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The Times Leader timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE, PA

SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011

DON CAREY PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

ROSE LOPRESTO

LOTTIE ZIKO

STACIA OKO

TILLIE JAMES

VOICES OF THE AGES

Remembering the past and looking ahead after living for a century

$1.50

Judges will not run for full term They had said when appointed they would serve only the remainder of the term. By MATT HUGHES and JERRY LYNOTT mhughes@timesleader.com jlynott@timesleader.com

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

ROSE ROSSI

“We have nothing else to do anyway,” said Rose Baiz Rossi, 101. “But I have a party to go to later today.” Rossi sat with two of her fellow residents of Little Flower Manor in Wilkes-Barre – Father Harry Lewis, 99, and Anna Madeline Moyer, 99. “I’d give anything to go back,” Moyer said. “To be in my old neighborhood, my friends and family. If only I stayed young, I could be able to do all the things I never had time for.” They all worked hard – most of them left school early to help their large families put food on the table. And they did it without question; without protest. They did, as the saying goes, what they had to do.

By BILL O’BOYLE boboyle@timesleader.com

T

hey’ve lived for a century each but they don’t talk about the historical events that occurred during their lives. The members of this group like to remember family, friends and neighborhoods. They remember the hard work and

difficult times. None of them can say why they’ve lived so long, but they are thankful and look forward to every day ahead. Five area residents who are 100 years old and older – and two who will turn 100 this year – agreed to talk about their lives.

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

See VOICES, Page 7A

TILLIE CAREY

Two judges who considered running for the office they agreed not to seek after serving out their temporary appointments said Saturday they will not be candidates for the Luzerne County bench this year. Judges Joseph Cosgrove and Joseph Van Jura separately announced their decisions not to run for a full 10year term for the Court of Common Pleas. They were among three nominees whose appointments came with agreements that they would serve only their Cosgrove terms. But Cosgrove and Van Jura had circulated nominating petitions and considered joining the list Van Jura of attorneys running to fill six vacancies in the court. The number of vacancies was one of the considerations for Cosgrove, he said in a prepared statement. “I recognize that the circumstances of our judiciary are considerably different now than they were at the time of my swearing-in,” said Cosgrove. He acknowledged that he explored a run for office, but added that he neither declared his candidacy nor formed a campaign committee. The 54-year-old Democrat See JUDGES, Page 2A

INSIDE: SNAPSHOTS OF OUR CENTENARIANS, PAGE 8A. VIDEO: GO TO www.timesleader.com

INSIDE A NEWS: Obituaries 10A B PEOPLE: Birthdays 5B C SPORTS: Outdoors 12C D BUSINESS: Mutuals 6D E VIEWS: Editorial 2E F ETC.: Puzzles 2F G CLASSIFIED

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INSIDE: The statements, Page 2A

Flood of 1936, which had a double crest, was area’s worst until Agnes But things didn’t work out Devastating event was last quite as planned for the Nantiflood to hit the area without a coke Street teenager as the water dike system in place. around his home began to rise. By TOM MOONEY For The Times Leader

Paul Dugan, 89, in his old neighborhood in Hanover Township where he lived as a boy during the 1936 flood. Dugan, who now lives in Kingston Township, was one of 40,700 people affected by the flood, but not one of the 15,000 who had to be rescued.

“I got the raft built and pulled it over by the back steps and jumped on it, and I pulled with the clothesline. But the clothesline broke and I went in. Fortunately it wasn’t too dangerous or anything because it was only about four feet deep.” Dugan, now 89 and a resident of Kingston Township, was one of thousands of Wyoming Valley people affected by the flood of 1936 – 75 years ago this month. The low-lying areas of Luzerne

When 14-year-old Paul Dugan heard talk about a possible flood, he decided there was just one thing to do – build a raft. “It took me about a week to make it,” said Dugan, who in March of 1936 was a resident of the Breslau section of Hanover Township. “I had lumber there because my dad stored lumber. He always did repair work on the house.” See 1936, Page 14A

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER


K PAGE 2A

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SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011

Van Jura statement In February 2010 I was deeply honored to have been nominated by Gov. Ed Rendell for a seat on the Court of Common Pleas of Luzerne County. I, together with attorney Lewis Wetzel, was confirmed to my judicial position unanimously by the Pennsylvania Senate. Since March 19, 2010, when I ascended to the court, I have striven to add value to the fabric of a system which had been the subject of criticism and ridicule. I have devoted my full time and energy to the task of dispensing justice in an honorable and compassionate way to those who appeared before me, and I have treated lawyers, litigants and court personnel with dignity and respect. In so doing, I have intended to honor my family, my friends, and my profession, and I am confident that I have fulfilled those goals. My stated wish to continue in the august office which I now occupy is motivated by many factors, not the least of which is my desire to continue the work which I have come to love and which I feel confident I do very well. Recent events, however, have caused me to view my future more globally. The course which I pursue will affect not only me, my family and those who support me. It will affect my

colleagues on the bench, men and women I have come to know well and deeply admire; it will affect the public’s view of the political and judicial systems, and it will affect those who have placed their trust in the principles of justice and faith I cannot countenance that my decision could serve to fractionalize any of those institutions which I have held dear throughout my professional and adult life, nor would I wish it to be a divisive issue within my community. I cannot and will not be a distraction to the conduct of this election for six judges, perhaps one of the most important contests held in Luzerne County in many years. Most importantly, I will not subject my integrity, which I have so carefully and faithfully established, to be challenged. It is therefore, with a strong sense of pride in the process which guided my decision and a continued commitment to serve the people of Luzerne County with distinction throughout the remainder of my term in office, that I respectfully withdraw my name from consideration for a seat on the Court of Common Pleas of Luzerne County in the forthcoming election.

Cosgrove statement When I was nominated to serve as judge on the Court of Common Pleas, I stated that I had no intention of seeking a full term on the bench. I was honored to hold office on an interim basis and to offer my experience in restoring stability to a court rocked by scandal. At my confirmation hearing, I reiterated my position, but was urged by several Senators of both parties to reconsider a possible run for a full term. In the months since becoming a judge, and at the urging of many friends and members of the community of all political persuasions, I have done just that – reconsidered. This has not been easy, but I have decided that I will not be a candidate this year for a seat on the Court of Common Pleas. There are many reasons to run for a full term, but the most important consideration is my earlier statement that I would not. That pledge is paramount, and is something I will not violate. While I never declared my candidacy or authorized creation of a campaign committee, I actively explored entering this race. I recognize that the circumstances of our judiciary are considerably different now than they were at the time of my swearing-in. When I was nominated, four vacancies were expected to be filled in the 2011 election. Now there are six. There also remain three vacancies on the court at this time, with no expectation that they will be filled in the

JUDGES

interim by gubernatorial appointment given the constraints on the judiciary’s budget. In deciding whether to run, I had to consider what contribution I could continue to make to our judiciary, especially in light of these unexpected and different circumstances. I know my service on the bench has vindicated the supportive statements made at the time of my nomination by leaders whom l greatly admire. I am also proud of my work in helping to create a mortgage foreclosure court which has allowed borrowers and lenders to seek agreement through mediation. With nearly two years of judicial experience under my belt if elected to a full term, I would have a great deal to offer in terms of ability and continuity. All of these factors were instrumental in contemplating a possible run, but my pledge to serve only during this interim period trumps all other considerations. I remain honored to serve on the Court of Common Pleas and will do so to the best of my ability for the remainder of my term. This election continues to be of the utmost importance and I wish all the candidates well, all of whom are my good colleagues and should be commended for their willingness to serve. As I had said earlier, it is for the people to decide whom they want to sit as judge, and I am sure the right choices will be made.

was appointed in late 2009 to fill a seat vacated when disgraced ex-judge Mark Ciavarella stepped down. Continued from Page 1A Baker said she “presented the said his nearly two years as judges for confirmation before judge provided experience and the Senate based on their goodhe would “have a great deal to faith representation that they offer in terms of ability and con- would not become candidates.” In a statement given to The tinuity” if he decided to run for Times Leader Saturday, Van Jua full term. “All of these factors were in- ra said he reconsidered his instrumental in contemplating a tent to run because “it will affect possible run, but my pledge to my colleagues on the Bench, serve only during this interim men and women I have come to period trumps all other consid- know well and deeply admire; it will affect the public’s view of erations,” he said. the political and Van Jura, a Demjudicial systems, ocrat, has withand it will affect drawn his petition But Judges Joseph those who have to appear in the Cosgrove and Joseph placed their trust 2010 judicial pri- Van Jura had both in the principals maries. The judge circulated nominating of justice and had been circulatfaith.” ing a petition to petitions and considVan Jura continseek election to a ered joining the list of ued that he “canfull 10-year term on attorneys running to the bench, despite a fill six vacancies in the not and will not be a distraction to reported agreement the conduct of that he would not court in the 2011 electhis election for run. tion. six judges, perVan Jura, togethhaps one of the er with county most important judge Lewis Wetzel, contests held in was nominated by former Gov. Ed Rendell and ap- Luzerne County in many years. pointed by the state legislature Most importantly, I will not subto fill a vacant judge’s seat in ject my integrity, which I have so carefully and faithfully estabMarch 2010. Van Jura said Wednesday that lished, to be challenged.” March 19 will mark one year he never promised not to run again, but that statement contra- since Van Jura was appointed to dicts what he said in 2010 at the the bench. He said Saturday that time of his nomination. Van Jura he initially sought reelection to said then he would not seek re- “continue the work which I have come to love and which I feel election to the position. State Sen. Lisa Baker, R-Leh- confident I do very well.” Van Jura did not return a reman Twp., also said in 2010 during her presentation to the Judi- porter’s phone message seeking ciary Committee regarding Van additional comment Saturday. Cosgrove had also been colJura and Wetzel’s nominations that “neither is positioning for a lecting signatures for a ballot petition, but said last Tuesday next life in electoral politics.” He also disputed being under he was only circulating a petany constraint or stipulation re- ition, but had not declared his garding the possibility of run- intent to run. That move was ning for a full term, but Baker decried by Rendell, Baker and also rebutted those assertions, state Sen. Majority Leader Dosaying Van Jura, Wetzel and minic Pileggi, who said they Cosgrove were all appointed were disappointed Cosgrove with the clear understanding was mulling another run. Tuesthat they would not seek a full day is the last day to file a pet10-year term this year. Cosgrove ition for the judicial primaries.

THE TIMES LEADER

Low-lying areas may flood How much rain falls in the W E A T H E R A L E R T S River is expected to rise near upper river basin and whether it 30 feet late Monday night or changes over to snow will affect Residents can receive weather alerts by text messages and early Tuesday morning. communities downstream, he e-mails by visiting http://luBy JERRY LYNOTT jlynott@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE – The Luzerne County Emergency Management Agency advised residents of low-lying areas along the Susquehanna River to monitor weather forecasts for the possibility of flooding. Heavy rain was forecast for today, but there is still a lot of uncertainty in the forecast, Steve Bekanich, EMA coordinator, said Saturday afternoon. “At this point, things are still a little too far out to make an informed decision,” he said.

added. Based on earlier forecasts, the river is expected to rise to near 30 feet late Monday night or early Tuesday morning. Flood stage is 22 feet; however, the Wyoming Valley Levee System protects many communities up to a river depth of 41 feet. Bekanich said homes and businesses in the unprotected area might experience basement flooding. Roadways might be closed, too. He advised residents living in those areas to monitor the weather and be prepared should flood warnings be issued. The EMA and the county

zerne.alertpa.org and registering on the home page.

Flood Protection Authority are in the process of determining whether to activate the Emergency Operations Center. Bekanich said he has had one conference call with the National Weather Service on Saturday and another is scheduled for 10 a.m. today. “When and if we do activate, it’s going to hinge on how the forecast turns out,” he said. A decision will be made today on whether to close the portals on the riverfront, he added.

HEALTH FAIR HELD AT GENETTI’S

www.timesleader.com

Lottery summary Daily Number, Midday Sunday: 1-7-8 Monday: 0-5-2 Tuesday: 1-0-6 Wednesday: 2-1-7 Thursday: 3-5-8 Friday: 7-1-0 Saturday: 2-8-2 Big Four, Midday Sunday: 4-1-3-1 Monday: 7-5-1-7 Tuesday: 4-9-0-1 Wednesday: 7-1-9-5 Thursday: 9-6-3-0 Friday: 9-8-5-5 Saturday: 3-6-5-0 Quinto, Midday Sunday: 5-4-8-4-2 Monday: 2-9-9-8-7 Tuesday: 6-5-3-2-5 Wednesday: 9-8-8-3-1 Thursday: 6-1-6-1-0 Friday: 5-1-5-4-7 Saturday: 6-4-1-7-2 Treasure Hunt Sunday: 07-09-11-16-22 Monday: 03-04-12-16-20 Tuesday: 06-09-21-22-25 Wednesday: 05-06-11-15-26 Thursday: 01-10-14-22-23 Friday: 01-08-13-17-30 Saturday: 03-12-16-23-25 Daily Number, 7 p.m. Sunday: 2-8-2 Monday: 1-2-4 Tuesday: 6-0-0 Wednesday: 6-7-6 Thursday: 6-6-9 Friday: 1-7-8 Saturday: 0-3-4 Big Four, 7 p.m. Sunday: 9-4-5-7 Monday: 2-3-7-2 Tuesday: 9-4-4-7 Wednesday: 2-2-3-3 Thursday: 0-3-1-1 Friday: 8-2-0-5 Saturday: 1-5-5-9 Quinto, 7 p.m. Sunday: 9-0-0-9-6 Monday: 0-3-8-8-9 Tuesday: 6-5-5-6-5 Wednesday: 6-2-1-2-5 Thursday: 2-2-0-4-9 Friday: 7-9-8-4-4 Saturday: 6-1-6-0-9 Cash 5 Sunday: 01-02-12-13-37 Monday: 04-16-22-37-41 Tuesday: 01-03-06-16-39 Wednesday: 10-21-22-28-43 Thursday: 16-17-24-27-39 Friday: 04-20-25-28-32 Saturday: 12-17-20-27-40

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

iera Hickman, a third-year pharmacy student at Wilkes University school of pharmaT cy, takes William Bailey’s blood pressure at a free diabetes health fair held Thursday at Genetti’s Best Western in Wilkes-Barre. Watching is pharmacist Jessica Ashford,

Wilkes University school of pharmacy instructor and a pharmacist at The Medicine Shoppe in Dallas.

Sugarloaf man requests new attorney James A. Antonelli may withdraw guilty plea. Co-defendant arrested. By SHEENA DELAZIO sdelazio@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE – A Sugarloaf man charged with abusing a boy appeared in Luzerne County Court on Friday, where he told a judge he wants a new lawyer and may want to withdraw his guilty plea to a related charge, while his co-defendant was arrested on an outstanding warrant relating to the crime. James A. Antonelli, 66, of West County Road, was scheduled to be sentenced on a single count of criminal conspiracy to commit indecent assault after pleading guilty to the charge in December. Antonelli’s attorney, James Scallion, said he filed a petition to withdraw as Antonelli’s attorney because Antonelli has a limited income. Judge David Lupas allowed Scallion to withdraw and in-

Moore in April structed Antonelli to ap- According to ply for a public defender. court records, 2007. The boy said on a Antonelli said he also day when it was wished to withdraw his a teen boy cold and rainy, he guilty plea to the charge, told state was intentionally where police say he police trooplocked out of the abused a teen boy by ers in June residence. locking him out of the State police alhouse on a cold and rainy 2010 that he the boy day, and by forcing him to was abused by lege claimed he was perform a sex act on Jen- Antonelli and forced by Antonelli nie Marie Moore, 46, also Moore in April to perform a sex act of West County Road. on Moore, and was If the boy did not per- 2007. assaulted if the act form the act appropriatewas unsatisfactory. ly, according to court paLuzerne County Children pers, he was kicked and and Youth Services obtained punched by Antonelli. Moore, who is also charged letters written by Moore statin the crime with a single ing how the child was instructcount of indecent assault, ed to touch her nude body, acfailed to appear for a Dec. 30 cording to court papers. Child caseworkers also obcourt date, and a warrant was tained a letter written by Antoissued for her arrest. Her arrest came Friday when nelli to Child Protective Sershe showed up at court with vices, in which he observed the Antonelli and was placed un- child removed Moore’s clothder arrest by Luzerne County ing, police said. Lupas scheduled Antonelli Deputy Sheriff’s. According to court records, a for a court appearance on teen boy told state police March 23, while he instructed troopers in June 2010 that he Moore to speak with her attorwas abused by Antonelli and ney.

Barletta in discussion on pipeline safety issues Times Leader staff

U.S. Rep. Lou Barletta, R-Hazleton, will participate in a roundtable discussion on pipeline safety issues Monday in King of Prussia. The discussion follows two deadly natural gas explosions in Allentown and Philadelphia. Barletta, a member of the House Subcommittee on Rail-

roads, Pipelines and Hazardous Materials, will join other congressmen Bill Shuster, Pat Meehan, Jim Gerlach and Charlie Dent. Shuster and Meehan are also subcommittee members. Other participants include Michael Nutter, mayor of Philadelphia, and Ed Pawlowski, mayor of Allentown, as well as

industry and state Public Utility Commission officials. The roundtable discussion will be held from 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. at the Upper Merion Township building on 175 W. Valley Forge Road, King of Prussia and is open to the public. A press conference will immediately follow the discussion.

Match 6 Lotto Monday: 02-07-17-19-27-31 Thursday: 20-21-23-28-41-42 Mega Millions Tuesday: 01-12-19-20-47 Megaball: 25 Megaplier: 03 Friday: 08-10-15-23-41 Megaball: 07 Megaplier: 04 Powerball Wednesday: 07-31-50-51-58 powerball: 06 powerplay: 02 Saturday: 02-23-31-42-48 powerball: 21 powerplay: 02

OBITUARIES Carraher, Timothy Dymond, Aileen Faux, Wilmer Flannelly, Catherine Gray, Richard Lane, Josephine Marranca, Michael Meyer, Rosalyn Papach, Helen Pastusak, Edward Santee, Dorothy Senczakowicz, Ruth Sokolski, Leonard Wajda, Julia Weiss, Morton Page 10A

BUILDING TRUST The Times Leader strives to correct errors, clarify stories and update them promptly. Corrections will appear in this spot. If you have information to help us correct an inaccuracy or cover an issue more thoroughly, call the newsroom at 829-7242.

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Wilkes-Barre man killed in one-car crash in Wyoming WYOMING – A WilkesBarre man was killed early Saturday in a one-car crash on Wyoming Avenue. Kristopher Adams, 21, died from multiple traumat-

ic injuries, said Luzerne County Coroner John Corcoran. Adams was pronounced dead at the scene around 5 a.m. He was the driver and only

occupant of the car that struck a utility pole near the Pennsylvania State Police barracks. The accident is still under investigation, said Corcoran.

Wilkes-Barre Publishing Company 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Periodicals postage paid at Wilkes-Barre, PA and additional mailing offices Postmaster: Send address changes to Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Delivery Monday–Sunday $3.50 per week Mailed Subscriptions Monday–Sunday $4.35 per week in PA $4.75 per week outside PA


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SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011 PAGE 3A

LOCAL Young people see their futures An expo at a Wilkes-Barre school gives students a chance to find out about a variety of career paths. By RUTH WHISPELL Times Leader Correspondent

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

From left, students April Llewellyn, Alaina Klapat, Samantha Simms and Amy Llewellyn visit the career expo.

PLAINS TWP. – The cafeteria of Solomon/Plains Memorial Junior High School was bustling with activity on Saturday during the school’s first Career, Educational and Vocational Expo. Through the free event, community members were able to explore more than 60 exhibits offering career, education and vocation opportunities. The expo was made possible by Brian Fischer, activities and music director at Solomon/Plains; John Wo-

Marking 99 years of Girl Scouts

about his aviation hobby. loski, Solomon/Plains “I wanted to Sokolas takes flying lesprincipal; and Marie Corsons out of the Wyoming rell, family and consumer see if there sciences teacher. were any plac- Valley Airport. He has his student pilot’s certificate Fischer said the expo which, he explained, alwas open to the public and es I was inlows him to fly solo for the organizers were ex- terested in.” training purposes. pecting several hundred Sarah Tabaka “I’m here to broaden the people. Hanover Area junior minds of children and to “The purpose was to let them know that this give everyone in the community a chance to explore not only type of hobby exists and it’s a very educational options, but career and rewarding hobby,” Sokolas said. Among the many exhibitors was vocational options. Whether people are career-minded, college or techni- Susan Timchack, an independent cal we wanted to provide everything demonstrator for Stampin Up!, a under one roof so people could see company which designs and manuwhat is available to them,” Fischer factures decorative rubber stamp sets and offers its customers accessosaid. Mike Sokolas, a freshman criminal ries for home décor, greeting cards, justice major at Marywood University, was at the expo teaching people See EXPO, Page 9A

COOL FUNDRAISER

Celebration held at Rice Elementary School with 65 Girl Scouts enjoying games, treats and other fun.

By CAMILLE FIOTI Times Leader Correspondent

MOUNTAIN TOP – On March 12, 1912, Juliette “Daisy” Gordon Low assembled 18 girls from Savannah, Ga. for the very first Girl Scout meeting. She believed that all girls should be given the opportunity to develop physically, mentally and spiritually. Her dream of a girl-centered organization was celebrated by Girl Troop leader Scout Service Pamela Heard Unit 314 Satursaid this is the day at Rice EleSchool. first year the mentary Over 65 Girl Scouts ranging service unit from Daisies to held a birthday Seniors gathered party to com- in the gym to celthe 99th memorate the ebrate birthday of Girl anniversary of Scouts with an afternoon of fun, Girl Scouts. games and Next year, she treats. Cadettes and said the unit Senior Scouts in hopes to cele- various troops from the Mounbrate the tain Top area 100th birthday manned the craft with a party on and game tables. Fairview Elethe Market mentary School Street Bridge. sixth-graders Natalie Mac Donald, 11, Sara De Sino, also 11, and Emily Lehman, 12 watched over the “decorate your own cupcake” table. The girls, who are Cadettes, joined fellow scouts from Troop 33318 to bake over 200 cupcakes for the event. “I wasn’t sure we could make 200 in two hours,” said Emily. Troop leader Pamela Heard said this is the first year the service unit held a birthday party to commemorate the anniversary of Girl Scouts. Next year, she said the unit hopes to celebrate the 100th birthday with a party on the Market Street Bridge. The unit will celebrate Girl Scouts See SCOUTS, Page 9A

PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

Mike Rinehimer of Mount Pocono leaps into the water of Lake Nuangola during Saturday’s polar plunge benefit help raise funds for three Mountain Top area families in need.

Taking the plunge Dip in icy water a way to help Mt. Top families By STEVEN FONDO Times Leader Correspondent

NUANGOLA – The overcast sky and steady mist didn’t deter Jacob Reilley from taking a plunge in an icy Lake Nuangola on Saturday. “I’ve seen people do this stuff on TV and thought it’d be a cool thing to give it a try,” the 14-year-old Crestwood student said. “Standing on the ice in bare feet was the worst part, but after I hit in the water, it wasn’t that bad.” Evidently 40 other “polar bear” enthusiasts agreed, taking the icy plunge into a 10 foot-by-10-foot hole cut into the blue-gray ice of the lake. See PLUNGE, Page 9A

CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

during Saturday’s plunge.

Ceppa running for W-B mayor, controller spots The accountant formerly served as township manager of Huntington Township. By MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

Sophie Norton works on a balloon animal for Dakota Langlitz.

It was all for the Mountain Top Memorial Polar Bear Plunge held at the grove at Lake Nuangola. The chilling event was held in memory of several area residents who have passed away, Joe Brozoski, Joe Hauze, Joe Jacobs and Scott Yakscoe, with proceeds benefiting three Mountain Top families with special needs. According to event organizer, Dan McDonough, "It’s been a long winter, and the economy’s got a lot of people depressed. I wanted to do something Polar plunge organizer Dan McDonough takes a dip in Lake Nuangola to help out.

WILKES-BARRE – Republican Karen Ceppa will run for two city government positions in the party’s May primary. Ceppa,42,saidSaturday she has collected more than the 100 signatures needed to run for mayor and city controller. She said she has heard concerns from many city residents while canvassing door-to-door and if

elected would work to address them. “Everybody’s concerns are going to be lookedat;they’llbeaddressed,” she said. “I’ll do my best to answer all the questions and Ceppa address all the issues that there are in the city of Wilkes-Barre.” She said specifically that she would work to improve the condition of the city’sroads,toimprovetheresponsetime of the city’s police department, and to establish a website where residents could submit information about problems and other issues in the city. Ceppa, an accountant, lives in the city’s North End. She said she has six

years experience working as a controller in the private sector, where she gained grantwritingexperience,andisstudying for a master’s degree in accounting at Misericordia University and to pass the certified public accountant exam. She also formerly served as a township manager in Huntington Township and was active with the Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts for a number of years. Tuesday is the last day to circulate and file nomination petitions for the 2010 primaries. Others circulating petitions for the mayor’s post include Bob Kadluboski, Nick Punko, Lisa Cope, Frank Sorick, ScottKoppenhofer,TylerHammondand Luzerne County Commissioner Stephen A. Urban.

MARK GUYDISH OPINION

Value added actually does have its value

F

riday’s story about Pennsylvania’s first-ever report on “Value-Added Assessment” of state tests provoked one local school board member to suggest the new system sounds like a method of twisting test results so they look better than they are. Well, in a way, yes. People like myself and this board member – the kind that grew up without computers and cell phones – have a pretty simple notion of test grades: You answer enough questions right and you get a good grade. And ever since state standardized math and reading tests were first given in 1995, that’s how results have been reported. It’s a no-brainer from the old-school. You know the material, you pass; you don’t know it and you flunk. Why complicate such a fundamental concept? I understand this lament. I earned good grades most of the time in school because I studied hard and knew the material when test time came. If I didn’t know it, I tanked the test, and I didn’t blame anyone. Well, OK, sometimes I’d whine that the teacher just didn’t teach what the test asked. And once I became convinced a college writing prof perversely refused to give anything above a C, marking things wrong on one paper that had been left unmarked on a prior paper. But those were exceptions. When I got a B in college calculus, I knew it was because I failed to master the material. I didn’t believe I deserved an A for effort, or because I knew more calculus after the class than before it. I may have known more, but I didn’t know enough. Value-added assessment doesn’t really care if a student knew enough to pass the standardized test, it just cares that the student learned more – at least as much as he or she should have – since taking the test the previous year. Distinction is a vital one The state explains the distinction as measuring progress rather than measuring achievement. Traditionally, we test a student and expect the test to show whether the student has achieved a certain level of knowledge. We don’t care if they learned a lot – if they made a lot of progress. We care that they learned enough. What difference does it make, people rightly argue, if a kid has made big gains in learning but still doesn’t know enough to succeed in college or land a job after graduation? I think you’d be hard pressed to rebut that argument. If we’re talking strictly about how well a student does after graduation, then academic achievement matters more than academic progress. The problem is, that’s not all we’re talking about. When the federal government passed the “No Child Left Behind Law” in 2002, academic progress became a mandate, not an option. Students must take reading and math tests every year in grades three through eight and 11, and the percent of students scoring proficient or better must rise steadily until 100 percent are proficient by 2014. But this system tries to measure progress by looking at achievement. A student who starts out knowing next to nothing can learn three times more than the bright student who coasts through class, but still not score proficient on the state test, giving a school that actually taught well – a school where students made big progress – a reputation for failing to help students progress. Billions of dollars have been spent trying to meet the NCLB goals, so how we measure test results directly impacts taxpayer wallets. Value-added assessment does not and should not replace the need to achieve. But it does put more emphasis on the other side of the academic coin, the need to progress. Call Mark Guydish at 829-7161 or e-mail mguydish@timesleader.com


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A juvenile orangutan peers from the slats of a wooden sleeping cage at a care center in Pasir Panjang, Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. Hundreds of orangutans live at the rehabilitation center waiting to be released into the wild. A half-century ago, more than three-quarters of Indonesia, a sprawling archipelagic nation spanning the width of the United States, was blanketed in plush tropical rainforest. But in the rush to supply the world with pulp, paper and, more recently, palm oil, half those trees have been cleared.

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Rival successes signal long and violent battle veering country closer to civil war

Rebels, Gadhafi both make gains

By MAGGIE MICHAEL and PAUL SCHEMM Associated Press

Looking for a way out

I

TRIPOLI, Libya — Government forces in tanks rolled into the opposition-held city closest to Tripoli after blasting it with artillery and mortar fire, while rebels captured a key oil port and pushed toward Moammar Gadhafi’s hometown in a seesaw Saturday for both sides in the bloody battle for control of Libya. With the Gadhafi regime’s tanks prowling the center of the city of Zawiya, west of Tripoli, residents ferried the wounded from the fierce fighting in private cars to a makeshift clinic in a mosque, fearing that any injured taken to the military-controlled hospital “will be killed for sure,” one rebel said after nightfall. The rival successes — by Gadhafi’s forces in entering resistant Zawiya, and by the rebels in taking over the port of

Ras Lanouf — signaled an increasingly long and violent battle that could last weeks or months and veered the country ever closer to civil war. Rebels in the east advanced from their eastern stronghold toward Sirte, setting the stage for fierce fighting with pro-Gadhafi forces who hold sway in the tribal area. Western leaders focused on humanitarian aid instead of military intervention, and the Italian naval vessel Libra left from Catania, Sicily, for the rebelheld port of Benghazi in eastern Libya, with 25 tons of emergency aid, including milk, rice, blankets, emergency generators, water purifying devices and tents. It is due to arrive early Monday. The crisis in Libya has distinguished itself from the other uprisings sweeping the Arab world, with Gadhafi unleashing a violent crackdown against his political opponents, who them-

Libyan rebels who are part of the forces against Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi sit on a truck with a heavy machine gun after capturing the oil town of Ras Lanuf, in eastern Libya, Saturday.

AP PHOTO

selves have taken up arms in their attempt to remove him from office after ruling the country for more than 41 years. Hundreds have been killed. Gadhafi has drawn international condemnation for his actions. President Barack Obama has insisted that Gadhafi must leave and said Washington

was considering a full range of options, including the imposition of a “no-fly” zone over Libya. The storming of Zawiya, a city of some 200,000 people just 30 miles west of Tripoli, began with a surprise dawn attack by pro-Gadhafi forces firing mortar shells and machine guns.

U.S. pastor still jailed in Haiti

A CARNIVAL OF MUD

WELLINGTON, NEW ZEALAND

Aftershock ups death toll

powerful aftershock has rocked the devastated New Zealand city of A Christchurch and the confirmed death toll from last month’s magnitude 6.3 earthquake has risen by one to 166. The GNS Science monitoring agency says the magnitude 4.8 aftershock struck Saturday night causing minor damage. Police Supt. Sandra Manderson on Sunday told reporters the death toll had risen to 166 with another body recovered Saturday. The final toll is expected to exceed 200. A police cordon around the downtown disaster area has been partially lifted Sunday to allow some residents and business owners to return to their ruined premises for the first time since the Feb. 22 quake.

No charges are filed against Danny Pye, who has been in prison since last October.

By BEN FOX and TAMARA LUSH Associated Press

SYDNEY

Marchers support gays

Australia’s political leaders were lampooned for their opposition to gay marriage as hundreds of thousands of revelers crammed inner Sydney streets Saturday for one of the world’s premier gay and lesbian parades. Some 300,000 spectators in sidewalk throngs often 10 to 15 people deep turned out for Sydney’s 34th annual Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras Parade. Caricatures of Prime Minister Julia Gillard in a wedding gown and opposition leader Tony Abbott in a Speedo — giant paper mache puppets with 5-foot -tall heads sometimes locked in carnal clinches — were a highlight underscoring opposition to Australia’s ban on same-sex marriage. Openly gay Hollywood star Lily Tomlin was among well-known gay advocates who kicked off the party with a superhero theme. RENO, NEV.

Man who fell into mine dies

A father of five children has died after falling into a Nevada mine shaft so deep and treacherous that rescuers had to abandon efforts to reach him while he was still alive, officials said Saturday. Devin Westenskow, 28, of Evanston, Wyo., worked at a geothermal drilling operation in Nevada and had gone exploring Wednesday with two friends during his off-hours when he fell 190 feet into the open shaft northeast of Reno. Westenskow was given last rites Friday. Authorities said he was pronounced dead at 12:30 p.m. Friday. Word of the death was not released until Saturday because there was no cell phone service in the remote area for authorities to stay in contact. RAYNE, LA.

Tornado kills 1, injures 11

A tornado slammed a southwestern Louisiana town Saturday, killing a woman and injuring 11 other people. More than 100 homes were damaged, many of them destroyed, authorities said, and about 1,500 people were evacuated because of natural gas leaks. The 21-year-old woman was killed when a tree fell on her house, said Maxine Trahan, a spokeswoman for the Acadia Parish sheriff. Debris was littered throughout Rayne, a town of about 8,500 people, after a line of violent thunderstorms moved through the area and left behind a swath of damage about a quarter of a mile wide to three miles long.

AP PHOTO

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overed by mud, people participate in a mud party during Carnival celebrations in Paraty, Brazil, Saturday. The five-day annual carnival celebration officially started Friday and is expected to draw about 756,000 visitors, both foreign and Brazilian, who will pack hotels to nearly 100 percent capacity and spend about $559 million, according to Rio state’s tourism department.

Protests escalate in the Mideast Yemen’s president refuses suggestion to step down early. Oman’s ruler pushes out additional top officials.

By BRIAN MURPHY and AHMED AL-HAJ Associated Press

SANAA, Yemen — Yemen’s besieged president defiantly rejected a proposal Saturday to leave office early and possibly end weeks of protests and bloodshed, whileOman’srulerpushedoutthreemore

top-level officials in attempts to quell widening demands for economic reforms and justice for the killing of a demonstrator. In other parts of the Mideast, there were bursts of anger and warnings in anticipation of unrest. Hundreds of Egyptians gathered outside Cairo offices of the nation’s internal security services — the main enforcers of Hosni Mubarak’s former regime — a day after protesters beat officials inside the agency’s building in the Mediterranean port of Alexandria. In Saudi Arabia, authorities banned all forms of demonstra-

tion as calls grow for protest marches Friday in the Western-allied kingdom. In Yemen, tens of thousands of demonstrators streamed through cities across the country in a show of resolve against President Ali Abdullah Saleh, who has been in power 32 years. But Saleh — a key U.S. ally in the campaign against al-Qaida — dug in deeper. In Bahrain, thousands of Shiite protesters formed a huge human chain around the capital Manama as protests against the Sunni monarchy moved into its third week.

JACMEL, Haiti — It’s become a running joke of sorts, a cruel one for Danny Pye: Nearly every week authorities tell the U.S. missionary he’ll be freed from his Haitian jail cell “next week,” that the man who cared for Haitian orphans will be home with his own daughter and pregnant wife “next week.” But the weeks go by, and almost nothing has changed since Pye found himself abruptly jailed last October. “I’ve been Nearly every told it was supweek authorposed to happen pretty ities tell the much every missionary week for the last he’ll be freed five months,” Pye told The from his Haitian jail cell Associated Press during a “next week.” brief talk at his cell. There are no charges filed against the 29-yearold Christian pastor. He initially was ordered into 90-day custody pending an investigation into claims he’d taken property belonging to a U.S.-based ministry. The order surprised ministry leaders, who thought they’d settled the dispute. Pye was freed on Christmas Eve. But as he and his wife, Leanne, walked to their car, a police officer approached. He was told questions had arisen about the validity of his residency card.

Filmmaker Moore joins Wisconsin protesters The governor has threatened public employee layoffs if his bill limiting bargaining rights is not passed.

By TODD RICHMOND Associated Press

MADISON, Wis. — Liberal filmmaker Michael Moore urged Wisconsin residents Saturday to fight Republican-backed efforts to strip most public workers of their collective bargaining rights, telling thousands of protesters that "Madison is only the beginning." The crowd roared in approval as Moore implored demonstrators to keep up their struggle against Republican Gov. Scott Walker’s legislation, comparing their fight to Egypt’s

revolt. He also thanked the 14 state Democratic senators who fled Wisconsin to block a vote on the bill, saying they’ll go down in history books. Walker has said the legislation is needed to help ease a state deficit projected to hit $3.6 billion by mid-2013, though opponents see it as an effort to weaken unions. With the labor bill stalled, Walker said layoffs may be necessary so the state can start to realize the $30 million savings he had assumed would come from the concessions.

A protester has a 14 on his hand in Madison, Wis., Thursday. The 14 signifies the 14 state senators out of state objecting to the proposed budget. AP PHOTO

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SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011

CHURCH CLOSURES

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Vatican panel’s ruling that overturns Allentown Diocese’s decision to shutter nine worship sites in Pa. seen as monumental

Catholicism expert ‘floored’ by reversals padlocked buildings for worship. “It does not bring the parish MINERSVILLE — Like many back to life, but it puts on the taRoman Catholics, Marie Lutkus ble what could be a workable felt anger, sadness and disillu- compromise: to physically resionment after her beloved open the locked-up church as a church was shut down in a con- Catholic place of worship,” said prominent Catholic activist Peter solidation of parishes. St. Francis of Assisi had been Borre of the Council of Parishes, her spiritual home since 1961. It’s which has spent years appealing the place where she was married, church closures in the Boston arwhere her children and grand- ea. Around the same time children were baptized, as the Allentown deciwhere she mourned the sions, the Vatican also loss of her parents and “It’s not a rejected attempts by the brother. So when the complete diocese of Springfield, doors were locked in win, but Mass., to convert three 2008, Lutkus couldn’t it’s a par- church buildings from simply let go. holy to secular use. Three years later, Lut- tial win. While a spokesman kus and parishioners at said the Allentown dioeight other shuttered We succese is seeking clarificachurches in Pennsylva- ceeded in tion about the Vatican nia’s Allentown diocese have persuaded a Vati- getting the decrees, Wilson and other experts said the decican panel to overturn building sions should give hope the bishop’s decision to to other parishioner close them down — an open.” exceedingly rare reversFelicia Pilla groups fighting to save al that experts say may Parishioner, Our their places of worship. Lady of Mount “This is the first masignal a policy shift on Carmel Church jor, official pronounceU.S. church closures. ment by the Congrega“This is a thunderclap. tion for the Clergy that I am absolutely floored,” gives relief to American said Charles Wilson, executive director of the Saint Jo- parishioners challenging the supseph Foundation, a San Antonio, pression of their parishes,” Borre Texas-based group that helps Ca- said. It’s unclear what will happen tholic laity navigate church law. In a series of decisions that par- next. Parishioners and diocesan lawishioner groups began receiving in January, the Congregation for yers in Allentown are still evalthe Clergy — the Vatican office in uating the rulings, and Bishop charge of the world’s 400,000 Ca- John Barres could appeal to the tholic priests — said the bishop Vatican’s highest court. Complihad failed to come up with a cating matters is that the Congre“grave reason” for shuttering the gation for the Clergy upheld the churches as required by Catholic bishops’ decision to merge parlaw. The panel ruled that parish- ishes, the broader territorial ioners must be allowed to use the units that include churches and

Former members of St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church in Minersviille, Pa., stand for a photo in front of the vacant property. Parishioners from this church and eight others from Pennsylvania’s Allentown diocese have successfully persuaded a Vatican panel to overturn the bishop’s decision to close them down. The Congregation for the Clergy said the bishop had failed to come up with a ‘grave reason’ for shuttering the churches as required by Catholic law.

By MICHAEL RUBINKAM Associated Press

AP FILE PHOTO

other Catholic buildings. Still, it’s a completely unexpected victory for the parishioners. After St. Francis closed, Lutkus, 58, said she became a “roamin’ Catholic” who sampled many churches but never found one that felt right. With other longtime members of St. Francis, she appealed the bishop’s decision. “We were aware of the odds,” Lutkus said. “But I’m a very optimistic person and I always think that right wins. The most they would do to me was say no again.” Then-Allentown Bishop Edward Cullen had cited a growing

shortage of priests in his decision to close 47 churches, many of them serving small ethnic enclaves in historical coal-mining regions of Schuylkill and Carbon counties. Barres, who succeeded Cullen in 2009, said he was in “complete accord” with the decisions of his predecessor and adopted them as his own. Parishioners at 14 of the churches appealed to the Vatican. Some parishioners complained bitterly about the process used to decide which churches would close. They also questioned why newer, more modern buildings were targeted while older churches were left alone.

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Traditionally, bishops have been given a free hand to make decisions about church closures, consulting with parishioners but ultimately having the final say even as church law requires them to obtain the consent of “those who legitimately claim rights for themselves in the church.” It appears the Vatican panel, in overturning the decisions in Allentown and Springfield, has ruled that the bishops should have considered the rights of the laity in deciding to close the churches, according to Nicholas Cafardi, a law professor at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh and an expert in canon law. “If that legal theory has legs,

you could see more and more decisions to close churches being overturned,” said Cafardi, former general counsel for the Pittsburgh diocese. “It’s a very correct reading of the canons. It’s just one that I’ve not seen before.” Barres’ spokesman, Matt Kerr, said two of the churches never closed their doors and are still being used as worship spaces, “so we feel we are already in compliance” with the Vatican. “The parishes don’t exist as parishes anymore,” Kerr said. “The buildings, in some cases, may have to be used for sacred purposes. What exactly that is, we’re trying to figure out.” Felicia Pilla, 73, worries about what she’ll find when she enters Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church in Nequehoning — another of the shuttered churches — for the first time in three years. She said the water was shut off and there’s no heat in the building. “It’s not a complete win, but it’s a partial win,” she said. “We succeeded in getting the building open.” Lutkus said she looks forward to the reopening of St. Francis. “I would like to walk in there, and look around, and sit down and feel like I’m back home,” she said. “I want to see it used for the reason that it was built. That’s all I want.”

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SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011 PAGE 7A

S N A P S H O T O F 1 9 11

VOICES

• The Athletics were still in Philadelphia, and they won the World Series. • The average price of a home was $2,625. • William Howard Taft was president. • Roald Amundsen, using dogs and sleds, became the first to reach the South Pole. • The average annual U.S. income was $983. • A quart of milk cost 8 cents. • The average price of a new car was $1,130. • A loaf of bread cost a nickel. • Postage stamps cost 2 cents. • The country’s population was 93,863,000. Today it’s 310,920,000. • The Indianapolis 500 was run for the first time. • Inventions included the air conditioner and Crisco vegetable shortening. • Wilkes-Barre’s population was 67,105 and Luzerne County’s was 343,186. Today those estimates are 40,964 for the city and 311,983 for the county. • The U.S. life expectancy was 48.4 years for men and 51.8 years for women. Today it’s 75.1 and 80.2 respectively. • The U.S. had 46 states. New Mexico, Arizona, Alaska and Hawaii would enter later. • Penn State (8-0-1) and Princeton (8-0-2) each was named college football national champion by different organizations. This past season, the squads combined for eight wins. • John K. Tener, a former minor league baseball player who played one game in the majors with Baltimore, began a fouryear term as governor of Pennsylvania. • Pringle, Dupont, Penn Lake Park, Conyngham and Bear Creek Village had yet to be incorporated as boroughs in Luzerne County.

Continued from Page 1A

“We made America,” said Rose Lopresto, 100, of Hanover Township. “We built it up.”

Aspirations Lottie Ziko, a retired elementary school principal who still reads books and letters from her former students, says she doesn’t feel 100 years old. But she is.Tillie James will be 103 soon and quit school in the third grade to help her family through difficult times. She had her first paying job at age 9. James said her young life revolved around work, church and family. Moyer wanted to be a nurse, but she never finished high school. Her mother became ill and Moyer did what so many other kids did back then – she quit school and went to work. “People struggled for everything back then, but we were happy,” Moyer said. “But there was a lot of jealousy, too. If somebody bought a car, some people AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER wouldn’t speak to them. But Tillie Carey walks into a surprise birthday party for her Saturday at the Stage Coach Inn Ballroom. Family members from California, they got over it.” “I’ve always hoped that the Colorado, Florida, Nevada, North Carolina, Michigan and Texas came to congratulate her on reaching the century mark. world would change,” said Faask the good Lord why I’m still all common denominators of eggs were 20 cents a dozen. ther Lewis. “That the world their lives. They have few re“I could write a book,” Moyer here.” would become more friendly Father Lewis said Catholic grets. said. and stop the wars. War has made They have enjoyed life every She remembers farmer dances Mass is said in English today, as a difference in people all over the and the anticipation of going to opposed to the Latin rite of years day and, like everyone else, they world.” look forward to the next with anago. them. Did she dance? And then Father Lewis said “But are people hearing what ticipation and excitement. “Oh, for sure,” Moyer said. this: “Life is what you make it,” Rossi said people today just is being preached?” he asked. “I’ve gone through life once; I Stacia Oko, 102, Lopresto, Zi- Rossi said. don’t know each other, and that’s wouldn’t want to go through it because they don’t take the time. ko, and James said much the again.” She and the others said neigh- same when talking about their Moyer said her secret for livborhoods were filled with people lives. ing long is hard work and the Bill O’Boyle, a Times Leader staff Family, friends, hard work, writer, may be reached at 829-7218. who cared about each other and others agree. helped each other through some simple pleasures, faith in God – “We were always doing someof the most difficult times. thing,” she said. “And if I did my Living for 100 years is quite an work, I would get a nickel for the accomplishment, but dealing movies. We had simple pleasurwith a changed world filled with es.” people they don’t know is a diffiChanging times cult adjustment for them. They long for the days of front porch The last 100 years have been a conversations, block parties and parade of significant milestones, neighborhood celebrations. inventions and people that fill They know the pleasure of sitthe pages of history books. The centenarians interviewed by want to talk about. It’s not what ting in their homes with the Professional Eye Care You Can Count On doors unlocked. The Times Leader have lived they remember as important. “People today are always on through most, if not all, of that They remember when butter history. But it’s not what they cost a dollar for four pounds and the go,” Rossi said. “Sometimes I

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THE TIMES LEADER

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DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

ROSE LOPRESTO CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

ROSE ROSSI

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ILKES-BARRE – Rose Baiz Rossi remembers when her father had a fruit stand and “you could buy everything cheap.” “When we were kids we used to walk around with a nickel in our pockets,” she said. “Now kids have dollars in their pockets – lots of dollars.” Rossi said families stuck together when she was young. Her mother ran a candy store on Union Street for decades. Rose worked there and she remembers kids coming in for penny candy. “We had fresh hot pretzels for a penny BIO apiece,” she said. Rossi can still see their faces. She can reName: Rose member conversations and she misses those Baiz Rossi days. Age: 101 Hometown: “People don’t know each other these days,” Wilkes-Barre she said. “They don’t take the time.” Education: Rossi still goes to the Farmers Market on High school Public Square with other residents of Little Children: None Flower Manor. She loves fresh vegetables and Secret to fruit. She likes to watch the people milling longevity: around. It brings back good memories for her. “Enjoy life” “But people were more friendly back in my day,” she said. “People have too much today. Kids get too much; they don’t have to work for anything. Not like we did,” she added. Rossi remembers happier times. People visited each other and helped each other. “People don’t take that time today,” she said. Rossi wants wars to stop. She doesn’t like to watch all the violence in the world. “Too many young people are dying,” she said, wondering if history has taught us anything. “It’s sad. I hear about a soldier dying, and I think of his family left behind.” She remembers her cousin playing the violin and another played the accordion. She attended dances at the Italian Club. “We had so much fun,” she said.

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ANOVER TWP. – Rose Lopresto was a striking young lady when she worked at Macy’s Department Store in New York City. Lopresto, now 100, climbed the ladder at Macy’s – starting out in security and later in the office. She stayed there for 19 years, never wanting to leave. Her husband worked at Grand Central Station. She and her husband were just like many other people back then. “We made America,” she said. “We built it up.” Lopresto, like others of her generation, worked hard in their day and for low salaries and no benefits and no vacations. They were there for the beginnings of the creation of the middle class. BIO God and religion are foremost in Lopresto’s life Name: Rose today. Her room in her niece’s home in Hanover Lopresto Township features several religious items. Age: 100 “People won’t do what God tells them,” she said. Hometown: “How can I help them?” Wilkes-Barre Lopresto doesn’t like to hear about churches Education: High school closing. Children: None “People need faith,” she said. Secret to When she was growing up in Wilkes-Barre, she longevity: “Faith in God” said there was happiness. “People were working; people were living,” she said. One of 10 children, Lopresto prays a lot – usually to St. Michael. She wears a rosary around her neck. “We all have the Holy Spirit in us,” she said. “When we are born, we are all children of God. God loves us all.” Lopresto likes to assemble jigsaw puzzles and her niece, Kathy Franz, gets them glued and framed. Lopresto also likes to watch the news. “Obama got in there and he’s got it tough,” she said. “And judges are going to jail. This should not be.” She has other opinions. “There’s too much sex in the world,” she said. “When we were brought up we didn’t even know what sex was. We never talked about that.” She remembers a mine explosion back in 1914 when she was 3. She remembers body bags “like sacks of potatoes” in McLaughlin’s garage. Lopresto remembers growing up in a world with few cars, no airplanes and weekly paychecks of $5. “Everybody helped everybody,” she said. “We went to school, we came home, we did our chores,” she said. “Today’s world has too much evil and disrespectfulness.” And she goes back to her faith. “Be thankful; let God lead you.”

LOTTIE ZIKO

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ILKES-BARRE – Lottie Ziko is a retired elementary school principal who sits in her room at Riverstreet Manor and reads. She reads books and she reads letters – most of those come from her former students who remember Miss Ziko and still visit her. “I feel young,” she said. Her roommate, Mary, is 75. She says Lottie is in far better shape than her. “She’s so smart,” Mary says of Lottie. Ziko said she doesn’t feel 100, except on some mornings when pain starts her day. She doesn’t watch much TV. The BIO television wasn’t around when she was growing up. “There’s too much fighting and too many wars,” Name: Lottie she said. Ziko Age: 100 So she reads, but her eyesight is getting worse, Hometown: she said, making it more and more difficult for her Edwardsville to read all the books she wants. Education: Ziko, a music major in college, remembers Fred College degree Children: Nev- Waring and his orchestra. “That was music,” she said. And she loves the opera. er married Secret to The walls in her room are adorned with pholongevity: tographs and cards and letters from her former “Accept what students. They keep in touch with Miss Ziko. They comes to you” remember her and how she left an indelible mark on their lives. “I do miss my friends, family and co-workers,” she said. “My former students keep me busy, though.” She taught music and art, science, English and math before becoming a principal at Jackson Street Elementary School in Edwardsville. What keeps her going? “I really don’t know,” she said. “I guess there’s something in me.” She says technology has made for a better world, but a world that she doesn’t participate in. “When I taught school, children were not rough,” she said. “They were polite and mannerly. And the parents always went along with the teachers.” Daily news reports about corruption and violence in the community upsets her. “It’s going too far,” Ziko said. “All of this is hurting the poor people.” Ziko liked to travel in her younger days – England, Italy, France, Germany, Switzerland, Holland and Austria were some of her destinations. “The world has changed over the years,” she said. “Some for the better and some not so good.”

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DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

TILLIE JAMES

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illie James left school in the third grade. She was 9 years old. Her family needed her help. James, who will turn 103 on April 3, grew up in Luzerne and lived there most of her life. She had five children and raised them by herself. She worked as a waitress and did housework. BIO She picked coal and gathered wood. She later worked in a sewing factory. Name: Tillie “Live a good life,” she advises. “Work hard.” James She loves potato pancakes, but oatmeal, she Age: turns 103 says “Yuk.” on April 3 Hometown: “We didn’t have much fun when we were kids,” Luzerne she said. “We were always told to behave. When I Education: was young, it was a lot easier to be good.” Grade school James says people should go to church, mind Children: 5 their manners and care about each other. She said Secret to there are too many things going on these days – longevity: smoking, drinking, drugs. “Hard work” “We never had to deal with that stuff,” she said. So what’s her secret to her longevity. “Because I’m a good kid,” she said. Like other centenarians, James credits her faith as an integral part of her life. She carries a cross with her all the time and she prays the rosary daily when she isn’t going to therapy. “That (therapy) I don’t like,” she said. James plays bingo, dominos and pinochle at The Meadows in Dallas. She said she never expected to live this long. She talked about her old neighborhood. “Everyone was friendly,” she says. “We were all friends. It’s not like that today.” That said, James said she would never want to go back to those times. “They weren’t the good old days,” she said.

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

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AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

STACIA OKO

LAINS TWP. – Stacia Oko is the mother of six children, five of whom are now deceased. At 102, she has outlived most of her friends and family. Except for her 19 grandchildren and 23 great-grandchildren. Quite a legacy. Her daughter, Florence Rybotski, 78, of Wharton, N.J., said her mother never smoked or drank and loved being home. “She never drove a car, but she can sure cook, bake BIO and her garden was always spectacular.” Rybotski said her mother’s garden would cause Name: Stacia passersby to stop and admire. Oko “They even took pictures,” she said. “Her flowers Age: 102 Hometown: were so beautiful.” Parsons/ Oko said she got her first job at age 15. She later Wilkes-Barre worked in a shoe factory and then at Leslie Fay Education: where she worked in quality control. Didn’t finish “We lived quietly,” she said. high school Her husband, John worked in the coal mines. Oko Children: 6 had a twin sister who died shortly after birth. Secret to “She took two buses to get to work at Leslie Fay,” longevity: “Live quietly” Rybotski said. “She worked hard all her life.” A resident of Golden Living Center in Plains Township, Oko likes to read, watch the news, and she still knits and crochets. Her hearing is bad and her eyesight is failing. Her daughter said her mother made the best soups she ever tasted. All the ingredients came from her garden. “She never bought a frozen dinner,” Rybotski said. “I think her soups kept her going.” Oko had a difficult life, but she enjoyed many things. Like going to Atlantic City. “She went there last year and lost $10 and she felt terrible,” Rybotski said. “I gave her the $10 back.”

TILLIE CAREY

UTLER TWP. – It was more like an impromptu family reunion than a birthday party Saturday at a local restaurant. More than 100 people gathered for Tillie Carey’s 100th surprise birthday party at the Stage Coach Inn Ballroom in Drums. A large, handmade birthday card was there for visitors to sign and give their warmest regards to Tillie, who has enjoyed an incredible 100 years on earth. BIO Once Carey, of Wilkes-Barre, arrived by car with her nephew, John Graham, the awaiting family members sat wide-eyed at the entrance for their Name: Tillie Carey Aunt Tillie. Age: 100 on March 4 Once she entered, a round of applause, followed by hugging and Hometown: Heights kissing, graced the blue-blazered birthday girl. section of Wilkes-Barre “I never dreamed of anything like this,” said the centenarian. She Education: Graduated believes her steady diet of an orange and apple a day and never from St. Mary’s School, drinking or smoking are the keys to her livealy longevity. Wilkes-Barre “I just tried to do everything the right way,” added Carey. Children: no children, but cared for nieces Family members from California, Colorado, Florida, Nevada, and nephews North Carolina, Michigan and Texas came to congratulate their Secret to Longevity: loved one on the monumental occasion. “Mind over matter” A White House letter was addressed to Carey, congratulating her on what is a profound event of the human kind. “One of her greatest accomplishments has been being a kind and generous person her entire life,” said Graham. “She has never flown off the handle for anybody and has been so kind to everybody.” Carey’s nieces, Mary and Cathy Graham, orchestrated Saturday’s event.


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SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011 PAGE 9A●

SCOUTS Continued from Page 3A

around the world on March 17 with “Thinking Day” at the Wright Township Fire Hall. Each troop in the unit will represent a different country and teach a lesson on the customs and traditions including games, crafts and food of the country. Today, there are over 3.2 million girls and adults involved in Girl Scouts in the United States and CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/FOR THE TIMES LEADER over 50 million womMegan Gallagher, Jill Taleroski and Marley Myers are among the Girl Scouts to make a pledge during a party en are Girl Scout Saturday in Mountain Top to celebrate the organization’s 99th anniversary. alumnae.

PUBLIC RECORDS

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

Dan Johanssen of Drums participates in the polar plunge.

PLUNGE Continued from Page 3A

"I participated in my first polar bear plunge in Dickson City this winter," McDonough continued, "and I thought it would be a great way to remember some good friends who died this year and also raise money for some Mountain Top families who needed a little help making

EXPO Continued from Page 3A

craft projects and scrapbooking. As an independent demonstrator, Timchack holds home workshops, hostess on-the-go

ends meet.” He said the response was overwhelming and the weather was terrific. “Rain or shine, it doesn’t matter; the water’s still cold," McDonough smiled through shivering teeth. The organizers wish to thank everyone who helped make the event a success. Donations can be sent to: PNC Bank, 125 Mt. Blvd., Mountaintop, PA 18707. Attn: Mountain Top Memorial Polar Bear Plunge. workshops, classes out of her home, catalog parties and much more. She said the expo helped to introduce more people to her work. “I thought it (the expo) was a good idea. I heard about it on the radio and called Brian to tell him I was interested,” Timchack said.

Marriage license applications filed in the Luzerne County Register of Wills Office from Feb. 28 through March 4, 2011: • Milton J. Hules and Kristie Ackley • Jon Gorski and Nicole Gavinski • Harold E. Hunt and Charity Kaeni Manundu • Keegan Zane Geist and Danyel Renee Deiter • Edward J. Timins and Fifi Jani • Frank Nappa and Christina Grochal • Nicholas Lord and Kayla Brotzman • Amin Ernesto ReynosoFeliz and Rosa Garcia- Reynoso • Joel I. Ramos and Angie Bernuy • Paul Andrejko and Su Ling Sun

• Richard J. Forsey and Amanda L. Okane • Kenneth Raleigh Miller and Laura Denise Dunlop • Edward Anthony Yanchulis III and Jenna Kuckla • Anthony Frank Scaramastro and Melissa Ann Stetz • William James Machinshok and Julia Elizabeth Oley • Darren G. Snyder and Kelly Ann Bray Divorces sought and filed in the Luzerne County Prothonotary’s Office from Feb. 28 through March 4, 2011: • Krista A. Beppler, Harding, and Stephen J. Beppler, Harding • Megan L. Lloyd, Drums, and Scott W. Lloyd, Drums • Christopher Messner, Lake Winola, and Andrea Messner, Tunkhannock • Richard Rock, Avoca, and Christy Rock, Fredericksburg, Va. • Lori A. Miller, Hunlock Creek, and Joseph Miller, Hun-

lock Creek • Jean L. Fredmund, Mountain Top, and Lloyd John Fredmund III, unknown address • Anna-Maria Bittner, Dallas, and John A. Bittner, Dallas • Dwayne Andrew Kline, Drums, and Tammy Kline, Dallas • George D. Kegerreis Jr., Harrisburg, and Jennifer Hilla Kegerreis, Mountain Top • Amber Ferguson, Edwardsville, and Charles Ferguson, Nanticoke • Jean Simonton, Mountain Top, and Stephen Simonton, Wilkes-Barre • Jennifer Hatcher, Mountain Top, and Gerald Hatcher, Mountain Top • Emilio Barroso, West Hazleton, and Amarilis Barroso, Hackensack, N.J. • Santa C. Tejada-Tejada, West Hazleton, and Luis E. Carrasco, Hazleton • Ramon A. Espinal, Hazle-

ton, and Evelyn E. Espinal, Freeland • Corrine Liska Simon, Hughestown, and Abraham Joseph Simon, Hughestown • Kimberly A. Oetting, Drums, and Michael G. Oetting, Drums • Fidelina A. Coradin, West Hazleton, and Kirvi Coradin, West Hazleton • Tyler W. Briggs, Wapwallopen, and Kimberly A. Briggs, Wapwallopen • Jason Pish, unknown address, and Deborah Pish, unknown address • William A. Ramm, Hanover Township, and Sherry M. Ramm, Easton • Hina N. Patel, Hazleton, and Nimesh Patel, Scranton • Veronica Guerrero, Hazleton, and Gabriel Jimenez, New York, N.Y. • Joshua D. Anderson, Dallas, and Melissa Anderson, Hanover Township

Timchack’s table offered those at the expo a colorful crafty view of crafts she has made using Stampin Up! products. She said approximately 25 people stopped by her booth for information. Sarah Tabaka, a junior at Hanover Area High School, went to the expo in search of what

she wanted to do after graduating high school. “I wanted to see if there were any places I was interested in. I don’t know what I want my major to be so I thought I would fish around,” Tabaka said. She said she was most interested in what the Travel World booth had to offer. “They had

different occupations working on cruise ships where I would be able to travel, and that’s what I want to do.” There were also middle school students wandering the expo in search of a possible career or future. Kayla Cunningham, an eighth-grade student at Solomon Plains, said she

visited the expo to check out the different opportunities. “I was looking at the King’s College and Wilkes University booths. I want to be a pharmacist,” Cunningham said. Anyone with questions about the expo or any exhibitors featured may contact Brian Fischer at 570-826-7224.


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MORTON WEISS, of WilkesBarre, died Saturday, March 5, 2011, in the Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. Born March 30, 1925, in Scranton, he graduated from Scranton High School and was a veteran of World War II, where he served as a Sergeant in the U.S. Army. He was preceded in death by his parents, brother and sister. He worked in the Wholesale Carpet Business for 35 years before retiring. Graveside services will be held in Temple Israel Cemetery, Swoyersville, at 11 a.m. Monday. Rabbi Kaplan will officiate. Arrangements are by the Rosenberg Funeral Chapel, Wilkes-Barre. DOROTHY E. SANTEE, 79, of Pittston, passed away Friday, March 4, 2011, at home surrounded by her family. Born April 16, 1931, in Scranton, she was a daughter of the late Stanley and Elizabeth Mazur Novak. Prior to retirement, she was employed in the garment industry. She was preceded in death by her husband, William; grandson, John Chismar; greatgrandson Brian Coolbaugh Jr.; and brothers, Edward and Hubert. Surviving are daughter Dorothy Chismar, with whom she resided; granddaughter Stacey Conti and her husband, Thomas; and greatgrandchildren, Jeremy Chismar, Billy Kuna, Ashlee Coolbaugh, and Rissa Conti. Funeral services will be private with interment in St. John the Baptist Cemetery, Schooley Street, Exeter. Funeral arrangements have been entrusted to the Bednarski Funeral Home, 168 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming. EDWARD PASTUSAK, 94, formerly of High Falls, N.Y., died at 11:55 p.m. Friday, March 4, 2011, at the Millville Health Center, Millville, Columbia County, Pa. Born in Nanticoke on September 20, 1916, he was a son of the late Basil and Eva (Kuschinski) Pastusak. Ed served in the U.S. Army during World War II onboard a minesweeper and was a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post in New Paltz, N.Y. he was preceded in death by three sisters and six brothers. Surviving are a brother, Walter Pastusak and his wife, Lorraine, Orangeville, Pa.; and a number of nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Thursday in the Dean W. Kriner Inc. Funeral Home & Cremation Service, 325 Market St., Bloomsburg, Pa. Interment will be in the Indiantown Gap National Cemetery, Lebanon County, Pa. The family will receive friends from 1 to 2 p.m. Thursday. ROSALYN GELB MEYER, 74, of Boynton Beach, Fla., died Thursday, March 3, 2011, at home. Born in Wilkes-Barre, she was a daughter of the late Phillip and Sarah Wolowsky Gelb and was a graduate of G.A.R. High School. Rosalyn is survived by her loving husband, Joseph; sons, Louis (Kim), Steven (Julie), Allan and Philip; daughters, Debra Weinstein (Scott), and Rebecca Hoffman (Robert); eight grandchildren; and brother, Irwin Gelb. Funeral service will be held at 11 a.m. Tuesday at the Rosenberg Funeral Chapel, with interment in Temple Israel Cemetery. Shiva times will be announced in Monday’s Times Leader. TIMOTHY J. CARRAHER, 59, of Equinunk, Pa., died Saturday, March 5, 2011. Born in Oklahoma City, Okla., on April 7, 1951, a son of Raymond and Elizabeth Greteman Carraher, Tim is survived by brothers, Patrick and Adin; and sisters, Barbara and Mary. Private arrangements are by the Kearney Funeral Home Inc., 125 N. Main Ave., Scranton. Visit KearneyFuneralHome.com for condolences. CATHERINE E. FLANNELLY, formerly of Avoca and West Pittston, passed away Friday evening, March 4, 2011, at Kindred Hospital, Wilkes-Barre. Arrangements are pending from Kniffen O’Malley Funeral Home Inc., 728 Main St., Avoca. JULIA WAJDA, of Wilkes-Barre Township, passed away Friday, March 4, 2011, in Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center, Plains Township. Funeral arrangements will be announced by the Jendrzejewski Funeral Home.

Aileen Dymond March 4, 2011

ileen Dymond, 88, of Trucksville, passed away Friday, A March 4, 2011.

She was preceded in death by her husband, Lauren Dymond; brothers, James, William and Charles Connors; and sister, Mary Burns. Aileen is survived by her son Lauren Dymond of Shavertown; daughter Carol (Robert) Eyet of Dallas; five grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. She a past treasurer of Shavertown Fire Company Auxiliary, and a member of the Circle Eighters Modern Western Dance Club. A memorial services will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday at Friedman Farm Chapel (formerly East Dallas United Methodist Church), Lower Demunds Road, Dallas. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Back Mountain Memorial Library, 96 Huntsville Road, Dallas, PA 18612.

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Wilmer L. Faux

Michael F. Marranca

March 4, 2011

March 3, 2011

L. Faux W ilmer Northmoreland

of Vernon, Township, Pa., died at his home Friday afternoon, March 4, 2011. He was born in Northmoreland Township, Wyoming County, on May 26, 1942, a son of the late Joseph and Cloe Evans Faux. Wilmer was a 1960 graduate of Tunkhannock High School, class of 1960, and a U.S. Navy Veteran. Prior to his retirement, he was employed by the State of Pennsylvania as a Park Ranger for 31 years. He was an avid gardener and was the owner of Faux’s Greenhouse in Vernon. Wilmer was preceded in death by his wife, Diane Saporito Faux; and a brother, Robert Faux. Surviving are a son and daughterin-law, Wilmer D. and Shannon M. Faux of Tunkhannock; daughter and son-in-law, Judy and Toby Lyons of Pittston; brothers, William, Arthur, and Joseph Faux, all of Tunkhannock, and David Faux of Chandler, Ariz.; sisters, Ethel Kidd and Donna Robinson, both of Tunkhannock; as well as grandchildren, Zachery and Cloe Faux.

ichael F. Marranca, 78, of PittM ston and Naples, Fla., passed away Thursday, March 3, 2011, at

Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Tuesday from the Sheldon-Kukuchka Funeral Home Inc., 73 W. Tioga St, Tunkhannock, with Pastor Glen Spencer, pastor of the Vernon Baptist Church, officiating. Interment will be in Perrins Marsh Cemetery, Centermoreland. Friends may call at the funeral home from 6 to 8 p.m. Monday. Memorial contributions may be made to Hospice of the Sacred Heart, 600 Baltimore Drive, No. 7, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702-7901. Online condolences may be sent to the family at www.sheldonkukuchkafuneralhome.com.

Helen Papach March 3, 2011

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elen Papach, 95, of Waverly, died Thursday, March 3, 2011, in Mercy Hospital after being stricken ill at home. She was the widow of the late Leo Papach, who died June 26, 2000. The couple had been married over 63 years. She was born March 16, 1915, in Scranton, and was a daughter of the late Frank and Caroline (Calowits) Chermak. She was educated in the Scranton schools and lived in Chinchilla before moving to Waverly, where she lived most of her life. Helen was employed many years by Spotless Cleaners at their Chinchilla location, and later as a fashions consultant at The Cummings ews. Services will be private and at House women’s clothing, Glenburn, the convenience of the family. InterPa. A gracious woman, she had a ment will be held in Hickory Grove friendly smile and nice greeting to Cemetery, Waverly. Memorial contributions may be all she met. She and her late husband Leo were known by many of made to The Griffin Pond Animal their family and friends to always Shelter, 967 Griffin Pond Road, have a lending hand to help and pro- South Abington Township, PA 18411; or The SPCA of Luzerne vide hospitality for others. She was preceded in death by a County, 524 E. Main St., Fox Hill grandson, Kevin Papach; two broth- Road, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702. Arrangements are being made by ers, Joseph T. and Daniel E. Chermak; and two sisters, Laural the Jennings-Calvey Funeral and Cremation Services Inc., 111 ColSchneider and Pauline Racavich. Surviving are her son, Larry Pa- burn Ave., Clarks Summit, Pa. For more information, directions, pach and companion, Barbara, Mountain Top; a grandson, Jeffrey, or to send an online condolence, Southbury, Conn.; and nieces, neph- please visit www.jenningscalveyews, great-nieces and great-neph- .com.

Leonard Sokolski March 4, 2011 eonard Sokolski, of WilkesBarre, passed away Friday, L March 4, 2011, in the Hospice Com-

munity Care Inpatient Unit at Geisinger South Wilkes-Barre. Born in Wilkes-Barre, he was a son of the late Stephen and Helen Tomczyk Sokolski. He was a graduate of Marymount High School, Wilkes-Barre. He proudly served his country in the U.S. Army Reserves as a Sergeant with the 402nd Military Police. Leonard was employed for many years with InterMetro Industries and Reilly Finishing Technologies. Surviving are his loving wife, Mary Lois; son Robert of Wilkes-Barre; sisters, Barbara Terpack and her

husband, Carl, Lorraine Anton and her husband, Bernard, Mary Joyce Perschy-Lynch and her husband, Dennis, and Janet Smith; as well as several nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be held at 10 a.m. Monday from the Jendrzejewski Funeral Home, 21 N. Meade St., Wilkes-Barre, with a Mass of Christian Burial at 10:30 a.m. in Holy Saviour Church, 54 Hillard St., Wilkes-Barre. Interment will be in St Mary’s Cemetery, Hanover Township. Friends may call from 5 to 8 p.m. today at the funeral home. Memorial donations may be made to the charity of the donor’s choice.

FUNERALS ANTHONY – John Sr., funeral 10 a.m. Monday from the S.J. Grontkowski Funeral Home, 530 W. Main St., Plymouth. Mass of Christian Burial 10:30 a.m. in St. John the Baptist Church, Larksville. Friends may call from 3 to 6 p.m. today at the funeral home. COMINSKY – Joan, funeral 9 a.m. Tuesday from the Bednarski & Thomas Funeral Home, 27 Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Mass of Christian Burial 9:30 a.m. in St. Nicholas Church, Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Monday at the funeral home. DILTZ – Robert, funeral 5 p.m. today at Town Hill United Methodist Church, 417 Town Hill Rd., Shickshinny. Visitation will be from 2 to 5 p.m. today. FERRETTI – Argentina, friends may call from 4 to 7 p.m. today at the Graziano Funeral Home Inc. Mass of Christian Burial will be held at St. Anthony of Padua R.C. Church 10 a.m. Monday (9:30 a.m. from funeral home). HUDACK – Eleanor, funeral 10:15 a.m. Monday from the KizisLokuta Funeral Home, 134 Church St., Pittston. Mass of Christian Burial 10:45 a.m. in St John the Evangelist Church, Pittston. Friends may call at the funeral home from 9:15 a.m. until time of service Monday. LEIBMAN – Joseph, funeral service 11 a.m. today at the Rosenberg Funeral Chapel, 348 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre. Shiva will be observed at the home of Sandra Platsky. MATISKELLA – Funeral services 2 p.m. today from the Kopicki

Funeral Home, 263 Zerbey Ave., Kingston. Friends may call from 1 p.m. until time of service today. NIEDZWIECKI – Joan, funeral 9:30 a.m. Monday from the Harold C. Snowdon Funeral Home Inc., 140 N. Main St., Shavertown. Mass of Christian Burial 10 a.m. in St. Therese’s Church, Shavertown. Friends may call from 4 to 7 p.m. today at the funeral home. PAWLOWSKI – Alice, memorial service 5:30 p.m. Monday at the H. Merritt Hughes Funeral Home Inc., 211 Luzerne Ave., West Pittston. Friends may call from 4 p.m. until the time of service Monday. REDINGTON – Harold, funeral 9 a.m. Monday from the H. Merritt Hughes Funeral Home Inc., 211 Luzerne Ave., West Pittston. Funeral Mass 9:30 a.m. in St. John the Evangelist Church, Pittston. Friends may call from 3 to 5 p.m. today. VALADJA – Mary, funeral 11:30 a.m. Monday from the S. J. Grontkowski Funeral Home, 530 W. Main St., Plymouth. Services noon in Ss. Peter & Paul Ukrainian Catholic Church, Plymouth. Friends may call from 3 to 6 p.m. today. YATSKO – Frances, funeral 9:30 a.m. Tuesday from the Wroblewski Funeral Home Inc., 1442 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort. Mass of Christian Burial 10 a.m. in Saint Ignatius of Loyola Church, Kingston. Friends may call from 4 to 7 p.m. Monday at the funeral home.

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A fterFu nera lLu ncheons Sta rting a t$7.95 p erp erson

H otelBerea vem entR a tes

the Physicians Regional Hospital, Naples, Fla. His wife is Dolores Osticco Marranca. Born on April 29, 1932, in Pittston, he was a son of the late Mary (Falcone) Marranca and Carmen Marranca. He was a graduate of Pittston High School and King’s College, Wilkes-Barre. He retired as CEO and President of Fidelity Loan/Savings Bank of Scranton, after 30 years. He was a former bank examiner at the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). Michael was a member of the U.S. Army, held the rank of Lieutenant and served in Korea. He was a member of the Serradifalco Society of Pittston. He was preceded in death by his brother, Charles Marranca; and sister, Loretta Sciandra. Surviving are son Carmen Marranca and wife, Maryann, West Pittston; granddaughters, Gianna Marranca, West Pittston, and Justine Marranca, West Pittston; grandson Michael Marranca, West Pittston; great-granddaughters, Ava, West Pittston, and Karamia, West Pittston; brothers, Joe Marranca, Exeter, and Gregory Marranca, Pitt-

ston; sister-in-law Janet Marranca, Exeter; brother-in-law Steve Sciandra, Pittston; sister-in-law Fidelis and husband, John Altobelli, Jenkins Township; as well as numerous nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be handled by the Graziano Funeral Home Inc., 700 Twp. Blvd., Pittston Township. Calling hours will be held from 4 to 8 p.m. Monday, and a Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday at St. Rocco’s R.C. Church in Pittston. The Rev. Joseph Sibilano, O.S.J., will be celebrant. Interment will be held at Mount Olivet Cemetery, Carverton. Contributions can be made in memory of Michael to the donor’s choice.

