safari the animals that they saw were elephants, lions, buffaloes, giraffes and antelopes. 5. Several disasters happened in the country in six months a bushfire, an earthquake, a cyclone and a flood. LLAn apostrophe is used when something has been left out of a word, e.g. it is/it’s or to show ownership, e.g. Dr John Bradfield’s plans.

C

 Add an apostrophe where it is necessary.

1. In 1982 it was the Bridges 80th anniversary. 2. Its a challenging climb to the top.

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3. Dr Bradfields plans were accepted.

4. Its one of Australias most famous landmarks.

5. A member of Premier Langs group retied the official ribbon. 18


• Building The Bridge •

l  Plan A Report

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' �  Title book preview.  Create your own report. Before writing, it is important to research information about the subject. You can use different sources to gather information, such as: interviews, the internet, newspaper items, books, diagrams or photographs. Make notes below. Brainstorm a few interesting titles before choosing the one that works best. Usually a shorter title rather than a longer one works best for a report. Make sure that the title is relevant. Change the title later if you think of a better one.

�  Introductory Statement This part introduces your topic to the reader and usually makes a general statement about the subject of the report.

�  The Description This is the main part and describes the topic of your report clearly and in detail. It usually includes the names of people and places and technical language relevant to your subject.

�  The Final Statement In the final statement, the writer sums up the information about the topic and sometimes makes a personal comment.

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 Write the first draft of your report. 19


• Building The Bridge •

l  Review Your Writing

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Writing a report involves careful research and clear presentation of relevant information in a way that will be interesting to the reader. When you have edited your final draft and finished the proofreading, your work should be ready to be shared. Check the following points and rate your writing.

Yes

No

Was the title relevant? Did you introduce the topic clearly in the opening paragraph? Did you research your information indepth before you presented it? Did you present the information in a logical order? Did you use relevant facts when writing about the topic? Did you use interesting verbs and strong descriptions? Did you use verbs in the present tense? Were ideas linked smoothly? Did you include a final statement summing up the information? Did you edit your report so that it was well-structured? Did you proofread your work so that there weren’t any errors?

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Did you connect with your intended readers? Do you think they would be interested in reading about your topic? 20


This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.

• Title • • Vote At 16 •

This section covers the following Australian Curriculum Links: Year 5 Language ACELA1504 ACELA1505 ACELA1506 ACELA 1507 Literacy ACELY1701 ACELY1704 ACELY1705

Go to www.readyed.net 21


 Vote At 16 is an expository text. It presents arguments for lowering the voting age to 16 in Australia.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' • Vote At 16 • book preview. In Australia it is compulsory to enrol to vote at the age of 18 and once enrolled it is compulsory to vote in local, state and federal elections. The voting age in Australia was lowered from 21 to 18 in 1973. Many people argue that it is now time to lower it to age 16. A strong argument for lowering the vote is that 16 year olds today are more mature than they were 40 years ago when the voting age was lowered to 18. Young people have access to the latest local, national and global information through technology. The majority of 16 year olds have a computer and a mobile phone so are able to access information and opinions on any subject 24/7. It is clear that 16 year olds already have many other important rights. They can leave school, they can work full-time, take up an apprenticeship and they can apply for a credit card. In addition, they can drive with L plates under supervision and at age 17 are eligible to attempt the driving test to gain their licence. At age 17 they can join the army (but not fight on the front line) if they have parental permission. Many people believe that if 16 year olds are in the work force and paying taxes then they should have the right to vote. Issues in the community affect them so they should be able to have a say by voting for the political party of their choice that will use taxes to put policies

in place. For the majority of 16 year olds who are still in school then, there is the perfect opportunity to learn about politics in a setting where mature discussion will ensure that they make informed decisions when voting. There are definite advantages in including a wide range of opinions on issues at a local, state or national level. Encouraging young people to get interested in politics so that they are informed before voting at age 16 will benefit the community. It will ensure that politicians take more seriously issues that affect young people. The fact is that many politicians don’t ask enough young people their opinions on issues that matter to them. By lowering the voting age to 16 both politicians and young voters would be in a win-win situation. In November 2012, Argentina lowered the country’s voting age from 18 to 16 but voting was made voluntary for 16 to 18 year olds. Other countries including Brazil, Cuba, Ecuador and Nicaragua already have a voting age of 16. Germany and Austria allow 16 year olds to vote in some local elections, and East Timor, Indonesia and Sudan have a voting age of 17. Research shows that 16 year olds in Australia are mature and responsible enough to make informed decisions in other aspects of their lives. This should include the right to vote.

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22


• Vote At 16 •

l  Examining An Exposition

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Re-read Vote At 16 and complete the questions and tasks below.

LLAn exposition introduces a topic then presents a particular point of view on this topic to try to persuade the reader to adopt this point of view. Expository texts consist of an introductory statement which introduces the topic and states the writer’s point of view, arguments which are presented in logical order, usually with the strongest one first, and a conclusion which sums up the arguments and often contains a personal comment.

A

 What does the introductory statement say about the topic?

_________________________________________________________________________

B

 Summarise the four main arguments for lowering the voting age to 16.

1. ______________________________________________________________________ 2. ______________________________________________________________________ 3. ______________________________________________________________________ 4. ______________________________________________________________________

C

 In your opinion which argument is the strongest?

_________________________________________________________________________  Does this argument convince you that lowering the voting age to 16 is a good idea? Give reasons for your opinion. _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________

D

 Sum up the final statement.

_________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________

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Extra! Complete in your workbooks.

 Did the writer of this text convince you that lowering the voting age to 16 is a good idea? If the answer is yes, then explain why you were convinced, but if the answer is no, explain why the writer wasn’t successful in persuading you. 23


• Vote At 16 •

l  Check The Text 1

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. A  Re-read Vote At 16 and complete the tasks below.

LLVote At 16 is persuasive. The writer presents arguments for lowering the voting age to 16 and tries to persuade the reader to adopt this point of view.

 Read the text and find 10 words or phrases that are persuasive.

1. ___________________

4. ___________________

7. ___________________

2. ___________________

5. ___________________

8. ___________________

3. ___________________

6. ___________________

9. ___________________

B

 Summarise the four arguments in point form.

• ______________________________________________________________________ •

_ ____________________________________________________________________

• ______________________________________________________________________ • ______________________________________________________________________

C

 Underline the introductory words or phrases at the start of each new paragraph. Comment on the style of language used and the purpose of this style of language.

________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________

D

 Complete these sentences with information about any suitable topic.

1. Most people agree that __________________________________________________ 2. There are definite advantages to___________________________________________ 3. I am strongly in favour of _________________________________________________ 4. The fact is that__________________________________________________________ 5. Most teenagers believe that_______________________________________________

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Extra! Complete in your workbooks.

 Explain the meaning of these words from the text. Use a dictionary if necessary. enrol, compulsory, local, national, global, rights, issues, politics, politician, voluntary 24


• Vote At 16 •

l  Check The Text 2

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Re-read Vote At 16 and complete the tasks below.

LLA clause is a group of words with a subject, a verb and a comment that adds to the information, e.g. In Australia it is compulsory to vote at age 18. Compound and complex sentences have more than one clause, e.g. In Australia, whether you are a student or in the workforce, it is compulsory to vote at age 18.

A

 Underline the clause or clauses in these sentences.

1. The voting age was lowered from 21 to 18. 2. 16 year olds have access to the latest technology. 3. They can drive with L plates at 16. 4. Young people, who are interested in politics, should be able to vote. 5. 16 year olds, who are mature and responsible, have important political opinions. LLCapital letters are used to start a sentence, and also for the names of: people, places, days, months, festivals, organisations and for the titles of books and movies, e.g. On Monday we went to Darwin with Sam to see the band Zombies.

B

 Proofread this paragraph taken from Voting At 16 to make sure that capital letters are used correctly. Change the text where necessary.

in november 2012, argentina lowered the country’s voting age from 18 to 16 but voting was made voluntary for 16 to 18 year olds. other countries including brazil, cuba, ecuador and nicaragua already have a voting age of 16. germany and austria allow 16 year olds to vote in some local elections and east timor, indonesia and sudan have a voting age of 17.

