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Castro Adobe’s First Open House

Friends of Santa Cruz State Parks today announced the Castro Adobe, Santa Cruz County‚s next State Historic Park, will be open to the public on Saturday, June 7 for an open house event. Attendees will have the opportunity to tour the restored cocina (kitchen), which is currently under restoration, and the recentlyrestored garden, which was originally designed by famed landscape architect Thomas Church. Full Story page 6

Cabrillo College Graduates 1,267 Students Cabrillo College honored a graduating class of 1,267 students during a formal commencement ceremony to confer degrees and certificates. The Cabrillo College Class of 2014 is the College’s largest graduating class in seven years. Full Story page 5

Local Measures on June 3 Election Ballot Measure F would levy a special tax in the annual amount of $8.50 on all improved parcels within County Service Area Number 11 (CSA 11). The purpose is to maintain Santa Cruz County parks, facilities, beach access and open space; and provide recreation programs within CSA 11. The proposed parcel tax replaces the expiring CSA 11 service charge of $6.58 per residential parcel. Full Story page 8

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The Tale of Aptos Creek Fire Road Until recently driving, walking or biking up Aptos Creek Fire Trail, the entrance into Nicene Marks State Park in Aptos, has been a mixture of blinding dust and spinerattling potholes. This has been especially true during the drought of the past two years. The problem was getting everyone on the same page – the state, county, and volunteer organizations – trying to make grading improvements and dust abatement to the Fire Road that

the county, Friends of Santa Cruz State Parks, Advocates of Nisene Marks Park interested residents and some really great local businesses and volunteers all came together to make it materialize. ... continued on page 4

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No. 11 Volume 23

14

19

27

Table of Contents

10

Cover The Tale of Aptos Creek Fire Road by John Fuchs 5 6 7 8 9 14 16 17

Community News Cabrillo College Graduates 1,267 Students Castro Adobe’s First Open House

Advisory Committee Meetings

18 Student Winners Of Congressional Art Competition Announced 20 21 Mosquitoes are Taking Flight 22 23 31 California Giant Welcomes New Manager and additions to Sales Department Kids Camp 10 11 Sports Camps for Summer Fun by William Hauselburg 12 Letters to the Editor 14 Parks are Important Local Sports 15 Aptos High School Scoreboard #OMMUNITY#ALENDARs!RTS%NTERTAINMENTnPagesn -ONTHLY(OROSCOPEsPage 29 - Your June Horoscope 19 24 26 27 30

31

Featured Columnists Renewal Development in Aptos mation… tection District

-

Control 30#!&EATURED0ET Support Group

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Aptos Times / June 1st 2014 / 3


Patrice Edwards

publisher

publisher’s assistant Camisa Composti editor Noel Smith contributing writers Noel Smith, John Fuchs, Ethan Schafer, William Hauselburg, Josef Sekon, Kevin Newhouse, Robert Francis, Mike Conrad, Kim Adamson layout Michael Oppenheimer, Fani Nicheva graphic artists Fani Nicheva, Michael Oppenheimer production coordinator Sandra Gonzalez advertising sales Don Beaumont, Jackie Hinds, Judie Block, Michelle Hayes office coordinator Cathe Race distribution Bill Pooley, Jana Mears

TPG

Times Publishing Group, Inc.

“Aptos Creek Road” from page 1 This is their story as if it were a movie told on a DVD. Locations The locations in this story of hope,

Forest of Nisene Marks Friends of Santa Cruz State Parks

Time-line Cast of Characters siastic, sincere and over-bearing (bordering on annoying) sparkle in his eyes and generosity in his soul

Maureen Thrash (from left), John Fuchs and Barbi Barry.

capable, hard-working, experienced, knowledgeable and award winning

the cross winds, she perseveres with dignity and sustains herself by giving, forgiving and baking

ogist (Chris Spore) 500 Tons of Base rock

to chaos, imposing gag-orders and

backbone of this story and ‘salt of the earth’ characters ... and yes that was a little Magnesium Chloride

5 days to complete with a grader, rented roller, rented water truck and 6-7 incredible State Parks workers and one

strong in his veins

“It shimmers in the dappled sunlight as the smiling and grateful families with strollers, vehicles, cyclists, runners, and

Times Publishing Group, Inc. 9601 Soquel Drive, Aptos, CA 95003 The Times Publishing Group, Inc., publishers of the Aptos Times, a bi-weekly publication, the Capitola Times and Scotts Valley Times, each printed monthly, Coastal Weddings Magazine, Coastal Home and Garden Magazine, Aptos’ Fourth of July Parade Official Program Guide and Capitola’s Begonia Festival Official Program Guide, is owned by Patrice Edwards. Entire contents ©2014. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form is prohibited without the publisher’s written permission PHONE: (831) 688-7549 FAX: (831) 688-7551 GENERAL E-MAIL: info@cyber-times.com Patrice Edwards: patrice@cyber-times.com Publisher’s Assistant: assistant@cyber-times.com Editor: info@cyber-times.com Opinions/Letters: editorial@cyber-times.com Calendar Listings: www.tpgonlinedaily.com Graphics Department: graphics@cyber-times.com Billing Inquiries: cathe@cyber-times.com Classified Sales: sales@cyber-times.com Production: production@cyber-times.com CHECK OUT OUR WEB SITE AT: www.tpgonlinedaily.com distribution We at the Times Publishing Group, Inc. are dedicated to providing a voice for the individuals and organizations in our community while highlighting the outstanding accomplishments of our local businesses. We seek to promote healthy family values through our coverage of youth activities, school news, senior events, community groups and entertainment 4 / June 1st 2014 / Aptos Times

Desperately trying to hold back a tsunami tide of un-armed marauders epitome of class, patience and reasoned restraint nd

and vocal group

Unbridled enthusiasm coupled with a can-do spirit, precise and smart makes things happen... a force for the

-

Slowly fade to black, cut the music ... Run the Credits! Neither paving nor chip-sealing was possible due to expense and long term approval process

A

and everyone who contributed to make

worked very hard in the planning stages and more importantly to overcome all the daily problems that are always associated Spectacular teamwork and result. And a big Thank You to Friend and The Advocates for helping us realize the things we can

Group who is an in-holding resident came out and took some photos. She was delighted with the improvements and very hopeful that the binding agent will make a Advocate board member, Maureen to make incredible cookies for the hard working State Parks crew. Judging by the size of the bag, they ought to get about 10 “Aptos Creek Road” page 8


Cabrillo College Graduates 1,267 Students C abrillo College honored a graduating class of 1,267 students during a formal commencement ceremony

Cabrillo College Class of 2014 is the College’s largest graduating class in seven years. The Graduation Ceremony took Stadium in Aptos.

The Cabrillo College Class of 2014 is comprised of graduates ranging in age from 18

Cabrillo College President Laurel Jones with Graduate Lola (Laura) Pederson. requirements are guaranteed admission to

The class of members graduating point average (GPA) students graduated

2014 contains 104 with a perfect grade of 4.0. This year 154 with high honors

Following the processional, Cabrillo College Vice President of Student Serparticipants and guests. Cabrillo College

Seventeen students graduated as part of the Honors Transfer Program, having completed all of the courses required to transfer, including at least 15 units of honors coursework, while also main-

Jones and Cabrillo Faculty Senate President Dr. Michael Mangin gave their congratulatory remarks to the Cabrillo College Class of 2014. Vice President of Instruction Dr.

have been accepted and plan to transfer in

and shared inspiring stories of graduates in the 2014 class who have overcome adversity in achieving their degrees.

UC Irvine, UC Santa Cruz, and Mills College, among others. With more than a four-fold increase

President Susan True participated in the with

Cabrillo

College

President

and

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Castro Adobe’s First Open House Friends of Santa Cruz State Parks today announced the Castro Adobe, Santa Cruz County‚s next State Historic Park, will be open to the public on Saturday, June 7 for an open house event. Attendees will have the opportunity to tour the restored cocina (kitchen), which is currently under restoration, and the recently-restored garden, which was originally designed by famed landscape architect Thomas Church. The open house will also feature the personal unveiling of “The Adobe Series” art prints featuring the Castro Adobe and Santa Cruz Mission by artist Michael Schwab. Schwab created the iconic Santa Wilder Ranch, The Forest of Nisene Marks 2005. Friends of Santa Cruz State Parks will host a Pop-Up ParkStore that will have Schwab-themed merchandise. Proceeds

and local state parks and beaches. The Open House is 12-2pm, Saturday, June 7. Admission is free. The Castro Adobe is located at 184 Old Adobe Road, Watsonville. Parking is limited. Carpooling is encouraged. About the Castro Adobe ville, the two-story Castro Adobe is one

four remaining adobe structures in Santa Cruz County. Friends of Santa Cruz State Parks is working hard in partnership with California State Parks to open the Castro Adobe as a State Historic Park. Friends undertook restoration of the Castro Adobe in order to preserve and interpret for the public the only remaining building of the Castro Adobe State Historic Park will serve visitors interested in adobe architecture and preservation, as well as 4th graders studying the Mexican Rancho Period local history. In the cocina (kitchen), the link between our Californio heritage will be tangible as students experience tortillas, beans and nopales (cactus), which were produced in the Rancho period and are

and Archives — Center for

opened to serve scholars and other visitors interested in the study of the cultural heritage of early California. The Castro Adobe was honored in May 2014 by the Santa Cruz County Historic Resources Commission, which also named Friends of Santa Cruz State Parks and California State Parks as award recipients for their work „preserving the history of the Mexican Rancho Period in Santa Cruz County. The Castro Adobe is an active construction site and is accessible currently by appointment only. To make

Friends supports dozens of state parks and beaches in Santa Cruz and San Mateo counties and operates six ParkStores, and beaches. ParkStore locations include

Friends of Santa Cruz State Parks is

In May 2014, Friends was honored by California State Parks with a Dewitt Award for Partnership, which recognizes “commitment above and beyond the call of duty over a substantial period of time” and “recognizes those who have served as irreplaceable partners in the accomplishment of the State Parks Mission.”

the legacy of our state parks and beaches. Through an innovative partnership with California State Parks, and by leveraging local

Learn more at ThatsMyPark.org or via Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest.

email parks@thatsmypark.org. To follow progress on the restoration

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6 / June 1st 2014 / Aptos Times

community support, Friends has provided millions of dollars of funding for educational

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Aptos Chamber ALERT S oquel Creek Water District is proposing a moratorium on all construction or changes of use that add

Resources Director and our County Supervisor do not support this proposal. Action Requested: not to enact a moratorium by sending emails and encourage others individuals and organizations to send emails to karenr@soquelcreekwater. org; and also,

School and show your opposition to this ill-conceived proposal. of Directors is proposing a moratorium on commercial and residential construction including upgrades, remodels or additions of use to commercial properties that add Director and our County Supervisor do not support this proposal. Such an action would have a severe, negative impact on our community; creating an island of economic strife while business and property values in surrounding communities continue their post-recession recovery. water from the same aquifers as Soquel Creek Water District customers, and yet a moratorium is not being considered in these communities. It is essential that you understand the facts and we encourage you to write letters

to the Soquel Creek of Directors and attend the board’s hearing on Tuesday,

from imposing this moratorium. Our groundwater basin is in a state of overdraft and pumping needs to be reduced for a prolonged period in order for the basin to recover. Development has neither caused nor made the existing problem worse. Water consumption in Soquel Creek Water ago. The District’s Urban Water Man-

a result of conservation without any restrictions on development. Additional growth is already controlled by County land use policies. Growth over the last 10 years has

water use by purchasing and installing tures for existing users. If we want the economy to continue to grow we must allow for reasonable development of new and existing residents and business. The president of the Cambria Chamber of Commerce said their own moratorium has stagnated the tourism-driven economy, pushing businesses out and discouraging new ones. It also has gutted the local construction industry and left hundreds of property owners with empty lots. Putting when we’re emerging from a devastating recession is not the answer. A moratorium will prevent any new well as any business that will require addi-

plans to build a new school building to replace old portable classrooms will not be

in the overall current water use. In order to approve a moratorium, the district must declare a groundwater emerto public health and safety. This is simply tions of how much water will be saved during a moratorium are negligible. Please urge the Soquel Creek Water

Program for all development and continue to focus on developing a supplemental water supply, which is the only viable answer to our long-term water issue. n Emails to the Board can be sent to karenr@ soquelcreekwater.org The Board meeting will be held at; New Brighton Middle School 250 Washburn Ave, Capitola June 3, at 7 pm Article reprinted by permission of the Aptos Chamber.

