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SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2011

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THE FLOOD OF 2011

MOVE OVER, AGNES

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Flooding along the Susquehanna River in West Pittston as seen on Friday afternoon. West Pittston was just one of many municipalities that saw widespread flooding that exceeded that seen during Agnes in 1972. By TERRIE MORGAN BESECKER and ANDREW M. SEDER tmorgan@timesleader.com, aseder@timesleader.com

INSIDE ALL EYES ON US: Area’s plight gets national attention. 2A FOUL WATER: Unhealthy substances in floodwaters a big concern. 3A DAMAGE CONCERNS: Pierce Street Bridge will be inspected. 3A AROUND OUR AREA: Reports from Plains Twp. and Shickshinny 4A LACKAWANNA RIVER: Partial levee fails, inundates Duryea, 5A THROUGH THE LENS: A look at this historic flood in pictures, 6A, 7A DOING THEIR JOB: Engineers say flood gates are working fine, 9A WASHED OUT: High school, college football games postponed. 1B

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To see more photos and video, visit www.timesleader.com

Confusion follows failure of gauge

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he levee system protecting the Wyoming Valley withstood the greatest challenge in its history as the Susquehanna River unofficially crested at a historic 42.66 feet Friday, but emergency officials remained concerned about additional stress on the system into today. The main concern focused on a section of the levee near the soccer fields in Forty Fort, where the raging river began pushing beneath the surface of the base of the dike, threatening its structural integrity, said Luzerne County engineer Jim Brozena and Cpl. Dave Anderson of the Army Corps of Engineers.

“This flood fight is not over. This system has been incredibly stressed throughout this event,” Anderson said. Flooding after Tropical Storm Lee caused widespread devastation throughout Luzerne County and Pennsylvania, prompting President Barack Obama to declare states of emergency in New York and Pennsylvania early Friday. It displaced more than 100,000 people who live along the Susquehanna in Pennsylvania and New York,

including 65,000 in Luzerne County. County Commissioner Stephen A. Urban said approximately 700 county residents have checked into shelters since evacuations were ordered Thursday. The Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency said it is unable to quantify the damage in affected areas at this point because flood waters have not yet receded. Damage assessments locally are expected to start Monday. Six deaths related to Tropical Storm Lee and its after-

math were reported in Pennsylvania, The Associated Press reported. Luzerne County Coroner John Corcoran said his office is investigating one death in West Pittston that may be related to flooding in that community. Corcoran would not release any additional information about that death Friday because the next of kin had not been notified. An autopsy has been scheduled for 1 p.m. today at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital.

A crest of 42.66 feet likely a record, but definitely a surprise. CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

U.S. Sen. Robert Casey talks with the media as he tours several flooded areas in West Pittston on Friday morning. Casey and fellow Sen. Pat Toomey vowed they would do all they could to help.

See FLOOD, Page 14A

Flooding extensive throughout W. Pittston, Exeter By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES jandes@timesleader.com

WEST PITTSTON -Judy Barone sat quietly in a car around 8 a.m. Friday staring at her West Pittston home as household objects floated out, one by

INSIDE

one. The muddy, contaminated Susquehanna River permeated the Susquehanna Avenue home that she kept so neat you could eat off the floor. Her body tensed up as she thought

A NEWS Local Obituaries Editorial

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of what it would take to get back to usual. Still, she didn’t utter a word of complaint or seek out pity, saying her family’s health and safety was more important. She looked at her son, Charles

Unity

III, who successfully battled a serious illness this year. “Isn’t he a picture of health?” she said, smiling for the first time that See EXTENSIVE, Page 14A

Local anti-Muslim sentiment rare News, 12A

B SPORTS MLB Football Business

FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

An excavator works on the Market Street Bridge flood gate Friday. Water seeped under the gate as the river rose to 42.66 feet, an unofficial record reached after it was determined that a river gauge was faulty.

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By ANDREW M. SEDER aseder@timesleader.com

The 42.66-foot crest of the Susquehanna River at Wilkes-Barre at 3 a.m. Friday is unofficial but is likely to set a record once the precise level is determined, according to a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Binghamton. David Morford said that because the National Weather Service’s river gauge failed before midnight Thursday, more than four hours before the river crested, a decision was made to come up with a figure based on visual observations of the river and flood levels of areas not protected by the levee system. He said the official crest figure will be See CREST, Page 14A

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Evacuees flock to lightly hit Nanticoke By SHEENA DELAZIO sdelazio@timesleader.com

NANTICOKE -- With most flooding occurring on the west side of the Susquehanna River, people sought shelter in Nanticoke. The gymnasium at Luzerne County Community College was turned into a Red Cross shelter and people from other communities sought refuge there. But, in another part of the city, the Susquehanna River flooded low-lying roads and the city’s Honey Pot section, with about 630 residents. The unnamed creek that flooded the roadway and railroad tracks near the river originates in Glen Lyon and runs through Honey Pot and into the Susquehanna. “This is worse than the Agnes flood,” said one Garfield Street resident trying to make his way to work Friday morning. The flood waters affected River Street, Access Road and parts of Market Street, including the parking lot and building that houses Weis Markets and a neighboring

know of the flood waters. City Councilman James Litchkofski, a resident of the Honey Pot section, said he spoke with city and emergency officials, and that no problems were reported. “It’s certainly historic,” Litchkofski said. “I’ve only ever seen anything like this twice in my life.” Firefighters said Friday they didn’t know when to expect the flood waters to recede, but speculated it could be a day or more. The Stachowiak family, whose home was affected by the swollen river, said they had a few inches of water in their basement, which they continued to pump out Friday. Residents made their way to the flood waters throughout the day to take photos, others reminisced about the Agnes Flood in 1972, reAIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER membering taking boats from the Amanda Kissinger of Corlear Street in Wilkes-Barre opens a soda with her family members Friday at Honey Pot section to get into Nanticoke. the shelter at Luzerne County Community College in Nanticoke. Flood waters closed Access Road early Thursday, and by FriHoney Pot because of the flood wa- a nearby industrial park. state liquor store. The Honey Pot Active Volunteer day morning flood waters nearly At around 9:30 p.m. Thursday, ters that shut down access to the Nanticoke Mayor Joe Dougherty area, as well as to a housing devel- Fire Department made its rounds reached the tops of street signs, declared a state of emergency in opment in Newport Township and Thursday night to let residents covering a stranded car.

Local flood attracts national media By SARAH HITE shite@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE – The historic flooding of the Susquehanna River and surrounding creeks and streams Thursday has received national media attention. Reporters from The Weather Channel, CNN and The Associated Press visited the area, while major news networks such as ABC, CBS, NBC, FOX News, and MSNBC featured the flood on television programs and on websites. Jim Cantore of The Weather Channel visited the area Thursday and Friday to report on the continuously fluctuating river level. He said the rising river, which crested unofficially at 42.66 around 3 a.m. Friday, according to the National Weather Service, and resulting flood were historic moments for the Wyoming Valley. “Obviously, this is a historic flood,” he said. “This is the worst flood in 40 years, and the levees have never been tested.” Cantore said he was keeping an eye on the scene late Thursday. On Friday he was to visit Hillside Road in Jackson Township, where flooding from the overflowing Huntsville Dam is preva-

POLICE BLOTTER WASHINGTON Bath salts move lauded U.S. Sen. Bob Casey, DScranton, is applauding action taken Wednesday by the Drug Enforcement Administration to temporarily ban the chemicals in so-called “bath salts.” Casey first called on the DEA to implement such a ban in March. Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett signed into law a bill June 23 banning the possession, use and sale of synthetic designer drugs including the dangerous substance known as “bath salts.” The DEA’s action will make possessing and selling these chemicals or the products that contain them illegal in the U.S. for at least one year while the DEA and the United States Department of Health and Human Services further study whether these chemicals should be permanently controlled. HUNLOCK CREEK Boback has new office State Rep. Karen Boback, R-Harveys Lake, will host an open house on Sept. 29 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., at her district office, 5929 Main Road (off Route 118), Hunlock Creek. Boback moved her Sweet Valley office to the new location earlier this year to offer

ERIC SANDROSKI/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Jim Cantore of The Weather Channel visited the area Thursday and Friday to report on the continuously fluctuating river level.

lent. The river’s raging waters also attracted a local filmmaker to the evacuated area late Thursday. Scott Spinucci, of WilkesBarre, said he was recording

footage of the river for a documentary he has been working on for the last five years about the River Common project. “The River Common is all about flood protection,” he said. “The levee system was built to

9 a.m. and 4 p.m. on Oct. 8, in the parking lot behind the Red Cross building at 256 Sherman St. The rain-or-shine event will benefit the Prevention Education Services Department, which services Luzerne, Lackawanna, Wyoming, Wayne, Susquehanna and Pike counties. “Old items in addition to new and exciting merchandise will be available,” stated Donna Kearney, intervention coordinator. State Police open house For sellers, the suggested donation is $15 per space The Pennsylvania State outdoors and $25 for an inPolice will conduct a “Get to door spot. Sellers keep the Know Us” open house on profits of their sales. AdmisSeptember 17 at Troop P sion is free, but donations will headquarters, 475 Wyoming be accepted. Ave., Wyoming. The open Contact Kearney at 823house will run from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., and will be held rain or 7161, ext. 345, or kearneydo@usa.redcross.org with shine. questions. Pennsylvania State Police RICE TWP. Troopers, as well as civilian staff, will be on hand to anNeighborhood Watch swer questions about careers program in the Pennsylvania State In recognition of National Police. Displays and attractions from various state police Crime Prevention Month, the Rice Neighborhood Watch departments will be available Program will welcome Lufor public access, including a state police helicopter, as well zerne County District Atas canine, equestrian, accident torney Jackie Musto Carroll as guest speaker at the Oct. 6 investigation, and special meeting. emergency response team The group will meet at 7 units. p.m. at the Rice Township WILKES-BARRE Municipal Building, 3000 Red Cross plans ‘yard sale’ Church Rd., Mountain Top. WILKES-BARRE The American Red Cross will hold a yard sale, between

citizens from the Luzerne and Columbia County areas a more convenient location. Advanced registration is not required to attend, but residents who have questions may call the Hunlock Creek office at 477-3752 or Tunkhannock at 836-4777. Residents can call toll-free at (800) 278-3930. State forms are available at RepBoback.com, and information is also posted at Facebook.com/RepBoback. WYOMING

withstand a flood event like this, and this is a major part of the River Common.” Spinucci said the most recent flooding will be the final segment of his three-part documentary.

Local companies step up, help out By ANDREW M .SEDER aseder@timesleader.com

FORTY FORT – At least three local companies have volunteered their men, equipment and expertise to help alleviate the flooding and concerns about the integrity of the levee. Mericle Construction Inc., of Plains Township, sent men, equipment and dirt fill to various trouble spots throughout the Wyoming Valley on Thursday and Friday to help avert additional flooding. “We’re jut doing our part to be helpful during the current crisis,” company spokesman Jim Cummings said. He said employees have been hauling fill and materials to “shore up the levee” and assisting the Army Corps and EMA in Forty Fort, Kingston and Plymouth Township. Two local engineering firms, Quad 3 of Wilkes-Barre and Borton Lawson, of Plains Township, had employees assisting the county with integrity concerns along the levee, including the “boil” in the dike at Forty Fort that caused concerns for crews throughout Friday as water seeped under it. Tom Lawson, one of the partners with Borton Lawson, said there will be no charge for their assistance. “It’s community service,” he said.

Hazleton City Council moves toward OK of rental ordinance By GERI GIBBONS Times Leader Correspondent

HAZLETON -- The proposed city rental ordinance was once again the topic of heated discussion at a Hazleton City Council meeting on Wednesday. Council approved a second reading of the ordinance, which will give council an opportunity for a final vote at next month’s meeting. The ordinance directs that landlords pay a registration fee of $100 for a multi-family dwelling and a $50 fee for a one- or twofamily dwelling. An annual occupancy licensing fee of $25 would also be levied on each owner after an inspection of each unit. Several members of HALO, Hazleton Area Landlords Organization, spoke in opposition to the ordinance, saying they believed that council had not fully heeded their arguments at recent meetings. Janice Crego, who spoke on behalf of the organization, contended the ordinance was illegal and unenforceable. She said she believed that council’s purpose in proposing the ordinance was to raise revenue to support a weak budget. In response, city Solicitor Chris Slusser indicated that HALO had not submitted its concerns or revisions to the council

in writing as had been requested. Slusser said revenue raised by implementation of the ordinance would be used to hire additional city personnel needed to do inspections outlined in the code. Crego said that if the city passed the ordinance HALO would immediately file for injunctive relief and the city would be barred from enforcement until it was reviewed by the courts. Karin Cabell, council vice president, questioned Crego’s motives. “I don’t understand why you are paying thousands of dollars to lawyers to fight a fee of only a hundred dollars,” she said. “Do you believe that the properties will not pass inspection and that city landlords will need to put a significant amount of money into these properties in order for them to pass inspection?” Crego responded that HALO members simply had not been given information they had requested to allow them to fully understand the intent of the ordinance. “Just tell me what documentation or clarification that you need and it will be timely provided to you,” Slusser said. “This is the time,” he continued, “for the city to come together and initiate a dialogue between city landlords and council.”

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DETAILS LOTTERY MIDDAY DRAWING DAILY 4-9-0 BIG 4 9-8-8-5 QUINTO 5-6-8-0-9 TREASURE HUNT 02-06-11-15-18 NIGHTLY DRAWING DAILY 2-9-9 BIG 4 8-9-5-2 (3-7-2-2, DOUBLE DRAW) QUINTO 9-6-5-9-7 CASH 5 04-06-10-18-27 THE MEGA MILLIONS NUMBER WERE NOT AVAILABLE AT PRESS TIME.

HARRISBURG – One player matched all five winning numbers drawn in Friday’s “Pennsylvania Cash 5” game so the jackpot will be worth $20,000,000. Monday’s “Pennsylvania Match 6 Lotto” jackpot will be worth at least $1,980,000 because no player holds a ticket with one row that matches all six winning numbers drawn in Thursday’s game.

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SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2011 PAGE 3A

LOCAL

Oil and other fuels, sewage and contaminants a problem in many flooded areas

Smelly problem adds to misery Environmental officials plan to investigate the issue once the flood waters recede.

It is too early to determine if the ’Pierce Street’ Bridge was damaged by flood waters.

MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

Those able to get close to the Susquehanna River since the flood waters rose have noted more than just the sight and sounds of rushing water. A powerful odor, like oil or diesel fuel, permeates the air around the river. Environmental protection officials have noted the smell, as well as an oily sheen on the surface of the river, and said they plan to investigate when the waters recede. “We have a list of potential affecting factors, such as gas stations and storage facilities that we’re going to be going to and looking at,” DEP spokesman Kevin Sunday said Friday. “If one of them had a substantial loss of fuel, that could have been a cause of that smell.” “DEP did notify EPA today that there was some kind of a sheen downstream from where the Butler Mine Tunnel is,” said U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Mid-Atlantic Region spokesman Roy Seneca. “It could be coming from some flooded gas stations, it could be coming from some other sources or it could be coming from the Butler Mine Tunnel.” The Butler Mine Tunnel is a mine water drainage tunnel and EPA Superfund environmental cleanup site that underlies Pittston and drains into the Susquehanna River. Millions of gallons of oil and other chemicals were illegally dumped into the tunnel in the late 1970s and later spilled into the river in 1979 and 1985. The last time it drained followed high waters in the wake of a hurricane. Other sources of contamination could be underground fuel storage tanks and home heating oil tanks, officials said.

By BILL O’BOYLE boboyle@timesleader.com

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Debris and oil floats on the top of the water on Main Street in Duryea on Friday after flooding from the Lackawanna River, which was blocked from flowing into the Susquehanna by high water.

With the flood damaging heating oil tanks, DEP is helping homeowners pump oil from their basements and clean the affected portions of their homes, Sunday said. The state agency is also inspecting dams and sewage treatment plants and assisting municipalities affected by flooding with environmental testing and cleanup as needed. “We have staff out doing inspections of sewage treatment plants as needed, were also going to municipalities as needed,” Sunday said. “At this time our emergency response and environmental cleanup staff are assisting municipalities as needed. Until the waters recede, our other staff are in a wait-and-see mode.”

Fully operational Despite some flooding of pump stations at its Hanover Township plant, the Wyoming Valley Sanitary Authority was 100 percent operational as of Friday morning, Sunday said, but other water treatment plants along the river have gone offline or are working at partial capacity, presenting a health risk. The Lower Lackawanna/Luzerne Valley Sewer Authority issued a request Friday afternoon for all residents of Avoca, Dupont, Duryea, Old Forge, Moosic and Taylor begin conserving water immediately. Water use in the six towns feed into the LLVSA Plant in Coxton, which was underwater Friday due to the flooding

of the Susquehanna and Lower Lackawanna rivers. State Rep. Mike Carroll, D-Avoca, said in a statement that Duryea residents are also having trouble pumping water out of flooded areas because the water has nowhere to go because of the continued use of the LLVSA system. As Sunday explained, “If a sewage treatment plant shuts down, you have two options. One is to close the flow, and that would cause it to back up in the residential homes, and you don’t want to do that. So the only other option is to discharge untreated or partially-treated sewage into the river.” Water left standing for more than 48 hours also presents an additional risk of mold.

State’s senators arrive to pledge support Bob Casey, a Democrat, and concrete to work with. Pat Toomey, a Republican, say Although he wasn’t part of the tour with the senators, U.S. aid will be on the way. Rep. Tom Marino, R-Lycoming

By JERRY LYNOTT jlynott@timesleader.com

Divided by political parties, U.S. Sens. Bob Casey and Pat Toomey stood side by side Friday during their 90-minute tour of the flood damaged areas in the Wyoming Valley and united in their promise to deliver federal aid. The two men stopped in West Pittston, Wilkes-Barre and stood on the concrete deck of the Eighth Street Bridge in Wyoming as the muddy river raged beneath them. They heard pleas from elected officials and unofficial pleas from homeowners trying to deal with the devastation. The lawmakers said they had a foundation to work on with emergency declaration signed by President Barack Obama and that they expected support from others in getting approval for directing funds to the hard hit areas. “We’re going to work together, the two of us, and as a congressional delegation,” said Casey, D-Scranton. The presidential declaration is a start, he added. “That’s just the beginning of a long battle to get help here. We want to make sure that people to know that.” Toomey, R-Zionsville, also pledged a unified effort to make sure resources are available. “Disaster relief is something Congress usually comes together on,” Toomey said. It was too early to tell how much the region needed because high waters prevented an accurate damage assessment, the senators pointed out. But once the figures are calculated lawmakers will have something

Officials: Veterans Bridge will be inspected

Township, promised federal assistance in the short and long terms. Marino said he has been in touch with the deputy director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the emergency services directors in the five counties in his district. His office would be providing contact numbers for people affected by the flooding so that they could get in touch with the proper agencies and officials about obtaining assistance. “The money’s going to be there,” Marino said. Politicalbickeringandintransigence have marked the current Congress, especially with regards to funding, but all that will be put aside. “We’re not going to worry right now about what to cut,” he said. In West Pittston, Mayor Tony Deniscotookthesenatorstothe edge of the water that covered Wyoming Avenue and submerged the Jenkins Cemetery, where two of the first people killedintheWyomingMassacre are buried. The massacre predates the Revolutionary War. Houses were under water, roads impassable and people were displaced, said Denisco. “The taxpayers of West Pittston are counting on you,” he said. Casey stopped to hear from Carloyn White who showed up in her motorized wheelchair holding a leash for her Great Dane, Jet. White said her house on LaCoe Street had water on the first floor and she had no flood insurance. She rebuilt it after it was damaged by Tropical Storm Agnes in June 1972 and asked for help to do it again. “It’s my house since 1965. I

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Senators Bob Casey, center, and Pat Toomey, second from right, speak as West Pittston Mayor Tony Denisco, left, and county commissioners Maryanne Petrilla and Stephen Urban listen.

don’t want to lose it,” said White. On Second Street, the senators stood on a grassy bank behind the nearly submerged Pennsylvania National Guard Armory. They looked out over water that almost covered the top of the chain-link fence surrounding the property and at an M-1Abrams tank up to its turret in river water. Another tank and the contents of the armory were moved out before the flooding, said Sgt. First Class Fred Domkowski. U.S. Rep. Lou Barletta, R-Hazleton, said he has instructed his staff to work closely with local, county and state officials to provide assistance to constituents affected by flooding. Barletta’s office can be reached at (855) 241-5144.

Some of the accumulated flood debris caught at the Eighth Street Bridge over the Susquehanna River is seen Friday morning between Wyoming and Jenkins Township. Some in Jenkins and West Pittston are blaming the design of the new concrete span for increasing the level of their flood damage.

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Officials won’t know for some time if the raging waters of the Susquehanna River caused any structural damage to the Veterans Memorial Bridge. “I’m not officially aware of any damage to the bridge,” said Joe Gibbons, Luzerne County engineer. “I can’t confirm or deny that report.” The bridge was ordered closed Thursday, leaving Wyoming Valley commuters withjusttwobridges--theNorthCrossValley Expressway and the 109th Field Artillery Bridge -- to cross the river. “The Pierce Street Bridge was closed because water had covered the road surface leading to the bridge near the Luzerne County Courthouse,” Gibbons said, referring to the more commonly used name for the span between Kingston and WilkesBarre. “We did not detect any damage to the bridge and that is not why it was closed.” Mike Taluto, spokesman for Pennsylvania The Eighth Department of Trans- Street Bridge portation,saiditcan’tbe determined at this time that connects if the bridge has been Jenkins Towndamaged. ship and “We cannot confirm Wyoming any damage to the Pierce Street Bridge un- Borough has til it is inspected which also been may not occur until reported to Monday or when the have incurred water levels go down,” some damage Taluto said. The Eighth Street during the Bridge that connects storm. The Jenkins Township and Wyoming Borough has concrete also been reported to bridge opened have incurred some earlier this damage during the year, replacstorm. The concrete bridge opened earlier ing a steel this year, replacing a structure that steel structure that had had deteriodeteriorated. rated. Half of the old bridge Half of the old has been removed. “It’s a new bridge and bridge has will need to be inspect- been reed when it’s safe for inspectors to go into to moved. takealook,”Talutosaid. “PennDOT will review any findings and will study the issues further. Right now it is too early to come to any kind of conclusions about the bridge and flooding issues.” With estimates revealed Friday by Luzerne County officials that the river crested unofficially at 42.66 feet, Jim Brozena, executive director of the Luzerne County Flood Protection Authority, said low-lying communities received more inundation because of the massive amount of water in the river. Brozena explained the increased river levels caused more properties to get flooded. But former West Pittston Mayor Bill Goldsworthy said the new bridge is a majorreasonwhyhistownandothershaveexperienced higher water levels. “The old bridge is metal and the river water was able to pass through,” Goldsworthy said. “The new bridge is concrete anditactedlikeadam,causingthewaterto back up into the towns that are not protected by the levee system.” Plains Township, Jenkins Township, Exeter Borough and other towns suffered extensive flooding during the recent storm. “I’ve talked to several residents of West Pittston and they told me they have receivedmuchmorewaterthaneverbefore– as much as 4 to 5 feet more,” Goldsworthy said. “We were told when the dike system was raised, we could expect 6 inches to 1 foot more of water during a storm of this size.” Some reports indicated the higher levee systemcontributedtothehigherwaterlevel in the low-lying towns. “If that report is true, we will have to do an assessment when the river returns to normal,” said state Sen. Lisa Baker. “If that is the case, then we must take all appropriate steps to correct the problem.”


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Plains advises residents to report damage By B. GARRET ROGAN Times Leader Correspondent

PLAINS TWP. -- Plains Township officials held a meeting on Friday to prepare for the disaster recovery process now that the river has crested. Township residents or business owners who have sustained damage from flooding related to the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee are being asked to call the township municipal offices at 570-829-3439, extensions 4001, 4002 or 4003. Damage can also be directly reported to the Plains Township Emergency Management Coordinator Charlie Krommes at 570-417-9689. Krommes, who led Friday’s meeting, reminded township officials they are now entering the extremely difficult recovery phase of responding to the emergency. He will be joined by building inspector Kenny Schefley as they tour the flood-affected areas to perform “windshield assessments.” The two will be making preliminary cost estimates for repairing the damage done to homes, businesses and infrastructure. They will provide that information to the Federal Emergency Management Agen-

Township Commissioner Rob Sax said officials want to keep the evacuated areas clear so as to ease the concerns of those who have left their properties. cy and continue to refine the cost estimates as they gain more access to the properties once the flood waters begin to recede. Any individuals who suspect that they may have had floodrelated damage and have not been visited by Krommes and Schefley should call the numbers listed above. The two anticipate having total preliminary figures compiled for county and federal officials by Tuesday. Krommes has asked that township workers, residents and business owners take as many photographs of damage as possible. He also asked township workers to keep detailed receipts of all costs associated with the recovery effort so that the township can be reimbursed as completely as possible. Plains Township will continue to impose an 8 p.m. curfew until it is safe to return to the floodaffected areas. Township Commissioner Rob Sax said officials

want to keep the evacuated areas clear so as to ease the concerns of those who have left their properties. Police Chief James O’Malley said looting of evacuated properties is “always a concern,” but there has thus far been no reports of looting of theft. The major concern to this point has been with onlookers going too close to the floodwaters. On the whole, Plains officials have been thrilled with the cooperation demonstrated by the community. Police officers were thankful for residents near the evacuated areas who have opened up their homes to them. Officers were given access to bathroom facilities, regularly furnished with snacks and even provided with dinner in some cases. Krommes said Luzerne County Emergency Operation Center representatives have commended Plains for how efficiently it has handled the disaster thus far. Plains residents and business owners reporting flood damage may call (570) 829-3439, extenAIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER sions 4001, 4002 or 4003 and Residents of Plains Township check out the flooded section of River Road through Plainsville on Thursday. (570) 417-9698.

L A K E S I L KWO RT H /SC H I C KS H I N N Y

WILKES-BARRE Two kayakers drift along in flooded Shickshinny on Friday after the Susquehanna River overflowed its banks and spilled into the center of town, flooding homes and businesses.

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

Residents remain positive while beginning task of cleaning up Many expressed willingness to nior Spencer. A 911 employee who help neighbors in the area asked not to be identirepair damage. fied summed up the By GERI GIBBONS and STEVE MOCARSKY smocarsky@timesleader.com

HUNLOCK CREEK -- Mark Spencer Jr. stood in his stocking feet in the middle of the Pump and Pantry store by Pikes Creek on Friday afternoon. “By the time I got done moving valuable possessions to the second floor of our house,” said Spencer, “my shoes were ruined,” adding that he had slept in a car the night before so he could keep an eye on his home if the Susquehanna River flooded its banks. Despite the fact that the first floor of his home on Route 11 in Hunlock Creek was under more than 8 feet of water on Friday, Spencer Jr. maintains a positive attitude. He expressed gratitude that his family is safe. Spencer and his father, Mark Spencer Sr., owner of ABC Auto Parts in Hunlock Creek, a business that lost much of its inventory due to the flooding. “Devastating is the word I would use,” said Spencer Sr., in regard to the effects of recent area flooding. Spencer Sr., who resides with his wife in West Nanticoke, also had the first floor of his home completely flooded. “We are waiting for the waters to recede so that we can begin cleanup,” said the se-

“In general, people have showed concern and support for each other throughout the day.”

work for the next few days. “I usually take Route 29,” said Ide, “but I am going to storm saying, “It was need to find an alteras bad as Agnes in ’72 nate route until area – different, but just as roads are clear.” devastating.” Creeks in the Other area residents Shickshinny area alhad not been directly so flooded various affected by the floodparts of the road and ing, but were preparmade travel difficult. ing to help friends Shickshinny Counwho had experienced cilwoman Francene losses. Kory Mininger Tearpock-Martini Despite the chalABC Auto Parts said in a phone interlenges, those gathered employee, view that roads in all at the convenient mart Hunlock Creek directions out of the were unanimously borough were floodpositive. Many exed, as well as much pressed willingness to of the downtown and help neighbors in the area clean up and repair dam- businesses along Route 11. “We really are trapped age caused by flooding. “In general,” said employee when we’re in a flood,” she Kory Mininger, “people have said. Just about all of the busishowed concern and support for each other throughout the nesses took on water. “The mall put up flood day,” indicating that the business had been very busy sell- gates, but it went right over ing gasoline and staples to ar- them. I hope the businesses can make a comeback or we ea residents. “I’m on my way to Wyalus- won’t have anything here,” ing to help a recently retired she said. Tearpock-Martini, whose friend who had a trailer totally destroyed by water,” said home is not in the flood plain, Ray Steinruck, of Town Hill, said a high-rise building for indicating his friend had also the elderly was evacuated and experienced difficulty travel- people without a place to stay were sent to a shelter at ing through area. Many residents at the con- Northwest Area High School. venience store expressed The fire hall and municipal frustration about trying to building were flooded as well, get from one place to another, she said. She had no idea how many especially since Route 11 had become impassable in the ar- people or homes were affected. ea of West Nanticoke. Attempts to reach other Resident Darren Ide, who works in Dupont, said that he borough officials were unsucwas worried about getting to cessful.

Mayor: Heed evacuation

Leighton says city may not allow residents to return home until Sunday. By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES jandes@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE -- Mayor Tom Leighton begged residents to stay away from their properties until the city lifts its evacuation, which may not happen until Sunday. The Susquehanna River is expected to remain above flood stage until then and continue to test the Wyoming Valley levee, he said during a Friday afternoon press conference. “The river may have crested, but we are not out of harm’s way,” the mayor said. A curfew remains in effect, and people who are warned and continue to violate it will be arrested, he said. The curfew is from 9 p.m. to 6 a.m. Flooding of streams and creeks that run through the city also remains a concern, he said. Constant security patrols of evacuated areas are being conducted by city and state police and the National Guard, he said. Four people were arrested by city police Friday after the National Guard caught them looting residences, Leighton said. The city did not immediately have information about the arrests. Residents of Brookside, Chestnut and Chilwick streets were added to the city evacuees Friday morning because of flooding at the Mill and Laurel Run creeks. About 300 homes had flood-

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Wilkes-Barre firefighters secure a rescue boat along Weir Lane in the city’s Brookside section where there were rescues.

ing in that area, Leighton said. As of Friday afternoon, there was no flooding of properties along Solomon Creek, he said. Water that normally drains into the Susquehanna is backing up because it has no outlet with a swollen river and saturated ground, he said. Creek flooding is “unavoidable,” he said. “The ground is like a sponge, and there’s just nowhere for that water to go,” he said. Seepage at the levee’s Market Street Bridge flood gate “remains a concern,” the mayor said. “This is a very dangerous situation for all of us, including our professional service members. We are very confident our levee system will hold.” The county is in constant contact with county engineers, he said. Additional sandbags were be-

ing stacked along the gate closure on Friday afternoon. The city was in the process of setting up a special web page for residents to report flood-related problems. Emergency evacuation centers are operational and fully stocked, he said. Verizon Wireless was setting up a trailer at GAR Memorial Junior/Senior High School to allow people to charge cell phones and call friends and relatives if they don’t have phones. Leighton asked residents and businesses for their patience. “This is the largest river crest that we have experienced and one of the most serious natural disasters we have encountered. We will work around the clock and exhaust every resource we have to get the city back to work and functioning on a normal basis.” “It will take time, but we will come back,” he said.

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Ariel view of the Luzerne County Courthouse looking from Kingston and upstream with Kirby Park on lower left shows the water’s reach.


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Houses and businesses in both best seat in the house,” said Ha- be substantial. “It’s impossible to put a price nawalt, whose house sits high municipalities see worst tag on it at this point,” he said above the road. damage since Agnes. Plymouth Township SuperviHanawalt and several other

By CAMILLE FIOTI and ANDREW M. SEDER aseder@timesleader.com

PLYMOUTH TWP. -- Resting against the guard rail on the east side of West Main Street early Friday afternoon, Josie Uravage watched helplessly as the Susquehanna River enveloped her house. The river had risen to just below the second floor, and a lit porch light peeked eerily above the muddy water. In an adjacent playground, all that could be seen was a slide jutting out of the water. Married in 1963, Uravage and Francis Federici, 66, bought their house in the 1000 block in 2001 when they reunited after their divorce in 1978. “When we bought it, they said this house never flooded,” said Uravage, 65. The house has since flooded with roughly 4 inches of water on the first floor during storms in 2004, 2005 and 2006. Not only couldn’t Uravage make it to her job as a personalcare aide at the Laurels Health and Rehabilitation Center in Kingston, she had to miss her brother’s funeral Thursday. “I feel sorry for anybody that gets flooded,” Uravage said. “My heart goes out to all of them. I’ve had two days of crying and there’s no more tears left.” Across the road, Jeff Hanawalt, 59, and Bob Partington, 57, kept watch over the scene from Hanawalt’s porch. “This is the

homeowners along the road chose to ignore the mandatory evacuation order. “I wasn’t going nowhere,” he said. “It’d take a lot more than 40 feet to get me to get out.” In the waters below, a Plymouth Township Fire & Rescue boat made its way up to dry ground, where dozens of parked cars and onlookers gathered. Climbing out of the boat, Line Chief Andy Novak, who was joined by Lt. Mark Neberdosky and fire police officer Mark Wesolowski, said they haven’t had to rescue anyone. “We’re just checking on residents,” he said. The trio patrolled a stretch of West Main Street that includes roughly 30 houses. “There’s debris everywhere, from parts of toilets to garbage bags,” Novak said. “Everybody’s got water at least past the first floor on the river side.” Novak added that the Plymouth Township Fire Department’s first floor is also flooded. In downtown Plymouth, the basements of about 15 houses on Beade and Ferry streets were flooded when a storm pipe was blocked and drains blew out, said borough Fire Chief Jerome Bolesta. Businesses including Red’s Deli and Main Street Deli in that area sustained the most damage with flooded basements. The damage, Bolesta said, is confined to a one block area between Washington Avenue and Eno Street. Bolesta estimates the major structural damage in the area to

sor Gale Conrad, 59, rowed a boat through her municipality’s flooded streets with her husband, Mark. The lifelong township resident recalled what were recordsetting water levels created by 1972’s Agnes flood. And she knew by looking at the breadth of the water that Friday’s flooding was a record breaker. At least 100 homes and businesses were flooded, including four that were actually elevated just two years ago. She said the township’s position – the first municipality downstream of the levee system – might have made things worse. Some of her anger was directed at federal officials and entities that built the levee system but stopped short of extending them farther down stream. Among her first requests from state and federal officials will be to get cleanup crews into the township to clear debris and assist residents in getting their lives back in order. She said solutions are needed for a quick-term recovery. “I want our residents to be able to get a small camper to park in their yard to temporarily give them facilities, and a place to sleep, eat and shower,” she said. And it’s not just her town that she believes should be helped immediately. “The people without the levee system deserve first consideration,” Conrad said. The 109th Field Artillery Bridge (Carey Avenue) looking toward Plymouth. Parts of Plymouth and Plymouth Township sustained flood damge as a result of the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee.

