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Council candidates slug it out / P. 14

An edition of the East Valley Tribune

Reuniting a half century later / P. 29

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Sunday, October 28, 2018

Land interests enrich some campaign coffers

INSIDE

This Week

BY WAYNE SCHUTSKY Progress Managing Editor

CITY NEWS .................20 Property owners in the Arts District want more parking.

T

he real estate and development communities have poured a signi�icant amount of money into Scottsdale’s City Council election, new quarterly campaign �inance statements show. Of the total funds raised by all �ive candidates between July 1 and Sept. 30, over half the contributions came from individuals or political action committees with ties to real estate or land development. The bulk of those contributions went to

incumbent Councilwoman Linda Milhaven, who signi�icantly out-raised her opponents in the third quarter by amassing $76,019 in contributions during the time period. The next closest council candidate, Bill Crawford, raised $36,150 in the third quarter. Over $60,000, or approximately 80 percent, of contributions to Milhaven came from individuals or political action committees with ties to real estate or land development companies. They included executives from The Wolff Company, Grayhawk Development, Tram-

mel Crow and Stockdale Capital Partners – a Los Angeles-based real estate investment �irm that has an of�ice in Scottsdale and owns the Scottsdale Galleria. Milhaven also received $5,000 from the Realtors of Arizona PAC and $1,000 from Arizona Multi-Housing Association PAC. Pro Prop 420 groups have argued that projects like Desert Edge – the proposed $68-million educational center that would be located on the preserve and was the genesis for the push to put Prop 420 on the ballot in the �irst place – would ��� CAMPAIGN ���� 4

World-class exhibit graces Museum of the West

NEIGHBORS ............... 26 Scottsdale makes its mark in Christmas tabletop book.

ARTS................................. 36 Film fest expands dramatically this year.

NEIGHBORS ........................ 22 LOOKING BACK ..................29 BUSINESS ..............................31 OPINION .............................. 32 SPORTS ................................34 ARTS ....................................36 FOOD & DRINK...................39 CLASSIFIEDS ........................41 Scotts turnin dale landm g 70 / ark P. 20

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cottsdale’s Museum of the West – the Smithsonian-af�iliated institution dedicated to all things western – is home to a world-class Hopi pottery exhibit that would �it right in at the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C. The permanent exhibition, titled Canvas of Clay: Hopi Pottery Masterworks from The Allan and Judith Cooke Collection, features over 65 pieces of pristine Hopi pottery dating back to the 1400s. Though most of the pottery was crafted with an actual utilitarian use in mind, it is now celebrated the world over for its uniqueness and beauty. “I’m amazed at how the potteries have lasted centuries and centuries and how much it has evolved now to where the art (is recognized worldwide),” said Rose Hawee, a Hopi consultant who works with the museum. While the jars and vessels on display have

(Loren Anderson Photography)

Visitors to the Museum of the West linger over the world-class Hopi pottery exhibit that features 65 pieces dating back more than 600 years. Informational placards guide visitors through the diffrences between different generations of the art.

some similarities, they also carry striking artistic and functional differences that are related to the era in which they were built. The exhibition has the pieces separated by

time period and includes informational placards to help visitors learn more about the differences between pottery from differing ��� HOPI ���� 12

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SCOTTSDALE PROGRESS

Scottsdale Progress - October 28, 2018  
Scottsdale Progress - October 28, 2018