The district’s 2012 Integrated Resources Plan calls for the development of a supplemental supply of water within the next 6-8 years. Groundwater conditions have not gotten appreciably worse over the last several years. The District’s construction has successfully reduced demand without ratepayer expense while a solution for a long-term sustainable supply is developed. The program requires new

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Local Measures on June 3 Election Ballot County Park Funding. pass. This measure would levy a special tax in the annual amount of $8.50 on all improved parcels within County Service Area Number 11 (CSA 11). The purpose is to maintain Santa Cruz County parks, facilities, beach access and open space; and provide recreation programs within CSA 11. The proposed parcel tax replaces the expiring CSA 11 service charge of $6.58 per residential parcel. CSA 11 provides for park acquisition, development, maintenance, operations and programming within the unincorporated area of the County outside of the four independent recreation and

City of Watsonville Sales Tax for Public Safety. Measure G

a Special Municipal

pass. The tax on retail sales in Watsonville is

the date of the occurrence of the vacancy. A Council Member

tax which would increase the total sales tax rate on retail sales in Watsonville from

services and not used or borrowed for other purposes City of Watsonville

a Council Member, then the vacancy shall trict of a new Council Member to be held

awesome. I think he might be the only person

grader. I had to double-check him to make sure he was getting the grade between 4 and

as used in this measure shall mean Parks, by appointment by vote of the City Council Measure I requires a

the new process shall be selected from the respective numbered City Council District that has gone the longest amount of time since a Council Member from said District has served a complete one-year term as Mayor. Thereafter each succeeding Mayor shall be appointed in a sequential order based upon each respective City Council District. This Measure ensures that each City Council District’s representative can serve as Mayor.

The roadwork is on schedule and rumor has it that we might even be under budget. That’s not the most common outcome on

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chapter indeed. Vehicles, runners, walkers

snapshots of the activities. The last of the base-rock was delivered, graded, wetted and compacted. The State Parks crew ran a little short on time and base-rock. About entire road got graded and improved.

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Members will have the right to nominate a proposed name for the respective public place to be named and each nominated name will be placed on the ballot for the voters of the City to vote on. This Measure ensures that the public names Public Places.

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Naming of Public Places. Measure J to pass. The naming of all public places within the City of Watsonville or owned by the City outside of the City limits shall be approved by the voters of the City of Watsonville, voting at either a General

remaining period of the unexpired term of ropolitan Transit District. If approved by the voters, Measure G would authorize an

All revenue generated by this Measure would go to a special public safety fund

“Aptos Creek Road� from page 4

Council must cause to be held no later than

water truck are keeping the road base wet.

supervising. It’s a fantastic and precise oper-

areas that notoriously develop potholes. The parade of base rock trucks will tons of base rock. The binding agent will be applied on Friday, and that will complete the

of the Nisene Fire Road improvements is in the books, and it’s a wonderful

Sequel: Will there be a Sequel? Only time will tell. We are hoping the Dust the winter rains come again. And in the meantime, this whole cast of characters could get together again in the hopefully not to distant future for new epics such

based in reality and community need. Volunteers are always welcome by the Advocates of Nisene Marks Park www. Cruz State Parks www.thatsmypark.org Story By John Fuchs (mostly) Cover Photo: Ethan Harmon (left) and John Fuchs take measurements on the road.


58 Students The Seal Of Bi-literacy Award

O

The 7th

was honored to present 58 dedicated students with their well-deserved Seal of

friends and family members recognized the achievement of these 58 students. literacy is a special award given to graduating seniors requirements. This year recipients should feel especially proud as the rigor

May 15, 2014 at Driscoll’s Rancho Corralitos in Watsonville. This event is supported by women involved in, or supporting, agriValley. The purpose of the luncheon is to raise funds for Agri-Culture’s Focus Agriculture program, the Jimmie Cox Memorial Scholarship fund and the Santa Cruz This year’s featured speaker for the event was Helene Dillard, Dean of Agriculwho spoke on the topic “Females, Farms and Food - Plates of Plenty”. Also speaking at the event was Mary Anne Carson, Santa Cruz County

greater. Recipients receive a special seal on their high school diploma and the information is included on their school transcripts. The award is one way for the community to publicly recognize the importance of cultural literacy and lan-

as a participant in Agri-Culture’s Focus

society. We congratulate and wish the very best to these graduating seniors.

Corralitos, Watsonville.

N Tractor, spoke about the Jimmie Cox Memorial Scholarship at its 2014 recipient, John (JP) Thompson. Go to Agri-Culture’s Facebook page to

Saturday June 14 at 10 a.m. Wetlands Educational Resource Center or years, the Watsonville Wetlands Watch (WWW) has been planting native plants as part of an ongoing

F

sloughs. Most of these native plants were started in our greenhouse or seed farm. On Saturday, June 14, WWW Restoration Specialist and native plant expert John Pritchard and WWW board Meeting Dates and Proposed Topics greenhouse and select restoration sites including Tarplant Hill for an up-close look at wetland and grassland native plants and habitats. The tour starts at 10 a.m. Meet at the tour is free, but please register by noon on -

watsonvillewetlandswatch.org.

of Advisory Committee, meeting ground rules, background on the mid-county water problem, scope and schedule for future committee meetings and opening the conversation to the public on what they’d like this group to do. Meeting was held with 70 attending. Community Foundation 7807 Soquel Drive Aptos. Who are we and what do we do? Presentations from SqCWD, Central WD, County on management, long term planning, groundwater monitoring, conservation, etc. Community Foundation 7807 Soquel Drive California’s vision for sustainable groundwater management “Briefs” page 25

Photo Credit: Denise Murphy Aptos Times / June 1st 2014 / 9


Camping Helps Develop Strong Kids Ethan Schafer, Ph.D. Why is Camp So Good for Children? ne of the reasons that well-run camps are so good for children is that they emulate the processes found in what psychologists call authoritative families. Parents who are authoritative provide their children with a great deal of structure and have high expectations of their children, while simultaneously providing a high degree of emotional warmth and encouragement. They can be distinguished from parents who are permissive (high emotional availability, but little structure and low expectations), or authoritarian (high expectations and structure, but low on emotional warmth and encouragement). When working with parents, I may describe permissive parents as “spoilers,” and authoritarian parents as “dictators.” Decades of psychological research support the conclusion that authoritative parenting is most likely to result in children who are happy, independent, and secure in themselves. Good tions are given, rules are enforced in a fair and sensitive manner, and campers are given warmth, respect, and encouragement.

O

G

ood camps also help children by matching their programs to the developmental level of the child. Psychologists will often speak of “developmental tasks” or “age-appropriate challenges” when discussing what children of appropriately. Camp is one of the few areas of your child’s life where the program can be

natural strengths. In my opinion, the camp experience is superior to most schools in this regard, as camps make no assumption that all third graders, for example, need to learn the same things or be treated the same way. same chronological age can vary widely in terms of emotional, social, and intellectual development, the following can be used as a general set of guidelines for what you can expect your child to get out of camp whether your choice is a day camp close to home or an overnight camp in a neighboring state. Children Four to Six Years lthough children of this age may seem too young for camp, almost all of them can

A

cases, overnight camp. Young children are learning how to explore their world, gradually spending more time away from their parents’ side. Day camp, or a brief, overnight camp is an ideal place for young children to experience being away from their parents in a safe, nurturing environment. Good camps will have many structured, productive activities such as used to following a schedule.

C

amp is a particularly good match for this age group, given the chances to participate in activities that are unlikely to be available

tasks, helping children make the most of their

Aptos Soccer Club Fall Registration Aptos Soccer Club invites all boys and girls under age 19 to play in our recreational Fall soccer league.

Recreational soccer is a fun opportunity to develop athletic skills and character.

Register Now! Teams are formed in early August! Register online at:

Sponsorship, coaching and volunteer opportunities available.

Aptos Soccer Club s P.O. Box 1328, Aptos, CA 95001 10 / June 1st 2014 / Aptos Times

sailing, or nature exploration, as well as more typical activities such as team sports. The variety of activities nicely with this group of children. Social development is also critical in this period, as early friendships are formed and the child’s individual personality begins to express itself. Some children are simply born more introverted, preferring to be in small groups or alone; others are born more extraverted,

motivations as they enter adolescence.

A

dolescents aged thirteen and older may When we expect them to behave like stereotypically rebellious, troubled teenagers, we are in danger of acting in ways that elicit these behaviors. Camp is a tremendous way to reverse this process. Older campers have opportunities for service and leadership that are unrivaled compared to most other summer activities. For example, older campers will often be given positions where they serve as role models for younger campers.

camp provides, because of the sheer amount of time young children spend playing with each other, is the chance to experience the structured and unstructured social interactions of childhood that allow them to determine what kind of person they are going to be.

the chance to prove themselves in a positive way. Older campers also learn that they can leave a constructive, lasting impact on the people around them, helping them develop

C

C

getting ready for school, seems obsessed who did or did not say “hi” to them in the hallway, and so on. Some voice the frustration of feeling forced to “be too grown up” on one hand, while some are tired of “being treated like a little kid” on the other. The variety of social, athletic, and

help them for the rest of their lives.

hildren of these ages are beginning to

old can still be engrossed in cartoons and action

addresses these issues very well. If your child is “young for his or her age,” camp will allow them to spend time with other children doing The more “mature” child will have similar opportunities with older children, without fear of being ostracized. Camp provides a safe, supervised set of opportunities to

and altruism. The Summer and Beyond amp allows children to be exposed to a diverse group of people, interests, and activities where they are given the opportunity to try and succeed. The sense of accomplishment children get from mastering these challenges gives Campers a personal

Visit our family-dedicated Web site, www. CampParents.org or call our toll-free number, 1-800-428-CAMP (2267). Ethan Schafer specializes in working with children and families. He holds a Ph.D. in child clinical psychology and writes frequently on topics surrounding child development and camp. Originally printed in CAMP Magazine,

reprinted by permission of the American Camp Association © 2005 American Camping Association, Inc.