C

 What do you think are the five main issues that politicians should consider regarding young people? List them in point form.

• ______________________________________________________________________ •

_ ____________________________________________________________________

• ______________________________________________________________________ • ______________________________________________________________________

Go to www.readyed.net

• ______________________________________________________________________

your opinion! Complete in your workbooks.

 Are you in favour of the idea that the voting age should be lowered from 18 to 16? Explain your reasons for this opinion. 25


• Vote At 16 •

l  Plan An Exposition

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' �  Title book preview.  Create your own exposition. Before writing, it is important to research information about the subject. You can use different sources to gather information: the internet, newspaper items, interviews, reports or books.

Brainstorm a few interesting titles before choosing the one that works best. Make sure that the title is relevant. Change the title later if you think of a better one.

�  Introductory Statement This first paragraph introduces your topic to the reader.

�  Arguments Set out your arguments logically starting with the strongest argument first. Support each point with any evidence or statistics. Use persuasive language to convince your readers.

�  The Final Statement In the final statement, the writer sums up the information about the topic.

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 Write the first draft of your exposition. 26


• Vote At 16 •

l  Review Your Writing

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Writing an exposition involves careful research, logical thinking and the clear presentation of relevant information and evidence in a way that will persuade the reader to adopt a particular point of view. When you have edited your final draft and finished the proofreading, your work should be ready to be shared.  Check the following points and rate your writing.

Yes

No

Was the title relevant? Did you introduce the topic clearly in the opening paragraph? Did you research your information indepth before you presented it? Did you present the information in a logical order? Did you include evidence to support your arguments? Did you use persuasive language when presenting the arguments? Did you use interesting verbs and strong descriptions? Did you link the ideas smoothly? Did you use verbs in the present tense? Did you include a final statement summing up the arguments? Did you edit your writing so that it was well-structured?

Go to www.readyed.net

Did you proofread your work so that there weren’t any errors?

Did you connect with your intended readers? Do you think they would be interested in reading about your topic? 27


This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. •  CTitle odename: White Mouse • • •

This section covers the following Australian Curriculum Links: Year 5 Language ACELA1504 ACELA1507 ACELA1508 Literacy ACELY1701 ACELY1704 ACELY1705

Go to www.readyed.net 28


 Codename: White Mouse is a biography. It is a recount about the life of the WWII heroine, Nancy Wake.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' • Codename: White Mouse • book preview. Nancy Wake was one of the most decorated Australian servicewomen in WWII. She received these awards for her courageous work with the French Resistance during the war and for helping to save many hundreds of lives. Nancy Wake was born in New Zealand on 13th August 1912. When Nancy was about two years old her family moved to Australia where Nancy grew up. At age 16 she was working as a nurse but a few years later in 1932 she left Australia to work as a journalist in Europe. One of her early assignments was to interview Adolf Hitler who had become Chancellor of Germany in January 1933. In 1935 when she visited Berlin she saw firsthand the increasing violence against minority groups. In 1939 war was declared. It was also the year that she married Henri Fiocca, a wealthy French businessman. In 1940 when France fell to Hitler’s advancing armies, Wake and her husband joined the French Resistance. They helped to deliver secret messages and necessary food to groups who were helping Jewish refugees, escaped prisoners of war and aircrews whose planes had been shot down. By 1942 the Gestapo knew about a secret agent who was working against them. They gave her the code name: ‘The White Mouse’

and listed her as number one on their wanted list offering a five million franc reward. Fearing being captured, Wake escaped to England but her husband was arrested. In 1943 she began working with the French section of the Special Operations Executive, a unit of specially trained men and women who worked with resistance groups in occupied areas. Following special training, Wake returned to France in 1944 to once again work with the Resistance before D-Day. She was parachuted into France and helped to organise weapons and equipment for Resistance fighters. On one occasion she cycled close to 500 kilometres in 72 hours, crossing several German checkpoints to obtain important radio codes after the original codes were destroyed in a German raid. When the war ended in 1945, Wake learned that her husband had been killed after he was captured in 1943. For her bravery and assistance in helping so many soldiers and refugees escape to safety, she received military honours from France, Britain and the United States. However, it is the people who she helped to escape and those who fought alongside her, who praise so highly the courage of ‘The White Mouse’. Nancy Wake’s medals are on display at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra. She died in London on 7th August 2011.

Go to www.readyed.net Wikimedia Commons

29


• Codename: White Mouse •

l  Examining A Biography

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Reread Codename: White Mouse, then answer the questions.

LLA biography is a recount of a person’s life. It usually has an orientation which introduces the subject of the biography to the reader, a main part which tells the reader about significant events, usually in time order, and a conclusion which tells the reader why this person will be remembered and sometimes includes a personal opinion.

1. What important fact does the first paragraph tell you about Nancy Wake?

_________________________________________________________________________

2. Where was she born and when?

_________________________________________________________________________

3. Which country did the family move to?_________________________________________ 4. What was Nancy Wake doing at age 16?_ _______________________________________ 5. What work was she doing in 1932?_ ___________________________________________ 6. When did she get married?___________________________________________________ 7. In 1939 war_ ______________________________________________________________ 8. In 1940, France fell to_ ______________________________________________________ 9. Wake and her husband joined the_____________________________________________ 10. By 1942 she was known to the Germans as______________________________________ 11. In 1943 she escaped to ____________________________ as she feared being captured. 12. In 1945___________________________________________________________________

Your opinion!  What is your opinion of Nancy Wake after reading part of her biography?

30

___________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________

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• Codename: White Mouse •

l  Check The Text 1

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' A book preview.  Reread the text on page 29 to complete the tasks and questions below.

LLNancy Wake’s biography includes vocabulary that is connected to the topic of war and fighting.

 Find nine words in the text that relate to this subject.

1. ___________________

4. ___________________

7. ___________________

2. ___________________

5. ___________________

8. ___________________

3. ___________________

6. ___________________

9. ___________________

LLA biography usually recounts events in chronological (time) order to give the reader a clear understanding of the subject’s life.

B

 In point form explain the importance of the following dates in Nancy Wake’s life.

1912_ _____________________________

1942_ _____________________________

1932_ _____________________________

1943_ _____________________________

1933_ _____________________________

1944_ _____________________________

1939_ _____________________________

1945_ _____________________________

1940_ _____________________________

2011_ _____________________________

LLNoun groups consist of a noun and an adjective. They give the reader a better description of people, places and events.

C

 Check the text and add adjectives to complete these noun groups.

1. _____________________ assignment

6. _________________________ mouse

2. ________________________ violence

7. _________________ men and women

3. _________________________ groups

8. ________________________ training

4. _______________________ messages

9. _____________________ radio codes

5. _______________________ prisoners

10. ________________________ honours

LLA biography is usually written in the past tense because it tells the reader about events that have already happened.

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Extra!

 Read through Nancy Wake’s biography again and note the verbs in each sentence. A verb is a word that describes what someone or something is doing, or feeling, e.g. received, helped. 31


• Codename: White Mouse •

l  Check The Text 2

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' A book preview.  Complete the tasks after reading the text on page 29.

 List nine verbs that describe an action in the past tense.

1. ___________________

4. ___________________

7. ___________________

2. ___________________

5. ___________________

8. ___________________

3. ___________________

6. ___________________

9. ___________________

LLConnectives are words that are used to connect sentences or paragraphs in logical sequence, e.g. first, because, although.

B

 Find five examples of connectives in Codename: White Mouse.

1. _______________________________

4. _______________________________

2. _______________________________

5. _______________________________

3. _______________________________ LLCapital letters are used to start a sentence, and also for the names of: people, places, days, months, festivals, organisations and for the titles of books and movies, e.g. Nancy Wake was an Australian servicewoman in WWII.

C

 List nine examples where capital letters are used and say why.

