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Special Supplement • Wednesday, September 14, 2011


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COLLEGE BOUND

Kennebec Journal | Morning Sentinel | Special Supplement |

Wednesday, September 14, 2011


Wednesday, September 14, 2011

| Kennebec Journal | Morning Sentinel | Special Supplement

COLLEGE BOUND

3

CMMCC — The community of Rivier College More than just a college of nursing Since 1891, Central Maine Medical Center College of Nursing and Health Professions in Lewiston, Maine has educated students for rewarding careers as Registered Nurses. The College has now added an Associate Degree Radiologic Technology Program as well as a Nuclear Medicine Technology Program. Check the College’s website www.cmmccollege.edu for information about these exciting programs. General education courses are offered to the public and include Anatomy & Physiology I and II, Microbiology, College Writing, Introduction to Literature, Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Pharmacology, various elective courses, and a Phlebotomy course. An RN Re-Entry course is offered for Registered Nurses who are licensed in the State of Maine but who have not practiced recently. Also available to LPN’s, Paramedics, and students transferring from other nursing programs is an Advanced Placement Bridge program for qualified applicants. The CMMC College of Nursing and Health Professions is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges Commission on Higher Education, the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission, the Maine State Board of Nursing, the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology, the Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology, and is approved by the State Approving Agency for Veterans’ Education.

Located in Nashua, New Hampshire, Rivier College is praised by students for its community atmosphere, vibrant student life, and professors’ and coaches’ vested interest in students’ academic and personal growth. With fully updated facilities and more than 30 liberal arts and pre-professional undergraduate majors, Rivier College prepares students for a rewarding career. “You can walk from one building to another and see people you know, whether they are students or faculty members,” says Karen Waterman, of the Class of 2012. She quickly adds, “And people hold doors for each other.” Nicole Peacock, a sophomore, has also encountered the closeness of the Rivier community. “It’s like family,” she says. Rivier has an undergraduate day studentfaculty ratio of 19:1, resulting in small class sizes and a lot of student-teacher interaction, both inside and outside the classroom. Student-centered instructional methods allow students to engage in the material, and professors are always accessible outside of class to meet with students. “You get to know your professors and they get to know you,” says junior Sarah Howard. Rivier faculty members are widely recognized as experts in their respective disciplines. More than professors, they are artists, nurses, economists, and police officers, to name a few. They infuse their courses with unique insights by bringing real-world experience to the classroom. Rivier’s coaches are also dedicated to student-athletes. “All the coaches want you to do your best,” says Howard, a member of Rivier’s basketball and softball teams. Sophomore Tom Poitras, a member of the men’s basketball team, says “To them, school always comes first.” Rivier fields 13 NCAA Division III teams, offering a variety of sports for men and women. Student-athletes train with the most up to date fitness equipment, thanks to a recent major renovation of the Muldoon Fitness Center. Completed in December, the expansion project included new exercise and

weightlifting machines, an athletic training facility, a coaches’ office suite, and a sand volleyball court. “Without this updated equipment it would be difficult to get the same high-quality training we do now,” says sophomore Nicole Boucher, a member of the Raiders volleyball team. The college also offers service learning opportunities and internships so students can apply what they learn in the classroom to the real world. Service projects with various local agencies and charities allow students to use their academic knowledge to help others, and internship opportunities with several public and private sector organizations in a wide variety of fields allows students to gain real-world experience so they can land their first professional position. With 1,000 undergraduate day students, Rivier is a tight-knit community where students get to know one another through classes, participating in student activities and organizations, or by simply walking around campus. “You always feel like you’re a part of something,” says junior Sarah Fronckwicz. Rivier offers a quality education that positions students for future success. Graduates leave Rivier with the knowledge and background necessary for the competitive global

www.rivier.edu.

environment, and the skills employers demand — solid critical thinking, communications, and analytical abilities, cutting-edge professional training, and practical realworld experience. For more information visit www.rivier.edu.