Richard C. Gray March 4, 2011 C. “Rick” Gray, 57, of R ichard Wilkes-Barre, died unexpected-

ly on Friday, March 4, 2011, at the Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. Born December 27, 1953, in Wilkes-Barre, he was a son of the late Fred L. and Betty Steinkirchner Gray. Rick was a graduate of Saint Nicholas High School and earned his bachelor degree in business administration from Penn State University. Rick was proud to be a member of the family of Medico Industries while employed as branch manager of the Pocono Office, and he also worked for Keystone Professional Pharmacy. Rick was dedicated to his faith as a member of the Parish of Saint Nicholas. He was formerly active with the Saint Nicholas-Saint Mary’s Sports Club and Saint Therese’s Little League Baseball, and he served as Past Exalted Ruler of the BPO Elks Lodge 109. An enthusiastic fan of Penn State, the New York Yankees and Green Bay Packers, Rick truly enjoyed spending time with his family and countless hours with his black lab. He will be deeply missed by his wife, the former Carol Leighton; children, Richard C. Gray Jr., Alison Gray and Christopher Gray, of Wilkes-Barre; brother, Fred and his

wife, Charlotte Gray, of Hanover Township; nieces and nephews, godson Robert J. (RJ) Payne, goddaughter Jennifer Keller, Jeffrey Gray, Kelly Kablick, Matthew and Kevin Dessoye; as well as his beloved black lab, Bonnie. Celebration of Rick’s Life will be held at 10 a.m. Tuesday from McLaughlin’s Family Funeral Service, 142 S. Washington St., WilkesBarre, with funeral Mass at 11 a.m. in the Church of Saint Nicholas. Interment will be in Saint Mary’s Cemetery in Hanover Township. Visitation will be held at McLaughlin’s from 5 to 8 p.m. Monday. To see Rick’s Life Story, get directions, leave a message, share memories, photos and more go to www.celebratehislife.com.

Josephine C. Lane March 4, 2011 C. Lane, 100, of EdJ osephine wardsville, died Friday, March 4, 2011, in The Laurels Health Care Center, Kingston. She was born in Larksville, a daughter of the late Joseph and Catherine Dul Kasak (Kosek). Though she had only a sixth-grade education, she went back to school at the age of 56 and became a nurse’s aide. She was a member of St. Ignatius Parish, Kingston, and the Polish National Alliance. Josephine was preceded in death by her husband, James Lane; sons, James and Joseph; daughter-in-law Geraldine; and granddaughter Cyn-

thia. She is survived by grandsons, Joseph Lane, Pasco, Wash., Robert and James Lane, Edwardsville; granddaughter Michelle Lane, Luzerne; and nine great-grandchildren. Funeral will be held at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday from the Kopicki Funeral Home, Zerbey Avenue, Kingston, with Mass of Christian Burial at 1 p.m. in St. Ignatius Church. Entombment will be in the St. Mary’s Cemetery, Hanover Township. Friends may call from 6 to 8 p.m. Monday.

Ruth Ester Senczakowicz February 7, 2011 Ester Senczakowicz (SinR uth co), of Oplinger Towers, Nanti-

coke, passed away February 7, 2011, at Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center, Plains Township. Born in Nanticoke, on June 16, 1916, she was a daughter of the late Stanley and Ester Kozlowski. Ruth was a graduate of Nanticoke High School, after which she pursued a career as a Practical Nurse and was employed at Mercy Hospital, Wilkes-Barre. Mrs. Senczakowicz was a member of St. Faustina Parish, St. Stanislaus Church, Nanticoke. In addition to her parents and her

husband, Michael, she was preceded in death by a brother, Joseph Kozlowski, Syracuse, N.Y. Presently surviving are her sons and daughters-in-law, Dr. Harry J. and Patricia Sinco, Clifford Township, Pa., and Dr. Michael E. and Ann Sinco, Mountain Top; seven grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; and sisters, Gertrude Conroy, Milford, Pa., and Margaret Suskind, West Orange, N.J. A private funeral service was held March 5, 2011, from the Grontkowski Funeral Home P.C., Nanticoke, with entombment in St. Francis Cemetery, Nanticoke.

825.6477

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POLICE BLOTTER HANOVER TWP. – Shots were fired after an altercation at Hipnotics Bar on the Sans Souci Parkway early Saturday morning, police said. Police responded at approximately 2:15 a.m. to a report of a large group fighting and shots fired outside the bar at 1266 Sans Souci Parkway. Police said they found several shell casings and blood in front of the bar entrance upon arrival, but that the persons involved in the altercation had fled the scene prior to their arrival. Police are continuing investigation. Anyone with information about the incident is asked to contact township police at 825-1254 or Luzerne County 911. Ashley and Nanticoke police assisted at the scene. • Raymond Hiller, of Dunmore, reported that someone stole the license plate from his van while it was parked in the parking lot of Chaucer Press, 535 Stewart Road, sometime between 5 and 7 a.m. Friday. • Paul Wychock, of Hunlock Creek, reported to police that he was harassed by another customer while inside Nimrod Haven Sporting Goods, 1757 Sans Souci Parkway, Friday. HAZLE TWP. – State police responded to a reported single vehicle crash at 5:42 p.m. Friday. State police said Jonathan Lee Kripp, 19, of West Hazleton drove off the right side of the road and his vehicle struck several large boulders, severely damaging the 1997 Ford Escort. Kripp reported that he swerved to avoid colliding with a vehicle approaching his in the same lane. Both Kripp and a 15year-old passenger were injured in the crash. Kripp was not wearing a seatbelt, police said. Kripp’s vehicle was towed from the scene by Zenier’s Towing. • State police said they will charge Leorvis Mejia Pimentel, 18, of Hazleton, with criminal trespass after he appeared at the Hazleton Area 9th Grade Center, where he had been a former student, at 1:30 p.m. Thursday. • State police plan to charge Thomas Natt, 18, of Hazleton, with disorderly conduct after he allegedly created a disturbance in the men’s restroom at Hazleton Area High School. Natt engaged in violent, threatening behavior, used obscene language and ignored commands from school officials to stop, state police said.

OBITUARY POLICY The Times Leader publishes free obituaries, which have a 27-line limit, and paid obituaries, which can run with a photograph. A funeral home representative can call the obituary desk at (570) 829-7224, send a fax to (570) 829-5537 or e-mail to tlobits@timesleader.com. If you fax or e-mail, please call to confirm. Obituaries must be submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Obituaries must be sent by a funeral home or crematory, or must name who is handling arrangements, with address and phone number. We discourage handwritten notices; they incur a $15 typing fee.

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Corbett faces ‘day of reckoning’ on balancing budget By PETER JACKSON Associated Press

HARRISBURG — Pennsylvania’s statehouse is abuzz with speculation as Gov. Tom Corbett prepares to finally answer a question that has lingered since last year’s election campaign: How will he balance the state budget with a $4 billion shortfall and no new taxes? The new administration has clamped down tightly on the release of information about the Republican’s first budget, which he is scheduled to present in an address to the Legislature on Tuesday — “the day of reckoning,” as Charles Zogby, the governor’s top budget adviser, put it last week in a Harrisburg speech. Corbett is hardly alone as a new governor facing serious fiscal challenges. Across the country, newly elected GOP chief executives are providing plenty of

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examples for him to follow if he so chooses. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, described by Corbett as a role model, wants state employees to pay more toward their pensions and health insurance. In Florida, Gov. Rick Scott is calling for the elimination of 8,600 state jobs and cutting fees paid to hospitals and nursing homes to reduce Medicaid spending. And Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder is advocating slashing business taxes while taxing pensions, privatizing certain services at state prisons and cutting publicschool subsidies by hundreds of dollars per student. In reaching the budget decisions he will reveal next week, Corbett has been constrained by two factors — his campaign promise not to raise state taxes or fees and the fact that billions in federal stimulus money and state transfers that helped support this

Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett will address the Legislature to present his first budget, trying for a balanced spending plan despite a $4 billion shortfall and a promise of no new taxes. AP PHOTO

year’s $28 billion in spending won’t be available in the fiscal year that starts July 1, creating most of the projected shortfall. On the other hand, tax collections were running $243 million, or 1.6 percent, above projections through February, the eighth month of the fiscal year, and officials are hoping that the state will wind up with at least a modest surplus in June. That could justi-

fy a rosier revenue forecast for next year — and a corresponding reduction in the shortfall. Corbett has said all along that spending cuts are inevitable and suggested that some services, such as selling liquor and wine, could be done more efficiently and cheaply by the private sector. But details have been scarce. During his first seven weeks in office, Corbett has sent out some

translate into $200 million in tax breaks for 2010 and 2011, the Revenue Department said. Among the groups closely monitoring Corbett’s first budget are the county officials who administer billions of dollars a year in state money for social services. Doug Hill, director of the Pennsylvania County Commissioners Association, said one concern is the possibility of behavioral health services being privatized and payments being paid directly to providers, eliminating the current layer of local control that he said saves taxpayers money. “Privatization is something that we need to approach with extreme caution,” Hill said. Gene Barr, vice president of the Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry, said he expects that Corbett will follow through on his promises to rein in spending and make state government smaller.

new signals about his leadership philosophy and style. For example, he terminated adultBasic, the state-subsidized insurance program that helped 41,000 low-income people, when it ran out of money last month, rather than trying to revive it. Zogby called it one of many “difficult choices” facing government. Corbett also let it be known that he would sign a “right-towork” bill banning compulsory union membership in Pennsylvania. But he stopped short of endorsing Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker’s call for eliminating collective bargaining rights for most public workers, which has inflamed union activists across the country. And Corbett’s administration adopted a new, “business-friendly” interpretation of the law governing how rapidly corporate taxpayers may claim depreciation deductions. It’s expected to

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SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011 PAGE 13A

SKATING PARTY TO BENEFIT NEIDIG FAMILY

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Lynda Gelik, left, Holly Lynott, Asmita Shah, and Sandy Repak BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Ray Bianconi, left, and Joe Malacari, both of WilkesBarre JENNIFER WYCHOCK PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Jacob Brink, 6, left, Hailey Shaw, 5, and Peyton Shaw, 7

Eric Bartos, left, Krystal and David Sperlazzo

William Uggiano, left, and John Hyder, both of WilkesBarre

Linda, left, Alyssa, 6, and David Olson

Ed Ciarimboli, left, Jarrett and Nicole Ferentino

Tyler Scharff, 12, left, Morgan Trendle, 12, and Katie McCue, 11

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SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011

Flood of ’36 force behind construction of current levee system

By STEVE MOCARSKY smocarsky@timesleader.com

The present-day Wyoming Valley levee system was more than 70 years in the making, with initial construction begun in 1938 after the Valley experienced the worst flooding to date two years earlier. “That was the impetus to really get things started,” Jim Brozena, executive director of the Wyoming Valley Flood Protection Authority, said of the flood of 1936. At the time, federal dollars funded flood control work, but that work soon halted after Japan attacked Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7,

The water is up to first-floor level on these houses along the main road in Plymouth Township.

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1941 and the focus of the Wyoming Valley and the rest of the country turned to World War II. Flood-control work on the areas of Forty Fort, Wyoming and Exeter was not addressed until the mid-1950s, Brozena said. “Then the thing pretty much sat there with nothing happening to it until 1972,” Brozena said. That was the year the Wyoming Valley was hit with the worst disaster to date – the flooding that occurred in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Agnes. The Susquehanna River crested at 40.6 feet. Following the flood of 1972,

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the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers came to the Valley and completed a great deal of remedial work on the levee system. But it wasn’t until 1996, when the present-day county flood protection authority was created, that the bulk of the work on the levee system received funding necessary to complete the job. The federal government funded 75 percent of the cost of the nearly $150 million project, with the state and local governments splitting the remainder. That funding would create the approximately 15 miles of flood control systems.

Plymouth’s main street is pretty well submerged, and the diner appears to be tilting under pressure of the water. Though much of the borough is on higher ground, Plymouth suffered greatly in the 1936 flood.

THE TIMES LEADER But additional protection was needed to defend the more than 50 communities in five counties that would be affected by the Wyoming Valley’s protections. The Valley’s levee system would cause a backup of high water in communities downriver and upriver from the WilkesBarre area. The additional protections in place today total more than $200 million. Still, the Valley isn’t fully protected. The ongoing Solomon Creek project will cost another $60 million. The county is waiting for $10 million to $12 million

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in additional federal funding to move that project forward, Brozena said. “When all is said and done, this thing is going to be a quarter of a billion-dollar project,” Brozena said. And while the massive floodcontrol project is designed to protect the Valley and surrounding floodplain areas from water levels on par with the flood of 1972, Brozena said there’s really no guarantee of complete safety. “Obviously, we designed it for the storm of record, but you never bet against Mother Nature,” he said.

The area of the Central Methodist Church on Wilkes-Barre’s South Franklin Street is a busy place as boats are launched.

1936 Continued from Page 1A

County bordering the Susquehanna River are in what geologists call a floodplain. Within the living memory of the people of the 1930s there had been two disastrous events. In 1865 and again in 1902 the river overflowed its banks, inundating areas from Pittston to Shickshinny, with much of Wilkes-Barre and the West Side under many feet of water. The people of the Wyoming Valley back then were about to weather history. Signs of danger In February 1936, weather forecasters were growing alarmed. Heavy snow in upstate New York, the watershed of the Susquehanna – coupled with lack of thawing – suggested a danger in the making for the approaching spring season of rain and warming temperatures. On Feb. 28, the Flood Control Committee of the Wyoming Valley Chamber of Commerce met with municipal and emergency officials to draw up contingency plans. The group concluded that conditions posed “a distinct menace to the Wyoming Valley” and urged preparedness. The river began to rise on March 11. The “menace” was turning into reality. Flood stage of the Susquehanna River at Wilkes-Barre is 22 feet. At that point the water begins overflowing from the river’s natural banks. In 1936 there was nothing to stop that overflow from rising from the natural banks into the community, inundating homes, businesses, streets and farms. Although a levee system to protect the most heavily populated areas had been discussed for decades, no more than preliminary work had been done. There was nothing to stop a rising Susquehanna River.

PHOTOS FROM THE WYOMING VALLEY FLOODS OF 1936

This view across the Market Street Bridge shows how far water has spread into the West Side. The 109th Field Artillery Armory is in the center of the photo. Kingston and other West Side communities were completely or almost completely inundated.

house before it came. We went to my cousins’ on Pringle Street.” All over the low-lying areas bordering the Susquehanna, others were fleeing as well. Many residents, though, accustomed to minor spring flooding, chose to stay in their homes – a bad decision, as it turned out. Within a day, Coast Guard boats were plying the streets of numerous communities, plucking people from second stories or rooftops and taking them to refugee centers staffed by the Red Cross and aided by the Boy Scouts. In the Firwood section of Wilkes-Barre, hundreds of flood victims were brought by boat to the railroad embankment where Worst fears realized a train stood ready to carry them For a time early in March it to safety. looked as if the crisis had passed. After an initial rise to 28.85 feet Chronicling a disaster on March 13, a cold spell slowed Herbert E. Atkins edited and runoff in New York. published what is probably the But then on the definitive book on early morning of F L O O D F A C T S the disaster – “The March 17, the river Wyoming Valley began to rise again. When: March 12-22, 1936 Floods of 1936.” Within a day it Cause: Rain, melting Though the river’s was over 30 feet snow pack rise in that year to and still climbing. Crest: 33.7 feet 33.3 feet has been suArea: 45 square miles Water was now People affected: 40,700 perseded by that of pouring into the Rescues: 15,000 the 1972 Tropical streets of low-lying Deaths: Seven in area Storm Agnes disascommunities. ter’s figure of 40.9, it Property damage: $9 Len Kuchinskas million was at the time the of Kingston was 10 worst flooding years old. His faWyoming Valley had ther owned a tailor shop on Zer- ever experienced. The 1936 flood bey Avenue, a busy street of – sometimes called the St. Pahomes and small stores strad- trick’s Day flood – also had the dling the Kingston-Edwardsville distinction of a double crest. The border. river peaked, receded and then He remembers his family lis- peaked again. tening to their radio, through Atkins’ book includes many which disc jockey and newsman photographs that show familiar Bill Phillips was telling listeners streets turned into lakes, interthat a flood was coming. sections clogged with boats rathThe family immediately made er than automobiles and postits plan – walk to nearby higher flood scenes of collapsed buildground right away. ings and broken asphalt, with “We were kind of excited,” re- motor vehicles tossed about like calls Kuchinskas, now of West toys. Wyoming. “We weren’t sure what Stories of extraordinary effort to take with us and what to leave abound. Wilkes-Barre firefightbehind. But we got out of the

A rescue boat makes its way up Carey Avenue toward Academy Street in Wilkes-Barre. Streets normally filled with automobiles turned into waterways during the flood.

ers, sometimes thrown into the water by whirlpools, fought on through the city’s streets to rescue the stranded. In Hanover Township, where the Lyndwood Elementary School had become a refugee center, a nurse was called to an upstairs classroom where she saw that in the freezing cold a woman was about to give birth. The nurse, and a doctor who risked drowning by wading to the school in hip boots, delivered the baby. At Wilkes-Barre’s GAR High School, well up on high ground, students and faculty reported to the building and stayed there for days, serving meals and comforting victims who knew nothing of what was happening to their homes. People carried on as best they could. Though her Luzerne home was beyond the floodwaters, 6-yearold Jeanne Meyers (now Jeanne Micklo) fell in her school playground, suffering a serious eye injury. Flood or not, there was no way treatment could wait. But her fa-

ther was a miner, and the doctor to whom they were assigned by the coal company was in a flooded area of Kingston. Micklo, 80, and now a resident of Forty Fort, remembers being put into a boat and rowed to the medical office on Wyoming Avenue, where the physician was still practicing. “I came out with a patch over one eye,” she said. “Then they put me in the boat again and brought me back up.”

The grocery store Paul Dugan’s parents owned had been spared. Though on the first floor, the store was up fairly high from the street, and water stopped within an inch or so of it. In those days, when many customers bought “on the book” and settled their bills weekly, Dugan recalls his dad’s attempt to help the neighbors. “A lot of them didn’t have the money, but we let them stay on the book and pay the bill later,” he said. Help came from outside Wyoming Valley in many ways. Scranton sent details of police and firefighters to assist the weary local personnel. Truckloads of food came in from Philadelphia for distribution. Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia of New York City sent three fire engines and 38 pumps. Men of the federal Civilian Conservation Corps program arrived to help with the cleanup. Perhaps the most significant help, however, came later.

Widespread devastation On March 20, the Susquehanna River level began to fall. For people who had fled, and those who had stayed, it was time to confront loss and devastation. Utilities, including phone service, were nonexistent for a while. Stores, schools, banks – all were at least temporarily shut down. Len Kuchinskas’ family returned after three days. “We lost personal things, appliances, which weren’t too fancy,” he said. “We lost what we had.” He still remembers the FDR visits region In August, President Franklin long, grueling cleanup.

D. Roosevelt visited Wyoming Valley. Though he waved to crowds from his train platform and his motorcade, he had a more serious purpose in mind. In South Wilkes-Barre, he met with engineers and WPA (Works Progress Administration) officials about the planned flood control project, which would have prevented the disaster. By autumn the federal government had appropriated $3 million to complete the extensive levee system. In time, the heavily populated low-lying areas of the valley were protected by levees good up to 35 feet, slightly above the 1936 flood levels. Since then, because of the 1972 Agnes disaster, the system has been built up still higher to 41 feet, and extended to include more communities. The flood of March, 1936, was the last one to catch the area without a dike system in place. By hard experience, the people of Wyoming Valley have learned to respect the Susquehanna River. No longer is it the carefree “swimming hole” that it was for the young Paul Dugan, who recalls a popular area near the Carey Avenue Bridge being “like a sandy beach.” Jeanne Meyers Micklo knows full well what the river can do. As an adult she was flooded out of her then-Forty Fort home in 1972. Still, at least one observer, GAR High School Principal Stanley R. Henning, saw something noble in those dark days of 75 years ago. After the last flood victim had cleared his building and local life had begun to resume its normal shape, Henning wrote, “And finally we were all made to realize that the spirit of brotherly love which may have been somewhat latent, is still in existence and will arise when necessary to meet any emergency.”


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THE TIMES LEADER

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SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011

L O O K B E F O R E YO U L E A P C A R E E R FA I R

TOM MOONEY REMEMBER WHEN

Some old items should have new shelf life

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DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Members of the Leadership Wilkes-Barre group met at Misericordia University to plan a career fair for students. Shown from left to right; Ted Ringsdorf, Maria Zangardi, Nicole Litts, Lauren Pluskey, Carol Fahnestock and Erik Van Laningham.

Get S ready for work

LO O K B E FO R E YO U L E A P COMMITTEE:

By KIM ROLLMAN Times Leader Correspondent

ophomore students from several local high schools will be offered a jump start on career planning when nine members of the Leadership Wilkes-Barre core program hold their Look Before You Leap Career Fair at Misericordia University in Dallas Township. The career fair on Thursday, March 10 will host nearly 300 students from the Dallas, Crestwood and Lake-Lehman school districts. The goal of the project, according to committee members Ted Ringsdorf and Carol Fahnestock, is to get students thinking about what they want to do with their lives and to give them the information they need to make informed decisions on a career choice. Leadership Wilkes-Barre is a local nonprofit organization whose mission is to teach leadership skills and to encourage community involvement. The core program is designed for adult professionals and includes leadership training workshops as well as community projects. As their community project, members of this year’s Leadership Wilkes-Barre Core Program class have organized the career fair. The three-hour program will be emceed by A.J. from local radio station 97 BHT and will include a presentation by keynote speaker, Senator Lisa Baker. In addition, students will each attend four, 25-minute breakout sessions which aim to assist

Josh Courter, Sallie Mae Carol Fahnestock, Misericordia University Nicole Litts, Prudential Retirement Wayne Morgan, Northeast PA Youth for Christ Lauren Pluskey, Wilkes University Ted Ringsdorf, Benco Dental Eric VanLaningham, Intermetro Industries Corp. Maria Zangardi, Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs.

them in narrowing their career choices. Whether the students aspire to be a nurse, a computer programmer or an electrician, each will have a chance to talk one-on-one with local representatives from various professional backgrounds, giving them an opportunity to make informed choices when planning for their futures. Robyn Jones, Dallas High School guidance counselor, explained that the career fair is important to sophomores as they start to tweak their high school curriculum for their junior and senior years; focusing on courses that will be important to their particular career choices. She said that talking to professionals can give the students a realistic look at a career. “The benefit of a program like this,” Jones said, “is that the students have the opportunity to get up close and personal; to talk to people who are in the trenches of these profesSee WORK, Page 4B

“If we can have people realize a broad range of opportunities, they are more likely to succeed. And I think it’s important for kids to know that they can be successful and have a range of opportunities right here in this area.” Chris Borton, president and CEO of Borton-Lawson

MEET SCOTT CANNON

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cott Cannon is the owner and operator of Video Innovations in Plymouth. He is a graduate of Meyers High School and East Stroudsburg University, where he earned a degree in media communications. Cannon, 46, has owned Video Innovations for 22 years. He and his wife, Sherri, have been married for six years. They have two children: Gabi, 15, and Lily, 4. His wife is the owner of Dead Ahead Gifts in Luzerne. They live in Plymouth.

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

Tell us about Video Innovations. “I consider myself an advertising agency specializing in television commercials and web videos. And I do political media as well.” What first drew you to working with video? “When I was a kid, I watched a lot of TV. And I was just fascinated by how they put television together behind the scenes.” Twenty two years in, you must like it? “The biggest part that sustains me is that it is my own business. I worked at some of the local TV stations, but when you own your own business of this type, you really get to be hands-on in the creative process.” You were also involved with a local entertainment show for a while, correct? “We had a show called ‘Out of Focus’ that was around in 1995, which was a lot of fun. But the most interesting job I ever went on was to do a video for Bridon American. I videotaped in three time zones in one day.” What do you do to relax? “I play Frisbee golf on occasion. It’s one of those things that you either get it or you don’t. But it’s a lot of fun.” What about local bands? You’ve been in quite a few. XCountry was pretty big. “I was in a band called Hyfun back in the late ’80s. Then a band called Breakaway, and then Ten-82. After that, there

wasn’t really a market for guys our age playing classic rock and modern rock, so we decided to try modern country. And that really took off beyond our expectations. We didn’t think it was going to be that big of a deal, but for some reason we were just the right band at the right time.” Weren’t you also involved with Jimmy Harnen and Synch? Didn’t you write some music with them? “I took a couple of guitar licks, put them on a tape, and gave them to Synch’s guitar player, who was a good friend of mine, who gave them to Jimmy. He put some words to it, and it ended up being the flipside to ‘Where Are You Now?,’ which was a top-10 hit. It was called ‘Only For The Night.’ So I wrote a flipside for a top-10 hit, which is kind of neat.” Royalties? “I was getting checks for like 34 cents or 84 cents for a while, and then all of a sudden I got a check for $1,000 dollars. Never saw it again. I thought that was the beginning of the big checks, but it was the last.” Who do you listen to? Favorites? “The Beatles, KISS and Van Halen.” Boyhood hero? “Ace Frehley.” Favorite book? “‘Wisdom of the Ages’ by Wayne W. Dyer. It goes back through the great people in history See MEET, Page 4B

he flies were buzzing around the house like crazy – and it was Christmas. So, believing that swinging a plastic fly swatter was hopelessly last-centuryish, I bought sprays with unpronounceable and lethal-sounding additives. I think it would have been easier to shoot down a swarm of Messerschmitts from a B-17 dodging flak over Dusseldorf. Still they buzzed. Actually the things were beginning to sound more like “nyaah nyaah, can’t touch us.” “Why not get some of those flypaper rolls?” a family member suggested. Desperate, and reasoning that only the most shameless bargain hunters would dare use such a 1940s product, I went to a dollar store, and there they were. Those sticky ON THE WEB tapes look ugly For more columns by as sin – revoltTom Mooney, go to ing, in fact www.timesleader.com hanging in a house, and I hope you never have to use them. But don’t laugh: within a week or so it was bye-bye bugdom. Bless you, dollar store. There is a moral here: some old-time products are better than their modern counterparts. They tend to be cheaper, too. Of course some older items have deservedly vanished. Remember the extra-rich “premium” milk that cost more than the regular stuff because, with more butterfat, it was “healthier” for you in those days of gorge-on-dairy advertising? I also don’t miss the grainy travelogues they used to show in the Hart Theater when even the previews, a newsreel and a Tom and Jerry cartoon were insufficient to pad out the evening’s entertainment to a full two hours. No, I’m talking about products that have been sent to the cultural Class C minor leagues or worse because somebody for questionable reasons decided they just didn’t cut it anymore. Here are a few items I’d enjoy seeing revived: • Automobiles with some rear-seat leg room. You could have shot a game of marbles on the floor of some of those 1940s and 1950s DeSotos and Hudsons while dad drove you and mom to Kearney’s Barbecue on Route 11 (something else I’d like to see brought back) in Edwardsville. • Band uniforms with tons of braid and piping on the jackets and with the tall, shako-style hats like Napoleon’s troopers wore to throw fear into the Austrians. Boy, when those guys cranked up your alma mater you stood and gave thanks to be alive and there. • Cheap toys for kids. Probably everything starts at $49.95 today because someone has to cover the costs of licensing tie-ins with Hollywood studios. We certainly wouldn’t want some guy in the hills of Southern California to have to have to make do with a swimming pool that isn’t quite Olympic-size now, would we? • A stand that lets you put your TV down close to the floor – 1950s style. I don’t understand why craning your neck to look at a screen eight feet up a wall is relaxing. If I can find such a stand I’ll buy some “Your Show of Shows” tapes to watch on it. I already have black-andwhite “Dragnet.” • Of course I love my Dell PC. And when I put it out to pasture I’ll buy a newer, faster one. But in my wilder moments of fantasy I’d like to walk into a room with walls and walls full of 1950s-style jiggling dials and pulsating lights and huge levers and hear some underling in a white coat shriek “But Dr. Mooney, if we give Monsteriac more power we might blow up the planet.” Gosh, those old sci-fi movie computers were neat. In fact, I’ll drink a toast to them. Where’s that extra-rich milk? Tom Mooney is a Times Leader columnist. Reach him at tmooney2@ptd.net.


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SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011

Swingle, Kalinay

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rittany Swingle and Dwayne Kalinay were united in marriage July 10, 2010. They were married by Judge William Amesbury during an outdoor ceremony at Appletree Terrace, Newberry Estates, Dallas. The bride is the daughter of Ron and Judy Swingle, Hunlock Creek. She is the granddaughter of Ron and Sandy Swingle, Noxen, and Bill and Lois Lavelle, Dallas. She is the greatgranddaughter of Arvilla Zosh, Dallas. The groom is the son of Dwayne and Doreen Kalinay, Noxen. He is the grandson of Carol Kalinay, Dallas, and Edward and Shirley Furman, Noxen. The bride chose her sisters, Jessica and Samantha Swingle, as her maids of honor. Bridesmaids were Kara Makarewicz, Melissa Craig, Kaitlyn Ziegler and Laura Stempien, friends of the bride. The groom chose his friend, Joe Yankoski, and his brother, Devin Kalinay, as his best men. Groomsmen were William Evans, Jim Belles, Kean Riley and James Eric Brady, friends of the groom. A bridal shower was hosted by the mother and grandmothers of the bride and bridesmaids at the Irem Country Club, Dallas. The parents of the groom hosted a rehearsal dinner at their home. An evening cocktail hour and reception were held following the ceremony at the Appletree Terrace. The bride is a 2004 graduate of Lake-Lehman High School and a 2008 graduate of Wilkes University. She will graduate in May 2011 from the University of Scranton with a master’s degree in education. She is employed by the Luzerne Intermediate Unit as a special education teacher. The groom is a 2002 graduate of Lake-Lehman High School and a 2007 graduate of King’s College. He is employed by the Lake-Lehman School District as a science teacher. The couple is expecting their first child in July.

Huntzinger, Gagliardi

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eth Ann Huntzinger and William Michael Gagliardi Jr. were united in marriage on May 22, 2010, at Meade Street Baptist Church, Wilkes-Barre, by Pastor Chester F. Dudick Jr. The bride is the daughter of Robert and Sheila Huntzinger, Wilkes-Barre. She is the granddaughter of Joseph and Lois Huntzinger, Slocum; the late Carmella Huntzinger; and the late Leonard and Martha Leindecker. The groom is the son of Catherine D. Gagliardi, Wilkes-Barre. He is the grandson of Thelred Dudick, Wilkes-Barre, and the late Chester F. Dudick Sr. The bride was given away in marriage by her father. She chose her sister, Carla Huntzinger, as maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Jessica Boston, cousin of the bride; Katelyn Cook, friend of the bride; and Gillian Gagliardi, sister of the groom. Irelynn Bono, goddaughter of the bride, was the flower girl. The best man was Marc Berneski, friend of the groom. Groomsmen included Gavin Gagliardi, brother of the groom, and Kyle Atchison and Christopher Garavito, friends of the groom. Junior groomsman was Garrett Gagliardi, brother of the groom. Charles Vilanova, godson of the bride and groom, was the ring bearer. Scriptural readings were given by Dawn Vilanova, cousin of the bride, and Thelred Gagliardi, sister of the groom. Pianist was Jannell Dudick and soloist was Madison Dudick. A reception was held at the Knights of Columbus, Luzerne. The mother of the groom hosted a rehearsal dinner at Rodano’s, Wilkes-Barre. A bridal shower was hosted by the mothers of the bride and groom and attendants of the bride. Beth is a 2003 graduate of E.L. Meyers High School and a 2007 graduate of King’s College with a bachelor’s degree in elementary education. She is employed with the Wilkes-Barre Area School District as a second-grade teacher. William is a 2004 graduate of Wyoming Seminary and a 2009 graduate of Misericordia University with a master’s degree in physical therapy. He is employed with CareGivers America. The couple resides in WilkesBarre with their two dogs, Scout and Adali.

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ennifer Lynn Steinberg and Bachir Abadallah Matar where united in the sacrament of Holy Matrimony at St. Andrew’s Chapel in Bluffton, S.C., on Oct. 10, 2010. The Rev. Jeremi Wodecki performed the double-ring ceremony. Jennifer is the daughter of Ronald and Wileen Steinberg, Bluffton, S.C., formerly of York, Pa. She is the granddaughter of the late George and Josephine O’Bara Andrejko, Hanover Township, and the late Adam and Anita Steinberg, Kingston. Bachir is the son of Abadallah and Jamileh Mattar of North Mountain, Lebanon. He is the grandson of the late Mattar and Jalilihe Mattar and the late Elias and Samiha Mattar, Lebanon. The bride was given in marriage by her father. She chose her sister, Jessica Kurpis, as matron of honor. Dr. Heather Andrejko, Syndey, Australia, cousin of the bride, was maid of honor. The groom chose his best friend, Charbel Haddad, Myrtle Beach, as best man. Roland Abi Hassen, friend of the groom, was groomsman. Scriptural readings were given by Edward Siedlecki, uncle of the bride; Georgette Siedlecki, aunt and godmother of the bride; and George Andrejko, uncle and godfather of the bride. Offertory gifts were presented by the parents of the groom. Jennifer is a graduate of Dallastown High School and the New England Culinary Institute of Vermont. She works in the dietary department at Memorial University Medical Center of Savannah. Bachir is a graduate of Douma Technical School and American University of Science and Technology. He is a chef at Hilton Head Marriott Resort and Spa. He is pursuing a bachelor’s degree in hotel and restaurant management at the University of South Carolina. A cocktail hour and dinner reception followed the wedding ceremony at the Country Club of Hilton Head. A rehearsal dinner for the wedding party and out of town guests was hosted by the groom’s parents at the Woodbridge Clubhouse. A barbeque was hosted by the parents of the bride the following day. A bridal shower at TRUFFLE’S, Belfair Town Village, was hosted by the sister of the bride and cousin of the bride. Family and friends from Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York City and Florida attended the wedding celebration. Following the wedding, the couple toured parts of North Carolina, Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania and New Jersey. They reside in Bluffton, S.C.

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Hrichison, Freas Marie Hrichison and NathaL isa niel David Freas were united in

marriage on Oct. 3, 2010, by the Honorable Judge Andrew Barilla in an outdoor ceremony at East Mountain Inn, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. An evening reception immediately followed. The bride is the daughter of John and Regina Hrichison, Laflin, Pa. She is the granddaughter of John and Kathryn Hrichison, Ashley, Pa., and the late Michael and Anna Yanchick, Wyoming, Pa. The groom is the son of Karen Brown, Narvon, Pa., and Vincent Freas, Downingtown, Pa. He is the grandson of Edwina Wedgewood, Jennie Rae Freas and the late Howard Freas, all of Downingtown, Pa., and Thomas Downing, West Grove, Pa. The bride was given in marriage by her father and chose her dear friend, Michelle Rakshys, as maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Helene Hrichison, sister-in-law of the bride, and Alisha Turull, friend of the bride. The groom chose his friend, Leo White, as his best man. Groomsmen were Jonathan Hrichison, brother of the bride, and Eddie Hayes, cousin of the groom. The bride was honored at a bridal shower given by her mother and bridesmaids at the Genetti Hotel and Conference Center, Wilkes-Barre. She was also honored at a bridal shower given by the mother of the groom and bridesmaids at Bistro on 10, Honey Brook, Pa. A rehearsal dinner was hosted by the mother of the groom at East Mountain Inn. The bride is a 2000 graduate of Bishop Hoban High School, WilkesBarre, and a 2004 graduate of King’s College, Wilkes-Barre, with a degree in human resources management. The groom is a 2000 graduate of Coatesville High School. He will graduate from Reading Area Community College in May with a degree as a medical laboratory technician. The couple honeymooned on a cruise to New England and Canada. They reside in Womelsdorf, Pa.

families, announce their engagement and approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Bonnie Karazia and Martin Barrett and the step-daughter of John Karazia and Judy Barrett. The prospective groom is the son of Peggy Sheridan and the late John Sheridan. Rhiannon is a 2004 graduate of Coughlin High School and is employed at Travelocity. Nicholas is a 2000 graduate of G.A.R High School and a 2004 graduate of Luzerne County Community College. He is employed in surgical services at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. The couple will exchange vows on March 24, 2012.

The Trubelas

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lex and Joan Trubela, Wilkes-Barre, recently celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary. They were married Jan. 27, 1951, in St. Peter and Paul Church, Wilkes-Barre. The maid of honor was the sister of the bride, Marilyn Elias, and matron of honor was cousin, Arlene Oldershaw. The best man and usher were brothers of the groom, the late John Trubela and Charles Trubela, and late brother Andrew Trubela also attended. The ring bearer was cousin, Artie Poole, and the flower girl was cousin, Judy Feldman Grover. Mrs. Trubela is the daughter of the late Delbert and Arline Thomas. She graduated from Coughlin High School and was a cosmetics manager and sales consultant at Boscov’s. Mr. Trubela is the son of the late Michael and Eva Trubela. He attended Coughlin High School and earned a degree in surveying from Penn State University. Prior to retirement as a tailor for Boscov’s, he was a tailor and owned North End Cleaners and Al’s Tailor Shop in Wilkes-Barre with his wife. Mr. and Mrs. Trubela have three children, Barbara Mummert, Hanover; Deborah Mitchell, Bear Creek Village; and Karen Trubela Rizzo, Dorrance. They have seven grandchildren, Chad, Brooke and Kyle Mummert; Richard and Michael Mitchell; and Anthony and Jonathan Rizzo. The occasion was celebrated with a cruise to Florida and the Bahamas.

marriage at Sandals Whitehouse Resort, Westmoreland, Jamaica, on March 12, 2010, by the Minister Oswald Hall. The bride is the daughter of Joseph and Connie Lispi, Yatesville. She is the granddaughter of Gela Lispi, Yatesville; the late Albert Lispi; and the late Dorothy and Leonard Sharon. The groom is the son of April Sands and Richard S. Griffin, WilkesBarre. He is the grandson of Joan Sands, Wyoming, and the late Katherine Kulick. Following the wedding, the newly married couple celebrated with family and friends with a reception at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church Hall, Pittston. The bride is a 1996 graduate of Seton Catholic High School. She graduated from Empire Beauty School as a certified cosmetologist. She is self-employed. The groom is a 1998 graduate of GAR Memorial High School. He earned an Associate of Applied Science degree from Luzerne County Community College in 2001. He is employed as a route salesman for Ira Middleswarth & Sons, Larksville. The couple resides in Yatesville.

Heller and Andrea C hristopher Marlene Kratz were joined in

Kelly Briggs and James B ridget Vincent Rosentel, together with

Barrett and Nicholas R hiannon Sheridan, together with their

A. Lispi and Richard P. Griffin G ela were united in the sacrament of

Heller, Kratz

Briggs, Rosentel

Sheridan, Barrett

Lispi, Griffin

their families, are pleased to announce their engagement and upcoming marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Colleen Briggs, Hughestown, and William Briggs, East Stroudsburg. She is the granddaughter of Margaret McHale and the late Joseph Clifford McHale, Hughestown, and Clarence and Nicolina Briggs, Exeter. She is the great-granddaughter of Elva Briggs, Larksville. The prospective groom is the son of Patrice and James Rosentel Jr., Bear Creek. He is the grandson of James Rosentel Sr. and the late Ruth Rosentel, Bear Creek, and Bill and Shirley Baldauff, Moosic. Bridget is a 2002 graduate of Pittston Area High School. She earned an associate’s degree in applied science in painting illustration at Luzerne County Community College. She is employed as a customer service and sales specialist by Bank of America, Moosic. James is a 2002 graduate of Pittston Area High School. He is employed by Party Time Manufacturing, Hughestown. The couple will exchange vows on July 9, 2011, in Duryea.

marriage on Feb. 12, 2011, in front of their family and friends. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Kenneth Seegar at Holy Family Church, Sugar Notch. Christopher Andrew Heller and Cady Anissa Heller, children of the bride and groom, were best man and maid of honor. Jeffrey Cardimona, nephew of the bride, was the ring bearer. Kayla Marie Giannelli, granddaughter of the bride, was the flower girl. A reception was held at Vanderlyn’s in Kingston.

OUT-OF-TOWN BIRTHS Bryn Mawr Hospital, Bryn Mawr Grenewicz, Amy and Eric, Wayne, a daughter, Feb. 17. Grandparents are Joe and Debbie Grenewicz, Upper Askam, Hanover Township, and John and Cheryl Dempsey, Bethany Beach, Del. Great-grandparents are Ethel Priestman, Upper Askam, Hanover Township, and Georgina Timberman, Newark, Del.

OUT-OF-TOWN GRADUATES Kaplan University, Miami, Fla.

(On-line graduates) Coleen Heichel, Glen Lyon, Bachelor of Science degree in criminal justice; Belinda Blanton, Wilkes-Barre, Associate of Applied Science degree in travel and tourism.


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IN BRIEF DALLAS: The LifeSmarts Team from Dallas High School recently competed in the state LifeSmarts competition in Harrisburg. LifeSmarts is a national competition that challenges high school students’ knowledge in the areas of personal finance, health and safety, the environment, technology and consumer rights and responsibilities. The Dallas team of Kevin Hunter, Tim Reinert, Pierce Donovan, Danielle Spencer and Sara Hudak took second place, narrowly missing the opportunity to represent Pennsylvania in the national competition. The group spent many hours studying for the competition. This year’s successes can be attributed to the strong work ethic, knowledge base and teamwork abilities of the team.

Smith, Davenport onna Smith and Jason Davenport, together with their families, are D pleased to announce their engagement and approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Dan and Susan Smith, Sweet Valley. She is the granddaughter of Anna Mae Smith and the late Carl Smith, Ruggles Hollow, and George and Beverly Bacon, Sweet Valley. Donna earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in English from Penn State Wilkes-Barre in 2009. She is pursuing a Master of Arts degree in writing studies from Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia. She continues to recover from a near-fatal car accident in June 2010 and attributes her survival to the hand of God. Both Donna and Jason are youth leaders at Cross Creek Community Church. The prospective groom is the son of Lynn Davenport, Wilkes-Barre. He is the grandson of Joyce Sralik and Dorothy Davenport, both of WilkesBarre. Jason graduated from Bishop Hoban High School in 2002. He earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology from Wilkes University and his Master of Arts degree in human services with an emphasis in marriage and family counseling from Liberty University. He is employed as a behavior specialist consultant for Evergreen Behavioral Intervention for Children. The couple will exchange vows at Cross Creek Community Church in Trucksville on April 9, 2011, with Dr. Dave Earley officiating.

Talk focuses on importance of libraries and education Neil Grimes, library media specialist at James M. Coughlin High School, Wilkes-Barre, recently addressed the changing role of school libraries in the 21st century as part of the Drs. Robert S. and Judith A. Gardner Educational Forum Series at Wilkes University. His talk included a brief history of the impact of libraries on education and the importance of librarians, teachers and parents joining together to help young people become skillful in research and the use of library resources. Grimes is pursuing his master’s degree in instructional technology at Wilkes University. The next Gardner Forum Series event, Science Education in the 21st Century, will be held at 4:30 p.m. on March 28 in Marts 214 on the campus of the university. The lecture will be given by Michael Komorek, a science teacher in the Wilkes-Barre Area School District. At the lecture, from left, first row: Robert S. Gardner, assistant professor of education; John Stachacz, dean of library services; Sarah Simon, Kingston, a senior elementary education major; Grimes; David Mahalak, Wilkes-Barre, a senior math major; Kristen Pechulis, Plymouth, a senior English major; and Michelle Dubbs, Millville, a senior math major.

KINGSTON: Public School Employees Retirement System (PSERS), in conjunction with Pennsylvania Association of School Retirees (PASR), will present a pre-retirement seminar for all school employees considering retirement within the next five years from 8:30-11:30 a.m. on April 2 at the Kingston Intermediate Unit on Tioga Avenue. A continental breakfast and lunch will be served. In addition to the “Foundations for the Future Program” presented by PSERS, information will also be provided on health insurance options, dental, vision and longterm care insurance, Social Security and financial planning. There will be a $6 charge to register. If planning to attend, call June Seely at 384-4407, or e-mail her at seely@pa.metrocast.net.

Wyoming Area Catholic students named Redeemer Scholars

Wildlife biologist visits Northwest Area

Mary Pat Blaskiewicz, Peter Kulick and Ana Rogers, eighth-grade students at Wyoming Area Catholic School, were recently named Holy Redeemer Scholars. This academic recognition is given to students who placed in the top 10 percent on the placement test given in December. A scholarship is also given for Holy Redeemer High School in Wilkes-Barre. Award winners, from left, are Blaskiewicz, Kulick, Rogers and principal Lucille Procopio.

Students in Atchley Stackhouse’s Pennsylvania wildlife class at Northwest Area Senior High and Middle School recently hosted Rich Fritsky, wildlife diversity biologist from the Pennsylvania Game Commission. Fritsky brought in a barn owl and described its various characteristics. Some of the participants, from left, first row are Fritsky and Jeffrey Morris. Second row: Shanna Hummel, Janice Richardson, Tyler Kittle, Richard Wisniewski and Rich Brizzy.

Dallas Middle School salutes honor roll students

GAR students raise money for St. Vincent dePaul Kitchen

Dallas Middle School recently held its awards assembly for the second quarter. Students who earned honor roll distinction were recognized. The Accelerated Reader Program point leaders were presented with acknowledgements and student athletes who participated in winter sports were congratulated. A Celebration of Accomplishments Award, a new award facilitated by assistant principal Matthew Barrett, was given to students and staff members. The award is part of school-wide positive behavior modification programming that allows anyone in the school to nominate anyone else for doing something special. The nominees are reviewed and each quarter students and staff are recognized for positive, pro-social behaviors and for going above and beyond as members of the school community. Recipients of the Celebration of Accomplishments Award, from left, first row, are Dominic Augustine, Emily Banta, Dusten McGeehan, Leah Popple, Joni Rakowski, Kylie Rosengrant, Kimberly Kuzma and Barrett. Second row: Thomas Duffy, principal; Bill Jenkins; Michelle Leonard; MaryKate Stauffer; Matthew Stretanski; and Firouzeh Razavi.

Students in Linda Chopyak’s class at GAR Memorial Junior-Senior High School recently donated $100 to the St. Vincent de Paul Kitchen, WilkesBarre. The students raised the money by volunteering to wrap holiday presents at Barnes & Noble, Wilkes-Barre Township. Ann Marie McCauley, director of St. Vincent de Paul Kitchen, said the money will provide meals for 400 guests and the students will be listed as sponsors for a day. At the check presentation, from left, first row: McCauley; Erica Saunders, student volunteer; Colleen Robatin, principal; and Anthony Khalife, assistant principal. Second row: Chopyak and Jeremy Soto and Denzel Kemp, student volunteers.

Wilkes students wrapping up internships More than 80 Wilkes University students are completing internships for the spring 201 1 semester. These student interns work in various fields, including law enforcement, radio broadcasting, event planning and adoption services. Their majors range from criminology and political science to psychology and communications studies. Some of the interns, from left, first row: Alison Heck, Kingston; Anne Janecek, Mountain Top; Janelle Nye, Coal Township; Jamar Beverley, South Plainfield, N.J.; Britney Hazleton, Dallas; Alyssa Fusaro, Wilkes-Barre; Justine Pevec, Scranton; Linzey Astleford, Archbald; Chelsea Uselding, Evanston, Ill.; Alitsa Panteloukas, Middletown, N.Y.; Rachel Leggieri, Wilkes-Barre. Second row: Frantzddyn Pamphile, Tobyhanna; Erin Robinson, Harford; Sean LaFleur, Elimsport; Natalie Walter, Scranton; Justine Adams, Bethlehem; Rusty Cook, Matamoras; Richard McGarry, Moscow; Holland Ramaley, Reading; Brandon Dixon, Scranton; Allison Roth, Princeton, N.J.; Amanda Gunther, Boyertown; Brianna McGinn, Telford; Gina Manganiello, Exeter. Third row: Andrew Wallace, Pine Hill, N.J.; Angelia Karsko, Wyoming; Minhui Cai, China; Daniel Kautz, Pelham, N.Y.; Brandon E. Pauling, Hughesville; Stephanie Harkins, Larksville; Sara Kaspriskie, Exeter; Lindsey Fernald, Allentown; Miranda Bonetsky, Tamaqua; Kevin Gerhart, Hummelstown; Tony Thomas, Wilkes-Barre; Sharon Castano, internship and mentoring coordinator at Wilkes. Fourth row: Jonathan Bowman, Jersey City, N.J.; Ryan Kane, Plains Township; Ryan Clifford, Raritan, N.J.; Ben Webb, Shohola; Edward Pearson, Pittston; Matt Jackosky, Hopatcong, N.J.; Drew Kent, Miller Place, N.Y.


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sions. There is no greater experience than to be able to talk face-to-face with the people who actually do these jobs.� Breakout sessions include professionals from the following fields: Information Technology/Engineering, Business/ Marketing/Finance; Health Care/Sciences; Education; Criminal Justice/Public Service/Legal, Electrical/Plumbing/HVAC and other trades, and Entrepreneurship/Local Business Owners. Chris Borton, president and CEO of Borton-Lawson, Plains Township, is one of the local professionals who will be available to talk to students at the career fair. He believes that the event is important not only to expose students to various professions, but also to give them an idea of the range of opportu-

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and talks about their quotes and their philosophies of life, and what made them great and interesting people. Very positive stuff.� Favorite movie? “The Fisher King.� TV? “My wife and I like to

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Students in the Part-Time Accelerated Evening Nursing Program division of the Student Nurse Association of Pennsylvania (SNAP) at Misericordia University are collecting diapers to present to Angelic Diaper Ministries Inc. of Dallas, a nonprofit organization that provides diapers to babies of families in need. Diapers will be collected on campus in the Department of Nursing offices on the second floor of the College of Health Sciences building on Lake Street and in the Banks Student Life Center lobby on campus until May 6. Donations can also be made directly to Angelic Diaper Ministries online at http://www.angelicdiapers.org. For more information about the diaper drive, call the Department of Nursing at 570-674-6474, or log on to www.misericordia.edu/nursing. SNAP officers who organized the drive, from left: Tina Tomkins, assistant professor; Wendy Franklin, Wilkes-Barre, vice president; Colleena Jenceleski, Nanticoke, treasurer; Susan Kupstas, Ashley, president; and Nicole Johnson, Kingston, secretary.

the most giving.� Proudest moment? “A tie between my wedding day and my daughter’s birth. Your wife giving life to one of your children - it’s incredible.�

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The Millie Lawson Women’s Resource Room recently re-opened on the ground floor of the D. Leonard Corgan Library at King’s College. The resource room is dedicated to the late Mildred Lawson, who was an assistant professor of English at King’s College and an advocate for women’s awareness. The original Millie Lawson Women’s Resource Room was located in various academic buildings before being relocated. The room will be used for small events, gatherings, discussions and presentations concerning women’s issues. It is open to students, faculty and staff who wish to talk about women’s interests. At the re-opening, from left: Nicholas A. Holodick, vice president of academic affairs; Teresa M. Peck, associate vice president for enrollment and academic services; Judy Plummer, director of co-curricular programs and adjunct assistant professor of education; Robin Field, director of women’s studies and assistant professor of English; and the Rev. Thomas O’Hara, president.

E.O.E.

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Misericordia nursing students collecting diapers

news lately and have been very outspoken on your opposition to gas drilling. “I can really see the damage that the gas industry does when it moves into a town, and right now, people are starting to see that.� Greatest influences? “Definitely my parents. The nicest people in the world. I was a cranky teenager, but they were the most patient people. And

watch anything with Gordon Ramsay in it. And ‘Survivor.’� Favorite food? “Pizza.� Always in the fridge? “Lunch meat and asparagus.� Favorite city? “Plymouth.� You’re involved with the Plymouth Kielbasa Festival, right? “I’m on the Plymouth Alive group and we do the festival every year. It’s a lot of fun.� You’ve also been in the

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nities within each profession. “I think the kids need to see that you’re not pigeon-holed by your degree; you’re pigeon-holed by the options you are aware of,� he explained, “For example, only 10 per cent of graduating engineers do what I do; the other 90 percent do other things. There are a lot of different options even within one profession.� Borton also said that the career fair is important for the success of not only the students, but of the local business community as well. He explained that giving businesses a mechanism to highlight local opportunities and encourage students to remain in the area to develop their careers is important to local industries. “If we can have people realize a broad range of opportunities, they are more likely to succeed. And I think it’s important for kids to know that they can be successful and have a range of opportunities right here in this area.�

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HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011 PAGE 5B

OUT-OF-TOWN DEANS’ LISTS

Heather Regnosky, Dallas; Duane Swank, Berwick; Dylan Tyree, Stillwater; Ashley Valentine, Tunkhannock; David Vest, Courtdale; Joshua Wood, Meshoppen.

Berklee College of Music, Boston, Mass.

Olivet Nazarene University, Bourbonnais, Ill.

Michaelina Trapane, Berwick.

Cherise Rosenberg, Kingston.

Colgate University, Hamilton, N.Y.

Slippery Rock University, Slippery Rock

Quinn Mongeon, Mountain Top.

Dickinson College, Carlisle

Alexis E. Kuzma, Shavertown.

Matthew N. Pelleschi

Amanda Benczkowski

Kaitlyn and Rachel Benczkowski

Matthew Nevio Pelleschi, son of Stephen and Kathy Pelleschi, Exeter, celebrated his seventh birthday Feb. 28. Matthew is a grandson of Betty Milazzo and Nevio and Colleen (Mickey) Pelleschi, all of West Wyoming, and Charles Milazzo, Pittston.

Amanda Benczkowski, daughter of Rita Benczkowski, Plains Township, celebrated her 15th birthday March 4. Amanda is a granddaughter of Stanley and Rita Benczkowski, Hudson. She is a great-granddaughter of Helen Belles, Plains Township. Amanda has a brother, Chris, and a sister, Aimee.

Kaitlyn Benczkowski, daughter of Stanley Benczkowski and the late Carol Benczkowski, Bear Creek, is celebrating her 16th birthday today, March 6. Her sister, Rachel Benczkowski, celebrated her 12th birthday March 4. Kaitlyn and Rachel are the granddaughters of Stanley and Rita Benczkowski, Hudson, and Stanley Runscavage and the late Theresa Runscavage, Bald Mountain.

Sebastian P. Evans Sebastian Paul Evans, son of Scott and Jennifer Evans, White Haven, is celebrating his fourth birthday today, March 6. Sebastian is a grandson of Karen Cool, Dolgeville, N.Y., and Jean Evans and the late Paul Evans, Bristol. He is a great-grandson of Margaret Bissett, Dolgeville, N.Y. Sebastian is the adopted grandson of Catherine Penska and the late Joe Penska, White Haven. He has a sister, Isabella, 6, and a brother, Mitchell, 1.

Daniella N. Pace Daniella Nicole Pace, daughter of Daniel and Teri Pace, Dallas, is celebrating her 10th birthday today, March 6. Daniella is a granddaughter of Theresa Armstrong, Exeter, and Daniel and Patricia Pace, Wyoming. She has a brother, Anthony, 13.

Shelby Plaza, Drums; Veronica Sardo, Drums; Kelsey Diltz, Berwick; Samantha Condo, Dallas; Gillian Clarke, Meshoppen; Caitlin Morahan, Meshoppen; Gabrielle Malishchak, Nanticoke; Erin Moran, Plymouth; Amanda Spock, White Haven.

Drew University, Madison, N.J.

Marissa Kraynak, Larksville; River Merz, Albrightsville.

Gettysburg College, Gettysburg

Syracuse University, Syracuse, N.Y.

Honor List: Alexandra Bull, Berwick. Commendation List: Thomas Daniels, Tunkhannock; John Lasko, Mountain Top.

Andrea Butchko, Dallas.

Keystone College, La Plume

Sky Patience Grella

Elizabeth Seward

Sky Patience Grella, daughter of Nicole Sholcosky and John C. Grella, is celebrating her sixth birthday today, March 6. Sky is a granddaughter of John and Nancy Grella, Avoca, and Joseph and Flora Sholcosky, Dickson City. She is a great-granddaughter of Francis Cavalari, Avoca.

Elizabeth Seward, daughter of Matt and Kathy Seward, Red Rock, is celebrating her 13th birthday today, March 6. Elizabeth is a granddaughter of Marvin and Marilyn Seward, Red Rock, and John and Mary Hanko, Berwick. She has a sister, Ashley.

President’s List: Keith Brice, Wilkes-Barre, and Kristin L. Brice, Wilkes-Barre. Dean’s List: Neil Elms, Forty Fort; Tara Gwilliam, Harveys Lake; Ciera Kinley, Pittston; Michael O’Boyle, Kingston; Dylan Slater, Wyoming. Honor’s List: Christina DeFrancesco, Pittston; Samantha Littleford, Nanticoke; Bernard Posten, Pittston.

Loyola University, Baltimore, Md.

William Mitchell, Wilkes-Barre; Paul Wontroski, Dunmore.

Mansfield University, Mansfield

Rebecca Bliss, Tunkhannock; Charis O’Connell, Harveys Lake;

BIRTHS

West Chester University, West Chester Kathleen McNulty, Wilkes-Barre.

Walton, Anna and Jesse, Dallas, a daughter, Feb. 22. Derr, Michelle and Jarrid Shulla, Wilkes-Barre, a son, Feb. 22.

Engle, Leigh Ann and Dan, WilkesBarre, a son, Feb. 16.

Strzelczyk, Jennifer and Roberto Colin, Exeter, a daughter, Feb. 23.

Arbogast, Michelle and Jeff Heck, Tobyhanna, a son, Feb. 16.

Naples, Chelsea and Devan Fenton, Dallas, a son, Feb. 23.

Wilcox, Jennifer and Kyle McKay, Exeter, a daughter, Feb. 16.

Oakes, Jennifer and Thomas Castellano, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, Feb. 24. Elliott, Heather, Harveys Lake, a daughter, Feb. 24.

Mowry, Rebecca and David, Meshoppen, a daughter, Feb. 17.

Bozek-Hoffman, Karen and Philip Cosentino, Pocono Lake, a daughter, Feb. 24.

Fletcher, Megan, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, Feb. 17.

MMI Preparatory School’s MATHCOUNTS team recently placed first in the Luzerne Chapter competition at Penn State Hazleton and will now participate in the state-level challenge on March 18-19 in Harrisburg. Students competed in written and oral matches on various math topics. In the individual portion of the competition, MMI students took five of the top 10 spots and participated in the countdown round. MATHCOUNTS is a national enrichment club and competition program that promotes achievement in middle school mathematics. Participants, from left: Susan Moyer, math instructor and coach; Chiara DeMelfi; Claire Sheen; Sarah Moyer; Yusuf Qadri; and Jay Solgama.

Kaytlin Kopen, Shavertown.

Kapsick, Melissa and Brian, Shavertown, a daughter, Feb. 21.

Burridge, Ashlee, Tunkhannock, a son, Feb. 17.

MMI MATHCOUNTS team moves on in competition

Washington University in St. Louis, Mo.

Rogaski, Monique and Bill, WilkesBarre, a daughter, Feb. 21.

Zagata, Tara and Eric, Luzerne, a son, Feb. 15.

The Misericordia University National Student Speech Language Hearing Association (NSSLHA) Chapter and the Misericordia University Lions Club are selling bottled water on campus to raise money for a rain water harvesting project in the village of Aangre Kond, Taluka Mahad, India. Students are selling the bottled water for $2 each at athletic events and on campus. To purchase bottled water, contact Lori Cimino, clinical director and assistant professor of speech-language pathology at 570-674-6724. The public can also make donations to the water project online at www.misericordia.edu/slp. NSSLHA officers posing with cases of water, from left, first row, are Ambria Andrasi, Dallas, treasurer, and Jill Cline, Hellertown, secretary. Second row: Mary Kate Baran, Bethlehem, president, and Haley Ellis, Bangor, vice president.

Matthew Panzitta, Pittston; Caroline Boris, Shavertown; Lael Hoegen, Kingston; Taylor Smith, Plains Township; Antonio Villamor, Kingston; Lauren Moyer, Tamaqua; Jordan McGroarty, Wilkes-Barre.

Pierce, Christine and Edgar Diaz, Hazleton, a daughter, Feb. 20.

Daniels, Mindy and Christopher DeLuca, West Wyoming, a daughter, Feb. 15.

Students raising money for water project in India

Villanova University, Villanova

Fox, Miranda and Ryan Loke, Laceyville, a son, Feb. 20.

Ostroskie, Amy and Jeff J. Golden, Edwardsville, a son, Feb. 15.

Emily Rose Emel, daughter of Rose Lee Emel, celebrated her fifth birthday March 3. Emily is a granddaughter of the late Melvin Emel, Glen Lyon; the late Ferns Emel; and Emory and Carol Kocher, Kingston. She is a great-granddaughter of the late Mary Emel, Plymouth.

Shane Gavrish, Edwardsville.

Feb. 19.

Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center

Emily R. Emel

University of Pittsburgh, College of Business Administration, Pittsburgh

Amezquita, Yashira and Marcus Perez, Hazleton, a daughter, Feb. 17. Thomas, Missy and Paul, Mountain Top, a son, Feb. 17. Bieble, Sarah and Michael, Nanticoke, a daughter, Feb. 18.

Bruch, Karalynn and Aaron, Dallas, a son, Feb. 24. Hazeltine, Karissa and John Morrow, Hanover Township, a daughter, Feb. 25. Clayworth, Alicia and Timothy, Nanticoke, a daughter, Feb. 26.

Horsley, Heather and Ryan, Mountain Top, a daughter, Feb. 18.

Harding, Colleen and Brian Passarelli, Pittston, a son, Feb. 27.

Merrifield, Tammy and John, Mountain Top, a son, Feb. 18.

Buyo, Glenda and Glenn, Mountain Top, a daughter, Feb. 27.

Stoss, April and David Kaslavage, Pittston, a daughter, Feb. 19. Stevens, Bethany and Justin Dalton, Trucksville, a son, Feb. 19. DeStefano, Laura and Jason Shearer, Pittston, a daughter,

Lord, Heather and Shane, West Nicholson, a daughter, Feb. 24.

Hodle, Lauren and Daniel Jr., Dallas, a daughter, Feb. 28. Provinzano, Amanda and Jamel Karim, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, Feb. 28.

GUIDELINES

Children’s birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge name, age and birthday, parents’, grandparents’ and great-grandparents’ names and their towns of residence, any siblings and their ages. Don’t forget to include a daytime contact phone number.

We cannot return photos submitted for publication in community news, including birthday photos, occasions photos and all publicity photos. Please do not submit precious or original professional photographs that

require return because such photos can become damaged, or occasionally lost, in the production process. Send to: Times Leader Birthdays, 15 North Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 187110250.

If your child’s photo and birthday announcement is on this page, it will automatically be entered into the “Happy Birthday Shopping Spree” drawing for a $50 certificate. One winner will be announced on the first of the month on this page.

What About Something Pearly White For The Bride And The Entire Wedding Party? Don’t let a dull, stained, YELLOW smile be the flawed attention getter in photos meant to last a lifetime. Brides and wedding planners: insist on the brightest, cleanest, healthiest, and whitest smiles on everyone in your photos. 4 paid bleachings for the wedding will qualify you for a FREE polish and bleaching for the Bride!

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Photographs and information must be received two full weeks before your child’s birthday. To ensure accurate publication, your information must be typed or computer-generated. Include your child’s

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Dr. Chas M. Carpenter


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THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

HONOR ROLL Thomas J. Duffy, principal, Dallas Middle School, recently announced the Honor Roll for the second marking period. Grade 6: Honors with Distinction: Liam Barrett, Maria Bednar, Angela Bendick, Paige Boyle, Zachary Charlton, Courtney Devens, Christopher Good, Leah Gorr, Elizabeth Kennelly, Sara Lojewski, Justin Marshall, Ann Metzloff, James Oschal, Carley Perloff, Troy Reinert, Madeleine Ross, Justin Sarker, Allison Stallard, Sarah Strazdus, Jessica Stuart, Shayla Stuart, James Vitale. First Honors: Moustafa Almeky, Ashlie Alves, Chase Anderson, Jacob Besecker, Kyle Besecker, Harry Blamire, Justin Butsavage, Mikaila Chakon, Brandon Clemow, Ryan Cohen, Malynda Cook, Jason Culp, Aneilia Cummings, Sarah Daly, Nico DeLuca, Maxine DeRome, Blake Dyke, Lee Eckert, Lacey Fassett, Maggie Gilbertson, Savannah Gochoel, Max Gordon, Mia Greenwood, Elizabeth Grose, Nickolas Guzzo, Rachel Habib, Emily Heltzel, Kaitlyn Hill, Emily Howell, Joshua Hunter, Madison Hurst, Haley Karasinski, Madalyn Kelley, Ryan Kelly, Connor Kerkowski, Greta Ketchner, Talia Kosierowski, Jessica Kus, Tori Landon, Kate Lazzeri, Nina Leeds, Anna Lehane, Emma Lehman, Stone Mannello, Connor McAndrew, Corey McAndrew, Abigail McCabe, Jordan McLaughlin, Megan Meyer, Megan Miller, Richard Morgan, David Orehotsky, Riley Oremus, Ronald Ostrowski, Emily Pellam, Collin Pertl, Desire’ Petrikonis, Connor Phillips, Sara Reichold, Margaret Rinehart, Brianna Rinehimer, Christian Roberts, Michael Santora, Jonathon Scintilla, Joelle Serafin, Megan Sinoracki, Michael Smith, Alexis Spaciano, Arthur Spears, Samantha Stier, Jacob Stritzinger, Robert Swida, Ethan Szczecinski, Andrew Thomas, Joseph Thompson, Justin Thompson, Josephina Treslar, Victoria Vespico, Jordan Wilson, Alexander Zaykowski, Abigaile Zondlo. Second Honors: Robert Ackerman, Christopher Allen, Hannah Baloga, Gregory Banks, John Barrett, Logan Baseski, Jarod Blockus, Daniel Burkhart, Raymond Centanni, Kaura Chavez, Nicholas Christman, Breiana Coolbaugh, Cody Coolbaugh, Alexa Davis, Teresa Davis, Stevie Rae Dickson, Jadyn Dinardi, Meghan Donahue, Jacqueline Dottor, Julia Evans, Paige Evans, Michael Farrell, Dalton Gattuso, Elijah Geise, Charles Giacometti, Christian Goldsmith, Matthew Gruver, Daniel Harpersberger, Ryan Hulbert, Christina Husar, Colby Jimmie, Gabrielle Kosierowski, Rachael Kozick, Stephen Lofing, Kady Mamola, Rachel Maniskas, Carl Markowski, Erin May, Michael Mesko, Kyle Moskaluk, Jack Murray, Abigail Noone, Anthony Nyzio, Lexes Palissery, Kaitlyn Pelchar, Justin Phillips, Ryan Phillips, Emma Ripka, Miranda Roche, Jacob Serafin, Andrew Shurites, Madison Slacktish, Mikayla Sowga, Owen Sprau, Erik Sweppenheiser, Christian Sypniewski, Ryan Trumm, Erica vanEtten, Dillon vanTuyl, Robert Wagner, Curtis Walter, Jaydin West. Grade 7: Honors with Distinction: Rebecca Andrews, Christopher Biesecker, Andrew Chupka, Chase Feeney, Courtney Hoats, Lauren Hudak, Michael Kelly, Michael Kovalick, Kyleigh Kravits, Jared Krawetz, Rachel Luke, Ryan Martin, Daniel Mingey, Justin Novitski, Marlena Ostrowski, Mira Patel, Alexandra Rome, Kathryn Snedeker, Krista Vivian, Emilee Zawatski. First Honors: Maria Ansilio, Kyle Archer, Brendan Balara, Julia Baloh, Lia Barbacci, Joseph Bevevino, Joseph Blaine, Catherine Blankensop, Jessica Blat, Brielle Brace, Anthony Brominski, Lorenzo Buchhalter, Jacob Buda, Peter Capitano, Danielle Caputo, Kaitlyn Chacke, Maura Chappell, Arthur Coolbaugh, Noah Cote, Allison DeBoer, Jared DelGatto, Anthony DeLuca, Catherine Dillon, Alexa Dosiak, Lauren Dottor, Mariana Dymond, Timothy Elston, Madison Evans, James Farrell, John Fessler, Lauren Finnegan, Joseph Fiorello, Joshua Frankevich, Tanner Gattuso, Devon Gerstein, Anna Giacometti, Madison Goodwin, Tabitha Grabowski, Tabbytha Greene, Kathryn Grose, Makayla Guzzo, Rachel Healey, Madeline Jones, Taylor Joseph, Madison Kaminski, Katie Kapral, Morgan Kapral, Christian Kimmerle, Kaitlyn Kochanski, Angelo Kwak, Michelle Leonard, John Lyback, Stephanie Lyons, Connor Macarty, Megan Mancinelli, Sukhmail Mathon, Ruby Mattson, Connor Motley, Adam Niznik, Michaela O’Connell, David Oley, Joshua Orlandini, Grant Payne, Katherine Pugh, Julia Ramirez, Samantha Rinehimer, Jacob Roberts, Jacob Ross, Cameron Shaner, Jackson Shaver, Janelle

Sherman, Shawn Spencer, Bret Storrs, Stephen Strumski, Justin Sweeney, Annabelle vanHemert, Danielle Walsh, Alexis Wyandt, Kaitlyn Yakus, Tyler Yang, Anne Yanik, Tiffany Zukosky. Second Honors: Saleem Abualburak, Jonathan Bonham, Jessica Bowden, Kathleen Brown, Julie Butwin, Taryn Chopyak, Steven Darling, Jared Dieffenbach, Zachary Dottor, Keith Gillette, Paul Gray, Rachel Kon, Katherine Kravitsky, Alexandria Krebs, Samantha LaNunziata, Joseph Latzko, Paige Lewandowski, Michael Lord, John Luksic, Rachel Magnotta, Nicholas Mathers, Cory Metz, Amanda Miller, Linsey Miller, Cassidy Muldoon, Derek Peters, Chad Phillips, Kyle Piskorik, Bria Polachek, Courtney Powell, David Powell, Arden Rice, William Robbins, Colin Ryniec, Charles Siegel, David Simpson, Ian Spare, Jayson Strausser, Nicholas Talaska, Justin Yavorski, Aaron Yurko. Grade 8: Honors with Distinction: Abigail Bendick, Jacob Bozentka, Madalyn Bozinski, Katie Conrad, Nicholas Conway, Isabella DelPriore, Brian Drouse, Aleksey Gitelson, Haley Haddle, Lindsey Jacobs, Kelsey Karasinski, Connor Koscelansky, Ryan Marshall, Julianna Murray, Kajal Patel, Lia Ruggerio, Grace Schaub, Talia Szatkowski, Christina Valenti, Kassandra Weeks, Brittany Weinstein. First Honors: Jesteen Adams, Dorian Anderson, Jacob Archer, Kaylin Augustine, Brendan Baloh, Anastasia Baney, Emily Banta, James Baut, Peter Baut, Alysha Becker, Ernie Bidding, Amy Bolton, Sarah Boyd, Alexandra Bruch, Brian Butler, Cassandra Cocco, William Colacito, Calvin Crane, Gabriella Darbenzio, Eric Davies, Michael Davis, Abigail Downs, Sarah Fasulka, Mallory Faux, Melissa Fleming, James Flores, Katelyn Force, Autumn Gallagher, Lia Giampietro, Caitlyn Gill, Elizabeth Hastings, Caylee Irvin, Brian Jefcoat, Sydney Kern, Thomas Ketchner,

Owen Kiluk, Hannah Kimball, Elizabeth Kutza, William Luksic, Luke Matusiak, Kameryn McGee, Aidan McLaughlin, Kellie Meehan, Alexandra Milligan, Michael Minarik, Kelsey Monahan, Morgan Morris, Alexis Murdoch, Olivia Musto, Gregory Navestad, Catrina Notari, Milan Novak, Michael Olenginski, Lindsey Oremus, Anthony Pace, Alexis Pelchar, Madison Perez, Shane Pitts, Jacob Plank, Leah Popple, James Rinehart, Allison Rismondo, Marissa Rollman, Matthew Ross, Jonathan Sabatini, David Schnable, Amanda Schwerdtman, Allyson Sebolka, Caroline Sheehan, Michael Shutlock, Samantha Starbuck, Ashley Strazdus, Caroline Thomas, Dylan Thomas, Olivia Thomas, Caitlyn Vailes, Gabrielle Volpetti, Courtney Wagner, Joanna Wallace, David West, Jonathan Wilson, Stephanie Zimmerman, Tara Zukosky. Second Honors: Michael Alves, Stephen Bath, Keith Baxter, Mitchell Benson, Jacob Bienkowski, Samantha Bitto, Jeremy Burton, Justyn Cave, Ryan Cheskiewicz, Zachary Connolly, Aaron Eldred, Sydney Emershaw, Allen Fell, Jonathan Ferris, Lauren Gallagher, Madisen Gilhooley, Jesse Goode, Cheyanne Gray, Kara Hockenberry, Katelyn Hunter, Tyler Kerkowski, Jacob Kolojejchick, Peter Konnick, David Mallarkey, Quinn Marsola, Casidhe Menig, Devin Michalec, Donald Michalisin, Jason Morgan, Romy Morsy, Ben Narcum, Robert Nardone, Omar Nijmeh, Eric Pincofski, Sara Pizzo, Kaley Polachek, Kyle Radzewicz, Robert Reichold, Gabriel Reilly, Matthew Reynolds, Megan Roberts, Richard Sarker, Jacob Schmid, Ashleigh Schwartz, Keisha Segear, Kelly Snyder, Kurtis Sod, Kennedy Straitiff, Andrew Stubeda, Allen Sweppenheiser, Sadie Trudgen, Samantha West, Christina Yannuzzi, Cierra Yonchik.

