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             Gauteng is the smallest province in South Africa, yet it generates 10% of Africa’S GDP and the highest per capita income of South Africa’s Province. As a result, it comes as no surprise why over 70 foreign bank headquaters and 100 foreign embassies chose Gauteng as a place to do business. www.Gauteng.net


START

HERE

For the next four weeks the world will be in Gauteng — the centre stage of the 2010 Fifa World Cup — a place where you can play and do business. Gauteng represents the beginning of the beginning, where all humanity originated — the Cradle of Humankind. It is therefore proper for me to say to all the visitors — welcome back home. From the agrarian and cattle fortunes of our past, emerges the biggest trade hub on the African continent.



 

A bit about Gauteng, How to use this guide

 

By the numbers, Key matches, Points of interest



Newtown

  

  

Gauteng is the clay pot in which African and global business is brewed. A major role player in the global economic sectors, our province ensures multiple harvests from the ever-green fields of our business shores. With the largest per capita income in South Africa, Gauteng’s vigorous consumer trends help drive an economy that is solidly based on sophisticated financial, mining and manufacturing sectors. Gautengers, however, are not inclined to rest on the province’s laurels as Africa’s most dynamic economy. We always stay on the move. The most compelling reason for investing in Gauteng is that investors will find the region offers access to a wide variety of products and markets. On the tourism side, Gauteng is Africa with a difference — offering the best of all worlds. Fascinating natural

attractions to visit and enjoy include the Sterkfontein Caves and Maropeng, the Tswaing Crater and the Suikerbosrand Nature Reserve. Our province is the undisputed capital of South African sport and major events, providing venues of world-class luxury, tinged with the African experience. And for those who simply arrive to conduct business or to convene a meeting or conference, our golf courses rank among the best in the world. Modern shopping malls abound throughout the province and offer a variety of shopping choices, fine dining and entertainment. Enjoy your stay!

Economic Development MEC. Firoz Cachalia

Jozi jazz



The top galleries around Gauteng



Cosmo cuisine — a world of culinary tastes



Constitution Hill



Parkview and Rosebank

   Parys



“It’s a place where people can come and really let their hair down. For a small town, there are many great places to eat here — each with a distinct flavour. If you’re into antiques, this is the spot to browse.� — Ronel Dicks, Parys resident.

Finding your bearings Editor: Damon Boyd, Art director: Keith Tamkei, Subeditor: Tiara Walters Contributors: Diane Coetzer, Nikki Temkin, Sean O’Toole

USING THIS GUIDE Gauteng is a city that can overwhelm the unsuspecting traveller. Relax. This guide is here to help make the most of the short time you’ll be spending in our cool province. It’s organised into two main segments: seeing and doing. We’ve colour-coded everything to make it easier for you to get to where you need to be. We’ve got restaurants, bars, clubs, shops, cultural hotspots and places to venture to while you twiddle your thumbs between the big games. We hope you enjoy your stay. Kinda. RED: For those in the mood to drink like a champion and party YELLOW: For the gastronomes who like fine dining, theatre and other performances BLUE: For those who want to take in Gauteng’s heritage and history, along with some heavy-duty shopping and recreation GREEN: For the people who like getting away from the action and spending some time exploring the reaches of a province ORANGE: Stadiums and their surrounds

This is the second edition of six guides to the province of Gauteng. Gauteng isn’t just Joburg. It’s also home to Pretoria and other strange surrounds, like Midrand. You can get your guide in the weekend editions of the Sunday Times, Sunday World and on week days in the Sowetan. Cheers — Damon, Ed

3


STADIUMS  

WHAT YOU’RE LIKELY TO SEE

* Home of the Lions, the rugby team not the feline

WHAT YOU’RE LIKELY TO SEE

Ellis Park — not just a Hollywood set, but the grand old lady of SA sport

4

Even after the last World Cup flags are packed away, and the last of the seven matches to be played are over, it’s likely nothing will ever quite match the role of Ellis Park, the scene of the 1995 Rugby World Cup. For it was on June 24, on a day clear enough for an SAA plane to fly over the stadium, that South Africa snatched victory from New Zealand, uniting the country for one brilliant moment (cue Invictus music). But the ground on which the stadium is built has long had the thunder of sports players on it: back in 1928, the first rugby test match against the All Blacks was played at the newly built stadium. The stadium was demolished in 1979 and rebuilt, becoming synonymous with rugby, until recent times when Orlando Pirates Football Club took up residence here. Some construction has come as a result of the Fifa World Cup: the new tier on the north stand has increased the seating capacity to just under 62 000 (from 57 000), which means more people can see the nail-biting action as it unfolds.

         1. Why did Uruguay and Argentina toss up before the 1930 final? To choose the ball To choose the shirt colour To choose the dressing room To choose an opening song by Barbra Streisand 2. Hector Castro, who scored Uruguay’s winning goal in the 1930 final, was physically handicapped. What was his handicap? He had only one hand He was dumb He was married He had a deaf ear 3. What was the consequence of Argentina’s unexpected defeat in the 1930 final? The Argentinian captain was jailed The Uruguayan consulate was killed One Argentinian player was killed The Argentinian president was overthrown 4. What did each Uruguayan player receive from the government after winning the World Cup in 1930? A plot of land with a new house A new car Tickets to the USA Tom Cruise

Answers to last week’s quiz 1. Romania 2. He had sneaked out of the hotel without permission 3. The referee had made a mistake 4. He had broken a bottle of chloroform 5. For alleged collaboration with the Nazis

• Students: There are several universities here, so the diligent kind who like to get in that little bit of research during the hols. Plus, reprobates and other low-life riffraff from nearby Bertrams and Troyeville

  • Team whirlpools ... yes — the boys can soak together after a hard kick around the pitch. No TV cameras allowed into this gathering. • No need to jump onto your seat. The stadium now has top-notch audio visuals to keep fans ‌ well, informed. • Artwork aplenty. Who says culture and sport don’t mix? The precinct around the

stadium has some eyecatching artwork, including a pretty impressive mosaic. • Okay. This is not such a fun fact. Glass bottles, glass receptacles, cans and pyrotechnics are just some of the things that will get you stopped at the entrance. • This grand old lady of South African sport had a facelift ahead of Fifa 2010 World Cup. It was a snip at just R240-million.

TAKE NOTE Ellis Park 48 Staib Street,Joburg 011 402 8644

 

June 12 4pm Group B Argentina v Nigeria June 15 8.30pm Group G Brazil v Korea DPR June 18 4pm Group C Slovenia v USA June 21 8.30pm Group H Spain v Honduras June 24 4pm Group F Slovakia v Italy June 28 8.30pm Round of 16 July 3 8.30pm Quarter finals July 10 8.30pm Third place playoff July 11 8.30pm Finals Clint Dempsey of USA

  It wasn’t just rugby that made 1995 such a landmark year for Ellis Park. In that February, the stadium played host to the Rolling Stones — one of many high-profile music events that have taken place at this stadium at the bottom end of the city. U2, the 46664 concert, Black Eyed Peas and even the late Michael Jackson have shown their live chops here.

• Ponte: That would be that tall, circular building on the hill that was built in 1975 to a height of 173 m (567.6 ft), making it the tallest residential skyscraper in Africa. A few years ago, this block of residential flats, with a massive interior opening, was poised to undergo a refurbishment. Sadly that hasn’t happened and it’s really recommended that you only look at Ponte from a distance.

Sir Mick, pirate Keith and co’s Ellis Park setlist: 1. Not Fade Away (Buddy Holly cover) 2. Tumbling Dice 3. You Got Me Rocking 4. It’s All Over Now (The Valentinos cover) 5. Live with Me 6. Sparks Will Fly 7. (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction 8. Out of Tears 9. Angie 10. Rock and a Hard Place 11. Midnight Rambler 12. I Go Wild 13. Miss You 14. Honky Tonk Woman 15. Happy 16. Slipping Away 17. Sympathy for the Devil

5


STADIUMS  

WHAT YOU’RE LIKELY TO SEE

* Home of the Lions, the rugby team not the feline

WHAT YOU’RE LIKELY TO SEE

Ellis Park — not just a Hollywood set, but the grand old lady of SA sport

4

Even after the last World Cup flags are packed away, and the last of the seven matches to be played are over, it’s likely nothing will ever quite match the role of Ellis Park, the scene of the 1995 Rugby World Cup. For it was on June 24, on a day clear enough for an SAA plane to fly over the stadium, that South Africa snatched victory from New Zealand, uniting the country for one brilliant moment (cue Invictus music). But the ground on which the stadium is built has long had the thunder of sports players on it: back in 1928, the first rugby test match against the All Blacks was played at the newly built stadium. The stadium was demolished in 1979 and rebuilt, becoming synonymous with rugby, until recent times when Orlando Pirates Football Club took up residence here. Some construction has come as a result of the Fifa World Cup: the new tier on the north stand has increased the seating capacity to just under 62 000 (from 57 000), which means more people can see the nail-biting action as it unfolds.

         1. Why did Uruguay and Argentina toss up before the 1930 final? To choose the ball To choose the shirt colour To choose the dressing room To choose an opening song by Barbra Streisand 2. Hector Castro, who scored Uruguay’s winning goal in the 1930 final, was physically handicapped. What was his handicap? He had only one hand He was dumb He was married He had a deaf ear 3. What was the consequence of Argentina’s unexpected defeat in the 1930 final? The Argentinian captain was jailed The Uruguayan consulate was killed One Argentinian player was killed The Argentinian president was overthrown 4. What did each Uruguayan player receive from the government after winning the World Cup in 1930? A plot of land with a new house A new car Tickets to the USA Tom Cruise

Answers to last week’s quiz 1. Romania 2. He had sneaked out of the hotel without permission 3. The referee had made a mistake 4. He had broken a bottle of chloroform 5. For alleged collaboration with the Nazis

• Students: There are several universities here, so the diligent kind who like to get in that little bit of research during the hols. Plus, reprobates and other low-life riffraff from nearby Bertrams and Troyeville

  • Team whirlpools ... yes — the boys can soak together after a hard kick around the pitch. No TV cameras allowed into this gathering. • No need to jump onto your seat. The stadium now has top-notch audio visuals to keep fans ‌ well, informed. • Artwork aplenty. Who says culture and sport don’t mix? The precinct around the

stadium has some eyecatching artwork, including a pretty impressive mosaic. • Okay. This is not such a fun fact. Glass bottles, glass receptacles, cans and pyrotechnics are just some of the things that will get you stopped at the entrance. • This grand old lady of South African sport had a facelift ahead of Fifa 2010 World Cup. It was a snip at just R240-million.

TAKE NOTE Ellis Park 48 Staib Street,Joburg 011 402 8644

 

June 12 4pm Group B Argentina v Nigeria June 15 8.30pm Group G Brazil v Korea DPR June 18 4pm Group C Slovenia v USA June 21 8.30pm Group H Spain v Honduras June 24 4pm Group F Slovakia v Italy June 28 8.30pm Round of 16 July 3 8.30pm Quarter finals July 10 8.30pm Third place playoff July 11 8.30pm Finals Clint Dempsey of USA

  It wasn’t just rugby that made 1995 such a landmark year for Ellis Park. In that February, the stadium played host to the Rolling Stones — one of many high-profile music events that have taken place at this stadium at the bottom end of the city. U2, the 46664 concert, Black Eyed Peas and even the late Michael Jackson have shown their live chops here.

• Ponte: That would be that tall, circular building on the hill that was built in 1975 to a height of 173 m (567.6 ft), making it the tallest residential skyscraper in Africa. A few years ago, this block of residential flats, with a massive interior opening, was poised to undergo a refurbishment. Sadly that hasn’t happened and it’s really recommended that you only look at Ponte from a distance.

Sir Mick, pirate Keith and co’s Ellis Park setlist: 1. Not Fade Away (Buddy Holly cover) 2. Tumbling Dice 3. You Got Me Rocking 4. It’s All Over Now (The Valentinos cover) 5. Live with Me 6. Sparks Will Fly 7. (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction 8. Out of Tears 9. Angie 10. Rock and a Hard Place 11. Midnight Rambler 12. I Go Wild 13. Miss You 14. Honky Tonk Woman 15. Happy 16. Slipping Away 17. Sympathy for the Devil

5


STADIUMS  

* Home of the Lions, the rugby team not the feline

     • Stay in the stadium if you want to experience a South African sporting tradition: the match braai. Braai facilities are now available on the north side of the stadium next to the bar area. Braai packs (chop, wors and steak) are on sale here for R40. • NARINA TROGON 81 De Korte Street, Braamfontein, Joburg, 011 339 6645 Not strictly in walking distance, but good enough if you want some inventive and locally sourced seasonal food before hopping into a cab and heading over the hill to the stadium. • THE CANTEEN AT ARTS ON MAIN 245 Main Street (entrance 260 Fox Street), Joburg, 011 334 5947 You’ll appreciate this urban oasis in this cleverly positioned, reclaimed building even more once the vuvuzelas are within hearing distance. Good beers, yummy food and a quiet inside area, dammit! What more does the die-hard urbanista need ahead of a major showdown? • LUCKY MOO Shop A01, Gandhi Square, 8 New Street South, cnr Rissik and Main streets, Joburg Feeling lucky? Or cheeky? Then sit on a pavement and place a phone order with Lucky Moo, a marvellous eatery situated in the heart of the city. It’s yum-yum Chinese food.