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Kennebec Journal | Morning Sentinel | Special Supplement |

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Southern Maine Community College At Southern Maine Community College (SMCC) you will find a vibrant campus that is home to a wide array of programs as well as to a faculty and staff committed to student success. Well-situated at the edge of Casco Bay and surrounded by extraordinary ocean views, SMCC is an attractive setting for learning and discovering. With nearly 40 areas of study that include business, health, education, the arts, trades, and the natural and social sciences, your opportunities at SMCC are almost limitless. At SMCC, we strive to be your first choice for a high quality and extremely affordable education. Because of our commitment to student learning, you will find a collegial environment with small classes that allow students to work side-by-side with faculty. Our exceptional faculty mentor and guide students throughout their college career with the important academic and career choices available to them. Their goal is to make your transition to college life and beyond both easy and enriching. Even if you are the first person in your family to go to college, you will feel at home at SMCC.

Our most impressive resource, however, is our students. They come from across the state and around the world, sharing both talent and an astonishing drive to succeed. Our students and graduates excel academically, transferring to universities and elite colleges throughout Maine and the United States, such as the University of Maine and Mt. Holyoke and Smith colleges. Even in these difficult times, and perhaps because of them, SMCC refuses to rest on its laurels. We continuously endeavor to match our programs with evolving and expanding job opportunities to maximize the opportunities available to our students. This year, the college opened its new midcoast campus in Brunswick at Brunwick Landing (the former Brunswick Naval Air Station). It will provide access to higher education for an additional 2,000 students and is designed to be a thriving center for education, innovation and economic growth in Maine working as a close partner to Maine businesses. Once fully operational, the SMCC midcoast campus will offer new associate degree and certificate programs in pre-

engineering, composites, manufacturing, and heavy equipment operations and maintenance, as well as expanded programs in health science including nursing, imaging and EMT/paramedicine. The midcoast campus will feature the Maine Advanced Technology and Engineering Center, offering a seamless education pathway from associate, to bachelor, to master degrees in engineering in partnership with the University of Maine. Other buildings on campus will include the Learning Commons & Health Science Center, Transportation Technology Center, Academic Center (Arts & Sciences Center), and the midcoast campus residence hall. This is only a small glimpse of Southern Maine Community College. Browse our website to explore our rich history, our diverse programs of study, our wide variety of cultural and athletic opportunities, and our picturesque campus overlooking Casco Bay. Discover a community that is dedicated to expanding educational opportunities at an affordable price and promoting academic excellence, responsible citizenship, and personal growth.


Wednesday, September 14, 2011

| Kennebec Journal | Morning Sentinel | Special Supplement

COLLEGE BOUND

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D’Youville College D’Youville College, a small private institution in Buffalo, has emerged over the past decade as an international leader in health care education with strong offerings in teacher education and business. Now in its second century, D’Youville enrolls approximately 3000 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral students in day evening, weekend and summer sessions. Founded in 1908 by a religious order from Canada, the Grey Nuns, as the first private women’s college in Western New York, and named for Saint Marguerite d’Youville, it developed into a quality institution with outstanding faculty. It became coeducational in 1971. Initially, D’Youville focused on preparing students for a career in teaching and with the advent of World War II, launched a four-year nursing program, the first in the area that became the keystone of a full array of state-of-the-art health care programs. Combined with teacher education D’Youville has positioned itself in an enviable position for its second century. “We have the academic programs that lead to good jobs and students and their parents know the importance of the right degree,” says D. John Bray, director of pub-

lic relations at the college. Health care ranks near the top of professions that offer plenty of job opportunities for graduates. The Bureau of Labor says seven of the 20 fastest growing occupations are health care related with 3 million new jobs being generated between now and 2016. The demand for teachers continues at a high rate especially for educators in math, science, and bilingual education. Specially designed by D’Youville are unique five-year programs that allow the student to earn both bachelors and master’s degrees in just five years. These include dietetics, international business, physician assistant, and occupational therapy. D’Youville continued its innovative programming with the introduction of a new six-year Doctor of Pharmacy program now in its second year and housed in a new $20 million building. D’Youville established a doctor of chiropractic program in 2004, the first standard accredited multi-disciplinary college in New York offering the program, and was the second in the U.S. to do so. The academic majors in health care also include graduate programs in community health nursing, family nurse practitioner,

nursing), early childhood education, childhood education, adolescence education, special education, health services administration, international business, business administration MBA, occupational therapy and physical therapy. There is also a special R.N.-B.S. /M.S. degree in nursing that is extremely popular. In keeping with its history, D’Youville requires a strong liberal arts core in all academic majors. In the past decade, D’Youville has invested more than $50 million in their campus located in the heart of Buffalo. A new library, gym, academic center, apartment style residence hall, snack bar, workout room, and the new building have significantly added to the learning atmosphere and comfort of D’Youville students. D’Youville has worked to grow in the right direction and adapt to the changing needs of a fast moving world economy and to the needs of today’s students who know a college degree is necessary and that it has to be a degree that leads to a job. For more information visit www.dyc.edu.