LCCC sponsors table games dealer training program Luzerne County Community College Continuing Education Department, in partnership with World Wide Gaming Consultants LLC, recently held a table games dealer training program. Students who complete the program and also meet the state’s gaming license requirements will be eligible to audition for jobs at any casino that offers table games. Blackjack dealer trainees from the night class (above), from left, first row: Don Grandis, Warrior Run; Angelo Lovecchio, Dallas; Linda McDonnal, Mountain Top; Joseph Amoia, instructor, table games; and Nicole Coffee, Mountain Top. Second row: Kevin Mooney, Dallas; Steven Roberts, Gouldsboro; Ryan Torbeck, Scranton; Willard Hauze Jr., Wapwallopen; and Dereck Rosengrant, Mocanaqua. Trainees from the day class (below), from left, first row: Penka Farina, Scranton, coordinator, table games; Ellen O’Toole, Clarks Summit; Yvonne Faust, Larksville; Melissa Kuffa, Tunkhannock; Jared Shoemaker Jr., Dunmore; Joseph Amoia, instructor, table games; John Nicks, Dallas; Victor Kalvaitis, Tunkhannock; and Christine Donnolo, Scranton, associate dean, continuing education. Second row: Ivar Iverson, Carbondale; Marty Wentz, Mountain Top; David Barasha, Hazleton; Ryan Selner, Nanticoke; Michael Braskey, Drums; Michael Paolucci III, Clarks Summit; Gary Nobel, Plymouth; Nick Mielo, WilkesBarre; and Wesley Walthour, Bear Creek.

High School & College These Are The Courses:

Algebra, Geometry, Pre Calculus, & Calculus

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A Touch of Class Catering At The Palace

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Cocktail Reception

We will begin the evening with one hour of open bar and stationed and passed hors d’oeuvres.

Hors d’oeuvres

Served during cocktail hour. Included with all packages.

Flowers and Decor

Complimentary floral centerpieces on all guest tables. White or ivory table linens with your choice of color napkins. Also, candelabras for the head table.

Bar Package

Wedding Cake

Referral Lists

We offer a wide variety to suit any style and theme, freshly baked with your choice of flavor and accent color. Served with ice cream for dessert.

Our Package includes cocktail hour and (3) hour service after dinner. Wine toast is included for all guests.

For bands, D.J.’s, wedding attire and photographers.

228 George Avenue, Wilkes-Barre, PA • 824-0500

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Dallas Middle School


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The first-grade classes of Mollie McDermott and Alvina Austin at St. Nicholas-St. Mary School recently completed a social studies unit on arctic animals and created their own habitats. With their projects, from left, first row, are Jacob Jachimiak, Marie Lombardi, Lacey Rinker and Joshua Kester. Second row: Dean Hudak, Connor Mulhern, Katie Vargo, Nicholas Riley and Aidan Verdekal. Third row: Faith Sekol and Katie Fitzgerald. Fourth row: Kevin Caffrey, Tessa Martin, Dylan Cole, Aleia Atherton and Will Vinsko.

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The Parent Teacher Guild of St. Jude School, Mountain Top, recently held its annual luncheon honoring the faculty and staff during Catholic Schools Week. This year’s event featured a ‘looking forward to spring’ theme. PTG President Rene Rymar gave the opening remarks followed by prayers led by the Rev. Jerry Shantillo, assistant pastor of St. Jude Parish. At the luncheon, seated, from left, are Olivia Kopinski, Ann Manganiello, Anna Pauline, Linda Lawler, Lester Kempinski, Eileen Kempinski, Toni Bosevich, Jane Cosgrove, Marilyn Baran and Linda Brittain. Second row: Shantillo, Dawn Sullin, Mary Ann Crofchik, Paula Kovaleski, Kitty Lutz, Kathy Madden, Rose Lee Bednarz, Linda Johnson and Karen Evans.

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all potential nominees. They have jobs, families and busy schedules, yet manage to serve as a role model for others through community service and volunteering. The Times Leader’s Humanitarian Awards provides the opportunity to recognize ordinary people who do extraordinary things. A ceremony will be held in honor of those selected.

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Complete and mail the registration form below and you’ll receive sponsor information. There will be lots of prizes, food and refreshments! All proceeds raised from the event stay in Luzerne County to benefit our local Big Brothers Big Sisters.

2011 TTo nominate: i t

Complete the nomination form and on a separate sheet of paper, write why you are nominating this person for a Humanitarian Award. Mail both the form and your essay to: The Times Leader, Humanitarian Awards, 15 N. Main Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711.Or, you may submit your essay with the information on the form below to promotions@timesleader.com. Deadline for nominations is Wednesday, March 24. This nomination form can also be downloaded at timesleader.com.

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HUMANITARIAN AWARDS NOMINATION FORM

For more information call 824-8756 or visit our website at www.bbbswb.org

For The Times Leader Humanitarian Awards, I nominate...

Registration Form • 29th Annual Bowl For Kids' Sake

Nominee’s Name: _________________________________________________________ Nominee’s Phone: ________________________________________________________ Nominee’s Street Address: ___________________________________________________ City: ______________________________________ State: _____ Zip: _______________ Your Name: ____________________________________________________________ Your Phone: ____________________________ Your Address: ___________________________ N NUMBER _____________________________________ City: __________________________________ State: __________ Zip: ___________________

Mail To: Big Brothers Big Sisters of The Bridge, P.O. Box 1285, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703-1285

Team Name ________________________ Captain _________________________ Name Address Phone T-Shirt Size 1. ______________________________________________________________________________

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5. ______________________________________________________________________________ A program of Catholic Social Services

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A I N R A A WARDS T I N A M U H

Stanton Lanes in Wilkes-Barre • Saturday, March 26

Preferred Bowling Time ______________

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Do you know a volunteer who has touched the lives of others and has taken on challenges without hesitation? If so, they should be recognized for their selfless efforts. Please recognize a true HERO – nominate this special person for a Humanitarian Award from The Times Leader. Your neighbors, friends and coworkers are

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Sponsored by:

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Nominate A Local Hero

Spare Some Time To Make A Difference On Saturday, March 26 you can have a good time, win prizes and support a great cause all at the same time. Join the hundreds of others participating in the 29th annual Bowl for Kids’ Sake Bowl-A-Thon, and make a difference in the lives of area children.

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St. Jude staff honored at luncheon

St. Nicholas-St. Mary students study arctic animals

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On a separate sheet, write, in 200 words or less, why you are nominating this person.

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THE TIMES LEADER

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Meyers Speech and Debate team takes honors at competition Thirty-five varsity and novice members of the Meyers Speech and Debate team recently competed at the Scranton Catholic Forensic League tournament held at Abington Heights High School, Clarks Summit. Gabby Richards won the varsity congress event and Joe Arnone took first place in declamation. Melinda Formola and Tom Lovecchio placed fourth in varsity public forum debate. Eilish Hoban and Kylee McGrane finished fifth in varsity dramatic duo interpretation and Bethany Romero took sixth place in varsity dramatic interpretation. In novice competition, Alexis Brown took second place in novice LincolnDouglas debate, followed by Florence Kwok who placed fourth. Emily Welles earned second place in novice congress. In novice dramatic interpretation, Catherine Morocho placed sixth. Also competing at the tournament were Emmalie Langan, Kayla Raniero, John Snyder, Michelle Chavez, Christa Franckiewicz, Ben Manarski, Julia Kerr, Morgan Prince, Anna Macko, Frances Kwok, Olivia Richards, Sabrina Robertson, Kierstan Poplawski, Betsy Macko, Bailey McDaniel, Maura Clark, Marissa Prince, Joseph Franckiewicz, Victoria Kwok, Megan Welles, Hayley Zelinka, Jillian Kopec, Brittany DelCastillo and John Jones. Assisting the team in coaching and judging capacities were alumni Joe Borland, Alex Mertz, Alison McManus and Ron Woznock. The team can be followed on Twitter at MHSForensics and at its website, www.meyersspeechanddebate.com. Some of the award winners, from left, are Florence Kwok, Catherine Morocho, Bethany Romero, Alexis Brown, Joe Arnone, Gabby Richards, Kylee McGrane, Eilish Hoban, Tom Lovecchio, Melinda Formola and Emily Welles

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HONOR ROLL Hanover Area Jr.-Sr. High School David Fisher, principal, Hanover Area Jr.-Sr. High School recently announced the Honor Roll for the second quarter.

Swetts. Honors: Sarah Beechman, Derek Brodginski, Elizabeth Cherkauskas, Joshua Davis, Kaitlyn Dixon, Chyanne Fine, Lauren Gallagher, Jordan Hagler, Shaun Jones, Marissa Keegan, Kaylene Kennedy, Kiersten Knorr, Marissa Kremenic, Thomas Kriton, Melissa Krzysik, Tyler Major, Samantha Martinez, Madalyn McAnney, Ian McGraw, Meghan McGurie, Thomas Monahan, Brianna Nutaitis, Christian Pack, Sabrina Rios, Jessica Rutkoski, Keely Simonson, Chelsey Thompson, Amanda Ungvarsky, Dominic Vitale, Cindy Vo, Shawn Washington.

Grade 7: High Honors: Haylee Bobos, Michael Bonifonte, Sabrina Chan, Maryann Chapin, Sean Connelly, Mallory Ellis, Frank Geklinsky, Dominick Gurnari, Alyssa Koneski, Simran Mangat, Megan Milford, Daelyn Mynes, Kristen Podolak, Johnny Qiu, Lauren Richmond, Alicia Saltz, Renee Grade 9: High Honors: Sara Saraka, Zachary Shaffer, NiBelles, Michael Blazaskie, cholas Stefanec, Shelby TencThomas Bogarowski, Brooke za, Dana Tomko, Kathryn WaBullek, Carmen Cesari, Alexanclawski, Justina Warnick, Kelly der Chan, Matthew Clemons, Weaver, Alysah Williams, Fei Michael Dubinski, Dominic Fan Xu. Honors: Luis Avila, Gagliardi, Joseph Gagliardi, Connor Bowers, Courtney Alexandra George, Erin GlenCimakosky, Lauren Coleman, non, Elise House, Matthew David Cook, Alyssa Evarts, Kuhl, Alyssa McCoog, Brittany Alyssa Ferrence, John Fulginiti, McNair, Darrek Mislivets, David Anna Fusco, Michaela Halesey, Nareski, Allison Nelson, Erik Asdone Hooper, Amelia HosNierwinski, Brexy Pena, Eric sage, Joshua Jacobino, Julia Prozeralik, Emily Rinehimer, Jopling, Kayleigh Kashubski, Fred Schiel III, Alexis Schutz, Jared Keats, Jesse Keats, Savannah Smith, Kyle StarRyan Kinney, Robert Kiska, zynski, Michael Steve, Michael Jinlin Lin, Nathan Maholtz, Sulcoski, William Tarutis III, Brianna McGovern, Michelle Alyssa Thomas, Sara WaclawMcNair, Zachary Meckes, Hanski, David Williams, John nah Mendygral, Christian Windt. Honors: Mitchell BagMercadente, Christina Mercanas, Michael Beierle, Sara dente, John Morgan, Ian MorBiller, Caitlyn Bogart, Aaliyyah gans, Kayla Reilly, Cabrini Rudnicki, Brandon Starzynski, Carden, Moeniesha CurtisCaleb Szczucki, Jacob Viti, ,Nicholas Deno, Anthony Eck, Kristen Weisgerber, Sean WestToni Elick, Blaire Evans, Angela awski, Riley Williams. Frawley, Mackenzie Gasper, Mary Kate Gavlick, Amber Grade 8: High Honors: Larissa Goodman, Heather Grady, Bannon, Jacob Barber, Alyse Nicholas Haslinsky, Danielle Callahan, Megan Connelly, Houck, Michelle Kaminski, Joelene Davis, Bryanna EiBrandon Maholtz, Maggie May, chler, Randall Florek, Abrielle Daniel Monk, Brian O’Malley, Garber, Melina Good, Amber Shawna Parsons, Sean Reilly, Grohowski, Meighan Hannon, Analiese Reisinger, Kaine Gabrielle Keating, Robert Rimmer, Hailee Shuman, Kerestes III, Jordan McKeaige, Amanda Sirak, Robert ThompAriel McPeek, Tristin Milazzo, son, Brooke Toluba, Heather Travis O’Boyle, Kimberly PerTorres, John Wickiser, Mary icci, Jessica Rabbas, Kristie

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Wychock, Wyatt Zapotok. Grade 10: High Honors: Kaylee Baran, Antonio Costantino, Kyle Cunard, Stephen Dokas, Michael Ferrence, Bradley George, Mary Kate Hannon, Ethan Hoolick, Olivia Jendrzejewski, Ann Marie Karis, Jill Kost, Haley Lawson, Renee Mackunis, Lyndsey Malarkey, Kyra Maldonado, Nicholas Pallotta, Rebekkah Parsons, Juan Ramos, John Rash, Timothy Saltz, Christina Santarsiero, Holly Saraka, Jacqueline Taylor, Kathleen Weston, Kelsey Williams, Matthew Williams. Honors: Trevor Ahouse, Nathalia Avila, Matthew Balon, Tyler Bartnick, Cody Bedosky, Samantha Cefalo, Vincent Cerreta, Alissa Cimakosky, Tammy Cirko, Jonathan Czerpak, Jamie Derby, Kevin Fahey, Casey Fedor, Ciera Gensel, Deena Gurnari, Jarrell Hagler, Alec Hontz, Kayla Jenkins, Ryan Josefowicz, Amanda Judge, John Kashmer, Kayla Keating, Jessica Keihl, Maranda Keihl, Marissa Keihl, James Linski, Osmel Martinez, Samantha Masher, Samantha Maxwell, Michael Meeker, Emily Mikluscak, John Paul Morio, Ian Murphy, Jared Osko, Rachel Rakowski, Janessa Rice, Tiffanie Rowe, Joseph Rutkoski, Charles Schmoll, Alycia Stefanoski, Jessica Taylor, Rachel Thomas, Autumn Walski, John Westawski, Nikki Zula. Grade 1 1: High Honors: Sandra Attar, Gina Baiamonte, Stanley Chan, Jolene Domyan, Tyler Edwards, Adrienne Feisel, Amanda Frisoulis, Marsha

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Geiser, Shannon Glennon, Brianna Good, Jeffrey Jaikes, Jared Jones, Amanda Keegan, Kara Kiska, Brittany Malia, April Marcincavage, Johnna McGovern, Anthony Pellegrino, Colleen Pstrak, Catherine Qiu, Shawna Rabbas. Steven Radzwilla, Amy Savidge, Julia Smith, Melissa Steininger, Sarah Tabaka, Daniel Tomko, Amy Viti, Caryn Wielgopolski, Adam Zapotok. Honors: Mohammed Abuelhawa, Kayla Baron, Alison Besecker, Peter Blasi, Brea Bonning, Devon Brown, Michael Cline, Markie Collum, Brandon Connelly, Patrick Cook Jr., Bethany Costantino, Carl Daubert, Samantha Dickson, Nicholas Drust, Ashley Evans, Andrew Harrison, Forest Hawkins, Cody Hossage, Shaina Jaslar, Kacey Kobal, Bryan Lopez, Keyana Louis, Troy Malia, Joel Martinez, Jesse McDermott, Jeremy McDonnell, Michael McGavin, Marissa Metric, Gabrielle Murphy, John Muscovitch III, Johanna Nutaitis, Emily O’Day, Domenick Pallotta, Aimee Pelak, Sarah Richards, Paige Rogers, ShaQuille Rolle, Tiffany Rosick, Liza Rybitski, Felicia Schiel, Martin Steve, Noelle Swetts, Christian Tencza, Molly Walsh, Thomas Yancheck, Candace Young, Frankie Zupancic. Grade 12: High Honors: Kimberly Bagnas, Veronica Blendick, Emily Bogarowski, Jessica Boyko, Laura Breakstone, Cory Dickson, David Gagliardi, Bryonna Harris, Mary Kate Keating, Kyle Konetski, Brittany Kornacki, Robert Kost, Kyle

SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011 PAGE 9B Kreitzer, Kayla Kriton, Nicholas Kruger, Robert Lawson III, Christopher Luciano, Nichole McNair, Helen Minnick, Hanh Nguyen, Jeremy Osko, Kurt Pericci, Raisha Piper, Samantha Proctor, Courtney Prozeralik, Jessica Roberts, Gokul Shah, Christina Shoemaker, Rachel Smith, Lyndsey Szela, Tiffany Timmons, Jenny Vo, Gino Warnick, Christine Wickiser, Alexandra Zara, Allen Ziolkowski. Honors: Kala Ankner, Dana Authier, Jason Bresnahan, Michelle Bugonowicz, Dale Chamberlain III, Krista Colarusso, Christopher Coley, Katie Conahan, Chelsie Cormier, Daniel Cunningham, Jessica Curtis, Alexander Draina, Justin Eck Jr., John Elick, Cassie Gasper, Bernard Gavlick, Catherine Gayewski, Karolina Gumolka, Rebecca Haynes, Mariah Jackson, Alexis Jayne-Paisley, DeAnna Karpowich, Andrew Kaufer, Michael Kelleher, Joshua Kennedy, Courtney Langdon, James Leiphart, Lauren Lewis, Leanna Little, Matthew Lukachinsky, Matthew Malachefski, Julie McCarthy, Ryan McDermott, Marc McEvoy, Jennifer Mullin, Dominick Murray, Amanda Natitus, Kelly Noonan, Rafael Penaloza, Matthew Petrosky, Christa Policare, Matthew Richards, Shianne Rowe, Edward Rozelle, Valerie Sanchez, Fares Siam, Neveen Siam, Cynthia Simonton, Seth Skoloda, Chadwick Theurer, Paul Theurer, Sarah Thomas, Felicia Tryba, Michael View, Bethany Volkel, Rebecca Wychock.

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Misericordia students practice interviewing Misericordia University students recently participated in a series of mock interviews with regional business professionals at the Insalaco Center for Career Development (ICCD). Junior and senior students dressed in professional attire and brought their newly refined resumes and interview skills to the practice sessions. Representatives from regional employers included Julia Edmunds Associates, Riverside Rehabilitation, The Times Leader, The Metz Group, The Commonwealth Medical College and Mercy Health Partners. The mock interviews are only one of several workshops held by ICCD each semester to help students prepare for their future job placement. For more information about the center, call 570674-6409, or log on to www.misericordia.edu. From left: Joe Butkiewicz, vice president and executive editor of The Times Leader, interviews senior Kari Leigh Breazeale of Dallas.

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NAMES AND FACES Lindsey M. Harger, Dallas, was recently selected for membership in The National Society of High School Scholars. The society recognizes top scholars and invites only those stuHarger dents who have achieved academic excellence. Members enjoy a wide variety of benefits, including scholarship opportunities, academic competitions and free events and resources. Harger, the daughter of Joseph and Lisa Perugino, Dallas, and Wayne Harger, Luzerne, is a senior high school student at Dallas Senior High School. She has been accepted at the University of Scranton and will major in neuroscience/pre-med. She is also a member of the National Honor Society. Christopher Jackson, a senior surveying engineering student at Penn State Wilkes-Barre, will participate in the U.S. Hydro 2011 Conference sponsored by the Hydrographic Society of America this Jackson April in Tampa, Fla. Jackson, a native of Robinson Town-

ship, is among only 20 students invited to this outreach program and will join fellow students from Florida, California, Alaska, Minnesota, New York, Pennsylvania and Canada for the four-day symposium. The conference will feature technical and poster sessions as well as workshops devoted to the latest technology regarding hydrographic surveying, electronic charting, marine archaeology and multi-beam and side scan sonar. Jackson serves as president of the Penn State Wilkes-Barre Surveying Society and is a member of the Lambda Sigma National Honor Society for surveyors. He is also a student member of the Pennsylvania Society of Land Surveyors, American Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, American Society of Highway Engineers and American Congress on Surveying and Mapping. Jackson is also an Eagle Scout and volunteers as an associate advisor to Venturing Crew 306 and is an assistant scoutmaster for Troop 262 in Pittsburgh. Patricia Hinchey, associate professor of education at Penn State Worthington Scranton, recently addressed 250 union representatives and school administrators from throughout the state of

Hinchey

Ohio at a professional development conference sponsored by the Ohio Education Association in Columbus, Ohio. Hinchey’s remarks focused on dualpurpose teacher evaluation systems. She outlined the benefits and challenges of devising a more sophisticated and reliable system using multiple sources of information tailored to the unique opportunities and challenges of individual districts and schools. Her presentation captured highlights of her recent research, “Getting Teacher Assessment Right: What Policymakers Can Learn from Research,” published by the National Education Policy Center (NEPC) at the University of Colorado, Boulder, Colo., where Hinchey is a Research Fellow. Hinchey has been at Penn State Worthington Scranton since 1992 and has authored several books on education. She lives in Dallas with her husband, Ed. Connor McGowan, Pittston, a sixth-grade student at Wyoming Seminary Lower School, will be one of two area students representing Luzerne County during the state MATHCOUNTS McGowan competition in Harrisburg on March 18-19. McGowan placed first in the individual competition and sec-

ond in the countdown round during the Luzerne County MATHCOUNTS Chapter Competition held in February. The Lower School team finished in second place overall. McGowan, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Jay McGowan, is a member of the Greater Pittston Stoners, Riverfront Sports soccer and Jenkins Township baseball. He also participates in St. Maria Goretti’s Laflin community service programs. Local students were recently inducted into Lebanon Valley College’s chapter of Phi Alpha Epsilon, an academic and service honor society. Membership is limited to senior students who have achieved a 3.6 GPA, completed 24 credits of coursework, and earned a bronze, silver or gold community service award. A formal induction program will be held on March 24. New inductees are: Tabitha Brobst, Tamaqua; Robert Cyphers, Tunkhannock; Jessica Ferlenda, Dallas; Samantha Ide, Tunkhannock; Paul Orsulak, Tamaqua, and Krystina Sissick, McAdoo.

Wyoming Area Catholic students explore time travel Mrs. Toomey’s fourth-grade reading class at Wyoming Area Catholic School recently read the play ‘Grace and the Time Machine’ and created their own time machines to travel to interesting destinations such as Hawaii, Italy, California and Japan. With their time machine, from left, are Elizabeth Kravitz, Courtney Wartella, Bianca Mazzarella and Dominic Cirelli.

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AU1183 - Cruise, Tilt, PL, PW, Keyless Entry, Fog Lights, Rear Defogger, Roof Rack, CD, ABS

2008 CHEVY EQUINOX LT

CD, ABS, Keyless Entry, Rear Defogger, Tilt Wheel, PL, PW, Cruise Control, Air Conditioning

72 MOS.

72 MOS.

Pwr. Driver’s Seat, Keyless Entry, Fog Lights, AM/FM/CD, Bedliner, PL, PW

2005 TOYOTA TACOMA DOUBLE CAB 4X4

2007 ACURA RDX 4X4

2007 LINCOLN MKX 4X4

Pwr. Adjust Pedals, Hard Tonneau

Pwr. Leather Heated Seats, Homelink Sys., Parking Cover, Electronic Trunk Closer, Sensors, Rear Wipers, Keyless Entry with Keypad, ABS, Carpeted Floor Mats, Bedliner Fog Lights, Rear Defogger, Side Airbags, Traction Control, Dual Zone Climate STARTING AT Control, Cruise, Tilt, Heated Mirrors Most with Air, AM/FM/CD,

2010 E-350 XLTs

TO CHOOSE FROM Cruise Control, Privacy Glass, ABS, Rear Defogger, Keyless STARTING AT AU9907- Climate Control, 6 Disc CD, Heated Mirrors, Remote Trunk Entry, PM, PL, PW, Running Lid, Rear Wipers, Premium Wheels, Parking Sensors, Pwr. Liftgate, Boards, Traction Control Electronic Truck Closer, Chrome Exhaust Tips, Rear Defogger, Fog

2008 EDGE LIMITED 4X4

TO CHOOSE FROM

Moonroof, Tilt, Cruise, Digital Info Center, Homelink Sys.

Moonroof, Keyless Entry, Rear Defogger, ABS, CD, Roof Rack

2005 CHEVY COLORADO CREW CAB LS 4X4

AU1329- AM/FM/CD, Tilt Wheel, Pwr. Door Locks, Pwr. Mirrors, Pwr. Windows, Cruise Control, ABS

AU1165- TRD Off-Road Pkg., SR5, VR-6, Pwr. Windows, PDL, Pwr. Mirrors, AM/FM/6 Disc CD, Fog Lamps., Keyless Entry, Tow Pkg., ABS, Cruise Control, Tilt AU1172- Technology Pkg., Pwr. Heated Leather Seats, 6 Disc CD, Wheel, Bedliner, Navigation Sys., Reverse Camera, Tilt, Cruise, Moonroof, Roof Sliding Rear Window Rack, Digital Info Center, ABS, 47K MILES! Fog Lights, Side Airbags, Rear 2002 LINCOLN BLACKWOOD SUPER CREW CAB Defogger, Traction Control, AU9850- Anti-Theft Sys., 6 Disc CD, ABS, Fog Lights, Keyless Keyless Entry, Rear Entry w/Keypad, Rear Defogger, Moonroof, Rear AC, Tow Pkg., Traction Control, Pwr. Leather Heated Seats, Memory Wipers, Premium Wheels Seats, Digital Info, Climate Control, 39K MILES! Remote Trunk Lid, Navigation Sys.,

2007 CADILLAC SRX4 AWD 2009 CHEVY MALIBU LTZ 2007 CHRYSLER ASPEN AU1042CD, Satellite Radio, Separate Tweeters, Premium Sound, ABS,

AU9744- Navigation Sys., Reverse Camera, Separate Tweeters, Subwoofers, Remote Trunk Lid, CD, ABS, Keyless Entry, Rear Defogger, Traction Control, Cruise, Tilt, Digital Info Center, Climate Control, Homelink Sys., Pwr. Heated Leather Seats, Wood Trim, Steering Wheel Controls, Bluetooth, Daytime Running Lights

STARTING AT

2007 DODGE DAKOTA SLT SUPER CAB 4X4 2009 ESCAPE LIMITED 4X4 AU9511 - Cruise Control, Tilt Wheel,

AU1327- Pwr. Heated Leather Seats, 6 Disc CD, ABS, Fog Lights, Rear Defogger, Keyless Entry w/Keypad, Traction Control, Tilt Wheel, Cruise Control, Digital 23K MILES! Info Center, Moonroof, Rear Wipers, Satellite Radio, Heated Mirrors, Parking Sensors

Lights, Keyless Entry with Keypad, Traction Control, ABS, Memory STARTING AT 2007 FORD ESCAPE XLT/LMTD 4X4 Seat, Pwr. Leather Heated Seats, Tilt Wheel, PL, PW, Cruise Control,

AU1317 - Leather Seats, AM/FM/CD, Keyless Entry, Rear Defogger, Tilt Wheel, Cruise Control, Moonroof, PL, PW, PM, Child Proof Door Locks

2008 LINCOLN NAVIGATOR ELITE AWD

2007 HONDA CR-V EX-L AWD

Most with SYNC, CD, Fog TO CHOOSE FROM Lights, Keyless Entry, Rear Defogger, Side Air Bags, Tilt, STARTING AT 2005 ESCAPE 4X4 Cruise, ABS, Pwr. Driver’s Seat, AU1104- Cruise Control, Tilt, Moonroof, Digital Info Center, Wheel, Rear Defogger, Keyless Compass & Temp. Display Entry, ABS, AM/FM/CD 72 MOS.

2008 MARINERS & ESCAPES

Most with ABS, Traction Control, Keyless Entry, Cruise Control, TO CHOOSE FROM PL, PW, PM, Rear Defogger, Side Air Bags, Tilt Wheel, Pwr. STARTING AT Moonroof, Pwr. Leather Seats, Pwr. Heated Mirrors, CD

2007 HUMMER H3 AWD

AU1035- AM/FM/CD, ABS, Fog Lights, Keyless Entry, Rear Defogger, Roof Rack, Moonroof, Pwr. Seat, Cruise, Tilt Wheel, Rear Wipers

AU1322- CD, ABS, Keyless Entry, Tilt, Rear Defogger, Side Airbags, Traction Control, Privacy Glass, Pwr. Driver’s Seat, Cruise,

CAR!

Most with 6 Disc CD, ABS, Dynamic Stability Fog Lights, Keyless Entry w/Keypad, Rear Defogger, Security Sys., Side Airbags, Traction Control, Tow Pkg., Tilt, Cruise, Moonroof, Pwr. Leather Heat/ Cool Front Seats, Digital Info Center, Memory Seat, Homelink Sys., Roof Rack, Rear AC, Video Sys., Touch Screen, 3rd Seat, Rear Wipers, Reverse Running Boards, Navigation Sys., Parking 2005 FORD EXPEDITION XLT 4X4 Camera, Sensors, Luxury Seats, Custom Bumper, DVD CD, ABS, Keyless Entry, Traction Control, Rear Defogger, Tow Pkg., Roof Player, Electronic Trunk Closer, Chrome Exhaust Rack, Rear A/C, Pwr. Seat, Heated Tips, Premium Wheels, Pwr. Liftgate, Premim Mirrors, Running Boards, Rear Wipers Sound, Body Side Moldings, Carpeted Floor Mats, Pwr. Adjustable Pedals, Heated Mirrors

All Wheel Drive, Pwr. Leather Heated Seats, Digital Info Center, Adaptive Cruise Control, Tilt, Moonroof, ABS, Climate Control, TO Fog Lights, Rear Defogger, Touch Screen, Reverse CHOOSE Camera, Navigation Sys., Memory Seat, Traction FROM Control, Side Air Bags, Heated Mirrors, AU1221- Pwr. Leather Seats, Rear Defogger, Custom Bumper, Premium Wheels, ABS, Moonroof, Tilt Wheel, PL, PW, PM, Keyless Entry with Keypad AM/FM/6 Disc CD, Cruise Control

2006 ESCAPE XLT 4X4

2008 HONDA ACCORD LX-P

07-08 EDGE SE/SEL AWD

AU1095- Pwr. Leather Heated Front & Rear Seats, ABS, Fog Most with Cruise, Tilt, Privacy Glass, Keyless Entry, Lights, Keyless Entry, Rear Defogger, CD, Navigation Sys., Traction Control, Rear Defogger, Rear Wipers, CD, Remote Start, Premium Wheels, Satellite Radio, Parking ABS,Side Airbags, Some with Parking Sensors, Heated Sensors, Daytime Running Lights, Cruise Control, Tilt Wheel, Mirrors, 6 Disc CD, Moonroof, Heated Seats, Memory Seat Moonroof, Memory Seat, STARTING AT TO Homelink Sys., Digital Info CHOOSE Center, Body Side Moldings FROM

THE

Fog Lights, Keyless Entry, Rear Defogger, Side Airbags, Traction Control, Tow Pkg., Roof Rack, Pwr. Driver’s Seat, Memory Seat, PWr. Leather Heated Seats, Moonroof, Homelink Sys., Digital Info Center, Cruise, Tilt, Navigation Sys., DVD Player, 3rd Row Seat, Rear Wipers, OnStar, Dual Zone Climate Control, Premium Wheels, Touch Screen, Pwr. Liftgate, Pwr. Adjust Pedals, Electronic Trunk Closer

2006 F-150 CREW CAB XLT 4X4 AU1022- AM/FM/CD, ABS, Fog Lights, Keyless Entry, Tow Package, Privacy Glass, Pwr. Driver’s Seat, Cruise Control, Tilt Wheel, Sliding Rear Window, Bedliner, Running 21K MILES! Boards, Split Front Bench, Tow Hooks, Child Proof Door Locks

08 FORD F-150 XLT SUPERCAB 4X4 Most with CD, ABS, Tilt, Keyless Entry w/ Keypad, Cruise, Tow Pkg., Fog Lights, Driver & Passenger Air Bags, PL, PW, Pwr. Steering

TO CHOOSE FROM

2007 EXPEDITION LIMITED 4X4 2010 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 CREW LT Z71 4X4

AU1114- CD, ABS, Fog Lights, Keyless Entry, Rear Defogger, Side Airbags, Traction Control, Tow Pkg., Roof Rack, Rear AC, Moonroof, Pwr. Leather Heated/Cooled Seats, Memory Seat, Homelink Sys., Dual Zone Climate Control, Cruise Control, Tilt Wheel, Navigation Sys., Pwr. Liftgate, Rear Wipers, Running Boards, 3rd Row Seat, Touch Screen, Pwr. Adjustable Pedals, Heated Mirrors, Electronic Trunk Closer, Parking Sensors

AU1277 - AM/FM/CD, ABS, Fog Lights, Keyless Entry, Traction Control, Steering Wheel Controls, Pwr. Driver’s Seat, MILES! Digital Info Center, Tilt Wheel, Privacy Glass, Cruise Control, Sliding Rear Window, Bedliner

14K

Tax and tags extra. “BUY FOR” prices are based on 72 month (*66, 63, 60, 48, and 36 months for selected vehicles) with $2,500 down (cash or trade). Photos of vehicles are for illustration purposes only. Coccia Ford is not responsible for any typographical errors. No Security Deposit Necessary. See dealer for details.

CALL NOW 823-8888 1-800-817-FORD Overlooking Mohegan Sun 577 East Main St., Plains Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B


SUNDAY DISPATCH

SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011 PAGE 13

460 AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE DIRECTORY 468

Auto Parts

570-301-3602

CALL US! TO JUNK YOUR CAR

BEST PRICES IN THE AREA CA$H ON THE $POT, Free Anytime Pickup 570-301-3602

506 Administrative/ Clerical

AR/ AP OFFICE ASSISTANT Varsity Landscaping & Garden Center in Swoyersville is seeking an office assistant with proficiency in AR/ AP and MS office. 7:30am5 and 40-50 hours/ week. No health insurance available. Must have reliable transport.

LINE UP A SUCCESSFUL SALE IN CLASSIFIED!

Call Harvis interview service at 542-5330 or send resume: varsity.harvis@gmail .com

Do you need more space? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way to clean out your closets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

No Walk-Ins Please EOE

VITO’S & GINO’S Wanted: Junk Cars & Trucks Highest Prices Paid In Cash!!! FREE Pick Ups Call Anytime 288-8995

490 Truck/SUV/ Van Accessories TRUCK CAP. Red for 6’ Chevy box $200. Call Dave at 570-760-9074

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED! Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

DATA ENTRY Positive Results Marketing, Inc. located at 510 S. Main St. Old Forge, PA 18518 is looking for a part-time data entry clerk. Qualified individual must be able to type 80WPM and must have basic computer skills, be proficient in Microsoft Excel and must be available during normal business hours. Interview will included a typing test. Please contact Nora at (570) 457-7020 to set-up an interview or e-mail your resume to prminc14@aol.com.

506 Administrative/ Clerical

Assistant Office Manger Immediate full-time position with electrical contractor located in the Greater Pittston Area. Experience in construction industry and with PennDOT ECMS network is preferred but not required. Work responsibility will include billing, cash receipts, job cost entries, end of month/year reports, A/R closing & financial statement preparation, contract administration, insurance administration, material certification compliance, answering phones and other duties as required. Candidates must be knowledgeable with Microsoft Office software, and have strong communication skills. Salary is dependent on experience and training is provided. We are an equal opportunity employer. Please send resume to:

Human Resources Department PO Box 1042 Pittston, PA 18640

533

Installation/ Maintenance/ Repair

533

Installation/ Maintenance/ Repair

CRANE MECHANIC Local, well established Crane Company in need of an experienced Hydraulic Crane Mechanic to work on crane fleet in the Williamsport Pa area. Top Pay in the business. Excellent Benefits. Service Truck Provided. Class B Required. Will assist in relocation. Must have own tools, Minimum 5 years experience and willing to work over time and weekends when needed. Experience with Link Belt, Liebheer and Grove Cranes a plus! Email: careeropportunity17701@gmail.com

554

Production/ Operations

554

Production/ Operations

CRANE OPERATORS Locally owned, large crane company working in oil field, road construction & general construction looking for Crane Operators. CCO Certification & Class A/B License required (2) Years experience. Over time and weekends required. Permanent work based out of Williamsport, Pa and through out the Northern Tier. Top Pay in Industry. Excellent Benefits. State of the Art Equipment. Will assist in relocation. Email: careeropportunity17701@gmail.com

468

Auto Parts

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Would you enjoy working for the industry leader? Slusser Brothers, the regions leading construction contractor & materials supplier has the following fulltime positions available:

• Asphalt Plant Operator • Aggregate Blacktop Lab Tech • Blacktop Lab Technician – Necept certification helpful •Tri-Axle Dump Truck Driver

•Quarry Laborer •Hauler Driver •Millwright Are you up for the challenge of joining our team? You may apply online at www.oldcastle midatlantic.com EOE/AAP M-F-D-DV

91

%

Do you need more space? A yard or garage sale in classified Wanna make a is the best way to clean out your closets! speedy sale? Place your ad today 570You’re in bussiness 829-7130. with classified! 506 Administrative/ Clerical

Building/ Construction/ Skilled Trades

468

Auto Parts

BUYING JUNK VEHICLES $300 and Up $125 extra if driven, pulled or pushed in. NOBODY Pays More

570-760-2035

Monday thru Saturday 6 am-9 pm Sunday 2 pm-8 pm

of Times Leader readers read the Classified section. *2008 Pulse Research

What Do You Have To Sell Today?

515 Creative/Design

GRAPHIC DESIGN Can you put together a display ad from scratch in one hour? Have you done commercial work for an existing business? Does your portfolio have any work besides school projects? Do you own a computer with CS4 or CS5? Are you an expert in indesign? Can you work in a studio environment? If you said yes to ALL of these questions then please call: Rachel Antosh at (570) 457-7020 to set-up a time to showcase your skills. Art Director, Rachel Antosh of PRM, Inc. is looking for part and full-time graphic designers to work in her Old Forge Studio. Part time work would take place between 9am-5pm M-F. No freelance work is available. If you said NO to any of the questions above then you would qualify for these particular positions. E-mail your resume to: prminc14@aol.com

522

Education/ Training

TEACHERS / ASSISTANTS

Full time/Part time positions in child care center. 2year/4 year degree in Early Childhood required for teacher. Excellent benefits. Apply Child Development Council, 9 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre or email: karenbcdc3@ aol.com. E.O.E.

527 Food Services/ Hospitality

Call 829-7130 to place your ad.

COOKS & CHEFS Apply in person:

ONLY ONL NL ONE NLY N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

551

Other

Isabella Restaurant 1140 Route 315 Wilkes-Barre, PA

551

Other

527 Food Services/ Hospitality

PIZZA & SHORT ORDER CHEFS Experienced. Night & Weekend Shifts. Apply in person at The Woodlands 1073 Highway 315 Wilkes-Barre

533

Installation/ Maintenance/ Repair

AUTO MECHANIC

No weekends. Paid holidays & vacation. Must have PA inspection & Emissions license. Must have own tools. Salary commensurate with experience. Call Jerry 570-388-2570 Monday-Friday 8am-5pm

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

EXPERIENCED PIPEFITTERS WANTED For Expanding HVAC Co. Must be a team player, hard working, and have reliable transportation. Candidate will work four, ten hour days. Prevailing wage pay. Please forward resumes to: Master Mechanical Corp. 3 Banks Ave. McAdoo, PA. 18237

LABORERS

Landscaping & Gas Field work available now. Physically demanding. $9/hour. 5-6am daily start. 40-60 hours per week. Apply erosion control matting on gas site. Also landscaping duties like operating mowers, whackers, rake, shovel & Bobcat. No health insurance available. Must have reliable transport, clean driving record, and pass drug test. Apply in person. 8am-3pm, ONLY and bring ID. Varsity Inc. 1204 Main Street Swoyersville Q’s call Brian 542-5330 E.O.E.

551

Other

538

Janitorial/ Cleaning

542

Logistics/ Transportation

HOUSEKEEPER Mother’s Helper needed in Dallas. Monday-Friday 7-11am. Non Smoker & Detail Oriented. $10-12/hour. housekeeper18612@ gmail.com

542

Logistics/ Transportation

SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS NEEDED Great for retirees or stay at home parents. Please contact 570-587-2683

DRIVER/WAREHOUSE Full time driver/ warehouse person needed for local well-established organization. No overnights/ evenings. Competitive wages and benefits. Must have a clean drivers license. CDL not required. Apply in person at Master Chemical Products 201 Carey Avenue Wilkes-Barre 570-825-3465 Drivers: Top Pay + Benefits/Bonuses! No-Touch. 85-95% D&H. CDL-A. 866-460-8464 or Apply gomartini.com CDL A DriversExcellent Opportunity! Ryder Dedicated Account. HOME DAILY! Monday-Friday schedule. Great Pay, Top Benefits, Class A Driver, Flatbed experience. Prefer experience with steel. CALL 800-793-3754 EOE. Drug Test required for employment. Drivers: Excellent Pay, benefits, bonuses & home weekly dedicated account openings with premier truckload carrier. Werner Enterprises 1-800-397-2645

OWNER OPERATORS NEEDED Dedicated service. Good pay. Steady year round work. Regional work. Home weekends. Call 570-996-7662

551

Other

TRUCKING

SAFETY DIRECTOR

Local Trucking Company looking for an experienced Safety Director, if you have knowledge of FMCSA regulations, driver recruitment and retention, OSHA regulations, H/R, accident Investigation, workers compensation and excellent people skills then we want to talk to you. Send resume and salary requirements to hr@ calexlogistics.com or apply in person: Calex 58 Pittston Ave, Pittston, Pa. EOE

545

Marketing/ Product

MARKETING SPECIALIST The P&G Mehoopany Employees Federal Credit Union has an immediate opening for a Marketing Specialist. Benefits include 95% paid healthcare, paid holidays and much more. Must have excellent communication and demonstration skills; able to handle many assignments simultaneously; exhibits creativity and resourcefulness; expert in market research and problem solving; forward thinking, ability to listen to details attentively; self- confident and outgoing. A Bachelor’s degree in advertising, marketing or communications is preferred. Must have at least 3 years experience in related field. Email resume with cover letter to Kathy Stanziale at kathypgcu@ptd.net or mail to P&G Mehoopany Employees FCU, PO Box 210, Tunkhannock, PA 18657, attention Kathy Stanziale.

551

Other

548 Medical/Health

548 Medical/Health

548 Medical/Health

DENTAL ASSISTANT

HELPMATES, INC. HOME CARE AGENCY

MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST

Helpmates, Inc., Leading home care provider in PA since 1987. We are now hiring a part-time Administrative Assistant for our Luzerne/ Wyoming County office, located in Wilkes-Barre. We are also seeking an RN Consultant. You will be responsible for Patient initial assessments, quarterly visits, as well as aide verification of competencies & aide supervisory visits. RN certification & liability insurance is required. We are always accepting applications for Personal Care Aides, immediate need in Hazleton, Nicholson, and Wilkes-Barre. Interested candidates should call to 570-829-2037 for more information. EOE

Part time for Wilkes-Barre Physicians Office. Monday-Wednesday 8:30am-4:30pm. Immediate opening. Salary based on experience. Send resume to c/o Times Leader Box 2455 15 North Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250

Energetic person for busy dental/orthodontic office. 4 day work week. Must be X-ray certified. Send resume to: c/o Times Leader Box 2450 Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250

To place your ad Call Toll Free 1-800-427-8649

FIREFIGHTER/ EMT

Full & Part Time positions. Successful candidates must have EVO & EMT certificates. Competitive salary & benefits. Please mail resume to: Dallas Fire & Ambulance Inc. P.O. BOX 336 Dallas, PA 18612 EOE

HEALTH CARE

Seeking LPN to provide excellent personal care in our home. Pittston area. Alternate Weekends. Experience & references required. Call 239-4589.

542

Logistics/ Transportation

Looking for Work? Tell Employers with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

542

Logistics/ Transportation

MEDICAL SALES

Lincare of Scranton, PA, a leading national respiratory company is seeking a results driven Sales Representative. Create working relationships with MD’s, nurses, social workers and articulate our excellent patient care with attentive listening skills. Competitive Base + un-capped commission. For a confidential interview please email to Mbrady@lincare.com Drug-free workplace EOE

542

Logistics/ Transportation

XLC Services, LLC (Logistics) is seeking experienced forklift operators & Inexperienced candidates with great employment history to work at their Mehoopany, PA location. The following skills are Every Thursday necessary for these positions: • High School Diploma/GED In March • Computer Skills EXCEPT NO FAIR • Valid Driver’s License • Criminal Background Check March 17th • Pass Pre-employment Drug Screen & Physical 10:00 am - 4:00 pm • Part-time position for experienced Tunkhannock driver only. All full-time positions come with the Library following benefits: medical, 8 paid holidays, 401k after 1 year, and paid vacation. Pay increase based on skill development. 273001

509

551

Other

551

Other

551

Other


SUNDAY DISPATCH

SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011 PAGE 13

460 AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE DIRECTORY 468

Auto Parts

570-301-3602

CALL US! TO JUNK YOUR CAR

BEST PRICES IN THE AREA CA$H ON THE $POT, Free Anytime Pickup 570-301-3602

506 Administrative/ Clerical

AR/ AP OFFICE ASSISTANT Varsity Landscaping & Garden Center in Swoyersville is seeking an office assistant with proficiency in AR/ AP and MS office. 7:30am5 and 40-50 hours/ week. No health insurance available. Must have reliable transport.

LINE UP A SUCCESSFUL SALE IN CLASSIFIED!

Call Harvis interview service at 542-5330 or send resume: varsity.harvis@gmail .com

Do you need more space? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way to clean out your closets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

No Walk-Ins Please EOE

VITO’S & GINO’S Wanted: Junk Cars & Trucks Highest Prices Paid In Cash!!! FREE Pick Ups Call Anytime 288-8995

490 Truck/SUV/ Van Accessories TRUCK CAP. Red for 6’ Chevy box $200. Call Dave at 570-760-9074

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED! Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

DATA ENTRY Positive Results Marketing, Inc. located at 510 S. Main St. Old Forge, PA 18518 is looking for a part-time data entry clerk. Qualified individual must be able to type 80WPM and must have basic computer skills, be proficient in Microsoft Excel and must be available during normal business hours. Interview will included a typing test. Please contact Nora at (570) 457-7020 to set-up an interview or e-mail your resume to prminc14@aol.com.

506 Administrative/ Clerical

Assistant Office Manger Immediate full-time position with electrical contractor located in the Greater Pittston Area. Experience in construction industry and with PennDOT ECMS network is preferred but not required. Work responsibility will include billing, cash receipts, job cost entries, end of month/year reports, A/R closing & financial statement preparation, contract administration, insurance administration, material certification compliance, answering phones and other duties as required. Candidates must be knowledgeable with Microsoft Office software, and have strong communication skills. Salary is dependent on experience and training is provided. We are an equal opportunity employer. Please send resume to:

Human Resources Department PO Box 1042 Pittston, PA 18640

533

Installation/ Maintenance/ Repair

533

Installation/ Maintenance/ Repair

CRANE MECHANIC Local, well established Crane Company in need of an experienced Hydraulic Crane Mechanic to work on crane fleet in the Williamsport Pa area. Top Pay in the business. Excellent Benefits. Service Truck Provided. Class B Required. Will assist in relocation. Must have own tools, Minimum 5 years experience and willing to work over time and weekends when needed. Experience with Link Belt, Liebheer and Grove Cranes a plus! Email: careeropportunity17701@gmail.com

554

Production/ Operations

554

Production/ Operations

CRANE OPERATORS Locally owned, large crane company working in oil field, road construction & general construction looking for Crane Operators. CCO Certification & Class A/B License required (2) Years experience. Over time and weekends required. Permanent work based out of Williamsport, Pa and through out the Northern Tier. Top Pay in Industry. Excellent Benefits. State of the Art Equipment. Will assist in relocation. Email: careeropportunity17701@gmail.com

468

Auto Parts

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Would you enjoy working for the industry leader? Slusser Brothers, the regions leading construction contractor & materials supplier has the following fulltime positions available:

• Asphalt Plant Operator • Aggregate Blacktop Lab Tech • Blacktop Lab Technician – Necept certification helpful •Tri-Axle Dump Truck Driver

•Quarry Laborer •Hauler Driver •Millwright Are you up for the challenge of joining our team? You may apply online at www.oldcastle midatlantic.com EOE/AAP M-F-D-DV

91

%

Do you need more space? A yard or garage sale in classified Wanna make a is the best way to clean out your closets! speedy sale? Place your ad today 570You’re in bussiness 829-7130. with classified! 506 Administrative/ Clerical

Building/ Construction/ Skilled Trades

468

Auto Parts

BUYING JUNK VEHICLES $300 and Up $125 extra if driven, pulled or pushed in. NOBODY Pays More

570-760-2035

Monday thru Saturday 6 am-9 pm Sunday 2 pm-8 pm

of Times Leader readers read the Classified section. *2008 Pulse Research

What Do You Have To Sell Today?

515 Creative/Design

GRAPHIC DESIGN Can you put together a display ad from scratch in one hour? Have you done commercial work for an existing business? Does your portfolio have any work besides school projects? Do you own a computer with CS4 or CS5? Are you an expert in indesign? Can you work in a studio environment? If you said yes to ALL of these questions then please call: Rachel Antosh at (570) 457-7020 to set-up a time to showcase your skills. Art Director, Rachel Antosh of PRM, Inc. is looking for part and full-time graphic designers to work in her Old Forge Studio. Part time work would take place between 9am-5pm M-F. No freelance work is available. If you said NO to any of the questions above then you would qualify for these particular positions. E-mail your resume to: prminc14@aol.com

522

Education/ Training

TEACHERS / ASSISTANTS

Full time/Part time positions in child care center. 2year/4 year degree in Early Childhood required for teacher. Excellent benefits. Apply Child Development Council, 9 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre or email: karenbcdc3@ aol.com. E.O.E.

527 Food Services/ Hospitality

Call 829-7130 to place your ad.

COOKS & CHEFS Apply in person:

ONLY ONL NL ONE NLY N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

551

Other

Isabella Restaurant 1140 Route 315 Wilkes-Barre, PA

551

Other

527 Food Services/ Hospitality

PIZZA & SHORT ORDER CHEFS Experienced. Night & Weekend Shifts. Apply in person at The Woodlands 1073 Highway 315 Wilkes-Barre

533

Installation/ Maintenance/ Repair

AUTO MECHANIC

No weekends. Paid holidays & vacation. Must have PA inspection & Emissions license. Must have own tools. Salary commensurate with experience. Call Jerry 570-388-2570 Monday-Friday 8am-5pm

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

EXPERIENCED PIPEFITTERS WANTED For Expanding HVAC Co. Must be a team player, hard working, and have reliable transportation. Candidate will work four, ten hour days. Prevailing wage pay. Please forward resumes to: Master Mechanical Corp. 3 Banks Ave. McAdoo, PA. 18237

LABORERS

Landscaping & Gas Field work available now. Physically demanding. $9/hour. 5-6am daily start. 40-60 hours per week. Apply erosion control matting on gas site. Also landscaping duties like operating mowers, whackers, rake, shovel & Bobcat. No health insurance available. Must have reliable transport, clean driving record, and pass drug test. Apply in person. 8am-3pm, ONLY and bring ID. Varsity Inc. 1204 Main Street Swoyersville Q’s call Brian 542-5330 E.O.E.

551

Other

538

Janitorial/ Cleaning

542

Logistics/ Transportation

HOUSEKEEPER Mother’s Helper needed in Dallas. Monday-Friday 7-11am. Non Smoker & Detail Oriented. $10-12/hour. housekeeper18612@ gmail.com

542

Logistics/ Transportation

SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS NEEDED Great for retirees or stay at home parents. Please contact 570-587-2683

DRIVER/WAREHOUSE Full time driver/ warehouse person needed for local well-established organization. No overnights/ evenings. Competitive wages and benefits. Must have a clean drivers license. CDL not required. Apply in person at Master Chemical Products 201 Carey Avenue Wilkes-Barre 570-825-3465 Drivers: Top Pay + Benefits/Bonuses! No-Touch. 85-95% D&H. CDL-A. 866-460-8464 or Apply gomartini.com CDL A DriversExcellent Opportunity! Ryder Dedicated Account. HOME DAILY! Monday-Friday schedule. Great Pay, Top Benefits, Class A Driver, Flatbed experience. Prefer experience with steel. CALL 800-793-3754 EOE. Drug Test required for employment. Drivers: Excellent Pay, benefits, bonuses & home weekly dedicated account openings with premier truckload carrier. Werner Enterprises 1-800-397-2645

OWNER OPERATORS NEEDED Dedicated service. Good pay. Steady year round work. Regional work. Home weekends. Call 570-996-7662

551

Other

TRUCKING

SAFETY DIRECTOR

Local Trucking Company looking for an experienced Safety Director, if you have knowledge of FMCSA regulations, driver recruitment and retention, OSHA regulations, H/R, accident Investigation, workers compensation and excellent people skills then we want to talk to you. Send resume and salary requirements to hr@ calexlogistics.com or apply in person: Calex 58 Pittston Ave, Pittston, Pa. EOE

545

Marketing/ Product

MARKETING SPECIALIST The P&G Mehoopany Employees Federal Credit Union has an immediate opening for a Marketing Specialist. Benefits include 95% paid healthcare, paid holidays and much more. Must have excellent communication and demonstration skills; able to handle many assignments simultaneously; exhibits creativity and resourcefulness; expert in market research and problem solving; forward thinking, ability to listen to details attentively; self- confident and outgoing. A Bachelor’s degree in advertising, marketing or communications is preferred. Must have at least 3 years experience in related field. Email resume with cover letter to Kathy Stanziale at kathypgcu@ptd.net or mail to P&G Mehoopany Employees FCU, PO Box 210, Tunkhannock, PA 18657, attention Kathy Stanziale.

551

Other

548 Medical/Health

548 Medical/Health

548 Medical/Health

DENTAL ASSISTANT

HELPMATES, INC. HOME CARE AGENCY

MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST

Helpmates, Inc., Leading home care provider in PA since 1987. We are now hiring a part-time Administrative Assistant for our Luzerne/ Wyoming County office, located in Wilkes-Barre. We are also seeking an RN Consultant. You will be responsible for Patient initial assessments, quarterly visits, as well as aide verification of competencies & aide supervisory visits. RN certification & liability insurance is required. We are always accepting applications for Personal Care Aides, immediate need in Hazleton, Nicholson, and Wilkes-Barre. Interested candidates should call to 570-829-2037 for more information. EOE

Part time for Wilkes-Barre Physicians Office. Monday-Wednesday 8:30am-4:30pm. Immediate opening. Salary based on experience. Send resume to c/o Times Leader Box 2455 15 North Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250

Energetic person for busy dental/orthodontic office. 4 day work week. Must be X-ray certified. Send resume to: c/o Times Leader Box 2450 Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250

To place your ad Call Toll Free 1-800-427-8649

FIREFIGHTER/ EMT

Full & Part Time positions. Successful candidates must have EVO & EMT certificates. Competitive salary & benefits. Please mail resume to: Dallas Fire & Ambulance Inc. P.O. BOX 336 Dallas, PA 18612 EOE

HEALTH CARE

Seeking LPN to provide excellent personal care in our home. Pittston area. Alternate Weekends. Experience & references required. Call 239-4589.

542

Logistics/ Transportation

Looking for Work? Tell Employers with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

542

Logistics/ Transportation

MEDICAL SALES

Lincare of Scranton, PA, a leading national respiratory company is seeking a results driven Sales Representative. Create working relationships with MD’s, nurses, social workers and articulate our excellent patient care with attentive listening skills. Competitive Base + un-capped commission. For a confidential interview please email to Mbrady@lincare.com Drug-free workplace EOE

542

Logistics/ Transportation

XLC Services, LLC (Logistics) is seeking experienced forklift operators & Inexperienced candidates with great employment history to work at their Mehoopany, PA location. The following skills are Every Thursday necessary for these positions: • High School Diploma/GED In March • Computer Skills EXCEPT NO FAIR • Valid Driver’s License • Criminal Background Check March 17th • Pass Pre-employment Drug Screen & Physical 10:00 am - 4:00 pm • Part-time position for experienced Tunkhannock driver only. All full-time positions come with the Library following benefits: medical, 8 paid holidays, 401k after 1 year, and paid vacation. Pay increase based on skill development. 273001

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PAGE 14 SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011 548 Medical/Health

554

LITTLE FLOWER MANOR is accepting

TOOL MAKER/ MACHINIST Experience

applications for the following positions: CNA’s – full and part time 3-11 and 11-7 LPN’s – per diem Dietary Aides – per diem 6 a.m. – 2 p.m. and 4-7 p.m.

necessary. Please send cover letter & resume to: r.delvalle@ usmaero.net

566

Prep Cook – Per diem 6 a.m – 2 p.m. Director of Food Service – plans, directs and coordinates the activities of the Food Service Department to provide dietetic services to residents, employees, guests, special events, etc., must have 3-5 years of experience in culinary and nutiritonal services, plus management and long term care experience. CDM preferred. Assistant Director of Food Service – must have cooking and management experience, knowledge of purchasing, inventory control and long term care regulations. Environmental Aides full and part time Resident Assistants (Saint Therese Residence) Full And Part Time 3-11 And 11-7 Candidates are required to be available weekends and holidays. APPLY: HUMAN RESOURCES LITTLE FLOWER MANOR & ST. THERESE RESIDENCE 200 S. Meade St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702 pmelski@ lfmstr.com fax: 570-408-9760 EOE

NORTHEAST VETERINARY REFERRAL HOSPITAL A state-of-the-art veterinary referral and emergency hospital, located near Wilkes-Barre, seeks qualified individuals available to work nights, weekends and holidays in the following positions: • Veterinary Technicians • Client Service Team Members Technicians must have experience, and/or education. Client Service TMs must have customer service experience and the ability to multi-task in a fast paced environment. We offer a comprehensive benefits package. Please apply in person or send resume to:

NVRH

242 S. River St. Suite 200 Plains, PA 18705 EOE

RN / LPN / MA

Part Time For Physician’s office. Send resume to: Dallas Family Practice Attn: Office Manager 16 Church St. Dallas, PA. 18612

551

ROUTE SALESPERSON

SALES

Looking for a new career opportunity and not just a job? Fast-paced insurance agency looking for an ambitious, persuasive selfstarter with excellent selling skills — an individual seeking an opportunity to earn what they are worth. Individual with a desire to learn & willingness to do ‘whatever-ittakes.’ Willing to train, if you have initiative and talent. Requirements include entrepreneurial drive & an “A Plus” Personality. Background in insurance, real estate or financial services helpful, but not required. Competitive compensation. Please email resume to: troye3@ nationwide.com

SALES

Position available for the right person who will sell locations for our recycling units. You must be personable, outgoing, able to make cold calls, have a reliable vehicle and believe in saving the environment through recycling. Sales area covers a 100 miles radius from our Wilkes Barre location. Salary $25,000.00 plus commission plus mileage. U’SAgain Recycling 486 S Empire St. Wilkes-Barre 570-270-2670

554

Production/ Operations

ASSEMBLY / METAL SHOP Full-time/Part-Time Monday-Friday Apply in Person Barhill Mfg. Corp 396 S. Township Blvd., Pittston, PA

CNC OPERATOR Experience necessary. Please send cover letter & resume to: r.delvalle@ usmaero.net

H.C.S.C. INDUSTRIAL LAUNDRY

708

Antiques & Collectibles

BASEBALL CARDS: Certified Duke Snyder autographed COA from Nabisco & MLBBPA $45. Barry Sanders graded 89 score rookie card. (N.Mint 8) by CSA $40. 655-5009 COMIC BOOKS Gen 13-1, X-files #1 & 2, Spiderman & many others, $2 each. 570-829-2411 LP’S (1000!) 78’S, 45’S From 40’S, 50’S, 60’S & 70’S $1 each. 829-2411 MEMORABILIA Michael Jackson. Posters, $10 each. Key chains, $5 each. Stickers, $3 per pack. Bottle openers, $5 each. 570-829-2411 NEON SIGN - Electric, Camel sign, 30 years old, $300. 570-829-2411

548 Medical/Health

91

%

of Times Leader readers read the Classified section. *2008 Pulse Research

What Do You Have To Sell Today? Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONLY ONL NL ONE NLY N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

548 Medical/Health

EXPERIENCED CAREGIVERS NEEDED Visiting Angels is looking for experienced compassionate and reliable caregivers to work in the homes of the elderly. We offer competitive wages, training, friendly and supportive staff. Come Join Our Growing Team! Must have a minimum of 2 years experience, valid driver’s license. Immediate Openings in the Dallas area.

Why a career with Visiting Angels? Because we care about our caregivers!

Call 570-270-6700 today!

708

Antiques & Collectibles

YEARBOOKS: Coughlin H.S. 1926, 1928, 1932, 1937, 1940, 1961, 1963, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1949. G.A.R. H.S. 1934, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1951, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1961, 1963, 1965, 1966, 1970, 1980, 1985, 2005, 2006. Meyers H.S. 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1959, 1960, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977. Kingston H.S. 1938, 1939, 1940, 1944, 1948, 1949. Plymouth H.S. 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1938, 1943, 1944, 1959, 1960. Hanover H.S. 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1960. Edwardsville H.S. 1965, 1966. West Pittston H.S. Annual 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1931, 1932, 1959. Luzerne H.S. 1951, 1952, 1956, 1957, 1959. Berwick H.S. 1952, 1953, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1960, 1967, 1968, 1969 ,1970. Lehman H.S. 1973, 1974, 1976, 1978, 1980. Nanticoke H.S. 1957. Nanticoke Area H.S. 1976, 2008. Dallas H.S. 1966, 1967, 1968. Bishop Hoban H.S. 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975. West Side Central Catholic H.S. 19651975, 1980, 1981. Benton H.S. 1977. Dallas Twp. H.S. Kingston Twp. H.S. 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951. Dallastowian H.S. 1949, 1950, 1951. DallasKingston H.S. 1952. 570-825-4721

710

710

Appliances

DRYER: HotPoint 3 cycle, large capacity, good condition $150. G.E. 6 cycle washer heavy duty large capacity good condition $150. Hot point fridge, good condition $150. Maytag washer, 2 speed. heavy dutygood condition $150. Whirlpool dryer Supreme 6 cycle, 4 temperature heavy duty super capacity $150. For more details! 212-0183 MICROWAVE $15. TOASTER OVEN $15. 2 DRIP COFFEE MACHINES $10. or 2 for $15. All good condition. 740-1392 REFRIGERATOR Kenmore, almond, 21.6 cu. ft. with ice maker & filtered water $350. 570-868-6018 REFRIGERATOR. 16 CU. FT $150, FREEZER, chest, $100. MICROWAVE, new! $100. Moving Sale. 570-852-1039

566 Sales/Business Development

710

Appliances

710

Appliances

STOVE: Kenmore, brand new gas stove, white, inside never used, $300. 570-905-2364

GENE’S RECONDITIONED APPLIANCES 60 Day Warranty Monday-Friday 8:00PM-5:00PM Saturday 8:00AM-11:00AM Gateway Shopping Center Kingston, PA

(570) 819-1966

REFRIGERATOR. Frigidaire Gallery Series. Brand new NEVER USED. 26 cu ft, side by side. Water and ice maker, stainless front. Sells for $1400 Asking $800. 570-262-2845

STOVE: White electric, black glass top. Great condition $275. or best offer. Allison 570-6316635 9:00-5:30 or 570-283-5958 after 5:30.

Line up a place to live in classified! WASHER & DRYER Maytag washer Frigidaire dryer. Both work well. $175.00 for both. Call after 5:30 pm. (570) 451-0529

712

Baby Items

554

Production/ Operations

554

Production/ Operations

Baby Items

PACK N PLAY. Graco, clean, excellent condition. $30. BOUNCER, hanging for 6 month old. $5. 570-735-0821

716

Building Materials

GLASS DOOR. 3 way glass door for bath tub. $25 570-331-8183 WELL TANK. GOULDS V60 19.9 gallon tank. New in box. Great Deal on pricey item! $225. 570-239-8149 WOOD. Rough cut and finished. Varying lengths/widths. Oak, pine, hemlock. $400. 239-8149

720

STOVE, electric, almond color. $225. 570-956-1961

566 Sales/Business Development

566 Sales/Business Development

726

Cemetery Plots/Lots

CEMETERY PLOTS

Plymouth National Cemetery in Wyoming. 6 Plots. $450 each. Call 570-825-3666

Clothing

JACKET: boys genuine Italian stone leather jacket, size 14. $25. 868-6018 JACKET: Dallas Cowboys all leather superbowl jacket. All superbowls listed $250. 954-4219 PURSES (2)Vera Bradley capri blue with wallet, reversible burgundy $20 each. 570-693-2612 PURSES: American Eagle Outfitters wool design purse great condition $3.00 Victoria Secret black/pink slipper boots, medium great condition $3. Liz Claiborne small butterfly print leather purse $4. Misses/junior Old Navy & American Eagle tops, XS to Medium $1. Old Navy Size 6 flare jeans $2. Pants/ khaki’s sizes 4, 6, 8, 10 $2. each. Lilu small purse with cute buttons from Pac Sun $3. Black slip-on waitress shoes size 6-1/2 rarely worn $1.50 Asics track cleats silver/light green size 7 good condition $3. 696-3528

Appliances

OVEN: Big George oven $100. 570-457-2109

554

712

BOTTLE DRYING RACK, formula mixer, auto mirror, born free baby bottles 3 small, 3large $20. Evenflo Baby Exersaucer, farm theme, for 4 months to walking, excellent condition $25. 570-288-7905

Equal Opportunity Employer

Production/ Operations

Please submit resume to Gary.Swanson.GXMY@Statefarm.com or fax us at 570-821-7535

Hiring Assemblers & Parts Shippers E Seeking Assemblers & Parts Shippers for Duryea Manufacturing Facility. Generous benefits include affordable healthcare with minimal co-pays.

401 York Ave, Duryea, PA 18642 Apply online at www.pridemobility.com/careers EOE/MF/DV/AA

551

Other

551

Other

551

Other

551

Other

551

Other

551

Other

551

Other

726

Clothing

SPORT COAT, navy blue, excellent condition, size large/ extra large. $5. 570-823-4941

728

Commercial/ Industrial Equipment

SNOWPLOW: Meyers 84” full size snow plow with frame only, no truck mounting. manual swivel adjustment, but has hydraulic mounts for conversion. Excellent condition, garage kept $350. 926-5075

730

Computer Equipment & Software

COMPUTER: Dell dimension 8100 tower. newly installed windows xp. 80gb hard drive. cdrw $80. HP PAVILION CORE2 duo tower, windows xp, 80gb harddrive. dvdrw, 1gb ddr2 ram. Very fast, new mainboard. $135 570-905-2985 DELL 531S & dual proc. 3.50 GB ram, 2 300gb HD Dell 18” flat screen, DVD + RW CDRom, sound sub woof. Excellent condition. $325. 570-542-5622

732

Exercise Equipment

PILATES Performer exercise machine, great condition. $50. 570-362-2772 if interested. TREAD MILL, excellent condition, $75. 570-825-4261.

738

Floor Care Equipment

VACUUM PARTS. New for Shark Navigator. Front brush roller, $50. Dog pet hair tool, $20. 570-693-2612

742

Furnaces & Heaters

EDENPURE HEATER Gen 3 Model 1000 Like New!! Paid $400. Sell for $200 570-328-1165 HEATER. Propane gas, with 30’ copper tubing. $100 or best offer. 570-287-9946

551

Other

600 FINANCIAL 610

Business Opportunities

INTERSTATE PRODUCTS is a Private Label Chemical Manufacturer. We offer a partnership program for sales minded people. This Opportunity will give you the chance to develop your own business with our help. We will design a complete program just for you with your co name and private label program. Your sales ability is your ticket to financial freedom. Call (570) 288-1226 PUC Limousine License for Sale. For more details, contact 570-574-2111

2 LOCAL MILLIONAIRES looking for 10

FOSTER FAMILIES

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

Sales/Retail/ Business Development

Major local snack food distributor has an opening for Route Salesperson. Training program, excellent benefits and compensation. Email replies to: snackroute94@ yahoo.com

Other

wanted. Complete training, support and reimbursement provided. If you like young people and enjoy being a parent, call FCCY 1-800-747-3807. Fccy.org EOE

Production/ Operations

SUNDAY DISPATCH

Motivated individuals to train for serious income in a recession-proof business. Call 1-800-292-0618

630 Money To Loan “We can erase your bad credit 100% GUARANTEED.” Attorneys for the Federal Trade Commission say they’ve never seen a legitimate credit repair operation. No one can legally remove accurate and timely information from your credit report. It’s a process that starts with you and involves time and a conscious effort to pay your debts. Learn about managing credit and debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

2nd Shift Positions Available

H.C.S.C. Laundry (Beside the Armory) Rear 310 Market St. Kingston, PA 18704 NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE!! E.O.E.

MECHANICAL ASSEMBLERS Experience necessary. Please send cover letter & resume to: r.delvalle@ usmaero.net

700 MERCHANDISE 702

Air Conditioners

AIR CONDITIONER $40 570-740-1246 AIR CONDITIONERS (2). New window units. 7,000 BTU. $75 each. Moving sale. 570-852-1039

708

Antiques & Collectibles

ANTIQUE WRENCHES. 15 total. Varying sizes. Early 1900’s. Great deal for collectors! $75. 570-239-8149

272619

1 year, 18 months & 2 year increases. Production Hours: 4:30p.m.-12:30a.m. Overtime Required. Excellent Benefit Package. $50.00 Monthly Attendance Bonus. Pre-placement drug screen required.


SUNDAY DISPATCH 742

Furnaces & Heaters

FURNACE Clayton 1600 hot blast, wood-coal, 3 speed blower, forced air draft motor, 24”w, 36”l, 49”h takes wood up to 30”, green, nice shape. Sells for $1900 will sell for $950. Call before 8pm 570-477-2604 HEATER. Eden Pure Gen3. Quartz infrared Portable, 1500W. Works excellent. $100 570-457-7854

744

Furniture & Accessories

BARSTOOLS (2), white wood with wicker seats. Great condition. $35 each. Call 760-1005 BED FRAME: full/ queen size. $150 TV stand, dark cherry. 5wx2h, 4 glass doors with shelves. nice $125. 2 lamps basket weave cherry with sage shades both $10. 570-283-0636 BENCH: pine country high back with cutout hearts. 30” x26”x11” $20. Wood Sofa Table with decorative hardware, light colored finish 48X 28” X16” $50. PLANTERS: 3 decorative olive green metal 24” planters for over a railing. $20. for all. LAMP 32” tall gold metal table lamp with white shade, $10. 570-868-5275 BOOKCASES 2 antique oak $200. each. 1 Barrister bookcase $200. 1 small mahogany bookcase with doors $100. 570-675-0920 COFFEE TABLE Solid oak, 53 1/4” X 24” with 3 glass top inserts. Excellent condition, $50. 570-288-3723 COMPUTER DESK 2 tier 48x30 glass /metal and matching 4 shelf bookcase 29x70, elegant industrial modern design, excellent condition $175. LOVESEAT 68x39 hunter green, cloth upholstery removable back cushions excellent condition $110.570-690-2837 COMPUTER DESK, larger corner, light oak color & gray. $80. 570-868-6018 COUCH. Rebuilt. Good. Sacrifice $20 570-540-0175 DESK & chair, 7 drawer 40l-29H117W $35. 570-823-0881 DINING ROOM SET, traditional Cherry wood, 2 piece china closet, server on wheels, table with 6 padded chairs. Excellent condition. $1,700 or best offer. Call (570) 271-2835 DRESSER with mirror. 4 small drawers across top, 6 drawers beneath $45. Chest of 5 drawers $50. Chest of drawers $50. 570-288-8689 LAMP - Parlor stand up lamp. Very good condition. Grey metal color. $25. 570-740-1246 LIVING ROOM SET by Raymour Flanigan. Includes gold striped damask sofa with coordinating chair. French country design. Never used. Settling estate. Paid $1450 Sell for $650. Call 570-472-3038 LIVING ROOM SET, 2 piece, peach, rust, green & light gold. Couch,chair and a half, very pretty & comfortable! Asking $150. good condition. KITCHEN SET. table, 6 chairs, rectangular.cream. 60” plus 18” leaf!! Nice heavy set for any size family. asking $125. ROCKER/RECLINER. burgundy leather! Large & comfortable! Originally paid $650. asking $85. great shape. CHAIR nice side chair, claw feet. dark green with small gold diamond pattern throughout. asking $40. COFFEE TABLE. rectangular. solid cherry, has a lower open shelf. decorative legs with claw feet. 50”x30”. great shape. asking $50. Call between 8:00am & 9pm. 570-474-2756 LIVING ROOM SET: previously owned 6 piece French Provincial includes: high back sofa, 2 end tables, coffee table, high back reclining rocking chair & a high back reclining chair $300. Previously owned 4 piece FRENCH PROVINCIAL BEDROOM SET INCLUDES: full bed with headboard, night stand, 6 drawer mirrored dresser & 5 drawer bureau $175. 570-287-2078 LOVESEAT & OTTOMAN solid sand colored cushioned, excellent shape $200. SOFA: 100% Italian black leather sofa & loveseat, very good condition $600. 570/824-7807 or 570-545-7006 RECLINER Leather, new, excellent condition $125. 570-740-1392

744

SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011 PAGE 15 Furniture & Accessories

762

Musical Instruments

TABLE: 36” Round Oak Veneer. Sturdy. Good condition. $20. 570-822-7903

HARMONICA Hohner with button. $50, or best offer 570-287-9946

752 Landscaping & Gardening

768

FOUNTAIN Little girl & boy fountain, & pump. 38” high. Excellent condition, $90. 570-477-2604

BLACKBERRY STORM 9530 Smartphone for Verizon. Great global phone with camera, internet access, email, text, bluetooth. Includes car charger, AC charger, all manuals, CD. Excellent condition. $75. 570-479-1463

754

Machinery & Equipment

AIR COMPRESSOR. Titan Industrial commercial dual tank. Sells for $1,250, asking $700. or best offer 570-829-2411

756

Medical Equipment

DIABETIC TEST STRIPS. Box of 50, 3 boxes available. $10. 570-239-0057 JAZZY POWER CHAIR model 1120 dual batteries, adjustable arms, built in charger $350. Electric mobility trunk liftnylon strap $250. 570-298-2291

Personal Electronics

TRANSCEIVER Vintage 1975, 40 channel, JCPenney, model, 6218, 12 volt, CB transceiver with LED, TX-RX indicator, ANL, NB, PA, controls, microphone, like new $125. or best offer. 570-287-2901

770

Photo Equipment

CANON ultrasonic EF, 28-200mm, AfMF, F/3.5-5.6 USM, Macro-zoom lens in box $199. 287-2901

MASTECTOMY PROSTHESIS, $20. each. CPAP Breathing Machine, $75. 570-823-6829

MANFROTTO Mono -Pod model 681B. Excellent Condition. $50. or best offer. 570-788-2388 after 5 pm.