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

AIMEE DILGER PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

A rescue crew was sent out into Main Street, Duryea, to rescue military personnel after their Humvee became submerged.

Partial levee fails; 200 moved Some blame levees above and below them for causing worse damage than from Agnes.

Flooded vehicles and structures can be seen looking into Main Street, Duryea, on Friday after the Lackawanna River backed up and flooded the borough.

By SARAH HITE and STEVE MOCARSKY shite@timesleader.com, smocarsky@timesleader.com

DURYEA – Agnes’s aftermath wasn’t anything compared to the most recent flooding that followed the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee in Duryea. A partial levee through the borough breached Thursday night, causing the Lackawanna River to gush onto several roads below and including Main Street, as well as Stephenson Street, Chittenden Street, River Street and Lackawanna Avenue. The Lackawanna is an approximately 40-mile tributary of the Susquehanna River that meets it less about a mile southwest of Duryea. Emergency crews closed the floodgates at Stephenson Street and attempted to pump out excess water to no avail. Mayor Keith Moss said about 200 people in the area had to be evacuated, and a shelter was set up at Sacred Heart Church on Stephenson Street. Duryea Emergency Management Agency Director Frank Groblewski estimated 5 to 6 feet of water remained Friday in the lowest sections. Residents who did not heed the voluntary evacuation of the Coxton section of the borough were like castaways marooned on an island, surrounded by about 12 feet of water and without electricity, he said. Problems compounded when the sewage treatment plant was inundated and had to shut down, as sewage began backing up. Waste Management Inc. lent the borough two massive pumps on Friday to force the

standing water back over the levee. Groblewski said that while the Wyoming Valley saw its worst flood damage ever after Tropical Storm Agnes in 1972, the borough saw little. Since then, levees were built in communities upstream along the Lackawanna and downstream along the Susquehanna. “Everybody’s building up their dikes and the higher they go, the more water we get. … If the Susquehanna River is low, it’s OK. But if it’s high, the Lackawanna has no place to go and keeps backing up,” he said. Flooding would be little to nil in Duryea, he said, if the levee was completed. “There’s a section between Stephenson Street and Lackawanna Avenue where the dike was never finished. I guess people didn’t want to give up their land (about 20 years ago). We built a sand dike a long time ago, but it didn’t hold,” Groblewski said. “If we get another storm and the river goes up more than 35 feet, we’re not going to make it. We’re toast,” he said. Groblewski said federal officials promised construction of the missing section at least 15 years ago, but the problem has been funding. Moss said U.S. Rep. Lou Barletta, R-Hazleton, told him he would do what he could to help speed up funding. That’s little comfort to people like 71-year-old Nancy Parrick,

who evacuated her Main Street home around 6:30 Thursday night. In 1972, she saw flooding only in her basement. “Now, they said it’s threequarters of the way up my front door,” said Parrick, adding that she never bought flood insurance because she was told “it doesn’t pay much for what you pay into it.” Lackawanna Avenue resident Jim Seroka, 49, said his basement was flooded with 3 feet of water. “My sister got flooded in Swoyersville in ’72 and this year she got nothing. She came here when she evacuated because in ’72, we had nothing. … If they’re going to fortify the levee, they should do it every place because water’s going to find an outlet somewhere,” Seroka said. Angry and frustrated, Tony Zuchinski sat on the wall of the cemetery on Chittenden Street watching two men launch a boat into the water that crept up 4 feet on the first floor of his home a half block away. “The levee broke and the borough didn’t sandbag. … It started going over. I was here and I said, ‘Let’s start sandbagging.’ They said no, it’s too far down. And it’s not. Look, that’s where it went over, one little spot. They had backhoes here and they just left it,” Zuchinski said. Zuchinski said he didn’t know for sure that sandbags would have made a difference. “But I think, if I made an effort, at least I could say I tried.”

PRINGLE

West Side CTC a gracious host to evacuees Emergency shelter gets high 73 came from Kingston Compraise for the way in which all mons. Tkatch said she discussed the who came were treated. site with the county Emergency By ALAN K. STOUT astout@timesleader.com

PRINGLE -- Hundreds of residents from two area nursing homes took refuge on Thursday and Friday at the West Side Career and Technology Center, joining more than 140 local residents also sought shelter there. And while those evacuated due to potential flooding of the Susquehanna River hoped to return to their residences today, the make-shift emergency site was given high praise from those staying there and from those at the school. Nancy Tkatch, the administrative director at the West Side Career and Technology Center, also served as facilitator of the shelter. She said the HCR ManorCare and Kingston Commons nursing homes had previously designated the school as their evacuation site. Approximately 165 residents came from ManorCare. About

Management Agency and the Wyoming Valley Chapter of the American Red Cross, and that once the Red Cross learned nursing home patients were staying there, they decided not to use it as a Red Cross shelter. Still, that didn’t stop about 145 local residents from showing up. “People know we’re on high ground. They come. And we weren’t about to turn them away,” said Tkatch. “We used our own best resources that we had at the school and the Salvation Army and Commission on Economic Opportunity also helped us out. Our food service department and our staff came in to manage the folks from the community and I’m really proud of the staff. Any of those that may not have been affected and were able to get here, did, and we just pitched in. Our food service director, custodial staff and grounds crew did what they needed to do. We had office people, teachers and even students help. We had a student, Allison Misson, who

stayed with us all day yesterday and slept here last night. She handed out blankets and helped out with everything. We also did what we needed to do to help the nursing facilities, but they really had it under control. They’ve been amazing.” Tkatch said the work of the HCR ManorCare and Kingston Commons staffs was commendable. “They came very well-prepared,” she said. “They came with mattresses and bed linens, and we lined them up in the hallways. We used the gymnasium as the food service dining area for the nursing facilities and the school cafeteria for the community residents. We have an advantage, because we have a culinary arts class, so we have two kitchens: the cafeteria and the culinary kitchen. The nursing homes brought their staffs: skilled nursing care, RNs, aids, food service, administrators - everybody. Those two facilities are to be commended for the way they managed that patient care under the circumstances.” Tom Ford, administrator at HCR ManorCare, also praised

all involved and noted that Martz Trailways and the Wyoming Valley West School District each provided buses for the evacuation. He said that the nursing home began moving residents to the school at 10:30 a.m. on Thursday and that by 1:30 p.m., all residents were at the school and everything was properly set up for their stay. “That time frame, by my standards, was very, very efficient,” he said. Mae McHugh, 86, a resident of HCR ManorCare, was pleased with the accommodations and said she had a comfortable night. “It was unbelievable,” said McHugh. “The transportation ... I never saw so many ambulances. … No panic.” Barbara Grula, 69, a resident of Kingston Commons, said she had a feeling her nursing home would be spared the flooding and she hoped to return on Saturday. She agreed, however, that the shelter was a more than adequate home during the evacuation. “It was well-organized,” she said. “And the food was good.”

MARK GUYDISH/THE TIMES LEADER

Mae McHugh, right, dines with other evacuees at West Side Career and Technology Center in Pringle on Friday. The school accommodated hundreds of area people who had to leave under flood evacuation orders.


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THE TIMES LEADER/AIMEE DILGER CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

The river inundated homes along Susquehanna Avenue in West Pittston. The photograph was taken Friday morning as the Susquehanna was receding.

People walk and ride along the levee system in Wilkes-Barre. Most of the time, the levee is used for recreation. But when the river rise, the earthen system created by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers can save many communities from flooding.

Region at the mercy of flood

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Pedestrians ignored police tape to walk onto the Water Street Bridge across the Susquehanna River between Pittston and West Pittston.

Water finds a way. And it’s not always good. Seemingly endless rainfall from the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee found a way to ruin homes and businesses, neighborhoods and large swaths of the Wyoming Valley and across Northeastern Pennsylvania. Streets backed up with ponding water. Small streams with innocuous names such as Mill and Solomon turned into brown torrents. And the Susquehanna? Record-setting rainfall turned the usually placid waterway into a catastrophe, cresting at 42.66 feet at Wilkes-Barre, unofficially. An estimated 65,000 people were evacuated from across the area. Many waited to return to homes protected by the levee systems. But for communities from West Pittston to Plymouth Township and Shickshinny, this was a record-setting event they’d be glad to forget.

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

Flooding impacted a home at the intersection of 4th and Philadelphia Avenue in West Pittston Friday morning.

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

An oily sheen covers the water in front of a home in Jenkins Twp. There were numerous reports in many areas of a petroleum odor.

FOR THE TIMESLEADERCHARLOTTE BARTIZEK

Al Roker from NBC’s Today show broadcast his report from the foot of Huntsville Dam in Jackson Twp. on Friday morning.

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

A reporter and videographer from CNN report from the east side of the Eighth Street Bridge in Jenkins Township Friday morning.

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

West Pittston, which is not protected from the rising Susquehanna River by levees, suffered extensive damage.


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BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

One way signs at the corner of Water and Tannery streets.

Water bubbles up through a manhole on Brookside Street in Wilkes-Barre Friday afternoon.

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Pete Dzieken is given lunch at the LCCC shelter.

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

Planes from the Forty Fort airport were parked a higher ground near the Wyoming Monument Friday morning.

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Pennsylvania State Police Commissioner Frank Noonan, left, addresses the media as Gov. Tom Corbett looks on after arriving at the Wyoming Valley Airport in Forty Fort on Friday afternoon.

BILL TARUTIS

U.S. Senator Bob Casey, right, talks with West Pittston resident Carolyn White about her flooding as Luzerne County Commissioners Thomas Cooney, Maryanne Petrilla, and Stephen Urban look on. A look onto Main Street Duryea.

A emergency worker walks on the Veterans Memorial Bridge.

FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER


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DUE TO THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE FLOOD, the Peter J. Adonizio Funeral Home, West Pittston, will continue to serve the funeral needs of residents at the Adonizio Funeral Home, 251 William St., Pittston. The Peter J. Adonizio Funeral Home may continue to be reached at 654-8683. Thank you for allowing us to serve you in your time of need. DUE TO THE FLOOD, the regular meeting of the Luzerne County Funeral Directors Association scheduled for Monday evening at the Hollywood Diner and Sports Bar, Hazleton, has been changed to 6 p.m. Monday, Sept. 19. President Jeff Stock will preside. ROMAYNE R. (STREZNESKI) LARK, 79, of Dickson City, died Thursday, September 8, 2011, at Allied Services Skilled Nursing Center, where she had been a resident for the past five months. Born in Dickson City, on October 17, 1931, she was a daughter of the late Barney and Mary (Mocarski) Strezneski. She was preceded in death by her husband John A. Lark; sons, Arthur and Allen R. Lark. Surviving are sons, John (Jack) Lark, Wilkes-Barre, and Robert Lark, Dickson City; daughters, Kathy Cirba, Dickson City; Debra Grigalunes, Dickson City, and Gloria Perry, Dunmore; brother, Edward Strez, East Millstone, N.J.; sister, Mary Ann Orner, Spartanburg, S.C.; 14 grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren. Funeral Services will be at the convenience of the family. Arrangements have been entrusted to Kniffen O’Malley Funeral Home Inc. DELLA D. GRAY, 99, formerly of Ashley and Wilkes-Barre, died Sunday, September 4, 2011, at St. Mary’s Hospital in Pittsburgh. Funeral services are pending with Betz-Jastremski Funeral Home Inc., Luzerne. To light a virtual candle or send a message of condolence, please visit www.betzjastremski.com.

Dorothy J. Berry September 8, 2011

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orothy J. Berry, 98, formerly of Kingston, died Thursday, September 8, 2011, in Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center, Plains Township. Born in Scranton , on December 6, 1912, she was a daughter of the late Walter and Mary Jenkins Jones. Dorothy was a graduate of Kingston High School, class of 1930, and Bloomsburg State Teachers College, class of 1932. She was employed as an elementary school teacher for 31 years working in the Kingston and Wyoming Valley West School Districts. Dorothy was a member of the National Teachers Association, Pennsylvania School Educator Retirement System, Bloomsburg Alumni and the Wyoming Valley Women’s Club. She was the eldest living member of the Wyoming Avenue Christian Church, Kingston, and formerly served as a Deaconess and on the Board of the church. Preceding her in death, in addition to her parents, were her husband Donald V. Berry; sisters, Ann Brodie and Gladys Clemens; and an infant brother. Surviving are daughters, Elaine B. Daylor and her husband, Jim, Kennett Square, and Carol A. Shumaker and her husband, Ian, Lansdale; grandchildren, Kristin Blackburn and her husband, Scott; Karen Byorick and her husband, Tom, and Eric and Marc Shumaker; great-grandchildren, Dylan and Cole Blackburn, and Conor Byorick; as well as numerous nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. Monday from the Harold C. Snowdon Funeral Home Inc., 140 N. Main St., Shavertown. Norman E. Beck and Rev. Louis Falcone will officiate. Interment will be held in Fern Knoll Burial Park, Dallas. Friends may call at the funeral home from noon until time of services. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be sent to the Wyoming Avenue Christian Church, 881 Wyoming Ave., Kingston, PA 18704; or the Wesley Village Retirement Community, 209 Roberts Road, Pittston, PA 18640.

OBITUARY POLICY The Times Leader publishes free obituaries, which have a 27-line limit, and paid obituaries, which can run with a photograph. A funeral home representative can call the obituary desk at (570) 829-7224, send a fax to (570) 829-5537 or e-mail to tlobits@timesleader.com. If you fax or e-mail, please call to confirm. Obituaries must be submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Obituaries must be sent by a funeral home or crematory, or must name who is handling arrangements, with address and phone number. We discourage handwritten notices; they incur a $15 typing fee.

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Mary Letnianczyn Siepietowski September 8, 2011

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ary Letnianczyn Siepietowski, 93, a resident of Oplinger Towers, Nanticoke, passed away Thursday, September 8, 2011, at Guardian Elder Care, Sheatown, after a short stay there. Born on November 10, 1917, in Chester, Mary was a daughter of the late Andrew and Katherine (Wisenka) Letnianczyn. Mary married her beloved husband, the late Frank Siepietowski, in 1939, and they resided in Glen Lyon and Alden throughout their married years. Prior to her retirement, Mary was employed by the former General Cigar Co., both in Nanticoke and Mountain Top. In addition to her parents, Mary was preceded in death by her husband, Frank Siepietowski, who passed away on November 10, 1989; her brother, Peter Letnianczyn; and her sister, Ann Rash. Mary is survived by her daughters, Mrs. Carl (Bernadine) Knorek of Nanticoke, and Mrs. Fredrick (Nancy) Toole of East Berlin; her grandchildren, Mr. Carl F. Knorek of Mountain Top, Mrs. Joseph (Catherine) Rubbico of Shavertown, Mrs. Rick (Lynann) Cimono of Gladwyne, and Mr. Steven Toole of Enola; as well as her seven great-grandchildren.

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LUZERNE COUNTY -- As thousands worry about their houses and property while coping with evacuation, funeral diThough Mary had a short stay at Guardian Elder Care, her family wishes to extend their sincere gratitude and appreciation to the nurses, aides and staff at Guardian Elder Care for their genuine care, concern and compassion they bestowed upon Mary during her time of need. A Blessing Service will be celebrated at 10:30 a.m. Monday at the Grontkowski Funeral Home, P.C., 51-53 W. Green St., Nanticoke, with the Rev. James Nash, pastor of Saint Faustina Parish, Nanticoke, officiating. Interment will follow in Saint Mary’s Cemetery, HanoverTownship. Family and Friends may call from 9 to 10:30 a.m. Monday at the funeral home.

rances C. Bases, of Mountain Top, passed away peacefully F Wednesday, September 7, 2011,

rectors in the area have their hands full as well. Many services to be held this weekend in the Susquehanna River valley have been postponed due to flooding and saturated cemetery grounds. Clarke Piatt, a funeral director in Hunlock Creek, said storm water from Tropical Storm Irene last weekend, combined with the rain from the remnants of Tropical

Francis Joseph ‘Click’ Cholewa September 1, 2011 rancis Joseph “Click’’ Cholewa, F 92, went home to be with his late wife of 56 years, Eleanor (Tysar),

Thursday, September 1, 2011. He was born April 5, 1919, in Nanticoke. He served in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II. He was preceded in death by his parents, Joseph Cholewa and Agnes (Dey) Cholewa; and brothers, Stanley, Teddy, Leonard, and Richard. He is survived by his son, Ronald (Alma (nee Kotar)) Cholewa of Mentor; granddaughter Kelly Marie; sisters, Irene Gozdziewski of Baltimore, Eleanor Pientka of Nanticoke; and brother, Eugene Chole- 10:30 a.m. today at Monreal Funeral wa of Baltimore. Home, 35400 Curtis Blvd., EastFuneral Mass will be at 11:30 lake. Following visitation there will a.m. today at St. Bede the Ven- a procession to the church. erable, 9114 Lake Shore Blvd., MenContributions may be made to tor. Burial will be at a later date in Hospice of the Western Reserve, Susquehanna Memorial Gardens in 300 E. 185th, Cleveland, OH 44119. York. Friends may call from 9:30 to Visit www.monreal.com.

Deborah R. Forgie September 7, 2011 eborah R. Forgie, of Mountain Top, entered into eternal rest D Wednesday, September 7, 2011.

While Fran will be dearly missed by her family, they know that she is now reunited with the love of her life, John, and other family and friends from a long full life. A memorial service will take place for family and friends at 1 p.m. today at the Christ United Methodist Church in Mountain Top with light refreshments to follow in the church hall. All are welcome. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the American Heart Association in her family’s name.

Born in Mechanicsburg, she was a daughter of William Reichert and Vivian Myers. Deborah was a member of Christ United Methodist Church, Mountain Top, and an active member of the Mountain Top Women’s Club. She loved gardening, her pets and helping preserve the environment. She was a 1960 graduate of East Pennsboro High School and a 1964 graduate of Penn State University. Deborah is survived, in addition to her parents, by her husband James Brian Forgie; her son Kevin;

grandmother Minnie Lebo; sister, Christine Wiest; sister, Angela Banks; niece Kylie Wiest; nephew Michael Banks; as well as cousins. The Funeral Service will be held at 11 a.m. Monday at Christ United Methodist Church, 175 S. Main Road, Mountain Top, with Pastor Stephen Sours officiating. Interment will follow in Rolling Green Memorial Park, 1811 Carlisle Road, Camp Hill. Relatives and friends are invited to call from 9 to 10:30 a.m. Monday at the McCune Funeral Home, 80 S. Mountain Blvd., Mountain Top. View obituaries online atmccunefuneralserviceinc.com.

Elaine J. Tensa September 6, 2011

FUNERALS St. Mary’s Church, 283 Shoemaker St., Swoyersville. MACINTYRE – Rev. Robert, memorial service 11 a.m. today at Church of Christ Uniting, Market and Sprague streets, Kingston. Friends may call 10 a.m. until the time of service today. MICHALAK – Dorothy, services have been rescheduled due to the flood. There will be a date to be announced. O’CONNELL – Mary, memorial Mass 10 a.m. today in Gate of Heaven Church, 10 Machell Ave., Dallas. PEARSALL – Adrian, services have been postponed and have been rescheduled for 2 p.m. Sept. 18 in Church of Christ Uniting, Market Street and Sprague Avenue, Kingston. The Pearsall family will receive friends from 4 to 7 p.m. on Sept. 17 at Harold C. Snowdon Funeral Home Inc., 140 N. Main St., Shavertown. ROSENCRANCE – Betty, graveside services 11:30 a.m. today in the Newton Cemetery, Newton Ransom Boulevard. SCHWINGEN – William, viewing has been rescheduled 8 to 9 a.m. today at the Nat & Gawlas Funeral Home, 89 Park Ave., WilkesBarre. Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in Our Lady of Hope Parish, Wilkes-Barre. Interment will be in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Hanover Township. SEARFOSS – Dorothy, funeral changed to 11 a.m. Monday in the Metcalfe and Shaver Funeral Home Inc., 504 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming. Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m. Sunday at the funeral home. SHONK – Victoria, funeral will be postponed until further notice. SIEPIETOWSKI – Mary, blessing service 10:30 a.m. Monday at the Grontkowski Funeral Home, P.C., 51-53 W. Green St., Nanticoke. Family and friends may call from 9 to 10:30 a.m. Monday at the funeral home. SIMKO – Helen, due to flood, the funeral will be held 11 a.m. Tuesday with Mass of Christian Burial in St. Benedict Parish at St. Dominick Church, Wilkes-Barre. SNYDER – George, funeral 11 a.m. today at McCune Funeral Home, 80 S. Mountain Blvd., Mountain Top. TAVELLA – Jason, funeral 10 a.m. today in St. Elizabeth’s Church, Bear Creek. Friends may call 9 to 10 a.m. at St. Elizabeth’s Church. TENSA – Elaine, calling hours 4 to 78 p.m. Monday. Funeral 9 a.m. Tuesday from the S.J. Grontkowski Funeral Home, Plymouth. Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in All Saints Parish. TIRPAK – David, funeral rescheduled for 9 a.m. Monday from the Simon S. Russin Funeral Home, 136 Maffett St., Plains Township. Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in the former Church of St. Stanislaus Kostka, Wilkes-Barre. Family and friends may call 5 to 8 p.m. Sunday. WALSH – Gerald, Memorial Mass 1:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24, at Holy Family Parish, 828 Main St., Sugar Notch. YANCIS – Joseph, Mass of Christian Burial 9:30 a.m. today in the Holy Family Parish, 568 Bennett St., Luzerne. YEDENAK – Mae, memorial service rescheduled for Friday, Sept.16, at the Baloga Funeral Home Inc., 1201 Main St., Pittston (Port Griffith).

www.timesleader.com

Flooding hits funeral planning

By JOHN KRISPIN jkrispin@timesleader.com

September 7, 2011

BENSCOTER – Weltha, funeral services have been rescheduled for 11 a.m. Monday at the Clarke Piatt Funeral Home Inc., 6 Sunset Lake Road, Hunlock Creek. Calling hours 7 to 9 p.m. Sunday at the funeral home. Interment will follow in Scott Cemetery, Waterton, Shickshinny. This is due to the flood. BERRY – Dorothy, funeral 1 p.m. Monday from the Harold C. Snowdon Funeral Home Inc., 140 N. Main St., Shavertown. Friends may call at the funeral home from noon until time of services. BERRY – Martin, Mass of Christian Burial 10 a.m. today at St. Mary’s Our Lady Help of Christians R.C. Church. Friends are asked to assemble at the church this morning. There will be no funeral procession. BORZELL – John, viewing and funeral are postponed until further notice due to flooding. BUTCHKO – John, former Swoyersville Councilman John Butchko passed away Friday, September 9, 2011, at the Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. Arrangements are pending from the Lehman-Gregory Funeral Home Inc., 281 Chapel St., Swoyersville. CARUSO – Patricia, Funeral Liturgy 1 p.m. today in the Mausoleum Chapel at Saint Mary’s Cemetery in Hanover Township. Entombment will follow. FORGIE – Deborah, funeral 11 a.m. Monday at Christ United Methodist Church, 175 S. Main Road, Mountain Top. Relatives and friends may call from 9 to 10:30 a.m. Monday at the McCune Funeral Home, 80 S. Mountain Blvd., Mountain Top. GODFREY – Herbert, funeral 10 a.m. today in the Church of Saint Jude, Mountain Top. Interment will follow in Holy Trinity Cemetery in Bear Creek. HECK – Donald, funeral 9 a.m. Monday from the Nat & Gawlas Funeral Home. Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in St. Andrew’s Parish, 316 Parrish St., WilkesBarre. Viewing 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday at the funeral home. HEISER – Charles, due to the inclement weather the funeral is rescheduled for 10 a.m. Tuesday from the Wroblewski Funeral Home Inc., 1442 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort. Mass of Christian Burial at 10:30 a.m. in Holy Name/ Saint Mary’s Church, Swoyersville. Interment with the Rite of Committal will follow in Chapel Lawn Memorial Park, Dallas, where military honors will be accorded by the U.S. Army. Family and friends may call from 6 to 8 p.m. Monday at the funeral home. HILL – Barbara, Memorial Mass 7 p.m. Sept. 26 in the All Saints Church, 66 Willow St., Plymouth. KOVALESKI – Bernard Sr., memorial Mass at Ss. Peter & Paul Catholic Church, Plains Township, for 9 a.m. today will be scheduled at a future date. Arrangements are entrusted to the Simon S. Russin Funeral Home, Plains Township. KRESGE – Robert, services have been postponed and have been rescheduled for 11:30 a.m. Tuesday from Bennett Presbyterian Church, 501 Bennett St., Luzerne. The Kresge family will receive friends in the church from 10:30 a.m. until the time of service. LIPINSKI – Theresa, Memorial Mass 10 a.m. Sept. 17 in the Holy Name/

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Emergency, saturated ground causing funeral directors to postpone services.

Frances C. Bases

with family members at her side. Born September 23, 1924, in Brooklyn, N.Y., Fran married her childhood sweetheart, John Bases. She was a stay-at-home mom and later worked as an executive secretary for many years while managing the books for her husband’s upholstery business. Fran’s focus in life was the happiness and well being of her family. She and John shared 63 years of marriage and retired to Florida where they lived and played in the sunshine for 20 years. She was a recent resident of Smith Health Care in Mountain Top. She was well cared for and loved by staff and fellow residents. Fran was preceded in death by husband, John; eldest son Randy; and sister, Rosalie Giannone. She is survived by her son Richard Bases and his wife, Naomi; granddaughters, Samantha and Jessica; and granddog, Raven, all of Mountain Top; as well as her daughter-in-law Shirley Bases of Arizona.

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laine J. Tensa, 58, of Plymouth, passed into the Hands of the E Lord Tuesday, September 6, 2011, at

the Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center. She was born September 18, 1952, in Alden, and was a daughter of the late Stanley and Helen Kellar Kielar. Elaine was a graduate of Greater Nanticoke High School, Luzerne County Community College and Bloomsburg University. She completed graduate level courses at Bloomsburg, Wilkes and Marywood Universities. She was a member of All Saints Parish of Plymouth and she had been a CCD teacher for St. Vincent De Paul Church. Elaine was very active with The Knights of Columbus Council 11901, Plymouth, VISION and the Salvation Army Christmas toy drives. She helped to refurbish religious items for the Apostles of Jesus Mission in Uganda. She was a special education teacher at the Luzerne Intermediate Unit and the Greater Nanticoke School District. Elaine was a member of the NEA, the PSEA and the GNAEA. She enjoyed gardening and cooking, and the highlight for her was spending time with her grandchildren. She was preceded in death, in addition to her parents, by a brother,

Joseph Kielar; and an infant brother, Raymond. Surviving are her husband George J.; children, Traci Frisbie and her husband, Leonard; Jodi Welkie and her husband, George, and George J. Tensa II, all of Plymouth. There are four grandchildren, Jonathan, Nicholas and Bailey Welkie, and Leonard Frisbie III; and brothers, Thomas Kielar of Alden, and Richard Kielar and his wife, Karen, of Baltimore, Md.; and a sister, Sylvia Laibinis and her husband, Joseph, of Tarpon Springs, Fla. She is also survived by nieces and nephews, Lynne Marie Laibinis, Paul Eric Kielar and his wife, Michelle, and Christopher Laibinis and his wife, Christine; as well as great-nieces and great-nephews, Connor Liam and Tyler Ryan Laibinis, and Ashlyn and Nathan Kielar. Calling hours will be held from 4 to 78 p.m. Monday. Funeral will be held at 9 a.m.Tuesday from the S.J. Grontkowski Funeral Home, Plymouth, with a Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in All Saints Parish. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the Christian Service Center of All Saints Parish, Plymouth, or the charity of the donor’s choice.

Irvin Ray Yeager September 7, 2011 rvin Ray Yeager, 91, of Mechanicsburg, passed away Wednesday, ISeptember 7, 2011, at the Penn State

He was preceded in death by his brothers, Alfred and Elwood Yeager, both of Shickshinny; and brother-inHershey Medical Center. law Eugene Wollett of MechanicsBorn August 30, 1920, in Slocum burg. Township, he was a son of the late Surviving are his daughter Jill Frederick A. and Reta M. (Rinehim- Klotz; son-in-law Philip; and grander) Yeager. He was the husband of children, Lindsay and Philip, all of the late Sadie Ann (Thomas) Yeag- Mechanicsburg; his brother, Allen er. Yeager of Mountain Top; sisters-inIrvin was a graduate of Newport law, Velma Wollett of MechanicsTownship High School and Blooms- burg, Joan Yeager of Deltona, Fla., burg State Teachers’ College where and Marie Yeager of Shickshinny; as he was a math and history major well as many nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be held and an outstanding member of the at 1:30 p.m. today at Mechantrack team. During World War II, he was icsburg Presbyterian Church. Burial served as a lieutenant in the U.S. Ar- will take place in Myers Cemetery at my. Subsequently, he worked at the Mt. Zion Union Church near SloNavy Depot in Mechanicsburg and cum. Visitation will be held from the Tobyhanna Army Depot. In the 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. at the church. In lieu of flowers, contributions mid-1950s, he joined the Western Electric Co. in Allentown. He began may be made to Mechanicsburg as a Quality Control Engineer and Presbyterian Church, 300 E. Simplater served as the Department son St., Mechanicsburg, PA 17055. To sign the online guest book, Chief of Training and Public Relaplease visit www.malpezzifuneraltions. Mr. Yeager served as Past Presi- home.com. dent of the Lehigh Valley Chapter of the American Society for Quality Control and the Lehigh Valley Chapter of the American Society for Training and Development. An active church member, he served as Sunday School superintendent and on church council for many years.

Storm Lee, have soaked the cemeteries where he holds most of his services. Those are Scott Cemetery in Shickshinny and Ss. Peter & Paul Cemetery in Plymouth. “We decided to postpone the burials and services because you cannot excavate the grounds due to all of the excess water. We take the extra time so we have a respectful service for those who passed,” said Piatt. Even grave plots dug out a week ago are full of water due to the amount of moisture that has built up in the ground. “You just can’t have a service with those types of conditions. The machine will rip up other graves. I am very conscious of that,” Piatt said. Frantz Stegura, of the Williams-Hagen Funeral Home in Plymouth and the Stanley S. Stegura Funeral Home in Nanticoke, said the flood waters have compromised the inventory at the Main Street Plymouth location. “We’ve had to take all of our caskets from the first floor to the second floor, and anything else I could take went to my family’s business in Nanticoke,” Stegura said. He added that the effects of rescheduling services also take a toll on the family members who have traveled to be with others at funeral services. “It’s hard on the families that are flown in for the service and are told it’s canceled. That can’t happen.” For more information on funeral service cancellations and rescheduling, look under the Coming Funerals listings in today’s newspaper.

COURT BRIEFS WILKES-BARRE – The trial of a Mountain Top man whose trial on charges relating to the 2006 rape of a woman was delayed because of appeals has been scheduled to begin on Nov. 14. Luzerne County Senior Judge Joseph Augello scheduled the trial of Daryl J. Boich, 44, of Church Road, to begin with jury selection at 9:30 a.m. Boich faces charges of rape, indecent assault, and two counts of sexual assault. Boich was charged in October 2005 after police said he raped a woman in the parking lot of the former Murray’s Inn in WilkesBarre. The state Supreme Court in early August declined to hear an appeal made by Boich to have the woman undergo a psychiatric examination. The high courts decision cleared the way for a trial to be held. The trial never occurred previously due on a series of appeals taken by Boich, and then prosecutors, regarding the psychiatric exam. WILKES-BARRE – Attorneys in the case of a Pringle woman charged in the shooting death of her boyfriend in March met Wednesday at a pre-trial hearing, where they told a judge everything is on schedule for a previously scheduled December trial. Assistant District Attorney Chester Dudick and defense attorney Demetrius Fannick appeared before Judge William Amesbury where they said they are prepared for Kathleen Jordan’s Dec. 19 trial. Amesbury said another pretrial hearing will be held on Oct. 20, and that any request or motion in the case must be filed by Fannick by Nov. 15 and prosecutors must respond seven days after. A motions hearing was scheduled for Nov. 29. Investigators allege Jordan killed Milo Vincent Reilly, 45, inside a Valley View Drive, Pringle, house on March 8.