www.dyc.edu.


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Kennebec Journal | Morning Sentinel | Special Supplement |

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Having a Ball: sophomore Shelby Gilcott interns with the Maine Red Claws BY ERIN BALTES Submitted by Thomas College

Sport Management major Shelby Gilcott ‘13 really hustled this semester. She couldn’t afford not to pick up the pace; she had a fantastic opportunity to intern with the Maine Red Claws, Portland’s NBA Development League, and she could not let it pass her by. “I didn’t plan on this internship,” Shelby says. “I went to Portland with my parents because [Boston Celtics legend] Tommy Heinsohn was signing books at the Expo. It turns out that Red Claws management was there.” Meet Gilcott and you’ll see why one thing soon led to another: the outgoing, bubbly young lady was quickly talking to Red Claws Manager Jon Jennings and Public Relations Director Jana Spaulding. Before she knew it, she was in touch with Operations Manager Cam Twiss, who gave Gilcott his business card. “I told Cam that my ultimate professional dreams are to work for the Celtics and write for Sports Illustrated, and he invited me right away to do an internship with the Red Claws. He said, ‘Show up on Monday,’ and I was freaking out!” Gilcott was made a public relations and community relations coordinator for the team, working closely with Spaulding in the world of media and events. “It’s been a huge learning oppor-

believer in quality internship programs.” Adds Bill Ryan, Jr., chairman of the Red Claws and trustee at Thomas College, “Our student interns are great assets, as they bring passion and energy to our operations. Interns get an insider’s view of what it’s really like working for SHELBY GILCOTT ‘1 a team.” Ryan, too, points to Thomas students like Gilcott as part of the reason he joined the college’s board of trustees her the right way to compose a press earlier this academic year. “The sport release, and though the Red Claws’ techmanagement program gives Thomas stunique has been a little different, she has dents a solid background in the sports realized that there are a variety of business, and certainly gives them a leg approaches. Plus, she enrolled in a pubup on others looking for a job in the lic speaking course, which she credits as sports world. I had the opportunity to being crucial to where she is as a student meet with the staff of the program, and and worker today. “I have anxiety chalwas very impressed with what they were lenges, so it’s been helpful. Today I teaching students. I’ve also been spoke in front of 300 people… I never impressed by the Thomas graduates I would’ve guessed that I could do that! have met, and I love the college’s comI’ve really learned what I can accommitment to Maine.” plish.” When asked what her long-term plans Red Claws President and General are, Gilcott, whose mom Cynthia is a Manager Jon Jennings knows firsthand member of Thomas’s Class of 1984, how valuable the internship experience acknowledges that she is aiming for that is for students like Shelby. “My own career in public relations and sport jourinternships with the Indiana Pacers meant everything to my career,” he says nalism, but isn’t ready to limit her goals. “I want to work with people, and I love just before a game one day this spring. “It led to a full-time job with the Celtics, dealing with kids. I write down my and later, I had the chance to work at the dreams and goals because I have a lot of them. I would love to write a book, and I White House. Now, I’ve had this great opportunity to get back to sports and put believe my positive attitude can make a difference.” together this terrific team. I’m a huge

“Thomas was my absolute first choice. My mom is an alumna, so I came for a tour as a junior in high school. There was nothing I didn’t like! Now, as a student, I can see my truck from my classroom window. Things like that make me feel at home. And I know all my professors personally. I can talk to them so easily.”