WALKERS with wheels $20 & 425. CANES $10. to $25. 570-825-2494

774

Restaurant Equipment

WHEELCHAIR Quickie, LXI custom, lightweight. Candy apple red. Purchased 7-19-10. Have all paperwork with dimensions & weight specifications. Paid $1,200 selling for $950. 570-333-1014

RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT, Somerset Dough Sheeter, Model CAR-100. 2 available. $1,500 each or all 2 for $2,400 Call for more info 570-498-3616.

758 Miscellaneous

Somerset Dough Sheeter, Model CAR-100. 2 available. $1,500 each or all 2 for $2,400 Call for more info 570-498-3616.

BARREL, wooden. 53 gallon. Excellent condition $195. 570-876-3830 BEDLINER: 89 Chevy S10, standard cab $30. 2000 Chevy Cavalier LS rear trunk spoiler, black 410. 250’ of 6 gauge bare copper wire $100. Two Haynes 198-0 thru 1994 Subaru repair manuals, free. SUITCASES 3 in excellent shape, $40. 570-740-1246 BOOK Bon Sail $15. VHS tapes (2) daniel O’Donnell $15. 570-825-2494 BOOKS: College book, Writing a Research Paper, 5th edition, ISBN: 1877653-66-7, good condition $2. Life As We Know It, A collection of Personal Essays by Foote Sweeney, great condition ISBN: 0-7434-76867 $5. 696-3528 CANISTER SET 4 piece, burgundy, $8. Hamilton Beach can opener, used less than 1 year $8. Electrolux canister 4 ply bags Style C generic 10 count $10. Electrolux upright 4 ply, style U 9 count $10., style U generic upright 10 count $10., upright 4 ply bags style u generic 10 count. $10. 570-868-6018 CAR RAMPS, 1 pair, all steel. $20. Call 570-814-9845. DEEP CLEANER Bissell “Big Green” power brush deep cleaner (hot water extraction system. $60. 570-288-3723 DRAFT GUARD. New in package. $3 570-735-0821 after 1PM FUEL CONTAINER 5 gallon, plastic, diesel with spout, $5. 570-868 5275 PAINTING, of one time Newcomb Bros Coal & Ice silos and office building circa 1950’s 16x20 Newcombs Bros was at the bottom of Tompkins St. across from the former Medico Machine Shop by a well known Pittston artist $40. Various sizes of glass plates Ideal for picture frames. mostly 18x24 and 16x22. 30 pieces. All for $10. Call Jim 570-655-9474 PICTURE, Waterfall with light & sounds. $10. LAMP, cornerfloor, 5 brass lights which extend $25.Swag, $10. 570-693-2612 RELIGIOUS ITEMS Handmade Rosaries $5. MEMORABILIAMichael Jackson posters, $10 each. Key chains, $5 each. Stickers, $3 per pack. Bottle openers, $5 each. 570-829-2411 TIRES & RIMS (2) lexington mud & snow tires on rims, 5hole, 75% tread 195/70-14 $60. 4 Timberline tires on rims, center caps, 90% tread, 5 hole, white letters 205/75 -15 $300. 570-823-0881 WEATHER TECH MATS for Chevy Tahoe or GMC Yukon will fit all newer models, front and back, good condition. tan $50. 570-881-4771 YARN, 2 big boxes, .50 cents a skein. Call 570-823-4941

RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT,

RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT, Bakers Pride Oven, Model KOS-1, 115 volt, single deck oven. $350; SOMERSET TURN OVER MACHINE model SPM45, $500. ASTRO BLENDER with foot pedal, model AM2, $50. For more information, call

784

Tools

SAW 10” Delta Contractor saw, top 27”x 49” with extensions, includes blade & rip fence, 1hp single phase motor mounted on 8 drawer storage bench, dust bin $275. Call before 8pm 570-477-2604

786 Toys & Games ARCADE BALL with electronic scoring and mini pool table combination. $25. 570-472-3641 BOARD GAMES Vintage 1982 Parker Brothers, William Fuld, Ouija in box $25. Vintage 1975 Selchow & Righter Co., Parcheesi, in box $25. Best offer. 570-287-2901 DOLLS Ken & Jenny $10. 570-825-2494 GAME TABLE 10 IN 1 approximate 3 X 5 $50. 868-6018 KITCHEN – Step 2 Lifestyle Party Time Kitchen Set with accessories. Great condition. $70. Call 570-868-5048

792

Video Equipment

CASH 4 GUNS BUY - SELL TRADE Also Buying Ammo; War / Military Items; Bayonets; Gold & Silver; Coins 570-735-1487 Daily 10am 7pm

794

Video Game Systems/Games

GUITAR ONLY for Guitar Hero III X-Box 360 & Playstation 2, used almost new $20. 570-868-6018 PLAYSTATION2 Two steering wheels and foot pedals for racing games. $20. each or 2 for $30. New, never opened, Nintendo Gamecube Bomberman Jetters, rated E. $10. New, never opened. Nintendo Gamecub A series of Unfortunate Events, rated E. $7. 570-696-3528

Too many baby toys? Pass them on, sell them with an ad! 570-829-7130

800 PETS & ANIMALS 815

Dogs

TO CONSIDER.... ENHANCE YOUR PET CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE Call 829-7130

CROSS BOW LEGEND exercise machine, very good condition, sacrifice $200.570-788-2388

Place your pet ad and provide us your email address

POOL TABLE regulation size, excellent condition, all accessories, $100. 570-825-4261. SKIS USA Super S Volart 72IN Skis with Salomion 900S aluim bindings $199. 570-287-2901 TURKEY CALLS. Quaker Boys, Preston Pittmans, Rohm Bros., Boyer Calls, Guluas Calls. $4 each. Various Frictions. Collectors $50 each. 570-287-2073 UNICYCLE – Sun unicycle with 24” tire. New/excellent condition. $65. Call 570-868-5048.

778

Stereos/ Accessories

DVDS: Relive the greatest fights of all time. Pick any fights. 2 hour DVD $20. Van Halen at the US Festival 2 DVD set copy $20. The Rolling Stones video rewind. (copy of out of print) $20, Bon Jovi Live in NYC video plus live at Giants Stadium copy $30. MMA Fights on video. You pick the fights. 2 hour DVD $20. 5780-814-1875

780

This will create a seller account online and login information will be emailed to you from gadzoo.com “The World of Pets Unleashed” You can then use your account to enhance your online ad. Post up to 6 captioned photos of your pet Expand your text to include more information, include your contact information such as e-mail, address phone number and or website.

DACHSHUND PUPPIES

AKC registered puppies for sale. Call for information, 570-864-2207

POM PUPPIES Purebread. 1 female black & tan $450. 1 Male, red & tan $400. Parents small Call 570-379-2225

POMERANIAN PUPPIES 8 weeks, 2 females, 1 male, $350. No papers. 570-443-8315

SHIH-TZU PUPPIES Parents on premises

TELEVISION: GE. Works good. 28”. $100. 570-740-1246

Shots Current. $550 & up 570-401-1838

TV 13” Panasonic HD antenna and converter $25. call Bill 570-825-8256

SIBERIAN HUSKY PUPPIES, ACA,

TV- 20 inch flat tube tv. $40. 570-283-0636

Parents on premises. Vet checked. Very loving. Family raised. $500. Call (570) 945-7068

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

INKERMAN JENKINS TWP. 45 Main St.

SWOYERSVILLE

Large 3 bedroom home, freshly painted with some new carpeting, new vanity and new flooring in bath. Good sized rear yard, off street parking. Perfect for your growing family. Price reduced for a quick sale. MLS#09-2449 $64,900 Call Charles

EXCEPTIONAL & LARGE 3 bedroom, 2.5

LINE UP A SUCCESSFUL SALE IN CLASSIFIED! Do you need more space? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way to clean out your closets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

WEST PITTSTON OPEN HOUSE

bath home. Living room, dining room, family room, kitchen, central air PLUS finished lower level family room, storage room & laundry room (unfinished), 2 car garage, deck, fenced yard on corner lot. $249,000. For sale by owner, realtors welcome. 570-706-1077

Ledge View Development 132 Clear Spring Ct. Ranch style townhome, with 2 bedrooms, 1 3/4 modern baths, modern kitchen with stove, dishwasher, garbage disposal, fridge. Separate laundry room, 1 car garage, like new condition. MLS 11-366 $162,500 Call Lu-Ann 570-602-9280

WEST WYOMING 438 Tripp St

PITTSTON

FORTY FORT

104 Butler Street Great starter home in nice neighborhood. 3 bedrooms, 1 bath. Large yard, attached garage. Asking $65,900. Call (570) 693-1678

HARVEYS LAKE

Lakefront property for sale. 1 acre of land. 50’ of developed lakefront. Respond to: For Sale by Owner P.O. Box 286 Harveys Lake, PA 18618

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED! Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

DUPONT

Totally renovated 6 room apartment. Partially furnished, brand new fridge/ electric range, electric washer & dryer. Brand new custom draperies, Roman shades, carpeting / flooring & energy efficient furnace & windows. 2 bedroom + large attic loft bedroom with spacious walk-in closet, full tiled bath on 1st floor, Easy access to I-81, airport & casino, off street parking. No smoking, No pets. $750 + utilities & security. 570-762-8265

FORTY FORT

1633 Wyoming Ave. 2 bedrooms, no pets, newer carpet & paint, air conditioning. $650/per month, plus utilities. Call (570) 287-3059

1st floor, spacious 5 rooms, 2 bedrooms, stove & fridge included, washer & dryer hookup, off street parking for 1 car. $580+ utilities. Sewer & recycling included. Security, lease, references & background check. Call 570-287-3484

KINGSTON

1st Ave. 1 bedroom, single occupancy, off-street parking, no pets, references, $420 + utilities. Call 570-654-1171

KINGSTON

1st floor, 2 bedroom, all appliances included, coin-op washer / dryer in basement with extra storage, offstreet parking, No pets. $600 + utilities Call 570-287-9631 or 570-696-3936 (after 5:00)

KINGSTON

16 Defoe St. Lovely 2 story, 3 bedrooms, 1.5 bath home that features open floor plan with cathedral ceiling family room. Pristine hardwood floors. 3 season sun room leads to patio, in ground pool and manicured vinyl fenced yard. $169,000 MLS 11-141 Call Terry 570-885-3041 or Angie 570-885-4896

SUNDAY 1:00PM-3:00PM Completely remodeled home with everything new. New kitchen, baths, bedrooms, tile floors, hardwoods, granite countertops, all new stainless steel appliances, refrigerator, stove, microwave, dishwasher, free standing shower, tub for two, huge deck, large yard, excellent neighborhood $154,900 (835.00 / 30years/ 5%) 570-654-1490

WEST WYOMING 993 Sunrise Drive Horizon Estates Stunning 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath end Townhome with 2 car garage. 1st floor master bedroom with vaulted ceiling and luxurious bath, ultra kitchen, fireplace, loft. 12x16 trex deck and large fence-able yard. Beautiful hardwood and tile. Convenient location in a great neighborhood and very low HOA fee. MLS 10-4677 NEW PRICE $289,900 Call Terry 570-885-3041 Angie 570-855-4896

TOY TOWN SECTION

49 S. WELLES AVE. 1 bedroom, no pets, 3rd floor, heat furnished, $475/per month, Call (570)288-9434 KINGSTON 595 MARKET ST

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

PITTSTON

1 bedroom, 2nd floor, tv room, kitchen & full bath, new carpeting. Partially furnished. No pets & no smoking. Security & references required. $525/month. All utilities included except phone & cable. For info, call (570) 474-9613 Leave Message

PITTSTON

3rd floor, 1 bedroom, eat in kitchen, stove & fridge. Living room, 1 bath, coin-op washer/dryer. Heat, water, sewer included. $495/ month + security and references Call 570-822-8671

WYOMING

301 Wyoming Ave. 1st floor, 1 bedroom, newly remodeled, all appliances, w/d hardwood floors. Security & references, no pets. $495/mo+ utilities. Available April 1 570-954-2972

WYOMING

4 room apartment. Heat & hot water included. No pets. References. Security. $600. Call 570-693-2254 or 570-287-0939

PITTSTON

WYOMING

CLEAN & SPACIOUS 4 rooms, 2nd floor, wall to wall carpet, off street parking. Water, sewer & garbage included. Non smokers & no pets. $550/month. 570-655-2567

481 Monument Ave. 2nd floor, 2 bedroom, very clean. All appliances, w/d, off street parking, great location. $535/mo+ utilities No Pets. Security and references. Available April 1 570-954-2972

944

Commercial Properties

WEST WYOMING

AVAILABLE NOW!! 2nd floor 1 bedroom, nice kitchen with appliances, $450 month plus utilities and security deposit. No Dogs. 570-693-1000

Do you need more space? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way to clean out your closets! You’re in bussiness with classified! WILKES-BARRE

BRAND NEW

$74,000

909

Income & Commercial Properties

JENKINS TOWNSHIP May Street

KINGSTON

Certain Restrictions Apply*

KINGSTON DUPLEX

3 bedroom, 1 1/2 double, 1.5 bath, gas heat, off-street parking, fenced in yard, excellent condition. $595/ month + utilities, references & security. No pets. Call 570-881-4078

90 Sharpe Street 2nd floor, 2 bedrooms. $615/month. Heat, water, stove & refrigerator included. References & security required. Section 8 Welcome. Call Ed. 570-287-9661 extension 229

Beautiful 1st floor, 2 bedroom, 1.5 baths, 5 rooms, convenient residential location, hardwood floors, natural woodwork, french doors, ceiling fan, laundry with washer/dryer included, refrigerator, gas range, dishwasher, oak cabinets, off street parking, fenced-in back yard, storage. Available April 1. $695 + utilities. Call 570-690-0633

KINGSTON

E.Light, WALNUT ST. bright, 1st

PLAINS

Absolute Must See River Ridge Townhouse!

Former Parrish Center Hall with kitchen & parking MLS#08-2954 $179,900 Call Charlie

264 Burke Street No maintenance fees. Many upgrades. Move in condition. 2,000 sq. ft. Berber, ceramic tile & hardwood. 2 bedroom, 2.5 baths. Walk in closet. No units in front of or behind. 1 car garage. Very private. Near all interstates. REDUCED PRICE Call 570-829-3162

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED! Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

SUGARLOAF

2 houses. Must sell together. Each has its own utilities on 2.57 acres. 3 car garage with 3 large attached rooms. For Sale By Owner. $249,900 Call (570) 788-5913

floor, 2 bedrooms, elevator, carpeted, Security system. Garage. Extra storage & cable TV included. Laundry facilities. Heat & hot water furnished. Fine neighborhood. Convenient to bus & stores. No pets. References. Security. Lease. No smokers please. $840. 570-287-0900

MOUNTAIN TOP WOODBRYN 1 & 2 Bedroom, 941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

AVOCA

3 rooms, wall to wall carpeting, appliances, coin-op washer/dryer, off street parking, $410+ security. No pets. 570-655-1606

DURYEA/PITTSTON 2 bedrooms, gas heat, washer & dryer hookup, tile kitchen & bath. Large yard. $525 + utilities, security and references. Call 570-840-4534

- Light & bright open floor plans - All major appliances included - Pets welcome* - Close to everything - 24 hour emergency maintenance - Short term leases available

www.mayflower crossing.com

MINT CONDITION MUST SEE! Charming 750 sq. ft. corner lot home. All hardwood floors, new hot water boiler, gas heat, immaculate with full basement. 2 car garage. 570-446-3254

Mayflower Crossing Apartments 570.822.3968

1 bedroom apartment. $550 + utilities. No pets / No smoking. Off street parking, air, new appliances & microwave, laundry. Security, references & Background check required. 570-288-4508

148 Stites Street

HANOVER TWP.

Single Family Home! 3 Bedrooms, nice neighborhood, large yard, gas baseboard hot water heat, near schools & public transportation. Low taxes. To Settle Estate. REDUCED PRICE $72,500 No Realtors. Call 570-262-6480 for appointment.

Apartments/ Unfurnished

315 PLAZA

1750 & 3200 SF Retail / Office Space Available 570-829-1206 DURYEA

RETAIL STOREFRONT

Main St. High traffic area. Parking in rear. Lots of light. 3,100 sq ft. Great Opportunity. $975 / negotiable Call 570-451-1978 KINGSTON

PITTSTON TWP. Wildflower Village 1101 Chicory Court This immaculate end unit townhome, 5 years young, is ready and waiting for its new owner to move right in! Bright 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath, new carpeting and flooring throughout, crown moulding. Gas furnace and air conditioning. Back yard features patio, vinyl fence and storage $116,000 MLS 11-144 Call Terry 570-885-3041 or Angie 570-885-4896

941

FORTY FORT

DUPONT

Single family home for sale in quiet neighborhoodBeautiful 2400 Sq. Ft. 6 bedroom, 2 full baths, 2 story home, fully air conditioned, oil & gas heat, renovated kitchen, full unfinished basement, 2 enclosed porches, 15 x 20 deck with power awning cover – generous size lot, off street parking, first floor washer/dryer. All appliances included. Offering price $180,000 Call 570-421-0587 or Rodite@enter.net use “Dupont Home” in E-mail subject line.

Immaculate 2 story, stone & vinyl. Large lot on cul-de-sac. 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths. Detached oversized 2 car garage with loft. Tile, hardwood, granite, central air. laundry/pantry & large family room with built in bar & fireplace on 1st floor. $284,900. 570-288-3256

SUNDAY 12-1:30 pm

LARKSVILLE BIRCHWOOD ESTATES 3 SONDRA DRIVE

Australian Shepherd puppies - AKC reg., outgoing, smart, CH parents, health clearances. 570-788-1044

Televisions/ Accessories

TELEVISION. Big Screen. 52” Moving Sale $125. 570-852-1039

906 Homes for Sale Having trouble paying your mortgage? Falling behind on your payments? You may get mail from people who promise to forestall your foreclosure for a fee in advance. Report them to the Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency. Call 1-877FTC-HELP or click on ftc.gov. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

PAWS

(24 hours)

GOLF CLUBS. Putter wedge $6. 570-825-2494

900 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

EXETER

570-855-2613

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

Pet Supplies

DVD - X Files Season 7 DVDs in very good condition. $25. Rick 283-2552

570-498-3616

776 Sporting Goods

845

BIRD CAGES: small $10. Large $20. 570-288-4852

available immediately, No pets. Rents based on income start at $395 & $430. Handicap Accessible. Equal Housing Opportunity. Call 570-474-5010 TTY711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

NANTICOKE 2nd floor, 1 bedroom, includes all appliances & washer/dryer, heat & hot water included. No pets. $550 + security. (570) 735-2573

PITTSTON bedroom.

2 All appliances included. All utilities paid; electricity by tenant. Everything brand new. Off street parking. $750 + security & references 570-969-9268

Call TODAY For AVAILABILITY!!

WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE

72 W. River St.

Newly refurbished, large & very charming 3 bedroom dwelling in Historic Mansion in a beautiful neighborhood. Off-street parking, Hardwood floors, new kitchen & appliances, Central Air & Heat. Hot water included. $1,350 + security. 570-466-2227

WILKES-BARRE SOUTH SECURE BUILDINGS

1 & 2 bedroom apartments. Laundry facility. Off street parking available. Starting at $440. 570-332-5723

WILKES-BARRE

South Welles St. 2 Bedrooms, 2nd floor. New bath. Washer/dryer hookup. Heat & hot water, sewer & garbage included. $595 + security, pets negotiable. Call 570-589-9767

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

COMMERCIAL SPACE FOR RENT 620 Market St. Newly Renovated Prime Space. 1,250 sq. ft., Near Kingston Corners. Great location for retail or business office. Easy Access and parking. Call Cliff 570-760-3427

PITTSTON COOPERS CO-OP Lease Space Available, Light manufacturing, warehouse, office, includes all utilities with free parking. I will save you money!

PLAINS TWP 7 PETHICK DRIVE OFF RTE. 315 1200 & 700 SF Office Available. Reasonable. 570-760-1513

WEST PITTSTON

$1.00 PER SQ. FT. Great assembly space. Second level. 18,000 & 9,000 sq. ft. 508 Delaware Ave.; former Pride Scooter & Aureus Sportsware. Air conditioned & gas heat; separate electric & gas meters. Owner 908-852-4410 WILKES-BARRE

TIRED OF HIGH RENTS? Are you paying too much for your current office? Call us! We have modern office space available in Luzerne Bank Building on Public Square. Rents include heat, central air, utilities, trash removal, and nightly cleaning - all without a sneaky CAM charge. Access parking at the new intermodal garage via our covered bridge. 300SF to 5000SF available. We can remodel to suit. Brokers Protected. Call Jeff Pyros at 822-8577

950

Half Doubles

DUPONT

2 bedroom, 1 bath. $600 + utilities & security. Call 570-947-4226

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE

Immediate Occupancy!!

MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS 61 E. Northampton St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701 • Affordable Senior Apartments • Income Eligibility Required • Utilities Included! • Low cable rates; • New appliances; laundry on site; • Activities! • Curb side Public Transportation

Please call 570-825-8594 TDD/TTY 800-654-5984


PAGE 16 SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011

SUNDAY DISPATCH 953 Houses for Rent

The Dispatch

BEAUTICIAN SERVICES

HAIR AT HOME

If you are someone who is not able to get to a Salon to have your hair cut, colored, or permed. Call 570-655-8639

WEST PITTSTON Remodeled, 3 bedroom home. Ultra new kitchen with island, 1.5 baths, dining room, office or playroom, tile & hardwood floors, off street parking, large yard, front & back porches. New furnace, gas. $875 plus utilities, lease & 1 month security. No pets & no smoking. Call 570-696-3289

LOCAL PROS

Shirley Berti Hair Designs

SNOW REMOVAL CONSTRUCTION

959 Mobile Homes

Village Landscapin n e d r g Ga

CHRIS LATONA

HUNLOCK CREEK

Very nice 1 bedroom. $400 / month. Water, sewer & trash included. Call 570-477-2845

General Contractor Ceramic Tile Work - Kitchens - Bathrooms - Garages - Replacement Windows - New Homes - Additions - Doors Complete Remodeling FREE Estimates - Insured

SNOW REMOVAL

Let the Community Know! Place your Classified Ad TODAY! 570-829-7130

& La wn Ser vices, Inc.

HOMES AVAILABLE

Homes available in Birchwood Village Estates. Estates 2 and 3 bedrooms. Rentto-own available. CALL TODAY! 570-613-0719

• Sidewalks • Driveways • Small Business Parking Lots • Emergency Snow Removal From Roofs FREE ESTIMATES

457-8145 or 655-0777 Quality Works at Affordable Prices PA008322

Robert Smith-Owner 570-602-LAWN • 570-602-5296 West Pittston

TRAVEL

1000 SERVICE DIRECTORY 1024

Tuesday, April 5 & 6 Complementary room, transportation & baggage handling. Food, Beverages & Snacks served on bus. $25 per person.

551

Other

551

Other

551

Other

551

Other

551

Other

953 Houses for Rent

551

Other

950

Half Doubles

AMERICA

LARKSVILLE bedroom, 1 bath

REALTY CO. RENTALS

3 half double, Freshly cleaned & painted. Tenant pays all utilities including sewer. $550 plus security. Call (570) 332-5723

FORTY FORT Call for current availability. Over 30 years managed service provided. NO PETS/SMOKING /2 YEAR SAME RENT/LEASE AND EMPLOYMENT VERIFICATION/APPLICATION REQUIRED. Details call 570-288-1422

KINGSTON PITTSTON NEWLY REMODELED HOME 25 Webster Street For lease, available immediately, 2 bedrooms, 1 bath room, refrigerator and stove provided, washer/dryer hookup, off-street parking, no pets, Hardwood Floors, Tiled Kitchen Floors, New Kitchen Upgrades, New Carpet, Just Painted, Very Clean Premises, $675/per month, plus utilities, $500 /security deposit. 570-237-0425

PITTSTON

Nicely refinished, 2 bedrooms with modern eat-in kitchen, off street parking, convenient location. $550 + utilities. Call 570-793-9449 or 973-896-0136

Do you need more space? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way to clean out your closets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

953 Houses for Rent

DALLAS

Home for rent at the Village at Greenbriar a gated retirement community. Our home features 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, & a 2 car garage. $1,575 / month + utilities. Monthly maintenance fee included in rent. References & security. 1 year lease. Call 570-592-3023

DUPONT TOWNHOUSE STYLE 2 bedrooms. includes heat & sewer. No pets. $750/month,. 570-479-6722

EXETER

272613

Other

1135

264001

Al Lispi: 570-814-3137 or 570-823-9578 551

www.NEPABest contractors.com 888-809-3750 Bonded & Insured Reliable, Prompt Best Prices All Types of Home Remodeling Kitchens, Baths Additions, Sunrooms Painting, Electrical 24/7 888-809-3750

The Dispatch Call 1-800-273-7130 for Local Pros

Overnight Junket to Atlantic City’s Trump Marina!

SCARBORO AVE Completely remodeled 1/2 double, 3 bedroom, 1.5 baths, mint/excellent condition, gas heat, new tile & hardwood, new kitchen & baths, all new appliances, nice yard & neighborhood. $795. No Pets 570-479-6722

Building & Remodeling

Hauling & Trucking

A.S.A.P Hauling Estate Cleanouts, Attics, Cellars, Garages, Fire & Flood Damage. Free Estimates, Same Day Service! 570-822-4582

1153

Insulation

www.NEPABest contractors.com 888-809-3750 Bonded & Insured Waterproofing, Insulation Windows, Roofing Residential and Commercial Cleaning All Home repairs Modular Homes 24/7 888-809-3750

1204

1204

Painting & Wallpaper

Larry Neer’s Professional Painting 31 Yrs. Experience Hand Brush,Spray, Wood, Metal, Aluminum Siding, Decks, Handy Man Repairs, Powerwashing. Interior/Exterior Residential & Commercial 570-606-9638 www.NEPABest contractors.com 888-809-3750 Bonded & Insured Waterproofing, Insulation Windows, Roofing Painting, Electrical Siding, Lawn Care Landscaping Drywall, Masonry 24/7 888-809-3750

1327 Waterproofing www.NEPABest contractors.com 888-809-3750 Bonded & Insured Waterproofing, Insulation Windows, Roofing Residential and Commercial Cleaning All Home repairs Modular Homes 24/7 888-809-3750

LINE UP A SUCCESSFUL SALE IN CLASSIFIED! Do you need more space? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way to clean out your closets! You’re in bussiness with classified! 1339

Window Service

www.NEPABest contractors.com 888-809-3750 Bonded & Insured Waterproofing, Insulation Windows, Roofing Residential and Commercial Cleaning All Home repairs Modular Homes 24/7 888-809-3750

Collect Cash. Not Dust. Sell it in The Times Leader Classified section.

Painting & Wallpaper

J & S PAINTING

46 Zerby Ave Sunday 1pm-3pm Lease with option to buy, completely remodeled, mint, turn key condition, 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, large closets, with hardwoods, carpet & tile floors, new kitchen and baths, gas heat, shed, large yard. $134,000, seller will pay closing costs, $5000 down and monthly payments are $995/month. WALSH REAL ESTATE 570-654-1490

LAKESCENIC HARMONY MOUNTAIN COMMUNITY Furnished 2 bedroom, 1 loft with bunk beds, A-frame home, recreation room, $975. (302) 275-6260

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

NANTICOKE Desirable Lexington Village Nanticoke, PA Many ranch style homes. 2 bedrooms 2 Free Months With A 2 Year Lease $795 + electric

SQUARE FOOT RE MANAGEMENT 866-873-0478

PRINGLE

Single home. 2 bedrooms, large kitchen and living room, washer dryer hookup, porch & large lawn. Quiet neighborhood. $525 + utilities, security, lease. References required. Call 570-472-9907

Family owned for 7 years. Free estimates. Painting, drywall, pressure washing, wall repairs, gutter cleaning, minor foundation repair. Exterior & Interior painting and much more. Schedule now for 25% spring discount on exterior painting! Senior Discount 15% off interior 30% off exterior Licensed & Insured Owner on every job We’re not happy till the customer’s satisfied! Call 570-793-4468

554

Production/ Operations

Call 829-7130 to place an ad. ONLY ONL NL LY ONE N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER. timesleader.com

554

Production/ Operations

Purchasing Clerk Accepting resumes to coordinate, process and execute purchasing activities for busy manufacturing plant. Must be experienced with MS Word & Excel, have strong organization skills and attention to detail, have ability to multi-task in fast paced environment, experience with placing orders with vendors, monitoring and processing purchase orders. Will be expected to follow established system of orders and maintain accurate records. Previous accounting/purchasing experience in industrial facility desired. Competitive salary & benefits including: paid vacation & sick time, 9 paid holidays, 401K, ST/LT Disability and Stock Purchase, Flex Spending, Medical, Dental and Life Insurance. Those qualified applicants may apply or fax resume to with SALARY requirements: AEP Industries, Inc. Attn: Human Resources 20 Elmwood Ave., Mountaintop, PA 18707 Fax (201) 994-2922 or email Lynottm@aepinc.com EOE.

944

Commercial Properties

944

Commercial Properties

OFFICENTERS

5 Prime Locations

Pierce St., Kingston Various Size Suites Medical, Legal, Commercial Utilities, Parking, Janitorial Custom Design Renovations

MEDICAL SUITE

New Bridge Center 480 Pierce St., Kingston 1st floor, 2 treatment rooms, business office & private office. FRAN RICH - 570-287-1161


CMYK

SPORTS

SECTION

timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

C

SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011

DISTRICT 2 CLASS 3A GIRLS BASKETBALL

Redeemer’s OT magic disappears in final 53

Extra-session success ends for the squad seeking a third-straight district title.

center said. But this WEST time it was difSCRANTON ferent. Senior forward Amanda Greene scored HOLY seven of her REDEEMER game-high 19 points in OT to lead West Scranton to a 53-49 victory over Holy Redeemer in the District 2 Class 3A championship game on Saturday at Pittston Area High School. Both teams advance to next week’s PIAA Tournament. Next Saturday, West Scranton will face the No. 2 team from

49

By VAN ROSE vrose@timesleader.com

YATESVILLE — Even though Holy Redeemer let a six-point lead slip away in the second half against West Scranton, Sydney Myers wasn’t too concerned when the game went into overtime. “We won our last two games in overtime, and I just figured that we could do it one more time,” the 6-foot sophomore

District 4, and Holy Redeemer (18-7) will take on the No. 3 team from District 3. The sites and times are yet to be determined.. “The third time’s a charm (for the other team),” Royals coach Rich Nemetz said, referring to the fact his team was unable to survive a third-straight heart-stopper. “We made too many mistakes. We had 17 turnovers in the first half, and didn’t handle the ball very well in the second half, either. You can’t do that and win.” West Scranton’s swarming See REDEEMER , Page 4C

PAUL SOKOLOSKI OPINION

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Holy Redeemer’s Olivia Francisco, right, drives past West Scranton’s Colleen Cadden. Francisco finished with 11 points.

H . S. B OYS BAS K E T BA L L

No room to maneuver

Scranton storms through Spartans

Meyers is stifled by Riverside’s tough defense in the District 2 Class 2A title game. By JOHN ERZAR jerzar@timesleader.com

The Knights overwhelm Valley West in the District 2 Class 4A title game.

49

By JOHN ERZAR jerzar@timesleader.com

SCRANTON — From the onset Saturday afternoon, Wyoming Valley West found itself in a whirlwind of basketball with little chance of escape. Most other of Scranton’s opponents have been in the same situation this season. Scranton SCRANTON jumped out quickly and rarely let off the accelerator, deWVW feating Valley West 97-66 in the District 2 Class 4A boys championship game at Marywood University. The victory gave Scranton (23-2) its second consecutive D2-4A championship. The Knights will open PIAA tournament play next Saturday against District 1 sixth seed Lower Merion (18-9). “We didn’t defend, we didn’t box out, we didn’t take charges. And this is the stuff we talk about,” Valley West coach George Reimiller said. “Our game

36

97

66

See SPARTANS, Page 4C

SCRANTON — Meyers was beaten at its own game Saturday afternoon – defense. And it was little surprise which opponent did it to the Mohawks in the District 2 Class 2A boys basketball championship game. For the second RIVERSIDE time in two seasons, Riverside put the clamps on Meyers’ offense as MEYERS the Vikings won their first district title since 1986-87 with a 49-36 victory at Marywood University. Riverside’s offensive duo of Jerry Kincel (17 points) and Tommy Armillay (16) once again paced the Vikings (22-5). But it was the defense that stymied Meyers once again. The Mohawks (23-2) saw their 16-game winning streak end with their lowest offensive output of the season. It was also the fewest points they scored since a 35-32 loss to Riverside in the D2-2A playoffs last season. Saturday’s loss, however, didn’t end Meyers’ season. The Mohawks will play D4 runner-up Central Columbia (17-9) next Saturday in the first round of the PIAA 2A playoffs. Riverside will play D3 third seed Loyalsock (18-7) also next Saturday in the state tournament. “Defensively, I challenged the boys before the game,” Meyers coach Pat Toole said. “I thought if

NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Meyers’ Rasheed Moore (right) drives against Riverside’s Tommy Armillay during Saturday’s District 2 Class 2A title game at Marywood University in Scranton.

DISTRICT 2 CLASS 2A SWIMMING

See MEYERS, Page 4C

CLASS 3A REGIONAL WRESTLING

Dallas boys, Redeemer girls celebrate For PA’s 112 star, trip Mounts cruise to second straight title. Royals edge Prep, repeat as champions.

to Hershey so sweet

By JAY MONAHAN For The Times Leader

Domarasky gets third; WVC has 7 in state meet. Popple of Coughlin wins 189 title.

WILKES-BARRE – Even after a Wyoming Valley Conference title and an undefeated season, the Dallas boys swimming team INSIDE: Wyom- didn’t show ing Valley West its true domgirls claim 3A inance until crown. 4C Saturday’s District 2 Class 2A Swimming Championships at the Wyoming Valley Catholic Youth Center. Including last weekend’s diving competition, the Mountaineers finished with eight district champions – six individual and two relays. Dallas finished with a 124.5-point lead over second-place Holy Redeemer, 343-218.5, to se-

By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Elizabeth Finnegan of Holy Redeemer is on her way to winning the 100 freestyle title in the District 2 Class 2A meet.

cure its second-consecutive district title. The Royals’ girls team held off a feisty Scranton Prep squad, which led with seven combined champions for the two-day meet, to nab back-toback district championships.

Holy Redeemer held a 285262.5 advantage over the Cavaliers, after having just a 5.5point lead after Friday’s races. The top finisher in each event moves on to the PIAA See SWIMMING , Page 3C

INSIDE: Meyers and Lake-Lehman stars qualify for state 2A meet. 3C

School over Easton junior Peter Stanley, 2-1, Saturday afternoon to advance to the state tournament, which will be held Thursday through Saturday at Hershey’s Giant Center. Domarasky claimed the win with a third-period reversal, then only allowed an escape late in the period to hold on for the victory. “It is (sweeter) to get there now, but it puts pressure on you as well, being that you’re a senior and this is your last time ever to get a chance to go to states,” Domarasky said. “Hopefully it all works out well.

BETHLEHEM — Since his freshman year, Michael Domarasky came ever so close to qualifying for the PIAA Championships. Every year, he would win at least two matches at the Northeast Regional Tournament only to fall one or two places shy of the qualifying medal. Now a senior, the Pittston Area 112-pounder has finally achieved his goal. Domarasky won a thrilling third-place match in the Class 3A regional at Freedom High See REGIONALS , Page 3C

Down to final shot, Royals savor the gold

T

he biggest kid on the floor was running and grinning and waving his index finger toward Holy Redeemer’s student body, high above everyone else. Across the floor, one of his fellow seniors was leaping and banging bodies in the air with his joyous teammates. Smack in the middle of these displays of celebration, the stone-faced coach couldn’t stop smiling. This is what a release of pressure looks like. After three years of trying, Holy Redeemer finally won a District 2 boys basketball championship. “It was a definite relief,” said Pete Alexis, the Royals’ imposing 6-foot-11 Penn State-bound center who earned the right to show everyone his team was number one. “There was a lot of expectation.” Those beliefs had been burst before. Two years ago, the Royals were rocked during a buzzer-beating defeat in the district title game. Last season, they got rolled in another district final. But Redeemer wasn’t about to roll over Friday night. The first freshman team in Royals history roared to a District 2 ninth-grade championship without Alexis – who was up with the varsity – after the Catholic school merger that formed Holy Redeemer High four years ago. Those players never thought it’d take until their senior season to bring the school its first district varsity title. “We were all on the same freshman team,” said Redeemer guard Austin Carr, after he finished his body-banging victory party. “I’m always used to winning.” So was Mark Belenski, who coached Bishop O’Reilly to two Class A state championships before taking over at Redeemer. But things change. Royals such as Carr, Timothy Lambert, John McCarthy and Stephen Ruch who won districts as freshmen had trouble getting it done in the big game on the varsity. Twice. “Frustration,” Carr called it. “That feeling last year and the year before wasn’t too great.” A third straight district defeat would have been even worse. “I would have been a little crushed, yeah,” Alexis said. Instead, the Royals crushed their demons of the past. Breakthrough win over W. Scranton They used a suffocating perimeter defense, three dunks from Alexis and a scoring surge from Carr to pull away with a 42-29 Class 3A district championship victory over West Scranton. “After two years, not getting anything but second place, it was districts or bust for us,” Carr said. The Royals busted through the finish line this time with undying resolve. “We came out with the mindset we were here to win,” Alexis said. “It was now or never.” They’ll never have this feeling at Holy Redeemer again. Oh, future Royals teams might be filled with more skill and load the school’s trophy case with more district titles. But they won’t be the first. And they’re not likely to set an example for generations to come on how perseverance plays such a big role in a rise to number one. “I’m very excited for the kids,” Belenski said. “They worked extremely hard for it. “You always want that gold,” Belenski continued. “If you don’t get it, you want to come back. And if you get it, you want another one.” The first one is always the best one -especially when it takes so much effort to at long last become the best.

Paul Sokoloski is a Times Leader sports columnist. You may reach him at 970-7109 or email him at psokoloski@timesleader.com.


K PAGE 2C

SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011

T O D AY ’ S L O C A L C A L E N D A R COLLEGE BASEBALL Marywood at Wilkes, 12 p.m. COLLEGE MEN'S LACROSSE Misericordia at Mt. Saint Vincet, 1 p.m.

T R A N S A C T I O N S BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA — Suspended Orlando C Dwight Howard one game for receiving his 16th technical foul of the season during Friday’s game against Chicago. Fined Miami C Erick Dampier $10,000 for flagrant foul (penalty two) against San Antonio G Tony Parker during Friday’s game. MEMPHIS GRIZZLIES — Signed F Leon Powe. HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS — Assigned G Ray Emery to Syracuse (AHL). Recalled G J.P. Levasseur from Syracuse. ATLANTA THRASHERS — Reassigned G Chris Carrozzi from Chicago (AHL) to Gwinnett (ECHL). OTTAWA SENATORS — Reassigned F Colin Greening to Binghamton (AHL). American Hockey League ROCKFORD ICEHOGS — Returned F Andrew Sarauer to Reading (ECHL). TORONTO MARLIES — Recalled F Matt Caruana from Reading (ECHL). ECHL ELMIRA JACKALS — Signed F Chris Affinati and F Justin Barr.

W H A T ’ S

O N

T V

AUTO RACING 3 p.m. FOX — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Kobalt Tools 400, at Las Vegas BOWLING 1 p.m. ESPN — PBA, Mark Roth Plastic Ball Championship, at Cheektowaga, N.Y. CYCLING 4 p.m. VERSUS — Paris-Nice, stage 1, at Houdan, France (same-day tape) GOLF 1 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, The Honda Classic, final round, at Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. 3 p.m. NBC — PGA Tour, The Honda Classic, final round, at Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 3 p.m. WGN — Preseason, Chicago Cubs vs. L.A. Dodgers, at Mesa, Ariz. MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL Noon CBS — Kentucky at Tennessee 2 p.m. CBS — Missouri Valley Conference, championship game, teams TBD, at St. Louis 4 p.m. CBS — Wisconsin at ohio St. 6 p.m. FSN — Florida St. at N.C. State 8 p.m. ESPN2 — West Coast Conference, semifinal, teams TBD, at Las Vegas 10 p.m. ESPN2 — West Coast Conference, semifinal, teams TBD, at Las Vegas NBA BASKETBALL 1 p.m. ABC — Chicago at Miami 3:30 p.m. ABC — L.A. Lakers at San Antonio 6:30 p.m. ESPN — New York at Atlanta 9 p.m. ESPN — Boston at Milwaukee NHL HOCKEY 12:30 p.m. NBC — Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers RODEO 8 p.m. VERSUS — PBR, Chicago Invitational (same-day tape) WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 1 p.m. FSN — Atlantic Coast Conference, championship game, teams TBD, at Greensboro, N.C. 3:30 p.m. ESPN2 — Big Ten Conference, championship game, teams TBD, at Indianapolis FSN — Washington at Southern Cal 5:30 p.m. ESPN2 — Southeastern Conference, championship game, teams TBD, at Nashville, Tenn.

for an overtime or shootout loss. Saturday's Games Toronto 2, Hamilton 0 Adirondack at Albany, (n) Charlotte at Worcester, (n) Norfolk at Hershey, (n) Connecticut at Springfield, (n) Bridgeport at Portland, (n) Rochester at Grand Rapids, (n) Rockford at Lake Erie, (n) Syracuse at San Antonio, (n) Houston at Texas, (n) Abbotsford at Oklahoma City, (n) Chicago at Peoria, (n) Manitoba at Milwaukee, (n) Sunday's Games Hamilton at Toronto, 1 p.m. Charlotte at Manchester, 3 p.m. Albany at Adirondack, 3 p.m. Connecticut at Worcester, 3 p.m. Springfield at Portland, 4 p.m. Manitoba at Chicago, 4 p.m. Bridgeport at Providence, 4:05 p.m. Wilkes-Barre/Scranton at Hershey, 5 p.m. Norfolk at Binghamton, 5:05 p.m. Abbotsford at Houston, 6:05 p.m. Monday's Games Syracuse at Texas, 12 p.m.

N A S C A R

All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Philadelphia ................ 64 40 18 6 86 208 167 Pittsburgh .................... 66 37 21 8 82 190 164 N.Y. Rangers............... 67 34 29 4 72 186 164 New Jersey ................. 64 29 31 4 62 136 166 N.Y. Islanders.............. 66 25 32 9 59 182 210 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston.......................... 64 38 19 7 83 197 149 Montreal....................... 65 35 23 7 77 172 165 Buffalo.......................... 64 31 25 8 70 186 185 Toronto ........................ 65 29 27 9 67 170 197 Ottawa .......................... 65 22 34 9 53 147 206 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Tampa Bay................... 64 37 20 7 81 193 194 Washington ................. 65 35 20 10 80 173 164 Carolina ....................... 66 31 26 9 71 191 201 Atlanta .......................... 65 26 28 11 63 180 211 Florida .......................... 64 26 31 7 59 160 177 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit .......................... 65 39 19 7 85 215 188 Chicago........................ 65 36 23 6 78 213 179 Nashville ...................... 65 33 23 9 75 165 153 Columbus .................... 64 31 26 7 69 176 191 St. Louis....................... 65 28 28 9 65 177 194 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver ................... 66 41 16 9 91 213 155 Calgary ........................ 67 34 24 9 77 204 191 Minnesota.................... 65 34 25 6 74 169 171 Colorado ...................... 64 26 30 8 60 184 219 Edmonton .................... 65 22 35 8 52 164 214 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA San Jose ...................... 65 38 21 6 82 183 164 Los Angeles ................ 65 36 25 4 76 180 159 Phoenix........................ 66 33 23 10 76 186 190 Dallas ........................... 64 34 23 7 75 177 181 Anaheim ...................... 65 35 25 5 75 182 190 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Friday's Games New Jersey 2, Pittsburgh 1, OT N.Y. Rangers 4, Ottawa 1 Chicago 5, Carolina 2 Calgary 4, Columbus 3 Anaheim 4, Dallas 3, OT Saturday's Games N.Y. Islanders 5, St. Louis 2 Buffalo 5, Philadelphia 3 Vancouver 3, Los Angeles 1 Pittsburgh at Boston, (n) Chicago at Toronto, (n) Florida at Atlanta, (n) Montreal at Tampa Bay, (n) Detroit at Phoenix, (n) Edmonton at Colorado, (n) Dallas at San Jose, (n) Sunday's Games Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers, 12:30 p.m. New Jersey at N.Y. Islanders, 3 p.m. Washington at Florida, 5 p.m. Buffalo at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Nashville at Calgary, 8 p.m. Vancouver at Anaheim, 8 p.m.

Sprint Cup Kobalt Tools 400 Lineup

A H L All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Manchester ........... 64 38 19 2 5 83 211 174 Portland ................. 59 35 17 5 2 77 206 172 Connecticut........... 61 29 24 2 6 66 163 170 Worcester.............. 61 27 22 4 8 66 165 185 Springfield ............. 62 30 28 1 3 64 192 198 Providence............ 62 27 30 3 2 59 153 203 Bridgeport ............. 60 21 32 3 4 49 161 200 East Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Wilkes-Barre/ Scranton ................ 61 44 17 0 0 88 199 140 Hershey ................. 62 38 20 1 3 80 204 161 Charlotte................ 63 34 21 2 6 76 213 196 Norfolk ................... 61 31 17 8 5 75 202 164 Binghamton........... 61 32 22 3 4 71 200 170 Albany .................... 60 23 33 1 3 50 153 210 Adirondack............ 60 20 31 3 6 49 139 198 Syracuse ............... 60 20 33 3 4 47 146 195 WESTERN CONFERENCE North Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Hamilton ................ 61 33 22 1 5 72 176 154 Manitoba................ 61 33 22 1 5 72 169 154 Lake Erie ............... 64 32 24 3 5 72 174 170 Toronto .................. 65 32 25 0 8 72 187 179 Abbotsford ............ 63 30 25 3 5 68 152 171 Grand Rapids........ 62 28 25 1 8 65 180 193 Rochester.............. 63 29 28 3 3 64 171 197 West Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Milwaukee ............. 62 35 16 4 7 81 179 152 Houston ................. 65 37 23 1 4 79 185 167 Texas ..................... 63 33 21 4 5 75 175 175 Peoria .................... 63 34 23 2 4 74 176 169 San Antonio .......... 61 35 23 3 0 73 190 178 Oklahoma City...... 61 32 22 2 5 71 186 176 Chicago ................. 64 32 25 3 4 71 208 209 Rockford................ 61 24 29 4 4 56 158 193 NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point

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B

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THE TIMES LEADER

By ROXY ROXBOROUGH NBA Favorite

SPURS

3

(192)

Lakers

MINNESOTA

4.5

76ERS

7

(207.5) Warriors

After Friday qualifying;race Sunday At Las Vegas Motor Speedway Las Vegas, Nev. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 188.884 mph. 2. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 188.166. 3. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 188.127. 4. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 187.97. 5. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 187.565. 6. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 187.318. 7. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford, 187.253. 8. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 187.22. 9. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 187.201. 10. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 187.195. 11. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 187.084. 12. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 187.084. 13. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 186.903. 14. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 186.728. 15. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 186.528. 16. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 186.528. 17. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 186.464. 18. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 186.445. 19. (83) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 186.335. 20. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 186.079. 21. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 186.053. 22. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 186.002. 23. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 185.97. 24. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 185.688. 25. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota, 185.567. 26. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 185.478. 27. (13) Casey Mears, Toyota, 185.217. 28. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 185.103. 29. (32) Mike Skinner, Ford, 184.742. 30. (4) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 184.47. 31. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 184.464. 32. (46) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 184.2. 33. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 183.949. 34. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 183.014. 35. (34) David Gilliland, Ford, 183.007. 36. (60) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 182.07. 37. (09) Bill Elliott, Chevrolet, 181.977. 38. (7) Robby Gordon, Dodge, 181.403. 39. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 181.269. 40. (71) Andy Lally, Chevrolet, 179.414. 41. (37) Tony Raines, Ford, Owner Points. 42. (6) David Ragan, Ford, Owner Points. 43. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota, 181.769. Failed to Qualify 44. (92) Brian Keselowski, Dodge, 179.7.

NASCAR Nationwide Sam's Town 300 Results Saturday At Las Vegas Motor Speedway Las Vegas Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 200 laps, 112.2 rating, 0 points, $82,020. 2. (10) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 200, 110.4, 42, $63,015. 3. (11) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 200, 103.6, 0, $40,525. 4. (22) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 200, 93.1, 40, $41,180. 5. (7) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 200, 95.5, 39, $38,380. 6. (1) Carl Edwards, Ford, 200, 132.4, 0, $28,050. 7. (9) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 200, 119.5, 0, $22,450. 8. (3) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 200, 112.5, 36, $28,405. 9. (26) Jason Leffler, Chevrolet, 200, 84.4, 35, $27,315. 10. (15) Kenny Wallace, Toyota, 200, 84.8, 34, $27,980. 11. (8) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 199, 104.3, 33, $26,205. 12. (6) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 199, 91.9, 32, $18,625. 13. (12) Michael Annett, Toyota, 199, 94.5, 31, $25,105. 14. (13) Brian Scott, Toyota, 199, 85.8, 30, $25,045. 15. (14) Aric Almirola, Chevrolet, 198, 76.5, 29, $25,185. 16. (17) Steve Wallace, Toyota, 198, 74.4, 28, $24,400. 17. (19) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet, 197, 78.8, 27, $25,440. 18. (36) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, 196, 61.6, 26, $23,805. 19. (16) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 195, 68.2, 25, $24,695. 20. (20) Eric McClure, Chevrolet, 194, 57.3, 24, $25,060. 21. (18) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 193, 66.2, 23, $23,675. 22. (33) Robert Richardson Jr., Dodge, 193, 46.3, 22, $23,340. 23. (38) Joe Nemechek, Chevrolet, 193, 46, 21, $16,575. 24. (35) Timmy Hill, Toyota, 193, 49, 20, $23,095. 25. (34) Derrike Cope, Chevrolet, 190, 45, 19, $23,570. 26. (41) Donnie Neuenberger, Dodge, 189, 41.1, 18, $22,825. 27. (23) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, fuel pump, 181, 68.1, 17, $23,090. 28. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 168, 85.8, 0, $15,515. 29. (29) Shelby Howard, Chevrolet, 165, 47.5, 15, $22,395. 30. (2) Kyle Busch, Toyota, accident, 130, 124.7, 0,

GEORGIA TECH NC STATE

1 PK

Wisconsin Penn St Miani-Florida Florida St

2

(205)

Knicks

4.5

(200)

Wizards

6

(196.5)

CAVALIERS

Odds

Underdog

Flyers

-$120/even

RANGERS

THUNDER

5.5

(212.5)

Suns

Devils

-$135/+$115

ISLANDERS

MAVERICKS

6.5

(200.5) Grizzlies

Capitals

-$165/+$145

PANTHERS

(182.5)

WILD

-$125/+$105

Sabres

Canucks

-$130/+$110

DUCKS

FLAMES

-$140/+$120

Predators

7

Favorite

GB — 101⁄2 16 211⁄2 27

TENNESSEE

Bulls

BUCKS

College Basketball

GB — 21⁄2 41⁄2 7 241⁄2

1 7.5

(188.5)

Hornets

GB — 51⁄2 16 171⁄2 201⁄2

Kentucky OHIO ST

4.5

HAWKS

GB — 151⁄2 19 211⁄2 301⁄2

Wake Forest

Underdog

PISTONS

GB — 31⁄2 6 161⁄2 27

17

O/U

HEAT

GB — 14 141⁄2 27 291⁄2

BOSTON COLLEGE

Points

N B A

N H L

C

AMERICA’S LINE

Celtics

At A Glance All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct Boston........................... 45 15 .750 New York ...................... 31 29 .517 Philadelphia ................. 31 30 .508 New Jersey .................. 19 43 .306 Toronto ......................... 17 46 .270 Southeast Division W L Pct Miami............................. 43 19 .694 Orlando ......................... 40 23 .635 Atlanta ........................... 37 25 .597 Charlotte ....................... 26 35 .426 Washington .................. 15 45 .250 Central Division W L Pct Chicago......................... 42 18 .700 Indiana .......................... 27 34 .443 Milwaukee..................... 23 37 .383 Detroit ........................... 22 41 .349 Cleveland...................... 12 49 .197 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct San Antonio.................. 51 11 .823 Dallas ............................ 45 16 .738 New Orleans ................ 36 28 .563 Memphis ....................... 34 29 .540 Houston ........................ 31 32 .492 Northwest Division W L Pct Oklahoma City ............. 38 22 .633 Denver .......................... 37 26 .587 Portland......................... 34 27 .557 Utah............................... 32 30 .516 Minnesota..................... 15 48 .238 Pacific Division W L Pct L.A. Lakers ................... 44 19 .698 Phoenix......................... 32 28 .533 Golden State ................ 27 34 .443 L.A. Clippers................. 22 40 .355 Sacramento.................. 15 44 .254 Friday's Games New Jersey 116, Toronto 103 Chicago 89, Orlando 81 Philadelphia 111, Minnesota 100 Oklahoma City 111, Atlanta 104 Boston 107, Golden State 103 Cleveland 119, New York 115 New Orleans 98, Memphis 91 Dallas 116, Indiana 108 Phoenix 102, Milwaukee 88 San Antonio 125, Miami 95 L.A. Lakers 92, Charlotte 84 Saturday's Games New Jersey 137, Toronto 136,3OT Minnesota at Washington, (n) Indiana at Houston, (n) Sacramento at Utah, (n) Charlotte at Portland, (n) Denver at L.A. Clippers, (n) Sunday's Games Chicago at Miami, 1 p.m. L.A. Lakers at San Antonio, 3:30 p.m. Washington at Detroit, 6 p.m. Golden State at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. New York at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m. New Orleans at Cleveland, 6:30 p.m. Phoenix at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. Memphis at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Boston at Milwaukee, 9 p.m. Monday's Games L.A. Clippers at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Portland at Orlando, 7 p.m. Utah at New York, 7:30 p.m. New Orleans at Chicago, 8 p.m. Oklahoma City at Memphis, 8 p.m. Dallas at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Houston at Sacramento, 10 p.m.

S

Points

Underdog

$15,530. 31. (30) Jennifer Jo Cobb, Ford, accident, 127, 51.4, 13, $15,120. 32. (37) Carl Long, Ford, wheel bearing, 83, 48, 12, $15,010. 33. (32) Scott Wimmer, Chevrolet, engine, 72, 61.7, 11, $14,900. 34. (24) J.J. Yeley, Ford, engine, 25, 57, 0, $14,790. 35. (21) Kelly Bires, Ford, vibration, 14, 42.2, 9, $14,680. 36. (27) Brett Rowe, Chevrolet, handling, 12, 38.6, 8, $14,645. 37. (25) Kevin Lepage, Ford, power steering, 11, 38.8, 7, $14,600. 38. (28) Josh Wise, Ford, accident, 10, 36.2, 6, $21,595. 39. (43) Daryl Harr, Chevrolet, overheating, 8, 37.9, 5, $14,490. 40. (40) Charles Lewandoski, Dodge, clutch, 6, 36.4, 0, $14,455. 41. (39) Tim Andrews, Ford, transmission, 4, 35, 3, $14,400. 42. (31) Jeff Green, Chevrolet, vibration, 2, 33.5, 2, $14,355. 43. (42) Kevin Conway, Chevrolet, overheating, 2, 31.8, 0, $14,311. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 132.792 mph. Time of Race: 2 hours, 15 minutes, 33 seconds. Margin of Victory: 1.221 seconds. Caution Flags: 6 for 27 laps. Lead Changes: 11 among 6 drivers. Lap Leaders: K.Harvick 1-8;K.Busch 9-47;C.Edwards 48-50;K.Busch 51-70;D.Hamlin 71-81;C.Edwards 82-101;K.Busch 102-126;D.Hamlin 127-143;C.Edwards 144-188;B.Keselowski 189-199;M.Martin 200. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): K.Busch, 3 times for 84 laps;C.Edwards, 3 times for 68 laps;D.Hamlin, 2 times for 28 laps;B.Keselowski, 1 time for 11 laps;K.Harvick, 1 time for 8 laps;M.Martin, 1 time for 1 lap. Top 10 in Points: 1. R.Sorenson, 111;2. R.Stenhouse Jr., 109;3. J.Leffler, 106;4. D.Patrick, 98;5. J.Allgaier, 95;6. T.Bayne, 87;7. A.Almirola, 85;8. K.Wallace, 84;9. M.Bliss, 82;10. J.Nemechek, 79. NASCAR Driver Rating Formula A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a race. The formula combines the following categories: Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Running Position While on Lead Lap, Average Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.

P G A Honda Classic Scores Saturday At PGA National (Champions Course) Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. Purse: $5.7 million Yardage: 7,158;Par: 70 Third Round Rory Sabbatini ...................................71-64-66—201 Y.E. Yang ...........................................68-71-67—206 Jerry Kelly ..........................................71-67-68—206 Gary Woodland .................................71-68-68—207 Kyle Stanley.......................................68-66-74—208 Charles Howell III..............................71-71-67—209 Matt Bettencourt ................................70-70-69—209 Tommy Gainey..................................71-67-71—209 Ricky Barnes......................................70-68-71—209 Jeff Overton .......................................69-72-69—210 Stuart Appleby...................................68-70-72—210 Roland Thatcher ................................70-73-68—211 Justin Leonard...................................70-71-70—211 Matt Kuchar........................................69-70-72—211 Charl Schwartzel...............................68-69-74—211 Kent Jones.........................................72-71-69—212 Hiroyuki Fujita ...................................72-71-69—212 Scott Gutschewski ............................73-70-69—212 Davis Love III.....................................73-70-69—212 Hunter Haas ......................................70-71-71—212 Webb Simpson..................................74-67-71—212 Spencer Levin ...................................67-72-73—212 Marc Leishman..................................72-72-69—213 Colt Knost ..........................................74-69-70—213 Fredrik Jacobson ..............................74-68-71—213 Jimmy Walker....................................74-67-72—213 Luke Donald ......................................73-68-72—213 Sean O’Hair .......................................70-70-73—213 Nathan Green ....................................73-67-73—213 Josh Broadaway................................78-68-68—214 Chad Campbell .................................74-70-70—214 Graeme McDowell ............................73-71-70—214 Chris Kirk ...........................................73-70-71—214 Jason Dufner .....................................75-67-72—214 Justin Hicks .......................................73-68-73—214 Lee Westwood ..................................70-69-75—214 Robert Allenby ..................................71-73-71—215 Richard S. Johnson ..........................72-71-72—215 J.J. Henry...........................................71-70-74—215 Cameron Tringale .............................71-70-74—215 John Senden .....................................70-71-74—215 Chris Couch.......................................70-70-75—215 Ben Curtis ..........................................72-74-70—216 Alex Cejka..........................................71-74-71—216 Brian Gay............................................74-70-72—216 Kenny Perry.......................................71-72-73—216 Carl Pettersson .................................70-71-75—216 Greg Chalmers..................................68-72-76—216 William McGirt ...................................75-70-72—217 Shaun Micheel...................................74-71-72—217 Paul Goydos ......................................73-72-72—217 Nick Price...........................................70-74-73—217 Blake Adams .....................................73-73-72—218 Chad Collins ......................................74-72-72—218 Edoardo Molinari...............................73-73-72—218 Vaughn Taylor ...................................71-75-72—218 Ian Poulter..........................................74-71-73—218 Kevin Streelman................................73-71-74—218 David Mathis ......................................71-72-75—218 Stephen Ames ...................................73-72-74—219 Alex Prugh .........................................74-71-74—219 Chris Stroud.......................................73-69-77—219 Louis Oosthuizen ..............................75-70-75—220 Henrik Stenson .................................74-70-76—220 Andres Romero.................................72-74-75—221 Jeff Maggert.......................................75-70-76—221 Brendan Steele .................................74-71-76—221 Rory McIlroy ......................................73-71-77—221 Marc Turnesa ....................................75-71-76—222 D.A. Points.........................................74-72-76—222 J.P. Hayes..........................................76-69-77—222 David Duval .......................................74-71-77—222 Trevor Immelman..............................74-71-77—222 Jhonattan Vegas ...............................76-70-77—223 Ernie Els.............................................75-71-78—224 Steve Flesch......................................73-73-78—224 Josh Teater ........................................75-70-79—224

N A T I O N W I D E T O U R Pacific Rubiales Bogota Open Scores Saturday At Country Club de Bogota Bogota, Colombia Purse: $600,000 Yardage: 7,237;Par: 71 Partial Third Round Brenden Pappas.....................................67-66—133 Matt Every ................................................67-67—134 Julian Etulain ...........................................67-68—135 Clayton Rask ...........................................66-69—135 Bubba Dickerson ....................................70-66—136 Geoffrey Sisk...........................................70-67—137 Andrew Buckle ........................................68-69—137 Cliff Kresge ..............................................70-68—138 Rob Oppenheim .....................................69-70—139 Ron Whittaker .........................................70-69—139 Scott Stallings .........................................70-69—139 Brian Bateman .........................................71-68—139 Jonas Blixt ...............................................69-70—139 Andrew Parr ............................................65-74—139 Manuel Villegas.......................................68-71—139 Ken Duke .................................................71-69—140 Danny Wax ..............................................70-70—140 Todd Bailey..............................................68-72—140 Marco Dawson ........................................71-69—140 James Hahn ............................................71-70—141 Seong Ho Lee .........................................71-70—141 Casey Crain.............................................70-71—141 Doug LaBelle II .......................................71-71—142 Paul Claxton ............................................72-70—142 Roger Tambellini ....................................70-72—142 Greg Owen ..............................................70-72—142 Danny Lee ...............................................69-73—142 Brian Stuard.............................................71-71—142 Nick Flanagan..........................................73-69—142 Gary Christian .........................................73-69—142 Adam Bland .............................................70-72—142 Oscar Alvarez .........................................72-70—142 Robert Herrera........................................70-72—142 Gavin Coles.............................................72-71—143 David Lutterus.........................................73-70—143 Diego Velasquez ....................................71-72—143 Sebastian Fernandez .............................72-71—143 David Lingmerth .....................................72-72—144 Tim Wilkinson..........................................74-70—144 Josh Geary ..............................................72-72—144 Scott Dunlap............................................71-73—144

NHL Favorite

Bradley Iles..............................................71-73—144 Jeff Brehaut .............................................73-71—144 David Branshaw ......................................75-70—145 Brian Smock ............................................71-74—145 Dustin Garza ...........................................72-73—145 Brad Adamonis .......................................70-75—145 Steve Pate ...............................................72-73—145 John Kimbell............................................75-70—145 Matt Davidson .........................................70-75—145 Blake Parks .............................................72-74—146 Jeff Curl....................................................71-75—146 Travis Bertoni ..........................................74-72—146 Rick Price.................................................76-70—146 Scott Sterling...........................................73-73—146 Andrew Svoboda ....................................71-75—146 Omar Uresti .............................................74-72—146 Steve Wheatcroft ....................................73-74—147 Rich Barcelo ............................................74-73—147 Justin Peters ...........................................69-78—147 Brendon Todd .........................................73-74—147 Bernando Gonzalez ...............................74-73—147 Bryan DeCorso........................................75-74—149 Zack Sucher ............................................75-75—150 Michael Sims...........................................76-74—150 Andrew Magee........................................76-75—151 Chris Nallen.............................................77-74—151 Jim Carter ................................................74-77—151 Brock Mackenzie ....................................78-73—151 Luiz Fernando Posada...........................77-75—152 Leaderboard Brenden Pappas...........................................-9thru18 Matt Every ......................................................-8thru18 Clayton Rask .................................................-7thru18 Bubba Dickerson ..........................................-6thru18 Tyrone Van Aswegen...................................-6thru 8 Darron Stiles .................................................-6thru 6 Geoffrey Sisk.................................................-5thru18 Andrew Buckle ..............................................-5thru18 Rahil Gangjee................................................-5thru 3 David Vanegas..............................................-5thru 0

C O L L E G E B A S K E T B A L L Top 25 Fared Saturday 1. Ohio State (28-2) did not play. Next: vs. No. 10 Wisconsin, Sunday. 2. Kansas (29-2) beat No. 22 Missouri 70-66. Next: Big 12 quarterfinals, Thursday. 3. BYU (28-3) beat Wyoming 102-78. Next: MWC quarterfinals, Thursday. 4. Duke (27-3) at No. 13 North Carolina. Next: ACC quarterfinals, Friday. 4. Pittsburgh (27-4) beat No. 19 Villanova 60-50. Next: Big East quarterfinals, Thursday. 6. Purdue (25-6) lost to Iowa 67-65. Next: Big Ten quarterfinals, Friday. 7. Texas (24-6) at Baylor. Next: Big 12 quarterfinals, Thursday. 8. Notre Dame (25-5) beat No. 16 Connecticut 70-67. Next: Big East quarterfinals, Thursday. 9. San Diego State (28-2) vs. Colorado State. Next: MWC quarterfinals, Thursday. 10. Wisconsin (23-6) did not play. Next: at No. 1 Ohio State, Sunday. 11. Louisville (23-8) lost to West Virginia 72-70. Next: Big East tournament, Wednesday or Thursday. 12. Syracuse (25-6) beat DePaul 107-59. Next: Big East tournament, Wednesday or Thursday. 13. North Carolina (23-6) vs. No. 4 Duke. Next: ACC quarterfinals, Friday. 14. Florida (23-6) at No. 21 Vanderbilt. Next: SEC quarterfinals, Friday. 15. St. John’s (19-10) vs. South Florida. Next: Big East tournament, Wednesday or Thursday. 16. Connecticut (21-9) lost to No. 8 Notre Dame 70-67. Next: Big East tournament, Tuesday or Wednesday. 17. Georgetown (21-9) lost to Cincinnati 69-47. Next: Big East tournament, Tuesday or Wednesday. 18. Arizona (25-6) beat Oregon 90-82. Next: Pac-10 quarterfinals, Thursday. 19. Villanova (21-10) lost to No. 4 Pittsburgh 60-50. Next: Big East tournament, Tuesday or Wednesday. 20. Kentucky (21-8) did not play.Next: at Tennessee, Sunday. 21. Vanderbilt (21-8) vs. No. 14 Florida. Next: SEC tournament, Thursday or Friday. 22. Missouri (22-9) lost to No. 2 Kansas 70-66. Next: Big 12 tournament, Wednesday or Thursday. 23. Xavier (24-6) beat Saint Louis 66-55. Next: Atlantic 10 quarterfinals, Friday. 24. Texas A&M (23-7) beat Texas Tech 66-54. Next: Big 12 tournament, Wednesday or Thursday. 25. Utah State (27-3) at Louisiana Tech. Next: WAC semifinals, Friday.

Major Scores EAST Fordham 77, Massachusetts 73 George Washington 60, Dayton 58 N.J. Tech 78, Chicago St. 46 Notre Dame 70, Connecticut 67 Pittsburgh 60, Villanova 50 St. Bonaventure 74, Rhode Island 68 Syracuse 107, DePaul 59 Temple 90, La Salle 82 West Virginia 72, Louisville 70 SOUTH Alabama 65, Georgia 57 Clemson 69, Virginia Tech 60 McNeese St. 92, Lamar 74 Memphis 66, Tulane 61 Mississippi 84, Arkansas 74 Mississippi St. 60, South Carolina 58 Northwestern St. 70, Stephen F.Austin 65 Richmond 68, Duquesne 56 SE Louisiana 50, Nicholls St. 43 Saint Joseph’s 71, Charlotte 70 UNC Asheville 60, Coastal Carolina 47 Virginia 74, Maryland 60 MIDWEST Ball St. 67, N. Illinois 57 Bowling Green 73, Buffalo 63 Cincinnati 69, Georgetown 47 E. Michigan 69, Toledo 50 Illinois 72, Indiana 48 Iowa 67, Purdue 65 Kansas 70, Missouri 66 Kansas St. 67, Iowa St. 55 Michigan 70, Michigan St. 63 W. Michigan 81, Cent. Michigan 68 Xavier 66, Saint Louis 55 SOUTHWEST Oklahoma 64, Oklahoma St. 61 Texas A&M 66, Texas Tech 54 UTEP 59, SMU 56 FAR WEST Arizona 90, Oregon 82 Arizona St. 80, Oregon St. 66 BYU 102, Wyoming 78 UNLV 78, Utah 58 TOURNAMENT America East Conference Quarterfinals Stony Brook 67, Albany, N.Y. 61 Vermont 57, Binghamton 46 Colonial Athletic Association Quarterfinals George Mason 68, Georgia St. 45 Va. Commonwealth 62, Drexel 60 Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference Quarterfinals St. Peter’s 70, Loyola, Md. 60 Missouri Valley Conference Semifinals Missouri St. 60, Creighton 50 Southern Conference Quarterfinals W. Carolina 77, UNC Greensboro 66 Wofford 69, Appalachian St. 56

Next: TBA. 11. Michigan State (26-4) vs. Ohio State. x-Next: vs. Penn State or Illinois, Sunday. 12. DePaul (26-5) did not play. Next: vs. St. John’s or West Virginia, Sunday. 13. Maryland (23-6) did not play. Next: TBA. 14. Florida State (23-7) did not play. Next: TBA. 15. Wisconsin-Green Bay (29-1) beat Detroit 68-48. Next: Horizon League quarterfinals, Wednesday. 16. Kentucky (23-7) vs. Vanderbilt. x-Next: vs. No. 4 Tennessee, Sunday. 17. Georgetown (22-9) beat Syracuse 61-60. Next: vs. No. 1 Connecticut, Sunday. 18. Oklahoma (20-10) lost to Texas Tech 61-56. Next: Big 12 tournament, Tuesday or Wednesday. 19. North Carolina (25-7) beat No. 10 Miami 83-57. Next: vs. No. 8 Duke, Sunday. 20. Marquette (23-7) beat Pittsburgh 65-61. Next: vs. Rutgers, Sunday. 21. Marist (28-2) beat Siena 60-45. Next: vs. Loyola, Md., Monday. 22. Gonzaga (26-4) did not play. Next: vs. Portland or Santa Clara, Sunday. 23. Iowa State (21-9) lost to Missouri 49-48. Next: TBA. 24. Iowa (22-8) did not play. Next: TBA. 25. Houston (25-4) beat Tulane 90-84, OT. Next: vs. SMU or UTEP, Thursday. x-must win to advance

Saturday's Women's Basketball Scores EAST Chicago St. 66, N.J. Tech 43 SOUTH Alabama A&M 52, Jackson St. 42 Louisiana Tech 65, Idaho 55 McNeese St. 70, Lamar 69 Md.-Eastern Shore 63, Bethune-Cookman 54 SE Louisiana 77, Nicholls St. 66 MIDWEST Bradley 77, Indiana St. 69 Butler 58, Valparaiso 47 Cleveland St. 79, Ill.-Chicago 68 Drake 65, Creighton 54 Missouri 49, Iowa St. 48 Missouri St. 70, S. Illinois 58 N. Iowa 72, Illinois St. 54 SIU-Edwardsville 54, Seattle 50 Wichita St. 65, Evansville 50 Winona St. 73, Wayne, Mich. 65 Wis.-Green Bay 68, Detroit 48 Wright St. 86, Wis.-Milwaukee 69 Youngstown St. 84, Loyola of Chicago 65 MIDWEST Bradley 77, Indiana St. 69 Butler 58, Valparaiso 47 Cleveland St. 79, Ill.-Chicago 68 Drake 65, Creighton 54 Missouri 49, Iowa St. 48 Missouri St. 70, S. Illinois 58 N. Iowa 72, Illinois St. 54 SIU-Edwardsville 54, Seattle 50 Wichita St. 65, Evansville 50 Winona St. 73, Wayne, Mich. 65 Wis.-Green Bay 68, Detroit 48 Wright St. 86, Wis.-Milwaukee 69 Youngstown St. 84, Loyola of Chicago 65 SOUTH Alabama A&M 52, Jackson St. 42 Louisiana Tech 65, Idaho 55 McNeese St. 70, Lamar 69 Md.-Eastern Shore 63, Bethune-Cookman 54 SE Louisiana 77, Nicholls St. 66 SOUTHWEST Alcorn St. 65, Texas Southern 56 Houston 90, Tulane 84, OT Sam Houston St. 93, Texas St. 79 Texas Tech 61, Oklahoma 56 UTSA 77, Texas-Arlington 53 FAR WEST Arizona 88, Oregon 65 Arizona St. 59, Oregon St. 54 BYU 69, Wyoming 53 Baylor 81, Colorado 59 Colorado St. 66, San Diego St. 51 Idaho St. 69, N. Colorado 61 Montana 66, E. Washington 60 New Mexico 73, Air Force 70, OT New Mexico St. 82, Boise St. 51 Portland St. 65, Montana St. 63 Sacramento St. 69, Weber St. 54 UCLA 66, Washington St. 48 TOURNAMENT Atlantic 10 Conference Quarterfinals Charlotte 68, Richmond 63 Temple 75, St. Bonaventure 56 Xavier 71, Saint Joseph’s 55 Atlantic Coast Conference Semifinals Duke 74, Georgia Tech 66 North Carolina 83, Miami 57 Atlantic Sun Conference Championship Stetson 69, Jacksonville 50 Big East Conference Second Round Georgetown 61, Syracuse 60 Marquette 65, Pittsburgh 61 Big Ten Conference Semifinals Penn St. 79, Illinois 64 CCAC Conference Tournament Championship St. Xavier 101, Olivet Nazarene 91 ECAC Metro Semifinals St. John Fisher 70, Old Westbury 59 East Coast Conference Semifinals C.W. Post 78, St. Thomas Aquinas 67 GLIAC Conference Tournament Semifinals Ashland 80, Northwood, Mich. 67 Michigan Tech 69, Hillsdale 58 Gulf Coast Athletic Conference Championship Xavier, NO 71, Tougaloo 44 Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference Semifinals Loyola, Md. 50, Manhattan 47 Marist 60, Siena 45 Mid-American Conference First Round Akron 76, W. Michigan 65 E. Michigan 82, Miami (Ohio) 74 Mid-South Conference Tournament Semifinals Lindsey Wilson 65, Shawnee St. 58 Rio Grande 94, Campbellsville 71 Northeast Conference First Round Cent. Connecticut St. 54, Sacred Heart 49 Monmouth, N.J. 55, Quinnipiac 36 Robert Morris 78, Long Island U. 72 St. Francis, Pa. 72, Fairleigh Dickinson 59 Ohio Valley Conference Championship Tenn.-Martin 82, Tennessee Tech 76 Patriot League First Round American U. 72, Holy Cross 44 SAC tournament Semifinals Wingate 69, Carson-Newman 57 Southeastern Conference Semifinals Tennessee 82, Georgia 58 Southern Conference Quarterfinals Chattanooga 68, Wofford 58 Elon 69, Furman 62 Summit League First Round IPFW 68, UMKC 53 Oral Roberts 108, W. Illinois 79 Sun Belt Conference First Round Arkansas St. 66, Florida Atlantic 52 Louisiana-Monroe 60, Troy 51 South Alabama 58, Louisiana-Lafayette 53 W. Kentucky 81, North Texas 66 West Coast Conference Second Round Portland 75, Santa Clara 64

Women's NCAA Automatic Bids Stetson, Atlantic Sun Conference Tennessee-Martin, Ohio Valley Conference

T E N N I S WTA Whirlpool Monterrey Open Results Saturday At Sierra Madre Tennis Club Monterrey, Mexico Purse: $220,000 (Intl.) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Semifinals Jelena Jankovic (1), Serbia, def. Polona Hercog (8), Slovenia, 6-3, 6-2.

