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WILKES-BARRE, PA

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

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H A Z L E T O N ’ S A L I C E C . W I LT S I E C E N T E R

SPORTS SHOWCASE

A castle’s renaissance

AHL

SENATORS 5 PENGUINS 4 NHL

KINGS 3 FLYERS 2 SABRES 3 PENGUINS 2 ISLANDERS 4 RANGERS 2 CAPITALS 2 SENATORS 1

PSU OVER PURDUE

Silas Redd ran for 131 yards and a touchdown and Penn State took advantage of Purdue’s special teams miscues to hold on Saturday for Paterno a 23-18 win. PSU’s Joe Paterno coached Saturday’s homecoming game from the Beaver Stadium press box. The 84-year-old Hall of Famer is recovering from right shoulder and pelvis injuries. Sports, 1C

INSIDE A NEWS: Local 3A Nation & World 5A Obituaries 2A, 7A B PEOPLE: Birthdays 10B C SPORTS: Scoreboard 2C Outdoors 12C D BUSINESS: Motley Fool 6D

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

Above, Executive Director Cindy Garren sits in the Alice C. Wiltsie Performing Arts Center located at Hazleton Elementary-Middle School before providing a tour of the recently completed auditorium last week. At top, an original light sconce, one of four that has been retrieved, restored and remounted. By STEVE MOCARSKY

HAZLETON – The dream has been realized. With restoration complete, the Castle on the Hill stands, once again, as a source of pride for the community that fought to save it. After years of neglect, a grass-roots effort to save it from demolition resulted in its rebirth.

smocarsky@timesleader.com

After reopening as Hazleton Elementary-Middle School in 2007 and a four-year fund drive to restore its once-opulent auditorium, the former Hazleton High School will open the doors of that space to the public for the first time in more than a decade next Sunday. Formerly known as the Castle Auditorium, the Alice C. Wiltsie Performing Arts Center will present “Raise the Curtain” – a dedication ceremony followed by There and Back Again performing classic rock, 1980s hits, 1970s disco, coun-

INSIDE: The mission of saving and restoring the structure. Page 14A

try, modern rock and more with the audience being invited backstage for refreshments after the show. The late Alice C. Wiltsie was an art teacher at the school. “For me, it’s the final piece of the puzzle, once we have the first performance there,” said Tom Gabos, chairman of the performing arts center board. See WILTSIE, Page 14A

COMING EVENTS Events scheduled at the Alice C. Wiltsie Performing Arts Center: Raise the Curtain – A dedication and performance by There and Back Again, with a reception to follow, 2 p.m., Oct. 23. Tickets are $10. Chicago in Concert – The band performs its hits and seasonal selections, 7 p.m. Nov. 27. Tickets start at $75. Tickets may be purchased at the box office, located in the lobby of Best Western Genetti Inn & Suites, 1341 N. Church St., Hazle Township, from noon to 4 p.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays, or online at www.wiltsiecenter.org.

E VIEWS: Editorial 2E Forum 3E F ETC.: Puzzles 2F Books 5F Travel 6F G CLASSIFIED

Student share of college costs Money for student subsidies has declined, so college students are picking up a larger share of total costs. The impact is bigger at public institutions, and most notable at community colleges. * Penn State data is for the entire university, not for the local campuses.

WEATHER Caleb Roe Partly sunny, windy High 59. Low 42. Details, Page 14C

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09815 10077

Report: Colleges cutting spending while upping tuition

Students sharing the costs By MARK GUYDISH mguydish@timesleader.com

Source: Delta Data Project

Times Leader graphic/Mark Guydish

College students have been hit by a financial double whammy, the car-crash equivalent of getting T-boned on both sides at the same time. A new analysis by a nonprofit research group says the sour economy has led to cuts in public funding and private donations at the same time tuition has surged. The upshot: Students are paying a bigger chunk of the total cost of their education; in some cases, much bigger, especially at public colleges, and especially in community colleges. This holds true locally, according to data from the organization

INSIDE: Delta Costs Projects compares colleges and universities, Page 8A

that issued the report, the Delta Project on Postsecondary Education Costs, Productivity and Accountability. From 2004 to 2009 (the latest available data): • The average, per-pupil subsidy helping Luzerne County Community College offset costs for students dropped from $7,207 to $3,574, while net per-pupil tuition rose from $3,643 to $5,952. The “student share of costs,” according to Delta Project, jumped from 33.6 percent to 62.5 perSee TUITION, Page 8A

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

Recent Lake-Lehman grad Julie Travis is attending LCCC.


K PAGE 2A

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

MEETINGS Board discusses Meyers roof leaks

WILKES-BARRE – Leaks in the Meyers High School roof have been fixed just in time for the Wilkes-Barre Area School Board to mull expensive repairs to leaks in a water main buried under the basement floor. At Wednesday’s combined work session and regular meeting, Project Manager Gary Salijko from the Apollo Group Inc. – the company overseeing repairs – announced that lengthy roof and parapet repairs are done. He then talked of a water leak contractors have struggled to locate for months. Devices designed to find leaks by sound detected what “we believe is a large leak” and some smaller leaks in the line inside the school, Salijko said. Repairs would be difficult because the line is so old and the leak may actually be relieving pressure on other fragile parts of the system.

Salijko suggested abandoning tural zone, which accounts for the existing line and installing a about 70 to 80 percent of townnew water main above ground ship land. in the school. Pressed for an Sarah Hite estimate, he said it could run "$100,000 to $200,000." Mark Guydish

Residents inquire about gas amendment

Council hires 3 new community workers

EDWARDSVILLE – Borough council voted at its regular session on Thursday to hire three new employees to fill DALLAS TWP. – Residents various roles in the community. expressed concern and praise The board acted to hire James Thursday for a proposed amendVerdekal as a part-time police ment to the township zoning officer at a rate of $11.57 per ordinance that would provide hour, effective Nov. 1. regulations for future natural Council also accepted the gas development. resignation of police officer The addition was first proBradley Snell, who is leaving the posed in May, but after public department for an opportunity outcry over the original draft, officials decided to take a differ- with the U.S. Army. The board also agreed to hire ent approach. Gregory Murray as part-time The draft, which was drawn up by Solicitor Thomas Brennan fore truck driver at a rate of $10.71 an hour, effective Oct. 13. and planning consultant Jack Council voted to add partVaraly, sets specific definitions time employee, Irwin Wainwfor oil and gas activities and a right, to the borough street lengthy list of rules companies department, beginning Oct. 13, must follow for each act. It at a wage of $10 per hour. restricts activities to certain Steven Fondo districts, primarily the agricul-

Amelia ‘Lena’ Singer October 15, 2011 “Lena” Singer, a lifelong A melia resident of Hughestown, passed

away peacefully at her home surrounded by her family Saturday, October 15, 2011. She was born November 20,1927, a daughter of the late Nicola Maria and Maria Guiseppe Altieri Foglia. She was a 1944 graduate of Hughestown High School. Mrs. Singer was a member of the Second Presbyterian Church, Pittston, where she was a member of the Golden Star Bible Class. She was employed in the Greater Pittston Garment Industry and was a member of the I.L.G.W.U. Lena was preceded in death by her husband, Francis, February 15, 2011; and brothers, Michael Foglia and Vincent James Foglia. Surviving are her sons, Francis Singer Jr., New York, N.Y., and attorney Mark Singer and his wife, Heidi, Hughestown; grandchild Anjelica Singer, who was the apple of her grandmother’s eye; and sister, Sylvia Lavelle, Groveville, N.J. She was a loving caring wife, mother, daughter, grandmother and sister. The family would like to thank Heartland Hospice Care Staff and

➛ timesleader.com pany perceived the ordinance unfairly interfered with business. On Thursday, Menn told Wright the ordinance was being reworked to enhance the township’s ability to enforce its terms despite the threat of lawsuit. B. Garret Rogan

Members clash over finance reports

Quarry allegations made at session

all her caregivers for the compassionate care Mrs. Singer received during her illness. The funeral will be held at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday from the Howell-Lussi Funeral Home, 509 Wyoming Ave., West Pittston, with services at 11 a.m. in the Second Presbyterian Church, 143 Parsonage St., Pittston. The Rev. David Brague, her pastor, will officiate. Friends may call at the funeral home from 5 to 8 p.m. Monday. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be sent to the Second Presbyterian Church, 143 Parsonage St., Pittston, PA 18640.

October 13, 2011 mil Katona, 93, formerly of Elm E Avenue, Kingston, died Thursday, October 13, 2011, at Tiffany

tona, New Jersey; three grandsons, Jeff, Steve and Bryan; four greatgrandchildren; two nieces; a nephew; and cousins. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Wednesday from the Hugh B. Hughes & Son Inc. Funeral Home, 1044 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort, with the Rev. James Quinn officiating. Interment will be held in the Fern Knoll Burial Park, Dallas. Friends may call from 7 to 9 p.m. Tuesday evening. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions, if desired, can be made to the Bennett Presbyterian Church, 501 Bennett St., Luzerne, PA 18709; or to the Hospice of the Sacred Heart, 600 Baltimore Drive, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702.

LAKE TWP. – Supervisors on Wednesday night discussed the status of a washed out bridge and announced that the Salansky Marcellus Shale natural gas well, on Zosh Road, has been plugged. Barney Dobinick, emergency management coordinator, said the bridge between Route 29 and East Sorber Mountain washed completely out days following Tropical Storm Lee. The section of road is closed at this point and residents in that area are being detoured over another bridge. Dobinick said the bridge collapsed after sustaining damage from the storm. He was told by Joe Gibbons, Luzerne County engineer, it would cost about $300,000 to replace the state owned bridge. Dobinick estimates the bridge will not be replaced before winter. Eileen Godin

East Center St. Bridge work will be delayed

October 14, 2011 andra Jean Graboske, 74, of Hanover Township, passed away S Friday, October 14, 2011, at the fam-

ily home. She was born April 17, 1937, in Hanover Township, a daughter of the late Gordon and Evelyn Obitz Lane. Sandra was a graduate of Hanover High School and a member of the Buttonwood Congregational Church. She had been employed by the Acme Markets and at the Hanover Bank. Sandra was a member of the Christian Woman’s Club of Wilkes-Barre. She was preceded in death by sisters, Margaret Rindgen, Dorcas Trischuk, Shirley Yudisky and Fay Lane; and a brother, Gordon Lane. Surviving are her husband of 45 years, Henry C. Graboske; children, Henry C. Graboske II, and his wife, Jonell, of Hanover Township; Robert M. Graboske and his spouse, Amy, of Hanover Township; Jennifer Gribble and her husband, Jason, of Bloomingdale, and Michael L. Graboske and his spouse, April, of

Hanover Township; six granddaughters, Alexa Jane and Alivia Marie Graboske, Kiley C. and Kenley G. Graboske, and Hadassah R. and Samantha S. Graboske; a brother, George (Jake) Lane, of Seattle, Wash.; as well as numerous nieces and nephews. Funeral service will be held at 10 a.m. Monday at the Buttonwood Congregational Church, with the Rev. John Pugh, pastor, officiating. Interment will be in the Hanover Green Cemetery. Friends may call from 3 to 7 p.m. today at the S.J. Grontkowski Funeral Home, 530 W. Main St., Plymouth, and from 9:30 a.m. until the time of service Monday at the Buttonwood Congregational Church. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions, if desired, may be made to the Buttonwood Congregational Church; or to the charity of the donor’s choice. Please visit www.sjgrontkowskifuneralhome.com to submit online condolences.

Thomas Joseph Hudak Sr. June 15, 2011

Joseph J. Elgonitis October 13, 2011

October 13, 2011, at his home. He resided in Nanticoke since 1972 and previously in Hanover Township. Born on April 13, 1930, in Hanover Township, he was a son of the late John and Anna Chupcavich Elgonitis. He graduated from the former Hanover Memorial High School, class of 1949. Upon graduating, he was a manager for Melody Shoe Co., Wilkes-Barre, until being inducted into the U.S. Army in 1954. Joseph served with the Allied occupation in Germany as a driver and mechanic and attained the rank of Specialist 3rd Class. During that time, he embraced the opportunity to travel throughout Europe, and he often reminisced on those times and loved to share stories of his experiences and journeys. After his return, he was employed as a manager at the former Alta Products, Hanover Township, for many years and was last employed at Techneglas as a technician until his retirement. He was an active member of the

Status of washed out bridge is discussed

Board approves construction orders

Emil Katona

oseph J. Elgonitis, 81, of Seneca Drive, Nanticoke, passed away Junexpectedly Thursday morning,

December 2011. Township Manager Kathleen Sebastian said Borton-Lawson, an engineering and architectural firm, has requested a fifth extension due to contractual and other issues. Sarah Hite

LUZERNE – The borough council meeting Wednesday night opened up with a clash between council members Kurt Santayana and Judy Gober over the format of the monthly finance reports. Santayana had asked that the reports, which come from the office of private Luzerne-based accountant Bill Balavage, be printed to show expenses, revenue and the amount initially budgeted for the various budget items at several of the past monthly council meetings. Gober had countered by asking Santayana to personally meet with Balavage in order to discuss his preferred formatting. Santayana then complained he had voiced this preference at a meeting with Balavage and borough accountant Phil Keating of J.H. Williams Accounting PLAINS TWP. – The townin early 2011. ship Board of Commissioners Balavage, who was in attendagain heard allegations Thursance at Wednesday’s meeting, day night that the Wilkes-Barre denied ever receiving such a Materials rock quarry is disrequest and asked Santayana turbing its neighboring residents by carrying out actions in why he did not bring the matter to him in person when he first violation of an ordinance. noticed that the reports were Resident John Wright of KINGSTON – It took under not printed to his satisfaction. Ridgewood Road, who has fre10 minutes Wednesday for the Santayana did not respond. quently attended the regular Wyoming Valley West School B. Garret Rogan Board to work through a light meetings due to his concerns about the way the quarry is agenda that included a few operating, again took the board personnel moves, some coachto task over what he believes is ing appointments and a pair of the township’s inaction against construction change orders. the company’s alleged violaThe board approved two tions. KINGSTON TWP. – Superchange orders to contracts with At the August regular meetvisors announced Wednesday Sargent Enterprises Inc. for ing, Solicitor Stephen Menn the long-awaited completion of work on the State Street Elesaid an ordinance was created to the East Center Street Bridge mentary Center asbestos abateregulate the levels of dust after project in Shavertown will be ment project. A deduction of blasts, the noise levels from the delayed until December 2012. 176 linear feet of underground blasts, the hours of operation for The East Center Street Bridge transite piping netted the disblasting and the transport of project has been ongoing for trict a savings of $1,056, while material from the quarry. more than 10 years due to disthe need to remove 3,926 square Menn had also explained that putes among property owners feet of blackboards/mastic at $5 Wilkes-Barre Materials exnear the work site. a square foot increased that pressed an intention to file suit Last November, the bridge contract by $19,630. Janine Ungvarsky against the township if the com- was set to be completed by

Sandra Jean Graboske

Court, Kingston. Born and raised in Kingston, he was a son of the late Julius Katona and Julia Munkatchy Katona. He attended Kingston schools. Emil joined the U.S. Army to fight in World War II, where he received the Bronze Star. He was employed by Wagner Construction Co., and prior to his retirement he worked at Addy Asphalt. Emil resided in Kingston his entire life. He was a member of the Bennet Presbyterian Church and was a member of the American Legion, Kingston. He was preceded in death by his wife, Regina, married 67 years at the time of her death; and brothers, Lewis and Edward Katona. Surviving are his daughters, Jeanne Leidner and her husband, Dr. Burton, Florida, and Ruthanne Guy and her husband, James, California; sisters, Ruth and Emma Katona, Kingston; brother, William Ka-

THE TIMES LEADER

former Holy Trinity Church, Wilkes-Barre, until his health no longer permitted. He had a passion for gardening, traveling and following sports. He enjoyed spending his mornings with friends at the café at Wegman’s. Most importantly, Joseph was a caring father and loving grandfather. He took great pride in enlightening his granddaughters and sharing experiences with them as only Grampy knew how. He was preceded in death by a brother, John Elgonitis; and sisters, Eve Simonitis and Ann Blessner. Surviving are his son, Joseph Elgonitis and his wife, Lisa, Swoyersville; granddaughters, Ava and Alanna; a brother, Anthony Elgonitis and his wife, Barbara, Hanover Township; a sister, Mary Wineski, Cape May, N.J.; and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be held at 10 a.m. Tuesday from the Davis-Dinelli Funeral Home, 170 E. Broad St., Nanticoke, with the Rev. John Terry officiating. Interment will follow in Holy Trinity Cemetery, Bear Creek. Visitation will be from 5 to 7 p.m. Monday at the funeral home.

homas Joseph Hudak Sr., 66, of Las Vegas, Nev., passed away T June 15, 2011.

Born June 27, 1944, in Kingston, Mr. Hudak was a 30-year resident of Nevada. He was married to his first wife, Marie Biniek, in 1962, and, having joined the U.S. Navy right out of high school, trained as an electronics engineer, serving from 1963 to 1967. He moved from Dallas to Brunswick, Md., where he began raising his family and became post commander of the American Legion. In 1981, his work moved him and his family to Las Vegas, Nev., where they enjoyed the desert lifestyle: no bugs or snow, and plenty of “dry” heat. He was an electronics engineer his entire life and retired from Raytheon after working many years at the Nevada Test Site - though never permitted to elaborate on the nature of that work. Tom enjoyed hunting for rocks, minerals, and Indian arrowheads, and was an avid scuba diver and archer, as well as a bit of a numismatist. But above all, he enjoyed designing and figuring things out: crossword puzzles, replica kit-cars, metal detectors, “fun boxes” with blinking lights, bells and whistles to entertain his kids (and grandkids), and a lighted clock based on the More Obituaries, Page 7A

hexi-decimal numbering system. After his three children were grown and on their own, he and Marie divorced. He married Tilly Hyatt on January 29, 2005, and happily enjoyed his retired life with her. He will be missed dearly by all who knew him and will be remembered as fun-loving, intelligent, kind, generous, honest, hardworking, and always willing to help out however he could. Tom was preceded in death by his mother and father, Anna (Hardisky) and Joseph Hudak; and his first wife, Marie Hudak. Tom is survived by his wife, Tilly Hudak; son Thomas J. Hudak Jr.; daughters, Julianna Hudak and Lisa Wells; and son-in-law Ron Wells, all of Henderson/Las Vegas, Nev.; grandchildren, Jacob, Jessica and Jonathan Wells, Jenny Hudak and Amy Lasagna; seven stepchildren, Jack, Rhonda, Stanley, Bob, Gary, Sheri and Tommy; 20 step-grandchildren; one step-great-grandchild; and brothers, Joseph (Dallas), and Vince (Sweet Valley). As services were held in Nevada on June 23, 2011, please visit the Thomas J. Hudak page and photo album on DignityMemorial.com. Posted comments are greatly appreciated by Tom’s family and friends.

BUILDING TRUST The Times Leader strives to correct errors, clarify stories and update them promptly. Corrections will appear in this spot. If you have information to help us correct an inaccuracy or cover an issue more thoroughly, call the newsroom at 829-7242.

THE PROMO FOR THE LUZERNE COUNTY COUNCIL candidate forum published Saturday and Sunday states the event on Monday starts at 6 p.m. Doors open at 6; the forum runs from 7 to 9 p.m. A STORY THAT APPEARED on Page 1A in Saturday’s Times Leader contained conflicting information. The correct information about the proposed new science building was provided by Tim Gilmour, president of Wilkes University. Gilmour said the new building will have biology, chemistry, environmental engineering and earth sciences and the Institute for Energy and Environmental Research. In the Stark Learning Center, Gilmour said, Wilkes will have pharmacy, nursing and engineering programs. A LIST OF SAT SCORES for schools that students from Luzerne County attend was inadvertently omitted from a story on Page 1A in Saturday’s Times Leader. Below is the list of total math and verbal scores, based on data from the state Department of Education website: • Dallas High School, 1,047 • Crestwood High School, 1,019 • Greater Nanticoke Area High School, 993 • Wyoming Area Secondary Center, 987 • Northwest Area Middle/High School, 982 • James M. Coughlin High School, 976 • Hanover Area Junior/Senior High School, 962 • Lake-Lehman Junior/Senior High School, 961 • Pittston Area High School, 958 • Berwick Area Senior High School, 948 • Wyoming Valley West High School, 946 • Elmer L. Meyers High School, 941 • Hazleton Area High School, 907 • G.A.R. Memorial High School, 864

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Lottery summary Daily Number, Midday Sunday: 0-9-0 Monday: 7-1-6 Tuesday: 2-2-1 Wednesday: 2-4-4 Thursday: 9-5-2 Friday: 9-4-1 Saturday: 1-1-0 Big Four, Midday Sunday: 6-9-6-5 Monday: 9-9-6-3 Tuesday: 3-4-3-5 Wednesday: 4-8-6-1 Thursday: 0-1-5-1 Friday: 0-9-0-5 Saturday: 2-1-3-3 Quinto, Midday Sunday: 4-7-8-5-2 Monday: 9-4-3-3-4 (0-2-3-3-3, double draw) Tuesday: 4-7-1-2-0 Wednesday: 4-9-2-6-3 Thursday: 2-5-4-7-1 Friday: 6-9-7-8-3 Saturday: 4-1-0-1-5 Treasure Hunt Sunday: 04-06-18-19-22 Monday: 05-09-11-17-20 Tuesday: 02-05-07-29-30 Wednesday: 07-08-11-17-22 Thursday: 02-16-25-26-29 Friday: 02-04-23-24-30 Saturday: 09-17-19-26-29 Daily Number, 7 p.m. Sunday: 2-1-2 Monday: 5-3-7 Tuesday: 7-0-9 Wednesday: 8-4-8 Thursday: 7-4-8 Friday: 1-2-5 Saturday: 7-7-8 Big Four, 7 p.m. Sunday: 8-8-2-4 Monday: 7-0-4-1 Tuesday: 7-1-9-3 Wednesday: 5-2-7-3 Thursday: 7-9-0-3 Friday: 2-0-4-0 Saturday: 1-8-5-3 (3-3-4-7, double draw) Quinto, 7 p.m. Sunday: 4-6-1-8-4 Monday: 8-6-8-6-9 Tuesday: 4-3-5-7-7 Wednesday: 3-7-2-2-5 Thursday: 6-3-9-0-3 Friday: 5-1-1-0-4 Saturday: 4-9-7-3-9 Cash 5 Sunday: 07-13-21-23-40 Monday: 16-26-27-35-43 Tuesday: 10-13-27-39-40 Wednesday: 12-13-15-21-41 Thursday: 16-22-23-38-39 Friday: 08-15-23-35-40 Saturday: 05-12-13-20-27 Match 6 Lotto Monday: 19-21-25-26-29-37 Thursday: 02-23-31-33-40-41 Powerball Wednesday: 10-12-23-43-47 powerball: 18 powerplay: 03 Saturday: 05-10-24-38-43 powerball: 01 powerplay: 04 Mega Millions Tuesday: 23-34-38-44-56 Megaball: 27 Megaplier: 04 Friday: 13-35-42-45-54 Megaball: 26 Megaplier: 04

OBITUARIES Astolfi, Clara Bellarmino, Margaret Caboot, Dorothy Davis, Pearl Elgonitis, Joseph Graboske, Sandra Gullo, Vivian Hileman, George Hudak, Thomas Sr. Katona, Emil Major, Ruth Miscavage, Gertrude Myers, Bessie Sabulski, Charles Shuck, Julia Singer, Amelia Skrzysowski, Leonarda Wozinski, Carol Ann Page 2A, 7A

+(ISSN No. 0896-4084) USPS 499-710

Issue No. 2011-289 Newsroom

829-7242 jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 3A

LOCAL

I N

Commonwealth Medical College opens Scranton building

Science facility dedicated

By MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

SCRANTON – The Commonwealth Medical College has a new home in downtown Scranton. The college dedicated its $115-million Medical Sciences Building on Pine Street Saturday. “This building is wonderful. It represents so much,” Interim President and Dean Dr. Lois Nora said at the dedication ceremony. “It springs forth from solid foundations. It has already changed the landscape and it screams out proudly that TCMC is here and is pointing towards the future.” The 183,000-square-foot building, constructed on a 3-acre property for-

merly owned by the Scranton School District, is divided into two wings, one primarily housing classroom space and the other housing laboratories. It features a 250-seat auditorium and two 160-seat lecture halls, 24 smallgroup teaching rooms, 35 medical research laboratories and a clinical skills and simulation center where students can practice their diagnosis skills in a simulated hospital setting. The building broke ground in 2009, the same year the medical school opened in space borrowed from Lackawanna College. Former state Sen. Robert Mellow, who helped obtain a $35 million state grant to start construction of the facility, said that in addition to bettering the

WILKES-BARRE

Brominski building reopens

health of area residents, the medical school will contribute to the economic revitalization of the surrounding community. “You’re looking at one facility in downtown Scranton,” Mellow said. “Twenty years from now there’s going to be plenty more facilities in downtown Scranton, and the person who’s really going to benefit from that is the mayor of Scranton, because in every place in this country where you have a medical school, you have a booming economy. You don’t need a medical school to have PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER a booming economy, but if you have a medical school, you will have a boom- TCMC Interim President and Dean, ing economy because of all that it brings Lois Nora, M.D., J.D., welcomes guests and dignitaries. with it.”

Casey backs lower rates for fed loans U.S. senator seeking reduced disaster relief loan interest rates for small businesses. By JONATHAN RISKIND Times Leader Washington Bureau

WASHINGTON – Sen. Bob Casey is joining the legislative push to lower interest rates on some federal disaster relief loans. In the wake of the recent storm-related flooding that swept through much of Northeastern Pennsylvania, Rep. Lou Barletta, R-Hazleton, proposed lowering disaster loan interest rates charged by the federal government. Casey, a Democrat from Scranton, Friday unveiled legislation aimed at helping small businesses recover after disasters. Casey’s bill would cap federal Small Business Administration disaster loan interest rates at 1 percent for businesses that do not have other available credit and 3 percent for businesses that do have access to other credit. His legislation also would apply retroactively to loans made nationwide since Hurricane Irene swept up the coast. “These residents have suffered an economic disaster and now a natural disaster,” Casey said in a statement. “We need to do everything we can to help them get back on their feet, reopen their businesses and start hiring again. This bill is a common-sense step to help our communities recover.” Casey in September wrote a letter to the SBA urging it to take action itself to lower interest rates, but that hasn’t happened yet. Barletta has introduced legislation to cap the rate of federal low-interest recovery loans for both small business owners and homeowners at one percent, across the board, with the one percent interest rate serving to pay the government’s administrative costs. Currently, homeowners pay up to 2.6 percent and small business owners from 4 percent to 6 percent on federal disaster recovery loans, depending on whether they have access to another type of loan. Barletta’s bill doesn’t currently make the one percent cap retroactive, but Barletta spokesman Shawn Kelly said Friday the lawmaker is working to add a clause to his legislation making the one percent interest rate “available to all victims of presidentially declared disasters” dating back to Jan. 1 2011. Barletta took to the House floor earlier this month to argue the case for his legislation. “This bill would not cause the government to spend any additional money. It would mean the federal government takes in less in interest from disaster recovery loans,” Barletta said. “But can anyone honestly say that providing disaster recovery loans for American homeowners and American businesses should be a moneymaking operation?” Casey also has addressed homeowners’ disaster recovery needs. He wrote Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner in September, asking the administration to grant Pennsylvania’s request to allow owners of low-income housing tax credit projects in the state to use vacant units to provide temporary housing to individuals forced from their homes in declared disaster areas.

PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

Above, visitors roam the Luzerne County Community College Alumni Association Fall Craft Festival on Saturday. Below, vendor Gail Hart of Vintage Gypsies in Mountain Top gets festive as she is decked out in witches costume.

In a world of crafts

LCCC Alumni Association holds fall show By CAMILLE FIOTI Times Leader Correspondent

NANTICOKE – More than 150 vendors from across the region displayed their wares at Luzerne County Community College’s 22nd annual Alumni Association Fall Craft Festival on Saturday. The event featured sweet treats made by the college’s pastry art students, food vendors, raffles, a custom car and truck show and children’s entertainment. Some of the unique items for sale included hand-turned wood and deer antler pens, melted wine bottles reshaped into cheese trays, silver cutlery repurposed into jewelry, and teacup birdfeeders. Lynn Elko, owner of Emma’s Friends Soaps and Lotions, carefully stacked

bars of fragrant hand-cut soap on a table. Her company is named after her daughter, Emma, who was born with multiple disabilities nine years ago. After Emma was born, Elko, of West Hazleton, said she began making soaps and other personal care items for her daughter’s therapists. Her hobby has since blossomed into a business that helps others with special needs. The soaps, lip balms and other products in the line are made by individuals with disabilities. Carrying a giant wooden snowman to her car, Theresa Parker of White Haven said she attends the craft fair every year. “I look forward to this all year,” she said. “This is my treat to myself, but I always spend too much.”

The sound of music and melodic voices of the Valley Wyoming Valley Harmony Society holds clinic for aspiring vocalists at Wesley Village community building.

The Wyoming Valley Harmony Society hosted a vocal clinic at Wesley Village in Jenkins Township on Saturday. ‘Sounds Abound Quartet’ performed. Members are Wayne Steele of Wyoming, left, Joe Husty of Wilkes-Barre, Tom Roberts of Kingston, and Drew Smith of West Pittston.

By CAMILLE FIOTI Times Leader Correspondent

PITTSTON – The soothing sounds of dozens of harmonizing male voices filled the air at Wesley Village Saturday during a vocal clinic sponsored by the Wyoming Valley Harmony Society. The clinic was open to men of all ages who wanted to become better singers, whether professionally or just in the shower. Many of the men in attendance are members of the society, a group of about 30 barbershop singers, who perform year-round for a number of public and private events. Bill Zdancewicz has been singing with the Wyoming Valley Harmony Society for more than 50 years. He recalled a time when his chorus sang for residents at a local nursing home. As he sang, he noticed an elderly woman in a wheelchair mouthing the words to the song. Later he learned that

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

the woman, who had been despondent for some time, had recognized the song and was trying to sing along. “It was so touching,” he said. “We enjoy what we do and we love to see how much they enjoy it too.” Drew Smith of West Pittston, who serves as president of the society, said a friend encouraged him to join years ago. Smith, who’s been a member for 23 years, said he’s having the time of his life. “It’s fun and it’s a

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great hobby, but I’m sad that I didn’t join 40 years ago,” he said. “I was working shift work and just could never find the time. Now I sing everywhere I can. I just can’t stop.” The Wyoming Valley Harmony Society will hold another vocal clinic on Saturday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Irene Raeder Community Building at Wesley Village. For more information, call (570) 6963385.

The Luzerne County Court of Common Pleas Domestic Relations Section, with the exception of the Master’s Division, will return to the Bernard J. Brominski building, 113 W. North Street, on Monday. The office was relocated to the Penn Place office building after the Brominski building was closed due to flooding on Sept. 8. The Orphans Court and the Domestic Relations Section’s Master’s Division will remain in their temporary location on the third floor of the Penn Place building, 20 N. Pennsylvania Blvd., Wilkes-Barre. WILKES-BARRE

Candidates forum is set

The Downtown Residents Association will host a forum Monday night so that voters can learn about the 28 candidates for Luzerne County Council. Organizer Pat Parks said the county council election is historic because of the change in form of government to home rule, eliminating commissioners and putting leadership and policy making in the hands of the Parks council and a hired manager. Parks, coordinator of the association, Eileen Kenyon and Judy Barr are serving as a three-person committee for the event set for the Henry Student Center, 84. W. South St., from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Candidates will arrive between 6 p.m. and 7 p.m. and the forum will begin at 7 p.m. and run until 9 p.m. The Times Leader is co-sponsoring the event. Wes Parks, Pat’s husband, will serve as moderator. Each candidate will be given 2 to 3 minutes to state their case why voters should choose them, Parks said. After the presentations, questions will be asked and each candidate will respond. Parking is available in the center’s parking loot. For more information, call 826-0410. WILKES-BARRE

Group stages Sterling rally

A half dozen protesters from the group Save Our Sterling staged a “Last Hope Rally” Saturday afternoon at the corner of West Market Street and River Street across from the crumbling Hotel Sterling. Organizers of the group, which has staged similar protests outside the hotel for the past year, said they recognize that the chance to save and restore the hotel has likely passed, as engineers have declared it a safety hazard and the city has marked it for demolition as soon as it can find a way to pay for it. But they staged the rally to point a finger at those who allowed the Sterling to deteriorate to its present condition. Protesters clutched placards reading “Corruption destroyed our Sterling” and “Thanks for nothing CityVest,” a reference to the building’s nonprofit owner, CityVest Corporation, which unsuccessfully sought to market the building for private redevelopment. HAZLETON

Alliance hosts cancer event

The Greater Hazleton Health Alliance will conduct its annual, "Food for the Fight-A Breast Cancer Survivor/ Awareness Event’’ (formerly known as "Food the Cure") on Thursdayat 6p.m. The free light fare dinner, and cooking demonstrations, will be held at the Hilltop Café, lower level, at the Hazleton General Hospital, 700 E. Broad St. The evening’s activities will also include an educational presentation and tricky trays in honor of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Food and eating recommendations for cancer patients, designed specifically for the side effects of cancer treatments and to build up a patient’s strength, will be given. A cancer patient’s nutrition recommendations are different because they are designed to help build up strength and help the patient withstand the effects of cancer and its treatment. The program is free but donations will be accepted and forwarded to the American Cancer Society in honor of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Reservations are required; to register, call 501-6204 by Tuesday.


CMYK SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

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KANSAS CITY, MO.

Bishop cited in porn case

he first U.S. bishop criminally charged with sheltering an abusive T clergyman has been accused of failing

to protect children after he and his diocese waited five months to tell police about hundreds of images of child pornography discovered on a priest’s computer, authorities said. Bishop Robert Finn and the Kansas City-St. Joseph Catholic Diocese have pleaded not guilty on one count each of failing to report suspected child abuse, officials said Friday. Prosecutor Jean Peters Baker said Finn and the diocese were required under state law to report the discovery to police because the images gave them reason to believe a child had been abused. Finn faces a maximum penalty of one year in jail and a $1,000 fine if convicted of the misdemeanor. The diocese also faces a $1,000 fine.

KABUL, AFGHANISTAN

Militants assault U.S. base

Militants tried to blast their way into an American base in eastern Afghanistan on Saturday, striking before dawn with rocket-propelled grenades and a car bomb. All four attackers were killed as well as two truck drivers parked nearby, said provincial Police Chief Gen. Mohammad Qasim Jangalbagh. Two Afghan security guards were wounded. The militants failed to breach the gate of the base in Panjshir province’s Rakha district, though they did hit a security tower with a rocket-propelled grenade. The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack in an AP text message.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 5A

High-profile airstrike kills al-Qaida members, including son of Anwar al-Awlaki. By HAMZA HENDAWI Associated Press

AP PHOTO

A Carabinieri (Italian paramilitary police) van is engulfed in flames after protesters set it on fire during clashes in Rome, Saturday.

Protests take violent turn in Rome By ALESSANDRA RIZZO and MEERA SELVA Associated Press

ROME — Italian riot police fired tear gas and water cannons Saturday in Rome as violent protesters hijacked a peaceful demonstration against corporate greed, smashing bank windows, torching cars and hurling bottles. Elsewhere, hundreds of thousands nicknamed “the indignant” marched without incident in cities across Europe, as the “Occupy Wall

Street” protests linked up with long-running demonstrations against European governments’ austerity measures. Heavy smoke billowed in downtown Rome as a small group broke away and wreaked havoc in streets close to the Colosseum in clashes that left about two dozen injured. Clad in black with their faces covered, protesters threw rocks, bottles and incendiary devices at banks and Rome police in riot gear.

With clubs and hammers, they destroyed bank ATMs, set trash bins on fire and assaulted at least two news crews from Sky Italia. Riot police charged the protesters repeatedly, firing water cannons and tear gas. More than 20 people were injured, according to news reports, including one man who tried to stop the protesters from throwing bottles. TV footage showed one young woman with blood covering her face.

SANAA, Yemen — The United States has raised the tempo in its war against al-Qaida in Yemen, killing nine of the terror group’s militants in the second, high-profile airstrike in as many weeks. The dead in the late Friday night strike included the son of Anwar al-Awlaki, the prominent American-Yemeni militant killed in a Sept. 30 strike. Yemeni officials on Saturday attributed the recent U.S. successes against al-Qaida to better intelligence from an army of Yemeni informers and cooperation with the Saudis, Washington’s longtime Arab allies. The successes come even as Yemen falls deeper into turmoil, with President Ali Abdullah Saleh clinging to power in the face of months of massive protests. Saturday saw the worst bloodshed in weeks in the capital, Sanaa: At least18 people were killed when Saleh’s troops fired on protesters and clashed with rivals. Witnesses estimated up to

300,000 people joined Saturday’s demonstrations, the largest in the capital in several months. “Everyone with interests in Yemen, including al-Qaida and the Americans, is raising the stakes at this time of uncertainty” said analyst Abdul-Bari Taher. “The Americans are wasting no time to try and eliminate the al-Qaida threat before the militants dig in deeper and cannot be easily dislodged.” Also dead in the Friday airstrike in the southeastern province of Shabwa was Egyptianborn Ibrahim al-Banna, identified by the nation’s Defense Ministry as the media chief of the Yemeni branch of the al-Qaida. Al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, as the branch is known, is considered by the U.S. the most dangerous of the terror network’s affiliates after it plotted two recent failed attacks on American soil. Its fighters and other Islamic militants have taken advantage of Yemen’s chaos to seize control of several cities and towns in a southern province.

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CMYK SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

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Cookoff winner is queen

Gerri Vickers’ family recipe crowned best of the mountain in annual chili competition. By B. GARRET ROGAN Times Leader Correspondent

MOUNTAIN TOP – The 4th Annual King of the Mountain Chili Cookoff at the Christ United Methodist Church crowned a queen this year as Gerri Vickers was judged to have made the best batch of chili. Last year, the event, organized by the Church’s Men’s Group, raised $400 for the Mountain Top Free Health Clinic at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church. Although Saturday’s weather may have hampered attendance, the group still hopes to raise around $300 in donations this year. Contestants had to contribute a $10 entry fee while tasters donated $5. “I consider chili to be a staple American food for fall weather,” said Dwayne Sherksnas of Mountain Top, one of the event’s principal organizers. Sherksnas, who placed fourth for his entry, pointed out that chili started as a food of convenience for Texas cowboys running cattle but has evolved into a national comfort food. He roughly follows the same

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Mark Velehoski starts at one end of the chili line and will eat his way through each dish to decide whose chili he likes best.

recipe each time he makes his chili but adjusts it according to taste so that it comes out different each time. “The hottest chili is not the best chili,” he said. He instead looks for a certain balance of spices and heat. Vickers, also of Mountain Top, said that she looks for a gentle and pleasing aftertaste. “Something that stays with you,” she said. She won using a family recipe that she learned from her grand-

mother. She was surprised to have received the most votes. She was undecided whether to attend this year’s event due to the passing of her father-in-law, Cesco Omer Vickers Jr., who died earlier in the week at the age of 80. David Coates, also of Mountain Top, placed second with his chili. “I look for a certain blend of sweet and hot,” he said. “I like to go beyond the norm,” Coates said. To sweeten his chili this year, he added carrots, buckwheat honey and raisins.

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POLICE BLOTTER ASHLEY – State police said a man showed the handle of a revolver tucked in the waistband of his pants and robbed the S&J Grocery & Deli on Ashley Street around 8:45 p.m. Saturday. The man grabbed an undetermined amount of money from the cash register and fled on foot. The gunman was described as white, between 5-foot-8 and 5-foot-10 in height and weighing approximately 180 pounds. He wore a black hooded top and had a dark blue bandana partially covering his face. Anyone with information about the armed robbery is asked to contact state police in Wyoming at 570 697-2000. WILKES-BARRE – City police reported the following: • Nicholas Biros, 23, will be charged with simple assault and resisting arrest after he allegedly punched a police officer who responded to a domestic disturbance call Friday night at 32 McFarland St. Police said Biros refused to comply with police orders to stop acting disorderly and had to be subdued. He was taken for a mental health evaluation. • Police arrested and charged James Monroe, 38, of South Franklin Street, with driving under the influence Saturday. Police said they found Monroe

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com sleeping at the wheel of his vehicle at the traffic light at the intersection of South Main Street and Blackman Street at 1:44 a.m. A breath test found his blood alcohol level to be above the legal limit of .08 percent, police said. • Police arrested and charged Hector Adrian Reyes-Garcia, 36, of Hanover Township, on driving under the influence charges Friday, police said. Police said they stopped Reyes-Garcia at the intersection of South Franklin and Horton streets after he was allegedly observed committing traffic violations. A breath test found his blood alcohol level to be above the legal limit of .08 percent, police said. Police said Reyes-Garcia had a 3-year-old passenger in the car, who was turned over to a responsible sober adult. Police said they checked with the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency because Reyes-Garcia was unable to produce local identification. The check resulted in ReyesGarcia being detained relative to deportation proceedings, police said. • Matthew Cienciva of Old East Road said he was fixing his car at the corner of South Welles Street and Rose Lane at 9:09 p.m. Friday when two black males approached him, showed handguns and demanded money. Cienciva said he handed over cash and prescrip-

tion drugs and the men fled the scene. Police said investigation is continuing. • Khalif Wiggins was arrested Thursday on a warrant for an alleged burglary and home invasion in Plymouth. Wiggins was taken into custody at apartment 420 of building 308 in the Sherman Hills apartment complex. He was in possession of crack cocaine and other charges are pending, police said. HANOVER TWP. – Township police reported the following: • Heather Tolodzieski, 21, of Apollo Circle, Nanticoke, was arrested Friday on a charge of retail theft. Employees of the Gerrity’s Supermarket on the Sans Souci Parkway saw her take $89 in food from the store without paying for the items. She was arraigned by District Judge Diana Malast in Plains Township and released on $5,000 bail. Tolodzieski has a preliminary hearing before District Judge Joseph Halesey in Hanover Township at 9:30 a.m. on Tuesday. • Charges are pending against Conway Taltoan, 40, of Hazle Street, in connection with the assault of Cindy Sincavage, 28, of Grove Street, Pringle. Sincavage said she was visiting a friend in the 400 block of Marion Terrace apartments around 1 a.m. Friday when the assault occurred. Charges will be filed against Taltoan pending the outcome of Sincavage’s medical records.

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com RUTH A. MAJOR, 97, a former resident of Kingston, died Friday, October 14, 2011, in Lewisburg. She was born in Wilkes-Barre, a daughter of the late Robert and Freda Christensen Fraley, and was a graduate of James M. Coughlin High School, class of 1932, WilkesBarre. She was preceded in death by her brother, Arthur Fraley; and sisters, Florence Howe and Irene Williams. Surviving are her children, Dr. Ruth F. Major, Pocono Pines, and Robert L. Major and his wife, Georgie, South Williamsport; and several nieces and nephews. A private funeral will be held from the H. Merritt Hughes Funeral Home Inc., 451 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, at the convenience of the family. Interment will be held in the Fern Knoll Burial Park, Dallas. There will be no public calling hours. CLARA ‘FIFI’ ASTOLFI, 90, of Old Forge, died Saturday, October 15, 2011. Born in Peckville, on August 22,1921, she was the daughter of the late Louis and Elvira Calibani. She was preceded in death by husband Louis A. Astolfi Sr.; brothers, Albert and Eugene Calibani; sister, Dora Coombs; and daughter-in-law, Ellen Astolfi. She is survived by sons, James Astolfi and Louis Astolfi Jr.; sister, Elsie Piersomoni; grandchildren, Cheryl Burger, Linda Astolfi, Melissa Astolfi-Lewis and Louis Astolfi; and great-grandchildren. Funeral services will be at 9:15 a.m. Wednesday in the Thomas P. Kearney Funeral Home Inc., Old Forge, with a10 a.m. Mass of Christian Burial in St. Mary’s of the Assumption R.C. Church, Old Forge. Interment will follow in Fairview Memorial Park in Elmhurst. Relatives and friends may pay their respects from 5 to 8 p.m. Tuesday at the funeral home. DOROTHY L. CABOOT, died Friday, October 14, 2011, in Scranton. She was preceded in death by her husband, Frank Caboot. Born in Dunmore, on December 5, 1920, she was a daughter of the late Edward and Martha Martin Mickel. Dorothy was educated at Dunmore High School. A sister, Elba Bittner, preceded her in death. She is survived by sons, Gary Caboot and wife, Darlene, of York; Blair Caboot and wife, Betty, of Clarks Summit, and Blain Caboot and wife, Shirl of Moosic; grandchildren, Major Jason B. Caboot, M.D., and wife, Rebecca; Jody Wickenheiser and husband, Ryan; attorney Ryan Caboot and wife, Barbara, and Marissa Barry and husband, Erik; great-grandchildren; several nieces and a cousin. Private funeral services will be conducted Monday at the Thomas P. Kearney Funeral Home, Old Forge. Interment will follow at Salem Cemetery in Hamlin. PEARL A. DAVIS, of Pittston, passed away Thursday, October 13, 2011, in Highland Manor Nursing Center, Exeter. She was born in Moosic, November 27, 1922, a daughter of the late William and Nettie Seig Hoover. She was preceded in death by her husband William Davis; and a daughter Jane Ann Davis. She is survived by nieces and nephews. A memorial service will be held at a time to be announced. Arrangements are by the Howell-Lussi Funeral Home, West Pitttson. BESSIE C. MYERS, 96, of Lancaster, died Wednesday, October 12, 2011, at Conestoga View, Lancaster. Born June 9, 1915, in Moosic, she was a daughter of the late Edward and Ethel Mae “Nanny” (Topp) Cooney. She is survived by a daughter, Sallie M. and husband, Edmund F. Domboski, Lancaster; a son, Kenneth Jay Myers and wife, Judith, Williamsport; and three sisters, Margaret Bellarmino and Frances Hartnett, both of Scranton, and Evelyn Poli, Troy, Ohio. Funeral services for both Bessie and her beloved sister, Margaret “Mollie” Bellarmino, who passed away October 12, 2011, will be conducted at 11 a.m. Tuesday in the Thomas P. Kearney Funeral Home Inc., 517 N. Main St., Old Forge. Interment will follow in the Langcliffe Cemetery, Avoca. Relatives and friends may pay their respects from 10 to 11 a.m. Tuesday at the funeral home. MARGARET COONEY BELLARMINO, 99, died Wednesday, October 12, 2011, at Moses Taylor Hospital. She was preceded in death by husbands, Francis Walsh and Dr. Francis Bellarmino. She was also preceded in death by a sister, Bessie Myers; and three brothers, James, Joseph and Kenneth Cooney. Born in Moosic, she was a daughter of the late Edward J. and Ethel Mae Topp Cooney. Surviving are two sisters, Frances Hartnett, Scranton, and Evelyn Poli, Troy, Ohio. Funeral services will be conducted at 11 a.m. Tuesday by the Rev. Dr. Tom H. Collins, Pastor, Hickory Street Presbyterian Church, in the Thomas P. Funeral Home Inc., 517 N. Main St., Old Forge. Interment will follow in the Langcliffe Cemetery, Avoca. Relatives and friends may pay their respects from 10 to 11 a.m. Tuesday.

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Gertrude H. Miscavage

Carol Ann Wozinski

October 14, 2011

October 14, 2011

Friday, October 14, 2011, at the Mercy Center Nursing Unit, Dallas. Gertrude was born in the Mayflower section of Wilkes-Barre on November 13, 1919, a daughter of the late Frank and Katherine Klein Witzigman. She was a graduate of St. Nicholas High School and was a member of St. Nicholas Church, South Washington Street, WilkesBarre, and its Altar and Rosary Society. Gertrude was employed as a seamstress at L.A. Dress and Harris Hogan in Wilkes-Barre. She enjoyed going to ceramics with her daughter and crocheting afghans for family members. She loved doing crossword puzzles, watching sports and, above all else, spending time with her family. She was so proud of them all and especially looked forward to visits from her grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Gertrude touched the lives of everyone she met, becoming a mother figure, and offering kind words of support and encouragement. She lived her life with grace and dignity; her life was an example of how to treat others. She was a genuine and compassionate woman who always was there with an open heart. She was preceded in death by her husband, Alexander C. Miscavage; by her brother, Frederick Witzigman; and by sisters, Frances Eckert, Margaret Wilsch, Elizabeth Gildea, Catherine Baran and Ruth Keller. Gertrude is survived by her children, Geraldine Conrad and her husband, Raymond, Dallas; Richard Miscavage and his wife, Denise, Lehman Township, and Paula Miscavage, Dallas; grandchildren, Ray Conrad Jr., and his wife, Cathy; Shawn Conrad and his wife, Susan; Sherri Matus and her husband, Jus-

tin; Stacie Adamski and her husband, David; Jason Miscavage and his wife, Maura; Isaiah Miscavage, Marissa Miscavage and Jeffrey Buscher. She is also survived by a brother, Harold Witzigman, New Jersey; as well as many nieces and nephews. Our family would like to extend our most heartfelt thanks and appreciation to the entire staff of the Mercy Center Nursing Unit for the love and care they provided to our mother. Gertrude will be remembered by those who knew and loved her as being a loving and caring mother, grandmother, great-grandmother and aunt; as well as a great friend to all who knew her. She will be sadly missed. Funeral services will be held at 9 a.m. Tuesday from the Nat & Gawlas Funeral Home, 89 Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre, with a funeral Mass at 9:30 a.m. in St. Nicholas Church, 226 S. Washington St., WilkesBarre. Interment will be in Mount Greenwood Cemetery, Shavertown. Friends may call from 5 to 8 p.m. Monday at the funeral home. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the “Women with Children Program,” in care of Misericordia University, 301 Lake St., Dallas, PA 18612.

Eternal Life Friday evening, October 14, 2011, in the Wilkes-Barre General Hospital following a brief illness. Born September 22, 1940, in Wilkes-Barre, she was a daughter of the late Henry F. and Ann Cecilia (Roddick) Nied. Educated in the area schools, she was a graduate of the former Central Catholic High School, class of 1958. Associated with her family business most of her life, she and her husband, Mr. Albin F. Wozinski, owned and operated Nied Auto Supply on the Sans Souci Parkway, retiring in 1999. The couple recently celebrated 45 years of married life on September 17, 2011. She was a member of Holy Spirit Parish/Saint Martha’s Roman Catholic Church, Stillwater. Active in parish affairs, Mrs. Wozinski was a member of the Lady’s Club and also formerly taught religious education classes at Saint Martha’s. She is remembered by family and friends as being a loving wife, mother, grandmother and friend to all who knew and loved her. She was also an avid “Bunco” player. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Wozinski was preceded in death by an infant sister, Judith, and a brother; Henry “Hank” Nied. Surviving, besides her husband, Albin, at home, are sons, Mark D. and his wife, Francine, Mountain Top; Tony M., at home; Vincent R. and his wife, Christine, Shickshinny Lake; Daniel M. and his wife, Suzanne Klein, New Providence, N.J., and Patrick A. of Bellefonte; be-

October 13, 2011 eorge Hileman, 87, of Sylvania Township, Ohio, passed away G Thursday, October 13, 2011, at the

Hospice of Northwest Ohio, Perrysburg. He was a proud 1948 graduate of Penn State University. George was employed as a Professional Engineer with the Babcock and Wilcox Corporation for 35 years and then joined Keeler Dorr Oliver of Williamsport, where he retired in 1988. A very spiritual individual, embracing the Presbyterian Faith, George served on the National Presbytery for five years. He was a Church Elder for more than 50 years and a Sunday School Teacher. George also served as church Building and Grounds Chairmen as well as Chairman of the Worship Committee during his life of service to the church. He especially enjoyed the Men’s Bible Study Group at Christ Presbyterian Church. Not just limiting his time to church service, George found time to serve on the Rittman, Ohio, and Williamsport Planning Commissions. George was also a dedicated volunteer with Habitat for Humanity for 17 years. He was preceded in death by his loving wife of 59 years, Beverly L. Hileman; and his brothers, David and Floyd Hileman. George is survived by sons, Donald P. (Elizabeth) and James S. (Sharon) Hileman; six grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; and his sister, Mary Williams of Wyom-

ing.

George’s life will be celebrated at the Christ Presbyterian Church at 10 a.m. Monday. He will be laid to rest, with Military Honors, at the Ohio Western Reserve National Cemetery, Rittman, Ohio. George’s family would like to thank the staff of Flower Hospital’s Cardiac and Pulmonary Rehabilitation Unit, everyone at the Hospice of Northwest Ohio, and especially Pastors Tom Schwartz and Cheryl Nutting, for their commitment to care and spiritual support for George. Those wishing to make a donation in George’s memory may wish to consider, in lieu of flowers, a contribution to Hospice of Northwest Ohio. Professional services were provided by the Reeb Funeral Home, Sylvania, Ohio, where online condolences may be offered at www.reebfuneralhome.com.

Leonarda M. Skrzysowski October 15, 2011 M. Skrzysowski, of DuL eonarda pont, passed away Saturday

morning, October 15, 2011, at her home. She and her husband, Felix J. Skrzysowski, celebrated their 62nd wedding anniversary on November 13, 2010. Born in Dupont, she was a daughter of the late Edward and Mary Boyanowski Smichowski. She was a graduate of Dupont High School, class of 1946. Prior to retirement, she worked as a seamstress in the garment industry and was a member of the ILGWU. She was a member of Sacred Heart of Jesus Church, Dupont, and its Women’s Society. She was preceded in death by her two sisters, Steffie Nicholas and Evelyn Szumski. Also surviving are her daughter Felicia Luckasavage and her husband, John, Dupont; brother, Edward Smichowski, Dupont; grandchildren, John Luckasavage and his wife, Lynne, and their daughter, Hailey, and James Luckasavage and his wife, Brandi; and several nieces and nephews. The funeral will be at 9:15 a.m. Tuesday from the Baloga Funeral Home Inc., 1201 Main St., Pittston (Port Griffith), with a Mass of Chris-

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tian Burial at 10 a.m. in Sacred Heart of Jesus Church, Lackawanna Avenue, Dupont, with the Rev. Joseph D. Verespy officiating. Interment will be in Sacred Heart of Jesus Cemetery, Dupont. Relatives and friends may pay their respects from 5 to 8 p.m. Monday at the funeral home, with the Women’s Society of Sacred Heart of Jesus Church reciting the rosary at 6 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Sacred Heart of Jesus Church, 215 Lackawanna Ave., Dupont, PA 18641. For directions or to send an online condolence, please visit www.balogafuneralhome.com.

loved grandchildren, including Amanda, Carissa, Maxwell and Christopher; as well as several nieces and nephews. Funeral services for Mrs. Wozinski will be conducted at 9:45 a.m. Tuesday from the Clarke Piatt Funeral Home, 6 Sunset Lake Road, Hunlock Creek, followed by a funeral Mass at 10:30 a.m. in the Saint Martha worship site of Holy Spirit Parish, with the Rev. Maria Savari Thumma, parochial vicar, officiating. Interment will be in the parish cemetery, Stillwater. Relatives and friends may join her family for visitation and remembrances from 4 to 7 p.m. Monday at the funeral home. In lieu of floral tributes, memorial contributions may be made in Carol Ann’s memory to Holy Spirit Parish, 150 Main St., Mocanaqua, PA 18655-1599. The John V. Morris Family is honored to care for Mrs. Wozinski, her husband and family at this time. To send online words of comfort, please visit our website at www.JohnVMorrisFuneralHomes.com.

Julia H. Shuck

George Hileman

October 14, 2011

October 13, 2011

T. Gullo, 83, of EdwardsV ivian ville, died peacefully Thursday,

Judy was preceded in death by her beloved husband, Sherman Mason Shuck; and three brothers and three sisters. She is survived by her daughter Jane and son-in-law, Robert Gonos, of Glen Summit; granddaughter Katie and husband, Steve Adkins, of Valdosta, Ga.; grandson John Gonos and grandson James Gonos. A memorial service conducted by Chaplain Joseph Rafferty will be held at 11:30 a.m. Monday from The McCune Funeral Home, 80 S. Mountain Blvd., Mountain Top.