tunity,” she says. “After games, I write press releases. I give stat sheets to fan and the media. But the bulk of the work takes place before the game. I set up the media table and press passes, coordinate the ball kids, and assist where I’m needed. Things move quickly, so it keeps me on my toes!” Her favorite part of the internship? The people she has met. “I was at the media table one day when a man came to me and said he wasn’t sure where he was supposed to be,” she recalls. “It turns out he was the assistant general manager for the Celtics. I was excited, but had to remember to be a professional too. I set him up with his media credentials, took him to his seat, and made sure he was all set.” Like other interns, Gilcott finds her work for the Red Claws pays off in building her skill set, but that her course work at Thomas really helped set the stage for her success. She notes that classes with instructor Greg King taught

Unity College to offer seasonal law enforcement training program In conjunction with the National Park Service, Unity College is now offering a seasonal law enforcement training program through its Conservation Law Enforcement major. The first class takes place this fall at the Schoodic Education and Research Center just outside Winter Harbor, Maine. Successful graduates of the program will be Level II law enforcement officers, the requirement to attain a seasonal law enforcement ranger position with the National Park Service. “Individuals with this training will be qualified to hold a seasonal law enforcement position at Acadia National Park or any other national park in the United

States,” said Tim Peabody, Associate Professor of Conservation Law Enforcement, former Colonel of the Maine Warden Service, and a 1981 alumnus of the college. Peabody helped to plan the program with input from the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Glynco, Georgia, and a variety of Maine State law enforcement agencies including the State Police. Classes are open to 20 qualified applicants with preference given to students enrolled in a Unity College degree program. Peabody expects the majority of participants will be Conservation Law Enforcement majors, though that is not a

requirement. This intensive 400-hour course consists of law enforcement training in federal criminal law and court procedures, pistol and shotgun qualifications, emergency response driving, patrol skills, and defensive tactics. The course will run for 10 weeks with participants training eight hours each day. Conservation Law Enforcement has traditionally been one of the largest and best-known degree programs at Unity College, so forming the program made sense as a logical step forward, essentially creating an “in-house” opportunity for Unity students who frequently pur-

sued this training elsewhere. In the past, students have been offered federal jobs prior to graduation after completing the seasonal law enforcement training program. “It’s a win for students because they get this advanced law enforcement training and as a result have the chance to take a summer position with the National Park Service,” Peabody stated. “Well-qualified students will be sought after.” For more information, please visit the Unity College website www.unity.edu or contact Tim Peabody, Associate Professor of Conservation Law Enforcement tpeabody@unity.edu.


Wednesday, September 14, 2011

| Kennebec Journal | Morning Sentinel | Special Supplement

COLLEGE BOUND

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Contributed photo

Associate Professor Tim Peabody ’81 (right facing) guides students in a finger-printing lab at Unity College.

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Kennebec Journal | Morning Sentinel | Special Supplement |

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

KVCC recognized by Aspen Institute as one of the top community colleges in the nation for 2011 FAIRFIELD – The Aspen Institute in 2011 recognized Kennebec Valley Community College (KVCC) as one of the best two-year colleges in America based on student success rates. KVCC was one of 120 community colleges ranked in the top 10 percent of the nation’s two-year colleges by the Institute in April, and the ranking has put KVCC in line to compete for the Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence, potentially a $1 million prize that will be awarded in December of this year. “Kennebec Valley Community College was delighted to receive this national recognition of the hard work by our faculty and staff to achieve strong student retention and graduation rates,” KVCC President Barbara Woodlee, said. “We measure our success here by the success of our students, and this ranking reflects the results that philosophy has produced.” Colleges did not apply for the recognition, but were chosen based on independent evaluation of publicly available data that measured their performance in the following three areas: • Student success in persistence and completion. • Consistent improvement in outcomes over time.

