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TIMOTHY LINEHAN Lands c ape

Ar chi tectur e

Por tfol i o


ABOUT ME I grew up spending most of my life in New Hampshire. When I decided to go to college for landscape architecture, I chose to branch out and go further from home. I have attended Philadelphia University for the past 5 years; completing my BLA. I decided to push my self even further and went abroad for a semester where I studied urban design in Copenhagen, Denmark. Now I am in my final year of school. If I have learned anything from moving around the US and traveling the World, it has been to cherish the environment that you live in and the people around you. Designing the landscape and elements that go into it is a way that I can help make these environments better. I feel that I can not only make my life better through landscape architecture, but also improve the lives of others around me as well. I am a highly motivated individual. I enjoy problem solving, sketching, learning, exercising, and photography. Through my life to this point, I have discovered not only how to work efficiently by myself, but also how to communicate and collaborate with others in a group atmosphere. I plan to use my knowledge and skills on the road ahead.


“UNLESS someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. Its not.” -Dr. Suess


Germantown

Bartram’s North

COMMUNITY DESIGN Semester Abroad

URBAN DESIGN Park West

BROWNFIELD RESTORATION

Magee Hospital

CONTENTS GREEN SPACE

Night Market

PRODUCT DESIGN

Comcast Competition

STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

PI Philly Charette

Skills

Professional Experience


GERMANTOWN Fall 2013 - Spring 2014


Philadelphia, PA USA

Germantown

Community & Urban Design Group: Taylor Klemm, Tim Linehan, Vanessa Miller, Darpan Patel

This interdiscplinary year long studio with landscape architects and architects was focused on creating a long term vision plan for a neighborhood during the fall semester, while also phasing out the project and detailing the initial steps in the spring semester. After inventorying and analyzing the elements of the neighborhood, our group discovered that through the rich history of Germantown, there was a large amount of vacant and underutilized space in the town center left behind by a historic rail spur. During our first semester, it was the vision to create a cultural corridor through these vacant spaces to re-start the neighbrohoods town center. It was our intent to this cultural corridor would not only re-start the failing town center, but it would also add density, make the area more walkable, implement sustainable structures, and create public, semi-private and private spaces for the community to use and enjoy.


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Open stormwater systems (rain gardens, swales)

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Private Spaces Green roofs, community gardens, and solar energy

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Elevated Greenway Private resident spaces Skate Park

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Germantown Train Station

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Main Economic Corridors (Primary Connections) Secondary Connections Additional Pedestrian Connections Cultural Corridor (Phase 1 corridor) Internal Community connections (Phase 2 & 3 corridor)

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Honey Creek Wingohocking Creek Historic Railroad lines

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Germantown’s town center was investigated as the area between Germantown High School and Market Square, and Germantown and Chelten train stations.

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To the right is an exploded view showing the various elements that were looked and and implemented into the design of the cultural corridor.


Below shows our groups vision plan for the center of Germantown. The corridor runs along the historic rail road spur that once existed in the neighborhood

Before

Vanessa Miller, Tim Linehan, Darpan Patel


Vanessa Miller, Darpan Patel

There are over 250 artists that reside in the neighborhood, so in our design we created a plaza space where live/work residential units, theatre space, and a multiuse space for the community help create vibrant edges to the area.


TREES Provides evapotransporation, cooling of home, creates habitat, manages stormwater, and cleaner air quality

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPLICATIONS Creates a place where people can become educated about the environment but increases corridors for wildlife COMMUNITY GARDENS Creates a place to learn how to grow fresh local food

PUBLIC & PRIVATE OUTDOOR SPACE Not only creates a greenway corridor along abandoned railways but also captures stormwater, allows for community interaction, and food growing

GREEN ROOF Captures rainwater, reduces the heat island effect, regulates home temperatures, provides wildlife benefits

SOLAR PANELS Creates energy from solar rays for the home

TRANSIT Close proximity to mass transit like SEPTA will create a sustainable and better means of transportation in and out of Germantown SOLAR SHADING Windows and shading allow for sunlight warmth to penetrate into the home during winter and shades in the summer in order to maintain efficient heating and cooling

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THERMAL MASS Helps sustain a consistant temperature UNDERGROUND WATER STORAGE Stores rain water from green roof and terrace and can be reused in utilities such as bathroom facilities

UNDERGROUND WATER STORAGE

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GEOTHERMAL ENERGY Uses heat from the earth to power energy to a building for its heating and cooling systems

Vanessa Miller, Darpan Patel

OPEN DOOR CONCEPT Doors open straight onto the plaza to increase community interaction and artist venues in return increasing Germantown’s identity

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RADIANT HEATING Water from geothermal is used to heat homes

Section of the Artist Plaza

PERFORMING ARTS CENTER (revitalized/reused Verizon building)

MIXED USE (commercial & residential)

MIXED USE (commercial & residential)

ARTIST’S LOFTS & STUDIOS

railway walk: direct connection to rail line

partial closure of Lena Street for extended plaza & pedestrian safety

Tim Linehan, Darpan Patel, Taylor Klemm

berm, playscape, & amplitheatre seating

artist spill out space


This view shows the Market Plaza that we designed which includes a market, multi use residential, commerical, and office space to create an edge to an active community space.