FUNERALS ADAMS-EVANS – Jule, memorial services 11 a.m. Saturday. Friends may call 10:30 a.m. at the Nebo Baptist Church, 75 S. Prospect St., Nanticoke, 570-735-3932. BALENT – Eugenia, funeral 9 a.m. Monday from the Kizis-Lokuta Funeral Home, 134 Church St., Pittston. Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. at St. Cecilia’s Church, Wyoming Avenue, Exeter. Friends may call 4 to 7 p.m. today at the funeral home. BROJAKOWSKI – Phyllis, Mass of Christian Burial 10:30 a.m. Saturday in St. Mary’s Church, Nanticoke. Friends may call at the church at 9:30 a.m. prior to Mass. CAIN – Marlene, funeral 9:30 a.m. Monday from Davis-Dinelli Funeral Home, 170 E. Broad St., Nanticoke. Concelebrated Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in St. Faustina Parish/St. Mary of Czestochowa Church, South Hanover Street, Nanticoke. Friends may call 5 to 7 p.m. today at the funeral home. CUNDIFF – Richard, memorial service 11:30 a.m. today at the Nulton Funeral Home Inc., SR 309, Beaumont. Friends may call 10:30 a.m. until the time of service today. KEATING – James, funeral 9:15 a.m. Monday from the Mamary-Durkin Funeral Services, 59 Parrish St., Wilkes-Barre. Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in All Saints Parish, Plymouth. Friends may call at the funeral home from 4 to 7 p.m. today. KURLANSKI – Anna, funeral 10 a.m. Monday from the Simon S. Russin Funeral Home, 136 Maffett St., Plains Township. Mass of Christian Burial at 10:30 a.m. in the Parish of St. Benedict, 155 Austin Ave., Parsons. Friends may call 9

M .J. JUD G E

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harles Sabulski, 83, passed away Friday, October 14, 2011, at the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Plains Township. Born March 7, 1928, in WilkesBarre, he was a son of the late Peter and Catherine Liscosky Sabulski. He attended G.A.R. High School, Wilkes-Barre, and was a U.S. Navy veteran of World War II. Charles was a self-employed contractor for over 60 years, and he was employed as a maintenance person at Citizens Bank, Wilkes-Barre, for seven years, retiring in 1995. Charles was a member of the former Holy Trinity Church, WilkesBarre, before becoming ill. He was an avid coin collector and enjoyed gardening and antiquing in the New England area. He loved and enjoyed his grandchildren and watching the changing of the four seasons. Charles was preceded in death by brothers, George, Anthony and Joseph; and sisters, Mary Sabulski, Margaret Steininger, Anna Steininger, Helen Mauro, Mildred Zupkof, Frances Salek and Catherine Borum. Charles will be sadly missed by his wife, the former Nancy Lines; sons, Charles and his wife, Linda, Mechanicsburg, and Peter and his wife, Karen, Wilkes-Barre Township; daughters, Catherine, Wilkes-Barre, and Nancy Ellen, Wilkes-Barre; five grandchildren and three great-grandchildren; a sister, Adeline and her husband, Hans Salvesen; as well as numerous nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be held at 7 p.m. Monday at the Jendrzejewski Funeral Home, 21 N. Meade St., Wilkes-Barre, with the Rev. John S. Terry, pastor of Our Lady of Hope Parish, officiating. Private interment will be at the convenience of the family. Friends may call from 4 to 7 p.m. Monday.

Vivian T. Gullo

O

n Friday evening, October 14, 2011, Julia H. “Judy” Shuck, 93, passed away at Mountain Top Senior Care with her daughter and son-in-law at her side. Julia was born March 16, 1918, in Milden, Saskatchewan, Canada. She was a daughter of the late Ida Milberry Hersberger and Thomas S. Hersberger. Due to the untimely death of her mother, Judy went to live with her Aunt Julia in Rockville, Md., where she graduated high school. She then went on to receive her Registered Nurse degree from the Church Home and Infirmary, at that time a division of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Judy worked at Women’s Hospital, Union Memorial Hospital and Greater Baltimore Medical Center as a staff nurse and as a private duty nurse for many years. She also was a loving mother and superb homemaker. A member of the Roland Park Garden Club, Judy had a passion for flowers and spent hours tending her plants in the yard. After retirement she enjoyed travel with her friends.

October 14, 2011

C

Ann (Nied) Wozinski, 71, of C arol Shickshinny Lake, passed into

ertrude H. Miscavage, 91, of G Dallas and formerly of Hutson Street in Wilkes-Barre, passed away

Charles Sabulski

to 10 a.m. Monday. MADAY – Leonard, memorial Mass 11 a.m. Saturday in the Exaltation of the Holy Cross Church, 420 Main Road, Hanover Township. Friends may call at the church beginning at 9:30 a.m. SAIDMAN – Marilyn, funeral noon today in the Rosenberg Funeral Chapel, 348 S. River St., WilkesBarre. SLUSHER – William, funeral 10 a.m. Monday with a Mass of Christian Burial in Holy Trinity Church, Swoyersville. STALLONE – Marie, Mass of Christian Burial 10 a.m. Monday in St. Mary of the Assumption Church at Prince of Peace Parish, West Grace and Lawrence streets, Old Forge. The family requests people proceed directly to the church. Friends may call 4 to 7 p.m. today in the Victor M. Ferri Funeral Home, 522 Fallon St., Old Forge. STONER – Edward, funeral 10:30 a.m. Tuesday at Gate of Heaven Church, 40 Machell Ave., Dallas, where friends may call after 9:30 a.m. at the church. VICKERS – Cesco Jr., funeral 10 a.m. Monday at Christ United Methodist Church, 175 S. Main Road, Mountain Top. Friends may call 5:30 to 7 p.m. today at the church. WARD – Henry, memorial service 11:30 a.m. Saturday at First Presbyterian Church, 97 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. Family will receive friends from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. in the church. WILLIAMS – Arvet, memorial service 2 p.m. Tuesday at the Salvation Army Kirby House, 17 S. Pennsylvania Ave., Wilkes-Barre.

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October 13, 2011. He was born December 18, 1927, in Edwardsville, a son of the late Dominic and Mary Trovato Gullo. He was a graduate of Edwardsville High School, and a 1952 graduate of King’s College with a bachelor’s degree in accounting. He was formerly employed by International Harvester Corporation, retiring after 30 years as office manager and accountant. He also retired from the U.S. Naval Reserves after 42 years as chief petty officer (yeoman). Mr. Gullo served as past president, vice president and member of the Wyoming Valley West School Board. He was involved with the Catholic War Veterans St. Joseph Post 752 of Edwardsville for many years and served as past president. He was preceded in death by his brother, Anthony Gullo; and sisters, Ann Hoyson and Mary Gullo. He is survived by his wife, the former Marie Meholick; four children, Ann Marie Gullo, Larksville; Thomas Gullo and wife, Robin, Parker, Colo.; Mary Olevian and husband, David, Larksville, and Janine Gullo, Edwardsville; and five grandchildren, Dane Olevian, Nicole Jones, Madisyn, McKenzie and Mason Gullo. Funeral services will be at 10 a.m. Wednesday from the Kopicki Funeral Home, 263 Zerbey Ave., Kingston, with a Mass of Christian Burial at 10:30 a.m. in St. Ignatius Church, Kingston. Interment will be in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Hanover Township. Friends may call from 5 to 8 p.m. Tuesday at the funeral home. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Hospice of the Sacred Heart, 600 Baltimore Dr., WilkesBarre, PA 18702, or www.hospicesacredheart.org.

OBITUARY POLICY The Times Leader publishes free obituaries, which have a 27-line limit, and paid obituaries, which can run with a photograph. A funeral home representative can call the obituary desk at (570) 829-7224, send a fax to (570) 829-5537 or e-mail to tlobits@timesleader.com. If you fax or e-mail, please call to confirm. Obituaries must be submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Obituaries must be sent by a funeral home or crematory, or must name who is handling arrangements, with address and phone number. We discourage handwritten notices; they incur a $15 typing fee. More Obituaries, Page 2A

The family of the late

Virginia R. Myers

“Ginny” is holding a celebration of Ginny’s life on November 6, 2011 at 10:30 a.m. at the Irem Temple Country Club. A brunch will be served. Please call 434-974-9786 if you plan to attend.


CMYK PAGE 8A

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Report: King’s spends most money on public service “If people buy a car they do a lot of research. People buy an education once in a lifetime. The more information they have, the better.”

vice. This should come as no Delta Costs Project noted surprise. Wilkes had biggest increase in Former King’s president, the graduation rate 2004-2009. Rev. Thomas O’Hara, believed it

By MARK GUYDISH mguydish@timesleader.com

While a new report shows local college students are bearing a bigger chunk of the total cost for their education, the Delta Costs Project collects and analyzes a mother lode of information comparing colleges and universities. Mining that lode shows most area institutions have something to crow about. For example, from 2004 to 2009, King’s College saw the biggest increase, percentagewise, in spending on public ser-

TUITION

was a critical part of a complete education. During his tenure the school launched a Hispanic outreach program and opened the Shoval Center for Community Engagement and Learning. O’Hara’s successor, the Rev. John Ryan, holds the same conviction. Last Tuesday King’s announced a new program to have college students mentor non-violent juvenile offenders. “We couldn’t get a grant for that, but we’re going to go ahead with it.” Ryan said. “If we’re going to err, we’re going to err on the side of public service.” Wilkes University had the bigment among schools more accurate -- rose here from 8.6 percent at LCCC to 28.8 percent at Wilkes.

Continued from Page 1A

cent. • This occurred even as total spending on “education and related” services dropped, from $10,850 per pupil to $9,526. • Other local institutions saw a similar pattern, though in smaller increments. At Wilkes University, the student share of total cost climbed from 83.5 percent to 87.4 percent; at King’s College it went from 75.1 percent to 87.8 percent -- the biggest jump locally other than LCCC; at Misericordia University it rose from 86 percent to 92.2 percent. The average subsidy dropped in every local school as well. • As with LCCC, most local institutions raised tuition while cutting spending on education and related services, with decreases ranging from 1.4 percent at Wilkes to 6.3 percent at King’s. Misericordia was the lone local exception, increasing E&R spending per pupil by 4.3 percent. • All of this happened as colleges and universities both nationally and locally saw enrollment boom. Total enrollment here increased by anywhere from 6.1 percent at LCCC to 34.4 percent at Wilkes. “Full-Time Equivalent” enrollment -- a measure that tries to make comparison of full-time and part-time enroll-

‘Paying more for less’ “Almost everywhere, rising student tuition revenues did not translate into greater education and related spending, so students were paying for more while institutions were subsidizing less,” the authors of the Delta Project report wrote. “This gap between prices and spending raises troubling questions about the sustainability of the funding model for the future and is the source of growing public and policy critiques of higher education.” LCCC offers only two-year (or even shorter) programs and handles a high rate of part-time and non-traditional (adult) students, many working toward trades like plumbing they can’t learn at traditional four-year institutions. So sizing it up against private fouryear and master’s degree colleges is a bit like comparing grapes to watermelons – they all may be institutions of higher learning with classrooms, instructors and students, but that’s where most similarities end.

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gest increase in graduation rate among area colleges from 2004 to 2009. It also had the smallest per pupil tuition increase in that time, and the smallest decrease in subsidies for students. Wilkes spokeswoman Vicki Mayk credited those trends to a focus on shifting “resources from administrative areas to our faculty and students.” In particular, she cited the

new “one-stop operation for student services,” a consolidation of financial aid, student records and other administrative functions. Mayk noted the improvements came at a time of rapid enrollment growth. Wilkes was recently listed as one of the fastest growing institutions in the region by The Chronicle of Higher Education, a claim sup-

doesn’t fare well in some key measures. It had the biggest drop, percentage-wise, in subsidies and the second-biggest increase in net tuition while cutting instruction spending more than any of the others, according to Delta Project data. LCCC President Tom Leary said he was surprised when he saw the Delta Project data analyzed by The Times Leader. “We held the line on tuition for two consecutive years,” Leary said. “We might be one of the very few colleges in the state that did that. I know we’re the only community college in the state to do that.”

Accounting changes Those two years would have occurred after the 2009 data available from the Delta Project website. But Leary also said he believes LCCC’s apparent spike in student share of total cost may be a matter of accounting changes. “I asked my finance people to analyze this,” Leary said. “They found that there were different variables included in the 2004 report that were not included in the 2009 report.” More exactly, he explained, data related to depreciation and federal grants were shifted under dif-

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ported by Delta Project data. In the five-year period reviewed, total enrollment climbed by 34 percent. Misericordia University was the only area institution that increased – rather than decreased – the amount spent per pupil on education and related services. The increase from 2004 to 2009 was modest – 4.3 percent – but still unusual. President Michael MacDowell said judicious enrollment growth helped make that possible. “If you keep costs essentially the same and grow the student body, there are more tuitionpaying students, and so the cost per student is lower,” MacDowell said. The news isn’t all good. As at LCCC, students at King’s, Mi-

sericordia and Wilkes are paying a larger share of the total cost than they did in 2004. And all local colleges cut the money spent per pupil on operations and maintenance, though Ryan, MacDowell, Mayk and LCCC President Tom Leary all insisted those cuts did not come at the expense of necessary upkeep. Ryan and others noted the wealth of data helps keep colleges accountable, even as they compete for students by trying to provide modern, attractive amenities. “If people buy a car they do a lot of research. People buy an education once in a lifetime,” MacDowell said. “The more information they have, the better.”

ferent bookkeeping categories from 2009 on. This occurred because of changes in rules promulgated by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board, an independent agency that sets the way government-funded entities do their books. GASB rules do not have the force of law, but auditors look for compliance to GASB, and failure to comply can lead to a loss of state and federal funding. Leary said changes made for 2009 to comply with new GASB rules shifted several million dollars that had been counted toward instruction costs. This could account for the sharp

changes in Delta Project Data, which is derived from information LCCC annually provides to the federal government through the “Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System,” or IPEDS. “If we calculate using the same variables from 2004 to 2009,” Leary said, “there is no decrease in investment per pupil.” Likewise, he added, the student share of total cost remains the same – or drops slightly. The Delta Project report – titled “Trends in College Spending, 1999-2009” – says “AdjustSee TUITION, Page 9A

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Union Township will host concert for flood victims By MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

A Wyoming Valley community fortunate enough to have been spared by the September flooding is reaching out to its neighbors in need, and inviting you to lend a hand, too. The Union Township Supervi-

PUBLIC RECORDS

sors announced Saturday they will host a benefit concert and dance Nov. 18 at the Genetti Hotel and Conference Center in Wilkes-Barre and will donate all proceeds to the American Red Cross and The Salvation Army, organizations that have provided sustained relief to flood victims. Board of Supervisors Vice Chairman Ed Raineri said organizing the concert is the least the board can do, given how hard neighboring Shickshinny and nearby communities such as Plymouth and Blooms-

• William Steven Weinstein and Marguerite Agnes McCunney • Michael C. Fino and DeDivorces sought and filed nise Guiliano in the Luzerne County • Scott T. Miller and Susan Prothonotary’s Office from Claire Lawson Oct. 10 to 13, 2011: • Brian S. Rose and Marie • Robin A. Antosh, MounM. Sutherland tain Top, and Kevin A. An• Manuel Joseph Menentosh, Mountain Top dez and Mildred Jane Da• Quincy Michael Morton, lessandro Wilkes-Barre, and Sera J. • Eric R. Seamans and Morton, Fairbanks, Alaska Rachael Christina Card • Janelle Lynn Kuhl, Plains • Jason Paul Blair and Township, and Raymont Kuhl Cheryl Jane Bagi Jr., Kingston • John Edward Shaw and • Valerie Ann Zelinsky, Sarah Ann Radazvicz Kingston, and Thomas J. • Jeremy Mitkowski and Zelinsky, Kingston Jessica Brynn Bono • Frank Meehan, Wilkes• John Patrick McGlynn IV Barre, and Romayne Meeand Kristen Marie Kleban han, Wilkes-Barre • Esteban Rafael Mediano • Christopher L. Messand Yakaira Brenda Rivera inger, Berwick, and Makala E. Burgos Messinger, Washington, N.J. • Russell H. Traver Jr. and • Andrew A. CwiertniewEugenia L. Shannon icz, Sugarloaf, and Claudine • Dominick T. Cavello III O. Cwiertniewicz, Sugarloaf • Lauren E. Levish, Drums, and Jennifer Petro • Joshua Carlo and Katheand Lance J. Levish, Drums Marriage license applica- rine Urena • Mark Lewandowski and tions filed in the Luzerne Alyssa A. Fusaro County Register of Wills • Richard Michael Yingst II Office from Oct. 10 to 13, and Kristen Marie Ruda 2011: • James J. Miller and Lee• Eric Michael Panusky sa Marie Muller and Jamie Lee Petrucci • Brian Rowles and Anglia • Edward Clark Pacheco Davis and Purity Manundu • Stewart Possinger and • Jonathan Beauchaine Anita Louise Forsha and Olivia Hillard Anzalone

burg were hit by the flood. “I said these people got hit so hard, I can’t just sit here and say thank God we were unaffected. We need to reach out,” Raineri said. The concert and dance will feature local legends Joe Nardone and the All Stars and Eddie Day and the Starfires performing on the same stage for the first time. The show will be closed by special guest Gary DeCarlo of the band Steam, bidding goodbye to the flood waters with his1969 hit, “Na Na, Hey Hey, Goodbye.’’

I F YO U G O :

What: Benefit Dance Concert for Wyoming Valley Flood Victims, featuring Joe Nardone and the All Stars and Eddie Day and the Starfires Where: Genetti Hotel and Conference Center When: Nov. 18, 7:30 p.m.

Tickets: $20, available at all Joe Nardone’s Gallery of Sound locations, limited number of tickets available at door, includes food and beverages, cash bar available Contact: Union Township Supervisors, 256-7600

“What a show-closer,” Raineri said. “It’s gonna be huge.” Rainerisaidhewasmostpleased by the fact that so far expenses for the dance have been zero.

The bands are donating their performances, Rock Street Music of Pittston will donate sound equipment, Genetti’s owner Gus Genettihasdonatedspaceinoneof

hisballrooms,CorcoranPrintingof Wilkes-Barre is printing fliers to advertise the dance free of charge and Bob’s Auto Center of Nanticoke is picking up the cost of printing tickets. All of that means every penny received in ticket sales will go directly to the Red Cross and the Salvation Army. Supervisors hope to sell 1,000 tickets for $20 each, raising $20,000 for flood relief. “It’s a good team effort,” Raineri said. “It’s the Valley coming together.”

TUITION Continued from Page 8A

ments were made to harmonize and standardize the data as much as possible, to account for changes over time in accounting standards and IPEDS reporting formats.” The data also is adjusted to account for inflation. But Delta Project also warns its online data “is good enough for comparisons over time and other areas,” but not detailed enough to judge “relative cost-effectiveness of different academic or administrative functions” within a college or university. All of which mattered about as much as vinyl music albums to LCCC students interviewed on campus during a recent warm October afternoon. “It’s only a two-year program,” Jim Walsh of Wilkes-Barre said of his effort to earn certification in plumbing, heating, air conditioning and ventilation. If students are paying a bigger chunk now than in 2004, few would notice the change because they only enrolled after 2009. “What’s the tuition at Wilkes?” Brandon Swendson asked, noting he had moved to Nanticoke from Tyler Hill just so he could pay the in-county tuition at LCCC while earning a plumbing and HVAC certification. Even with rent, he said, LCCC is the best deal around. The two estimated they will

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

Luzerne County Community College students Jim Walsh, left, and Brandon Swendson said the school remains the best bargain around despite data suggesting students are paying a higher share of total costs now than in 2004.

graduate with $14,000 to $16,000 in debt from loans, but Walsh, who lost a job after 25 years when the plant he worked at went out of business, was philosophical. “It’s just like making a car payment.” Students satisfied If LCCC has cut spending on instruction, Lake-Lehman High School graduate Julie Travis said she hasn’t noticed it. “To me it’s the number one college, they help you a lot,” she said.

Travis said that students who received learning support services in high school – someone helping take notes, for example – often continue to get that support at LCCC. Travis said LCCC provides a low-cost alternative for students like her seeking four-year degrees. She is earning an associate degree in early education and plans to carry those credits to a four-year institution like Misericordia, where she can earn a bachelor’s and become a licensed

teacher. She could not afford to take all four years at Misericordia, she added. Bill Femea also praised the school, noting he earned an associate’s in communication last August but, when told by employers he needed experience to land a job, was given a chance to do some “work study” at LCCC this year. He offered a reason the Delta Project data is irrelevant to many students: “This school wants you to succeed in life.”

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CMYK PAGE 10A

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

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CMYK PAGE 12A

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 13A


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Many fought to save old high school, restore auditorium The structure itself reopened in 2007, but extra money was needed to refurbish theater. By STEVE MOCARSKY smocarsky@timesleader.com

Constructed in 1926, Hazleton High School was the first million-dollar school to be built in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, boasting oak doors, marble floors and skylights. But by 1998, the school was scheduled for demolition. Known locally as “the Castle on the Hill,” because of its gothic style and fortress-like appearance, the building had fallen into disrepair. Members of the Hazleton Area School Board said it was beyond repair and unsafe for students. Plans were made for demolition, but the school board was met with loud community

opposition. Local contractor and school alumnus Tom Gabos was one of many who spoke against the plan and later worked with Bobby Tombasco to keep the structure safe and the elements out while the building was essentially abandoned by the board for about six years. Several others in the Hazleton area were key in the fight to prevent the building’s demolition, Gabos said, including Michael Greco Jr., the late school director Gil Degenhart, who led the Committee to Save the Castle, and the late Hazleton Historical Society President Jean Gormley. “But it’s Mike Marsicano who is the true hero here,” he said. Marsicano, who was mayor of Hazleton at the time, said he and his father were both alumni of the school and his father had worked there as a plumber.

When he heard of the school board’s plans, he had a mason assess the school and was told it was structurally sound. Marsicano said that after he failed to “make any headway” with the school board and administration, he went to a school board meeting and announced he would not issue a demolition permit for the structure. “That building is a foundation of this community, just like the train station (that was demolished in the 1970s),” Marsicano said. And now that it’s fully restored, “it’s magnificent. I think it’s the center of the community.” Gabos and Tombasco had made notes on who bought what at an auction the school board authorized at the school. With the help of Gormley, they eventually bought back items in hopes they could one day be restored.

The school board hired architect Vern McKissick in 2003 to design the renovation of the school and it re-opened in January 2007 as Hazleton Elementary-Middle School. But the district had run out of funding for the auditorium restoration. School directors Elaine Maddon Curry, Steve Hahn and Carmella Yenkevich spearheaded a movement to turn the unfinished auditorium into a community arts center and, in 2007, the Castle Fund was established. Many in the community participated in fundraising efforts. Naming rights came through a $100,000 donation from Allan Werst, nephew of the late Hazleton High School art teacher Alice C. Wiltsie. A donation also came from Wiltsie’s son, Dr. John Wiltsie. The committee raised more than $600,000 and state and federal grants secured by for-

TIMES LEADER FILE PHOTO

The structure known locally as ‘the Castle on the Hill,’ originally opened in 1926 as Hazleton High School.

mer U.S. Rep. Paul Kanjorski, million. The Wiltsie Center dedication former state Rep. Todd Eachus and state Rep. Tarah Toohil, R- and first public show are at 2 Butler Township, totaled $1.3 p.m. next Sunday.

WILTSIE

Seats in the recently completed Alice C. Wiltsie Performing Arts Center, located at the Hazleton Elementary-Middle School, are expected to be filled for a dedication and concert on Oct. 23 and a concert by the band Chicago on Nov. 27. A $1 million state grant, a $300,000 federal grant and more than a half million dollars in donations enabled the auditorium to be restored to near original condition and with the luxuries that new technology has to offer. The rest of the structure, known as ‘the Castle on the Hill,’ had undergone a $24 million facelift that resulted in the building opening its doors to students in January 2007, but the school district had run out of funding to restore the auditorium.

Continued from Page 1A

Gabos and friend Bobby Tombasco had been known as the Castle Keepers for years, keeping broken windows boarded up and water from entering the building’s badly leaking roof from the time the school district decided to raze the building in 1998 until reconstruction began about six years later.

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

“This is so great to work in a new theater. I’m so used to jerryrigging things. … The sound and light equipment is the most technologically advanced available. For the big acts and production companies, it’s like a candy store for them,” Garren said. And while equipment might be new, the ambience is reminiscent of the original 1928 auditorium. The heavy wood doors to the auditorium are original, as are the lighting fixtures at the rear of the building. The original box office door has been located in the building basement and will be incorporated into the movable box office that will be set up in the school lobby before performances. The front section of the stage is adjustable to three different heights and can be removed to accommodate an orchestra pit. And the new main curtain is a deep “Hazleton blue.” Original wall sconces Garren pointed out four original lighted wall sconces that had been retrieved, restored and remounted after being torn off the walls and carried off when the school board still intended to de-

molish the building and opened the doors for an auction so people could buy souvenirs. Gabos said the Wiltsie board hopes to raise money to have replicas made of the two sconces that could not be found. Garren predicts performers will enjoy the center as much as the audiences because of the new technology, the elegant ambience and the intimacy with the audience made possible by the size and set-up of the auditorium. As for the types of acts to be booked, Garren said it’s “a matter of economics. Could we book Johnny Mathis? Well, we could, but you’re going to pay $200 a ticket,” she said. The Hazleton area is fortunate to have the band Chicago playing there on Nov. 27, with tickets starting at $75 a pop. “I believe this is the smallest venue Chicago is playing on their tour,” she said. The Wiltise Center got lucky, she said, because a local supporter, Freeland native Jim Della Croce, works in the music industry and “knows the right people,” and because the band had a date open and is playing in New Jersey the preceding two days.

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Major facelift The structure underwent a $24 million facelift that resulted in the building opening its doors to students in January 2007, but the school district had run out of funding to restore the auditorium, which had been a cultural centerpiece in the community since the school was built in1928. A $1 million state grant, a $300,000 federal grant and more than a half million dollars in donations enabled the auditorium to be restored to near original condition and with the luxuries that new technology has to offer. “We kind of have our own F.M. Kirby Center here in Hazleton,” Gabos said. Cindy Garren, whom the board hired as executive director, is enchanted with the venue, which boasts 774 seats, 10 wheelchair spaces and 12 companion seats on the main floor and another 355 seats in the balcony. “It’s very intimate. There’s not a bad seat in the house. Even if you sit in the very last row of the balcony, it’s still a really great view of the stage,” Garren said. Garren, of Nanticoke, brings a wealth of experience in the performing arts to her new position, having worked as executive director of the Bailey Concert Hall in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.; spending a few years as cultural institutions evaluator for the Florida Department of State; serving as executive director of the Gold Coast Jazz Society in Fort Lauderdale; and serving as director of programming and audience development at the Scranton Cultural Center. She had been working as interim executive director of Troy Savings Bank Music Hall before starting at the Wiltsie Center in July.

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Cindy Garren, executive director of the Alice C. Wiltsie Performing Arts Center, shows backstage electrical equipment she said professional production companies would appreciate.

Garren said she will work to get a wide variety of performers and she will work with the Hazleton Community Concert Association to complement the organization’s offerings. The venue will be available to other community organizations at reasonable fees,

she said. Garren said she is the only fulltime employee of the Wiltsie Center. Other than a part-time box office employee, everyone else involved in local productions and fundraising are volunteers. And because the school has use of

the auditorium on weekdays, the Wiltsie Center pays only token rent. “If the community supports this place by volunteering, buying tickets and attending shows, we can be here for 250 years,” she said.


CMYK

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TOM MOONEY REMEMBER WHEN

Students from Wilkes University look over some of the entries in the ’Colonels Abroad’ photo contest inside the Henry Student Center. CLARK VAN ORDEN PHOTOS /THE TIMES LEADER

By JORDAN RAMIREZ Times Leader Intern

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rt and philanthropy came together in an unexpected fashion in the African nation of Burkina Faso. Pamela Pogash, 24, a pharmacist and graduate of Wilkes University, took a photograph of children who were among 598 villagers given medical and pharmaceutical aid through a medical mission and study-abroad trip. That photo and 59 others taken in various countries across Asia, the Americas, Europe and Africa were the subjects of a photocontestheldatWilkesearlierthismonth.Studentsand faculty submitted the photos accompanied with a brief description of their experiences abroad and how each came to take their picture. The “Colonels Abroad” photo contest was a collaboration between Godlove Fonjweng, director of global education and Andrew Miller, political science professor and adviser for the International Service Club. See CONTEST, Page 9B

Erica Acosta, associate director of diversity, and Charlotte Hacker, a senior at Wilkes, look over the photographs students entered into a photo contest that Wilkes held.

MEET DONNA FARRELL CLARK VAN ORDEN /THE TIMES LEADER

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onna Farrell is the senior vice president/regional manager for retail branch banking at Citizens Bank. Farrell, 41, is a graduate of Wyoming Valley West High School and studied business at Luzerne County Community College and the University of Phoenix. She and her husband, Mark, have three sons: Michael, 12, Jack, 9, and Nicholas, 5. They live in Dallas.

You previously worked in retail, and then got involved with in-store banking. Now, you oversee a wide area for a very large company. What do you enjoy the most about your work? “Impacting the people that work with me. I love managing. I love leading people. And the keywords that I always hear about myself as a leader is that I motivate and inspire. I get folks to love their job, because I love it. I had 300 branches at one point, and when I speak in front of a group, I feel like I connect with the audience. We have some fun. Banking doesn’t always have to be so serious ... I’ve had workshops or training sessions or seminars, talking about sales and how you treat the customer, and why it’s important to treat the customer well, and I always felt like people walked away feeling inspired and wanting to do more for

the bank and for the customer. That’s my passion.” Outside of work, how to do relax? “I love to cook out with friends and family and enjoy our pool, and really just spend time with our boys. They’re in different athletic activities — basketball, soccer and football — and I make it a priority to get to as many games as I can and enjoy it when I’m there.” Any hobbies or other interests? “I love to garden.” Music? “Dave Matthews and Steely Dan. And the kids and I also love pop music right now. We dance in the kitchen at night to whatever they’re listening to. Katy Perry is like a fixture in our household. Cobra Starship is on my iPod.” Your sons are very involved in sports. And when Citizens Bank Park opened in Philadelphia, you were very involved in starting some promotions there. What teams do you follow? “We are divided. My husband is a Mets fan, I’m a huge Phillies fan. During the first season at Citizens Bank Park, I was there for every game. And since we lived in Philly, I also had to be-

come an Eagles fan. But my husband is a Cowboys fan. My oldest son Michael loves the Eagles with me. My middle guy, Jack, likes the Cowboys. And Nick ... we’re working on. When we watch football, we have ‘the Eagles couch’ and ‘the Cowboys couch,’ and Nick’s right on the ottoman in the middle.” Favorite food? “Anything Italian. But in the summer, what I love the most is potato pancakes. When the bazaar season comes around, you can find me in the potato pancake line.” Favorite city? “Besides Wilkes-Barre, Philadelphia. I also really enjoyed New Orleans.” Favorite place to vacation? “Riviera Maya, Mexico.” Always in the fridge? “Diet green tea. And for the boys, Nardone Brothers Pizza.” Guilty pleasure? “Peanut M&M’s” Favorite movie? “I loved ‘Forrest Gump’ and ‘Terms of Endearment’ And anything that my boys like. We’ve watched ‘DespicSee MEET, Page 9B

Good intentions can sure take joy out of toys C

lutching my trusty revolver, I took stock of the situation. I was badly outnumbered, and I’d have to hit with all six of my shots. There’d be no time to reload — not with the fiendish gang of outlaws I was facing. I spotted them, sneaking out from cover, probably wondering where I was. Biding my time, as any good western hero would, I waited until they were all in the open. “Eat hot lead,” I shouted, leaping forth to confront the evil crew. They spun and turned toward me (I’d never shoot a man in the back), but I was too quick for them. Blam! Blam! Blam! Blam! Blam! Blam! Success. Not one managed to return fire. Taking a deep breath, I opened my six-gun and with some burning of my fingers pulled out the blackened disc cap as acrid smoke from the 49-cent Texas Jr. revolver wafted across Loomis Street. Within minutes my grade-school buddies and I were creating another scenario. This time I’d be a rustler of imaginary cattle and have to dodge the sheriff’s frontier justice there in the wilds of Rolling Mill Hill. Why do these old games pop into my mind today? With our local stores putting out their Christmas merchandise, you can imagine how saddened I was to read last week that the European Union has tightened still further its many regulations on toys that may be imported into its member countries. Talk about killjoys! The EU now demands that balloons be sold with labels warning parents not to let children younger than 8 blow them up without adult supervision. Stuffed animals must be treated to reduce germs. Small party favors face a host of thou-shalt-nots. As for toys that make noise, well, they’re not banned, but they can’t make as much noise as the ones granddaddy played with back in 1938. OK, nobody wants to see kids get hurt. Some regulations are vital. But I have this fantasy that the lords of the EU rush to the windows of their Brussels headquarters one day to see what all the commotion is in the street down below. To a man, they cry out in despair as they spy thousands of children from all over the world leaping from behind buildings amid ear-splitting volleys from cap guns smoking with the fires of Hades and shouts of “gotcha, ya dirty rat.” China, the source of many of the world’s toys, is said to be in a tizzy. So is the West. An online newsletter entitled “The New American” lamented that as Christmas approaches toy buyers in Europe and America will see “products being eliminated from the market” and price hikes for others as costs rise “to meet regulatory requirements.” I feel sorry for Europe. Imagine little Pierre and Marie charging down the Rue De-Something-or-Other and storming the Bastille with weapons so wimpy they wouldn’t even wake up King Louis XVI’s guards. Will there still be merriment in Manheim on Dec. 25 when young Karl and Sieglinde rush downstairs to discover that the fuzzy bears they wanted have been disinfected, shrink-wrapped and placed in permanent hibernation, courtesy of the EU? America is already partway down that slippery slope. Do children still shoot marbles (small, easily-swallowed objects)? Come to think of it, I don’t see many paint books and paint sets (poisonous chemicals) in the stores. And - good Lord — are Legos next? I hope you guys at the European Union are satisfied. A big seasonal “bah, humbug” to all of you.

Tom Mooney is a Times Leader columnist. Reach him at tmooney2@ptd.net.


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hristina Marie Curcio and Eric Michael Crahall were united in marriage on Sept. 17, 2011, at Christ the King Chapel, on the campus of King’s College, WilkesBarre, by the Rev. Richard Hockman. The bride, daughter of Michelle and Michael Curcio, Wind Gap, is the granddaughter of Shirley and Anthony Curcio and Janet and Arthur Lee of Pen Argyl. The groom, son of Patricia and Adam Crahall, Dallas, is a grandson of Marie McHugh, WilkesBarre, and the late John McHugh and the late Stella and Adam Crahall. Given in marriage by her father, the bride chose her aunt, Kelli Castle, as matron of honor. Bridesmaids were Katie Postupak, sister of the groom, Amy Boekhout, friend of the bride, and Stephanie Kromer, friend of the bride. The groom chose his brother, AJ Crahall, as best man. Groomsmen were Michael Boyle, cousin of the groom, David Keefer, friend of the groom, and Anthony Curcio II, brother of the bride. The wedding party and guests were welcomed to the chapel by bagpiper Daniel Bartley. Carl Postupak, brother-in-law of the groom, and Stephen Postupak, nephew of the groom, served as program attendants. Scripture readings were given by Stephanie Bednarz, cousin of the bride, Susan Crahall, sister-in-law of the groom, and Thomas Torbik, cousin of the groom. Offertory gifts were presented by Stephen Postupak, Emily Crahall, and Zachary Crahall, niece and nephews of the groom. An evening reception was hosted by the parents of the bride at the Ramada Inn, Wilkes-Barre, and a rehearsal dinner, hosted by the parents of the groom, was held at Café Toscana, Wilkes-Barre. The bride was honored at a bridal shower hosted by family and the bridal party at the Knights of Columbus, Bangor, Pa. The bride is a graduate of Pen Argyl Area High School and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in history and a secondary education certification from King’s College, magna cum laude. She is employed at Sallie Mae Inc., servicing Department of Education loans. The groom is a graduate of Dallas High School and earned a Bachelor of Science degree in labor and industrial relations with a minor in exercise science from the Pennsylvania State University. He also earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in history from Misericordia University with certification in secondary education and a Master of Science degree in education from Wilkes University. He is employed as a social studies teacher in the Wilkes-Barre Area School District. The couple honeymooned in historic Cape May, N.J. They reside in Dallas, Pa.

ristina Briann Bach of Shickshinny and Wayne Thomas Kogoy Jr. of Wilkes-Barre were united in marriage on May 20, 2011, during a sunset ceremony on the beach in Key West, Fla. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Kerry J. Bach of Shickshinny, and a granddaughter of the late James E. Bach of Shickshinny, the late Paul and Betty Kramer of Shickshinny, and Diana Hains of Nanticoke. The groom is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Kogoy Sr. of Wilkes-Barre, and a grandson of the late Mr. and Mrs. John Kogoy Sr. of Parsons, the late Robert Wren and the late Jeanne Wren of Wilkes-Barre. The bride was given in marriage by her parents and escorted by her father. Kelci and Kassidy Grooms, cousins of the bride, were flower girls. Kyle Kogoy, brother of the groom, was the ring bearer. Following the ceremony, an evening cocktail hour and reception was held at the Beachside Marriott in Key West. An outdoor wedding celebration was also held with local family and friends at the Holy Child Grove, Nanticoke, Pa. The bride was honored with a bridal shower at the Waterfront in Plains Township, hosted by the mothers of the bride and groom. A rehearsal dinner was hosted by Mr. and Mrs. Bascom Grooms IV, cousins of the bride, at their home in Key West, Fla. Kristina is a graduate of Misericordia University where she earned a Bachelor’s of Science degree in health sciences and a Master of Science degree in physical therapy. She is employed by Genesis Rehabilitation Services in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., and is actively pursuing her Doctorate degree in physical therapy. Wayne is also a graduate of Misericordia University where he earned a Bachelor’s of Science degree in health sciences and a Master of Science degree in physical therapy. He is employed at Pro Rehabilitation Services in Plains Township, Pa. Following a honeymoon in the Bahamas, the couple reside in WilkesBarre.

r. and Mrs. Joseph Margalis, lifelong residents of WilkesM Barre, celebrated their 60th wed-

ding anniversary on July 21, 2011. Joseph is the son of the late Joseph and Constance Margalis. Margaret is the daughter of the late Andrew and Helen Monko. They have three children, Susan Perlis and her husband, Joseph, Wilkes-Barre; Joseph Margalis and his partner, Elizabeth Schur, Wilkes-Barre; and Andrea Stackhouse and her husband, Ken, West Pittston. They have four grandchildren, Joseph Perlis, Villas, N.J.; Andrew Perlis, Wilkes-Barre; and Haley and Shelby Stackhouse, West Pittston. A family dinner to celebrate the special occasion was recently held at their home.

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eather Lynn Harry and Jeremy Norman Conrad were united in marriage on June 4, 2011, at The Crestmont Inn, Eagles Mere, Pa. The bride is the daughter of Judith Harry, Hanover Township, Pa., and Keith Harry, Harveys Lake, Pa. She is the granddaughter of Mary and Frank Macierowski, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., and Betty Harry and the late Stewart Harry, Plymouth, Pa. The groom is the son of Paulette Conrad, Forkston, Pa., and Ralph Conrad, Gahanna, Ohio. He is the grandson of the late Pauline and Norman Ashcraft, Forkston, Pa. The bride was escorted down the aisle by her mother and father. The couple chose their close friends, Scott Fenton and Angelo Atwell, to accompany the bride on her walk down the aisle to her parents. A rehearsal dinner was given by the groom’s mother at the Eagles Mere Country Club. The dinner reception was hosted at The Crestmont Inn following the ceremony. The bride is a 1997 graduate of G.A.R. Memorial High School, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., and a 2002 graduate of Clarion University, Clarion, Pa., where she earned a Bachelor of Science degree in psychology. She is employed by Blue Cross of Northeastern Pennsylvania as manager of quality and performance improvement. The groom is a 1991 graduate of Tunkhannock High School, Tunkhannock, Pa. He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in business administration from Wilkes University, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., in 2001, and a Master of Business Administration degree from Wilkes University in 2003. He is employed by Blue Cross of Northeastern Pennsylvania as manager of individual product management. The couple has planned a November honeymoon in St. Maarten.

THE TIMES LEADER

Gilroy, Salitis t. Thomas Aquinas Church was the setting Sept. 9 for the wedS ding of Maureen Gilroy and Martin

Salitis, both of Olyphant. The bride is the daughter of Judy and John Gilroy, Archbald. The groom is the son of Elizabeth and Jerome Salitis, Duryea. The Rev. Christopher Sahd performed the ceremony. Melissa Remus, Dallas, was matron of honor. Bridesmaids were Karen DiPasquale, Jefferson Township, Sondra Holmes, Fleetville, Dayna Tomaszewski, Archbald, Melissa Zawislak, Archbald, cousin of the bride, Michele Dolph, Blakely, cousin of the bride, and Emily Bonacci, Peckville. Abigail Salitis, daughter of the groom, and Savannah Remus, goddaughter of the bride and both of Dallas, were the flower girls. Christopher Gilroy, Archbald, brother of the bride, was the best man. Ushers were Jeffrey Perhalla, Old Forge, Joseph Valvonis, Laflin, Christopher Tomaszewski, Archbald, John Remus, Dallas, Eric German, New Ipswich, N.H., and Lorbertson Palarca, Scranton. A reception was held at Fiorelli’s, Peckville. The bride is a graduate of Valley View High School and earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s degree in occupational therapy. She is an occupational therapist for Genesis Healthcare at Wayne Woodlands Manor, Waymart. The groom graduated from Pittston Area and earned a bachelor’s degree in electronics engineering from the University of Scranton. He is an electronics engineer at Tobyhanna Army Depot.

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Myers, Haddle bigail Ann Myers and Daniel Edward Haddle Jr. were unitA ed in marriage on Oct. 16, 2010,

at the Cherry Street Bible Church, Plymouth, by the Rev. James Sienkiewicz. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Myers, Plains Township. She is a granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Peters and the late Robert G. Myers and Dolores Myers. The groom is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Haddle, Dallas. He is a grandson of Mr. and Mrs. James W. Haddle and the late Mr. and Mrs. Charles Corcoran. The bride was given in marriage by her father, Robert Myers. She chose her sister, Amanda Marko, as her matron of honor. Bridesmaids were Molly Martin, friend of the bride, and Haley Haddle, sister of the groom. Flower girl was Alexis Zielecki. The groom chose his friend, Steve Chopick as his best man. Groomsman were Matt Pietrzak and John Marko. Ring bearer was Richard Zielecki. A bridal shower was hosted by the mothers of the bride and groom and bridesmaids at the Plains Ambulance Banquet Facility. The parents of the groom hosted the rehearsal dinner at Rustic Kitchen, Plains Township. An evening reception was held at the Apple Tree Terrace, Dallas, following the ceremony. The groom is an accountant at Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs. The bride is a registered nurse at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. The couple honeymooned in Couples, Negril, Jamaica. The couple reside in Plains Township.

Johnson, Felsen and Mrs. Robert Johnson, M r.Mountain Top, are proud to

Yurko, Wolsieffer

The Charneys The Margalises

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r. and Mrs. Robert Charney of Pittston celebrated their 50th M wedding anniversary on Oct. 14, 2011.

They were married in St. Rocco’s Church, Pittston, by the late Rev. Julio Serra, O.S.J. Mrs. Charney is the former Mary Loquasto, daughter of the late Modesto and Adele Loquasto, Pittston. She is retired from Kmart Corporation. Mr. Charney is the son of the late John and Anna Charney, West Wyoming. He is retired from American General Insurance and is employed by Geisinger Health Systems. The couple has been blessed with two daughters, Adele and husband John Leonard, Valrico, Fla., and Susan and husband Jerry, Wilkes-Barre. They have one granddaughter, Emily Leonard. In honor of the occasion, the couple shared a celebratory dinner with their family and friends at the Irem Country Club that was hosted by their children.

Amanda Elizabeth Yurko and William Kyle Tyler Wolsieffer were united in marriage on July 9, 2011, at Fred Howard Park Beach in Tarpon Springs, Fla. The bride is a daughter of David and Christine Yurko, Wilkes-Barre. She is a granddaughter of Vincent and Barbara Yurko, Wilkes-Barre, and Philip and Sharon Carden, New Port Richey, Fla. The groom is a son of William and Deneva Wolsieffer, Wilkes-Barre. He is a grandson of Mary Wolsieffer and the late William Wolsieffer, WilkesBarre; Dorris Rendleman, Ft. Walton Beach, Fla.; and the late Denver Glenn. The bride was given in marriage by her father. She chose her sister, Briana Yurko, as maid of honor and sister of the groom, Kyra Wolsieffer, as bridesmaid. The groom chose his brother, Keith Wolsieffer, as best man and brother of the bride, Jacob Yurko, as groomsman. A reception was held at the home of Philip and Sharon Carden. Amanda is a 2007 graduate of E.L. Meyers High School. She is attending Seminole State College. William is a 2006 graduate of E.L. Meyers High School and a 2009 graduate of Delta Connection Academy. He is employed as a pilot for American Eagle Airlines. The couple reside in Wilkes-Barre with their dog, Bo.

announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their daughter, Renee M. Johnson, to Sebastian Felsen in Philadelphia. Renee is a 1992 graduate of Crestwood High School, Mountain Top, and earned her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, formerly called the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science, graduating magna cum laude. She completed a clinical internship at Rush Presbyterian St. Luke’s Medical Center in Chicago and was subsequently employed at Wilkes University as an associate professor teaching pharmacy practice at the Nesbitt School of Pharmacy. She is employed by Pfizer at the corporate headquarters in New York City as a director in global medical information. She is also pursuing a master’s degree in global public health at New York University. Sebastian Felsen is the son of Marian Felsen and Rene Felsen, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Sebastian graduated from St. Andrews Scott’s School, Buenos Aires, and earned a Bachelor of Science degree in economics from the University Torcuato Di Tella. He is a graduate of Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, earning a Master of Business Administration degree with a focus on finance and strategy. Sebastian held a variety of positions in banking, corporate finance, business development and mergers and acquisitions and is employed at FMC Corporation, Philadelphia, as a controller of global innovations. A summer wedding is planned for June 22, 2012, in historic Philadelphia.

The Kreidlers r. and Mrs. Dean and Shannon Kreidler will celebrate M their 10th anniversary Thursday,

Oct. 20, 2011. They were united in marriage at Maple Grove United Methodist Church. The Rev. Mary Jean Simonin performed the ceremony. The bride is the former Shannon Simmons, daughter of Douglas Simmons and Hannah Simmons of Beach Lake, Pa. The groom is the son of Robert Kreidler and the late Nancy Kreidler Pikes Creek, Pa. They have four children and three grandchildren. Mrs. Kreidler is employed as a second-grade teacher at Ross Elementary School. Mr. Kreidler is employed by the Lehman Road Department. The couple plans to commemorate the occasion by renewing there wedding vows.


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The Semaneks r. and Mrs. Al Semanek, Swoyersville and formerly of M Dupont, celebrated their 40th wed-

ding anniversary on Sept. 13, 2011. They were married Sept. 13, 1971, in Holy Trinity Church, Swoyersville. Maid of honor was Evelyn Intelicato Snipas, sister of the bride, and best man was Joseph Reinhard, cousin of the groom. Mrs. Semanek is the former Carol Intelicato, daughter of Teresa Intelicato and the late Joseph Intelicato of Wilkes-Barre Township. Mr. Semanek is a son of the late Albert and Helen Semanek of Swoyersville. Al retired from MetLife Insurance Co. after 35 years of service at the Clarkes Summit Computer Data Center. Carol was formerly employed by Nemetz Bakery in Swoyersville and Gerrity’s Supermarket, Wyoming. The couple own and operate a vending machine business that services the greater WilkesBarre and Scranton areas since 1998. They have been blessed with two children: Amy and boyfriend Bryan Firestine; and Joseph and wife Irene. They also have two grandchildren: Nicholas and Summer Semanek. Daughter Amy and Bryan and son Joseph and Irene gave a surprise dinner party on Sept. 11 for close family and friends at The Gramercy restaurant in Pittston.

Students learn about nursing careers at Misericrordia High school seniors from three states explored the profession of nursing through a mixture of clinical, laboratory, classroom and field experiences at the annual Nursing Career Exploration Camp at Misericordia University. Participating in a tour of Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center (above), from left, first row: Kathleen Gelso, assistant professor, Misericordia University; Michele Swida,

nursing supervisor, Geisinger; and Mary Gildea, vice president of nursing, Geisinger. Second row: Michelle Druby, Mountain Top, and Cory Chikowski, student nursing ambassador, West Pittston. Third row: Heather Krzywicki, Mountain Top; Ellen Hendricks, West Point, N.Y.; Allison McLaughlin, Delran, N.J.; and David D’Achille, Denville, N.J. Fourth row: Nina Haelin, Middletown, N.Y.; Joy Cannon, Stroudsburg; and

Madison Gallagher, Philadelphia. Fifth row: Jessica Kehoe, Philadelphia; Sonia Garcia, Point Pleasant Beach, N.J.; and Marge Hennelly-Bergin, chief nursing officer, Geisinger. More students (below) from left, first row: Jamie Novitski, Misericordia student ambassador, Shavertown; Tiffany O’Donnell, Clarks Summit; and Kelly Merwine, Williamstown. Second row: Lindsey Ross, Misericordia student ambassador,

Wyoming; Haley Meixsell, Bethlehem; Adrienne Trotto, Northumberland; and Marissa Noll, Elysburg. Third row: Marge Hennelly-Bergin, chief nursing officer, Geisinger; Angela Ning, Bridgewater, N.J.; and Leah Santucci, Laflin. Fourth row: Linsey Young, Shamokin Dam; Mary P. Gildea, vice president of nursing, Geisinger; Michele Swida, nursing supervisor, Geisinger; and Cara Marzullo, Kinnelon, N.J.

Bus patrol monitors named at Wyoming Area Catholic

Misericordia benefactors honored at scholarship event

Wyoming Area Catholic School recently inducted bus patrol monitors for the 201 1-2012 school year. James Slocum from AAA Mid-Atlantic spoke to the group about bus safety and their responsibilities as bus patrol monitors. Patrol members from Mrs. Walsh’s eighth-grade class, from left, first row, are Pat Hotchkiss, Brandon Richards, Matt Clemow, Jack Patterson, Noah Heck, John Paul D’Amato, Eric Fritz, Nick Skrzysowski and Christian Coassolo. Second row: Emily Kolojejchick, Abigail Burge, Alexa Blandina, Alexia Mazzarella, Giana Tondora, Jennifer Loughney, Abby Bradigan and Juliana Buonsante.Third row: Rebecca Prociak, Slocum, Nicole Telford, Thomas Day, Alexandra Mondlak, Drew Casper, Alyson Manley, Nick Allardyce, Sara Flannelly, James Orr, Danielle Franklin, Justin Januszko, Meghan Corridoni, Devin Rajza, Emily Johnson, Walsh and Isabella Romani.

Misericordia University and student scholarship recipients honored and recognized the generosity of benefactors who have established endowed and named scholarships at the university during the 22nd Annual Scholarship Recognition Day event. The annual event recognized the Freda Thalenfeld Popky ‘28 HD ‘07 Scholarship, which was awarded to Megan Zelonis, Pittston. The scholarship was established by Mrs. Popky’s brother, the late David Thalenfeld and his wife, Lillian, along with Mrs. Popky’s nephew, John Thalenfeld, to honor her as a member of Misericordia’s first graduating class in 1928. Mrs. Popky celebrated her 103rd birthday in April and is Misericordia’s oldest living alumna. At the event, from left: Kathy Zelonis; Megan Zelonis; Michael A. MacDowell, president; Frida Thalenfeld Popky ’28; John Thalenfeld; Tina MacDowell; Ryan Zelonis; and Joe Zelonis.

The Rogerses r. and Mrs. Ronald R. Rogers, Plymouth, are celebrating their D 35th wedding anniversary today.

They were married Oct. 16, 1976, at the former Holy Rosary Church, Duryea, by the late Rev. Anthony A. Suchocki. Mrs. Rogers is the former Charlene Guarnieri, daughter of the late Charles and Irene Guarnieri, Duryea. Dr. Rogers is the son of the late Frank and Helen Rogers, Plymouth. The couple has two children, Ronald and Victoria. They have also recently been blessed with one granddaughter.

LCCC students graduate from surgical technology program Luzerne County Community College recently awarded degrees to graduates of the college’s surgical technology program at a ceremony held at the Educational Conference Center. The graduates received a surgical technologist lapel pin to signify their entry into the profession. Student achievement awards for perfect attendance for class, lab and clinical were presented to Brandon Lasecki, Drums; Marielle Evans, Mountain Top; and Nadine Loncosky, Tunkhannock. Graduates, from left, first row: Lisa Latona, Pittston; Becky Carroll, Kingston; Christine Rosengrant, Dallas; Loncosky; and Mallory McClintock, Kingston. Second row: Edwina Soreth, adjunct instructor; Evans; Sarah Westley, Plymouth; Alana DeMinico, Franklin Township; Regina Titman, Berwick; and Sara Komnath, Wilkes-Barre. Third row: Dr. Deborah Vilegi Peters, director, surgical technology; Patricia Bove, Nanticoke; Luke Shillington, Huntington Mills; Lasecki; Laurie Wujcik, Shavertown; and Sherry Kopicki, Scranton.

BIRTHS Nesbitt Women’s and Children’s Center at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital Watson, Kera, Sweet Valley, a daughter, Oct. 2. Rollins, Kristy and Jamiel, Shavertown, a daughter, Oct. 3. Brennan, Megan and Scott, Nanticoke, a daughter, Oct. 3. DeFinnis, Jodee and James C., Shavertown, a daughter, Oct. 3. Zeiler, Mia and Jason Lyman, Mountain Top, a son, Oct. 3. Eick, Jessica and Francis, WilkesBarre, a son, Oct. 3.

LCCC society holds fundraiser for Head Start Members of the Luzerne County Community College Literary Arts Society (LAS) recently held a Chinese auction to benefit the Head Start Birthday Book Project. Some of the participants, from left: Theresa Gagliardi, Hanover Township, treasurer, LAS; Ashley Stuccio, Forty Fort, secretary, LAS; Katie Smith, Bloomsburg; Stephanie Kuharchik, West Wyoming; Susan Porter-Allen, Mountain Top; and Mary Stchur, adviser, LAS and associate professor and chair, English.

Namey, Sandra and Wayne, Plains Township, a son, Oct. 4. Wojciechowicz, Brianna and Jonathan McLaren, WilkesBarre, a son, Oct. 4. Anstett, Ashley E. and Jeremy R. Gibbon, Kingston, a daughter, Oct. 4. Saunders, Nicole and Jamie, Kingston, a son, Oct. 4. Fogle, Audam and Daniel Rodriguez, Wilkes-Barre, a son, Oct. 5. Joseph, Beth and John II, WilkesBarre, twin daughters, Oct. 5. Bonk, Jennifer and Richard, Nanticoke, a son, Oct. 5. Decesaris, Riann and Angelo, Wyoming, a daughter, Oct. 6. Tyler, Kimberly and Chuck, Lu-

zerne, a daughter, Oct. 6. Palute, Andrea and Frank, Kingston, a son, Oct. 7. Andrews, Willena and Michael Johnson, Edwardsville, a son, Oct. 7. Kukosky, Heather and Matthew, Lehman Township, a daughter, Oct. 7. Hickey, Narissa and Ross M. Wayman, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, Oct. 8. Baldwin, Rachele and Jason, Pittston, a son, Oct. 8. Johnson, Mallory and Antoine Dodson, Wilkes-Barre, a son, Oct. 9. Elizondo, Caridad and Victor Lopez, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, Oct. 10.

Seminary Jazz Ensemble to perform at All-State Conference St. Jude School alumni talk to students about Holy Redeemer Five St. Jude School alumni recently returned to their alma mater to speak to the upper grade students about the academic opportunities and activities available to them at Holy Redeemer High School, Wilkes-Barre. The students discussed the curriculum of arts, sciences, humanities and theology and the opportunities open to them in the areas of clubs, sports and service. Some of the participants, from left, first row, are Sean Murphy, Valerie Soto, Emily Thomas and George Strish. Second row: Alyson Rymar, Nicholas Ganter, Mary Eroh and Nathan Ragantesi. Third row: Michael Booth, vice principal, Holy Redeemer; Hallie Rexer; Dylan Myslowski; Jeffrey Capaci; Michael Martin; Jessica Ruppert; and Mary Humiston, chair, science department, Holy Redeemer.

KINGSTON: The Wyoming Seminary Upper School Jazz Ensemble has been selected by the Pennsylvania Music Educators Association (PMEA) as the best jazz ensemble in the state and will perform at the 2012 PMEA All-State Conference to be held in April, 2012, in Lancaster. Seminary’s Jazz Ensemble was one of100 bands from across the state to submit an audition recording in the PMEA’s annual

competition for the honor to perform at the conference. This is the second time in three years that the band, led by Lower School music teacher and jazz trumpeter Robert Lugiano, has been chosen as the best in the state. The ensemble recently returned from a trip to the Czech Republic and Austria where the students performed in popular

Czech jazz clubs. The ensemble also performs regionally and nationally at the Fine Arts Fiesta, the River Street Jazz Café and Disney World and at school concerts and assemblies. The first concert of the year for the ensemble will be 7 p.m. Dec. 13 in the Buckingham Performing Arts Center on the Upper School campus. The concert is free and open to the public.