W O M E N ’ S B A S K E T B A L L

F I G H T S C H E D U L E

Top 25 Fared Saturday 1. Connecticut (29-1) did not play. Next: vs. No. 17 Georgetown, Sunday. 2. Stanford (27-2) did not play. Next: Pac-10 semifinals, Friday. 3. Baylor (28-2) beat Colorado 81-59. Next: Big 12 quarterfinals, Wednesday. 4. Tennessee (30-2) beat Georgia 82-58. Next: vs. No. 16 Kentucky or Vanderbilt, Sunday. 5. Texas A&M (25-4) vs. Nebraska. Next: Big 12 quarterfinals, Wednesday. 6. Xavier (26-2) beat Saint Joseph’s 71-55. Next: vs. Richmond or Charlotte, Sunday. 7. Notre Dame (24-6) did not play. Next: vs. Louisville or Villanova, Sunday. 8. Duke (28-3) beat Georgia Tech 74-66. Next: vs. No. 19 North Carolina, Sunday. 9. UCLA (25-3) vs. Washington State. Next: Pac-10 semifinals, Friday. 10. Miami (27-4) lost to No. 19 North Carolina 83-57.

Friday, March 11 At the Planet Hollywood Theatre, Las Vegas (PPV), Joel Casamayor vs. Michael Anchondo, 10, super featherweights; Tye Fields vs. Michael Grant, 10, heavyweights; Ron Johnson vs. Garrett Wilson, 10, light heavyweights. March 12 At Glasgow, Scotland, Ricky Burns vs. Joseph Laryea, 12, for Burns’ WBO junior lightweight title. At Mendoza, Argentina, Jonathan Victor Barros vs. Miguel Roman, 12, for Barros’ WBA World featherweight title. At Foxwoods Resort Casino, Mashantucket, Conn. (HBO), Sergio Gabriel Martinez vs. Serhiy Dzinziruk, 12, for Martinez’s WBC middleweight title; Andy Lee vs. Craig McEwan, 10, middleweights. At MGM Grand, Las Vegas (PPV), Miguel Angel Cotto vs. Ricardo Mayorga, 12, for the WBA Super World light middleweight title; Miguel Vazquez vs. Leonardo Zappavigna, 12, for Vazquez’s IBF lightweight title; Donnie Nietes vs. Raul Garcia, 12, for

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Nietes’ WBO minimumweight title; Yuri Foreman vs. Pawel Wolak, 10, super welterweights; Joshua Clottey vs. Calvin Green, 10, junior middleweights. March 18 At Hollywood, Fla. (ESPN2), Demetrius Hopkins vs. Brad Solomon, 10, welterweights; Chris Avalos vs. Yan Barthemely, 10, junior featherweights; Cedric Boswell vs. Alonzo Butler, 10, heavyweights. March 19 At Cologne, Germany, Vitali Klitschko vs. Odlanier Solis, 12, for Klitschko’s WBC heavyweight title. At Dublin, Ireland, Guillermo Rigondeaux vs. Willie Casey, 12, for Rigondeaux’s interim WBA World junior featherweight title. At Montreal (SHO), Lucian Bute vs. Brian Magee, 12, for Bute’s IBF super middleweight title; Renan St-Juste vs. Edison Miranda, 10, super middleweights.

E C H L At A Glance All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Reading . 57 35 17 2 3 75 195 172 Elmira..... 56 26 23 6 1 59 205 202 Trenton .. 58 21 31 2 4 48 181 211 North Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Kalamazoo ......... 57 31 20 2 4 68 206 191 Wheeling........... 58 30 25 0 3 63 189 172 Cincinnati.............. 57 25 23 6 3 59 163 184 Toledo.... 57 26 27 3 1 56 186 211 South Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Greenville ......... 59 36 20 2 1 75 200 159 South Carolina . 59 33 22 2 2 70 167 167 Florida.... 60 30 26 1 3 64 201 188 Gwinnett 58 26 25 2 5 59 170 199 WESTERN CONFERENCE Mountain Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Alaska.... 56 33 20 2 1 69 176 151 Idaho...... 58 28 18 4 8 68 183 168 Utah ....... 57 28 23 4 2 62 161 168 Victoria... 58 27 28 1 2 57 172 180 Pacific Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Las Vegas .... 57 33 19 3 2 71 180 156 Stockton 57 29 19 4 5 67 178 166 Bakersfield......... 58 30 25 2 1 63 177 179 Ontario... 59 21 32 2 4 48 154 220 NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point for an overtime or shootout loss. Friday's Games Kalamazoo 4, Toledo 3 Greenville 3, Trenton 2, OT South Carolina 3, Florida 1 Wheeling 2, Cincinnati 1 Ontario 3, Utah 2 Idaho 4, Las Vegas 2 Bakersfield 2, Victoria 1 Stockton 4, Alaska 1 Saturday's Games South Carolina at Florida, 7 p.m. Elmira at Greenville, 7:05 p.m. Trenton at Gwinnett, 7:05 p.m. Wheeling at Reading, 7:05 p.m. Toledo at Cincinnati, 7:30 p.m. Ontario at Utah, 9:05 p.m. Las Vegas at Idaho, 9:10 p.m. Bakersfield at Victoria, 10:05 p.m. Alaska at Stockton, 10:30 p.m. Sunday's Games Cincinnati at Kalamazoo, 4 p.m. Trenton at Gwinnett, 4:05 p.m. Elmira at Greenville, 4:05 p.m. Wheeling at Reading, 5:05 p.m. Alaska at Stockton, 7 p.m.

M A J O R L E A G U E B A S E B A L L Spring Training Glance All Times EST AMERICAN LEAGUE ..........................................................................WL Pct Baltimore ......................................................... 41.800 Kansas City..................................................... 52.714 Minnesota ....................................................... 52.714 Texas............................................................... 53.625 Detroit.............................................................. 64.600 Cleveland ........................................................ 44.500 Los Angeles.................................................... 44.500 Seattle.............................................................. 33.500 Boston ............................................................. 34.429 Oakland ........................................................... 34.429 Toronto............................................................ 35.375 New York ........................................................ 25.286 Chicago ........................................................... 15.167 Tampa Bay ...................................................... 16.143 NATIONAL LEAGUE ..........................................................................WL Pct Atlanta ............................................................. 62.750 Milwaukee ....................................................... 52.714 St. Louis .......................................................... 52.714 San Francisco................................................. 73.700 Washington .................................................... 42.667 Cincinnati ........................................................ 53.625 Colorado ......................................................... 43.571 Pittsburgh........................................................ 54.556 Philadelphia.................................................... 44.500 San Diego ....................................................... 33.500 New York ........................................................ 34.429 Florida ............................................................. 24.333 Los Angeles.................................................... 36.333 Arizona ............................................................ 37.300 Chicago ........................................................... 25.286 Houston........................................................... 26.250 NOTE: Split-squad games count in the standings;games against non-major league teams do not. Friday's Games Minnesota 5, Tampa Bay 4 St. Louis 10, Houston 2 Atlanta (ss) 6, Washington 4 N.Y. Mets 4, Florida 3 Toronto 7, Atlanta (ss) 5 Baltimore 6, Detroit 2 Philadelphia 7, Pittsburgh 4 Cleveland 6, Colorado 2 L.A. Angels 3, Chicago White Sox 1 San Francisco (ss) 7, Milwaukee 2 Cincinnati 3, Seattle 1 Texas 6, Oakland 3 Kansas City 5, Chicago Cubs 4 San Diego 3, Arizona 2 Boston 5, N.Y. Yankees 3 San Francisco (ss) 5, L.A. Dodgers 3 Saturday's Games Pittsburgh 4, Philadelphia 3 Minnesota 6, Tampa Bay 1 Detroit (ss) 5, Houston (ss) 0 Baltimore 4, Boston (ss) 4, tie, 10 innings Washington 10, N.Y. Yankees 8 St. Louis 1, Houston (ss) 0 Florida 11, Boston (ss) 2 Atlanta 6, N.Y. Mets 4 Toronto 7, Detroit (ss) 4 Milwaukee 2, L.A. Angels 1 Chicago Cubs 9, San Diego 4 Oakland 6, San Francisco 0 Colorado 10, Kansas City 9 Cleveland (ss) 8, Chicago White Sox 3 Seattle 7, Cleveland (ss) 2 L.A. Dodgers 2, Cincinnati 0 Arizona 3, Texas 2 Sunday's Games Philadelphia (ss) vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Baltimore vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla., 1:05 p.m. St. Louis vs. Florida at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Philadelphia (ss) at Clearwater, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Atlanta vs. Washington at Viera, Fla., 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees vs. Houston at Kissimmee, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Toronto vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Boston vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, Fla., 1:10 p.m. Arizona vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Seattle vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Oakland (ss) vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (ss) vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers vs. Chicago Cubs (ss) at Mesa, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Milwaukee (ss) vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Milwaukee (ss) vs. Oakland (ss) at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m. Kansas City vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Cleveland vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:10 p.m. Monday's Games Atlanta vs. Florida at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Philadelphia vs. N.Y. Yankees (ss) at Tampa, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Baltimore (ss) vs. Boston at Fort Myers, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla., 1:05 p.m. St. Louis vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Houston vs. Washington at Viera, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Detroit vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, Fla., 1:10 p.m. L.A. Angels vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Cleveland vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Milwaukee vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Arizona vs. Kansas City (ss) at Surprise, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Seattle vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (ss) vs. Baltimore (ss) at Sarasota, Fla., 7:05 p.m. Texas vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz., 9:05 p.m. Kansas City (ss) vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 9:05 p.m.


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SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011 PAGE 3C

NORTHEAST REGIONAL CLASS 2A WRESTLING

Meyers’ Pasone, Lehman’s Harry Hershey-bound With second places, Mohawks 112-pounder and Black Knights 119 star head to state meet. By DAVE KONOPKI dkonopki@timesleader.com

WILLIAMSPORT — After the pain of losing in his championship match began to subside, Vito Pasone stood in a hallway adjacent to the Williamsport High School gym and summed up his wrestling weekend in one word. “Successful.” Although he came up short of winning a championship, the Meyers junior earned a trip to the state tournament with a secondplace finish in the 112-pound division of the Northeast Regional Class 2A wrestling tournament on Saturday. Pasone will be joined in Hershey by Lake-Lehman freshman Austin Harry, who finished second in the 119-pound weight class. The state tournament begins Thursday in Hershey. District 2 champion Pasone ran into a buzzsaw in returning state champion Zain Retherford of Line Mountain in the championship final. Retherford – the top-ranked 112-pounder in the state, who also owns a No. 5 national ranking – defeated Pasone by major decision, 12-2. Pasone was the aggressor early, but the District 4 champion was able to take down the Mohawk and earn three back points in the final minute of the first period to take a 5-0 lead. The margin increased to 7-0 early in the second period and 9-0 a minute later. “Once (Retherford) got up 7-0, it’s a different match,” Meyers coach Ron Swingle Jr. said. “Now, Vito has to start changing some things and worrying about getting back points. It’s very difficult to do that against someone like (Retherford).” Despite the loss, there was

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plenty of reason for optimism for Pasone. Last year, he suffered an early-round loss and wasn’t able to place at regionals. “I’m really happy with how I wrestled,” Pasone said. “It feels good to know where I stand. I know some of the things I need to work on. (Retherford) is really tough. He never stops moving. He’s a great wrestler. But wrestling someone like that helps get me ready for next week.” Harry, the only freshman who was competing in the 119-pound weight class, was pinned in the first period by Benton sophomore Colt Cotten in the final. Cotten is a returning state qualifier who won a District 4 championship last weekend. “I had two goals before the season started – to win a district championship and make it to states,” said Harry. “I did both.” The ninth-grader’s appearance might have surprised some, but not Lake-Lehman coach Tom Williams. “After the Tunkhannock tournament, I told Austin he had a really good chance to get to states. This should give him some confidence, knowing that he can compete with kids on the state level. Historically, if you place at this regional, you have a good chance to medal at states. “I was really happy for Austin and with the performance of the Lake-Lehman kids. We came here with four wrestlers and three won at least one match.” Two other WVC wrestlers came close to earning a spot in Hershey, but came up just short in their respective third-place matches. Dallas 189-pound senior Adam Goeringer had the most heartbreaking finish, losing his second overtime match of the day to finish fourth. In the third-place match against Bloomsburg’s Remington Weigle, Goeringer came within inches of securing a takedown in the closing seconds of Ann Mahle outpaced the stiff competition. Mahle’s swim of 59.98 seconds edged Mayurnick by .11 seconds. “I think that backstroke with Julie Ann Mahle and Lucy Reilly (who finished fifth) was magic,” said Holy Redeemer coach Mara Campbell Pawlenok. “The timing couldn’t have been more perfect right there. “When they did that, Julie Ann came over and said, ‘Maybe we could win this meet.’” Tunkhannock senior Stephanie Halloran lowered four seconds off her seed time to earn an upset victory in the 100 breaststroke. “Maggie Germain from Prep was my biggest worry; she’s been on top all four years,” said Halloran. “I just kept remembering my coach saying, ‘Don’t die, don’t die, don’t die’ because I usually pull back and that’s what I kept in my mind once I got ahead.” The Crestwood boys team claimed its first district title in school history as Joseph Grzech placed first in the 100 backstroke.

Swimming and Diving Championships at Bucknell University in Lewisburg on March 16-19. Dallas’ Chris Tamanini took home his second individual title, in the 100 free, racing to a 47.88-second finish. With wins in the 100 butterfly, the 400 free relay and the 200 medley relay, Tamanini won four district titles and finished first in each race he swam. In the 400 free relay race, the team of Jake Chielli, John Laity, Brian Stepniak and Tamanini clocked in at 3:19.69 – nearly 10 seconds faster than secondplace Holy Redeemer. “What impressed me the most was the way they kept dropping times,” said Dallas coach Romayne Mosier. “They wanted it. They wanted to do better each time and get the best possible time. So even though they finished first in a lot of things, the goal was to get a really good seed time for states.” The key to Dallas’ success Girls FINAL STANDINGS – 1. Holy Redeemer was its depth. Chielli placed (HR), 285; 2. Scranton Prep (SP), 262.5; 3. Dallas (DAL), 146.5; 4. Tunkhannock (TUN), 123; 5. Elk second in the 100 free. Laity fol- Lake (EL), 93; 6. Crestwood (CRE), 73; 7. Berwick (BER), 71; 7. Valley View (VV), 71; 9. Pittston Area low teammate Marcus Wagn- (PA), 67; 10. Wyoming Area (WA), 66; 11. HanovArea (HAN), 48; 12. Meyers (MEY), 41; Holy er’s district-winning 500 free er Cross (HC); Nanticoke (NAN); 100 FREE – 1. HR, race by slicing 20 seconds off E. Finnegan, 55.53; 2. EL, Karabin, 55.79; 3. TUN, Dymond, 56.22; 4. SP, Telincho, 56.63; 5. SP, his seed time. Blake, 58.29; 6. VV, Franchak, 59.02; 500 FREE – 1. SP, Nonneneberg, 5:09.37; 2. EL, Zdancewicz, “I think these guys, especially 5:30.19; 3. DAL, Barry, 5:37.55; 4. HR, Kalafut, 5. HR, Ryan, 5:44.38; 6. VV, LaTorre, the younger ones, want to get 5:42.46; 5:45.73; 100 BACK – 1. HR, Mahle 59.98; 2. SP, Mayurnick, 3. HC, Carey, 1:01.67; 4. better because they want to car- CRE, Blass,1:00.09; 1:02.07; 5. HR, Reilly, 1:06.59; 6. PA, Scialpi, 1:06.59; 100 BREAST – 1. TUN, Halloran, ry on the tradition,” said Mo- 1:11.53; 2. SP, Germain, 1:12.11; 3. HR, Chmil, 1:12.24; 4. HR, Kusakavitch, 1:14.7; 5. HR, sier. “They work hard and Steele, 1:15.3; 6. NAN, Medura, 1:16.71; 400 achieve their goals.” FREE RELAY – 1. SP, (Nonneneberg, Germain, Blake, Mayurnick), 3:46.12; 2. EL, 3:50.29; 3. On the girls’ side, Holy Re- TUN, 3:50.6; 4. DAL, 3:59.04; 5. HR, 4:00.82; 6. VV, 4:01.7 deemer trailed Scranton Prep after the 100 free, despite getBoys ting its first district winner of FINAL STANDINGS – 1. Dallas (DAL), 343; 2. Holy (HR), 218.5; 3. Valley View (VV), the meet. The Royals’ Elizabeth 154; Redeemer 4. Scranton Prep (SP), 140; 5. Berwick (BER), 129; 6. Crestwood 98; 7. Elk Lake Finnegan edged Elk Lake’s (EL), 93.5; 8. Hanover Area(CRE), (HAN), 73; 9. Wyoming Seminary (SEM), 28; 10. West Scranton (WS), Chelsea Karabin by just over 17; 11. Lake-Lehman (LL), 9; 100 FREE – 1. DAL, two-tenths of a second to earn Tamanini, 47.88; 2. DAL, Chielli, 48.22; 3. SP, Holmes, 48.4; 4. HAN, Pisano, 50.68; 5. BER, the 100 win. Brown, 51.39; 6. CRE, Grzech, 52.4; 500 FREE – 1. DAL, Wagner, 5:14.78; 2. DAL, Laity, 5:18.06; The Royals hurdled the Cava- 3. HR, Smith, 5:24.58; 4. HR, Hauze, 5:30.28; 5. Senese, 5:32.5; 6. VV, Conaboy, 5:34.35; liers in the overall standings in a HR, 100 BACK – 1. CRE, Grzech, 58.06; 2. DAL, 59.3; 3. SP, Muzzi, 1:00.59; 4. BER, pivotal 100 backstroke race. Pit- Stepniak, Witchey, 1:02.69; 5. VV, Kraycer, 1:02.82; 6. HR, ted against Scranton Prep’s Lau- Evans, 1:03.51; 100 BREAST – 1. EL, Phillips, !:00.93; 2. DAL, Harding, 1:01.9; 3. VV, Ounkiavren Mayurnick, Megan Carey of age, 1:07.08; 4. DAL, Matsiuk, 1:07.25; 5. SP, Legg, 1:07.71; 6. DAL, Luksic, 1:07.71; 400 FREE Holy Cross and Crestwood’s RELAY – 1. DAL, (Chielli, Stepniak, Laity, Tamani3:19.69; 2. HR, 3:29.45; 3. VV, 3:36.04; 4. EL, Brittany Blass, all of whom ni), 3:37.94; 5. BER, 3:58.16 were seeded within two-tenths of a second, fourth-ranked Julie

regulation, but wasn’t awarded the point. Weigle won 4-2 by taking down Goeringer with 24 seconds remaining in overtime. In the morning semifinals, Goeringer lost in three overtimes to drop to the consolation round. Meyers junior Darren Stucker also suffered a tough loss in the 135-pound third-place match. Stucker was leading Adam Kritzer of Line Mountain, 3-2, and attempted to get a cradle. Instead, Kritzer recorded a reversal with 52 seconds remaining and pinned Stucker nine seconds later. The second day of the two-day event was much better for WVC wrestlers, who posted a combined 4-23 record in Friday night’s quarterfinals. The WVC came back to win eight matches in the first round of consolations. Swingle said wrestling against quality competition can only help District 2 wrestlers get better, especially someone such as Pasone – who has hopes of winning a state medal in Hershey. “This was a good match for us,” he said. “That’s what we’re going to face next week. It’s hard to be really upset when you lose to a state champion. But the medals you really want are the medals next weekend.” Northeast Regional Class 2A tournament at Williamsport H.S., Williamsport Top three in each class advance to state meet Final team scores: 1, Line Mountain 75.5; 2, Towanda 71.5; 3, Benton 68.5; 4, Lewisburg, 64; 5, Muncy 57.5; 6, Shamokin 54; 7, Western Wayne 40; 8, Mifflinburg 38; 9, Montoursville 36.5; 10, Milton 32 First Round Consolations 103: Kyle Blascak, Towanda, dec. A. J. Luton, GAR 8-4; Dominick Degraba, Dallas Area, dec. Daniel Killian, Canton 8-1. 112: Brandon Lontz, Benton, pinned Zach Edwards, Blue Ridge 2:51; Andrew Gipe, South Williamsport, maj. dec. Patrick Creedon, Scranton Prep 13-2. 119: Braden Calkins, Troy, dec. Aaron Perez, Dallas Area 7-0; Mason Zimmerman, Line Mountai, maj. dec. Kashif Alston, Meyers 13-1. 125: Nick Dusendschine, Mount Carmel, maj. dec. Stephen Mingey, Dallas Area 13-3; Andy Schutz, Wyoming Area, pinned Zach Jones, Western Wayne 0:41. 130: Ryan Hart, Wyalusing, dec. James McMoore, Nanticoke Area 4-2; Dalton Church, Blue Ridge, dec. Brian Deluca, Dallas Area 4-2. 135: Jeric Kasunic, Benton, dec. John Elick, Hanover Area 3-2; Chris Dixon, Lackawanna Trail, dec. Dylan Hornberger, Mount Carmel 5-4. 140: Alan Miller, Mifflinburg, pinned Matt Lukachinsky, Hanover Area 2:10; Tom Maby, Susquehanna Community, pinned Zach Macosky, Dallas Area 1:49. 145: Ben Emmett, Central Columbia, pinned

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And if it doesn’t it’s not the end of the world. It’s just a great feeling to know I qualified for the Pennsylvania state tournament.” Domarasky will be joined by six other Wyoming Valley Conference wrestlers in Class 3A to make up a total of 11 from District 2 advancing. Domarasky’s teammate Jason Laboranti (215) moved on by finishing as a silver medalist. The duo are joined by Crestwood teammates Matt Ritz (140) and Mike Mirra (189), who were also runners-up. The Hazleton Area tandem of Tim Samec (152) and Chad Hoffman (171) moved on by finishing second and third, respectively. Coughlin’s Josh Popple (189) was the lone gold medalist for the conference. Popple and Mirra will be participating in the state tournament for the second time, while the rest of the WVC qualifiers will be making their first trip to Hershey. Popple beat Mirra – the returning regional champion – 8-2 on Saturday for his fourth win over his conference rival this season and his first regional title. In doing so, Popple ran his record to 41-0. He enters the state tournament as one of only two unbeatens from the region, the other being Nazareth 130-pounder Zachary Horan (45-0). Once again, Popple earned the victory on the strength of seven back points. “It’s always an exciting match (when I wrestle Mirra). It’s never a blowout. It’s always very tight,” Popple said. “Records aren’t really anything but looking at them. The only thing that matters is getting on that stand next week with the number one on it.” Samec had a double thrill when he qualified for states with a win in the 152 semifinals while notching his 100th career win in the process. “I’ve been looking forward to that since I talked to (former Hazleton Area coach) Davey Shafer about my wins in freshman and sophomore year,” Samec said. “To get both of them at the same time is unreal.”

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Meyers’ Vito Pasone battles Line Mountain’s Zain Retherford during the 112-pound championship bout at the Class 2A Northeast Regional wrestling tournament in Williamsport. Pasone, who qualified for the state tournament, lost a 12-2 major decision to the defending state champ. Kris Roccograndi, Dallas Area 1:35; Kurt Pericci, Hanover Area, pinned Bryan Carter, Lake-Lehman 2:53. 152: Bill Dress, Meyers, dec. Jake Clemens, Wellsboro 6-4 SV; Richard Emel, Lake-Lehman, dec. Bill Dixon, Dallas Area 5-2. 160: Don English, Milton, dec. Zach Thorne, Montrose 3-1; Garrett Shnyder, Montgomery, pinned Garrett Wynn, Hanover Area 3:57. 171: Steve Radzwilla, Hanover Area, pinned Aaron Shrawder, Midd-West 4:07; Nick Shelley, Lake-Lehman, dec. Marvess Rosiak, Lackawanna Trail 4-1. 189: Josh Harrison, Western Wayne, dec. Anthony Clark, Wyalusing 5-4; Pedro Bracero, Nanticoke Area, dec. Kenny Rothermel, Line Mountain 4-2. 215: Nathan Stettler, North Penn, pinned Mike Glowniak, Dallas Area 0:15; Dylan Dailey, Danville, pinned Cody Shreck, Muncy 1:32. 285: Eric McCracken, Central Columbia, dec. Anthony Gipson, Meyers 3-2; Joseph Ingaglio, Western Wayne, dec. Mike Galantini, Valley View 5-3 Championship Semifinals 103: Shawn Nitcznski, Sullivan County, maj. dec. Evan Decker, Western Wayne 9-0; Logan Everett, Williamson dec. Matt Welliver, Benton 4-0. 112: Zain Retherford, Line Mountain pinned Caleb Pearson, Montoursville 3:14; Vito Pasone, Meyers tech. fall David Sheesley, Mifflinburg 18-3, 5:02. 119: Colt Cotten, Benton dec. Eric Wolfe, Milton 10-3; Austin Harry, Lake-Lehman dec. Jared Watson, Warrior Run 5-2. 125: Cody Wheeler, Towanda maj. dec. Zack Green, Northeast Bradford 12-4; Seth Lansberry, Line Mountain maj. dec. Zane Rowe, Mifflinburg 11-3.

Like Domarasky, Hoffman won a state-qualifying bout at 171 to advance. He avenged a loss from Wyoming Valley West’s George Simms in the District 2 finals by locking a pin in 4:58 to move on to the state meet for the first time. “When I got that win it almost didn’t seem real at first. It felt so quiet around me so I soaked it in,” Hoffman said. “After losing districts to him, this is great.” Laboranti, who bumped up from 189 for the postseason, took second, falling in a tough bout with Tarek Haddad from Parkland, 7-4, in the 215 finals. But he’s still moving on to the next round. “There was no pressure either way so I just decided to go out and have fun,” Laboranti said. Ritz, a senior, advanced to states for the first time after beating Shikellamy’s Matt Neff in the 140 semifinals. He then wrestled for the championship with Easton’s Mitchell Minotti, but fell 10-3. “I hoped to wrestle better in the finals, but I’m going to states at least,” Ritz said. “You wish you could get a regional championship, but I didn’t wrestle my greatest. It is what it is.” The Patriots’ Jamie Scarantino (103), Valley West’s Kyle Krasavage (119), Crestwood’s Kyle Hankinson (145) and Berwick’s Roy Dennis (215) took home fourth-place medals. The rest of the qualifiers from District 2 are Delaware Valley’s C.J. Palmer (119) and Marc Wagner (160) and Abington Heights’ James Fruehan (152) and Morgan Craig (285). Class 3A Northeast Regional (at Freedom H.S., Bethlehem) Team Scores: 1. Easton (East) 129.5; 2. Parkland (Park) 122.5; 3. Nazareth (Naz) 97; 4. Northampton (North) 81.5; 5. Liberty (Lib) 76; 6. Blue Mountain (BM) 64; 7. Shikellamy (Shik) 48; 8. Delaware Valley (DV) 46.5; 9. Crestwood (Cre) 44; 10. Pittston Area (PA) 40; 11. Williamsport (Will) 38; 12. Coughlin 33.5; 13. Hazleton Area (Haz) 32; 14. Abington Heights (AH), Pleasant Valley (PV) 28; 16. Stroudsburg (Str) 25; 17. Southern Lehigh (SL), Wyoming Valley West (WVW) 24; 19. Selinsgrove (Sel) 22.5; 20. Berwick (Ber), Pocono Mountain West (PMW), 18; 22. Dieruff (Dier) 17; 23. Pottsville (Pott), Scranton (Scr) 9; 25. Honesdale (Hon) 8; 26. East Stroudsburg South (ESS) 7; 27. Emmaus (Emm) 6; 28. Freedom (Free), Jersey Shore (JS) 5; 30. Pocono Mountain East (PME) 4; 31. Tunkhannock (Tun), West Scranton (WS) 2; 2. Wallenpaupack (Wall), Whitehall (White) 0 Finals 103 – Ethan Lizak (Park) dec Brett Marino (Lib) 9-5 112 – Anthony Cabrera (Lib) dec DeMarquis Holley (Dier) 5-0 119 – Corey Keener (BM) dec C.J. Palmer (DV) 6-4, OT 125 – Devon Lotito (Lib) pinned Mike Fake (Park) 4:47 130 – Zach Horan (Naz) dec Brandon Choate (BM) 3-1 135 – Joseph Rizzolino (East) dec Jason

130: Coltin Fought, Benton maj. dec. David Batkowski, Montoursville 10-0; Brandon Pesarchick, Shamokin pinned Sean Heggs, East Juniata 3:34. 135: Josh Lahr, Shamokin dec. Adam Kritzer, Line Mountain 7-5; Caleb Willey, Towanda tech. fall Darren Stucker, Meyers 19-3, 5:43. 140: Luke Frey, Montoursville pinned Herbie Shannon, Central Columbia 0:41; Travis Erdman, Line Mountain maj. dec. Brenton Acorn, Wellsboro 16-6. 145: Troy Hembury, Muncy dec. Ryan Preisch, Milton 5-3; Brian Watkins, Southern Columbia dec. Zack Ripic, Towanda 4-2. 152: Zach Strickland, Muncy dec. Kurt Meske, Central Columbia 6-0; Curtis Schneider, Lewisburg dec. Kody Getkin, Danville 8-2. 160: Casey Fuller, Western Wayne dec. Tyler Stettler, North Penn 7-2; Ty Walter, Mifflinburg dec. Jake Balchikonis, Northeast Bradford 6-5. 171: Nathaniel Brown, Lewisburg maj. dec. Jake Mankey, Benton 12-4; Mike Cobb, Wyalusing maj. dec. Garrett VanDeMark, Towanda 12-3. 189: Ryan Hembury, Muncy maj. dec. Remington Weigle, Bloomsburg 13-5; Brandon Smith, Lewisburg dec. Adam Goeringer, Dallas Area 4-3, 2 OT. 215: Eric Laytos, Lackawanna Trail inj. def. Ryan Longenberger, Bloomsburg 3:41; Ryan Solomon, Milton pinned Matt Rosensweet, Western Wayne 1:21. 285: Wes Tillett, Shamokin dec. Nazar Mironenko, Mifflinburg 5-2; Aaron Schultz, Towanda dec. Sean Charest, Lewisburg 1-0. Consolation Semifinals 103: Matt Welliver, Benton pinned Kyle Blascak, Towanda 4:12; Evan Decker, Western Wayne dec. Dominick Degraba, Dallas Area 1-0. 112: David Sheesley, Mifflinburg dec. Brandon

Stephen (North) 5-3 140 – Mitchell Minotti (East) dec Matt Ritz (Cre) 10-3 145 – Justin Heller (Park) dec Cole Sheptock (North) 8-2 152 – John Lambert (North) dec Tim Samec (Haz) 4-3 160 – Ryan Krecker (Naz) dec Michael Ottinger (Park) 3-2 171 – Travis Moyer (BM) pinned Zachary Bambary (East) 5:21 189 – Josh Popple (Cou) dec Mike Mirra (Cre) 8-2 215 – Tarek Haddad (Park) dec Jason Laboranti (PA) 7-4 285 – Tim Maeshack (Will) dec Josh Gonzalez (PMW) 5-0 Third-Place 103 – Kenny Yanovich (PV) dec Kyle Baker (East) 4-3 112 – Michael Domarasky (PA) dec Peter Stanley (East) 2-1 119 – Evan DiSora (East) dec Kyle Krasavage (WVW) 9-2 125 – Robert Rizzolino (East) dec Franco Ferraina (Naz) 2-1, UTB 130 – Michael Dahlstrom (PV) dec Leroy Harman (Will) 5-4 135 – Eric Howey (Str) dec Greg Noll (Naz) 6-4 140 – Cody Zechman (Sel) dec Matt Neff (Shik) 2-1, UTB 145 – Matt Gotzon (SL) dec Kyle Hankinson (Cre) 4-2 152 – James Fruehan (AH) dec Luke Gotzon (SL) 2-1 160 – Marc Wagner (DV) dec Mark Granahan (Scr) 3-1 171 – Chad Hoffman (Haz) pinned George Simms (WVW) 4:58 189 – Dominick Wolfe (Shik) dec Adam Manzoni (DV) 3-2 215 –Nick Bennick (Shik) dec Roy Dennis (Ber) 7-3 285 – Morgan Craig (AH) dec Jalal Paige (East) 5-1 Semifinals 103 –Ethan Lizak (Park) maj dec Kenny Yanovich (PV) 9-1; Brett Marino (Lib) pinned Kyle Baker (East) 1:56 112 – Anthony Cabrera (Lib) dec Ian Evans (Park) 8-1; DeMarquis Holley (Dier) dec Chase Zemenak (Naz) 5-3 119 – C.J. Palmer (DV) dec Evan Disora (East) 5-0; Corey Keener (BM) dec Kyle Krasavage (WVW) 13-6 125 – Mike Fake (Park) dec Franco Ferraina (Naz) 7-4; Devon Lotito (Lib) pinned Joshua Fritz (Emm) 1:59 130 – Zach Horan (Naz) pinned Mike Dahlstrom (PV) :44; Brandon Choate (BM) dec Leroy Harman (Will) 3-2 135 – Joseph Rizzolino (East) dec Eric Howey (Str) 5-1; Jason Stephen (North) dec Greg Noll (Naz) 6-5, OT 140 – Mitchell Minotti (East) maj dec Cody Zechman (Sel) 15-3; Matt Ritz (Cre) dec Matt Neff (Shik) 6-4 145 – Justin Heller (Park) pinned Brandon Dolan (PA) 5:40; Cole Sheptock (North) dec Kyle Hankinson (Cre) 6-4, OT 152 –Tim Samec (Haz) dec Luke Gotzon (SL) 7-2; John Lambert (North) maj dec Ty Gardner (Pott) 13-2 160 – Michael Ottinger (Park) dec Marc Wagner (DV) 5-2; Ryan Krecker (Naz) tech fall Mark Granahan (Scr) 21-5, 5:47 171 – Travis Moyer (BM) tech fall Taiten Valiquette (Shik) 19-4, 4:45; Zachary Bambary (East) dec Eric Wolak (Naz) 5-4 189 – osh Popple (Cou) pinned Evan Kauffman (Free) 3:47; Mike Mirra (Cre) dec Adam Manzoni (DV) 3-1 215 – Tarek Haddad (Park) injury default Roy Dennis (Ber); Jason Laboranti (PA) dec Nick Bennick (Shik) 4-3 285 – Tim Maeshack (Will) dec Morgan Craig (AH) 8-4; Josh Gonzalez (PMW) dec Nick Sharga (North) 6-2 Consolation Third Round 103 – Jake Witmer (Shik) pinned Brandon Sommer (North) 3:55; Jamie Scarantino (PA) dec Bill Poray (Cou) 7-0 112 – Michael Domarasky (PA) dec TJ Tressler (Will) 7-2; Peter Stanley (East) dec Tom Hendry (Scr) 7-2 119 – Kevin Laubach (Ber) pinned Tanner Fasold (Shik) 2:09; Grimaldi Gonzalez (Lib) pinned Matt Evans (Hon) 2:13 125 –Jalen Palmer (DV) pinned Steffen Yaskoweak (Will) 2:41; Robert Rizzolino (East) dec Aaron Kennedy (Hon) 10-7 130 – Calvin Daly (East) maj dec Ryan Smith (Hon) 11-2; Landry Badman (Shik) dec Forrest Touchberry (Park) 4-3 135 – Cody Ulmer (JS) dec Ryan Kline (Haz) 5-3; Kevin Packer (Tun) dec Michael Marano (Park) 3-0 140 – Donald Paul Miller (ESS) dec Zach Wilson (North) 6-5; Justin Wilk (PA) dec Joseph Bickelman (Pott) 4-1 145 – Matt Gotzon (SL) dec Zach Smith (Hon) 3-2; Kevin Finn (ESS) dec Wyatt Miller (Naz) 3-2 152 – Aaron Transue (Str) pinned Logan Koch (Shik) 1:48; James Fruehan (AH) maj dec Matt Hammerstone (Cre) 14-4

Lontz, Benton 5-2; Andrew Gipe, South Williamsport dec. Caleb Pearson, Montoursville 3-2. 119: Braden Calkins, Troy dec. Jared Watson, Warrior Run 5-2; Mason Zimmerman, Line Mountain dec. Eric Wolfe, Milton 6-2. 125: Nick Dusendschine, Mount Carmel dec. Zane Rowe, Mifflinburg 5-4; Zack Green, Northeast Bradford dec. Andy Schutz, Wyoming Area 6-0. 130: Sean Heggs, East Juniata dec. Ryan Hart, Wyalusing 1-0; David Batkowski, Montoursville pinned Dalton Church, Blue Ridge 4:44. 135: Darren Stucker, Meyers dec. Jeric Kasunic, Benton 5-2; Adam Kritzer, Line Mountain dec. Chris Dixon, Lackawanna Trail 5-0. 140: Brenton Acorn, Wellsboro dec. Alan Miller, Mifflinburg 8-1; Herbie Shannon, Central Columbia dec. Tom Maby, Susquehanna Community 1-0. 145: Ben Emmett, Central Columbia dec. Zack Ripic, Towanda 6-5; Ryan Preisch, Milton pinned Kurt Pericci, Hanover Area 1:54. 152: Kody Getkin, Danville maj. dec. Bill Dress, Meyers 11-3; Kurt Meske, Central Columbia pinned Richard Emel, Lake-Lehman 1:50. 160: Jake Balchikonis, Northeast Bradford dec. Don English, Milton 4-2; Tyler Stettler, North Penn dec. Garrett Shnyder, Montgomery 7-5. 171: Garrett VanDeMark, Towanda pinned Steve Radzwilla, Hanover Area 0:25; Jake Mankey, Benton pinned Nick Shelley, LakeLehman 4:02. 189: Adam Goeringer, Dallas Area tech. fall Josh Harrison, Western Wayne 16-1, 4:17; Remington Weigle, Bloomsburg pinned Pedro Bracero, Nanticoke Area 1:41. 215: Matt Rosensweet, Western Wayne pinned Nathan Stettler, North Penn 2:23; Dylan Dailey, Danville pinned Ryan Longenberger, Bloomsburg 1:33. 285: Sean Charest, Lewisburg dec. Eric McCracken, Central Columbia 9-4; Nazar Mironenko, Mifflinburg dec. Joseph Ingaglio, Western Wayne 6-3. Third Place 103: Matt Welliver, Benton, dec. Evan Decker, Western Wayne, 7-2 112: David Sheesley, Mifflinburg, dec. Andrew Gipe, South Williamsport, 6-5 119: Braden Calkins, Troy, dec. Mason Zimmerman, Line Mountain, 1-0 125: Nick Dusendschine, Mount Carmel, dec. Zach Green, Northeast Bradford, 8-6 130: David Batkowski, Montoursville, dec. Sean Heggs, East Juniata, 9-2 135: Adam Kritzer, Line Mountain, pinned Darren Stucker, Meyers, 4:17 140: Brenton Acorn, Wellsboro, dec. Herbie Shannon, Central Columbia, 7-0 145: Ben Emmett, Central Columbia, dec. Ryan Preisch, Milton, 7-2 152: Kody Getkin, Danville, dec. Kurt Meske, Central Columbia, 6-3 160: Jake Balchikonis, Northeast Bradford, dec. Tyler Stettler, North Penn, 3-1 SV 171: Garrett VanDeMark, Towanda, dec. Jake Mankey, Benton, 6-2 189: Remington Weigle, Bloomsburg, dec. Adam Goeringer, Dallas Area, 4-2 SV 215: Dylan Dailey, Danville, dec. Matt Rosensweet, Western Wayne, 8-2 285: Sean Charest, Lewisburg, dec. Nazar Mironenko, Mifflinburg, 4-2 SV Championships 103: Logan Everett, Williamson, dec. Shawn Nitcznski, Sullivan County, 4-0 112: Zain Retherford, Line Mountain, maj. dec. Vito Pasone, Meyers, 12-2 119: Colt Cotten, Benton, pinned Austin Harry, Lake-Lehman, 1:29 125: Cody Wheeler, Towanda, dec. Seth Lansberry, Line Mountain, 13-7 130: Coltin Fought, Benton, dec. Brandon Pisarchick, Shamokin, 3-0 135: Josh Lahr, Shamokin, dec. Caleb Willey, Towanda, 5-1 140: Luke Frey, Montoursville, dec. Travis Erdman, Line Mountain, 6-2 145: Troy Hembury, Muncy, dec. Brian Watkins, Southern Columbia, 1-0 152: Zach Strickland, Muncy, tech. fall Curtis Schneider, Lewisburg, 17-1, 5:01 160: Casey Fuller, Western Wayne, dec. Ty Walter, Mifflinburg, 3-1 171: Nathaniel Brown, Lewisburg, maj. dec. Mike Cobb, Wyalusing, 11-2 189: Ryan Hembury, Muncy, dec. Brandon Smith, Lewisburg, 3-2 215: Eric Laytos, Lackawanna Trail, dec. Ryan Solomon, Milton, 6-4 285: Wes Tillett, Shamokin, dec. Aaron Schultz, Towanda, 2-1

160 – Ed Helm (PME) dec Mike Ede (Sel) 5-0; Timothy Kunkel (North) dec Jacobi Nordmark (Str) 4-3 171 – George Simms (WVW) dec Eric Eaton (Sel) 17-11; Chad Hoffman (Haz) dec Martin Strenk (DV) 7-2 189 – Dominic Wolfe (Shik) dec Troy Newhard (Emm) 3-2; Marcus Newsom (North) dec Ben Bradley (Naz) 2-1 215 – Tyler Greene (East) dec David Wilke (Naz) 2-1; Brad Emerick (Cou) pinned Michael Kershner (JS) :59 285 – Isaiah Shipman (Sel) pinned Shaun Heist (Park) 2:51; Jalal Paige (East) dec Aaron Bradley (Naz) 3-1, OT Consolation Semifinals 103 – Yanovich (PV) dec Witmer (Shik) 5-3; Baker (East) dec Scarantino (PA) 8-2 112 – Domarasky (PA) dec Evans (Park) 5-1; Stanley (East) dec Zemenak (Naz) 5-1 119 – DiSora (East) dec Laubach (Ber) 2-0; Krasavage (WVW) dec Gonzalez (Lib) 10-3 125 – Ferraina (Naz) dec Palmer (DV) 12-7; Rizzolino (East) dec Fritz (Emm) 3-0 130 – Dahlstrom (PV) dec Daly (East) 10-4; Harman (Will) maj dec Badman (Shik) 10-0 135 – Howey (Str) dec Ulmer (JS) 8-4; Noll (Naz) dec Packer (Tun) 2-1 140 – Zechman (Sel) dec Miller (ESS) 13-7; Neff (Shik) dec Wilk (PA) 5-3 145 – Gotzon (SL) dec Dolan (PA) 2-1; Hankinson (Cre) dec Finn (ESS) 7-3 152 – otzon (SL) maj dec Transue (Str) 10-2; Fruehan (AH) pinned Gardner (Pot) 1:35 160 – Wagner (DV) dec Helm (PME) 10-6; Granahan (Scr) dec Kunkel (North) 4-2 171 – Simms (WVW) tech fall Valiquette (Shik) 20-5, 3:47; Hoffman (Haz) dec Wolak (Naz) 6-4 189 – Wolfe (Shik) maj dec Kauffman (Free) 12-3; Manzoni (DV) dec Newsom (North) 7-1 215 – Dennis (Ber) dec Greene (East) 4-3; Bennick (Shik) dec Emerick (Cou) 7-3 285 – Craig (AH) maj dec Shipman (Sel) 9-0; Paige (East) dec Sharga (North) 2-1 Consolation Second Round 103 – Jake Witmer (Shik) pinned Colby Ems (ESS) 3:45; Brandon Sommer (North) pinned Ben Rutledge (Hon) :48; Bill Poray (Cou) maj dec Justin Cortez (Sel) 11-0; Jamie Scarantino (PA) pinned Peter Talanca (Ber) 2:40 112 – Michael Domarasky (PA) pinned Bob Gray (Cre) 4:44; TJ Tressler (Will) pinned Tristan Paul (Shik) 4:51; Tom Hendry (WS) maj dec Travis Roper (WVW) 16-2; Peter Stanley (East) dec Sean Bianco (PV) 4-0 119 – Kevin Laubach (Ber) dec James Palys (PME) 6-0; Tanner Fasold (Shik) dec Tom Kramer (Sel) 4-2; Matt Evans (Hon) dec Paul Hetrick (North) 5-3; Grimaldi Gonzalez (Lib) dec Adam Delgado (Naz) 6-3 125 – Jalen Palmer (DV) tech fall Austin Soboleski (Ber) 16-0, 2:57; Steffen Yaskoweak (Will) pinned Gary Miller (Shik) 3:25; Aaron Kennedy (Hon) pinned Nathan Cheek (WVW) 2:24; Robert Rizzolino (East) dec Ernest Klingel (PV) 3-1 130 – Calvin Daly (East) dec Derrick Simms (WVW) 9-2; Ryan Smith (Hon) dec Frank Mahmoud (Cou) 9-2; Landry Badman (Shik) maj dec Chris Gannon (WSS) 16-2; Forrest Touchberry (Park) dec Angelo Lussi (PA) 3-0 135 – Ryan Kline (Haz) dec Anthony Talanca (Ber) 5-3; Cody Ulmer (JS) dec Jake Hummel (Shik) 4-1; Kevin Packer (Tun) dec Chavez Lill (Hon) 4-1; Mike Marano (Park) dec Tye Vallone (SL) 6-0 140 –Zach Wilson (North) dec Pat Inguilli (Wall) 4-2; Donald Paul Miller (ESS) dec Alex Yanovich (PV) 8-5; Justin Wilk (PA) dec Joe Stellato (DV) 4-0; Joe Bickelman (Pott) dec Elijah Angradi (Str) 7-5 145 – Zach Smith (Hon) dec Adam Jaworski (WVW) 4-1; Matt Gotzan (SL) dec Anthony Minotti (East) 3-2; Wyatt Miller (Naz) won by forfeit; Kevin Finn (ESS) dec Sean Andrews (Will) 6-2 152 – Aaron Transue (Str) dec Ryan Price (PME) 4-0; Logan Koch (Shik) dec Kaiden Brungard (JS) 6-2; James Fruehan (AH) pinned Lucas Markowitz (AH) 2:29; Matt Hammerstone (Cre) dec Solomon Sohn (East) 4-2, OT 160 – Ed Helm (PME) dec Charlie Generotti (Tun) 3-1; Mike Ede (Sel) dec Zac Cooper (PME) 6-3; Jacobi Nordmark (Str) dec Dom Lussi (PA) 8-1; Timothy Kunkel (North) pinned Dyvon Gibson (East) 3:54 171 – George Simms (WVW) forfeit Jovon Reyes (Dier); Eric Eaton (Sel) dec Joe Fogle (PME) 7-4; Martin Strenk (DV) dec Roger Legg (Cre) 9-3; Chad Hoffman (Haz) dec Robert Karstendiek (Str) 5-0 189 – Dominick Wolfe (Shik) dec Cory Bruder (Park) 8-3; Troy Newhard (Emm) maj dec Bob Falvo (PA) 11-2; Ben Bradley (Naz) tech fall Anthony Longer (Sel) 15-0, 5:00; Marcus Newson (North) dec Blake Smith (PME) 4-2 215 – David Wilke (Naz) forfeit Michael Wright (North); Tyler Greene (East) maj dec Jacob Dolin (White) 14-3; Michael Kershner (JS) pinned Tyler Pearson (Free) 3:48; Brad Emerick (Cou) pinned Dylan Berardelli (AH) 1:41 285 – Shaun Heist (Park) dec Daulton Romano (SL) 1-0; Isaiah Shipman (Sel) pinned Casey Drake (Tun) 2:47; Aaron Bradley (Naz) pinned Frank Bruno (Wall) 1:25; Jalal Paige (East) pinned Jack Fagan (DV) 3:21


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SPARTANS Continued from Page 1C

plan was we didn’t want to make two passes and shoot. We wanted to move the ball around a little bit, make sure every shot was something like Eugene (Lewis) was doing, look for a layup. Or a wide-open three. “Our guys were scared, and you can see it. The sad part is everyone of my kids play against these guys in AAU. They know how they play.” The next step doesn’t get any easier for Valley West (18-6). The Spartans will travel to District 1 ninth-seed Penn Wood (19-8), a team with two Division I recruits in the lineup, on Tuesday for a PIAA 4A qualifying game. “What can I say?” Reimiller said. “We got the lovely team called Penn Wood – 6-10, 6-7, 6-5. So that will be fun.” Scranton scored the game’s first seven points and took a 27-18 lead after one quarter on Karlon Quiller’s buzzer-beating threepointer. The Knights also forced seven turnovers in the opening period. “I think all but two first quarters we’ve won the entire season,” Scranton coach Tony Battaglia said. “We’re very good at jumping out on teams and dictating the tempo of the game with

NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Hanover Area’s Bilal Floyd (32) works against the defense of Mike Brannon (10) and Ryan McGoff of Holy Cross on Saturday. NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Wyoming Valley West’s Eugene Lewis (left) and Henry Moore (31) eye a loose ball headed for Scranton’s Malik Draper on Saturday afternoon in Scranton. Lewis led all scorers with 30 points.

our traps and pressure. That’s the style game we want to play in.” Malik Draper, who scored a team-high 29 points, opened the second quarter with two threepointers, and Scranton was off and running again. Lewis and, at times, guard James McCann were the only Spartans able to keep up with the high-flying Knights. Lewis had a game-high 30 points, while McCann added 17. McCann’s three-pointer and Le-

wis’ inside basket cut the deficit the century mark for the first to 50-39 with 5:16 left in the third time since the 2003-04 season, quarter. Valley West, though, but missed a pair of threes. WYOMING VALLEY WEST (66): McCann 6-14 failed on its next trip down court, 3-4 17, Hoinski 1-3 0-0 2, Gimble 0-3 0-0 0, Lewis 14-18 2-3 30, Good 2-5 2-2 6, McClary 0-8 4-4 4, and Scranton finished off the Williams 1-5 0-0 2, Moore 0-0 0-1 0, C. McCue 0-0 0-0 0, Gurtis 0-0 0-0 0, Stelevich 0-0 0-0 0, E. McCue Spartans with a 17-7 run. 1-2 0-0 2, Ferenchick 1-3 0-3 3. Totals 26-63 11-14 Besides Draper, four other 66. SCRANTON (97): Fisch 3-7 4-6 11, Turner 7-15 Knights finished in double fig- 4-7 19, Quiller 6-8 1-2 15, Draper 12-17 0-0 29, Dixon 5-7 0-0 10, Lewis 2-3 0-0 4, McCarthy 1-1 0-0 2, ures. Division I recruit Terry Devine 1-4 0-0 2, Gallagher 1-2 0-0 2, Olsheski 1-2 0-0 2, Chu 1-2 0-0 3, Harrison 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 39-67 Turner had19 followed by Quiller 9-15 97. Valley West ................ 18 14 18 16 — 66 with 15, Tim Fisch with 11 and Wyoming Scranton ....................................... 27 18 26 26 — 97 3-Point Field Goals— WVW 2-12 (McCann 2-5, Hasiin Dixon with 10. Gimble 0-1, Good 0-1, McClary 0-3, Ferenchick The Scranton reserves had two 1-2); Scranton 10-22 (Fisch 1-4, Turner 1-2, Quiller 2-2, Draper 5-8, Lewis 0-1, Devine 0-3, Chu 1-2). chances at getting Scranton to

R E C E N T D I S T R I C T 2 B O Y S C H A M P I O N S CLASS 4A 2010-2011 season ........................................Scranton 2009-2010 season .......................................Scranton 2008-2009 season............................Hazleton Area* 2007-2008 season ........................Abington Heights 2006-2007 season .............................Hazleton Area 2005-2006 season .............................Hazleton Area 2004-2005 season .............................Hazleton Area 2003-2004 season .............................Hazleton Area 2002-2003 season ...........................Wallenpaupack 2001-2002 season .......................Abington Heights* 2000-2001 season .............................North Pocono* 1999-2000 season...............Wyoming Valley West* *-- Lost to District 4’s Williamsport in tournament championship game

NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Meyers High School players Nahjee Brown, left, and Ryan Krawczeniuk, reflect moments after Saturday’s loss to Riverside High School.

MEYERS Continued from Page 1C

we held them under 50 points we would have a chance to win. I guess (Riverside coach) Mike (Morgan) had a better defensive plan than I did to keep us at a lower mark.” Riverside’s defense was tenacious throughout. So was the rebounding. Even 5-foot-6 sophomore Jaron Vishnesky crashed the boards with vigor, turning two offensive rebounds into baskets in the second quarter. “I was upset at halftime,” Toole said. “Even Vishnesky, their smallest guy, had four offensive rebounds.” The Vikings defense concentrated on inside players Keyton Winder and Rasheed Moore. They held Winder, Meyers’ leading scorer, without a basket in the second half and eight points for the game. Moore finished with 16

but had none in the fourth quarter as Riverside pulled away. “Coming in, we really didn’t want to pressure the guards because of the quickness of (Nahjee) Brown,” Morgan said. “We wanted to back off a little bit and focus on the inside with Winder and Moore. We just matched on all our screens with those two.” Toole said his team didn’t help matters, failing to get the ball to Winder and Moore in a consistent manner. “The big thing was our guards, sometimes when we’d get the ball back in we’d kick back out,” Toole said. “We wanted to go back in again with a two-man game. But give them credit. I thought they pressured our guards into a lot of bad angles and bad situations. We had a lot of trouble getting the ball to our big guys.” Meyers had trouble scoring after tying the score 27-27 at 5:33, then cutting a small Riverside lead to 32-30 when Moore scored off a rebound at1:55 of the period. The Mohawks went over nine

CLASS 3A 2010-2011 season ............................Holy Redeemer 2009-2010 season.........................Abington Heights 2008-2009 season ...................................Crestwood 2007-2008 season .............................Scranton Prep 2006-2007 season ...................................Crestwood 2005-2006 season ...................................Crestwood 2004-2005 season ...................................Crestwood 2003-2004 season ...................................Crestwood 2002-2003 season .....................................Nanticoke 2001-2002 season..............................Scranton Prep 2000-2001 season..............................Scranton Prep 1999-2000 season.............................Wyoming Area CLASS 2A 2010-2011 season .......................................Riverside 2009-2010 season ...................................Holy Cross 2008-2009 season ...................................Holy Cross 2007-2008 season ...................................Holy Cross 2006-2007 season..............................Bishop Hoban 2005-2006 season..............................Bishop Hoban 2004-2005 season..............................Bishop Hoban 2003-2004 season..................................Carbondale 2002-2003 season..............................................GAR 2001-2002 season ............................Bishop Hannan 2000-2001 season ............................Bishop Hannan 1999-2000 season..........................................Meyers CLASS A 2010-2011 season ......................................Old Forge 2009-2010 season .....................................Old Forge 2008-2009 season.....................................Old Forge 2007-2008 season.....................................Old Forge 2006-2007 season.....................................Old Forge 2005-2006 season ...........................Bishop O’Reilly 2004-2005 season ...........................Bishop O’Reilly 2003-2004 season ...........................Bishop O’Reilly 2002-2003 season ...........................Bishop O’Reilly 2001-2002 season .............................Seton Catholic 2000-2001 season .....................................Old Forge 1999-2000 season ............................Bishop Hannan

minutes without a basket, allowing Riverside to take a 40-30 lead into the fourth quarter. The Vikings didn’t push the tempo after building the lead, content to spread the floor and eat the clock.

MEYERS (36): Brown 2-8 0-1 4, Krawczeniuk 0-3 1-2 1, Lavan 0-4 0-0 0, Moore 7-13 2-3 16, Winder 3-8 2-2 8, Walters 1-2 0-0 2, McGavin 1-1 0-0 3, Smith 1-2 0-0 2, Pape 0-0 0-0 0, Szafran 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 15-41 5-8 36. RIVERSIDE (49): King 1-1 2-2 5, Vishnesky 3-5 1-2 8, Kincel 6-11 5-6 17, Armillay 5-9 4-7 16, Rowe 0-3 2-2 2, Mackin 0-3 1-2 1. Totals 15-29 15-21 49. Meyers ............................................ 10 10 10 6 — 36 Riverside......................................... 9 16 15 9 — 49 3-Point Field Goals— MEY 1-15 (Brown 0-3, Krawczeniuk 0-2, Lavan 0-4, Moore 0-1, Winder 0-4, McGavin 1-1); RIV 4-11 (King 1-2, Vishnesky 1-2, Kincel 0-2, Armillay 2-5).

D I S T R I C T 2 B O Y S P L AY O F F G L A N C E (Overall records in parentheses) CLASS 4A (two teams advance) Saturday, Feb. 26 Delaware Valley 47, Wallenpaupack 37 Wednesday's results Scranton 76, Delaware Valley 53 Wyoming Valley West 48, Hazleton Area 43 Saturday's result Championship game, Scranton 97, Wyoming Valley West 66 Tuesday, March 8 PIAA qualifier D2 runner-up Wyoming Valley West (18-6) at District 1 ninth seed Penn Wood (19-8) Saturday, March 12 PIAA first round D2 champion Scranton (23-2) vs. District 1 sixth seed Lower Merion (18-9) -------------CLASS 3A (three teams advance) Friday, Feb. 25 Holy Redeemer 50, Dallas 40 Abington Heights 48, Crestwood 46 2OT Tunkhannock 67, Valley View 53 West Scranton 59, Nanticoke 36 Tuesday's results Holy Redeemer 58, Abington Heights 51 West Scranton 51, Tunkhannock 31 Friday's results Championship, Holy Redeemer 42, West Scranton 29 Third-place game, Abington Heights 61, Tunkhannock 37 Friday, March 11 PIAA first round D2 champion Holy Redeemer (22-4) vs. District 4 runner-up Danville (17-7) D2 runner-up West Scranton (20-6) vs. District 3 third seed Lampeter-Strasburg (20-8) D2 third seed Abington Heights (16-11) vs. District 11 champion Allentown Central Catholic (16-9) -------------CLASS 2A (three teams advance) Saturday, Feb. 26 Riverside 72, Mid Valley 65 OT Holy Cross 42, GAR 41 2OT Hanover Area 47, Lackawanna Trail 35 Meyers 59, Dunmore 46 Wednesday's results Riverside 53, Holy Cross 50 Meyers 52, Hanover Area 30 Saturday's results Championship game, Riverside 49, Meyers 36 Third-place game, Holy Cross 63, Hanover Area 43 Saturday, March 12 PIAA first round D2 champion Riverside (22-5) vs. District 4 third seed Loyalsock (18-7) D2 runner-up Meyers (23-2) vs. District 4 runnerup Central Columbia (17-9) D2 third seed Holy Cross (18-6) vs. District 4 champion Hughesville (18-7) -------------CLASS A (two teams advance) Friday, Feb. 25 Forest City 64, St. Michael’s 26 Tuesday's results Old Forge 56, Forest City 30 Susquehanna 49, MMI Prep 44 Friday's result Championship, Old Forge 47, Susquehanna 24 Tuesday, March 8 PIAA qualifier D2 runner-up Susquehanna (8-16) vs. District 3 fourth seed Antietam (16-9) Friday, March 11 PIAA first round D2 champion Old Forge (16-7) vs. District 1 runner-up Faith Christian (19-6)

Hanover Area falls in third-place game The Times Leader staff

SCRANTON — Hanover Area saw its season come to an end Saturday afternoon as Holy Cross defeated the Hawkeyes 63-43 in the District 2 Class 2A third-place game at Scranton High School. Holy Cross, which won the three previous D2-2A championships, qualified for the state tournament for the fourth time in its four-year existence. The Crusaders (18-6) will play D4 champion Hughesville (18-7) next Saturday in an opening-round game. Hanover Area ended its season at 16-9 under first-year coach Steve Harnischfeger. Josh Kosin led Holy Cross with a team-high 20 points, including seven in the first quarter as the Crusaders opened a14-8 lead. Kosin just missed a double-double by grabbing a team-high eight re-

REDEEMER Continued from Page 1C

full-court press and the Royals’ ball handling woes proved to be Holy Redeemer’s undoing in its bid to win a third straight district championship. The Royals held a 24-21 halftime lead on a three-point shot by senior guard Olivia Francisco. Holy Redeemer took its biggest lead at 34-28 on a Nicole Maximowicz free throw at the 7:03 mark of the third quarter. The Royals ended the quarter on a high note when Francisco tossed in another rainbow that gave Holy Redeemer a 37-32 lead entering the fourth period. However, the Invaders drew even at 39 on a basket by Shane Miller with 4:06 left in the period, and forged a 43-39 lead on a steal and layup by Greene with 2:22 remaining in regulation. Holy Redeemer rallied to tie the score at 43 on two free throws by Francisco with 13 seconds left. The game went into overtime after West Scranton’s Nora Joyce missed an 18-foot jumper from the corner at the buzzer. Greene took over the game in overtime. She had a pair of steals, along with her seven points in the extra session, which included

bounds. Connor Callejas provided the offense in the second quarter, scoring 10 of his 16 points. The Crusaders extended their lead to 42-31 entering the fourth. Aaron Springer led Hanover Area with 14 points. Cory Dickson and Mike Kellerer added 11 apiece. Bilal Floyd had a teamhigh eight rebounds. Andrew Moran also scored in double figures for Holy Cross, finishing with 11. HANOVER AREA (43): Kellerer 4 0-0 11, Floyd 0 2-5 2, Dickson 3 4-5 11, Springer 5 2-3 14, Steve 0 3-4 3, Rolle 1 0-2 2, Colon 0 0-0 0, Hoolick 0 0-0 0, Bennett 0 0-0 0, Everetts 0 0-0 0, Hemsley 0 0-0 0. Totals 13 11-19 43. HOLY CROSS (63): Kosin 6 8-11 20, Nelson 0 0-0 0, Brannon 1 0-0 3, McGoff 1 1-2 4, Callejas 5 5-6 16, Loefflod 0 0-1 0, Moran 4 3-5 11, Kearney 0 0-0 0, Joyce 0 0-0 0, Boylan 0 0-0 0, Gaughan 0 2-4 2, Barmes 3 1-3 7. Totals 20-20-32 63. Hanover Area............................ 8 12 11 12 — 43 Holy Cross................................. 14 15 13 21 — 63 3-Point Field Goals— HA 6 (Kellerer 3, Dickson 1, Springer 2); HC 3 (Brannon, McGoff, Callejas 1).

two foul shots that gave the Invaders a 51-47 lead with 13 seconds remaining. The Royals pulled to within 5149 on a five-foot jumper by Myers with five seconds to play. However, West Scranton sealed the deal at the free throw line in the final seconds. “I was just determined to make sure we didn’t lose,” said Greene. “We kept applying defensive pressure and came up with some big steals.” The Royals were hampered when 5-11 senior forwards Maximowicz and Allison Capaci both fouled out late, leaving the frontline duties primarily to Myers. “It killed us when Maximowicz and Capaci fouled out,” said Myers, who paced Redeemer with13 points. “We needed them, especially on the boards.” Francisco, who finished with11 points, said the Royals shot themselves in the foot. “We didn’t handle their press, and were out-rebounded. I think we’ll bounce back and play better in the state tournament.” WEST SCRANTON (53): Cadden 1 1-3 3, Miller 3 0-1 6, Perry 3 0-0 6, Joyce 3 1-4 8, Greene 6 7-12 19, Coleman 4 0-2 8, Ruether 1 0-0 3. Totals 21 9-22 53. HOLY REDEEMER (49): Wempa 3 4-6 10, Wignot 2 0-0 4, Murray 0 2-2 2, Capaci 2 0-0 4, Maximowicz 1 3-4 5, Francisco 2 5-7 11, Myers 6 1-2 13. Totals 16 15-21 49. West Scranton ..........................15 6 11 11 10 53 Holy Redeemer ........................11 13 13 6 6 49 3-Point Field Goals—WS: Joyce, Ruether. HR: Francisco 2.

With dramatic 400 relay win, WVW girls capture D2-4 swim crown By JAY MONAHAN For The Times Leader

WILKES-BARRE – Surely, the meet manager didn’t need to preface the girls 400 freestyle relay race with “This is an important race” at Saturday’s District 2-4 Class 3A Swimming Championships. With a district and regional title on the line, Wyoming Valley West’s relay team of Kayleigh Fishe, Morgan Hanadel, Desiree Holena and Janelle McDaniels out-paced Hazleton Area in a closely contested race that featured seven lead changes, edging the Cougars by .54 seconds. Trailing by more than a second going into the last leg of the 400 free relay, McDaniels swam the last 100 yards in 53.72 seconds to touch the wall with a total relay time of 3:44.95. “I knew it was going to be extremely close,” said McDaniels of the race for the team title. “I didn’t

know if the relay would win the team title, but I knew that we were going to get this relay to states. We worked so hard. “The relay really needed it. I knew I had to go all out. There was nothing that was going to stop me from getting first.” The relay victory leap-frogged the Spartans over Hazleton Area and Abington Heights for the regional’s top spot. Wyoming Valley West finished with 261points. Hazleton Area was second with 259.5. The Spartans trailed by as much as18.5 points going into the final two races. McDaniels pulled out a victory in the 100 breaststroke and finished off a comefrom-behind win in the 400 free relay, after an upsetting first day at districts on Friday that saw her lose her top spot in the 200 IM. “It means everything,” said McDaniels, who placed third in the 200 IM. “This is my last year. I

wanted it for myself. I didn’t have the best swims (Friday). I wanted to prove it to myself and to my team. Wyoming Valley West had more than a three-second lead in the 400 free relay before Hazleton Area’s Bria Edwards turned that into a one-second Cougar lead, setting up a battle to the finish between McDaniels and Jocelyn Hinkle. “When I was getting in there, I knew Jocelyn is a great swimmer and we’ve always been great competitors,” said McDaniels. “I knew it was going to be head to head. I knew I really, really wanted it more than anything.” Williamsport Area took the boys title with 371 points, eclipsing Wyoming Valley West’s 197 points. The Millionaires won all but one event in Saturday’s action. “We’re boys’ heavy. We have 22 boys on our team,” said Williamsport coach Bill Keiser. “It’s really

(a race); I can concentrate better.” GIRLS

FINAL STANDINGS– 1. Wyoming Valley West (WVW), 261; 2. Hazleton Area (HAZ), 259.5; 3. Abington Heights (AH), 253.5; 4. Williamsport (WIL), 184; 5. Delaware Valley (DV), 176; 6. Wallenpaupack (WAL), 87; 7. Scranton (SCR), 59; 8. West Scranton (WS), 42; 9. Coughlin (COU), 37 100 FREE – 1. DV, Glaster, 54.32; 2. WVW, Hanadel, 55.47; 3. HAZ, Hinkle, 56.2; 4. AH, Lempicky, 57.53; 5. AH, Gromelski, 58.05; 6. HAZ, Schott, 58.16; 500 FREE – 1. HAZ, Edwards, 5:23.28; 2. WVW, Lord, 5:40.96; 3. WIL, Miller, 5:41.31; 4. HAZ, Yannes, 5:41.5; 5. WVW, Smulowitz, 5:45.39; 6. DV, Pandish, 5:45.52; 100 BACK – 1. HAZ, Grego, 1:01.27; 2. WIL, Schwoyer, 1:01.41; 3. WVW, Hanadel, 1:03.56; 4. AH, Barren, 1:04.59; 5. AH, Brickel, 1:06.06; 6. HAZ, Podlesny, 1:06.33; 100 BREAST – 1. WVW, McDaniels, 1:08.48; 2. WIL, Harris, 1:11.74; 3. HAZ, Kendall, 1:13.02; 4. WIL, Smith, 1:14.27; 5. WAL, Kutfy, 1:15.71; 6. DV, Marceca, 1:17.7; 400 FREE RELAY – 1. WVW, (Fishe, Hanadel, Holena, McDaniels), 3:44.95; 2. HAZ, 3:45.49; 3. DV, 3:54.34; 4. AH, 3:54.61; 5. SCR, 4:09.46; 6. WIL, 4:11.47

BOYS

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Paine Fleisher of Wyoming Valley West takes third place in the boys 100 breaststroke at the District 2-4 Class 3A meet.

great to have that because you have competition in the pool every day. So the depth and competition within our own pool is what you’re seeing here.”

Tunkhannock’s David Novak won his second event at districts with a victory in the 500 free, in 4:53.93. “I like swimming the long events,” he said. “It’s not as close

FINAL STANDINGS– 1. Williamsport (WIL), 371; 2. Wyoming Valley West (WVW), 197; 3. Tunkhannock (TUN), 195; 4. Hazleton Area (HAZ), 179; 5. Delaware Valley (DV), 162; 6. Abington Heights (AH), 88; 7. Scranton (SCR), 90; 8. Wallenpaupack (WAL), 47 100 FREE – 1. WIL, Runtas, 48.5; 2. HAZ, Paisley, 49.2; 3. WIL, Frazier, 49.63; WIL, Smith, 1:49.71; 5. AH, Sorokanich, 49.97; 6. TUN, Fowler, 51.74; 500 FREE – 1. TUN, Novak, 4:53.93; 2. WIL, Good, 5:01.67; 3. WIL, Nardone, 5:06.68; 4. WVW, Palkovic, 5:10.76; 5. HAZ, Valkusky, 5:12.14; 6. HAZ, Cunningham, 5:20.78; 100 BACK – 1. WIL, Mackey, 56.95; 2. TUN, Kupchunas, 57.73; 3. DV, Larson, 59.26; 4. WIL, Hartzel, 59.89; 5. WIL, Kuzio, 1:00.05; 6. SCR, Arie Kazmierczak, 1:00.68; 100 BREAST – 1. WIL, Harris, 1:00.75; 2. TUN, Spencer, 1:01.18; 3. WVW, Fleisher, 1:04.9; 4. DV, Daggett, 1:05.68; 5. TUN, Moffitt, 1:06.78; 6. WIL, Smith, 1:07.11; 400 FREE RELAY – 1. WIL, (Frazier, Mackey, Smith, Harris), 3:16.74; 2. TUN, 3:18.24; 3. HAZ, 3:24.83; 4. WVW, 3:27.61; 5. SCR, 3:32; 6. AH, 3:32.29


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

LOCAL ROUNDUP

No. 6 Purdue upset; OSU takes Big Ten Cougars’ The Associated Press

IOWA CITY, Iowa — Jarryd Cole had 16 points and 10 rebounds in his final home game and Iowa stunned No. 6 Purdue 67-65 Saturday, putting the Boilermakers’ hopes for a No. 1 seed in the NCAA tournament in jeopardy and clinching the Big Ten title for top-ranked Ohio State. Bryce Cartwright and Matt Gatens each added 13 points for the Hawkeyes (11-19, 4-14), who snapped the Boilermakers’ seven-game winning streak and took down their first ranked opponent this season. Cartwright then hit a floater that bounced up and in with 31 seconds left to put the Hawkeyes ahead 65-61. Purdue’s Lewis Jackson answered with a layup, but Gatens raced down the floor and hit two game-icing free throws with 6 seconds left. JaJuan Johnson had 22 points and 12 rebounds for Purdue (25-6, 14-4), which went 5 of 25 from 3-point range and shot just 36.2 percent from the field. It took 30 games for Iowa to put it all together, but the Hawkeyes finally came through by pulling off perhaps the Big Ten’s biggest upset of the year. No. 13 North Carolina 81, No. 4 Duke 67 CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — Harrison Barnes scored 18 points to help No. 13 North Carolina beat No. 4 Duke, clinching the Atlantic Coast Conference regularseason championship. Kendall Marshall had 15 points and 11 assists as the Tar Heels (24-6, 14-2) ended a three-game losing streak to their fierce rival and earned the top seed in next week’s ACC tournament. North Carolina also avenged last month’s loss at Cameron Indoor Stadium in which the Tar Heels blew a 16-point lead in the first half. Once again, the Tar Heels built a big lead in the first half, this time 14 points. But Barnes and the Tar Heels protected that margin Saturday and stayed in control the entire night in a game that had tension and energy befitting a postseason game. Nolan Smith scored 30 points for Duke (27-4, 13-3), while Seth Curry had 20 points with six 3-pointers.

10 rebounds for Kansas, which has won 14 of the last 17 in a lopsided border series. The Jayhawks (29-2, 14-2) committed a season-worst 24 turnovers, but dominated inside and held Missouri (22-9, 8-8) to season-worst 29.3 percent shooting. They have won 10 of 11 heading into the conference tournament. The Tigers have lost three in a row heading into the postseason and were 3 for 23 from 3-point range, many of them hurried attempts and several of them air balls. No. 14 Florida 86, No. 21 Vanderbilt 76 NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Kenny Boynton scored 17 points, all three of Florida’s seniors reached double figures and the 14th-ranked Gators clinched the Southeastern Conference regular-season title with a victory over No. 21 Vanderbilt. Florida (24-6, 13-3) set a school record for conference wins and earned its third outright SEC title — its first since 2007. West Virginia 72, No. 11 Louisville 70 MORGANTOWN, W.Va. — Truck Bryant sank two free throws with one second left to lift West Virginia to the win. West Virginia (20-10, 11-7 Big East) clinched a first-round bye in the conference tournament. The Mountaineers earned their fourth consecutive 20-win season under coach Bob Huggins and the seventh straight overall. Kevin Jones had a career-high 25 points and 16 rebounds — his third straight double-double — for the Mountaineers. John Flowers had 12 points and 12 rebounds while Bryant finished with 10 points. West Virginia beat a ranked team for the fifth time this season and will take a threegame winning streak into the conference tournament.