Aptos Soccer Club P.O. Box 1325, Aptos, CA 95001 Phone: 831-688-8501 web: www.aptossoccer.org Aptos Soccer Club is hosting our annual 4 v 4 Clinics starting Sunday, April 6 to provide players for all ages and abilities with the rare opportunity to receive individual foot skills, technical drills, tactical practices, small-sided games and child with lessons in respect, responsibility, integrity, sportsmanship and leadership. Please refer to the ASC website for further details and registration.


Sports Camps for Summer Fun By William Hauselburg emphasize fun and team spirit without a hard focus on competition and game improvement.

Summer Activity Summer is always an idle time for kids. Unless they are in a school district that has year-round classes, the summer months are a vast expanse of boredom and “nothing to do.” Sure, your kids would be happy to play video games all day, but is that the bets thing for them? Wouldn’t it be better if they had something fun and exciting to do with other kids that would get them outside and moving? With obesity rates among US kids at

of sport, but some of the most popular and Soccer Camp. There are camps that

to give the kids a taste of multiple sports in one camp session. If you are concerned about your

and there is nothing better than sports to get kids running and moving their bodies. activity with skills building and camaraderie.

to enroll your child in an activity that will

SpeechRighter/Brain Waves Therapies Chris Colip, M.S., CCC-SLP 415 Capitola Ave., Capitola, CA 95010 Phone: 800-588-0947 web: www.speechrighter.com

get him or her exercising, playing with other kids, and learning new skills all in a safe, guided environment. of options. There are Sports Skills Camps that focus on learning and honing the methods and skills of playing the game, and Recreation Sports Camps, which

daughter involved in sports in a safe, supervised environment, a kids camp may be the best solution for you. If your child already has a favorite sport, it is often easy or an opportunity to play that sport, and if your child likes many sports or doesn’t multiple sports might be the best choice. “Sports Camp” page 13

of computer learning programs designed to increase reading and academic success. academic skills.

Giving Tree Academy 175 Lawrence Ave., Watsonville, CA 95076 Phone: 831-722-7811 Fax: 831-722-8727 e-mail: givingtreeacademy1@gmail.com web: www.givingtreeacademy.com of exciting, hands-on summer activities which will encourage exploration and new experiences in a safe, fun learning environment. Giving Tree Academy is a developmentally appropriate program where children learn to express themselves creatively through play, curriculum-based learning activities and social interaction.

SUMMER CAMP JUNE 2 – AUGUST 22

SUMMER IS SOON APPROACHING! Now Enrolling for our Summer and Fall Programs

Join us this summer for a variety of fun activities. Our qualified teachers encourage children to explore and create a fun, educational and loving environment where children thrive.

Summer Session Session 1

Week 1: Under the Sea Week 2: Camping Under the Stars Week 3: Creepy Crawly Creatures Week 4: Vehicles in Motion

Session 2

Week 5: 4th of July Celebration Week 6: Wide World of Sports Week 7: Space Adventures Week 8: Safari Exploration

Session 3

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Week 9: Carnival Fun Week 10: Dinosaur Invasion Week 11: Under Construction Week 12: Around the World in 5 Days

Potty Training Offered Giving Tree Academy

Open Mon-Fri 7 am-6 pm 175 Lawrence Ave. Watsonville, CA 95076

831-722-7811 Web: givingtreeacademy.com Email: givingtreeacademy1@gmail.com Aptos Times / June 1st 2014 / 11


Kids and Healthy Lifestyles W play a vital role in turning back this national trend. Camps are important partners for parents and children who want to make positive changes that keep kids active and eating right all year long. The Culprits ealth professionals agree that numerous environmental and social factors are at play when it comes to the eating and exercise behaviors of young people. The era of “walking uphill two miles to school every day” is long-gone

H

for most kids, and with the availability of buses and carpools, most children no longer walk to school. Playing outside is also decreasing with children spending much more time indoors than children ten or twenty years ago. According to the Council for Physical

minimum amount of physical activity recommended for children. Children should

be part of each day’s activities, with sixty minutes of moderate and vigorous activities from outside play, games, walking, and other environment to encourage varying levels of physical challenges, teach lifelong active recreational pursuits, and establish opportunities to learn active lifestyle behaviors.

C

healthy and active living. If children

three times a week. Active aerobics, active sports and recreation activities as should

begin to change some of their food and activity habits at camp, they might be able to transfer some of these behaviors when they return home. Camps focus on the positive development of children:

Aptos Academy of Performing Arts Summer Camp 7970 Soquel Drive, Aptos, CA 95003 Phone: 831-684-1800 e-mail: frontdesk@aptosacademyofperformingarts.org web: www.aptosacademyofperformingarts.org Your child will receive a quality dance education in a caring and fun environment, Academy curriculum is designed by internationally renowned master teachers and child development experts. Your child will be inspired to pursue their dreams dreams will develop the love and skills of dance that will last for a lifetime.

Jim Booth Swim School >ÀÛiÞÊ7iÃÌÊ*œœ]Ê->˜Ì>Ê ÀÕâÊUʘÊ-…>«iÊ ÕL]Ê >«ˆÌœ> 7>Ìܘۈiʘ`œœÀÊEÊ"ÕÌ`œœÀÊ*œœÃ Phone: 831-722-3500 web: www.jimboothswimschool.com

August 11-15 M-F 9 AM-12 Noon This camp promotes physical health, confidence and creativity while teaching proper dance technique. This complete camp curriculum focuses on reading and studying the book, “Angelina’s Perfect Party”. Also included are lessons in nutrition, creating a strong and healthy body, education activity sheets and craft projects. $200 per Ballerina

Princess Party Camp August 4-8 M-F 9 AM-12 Noon

For children 3-5 years old Join us at the Princess Party where enchanting fun awaits! Princesses will explore this royal theme through Dramatic Play, Arts and Crafts, Creative Ballet Dance, Princess Dress-Up, and there will even be a dance performance on Friday, Aug. 8 at 11:30 am for the Princesses’ royal friends and family. $190 per Princess

12 / June 1st 2014 / Aptos Times

swim and are never dunked or forced. Parents feel comfortable that they are starting all ages the foundations required to be great swimmers for their entire lives. Mike

Cruz’s Harvey West Park and In Shape in Capitola. For more information call Jim


and games

that are good for them by presenting good choices. for snacks and side dishes (chips, cookies, candy, etc.)

adults as mentors to support positive, healthy behavior.

and knowing when to stop eating is fun and can be an activity of choice over television and video games.

Most camp programs are synonymous

oriented learning center. Food and Nutrition any camps look for ways to provide healthy choices and decision-making

Social Support f young people see peers and adults

I

they will likely want to model a similar behavior in the company of friends. Camps can contribute to lifelong patterns of exercise and excellent nutrition,

environment, safe and secure location, and most of all, fun. Adapted from the article, “Kids and Healthy Lifestyles,� by Viki Kappel Spain; M. Deborah Bialeschki, Ph.D.; Karla A. Henderson, Ph.D. Originally printed in CAMP Magazine, reprinted by permission of the American Camp Association Š 2006 American Camping Association, Inc.

games

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lots of equipment participation

ences by giving them good choices

“Sports Camp� from page 11 Regardless of what kids sports camp you choose, getting your kids involved

in sports will encourage them to exercise, help them develop healthy bodies, foster friendships and build skills that they can use throughout their lives.

Cougar Swim School

Monte Vista Horsemanship Camp

San Lorenzo Valley High School Pool Soquel High School Pool 7105 Highway 9, Felton 95018 401 Soquel San Jose Road, Soquel 95073 Director: Kurt Edwards e-mail: kurt@cougarswimschool.com Phone: 831.239.4228

Ă“ĂŠ-V…œœÂ?ĂŠ7>Ăž]ĂŠ7>ĂŒĂƒÂœÂ˜Ă›ÂˆÂ?Â?i]ĂŠ ʙxĂ¤Ă‡Ăˆ Phone: 831-206-9707 e-mail: MVEquestrian@gmail.com web: www.montevistaequestrian.com

Our program uses a unique, gentle, personal teaching method that promotes learning and allows the student to learn the proper way to swim and be safe in the water. Instruction in our program ranges from our specialized classes for infants and toddlers to training for those wanting to develop stroke technique in preparation for swim teams. Regardless of the level, our instructors guide students to attain their

The week-long Horsemanship Camp at Monte Vista Christian School is a wonderful opportunity for boys and girls to spend hours every day riding and learning about

MVEquestrian@gmail.com or visit www.montevistaequestrian.com

Cougar

Swim School

Summer Swim Lessons

at the Soquel High School Pool June 17th to August 8th Four Sessions Each sessions is 2 weeks long

8 Classes per session Classes: Tuesday thru Friday ÂŁÂŁĂŠ>“ÊUĂŠÂŁÂŁ\ÎäÊ>“ÊUĂŠÂŁĂ“ĂŠÂ˜ÂœÂœÂ˜ĂŠUĂŠÂŁĂ“\Îäʍ“

Springboard Diving Classes 11 am and 12 noon

PLUS

Family Recreation Swimming 1 pm to 4 pm Tuesday thru Saturday

Cougar/Soquel Swim School nΣ‡Ó{LJxÂŁĂ“ĂˆĂŠUĂœĂœĂœÂ°VÂœĂ•}>Ă€ĂƒĂœÂˆÂ“ĂƒV…œœÂ?°Vœ“ -ÂœÂľĂ•iÂ?ĂŠˆ}Â…ĂŠ-V…œœÂ?ĂŠ*œœÂ?ĂŠUĂŠ{ä£Ê-ÂœÂľĂ•iÂ?ĂŠ->Â˜ĂŠÂœĂƒiĂŠ,`°]ĂŠ-ÂœÂľĂ•iÂ?

Aptos Times / June 1st 2014 / 13


Live Earth Farm U-Pick Events

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Program

the public to pick seasonal, organic produce

apricots, dry-farmed tomatoes, apples, and pumpkins will all be available as they ripen. There will be

and October 25. educational programming at each picking nesses to provide prepared food and food systems educational activities during each U-Pick event. A percentage of sales will

fruit or vegetable will be featured each in the peak of their season.

systems and nutrition education to local students and families. open up the farm to people of all ages through a variety of fun, educational

weeks in the summer. There are two drop in programs each month for the youngest farmers and their mothers, fathers, nannies, grandparents, or whoever takes

to mouth, farm to fork, and child to community connections through a variety of hands-on educational programs serving the youth of Santa Cruz, Santa Clara and Monterey counties and beyond. A special emphasis is placed on reaching under served people in the community to bolster individual, community and environmental health. We welcome volunteers in in touch.

Parks are Important amilies love parks. We also know how important it is to keep them safe and clean. If you live in unincorporated Santa Cruz County, vote for Measure F on June

F

to children, teenagers, families and seniors and for park development. Since this is a parcel tax, requiring a

places to play. Funds from Measure F will account

friends and family to support it and vote for it too. This $8.50 annual parcel tax replaces the expiring tax of $6.58, only an increase

only be used to clean bathrooms, maintain facilities, beach access and open space, provide recreation and cultural programs 14 / June 1st 2014 / Aptos Times

years old, and Small Farmers is a slightly longer and more in depth program for

we can continue to maintain our local Vote YES on Measure F.