1. ___________________

4. ___________________

7. ___________________

2. ___________________

5. ___________________

8. ___________________

3. ___________________

6. ___________________

9. ___________________

LLWhen you have finished writing the draft of a biography, it is important to edit and proofread your writing. Check that the sentences are clearly structured and make sense. Check for any spelling, grammatical and punctuation errors.

D

 The following paragraph has two spelling errors, two grammatical errors and six punctuation errors. Circle the errors.

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Following speshil training wake return to France in 1944 before d-Day. she was parachuted into france to help the fighters. On one Occasion he cycled close to 500 kilometres in 72 Hours. She had to cross several German checkpoints to obtain important radiow codes. 32


• Codename: White Mouse •

l  Plan A Biography

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. �  Title  Create your own biography. Before writing, it is important to research information about the person. After you decide who will be the subject of your biography, you can use different sources to gather information: interviews, newspaper articles, the internet, books or photographs. Make notes below.

Brainstorm a few interesting titles before choosing the one that works best. Usually a shorter title rather than a longer one works best for a biography. Make sure that the title is relevant. Change the title later if you think of a better one.

�  Orientation This part introduces your subject to the reader and usually tells the reader why this person is important. This doesn’t mean that the person has to be famous or well-known. It could be someone special who isn’t well-known like a family member, a friend or a coach.

�  The Main Part

�  Conclusion

This section tells the reader about the person’s life, usually describing events, people and places. It is usually written in time order.

In the final statement, the writer explains why this person is important and how he/ she will be remembered. This final statement can also include your personal opinion.

Go to www.readyed.net  Write the first draft of your biography. 33


• Codename: White Mouse •

l  Review Your Writing

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Writing a biography involves careful research and presentation of information in a way that will be interesting to the reader. When you have edited your final draft and finished the proofreading, your work should be ready to be shared. Check the following points and rate your writing.

Yes

No

Is the title interesting? Did the opening paragraph introduce the person and explain why he/she is known? Did you use interesting vocabulary when describing people and events? Was the information relevant to the person’s life? Were events presented in chronological (time) order? Were ideas linked smoothly? Did you use time connectives to link the ideas? Did you use past tense verbs when describing past events? Did you include a closing statement about this person and perhaps add your opinion? Did you edit your biography so that it was structured well? Did you proofread your work so that there weren’t any errors?

Go to www.readyed.net

Did you position the readers to think about the person in a certain way? 34


This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Into• The Rainforest • ••Title

This section covers the following Australian Curriculum Links: Year 5 Language ACELA1504 ACELA1508 ACELA1512 ACELA 1513 Literacy ACELY1701 ACELY1704 ACELY1705

Go to www.readyed.net 35


 Into The Rainforest is a descriptive text. It describes the tropical rainforest area in north Queensland.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' • Into The Rainforest • book preview. Many millions of years ago when Australia separated from the super continent Gondwanaland, the land was covered in rainforest. As Australia moved northwards much of the lush rainforest disappeared. Today, most of Australia’s remaining tropical rainforest is in north Queensland. A tropical rainforest survives in an area that has a warm temperature all year and also receives a steady rainfall. For this reason, plants in a rainforest environment grow rapidly. These plants provide abundant food for a range of animals, birds, insects and reptiles that inhabit the rainforest. The Daintree rainforest north of Cairns is one of the oldest rainforests in the world. Covering around 1,200 square kilometres it is home to the largest range of plants and animals on the Earth. It contains 30% of the frog, marsupial and reptile species in Australia, 65% of the country’s bat and butterfly species and 20% of the bird species found in Australia. Walk through the rainforest, look around and you will see distinct layers of vegetation. These different layers provide a range of habitats and varied food supply for all the creatures that live in them. You might see endangered species such as the southern cassowary, the spotted-tailed quoll, the little musky rat-kangaroo or the green ringtail possum. Look up and you

might see the rare tree-kangaroos that really do live in trees or any of the 400 bird species, some of which are found nowhere else in the world. At the top of the rainforest is the emergent layer. This contains a small number of very tall trees growing to 70 metres that emerge into the sunlight. These trees must be able to tolerate full sun and strong winds. The next layer is the canopy. It consists of tall trees whose branches and leaves almost join together to form a dense cover over the forest. The understorey layer is not as thick as the canopy but as it is lower down it is heavily shaded. Under this is the shrub layer. The shrubs that grow in this layer receive little sunlight. At ground level on the forest floor the plants that need little sunlight like ferns and mosses grow. The forest floor is also covered with a thick layer of rotting leaves. The Daintree tropical rainforest was placed on the World Heritage list in 1988 so it will be preserved for future generations. Deep within the Daintree rainforest is Cape Tribulation, a spectacular area where two World Heritage areas meet…the amazing Daintree rainforest and the sparkling sea of the Great Barrier Reef. Over a million people from all over the world have visited the Daintree rainforest to experience firsthand its unique flora and fauna.

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36


• Into The Rainforest •

l  Examining A Description

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Reread the text on page 36 then answer the questions.

LLA description introduces the topic of interest then describes important information and features. It consists of an introductory statement which introduces the subject being described, a description which includes facts and information that describe the features of the subject, and a conclusion which states that something is special or unique about the subject.

A

B

 What does the introductory statement say about the topic?

___________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________

 Read the description again and list ten facts about the Daintree rainforest that you consider are important.

1. ______________________________________________________________________ 2. ______________________________________________________________________ 3. ______________________________________________________________________ 4. ______________________________________________________________________ 5. ______________________________________________________________________ 6. ______________________________________________________________________ 7. ______________________________________________________________________ 8. ______________________________________________________________________ 9. ______________________________________________________________________ 10. ______________________________________________________________________

C

 What are the two important facts in the final statement? 1. ___________________________________________________________________ 2. ___________________________________________________________________

Extra! Complete in your workbooks.

Go to www.readyed.net

 Have you ever been to the Daintree rainforest in north Queensland? If your answer is ‘yes’, describe what impressed you most.  If you haven’t ever been to the Daintree rainforest, would you like to see it and what would interest you most? 37


• Into The Rainforest •

l  Check The Text 1

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. A  Complete the tasks below after reading page 36.

LLThe description of the Daintree rainforest is informative. The writer describes the rainforest in great detail to the reader. The description of the rainforest contains important facts, dates and statistics.

 Scan the text and identify what information these statistics are related to.

1. many millions of years ago________________________________________________ 2. 1,200 square kilometres__________________________________________________ 3. 30%__________________________________________________________________ 4. 65%__________________________________________________________________ 5. 20%__________________________________________________________________ 6. 400 species_ ___________________________________________________________ 7. 70 metres_____________________________________________________________ 8. 1988__________________________________________________________________ 9. one million_ ___________________________________________________________ 10. today_________________________________________________________________ LLThe description of the Daintree rainforest contains many examples of noun groups that bring the description to life, e.g. lush rainforest.

B

 Find ten examples of noun groups.

1. ________________________________

6. ________________________________

2. ________________________________

7. ________________________________

3. ________________________________

8. ________________________________

4. ________________________________

9. ________________________________

5. ________________________________

10. ________________________________

LLThe description of the Daintree contains vocabulary that is connected closely with this specific topic.

Extra! Complete in your workbooks.

Go to www.readyed.net

 Find the following words in the text and write their meanings. You can work out each meaning either from the context of the sentence or by using a dictionary.

Gondwanaland, rainforest, environment, marsupial, reptile, vegetation, creatures, species, emergent, canopy, understorey, shrub, flora, fauna, heritage 38


• Into The Rainforest •

l  Check The Text 2

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' A book preview.  Read the text on page 36 again, then complete the tasks.

 Create a word bank (words and phrases) that describes the Daintree rainforest.

B

 Proofread the following paragraph. Underline the ten spelling errors and write the correct spelling on top.

Walk through the rainforest, look around and you will see distinct liars of vegetation. These diffrint layers provide a range ov habitats and varied food supply for all the creatures that live in them. You might sea endangered speshies such as the suthern cassowary, the spotted-tailed quoll, the little musky rat-kangaroow or the green ringtail possum. Look up and you might see the rare treey-kangaroos that really do live in trees or eny of the 400 bird species, some of which are found nowhere else in the wirld.