6

Get your kicks after an Ellis Park game at an Afro-cool haunt next to the stadium MAPUNGUBWE HOTEL Marshall Street, Joburg, 011 429 2600 In a basement once used for the French Bank, you’ll find the Mapungubwe Hotel’s whisky bar. It has a plasma-screen TV in case you decide the trek to the stadium is just too much of an effort. THE SUNNYSIDE PARK HOTEL Princess of Wales Terrace, Parktown, Joburg, 011 640 0400 Just up and over the hill from Ellis Park is a hotel that is even older than the stadium’s original structure. The Sunnyside Park Hotel was built in 1895 and has been declared a national monument. Marvel at the contrast between the wild city a kilometre away and its Victorian elegance while sipping a drink at the Penny and Pound Irish Pub. TROYEVILLE HOTEL 25 Bezuidenhout Street, Troyeville, Joburg, 011 402 7709 Actually, the best spot for drinking if you plan on being superbly placed to walk to the stadium. Long a favourite of locals, the word from owner Laurence Jones is that the bar at the entrance to the hotel will be open “all day�, so install yourself early.

NEXT WEEK: Loftus Versveld and Hatfield Square — for great food, great pubs, great girls • visit http://issuu.com/timeslive/docs/extratime to see last week’s Soccer City and surrounds

STADIUM FAVOURITE This is important if you want to take advantage of what this locals’ favourite has on offer during the tournament. With delicious Portuguese-based food on offer all year round (in keeping with the area’s heritage as a base for Jozi’s Portuguese community), the hotel offers a R300 buffet on days when matches are being played at Ellis Park, plus R120 buffets on other biggame days — massive TV screens and all. Booking by e-mail (info@troyevillehotel.co.za) is essential. Lunch starts from 12pm. Dinner from 6.30pm. Expect to wolf down grilled calamari and prawn salad, chicken livers, chourico sausage, peri-peri chicken, hake fillet fritta, beef stew, chicken curry, chickpea and vegetable curry, and a range of desserts that include bread and butter pudding.

!  !   • INC. THE CLUB 39-41 Juta Street, Braamfontein, Joburg, 011 403 9833 Want to live it up like a black diamond (“black yuppieâ€?)? Then slip on some heels and head over to Inc. The Club for a night of African decadence. • THE ALEXANDER THEATRE 36 Stiemens Street, Braamfontein, Joburg, 082 699 6733 Faux grass on the roof. Safe parking. A regular parade of hot DJs and live music. Go straight to this avant-garde joint if you consider yourself even vaguely hip. • HOUSE OF NSAKO Troyeville Hotel, 25 Bezuidenhout Street, Troyeville, Joburg, 011 402 7709 This Afrocentric live-music venue is going to be delivering some great tunes during 2010.

• We’re not the sort to recommend chains but hey, when you’re on the run in a human river of soccer fans, then who’s got time to be choosy? Local pizza chain Debonairs (011 402 6060) and KFC (011 402 9193) are a stone’s throw from the stadium.

7


STADIUMS  

* Home of the Lions, the rugby team not the feline

     • Stay in the stadium if you want to experience a South African sporting tradition: the match braai. Braai facilities are now available on the north side of the stadium next to the bar area. Braai packs (chop, wors and steak) are on sale here for R40. • NARINA TROGON 81 De Korte Street, Braamfontein, Joburg, 011 339 6645 Not strictly in walking distance, but good enough if you want some inventive and locally sourced seasonal food before hopping into a cab and heading over the hill to the stadium. • THE CANTEEN AT ARTS ON MAIN 245 Main Street (entrance 260 Fox Street), Joburg, 011 334 5947 You’ll appreciate this urban oasis in this cleverly positioned, reclaimed building even more once the vuvuzelas are within hearing distance. Good beers, yummy food and a quiet inside area, dammit! What more does the die-hard urbanista need ahead of a major showdown? • LUCKY MOO Shop A01, Gandhi Square, 8 New Street South, cnr Rissik and Main streets, Joburg Feeling lucky? Or cheeky? Then sit on a pavement and place a phone order with Lucky Moo, a marvellous eatery situated in the heart of the city. It’s yum-yum Chinese food.

6

Get your kicks after an Ellis Park game at an Afro-cool haunt next to the stadium MAPUNGUBWE HOTEL Marshall Street, Joburg, 011 429 2600 In a basement once used for the French Bank, you’ll find the Mapungubwe Hotel’s whisky bar. It has a plasma-screen TV in case you decide the trek to the stadium is just too much of an effort. THE SUNNYSIDE PARK HOTEL Princess of Wales Terrace, Parktown, Joburg, 011 640 0400 Just up and over the hill from Ellis Park is a hotel that is even older than the stadium’s original structure. The Sunnyside Park Hotel was built in 1895 and has been declared a national monument. Marvel at the contrast between the wild city a kilometre away and its Victorian elegance while sipping a drink at the Penny and Pound Irish Pub. TROYEVILLE HOTEL 25 Bezuidenhout Street, Troyeville, Joburg, 011 402 7709 Actually, the best spot for drinking if you plan on being superbly placed to walk to the stadium. Long a favourite of locals, the word from owner Laurence Jones is that the bar at the entrance to the hotel will be open “all day�, so install yourself early.

NEXT WEEK: Loftus Versveld and Hatfield Square — for great food, great pubs, great girls • visit http://issuu.com/timeslive/docs/extratime to see last week’s Soccer City and surrounds

STADIUM FAVOURITE This is important if you want to take advantage of what this locals’ favourite has on offer during the tournament. With delicious Portuguese-based food on offer all year round (in keeping with the area’s heritage as a base for Jozi’s Portuguese community), the hotel offers a R300 buffet on days when matches are being played at Ellis Park, plus R120 buffets on other biggame days — massive TV screens and all. Booking by e-mail (info@troyevillehotel.co.za) is essential. Lunch starts from 12pm. Dinner from 6.30pm. Expect to wolf down grilled calamari and prawn salad, chicken livers, chourico sausage, peri-peri chicken, hake fillet fritta, beef stew, chicken curry, chickpea and vegetable curry, and a range of desserts that include bread and butter pudding.

!  !   • INC. THE CLUB 39-41 Juta Street, Braamfontein, Joburg, 011 403 9833 Want to live it up like a black diamond (“black yuppieâ€?)? Then slip on some heels and head over to Inc. The Club for a night of African decadence. • THE ALEXANDER THEATRE 36 Stiemens Street, Braamfontein, Joburg, 082 699 6733 Faux grass on the roof. Safe parking. A regular parade of hot DJs and live music. Go straight to this avant-garde joint if you consider yourself even vaguely hip. • HOUSE OF NSAKO Troyeville Hotel, 25 Bezuidenhout Street, Troyeville, Joburg, 011 402 7709 This Afrocentric live-music venue is going to be delivering some great tunes during 2010.

• We’re not the sort to recommend chains but hey, when you’re on the run in a human river of soccer fans, then who’s got time to be choosy? Local pizza chain Debonairs (011 402 6060) and KFC (011 402 9193) are a stone’s throw from the stadium.

7


SEE   * It’s where it’s at

Once the core of SA’s protest art, Newtown still leads the charge — this time with the grand cultural revival of Joburg

8

Vibrant Newtown, the cultural heart of Joburg, is located near the city centre and boasts a rich history. Originally a racially mixed, working-class district where bricks were manufactured, people of all races lived and worked in the area up to 1906, when African and Indian residents were forcibly removed. The district was renamed Newtown and a fresh produce market, a mill and a power station were erected. It became a centre of agricultural trade and also produced much of Joburg’s power. It continued to be a place, however, where workers lived and even protested during major strikes. In the ’30s the open space in front of the market was named Mary Fitzgerald Square, after the fierce labour activist and deputy mayor. A pivotal moment dawned in 1976 when the Market Theatre moved into the vicinity. Other establishments like Museum Africa followed and trendy cafÊs and bars, such as the famous jazz club Kippies, sprung up. Many of the city’s artists made Newtown their home and the council developed it into a cultural centre. Today, Newtown’s evolution as a creative hub lives on. As part of an initiative by Gauteng province, it continues to be revamped and redeveloped to make it even more attractive to those looking for a large dose of Jozi arts, culture and fun. For the past 30 years, Newtown has been at the centre of culture, commerce and community — a uniquely South African phenomenon in constant transformation.

1 THE MARKET THEATRE Why go? This is a fab night out in Jozi. Founded in 1976, the “Theatre of the Struggle� is a beautiful landmark that has earned its reputation for staging hardhitting political plays like   and   . Originally constructed in 1913, it puts on performances that push boundaries, engage, challenge and entertain. Some of South Africa’s most famous actors have trod these boards for scenes by playwrights like Athol Fugard and Bertold Brecht. What’s on? Catch House of Holy Afro, a glam package of Afro kitsch — part club night, part musical —

between June 11 and July 11. Performed by seven singer-dancers, it weaves together spiritual melodies with celebrated DJ Dino Moran’s driving housebeats, electrifying African choreography and over-the-top poetry. Why not ... enjoy a pre-show meal of exotic African food at Gramadoelas (011 838 6960) next door? Where: 56 Margaret Mcingana Street, Market Theatre Precinct, Newtown Digits: 011 832 1641 Show times: Book on 011 832 1641, or through Computicket at 011 340 8000 / www.computicket.co.za GPS: S 11 48 73 | E 00 05 63

2 SAB WORLD OF BEER Why go? Because you love beer. Plus it’s been ranked as one of the top two tourist experiences in the country and it’s really cheap too. The SAB World of Beer offers a fascinating look into the processes and culture of beer-making and beer drinking in South Africa. The informative high-tech tour led by professionals, traces the golden brew’s origins about 6 000 years back — from Mesopotamia through Africa and Europe to its place in modern society. You’ll experience the feel of a turn-of-the-century Jozi pub, as well as a traditional Soweto shebeen. Afterwards, enjoy a few frosties in the tap room over a pub lunch. Cheers! Where: 15 President Street, entrance in Gerard Sekoto Street, Joburg Digits: 011 836 4900 Opening times: Every Tue to Sat, 10am-6pm Entrance fee: A 90minute tour costs R30 and includes two free drinks GPS: S 26 11 59 55 | E 28 01 56 12

4 1 5 2 3

9

3 ZASEKHAYA MARKET Why go? “Zasekhaya� means “brewed at home�, so expect to engage in some alternative retail therapy. Located at The Bus Factory, this market peddles an affordable range of unusual, handmade SA arts and crafts beyond what’s available elsewhere — think one-of-a-kind mosaic mirrors, wire and leather work, colourful handbags (made from recycled cans), children’s toys, photography and prints, clothing and handmade paper. You’re as likely to net yourself a pair of quirky Marmite label earrings as you are a painted ceramic bowl. Purchases are bound to be conversation starters and, even better, Zasekhaya’s an empowerment project too. Refreshments are on sale. Why not ... pop into the Artist Proof Studio and Gallery next door? It’s wellworth it: 011 492 1278, Mon to Fri 9am-4pm, Sat 10am-3pm Where: The Bus Factory, cnr Henry Nxumalo and President streets Digits: 072 721 1953 Opening times: Open the last Saturday of every month, 10am-4.30pm GPS: S 11 31 15 | E 01 49 76

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


SEE   * It’s where it’s at

Once the core of SA’s protest art, Newtown still leads the charge — this time with the grand cultural revival of Joburg

8

Vibrant Newtown, the cultural heart of Joburg, is located near the city centre and boasts a rich history. Originally a racially mixed, working-class district where bricks were manufactured, people of all races lived and worked in the area up to 1906, when African and Indian residents were forcibly removed. The district was renamed Newtown and a fresh produce market, a mill and a power station were erected. It became a centre of agricultural trade and also produced much of Joburg’s power. It continued to be a place, however, where workers lived and even protested during major strikes. In the ’30s the open space in front of the market was named Mary Fitzgerald Square, after the fierce labour activist and deputy mayor. A pivotal moment dawned in 1976 when the Market Theatre moved into the vicinity. Other establishments like Museum Africa followed and trendy cafÊs and bars, such as the famous jazz club Kippies, sprung up. Many of the city’s artists made Newtown their home and the council developed it into a cultural centre. Today, Newtown’s evolution as a creative hub lives on. As part of an initiative by Gauteng province, it continues to be revamped and redeveloped to make it even more attractive to those looking for a large dose of Jozi arts, culture and fun. For the past 30 years, Newtown has been at the centre of culture, commerce and community — a uniquely South African phenomenon in constant transformation.