Aptos High School Scoreboard Discus Rodriguez, Aptos CCS Local Girls

Baseball Aptos Season Record: (14-14, SCCAL 7-5) (May 21) CCS Div II Tournament 1st Round

1,600 Clare Peabody, Aptos; , Aptos 3,200 , Scotts Valley; , Santa Cruz; Yulisa Abundis, Aptos High jump , Santa Cruz; , Scotts Valley; , Aptos

(May 14) SCCAL Tournament

SCCAL Tournament (May 10, Hm)

Boys Lacrosse Aptos Season Record: (12-7) Santa Cruz Coast Athletic League Honors MVP Nick Wameling, Aptos, senior

Boys Volleyball 2014 all-SCCAL Co-MVPs , PCS, OPP, and Co-Sophomores of the Year Chayton Clark, Harbor, OH – Kolby Losik, Setter, Aptos Freshman of the Year Jayson Guy First team Kael Losik, Aptos, OH, Sr.; Cole Welle, Aptos.

Honorable mention ,

Track & Field Shot put

, Aptos

First team Sean Collins, Aptos, senior defense; Blake Kennerson, Aptos, senior mid; Noah Wolfe, Aptos, sophomore attack Second team , Aptos, Tyler Kawata, Aptos, senior attack; , Aptos, senior defense

Aptos Times / June 1st 2014 / 15


‘World’s Biggest Garage Sale’ a Success

Twin Lakes Church’s Event Raises Over 190,000 Meals For Second Harvest Food Bank

H

undreds of people descended on the church’s campus on Saturday

support those in need in our county.

was astounded at the turnout. Schlaepfer. “There was a huge line of

people waiting an hour before the sale a steady flow from then until we closed at 2PM. We couldn’t be happier with the turnout and amount raised for Santa Cruz needy And the number is still growing. High-end items that were donated to the sale are being sold online to raise as much money as possible. “We hope to 200,000 meals for the hungry in our county. That’s over 60,000 more meals than we raised from says Schlaepfer. Second Harvest munity came through and stepped up went into the sale before, during, and after by all of the volunteers is truly amazing. The almost 200,000 meals that

16 / June 1st 2014 / Aptos Times

were raised that day will go a long way this summer for our local kids when school is out.” At this weekend’s church services lected from the sale.


Luncheon Honors Foster Parents T he Foster grams of Human honored foster givers at the

Care and Adoptions Prothe Santa Cruz County Services Department, parents and family careannual Resource Parent

Supervisors Neal Coonerty and Zach Friend made a proclamation May 14, 2014 Resource Parent Appreciation Day in Santa Cruz County. Coonerty and Santa Cruz Superior Court Judge John Gallagher, who presides over the Dependency Court, made remarks to the parents.

More than 40 foster parents and relatives who care for children attended the event, which has been held annually for more than 15 years. An angel theme carried the message that these parents had “earned their wings” for giving the gift of family to youth who could not stay in their homes due to abuse, neglect or other circumstances outside.

educator who holds a Masters degree in Social Work, spoke to the resource parents. She focused on self-care and the need to have personal support systems. Sammie Rogers, a Harbor High student and foster youth, read the County Supervisors’ proclamation aloud for the assembled.

Santa Cruz County Symphony is -

the direction of Maestro Daniel Stewart. The evening’s musical program will include selections from Carmen and

educational outreach programs takes place on Saturday, June 7, 8 pm at the Santa Cruz Civic Auditorium. The concert will feature tango dance the talented, young classical guitarist, Roberto Granados, the ever-popular, sensation — Quartet San Francisco and of course, the fantastic musicians of the Santa Cruz County Symphony under

exciting event, and attendance will help keep music in local elementary schools.

TICKETS: Single tickets ($30-$70) are on sale now. Call 831.420.5260 or visit SantaCruzTickets.com. More information about the symphony: Visit SantaCruz Symphony.org

Concert proceeds support the Symthe Symphony performs four free concerts to over 4,000 elementary students countywide. The Symphony also sends musicians into classrooms across the county to demonstrate craft and talk about classical music. A new program provides teachers with classical music kits to facilitate a daily classical music listening program which helps keep students calm and focused on their coursework.

Aptos Times / June 1st 2014 / 17


Student Winners Of Congressional Art Competition Announced Rep. Sam Farr, D-Carmel, today announced that Jung Stevenson School, is the winner of the 2014 in the halls of the Capitol along with other students’ works from across the country.

out how talented our young local artists are. The great tradition of Central Coast generation.” courtesy of Southwest Airlines, to be honored at a Congressional reception. He will also receive a $1500 renewable scholarship from the Savannah College of Art and Design.

will be prominently displayed in the connamed the 2nd place winner with his piece

High School senior Jericho Coquilla was named the third place winner, with “Young Dude”. His piece will be displayed in the

constituents. Since then, over 650,000 high school students have been involved with the nation-wide competition.

her entry “Walking in Israel.” The Congressional Art Competition was open to all local high school students in the 20th congressional district. A total of

Blue Moon Aptos

The 2014 Congressional Art Competition winners are:

Acrylic a local artist and gallery owner and William Monterey County. The Artistic Discovery competition encourages and recognizes the rich artistic talents of young Americans. Students are allowed to submit various styles and types of art, ranging from paintings and drawings to photography and mixed media pieces. The winners are determined using criteria based on originality, skill of execution, excellence in use of materials

Cristian Ponce – Dr. T.J.

Acrylic

Charcoal and pastel -

The Congressional Art Competition for members of Congress to encourage and recognize the artistic talents of their young

7558 Soquel Dr., Aptos

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18 / June 1st 2014 / Aptos Times

Preparatory, Heart Strings

encourages and recognizes the rich artistic talents of young Americans.


SCC Symphony Final Concert: Renewal O n Sunday, May 18 at the Mello Center for the Performing Arts the Santa Cruz Symphony under the direction of charismatic Music Director Daniel Stewart presented an afternoon of beautifully performed sacred music. T h e p r o g r a m had moving religious Ryan Speedo Green overtones and consisted of Mozart’s Ave Verum Corpus, -

of professional praise is well deserved for the marvelous orchestra whose musical, technical and artistic abilities under the keen ear of Maestro Daniel Stewart have been simply

Renee Tatum

same can be said for the many hours of excellent preparation of the Cabrillo Symphonic Choir by Director Cheryl Anderson, who herself participated in the

Choir. The 140 members of the Cabrillo Symphonic Choir crowned the stage and performed with absolute professionalism. As Assistant Director of the Metropolitan Opera, Maestro Stewart has made a valuable connection by including fresh Metropolitan Opera talent as was heard in the Mozart Requiem Mass. Ave Verum Corpus was composed in the last years of Mozart’s life. It was composed as a type of payment to a friend Anton Stoll, in the same way Pablo Picasso gave away some of his valuable sketches. This beautiful work began with somber, peaceful expression that immediately captured the intended emotional solemnity to the very last note. As in stein’s works the Chichester Psalms features the harp, which opened Mario Chang this piece. Special acknowledgement to trombonist Michael Cushing, harpists Randall Pratt and Meredith Clark and bassoonist Jane Orzel for their artistic solo contributions in the performed works. Most impressive

was the roll of young boy soprano Daniel Ostrom, who sat patiently waiting for his entrance. Daniel performed beautifully. The soloists in the Mozart Requiem mezzo-soprano; Mario Chang, tenor and Ryan Speedo Green, four vocalists performed with wonderful skill in all registers while Maestro Stewart maintained an excellent sense of Lei Xu dynamic balance during the performance. The various pairings of soprano-mezzo soprano duets, tenor-baritone and the quartet together was artistically done and with excellent

Daniel Stewart – Photo Credit Anastasia Chernyavsky

dynamic balance between them and the orchestra. was perfectly tapered and vanished into hall. County Symphony, Cheryl Anderson, Cabrillo Symphonic Choir and all soloists

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The ‘Dewitt Award For Partnership’

Friends Of Santa Cruz State Parks Honored For ‘Commitment Above And Beyond’ To State Parks Friends of Santa Cruz State Parks today announced the organization was honored with the Dewitt Award for Partnership at the annual State Park Director’s Awards Recognition Program on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 in Sacramento. The award is named for John Dewitt

his life to the protection of public lands. The award recognizes “commitment above and beyond the call of duty over a substantial period of time” and “recognizes those who have served as irreplaceable partners in the accomplishment of the State Parks Mission.” Friends of Santa Cruz State Parks is the legacy of our state parks and beaches. Through an innovative partnership with California State Parks known as “The Friends Model,” and by leveraging local community support, Friends has provided millions of dollars of funding for educational programs, visitor services and

T

here are only two state propositions

summaries of the propositions and the arguments for and against. We have also included an editorial comment on what we consider the central issues.

Summary – Legislative Initiative uthorizes $600 million in general

A

“This award well and truly belongs community volunteers and State Parks professionals who put the ideal of partnership

Santa Cruz State Parks. ately dedicated to the preservation of the region’s spectacular natural environment and rich cultural history. Friends supports Santa Cruz County and coastal San Mateo County. The inaugural Partnership Award was presented to Dewitt more than a decade ago. After his death, the award was renamed for Dewitt, who made wideranging contributions to the California State Parks System in his lifetime including political support and his own labor. The award now honors both his legacy and its annual recipient. Friends supports dozens of state parks and beaches in Santa Cruz and San Mateo counties and operates six

State Parks Sector Supt Kirk Lingenfelter, Friends exec dir Bonny Hawley and State Parks Director Jackson. local parks and beaches. ParkStore loca-

in bonds previously approved for the portive housing to relieve homelessness, rental housing, or related facilities for veterans and their families. Fiscal Impact costs averaging about $50 million annually over 15 years for a payback of $750 million.

at ThatsMyPark.org or via Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest.

A The state would sell $600 million in general

Arguments For Prop. 41 The Veterans Housing and Homeless Prevention Act of 2014,

bonds previously approved for the CalVet

in bonds previously approved, unspent

low-income and homeless veterans. A NO vote means bonds would NOT be sold and a diversion of CalVet Home and Farm

bond funds to construct and rehabilitate housing for California’s large population of homeless veterans. “State Propositions” page 25

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Mosquitoes are Taking Flight

Dump and Drain — Fight the Bite!