C

 Edit the following paragraph to make it more interesting. Join sentences using conjunctions or change the wording. Vary the sentence length by using some short and some long sentences.

A long time ago Australia was joined to other countries. It was called Gondwanaland. It was all covered in rainforest. Australia slowly moved northwards. It was hotter and drier. A lot of the rainforest disappeared. Not all of it disappeared. Some tropical rainforest is in north Queensland. It grows there. It is warm and gets a lot of rain. The plants in the rainforest grow quickly. They like the sun and rain. It doesn’t get very cold in winter.

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The plants provide food for many animals. Animals, birds, insects and reptiles live in the rainforest. Some of them only live there. Nowhere else in the world. The rainforest is special. It is important to look after it. 39


• Into The Rainforest •

l  Plan A Description

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' �  Title book preview.  Create your own description. Before writing, it is important to know a lot of information about the subject. You can use different sources to gather information: personal experience, the internet, interviews, newspaper items, books, diagrams or photographs. Brainstorm a few interesting titles before choosing the one that works best. Make sure that the title is relevant. Change the title later if you think of a better one.

�  Introductory Statement This part introduces your subject to the reader and usually has a general statement about what or who is being described.

�  The Description This is the main part and describes the subject with detailed information. It can include the names of people and places and descriptive vocabulary relevant to your subject.

�  The Final Statement In the final statement, the writer sums up the information about the subject and sometimes makes a personal comment.

Go to www.readyed.net

 Write the first draft of your description. 40


• Into The Rainforest •

l  Review Your Writing

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Writing a description involves presenting detailed information about a subject that will be interesting to the reader. When you have edited your final draft and finished the proofreading, your work should be ready to be shared. Check the following points and rate your writing.

Yes

No

Was the title relevant? Did you introduce the subject clearly in the opening paragraph? Did you research your information indepth before you presented it? Did you use descriptive language? Did you include information about the subject’s special features? Did you use interesting verbs? Did you use paragraphs? Did you use conjunctions to join phrases and clauses? Did you include a final statement summing up the information? Did you edit your description so that it was well-structured? Did you proofread your work so that there weren’t any errors?

Go to www.readyed.net

Did you connect with your intended readers? Do you think they would be interested in reading about your topic?

41


This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. •• The TitleKraken: • Fiction Or Fact? •

This section covers the following Australian Curriculum Links: Year 5 Language ACELA1500 ACELA1504 ACELA1508 ACELA1512 ACELA1513 Literacy ACELY1701 ACELY1704 ACELY1705

Go to www.readyed.net 42


 The Kraken: Fiction Or Fact? is an explanatory text. It explains the origin of the legend of the sea monster, the Kraken, and how the legend might have been based on fact.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' • The Kraken: Fiction Or Fact? • book preview. As long ago as the 12th century, there were stories of a large, frightening sea creature that lived deep in the ocean. Over the following centuries, sailors occasionally reported sighting a sea creature in the sea around Norway that was huge and terrifying. It wasn’t until the early 18th century that it was named the Kraken, a Norwegian word for this fearsome creature. The Kraken was described as a giant cephalopod that lived deep in the ocean. With a large head, huge eyes and many tentacles like a giant octopus, it was supposedly large enough to crush small wooden sailing ships and eat the crew. Sailors at the time feared being shipwrecked during storms and feared that their ships would be damaged on rocks, but their worst fear was an attack by the legendary monster. In the 20th and 21st centuries scientists have used technical equipment to explore the deep parts of the oceans. Scientists now know that a giant squid really does exist. For many years scientists tried to take photographs or film of a giant squid but this giant predator was camera shy and no one was successful until 2004. Known to scientists as Architeuthis it was known to live deep in the ocean and feed on smaller squid and large deep-sea fish. In 2004 researchers from Japan

who had researched the possible habitat of the giant creature successfully took the first photographs of the giant squid in its natural habitat. In 2006 they filmed a live adult squid for the first time. The three-man crew led by Tsunemi Kubodera followed the creature in their submersible to a depth of 900 metres where the ocean is dark and the pressure is high. The creature appeared to be silvery in colour and could be up to 10 metres long with a large head, dark eyes the size of plates and long tentacles. While it has been exciting to have film of the giant squid, another even bigger species has now been identified. Six specimens of this squid were found in the stomachs of dead whales and another was caught in a trawl net at a depth of about 2,000 metres in the ocean near Antarctica. Scientists say that this species of squid is larger than the giant squid, possibly up to 15 metres in length. Its scientific name is Mesonychoteuthis hamiltoni but its common name is the colossal squid. Is the ancient legend of the giant sea monster, the Kraken, fiction or fact? It seems now that the origin of the legend of the terrifying sea monster was probably based on actual sightings of the species of giant squid that still inhabit the deep ocean.

Go to www.readyed.net Wikimedia Commons

43


• The Kraken: Fiction Or Fact? •

l  Examining An Explanation

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. A  Re-read The Kraken: Fiction Or Fact? and complete the information.

LLAn explanation gives the reader information about a topic. It consists of an introductory statement which introduces the subject, an explanation which includes an account of all aspects of the subject, and a final statement which sums up the information about the topic.

 Summarise the information in the first paragraph.

_________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________

B

 Briefly describe what the sailors a few hundred years ago thought the sea monster looked like.

_________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________

C

 How has technology helped scientists to get actual information about giant sea creatures?

_________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________

D

 Briefly describe what scientists know about the giant squid and its known habitat.

_________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________

E

 Do you think that there might be other sea creatures that live deep in the ocean that scientists don’t know about? Give reasons for your answer.

_________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________

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your opinion! Complete in your workbooks.

 Do you think the Kraken is fiction or fact? Give reasons for your answer. 44


• The Kraken: Fiction Or Fact? •

l  Check The Text 1

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' A book preview.  Reread the text The Kraken: Fiction Or Fact?, then complete the tasks below.

LLThe explanation about the origins of the legend of the Kraken includes technical vocabulary that refers specifically to this topic.

 Explain the meaning of these words. Use a dictionary if necessary.

1. cephalopod_____________________________________________________________ 2. habitat_________________________________________________________________ 3. submersible_____________________________________________________________ 4. specimen_______________________________________________________________ 5. predator_ ______________________________________________________________ LLNoun groups add detail to the descriptions of the Kraken and the giant squid.

B

 Find nine examples of noun groups in the text.

1. ___________________

4. ___________________

7. ___________________

2. ___________________

5. ___________________

8. ___________________

3. ___________________

6. ___________________

9. ___________________

LLThe Kraken and the squid are described in terms of size.

C

 Find examples in the text where the writer has used these words.

1. large___________________________________________________________________ 2. huge_ _________________________________________________________________ 3. giant_ _________________________________________________________________ 4. colossal_ _______________________________________________________________

extra! Complete in your workbooks.  The writer uses the scientific names and also the common names of the giant squid and the colossal squid. Scientific names of animals and plants are always written in Latin in italics and start with a capital letter. The best way to read them is to break the words into syllables, e.g. Ar / chi / teu / this and Me / so / ny / cho / teu / this / hamil / toni Architeuthis = giant squid. Mesonychoteuthis hamiltoni = colossal squid. Find out which animals the following scientific names belong to: Macropus rufus, Tachyglossus aculeatus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, Vombatus ursinus, phascolarctus cinereus

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45


• The Kraken: Fiction Or Fact? •

l  Check The Text 2

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' A book preview.  Read the text on page 43 again to help you to complete the tasks. LLThere are a number of ‘time’ words and phrases in the text.

 Underline the words or phrases in these sentences that give the readers information about when events happened.

1. As long ago as the 12th century there were stories of a large, frightening sea creature. 2. Over the following centuries, sailors occasionally reported seeing this sea creature. 3. In the 20th and 21st centuries scientists have used technical equipment to explore the oceans. 4. For many years they tried to get photographs of the giant squid. 5. In 2004 researchers from Japan took photographs of the giant squid. 6. In 2006 they filmed a giant squid.