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PUBLIC WELCOME!!!! GNA students recognized for participating in chess club Students from Greater Nanticoke Area Elementary Center recently received medals for participating in the after-school chess club. Medal winners, from left, first row, are Samantha Waichulis, Kyle Stratton, Matt Stegura, Evan Stecco, Aaron Miller and David Mash. Second row: Brandon Karavitch, Tyler Zaremba, Justin Ostopik, Matt Pointkowski, Hunter Peterson, Joey O’Hara and William Kanjorski.

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 5B

Religious scholars’ lecture explores ‘A Spirituality of Single Life’

Northeast High School Class of ’66 reunites Northeast High School Class of 1966 recently celebrated its 45th anniversary reunion with a picnic at the outdoor pavilion at the Checkerboard Inn. Faculty member Gerard Musto made a cameo appearance. Classmates in attendance, from left, first row, are Bill Kennedy; Betty Duszak Mihalka; Carole Rodola Darbenzio; Danny Mancini; Frank Barosky, class president; Barbara Zupon Alba; Elaine Doran Blazosek; Barbara Hannon Evans; Rosemary Timlin Thomas; Marlene Sobuto Mitala; and Mary Alice Sokol Robinson. Second row: Joe O’Hara, Ron Opello, Joe Mihalka, Mary Lou Johnson Tozzi, Diane Kenia Yedlock, Lorraine DeMark DeFrancesco, Mike Magda, Cynthia Stella Liberski, Peggy Boccolini Guffrovich, Mary Ann Pompino Augustine, Rosalyn Magistro LaBrutto, Bernice Zupon Polk, Charlotte Moleski Herman, Margaret Boccolini Borget, Cathy Pupa Lapsansky and Diana Ball Rodgers. Third row: John Stegura, Stan Golembiewski, Harry Werts, Butch Ostroswki, John Mikiewicz, Butch Regan, Stan Shemanski, John Sieto, Robert Ryczak, Joe Blazosek, Tony Kleynowski and Paul Savakinas.

WILKES-BARRE: Religious scholar Dr. Anita Houck will deliver the annual Moreau Lectures at King’s College on Wednesday in the Burke Auditorium, William G. Houck McGowan School of Business, North River Street. Houck will explore the conversation between Catholic Christian theology and the lived experience of single adults during two free public lectures. Houck’s lecture will consider what renewed attention to the experiences of single adults might bring to the Christian tradition. She will discuss “The Fourth Vocation: A Spirituality of Single Life,” at 3:30 p.m. and “What the Church Can Learn from Single Life” at 7:30 p.m. Houck is associate professor and chair of religious studies and director of the college’s Writing Proficiency Program

at Saint Mary’s College, Notre Dame, Ind. She earned a doctorate from the University of Chicago Divinity School and a master’s degree in education from Harvard Graduate School of Education. She is a graduate of Wesleyan University. The Moreau Lecture Series brings renowned theologians to the King’s campus to address issues of social justice, peace, morality and Catholic identity and other subjects relevant to the lives of students, Catholics, and all other people concerned with the significant issues facing the church and society. The King’s College Moreau Lecture Series is named in honor of Blessed Father Basil Anthony Moreau, founder of the Holy Cross Congregation, who established and sponsors King’s College. Parking will be available at on-campus lots. For more information, contact the Rev. Daniel Issing, assistant professor of theology, at 570-208-5900, ext. 5491.

Local fifth-grader chosen for Kellogg’s photo shoot, Starz Network TV show

Greater Nanticoke Area Elementary Center recently held its annual Family Math Night. Approximately 200 students and parents learned fun and educational ways to practice math skills at home. Third-grade teachers Tracey View and Ami Stelma cochaired the event. Some of the committee members, from left, first row, are Jennifer Ferro, Nicole Letteer, Kristen Cunningham and Anna Lamoreaux. Second row: Laura Price, Heather Kowalski, Stelma, View and Jessica Cashner. Janice Levandowski and Norm Morris are also members of the committee.

VAntage opens student branch at Pittston Area

Woodlands workers raise money for flood victims Employees of The Woodlands Inn & Resort organized a fundraiser to help victims of the recent flooding that ripped through Northeastern PA. Through donations collected from fellow staff and patrons, $500 was presented to Amy George, development coordinator, and Edward C. Winters, regional CEO of the Wyoming Valley Chapter of the American Red Cross. At the check presentation, from left, are Jaime Tribbett, Woodlands staff; Jeanne Stanton, beverage manager, Woodlands; George; Winters; and James Meyer and Melissa Reynolds, both Woodlands staff.

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The Department of Medical Imaging at Misericordia University has formed the Nuclear Medicine Technology Advisory Board to provide regular feedback for ongoing improvement of program policies, procedures and curriculum. Members of the board, from left, first row: Lynn Hoegg, Greater Hazleton Health Alliance; Maryann Leechak, Greater Hazleton Health Alliance; Shawn Booker, Wyoming Valley Health Care System; and Gary Golecki, Prime Med. Second row: Tom Staskowski, Pocono Medical Center; Christi Albert, Misericordia University; Jennifer Simonds, Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital, Binghamton, N.Y.; Cindy Turchin, Misericordia University; Dr. Elaine Halesey, chair, Medical Imaging Department, Misericordia University; and Mary Ann Place, Tyler Memorial Hospital, Tunkhannock.

GNA Elementary Center hosts Family Math Night

video and public service announcement. The film entitled, “SNAP,” will premiere at the Fort Myers Film Festival. Crisci was recently chosen to be in “Magic City,” a new television show on the Starz Network, which will premier in January 2012. He is the first child actor booked for the show which is set in Miami during 1959. It will showcase a typical Miami Hotel during the day that is overrun with the mob at night. Alex, 10, is a fifth-grade student. He has a brother, Tyler, 13, and a sister, Lauren, 9. He moved to Florida when he was 5, but visits his family frequently in the West Pittston/ Harding area.

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Alex Crisci, son of Gary and Lorrie Crisci, Naples, Fla., formerly of West Pittston, recently booked a photo shoot for Kellogg’s/ AARP. His photo will appear in AARP literature and on the back of a KelCrisci logg’s cereal box. Crisci is also involved in a PBS show in Naples, Fla., called “Curious Kids.” The show focuses on wildlife and different cultures from around the world and on how to conserve our natural resources. He was also chosen to participate in a short film on bullying that included a music

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Crestwood students take part in National Merit Scholarship Program Christopher Gegaris, principal, Crestwood High School, recently announced that Susan Hao has been named a Commended Student and Alfredo Jimenez a semifinalist in the 2012 National Merit Scholarship Program. The students will receive a Letter of Commendation from the school and the National Merit Scholarship Corporation. As a semi-finalist, Jimenez will continue in the 2012 competition for National Merit Scholarships. Hao will not continue, but placed among the top five percent of more than 15 million students who entered the competition. Students entered the competition by taking the 2010 Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test. From left, are Jimenez and Hao.

Misericordia conducts workshop for students The Department of Occupational Therapy at Misericordia University recently hosted and sponsored a fieldwork educator workshop for therapists who provide clinical experiences for students in the university’s occupational therapy master’s degree program. At the workshop, from left, are Dawn Evans, organizer and occupational therapy academic fieldwork coordinator, Misericordia; and Felicia Chew, presenter, director of clinical services and occupational therapy, Genesis Rehab Services.

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LCCC holds Dental Health Alumni Day

Boscov’s workers, Red Cross hold bake sale

The Luzerne County Community College Alumni Association and Dental Health Department recently held the 12th Annual Dental Health Alumni Day. The focus of this year’s seminar was ‘Oral Cancer -- Causes, Prevention and Patient Care.’ Robert Pellecchia, D.D.S., director of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Dental Medicine at Geisinger Medical Center, was the keynote speaker. Eva Grayzel, a cancer survivor and champion for early detection, presented her oral cancer awareness campaign, ‘The SixStep Screening: Six Steps to a thorough Oral Cancer Screening.’ At the seminar, from left: Bonnie Brennan Lauer, director, alumni relations, LCCC; Thomas P. Leary, president, LCCC; Grayzel; Pellecchia; Barbara Montante, program chair and associate professor, dental hygiene, LCCC; and Jeanne Farrell, instructor, dental assisting, LCCC.

Employees of Boscov’s department store in Wilkes-Barre along with volunteers from the Wyoming Valley Chapter of the American Red Cross raised funds by organizing a bake sale and participating in a dress down day to help victims of the devastating flooding that ripped through the region. Boscov’s employees presented the check of more than $600 to Amy George and Joanna Springer of the Wyoming Valley chapter. Representatives at the check presentation are Irene Kelly, regional manager public relations/special events, Tony Georgetti, store manager, Debbie Shaw, Boscov’s employee, Joanna Springer, regional development coordinator American Red Cross, and Amy George, development coordinator American Red Cross.

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 7B

Along with many of you, our associates and customers are struggling with the devastation caused by the recent ooding in the Wilkes-Barre area.

We’re all in this together. Raymour & Flanigan is proud to be part of—and serve—the Wilkes-Barre area. To help ease some of your burden and expenses, we’re offering all ood victims our discounted commercial pricing, normally available only to large commercial accounts. We’re also pleased to offer furniture delivery in 3 days or less, so you can get back to normal as soon as possible.

During this time of recovery, Raymour & Flanigan will do our part to support and serve the community.

  

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Over the knee Bailey Button

Wyoming Area Catholic students elect class representatives Students at Wyoming Area Catholic School, Exeter, recently participated in the election of class representatives for first through eighth grades. Two representatives were chosen from each class. Officers will be elected at the first council meeting. Moderators are Evelyn Owens, third grade, and Ann Marie Walsh, eighth grade. Class representatives, from left, first row, are Hayden Foland, Sydney Kozden, Lynzie Skoronski, Carissa Benderavich, Dominic Caparelli, Matt Sorick, Danielle Morris, Jeffrey Johnson and Richie Morris. Second row: Owens, Tim Murphy, Sarah Satkowski, Justin Januszko, Alexia Mazzarella, Charles Kulick, Erika Serafin, Camryn Cassetori and Walsh.

Bomber Chestnut

LCCC conducts Alumni Phonathon Members of the Luzerne County Community College Alumni Association, students and college faculty and staff recently conducted the annual Alumni Phonathon to raise funds for updated instructional equipment, the Association’s Alumni Scholarship and the newly established LCCC College Endowment. Alumni who were not contacted can still contribute to the Phonathon by sending their donations to the LCCC Alumni Office, 1333 S. Prospect St., Nanticoke, Pa. 18634, or by calling the Alumni Office at 7400735. At the Phonathon, from left, first row: Holly Evanoski, Wilkes-Barre, board member, Alumni Association; Kyle Stevens, Clarks Summit; Kelly Kopec, Pittston; and Kourtney Winder, Wilkes-Barre. Second row: Susan Gilroy-King, Ashley, board member, Alumni Association; Jennifer Pawlowski, Nanticoke, board member, Alumni Association; Stephanie Yavorchak, Larksville; Mary Sullivan, director, student life and athletics; Henry Penafiel, Wilkes-Barre; Bonnie Brennan Lauer, director, alumni relations; Lisa Owens, Muhlenburg, vice president, Alumni Association; Melissa Taney, Nanticoke, president, Alumni Association; Sandy Nicholas, executive director, resource development; and Thomas P. Leary, president.

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CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

MEET Continued from Page 1B

able Me’ and ‘Toy Story’ over and over.” Favorite quote? “Find a profession that you love, and every paycheck is a bonus.” - Oprah Winfrey. Favorite book? “ ‘Good To Great,’ which is the story of Jack Welch and all that he did with GE. And anything like Mary Higgins Clark. I like mysteries. That’s my beach reading.” Proudest professional moment? Farrell says that Ellen

Alemany, the chairman and CEO of Citizens Bank, as well as Lisa Binder, a former executive with the company, each reached out to her earlier in her career and provided guidance and support. She says both women are very powerful, respected and wellrecognized within the banking industry and that their interest in her career was both important and flattering. “I’ve been lucky enough to have had fantastic mentors in banking that invested in me.” Alan K. Stout writes about area people for the Meet feature. Reach him at 970-7131.

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“I took this shot not only for the colors, but it really made me think about the many differences there arefromoneculturetoanotherand howbeautifuleachoneis,”saidJordan Brown, 21, of Harpswell, Maine, about his photo of a dilapidated house in the hills of Amizmiz, Morocco. Current Wilkes students and graduates, such as Pogash and Brown, captured their

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STUDY ABROAD PHOTO CONTEST First Place ($150 prize): Joseph Shipula, “Two Jackson’s Hartebeest in Uganda” Second Place ($100 prize): Pamela Pgash, “Children in a Village in Kaya, Burkina Faso” Third Place ($50 prize): Justin Balint, “Haitian Woman”

Honorable Mentions: Jordan Brown, “ Window in Amizmiz, Morocco” Brenda Zagar, “Children in Chinchon, Spain” Zahra Elhusseini, “Husband in Seattle”

snapshots purely by chance while pursuingtheirstudies.Eachphotograph represents a lasting memory. “You see photos and hear stories of marvelous things throughout theworld.Youneverimagineexpe-

riencing these things for yourself,” said Joseph Shipula, 23, WilkesBarre, who was the contest winner. Shipula captured a photo of two wild Jackson’s Hartebeest while See CONTEST, Page 11B

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

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IN BRIEF

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

Emeleigh A. Krzysik

Torin M. Smith

Emeleigh Ane Krzysik, daughter of Jeffrey Krzysik and Erin Karcheski of Hanover Township, is celebrating her second birthday today, Oct. 16. Emeleigh is a granddaughter of William and Margurite Karcheski, Nanticoke, and John and Karen Krzysik, Hanover Township. She is a great-granddaughter of Jay and Shirley Morgan, Wilkes-Barre, Joseph Otway, Edwardsville, Teresa Eppley, Edwardsville, Frank Karcheski, Lee Park, Shirley and the late John C. Krzysik, Warrior Run, the late John and Jean Morris, Nanticoke, and the late Elizabeth Norman, Plymouth.

Torin M. Smith, daughter of Christopher and Vannessa Smith, Exeter, is celebrating her fifth birthday today, Oct. 16. Torin is a granddaughter Marshall and Pamela Smith, Long Pond; Linda and Al Dippel, Rock Hill, S.C.; and Rick Thomas Jr. and Rebecca Peabody, Weatherly. She is a great-granddaughter of Marieve and Rick Thomas Sr., Trucksville. Torin has three brothers, Francis, 13, Lincoln, 2, and Burton, 10 months.

College Fair being held Thursday at LCCC The Pennsylvania Association for College Admissions Counseling (PACAC) will sponsor the Luzerne County Regional College Fair 78:30 p.m. Thursday at the Luzerne County Community College Campus Center. Representatives from nearly 100 colleges, universities, post-secondary technical schools, and the armed services will be in attendance to speak with prospective college students and parents. Representatives from the LCCC financial aid office will also be available to discuss federal and state financial aid programs. The annual fair is coordinated by PACAC with the assistance of LCCC and the Luzerne County Counselors Association. The program is free and open to the public. For more information, call LCCC at 740-0340, or 800-377-LCCC, ext. 7340. Preparing for the fair, from left, first row, are Thomas P. Leary, president, LCCC; Phyllis Johnson, admissions data processing assistant, LCCC; and Bill Hischak, secondary school counselor, Nanticoke Area High School. Second row: Randy Light, director, counseling and student support services, LCCC; Ed Hennigan, assistant director, admissions, LCCC and member, PACAC college fairs committee; Charles Salvo, counselor, Luzerne Intermediate Unit; and Jim Domzalaki, director, enrollment management, LCCC.

Mallory M. Powell Mallory Marie Powell, daughter of Amanda Stone and Anthony Powell Jr. of Plymouth, is celebrating her seventh birthday today, Oct. 16. Mallory is a granddaughter of Patrick and Karen Stone, Plymouth, and Benjamin and Sharon Simon, Wilkes-Barre. She is a great-granddaughter of Harry Stone, Plymouth, the late Anna Stone, Joseph and Eleanor Eddy, Plymouth, the late William Williams, and Minnie Sims and Clarence Sims.

Emily G. Crahall Emily Grace Crahall, daughter of A.J. and Susan Crahall, Dallas, is celebrating her ninth birthday today, Oct. 16. Emily is a granddaughter of Bob and Sandy Richardson and Adam and Tish Crahall, all of Dallas. She is a great-granddaughter of Marie McHugh, Wilkes-Barre. Emily has a brother, Zachary, 6.

THE TIMES LEADER

Gabriel A. Vecchio Gabriel Anthony Vecchio, son of Joshua and Jill Vecchio, Harrisburg, is celebrating his first birthday today, Oct .16. Gabriel is a grandson of Jaret Straub and the late Walter J. Straub, WilkesBarre Township, and Dave and Jodi Vecchio, Scottdale. He is a great-grandson of Hilda Griffiths, Wilkes-Barre.

NANTICOKE: Luzerne County Community College will also hold its annual Transfer Day Program 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Thursday at the college’s Campus Center. Representatives from colleges and universities will provide information to students who are interested in learning more about transferring to another institution after completing their studies at LCCC. The college will also hold will host a law enforcement seminar for individuals who respond to potentially lethal threats from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 29 at the college’s Educational Conference Center. Retired U.S. Army Lt. Col. David Grossman will be the featured speaker. Grossman is the director of the Warrior Science Group, a member of the American Board for Certification in Homeland Security and a member of the American College of Forensic Examiners Institute. Participants will receive instruction on selfassessment, potential areas of improvement and individual capacity to respond appropriately to the risks one faces in violent confrontations. Tuition is $89 per person and lunch is included. For more information, or to register, contact LCCC at 740-0481, or email kflannery@luzerne.edu.

NANTICOKE: Luzerne County Community College will hold a Menu Tasting and Open House 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Oct. 25 at the college’s Educational Conference Center. The event is open to the public at no cost and will include menu samples and tours of the facility. To make reservations, call 740-0602 or 800-377LCCC, ext. 7602. SCRANTON: The Lackawanna Heritage Valley National and State Heritage Area (LHV) is sponsoring grants through the 2011-2012 Educational Mini-Grant Program to teachers of grades kindergarten to 12. The program will award 10 grants of $500 each to educators in Northeastern Pennsylvania to produce heritage and environmental projects. This includes classroom teachers in the Northeastern Educational Intermediate Unit 19 service area and educators at cultural, historic and environmental organizations and sites. Complete program guidelines and grant applications are available on the LHV’s website at http://lhva.org/educational-minigrants.html. Deadline for submission is noon on Oct. 28. For more information, or to discuss a potential project, contact Tom McHugh, program/educational consultant, at 570-793-3692 or edventures@epix.net.

NAMES AND FACES

Carlucci speaks at Seminary Founders Day program Wyoming Seminary Upper School recently held its annual Founders Day assembly. The featured speaker was Frank C. Carlucci III, a member of the Seminary Class of 1948 and Secretary of Defense from 1987-89 during the Reagan Administration. Carlucci, who has served in high-level positions in the Foreign Service, State Department, Defense Department and Central Intelligence Agency, presented insight into his years of service to the United States and encouraged the students to pursue opportunities in public service. The program also included brief profiles of other Seminary graduates who have served the public. The program concluded with an announcement of the Frank C. Carlucci III Scholarship, which will be presented each spring to a rising senior student who demonstrates interest in public service and has made significant contributions to the school and the greater community. At the Founders Day program, from left: John Mueller, Class of 1952, vice president of the Board of Trustees; Carlucci; Frank Henry, Class of 1950, Honorary Trustee; and Dr. Kip Nygren, president, Seminary.

Renee McGowan, a member of the Wyoming Seminary Lower School mathematics faculty, has published a paper in the Fall 201 1 issue of the Journal of Technology Instruction in the Classroom. The McGowan paper titled, “The Influence of Technology on Skill Mastery in MiddleSchool Math,” described her experiences in using iPads in teaching statistics to eighthgrade students and comparing the results with those of students who used book-based and manipulatives learning techniques. McGowan holds a Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics and secondary

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education teacher certification from King’s College and is completing a master of education degree in curriculum and instruction with a concentration in mathematics from King’s College. Meredith Yozwiak, a student in Mrs. Nowakowski’s Honors English class at Pittston Area High School, was a winner in the Ayn Rand Anthem essay contest sponsored by Yozwiak the Ayn Rand Institute. Yozwiak received a monetary award. The contest was open to eighth-, ninth- and 10th-grade students worldwide. The essay was judged on both style and content and winning essays demonstrated an outstanding grasp of the philosophic meaning of Anthem.

GUIDELINES

Children’s birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge Photographs and information must be received two full weeks before your child’s birthday. To ensure accurate publication, your information must be typed or computer-generated. Include your child’s

name, age and birthday, parents’, grandparents’ and great-grandparents’ names and their towns of residence, any siblings and their ages. Don’t forget to include a daytime contact phone number.

We cannot return photos submitted for publication in community news, including birthday photos, occasions photos and all publicity photos. Please do not submit precious or original professional photographs that

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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Monday, October 17, 6 p.m. Henry Student Center, South Street, 2nd floor ballroom

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

Godlove Fonjweng, Ph.D., director of gobal education at Wilkes University talks to those gathered at the Henry Student Center to hear the winners announced for the ’Colonels Abroad’ photo contest.

CONTEST Continued from Page 9B

visiting the Murchison Falls of the Nile River in the Republic of Uganda. Shipula is currently pursuing a careerinpharmacyasamemberof the class of 2012. “The pictures represent moments when our students, faculty and staff can reflect upon and appreciate all the learning that went onduringthetrip,”Fonjwengsaid. The option to study abroad at Wilkes is available to all students. The event’s photographs showed personal experiences, destinations and visuals that were but a fraction of the summer trip, semester or full academic year that the students and faculty spent abroad. “The pictures are a glimpse of the learning and discoveries,” Fonjweng said. Justin Balint, 23, of Hazleton, would agree. Balint spent a week providing care in an orphanage as well as teaching English in the DominicanRepublic.Hisphotograph of a Haitian woman crossing the Dominicanborderthroughasmall

river to get to a market was just a small example of the difficulties the islanders face daily. “The woman in the photograph really represented the hardship that many of these people go through,” Balint said, “although it shows her dedication and strength.” The service-learning, classes andresearchopportunitiesabroad benefit not only students, but faculty, too. “The programs aim to enhance

our internationalization efforts and are designed to help our graduates seamlessly integrate in the global community,” Fonjweng said. The photos will be on exhibit in the Henry Student Center, 84 W South St., on the Wilkes University campus. In the near future, the photos will be displayed online at www.wilkes.edu/abroad, throughout the Wilkes campus, and in the Wilkes Study Abroad Photo Book.

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• Single Family Home up to 2,000 sq. ft. up to $200k • Single Family Home up to 2,000 sq. ft. under $250k • Residential Additions up to $75k • Residential Additions over $75k

John Holahan, president and partner of Liberty Homes Custom Builders, Pocono Lake, PA, has served the community in myriad service roles for more than two decades. As Life Director and member of the board of directors for the Pennsylvania Housing Association, Mr. Holahan assists in promoting and advancing home ownership through education for the housing industry. Mr. Holahan is a Trustee of Clymer Library, Pocono Pines, a member of the board of directors for the Greater Pocono Chamber of Commerce, and a member of the Pocono Healthy Community Alliance Committee. As a committee member for the PHCA, Mr. Holahan helps craft policy and procedures to advance safe and affordable housing for the Monroe County community.

Six lucky winners will receive a family 4-pack to see “Where the Wild Things Are” presented by the Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic.

Sunday, Oct. 23, 2011 • Scranton Cultural Center 1:00PM Activity | 2:00PM Concert

Audience encouraged to come in costume just in time for Halloween!

Enter to win a Family 4-pack of tickets!

Where the Wild Things Are • NEPA Philharmonic • Scranton Cultural Center

Media Sponsor

Pinnacle Sponsor THE TIMES LEADER Keystone Sponsors

Winners will be contacted by phone.

Name: ______________________________________________________ Return completed entry by October 19, 2011 to: The Times Leader, Where the Wild Things Are 15 N. Main Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711

716711

Cornerstone Sponsors

CO

I C UN

K n ee R ep lacem en t?

Building Industry Association Of Northeastern Pennsylvania

John Holahan

E N R E Z U L UNTY L CO

520 Third A venu e • K ings to n

Building Industry Association of NEPA Fourth Annual Keystone Award Winner

President, Partner Liberty Homes Custom Builder

R O F M U R A FO ATES FOR D I D N CA

Address: ____________________________________________________ City: _________________________________ State: ____ Zip: _________ Phone: _______________________ E-mail: _________________________

No purchase necessary. Prizes have no cash value and are nontransferable. Winners agree to having their name and photo used for publicity. Copies may be examined at our 15 N. Main St., WilkesBarre office. The winners will be determined through random drawing from all entries received by October 19, 2011. This newspaper cannot answer or respond to telephone calls or letters regarding the contest. Sponsors’ employees and their immediate families are not eligible to enter.


CMYK PAGE 12B

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

This Week Only INTERNATIONAL COIN COLLECTORS are in Wilkes-Barre! Paying Cash for all Coins and anything Gold or Silver! By KEN MCINTOSH STAFF WRITER ICCA will be placing ads in newspapers, radio and running television spots this week asking people to bring in any old silver and gold coins made before 1970. Those that bring in their coins will be able to speak with collectors one on one and have their coins looked at by a specialist. With the help of these ICCA members, offers will be made to those that have coins made before 1970. Offers will be made based on silver or gold content and the rarity of the coins. All coins made before 1970 will be examined and purchased including gold coins, silver coins, silver dollars, all types of nickels and pennies. Those that decide to sell their coins will be paid on the spot. If you are like a lot of people you might have a few old coins or even a coffee can full lying around. If you have ever wondered what they are worth now might be your chance to find out and even sell them if you choose. They could be worth a lot according to the International Coin Collectors Association also known as ICCA. Collectors will pay a fortune for some coins and currency for their collections. If it is rare enough, one coin could be worth over $100,000 according to Eric Helms, coin collector and ICCA member. One ultra rare dime, an 1894S Barber, sold for a record $1.9 million to a collector in July of 2007. While that is an extreme example, many rare and valuable coins are stashed away in dresser drawers or lock boxes around the country. The ICCA and its collector members have organized a traveling event in search of all types of coins and currency. Even common coins can be worth a significant amount due to the high price of silver and gold, says Helms. Washington quarters and Roosevelt dimes can be worth many times their face value. Recent silver markets have driven the price up on common coins made of silver. Helms explains that all half dollars, quarters and dimes made before 1965 contain 90% silver and are sought after any time silver prices rise. Right now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a sellers market he said. The rarest coins these collectors are looking for include $20, $10, $5 and $2 1/2 gold coins and any coin made before 1850. These

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Any and all coins made before 1970, rare coins, entire collections, Silver Dollars, Half Dollars, Quarters, Dimes, Half Dimes, Nickels, Three Cent Pieces, Two Cent Pieces, Cents, Large Cents, Half Cents and all others.

JEWELRY

Gold Jewelry, Silver Jewelry, Gold Buillion Diamond rings, bracelets, earrings, loose diamonds, all gem stones, scrap gold, broken jewelry etc.

coins always bring big premiums according to the ICCA. Silver dollars are also very sought after nowadays. Other types of items the ICCA will be purchasing during this event include U.S. currency, gold bullion, investment gold, silver bars, silver rounds, proof sets, etc. Even foreign coins are sought after and will be purchased. Also at this event anyone can sell their gold jewelry, dental gold or anything made of gold on the spot. Gold is currently trading at Record Highs. Bring anything you think might be gold and the collectors will examine, test and price it for free. If you decide to sell, you will be paid on the spot â&#x20AC;&#x201C; it has been an unknown fact that coin dealers have always paid more for jewelry and scrap gold than other jewelers and pawn brokers. So whether you have one coin you think might be valuable or a large collection you recently inherited, you can talk to these collectors for free. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re lucky you may have a rarity worth thousands. Either way there is nothing to lose and it sounds like fun! For more information on this event visit WWW.INTERNATIONALCOINCOLLECTORS.COM

WE BUY ALL GOLD & SILVER JEWELRY

WE ALSO BUY COSTUME JEWELRY

Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s How It Works:                 

                                           

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DIRECTIONS: (570) 820-8595 SHOW INFO: (217) 787-7767

PLATINUM

GOLD COINS

Including $20, $10, $5, $4, $3, $2.5, $1, Private Gold, Gold Bars, etc.

INVESTMENT GOLD

1893 Morgan PAID $1,800

All denominations made before 1934.

Also Buying

1916 Mercury Dime PAID $2,800

Antiques

PAID $250

NO WAITING IN LINE

GOLD

IS TRADING AT ALL TIME HIGHS NOW IS THE TIME TO CASH IN!

Bring this pass and beat the lines Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss your chance of cashing in at these Record High Gold & Silver Prices ALL JEWELRY ACCEPTED

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PAPER MONEY

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Kruggerands, Canadian Maple Leafs, Pandas, Gold Bars, U.S. Eagles and Buffalos, etc.

Recent Finds:

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Anything made of Platinum.


CMYK

SPORTS

SECTION

timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

C

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

PAUL SOKOLOSKI

Rangers Cruz into Series Texas repeats as AL champs with 15-5 rout

By STEPHEN HAWKINS AP Sports Writer

ARLINGTON, Texas — Nelson Cruz and the Texas Rangers are headed to their second straight World Series, finishing off the Detroit Tigers to become the American League’s first repeat champion in a decade. Cruz set a postseason record with his sixth home run of the se-

ries, Michael Young hit a pair of two-run doubles in a nine-run third inning, and the Rangers romped to a 15-5 win Saturday night that won the AL pennant in six games. They’ll open the World Series on Wednesday night at St. Louis or Milwaukee, seeking the first title in the history of a franchise that started play in 1961.

Penguins meet their goal of a better start, but cannot finish off champion Binghamton.

World Series will again be deep in the heart of Texas. Young caught Brandon Inge’s gameending popout in short right field and pumped a fist into the air signaling “No. 1” while fireworks and confetti filled the air, then ran toward the middle of the field to celebrate with his team-

Cruz had 13 RBIs in the series, another postseason record, and was selected MVP. “He was unbelievable,” teammate Adrian Beltre said. “Every moment we needed him, he came through.” Young, who also homered, had five RBIs in the finale, and the longest-tenured player on the Rangers helped make sure the See RANGERS, Page 6C

PENGUINS HOCKEY

Senators triumph in overtime

Josh Hamilton scores in the third inning on Saturday.

BOILERMAKERS

23

18

Enough to win

By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE TWP. – After giving up two goals in the first five minutes of their 7-4 loss to SpringfieldonFriday,the Wilkes-Barre/ Scranton Penguins came into Saturday’s contest with one goal inmind–getoffto a better start. They did just SENATORS that by limiting the Binghamton Senators to one shot and carrying PENGUINS a 2-0 lead to close out the period, thanks to goals from Brandon DeFazio and Eric Tangradi. It certainly was thestartthatthePenguinshopedfor, but the same can’t be said for the end. After carrying a 3-2 lead well into the third period, the Penguins allowed the Senators to come back and eventually win in overtime, 5-4.

5

4

See PENGUINS, Page 6C

NHL ROUNDUP

King Richards victorious in Philly return The Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — Mike Richards had a triumphant return to Philadelphia, assisting on Jack Johnson’s winning power-play goal at 1:39 of overtime to lift the Los Angeles Kings past the Flyers 3-2 on Saturday night. Richards returned to Philadelphia for the first time since his shocking trade in June. Richards was KINGS the Flyers captain and led them to the Stanley Cup fiFLYERS nal in 2010. He heard mostly cheers during his pregame introduction and a huge ovation when the Flyers thanked him on the big screen for his years of service. The goodwill ended soon after

3

2

See KINGS, Page 10C

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Penn State running back Silas Redd (25) holds off Purdue linebacker Joe Gilliam during the first quarter Saturday in State College.

Penn State’s offense sputters past Purdue By DEREK LEVARSE dlevarse@timesleader.com

STATE COLLEGE -- The pile lurched forward as a dozen players converged on the football. When it finally came to a stop, out fell Matt McGloin to the roar of the crowd. McGloin landed well past the first down marker on the fourth-and-1 quarterback sneak, and it was finally over. On an afternoon of bizarre bounces and sloppy play, Penn State wasn’t about to chance things by kicking a field goal deep in Purdue territory, instead putting the ball in McGloin’s hands to finish off

the Boilermakers. The Scranton native did just that, and the Nittany Lions picked up yet another all-too-close win by holding off Purdue 23-18 Saturday at Beaver Stadium. Penn State improved to 6-1 and 3-0 in the Big Ten, with those three conference wins coming by a combined 21 points. “Fortunate? Yeah, (we’ve been) fortunate that we got a couple bounces,” coach Joe Paterno said. “And unfortunate that we made a couple of games closer than they should have been because we made some mistakes. “I just want to enjoy this one.”

The Lions are, of course, enjoying their 6-1 start to the season. But many of the same problems still have to be solved as they head back on the road to face Northwestern next week. On a cold, windy day in Happy Valley, the Lions finished the game 10-of-23 passing for 185 yards and an interception. Though Bolden started for a seventh straight game, it was McGloin who saw most of the work, going 8-of-17 for 145 yards and a pick while playing most of See ENOUGH, Page 3C

HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL

Rangers pass Trojans to extend series streak Northwest has 298 yards passing as Nanticoke drops fourth straight between foes.

By JOHN ERZAR jerzar@timesleader.com

Christian Foley struck for a third time. Northwest’s pass-catch duo connected on a 32-yard touchdown pass with 1:37 to play, giving the Rangers a 34-30 victory and sending Nanticoke to a frustrating loss in a Wyoming Valley Conference Division 2A-A game. “It’s tough because there’s nothing you can say to make it

NANTICOKE – Four consecutive years of lopsided losses to Northwest were on the cusp of being avenged Saturday night. Then Gunner Majer and See RANGERS, Page 7C

Looks are deceiving with Lions

THEIR 6-1 RECORD suggests a dominant team, a dynamite season, a deathtrap for any opponent on the

PENN STATE FOOTBALL NITTANY LIONS

OPINION

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Nanticoke running back Brian Maslowski finds a hole in the Northwest defense in Nanticoke on Saturday night.

schedule. Their slim margin of most victories says drop those thoughts. At least Penn State didn’t drop down in the Big Ten standings. The Nittany Lions didn’t blow anyone away Saturday while weathering a 23-18 victory over Purdue. At least their hopes of a conference title didn’t get blown away on a windy day at Beaver Stadium. "I really don’t care what we look like," snapped Lions quarterback Matt McGloin from West Scranton High School. "As long as we keep winning." The Lions looked the way they normally do, using a big-play defense and just enough offense to squeak by. But all this grinding isn’t making much noise at Penn State. A fifth consecutive victory and a 3-0 start to their Big Ten season probably won’t move the Lions up much from their No. 25 position in the national polls. That’s because Penn State has beaten its first three very average conference opponents by a combined 21 points and won three of their six victories by less than a touchdown. This is supposed to be one of the Big Ten’s teams to beat? "I feel like we’re a dominant, powerful football team," insisted Lions linebacker Nate Stupar, who came up with his first interception of the season to seal Saturday’s victory. "Our defense makes big plays. Creating turnovers helps our offense get into better situations. We’ve won big games, been in big situations." But it’s not as if Penn State is viewed as the big, bad wolf of the Big Ten. "I guess because we’re not blowing teams out," McGloin said. But something special may be blowing in the Beaver Stadium wind. ‘We can win games’ Before the Lions bumped off the Boilermakers, they escaped Iowa, 13-3, staved off Indiana 16-10 and nipped Temple, 14-10. But while this hasn’t been a season of clear superiority for Penn State, the Lions never looked inferior after suffering a 27-11 defeat against second-ranked Alabama in the second game of the season. "We feel like a 6-1 team," Lions wide receiver Justin Brown said. "We know we can win games." You are what your record says you are, former NFL coach Bill Parcells used to say. And Penn State quarterbacks coach Jay Paterno pulled out a variation of that line while defending his team’s status among the elite teams in the nation. "It’s a 6-1 team," Paterno said. "Right now, we’re 3-0 (in the) Big Ten. We play good defense, we don’t turn the ball over in our end. We’re taking care of the football when we have to take care of it." It’s called taking care of business, one way or the other. And if that trend continues against more respected conference opponents including unbeaten Wisconsin and once-beaten Illinois and Nebraska, the Lions will wind up defending a Big Ten championship instead of defending a record that suggests they belong among the best. "Who doesn’t like to be under the radar?" Stupar asked. "Who doesn’t love an underdog playing well?" Penn State hasn’t played at an elite level that will wow anyone yet. Just well enough to show it can stand among the best.


K PAGE 2C

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

T H I S W E E K ’ S L O C A L C A L E N D A R TODAY COLLEGE FIELD HOCKEY Misericordia at Catholic, 2 p.m. WOMEN'S TENNIS MAC Tournament at Ralston Complex/Kirby Park MONDAY, OCT. 17 H.S. FIELD HOCKEY Hazleton Area at Lake-Lehman Lackawanna Trail at Wyoming Valley West Honesdale at Nanticoke Wyoming Seminary at Wyoming Area Coughlin at Holy Redeemer Meyers at Dallas Wallenpaupack at Delaware Valley Abington Heights at Crestwood H.S. GOLF Regional Tournament at Golden Oaks Golf Club, Fleetville H.S. GIRLS TENNIS District 2 Class 2A Team Quarterfinals Valley View at Dallas, 7 p.m. Mid Valley at Wyoming Seminary, 4 p.m. H.S. BOYS SOCCER Dallas at Wyoming Valley West Coughlin at Hazleton Area, 7 p.m. Berwick at Hanover Area, 7 p.m. MMI Prep at Wyoming Area Nanticoke at GAR Wyoming Seminary at Tunkhannock Lake-Lehman at Pittston Area H.S. GIRLS VOLLEYBALL (4:15 p.m. unless noted) Nanticoke at MMI Wyoming Area at Hanover Area Lake-Lehman at Meyers COLLEGE FIELD HOCKEY King’s at FDU-Florham, 4 p.m. TUESDAY, OCT. 18 H.S. FIELD HOCKEY Berwick at Hanover Area Coughlin at Abington Heights Elk Lake at Pittston Area GAR at Tunkhannock Lackawanna Trail at Wyoming Area Montrose at Northwest, DH, 3:15 p.m. H.S. GIRLS TENNIS District 2 Class 3A Quarterfinals Coughlin at Wallenpaupack, 4 p.m. H.S. BOYS SOCCER Crestwood at Dallas Nanticoke at Hanover Area Coughlin at Meyers H.S. GIRLS VOLLEYBALL (4:15 p.m. unless noted) North Pocono at Delaware Valley Coughlin at Wyoming Valley West Dallas at Holy Redeemer Tunkhannock at Crestwood Berwick at Pittston Area WOMEN'S SOCCER King’s at Wilkes, 4 p.m. DeSales at Misericordia, 7 p.m. WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL Eastern at King’s, 7 p.m. Misericordia at FDU-Florham, 7 p.m. WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19 H.S. CROSS COUNTRY Wyoming Valley Coaches Meet H.S. FIELD HOCKEY Montrose at Hanover Area Northwest at Wyoming Valley West, 6:30 p.m. Pittston Area at Elk Lake Wyoming Area at Hazleton Area H.S. BOYS SOCCER Crestwood at Lake-Lehman Meyers at Pittston Area H.S. GIRLS VOLLEYBALL (4:30 p.m. unless noted) MMI at Wyoming Area Nanticoke at Lake-Lehman Hanover Area at GAR COLLEGE FIELD HOCKEY Misericordia at Delaware Valley, 4 p.m. Wilkes at King’s, 7 p.m. MEN'S SOCCER DeSales at Misericordia, 7 p.m. King’s at Wilkes, 7 p.m. THURSDAY, OCT. 20 H.S. GIRLS VOLLEYBALL (4:30 p.m. unless noted) Hazleton Area at Wyoming Valley West Crestwood at Dallas North Pocono at Coughlin Berwick at Holy Redeemer Pittston Area at Tunkhannock H.S. GIRLS TENNIS District 2 Team Championships Class 2A semifinals at Kirby Park, 12:30 p.m. Class 3A semifinals at Kirby Park, 11:30 a.m. H.S. BOYS SOCCER Coughlin at Wyoming Valley West WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL Lycoming at Misericordia, 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 21 H.S. FOOTBALL (7 p.m.) Crestwood at Wyoming Valley West Hazleton Area at Coughlin Lake-Lehman at Nanticoke Meyers at Northwest Pittston Area at Berwick Tunkhannock at Williamsport SATURDAY, OCT. 22 H.S. FOOTBALL Hanover Area at Holy Redeemer, 1 p.m. Pocono Mountain East at Dallas, 1 p.m. Wyoming Area at GAR, 7 p.m. H.S. FIELD HOCKEY Wyoming Seminary at Eastern (N.J.), 6:30 p.m. COLLEGE FIELD HOCKEY King’s at Misericordia, 1 p.m. Manhattanville at Wilkes, 1 p.m. COLLEGE FOOTBALL King’s at Delaware Valley, 1 p.m. MEN'S SOCCER Wilkes at Delaware Valley, 2 p.m. Misericordia at FDU-Florham, 2:30 p.m. DeSales at King’s, 7 p.m. WOMEN'S SOCCER Misericordia at FDU-Florham, 11 a.m. Wilkes at Delaware Valley, noon DeSales at King’s, 4:30 p.m. COLLEGE SWIMMING Post at Misericordia, 2 p.m. WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL Misericordia at William Patterson

W H A T ’ S

O N

T V

AUTO RACING 2 p.m., SPEED — ARCA, Toledo 200, at Toledo, Ohio 3:30 p.m., ABC — IRL, IndyCar, World Championships, at Las Vegas 7 p.m., ESPN2 — NHRA, Arizona Nationals, at Chandler, Ariz. (same-day tape) EXTREME SPORTS 4:30 p.m., NBC — Dew Tour Championships, at Las Vegas GOLF 9 a.m., TGC — European PGA Tour, Portugal Masters, final round, at Vilamoura, Portugal 2 p.m., TGC — PGA Tour, The McGladrey Classic, final round, at St. Simon Island, Ga. 5 p.m., TGC — Nationwide Tour, Miccosukee Championship, final round, at Miami (same-day tape) 7:30 p.m., TGC — Champions Tour, AT&T Championship, final round, at San Antonio (same-day tape) 9:30 p.m., TGC — LPGA Malaysia, final round, at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (same-day tape) MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 4 p.m., TBS — Playoffs, National League Championship Series, game 6, St. Louis at Milwaukee MOTORSPORTS 4 p.m., SPEED — MotoGP World Championship, Australian Grand Prix, at Phillip Island, Australia (same-day tape) 5 p.m., SPEED — FIM World Superbike, at Portimao, Portugal (same-day tape) NFL 1 p.m., CBS — Jacksonville at Pittsburgh 1 p.m., FOX —Philadelphia at Washington 4:15 p.m., FOX — Dallas at New England 8 p.m., NBC — Minnesota at Chicago PAN AM GAMES 3 p.m., ESPN2 — Events TBA, at Guadalajara, Mexico SOCCER 9 p.m., ESPN — MLS, CD Chivas USA at Los Angeles MEN'S COLLEGE SOCCER Noon, BTN -- Indiana at Michigan 2 p.m., BTN -- Northwestern at Penn State WOMEN'S COLLEGE SOCCER 4 p.m., BTN -- Wisconsin at Illinois WOMEN'S COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL 6 p.m., BTN -- Iowa at Wisconsin

C O U N T Y C U P S O C C E R U18 Girls Nanticoke 8, Forty Fort 0 Nanticoke received two goals from Kloey Cimansky and a goal apiece from Zoe Bozinski, Lindsay Lane, Brittany Sugalski, Jessica McMahon, Kymber Letteer, Alexandra Krysiuk.

U16 Girls

Plains 3, West Side AC 2 Scoring for Plains was Julie Kosik, Melanie Sweeney and Erin Flanagan.

U14 Girls

Plains 4, Kingston 1 Kalie Reed scored two goals and Abby Majeski and Caroline Majeski each had one goal for Plains. M’kensie Lee was in goal for Plains. Alex Hargrave scored for Kingston. Mountain Top 4, Plains 2 Alyssa Cuono scored all four goals for Mountain Top, while Autumn Kaminski had 2 assists. Caroline Majeski and Megan Obeid scored for Plains with Abby Majeski has both assists for Plains. Nanticoke 3, Bear Creek 1 Scoring goals for Nanticoke were Lexi Seery, Sam Russin and Leeann Wasiakowski.

U12 Girls

Nanticoke Strikers 6, Stoners 0 Kayla Aufierio recorded a hat trick, while Katie Butczynski, Amiah Lukowski and Emily Sims each had a goal.

H . S . S O C C E R Boys WVC Standings

Division I Dallas (2A)......................................... Crestwood (2A) ................................ Coughlin (3A).................................... Valley West (3A) .............................. Hazleton Area (3A) .......................... Division II Lake-Lehman (2A) ........................... Pittston Area (3A)............................. Tunkhannock (3A)............................ Holy Redeemer (2A)........................ Wyoming Seminary (A)................... Meyers (A)......................................... Division III Berwick (2A)...................................... Hanover Area (2A) ........................... Wyoming Area (2A) ......................... MMI (A) .............................................. GAR (2A) ........................................... Nanticoke (2A) ..................................

W 12 9 8 8 1 W 11 9 9 8 7 4 W 10 8 4 3 2 0

L 0 3 3 4 11 L 3 4 6 7 6 10 L 4 4 10 9 13 13

T 0 0 0 0 0 T 0 1 0 1 2 0 T 1 1 0 0 0 0

P

O

Note to coaches: Information is compiled through matches reported to The Times Leader. To correct stats, e-mail drosengrant@timesleader.com

INDIVIDUAL SCORING G 19 14 14 10 12 8 10 10 7 3 4 5 4 3 4 3 3 1 3 3 3 2 1 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 G 27 29 25 24 15 13 16 12 10 9 9 7 4 9 6 6 6 3 6 5 4 3 5 5 3 2 2 5 4 4 2 3 2 2 3 3 3 3 2 2 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 G 31 27 30 23 10 16 6 8 7 4 4 3 5 4 4 4 1 3 3 3 2 2 3

A 9 7 4 10 5 11 5 2 1 9 5 0 2 4 1 3 2 6 1 1 1 3 5 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 A 11 6 12 9 12 12 5 11 4 6 4 8 14 2 5 5 5 10 1 3 5 7 2 2 6 7 7 0 1 1 5 2 4 4 1 1 0 0 2 1 3 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 2 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 A 10 12 5 2 15 1 6 1 3 9 4 6 1 3 3 2 7 2 1 1 3 3 0

Pt. 47 35 32 30 29 27 25 22 15 15 13 10 10 10 9 9 8 8 7 7 7 7 7 6 6 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Pt. 65 64 62 57 42 38 37 35 24 24 22 22 22 20 17 17 17 16 13 13 13 13 12 12 12 11 11 10 9 9 9 8 8 8 7 7 6 6 6 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Pt. 72 66 65 48 35 33 18 17 17 17 12 12 11 11 11 10 9 8 7 7 7 7 6

R

T

S

THE TIMES LEADER

By ROXY ROXBOROUGH INJURY REPORT: On the NFL board, Houston WR Andre Johnson is out and QB Matt Schaub is probable; Dallas WR Miles Austin is probable. For the latest odds & scores, check us out at www.americasline.com. BOXING REPORT: In the WBO welterweight title fight on November 12 in Las Vegas, Nevada, Manny Pacquiao is -$800 vs. Juan Manuel Marquez +$550. BASEBALL Favorite

Odds

Underdog

RAIDERS

6.5

PATRIOTS

7

American League Championship Series

Saints

RANGERS

BEARS

9.0

Tigers

BREWERS Favorite

8.5 Points

Cards Underdog

PACKERS

14.5

STEELERS

12

Jaguars

Eagles

3

REDSKINS

LIONS

4

49ers

FALCONS

4

Panthers

BENGALS

Rams

7

Colts

GIANTS

3.5

Bills

RAVENS

8

A.J. Woznock, Berwick Brian Wisowaty, Wyoming Area Zach Klinger, Berwick Jose Umana, Berwick Dave Stecco, Nanticoke William Gray, Wyoming Area Jeff Albert, Hanover Area James Lukachinsky, Hanover Area Jeremy Moyer, Berwick Joharky Santo, GAR Ryan Cherkauskas, Hanover Area Casey Olszewski, MMI Zack Mitchell, Berwick Edgar Junior Ramos, Berwick Junior Ramos Ramirez, Berwick Justin Galbraith, GAR Nicole Krzywicki, GAR Brandon Bailey, Hanover Area Ryan Richards, Hanover Area Austin Gray, Nanticoke Mike Mihneski, Nanticoke Brian Mapes, Wyoming Area Julio Ayala, Berwick Brandon Cope, Berwick Anthony Eck, Hanover Area Aaron Smith, Hanover Area Elijah Dove, MMI James Gabrielle, MMI Andrew Blank, Nanticoke Winston Goday, Nanticoke Jake Niewinski, Nanticoke Nick Gunska, Wyoming Area Daniel Haley, Wyoming Area Michael Kohut, Wyoming Area

Texans 1 2 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

4 1 3 3 0 0 2 2 2 1 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

6 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

TEAM SCORING DIVISION I Coughlin .................................................. Crestwood............................................... Dallas....................................................... Hazleton Area ........................................ Wyoming Valley West........................... DIVISION II Holy Redeemer...................................... Lake-Lehman ......................................... Meyers..................................................... Pittston Area........................................... Tunkhannock.......................................... Wyoming Seminary............................... DIVISION III Berwick.................................................... GAR ......................................................... Hanover Area ......................................... MMI .......................................................... Nanticoke ................................................ Wyoming Area .......................................

Browns Cowboys

5.5

BUCS

3

Vikings

7

Dolphins

Monday

National League Championship Series

G 11 12 12 13 12 G 16 14 14 14 15 14 G 15 14 12 12 13 12

GF GA 42 13 44 17 63 6 11 80 22 14 GF GA 49 46 63 18 38 43 85 36 66 52 42 29 GF GA 90 29 26 94 41 24 34 87 9 93 34 72

A H L EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Manchester................ 4 3 1 0 0 6 17 5 St. John’s................... 4 3 1 0 0 6 11 7 Worcester .................. 2 2 0 0 0 4 10 2 Portland...................... 2 1 1 0 0 2 5 7 Providence ................ 4 1 3 0 0 2 7 16 East Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Hershey ..................... 3 3 0 0 0 6 13 9 Norfolk........................ 3 2 1 0 0 4 15 15 Penguins .................. 5 1 2 1 1 4 15 17 Binghamton ............... 4 1 2 1 0 3 13 15 Syracuse.................... 1 1 0 0 0 2 5 4 Northeast Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Adirondack ................ 2 2 0 0 0 4 12 6 Springfield ................. 4 2 2 0 0 4 16 16 Connecticut ............... 3 1 1 0 1 3 6 9 Bridgeport.................. 3 1 2 0 0 2 9 12 Albany ........................ 4 1 3 0 0 2 9 18 WESTERN CONFERENCE Midwest Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Milwaukee.................. 2 2 0 0 0 4 8 3 Rockford .................... 3 2 1 0 0 4 11 9 Charlotte .................... 2 0 1 1 0 1 8 10 Chicago...................... 3 0 2 0 1 1 5 11 Peoria......................... 2 0 2 0 0 0 4 9 North Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Hamilton..................... 3 2 1 0 0 4 11 8 Toronto....................... 3 2 1 0 0 4 10 8 Grand Rapids ............ 2 1 1 0 0 2 5 5 Rochester .................. 3 1 2 0 0 2 6 11 Lake Erie.................... 4 0 4 0 0 0 5 11 West Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Abbotsford ................. 3 3 0 0 0 6 7 4 Houston ..................... 2 2 0 0 0 4 9 3 Oklahoma City .......... 2 1 1 0 0 2 3 9 San Antonio............... 2 1 1 0 0 2 5 5 Texas ......................... 2 1 1 0 0 2 9 5 NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point for an overtime or shootout loss. Saturday's Games Toronto 5, Lake Erie 3 St. John’s 6, Hamilton 2 Providence 4, Springfield 1 Manchester 5, Portland 1 Worcester 6, Albany 1 Bridgeport at Connecticut, 7 p.m. Norfolk at Hershey, 7 p.m. Peoria at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Binghamton 5, Penguins 4, OT Adirondack at Syracuse, late Texas at Oklahoma City, late Milwaukee at Chicago, late San Antonio at Houston, late Today's Games Lake Erie at Toronto, 1 p.m. Peoria at Charlotte, 3 p.m. Manchester at Springfield, 3 p.m. Adirondack at Bridgeport, 3 p.m. Rockford at Abbotsford, 4 p.m. Binghamton at Albany, 4 p.m. Portland at Providence, 4:05 p.m. Houston at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. Grand Rapids at Rochester, 6:05 p.m.