T

his spring mosquitoes are worse ville sloughs dried in the winter, the fish that prey on the mosquito larva died also. Now the sloughs have water and mosquitoes are breeding. Also, miles of small streams throughout Santa Cruz County have slowed to a trickle, forming small pools where mosquitoes are also breeding. With warming and lengthening days and the light spring rains, standing water has been left in gutters and low places. Stagnant rainwater left in buckets, birdbaths, and tires and warmed by the sun becomes a breeding ground for mosquitoes. This time of

year, mosquitoes breed in water held by tarps, boat bilges, clogged drains, gutters and unmaintained swimming pools, spas, fountains and fishponds. Mosquitoes are a public health threat since the insects can carry West Nile virus picked up from biting

due to West Nile virus. “We’re experiencing lots of mosquitoes breeding in the sloughs, streams, ponds and coastal marshes and we are controlling them in the larval stage. With the combination of the warm weather and all the water in yard containers, we really need for the public

to do their part and empty any water that might be around their property,” says manager of Santa Cruz County MosControl. “The mosquitoes that hatch now will be those that get a blood meal, lay eggs and keep the cycle going,” he commented. “The idea is to keep those numbers down now to reduce an even worse infestation later this summer. The district’s goal is to minimize the disease risk and nuisance to the public created by mosquitoes.” A female mosquito lays between 50 to 200 eggs at a time, and a neglected swimming pool can produce hundreds of thousands of mosquitoes and infect an entire neighborhood. It takes seven to ten days for a mosquito egg to develop into a flying blood-sucking insect. As drought conditions increase this summer, birds can be more prone to be bitten by disease-transmitting mosquitoes. The yellow fever mosquito has invaded California and we need to detect them if and when they arrive

4(%

in the County. Please report any resiTo prevent mosquito bites use insect repellent and drain any standing water around your home. If you see standing water that you cannot empty or drain, or if you know of a neglected swimming pool, contact Mosquito and

The district provides free mosquitoeating fish and is also asking people to report dead birds to the West Nile Virus www.westnile.ca.gov so that they may be tested for mosquito-borne viruses and be sure to vaccinate horses against West Nile virus.

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Aptos Times / June 1st 2014 / 21


Meow Luau: Kitten and Cat Adoption Event S anta Cruz County Animal Shelter

Organizations to Find Homes for the

On Saturday, June 7, 2014, Santa Cruz County Animal Shelter (SCCAS) will host its 4th Cat Adoption event at SCCAS’ Santa Cruz shelter, 2200 7th Avenue, from noon to 4 p.m. The goal of the event is to adopt cats and kittens into new homes during the busy summer season when there are many homeless animals entering shelters. partnership between SCCAS and local animal welfare organizations Animal Shelter Relief animalshelterrelief.org, Four Paws

All organizations will have kittens and cats on site available for adoption. Participants are invited to come to Santa Cruz County’s largest animal shelter to meet beautiful cats and kittens available for adoption. During this event, all kitten

microchip tration),

(including regisage appropriate

testing, routine treatment free pet wellness exam with local participating veterinarians. Also, there will be a featured performance

Sisters. Show times are at noon and to

Animal Rescue headinghomerescue.org and Santa Cruz SCPA spcasc.org.

Personal

Vet

www.mypersonalvet.com

will be available at the event. SCCAS will also be unveiling the new “Catio” outdoor cat enclosure built and donated to SCCAS “During the spring and summer months, as the weather gets warmer, cats begin new breeding cycles and many cats and kittens enter the shelter,” said Melanie Sobel, general manager, SCCAS. “Cats can have multiple litters a year, so it is very important that cat owners make sure that their cats have been spayed or neutered to prevent unwanted litters with hundreds of kittens that end up at area shelters.” SCCAS currently has a program entitled,

(including registration), rabies and FVRCP vaccinations, all for a total of only $5 and For more information, please visit scanimalshelter.org. The Santa Cruz County Animal Shelter is an open admission shelter that welcomes EVERY animal in need. There are two locations

R

American Cancer Society fundraiser, is a life-changing event that gives everyone in our community a chance to celebrate the lives of people who have battled cancer, remember loved ones lost also provides an opportunity to inform our community about the many services and programs available to local cancer patients and caregivers. Relay starts at 10 am on Saturday, July 12 with the Opening Ceremony and

Santa Cruz are beyond description. Your doctor can’t prescribe it; it doesn’t come in pill form and it doesn’t come in a bottle. survivors are invited to circle the track together and help everyone celebrate the victories we’ve achieved over cancer. Their presence at Relay helps bring hope that, together, we can eliminate cancer as a

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house as well as carnival-type games and food booths. After dark, we honor people who have been touched by cancer and remember loved ones lost to the disease

priceless all at the same time. experience can take pride in knowing they are working to create a world with less

a way of turning tough stories about cancer Throughout the day we have live entertainment on the center stage, a fab-

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adopt new animal companions, or sign up for PLANNED PetHood, our low cost spay/neuter program available for all resident pets. Website, www.scanimalshelter.org.

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visit our Facebook page.


The Mountain Community Theater Presents

August: Osage County at Park Hall

Mountain Community Theater is proud to present the

County, one of the most acclaimed plays of the last decade. It won the 2008 Tony Pulitzer Prize for Drama, and an enormous success about three generations of an Oklahoma family has drawn comparisons to the work Sam Shepard, and Tennessee Williams. In addition, the recent movie adaption garnered Academy Award nominations for both Meryl Streep and Julia Roberts. The performance contains adult

story, which unfolds over the course of several weeks, tells the story of the Westons, a large extended clan that comes together at their rural Oklahoma homestead when the alcoholic patriarch disappears. Forced to confront unspoken truths and astonishing secrets, the family must also contend with Violet, the acid-tongued, pillpopping mother at the center of this storm. From the very beginning, this dark comedy aggressively exposes the dysfunction of their Midwestern family. MCT veteran Peter Gelblum directs the show. The cast includes some of the top acting talent in Santa Cruz, including both MCT alumni and several actors who we are proud to present to the MCT audi-

suitable for young children.

gleton, Dahlela Hennig, Daria Troxell, Ann

on opening night. It continues through Sunday, June 15. All Thursday, Friday and

matinee on opening weekend). There will also be a special talkback with the cast after the Sunday June 8 matinee. General Admission tickets $20. Students and Seniors $17. The Thursday June 5 performance is a special “2 for 1” for $20.00. For more information or to purchase tickets, please visit www.mctshows. org or www.brownpapertickets.com.

Mountain Community Theater (MCT) is Santa Cruz County’s longest continuously running community theater company that derives its support primarily from performance proceeds and charitable donations. Park Hall is located at 9400 Mill Street in Ben Lomond, just 17 minutes away from downtown Santa Cruz.

Lynda and Kidz Backpack Project Begins Collection Project income youth throughout Santa Cruz County. is again gathering new or gently used backpacks as well as monetary donations to cover the cost of school supplies in preparation for the 2014-2015 school year. They collect gently used or new them with school supplies. They are then distributed to homeless and low-

“This is our 11th year and I need help spreading the word. We have four drop off locations in the county — Deluxe Foods of Aptos, The True Olive Connection in Santa Cruz, Felton Nails and covers the cost to purchase a backpack

and the school supplies to fill it. Donations will be collected through July

families throughout Santa Cruz County in preparation for the school year.

to fill a backpack full of school supbackpack and the school supplies to fill it 4.) Donate supplies — e.g., key rings, water bottles, pens, etc. (items To arrange for a donation pick-up

low-income children with fully stuffed back-to-school backpacks through their partners — the Rebele Santa Cruz Shelter, Homeless Services Center, Walnut Avenue Women and Children’s

kidzbackpacks@gmail.com,

telephone

8 Madrone Avenue, Mount Hermon, CA Street Mission. To date, more than 1,000 kids have gotten backpacks. packs throughout Santa Cruz County to children in need. This year their goal is to provide 500 backpacks. You can help meet this goal by donating a backpack or by making a monetary donation to fill these backpacks with the supplies needed for children to be successful in school. used or new backpack 2.) Donate $25

is kidzbackpacks@gmail.com 4. Drop

Felton. Lynda and Kidz Backpack Project Website: backpackproject.info Email: kidzbackpacks@gmail.com Facebook: https:// w w w. f a c e b o o k . c o m / p a g e s / Ly n d a - a n d Kidz-Backpack-Project/119313828154042 Phone: 831.332.6371 Aptos Times / June 1st 2014 / 23


Forest Glen

The First Residential Development in Aptos By Kevin Newhouse

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or thousands of years Aptos was nothing more than a small Indian village. It was a peaceful community with plenty of resources and no need or desire to develop the land. In fact, even part of a Mexican land grant, it would take nearly 100 years before Aptos would see its opment that would come to be known as the Forest Glen tract.

was deeded 5,500 acres as part of a Mexican remained undeveloped ranch land where Castro’s cattle could roam free. Around 1850, Castro began to lease his land to the “Yankees,” at which time a wharf, a general store, and a logging mill were built. Around 1872, Claus Spreckels, the millionaire “sugar king” had bargained acres of land; most of the remaining land that Castro had not already gifted to his children or sold to others. Thus, the CastroIndian-Spanish-Mexican dominance. During the Spreckels-era, railroad lines were installed and the main industry in Aptos had shifted from ranching and cattle hides to lumber. Spreckels built a

have argued was the nicest hotel in California at the time. It was located in Rio Del Mar at the intersection of Claus Court and Spreckels Drive, which explains the origin attract tourists and spark growth. Aptos, however, was a rough and rugged logging town and Spreckels’ dream of growth was short-lived. His hotel closed and the

and his land was passed to a trust called The San Christina Investment Company. The Trust decided to sell the property in estate investor from Pomona, CA. The time, the timber industry had come to an end and the focus had shifted to apples. The unattractive nature of a logging town also came to an end and there was a very strong push for tourism and residential growth. Fred Somers formed the Aptos Company with the intent to subdivide and resell the property to devel-

negotiated the sale of 411-acres, some of which would become Forest Glen. The Santa Cruz News reported on

From the Bob Murphy Collection

had purchased the land on Trout Gulch Road to build a summer home on part of the property. The remainder of the land would be subdivided for cottages. The development, initially known as Forest Park, changed its name to Forest Glen with

no explanation as to why the change was the 112 lots on the tract were made available for purchase, nine lots were reported sold. One writer boasted that never again could Aptos be called a “sleepy village” which is what a San Francisco reporter had written some years before. Another article said Aptos was now “on the map” and intended to remain there. Trout Gulch as seen in the picture with

and Valencia Roads bordered the timbered bungalow and cabin sites on either side with a mountain stream running through the property mostly parallel to the roadways. There was even a bridge over the creek that connected Trout Gulch with Valencia Road. Today, most of the cabins have been the creek is long gone and so is the entrance sign over Trout Gulch Road. The Forrest in Aptos and it no doubt sparked subse-

From the Aptos History Museum 24 / June 1st 2014 / Aptos Times

player in the development of Aptos but it remains today as only as a very distant memory.


“State Propositions” from page 20 Against Proposition 41 The Veterans Housing and Homeless Prevention Act of 2014 would authorize the State to borrow million in bonds previously approved by voters in 2008 for use by the CalVet Home Comment – Should two-thirds of funds available to the CalVet Home and housing for the homeless only?

Amendment. Summary equires local government compliance with laws providing for public access to local government body meetings and

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reimbursement costs of compliance for public access by local government from the state to the local government. Fiscal

local governments for compliance by tens of millions of dollars annually. Increases future costs of compliance to local governments by tens of millions of dollars annually. A The state would no longer be required to pay local governments for costs to follow state laws that give the public access to local government information.

A NO state would continue to be required to pay local governments for certain costs of providing public access to local government information. Comment Will the transfer of compliance costs from the state to local governments affect the availability of public access to local government body meetings and records of government officials?