Vanessa Miller, Taylor Kleem

MIXED USE (commercial & residential)

HEALTH CENTER

MIXED USE (commercial & residential)

additional rainwater can be reused as gray water direct pedestrian connection to the Germantown train stop

MIXED USE (commercial & residential)

capture rainwater on greenroofs

ART STU

elevated railway walk to create better access to homes and to create views into Germantown

use solar panels for renewable energy

capture runoff from surrounding areas into rain gardens

Chelten Avenue C e Armat Street capture runoff from roofs and right of way in tree trenchs & bump outs

geothermal energy supply reuse of tanks for water storage

Tim Linehan, Darpan Patel, Taylor Klemm

underground cistern

WATER TABLE

(can repl


This space is a newly designed Railway Walk that creates better access to the existing rail line in order to promote a more transit oriented neighborhood and create a more walkable environment.

Vanessa Miller, Tim Linehan, Darpan Patel

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THEATRE

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APARTMENTS (revitalized mill building)

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capture stormwater on greenroofs and reuse additional rainwater can be reused as gray water capturing stormwater from the plaza

underground cistern lenish groundwater and be used as gray water in buildings)

green wall to capture water and cool building

integrated residential dwellings for better community interaction and expression

shared renewable energy

Church Lane


Vanessa Miller, Tim Linehan


Vanessa Miller, Darpan Patel

MIXED USE (revitalized buildings for commercial & residential)

MIXED USE (revitalized buildings along Germantown Ave for commercial & residential)

MIXED USE (revitalized buildings for commercial & office space)

revitalized streetscape on Germantown Ave

Germantown Avenue

Tim Linehan, Darpan Patel

undulating berm sculptures

interactive spray ground

landmark: information and communication screen / tower


BARTRAM’S NORTH Spring 2013


Kingsessing Philadelphia, PA USA

Brownfield Remeditation Group: Tim Linehan, Mark Keinard, Ryan Harms, Steph Miller

This project focused on a site that was historically an oil and coal yard. The resulting aftermath was a contaminated site that was not only polluting the soil of the property but also leaching chemicals into the adjacent river. As a result, the contaminated site was not only a hazard for the city, but also prevented residents of the area from accessing the waterfront and using this valuable open space. It was the goal of the project to meet the clients needs of adding industry back to the site in a “clean” manner while also meeting the needs of the city to continue the Schuylkill River trail along the rivers edge. Our group focused on cleaning the contamination of the site and finding and interesting way to bring back a natural ecology of the site to through bioremediation, while also creating a symbiotic relationship between trail users and a “lighter, greener” industry. This goal would prevent residents of the adjacent neighborhoods and the city from being cut off from natural open spaces and would rather embrace the interaction between these persons and a new, small scale industry.


Visual connection between the trail and the industry

Connection to Bartram’s Garden

Access to the waterfront

Connection to the city


Mark Keinard


Historically the industry had cut off the adjacent neighborhood from waterfront. Our group brought back some of the natural ecology to remediate contaminants while also providing access to the river that the community had not experienced for over 50 years

Connection between the boardwalk, tidal wetland, and the pedestrain ramp down to the river.

Detail showing the construction of the tidal wetland. Large footers will support the boardwalk struction and gabion walls will help to structurally support the steep slope while allowing vegetation to establish.


View looking back to the pedestrian ramp leading to the river.

Terraced gabion walls to allow for bank stablization from the tidal changes in the river.

Interlocking unit paver design for the ramp path

Ramp leading down to the river


SEMESTER ABROAD Fall 2012


Copenhagen Denmark

Urban Design This semester abroad opened my eyes to a lot of things in relation to urban design and the elements that help make a great space successful. A large influence was not only the city of Copenhagen, but also traveling to other cities to study how they were designed and used. Over the course of the semester, I studied multiple developments in and around Copnenhagen area as well as in other nearby countries. A large influence on my view of urban design while abroad and after are the findings of Jan Gehl. His study of urban spaces for the past 60 years has made his work intriguing in relation to the “human scale�. Copenhagen, world renowed for its ideas about urban design, was a great place to study. On the following pages are a few of the urban case studies and projects that I completed.


Orsunds Kollegiet: student housing landscape Before

This view shows how light can not only be brought into the space at night, but also during the day. Uplighting of the space at night can make the space feel more comfortable. Softening some of the edges with lightly colored vegetation as well as some grade changes to create a variety of spaces for different functions.

he This student housing complex lacked natural light due to the height and close proximity of the buildings to each other so the goal of this project was ways to make the space feel “lighter� even if natural light could not be brought into the space.


Case Study: Utrecht Canals

Myself and three other students from various disciplines did an urban study of a city in Holland where historic canals affected its development. We studied how the area was affected by the grade change, the canals, tree coverage, bridges, bends in the river, facades of buildings, and the width of the different pedestrian paths. Each aspect had an effect on the feel and mood of the space. Tim Linehan, Nadine Oelschlager, Adam Strauss, Tim Schaefer

The upper and lower paths as well as the tree coverage had an affect on the feel of the urban space.

Tim Linehan, Nadine Oelschlager, Adam Strauss, Tim Schaefer

The infrastructure of the space, including the arched bridges and the “four second� building facades had a profound affect on how the space was percieved.


Amager: re-design of an urban complex

Implementing Infrastructure

(Adding roads, pedestrian streets, bus routes)

Hierarchy of Spaces

(Importance of Public, Semi-Private, Small, Large)

A view of the changes in sizes of spaces as well as their function based on how private or public the areas are.


A view looking down the main pedestrian corridor in the neighborhood. The buildings are no higher than 6 stories, giving the space a human scale that people can relate to and feel comfortable in.