B

 Discuss the purpose of the underlined words in the following sentences.

1. It was supposedly large enough to crush a small wooden sailing ship. 2. They had researched the possible habitat of the giant creature. 3. The creature appeared to be silvery in colour. 4. Scientists say that the colossal squid is possibly up to 15 metres in length. 5. It seems now that the origin of the legend was probably based on actual sightings.

C

 Always edit your writing to check that you have not used the same word too many times. Edit this paragraph to improve the description.

Hundreds of years ago sailors told stories of a big sea creature that was big enough to crush their ships. The creature was big and scary. It had a big head, very big eyes and looked like a big octopus. In 2004 scientists took photographs of a very big squid that lives deep in the ocean. Two years later they filmed the very big squid. Scientists now say that there is an even bigger squid living deep in the ocean. It seems that the sailors, several hundred years

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ago, who said that they had seen a big sea monster had actually seen a very big squid.

extra! Complete in your workbooks.

 Make a word bank of words that you would use to describe the giant squid. 46


• The Kraken: Fiction Or Fact? •

l  Plan An Explanation

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' �  Title book preview.  Create your own explanation. Before writing, it is important to research information about the subject. You can use different sources to gather information, such as: the internet, newspaper items, interviews, reports or books. Make notes below. Brainstorm a few interesting titles before choosing the one that works best. Make sure that the title is relevant. Change the title later if you think of a better one.

�  Introductory Statement This first paragraph introduces your topic to the reader.

�  The Explanation This is the main part and explains your topic clearly. It usually includes technical language relevant to your subject.

�  The Final Statement In the final statement, the writer sums up the information about the topic.

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 Write the first draft of your explanation. 47


• The Kraken: Fiction Or Fact? •

l  Review Your Writing

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Writing an explanation involves careful research and clear presentation of relevant information in a way that will be interesting to the reader. When you have edited your final draft and finished the proofreading, your work should be ready to be shared. Check the following points and rate your writing.

Yes

No

Was the title relevant? Did you introduce the topic clearly in the opening paragraph? Did you research your information indepth before you presented it? Did you present the information in a logical order? Did you use relevant technical language when explaining the topic? Did you use interesting verbs and strong descriptions? Were ideas linked smoothly? Did you use verbs in the correct tense? Did you include a final statement summing up the information? Did you edit your explanation so that it was well-structured?

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Did you proofread your work so that there weren’t any errors?

Did you connect with your intended readers? Do you think they would be interested in reading about your topic? 48


This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. • •Think Title •Like An Inventor •

This section covers the following Australian Curriculum Links: Year 5 Language ACELA1500 ACELA1501 ACELA 1504 ACELA 1512 ACELA 1513 Literacy ACELY1701 ACELY1704 ACELY1705

Go to www.readyed.net 49


 Think Like An Inventor is a report coupled with a procedural text. The report presents information about inventors and inventions, and the procedural text provides instructions re how to think like an inventor.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' • Think Like An Inventor • book preview. Why do people invent things? Sometimes they invent something completely new, e.g. the telephone or television. Sometimes an inventor designs something new to solve a problem, e.g. sticky tape or liquid paper. Sometimes an inventor sees a way to improve something already invented, e.g. the electric can opener or the washing machine. Some inventions are very successful but other imaginative inventions are totally unsuccessful. In 1923 Richard G. Drew invented masking tape to help painters paint a straight border between two colours. The tape was sticky only at the edges but not in the middle. Following that successful invention, in 1930 he invented an improved tape that was a clear, allpurpose sticky tape that was soon being used worldwide. In 1932 another inventor, John A. Borden invented a sticky tape dispenser with a cutting edge that made using sticky tape easier. These successful inventions are still being manufactured and widely used. Another inventor has invented the flying bike but the flying bike has never actually flown. The inventor thought that the flying bike would help to overcome increasing traffic on the roads and traffic jams. However, the fact that the inventor is yet to actually build a flying bike didn’t stop him patenting his idea in 2003.

To become an inventor you must think like one. Follow these steps: 1. Keep a notebook and pen handy at all times. 2. Write down the idea for your invention or draw it straight away. 3. Look at objects around you and try to visualise them in a different way. 4. Consider how you could modify an existing invention to make it better. 5. Imagine adding, removing or substituting something. 6. Sketch your invention and write notes to go with it. 7. Leave your notes for a week or two and allow your brain to think about how your invention would work and how you would build it. 8. Build a prototype of your invention. You might need help. 9. Give your prototype a test run to see if it works. 10. Modify your invention to improve it (not many inventions are perfect on the first attempt). 11. Get advice about protecting your invention by applying for a patent or licence.

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It’s an old saying but true: Necessity is the mother of invention. 50


• Think Like An Inventor •

l  Examining A Report

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Read the text on page 50, then answer the questions and complete the tasks below.

LLA report introduces a topic then gives factual information and descriptions of the topic. It consists of an introductory statement which introduces the topic, a description, and a conclusion which sums up the information about the topic of the report. Think Like An Inventor is a short report that includes important information about inventing.

A

 List the three reasons why people invent things.

1. _______________________________________________________________________ 2. _______________________________________________________________________ 3. _______________________________________________________________________

B

 Why do you think successful inventions like sticky tape and the sticky tape dispenser that were invented 80 years ago are still being produced?

_________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________

C

 Why do you think that the flying bike invention hasn’t been successful?

_________________________________________________________________________ LLA procedure sets out clear instructions that can be easily followed in order to achieve a result.

D

 The procedural text refers to items that an inventor should have handy at all time. What is the purpose of these items?

_________________________________________________________________________ LLIn the procedural text Think Like An Inventor the instructions on what to do are listed clearly with each instruction starting with a verb in the present tense.

E

 List the verbs used in the instructions. Some instructions have more than one verb.

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_________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ 51


• Think Like An Inventor •

l  Check The Text 1

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. A  Read page 50 to help you to complete the tasks below.

LLThe first part of Think Like An Inventor is a report. The writer is reporting to the reader why inventors invent and makes mention of failed and successful inventions. In the first paragraph of the report, verbs are written in the present tense.

 What is the purpose of using verbs in the present tense?

_________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________

B

 In the second paragraph the writer uses verbs in the past tense. Why has the writer changed tenses?

_________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ LLThe opposite of a successful invention is an unsuccessful invention. A prefix is a group of letters at the beginning of a word that change the meaning of the word to its opposite, e.g. by adding the prefix un to successful the meaning is changed to its opposite: unsuccessful. Common prefixes are: dis / un / /in / im / ir / il.

C

 Use a prefix to change these words to their opposites.

1. patient_________________________

6. possible________________________

2. mature_________________________

7. conscious______________________

3. complete_______________________

8. lucky_ _________________________

4. necessary_______________________

9. appear_________________________

5. regular_________________________

10. honest_________________________

LLThe instructions re how to think like an inventor include specific words that refer to inventing.

D

 Explain the meaning of these words. Use a dictionary if necessary.

1. visualise________________________________________________________________ 2. modify_________________________________________________________________

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3. prototype_ _____________________________________________________________ 4. test run_ _______________________________________________________________ 5. patent_ ________________________________________________________________ 52


• Think Like An Inventor •

l  Check The Text 2

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' A book preview.  Read page 50 to help you to complete the tasks below. LLA proverb is an old, wise saying that gives advice.

 Write down the literal meanings of these proverbs (sayings).

1. A leopard cannot change its spots. 2. Actions speak louder than words. 3. All that glitters is not gold.

4. An empty can makes the most noise. 5. The longest journey starts with a single step. LLA report and a procedure are two different types of texts written for different purposes.

B

 Explain the purpose of a report and the purpose of a procedure.