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Seeking shelter from storm of bad news Videos of flood waters were too disturbing for some flood refugees who sought relief. By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER tmorgan@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE TWP. – Having just evacuated her Forty Fort home, Frances Jane Yeager sat in her mother’s Wilkes-Barre living room watching the news and decided: She couldn’t take it any more. The videos of flood waters inching perilously close to the top of levee and bridges under water were too disturbing, so she and her husband, Dale, decided to take a break from it all. The TGI Friday’s restaurant on Kidder Street was more than happy to help them forget their woes. The Yeagers were among more than 700 people who ventured to the popular chain restaurant for lunch and dinner Thursday, said Jonathan Williams, assistant general manager. He suspects the bulk of the customers were flood refugees like the Yeagers. The couple left their Center Street home in compliance with the mandatory evacuation order issued for all residents who lived in areas affected by the Agnes flood in 1972. Moving their furniture and belongings to safety before they left was a tough job, but

it was even tougher “We’re ty- heard it on the radio coming in, but I didn’t watching newscasts of ing to get know who it affected.” the flooding that was raout and Many of the restauvaging lower-lying areas rant’s customers were not protected by the lev- just relax evacuees who had taken ees, Frances Yeager said. and get up shelter in nearby ho“We’re tying to get out tels, including the adjaand just relax and get away from cent Quality Inn, which away from the TV. Listen- the TV. was sold out Thursday ing to all this really gets Listening night. Others, like Josh to you,” she said. McDermott and his Shantel Roundtree of to all this aunt, Kate Phillips, were Kingston also was looking for a little “R and R” at really gets visiting the area from upstate New York and the restaurant with his to you.’’ found themselves unexfriends, Terrence Robinson and Emmy Soltren. Frances Yeager pectedly caught up in Forty Fort nerve-wracking commoRoundtree and Robinson resident tion. evacuated their homes in McDermott is the Parkway Manor off Pierce Street, Kingston, and were spokesman for Pride Mobility, staying with Soltren at her home which manufactures power chairs in Mayflower Crossings in Wilkes- and other mobility products, and had come to the area for a photo Barre. Roundtree was affected by the shoot. He couldn’t make it to the 2006 flood that led to a widescale plant in Exeter on Thursday due evacuation. This flood threat to flooding. “I really feel bad for the people,” seemed far more real, he said. “I’m more concerned this time. McDermott said. While they were concerned for It looks like the water level is highthe safety of those affected, er this time,” he said. Just as he was finishing his McDermott and Phillips said they meal, he learned of a new worry: also were impressed by the sense Emergency officials had issued a of camaraderie they witnessed countywide curfew for 9 p.m., a re- among evacuees who were stayporter advised him. It was 8:58 ing at the Quality Inn. “All these people who were p.m., and he hadn’t finished his stranded were playing cards,” drink yet. “I have a drink. I can’t leave Phillips said. “That’s definitely different than right now,” he said with a laugh. “I

TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER/THE TIMES LEADER

Shantel Roundtree of Kingston, left, Emmy Soltren of Wilkes-Barre, center, and Terrence Robinson of Kingston seek refuge at the TGIFriday restaurant in Wilkes-Barre on Thursday.

New York,” McDermott said with a laugh. “It’s a little more, ‘I don’t give a crap’ attitude there.” Williams said he was also impressed by the sense of cooperation he witnessed Friday amongst

his staff, many of whom went to great lengths to make things work. When word of the evacuation spread, managers from across the region volunteered to come into work in case the regular staff

W-B’s Brookside among scenes of rescue The record Susquehanna River level prevented the creeks in the area from flowing into the river.

Rescuers had to give a lift to military personnel after their Hummvee was surrounded by deep water Friday on Main Street in Duryea. The borough was just one place where rescues were needed as the result of rising waters from the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee, which drenched the area over several days. The storm caused record flooding in many areas up and down the Susquehanna River.

By JERRY LYNOTT jlynott@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE – People and pets evacuated homes along Brookside Street on Friday morning after the high level of the Susquehanna River caused feeder streams to back up and flood the neighborhood. Wilkes-Barre Fire Chief Jay Delaney said 65 properties along Brookside Street, North Pennsylvania Avenue and Weir Lane were affected by the high water. The houses are located near the confluence of Laurel Run and Mill creeks, but the record river level prevented the creeks from flowing into the river and flooded basements and backyards. “There is just no where for the water to go,” said Mayor Tom Leighton, who spent a good part of the morning in the flooded area. He met with U.S. Sen. Bob Casey, DScranton, at the intersection of Weir Lane and North Pennsylvania Avenue and stressed the need for assistance from the federal government. Casey and Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Zionsville, toured sections of the Wyoming Valley to assess the damage from the flooding. A nearby wall collapsed on North Washington Street and the repair cost is estimated at $300,000, said Leighton, and that’s just one instance of damage in the city. “We need help in Pennsylvania,” said

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Leighton. Firefighters came to the aid of people who could not evacuate in time and took four people out of the affected area by boat. Alan Montijo was one of them. “I knew it was coming but I didn’t expect it to get that high,” Montijo said as he waited for firefighters to go back to his Brookside house to retrieve medication around 12:30 p.m. Earlier he and two dogs got in the boat to be taken to safety. His wife, daughter and two grandchildren had left the house Thursday night. Water had been coming into the basement when they left and rose

throughout the night. He worried that if it continued to rise, it would weaken his first floor and send a piano he has there crashing into the basement. Montijo left two other pets in the house, saying he left the windows open for them and that they were safe. “My cats are upstairs,” he said. Not as bad off as Montijo, Wayne Prutzman said he had about 2 ½ feet of water in the basement of his house on North Pennsylvania Avenue. “I got a big pump going. We’re just trying to maintain the level,” said Prutzman.

His pump was not dependent upon electricity to operate like many others in the area. And maintaining power to them was essential to keep the pumps working. Bill Vinsko, the solicitor for the city, surveyed the damage. “PPL is going to cut power to specific houses,” said Vinsko. But there was some debate about shutting down the grid. That would hit houses that were not flooded and a pumping station near the creeks. After some discussion the crew agreed to go to individual houses to shut off power.

Engineer says flood gates are working as intended According to Joe Gibbons, seepage during high river levels is not unusual.

when there is no water elevation on the other side. “Because of that, there is water that is discharged through the cracks in the joints,” he said. The water coming through the joints WILKES-BARRE – Luzerne County has been diverted to a pumping station Engineer Joe Gibbons said Friday that on South River Street located adjacent to the flood gates used at each end of the the bridge, Gibbons said, where it is then Market Street Bridge have performed ex- pumped back into the river. Responding to reports the actly as expected, deflood gates had been stored spite concerns about “The structures improperly and had suffered leakage. structural damage, Gibbons Gibbons said the gates performed as desaid the gates were in fine – called stop-log struc- signed. They are shape when they were put in tures – have joints that place. usually leak, and the not watertight.” “When the river recedes seepage experienced Joe Gibbons Luzerne County engineer to the point where we can reduring the current high move the flood gates, we will levels of the Susquehanhave them inspected by prona River is not unusual. “The structures performed as de- fessional engineers to determine if any signed,” he said. “They are not water- damage occurred while they were in use during the storm,” he said. tight.” Gibbons said the portable flood gates Gibbons explained the gates have to withstand “hydro-static pressure” – the are used on both sides of the Market force exerted by the river on one side Street Bridge, on Solomon Creek and on

Luzerne County Emergency Management Agency officials inspect and assess leaks in the flood gates at the Market Street Bridge in WilkesBarre on Thursday evening. Some amount of seepage during high river levels is normal, officials say. PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

Route 11 in Edwardsville. The entire 15-mile levee system has performed well during extreme conditions, he said. “So far, so good,” Gibbons said. “We’ve had some problems in a few areas, like boiling, and we are addressing those.” In Plymouth Borough, Gibbons said, seven manholes were lifted when water backed up. He said water has been divert-

ed to the storm sewer system and carried back to the river. Joe Mazur, Plymouth Borough manager, said the water did not reach any of the businesses or residences on East Main Street, Washington Avenue or Cherry Street. Mazur said there were a few “boil areas” along the dike, but all were addressed.

couldn’t make it in, he said. “We were joking saying ‘The cavalry has arrived,’ ” Williams said. “It shows how the community pulls together in a time of crisis.”

Places to worship are still open

Churches safe from the flood waters are offering regular services this weekend. By MARY THERESE BIEBEL mbiebel@timesleader.com

Safe on a hill in the Rolling Mill Hill section of Wilkes-Barre, church secretary Dolores Bradigan fielded phone calls about weekend Mass times. “Quite a few people have been calling,” she said Friday afternoon. St. Andrew Parish, located in the St. Patrick’s Church building on Parrish Street in Wilkes-Barre, has Mass at 4 p.m. Saturday, 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Sunday – and it is high above the flood plain. If you’re seeking worship services on even higher ground, St. Paul’s Lutheran Church on Route 309 in Mountain Top will have its regular services at 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Sunday. A memorial service for the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks is set for 7 p.m., and should be especially poignant, the Rev. Michele Kaufman said. “When you think about it, people came together in the aftermath of that tragedy and now, 10 years later, they’re coming together again to help each other (after the flooding). It’s all about being neighborly.” People who come to St. Paul’s are invited to bring mops, scrubbing brushes and cleaning solution to help people clean up homes that may have been damaged. The “bucket brigade” effort is part of Lutheran Disaster Relief, a national program that can be traced back to the Agnes Flood of 1972 and Northeastern Pennsylvania. First Presbyterian Church on South Franklin Street in Wilkes-Barre, which had planned a Sunday evening ecumenical memorial service for the 9/11 disaster in conjunction with Temple Israel, has postponed the event. If the evacuation order is lifted by Sunday, the Rev. Robert Zanicky said, the memorial service will go on as planned. Another congregation safely removed from the flood plain is Agudas Israel Synagogue, 77 N. Pine St., Hazleton, where today’s 9:30 a.m. service should go on as planned. The Diocese of Scranton issued a statement acknowledging that “the opportunity for regularly scheduled Masses … may not be possible,” but that “Catholics who are able to safely attend Mass at other churches are encouraged to do so.” The statement referred Catholics to available Mass times posted on the diocesan website, www.dioceseofScranton.org. Bishop Joseph Bambera has written a letter to be read at Masses this weekend that urges those unaffected by the flood “to continue to provide resources, including helping hands, listening ears and shoulders to help flood victims.”


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L I B YA N T U R M O I L

Fighters, Gadhafi backers clash Gadhafi, son Seif al-Islam and The former rebels had set a Anti-Gadhafi forces were moving in from the east and south, Saturday deadline for Bani Wa- and the fighters deepest inside Bani Walid were clashing with ex-chief of military lid to surrender or face an offenintelligence are most wanted. sive but decided to attack Fri- Gadhafi’s men about a mile from the center of the town, Abday evening after Gadhafi dullah Kenshil, the former rebels’ chief negotiatior. By HADEEL AL-SHALCHI Associated Press

WISHTATA, Libya — Libyan fighters launched a twopronged assault Friday on one of the last towns to resist the country’s new rulers, clashing with Moammar Gadhafi’s supporters inside Bani Walid as a week-long standoff dissolved into street-to-street battles, the former rebels said. AP PHOTO

A Yemeni soldier who defected stands guard at a checkpoint next to the site of a demonstration by anti-government protestors in Sanaa, Yemen.

forces fired volleys of rockets at the fighters’ positions around the town. Abdullah Kenshil, the former rebels’ chief negotiatior, said the former rebels were fighting gunmen positioned in houses in the town and the hills that overlooked it. Anti-Gadhafi forces were moving in from the east and south, and the fighters deepest inside Bani Walid were clashing

with Gadhafi’s men about a mile from the center of the town, Kenshil said. Before the reported Friday evening assault, Gadhafi holdouts in Bani Walid fired mortars and rockets toward the fighters’ position in a desert dotted with green shrubs and white rocks, killing at least one and wounding several. Loud explosions

were heard about six miles from the front line, followed by plumes of black smoke in the already hazy air. NATO planes circled above. NATO says it is acting under a U.N. mandate to guarantee the safety of Libya’s civilian population. Its bombing campaign has been crucial to the advance of Gadhafi’s military op-

A L L E G AT I O N S I N J A C Q U E L I N E K E N N E D Y B O O K

At least 5 killed in Yemen

SANAA, Yemen — Medical officials and witnesses say at least five civilians have been killed in the past 48 hours in military strikes in southern Yemen. Officials say that another 38 civilians have been wounded in the military offensive against al-Qaida linked militants. Wounded civilians had to get treatment at field clinics because government hospitals are closed. In recent weeks, government troops, backed by U.S. airstrikes, have stepped up attacks on militants who have taken advantage of internal political turmoil to seize control of parts of southern Yemen.

By CHRISTOPHER SHERMAN Associated Press

SAN DIEGO — Federal regulators will investigate the massive power outage that blacked out millions of customers in Southern California, Arizona and Mexico. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission said Friday that it will work with the North American Electric Reliability Corp. to determine what caused the blackout and how future problems can be prevented. FERC spokeswoman Mary O’Driscoll says if regulatory violations are found, the commission could issue fines of up to $1 million per day for every violation.

Syrian protesters seek aid

Oil workers missing in Gulf

VILLAHERMOSA, Mexico — Mexico’s state oil company said Friday it was searching for 10 workers from a Texas-based company who evacuated from a research vessel in the Gulf of Mexico ahead of Tropical Storm Nate. Petroleos Mexicanos said it has two ships searching in the area where the workers, employed by Houston-based Geokinetics Inc., called for help Thursday afternoon after leaving a vessel known as a liftboat, the Trinity II, on an enclosed life raft. "We’re deeply concerned about the incident in the Gulf of Mexico involving our employees and others who had to abandon a disabled liftboat due to conditions brought about by Tropical Storm Nate," said Geokinetics spokeswoman Brenda Taquino. "The safety and rescue of the employees, everyone on the life raft, is a top priority." Taquino said the company learned Thursday morning that the Trinity II, contracted from Louisiana-based Trinity Liftboat Services LLC, was disabled in the Bay of Campeche because of storm conditions. A liftboat can lower legs to the sea floor and then elevate itself above the water level. This one was being used as a recording vessel and housing for the crew.

Wildfires get worse in Texas

La Nina weather pattern will bring drier, windier cold fronts in the months ahead.

Power outage being probed

BEIRUT — Thousands of Syrian protesters appealed Friday for international help in the face of a bloody government crackdown, marking a fundamental shift in an uprising that has defied bullets, tanks and snipers but has failed to crack the regime of President Bashar Assad. The revolt in Syria began six months ago with modest calls for reform and an insistence that there be no foreign intervention whatsoever. But as the crackdown continues, and the death toll tops 2,200 people, the protesters are increasingly calling for some sort of outside help — although not necessarily military action like the NATO intervention that helped topple the government of Libya. Instead, they are largely calling for observation missions and human rights monitors who could help deter attacks on civilians.

ponents. Daw Salaheen, the chief commander for the anti-Gadhafi forces’ operation at Bani Walid, said his fighters responded with their own rocket fire, and advanced on the town. "They are inside the city. They are fighting with snipers," Kenshil said. "They forced this on us and it was in self-defense." He said three Gadhafi loyalists had been wounded and three killed, while the former rebels had one dead and four wounded. He said the former rebels had taken seven prisoners.

AP FILE PHOTO

Jacqueline Kennedy is at her typewriter where she wrote her weekly ‘Candidate’s Wife’ column in her Georgetown home in Washington in 1960.

JFK derided LBJ By BETH FOUHY Associated Press

NEW YORK — President John F. Kennedy openly scorned the notion of Vice President Lyndon Baines Johnson succeeding him in office, according to a book of newly released interviews with his widow, former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy. She said her husband and his brother then-Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, a longtime LBJ antagonist, even discussed ways to prevent Johnson from winning the Democratic nomination in a future contest. The book, “Jacqueline Kennedy: His-

toric Conversations on Life with John F. Kennedy,” includes a series of interviews the former first lady gave to historian and former Kennedy aide Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. shortly after her husband was assassinated on Nov. 22, 1963. Over seven sessions, she recalled conversations on topics ranging from her husband’s reading habits to the botched Bay of Pigs invasion in Cuba. The book will be published by New York-based Hyperion Books on Sept. 14. Its release comes on the 50th anniversary of Kennedy’s first year in office. The Associated Press bought a copy Thursday. JFK chose Johnson, a Texas senator

and former political rival, as his running mate in 1960. But Jacqueline Kennedy told Schlesinger in the 1964 interviews that he often fretted about the prospect of a Johnson presidency. “Jack said it to me sometimes. He said, ‘Oh, God, can you ever imagine what would happen to the country if Lyndon were president?’ ” she recalled. “And Bobby told me that he’d had some discussions with him ... do something to name someone else in 1968.” Johnson was sworn in as president after JFK’s assassination and was elected to a full term in 1964. He declined to seek re-election in 1968.

BASTROP, Texas — Scorching temperatures, strong winds and dry vegetation are turning Texas wildfires into fast and furious dangers that hop from place to place within hours, even minutes, and give residents little time to flee. Now it’s likely to get worse. Another La Nina weather pattern promises to bring drier, windier cold fronts in the “It’s the months ahead, perfect setting the stage for even conditions more destruc- for a fire tive blazes as the state pre- storm that pares for au- just betumn — traditionally its busi- comes veest wildfire sea- ry catason. “It’s the per- strophic … fect conditions and very for a fire storm that just be- difficult to comes very cat- control.” astrophic, very Doug Piirto intense and veCalifornia ry difficult to Polytechnic control,” said State University Doug Piirto, head of the Natural Resources Management and Environmental Sciences Department at California Polytechnic State University. The perilous mix has spawned a massive blaze that’s destroyed nearly1,400 homes in the Bastrop area southeast of Austin and nearly 300 others firefighters have battled nonstop since February. Their job has been made more difficult by a historic drought that is dehydrating vegetation — fuel for a fire — and a bubble of high pressure that has brought recordbreaking, triple-digit heat to nearly every corner of the state.

Moving water from flood zones to drought areas just not realistic, experts say Moving vast quantities of water is costly and too political, they say.

By SETH BORENSTEIN AP Science Writer

WASHINGTON — As the soggy East tries to dry out from flooding and Texas prays for rain that doesn’t come, you might ask: Isn’t there some way to ship all that water from here to there? It’s an idea that has tempted some, but reality gets in the way. A Texas oilman once envisioned long pipelines carrying water to drought-stricken Texas cities, just one of several untested fantasies of moving water vast distances.

Parched Las Vegas still wants to indirectly siphon off excess water from the overflowing Mississippi River. French engineers have simulated hauling an iceberg to barren Africa. There are even mega-trash bags to move heavy loads of water. There’s certainly plenty of rainwater available. Tropical Storm Lee dumped enough on the already saturated Mid-Atlantic, Northeast and Gulf Coast to bring 9.6 inches of rain across the entire state of Texas, according to calculations by the National Oceanic and Atmo-

spheric Administration and The Associated Press. “One man’s flood control is another man’s water supply,” said Patricia Mulroy, general manager of the Southern Nevada Water Authority. “Doesn’t it make you want to think about a larger distribution that helps both? That’s the crazy part of this. It’s a win-win. There’s no loser.” But moving vast quantities of water is not simple or cheap, and thus not realistic, experts say. Mostly, it’s too costly and political.

However, these dreamed-up concepts show that a quiet water crisis is getting more desperate. “We will go to any lengths to avoid confronting the reality of water shortages,” said University of Arizona law professor Robert Glennon, author of the book “Unquenchable.” “The short answer ... is that it costs too much. It’s not a technical problem,” said Peter Gleick, president of the Pacific Studies Institute and a MacArthur genius grant recipient for his work on water.

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SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2011 PAGE 11A

NYC, D.C. threat increases tensions again By COLLEEN LONG Associated Press

NEW YORK — Security worker Eric Martinez wore a pin depicting the twin towers on his lapel as he headed to work in lower Manhattan on Friday, unfazed by a report of a credible but unconfirmed terror threat before the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks. He worked downtown then and lived through it. He still works there — and didn’t hesitate to take the subway. "It’s the only way you can get to work. If something’s going to happen, it’s going to happen. You just have to deal with it," he said. "This is the time we live in. If you’re going to be afraid, you’re just going to stay home." Once again, New Yorkers dealt with an ominous-sounding report of a possible threat against the city by taking it in stride. "…Every To them, the inday, there conveniences are threats of snarled traffic, bridge of people, checkpoints particular- and train station bag searchly around es have become big sport- routine. U.S. officials ing events said Thursday and relithat they were gious holi- chasing a credible but uncondays, and firmed al-Qaida threat to use a around car bomb on commemo- bridges or tunrations of nels in New York or Washthings like ington. D.C. commu9/11. And ters grappled each time with similar …we incomplications and tried to crease our take them in security, stride. which obvi- Cheryl Francis, of Chantilously we ly, Va., comhave done mutes over a bridge into for this." Washington evMichael ery day and Bloomberg didn’t plan to NYC mayor change her habits. She was at work in the capital city on Sept. 11, 2001, and believes the country is more aware and alert now. "It’s almost like sleeping with one eye open," she said. In New York, Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said already-heightened security was beefed up even more. Police were increasing security at bridges and tunnels, setting up vehicle checkpoints, doing bomb sweeps of parking garages and towing more illegally parked cars, Kelly said. The measures were nothing New Yorkers — or the well-prepared law enforcement agencies — haven’t seen before, Bloomberg said Friday. "Keep in mind, we have threats all the time," he said on his weekly radio appearance on WOR. "On the Internet, every day, there are threats of people, particularly around big sporting events and religious holidays, and around commemorations of things like 9/11. And each time the NYPD, with the FBI, we increase our security, which obviously we have done for this." On Friday morning, the mayor rode the subway down to City Hall to try to assure commuters the city was prepared. Police planned a show of force at Grand Central Terminal, Pennsylvania Station and the Times Square subway station because of a previously planned counterterror drill with rail agencies. Authorities stopped vehicles at the 59th Street bridge, which connects Manhattan to Queens, causing a major backup. The Brooklyn Bridge was down to one lane, and checkpoints were up near Times Square and in other Midtown locations.

AP PHOTO

A heavily armed Port Authority police officer stands guard next to the North Pool at the World Trade Center memorial site Friday in New York. Just days before the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, U.S. counterterrorism officials are chasing a credible but unconfirmed al-Qaida threat to use a car bomb on bridges or tunnels in New York City or Washington.

At Penn Station, transit police in helmets and bulletproof vests and carrying assault rifles watched the crowds. Officials were swabbing passengers’ bags near an escalator to the train platforms, and police searched the bags of passengers at the entrance to a subway station. National Guard troops in camouflaged fatigues moved

among the throng, eyeing packages. Roseanne Lee, 64, said her taxi was stopped twice at police checkpoints on its way from the Upper East Side to Penn Station. Police looked in the windows of the cab but did not question her or the driver, she said. At one checkpoint, police were searching a moving van, she said.

The delays made the fare higher, "but I don’t care," Lee said. "It’s better to be safe. You can’t stop doing what you’re doing because of these threats. You just have to be careful." Gail Murray, an administrative assistant who works in Manhattan, took the threat in stride as she listened to Long Island Rail Road announcements aboard a

train heading to Penn Station. "I thought, ’Here we go again,’" she said. "That’s all just part of living in New York City." Police tours were extended, effectively increasing the strength of the patrol force, and the department prepared to respond to an increase in calls of suspicious packages. They also added more police vehicles with license plate

readers. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which owns the World Trade Center site, was also at a heightened state of alert. Spokesman Steve Coleman said there would be increased vehicle checks and increased bag checks at the authority’s airports, bus and rail terminals. Suburban police were also stepping up patrols. Officials in Nassau and Suffolk County said Friday additional uniformed and plainclothes officers had been deployed to shopping centers, train stations and other locations. Nassau County Deputy Police Chief Frank Kirby said at a Mineola briefing that his officers, along with state police, were deployed at several locations near the New York City border, using sophisticated radiation sensors at highway checkpoints. City officials said there much would be done behind the scenes, in places that New Yorkers wouldn’t even notice. Bloomberg and Kelly stressed the most important thing to do was to go on with life as usual. Many New Yorkers were doing just that. Dressed in jeans and a Teamsters T-shirt, Michael Murphy of Seaford, didn’t have terror threats on his mind as he headed to work at the armory at 26th and Lexington Avenue, where he was helping to stage shows for Fashion Week. "Like they said last night, we have the greatest police department in the world," said Murray, 49. "I’m confident they’ll do the job." In Washington, one rail rider was more frightened. Maria Rothman tried to take an early morning Amtrak train to Philadelphia, hoping it would be a less inviting target, although she wound up missing it. "I embrace as a concept you got to go ahead and live your life," she said, "except that it’s hard."

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Once again, New Yorkers deal with an ominous-sounding report by taking it in stride.


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Post 9/11, anti-Muslim feelings in community seen as rare Area’s history for hosting people of many backgrounds and ethnicities seen as a plus.

By MARK GUYDISH mguydish@timesleader.com

If the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks evoked tensions between local Muslims and their neighbors, it was not apparent during the last decade to two prominent Muslims or local leaders of other religions. “I personally have not noticed any tensions,” Wilkes University professor Wagiha Taylor said. “I know a couple of people who may have mentioned they encountered some ignorance on the part of others, maybe because of the way they dress or act. But I have not heard of anything serious.” “I never felt it myself,” Mahmoud Fahmy said. “Maybe other members of the community felt it. If so, I would like the public very much to learn, what is Islam? People sometimes interpret Islam in the prism of those who attacked the United States. These are violent people, they are not Muslims. They use Islam as an ideology to promote their own cause.” Taylor credited the lack of overt tension to the region’s long history of coping with immigration of many ethnic groups. “I would think it’s easier living here than in one of the huge cities, where there can be more tension between the

big groups of different people.” And, she noted, the local Muslim population has boomed since Fahmy 9/11. “There is a very, very large constituency from Pakistan, some from Afghanistan, some from the Middle East, some Palestinians,” she said. “I think the professions are available here. Jobs in the bigger cities got taken, so they started moving to smaller and smaller cities.” Wilkes, she added, has more than 70 students from Saudi Arabia alone. All this growth differs starkly from her arrival in the area more than four decades ago, when the entire Muslim community was “maybe a handful of families.” Tensions may not be overt, but Scott Richardson, executive director of the Diversity Institute at Misericordia University, said he knows “prominent members of the Wilkes-Barre Muslim community who are challenged because of the kind of broad strokes painted over them based on the horrific acts of 9/11. “I think we all carry a knapsack of bias,” said Richardson, who is not a Muslim. “People think of Muslim as a race, and the bias is kind of connected to racism, but this is about faith. I call it faithism.

“I work with a young lady here who is a Muslim from Egypt, and she wouldn’t be considered an African American; she has brunette hair, blue eyes and fair skin,” Richardson said. “She told me ‘I won’t associate with being a Muslim, it’s too tough. I just want people to think I’m an American.’ ” Fahmy, a native Egyptian who came to the U.S. 46 years ago, said when tensions do arise, Muslims share some of the blame. “People in the Muslim community must understand what the United States is. We are unique in history. We are not the Roman Empire, not the Hellenic Empire, not the Egyptian Empire,” Fahmy said. “These old empires were based on despotism. We are a completely open society. “The Muslim community living here should understand that the people here really reflect the American idea; we are a welcoming community,” Fahmy said. “I tell the Muslim community that they have to accept, assimilate, integrate. “And assimilate does not mean they have to reject religion. I’m still a Muslim. But before this, I’m an American. They also have to understand that if they are living here, they have to give back to the community. I’ve been adopted by this community, and I adopted this community.” Fahmy and Taylor both have worked for years with the local Interfaith Council, which brings together practitioners of many

faiths. Temple Israel Rabbi Larry Kaplan, who has helped spearhead many interfaith initiatives, had nothing but praise for the Muslims he has worked with, including Fahmy, Taylor, Penn State Hazleton professor Mamoun Bader, and Dr. Ibrahim Almecky, a physician at local hospitals who also serves as Imam, or spiritual leader, at the WilkesBarre mosque on Scott Street. When Bader’s children won the regional spelling bee several times, “I shepped nachas (Yiddish of ‘shared the joy’), and considered that to be a wonderful sign of what is right about America, despite the sad memories of 9/11,” Kaplan wrote in an e-mail. The Rev. Philip Altavilla, director of the Diocese of Scranton’s Office of Ecumenism and Interfaith Affairs, was similarly upbeat. “I do not recall any concrete examples of anti-Muslim sentiment or activities in our area, either at the time of 9/11 or since,” Altavilla wrote in an email. “Given the fact that the Muslim community in our area is significant, though certainly not as large as the Christian community, there is a healthy interaction. The answer to relieving or preventing tensions is simple, all agreed: Education. “Certainly prejudice and discrimination of those different from ourselves have no place in any faith tradition,” Altavilla wrote. “But this is definitely

Flight 93 memorial guestbook unites the country during time of remembrance By KEVIN BEGOS Associated Press

SHANKSVILLE — Some of the writing in the guestbook is elegant script, some a labored scrawl. The notes are from Maine, Michigan, South Carolina, Idaho, Florida and many states in between. All of them were written in the last 24

hours. In this quiet, remote part of western Pennsylvania, people from all over the country came pay their respects to the passengers and crew of United Flight 93, which crashed into a desolate field nearly 10 years ago. Family members of those who died on Flight 93 shed tears Fri-

day, but they also celebrated the spirit of the crash site’s guestbook — a rare feeling that people from vastly different walks of life had come together. "I don’t focus on what happened. You can’t change that," said Lorne Lyles, whose wife, CeeCee Ross Lyles, had been working as a United Airlines

flight attendant for only nine months on that September morning in 2001. "Coming here is more of a celebratory thing. She’s been memorialized," Lyles said. "Just to see the outpouring from all over the world is touching. You really do have some caring people in the world."

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Editorial

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2011 PAGE 13A

OUR OPINION: THE RIVER

Sigh of relief? Not quite yet

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HE MERCILESS rain nerving chatter about seeping stopped, the dour leaks in the vital levee. Workers clouds shyly offered a scrambled frantically to plug wisp of light. Days of dangerous sprays through cracks of gates sealing off the deluge seemed at last at end. And the Valley held its col- Market Street Bridge. The water crested, the risk lective breath. We watched the river swell, reached its peak. And the Valley held its colwe saw the city shrink. The air stilled, the streets lective breath. Even if it did hold, we knew -turned silent. Wilkes-Barre and other low-lying municipal- and know -- this Herculean test ities took on an eerie patina of of human engineering prowess would not end emptiness, a hauntwith dawn … or ing hollowness in the The storm ends, even the setting wake of a mammoth the river ebbs. sun. evacuation. And the valley The levee must Sentinels – and hold, and it must others willing to holds its hold everywhere, evade legal banish- collective breath. until the Susquement – eyed the earhanna subsides, then walls with trepidation. We had survived the in- until the debris careens beterminable torrent. Would the yond our shores. It must hold levee survive the resultant rage until the Susquehanna returns to its placid self, pulls back of a river unleashed? Some already stood fatigued from its sodden flood plains, so from hours or days of pumping water and nerves can drain basements. Others watched as away. The storm ends, the river their unprotected homes slipped slowly under the wild ebbs. And the Valley holds its colwaterway. Scanners rattled with un- lective breath.

QUOTE OF THE DAY “W’ere going into a place that we have not been in this community in a very long time.” Jim Brozena The Luzerne County Flood Protection Authority executive director spoke of facing the unknown as the Susquehanna River rose to the lip of a levee system built to prevent another Agnes Flood.