PARK WEST Fall 2010 - Spring 2011


Wes st Philadelphia West Philadelphia, PA USA

Community & Urban Design Group: Tim Linehan, Andrew Calderone, Crystal Vega, Kabir Punde

This year long studio was my first introduction to community and urban design. As groups, we looked at the neighborhood of West Philadelphia and completed an inventory and analysis of the area to determine good gateways in and out of the area. After doing an in depth analysis of the area, our group decided to focus on the intersection of Upland and 59th street to investigate ways of making the area more pedestrian friendly and inviting for visitors of the area. The second semester was spent on choosing a site and developing it in more detail. I chose an adjacent property with a closed box store located on it. I looked at how this site could add to the gateway into the neighborhood. Ultimately, a mixed use development was seen as a good way to not only bring people to the neighborhood, but also a good way to keep people living in the area.


During the first semester I worked with other student to inventory, study, and analyze the area to create a more pedestrian friendly gateway into the Park West neighborhood.

Existing Conditions

Looked at multiple ways to re-design the intersection of Upland & 59th in order to make it safer for pedestrians

Before


After looking at the unsafe intersection of Upland and 59th, I focused on designing a property where a closed box store existed. The site was adjacent to the intersection and a new mixed use development could act as a good attraction to bring people to the area and draw people into the surrounding neighborhood.

Detailed view of a plaza space adjacent to the mixed use development.

The drastic 20 foot drop in elevation from the surrounding streets posed an obstacle for access to the site, so various scenarios were explored. Since parking was needed on site, it was decided to keep parking on the outside of the spaces in order to provide a more pedestrian friendly environment for visitors to enjoy.

View showing how the mixed use development could not only bring economic stability back to the neighborhood, but could also provide places to live, work, and play.


MAGEE HOSPITAL Fall 2011


Center City Philadelphia, PA USA

Green Space After visiting the hospital and speaking with our client, it was explained that the patients as well as employees and families wanted to have a space on the existing roof top where they could get away from the hospital environment and be in a peaceful healing space. Therefore, it was the goal to create a passive space to act as both a green roof and a healing garden for its users. When inventory and analysis of the space was completed, it was clear that the vast open space had to be programmed for both larger gathering spaces as well as secluded spaces for all types of users to enjoy. It was at this point that I looked into Japanese gardens and how their passive atmosphere and simple designs could help with the healing process. So, I tried to emulate characteristics and elements seen typically in these types of spaces and seperate the roof top into various “rooms” that people could use. The simple design elements of typical Japanese gardens helped to create these “rooms”.


Above is the master plan for the green roof and healing garden. The flowing movement through the space not only helps to create a comfortable passive space, but also helps to seperate the space into designated “rooms� that people can enjoy.

Doing a detailed inventory and analysis of the site was crutial to understanding the limited space that was available on the roof top.


NIGHT MARKET Spring 2012


Northern Liberties/ Fishtown Philadelphia, PA USA

Green Space & Urban Design Group: Tim Linehan, Chris Lousos, Justin Lentz, Ian Schieve, Jordan Force, Ryan Harms, Megan Krieg

This semester studio focused on selecting and designing an area for a Night Market. For the first part of the semester, we used programs such as GIS to anaylze and chose potential candidates. After a long search, a site in the Northern Liberties/Fishtown neighbrohood of Philadelphia was selected. The space was a large stretch of vacant land under the I-95 overpass that dissects the neighborhood. It was our groups goal to not only create a space for a Night Market, but also to create an area that could be used for eduational purposes, for passive green space, and even for stormwater management. Through the design process, we focused on the ideas based around sustainability and incorporated them into our spaces as the site developed. We made each lot connect to the adjacent lots, but provided design elements that would allow the spaces to function solely on their own if so desired.


Chris Lousos


Ian Schieve

Park by Day


Market by Night

Justin Lentz

Ryan Harms

Jordan Force


COMPETITIONS Fall 2013


Philadelphia, PA USA

Group 1: Tim Linehan, Melanie Whedon, Lea DiSantis, Katie Blumberh, Brandon Saiz Group 2: Tim Linehan, TJ Burghart, Jeff Gu, Adrian

The first competition was for Comcast and the goal was to design the future home of 2020 with technology. Our group focused on the idea of community living and how the typical Philadelphia rowhome promotes interaction. We looked at creating a central “hearth� where all technologies could be housed in order to create a efficient, sustainable, communal space for people to gather around. Our group won second place for the competition. The second competition was a charette that the organization PIPhilly held where students of various disciplines from various schools in the city were asked to come together to help solve a urban design problem. The groups were given a few hours to look at three vacant lots in the city center and problem solve solutions for the space. Our group focused on multi-use live/ work spaces that could create liveable, walkable, and intimate spaces to tie into the surrounding urban fabric. Our group ended up winning first place.


Comcast: Home of 2020 HEARTH: CENTRAL CORE TO THE HOME

HEARTH CONTAINS ALL KEY AMENITIES

LOCALIZED “SMART GRID” ENERGY

SOLAR POWER “SMART” HEATING & COOLING

Melanie Whedon SHARED ENERGY

GEOTHERMAL POWER

MANAGING & MONITORING STORMWATER

USE FOR IRRIGATION

(Technology can control when captured water can be released for irrigtation)

USE AS “GRAY WATER”IN THE HOME

(Technology can control when water needs to go to outdoor system)

STORMWATER SYSTEM

(Can use technology to monitor system)

OVERFLOW FROM ROOF RUN-OFF

Melanie Whedon


Katie Blumberh


PIPhilly: urban design charette Each group was given a room in which to discuss and design urban design strategies for the area. To the left shows the work environment

The interdisciplinary character of the exercise made the competition challenging given the time frame, but allowed members not only to learn more about other dsiciplines, but also resulted in a better end product that made sense from multiple perspectives.