1 THE MARKET THEATRE Why go? This is a fab night out in Jozi. Founded in 1976, the “Theatre of the Struggle� is a beautiful landmark that has earned its reputation for staging hardhitting political plays like   and   . Originally constructed in 1913, it puts on performances that push boundaries, engage, challenge and entertain. Some of South Africa’s most famous actors have trod these boards for scenes by playwrights like Athol Fugard and Bertold Brecht. What’s on? Catch House of Holy Afro, a glam package of Afro kitsch — part club night, part musical —

between June 11 and July 11. Performed by seven singer-dancers, it weaves together spiritual melodies with celebrated DJ Dino Moran’s driving housebeats, electrifying African choreography and over-the-top poetry. Why not ... enjoy a pre-show meal of exotic African food at Gramadoelas (011 838 6960) next door? Where: 56 Margaret Mcingana Street, Market Theatre Precinct, Newtown Digits: 011 832 1641 Show times: Book on 011 832 1641, or through Computicket at 011 340 8000 / www.computicket.co.za GPS: S 11 48 73 | E 00 05 63

2 SAB WORLD OF BEER Why go? Because you love beer. Plus it’s been ranked as one of the top two tourist experiences in the country and it’s really cheap too. The SAB World of Beer offers a fascinating look into the processes and culture of beer-making and beer drinking in South Africa. The informative high-tech tour led by professionals, traces the golden brew’s origins about 6 000 years back — from Mesopotamia through Africa and Europe to its place in modern society. You’ll experience the feel of a turn-of-the-century Jozi pub, as well as a traditional Soweto shebeen. Afterwards, enjoy a few frosties in the tap room over a pub lunch. Cheers! Where: 15 President Street, entrance in Gerard Sekoto Street, Joburg Digits: 011 836 4900 Opening times: Every Tue to Sat, 10am-6pm Entrance fee: A 90minute tour costs R30 and includes two free drinks GPS: S 26 11 59 55 | E 28 01 56 12

4 1 5 2 3

9

3 ZASEKHAYA MARKET Why go? “Zasekhaya� means “brewed at home�, so expect to engage in some alternative retail therapy. Located at The Bus Factory, this market peddles an affordable range of unusual, handmade SA arts and crafts beyond what’s available elsewhere — think one-of-a-kind mosaic mirrors, wire and leather work, colourful handbags (made from recycled cans), children’s toys, photography and prints, clothing and handmade paper. You’re as likely to net yourself a pair of quirky Marmite label earrings as you are a painted ceramic bowl. Purchases are bound to be conversation starters and, even better, Zasekhaya’s an empowerment project too. Refreshments are on sale. Why not ... pop into the Artist Proof Studio and Gallery next door? It’s wellworth it: 011 492 1278, Mon to Fri 9am-4pm, Sat 10am-3pm Where: The Bus Factory, cnr Henry Nxumalo and President streets Digits: 072 721 1953 Opening times: Open the last Saturday of every month, 10am-4.30pm GPS: S 11 31 15 | E 01 49 76

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


SEE   * It’s where it’s at

5 KO’SPOTONG 4 MUSEUM AFRICA

10

Why go? Because you’re into history and culture — not just local stuff, but that of the entire continent. Situated on what was once the city’s first fruit and veg market, which was built in 1913, the building is particularly beautiful. The museum’s approach is unique and its displays draw you into a journey on African culture, history and archaeology. It also looks back at the history of South Africa, dating from the Stone Age to the present. A variety of exhibits tell the story of gold’s discovery, the emergence of a unique urban culture and, finally, the struggle for democracy and the long walk to political freedom. Don’t miss the impressive rock art collection. Collected works include local artists as well as Pre-Raphaelite and Impressionist paintings. Why not ‌ also visit the renowned Bensusan Museum of Photography in the same building? Where: 121 Bree Street, Newtown Digits: 011 833 5624 Opening times: Tue to Sun, 9am5pm Entrance fee: None GPS: S 26 12 01 27 | E 28 01 49 47

Why go? It’s a week night and you’re itching to experience some late-night action and Mzansi (South African) culture at a secret spot ... Go to this unpretentious cocktail and entertainment venue, Ko’Spotong (“The Spotâ€?). You never know what you might find here, but there’s bound to be something chilled. It could be anything from beatbox, rock and poetry, to folk, rap, instrumental and open-mic sessions. The vibe is laid-back and authentic. Some of the country’s top performers sometimes make an appearance. And there’s grub for the hungry. Why not ‌ check out the other branches in Melville and Gandhi Square? Where: No 1 Central Place, Jeppe Street Digits: 011 836 5999 Opening times: Thur-Sat, 11.30am-12am GPS: S 26 09 42 53 | E 28 02 07 03

   

 

WHEN: June 11July 11 WHERE: Mary Fitzgerald Square CONTACT: 011 833 6323 As you may already know, Gauteng has a few public viewing areas for the World Cup. The Mary Fitzgerald Square area will probably be the best. There will be loads of retail and food stalls at the event. Plus, there will be plenty entertainment before and after match screenings. Live performances will include DJ battles, food fests and street parades. NICE TO You know the Nelson Mandela KNOW Bridge? The one going into Newtown? Well, it’s the longest cable-stayed bridge in southern Africa (295m).

 ’ !

THE SPACE EXHIBITION AT MUSEUM AFRICA WHEN: Until July 11 The title alludes to space and pace. Space is all about ideas and meanings, while pace is about the speed at which change or advancement take place in society.

WHEN: The Woods, from June 11-June 25 WHERE: The Woods, 082 332 5772 Get onto the dancefloor and break into a sweat at The Woods, where you’ll hear the likes of Craig Massiv, Ryan Dent and Blacksheep. Then, on the 18th DJ Fresh will get you jamming into the wee hours. Cover charge? Sure, it’s R60 for boys and ladies get in for free.

NEXT WEEK: Go on the rides, go down a mine shaft, see the history of the gold rush at Gold Reef City • visit http://issuu.com/timeslive/docs/extratime to see last week’s Melville pub crawl


Play anywhere, win in Gauteng

You’re invited to experience our memorable - Township tours - Party central - Heritage sites - Nature and wildlife - Chesa-nyama tours - Public-viewing events - Shopping experience

Contact Us 1 Central Place Cnr Jeppe & Henry Nxumalo Streets Newtown Johannesburg Tel: 011 639 1600 Fax: 011 639 1700 E-mail: info@gauteng.net Web: www.visitgauteng.net


PERFORMANCES " "  1 BASSLINE

Where: 10 Henry Nxumalo Street, Newtown, Joburg Digits: 011 838 9142/5/6 Opening times: From 9pm Cover charge: Varies (see below) Dress code: Casual Lineup: June highlights — Swazi Dlamini, Tshepo Mngoma & Mimi, R110 @ Computicket, R150 @ the door; Olufemi (Nigeria) and the United Band (Ghana), June 20, R100; Native Rhythms presents Zuluboy, Zonke, Putuma & Vuyo with guest artists from Holland, June 27, R100 Long considered the home of jazz in Jozi, the Bassline provides the soundtrack to the Newtown precinct all year long.

8

Born from the sorrows of the struggle, Joburg’s exuberant jazz scene of today is the beating heart of the city Look, it may sound hopelessly romantic, but those who lived in the teeth of ’50s apartheid say it was music that saved them. Hugh Masekela, in his book Still Grazing, quotes iconic jazz and blues singer Dorothy Rathebe: “As evil as apartheid was, it could never completely destroy us ... our music was the one thing the white government could not take away from us.� That very music, as Masekela puts it, had its roots “in ethnic wedding songs, and a cappella choral compositions�. That was ’50s Joburg — or Jozi, as the locals call it — and it was, like it is today, the burgeoning centre of the action. EMI and Gallo’s offices were downtown, Sophiatown stoked the flame in the suburbs, the creative hub was Eloff Street’s Dorkay House and

* It don’t mean a thing, if it ain’t got that swing

2

the city’s Coliseum record store was a magnet for jazz devotees searching for records by Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis or Sonny Rollins. Through a dazzling charge of musicians, songwriters and legendary stage shows like the township jazz concerts that sold out the city hall in the ’50s and, of course, the seminal musical King Kong, jazz has come to steal the hearts and minds of South Africans, and has not let up since.

1

3 TANZ CAFÉ Address: Buzz Shopping Centre, Witkoppen Road, Fourways, Joburg Digits: 082 855 5445 Opening times: From 7pm Cover charge: R50 Dress code: Casual Lineup: Ziza & the Solos, Cold War Candy Drop & Kathy Raven, June 23 Not strictly a jazz venue, but then again the word “strictâ€? isn’t something we South Africans identify with. This joint has just relocated from its position in a suburban road to a shopping centre in the more recently developed area of Fourways. Rock and pop usually hog the spotlight, but you can catch jazz-influenced bands here regularly.

JAZZ ESSENTIAL In one of jazz music’s most tragic moments, gifted pianist and composer Moses Molelekwa and his wife, Flo, were found dead in their office in downtown Joburg on February 13 2001. The circumstances around their death remain unclear (reportedly he was hanged and she was strangled). But what was never

uncertain was the impact this Tembisa-born musician had during his short music career. Heralded as the heir to greats like Abdullah Ibrahim, Molelekwa combined African jazz purity with a feel for the music of his generation. Hunt down his album   

for a taste of something special.

NEXT EDITION: Catch you at the 19th hole with the best golf courses Gauteng has to offer • visit http://issuu.com/timeslive/docs/extratime to see last week’s places to party

4

5

9

2 THE RADIUM BEER HALL Where: 282 Louis Botha Avenue, Orange Grove, Joburg Digits: 011 728 3866 Opening times: Lunch and dinner Cover charge: Varies from free to around R100 Dress code: Casual Lineup: The Radium Jazz Band — traditional jazz every Friday with Stephen Kunny and guests, no cover charge; Classic Jazz Masters, June 26, R60 It’s the ultimate retro-dive. It’s also the only place where you’ll find old-fashioned jazz and reliably good Portuguese food. The Radium is a tradition. Actually, you should’ve headed here as soon as you landed in Joburg. It’s the oldest surviving bar and restaurant in the city and it’s seen it all: shebeen customers in the ’20s, fiery community leaders and rabblerousers. Situated in the long-established suburb of Orange Grove, you’ll get a warm-hearted welcome here any day of the week.

6

3

4 NIKKI’S OASIS Where: 138 Bree Street, Joburg Digits: 011 492 1134 Opening times: Mon 12pm-12am; Tue 12pm10pm; Wed to Sat 12pm-12am; closed on Sun Dress code: Casual Cover charge: No You can catch some free live jazz at in Newtown on just about any night of the week.

SOUVENIR IDEA No 3 THE SET-OF-FIVE CIGAR COLLECTION Celebrate your winning team at a jazz club with a Monte Cristo, Cohiba, Romeo y Julieta or Hoyo. A gift that will set you back R1 230, but it’s worth it. Just don’t blow them into some loser’s face.

FIVE QUICK FACTS ABOUT HUGH MASEKELA • His US hits include     and the album   ’    

(1968) which sold 4 million copies. • He usually plays in jazz ensembles • He has made guest appearances on albums by The Byrds and Paul Simon • He had a hit in 1987 with      , which became an anthem for the liberation of Mandela • In the ’80s he set up a mobile studio in Botswana and punted “mbaqangaâ€?, a music style with Zulu roots that continues to influence musicians worldwide

5 SOPHIATOWN BAR LOUNGE Where: 1 Central Place, Cnr Jeppe and Henry Nxumalo streets, Newtown, Joburg Contacts: 011 836 5999 Opening times: All day, music starts at 8.30pm Cover charge: None Dress code: Casual (day); Afrochic (night) Lineup: Trumpeter Marcus Wyatt and co, every Wednesday; Safika, every Saturday If you want to experience legendary Sophiatown, a seething hotbed of jazz before the suburb was razed by the apartheid government, this is your best shot. Watch the passing parade by day, or soak up the music of the Sophiatown era by night.

6 ESPRESSO JAZZ CAFÉ Address: 60 4th Avenue, Linden Digits: 011 888 6212 Opening times: Gigs usually kick off around 8pm/9pm Cover charge: Varies, usually R60 Dress code: Smart casual Lineup: Marcus Wyatt playing songs from his album Language 12, June 15, 9pm, R60 The tagline boasts “Espresso Jazz: our best shot. Alwaysâ€?, but seriously, the place isn’t that pretentious. This small venue in the easy-to-reach suburb of Linden makes great coffee and its whisky is pretty awesome on our winter nights.

JUNE’S JAZZ MUST-SEES If you’re not a purist, catch Malatji at Pretoria’s Rendezvous Theatre on June 18. Discovered by contemporary Afro-jazz artist Selaelo Selota, this pianist and singer channels the spirit of his ancestors through music that is a shining example of what may rightfully be called world jazz. Our Joburg June highlight is Zonke at the Bassline on June 27. A spectacular vocalist and skilled songwriter, her performances are thrilling and, dare we say it, sexually charged.


PERFORMANCES " "  1 BASSLINE

Where: 10 Henry Nxumalo Street, Newtown, Joburg Digits: 011 838 9142/5/6 Opening times: From 9pm Cover charge: Varies (see below) Dress code: Casual Lineup: June highlights — Swazi Dlamini, Tshepo Mngoma & Mimi, R110 @ Computicket, R150 @ the door; Olufemi (Nigeria) and the United Band (Ghana), June 20, R100; Native Rhythms presents Zuluboy, Zonke, Putuma & Vuyo with guest artists from Holland, June 27, R100 Long considered the home of jazz in Jozi, the Bassline provides the soundtrack to the Newtown precinct all year long.