_________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________

C

 Louis Braille invented a system of reading using dots so that blind children could learn to read. Expand these words and phrases into a paragraph. When completed, edit and proofread your work. Louis Braille born 1809 France. Lost sight age three. Eye injury. Age 10 entered first school blind children. Age 15 invented Braille alphabet. Clever system raised dots. Two years later adapted system reading music. Age 19 teacher blind students. Braille system still used today.

D

 Think of an invention that you could create. What is your invention called? What will it be used for? Now draw a prototype of your invention.

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• Think Like An Inventor •

l  Plan A Report

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' Title book�  preview.  Before writing a report it is important to research information about the subject. After you decide on the subject of your report you can use different sources to gather information, such as: the internet, newspaper items, interviews, books, diagrams or photographs. Make notes below.

Brainstorm a few interesting titles before choosing the one that works best. Usually a shorter title rather than a longer one works best for a report. Make sure that the title is relevant. Change the title later if you think of a better one.

�  Introductory Statement This part introduces your topic to the reader and usually has a general statement about the subject of the report.

�  The Description This is the main part and describes the topic of your report clearly. It usually includes the names of people and places and technical language relevant to your subject.

�  The Final Statement

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In the final statement, the writer sums up the information about the topic and sometimes makes a personal comment.

 Write the first draft of your report. 54


• Think Like An Inventor •

l  Review Your Writing

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Create your own report. Writing a report involves careful research and clear presentation of relevant information in a way that will be interesting to the reader. When you have edited your final draft and finished the proofreading, your work should be ready to be shared. Check the following points and rate your writing.

Yes

No

Was the title relevant? Did you introduce the topic clearly in the opening paragraph? Did you research your information indepth before you presented it? Did you present the information in a logical order? Did you use relevant technical language when explaining the topic? Did you use interesting verbs and strong descriptions? Did you use verbs in the correct tense? Were ideas linked smoothly? Did you include a final statement summing up the information? Did you edit your explanation so that it was well-structured? Did you proofread your work so that there weren’t any errors?

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Did you position the reader?

55


This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. • Is Graffiti Art Or Vandalism? •

Covers the following Australian Curriculum Links: Language ACELA1500 ACELA1504 ACELA1505 Literacy ACELY1701 ACELY1704 ACELA1705

Go to www.readyed.net 56


 Is Graffiti Art Or Vandalism? is a discursive text. It argues for and against graffiti and tries to persuade the reader to think about different points of view.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' • Is Graffiti Art Or Vandalism? • book preview. Graffiti, the words or drawings written or painted on buildings, transport or advertising billboards is illegal. It is legal only when graffiti is done in a special area where it is allowed. Is graffiti art or vandalism? People who argue that graffiti is vandalism feel strongly about this because those who graffiti are breaking the law. Graffiti is illegal. They believe that if people are caught then they should be fined and made to clean it up. They maintain that tagging (writing signatures) and graffiti on public buildings and on public transport not only looks awful but also costs taxpayers millions of dollars to clean it up. The cleanup costs mean that money that is spent cleaning graffiti could be spent on other things that would benefit the community The fact is that doing graffiti is sometimes a very dangerous and risky activity as some young people have died or been seriously injured while doing graffiti on bridges, on railways and in tunnels. Tagging or doing graffiti in dangerous or hard to reach places can earn the person credit amongst other graffiti artists but they risk injury or being killed.

way as traditional artists. They say that their artwork involves imagination, technique and planning. It also often contains important social, political and environmental messages. While the artists use spraycans to produce their work it is no less important than artists whose work is in traditional galleries. They are simply choosing to use a public space to create and display their art. They reason that street art is not only used to share messages about important social issues but it can also improve the look of a public space that is neglected or dirty. Areas in the community such as rundown buildings or walls that are blank and uninteresting are changed for the better. In Melbourne for example, tourists come to look at the amazing range of street art. Street art is no longer ‘just graffiti’. It is considered important enough for the National Gallery of Australia in Canberra to buy 300 stencil designs by more than 30 artists. British street artist Banksy’s works are now famous in a number of countries and valued highly when sold. Finally, whether you feel strongly that graffiti is art or vandalism, it is still illegal to graffiti public or private buildings so most graffiti is done in secret unless it is done in a permitted designated area. However, the work of talented street artists has merit and is now being appreciated.

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Those who consider graffiti to be art believe that the work of graffiti or street artists should be considered in the same

57


• Is Graffiti Art Or Vandalism? •

l  Examining A Discussion

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. A  Read Is Graffiti Art or Vandalism? then complete the tasks below.

LLA discursive text introduces a topic then provides arguments for and against a particular point of view related to the topic. A discussion consists of an introductory statement which introduces the subject, arguments which present different points of view and any relevant evidence, and a final statement which sums up the information about the topic.

 What does the introductory statement say about the topic?

_________________________________________________________________________

B

 Summarise the three arguments that say that graffiti is vandalism.

1. _______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

2. _______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

3. _______________________________________________________________________

C

_______________________________________________________________________

 Summarise the three arguments that say that graffiti is art.

1. _______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

2. _______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

3. _______________________________________________________________________

D

_______________________________________________________________________

 Sum up the final statement.

_________________________________________________________________________

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_________________________________________________________________________

your opinion! Complete in your workbooks.  What is your opinion of tagging and street art? 58


• Is Graffiti Art Or Vandalism? •

l  Check The Text 1

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' A book preview.  Read the text on page 56 to help you to complete the tasks.

LLA discursive text appeals to the reader’s sense of logic, to their values and their emotions.

 Explain the meaning of these words.

1. graffiti_ ________________________________________________________________

2. tagging_ _______________________________________________________________ 3. illegal__________________________________________________________________ 4. vandalism_ _____________________________________________________________ 5. designated area_ ________________________________________________________

B

 Scan the text and find six verbs that are persuasive, e.g. agree, disagree.

1. ________________________________

4. ________________________________

2. ________________________________

5. ________________________________

3. ________________________________

6. ________________________________

C

 These unfinished sentences start with language that tries to persuade or convince others to adopt a particular point of view. Complete the sentences by adding something about the topic of graffiti.

1. People say that__________________________________________________________ . 2. My friend believes that _ __________________________________________________ . 3. It is thought that_________________________________________________________ . 4. There are advantages to _ _________________________________________________ . 5. Many people think that_ __________________________________________________ . 6. I feel that it is important to_________________________________________________ . 7. The fact is that___________________________________________________________ . 8. Parents say that__________________________________________________________ . 9. Obviously everyone should________________________________________________ .

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10. Research shows that______________________________________________________ .

your opinion! Complete in your workbooks.

 Which argument in Is Graffiti Art Or Vandalism? did you find the most persuasive? Why? 59


• Is Graffiti Art Or Vandalism? •

l  Check The Text 2

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' A book preview.  Read the text on page 56 again to help you to complete the questions.

 What is your opinion of tagging and graffiti on city trains that cost a lot of money to clean? In your workbooks state your opinion then briefly list your arguments to support your opinion. Use persuasive language and connectives such as ‘firstly', 'secondly', 'in addition', 'finally’. Start a new paragraph for each point. End your writing with a short final statement that sums up your arguments.

B

 Graffiti artists are now more commonly known as street artists. Do you think that the change of name will change people’s opinion of their work? Give reasons to support your opinion.

_________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________

C

 Create word banks for these two topics.

graffiti artist

D

traditional artist

 Proofread the following paragraph to find the errors. Underline three spelling errors, three punctuation errors and four grammatical errors.

graffiti refers to words or drawings that r written or painted on surfaces such as buildings, transport or advertising billboards. Unless graffiti is dun in a special area where they is allowed, then it is illegal. Graffiti is not something new. Examples of graffiti has been

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found that date back a few thousand years to the time of the ancient Greeks and romans. Modern graffiti started in New york in the 60s when tenagers used permanent marker pens to writing their names in public places especially on subway carriage. 60


• Is Graffiti Art Or Vandalism? •

l  Plan A Discussion

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' �  Title book preview.  Create your own discursive text. Before writing, it is important to research information about the subject. You can use different sources to gather information, such as: the internet, newspaper items, interviews, reports or books. Make notes below. Brainstorm a few interesting titles before choosing the one that works best. Usually a shorter title rather than a longer one works best for a discursive text. Your title should be relevant to the topic. Change the title later if you think of a better one.