• Equity in outcomes for students of all racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic backgrounds. The top-tier ranking of KVCC is a reminder of the growing importance of the College in Maine’s higher education market, and its ability to meet the needs of an increasingly wide range of students. The reasons for KVCC’s expanding role are simple and practical: • Affordability – KVCC offers the lowest tuition available in Maine, at $86 per credit hour for in-state students, making a full-time, 30-hour course load $2,580. • Flexibility – The College offers everything from standard in-classroom instruction to online courses, night and weekend schedules, and off-campus classes. • Transfer – A growing number of students are using KVCC as a stepping-stone to advanced degrees thanks to credit-transfer agreements with the University of Maine system and other four-year schools, taking advantage of the strong student support services and the affordable tuition at KVCC to start their college experience. • Jobs – With more than 95 percent of KVCC graduates consistently finding jobs or continuing their educa-

tion within six months of graduation, the vast majority of students find a KVCC education quickly pays off. The college’s 69-acre main campus is located three miles north of Waterville, just off I-95. It includes five classroom buildings, a library, multi-purpose room/gymnasium, café, and computer labs. A commuter college, KVCC offers students assistance with car pooling and child care options. The college offers more than 30 programs of study ranging from two-year associate degrees to certificate and diploma programs, as well as a comprehensive schedule of continuing education courses and business and industry outreach programs. The availability of an associate in arts degree in liberal studies has greatly expanded the educational options available to students who may wish to pursue advanced degrees. Enrollment at the college has grown steadily in recent years and exceeded 2,500 students for the fall 2010 semester. For more information on the Aspen Prize and the process used to select competitors for it, go to www.AspenCCPrize.org. For more information on KVCC go to www.kvcc.me.edu.


Wednesday, September 14, 2011

| Kennebec Journal | Morning Sentinel | Special Supplement

How to switch majors successfully Choosing a major is often met with trepidation. College students may feel pressured to choose a major when they are less than certain about what they want to study. Majors aren’t set in stone and students have the opportunity to switch concentrations if their original choice isn’t the right fit. Perhaps now more than ever, there is pressure on students to pick the right college major. In this weak economy, experts are touting advice on choosing a major that gives students the best chance of finding a job after graduation. The National Center for Education Statistics says that in 20072008, the most popular majors were business, social sciences, history, and education. According to Capital University, students usually have so many interests that they have difficulty narrowing their choices. Their first inclination is not to declare a major and wait to see if they find their niche. In general, two out of every three university students change majors at least once. This should give hope to students who feel they need a chance. Here are some tips that should help with the process. • Wait to declare. Many educators advise waiting a semester or two before declaring a major. Take a variety of elective courses and general education classes that will fit degree requirements regardless of major. A guidance counselor or adviser can undecided students choose courses that might help them find an area of study. • Take an assessment test. The career or guidance office may offer some of the standardized tools to help students find an area of concentration. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and the Campbell Interest and Skill Survey are two resources students use to identify strengths and potential paths of study. • Do your research. If you’re considering a new major, talk to your advisor about what will be required of that new major, including classes and other coursework. You can also talk to students currently studying under that major. Knowing what to expect beforehand can make the decision-making process a little easier. • Talk to the dean. Many colleges and universities have deans or advisors in charge of students in certain majors. They will know the courses required for a degree. Switching majors may involve taking or re-taking some courses that will fit with the new major. It may also mean that some courses that were taken cannot be applied to the new major. This can result in

having to take more classes one semester or taking an extra semester to graduate. • Consider finances. Taking different classes or stretching out your college career an additional semester might cost more money. Be sure that the finances are there, whether personally provided or funded through financial aid. • Assess whether your major truly matters. Many liberal arts or general studies majors are applicable in many fields. Therefore, switching majors may not even be necessary. Think about continuing with a current major and then concentrate or minor in something more specific. • Determine if you really need to switch majors. Sometimes the decision to switch majors is made for you. If you are having difficulty keeping up in class or find the courses really do not interest you, it may be time to change. Failing grades can impact grade point average. Dropping a class — or a major — is a way to redeem yourself. • Consider a double major. Students who ultimately cannot decide can choose to study for a double major. This may look good on a resume and show potential employers that you are not afraid of work. It also enables you to study two different subjects in detail. Keep in mind that double majors will mean a lot of extra work and may delay graduation so that you can get all the credits needed. Choosing a major is seldom an easy decision. Rest assured that if the first choice isn’t ideal, students can switch majors successfully with few obstacles.