19th Century

“Briefs” from page 9 Community Foundation 7807 Soquel Drive Aptos. Panel Discussion munity Water Dialogue and PVWMA

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This year we are featuring “SWIM Community Foundation 7807 Soquel Drive Aptos. Develop Recommendations For more information, contact: John Ricker, Water Resources Division Director County of Santa Cruz 831-454-2750 John. Ricker@santacruzcounty.us

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Ice Cream Social and Story Time at Porter Memorial Library

public to an ice cream social and story hour at 1 pm on June 18.

pond and the beach. The programs will This fun free event is for preschool and primary school grade children. The Porter

www.poterml.org. cream social and story hour at 1pm on July -

1. Plant life 6. OB-GYN test 9. What the Big Bad Wolf did 13. Couch 14. Hit the slopes 15. #1 Across partner 16. North African inhabitants 17. *He patented the saxophone in 1846 18. Inflexible 19. *Queen Victoria’s other half 21. Flying high 23. U.N. workers’ grp. 24. “Rhinestone Cowboy” singer

25. Seasonal blues 28. As opposed to stereo 30. Like having pH less than 7 35. Climbed down 37. Beverage usually served hot 39. Swelling 40. Nessie’s abode 41. *Nicholas I and Alexander III 43. Distinctive flair 44. Beforehand 46. *The Three Musketeers, e.g. 47. Singular of “algae” 48. *Famous HMS Beagle voyager 50. *”William ____ Overture” 52. Costa del ___ 53. Talk like a sailor? 55. Ice-T on “Law & Order: SVU”

6. Quiet attention grabber 7. Rap sheet abbreviation 8. Resolution dot 9. Fisherman’s fly, e.g. 10. *Sled sport, originated in 1800s 11. Author Bagnold 12. Roll of bills 15. *Louisiana Purchase seller 20. Fowl place 22. Grassland 24. Soap Box Derby vehicles 25. Tossed starter

"7 26. Luau greeting Governmental 27. Kitchen device approver 29. *a.k.a. Father of *Italian money the American Cartoon starting in 1861 31. Brainchild Face shape 32. Small valleys with Teacher of Torah trees and grass Founder of Scholasticism 33. Idealized image

57. *The Great _______ in Ireland 60. *Sitting Bull’s tribe 63. Like Cheerios 64. *”The Murders in the ___ Morgue” 66. Give a boot 68. Antler point 69. Geological Society of America 70. Hawaiian island 71. First-rate 72. *van Gogh severed his left one 73. Live snowmen? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

34. *Erie or Suez 36. Spring event 38. One of Great Lakes 42. Solf ge syllables: 5th and 4th 45. Cutting into cubes 49. Convent dweller 51. Probable 54. Type of twill fabric 56. Star bursts 57. Betting game 58. Perching place 59. ____ room 60. Shakespeare’s king 61. Windshield option 62. Palm tree berry 63. Pick 65. *This country declared war on Britain in 1812 67. “___ the season ...” © Statepoint Media

Answers on 31 »

Aptos Times / June 1st 2014 / 25


By Robert Francis

Kids’ books with plenty of information … Amazing Leonardo de Vinci Inventions You Can Build Yourself By Maxine Anderson Nomad Press. $15.95. Ages: 9-12 his hands-on history book not only provides some interesting information about the Renaissance and the life

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Vinci but it also of

hands-on

on de Vinci’s inventions. Using the information found here, you masque mask, learn to make paint from dirt and an egg yolk, and create a camera obscura with a tennis ball canister or large box as well as fashion shoes that will enable you to walk on water. materials needed and easy-to-follow instructions. There’s also an explanation explains how and why he spent his time on this idea or invention. Science teachers and parents home useful resource with some excellent ideas on how to engage a youngster with some ciples and teaches the young person a little bit about the Renaissance period.

Better Than a Lemonade Stand! Small Business Ideas for Kids

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By Daryl Bernstein Illustrated by Rob Husberg Aladdin/Beyond Words. $18.99. Ages: 9-14 helped scores of young entrepreneurs start their own businesses. This new edition contains making money by operating your own one person business.

describes the idea and then lists supplies needed, time involved, what to charge, how to advertise and then a set of “Hints” that will make it easier to make the business a success. 26 / June 1st 2014 / Aptos Times

notice during

Admittedly, some of the ideas here are questionable and probably won’t work in many areas. I think you can skip

Ford Trimotor airplane and the Hudson streamliner appeared, as Type 41 Royale auto and the Indian Chief motorcycle. From the horse drawn

phone information-line organizer, rock painter, silver polisher, col-

might be quite useful and create a nice washer, cage and litter box cleaner, garbage can mover (for older folks), party helper and seedling grower are all potential moneymakers. If you do check out this book, be sure to read the section entitled “Cautions” that risk, taxes and other things you should be aware of.

Design Line: Planes, Trains, and Automobiles By Chris Oxlade Illustrated by Mike Lemanski Age: all ages his concertina foldout book features one hundred iconic boats, bikes, trains and other modes of transportation that exhibit a creative excellence which make them stand out from the competition. T h e foldout stretches to tions and the back has the date and a bit of information about the machine. For

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Designed by Charles Parsons, the vessel was the fastest ship in the world at the time. Grouped by time periods, you also

that the

you’ll discover a wide array of machines for moving people and goods from one place to another. Although not a book in the traditional sense, this unusual foldout is a visual delight with lots of interesting information.

Stone Giant:

Michelangelo’s David and How He Came To Be

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Illustrated by John Shelley Charlesbridge. $16.95. Ages: 6-9 ation of one of the most famous statues in the world – Michelangelo sculpture of the shepherd boy from the

killed the giant warrior, Goliath. T h e huge block of marble David was carved from rested in Florence, Italy, for over forty years before Michelangelo began the three-year task of transforming it from a weathered block of stone to a breathtaking image of a young man. moved from the workshop where he was created to a place of honor in Florence’s city square. It took forty men four days to move the 18-foot statue and get it up on a pedestal where everyone could admire it. Filled with period detail and featuring vibrant color, John Shelley’s illustrations bring the narrative alive and add the visual dimension that makes this picture book

so special and one that both children and

Fractions in Disguise By Edward Einhorn Illustrated by David Clark Charlesbridge. $7.95. Ages: 7-10 his clever introduction to simplifying fractions lets George Cornelius Factor (GCF for short) do the teaching. George loves fractions so much, he collects them. G C F begins this fanciful tale by showing the reader his fraction collection. Then, when he hears that a valuable fraction will be up for auction, George knows he has to bid

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fraction goes missing. What follows is GCF’s quest to track down the missing fraction. This means also who is famous for disguising fractions he has illegally obtained. With his “Reducer”, an ingenious device he invents to reduce fractions down to their simplest form, GFC attempts to foil fraction. Granted this picture book is a bit weird but it does accomplish the end result, which is to make learning about fractions fun. Oh, greatest common factor?

Creatures By Orla Kiely Egmont. $12.99 (Ages: toddler) has created an animal concept board book that introduces a variety of animals. The clothbound book is sturdy and the graphics and colors come together nicely to create a very attractive and pleasing experience for both the child and his or her parents. This is a cut above the normal concept


Staying Safe — Part Two By Mike Conrad, Division Chief Operations Aptos La Selva Fire Protection District

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his month is part two of my two part series based on protecting your

Space around your home, this month I want to address ways to harden your home. Hardening your home is about ways

Starting at the top make sure your roof is free of tree litter, dry leaves and needles are very receptive to sparks and embers. Your roof should be covered with a Class A material, which includes composition, shingles, tiles or metal. Wood shakes and shingles should be replaced as soon as possible you may also be

again this is a short-term solution and the treatment will need to be repeated as per the manufactures recommendation. Ventilation openings under the eves can be an avenue for sparks and embers to enter your attic space. You can pre-cut

but this is a short-term solution. Contact a

Windows are also a common point that tection, windows should be doubled paned, tempered glass to protect the windows from

can be quickly installed when warned of a

your home.

The gutters around your roof line should be kept clear of debris and covered with screens to keep tree litter out and to reduce the chances of sparks and embers

well. Stucco and cement are excellent materials for providing protection from

If you have a crawl space under your home, these vent openings should also be protected with covers the same way as the attic vents. Have pre-cut plywood ready to install over these vents. If you have an attached deck to your home that is open underneath, it should

your homes siding.

ignite the wood that can easily spread to your house. “Staying Safe” page 31

Aptos Times / June 1st 2014 / 27


West side stores) Aptos et fresh ideas for easy-toChamber of Commerce G nutritious main entrees from a

Friday July 4

4th of July Festivities

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oin us for our Annual 4th of

adults, $5 children at the burger. Aptos World’s Shortest Parade 10 am - Noon along Soquel Drive, starting at State Park Dr. and ending at Trout Gulch Rd. Party in the Park Noon – 4 pm $5 donation for adults Aptos Village Park.

Friday August 8 Hula for History

5:30 -8:00 pm. ickets include entry to the

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munity Markets culinary team. Monday, ranging from meat dishes, to gluten-free, to vegan. Try a sample, get a recipe card, and learn tips for meal prep and leftovers. Featured recipes are posted on the New Leaf Community blog at www.newleafcommunity.com.

Cycling Center) Improve your speaking skills in a orning meditation schedule friendly, supportive environment with Redwood Ramblers Toastmasters. Open to all levels. followed by “Come As You Drop-ins welcome. For more instruction First Tues. of each information, call 831-335-3693.

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For more info. visit both oceangatezen.org and facebook.

Tuesdays thru Sundays

TOPS (Take off pounds sensibly)

8:45 am, Felton Firehouse et support for loosing Svaroopa® Yoga Classes See website for times, Deerpark weight at these health group Shopping Center, 783 Rio Del meetings. Mar Blvd. Aptos Learn more by calling (831) PROFILE of Santa Cruz 335-3510. support of blankets, beginning 9:00am-12:30pm, 2045 40th Ave. students relax into easy poses Clares St. Capitola designed to release to deepest Overeaters Anonymous tensions in the body along the 6:30-7:30pm at Teach by the Beach spine. Discover this unique form #50 Rancho Del Mar, Aptos of Hatha yoga that deeply relaxes, For more information, call (831) quiets the mind, reduces pain, 429-7906 help you too. Ongoing workshops promotes better over all health. will cover resume writing, comFor more information, visit www. First Wednesday each month munication, and interview skills. aptosyoga.org, or call (831) 688-1019 Adoption/Child Welfare Orientation 6:00pm- 8:00pm 1400 Emeline at (831) 479-0393 or visit www. First Tuesdays each month Avenue room 206, Santa Cruz.

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Ave. Santa Cruz CA 95060

B12 Fridays

Veterans of Foreign Wars

Medicine, 2849 Park Ave. Soquel 6:30 pm, 2259 7th Ave. Santa Cruz supports immunity, energy, ommander Ronals Petty leads sleep, mood, and the body’s ability the meetings. to handle stress. For more information, call (831) To learn more, call (831) 515-8699. 475-9804

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Drop-in Grief Support

Second and Fourth Thursdays 12:00pm, Hospice of Santa Cruz

Cabrillo Host Lions Club

7:00pm at the Cabrillo Community Center, Aptos Village Park, 100 Aptos Creek Rd. ublic is invited to all programs. Contact President

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or information or visit www. cabrillohostlions.org.