�  Introductory Statement This first paragraph introduces your topic to the reader.

�  The Arguments For And Against Set out your arguments logically starting with the strongest argument first. Support each point with any evidence or statistics. Use persuasive language to convince your reader.

�  The Final Statement In the final statement, the writer sums up the information about the topic.

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 Write the first draft of your discussion. 61


• Is Graffiti Art Or Vandalism? •

l  Review Your Writing

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Writing a discursive text involves careful research, logical thinking and the clear presentation of relevant information and evidence. When you have edited your final draft and finished the proofreading, your work should be ready to be shared. Check the following points and rate your writing.

Yes

No

Was the title relevant? Did you introduce the topic clearly in the opening paragraph? Did you research your information indepth before you presented it? Did you present the arguments in a logical order? Did you include evidence to support your arguments? Did you use persuasive language when presenting the arguments? Did you use interesting verbs and strong descriptions? Did you link the ideas smoothly? Did you use verbs in the present tense? Did you include a final statement which summarised the arguments? Did you edit your writing so that it was well-organised? Did you proofread your work so that there weren’t any errors?

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Did you position the reader in a particular way? 62


l  Answers AS SMART AS EINSTEIN

P9 1)Jack 2)Bluey 3)The bush and Jack's house 4) morning 5)Jack fell out of the tree. 6)He needed a stick to help him stand. 7)He needed an ambulance. 8)He got Bluey to help him.

because it has the same shape. 4)It allowed people to cross the harbour quickly and easily. 5)It was important for transport and also it was an important engineering feat. 6)It’s the largest steel arch bridge. 8)The Bridge is still very popular for transport and for tourism.

P10 A] The cockatoos helping Jack to pick the beans. B] 1)The kangaroo delivering mail tucked into her pouch. 2)The wombat coming in to watch Wildlife Rescue on TV. 3)Telling Bluey to race home to get the First Aid kit. 4)Bluey bandaging Jack’s leg. 5) Bluey ringing 000. C] In minutes the ambulance officers had located Jack, helped him onto a stretcher and moved him into the ambulance. Bluey watched as Jack waved goodbye and soon they were on their way to the hospital.

P17 A] Dr John Bradfield and Premier Jack Lang. B] 1)1924 2)Over 2,000 3)16 4)8 years 5)19.3.1932 6)11,000 7)150,000 8)1998 9)80 years old C]1)The Sydney Harbour Bridge is one of Australia’s most famous landmarks. 2)It wasn’t until after WWI that Dr John Bradfield’s plans were accepted. 3) The NSW Premier, John ‘Jack’ Lang officially opened the Sydney Harbour Bridge. 4)In 1998 a company started the Bridge Climb, which is very popular. 5)‘The Coathanger’ is now 80 years old and still an important landmark.

Then Bluey headed for home. She knew that her work wasn’t yet finished for the day. First she rounded up the twenty free-range chooks into their hen house so that they were safe from any foxes. Then she collected the eggs in a basket. Finally, she went inside, took a tin of Tasty Tucker from the cupboard, opened it, tipped it onto her plate and ate it. Last of all she switched on the TV, jumped up on the lounge and tuned in to her favourite program Working Dogs. EXTRA! As quickly as a monkey; as loud as thunder; like a sack of potatoes; as white as a sheet; as gentle as a lamb

P18 A] 1)famous landmark 2)distinctive shape 3)largest bridge 4)various teams 5)important event 6)colourful parade 7)special lane 8)daily traffic 9)amazing view 10)breathtaking sight B] 1)The wildlife sanctuary cared for a number of species: koalas, possums, kangaroos, wombats and bandicoots. 2)When you go camping you need a: tent, sleeping bag, cooking equipment, food, water, warm clothes and strong boots. 3) This is my shopping list: apples, oranges, bananas, strawberries, peaches and watermelon. 4)On safari the animals that they saw were: elephants, lions, buffaloes, giraffes and antelopes. 5)Several disasters happened in the country in six months: a bushfire, an earthquake, a cyclone and a flood. C] 1)In 1982 it was the Bridge’s 80th anniversary. 2)It’s a challenging climb to the top. 3)Dr Bradfield’s plans were accepted. 4)It’s one of Australia’s most famous landmarks. 5)A member of Premier Lang’s group retied the official ribbon.

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P11 B] 1)“Bluey, race home and get the First Aid kit.” 2)“Bluey, fetch that big stick near the fence.” 3)“Bluey, I need you to ring triple zero,” Jack said. 4)“When you hear the word ‘ambulance’ bark three times,” added Jack. 5)“It’s been a big day!” Bluey exclaimed to the wombat. C] In minits the ambulance officers had located jack, help him ontoo a stretcher and moved him onto the ambulance? Bluey watched as Jack waved goodbye and soon they was on their way to the hospital. Then bluey headed from home. She knew that her work wasn’t yet finish for the day.

BUILDING THE BRIDGE

VOTE AT 16

P23 A] It gives information re changing the voting age from 18 to 16 and states that it is compulsory to vote at age 18 and maybe it is now time to change the voting age to 16. B] 1)16 year olds are more mature these days. 2)16 year olds already have other rights. 3)Many 16 year olds work and pay taxes so they should have a say on how that is spent. 4)There are advantages for politicians as they can access the opinions of young people. D] The final statement supports the view that 16 year olds are mature and responsible enough to vote.

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P16 1)Sydney Harbour Bridge is one of Australia’s most famous landmarks, it’s now 80 years old, it’s known as the Coathanger because of its shape and it holds the record for being the largest steel arch bridge. 2)Dr John Bradfield in 1924. 3)The Coathanger

63


P24 A] compulsory; many people argue; a strong argument; more mature; access global information; it is clear; important rights; in addition; many people believe; the perfect opportunity (there are other examples) B] 16 year olds are more mature now; they already have other rights; they pay taxes so should have a say in decisions; advantages to politicians listening to young people EXTRA! 1)enrol: record your name 2)compulsory: required or must do 3)local: your area 4)national: the country 5)global: all countries 6)rights: what you are entitled to 7)issues: topics that are important 8)politics: the management of a state or country 9)politician: a person holding a position in the government 10) voluntary: do something by choice

1942 Gestapo knew of her work. Called her the 'White Mouse’. 1943 Began working with the French section of the Special Operations Executive. 1944 She returned to France. 1945 War ended. Found out that her husband had been killed. 2011 Nancy Wake died. C] Check the text and add adjectives to complete these noun groups. 1) early assignment 6) white mouse 2) increasing violence 7) trained men and women 3) minority groups 8) special training 4) secret messages 9) important radio codes 5) escaped prisoners 10) military honours EXTRA! received; visited; saw; was; declared; married; fell; joined; helped; knew; escaped

P25 A] 1)The voting age was lowered from 21 to 18. 2) 16 year olds have access to the latest technology. 3)They can drive with L plates at 16. 4)Young people, who are interested in politics, should be able to vote. 5)16 year olds, who are mature and responsible, have important political opinions. B] In November 2012, Argentina lowered the country’s voting age from 18 to 16 but voting was made voluntary for 16 to 18 year olds. Other countries including Brazil, Cuba, Ecuador and Nicaragua already have a voting age of 16. Germany and Austria allow 16 year olds to vote in some local elections and East Timor, Indonesia and Sudan have a voting age of 17.

P32 B] also, when, once again, following, however C] 1)Nancy Wake (person’s name) 2)WWII(event) 3)French Resistance (organisation) 4)New Zealand (country) 5)Australia (country) 6)Europe (continent) 7)Henri Fiocca (person’s name) 8) Gestapo (organisation) 9)White Mouse (code name) 10)Australian War Memorial (institution) D] Following speshil training wake return to France in 1944 before d-Day. she was parachuted into france to help the fighters. On one Occasion he cycled close to 500 kilometres in 72 Hours. She had to cross several German checkpoints to obtain important radiow codes.