No. 24 Texas A&M 66, Texas Tech 54 COLLEGE STATION, Texas AP PHOTO — David Loubeau scored 21 Villanova’s Mouphtaou Yarou (13) shoots over Pittsburgh’s Dante Taylor (11) in the first half of their points to help No. 24 Texas Big East basketball game on Saturday. The No. 4 Panthers beat the No. 19 Wildcats 60-50. A&M beat Texas Tech. Texas A&M (23-7, 10-6 Big Mexico on Wednesday night. NCAA tournament appearance title. 12) put together a 9-0 run to Abouo’s individual 8-0 run since Bob Huggins was coach. Arizona (25-6, 14-4) already stretch its lead to 43-30 with a early in the second half helped They won five of their last six, had earned a share of the title little more than 14 minutes No. 12 Syracuse 107, including a pair over the fading BYU seize control after it had a for the first time in six years remaining. The biggest highDePaul 59 38-35 lead at halftime. Hoyas (21-9, 10-8). and the McKale Center was light from the spurt was a dunk Francisco Cruz scored 13 of Cincinnati made 20 consecjuiced in anticipation of nets SYRACUSE, N.Y. — Rick by Loubeau that came after a his 18 points in the first half for utive free throws while pulling coming down. Jackson had 14 points, seven nifty pass from B.J. Holmes. Wyoming (10-20, 3-13). Daylen away, finishing 24 of 30 from The Wildcats put on quite a rebounds and four blocks, makThe Red Raiders went almost Harrison and Amath M’Baye the line. shooting show, hitting 11 3ing sure his final game in the four minutes without scoring, Austin Freeman scored 21 for had 12 points apiece. pointers and shooting 56 perCarrier Dome was one he thanks to turnovers and missed Fredette, one of the favorites Georgetown, which goes into cent overall to close out their would never forget as No. 12 layups, as Texas A&M built the the Big East tournament with a for national player of the year, Syracuse overwhelmed DePaul. first undefeated home season lead. and Jackson Emery helped BYU (17-0) in 12 years. Kyle Fogg led three-game losing streak. SeIt was the fifth straight win The Aggies already had segrab a share of the Mountain nior point guard Chris Wright Arizona with 20 points and for Syracuse (25-6, 12-6 Big cured a bye in next week’s Big missed his second game with a West Conference title in their Solomon Hill added 14. East) after a midseason swoon 12 tournament and the victory final home game. The Cougars broken bone in his left (nonin which the Orange lost four gives them the No. 3 seed. No. 4 Pittsburgh 60, will be the top seed for next shooting) hand that required straight and six of eight after an No. 19 Villanova 50 surgery. The Hoyas hope to get weeks’ conference tourney by 18-0 start. Syracuse also UNC-Asheville 60, virtue of their two wins over him back before the NCAA PITTSBURGH — Ashton clinched a double-bye in next Coastal Carolina 47. No. 9 San Diego State. tournament. Gibbs had 18 points and No. 4 week’s Big East tournament at CONWAY, S.C. — Chris Pittsburgh clinched the outMadison Square Garden. Stephenson scored 14 points, Temple 90, La Salle 82 No. 8 Notre Dame 70, right Big East title, using a big DePaul (7-23, 1-17) has won John Williams had 10 points No. 16 Connecticut 67 PHILADELPHIA — Lavoy only two regular-season confer- second half to beat reeling No. and nine rebounds and North Allen scored a career-high 24 STORRS, Conn. — Ben 19 Villanova. ence games in the past three points and grabbed 11 rebounds Carolina-Asheville beat Coastal Hansbrough scored 21 points After Notre Dame won at years, and its chances of adding to lead Temple to a win over La Carolina in the Big South Condespite fouling out with over 8 Connecticut earlier Saturday, another were dim at best withference title game. Salle in the regular-season fiout standout freshman forward Pitt (27-4, 15-3) needed a victo- minutes left and No. 8 Notre The third-seeded Bulldogs nale for both teams. Dame held off Kemba Walker ry to secure the No. 1 seed for Cleveland Melvin, the team’s (19-13) knocked off the top seed Khalif Wyatt added 18 points, and No. 16 Connecticut. leading scorer with a 17.4 aver- the conference tournament for on the Chanticleers’ home court Ramone Moore had 16 and Juan Walker scored 34 points but the first time since 2004 and age in Big East play. Melvin’s to reach the NCAA tournament missed a 3-point attempt with 8 Fernandez 14 for the Owls season ended with sprained left third overall. for the second time. UNC-Asheseconds left and UConn trailing (24-6, 14-2 Atlantic 10 ConferVillanova (21-10, 9-9) was thumb suffered against St. ville’s first bid came in 2003. ence), who shot 15 of 27 from 69-67. Donnell Beverly also without Corey Stokes (left John’s 11 days ago. It’s the second year in a row fumbled away a pass just before the floor (55.6 percent) in the Even with Melvin, it probably hamstring) and leading scorer that Coastal Carolina (28-5) second half to seal the victory Corey Fisher was limited due to time ran out. wouldn’t have mattered much. was the tournament’s top seed and finish the season 14-0 at Carleton Scott and Tyrone early foul trouble. But the WildSyracuse shot 70.6 percent (24 and lost the title game. The Nash each had 13 points for the home. cats managed to stay close of 34) in the first half, hitting 4 Chanticleers will get an autoThe Explorers (14-17, 6-10) behind Maalik Wayns, who had Fighting Irish (25-5, 14-4), who of 5 from beyond the arc, and matic bid to the NIT. kept alive their hopes for a 23 of his career-high 27 points held the undermanned Blue shot 64 percent from the field share of the Big East title. They (16 of 25), including 5 of 9 from Demons to 12 of 30 shooting, 3 in the second half. No. 23 Xavier 66, closed the regular season with Villanova opened the second of 11 from 3-point range. 3-point range (55.6 percent) in Saint Louis 55 four straight wins and have won the opening half and led 57-53 half with a 10-3 run to take a Scoop Jardine had 14 points ST. LOUIS — Tu Holloway 11 of 12 overall. 28-25 lead. But Pitt responded and eight assists, Dion Waiters with 15:35 left to play. scored 25 points and Xavier with an 16-4 surge to grab the had 12 points, C.J. Fair had 11 No. 3 BYU 102, Wyoming 78 No. 2 Kansas 70, extended its winning streak to advantage for good. points, and 7-foot freshman No. 22 Missouri 66 nine games. PROVO, Utah — Jimmer center Fab Melo had a 10 Cincinnati 69, Mark Lyons had 16 points Fredette scored 38 points and points, a season high, and six COLUMBIA, Mo. — Marcus No. 17 Georgetown 47 and Kenny Frease added 10 No. 3 BYU closed a tumultuous Morris and Thomas Robinson rebounds. points and 12 rebounds for the CINCINNATI — Yancy Gates week with a rout of Wyoming. had double-doubles and No. 2 No. 18 Arizona 90, Charles Abouo scored 21 of scored 10 of his 13 points from Kansas wrapped up its seventh Musketeers (24-6, 15-1 Atlantic Oregon 82 his 25 points in the second half straight Big 12 championship by 10), who have won 16 of 17 and the free-throw line, where Cinare the No. 1 seed for next cinnati was nearly flawless, and for the Cougars (28-3, 14-2 TUCSON, Ariz. — Derrick holding off No. 22 Missouri. week’s conference tournament the Bearcats completed a sweep Mountain West Conference), Williams had 14 points despite Robinson had 15 points and in Atlantic City, N.J. who earned their first win since 13 rebounds, returning to form early foul trouble and got plenty of Georgetown. Brian Conklin scored 14 Brandon Davies was kicked off The Bearcats (24-7, 11-7 Big of help in what may have been less than a month after arthrothe team for breaking the his final home game, lifting No. East) completed a breakscopic surgery on the right knee points for Saint Louis (12-17, 6-10), which had won four through regular season that put school’s honor code. BYU was 18 Arizona to a win over Orehe injured against Missouri at coming off an 82-64 loss to New home. Morris had 21 points and straight. them in position for their first gon and the outright Pac-10

800 star wins at ECACs The Times Leader staff

Misericordia’s Frank Redmond brought home a significant honor for the Misericordia men’s track team, winning the 800-meter run at the ECAC Indoor Track & Field Championships on Saturday in New York. Redmond set a school record (1:53.16) in the victory and met the provisional qualifying standard for the NCAA Championships. Also competing for the Cougars was Sean Ciborowski, who took eighth in the 55-meter hurdles. The 4x200 relay team of Sean Vitale, Joe Layman, Ciborowski and Aidan Marich was 23rd.

WOMEN’S TRACK

More records for Cougars

The Misericordia women’s team also competed at the ECAC Indoor Championships in New York, setting three school records on Saturday. Marcie Cusatis, Marina Orrson, Kelsey Cameron and Bridget Comiskey earned AllECAC honors with a fifth-place finish to set a record in the 4x800 relay (9:37.23). Ashlee Ward was All-ECAC in the high jump (5-0.25) with a program best while finishing sixth. Orrson was 15th in the mile with a Cougars record time of 5:08.49.

BASEBALL

Wilkes loses two games

The Colonels took on a pair of fellow Pennsylvania schools in Myrtle Beach, S.C., falling 9-4 to Allegheny and 4-0 to Penn State Abington. Matt Ruch had two RBI in the opener, while Tay Sidler knocked in another run with a double. Wilkes (1-3) was no-hit by PSU Abington in the second game. Misericordia 11, Ferrum 3

Patrick Clark struck out nine over seven innings as the Cougars (1-2) earned their first win of the season, knocking off Ferrum in Fort Pierce, Fla. Two freshmen – Joe Tagliarini and Ryan Cacchioli – broke open a close game in the fifth inning. With the Cougars up 3-2 with two outs in the frame, Tagliarini hit a three-run double and Cacchioli (3-for-4) later drove in two more.

SOFTBALL

Lady Colonels drop pair

In Virginia Beach, Va., for a season-opening set of games, Wilkes (0-4) lost to Hood College 6-5 and then fell to North Carolina Wesleyan 11-6 in the afternoon. Kait Brown and Jackie Follweiler each had two hits in the opening game for the Lady Colonels, who got two RBI from Jordan Borger. Borger had a two-run double in the second game while Follweiler added a three-run homer. Amanda Holston went 3-for-3.

Phelps edges Lochte in 200 IM competition The Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS — Michael Phelps has beaten Ryan Lochte again, this time in the 200-meter individual medley. The two-time defending Olympic gold medalist in the event finished in 1 minute, 56.88 seconds, the best time in the world this season. Lochte trailed Phelps by eight-tenths of a second at the midway point, but Phelps extended the lead in the breaststroke and pulled away in the freestyle. Lochte finished in 1:59.19. He’s the world record-holder in the event.


CMYK PAGE 6C

SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011

THE TIMES LEADER

➛ WWW.TIMESLEADER.COM/SPORTS

www.timesleader.com

PENGUINS SUNDAY LAST FIVE GAMES

Feb. 19 at Norfolk W, 2-1

Feb. 23 at Bing’mton L, 4-1

Feb. 26 Norfolk W, 3-2

Feb. 27 Springfield W, 5-4

NEXT FIVE GAMES

Friday at Toronto L, 2-1

Today at Hershey 5 p.m.

Tuesday Connecticut 7 p.m.

March 11 at Abb’tsford 10 p.m.

March 12 at Abb’tsford 10 p.m.

March 15 at Manitoba 9:30 p.m.

Trade Secrets “I TAKE PRIDE in not getting scored on. It’s something that’s always been important to me.”

THIS WEEK’S TIP Playing the puck

Player: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins goaltender Brad Thiessen Thiessen has started a collection of etched crystal, which is proof that he is a top goaltender. The etched crystal is what he received for being named the AHL’s Top Goaltender of the Month twice this season, and to earn such an honor a goaltender has to be skilled in all aspects of the game. That includes playing the puck. For a goaltender, dashing out of the crease after a loose puck can be a harrowing proposition. If an opponent beats you to it, chances are the puck will be in your net before you can turn around. But playing the puck can be a huge advantage for a goaltender. It can mitigate scoring chances before they can develop and help his team quickly transition into the other end. Here’s Thiessen’s tips for playing the puck. Pay close attention and do what he says, and maybe one day you’ll have your own etched crystal collection.

JENNIFER WYCHOCK/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins Zach Sill, left, and Carl Sneep at a recent practice at the ice rink on Coal Street.

Reborn on the PK

Ability to pressure puck carriers improves Sill’s NHL prospects By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

Zach Sill has enjoyed getting back to his roots. While the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins lost one forward after another because of call-ups to Pittsburgh last month, it forced head coach John Hynes to use players in different situations. In Sill’s case, that meant time as a primary penalty killer. It was a role that Sill had yet to fill during his two seasons in the AHL, but one he was quite familiar with. “I was always a PK guy in the past. It was my forte in juniors,” Sill said. “It feels really good to get back to it.” Sill proved it by leading a Penguins penalty kill unit that went an astounding 43-for-44 during a 10-game stretch in February. It was a key ingredient to the Penguins’ success last month when, at one point, their top-seven forwards were in Pittsburgh and they had no choice but to keep games close. While Sill’s role as a penalty killer might be a new one in his AHL career, his success on the unit really isn’t a surprise. The 22-year-old from Truro, Nova Scotia, plays a hard-charging, relentless style that gives opponents little time with the puck. It’s the perfect style for a penalty killer. “He’s a driving type of player,” Hynes said. “He has speed, he’s willing to block shots and has good instincts. He has those penalty-kill attributes.” Sill’s ability to pressure opposing puck carriers has helped him to find his niche in the AHL. He spent his rookie campaign last season anchoring the Penguins fourth line, and this season he has bounced between the third and fourth lines while being used extensively in a shutdown role

against other teams’ top forwards. For Sill, it’s the perfect job description. “I take pride in not getting scored on,” he said. “It’s something that’s always been important to me.” The key to Sill’s success can be found in his feet -- they’re always moving. A player who forces the pace of play is the most difficult to play against, and Sill added that his mobility is vital when playing against skilled opponents. “Highly skilled forwards need time and space,” Sill said. “If you can take that away, then you have an advantage. They still might be able to make a play, but it’s not the one they want to make.” If Sill does make it to the NHL one day, he said it will be via his hard work and determination. And now, with his recent success as a penalty killer, he has another benefit to bring to the table. But Sill’s new penalty kill role isn’t the only thing that has changed in his game during his second AHL season. As a player who has always thrived on physical play and delivering punishing hits, Sill never made it through a full season during his five seasons in juniors. As much as Sill’s bone-jarring hits hurt his opponents, his body sometimes paid a price as well. “I’ve always gotten injured at some point in a season,” he said. “It really takes a toll on your body.” Now, Sill is less the straight-line hitter looking to obliterate an opponent. Most of his checks now are delivered from angles, which are still as effective as the head-on collisions that were once common in his game.

L E R G ’ S A P E N A LT Y- K I L L S TA R

Bryan Lerg is another Penguin who saw extensive penalty-kill time during the last month. Coach John Hynes didn’t hesitate to put Lerg on the ice with two defensemen during five-on-three penalty kill situations, and, like Sill, he availed himself well. “He’s a very smart player who understands how to play defensively, be in position to block up the shot lanes and anticipate the play,” Hynes said. “Like Sill, he’s another pressure player who moves his feet and plays very aggressive.” Lerg played on the U.S. National Team from 2002 to 2004 while Hynes was head coach. Lerg said he was used as a penalty killer back then and to fill the same role for Hynes years later is a confidence booster. “I’m just honored that Coach is giving me that opportunity again,” Lerg said. “It’s a big part of the game, and it’s a good feeling when you’re successful, especially on those five-on-three situations.”

It’s a change that he made not only for the sake of self-preservation, but out of necessity once he matured as a pro. “If I get a chance to catch a guy with his head down, of course I’ll take it, but there’s not as many guys skating like that in this league,” Sill said. “The players are smarter, and they don’t put themselves in a situation to be hit like that.” With forwards such as Tim Wallace, Joe Vitale and Ryan Craig back from Pittsburgh, Hynes said there is now more competition for time on the penalty kill. And Sill is firmly in the running. “We’ve spotted him in on the penalty kill, and his time in that role has increased over the year,” Hynes said. “The last month he had to really step up into that role, and he showed he can do it.” Sill hopes it’s a role where he now has a permanent place. “It does feel good to be back on the penalty kill. It gives you extra ice time and makes you feel like more a part of the team because you’re helping out in a big way,” Sill said. “I feel I’ve played good enough on the penalty kill to get a shot to remain there even with everyone back.”

Should I stay or should I go: “You have to be aware of where the other team is and how fast they’re coming into your zone. If your opponent is the first guy coming down, you can try to outrace him and prevent a breakaway. If they’re dumping the puck in from center ice, you can get out and play it. But just make sure you can get there first or else you’re in trouble.” Work with your D: “We have certain rules on our team if I’m going to play the puck. If our defenseman is the first back and he’s ahead of the other team, he’s going to take the puck. If their guys are coming first, our defenseman is going to go to the side and I’m going to make a play to him.” Help your D: “As a youth hockey goalie, an important skill to learn is stopping the puck and setting it up for your defenseman. That’s important because it helps them out a lot and allows them to move it up ice quickly.” Help your forwards: “If the puck is dumped in and the other team goes for a line change, that’s a good opportunity for you to get out there and move the puck up fast to try to catch them on a change. It happens on power plays sometimes. Watch your forwards when you do this. If one of our forwards sees that I’m coming out, they might stay put on the blueline and I’ll try to pass them the puck so they can make a rush.” Help the penalty kill: “If you play the puck during a penalty kill, you have to make sure you can get it high enough to get it over everybody and out of your zone. I like to get out there and play it, take a quick look and see what’s open as well. I’ll look toward the glass, the middle or just make a simple pass to a defenseman. Always look for a lane to get the puck down the ice.” Help yourself: “As a goalie you obviously worry about making saves first, but if you can add playing the puck to your game, it helps out a lot. Your defensemen will appreciate it, and it gives you a little extra over someone who maybe can’t do it as well. Practice it as much as you can, and it will help you in the long run.”


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NHL ROUNDUP

NBA ROUNDUP New Jersey’s Travis Outlaw takes the ball around Toronto’s Amir Johnson during a game at O2 Arena in London on Saturday.

AP PHOTO

AP PHOTO

Buffalo goalie Ryan Miller reaches for a shot in the third period of Saturday’s game against Philadelphia. The Sabres won 5-3.

Flyers lose third straight game The Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — Jason Pominville snapped a tie game in the third period after Buffalo scored three times in the second, and the Sabres beat the Philadelphia Flyers 5-3 on Saturday. The Eastern Conferenceleading Flyers have lost three straight for the first time since Nov. 26-Dec. 1. Drew Stafford, Tyler Ennis and Andrej Sekera scored three straight goals in the second to put the Sabres ahead. Ryan Miller bounced back from a shaky first period to stop 33 shots. Nathan Gerbe added an empty-netter late in the third. Kris Versteeg, James van Riemsdyk and Kimmo Timonen scored for the Flyers.

losses. David Krejci got the Bruins even at 2 when he scored with 33 seconds left in regulation while Boston goalie Tim Thomas was pulled for an extra skater. Zdeno Chara had the other goal for Boston, which was on its longest winning streak since a 10-game run from Dec. 12, 2008, to Jan. 1, 2009.

Islanders 5, Blues 2 UNIONDALE, N.Y. — Islanders defenseman Andrew MacDonald scored two rare goals, John Tavares and P.A. Parenteau both had a goal and an assist in the first period, and New York sent sinking St. Louis to its fourth straight loss. MacDonald, who entered his Penguins 3, Bruins 2, OT 100th NHL game with only three career goals, scored his third in BOSTON — Dustin Jeffrey two games. Each goal Saturday scored his second goal of the game 1:52 into overtime and the gave the Islanders a three-goal Pittsburgh Penguins snapped the lead. Al Montoya made 21 saves, Boston Bruins’ winning streak at giving up Andy McDonald’s 14th seven. Marc-Andre Fleury stopped 29 of the season 3:26 into the third period that made it 3-1 and Chris shots, and Jordan Staal also scored for Pittsburgh, which had Stewart’s power-play tally that brought the Blues within 4-2 won only one of the previous seven — including four overtime with 9:42 remaining.

Rookie Michael Grabner put this one away with 7:35 left, netting his 26th. St. Louis is 1-7 in its last eight games, falling to 13th in the West and well out of the playoff chase. Canucks 3, Kings 1 LOS ANGELES — Daniel Sedin scored the tiebreaking goal with 8:24 to play, Roberto Luongo made 21 saves, and Vancouver opened a five-game road trip with a gritty victory over Los Angeles. Jannik Hansen scored in the first period and Alexandre Burrows added an empty-net goal for the Canucks, who have stayed on top of the NHL standings despite alternating wins and losses for a full month. Blackhawks 5, Maple Leafs 3 TORONTO — Jonathan Toews scored a goal to extend his points streak to nine games and the Chicago Blackhawks won their eighth straight game, beating the Toronto Maple Leafs. Marian Hossa, Michael Frolik, Viktor Stalberg and Bryan Bickell also scored for Chicago. The

defending Stanley Cup champions took a 3-0 lead in the first period, a night after a 5-2 home victory over Carolina. Joffrey Lupul, Joey Crabb and Luke Schenn replied for Toronto, 10-3-4 since the All-Star break. The Maple Leafs had earned at least a point in nine straight games. Canadiens 4, Lightning 2 TAMPA, Fla. — Max Pacioretty scored two goals and Carey Price made 43 saves to lead the Montreal Canadiens to a victory over the Tampa Bay Lightning. Montreal has won four consecutive games, including three on the road, and the sixth-place Canadiens are only one point behind Tampa Bay in the Eastern Conference playoff race. The Southeast Division-leading Lightning have lost three in a row. Price stopped all but three of the 116 shots he faced during a three-game road sweep of Southeast opponents Atlanta, Florida and Tampa Bay. The Canadiens went up 2-0 when Hal Gill and David Desharnais beat Dwayne Roloson 3:14 apart in the first period.

Nets earn triple-OT victory in London The Associated Press

LONDON — Travis Outlaw scored the final eight points for New Jersey to help the Nets beat the Toronto Raptors 137136 in triple overtime Saturday night and sweep the NBA’s European doubleheader. Outlaw made two free throws with 12.6 seconds remaining to put the Nets ahead for good and Andrea Bargnani missed a jumper at the buzzer. Brook Lopez had 34 points and 14 rebounds for the Nets but fouled out in the second overtime. Deron Williams added 21 points and 18 assists for his fifth straight double-double since joining the team from Utah last week. Sasha Vujacic had 25 points — including six 3-pointers — and Kris Humphries added 20 points and 17 rebounds for New Jersey. Outlaw finished with 14 points. Toronto’s DeMar DeRozan finished with 30 points for the second straight night. Bargnani led all scorers with 35 points, but also missed a potential game winner with 2 seconds left in the first OT of a game that had exactly the kind of excitement and tight finish that the NBA had hoped for when it decided to bring regular-season games to Europe for the first time. New Jersey won the first game at the O2 Arena in London 116-103 on Friday.

Williams made a jumper with 9.8 seconds left of the second overtime to tie it at 126, and DeRozan’s shot at the other end then clanked off the rim with 2 seconds left. Bargnani grabbed the rebound but couldn’t get a shot off before the buzzer. Vujacic then made 3 free throws to start the third OT, before Outlaw took over the game at both ends. After making two more free throws, Outlaw blocked Bargnani on the next possession and held on for a jump ball against Amir Johnson. Wizards 103, Timberwolves 96 WASHINGTON — John Wall scored 18 points and had 11 rebounds to lead the Washington Wizards to a win against the Minnesota Timberwolves. Kevin Love scored 20 points and had 21 rebounds for Minnesota, the third straight game with at least 20 points and 20 rebounds for the All-Star forward and his 11th of the season. Andray Blatche scored 20 points and had seven rebounds for Washington, which snapped a seven-game losing streak. The Wizards have won their last seven games at home against the Timberwolves. It was Love’s 50th doubledouble in a row, one game shy of tying the mark set by Moses Malone in 1978-79. Love leads the NBA with 59 this season.

WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

No. 4 Tennessee, 8th-ranked Duke and No. 17 Georgetown triumph The Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Meighan Simmons scored 18 points and No. 4 Tennessee beat Georgia 82-58 on Saturday in the Southeastern Conference tournament semifinals. The Lady Volunteers (30-2) will play in their 20th conference championship against No. 16 Kentucky or Vanderbilt. Tennessee scored the first nine points of the game and never trailed. A 3-pointer by Taber Spani gave the Lady Vols a 16-2 lead with 13:51 left in the first half. The Lady Bulldogs missed their first 14 shots from the field. Khaalidah Miller broke the drought when she hit a 3-pointer from the top of the key just before the shot clock expired to cut the margin to 16-5 with 9:55 to go before halftime. No. 8 Duke 74, Georgia Tech 66 GREENSBORO, N.C. — Karima Christmas scored a seasonhigh 20 points to help No. 8 Duke hold off Georgia Tech in the semifinals of the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament. Christmas came up with two key baskets and assisted on a third during a spurt that helped the Blue Devils (28-3) take control after the Yellow Jackets had cut a 13-point deficit to two with about seven minutes left. Jasmine Thomas added 12

points for top-seeded Duke, which reached Sunday’s championship game for the fourth time in as many tries under Joanne P. McCallie. It was also Duke’s 33rd straight win against fifth-seeded Georgia Tech (23-10).

No. 3 Baylor 81, Colorado 59 BOULDER, Colo. — Brittney Griner had 26 points and 13 rebounds and ceaseless shotNo. 17 Georgetown 61, altering defense helped thirdSyracuse 60 ranked Baylor overcame a firstHARTFORD, Conn. — Sugar half letdown to rout Colorado. Odyssey Sims added 16 points Rodgers scored 18 points to help and eight rebounds for the No. 17 Georgetown edge SyraBears (28-2), who finished 15-1 cuse in the second round of the in Big 12 play, one win better Big East tournament. than their 2005 national chamThe Hoyas (22-9) will face top-ranked Connecticut today in pionship team. Brittany Spears scored 23 the quarterfinals. points for Colorado (15-14, 6Georgetown was befuddled 10), which trimmed an early for most of the game by a junk 20-point deficit to 34-28 at the defense used by Syracuse. The Orange were daring anyone but half but couldn’t make another run after halftime without sophRodgers or Monica McNutt to omore guard Chucky Jeffery. beat them. The Buffaloes’ second-leading The ploy worked as Syracuse scorer and top rebounder was led for most of the game until attending her great grandmothGeorgetown finally started er’s funeral in New York. hitting shots.

No. 20 Marquette 65, Pittsburgh 61 HARTFORD, Conn. — Paige Fiedorowicz scored 14 points and Tatiyiana McMorris added 13 to help No. 20 Marquette beat Pittsburgh in the second round of the Big East tournament. The Golden Eagles (23-7) will face fourth-seeded Rutgers in the quarterfinals today. Trailing 44-37 midway

going 3 of 5 from 3-point range, and Special Jennings scored 11 for the Musketeers (26-2). Katie Kuester scored 17 points and Erin Shields had 10 for Saint Joseph’s (19-11).

through the second half, Marquette rallied despite leading scorer Angel Robinson sitting on the bench with four fouls.

No. 25 Houston 90, Tulane 84, OT HOUSTON — Courtney Taylor had 24 points and 14 rebounds to lead No. 25 Houston to a victory in overtime against Tulane in the teams’ Conference USA regular-season finale. It was a team-record 16th straight win for Houston (25-4, 16-0), which took a 73-71 lead

No. 16 Kentucky 69, Vanderbilt 56 NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Victoria Dunlap scored 22 points and No. 16 Kentucky withstood a late rally to beat Vanderbilt in the Southeastern Conference semifinals. The Wildcats (24-7) will make their third SEC championship appearance, meeting No. 4 Tennessee in a rematch of last year’s final.

AP PHOTO

Tennessee players celebrate in the final seconds of their 82-58 win over Georgia in a SEC tournament semifinal game.

on Brittney Scott’s layup with 41 Saint Joseph’s 55 seconds remaining. LOWELL, Mass. — Amber Tulane (20-9, 9-7) answered Harris scored 19 points and on Danielle Nunn’s lay-in with Ta’Shia Phillips had 12 points 30 seconds left and had a and 11 rebounds to record her chance to win it in regulation, 19th double-double of the seabut Scott missed a jumper and son and lead No. 6 Xavier to a Nunn’s half-court heave at the victory over Saint Joseph’s in buzzer was off. the Atlantic 10 quarterfinals. Tyeasha Moss had 14 points, No. 6 Xavier 71,

No. 9 UCLA 66, Washington State 48 LOS ANGELES — Jasmine Dixon scored 17 points for UCLA in the final game at Pauley Pavilion before it closes for a renovation project. Darxia Morris added 15 points for the Bruins (26-3, 16-2 Pac-10). No. 15 Green Bay 68, Detroit 48 DETROIT — Kayla Tetschlag had 20 points and 10 rebounds to help Wisconsin-Green Bay complete a perfect run through the Horizon League. Adrian Ritchie added 15 points for the Phoenix (29-1, 18-0).


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SPRING TRAINING ROUNDUP

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

All eyes back on Phillies pitcher Cliff Lee returned to Philadelphia this offseason with high hopes.

AP PHOTO

Phillies second baseman Chase Utley fields a ground ball during spring training baseball practice, Saturday, in Clearwater, Fla.

By ROB MAADDI AP Sports Writer

PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES

Utley still sidelined with ailing right knee

hiladelphia Phillies second baseman Chase Utley misP sed another spring training

game after getting a cortisone shot in his right knee Utley, 32, got the shot Friday. He has not appeared in any of the Phillies eight exhibition games this spring, and was out of the lineup for Saturday’s game against the Pittsburgh Pirates. Utley was held out of the first three games of the spring for “general soreness.” The Phillies medical staff performed an MRI on the knee last weekend, revealing patellar tendinitis. Utley was limited to a careerlow 115 games in the 2010 season after needing surgery to repair a torn tendon in his right thumb in July. CLEVELAND INDIANS

Donald hit by pitch, getting X-rays on hand

Indians starting third baseman Jason Donald is getting X-rays after being struck on the left hand by a pitch from Chicago starter Gavin Floyd. Donald was hit during an at-bat in the second inning. He stayed in the game and played in the field in the third before he was replaced by a pinch-hitter in the bottom half. Donald did not stop to speak with reporters as he was escorted by a trainer to a bus for the short drive back to the Indians’ training complex. The team had no immediate word on Donald’s injury. Donald moved to third this year after playing shortstop and second base in 2010. Last season, Donald batted .253 with four homers and 24 RBI in 88 games. SEATTLE MARINERS

Olivo suffers injury while running bases

Seattle Mariners catcher Miguel Olivo strained his groin while running home in an exhibition game. The Mariners say Olivo hurt himself on the left side Saturday and will have an MRI exam. Olivo was injured while scoring a run against Cleveland. He was headed home in the second inning and fell, landing on his stomach with his hands touching the plate. Mariners trainers helped Olivo and he was taken to the clubhouse on a cart. BALTIMORE ORIOLES

Lefty Matusz expects to make next start

Orioles left-hander Brian Matusz returned to the mound one day after getting a wart removed from his left middle finger and expects make his next start. Matusz had the procedure done in Philadelphia on Friday a day after pitching two scoreless innings in a loss to Minnesota. The left-hander threw on a back field Saturday. Baltimore manager Buck Showalter had said on Thursday that he thought Matusz would probably miss a start, but the left-hander said he felt well enough to pitch against the Phillies in Clearwater on Tuesday.

AP PHOTO

Philadelphia Phillies pitcher Roy Halladay throws in the second inning of a spring training baseball game against the Pittsburgh Pirates in Clearwater, Fla., on Saturday. Halladay threw three scoreless innings against the Pirates.

Halladay to start opener The Associated Press

CLEARWATER, Fla. — Roy Halladay breezed through three scoreless innings, then got the official word: He’ll start on opening day for the Philadelphia Phillies. Whether rookie outfielder Domonic Brown will be with the Phillies then is uncertain. Brown broke his right hand during a 4-3 loss to the Pittsburgh Pirates on Saturday, an injury that may require surgery and could sideline him from three to six weeks. Brown, the team’s top prospect, began the day 0 for 15 this spring. He hurt himself when he swung at the first pitch of his first at-bat, stayed in the game and singled through the middle. Halladay held Pittsburgh to one hit and struck out four in his second start of the spring. After the game, pitching coach Rich Dubee said the reigning NL Cy Young winner would start the opener April 1 against Houston. Halladay will be followed by Cliff Lee, Roy Oswalt, Cole Hamels and Joe Blanton.

McClellan allowed two hits. He struck two of the first three batters he faced, then breezed through the second inning on five pitches. McClellan is the favorite to fill a starting spot left by Adam Wainwright, who had season-ending ligament replacement surgery earlier this week. Red Sox (ss) 4, Orioles 4, 10 innings SARASOTA, Fla. — Carl Crawford had his first two hits in a Boston uniform and a Red Sox split-squad and the Baltimore Orioles played 10 innings before calling it a tie. Crawford, hitless in his first nine at-bats, signed a 7-year, $142 million contract with the Red Sox this winter. He had singles in the first and fifth innings and left the game after walking in the seventh inning.

Twins 6, Rays 1 PORT CHARLOTTE, Fla. — Nick Blackburn pitched three perfect innings and Chris Parmelee hit a solo homer to lead the Minnesota Twins Nationals 10, Yankees 8 over the Tampa Bay Rays. Blackburn hasn’t allowed a run or TAMPA, Fla. — Bryce Harper drove walked a batter in five innings this in his first big league run with an eighth-inning single and the Washing- spring. ton Nationals beat the New York Rockies 10, Royals 9 Yankees. SURPRISE, Ariz. — NL batting Harper, 18, taken first overall in last champion Carlos Gonzalez went 3 for June’s draft and given a $9.9 million, 3 and the Colorado Rockies outlasted five-year contract, is 2 for 10 this the Kansas City Royals. spring. Gonzalez, who hit .336 last season, New York ace CC Sabathia strugscored twice and drove in a run. gled in his second spring training Jason Giambi doubled twice and start, allowing five runs and six hits had two RBI for the Rockies. over 2 2-3 innings.

Braves 6, Mets 4 KISSIMMEE, Fla. — Chipper Jones hit his first homer of the spring, Derek Lowe extended his scoreless string to five innings over his first two starts and the Atlanta Braves beat the New York Mets. Jones, who is coming off ACL surgery on his left knee, is batting .294 and started his second game at third base. He said it was the first time all spring that his knee felt fine. Marlins 11, Red Sox (ss) 2 FORT MYERS, Fla. — Anibal Sanchez was sharp for three innings while Daisuke Matsuzaka struggled as the Florida Marlins beat Boston’s split squad. Sanchez blanked the Red Sox on one hit and struck out three. Matsuzaka was tagged for seven runs on six hits and two walks in three innings. Cardinals 1, Astros (ss) 0 JUPITER, Fla. — Kyle McClellan’s bid to make the St. Louis rotation got off to a strong start when he pitched three scoreless innings in a victory over a Houston split squad.

Tigers (ss) 5, Astros (ss) 0 KISSIMMEE, Fla. — Justin Verlander was sharp for 3 2-3 innings and Victor Martinez hit a two-run double as the Detroit Tigers beat the Houston Astros in a split squad game. Verlander gave up three hits and struck out three. Rookie left-hander Andy Oliver pitched two hitless innings, striking out the Astros in order in the sixth. Indians (ss) 8, White Sox 3 GOODYEAR, Ariz. — Cleveland third baseman Jason Donald had a bruised left hand after being hit by a pitch from Gavin Floyd in a win over the Chicago White Sox. The Indians will likely give Donald a few more days off to recover. Matt LaPorta’s RBI double in the first inning off Floyd was the first hit allowed by a White Sox starter this spring. Before that, Chicago’s fiveman rotation of Mark Buehrle, John Danks, Edwin Jackson, Jake Peavy and Floyd had faced 36 batters this spring without allowing a hit. Brewers 2, Angels 1 PHOENIX — Prince Fielder ended

an 0-for-7 start to his spring with a two-run homer and the Milwaukee Brewers beat the Los Angeles Angels. Fielder had been scheduled to take the day off, but asked Brewers manager Ron Roenicke to be the designated hitter to get extra at-bats. Both starting pitchers, Joel Piniero and the Brewers’ Shawn Marcum, were sharp in their three-inning stints. Athletics 6, Giants 0 PHOENIX — Brett Anderson struck out five in three innings and the Oakland Athletics beat the San Francisco Giants. Madison Bumgarner, making his first spring start after two relief appearances, went three innings for the Giants. He allowed an unearned run on two hits. Cubs 9, Padres 4 MESA, Ariz. — Marlon Byrd doubled twice and scored three times, leading Randy Wells and the Chicago Cubs over the San Diego Padres. Byrd is 6 for 12 this spring and has scored five runs. Alfonso Soriano added a two-run, bases-loaded single for Chicago. Wells allowed an unearned run and three hits and struck out three. Dodgers 2, Reds 0 GLENDALE, Ariz. — Clayton Kershaw allowed one hit and struck out three in four scoreless innings, helping the Los Angeles Dodgers beat the Cincinnati Reds. The lefty, who will start opening day versus San Francisco, walked one in his second spring start. Diamondbacks 3, Rangers 2 SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — Micah Owings threw a perfect inning and the Arizona Diamondbacks beat the Texas Rangers on Ryan Roberts’ run-scoring single in the bottom of the ninth. Armando Galarraga, like Owings, a free agent signed in the offseason, was almost as effective. Galarraga, who missed a perfect game last season with Detroit because of an umpire’s mistake, went three hitless innings, giving up only a walk and a hit batter. Blue Jays 7, Tigers (ss) 4 DUNEDIN, Fla. — Highly regarded prospect Brett Lawrie hit his first homer of the spring, a three-run shot that highlighted a six-run rally in the eighth inning and sent the Toronto Blue Jays over a Detroit Tigers split squad. The Blue Jays traded Shaun Marcum, their opening day pitcher last year, to Milwaukee in the offseason to get Lawrie. Kyle Drabek, whose first spring start for the Blue Jays was delayed five days due to a stiff neck, gave up one run in two innings and struck out three.

CLEARWATER, Fla. — Cliff Lee walked up to the table set up for a group news conference and picked up the placard bearing his name to make sure he was sitting in the right seat. “I guess I’m in the middle,” Lee said. As usual, his location was right on. On a staff of aces and team of stars, Lee has been the center of attention since the Philadelphia Phillies opened spring training. From the minute he arrived, he has been followed by cameras and surrounded by microphones. When the five members of the starting rotation talked as a group to reporters upon arriving in camp, most of the questions were directed at Lee. Roy Halladay is the reigning NL Cy Young Award winner. Cole Hamels and Joe Blanton have World Series rings. Roy Oswalt has more 20-win seasons and All-Star game appearances than Lee. Yet everyone is talking about Lee because he’s the new guy and perhaps the one who can help the Phillies win another World Series. Left fielder Raul Ibanez spent his offseason in Philadelphia instead of returning to his home in Miami. Wherever he went around town, people asked him about one guy. “Cliff Lee. Right when we got Cliff Lee, they were so excited,” Ibanez said. “Everybody who came up to me was so gracious and so excited about getting Cliff and how they were working on getting their season tickets already. It’s a lot of fun. The fans are phenomenal. What can you say? They’re the best. It was November or December and I was running into people and they were so fired up like spring training was around the corner. And it was still football season. It’s great to be a part of.” The Phillies stunned the baseball world when they lured Lee away from the Texas Rangers and out of the grasp of the New York Yankees with a $120 million, five-year contract. The left-hander took about $30 million less from the Phillies, spurning the bright lights of the Big Apple for the Liberty Bell and those famous cheesesteaks. “I like Philly cheesesteaks, but that had nothing to do with me coming back to Philadelphia,” Lee said. Of course not. Clearly, money wasn’t his top priority, either. Lee got a taste of the World Series with the Phillies in ’09 and the Rangers last year. But he didn’t win a title and he chose Philadelphia because he wants to get over that hump and celebrate a championship parade. “I could have gotten more money in other places. That really wasn’t what it was all about for me,” Lee said. “It was really three pretty good options to be honest with you. I just honestly stepped back and looked at each team and evaluated. I felt like this is the team that’s going to give me the best chance to win a ring, and hopefully multiple rings. That was what the decision was based on. “Obviously, the fans had a lot to do with it. They sell out every game. A lot of the stadiums were packed. There was a lot of hype every game. It’s a great feeling playing in that park, and I wanted to come back and do some more of it.”

The Phillies’ Cliff Lee


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SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011 PAGE 9C

NASCAR

Hot start for Fords this year

The automaker won at Daytona and has the top four spots today in Las Vegas.

A little luck helps Martin

NFL

Danica Patrick earned a career-best fourth-place finish. It was the highest finish in a NASCAR race by a woman since 1949.

A tire problem for Keselowski allows Martin to capture the Nationwide race in Vegas.

With CBA deadline pushed to Friday, NFL’s out to avoid shutting down operations.

By JENNA FRYER AP Auto Racing Writer

LAS VEGAS — When Richard Petty Motorsports courted Marcos Ambrose last season, the Australian saw an opportunity to further his NASCAR development and partner with Ford. It wasn’t an easy decision, and Ambrose certainly had second thoughts when financial issues nearly shut down RPM right about the time he began to string together some decent results with JTG Daugherty Racing. He kept his word, though, and was in RPM’s No. 9 Ford at Daytona. “I took a chance and I really stuck my neck out to see if I had what it took,” Ambrose said of his move to RPM. But the launch with his new team hardly produced the results he had hoped for through the first two weeks: Ambrose was 37th at Daytona, 16th at Phoenix and came to Las Vegas Motor Speedway ranked 27th in the Sprint Cup Series standings. It put the pressure on Ambrose to step up and turn things around, which he did by qualifying second for Sunday’s race. In all, Fords swept the first four qualifying spots, as Carl Edwards and Greg Biffle qualified third and fourth. All four cars are powered by Roush Yates Engines. The top three finishers at the Daytona 500 were powered by Roush Yates, and Edwards won the pole last week at Phoenix. “We’ve had such a great start to the 2011 season,” said chief engine builder Doug Yates. “We’ve worked really hard in the offseason to see gains on the race track, and I think there are even more great things to come.” Everybody in the blue oval group is anticipating a great year after a mediocre 2010. Trevor Bayne, 20, drove a Ford to victory at the Daytona 500, and Edwards had the car to beat last week at Phoenix until he was wrecked by Kyle Busch. As the NASCAR schedule hits the first intermediate track of the season on Sunday, the Ford group is looking at Las Vegas as a measure of where their equipment stacks up against the competition. “The real test is how we run here and at Bristol,” Edwards said. “If our cars are that good, then this is going to be a great year.”

By JENNA FRYER AP Auto Racing Writer

LAS VEGAS — Mark Martin knew he had to save gas to have any chance of winning the Nationwide Series race at Las Vegas Motor Speedway. Even then, he was going to need some help. He got it when leader Brad Keselowski cut a tire on the final lap of Saturday’s race, and Martin sailed past him for the victory. It was the fourth win in six Nationwide races at Las Vegas for Martin. “I can’t gloat. If Brad hadn’t of had a tire problem, he looked like he would win,” Martin said. “All I could do is make sure we didn’t run out of gas.” The race will most likely be remembered, though, for Danica Patrick’s history-making run and not the last-lap dramatics. Patrick placed fourth, the best finish for a woman in a national NASCAR race since Sara Christian was fifth at Pittsburgh in 1949. “Awesome!” Martin said when told of Patrick’s finish. “I am really happy for her. That’s fantastic.” It was a turnaround for Patrick, who struggled all weekend at Las Vegas and fell a lap down in Saturday’s race. But she put herself in position to get back on the lead lap, then steadily worked her way into the top 10. Fuel strategy did the rest, as many of the cars in front of her had to make late stops for gas and Patrick slid all the way up to fourth. “We just had a good car, that’s all I can say. That’s what makes a difference in these things,” said Patrick. “I know I haven’t had the best results, especially in NASCAR, but we’re getting them now.” Patrick, who has only 16 races in her NASCAR career, improved on her previous careerbest finish of14th, earned at Daytona last month. “I don’t know. I don’t think about trying to achieve the highest finish of a female,” she said. “I think about trying to win the race.” The fuel issues, and a midrace crash by Kyle Busch, shuffled the final running order and put Keselowski in position to win the

By HOWARD FENDRICH AP Pro Football Writer

AP PHOTOS

Mark Martin poses with the trophy after winning a NASCAR Nationwide Series race Saturday in Las Vegas. Martin took advantage of a cut tire for Brad Keselowski to take the lead on the last lap.

race. But the defending Nationwide champion got a flat tire on the final lap and his Dodge darted into the wall. “Must have run over something because it went down pretty quick,” he said. Martin, who didn’t think he had enough gas to get to the finish, then sailed by for his Nationwide-leading 49th career victory. “We really only had one chance to win the race and that was to make it on fuel, and some of the guys in front of us not,” Martin said. “When I caught Brad, I realized it was going to take all the gas I had to get by him because he wanted to race. Had to wait and see if Brad would make it our not, and that would be the determination be-

cause I didn’t feel confident I could make it (on gas) and pass him.” Justin Allgaier finished second to give Turner Motorsports, a Nationwide Series team competing against Sprint Cup teams every weekend, a 1-2 finish. The new scoring rules, which prevent Cup drivers from earning points in lower series, has helped Turner put three of its drivers in the top five of the Nationwide standings. Reed Sorenson is the points leader, Jason Leffler is third and Allgaier is fifth. Keselowski wound up third, but finished his first Nationwide race of the season after wrecking at Daytona and Phoenix. “It’s got to come back around,”

he said. “We’re just on downside of the roller coaster. I’m ready for it to come back up.” Trevor Bayne was fifth and Carl Edwards, who had to give up the lead late to stop for gas, settled for sixth after leading 68 laps. Denny Hamlin was seventh, while Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Jason Leffler and Kenny Wallace rounded out the top 10. Busch led a race-high 84 laps, but wrecked when he tried to make a three-wide pass around Keselowski. He ducked his car into the grass, lost control and couldn’t save it as he ran into an interior wall. He finished 30th. “I know the grass typically doesn’t work, so I look kind of stupid doing that,” he said. “I screwed up.”

GOLF

Sabbatini takes 5-shot lead into Honda Classic final round After shooting a 66 Saturday, the South African sits at 9-under for the tournament. By STEVEN WINE AP Sports Writer

PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla. — After making consecutive birdies,HondaClassicleaderRorySabbatini stood in the rough along the sixth fairway, complaining to a PGA Tour official about a delay in play and wondering what had become of the group just ahead of him. The strange interruption could have halted Sabbatini’s momentum. Instead, after a long wait he hitaniron200yardsto10feetofthe pin, one of his better shots among the 66 Saturday that gave him a cushy lead. Sabbatini will enter the final round at 9-under 201, five shots ahead of Jerry Kelly and 2009 winner Y.E. Yang. The wait at No. 6 occurred when Kelly, playing two groups ahead of Sabbatini, lodged a shot in a palm tree. A newspaper photographer’s zoom lens was used to identify the ball as Kelly’s, allowing him to avoid being penalized for a lost

ball. The inspection took time, so the twosome behind Kelly played through. Meanwhile, Sabbatini and playing partner Kyle Stanley waited and wondered how they had caught up with Kelly. “It was a little bit of dazed and confused,” Sabbatini said. “We’re like,‘OK,wheredidhecomefrom?’ And we’re trying to figure out what’s going on.” ASouthAfricanwholivesinTexas, Sabbatini is known for his feisty manner and candor. But nothing has riled him up this week, and he tried to look at the delay as something positive. “Actually, I think maybe that might have helped me slow down a little out there,” he said. “It allowed me to back off a little bit and kind of refocus again. So I think that was a good thing.” Yang birdied the last two holes for a 3-under 67 and moved into a tie for second with Kelly, who shot a roller-coaster 68. Gary Woodland also had a 68 and was fourth, six shots behind. Second-round leader Stanley had a 74 to drop seven strokes back. Sabbatini, who changed putters this week, made birdie putts of 2, 40, 12, 18 and 18 feet.

Entering a critical week of dialogue

“I’ve been putting well all year; I just didn’t feel like I was making anything,” he said. “Sometimes just changing the look of things, changing the feel of things, can kind of just spur something.” With his new mallet-style putter, Sabbatini had the lowest round for the second day in a row after tying the tournament course record with a 64 Friday. SabbatinihaswonfivePGATour titles, most recently at the 2009 Byron Nelson Championship. But he’s perhaps best known for once calling Woods “more beatable than ever,” long before the sex scandal that sent Woods’ career off track. Sabbatini said he dislikes being cast as a villain, which may be why he switched from Friday’s widebrimmed black hat to a white one. Hesaidhehadn’tdecidedwhatcolor to wear Sunday, but regardless, he’ll be wearing a target as the leader. Given the tough course and conditions at PGA National, Kelly doesn’t consider his five-shot deficit insurmountable. “It’s catchable in three holes,” he said. “You never know what three AP PHOTO holes they may be. You’ve just got to play solid, get some birdies, and Honda Classic leader Rory Sabbatini tees off on the fourth hole you never know.” during round three of the tournament in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.

WASHINGTON — Those optimistic about the NFL’s labor talks with the players’ union will point to the sides’ decision to push back the bargaining deadline by a week and think, as Commissioner Roger Goodell put it: “The fact that we’re continuing this dialogue is a positive sign.” And those “Continwho are pesuing this simistic about where dialogue is this is headed will recog- a positive nize that, as sign.” Roger Goodell league lead negotiator Jeff Pash described it: “We’ve got very serious issues. We’ve got significant differences.” That last observation has been obvious all along. Indeed, from shortly before Thanksgiving until the day before the Super Bowl in February, the sides went more than two months without sitting down in large groups for face-to-face, formal bargaining on a new collective bargaining agreement. The sides were using this weekend to assess their positions, before resuming talks in front of a federal mediator Monday — and then they will have until the end of Friday to reach a new CBA, thanks to two extensions of the old deal. It originally was to have expired last Thursday. What will happen is still anyone’s guess. A deal could be reached at any time. Talks could break off. The sides could agree to yet another extension. After having such a hard time arranging full-scale sessions, the league and NFL Players Association have spent time at the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service on 11 of out of 15 days. According to mediator George Cohen, the tenor of the talks has changed. The two parties reached a “level of dialogue” and “constructive discussion” where they “fully, frankly and candidly talk to each other,” Cohen said Friday. Pash gave Cohen and his colleagues at the FMCS credit for that. “What the mediators bring to the process is a structure and a discipline that wasn’t always there,” Pash said. “They inject a seriousness of purpose to it. And they encourage you. They keep you going.” There wasn’t someone to play that role before Feb. 18, when Cohen first presided over the negotiations, only days after the NFL filed an unfair labor practice charge against the union with the National Labor Relations Board. The league has estimated there would be a cut in gross revenues of $120 million without a new collective bargaining agreement by early March; $350 million if there’s no CBA by August, before the preseason starts; and $1 billion if no new contract is in place until September. If regular-season games are lost, the NFL believes revenue losses could top $400 million a week. “The reality is what is going to move the needle on this is the fact we are into March, when season tickets and sponsorships have to be set, and people need to make decisions to set the gross revenues,” agent Peter Schaffer said. “There’s urgency there.”


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GYMNASTICS

U.S. duo claim American Cup titles

Horton and Wieber make it a sweep for the host nation in the international event. By MARK LONG AP Sports Writer

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Jonathan Horton was more nervous before the American Cup on Saturday than he was leading into the world championships in October. He worried about rusty routines, sloppy skill sets and faultinducing fatigue. “I kept thinking, ’Please don’t have a meltdown,”’ Horton said. Not even close. Horton finished in the top three in five of six events, good enough to win his third American Cup. Horton and Jordyn Wieber gave the United States a sweep of the international invitational.

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100 ANNOUNCEMENTS 150 Special Notices

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“Major confidence boost,” said Horton, who also won the event in 2006 and 2007. The silver medalist at the Beijing Olympics moved from second to first place with a solid performance on the parallel bars, then held on with an error-free routine on the high bar. Wieber topped the women’s field in three of four events — she fell on uneven bars — and claimed her second American Cup. Not bad considering she got in the field as an alternate when Britain’s Nicole Hibbert withdrew because of an injury. Wieber overcame a small deficit in the final women’s event, the floor exercise, despite stepping out of bounds on her opening pass. “I was really just trying to do the best routine I could,” said Wieber, the 2009 champion. “Even though I went out of

Accounting/ Finance

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bounds once, I still feel like I gave it my all. I just wanted to get every tenth out of that routine.” She did. The 2008 U.S. junior champion was flawless the rest of the way, allowing her to make up ground on world champion Aliya Mustafina of Russia. Mustafina touched the floor at the end of a tumbling pass and finished second. Alexandra Raisman of the United States was third. Ukraine’s Mykola Kuksenkov was second on the men’s side, followed by American Jake Dalton. Philipp Boy of Germany and Daniel Purvis of Britain had disappointing meets. Boy dropped off the pommel horse early in the competition and later fell twice on the high bar — two of his best events. The world silver medalist finished sixth, but still has time to get things worked out before the Eu-

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OFFICE OF MARKETING AND ADVERTISING GRAPHIC DESIGNER AND WRITER

King’s College is seeking a qualified individual for the graphic designer and writer position within the Office of College Marketing and Advertising. The successful candidate will have extensive experience using Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign to create effective marketing materials that complement the integrated marketing campaign of The the college. ability to write for specific audiences and edit works of others is required. Interested persons should have a bachelor’s degree in communications, graphic design, English, or related field and professional qualifications. Previous experience in an educational setting is a plus. Interested persons should send a cover letter, résumé, contact information, and three references to: hrjobs@kings.edu or to the following address: King’s College Office of Human Resources 133 North River St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

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Jonathan Horton, of Houston, keeps his eye on the bar as he performs a highbar routine during the 2011 AT&T American Cup on Saturday at Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena in Jacksonville, Fla. Horton placed first overall in the event, which is the first of four International Gymnastics Federation World Cup events.

ropean championships next month. Purvis, who finished fifth in allaround at worlds last year and won the bronze medal on floor, dropped off the pommel horse and fell while landing on vault. Purvis was the only man to not score at least a 14.8 and finished last in the field of eight. Horton fared considerably better. Maybe even better than he anticipated. He broke his left thumb in January while training on parallel bars and was limited to conditioning work for almost two months. He initially feared he might have to drop out of Saturday’s meet, but recovered faster than expected. “He’s still not 100 percent right now,” Dalton said. “He’s about 80 percent, which is right where he should be right now. He’s only going to get better.”

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Insurance Agency looking for employees to work in a property & casualty agency. Experience required. Pay commensurate with experience. Send resume to PO Box 1713 Wilkes-Barre, 18703

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SKIING

S P E E D S K AT I N G

Vonn retains downhill dominance The American clinched her fourth straight season-long championship on Saturday. By ANDREW DAMPF AP Sports Writer

TARVISIO, Italy — Here’s a measure of Lindsey Vonn’s strength in the downhill: She no longer bothers to celebrate the season-long championship. She won the downhill crown for the fourth consecutive year Saturday by finishing second to Sweden’s Anja Paerson. A day earlier, Vonn clinched her second straight super-combined title. She now has 11 World Cup championships for her career, with another possibly on the way in Sunday’s super-G. This latest title hardly prompted a ski-dancing display in the snow as was the case Saturday. Instead, Vonn appeared upset when she crossed the line a distant 0.73 seconds behind. Still, she wasn’t about to take this milestone for granted, especially in a season in which she left the world championships because of the lingering effects of a concussion. “You can never expect any titles,” she said. “Nothing is given to you and you have to fight for every point and every place, and this year I wasn’t able to win as many times as last year, so it definitely wasn’t easy. Maria gave me a run for my money and I had to keep fighting hard the whole season.” Elisabeth Goergl, who won gold in the super-G and downhill at last month’s world championships, finished 1.17 back in third. Tina Maze, Friday’s super-combined winner, was fourth on a sunny, cool day and on a shortened course because of curtailed training on the upper section. Vonn’s runner-up finish gave her an insurmountable 143-point

AP PHOTO

Overall winner Shani Davis wins the men’s 1,500-meter race during the World Cup finals on Saturday.

Four straight for veteran Davis The Associated Press

AP PHOTO

Lindsey Vonn speeds down the course on her way to a second-place finish during a Women’s World Cup downhill race in Tarvisio, Italy, on Saturday. Vonn won her fourth straight downhill crown.

lead in the downhill standings over German rival Maria Riesch, who finished sixth but remains the overall leader. Vonn and Riesch have both won three downhills this season, with Paerson the only other woman to win in the discipline. Last season, Vonn won six of eight downhills. Still, only Austrians Annemarie Moser-Proell (seven) and Renate Goetschl (five) have won more downhill titles. “It’s an incredible achievement,” U.S. coach Alex Hoedlmoser said. “To be consistent is what those titles show — always being on the top in downhill for four years now. It’s very, very impressive and she can be really proud about that.” This was Paerson’s first victory in a season hampered by knee problems. It was also the 42nd of her World Cup career, improving

her fourth-place position on the list and moving her two in front of Vonn. Last weekend in Are, Sweden, Paerson pulled up short because of knee pain. “I was so bummed with the knee and I didn’t know if I could race here,” she said. “It’s always frustrating when you know how fast you can ski and what you can do, and then you do those small mistakes all the time. I knew when I came to Are and I knew when I came here that I could win the races.” Vonn trails Riesch by just 136 points in the overall standings with seven races remaining. But even if Vonn’s streak of three consecutive overall titles ends, the American can console herself with two — and perhaps three — discipline titles. “If I don’t win, it just gives me more motivation to come back and really step it up next year,”

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Mark Tuitert, who edged Davis for second place in the 1,500 at the Vancouver Winter Olympics, was ninth. Olympic champion Martina Sablikova of the Czech Republic won the 3,000 race and the season title, beating Stephanie Beckert of Germany into second in the final pairing of the day with a time of 4:06.21. The pair also finished one-two in the season standings. Jorien Voorhuis of the Netherlands finished third on Saturday, while Jilleanne Rookard was fifth. Claudia Pechstein of Germany, who recently returned to competitive skating after a twoyear ban, was fourth.

ONE

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Vonn said. “(Riesch) has shown what’s possible. In the past I’ve been able to win downhills, super-G’s and combined (races) and been able to win the overall, but now Maria is getting podiums in all events, so the bar has been raised and I’m ready to raise it again next year.”

HEERENVEEN, Netherlands — Shani Davis won the 1,500meter speedskating World Cup race on Saturday to guarantee a record fourth-straight overall season title in his favorite distance. The two-time Olympic silver medal winner won at the Thialf oval in Heerenveen in 1 minute, 45.92 seconds. Stefan Groothuis of the Netherlands was second in 1:46.09 and world and European allround champion Ivan Skobrev of Russia was third. Davis’ second 1,500 victory of the season was enough to clinch the World Cup title, ahead of Havard Bokko of Norway and Groothuis.

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CMYK PAGE 12C

SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011

THE TIMES LEADER

➛ WWW.TIMESLEADER.COM/SPORTS

www.timesleader.com

OUTDOORS Patience and physical strength needed to fit radio collars or ear tags to monitor deer’s movements and harvest rates

TOM VENESKY OUTDOORS

This debate about cougars far from extinct

I

TOM VENESKY/THE TIMES LEADER

Jim Stickles, a field crew supervisor with the PGC, attaches a wire to the trigger of a Clover trap used to live-capture deer for a study.

The live-trapping test By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

GREAT BEND TWP., SUSQUEHANNA COUNTY -- With his hand clutching a wire connected to four cage traps, Jim Stickles decided to take a gamble. Stickles, who is a field crew leader with the Pennsylvania Game Commission’s Deer and Elk Section, is in the middle of a program to live-trap deer and fit them with radio collars or ear tags in order to monitor their movements and harvest rates. As he watched the four traps Thursday evening, a large doe entered the first trap and began feeding on the shelled corn inside. But Stickles waited. Nearby stood two fawns that showed a strong interest in entering the other traps. Stickles hoped to trap all three rather than go for the doe already in a trap. A few minutes later, however, the doe walked out and, with her fawns, disappeared into the woods. “It’s tough,” Stickles said. “You have one deer in the trap and two deer looking like they’re going to go in. That’s the gamble you take.” About an hour later, however, Stickles’ gamble paid off. With darkness covering the landscape, Stickles strained through a pair of binoculars watching a group of deer meander around the traps. Minutes passed before he could make out the dark form of a deer completely in a trap. Stickles jerked the wire, triggered the trap doors to slam shut and shouted at his assistants to rush outside. That’s when they discovered that two of the traps held deer – a pair of adult bucks that had shed their antlers. PGC biologists Kevin Wenner and Richard Fritsky rushed into the traps to face the thrashing bucks. Wearing helmets to protect against a hoof to the head, Wenner and Fritsky promptly

TOM VENESKY/THE TIMES LEADER

PGC biologist Kevin Wenner isn’t necessarily a Philadelphia Flyers fan. He’s wearing the goaltender’s mask for protection against the flailing hooves and hard head of the buck he held while data were collected for a research project.

pinned the deer agains the back of the traps, wrapped an arm around their front legs and used their weight to pin the bucks to the ground. A blindfold was placed over each deer to help keep them calm, and while Wenner and Fritsky held tight, Stickles’ assistants entered the traps to place ear tags in each buck. The deer were then turned to face the open door, the blindfolds removed and the bucks were then released. The whole process took about five minutes but felt like an eternity to Wenner and Fritsky as they struggled

to overcome the strength of each buck. “It took all my weight to hold him down,” said Wenner, who has livetrapped black bears for other PGC studies. “Unlike the bears, these animals aren’t sedated so they have all their power. The flailing legs and even their heads can inflict injury, plus they are stressed so that’s why it’s important to keep them stable and work quickly to avoid injury to yourself and the animal.” Considering that the group waited quietly for hours inside a house over-

looking the traps, Fritsky said it was a rush to enter a cage trap containing a live deer. “I just basically did a bear hug to grab his legs and then put my weight down on him,” Fritsky said. “You think you have him under control, and a moment later he kicks with all his force and you realize just how strong this animal is.” The study, which is being done in Wildlife Management Unit 3C, is in its third and final year. So far Stickles and his crew have trapped 157 deer since mid-January and will continue until April. Forty-two of the deer have been fitted with collars, Stickles said, and the rest with ear tags that offer a $100 reward to anyone who turns them in to the PGC. Stickles uses rocket nets and Clover traps (similar to a cage trap) baited with corn to capture deer. Success, he said, is determined by the weather. “This year we had spectacular weather for trapping – deep snow, cold and a thick crust. Deer weren’t able to get to their food sources so the corn is an easy food source for them,” Stickles said. “When the snow melts, other foods become available and it can be tougher to get them to enter a trap.” Stickles will monitor the radio-collared deer until the end of the year when the study expires, going out once a week to pick up signals and document locations. Although the study is scheduled to conclude at the end of this year, Stickles would like to see it extended in order to obtain more data. And considering the collars cost $300 each, he said it would be nice to get more than one year of data from the deer that were collared this winter. “It would really be beneficial to get data for a few years on them,” he said. “We’re on a record pace for captures this year and we could top the 200 mark.”

OUTDOORS NOTES District 9 of the PA Trappers Association hosted a fur sale in Susquehanna County on Feb. 12. The sale included four buyers and 102 furtakers. Results are as follows (species, number of pelts, average price): Red fox – 654; $15.99 Gray fox – 265; $21.67 Coyote – 162; $20.58 Bobcat – 8; $34.37 Raccoon – 732; $10.30 Muskrat – 765; $6.40 Beaver – 165; $16.40 Mink – 75; $13.68 Opossum – 146; $1.45

Skunk – 15; $3.53 Weasel – 5; $2 Fisher – 1; $30 Ginseng - $400 per lb. Castor – 11 lbs.; $35.73 per lb. The North Mountain Branch of the Quality Deer Management Association will hold its 8th annual REACH banquet on Saturday, April 9, at the Triton Hose Co. in Tunkhannock. Doors open at 4:30 p.m., bar opens at 5 and dinner begins at 6. The banquet includes a live auction, silent auction, gun raffles and a ladies and sportsmen’s raffles. Twelve guns will be auctioned this year. Tickets

are $45 for single, $65 for couple and $250 sponsor. For an extra $100, early bird tickets may be purchased, which includes $300 of additional raffle and bonus tickets. For information, contact Chris Denmon at 477-2238 or Linda Coolbaugh at 836-2765. Pennsylvania Game Commission wildlife biologists are seeking information from the general public about dead barn owls that might have succumbed to starvation during the long periods of snow and ice that covered much of Pennsylvania this winter. Information can be submitted to the Game Commission’s

Region Offices. The number for the Northeast Region Office is 675-1143. The Northeastern Pennsylvania Friends of NRA will hold its 19th annual banquet on Saturday, March 19, at the Genetti Manor, 1505 North Main Ave. in Dickson City. Activities begin at 5 p.m. and include live and silent auctions, bucket drawings, games and special events. Tickets are $40 each, $75 for couples and $25 for anyone younger than 21. Numerous guns and other prizes will be auctioned or included in raffles. For information, contact Carl Mozeleski at 587-2662.

doubted that a recent recommendation from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service declaring the eastern cougar extinct would do much to silence the multitude of sightings that are generated each year. A call to John Lutz proved that it didn’t. Lutz is the director of the Eastern Puma Research Network, based in West Virginia. When I contacted him on Friday to get his thoughts about the USFWS news, Lutz said he had received more than 475 phone calls and e-mails that day. They all were in reference to the USFWS release. “All they did is open up pandora’s box,” Lutz said. “There will be more reports to prove them wrong.” The eastern cougar has been listed on the endangered species list since 1973. Its historical range includes 21 states, from Maine to Georgia, with Pennsylvania right in the middle. During a five-year review conducted by the USFWS, the agency received 573 responses in regards to a request for information about the possible existence of the eastern cougar. The agency also requested information from the 21 states about the eastern cougar. The end result? None of the states expressed a belief that an eastern cougar population existed, and, after reviewing all the comments, the USFWS stood by its belief that the subspecies has likely been extinct since the 1930s. But Lutz has a different belief. Endangered species or extinct? He feels that there was pressure to remove the eastern cougar from the endangered species list because of the protections that come with it if the animal’s existence is proven. Lutz, who has been documenting cougar sightings since 1965, has volumes of reports and photographs from all over the country. Pennsylvania, he said, has its fair share of cougars – a mixture of animals moving in from eastern Canada, New England and from states to the south. He also claims to have cougar tracks confirmed in Clinton and Cameron counties, as well as a photograph of one taken in the area. Lutz doesn’t believe the USFWS release because of “the sheer number of sightings and tracks that have been found.” Even the USFWS recognizes that cougars might exist in the eastern U.S. and acknowledges that many people have seen them. But the agency believes the reports of cougars observed in the wild are animals of other subspecies, such as those from South America that were released from captivity. “We found no evidence to support the existence of the eastern cougar,” said Martin Miller, Northeast Region Chief of Endangered Species for the USFWS. Lutz, on the other hand, said he has plenty of evidence. “Since 1965 we’ve had more than 11,000 reports of sightings sent to us from the eastern U.S.,” he said. “We have three books of confirmations. “How can you actually prove a subspecies does not exist? I don’t believe they are extinct.” The USFWS will now prepare a proposal to remove the eastern cougar from the endangered species list. The public is encouraged to provide comments and even evidence of the animal’s existence after the proposal is published in the Federal Register. Lutz intends to do just that. It’s something he’s been working on since 1965. “I’m going to get a blood and hair sample and have it confirmed. That’s all I want,” Lutz said. Tom Venesky covers the outdoors for The Times Leader. Reach him at tvenesky@timesleader.com


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011 PAGE 13C

SLED DOG RACE

The field’s off and mushing Serious part of 1,150-mile race him from reaching Nome first, again. begins today. Dogs could hit “If people didn’t think I could finish line in 8 days. do four and I did, why shouldn’t I By MARY PEMBERTON Associated Press

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — The streets of downtown Anchorage were filled with barking dogs and screaming fans Saturday as the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race got under way with a rollicking sprint through Alaska’s biggest city. The ceremonial start of the world’s longest sled dog race is always a festive affair in which one of the city’s main streets becomes crowded with dog teams and people seeking to greet their favorite mushers and bid them good luck in the 1,150-mile race to Nome. The serious mushing begins today at the restart in Willow, where there will be far fewer fans and less hoopla as the 16-dog teams leave the start line — and the clock begins ticking — in the quest to be the first to reach the coastal gold-rush town. If it is a fast race, the winner could cross the finish line in eight or nine days. Defending champion Lance Mackey is trying for his fifth consecutive Iditarod win. He is coming to the race with a young, untested team compared to last year. His dogs wore hot pink booties on their feet for the ceremonial start. Mackey finished the 2010 race in eight days, 23 hours, 59 minutes — the second-fastest finish in Iditarod history. The 40-yearold Fairbanks musher said there is nothing in his way to prevent

do five?” Mackey said. “I have the ability, the confidence and the dog team to do it.” Paul Kurtz, 56, was one of hundreds of fans cheering on the mushers. He said a trip to Alaska to attend the Iditarod and meet Mackey was on his “bucket list” of things to do. He plans to get a photo of himself shaking Mackey’s hand blown up to poster size. “Not too many people impress me, but he does,” said Kurtz, a general contractor from West Bloomfield, Mich. “What he has been able to accomplish — to dominate a sport to the extent that he has.” Sixty-two teams are entered in this year’s Iditarod. The field includes nine of the top 10 teams. Absent is four-time champion Jeff King who was third last year and retired from the Iditarod. The top 30 finishers in this year’s race will share a purse of $528,000. The winner will get $50,400 and a new truck. Cain Carter, Mackey’s 19-yearold stepson, said he’s gunning for the Rookie of the Year Award. He said he has a lot of confidence and determination and believes he will do well in his first Iditarod. When his then not-so-famous stepfather was diagnosed with throat cancer in 2001, Carter stepped up and helped out by feeding dogs, cleaning out runs and occasionally running his dogs. That experience, and all that Mackey showed him after that, helped him a lot, he said. “Once he taught me, it was a lot easier,” Carter said.

“If people didn’t think I could do four and I did, why shouldn’t I do five?”

The Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race began in 1973 to commemorate a race against time, when sled dogs and drivers teamed up in 1925 to defeat a deadly outbreak of in Lance Mackey diphtheria Four-time Nome. It was feared defending champ the disease would decimate Eskimo families living near the gold-rush town on Alaska’s western coastline. Dog drivers drove teams 674 miles from Nenana to Nome to deliver the lifesaving serum in five days. Ray Redington Jr., the grandson of Joe Redington, who is credited with founding the race, said he would love to win the Iditarod but has to be realistic about his chances given how competitive the race has become. “Now, it is definitely serious,” said Redington, Jr., who finished 11th last year. The Iditarod is not all that serious for some mushers. Kris Hoffman, 34, of Steamboat Springs, Colo., is one of 13 rookies in the race. “For me, this is a vacation,” he said.

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CMYK PAGE 14C

SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011

W

E

A

T

H

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THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

NATIONAL FORECAST

50° 48°

TODAY Heavy rain, p.m. mix north

WEDNESDAY

MONDAY

THURSDAY

Partly sunny

Partly sunny

Mostly sunny

35° 27°

42° 17°

FRIDAY

Rain, ending as a mix

45° 23°

NATIONAL FORECAST: A moist and slow-moving storm system will produce torrential rain across the eastern United States today. Rain will turn to snow on the western flank of the system, and it may be heavy at times this afternoon. Strong thunderstorms will affect parts of the Southeast. Expect rain and mountain snow from the Rockies to portions of California, as well.

TUESDAY

SATURDAY Partly sunny, a flurry

45° 31°

46/33

Partly sunny, a flurry

39° 28°

22/7

29/21 34/19 35/27

59/47

40° 29°

52/28

54/38

60/37

46/34 57/35

The Poconos

Syracuse 40/19

Today’s high/ Tonight’s low

Albany 50/27

Scranton 48/26

Poughkeepsie 50/32

New York City 54/38 Reading 54/33

Yesterday Average Record High Record Low

Heating Degree Days*

Yesterday Month to date Year to date Last year to date Normal year to date

56/37 43/25 69 in 1976 2 in 1948 18 159 4847 4731 4756

*Index of fuel consumption, how far the day’s mean temperature was below 65 degrees.

Yesterday Month to date Normal month to date Year to date Normal year to date Sunrise 6:30a 6:29a Moonrise Today 6:52a Tomorrow 7:16a Today Tomorrow

Yesterday

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Buffalo Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Las Vegas Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis

19/7/.00 59/48/.53 63/39/.00 55/29/.00 49/43/.87 62/50/.11 36/29/.16 51/34/.61 57/39/.00 48/14/.00 46/30/.72 76/69/.00 66/52/.03 52/36/1.56 67/46/.00 75/53/.00 80/70/.00 32/28/.05 29/17/.00

Highs: 35-46. Lows: 17-19. Rain will turn to snow today, and snow may become heavy. Snow will end tonight.

Brandywine Valley

Delmarva/Ocean City

Highs: 55-64. Lows: 34-39. Showers and thunderstorms will be likely today and tonight.

Today Tomorrow 29/17/s 57/35/sh 59/36/t 56/41/sh 35/19/sn 65/35/t 35/27/pc 32/17/pc 63/42/s 52/28/c 34/19/pc 81/69/pc 66/47/s 42/25/pc 72/53/pc 63/53/c 82/65/t 30/24/pc 29/21/c

ALMANAC Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Int’l Airport

Precipitation

Sun and Moon

81/69

City

Highs: 56-58. Lows: 36-36. Expect periods of rain and a few thunderstorms today. Rain will end tonight. Atlantic City 55/38

River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.