8

Born from the sorrows of the struggle, Joburg’s exuberant jazz scene of today is the beating heart of the city Look, it may sound hopelessly romantic, but those who lived in the teeth of ’50s apartheid say it was music that saved them. Hugh Masekela, in his book Still Grazing, quotes iconic jazz and blues singer Dorothy Rathebe: “As evil as apartheid was, it could never completely destroy us ... our music was the one thing the white government could not take away from us.� That very music, as Masekela puts it, had its roots “in ethnic wedding songs, and a cappella choral compositions�. That was ’50s Joburg — or Jozi, as the locals call it — and it was, like it is today, the burgeoning centre of the action. EMI and Gallo’s offices were downtown, Sophiatown stoked the flame in the suburbs, the creative hub was Eloff Street’s Dorkay House and

* It don’t mean a thing, if it ain’t got that swing

2

the city’s Coliseum record store was a magnet for jazz devotees searching for records by Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis or Sonny Rollins. Through a dazzling charge of musicians, songwriters and legendary stage shows like the township jazz concerts that sold out the city hall in the ’50s and, of course, the seminal musical King Kong, jazz has come to steal the hearts and minds of South Africans, and has not let up since.

1

3 TANZ CAFÉ Address: Buzz Shopping Centre, Witkoppen Road, Fourways, Joburg Digits: 082 855 5445 Opening times: From 7pm Cover charge: R50 Dress code: Casual Lineup: Ziza & the Solos, Cold War Candy Drop & Kathy Raven, June 23 Not strictly a jazz venue, but then again the word “strictâ€? isn’t something we South Africans identify with. This joint has just relocated from its position in a suburban road to a shopping centre in the more recently developed area of Fourways. Rock and pop usually hog the spotlight, but you can catch jazz-influenced bands here regularly.

JAZZ ESSENTIAL In one of jazz music’s most tragic moments, gifted pianist and composer Moses Molelekwa and his wife, Flo, were found dead in their office in downtown Joburg on February 13 2001. The circumstances around their death remain unclear (reportedly he was hanged and she was strangled). But what was never

uncertain was the impact this Tembisa-born musician had during his short music career. Heralded as the heir to greats like Abdullah Ibrahim, Molelekwa combined African jazz purity with a feel for the music of his generation. Hunt down his album   

for a taste of something special.

NEXT EDITION: Catch you at the 19th hole with the best golf courses Gauteng has to offer • visit http://issuu.com/timeslive/docs/extratime to see last week’s places to party

4

5

9

2 THE RADIUM BEER HALL Where: 282 Louis Botha Avenue, Orange Grove, Joburg Digits: 011 728 3866 Opening times: Lunch and dinner Cover charge: Varies from free to around R100 Dress code: Casual Lineup: The Radium Jazz Band — traditional jazz every Friday with Stephen Kunny and guests, no cover charge; Classic Jazz Masters, June 26, R60 It’s the ultimate retro-dive. It’s also the only place where you’ll find old-fashioned jazz and reliably good Portuguese food. The Radium is a tradition. Actually, you should’ve headed here as soon as you landed in Joburg. It’s the oldest surviving bar and restaurant in the city and it’s seen it all: shebeen customers in the ’20s, fiery community leaders and rabblerousers. Situated in the long-established suburb of Orange Grove, you’ll get a warm-hearted welcome here any day of the week.

6

3

4 NIKKI’S OASIS Where: 138 Bree Street, Joburg Digits: 011 492 1134 Opening times: Mon 12pm-12am; Tue 12pm10pm; Wed to Sat 12pm-12am; closed on Sun Dress code: Casual Cover charge: No You can catch some free live jazz at in Newtown on just about any night of the week.

SOUVENIR IDEA No 3 THE SET-OF-FIVE CIGAR COLLECTION Celebrate your winning team at a jazz club with a Monte Cristo, Cohiba, Romeo y Julieta or Hoyo. A gift that will set you back R1 230, but it’s worth it. Just don’t blow them into some loser’s face.

FIVE QUICK FACTS ABOUT HUGH MASEKELA • His US hits include     and the album   ’    

(1968) which sold 4 million copies. • He usually plays in jazz ensembles • He has made guest appearances on albums by The Byrds and Paul Simon • He had a hit in 1987 with      , which became an anthem for the liberation of Mandela • In the ’80s he set up a mobile studio in Botswana and punted “mbaqangaâ€?, a music style with Zulu roots that continues to influence musicians worldwide

5 SOPHIATOWN BAR LOUNGE Where: 1 Central Place, Cnr Jeppe and Henry Nxumalo streets, Newtown, Joburg Contacts: 011 836 5999 Opening times: All day, music starts at 8.30pm Cover charge: None Dress code: Casual (day); Afrochic (night) Lineup: Trumpeter Marcus Wyatt and co, every Wednesday; Safika, every Saturday If you want to experience legendary Sophiatown, a seething hotbed of jazz before the suburb was razed by the apartheid government, this is your best shot. Watch the passing parade by day, or soak up the music of the Sophiatown era by night.

6 ESPRESSO JAZZ CAFÉ Address: 60 4th Avenue, Linden Digits: 011 888 6212 Opening times: Gigs usually kick off around 8pm/9pm Cover charge: Varies, usually R60 Dress code: Smart casual Lineup: Marcus Wyatt playing songs from his album Language 12, June 15, 9pm, R60 The tagline boasts “Espresso Jazz: our best shot. Alwaysâ€?, but seriously, the place isn’t that pretentious. This small venue in the easy-to-reach suburb of Linden makes great coffee and its whisky is pretty awesome on our winter nights.

JUNE’S JAZZ MUST-SEES If you’re not a purist, catch Malatji at Pretoria’s Rendezvous Theatre on June 18. Discovered by contemporary Afro-jazz artist Selaelo Selota, this pianist and singer channels the spirit of his ancestors through music that is a shining example of what may rightfully be called world jazz. Our Joburg June highlight is Zonke at the Bassline on June 27. A spectacular vocalist and skilled songwriter, her performances are thrilling and, dare we say it, sexually charged.


ART ! ! * More than meets the eye

A mean as Joburg’s streets can be, they’re also a portal into a delirious world of fire walkers and sculptures that change before your eyes

(yes, it’s stuffed)

14

South Africa’s first art galleries were unfussy places. Remote and hard to access, they also offered visitors little by way of variation. Once an artist had put up their work, typically a visually sparse narrative about a hunt or battle, there it stayed. Forever. The arrival of European settlers in 1652 heralded a sea change, if you’ll excuse the pun, in attitudes towards art and its appreciation locally. The museum, as opposed to the sheltering cave, came to represent the pinnacle of a reverential but abstracted way of viewing visual stories about the uncommon and the everyday. By the end of the colonial period, in 1910, the start of the Union of South Africa, there were already a dozen museums and art galleries scattered across the country. Largely modelled on late Victorian museums, they showed all sorts of arts and crafts, including textiles, antiquities and stuffed animals. Their intention was sternly educative. According to art historian Jillian Carman this was the plan for the Johannesburg Art Gallery. Opened in November 1910, this public museum was largely willed into being by Florence Phillips, the wife of one of the city’s wealthy mining oligarchs, Lionel Phillips. An able tactician, she cajoled the country’s mining elite into contributing to the museum. They reluctantly agreed, partly to “counteract the growing animosity to absentee magnates�, writes Carman in her 2007 book, Uplifting the Colonial Philistine, “and to encourage a stable and contented society that would adequately

       CIRCA ON JELLICOE 2 Jellicoe Avenue, Rosebank, Joburg, 011 788 4805, Mon-Fri 9am-6pm, Sat 9pm-1pm A multi-purpose exhibition space and lounge for the wellheeled that opened in November 2009. The venue has already hosted some big-name artists, notably sculptor Willem Boshoff. Cape Town artist Zwelethu Mthethwa is currently showing photographs and pastel drawings (on until July 9). It’s been a good year generally for Mthethwa, who recently launched his debut book. In May his portrait of a sugar cane worker doubled its high estimate, selling for $27 500 at an auction in New York. GOODMAN GALLERY 163 Jan Smuts Avenue, Parkwood, Joburg, 011 788 1113, Tue–Fri 09.30pm–5.30pm / Sat 09.30pm–4pm Arguably South Africa’s preeminent private art gallery specialising in contemporary art, the Goodman has come a long way since it opened in Joburg’s Hyde Park, 1966. In its early years it dealt in work by Henry Moore and Picasso, but established its reputation locally with shows by pioneering vernacular modernists like Walter Battiss, Sydney Kumalo and Cecil Skotnes. Internationally its name is founded on star gallery artists William Kentridge and David Goldblatt.

service their mining concerns�. (The parallels with contemporary Russian history are striking.) Under the guidance of dealer Hugh Lane, the gallery assembled a launch collection. First exhibited in London, English critics praised Lane’s “standard of healthy modern experiment� but wondered if the French Impressionist and British PreRaphaelite works would “appeal to the colonial Philistine�. They did, the work only removed from permanent display in the mid-2000s. Its art library is one reason to visit the Johannesburg Art Gallery. Diligently archived in files are original invitation cards to long defunct Gauteng art galleries. A light blue card dated 1947 invites the holder to a show of paintings by Gerard Sekoto at the Gainsborough Galleries. Another, issued in 1990 by novelist Nadine Gordimer’s husband, dealer Reinhold Cassirer, announces a solo show by William Kentridge. Individually, the cards are quaint bits of ephemera. Collectively they demonstrate a long-standing and varied history of art appreciation in South Africa’s brash mercantile centre.

JOHANNESBURG ART GALLERY Joubert Park, cnr Klein and George streets, 011 725 3130, Tue-Sun 10pm-5pm Despite its invidious position next to a busy taxi terminus, which makes travel to this venue during peak hour impossible, it is worth the effort. The gallery has a long history of balking racial trends in art, in 1988 hosting The Neglected Tradition, a ground-breaking survey show that brought together a great wealth of works made by black South African artists throughout the 20th century. The focus of its current blockbuster show is Cuba. ARTS ON MAIN 264 Fox Street, City and Suburban, Tue-Sat 10am-4pm, Sun 10am-2pm, 011 334 1054 Artists William Kentridge and Mikhael Subotzky have studio spaces here. Goodman Project Space and Goethe on Main show less commercial work. There’s an outdoor courtyard with fledgling olive and lemon trees for rustic urban lunches.

NEXT WEEK: Fan parks around Gauteng — what’s on and what’s in store • Go online for last week’s look at the best musical and drama productions around Gauteng at http://issuu.com/timeslive/docs/extratime

PRETORIA ART MUSEUM Cnr Schoeman and Wessels streets, Arcadia Park, Pretoria, 012 344 1807/8, Tue-Sun 10am-5pm Once upon a time, before 1982 perhaps, the capital city was the de facto art capital of the north. This is no exaggeration. Sculptor Anton van Wouw lived here, so too the painters JH Pierneef, Alexis Preller and Gerard Sekoto. Opened in 1962 and built at a cost of R400 000, the Pretoria Art Museum is a good-looking building. Coolly modernist, it shows up its Joburg rival as a real architectural Frankenstein — even if it is the poorer cousin in the equation.

NELSON MANDELA SQUARE To call it controversial would be an understatement. When the Nigerian literary titan Wole Soyinka saw sculptor Kobus Hattingh’s 6m bronze likeness of Nelson Mandela on a public piazza in Sandton in 2005, he told a lecture audience afterwards: “I would take a bulldozer to that place.� His comment was met with wild applause. Unveiled in March 2004 by Mandela’s eldest granddaughter, Ndileka Mandela, the statue has nonetheless acquired an affectionate landmark status. THE FIRE WALKER Unveiled in July 2009, this 11m high tapestry on the Queen Elizabeth Bridge is a collaboration between artists William Kentridge and Gerhard Marx. Apparently distorted when viewed from the ‘wrong’ angle, this anamorphic sculpture only coheres into an image when seen from a particular angle. A scaled-down version of this woman bearing a burning brazier on her head was exhibited at NIROX Sculpture Park north of Joburg in April last year, much to the intrigue of a local troop of monkeys. OPTIC GARDEN “What was that?� motorists travelling on Houghton Drive found themselves wondering one day in 2009. The prompt was another one of Joburg’s “now you see me, now you don’t� anamorphic sculptures. Comprising 195 red and white chevron road signs mounted on timber poles, Maja Marx’s public sculpture shows the image of a soccer field. The work comes into view just after you pass beneath the Desmond and Leah Tutu Bridge and sits at the eastern end of a sweeping arc of public art that extends all the way to Newtown. NIROX SCULPTURE PARK Nirox (083 625 6761) is a 15hectare landscaped park a short drive north-west of Joburg. It has delighted and confounded visiting artists, chiefly sculptors. Brett Murray, who exhibited here last year, described it as a “beautiful Arcadian landscape�. It is presently hosting a show of work by Edoardo Villa and visiting Italian sculptor Arnaldo Pomodoro, as well as a festival of outdoor sculpture featuring, among others, James Webb, Joachim Schonfeldt and Samson Mudzunga.