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CODENAME: WHITE MOUSE

P30 1)That she is a decorated Australian servicewoman who helped to save many lives during the war. 2) New Zealand on 13.8.1912 3)Australia 4)Working as a nurse 5)Journalism 6)1939 7)War was declared. 8)In 1940, France fell to Hitler’s armies. 9)Wake and her husband joined the French Resistance. 10)By 1942 she was known to the Germans as the White Mouse. 11)England 12)In 1945 the war ended and Wake learned that her husband had been killed. P31 A] 1)decorated 2)servicewoman 3)courageous 4) violence 5)armies 6)Resistance 7)refugees 8) prisoners of war 9)shot down (there are other examples) B]1912 birth date 1932 left Australia for Europe 1933 Hitler became Chancellor of Germany 1939 Married Henri Fiocca. War declared 1940 Joined French Resistance with her husband.

INTO THE RAINFOREST

P37 A] Rainforest growing today is connected to a time when Australia was part of Gondwanaland and covered in rainforest. B] 1)Millions of years ago Australia was part of Gondwanaland, which was covered in rainforest. 2)Most of Australia’s tropical rainforest is in north Queensland. 3) The Daintree is one of the oldest rainforests in the world. 4) It covers around 1,200 square kilometres. 5)It is home to the largest range of plants and animals on the Earth. 6)It contains 30% of the frog, marsupial and reptile species in Australia. 7) It contains 65% of the country’s bat and butterfly species. 8) It contains 20% of the country’s bird species. 9) It was placed on the World Heritage list in 1988. 10) At Cape Tribulation two World Heritage areas meet: the Daintree rainforest and the Great Barrier Reef. C] The Daintree rainforest was placed on the World Heritage list in 1988. Inside the Daintree rainforest at Cape Tribulation two World Heritage areas meet: the Daintree rainforest and the Great Barrier Reef.

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P38 A] 1)many millions of years ago: Australia separated from the supercontinent Gondwanaland 2)1200 square kilometres: the size of the Daintree rainforest 3)30%: frog, reptile and marsupial species 4)65% : bat and butterfly species 5)20%:bird species 6)400 species: bird species 7)70 metres: tallest trees 8)1988: Daintree listed as World Heritage area 9) one million: visitors to Daintree 10)today: Daintree protected for the future B] tropical rainforest; warm temperature; steady rainfall; abundant food; largest range; distinct layers; varied food; endangered species; southern cassowary; green ringtail possum (there are other examples) EXTRA! Gondwanaland: ancient supercontinent rainforest: type of forest that grows in hot areas that have steady rain environment: the physical conditions of a place such as weather, water and vegetation marsupial: a mammal that has a pouch reptile: an animal covered in scales, breathes air through lungs and whose body temperature changes with the air or water temperature vegetation: plants that grow in an area creatures: living things species: the groups into which animals and plants are divided emergent: tall trees that grow above the others canopy: top layer of the rainforest understorey: the lower section shrub: a small tree-like plant flora: the plants of an area fauna: the animals of an area heritage: something that is passed on from a family or country

big eyes and long tentacles. P45 A] cephalopod: the group of creatures that have a large head and eyes and long tentacles. habitat: the place where plants or animals live and grow. submersible: a small ship capable of going deep in to the ocean. specimen: a sample that represents a whole group. predator: an animal that hunts other animals for food. B] 1)large, frightening creature 2)fearsome creature 3)large head 4)huge eyes 5)small wooden sailing ship 6)legendary monster 7)technical equipment 8) giant squid 9)deep-sea fish 10)colossal squid (there are other examples) C] large: large , frightening sea creature huge: huge and terrifying giant: the giant creature colossal: its common name is the colossal squid EXTRA! Macropus rufus: Red Kangaroo; Tachyglossus aculeatus: Echidna; Ornithorhynchus anatinus: Platypus; Vombatus ursinus: Wombat; Phascolarctus cinereus: Koala

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P39 B] liars/layers diffrint/different ov/of sea/see speshies/species suthern/southern kangaroow/ kangaroo treey/tree eny/any wirld/world

THE KRAKEN: FICTION OR FACT?

P44 A] Over many centuries there have been stories of a giant sea creature that was eventually named the Kraken. B] A giant octopus with a large head, huge eyes and many tentacles that was big enough to crush a small ship. C] Scientists have been able to go deep into the ocean in a submersible and using special equipment they have been able to take photographs and film of giant squid. D] They know that it lives deep in the ocean and feeds on smaller squid and large deep-sea fish. It could grow to 10 metres and has a large head and

P46 A] 1)As long ago as the 12th century there were stories of a large, frightening sea creature. 2) Over the following centuries, sailors occasionally reported seeing this sea creature. 3)In the 20th and 21st centuries scientists have used technical equipment to explore the oceans. 4)For many years they tried to get photographs of the giant squid. 5) In 2004 researchers from Japan took photographs of the giant squid. 6)In 2006 they filmed a giant squid. B] These words are used when the information cannot be proved but it is thought to be true.

THINK LIKE AN INVENTOR

P51 A] 1)They think of something completely new. 2) They invent something to solve a problem. 3)They improve something that has already been invented. B] They still have a use today. D] A notebook and pen for recording ideas so that they aren’t forgotten. E] keep; write; draw; look; try; consider; imagine; sketch; leave; allow; build; give; modify; get

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P52 A] The writer is speaking about something that happens day to day and is still happening so the present tense is appropriate. B] In the second paragraph the writer is referring to past events so the past tense is appropriate. 65


C] 1)impatient 2)immature 3)incomplete 4) unnecessary 5)irregular 6)impossible 7) unconscious 8)unlucky 9)disappear 10)dishonest D] visualise: to have a mental image of something modify: to make changes to something prototype: the original model of an invention test run: to try something to see if it works patent: permission given by the government for a person to be allowed to make or sell an invention

written or painted on surfaces such as buildings, transport or advertising billboards. Unless graffiti is done in a special area where it is allowed, then it is illegal. Graffiti is not something new. Examples of graffiti have been found that date back a few thousand years to the time of the ancient Greeks and Romans. Modern graffiti started in New York in the 60s when teenagers used permanent marker pens to write their names in public places especially on subway carriages.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. P53 A]1)A person can’t change their nature. 2)Doing something is more effective than just talking about it. 3)Things that seem special aren’t always special. 4)A person who talks the loudest doesn’t always have the best ideas. 5)Whatever big ideas you have, you have to make a start before you can achieve anything. B] A report is about something that has happened and gives information about it. A procedure is a set of instructions for a particular purpose. C] Example: Louis Braille was born in France in 1909. At the age of three he lost his sight because of an injury to his eye. When Louis was ten he entered the first school for blind children in Paris. At age 15 he invented what is now called the Braille alphabet, which was a clever system of raised dots that enabled blind children to learn to read. Two years later he adapted this system to reading music. At age 19 Louis became a teacher of blind students. The amazing system that he invented so many years ago is still used today.

IS GRAFFITI ART OR VANDALISM?

P58 A] It explains what graffiti is and that it is illegal. B] 1)It looks awful and is illegal. 2)It costs taxpayers money to get it cleaned off buildings, etc. 3)It is dangerous and some people have died or been injured doing graffiti. C] 1)Graffiti or street art is creative art. 2)It often contains important social and environmental messages. 3)It improves rundown or uninteresting areas. D] Graffiti or street art is illegal unless done in an approved area but there is definite talent in some of the amazing work done by street artists. P59 A] 1)graffiti: drawings or words written on walls in public places. 2)tagging: leaving a signature. 3) illegal: against the law. 4)vandalism: deliberately destroying or damaging something. 5)designated area: a special area set aside for an activity. B] argue; believe; maintain; consider; reason; appreciated P60 D] Graffiti refers to words or drawings that are

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This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.

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This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.

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Write & Connect 2 - Book 2, 11-14 year olds  

Write and Connect - Book 2 is part of a three-book series written specifically for lower secondary students who are not writing at their exp...

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