C O L L E G E F O O T B A L L The AP Top 25 Fared No. 1 LSU (7-0) beat Tennessee 38-7. Next: vs. No. 24 Auburn, Saturday. No. 2 Alabama (7-0) beat Mississippi 52-7. Next: vs. Tennessee, Saturday. No. 3 Oklahoma (5-0) at Kansas. Next: vs. Texas Tech, Saturday. No. 4 Wisconsin (6-0) beat Indiana 59-7. Next: at No. 23 Michigan State, Saturday. No. 5 Boise State (6-0) beat Colorado State 63-13. Next: vs. Air Force, Saturday. No. 6 Oklahoma State (6-0) beat No. 22 Texas 38-26. Next: at Missouri, Saturday. No. 7 Stanford (5-0) at Washington State. Next: vs. Washington, Saturday. No. 8 Clemson (6-0) at Maryland. Next: vs. North Carolina, Saturday. No. 9 Oregon (4-1) vs. No. 18 Arizona State. Next: at Colorado, Saturday. No. 10 Arkansas (5-1) did not play. Next: at Mississippi, Saturday. No. 11 Michigan (6-1) lost No. 23 Michigan State 28-14. Next: vs. Purdue, Saturday, Oct. 29. No. 12 Georgia Tech (6-1) lost to Virginia 24-21. Next: at Miami, Saturday. No. 13 West Virginia (5-1) did not play. Next: at Syracuse, Friday. No. 14 Nebraska (5-1) did not play. Next: at Minnesota, Saturday. No. 15 South Carolina (6-1) beat Mississippi State 14-12. Next: at Tennessee, Saturday, Oct. 29. No. 16 Illinois (6-1) lost to Ohio State 17-7. Next: at Purdue, Saturday. No. 17 Kansas State (5-0) at Texas Tech. Next: at Kansas, Saturday. No. 18 Arizona State (5-1) at No. 9 Oregon. Next: vs. Colorado, Saturday, Oct. 29. No. 19 Virginia Tech (6-1) beat Wake Forest 38-17. Next: vs. Boston College, Saturday. No. 20 Baylor (4-2) lost to No. 21 Texas A&M 55-28. Next: at No. 6 Oklahoma State, Saturday, Oct. 29. No. 21 Texas A&M (4-2) beat No. 20 Baylor 55-28. Next: at Iowa State, Saturday. No. 22 Texas (4-2) lost to No. 6 Oklahoma State 38-26. Next: vs. Kansas, Saturday, Oct. 29. No. 23 Michigan State (5-1) beat No. 11 Michigan 28-14. Next: vs. No 4 Wisconsin, Saturday. No. 24 Auburn (4-2) vs. No. 17 Florida. Next: at No. 1 LSU Saturday. No. 25 Houston (6-0) did not play. Next: vs. Marshall, Saturday.

www.timesleader.com

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AMERICA’S LINE

NFL

WVC Scoring Leaders

DIVISION I Justin Okun, Coughlin ............................ Dante DeAngelo, Dallas ......................... Alex Mahalick, Crestwood ..................... Danny Saba, Dallas................................. A.J. Krysicki, Crestwood......................... A.J. Nardone, Dallas ............................... Josh Shilanski, Dallas ............................. Pat Malone, Coughlin.............................. Connor Dolan, WVW............................... Travis Keil, Coughlin ............................... Brandon Scharff, Dallas.......................... Max Pozzessere, Haz. Area .................. Eric Whited, WVW................................... John Andrews, Crestwood..................... John Murray, Dallas ................................ Alex Buchholz, Crestwood..................... Joe Tona, Coughlin ................................. Dave Marriggi, Coughlin......................... Sammy Skonieczki, Crestwood ............ Tyler Bicking, Haz. Area ......................... Dan Taren, WVW..................................... Matt Saba, Dallas..................................... Ryan Wisnewski, WVW.......................... Nate Wood, Dallas................................... Brian Stepniak, Dallas............................. Casey Barrett, Dallas .............................. Josh Tarnalicki, Coughlin....................... Bobby Caffray, Haz. Area ...................... Jeremy Biagotti, WVW............................ Zach Patricio, WVW ................................ Marty Ryman, Crestwood....................... Kevin Wimphfeimer, Crestwood ........... Eddie Thomas, WVW ............................. Tom Sebia, Coughlin .............................. Christian Malkemes, Crestwood ........... Mike Gallis, Dallas................................... David Miller, Dallas.................................. Brooks Thompson, WVW ...................... Nick Singer, WVW................................... Josh Featherman, Coughlin ................... Bobby Hawkins, Coughlin ...................... Kevin Zingaretti, Coughlin...................... Sean Hutchins, Crestwood .................... Damon Szatkowski, Dallas..................... Ryan Mimmick, Haz. Area ..................... Josh Pozzesserre. Haz. Area................ Mike Pozzesserre, Haz. Area................ Chris Jaworski, WVW ............................. Casey Ritsick, Crestwood...................... Blake Pertl, Dallas ................................... John Skursky, Coughlin.......................... John Stack, Coughlin.............................. George Gendler, Crestwood ................. Dom Mack, Crestwood ........................... Yuri Ackerman, Dallas ............................ Daniel Mendoza, Haz. Area................... Colin Schaeffer, Haz. Area .................... Colin Harrison, WVW.............................. DIVISION II Jordan Consagra, Pittston Area Ryan Karnopp, Tunkhannock Pietro Colella, Pittston Area Jay Dawsey, Lake-Lehman Jared Kukosky, Holy Redeemer Ian Tracy, Pittston Area Jacob Hughes, Tunkhannock Chris Edkins, Lake-Lehman Austin Shin, Wyo. Seminary Cal Lisman, Meyers Henry Cornell, Wyo. Seminary Dean Mirabelli, Tunkhannock Robert Wingert, Holy Redeemer Brendan Leahigh, Holy Redeemer Chris Pawlenok, Holy Redeemer Kris Konicki, Lake-Lehman Caleb Simpson, Meyers Will Trowbridge, Meyers David Oram, Meyers Austin Harry, Lake-Lehman Matt Tavaglione, Pittston Area Aiden Cronin, Tunkhannock Chris Herrick, Lake-Lehman Jon Zionce, Meyers Zach Benedict, Tunkhannock Chris Musto, Pittston Area Malcolm Lumia, Wyo. Seminary T.J Doyle, Holy Redeemer Jeremy Jayne, Lake-Lehman Tom Allardyce, Pittston Area Zach Manganella, Lake-Lehman Kenny Rexer, Holy Redeemer Eric Fino, Pittston Area Jesse Macko, Meyers George Parkhurst, Wyo. Seminary Julius Rodatz, Wyo. Seminary Dan Williams, Lake-Lehman Andre Gonzalez, Wyo. Seminary Fernando Ramirez, Meyers John Kielbasa, Pittston Area Eric Cudo, Holy Redeemer Dave Eury, Lake-Lehman Dylan Bassham, Wyo. Seminary Matt Wert, Holy Redeemer Mike Kendra, Meyers Branden Ott, Meyers Quinn Tracy, Pittston Area Willie Lu, Wyo. Seminary John Roatz, Wyo. Seminary Jacob Cole, Tunkhannock Brian Ly, Tunkhannock Justin Hill, Tunkhannock Greg Gilmore, Wyo. Seminary Colin Masters, Lake-Lehman Pat O’Brien, Lake-Lehman Jared Monteforte, Pittston Area Ian Manglivitti, Tunkhannock Eric Stamer, Tunkhannock David Choi, Wyo. Seminary Minh Tran, Wyo. Seminary Pat Duffy, Holy Redeemer Mike Novak, Lake-Lehman Sami El-Meshtaub, Wyo. Seminary Matt Geraghty, Holy Redeemer Alex Kopch, Holy Redeemer Matthew Lyons, Holy Redeemer Matt Nicholas, Holy Redeemer Tom Lovecchio, Meyers Shawn Jones, Pittston Area Mike Mazur, Pittston Area Taylor Roberts, Pittston Area Luke Cruver, Tunkhannock Dan Shurleff, Tunkhannock Rich Stamer, Tunkhannock Constantin Ehrensberger, Wyo. Sem Brandon Jang, Wyo. Seminary Yifei Wang, Wyo. Seminary Tyler Kukosky, Holy Redeemer Greg Ciravolo, Lake-Lehman Kyle Paulson, Lake-Lehman Joel Tlatenchi, Meyers Matt Diamond, Tunkhannock Paul Roman, Tunkhannock Brian Geraghty, Holy Redeemer Kenny Kocher, Lake-Lehman Brian Peck, Lake-Lehman Mike DiMaggio, Meyers Alex Pape, Meyers Josh Sheetz, Meyers Julien Kester, Pittston Area Zack McKititsh, Pittston Area DIVISION III Richard Umana, Berwick Kyle Venditti, Berwick Austin Bogart, Hanover Area Alex Van Hoekelen, MMI Arlinson Reyes, Berwick Nate Brague, Wyoming Area EA Ramos Ramirez, Berwick Jesus Tlatenchi, GAR Sean O’Malley, Wyoming Area Brandon Dougherty, Berwick Luke Henger, Berwick Matt Elmy, Hanover Area Dennis Hynes, GAR Luke Height, GAR Chris Bone, Wyoming Area Corey Sisock, MMI Pat Cook, Hanover Area Edgar Tapia, GAR Jeremy Soto, GAR Zach Sypniewski, Wyoming Area Dom Gagliardi, Hanover Area Noah Beltrami, MMI Rees Roberts, Nanticoke

S

JETS

Bye week: Cards, Broncos, Chiefs, Chargers, Seahawks, Titans NHL Favorite

Odds

Underdog

DUCKS

-$145/ +$125

Blues

Favorite

Points

CFL Underdog

MONTREAL

6

Hamilton

Br Columbia

8

SASKATCHEWAN

Home team in capital letters College Football Scores EAST Albany (NY) 28, Robert Morris 17 Bloomsburg 38, Shippensburg 18 Brown 34, Princeton 0 Buffalo St. 34, College of NJ 12 CW Post 34, East Stroudsburg 30 Campbell 35, Marist 21 Castleton St. 56, Becker 28 Colgate 35, Cornell 28, OT Duquesne 28, CCSU 21 Gettysburg 14, Muhlenberg 10 Harvard 42, Bucknell 3 Holy Cross 25, Dartmouth 17 Indiana (Pa.) 38, Clarion 7 Lafayette 28, Yale 19 Lebanon Valley 51, FDU-Florham 7 Lehigh 34, Fordham 12 Lycoming 40, Wilkes 7 Maine 27, Rhode Island 21 Monmouth (NJ) 40, Bryant 35 NY Maritime 34, Anna Maria 13 Penn 27, Columbia 20 Penn St. 23, Purdue 18 Rowan 36, Morrisville St. 17 Rutgers 21, Navy 20 Sacred Heart 60, St. Francis (Pa.) 45 Stony Brook 55, St. Anselm 6 Susquehanna 20, Moravian 0 Temple 34, Buffalo 0 UConn 16, South Florida 10 UMass 21, Delaware 10 Ursinus 21, Juniata 7 Utah 26, Pittsburgh 14 Westminster (Pa.) 22, Waynesburg 20 SOUTH Alabama 52, Mississippi 7 Alabama St. 20, Prairie View 7 Appalachian St. 49, The Citadel 42 Bethune-Cookman 58, Fort Valley St. 30 Bridgewater (Va.) 59, Guilford 13 Catholic 24, Apprentice 15 Chattanooga 51, W. Carolina 7 Cumberland (Tenn.) 49, Faulkner 28 Cumberlands 20, Campbellsville 13 E. Kentucky 41, SE Missouri 17 Florida St. 41, Duke 16 Georgetown 21, Howard 3 Georgetown (Ky.) 45, Pikeville 21 Georgia Southern 50, Furman 20 Grambling St. 44, Concordia-Selma 0 Hampden-Sydney 38, Emory & Henry 36 Jackson St. 17, MVSU 16 Jacksonville 50, Morehead St. 14 James Madison 34, Villanova 10 LSU 38, Tennessee 7 Liberty 63, Coastal Carolina 27 Lindsey Wilson 20, Union (Ky.) 6 Louisiana-Lafayette 30, North Texas 10 Mars Hill 31, Catawba 28, OT Marshall 24, Rice 20 Miami 30, North Carolina 24 Missouri S&T 52, Kentucky Wesleyan 28 Morgan St. 52, NC Central 3 Murray St. 36, E. Illinois 27 NC A&T 42, Delaware St. 24 Norfolk St. 34, Hampton 24 Presbyterian 28, Gardner-Webb 14 SC State 23, Georgia St. 13 Samford 43, Elon 31 Sewanee 30, DePauw 7 South Alabama 33, UT-Martin 30 South Carolina 14, Mississippi St. 12 Towson 39, Old Dominion 35 Tusculum 26, Lenoir-Rhyne 25 Tuskegee 41, Lane 17 UTEP 44, Tulane 7 VMI 21, Charleston Southern 17 Virginia 24, Georgia Tech 21 W. Kentucky 20, FAU 0 Washington & Lee 34, Randolph-Macon 30 Wesley 46, Va. Lynchburg 0 West Georgia 23, St. Augustine’s 21 William & Mary 24, New Hampshire 10 Wofford 47, Virginia-Wise 14 SOUTHWEST Cent. Arkansas 21, McNeese St. 18 Oklahoma St. 38, Texas 26 SMU 38, UCF 17 Sam Houston St. 47, Nicholls St. 7 Texas A&M 55, Baylor 28 Trinity (Texas) 24, Huntingdon 7 MIDWEST Albion 12, Hope 3 Ashland 20, Wayne (Mich.) 17 Augustana (SD) 23, Winona St. 15 Aurora 33, Maranatha Baptist 14 Avila 27, Culver-Stockton 13 Baldwin-Wallace 20, Ohio Northern 6 Ball St. 23, Ohio 20 Bemidji St. 35, Minn. St.-Moorhead 10 Benedictine (Ill.) 20, Concordia (Wis.) 14 Bethel (Minn.) 41, Gustavus 27 Bluffton 17, Anderson (Ind.) 12 Butler 42, Valparaiso 14 Capital 24, Otterbein 20 Case Reserve 34, Hiram 7 Central 70, Loras 7 Cincinnati 25, Louisville 16 Concordia (Ill.) 48, Rockford 14 Concordia (Moor.) 38, Augsburg 26 Concordia (St.P.) 27, Wayne (Neb.) 24 Dakota St. 24, Briar Cliff 16 Dayton 28, Davidson 0 Defiance 26, Earlham 10 Dubuque 40, Cornell (Iowa) 17 E. Michigan 35, Cent. Michigan 28 Ferris St. 35, N. Michigan 6 Findlay 27, Ohio Dominican 24 Franklin 27, Manchester 14 Greenville 49, Martin Luther 35 Grinnell 17, Lawrence 15 Heidelberg 56, Mount Union 7 Hillsdale 13, Michigan Tech 7 Illinois College 46, Knox 19 Illinois St. 28, South Dakota 3 Indiana St. 46, W. Illinois 24 Indianapolis 29, Saginaw Valley St. 20 John Carroll 33, Muskingum 14 Lakeland 20, Wis. Lutheran 7 Luther 14, Buena Vista 7 Marian (Ind.) 40, St. Francis (Ind.) 13 Miami (Ohio) 9, Kent St. 3 Michigan St. 28, Michigan 14 Minn. Duluth 41, Mary 28 Minn. St.-Mankato 32, Upper Iowa 14 Minn.-Morris 40, Eureka 7 Missouri 52, Iowa St. 17 Missouri Southern 24, Truman St. 17 Missouri Western 22, Emporia St. 16 Monmouth (Ill.) 53, Lake Forest 47 N. Illinois 51, W. Michigan 22 North Central 61, Millikin 14 Northern St. (SD) 45, Minn.-Crookston 21 Northwestern (Iowa) 35, Concordia (Neb.) 10 Northwestern (Minn.) 39, Crown (Minn.) 21 Northwood (Mich.) 20, Tiffin 10 Ohio St. 17, Illinois 7 Olivet 14, Kalamazoo 10 Pittsburg St. 69, Lincoln (Mo.) 6 Presentation 27, Mac Murray 26 Ripon 31, Beloit 27 Rose-Hulman 20, Mount St. Joseph 14 Simpson (Iowa) 38, Wartburg 37, OT St. Norbert 28, Carroll (Wis.) 7 St. Olaf 28, Carleton 7 St. Scholastica 29, Westminster (Mo.) 12 St. Thomas (Minn.) 49, Hamline 0 St. Xavier 48, Quincy 14 Sterling 35, Bethel (Kan.) 10 Taylor 48, Concordia (Mich.) 0 Toledo 28, Bowling Green 21 Trine 26, Alma 0 Valley City St. 23, Dickinson St. 13 Wabash 37, Oberlin 23 Wis.-Eau Claire 31, Wis.-LaCrosse 21 Wis.-Oshkosh 24, Wis.-Platteville 3 Wis.-Stevens Pt. 31, Wis.-River Falls 10 Wisconsin 59, Indiana 7 Youngstown St. 35, S. Illinois 23 FAR WEST BYU 38, Oregon St. 28 Boise St. 63, Colorado St. 13 Montana 30, Portland St. 24 Montana St. 41, N. Arizona 24 Nevada 49, New Mexico 7 San Diego 31, Drake 24 UC Davis 38, UTSA 17 Washington 52, Colorado 24 Weber St. 39, Idaho St. 12 Wyoming 41, UNLV 14

B A S E B A L L Postseason Glance LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES (Best-of-7;x-if necessary) American League All games televised by Fox Texas 3, Detroit 2 Saturday, Oct. 8: Texas 3, Detroit 2 Sunday, Oct. 9: Detroit at Texas, ppd. rain Monday, Oct. 10: Texas 7, Detroit 3, 11 innings Tuesday, Oct. 11: Detroit 5, Texas 2 Wednesday, Oct. 12: Texas 7, Detroit 3, 11 innings

Expanded Glance AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA Home Buffalo ..................................................... 4 1 0 .800 164 120 3-0-0 New England .......................................... 4 1 0 .800 165 119 2-0-0 N.Y. Jets ................................................. 2 3 0 .400 121 125 2-0-0 Miami ....................................................... 0 4 0 .000 69 104 0-2-0 South W L T Pct PF PA Home Houston................................................... 3 2 0 .600 127 95 2-1-0 Tennessee.............................................. 3 2 0 .600 105 94 2-0-0 Jacksonville ............................................ 1 4 0 .200 59 115 1-2-0 Indianapolis ............................................ 0 5 0 .000 87 136 0-3-0 North W L T Pct PF PA Home Baltimore .................................................. 3 1 0 .750 119 57 2-0-0 Cincinnati.................................................. 3 2 0 .600 110 94 1-1-0 Pittsburgh................................................. 3 2 0 .600 102 89 2-0-0 Cleveland ................................................. 2 2 0 .500 74 93 1-2-0 West W L T Pct PF PA Home San Diego ............................................... 4 1 0 .800 120 109 3-0-0 Oakland................................................... 3 2 0 .600 136 133 1-1-0 Kansas City ............................................ 2 3 0 .400 77 150 1-1-0 Denver..................................................... 1 4 0 .200 105 140 1-2-0 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA Home Washington ............................................ 3 1 0 .750 83 63 2-0-0 N.Y. Giants ............................................. 3 2 0 .600 127 123 1-1-0 Dallas ...................................................... 2 2 0 .500 99 101 1-1-0 Philadelphia............................................ 1 4 0 .200 125 132 0-2-0 South W L T Pct PF PA Home New Orleans........................................... 4 1 0 .800 157 125 2-0-0 Tampa Bay.............................................. 3 2 0 .600 87 125 2-1-0 Atlanta ..................................................... 2 3 0 .400 104 130 1-1-0 Carolina................................................... 1 4 0 .200 116 132 1-2-0 North W L T Pct PF PA Home Detroit ................................................... 5 0 0 1.000 159 89 2-0-0 Green Bay............................................. 5 0 0 1.000 173 111 2-0-0 Chicago................................................. 2 3 0 .400 107 122 2-1-0 Minnesota............................................. 1 4 0 .200 111 106 1-2-0 West W L T Pct PF PA Home San Francisco ........................................ 4 1 0 .800 142 78 2-1-0 Seattle ..................................................... 2 3 0 .400 94 122 1-1-0 Arizona.................................................... 1 4 0 .200 96 121 1-1-0 St. Louis .................................................. 0 4 0 .000 46 113 0-3-0 Sunday's Games Minnesota 34, Arizona 10 Oakland 25, Houston 20 Kansas City 28, Indianapolis 24 Buffalo 31, Philadelphia 24 New Orleans 30, Carolina 27 Cincinnati 30, Jacksonville 20 Pittsburgh 38, Tennessee 17 Seattle 36, N.Y. Giants 25 San Francisco 48, Tampa Bay 3 San Diego 29, Denver 24 New England 30, N.Y. Jets 21 Green Bay 25, Atlanta 14 Open: Baltimore, Cleveland, Dallas, Miami, St. Louis, Washington Monday, Oct. 10 Detroit 24, Chicago 13 Today's Games St. Louis at Green Bay, 1 p.m. Jacksonville at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. Philadelphia at Washington, 1 p.m. San Francisco at Detroit, 1 p.m. Carolina at Atlanta, 1 p.m. Indianapolis at Cincinnati, 1 p.m. Buffalo at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m. Cleveland at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. Houston at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m. Dallas at New England, 4:15 p.m. New Orleans at Tampa Bay, 4:15 p.m. Minnesota at Chicago, 8:20 p.m. Open: Arizona, Denver, Kansas City, San Diego, Seattle, Tennessee Monday, Oct. 17 Miami at N.Y. Jets, 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 13: Detroit 7, Texas 5 Saturday, Oct. 15: Detroit (Scherzer 15-9) at Texas (Holland 16-5), 8:05 p.m. x-Sunday, Oct. 16: Detroit (Fister 11-13) at Texas (Lewis 14-10), 8:05 p.m. National League All games televised by TBS St. Louis 3, Milwaukee 2 Sunday, Oct. 9: Milwaukee 9, St. Louis 6 Monday, Oct. 10: St. Louis 12, Milwaukee 3 Wednesday, Oct. 12: St. Louis 4, Milwaukee 3 Thursday, Oct. 13: Milwaukee 4, St. Louis 2 Friday, Oct. 14: St. Louis 7, Milwaukee 1 Sunday, Oct. 16: St. Louis (Jackson 12-9) at Milwaukee (Marcum 13-7), 4:05 or 8:05 p.m. x-Monday, Oct. 17: St. Louis (Carpenter 11-9) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 17-10), 8:05 p.m. WORLD SERIES (Best-of-7;x-if necessary) All games televised by Fox Wednesday, Oct. 19 at National League Thursday, Oct. 20 at National League Saturday, Oct. 22 at American League Sunday, Oct. 23 at American League x-Monday, Oct. 24 at American League x-Wednesday, Oct. 26 at National League x-Thursday, Oct. 27 at National League Most Runs in a Postseason Inning 10 Runs 2002 — Anaheim Angels vs. Minnesota Twins, ALCS. 1968 — Detroit Tigers vs. St. Louis Cardinals, World Series. 1929 — Philadelphia Athletics vs. Chicago Cubs, World Series. 9 Runs 2011 — Texas Rangers vs. Detroit Tigers, ALCS. 1985 — St. Louis Cardinals vs. Los Angeles Dodgers, NLCS. Baseball Calendar Oct. 19 — World Series begins, city of NL champion. October-November — Free agent period to sign exclusively with former teams, first five days after World Series ends. Nov. 14-15 — General managers’ meetings, Milwaukee. Nov. 15-16 — Owners’ meetings, Milwaukee. Nov, 23 — Last day for teams to offer salary arbitration to their former players who became free agents. Dec. 5-8 — Winter meetings, Dallas. Dec. 7 — Last day for free agents offered salary arbitration to accept the offers. Dec. 11 — Collective bargaining agreement expires. Dec. 12 — Last day for teams to offer 2012 contracts to unsigned players. 2012 Jan. 5-15 — Salary arbitrating filing. Jan. 18 — Exchange of salary arbitration figures. Feb. 1-21 — Salary arbitration hearings, St. Petersburg, Fla. Feb. 19 — Voluntary reporting date for pitchers, catchers and injured players. Feb. 24 — Voluntary reporting date for other players. March 2 — Mandatory reporting date. March 2-11 — Teams may renew contracts of unsigned players. March 19 — Last day to place a player on unconditional release waivers and pay 30 days termination pay instead of 45 days. April 2 — Last day to request unconditional release waivers on a player without having to pay his full 2012 salary. April 4 — Opening day, St. Louis at Miami. Active rosters reduced to 25 players. June 4 — Amateur draft. July 10 — All-Star game, Kansas City, Mo. July 22 — Hall of Fame induction, Cooperstown, N.Y. July 31 — Last day to trade a player without securing waivers. Sept. 1 — Active rosters expand to 40 players. Dec. 3-6 — Winter meetings, Nashville, Tenn.

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EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh......................... 6 3 1 2 8 18 16 Philadelphia ..................... 4 3 0 1 7 12 8 N.Y. Islanders .................. 4 3 1 0 6 11 6 New Jersey ...................... 3 2 1 0 4 6 6 N.Y. Rangers ................... 3 0 1 2 2 5 9 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Toronto ............................. 3 3 0 0 6 11 7 Buffalo .............................. 4 3 1 0 6 14 9 Montreal ........................... 4 1 2 1 3 11 13 Boston .............................. 4 1 3 0 2 7 7 Ottawa .............................. 5 1 4 0 2 14 23 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Washington...................... 4 4 0 0 8 15 11 Carolina............................ 5 2 2 1 5 13 18 Tampa Bay ....................... 4 1 2 1 3 12 16 Florida............................... 2 1 1 0 2 4 4 Winnipeg .......................... 3 0 3 0 0 5 13 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit ............................... 3 3 0 0 6 10 3 Chicago ............................ 3 2 1 0 4 10 7 Nashville........................... 3 2 1 0 4 9 9 St. Louis ........................... 3 1 2 0 2 9 9 Columbus......................... 4 0 3 1 1 8 13 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Colorado........................... 5 4 1 0 8 17 11 Minnesota ........................ 4 2 1 1 5 10 9 Edmonton......................... 2 1 0 1 3 3 3 Vancouver........................ 4 1 2 1 3 10 13 Calgary ............................. 4 1 3 0 2 11 14 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas................................ 4 3 1 0 6 9 9 Los Angeles..................... 4 2 1 1 5 9 10 Phoenix ............................ 4 2 1 1 5 13 11 Anaheim ........................... 3 2 1 0 4 4 5 San Jose .......................... 2 1 1 0 2 6 4 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Friday's Games Carolina 4, Buffalo 3 Anaheim 1, San Jose 0 Saturday's Games Colorado 6, Montreal 5, SO Toronto 3, Calgary 2 N.Y. Islanders 4, N.Y. Rangers 2 Los Angeles 3, Philadelphia 2, OT Buffalo 3, Pittsburgh 2 Washington 2, Ottawa 1 Phoenix 4, Winnipeg 1

Away 1-1-0 2-1-0 0-3-0 0-2-0

AFC 3-1-0 4-1-0 1-3-0 0-4-0

NFC 1-0-0 0-0-0 1-0-0 0-0-0

Div 1-0-0 2-1-0 0-1-0 0-1-0

Away 1-1-0 1-2-0 0-2-0 0-2-0

AFC 3-1-0 3-2-0 1-2-0 0-4-0

NFC 0-1-0 0-0-0 0-2-0 0-1-0

Div 1-0-0 0-1-0 1-0-0 0-1-0

Away 1-1-0 2-1-0 1-2-0 1-0-0

AFC 2-1-0 3-1-0 2-2-0 2-2-0

NFC 1-0-0 0-1-0 1-0-0 0-0-0

Div 1-0-0 1-0-0 0-1-0 0-1-0

Away 1-1-0 2-1-0 1-2-0 0-2-0

AFC 3-1-0 3-2-0 1-2-0 1-3-0

NFC 1-0-0 0-0-0 1-1-0 0-1-0

Div 2-0-0 1-0-0 0-1-0 0-2-0

Away 1-1-0 2-1-0 1-1-0 1-2-0

NFC 3-1-0 3-2-0 2-1-0 1-3-0

AFC 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-1-0 0-1-0

Div 1-1-0 1-1-0 1-0-0 0-1-0

Away 2-1-0 1-1-0 1-2-0 0-2-0

NFC 2-1-0 2-2-0 2-3-0 0-4-0

AFC 2-0-0 1-0-0 0-0-0 1-0-0

Div 1-0-0 1-0-0 0-1-0 0-1-0

Away 3-0-0 3-0-0 0-2-0 0-2-0

NFC 4-0-0 4-0-0 2-3-0 1-2-0

AFC 1-0-0 1-0-0 0-0-0 0-2-0

Div 2-0-0 1-0-0 0-2-0 0-1-0

Away 2-0-0 1-2-0 0-3-0 0-1-0

NFC 3-1-0 2-2-0 1-4-0 0-3-0

AFC 1-0-0 0-1-0 0-0-0 0-1-0

Div 1-0-0 1-1-0 0-1-0 0-0-0

Tampa Bay at Florida, late New Jersey at Nashville, late Detroit at Minnesota, late Columbus at Dallas, late Boston at Chicago, late Vancouver at Edmonton, late St. Louis at San Jose, late Today's Games St. Louis at Anaheim, 8 p.m.

T R A N S A C T I O N S FOOTBALL National Football League INDIANAPOLIS COLTS—Announced the retirement of senior vice president of sales and marketing Tom Zupancic. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—Signed DB Sterling Moore from the practice squad. Released DT Marcus Harrison. NEW YORK GIANTS—Signed DT Dwayne Hendricks from the practice squad. HOCKEY National Hockey League NEW JERSEY DEVILS—Recalled G Keith Kinkaid from Albany (AHL). NEW YORK ISLANDERS—Activated LW Trevor Gillies from injured reserve. WASHINGTON CAPITALS—Recalled G Dany Sabourin from Hershey (AHL). American Hockey League HAMILTON BULLDOGS—Signed D T.J. Fast. ECHL ELMIRA JACKALS—Announced F Maxime Gratchev was assigned to the team from Binghamton (AHL). Central Hockey League LAREDO BUCKS—Placed G Nick Gigone, F Chris Jones, F Kelly Miller, F Alex Morton, F Jordan Oye and F Jeffrey Verreault on waivers. MISSOURI MAVERICKS—Placed G Derek Smith on waivers. RAPID CITY RUSH—Signed D Carl Hudson and F Nic Polaski. RIO GRANDE VALLEY KILLER BEES—Placed D Sam Cannata, F Travis Eggum, D James Isaacs, F David Labrecque, F Mark Magnowski, D Dan Markowitz, D Matt Ridley and F Adam Stuart on waivers. WICHITA THUNDER—Announced F Chris Chappell was assigned to the team from the New York Rangers.

C F L EAST DIVISION W L x-Montreal .............................. 9 5 x-Winnipeg ............................. 9 6 Hamilton.................................. 7 7 Toronto ................................... 4 11 WEST DIVISION W L x-Edmonton............................ 9 6 x-B.C. ...................................... 8 6 x-Calgary ................................ 8 7 Saskatchewan........................ 4 10 x-clinched playoff berth Friday's Game Toronto 31, Calgary 29 Saturday's Game Edmonton 24, Winnipeg 10 Today's Games Hamilton at Montreal, 1 p.m. B.C. at Saskatchewan, 4 p.m.

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PF 435 360 395 313

PA 348 350 389 429

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PF 353 400 424 276

PA 328 304 412 402

F O O T B A L L

WYOMING VALLEY CONFERENCE Division 4A ........................ W L PF PA CP x-Wyoming Valley West.... 6 1 291 125 51 Hazleton Area .................... 3 4 150 248 25 Williamsport ........................ 2 5 77 180 17 Division 3A ........................ W L PF PA CP Dallas................................... 6 0 219 101 50 Crestwood .......................... 5 1 212 83 42 Coughlin.............................. 4 3 160 135 34 Berwick................................ 4 3 209 159 33 Pittston Area....................... 2 5 152 169 17 Tunkhannock...................... 0 7 77 275 0 Division 2A-A.................... W L PF PA CP GAR ..................................... 6 1 273 126 40 Wyoming Area ................... 5 1 261 85 35 Northwest (A) ..................... 4 3 165 181 28 Lake-Lehman ..................... 3 4 201 176 20 Nanticoke ............................ 2 4 151 172 14 Hanover Area ..................... 2 5 141 250 14 Meyers................................. 2 5 87 246 14 Holy Redeemer .................. 0 7 151 339 0 x-Clinched division title. NOTE: CP is Championship Points toward the divisional title. Teams get nine points for defeating a Class 4A opponent, eight for a Class 3A opponent, seven for a Class 2A opponent and six for a Class A opponent. The team with the most Championship Points is the division winner. Friday's Results Berwick 43, Williamsport 0 Coughlin 27, Pittston Area 14 Wyoming Valley West 66, Hazleton Area 21 Wyoming Area 44, Holy Redeemer 12 GAR 37, Lake-Lehman 23 Meyers 21, Hanover Area 15 Pocono Mountain West 28, Tunkhannock 13 Northwest at Nanticoke, ppd. Saturday's Results Northwest 34, Nanticoke 30 Crestwood at Dallas, ppd. Monday's Game Crestwood at Dallas, 2:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 21 (7 p.m.) Crestwood at Wyoming Valley West Hazleton Area at Coughlin Lake-Lehman at Nanticoke Meyers at Northwest Pittston Area at Berwick Tunkhannock at Williamsport Saturday, Oct. 22 Hanover Area at Holy Redeemer, 1 p.m. Pocono Mountain East at Dallas, 1 p.m. Wyoming Area at GAR, 7 p.m.


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 3C

One bad toss leads to another By DEREK LEVARSE dlevarse@timesleader.com

STATE COLLEGE -- The play itself -- a 93-yard kickoff return by Chaz Powell -- was brilliant. The flag that came afterward? Not so much. With Penn State clinging to a 20-18 lead over Purdue in the fourth quarter Saturday, Powell answered a Boilermakers touchdown by taking the ensuing kickoff through a seam and down the left sideline. The senior beat the kicker to the corner but appeared to run out of steam, slowing up near the Purdue 20. But as defenders closed in on him, Powell accelerated to full speed once again, racing past a few more players before going out of bounds at the 3-yard line. But Powell celebrated by tossing the ball up in the air and was called for a controversial unsportsmanlike conduct penalty. The flag backed the Nittany Lions up 15 yards and the offense settled for a field goal instead of a touchdown and a two-score lead. “If I could do it all over again, I would’ve handed the ball over to the officials,” Powell said. “They told me after that’s the rule and it’s a close game, so they have to call that. “They took the (view) that I was trying to get some attention. But I was just in the game and made a big play. I was excited.” Complicating matters was the fact that the Big Ten officiating crew was led by referee Dave Witvoet, who is infamous for poor and muddled calls and explanations. Witvoet initially announced that the flag was on No. 6 (Gerald Hodges), further confusing fans and players alike. “He jumped up and he threw the ball up in the air,” Witvoet said after the game. “It’s an unsportsmanlike call, 15 yards. It’s a point of emphasis. It’s drawing attention to yourself -- a celebration-type thing.” Powell’s runback was the second big return by the Lions’ special teams in the game, following a 33-yard punt return by Justin Brown in the third quarter. Both plays led to field goals, and the Lions ended up winning by five, 23-18. “Any time your special teams goes out and does something big, it definitely helps,” quarterback Matt McGloin said. “Especially in Big Ten conference games. Any advantage you can

PENN ST. 23, PURDUE 18 Purdue ................................... 3 3 6 6 — 18 Penn St.................................. 7 3 10 3 — 23 A—100,820. Pur PSU First downs ........................... 15 21 Rushes-yards ....................... 33-162 48-182 Passing.................................. 182 185 Comp-Att-Int ......................... 14-30-3 10-23-1 Return Yards ........................ 78 57 Punts-Avg. ............................ 4-43.8 6-44.5 Fumbles-Lost........................ 0-0 2-0 Penalties-Yards.................... 6-33 5-43 Time of Possession ............. 26:09 33:51 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Purdue, Bolden 13-97, Shavers 13-54, TerBush 6-10, Pegram 1-1. Penn St., Redd 28-131, Dukes 6-21, McGloin 3-16, Bolden 4-10, Suhey 1-3, Green 1-2, De.Smith 2-2, Brown 1-0, Team 2-(minus 3). PASSING—Purdue, TerBush 12-25-2-162, Marve 2-5-1-20. Penn St., McGloin 8-17-1-145, Bolden 2-6-0-40. RECEIVING—Purdue, Siller 5-67, Edison 3-46, Gravesande 2-26, Pegram 1-20, Ross 1-14, Shavers 1-7, Bolden 1-2. Penn St., Brown 4-86, Moseby-Felder 2-40, De.Smith 2-34, Zordich 1-16, Suhey 1-9.

PENN STATE NOTEBOOK get, you want. We’re real happy the way that worked out.” Infirmary report Penn State played without senior receiver Derek Moye, who broke a bone in his left foot earlier in the week and is expected to miss at least another week. Sophomore Brandon Moseby-Felder started in his place, catching two passes for 40 yards. The Lions welcomed back cornerbacks D’Anton Lynn and Stephon Morris from injury. Tailback Brandon Beachum dressed but did not get a carry. “I was a little timid at first because I hadn’t had full contact,” said Lynn, who sat out the past two weeks after suffering a concussion and stingers down both of his arms after a helmetto-helmet collision against Eastern Michigan. “But as I started playing, I started getting back to my old self.” Morris made two huge, touchdown-saving tackles, stopping Purdue tailback Ralph Bolden on a run and Raheem Mostert on a 71-yard kick return in the second quarter. Back in the booth After three straight weeks of starting the game on the sideline, Joe Paterno spent the entire afternoon Saturday in the coaches booth. The Penn State coach has been feeling close to normal last week against Iowa, having recovered from a collision that put him in the hospital with injuries to his right hip and shoulder in August. His plan last week had been to spend the whole game on the field for the first time all season. But when a Hawkeyes receiver came near him on a route in the first half, he was yanked away from the traffic on the sideline and was hurt again in the process. “It’s almost like all over again -- my leg hurts and my hip,” Paterno said. “Nothing serious, it’s just that I’m getting to be a sissy in my old age. “If I can’t move around down there, I get in the way. Everybody’s worrying, ‘Where’s Paterno? Where’s coach?’ That’s not fair. So anyway, I decided I was going to stay upstairs for this one. I think next week I’ll be back on the sideline, hopefully.”

FIRST QUARTER

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The football bounces off Purdue’s Josh Johnson (28), who broke up a pass intended for Penn State’s Bill Belton, during the fourth quarter. It was intercepted by Purdue’s Albert Evans.

ENOUGH Continued from Page 1C

the second half. McGloin also had a potential touchdown pass dropped at the end of the first half as Andrew Szczerba couldn’t hang onto the ball in traffic. It was McGloin on the field for every drive in the fourth quarter, including the one that ran out the clock on Purdue. “It’s great to be in there and take that last knee,” McGloin said. “I don’t care if we win by one point or a hundred points, as long as we continue to win. That’s fine with me and it’s fine with everybody else as well.” Things were a bit tougher than expected in this one because the Boilers were able to move the ball well against a Penn State squad that entered the week ranked fourth in the nation in total defense. Purdue finished with 344 total yards, nearly 100 more than the defense’s average per game (250). But Purdue proved to be the sloppier side. Using two quarterbacks themselves, the Boilermakers threw three interceptions. They missed a field goal and clanged an extra point off of the right upright in the third quarter, and would spend the rest of the game chasing it. “I think both sides would probably make the same statements” about missed opportunities, Purdue coach Danny Hope said. “They were forcing us to come up with more points in the end.” Penn State never trailed in the contest, getting touchdown runs from Curtis Dukes and Silas Redd to go with three field goals by Anthony Fera. Safety Nick Sukay came up with one interception and line-

SECOND QUARTER

Penn State quarterback Matt McGloin rolls out looking to pass during the third quarter against Purdue in State College on Saturday. Penn State won 23-18.

backer Nate Stupar finished with two, including the one deep in Illinois territory in the final minutes that allowed the Lions to run out the clock. “I’ve been working this week with really using my hands, two hands getting on the ball,” Stupar said. “The coaches have really been pressing that, and I thank them for that because it helped out today.” While the defense fell short of some of the lofty marks it had set through the first six weeks of the season, the offense was again was paced by Silas Redd and the running game. Redd finished with 131 yards

on the ground and a touchdown for his third straight game over 100 yards. Dukes added 21 yards and scored his first career touchdown in the first quarter. Thanks to an Illinois loss, Penn State comes out of the week alone in first place in the Leaders Division, a half-game ahead of No. 4 Wisconsin, which had a bye week already this month. But with the hardest part of the schedule still to come, the Lions aren’t favored for anything just yet. “There’s plenty of time,” Paterno said. “We’ve got plenty of opportunities to find out how good we are.”

Receiver Moseby-Felder makes most of his opportunity The sophomore makes a pair of very important receptions in the Nittany Lions’ victory. By JAY MONAHAN For The Times Leader

STATE COLLEGE – Brandon Moseby-Felder knew he needed to step up in his first start. With big shoes to fill after Derek Moye broke his foot, the sophomore wide receiver wasted little time igniting a dormant Penn State passing offense. Moseby-Felder caught two passes for 40 yards in the second drive of Saturday’s 23-18 victory over Purdue, setting up a Nittany Lions touchdown – a rare feat for a team that averaged 14.5 points through its first two Big Ten games. The Nittany Lions’ receiving corps rose to the occasion Saturday with 10 catches for 185 yards, spurring each of Penn State’s two touchdown drives. “I thought the receivers did a good job,” coach Joe Paterno said. “I think, again, you’ve got to give Purdue some credit. I didn’t think our passing game was great.” Moye, the Nittany Lions’ lead-

ing receiver, broke his foot Tuesday when he slipped on stairs in his apartment. The broken fifth metatarsal bone does not require surgery, according to school reports, and he could return for an Oct. 29 matchup with Illinois. Heeding the call, Moseby-Felder broke wide open from his defender and caught a 21-yard pass from Rob Bolden. Four plays later, Bolden laced a throw to Moseby-Felder, who made a diving 19yard grab just in front of the goal line and created a Curtis Dukes touchdown. “Derek Moye is a great athlete,” said Moseby-Felder, who came into Saturday with just one catch for 4 yards. “You never expect that to happen. I have to step up and play the role that he played.” Bolden and Matt McGloin struggled to find a rhythm in a run-oriented offense that featured 10 more rushing plays in the first half. McGloin found his groove in the third and fourth quarters. The Scranton native completed six consecutive completions before a fluke interception off Bill Belton’s leg in the end zone. Justin Brown led the Nittany Lions with four catches for 86 yards. Brown made a 20-yard

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Penn State receiver Brandon Moseby-Felder (85) hauls in a pass behind Purdue’s Ricardo Allen during the first quarter Saturday.

catch inside the red zone that set up a Silas Redd 9-yard touchdown. On the next drive, Brown made a dazzling 34-yard onehanded catch over the head of Purdue’s Josh Johnson. Confidence in the wide receivers, regardless of quarterback, is how Penn State overcame Moye’s loss. “Matt and Rob both put a lot of trust in us,” Brown said. “Matt is going to throw the ball up with the expectation that we, as re-

PSU -- Curtis Dukes 1-yard run (Anthony Fera kick), 4:38. Drive: 7 plays, 73 yards, 3:14. Comment: Rob Bolden starts at quarterback for the seventh straight game. And after a three-andout on the first series, Bolden and the offense come through with a rare touchdown drive. Silas Redd breaks off a few nice runs, but the real surprise is sophomore Brandon Moseby-Felder, starting in place of the injured Derek Moye. After just one catch as a reserve in the first six games, Moseby-Felder comes up with two on the drive for 40 yards. That sets up another sophomore in Dukes to punch it in from inside the 1 for his first career score. PENN STATE 7, PURDUE 0. PU -- Carson Wiggs 28-yard field goal, 1:39. Drive: 8 plays, 69 yards, 2:59. Comment: Hand it to the Boilermakers -- their offense has been moving the ball as well as anyone else the Nittany Lions have faced. A little improv doesn’t hurt on this drive as Caleb TerBush scrambles to his right and buys time for Justin Siller to break away from a pack of defenders, make the catch and sprint across the field for a gain of 50. It was the longest play against the Penn State defense allowed all year. PSU 7, PU 3.

ceivers, are going to come down with it. “After that one-handed catch, I said to him ‘Thanks for having trust in me, man.’” To put the loss of Moye in prospective, the preseason All-Big Ten wide receiver accounted for half of Penn State’s receiving touchdowns (three), 38 percent of its receiving yards (80.8 per game) and 28 percent of its receptions (4.6 per game). He resides in the top five in school his-

tory in career receptions, receiving yards and receiving touchdowns. Paterno initiated the backfield into the passing game in the second half. Michael Zordich made two catches for 16 yards, and Joe Suhey caught a 9-yard pass. “Purdue had taken a lot of things away from us and then we finally started to throw the ball over to the fullback and a couple of things,” Paterno said. While Zordich said he and other backs “are being incorporated into the running game,” the offense remains unchanged in spite of Moye’s absence. “We’re not going to change anything just for the sake of Moye being out. It’s just that we’re going to have to fill in for him until whenever he comes back.” Depth is not a concern for the Penn State’s passing attack, according to McGloin. Nineteen players have receptions through seven games. “(Moye)’s such a great playmaker, and hopefully he’ll be back soon,” the West Scranton grad said. “But a lot of guys did a lot of big things, and it shows you how deep we are at the wideout position.”

PU -- Wiggs 32-yard field goal, 4:36. Drive: 8 plays, 67 3:54. After giving up the longest pass play of the season in the first quarter, the Lions surrender the longest rushing play of the year in the second. Ralph Bolden finds a seam down the middle of the field and picks up 39 yards before being tackled by Stephon Morris. Reaching the Lions 14-yard line, defensive tackles James Terry and Devon Still make back-to-back big stops to force the kicking unit to come out again for the Boilers. PSU 7, PU 6. PSU -- Fera 29-yard field goal, 0:00. Drive: 3 plays, 12 yards, 0:14. Comment: The Boilers are rotating quarterbacks as well, and Robert Marve makes a horrible decision throwing across his body to the middle of the field while on the run. With a host of defenders in the area, Nate Stupar leaps to make the interception and returns it 24 yards to the Purdue 24. The 12 yards on the drive comes courtesy of a late hit after the play that moves the ball half the distance to the goal with 14 seconds on the clock. With just three seconds left, Fera comes on for the field goal to improve to 8-for-9 on the season. PSU 10, PU 6.

THIRD QUARTER PSU -- Fera 40-yard field goal, 5:57. Drive: 4 plays, 8 yards, 2:00. Comment: With the offense struggling, Justin Brown delivers the team’s best punt return of the season, going 33 yards down the right sideline to set the offense up at the Boilers’ 31. Penn State runs three straight times for 8 yards and squanders the chance. Fera bails the offense out again, hitting the longest field goal of his career. PSU 13, PU 6. PU -- O.J. Ross 14-yard pass from Caleb TerBush (Wiggs kick failed), 4:02. Drive: 4 plays, 26 yards, 1:23. Comment: And the special teams gives one right back. The normally reliable kickoff coverage unit has a breakdown as Raheem Mostert sprints 71 yards down the left sideline and barely -- just barely -- is forced out of bounds by Stephon Morris. This time, the Boilers don’t stall as TerBush rolls left and hits Ross for the score. Incredibly, Wiggs hammers the extra point off the right upright. PSU 13, PU 12. PSU -- Silas Redd 9-yard run (Fera kick), 2:37. Drive: 4 plays, 60 yards, 1:25. Comment: McGloin answers with a strong drive to give the momentum back to the Lions, completing three straight passes into the wind to set Penn State up in the red zone. The red zone struggles don’t surface this time as Redd scores immediately, twisting after contact to fall across the goal line. PSU 20, PU 12.

FOURTH QUARTER PU -- Akeem Shavers 1-yard run (TerBush run failed), 8:08. Drive: 8 plays, 45 yards, 4:05. Comment: McGloin was looking great, hooking up with Justin Brown on a great one-handed catch. On the next play McGloin tries to go for it all to Bill Belton, but the ball is tipped, then kicked into the air and intercepted by Albert Evans, who brought it out of the end zone to the Penn State 45. Purdue goes eight plays for the touchdown as Shavers flips over top of the pile for the score. Down by 2, Purdue goes for the conversion but TerBush is stopped well short on a run to his right by linebacker Khairi Fortt. PSU 20, PU 18 PSU -- Fera 29-yard field goal, 6:24. Drive: 4 plays, 6 yards, 1:28. Comment: A brilliant 93-yard kick return by Chaz Powell is dampened when the side judge flags the senior corner for flipping the ball in the air after the play is over. The 15-yard unsportsmanlike conduct penalty costs the Lions. PSU 23, PU 18


CMYK PAGE 4C

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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COLLEGE FOOTBALL ROUNDUP

PA . C O L L E G E F O OT B A L L

LSU, Alabama romp to blowout wins The Cavaliers (4-2, 1-1 Atlantic Coast Conference) sealed the victory by holding onto the ball for the final 6 minutes, making five first downs to get inside the Yellow Jackets’ 5.

The Associated Press

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. — Jarrett Lee threw two touchdown passes, and Spencer Ware caught one and ran for another score as No. 1 LSU stayed unbeaten with another rout, 38-7 against Tennessee on Saturday. The win was the seventh straight by a double-digit margin for the Tigers (7-0, 4-0 Southeastern Conference) and marked the second consecutive season they’ve swept their three SEC East foes. Matt Simms, making his first start of the season for Tennessee (3-3, 0-3) in place of the injured Tyler Bray, was 6 of 20 for 128 yards and two interceptions against one of the nation’s best defense. It marked a departure in the series between the two teams in which three of the last four games have been decided by a touchdown or less, including last year’s bizarre finish in Baton Rouge when LSU scored the winning touchdown after the game was extended by a Tennessee penalty for too many men on the field. No. 2 Alabama 52, Mississippi 7 OXFORD, Miss. — Trent Richardson rushed for 183 yards and a career-high four touchdowns and No. 2 Alabama’s defense smothered foundering Mississippi. Richardson put the Rebels (2-4, 0-3 SEC) away with an electric 76-yard run midway through the third quarter and now leads the nation with six straight 100-yard games. He’s scored 16 touchdowns this season for the Crimson Tide (7-0, 4-0) and displayed his rare combination of power and speed as he tossed aside Rebels with ease. It was the most-lopisded defeat since a 49-3 loss to Florida in 1981 for Ole Miss, playing the first of three straight games against ranked opponents. No. 5 Boise State 63, Colorado State 13 FORT COLLINS, Colo. — No. 5 Boise State is already the biggest bully in the Mountain West Conference, even if the Broncos’ stay becomes short and sweet. The Broncos routed Colorado State in their Mountain West debut behind huge games from quarterback Kellen Moore, tailback Doug Martin and wide receiver Tyler Shoemaker. Moore threw for 338 yards and four touchdowns on 26of-30 passing, Martin ran 20 times for 200 yards and three scores and Shoemaker caught nine passes for 180 yards and two TDs and added a 36-yard run on a fake punt that led to another score for the Broncos

No. 15 South Carolina 14, Mississippi State 12 STARKVILLE, Miss. — Alshon Jeffery caught a 4-yard touchdown pass from Connor Shaw with 3:50 left in the fourth quarter and No. 15 South Carolina rallied to beat Mississippi State. In his third career start, Shaw struggled for much of the afternoon. No. 17 Kansas State 41, Texas Tech 34 LUBBOCK, Texas — Collin Klein ran for three touchdowns and threw for another as No. 17 Kansas State came from behind to beat Texas Tech 41-34 on Saturday night. Klein ran for 110 yards on 23 carries, scoring on three short runs and hitting Chris Harper for a 3-yard TD pass on the Wildcats (6-0, 3-0) first drive of the third quarter. No. 19 Virginia Tech 38, Wake Forest 17 WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. — Logan Thomas rushed for two touchdowns and passed for two more to lead No. 19 Virginia Tech past Wake Forest. Thomas finished 17 of 32 for 280 yards with scoring passes of 20 yards to Jarrett Boykin and 30 yards to Marcus Davis, and added scoring runs of 1 and 3 yards for the Hokies (6-1, 2-1 ACC). No. 21 Texas A&M 55, No. 20 Baylor 28 COLLEGE STATION, Texas — Ryan Tannehill threw for 415 yards and a career-high six touchdowns and Ryan Swope caught four of them to lead No. AP PHOTO 21 Texas A&M to a win. LSU quarterback Jordan Jefferson, top, and lineman Josh Williford celebrate after a touchdown The Bears got within six run by Jefferson against Tennessee on Saturday in Knoxville, Tenn. LSU won 38-7. points after a touchdown run by Terrance Ganaway in third drew Luck threw two thirddown passes, freshman Sammy quarter before the Aggies (6-0, 1-0). quarter touchdown passes to and No. 8 Clemson rallied from scored 21 straight to take a No. 6 Oklahoma State 38, Levine Toilolo as No. 7 Stanford an 18-point deficit against Mary- 55-28 lead with about six minNo. 22 Texas 26 beat Washington State 44-14 land to remain unbeaten with a utes remaining. Saturday to extend the nation’s 56-45 victory Saturday night. AUSTIN, Texas — Jeremy longest winning streak to a The Tigers (7-0, 4-0 Atlantic Smith ran for 140 yards and No. 24 Auburn 17, Florida 6 Coast Conference) trailed 28-10 scored on two long touchdown school record 14 consecutive AUBURN, Ala. — Onterio late in the first half and 35-17 in McCalebb opened the fourth runs and No. 6 Oklahoma State games. Stanford (6-0, 4-0 Pac-12) the third quarter before stormbeat No. 22 Texas. quarter with a 14-yard touchstruggled against the Cougars ing back behind Boyd, who Smith went 30 and 74 yards down run, Ikeem Means recodefense before blowing the went 26 for 38 for 270 yards as for scores and Justin Gilbert vered a muffed punt late and the catalyst of an offense that returned the third quarter kick- game open in the second half. No. 24 Auburn beat Florida 17-6 Luck, a Heisman Trophy candi- amassed 576 yards. off 100 yards for a touchdown. in a defensive game that saw Gilbert tied the Oklahoma State date, finished with four touchseven players take snaps at Virginia 24, down passes, all in the second (6-0, 3-0 Big 12) school record quarterback. No. 12 Georgia Tech 21 half. for career kickoff TD returns Two teams that have comCHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — bined to win three of the last with four. No. 8 Clemson 56, Perry Jones ran for 149 of Virfive national titles with creative Maryland 45 No. 7 Stanford 44, ginia’s 272 yards on the ground offenses, turned to backup QBs Washington St. 14 and the Cavaliers beat No. 12 COLLEGE PARK, Md. — in the second half in search of Georgia Tech. PULLMAN, Wash. — AnTajh Boyd threw four touchsome offensive life.

B I G 10 RO U N D U P

Spartans hand Wolverines’ Hoke first loss The Associated Press

EAST LANSING, Mich. — Keshawn Martin scored twice in the third quarter on similar lunges to the end zone, and No. 23 Michigan State held off Denard Robinson and No. 11 Michigan 28-14 on Saturday for its fourth straight victory over the Wolverines. The Spartans (5-1, 2-0 Big Ten) equaled their longest winning streak over their instate rivals. Michigan (6-1, 2-1) lost for the first time under coach Brady Hoke. The Wolverines had a chance to tie it, but Robinson was sacked on fourth-and-1 from the Michigan State 9-yard line with 6:16 to play. Robinson later threw an interception, and Isaiah Lewis returned it 39 yards for a touchdown with 4:31 left to make it 28-14. Shortly after that, Robinson was shaken up by a hit and left the game. Edwin Baker ran for 167 yards and a touchdown for the Spartans. Robinson ran for a first-quarter touchdown but was mostly ineffective through the air,

going 9 for 24 for 123 yards and a touchdown on a windy day in East Lansing. Down 21-7, Robinson found Roy Roundtree for a 34-yard touchdown with 9:49 left in the game. Martin then fumbled on an end around, giving Michigan the ball at the Michigan State 32. After converting fourth-and-1 from the 23 with a short run, Robinson faced the same down and distance from the 9. Michigan called a slow-developing play-action attempt, and Johnny Adams sacked Robinson to end the drive. After Michigan got the ball back, Robinson’s pass was intercepted by Lewis, who took it back for a touchdown. Lewis risked a penalty by holding the ball out before crossing the goal line, but the touchdown stood. Michigan State hasn’t had a four-game winning streak in the series since 1959-62 — which was part of a 6-0-2 stretch against Michigan. Ohio State 17, No. 16 Illinois 7 CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Daniel Herron, who hadn’t played

quarter. Illinois quarterback Nathan Scheelhaase was 20 of 34 for 169 yards, two interceptions and a late TD pass.

AP PHOTO

Michigan State’s Keshawn Martin, center, scores a touchdown on a 13-yard pass reception Saturday in East Lansing, Mich.

since the Sugar Bowl in January because of NCAA suspensions, ran for 114 yards and a touchdown in his return Saturday to lead Ohio State past No. 16 Illinois, 17-7. With true freshman Braxton Miller at quarterback, the struggling offense of Ohio State (4-3, 2-1 Big Ten) counted on Herron against Illinois (6-1, 2-1). The

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 5C

Buckeyes didn’t complete a pass until Miller hit Jake Stoneburner for a fourth-quarter touchdown and a 17-0 lead. The Buckeyes’ defense forced three turnovers and turned two of them into their only touchdowns. Herron’s 12-yard touchdown run followed an interception by Bradley Roby and put Ohio State up 10-0 in the third

Wisconsin 59, Indiana 7 MADISON, Wis. — Quarterback Russell Wilson added a new chapter to his brief-butgrowing legend, making a touchdown catch on a trick play as No. 4 Wisconsin routed Indiana 59-7 on Saturday. Wilson, who is being touted as a Heisman Trophy candidate by Wisconsin (6-0, 2-0 Big Ten), added another memorable moment to his resume when he caught a 25-yard score from running back Montee Ball in the second quarter. Ball had a huge day, rushing for three touchdowns. Wilson threw for 166 yards and a touchdown with 42 yards rushing. Wisconsin was playing without top wide receiver Nick Toon, who sat out with a left foot injury. Stephen Houston had a 67yard touchdown run for the struggling Hoosiers (1-6, 0-3).

Warriors’ Douds ties game mark

The Times Leader staff

EAST STROUDSBURG – East Stroudsburg University head coach Denny Douds tied the Division II record with his 393rd game coached and redshirt senior quarterback Ray Wagner threw for 503 yards, becoming the first player with back-to-back 500-yard games in Pennsylvania Athletic Conference history, but C.W. Post left Eiler-Martin Stadium with a 34-30 victory on Saturday afternoon. Douds, 230-160-3 in his 38th season at ESU, tied the division’s mark held by Jim Malosky, who guided MinnesotaDuluth from 1958-1997. Douds will coach his record-setting 394th game next Saturday when the Warriors host Millersville at 3:05 p.m. Wagner followed a 522-yard game at Kutztown last Saturday by throwing three long first-half touchdown passes – 73 and 75 yards to redshirt junior Jordan Hallman and 61 yards to redshirt sophomore Robert Bleiler – as the Warriors built a 23-7 lead, but couldn’t hang on. Utah 26, Pittsburgh 14

PITTSBURGH — John White ran for 171 yards and Coleman Petersen kicked four field goals in the tricky Heinz Field winds to lead Utah by reeling Pittsburgh. The Utes (3-3) snapped a two-game losing streak behind the legs of White and Petersen, and an impressive defensive effort to improve to 9-0 all-time against current members of the Big East. Petersen, who’d made four field goals all year coming in, converted kicks of 23, 34, 39 and 45 yards in winds that gusted over 30 mph. Utah’s Derrick Shelby returned a late interception 21 yards for a touchdown as the Utes sent Pitt (3-4) to its second straight loss. The Panthers managed just 120 total yards, turned it over three times and a reconfigured offensive line allowed quarterbacks Trey Anderson and Tino Sunseri to get sacked six times. Temple 34, Buffalo 0

PHILADELPHIA — Bernard Pierce ran for 152 yards and two touchdowns on 23 carries, and set new Temple rushing records along the way, as the Owls blasted Buffalo. Pierce became Temple’s single-season and career rushing leader with his performance, as he crossed the 100-yard mark for the fifth time this season. Even his backup joined the party. Matt Brown ran for 120 yards and a score on 12 carries as the Owls (5-2, 3-1 MAC) compiled 400 yards on the ground, and owned 39:08 time of possession, never really giving the Bulls (2-5, 1-2) an opportunity to fight back. James Madison 34, Villanova 10

HARRISONBURG, Va. — Trailing 10-6 midway through the third quarter, James Madison erupted for four touchdowns — two each in the third and fourth quarters — and pulled away from Villanova. Jordan Anderson ran for three touchdowns for the Dukes, two in the decisive second half. The Dukes rushed for 253 yards, 19 yards more than Villanova’s total offensive output. Bloomsburg 38, Shippensburg 18

BLOOMSBURG – Huskies senior quarterback Pat Carey threw for 201 yards and three touchdowns as Bloom (7-0, 4-0 PSAC East) topped the Red Raiders. Defensively Jarrett Pidgeon recorded a career high 17 tackles. Eddie Mateo rushed for 129 yards on 16 carries to go along with a season long 69-yard rush, while Franklyn Quiteh went for 105 and two touchdowns for Bloomsburg. Fullback Matt Cox also added a 61-yard run on a fake punt.


