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Scottsdale icon going away / P. 17

An edition of the East Valley Tribune

INSIDE

This Week

NEWS .................................. 14 Will Phoenix scofflaws dump trash in Scottsdale?

BUSINESS .......................... 27 Old Town duo offers decor from the past.

RECREATION .................. 29 Giving dad a good game of golf.

NEIGHBORS ......................... 17 BUSINESS ............................. 27

OPINION ..............................28

ARTS ....................................29 FOOD & DRINK................... 32 CLASSIFIEDS .......................34

Look what's new in Old Town / P. 32

Sunday, June 9, 2019

FREE ($1 OUTSIDE OF SCOTTSDALE) | scottsdale.org

As temperatures rise, pools become loaded guns BY JIM WALSH Progress Staff Writer

A

s temperatures begin to soar, drowning prevention advocates are warning that the backyard swimming pool poses about the same threat to toddlers as a loaded gun. But the pool can also become a deadly weapon for adults, as demonstrated annually by a chronic toll of avoidable deaths. Far fewer children are drowning in Arizona

than 30 years ago — when the Drowning Prevention Coalition of Arizona formed to spearhead safety campaigns. Nevertheless, the prevention advocates say their goal of zero drownings remains largely unrealized — even if Scottsdale hit this elusive target last year. In a society full of distractions, they warn, complacency remains a chronic problem. Statistics show a regular pattern of children and adults perishing throughout the East Valley and across the state each year, their

deaths changing the lives of grieving relatives and even first responders forever. Mesa, Chandler, Gilbert and Tempe recorded 18 fatal drownings last year in 63 waterrelated incidents, according to the Children’s Safety Zone website. Phoenix recorded another 11 deaths in 56 water-related incidents. In 2017, the same East Valley cities recorded 17 fatal drownings in 49 water-related incidents. Phoenix had 14 fatal drownings in

New Prop 420 Kitchen magicians complaint �iled

see DROWNINGS page 6

BY WAYNE SCHUTSKY Progress Managing Editor

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former Scottsdale city councilman has filed a campaign finance complaint that could impact the upcoming $319-million bond election and the 2020 council race. The complaint by David Smith is tangentially tied to a previous one filed in September 2018 against NoDDC, a community group supporting Proposition 420 last year. City Attorney Bruce Washburn ultimately found that NoDDC failed to register as a political action committee (PAC) with the city and levied a $5,000 fine against the group. The new complaint alleges a number of campaign finance violations by NoDDC and its PAC. The complaint also names potential 2020 City Council candidate Jason Alexander as

see PAC page 12

Andrew Bloom REALTOR®, Senior Partner Andrew@BVOLuxury.com VOTED #1 SCOTTSDALE REAL ESTATE TEAM FOR 2018

Getting ready to whip up made-from-scratch meals at Scottsdale Community College's summer Simply Cooking Camp for kids are, from left, Olivia Holzhauer, Addison Scott and Sofia McGahey. For a closer look at the young chefs, see page 20. (Kimberly Carrillo/Progress Staff Photographer)

(480) 999-2948 www.BVOLuxuryGroup.com

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Scottsdale Progress 06-09-2019  

Scottsdale Progress 06-09-2019  

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