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Third Fridady of Each Month

Friday Shakespeare Club

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Announcements

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Ongoing Events

Mondays

Meal Solution Mondays

Tuesdays, Thursdays thru Saturdays

Ocean Gate Zen Center Zazen

4:00pm-6:00pm, New Leaf Community Markets, 1210 41st Ave. Instructions 7:00pm, 920 41st Ave. Suite Capitola (Also down town and at B, Santa Cruz (next to Family 28 / June 1st 2014 / Aptos Times

Speak for Success

12:00pm-1:00pm, St. Philip’s healthy 4 meals to people in need Episcopal Church, 5271 Scotts throughout Santa Cruz through 200 Valley Drive, Scotts Valley. iving a business presentation? that Second Harvest support.

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9:45am: Bible Study; 11:00: Worship, First Baptist Church 7565 Sunset Way, Aptos ooking for a church? Come

Dated Events

support group for adults grieving the death of a family member or a friend. This group is a place where Tuesday June 10 you can share stories, learn tools for Networking Lunch at coping, and receive support from Shadowbrook people who care. For more information, please call 11:30 am - 1:00 pm, 1750 Wharf Road (831) 430-3000. ake your reservation for the

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Church Bible Study/Worship

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Third Thursday each month

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reservation by 5pm, Fridays. Call (831) 429-7906.

County ospice of Santa Cruz County

1:30 pm-2:30pm, Lounge of the First Congregational Church, 900 Tail Wagging World of Dog match. Delicious food from 7:00pm, Firehouse on Soquel Dr. Aptos High St. Santa Cruz eets monthly on the third Mondays, Wednesdays, Ownership peakers helping speakers attend orientation. The orientation friday, until May 17th. Come 6:30pm at the Santa Cruz SPCA, is designed to review the child and Thursdays get gigs. 2685 Chanticleer Ave., Santa welfare system and to give you Call (831) 332-8221 for more Co-dependents Anonymous in stimulating discussions of ShakeCruz (cross street is Soquel Ave.). a chance to have your question entertainment, craft fair with information. o-dependents Anonymous is a speare’s plays. Guests are welcome. local vendors, and great profes12-step group for people who want To register to one of the meeting and sional tennis with world-ranked healthy relationships and self esteem. First Tuesdays and Fourth Thursdays each month for directions, please call 454-4687. players. Third Wednesdays each month Aptos Veterans of Foreign Wars Saturdays $30 in advance, $40 at the door. charge in Santa Cruz and Watsonville. Orientations to Become For a schedule and more information, Second and Fourth Wednesdays Post 10110 8:00 -12:00pm at Cabrillo College go to www.coda.org or e-mail Advocates for Children Santa Cruz/ Monterey Bay Branch 6:30 pm, Severinos, 7500 Old Buy your Aptos History Book gratefulcoda@gmail.com or call (831) he Aptos Market, with over ADHD Support Group Meetings Dominion Ct., Aptos 469-6096. Today! 80 vendors, is open year Tuesday of month (for location ommander Chuck Woodson 6:30-8:00pm Aptos Fire Station elp Support the Aptos History details contact Danielle at 761round, with the best selections of on Soquel Dr. leads the meetings. Second and Fourth Mondays 2956 X102) South County, 5:30-7 Museum Purchase your fresh foods. In addition, family pen Support meetings on For more information, call (831) First and Third Wednesdays p.m., third Wednesday of the activities, music, cooking demos second Wednesday. Adult Only 295-1939 Aptos” at the Aptos Chamber Alzheimers Support Groups by professional chefs, gardening meetings on fourth Wednesday. Freedom Blvd. Watsonville Monday: 2:00 - 3:30pm Any Questions, contact Judy workshops, seasonal fairs and Court) $22 each with proceeds ASA (Court Appointed Special Fridays Wednesday: 5:30 – 7:00pm Brenis at (831) 818-9619. events are a part of the market. going to Aptos History Museum. Conference Room at Elena Baskin/ Clutterers Anonymous hours per week, to provide support, Live Oak Senior Center, 1777-A guidance, and a powerful voice in 5:30-6:45 Sutter Maternity Third Wednesdays Scotts Valley Farmer’s Market Capitola Road, Santa Cruz. court for children who have been & Surgical Center, 2900 Meeting Schedule for the 9a.m.-1p.m. SV Community Center, acilitated by Jill Ginghofer, this removed from their homes because Chanticleer Ave, Soquel Dr. 360 Kings Village Drive SCWD2 Task Force group is for caregivers and family Santa Cruz. 7:00pm, Soquel Creek Water www.santacruzfarmersmarket.org members of people with Alzheimers welcome, men and bilingual folks District Headquarters, 5180 especially encouraged. Nar-Anon Soquel Dr. Soquel 12-step program offering To RSVP call 761-2956 hat is co-dependency? What Tuesdays Sundays eetings are open to the public ongoing support for anyone Ext. 102, or email is enabling? What is this and the location alternates Over-Eaters Anonymous WomenCARE Support Group Danielle@casaofsantacruz.org insanity? Am I the only one who between the City of Santa Cruz Police wanting a more organized and 9:00am-10:15am, Sutter uesday Support Group is a feels this way? Join Nar-Anon, a Community Room, and the Soquel uncluttered life, or dealing with gathering for women with all Second Tuesdays each month Creek Water District Headquarters. the consequences of having too Maternity and Surgery Center, world wide fellowship of relatives 2900 Chanticleer Ave. Sc. Visit www.scwd2desal.org for women through all stages from Free Job Seek Workshop! and friends of addicts who have much stuff. All are welcome. A is a 12-step support group for diagnoses through treatment. 6:00pm-7:00pm, Gateway Bible for more info. For more information , call those who wish to stop eating Church, 5000 Granite Creek Rd. Thursdays addiction. Three meetings are now For more information or to (831) 426-1868. Scotts Valley. For more inforbeing held in Santa Cruz County, register call (831) 457-2273 Capitola-Aptos mation, visit http://hirewire.org on Sundays, Tuesdays, and Fridays. Rotary Club Meeting Drop in Grief Support For a meeting near you call 12-1:30 p.m. at Seascape Golf Course. 6:00pm at Aegis, 125 Heather PFLAG (Parents, Families, and (888) 374-1164 or email Contact Chuck at 831-462-6092 Terrance, Aptos Friends of Lesbians and Gays) saveyoursanity@aol.com or e-mail charleswhitt@att.net for oin other adults who are grieving 7:00pm-9:00pm, 900 High St. First more information. Visit http://nar-anon.org/Narthe death of a friend or family Congregational Church of Santa Cruz Anon/California.html for more To learn more, call (831) 427-4016 information. Hoffman’s for Second Harvest support from people who care. No registration required, please Wednesdays of total sales to Second Harvest call (831) 430-3000 Toastmasters: every Thursday night from 5-10

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compulsively. All are welcome.

Second Thursdays each month 3:00pm-6:00pm, Thrive Natural Free childcare with advance

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Shadowbrook Restaurant. Guest

Director of UnChained. Mission is to foster empathy and respect in at-risk youth through animal advocacy. To learn more about UnChained visit www.livingunchained.org

Sunday June 22

Help Santa Cruz County Outrun Hunger 8 am, San Lorenzo Park 10 am-12 pm Expo he River Run is a fun, familyfriendly event that features 1k, 5k, and 10k courses along the

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The event will be coming to The A post race expo will follow the event and open and free to the public. The expo will feature a variety of local businesses. Runners will receive a T-shirt and goody bag as well as a free breakfast of various items. For info: e-mail farrah@santacruzcore.com or call 831-425-9500

Sunday June 29

Bikes on the Bay Vintage Motorcycle Show 9 am - 4 pm, Capitola Mall Parking Lot 1855 41st Avenue ee the motorcycles you always secretly wanted

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Your June Horoscope Times Publishing Group, Inc.

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Announcements Volunteers Needed for the Monterey Symphony

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he Monterey Symphony is seeking volunteers. If you love music and want to be involved, please call

Modern Square Dancing Class 7:00pm, German-American Hall Santa Cruz, 230 Plymouth

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caller4u@razzolink.com for

Last Thursdays each month

Monthly Argentine Tango at Star Bene Italian/Argentine Restarante

montereysymphony.org for more 4:30pm-9:30pm, Star Bene information. Italian/Argentene Restarante,

Ongoing Events Tuesdays

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his is a night for true “Social Tango.� Order a wonderful

Argentine Menu, (or their well

BINGO

MCSC. For more information, call (831) 476-4711.

Second Sundays Each Month

Downtown Santa Cruz Antique Fair

9:00am-4:00pm, Lincoln St.

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endors offer an eclectic blend of antiques and unique items. Come and a wide assortment of treasures including books and clothing, glass and ceramic collectibles, vintage hawaiian kitsch, turquoise, original artwork, and a whole lot of

the ambiance of Argentina and 6:30 p.m. Santa Cruz Elks Lodge, For more info, please contact us to music from the Golden Age 150 Jewell St. at (831) 476-6940 or visit us on of Tango. osted by Soquel Sports Private instruction and classes Facebook. snack bar available. First Tuesday by arrangement. For more of each month is special $25 buy in information, call Michael (831) 239-2247. www.soquelsports.com

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For more info, please contact (831) 476-6940 or visit us on Facebook www.facebook.com/ pages/Santa-Cruz-AntiqueFair/157459219817

Sunday June 8 Avant Garden Party 2pm - 6pm

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and Argentina along with a variety of other performers. Gourmet Delicacies by Chef India Jozseph Schultz (food is free with price of admission). Premium wines and beers. Silent auction deals of the new century. Gung-Fu Hidden Peak Teahouse.

Wednesday June 18 Porter Memorial Library Ice Cream Social

Porter Memorial Library, 3050 Porter Street

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invites the public to an ice cream social and story hour at 1pm Wednesdays First Friday Art Tour Saturday June 7 on June 18th. This free event is Peninsula Banjo Band he First Friday Art Tour for preschool and primary school Japanese Cultural Festival 7:00 - 8:30 p.m., Harry’s Hofbrau, is a Santa Cruz Institute grade children. apanese culture, both 390 Saratoga Ave, San Jose of Contemporary Arts event, traditional and contemporary, Parking is behind the Baglery. orty-seven years of take the stage at the 28th annual the participating art venues. The fair at Mission Plaza Park in Saturday June 21 Area, over 250 popular tunes. event takes place year-round Santa Cruz. The fair provides an Come see our band for Free in and illuminates some of the most opportunity for the community Woodies On The Wharf he historic Santa Cruz Wharf to increase its awareness and talented local artists from local No cover. is setting for the 20th annual understanding of the Japanese galleries. Contact Lee McLaughlin, celebration of the surf spirit and community through arts, craft Booking Agent, at 408-993classic surf wagons. More than 200 and culture. BAND (2263) for information in a First Friday art tour, visit www.jcfsantacruz.org about booking the band for wood bodies will line the wharf. galleries are open 12-9 pm for Non-profit events (donations Music, memorabilia and prize Sunday June 8 are tax deductible). First Friday viewings.) drawings add to the fun. www.PeninsulaBanjoBand.org www.santacruzwharf.com Downtown Antique Fair 9am - 5pm Second Fridays each month he original Downtown Antique Thursdays Big Band Dance Saturday June 21 Fair is held every second Lucky Steppers Modern 7:30pm-10:00pm, at Mid-County sunday of every month (weather Pleasure Point Street Fair Square Dance Senior Center 829 Bay Ave, he second annual street fair takes 6:30 pm, German American Capitola place June 21st in the heart of electric blend of antiques and Hall, 230 Plymouth St. Santa allroom dancing to live lea sure Point - on Portola Drive unique items. Come and check Cruz music by The 10th Ave. assortment of treasures including local vendors, selling are and food floor, friendly atmosphere, free books and photographs, vintage event is family friendly. Classes and a beer garden. A portion of the parking. Open to the publiccollectibles, vintage Hawaiian For more information, contact kitsch, turquoise, original artwork www.pleasurepointstreetfair.com Sue or Don at (831) 72-7053 or Suggested donation, $6 per e-mail at caller4u@att.net. person. Proceeds benefit

First Fridays each month

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Wednesday June 25 Capitola Twilight Concert

6 - 8 pm, Bandstand Stage – Esplanade Park, Capitola hane Dwight Sings and Plays

times, but we all need a break from too much action, pressure, and decision making, and June gives you opportunities for that break. You could be in the mood to sow some serious wild oats on the 1st and 2nd. Have fun, be sociable, and don’t take everything so personally. Jupiter on a personal level, and attracting good people and circumstances into your life as a result.