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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

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RUNNING

RANGERS

LOCAL ROUNDUP

Wilkes advances 9 to MAC semifinals

Continued from Page 1C

mates. Cruz threw both hands in the air and briefly knelt to a knee in the outfield before running to the infield for the ginger ale-spraying celebration to come while a banner was unfurled high over center field declaring the Rangers 2011 AL champions With former President George W. Bush seated in the front row alongside Hall of Fame pitcher Nolan Ryan, part of the ownership group that took over the team last year, Rangers manager Ron Washington was at the edge of the dugout wildly waving his arms and shouting encouragement to his players as the big inning unfolded. All Tigers manager Jim Leyland could do was take off his cap and scratch his head. A franchise that began as the expansion Washington Senators and moved to Texas in 1972 had failed to reach the World Series in its first 49 seasons. Then the Rangers won their first AL pennant last year only to lose the Series to the San Francisco Giants in five games. “As soon as the season began, we were hungry, we were hungry to get back,” Rangers shortstop Elvis Andrus said. Texas overcame a 2-0 deficit by sending 14 batters to the plate against Detroit starter Max Scherzer (0-1) and three relievers in the highest-scoring postseason inning since 2002. Alexi Ogando (2-0) pitched two scoreless innings for his second win in the series as the Rangers became the AL’s first consecutive pennant winner since the New York Yankees won four in a row from 1998-01. While Young became only the fourth player in postseason history with two extra-base hits in the same inning — first a tying double into the left-field corner and then one down the right field line for a 9-2 lead — every batter in the Texas lineup reached base at least once before the third out of the third. By the time all the fireworks was over, the Rangers scored the most runs ever in a postseason game against the Tigers and the most in any postseason contest since the Yankees routed Boston 19-8 in Game 4 of the 2004 ALCS. Also among the sellout crowd of 51,508 was Dirk Nowitzki, MVP of the NBA finals won by the Dallas Mavericks in June.

The Times Leader staff

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Runners take off to start the inaugural Catholic Youth Back Mountain Fall 5K Run along Monroe Avenue in Dallas on Saturday morning.

Scenic run poses challenges Robert Moulton and Jen Stec win inaugural Back Mountain Catholic Youth Fall 5K Run.

By ROBERT MINER For The Times Leader

DALLAS – Robert Moulton and Jen Stec ran to wire-to-wire victories in the inaugural running of the Back Mountain Catholic Youth Fall 5K Run on Saturday at the Gate of Heaven School. Moulton,19, of Mountain Top, tackled the challenging course that was loaded with hills, winning overall honors in 17 minutes, 51 seconds. He outran second-place finisher, Tony Korch, 51, of Nanticoke, by 1:56. Mark Wright, 43, of Shavertown, who won the Lupus Loop 5K Run in Kirby Park on Sept. 25, finished third in 20:55. “I took a medium pace up the hills, especially on the first hill, because I knew there were more hills to come,” Moulton said. “I used a long stride on the downhills. It was hard getting into a nice rhythm because of the hills. But I did every chance I got.” Moulton ran track and cross country for Crestwood High School. He is currently an assistant cross country coach for the Comets while attending King’s

College, where he runs track as a sophomore. Moulton said the new race at Gate of Heaven was the toughest 5K he had ever run. Nevertheless, he enjoyed the scenic hills and said he would run it again. Stec, who won top female honors with a sixth-place overall finish in 22:37, echoed Moulton’s remarks. “The course was outstanding,” said Stec, 36, of Mocanaqua. “It was hilly and scenic. I will definitely come back and run this race again. Everything was so well organized. And the traffic control, along the course, was great.” Stec, who just two weeks ago ran a trail marathon (actually a 25-1/2 miler), said she tried to take it a little easy. “I tried to run at a strong uphill pace,” Stec said. “And I made up as much time as I could over the downhills.” Sandy Jesse, 38, of Dallas, finished second among the women, finishing 10th-overall in 24:50. Proceeds from the race go to the Back Mountain Catholic Youth Group to help fund a trip to Camden, N.J., to the Romero Center, an outreach community organization that helps the poor. Jayne Moore and Fr. Daniel Toomey are coordinators of the youth group. Moore said the

youth learn about helping the poor and social justice. Then they bring what they’ve learned back home. Moore said that Camden is the second poorest city in the United States. Back Mountain Catholic Youth Fall 5K Run results Top 10 Robert Moulton, 19, Mountain Top, 17:51 Tony Korch, 51, Nanticoke, 19:47 Mark Wright, 43, Shavertown, 20:55 Andy Levandoski, 15, Dallas, 21:38 Ryan Walp, 38, Dallas, 22:34 Jen Stec, 36, Mocanaqua, 22:37 Mike Stochnic, 16, Dallas, 24:27 Kyle Magda, 18, Dupont, 24:28 Dave Eury, 17, Shavertown, 24:40 Sandy Jesse, 38, Dallas 24:50 Male award winners: Overall: Moulton. Age group winners: 14 & under: 1. Sean McMonagle, Shavertown, 24:51; 2. Alex Clark, Monroe Twp., 33:32. 15-19: 1. Andy Levandoski, Dallas, 21:38; 2. Mike Stochnik, Dallas, 24:27. 20-29: 1. Todd DeSando, Dallas, 25:01; 2. Pat Martino, Jim Thorpe, 27:10. 30-39: 1. Ryan Walp, Dallas, 22:34; 2. Doug Clark, Monroe Twp., 28:23. Masters division: 4049: 1. Mark Wright, Shavertown, 20:55; 2. Gus Panagokus, Dallas, 27:08. 50-59: 1. Tony Korch, Nanticoke, 19:47; 2. Ron Ruda, Dallas, 29:12. Top 3 females Jen Stec, 36, Mocanaqua, 22:37 Sandy Jesse, 38, Dallas, 24:50 Diane Levandoski, 52, Dallas, 25:09 Female award winners: Overall: Stec. Age group winners: 14 & under: None. 15-19: None. 2029: 1. Kelly Wagner, Kingston, 27:14; 2. Kelsey Daum, Orwigsburg, 29:19. 30-39: Sandy Jesse, Dallas, 24:50; 2. Karen Buckley, Shavertown, 33:45. Masters division: 40-49: 1. Sandra Darling, Dallas, 31:41; 2. None. 50-59: 1. Diane Levandoski, Dallas, 25:09; 2. Irene Ghezzii, Dallas, 29:45. 5K racewalk First male: John Aciukewicz, 52, Trucksville, 39:00. First female: Ann Charney, 46, Dallas, 39:36. Field: 57. Official starter: John Martino, race director. Timing and results: Joe Mogilski and George Mitzen. Back Mountain Youth Group coordinators: Jayne Moore and Fr. Daniel Toomey. Schedule Sunday, Oct. 23: Jewish Community Center of Wyoming Valley’s Benjamin August Memorial 3 Mile Run/Walk at 10:30 a.m. at the JCC, River Street, Wilkes-Barre. Info: Bill Buzza, 824-4646, ext. 232. Sunday, Oct. 30: Wyoming Valley Striders’ Fall Trail (5.5-mile) Run at 1 p.m. at the pavilion, near the boat launch area, of Frances Slocum State Park, Kingston Twp. Info: Vince Wojnar, 474-5363. Thursday, Nov 24 (Thanksgiving): Berwick Marathon Association’s (9 mile) Run for the Diamonds at 10:30 a.m. at Market and Second streets, Berwick. Info: Margaret Livsey, 759-1300.

WILKES-BARRE -- The MAC Women’s Tennis Championships opened Saturday at Kirby Park with representatives from Wilkes, King’s and Misericordia all performing well -- 14 representatives of the schools advanced to their respective semifinals. Wilkes leads the way for the locals with all but one flight consisting of a semifinalist as Melanie Nolt, Katie Lynn, Allison Kristofoco, Alexis Donner, Anna Mitchell, Rebekah Shanaman, Amanda Holyk and the doubles teams of Donner/Kristofoco and Mitchell/ Shanaman will also play in the semis. Misericordia has representatives in five flights, with Breanne Phillips (No. 1 singles), Emily Boro (No. 3 singles), Cassie Foy (No. 4 singles), Phillips and Michelle Cameron (No. 1 doubles), Boro and Foy (No. 2 doubles) moving on. The Monarchs advanced three singles players – Vanessa Wagner, Kate Rossowski and Gina McLaughlin to the semis – and one doubles squad. Rossowski and Wagner teamed up at No. 4 doubles to reach the final four of that flight.

WOMEN’S SOCCER

EPCC Championships

LCCC won the Thaddeus Young Invitational and the EPCC Championships led by Bornfase Omurwa’s first-place finish and Jimmy Ryan’s fifth. Joe McDonald (sixth), Tyler Angeli (10th) and Mike Kennedy (11th) also helped the team as it scored 33 points to beat Valley Forge, which tallied 37.

WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL

Neumann Invitational

Wilkes dropped a pair of games on Day 1 of the Neumann Invitational, falling 3-0 Laura Roney scored 11 secto Rowan (25-18, 25-14, 27-25) onds into overtime off an and 3-0 to the host (25-17, assist from Sam Helmstetter 25-20, 25-14). to lift Misericordia. Casey Bohan led the way Erin McGreal also scored for the Cougars to give them a 1-0 with nine kills, and Paige Trusty followed with six kills lead at 55:30. and seven digs against Rowan. FDU-Florham 3, King’s 0 Erin Nothstein contributed with a team-high 12 digs, Lady Monarch goalie Lauren Duguid posted eight saves while Kate McGurk added 23 assists. in the contest. Bohan and Trusty combined Wilkes 3, Manhattanville 0 for 15 kills versus Neumann, while Nothstein finished with Jana Martin recorded her second straight two-goal game 15 digs and McGurk added 16 assists. to lift Wilkes. Amy Davies also scored for H.S. WATER POLO the Colonels.

FIELD HOCKEY

King’s 3, Delaware Valley 0

Wilkes 1, DeSales 0

Continued from Page 1C

20th and the men placed 21st, while the Cougar women were 14th and the Cougar men took 11th. Wilkes’ men took 22nd and the women were 21st. Misericordia’s Marina Orrson led the way for all local runners, placing eighth overall with a time of 24:25. Michon Dinwoodie led the way for the Monarchs finishing in 115th place in a time of 26:57. The Monarchs’ men’s top finisher was Nicholas Guarino in 86th place in a time of 29:44. A.J. Limongelli (28:54) finished 46th to lead the Misericordia men. For Wilkes, Dan Lykens (29:51) led the way for the men, finishing 92nd, and Michelle Wakeley’s time of 25:56 was good for 61st.

Misericordia 2, Eastern 1

Jackie Sikora scored a pair of goals to lead the Monarchs. Calli Berryman also knocked in a goal for King’s.

PENGUINS The loss – their second in a row, drops the Penguins to 1-2-1-1 on the season, good enough for four points. And even though they managed a point on Saturday, it certainly wasn’t good enough. “At this time of year, in overtime, you at least want to get to a shootout so you have a chance at two points,” said Geoff Walker, who had a power play goal but was a minus-3. “This is tough to swallow.” Despite the blown-lead, the components of the Penguins’ game at times showed things may be close to coming together. The defense was remarkable in the first period, Brad Thiessen made several brilliant saves and the offense was consistent throughout. Now all they need is for all those elements to perform well together for an entire 60 minutes. “That’s what we’re working toward,” said head coach John Hynes. “Tonight’s performance we had hard work, but the miscues cost us. We’re learning some tough lessons.” Miscues such as the blown coverage that allowed Senators forward Derek Grant to break in alone on Thiessen and bury the puck to cut the Penguins lead to 2-1 early in the second period. Or Kaspars Daugavins’ third period goal that came after he skated behind several Penguins in the neutral zone and got by Alexandre Picard to score on Thiessen and give Binghamton a 4-3 lead. Down by one with seven minutes to play, the Penguins leaned on their leading goal scorer, Bryan Lerg, to even things up. Paul Thompson set things up when he gained control of the puck behind the Senators’ net

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Brittany Beavers, assisted by Ashley Ream, scored the only goal in the game with 16:11 remaining in the second half to give Wilkes the shutout victory.

MEN’S SOCCER

King’s 2, FDU-Florham 1

Billy Elliott and Joey Bender each scored off assists from Kevin Burke to open a 2-0 lead. Misericordia 0, Eastern 0

LaSalle 10, Wyoming Valley West 9

Alex Himlin and Justin Klemish each scored three goals to pace the Spartans, while Ibrahim Ismail chipped in two tallies and Adin Greenwald added a goal.

H.S. FIELD HOCKEY

Pittston Area 5, Montrose 0

Gabby Vaxmonsky and Dana Maurizi each scored twice to pace the Patriots.

Montrose ................................................. 0 0 — 0 Pittston Area ........................................... 4 1 — 5 First half: 1. PA, Meredith Yozwiak (Alexa Danko) 7:59; 2. PA, Gabby Vaxmonsky (Marina Barnak) 6:11; 3. PA, Dana Maurizi (Rebecca Weinstock) 2:59; 4. PA, Vaxmonsky (Liz Mikitish) :30 Second half: 1. PA, Maurizi (Brielle Warren) 11:09 Shots: MON 0, PA 18; Saves: MON 13 (Taylor Wright), PA 0 (Lea Garibaldi, Ariel Ardo); Corners: MON 0, PA 24.

Holy Redeemer 5, Nanticoke 0

Lauren Bernardi netted a Dan Fritz made three saves hat trick, while Ashley Bernarin goal and Bryan Kulbacki di had a goal and assist to lead cleared a ball off the line in the the Royals to the win. Nanticoke................................................... 0 0 — 0 second half to preserve the Holy Redeemer......................................... 1 4 — 5 First half: 1. HR, Lauren Bernardi (Sara Alteshutout. Manhattanville 3, Wilkes 2

FRED ADAMS/THE TIMES LEADER

Penguins forward Eric Tangradi, left, throws up his arms celebrating the Penguins second goal in the first period against Binghamton.

and dished a pass to Lerg in front. Lerg blasted a one-timer through Binghamton goaltender Robin Lehner to make it 4-4. The goal was Lerg’s in his last three games and gave him six points on the year. But the Senators had the final say with less than two minutes remaining in the overtime period. Once again, a bad read gave Binghamton an odd-man rush into the Penguins zone, and Mark Parrish buried the puck for his second goal of the night and the gamewinner. Walker, who said the goal was his fault, said the Penguins have been beating themselves with turnovers, bad read and mistakes. Still, he emphasized that all is not lost. “It feels real tough right now

but I think we’re close. It’s good game. Hynes said he has a lower that we’re going through this body injury and will be evaluated early. We need to learn from it today. Binghamton ............................................. 0 2 2 1 — 5 and get stronger,” he said. Penguins.................................................. 2 1 1 0 — 4 Period – Scoring – 1. WBS, Brandon DeFaHynes echoed Walker’s senti- zio First 1 (Strait, Chupp) 5:49. 2. WBS, Eric Tangradi 2 ment, adding that his team gave (Gibbons, Dimitrakos) 18:43. Penalties – BNG, Schira (boarding) 10:16. up big plays that led to point Second Period – Scoring – 3. BNG, Derek Grant 1 (Parrish, Conboy) :16. 4. WBS, Geoff Walker 2 blank shots… and those usually (Tangradi, Lerg) power play 1:53. 5. BNG, Mike Hoffman 1 (Locke, Parrish) 2:22. Penalties – WBS, lead to goals. Despres (cross-checking) 3:41; BNG, Conboy to the head) 14:54; WBS, Mormina (trip“That’s not smart defense,” he (checking ping) 18:09.Third Period – Scoring – 6. BNG, Mark 3 (Wiercioch, O’Brien) 7:16. 7. BNG, Kassaid. “We’ve been hanging in the Parrish pars Daugavins 3 (Borowiecki, Locke) 11:18. 8. fight, we just haven’t had a couple WBS, Bryan Lerg 4 (Thompson, Sneep) 12:48. Penalties – BNG, O’Brien (high-sticking) 8:54. good knockouts yet.” Overtime— Scoring – BNG, Mark Parrish 4 (O’Brien, Hoffman) 3:29. Penalties – None. NOTES: D Philip Samuelsson, Shots on goal – Binghamton– 1-12—5-6-24. – 7-10-11-1-29 D Alex Grant, C Matt Rust and Penguins Power-play Opportunities – Binghamton– 0 of 2. Penguins – 1 of 4 LW Ryan Schnell were scratched Goaltenders – Binghamton– Robin Lehner 11-0 (25 saves – 29 shots). Penguins – Brad Thiesby the Penguins… Simon Despres sen 1-2-0 (19-24) Starters – Binghamton– G Robin Lehner, D had a play of the year candidate in Mark Borowiecki, D Tim Conboy, LW Derek Grant, C the third period when he skated Jim O’Brien, RW Mark Parrish. Penguins – G Brad Thiessen, D Joey Mormina, D Simon Despres, LW into the Binghamton zone, spun Geoff Walker, C Bryan Lerg, RW Colin McDonald Three Stars – 1. BNG, Mark Parrish (two goals) and wheeled a behind-the-back 2. WBS, Bryan Lerg (goal, assist) 3. WBS, Eric Tan(goal, assist) pass to Cody Chupp in the slot. gradiReferee – Chris Cozzan. Linesmen – Jameel Jud Ritter Chupp’s shot hit the post… Ryan Chaudry, Attendance – 4,732 Craig didn’t suit up for Saturday’s

T.J. Brandt and Michael Turner each scored, but it wasn’t enough as Wilkes couldn’t back from a 2-0 deficit.

CROSS COUNTRY

mose) 27:00 Second half: 1. HR, Greta Ell (Bernardi) 20:00; 2. HR, Bernardi (Ashley Bernardi)19:00; 3. HR, L. Bernardi (A. Bernardi) 14:00; 4. HR, A. Bernardi (Amber Desiderio) 10:00 Shots: NAN 2, HR 17; Saves: NAN 12 (Alexa Gorski), HR 2 (Elizabeth Nicholas); Corners: NAN 6, HR 20.

H.S. BOYS SOCCER Dallas 5, Crestwood 1

In a Division I match played Friday, the Mountaineers Penn State Wilkes-Barre remained undefeated moving freshman Alex Leandri won to 12-0 as Matt Saba scored her third straight PSUAC cross the first two goals in the first country meet winning the seven minutes to help with the PSUAC Lehigh Valley Invitaroad victory. tional with a time of 22:23. Danny Saba, Josh Shilanski The second place finisher and Dante DeAngelo also finished 1 minute 15 seconds scored for Dallas. behind Leandri. John Andrews took a pass Next week, Leandri will from A.J. Krysicki to score for compete for the PSUAC the Comets just 1:27 into the Championship at Penn State second half. Dallas....................................................... 3 2 — 5 Fayette. Crestwood............................................... 0 1 — 1 PSU-WB frosh winning

Gettysburg Invitational

The King’s, Misericordia and Wilkes cross country teams participated at the Gettysburg Invitational, an event consisting of 31 teams from Division I, II and III. The King’s women finished

First half: 1. DAL, Matt Saba 38:20; 2. DAL, Matt Saba (A.J. Nardone) 32:17; 3. DAL, Danny Saba (Brian Stepniak) 22:03 Second half: 1. CRE, John Andrews (A.J. Krysicki) 38:33; 2. DAL, Josh Shilanski (Dante DeAngelo) 18:17; 3. DAL, DeAngelo (Brandon Scharff) 12:16 Shots: DAL 37, CRE 25; Saves: DAL 17 (Ryan Koslozski), CRE 29 (Steve Rerick); Corners: DAL 5, CRE 2.


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 7C

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

PA N A M GA M E S

Points at a premium for Colonels

Irmiger of US wins first gold at games

Potent Lycoming runs for 303 yards, scores game’s first 34 points in rout of Wilkes.

RANGERS Continued from Page 1C

better,” said Nanticoke coach Ron Bruza, whose team fell to 2-4. “We didn’t lose 35-0 or 48whatever or 52-0. It’s just a tough loss. Somebody had to lose the game, and unfortunately it had to be us.” Northwest (4-3) had defeated Nanticoke the past four years by a combined score of 171-12. That included consecutive shutouts of 53-0 and 35-0 the past two years. “Hats off to Nanticoke,” Northwest coach Carl Majer said. “That’s the best they’ve played us in four years. It could have gone either way and I said that to every (Nanticoke) player walking across here.” Northwest trailed 30-28 when it got the ball back with 2:17 to play. After three plays moved the ball 12 yards to the Nanticoke 32yard line, Foley lined up on the right side, slanted between the hash marks and caught a bullet from Majer in stride for the gamewinner.

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Wilkes managed just 64 yards after that drive until the final 15 minutes. The Warriors (5-2, 3-1) capitalized on Wilkes’ miscue, driving 80 yards on 10 plays on their opening possession, capped with a 14-yard TD pass from Zach Klinger to Matt Atkinson for a 6-0 lead at the 4:02 mark. Lyco took a 13-0 advantage at halftime after a second quarter, 9-yard scoring run by Craig Needhammer (20 carries, 152 yards). Trailing 20-0 in the third quarter, the Colonels were putting something together and driving in Warriors territory before QB Tyler Bernsten was picked off

CRESTWOOD-DALLAS M O V E D T O M O N D AY Due to field conditions caused by rain Saturday morning, the Crestwood at Dallas football game was postponed. The game will be played at 2:30 p.m. Monday at Dallas.

The duo also hooked up on TD pass of 60 and 40 yards in the first quarter. Nanticoke’s final chance started poorly as Northwest’s Dalton Tomko sniffed out a running play for a 9-yard loss. After an incompletion, defensive back Jeramie Rittenhouse picked off his third pass of the game to seal the victory. Early on, it looked like the Rangers might have been headed to another blowout victory over the Trojans. Majer tossed his third TD pass of the game early in the second quarter for a 20-8 lead. Nanticoke, though, battled back behind the running of Brian Maslowski to take a 24-20 lead at halftime. Northwest regained a 28-20

lead when running back Tony Politz scored on a 10-yard run on its first possession of the third quarter. The key play in the drive was the first one. Majer and Politz ran an option to the left, but as Majer was hit in the backfield he flipped the ball forward to Politz, resulting in a 47-yard reception. The Rangers were driving again on their next possession when Nanticoke defensive back Jeff Jezewski recorded the second of his three interceptions and returned it 82 yards for a score and 30-28 advantage. Northwest 34, Nanticoke 30 Northwest ............................. 14 6 8 6 — 34 Nanticoke.............................. 8 16 6 0 — 30 First Quarter NWT – Foley 60 pass from Majer (Foley kick), 9:50 NAN – Maslowski 2 run (Maslowski run), 1:02 NWT – Foley 40 pass from Majer (Foley kick), 0:27 Second Quarter

GUADALAJARA, Mexico — The United States quickly moved to the top of the medals table at the Pan American Games on Saturday with two golds and a bronze in the first three events. Heather Irmiger won the competition’s first gold in the women’s cross-country mountain bike race, and Jeremiah Bishop added a bronze in the men’s event a few hours later. “The course was perfect for me,” Irmiger said. “I enjoyed the technical sustained climb and navigating my way through the cobbled streets lined with yelling fans.” In modern pentathlon, Margaux Isaksen took gold with 5,356 points. There are eight more gold medals to be won on the first day of competition in Guadalajara, including five in swimming. The United States has traditionally dominated the Pan American Games, which have been staged every four years since the first competition in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 1951. Irmiger took the lead from the first lap on the 24.8-kilometer mountain bike circuit, winning in 1 hour, 34 minutes, 9 seconds. Laura Lorenza Morfin of Mexico was second in 1:35:54 and Amanda Sin of Canada third in 1:37:14. Defending champion Hector Paez of Colombia won the gold medal in the men’s race in1:31:12, followed by Max Plaxton of Canada in 1:31:29. Bishop was third in 1:32:41.

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“It was an aggressive race,” said Bishop, who won Pan Am gold in 2003. “I went full gas right from the start to put pressure on the others.” Isaksen won the opening fencing event in the modern pentathlon, and finished second to silver medalist Yane Marques of Brazil in the 200-meter freestyle swim and the show jump. But Isaksen again finished first in the concluding combined event, which consists of a 3-kilometer run with breaks for shooting. Marques was second with 5,260 points, while Tamara Vega of Mexico took bronze with 4,956. In the swimming heats, Claire Donahue of the United States set the first meet record, winning her 100-meter butterfly heat in 58.59 seconds. The previous record, held by American swimmer Kathleen Hersey, was 59.21 from the 2007 Games in Rio. The world record is 56.06. The women’s United States 400 freestyle relay team soon followed with another championship record, winning a heat in 3:40.85. Olympic champion Cesar Cielo, one of the most accomplished swimmers competing in Guadalajara, made a brief visit to the hospital Saturday because of a minor illness, but he is expected to swim as scheduled today. Before competition even started Saturday morning, three doping cases emerged. Brazilian runner Simone Alves da Silva and Puerto Rican mountain biker Kelvin Gonzalez both tested positive for EPO, while Chilean weightlifter Cristian Escalante tested positive for the stimulant methylhexaneamine. All three were withdrawn from the Games.

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NWT – Rittenhouse 22 pass from Majer (kick blocked), 9:27 NAN – Maslowski 4 run (Maslowski run), 5:35 NAN – Maslowski 13 run (Maslowski run), 3:44 Third Quarter NWT – Politz 20 run (Foley from Majer), 9:50 NAN – Jezewski 82 int. return (run failed), 7:35 Fourth Quarter NWT – Foley 32 pass from Majer (pass failed), 1:37 Team Statistics Northwest Nanticoke First downs .................. 14 13 Rushes-yards.............. 26-61 47-230 Passing ........................ 298 21 Total Yards .................. 359 251 Comp-Att-Int................ 11-26-3 1-10-4 Sacked-Yards Lost .... 2-18 0-0 Punts-Avg. ................... 2-23 2-23 Fumbles-Lost .............. 1-0 1-0 Penalties-Yards .......... 3-13 9-63 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING – Northwest, Politz 9-54, Majer 9-7, Mazonkey 5-18, team 3-(minus-18). Nanticoke, Maslowski 32-146, Vitale 1-3, Hempel 9-71, Matulewski 4-19, Kaspryk 1-(minus-9). PASSING – Northwest, Majer 11-26-3-298. Nanticoke, Matulewski 1-5-2-21, Maslowski 0-2-1-0, Decker 0-3-1-0. RECEIVING – Northwest, Foley 4-119, Rittenhouse 4-88, Politz 1-47, Mazonkey 1-5, Pegarella 1-9. INTS – Northwest, Rittenhouse 3, Kramer. Nanticoke, Jezewski 3. MISSED FGS –none.

The United States moved atop the medals table after medaling first three events.

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WILLIAMSPORT – Wilkes piled up the second-most yardage against Lycoming this year when it totaled 230 yards Saturday afternoon at David Person Field. Even though the output was just 31 yards shy of the most allowed by the Warriors this year, the Colonels couldn’t handle Lycoming and fell 40-7. The afternoon got off to a good start for Wilkes (2-4, 2-3 MAC) as it received the opening kickoff and drove 73 yards on 13 plays only to come away empty handed as a 23-yard field goal attempt by Geoffrey Arentz was pushed to the right. That turned out to be the biggest threat the Colonels had until the fourth quarter.

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by Northwest grad Ray Bier- 13-yard pass from Bernsten to bach, who took the interception Todd Eagles. That score 63 yards to the Wilkes’ 1, setting trimmed Lyco’s lead to 34-7. up another Lycoming score. Lycoming 40, Wilkes 7 The interception by the se- Wilkes ................................ 0 0 0 7 — 7 6 7 14 13 — 40 nior moved him into fifth-place Lycoming ........................... First Quarter LYCO – Atkinson 14 pass from Klinger (kick on Lycoming’s all-time list, with failed) 4:02 12 in his career. The defensive Second Quarter LYCO – Needhammer 9 run (Czap kick) 8:51 back added eight tackles and reThird Quarter – Oliver 29 pass from Atkinson (Czap turned two punts for negative kick)LYCO 13:17 LYCO – Showers 5 run (Czap kick) 9:38 yardage. He now has two interFourth Quarter WILKES – Eagles 13 pass from Bernsten ceptions this season. (Arentz kick) 8:46 LYCO – Showers 2 run (kick failed) 3:13 The Colonels offensive line Statistics Wilkes Lycoming remained strong against the Ly- Team First downs..................... 14 25 48-303 coming defensive line, which Rushes-yards................. 38-110 Passing........................... 120 158 entered the game fourth in the Total Yards..................... 230 466 12-22-0 country allowing just 54.6 yards Comp-Att-Int................... 10-23-2 Sacks-Yards Lost .......... 0-0 1-4 per game. Wilkes became the Punts-Avg....................... 7-31.0 4-28.5 Fumbles-Lost ................. 0-0 0-0 first team this year to rush for Penalties-Yards ............. 4-37 10-110 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS more than 100 yards against the RUSHING – WILKES, George 12-35, Tivald 9Warriors, combining for 110 31, Bernsten 5-28, Wogou 6-10, Regan 3-9, Van Mater 1-7, Sloh 1-1, TEAM 1-(minus-11). LYCO, yards on the ground. The previ- Showers 20-152, Needhammer 16-77, Klinger 753, Floyd 2-14, Atkinson 1-7, Czap 1-7, TEAM 1ous high against Lycoming was (minus-2). PASSING – WILKES, George 6-12-1-70, Albright’s 84 yards. Bernsten 4-11-1-50. LYCO, Klinger 11-21-0-129, 1-1-0-29. Seven players ran the ball for Atkinson RECEIVING – WILKES, Eagles 4-60, Bousson Wilkes, led by Alex George’s 35 4-49, Regan 1-16, Wogou 1-(minus-5). LYCO, Oliver 5-71, Atkinson 3-45, Campman 3-30, Milardo yards and Zach Tivald’s 31. 1-12. INTERCEPTIONS – LYCO, Bierbach, Flail Wilkes’ touchdown came with 8:46 left in the game on a

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CMYK PAGE 8C

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

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NFL SUNDAY EAGLES VS. REDSKINS

A F C I N D I V I D U A L L E A D E R S Week 5 Quarterbacks Att Com Yds TD Int Brady, NWE .............. 196 133 1874 14 6 Fitzpatrick, BUF ........ 172 113 1233 10 4 Hasselbeck, TEN ..... 181 117 1414 9 4 Schaub, HOU............ 164 98 1377 9 5 Cassel, KAN.............. 140 93 945 8 5 Roethlisberger, PIT.. 172 109 1376 8 6 Rivers, SND .............. 186 125 1536 6 7 J. Campbell, OAK .... 156 94 1118 6 4 Sanchez, NYJ ........... 173 97 1171 8 5 Flacco, BAL............... 140 69 973 7 3 Rushers Att Yds Avg LG TD D. McFadden, OAK.... 91 519 5.70 70t 3 F. Jackson, BUF ......... 90 480 5.33 43t 5 Jones-Drew, JAC ....... 96 476 4.96 41 2 Ry. Mathews, SND ..... 85 413 4.86 36 3 Benson, CIN ............... 101 401 3.97 39t 1 McGahee, DEN .......... 85 384 4.52 28 1 Green-Ellis, NWE....... 77 333 4.32 16t 5 Be. Tate, HOU ............ 68 321 4.72 20 1 R. Rice, BAL................ 66 297 4.50 53 2 A. Foster, HOU ........... 62 256 4.13 42t 1 Receivers No Yds Avg LG TD Welker, NWE................ 45 740 16.4 99t 5 M. Wallace, PIT ........... 31 536 17.3 81t 3 N. Washington, TEN ... 28 389 13.9 57 1 St. Johnson, BUF......... 28 343 12.3 44 3 Tolbert, SND ................ 28 231 8.3 21 2 And. Johnson, HOU .... 25 352 14.1 48 2 A.. Green, CIN ............. 24 402 16.8 58 3 Bowe, KAN ................... 23 420 18.3 52t 4 V. Jackson, SND ......... 23 408 17.7 55t 3 D. Branch, NWE........... 23 300 13.0 33 2 Punters No Yds LG Avg Lechler, OAK....................... 24 1293 77 53.9 B. Fields, MIA...................... 15 774 70 51.6 Moorman, BUF .................... 25 1273 65 50.9 B. Colquitt, DEN.................. 23 1166 65 50.7 Sepulveda, PIT ................... 15 748 66 49.9 McAfee, IND ........................ 28 1343 64 48.0 Mesko, NWE ....................... 16 729 57 45.6 Punt Returners No Yds Avg LG TD Arenas, KAN................. 10 163 16.3 37 0 A. Brown, PIT ............... 11 161 14.6 41 0 Cribbs, CLE .................. 10 128 12.8 43 0 Jac. Jones, HOU ......... 15 182 12.1 79t 1 Edelman, NWE ............ 9 105 11.7 18 0 Bess, MIA ..................... 5 57 11.4 22 0 Kerley, NYJ .................. 11 125 11.4 53 0 Crayton, SND ............... 8 87 10.9 29 0 Br. Tate, CIN................. 19 187 9.8 22 0 L. Webb, BAL ............... 6 59 9.8 29 0 Kickoff Returners No Yds Avg LG TD McKnight, NYJ........... 9 410 45.6 107t 1 A. Brown, PIT............. 8 253 31.6 52 0 Cribbs, CLE................ 7 199 28.4 52 0 D. Manning, HOU ...... 12 330 27.5 46 0 Edelman, NWE .......... 9 214 23.8 37 0 McCluster, KAN ......... 8 190 23.8 35 0 Br. Tate, CIN .............. 12 284 23.7 37 0 Cromartie, NYJ .......... 7 165 23.6 46 0 Scoring Touchdowns TD Rush Rec Ret Pts Decker, DEN ............ 5 0 4 1 30 Green-Ellis, NWE .... 5 5 0 0 30 R. Gronkowski, NWE .......................... 5 0 5 0 30 F. Jackson, BUF ...... 5 5 0 0 30 Welker, NWE............ 5 0 5 0 30 Bowe, KAN ............... 4 0 4 0 24 Chandler, BUF.......... 4 0 4 0 24 Garcon, IND ............. 4 0 4 0 24 D. McFadden, OAK . 4 3 1 0 24 R. Rice, BAL ............. 4 2 2 0 24 Kicking PAT FG LG Pts Rackers, HOU ................ 13-13 12-13 54 49 Janikowski, OAK ............ 13-13 11-12 63 46 Lindell, BUF .................... 20-20 8-9 43 44 Gostkowski, NWE .......... 19-19 8-9 47 43 Novak, SND .................... 9-9 11-11 51 42 Nugent, CIN .................... 9-10 11-11 47 42 Cundiff, BAL.................... 12-12 9-11 41 39 Folk, NYJ......................... 14-14 7-7 50 35 Bironas, TEN .................. 12-12 7-9 46 33 D. Carpenter, MIA.......... 6-6 9-12 51 33

N F C I N D I V I D U A L L E A D E R S Week 5 Quarterbacks Att Com Yds TD Int A. Rodgers, GBY...... 180 129 1721 14 2 Ale. Smith, SNF........ 126 83 965 7 1 Brees, NOR............... 219 152 1769 12 5 E. Manning, NYG ..... 164 104 1486 11 5 Stafford, DET ............ 187 119 1436 13 4 Romo, DAL................ 152 99 1273 7 5 Vick, PHL................... 169 105 1336 8 7 C. Newton, CAR ....... 194 113 1610 7 6 Cutler, CHI ................ 169 99 1209 6 4 Ta. Jackson, SEA..... 157 99 1012 6 5 Rushers Att Yds Avg LG TD A. Peterson, MIN........ 110 498 4.53 46 6 L. McCoy, PHL ........... 77 443 5.75 49t 5 Forte, CHI.................... 82 440 5.37 46 1 Gore, SNF ................... 94 400 4.26 40 3 B. Wells, ARI............... 79 381 4.82 39 6 M. Turner, ATL ........... 84 360 4.29 61 4 Best, DET .................... 72 353 4.90 88t 2 Blount, TAM................. 77 328 4.26 35t 3 Vick, PHL..................... 37 318 8.59 53 0 Bradshaw, NYG.......... 72 286 3.97 37 2 Receivers No Yds Avg LG TD J. Graham, NOR .......... 32 496 15.5 59 3 Maclin, PHL .................. 32 388 12.1 43 3 R. White, ATL............... 32 352 11.0 30 2 Sproles, NOR............... 31 264 8.5 36 1 Forte, CHI ..................... 30 345 11.5 56t 1 Ca. Johnson, DET ....... 29 451 15.6 73t 9 G. Jennings, GBY........ 29 448 15.4 49t 4 H. Nicks, NYG.............. 28 412 14.7 68 3 St. Smith, CAR............. 27 609 22.6 77t 3 Fitzgerald, ARI ............. 27 427 15.8 73t 2 Punters No Yds LG Avg A. Lee, SNF ......................... 23 1186 68 51.6 McBriar, DAL....................... 15 743 68 49.5 Morstead, NOR................... 13 623 59 47.9 J. Ryan, SEA ....................... 33 1548 77 46.9 Kluwe, MIN .......................... 24 1124 58 46.8 Koenen, TAM....................... 23 1052 58 45.7 Weatherford, NYG .............. 29 1323 61 45.6 Punt Returners No Yds Avg LG TD P. Peterson, ARI.......... 11 175 15.9 89t 1 Sproles, NOR............... 7 107 15.3 72t 1 Sherels, MIN ................ 11 167 15.2 53 0 Ginn Jr., SNF ............... 17 201 11.8 55t 1 L. Washington, SEA.... 15 163 10.9 33 0 P. Parker, TAM............. 7 73 10.4 23 0 Banks, WAS.................. 14 145 10.4 35 0 Kickoff Returners No Yds Avg LG TD Cobb, GBY ................. 9 309 34.3 108t 1 Ginn Jr., SNF ............. 9 309 34.3 102t 1 Jefferson, ARI ............ 7 203 29.0 51 0 Sproles, NOR............. 9 251 27.9 57 0 Booker, MIN ............... 8 221 27.6 68 0 Dev. Thomas, NYG... 11 290 26.4 37 0 Je. Norwood, STL ..... 6 156 26.0 31 0 Stephens-Howling, ARI............................... 7 175 25.0 33 0 Scoring Touchdowns TD Rush Rec Ret Pts Ca. Johnson, DET ... 9 0 9 0 54 L. McCoy, PHL......... 7 5 2 0 42 A. Peterson, MIN ..... 6 6 0 0 36 B. Wells, ARI ............ 6 6 0 0 36 C. Newton, CAR ...... 5 5 0 0 30 Mi. Austin, DAL ........ 4 0 4 0 24 T. Gonzalez, ATL..... 4 0 4 0 24 G. Jennings, GBY.... 4 0 4 0 24 M. Turner, ATL......... 4 4 0 0 24 Bradshaw, NYG ....... 3 2 1 0 20 Kicking PAT FG LG Pts Ja. Hanson, DET ............ 18-18 11-11 51 51 Kasay, NOR .................... 15-15 12-14 53 51 Crosby, GBY................... 20-20 9-9 56 47 Akers, SNF ..................... 16-16 10-12 55 46 D. Bailey, DAL ................ 9-9 12-13 48 45 Gould, CHI ...................... 11-11 10-10 49 41 Henery, PHL ................... 14-14 9-12 38 41 Longwell, MIN................. 12-12 9-10 53 39

JAGUARS VS. STEELERS

Matchup nothing like old times

Coach Mike Tomlin refuses to talk about the Steelers ‘08 playoff loss to the Jags. By WILL GRAVES AP Sports Writer

AP FILE PHOTO

Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Michael Vick (7) rushes during the first half against the Washington Redskins on Nov. 15, 2010, in Landover, Md. The Eagles won 59-28.

Payback time for Redskins First-place Washington is out to avenge last year’s embarrassing loss to Philly. By JOSEPH WHITE AP Sports Writer

LANDOVER, Md. — Even by Andy Reid standards, it was an uncomfortable and short call when the Philadelphia Eagles coach spoke to Washington Redskins reporters this week. The height of absurdity was reached when he was asked if he recalled much about the last time the two teams met. “No,” Reid answered. “I have a short memory.” It should be a positive memory. It was 11 months ago that the Eagles rolled into Washington for a Monday night game and dominated like few teams before them, taking a 35-0 lead en route to a 59-28 drubbing. Michael Vick was nothing short of stunning — four touchdowns passing, two touchdowns rushing — and the Redskins were nothing short of stunned. Washington coach Mike Shanahan remembers it all too well. Asked if he was going to review video from that game this week, he longed for Reid’s selective recall. “I’m trying to get that out of my mind,” Shanahan said with a laugh. “No, I’m not going to watch it.” This Sunday’s game between the Eagles and Redskins shapes up to

pretty much what everyone expected at the start of the season: one team in first place with a chance to pull away from the rest of the NFC East vs. a team bringing up the rear. Except that the roles are reversed. Philadelphia (1-4) is in a four-game skid, its longest since 2005, and UP NEXT doesn’t look like the PHILADELdream team predicted afPHIA at ter a post-lockout spendWASHINGTON ing spree. Washington TV: 1 p.m., FOX, (3-1), which knows all too WOLF-56 well about spending OPENING sprees that backfire, was a LINE: Eagles by 11⁄2 consensus pick to finish LAST MEETlast in the division. ING: Eagles The Redskins’ success beat Redskins is also a surprise, and it 59-28, Nov. 15, centers around a defense 2010 that ranked 31st a year ago and is up to No. 6 this season. Offenses convert only 26 percent of their third downs against Washington — a rate no other defense comes close to matching. Stopping Vick is another matter. For one thing, no one has really stopped the Eagles. They just keep stopping themselves.

Philadelphia’s offense ranks third in the league, but the Eagles have committed a league-high 15 turnovers. Vick already has more interceptions (7) than he had all last season (6), although most have been due to receiver mistakes and poor protection by the offensive line. “People say they’re a dream team,” Redskins fullback Darrel Young said. “I know they probably don’t want to be considered a dream team because of their record. No one wants to be considered that until it’s all said and done.” The Redskins are in sole possession of first place, somewhere they haven’t been this late in the season since they last won the NFC East in 1999. This will be one of their biggest regular season games of the last 15 years, a chance to bury a ballyhooed rival that embarrassed them last year. “Just looking at what they did to us last year? It’s kind of payback time,” Young said. As for the Eagles, it’s hard to use the phrase “must-win” this early in the season, but consider this: Five teams since 1990 have won division titles after starting 1-4, but none has done so after starting 1-5. It’s now or never to solve the turnovers on offense and the missed tackles a defense, a unit still adjusting to Juan Castillo’s move from offensive line coach to defensive coordinator.

BILLS VS. GIANTS

Fitz has Buffalo believing again The Bills and their QB are playing as well as any Buffalo squad has in the past decade.

By TOM CANAVAN AP Sports Writer

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Maybe it’s time to stop waiting for the Buffalo Bills to collapse and revert to the team that hasn’t made the playoffs since 1999. They seemingly are playing too well to fall apart. The same can’t be said for the New York Giants, who suddenly find themselves with a lot more doubters after an embarrassing loss at home to the Seattle Seahawks last weekend. The Bills (4-1) and Giants (3-2) meet for the first time in four years Sunday in a game at MetLife Stadium that may go a long way in determining where these teams are headed. This is a game the Giants need to win. They will have a bye after this game, a game against winless Miami and then a killer schedule with games against New England, San Francisco, Philadelphia, New Orleans and Green Bay. Getting past Buffalo won’t be easy. The high-scoring, ball-

NEXT GAME BUFFALO at NEW YORK GIANTS TV: No local channel OPENING LINE: Giants by 3 LAST MEETING: Giants beat Bills 38-21, Dec. 23, 2007

hawking Bills are looking to match their best start since 2008, a year that quickly went south and ended with a 7-9 mark. A win also would top last season’s total. “We’re in a great situation. We’re in a great position, but we still have a long way to go. Eleven games,” Bills linebacker Andra Davis said. “I told you about being out there in Denver, 6-0, I’ll never let that happen again. 4-1 is great. It’s better than a lot of people, but at the same time, we’ve still got a lot of work. We could be 5-0, but at the same time we could be 2-3, we could be 0-5 like last year.” The secret to the Bills’ success has been the balance of the offense led by quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick and halfback Fred Jackson and the ability of the de-

AP PHOTOS

New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning looks to pass against Seattle on Oct. 9.

Buffalo Bills’ Ryan Fitzpatrick scrambles against Philadelphia on Oct. 9.

fense to force turnovers. The team is averaging close to 33 points and has scored 20 points in five straight games. It also has an NFL-best plus 11 in turnovers, led by a league-high 12 interceptions. Turnovers have led to 79 points, nearly half Buffalo’s total for the season. Fitzpatrick, who has thrown for 1,233 yards, 10 TDs and four interceptions, has been the con-

stant, leading them to a blowout win over Kansas City, comebacks win over Oakland and New England and a tight one last week against Philadelphia. Going against the Giants, Fitzpatrick will be facing a defense that is giving up a ton of yards but one that also is leading the NFL with 18 sacks, including 61⁄2 by second-year defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul.

PITTSBURGH — Mike Tomlin isn’t big on trips down memory lane, particularly painful ones. The Pittsburgh Steelers coach grew so annoyed by repeated questions about Jacksonville’s win at Heinz Field in the NFL Divisional playoffs four seasons ago he hung up on reporters. “Anybody got any questions relative to this week?” Tomlin asked just before the phone went click. Forgive Tomlin for his lack of enthusiasm when talking about arguably the lowest point of his highly successful tenure. Be- U P N E X T sides, as he is quick to point JACKSONout, the Jag- VILLE at uars’ 31-29 up- PITTSBURGH TV: 1 p.m., CBS, set is ancient WYOU-22 history for both OPENING franchises. LINE: Steelers The Steelers by 13 have won a Su- LAST MEETper Bowl and ING: Steelers beat Jaguars lost another in 26-21, Oct. 5, the interim 2008 while Jacksonville has floundered, going 21-33 since David Garrard’s gusty fourth-down scramble set up Josh Scobee’s game-winning field goal. The two teams that face off when Pittsburgh (3-2) hosts the rebuilding Jaguars (1-4) on Sunday bear little resemblance to the two that played on that chilly January night. “I understand that might have been a big game in Jacksonville four years ago but that’s old news,” Tomlin said. “Many of those guys are no longer here and definitely many of the guys that were in Jacksonville are no longer there.” Jacksonville quarterback Blaine Gabbert wasn’t even in college yet. Now the rookie is learning on the job and in the midst of a daunting run that will have the Jaguars facing the NFL’s top three defenses in successive weeks. The returns have been mixed so far. Gabbert threw for 200 yards against Cincinnati last week, easily the best performance of the 22-year-old’s brief career. Yet the numbers haven’t translated to joyful jogs off the field. “We’ve got to win football games for us to feel good about ourselves and know that we’re actually accomplishing something,” Gabbert said. “We all get sick and tired of hearing we got better this week, we got better this week, but when you’re losing you didn’t get better, you lost.” Jacksonville’s defense has done its best to give Gabbert a chance. Only New Orleans topped 300 yards of total offense and the Jaguars have traditionally played the Steelers close. Each of the last seven meetings have been decided by nine points or less. Not that the Steelers need any reason to be wary. They’ve failed to string together consecutive solid games during an uneven opening month. Pittsburgh appeared to get back on track with a 38-17 rout of Tennessee last weekend in which quarterback Ben Roethlisberger tied a franchise record with five TD passes.


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 9C

➛ WWW.TIMESLEADER.COM/SPORTS

PENGUINS SUNDAY LAST FIVE GAMES

Oct. 8 Hershey L, 3-2

Oct. 9 Connecticut L, 1-0 (SO)

Thursday at Rochester W, 5-1

NEXT FIVE GAMES

Friday Springfield L, 7-4

Saturday Binghamton L, 5-4 (OT)

Oct. 21 at Springf’ld 7:30 p.m.

Oct. 22 at Hershey 7 p.m.

Oct. 28 at Syracuse 7:30 p.m.

Veteran goaltender Scott Munroe learned that while the game’s the same, it’s a different world playing professional hockey in Russia

Oct. 29 at Manch’ter 7 p.m.

Nov. 4 Hershey 7:05 p.m.

Fantasy GM

Happy to be back By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

Scott Munroe was leaving the visa office in Moscow when he spotted an elderly woman approaching. Wanting to be polite, Munroe paused and held the door open so the woman could enter. She elbowed Munroe in the stomach as she brushed by. Welcome to Russia. “I thought ‘Wow, this is different,’” Munroe said. Much has been written about the challenges – both language and cultural -- that European hockey players face when they come to play in North America. When the roles are reversed, the difficulties are the same, especially for North American players playing in Russia’s Kontinental Hockey League. Munroe and his current Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins teammate Niko Dimotrakos have both spent a season in Russia and they each came back with different experiences. Growing up in Moose Jaw, Sasketchewan, Munroe was used to long, harsh winters. When he signed to play in Russia last season with a team in Nizhnekamsk -- a town several hundred miles southeast of Moscow, Munroe and his wife had no problems handling the hard winter. But the cold and snow were about the only things that were an easy adjustment. Nizhnekamsk is industrial town with a population of approximately 230,000. It’s a bleak area where the buildings are all painted the same dull color and sunny days are few and far between. “Every apartment building looks like it was cloned,” Munroe said. “It’s a pretty depressing place.” Prior to deciding to spend the 2010-11 season in Russia, Munroe spent his six-year career in the United States. He had never played overseas and really wasn’t ready for the culture shock that awaited. In North America, he said, you can buy anything you want, day or night. It’s an aspect of life that’s taken for granted. In Russia, basic errands like going to the grocery store, ordering fast food or even picking up a package at the post office were a challenge. Why? Because people in Russia don’t believe in standing line, Munroe said. “They’re very aggressive when it comes to standing in line for something. McDonald’s was one of the only things familiar to us over there and we went there a couple times,” he said. “But there are no lines in front of the cash register. Over there, they line up at the counter and lean in across it to order. I stood there my first time and people will just come in and stand right in front of you.” And that was just to order a cheeseburger. When it came time to pick up the mail, Munroe said the aggressiveness was worse. “We went there to get a package and it was an absolute zoo,” he said. “We were crammed into one stall and people kept pushing into it.

RYAN CRAIG Penguins Center

Ryan Craig’s full-time job is to play center for the Wilkes-Barre/ Scranton Penguins. But for this week, at least, he’s moonlighting. The Penguins’ captain will step in for the first installment of Fantasy GM. Today he’ll fill the shoes of GM’s such as Ray Shero, Lou Lamoriello and Ken Holland. There’s a twist, though -- this isn’t your normal team. Roster spots are few and job titles are specific. Craig has molded a highly-skilled roster packed with stars that he has played with and against during his time in the NHL. Here’s what Craig’s team would look like if he were GM for a day (WBS Penguins teammates excluded): Forward: Martin St. Louis (Tampa Bay Lightning) Defense: Niclas Lidstrom (Detroit Red Wings) Goaltender: Marc-Andre Fleury (Pittsburgh Penguins) Power Play Specialist: Steven Stamkos (Tampa Bay Lightning) Penalty Kill Specialist: Jeff Halpern (Washington Capitals) Enforcer: Jordin Tootoo (Nashville Predators) (honorable mention – Andre Roy) Agitator/Pest: Joe Vitale (Pittsburgh Penguins) Head Coach: Dan Bylsma (Pittsburgh Penguins) All-Time Great: Steve Yzerman (Detroit Red Wings) or Joe Sakic (Colorado Avalanche) AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Penguins goaltender Scott Munroe catches a puck during pregame warmups Friday.

You have to literally fight your way to the front of the line.” Making Munroe’s Russian experience more of a challenge was the language barrier. He and his wife didn’t speak Russian, and very few people in the town spoke English. Simple tasks such as hailing a cab or paying for groceries became a huge challenge because of the language barrier. “It’s a grind. You’re away from home, you don’t have television or even a grocery store where they understand you,” Munroe said. “You’re totally out of your element.” One place where Munroe did feel at home – at least in the beginning, was on the ice. At the start of the season there was another North American player – former Binghamton Senator Martin St. Pierre, on the roster, along with two players from Sweden who spoke English. At the hockey rink, at least, Munroe had three teammates with whom

he could carry on a conversation. It was a small comfort of home – one that was shortlived. A few games into the season, St. Pierre was released and sent back home. A few days later the two Swedish players were let go as well. That left Munroe as the only import on the roster, and he wondered if he would be the next to go. But that wasn’t the hardest part. The night before each home game, all of the players were required to stay at the team’s “base” or headquarters. That meant Munroe had to leave his wife home alone at their apartment. “There she was in a tiny apartment by herself, didn’t know the language and even though I was in the same town I couldn’t see her,” Munroe said. “It was tough.” Even routine practices were

a major change. In North America, Munroe said, athletes are somewhat pampered and their teams help them with basic needs like finding a place to live. In Russia, the athlete’s life revolves around constant training. Munroe likened it to being treated like a machine. A typical day consisted of practice in the morning, a workout at the gym, head home for lunch then meet with the team that night to go for a run in the snow. “I was like ‘Are you kidding me right now?’ Having us do that once or twice, I get it, but this was pretty consistent,” Munroe said. Eventually the adjustment did get a bit easier and Munroe remained with the team for the entire season. He picked up enough Russian for basic communication, and established

NIKO DIMITRAKOS is the other Penguin player who spent a season in Russia playing in the

KHL. Unlike Munroe, Dimitrakos played with a team in Moscow, Russia’s capital and largest city. The big city brought many of the amenities that Dimitrakos was used to – restaurants, places to shop and places to take his kids. Playing in Moscow lessened the culture shock for Dimitrakos. “I was fortunate. There were places in Siberia where we’d fly into to play a game, and you can see that things were different than in Moscow,” he said. Dimitrakos also had the luxury of playing in Sweden before he went to Russia, so he was familiar with how to cope with playing overseas. “In Sweden, everybody spoke English so it was easier,” Dimitrakos said. “Russia took a little while. Luckily for me I had guys that I played with before that were on the team, so that helped.”

a bond with North American players on other teams he played against. “If you see another guy you talk to him right away,” Munroe said. “In pregame warmups, the North American guys would come by and tap me on the pads. There was some comraderie among the few North American players over there.” Munroe doubts he’ll return to Russia and admitted he’s happy to be back playing in North America. Still, despite the difficulties, he and his wife don’t regret the eight months they spent living in an industrial town in Russia. “In some ways we’re proud of ourselves that we did it,” Munroe said. “We lived in a smaller town with no English, and we were able to learn enough and figure it out.”