0.00” 0.00” 0.40” 5.31” 4.94”

Susquehanna Wilkes-Barre Towanda Lehigh Bethlehem Delaware Port Jervis

Sunset 6:00p 6:01p Moonset 8:03p 9:02p

First

Stage Chg. Fld. Stg 7.51 -1.28 22.0 4.50 -0.33 21.0

Full

1.64 -0.68

16.0

4.98

18.0

0.19 Last

New

Forecasts, graphs and data ©2011

City

Yesterday

Amsterdam Baghdad Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Dublin Frankfurt Hong Kong Jerusalem London

45/32/.00 70/41/.00 55/36/.00 41/23/.00 84/68/.00 48/39/.00 50/27/.00 68/61/.00 73/50/.00 45/34/.00

Weather Central, LP For more weather information go to:

www.timesleader.com National Weather Service

607-729-1597

March 12 March 19 March 26 April 3

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82/65

32/17

The Finger Lakes

Wilkes-Barre 49/25

Philadelphia 58/37

Temperatures

29/17

The Jersey Shore

Pottsville 50/29

Harrisburg 52/32

66/47

Highs: 52-56. Lows: 34-39. Breezy with rain and a chance of thunderstorms today. Rain will diminish tonight.

Towanda 47/20

63/42

74/46

Highs: 47-54. Lows: 25-32. Expect cloudy skies with heavy rain today. Rain will turn to snow overnight.

Binghamton 46/19

State College 48/25

63/53

32/16/pc 61/42/pc 50/29/s 45/27/sh 33/17/sf 61/33/s 41/31/c 34/19/pc 68/51/pc 40/22/sn 35/23/pc 82/70/s 69/58/pc 45/30/c 64/45/sh 61/48/pc 80/64/pc 36/30/c 33/23/c

City

Yesterday

Myrtle Beach 68/46/.00 Nashville 57/46/1.07 New Orleans 75/63/2.62 Norfolk 66/45/.00 Oklahoma City 50/27/.00 Omaha 34/13/.00 Orlando 81/60/.00 Phoenix 78/50/.00 Pittsburgh 53/45/.27 Portland, Ore. 52/39/.06 St. Louis 53/36/.36 Salt Lake City 54/37/.00 San Antonio 68/52/.00 San Diego 75/54/.00 San Francisco 61/46/.00 Seattle 49/39/.02 Tampa 81/63/.00 Tucson 77/45/.00 Washington, DC 59/42/.00

WORLD CITIES

Today Tomorrow 40/29/pc 73/57/s 50/28/pc 41/21/s 82/67/s 46/27/pc 39/21/s 70/64/c 73/49/pc 45/31/s

43/31/s 80/56/pc 51/26/s 40/23/s 84/65/s 47/25/pc 40/22/s 67/59/sh 70/46/pc 46/30/s

City

Yesterday

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Paris Rio de Janeiro Riyadh Rome San Juan Tokyo Warsaw

81/50/.00 39/34/.22 32/27/.14 46/32/.00 77/73/.00 82/61/.00 54/45/.00 84/72/.00 52/34/.00 36/32/.00

Today Tomorrow 69/45/t 49/31/pc 62/45/s 65/39/t 60/36/pc 38/28/pc 80/59/t 83/54/pc 40/20/rs 50/37/pc 45/32/pc 52/40/sh 70/46/s 64/53/c 59/46/sh 46/33/pc 76/53/t 80/51/pc 60/37/t

59/44/s 56/40/pc 68/59/s 54/34/s 61/44/c 35/31/rs 79/57/s 77/46/pc 39/22/pc 49/37/pc 51/34/c 47/31/rs 74/62/pc 60/48/pc 57/43/pc 45/34/pc 74/58/s 77/42/pc 52/30/s

Today Tomorrow 73/48/pc 34/21/rs 33/22/sn 41/29/pc 81/74/t 79/61/s 61/38/pc 83/73/t 59/44/pc 35/22/pc

80/49/s 30/9/sn 28/10/c 43/27/s 82/73/c 81/60/s 50/33/s 82/72/pc 50/39/sh 36/23/s

It's going to be a rainy Sunday as a massive surge of moisture out of the Gulf of Mexico delivers a soaking rain to the region. Amounts will range between 1 to 2 inches with isolated spots seeing more by late tonight. The potential exists for flooding of creeks and streams, and then eyes turn to the larger rivers. The good news is that the storm is trending colder, meaning it may end as a period of snow, leaving us with a coating and potentially cutting down on rain totals. Snow would cut down on runoff to rivers and streams. Still, the Susquehanna River is expected to rise above flood stage later Monday night, long after the rain departs. Expect cooler and quiet conditions for the start of the new work week. -Ryan Coyle

Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snow flurries, i-ice.

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CMYK

BUSINESS timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

Local bank branches out By ANDREW M. SEDER aseder@timesleader.com

A decade ago this month, a group of area businessmen and investors, growing tired of large banks from out of the area coming to Northeastern Pennsylvania and buying up community banks, decided to start a new bank in Pittston. The original incorporators and directors offered $10 million in shares of common stock at $10 per share and set out on a mission to buck the trend of big banks. Ten years later, Landmark Community Bank has braches in Pittston, Forty Fort, Scranton and Hazleton and a loan production office in Strouds-

SECTION

burg. The bank employs 41, and has total assets of $206 million and deposits of $165 million. When it opened for business at the former Miners Savings Bank building at the corner of Broad and South Main streets in Pittston on March 1, 2001, it became the first bank to open in the city in 80 years. Bank President and Chief Executive Officer Dan Nulton agreed to answer seven questions about Landmark Community Bank’s past present and future. The Times Leader: Ten years may not sound like much, but in today’s world of banks merging or being bought out, how has Landmark Community

been able to not only survive but grow? Dan Nulton: During the 10year period since Landmark Community Bank opened its doors on March 1, 2001 our economy has been jolted by everything from the turmoil of 9/ 11/01 to the near collapse of our financial system. Landmark Community Bank has been able to not only survive, but grow and thrive, because of our commitment to developing and maintaining long term relationships between the bank’s senior decision makers and our clients. This success is evidenced by the Five Star Superior rating the bank has garnered from Bauer Financial, one of

YOUR JOB

Why is it that he’s making more than me? CLARK VAN ORDEN /THE TIMES LEADER

Daniel Nulton, president and chief executive officer of Landmark Community Bank, at his office at the bank’s Pittston headquarters. The bank is celebrating a decade in business.

the nation’s leading independent bank rating companies. The TL: What was the genesis for the creation of the bank? Nulton: The original directors and incorporators of Land-

mark Community Bank felt that personal relationships and a basic understanding of customer needs had fallen victim See LANDMARK, Page 2D

S.JOHN WILKIN / THE TIMES LEADER

Albert Dehaven dressed as the Statue of Liberty, advertises for the Liberty Tax Service office in Edwardsville.

TIME TO TAKE ACCOUNT

O

ne tax service owner called March 1 the “psychological trigger” for many people to get serious about their taxes in a season in which she is seeing numerous clients with gas lease revenue and gambling losses. Karen M. Hazleton, a certified public accountant from Nanticoke, said the start of the tax season was marked by confusion and delays, due in part to end-of-year tax law changes. Other local tax professional share that observation. The IRS had announced on Feb. 15 that it would start processing individual tax returns affected by December’s legislation. That date opened the flood gates in some tax preparers’ offices. “It was absolute insanity in our of-

fice,” Hazleton said. She said there was confusion beforehand among some taxpayers about whether they could efile. Hazleton said adding to the delay were brokerage houses that didn’t mail out statements until after mid-February. “That held us up two weeks,” she said. In mid-February the IRS said it would finally accept and process both e-file and paper tax returns claiming itemized deductions on Form 1040, Schedule A, higher education tuition and fees and state and local sales tax. Erick Spronck said the season at his Jackson Hewitt offices in Luzerne and Monroe counties, got off to a weak start, partly because of December’s federal tax legislation, but business is now brisk. He said that slow beginning was coupled with documents arriving later than usual from employers and corporations.

SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011

DIANE STAFFORD

TAX SEASON

By BONNIE ADAMS Times Leader Correspondent

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Lori Savoy, the owner of the Liberty Tax Service offices in Edwardsville and Wyoming, acknowledged that delay and said some taxpayers were forced to wait to file. Hazleton said some forms were delayed in being released, such as one related to health insurance for small businesses that finally came out on Feb. 25. The CPA said her firm has had to hold onto several tax returns until the necessary forms were available. “Come on,” she said. This season has been unique, she said, with the large number of customers who are receiving payments for gas leases on their properties. Asked if that is confusing to them for tax purposes, she said, “I think they’re absolutely overwhelmed.” They may be among the financial winners, but Hazleton said she’s seeing clients at the other end of the spec-

TAX DAY DELAY No reason to rush to your local post office on April 15. This year’s tax due date is Monday, April 18, even though April 15 falls on a Friday. This rarity is occurring because the IRS follows the Washington D.C.’s holiday calendar and April 16 is Emancipation Day in the nation’s capital. The holiday is moved up to Friday when it falls on a Saturday, as it does this year. The holiday commemorates Abraham Lincoln’s signing of an 1862 order emancipating slaves in the district.

trum, too. “A lot of people are coming in with gambling losses,” she said. The CPA said some of them don’t realize that they can’t simply “write off” those losses, which must balanced against winnings. Hazleton said one of the biggest gambling losses she’s seen is for $60,000. Another sign of the times, Hazleton said she is seeing some churches that no longer have staff to compile churchgoers’ contribution statements for the See TAXES, Page 3D

Twice recently I’ve heard from workers who discovered that a co-worker — who does the same job — makes a lot more money than they do. Why does that happen? And what can you do about it? In one case, the worker learned that a colleague who was hired six months before him was making tens of thousands more than he was. In the other instance, a longtenured employee found out that a new hire was brought in at tens of thousands more. Neither case involved sex discrimination. All parties were men. Neither case involved age discrimination. The pairs in each case were close in age. In both situations, the workers who complained perceived no difference in job duties, skills or experience to explain the pay dichotomy. Without being a fly on the wall or directly conIf the pay disfronting management, it’s crepancy still hard to pinseems inexplicpoint the reaable, the best son for such disparities. But thing a lesserit’s a good bet paid worker can that the answer do is prepare a goes back to good case for a the moment of hire. pay raise at his The salary next performagreed to at the ance review. outset usually is the key to otherwise unexplained pay differences. Often the variation reflects someone’s negotiation skills. It makes a difference, too, just how badly the employer needed someone to fill the spot at that particular moment. And it matters whether the organization’s hiring budget at the time is healthy or shrinking. There also may be certain unknowables (at least to the lesserpaid worker). The employer may believe the better-paid worker is a bigger asset and has fast-track plans for him. If the pay discrepancy still seems inexplicable, the best thing a lesserpaid worker can do is prepare a good case for a pay raise at his next performance review. Note: The case is never “but he makes more than I do.” It’s always: “Here’s the value I bring to the organization.” Situations like this point out the importance of researching pay ranges and company practices before you take a job. After you’ve signed on the bottom line, it’s usually too late to make a big difference in your paycheck. Diane Stafford is the workplace and careers columnist at The Kansas City Star. Her “Your Job” blog at economy.kansascity.com includes daily posts about job-related issues of wide interest. Readers may write to her at: Kansas City Star, 1729 Grand Blvd., Kansas City, Mo. 64108-1413, or by e-mail at dstafford@kcstar.com.

March Madness brings an assortment of money-saving strategies for shoppers MARCH MADNESS is right around the corner, but already the contests have begun off the hardwood. Here’s one I started playing recently, though I haven’t been lucky enough to win … yet. Play the new Coke Zero NCAA Bracket Challenge at Chili’s for a chance to be one of 51 daily winners. Instant Win prizes include basketballs, NCAA t-shirts, free Chili’s appetizers and beverages. There are grand prizes including Final Four tickets, televisions, a $2,500 Chili’s gift card and

ANDREW M. SEDER

Victoria’s Secret stores are giving away a weekend bag, with a retail value of $85, to customers making a purchase STEALS & DEALS of $75 or more today. The promotion is while supplies last so ask before you shop if you’re only buying to get the more. You can play the instant win game daily now and the bracket contest free bag. The lingerie shop has another prowill go online March 13. Go to: https:// motion going on through the rest of the cocacola.promo.eprize.com/cokezemonth. Spend $10 or more and you’ll robracket to register for free and play. get a secret reward card worth at least Want to win $10,000? How about $10 and as much as $500. The card is meeting college basketball announcer Dick Vitale? Yeah, me too, give me the redeemable in April and the value 10 grand baby, keep the Dickie V. Enter won’t be revealed until you checkout. As I’m writing this column, all of a for a chance to win one of them by sudden I’m thinking Arby’s. And you creating the next Dick Vitale catchshould be too, with this coupon for a phrase at: espn.com/phrasethatpays.

free small curly fries and 22 ounce soda when you buy a new Angus Three Cheese & Bacon sandwich: www.arbys.com/marchArbysExtrasoffer03032011/?CID=e_arbysextras03032011 Here’s a checkout code for kohls.com that will get you an extra 15 percent off all merchandise, even clearance, today only. Just use: GET15XTRA at checkout. Here’s this week’s best uses of coupons found in today’s Times Leader at area retailers: • Use the $1 off Bailey’s Coffee Creamer at Price Chopper where the 16 ounce bottles are on sale for $1.50.

You’ll pay just 50 cents. • Rite Aid has Luden’s cough drops on sale for $1 per bag. Get two for that price when you use the $1 off two bags coupon. • Weis has 50- or 60-ounce bottles of Wisk laundry detergent on sale for $3.99 and with the $2 off coupon you will pay just $1.99.

Andrew M. Seder, a Times Leader staff writer, may be reached at 570-829-7269. If you know of any local steals or deals, especially for the upcoming St. Patrick’s Day celebration, send them to aseder@timesleader.com.


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BUSINESS AGENDA Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber: Women in Business Luncheon

The Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber’s Women in Business Luncheon, sponsored by Citizens Bank, will be held from noon-1 p.m. on Tuesday at Genetti’s, downtown Wilkes-Barre. Cost is $16.50 for members. Featured speaker will be Linda Armstrong of Dress for Success Luzerne County. For reservations, contact Jean Kile at 823-2101 ext. 113 or e-mail jeankile@wilkes-barre.org.

NEPA Customer Service Consortium: E-Learning Webinar

The NEPA Customer Service Consortium will hold an E-Learning Webinar from noon-1 p.m. on Thursday. The webinar will be facilitated by Jesse James, training manager, Frontier Communications, and will feature E-Tips including: how to approach and implement e-learning effectively; the value it provides to employees and the company; thoughts about what can/cannot be delivered via e-learning and a question and answer session with Frontier Communications and TMG Health. For more information on the event, visit the NEPA Customer Service Consortium website at www.nepacsc.ning.com.

Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber: Human Resources Forum

The Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber will hold a Human Resources Forum at 8:30 a.m. on Friday in the Chamber conference room, Wilkes-Barre. The forum is free to chamber members. The forum is suggested for all businesses, particularly Human Resource professionals, managers, supervisors, and communicators. Ed Evans, of Evans HR Services, will lead a discussion on Employee Handbook Do’s and Don’ts. To register, contact Karen Gallia at 823-2101 ext. 133 or e-mail karen@wilkes-barre.org

HSMAI Meeting/Doing Business Online

The Northeast PA chapter of the Hospitality Sales Marketing Association International will hold a dinner meeting at 5 p.m. on Monday, March 14 at the Quality Inn, Kidder Street, Wilkes-Barre. Cost is $35 per person or $20 for students. The featured speaker will be Matt

CORPORATE LADDER BORTON LAWSON

The local architectural and engineering design firm recently added four new employees to its team. Lenet J. Guidry is a senior architect in the firm’s Wilkes-Barre office. He is responsible for oversight, development and execution of architectural documents; focused on strict quality Guidry control. Guidry holds a bachelor’s degree in architecture from Louisiana State University and is CDT and NCARB certified and a Registered Architect in several states. Douglas Begg is an electrical designer based at the WilkesBarre office. He holds an associate’s degree in specialized technology and design drafting technology from York Technical Institute. James Hinely is a crew chief based in the firm’s Pittsburgh office. He has a background in boundary, tree, topographical, route and ALTA surveys. He attended the University of South Carolina and Trident Technical College for civil engineering. Carl McGloughlin is a senior bridge engineer in the firm’s Lehigh Valley office. He has over 12 years of engineering experience and holds a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from Lafayette College and a master’s degree in civil engineering from Rutgers University.

SORDONI CONSTRUCTION SERVICES, INC.

Jennifer Pocius Davis was recently promoted to vice president of business development. She oversees business development, client relations, and Davis select preconstruction activities. As the firm’s director of business development since 2008, she has been instrumental in securing several key projects and in implementing company initiatives including geographic expansion, community service projects, newly de-

Artz, designer, technologist and entrepreneur, who owns a design strategy consulting agency comprised of designers, technologist and strategist. Topics of discussion will be: Doing Business On Line in 2011; The Web Today; and Social Media: Local Search and Mobile Applications. Reservations can be made by e-mail to: muggsie3@comcast.net.

MAEA Human Resources Roundtable

The Northeast Pennsylvania Manufacturers and Employers Association will hold an HR Roundtable from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. on March 16 at Top of the 80’s, Hazleton. Lunch will be served at noon. Cost is $36 per person for members or $72 per person for non-members. Kathy Couch, area Director for AHEDD, will provide information on Disabilities in the Workplace. AHEDD is a specialized human resource organization with a mission to serve the community as a catalyst in the employment and development of persons with disabilities. Couch will provide benefits and resources that may be utilized for a company’s existing or future work force. Discussion topics will include what constitutes a “disability”, services available from the Office of Vocational Resources for individuals injured on the job, state provided insurance for part-time and full-time disabled employees, free resources available to accommodate employees, tax incentives associated with hiring individuals with disabilities and support services to help a business hire and retain disabled employees. For more information or to register, contact Gina Whalen at gwhalen@maea.biz, or call the MAEA office at 622-0992.

Money Matters for Young Adults

Wilkes University’s Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE) will hold a free two-part Money Matters seminar from 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. on March 17 and 31 in room 106 of Breiseth Hall. The discussions will target young adults and will be beneficial to local collegeaged students and the local community. Light refreshments will be served. The first seminar will focus on credit, how to establish credit, how to manage it, and how to get out of debt. The second seminar will discuss long term financial planning and wise saving habits, IRAs, stocks and bonds. For more information, contact the SIFE team at 408-4591. signed marketing collateral, and a signature 1000th anniversary event. Davis holds an undergraduate degree and a master’s degree in architecture from the University of Pennsylvania.

THE WEEKENDER

Nikki M. Mascali of Plains was recently named editor of the Weekender, Wilkes-Barre Publishing Company’s arts and entertainment alternative weekly paper.Mascali joined the Weekender as an editorial intern in 2005and was Mascali hired full time as a staff writer in 2006. She received her degree in journalism from Luzerne County Community College in 2007.She most recently served as the paper’s associate editor.

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Google Street View harnesses tricycles By MIKE SWIFT San Jose Mercury News

SAN JOSE, Calif. — Google Inc. this week launched its largest-ever collection of Street View images taken by a humble but versatile vehicle — the tricycle — as the Internet giant greatly expands the reach of the popular but controversial program beyond public streets into hiking trails, amusement parks, historical landmarks, parks and gardens. Google’s Street View service has mostly been limited to places where cars mounted with cameras can drive. But now, Street View increasingly will include images of public and private sites ranging from California hiking trails to Florida’s Sea World Orlando to London’s Kew Gardens. To extend Street View to places beyond the reach of its ubiquitous Toyota Prius fleet, Google is using ungainly, 250-pound, 9foot-long, human-powered trikes with a 7-foot stalk of cameras on the back. The trikes were the brainchild of Google engineer Daniel Ratner, who visited cobblestone alleys impassible to cars in Barcelona, Spain, and re-

AP PHOTO

This screen grab taken from Google Earth shows a satellite image of the area around Riverhead, N.Y., center.

alized Google needed something to record universities, parks, trails and other places, many of them private, where cars can’t go. “I feel like we’re just scratching the surface of what sorts of images our users want to see,” said Ratner, as he showed off one of the trikes that he helped develop at Google’s headquarters in Mountain View, Calif. “We don’t compare the trikes to the cars. We see them as being complementary vehicles.” Google now has Street View imagery for almost every major

LANDMARK Continued from Page 1D

to the growth and merger mania which was rampant in the banking industry. Their goal was to establish an institution that was locally owned and managed by individuals who were committed to building deep personal relationships and providing the level of service clients deserve. The TL: Why were the locations of branches chosen? Nulton: The main office location, in Pittston, was chosen based on its convenience to both the Greater Wilkes-Barre and Scranton areas and because the building, which was built and operated as a banking center for nearly a century, was conducive to future growth. The Forty Fort, Scranton and Hazleton locations were chosen based on convenience, visibility and the demographics of the markets they serve. Most business, professional and institutional clients are served in their offices with services like remote check deposit and courier service so they never have to go to the bank but they can easily relate to the branch location. The TL: Is there future expansion on the way and what geographic areas are being targeted? Nulton: Landmark continuously considers future expansion but also recognizes the significant growth potential of the existing footprint. Unlike most banks, Landmark is

BUSINESS AWARDS Six Tobyhanna Army Depot employees were recently recognized for their years of government service. Honorees included: 35 years of service Wayne Watkins, division chief in the Tactical Missile Division, and Marivita Williams, management analyst; 30 years - James Kester, financial technician, Kenneth Martin, electronics integrated systems mechanic,

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not bound by the immediate geography of its branches. This is evidenced by the success of Landmark’s bonded insured courier service, “Valet Banking for Business,” which runs six days per week, as far as the Delaware Water Gap, picking up more than 1,200 deposits per month. The TL: What separates Landmark Community Bank from other financial institutions in the region? Nulton: There are three major differences between Landmark Community Bank and other institutions. First of all, Landmark Community Bank is unique in that Landmark’s directors each have a significant investment in the bank and are significant clients of the bank, which ensures that they are personally committed to serving the interests of both clients and shareholders. Landmark is also fortunate to have an advisory board comprised of significant clients of the bank who are willing and able to provide a steady stream of qualified prospective clients who value the relationship and service provided by the bank. Finally, Landmark’s unique ability to serve business, professional, municipal and institutional clients in their office, throughout Luzerne, Lackawanna and Monroe counties, with a combination of remote check deposit and a bonded insured courier service eliminates the traditional boundaries of branch banking which limit other banking institutions. The TL: How has banking changed in the decade since Landmark was born? Nulton: The banking industry has

Francis Perrella, welder, and Chris Dumback, general equipment mechanic. Community Bank System, Inc., parent company of First Liberty Bank & Trust and Community Bank N.A., was recently ranked as the 7th best bank in Forbes magazine listing of the 100 Best Banks in America. The ranking is based on eight financial measures, including return on average equity, net interest margin, non performing loans as a percentage of loans, non performing assets as per-

BUSINESS ADVANTAGE LINE OF CREDIT SPECIAL

metro area in the U.S., as well as in 27 other countries. The program does not earn Google revenue directly, but the company considers it a valuable component of Google Maps, which does have a large and growing advertising element, said Deanna Yick, a Google spokeswoman. Since it launched in 2007, Street View has also caused what may be Google’s biggest privacy problem, when its cars scooped up data from unsecured Wi-Fi networks in Europe and North America. Google said the breach was inadvertent and has pledged

never to use any of the data it collected. One British village was so angry about Street View, viewing it as an invasion of privacy, that residents blocked Google cars from cruising their town. But Ratner said the reception was friendly as he pedaled the Street View trike in Southern California destinations such as Legoland and the Santa Monica Pier. The Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District granted Google a permit to photograph trails in five of its San Francisco Bay Area preserves, a move the group hopes will boost its visibility. “It’s exciting. We’re trying to get the word out to the Bay Area and to the community about the open space preserves and the trails that are available to them,” said Leigh Ann Gessner, a spokeswoman for the district. The trikes will increasingly allow Google to extend Street View beyond the public streets onto private property, if an owner requests being added to the partner program. Google lets private partners post Street View images on their websites at no cost.

changed dramatically in the last 10 years with major changes in technology and significant regulatory changes like the Patriot Act, FDIC Insurance and the recently passed Dodd-Frank reform bill to name a few. This rapidly changing landscape makes compliance challenging and expensive and will cause many banks to focus inward. At Landmark we see this as an opportunity to continue to grow by maintaining our focus on our clients and helping them meet the challenges and opportunities they face. The TL: You see banks with the word “community” in its name. Why was it incorporated into your bank’s name? Nulton: As a community bank we understand that our communities cannot thrive without successful businesses, professionals and institutions. At Landmark we take pride in our unique ability to support these clients with state of the art deposit products and services that allow them to conduct all of their banking transactions from their office and provide the financing they need to grow, hire employees, pay taxes and support their communities. At Landmark Community Bank we are committed to being a good corporate citizen, supporting local charities and organizations both financially and through volunteer efforts and we also recognize that if we can help our clients achieve success our communities are bound to prosper. Andrew M. Seder, a Times Leader staff writer, may be reached at 570-829-7269.

centage of assets, reserves as a percentage of non performing loans, two capital ratios (Tier 1 and risk-based) and leverage ratio. According to the article, Community Bank System Inc. had one of the lowest ratios of nonperforming loans on the list at 0.5 percent. PPL Electric Utilities recently ranked highest among large electric utility providers in the East Region in the J.D. Power and Associates 2011 Electric Utility Business Customer Satis-

faction Study. The study, based on interviews with representatives of more than 17,000 U.S. businesses that spend between $500 and $50,000 monthly on electricity, included more than 90 utility brands serving a total of more than 11.7 million business customers. Overall customer satisfaction was measured by examining six factors: power quality and reliability; billing and payment; corporate citizenship; price; communications; and customer service.

www.firstlibertybank.com

%

INTRODUC TORY R ATE*

or

FIXED R ATE TERM LOAN SPECIAL

** % 4.75

Our new business loan rates really PACK A PUNCH. For a limited time, First Liberty Bank & Trust is offering local businesses two knockout loans: our Business Advantage Line of Credit special and our Fixed Rate Term Loan special. With incredibly strong rates and terms, these offers won’t last long. So stop into your local branch today. And Bank Happy.

We promise we’d never really hit you. *The introductory rate of 1.99% is valid for six months from the date of account activation. After six months, rate reverts back to standard LOC terms of prime +1.00% with a floor of 7.00%. There is a $50,000 line of credit maximum with $150,000 or less in First Liberty Bank & Trust loan relationships. **Special rate of 4.75% is available at a five-year fixed rate term. Both offers: Effective 2/22/11 through 4/22/11. Offers may change at any time. New loans only. Must have an active First Liberty Bank & Trust business checking account. Subject to credit approval. First Liberty Bank & Trust is a division of Community Bank N.A.


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Local businesses offer advice By BONNIE ADAMS Times Leader Correspondent

Local tax professionals offered some advice on this year’s tax code and some tips on available credits and making sure filers get as much as they can. Lori Savoy, the owner of the Liberty Tax Service offices in Edwardsville and Wyoming, said all unemployment benefits were taxable in 2010 as compared to 2009 when a portion wasn’t, meaning some people may be due refunds from 2009. Savoy said taxpayers who used the First Time Homebuyer Credit in 2008 should be aware that they are now due to pay back $500 this year. She said those who used that homebuyer credit in 2009 or 2010 don’t have to repay any money. She said employees should be aware that the number of exemptions they claim on their W-4 form may mean their employer isn’t withholding enough taxes. She said such taxpayers could end up owing thousands of dollars in taxes. Savoy also reminds taxpayers that the American Opportunity Credit, new for 2010, is more generous because it can be claimed for four years of school. Savoy said the former Hope Credit could be claimed for only two years. IRS information says the American Opportunity Credit in-

TAXES Continued from Page 1D

year seeking assistance. Hazleton said some taxpayers are on their own, trying to determine how much they donated in 2010. Her firm was also one of those affected by a mandate to efile customers’ tax returns for tax offices with more than 100 customers. “We have all of our clients filing electronically this year,” she said. “I think it’s been easy for us and it’s been easy for our customers.” Hazleton said she especially enjoys working with senior citizens, many of whom are e-filing for the first time. An accountant needs a custom-

MORE TIPS

Here are some other tax tidbits from the Wall Street Journal: • Adoption credit: For 2010, the tax credit of up to $13,170 for outof-pocket expenses for the legal adoption of a child is refundable. That means eligible taxpayers can get a check from the U.S. government even if they owe no tax. This credit phases out for joint filers with incomes above $182,520. Adoption papers must be filed with a return. For more information, see the instructions for Form 8839. • Mileage rates: For tax year 2010, the standard mileage rate for business use of a car is 50 cents per mile. For medical expenses, it’s 16.5 cents a mile. For moving expenses, it’s 16.5 cents a mile. And for charitable donations, it’s 14 cents a mile. • Charitable IRA rollovers: Lawmakers also extended a popular provision allowing taxpayers over

age 70½ to make contributions of IRA assets of up to $100,000 per year directly to a charity. The donation isn’t tax-deductible, but doesn’t raise reported income that might trigger higher Social Security taxes or Medicare premiums. Amounts donated can count as part of a person’s required minimum distribution. • Unemployment pay fully taxable: In 2009, taxpayers were allowed to exclude up to $2,400 of unemployment compensation from income. That exemption expired, so all unemployment compensation is taxable for 2010. • No extra standard deduction for property taxes: Lawmakers didn’t extend a provision allowing taxpayers to add as much as $1,000 to their standard deduction if they pay property taxes. This means taxpayers who want to deduct property taxes will have to itemize.

cludes many people with higher incomes. Erick Spronck, who owns Jackson Hewitt offices in Luzerne and Monroe counties, said that with today’s blended families, some taxpayers might miss out on varied child credits that can benefit both parents even though they are no longer together. Bill Balavage is a partner in Balavage, McNulty and Co. in Luzerne. He said the energy credits taxpayers can claim for home in-

sulation, energy efficient windows and other items will be decreased in 2011 compared to last year. “I’m seeing some people take advantage of that,” he said. Nanticoke CPA Karen Hazleton urged taxpayers to be aware of those energy credits they can claim on 2010 taxes due to uncertainty in future years. “We never know what’s going to happen with the energy credits,” she said.

er’s checking account number so their refund can be deposited directly into their bank account. “They’re a little remiss to give us their checking account number,” she said. But she recalled one 94year-old customer who e-filed for the first time this year. “He did great.” Spronick said electronic filing has been popular for some time in his offices. Savoy said March marks the transition from customers filing a simple Schedule A return to a diverse group needing professional tax advice. Savoy, Hazleton and Spronck all advise people to use professional tax preparers. Spronck said more people are using tax software to do their taxes themselves and though some do benefit, others don’t.

“They do a software program and they don’t know what they’re doing,” he said. He said such tax software can create a “Catch 22 situation for taxpayers because if they forget to report something such as a W-2, the IRS will notify them. But Spronck said if that same taxpayer misses a tax credit, the IRS won’t let them know, resulting in money lost to the taxpayer. He said his offices often get calls with questions from people using tax software at home. “Make sure you get your tax return professionally prepared because the tax law changes everyday,” Hazleton said. She said the fee a customer pays a tax preparer can be offset by the savings a professional can find for that customer.

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Timeshare vacation baggage haunts owners By JENNIFER BJORHUS Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

MINNEAPOLIS — Timeshares are tough to sell, even in the best of times. Now a perfect storm of trouble has turned some of those slices of paradise into albatrosses, making the shared vacation properties and their hefty annual fees nearly impossible to unload and breeding a horde of scam artists preying on motivated sellers. Nearly 8 million people — about 7 percent of U.S. households — own a timeshare, which is basically a vacation property owned by many people who take turns using it. While it’s unclear how many are owned by Minnesotans, experts say it’s likely even a larger percentage given that people in colder climes, eager to escape nasty winter weather, are more likely to own timeshares. The down economy and the fact that the first generation to buy timeshares 35 years ago has been retiring means many people are looking to sell. Craigslist, eBay and specialized listing service Redweek are chock-full of offerings. But how much they’re worth is a different issue. OneFloridalistingserviceestimatesthatmosttimeshares are selling for no more than 10 percent of the original price. Some owners are lucky to get pennies. “We’ve never seen the resale market where it is now,” said Brian Rogers, head of the Timeshare Users Group, a consumer advocacy group in Jackson-

MCT PHOTO

Bernie Wiklund has been trying to sell his timeshare in Cape Cod for six years. He is shown at his job as a security guard at a bank in St. Paul, Minnesota, that he works to help make ends meet.

ville, Fla., that runs the listing service. Most owners “huff away mad” when told their timeshare has depreciated like a Yugo, he said. Then there are the scams. Resale scammers feeding on desperation have run so rampant that the Better Business Bureau last month named timeshare resale swindles one of the top rip-offs of 2010. The Minnesota attorney general’s office last week issued its own consumer warning, saying it has been fielding complaints over the past few months.

MSHA fighting for additional mine safety laws By VICKI SMITH Associated Press

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. — Federal mine regulators need stronger laws to protect the nation’s underground coal miners, particularly when it comes to protecting whistle blowers and criminally charging operators who deliberately cut corners on safety, the head of the Mine Safety and Health Administration said Thursday. In testimony to the House Subcommittee on Workforce Protections, MSHA chief Joe Main called for more legislation and a bipartisan effort to save lives, support good operators and hold bad operators accountable. Main told the chairman, Republican Rep. Tim Walberg of Michigan, he was not recommending any particular legislation. Rather, lawmakers should collaborate to address key areas:

better tools for cracking down on companies with patterns of violations, stronger protections for whistle blowers, stiffer criminal penalties and “quick fix” injunctive relief that would let the Department of Labor act decisively against an operator when it identifies an immediate threat. Even with stronger laws, Main said, criminal charges would likely continue to be rare. “Now they are rare, however, because the bar for prosecution is too high,” he said. Part of Thursday’s hearing focused on a report by The Charleston Gazette that just two weeks before the Upper Big Branch mine explosion that killed 29 men last April, an MSHA Office of Accountability report warned lawmakers about serious enforcement lapses at the agency. The March 25, 2010, report to the Senate Appropriations Com-

mittee said that in the two preceding years, inspectors in 20 of 25 audited field offices failed to properly evaluate the gravity and negligence of the operator’s violations, and that supervisors in 21 of those offices failed to ensure inspectors took proper enforcement actions. The report said internal audits also revealed that officials failed to document inspections well enough to withstand court challenges, and that a handful of inspectors failed to do mandatory spot inspections for mines generating high volumes of methane gas. That report, however, also said MSHA’s audit focused only on field offices where it believed it had problems and was not indicative of a systemic problem at all 92 field offices. Still, Rep. John Kline, RMinn., called the report “pretty damning.”

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OFFICE COACH

Tips for overcoming language obstacles By MARIE G. MCINTYRE McClatchy-Tribune News Service

In my Jan. 2 column, I asked for suggestions to help a manager who had difficulty communicating in English. Many thanks to all the readers who responded. Here are some of their comments: • I’m from Nicaragua and sometimes have problems with English. However, in today’s world, being bilingual is an asset, not a liability. The key is to not become anxious and remain polite and courteous. Remember, if you cannot get your point across one way, try another. • People who stay in ethnic communities, using only their native language, will never speak like Americans. When I came here as a software engineer, I spoke very little English. To practice, I would strike up conversations in supermarkets, restaurants, ballparks and elevators. I watched TV, read the newspaper, listened to conversations, and kept a notebook of American expressions. I also did volunteer work and played sports with American friends. Today, I am a proud naturalized American who can run meetings like a pro. •As a team leader in an international corporation, I am concerned when employees have difficulty speaking English in meetings. Their input is critical and cannot be overlooked. I try to help by providing a detailed agenda in advance and suggesting that they write notes about points they wish to make. Afterward, I send everyone a written meeting summary. •“English as a Second Language” classes are offered in community centers, libraries and schools. The teachers often provide private tutoring. •The difference between “book English” and “street En-

glish” can be confusing. To give learners time to think, listeners can ask them to slow down. Also, a simple smile goes a long way! It’s warmth says “I am tuned in to you, and if you take your time, I will still be here, listening.” •I am an executive who teaches ESL to business managers. Sometimes there are problems with cultural differences. For example, American managers are expected to openly express opinions, but in many cultures this is not acceptable. Your column has been a useful teaching tool. •Try starting a conversational English group where members can practice discussing work-related topics. Invite people from different countries, including at least one native English speaker. •The problem may be in the ears of the listener, not the words of the speaker. When I make an effort to understand my foreignborn colleagues, I usually succeed. However, many Americans become frustrated and don’t even try. God placed us here to be good to one another. Making a serious effort to communicate is just one example of “doing good.” •To get ahead in business, you must look at yourself first. Many resources exist for improving language skills. Fixing the root problem is the answer, not asking others to accommodate it. •Speech pathologists who specialize in accent reduction can be an excellent resource. •Listening to English-language radio or TV can help learners adopt proper grammar and acquire new words. As a native English-speaker, I listen to Spanish radio every day. Marie G. McIntyre is a workplace coach and the author of “Secrets to Winning at Office Politics.” Send in questions and get free coaching tips at http://www.yourofficecoach.com, or follow her on Twitter officecoach.

MCT PHOTO

Dave Kang, vice president of Evermetal, Inc., sells scrap metal to companies in Asia.

Focus on education boosts Asian businesses By ALEXANDER MACINNES The Record (Hackensack N.J.)

HACKENSACK, N.J. — Small business experts believe Asians are successful, in part, because of their disciplined work ethic, their investment in educating the next generation to join the professional ranks and their loyalty in serving the Asian community. Nationally, there are about 6 million minority-owned businesses, of which 3 percent gross more than $1 million in sales, according to Heyward Davenport, regional director of the Minority Business Development Agency of the U.S. Department of Commerce. Of those most profitable businesses, half are owned by Asian-Americans, according to Davenport. That success, according to interviews and available data, starts with a rigorous commitment to educational achievement, which then leads to higher-paying jobs, or the creation of businesses in more lucrative fields — such as engineering, information technology and health care. Once established, Indian, Korean and Chinese business leaders tend to carry less debt and save more of what they’ve

earned. Anil Bansal, president of the Asian Indian Chamber of Commerce of New Jersey, is blunt about the success of Indians. “It’s the education,” said Bansal, a founder of the Indus American Bank in Edison and owner of a Web design company and a restaurant. “There’s no secret, whatsoever.” The gap in earnings between workers with advanced degrees and those with some college experience or an associate’s degree has grown in the last10 years, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In 2000 those with advanced degrees earned on average 70 percent more than employees with less education. Last year, that difference grew to 84 percent. Succeeding in the classroom is a message delivered repeatedly to the next generation, according to Saeed Patel, president of Amex Computers Inc. in Carlstadt. Patel came to New Jersey from Gujarat, India, 22 years ago — with a $15,000 loan from his parents and an engineering degree. “We don’t discount education,” Patel said. “We want to make sure our kids have the best

opportunities. That is actually on my mind every day.” Patel’s Amex, a wholesale computer distribution company, had sales of $28.5 million last year. He said he has expanded his businesses cautiously, without overextending himself and building on his savings — characteristics, Patel says, that are common among Asian immigrants. Asian business leaders across the country added almost as many employees to the workforce as African-American, Hispanic and Native American business owners combined, according to the U.S. 2007 Economic Census. Asians created 2.8 million jobs, compared with 3 million by businesses owned by the other three groups. When Asians created those jobs, they were more often in the science and technology sectors. Chiling Tong, the former chief of staff for the Minority Business Development Agency of the U.S. Department of Commerce, says Asians are expanding into areas of business beyond information technology, such as energy and recycling.

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CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

B

U

S

I

N

E

S

S

SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011 PAGE 5D

MarketPulse THE JANUARY-FEBRUARY EFFECT The unrest in the Middle East has sent oil prices soaring and jarred U.S. financial markets. But a subtle sign that the major indexes will end the year higher might reassure investors. Even with the recent losses, the S&P 500 index closed higher in both January and February. Bespoke In-

RABBIT HOLES Economists watching trends in Asian exports may be stymied this year by a rabbit -- or, at least, the Lunar New Year heralded by the animal. Exports from Japan to China, Japan’s main trading partner, usually surge before and after China closes customs operations for a week during the holiday. But it can be tricky to detect the blip, since the holiday can fall anywhere during January and February. That makes year-over-year comparisons difficult. Investment firm Nomura Group says Japan’s monthly industrial production report, which compares how much manufacturers plan to make for the next two months to the previous two months, is a better gauge of trade levels.

vestment Group says that's an auspicious sign. In 26 out of the 30 years since 1928 that the S&P 500 finished both January and February with a gain, the index has continued rising for the rest of the year. And since 1938, there has been only one year where that wasn’t the case: 1987, the year of the stock market’s October crash.

Years when the S&P 500 rose in January and February

All other years since 1928

Average Jan-Feb S&P 500

Average Jan-Feb S&P 500

Median Jan-Feb S&P 500

Median Jan-Feb S&P 500

Percentage of years the S&P 500 finished the year higher

Percentage of years the S&P 500 finished the year higher

6.0%

7.4%

11.0%

3.7%

87.0%

56.6%

Source: Bespoke Investment Group

MONOPOLY PLAYERS Company takeovers dwindle when the economy is weak. So a recent report by the Federal Trade Commission and Department of Justice that shows merger filings rose dramatically in fiscal year 2010 is a sign that the economy is healing. The two agencies reviewed 1,166 potential mergers during the year, a 63 percent increase over the previous year. But as M&A activity increases, more companies bump up against antitrust violations. In 2010, the FTC and DOJ made inquiries into 46 potential mergers that raised concerns they would curb competition - 48 percent more than they did the year before.

Merger filings reviewed by the FTC and DOJ 2,500

1,875

1,250

625

0

’01 ’02 ’03 ’04 ’05 ’06 ’07 ’08 ’09 ’10 Source: Federal Trade Commission, Department of Justice

Francesca Levy, Kristen Girard • AP

Staying the course on stocks In the past few weeks, investor confidence has been shaken by unrest in the Middle East that caused oil prices to soar. Barry Knapp, chief equity strategist for Barclays Capital, says recent market dips were only a temporary setback. In fact, last week Barclays raised its expectations for how the markets would perform this year, saying the S&P 500 would reach 1,450 by the end of the year. It had previously predicted a year-end level of 1,420. Why are you so bullish on stocks? We’re in the sweet spot. In almost every business cycle you get to a stage where the economy is recovering and we’re achieving escape veKnapp locity, but the Fed is not absolutely convinced. There’s still lingering risk that keeps the Fed in accommodative mode. So you have a powerful combination of an improving economy and a very accommodative Fed. It would be extremely unusual for the stock market to decline in that environment.

InsiderQ&A

What are some of the risks to the market that could threaten your forecast? Clearly the market is now focused on the risk of an adverse oil price shock. It’s not an insignificant risk. We do not believe that risk is inflationary. We think it’s unlikely to derail the recovery, in part because the payroll tax (cut) offsets it, as does the improvement in the labor market. It means more disposable income, more personal income, and it should be more than enough, from a broad economic perspective, to offset the increase in oil prices. How much of the market’s gains over the past six months are a result of the Fed’s quantitative easing program, and do you think the recovery will be able to sustain itself without the assistance of monetary policy? QE2 definitely played a big role in the rally, but the rally significantly improved business confidence for both small and large businesses. So initially it boosted stock prices, but now there’s enough macroeconomic improvement to support those higher stock prices. You have the ADP employment survey showing employment gains for small and medium-sized businesses and a business confidence survey that is pointing in the same direction. Stock prices aren’t just up on air; they’re up because the economy’s getting better. What are some of the sectors you’re watching closely? Our favorites going back to the early fall have been industrials and technology, but we recently added the financial sector. Industrials are likely to be the big winners through the business cycle, because the American manufacturing sector has done a great job of restructuring itself. It has substituted capital for labor and made itself much less sensitive to higher labor costs than the rest of the world. Also, look at the multiindustry sector: the GEs, the 3Ms, the Danahers. Ten years ago, their exposure to emerging markets was close to zero. Now it’s close to 25 percent of revenues. They’ve done a great job taking advantage of global growth trends and they’ve made themselves more efficient. Rumors of the U.S. manufacturing sector’s death have been greatly exaggerated. On the negative side, we’ve downgraded the consumer discretionary sector. The household savings rate has averaged 5.8 or 5.9 percent since the Lehman Brothers bankruptcy. It fell to 5.4 in the third quarter of last year. In January, with that lower payroll tax, the consumer boosted it back to 5.8 percent. So they actually took that money and banked it. That ongoing de-leveraging through the business cycle will cap revenue growth in the consumer discretionary sector, and it makes the sector vulnerable to anything like an oil price shock.

Warning Flag On Junk Bonds

Mortgage rates drop again

Junk bond mutual funds have had stock-like returns recently, but some analysts are turning cautious.

Mutual fund performance

InterestRates

1-year return

Junk bond funds have been some of the best mutual fund performers over the last two years. But veteran investors say they see some signs of concern. Investors are tired of the scant interest rates they’re getting on savings accounts and other short-term investments. So, many have turned to bonds, including junk bonds issued by financially weak companies. These offer higher yields to make up for their low credit ratings. But buyer beware, Standard & Poor’s analysts wrote in a recent report. They point to a surge in issuance of certain types of junk bonds, which had nearly disappeared after the 2008 meltdown. Companies are issuing more junk bonds not to hire more workers or build new factories but to pay dividends or buy back stock. Many of these deals are done by companies owned by private equi-

ty firms. The problem is that such deals heighten the risk of default, because they raise a company’s debt without improving its ability to pay for it. Last year, Standard & Poor’s said companies raised more than $50 billion in debt to pay for dividends or buybacks. In the prior two years, the combined total was just $12 billion. The last time such deals were so popular was in 2007. To be sure, junk bond investors say this is more of a warning signal than a sign of imminent collapse. “We just think that as investors, you’ve got to stay very careful here, because underwriting standards are starting to deteriorate,” says Jim Keegan, chief investment officer of Seix Advisors. He likes investment-grade bonds issued by utilities and other recession-resistant companies.

SOURCE: Morningstar

Data through Feb. 28

Money market mutual funds

ck e-cap sto U.S. larg

nd funds Junk bo

TICKER

Air Products

APD

20.9%

16.7

91.22

Amer Water Works Amerigas Part LP

AWK

19.41 0

28.29

27.69

APU

35.00 8

51.50

47.02

Aqua America Inc

WTR

16.52 9

23.79

22.58

24.22 0

38.02

36.95

-0.20

iate-term Intermed t-grade bond n e investm

9.7

bond iate-term Intermed

0.11 0.07 0.10 0.07 -0.09 0.06

FRIDAY YIELD

1WK

0.11 0.26 0.14 0.67 2.17

-0.01 -0.01 -0.01 -0.04 0.01

t t t t t

t t t s s

-0.02 -0.07 -0.04 -0.17 -0.10

0.17 0.48 0.25 1.16 2.73

0.06 0.20 0.14 0.31 1.02

10-year T-Note 3.48 30-year T-Bond 4.60 Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.

0.06 0.09

t t

s -0.12 s 0.05

3.99 4.84

2.38 3.53

%CHG 1MO

%RTN 1YR

3-month T-Bill 1-year T-Bill 6-month T-Bill 2-year T-Note 5-year T-Note

6.5

tmentrm inves Short-te d n grade bo

3.3

-0.2

s

s

0.32

1.2

s

-1.55

-3.2

t

0.26

1.2

0.07

162.57 0 276.00 265.42 10.03

0.3 +29.61

2

9.3

s

9.5 +34.40

2

t

-3.7 +24.85

t

s

0.4 +38.72

0.2

s

3.9

s

19

2.1

s s s s t s

-0.20 -0.04 -0.36 0.37 -2.17 0.04

NAME

TICKER

3.65 5.45 4.61 5.95 9.53 2.60

CHANGE 1MO 3MO 1YR

FRIDAY CLOSE

CHG WK

2.35 4.24 3.47 4.86 6.74 1.35

52-WK HIGH LOW

%CHG 1WK

Barc iPath Cotton

BAL

110.81

14.22

14.7

31.8

34.0

ProShs Ultra Silver

AGQ

204.19

24.37

13.6

47.7

235.9 329.1

ProSh Ultra Crude

UCO

56.46

6.37

12.7

22.4

Fact OilBull/SPBear

FOL

27.59

2.96

12.0

15.2

...

Barc iPath GlobCarbn

GRN

28.78

2.48

9.4

14.4

-18.9 -66.9

-8.3

18

3.2

Direxion EmMktBull3x

EDC

38.37

3.16

9.0

1.5

28

6.0

GlobalX SilverMiners

SIL

28.34

2.25

8.6

19.0

...

2

-3.1

25

2.7

DB Cmdty Long

DPU

20.34

1.51

8.0

9.5

25.4

s 22.8 +25.20

2

4.2

12

1.7

ProShs Ult China25

XPP

73.98

5.22

7.6

2.3

12.3

s

1 22.6

16

...

E-Tracs silver

USV

50.09

3.43

7.4

21.2

95.4

5.8—13.66 4 -14.7

51.0

ADM

Bank of America

BAC

10.91 4

19.86

14.12

-0.07

-0.5

t

s

Bk of NY Mellon

BK

23.78 8

32.65

30.06

-0.57

-1.9

t

s

Bon Ton Store

BONT

6.08 8

18.63

15.19

-0.69

-4.3

s

s 20.0 +36.85

CIGNA Corp

CI

29.12 0

44.03

43.82

1.83

4.4

s

s 19.5 +28.85

2

1.3

9

0.1

CVS Caremark Corp

CVS

26.84 6

37.82

33.01

0.07

0.2

s

s

-5.1 —4.22

4

3.7

13

1.5

CocaCola

KO

49.47 0

65.88

65.21

0.90

1.4

s

s

-0.9 +22.95

3

11.7

13

2.9

Comcast Corp A

CMCSA 16.30 0

25.91

25.55

0.29

1.1

s

s 16.8 +51.01

1

7.9

20

1.8

Community Bk Sys

CBU

21.33 5

28.95

25.03

-0.11

-0.4

t

s

3

6.3

13

3.8

Community Hlth Sys

CYH

25.63 0

42.30

41.24

1.29

3.2

s

s 10.4 +12.59

3

1.9

14

...

Entercom Comm

ETM

4.97 7

16.00

11.87

-1.33 -10.1

s

s

4 -11.7

10

...

-2.6 +58.35 -0.5 +5.30

-9.9 +16.46 2.5

-.67

21

0.3

DB Cmdty DblLg

DYY

12.32

0.82

7.1

14.5

-0.5

15

1.2

Global X China Inds

CHII

15.96

1.05

7.0

-1.9

6.3

2 -12.2

21

...

B2B Internet HldTr

BHH

1.22

0.08

7.0

7.0

155.3

BarcBk nt lkd GS Oil

OIL

28.03

1.83

7.0

14.2

4.6

Direx LatAm Bull 3x

LBJ

37.86

2.37

6.7

8.2

...

US Oil Fund LP

USO

42.33

2.65

6.7

13.4

4.5

Global X ChinaConsum

CHIQ

17.42

1.09

6.7

-1.1

7.9

PwShs Silver Fund

DBS

62.28

3.92

6.7

22.2

96.5

4

Fairchild Semicond

FCS

7.71 0

19.80

18.79

0.40

2.2

s

s 20.4 +80.85

1

0.7

22

...

Frontier Comm

FTR

6.96 5

9.84

8.13

-0.29

-3.4

t

t -16.4 +18.33

3

-0.8

17

9.2

Genpact Ltd

G

13.22 2

18.71

13.77

-0.23

-1.6

t

t

-9.4 —9.41

4 0.3a

25

1.3

Harte Hanks Inc

HHS

9.60 6

15.84

13.01

0.55

4.4

s

s

1.9 +10.59

3 -12.5

15

2.5

Heinz

HNZ

40.00 9

50.77

49.13

-0.87

-1.7

s

s

-0.7 +10.29

3

8.3

17

3.7

Hershey Company

HSY

39.79 0

53.12

52.94

0.99

1.9

s

s 12.3 +31.98

2

2.8

24

2.6

Kraft Foods

KFT

27.49 8

32.67

31.58

-0.13

-0.4

s

s

0.2 +12.59

3

4.5

13

3.7

Lowes Cos

LOW

19.35 8

28.54

26.24

0.97

3.8

s

s

4.6 +12.06

3

-3.8

18

1.7

3

M&T Bank

MTB

72.03 7

96.15

88.01

-0.55

-0.6

s

s

1.1 +19.24

-2.0

15

3.2

McDonalds Corp

MCD

63.25 8

80.94

76.03

1.59

2.1

s

t

-1.0 +23.52

3 19.5

17

3.2

NBT Bncp

NBTB

19.27 5

25.96

22.39

0.06

0.3

t

t

-7.3 +3.62

4

3.4

13

3.6

Nexstar Bdcstg Grp

NXST

3.64 9

7.56

7.10

0.52

7.9

s

s 18.5 +55.36

1

9.6

...

...

PNC Financial

PNC

49.43 6

70.45

60.95

-0.93

-1.5

t

s

0.4 +13.19

3

-0.4

11

0.7

PPL Corp

PPL

23.75 4

29.30

25.56

0.75

3.0

s

t

-2.9 —5.93

4

0.1

12

5.5

Penn Millers Hldg

PMIC

10.32 8

15.43

13.95

-0.19

-1.3

t

s

5.4 +33.24

2

...

...

...

Penna REIT

PEI

10.03 6

17.35

14.18

0.16

1.1

s

s

-2.4 +42.94

2 -11.3

...

4.2

PepsiCo

PEP

60.32 4

68.11

63.40

0.28

0.4

t

t

-3.0 +1.89

4

16

3.0

Philip Morris Intl

PM

42.94 0

63.95

63.50

1.25

2.0

s

s

8.5 +30.16

Procter & Gamble

PG

39.37 9

66.95

62.03

-0.81

-1.3

t

t

Prudential Fncl

PRU

48.56 9

67.52

63.87

-0.90

-1.4

s

s

SLM Corp

SLM

9.85 9

15.31

14.72

-0.24

-1.6

s

s 16.9 +26.57

SLM Corp flt pfB

SLMpB 32.41 0

54.00

53.55

2.30

4.5

s

s 22.2

Southn Union Co

SUG

20.00 0

29.24

28.68

0.44

1.6

s

s 19.2 +22.56

3

4.9

15

2.1

TJX Cos

TJX

39.56 0

51.11

50.58

0.25

0.5

s

s 13.9 +24.71

2 16.9

14

1.2

UGI Corp

UGI

24.30 0

33.34

33.00

0.99

3.1

s

s

4.5 +36.40

2 10.8

13

3.0

Verizon Comm

VZ

25.79 9

37.70

36.08

0.11

0.3

t

s

0.8 +38.77

2

8.1

27

5.4

WalMart Strs

WMT

47.77 5

57.90

52.07

0.32

0.6

t

t

-3.4 —1.26

4

4.6

13

2.8

Weis Mkts

WMK

32.56 9

41.30

40.42

1.15

2.9

s

s

0.2 +15.63

3

1.1

16

2.9

3.8

2

...

16

4.0

+.45

4

3.2

17

3.1

8.8 +20.92

3

-1.8

9

1.8

-3.6

2 -22.8

8

...

0.0

...

8.6

...

Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quarters. Rank classifies a stock’s performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).

Direx India Bull 2X

INDL

39.18

2.46

6.7

4.5

...

ETFS Silver Trust

SIVR

35.38

2.19

6.6

22.2

98.9

Barc iPath Softs

JJS

95.07

5.91

6.6

10.7

33.2

iShares Silver Trust

SLV

34.69

2.13

6.6

22.2

98.7

iPath LongEnh EmMkts

EMLB

110.59

6.66

6.4

1.7

...

ProShs Ult EmergMkts

EET

105.40

6.30

6.4

1.4

29.6

PwSh Crude Oil Long

OLO

15.72

0.87

5.9

10.9

13.9

PwShs Oil Fund

DBO

31.96

1.73

5.7

10.9

13.9

Mkt Vect JrGoldMin

GDXJ

39.95

2.09

5.5

6.5

64.2

JPM FstTr LgCap ETN

JFT

37.25

1.93

5.5

4.0

23.6

EG China Infrastr

CHXX

21.12

1.07

5.4

-2.8

...

US 12 Month Oil Fd

USL

47.90

2.40

5.3

9.5

17.4

E-Tracs Energy

UBN

17.38

0.87

5.3

10.2

15.2

Gugg China SC

HAO

29.06

1.43

5.2

-3.0

10.6

Direx BRIC Bull 2X

BRIL

44.93

2.15

5.0

5.9

...

iShs MSCI Poland

EPOL

35.15

1.66

5.0

0.9

...

Global X China Fin

CHIX

13.30

0.63

5.0

0.8

-1.3

Dir Dly Gold Bull2x

NUGT

37.34

1.73

4.9

14.9

...

iShs EmergMktFin

EMFN

28.01

1.32

4.9

2.8

17.2

US Gasoline Fd LP

UGA

49.66

2.28

4.8

18.1

32.5

ETFS White Metals

WITE

60.39

2.69

4.7

11.9

...

iShs MSCI Chile

ECH

71.06

3.21

4.7

...

28.4

Currency Russian

XRU

35.68

1.59

4.7

6.5

6.0

Global X Columbia 20

GXG

41.85

1.85

4.6

4.3

30.9

iShs GSCI Cmdty

GSG

37.85

1.63

4.5

8.7

18.8

Barc MSCI India TR

INP

67.86

2.95

4.5

4.4

110.7

Teucrium Crude Oil

CRUD

53.12

2.28

4.5

4.4

...

ProShs Ultra Cmdty

UCD

39.43

1.70

4.5

6.5

47.4 31.6

US Heating Oil Fd LP

UHN

36.03

1.52

4.4

13.2

SPDR S&P Russia ETF

RBL

39.16

1.66

4.4

4.1

...

iShs IndiaNifty50

INDY

28.15

1.17

4.3

4.8

12.3

iPath LgEnh EAFE

MFLA

126.69

5.05

4.2

2.0

...

Searching for big bargains profit that a company has earned over the last 12 months. A lower P-E ratio can indicate a cheaper stock. The companies in the S&P 100 index have an average P-E ratio of about 15. All these stocks also have dividend yields of at least 1.9 percent, the average for the S&P 100. Intel has not only the strongest dividend yield among the screened group but also the lowest P-E ratio. Revenue for the chip maker grew 24 percent last year to $43.62 billion, but worries about demand for personal computers have held its stock back.

s r r t t t

52-WK HIGH LOW

2 14.7

AZO

The biggest stocks are home to some of the market’s best deals, financial analysts say. Since this bull market began in March 2009, small and mid-size stocks have been climbing the fastest. Big stocks have gained as well, just not as fast. That leaves them looking more attractively valued than small and mid caps, based on their earnings and dividends. This screen shows the “Buy” rated stocks in the S&P 100 index of mega-cap stocks that have price-earnings ratios of below 15. The P-E ratio shows how much investors are paying for each $1 in

CHANGE 1MO 3MO 1YR

Exchange-Traded Funds

AutoZone Inc

SOURCE: FactSet

3.17 5.21 4.11 5.66 6.80 2.30

TREASURYS

Arch Dan Mid

Stock Screener

1WK

Broad market Lehman Triple-A corporate Moody’s Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman Municipal Bond Buyer U.S. high yield Barclays Treasury Barclays

52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN RANK %RTN LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD 95.00

FRIDAY YIELD

U.S. BOND INDEXES

S. Choe, K. Girard • AP

64.13 9

MIN INVEST PHONE

YIELD

PRIME FED Taxable—national avg 0.01 RATE FUNDS Harbor Money Market Fund/Admin0.16 $ 50,000 min (800) 422-1050 FRIDAY 3.25 .13 Tax-exempt—national avg 0.02 6 MO AGO 3.25 .13 Alpine Municipal MMF/Investor 0.20 $ 2,500 min (888) 785-5578 1 YR AGO 3.25 .13

LocalStocks COMPANY

The average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage fell for the third straight week, dropping to 4.87 percent from 4.95 percent, according to Freddie Mac. Such rates tend to follow Treasury yields, which have been mostly falling since Feb. 8. Yields drop when investors buy Treasurys. Government debt has become more popular because higher oil prices have many investors seeking safety.

COMPANY

TICKER

Intel

52-WK LOW

INTC $21.49 $17.60 $24.37

Coca-Cola

KO

Chevron Microsoft

CLOSE

DIVIAVG. 52-WK 1-YR P/E DEND BROKER HIGH CHANGE RATIO* YIELD RATING**

64.43

CVX 103.47

6.1% 11

49.47 65.88 22.0

13

3.3%

1.5

2.9

1.3

66.83 104.99 42.7

11

2.8

1.3

MSFT

26.08

22.73 31.58 -7.9

11

2.4

1.3

WMT

51.97

47.77 57.90 -3.1

12

2.3

1.5

GD

75.11

55.46 79.00

7.0

11

2.2

1.4

TGT

52.30

48.23 60.97

0.3

13

1.9

1.3

Freeport-McMoRan FCX Copper & Gold

51.98

28.35 61.35 32.3

11

1.9

1.4

Wal-Mart Stores General Dynamics Target

Data through Mar. 2

*Based on past 12 months’ results

**1=buy; 2=hold; 3=sell

p p p p

Dow industrials

+0.3%

WEEKLY

Nasdaq

+0.1% WEEKLY

LARGE-CAP

S&P 500

+0.1%

WEEKLY

SMALL-CAP

Russell 2000

+0.4%

WEEKLY

p p p p p p p p

+0.6%

MO +5.1%

YTD +0.6%

MO +5.0%

YTD +0.8%

MO +5.1%

YTD

+3.1%

MO +5.3%

YTD


CMYK ➛

SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2011

Mutual Fund Categories PERCENT RETURN 1YR 3YR*

SPECIALTY FUNDS

YTD

Conservative Allocation (CA) Moderate Allocation (MA) Health (SH) Natural Resources (SN) Real Estate (SR) Technology (ST)

2.52 3.50 5.89 6.37 4.30 7.26

11.39 14.39 10.44 26.86 30.87 30.23

4.16 3.25 5.11 0.39 2.74 10.60

4.02 3.58 3.18 8.38 1.20 5.82

BALANCED Target-Date 2000-2010 (TA) Target-Date 2011-2015 (TD) Target-Date 2016-2020 (TE)

2.51 3.14 3.08

12.31 14.41 14.84

2.96 2.44 2.41

3.79 3.36 3.19

INTERNATIONAL Divers. Emerging Mkt. (EM) Europe Stock (ES) Foreign Small/Mid Val (FA) Foreign Large Blend (FB) Foreign Large Growth (FG) Foreign Small/Mid Gr. (FR) Foreign Large Value (FV) World Allocation (IH) World Stock (WS)

-2.29 5.80 3.32 4.22 3.07 2.42 5.68 2.86 4.09

19.10 20.00 25.01 18.04 20.40 27.17 16.86 14.31 18.99

-0.05 -2.85 2.00 -2.18 -1.15 1.14 -2.22 1.91 0.63

8.01 2.75 4.40 2.21 3.27 4.36 1.95 4.56 2.96

YTD 5-YR FUND %RTN %RTN AMF ARM b +.2 -1.0 Acadian EmgMkts d -1.2 +8.6 AdvisorOne AmerigoN +4.0 +3.4 Alger Group CapApInsI +6.5 +8.3 CapApprA m +6.3 +8.2 MdCpGInsI +9.2 +2.4 SmCpGrthO +7.1 +5.8 SmCpInstI +7.1 +5.2 Allegiant UltShtBdI +.1 +3.5 Alliance Bernstein BalShrA m +4.8 +2.5 BalShrB m +4.6 +1.8 BalWlthStrA m +4.2 +3.5 BalWlthStrC m +4.1 +2.7 CoreOppA m +8.0 +3.0 GlTmtcGA m +3.5 +5.4 GlblBondA m +.1 +6.9 GlblBondC m -.2 +6.1 GrowA m +7.4 +.3 GrowIncA m +6.7 +.7 HighIncA m +2.8 +10.6 HighIncC m +2.7 +9.7 IntGrA m +1.1 +1.7 IntlValA m +7.0 -2.3 IntlValAdv +7.0 -2.0 LgCapGrA m +9.6 +5.1 MuInCAA m +.7 +3.3 MuInNYA m +.7 +3.6 MuInNatlA m +.6 +3.3 SMCpGrA m +11.1 +3.9 SmMidValA m +5.5 +6.5 TxMgdWlApStAd +5.6 +.2 WlthApprStr +5.9 +1.3 WlthApprStrA m +5.8 +1.0 Allianz NFJDivVlA m +5.4 +.9 NFJDivVlC m +5.3 +.1 NFJEqIncD b +5.5 +.9 NFJIntVlA m +4.2 +6.2 NFJSmCVlA m +6.4 +7.5 NFJSmCVlC m +6.2 +6.7 RCMGlTchA m +10.0 +8.1 Alpine DynDiv d +3.0 -1.7 InRelEstY d -1.5 -2.6 UlShTxAdv d +.2 +3.2 Amana Growth m +4.1 +6.6 Income m +3.9 +7.4 American Beacon BalAMR +3.3 +3.8 IntlEqAMR d +7.3 +3.2 IntlEqInv +7.2 +2.6 LgCpVlAMR +5.1 +2.2 LgCpVlInv +5.0 +1.6 SmCapAMR +6.7 +4.9 SmCpVlInv +6.6 +4.3 American Cent BalInv +3.2 +3.8 CAInTFBdIv +.9 +3.6 DivBdInv +.2 +6.2 EmgMktInv d -2.1 +7.3 EqGrowInv +5.1 +1.6 EqIncA m +3.2 +4.1 EqIncInv +3.2 +4.3 Gift +5.2 +8.1 GinMaeInv +.5 +6.0 GlGold d +.4 +14.4 GovBdInv ... +5.9 GrowthAdv m +5.7 +5.2 GrowthInv +5.8 +5.5 HeritA m +5.3 +9.7 HeritInv +5.4 +10.0 InTTxFBInv +.5 +4.0 IncGrInv +4.7 +1.0 IncGroA m +4.7 +.7 InfAdjAdv m +1.3 +5.2 InfAdjI +1.4 +5.5 IntlBd +1.8 +5.7 IntlDisIv d +2.9 +4.1 IntlGrInv d +4.2 +3.7 LgCoVlInv +4.7 +.2 MdCpValIv +3.8 +6.8 NTEqGrIns +5.0 NA NTGrthIns +5.8 NA NTLgCmVlI +4.6 NA OneChAgg +3.7 +4.6 OneChCon +2.5 +4.8 OneChMod +3.2 +4.7 RealEstIv +4.8 +.2 SelectInv +6.6 +3.7 ShTmGovIv +.1 +3.9 SmCpValAdv m +3.5 +6.3 SmCpValIv +3.4 +6.5 StrAlAgIv +3.7 +4.6 StrAlMd +3.1 +4.7 StrAlMd m +3.1 +4.5 UltraInv +5.7 +2.8 ValueInv +4.4 +2.6 VistaInv +5.4 +2.8 American Funds AMCAPA m +4.9 +3.4 AMCAPB m +4.8 +2.6 BalA x +4.0 +4.3 BalB x +3.9 +3.5 BondA m +.4 +3.4 BondAmerB m +.3 +2.7 CapIncBuA m +2.2 +4.0 CapIncBuB m +2.0 +3.2 CapWldBdA m +1.0 +6.3 CpWldGrIA m +3.1 +4.5 CpWldGrIB m +3.0 +3.7 EurPacGrA m +3.5 +5.2 EurPacGrB m +3.4 +4.5 FnInvA x +6.0 +4.4 FnInvB x +5.8 +3.6 GrthAmA m +5.1 +2.8 GrthAmB m +5.0 +2.1 HiIncA m +3.5 +7.3 HiIncB m +3.4 +6.5 HiIncMuA m -.2 +1.7 IncAmerA m +4.0 +4.4 IncAmerB m +3.8 +3.6 IntBdAmA m +.2 +3.8 IntlGrInA m +3.9 NA InvCoAmA x +4.1 +2.6 InvCoAmB x +4.0 +1.8 LtdTmTxEA m +.4 +3.7 MutualA m +3.8 +3.6 NewEconA m +4.4 +4.3 NewPerspA m +4.2 +6.1 NewPerspB m +4.0 +5.3 NwWrldA m -.9 +8.7 NwWrldB m -1.0 +7.8 STBdFdofAmA m ... NA SmCpWldA m +1.1 +5.4 SmCpWldB m +.9 +4.6 TDR2010A m +2.3 NA TDR2015A m +2.6 NA TDR2020A m +3.0 NA TDR2025A m +3.4 NA TDR2030A m +3.5 NA TaxEBdAmA m +.4 +3.1 TaxECAA m ... +2.7 USGovSecA m -.4 +5.1 WAMutInvA m +4.9 +2.3 WAMutInvB m +4.8 +1.5 Aquila HITaxFA m +.9 +3.4 Arbitrage ArbtrageR m +1.0 +4.5 Ariel Apprec b +7.5 +5.9 Ariel b +7.3 +3.3 Artio Global GlobHiYldA b +4.2 +9.1 IntlEqA b +2.0 +1.4 IntlEqIIA b +1.7 +2.0 Artisan IntSmCpIv d -1.0 +5.4 Intl d +3.5 +2.8 IntlVal d +3.8 +6.9 MdCpVal +8.0 +7.0 MidCap +5.4 +7.9 SmCapVal +6.2 +7.0 Assetmark CrePlFxIn b +.3 +4.9 Aston Funds MidCapN b +6.0 +9.7 MtgClGrN b +4.8 +5.0 BBH BrdMktFxI d +.4 +4.3 IntlEqN d +4.7 +3.4 TaxEffEq d +4.3 +6.9 BNY Mellon BalFd +3.0 +4.9 BondFd +.4 +6.0 EmgMkts -1.4 +9.3

52-WEEK WK HI LOW NAV CHG 7.51

7.29

7.41 +.01

20.51 14.99 19.96 +.55 14.03 10.72 13.88 +.08 22.44 15.69 15.70 34.86 30.27

16.35 11.44 10.83 24.61 21.29

22.05 15.41 15.50 34.33 29.82

10.08 10.01 10.01

+.12 +.07 +.11 +.31 +.26 ...

15.54 14.56 12.42 12.37 12.48 80.44 8.58 8.61 39.79 3.54 9.27 9.37 16.17 14.78 15.06 27.62 11.09 10.12 10.12 6.81 19.02 13.05 12.88 12.87

12.87 12.08 10.22 10.19 9.10 58.26 8.10 8.12 29.24 2.69 8.32 8.41 12.08 11.10 11.32 19.67 10.14 9.39 9.33 4.25 13.41 9.94 9.65 9.63

15.49 14.51 12.38 12.32 12.43 79.86 8.33 8.35 39.30 3.52 9.20 9.30 15.54 14.62 14.90 27.15 10.41 9.61 9.55 6.72 18.63 12.90 12.76 12.75

+.06 +.05 +.07 +.07 +.09 +.60 -.02 -.02 +.37 +.02 +.01 +.01 +.22 +.12 +.12 +.03 -.01 -.02 -.01 +.09 +.07 +.08 +.11 +.11

12.04 12.07 12.07 21.63 30.53 29.26 53.16

9.37 9.41 9.39 16.72 23.14 22.14 34.95

11.96 11.99 11.99 21.60 30.37 29.10 52.00

+.02 +.02 +.02 +.26 +.19 +.17 +.33

5.19 3.90 4.87 +.06 26.98 18.53 25.54 +.67 10.06 10.03 10.04 -.01 25.96 20.05 25.74 +.19 33.16 26.30 33.01 +.27 13.01 17.86 17.71 20.70 19.89 21.46 21.01

11.17 13.44 13.18 15.91 15.29 15.09 14.82

12.85 17.66 17.50 20.25 19.45 21.14 20.69

... +.12 +.11 +.01 +.01 +.08 +.07

16.04 11.56 11.16 9.14 22.28 7.49 7.49 30.35 11.10 26.85 11.50 27.39 27.81 22.09 22.70 11.39 25.60 25.57 12.40 12.45 15.24 11.04 11.58 5.87 13.23 10.23 12.78 8.97 12.62 11.31 12.02 19.82 40.88 9.89 9.44 9.48 7.96 6.77 6.76 24.26 6.06 18.09

13.65 10.73 10.57 6.53 17.04 6.21 6.21 21.19 10.69 16.91 10.94 20.11 20.43 14.84 15.23 10.63 19.69 19.67 11.41 11.45 13.03 7.62 8.39 4.56 10.43 7.84 9.40 6.96 10.06 9.99 10.03 14.47 29.72 9.69 6.99 7.02 6.30 5.63 5.62 17.78 4.77 12.38

15.94 10.95 10.72 8.79 21.97 7.44 7.44 29.58 10.88 26.19 11.09 26.92 27.33 21.51 22.11 10.82 25.15 25.12 11.92 11.96 14.05 11.02 11.43 5.78 13.06 10.08 12.56 8.83 12.51 11.29 11.96 19.23 40.26 9.75 9.29 9.32 7.86 6.73 6.72 23.95 5.97 17.61

+.03 ... -.02 +.28 +.08 +.02 +.02 +.09 +.01 +.95 -.01 +.05 +.05 +.12 +.13 ... +.05 +.05 +.03 +.04 +.06 +.22 +.07 ... ... +.03 +.02 ... +.07 +.02 +.05 -.17 +.21 +.01 -.04 -.04 +.01 +.02 +.02 +.13 +.01 +.08

20.05 19.16 18.78 18.70 12.56 12.56 51.24 51.23 21.53 37.22 36.99 43.00 42.60 39.25 39.11 32.33 31.35 11.57 11.57 14.26 17.26 17.12 13.74 32.53 29.80 29.65 16.04 26.59 26.93 30.08 29.65 56.42 55.22 10.18 39.70 37.70 9.49 9.50 9.38 9.54 9.79 12.54 16.63 14.79 28.77 28.55

15.28 14.67 15.49 15.44 11.90 11.90 43.95 43.91 19.51 29.35 29.16 33.17 32.78 29.89 29.81 25.00 24.17 10.55 10.55 13.10 14.61 14.51 13.16 25.76 23.39 23.30 15.29 21.52 20.50 23.12 22.72 43.32 42.55 10.02 30.53 28.95 8.44 8.33 8.08 7.89 7.94 11.53 15.19 13.66 22.58 22.43

19.76 18.87 18.55 18.50 12.17 12.17 50.99 50.96 20.62 36.83 36.59 42.83 42.44 38.77 38.69 31.99 31.01 11.55 11.55 13.33 17.21 17.06 13.40 32.43 29.19 29.09 15.45 26.29 26.44 29.81 29.38 54.10 53.22 10.06 39.27 37.27 9.32 9.39 9.34 9.47 9.71 11.78 15.48 13.82 28.54 28.32

+.04 +.04 -.08 -.05 -.01 -.01 +.32 +.32 +.04 +.20 +.20 +.59 +.59 +.15 +.22 +.14 +.13 +.01 +.01 -.04 +.06 +.05 ... +.30 -.10 -.05 ... +.05 +.13 +.24 +.23 +1.02 +1.00 ... +.52 +.49 +.02 +.03 +.04 +.05 +.06 -.01 -.03 -.03 +.15 +.15

11.60 11.04 11.22

...