TJ Burghart

TJ Burghart

TJ Burghart

Our group was asked to present our idea to the Philadelphia City Planning Commision (PCPC)


SKILLS Fall 2009 - Present


Skills learned from all around the World

In the following section, there are examples of projects from classes that were unique to the program and aided in a more well rounded view of landscape architecture as a profession. Such classes as construction documents, planting design, grading, and hyrdrology helped me to understand more than just the design aspects of the profession. I learned skills that are used in the profession outside of the educational background. The projects and classes show the dynamic structure of the program where real world applications are brought to the table on a regular basis. This section also includes hobbies and pastimes such as sketching and photopgraphy that I have brought with me around the world. The skills that I have learned and obtained are not only applicable to where I studied, but can be taken with me anywhere I go. These skills have set the foundation for a future in landscape architecture and have created opportunities for continued learning. I hope to use these skills to become a better designer and utilize them in the professional arena.


Construction Documents For this project, I was given a site on campus near the student center where a stormwater management system as well as the adjacent spaces had to be re-thought and re-designed. On the following pages are plans and details that were created in the construction documents course that I took. The project was also used in the following planting design course that I took where plants were selected for the re-designed stormwater management space. Planting plans and details of the plantings are shown on the following spread.


Planting Design


Grading For this project, I was given a undeveloped lot was given certain requirements for a proposed development. Site elements that were needed include: five homes, a convienence store and parking lot with a minimum of twenty four parking spaces, a road, and a stormwater basin to manage runoff from the designed development. Certain grades had to be maintained as a requirement of the project. To the left is the final grading plan for the development.

VERTICAL CURVE

While grading the road through the development, we not only were required to analyze the horizontal representation of the grading but also had to calculate the vertical curve of the proposed street. To the right is the graph showing where cut and fill would be needed if the road were to be constructed.


R

KI RK

G SIN RI

RECREATIONAL BUILDINGS

/

1

AR GY LE BE NN E

R

HO ATHLETIC FIELDS L

CO ML Y

AL CO CH ELT TT RO EN SA HA LIE M

OA K

HA SB CO ML Y

BE

0

250

500

1,000

Feet 2,000

1,500

/

1 inch = 500 feet Date: 3/18/2013

0

100

200

400

HO W EL L

N SU

SIN RI

G

N SU

LG AT E

G

N SU

CO ML Y

OL GA TE

HA SB RO OK

SE NT NE

2

3 SIN RI

KI NL EY

MA LTA

VA N

AL CO TT

7

BE NN ER

CO LG AT E

HO W EL L

MC

5

ATHLETIC COURTS

PA LM ET TO

4

6

LA RD NE R

AR GY LE

OA KL EY

AR GY LE

HA SB RO OK

RO BB IN S

S EN EV ST

HA SB RO O K

ST

UX EA ER S EV EN D EV ST LA RD NE R

LA RD NE R

contours flow arrows stormwater inlets topographic barriers nonbuilt areas program parcels drainage areas

S N

For this project, I was given a park in Northeast Philadelphia, and the area needed to be anaylzed for potential Green Stormwater Infrastructure systems (GSI). Potential areas were located, concepts were developed, and loads for the systems were calculated to see how much stormwater could be captured.

O

Hydrology

contours flow arrows stormwater inlets topographic barriers nonbuilt areas site boundary drainage areas

Feet 600

1 inch = 200 feet

opportunities constraints SMP footprints PPR Preferences

CONCEPT OVERVIEW GSI Footprint

" ""

"

SH EL BO RN E

D5

LA RD NE 5 R D5 D5

"

4

S EN

" ""

The stormwater coming from D5 will be collected and piped to the underground stonebed of SMP 5.

UX EA ER EV D

EV ST

SMP 5

GSI Subsurface Footprint

GSI Sideslope

LARDNER AND RISING SUN

SMP 1: Vegetated Swale

AR GY LE

ExisƟng Inlet

OA KL EY

Proposed Inlet

HA SB RO O

Flow DirecƟon Arrow

" ""

"

SMP 7

"

"

The stormwater coming from D7 will be collected and piped to the underground stone bed of SMP7.

" " "

D5 D1

" "

D4

SMP 4

" " "

D1 D1

This rain garden will manage the water of D4 on the adjacent streets of Comly and Hasbrook. "C OM " L

"

""

"

"" "

D6

D3

3

D6

6

"

SIN RI

KI RK

""UN S "

G

"

PA LM ET TO

" "

SURFACE SYSTEMS

SMP 2 This rain garden will manage the stormwater from D2 Áowing off Rising Sun Ave.

""

3

CO LG AT E

D6

ID #

SMP

DRAINAGE AREA ID #s

S1 S2 S3 S4 *S6

swale rain garden tree trench rain garden (across street)

D1 D2 D3 D4 D6

DRAINAGE FOOTPRINT AREA (sf) (sf)

40171 19315 25030 22200 71560

4017.1 1931.5 2503 2220 7156

RAINFALL DP (in)

STORAGE REQUIRED (cf)

SOIL DP (ft)

SOIL STORAGE CAPACITY (%)

SOIL STORAGE (cf)

1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5

5021.375 2414.375 3128.75 2775 8945

5 5 6.25 5 0

20% 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2

4017.1 1931.5 3128.75 2220 0

3 3 0 3 0

/

0

100

200

PONDING TOTAL PONDING DP STORAGE VOLUME (in) (cf) MANAGED (cf)

RAINFALL DP (in)

STORAGE REQUIRED (cf)

STONE DP (ft)

STONE STORAGE CAPACITY (%)

STONE STORAGE (cf)

TOTAL VOLUME MANAGED (cf)

1.5 1.5

6696.625 2259

3.15 3.15

40% 0.4

6750.198 2277.072

6750.198 2277.072

*Potentially managed on the Salvation Army site SUBSURFACE SYSTEMS

ID #

SMP

DRAINAGE AREA ID #s

S5 S7

stone bed stone bed

D5 D7

DRAINAGE FOOTPRINT AREA (sf) (sf)

53573 18072

5357.3 1807.2

SMP 6 It is not possible to manage this drainage area on the existing site. There is the potential to create a SMP on the Salvation Army site across the street.