Martin St. Louis

W H E E L I N G WAT C H

Nailers open with victory Second-year pro Mikael Bedard scored two goals and Patrick Killeen stopped 19 of 20 shots as the Wheeling Nailers beat the Greenville Road Warriors 6-1 in their season opener on Friday. Defenseman Nick Plastino, who had an extended stay in WilkesBarre/Scranton’s training camp, had a goal and an assist. Forward Matt Lombardi, who was recently acquired from the Chicago Express, added a goal. Center Zack Torquato led the Nailers with a plus-4 rating. -- TOM VENESKY


CMYK PAGE 10C

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

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THE TIMES LEADER

H.S. FOOTBALL

KINGS

Lineman dies after hit to head in game

Continued from Page 1C

and he was booed each time he touched the puck. Richards raised his arms in celebration after Johnson redirected his shot past Ilya Bryzgalov to spoil Philadelphia’s perfect start. Justin Williams scored two goals for the Kings and Jonathan Quick was stout in goal with 32 saves. Flyers forward James van Riemsdyk was whistled for tripping in the final moments of regulation, leading to the power-play attempt for Los Angeles at the start of overtime. It was a furious end to the third that allowed Richards to star again at the Wells Fargo Center. Williams scored on a rebound off his own backhand to beat Bryzgalov with 7:25 left in the third for his second goal of the game and a 2-1 lead. Richards was a helpless spectator in the penalty box after he was whistled for hooking. The Flyers pounced and Matt Carle scored the tying goal when he fired one from the circle past Quick not long after. More Flyers fans than usual, many wearing a Richards Flyers jersey, pressed along the gate outside the arena waiting for his arrival. Some fans asked each other if they thought Richards would be booed. He wasn’t, at least, not at first. Richards received loud cheers amid a smattering of boos when he was introduced as the starting center. He received a rousing ovation in the first period when the Flyers flashed a message on the videoboard that read: “Thank you, Mike Richards, for all your contributions and service to the Flyers organization and our fans.” Richards spent the past three seasons as team captain. He scored 133 goals and had 349 points in 453 games since making his debut with the Flyers in 2005. He had no desire to leave and

The 16-year-old’s death adds more controversy to whether there’s enough protection. The Associated Press

AP PHOTO

Fans hold signs and cheer as former Flyers captain Mike Richards, now a member of the Los Angeles Kings, skates by during warmups before the start of Saturday’s game in Philadelphia.

was “shocked” when he learned of the deal. Richards needed time to regroup and couldn’t fully come to terms with the trade until he made his first visit to Los Angeles. Richards, once viewed as the face of the franchise, was traded June 23 for forwards Brayden Schenn, Wayne Simmonds and a second-round pick. He wears No. 10 instead of 18 and is no longer a captain. Sabres 3, Penguins 2 PITTSBURGH — Nathan Gerbe and Luke Adam each had a goal and an assist and the Buffalo Sabres beat the Pittsburgh Penguins for the first time in almost two years, 3-2 on Saturday night. Gerbe had a first-period goal to open the scoring, and he deftly left the puck on a drop pass for Drew Stafford’s goal with 11:54 to play that gave the Sabres a two-goal lead. The Penguins lost in regulation for the first time in six games this season. James Neal scored for the

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third consecutive game, extending his NHL-leading goal total to five for Pittsburgh (3-1-2). Jordan Staal added a thirdperiod goal for the Penguins, whose streak of earning at least a point in five straight games to open the season was their best in 17 years. Still without Sidney Crosby, Pittsburgh played this one Evgeni Malkin, too. Crosby, though, took part in the morning skate and is cleared for contact. Islanders 4, Rangers 2 UNIONDALE, N.Y. — John Tavares had three goals, including the tiebreaking tally in the third period, and added an assist for the New York Islanders, who beat the New York Rangers and gave goalie Evgeni Nabokov a win in his return to the NHL. The Islanders have won three straight following an openingnight loss and they have Tavares to thank for the past two. Capitals 2, Senators 1 WASHINGTON — Marcus

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Johansson and Nicklas Backstrom scored, and Washington held off Ottawa. Capitals goaltender Tomas Vokoun had 33 saves in his third straight start. Mike Knuble assisted on both goals for Washington, which has won its first four games of the season. This was the Capitals’ first win in regulation. Coyotes 4, Jets 1 GLENDALE, Ariz. — Oliver Ekman-Larsson scored twice and Phoenix won its home opener, beating Winnipeg. The 20-year-old Swedish defenseman, Phoenix’s top draft pick and the sixth selection overall in 2009, has three goals in Phoenix’s first four games. Maple Leafs 3, Flames 2 TORONTO — Phil Kessel had two goals and an assist and Toronto overcame an early two-goal deficit to extend its season-opening winning streak to three games, beating Calgary.

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HOMER, N.Y. — A high school football player died after he was hit during a varsity game in upstate New York and suffered a head injury, a death that stunned his school community and came at a time when youth sports are under scrutiny over whether enough is being done to protect players’ heads. Ridge Barden, a 16-year-old lineman from John C. Birdlebough High School in Phoenix, was face down after the play Friday and was able to sit up, but he complained of a very bad headache and collapsed when he tried to stand, authorities said. “The coaches and trainers went over. He was talking. He rolled on his back by himself,” Phoenix School District Superintendent Judy Belfield said Saturday. Birdlebough was playing at Homer, south of Syracuse. The hit came about six minutes into the third quarter during a play, Homer police officer Donald Warner said. An ambulance took Barden to a hospital, and he was being transferred to a larger medical center in Syracuse when his condition deteriorated, Belfield said. The ambulance turned around, but doctors were unable to save the boy’s life. Team coaches didn’t learn until after the game that his injuries were severe, Belfield said. She said the school community was distraught. Officials opened the high school Saturday to students or staff who wanted to talk about what had happened. “It’s just one of those freak things,” she said. “The Homer players have to be feeling just as much sadness.”

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The Homer Central School District posted a message on its website Saturday morning saying the community had Barden been “deeply saddened and shares in the grief of the Phoenix School Community.” Warner, who was working at the game, said police were investigating but there was no suspicion of criminal activity. “It looks like just a bad accident,” he said. Head injuries in football have been a concern across the country in recent years, with some medical evidence emerging to suggest that the equipment players use may not be enough to protect them from serious, long-term injuries. A handful of high school students suffer fatal on-field injuries every fall, according to the University of North Carolina’s National Center for Catastrophic Sport Injury Research. A player at Frostburg State University, in Maryland, died after suffering a head injury in a practice in August. Belfield said the school district sends its football helmets out to be reconditioned every year, and that each has to pass a safety inspection before the season begins. “Over the course of the past few years, they have really tried to improve the protection of the head. But there is always a risk of injury or of death,” she said. She added that an investigation would be conducted to try to determine what went wrong. In New York, a law signed this summer will require school coaches to bench student athletes who have symptoms of a concussion, a mild traumatic brain injury with symptoms such as dizziness or headaches.

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GYMNASTICS

MOTORSPORTS

Smith helps Brits leave with medal

Kenseth jumps up in Chase with Charlotte win By JENNA FRYER AP Auto Racing Writer

TOKYO (AP) — The British men can skip the souvenir shopping, Louis Smith has them covered. Smith won the bronze medal on pommel horse Saturday, ending Britain’s world gymnastics championships on a high note after a dreadful start. The British men have now won at least one medal at the last four worlds after managing a grand total of two in the first 90 years of the championships. “I think I’m more relieved,” said Smith, who is also the reigning Olympic bronze medalist on pommel horse. “It’s nice to come to a world championships and come away with something, whether it be in the team event or the all-around. ... I think it’s positive that, despite what happened in men’s qualification, me and Daniel Purvis came away from that, trained a little, cleared your head and did a fantastic competition.” The British are a team on the rise, and many expected them to contend for a medal this year. Not only did they fail to make the podium, they missed out on one of the eight spots available here for next summer’s London Olympics. They’ll now have to go to a second qualifier in London in January. Purvis eased some of the pain with his fourth-place finish in the all-around Friday night, missing a medal by about three-tenths of a point. It’s the second-best finish ever at worlds by a British man, behind Daniel Keatings’ silver in 2009. But it’s the hardware everybody wants. Smith does the hardest pommel horse routine in the world — his start value of 7.0 is threetenths of a point higher than anyone else’s — and he was dazzling for all but the last few seconds.

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CONCORD, N.C. — Matt Kenseth has staked his claim on NASCAR’s championship with a win Saturday night at Charlotte Motor Speedway. Kenseth passed Kyle Busch with 25 laps to go then held Busch off on a restart to win his first race in the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship. The victory was Kenseth’s third of the season, but first since NASCAR’s title-deciding series began five races ago. The win pushed Kenseth from fifth to third in the standings. He trails leader Carl Edwards by seven points at the halfway point of the 10-race Chase. Busch changed his engine before the race and started last in the 43-car field. But he rallied to finish second for his best finish in the Chase. RATINGS RUN WILD: An exciting start to NASCAR’s championship series has boosted ESPN’s ratings over the last month, a positive turnaround after a lengthy decline in television viewers. The first four races of the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship are up 11 percent compared to the first four races of last season. The numbers don’t include the Chase opener at Chicago, which was rained out and held a day later. But an 18 percent boost at Dover and a 13 percent increase at Kansas have the overall numbers up. Julie Sobieski, vice president of programming and acquisitions, said the on-track competition will be critical in keeping

NASCAR

NOTEBOOK the ratings up through the Nov. 20 finale. “The story lines are what drives it, and there has been great story lines all year,” she said. “There’s been great momentum, great competition and these tremendous story lines.” Tony Stewart, who had said he wasn’t running well enough to contend for the championship, won the opening two Chase races while five-time defending series champion Jimmie Johnson struggled. Kurt Busch, his rival, then beat Johnson in a race to the finish at Dover, and Johnson got back into the title hunt with a win last weekend at Kansas. Sobieski also said the ratings have been helped by the Chase races starting at 2 p.m., an hour later than last year. The earlier starts put the end of the races up against the end of the early NFL games, and the network believed that head-to-head competition hurt the ratings. “The 2 o’clock starts have made a nice difference,” she said. “That was a smart decision that we all discussed in the offseason and that was definitely the right way to go.” LADIES BEHIND THE WHEEL: Jacquelyn Butler, the girlfriend of Cup driver David Ragan, won the charity race held before Saturday night’s main event. The Better Half Dash pitted 14 wives and girlfriends against each other in a 25-lap race that

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tony Stewart makes a pit stop during the Sprint Cup race at Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C., on Saturday.

benefited Motor Racing Outreach and Speedway Children’s Charities. Butler, familiar with the Bandolero cars that Ragan has raced for years, passed Ashley Allgaier with eight laps to go to take the victory in the inaugural event. “All of the girls did really good,” she said. “It was fun out there. I want to go back and do it again next week.” Tricia Mears, wife of Cup driver Casey Mears, finished second and seemed to have been bit by the racing bug. “It’s no fun getting second,” she said. “I’m actually mad right now. I’d rather get 14th. I can’t handle it right now.”

Allgaier, wife of Nationwide driver Justin Allgaier, led a race-high 17 laps before finishing third. She later talked some good-natured trash with Butler after the race by blaming her loss on her tires fading over the end.

for those events. Home Depot has been the primary sponsor of the No. 20 since its 1999 inception but has cut back dramatically this season its marketing of Logano. But the pairing with Dollar General could be good for LogaLOGANO’S PRESSURE: Joey no, who hasn’t been the best fit Logano has been surrounded all with Home Depot because of his young age (he’s 21) and season by uncertainty. Everything from his sponsor, his crew because he’s been consistently chief and his long-term future at outperformed on the track by Lowe’s-sponsored Jimmie JohnJoe Gibbs Racing has been son, the five-time defending scrutinized. The announcement this week NASCAR champion. Logano, a popular pick to that Dollar General will sponsor him for 12 Sprint Cup Series make the Chase this season, races next season gives Logano entered Saturday night’s race a disappointing 23rd in the standa little breathing room. Dollar ings. General replaces Home Depot


CMYK PAGE 12C

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

THE TIMES LEADER

➛ WWW.TIMESLEADER.COM/SPORTS

www.timesleader.com

OUTDOORS Hunters looking for ‘the ultimate upland game challenge’ have gone afield to mark the opening of the season for the wily ruffed grouse

TOM VENESKY OUTDOORS

Goal shared by all: More youth hunting

S

JAKE DINGLE/PGC PHOTO

Grouse numbers are down about seven percent from last year, which can make a challenging hunt even more difficult this season.

Tough times ahead

“It’s the ultimate upland game challenge,” he said. “It’s exciting to watch a dog point and see Ruffed grouse may be the hardest game to hunt the grouse flush.” The state’s three-part grouse season began in Pennsylvania, and the numbers back it up. According to the Pennsylvania Game Commis- Saturday and runs through Nov. 26. The season reopens Dec. 12-23, and then again from Dec. 26 sion’s Game Take Survey, an estimated 91,000 to Jan. 28. PGC biologists predict an average to hunters pursued grouse during the 2010-11 seaslightly below average grouse season, thanks to son. the extreme weather conditions of the spring and Many came home empty-handed. Those 91,000 hunters spent 414,500 days in the summer. “Cool wet springtime conditions tend to defield, according to the survey, and took 66,000 crease early brood survival for grouse, while hot grouse. As further evidence of the difficulty that comes dry summer conditions are generally beneficial,” with hunting for grouse, hunters flushed an aver- said Lisa Williams, Game Commission grouse and woodcock biologist. “With Pennsylvania age of 1.32 birds per hour last season – placing experiencing both of those extremes in 2011, it’s Pennsylvania at the top when compared with all hard to predict how this year’s weather might the central Appalachian states (Kentucky, Maryland, New York, New Jersey, Ohio, West Virginia impact grouse populations in your favorite coverts. While Game Commission field staff report and Virginia). fewer summer grouse sightings than last year at It’s clear that hunters are putting in the time a statewide level, they saw fantastic grouse numand they are flushing grouse, but it’s just tough bers in areas of good habitat.” to connect. During the Summer Sighting Survey conductIt’s a fact that doesn’t surprise Dallas resident ed by PGC personnel this year, sightings of Russ Bigus, who is an ardent grouse hunter. “They’re a fast-flying bird that’s simply difficult broods and individual grouse were down about to hit,” he said. “The terrain where you find them seven percent from last year. Bigus hunts the thick cover in western Wyomis very thick and unforgiving, and it’s just a very ing County and eastern Sullivan County. There, tough, challenging hunt.” And that’s exactly why Bigus spends days each he said, grouse numbers seem on par with previous years. He even had four incidental flushes season hunting grouse. By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

SQUIRREL PROSPECTS GOOD Joining grouse season with an Oct. 15 opening day was squirrels. That season runs until Nov. 26, and the season reopens Dec. 12-23 and Dec. 26-Feb. 25. As with most years, the prospects for finding good numbers of squirrels remain high. “Gray squirrels are our most abundant game species and are found throughout Pennsylvania,” said Tom Hardisky, Pennsylvania Game Commission biologist. “Look for mast-producing trees such as walnut, butternut, oak and hickory when searching for the best hunting areas.In agricultural areas, woodlots in the vicinity of standing cornfields often support large numbers of squirrels. They can be found throughout deep woods areas.The black squirrel is actually a color phase of the gray squirrel. In general, black squirrels can be found in the northern half of Pennsylvania. Squirrels with this black color variation often occur in local concentrations scattered about their northern Pennsylvania range. The season for pheasants and rabbits opens on Oct. 22 to Nov. 26, Dec. 12-23 and Dec. 26 to Feb. 4 for pheasants, and Feb. 25 for rabbits.

earlier this month while taking his daughter, Alexis, out for the youth pheasant season. “If I flush a dozen in a season I’m happy,” Bigus said.

OUTDOORS NOTES THE PA BASS CASTERSWILL hold two open buddy bass tournaments this month at Harvey’s Lake. The first will be held Oct. 23, followed by another Oct. 30. Check-in is at 5:15 a.m., and weigh-in will be at 2 p.m. For more information, call Dan Davis at 762-1469.

restore and protect area grouse and woodcock habitat. For more information and/or tickets, contact Clark at 983-9918.

hurst, Griffin and Maple Lake. The ceremony will take place Thursday, Oct. 27, from 2-3 p.m. at Curtis Reservoir. From Moscow, travel North on Route 435 to Elmhurst, THE COLUMBIA COUNTY CHAPturn right onto Route 590/HollisterTER of Trout Unlimitedwill host a ville Road, travel East on 590 and presentation by David Sewalk, TU’s turn right onto Reservoir Road after PennsylvaniaMarcellusShale field you pass Elmhurst Reservoir, then organizer, on Nov. 17 at 7 p.m. at the THE NORTHEASTERN PENNtravel a short distance on Reservoir Ag Center, 702 Sawmill Road, SYLVANIA Chapter of the Ruffed Road to the small parking area on Bloomsburg. The presentation is Grouse Society (RGS)will host its the left just past Curtis Reservoir. 27th annual Sportsmen’s Banquet on entitled “Marcellus Shale, Where We The creation of these new public Are and Where Are We Going.” Wednesday, Nov. 2, at the Inn of the fishing areas was the result of a It will focus on TU’s statewide efforts Abingtons, Route 524, Dalton, beginpartnership between Pennsylvania to protect streams from drilling ning with a reception hour at 6 p.m. American Water and the Fish and damage. Efforts include the use of Dinner will be at 7:30 p.m. Boat Commission. The event will feature live and silent GIS mapping to identify potential “We are very fortunate in this area auctions, games, drawings and door conflicts and the use of volunteer to benefit from so many natural prizes with quality firearms, artwork teams to monitor water quality. resources ,” stated Dan Hufton, seFor more information, call 672-0111. and collectables. Individual membernior director, production, Pennsylvaship and dinner tickets are $50.Fam- PENNSYLVANIA AMERICAN Water nia American Water. “Pennsylvania ilypackagewith two dinners is $90, and the Pennsylvania Fish & Boat American Water is proud to partner and additional dinners are $25. Ban- Commission (PFBC) invites the pubwith the Fish and Boat Commission quet, Conservation and Sustaining lic to attend a ceremony to celebrate to offer residents of Northeast Pennsponsorship packages are also avail- the opening of five Pennsylvania sylvania access to fishing along the able at $275, $500 and $1,000, reAmerican Water reservoirs in Lackashoreline of these five reservoirs.” spectively. wanna County for public fishing. The As with all RGS fundraisers, profive new reservoirs that will be open STAFF AT NESCOPECK STATE ceeds from this event will be used to include Curtis, Dunmore No. 1, ElmPARK will be offering a professional

development workshop for educators on Thursday, Nov. 10, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Learn how you can motivate your students to get up and active during the winter through an interdisciplinary set of lessons for teachers created by the PA Bureau of State Parks. Lessons focus on health, fitness and preparedness; snow, weather and climate, history and the arts. The lessons meet physical education & health standards, as well as standards for history, science & technologies, and the humanities.While the lessons are geared toward middle school teachers, they are adaptable for younger and older grades.Resources for planning a snowshoe field trip with students will be shared. Participants will be eligible for four Act 48 hours. The cost for this workshop (which includes curriculum materials) is $20 per person. Preregistration is required, as space is limited. To register, call the park office weekdays, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 403-2006.

tate Rep. Ed Staback and Mountain Top resident Tommy Hollock have the same goal in mind. They both want to keep young hunters in the sport and attract more youth at the same time. But when it comes to achieving that goal, Staback and Hollock both have different ideas. Those ideas were discussed in detail during Thursday’s Sportsmen’s Forum hosted by state Rep. Gerald Mullery. The event was held at Hanover Area High School and allowed the public to ask PGC officials and legislators about anything related to the outdoors. It was a great idea by Mullery and I hope he holds more forums in the future. A multitude of topics were covered and interesting debate ensued, such as that regarding ways to attract more youth to the sport of hunting. Staback, who has long been a supporter of Sunday hunting, believes adding another day to hunt on the weekends will give young hunters more opportunity to spend time afield. It’s a day that they don’t have to take off from school. A bill that would give the PGC the authority to implement Sunday hunting currently sits in the House Game and Fisheries Committee. Staback is the minority chair of the committee while Mullery serves as the secretary. Before the committee acts to move the bill onto the House floor, Staback said, they are waiting to see if there is enough support. That could happen next month. Adding Sunday to the hunting season adds opportunity, Staback said, and that will make it easier for parents to take their children hunting. Jay Delaney, who serves as the PGC commissioner for the Northeast Region, said he believes the youth hunting seasons established by the agency are working to get more kids afield. He cited the special pheasant season for junior hunters and the hunts hosted by sportsmen’s clubs solely for kids as examples. Hollock attended the forum with his family and, with his son, Sam, sitting nearby, listened intently while Staback and Delaney spoke. Need more deer With a love for hunting that runs generations deep in his family, Hollock had to weigh in. He agreed with the importance of attracting youth to hunting, but he wasn’t sold on the idea that Sunday hunting is the way to do it. And while the youth pheasant season is nice, it’s not enough, Hollock added. The solution, he said, is to increase the deer population. When it comes to hunting in Pennsylvania, deer hunting is easily the most popular choice. And when it comes to attracting more kids to the sport, the focus should be on deer, Hollock said. “I’m not talking about necessarily shooting a deer, but at least get the numbers to a point where they are seeing deer while they’re out in the woods or on stand,” Hollock said. “That’s what needs to be done if you want to keep youth in the sport.” Without choosing a side in the debate, at least not right now, I can relate to what Hollock said. Looking back on my first deer season as a 12-year-old, I remember spending a cold morning on the first day of buck season hearing shots in the distance and seeing deer run by. I didn’t see a buck that first year, but I saw enough deer throughout the day that my interest and enthusiasm never waned. The fact that I stood a good chance at just seeing deer was enough to keep me coming back season after season. Staback’s Sunday hunting, Delaney’s youth seasons and Hollock’s call to increase deer numbers are all interesting arguments when it comes to the issue of attracting new hunters to the sport. While the concepts may be different, the resulting goal is the same. That’s what matters most when it comes to the future of hunting.


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 13C

GOLF

Simpson in pursuit of top money spot The Associated Press

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. — Michael Thompson shot a 3under 67 on Sunday to take a one-stroke lead over Billy Horschel in the McGladrey Classic, while Webb Simpson was two strokes back in his bid to win the PGA Tour money title. Thompson was 13 under on Sea Island’s Seaside Course. Horschel followed his opening 64s with a 70. Simpson shot a 69 to match Trevor Immelman (62) at 11 under. Simpson and top-ranked Luke Donald are vying for the money title and both will play next week in the season finale at Disney. Simpson trails Donald by $68,971, but could move into the top spot with a strong round Sunday. Simpson also is looking for a tour-leading third win this year,

which could make him the favorite for PGA Tour player of the year. AT&T Championship SAN ANTONIO — Fred Couples birdied six of the first seven holes and finished with a course-record 10-under 62 to take a seven-stroke lead in the Champions Tour’s AT&T Championship. Couples had 12 birdies — six in a back-nine 30 — and a double bogey to reach 17 under at TPC San Antonio’s Canyons Course, the first-year venue after nine years at Oak Hills. On the par-3 fourth, Couples pushed his tee shot and dumped a chip into a bunker en route to the double bogey. He won the Senior Players Championship on Aug. 21 at Westchester for his first senior major title.

Mark Calcavecchia was second after a bogey-free 66. He made a 20-foot birdie putt on the 18th. The seven-stroke lead is the largest 36-hole margin on the 50-and-over tour since 1998 when Isao Aoki, Hale Irwin and Larry Nelson led events by eight shots. Couples broke the tournament record of 130 set by Mark McNulty in his 2004 victory, and the 62 tied the event record set by Gil Morgan in 2004 and matched by John Harris in 2005. LPGA Malaysia KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia — South Korea’s Na Yeon Choi took a one-stroke lead over Brittany Lang in the LPGA Malaysia, finishing off a 4-under 67 in fading light after a long rain delay.

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CMYK PAGE 14C

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

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A

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THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

NATIONAL FORECAST TODAY Partly sunny, windy

59° 42°

Partly sunny, windy

Cloudy, rain, breezy

FRIDAY

Cloudy to partly sunny

62° 48°

63° 44°

62° 45°

THURSDAY

WEDNESDAY

NATIONAL FORECAST: A weak frontal boundary will stretch across the entire United States today. Showers associated with this system will fall over portions of the Northeast, Great Lakes, and portions of the Ohio Valley. Showers will be scattered across the Northwest and Intermountain West as Partly sunny, p.m. well. shower

TUESDAY

MONDAY

57° 44°

SATURDAY Mostly sunny

Sunny

55° 41°

60° 40°

REGIONAL FORECAST Syracuse 60/47

Today’s high/ Tonight’s low

Highs: 66-69. Lows: 54-59. Partly cloudy, breezy in the afternoon.

New York City 66/56 Reading 66/50

Atlantic City 68/59

Heating Degree Days*

Yesterday Month to date Year to date Last year to date Normal year to date

14 129 215 271 335

*Index of fuel consumption, how far the day’s mean temperature was below 65 degrees.

Delmarva/Ocean City

Highs: 70-73. Lows: 54-60. Partly to mostly sunny.

Yesterday Month to date Normal month to date Year to date Normal year to date

Sun and Moon

Sunrise Today 7:16a Tomorrow 7:17a Moonrise Today 9:03p Tomorrow 9:57p

River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.

0.05” 2.22” 1.54” 52.38” 30.41”

Susquehanna Wilkes-Barre Towanda Lehigh Bethlehem Delaware Port Jervis

Sunset 6:22p 6:20p Moonset 11:34a 12:24p

Last

Stage 7.67 5.70

0.54

16.0

5.84

1.32

18.0

First

Oct. 19 Oct. 26 Nov. 2

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Forecasts, graphs and data ©2011

Weather Central, LP For more weather information go to:

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90/68

5.0 Cu. Ft. Gas Range FFGF3023LW • 4 Sealed Burners • Quick Boil Burners • Ready Select Controls

City

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Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Buffalo Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Las Vegas Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis

44/37/.01 77/56/.00 71/51/.00 67/56/.00 51/45/.39 75/51/.00 62/47/.00 58/48/.01 87/59/.00 82/49/.00 58/46/.09 85/74/.00 85/58/.00 63/46/.00 90/63/.00 67/63/.00 82/79/.00 60/48/.00 60/43/.00

City

Yesterday

Amsterdam Baghdad Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Dublin Frankfurt Hong Kong Jerusalem London

57/36/.00 97/64/.00 68/45/.00 54/30/.00 81/55/.00 59/50/.00 55/36/.00 84/73/.00 82/60/.00 63/43/.00

43/30/sh 82/57/s 71/56/pc 64/54/pc 57/51/sh 79/50/s 62/48/pc 60/49/sh 90/66/s 72/43/pc 55/45/sh 86/70/s 90/68/s 75/48/pc 91/67/s 70/59/s 84/78/t 59/41/pc 56/41/s

$

after rebate

57/37/s 99/72/s 70/48/s 57/36/s 76/50/s 56/47/pc 57/35/s 83/73/s 75/57/s 65/47/pc

61/43/pc 56/66/pc 71/45/s 56/37/s 68/51/pc 52/43/sh 56/36/s 81/72/s 74/56/s 64/53/pc

Myrtle Beach Nashville New Orleans Norfolk Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Ore. St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, DC

82/55/.00 72/49/.00 84/60/.00 76/52/.00 83/56/.00 72/38/.00 82/64/.00 99/71/.00 61/49/.00 61/50/.00 71/47/.00 79/51/.00 85/57/.00 69/63/.00 72/60/.00 56/43/.00 81/66/.00 99/62/.00 71/50/.00

City

Yesterday

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Paris Rio de Janeiro Riyadh Rome San Juan Tokyo Warsaw

70/52/.00 57/52/.00 37/32/.00 61/37/.00 73/66/.09 93/68/.00 70/54/.00 88/74/.01 79/72/.00 45/32/.00

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Today Tomorrow 76/58/s 83/57/s 86/67/s 75/60/s 90/60/s 63/41/pc 87/67/s 100/70/s 63/47/sh 63/45/s 80/55/pc 75/51/pc 90/68/s 71/65/s 71/57/pc 58/49/pc 86/66/s 96/62/s 71/55/pc

82/63/s 85/60/pc 86/70/s 82/59/s 77/47/pc 57/40/pc 88/71/s 100/68/s 62/45/sh 71/48/s 66/47/sh 64/43/s 90/63/pc 73/64/s 75/57/s 60/48/s 89/72/t 95/61/s 73/52/pc

Today Tomorrow 70/53/pc 55/48/c 41/32/pc 64/45/s 75/69/sh 95/72/s 73/47/s 86/77/t 77/63/t 48/29/s

74/54/t 55/48/sh 43/33/pc 69/43/pc 55/68/sh 96/68/s 70/49/s 85/76/pc 74/62/pc 49/30/s

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40/28/sh 83/61/s 72/52/pc 67/51/s 60/44/s 82/57/s 60/46/s 58/50/pc 88/52/pc 66/39/pc 58/46/pc 85/70/s 90/69/s 63/48/c 89/66/s 72/62/s 85/79/t 57/44/pc 54/37/pc

City

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40” Full 1080p LCD TV

HDLCD4050

Today Tomorrow

Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snow flurries, i-ice.

5.3 5 Cu. Ft. Electric Range FFEF3018LW F • 4 Radiant Elements • Even Bake Technology • Store-More Storage Drawer

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84/78

86/70 45/36

Nov. 10

399955

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82/57

90/66

90/56

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Precipitation

Built by America’s Leading Laundry Manufacturer

Brandywine Valley

Highs: 61-67. Lows: 49-54. Partly cloudy and breezy in the afternoon.

Philadelphia 68/54

56/46 62/42 81 in 1947 29 in 2006

The Finger Lakes

Highs: 57-61. Lows: 42-51. Mostly cloudy with showers.

Pottsville 61/48

Harrisburg 64/52

Yesterday Average Record High Record Low

70/59

43/30

Wilkes-Barre 61/46

71/55

71/50

The Jersey Shore

Scranton 58/46

The windy conditions have been the hot topic the past couple days. Some places have seen gusts up to 25 mph. The wind today will still be blowing the leaves off the trees, and it's going to be breezy. Morning lows around the area are 42 with partly cloudy skies. We will warm up to 59 and have mostly cloudy skies. A stray shower is possible. Lows tonight will be around 42. On Monday, we will have partly sunny skies and a warmup to 62 and have breezy conditions. The chance for showers will return late Tuesday night and most of Wednesday.

66/56

62/48

72/43

70/57

Highs: 58-63. Lows: 45-47. Mostly cloudy with a chance of afternoon showers.

Poughkeepsie 61/45

56/41 55/45

The Poconos

Albany 60/43

Towanda 61/44

Temperatures

55/39

TODAY’S SUMMARY

Binghamton 59/43

State College 61/45

58/49

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

Huawei seeks to become a tech powerhouse By JOHN BOUDREAU San Jose Mercury News

SHENZHEN, China — The intensity of this nation’s tech ambitions are apparent on the sprawling campus of Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd., whose youthful employees play hard on basketball courts after working hard to create telecommunications technology for what they hope will be China’s first major global company. Started 24 years ago as a reseller of low-end telephone equipment, Huawei has evolved into the world’s secondlargest provider of telecom and Internet technology, and is considered a national champion by Chinese authorities. While suspected of having ties to the

Chinese military by some American national security officials, and accused by others of getting unfair assistance from the Chinese government, the tech conglomerate has become a competitive threat to Silicon Valley giants Cisco Systems, Juniper Networks and HewlettPackard. Though it has so far failed to land a big deal in the United States because of pressure from Washington, Huawei has become a major force in the global telecom market and is developing high-end Internet technology and other products, such as videoconferencing systems, for businesses and governments. Cisco CEO John Chambers recently described Huawei as “a very tough com-

petitor over the long term.” While industry observers believe Huawei, an employee-owned company that reported revenues of $28 billion last year, still lacks the innovative edge of Cisco and other leading tech companies, there is no doubt the Chinese company seeks to become a dominant global player. Nearly half its 120,000 global employees, including about 500 in Santa Clara, Calif., focus on research and development. Huawei, which landed $2 billion in enterprise contracts in 2010, expects to double that this year and reach $15 billion to $20 billion a year by 2015. It is tripling its enterprise unit employees to 30,000 in three years.

It also has carved out a significant share of the market for handsets and tablet computers, and expects to sell 20 million smartphones globally this year. “Huawei has an excellent chance of becoming the first truly Chinese brand to be a household name around the world,” said Richard Brennan, a Palo Alto, Calif., native who is an executive in the company’s industry standards department. Huawei has come a long way in less than a decade. In 2003, Cisco filed a lawsuit accusing it of copying Cisco’s software and violating patents, though the dispute was quickly settled because the See HUAWEI, Page 4D

AP PHOTO

David Lindenberger, a farmer at the Noank Aquaculture Cooperative, sorts and bags harvested oysters for distribution in Noank, Conn.

Oystermen seek help after Irene

By STEPHEN SINGER Associated Press

GROTON, Conn. — The damaged docks and scattered oysters left after Tropical Storm Irene tore through Long Island Soundthissummerrevealonlysomeofthe problems Connecticut oystermen face in trying to rebuild their industry along the Mystic River. They worry a shutdown of more than a month will result in a permanent loss of customersandexpressirritationoverwhat theyconsideraslowprocesstogetpermits forwinterharvestingfromtheriverandfor growing oysters in indoor tanks to extend their season. There’s also some frustration at being regulated like fishermen when they consider themselves “growers,” akin to farmers and in need of the same kinds of government aid. Oystermen plant small shellfish in beds to grow and later be harvested. Like farmers, each has his own territory in which to plant. James Markow, 55, estimated he lost $35,000, or about 20 percent of his annual sales, when he had to close operations for five weeks before, during and after the storm. The extended shutdown resulted from persistent rain that started even before Irene reached the sound, creating runoff and the threat of pollution. Shellfishing, a traditional industry in New England, had largely died out in southeastern Connecticut when a few oystermen began working to revive it about15 years ago. The industry now adds about $30 million to the state’s economy each year and supports more than 300 jobs, according to a recent disaster aid request from the state’s congressional delegation. Nationally, the shellfish industry generates $1billion in wholesale sales each year,

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

John Augustine, senior director of entrepreneurial development for the Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Business and Industry, and Tom Williams, the chamber’s director of real estate development, look over site plans while standing on the foundation of the former Poseidon Pools factory at the Crestwood Industrial Park in Mountain Top.

BACK IN THE POOL Poseidon property cleanup nears completion By ANDREW M. SEDER

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aseder@timesleader.com

RIGHT TWP. – Thirteen years and nearly $4 million in cleanup costs later, an arm of the Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Commerce is close to

putting the former Poseidon Pools property in the Crestwood Industrial Park on the market. The Greater Wilkes-Barre Industrial Fund took ownership of the 37acre site in 1998 after Poseidon filed for bankruptcy, defaulting on a $1.6 million Pennsylvania Industrial Development Authority loan, which the chamber guaranteed. The chamber was left holding the bag for $800,000 and then learned it needed to clean up the soil that was contaminated by a mixture of industrial-related chemicals that had seeped into the ground. The chamber, through its contract-

wouldn’t be enough to stop the chamber from putting the land on the market. A contract will be awarded in the coming weeks for the earth works portion of the project, which includes leveling the land, crushing the remaining flooring, footers and foundation and installing a building pad on the property, said Tom Williams, the chamber’s director of real estate projects. The dilapidated structure on the site was demolished late last year. “We believe we are just weeks away from having a completely clean site,” said Todd Vonderheid, chamber president. John Augustine III, the chamber’s senior director of economic and entrepreneurial development, said the property has a good location and a

ed consulting engineer The Quad 3 Group, embarked on a $1.5 million environmental cleanup and development project that’s in the final phases. The state has contributed more than $2 million more to cleanup costs. Kevin Sunday, a DEP spokesman, said the site’s soil has been cleaned to an acceptable level but the groundwater still had some contaminants, including Trichloroethylene and bis(ethylhexyl) phthalate when it was last tested in September. But that See POSEIDON, Page 3D

See OYSTER, Page 3D

Toymaker offers great rebate promotion on Transformer products THERE’S MORE TO Transformers than meets the eye and this deal should be taken advantage of in a blink. Toymaker Hasbro has a rebate promotion that rewards you with $20 worth of Transformers products if you purchase $20 worth of Transformers toys. Spend $20 before tax and coupons on Transformers Dark of the Moon toys then submit the form found at www.transformersPrimeStyle.com for an offer that will net you a limited edition Transformers T-shirt, a Kreon Transformer and another $5 off coupon toward a future Transformers toy purchase. Make that purchase before Oct. 20 to qualify. Here are some more rebate offers: • Buy a bottle of Woolite Oxy

ANDREW M. SEDER

when you buy the product between now and April 1 and send in this form: www.bissell.com/downloadSTEALS & DEALS file.aspx?id=17345. • CVS has 28-count packs of 24Deep at any store and get a rebate up hour Prevacid on sale for $18.99 and to $5.99. Buy the item before Jan. 15 you can get an $18 manufacturer’s mail in rebate by downloading the to qualify. Go to www.woolitecarform on cvs.com or asking the store pet.com/images/IncludeContent/ Mail-in-rebate-form-oxy-deep.pdf for for details. As with all rebate deals, save your the rebate form, and read complete receipts and product package for the details. • Buy some Carmex Moisture Plus UPC code. There are loads of scary good coulip balm at CVS between now and pons in today’s Times Leader. Here Dec. 15 and fill out the rebate form are a few ways to use them wisely: found here: mycarmex.com/cvsre• Take the $1 off of two Suave bate/CarmexMoisturePlusCVSRebaProfessionals shampoo or conditionteForm.pdf, to get up to $2.99 back. er coupon to Price Chopper and pay You must buy the item at CVS to $2 for two bottles. qualify for the rebate. • Also at Price Chopper, Arm and • Right now you can try the new Hammer fabric sheets and laundry Bissell Stomp ’N Go for free after detergents are buy-one, get-one free. mail-in rebate. Get up to $5.99 back

There’s a $1 off two Arm and Hammer products coupon that makes the price of two $1 less than the typical price of one item. No coupon needed for this thirstquenching offer from Target. Buy 10 bottles of 20-ounce Vitamin Water, 700 ml Smart Water or 16.9 ounce Fuze drinks for $10 and you’ll get a $5 Target gift card at checkout. Also, check out the Rite Aid circular’s page 5 and 12 for another batch of items that are free after rebate or where you’ll get the entire cost of the product back by way of a store coupon that will print on your receipt when you use your Wellness+ Card. Andrew M. Seder, a Times Leader staff writer, may be reached at 570-829-7269. If you know of any local steals or deals send them to aseder@timesleader.com.

RON BARTIZEK BUSINESS LOCAL

Gas exports show need for energy policy

A

recent request filed by a company that owns natural gas pipelines and storage facilities sheds light on the gold rush mentality that infuses the industry. Richmond, Va.based Dominion Resources is asking the federal government to allow it to export 1 billion cubic feet per day of gas through a terminal in Maryland. The proposal comes at the same time the Marcellus Shale Coalition trade group is touting “energy security” as a reason to turn drillers loose on the land. Let’s put this in perspective: 1 billion cubic feet of gas is approximately the amount 13,500 U.S. households use in a year. Dominion wants to ship out that much gas every day. In the course of a year, they’d send overseas the equivalent of 8 percent of the entire nation’s annual residential gas usage. And that’s only one of several companies gearing up to export gas in liquefied form. Dominion said it wants to sell gas overseas because while supplies are surging thanks to finds like the Marcellus Shale, domestic demand is flagging. Half of the reason why, according to a 2010 report by the Energy Information Administration, is that heating equipment and appliances have become much more efficient. Think about it. We’ve managed to reduce demand by boosting efficiency, which is a more effective step toward energy independence than piling on supply. But efficiency and conservation are the enemies of energy producers. To support its request, Dominion contends gas exports will help reduce the nation’s trade deficit, which would be laudable if depleting our resources didn’t jeopardize future energy reserves — and potentially increase the need for imported oil. Dominion’s plan reveals the company’s — and perhaps the industry’s — eagerness to place short -term profits ahead of the nation’s long -term welfare. That’s understandable in an era when businesses disclaim responsibility for anything except raising shareholder value. But there needs to be pushback, and at the moment there’s not a strong mechanism for that. This is where government has a legitimate role, and if we had a national energy strategy it could be invoked to prevent, or at least rationalize, the export of irreplaceable resources. But we don’t have a coherent policy, which means companies and industries can wield their influence to get the results they want, which are more likely ones that boost profits rather than assure adequate future supplies. I know some will suggest the government ought to keep its nose out of decisions like this, that the “free market” will come up with the best response. That’s a legitimate argument for some situations, but not one as important as this, when unchecked greed could in a few decades sell off a resource that may prove key to our future. I doubt that opponents of an energy policy would argue that we should turn over national defense to Lockheed and Boeing. But it turns out the Marcellus Shale Coalition thinks energy security is none of our business. “These are private minerals owned by private individuals,” coalition spokesman Travis Windle told me Thursday, earning the fees the coalition pays the K Street lobbying firm he works for. Would rational planning mean less opportunity for the industry to exploit energy resources for its own short-term goals? Surely it would, and slowing the pace of production would provide more time to analyze, anticipate and fix environmental risks. Wouldn’t that be a fair compromise; a steady stream of business for energy producers and reliable domestic supply of fairly priced energy for the next century or more? Ron Bartizek, Times Leader business editor, may be reached at rbartizek@timesleader.com or 570—970—7157.


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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

CORPORATE LADDER EASTERN INSURANCE GROUP

George J. Karosa has been named vice president of sales. Karosa has more than 20 years of insurance experience specializing in all aspects of commercial and personal insurance. He lives in Karosa Swoyersville with his wife Carolyn and son, Jack, and has an adult daughter, Jillian.

TOBYHANNA ARMY DEPOT

Lt. Joseph Janosov, Harding, is a shift supervisor in the Security Division, overseeing police and security personnel in all areas of the depot. His work involves

BUSINESS AGENDA METROACTION FINANCING YOUR BUSINESS SEMINAR: Tuesday, 9-1 1 a.m., Hazleton Chamber of Commerce, 20 W. Broad St., Hazle Township. $10 per person. Topics include grants, borrowing basics, what lenders look for, credit analysis and available community resources. To register, visit www.MetroAction.org or call

Janosov

handling problems ranging from rules violations to large-scale threats. Prior to his current position, Janosov was a desk sergeant

in the division. Janosov is a 1980 graduate of Coughlin High School. He served 10 years in the Air Force as a security police supervisor.

PARENTEBEARD

Several new employees have joined the Wilkes-Barre office of the accounting firm: Tyler Moore is a Staff Accountant II in the Small Business Services practice. Moore graduated from Misericordia University. He resides in Old Forge. Christine Turner is a Staff Accountant II in the Audit and Accounting Services practice.

341-0270. NETWORKING MIXER: Wednesday, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Rodano’s, Public Square, Wilkes-Barre. Free to Wilkes-Barre Chamber members. Reservations required; call Jean Kile at 823-2101 ext. 1 13 or email jeankile@wilkes-barre.org. NEPA NETWORKERS MIXER: Thursday, 5:30-7:30 p.m., in the Seasons Ballroom at Mohegan Sun Casino at Pocono Downs. $15 per person includes hors d’ouevres and non-alcoholic

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Turner graduated from Wilkes University. She resides in Shavertown. Katherine Gallagher is a Staff Accountant I in the Audit and Accounting Services practice. Gallagher graduated from Wilkes University. She resides in Jessup. Amanda Marcy is a Staff Accountant I in the Audit and Accounting Services practice. Marcy graduated from University of Scranton. She resides in Kingsley. Megan Miller is a Staff Accountant I in the Audit and Accounting Services practice. Miller graduated from Bloomsburg University. She resides in Conyngham. Michael Stampone is a Staff Accountant I in the Audit and Accounting Services practice. Stampone graduated from King’s College. He resides in Bethlehem.

FIDELITY BANK

Tami Herman has been promoted

beverages; cash bar available. Anyone can attend. To reserve or view the attendee list, visit http://events.linkedin.com/ NEPA-Networkers-Fall-Mixer/ pub/782410. NETWORKING MIXER: Thursday, 5-7 p.m., Rinehouse Radiology, 1201B N. Church St., Suite 300, Hazle Township. Free to Hazleton Chamber members, employees, co-workers and guests. Complimentary hors d’ oeuvres, wine and door prizes. Reserva-

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to Business Services Solutions Representative. Herman had been a customer service specialist in the retail banking department in Fidelity’s downtown Scranton ofHerman fice. She earned an Associate of Arts degree from Baptist Bible College in Clarks Summit and attended the College of Business at the University of Toledo for four years. Submit announcements of business promotions, hirings and other events to Corporate Ladder by email to tlbusiness@timesleader.com; by mail to 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250; or by fax to (570) 8295537. Photos in jpg format may be attached to email.

tions required; online at www.hazletonchamber.org, by email to jferry@hazletonchamber.org, or by calling 570-455-1509. MAEA DISCOVERY BREAKFAST: Thursday, 8-9 a.m., Top of the 80’s restaurant, Hazleton. Free; includes breakfast. Topics include an overview of services that are available to MAEA member companies and testimonials from current members. Registration required; call 6220992 or email gwha-

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

OPENING FOR BUSINESS AMORE JEWELRY AND GIFTS

The store at 29 W. Center St., Shavertown, formerly Bridal Trinkets, held a grand reopening celebration on Saturday. Amore will now offer new lines of trendy fashion jewelry, inspirational and motivational gift items, handbags, watches and accessories. A new upstairs bridal boutique features custom bridal jewelry, veils and tiaras, wedding accessories, engravable gifts and hard-to-find traditional items such as babushkas, bridal aprons, garters and sixpence. For more information, call owner Mary Bartos at 570-675-3105.

SPORTSMANS LIQUIDATION

The Chambersburg-based discount retailer of hunting, fishing, camping and outdoorrelated merchandise has len@maea.biz.

RED CARPET BREAKFAST: Oct. 26, 7:45-9 a.m., Comfort Inn, 58 state Route 93, West Hazleton. Featuring Jack St. Pierre of CAN BE. Hazleton Chamber members $15; non-members $25. Register online at www.hazletonchamber.org, by email to jferry@hazletonchamber.org, or by calling 570-455-1509. BUILDING INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION INSURANCE FAIR: Oct. 27, 8 a.m.-noon, 411 Main St.,

opened a new 7,000-squarefoot store at 320 Highway 315, Pittston Township, in the Pittston Crossings center. Sportsmans Liquidation sells name brands at 50-80 percent off retail prices, said Keith Baughman, director of retail operations. The store will be open 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Monday-Saturday, and 9-5 on Sundays. Ryan Hale is store manager. For more information, visit www.sportsmansliquidation.com Editor’s note: The Times Leader announces new businesses and business moves and expansions. Submit announcements to Opening for Business by email to tlbusiness@timesleader.com; by mail to The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250; or by fax to (570)829-5537.

Kingston. Free review of workers compensation and health insurance for BIA members. Reservations preferred by calling 570287-3331, but not necessary. GREATER HAZLETON CHAMBER AWARDS LUNCHEON: Oct. 27, 12-1 p.m., The Lookout House, 1279 state Route 93, Drums. $25 per person. Reservations required; online at www.hazletonchamber.org, by email to jferry@hazletonchamber.org, or by calling 570-455-1509.


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

BUSINESS AWARDS Sundance Vacations, a WilkesBarre Township-based wholesale travel company, ranked 2,917 on the most recent Inc. 500/5000 list of fastestgrowing private companies. Sundance Vacations has appeared on the list for the past three years. Last year the company ranked 4,718 on the list. Nancy Shymanski, Larksville, has been named the Employee of the Month for October at Golden Technologies, Old Forge. Shymanski has worked as a sewer at Shymanski Golden Technologies since 2006. The award honors her attendance record, cooperative attitude and attention to detail. Geno V. Marola, administrator at Bucci Laser Vision Institute, has become a Fellow in the American College of Medical Practice Executives, the certification body of the Medical Group Management Association. Fellowship in the organization is the highest distinction in the medical group practice management profession.

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 3D

POSEIDON

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Continued from Page 1D

Continued from Page 1D

good size but was likely much more attractive a few years ago when the economy was better. “Trying to sell land right now is very difficult,” Augustine said. He said in the past, “a great flat pad-ready KOZ site” was a good sales pitch. “But deal flow is at an all-time low in the region. There’s really not a lot of appetite for land. They’re looking for a building now.” But Augustine said the land, which could hit the market as soon as year’s end if the DEP deems the water on the property safe, could still be attractive for a buyer or company looking to lease land. “That’s not to say that property’s not prime for someone,” Augustine said. He said making it more attractive is that interest on a PIDA loan rate has dropped to 2 percent, meaning a company could finance the construction of a building on the site with a low interest rate and taxes would be abated for 10 years since the park is in an approved Keystone Opportunity Zone.

and it’s growing, said Michael Rubino, director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Aquaculture Program. The federal government has been looking to foster the domestic seafood industry. More than four-fifths of the fish, clams, oysters and other seafood Americans ate in 2009 was imported, according to the latest figures from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Louisiana is the largest producer of shellfish, with major industriesoneachcoastinWashington state and Virginia, Rubino said. In Connecticut, the industry is still relatively small, and recent setbacks have the oystermen worried about hanging on. Most have repaired the damage from the storm, but they worry the restaurants and other customers who foundothersuppliersduringtheir

AIMEE DILGER FILE PHOTO/THE TIMES LEADER

The former Poseidon Pools factory in the Crestwood Industrial Park in Wright Township before it was razed last year.

“We believe we are just weeks away from having a completely clean site.” Todd Vonderheid Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Commerce president

An Eberhard Faber Pencil Co. factory was the first tenant on the property and businesses to move into the park when it opened in 1956, Vonderheid said. Eberhard Faber left in 1986 when it moved its operations to Mexico. Poseidon came in a few years later.

Vonderheid said the site “never had significant environmental issues, but enough that we needed to clean it up.” The cleanup included soil remediation, the clearing of the 325,000-square-foot vacant factory and water testing.

month-long shutdown won’t be back. “Once a customer gets his oysters from somebody else, it’s over,” Markow said. Connecticut’s congressional delegation has written a letter to U.S. House Speaker John Boehner,askingthatshellfishgrowersbe eligible for federal disaster aid for the storm’s victims. Typically, they qualify only for low-interest loans, not grants, unless the shellfish are grown in controlled environments such as wire cages, according to the U.S. Farm Service Agency in Connecticut. Most Connecticut shellfish are grown in riverbeds. Markow said the oystermen would like to grow more in controlled environments. He and others have asked for state permits for indoor tanks that can serve as an alternative to the river and provide a steady supply of oysters. They’re also seeking permission for winter harvesting from the river. “We’d like to hire more people and grow,” he said. “It’s tough to do that when all you hear is no.”

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CMYK PAGE 4D

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

OFFICE COACH

Firm guidance can streamline vendor meetings

By MARIE G. MCINTYRE McClatchy-Tribune News Service

MCT PHOTO

Engineers from the Addis Ababa Information & Communication Technology Development Agency (AAICTDA) in Ethiopia, Africa, train on Huawei’s networking equipment at the training center at Huawei headquarters in Shenzhen, China.

HUAWEI Continued from Page 1D

San Jose, Calif., company did not want to damage relations with the Chinese government, analysts say. Fairly or not, Huawei is viewed by some as a proxy of China’s Communist government. Mediashy founder and Chairman Ren Zhengfei was an engineer in the People’s Liberation Army 25 years ago. Huawei, facing a wall of opposition from some members of Congress and former Commerce Secretary Gary Locke, now the American ambassador in China, has yet to win a contract with top U.S. telecom carriers, even though it supplies equipment to 45 of the world’s top 50 telecoms. U.S. regulators have blocked it from making acquisitions and early this year pressured it to retreat from plans to buy the assets of Santa Clarabased cloud-computing company 3Leaf Systems. Critics say the company has benefited greatly from behindthe-scenes assistance from the government, though Huawei fiercely denies that. William Plummer, Huawei’s Washington-based vice president of external affairs, says Huawei is being maligned because of fears of a rising China and lobbying against it by U.S. competitors. “There are always going to be

competitors who are trying to stir some fear, smut, some doubts,” he said. “I understand the tension between the United States and China. Huawei is caught up in that rubric. We are a punching bag.” Plummer is one of a number of Western executives formerly with companies such as Cisco, Intel, AT&T and Sun Microsystems that Huawei has hired in recent years. The moves are part of a broader campaign by Huawei to address concerns about its alleged ties to the Chinese military. In February it issued an open invitation for the United States government and anyone else to investigate its businesses operations. It recently released information about the makeup of its board, reducing some of the secrecy shrouding the company. Huawei has long denied it has ties to the military. Founder Ren left the PLA during a military downsizing and started his company six years later, Plummer said. He dismissed as “malarkey” the accusations that Huawei has received significant financial assistance from the Chinese government. In June, U.S. Export-Import Bank President Fred Hochberg attributed some of Huawei’s dramatic growth to a $30 billion credit line from the Chinese Development Bank that reduces its cost of capital and offers financing to buyers at rates lower than those of competitors.

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Q: Can you suggest a nice way to interrupt during a business conversation? For the past week, I have been meeting with vendors who hope to sell their products to our company. Some of these people spend a lot of time chatting or giving me unnecessary information. I am a polite and courteous person, but this is sending me over the edge. These incessant talkers are wasting time that I do not have. How do I get them to focus on the business at hand? A: You have not only diagnosed your own problem, but also identified the solution. Most people held hostage by longwinded conversationalists are simply being too polite. They believe interrupting would be rude, so they wait for the person

to finish, silently gritting their teeth all the while. The quick fix for this predicament is learning to interrupt in a courteous manner. When a longwinded vendor reaches the end of a sentence, you should immediately jump in and gracefully redirect the discussion. For example: “Bob, let me stop you there for a minute. Since we have limited time, I want to be sure we review all the price and delivery options. What information do you have about that?” An even better strategy, however, is to take control from the beginning. As the buyer, you hold the “power position” in these meetings, so you have every right to define the agenda and manage the time. Start by saying, “Here’s what I’d like to cover today,” then list the points you want the seller to address. To speed up a sluggish conversation, offer a gentle

reminder: “Since we only have 15 minutes left, let’s talk about contract terms.” Most vendors will appreciate this guidance, because they are eager to make a good impression. Annoying a potential customer is the last thing they want to do.

Q: A few months ago, the small restaurant where I work was sold. Everything was fine at first, but then the new owner moved me from the day shift to evenings and reduced my weekly schedule from 38 hours to 15. This guy clearly doesn’t like me, so the environment has become very unpleasant. Should I just give up and quit? A: Before you walk out in frustration, remember that there are two valid reasons to remain in a difficult workplace. The first is the paycheck. The second, iron-

ically, is that it’s usually easier to find a job when you have a job. Unemployment is an automatic red flag for many interviewers. If you decide to stay, use the extra 25 hours per week to ramp up your job search. When asked why you’re seeking a new position, just give a brief description of the facts. For example: “The restaurant where I work was recently sold. My job has been made part-time, so I’m interested in finding full-time work.” Avoid the temptation to disparage your new boss, because that will only make interviewers wonder if you might be difficult to manage. Marie G. McIntyre is a workplace coach and the author of “Secrets to Winning at Office Politics.” Send in questions and get free coaching tips at http://www.yourofficecoach.com.


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

B

U

S

I

N

E

S

S

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 5D

MarketPulse BIG BLUE

HIT AGAIN Already weak corporate pension plans are in even more trouble. The weak stock market has dragged down the value of pension plans’ holdings. Those in the S&P 500 are underfunded by about $477 billion, or 28 percent. Stock investors should care because the underfunding means companies may have to contribute more cash next year to fill their pension plans’ coffers. Credit Suisse analyst David Zion estimates it could total $91 billion for S&P 500 companies. That’s cash that could have gone to shareholders through dividends or stock buybacks or been used to develop new products.

IBM’s stock has never been higher. $200

Friday’s close $190.53

150

Most stocks are struggling, but IBM has never been higher. Its stock climbed to $190.53 on Friday, a record. It has been the best stock in the Dow Jones industrial average this year, up 29.8 percent. The second-best is McDonald’s, which is up 17.2 percent. The overall Dow is up 0.6 percent. One reason why IBM has done so well is that its earnings tend to be steady. Going back to the fourth quarter of 2005, IBM’s profit has dropped just once. That time was by only 1 percent. Such resilience is alluring when investors worry the weak economy could drag down corporate earnings.

100

50

0

’96 - ’00 ’01 - ’05

’06 - ’10 ’11

SOURCE: FactSet

SMALL GLIMMER Here’s maybe a glimmer of hope on jobs: Small businesses felt more optimistic in September. Granted, the rise in the small business optimism index compiled by the by the National Federation of Independent Business was small. It rose to 88.9 from 88.1, and IHS Global Insight economist Christ Christopher calls the gain “a measly 0.8.” But it was still the first gain in optimism in seven months. Small companies employ more than half of all private-sector workers, according to the Small Business Administration. The unemployment rate has been at or above 9 percent since April.

S&P 500 year-to-date percent change 10 percent 5

-2.6% 0 -5 -10 -15

J F M A M J 2011

J

A S O

SOURCE: FactSet

Stan Choe, Kristen Girard • AP

Spotting the next bubbles It’s easy to find stock bubbles with years of hindsight. But scholars from Columbia and Cornell universities say they have found a way to spot overvalued companies in real time, using complicated mathematical formulas. Columbia professor Philip Protter explains why bubbles matter to investors.

InsiderQ&A

Why should investors care? There are two fundamental reasons, and they’re kind of different. One is that, when the Federal Reserve, or various government agencies, regulate the economy ... one of the things they do is they insist that banks have a certain amount of capital reserved. ... If one of the assets, or many of the assets they’re holding, are undergoing bubble pricing, then the banks and everybody else thinks they have a lot more capital reserves than they actually do because the prices are inflated. ... The other reason is more pedestrian. ... Let’s say you’re in an investor long-term, and you think that Verizon is a good stock and it’s going to be a good stock for the next 20 years, and you want to buy it. If you see that it’s currently in a bubble, you may want to wait until that plays itself out before you buy it, and just keep your money in the bank.