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Kennebec Journal | Morning Sentinel | Special Supplement |

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Attend USM today and be ready for the career of tomorrow At the beginning of the 2011 academic year, University of Southern Maine President Selma Botman said, “USM is dedicated to making sure that Maine students leave here with the knowledge and experiences they need to be competitive in the workplace and prepared for the fields of tomorrow.” The experiences of the following students and a recent graduate demonstrate how ready for the workplace USM students are. Summer Job with a Twist They could have found routine summer jobs but instead business majors Ry Russell of Scarborough, Patric Brophy of Farmington and Tyler Wells of Holden, Mass. found investors and decided to lease and manage the iconic Saco Drive-In. The drive-in, which is believed to be one of the oldest in the country, was scheduled to close but cars were lined up to enter the 72-yearold theatre, thanks in large part to the students’ successful Facebook campaign. “We learn so much at USM, and we wanted the chance to apply it and build our resumes,” said Brophy. At the end of the summer, these successful undergraduate entrepreneurs were able to pay back their investors. A Triumphant Return Home Ashley Emerson returned to Portland this summer as a rising star in the opera world. The 2006 graduate of the USM School of Music and native of Bangor, who has made more than 50 appearances at the Metropolitan Opera in New York, was here to sing the lead in PORTopera’s production of “The Daughter of the Regiment.” Emerson shared the stage with her former USM voice professor and mentor, Ellen Chickering, who is credited with playing a major role in Emerson’s success. Chickering, a talented singer in her own right, has taught and mentored countless stu-

http://www.usm.maine.edu/cahs#

dents over the years who have gone on to become performers and teachers. Serious Sailing in the Gulf of Mexico USM researcher John Wise and a team of USM students and staff returned to the Gulf of Mexico this summer to research the toxicological impact of the 2010 BP oil disaster on the health of the Gulf’s whales and other wildlife. Wise posted on his voyage blog, “…that the expedition received confirmation from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration that we are indeed the only group studying the toxicology of chemicals in these Gulf whales.” The crew aboard the 93-foot Ocean Alliance vessel “Odyssey” uses non-invasive techniques to collect skin samples of whales, and grow cell cultures in an onboard lab. Further analysis will be conducted throughout the year at USM’s Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology in Portland. This summer, 15 students participated in the research expedition, among them

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Oquossoc, Maine’s Shanelle Dugan, a senior nursing student. She wrote, “It is a wonderful feeling to be part of something great ... I hope that the findings discovered by the “Odyssey” and her crew are able to make the changes necessary for the survival of our environment and those who share it with us.”

Earlier this summer, the Princeton Review named USM one of its best colleges in the Northeast, based on information from institutional data, school visits, plus feedback from current students. To schedule a campus visit, please call 207-780-5670, or visit http://www.usm.maine.edu/admit/visit-usm


Wednesday, September 14, 2011

| Kennebec Journal | Morning Sentinel | Special Supplement

http://www.cmcc.edu/about_cmcc/

Central Maine Community College Located on the shores of beautiful Lake Auburn, Central Maine Community College (CMCC) boasts a vibrant campus community that is committed to preparing students for challenging careers, transfer to four-year colleges, and lifelong learning. We offer more than 24 program areas leading to technical, business, and health careers. With hands-on programs utilizing cutting edge technology, strong academic resources, on-campus housing, athletics, and student organizations, CMCC offers a complete college experience . . . all this with the lowest tuition rates in Maine. Our 135-acre campus stretches along the shores of Lake Auburn, in the twin cities of Lewiston and Auburn - Maine’s second largest urban center. Sandy beaches, challenging ski slopes, and scenic wilderness areas are all within an easy drive. Fine restaurants, movie theaters, and shopping centers are also nearby. In addition to associate degrees and certificates in popular career and technical fields such as business, computer technology, criminal justice, medical assisting, early childhood education and automotive, electromechanical, and precision machining technology, the college offers associate in arts degrees in general studies or liberal studies, programs designed for transfer to a four-year college or university. Through our popular AdvantageU program, liberal studies graduates can receive admission to any of Maine’s public universities and experience a simplified transfer process. We even have a transfer advisor to show you the way. At CMCC we believe learning takes place both inside and outside the classroom. Student activities include intramural and intercollegiate athletic teams, outdoor club, student senate, honor society, drama club, literary magazine, and other special interest groups. A new campus fitness center including cardio and strength training equipment is available to all students. In addition, students can receive membership benefits at the Lost Valley Ski Area, which is located just minutes from the campus. The CMCC Mustangs participate nationally in the USCAA (United States Collegiate Athletic Association) and locally in the Yankee Small College Conference. We offer baseball, softball, and men’s and women’s basketball, soccer, cheering, and bowling. Several teams have advanced to conference playoffs and tournament appearances over the years. The men’s basketball team holds the distinction of the only college team in Maine to ever win a national basketball championship. The college offers three living options for full-time students: Rancourt Hall, a fourfloor residence hall overlooking Lake Auburn; Fortin Hall, which includes a recently renovated game room and lounge; and a two-building apartment complex. All offer on-campus convenience and the benefit of living within a community of students who share common goals of academic and personal success. In addition to the benefits of being close to classes and campus activities, students feel at home on our safe, well-lit campus. At Central Maine Community College, you'll receive a quality education at affordable prices, one that prepares you for interesting and rewarding work . . . right here in Maine.