STORMWATER RUNOFF FROM LARDNER STREET AND ALLEY OFF OF LARDNER -USING PIPE AND NEW OUTFALL

CALCULATIONS

BE NN ER

"

HO W EL L

STORMWATER RUNOFF FROM RISING SUN AND LARDNER STREETS -USING PIPE AND NEW OUTFALL

"

D2

D3

D6 "

AN

This vegetated swale will collect stormwater from D1 and will enter the SMP on Rising Sun Ave.

D7

2

The stormwater from the schoolyard of D3 will be managed in both areas of SMP 3 which are vegetated tree trenches.

SMP 1

D7

D2

D4 D5

SMP 3

D1

1

7

Y

400

1 inch = 200 feet

Feet 600 TOTAL IMPERVIOUS AREA MANAGED: TOTAL WATER VOLUME MANAGED: TOTAL GREENED ACRES:

178361 SF 22366.77 CF 267541.5 G. ACRE

1004.275 482.875 0 555 0

5021.375 2414.375 3128.75 2775 0


Sketches


Photography


WORK EXPERIENCE Fall 2011 - Present


Philadelphia, PA USA

Hudson, NH USA

Over the past few years, I have obtained jobs in both my hometown in New Hampshire as wel as where I attend school in Philadelphia. The most recent position that I’ve had has been with the Philadelphia Water Department. I started a summer internship in May of 2013 where I started off only knowing the basics about stormwater management and ended learning a great deal about how many systems are planned, function, and are ultimately designed and implemented. I was asked to come back for part time work after the summer ended and I am currently working on aspects involving the planting design of the systems and how to make the systems not only function, but also look aesthetically pleasing from a design perspective. In addition to my work at the water department, I also spent two summers doing residential landscape construction where I learned a great deal about the construction side of how landscapes are designed and ultimately implemented. Both these positions where unique in the fact that I was able to see both sides of a project from design to its construction. They have helped me to understand the design and construction process and have pushed me to think more critically about how to design landscapes.


Philadelphia Water Department W,KdKE>z^/^

This was a task that I was given while working at the water department where I had to look at a park, inventory the area, anaylze the opportunities and constraints, and come up with a design concept for the site. The project presented many challenges from ultility constraints to extensive grade changes, but in the end, the concept shows that a fair amount of stormwater can still be disconnected form the combined sewer system and managed in or around the park. The concept for this site has now moved onto the design phase and is currently be looked at for actual GSI systems.

EKd͗dŚŝƐƉĂŐĞƌĞŇĞĐƚƐŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƟŽŶĨƌŽŵƚŚĞ:ƵŶĞϮϬϭϯƐŝƚĞǀŝƐŝƚǁŝƚŚWWZ͘ZŽŽĨůĞĂĚĞƌĚŽǁŶƐƉŽƵƚƐǁĞƌĞŶŽƚĞĚĂŶĚƉŚŽƚŽŐƌĂƉŚĞĚ͘dŚĞůĂďĞůĞĚƉůĂŶƐŚŽǁƐƚŚĞůŽĐĂƟŽŶŽĨƚŚĞĚŽǁŶƐƉŽƵƚƐƚŚĂƚĂƌĞďĞŝŶŐƐŚŽǁŶ͘

1

6

10

2

7 one on corner

1

9

2 2

9

8

8

3

8

7

8

3

7

ƚǁŽŝŶĐŽƌŶĞƌ

3 7

4

7

8 5

8

4

9

7

78

82

92

76

86

KEWdW>E͗^z^dDϲ͕ϳ͕ϴ

90

9088

&ůŽǁŝƌĞĐƟŽŶƌƌŽǁ

DIVINITY

49TH

66

Total Drainage Area: 5,900 SF (.14 AC)

(6a) 1800

7,100

500 17,500

Εϱϱ͛

51ST

78

(8a)

78

;ϵĞͲŐͿ

>ŝŵŝƚƐŽĨ ƌĞĐƌĞĂƟŽŶĂů ĮĞůĚ;ƐͿ

3900

ΕϰϮ͛

ADDITIONAL NOTES: t dŚĞƐĞϯƐLJƐƚĞŵƐǁŝůůĐĂƉƚƵƌĞĂůĂƌŐĞĂŵŽƵŶƚŽĨǁĂƚĞƌĨƌŽŵ ƚŚĞƌŝŐŚƚŽĨǁĂLJŝŶƚŚĞƉĂƌŬ͘sĞŚŝĐƵůĂƌĂĐĐĞƐƐŶĞĞĚƐƚŽ ďĞůĞŌŽƉĞŶĨŽƌďŽƚŚƚŚĞƌĞĐƌĞĂƟŽŶĂůĮĞůĚĂƐǁĞůůĂƐƚŚĞ ĐŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJŐĂƌĚĞŶ͘^LJƐƚĞŵϴŝƐůĂďĞůĞĚĂƐĂƐƚŽŶĞďĞĚ͖ ŚŽǁĞǀĞƌ͕ĂƌĐŚĞĚƐƚŽƌĂŐĞŵĂLJďĞƵƐĞĚĂƐĂƐƵďƐƟƚƵƚĞ͘