13.02 12.27 12.72 +.01 46.42 32.10 45.56 +.23 53.20 35.47 52.13 +.11 11.15 10.27 10.97 +.05 30.27 23.84 30.00 +.47 12.79 10.01 12.60 +.21 20.15 22.64 28.41 21.83 36.20 18.13

14.85 17.10 21.18 16.84 24.84 13.37

19.69 22.47 28.14 21.68 35.44 17.90

+.53 +.22 +.35 +.03 +.30 +.08

9.62

9.05

9.41

-.01

34.58 24.75 33.87 +.27 25.69 20.23 25.29 +.01 10.47 10.27 10.42 ... 13.80 10.78 13.68 +.02 15.07 12.05 14.95 +.06 11.43 9.59 11.35 +.03 13.47 12.88 13.08 -.03 12.00 8.85 11.68 +.35

5YR*

YTD 5-YR FUND %RTN %RTN IntlM +6.5 +1.1 IntmBdM +.3 +5.6 LgCpStkM +5.2 +2.5 MidCpStM +6.9 +4.8 NtlIntM +.9 +4.1 NtlShTM +.2 +3.0 PAIntMu +.6 +3.5 SmCpStkM +6.1 +1.4 Baird AggrInst +.9 +5.6 CrPlBInst +1.2 +7.3 IntBdInst +.8 +6.0 IntMunIns +1.1 +4.9 ShTmBdIns +.5 +4.3 Barclays Global Inv LP2020R m +2.8 +3.2 Baron Asset b +6.0 +4.1 Growth b +6.7 +4.5 Partners b +4.8 +3.7 SmCap b +8.2 +4.8 Bernstein CAMuni +.5 +3.8 DiversMui +.6 +4.0 EmgMkts -1.0 +7.5 IntDur +.7 +6.3 IntlPort +4.5 -2.1 NYMuni +.5 +3.9 ShDurDivr +.3 +2.7 ShDurPlu +.3 +2.8 TxMIntl +4.5 -2.3 Berwyn Income d +1.4 +8.3 BlackRock BalCapA m +5.3 +3.0 BasicValA m +6.2 +3.2 BasicValC m +6.0 +2.4 Engy&ResA m +10.4 +8.1 EqDivA m +5.2 +4.7 EqDivR b +5.1 +4.4 EquitDivC m +5.1 +3.9 GlbDynEqA m +4.4 +6.0 GlobAlcA m +3.4 +7.3 GlobAlcB m +3.2 +6.4 GlobAlcC m +3.3 +6.4 GlobAlcR m +3.3 +6.9 GovtInIvA m -.4 +4.3 HiIncA m +4.2 +7.8 HiYldInvA m +3.8 +8.4 HthScOpA m +7.2 +7.6 InflPrBndA m +1.2 +5.9 InflPrBndC m +1.1 +5.1 IntlOppA m +4.2 +5.5 LCCrInvA m +8.3 +.3 LCCrInvC m +8.0 -.6 LatinAmA m -4.0 +14.6 LgCapValA m +6.8 0.0 LowDurSvc b +.7 +3.5 MidCpValEqA m +5.9 +4.8 NatMuniA m -.1 +3.1 NatResD m +10.3 +8.5 S&P500A b +5.3 +2.1 TotRtrnA m +.3 NA USOppInvC m +5.1 +7.2 USOppsIvA m +5.2 +8.0 ValOpptyA m +8.4 +1.5 Brandywine BlueFd +4.1 -.4 Brandywin +8.0 -.2 Bridgeway UltSmCoMk d +5.1 -.6 Brown Cap Mgmt SmCo Is d +4.3 +11.0 Buffalo MidCap d +2.0 +5.0 SmallCap d +4.5 +4.3 CG Capital Markets CrFixIn +.6 +6.8 EmgMktEq -2.0 +8.1 IntlEqInv +4.6 +2.4 LgCapGro +6.1 +4.0 LgCapVal +6.0 +.9 CGM Focus -2.0 +4.0 Mutual -1.1 +6.0 Realty +3.3 +8.7 Calamos ConvC m +4.8 +5.3 ConvertA m +5.0 +6.1 GrIncA m +5.5 +5.2 GrIncC m +5.4 +4.4 GrowA m +5.5 +2.6 GrowB m +5.4 +1.9 GrowC m +5.4 +1.9 MktNuInA m +1.8 +3.3 Calvert BalancedA m +3.3 +2.1 BondA m +.4 +4.6 EquityA m +5.8 +4.7 Income m +.9 +3.9 ShrtDurIn m +.7 +5.1 Cambiar OppInv +7.7 +3.5 Champlain Investment ChSmlComp b +5.8 +8.1 Clipper Clipper +5.2 -.8 Cohen & Steers Realty +4.7 +3.3 Colorado BondShares COBdShrs f -.1 +4.2 Columbia AcornA m +3.9 +4.9 AcornC m +3.8 +4.1 AcornIntA m +1.2 +7.3 AcornIntZ +1.2 +7.7 AcornSelA m +2.2 +5.1 AcornSelZ +2.3 +5.4 AcornUSAZ +6.1 +3.6 AcornZ +4.0 +5.2 BondZ +.4 +5.6 ComInfoA m +6.3 +9.5 ComInfoC m +6.2 +8.7 ConHiYldZ +3.5 +6.2 CoreBdZ +.5 +5.3 DivBondA m +.9 +5.3 DivBondI +.9 +5.7 DivIncA m +4.3 +4.4 DivIncZ +4.3 +4.7 DivOppA m +4.6 +4.6 DivrEqInA m +4.0 +1.9 EmMktOppA m -2.8 +8.4 EnrNatRsZ +11.2 +8.2 EqValueA m +4.4 +2.1 FedSecA m ... +4.6 FlRateA m +2.3 +3.8 GlblTechA m +4.3 +8.0 HYMuniZ -.5 +1.4 HiYldBdA m +3.5 +8.0 HighIncZ +3.2 +6.8 IncOppA m +3.4 +7.7 IncomeZ +1.3 +6.2 IntlOpZ +2.0 +1.9 IntlVaZ +7.9 +2.4 IntmBdZ +1.0 +6.0 ItmMunBdZ +1.0 +3.7 LarCaCorZ +4.0 +3.1 LgCpGrowZ +6.2 +4.1 LgCrQuantA m +5.7 +1.1 LtdDurCrdA m +1.1 +4.9 MAIntlEqZ +3.8 +1.1 MAdvIntValA m +5.7 -1.0 Mar21CA m +4.0 +2.5 Mar21CC m +3.9 +1.8 Mar21CZ +4.0 +2.8 MarFocEqA m +3.6 +2.7 MarFocEqZ +3.7 +3.0 MarGrIA m +4.2 +2.0 MarGrIZ +4.3 +2.2 MdCapGthZ +6.8 +6.6 MdCapIdxZ +6.9 +5.9 MdCpValOppA m +4.3 +3.8 MdCpValOppR4 +4.4 +4.0 MdCpValZ +5.6 +3.7 MdCpVlA m +5.5 +3.4 MidGrOppA m +5.7 +5.7 ORIntmMuniBdZ +.8 +3.7 PBAggA m +4.0 +3.5 PBModA m +3.1 +4.9 PBModAggA m +3.6 +4.2 PBModConA m +2.5 +5.0 PBTtlEqA m +4.6 +2.6 SIIncZ +.5 +4.5 SelSmCapZ +3.9 +3.7 ShTmMuZ +.2 +3.3 SmCaVaIIA m +8.4 +4.3 SmCaVaIIZ +8.5 +4.5 SmCapCrZ +5.0 +5.5 SmCapIdxZ +5.0 +3.9 SmCapValA m +6.3 +5.2 SmCpGthIZ +7.0 +6.7 SmCpValIA m +3.7 +4.5 +3.7 +4.7 SmCpValIZ

SMALL-CAP MID-CAP LARGE-CAP

PAGE 6D

VALUE LV 6.4 21.1 -1.4 0.7

YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR

5.5 22.2 6.3 3.6 5.1 24.9 10.9 5.5

M

BLEND LB 4.7 16.4 2.1 3.8

MV

7.1 30.3 7.3 5.0 6.8 30.1 9.7 4.9

SV

U

T

U

GROWTH LG 4.8 19.5 4.0 3.0

MB

SB

7.8 32.6 5.8 5.1

MG

7.5 36.1 9.7 4.5

SG

A

L

S

THE TIMES LEADER

Fund Focus FundFocus Norman Boersma is taking over as Templeton Growth’s lead manager this month. The fund has lagged in recent years due to its emphasis on large-company stocks from developed markets. FrankTemp-Templeton Growth A m TEPLX

BOND FUNDS Interm-Term Bond (CI) Interm. Government (GI) High Yield Muni (HM) High Yield Bond (HY) Muni National Interm (MI) Muni National Long (ML) Muni Short (MS)

0.76 0.11 -0.74 3.60 0.79 0.26 0.31

6.13 3.75 0.45 15.89 1.31 0.21 0.97

5.54 4.61 1.24 9.62 4.15 3.41 2.79

5.36 5.12 0.61 6.94 3.50 2.48 2.93

NAV 11.47 12.89 9.11 13.10 13.00 12.86 12.34 12.44

10.91 10.88 11.31 11.79 9.81

10.54 ... 10.56 ... 10.90 +.01 11.38 ... 9.69 +.01

10.30 10.29 10.67 11.21 9.61

WK CHG +.02 -.03 -.02 +.08 ... ... -.01 +.15

15.61 13.29 15.57 +.04 59.41 54.92 22.03 25.84

44.23 40.23 15.39 18.53

58.56 +.16 54.67 +.43 21.56 -.02 25.72 +.18

14.96 14.84 33.99 14.27 16.40 14.61 12.72 11.96 16.51

14.09 14.14 25.01 13.39 12.58 13.94 12.53 11.75 12.66

14.21 14.27 32.97 13.73 16.32 14.05 12.58 11.91 16.44

-.01 ... +.93 -.02 +.19 ... ... +.01 +.20

13.66 12.76 13.44

-.03

22.50 27.74 26.03 43.39 18.57 18.65 18.19 13.10 20.11 19.62 18.77 19.47 11.23 4.93 7.88 30.37 11.60 11.58 35.06 11.84 10.96 77.62 15.84 9.75 12.27 10.47 70.90 16.43 11.47 38.36 42.09 20.80

18.95 20.96 19.64 26.49 14.48 14.55 14.19 10.22 16.99 16.56 15.85 16.45 10.25 4.41 7.10 25.80 10.54 10.53 26.06 8.95 8.28 52.98 11.95 9.54 9.18 9.48 47.67 12.57 10.64 27.63 30.23 14.24

22.44 27.17 25.48 43.39 18.43 18.51 18.05 13.05 20.08 19.58 18.73 19.43 10.72 4.93 7.86 30.37 10.89 10.88 34.92 11.78 10.90 71.98 15.61 9.67 12.11 9.77 70.86 16.17 11.08 37.61 41.27 20.69

+.14 -.02 -.03 +.41 +.09 +.08 +.08 +.11 +.13 +.11 +.11 +.12 -.01 +.01 +.01 +.72 +.03 +.03 +.60 +.13 +.12 +1.63 +.13 ... +.04 -.03 +.71 +.02 -.03 +.19 +.21 +.21

FUND

YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG

StLgCpGrA m StLgCpGrZ StrInvZ StratAllocA m StratIncA m StratIncZ TaxEA m TaxEBdA m TaxEZ TotRetBdZ ValRestrZ ValueA m ValueZ Commerce Bond Constellation SndsSelGrII DFA 1YrFixInI 2YrGlbFII 5YearGovI 5YrGlbFII EMktsSoCo EmMkCrEqI EmMktValI EmMtSmCpI EmgMktI GlEqInst Glob6040I InfPrtScI IntGovFII IntRlEstI IntSmCapI IntlValu3 LgCapIntI RelEstScI STMuniBdI TMIntlVal TMMkWVal TMMkWVal2 TMUSEq TMUSTarVal TMUSmCp USCorEq1I USCorEq2I USLgCo USLgVal3 USLgValI USMicroI USSmValI USSmallI USTgtValI USVecEqI

+6.6 +6.7 +5.3 +3.2 +2.0 +2.1 +.4 ... +.4 +.8 +3.1 +3.4 +3.4

NA +6.3 +4.6 +2.4 +6.8 +7.1 +3.1 +2.9 +3.3 +5.7 +2.8 +.9 +1.1

13.36 13.46 20.16 9.76 6.07 6.00 12.69 3.61 12.69 10.00 52.08 11.89 11.91

+.01 +.01 +.05 +.03 +.02 +.02 -.03 -.01 -.03 -.02 +.44 -.05 -.05

+1.1

+7.2 20.44 19.26 19.96

-.01

+5.1

+5.4 10.83

-.07

+.1 +.1 -.1 +.1 -2.4 -2.8 -2.7 -5.4 -1.1 +5.3 +3.3 +1.5 -.2 +5.2 +5.5 +7.0 +5.9 +4.5 +.3 +7.1 +7.7 +7.8 +5.5 +6.0 +6.1 +5.9 +6.3 +5.5 +8.1 +8.2 +5.2 +6.7 +6.1 +6.3 +6.3

+3.3 +3.4 +4.6 +4.5 NA +12.2 +13.7 +13.7 +10.9 +3.7 +4.8 NA +6.4 NA +4.5 +4.1 +3.4 +1.6 +2.8 +4.3 +2.0 +2.2 +2.7 +1.8 +1.9 +3.5 +3.3 +2.8 +2.4 +2.2 +2.2 +3.2 +4.5 +4.1 +2.9

13.66 13.75 20.49 9.81 6.28 6.21 13.79 3.89 13.79 10.17 52.53 12.19 12.22

10.38 10.30 11.17 11.75 15.50 22.48 38.10 25.24 31.06 14.37 13.33 11.90 12.91 5.28 18.20 18.68 21.22 23.33 10.41 16.32 16.44 15.82 14.53 23.12 24.62 11.84 11.85 10.60 16.93 22.11 14.57 27.71 22.97 17.97 11.76

9.38 9.43 14.82 8.17 5.81 5.75 12.35 3.51 12.35 9.80 37.85 9.27 9.28

7.46 10.52 10.31 10.13 10.69 10.78 11.41 16.37 27.82 17.79 22.98 10.65 11.08 10.84 12.02 3.67 13.30 13.45 15.92 17.26 10.21 11.75 11.84 11.39 10.91 16.00 17.19 8.71 8.62 8.07 12.26 16.02 10.30 18.50 15.89 12.42 8.39

10.33 10.16 10.78 10.89 14.40 21.55 35.17 22.77 30.32 14.20 13.27 11.47 12.26 5.28 18.14 18.39 21.08 22.54 10.25 16.12 16.20 15.60 14.31 22.76 24.33 11.65 11.66 10.44 16.66 21.76 14.48 27.28 22.67 17.68 11.56

... +.01 +.01 +.01 +.40 +.60 +.96 +.56 +.86 +.08 +.05 +.04 -.01 +.08 +.27 +.03 +.11 -.27 +.01 +.05 +.02 +.02 +.02 +.01 +.12 +.02 +.02 +.01 ... +.01 +.07 +.09 +.11 +.02 +.01

FUND

YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG

AtvMdCpA f +6.6 -.6 35.56 26.58 35.01 +.04 BasSP500 +5.4 +2.5 27.48 20.96 27.05 +.03 BondIdxIn b +.1 +5.4 10.85 10.30 10.50 -.01 BstSmCpVl +4.6 +3.6 24.60 18.32 24.09 +.03 CAAMTBdZ +.1 +2.8 14.90 13.35 13.74 -.02 DiscStkR b +5.3 +3.2 32.80 24.46 32.23 ... Dreyfus +4.8 +3.2 9.64 7.21 9.42 -.03 EmergMarI d -1.5 +9.4 13.72 10.31 13.34 +.39 EmgLead +4.8 -2.7 22.39 15.03 22.03 +.11 EmgMkts m -1.5 +9.2 13.64 10.23 13.27 +.39 GNMA Z b +.4 +5.5 15.83 15.03 15.48 -.01 GrowInc +5.8 +3.1 15.25 11.14 14.97 +.01 GrtChinaA m +.5 +20.8 55.00 36.76 50.43 +1.42 HiYldI +4.2 +7.7 6.81 6.17 6.80 +.01 IntIncA f +1.4 +5.9 13.43 12.64 13.17 +.01 IntMuBd +1.0 +3.7 13.89 13.00 13.24 ... IntlStkI +3.7 NA 14.23 11.01 14.21 +.10 IntlStkIx +5.6 +2.0 15.85 11.91 15.75 +.12 MidCapIdx +6.9 +5.6 30.22 21.87 29.81 +.14 MuniBd +.2 +2.7 11.58 10.53 10.78 -.01 NJMuniA f +.1 +2.9 13.10 11.86 12.17 -.01 NYTaxEBd +.4 +3.4 15.22 13.92 14.25 -.01 OppMdCpVaA f +8.7 +7.8 37.62 25.47 37.15 +.30 SIMuBdD b +.3 +3.5 13.33 13.02 13.06 +.01 SP500Idx +5.3 +2.2 37.00 28.92 36.43 +.05 SmCapIdx +5.0 +3.8 21.69 15.98 21.45 +.14 SmCoVal +4.9 +10.9 32.15 21.96 31.64 +.18 StratValA f +5.9 +3.4 30.85 22.81 30.18 -.04 TechGrA f +4.1 +5.8 34.86 23.69 33.82 -.27 WldwdeGrA f +4.8 +4.9 41.86 33.26 41.63 +.41 Driehaus ActiveInc +2.5 +6.8 11.35 10.71 11.33 +.01 EmMktGr d ... +11.1 32.72 23.49 32.22 +.88 Dupree KYTxFInc +.9 +4.0 7.92 7.33 7.49 -.02 Eagle CapApprA m +3.8 +3.0 29.44 22.76 28.99 -.01 MidCpStA m +3.7 +4.4 29.07 21.40 28.59 +.14 Eaton Vance DivBldrA m +3.7 +3.4 10.42 8.45 10.36 +.06 Floating-Rate A m +2.2 +3.9 9.41 8.91 9.40 ... FltRateC m +2.1 +3.2 9.09 8.60 9.08 ... FltRtAdv b +2.2 +3.9 9.10 8.61 9.09 ... GovOblA m +.2 +5.6 7.65 7.39 7.45 +.01 GtrIndiaA m -11.4 +5.4 29.97 21.43 24.98 +.95 HiIncOppA m +3.2 +6.5 4.47 4.07 4.46 ... HiIncOppB m +3.1 +5.8 4.48 4.08 4.47 +.01 IncBosA m +3.4 +7.6 5.96 5.47 5.96 +.01 LrgCpValA m +3.0 +1.7 19.07 15.13 18.76 +.01 LrgCpValC m +2.9 +1.0 19.05 15.14 18.74 +.01 NatlMuniA m -1.0 -.3 10.03 8.44 8.73 -.02 NatlMuniB m -1.2 -1.0 10.03 8.44 8.73 -.02 NatlMuniC m -1.2 -1.0 10.03 8.44 8.73 -.02

27.34 19.61 26.68 +.05 28.98 19.53 28.68 +.32 15.71 11.20 15.52

-.04

45.63 32.88 45.62 +1.04 17.85 13.25 17.25 28.20 20.78 27.39

-.11 -.04

8.88 8.27 8.37 -.03 17.66 13.09 16.95 +.45 11.09 8.22 11.06 +.15 15.93 11.42 15.66 +.02 9.38 7.28 9.30 +.02 36.39 24.44 34.10 +.33 30.21 22.53 29.13 +.04 28.49 19.95 27.68 -.27 20.62 20.72 33.60 33.76 57.42 57.03 52.19 12.26

17.92 17.99 26.77 26.92 41.56 41.47 37.95 11.18

20.45 20.57 33.15 33.29 56.33 55.93 51.18 12.20

28.37 16.05 38.73 16.18 16.71

24.05 15.33 28.43 15.58 16.36

28.18 +.06 15.52 -.05 37.85 +.06 15.96 -.03 16.46 -.02

20.13 13.98 19.77

+.04 +.05 +.01 ... +.14 +.13 +.11 ...

-.06

15.53 11.28 15.42 +.12 66.17 51.94 65.17 +.18 63.29 46.42 61.21

-.72

9.20

8.95

8.99

-.01

30.67 28.14 41.35 41.43 29.10 29.94 30.73 31.68 9.62 48.80 40.48 8.03 11.22 5.12 5.13 13.75 13.76 8.20 10.73 10.28 25.79 11.11 11.20 9.09 22.24 10.11 2.85 8.23 10.16 9.91 12.24 15.38 9.25 10.72 13.90 25.56 5.79 10.11 12.72 6.52 14.61 13.61 14.94 24.23 24.76 21.70 22.09 28.97 12.48 8.36 8.40 14.47 14.46 12.23 12.67 10.67 10.96 10.82 10.75 10.51 10.03 18.86 10.60 14.98 15.08 16.83 18.35 17.35 34.13 47.00 49.31

22.85 21.11 31.37 31.44 21.15 21.72 21.26 23.54 9.14 35.02 29.19 7.33 10.71 4.85 4.86 10.95 10.95 6.29 7.97 7.47 16.96 8.21 10.68 8.44 16.79 9.18 2.58 7.71 9.28 9.35 9.17 12.11 8.90 10.02 10.58 18.81 4.39 9.75 9.56 4.99 10.63 9.95 10.85 17.36 17.74 15.54 15.80 19.75 8.96 5.98 6.02 10.46 10.45 8.51 11.85 8.38 9.30 8.82 9.50 7.89 9.89 12.85 10.46 10.17 10.25 11.92 13.35 11.98 23.42 34.92 36.63

30.39 27.87 41.35 41.43 28.56 29.38 30.31 31.40 9.24 47.54 39.42 8.03 10.94 5.02 5.03 13.61 13.62 8.15 10.50 9.61 25.79 10.88 10.84 9.07 21.76 9.33 2.85 8.21 9.75 9.71 12.22 15.23 9.08 10.22 13.65 25.18 5.72 10.00 12.63 6.47 14.13 13.16 14.44 23.54 24.06 21.20 21.58 28.43 12.32 8.21 8.26 14.21 14.19 11.97 12.06 10.57 10.93 10.75 10.74 10.38 9.93 18.45 10.47 14.83 14.93 16.69 18.15 16.97 33.81 46.42 48.71

+.19 +.17 +.74 +.75 +.16 +.16 +.01 +.20 -.02 -.05 -.05 +.02 -.02 ... ... +.03 +.03 +.06 +.01 +.32 +.41 +.01 -.02 ... +.06 -.04 ... +.03 +.03 -.02 +.19 +.09 -.02 +.01 +.01 +.10 +.02 ... +.13 +.06 -.12 -.11 -.12 +.05 +.06 +.05 +.05 +.14 +.06 +.06 +.07 +.02 +.02 -.03 ... +.05 +.04 +.05 +.03 +.06 ... +.05 ... +.10 +.10 +.08 +.12 -.06 +.49 +.03 +.04

DWS-Investments DrSmCpVlA m +4.0 +5.4 39.17 LgCapValA m +5.2 +3.2 18.45 LgCapValS +5.2 +3.5 18.45 DWS-Scudder BalA m +3.0 +2.6 9.39 CATFIncA m -.1 +3.0 7.47 CapGrA m +4.0 +3.6 57.80 CapGrS +4.1 +3.9 58.17 EMkFIS d +.1 +5.0 11.53 Eq500S +5.4 +2.5 151.09 GNMAS +.9 +6.1 15.65 GlbTS d +3.4 +2.2 25.03 GrIncS +5.9 +2.1 17.61 GvtSc m +1.3 +6.0 9.00 HiIncA m +3.5 +7.1 4.93 HlthCareS d +5.8 +4.1 25.81 IntTFrS +.9 +4.0 11.76 IntlS d +3.5 -.2 47.59 LAEqS d -2.7 +9.3 53.58 MgdMuniA m +.3 +3.7 9.25 MgdMuniS +.3 +4.0 9.26 REstA m +5.4 +2.7 19.26 SPInxS +5.3 +2.4 17.88 ShDurPS +1.3 +4.3 9.64 StrHiYldTxFA m -.6 +2.9 12.52 StrHiYldTxFS -.6 +3.1 12.53 StrValA m +5.3 -2.2 35.01 TechA m +7.0 +3.8 14.76 Davis FinclA m +2.8 +.3 33.17 NYVentA m +3.7 +1.7 36.02 NYVentB m +3.5 +.9 34.53 NYVentC m +3.6 +.9 34.80 Delaware Invest CorpBdIs +1.3 +8.2 6.35 DiverIncA m +1.0 +8.4 9.84 EmgMktA m +1.0 +11.5 16.33 GrowOppA m +11.7 +6.7 24.07 HiYldOpA m +4.1 +8.4 4.25 LgValA m +6.6 +1.7 16.07 LtdDvIncA m -.1 +5.7 9.05 OpFixIncI +1.2 +7.4 9.87 OptLgCpIs +5.3 +2.7 12.95 OptLgValI +5.9 +2.7 11.08 TaxFIntA m +.3 +3.6 12.12 TaxFMNA m +.4 +3.4 12.74 TaxFPAA m -.3 +3.4 8.13 TaxFUSAA m -.1 +3.2 11.64 Diamond Hill LngShortA m +3.6 +1.4 16.90 LngShortI +3.7 +1.8 17.08 LrgCapI +4.3 +3.3 15.68 SmCapA m +1.4 +3.3 26.55 Dimensional Investme IntCorEqI +5.9 +4.0 12.02 IntlSCoI +4.9 +5.2 18.05 IntlValuI +6.9 +3.9 19.96 Direxion DynHYBdI b +2.6 +1.2 15.61 Dodge & Cox Bal +5.0 +2.5 75.29 GlbStock +4.9 NA 9.56 Income +1.1 +6.7 13.51 IntlStk +3.8 +4.6 37.48 Stock +6.1 +.4 117.81 Domini Social Invmts SocEqInv m +5.7 +2.3 31.71 Dreyfus Apprecia +5.1 +3.9 40.34

28.99 38.31 -.10 14.73 18.33 +.09 14.73 18.33 +.09 7.98 6.70 43.03 43.36 10.28 114.86 15.04 19.11 13.35 8.62 4.51 21.24 10.91 37.27 39.22 8.39 8.40 13.93 13.58 9.49 11.18 11.19 26.65 10.37

9.36 6.90 56.65 57.02 10.87 148.74 15.29 24.64 17.28 8.82 4.92 25.76 11.17 46.87 51.71 8.62 8.63 18.63 17.60 9.57 11.50 11.51 34.41 14.44

+.05 -.01 +.09 +.09 +.08 +.18 +.04 +.10 +.03 +.04 +.02 +.53 -.01 +.33 +1.01 -.01 -.02 -.20 +.02 +.02 -.03 -.04 -.02 +.02

26.45 28.46 27.23 27.44

32.66 35.61 34.14 34.40

+.12 +.18 +.17 +.17

5.76 9.14 11.99 16.72 3.81 12.15 8.83 9.21 9.44 8.49 11.26 11.67 7.36 10.62

5.88 9.23 16.17 23.84 4.25 15.96 8.87 9.53 12.69 11.01 11.44 11.94 7.54 10.86

-.02 ... +.27 +.31 +.01 +.19 -.01 ... +.05 +.08 ... -.01 -.01 -.01

14.67 14.79 12.40 21.10

16.84 +.06 17.02 +.06 15.46 +.02 26.16 -.13

8.79 11.92 +.09 13.00 18.02 +.29 14.38 19.65 +.03 14.09 14.66 +.05 59.93 7.14 13.03 27.90 87.05

73.70 -.08 9.34 +.04 13.37 +.01 37.07 +.41 114.35 -.20

24.27 31.40 +.12 31.31 40.13 +.26

CATEGORY MORNINGSTAR RATING™ ASSETS EXP RATIO MANAGER SINCE RETURNS 3-MO YTD 1-YR 3-YR ANNL 5-YR-ANNL

World Stock ★★★✩✩ $13,963 million 1.10% Matthew Nagle 2010-08-01 +9.1 +6.2 +17.5 -1.4 +0.2

TOP 5 HOLDINGS Oracle Corporation Microsoft Corporation Pfizer Inc. Accenture PLC Vodafone Group PLC

*– Annualized 52-WEEK HI LOW 11.63 8.78 13.24 12.75 9.30 6.90 13.28 8.96 13.75 12.73 13.01 12.85 12.96 12.13 12.59 8.70

FUND

PAMuniA m +.7 PaTxMgEMI d -2.5 StrIncA m +.9 StratIncC m +.9 TMG1.0 +4.9 TMG1.1A m +4.8 TMGlbDivIncA m +4.5 TMGlbDivIncC m +4.3 TaxMgdVlA m +3.1 WldwHealA m +4.2 FAM Value +4.5 FBR FBRFocus m +.8 FMI CommStk +5.7 Focus +6.3 LgCap +4.1 FPA Capital m +8.5 Cres d +3.8 NewInc m +.6 Fairholme Funds Fairhome d -1.0 Federated CapAprA m +2.9 ClvrValA m +5.6 HiIncBdA m +3.4 InterConA m +3.8 KaufmanA m -.2 KaufmanB m -.2 KaufmanC m -.2 KaufmanR m -.2 KaufmnSCA m +.7 MuniSecsA f +.6 MuniUltA m +.2 PrdntBr m -5.3 StrValA m +2.9 StratIncA f +1.6 TotRetBdA m +.6 USGovSecA f +.4 Fidelity AstMgr20 x +1.6 AstMgr50 +3.0 AstMgr85 +4.5 Bal +3.9 BlChGrow +5.4 BlChVal +4.9 CAMuInc d +.6 CASITxFre d +.4 CTMuInc d +.8 Canada d +8.5 CapApr +4.5 CapInc d +5.0 ChinaReg d -.7 Contra +5.3 ConvSec +6.8 DiscEq +5.4 DivGrow +5.9 DivStk +6.1 DivrIntl d +4.8 EmergAsia d -1.2 EmgMkt d -1.6 EqInc +5.3 EqInc II +5.4 EuCapApr d +5.1 Europe d +5.4 ExpMulNat d +4.8 FF2015 +3.2 FF2035 +4.5

+1.6 9.25 +11.1 52.25 +7.0 8.26 +6.2 7.79 +2.5 568.05 +2.1 25.32 +1.8 10.13 +1.1 10.11 +1.2 17.69 +4.5 9.78

8.22 39.18 8.10 7.64 435.73 19.51 8.44 8.43 14.12 8.15

8.55 49.84 8.21 7.75 560.18 24.96 10.10 10.08 17.43 9.74

-.01 +.77 ... ... +.94 +.04 +.08 +.08 +.02 +.13

+2.2 48.19 38.16 47.37

-.04

+6.5 51.90 38.90 50.25

-.12

+8.3 26.91 20.91 26.50 +.04 +8.2 32.79 23.07 32.25 +.28 +5.3 16.52 13.23 16.25 +.06 +6.7 44.96 30.86 44.70 -.18 +6.6 27.90 23.99 27.82 +.24 +4.3 11.07 10.82 10.92 +.01 +8.6 36.53 28.24 35.24

-.34

+2.9 +2.0 +8.2 +4.3 +2.6 +2.1 +2.1 +2.7 +3.1 +2.3 +2.3 +.1 +1.4 +7.7 +5.9 +5.0

20.00 15.43 7.75 51.99 5.63 5.33 5.33 5.64 27.48 10.34 10.05 5.65 4.51 9.45 11.48 7.93

15.48 11.60 7.11 37.18 4.37 4.13 4.13 4.38 19.09 9.34 10.01 4.42 3.75 8.54 10.95 7.66

19.58 15.21 7.75 51.81 5.48 5.19 5.19 5.49 26.37 9.62 10.01 4.48 4.49 9.18 11.14 7.75

-.07 -.02 +.02 +.89 +.01 +.01 +.01 +.01 -.11 -.01 ... +.01 +.03 +.03 -.01 -.01

+4.6 +4.7 +4.1 +4.0 +5.4 -1.4 +3.2 +4.0 +4.0 +8.6 +2.6 +10.5 +13.9 +5.2 +6.8 +.4 +4.4 +2.8 +2.1 +10.1 +6.6 +1.4 +.3 +2.5 +2.5 +2.0 +4.1 +3.0

12.98 15.94 14.14 19.06 48.88 11.48 12.37 10.81 11.84 63.11 27.28 9.88 34.07 71.69 27.62 24.20 30.52 16.10 31.64 31.40 27.08 47.58 19.63 20.14 33.21 23.28 11.71 12.06

12.01 13.52 10.85 15.94 34.78 9.04 11.33 10.49 11.01 46.30 20.41 8.47 24.62 54.99 21.07 19.05 21.79 12.06 23.93 22.93 19.80 35.94 14.86 14.36 23.88 17.70 10.07 9.53

12.97 15.89 14.00 18.95 47.78 11.34 11.61 10.55 11.24 63.11 26.47 9.82 32.28 71.23 27.19 23.75 30.11 15.87 31.60 30.26 25.93 46.59 19.24 20.02 33.00 22.85 11.70 11.99

+.01 +.06 +.08 +.05 +.05 +.07 -.01 +.01 -.01 +1.45 +.03 ... +1.10 +.63 +.01 +.11 +.17 +.04 +.43 +1.07 +.79 -.09 -.03 +.22 +.35 +.04 +.05 +.08

FUND

PCT 2.73 2.47 2.44 2.43 2.37

YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG

FF2040 +4.6 Fidelity +6.8 Fifty +4.4 FltRtHiIn d +1.5 FocuHiInc d +3.1 FourInOne +4.7 Fr2045 +4.7 Fr2050 +4.9 Free2000 +1.8 Free2005 +2.7 Free2010 +3.1 Free2020 +3.6 Free2025 +4.0 Free2030 +4.2 FreeInc x +1.8 GNMA +.5 GlobBal d +4.3 GovtInc -.2 GrDiscov +7.2 GrStr d +3.8 GrowCo +6.1 GrowInc +4.8 HiInc d +3.9 Indepndnc +5.0 InfProtBd +1.4 IntBond +.7 IntGovt -.1 IntMuniInc d +.6 IntSmOpp d +3.0 IntlCptlAppr d +3.0 IntlDisc d +3.6 IntlSmCp d +4.5 InvGrdBd +.8 Japan d +4.7 LargeCap +6.0 LatinAm d -2.3 LevCoSt d +7.3 LgCpVal +5.2 LowPriStk d +5.2 MAMuInc d +.8 MIMuInc d +.7 MNMuInc d +1.0 Magellan +6.3 MdCpVal d +5.5 MeCpSto +5.7 MidCap d +4.6 MtgSec +.5 MuniInc d +.5 NJMuInc d ... NYMuInc x +.1 NewMille +6.4 NewMktIn d ... Nordic d +2.6 OHMuInc d +.8 OTC +8.6 Overseas d +3.7 PAMuInc d +.9 PacBasin d +2.0 Puritan +4.3 RealInv d +4.3 RelEstInc x +3.6 Series100Index +5.0 ShIntMu d +.2 ShTmBond +.4 SmCapRetr d +7.0 SmCapStk d +6.0 SmCpGr d +5.9 SmCpOpp +6.4 SmCpVal d +4.7 StkSelec +5.4 StrDivInc +5.2 StratInc +2.3 StratRRet d +3.0 StratRRnI d +3.1 TaxFrB d +.6 Tel&Util +2.8 TotalBd +1.0 Trend +6.2 USBdIdx +.3 Value +6.1 ValueDis +5.6 Worldwid d +5.6 Fidelity Advisor AstMgr70 +3.9 BalT m +3.9 CapDevO +7.4 DivIntlA m +4.9 DivIntlC m +4.7 DivIntlIs d +4.9 DivIntlT m +4.8 EmMktIncI d ... EqGrowA m +7.2 EqGrowI +7.3 EqGrowT m +7.2 EqIncA m +5.5 EqIncI +5.5 EqIncT m +5.4 FltRateA m +1.4 FltRateC m +1.3 FltRateI d +1.4 Fr2010A m +3.1 Fr2015A m +3.2 Fr2020A m +3.7 Fr2020T m +3.7 Fr2025A m +4.1 Fr2030A m +4.3 Fr2035A m +4.6 Fr2040A m +4.7 GrowIncI +4.8 GrowOppT m +6.1 HiIncAdvA m +5.1 HiIncAdvI d +5.1 HiIncAdvT m +5.1 IntrDiscA m +3.5 LeverA m +7.2 LeverC m +7.0 LeverI +7.2 LeverT m +7.2 LrgCapI +6.0 Mid-CpIIA m +4.7 Mid-CpIII +4.7 MidCapA m +1.2 MidCapI +1.2 MidCapT m +1.2 MidCpIIT m +4.7 NewInsA m +5.1 NewInsB m +4.9 NewInsC m +4.9 NewInsI +5.1 NewInsT m +5.0 OverseaI d +5.2 ShFixInI +.5 SmCapA m +6.7 SmCapI +6.8 SmCapT m +6.7 StSlctSmCp d +6.4 StratIncA m +2.2 StratIncC m +2.1 StratIncI +2.3 StratIncT m +2.2 TechA m +7.3 TotBondA m +.9 TotBondI +1.0 ValStratT m +4.6 Fidelity Select Banking d +.3 Biotech d +3.6 BrokInv d +2.1 Chemical d +6.1 CommEq d +13.3 Computer d +5.8 ConsStpl d -.6 DefAero d +6.6 Electron d +9.3 Energy d +15.7 EnergySvc d +15.5 FinSvc d +.8 Gold d -1.6 HealtCar d +9.5 Industr d +6.4 Leisure d -.3 Materials d +3.2 MedDeliv d +13.5 MedEqSys d +9.4 NatGas d +9.8 NatRes d +13.1 Pharm d +4.5 SelctUtil d +3.9 SoftwCom d +4.5 Tech d +7.4 Trans d +1.5 Fidelity Spartan ExtMktIdI d +5.8 FdSpIntIv -.5 IntlIdxIn d +5.7 TotMktIdI d +5.5 USEqIndxI +5.4 First American CoreBdY +1.2 HiIncBdY +4.6 IntmBdInY +.8 IntrmTxFY +.7 RealA m +4.6 ShtTmBdY +.8 TotRetY +1.5

+2.9 +3.5 +.5 +4.9 +6.5 +3.4 NA NA +4.1 +4.0 +4.3 +3.7 +3.7 +3.1 +4.3 +6.5 +6.7 +5.7 +4.7 +2.5 +5.7 -4.6 +8.6 +5.1 +4.8 +5.3 +5.4 +4.0 -1.4 +1.7 +3.1 +4.3 +5.0 -3.2 +4.1 +11.0 +4.4 -1.5 +5.2 +3.8 +3.9 +3.9 +.9 +3.7 +2.6 +3.4 +4.5 +3.6 +3.6 +3.8 +5.1 +8.1 +5.3 +3.9 +8.7 +.6 +3.8 +6.5 +4.9 +1.5 +5.1 NA +3.7 +2.7 +9.3 +6.0 +5.1 NA +6.0 +2.7 +1.6 +8.1 +4.7 +4.7 +3.9 +3.3 +6.3 +5.7 +5.3 +2.1 +1.3 +5.1

8.43 34.79 18.85 9.91 9.57 28.57 10.00 9.90 12.17 11.10 14.02 14.31 12.02 14.41 11.46 11.94 23.28 10.97 14.91 21.79 90.13 19.45 9.20 26.12 12.21 10.86 11.21 10.48 10.70 13.33 34.51 22.22 7.56 11.87 19.01 59.88 31.17 11.29 40.69 12.32 12.24 11.79 76.94 17.10 10.77 30.57 11.03 12.97 11.94 13.36 31.44 16.63 35.26 11.97 61.10 33.95 11.12 26.70 18.84 27.73 10.81 9.33 10.82 8.53 22.27 21.70 16.71 11.75 16.64 27.59 11.16 11.67 9.87 9.86 11.19 16.50 11.16 72.85 11.71 74.15 15.73 19.91

6.64 25.78 13.85 9.37 8.79 22.66 7.83 7.66 11.34 9.77 12.11 11.96 9.81 11.61 10.74 11.30 18.76 10.26 10.46 15.60 64.17 14.60 8.31 18.16 11.14 10.24 10.58 9.89 7.87 9.92 25.96 15.98 7.11 9.65 13.84 43.25 21.30 8.87 30.93 11.38 11.45 11.08 58.10 12.44 8.05 22.04 10.53 11.94 11.03 12.28 23.28 14.84 24.46 11.11 41.75 25.84 10.30 19.64 15.52 20.33 9.45 7.23 10.54 8.35 15.40 14.68 11.86 7.90 12.35 20.13 9.11 10.72 8.48 8.46 10.27 13.39 10.60 51.59 11.07 53.86 11.82 14.47

8.38 34.33 18.40 9.89 9.40 28.27 9.94 9.84 12.16 11.10 14.01 14.29 11.98 14.35 11.46 11.46 23.27 10.37 14.67 21.21 88.19 19.17 9.19 25.56 11.78 10.57 10.67 10.01 10.70 13.28 34.22 22.22 7.41 11.70 18.66 57.69 30.50 11.07 40.39 11.64 11.65 11.29 76.15 16.83 10.56 30.19 10.82 12.24 11.22 12.54 30.99 15.50 35.22 11.39 59.63 33.67 10.53 26.58 18.68 26.80 10.72 9.18 10.58 8.47 21.91 20.78 16.62 11.54 16.34 27.12 11.10 11.20 9.87 9.86 10.52 16.39 10.76 71.56 11.30 72.86 15.46 19.71

+.05 +.16 -.03 ... +.02 +.07 +.07 +.07 +.03 +.04 +.06 +.08 +.07 +.09 +.02 +.01 +.14 -.01 +.04 -.04 -.05 +.03 +.02 +.11 +.04 ... -.01 -.01 +.22 +.25 +.41 +.50 -.01 +.03 -.01 +1.48 +.03 -.01 +.29 -.02 -.02 -.02 +.67 +.08 -.02 +.16 +.02 -.03 -.02 -.06 +.13 +.09 +.73 -.02 +.11 +.34 -.01 +.71 +.03 -.36 -.05 ... ... +.01 +.10 -.20 +.28 +.06 +.03 +.08 +.03 +.02 +.05 +.06 -.02 +.11 ... -.09 -.01 +.10 +.02 +.13

+4.1 +3.3 +3.3 +.1 -.7 +.4 -.2 +8.1 +3.3 +3.7 +3.1 +.6 +.9 +.4 +4.6 +3.8 +4.9 +4.2 +4.0 +3.5 +3.2 +3.5 +2.8 +2.8 +2.7 +1.7 +2.0 +7.7 +8.0 +7.7 +2.9 +4.7 +4.0 +5.0 +4.5 +4.1 +6.0 +6.3 +.3 +.6 +.1 +5.8 +4.7 +3.8 +3.9 +4.9 +4.4 +2.9 +3.1 +7.0 +7.3 +6.8 +2.7 +8.0 +7.1 +8.2 +8.0 +7.0 +5.9 +6.2 +3.1

17.09 15.71 11.62 16.88 16.20 17.14 16.73 13.89 58.84 62.63 58.59 24.63 25.37 24.98 9.92 9.92 9.90 11.91 11.87 12.46 12.46 12.11 12.76 12.16 13.01 18.35 37.32 10.41 9.89 10.46 34.29 37.68 35.89 38.09 37.02 20.19 18.86 19.09 20.75 21.63 20.94 18.73 21.08 20.03 20.12 21.29 20.85 19.62 9.29 26.40 27.65 25.49 20.07 13.09 13.06 13.22 13.08 27.46 11.17 11.15 27.52

13.68 13.11 8.35 12.66 12.15 12.86 12.55 12.40 41.10 43.77 40.93 18.61 19.16 18.87 9.38 9.38 9.36 10.22 10.14 10.34 10.33 9.81 10.19 9.51 10.14 13.76 26.08 8.99 8.57 9.03 25.77 25.91 24.75 26.22 25.46 14.73 14.07 14.22 15.48 16.10 15.64 14.00 16.21 15.44 15.50 16.37 16.04 14.13 9.10 20.76 21.65 20.11 13.43 12.02 12.00 12.14 12.01 18.34 10.60 10.58 19.76

16.96 15.62 11.48 16.82 16.14 17.08 16.67 12.98 57.86 61.60 57.61 24.12 24.85 24.46 9.90 9.90 9.88 11.90 11.86 12.44 12.44 12.08 12.71 12.10 12.94 18.09 36.53 10.36 9.84 10.40 34.00 36.89 35.13 37.30 36.24 19.82 18.75 18.98 20.27 21.13 20.46 18.62 20.94 19.88 19.97 21.14 20.70 19.47 9.23 26.32 27.56 25.41 19.70 12.51 12.49 12.65 12.51 26.84 10.76 10.74 27.09

+.08 +.04 +.10 +.23 +.22 +.23 +.22 +.07 +.13 +.15 +.13 -.05 -.05 -.05 ... ... -.01 +.05 +.05 +.06 +.06 +.07 +.08 +.08 +.08 +.02 -.01 +.01 +.01 +.01 +.40 +.06 +.05 +.06 +.06 -.01 +.17 +.17 ... ... ... +.17 +.17 +.16 +.16 +.17 +.17 +.28 +.01 +.33 +.35 +.32 +.10 +.02 +.03 +.03 +.03 +.10 ... -.01 +.04

-7.0 20.28 +2.1 76.38 -1.2 55.95 +13.1 103.54 +6.1 30.03 +9.4 62.24 +8.8 69.20 +4.7 80.06 +2.8 54.98 +7.2 60.93 +6.5 86.55 -8.2 69.43 +15.4 54.48 +5.8 136.47 +7.6 25.89 +7.3 93.47 +12.2 72.15 +4.3 56.54 +8.7 30.17 +2.4 36.50 +10.0 39.52 +7.3 12.91 +3.7 50.52 +11.5 94.25 +9.2 105.02 +5.1 58.24

14.67 58.55 42.21 63.99 19.74 42.57 57.47 59.81 34.61 37.16 46.90 51.47 37.25 100.51 17.59 69.31 47.18 39.12 21.95 25.57 24.65 10.20 41.59 67.52 70.10 42.73

18.56 75.57 53.53 101.29 30.03 59.68 67.95 78.03 52.87 60.51 85.93 62.10 52.28 136.47 25.18 90.84 70.10 56.41 30.17 36.49 39.36 12.88 50.25 91.41 102.67 56.23

-.39 +1.61 -.58 +1.27 +.49 +.22 +.35 -.30 -1.16 +.48 +.49 -.94 +1.27 +2.77 +.08 +.19 +.61 +1.41 +.68 +.32 +.45 +.24 +.50 -.35 +.39 +.38 +.12 -.04 +.23 +.07 +.06

+5.5 +6.5 +2.6 +3.2 +2.6

40.97 11.39 37.51 39.03 47.62

29.12 10.22 28.13 29.40 36.36

40.39 10.57 37.17 38.44 46.89

+6.0 +8.3 +5.8 +4.1 +4.5 +4.4 +7.3

11.59 9.23 10.65 11.17 19.44 10.08 10.74

11.05 8.18 10.15 10.48 14.20 9.96 10.13

11.40 -.01 9.23 +.03 10.37 ... 10.65 -.01 18.81 -.22 10.07 +.01 10.66 +.01

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YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG

First Eagle FndofAmY b +5.0 +6.7 GlbA m +3.3 +8.3 Gold m ... +16.9 OverseasA m +2.3 +7.7 USValueA m +4.6 +6.3 First Investors BlChipA m +4.8 +1.3 GrowIncA m +5.7 +2.2 IncomeA m +3.2 +4.6 InvGradeA m +.9 +5.2 OpportA m +6.6 +3.4 TaxEA m +.7 +3.4 TotalRetA m +3.5 +4.2 FrankTemp-Franklin AZ TF A m -.2 +3.0 AdjUSA m +.4 +3.7 AdjUSC m +.3 +3.2 BalInv m +3.5 +1.0 CA TF A m -.6 +2.9 CA TF C m -.7 +2.3 CAHY A m -.8 +2.1 CAInTF A m +.4 +2.5 CAInt A m +.6 +3.3 CO TF A m +.2 +2.8 CaTxFrAdv -.5 +3.0 China A m -1.1 +14.8 CvtSc A m +4.3 +5.7 DynaTechA m +6.2 +6.0 EqIn A m +3.6 +1.3 FL TF A m +.2 +3.3 FLRtDAAdv +1.4 +3.4 Fed TF A m +.7 +3.3 Fed TF C m +.6 +2.7 FedIntA m +.9 +3.9 FedLmtT/FIncA m +.1 +3.5 FedTxFrIA +.7 +3.4 FlRtDAC m +1.4 +2.8 FlRtDAccA m +1.5 +3.2 FlxCpGr A m +5.0 +3.9 FlxCpGrAd +5.1 +4.1 GoldPrAdv -3.4 +20.2 GoldPrM A m -3.4 +19.9 GoldPrM C m -3.5 +19.0 GrowAdv +4.5 +5.3 GrowB m +4.4 +4.2 GrowC m +4.4 +4.2 Growth A m +4.5 +5.0 HY TF A m ... +2.9 HY TF C m ... +2.3 HighIncA m +3.8 +7.8 HighIncC m +3.7 +7.3 Income A m +4.8 +6.1 Income C m +4.7 +5.5 IncomeAdv +4.9 +6.3 IncomeB m +4.6 +5.2 IncomeR b +4.3 +5.7 InsTF A m +.4 +2.9 LoDurTReA m +.9 +5.2 MATFA m +1.0 +2.9 MD TF A m -.2 +2.8 MITFA m +.9 +3.2 MNTFA m +1.4 +3.8 MO TF A m +.5 +3.1 NC TF A m +.5 +3.3 NJ TF A m -.6 +3.2 NY TF A m +.1 +3.4 NY TF C m -.1 +2.8 NYIntTFA m +1.0 +3.7 NatResA m +10.4 +11.1 OHTFA m +.8 +3.2 OR TF A m +.7 +3.6 PA TF A m -.2 +3.2 PR TF A m -1.0 +2.9 RealRetA m +2.0 +5.7 RisDv A m +3.5 +2.5 RisDv C m +3.3 +1.8 SmCpGI C m +7.0 +4.2 SmCpValA m +4.0 +3.9 SmMCpGAdv +7.2 +5.3 SmMdCpGrA m +7.1 +5.0 StrInc A m +1.9 +7.3 StrIncAdv +2.0 +7.6 Strinc C m +1.8 +6.8 TotRetAdv +1.1 +6.2 TotalRetA m +1.1 +5.9 US Gov A m +.4 +5.7 US Gov C m +.3 +5.1 USGovtAdv +.3 +5.8 Utils A m +2.9 +5.3 Utils C m +2.8 +4.8 VA TF A m +.3 +3.1 FrankTemp-Mutual Beacon A m +4.9 +1.2 Beacon C m +4.9 +.5 Beacon Z +5.0 +1.6 Discov A m +3.8 +5.6 Discov C m +3.7 +4.8 Discov Z +3.9 +5.9 DiscovR b +3.8 +5.3 Euro A m +4.7 +5.4 Euro Z +4.8 +5.7 QuestA m +3.6 +4.8 QuestC m +3.5 +4.1 QuestZ +3.7 +5.1 Shares A m +4.8 +1.6 Shares C m +4.8 +.9 Shares Z +4.9 +1.9 FrankTemp-Templeton BricA m -2.2 NA DvMk A m -1.8 +6.6 EmgMktIs -2.6 +6.8 Fgn A m +8.0 +5.0 Frgn Adv +8.0 +5.3 Frgn C m +7.9 +4.2 GlBond A m +1.0 +11.7 GlBond C m +.8 +11.2 GlBondAdv +.9 +12.0 GlOp A m +5.9 +3.9 GlSmCo A m +2.0 +4.6 Growth A m +6.2 +.2 Growth Ad +6.2 +.5 Growth C m +6.0 -.5 IncomeA m +3.5 +7.3 World A m +6.0 +3.0 Franklin Templeton ConAllcC m +2.0 +4.7 ConAllctA m +2.1 +5.5 CoreAll A m +5.2 +2.7 FndAllA m +5.3 +2.5 FndAllC m +5.2 +1.8 GrAllcA m +3.7 +5.1 HYldTFInA +.1 +3.0 TemMdTaC m +2.6 +5.0 TemMdTarA m +2.7 +5.8 GE ElfunTr +6.8 +3.9 ElfunTxE +.4 +4.0 S&SInc +.8 +5.0 S&SProg +5.7 +4.0 GMO CHgIEqIII +2.4 +.4 DomBdVI d +1.5 +5.9 EmgDbtIII d +.5 +8.6 EmgDbtIV d +.6 +8.6 EmgMktII d +.5 NA EmgMktIII d +.5 +8.3 EmgMktIV d +.5 +8.3 EmgMktV d +.5 +8.4 EmgMktsVI d +.6 +8.4 ForII +6.4 +1.5 ForIII +6.4 +1.6 ForIV +6.4 +1.7 ForSmCaS d +4.5 +7.1 InCorEqIV +5.6 +2.2 IntCEqIII +5.6 +2.1 IntCEqVI +5.7 NA IntGEqIII +2.9 +4.1 IntGEqIV +2.9 NA IntIVlIII +6.4 +1.6 IntItVlIV +6.4 +1.6 IntlSmIII d +3.9 +4.5 QuIII +3.7 +2.7 QuIV +3.7 +2.7 QuVI +3.7 NA StFxInVI d +1.3 NA TxMdIEIII +5.7 +2.7 USCorEqVI +3.8 +.7 Gabelli AssetAAA m +5.1 +6.6 EqIncomeAAA m +4.5 +5.0 GoldAAA m -3.6 +15.7 GrowthAAA m +4.0 +1.9 SmCpGrAAA m +4.1 +7.4 UtilA m +4.2 +6.5 UtilAAA m +4.3 +6.5 UtilC m +4.2 +5.7 Value m +6.0 +5.3 Gartmore LrgCapA m +4.3 +2.9 Gateway GatewayA m +1.7 +2.6 Goldman Sachs BalStrA m +2.5 +3.7 CapGrA m +3.6 +2.0 CorFixIA m +.4 +4.2 G&IStrA m +3.7 +2.4 GovtIncA m ... +5.1 GrIncA m +4.6 +1.1 GrOppA m +4.4 +7.1 GrStrA m +4.7 +1.2 HiYieldA m +3.4 +6.9 LgCapValA m +4.8 +1.7 MidCapVaA m +5.2 +4.6 ShDuGovA m +.1 +4.8 SmCpValA m +5.3 +4.9 StrIntEqA m +5.8 +1.8 Greenspring Greensprretl d +1.4 +5.1 GuideStone Funds AggAllGS4 +5.2 +1.8 BlcAlloGS4 +3.0 +4.5 GrAlloGS4 +4.1 +3.3 GrEqGS4 +4.5 +2.1 IntEqGS4 +3.9 +2.5 LowDurGS4 +.5 +4.6 MedDurGS4 +.8 +6.5 SmCapGS4 +7.3 +2.8 ValEqGS4 +6.7 +.8 Harbor Bond +.8 +7.7 CapApInst +4.8 +3.3 CapAprAdm b +4.7 +3.0 CapAprInv b +4.7 +2.9 HiYBdInst d +3.2 +7.5 IntlAdm m +4.1 +6.2 IntlGr d +2.0 +2.4 IntlInstl d +4.2 +6.5 IntlInv m +4.1 +6.1 SmCpGr +4.4 +5.2 SmCpVal +7.0 +1.8 Harding Loevner EmgMkts d -3.8 +7.5 Hartford

27.31 48.05 34.34 23.17 17.25

20.85 38.82 23.95 18.88 14.38

27.19 47.90 33.96 23.17 17.08

+.17 +.34 +.95 +.23 +.02

22.48 15.35 2.56 9.92 29.38 10.11 15.58

17.70 11.56 2.34 9.19 20.56 9.18 13.18

22.17 15.16 2.56 9.53 28.99 9.43 15.50

+.05 +.06 +.01 -.01 +.13 ... +.03

11.11 8.96 8.95 50.06 7.25 7.24 9.73 12.40 11.81 12.01 7.22 42.05 16.06 32.51 17.61 11.69 9.26 12.16 12.16 12.08 10.49 12.16 9.25 9.25 51.59 52.40 53.67 51.50 49.28 47.41 45.40 44.92 47.39 10.39 10.53 2.05 2.07 2.27 2.28 2.25 2.25 2.24 12.19 10.48 11.95 11.73 12.22 12.55 12.33 12.51 12.36 12.01 11.99 11.57 43.93 12.78 12.22 10.57 12.16 11.36 34.46 34.05 36.25 47.30 41.68 40.47 10.58 10.59 10.58 10.42 10.40 6.88 6.84 6.90 11.95 11.89 11.93

9.93 8.86 8.85 36.40 6.48 6.47 8.68 11.08 10.93 10.65 6.47 29.94 12.86 23.50 13.78 10.75 8.88 10.93 10.93 11.19 10.25 10.94 8.87 8.87 37.91 38.44 34.66 33.32 32.07 36.66 35.11 34.74 36.62 9.31 9.44 1.87 1.88 1.97 1.99 1.96 1.97 1.95 10.93 10.16 10.64 10.58 11.12 11.47 11.14 11.29 11.13 10.72 10.71 10.72 27.63 11.50 11.08 9.49 10.77 10.62 27.54 27.18 25.18 33.28 28.77 27.98 9.93 9.94 9.92 9.79 9.77 6.63 6.59 6.65 10.12 10.09 10.77

10.27 8.86 8.86 48.90 6.62 6.61 8.85 11.47 11.14 11.05 6.61 39.39 15.91 32.02 17.41 11.05 9.22 11.32 11.32 11.42 10.29 11.33 9.22 9.22 50.63 51.43 51.44 49.33 47.11 46.68 44.69 44.21 46.66 9.55 9.69 2.04 2.06 2.25 2.27 2.24 2.24 2.22 11.34 10.39 11.07 10.87 11.48 11.89 11.52 11.70 11.44 11.12 11.11 10.94 43.87 11.94 11.45 9.79 11.07 11.35 33.99 33.57 35.79 46.39 41.16 39.96 10.53 10.54 10.52 10.13 10.11 6.72 6.68 6.73 11.83 11.79 11.15

-.03 ... ... -.01 -.04 -.04 -.03 -.04 ... -.04 -.04 +1.44 +.10 +.17 +.04 -.03 -.02 -.07 -.06 ... ... -.07 -.01 -.01 +.19 +.20 +1.38 +1.32 +1.26 +.24 +.23 +.23 +.25 -.05 -.04 -.01 ... -.01 ... ... ... -.01 -.05 ... -.04 -.03 -.03 -.02 -.02 -.02 -.04 -.06 -.06 ... +.50 -.04 -.02 -.03 -.04 -.01 +.16 +.15 +.33 +.08 +.38 +.37 -.02 -.02 -.03 ... -.01 -.01 -.01 -.02 ... +.01 -.03

13.00 12.90 13.09 30.74 30.48 31.11 30.46 22.55 23.00 18.41 18.21 18.55 21.90 21.68 22.07

10.67 10.53 10.78 25.55 25.28 25.88 25.31 18.75 19.12 15.15 15.06 15.24 18.05 17.83 18.20

12.84 12.74 12.93 30.30 30.03 30.67 30.02 22.06 22.50 18.20 18.00 18.34 21.64 21.43 21.81

-.01 ... ... -.01 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.11 -.11 +.01 +.01 +.01 +.04 +.04 +.04

15.52 26.06 17.13 7.57 7.49 7.41 13.89 13.91

11.33 18.79 12.28 5.52 5.47 5.40 12.62 12.64

14.85 25.07 16.27 7.54 7.46 7.38 13.62 13.64

18.96 7.65 19.07 19.07 18.62 2.94 15.89

14.76 5.62 14.70 14.71 14.31 2.41 12.25

18.76 7.59 18.89 18.89 18.44 2.92 15.73

+.43 +.74 +.48 +.09 +.09 +.09 +.08 +.08 ... +.14 +.11 +.18 +.18 +.18 +.02 +.12

13.84 14.07 13.23 11.09 10.93 15.92 10.42 14.34 14.66

12.35 12.54 10.22 9.05 8.94 12.91 9.34 12.37 12.63

13.80 14.03 13.05 11.01 10.86 15.82 9.58 14.28 14.60

+.05 +.05 +.06 +.06 +.06 +.09 -.05 +.06 +.07

44.82 12.06 11.48 43.11

35.00 11.02 10.96 33.17

44.20 +.02 11.28 -.02 11.29 -.01 42.51 -.02

24.44 4.68 9.47 9.46 15.05 15.08 14.98 14.96 14.99 12.97 13.03 13.34 14.37 30.95 30.97 30.92 23.99 24.00 23.47 23.45 8.55 20.94 20.96 20.95 15.78 15.48 12.12

20.48 4.37 7.81 7.80 10.88 10.91 10.84 10.83 10.85 9.82 9.87 10.10 10.14 22.83 22.84 22.81 17.75 17.76 17.38 17.37 6.04 17.16 17.17 17.17 14.82 11.52 9.63

24.00 4.37 9.15 9.14 14.74 14.77 14.68 14.66 14.69 12.88 12.94 13.25 14.32 30.67 30.69 30.64 23.85 23.86 23.24 23.23 8.50 20.85 20.86 20.85 15.31 15.39 11.98

+.06 -.20 +.09 +.09 +.36 +.36 +.36 +.36 +.36 +.11 +.11 +.11 +.24 +.24 +.24 +.24 +.23 +.23 +.16 +.16 +.14 +.18 +.17 +.17 -.05 +.14 +.08

52.03 21.59 36.71 33.00 35.65 6.61 6.57 6.05 16.71

38.79 16.60 24.62 24.66 25.80 5.86 5.83 5.34 12.68

51.43 21.31 34.44 32.64 35.31 6.55 6.51 5.89 16.52

+.24 +.07 +.56 +.09 +.27 +.04 +.04 +.04 +.08

15.64 12.35 15.42 +.02 26.60 24.00 26.51 +.05 10.50 22.30 10.07 10.98 15.90 22.47 24.43 11.32 7.44 12.63 38.46 10.50 42.10 10.94

9.32 17.33 9.47 9.23 14.78 17.40 18.37 9.09 6.80 9.68 27.65 10.21 30.34 8.19

10.48 21.95 9.80 10.94 14.95 21.98 23.96 11.25 7.43 12.36 37.75 10.25 41.58 10.82

+.04 ... -.01 +.06 -.01 -.06 +.02 +.07 +.01 -.04 -.08 ... -.09 +.08

24.65 22.58 24.53

-.02

12.58 12.55 12.91 20.20 14.05 13.49 14.48 15.66 15.32

9.50 10.93 10.51 14.50 10.65 13.17 13.51 10.87 11.41

12.40 12.48 12.78 19.75 13.96 13.28 13.74 15.51 15.06

+.06 +.02 +.04 -.01 +.16 ... ... +.12 +.03

12.45 39.35 39.17 38.93 11.33 62.94 12.65 63.37 62.76 13.79 21.32

11.57 29.37 29.22 29.06 10.46 46.33 9.49 46.64 46.17 9.86 15.62

12.20 38.47 38.29 38.05 11.25 62.65 12.62 63.08 62.47 13.44 20.96

+.03 +.11 +.11 +.11 +.04 +.79 +.19 +.80 +.79 +.05 +.02

52.18 39.03 49.82 +1.31


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW AdvHLSFIB b +4.2 +3.6 20.56 16.86 AdvHLSIA +4.3 +3.9 20.32 16.69 AdviserA m +4.2 +3.4 15.53 12.65 BalAlA m +3.6 +4.1 11.78 9.82 CapAppIIA m +5.7 +5.5 14.94 10.84 CapApr C m +2.9 +2.0 32.29 24.42 CapAprA m +3.1 +2.7 36.42 27.43 CapAprB m +2.9 +1.9 32.09 24.29 CapAprI +3.1 NA 36.44 27.39 ChksBalsA m +3.0 NA 9.93 8.27 CpApHLSIA +4.7 +4.5 45.11 33.13 CpApHLSIB b +4.7 +4.3 44.72 32.82 DivGrowA m +5.4 +4.4 20.31 15.66 DivGrowI +5.4 NA 20.25 15.61 DsEqHLSIA +5.9 +2.4 12.62 9.59 DvGrHLSIA +5.5 +4.8 20.88 16.18 DvGrHLSIB b +5.5 +4.5 20.82 16.13 EqIncA m +5.3 +4.5 13.58 10.54 FloatRtA m +2.0 +3.6 9.01 8.48 FloatRtC m +2.0 +2.9 9.00 8.47 FloatRtI +2.1 NA 9.01 8.49 GlbGrthIA +4.3 +.8 16.49 12.01 GrAlA m +4.2 +3.6 12.11 9.54 GrOpHLSIA +7.0 +4.0 28.12 20.00 GrOppA m +6.8 +3.6 29.09 20.77 GrOppL m +6.8 +3.8 29.89 21.32 HiYdHLSIA +4.2 +8.9 9.54 8.07 InOpHLSIA +2.9 +6.4 12.91 9.62 IndHLSIA +5.3 +2.4 28.04 21.47 InflPlC m +1.1 +4.8 12.20 10.95 InflPlusA m +1.2 +5.6 12.32 11.08 MCVlHLSIA +4.6 +4.8 11.02 7.92 MdCpHLSIA +6.4 +6.2 28.06 20.62 MidCapA m +6.3 +5.5 23.72 17.48 MidCapC m +6.2 +4.7 20.76 15.36 Sm-CpGrHLSIA +7.1 +3.9 23.26 15.28 SmCoHLSIA +8.8 +4.2 19.45 13.32 StkHLSIA +6.2 +3.0 44.23 32.79 TRBdHLSIA +.8 +4.8 11.54 10.80 TRBdHLSIA b +.7 +4.5 11.46 10.74 TotRetBdA m +.5 +4.4 10.76 10.28 USHLSIA +.1 +3.0 11.17 10.36 ValHLSIA +5.0 +4.4 11.50 8.77 Heartland SelectVal m +5.7 +6.1 31.09 23.25 Value m +7.1 +4.0 47.39 33.76 ValuePlus m +4.8 +9.6 31.48 22.65 Henderson IntlOppA m +6.5 +5.0 22.47 17.57 IntlOppC m +6.3 +4.2 21.29 16.63 Homestead Value d +6.3 +2.4 33.01 25.45 Hotchkis & Wiley LgCapValA m +4.7 -2.6 17.55 13.12 Hussman StrTotRet d +.1 +7.2 12.86 11.95 StratGrth d -2.0 -.9 13.53 11.84 ICON Energy +12.3 +8.5 22.63 14.53 ING CorpLeadB +9.3 +6.0 22.35 16.10 GNMAIncA m +.7 +5.8 8.99 8.67 GlREstA m +3.2 +2.1 17.04 13.21 IntlVal A m +7.1 +1.5 12.56 9.85 RussiaA m +8.3 +9.4 44.40 28.36 TRPGrEqI +5.2 +4.1 58.73 42.62 INVESCO AmerValA m +6.4 +5.5 29.41 21.92 AsPacGrA m -1.9 +12.7 31.45 22.94 BasBalA m +4.3 +.5 11.65 9.52 BasicValA m +5.6 -1.9 22.59 17.35 CapDevA m +7.6 +2.5 17.92 12.71 CharterA m +5.4 +5.0 17.21 13.78 ComstockA m +5.6 +2.4 16.96 12.78 ComstockB m +5.6 +2.1 16.94 12.78 ComstockC m +5.4 +1.6 16.94 12.78 ConstellA m +4.0 -1.3 24.75 18.32 ConstellB m +3.8 -2.1 22.22 16.53 CorpBondA m +1.2 +5.9 6.95 6.50 CpGrA m +5.9 +6.2 14.64 10.63 DevMkt A m -2.7 +10.3 34.13 25.75 DivDivA m +4.3 +4.2 13.06 10.32 DivDivInv b +4.2 +4.3 13.06 10.32 DivGrowB m +4.5 +.2 13.79 10.82 DynInv b +7.2 +3.8 24.34 16.86 EnergyA m +12.6 +9.8 46.88 29.13 EnergyInv b +12.5 +9.8 46.72 29.02 EnterprsA m +5.8 +6.3 18.98 13.82 EqIncomeA m +4.9 +4.5 9.14 7.32 EqIncomeB m +4.9 +4.3 8.96 7.18 EqIncomeC m +4.7 +3.7 9.00 7.21 EqWSP500A m +5.9 +4.2 33.14 24.54 EuroGrA m +3.9 +4.1 32.02 24.00 FloatRtA m +2.2 +3.3 7.88 7.34 GlHlthCrA m +6.6 +2.3 28.48 23.28 GlHlthCrI m +6.6 +2.3 28.48 23.28 GlS&MGrA m +3.0 +4.3 19.76 15.20 GlobEqA m +5.2 0.0 11.40 8.65 GlobFranA m +3.3 +6.6 22.45 17.92 GovtSecsA m -.1 +2.9 9.87 9.37 GrowIncA m +6.0 +3.1 20.81 15.61 HiYldA m +3.2 +8.3 4.33 3.96 HiYldMuA m -.7 +1.6 9.67 8.64 HiYldMuC m -.7 +.8 9.65 8.63 InsTaxFA m +.3 +1.0 16.79 15.24 IntlGrA m +3.2 +4.8 28.51 21.92 LrgCapGrA m +5.7 +2.6 13.01 9.53 MidCapGrA m +6.4 +7.0 32.16 22.79 MidCpCrA m +5.0 +5.5 24.51 19.97 MuniIncA m +.1 +1.9 13.56 12.23 PacGrowB m +.4 +5.2 22.75 17.66 RealEstA m +3.7 +2.4 23.03 17.40 SP500IdxA m +5.3 +2.2 14.49 11.04 SmCapEqA m +9.2 +5.4 13.44 9.20 SmCapGrA m +9.0 +5.9 31.45 21.79 SmCapValA m +5.2 +8.5 19.38 14.03 SmCpGrA m +9.1 +4.7 12.21 8.61 Summit b +4.2 +2.0 12.56 9.42 TaxESecY +.2 +2.9 11.21 10.05 TechInv b +9.1 +4.8 36.18 24.41 TxFrInmA3 m +.7 +4.2 11.59 10.92 USMortA m +.6 +4.2 13.22 12.75 USSmValY d +5.4 +9.0 29.03 20.24 Ivy AssetSTrB m +3.2 +9.3 24.54 19.43 AssetStrA m +3.3 +10.2 25.40 20.02 AssetStrC m +3.2 +9.4 24.67 19.51 AssetStrY m +3.4 +10.2 25.45 20.06 GlNatResA m +8.1 +6.2 23.35 15.21 GlNatResC m +7.9 +5.5 20.27 13.26 GlNatResI d +8.1 NA 23.82 15.47 GlbNatrlY m +8.0 +6.5 23.64 15.38 HiIncA m +3.5 +9.5 8.69 8.11 HiIncC m +3.4 +8.7 8.69 8.11 IntlValA m +4.4 +6.6 17.43 12.71 LgCpGrA m +4.8 +3.2 14.05 10.40 LtdTmBdA m +.1 +5.3 11.37 11.00 PacOppA m -2.4 +10.3 17.27 12.97 ScTechA m +9.5 +9.3 35.07 26.06 ScTechY m +9.5 +9.4 36.52 27.12 JPMorgan CoreBondA m +.4 +6.4 11.75 11.15 CoreBondC m +.3 +5.7 11.81 11.20 DiversMidCapGrA m+6.8 +5.1 23.31 16.11 EqIdxA m +5.3 +2.3 30.53 23.22 GovtBdA m ... +5.7 11.32 10.53 HighStatA m +.5 +1.3 15.87 14.95 HighYldA m +3.6 +8.8 8.39 7.61 InvBalA m +2.8 +5.0 12.61 10.95 InvConGrA m +1.9 +5.1 11.37 10.44 InvConGrC m +1.8 +4.5 11.33 10.41 InvGrInA m +3.5 +4.3 13.34 10.99 InvGrowA m +4.2 +3.6 14.22 11.14 MidCapVal m +4.2 +4.3 24.47 18.63 SmCapEqA m +5.0 +7.6 36.01 27.07 SmCapEqR5 +5.1 NA 39.20 29.41 James Advantage GoldRainA b +1.3 +5.9 20.36 18.18 Janus BalC m +3.8 NA 26.17 22.89 BalJ +3.9 +6.8 26.20 23.33 BalS b +3.8 NA 26.21 22.91 ContrJ +2.5 +2.6 15.36 12.32 EntrprsJ +5.9 +6.8 63.57 44.79 FlxBdJ +.9 +7.5 11.06 10.34 FortyA m +3.1 +5.4 35.46 28.15 FortyS b +3.1 +5.1 34.98 27.80 Gr&IncJ +6.2 +.4 32.80 25.62 HiYldJ d +3.4 +8.4 9.29 8.31 J +3.7 +3.1 30.76 23.93 OrionJ d +4.7 +7.2 12.81 9.24 OverseasJ d +2.1 +11.2 53.66 39.62 PerkinsMCVJ +4.7 +6.3 23.89 18.87 PerkinsSCVJ +4.2 +7.8 25.30 20.61 RsrchJ