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Kennebec Journal | Morning Sentinel | Special Supplement |

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Credit card pointers for today’s college kids College is a period of firsts. It’s the first time many students are away from home for an extended period of time; it’s the first time students get to choose their own coursework; and it’s the first time many are left to their own devices with respect to taking care of themselves. College is also the first time many apply for a credit card. Although at this point in life, it’s important for people to begin building their credit histories, it’s just as important for them to carefully consider the variety of credit card options before committing to a card. All cards are definitely not equal, and college students should look for cards that will help them start building a solid credit foundation. So how can college kids find a card that’s fit for them? Consider the following tips. • Steer clear of cards with annual fees. Some credit cards charge annual fees, regardless of whether or not a consumer ever makes a single purchase. Since many cards’ interest rates are similar, try to find one that doesn’t charge annual fees. • Find the best annual percentage rate. While interest rates are often similar, some cards have a better annual percentage rate, or APR. As attractive as low interest rates can be, be especially cautious with cards that promise zero percent interest for the first six or 12 months after signing. That’s because such cards typically have very high APRs. This isn’t a monthly fee, but rather a finance charge referred to as an annual rate. For college kids, whom history suggests struggle to pay their balances in full each month, a high APR could add considerably to the cost of having a credit card. • Don’t overdo it with credit cards. A 2009 report from Sallie Mae titled “How Undergraduate Students Use Credit Cards” found that half of college undergraduates had four or more credit cards in 2008. No college student needs that many credit cards. If at all possible, college kids should stick to one card and one card only. The card should only be used to help build a credit history and in the case of an emergency. Students who need four cards are either finding themselves in far too many emergency situations or harming themselves by charging too many purchases to plastic. • Be skeptical of reward cards. In theory, reward cards are excellent. The more a consumer purchases, the more rewards points they accrue. Those reward points can then be used toward a host of things, including airline miles. However, college kids typically do not make much money, and reward cards are really only beneficial to people who charge a lot of their purchases. Such people can typically afford to do so, whereas the average college kid cannot. Reward cards are better suited for men and women with full-time jobs and not so ideal for college kids without steady streams of income. • Don’t be late. If payments are not made online, they should be mailed at least a week in advance of the due date. A history of late payments can quickly mar a credit report. Even if only the minimum payment is possible, make sure that payment is made on time. • Borrow from Mom and Dad, not the credit card company. Credit card companies will lend cash to their customers. These loans are called cash advances. But unlike borrowing from Mom and Dad, accepting a cash advance from a credit card company typically comes with a heavy interest rate, making it much more worthwhile to call home instead of taking a cash advance. Getting a credit card is an important step for young people. Students should just be careful the credit card ends up building a solid credit foundation instead of digging a significant financial hole.


Wednesday, September 14, 2011

| Kennebec Journal | Morning Sentinel | Special Supplement

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Filing the FAFSA is Easy Here’s the truth…. filing the FAFSA is easier than ever. The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is the primary application for federal financial aid, regardless of the school a student is attending. If you are even considering college for the upcoming year, you should file the FAFSA. It’s FREE and required in order to be considered for any federal education grants or low-interest federal student loans. Completing the FAFSA should be on the annual “to do” list of every potential and current college student. The FAFSA becomes available for the upcoming school year on January 1. Many schools have a priority deadline by which the FAFSA must be filed; so be sure you know and meet the deadline for any school you are considering. Even if a school doesn’t have a deadline, it is important to complete the FAFSA as soon as possible since many financial aid funds are limited. The FAFSA does require some prior year income information and as a result people often think that it is necessary to wait until taxes are filed before completing the FAFSA. This is NOT true. The FAFSA can be filed using estimated income and then the information can easily be updated after taxes are filed. Never risk your chance to receive funds; file the FAFSA as early as you can.