GATEWAY PUBLIC SCULPTURE When English military engineer, artist and hunter William Cornwallis Harris passed through what would one day be Joburg, sometime in the 1830s, he saw a herd of eland roaming the unpopulated expanse. Now the eland have returned, albeit only one of these spiral-horned African antelope. Weighing 20 tonnes and measuring over 5m, the concrete eland standing on the ridge marking the start of Jan Smuts Avenue is the work of artist Clive van den Berg. The sculpture comprises two identical parts, which were cast and hoisted into place onsite. It is planted with hardy indigenous aloes and grasses whose growth and seasonal changes are integral to the sculpture.

15


ART ! ! * More than meets the eye

A mean as Joburg’s streets can be, they’re also a portal into a delirious world of fire walkers and sculptures that change before your eyes

(yes, it’s stuffed)

14

South Africa’s first art galleries were unfussy places. Remote and hard to access, they also offered visitors little by way of variation. Once an artist had put up their work, typically a visually sparse narrative about a hunt or battle, there it stayed. Forever. The arrival of European settlers in 1652 heralded a sea change, if you’ll excuse the pun, in attitudes towards art and its appreciation locally. The museum, as opposed to the sheltering cave, came to represent the pinnacle of a reverential but abstracted way of viewing visual stories about the uncommon and the everyday. By the end of the colonial period, in 1910, the start of the Union of South Africa, there were already a dozen museums and art galleries scattered across the country. Largely modelled on late Victorian museums, they showed all sorts of arts and crafts, including textiles, antiquities and stuffed animals. Their intention was sternly educative. According to art historian Jillian Carman this was the plan for the Johannesburg Art Gallery. Opened in November 1910, this public museum was largely willed into being by Florence Phillips, the wife of one of the city’s wealthy mining oligarchs, Lionel Phillips. An able tactician, she cajoled the country’s mining elite into contributing to the museum. They reluctantly agreed, partly to “counteract the growing animosity to absentee magnates�, writes Carman in her 2007 book, Uplifting the Colonial Philistine, “and to encourage a stable and contented society that would adequately

       CIRCA ON JELLICOE 2 Jellicoe Avenue, Rosebank, Joburg, 011 788 4805, Mon-Fri 9am-6pm, Sat 9pm-1pm A multi-purpose exhibition space and lounge for the wellheeled that opened in November 2009. The venue has already hosted some big-name artists, notably sculptor Willem Boshoff. Cape Town artist Zwelethu Mthethwa is currently showing photographs and pastel drawings (on until July 9). It’s been a good year generally for Mthethwa, who recently launched his debut book. In May his portrait of a sugar cane worker doubled its high estimate, selling for $27 500 at an auction in New York. GOODMAN GALLERY 163 Jan Smuts Avenue, Parkwood, Joburg, 011 788 1113, Tue–Fri 09.30pm–5.30pm / Sat 09.30pm–4pm Arguably South Africa’s preeminent private art gallery specialising in contemporary art, the Goodman has come a long way since it opened in Joburg’s Hyde Park, 1966. In its early years it dealt in work by Henry Moore and Picasso, but established its reputation locally with shows by pioneering vernacular modernists like Walter Battiss, Sydney Kumalo and Cecil Skotnes. Internationally its name is founded on star gallery artists William Kentridge and David Goldblatt.

service their mining concerns�. (The parallels with contemporary Russian history are striking.) Under the guidance of dealer Hugh Lane, the gallery assembled a launch collection. First exhibited in London, English critics praised Lane’s “standard of healthy modern experiment� but wondered if the French Impressionist and British PreRaphaelite works would “appeal to the colonial Philistine�. They did, the work only removed from permanent display in the mid-2000s. Its art library is one reason to visit the Johannesburg Art Gallery. Diligently archived in files are original invitation cards to long defunct Gauteng art galleries. A light blue card dated 1947 invites the holder to a show of paintings by Gerard Sekoto at the Gainsborough Galleries. Another, issued in 1990 by novelist Nadine Gordimer’s husband, dealer Reinhold Cassirer, announces a solo show by William Kentridge. Individually, the cards are quaint bits of ephemera. Collectively they demonstrate a long-standing and varied history of art appreciation in South Africa’s brash mercantile centre.

JOHANNESBURG ART GALLERY Joubert Park, cnr Klein and George streets, 011 725 3130, Tue-Sun 10pm-5pm Despite its invidious position next to a busy taxi terminus, which makes travel to this venue during peak hour impossible, it is worth the effort. The gallery has a long history of balking racial trends in art, in 1988 hosting The Neglected Tradition, a ground-breaking survey show that brought together a great wealth of works made by black South African artists throughout the 20th century. The focus of its current blockbuster show is Cuba. ARTS ON MAIN 264 Fox Street, City and Suburban, Tue-Sat 10am-4pm, Sun 10am-2pm, 011 334 1054 Artists William Kentridge and Mikhael Subotzky have studio spaces here. Goodman Project Space and Goethe on Main show less commercial work. There’s an outdoor courtyard with fledgling olive and lemon trees for rustic urban lunches.

NEXT WEEK: Fan parks around Gauteng — what’s on and what’s in store • Go online for last week’s look at the best musical and drama productions around Gauteng at http://issuu.com/timeslive/docs/extratime

PRETORIA ART MUSEUM Cnr Schoeman and Wessels streets, Arcadia Park, Pretoria, 012 344 1807/8, Tue-Sun 10am-5pm Once upon a time, before 1982 perhaps, the capital city was the de facto art capital of the north. This is no exaggeration. Sculptor Anton van Wouw lived here, so too the painters JH Pierneef, Alexis Preller and Gerard Sekoto. Opened in 1962 and built at a cost of R400 000, the Pretoria Art Museum is a good-looking building. Coolly modernist, it shows up its Joburg rival as a real architectural Frankenstein — even if it is the poorer cousin in the equation.

NELSON MANDELA SQUARE To call it controversial would be an understatement. When the Nigerian literary titan Wole Soyinka saw sculptor Kobus Hattingh’s 6m bronze likeness of Nelson Mandela on a public piazza in Sandton in 2005, he told a lecture audience afterwards: “I would take a bulldozer to that place.� His comment was met with wild applause. Unveiled in March 2004 by Mandela’s eldest granddaughter, Ndileka Mandela, the statue has nonetheless acquired an affectionate landmark status. THE FIRE WALKER Unveiled in July 2009, this 11m high tapestry on the Queen Elizabeth Bridge is a collaboration between artists William Kentridge and Gerhard Marx. Apparently distorted when viewed from the ‘wrong’ angle, this anamorphic sculpture only coheres into an image when seen from a particular angle. A scaled-down version of this woman bearing a burning brazier on her head was exhibited at NIROX Sculpture Park north of Joburg in April last year, much to the intrigue of a local troop of monkeys. OPTIC GARDEN “What was that?� motorists travelling on Houghton Drive found themselves wondering one day in 2009. The prompt was another one of Joburg’s “now you see me, now you don’t� anamorphic sculptures. Comprising 195 red and white chevron road signs mounted on timber poles, Maja Marx’s public sculpture shows the image of a soccer field. The work comes into view just after you pass beneath the Desmond and Leah Tutu Bridge and sits at the eastern end of a sweeping arc of public art that extends all the way to Newtown. NIROX SCULPTURE PARK Nirox (083 625 6761) is a 15hectare landscaped park a short drive north-west of Joburg. It has delighted and confounded visiting artists, chiefly sculptors. Brett Murray, who exhibited here last year, described it as a “beautiful Arcadian landscape�. It is presently hosting a show of work by Edoardo Villa and visiting Italian sculptor Arnaldo Pomodoro, as well as a festival of outdoor sculpture featuring, among others, James Webb, Joachim Schonfeldt and Samson Mudzunga.

GATEWAY PUBLIC SCULPTURE When English military engineer, artist and hunter William Cornwallis Harris passed through what would one day be Joburg, sometime in the 1830s, he saw a herd of eland roaming the unpopulated expanse. Now the eland have returned, albeit only one of these spiral-horned African antelope. Weighing 20 tonnes and measuring over 5m, the concrete eland standing on the ridge marking the start of Jan Smuts Avenue is the work of artist Clive van den Berg. The sculpture comprises two identical parts, which were cast and hoisted into place onsite. It is planted with hardy indigenous aloes and grasses whose growth and seasonal changes are integral to the sculpture.

15


EAT     THE ATTIC RESTAURANT

Where: 24 4th Avenue, Parkhurst, Joburg Digits: 011 880 6102 Fusion food abounds with signature dishes like Mozambican crab fettucine with coriander, chilli and lime; and slow-roasted pork belly with pancetta and asparagus. Oh, and the menus here change seasonally to complement the fresh ingredients as well as the weather.

Gautengers aren’t all brandy & Coke and braaied meat. As Africa’s economic engine, the province is a cultural magnet that serves the best of all culinary worlds

* ’Cause we have taste

BRONBERG LODGE Where: Bronberg Lodge, Swawelpoort, Pretoria Digits: 076 452 6182 Think traditional Afrikaans home cooking. Bronberg Lodge is great for variety at reasonable prices. Be a little daring and go for the traditional Afrikaner dishes such as tripe, oxtail, potjiekos and sheep’s head, which come highly recommended. There are also steaks, burgers, lamb chops, pasta and fish.

PROSOPA RESTAURANT Where: 103 Club Ave, Waterkloof Heights, Pretoria Digits: 012 460 1663 “Laughter is medicine and food is nothing but the best.� That’s the motto of Prosopa. And it’s apt. This is something of a romantic enclosure, with a menu that offers Greek, Portuguese and Spanish dishes. The signature dish has to be the kleftiko (stolen lamb), which comes in the form of a deboned leg of lamb, wrapped in vine leaves and foil, stuffed with feta, fresh tomato, herbs and spices and slowly roasted in the oven. Meat eaters, rejoice.

BOMBAY BLUES Where: Standard Bank Building, Cnr Cradock and Tyrwhitt avenues, Rosebank, Joburg Digits: 011 447 3210 Bombay Blues is all about North Indian cuisine. They really know how to use herbs and spices extensively to ensure that each dish is specially prepared. The tandoori dishes are first class; so are the curries, which range from kareli ki nihari (baby lamb dum cooked overnight in rich stock) to murg hyberabadi (tender pieces of chicken, marinated in a selection of spices, smoked in onion and tomato gravy). The clincher comes in the form of masala tea, or the delicate taste of imported kulfi ice cream — known to make grown men cry.

Where: Shop 3, Village Walk, Sandton Digits: 011 907 0372 Leave it to the Portuguese to give you great ambience and comfort food. These guys specialise in traditional fare like the bacalhau (cod fish), caldo verde (Portuguese green soup) and chicken peri-peri. They’re the popular choices along with the Sunday specialities, which include suckling pig and feijoada

VISIT: http://issuu.com/timeslive/docs/extratime to see the top local restaurants Gauteng has to offer including the best places for fortifying breakfasts

Where: Montecasino, Cnr William Nicol and Witkoppen roads, Fourways, Joburg Digits: 011 511 1844 Fresh ingredients served with love and happiness. Everything’s pretty bold here: from the steamed whole fish with garlic, chilli and coriander to the koong pikthai — six queen garlic prawns served with stir-fried vegetables.

Where: Nelson Mandela Square, Sandton, Joburg Digits: 011 884 9555 Take in flavours that hail from across the African continent. The restaurant’s name translates as the “meeting place�, not just for the who’s who of Gauteng, but for the meeting of exotic flavours and tastes. It’s famed for its rhythmic drumming and is inspired by the spice islands of the north, the French influences of West Africa, the Malay and Dutch heritage of the south and the Arabic flavours of areas bordering the Middle East.

Where: 137 Greenway Road, Greenside, Joburg Digits: 011 646 8981 Addictions love calling their food “modern contemporaryâ€?. Don’t worry, it’s not that pretentious. It’s more likely “distinctâ€?. Like the prawns in sweet and sticky honey and oregano glaze, or the brie cheese in phyllo pastry, shallow fried and served with red currant jam. Mains are just as expressive: French-cut rack of lamb grilled and served with a rosemary, red currant and red wine sauce, mustard mashed potato, baked butternut and cream of spinach; or Mediterranean lamb chops marinated in olive oil, lemon and garlic, served with potato wedges and grilled vegetables. Then there’s the cranberry coconut pie, or Amarula-flavoured crème brulee. Drooling yet?

ADEGA RESTAURANT

KAI THAI RESTAURANT

LEKGOTLA RESTAURANT

ADDICTIONS RESTAURANT

16

(pork stewed with sugar beans, carrots and cabbage). You’ve got to try out the selection of Portuguese wines and brandies, too. Bestsellers? The prawns, monk fillet and mussels, which come swimming in creamy garlic sauce.

A’LA TURKA RESTAURANT

NEXT WEEK We get our grubby hands all over the best places for food to eat on the street. From boerewors rolls to pastrami sarmies, slap chips, samoosas, springrolls and bunny chows ...

Where: 121 Irene Village Mall, Irene, Pretoria Digits: 012 662 4314 It’s back to Pretoria for you. This time, it’s A’la Turka, where East meets West in this enchanting little Turkish restaurant in Garsfontein. The cuisine is authentic Turkish, Lebanese and Greek. Promise.

Er, eat me. Please?