OTHER OPINION: IMMIGRATION

A smart shift on deportations

E

CONOMIC AND political realities prompt the Obama administration’s welcome shift on deportations from going after those who pose no security or public-safety threat to focusing enforcement on those who do. More than 800,000 people in the U.S. without permission were expelled in the last two years by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, setting a modern-day record. Considerable resources were expended on that dubious achievement. New guidelines draw appropriate distinctions among the 12 million living illegally in the United States. Low priorities for ICE agents will include people who have lived in the United States for a long time, many having come here as children. About 300,000 deportation cases currently before the immigration courts will be reviewed. Authorities will use their prosecutorial discretion to suspend deportation proceedings for some, including the elderly and the ill, longtime residents with clean police records, those who are close family of military service mem-

bers, or the parents or spouses of American citizens. Young people who graduated from high school and plan to attend college or serve in the military would have qualified for legal status under the longstalled Dream Act. They should be among the cases suspended by ICE. This is not amnesty. Only Congress can confer legal status. With the new changes, illegal immigrants enter a new legal limbo, albeit one with much less of a threat of deportation and with the ability to apply for work permits. Another plus is the chance to thin immigration court backlogs, clearing the way for swifter action on deportation of drug traffickers, gang members and other criminals. It can take nearly two years for cases to make their way through immigration court. This is a temporary fix that acknowledges the failure of President Obama’s immigration-overhaul agenda to gain traction in Congress. Reform is still crucial. But smarter prioritizing of deportation cases is key to using resources most effectively in the meantime. The Seattle Times

EDITORIAL BOARD RICHARD L. CONNOR Editor and Publisher JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ Vice President/Executive Editor

MALLARD FILLMORE

MARK JONES Editorial Page Editor PRASHANT SHITUT President/Impressions Media

MAIL BAG

LETTERS FROM READERS

Strategic alliances key to getting things done

T

here is a term to describe the most effective means to carry out missions in the modern era: “Strategic alliances.” It suggests that one entity alone cannot meet the needs of people in trouble, and that bringing together the resources of several organizations can be a strategic alliance that is powerful, multi- tasked, and large enough to have significant impact on almost any problem or issue. Strategic alliances are perhaps best defined when it comes to intelligence gathering and the sharing of information that can prevent a disaster that relates to homeland security. There are other examples, however, where strategic alliances apply to the needs of the community and people in need. In the Pocono-Northeast, such alliances to deliver social services that impact emotional and physical ailments can mean the difference between direct application of services, or people getting moved from agency to agency. This is why there is a need to define the types and kinds of strategic alliances best suited for the people of the region. Take the wonderful work of Help Line and the astonishing number of agencies listed in the Help Line Directory. That book spells out the many services available for the people of this region, and can be thought of as a strategic alliance. Referals to agencies by organizations that are approached for assistance but are unable to help is a form of a strategic alliance. On the other hand, there is a need for a more formalized setting that can incorporate action that implement an alliance of the great variety of social services found inside the region. Here are a few ideas. · Develop a regional strategic plan for social services that goes beyond traditional boundaries of service areas. Such a plan would identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (a SWOT analysis). · Prepare a series of action steps that implements the findings and conclusions of the Strategic Plan and identify the most appropriate entities to carry out the action components. · Incorporate the role of the three sectors of the economy -- private, public(government), and the nonprofit community -- so that it is clear who has the responsibility to meet the needs of all the people and families in need of services. · Sponsor county forums and perhaps focus groups that provide insight and information about social service needs, and ensure that clients as well as agencies are enabled to speak and present their ideas. · Create a regional coalition of social service agencies that can be representative of the many and have meetings of elected

SEND US YOUR OPINION Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification. Letters should be no more than 250 words. We reserve the right to edit and limit writers to one published letter every 30 days. • E-mail: mailbag@timesleader.com • Fax: 570-829-5537 • Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 1871 1

officials at the federal, state and local levels to ensure appropriate involvement of all relevant participants in the strategic alliance. The word “regional” applies to more than one county. Inside a single county such as Luzerne, the model can be established for a strategic alliance that then can be spread across county lines. Many opportunities exist to utilize strategic alliances as a tool of the 21st century to benefit this and future generations. Howard J. Grossman Executive director Jewish Family Service of Greater Wilkes-Barre

County government on the verge of new era

A

s Luzerne County moves into 2012 there is a lot to be hopeful about regarding the many changes. With the “kids for cash” scandal behind us, the county courthouse will have six new judges, which can change the face and improve the image of the court system. Along with those changes, Luzerne County government will be rebuilding its future under a new home rule charter. One of the things that does not change, though, is the separation of powers between the judicial court system and the executive (county manager) and legislative (county council) branches. There have been times in the past when the working relationship between these branches has not been the best. In fact, years ago our judicial system sued Luzerne County because its budget was cut. I am optimistic that issues like that will be handled differently in the future. One of the first issues that will need to be worked out is whether the judiciary should voluntarily have the court employees follow the new county personnel and ethics standards, so that all county employees play on the same playing field. I feel that there are a lot of positives of having all county employees following the same rules. The home rule charter requires the adoption of a personnel code to establish merit-hiring standards, including a process to objectively rank job applicants, and an ethics code to provide penalties, sanctions

DOONESBURY

and remedies for charter and ethics violations. The charter defines (in sections 7.03 and 9.03) that all county employees, which includes the judiciary and office to court administration, follow the new personnel and ethics codes. Luzerne County President Judge Thomas F. Burke Jr. previously said the state Supreme Court and state Administrative Office of Pennsylvania Courts supervise the county court system and would have to approve a decision to comply with the personnel and ethics standards established by the home rule government. He noted the charter and the home rule government can’t violate the separation-of-powers doctrine and independence of the judiciary. Jeffrey Malak, solicitor for the commission that wrote the charter and for the home rule transition committee, has said the new government can impose standards and restrictions on court employees as long as they “do not interfere” with judiciary’s ability “to hire, fire and supervise” court-appointed personnel. There is obviously no clear answer to this debate but I believe the best way to handle this debate is for the newly elected county council and county manager to open up lines of communication immediately with the judiciary courts come January of 2012. With the combination of the Home Rule Government and six new quality judges, Luzerne County has the potential for major positive change. The key is for all branches in the county to be on the same page, communicate and to work together for the taxpayers of the county rather than for the self interest! Rick Morelli Member, Home Rule Transition Committee Candidate, Luzerne County Council Sugarloaf Township

Tell our officials to get to work on creating jobs

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ow would you like to do something helpful? Something that wouldn’t cost you anything except a minute or two of your time every day? Something that would help someone, maybe even a friend or yourself? If you could do that, wouldn’t it make you feel good? Well, have I got a project for you. Just call, email or twitter or whatever, your congressman, both senators and the president every day. Ask them each the same question. What have you done today to put even just one person back to work? It’s a fair question. It’s not a partisan question. It’s not even political. It’s just a question that each of them needs to be able to answer. Because if they’re not creating jobs, are they really doing the job we asked them to do? Ed Cole Clarks Summit


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Kanjo: Investment worth it propriations funding for the proFormer Congressman Paul Kanjorski was instrumental in ject. Congress first authorized the getting the levee raised. project in 1986, during KanjorBy MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

It took more than 20 years after the devastation of Tropical Storm Agnes for the federal government to raise the Wyoming Valley levee, and nearly 40 for the levee to be tested to its limit. But now more than ever, it’s clear the government’s investment was worthwhile, former Democratic U.S. Rep. Paul Kanjorski said Friday. “We probably dodged a bullet that probably would have cost the Wyoming Valley probably five, six billion dollars,” Kanjorski said. “... If those levees hold, there isn’t one person in the Wyoming Valley who shouldn’t just shout that the federal government did something good; that they built one hell of a levee system. We’ve got good, clear evidence that federal government, sometimes, does something right.” Kanjorski, of Nanticoke, represented Pennsylvania’s 11th District from 1985 to 2011 and was instrumental in convincing the federal government to raise the levee and in securing annual ap-

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morning. West Pittston Mayor Tony Denisco estimated hundreds of properties in the borough were flooded, impacting about a quarter of the borough’s 4,800 residents. Many residents did not have flood insurance because their structures sustained little or no water damage during Suquehanna River flooding in 1972, he said. Denisco said he was in the process of asking the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and federal legislators to evaluate the feasibility of constructing a levee. Former West Pittston mayor Bill Goldsworthy, who now works as deputy director of the Northeast Regional Governor’s Office, said the U.S. Army Corps held a hearing several years ago to seek public input on the possible construction of a levee in West Pittston, and a large group of residents objected to the idea, mainly because they didn’t want an obstructed river view. Goldsworthy said he was in the minority as one of the levee supporters, and he’d still like to see the project materialize. Decision made The U.S. Army Corps ultimately decided against pursuing a levee, determining that the potential dollar loss of property from flooding did not exceed the cost of constructing a levee, Goldsworthy said. He did not know the cost, but said the project would be more involved because the Wyoming Valley project was raising an existing levee, while the West Pittston stretch would have to be built from scratch. Goldsworthy said the Army Corps never pointed to citizen objections as a deciding factor in scrapping the project, though he said he believes the outcry must have hurt. The Corps hearing was on Feb. 14 – he didn’t recall the year – and many locals still refer to it as the “Valentine’s Day Massacre.” Goldworthy said Thursday’s flooding was significantly more extensive than in 1972, which could make a levee more feasible. He expressed his support for a levee to legislators Friday, but said the decision would be up to the Army Corps and federal government. His home on Montgomery Avenue appeared to have about four feet of water on the first floor, but he couldn’t assess the damage because it was still unreachable Friday afternoon. “I can’t get to it,” he said. Mayor Denisco and borough Police Chief Paul Porfirio were

ski’s first term in office, but ground was not broken on the project for a further 10 years, and it wasn’t completed until 2002. “It was a very long, drawn-out process that took 10 years,” Kanjorski said. “It wasn’t until 1996 that I was able to get President Clinton down here to convince him that we needed it. ... It took more than 10 years after that to complete it, and every year it took millions of dollars in appropriations. I had to get those funds earmarked every year to get those funds.” He added sustained efforts of other legislators, including former U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter, former Gov. Robert P. Casey, and municipal leaders were also instrumental in that process. At first, Kanjorski said, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers did not want raise the levees to protect the valley from a flood equal to that following Agnes in 1972, but to only 38 feet, due to the corp’s cost/benefit analysis of the project, but that local legislators were united in the opinion that it needed to provide protection for at least the 41-foot mark set after Agnes. “We couldn’t make it less than

busy maintaining control Friday, despite their own hardships. Denisco’s son’s home was flooded, and the police chief said his property had more than three feet of flooding on the first floor. “I didn’t have time to get my own family out of the house. That’s how fast-moving this was,” he said. He didn’t have flood insurance because the property was not flooded in1972. “This is worse than Agnes,” he said. Borough resident Mike Butera, an attorney, said the water appeared to rise about a foot from the ceiling of his one-story ranch on Susquehanna Avenue. He bought the home from his uncle, who built the place in 1949. The structure had only 18 inches of water on the main floor in 1972. Butera took his wife, son, mother-in-law and dog to a relative’s home around 4:30 a.m. Thursday, but he stayed put until the house started to become surrounded by water at 7 a.m. He said he’ll have to rent an apartment until he can make his home habitable. When the water recedes, borough officials will work with flooded residents to get water pumped out of basements and collect soggy carpeting and other material, the mayor said. The state is trying to round up extra pumps for residents who don’t have them, he said. The mucky contaminated mud must also be scraped off the streets, he said. A wall of dirt was dumped in the middle of Susquehanna Avenue in neighboring Exeter borough to stop the river from flooding additional homes. About 20 homes on the river side of the avenue were flooded, many on the first floor, officials said. Makeshift levee Emergency workers started building the makeshift levee on Thursday in the middle of Susquehanna Avenue to prevent the river from flooding homes on the non-river side of the street. The water rose up to six feet high behind the dirt wall in one section, said Exeter resident James Roman, who volunteered to help residents throughout the chaos. “We need a dike system here,” said Roman, echoing the sentiment of at least two dozen residents interviewed Friday. Mark Parlante lives on the flooded side of Susquehanna Avenue in Exeter, and he crossed the manmade levee Friday morning to survey the damage to his home. The water stopped just below his first floor, but he lost all belongings in the basement along with construction material in his yard. Three quads, a gocart and lawnmowers were also under water.

“We probably dodged a bullet that probably would have cost the Wyoming Valley probably five, six billion dollars.” Paul Kanjorski Former Congressman representing Pennsylvania’s 11th District from 1985 to 2011

Agnes and end up having an Agnes,” Kanjorski said. In addition to raising the height of the levee, plans to extend the levee to protect West Pittston were also proposed, and Kanjorski said he supported them, but the Corps of Engineers was skeptical. The municipality’s leaders at the time also passed a resolution and residents signed a petition opposing the extension, which essentially killed that portion of the project. Leaders of municipalities not protected by the levee on Friday criticized the project, claiming the raised levees made the waters rise higher in their communities by backing up the river’s flow. Kanjorski said the Army took that into consideration, and its analysis of the project’s impact on other communities predicted the raised levees could cause the river to rise an additional 9 inches elsewhere.

“That extra 9 inches of water would not create significant damage given the current situation, because that 5, 6, 10 feet (of water) were already there,” he said. Funding for the levee project also included $30 million in mitigation funds for miscellaneous uses, which could be and were used to purchase homes in the most danger of flooding. Congressional appropriations funding, the kind that funded most of the levee raising project, has come under fire by some members of the Republican Party in recent years, and Republican legislators recently called for federal funding for the recovery from Hurricane Irene to be offset by spending cuts in other areas. Both 11th District Rep. Lou Barletta, R-Hazleton, and 10th District Rep. Tom Marino, R-Lycoming Township, said last week they support offsetting disasterrelief spending with budget cuts.

He stayed at the property Thursday until the water in his yard rose to his knees. He then watched helplessly as the levee was built on his street, trapping the water on his side. He was pleased that the dirt wall would spare others but sad that it had to be at his expense. Parlante appreciated the loan of electricity via a power cord from a neighbor who lived across the street. He was eager to pump out and dry the basement to try to minimize foundation damage. “It’s rough,” he said. Hillary Lynch, who lives a few houses from Parlante, was dismayed to discover that the water bubbled up through the first floor, enough to damage carpeting and possibly the hardwood and tile flooring. “There’s a film left on the entire first floor,” she said. Her grandmother’s home a few houses down the street also had basement flooding. “I’m depressed and angry. I’d like to see anything done that will prevent this,” said Lynch, who lives in the home with her father and child. She and her sister, Stephanie Lynch, were trying to clean up parts of the property that they could access but were slowed by mosquitoes and at least seven snakes they spotted in their yard. Luzerne County Deputy Clerk of Courts Tom Pizano was out with his camera. His family’s greenhouse on Susquehanna Avenue was flooded, ruining fans, fan motors and a furnace.

ing at another property they own. He bought the home about a year ago and did not buy flood insurance because the property only had minor basement flooding in 1972. Kunselman was disappointed but not devastated. “Everybody’s alive and OK. That’s what’s important,” he said. Rosella Fedor-Purcell and her husband George slept in the porch of their home, which is located behind Judy Barone’s property. The couple jolted awake throughout the night to check on the water inching toward their home. Fedor-Purcell was grateful her home was spared, but didn’t feel happy. It was the same way she felt in 1972. “During Agnes I had survivor’s guilt. I feel so bad for these people,” she said. It took many of the people on Susquehanna Avenue a year to get their properties back to normal in 1972, she said. The Barones own seven other properties – all rentals – in the borough, and they were all impacted by flooding.

’72 benchmark Like everyone, he said the flooding in Exeter and West Pittston was more severe than in 1972. “Luckily we didn’t have any plants in the greenhouse,” Pizano said. “It came up so fast, we didn’t have time to move things out.” Impacted residents approached their properties slowly Friday morning, apprehensive about what they would find. Mal Kunselman found his Philadelphia Avenue home was flooded up to the first-floor windows. During the flooding, he was at a hospital meeting to discuss upcoming joint replacement he must undergo. His son was helping other neighbors closer to the river move furniture and sandbag, not realizing that his father’s home would be hit. Kunselman said he will have to spend thousands to replace first-floor belongings and the two furnaces and two hot water heaters in his basement, in addition to electrical and other utility repairs. His garage was also flooded, and it contained new tools and a 1951 restored Coke machine he had recently purchased from a yard sale. He and his wife, who has multiple sclerosis, are stay-

Praise given Charles Barone praised borough officials and the National Guard for their assistance. The flood blew out a brand new 18-foot-wide garage door at his mother’s home, sending plastic tubs of important papers into the river. Emergency crews retrieved the tubs, he said. Charles was at his mother’s home Thursday morning to address utilities in the basement, and the river had started to rise. He and his friend looked out the basement window and could see tiny fish swimming past the window. They returned a short time later – jumping through the yard so they didn’t sink in – and the first floor was still dry, but the basement had already filled up. “We heard Niagara Falls in the basement,” he said. “You should’ve seen the water coming in. I’ve never seen anything like it.”

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announced today or tomorrow, but if it’s not 42.66 “it will be pretty close.” He said the old record crest of 40.91 feet, set during Tropical Storm Agnes in 1972, will likely be broken, but because it’s a potential new record, the weather service and United States Geological Service will take its time making a final determination on the final river crest level.

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FEMA providing help for flood victims The Federal Emergency Management Agency provides assistance to those affected in areas that have been declared a disaster. To be eligible for FEMA funding, applicants must live in an area declared a disaster, have filed a claim with their insurance company if insured and may apply for two types of funding. That funding can include “housing needs” – temporary housing, repair or replacement or “other than housing needs – including fuel, medical costs or damaged vehicles. To apply for a FEMA grant, go to www.fema.gov or call 1-800-

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Brozena and other officials detailed the problems and concerns – particularly about residents returning to evacuated areas too early – at three press conferences held at the Emergency Management Agency on Friday. The levee system faced an unprecedented test as the river crested at the 42.66-foot mark – more than a foot and a half higher than the 40.91-foot mark during the 1972 Agnes Flood that devastated the Wyoming Valley. Authorities initially reported the river had crested at 38.33 feet Friday morning, but they later determined that that figure was not correct. Malfunctioning gauge Brozena said the erroneous report was due to a flood gauge that had malfunctioned due to the extreme nature of the flood. A gauge behind the Luzerne County Courthouse was “inundated,” Brozena said. A sonar system used to detect river levels was also damaged. The revised crest figure was based on physical observations as well as information from the U.S. Geological Center, he said. The dike system protects most of the Wyoming Valley to 41 feet. There is an approximately 3-foot “safety zone” on top of that, Brozena said, explaining why the river did not top the dikes. Even with the buffer zone, the situation remained perilous Friday into today, Brozena said. “We are at the extreme limits of the flood control system,” Brozena said. “We are trying to contain a much larger flood than we previously anticipated. We are continuing to work as hard as we can to ensure the safety of the residents of this community and save this valley.” Brozena and Anderson said crews had made significant progress in repairing the problems in Forty Fort as of late Friday afternoon, but the danger had not passed as the entire system remained under “extreme stress” from the unprecedented volume of water. The river remained at 37.4 feet as of 7:45 p.m. Friday. “We need this river to drop and we need to maintain the system and get the river down under 30 feet so we can breathe a sigh of relief,” he said. Evacuation order The evacuation order will remain in effect until it reaches 28 feet, which is expected to happen some time today, he said. Despite the problems in Forty Fort, Brozena and Anderson said the levee system had performed amazingly well given the level of the river. Anderson said the stress being exerted on the system was “by far” the greatest pressure he has ever seen exerted on a public levee system. “Based on the amount of water we are holding back right now, it’s remarkable the limited number of problems we have seen,” Brozena said. County and state officials were extremely concerned that numerous residents defied the threeday evacuation order issued Wednesday. The situation was so alarming that Gov. Tom Corbett held a press conference at EMA to urge residents to stay out of those

621-3362. The Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency also offers funding through the Public Assistance Infrastructure Repair program or the Individual Assistance Human Services program. PEMA recommends individuals report damage to their community’s Emergency Management coordinator. To apply for assistance from PEMA, go to www.pema.state.pa.us or call 717-651-2163. The Small Business Administration also offers disaster funding in the form of loan assistance. -- Sheena Delazio

SUSQUEHANNA CRESTS The highest crests on record: .• 42.66 feet on Sept. 9, 2011, caused by remnants of Tropical Storm Lee. • 40.91 feet on June 24, 1972, caused by Tropical Storm Agnes. • 35.06 feet on Sept. 27, 1975, caused by Tropical Storm Eloise. • 34.96 feet on Sept. 19, 2004, caused by Tropical Storm Ivan. • 34.45 feet on Jan. 20, 1996, caused by massive snowmelt, unseasonably high temperatures and heavy rain. • 34.14 feet on June 28, 2006, caused by 4 to 6 inches of rain. • 33.10 feet on March 18, 1865, caused by snowmelt and heavy rain. • 33.07 feet on March 20, 1936, caused by snowmelt and heavy rain. • 32.01 feet on May 29, 1946, caused by heavy rain. • 31.53 feet on April 1, 1940, caused by 3 inches of rain. • 31.4 feet on March 2, 1902, caused by snowmelt and heavy rain.

areas, particularly Forty Fort. The problem in Forty Fort resulted from the water that is attempting to push underneath the dike, officials said. That can weaken the structure and potentially cause it to fail. “Not only does water go up, it can go under,” Corbett said. “It’s bubbling on the land side. The concern is it’s weakening the levee.” Should the levee in Forty Fort break, it would endanger that borough, Kingston and Edwardsville, he said. Corbett said he was not trying to “instill panic or scare people,” but the public needs to understand the seriousness of the situation and the potential peril they are placing themselves in by ignoring the evacuation order. “You have a levee system being tested to its all-time biggest test since Agnes,” Corbett said. “My concern is if we have a breach and people are not paying attention, there will be water sweeping down. They won’t have time to get away.” He warned he would not place National Guard troops or other emergency crews in danger to save people who “get in harm’s way who voluntarily put themselves there.” “Please, if you evacuated, stay out,” he said. Brozena said officials began to suspect Thursday night that the river levels being reported by the Mid Atlantic River Forecast Center were not accurate because things they were seeing did not add up to the levels that were being reported, Brozena said. “We were out (Thursday) night and (Friday) morning working on the levee system and saw some things we thought were suspect at that time,” he said. Corbett said the failure of the gauges is a major concern, but that issue will be addressed at a later date. “If data comes in and it’s not correct, it’s hard to predict,” he said. The key issue now is for crews to continue to work to stabilize the levee in problem areas and to ensure everyone has evacuated as ordered. “Our message to people is get out. We will worry about why (the gauges) didn’t work after,” he said. Times Leader staffer Bill O’Boyle contributed to this report.


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LOCAL COLLEGE FOOTBALL

King’s, Wilkes cancel games Both schools had been scheduled for non-conference road matchups today. By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

For the first time since football returned to King’s College in 1993, a gridiron game has been canceled. Due to the flooding threats this weekend, the Monarchs’ nonconference game scheduled for today at Bethany (W.Va.) was called off. No makeup date was announced. Likewise, Wilkes’ non-conference road game this afternoon at Waynesburg has also been canceled with no immediate plans for a makeup date. Both contests could possibly be rescheduled for the end of the season if the teams involved do not qualify for the postseason and a new date can be agreed upon. Although the games were being played out of the flood zone, they could not be played because the two Wilkes-Barre based schools were evacuated as part of a Luzerne County-wide evacuation on Thursday. Students from King’s and Wilkes who reside on their reSee COLLEGES, Page 5B

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Crimson-faced

H.S. football schedule gets rearranged The Times Leader staff

The flooding that wreaked havoc across the state on Thursday and Friday also washed out the majority of high school football games involving Wyoming Valley Conference teams scheduled for Friday night. Only the Crestwood at Pocono Mountain West game was still scheduled to be played as of late Friday afternoon. The reconstructed schedule includes three games today and seven more scheduled Monday. Four games involving WVC squads Coughlin, GAR, Meyers, Nanticoke and Tunkhannock had not been rescheduled as of Friday afternoon. TODAY • Scranton Prep vs. Dallas at Lake-Lehman, 1 p.m. • Williamsport at Hazleton Area, 7 p.m. • Lackawanna Trail at LakeLehman, 7 p.m. MONDAY • Holy Redeemer at SusqueSee SCHEDULE, Page 5B

OUTDOORS

Environmental issues linger as river recedes Sediment, chemicals and debris in the water from the flood can still cause problems. By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

collect in deposition areas such as sharp bends in the river. More yet will accumulate behind dams before the rest enters the bay. “The debris we see on the surface is only the tip of the iceberg,” Mangan said. “There is a lot more that is submerged, and that’s one reason why it’s dangerous to go into the water.” While the large debris floating on the surface and under the water is a hazard, so is the sediment and chemicals that have entered the river after being swept in from flooded areas. Even as the river gradually decreases from the crest of 42.66 feet that occurred on Friday, it still carries with it an enormous volume of sediment, chemicals and debris. Mangan said the amount of sediment being carried and deposited by the river is enormous – greater than what is seen over a period of years. “You’re talking years and years of sediment deposits occurring in a single storm event,” he said.

Onlookers gathered at virtually every overlook during the last two days to watch the swollen Susquehanna River and all the debris carried with it. Parts of houses. Entire trees. Countless tires. Even a camper was spotted floating past the Wapwallopen area on Thursday afternoon. So where does it all end up? “Given the force and volume of the river, the Chesapeake Bay is going to be a major recipient of what we see here,” said Dr. Brian Mangan, director of the King’s College Environmental Program and the Susquehanna Research Institute. But not everything will reach the bay. Some of the debris will get caught on the islands in the river, Mangan said, and some will See FLOOD, Page 5B

AP PHOTO

Alabama running back Eddie Lacy hurdles Kent State defensive back Josh Pleasant last Saturday.

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Penn State’s Silas Redd, right, celebrates with DeOn’tae Pannell after scoring against Indiana State last Saturday.

Lions ashamed by ’Bama game last year By DEREK LEVARSE dlevarse@timesleader.com

and they kind of sat on that a little bit.” Richardson had a lot to do with that. Last season he was the backup tailback, getting plenty of touches but still stuck behind Heisman Trophy winner Mark Ingram on the depth chart. Ingram sat out the game in 2010 PSU G A M E D A Y with a knee injury and is now in the NFL, leaving RiNo. 2 Alabama chardson and Eddie Lacy (1-0) to carry the load for the at No. 20 Penn Tide. State (1-0) Now it’s Richardson who 3:30 p.m. today Beaver Stadium, is the Heisman candidate. But Penn State defenders State College TV: ABC were getting a bit tired of Radio: WILK-FM hearing about him by the (103.1); WILK-AM middle of this week. (910, 980, 1300) “I mean, they’re great running backs -- when you’re doing a great job, you deserve the praise you get,” Lions linebacker Gerald Hodges said. “But hey, they’re human just

Some danced around it. Others downplayed it. Michael Mauti chose to be blunt. Penn State downright stunk against Alabama last season, losing 24-3 in Tuscaloosa. But it felt more like 44-3. “I’ve watched last year’s game so many times,” Mauti said. “And I know I can speak for a lot of guys on our defense here – our performance was kind of embarrassing.” The junior linebacker was speaking specifically of the defense that surrendered more than 400 total yards, 144 of which were picked up on the ground by Trent Richardson. But the offense also committed four turnovers, three of which came in or near the red zone. There was plenty of blame to go around. Heading into today’s rematch against No. 2 Alabama at Beaver Stadium, the Nittany Lions have vowed to give a better showing. Even Joe Paterno admitted this week that last season’s game against the Crimson Tide could have been much worse for the Lions. “Obviously it wasn’t as close as maybe people thought it was,” the Penn State coach said. “I thought that Alabama got ahead of us See PSU, Page 5B

Expect delays, parking changes at PSU game The Times Leader staff

Penn State has finalized parking conditions at Beaver Stadium for today’s game against Alabama, with about 2,500 vehicles expected to be redirected to off-site parking lots. PennDOT has also issued a travel advisory for anyone attending the game. Though most travelers from northeast Pennsylvania will not be affected directly by detours -- Interstate 80 has been fully open since late Thursday night – motorists are advised to plan for “major delays.” Most of the parking changes affect grass lots. Those who park in reserved, paved lots will be unaffected. Free shuttles to and from the stadium will be available to all who are displaced. Buses will run from 10:30 a.m. until kickoff, then resume at the beginning of the See DELAYS, Page 5B

N AT I O N A L F O O T B A L L L E A G U E

Beleaguered Packers ‘D’ comes through Despite surrendering 34 points and 477 yards, Green Bay got it done at the end.

Green Bay’s John Kuhn scored one of the Packers’ six touchdowns, but it was the defense that finally came up with a big stop to beat the Saints on the final play of Thursday’s NFL opener.

By CHRIS JENKINS AP Sports Writer

GREEN BAY, Wis. — A.J. Hawk was sure he had just made a big play to preserve a victory for the Green Bay Packers. With the Saints on the Packers’ 9-yard line, three seconds left on the clock and New Orleans needing a touchdown and two-point conversion to tie, Drew Brees threw a dart to Darren Sproles. Hawk broke on the ball, leaped high in the air and reached over Sproles’ right shoulder to poke the ball away. If Hawk made any significant contact with Sproles, it appeared to See PACKERS, Page 5B

AP PHOTO

Colts insist they can thrive even without QB Manning never applied to an Indianapolis quarINDIANAPOLIS — Reggie terback. Wayne believes Sunday’s game Manning’s at Houston will be just like any streak of 227 other Colts’ season opener. consecutive He’s excited to play some starts inmeaningful football, even if his Manning cluding the old pal, Peyton Manning, isn’t playoffs will end Sunday in throwing him the dang ball. Houston, three days after his “The next guy is going to latest neck surgery. He’s exhave to step up,” he said Fripected to be out at least two day. “And everybody is going months and perhaps for the to have to rally around that entire season, temporarily guy.” leaving Kerry Collins in charge Next man up has been a of the team Manning has run mantra Indianapolis players since September 1998. have embraced for nearly a decade. But until now Tony Dungy’s three-word phrase See COLTS, Page 5B By MICHAEL MAROT AP Sports Writer


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Shorthanded Phils chug the Brewers EDITOR’S NOTE: Due to an earlier deadline because of the flooding in the Wyoming Valley, Friday night’s baseball games ended too late for today’s edition.

threat of Hurricane Irene. Jones had a sacrifice fly and RBI double in the nightcap and a solo homer and a double in the opener, a 6-5 victory for Atlanta. The Braves were making a quick stop in New York to play two games postponed Aug. 27-28 after being handed their first three-game sweep of the season, by the Phillies. The Braves next head to St. Louis for a crucial series with the team they lead in the wildcard race by 7½ games.

The Associated Press

MILWAUKEE — For only the second time in nearly seven years, the Philadelphia Phillies played a game without three of their biggest stars — Ryan Howard, Chase Utley and Jimmy Rollins. It didn’t matter. Cole Hamels pitched a fourhitter and Hunter Pence’s triple keyed a six-run sixth inning as the Philadelphia Phillies beat the Milwaukee Brewers 7-2 on Thursday night. “It starts with Cole Hamels, I can tell you that,” Pence said. “A complete game with two runs. Anytime that happens it gives you a great chance to win.” Hamels (14-7) gave up solo home runs to Yuniesky Betancourt and Corey Hart, but kept Milwaukee from mounting any big innings in a game between the two best teams in the National League. The left-hander pitched his third complete game of the year, walking two and striking out two. “Just staying in that top echelon of guys,” Hamels said of his goals for this season. “I want to be in that sort of category. That’s what I strive for every year.” The Phillies managed only one hit off Chris Narveson (10-7) in the first 5 2-3 innings, but then broke through for six runs by getting seven consecutive batters on base to chase the Milwaukee starter in the sixth. Philadelphia had 11 of its 12 hits in the final 3 1-3 innings to win its fourth straight. “It’s hard to figure out with him,” Milwaukee manager Ron Roenicke said of Narveson. “He’s had so many games where he’s pitched really well and he’s breezing through. “Like today, his first five innings were outstanding,” he said. It was just the second time since Sept. 12, 2004 that Howard, Utley and Rollins all

Dodgers 7, Nationals 4 WASHINGTON — Tony Gwynn hit a tiebreaking double in the ninth inning and the Dodgers beat the Nationals in the first game of a doubleheader on Thursday. Gwynn drove in Jerry Sands and Rod Barajas with a long double to center off Drew Storen (6-3). Dee Gordon added a run-scoring single — setting a career high with his fourth hit of the game. Mike MacDougal (3-1), the Dodgers’ sixth pitcher, worked a scoreless eighth for the win. Javy Guerra pitched the ninth for his 16th save. Six Los Angeles relievers held Washington hitless over the last 6 1-3 innings.

AP PHOTO

The Phillies’ Michael Martinez throws to first after forcing out the Brewers’ Casey McGehee to complete a double play Thursday night in Milwaukee.

missed a game. The only other time was Oct. 4, 2009, when the trio rested in a meaningless game after the Phillies had clinched a playoff berth. “A lot of times when you put your reserves players in there, they are wanting to play and be a part of it,” Philadelphia manager Charlie Manuel said. “ They want to show they can earn the right to be on our team and show you they can contribute.” Even without the three stars, each of the eight position players in the starting lineup had at least one hit. John Mayberry Jr., Wilson Valdez and Ben Francisco each had two hits for the Phillies.

“It definitely can bring your team together,” he said. “Actually, that’s what happens a lot of times. The game tonight was good in that respect. Guys that hadn’t played for awhile winning the game. I guarantee you they feel good about themselves.” Pence also had a run-scoring double in the ninth and finished with three RBIs. It was his first game at Miller Park since July 29, when Houston manager Brad Mills removed him in the fifth inning and told him he had been traded to the Phillies. “We have a lot of guys who can swing here, all the way up and down,” Pence said.

Utley likely will miss the series after suffering a concussion Wednesday night. Rollins was reinstated off the disabled list before the game, but did not play and Howard was given a night off to rest. Braves 6, Mets 5, Game 1 Braves 5, Mets 1, Game 2 NEW YORK — Julio Teheran gave flashes of his vast potential in earning his first big league win and the Atlanta Braves, using a lineup with Chipper Jones starting as the No. 2 hitter for the first time in 15 years, beat the New York Mets 5-1 Thursday night to complete a sweep of a doubleheader made necessary by the

Diamondbacks 4, Padres 1 PHOENIX — Ian Kennedy struck out a season-high 11 over seven-plus innings for his National League-leading 19th win as the Diamondbacks beat the Padres. Kennedy (19-4) scattered seven hits and did not walk a batter over 7 2-3 innings. The right-hander joined Detroit’s Justin Verlander and New York Yankees ace C.C. Sabathia as the majors’ only 19-game winners. J.J. Putz pitched the ninth for his 38th save. Justin Upton hit his careerbest 29th home run for the Diamondbacks, who won for the 14th time in 16 games to open a 7½-game lead over San Francisco in the NL West. Corey Luebke (5-9) allowed two runs and three hits over 5 2-3 innings. He walked four and struck out nine.

T H U R S D AY ’ S A M E R I C A N L E A G U E R O U N D U P

Rain weary Orioles top Yankees The Associated Press

BALTIMORE — The New York Yankees would have preferred doing just about anything on their day off rather than playing a makeup game at Camden Yards. And that was before they lost to the Baltimore Orioles 5-4 in 10 innings on Thursday. Robert Andino singled home the winning run after tying it in the eighth, giving the Orioles their second straight extra-inning win over New York. It was the fourth game in four days between the division foes. The first three were held at Yankee Stadium before both teams headed south for a makeup of an Aug. 27 contest postponed by Hurricane Irene. “It’s not ideal, but the Orioles had to do it, too,” New York left fielder Brett Gardner said. “It’s part of the game. A lot of rain, seems like the whole season.” Although rain was in the forecast, the game started on time and was played without interruption. Afterward, the Yankees headed to Los Angeles and the Orioles took off for Toronto. “Definitely, it’s a lot of baseball in a short period of time,” Yankees manager Joe Girardi said before the game. “It’s one thing in April when guys are so fresh. It’s another thing when it’s so late.” After building a 4-1 lead, New York didn’t get a hit or place a runner in scoring position after the fourth inning.