Protter

Do you find that a lot of longterm investors slip up and buy stocks in bubbles? It depends on who you’re talking about. I think a lot of Wall Street types are a bit too savvy to get that burned. They may suspect something’s in a bubble. It’s kind of like when you’re driving, and you see the light is green and you notice it’s been green for a long time as you’re approaching it. You think it’s kind of a stale green and it’s going to turn yellow very quickly. And, so, if you’re on Wall Street and you’ve been seeing a run-up of something — something’s really been increasing, and you have an intuition that it’s in a bubble — and it’s been doing this for a while, then you know it’s dangerous to get into it. The ordinary, average investor who’s just trying to save some money through the stock market wouldn’t think like that. So what looks like a bubble now? Fairly recently, LinkedIn had an IPO. And, so there was a lot of speculation that a bubble was beginning. We got the data right from the first five days it was trading, and ran it through our [research formula], and determined that it was a bubble. Then, I read an article ... on whether gold is in a bubble or not. So, I thought, this is perfect, we’ll test gold. So we tested gold, and we discovered it was not a bubble. ... Those are the only two current things we’ve done so far, because it is a fair amount of work. We don’t have it where you just put the data into a black-box software and out pops [the conclusion]. We do it all by hand. Do you see the day when this is all automated on a computer, so people can just enter a ticker and see if a stock is in a bubble? Yes, I do see that. ... For example, let’s suppose you’re just an ordinary person and you want to buy a stock and you call up your broker. ... So, before you buy a stock, have it checked to see if it’s in a bubble. So you say, “This stock looks almost too good to be true.” So you ask your broker, “Could you run it through your software and see if it’s in a bubble?”

Yields rise as stocks rally

Short of confidence

Investors are placing the most bets since 2009 that stocks will fall. They are discouraged by the volatile stock market, Europe’s slow progress in resolving its debt problems and the tepid U.S. economic recovery. So, they are shorting stocks, which means they’re betting stocks will fall. To short a stock, an investor borrows a share and sells it. Later, if the price falls as expected, the investor can buy the share again at the lower price and pocket the difference. Investors had 14.95 billion shares borrowed for short sales on

Sept. 30, according to the most recent data available from the New York Stock Exchange. Two weeks earlier, they had 15.67 billion. That was the most since March 2009, when 16.17 billion shares were sold short. Interest in shorting stocks has been building through the year on growing pessimism about the global economy. Barclays Capital strategists on Tuesday cut their forecast for where the S&P 500 index will end the year to 1,260 from 1,325. They expect earnings growth to slow, and they say Europe’s debt

Investors are selling stocks short at levels not seen since 2009. That means they're betting stocks will fall.

Short interest on NYSE

14

PRIME FED Taxable—national avg RATE FUNDS Selected Daily Govt Fund/Cl D FRIDAY 3.25 .13 Tax-exempt—national avg 6 MO AGO 3.25 .13 Alpine Municipal MMF/Investor 1 YR AGO 3.25 .13

J F

M A

M J J 2009

A

S O

N D

Source: New York Stock Exchange

COMPANY

TICKER

M A

J F

M J J 2010

A

S O

N D

J F

M A

M J 2011

J

APD

72.26 5

98.01

84.06

4.03

5.0

s

t

Amer Water Works

AWK

23.32 9

31.03

29.82

0.45

1.5

s

s 17.9 +30.57

-7.6 +5.10

2

6.3

15

2.8

18

3.1

APU

36.76 7

51.50

45.92

1.50

3.4

s

s

-5.9 +5.88

2 14.3

29

6.4

Aqua America Inc

WTR

19.28 5

23.79

21.43

0.41

2.0

t

t

-4.7 +7.19

2

1.1

21

3.1

Arch Dan Mid

ADM

23.69 3

38.02

27.75

2.30

9.0

t

t

-7.7—14.72 4

-3.8

9

2.3

AutoZone Inc

AZO

227.70 0 337.23 328.12

4.10

1.3

t

s 20.4 +40.82

1 24.7

17

...

Bank of America

BAC

4.9

t

t -53.6—50.56 5 -26.7

...

0.6

Bk of NY Mellon

BK

Bon Ton Store

BONT

CIGNA Corp

CI

34.43 6

52.95

44.70

2.72

6.5

t

t 21.9 +24.45

1

2.7

8

0.1

CVS Caremark Corp

CVS

29.45 6

39.50

35.13

1.35

4.0

t

t

1.0 +13.90

2

3.4

14

1.4

CocaCola

KO

59.33 7

71.77

67.85

1.95

3.0

t

s

3.2 +16.34

1

11.5

13

2.8

Comcast Corp A

CMCSA 17.72 7

27.16

23.94

1.88

8.5

s

t

9.5 +32.60

1

-0.4

17

1.9

Community Bk Sys

CBU

21.67 4

28.95

24.56

1.49

6.5

s

t -11.6 +7.95

2

4.5

12

3.9

Community Hlth Sys

CYH

14.61 2

42.50

19.83

3.34

20.3

s

t -46.9—37.68 4 -11.2

7

...

Entercom Comm

ETM

4.61 3

13.63

6.50

1.19

22.4

s

t -43.9—22.53 4 -19.4

6

...

Fairchild Semicond

FCS

9.42 4

21.02

13.09

1.01

8.4

t

t -16.1 +28.33

1

-7.3

9

...

Frontier Comm

FTR

5.33 2

9.84

5.97

0.09

1.5

t

t -38.6—24.15 4

-6.0

Genpact Ltd

G

13.09 5

18.71

15.58

0.79

5.3

t

t

2.5—15.78 4 22.2a

21

1.2

Harte Hanks Inc

HHS

7.00 3

13.74

8.66

0.90

11.6

s

s -32.2—29.33 4 -17.7

12

3.7

Heinz

HNZ

46.99 7

55.00

52.25

1.89

3.8

s

t

5.6 +10.23

2

7.8

17

3.7

Hershey Company

HSY

45.67 0

60.96

60.04

1.05

1.8

s

s 27.3 +20.71

1

4.4

23

2.3

Kraft Foods

KFT

29.80 9

36.30

35.23

1.47

4.4

s

t

11.8 +14.43

2

2.7

20

3.3

Lowes Cos

LOW

18.07 4

27.45

20.93

0.59

2.9

s

t -16.5 —1.29

3

-6.0

14

2.7

5.13 2

15.31

6.19

0.29

17.10 2

32.50

18.97

1.14

6.4

t

t -37.2—25.66 4

-8.8

9

2.7

3.91 1

17.49

4.72

0.02

0.4

t

t -62.7—61.07 5 -32.3

18

4.2

37 12.6

M&T Bank

MTB

66.40 4

91.05

75.72

4.90

6.9

s

t -13.0 +3.78

2

-6.2

11

3.7

McDonalds Corp

MCD

72.14 0

91.22

89.94

2.74

3.1

s

s 17.2 +19.91

1 18.9

18

3.1

NBT Bncp

NBTB

17.05 5

24.98

20.45

1.56

8.3

s

t -15.3 —5.30

3

0.3

12

3.9

Nexstar Bdcstg Grp

NXST

4.25 8

10.28

8.60

1.79

26.3

s

s 43.6 +52.21

1 17.4

96

...

PNC Financial

PNC

42.70 4

65.19

51.16

3.41

7.1

t

t -15.7 -+.41

3

-3.4

8

2.7

PPL Corp

PPL

24.10 9

29.61

28.52

0.42

1.5

t

s

8.4 +8.52

2

1.1

12

4.9

Penn Millers Hldg

PMIC

13.16 0

20.25

20.12

0.02

0.1

t

s 52.1 +37.71

1

...

...

...

Penna REIT

PEI

6.50 2

17.34

7.76

0.51

7.0

t

t -46.6—34.89 4 -19.2

...

7.7

PepsiCo

PEP

58.50 3

71.89

62.24

1.22

2.0

s

t

2.5

16

3.3

Philip Morris Intl

PM

55.85 7

72.74

67.40

2.27

3.5

t

s 15.2 +21.37

1 19.2a

15

4.6 3.2

Procter & Gamble

PG

57.56 8

67.72

64.89

0.98

1.5

s

s

0.9 +6.53

2

3.4

17

Prudential Fncl

PRU

42.45 4

67.52

50.92

4.90

10.6

t

t -13.3 —3.89

3

-6.6

8

2.3

SLM Corp

SLM

10.91 5

17.11

13.54

0.98

7.8

s

t

7.5 +21.06

1 -21.7

10

3.0

0.3

SLM Corp flt pfB

SLMpB 38.11 3

60.00

43.95

1.50

3.5

s

t

...

0.0

Southn Union Co

SUG

23.60 9

44.65

40.79

0.80

2.0

t

t 69.5 +66.16

1 10.2

21

1.5

TJX Cos

TJX

42.55 9

59.72

57.71

2.01

3.6

s

s 30.0 +31.13

1 15.7

17

1.3

UGI Corp

UGI

24.07 4

33.53

27.64

1.37

5.2

t

t -12.5 —1.71

3

4.8

12

3.8

Verizon Comm

VZ

31.60 8

38.95

37.33

1.17

3.2

s

s

4.3 +21.12

1

6.7

16

5.4

WalMart Strs

WMT

48.31 8

57.90

55.46

1.76

3.3

s

s

2.8 +6.77

2

4.7

13

2.6

Weis Mkts

WMK

36.52 5

42.20

39.00

0.60

1.6

t

t

-3.3 -+.65

3

2.1

15

3.0

... 10.5

Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quarters. Rank classifies a stock’s performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).

Stock Screener

Where optimism is rising

Financial analysts got more pessimistic about this earnings season. The U.S. economic recovery is weak, and Europe still hasn’t fixed its debt problems. Such struggles likely hindered companies’ profit growth from July through September. So, many analysts cut their estimates for third-quarter earnings. COMPANY

TICKER

Southwest Airlines Tesoro Valero Energy Discover Financial Services Ross Stores Mead Johnson Nutrition Ameren Jabil Circuit

LUV TSO VLO DFS ROST MJN AEE JBL

SOURCE: FactSet

Analysts expect S&P 500 companies to report 12 percent growth in earnings for the third quarter. Three months ago, they were expecting 16 percent. Alcoa began the third-quarter earnings season with an inauspicious start on Tuesday: Its profit more than doubled, but the growth was weaker than analysts expected.

CURRENT QUARTER EPS FORECAST (NOW) (MONTH AGO)

$0.09 1.38 1.45 0.82 1.07 0.66 1.12 0.61

$0.13 1.68 1.71 0.90 1.17 0.72 1.20 0.65

REPORT DATE

Oct. 19 Nov. 2 Oct. 31 Dec. 15 Nov. 16 Oct. 27 Nov. 3 Dec. 20

1WK

0.02 0.16 0.04 0.27 1.12

0.01 0.00 0.02 -0.02 0.04

s s s s s

s r r t t

-0.11 -0.05 -0.12 -0.09 -0.05

0.16 0.34 0.20 0.83 2.39

0.07 0.01 0.16 0.78

10-year T-Note 2.25 30-year T-Bond 3.23 Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.

0.18 0.21

s t

t -0.24 t -0.67

3.72 4.77

1.72 2.72

52-WK HIGH LOW

t 0.11 t -0.60 s 0.44 t 0.12 s 1.90 t -0.19

3.29 5.31 4.22 5.95 10.15 2.46

CHANGE 1MO 3MO 1YR

FRIDAY NAV

WK CHG

American Funds BalA m ABALX American Funds BondA m ABNDX American Funds CapIncBuA m CAIBX American Funds CpWldGrIA m CWGIX American Funds EurPacGrA m AEPGX American Funds FnInvA m ANCFX American Funds GrthAmA m AGTHX American Funds IncAmerA m AMECX American Funds InvCoAmA m AIVSX American Funds NewPerspA m ANWPX American Funds WAMutInvA m AWSHX BlackRock GlobAlcA m MDLOX BlackRock GlobAlcC m MCLOX BlackRock GlobAlcI d MALOX Dodge & Cox Income DODIX Dodge & Cox IntlStk DODFX Dodge & Cox Stock DODGX Fidelity Contra FCNTX Fidelity DivrIntl d FDIVX Fidelity Free2020 FFFDX Fidelity GrowCo FDGRX Fidelity LowPriStk d FLPSX Fidelity Spartan 500IdxInv FUSEX FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m FKINX FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m FCISX FrankTemp-Templeton GlBond A mTPINX FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAdv TGBAX Harbor IntlInstl d HAINX Oakmark EqIncI OAKBX PIMCO AllAssetI PAAIX PIMCO ComRlRStI PCRIX PIMCO TotRetA m PTTAX PIMCO TotRetAdm b PTRAX PIMCO TotRetIs PTTRX PIMCO TotRetrnD b PTTDX Permanent Portfolio PRPFX T Rowe Price EqtyInc PRFDX T Rowe Price GrowStk PRGFX T Rowe Price MidCpGr RPMGX T Rowe Price NewIncome PRCIX Vanguard 500Adml VFIAX Vanguard 500Inv VFINX Vanguard GNMA VFIIX Vanguard GNMAAdml VFIJX Vanguard InflaPro VIPSX Vanguard InstIdxI VINIX Vanguard InstPlus VIIIX Vanguard MuIntAdml VWIUX Vanguard STCor VFSTX Vanguard STGradeAd VFSUX Vanguard Tgtet2025 VTTVX Vanguard TotBdAdml VBTLX Vanguard TotBdInst VBTIX Vanguard TotIntl d VGTSX Vanguard TotStIAdm VTSAX Vanguard TotStIIns VITSX Vanguard TotStIdx VTSMX Vanguard Welltn VWELX Vanguard WelltnAdm VWENX Vanguard WndsrII VWNFX

17.93 12.41 48.96 32.76 36.85 34.95 29.03 16.31 26.75 26.91 27.40 18.70 17.41 18.79 13.20 31.42 100.24 67.90 26.97 13.44 85.80 35.36 43.37 2.04 2.06 13.08 13.04 55.05 27.16 11.77 7.79 10.69 10.69 10.69 10.69 47.42 22.31 32.12 57.00 9.58 112.88 112.87 11.09 11.09 13.90 112.13 112.13 13.66 10.63 10.63 12.40 10.90 10.90 14.02 30.50 30.50 30.49 30.58 52.81 24.92

+.71 +1.55 +1.85 +2.21 +2.11 +1.75 +.53 +1.40 +1.60 +1.32 +.78 +.71 +.78 +.05 +2.04 +6.13 +4.55 +1.72 +.48 +6.11 +2.01 +2.45 +.07 +.07 +.29 +.28 +3.58 +1.12 +.25 +.31 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.01 +1.47 +1.14 +2.42 +3.41 -.02 +6.39 +6.39 -.01 -.01 -.15 +6.35 +6.35 -.01 +.01 +.01 +.54 -.04 -.04 +.88 +1.81 +1.81 +1.81 +1.04 +1.78 +1.26

4WK

2.15 3.79 3.36 4.86 6.61 0.96

52-WK HIGH LOW

RETURN/RANK 1YR 5YR

+2.0 -.9 +2.4 +4.0 +2.2 +2.5 +1.6 +1.8 +3.9 +2.7 +3.4 -.1 -.2 -.1 -1.0 +5.3 +3.3 +2.4 +1.7 +.2 +2.0 +2.3 +3.2 +.6 +.5 -1.5 -1.6 +4.8 +1.8 -1.8 -8.6 -2.1 -2.1 -2.1 -2.1 -3.1 +3.0 +2.3 +1.7 -1.1 +3.2 +3.2 -.7 -.7 -1.3 +3.2 +3.2 -1.2 -.5 -.4 +1.7 -.9 -.8 +2.6 +2.6 +2.6 +2.6 +2.5 +2.5 +3.5

+6.3/A +2.6/C +2.0/A -5.2/D -10.0/D +2.8/D +2.1/E +4.1/B +1.9/D -1.6/C +8.6/A -.3/C -1.1/C -.1/B +2.7/C -10.3/D +2.0/C +7.3/C -7.5/B +2.0/C +13.1/A +5.7/A +6.4/A +1.6/C +1.1/D -.6/D -.5/D -6.7/B +3.1/B -.1/B +2.8/C -1.2/E -1.0/E -.8/E -1.0/E +8.0/A +3.3/B +8.5/B +9.3/B +2.4/C +6.4/A +6.3/A +5.3/A +5.4/A +5.9/A +6.4/A +6.5/A +2.0/B +.9/B +1.0/B +3.1/A +3.9/A +3.9/A -9.2/D +6.2/B +6.2/B +6.0/B +4.2/A +4.3/A +4.9/B

+2.6/B +3.6/E +1.8/C +.7/B +.6/A +1.0/A +.2/D +1.9/C -.6/C +2.3/A /A +4.8/B +4.0/B +5.1/B +6.4/B -.8/A -3.6/D +3.6/A -2.2/C +1.8/C +5.5/A +3.1/A -.1/B +3.0/C +2.5/D +10.5/A +10.8/A +1.8/A +4.6/A +5.8/A +3.3/A +7.3/A +7.5/A +7.8/A +7.5/A +9.5/A -.7/B +2.3/B +5.8/A +6.5/B /B -.1/B +6.9/A +7.0/A +7.0/B /B /B +4.6/B +4.4/B +4.5/B +1.9/B +6.4/B +6.5/B -1.0/B +.5/B +.5/B +.4/B +3.7/A +3.7/A -1.3/B

Rank: Fund’s letter grade compared with others in the same performance group; an A indicates fund performed in the top 20 percent; an E, in the bottom 20 percent.

But there are always some exceptions. The table below shows stocks where analysts have raised their earnings expectations over the last month. Two refiners are near the top of the list, Tesoro and Valero. They have benefited because a glut of oil supply in the U.S. has kept prices for the crude that they refine lower than oil traded in other global markets.

CLOSE

52-WK LOW

52-WK HIGH

AVG. BROKER RATING*

$8.61 25.00 22.65 24.24 83.35 73.73 29.93 20.04

$7.15 12.79 16.40 17.02 55.56 55.12 25.55 13.67

$14.32 28.74 31.12 27.92 85.42 76.91 31.44 23.09

1.5 1.7 1.5 1.4 1.7 1.6 2.2 1.4

Data through Oct.13

s t s t s s

TICKER

GROUP, FUND

1 19.2a

3

CHANGE 1MO 3MO 1YR

MutualFunds

Amerigas Part LP

-4.7 —3.62

FRIDAY YIELD

S

52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN RANK %RTN LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD

Air Products

0.05 0.07 -0.03 0.01 -0.57 0.04

3-month T-Bill 1-year T-Bill 6-month T-Bill 2-year T-Note 5-year T-Note

Stan Choe Kristen Girard • AP

LocalStocks

0.01 0.08 $ 2,500 min (888) 785-5578

2.50 4.06 3.95 4.99 9.30 1.23

TREASURYS

A

0.01 0.12 $ 10,000 min (800) 243-1575

1WK

Broad market Lehman Triple-A corporate Moody’s Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman Municipal Bond Buyer U.S. high yield Barclays Treasury Barclays

Dow Jones industrial average hits bottom 6,547.05

MIN INVEST PHONE

YIELD

FRIDAY YIELD

U.S. BOND INDEXES

March 9, 2009

13 12

Money market mutual funds

Dow Jones industrial average falls 634 points and closes at 10,809.93

S&P downgrades U.S. credit rating setting off the most volatile stock movements ever

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InterestRates

Aug. 8, 2011

Aug. 5, 2011

17 billion shares

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problems have hurt corporate confidence. Morgan Stanley Smith Barney recommended last week that investors shift money to safer investments, such as bonds, and away from stocks. But some financial analysts see the increased short interest as a contrarian signal for optimism about stocks. If stocks keep rising like they did last week, it could trigger a spurt of buying, J.P. Morgan strategist Thomas Lee wrote in a report. Short sellers would scramble to buy stocks to limit their losses in a move called “short covering.”

Treasury prices fell last week, sending their yields higher, as investors bought riskier assets like stocks. Investors were encouraged by Europe’s progress in finalizing a plan to strengthen the region’s banks. The average rate on the 30-year fixed mortgage rose sharply last week. The week before, it fell below 4 percent for the first time in history.

*1=buy;2=hold;3=sell

p p p p

Dow industrials

+4.9% WEEKLY

Nasdaq

+7.6% WEEKLY

LARGE-CAP

S&P 500

+6.0% WEEKLY

SMALL-CAP

Russell 2000

+8.6% WEEKLY

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+1.2%

MO +0.6%

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MO +0.6%

YTD +0.7%

MO -2.6%

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The Right Number? It All Depends

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THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

The Motley Fool Credit Scores 101

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Park This Deere in Your Headlights

I started day-trading in 2007. In my first year, I was up about 50 percent. So I figured, why not mortgage the house and increase my available account by $300,000? Not too long after, I saw a certain stock going up very quickly. I managed to buy 30,000 shares at $16 per share, committing all my cash and a lot of borrowed (margin) money. I immediately put in an order to sell all of them at $16.50. I recall the shares going up to about $16.40 and then dropping rapidly. It was close to 4 p.m. and I finished the day down about $20,000. Two weeks later I sold the last 10,000 shares for $8.40. My $480,000 investment cost me $182,000 in less than two weeks. Later, the stock fell to under a dollar per share. I am now working at making my $1,774 monthly house payment with a $47,000 account. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; M., online The Fool Responds: Thanks for this painful reminder of how dangerous day-trading can be. A few folks might make money at it, but most people lose, and often lose quite a lot. Do you have an embarrassing lesson learned the hard way? Boil it down to 100 words (or less) and send it to The Motley Fool c/o My Dumbest Investment. Got one that worked? Submit to My Smartest Investment. If we print yours, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll win a Foolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cap!

Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great about the agriculture sector is that when it does well, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just farmers who make money. Businesses from fertilizers to farm equipment also stand to gain. Deere (NYSE: DE) is one such beneficiary. Its second-quarter revenues surged 24 percent, leading the company to raise its full-year earnings expectations. Higher shipment volumes and improved pricing have been boosting revenue by a compounded average rate of 6.8 percent over the past half-decade â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and a whopping 26.8 percent over the past year. This strong top-line growth has helped Deereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bottom line grow by 118.4 percent over the past year. Deere has been quite aggressive with new products and global expansion, strengthening its foothold in markets such as China and India. The main concern on Deereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s balance sheet is its debt load, but strong profit margins and ample cash provide some relief. Deereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s P/E ratio is in line with its peers, but given its strong performance and solid capital investments, it seems that its true potential has not been factored in much. Deere raised its dividend last quarter, the ninth quarterly dividend increase in seven years. Its dividend yield is a moderate 2.1 percent. Deere seems well-poised to benefit as the global economy eventually gets back on its feet. You might want to keep an eye on it.

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timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

KEVIN BLAUM

COMMENTARY

IN THE ARENA

TRUDY RUBIN

Take the time to hear views at council forum

Global views are foreign to GOP hopefuls

WHAT ARE you doing tomorrow night? Planning to stay home? It is a Monday, after all. You might even think you deserve a much needed break. Perhaps you expended a great deal of energy over the weekend and are looking forward to that rare and indulgent pleasure of just doing nothing. Sorry, but you can’t let up just yet. There is a candidate forum (debate) Monday evening and you need to be there. The 28 candidates campaigning for seats on the all-important, 11-member Luzerne County Council are scheduled to face off in a two-hour discussion sponsored by The Times Leader and the Downtown Residents Association. The event will be held on the campus of Wilkes University on the second floor of the Henry Student Center, 84 W. South St., Wilkes-Barre. You will cast no more important vote on Nov. 8 than for the 11 individuals you choose to sit on the new county council. It is they who will select Luzerne County’s new manager — the “CEO” who will run county government for years to come. How serious is the decision that awaits you? Under the terms of the new home rule charter, it requires the votes of only seven members of county council — a majority plus one — to install the woman or man who will lead this region toward a better and brighter future or plunge it deeper into the bowels of despair, debt and decline. Elect the wrong seven, and someone whose major “qualification” is his well-connected brother-in-law will take the controls of Luzerne County, its enormous budget, its enormous debt, large workforce, faltering economy and the power to hire and fire. Elect the wrong seven, and the freedom train of reform, government study and hope will be derailed and careen headlong off a cliff of squandered years. It is important that you take time to attend The Times Leader/Downtown Residents Association presentation of candidates for Luzerne County’s brand new county council. The event is scheduled to begin at 6 p.m. It will conclude at 8 p.m. Linger longer and you might have an opportunity to speak with the candidates and ask them additional questions. With only three weeks remaining before Election Day, Nov. 8, only a few of them will be looking for a quick exit. So make plans to attend. What’s the alternative? Monday Night Football? This week it’s the 2-and-3 New York Jets against the winless Miami Dolphins. Listening to a bunch of candidates answering a series of questions is certainly preferable to that sleeper. In any event, the game doesn’t start until 8:30 p.m. If you dash out as soon as the candidates finish speaking, you probably can make it home before the opening kickoff with no return, and certainly before Mark Sanchez throws his first interception. Go and listen to the candidates. Watch them closely. Take the full measure of each man and woman soliciting your precious votes for this position of incredible responsibility. The job requires smart people, steady hands and spines of steel. The very best council candidates are not all Democrats. Nor are they all Republican. This year, Republicans and Democrats must be willing to vote for a few candidates of the other party, plus a couple independents, in order to assemble the very best county council. There are 11 very good candidates to fill each of the 11 available council seats. But there are only 11, maybe 12. Can you pick them out of the crowd? Email me when you get home and let me know your thoughts and observations. “In the Arena” will make its endorsements on Oct. 30. See you tomorrow night.

FOREIGN POLICY hasn’t played much of a role in the Republican presidential race, and it’s easy to see why. GOP candidates’ remarks on our role abroad have ranged from the uninformed to the bizarre (with the exception of Jon Huntsman, who served twice as a U.S. ambassador). Front-runner Mitt Romney’s foreignpolicy speech last week had a Rip Van Winkle quality to it, as though he’d just awakened after a decade and was unaware of how the world had changed since 9/11. This is sad, because the country could use a serious national debate over what our global role should be in a time of economic turmoil and scarcity. But Republicans seem far more interested in hammering President Obama’s “weakness” abroad than addressing the real threats to our global standing. Romney may insist that “the 21st century must be an American century,” but repeating that mantra won’t make it so. Yet Republican wannabes have set forth no realistic roadmap for how America can maintain its role as global leader. Most have stumbled badly when asked foreign-policy questions. Texas Gov. Rick Perry confused India and Pakistan. Former Sen. Rick Santorum opined that we deal The GOP with Pakistan by seems unable cozying up to ousted to grasp that Pakistani dictator the world has Pervez Musharraf — who is now in exile changed and in London and faces that the Unitarrest if he returns ed States home. Former pizza king must adapt. Herman Cain made light of his foreignpolicy ignorance with a joke: “When they ask me who is the president of Ubeki-beki-beki-beki-stan-stan, I’m going to say ... I don’t know.” I won’t even start to track Michele Bachmann’s jumbled foreign-policy claims. Which brings me back to Romney, whose positions reflect the fact that he’s hired on a host of former George W. Bush advisers. He talks of restoring American strength by adding 100,000 U.S. troops and expanding defense spending. Yet he never mentions our budget crisis, although both parties have agreed defense cuts will be required to address it. He never explains how we can afford 100,000 additional soldiers when we’re overburdened with debt. Nor does he address what kind of strategic force we need to confront the threats of the future, which should determine the size of our forces. We’re unlikely to repeat the kind of ground wars we’ve waged in Afghanistan and Iraq, while drones and special forces are most effective for tracking down terrorists. Did Romney avoid these issues because he didn’t want to cite Obama’s success in sending special forces to kill Osama bin Laden? Perhaps. But it’s bizarre to pledge a vast increase in military manpower when you don’t say why it is needed. This lack of seriousness runs through every aspect of Romney’s foreign-policy posture. On Afghanistan, he’s backed off from an earlier pledge to bring troops home soon and now talks of a “full review” of our policy. Do we really have time for — or need — yet another full review? On the Middle East, he ignores failed peace talks but promises to focus aid and diplomatic efforts, even as Republicans slash the State Department budget. And on Iran, Romney talks tough — saying an Iran with nukes is “unacceptable” — but he doesn’t say how he’d act differently than Obama. Perhaps that’s merciful, because other Republicans (including the normally level-headed Huntsman) are talking of military strikes against Tehran. Never mind that most serious Iran experts believe a strike would not eliminate Tehran’s nuclear program,

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EW YORK — Brace yourselves for the attack ads. Rick Perry’s Social Security plan might cost Florida its entire public education and prison systems. Mitt Romney is the

flip-flopper responsible for “Obamacare.” Or so declare just two presidential campaign videos on the Web.

Going after the president and each other, Republican candidates have been testdriving themes and previewing attack lines online for months, foreshadowing the TV ad war that’s all but certain to start soon in Iowa, New Hampshire and other early voting states. With less than three months before voting begins in GOP nomination contests, the candidates’ pitches and criticism will be streaming into voters’ homes, either by the campaigns or outside groups working on their behalf. For a change, TV ads from the candidates so far this year have been scarce. Some contenders, such as Romney, are stockpiling cash for a long nomination battle and waiting for voters to start paying attention to the race in earnest. After all, TV ads are one of the most costly expenses of any campaign. Most GOP candidates, like Newt Gingrich and Rick Santorum, simply don’t have the cash to wage an aggressive TV effort. Texas Rep. Ron Paul has done limited advertising in Iowa and New Hampshire, and has the money to go back on the air. Others, primarily Perry, could run TV ads sooner rather than later as they look to change the dynamics of the race. “A smart ad campaign can absolutely put Perry back in the game,” says Mark McKinnon, who was media strategist for Republican President George W. Bush’s campaigns. “He is supposed to be the voice of the anti-Washington crowd, but the debates took him off track. Television can get him back on the rails.”

AP PHOTO

Some contenders, such as Mitt Romney, are stockpiling cash for a long nomination battle and waiting for voters to start paying attention to the race.

The Texas governor’s campaign, which is sitting on $15 million in cash, hints that TV ads are coming soon following state and national polls that show him badly trailing Romney after a series of weak deSee AD, Page 6E

M .CO NS LIA IO TO AT FO STR U ILL

Kevin Blaum’s column on government, life and politics appears every Sunday. Contact him at kblaum@timesleader.com.

By BETH FOUHY Associated Press

See RUBIN, Page 6E


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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Editorial

OUR OPINION: SIGNS OF TIMES

AP PHOTO

Demonstrators opposed to Wall Street greed flex their First Amendment rights at a recent rally.

A true solution: Express yourself

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EHOLD THE power of the simple, concise and highly visible protest sign. If nothing else, the Occupy Wall Street movement in New York City and its network of copycat events across the nation has rekindled the notion that people can make powerful, even profound, statements with just an ink pen and some poster board. Or, if need be, the tattered lid of a cardboard box. “Jail the bankers.” “I am the 99%.” “This is what democracy looks like.” This in-your-face – or at least, on-your-corner – kind of expression has been sorely lacking in most of Luzerne County and Northeastern Pennsylvania in recent years, despite a sweeping public corruption investigation that calls into question exactly who’s in charge of our public schools, our county government, our legal system. Did it make you angry to learn so many of your taxpayer-funded institutions had been abused, even hijacked?

Were you frustrated? If so, it barely showed. Aside from a few small gatherings outside courthouses on key dates, there was nary a whimper. A certain segment of the population eventually did display its disgust at the ballot box, tossing out the traditional form of county government for something new. Others registered their complaints via letters to the editor. But given the gravity of the situation – 30-plus public officials and area power brokers charged with corruption – the response was insufficient. Is insufficient. Recommended reforms of the state’s court system await action in Harrisburg. Certain school districts have yet to take on important procedural changes, such as adopting a formal teacher hiring policy. In too many corners of the county, it’s business as usual. If that perturbs you, or you’re bothered by other perceived improprieties on the part of your elected officials and public institutions, let it show. “Silence = surrender.”

QUOTE OF THE DAY “Although a recession has become less likely, households still can’t be relied on to drag the U.S. economy out of its continued malaise.” Paul Dales The senior U.S. economist for Capital Economics assessed last week’s upbeat Commerce Department report on retail sales, which increased 1.1 percent in September – the biggest gain in seven months.

OTHER OPINION: FEDERAL FUNDS

Solyndra gives solar a bad rap

S

HINING A BRIGHT light on the Solyndra solar panel company debacle illuminates two facts: • The Obama administration’s deeply flawed handling of loan guarantees for the California-based (and now bankrupt) solar panel maker could saddle U.S. taxpayers with a loss of $535 million. • Solar power isn’t dying in this country and doesn’t deserve to, either. Early on, President Barack Obama helped make Solyndra a poster child for his green jobs initiative, visiting the company and saying, “The true engine of economic growth will always be companies like Solyndra.” But evidence is mounting that the administration cut corners to funnel money to the

manufacturer. That’s a depressingly familiar story for Americans appropriately upset at how loosely federal funds too often are spent. However, harsh questioning of the very future of solar panel production in America – such as what U.S. Rep. Darrell Issa, a California Republican, engaged in recently – is off the mark. In the first half of 2011, photovoltaic installations were 69 percent higher than a comparable period in 2010. And the amount of solar power consumed in the country has more than doubled in the last six years. Acting more prudently in the future, Congress should continue to promote private-sector investment in solar power. Kansas City Star

Reverse racism rampant thanks to Department of Justice AMONG THOSE who have been disappointed by President Barack Obama, none is likely to end up so painfully disappointed as those who saw his election as being, in itself and in its consequences, a movement toward a “post-racial society.” Like so many other expectations that so many people projected onto this little-known man who suddenly burst onto the political scene, the expectation of movement toward a post-racial society had no speck of hard evidence behind it – and all too many ignored indications of the very opposite, including his two decades of association with the egregious Rev. Jeremiah Wright. Those people of good will who want to replace the racism of the past with a postracial society have too often overlooked the fact that there are others who instead want to put racism under new management, to have reverse discrimination as racial payback for past injustices. Attorney General Eric Holder became a key figure epitomizing the view that government’s role in racial matters was not to be an impartial dispenser of equal justice for all, but to be a racial partisan and an organ of racial payback. He has been too politically savvy to say that in so many words, but his actions have spoken far louder than any words.

dation in Philadelphia as only just an isolated incident involving a few thugs at one voting place, former U.S. Attorney Adams shows that these thugs were in fact part of a nationTHOMAS SOWELL wide organization doing similar things elsewhere. This is all spelled out in detail, naming The case that first gave the general public names and naming places, not only among a glimpse of Holder’s views and values was those in the country at large, but also among one in which young black thugs outside a those officials of the Justice Department who voting site in Philadelphia were televised intimidating white voters. When this episode turned its role of protecting the civil rights of all Americans into a policy of racial partisanwas broadcast, it produced public outrage. ship and racial payback. Although the Department of Justice’s The widespread, organized and systematic prosecution of these thugs began in the last corruption of the voting process revealed by days of the Bush administration, and the the author of “Injustice” is on a scale that can defendants had offered no legal defense, the case was dropped by the Justice Department swing not only local, but also national elections, including the 2012 elections. The Deafter Eric Holder took over. One of the lawyers who were prosecuting that case resigned partment of Justice under Attorney General Holder has not only turned a blind eye to in protest. blatant evidence of voter fraud, it also has That lawyer – J. Christian Adams – has actively suppressed those U.S. attorneys in written a book, “Injustice: Exposing the Racial Agenda of the Obama Justice Depart- its own ranks who have tried to stop that fraud. ment.” It is a thought-provoking and shockThis is an enormously eye-opening book ing book in what it reveals about the inner workings of the Department of Justice’s civil which makes painfully clear that, where racial issues are concerned, the Department rights division. of Justice has become the Department of Bad as the Justice Department’s decision Payback. A post-racial society is the last was to drop that case, which it already had won in court, this book makes painfully clear thing that Holder and Obama are pursuing. that this was just the proverbial tip of the iceberg. Thomas Sowell is a senior fellow at the Hoover Despite the efforts of some in the media Institution, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305. His website is www.tsowell.com. and in politics to depict the voter intimi-

COMMENTARY

Beyond Wall Street protests lies a Jobs-like solution YOU NEVER hear anyone complain that Steve Jobs became a multi-billionaire. That tells us something important about what motivates the protests growing on Wall Street and in many other places on both sides of the Atlantic. The anger of demonstrators is not the result of envy or of politically motivated hostility against the rich. Instead, it is the understandable expression of frustration with a system that has richly rewarded people who, quite simply, do not deserve it. Whatever you think of the protests and the protesters, they have good reason to feel cheated. When we discovered that the world’s financial system was on the brink of collapse back in 2008, the government had to rush in to prevent catastrophe. It was not about saving the bankers; it was about saving the world. Like it or not, the economy needs solvent, functioning financial institutions. Some of the world’s top financiers, in fact, have historically played important, honorable, even heroic roles in helping hard-working, innovative entrepreneurs bring progress and prosperity. The American system rewards risk-taking, innovation and entrepreneurship. Americans, unlike Europeans, don’t object to a system in which people can get rich –

COMMENTARY FRIDA GHITIS even extremely rich – if they make great contributions to society. In the United States, people tend to not hate the rich because they believe one day they might join their ranks. If you invent the iPhone, the iPad, become a billionaire. No problem. But the other side of that covenant says you pay a price for your mistakes. In recent years, however, the great minds of Wall Street brought us calamity. And when their irresponsible, unintelligent choices undermined the entire economy, the taxpayers had to step in to pay the price. That prevented everyone from having to live through the 1930s again. But it allowed the bankers to rake in more billions despite the mess they had made. What surprises me the most is that it took so long for the outrage to reach the street, Wall Street. At the very least, the bank bailout should have included a provision preventing huge compensation for people working in firms receiving bailouts. Financial firms claimed the bonuses were needed to attract and retain their brilliant staff. But their brilliance was rather well hidden. Incredibly, in 2008, despite hundreds of

billions in taxpayers’ bailouts and trillions in losses for investors, that year also ended with huge bonuses for Wall Street. That year, Wall Street firms paid $18 billion in bonuses, according to the New York State Controller. The average bonus in the largest firms topped $265,000. In 2010, the average bonus for all firms was $128,000. That’s on top of salary, options and other perks. Many people receive millions each year. Meanwhile, everyone else had to pay. Retirees on fixed incomes received almost no interest on their savings because the Fed pushes down interest rates to stimulate the listless economy. Efforts to trim bloated government budgets mean government employees lose their jobs, services are cut, infrastructure neglected. We all pay the price for the mistakes of people who have thrived despite their incompetence. So, the anger is plainly justified. Until now, however, its expression – occupying Wall Street or taking to the streets – might be good therapy but it’s not very good policy by itself. This is when the spirit of “Be Like Steve Jobs” comes in. This is where people with passion and creativity emerge to design a well thought-out solution to these problems. Surely, there’s an app for that. Frida Ghitis writes about global affairs for The Miami Herald. Readers may send her email at fjghitis@gmail.com.

Editorial Board RICHARD L. CONNOR Editor and Publisher JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ Vice President/Executive Editor

MARK E. JONES Editorial Page Editor PRASHANT SHITUT President/Impressions Media

RICHARD L. CONNOR Editor and Publisher PRASHANT SHITUT President

JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ Vice President/Executive Editor RICHARD DEHAVEN Vice President/Circulation

ALLISON UHRIN Vice President/ Chief Financial Officer


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Obama saving face by blaming others WHAT DO you do if you can’t run on your record – on 9 percent unemployment, stagnant growth and ruinous deficits as far as the eye can see? How to run when you are asked whether Americans are better off than they were four years ago and you are compelled to answer no? Play the outsider. Declare yourself the underdog. Denounce Washington as if the electorate hasn’t noticed that you’ve been in charge of it for nearly three years. But above all: Find villains. President Obama first tried finding excuses, blaming America’s dismal condition on Japanese supply-chain interruptions, the Arab Spring, European debt and various acts of God. Didn’t work. Sounds plaintive, defensive. Lacks fight, which is what Obama’s base lusts for above all. Hence Obama’s new strategy: Don’t whine, blame. Attack. Indict. Accuse. Who? The rich – and their Republican protectors – for wrecking America. In Obama’s telling, it’s the refusal of the rich to “pay their fair share” that jeopardizes Medicare. If millionaires don’t pony up, schools will crumble. Oil-drilling tax breaks are costing teachers their jobs. Corporate loopholes will gut medical research. It’s crude. It’s Manichaean. And the left loves it. As a matter of math and logic, however, it’s ridiculous. Obama’s most coveted tax hike – an extra 3 to 4.6 percent for millionaires and billionaires (weirdly defined as individuals making more than $200,000) – would have reduced last year’s deficit from $1.29 trillion to $1.21 trillion. Nearly a rounding error. The oil-drilling breaks cover less than half a day’s federal spending. You could collect Obama’s favorite tax loophole – depreciation for corporate jets – for 100 years and it wouldn’t cover one month of Medicare, whose insolvency is a function of increased longevity, expensive new technology and wasteful defensive medicine caused by an insane malpractice system. After three years, Obama’s self-proclaimed transformative social policies have yielded a desperately weak economy. What to do? Take the low road: Plutocrats are bleeding the country and I shall rescue you from them. Problem is, this kind of populist demagoguery is more than intellectually dishonest. It’s dangerous. Obama is opening a Pandora’s box. Popular

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ANOTHER VIEW

A photograph by Aimee Dilger and words by Mark E. Jones

COMMENTARY CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER resentment, easily stoked, is less easily controlled, especially when the basest of instincts are granted legitimacy by the nation’s leader. Exhibit A. On Tuesday, the Democratic-controlled Senate passed punitive legislation over China’s currency. If not stopped by House Speaker John Boehner, it might have led to a trade war – a 21stcentury Smoot-Hawley. Obama knows this. He has shown no appetite for a reckless tariff war. But he set the tone. Once you start hunting for villains, they can be found anywhere, particularly if they are conveniently foreign. Exhibit B. Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin rails against Bank of America for announcing a $5 a month debit card fee. Obama echoes the opprobrium with fine denunciations of banks and their hidden fees – except that this $5 fee is not hidden. It’s perfectly transparent. Yet here is a leading Democratic senator advocating a run on a major (and troubled) bank – after two presidents and two Congresses sunk billions of taxpayer dollars to save failing banks. Exhibit C. To the villainy-ofthe-rich theme emanating from Washington, a child is born: Occupy Wall Street. Starbuckssipping, Levi’s-clad, iPhoneclutching protesters denounce corporate America even as they weep for Steve Jobs, corporate titan, billionaire eight times over. These indignant indolents saddled with their $50,000 student loans and English degrees have decided that their lack of gainful employment is rooted in the malice of the millionaires on whose homes they are now marching – to the applause of Democrats suffering acute tea party envy and now salivating at the energy these big-government anarchists will presumably give their cause. Except that the real tea party actually had a program – less government, less regulation, less taxation, less debt. What’s the Occupy Wall Street program? Eat the rich. From the Senate to the streets, it’s working. Obama is too intelligent not to know what he started. But so long as it gives him a shot at re-election, he shows no sign of caring. Charles Krauthammer’s email address is letters@charleskrauthammer.com.

oon, she will sail over the stage with her fleet-footed friends; until then, wary of street grime and sudden downpours, this dancer wisely sticks with S some sensible shoes.

For faking it, Hollywood style, the Oscar goes to … IT’S NEVER too early for Oscar buzz. Will Brad Pitt get the best actor award for his role as the canny baseball executive in “Moneyball”? Should Meryl Streep be the favorite as Margaret Thatcher in “The Iron Lady” even though nobody’s seen it yet? And most important, which film will take home the statuette in Oscar’s newest category, Best Camouflage Job By A Law Firm Masquerading Its Propaganda As A Documentary? Alas, the Motion Picture Academy hasn’t really created that Oscar category yet. But if it had, the competition would be fierce. In a trend that’s equally noxious for the cinema and the law, big-time trial lawyers have infiltrated the ranks of documentary filmmakers, using them as cover to covertly gather information, apply political pressure and poison jury pools. Consider these examples: • Director Jason Glaser, whose film “Banana Land” purports to document corporate exploitation of agricultural workers in Latin America, revealed in court last year that while making his movie he was secretly on the payroll of Provost-Umphrey, a big Texas law firm that represents banana workers suing Dole Food Co. over its use of pesticides. The law firm paid him $17,000 a month, testified Glaser, who was untroubled by questions of conflict of interest since he’s not a journalist but “a

ground of the film’s director, Susan Saladoff, a former medical malpractice attorney and longtime anti-tort-reform activGLENN GARVIN ist. Is it cynical to suggest there’s a connection between facilitator and an activist.” And, those two omissions? • Here’s what the New York he added, objectivity is all humTimes had to say about bug anyway: “I don’t think “Crude,” a documentary about anyone has ever seen a docua crusading lawyer named mentary that is unbiased.” Steven Donziger who is press• “Hot Coffee” is a docuing a $27 billion lawsuit accusmentary arguing that tort reing Chevron of responsibility form – the legal movement to for oil spills in the Ecuadorean rein in runaway damages in jungle: “A thorough and impaspersonal-injury cases – is a corporate plot against ordinary sioned new documentary ... intelligently and artfully Americans; it caused a sensamade.” tion when it aired on HBO Here’s what the New York earlier this year. It presented Times didn’t say: “Crude” was the weepy tales of several justconceived, funded, promoted plain-folks allegedly trampled and in large part directed and by fascist corporations. One of edited by Donziger and his the most moving: a Houston pals. The film’s real story woman named Jamie Leigh emerged after a Chevron lawJones, who claimed she was drugged, beaten and raped by a yer noted that the version of “Crude” available on Netflix group of co-workers while had a scene not included on the working for the defense conDVD – a scene of startling legal tractor KBR in Iraq. misconduct, in which one of Jones sued KBR for $145 the Ecuadorean court’s supposmillion, accusing the company edly neutral experts held a of negligence and a hostile secret planning session with work environment. A few weeks after “Hot Coffee” made Donziger’s legal and technical team. its TV debut, her lawsuit went Chevron promptly went to to trial – and jurors promptly court to force “Crude” director rejected it. Trial testimony showed that doctors who exam- Joe Berlinger to turn over socalled outtakes – 500 hours of ined Jones found no evidence raw footage from which the of a beating or a rape and no film was put together – as well trace of drugs in her body. She as production documents. The also had a history of blackouts latter show that Donziger while drinking as well as unasked Berlinger to make the proven accusations of assault movie, got him money from and sexual harassment. some of the same people who Curiously, not a word of Jones’ background appeared in were financing the lawsuit and “Hot Coffee.” Neither was there sent a steady stream of emails telling the director how the a single mention of the back-

In a trend that’s equally noxious for the cinema and the law, big-time trial lawyers have infiltrated the ranks of documentary filmmakers, using them as cover to covertly gather information, apply political pressure and poison jury pools.

husband’s needs and administered the Heimlich maneuver. I want them and everyone else to know that there are still some caring people left in this world. I will be grateful forever. I wish I knew their names, but in the excitement I failed to get them. I also want to thank the Red Lobster manager. God bless everyone who extended such kindness to us at such a critical time. We just can’t express enough gratitude.

his passing. This year, 42 children were able to attend Camp AsthmaCadabra at the YMCA’s Camp Kresge in White Haven. Without Camp AsthmaCadabra, children with asthma would not be able to safely enjoy the camping experience. A special thank-you to Cathy Gower, banquet manager, and the entire staff at Mountain Laurel Golf Club, in White Haven. Our heartfelt thanks to our volunteers, who have donated their time year after year to make our event memorable. A very special thank-you goes to the Corazza family at Fairway Chevrolet for the car sponsorship for the hole-inone incentive. We also emphasize that it is your kind donations that keep alive our highly successful asthma camp project. We thank you for your kind and generous support and hope it will continue next year.

COMMENTARY

film should be shot and edited. No wonder! The outtakes make it clear that Donziger has only contempt for legal niceties, especially those of the Ecuadorean court where his suit is filed. In one clip, Donziger and his pals discuss how a court-appointed expert could exaggerate the damages against Chevron – while the expert sits right there in the room with them. In another, they chat about sending “an army” of demonstrators into the streets to make it clear what will happen to the judge if he rules against them. Evidence? We don’t need no stinkin’ evidence, Donziger says, dismissing scientific studies as “all for the court, just a bunch of smoke and mirrors and bull(bleep).” His real strategy: “You can say whatever you want and at the end of the day, there’s a thousand people around the courthouse, you’re going to get what you want.” Smile, Steve. You’re on Candid Camera. Glenn Garvin is a columnist for the Miami Herald, 1 Herald Plaza, Miami, FL 33132. Readers may write to him via email at ggarvin@miamiherald.com.

LETTERS FROM READERS

Marley’s Mission thanks supporters

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n Sept. 17, before thousands in the San Diego Civic Center, Marley’s Mission was chosen “best new charity” in the United States at the third annual Classy Awards hosted by StayClassy.org, a leader in social fundraising for nonprofits. The Classy Awards sifted through thousands of nominations from across the United States in 12 categories, including best new charity. Prior to being judged by an esteemed panel selected by StayClassy.org, nominees were required to demonstrate their organizations’ popular support in an online voting campaign. Thanks to the outpouring of support from our Northeastern Pennsylvania family, Marley’s Mission received the most popular votes among all nominees nationwide! It also was the incredible support from this region that, on July 5, 2010, allowed us to

MOUNTAIN LAURELS Mountain Laurels is a regular series of letters from readers conveying thanks to individuals or groups for their support, help or kindness.

cut a magnificent blue ribbon marking the grand opening of Marley’s Mission on a 24-acre campus in Lake Ariel. Now, some 14 months later, we again express our heartfelt thanks to our dedicated network of supporters and volunteers who have propelled the Mission and its vision of healing children who have experienced trauma onto the national stage. Marley’s Mission provides horse-assisted psychotherapy to children who have experienced trauma. With the help of a dedicated team of professionals and some very special horses, the Mission has provided free care to more than 80 children across six counties in Northeastern Pennsylvania. The vision of Marley’s Mission, developed by April Loposky, program director of the Mission, arose from a story of personal tragedy. She and her family were embraced by this

community, as was her vision for healing children. Now, that embrace and support has extended across the United States. To each of you who have stood behind us, supported this amazing vision and dedicated yourselves to its success, be proud. Be inspired. You have made a difference. Thank you. Gene Talerico President Marley’s Mission Lake Ariel

Storeowners laud Pittston police

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n Sept. 30, at midnight, I received a call that my storefront window was broken. As I live 45 minutes away, I was extremely worried about the safety and condition of my store, Sabatelli’s Market on South Main Street in Pitt-

ston. When my son Jason and I arrived, we were pleased to see the Pittston police and a few neighbors waiting in front of our store until we got there to secure the window and our building. We are fortunate to have such an excellent police force and are so proud to be part of the Greater Pittston community. Rocky, Jane and Jason Sabatelli Sabatelli’s Market Pittston

Janet and Buzz Hyatt Kingston

Caring customers Golf tournament prevent tragedy backers thanked

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y husband, Buzz Hyatt, and I recently celebrated our 60th wedding anniversary with a family dinner at Red Lobster. It was enjoyable and delicious until a scary incident. My husband was unable to breathe. He was choking. He would not be alive today if it were not for several generous and concerned men sitting at nearby tables who rose to my

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n behalf of the Max and Lorraine Foundation, we thank the golfers, hole sponsors and individual donors who made our 18th annual tournament a success. The foundation was formed in memory of Lorraine Button Tracy, who passed away at age 40, and her son Max, who was only 10 years old at the time of

Michael Tracy Dawn Timmeney and Kathleen Button Max and Lorraine Foundation Mountain Top


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LETTERS FROM READERS

Government helped to save the Valley

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

t’s obvious that the Army Corps of Engineers’ Wyoming Valley levee-raising project, plus a reservoir project upstream on the Susquehanna River, saved the Valley from disaster a few weeks ago. Residents need to thank former Congressman Paul Kanjorski for pushing this project through. Instead, the people elected a congressman who belongs to the political party denying global climate change and that apparently thinks the government shouldn’t help people. I doubt the free market would have raised the levees. The return on investment for our tax dollars on the levees was better than any private-sector investment. Plus, this project helped all the people, not only the wealthy. It’s popular for some politicians to complain about “big government,” but only government could have built a project like this that saved thousands of people from utter misery. Look at what happened to some people who

SEND US YOUR OPINION Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification. Letters should be no more than 250 words. We reserve the right to edit and limit writers to one published letter every 30 days. • E-mail: mailbag@timesleader.com • Fax: 570-829-5537 • Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., WilkesBarre, PA 1871 1

weren’t protected by the project. We need to be grateful for this project.

go along with the clique in the primaries and is not going with any clique now. My vote is for Bill James. Joseph James Dallas

Tom Walski Nanticoke

Council candidate is his own man

Boback explains property tax view

uzerne County Council candidate William “Bill” James is not owned by any clique, and he does not “play along to get along.” Remember, voters, approximately eight to 10 years ago, it was Bill James, Steve Flood and Steve Urban who tried to fight against closing the juvenile detention center, which led to the purchase of a new facility and turned into the kids-for-cash incident. Remember that he did not

ecently, The Times Leader published a letter (“Boback’s tax ‘solutions’ only serve to help rich,” Oct. 10) from a Dallas resident who criticized a property tax survey that I sent to the residents of my district. I am very sorry I offended this individual by asking for and caring about the opinions of those I serve; however, it has been and will remain my foremost duty to reflect in Harrisburg the will of the

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residents of the 117th District. That is how democracy in a representative government is supposed to work. School property tax elimination is one of my top priorities because every day I hear from residents asking for this regressive and onerous tax to be abolished. The most heartbreaking stories are those of senior citizens who must decide between purchasing lifesaving medicines or paying their property taxes for fear of being taxed out of their lifelong homes. The cost of education should not fall solely on homeowners, and most homeowners are hardworking middle-class people. Eliminating school property taxes will require a tax shift because funding for public education must come from somewhere. It is easy to say that you want school property taxes to be eliminated; most people would say they would like to see all taxes done away with, but residents must face the reality that the tax will have to be replaced with an alternative. The purpose of the survey was to gauge how citizens would like to see this tax shift handled and to make

them aware of the various taxing options available. Please be advised these options are not my proposals, but they represent existing taxes in the Tax Reform Code. I recently introduced a measure that would go a long way in reducing school property taxes. My House Bill 1870, which I have titled the Marcellus Revenue Sharing Act, would assess a fee on drilling companies (not landowners) based on the gross value of units severed at the wellhead, with 35 percent of the proceeds going to the Property Tax Relief Fund, which is distributed to homeowners in the form of decreased property taxes. The remainder of the fee would be allocated to remediation of the impact of drilling, environmental programs, the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation and institutions of higher learning to research environmental, safety and other issues related to the development of natural gas in this commonwealth. To date, almost 400 residents responded to the property tax survey, and the results will be available on my web-

site, RepBoback.com, in the coming weeks. I welcome residents to visit my site and review the results. I also encourage individuals to contact my office with their opinions about property taxes and any other state matter. I always appreciate the input of those I humbly serve. Karen Boback State representative Harveys Lake

Let parents choose school for children

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ote for the voucher program. I think parents should have the right to send their child to a school of their choice. It gives every child an option and opportunity to attend private or public school, whether he or she is poor, middle class or wealthy. Stop thinking about the teachers’ union and what effect it has, and do the right thing for our children. The parents will choose the best education for their child with the very best of teachers. Berni Smallcomb Fairview Township

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SEND US YOUR OPINION Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification. Letters should be no more than 250 words. We reserve the right to edit and limit writers to one published letter every 30 days. • Email: mailbag@timesleader.com • Fax: 570-829-5537 • Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., WilkesBarre, PA 1871 1

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am a candidate for controller of the city of WilkesBarre. I am a veteran of the U.S. Army and hold a master’s degree in business administration/accounting. I have worked for more than 10 years in nearly every capacity of the accounting field. I have experience as a company controller and am employed as the tax accountant for a large local corporation with international operations. I am writing to share with voters in the upcoming election on Nov. 8 just what the responsibilities of the city controller are. The responsibilities are as follows (per the city’s website): • To examine, audit and verify all books, records and accounts of the various administration and legislative units. • To examine and approve for payment all contracts, purchase orders and other documents by which the city incurs financial obligations. • To audit and approve all bills, invoices, payrolls and other evidence of claims. • To prepare and submit a complete financial report to the city council and the mayor at the end of every fiscal year. I want the voters to be aware of how I intend to execute the responsibilities of the office. If you choose to vote for me: • I am the only candidate who is capable of performing financial audits of the city’s finances. (My opponent cannot.) • I am the only candidate whose services will not require the hiring of outside audit assistance. (My opponent will.) • I am the only candidate who has extensive experience in finance with true, realworld experience. (My opponent does not.) • I am the only candidate who will provide the residents of Wilkes-Barre with the oversight of the city’s finances that

is the duty of the Controller’s Office, using whatever means are available. • I will provide the residents with a full report on the financial status of the city that is honest and open. I chose to run for office because I felt that the residents of Wilkes-Barre deserve an honest and open accounting of the tax dollars they entrust to city leaders to provide them with the services required by the Third Class City Code. Many years ago, as I completed high school, I chose to leave home and serve my country in the U.S. Army. Now I have chosen – with your permission – to serve you. Karen Ceppa Controller candidate Wilkes-Barre

Writer supports James for council

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ext month the voters will elect 11 people to serve on our first Luzerne County Council. There are many good, qualified candidates for whom to vote and who will represent the taxpayers with dedication and honor. Nevertheless, some candidates have the proven abilities to work toward good government. A candidate I’ve had the privilege of working with over the years is Bill James. Bill fearlessly served his country during the Vietnam War and now he is ready to take on the challenge of serving Luzerne County with his courage, good-government skills and selfless commitment. Many people who know Bill know that he is a nononsense guy who has never

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LETTERS FROM READERS

Controller hopeful details credentials

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been one of the “good-old boys,” and never will be, no matter what challenges he might encounter. I am asking you to consider voting for Bill James as one of your chosen candidates in November.

mostly from teachers’ unions, such as the Pennsylvania State Education Association, and from Democrats who are on the receiving end of PSEA campaign contributions. Ironically, Democrats claim to champion the needs of the poor and minorities, two groups that benefit from vouchers. Passage of a school voucher plan is not guaranteed, despite Republican control of the General Assembly. Please call or write your state representatives and senators and urge passage of school vouchers. Ken Skuba Sugarloaf Township

Carolee Medico Olenginski Wright Township

Reader backs school vouchers

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ov. Tom Corbett unveiled school vouchers as part of his education reform plan. He likely will throw his support behind Senate Bill 1, a plan to give vouchers to families in chronically failing school districts. It’s not what many conservatives want, but it’s a start toward a broader program that hopefully will provide vouchers for low- and middle-income families in all school districts. A local radio talk show recently devoted three hours to the issue of school vouchers. The host repeatedly called vouchers “unconstitutional,” violating the separation of church and state. She was misinformed. In a 2002 Cleveland school vouchers case, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that vouchers do not constitute the establishment of religion nor infringe upon the separation of church and state. It was a huge victory for school vouchers. The constitutionality of school vouchers is now settled law, provided the vouchers go directly to families, not schools. Wherever school vouchers have been tried, they have succeeded. Opposition is

Event funding is questioned

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hame on the River Common Chalk Fest organizers for accepting sponsorship money from Chesapeake Energy. About 40 miles upriver, Chesapeake is installing a dam to siphon 2 million gallons of water a day from the Susquehanna River to be used in its natural gas well fracking operations – 2 million gallons a day that will be mixed with toxic chemicals. That is only one of many water extraction places. Chesapeake Energy apparently is throwing around money for events such as this as a public relations scheme to get people to think it really cares about the communities. It only wants to take our gas, then leave the area – just as the coal companies did. It is my understanding that the River Common group’s mission is to educate people about the history and uses of a healthy river. To me, its decision is like having Marlboro cigarettes sponsor a lung cancer event. The Susquehanna River has been deemed the No. 1 endangered river in the country by American Rivers, in large part because of the gas drilling industry. Let’s get a new committee in there that cares about the

health of the river, instead of only getting people in the park to sit on its banks and look at the river. I’d love to volunteer. Scott Cannon Plymouth

Mundy comments called inaccurate

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he devastation from Tropical Storm Lee has left West Pittston in a state of disrepair never before seen and again saddled our beloved residents with financial and emotional burdens. One need only walk the mud-covered streets to witness neighbor helping neighbor recover from this tragedy. West Pittston’s borough officials participated in this effort. Mayor Tony Denisco and Councilman Brian Thornton spent countless hours tending to the needs of their neighbors and constituents. Despite the overwhelmingly positive and devoted efforts of these public servants, there are a select few, including state Rep. Phyllis Mundy, who shamelessly have tried to take political advantage of the vulnerability of this community. Over the past few weeks, many rumors and accusations have been directed at West Pittston borough officials and its building code inspector regarding home inspections performed following the devastating flood. The inaccurate comments made by some individuals require a clarification of what the law requires of the residents and public officials. Under Section 501 of the Pennsylvania Construction Code Act, municipalities are required to adopt the Uniform Construction Code as their municipal building code. In accordance with Section 7210.501(b)(2) of the Pennsylvania Uniform Construction Code, West Pittston, as most other municipalities, elected the state-authorized option to administer and enforce the code by the retention of a third party agency to act on behalf of the municipality

for administration and enforcement of the PCCA. The code also allows for municipalities to enforce their own ordinances that predate the state acts. It has been erroneously suggested by those who should know better that West Pittston inappropriately conferred a monopoly upon Advanced Code Group by allowing it to perform all inspections in the borough. First, other certified and qualified inspectors are not precluded from providing their services to the residents. However, the performance of building code compliance inspections is, by law, the exclusive authority of the third-party agency as an integral aspect of its enforcement authority. It also has been mistakenly rumored that West Pittston has charged inappropriate fees for building code inspections. Wrong again! Shortly after the flood, West Pittston had waived its portion of any building permit and inspection fees. Furthermore, the code does not establish fees for permit applications and inspections. All fees regarding building permits and inspections are set by the third-party agency in each municipality and are made publicly available. It is difficult to take Mundy seriously when she suggests that no permit costs or fees should be charged by contractors and inspectors. Does she really expect these people to work for free? For all her political and self-serving pandering, please know that the residents of this community see through her ill-timed political antics. Shame on you, Phyllis Mundy. Finally, I’d like to thank Congressman Lou Barletta, state Sen. John Yudichak and U.S. Sen. Bob Casey, who showed that they could roll up their sleeves and go to work for the people of West Pittston. Kevin Lescavage Council candidate West Pittston


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difference. Another Romney Web video attacks Perry for a Texas law allowing children of illegal immigrants to pay in-state tuition to attend public universities. It features a clip of former Mexican President Vicente Fox thanking Perry for helping “Mexican migrants” attend college. Businessman Herman Cain’s campaign has produced a Web video promoting his “9-9-9” plan to overhaul the federal income tax system that has become the central message of his candidacy. “Our tax code is the 21st century version of slavery,” Cain says in the spot — a provocative statement from a black candidate. While relatively few people see Web videos — Romney’s most popular one had just 372,000 views on his YouTube channel, and most of the rest didn’t break five figures — campaigns use the spots to attract press coverage, reinforce the candidate’s narrative and drive negative messages about an opponent that might later appear on television. Though voters today get their information from a wealth of

The Perry campaign also produced a hard-hitting Web video criticizing Obama. It pairs the president’s voice with scenes of city graffiti and abandoned homes, then cuts to images of farms, and American flags waving in the breeze intercut with clips of Perry announcing his candidacy. “It’s time to get America working again,” he says, reinforcing his campaign’s signature theme. Romney’s Web videos have focused mainly on criticizing Obama for his handling of the economy, using the slogan “Obama Isn’t Working.” Romney released one of those Thursday, assailing the president on international trade, coinciding with a speech Romney was delivering on trade. But Romney has also gone after Perry. In one video, directed at retiree-rich Florida, Romney highlights Perry’s proposal to let the states take over Social Security. “What could that look like?” the ad asks, suggesting the financial shortfall would be so great in Florida that the state might have to eliminate public education and its prison system to make up the

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sources, TV ads remain a powerful way for a campaign to take its message directly to viewers and bypass the media filter. Still, only a few Republicans will have the resources to go on the air. Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann, who advertised heavily in Iowa before winning the state’s Republican test vote, doesn’t have much cash and hasn’t been on the air since the summer. Gingrich, the former House speaker, and Santorum, the former Pennsylvania senator, lack major funding, too. Cain, a business executive enjoying a recent surge in popularity among conservative voters, also has struggled with fundraising throughout the campaign. Perry’s campaign has raised $17 million since he joined the race last summer, all but guaranteeing he’ll have the financial strength to compete with Romney on television. Romney has not yet released his most recent figures, but his campaign brought in $18 million through the end of June, far outpacing others in the field.