17


EAT     THE ATTIC RESTAURANT

Where: 24 4th Avenue, Parkhurst, Joburg Digits: 011 880 6102 Fusion food abounds with signature dishes like Mozambican crab fettucine with coriander, chilli and lime; and slow-roasted pork belly with pancetta and asparagus. Oh, and the menus here change seasonally to complement the fresh ingredients as well as the weather.

Gautengers aren’t all brandy & Coke and braaied meat. As Africa’s economic engine, the province is a cultural magnet that serves the best of all culinary worlds

* ’Cause we have taste

BRONBERG LODGE Where: Bronberg Lodge, Swawelpoort, Pretoria Digits: 076 452 6182 Think traditional Afrikaans home cooking. Bronberg Lodge is great for variety at reasonable prices. Be a little daring and go for the traditional Afrikaner dishes such as tripe, oxtail, potjiekos and sheep’s head, which come highly recommended. There are also steaks, burgers, lamb chops, pasta and fish.

PROSOPA RESTAURANT Where: 103 Club Ave, Waterkloof Heights, Pretoria Digits: 012 460 1663 “Laughter is medicine and food is nothing but the best.� That’s the motto of Prosopa. And it’s apt. This is something of a romantic enclosure, with a menu that offers Greek, Portuguese and Spanish dishes. The signature dish has to be the kleftiko (stolen lamb), which comes in the form of a deboned leg of lamb, wrapped in vine leaves and foil, stuffed with feta, fresh tomato, herbs and spices and slowly roasted in the oven. Meat eaters, rejoice.

BOMBAY BLUES Where: Standard Bank Building, Cnr Cradock and Tyrwhitt avenues, Rosebank, Joburg Digits: 011 447 3210 Bombay Blues is all about North Indian cuisine. They really know how to use herbs and spices extensively to ensure that each dish is specially prepared. The tandoori dishes are first class; so are the curries, which range from kareli ki nihari (baby lamb dum cooked overnight in rich stock) to murg hyberabadi (tender pieces of chicken, marinated in a selection of spices, smoked in onion and tomato gravy). The clincher comes in the form of masala tea, or the delicate taste of imported kulfi ice cream — known to make grown men cry.

Where: Shop 3, Village Walk, Sandton Digits: 011 907 0372 Leave it to the Portuguese to give you great ambience and comfort food. These guys specialise in traditional fare like the bacalhau (cod fish), caldo verde (Portuguese green soup) and chicken peri-peri. They’re the popular choices along with the Sunday specialities, which include suckling pig and feijoada

VISIT: http://issuu.com/timeslive/docs/extratime to see the top local restaurants Gauteng has to offer including the best places for fortifying breakfasts

Where: Montecasino, Cnr William Nicol and Witkoppen roads, Fourways, Joburg Digits: 011 511 1844 Fresh ingredients served with love and happiness. Everything’s pretty bold here: from the steamed whole fish with garlic, chilli and coriander to the koong pikthai — six queen garlic prawns served with stir-fried vegetables.

Where: Nelson Mandela Square, Sandton, Joburg Digits: 011 884 9555 Take in flavours that hail from across the African continent. The restaurant’s name translates as the “meeting place�, not just for the who’s who of Gauteng, but for the meeting of exotic flavours and tastes. It’s famed for its rhythmic drumming and is inspired by the spice islands of the north, the French influences of West Africa, the Malay and Dutch heritage of the south and the Arabic flavours of areas bordering the Middle East.

Where: 137 Greenway Road, Greenside, Joburg Digits: 011 646 8981 Addictions love calling their food “modern contemporaryâ€?. Don’t worry, it’s not that pretentious. It’s more likely “distinctâ€?. Like the prawns in sweet and sticky honey and oregano glaze, or the brie cheese in phyllo pastry, shallow fried and served with red currant jam. Mains are just as expressive: French-cut rack of lamb grilled and served with a rosemary, red currant and red wine sauce, mustard mashed potato, baked butternut and cream of spinach; or Mediterranean lamb chops marinated in olive oil, lemon and garlic, served with potato wedges and grilled vegetables. Then there’s the cranberry coconut pie, or Amarula-flavoured crème brulee. Drooling yet?

ADEGA RESTAURANT

KAI THAI RESTAURANT

LEKGOTLA RESTAURANT

ADDICTIONS RESTAURANT

16

(pork stewed with sugar beans, carrots and cabbage). You’ve got to try out the selection of Portuguese wines and brandies, too. Bestsellers? The prawns, monk fillet and mussels, which come swimming in creamy garlic sauce.

A’LA TURKA RESTAURANT

NEXT WEEK We get our grubby hands all over the best places for food to eat on the street. From boerewors rolls to pastrami sarmies, slap chips, samoosas, springrolls and bunny chows ...

Where: 121 Irene Village Mall, Irene, Pretoria Digits: 012 662 4314 It’s back to Pretoria for you. This time, it’s A’la Turka, where East meets West in this enchanting little Turkish restaurant in Garsfontein. The cuisine is authentic Turkish, Lebanese and Greek. Promise.

Er, eat me. Please?

17


For years it was the blackest reminder of Joburg’s past — today it’s the ultimate design coup of law and light

18

Robben Island may be the heritage site most associated with the cruelty of apartheid incarceration but, as site director Darryl Petersen puts it, Constitution Hill next to Hillbrow is its Joburg equivalent. Built in 1893, it was first employed as a fortress by Paul Kruger, the president of the Zuid-Afrikaansche Republiek, during the Anglo-Boer War — and, ironically, used by the British to imprison Boer soldiers during their occupation of the city. Those first imprisonments marked the start of the Old Fort’s use as a prison — initially it was only intended for white men, although Nelson Mandela was later held here

It’s no surprise that South Africa’s constitution places such importance on human rights. It’s paragraphs such as this that make South Africa’s constitution special: “Everyone has the right to freedom of conscience, religion, thought, belief and opinion.�

Constitution Hill can be found on 1 Kotze Street, Braamfontein Digits: 011 381 3100 OR The Constitutional Court 1 Hospital Street Constitution Hill Braamfontein Digits: 011 359 7400

#   $  

Tours are recommended to get the full scope of Constitution Hill — work your way down from the Old Fort through the two prisons, down the steps (built from the bricks of the demolished awaiting-trial block) and into the Constitutional Court chamber. Be prepared for an emotional experience as you go through Number Four Jail and the women’s prison. Audio-visual presentations allow the words of ex-prisoners to bring the gruelling experience of life under the apartheid regime to brutal light. Most moving are the solitary confinement cells where prisoners were kept alone, sometimes for close to a year. Thankfully, a visit to the Constitutional Court is a far happier one — and no visit to Constitution Hill should leave out this landmark building. Set aside at least three hours to work your way through this remarkable site and finish with a hot drink at the coffee shop opening in June.

The essential books to buy of our journey to democracy

   #"

  !

To get from Constitution Hill to the Newtown precinct, travel over Nelson Mandela Bridge — stopping off, if you like, at Wits University’s Origins Centre, home to a vast array of palaeoanthropological, archaeological and genetic materials that chart the origins of humankind. Call 011 717 4700.

TAKE NOTE

“I once had a mother phone me and ask why we had shown her child things that were a reminder of such a painful past. I pointed out that we end each and every tour at the Constitutional Court. This means everyone leaves here seeing the results of what the prisoners incarcerated here fought for.�— Darryl Petersen, site director, Constitution Hill

while awaiting trial in the early ’60s. Number Four Jail and the women’s prison are also found here — both were used to house political prisoners, including Mahatma Gandhi (1906) and Pan African Congress founder Robert Sobukwe, as well as high-profile anti-apartheid activists like Winnie Mandela and Fatima Meer. Barbara Hogan, South Africa’s minister of public enterprises, was also held within these walls while she was a member of the then-banned ANC. It wasn’t just political prisoners who were locked up on the hill: some of the country’s most notorious criminals were detained here, among them Daisy de Melker, who on December 30 1932 became the second woman in South Africa to be hanged after poisoning two of her three husbands.

  ’  The Constitutional Court features an enviable art collection that makes a visit to the building essential. Tapestries by Marlene Dumas, a selection by Gerard Sekoto from his Paris period, and drawings and sculpture by Dumile Feni are featured along with works by Judith Mason, William Kentridge, Sipho Ndlovu, John Baloyi, Cecil Skotnes, Hamilton Budaza, Kim Berman, Regi Bardavid, Willie Bester, Robert Hodgins, Pat Mautloa, Penny Siopis, Walter Oltman, Sue Williamson and Andrew Verster.

%&'

* Everything is illuminated

SEE     

! 

I Write What I Like Steve Biko Long Walk to Freedom Nelson Mandela My Traitor’s Heart Rian Malan Winnie Mandela: A Life Anne Marie du Preez Bezdrob Odyssey to Freedom George Bizos In a Different Time Peter Harris A Fortunate Man Ismail Meer Still Grazing: The Musical Journey of Hugh Masekela Hugh Masekela with D Michael Cheers White Power and the Rise and Fall of the National Party Christi van der Westhuizen

PS ... For these books, try Xarra Books at: 1 Central Place Jeppe Street Newtown Joburg 011 832 3069 . . . it’s a great way to pick up Afro-centric books of all genres, before having a coffee at Kaldi’s Coffee (which specialises in Ethiopian and other African brews). After that you may want to pop through to Museum Africa next to the Mary Fitzgerald Square fan park. Alongside a history of South Africa that dates from the Stone Age to present times, the museum’s Imbali shop (a project of the Imbali non-profit training programme) boasts a good range of crafts and design products.

NEXT WEEK: Go back in time with the Cradle of Humankind • See last week’s edition for things to do at the Apartheid Museum at http://issuu.com/timeslive/docs/extratime

Constitutional Court The highest court in the land and the protector of our human rights, democracy and constitution.

Number Four Built in 1902 for black male prisoners. Mahatma Gandhi , Robert Sobukwe, O R Tambo and the students of the 1976 uprising were all held at Number Four Jail.

Awaiting-trial block and Constitution Square Built in 1928, 156 treason trialists were housed in this section. It was demolished to make way for the court. The bricks were used to build the court chamber and the great African steps.

!

As you can see, the layout of Constitution Hill is pretty basic, in other words: square. What we have is six quadrants: the Constitutional Court, the Old Fort Prison, the women’s prison, awaiting-trial block and Constitution Square, as well as Number Four. Plus super basement parking for your park and ride to Soccer City and Ellis Park.

Old Fort Prison It was built in 1893 after the discovery of gold to maintain law and order in the city. Nelson Mandela was the only black prisoner to be incarcerated in the white male section of the prison. Women’s prison Did you know that Winnie Mandela, Barbara Hogan (minister of public enterprise), Helen Suzman, Albertina Sisulu and Fatima Meer were imprisoned here.

Super basement parking Park and ride to Soccer City and Ellis Park stadiums for the 2010 World Cup

19


For years it was the blackest reminder of Joburg’s past — today it’s the ultimate design coup of law and light

18

Robben Island may be the heritage site most associated with the cruelty of apartheid incarceration but, as site director Darryl Petersen puts it, Constitution Hill next to Hillbrow is its Joburg equivalent. Built in 1893, it was first employed as a fortress by Paul Kruger, the president of the Zuid-Afrikaansche Republiek, during the Anglo-Boer War — and, ironically, used by the British to imprison Boer soldiers during their occupation of the city. Those first imprisonments marked the start of the Old Fort’s use as a prison — initially it was only intended for white men, although Nelson Mandela was later held here

It’s no surprise that South Africa’s constitution places such importance on human rights. It’s paragraphs such as this that make South Africa’s constitution special: “Everyone has the right to freedom of conscience, religion, thought, belief and opinion.�

Constitution Hill can be found on 1 Kotze Street, Braamfontein Digits: 011 381 3100 OR The Constitutional Court 1 Hospital Street Constitution Hill Braamfontein Digits: 011 359 7400

#   $  

Tours are recommended to get the full scope of Constitution Hill — work your way down from the Old Fort through the two prisons, down the steps (built from the bricks of the demolished awaiting-trial block) and into the Constitutional Court chamber. Be prepared for an emotional experience as you go through Number Four Jail and the women’s prison. Audio-visual presentations allow the words of ex-prisoners to bring the gruelling experience of life under the apartheid regime to brutal light. Most moving are the solitary confinement cells where prisoners were kept alone, sometimes for close to a year. Thankfully, a visit to the Constitutional Court is a far happier one — and no visit to Constitution Hill should leave out this landmark building. Set aside at least three hours to work your way through this remarkable site and finish with a hot drink at the coffee shop opening in June.

The essential books to buy of our journey to democracy

   #"

  !

To get from Constitution Hill to the Newtown precinct, travel over Nelson Mandela Bridge — stopping off, if you like, at Wits University’s Origins Centre, home to a vast array of palaeoanthropological, archaeological and genetic materials that chart the origins of humankind. Call 011 717 4700.