“It’s surprising we didn’t and that’s probably the difference in the game,” Girardi said. “We lost because we didn’t score any more runs.” Vladimir Guerrero homered, doubled twice and scored two runs for the Orioles, who celebrated the victory by mobbing Andino at second base. In the 10th, Nolan Reimold got an infield hit off Scott Proctor (0-1) with one out and advanced on a walk. Andino then hit a grounder inside third base that got Reimold home without a throw. “We can’t walk people in that situation,” Proctor said. “It’s a good at bat (by Andino). He battled some pitches but again, you just have to execute.” Clay Rapada (1-0) retired the only batter he faced in the 10th. The last-place Orioles have nothing to play for except to avoid 100 losses, but they gave the Yankees fits over the last two days. “It shows a lot of heart. It shows a lot of character,” Rapada said. “We’re men just like they are. We want to compete and win. That’s what it comes down to.” New York starter Ivan Nova allowed three runs in 5 1-3 innings. The right-hander was poised to tie a Yankees singleseason rookie record with his 12th straight victory (over 13 starts) before Baltimore pulled even in the eighth. Although that mark is still

possible, Nova’s run of eight consecutive winning starts ended. Down 4-3, the Orioles missed a chance to tie it in the seventh when Nick Markakis was thrown out at the plate trying to score from first on a one-out double by Guerrero. In the eighth, Mark Reynolds was cut down attempting to score on a single by Chris Davis, who took second on the play. Andino followed with an RBI single. Derek Jeter and Eric Chavez each had two RBIs for the Yankees, whose lead in the AL East shrunk to two games, pending Boston’s game at Toronto on Thursday night.

AP PHOTO

Baltimore Orioles manager Buck Showalter congratulates Robert Andino after his game-winning single in the 10th inning of Thursday’s game in Baltimore.

Blue Jays 7, Red Sox 4 TORONTO — Ricky RomKonerko’s 10th career grand starts against the Red Sox, ero won for the seventh time slam tied Robin Ventura’s including an 0-3 record and in nine starts, J.P. Arencibia hit a three-run homer and the 10.62 ERA in five home starts. White Sox record and capped But the left-hander turned his Chicago’s seven-run seventh. Blue Jays beat the Red Sox. luck around in this one, allowEdwin Encarnacion and Eric Thames added solo shots ing three runs and five hits in Mariners 4, Royals 1 SEATTLE — Justin Smoak as the Blue Jays won back-to- 6 2-3 innings. hit his first home run in nearAndrew Miller (6-3) took back games for the first time ly three months, a two-run the loss. since Aug. 31 and Sept. 1 at shot in the sixth inning, to Baltimore. help the Mariners beat the Rookie David Cooper went White Sox 8, Indians 1 Royals. CHICAGO — Brent Morel 3 for 4 and had two RBIs as Smoak hit a 1-1 fastball hit two homers and Paul Toronto evened its record at from Luke Hochevar (10-11) Konerko had a grand slam, 72-72. into the right-field seats for lifting the White Sox to a Boston lost for the fourth his 13th, but first since June victory over the Indians. time in five games and failed 12. He had gone 48 games Morel hit a solo shot off to gain ground on the first between home runs. place New York Yankees, who Indians starter David Huff Jason Vargas (8-13) picked lost 5-4 in 10 innings to Balti- (2-4) in the third and a threeup the victory, his first since run homer off Frank Herrmore earlier in the day. The Aug. 10. He worked six inmann in the seventh — both Red Sox are 2 1/2 games nings, allowing four hits and on the first pitch. It was Mobehind New York with 19 left one run. Jamey Wright, Tom rel’s first career multi-homer to play. Wilhelmsen each worked a Romero (14-10) came in 2-6 game and his four RBIs were hitless inning. with an 8.08 ERA in 11 career a career-high.

PAUL HAGEN OPINION

Concussions also affecting MLB players

WHEN THE SUBJECT turns to concussions, the first image to come to mind might be Eagles wide receiver DeSean Jackson being pancaked by Falcons cornerback Dante Robinson last October. Or it may be former NHL MVP Sidney Crosby talking this week about when he might return to the ice. He has been out since suffering a pair of concussions last January. Football and hockey are more violent sports than baseball. But that doesn’t mean the summer game doesn’t have to deal with an injury that has been strongly linked to chronic headaches, loss of cognitive skills, permanent brain damage, deep depression and even suicide. In 2008, Mets outfielder Ryan Church was concussed sliding into the knee of Braves shortstop Yunel Escobar. He was back in the lineup 10 days later. Soon, though, he was placed on the disabled list with aftereffects. Since then, he has played for the Braves, Pirates and Diamondbacks. Still just 32, he went unsigned this season. On July 7, 2010, Twins first baseman Justin Morneau suffered a concussion while trying to break up a doubleplay against the Blue Jays. Since he had missed 10 days after being hit in the head by a pitch five years earlier, he thought he knew what to expect. “Not even close to what I had before,” he told reporters. “I think it’s more being on the cautious side.” The 2005 American League MVP was listed as day-to-day . . . and missed the rest of the season. Look, every injury is unique. It could turn out that the 91-mph pitch that conked Chase Utley on the batting helmet Wednesday night will turn out to be no big deal after all. Thursday, he was examined by Dr. Rob Franks, the Rothman Institute concussion specialist. For one thing, studies show that the effect of concussions are cumulative. Both Church and Morneau had incurred head injuries before. As far as we know, this is Utley’s first. But no matter what the ultimate diagnosis is, no matter how soon the Phillies’ second baseman thinks he’s ready — and he has earned a reputation for beating the clock in these situations — this is not something to be taken lightly. Listen to what Morneau said last summer: “I’m pretty aware of what can happen if you don’t take care of it. You can play through a sore knee or a banged up wrist, but the head’s something you don’t want to mess with.” Major League Baseball, to its credit, quietly implemented tougher concussion protocols in March. A seven-day disabled list was created specifically for players with head injuries, giving teams the option of not rushing players back, but also not losing them for a full 15 days. And there is mandatory paperwork that has to be evaluated by the league’s medical director before a player with a head injury can be cleared to play. Immediately after Wednesday night’s game, before the Phillies flew to Milwaukee with Utley scratched from the passenger manifest, both general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. and manager Charlie Manuel downplayed the seriousness of the injury. Which is understandable. Information was sketchy at the time and, besides, it’s human nature to hope for the best, particularly when talking about a player as important to the team’s hopes of winning another World Series as Utley. LATE NIGHT WITH JOE GIRARDI When the Orioles and Yankees began playing at 11:08 Tuesday night in Yankee Stadium, it was the latest first pitch for a major league game since the Phillies and Nationals got under way at 11:32 p.m. at RFK Stadium on Sept. 28, 2006. WILD THING Yankees righthander A.J. Burnett has thrown 23 wild pitches in 1722⁄3 innings this season. Teammate Mariano Rivera has 13 wild pitches in 1,205 career innings. FINALLY We often hear that teams will do anything to win. It turns out that there are limits. The San Francisco Chronicle reported that Giants manager Bruce Bochy weaned himself off a decades-long dependence on smokeless tobacco through hypnosis. His therapist then offered to put a curse on the division-leading Diamondbacks, but also warned that it could boomerang back on the sender. Bochy declined.


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SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2011 PAGE 3B

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Irish, Wolverines making history at Big House The first-ever night game at Michigan Stadium will feature plenty of excitement. By LARRY LAGE AP Sports Writer

ANN ARBOR, Mich. — Michigan is trying to make the first prime-time game at the Big House a spectacle. The school plans to distribute 100,000 maize pompoms, pay tribute to graduates who lost their lives on Sept. 11 a decade ago and honor Desmond Howard, their standout receiver who won the Heisman Trophy back in 1991. Then, there will actually be a game. And it should be a good one. Notre Dame is coming to town, smarting from an ugly 23-20 loss at home that got Brian Kelly’s second season in charge off to a sour start. The Irish haven’t forgotten last year’s loss against the Wolverines, either.

New Michigan coach Brady Hoke has been working all week to get his players focused on Notre Dame, not the pomp and circumstance surrounding the first night game at Michigan Stadium and one that might set an NCAA attendance record. “It is easier said than done,” Hoke said. “That’s our job.” The Wolverines are trying to build momentum after routing Western Michigan in a weathershortened game in Hoke’s debut. And even with less emphasis on quarterback, Michigan is likely to rely a lot on Denard Robinson in the next installment of a rivalry that stretches back to 1887. Robinson had his way with the Irish last season in just his second start at quarterback. Robinson racked up a schoolrecord 502 yards — 258 rushing, 244 passing — scored the gamewinning touchdown with 27 seconds left and had an 87-yard scoring run, the longest in Notre Dame Stadium history. Hoke and offensive coordina-

AP PHOTOS

Tommy Rees takes over at quarterback for Notre Dame.

Michigan quarterback Denard Robinson racked up a record 502 total yards and scored the winning TD against the Irish in 2010.

tor Al Borges have talked about using Robinson in different ways, putting him under center at times and asking him to delegate more to teammates. But he ran a sweep out of the shotgun on his first snap last week in what looked like a play out of Rich Ro-

driguez’s playbook. “He’s definitely one of the best offensive players in the country,” Notre Dame safety Harrison Smith said. “So just having the option to almost use him like a running back and at the same time he can throw the ball is

something that I think if, no matter who the coach is, they’re going to utilize that. It starts with him.” Kelly started Dayne Crist last week in the opener against South Florida, but yanked him after trailing 16-0 at halftime and

played Tommy Rees in relief. The sophomore won all four of his starts last season but couldn’t rally the Irish last week. The Wolverines prepared for both quarterbacks, but Kelly said the job is Rees’ to keep. “We don’t come to this decision thinking, ’Well, he’ll give us one game and then we’ll go back to Dayne,’” Kelly said. “That’s obviously not why we made this decision. We believe that Tommy is capable of leading this football team just as I believed strongly that Dayne is capable.” One factor that helped Rees is his ability to connect with star receiver Michael Floyd, who had 12 catches last week — 10 of them from Rees — after being reinstated to the team following brushes with the law over drinking. The player who simulated Floyd in practice this week for Michigan was Darryl Stonum, who Hoke redshirted this season after he went on probation for a second time for drunken driving.

HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL CAPSULES Abington Heights (1-0) at Valley West (1-0) 7 p.m. Monday

Coughlin (0-1) at Tunkhannock (0-1) PPD., TBA

Hanover Area (1-0) at Western Wayne (1-0) 7 p.m. Monday

The Coaches: Abington’s Joe Repshis (60-13, 7th year); Valley West’s Pat Keating (14-9, 4th year) Last Meeting: Abington 38-14 in 2011 Scouting Abington: The two-time defending D2-3A champion Comets were gutted by graduation, but were impressive in their 28-14 season-opening win against Hazleton Area. QB Dante Pasqualichio threw two second-half TD passes to seal the victory. The committee backfield of Corey Degilio, Quinn Karam and Sean Rock was solid in replacing two standout backs who have graduated. Scouting Valley West: The Spartans pretty much controlled Scranton in their 21-7 victory in the season opener. QB Eugene Lewis did his thing running and passing. The defense shut down the Knights’ running game and kept them off the board until late. Valley West WR Lucky Williams will miss the game after he was tossed from the Scranton game after a late hit on Lewis. WR Dylan Flayhart stepped up, though. What To Expect: Abington has won the last three meetings, but with the Comets on the road with a young team and facing Lewis on fake grass could mean Valley West breaking the streak. —John Erzar

hannock’s Rod Azar (0-1, 1st year) Last meeting: Coughlin 14-12 in 2010 Scouting Coughlin: The Crusaders drew a tough opener as Dallas passed over them 28-14. A couple observers said Dallas really took it to them physically in the first half. Standout RB Joe Parsnik rushed for 106, but 60 came on one run. Toss out that rush, and he averaged 2.4 yards on his other carries. Cinti was also disappointed in his team’s tackling. Scouting Tunkhannock: Pittston Area took the air out of Azar’s coaching debut – and snapped a 10-game losing streak – by topping Tunkhannock 45-6. It was a game worth forgetting as the Tigers gave up two TDs via punt returns and another on an interception. With so many new faces in the lineup, the loss wasn’t that surprising but the severity was considering Pittston Area was pretty much in the same boat. What To Expect: This one won’t come down to the wire like last season. Both teams want to make amends for last week, but only Coughlin will as its experience will be the decisive factor. —John Erzar

The Coaches: Crestwood’s Greg Myers (34-41, 7th year); West’s Jim McCarroll (32-64, 10th year) Last Meeting: Crestwood 19-15 in 2010 Scouting Crestwood: The Comets come in riding the momentum of the school’s first win over Berwick, a 19-6 victory where the offensive line, led by Tony Morgante, dominated. That allowed RB Roger Legg to rush for 101 yards and QB Nick Aigeldinger to rush for 125 more. There were a few glitches, a blocked punt and blocked extra point, but otherwise it was an impressive overall performance. Scouting West: Former Valley West assistant Jim McCarroll built West from the ground up, taking control of the program after the school was created in 2002. The Panthers won their first game later that season, defeating Crestwood 19-17 in the season finale. West lost 39-14 to Bethlehem Catholic last week. RB T.J. Bell ran the ball 31 times, but look for the Panthers to get WR/RB Travon Pugh more involved. What To Expect: Crestwood has won the last five meetings. None has been easy as the margin of victory hasn’t been more than six points during the streak. Crestwood has too much beef up front and that could be the deciding factor. —John Erzar

The Coaches: Hanover Area’s Ron Hummer (32-26, 6th year); Western Wayne’s Butch Keller (214-165-4, 37th year) Last Meeting: Hanover Area 39-23 in 2010 Scouting Hanover Area: The Hawkeyes needed a late touchdown from RB Parrish Bennett to slip past Susquehanna 15-12 last week. Bennett was solid in replacing graduated Andrew Forgatch, the Times Leader 2010 Player of the Year, but as a whole the offense needs to pick it up. The defense stopped Susquehanna 1 yard short of the end zone on the game’s final play. Scouting Western Wayne: The Wildcats enter off an emotional 40-34 victory at Wyoming Area where they outscored the Warriors 28-0 in the second half. They also put other D2-2A teams on notice that the rumblings of being a playoff contender are possible. RB Robbie Siclari (195 yds., 4 TDs) had a big game, but the defense did allow over 300 yards. What To Expect: Pretty much looks like a toss-up. Western Wayne gets a slight edge since it’s at home and Hanover Area was 0-4 against better competition on the road in 2010. —John Erzar

Meyers (0-1) at Dunmore (1-0) PPD., TBA

North Pocono (0-1) at Berwick (0-1) 7 p.m. Monday

Northwest (1-0) at Montrose (0-1) 4:30 p.m. Mon.

Old Forge (1-0) at GAR (1-0) PPD., TBA

The Coaches: Meyers’ Corry Hanson (0-1, 1st year); Dunmore’s Jack Henzes (348-150-8, 45th season) Last Meeting: Dunmore 28-7 in 2010 Scouting Meyers: Except for TE Jalen Miller, the Mohawks had an entire new cast of skill players on the field last week. It showed in the 37-14 loss to Holy Cross as the offense totaled just 101 yards and had three turnovers, including an interception for a TD. It also allowed a safety. The defense would have received a passing grade if not for allowing a couple big plays that turned the tide. Scouting Dunmore: There’s no secret to what Dunmore wants to do. Henzes is an old-school, run-first coach and the Bucks follow that credo. Daiqwon Buckley and Austin Seamon led a powerful running attack in a 41-21 season-opening victory against North Pocono. The Bucks scored 34 second-half points. What To Expect: No one expected Meyers to play Dunmore so closely last season. That same feeling resonates once again. It will be tough for the Mohawks to keep this one close. —John Erzar

The Coaches: Coughlin’s Ciro Cinti (29-27, 6th year); Tunk-

Crestwood (1-0) at Pocono Mnt. West (0-1) Scheduled Fri.

The Coaches: North Pocono’s Jason Sepkowski (19-24, 4th year); Berwick’s Gary Campbell (120-45-1, 7th year) Last Meeting: North Pocono 21-20 in 2010 Scouting North Pocono: The Trojans started Berwick’s slide last season, picking off a two-point conversion pass with under a minute to play to hang on. They started this season well, battling a very good Dunmore team to a 7-7 tie at halftime. The bottom fell out in the second half as Dunmore’s running game trampled North Pocono’s defense on the way to a 41-21 victory. Scouting Berwick: The Dawgs wanted to establish a running game this season and did so early by pounding RB Jeremy Freeman in their 19-6 loss to Crestwood. The passing game, though, was out of sync as there were obvious communication problems between QB Jared Pierce and his inexperienced receivers. The run defense was well below what was expected. What To Expect: Both teams have work to do, in particular with defending the run as both were carved up in their openers. Berwick has more veterans and is at home. Those two factors should mean a victory. —John Erzar

Scranton Prep (1-0) at Dallas (1-0) 1 p.m. today at Lake-Lehman

The Coaches: Prep’s Nick Donato (131-80-2, 20th year); Dallas’ Ted

Jackson (218-80-3, 27th year) Last Meeting: Dallas 26-12 in 2010 Scouting Prep: Prep wasn’t mentioned much as a preseason contender for a D2-3A playoff berth. But after shaking off a troublesome first half, the Cavaliers put opponents on notice with a 26-20 victory over Lakeland. They used two quarterbacks – senior Tom Timlin and junior Griff DiBileo – something that has its positives and negatives. The Cavs are inexperienced in the trenches. Scouting Dallas: Junior QB Ryan Zapoticky shined in his first start, throwing three TD passes in a 28-14 victory over Coughlin. It shouldn’t be a total surprise since he could have arguably started for about a half dozen WVC teams last year. WR Shane Dunn, who missed much of last season with an injury, also had a big game with two TD catches. The line play was very strong. What To Expect: Dallas has a lot of weapons; Prep has some. Dallas has experienced linemen; Prep doesn’t. Dallas will probably have something else – a victory. —John Erzar

The Coaches: Redeemer’s Joe Ostrowski (0-1, 1st year); Susque-

hanna’s Dick Bagnall (164-125-3, 28th year) Last Meeting: Susquehanna 48-7 in 2010 Scouting Redeemer: There were some positives in a 38-24 loss to Northwest last week. First, the Royals didn’t fold after falling behind 17-0 at halftime. Secondly, David Gawlas looks like a multiposition threat the program has lacked. Even sophomore QB Jimmy Strickland looks like he could develop nicely. The downside was the rush defense continued to give up big chunks of yardage. Scouting Susquehanna: Susquehanna was stopped a yard short of the end zone on the final play of a 15-12 loss to Hanover Area. But new QB Sean Stanley showed the ability to run the option attack and tossed the ball adequately, and the defense held the Hawkeyes to under 200 yards. What To Expect: Susquehanna made the D2-2A playoff last season and has its sights set on another postseason run. Despite last week’s setback, look for the Sabers to regroup in a big way. —John Erzar

The Coaches: Wyoming Area’s Randy Spencer (14-19, 4th year); West Scranton’s Joe Gerek (13-10, 3rd year) Last Meeting: West Scranton 40-27 in 2010 Scouting Wyoming Area: It was a tale of two halves last week in Wyoming Area’s 40-34 loss to Western Wayne. The Warriors led 34-12 at the break, but Western Wayne RB Robbie Siclari trampled the defense in the final two quarters, scoring the game winner with 18 seconds left. Wyoming Area’s Nick O’Brien had a solid game in his debut at quarterback after playing tailback the last two years. Scouting West Scranton: West passed its first test without QB Tyler Hughes, one of the area’s top dual threats who graduated, as the Invaders dumped Riverside 35-22. RB DeVaughn Chollette, who has an offer from Temple, had a big game. So did WR Malcolm Sweeting, who is one of the top big-play threats in the Lackawanna Conference. What To Expect: Wyoming Area will really paint itself into a corner with another early-season loss. The Warriors can’t let Cholette run wild like Siclari did or the ride home – and perhaps the season – will be a long one. —John Erzar

Russ Canevari (0-1, 1st year) Last Meeting: Northwest 41-16 in 2010 Scouting Northwest: The Rangers had to endure the heat and a spirited effort by Holy Redeemer for a 38-24 win last Saturday afternoon. QB Gunner Majer didn’t play the entire second half due to dehydration, but freshman Logan Womelsdorf proved to be a solid caretaker as a replacement. RB Tony Politz looked fresh while others withered, finishing with 244 yards rushing. Scouting Montrose: The Meteors lost their 19th consecutive game as Nanticoke routed them 48-14. The game was all but over at halftime and the mercy rule kicked in midway through the third quarter. RB John Lawton led the offense with 41 yards on seven carries and Montrose actually added some passing, albeit with mixed results. What To Expect: With a healthy Majer back in the lineup, it’s hard to envision Northwest winning in anything but a rout. Similar margin of victory as last year. —John Erzar

The Coaches: Mike Schuback (69-36, 10th year); Paul Wiedlich Jr.

(12-2, 2nd year)

Last Meeting: GAR 9-8 in 2010 Scouting Old Forge: The Blue Devils defeated Lake-Lehman 21-7

last week as elusive QB Colin Carey scored on runs of 11 and 48 yards on the way to a 111-yard night. RB Lou Febbo picked up where he left off last season by also rushing for 111 yards. Neither was much of a factor in last year’s offensive stalemate. The Blue Devils defense didn’t allow a score last week until late. Scouting GAR: QB Darrell Crawford was outstanding in a 34-12 win against Mid Valley, rushing for two TDs, returning a kick and punt for scores and tossing a TD pass to Shaliek Powell. Powell was the guy in last year’s game who picked up a fumble and was halfway to the end zone when the whistle abruptly blew and the Old Forge runner was declared down. Let’s leave it at that. What To Expect: The fake grass at Wilkes-Barre Memorial should mean more offense than last season. It would be hard to have any less. A valid argument can be made for either team winning. Should be a good one. —John Erzar

Scranton (0-1) at Pittston Area (1-0) 7 p.m. Monday

Holy Redeemer (0-1) at Susquehanna (0-1) 4 p.m. Monday

Wyoming Area (0-1) at West Scranton (1-0) 7 p.m. Monday

The Coaches: Northwest’s Carl Majer (23-12, 4th year); Montrose’s

The Coaches: Scranton’s Mike Marichak (13-18, 4th year); Pittston Area’s Mike Barrett (1-0, 1st year) Last Meeting: Scranton 20-7 in 2010 Scouting Scranton: Not only did Scranton lose 21-7 to Wyoming Valley West last Friday, the Knights also lost playmaking WR Karlon Quiller. Quiller will miss the game after being ejected for a fight spurred by a late hit on WVW’s Eugene Lewis. The Knights did little offensively, especially on the ground, and their only score came with under four minutes to play. Scouting Pittston Area: The Patriots were winless in 2010, but opened with a 45-6 rout of Tunkhannock. Junior Jordan Houseman returned two punts and an interception for TDs. The running game, a sore spot last season, showed life with Mark Romanczuk finishing just short of 100 yards. The defense clamped down on the Tigers, who are in a big rebuilding year. What To Expect: That good feeling of defeating Tunkhannock could come to a halt as the rest of September gets much tougher for Pittston Area. The Patriots, though, are heading in the right direction. Scranton could end up being a detour for them. —John Erzar

Williamsport (1-0) at Hazleton Area (0-1) 7 p.m. today

The Coaches: Williamsport’s Tom Gravish (62-65, 12th year); Hazleton Area’s Jim Drumheller (0-1, 1st year) Last Meeting: Williamsport 46-12 in 2010 Scouting Williamsport: The Millionaires opened with a 23-13 non-conference victory over Central Mountain. As expected, RB Devin Miller was a force, rushing for 292 yards and two TDs on an amazing 40 carries. The passing offense, usually a staple of the attack, was non-existent. The defense gave up some yardage, but created five turnovers. Scouting Hazleton Area: The Cougars had a tough assignment in Drumheller’s debut, trying to win in The Pit at Abington Heights. The reviews were mixed, but better than last season as Hazleton Area fell 28-14. A last-minute Hazleton Area TD made the score look a little better. QB Chad Hoffman had a solid all-around game, while RB Brian Campbell topped 100 yards on just nine rushes. What To Expect: Williamsport to head home for three straight games on its turf with its second road win of the season. Closer than last year since both teams have some rough spots to smooth out. —John Erzar

Lackawanna Trail (1-0) at Lake-Lehman (0-1) 7 p.m. today

The Coaches: Trail’s Steve Jervis (29-54, 9th year); Lehman’s Jerry Gilsky (7-5, 2nd year) Last Meeting: Lehman 29-22 in 2010 Scouting Trail: Jervis tried but couldn’t turn his alma mater Tunkhannock into a playoff contender. In his third season at Trail, he has righted a program that suffered a few down years. The Lions trounced Carbondale 43-12 in their opener, with RBs Eric Laytos and Jeremy Greenley leading a potent running game. Laytos had a big game last year vs. Lehman. Scouting Lehman: The after effects of Hurricane Irene made for a difficult week of preparation for Lehman. The result was a 21-7 loss to Old Forge where the Black Knights’ offense never found a groove. There’s too much talent on that side of the ball to expect many more similar performances. Defensively, they fell victim to Old Forge’s elusive QB Colin Carey a couple times. What To Expect: Last season’s game came down to the wire with Lehman’s Nick Shelley scoring the winning TD on a 35-yard pass from Jared Novitski with 20 seconds remaining. Expect another close game, but perhaps without last season’s dramatics. —John Erzar

Col-Montour Vo-Tech (0-1) at Nanticoke (1-0) PPD., TBA The Coaches: Tech’s Mark Varner (31-33,

7th year); Nanticoke’s Ron Bruza (5-6, 2nd year)

Last Meeting: Nanticoke 40-18 in 2010 Scouting Tech: The Rams played last week like a team missing

its two top players, including the school’s all-time leading rusher, Jay Hardenber. Minus key graduated players, Tech had no offense until late in the game. Meanwhile, the defense was porous as Sayre’s ground game led to an easy 29-8 victory. Scouting Nanticoke: The Trojans rolled out to a big lead in their 48-14 victory over Montrose. RBs Brian Maslowski (161 yds) and Tom Vitale (84 yds) sliced up Montrose’s defense. QB Josh Decker also had one of his better games and perhaps will give Nanticoke a little more balance this season. What to Expect: If Tech couldn’t stop Sayre’s running game, it’s highly doubtful the Rams will stop a bull like Maslowski and his sidekick Vitale. Nanticoke wins another by a large margin. —John Erzar


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AP PHOTO

So much for retirement for Kerry Collins. The guy who took the Giants to the Super Bowl after the 2000 season is back for a 17th season, and steps right in to replace Peyton Manning, the four-time league MVP who had his third neck surgery Thursday.

AP PHOTO

Atlanta wide receiver Roddy White is eager to see how opposing defenses will play against him now that Atlanta Falcons has added heralded rookie wideout Julio Jones.

Scouting Week 1 storylines Falcons WR White looks for big year

All eyes will be on Kerry Collins taking over for Peyton Manning in Indianapolis.

meets nearly every day after Atlanta’s top target expects practice with Ryan to watch film some more room with the and study the playbook. addition of rookie Julio Jones. He is ready to show what he’s

By RICHARD ROSENBLATT AP Sports Writer

For NFL fans wondering where the spotlight will shine brightest on the first Sunday of the season, look no further. We’re here to help. After a wild offseason — featuring a lockout and freeagent free-for-all afterward — the opening weekend presents so many new faces in new places and so many intriguing story lines, it’s a tough task for many fans to keep up with who’s coaching where (Mike Singletary is the Vikings linebackers coach?), who’s playing (Kerry Collins for the Colts?) and who’s not (Brett Favre is retired?). So on a Sunday that surely will be filled with more tears than touchdowns as the NFL pays tribute to the victims and heroes of the 9/11 terrorist attacks 10 years ago, here’s a Pick 6 of players and teams that will draw the most attention. At least, that’s the thinking here: • Kerry Collins, QB, Colts: So much for retirement for a guy who took the Giants to the Super Bowl more than a decade ago. Collins is back for a 17th season, and steps right in to replace Peyton Manning, the four-time league MVP who had his third neck surgery Thursday and could miss the entire season. Pressure? “I have a good idea of what I need to do to get ready to play and give a winning performance,” Collins says. He’d better: Manning has led the Colts to 11 playoff berths, eight AFC South titles, two AFC championships and a Super Bowl victory. The Colts are at division rival Houston. • Philadelphia Eagles: Eagle eyes will be on St. Louis, where Philly begins its Super Bowl express against the Rams after

AP FILE PHOTO

Steelers linebacker James Harrison (92) will be under scrutiny again. With the league toughening its stance on illegal hits, can Harrison – fined $100,000 last season – play within the rules?

landing CBs Nnamdi Asomugha and Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie, DE Jason Babin, DT Cullen Jenkins, WR Steve Smith, RB Ronnie Brown and QB Vince Young to go with $100 million QB Michael Vick, WRs DeSean Jackson and Jeremy Maclin and RB LeSean McCoy. No ifs, ands or buts here, the Eagles better start out with a win, and look like a Super Bowl team doing it. • Cam Newton, QB, Panthers: Must see TV, but this could turn ugly. The Heisman Trophy winner who led Auburn to a perfect season and national title makes his ballyhooed debut on the road against Arizona. He’ll work behind a shaky offensive line on a team that won two games and had the league’s worst offense a year ago — and didn’t make many changes other than bring in a rookie head coach in Ron Rivera. Ready to step into the spotlight could be Newton’s counterpart, former Eagles QB

Kevin Kolb, who makes his debut for the Cardinals. • Cowboys at Jets: Too many juicy angles to list ‘em all, so you’re best served by watching every play and every sideline shot. From Jets coach Rex Ryan to his twin brother, new Cowboys defensive coordinator Rob Ryan, oh the jawing — and body language — we should see. For Dallas, there’s the return of QB Tony Romo after missing most of last season with a left shoulder injury, and the fulltime coaching debut of Jason Garrett. For New York, playing a few miles away from the World Trade Center has put added pressure on the team to win. And let’s not forget the return of WR Plaxico Burress following a 20-month jail term after accidentally shooting himself in a Manhattan nightclub. •James Harrison, LB, Steelers: Nothing like opening the season at fierce rival Baltimore for this guy. However, it remains to be seen how effective

he is following two back procedures and little playing time in the preseason. With the league toughening its stance on illegal hits, can Harrison — fined $100,000 (later slightly reduced) for illegal hits last season — play within the rules on a consistent basis? The 33-yearold LB also is coming off a summer in which he criticized Commissioner Roger Goodell and some teammates, and then apologized, saying he was speaking out of anger and frustration. •Donovan McNabb, QB, Vikings: Third team in three years could work out — maybe. With Favre out of the way (he’s still retired, right?), McNabb comes over after a horrible season with the Redskins to try and help new coach Leslie Frazier turn the Vikings into contenders. His best asset is running back Adrian Peterson, but McNabb can still fling the ball pretty well, and the last time he faced San Diego he threw for 450 yards in a 2009 loss while with the Eagles.

Burress rips former coach, QB with Giants In a magazine interview, the Jets receiver criticized Tom Coughlin and Eli Manning. The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Plaxico Burress is critical of Giants coach Tom Coughlin, quarterback Eli Manning and fans for the way they reacted when he was sent to prison on a gun charge in the October issue of Men’s Journal. Burress said in an interview with the magazine before he

signed with the Jets that he wished Coughlin had shown some concern when he met with him after accidentally shooting himself in the leg in November 2008. He heard the coach commenting on the situation “and the first words out his mouth was ‘sad and disappointing.’ ” “I’m like, forget support — how about some concern?” Burress said. “I did just have a bullet in my leg. And then I sat in his office, and he pushed back his chair and goes, ‘I’m glad you didn’t kill anybody!’ Man, we’re

paid too much to be treated like kids. He doesn’t realize that we’re grown men and actually have kids of our own.” He also said that Coughlin is “not a real positive coach.” “You look around the league, the Raheem Morrises and Rex Ryans — when their player makes a mistake, they take ‘em to the side and say, ‘We’ll get ‘em next time,’” Burress said. “But Coughlin’s on the sideline going crazy, man. I can’t remember one time when he tried to talk a player through not having a day he

was having.” Burress said he was disappointed Manning never reached out to him while he served his sentence. “I was always his biggest supporter, even days he wasn’t on, ‘cause I could sense he didn’t have thick skin,” Burress said. “Then I went away, and I thought he would come see me, but nothing, not a letter, in two years. I don’t want to say it was a slap in the face, but I thought our relationship was better than that.”

learned, but Jones likewise knows that nothing will come as By GEORGE HENRY easily as it did during his three The Associated Press years in the Southeastern ConATLANTA — Falcons Pro ference with Alabama. “In the SEC, everybody comBowl receiver Roddy White is eager to see how opponents defend peted and here they’re compethim now that Atlanta has added ing hard, too,” Jones said. “Here, I think it’s more so because it’s rookie wideout Julio Jones. Trying to cover tight end Tony their job. That’s how they proGonzalez, flanker Harry Douglas vide for their families.” Falcons general manager Thoand rookie running back Jacquizz Rodgers might wear down mas Dimitroff orchestrated a the Chicago Bears if White blockbuster trade with Clevematches his single-game career land on draft day, moving up 21 averages and Jones, the NFL’s spots to pick Jones. The move No. 6 overall draft pick, lives up was Atlanta’s acknowledgement to his potential in Sunday’s sea- that it was predictable and too easy to defend in the playoffs last son opener. season, this de“We are confispite Pro Bowl dent,” White said “There are always seasons from Thursday, “but we Ryan, White, Gonknow these guys people around zalez and running aren’t called the when someone back Michael Monsters of the Midway for noth- catches the ball, so Turner. White led the ing.” you’ve got to make NFL with 115 Even though the some of those guys catches and was Falcons’ passing second with 1,389 attack has the abil- miss and break yards receiving in ity to produce subtackles. We need 2010. Those numstantial numbers bers set single-seabehind two-time some explosive franchise Pro Bowl quarter- plays against those son highs, but White back Matt Ryan, knows they weWhite knows that guys because they ren’t good enough Chicago offers a keep everything in to get him and the tough test. Falcons to the SuSince 2004, the front of them. You per Bowl. Bears have the won’t just throw After earning NFL’s most takethe NFC’s No. 1 aways (235), in- balls over their seed, Atlanta was cluding 137 inter- heads and things blown out at home ceptions, and are like that.” in the divisional led by a secondary Roddy White round, losing to that includes Falcons WR eventual chamstandouts Chris pion Green Bay. Harris at strong The Falcons’ ofsafety and Charles fensive weakness — tying for last Tillman at cornerback. Chicago added former Indi- in the league with only 44 plays anapolis starting cornerback of 20 yards or longer — was exTim Jennings in free agency and posed. The arrival of Jones is suphopes that Major Wright is ready to handle the responsibilities at posed to help stretch the field and give Ryan a speedy, deep opfree safety. Harris, however, missed tack- tion. Jones will soon understand, les on touchdowns scored by the New York Giants and Tennessee however, that routes close much Titans in the preseason, so the quicker in the NFL than they do Bears this week signed former in the SEC. “At a receiver’s level, I think Pro Bowl safety Brandon Meriweather after his release from the only big difference is the windows are harder to catch the balls New England. “There are always people in,” Douglas said. “The windows around when someone catches are smaller. In the NFL, you have the ball, so you’ve got to make to catch a lot of balls with bodies some of those guys miss and on you. You’re not as wide-open break tackles,” White said. “We as you are in college. They disneed some explosive plays guise coverages a lot better, too.” White believes Jones has taken against those guys because they keep everything in front of them. the right steps to succeed. “When he first got here, he was You won’t just throw balls over their heads and things like that.” kind of running routes short and Jones’ development seems to stuff like that, but he’s just movbe going well. Just as he did dur- ing along now,” White said. “He’s ing the NFL lockout, Jones still rolling.”