Εϴϭ͛

Εϰϯ͛

ΕϮϲ͛ SMP Label

ϭϮ͛ŵŝŶ͘ĨŽƌ vehicular access

64

Surface

7 Rain garden

Surface

8 Stone bed

Tree lined streets

;ϭϭďͿ

7,100 16,700 14,600

;ϴďͿ

20,200

3,900 ϳ͕ϴϬϬ

dŽƚĂů͗

20,2 200 20,200

16,700

66

38,400 ϳϲ͕ϭϬϬ

DRAINAGE AREAS BEING MANAGED BY THE SYSTEM

(7a)

SAINT BERNARD 88

92

74

84

CHESTER

94

86

86 90

9088

88

82

94

KINGSESSING

76

(11a)

KINGSESSING

20,200

8a 8b 8c

92 90

74 4

78

92 86 78

66

51ST

78

90

82

72

7a

80

78

70

KINGSESSING

RD

OCK

78

8c

N

±

64

40 Feet

64

GREYLOCK

30

82

20

8b

ΎDĞĂƐƵƌĞŵĞŶƚƐŽĨ^DWƐĂƌĞŶŽƚĞdžĂĐƚ͕ďƵƚƌĂƚŚĞƌĞƐƟŵĂƚĞĚĚŝŵĞŶƐŝŽŶƐƚŽĂƐƐĞƐƐƚŚĞĨĞĂƐŝďŝůŝƚLJŽĨĂƐLJƐƚĞŵ͘^LJƐƚĞŵƐƐŚŽƵůĚŶŽƚďĞ ĚĞƐŝŐŶĞĚŽƌĐŽŶƐƚƌƵĐƚĞĚďĂƐĞĚƐŽůĞůLJŽŶĂŶLJƉůĂŶƐǁŝƚŚŝŶƚŚŝƐĐŽŶĐĞƉƚ͕ďƵƚƐŚŽƵůĚďĞůŽŽŬĞĚĂƚĨŽƌĂŶĂůLJƐŝƐƉƵƌƉŽƐĞƐ͘dŚĞŵĂƉƐĂƌĞ ĐƌĞĂƚĞĚƵƐŝŶŐ'/^͕ƐŽŝŶĂĐĐƵƌĂĐŝĞƐĂƌĞƉŽƐƐŝďůĞ͘WƌŽƉŽƐĞĚĚƌĂŝŶĂŐĞĂƌĞĂƐĂŶĚĐŽŶĐĞƉƚƐƐŚŽƵůĚďĞƌĞĞǀĂůƵĂƚĞĚĂŌĞƌƐƵƌǀĞLJ͘

*NOT TO SCALE

86

ΎDĞĂƐƵƌĞŵĞŶƚƐŽĨ^DWƐĂƌĞŶŽƚĞdžĂĐƚ͕ďƵƚƌĂƚŚĞƌĞƐƟŵĂƚĞĚĚŝŵĞŶƐŝŽŶƐƚŽĂƐƐĞƐƐƚŚĞĨĞĂƐŝďŝůŝƚLJŽĨĂƐLJƐƚĞŵ͘^LJƐƚĞŵƐƐŚŽƵůĚŶŽƚďĞ ĚĞƐŝŐŶĞĚŽƌĐŽŶƐƚƌƵĐƚĞĚďĂƐĞĚƐŽůĞůLJŽŶĂŶLJƉůĂŶƐǁŝƚŚŝŶƚŚŝƐĐŽŶĐĞƉƚ͕ďƵƚƐŚŽƵůĚďĞůŽŽŬĞĚĂƚĨŽƌĂŶĂůLJƐŝƐƉƵƌƉŽƐĞƐ͘dŚĞŵĂƉƐĂƌĞ ĐƌĞĂƚĞĚƵƐŝŶŐ'/^͕ƐŽŝŶĂĐĐƵƌĂĐŝĞƐĂƌĞƉŽƐƐŝďůĞ͘WƌŽƉŽƐĞĚĚƌĂŝŶĂŐĞĂƌĞĂƐĂŶĚĐŽŶĐĞƉƚƐƐŚŽƵůĚďĞƌĞĞǀĂůƵĂƚĞĚĂŌĞƌƐƵƌǀĞLJ͘

5 10

92

SAINT BERNARD

88

50TH 5 0TH

72

64

84

AX O N PAXON P

74 78

±

0

84

64

300 Feet

6a 8a

68 76

225

REGENT R E GE N T

14,600 78

150

76

62

37.5 75

66

82

Total Proposed GSI System Area: 2,300 SF (.05 AC) Total Drainage Area: 22,250 SF (.52 AC)

66

0

;ϴĐͿ

GSI System 11

Total Proposed GSI System Area: 7,700 SF (.17 AC) Total Drainage Area: 76,100 SF (1.75 AC)

68

;ϴĐͿ GSI System 6,7,8

90

(7a)

17,500

7a

17,500

Subsurface

6

;ϴďͿ

6a

2,100

DIVINIT

78

70

&ĞŶĐĞ;ǁͬĨŽŽƚĞƌͿ

86 92 90

64

80

Total Drainage Total SMP Drainage Drainage Surface/ area per SMP System Areas Area Area (SF) Subsurface? (SF) (SF) Label

SMP Type

6 Rain garden

1,800

88

76

(8a)

Vehicular access

x ůŽĐĂƟŽŶƐ

8

Εϱϱ͛

51ST

66

12’ ŵŝŶ͘ĨŽƌ vehicular access

72

;ϵďͿ

(6a)