The good news is that the process to file the FAFSA has been greatly simplified. Students can now complete the process online at www.fafsa.gov. Bookmark the site now on your computer (and be sure it is the dot “gov” site, not the dot “com” site). Filing the FAFSA online is the best and fastest way to complete the application. The FAFSA now has “skip logic” which means you automatically skip questions that do not apply to you, greatly reducing, in some cases, the number of questions asked. The FAFSA also has built in “help” which provides information to assist in understanding the questions. This help feature is found next to each question. There are also edits that help minimize frequently made mistakes. The website is VERY user friendly. To make filing the FAFFA as easy as possible, gather all of the necessary information you may need ahead of time. The following link to the FAFSA website has a list of documents needed to complete the FAFSA: www.fafsa.ed.gov/help/before003.htm. Having the necessary documents at your fingertips will make the process easier than you may imagine. You can even sign your FAFSA electronically using a PIN that you create and activate as part of the FAFSA application. Don’t let filing the FAFSA stand between you and thousands of dollars of financial aid.

http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/index.htm

It is easy, but if you need assistance, call the Finance Authority of Maine (1-800-2283734), contact your high school guidance counselor or a Financial Aid Office. Free help

is available. There is no need to pay for any services related to completion of the FAFSA. Good luck. Filing the FAFSA will be time well spent.


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COLLEGE BOUND

Kennebec Journal | Morning Sentinel | Special Supplement |

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

New England Board of Higher Education’s Tuition Break helps Maine residents looking out of state for their college program Maine residents, who find that their chosen degree program is not offered by a Maine public college or university, may be eligible for a discount on out-of-state tuition through the New England Board of Higher Education’s (NEBHE) Tuition Break, the Regional Student Program (RSP). Maine residents pay in-state tuition when they attend a

Maine public college or university – including the seven University of Maine campuses, Maine Maritime Academy and the seven Maine community colleges. Leaving Maine to attend another state’s public college or university usually means paying much higher, out-ofstate tuition. However, Maine residents who pursue a degree program offered under the RSP Tuition Break could save on average about $7,000 on their annual tuition bills. Maine residents are eligible for the RSP Tuition Break for specific programs offered by public colleges and universities in Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont. Examples of Tuition Break degree programs available to Maine residents include: • Asian Studies at the University of Massachusetts Boston; • Biomedical Engineering at the University of Connecticut and University of Rhode Island; • Electronic Journalism Arts at Lyndon State College, Vt.; • Environmental Health at the University of Massachusetts Lowell; • Hospitality Management at the University of New Hampshire;

• Meteorology at Western Connecticut State University, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Plymouth State University, NH, and Lyndon State College, Vt.; • Outdoor Education at the University of New Hampshire and Johnson State College, Vt.; • Physiology and Neurobiology at the University of Connecticut; • Public Health Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Visit www.nebhe.org/tuitionbreak for detailed information and a list of currently offered degree programs. Contact the NEBHE offices at 617-357-9620 or email tuitionbreak@nebhe.org. For more than 50 years, the RSP Tuition Break has helped thousands of Maine residents to afford their college education. In academic year 2010-11, nearly 600 Maine residents participated and saved a total of $3.6 million on their tuition bills. A full-time student saved an average of $7,000. For additional information on NEBHE’s Tuition Break Program visit www.nebhe.org or contact NEBHE at 617357-9620 or tuitionbreak@nebhe.org.

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Wednesday, September 14, 2011

| Kennebec Journal | Morning Sentinel | Special Supplement

COLLEGE BOUND

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COLLEGE BOUND

Kennebec Journal | Morning Sentinel | Special Supplement |

Wednesday, September 14, 2011


College Bound