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U.S. OPEN TENNIS

Nadal rips Roddick in quarters Defending champion will play No. 4-seeded Andy Murray in a semifinal today. By HOWARD FENDRICH AP Tennis Writer

NEW YORK — Defending champion Rafael Nadal overwhelmed Andy Roddick right from the start in their U.S. Open quarterfinal. Whipping passing shots from all angles and returning superbly, the No. 2-seeded Nadal beat No. 21 Roddick 6-2, 6-1, 6-3 on Friday to reach the semifinals at Flushing Meadows for the fourth consecutive year. Nadal compiled a stunning 22-0 edge in forehand winners and broke Roddick’s powerful serve six times. “It was quick. Obviously, it was a combination of things that probably weren’t going to work out today,” said Roddick, who had trouble pushing off on his fatigued legs and was massaged by a trainer during a medical timeout in the third set. “It was evident pretty early that he was in full control.” Nadal took the first four games against the 2003 U.S. Open champion thanks to two breaks in the opening 18 minutes, then took 16 of the last 17 points to close the second set. “The beginning of the match was really important,” Nadal said. “Andy had a really tough match yesterday. Probably, he was tired. Sorry for him.” Seeking his 11th Grand Slam title, Nadal has yet to drop a set heading into today’s semifinal against No. 4 Andy Murray, who beat No. 28 John Isner 7-5, 6-4, 3-6, 7-6 (2) earlier Friday. The other semifinal was set up by Thursday’s quarterfinals, and it’ll be a big one, too: No. 1 Novak Djokovic against No. 3 Roger Federer, who has won five of his record 16 Grand Slam champion-

COLTS Continued from Page 1B

Team officials did not provide any additional medical updates Friday. Under Manning’s leadership, Indianapolis has become an annual Super Bowl contender. Without him, most of the socalled experts say the Colts are an average to below average team and that the NFL world is about to see just how many mistakes Manning covered up. Many say Indianapolis is headed for a doomed season that will end its record-tying run of nine straight playoff appearances. Inside the locker room, players don’t buy it. Veteran leaders such as Wayne and Dwight Freeney have long proclaimed that while Manning is the engineer of Indy’s success, it’s never been just

PSU Continued from Page 1B

like we are. Richardson, he’s no different a person than we are. We all lift, we all practice, we all do the same things. “There should be no reason we can’t stop those guys.” The 20th-ranked Lions enter this one with a lot more confidence. And, in at least one coach’s opinion, with a lot more speed. “They’re a much different team than we played a year ago,”

DELAYS Continued from Page 1B

second half and run until 90 minutes after the game. Please be aware of the following parking changes. • Yellow lots 11, 17, 18, 20, 22, 23, 24, 25 and 26 will be available for cars only on a firstcome, first-served basis. When full, alternate accommodations

AP PHOTO

Andy Murray returns a shot to John Isner during a quarterfinal match at the U.S. Open on Friday in New York. Murray defeated Isner and will face Rafael Nadal in the semifinals next.

ships at the U.S. Open. For the second time in the last three major tournaments, the final foursome is filled by the top four men in the game — but it hasn’t happened at the U.S. Open since 1992. “They’re pretty firmly the best players in the world right now,” Roddick said. “They certainly deserve the numbers next to their names.” Djokovic is 62-2 with nine titles in 2011, including at Wimbledon and the Australian Open. His first loss this season came when Federer ended Djokovic’s 43-match winning streak in a thrilling French Open semifinal. Nadal has won 12 of 16 career matchups against Murray, including beating him in the semifinals of the French Open and Wimbledon this year.

“That’s the most aggressive I’ve seen him play this summer. He came out swinging,” Roddick said about Nadal. “He has a tendency to play himself into tournaments, and then by the end, he’s taking cuts. I feel like today he was doing that.” The exits by Roddick and Isner — with first lady Michelle Obama sitting in the stands at Arthur Ashe Stadium — mean this will be the 32nd Grand Slam tournament in a row without a male champion from the United States, extending the country’s longest drought, which dates to Roddick’s 2003 triumph in New York. The stands were mostly empty at the start of Murray-Isner, and the partisan crowd was oddly silent watching Roddick succumb to Nadal in less than two

hours. “You’d rather be booed than have silence. It’s an empty feeling,” Roddick said. “That’s one of the most disconcerting things. You don’t ever want them to think you’re giving less than you can.” Not all that long ago, the 29year-old Roddick wasn’t even sure whether he’d be able to compete at the U.S. Open this year because of a torn muscle in his side. Struggling with various injuries, the former No. 1-ranked man endured a tough season, and he dropped outside the top 20 for the first time in a decade. At the U.S. Open, though, Roddick’s serve was broken only six times in four matches until Friday. Then again, he hadn’t faced anyone anywhere close to the talent of Nadal.

a one-man show. “What can you do about it? There’s nothing you can do,” Wayne said of the dire predictions. “Either let it go on deaf ears or you let it bother you. I think everyone in this locker room has dealt with it the same way and that’s to not let it bother us at all. We don’t feel like we have to prove anything to anybody, and we’re going to go out there and it’s going to be the same mentality.” Of course, the Colts have won without Manning playing his best ball. •In 2006, the Colts won the Super Bowl with Manning throwing seven interceptions and only three touchdowns in four postseason games. And the Colts wouldn’t have reached the big game without Adam Vinatieri making five field goals in a 15-6 second-round win at Baltimore. • Indy’s best seasons have

typically come when the speedy defense has played at its best. • Even the Texans have seen the Colts’ defense win games. In 2008, the Colts forced three turnovers in the final five minutes, producing an incredible 21-point rally to give Indy a 3127 victory. While Manning got the accolades then, those around him always knew the four-time MVP wasn’t doing it by himself. Neither can Collins, the new next man up. “Peyton’s so unique in the things he does, and I don’t think anybody expects me to go out there and run the offense like (him),” said Collins, who has had 16 days to learn the system. “That’s a whole other ballgame that we’re talking about. But I know that I’m very comfortable with what we’re doing.” Things will be different now. Offensive coordinator Clyde Christensen acknowledged the

Colts are likely to huddle up more often and make fewer calls at the line of scrimmage — a trademark of the Manning era. They also may run more often with two former first-round draft picks, Joseph Addai and Donald Brown, in the backfield. Collins will find himself surrounded by arguably the deepest group of receivers he’s ever played with. Besides Wayne, he can throw to 2009 playoff star Pierre Garcon and Pro Bowl tight end Dallas Clark. The Colts are out to prove they can keep winning — with or without Manning. “You’re here to do your job. We weren’t brought here to be second fiddle to anybody. You’ve just got to do your job,” Pro Bowl defensive end Robert Mathis said. “His (Manning’s) resume speaks for itself. But we’re not going to lay down for anybody. So if you want to count us out, go ahead and do that.”

Alabama’s Nick Saban said. “They seem like they play faster. I think the circumstances down here -- it was real hot last year -probably affected them a little bit. “They have more experience. The quarterbacks are playing better, which is probably the biggest key, offensively. … We think they will be a totally different team.” Of course, a change of venue doesn’t hurt either. Penn State did not handle the scene well at Bryant-Denny Stadium last year and the Lions hope the switch to Happy Valley makes a difference.

Players spent the week raving about the Beaver Stadium atmosphere during big games, particularly today’s “White House” promotion that occurs all fans to dress in white. But it remains to be seen how much the widespread flooding across the eastern half of the state will affect today’s attendance. Travel from Harrisburg will be particularly tricky as stretches of Route 322 have been shut down and are not likely to be reopened today. Conditions are not expected to affect the game itself, but traffic

and parking patterns have already changed, with several grass lots already closed. All of that aside, the Lions’ chances today come down to one thing in their minds. “This is a better team than we had last year,” Paterno said. “Whether it’s good enough, we’ll see. But they’ve worked. And I think we’ve done a little bit better job coaching. I know we’ve asked more of them, and they responded. “So I think we’re a better team. Whether we’ve made up that kind of difference (from last year) … we’ll see what happens.”

will be made. • Yellow Lot 12 will be closed. Fans who normally park in this lot should approach the campus from the east on Interstate 99/ Route 322 or choose an alternate location. • Brown Lot will be closed. Brown parking passes will be honored in the Orange lots. Cars should approach the Orange lots from the east on I-99/Route 322 or choose an alternate location.

• Yellow Lot 9 has limited availability on pavement areas only. Fans who utilize ADA grass parking in Yellow Lot 9 will be redirected to the East Parking Deck on Bigler Road. This parking deck will be open only to those with ADA parking permits. • The Family-Friendly Lot will be moved to a nearby lot. Fans who already have a FamilyFriendly Lot parking permit will be directed to the paved area in

front of the Housing and Food Services Building along Services Road. • Game day RV parking will not be permitted in Yellow, Green and Purple lots. • Orange and Blue RV lots are open to permit holders. Blue permit holders should approach the stadium via Route 26 and Porter Road. Orange permit holders should approach on Fox Hollow Road or from the east via I-99 / Route 322.

PACKERS Continued from Page 1B

come after he tipped the ball. Still, Hawk was flagged for pass interference. It was that kind of night for the Packers defense. While they gave up too many big plays and a jawdropping 477 net yards of offense — including 419 yards passing by Drew Brees — the Packers got the stops when they needed them most to secure a 42-34 victory Thursday night. No stop was bigger than the play that followed Hawk’s interference call. Hawk said he “kind of lost it” for a moment, yet the game still had to be won: Time had expired but the penalty meant there would be one last play for the Saints to try to score from the 1yard line. New Orleans gave the ball to Mark Ingram, a rookie running back already establishing a reputation for being able to make hard yards inside — but not this time. Led by Clay Matthews and safety Morgan Burnett, the Packers defense swarmed Ingram and stopped him short of the goal line to preserve the win. “Jeez, I knew we were there because of me, so I wanted to stop him more than anybody,” Hawk said. “Me and ‘Bish’ (Desmond Bishop) went over the top and the D-line did an excellent job of getting a ton of push at the line of scrimmage. The whole team was in on that.” The Packers’ defense has some kinks to work out, and more than a week to do so; their next game is at Carolina on Sept. 18. “That’s too many points allowed,” Matthews said. “We take pride in how many points we give up. I’m not sure how many touch-

FLOOD Continued from Page 1B

“It’s hard to guess what the sediment load is, but we could be seeing some all-time highs.” The volume of sediment being carried by the river is the biggest water pollutant when it comes to aquatic life. Tack on the variety of chemicals that enter the river and attach to the sediment particles, and the situation can become a hazard for people as well, Mangan said. “When that sediment and the contaminants dry on a previously flooded surface, that material can become airborne and it can be ingested into our lungs,” he said. And the threat isn’t limited to the air. With the river carrying a variety of contaminants – from fuel to sewage, contact with the water itself becomes an issue. “There could be concerns with bacteria and chemicals in the water, that’s why it would be ill-advised to swim or wade into any floodwater,” Mangan said. On Friday Mangan observed the river from several locations throughout the county and said he didn’t see anything he considers to be an acute health threat to people. But he did hear reports of people smelling fuel odors near

COLLEGES Continued from Page 1B

spective campuses were ordered to either go home with their families or to make their way to one of the several evacuation shelters located in the region. “We are obviously disappointed with the postponement, but at the same time we cannot control or predict what Mother Nature has in store for us,” King’s coach Jeff Knarr said in a school statement. “The weather has been constantly changing and it’s hard to predict what will happen in the

SCHEDULE Continued from Page 1B

downs we gave up, but it’s too many. Obviously, they’re a fantastic offense, Drew’s a fantastic quarterback, their offensive play calling, but there’s no excuse. “If we want to be a top five defense, we have to be able to shut down powerful teams like that. We came away with the victory, we made the plays when we needed to, but there’s a lot of stuff to learn and we still need to improve.” Packers defensive lineman Ryan Pickett said defensive statistics are a secondary concern, especially when facing a highpowered offense. “It comes down to the defense coming through,” Pickett said. “We’ve got time to worry about our defensive stats later on. In the game, the big thing about our defense, we made plays when we had to. “That’s been the story of our defense the last few years. When it comes down to the wire and we have to make a play, we make it. Yeah, they threw the ball down the field and got a lot of yards and put up some points, but in the end we were strong.” Two of Brees’ touchdown passes were for 31 and 29 yards, but the Saints weren’t so hot when they were closer to the goal line. New Orleans was 1-for-5 in the red zone.

RUNNING

Benefit race/walk stays on schedule The Komen Race for the Cure will still take place in Scranton today with a start in the 200 block of Wyoming Avenue. The 5k run begins at 8 a.m. The 5k walk begins afterward at 8:30 a.m. the water. “That’s not surprised considering some people just topped off their heating oil tanks and now those tanks are floating in the river,” Mangan said. Given the enormity of the river’s flow and water volume, some of the chemicals in the water will dilute. But not everything. Mangan said some chemicals that enter the river don’t always mix with the water. Instead, those chemicals form a slug of contamination that flows down the river. “That’s why you should simply avoid the water,” he said. “There’s a possible threat from the contaminants, and also the force of the river itself. You’ve got water there that can easily roll large boulders. There’s no stopping this force.” It could take two to four days before the river gets close to returning to its banks, Mangan added. It could take up to 10 days before the sediment that transformed the river into a dark brown clears out, and that will reduce the threat of the contaminants to some degree. Mangan said there still could be localized contamination issues, especially in areas where sewage treatment plants were submerged by the river. city over the next few days. Simply put, it is better to be safe than sorry. “It is a bit frustrating in that we have put in a lot of preparation to play Bethany, but our kids are just not safe right now.” Both games were part of the second annual, eight-game MACPAC Challenge. Wilkes defeated Waynesburg in 2010, while King’s fell to Bethany. The Monarchs and Colonels are slated to open MAC play next weekend with road games. King’s is scheduled to play at Stevenson in Owings Mills, Md., while Wilkes will face Albright in Reading. Wayne, 7 p.m. • Scranton at Pittston Area, 7 p.m. • Wyoming Area at West Scranton, 7 p.m.

hanna, 4 p.m. • Northwest at Montrose, 4:30 NOT RESCHEDULED YET • Coughlin at Tunkhannock, p.m. • Abington Heights at Wyom- ppd. • Old Forge at GAR, ppd. ing Valley West, 7 p.m. • Meyers at Dunmore, ppd. • North Pocono at Berwick, 7 • Columbia-Montour Vo-Tech p.m. • Hanover Area at Western at Nanticoke, ppd.


CMYK PAGE 6B

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2011

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CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Sixers coach plans for lockout layoff The Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — Amid the uncertainly that surrounds the Philadelphia 76ers, coach Doug Collins has kept some routine. Collins concluded a week of meetings and film sessions with his staff on Friday, and more sessions like it are planned, even as the start of the NBA season is in jeopardy because of the lockout. Collins wants to keep operations running as usual and have the Sixers raring to go whenever a labor deal is reached. “We should be able to hit the ground running, which is exciting,” he said by phone Friday. Collins planned this week exactly as he did last year.

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CMYK

The Week Ahead

Still shopping

Retail sales

Month-over-month change Shoppers have kept spending despite a weak economy. Investors will want to see whether that 0.9% changed in August, when the Commerce Department reports 0.5 on retailers’ revenue Wednesday. 0.5 In early September the monthly est. report from retail chains showed 0.2 0.1 that sales bumped up in August, -0.2 but analysts predict the Commerce Department will say sales fell slightly. Consumers have M A M J J A been making thriftier choices without giving up shopping altogether. Source: The Commerce Department

Price of milk

Consumer Price index

Month-over-month change Thursday, the labor department’s report on consumer prices in August will give investors a hint of how much they should worry about inflation. 0.6% 0.5 Fears that shoppers will pay more 0.4 for everyday items have receded as economists worry about the threat of 0.2 est. recession. Even so, in July the index 0.1 rose by the biggest amount since -0.2 March. Analysts polled by FactSet expect to see a more muted uptick in inflation when the report is released, M A M J J A but any increase will likely affect Source: FactSet already cash-strapped consumers.

Update on electronics Consumers are feeling increasingly uncertain about the economy. So they’re likely cutting back on nonessential items like flat-screen TVs and electronics. That’s one reason why analysts predict that Best Buy’s earnings fell in the second quarter. The nation’s largest electronics chain has been working to remake its business by opening smaller stores and focusing on more profitable products like tablet computers. Listen for executives to comment on those efforts when the company reports on Tuesday.

$50

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40 30 20

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Operating EPS

Price-to-earnings ratio:

I N

S&P 1154.23 -31.67

FLOODING ISSUES

The Times Leader sets up makeshift site at area hotel

B R I E F

Stocks in sharp falloff

U.S. stocks plunged Friday, erasing the week’s gains, amid rising fears about fallout from Europe’s debt crisis. Seeking safer investments, investors sent the yield on the 10-year Treasury note to the lowest level in five decades. Traders fear that one of Europe’s heavily indebted economies could collapse. Such an outcome would likely tip the world economy into recession. In the U.S., the economy faces slowing growth and a stubbornly high unemployment rate. The Dow had its steepest decline in more than three weeks, a period marked by wild swings in prices and sentiment. “Markets always vacillate between fear and greed, and today we’re coming down pretty much all on the fear side,” said Kim Caughey Forrest, equity research analyst at Fort Pitt Capital Group. All three indexes are lower for the week.

Layaway back at Wal-Mart

Wal-Mart, which ditched the pay-asyou-go plans in 2006, is rolling out a holiday layaway plan from Oct. 17 through Dec. 16. Wal-Mart is following rivals that brought back the service during the thick of the recession. Wal-Mart said it will limit layaway to toys and electronics with a price tag of $15 or more. Also, the total layaway purchase has to add up to at least $50. Wal-Mart will charge a $5 non-refundable service fee and $10 cancellation charge for orders not picked up by Dec. 16 or canceled by the customer. A 10 percent down payment is required.

McDonald’s sales slip

Shares of McDonald’s Corp. fell Friday, after the fast-food giant reported a slowdown in emerging markets and missed analysts’ expectations on a key revenue measure. The company said that revenue at stores open at least 13 months had declined 0.3 percent in August in the region of Asia/Pacific, the Middle East and Africa. That marked the first monthly decline in that area since November 2009. McDonald’s emphasized that on a companywide scale, revenue at stores open at least 13 months had risen 3.5 percent.

$3.63 $4.06 07/17/08

$3.67

$2.62

8

Source: FactSet

SECTION

B

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2011

Sunoco closure is feared By JEFF WOLFE jwolfe@delcotimes.com

FRED ADAMS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Times Leader staff members work out of the Host Inn on Friday to put together today’s paper.

The news still goes on

Penn Millers to be sold

Penn Millers Holding Corp. announced that the Wilkes-Barre-based insurance company will be sold to a subsidiary of ACE Limited for $20.50 per share in cash. The purchase price represents a premium of 39 percent over the $14.75 per share closing price of PMIC on Aug. 15, the date of its announcement that it was reviewing strategic alternatives, and is more than twice the initial public offering price of $10 per share on Oct. 18, 2009. F. Kenneth Ackerman, chairman of the Penn Millers board, said that ACE anticipates maintaining the WilkesBarre office. The transaction is expected to close by the end of first quarter 2012.

2Q ’12

Dividend: $0.64 Div. Yield: 2.6%

timesleader.com

Dow Jones 10,992.13 -303.68

est.

$0.52

based on past 12 months’ results

WALL STREET NASAQ 2467.99 -61.15

$0.60 2Q ’11

BUSINESS

THE TIMES LEADER

$24.50

By SARAH HITE shite@timesleader.com

W

ILKES-BARRE TWP. – The Times Leader news staff heeded the call to evacuate their workplace on North Main Street in Wilkes-Barre on Thursday, but an emergency operations plan and modern technology allowed reporters to keep the Wyoming Valley informed as flooding threatened a wide swath of the Wyoming Valley. After preparing an early Friday edition on Thursday afternoon, the staff moved essential equipment into the Host Inn on Kidder Street in Wilkes-Barre Township.

Times Leader IT staff works on the computer at the Host Inn as The Times Leader worked to put out the paper.

information) was too small,” he said. “When you’re stuck up in a hotel or an evacuation center and they shut the gas off at your home, you want to know that.” Director of Interactive and New Media Nick DeLorenzo and Content Specialist Gerard Hetman worked throughout the day to post information to the website as soon as it was reported. As information on the river’s status quickly changed throughout the day, DeLorenzo and Hetman coordinated with reporters to keep the website active and accurate, which attracted a larger-than-usual number of users. “The site was incredibly active throughout the day,” DeLorenzo said. The newspaper staff utilized another opportunity to reach flood-impacted residents when reporter Bill O’Boyle provided live updates for local Public Broadcasting System affiliate WVIA-TV. O’Boyle presented 15-minute live reports every other hour beginning at 6 p.m. and hourly updates begin-

ning at 10 p.m. Videographer Jacki Lukas traveled throughout the Wyoming Valley to record footage of the increasingly serious situation. She said filming the river’s power in action allowed residents to get a closer look without putting themselves in danger. “People do want to the see damage as it gets closer to home,” she said. Butkiewicz said the staff was enthusiastic about providing constant information throughout the day with many working extra shifts. “It was all hands on deck,” he said. Printing is being shared with the Harrisburg Patriot-News until full production could resume at The Times Leader’s plant on East Market Street. While home delivery was hindered by road closures, Butkiewicz said copies were distributed to areas near evacuation centers, and those with home delivery will receive copies of the papers they missed. The news team continued to work from the Host Inn on Friday to provide 24-hour coverage of the flood and its aftermath.

Four computer technicians began the transfer around 10:30 a.m. and continued to transport and set up about 20 computers and “a few crucial servers” for the news crew to work out of two suites in the hotel. Director of Information Technology Brian Dudick said the plan was also enacted during a flood evacuation in 2006. Throughout the day and night reporters manned key areas of concern in the Wyoming Valley including the county Emergency Management Agency building and the Market Street Bridge in Wilkes-Barre. News personnel communicated by cell phones and netbook computers to relay information for posting on The Times Leader’s website every 15 to 30 minutes. Executive Editor Joseph Butkiewicz said the plan was to keep the website as up-to-date as possible for concerned residents looking for information about areas that had been evacuated. “The one thing I wanted to impress upon the staff was that no little bit (of

If the Sunoco refinery in Marcus Hook, Pa., is not sold and does close in July, it will be practically impossible to measure the emotional impact it will have on the workers and their families. But one very measurable impact on the community would be the missing tax dollars that come from the refinery and its employees. According to Chichester School District Superintendent Barbara DiMarino, the school budget would take about a $2.7 million hit. And there’s more. According to Marcus Hook Mayor James Schiliro, the lack of Sunoco tax dollars would leave a hole of a little under $1 million in the borough’s $2.9 million budget. “It’s a big impact on the borough,” Schiliro said. “It’s a third of our budget which comes in through Sunoco. So, you’re talking about some pretty big numbers.” DiMarino acknowledged the possible closing would certainly affect the school district. “They went through a reassessment about 18 or 20 years ago and that was a loss of about $1 million for us,” DiMarino said. “The bottom line is, if they close, we will lose $2.7 million in tax revenue. And that’s actual cash.” And that could mean bad news for district residents when it comes time to balance the school budget for the 2012-2013 school year, especially in terms of their taxes. “Anytime there is a huge commercial reassessment or a loss in revenue, it could result, and I don’t have a crystal ball, but it would result in residential taxes going up,” DiMarino said. There would also be other losses to the school district that aren’t as easily measured. “Sun Oil has been a pretty good neighbor to us,” DiMarino said. According to Widener University professor of economics Joseph Fuhr, Sunoco’s closing would have a negative trickledown impact. “Once you have less jobs, then you have a multiplier effect,” Fuhr said. “It would happen in the sense that you have people around the area, and these people are going shopping to restaurants, stores and getting dry cleaning done. If you have less customers, you could lose more jobs and you may go out of businesses because of losing the Sunoco clientele.”

Feds probing solar firm that got $535 million loan By JASON DEAREN Associated Press

FREMONT, Calif. -- FBI agents executed search warrants Thursday at the headquarters of California solar panel manufacturer Solyndra, which received more than $500 million in federal loans before filing for bankruptcy last week. Blue-jacket-clad agents swarmed the company’s headquarters in Fremont as part of an investigation with the Department of Energy’s Office of Inspector General into the manufacturer once touted by

President Barack Obama as a beneficiary of economic stimulus, FBI spokeswoman Julianne Sohn said. The agents carried evidence in dozens of boxes and bags out of Solyndra’s offices late Thursday afternoon. Sohn said she could not provide details about the investigation, including what agents were gathering as the search continued hours after the early morning raid. The agents were expected to finish their search Thursday. Solyndra spokesman Dave

Miller said agents were collecting documents but the company did not know the reason for the search. "It certainly was a shock this morning to arrive and see the FBI here," Miller said. The assumption was that the search was related to the loans, he said. Those loans -- part of the $862 billion economic stimulus package that Congress passed in 2009 -- have for months been the subject of a probe by the House Energy and Commerce Committee. Thursday’s raid came about a

week after Solyndra’s announcement that it was filing for bankruptcy and laying off 1,100 workers. Solyndra, like other companies in the nation’s solar energy industry, faced declining prices for solar panels, in part because of heavy competition from Chinese companies. Solyndra’s technology relied on a solar tube of sorts that could soak up sunlight from many different angles, producing energy more efficiently and using less space.

AP PHOTO

FBI agent carry a box of evidence from Solyndra headquarters in Fremont, Calif., The FBI are executing search warrants at the headquarters of California solar firm Solyndra that received a $535 million loan from the federal government.


CMYK âž›

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com S&P 500 1,154.23

q

52-Wk High Low Name 27.58 31.00 13.50 59.54 42.40 17.88 8.98 27.65 45.40 31.94 10.87 54.24 78.25 22.23 63.66 84.50 2.60 12.65 11.70 35.99 6.10 9.58 27.73 46.01 55.33 98.01 54.65 6.63 18.47 25.94 73.53 85.74 8.43 42.14 23.13 34.40 68.05 49.59 28.13 36.30 227.45 30.50 29.82 29.84 16.20 30.76 10.85 17.46 38.99 53.80 52.67 38.88 56.84 30.70 51.50 65.12 43.47 47.00 61.53 8.49 85.50 43.28 52.86 18.79 134.13 12.46 404.50 16.93 23.79 44.95 38.88 36.99 38.02 13.50 32.18 8.33 36.40 53.50 16.80 35.25 14.17 46.15 55.12 43.52 36.20 29.60 104.59 52.46 56.55 49.50 131.49 165.96 81.00 40.56 2.51 44.46 22.54 13.52 15.66 15.31 49.26 32.50 1.59 21.69 79.12 21.06 55.95 62.50 6.23 60.55 131463 87.65 45.63 44.44 126.98 4.02 19.63 18.00 80.65 9.85 17.49 7.96 13.08 37.87 26.80 30.14 47.39 7.30 71.67 25.68 29.88 19.35 29.68 57.12 52.95 20.46 8.34 21.55 27.06 29.61 39.50 27.60 78.94 11.07 8.19 10.01 10.48 17.10 63.16 36.99 52.04 56.26 8.21 13.95 2.14 47.06 37.02 48.14 116.55 22.69 1.05 58.68 63.46 10.72 20.36 28.08 36.36 46.87 81.11 23.00 34.07 12.81 35.95 109.94 16.50 4.36 66.00 44.09 6.98 29.24 24.60 51.50 88.49 17.85 8.82 102.48 75.44 69.20

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A-B-C 18.48 ABB Ltd .64 20.03 AEP Ind ... 9.22 AES Corp ... 33.25 AFLAC 1.20 34.08 AGL Res 1.80 7.67 AK Steel .20 3.17 AMR ... 10.06 AOL ... 22.04 ASM Intl .56 27.14 AT&T Inc 1.72 4.05 AU Optron .14 45.07 AbtLab 1.92 34.07 AberFitc .70 17.43 AcadiaRlt .72 38.09 Accenture .90 33.07 AcmePkt ... 1.83 ActionSemi ... 10.40 ActivsBliz .17 9.19 AdamsEx .51 22.67 AdobeSy ... 3.25 AdvATech ... 5.60 AMD ... 10.09 Aeropostl ... 28.36 Aetna .60 28.65 Agilent ... 74.58 AirProd 2.32 19.50 AkamaiT ... 2.67 AlcatelLuc ... 10.70 Alcoa .12 16.24 AlignTech ... 42.26 AllegTch .72 63.35 Allergan .20 7.36 AlliBInco .48 33.91 AlliantEgy 1.70 13.85 AllscriptH ... 23.62 Allstate .84 26.05 AlphaNRs ... 25.76 AlteraCp lf .32 22.94 Altria 1.64 22.35 AmBev s 1.43 136.45 Amazon ... 25.55 Ameren 1.54 21.86 AMovilL s .41 18.32 AMovilA s .41 7.66 AmAxle ... 22.03 ACapAgy 5.60 5.42 AmCapLtd ... 10.00 AEagleOut .44 33.09 AEP 1.84 37.33 AmExp .72 21.46 AmIntlGrp ... 5.10 AmSupr ... 45.85 AmTower ... 22.16 AmWtrWks .92 36.76 Amerigas 2.96 38.93 Ameriprise .92 27.74 AmeriBrgn .46 29.82 Ametek s .24 47.66 Amgen 1.12 3.81 AmkorT lf ... 49.76 Anadarko .36 27.45 AnalogDev 1.00 39.70 AnglogldA .22 14.05 Annaly 2.59 90.31 Apache .60 7.32 ApolloInv 1.12 256.25 Apple Inc ... 10.47 ApldMatl .32 19.28 AquaAm .66 25.21 Arbitron .40 18.11 ArcelorMit .75 16.91 ArchCoal .44 26.00 ArchDan .64 3.43 AriadP ... 16.46 ArmHld .15 6.80 ArmourRsd1.44 16.20 ArubaNet ... 40.89 AstraZen 2.70 6.29 Atmel ... 28.35 ATMOS 1.36 6.15 AuRico g ... 22.99 Autodesk ... 39.27 AutoData 1.44 25.25 AveryD 1.00 20.25 Avon .92 18.92 BB&T Cp .64 69.03 BHP BillLt 2.02 40.69 BJs Whls ... 37.19 BMC Sft ... 35.15 BP PLC 1.68 94.47 BP Pru 9.47 82.16 Baidu ... 38.54 BakrHu .60 28.77 BallCp s .28 1.24 BallardPw ... 28.55 BallyTech ... 15.77 BcoBrades .80 7.84 BcoSantSA .82 8.15 BcoSBrasil 1.65 6.01 BkofAm .04 37.29 BkHawaii 1.80 18.77 BkNYMel .52 .60 BkAtl A h ... 9.51 Barclay .36 19.88 Bar iPVix rs ... 8.45 BarnesNob ... 42.50 BarrickG .48 42.70 Baxter 1.24 1.48 BeazerHm ... 38.33 BedBath ... 100265BerkHa A ... 66.51 BerkH B ... 23.00 BestBuy .64 27.82 BigLots ... 83.65 BioRadA ... 1.30 BioSante ... 9.96 Blackstone .40 10.13 BlockHR .60 56.01 Boeing 1.68 4.36 Boise Inc .80 5.59 BonTon .20 5.09 BostonSci ... 8.44 Brandyw .60 16.05 BrigExp ... 17.26 Brinker .64 24.97 BrMySq 1.32 30.71 Broadcom .36 3.18 BrcdeCm ... 54.51 Buckeye 4.05 18.61 CA Inc .20 13.42 CB REllis ... 12.52 CBL Asc .84 14.65 CBS B .40 41.50 CH Engy 2.16 33.16 CIGNA .04 16.96 CMS Eng .84 5.08 CNO Fincl ... 14.98 CSS Inds .60 17.70 CSX s .48 7.46 CVR Engy ... 28.11 CVS Care .50 16.02 CblvsNY s .60 26.62 CabotO&G .12 7.07 Cadence ... 2.21 CalDive ... 7.76 CalaStrTR .63 3.31 CaliperLSc ... 11.88 Calpine ... 37.91 Cameron ... 29.69 CampSp 1.16 31.87 CdnNRs gs .36 35.94 CapOne .20 5.08 CapitlSrce .04 10.78 CapsteadM1.64 .64 CpstnTrb h ... 30.79 CardnlHlth .86 21.26 CarMax ... 28.96 Carnival 1.00 68.80 Caterpillar 1.84 11.42 CedarF .55 .35 CelSci ... 27.89 Celanese .24 48.92 Celgene ... 4.81 Cemex ... 14.91 CenterPnt .79 5.21 CentEuro ... 19.64 CVtPS .92 31.75 CntryLink 2.90 54.15 Cephln ... 12.65 Checkpnt ... 24.30 Cheesecake ... 2.35 CheniereEn ... 20.74 ChesEng .35 76.97 Chevron 3.12 8.87 Chicos .20 2.62 Chimera .62 55.39 Chubb 1.56 30.98 ChurchD s .68 2.60 CIBER ... 10.33 CienaCorp ... 13.30 Cisco .24 25.40 Citigrp rs .04 50.21 CitrixSys ... 11.16 CleanEngy ... 1.32 Clearwire ... 59.86 CliffsNRs 1.12 60.56 Clorox 2.40 38.54 Coach .90