TAKE NOTE

“I once had a mother phone me and ask why we had shown her child things that were a reminder of such a painful past. I pointed out that we end each and every tour at the Constitutional Court. This means everyone leaves here seeing the results of what the prisoners incarcerated here fought for.�— Darryl Petersen, site director, Constitution Hill

while awaiting trial in the early ’60s. Number Four Jail and the women’s prison are also found here — both were used to house political prisoners, including Mahatma Gandhi (1906) and Pan African Congress founder Robert Sobukwe, as well as high-profile anti-apartheid activists like Winnie Mandela and Fatima Meer. Barbara Hogan, South Africa’s minister of public enterprises, was also held within these walls while she was a member of the then-banned ANC. It wasn’t just political prisoners who were locked up on the hill: some of the country’s most notorious criminals were detained here, among them Daisy de Melker, who on December 30 1932 became the second woman in South Africa to be hanged after poisoning two of her three husbands.

  ’  The Constitutional Court features an enviable art collection that makes a visit to the building essential. Tapestries by Marlene Dumas, a selection by Gerard Sekoto from his Paris period, and drawings and sculpture by Dumile Feni are featured along with works by Judith Mason, William Kentridge, Sipho Ndlovu, John Baloyi, Cecil Skotnes, Hamilton Budaza, Kim Berman, Regi Bardavid, Willie Bester, Robert Hodgins, Pat Mautloa, Penny Siopis, Walter Oltman, Sue Williamson and Andrew Verster.

%&'

* Everything is illuminated

SEE     

! 

I Write What I Like Steve Biko Long Walk to Freedom Nelson Mandela My Traitor’s Heart Rian Malan Winnie Mandela: A Life Anne Marie du Preez Bezdrob Odyssey to Freedom George Bizos In a Different Time Peter Harris A Fortunate Man Ismail Meer Still Grazing: The Musical Journey of Hugh Masekela Hugh Masekela with D Michael Cheers White Power and the Rise and Fall of the National Party Christi van der Westhuizen

PS ... For these books, try Xarra Books at: 1 Central Place Jeppe Street Newtown Joburg 011 832 3069 . . . it’s a great way to pick up Afro-centric books of all genres, before having a coffee at Kaldi’s Coffee (which specialises in Ethiopian and other African brews). After that you may want to pop through to Museum Africa next to the Mary Fitzgerald Square fan park. Alongside a history of South Africa that dates from the Stone Age to present times, the museum’s Imbali shop (a project of the Imbali non-profit training programme) boasts a good range of crafts and design products.

NEXT WEEK: Go back in time with the Cradle of Humankind • See last week’s edition for things to do at the Apartheid Museum at http://issuu.com/timeslive/docs/extratime

Constitutional Court The highest court in the land and the protector of our human rights, democracy and constitution.

Number Four Built in 1902 for black male prisoners. Mahatma Gandhi , Robert Sobukwe, O R Tambo and the students of the 1976 uprising were all held at Number Four Jail.

Awaiting-trial block and Constitution Square Built in 1928, 156 treason trialists were housed in this section. It was demolished to make way for the court. The bricks were used to build the court chamber and the great African steps.

!

As you can see, the layout of Constitution Hill is pretty basic, in other words: square. What we have is six quadrants: the Constitutional Court, the Old Fort Prison, the women’s prison, awaiting-trial block and Constitution Square, as well as Number Four. Plus super basement parking for your park and ride to Soccer City and Ellis Park.

Old Fort Prison It was built in 1893 after the discovery of gold to maintain law and order in the city. Nelson Mandela was the only black prisoner to be incarcerated in the white male section of the prison. Women’s prison Did you know that Winnie Mandela, Barbara Hogan (minister of public enterprise), Helen Suzman, Albertina Sisulu and Fatima Meer were imprisoned here.

Super basement parking Park and ride to Soccer City and Ellis Park stadiums for the 2010 World Cup

19


SHOP ( # * Where the hot guys and girls hang out

6 FLAG CLOCK Try saying the name of this clock after six beers. Anyway, it’s ingenious and it’s simple: the South African flag, a soccer ball, a clock — and it’s a somewhat bizarre takeaway present for the people back home. (R300, Art Africa, 62 Tyrone Avenue, Parkview, Joburg)

It’s always wise to stick to the old adage: when the going gets tough, go shopping — here’s two of Joburg’s coolest centres of fashion. Plus, Rosebank has the Rooftop Market, always a great place to find a local bargain. Now, show us the money 7 4

He’s our legendary statesman. He’s larger than life. He’s also our patron saint of soccer. Yep, it’s a Mandela soccer T-shirt and it can be found folded and awaiting your approval at Big Blue. (R190, The Zone, Rosebank, Joburg)

1

1 PENHALIGON’S SHAVING SET It’s the definitive gift for your man (or for yourself, men). It’s gentlemanly, it whispers taste and, if you like finding your gifts in the secluded areas of bookstores and restaurants, go in search of this. (R2 200, Croft & Co, Parkview, Joburg)

20

7 MADIBA MAGIC LADIES SOCCER T-SHIRT

8 BRAND COASTERS Ah, we love our Marmite, our Ouma Rusks, our Sunlight Soap. Very South African and very cool. These coasters are as cheap as you can get. (Price depends on number of items, Rosebank Rooftop Market)

5

2 HOODY SCARVES

2

This yellow and green hoody scarf is perfect for our winter chill, especially when you’re trekking from one stadium to the next. (R225, Rosebank Rooftop Market, Rosebank, Joburg)

8

21

9 AFRICAN KIMONO Feel a little Asian around the gills? Then this impeccable kimono design made from shweshwe fabric is for you. It’s pricey, but it’s chic. (R585, Art Africa, 62 Tyrone Avenue, Parkview, Joburg)

3 GREEN SILK CHECK JACKET We know you want it. In Rosebank’s Firs shopping mall is Eboka Design and sitting proudly on display is this green silk check jacket. Local designer Fred Eboka has an eye for beauty — so why deny it? (R4 800)

4 MINIBUS KEY HOLDER The minibus taxi. You’ll get used to them over the next five weeks — they’re part and parcel of Gauteng. Actually, they’re part and parcel of South Africa, period. That makes this key holder a timely reminder of their beeps, sudden stops and gravitydefying turns. (R290, Art Africa, 62 Tyrone Avenue, Parkview, Joburg)

3

6 9

5 GO AFRICA, GIRAFFE BABY GROW Isn’t it adorable? We have it under good authority that this little one-piece does well with the visitors to our country, so we’ve decided to stick it in here. It’s even got leopard-print sleeves. Can you get any more Afrocentric? (R223, Absolute Kid, Rosebank Mall, Rosebank, Joburg) Please see Page 26 for stockist numbers NEXT WEEK: Trawl through the markets around Gauteng • visit http://issuu.com/timeslive/docs/extratime for the best buys in Sandton


SHOP ( # * Where the hot guys and girls hang out

6 FLAG CLOCK Try saying the name of this clock after six beers. Anyway, it’s ingenious and it’s simple: the South African flag, a soccer ball, a clock — and it’s a somewhat bizarre takeaway present for the people back home. (R300, Art Africa, 62 Tyrone Avenue, Parkview, Joburg)

It’s always wise to stick to the old adage: when the going gets tough, go shopping — here’s two of Joburg’s coolest centres of fashion. Plus, Rosebank has the Rooftop Market, always a great place to find a local bargain. Now, show us the money 7 4

He’s our legendary statesman. He’s larger than life. He’s also our patron saint of soccer. Yep, it’s a Mandela soccer T-shirt and it can be found folded and awaiting your approval at Big Blue. (R190, The Zone, Rosebank, Joburg)

1

1 PENHALIGON’S SHAVING SET It’s the definitive gift for your man (or for yourself, men). It’s gentlemanly, it whispers taste and, if you like finding your gifts in the secluded areas of bookstores and restaurants, go in search of this. (R2 200, Croft & Co, Parkview, Joburg)

20

7 MADIBA MAGIC LADIES SOCCER T-SHIRT

8 BRAND COASTERS Ah, we love our Marmite, our Ouma Rusks, our Sunlight Soap. Very South African and very cool. These coasters are as cheap as you can get. (Price depends on number of items, Rosebank Rooftop Market)

5

2 HOODY SCARVES

2

This yellow and green hoody scarf is perfect for our winter chill, especially when you’re trekking from one stadium to the next. (R225, Rosebank Rooftop Market, Rosebank, Joburg)

8

21

9 AFRICAN KIMONO Feel a little Asian around the gills? Then this impeccable kimono design made from shweshwe fabric is for you. It’s pricey, but it’s chic. (R585, Art Africa, 62 Tyrone Avenue, Parkview, Joburg)

3 GREEN SILK CHECK JACKET We know you want it. In Rosebank’s Firs shopping mall is Eboka Design and sitting proudly on display is this green silk check jacket. Local designer Fred Eboka has an eye for beauty — so why deny it? (R4 800)

4 MINIBUS KEY HOLDER The minibus taxi. You’ll get used to them over the next five weeks — they’re part and parcel of Gauteng. Actually, they’re part and parcel of South Africa, period. That makes this key holder a timely reminder of their beeps, sudden stops and gravitydefying turns. (R290, Art Africa, 62 Tyrone Avenue, Parkview, Joburg)

3

6 9

5 GO AFRICA, GIRAFFE BABY GROW Isn’t it adorable? We have it under good authority that this little one-piece does well with the visitors to our country, so we’ve decided to stick it in here. It’s even got leopard-print sleeves. Can you get any more Afrocentric? (R223, Absolute Kid, Rosebank Mall, Rosebank, Joburg) Please see Page 26 for stockist numbers NEXT WEEK: Trawl through the markets around Gauteng • visit http://issuu.com/timeslive/docs/extratime for the best buys in Sandton


THIS WAY OUT

 * No, not gay Paris

If Italy is the boot of Europe then Parys has to be the welcome mat of Gauteng    

Strictly speaking, Parys lies in the neighbouring Free State but, without the impact of the meteorite that struck near this town over 2 billion years ago, Gauteng (Sotho for “Place of Gold�) would not be around, which forever links Africa’s economic powerhouse to this rural idyll. Sounds far-fetched? Not when you consider that most experts agree: were it not for the impact of the Vredefort meteorite, a Table Mountain-sized projectile, the gold-bearing reefs of the region would not have been accessible to man. Still sceptical? Then check out www.parys.info

18

!! 

Get onto the N1 (incidentally, the 1 405km motorway that will deliver you to Cape Town), drive for about 100km and you’ll find yourself in Parys (and, yes — well-spotted if you are hazarding a guess that the town’s name is an Afrikaans version of the eponymous French city).

! # 

Founded back in 1876 by the Van Coller brothers on Klipspruit Farm, Parys’s proximity to the Vaal River — Gauteng’s biggest supplier of water — means there’s loads to do here, starting with a visit to the Vredefort Dome. The latter was added to Unesco’s list of world heritage sites in 2005 and is the largest verified impact crater on Earth.

Actually, if fiery balls from deep space are your thing, then also visit the Tswaing Meteorite Crater 40km north of Pretoria. The 220 000-year-old site is one of the world’s best preserved meteorite impact craters, which makes wrapping your head around cosmic phenomena a little easier. For more info, call the Tswaing tourism office on 012 322 7632.

Adrenaline-junkie alert: Parys is the only plekkie in the country where you can get your heart pounding to the thrills of a 900metre long rapid! Boys’ own: Bachelor Adventures offer testosterone-fuelled getaways for those times when men will be ... er, with other men! http://www.bacheloradventures.co.za/bachelorsadventures.htm

%&'

!   Hot-air balloon rides, a bird sanctuary, river rafting (on the wild rapids of the upper Vaal), antique shopping, art browsing and golfing are just some of what’s on offer in and around Parys. Stop in and eat at Feast — A Celebration of Life (056 811 2397) after a morning walking through Vredefort; or book into one of Parys’s many accommodation jewels, such as Egweni, a B&B guesthouse. www.egweni.co.za

    

If you want to immerse yourself in the Vredefort experience while never leaving Jozi, then book yourself into the 12 Decades Art Hotel at the newly opened Main Street Life building, just down from Arts on Main in the east of the city. Ask for the room dedicated to the decade 1886-1896. The interior was designed by developer Jonathan Liebmann and artist Marcus Neustetter and inspired by a Google map of the Vredefort crater. Contact 12decades@gmail.com NEXT EDITION: Dam good watersports, a walk around the zoo and pigging out on comfort food at the Hartebeespoort Spur

“It’s a place where people can come and really let their hair down. For a small town, there are many great places to eat here — each with a distinct flavour. If you’re into antiques, this is the spot to browse.� — Ronel Dicks, owner of Feast restaurant and a Parys resident. Feast is open Tuesdays to Sundays. Booking recommended on Sundays.


Extra Time *300 000 Extra fans for your business

Extra Time is an exclusive six issue series packed full of what to do, where to go and how to have a good time in Gauteng. Over 300 000 visitors are expected to be in Gauteng during the World Cup and Extra Time is targeting all of them. (This is besides the locals who read our papers anyway.) As such, it’s the ideal place to advertise any business or services that are aimed at these guests, especially since Extra Time will be distributed FREE in Sunday Times, Sunday World and Sowetan for six weeks commencing on 6 June. And with so many extra eyes just looking for things to see, do or buy, can you afford to miss out?

For advertising sales contact Charnelle Louw on 011 280 3625 For listings and classified advertising/sales contact Vasie Naidoo on 011 280 5553

* source AFP


MAP ! !