Both rain gardens are in ĨĂŝƌůLJƐŚĂĚĞĚĂƌĞĂƐ͕ŵĂLJ need shade tolerant species

2100

Fence ;ǁͬĨŽŽƚĞƌͿ

78

GSI System 5.1 or 5.2

72

7

ZŽŽĨůĞĂĚĞƌ

Photo ǀŝĞǁ

Constraint

ŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ Garden

Εϰϭ͛

90

74 4

;ϭϬĐͲŚͿ

Conveyance

Εϰϴ͛

86 92 84

(4a) (3a)

88 74 78

Total Proposed GSI System Area: 600 SF (.01 AC)

90

GSI System 10

;ϭϬĂͲďͿ ;ϵĐͲĚͿ

68

78

'^/^ƵƌĨĂĐĞ Footprint

6

(9a)

(2a)

;ϭĐͿ

Total Drainage Area: 6,280 SF (.14 AC)

'^/^ƵďƐƵƌĨĂĐĞ Footprint

džŝƐƟŶŐ/ŶůĞƚƐ

Proposed Inlet

86

94

94

86

49TH

84

82

Total Proposed GSI System Area: 650 SF (.01 AC)

±

86

88

;ϭďͿ

REGENT

100 Feet

80

80

(1a)

Total Proposed GSI System Area: 1,600 SF (.04 AC)

(5a)

75

SAINT BERNARD 92

CHESTER

Total Drainage Area: 15,580 SF (.40 AC)

50

84

PAXON P AX O N

10

12.5 25

86

80

82

84 76

76

82

Total Drainage Area: 37,160 SF (.85 AC)

74

GSI System 3 & 4

6 5

0

Total Proposed GSI System Area: 3,800 SF (.09 AC)

74

76

Photo ǀŝĞǁ

Constraint

80

GSI System 9

Total Proposed GSI System Area: 4,500 SF (.10 AC)

52ND

Conveyance

72

72

GSI System 1 & 2

Total Drainage Area: 44,810 SF (1.02 AC)

'^/^ƵƌĨĂĐĞ Footprint

70

74

78

78

82

'^/^ƵďƐƵƌĨĂĐĞ Footprint

džŝƐƟŶŐ/ŶůĞƚƐ

86

Proposed Inlet

78

&ůŽǁŝƌĞĐƟŽŶƌƌŽǁ

82

CONCEPT OVERVIEW

5


g

p

p

p

Plant Genus LEGEND

City of Philadelphia Plant Selection Guidebook

Stormwater Bumpout: Sample Planting Plan 1

RECOMMENDED PLANT LOCATION

Photo of plant BLOOM COLOR

{

{

Lowest Middle Outer

White Blue / Purple Pink / Red

{

SEASON INTEREST

Fall Interest Winter Interest Full Sun

Lowest Middle Outer

Lowest

Location within the elevation of the system

Yellow / Orange

Part Sun/Shade Full Shade

GSI Plant Selection Manual

Philadelphia Water Department Plant List

BOTANICALNAME Cornussericea'kelseyi' න Rudbeckiahirta² SymphyotrichumnovaeͲbelgii ³ Liriopemuscari Ϻ

COMMONNAME RedTwigDogwood BlackͲEyedSusan NewfoundlandAster LilyTurf

IFSPECIESABOVEARENOTREADILYAVAILABLE,THEFOLLOWINGSPECIESMAYSERVEASSUBSTITUTES: නAroniaspp.(arbutifolia ormelanocarpa),Ilexglabra,Ilexverticillata,Physocarpusopulifolius ²Oenotherafruticosa,Pycnanthemumvirginianum ³Echinaceapurpurea,Liatrisspicata,Monardadidyma,Tradescantiavirginiana ϺCarexspp.(pensylvanica orflacca),Juncuseffusus

2014

SIZE SPACING 3gal 1gal 1gal 18"oc 1gal 12"oc

Cornus

Lowest

Rudbeckia

Lowest Middle Outer

Symphyotrichum

Lowest

Russian sage is a woody-based perennial. It has green leaves on stiff, upright, square stems. Its flowers are light blue and tiered in branched, terminal panicles. Maintenance: For best results, cut back plants almost to the ground in early spring before new growth begins. Scientific Name: Perovskia atriplicifolia Common Name: Russian Sage Mature Height: 3-5’ Mature Width: 2-4’

Outer

High

Lowest/ Middle/ Outer

-

High

Lowest Middle Outer

Outer

Meadow Anemone

Yes

Seasonal

Low

Lowest/ Middle

Red Columbine

Yes

Seasonal

Moderate

Middle/ Outer

Interest

milleform

Yarrow

3’

Ajuga

reptans

Bugleweed

6”

Allium

cernuum, giganteum

Nodding Onion 1-2’

Anemone

canadensis

Aquilegia

canadensis

Crocus

21

2-3’

vernus

Crocus

Eranthis

hyemalis

Winter Aconite

Galanthus

nivalis

Snowdrops

Geranium

maculatum

Wild Geranium

6”

6”

6”

6”

-

-

Iris

versicolor

BlueŇ Ňag Iris

1-2’

1’

Narcissus

minor

Miniature Daī īodils

6”

6”

-

-

High

Outer

Oenothera

fruƟ Ɵcosa, perennis

Sundrops

1-2’

1-2’

Yes

Seasonal

High

Lowest/ Middle

Penstemon

digitalis

Foxglove Beardtongue

2-3’

1-2’

Yes

Seasonal

High

Lowest/ Middle

Phlox

subulata

Moss Phlox

0.5’

1-2’

Yes

Seasonal

Moderate

Outer

-

-

High High

Outer Outer

-

Seasonal

High

Outer

Yes

Seasonal

High

Middle/ Outer

Regular

Moderate

Yes

Rudbeckia This wildflower has rough, hairy leaves that are lance shaped. The stems support daisy like flowers that have brown center disks and golden yellow petals. A prolific self-seeder.