18.09 24.56 10.33 33.83 39.87 8.22 3.35 14.72 24.49 27.54 4.27 50.43 62.99 20.63 49.82 45.59 1.93 11.42 9.63 24.64 4.64 6.52 10.21 38.00 33.36 78.39 20.77 3.11 11.58 17.07 44.75 78.57 8.07 38.43 17.09 24.81 30.81 34.61 26.37 32.39 211.39 28.93 23.39 23.35 7.74 28.39 8.12 10.70 36.80 47.28 23.36 6.04 52.38 28.68 42.74 41.73 38.40 36.38 54.05 4.30 69.88 32.11 47.13 17.81 95.12 8.54 377.48 10.73 21.12 33.54 17.76 19.52 27.11 9.56 27.46 7.43 18.38 44.32 8.69 33.07 11.70 25.41 47.62 25.95 21.10 20.90 77.17 50.92 38.46 36.00 108.34 143.63 56.79 34.03 1.41 28.29 17.19 7.87 8.91 6.98 38.08 19.92 .75 9.11 45.83 11.38 54.55 53.16 1.63 56.29 102272 67.77 24.50 31.72 92.23 2.75 12.21 13.13 61.79 6.00 6.24 6.20 8.93 28.08 20.01 29.16 33.44 3.78 62.49 19.71 14.05 13.23 22.14 52.79 42.88 18.81 5.71 15.58 19.58 27.65 36.50 15.99 70.19 8.88 2.41 8.34 10.45 13.91 48.28 30.85 34.35 41.78 6.25 12.68 1.07 40.18 26.32 30.68 83.96 20.18 .39 40.74 59.77 4.95 19.52 6.08 34.86 33.07 80.61 13.89 25.60 7.01 30.38 95.19 12.80 2.84 59.24 42.17 3.06 12.55 15.82 26.74 53.58 13.29 2.64 76.63 67.48 53.64

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-19.4 -5.4 -15.2 -40.0 +11.2 -49.8 -57.0 -37.9 -30.0 -6.3 -59.0 +5.3 +9.3 +13.1 +2.7 -14.2 -10.2 -8.2 -10.3 -19.9 +15.7 -20.3 -58.6 +24.5 -19.5 -13.8 -55.9 +5.1 -24.8 -12.6 -18.9 +14.4 +1.8 +4.5 -11.3 -22.2 -48.7 -2.7 +7.1 +4.4 +17.4 +2.6 -18.4 -18.3 -39.8 -1.2 +7.4 -26.9 +2.3 +10.2 -51.6 -78.9 +1.4 +13.4 -12.4 -27.5 +12.5 -7.3 -1.6 -42.0 -8.2 -14.8 -4.3 -.6 -20.2 -22.9 +17.0 -23.7 -6.0 -19.2 -53.4 -44.3 -9.9 +87.5 +32.3 -4.9 -12.0 -4.0 -29.5 +6.0 +42.9 -33.5 +2.9 -38.7 -27.4 -20.5 -17.0 +6.3 -18.4 -18.5 -14.4 +48.8 -.7 0.0 -6.0 -32.9 -15.3 -26.1 -34.5 -47.7 -19.3 -34.0 -35.0 -44.9 +21.9 -19.6 +2.6 +5.0 -69.8 +14.5 -15.1 -15.4 -28.6 +4.1 -11.2 +67.7 -13.7 +10.2 -5.3 -24.3 -50.7 -18.1 -23.2 +3.1 -4.2 +10.1 -23.2 -28.5 -6.5 -19.4 -31.4 -24.4 +16.2 +8.0 +17.0 +1.1 -15.8 -24.4 -9.1 +82.1 +5.0 -32.5 +85.4 +7.5 -57.5 -9.9 +64.8 +4.3 -4.8 -11.2 -22.7 -1.8 -12.0 +.7 +11.5 +4.9 -17.4 -33.5 -10.4 +33.1 -52.5 -1.0 +1.1 -51.9 +24.2 -73.4 +59.5 -28.4 +30.6 -32.4 -16.5 +27.0 +17.3 +4.3 +6.4 -30.9 -.7 +22.2 -34.6 -40.4 -21.8 -43.5 -21.7 -4.0 -48.8 -1.8 +6.6 -3.0

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-61.15

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DOW 10,992.13

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6-MO T-BILLS .04%

Combined Stocks

52-Wk High Low Name

Fri YTD Div Last Chg %Chg

71.77 29.99 37.59 83.48 92.00 27.16 25.40 43.53 28.95 42.50 56.61 26.60 28.27 81.80 56.32 56.96 11.68 27.73 7.35 59.50 23.43 83.95 57.65 19.36 47.63 72.85 41.58 121.49 148.81 10.29 23.95

57.22 CocaCola 1.88 19.56 CocaCE .52 17.56 Coeur ... 53.54 CognizTech ... 73.62 ColgPal 2.32 16.91 Comcast .45 16.32 Comc spcl .45 22.12 Comerica .40 21.75 CmtyBkSy .96 17.60 CmtyHlt ... 26.31 CompSci .80 21.02 ConAgra .92 23.17 ConnWtrSv .95 53.59 ConocPhil 2.64 33.42 ConsolEngy .40 47.44 ConEd 2.40 7.47 ConsolWtr .30 10.50 CooperTire .42 1.57 CorinthC ... 34.44 CornPdts .64 13.15 Corning .20 58.20 Costco .96 36.54 Covidien .80 6.71 CSVelIVSt s ... 23.38 CredSuiss 1.40 26.60 Cree Inc ... 27.82 CrownHold ... 79.62 Cummins 1.60 126.37 CurEuro .19 6.65 CybrOpt ... 11.15 CypSemi .36

69.37 25.34 29.10 60.79 88.96 20.91 20.53 22.31 22.69 17.66 27.63 23.80 25.70 64.23 43.12 55.12 8.00 10.93 1.87 44.57 13.58 78.90 47.72 6.59 22.86 31.34 32.37 88.16 136.09 6.64 15.54

-1.80 -1.63 -.98 -1.23 -1.50 -.51 -.54 -.22 -.76 -.66 -.80 -.96 -.91 -1.65 -.78 -.93 -.10 -.25 -.11 -1.44 -.78 -1.86 -1.99 -.68 -1.49 -.72 -1.28 -1.85 -2.25 -.38 -.11

+5.5 +1.2 +6.5 -17.1 +10.7 -4.4 -.9 -47.2 -18.3 -52.7 -44.3 +5.4 -7.8 -5.7 -11.5 +11.2 -12.8 -53.6 -64.1 -3.1 -29.7 +9.3 +4.5 -44.9 -43.4 -52.4 -3.0 -19.9 +2.3 -22.2 -16.4

5.89 10.24 13.50 52.78 19.35 56.09 53.81 13.90 99.80 17.60 14.54 26.03 43.96 66.00 10.60 15.28 93.56 85.53 37.12 53.40 99.51 81.50 72.25 45.55 51.16 34.36 34.29 96.25 92.65 93.27 27.92 32.57 44.34 37.13 50.67 21.34 70.15 42.23 43.13 6.44 57.00 19.50 15.63 18.85 6.92 18.13 35.35 28.73 53.80 121.44 46.97 5.95 56.49 57.19 21.54 35.65 12.60 22.12 25.05 64.56 34.58 35.22 13.05 65.44 84.94 5.38 55.50 60.31 13.63 80.79 44.35 5.83 15.44 21.04 45.27 32.89 60.89 88.23 145.76 50.33 21.02 36.80 98.66 17.43 15.75 46.09 12.67 15.10 175.45 45.80 8.50 25.50 18.97 40.52 40.23 28.56 65.48 24.60 61.35 28.60 9.84 2.41 11.91

3.61 8.52 8.82 43.22 10.11 38.91 42.37 7.13 66.06 11.93 6.41 13.78 9.22 32.52 3.83 10.63 61.18 67.07 24.70 38.80 30.58 37.05 31.60 19.29 12.01 15.78 8.72 35.10 45.38 28.20 15.25 17.95 29.60 26.65 41.13 13.16 48.53 25.37 33.60 2.19 41.86 16.87 9.82 8.11 3.54 9.90 23.38 19.39 33.93 84.93 34.58 1.75 37.66 43.81 11.84 22.51 4.40 13.34 14.67 41.37 25.03 23.09 3.72 43.32 61.60 .61 40.25 39.51 4.91 57.60 27.85 2.56 9.96 11.81 39.05 19.61 43.43 60.36 69.01 32.12 7.87 24.34 71.33 12.74 9.13 12.26 5.91 9.75 85.96 35.00 5.05 12.84 9.81 29.23 16.80 10.18 46.58 16.71 38.20 20.76 6.29 .98 7.77

D-E-F DCT Indl .28 DNP Selct .78 DR Horton .15 DTE 2.35 DanaHldg ... Danaher .08 Darden 1.72 DeanFds ... Deere 1.64 Dell Inc ... DeltaAir ... DenburyR ... Dndreon ... DeutschBk 1.07 DBGoldDS ... DevelDiv .16 DevonE .68 Diageo 2.63 Diebold 1.12 DirecTV A ... DrSCBr rs ... DirFnBr rs ... DirLCBr rs ... DrxEMBull 1.20 DrxEnBear ... DirEMBear ... DrxFnBull ... DirxSCBull ... DirxLCBull .10 DirxEnBull ... Discover .24 DishNetwk ... Disney .40 DollarGen ... DomRescs 1.97 DonlleyRR 1.04 Dover 1.26 DowChm 1.00 DrPepSnap1.28 DryShips ... DuPont 1.64 DukeEngy 1.00 DukeRlty .68 Dycom ... Dynegy ... E-Trade ... eBay ... EMC Cp ... ENI 1.38 EOG Res .64 Eastgrp 2.08 EKodak ... Eaton s 1.36 Ecolab .70 ElPasoCp .04 ElPasoEl .88 Elan ... EldorGld g .12 ElectArts ... EmersonEl 1.38 EnbrEPt s 2.13 EnCana g .80 EndvSilv g ... Energen .54 Energizer ... EngyConv ... EngyTsfr 3.58 ENSCO 1.40 Entercom ... Entergy 3.32 EntPrPt 2.42 EnzoBio ... EricsnTel .37 ExcoRes .16 Exelon 2.10 Expedia .28 ExpScripts ... ExxonMbl 1.88 F5 Netwks ... FMC Tch s ... FairchldS ... Fastenal s .52 FedExCp .52 FidlNFin .48 FifthThird .24 Finisar ... FstHorizon .04 FstNiagara .64 FstSolar ... FirstEngy 2.20 Flextrn ... FootLockr .66 FordM ... ForestLab ... ForestOil ... Fortinet s ... FortuneBr .76 FranceTel 2.02 FMCG s 1.00 FDelMnt .40 FrontierCm .75 FuelCell ... FultonFncl .20

4.43 10.05 9.58 48.47 11.72 42.59 43.37 8.27 75.26 13.97 7.18 14.09 11.40 31.14 4.18 11.33 63.19 75.97 27.16 41.43 48.66 63.35 44.49 20.25 18.62 23.98 12.09 38.79 50.52 41.80 23.92 24.42 31.04 34.80 47.19 13.85 51.67 25.77 36.85 2.92 45.27 18.55 11.10 17.32 5.10 10.74 28.46 21.29 36.33 85.32 39.42 2.87 38.66 50.20 18.24 33.69 9.59 21.48 21.36 43.40 28.31 22.89 12.67 44.63 68.97 .61 43.80 49.24 5.06 62.30 40.71 2.69 10.40 12.45 42.38 29.13 43.67 71.01 74.60 42.01 11.83 32.31 73.40 16.29 9.81 19.00 6.21 10.17 84.96 42.71 5.39 19.71 10.05 32.75 18.61 17.63 55.04 16.41 41.99 23.10 6.82 1.20 8.18

-.11 +.05 -.22 -.93 -.53 -.90 -.98 -.04 -2.00 -.37 -.13 -.70 +.52 -2.97 +.05 -.31 -2.43 -1.64 -.78 -.76 +3.92 +5.29 +3.24 -2.28 +1.63 +2.17 -1.12 -3.73 -4.35 -4.42 -.56 -.69 -.91 -.20 -.96 -.39 -1.32 -1.13 -.50 -.06 -1.13 -.26 -.39 -.25 -.18 -.53 -2.05 -.47 -1.85 -3.93 -.61 -.12 -1.20 -2.11 -.45 -.51 -.26 -.32 -.72 -.98 -.14 -1.01 -.13 -1.55 -2.56 -.02 -.35 -.11 -.18 -1.49 -.34 -.06 -.47 -.44 -.56 -.87 -2.21 -1.81 -3.84 -1.69 -.24 -.35 -1.59 -.83 -.31 -.92 -.18 -.27 -1.71 -1.26 -.16 -.27 -.29 -1.10 -.56 -.83 -1.17 -.68 -2.28 -.57 -.07 -.05 -.33

-16.6 +10.0 -19.7 +7.0 -31.9 -9.7 -6.6 -6.4 -9.4 +3.1 -43.0 -26.2 -67.4 -40.2 -47.6 -19.6 -19.5 +2.2 -15.3 +3.7 +3.9 +34.1 +1.5 -51.0 -17.4 +18.2 -56.6 -46.4 -29.3 -28.5 +29.1 +24.2 -17.2 +13.5 +10.5 -20.7 -11.6 -24.5 +4.8 -46.9 -9.2 +4.2 -10.9 +17.4 -9.3 -32.9 +2.3 -7.0 -16.9 -6.7 -6.9 -46.5 -23.8 -.4 +32.6 +22.4 +67.4 +15.7 +30.4 -24.1 -9.2 -21.4 +72.6 -7.5 -5.4 -86.7 -15.5 -7.8 -56.3 -12.0 -2.2 -49.1 -9.8 -35.9 +1.8 +16.1 -19.2 -2.9 -42.7 -5.5 -24.2 +7.9 -21.1 +19.1 -33.2 -36.0 -47.3 -27.3 -34.7 +15.4 -31.3 +.5 -40.1 +2.4 -51.0 +9.0 -8.6 -22.2 -30.1 -7.4 -29.9 -48.1 -20.9

G-H-I 17.19 13.09 GabDvInc .96 6.55 4.50 GabelliET .58 18.24 7.47 Gafisa SA .29 28.66 17.93 GameStop ... 18.93 9.45 Gannett .32 23.73 15.08 Gap .45 78.27 57.39 GenDynam1.88 21.65 14.82 GenElec .60 17.43 11.74 GenGrPr n .40 40.00 34.54 GenMills 1.22 39.48 20.88 GenMot n ... 4.35 2.60 GenOn En ... 35.35 18.04 Gentex .48 14.77 5.26 Genworth ... 15.11 6.63 Gerdau .25 43.49 33.13 GileadSci ... 45.34 36.28 GlaxoSKln 2.17 10.42 5.95 GlimchRt .40 10.23 3.09 GloblInd ... 18.70 13.62 GoldFLtd .24 56.31 39.04 Goldcrp g .41 6.01 1.78 GoldStr g ... 175.34 103.16 GoldmanS 1.40 18.83 9.51 Goodyear ... 642.96 463.02 Google ... 5.55 1.32 Gramrcy lf ... 111.42 26.14 GreenMtC ... 67.57 47.75 Greif A 1.68 3.25 1.25 GpoTMM ... 51.53 29.16 Guess .80 40.75 28.76 HCP Inc 1.92 59.14 40.28 HSBC 1.90 57.77 28.86 Hallibrtn .36 15.61 12.86 HanJS 1.14 25.05 5.82 HarbinElec ... 46.88 26.14 HarleyD .50 15.73 10.26 HarmonyG .08 53.39 34.15 HarrisCorp 1.12 36.78 19.90 Harsco .82 13.74 7.00 HarteHnk .32 31.08 16.26 HartfdFn .40 26.40 20.59 HawaiiEl 1.24 55.21 41.03 HltCrREIT 2.86 11.74 6.64 HltMgmt ... 11.56 5.65 HeclaM ... 55.00 46.12 Heinz 1.92 6.99 2.11 HercOffsh ... 59.45 45.31 Hershey 1.38 17.64 9.08 Hertz ... 87.40 52.63 Hess .40 49.39 22.75 HewlettP .48 38.90 13.47 HollyFrt s .35 39.38 28.13 HomeDp 1.00

14.53 -.10 -5.4 5.07 -.18 -10.6 8.79 -.80 -39.5 23.13 +.22 +1.1 9.84 -.03 -34.8 16.00 -.01 -27.4 59.00 -1.40 -16.9 15.09 -.50 -17.5 12.06 -.55 -22.1 37.52 -.38 +5.4 21.76 -.72 -41.0 3.07 -.04 -19.4 24.35 -1.04 -17.6 5.82 -.29 -55.7 8.31 -.28 -40.6 37.82 -1.70 +4.3 41.07 -.74 +4.7 8.11 -.49 -3.5 5.15 -.18 -25.7 17.23 +.61 -5.0 55.27 -.57 +20.2 2.55 -.07 -44.4 102.25 -2.54 -39.2 10.78 -.46 -9.0 524.85 -10.11 -11.6 3.38 -.17 +46.3 106.41 -2.16 +223.8 47.38 -2.05 -23.5 1.77 -.07 -29.2 30.07 -.24 -36.5 34.94 -1.13 -5.0 40.05 -1.29 -21.5 39.66 -1.95 -2.9 15.00 -.06 -.7 19.80 +.22 +14.1 34.63 -1.63 -.1 13.66 -.19 +8.9 38.51 -.90 -15.0 21.86 -.57 -22.8 7.29 -.17 -42.9 16.64 -.66 -37.2 23.30 -.32 +2.2 49.17 -1.38 +3.2 7.20 -.30 -24.5 7.77 -.20 -31.0 50.57 -1.79 +2.2 3.94 -.22 +13.2 56.56 -1.32 +20.0 9.83 -.22 -32.2 57.74 -2.10 -24.6 22.65 -1.22 -46.2 35.02 -1.53 +71.8 31.87 -.59 -9.1

52-Wk High Low Name

E

q

T

-.02

I

N

R

E

q

10-YR T-NOTE 1.92% 1,240

Fri YTD Div Last Chg %Chg

62.28 60.49 19.88 13.26 30.48 7.70 21.52 8.25 23.38 13.41 6.33 13.92 18.63 28.36 81.77 34.57 29.05 20.24 11.63 69.99 64.65 14.61 16.08 19.22 48.35 47.99 137.64 50.43 114.93 64.35 70.88 62.81 86.81 63.00 64.00 59.27 62.42 52.33 20.45 23.96 185.63 19.15 33.01 13.35 15.78 56.46 29.95 24.07 26.30

41.62 HonwllIntl 1.33 42.34 Hospira ... 10.19 HostHotls .12 5.38 HudsCity .32 11.31 HumGen ... 4.46 HuntBnk .16 9.40 Huntsmn .40 3.13 Hydrognc ... 16.06 IAMGld g .20 6.95 ING ... 4.94 INGPrRTr .31 3.82 ION Geoph ... 12.15 iShGold ... 20.45 iSAstla 1.06 55.95 iShBraz 3.42 26.74 iSCan .53 18.26 iShGer .67 16.24 iSh HK .42 9.24 iShJapn .17 49.46 iSh Kor .50 49.55 iShMex .71 12.20 iShSing .50 12.46 iSTaiwn .29 14.89 iSh UK .48 19.30 iShSilver ... 35.02 iShChina25 .85 109.94 iSSP500 2.45 38.71 iShEMkts .84 88.14 iShB20 T 4.02 49.15 iS Eafe 1.68 55.28 iSR1KV 1.38 48.66 iSR1KG .77 62.91 iShR2K .94 49.05 iShREst 2.09 42.43 ITT Corp 1.00 40.82 ITW 1.44 34.17 Informat ... 27.11 IngerRd .48 14.05 InglesMkts .66 17.75 Intel .84 125.39 IBM 3.00 13.65 IntlGame .24 20.77 IntPap 1.05 7.46 Interpublic .24 9.98 Intersil .48 39.87 Intuit .60 15.75 Invesco .49 15.77 InvMtgCap 3.74 15.68 ItauUnibH .84

44.72 41.23 10.69 5.53 11.51 4.60 11.91 6.15 22.49 6.64 5.26 6.13 18.12 22.58 60.97 28.44 17.82 16.71 9.23 52.19 54.18 12.32 13.10 15.44 40.52 35.95 116.26 40.01 113.71 48.75 58.05 54.15 67.50 54.63 42.78 42.51 37.24 32.27 14.40 19.70 161.37 13.96 26.17 7.49 10.46 46.24 16.46 16.28 17.11

-1.21 -2.09 -.30 -.15 -.43 -.21 -.36 -.22 -.41 -.63 -.04 -.45 -.11 -.74 -2.75 -.90 -.99 -.41 -.22 -2.41 -2.22 -.41 -.20 -.42 -.70 -1.00 -3.19 -1.40 +1.20 -1.75 -1.57 -1.47 -2.05 -1.58 -1.33 -1.64 -.70 -.96 +.06 -.20 -3.88 -.75 -.82 -.26 -.17 -.71 -.79 -.09 -.82

-15.9 -26.0 -40.2 -56.6 -51.8 -33.0 -23.7 +63.6 +26.3 -32.2 -7.6 -27.7 +30.4 -11.2 -21.2 -8.3 -25.6 -11.7 -15.4 -14.7 -12.5 -11.0 -16.1 -11.1 +34.3 -16.6 -7.9 -16.0 +20.8 -16.3 -10.5 -5.4 -13.7 -2.4 -17.9 -20.4 -15.4 -31.5 -25.0 -6.3 +10.0 -21.1 -3.9 -29.5 -31.5 -6.2 -31.6 -25.5 -28.4

7.30 55.58 10.24 29.12 48.36 23.09 14.57 9.79 7.60 68.05 42.92 45.01 16.11 51.83 41.71 57.70 20.77 9.77 69.63 20.31 78.00 19.90 7.70 58.00 36.30 10.08 25.85 12.72 15.10 7.74 59.10 64.72 55.47 26.95 21.54 39.14 2.67 18.65 57.25 39.78 42.75 32.68 36.14 7.90 4.86 82.43 45.31 27.45 64.49 48.12

3.91 38.00 3.02 9.69 32.31 11.25 5.89 7.25 3.86 57.50 27.77 19.37 5.09 27.94 29.85 48.51 8.48 5.94 61.00 14.60 63.42 13.84 2.54 42.64 29.80 4.16 20.53 5.27 4.65 4.16 34.92 45.24 30.54 17.80 12.39 22.68 .83 11.19 35.30 33.46 24.91 17.88 25.41 4.02 1.76 66.36 34.30 18.07 17.30 20.67

J-K-L JAlexandr ... J&J Snack .47 JA Solar ... JDS Uniph ... JPMorgCh 1.00 Jabil .28 JanusCap .20 JpnSmCap .08 JetBlue ... JohnJn 2.28 JohnsnCtl .64 JnprNtwk ... KB Home .25 KLA Tnc 1.40 Kaydon .80 Kellogg 1.72 KeyEngy ... Keycorp .12 KimbClk 2.80 Kimco .72 KindME 4.60 Kinross g .12 KodiakO g ... Kohls 1.00 Kraft 1.16 KrispKrm ... Kroger .42 Kulicke ... LDK Solar ... LSI Corp ... LamResrch ... LancastrC 1.32 LVSands ... LeggPlat 1.12 LennarA .16 LeucNatl .25 Level3 ... LibtyMIntA ... LifeTech ... LillyEli 1.96 Limited .80 LincNat .20 LinearTch .96 LizClaib ... LloydBkg ... LockhdM 3.00 Loews .25 Lowes .56 lululemn gs ... LyonBas A .80

6.42 47.57 2.85 12.34 32.08 15.76 6.36 7.32 4.01 63.64 28.90 21.46 5.67 35.46 31.26 53.09 12.68 6.12 67.23 16.19 68.82 17.95 5.73 42.60 34.51 8.09 22.02 8.20 4.81 6.55 37.18 58.13 46.62 20.86 13.48 26.96 1.53 15.59 39.22 36.13 36.60 18.03 28.13 5.05 1.94 71.57 35.96 18.96 55.06 31.19

+.14 -1.32 -.19 -.54 -1.43 -.67 -.18 -.13 -.04 -1.31 -.87 -.12 -.40 +.09 -1.01 -1.31 -.74 -.30 -.88 -.69 -.41 -.23 -.14 -1.27 -.55 -.49 -1.33 -.24 -.20 -.28 +.38 -1.64 -.52 -.63 -.47 -.97 -.11 -.21 -.80 -.88 -.41 -.78 ... -.33 -.08 -.37 -.49 -.62 -2.63 -2.16

+22.3 -1.4 -58.8 -14.8 -24.4 -21.6 -51.0 -18.4 -39.3 +2.9 -24.3 -41.9 -58.0 -8.2 -23.2 +3.9 -2.3 -30.8 +6.6 -10.3 -2.0 -5.3 -13.2 -21.6 +9.5 +15.9 -1.5 +13.9 -52.5 +9.3 -28.2 +1.6 +1.5 -8.3 -28.1 -7.6 +55.6 -1.1 -29.3 +3.1 +19.1 -35.2 -18.7 -29.5 -52.8 +2.4 -7.6 -24.4 +60.9 -9.3

95.00 8.32 15.04 9.28 8.64 7.23 11.79 16.94 30.62 23.23 19.50 34.97 47.43 66.94 43.16 44.86 42.78 31.57 22.01 15.03 17.94 28.49 28.44 5.61 51.26 26.14 91.22 45.47 19.80 34.74 66.38 43.33 16.15 37.68 27.42 22.65 57.94 48.72 18.79 11.95 29.46 19.31 23.51 79.16 77.09 25.90 41.93 46.46 46.25 31.04 89.24 47.91 38.74 25.46 24.98 20.97 25.66 15.96 41.60 32.47 37.34 29.71 2.45 75.98 52.18 86.71 28.11 24.94 71.49 61.02 304.79 11.04 14.10 47.45 19.33 11.72 8.85 20.38 77.93 66.39 18.35 19.08 27.94 10.28 58.98 21.78 94.23 46.72

M-N-0 69.23 M&T Bk 2.80 70.50 1.75 MELA Sci ... 3.24 4.96 MEMC ... 6.62 4.79 MF Global ... 4.99 6.71 MFA Fncl 1.00 7.00 6.19 MMT .51 6.48 1.59 MGIC ... 2.37 9.01 MGM Rsts ... 10.09 20.22 Macys .40 25.17 8.71 Manitowoc .08 9.25 12.06 Manulife g .52 12.41 19.01 MarathnO s .60 24.82 29.48 MarathP n .80 36.35 51.10 MktVGold .40 65.80 29.57 MktVRus .18 31.07 31.51 MktVJrGld 2.93 38.27 25.93 MarIntA .40 26.08 23.40 MarshM .88 28.57 11.23 MarvellT ... 13.69 7.22 Masco .30 7.80 12.69 MassMCp s1.20 16.73 21.55 Mattel .92 26.13 15.89 MaximIntg .88 23.11 1.40 McClatchy ... 1.45 40.31 McCorm 1.12 45.51 11.52 McDrmInt ... 13.24 72.14 McDnlds 2.44 85.03 28.95 McGrwH 1.00 38.72 10.98 McMoRn ... 11.93 16.15 Mechel ... 15.63 44.50 MedcoHlth ... 51.31 30.18 Medtrnic .97 33.38 4.29 MelcoCrwn ... 12.12 29.47 Merck 1.52 31.84 15.13 Meritage ... 16.56 6.86 Meritor ... 6.99 20.26 Mesab 2.21 25.91 28.84 MetLife .74 29.88 8.69 MetroPCS ... 10.46 5.18 MicronT ... 6.35 23.65 Microsoft .64 25.74 15.97 MdsxWatr .73 17.36 14.70 MobileTele 1.06 14.60 19.66 Molycorp ... 54.11 47.07 Monsanto 1.20 65.01 7.00 MonstrWw ... 7.91 22.25 Moodys .56 28.97 33.58 Moog A ... 33.82 34.07 Moog B ... 33.91 15.15 MorgStan .20 15.28 55.70 Mosaic .20 69.97 36.52 MotrlaSol n .88 40.34 20.77 MotrlaMo n ... 37.50 17.29 Mylan ... 19.36 18.00 NBT Bcp .80 17.74 13.28 NCR Corp ... 16.37 18.22 NRG Egy ... 22.71 12.31 NV Energy .48 14.02 24.62 NYSE Eur 1.20 25.67 16.20 Nabors ... 16.79 24.30 NalcoHld .14 35.33 18.59 NasdOMX ... 22.26 .80 NBkGreece .29 .83 44.14 NatFuGas 1.42 58.10 41.81 NatGrid 2.92 49.53 39.29 NOilVarco .44 62.66 22.69 NatRetPrp 1.54 26.25 11.84 NatSemi .40 24.85 33.66 Navistar ... 36.87 33.32 NetApp ... 35.68 137.60 Netflix ... 203.97 8.62 NewAmHi .78 9.67 5.62 NwGold g ... 13.90 37.14 NJ Rscs 1.44 44.64 11.48 NY CmtyB 1.00 11.88 6.48 NY Times ... 7.18 2.49 Newcastle .40 4.75 11.50 NewellRub .32 12.81 44.69 NewfldExp ... 47.60 50.05 NewmtM 1.20 65.26 12.88 NewsCpA .19 16.03 13.83 NewsCpB .19 16.26 18.34 Nexen g .20 19.50 3.85 NexstarB ... 5.91 49.00 NextEraEn 2.20 53.60 16.65 NiSource .92 21.02 69.43 NikeB 1.24 82.50 27.68 NobleCorp .53 33.84

-2.77 -.24 ... -.19 -.04 -.02 -.33 -.50 -.62 -.35 -.60 -.98 -1.38 -.83 -1.41 -.91 -.73 -.84 +.26 -.18 -.26 -.56 +.08 -.12 -1.16 -.91 -3.58 -1.72 -.43 -1.53 -2.13 -1.25 -.50 -.94 -.72 -.26 -.47 -.16 -.14 +.11 -.48 -.29 -.50 -2.60 -2.35 -.40 -1.11 -1.63 -1.45 -.56 -.80 -1.12 -.12 -.13 -.71 -.54 -.83 -.20 -.83 -.96 -1.14 -.88 -.04 -4.65 -.67 -2.43 -.58 -.03 -1.74 -.78 -7.23 +.03 -.15 -1.61 -.08 -.25 -.23 -.52 -2.38 -.40 -.29 -.26 -1.19 -.30 -1.06 -.51 -2.83 -.85

-19.0 -3.3 -41.2 -40.3 -14.2 -6.1 -76.7 -32.1 -.5 -29.4 -27.8 +10.4 -6.8 +7.0 -18.0 -4.1 -37.2 +4.5 -26.2 -38.4 +9.5 +2.8 -2.2 -69.0 -2.2 -36.0 +10.8 +6.3 -30.4 -46.5 -16.3 -10.0 +90.6 -11.7 -25.4 -65.9 -32.7 -32.8 -17.2 -20.8 -7.8 -5.4 -30.0 +8.4 -6.6 -66.5 +9.2 -15.0 -14.8 -43.8 -8.4 +6.0 +28.9 -8.4 -26.5 +6.5 +16.2 -.2 -14.4 -28.4 +10.6 -6.2 -50.6 -11.5 +11.6 -6.8 -.9 +80.6 -36.3 -35.1 +16.1 -2.9 +42.4 +3.5 -37.0 -26.7 -29.1 -29.5 -34.0 +6.2 +10.1 -1.0 -14.8 -1.3 +3.1 +19.3 -3.4 -5.4

V

I

E

W

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2011 PAGE 9B

p

GOLD $1,856.40

-.06

S&P 500

2,640

Close: 1,154.23 Change: -31.67 (-2.7%)

1,180 1,120

1,360

2,800

q

CRUDE OIL $87.24

Nasdaq composite

Close: 2,467.99 Change: -61.15 (-2.4%

2,360

10 DAYS

2,900

10 DAYS

2,700

1,280

2,600

1,200

2,500

1,120

2,400 M

A

M

StocksRecap NYSE Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

-.0235

2,500

1,440

1,040

q

EURO $1.3656

+2.00

4,834 3,877 461 2592 16 158

52-Wk High Low Name

NASD 2,031 1,936 406 2136 6 188

J

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Fri YTD Div Last Chg %Chg

11.75 52.15 78.40 36.47 4.42 72.50 50.86 16.90 64.82 41.82 49.24 71.69 12.82 15.50 14.91 26.17 117.89 6.25 19.20 167.37 37.04 11.95 118.66 29.48 36.50 33.32

4.82 NokiaCp .55 32.50 Nordstrm .92 57.18 NorflkSo 1.72 28.93 NoestUt 1.10 2.41 NthgtM g ... 49.20 NorthropG 2.00 39.63 NwstNG 1.74 7.36 NovaGld g ... 52.09 Novartis 2.53 23.11 Novlus ... 31.35 Nucor 1.45 51.34 NustarEn 4.38 10.02 NuvFloat .76 11.89 NvMAd .99 12.37 NvPA .94 9.85 Nvidia ... 73.86 OcciPet 1.84 2.10 OfficeDpt ... 5.02 OfficeMax ... 101.96 OilSvHT 1.58 16.61 OmniVisn ... 6.07 OnSmcnd ... 53.81 OpenTable ... 13.39 OplinkC ... 23.88 Oracle .24 16.01 OwensIll ...