RESTAURANTS 8. Addictions, 011 646 8981 9. Adega, 011 907 0372 10. A’la Turka, 012 662 4314 11. Attic (The), 011 880 6102 12. Bombay Blues, 011 447 3210 13. Bronberg Lodge, 076 452 6182 14. Canteen at Arts on Main (The), 011 334 5947 15. Debonairs, 011 402 6060 16. Gramadoelas, 011 838 6960 17. Kai Thai, 011 511 1844 18. KFC, 011 402 9193 19. Lekgotla, 011 884 9555 20. Lucky Moo, 011 492 0628 21. Narina Trogon, 011 339 6645 22. Nikki’s Oasis, 011 492 1134 23. Prosopa, 012 460 1663 24. Radium Beer Hall (The), 011 728 3866 25. Troyeville Hotel (The), 011 402 7709

* Finding your bearings

37

38

13

52 NIGHTCLUBS

23 10

1. Alexander Theatre (The), 082 699 6733 2. Bassline (The), 011 838 9142 3. House of Nsako, 011 402 7709 4. Inc. The Club, 011 403 9833 5. Nikki Beach, 011 823 5714 6. Tanz CafĂŠ, 082 855 5445 7. Woods (The), 082 332 5772

17

6

HOTELS

19

26. 12 Decades Art Hotel, 011 334 1054 27. Mapungubwe Hotel, 011 429 2600 28. Sunnyside Park Hotel (The), 011 640 0400

9

PERFORMANCES & ART

24

53

29. Artist Proof Studio, 011 492 1278 30. Arts on Main, 011 334 1054 31. Circa on Jellicoe, 011 788 4805 32. Espresso Jazz CafÊ, 011 888 6212 33. Goodman Gallery, 011 788 1113 34. Ko’Spotong, 011 836 5999 35. Market Theatre, 011 832 1641 36. Nirox Sculpture Park, 083 625 6761 37. Pretoria Art Museum, 012 344 1807/8 38. Rendezvous Theatre, 012 392 4000 39. Sophiatown Bar Lounge, 011 836 5999 7999

36 8

11 32

31 51 33 40 44 47 41 54 42

12

45 56 21 46 26 24

25

4

28

3

1

58

5 HERITAGE & SHOPPING

48 15

18 STADIUMS

59 43 49 39 35 7 2 22 50 55 34 16 20 57 29

27 14

30

58. Ellis Park Stadium, 011 402 8644

FAN PARKS 59. Mary Fitzgerald Square, www.newtown.co.za

40. Absolute Kid, 011 447 8246 41. African Craft Market, 011 783 4620 42. Art Africa, 011 486 2052 43. Bensusan Museum, 011 833 5624 44. Big Blue, 011 783 0779, 011 880 3994 45. Constitution Hill, 011 381 3100 46. Constitutional Court, 011 359 7400 47. Croft & Co, 011 646 3634 48. Johannesburg Art Gallery, 011 725 3130 49. Mary Fitzgerald Square, 011 833 6323 50. Museum Africa, 011 833 5624 51. Fred Eboka Design Studio, 011 447 7006 52. Tswaing Tourism Office, 012 322 7632 53. Origins Centre, 011 717 4700 54. Rosebank Rooftop Market, 011 442 4488 55. SAB World of Beer, 011 836 4900 56. Xarra Books, 011 832 3069 57. Zasekhaya Market, 072 721 1953

Yeah, yeah we know it’s not to scale. But look at the pretty colours

25


MAP ! !

RESTAURANTS 8. Addictions, 011 646 8981 9. Adega, 011 907 0372 10. A’la Turka, 012 662 4314 11. Attic (The), 011 880 6102 12. Bombay Blues, 011 447 3210 13. Bronberg Lodge, 076 452 6182 14. Canteen at Arts on Main (The), 011 334 5947 15. Debonairs, 011 402 6060 16. Gramadoelas, 011 838 6960 17. Kai Thai, 011 511 1844 18. KFC, 011 402 9193 19. Lekgotla, 011 884 9555 20. Lucky Moo, 011 492 0628 21. Narina Trogon, 011 339 6645 22. Nikki’s Oasis, 011 492 1134 23. Prosopa, 012 460 1663 24. Radium Beer Hall (The), 011 728 3866 25. Troyeville Hotel (The), 011 402 7709

* Finding your bearings

37

38

13

52 NIGHTCLUBS

23 10

1. Alexander Theatre (The), 082 699 6733 2. Bassline (The), 011 838 9142 3. House of Nsako, 011 402 7709 4. Inc. The Club, 011 403 9833 5. Nikki Beach, 011 823 5714 6. Tanz CafĂŠ, 082 855 5445 7. Woods (The), 082 332 5772

17

6

HOTELS

19

26. 12 Decades Art Hotel, 011 334 1054 27. Mapungubwe Hotel, 011 429 2600 28. Sunnyside Park Hotel (The), 011 640 0400

9

PERFORMANCES & ART

24

53

29. Artist Proof Studio, 011 492 1278 30. Arts on Main, 011 334 1054 31. Circa on Jellicoe, 011 788 4805 32. Espresso Jazz CafÊ, 011 888 6212 33. Goodman Gallery, 011 788 1113 34. Ko’Spotong, 011 836 5999 35. Market Theatre, 011 832 1641 36. Nirox Sculpture Park, 083 625 6761 37. Pretoria Art Museum, 012 344 1807/8 38. Rendezvous Theatre, 012 392 4000 39. Sophiatown Bar Lounge, 011 836 5999 7999

36 8

11 32

31 51 33 40 44 47 41 54 42

12

45 56 21 46 26 24

25

4

28

3

1

58

5 HERITAGE & SHOPPING

48 15

18 STADIUMS

59 43 49 39 35 7 2 22 50 55 34 16 20 57 29

27 14

30

58. Ellis Park Stadium, 011 402 8644

FAN PARKS 59. Mary Fitzgerald Square, www.newtown.co.za

40. Absolute Kid, 011 447 8246 41. African Craft Market, 011 783 4620 42. Art Africa, 011 486 2052 43. Bensusan Museum, 011 833 5624 44. Big Blue, 011 783 0779, 011 880 3994 45. Constitution Hill, 011 381 3100 46. Constitutional Court, 011 359 7400 47. Croft & Co, 011 646 3634 48. Johannesburg Art Gallery, 011 725 3130 49. Mary Fitzgerald Square, 011 833 6323 50. Museum Africa, 011 833 5624 51. Fred Eboka Design Studio, 011 447 7006 52. Tswaing Tourism Office, 012 322 7632 53. Origins Centre, 011 717 4700 54. Rosebank Rooftop Market, 011 442 4488 55. SAB World of Beer, 011 836 4900 56. Xarra Books, 011 832 3069 57. Zasekhaya Market, 072 721 1953

Yeah, yeah we know it’s not to scale. But look at the pretty colours

25


MAP $ * By the numbers

BARS & PUBS

HOTELS

Bohemian (The), 011 482 1725 Rats, 082 903 0248 Six Cocktail Bar, 011 482 8306 Stones, 011 726 1623 Trancesky, 011 726 2241 Xai-Xai, 011 482 6990

12 Decades Art Hotel, 011 334 1054 Mapungubwe Hotel, 011 429 2600 Sunnyside Park Hotel (The), 011 640 0400

NIGHTCLUBS Alexander Theatre (The), 082 699 6733 Bassline (The), 011 838 9142 Gin, 084 555 9585 House of Nsako, 011 402 7709 Inc. The Club, 011 403 9833 Jet Nightclub, www.myjet.co.za Kitchener’s Carvery Bar, 011 403 3646 Nikki Beach, 011 823 5714 Tanz CafÊ, 082 855 5445 Tokyo Sky, 011 465 0704 Woods (The), 082 332 5772 Zouk Ultra-Lounge, 073 362 7095

RESTAURANTS Addictions, 011 646 8981 Adega, 011 907 0372 A’la Turka, 012 662 4314 Attic (The), 011 880 6102 Bombay Blues, 011 447 3210 Bronberg Lodge, 076 452 6182 Canteen at Arts on Main (The), 011 334 5947 Col’Cacchio, 011 463 5034 Cool Runnings, 011 482 4786 Debonairs, 011 402 6060 Doppio Zero, 011 646 8740 Gramadoelas, 011 838 6960 Kai Thai, 011 511 1844 KFC, 011 402 9193 La Cucina di Ciro, 011 442 5187 Lapa Fo, 011 486 2651 Lekgotla, 011 884 9555 Lucky Moo, 011 492 0628 Meat Company (The), 011 511 0235 Moyo Melrose Arch, 011 684 1477 Moyo Zoo Lake, 011 646 0058 Narina Trogon, 011 339 6645 Nikki’s Oasis, 011 492 1134 Prosopa, 012 460 1663 Radium Beer Hall (The), 011 728 3866 44. Sophiatown, 011 836 5999 Troyeville Hotel (The), 011 402 7709 Truth CafÊ (The), 011 309 4700 Wandies Place, 011 326 1700

PERFORMANCES & ART Artist Proof Studio, 011 492 1278 Arts on Main, 011 334 1054 Circa on Jellicoe, 011 788 4805 Espresso Jazz CafÊ, 011 888 6212 Goodman Gallery, 011 788 1113 Joburg Theatre, 011 482 3550 Ko’Spotong, 011 836 5999 Linder Auditorium, 011 728 5492 Market Theatre, 011 832 1641 Nirox Sculpture Park, 083 625 6761 Pretoria Art Museum, 012 344 1807/8 Rendezvous Theatre, 012 392 4000 Sophiatown Bar Lounge, 011 836 5999 Teatro at Montecasino, 011 510 7999 Theatre of Marcellus at Emperors Palace, 083 251 2205 Victory Theatre, 011 728 9603

HERITAGE & SHOPPING Absolute Kid, 011 447 8246 African Craft Market, 011 783 4620 Apartheid Museum, 011 309 4700 Art Africa, 011 486 2052 Bensusan Museum, 011 833 5624 Big Blue, 011 783 0779, 011 880 3994 Constitution Hill, 011 381 3100 Constitutional Court, 011 359 7400 Coricraft Lifestyles, 011 884 2977 Croft & Co, 011 646 3634 Johannesburg Art Gallery, 011 725 3130 Mary Fitzgerald Square, 011 833 6323 Museum Africa, 011 833 5624 Fabiani, 011 783 3663 Fred Eboka Design Studio, 011 447 7006 Preview, 011 884 0402 Robot, 011 884 2977 Tswaing Tourism Office, 012 322 7632 Origins Centre, 011 717 4700 SAB World of Beer, 011 836 4900 Xarra Books, 011 832 30 Rosebank Rooftop Market, 011 442 4488 69. Zasekhaya Market, 072 721 1953 Rosebank Rooftop Market, 011 442 4488

STADIUMS Soccer City Stadium, www.soccercity2010.co.za Ellis Park Stadium, 011 402 8644

BREAKFAST JOINTS Bicccs, 012 346 3203 Ciao Baby Cucina, 011 675 1801/2 Mugg & Bean, 011 788 7111 Wimpy, 011 646 7434

FAN PARKS Mary Fitzgerald Square, www.newtown.co.za Giant Stadium, www.tshwane.gov.za/fanfest.cfm Themba Sports Ground, www.tshwane.gov.za/fanfest.cfm

26


CLUB/T-BONE STEAK

1899

RUMP/PORTERHOUSE STEAK

2199

/300g*

*300g = Typical restaurant portion

/300g*

*300g = Typical restaurant portion

! i a a r b ct e f r e p e with th

2699 /kg

SPATCHCOCK CHICKEN

4599 /kg

3499

4799

750ml

750ml

KLEINE ZALZE MERLOT

ninety9cents CHGT2473/E

CHAMPIONSHIP BOEREWORS (THICK/THIN)

ALTO ROUGE DRY RED

5999 /kg

GOURMET SOSATIES • BEEF • PORK

6599 750ml

ALLESVERLOREN CABERNET SAUVIGNON

6399

CERTIFIED NATURAL LAMB BRAAI CHOPS FREE OF ADDED HORMONES FREE OF ANTIBIOTICS

/kg

7499 750ml

LANZERAC PREMIUM PINOTAGE

9999 750ml

2499 750ml

LOURENSFORD THE RIVER GARDEN SHIRAZ/CABERNET SAUVIGNON

4299 750ml

BEYERSKLOOF PINOTAGE

5499

PLAISIR DE MERLE MERLOT

750ml

STELLENZICHT SHIRAZ

we bring the wine route to you

OFFERS VALID UNTIL SUNDAY 20/06/2010. PRICES APPLY TO CHECKERS AND CHECKERS HYPER STORES GAUTENG, BRITS, LIMPOPO, MPUMALANGA, POTCHEFSTROOM AND KLERKSDORP. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES. NO TRADERS PLEASE. WINE ONLY AVAILABLE AT STORES WITH WINE DEPARTMENTS. WINE FOR SALE ON SUNDAYS IN GAUTENG ONLY. E. & O.E. SELECTED ITEMS MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE AT CERTAIN STORES. CHECKLINE CUSTOMER SERVICE 0800 01 07 09 (TOLL-FREE).


Sunday Times extra time