Scientific Name: Rudbeckia fulgida Common Name: Goldstorm Coneflower Mature Height: 2-3' Mature Width:2-2.5’

Scientific Name: Rudbeckia hirta Common Name: Black-Eye Susan Mature Height: 2-3' Mature Width:1-2’ Identifying Characteristics: Hairy bristles cover leaves and stems

Scientific Name: Rudbeckia lanciniata Common Name: Cutleaf Coneflower Mature Height: 5-7’ Mature Width: 3-4’ Identifying Characteristics: bright yellow flowers, and plant can grow very tall

Scientific Name: Rudbeckia maxima Common Name: Giant Coneflower Mature Height: 5-7’ Mature Width: 3-4’ Identifying Characteristics: Very large flowers, and tall plant

Sources: http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/gardens-gardening/your-garden/plant-finder/plantdetails/kc/e540/perovskia-atriplicifolia.aspx

Hydrologic Zone ElevaƟ Ɵon

High

Seasonal

Drought Tolerance

Seasonal

-

Yes

Fall Interest

Yes

1’

1’

Achillea

1

Perovskia atriplicifolia

SMP Type

EARLY SEASON BLOOM

Liriope

GSI Plant Selection Manual

AdaptaƟ Ɵon

InundaƟ Ɵon Tolerance

KEY CS RH SN LM

Seasonality

NaƟ Ɵve to US

QTY 6 17 8 36

Bloom Color

Common Name

Genus

LOWESTZONE

TYPE SHRUB HERBACEOUS HERBACEOUS GRASS/GRASSͲLIKE

Form

Species

Plant Name

Scale: 3/16”=1’-0” Approx Area: 120 ft2

Sources: http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/gardens-gardening/your-garden/plant-finder/plant-details/kc/a109/rudbeckia-hirta.aspx http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/gardens-gardening/your-garden/plant-finder/plant-details/kc/c864/rudbeckia-maxima.aspx http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/gardens-gardening/your-garden/plant-finder/plant-details/kc/d589/rudbeckia-fulgida-city-garden.aspx http://www.finegardening.com/plantguide/genus/rudbeckia.aspx

Lowest

9


Design Works


All projects were designed by Jim Dinovo of Design Works and were constructed by myself and other employees.


TIMOTHY J. LINEHAN

Resume

606 Martin Street ● Philadelphia, PA 19128 ● phone: 603.438.2450 ● linehan5375@philau.edu

EDUCATION:

PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY, Philadelphia, PA Bachelor of Landscape Architecture (BLA) May 2014 GPA: 3.7, Dean’s List: 9/9 semesters Selected Courses:

PROJECTS:

“Park West Gateway Designs” (Fall 2010 - Spring 2011) • Created gateway to Fairmount Park in West Philadelphia; inventoried and analyzed site to create a sustainable design for the community. Practiced graphic techniques, community collaboration, and urban design “Master Planning of Mixed Use Neighborhood” (Fall 2012) • Created a master plan for a new mixed use community within Copenhagen; practiced new rendering techniques and learned from a new perspective. “Germantown Vision Plan” (Fall 2013 - Present) • Created a vision plan for this neighborhood of Philadelphia in the Fall semester. Continuing to design and detail portions of this plan in collaboration with the community and phasing the potential development of the project.

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SKILLS:

Design I-X: Variety of projects, design process, graphics, and planning. Grading: Grading/contouring of landscapes and ADA regulations. Local Flora: Various plants species and their environment. GIS: Learned program and its use in map making and site analysis. Semester Abroad: Studied urban design in Copenhagen, Denmark. Hydrology: Learned about water movement and green stormwater infrastructure.

Programs: Abilities:

Adobe: Illustrator, Photoshop, InDesign; Autodesk: AutoCAD; Microsoft: Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint, Word; Others: ArcGIS, Google Sketchup Sketching/Rendering, Site Analysis, Inventory, Planning, Project Presentation, 3D Modeling

EXPERIENCE:

PHILADELPHIA WATER DEPARTMENT, Philadelphia, PA (Summer 2013 – Present) Intern/Part-time Consultant • Surveyed potential sites to manage stormwater via computer and physical inspection; created conceptual designs for stormwater systems; was asked to continue part time during the school year through CHPlanning. DESIGN WORKS, Hudson, NH (Summer 2011 & Summer 2012) Landscaper • Constructed walls, patios, and planting beds in residential areas of Massachusetts and New Hampshire. EAST FALLS DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, Philadelphia, PA (Oct 2011- March 2012) Surveyor and Analyst • Inspected stormwater practices in East Falls in order to reevaluate and update a previous case study TOWN OF HUDSON, Hudson, NH (May 2010-Aug 2010) Project Inspector Intern • Located drainage and sewage lines with GPS; mapped points in AutoCAD to be uploaded to GIS; marked and cleared nature trails for the Conservation Committee and conducted area inspections.

ACTIVITIES:

PI-Philly Urban Design Charette: 1st place Comcast Home of 2020 Competition: 2nd place Member, ASLA-Philadelphia University Chapter, Fall 2009-Present (Treasurer: 2011-2012) Alpha Lambda Delta National Honors Society - Philadelphia University, Fall 2009-Present


Thank You


TIMOTHY LINEHAN Email: l i n e h a n 5 3 7 5 @p h i l a u . e d u Phone: ( 6 0 3 ) 4 3 8 - 2 4 5 0


Undergraduate Landscape Architecture Portfolio