6.70 79.90 48.63 33.41 9.20 4.68 65.19 97.81 29.06 58.75 10.29 59.50 99.40 29.20 34.09 33.91 73.95 20.25 44.29 29.11 41.00 17.34 14.49 20.36 71.89 3.10 36.81 42.75 31.47 21.45 72.74 34.27 14.88 15.05 45.64 26.36 41.96 44.28 34.30 3.59 64.05 32.02 24.05 59.83 4.87 111.74 71.29 35.00 37.46 51.27 32.58 67.73 26.87 97.08 85.65 56.94 93.26 41.54 63.30 75.87 40.95 52.16 31.34 88.00 111.16 37.56 22.99 67.72 49.15 22.13 82.16 8.75 67.52 34.22 124.81 8.99 6.98 18.83 59.84 61.21 19.06 15.98 16.30 5.93 8.48 26.00 10.12 23.38 53.12 8.09 15.34 24.00 3.30 33.10 70.54 19.33 39.87 76.67 1.47 44.70 98.19 44.83 49.99 77.97

4.66 69.01 37.57 21.00 5.26 .15 42.70 68.08 24.10 33.63 7.75 36.66 62.03 10.63 15.29 25.12 41.20 12.80 28.12 20.85 20.59 9.00 10.50 16.57 60.10 1.16 23.24 24.49 21.72 16.21 53.22 17.80 11.27 11.72 37.28 18.12 24.14 34.00 12.69 1.69 44.22 22.77 20.84 45.63 1.36 86.25 46.28 21.55 23.94 39.74 19.48 43.14 16.14 57.15 45.47 36.05 53.92 21.86 24.83 37.84 28.36 27.56 14.25 44.20 10.63 14.29 15.99 57.56 42.05 17.14 38.44 5.30 44.54 27.97 94.60 3.40 5.31 12.23 39.92 45.37 16.36 8.06 10.75 4.15 4.95 17.20 1.95 11.50 38.76 3.82 2.65 6.13 1.63 24.72 21.60 9.22 28.12 52.34 .87 19.93 53.02 27.86 22.27 54.97

17.65 17.11 60.00 128.63 185.85 184.97 137.18 19.21 27.77 41.32 45.87 27.54 56.44 65.76 77.44 87.13 13.53 25.43 30.34 54.18 12.97 160.12

J

5.98 44.05 64.83 33.10 4.00 51.81 44.07 9.16 55.42 28.12 33.14 56.83 10.57 13.94 14.44 13.88 80.54 2.36 5.44 125.47 17.13 7.17 55.24 16.02 26.00 16.64

-.36 -1.09 -1.65 -.72 -.34 -.97 -1.06 -.35 -.61 +.37 -1.16 -.77 -.12 +.05 +.06 -.30 -2.67 -.12 -.33 -4.78 -.42 -.05 -2.26 -.22 -.72 -.70

-42.1 +3.9 +3.2 +3.8 +25.0 -11.8 -5.2 -35.8 -6.0 -13.0 -24.4 -18.2 -10.5 +6.6 +8.3 -9.9 -17.9 -56.3 -69.3 -10.7 -42.1 -27.4 -21.6 -13.3 -16.9 -45.8

P-Q-R PDL Bio .60 5.69 PECO pfA 3.80 75.43 PG&E Cp 1.82 40.66 PICO Hld ... 20.82 PMC Sra ... 5.97 PMI Grp ... .21 PNC 1.40 46.38 PPG 2.28 73.10 PPL Corp 1.40 27.95 Paccar .48 35.38 Pacholder .84 9.14 PallCorp .70 42.47 ParkerHan 1.48 66.38 PatriotCoal ... 14.49 PattUTI .20 22.66 Paychex 1.24 25.93 PeabdyE .34 46.81 PennMill ... 20.13 PnnNGm ... 35.96 PennVaRs 1.96 26.15 Penney .80 25.34 PenRE .60 9.04 PeopUtdF .63 11.65 PepcoHold 1.08 18.43 PepsiCo 2.06 59.99 PeregrineP ... 1.23 PetrbrsA 1.34 24.28 Petrobras 1.26 26.54 PetRes 1.27 25.02 Pfizer .80 18.28 PhilipMor 2.56 65.90 PhilipsEl 1.02 17.23 PimcoHiI 1.46 12.32 PimcoMuni .98 13.31 PinWst 2.10 41.90 PitnyBw 1.48 19.07 PlainsEx ... 27.59 PlumCrk 1.68 35.48 Polycom s ... 21.69 Popular ... 1.79 Potash s .28 57.46 PwshDB ... 29.29 PS USDBull ... 21.91 PwShs QQQ.42 53.18 Powrwav ... 1.64 Praxair 2.00 94.72 PriceTR 1.24 49.43 PrinFncl .55 23.02 ProLogis 1.12 25.65 ProShtS&P ... 45.46 PrUShS&P ... 24.89 ProUltDow .28 49.01 PrUlShDow ... 20.41 ProUltQQQ ... 74.85 PrUShQQQ rs... 53.77 ProUltSP .35 39.68 PrUShtFn rs ... 80.73 ProUShL20 ... 22.31 ProUltSOG ... 34.17 ProUltFin .05 40.18 ProShtR2K ... 34.56 ProUltR2K .01 30.08 ProUSSP500 ... 19.90 PrUltSP500 s.05 49.20 ProUSSlv rs ... 11.51 ProUltSGld ... 15.03 ProUShEuro ... 18.60 ProctGam 2.10 61.84 ProgrssEn 2.48 48.06 ProgsvCp 1.40 18.04 ProUSR2K rs ... 54.76 ProvFnH .12 8.23 Prudentl 1.15 46.14 PSEG 1.37 32.28 PubStrg 3.80 120.66 PulteGrp ... 4.30 PPrIT .52 5.88 Qlogic ... 13.58 Qualcom .86 50.41 QstDiag .40 48.32 Questar .61 17.70 QksilvRes ... 8.66 Quidel ... 14.40 RCM ... 4.33 RF MicD ... 5.88 RPM .84 18.00 RadianGrp .01 2.84 RadioShk .25 11.84 Raytheon 1.72 40.64 RegionsFn .04 3.97 ReneSola ... 2.92 Renren n ... 6.91 RepFBcp ... 1.76 RepubSvc .88 28.23 RschMotn ... 29.68 Revlon ... 11.93 ReynAm s 2.12 36.56 RioTinto 1.17 56.44 RiteAid ... 1.07 Riverbed s ... 22.35 RockwlAut 1.70 56.56 Rowan ... 34.88 RylCarb .40 23.66 RoyDShllA 3.36 63.82

-.02 ... -1.00 -1.10 -.04 ... -1.42 -1.74 -.38 -1.14 -.04 -1.56 -3.31 -.19 -.99 -.70 -.86 ... -1.38 -.34 -.73 -.49 -.11 -.35 -1.35 -.04 -1.08 -1.25 -.88 -.54 -2.65 -1.08 -.28 +.02 -1.26 -.42 -1.01 -.94 -1.09 -.01 -1.21 -.47 +.26 -1.21 +.03 -2.31 -1.12 -.71 -1.17 +1.17 +1.22 -2.77 +1.04 -3.48 +2.30 -2.21 +4.64 -.50 +2.09 -2.58 +1.02 -1.88 +1.47 -4.13 +.36 +.21 +.58 -1.07 -.66 -.48 +3.06 +.03 -.93 -.98 -3.19 -.18 -.05 -.33 -1.15 -1.22 -.43 -.10 -.44 -.27 -.18 -.56 -.44 -.13 -.78 -.21 -.10 -.30 ... -.80 -1.63 -.54 -.95 -1.70 -.03 -1.33 -1.20 -1.06 -.96 -1.36

-8.7 +7.8 -15.0 -34.5 -30.5 -93.6 -23.6 -13.0 +6.2 -38.3 +8.2 -14.3 -23.1 -25.2 +5.2 -16.1 -26.8 +52.2 +2.3 -7.7 -21.6 -37.8 -16.9 +1.0 -8.2 -46.5 -28.9 -29.9 -7.4 +4.4 +12.6 -43.9 -3.1 +5.6 +1.1 -21.1 -14.2 -5.3 +11.3 -43.0 +11.3 +6.3 -3.5 -2.4 -35.4 -.8 -23.4 -29.3 -19.1 +3.7 +4.8 -10.1 -1.4 -8.1 -7.6 -17.4 +28.8 -39.8 -8.7 -39.5 +7.4 -29.5 +2.5 -28.0 -70.7 -45.9 -8.4 -3.9 +10.5 -9.2 +9.0 +13.7 -21.4 +1.5 +19.0 -42.8 -6.4 -20.2 +1.8 -10.5 +1.7 -41.2 -.3 -6.5 -20.0 -18.6 -64.8 -36.0 -11.6 -43.3 -66.6 -61.6 -27.9 -5.5 -48.9 +21.2 +12.1 -21.2 +21.2 -36.5 -21.1 -.1 -49.7 -4.4

S-T-U 12.55 SAIC ... 12.76 10.92 SLM Cp .40 12.71 35.75 SLM pfB 4.63 44.00 103.41 SpdrDJIA 3.12 109.82 121.38 SpdrGold ... 180.70 137.14 SP Mid 1.65 149.85 109.55 S&P500ETF2.44 115.92 13.05 SpdrHome .31 13.86 17.21 SpdrKbwBk .20 18.07 36.35 SpdrLehHY4.23 37.74 45.84 SpdrLe1-3bll ... 45.85 19.47 SpdrKbw RB.37 20.04 38.15 SpdrRetl .46 47.22 40.04 SpdrOGEx .47 50.68 50.79 SpdrMetM .42 55.66 48.46 SPX Cp 1.00 51.83 5.61 STMicro .40 5.80 16.51 Safeway .58 17.91 14.80 StJoe ... 16.97 35.13 StJude .84 42.66 7.67 Saks ... 9.39 97.92 Salesforce ... 123.23

-.26 -.35 ... -3.05 -1.11 -4.19 -3.12 -.45 -.63 -.44 +.01 -.62 -.85 -1.87 -1.69 -1.53 -.27 -.78 -.72 -1.68 -.15 -1.66

-19.5 +1.0 +.4 -5.0 +30.3 -9.0 -7.8 -20.3 -30.3 -5.0 0.0 -24.2 -2.4 -3.9 -19.1 -27.5 -44.4 -20.4 -22.3 -.2 -12.2 -6.6

A

2,300

S

M

HIGH

LOW

CLOSE

11294.83 4468.63 429.02 7355.17 2518.40 1185.37 847.00 12449.00 690.09

10935.64 4340.25 417.42 7012.59 2452.93 1148.37 817.53 12092.69 668.10

10992.13 4368.99 419.89 7045.01 2467.99 1154.23 823.36 12159.43 673.96

InterestRates Interestrates

The yield on the benchmark 10year Treasury note fell to 1.93 percent Friday. Yields affect interest rates on consumer loans. PRIME FED RATE FUNDS .13 YEST 3.25 .13 6 MO AGO 3.25 .13 1 YR AGO 3.25

A

M

J

J

CHG.

%CHG.

WK

-303.68 -103.48 -9.33 -212.35 -61.15 -31.67 -23.64 -330.48 -20.96

-2.69% -2.31% -2.17% -2.93% -2.42% -2.67% -2.79% -2.65% -3.02%

t t t t t t t t t

A MO QTR t t s t t t t t t

t t t t t t t t t

TREASURIES

YEST

PVS

NET CHG

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill

.01 .03

0.02 0.05

-0.01 -0.02

t t

r t

WK MO

52-wk T-bill

.08

0.09

-0.01

t

t

2-year T-note

.17

0.19

-0.02

t

t

5-year T-note

.80

0.86

-0.06

t

t

10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

1.92 3.25

1.98 3.30

-0.06 -0.05

t t

t t

BONDS

YEST

Barclays LongT-BdIdx Bond Buyer Muni Idx Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays CompT-BdIdx Barclays US Corp

2.91 5.01 2.32 8.50 4.13 1.03 3.59

NET PVS CHG WK MO 2.97 5.02 2.34 8.56 4.17 1.07 3.61

-0.06 -0.01 -0.02 -0.06 -0.04 -0.04 -0.02

t t t s t t t

t t t t t t s

Foreign Exchange & Metals CURRENCY CLOSE PVS. %CH. 6MO. USD per British Pound 1.5864 -.0103 -.65% 1.6192 Canadian Dollar .9973 +.0082 +.82% .9688 USD per Euro 1.3656 -.0235 -1.72% 1.3904 Japanese Yen 77.43 -.06 -.08% 82.70 Mexican Peso 12.6654 +.1581 +1.25% 11.9262

The U.S. dollar jumped to a nearly seven-month high against the euro Friday, due to concerns about a Greek default and the surprise resignation of a European Central Bank official. 52-Wk High Low Name 53.61 13.34 40.75 20.26 48.70 95.64 16.62 19.69 38.49 18.35 94.79 36.99 55.97 12.12 41.62 18.41 146.74 47.60 16.32 123.48 147.12 2.44 37.82 24.93 80.26 64.36 79.72 41.57 44.65 14.32 49.25 29.24 6.45 41.28 36.57 32.46 41.78 80.97 72.74 38.98 27.09 34.30 78.19 23.75 41.11 65.51 50.26 29.67 20.70 25.90 65.21 58.99 48.53 46.98 11.15 10.83 33.14 12.45 20.50 2.99 32.76 5.53 22.90 38.59 19.66 6.53 56.78 14.05 13.43 25.21 60.97 37.65 65.37 64.56 27.61 19.28 8.08 31.58 32.75 51.07 7.70 46.81 19.19 38.50 28.74 57.08 36.71 28.87 65.86 16.06 98.19 31.45 51.04 80.86 38.62 12.65 22.42 89.80 64.44 93.90

32.24 4.25 29.66 13.22 32.68 56.61 8.53 11.11 24.52 9.96 52.06 24.72 44.78 7.78 20.24 8.01 90.98 23.05 7.04 92.13 42.88 .99 18.08 14.82 59.71 43.83 23.15 35.73 23.60 7.81 30.61 21.17 2.98 31.61 28.94 27.15 31.70 53.22 11.81 29.03 21.53 29.45 55.80 11.94 24.53 37.88 31.35 19.63 11.03 12.28 43.73 40.25 29.00 27.36 4.98 4.37 16.86 6.40 13.92 1.18 26.43 4.70 13.69 25.89 15.82 1.71 40.77 9.44 2.25 15.10 45.28 14.95 36.54 49.40 18.48 14.24 3.67 17.91 25.25 29.35 3.96 24.93 9.10 13.25 11.91 36.05 23.26 14.66 44.41 7.05 76.50 15.00 35.80 50.36 27.62 7.06 14.59 69.33 43.81 67.63

METALS Copper Gold Platinum Silver Palladium

CLOSE PVS. 3.99 4.13 1856.40 1854.40 1837.90 1854.50 41.57 42.48 737.10 763.60

Fri YTD Div Last Chg %Chg

SanDisk ... SandRdge ... Sanofi 1.82 SaraLee .46 SaulCntr 1.44 Schlmbrg 1.00 SchoolSp ... Schwab .24 SeadrillLtd 3.03 SeagateT .72 SearsHldgs ... SemiHTr .64 SempraEn 1.92 ServiceCp .20 ShawGrp ... SiderurNac .81 Siemens 3.72 SilvWhtn g .12 SilvrcpM g .08 SimonProp 3.20 Sina ... SiriusXM ... SkywksSol ... SmithfF ... Smucker 1.92 SnapOn 1.28 SodaStrm n ... SouthnCo 1.89 SoUnCo .60 SwstAirl .02 SwstnEngy ... SpectraEn 1.04 SprintNex ... SP Matls 1.30 SP HlthC .63 SP CnSt .83 SP Consum .59 SP Engy 1.06 SPDR Fncl .18 SP Inds .67 SP Tech .35 SP Util 1.33 StanBlkDk 1.64 Staples .40 Starbucks .52 StarwdHtl .30 StateStr .72 Statoil ASA1.10 StlDynam .40 StillwtrM ... Stryker .72 SubPpne 3.41 Suncor gs .44 Sunoco .60 SunstnHtl ... Suntech ... SunTrst .20 Supvalu .35 Symantec ... Synovus .04 Sysco 1.04 TCW Strat .39 TD Ameritr .20 TE Connect .72 TECO .85 THQ ... TJX .76 TaiwSemi .52 Talbots ... TalismE g .27 Target 1.20 TataMotors .45 TeckRes g .60 Teleflex 1.36 TelefEsp s 1.98 TelMexL .83 Tellabs .08 TempleInld .52 TmpDrgn 1.73 Tenaris .68 TenetHlth ... Tenneco ... Teradyn ... Terex ... Tesoro ... TevaPhrm .87 TexInst .52 Textron .08 ThermoFis ... ThomCrk g ... 3M Co 2.20 TibcoSft ... THorton g .68 TW Cable 1.92 TimeWarn .94 TiVo Inc ... TollBros ... TorDBk g 2.72 Total SA 2.38 .58 Toyota

38.73 6.87 32.70 17.27 33.11 71.80 8.74 11.27 30.85 11.18 53.57 28.52 50.31 9.41 23.19 9.20 88.38 39.85 8.43 115.84 104.67 1.72 19.58 19.45 70.76 49.15 38.75 40.74 41.65 8.06 35.91 24.88 3.45 33.17 31.97 30.00 35.42 64.89 12.23 30.18 23.49 32.80 54.91 13.57 37.31 39.62 32.05 22.26 11.27 13.78 46.88 46.41 29.58 37.12 5.57 4.11 18.25 7.47 16.05 1.30 26.70 5.16 13.76 28.09 17.51 1.74 51.79 11.88 2.83 15.08 50.02 15.35 40.73 53.91 18.02 16.50 3.99 31.05 26.10 29.53 5.02 28.69 11.52 13.65 23.45 38.49 26.08 15.26 50.49 7.87 76.65 19.93 45.52 60.85 28.89 10.54 15.68 74.50 45.00 67.80

+.21 -.47 -1.40 -.47 -1.12 -3.67 -.23 -.35 -.44 +.15 -.86 -.17 -1.41 -.28 -.64 -.53 -4.96 -.85 -.64 -2.87 -4.07 -.04 -.75 -.82 -1.16 -1.86 -2.13 -.62 -.33 -.07 -1.55 -.39 ... -1.13 -.98 -.68 -.96 -2.22 -.40 -.83 -.51 -.68 -2.29 -.36 -1.61 -1.52 -1.25 -1.03 -.37 -.65 -1.80 -.44 -1.17 -.44 -.09 -.27 -.80 -.33 -.43 -.07 -.17 +.01 -.29 -1.17 -.35 -.12 -1.22 -.12 -.06 -.70 -.57 -1.56 -2.33 -1.63 -1.07 -.21 -.08 +.05 -.50 -1.16 -.18 -1.36 -.18 -.80 -.90 -1.05 +.28 -.34 -2.20 -.38 -2.61 -.76 -1.34 -2.33 -.95 -.16 -.46 -2.74 -1.47 -1.57

-22.3 -6.1 +1.5 -1.4 -30.1 -14.0 -37.3 -34.1 -9.1 -25.6 -27.4 -12.3 -4.1 +14.1 -32.3 -44.8 -28.9 +2.1 -34.3 +16.4 +52.1 +5.2 -31.6 -5.7 +7.8 -13.1 +22.7 +6.6 +73.0 -37.9 -4.1 -.4 -18.4 -13.6 +1.5 +2.4 -5.3 -4.9 -23.3 -13.4 -6.7 +4.7 -17.9 -40.4 +16.1 -34.8 -30.8 -6.4 -38.4 -35.5 -12.7 -17.3 -22.7 -7.9 -46.1 -48.7 -38.2 -22.4 -4.1 -50.8 -9.2 -1.1 -27.5 -20.6 -1.6 -71.3 +16.7 -5.3 -66.8 -32.0 -16.8 -47.7 -34.1 +.2 -21.0 +2.2 -41.2 +46.2 -15.1 -39.7 -25.0 -30.3 -17.9 -56.0 +26.5 -26.2 -19.8 -35.4 -8.8 -46.5 -11.2 +1.1 +10.4 -7.8 -10.2 +22.1 -17.5 +1.6 -15.9 -13.8

52-Wk High Low Name

%CH. 6MO. -3.40 -5.05 +0.11 +29.88 -0.90 +1.99 -2.13 +15.34 -3.47 -5.54

Div Last

45.09 85.98 64.17 52.30 31.89 15.20 11.51 53.38 20.12 20.08 27.26 33.53 12.26 9.87 6.35 38.71 34.27 107.89 41.32 29.75 3.52 77.00 34.78 28.94 13.74 45.60 64.03 91.83 53.50 27.16 39.26

34.77 49.05 46.62 29.17 11.20 6.30 8.58 36.28 14.59 12.05 20.40 25.81 4.95 4.65 1.89 32.40 26.97 78.00 15.13 15.92 1.79 60.74 12.59 20.10 9.63 30.31 25.44 67.12 33.33 20.39 23.50

TrCda g 1.68 Transocn .79 Travelers 1.64 TrimbleN ... TrinaSolar ... TriQuint ... TwoHrbInv 1.59 TycoIntl 1.00 Tyson .16 UBS AG ... UDR .80 UGI Corp 1.04 US Airwy ... US Gold ... USEC ... UniSrcEn 1.68 UnilevNV 1.21 UnionPac 1.90 Unisys ... UtdContl ... UtdMicro .19 UPS B 2.08 UtdRentals ... US Bancrp .50 US NGs rs ... US OilFd ... USSteel .20 UtdTech 1.92 UtdhlthGp .65 UnumGrp .42 UrbanOut ...

41.89 54.21 48.14 35.06 10.41 6.25 9.40 39.68 16.71 11.87 25.79 28.53 5.02 6.13 1.78 36.24 31.37 85.09 15.99 17.73 1.89 64.22 15.87 22.00 9.87 33.85 27.40 70.53 45.52 22.07 24.56

37.25 32.57 57.24 1.84 31.12 4.50 8.73 63.32 50.92 56.69 2.26 57.45 58.88 37.73 38.95 58.87 1.89 60.90 52.67 16.38 33.32 90.83 19.36 11.48 32.70 98.77 48.26 57.90 47.11 143.76 25.92 39.69 28.11 42.20 81.92 34.25 5.62 27.17 3.93 41.87 21.75 22.03 25.33 92.28 33.47 14.40 32.05 28.72 23.75 36.00 25.43 25.39 12.08 37.37 8.30 18.84 17.45 14.29 69.95 57.75 69.93 25.60 70.82 3.67 3.87

24.08 22.69 23.95 .80 16.57 2.16 1.75 48.72 39.64 41.91 .97 43.25 25.89 27.65 30.07 32.08 1.03 36.14 32.11 9.99 20.87 64.90 8.05 5.28 24.36 72.85 28.89 48.31 28.12 69.33 15.16 27.75 14.64 35.35 52.26 22.58 4.28 19.85 1.56 25.06 4.60 15.29 15.10 53.74 18.14 10.76 27.00 19.07 13.83 24.76 17.94 21.20 7.30 24.27 .55 11.09 10.00 4.78 19.78 43.66 47.09 14.82 27.30 2.71 2.90

V-W-X-Y-Z Vale SA 1.14 Vale SA pf 1.14 ValeantPh .38 ValenceT h ... ValeroE .20 ValpeyFsh ... ValVis A ... VangREIT 1.92 VangEmg .82 VangEur 2.31 VantageDrl ... Ventas 2.30 VeriFone ... Verisign 5.75 VerizonCm 2.00 VertxPh ... VestinRMII ... ViacomA 1.00 ViacomB 1.00 VimpelCm .79 VirgnMda h .16 Visa .60 VishayInt ... Vivus ... Vodafone 1.45 Vornado 2.76 VulcanM 1.00 WalMart 1.46 Walgrn .90 WalterEn .50 WarnerCh ... WsteMInc 1.36 WeathfIntl ... WeisMk 1.16 WellPoint 1.00 WellsFargo .48 Wendys Co .08 WernerEnt .20 WestellT ... WDigital ... WstnRefin ... WstnUnion .32 Weyerh .60 Whrlpl 2.00 WmsCos 1.00 Windstrm 1.00 WiscEn s 1.04 WT India .15 Worthgtn .48 Wyndham .60 XL Grp .44 XcelEngy 1.04 Xerox .17 Xilinx .76 YRC rsh ... Yahoo ... Yamana g .18 YingliGrn ... Youku n ... YumBrnds 1.00 Zimmer ... ZionBcp .04 ZollMed ... Zweig .36 ZweigTl .37

26.68 24.41 40.91 1.05 22.32 2.51 3.53 55.06 41.15 41.23 1.39 50.97 35.62 29.03 35.24 45.81 1.32 54.45 43.52 10.28 24.53 86.35 10.51 8.23 25.77 82.10 31.81 51.36 35.33 88.22 14.95 30.48 15.94 37.56 61.81 23.52 4.82 22.77 2.19 28.46 16.87 15.55 16.86 52.54 25.71 12.55 30.46 20.07 14.37 29.21 19.25 23.77 7.41 30.01 .48 14.48 16.98 4.53 21.32 51.53 53.82 16.13 40.92 3.00 3.13

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CMYK PAGE 10B

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2011

W

E

A

T

H

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

NATIONAL FORECAST TODAY Partly sunny, a shower

78° 61°

SUNDAY

Mostly sunny

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

Sunny, much cooler

75° 60°

Today’s high/ Tonight’s low

65° 50°

The Finger Lakes

Highs: 69-77. Lows: 47-59. Mostly cloudy with a chance of showers today. Scattered showers possible tonight.

Wilkes-Barre 79/58

Pottsville 78/58

New York City 81/65

Brandywine Valley

Reading 80/63

Harrisburg 80/61

Highs: 80-83. Lows: 66-67. Mostly cloudy with a chance of showers today. Scattered showers possible tonight.

Philadelphia 82/67

Delmarva/Ocean City

Atlantic City 82/69

Temperatures

Yesterday Average Record High Record Low

Cooling Degree Days*

77/64 75/55 95 in 1959 39 in 1956

Yesterday Month to date Year to date Last year to date Normal year to date

6 36 721 871 577

*Index of fuel consumption, how far the day’s mean temperature was above 65 degrees.

ONE DAY ! ONLY

Huge Savings! Hurry in for your best selection!

Highs: 79-83. Lows: 64-68. Mostly cloudy with a chance of showers today. Scattered showers possible tonight.

Yesterday Month to date Normal month to date Year to date Normal year to date

Sun and Moon

Sunrise 6:39a 6:40a Moonrise Today 6:16p Tomorrow 6:41p Today Tomorrow

0.00” 5.97” 1.13” 44.67” 26.14” Sunset 7:22p 7:20p Moonset 4:56a 5:57a

River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday. Susquehanna Wilkes-Barre Towanda Lehigh Bethlehem Delaware Port Jervis Full

Stage 38.72 24.22

Chg. Fld. Stg 3.96 22.0 -6.29 21.0

2.86

0.54

16.0

13.14

-1.06

18.0

Last

New

Forecasts, graphs and data ©2011

Weather Central, LP For more weather information go to:

www.timesleader.com

First

Sept. 12 Sept. 20 Sept. 27

National Weather Service

607-729-1597

83/61

91/68

95/67 58/46

91/80

88/72 59/41

City

Yesterday

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Buffalo Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Las Vegas Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis

53/46/.00 80/58/.00 80/66/.44 80/58/.00 80/63/.01 83/58/.00 70/64/.00 74/63/.00 88/65/.00 77/50/.00 74/64/.06 84/77/.00 96/62/.00 67/60/.00 96/76/.00 71/62/.00 92/75/.51 72/62/.00 89/63/.00

City

Yesterday

Amsterdam Baghdad Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Dublin Frankfurt Hong Kong Jerusalem London

68/61/.00 108/81/.00 77/57/.00 63/54/.00 75/48/.00 70/57/.00 70/32/.00 95/82/.00 82/64/.00 70/61/.00

Today Tomorrow 58/46/c 83/61/s 83/66/sh 72/55/c 69/59/sh 86/60/s 74/63/c 74/63/sh 91/68/pc 76/55/pc 71/62/sh 88/72/s 95/67/s 77/60/sh 93/74/t 69/63/pc 91/80/t 73/62/pc 84/61/s

58/48/s 85/64/s 81/66/sh 69/60/pc 74/66/sh 85/64/s 76/64/pc 75/63/c 94/69/s 81/57/s 75/62/pc 87/73/s 97/70/s 77/59/sh 90/72/t 69/62/s 91/79/t 75/63/pc 83/63/s

ALMANAC Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Int’l Airport

Precipitation

76/58

89/63

Highs: 73-79. Lows: 56-59. Mostly cloudy with a chance of showers today. Scattered showers possible tonight.

Poughkeepsie 80/55

81/65

69/63

The Jersey Shore

Scranton 77/56

71/62

84/67

76/55

Highs: 74-82. Lows: 63-69. Mostly cloudy with a chance of showers today. Scattered showers possible tonight.

Towanda 77/52

84/61

66/55

The Poconos

Albany 76/52

88/49

74/63

65° 45°

TODAY’S SUMMARY

Binghamton 77/52

State College 75/55

86/57

Mostly sunny, cool

REGIONAL FORECAST Syracuse 76/52

NATIONAL FORECAST: An upper-level trough of low pressure, along with a weak cold front will result in scattered showers from the mid-Mississippi Valley to the Ohio Valley and eastward to the coast. Scattered thunderstorms will develop over central and southern Florida. Scattered thunderstorms will also be possible over much of the Southwest.

78° 58°

72° 56°

Mostrly sunny, a shower

80° 58°

A shower possible

Partly sunny, a shower

WEDNESDAY

TUESDAY

MONDAY

Oct. 3

City

Yesterday

Myrtle Beach Nashville New Orleans Norfolk Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Ore. St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, DC

84/64/.00 80/55/.00 83/63/.00 87/76/.01 82/54/.00 82/62/.00 87/73/.00 97/87/.00 76/63/.00 85/61/.00 67/62/.17 85/57/.00 95/63/.00 68/64/.00 67/54/.00 82/56/.00 86/74/.02 97/77/.00 82/71/.48

WORLD CITIES

Today Tomorrow 78/60/t 107/78/s 67/60/sh 76/59/pc 69/41/sh 64/52/sh 81/59/s 91/81/t 85/66/s 73/59/sh

67/57/sh 107/77/s 77/61/pc 80/62/t 69/48/pc 60/53/sh 79/60/t 87/79/t 88/68/s 65/57/sh

City

Yesterday

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Paris Rio de Janeiro Riyadh Rome San Juan Tokyo Warsaw

70/39/.00 77/57/.00 55/52/.00 75/66/.00 79/77/.00 104/84/.00 81/63/.00 88/79/.00 86/77/.00 61/46/.00

Today Tomorrow 83/67/s 80/60/pc 87/67/s 85/67/s 84/60/pc 80/58/pc 91/73/t 101/81/pc 75/58/sh 95/61/s 72/62/sh 82/58/pc 96/70/s 69/61/pc 70/55/pc 86/57/s 89/76/t 93/71/t 84/67/sh

85/70/s 83/61/t 90/70/pc 87/68/s 88/61/s 83/61/s 92/75/t 102/81/pc 74/57/sh 93/60/s 80/62/pc 82/58/t 99/68/s 72/61/s 70/55/pc 88/58/s 91/78/t 93/72/t 82/67/sh

Today Tomorrow 71/46/s 68/48/s 57/50/r 83/62/t 84/70/sh 109/80/s 88/68/s 89/77/t 86/74/t 68/51/pc

65/51/sh 73/57/pc 58/52/sh 68/58/sh 82/69/sh 107/78/s 88/67/s 88/77/t 85/73/t 77/56/pc

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The extent of our flooding here this week can be qualified as being a 1 in 100 year flood. All the perfect ingredients for a major rainfall event came together to bring over 10 inches of rain in parts of our area this week; rain that fell on ground saturated from Irene. This time it was a tropical storm interacting with a stalled front transporting saturated air northward from the tropics. The result....a flash flood along the Susquehanna. This also happened back in Janaury 1996 when deep snow melted almost overnight followed by excessive rainfall on frozen ground. In 1972, Agnes stalled and looped over Pennsylvania for 3 days.

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Times Leader 09-10-2011  

Times Leader 09-10-2011

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