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petent and attentive. While some people could be feeling left out of your life as you tend to your responsibilities and personal need for space, the month is nevertheless strong for your personal life. The Full Moon can light up your workplace or career situation. Prepare for this and take the opportunity seriously. You have a chance to assume more responsibility and after the 21st, when attention to your social life comes more naturally. Make up for lost time.

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The June 12th Full Moon could take you places, some very far away. It could be physical or virtual. If you need a serious getaway, this might be the trigger. An old favorite fantasy or bit of wishful thinking may come to an end on June 21st. People you meet can be a source of inspiration. Unexpected opportunities to travel or expand your education can emerge. There is a fresh start when it comes to matters of the heart this month, and this means clearing out the deadwood and letting go of people, feelings, and attitudes that are holding you back and keeping you down.

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At the Full Moon of June 12th, you could become involved in the responsibilities of someone else. Remember to respect available resources (like time and energy). Respect boundaries, too, especially your own. Recent relationship challenges and personal frustrations will begin to disalso strong for practical matters. You are more willing than usual to work diligently for money.

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It’s a relationship-centered month for you, dear Scorpio. Personal energy levels remain on the low side, but your outlook improves considerably, and life is steadier in general. It’s easier to at the New Moon on June 27th and could make a relationship even more complicated. A rare balance of optimism and realism is with you, making it a good time for drawing up workable how you want the world to see and deal with you.

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Your ruler, Jupiter, is in great form this month, and this improves your general outlook as well as ferent life “departments�. Good energy is with you for healing, stabilizing, and improving family and other intimate relationships. Help seems to be magically there when you need it. A lightweight romance could turn super serious at the June 12th Full Moon. Or you might suddenly crave more

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The Full Moon encourages you to get serious about taking better care of yourself. You don’t dividing your time more evenly is important now. For some of you, there can be a real learning For the June 27th New Moon, you might want to change up or freshen your social crowd, fade

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Aquarius, this month is your big chance to start doing something you’ve always wanted to do but increased motivation for tackling tasks that you previously felt were monotonous or uninteresting. The 21st is a period that brings a more outgoing, playful, and creative energy to your life and, for some, budding romance. The New Moon on the 27th brings strong energy for starting fresh in these

*ÂˆĂƒViĂƒĂŠÂ­iL°Ê£™‡>À°ÊÓäŽ your life for expanding your horizons and your reach, in pleasing moderation. In fact, moderation is

Ă€ÂˆiĂƒĂŠÂ­>Ă€V…ÊÓ£‡ÂŤĂ€ÂˆÂ?ÊÓäŽ yourself, but the June 12th Full Moon reminds you to pay more attention to the small, less exciting details of daily life. You feel that you can truly begin to move forward. After a few months of some confusion or lack of clarity in your love life, relationships begin to regain momentum. Periods when you completely relax and retreat, removing yourself from everyday

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If you’ve been neglecting your own personal needs, this is a time for pursuing them, as well -

Saturday June 28

things. June is very strong for your social life, which can be especially nurturing and warm, but also practical. Networking is strong for you, both for life experience and for new, helpful ideas.

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You continue to experience a greater need for rest, relaxation, and some level of withdrawal from

Hop ‘N Barley Festival

he annual beer festival at Skypark in Scotts Valley features an array of local and regional breweries along with live

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a lot of activity with friends and networking, and fun opportunities arising from these activities,

local restaurants. The event is a fundraiser for the Community County. www.hopnbarley.org

www.tpgonlinedaily.com Aptos Times / June 1st 2014 / 29


Keeping Summer Water Use Under Control By Kim Anderson, General Manager Soquel Creek Water District

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Facing a Critical Financial Decision? Get a Second Opinion! J. Ben Vernazza CPA/PFS, TEP (UK) emeritus Fee-Only Registered Investment Consultant nΣ‡Ènn‡ÈäääÊUÊÜÜÜ°Li˜ÛV«>°Vœ“

spend more time gardening and watering outdoors, it’s easy to let our water use run away from us. With our ongoing water supply crisis, which is made worse by this year’s drought, Soquel Creek Water District is asking our customers to be extra careful this season. The District is also doing its part to reduce water use associated with ongoing operations and maintenance. Saving water is truly a com-

landscaping while it’s raining.

questions about what we are doing and what our customers need to do as

Additionally,

I want to take this opportunity to share some of those questions with you. Q: Are there rules against wasting water?

buildings, boats, cars, RVs and other vehicles with water unless you use a pressure washer or a hose with an automatic If water waste is reported by driveways, sidewalks, roadways, parking lots, patios, and other hard surfaces with water.

Ordinance

the District will investigate and enforce the ordinance. In the past, the District allowed two warnings before enforcing any penalties, but the proposed 2014 ordinance only allows one written warning. If the violation is not corrected within the

within 72 hours of discovering them. For the full list of water prohibitions,

may be restricted or customers can

and gardens to the point that the

Q: What kind of requirements does the District put on businesses? There are two new provisions

its part to reduce water waste.

Waste Ordinance in place that prohibits certain things that waste water. Directors updated the Ordinance to strengthen and clarify some rules, add standards for local businesses,

food service establishments may not serve water to customers unless expressly asked for it.

year-round.

and other guest accommodations must provide customers with the option of not having towels and linen laundered daily. In addition, businesses are

The

ordinance

will

do what most of our customers are Q: What kinds of activities aren’t allowed? The water restrictions for all customers are primarily for outdoor

www.tpgonlinedaily.com 30 / June 1st 2014 / Aptos Times

Q: Is it all up to customers? What is the District doing to cut water use?

outlined above as well as rules for re-circulating water in automatic carwashes and fountains. Q: How will these rules be enforced?

mains, except in the case of water quality complaints or concerns. District trucks and vehicles with potable water; at all District facilities (except for the new screening trees at Polo Grounds which are required); samples and using them for irrigation; plant operations to discharge the minimum volume of wastewater. Q: Is this the same as water rationing or water budgets that I keep hearing about? No. The actions in the Ordinance are targeted at eliminating water waste. It does not restrict how much water a home or business can use. Soquel Creek Water District will start a new program in early 2015 that will provide water use limits for residents and mandatory best practices for businesses. “Water Wisdom” page 31


SPCA Featured Pet

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Free Dog Training Discussion Group

month with a local reputable trainer to help dog owners with behavioral issues or training questions. This small-group setting is perfect for people who have newly adopted and are experiencing problems they’ve never dealt with before. Shelter animals can many times exhibit challenging behaviors and may be in need of a great deal of training. This hour long information session can prove to be invaluable in making sure your adoption is a

expert behavior evaluation. These sessions are for people only, so please leave your dog at home. Jumping up, barking, pulling on the leash, etc. comes naturally

Training 2601 Chanticleer Ave. in Santa Cruz *Reservations are required: To reserve a spot call (831) 465-5000*

Santa Cruz SPCA Pet Loss Support Group osing a pet is like losing a loved family member, a best friend, and a cherished companion--because that’s what they are. An overwhelming sense of with. We are here to help. Support Group in a new location to act as an important resource for people reeling from the devastating loss of a companion animal. This free support circle, open to community members grieving from a recent animal loss, is based on the belief that grief needs to be shared in order for healing to happen. The current group facilitator, Mary Quillin, takes a compassionate and empathetic approach to grief and feels that the healing magic of the group is in its gathering and guidance. Donations are welcomed as this organization solely relies on the support of the community and receives no government funding. The THIRD Thursday of every month from 2601 Chanticleer Avenue in Santa Cruz

California Giant Welcomes New Manager and additions to Sales Department California Giant egory Manager for the company. Connery is a veteran produce industry professional with sales experience both domestically and internationally. Most recently Jerry was the mixed berry category manager for Dole, but the bulk of his career was spent with Duda Farms where he served as the Domestic Giant Jerry will manage the bush berry category both domestically and internationally providing overall direction to the sales group for the year-round program. He will work with the VP of Sales and VP of Field Operations to help continue to increase volume in all growing regions and retail market share for the company. The company also recently hired Wes White and Gaby Pena as sales coordinators to assist the sales continued increase in volume and support needed for the full product line. As a

crossword on 25 »

© Statepoint Media

and has proven to be a critical addition to the team. He will perform daily domestic sales functions as well as support export sales on strawberries. “We are excited to have Jerry on board and we look forward to his expertise and the knowledge he brings to the sales team”, says Anthony Gallino, VP of Sales. “Jerry

ready to have a greater role within the sales department to make an impact from day-one as we expand our sales team and service level to our customers” Gallino adds. Connery graduated from San Diego State University, has two sons in college and resides in Aptos.

Jerry Connery, Wes White, Gaby Pena, Serjio Sanchez

“Staying Safe” from page 27 Have several garden hoses available around your home. You should have enough length to be able to reach every part of your home’s exterior. If you have a private well, install an emergency generator so you will have water even when the electricity goes out.

“Water Wisdom” from page 30

19th Century

is being promoted to salesperson and expanding his role in the department.

We’re encouraging all customers to start saving now so you’re ready for new water budgets next year. Now is the perfect time to start preparing by cutting your water use outdoors with drip irrigation, drought tolerant landscaping, or by removing your lawn. We’re here to help by

These hardening steps in combination with good defensible space will give your home the best chances of surviving a

For more information please contact

information.

outdoors, we have rebates for turf devices, graywater systems, rain barrels, and more. Please let us know if you have any questions about the water waste ordinance or other District programs. Stay tuned and visit www.soquelcreekwater.org for more details about water budgets later this year. And, in the meantime, have a fabulous

you can conserve. Aptos Times / June 1st 2014 / 31


LIVE Music Every Friday

starting at 5:30 pm

Private Party Room Now Available Call us for details at (831) 688-1477

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Aptos Times: June 1 2014  

Serving Our Community for Over 23 Years

Aptos Times: June 1 2014  

Serving Our Community for Over 23 Years