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rent foreign entanglements,” including a gradual drawdown from Afghanistan, and more focus on intelligence gathering and special forces Continued from Page 1E to fight terrorists. In fact, if you read Huntsbut would have huge, negaman’s speech, it doesn’t tive repercussions. (We sound so different from should keep this warning in mind as hysteria rises over an where Obama has arrived alleged Iranian plot to kill the through trial and error. I’ve had big gripes with Obama’s Saudi ambassador to Washforeign policies, but at least ington, an allegation that he’s trying to grapple with Iran experts find bizarre and the requirements of new contrary to Tehran’s opertimes. ational style.) However, Huntsman won’t This, in the end, is what get the nomination. So we’re disturbs me most about Releft with a GOP pack that publican foreign-policy posinsists on American superiorturing: The GOP seems unity and sabre-rattling while able to grasp that the world our country is crumbling has changed and that the internally. From such selfUnited States must adapt. delusion, the next American Huntsman does get it. He century won’t grow. rightly labels the need to “rebuild America’s core” as America’s No. 1 national seTrudy Rubin is a columnist and curity issue: Joblessness (not editorial board member for the to mention failing infrastruc- Philadelphia Inquirer. Readers may ture and education) underwrite to her at: Philadelphia Inquirer, cuts America’s ability to lead. P.O. Box 8263, Philadelphia, PA 19101, And he understands the or by email at trubin@phillynews.com. need to “right-size our cur-

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bate performances. Spokesman Mark Miner won’t say exactly when Perry ads will begin. He will say, “Mitt Romney has more in common with President Obama than he does with Republican primary voters.” Perhaps previewing upcoming ads, the Perry campaign released a scathing Web video earlier this week comparing Romney’s successful push for health care overhaul in Massachusetts to President Barack Obama’s federal health care law, which conservatives deplore. With dramatic music playing in the background, the ad shows a news clip of Romney declaring “I like mandates” and features voice-overs from a news commentator saying “Romney has flip-flopped on so many issues.” Amid the fast-moving images, a message crawls across the screen: “Even the richest man can’t buy back his past.”

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SECTION F SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

AP FILE PHOTO

Eric Stonestreet, left, and Jesse Tyler Ferguson play a gay couple on ABC’s ’Modern Family.’

ABOVE: Jack Bernesky of Plains Township, Dennis Fanucci of Jessup and Jim Cerminero of Scranton perform as ’The Three Tenors’ during a Mostly Opera concert. BELOW: Larry Vojtko sings a solo.

Broadway tunes get a special twist By MARY THERESE BIEBEL

mbiebel@timesleader.com

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ish gotta swim. Birds gotta fly. I’ve gotta …” • If the words “love one man ’til I die” immediately leapt into your head, you’ll likely enjoy “The Best of Broadway,” a revue members of the Mostly Opera company will stage at the Radisson Lackawanna Station Hotel on Friday.

“These are the songs everybody knew from when we were young,” executive director Helene Tinsley said, explaining the dinner-theater program will contain songs from “Showboat,” “Annie Get Your Gun,” “Camelot,” “Oklahoma” and many other musicals.

“They’re the kind of songs, you’ll leave the place humming,” said Jake Wentland of Roaring Brook Township, who has been practicing his solo, “Ol’ Man River.” At 86, Wentland believes he’s the oldest member of the Mostly Opera group. But that’s not the only reason or-

ganizers recruited him to sing about a life filled with commands to “tote that barge” and “lift that bale” along the “Ol’ Man” Mississippi. “He’s a basso profundo, a wonderful bass voice,” musiSee OPERA, Page 4F

IF YOU GO What: ‘The Best of Broadway’ Who: Presented by Mostly Opera When: Hors d’oeuvres and cash bar at 6 p.m. Friday, dinner and show at 7 Where: Radisson Lackawanna Station Hotel, 700 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton Tickets: $55 More info: 570-346-3693

Network gay roles dwindling By FRAZIER MOORE AP Television Writer

NEW YORK — The number of gay and bisexual characters on scripted broadcast network TV has dipped slightly this season to 19 out of nearly 650 roles, according to the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation. The 16th annual “Where We Are on TV” report released recently by GLAAD found that 2.9 percent of actors appearing regularly on primetime network drama and comedy series in the 2011-12 season will portray gay, lesbian or bisexual characters. That’s down from 3 percent in the 2009-10 season and 3.9 percent last season, when there were 23 out of a total of nearly 600 roles. The 2008-09 season saw an increased representation of 2.6 percent. Only five of the 19 gay and lesbian characters this season are nonwhite, GLAAD found. Using information provided by ABC, CBS, Fox, NBC and CW, the group reviewed 91 scripted series announced to air this season. Among broadcast series with gay and bisexual characters, GLAAD cited CBS’ “The Good Wife,” the CW’s “Ringer” and NBC’s “The Playboy Club.” Comedies include ABC’s “Modern Family” and Fox’s “Glee.” Fox leads the networks in gay representation, with eight regular characters out of a total of 117. The number of gay and bisexual characters on cable networks also has fallen slightly, from 35 last season to 29 in the upcoming season. As it did last year, HBO has the greatest number of gay and bisexual characters, with 11 regular and recurring characters. Showtime is close behind with 10. The HBO drama “True Blood” remains among the most inclusive series on television, with six characters, tied with the Showtime series “Shameless,” the group found. Some of TV’s most popular shows “weave story lines about gay and lesbian characters into the fabric of the show,” said GLAAD acting President Mike Thompson. “Americans expect to see the diversity of our country represented in their favorite programs, and that includes gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people.”

MTV says goodbye to Generation X Network switches things up with new TV shows to better suit millennials’ pop culture By MEG JAMES Los Angeles Times

NEW YORK — For MTV, the situation was more than awkward. In fall 2008, the network was bingeing on manufactured reality shows that celebrated wealth and excess just as the country was staggering into a recession. Banks were failing, people were losing their jobs, and college students were facing uncertain futures. But on MTV, the glamorous clique from “The Hills” was indulging in West Hollywood shopping trips and geta-

ways to Cabo San Lucas. And on “My Super Sweet 16,” the parents of a South Carolina beauty queen spent tens of thousands of dollars to give her the perfect birthday party, complete with a baby-blue Hummer. “We needed a total reinvention, a complete overhaul,” Stephen Friedman, MTV’s president, recalled. At the network since1998, Friedman has steered many of MTV’s social and political causes over the years. He assumed day-to-day management of the youth-oriented cable channel just as the economy was sinking and cracks in the network’s program strategy were becoming glaringly apparent. The audience had shifted: The younger portion of the network’s 12-to-34-year-old target audience (those who make up the

millennial generation, born after 1980) exhibited different tastes and sensibilities from the post-baby boom Generation X. MTV had failed to adapt, Friedman believed, because it hadn’t done its homework. So he recruited an unlikely tutor: Nick Shore, a lanky Brit who had built a business with such offbeat assignments as probing the psychology of pain and figuring out the essence of Princess Diana. A mirror of American youth culture for three decades, MTV has to recalibrate regularly to keep pace with the zeitgeist. From round-the-clock music videos, to reality TV pioneer “The Real World,” to the heh-heh-heh of “Beavis and Butt-Head,” and the gotcha of “Punk’d,” MTV continSee MTV, Page 4F

MCT PHOTO

Stephen Friedman, left, is president of MTV, and Nick Shore, right, is head of consumer research.


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HOROSCOPE

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE

10/16/11

BONUS PUZZLE GIVE IT SOME GAS

Gareth Bain

DIAGRAMLESS

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The Sunday Crossword

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis

CRYPTOGRAMS

ARIES (March 21-April 19). You’ll easily match your energy to those around you. It’s not only good manners; it’s also economical for you to do so. You’ll put in the effort that’s needed to be effective — no more, no less. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Your tasks are set before you. The only trouble is that you’re not particularly looking forward to any of them. A wild card in the mix will improve your mood and re-spark your interest. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). You have the best kind of power. It comes from a deep place in the core of who you are. So you don’t have to worry about protecting it to make sure no one steals it. They couldn’t if they tried. CANCER (June 22-July 22). There’s a kind of bottleneck in your life. People are restricting your energy flow because they are trying to direct it in the way that best suits them, not you. Stand up for yourself, and break the bottleneck. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). You’ve been circulating in interesting ways — ways that will be helpful to others, not just you. You will speak plainly and directly on subjects that capture your curiosity, and others will be all ears. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). In the beginning, it is said, was the word. Today you will feel the power of words, especially the ones you choose to say. You will also feel the power of the words you hold back. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). As you promote your interests, you are promoting yourself, as well. People assume that anyone who can present things with such enthusiasm must really have a lot of good going on in their life. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). No one wants to be around a person who brings up his or her insecurities. And yet, there are those who habitually knock others down to get a feeling of superiority. Stick with those who treat their fellows with respect and dignity. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). You’ll be considered for a project. You would do a tremendous job in the role, but you need some guidance about how to best present yourself. Don’t try to do this alone. Give yourself the edge. Preparation will be the factor that determines your success. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Your future is calling you. The thing is, you’re still on the line with the past. Luckily, you have “call waiting.” Hang up the phone with the past. Click over now. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You’ll be torn between tactics. Should you try to fit in with the culture around you, or should you exert your independent spirit? Do both. First blend, and then, at a strategic moment, make your independent move. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). There’s a funny reason why you have to keep going in the direction you are going, but you don’t understand it yet. There’s something good in this: You relate to those in similar circumstances. TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (Oct. 16). You’ll enjoy a series of victories this year. With each win, you’ll build confidence. Your thoughts will shift to empower you. November brings an influx of cash. In January, a sunny new friend will help to elevate your spirit and enrich your daily life. You start the new year with highly productive bursts of creativity. Sagittarius and Virgo people adore you. Your lucky numbers are: 4, 14, 33, 29 and 19.

Puzzle Answers on 3F


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UNIVERSAL SUDOKU

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WONDERWORD

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DEAR ABBY ADVICE

Siblings keep sister away from mom’s funeral Dear Abby: My mother’s family has never been close-knit, but what they did to her was despicable. My grandmother died recently, and not one person in the family called Mom to notify her. We saw it in our paper. No funeral details were mentioned, so we called the mortuary repeatedly only to be told arrangements were “still pending.” Mother tried to contact her sister, but got no response. She called her brother four times. He told her the same thing — the arrangements were pending. Two days later, Mom heard from another relative that her mother had been buried in a private ceremony with only immediate family. Mother called her brother again, and was told it wasn’t true — the arrangements were still pending. The next day, Mom and I went to the cemetery to see if the rumor was true. Imagine our sadness when we found my grandmother’s grave. Mom was heartbroken that she wasn’t able to pay her respects to her own mother. We went to my uncle to break the news to him, thinking he didn’t know, and were shocked when he admitted he had known all along about the arrange-

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1. The Young Cows’ Revolutionary Council cut back milk production until the farmers agreed to reforms and upgrades in grass supplies. It was dubbed the "Lactation Provocation." 2. The chickens were flying around and making a racket, disturbing the farmer. They claimed they were egged on by the roosters. 3. One pig admired a lady pig as she rolled in the mud. "You are so sty-lish," he shouted. 4. Farming pop songs are suddenly hot. "Tweet about my wheat," "All I need is Moo," and "Bye Bye, Sty" are all high on the top forty list. 10/16

HOW TO CONTACT: Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069

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ments, but that Mother’s older sister had instructed him to share no information with Mother. He said his “hands were tied” because she made him promise not to divulge any details to us. Abby, PLEASE tell your readers that no matter how dysfunctional family ties may be, everyone should be able to pay last respects to their own parent. And funeral homes should have the decency to tell callers that funeral arrangements are private rather than lying about it. — Brenda in Texas Dear Brenda: My deepest sympathy to you and your mother for your loss. Regardless of what caused the falling out with her siblings, their behavior was brutal and allowed her no closure. They have made it plain that she should keep her distance, and for her own sake I hope she will. It is obvious who “runs” that family, and further contact will cause your mother only more pain and frustration. Sometimes people have to build their own family, and that’s what I recommend you do. To receive a collection of Abby’s most memorable — and most frequently requested — poems and essays, send a business-sized, selfaddressed envelope, plus check or money order for $3.95 ($4.50 in Canada) to: Dear Abby’s “Keepers,” P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included.)

By Henri Arnold and Mike Argirion


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Continued from Page 1F

cal director Linda Houck said. “He’ll be backed up by the chorus, and it’s amazing to hear what a powerful instrument he still has.” Wentland began singing as a boy of 8 or 9 in the choir of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Scranton. He also sang with the Wyoming Valley Oratorio and the Scranton Singers Guild and, Tinsley said, he won so many prizes at the annual Cynonfardd Eisteddfod competition in Edwardsville that he “bowed out to give others a chance to win.” “We’re all so proud and happy that he’s going to sing with us,” Tinsley said. Members of Mostly Opera are happy to share their love for such comforting songs as “You’ll Never Walk Alone” from “Carousel” and such amusing numbers as “Anything You Can Do (I Can Do Better)” from “Annie Get Your Gun.”

Linda Houck Musical director

But, Tinsley and Houck admit, they have an ulterior motive – they want audience members to be so enchanted by the Broadway tunes in the fall, they’ll decide to attend the group’s more operatic performance in the spring. “We hope when people hear the quality of the voices in our group, they’ll look forward to hearing some more,” Houck said. And, if all the familiar Broadway numbers make you feel like lifting your own voice, rest assured Friday’s event includes an audience sing-along of such favorites as “It’s Almost Like Being in Love” from “Brigadoon” and “Do-Re-Mi” from “The Sound of Music.”

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ually pulls from its programming grab bag, most recently making headlines with “Jersey Shore” and “Teen Mom.” Now the chameleon network is at it again, launching a slate of scripted shows kicked off by “Awkward,” its latest hit, a smart, sweet half-hour comedy that would not have stumbled onto MTV’s schedule three years ago. Early signs are good, as prime-time ratings have climbed by 50 percent from two years ago. “This was a real opportunity to transform MTV once again,” Friedman said. “But we needed to let go of Generation X so we could own the millennials.” Shore, 45, got his start in London ad agencies and then spent 15 years as a marketing consultant in New York, with clients including Coca-Cola, Motorola and FritoLay. He once interviewed a halfdozen dominatrixes to help Johnson & Johnson better understand

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the psychology of pain to market its pain relievers. For Coke, he was charged with defining the qualities of an icon. Lady Diana Spencer had it all: the hair, the vulnerability and the pithy nickname, “Princess Di.” Retooling “something so rich and juicy and iconic as MTV” presented the “ultimate branding challenge,” said Shore, MTV’s senior vice president, strategic insights and research. Other TV networks, including ABC Family and CW, had been quicker to recognize the tastes of the millennial generation. Shows including ABC Family’s “The Secret Life of the American Teenager” were clicking with young viewers in 2008 and 2009 as MTV’s ratings were plunging. MTV faced turf incursions from all sides as the Internet, cell phones and video games commanded more of young adults’ time and focus.

Shore’s strategy has been to bombard MTV executives with interesting nuggets of information. He and his 32-member staff lob research notes about millennials called “M-Bombs,” and occasionally stage M-Days. Millennials were the first to grow up with the Internet, a powerful platform for expression, and they have no qualms about putting it all out for the world to see. “There is a very high premium on self-expression,” said Shore, who has two teenage daughters. “This generation ... can curate their identity through their Facebook profiles and present the best version of themselves to the

world.” “Life amplified,” is MTV’s current slogan. The network is in pursuit of stories that reveal and explore characters’ vulnerabilities. Authenticity, Shore and others say, is a critical component. “About the biggest put-down in the millennial world is to call someone fake,” said Carol Phillips, president of Brand Amplitude, a Michigan consulting firm. “They want to see experiences that feel real.” Snarkiness, the currency of Generation X, doesn’t carry the same appeal, partly, the researchSee MTV, Page 6F

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*The Big Year - PG - 110 min. (1:15), (3:50), 7:15, 9:50 *Footloose - PG13 - 125 min. (12:30), (1:20), (3:40), (4:00), 7:00, 7:20, 9:40, 10:00 *The Thing - R - 115 min. (12:50), (1:20), (3:15), (4:15), 7:10, 7:20, 9:40, 10:10 **The Ides of March - R - 115 min. (1:30), (4:15), 7:30, 10:15 Real Steel - PG13 - 140 min. (1:00), (1:20), (4:00), (4:15), 7:00, 7:20, 10:00, 10:15 (No 7:00 or 10:00 show on Thurs 10/20) Real Steel in DBOX - PG13 - 140 min. (1:20), (4:15), 7:20, 10:15 50/50 - R - 110 min. (1:25), (4:20), 7:25, 10:00 Dream House - PG13 - 120 min. (12:40), (3:10), 7:40, 10:15 What’s Your Number? - R - 120 min. (12:50), 7:30 (No 12:50 show on Sat 10/15; No 7:30 show on Tues 10/18; No 7:30 show on Thurs 10/20) Abduction - PG13 - 120 Min. (3:30), 10:10 (No 3:30 show on Sat 10/15; No 10:10 show on Thurs 10/20) Dolphin Tale - PG - 125 min. (12:30), (3:10), 7:10, 9:45 Moneyball - PG13 - 145 min. (12:45), (3:40), 7:00, 9:55 ***The Lion King in 3D - G - 100 min. (1:10), (3:20), 7:10, 9:20 (No 7:10 show on Thurs 10/20) SPECIAL EVENTS The Metropolitan Opera Live: Anna Bolena Saturday, October 15th at 12:55pm only The Rolling Stones Some Girls Tour: Live in Texas 1978 Tuesday, October 18th at 7:30pm only London’s National Theatre Live: One Man, Two Guvnors Thursday, October 20th at 7:00pm only All Showtimes Include Pre-Feature Content

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 5F

BOOKS ◆ BEST SELLERS

Capturing White House Christmas By TISH WELLS McClatchy Newspapers

“Christmas With the First Ladies: The White House Decorating Tradition from Jacqueline Kennedy to Michelle Obama” by Coleen Christian Burke; Insight Books, San Rafael, Calif. (160 pages, $29.95)

By JOHN BRUMFIELD The Philadelphia Inquirer “On Canaan’s Side” by Sebastian Barry; Viking (256 pages $25.95)

L

illy Bere has decided to end her life after the violent death of her Army veteran grandson, recently returned from the first Gulf War. At 89, after a life whose leitmotif has been unremitting loss, she reasons, “It is only one last bit of life that I undo. Lord, it is nothing, absolutely nothing. A year or two.” • But before doing so, she decides on a final bit of stock-taking — what she refers to as her “strange confession” — that takes the form of 17 daily journal entries of richly detailed, often cinematic, reminiscence that jump cuts with the present and her dwindling number of friends. Stick around, though. This is no self-indulgent apologia, and Irish writer Sebastian Barry makes the fine distinction between sentiment and sentimentality with a deft hand. A reluctant Irish immigrant, Lilly arrives in the United States with her fiance in the 1920s. They’re on the lam from the Irish Republican Army, which has issued a death sentence on her man for being part of the hated Black and Tans, whose royal mandate was to suppress Irish revolution. Finding no kin in New York, they play out their days and nights living vigilantly in Chicago, where both the real and imagined shadows of IRA sympathizers loom constantly. A friendship with the not-yet-famous Armenian immigrant painter Arshile Gorky leads dramatically to one of the first of Lilly’s many losses — one that will chime chillingly with another toward the end of this fine novel. And it means Lilly must be on the move again. The kindness of strangers leads to better luck than that of distant relatives as Lilly’s peregrinations take her eastward to Cleveland, where she marries, is abandoned by her husband, and has a

child. She then moves to Washington, D.C., and finally to Long Island, where she finds her niche and her nest cooking meals for a wealthy Irish American family. She would remain there for the duration of her long life and form a bond with her loving but no-nonsense employer that allowed her the security so elusive in her earlier immigrant years. While the theme of loss is ever present, the overall tone of the book is far from morose. The sheer liveliness of Barry’s writing, his sure handling of the wide variety of characters and their dialogue, and the resilient Lilly herself all ensure that the novel doesn’t bog down in her sorrows. With all the quiet interiority and the equanimity with which events are recalled here, it’s easy to overlook how exciting those events were. The “plot” is full of surprises — many shocking. War, single parenthood, betrayal, unexpected acts of compassion, death too early — or in at least one case, too late — and race relations are all threads in the tapestry of Lilly’s life. Accommodations must be made at every turn and Lilly makes them, all the while maintaining her own moral poise.

“Christmas With the First Ladies” is an attractive addition to the plethora of books on White House history. Drawingonthematerialsfrompresidential libraries, Coleen Christian Burke has delved into history to put a human face on presidential Christmases as presented by our presidents and their wives. It starts in1961with the first administrationofJohnF.Kennedy,whenJacqueline Kennedy — better known to most as Jackie — put together her first Christmas in the White House. She was known for her sophistication and international experience, which was reflected in her Christmas gifts. As earlyasSeptember,“alettertotheU.S. embassy in Paris indicates beautiful Chanelchiffonscarveswerefoundand purchased for Mrs. Kennedy to give as presents.” Oneofthegreatdelightsincludedin the book are personal pictures gathered from presidential archives. Here at the private family Christmas in Florida, Jackie is not the glamorous first lady but a harassed young mother, dressed in a deep pink pajamas — and pearls — dealing with two lively children on Christmas morning. Each first lady brings her own human touches to the White House. In the hard times of 1975, Betty Ford’s “Patchwork Christmas” trees were adorned with handmade decorations, done to be thrifty. Unfortunately, at the end they were more “expensive thantheChristmasdecorations”ofthe first ladies who preceded it. In contrast,11years later, Nancy Reagan showed the country trees dripping with silver tinsel, fake snow and white lights during the “Christmas Special at the White House.” In 1983, she sat on the lap of gold-chain-festooned “The A-Team” star Mr. T — dressed as Santa Claus — who distributed gifts. Another touch in “Christmas With the First Ladies” is a page dedicated to each first lady, with a favorite recipe or decoration. Lady Bird Johnson gave us a Christmas cranberry salad mold, to be used “whenever you serve chicken or turkey.” Rosalynn Carter made inexpensiveornamentsoutofsmallconebirthday hats. After stuffing them with peanuts, gum drops and candy canes, she hung them on lace ribbons amid hundreds of white crocheted stars. “Christmas” covers everything from the history of the White House crèche to the gingerbread house, which every family gives its own touch. The result is a book rich with holiday spirit that brings the White House to life.

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CMYK PAGE 6F

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

The best days in the orchard I

By ADRIAN HIGGINS The Washington Post

f you want to get a feel for the life, history and terrain of the Middle Atlantic, head north or west, to the foothills of the Appalachians and to the apple orchards that are enjoying their season. • The boughs are heavy with a fruit whose sweettart flavor seems to capture the essence of the landscape. I was indulging in this moment the other day, chewing on crisp apple slices as I took in the rolling pastures and hedgerows of eastern Pennsylvaniaandthepaleandstreakyskiesabovetheredbarns and gray silos.

An organically grown Liberty apple is ready for picking at the third annual Organic Apple Festival at the Rodale Institute near Kutztown.

InthePiedmontfromPennsylvania to Virginia and beyond, the apple has provided sustenance and comfort for generations of orchardistsandtheircustomers.Inthesupermarket, apples arrive yearround from other hemispheres; still, the local orchard and its season remain iconic. It is hard to gauge the regional apples’ better moment: the current harvest or the spring blaze of blossom. I remember driving one April past a large orchard and being overwhelmed by the geometric beauty ofhundredsoftreesinrankandfile, smothered in bloom. If I had stopped, I would have found the blush-pink flowers attendedbythousandsofhoneybees. The fruits of their labor could be found earlier this month in a 1,000tree orchard on the side of a hill in Berks County. I had driven to the third annual Organic Apple Festival put on by the Rodale Institute, the nonprofit group dedicated to advancing the cause and science of organic gardening and farming. Its 333 acres include pastures, crops and demonstration gardens, but it was to the hill above the stone and red-timber barn that I was drawn. The trees, planted in blocks of 25, are now probably 15 feet high and half that across, even with a regimen of winter pruning. “We haven’t fertilized in 20 years. Pruning is a big problem,” said Jeff Moyer, the farm director, who has

worked in these fields since 1976. The rural life seems to have served him as well: He has glowing complexion and walks briskly, with a coiled stride. Moyer,naturally,isabigfanoforganic methods of cultivation: Rodale’s publishing arm puts out Organic Gardening magazine, and thewholeenterpriseisnamedafter J.I. Rodale, the champion of organic gardening in the postwar years of better living through chemistry. Moyer and other disciples of the creed will tell you this: Organic gardening isn’t so much about replacing synthetic pesticides with natural ones as it is building soil life so plants are inherently healthier. That said, raising apples organically is a challenge. It’s a fruit beloved bybothpestsanddiseases.Themajor diseases include fire blight, which kills branches, and apple scab, which disfigures the fruit. The pests are legion, and a major culprit is the plum curculio, a weevil that pierces the young fruit and causes it to distort as it grows. In the Rodale orchard, the gardenerschoseLibertyandtwoother unnamedbutsimilarvarietiesfrom the venerable breeding program at Cornell’s Geneva Experiment Station in New York. The three varieties were bred for scabresistancebutstillneedalotof intervention. One strategy is to allow wildflowers to grow beneath the trees. This draws wasps and

otherinsectsthatpreyonthepests. The gardeners also rely on pheromone lures, which confuse pests and stop them from mating. It’s an approach that requires knowledge of not only what insect to target, but when. “In an organic system, it doesn’t mean no management,” Moyer said. “It means more intensive management.” Much of the fruit has a chalky bloom on it from the sprays of kaolin. By covering the fruit in this white clay, you minimize the pest damage.“Itwouldbelikeyougoing through six inches of chalk to get to your blueberry pie,” he said. Much of the fruit remains blemished, but that didn’t stop hordes of people braving a drizzly Saturday to gather the crop. To see many families with young children was heartening. The kids carried the bushelbasketsandclimbedintrees to pick the fruit. The apple harvest

becomes a formative experience to a new generation. And in this season of tree planting, what about planting apple trees in your yard for future harvest? Choose varieties that you like, are hard to find and resist disease. Plant at least two trees for good fruiting and think about the rootstock and ultimate size. Semidwarf stock will give you 15-foot trees, dwarf rootstock a more manageable 10 feet. I have no more room for apple trees, but if I were planting more, I would plant varieties of apples that hold up to baking, given the dearth of superior culinary apples in the marketplace. Phillip Baugher of Adams County Nursery in Aspers, near Gettysburg,recommendsanumberofdisease-resistant varieties bred with the home gardener in mind. In addition to Liberty, he suggests Pris-

tine, Crimson Crisp, Crimson Gold, Crimson Topaz and Gold Rush. The nursery (717-677-8105) is taking orders now but won’t ship until the spring. Appletreesaremorefussthanan ornamental such as redbud or dogwood, but why not go to the extra effort to have a pretty tree that not only marks the seasons but feeds the household? As Moyer says: “I tell everybody, ‘Just grow somethingyou’regoingtoeat.Itwillhelp you form a relationship with your food that you never had before.’ ” Andmorethananyotherplantin the garden, the apple tells a compelling story. Liberty counts as one of its parents the apple Macoun, itself the result of breeding at Geneva: Its parents are Jersey Black, now lost to cultivation, and the McIntosh, still very much with us. I grow McIntosh and love its spicy flavor. It is named for John McIn-

MTV

nant,” and in December it added “Teen Mom” and “Jersey Shore,” two gritty reality shows that were a dramatic pivot from the sundrenched escapism of “The Hills.” The series reversed MTV’s ratings slide and landed the network back on the cultural map. “Jersey Shore,” with its over-thetop partying and fighting, is partly a story about the search for love and acceptance — eternal themes for youth. And the show even gives an occasional shout-out to the unit most important to millennials: their families. “The characters themselves have become something of a family, and their moms and dads have been part of the show,” said Van Toffler, president of the MTV Networks Music and Logo Group.

“Before our evolution you would not have seen parents on MTV.” Now MTV is rolling out a new slate of shows, both scripted and reality, that hopes to speak to millennials in their own language. While it fell short with “Skins” and “The Hard Times of R.J. Berger,” MTV scored with “Awkward,” which debuted in July. MTV’s millennial mantra that “smart and funny is the new rock and roll” applies to the irreverent comedy. “Awkward” centers on 15-year-old Jenna Hamilton (Ashley Rickards), a witty nerd who is invisible at school until a freak accident, which everyone assumes is a suicide attempt (it wasn’t), makes her suddenly notorious. The quest for genuine voices is seeping into new reality offerings

too. On Oct. 11, MTV launches a documentary-styled program, “Chelsea Settles.” The show’s 23year-old heroine, Chelsea Settles, struggles with a tough decision: stay in small-town Pennsylvania with her seriously ill mother or move to Los Angeles to work in the fashion industry. Unlike the rail-thin blonds who populated MTV three years ago, Settles is black and weighs 324 pounds. Two scripted shows scheduled for next year revolve around millennial themes. The Doug Limanproduced “I Just Want My Pants Back” is about a group of 20somethings in Brooklyn navigating relationships, based on a novel by David J. Rosen. And MTV will introduce “Underemployed,”

a comedic stab at one of the biggest challenges facing young adults: overcoming the weak economy. Along with helping MTV find a new pop-cultural relevancy, the focus on what Shore calls “radical audience intimacy” is paying dividends. The network just ended its seventh consecutive quarter of year-to-year ratings growth. According to the Nielsen Co., nearly 1.2-million people on average watched MTV during prime time in 2011.

Continued from Page 4F

ers said, because millennials experienced a less hierarchical upbringing than did Gen Xers. Parents of millennials assumed the role of life coach or friend, a phenomenon called “peerenting.” “Millennials come from families that are more democratic and worlds spin around the kids,” Shore said. “This has created kids who have a sense of power, a sense of voice and kids who need to be listened to.” MTV already was overhauling its programming in 2009 when Shore came on board. That summer it had launched “16 and Preg-

ADRIAN HIGGINS PHOTOS/WASHINGTON POST

Adrian Lee, 3, of Orefield helps with the harvest as he rides in a wagon through the organic orchard near Kutztown. It’s hard to gauge the regional apples’ better moment: the current harvest or the spring blaze of blossom.

tosh, the son of Scottish immigrants who moved to Ontario from New York after the War of Independence. He found it as a seedling as he was clearing land on his farm, and he came to call it the Red McIntosh. His son recognized its value and began propagating it commercially. The original tree died off in 1908,sufferingfromanearbyhouse fire, but its scions were spread wide and far by then. Thus, the apple’s story is woven intoours.IntheBible,theapplegot us off to a bad start. Spend some time in an orchard at this time of year, and you have to believe the Creator has forgiven us a little. Mail order trees are also available from Stark Bros. (www.starkbros.com, 800-325-4180) and Miller Nurseries (www.millernurseries.com, 800-836-9630).

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#P14479, 5.7L V8 Hemi, Utility Cap, Power Windows/Locks, Tow Pkg

#S1790A, Alloy Wheels, Manual Trans., CD, Power Windows/Locks

22,650

$

13,588

$

*

*

*

21,999

$

*

22” GM Wheels, Navigation, Leather, Sunroof, All The Goodies!

33,799

$

*

24,998*

$

#S1795A, XLT Pkg, Automatic, CD, Alloy Wheels

14,770*

$

* 2.49% Based on 60 months. Must be approved under program guidelines. Tax & Tags Additional. Artwork for illustration purposes only. Not responsible for typographical errors. ** See Salesperson for complete details. ***Based on 3 Month District Avg from Suzuki Survey Statistics.

PRE-OWNED

CLOSE TO EVERYWHERE WE’RE EASY TO FIND JUST OFF EXIT 175 RTE I-81 • PITTSTON

KEN SUPER CENTER POLLOCK 339 HWY 315, PITTSTON, PA AT Ken Pollockk

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

1-800-223-1111

www.kenpollocksuzuki.com

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

Hours M-F 9-8pm Sat 9-5pm

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

2012 CHEVY IMPALA LS

BONNERCHEVROLET.COM 694 WYOMING AVE., KINGSTON 287-2117

349* /Mo.

$ Chevy Runs Deep

Purchase w/ Up To $4000 in Rebates

39 month lease

12k miles per year $2900 Cash Down

*Prices plus tax & tags, Lease payment is plus tax. Not responsible for typographical errors.


PAGE 2G 135

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

Legals/ Public Notices

LEGAL NOTICE DEADLINES Saturday 12:30 on Friday Sunday 4:00 pm on Friday Monday 4:30 pm on Friday Tuesday 4:00 pm on Monday Wednesday 4:00 pm on Tuesday Thursday 4:00 pm on Wednesday

150 Special Notices

ALL JUNK CAR & TRUCKS WANTED Highest Prices Paid!!! FREE REMOVAL Call V&G Anytime 288-8995

MONTY SAYS

Holidays call for deadlines

mpeznowski@ timesleader.com or fax to 570-831-7312 or mail to The Times Leader 15 N. Main Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 For additional information or questions regarding legal notices you may call Marti Peznowski at 570-970-7371 or 570-829-7130 PUBLIC NOTICE Change of Meeting Date. Notice is hereby given that the Northwest Area School District Board of Education has changed the date of the previously scheduled board meeting for the month of November and is now as follows: Wednesday, November 9, 2011 regular monthly meeting.The meeting will be held in the high school library and is scheduled to begin at 7:00 P.M.

150 Special Notices ADOPT: Adoring Mom, Dad, Big Brother would like to share a lifetime of hugs & kisses in our loving home with a newborn. Please Call Lynda & Dennis 888-688-1422 Expenses Paid

ADOPTION

Adoring couple longs to adopt newborn. Secure endless love awaits your baby. Kelly and Joe 800-551-3297 Expenses Paid

Congratulations to Amanda & Justin who just celebrated their Oyster Wedding on September 24th 2011! bridezella.net

468

Auto Parts

Thank you Karen B. For all about the great magazines and books. This women is a library!

PAYING $500 MINIMUM DRIVEN IN

Full size 4 wheel drive trucks

ALSO PAYING TOP $$$

for heavy equipment, backhoes, dump trucks, bull dozers HAPPY TRAILS TRUCK SALES 570-760-2035 542-2277 6am to 8pm

CHILD CARE

FOR FLOOD VICTIMS

A student of PA Leadership Charter School and member of Independent Bible Church of Duryea will be providing simple babysitting services, lunch, homework help and Bible lesson for children ages 4 - 3rd grade for Duryea families affected by the flood at no cost. Saturdays through October 29th at the Independent Bible Church of Duryea 10am-2pm. For more information call Elyse at 570-540-5757

409

Autos under $5000

DODGE `95 DAKOTA 2WD V6. Regular

Cab/6Ft. 5 speed. 113,000 miles. Runs like a champ. Needs some work. $1,400. 570-814-1255

360

380

FORD ‘01 FOCUS

113K, 4 door, new inspection. $3995

FORD ‘99 ESCORT STATION WAGON

One owner, 91k, new inspection. $3495

FORD ‘99 TAURUS

93K, 4 door, new inspection. $3195

GMC4WD, ‘96 JIMMY SLE Hunter Green, 4 door, CD, 168,000 miles. $2,100 obo. (570) 262-7550

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! HAWK 2011 UTILITY ATV

406

310

ATVs/Dune Buggies

Attorney Services

Collect Cash. Not Dust. Sell it in The Times Leader Classified section.

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

Call 829-7130 to place an ad. ONLY ONL NL LY ONE N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER. timesleader.com

468

Auto Parts

AS ALWAYS ****HIGHEST PRICES***** PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED VEHICLES!!! DRIVE IN PRICES Call for Details (570) 459-9901 Vehicles must be COMPLETE !!

Plus Enter to Win $500.00 Cash!! DRAWING TO BE HELD OCTOBER 31 www.wegotused.com

150 Special Notices

Octagon Family Restaurant

375 W Main St, Plymouth, PA 18651 570-779-2288

Saturday & Sunday,

NEW!! Full size adult ATV. Strong 4 stroke motor. CVT fully automatic transmission with reverse. Electric start. Front & rear luggage racks. Long travel suspension. Disc brakes. Dual stage head lights. Perfect for hunters & trail riders alike. BRAND NEW & READY TO RIDE. $1,695 takes it away. 386-334-7448 Wilkes-Barre

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

SATURN `04 VUE 65K, Auto, Loaded.

Needs transmission/airbags. Book value $10,000. Sell $3,000 or best offer (570) 829-2875 (570) 332-1252

HONDA`09 RECON

TRX 250CC/Electric shift. Like New. REDUCED $3,650. (570) 814-2554

409

Autos under $5000

CADILLAC `94 DEVILLE SEDAN

94,000 miles, automatic, front wheel drive, 4 door, air conditioning, air bags, all power, cruise control, leather interior, $3,300. 570-394-9004

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

CADILLAC ‘03 DeVille. Excellent

shape, all leather. $4650. BUICK ‘03 Century. Great shape $3400 570-819-3140 570-709-5677

CHEVROLET `04 CAVALIER 1 owner, non smok-

TOYOTA ‘01 CAMRY 104k, new inspection, 4 door. $4995.

Find that new job. The Times Leader Classified section.

er. NICER THAN NEW - gotta see it! Super clean, well taken care of!! $4,500. OBO (570) 406-4419

08 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT silver 5 speed 4x4 08 CADILLAC ESCALADE Blk/Blk leather, 3rd seat, Navgtn, 4x4 07 FORD ESCAPE XLT green/tan lint 4x4 07 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT Blue grey leather, 7 passenger mini van 06 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER LS V6 4 X 4 06 MITSUBISHI ENDEAVOR XLS, Blue auto, V6, awd 06 PONTIAC TORRANT Black (AWD) 06 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN ES, red, 4dr, entrtnmt cntr, 7 pass mini van 05 ISUZU RODEO silver, auito 4x4 05 EXPLORER XLT WHITE, AUTO, 4X4 05 FORD F150 XLT SUPER CREW TRUCK Blue & tan, 4 dr. 4x4 05 FORD ESCAPE XLT Silver 4 x4 05 BUICK RANIER CXL gold, tan, leather, sunroof (AWD) 05 GMC SIERRA X-Cab, blk, auto, 4x4 truck 04 CHEVY TAHOE LS grey, 3rd seat 4x4 04 FORD EXPEDITION Eddie Bauer, white & tan, tan leather, 3rd seat, 4x4 04 FORD EXPLORER LTD pearl white, black leather, 3rd seat 4x4 04 CHEVY SUBURBAN LS, pewter silver, 3rd seat, 4x4 03 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER grey, auto, 4x4 03 FORD WINDSTAR LX green 4 door, 7 passenger mini van 02 BUICK RENDEXZVOUS CXL, blue 3rd Seat, FWD 02 BUICK RENDEZVOUS Burgundy AWD 02 CHEVY 2500 HD Reg. Cab. pickup truck, green, auto, 4x4 01 HYUNDAI SANTE FE GLS silver, auto AWD 01 FORD F150 XLT Super Cab 4x4 truck, white & tan 00 CHEVY BLAZER LT Black & brown, brown leather 4x4 00 FORD EXPEDITION XLT, white, 3rd seat, 4x400 00 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO XCAB

2wd truck, burgundy & tan 00 GRAND CARAVAN SPORT, dark blue, 4 door, 7 pass mini van 98 FORD EXPLORER Eddie Bauer, white, tan leather, sunropof, 4x4 98 EXPLORER XLT Blue grey leather, sunroof, 4x4 97 DODGE RAM 1500

ACURA `06 TL

4 Door 3.2 VTEC 6 Cylinder engine Auto with slapstick. Navigation system. 57k miles. Black with Camel Leather interior. Heated Seats. Sun Roof, Excellent condition. Satellite Radio, Fully loaded. $18,000. 570-814-2501

CHEVY ‘03 CAVALIER

One owner, 98k, new inspection, 4 door. $5495

Call 829-7130 to place an employment ad.

Available for all types of services to help create more time in your day throughout the year.

Professional & Reliable

SUVS, VANS, TRUCKS, 4 X4’s

5 speed, $5,600 570-239-9316

Home of the Original ‘O-Bar’ Pizza

Contact Monica at 570-328-2074.

blue, auto V6 07 CHRYSLER 300 LTD AWD silver, grey leather 06 PONTIAC G6 Silver, 4 door auto 06 DODGE STRATUS SXT RED. 05 CHEVY IMPALA LS Burgundy tan leather, sunroof 05 TOYOTA CAMRY XLE silver, grey leather, sunroof 05 VW NEW JETTA gray, auto, 4 cyl 05 CHEVY MALIBU Maxx White, grey leather, sunroof 04 NISSAN ALTIMA SL 3.5 white, black leather, sun roof 03 CADILLAC SEDAN Pearl white, tan leather, 73k miles 03 AUDI S8 QUATTRO Mid blue/light grey leather, Navigation, (AWD) 02 BUICK PARK AVE Silver, V6 01 SATURN LS 300 Blue 01 VOLVO V70 STATION WAGON, blue/grey, leather, AWD 99 CHRYSLER CONCORDE gold 98 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS black 98 SUBARU LEGACY SW white, auto, 4 cyl. (AWD) 98 HONDA CIVIC EX, 2 dr, auto, silver

ACURA `02 RSX 142,000 miles,

Large Pie $6.95

References & rates available upon request.

Call Our Auto Credit Hot Line to get Pre-approved for a Car Loan!

red, auto, 4 x 4

One coupon per party. In house only.

Hire a PERSONAL ASSISTANT to take care of all of the things on your holiday to-do list. Take the stress away, enjoy your holidays and allow me to do services such as: SHOPPING Gifts * Groceries ERRANDS Dry cleaning * Package delivery * Pharmacy GIFT WRAPPING Invitations * Thank you’s * Party supplies

GOOD CREDIT, BAD CREDIT, NO CREDIT

XCAB TRUCK

Oct 15th & 16th Special

GIVE YOURSELF THE GIFT OF TIME THIS HOLIDAY SEASON….

1009 Penn Ave Scranton 18509 Across from Scranton Prep

PRIX SE

NY GIANTS FOOTBALL vs Bills 10/16

itsthejobsstupid.com Read the Book

343-1959

www.acmecarsales.net

Travel

vs Dolphins 10/30 vs Eagles 11/20 vs Packers 12/4 1-800-432-8069

ACME AUTO SALES

11 AUDI S5 QUATTRO CONVERTIBLE Sprint blue/black & tan leather, 7 speed, auto turbo, 330 HP, Navigation, (AWD) 08 PONTIAC GRAND

Instruction & Training

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical *Business *Paralegal* Computers *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-220-3984 www. CenturaOnline.com

412 Autos for Sale

800-825-1609

DAYCARE

SEIZE THE POWER See

Harry’s U Pull It

150 Special Notices

Child Care

in my Kingston home. Licensed. Accepting Lackawanna & Luzerne CCC. 570-283-0336

Friday 4:00 pm on Thursday

You may email your notices to

330

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

CHEVY ‘98 CAVALIER

One owner, 75k, new inspection, 2 door. $3495

ONLY ONL NLY ONE N LE LEA LEADER. E DER. timesleader.com

AUDI `01 A6 QUATTRO

123,000 miles, 4.2 liter V8, 300hp, silver with black leather,heated steering wheel, new run flat tires, 17” rims, 22 mpg, German mechanic owned. $7,500. OBO. 570-822-6785

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

AUDI `04 A6 QUATTRO

CHEVROLET `00 CORVETTE

CROSSROAD MOTORS

3.0 V6. Silver. New tires & brakes. 130k highway miles. Leather interior. Heated Seats. $7,500 or best offer. 570-905-5544

AUDI `05 A4 1.8T Cabriolet Convert-

ible S-Line. 52K miles. Auto. All options. Silver. Leather interior. New tires. Must sell. $17,500 or best offer 570-954-6060

AUDI `05 A6

3.2 Quattro AT6. Auto tiptronic 6 speed. Black with black leather. Garage kept. Fully loaded, gps, cold weather package. 78K miles. Asking $17,400. Call 570-814-6714

AUDI `96 QUATTRO

A6 station wagon. 143k miles. 3rd row seating. $2,800 or best offer. Call 570-861-0202

BMW `01 X5

4.4i. Silver, fully loaded, tan leather interior. 1 owner. 103k miles. $8,999 or best offer. Call 570-814-3666

BMW `07 328xi

Black with black interior. Heated seats. Back up & navigation systems. New tires & brakes. Sunroof. Garage kept. Many extras! 46,000 Miles. Asking $20,500. 570-825-8888 or 626-297-0155 Call Anytime!

BMW `99 M3

Convertible with Hard Top. AM/FM. 6 disc CD. 117 K miles. Stage 2 Dinan suspension. Cross drilled rotors. Cold air intake. All maintenance records available. $13,000 OBO. 570-466-2630

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

BMW ‘04 325 XI White. Fully

loaded. 120k miles. $10,500 or best offer. 570-454-3287

Rare, Exclusive Opportunity To Own...

2002 BMW 745i

The Flagship of the Fleet New - $87,000 Midnight Emerald with beige leather interior. 61K miles. Mint condition. Loaded. Garage Kept. Navigation Stunning, Must Sell! $20,000 $18,600

‘26 FORD MODEL T Panel Delivery

100 point Concours quality restoration. Red with black fenders. Never Driven. 0 miles on restoration. RARE! $40,000 $38,000 $36,500

1954 MERCURY MONTEREY WOODY WAGON 100 point restoration. $130,000 invested. 6.0 Vortec engine. 300 miles on restoration. Custom paint by Foose Automotive. Power windows, a/c, and much more! Gorgeous Automobile! $75,000 $71,000 $69,900

From an Exotic, Private Collection

Call 570-650-0278

BUICK `05 LESABRE Garage kept. 1 owner. Local driving, very good condition. 53,500 miles. Asking $9,700 (570) 457-6414 leave message

CADILLAC `04 SEVILLE SLS Beige. Fully loaded

Excellent condition. Runs great. New rotors, new brakes. Just serviced. 108,000 miles. Asking $5,000. OR BEST OFFER (570) 709-8492

CADILLAC ‘06 STS

AWD, 6 cylinder, Silver, 55,000 miles, sunroof, heated seats, Bose sound system, 6 CD changer, satellite radio, Onstar, parking assist, remote keyless entry, electronic keyless ignition, & more! $16,500 570-881-2775

Motorcycle for sale? Let them see it here in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

V-8. 5.7 liter. 345 Horse Power. Automatic. 56,000 miles. Pewter metallic. Hatch Back. Glass top. Air conditioning. Leather interior. Power seat, locks & windows. Bose AM/FM stereo. Cassette/CD Player. Very good to excellent condition. $17,500 SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY

(570) 696-0424

CHEVROLET `03 IMPALA 97,000 miles, $3,300. 570-592-4522 570-592-4994

CHEVROLET `04 CORVETTE COUPE Torch red with

black and red interior. 9,700 miles, auto, HUD, removable glass roof, polished wheels, memory package, Bose stereo and twilight lighting, factory body moldings, traction control, ABS, Garage kept - Like New. $25,900 (570) 609-5282

CHEVROLET `86 CORVETTE 4x3 manual, 3 overdrive, 350 engine with aluminum heads. LT-1 exhaust system. White with red pearls. Custom flames in flake. New tires & hubs. 1 owner. 61,000 original miles. $8,500 (570) 359-3296 Ask for Les

CHEVROLET `88 MONTE CARLO SS V8, automatic,

51,267 miles, MUST SELL $3,900 (570) 760-0511

CHEVROLET ‘06 CORVETTE CONVERTIBLE

Silver beauty, 1 Owner, Museum quality. 4,900 miles, 6 speed. All possible options including Navigation, Power top. New, paid $62,000 Must sell $45,900 570-299-9370

CHEVY `07 AVEO LT Power window/door locks. Keyless entry. Sunroof. A/C. Black with tan leather interior. 22,000 original miles. AM/FM/CD. New tires. $12,000 (570) 287-0815

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

CHEVY `96 CAVALIER

2 door, runs good and looks good. $1,950. Call 570-407-1134

CHEVY ‘04 BLAZER LS 4WD. Clean. Low Miles! $6,190.

MARSH MOTORS 1218 Main St. Swoyersville, PA 570-718-6992 Buy-Sell-Trade

CHRYSLER `04 SEBRING

570-825-7988

700 Sans Souci Highway WE SELL FOR LESS!! ‘09 DODGE CALIBER SXT 2.0 Automatic, 24k Factory Warranty! $12,699 ‘08 HONDA RIDGELINE RTL 32K, Factory Warranty, Leather Sunroof. Wholesale Price........ $22,999 08 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4 34K, Red $15,399 ‘08 SUBARU Special Edition 42k, 5 speed, AWD. Factory warranty. $13,899 ‘08 CHRYSLER SEBRING CONVERTIBLE 4 cylinder, 40k $11,899 ‘08 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 4x4, Regular Cab, 63K, Factory Warranty $13,699 ‘08 CHEVY IMPALA LS 4 door, only 37K! 5 Yr. 100K factory warranty $12,299 ‘08 CHEVY IMPALA LS 60k. Factory warranty. $10,399 ‘05 HONDA CRV EX One owner, just traded, 65k $13,499 ‘01 LINCOLN TOWN CAR Executive 74K $5,899 ‘08 CHRYSLER SEBRING CONVERTIBLE Touring. White & Gray. Only 27K. $15,299 ‘08 CHEVY IMPALA LS Only 18K! One Owner - Estate Sale. $14,899 TITLE TAGS FULL NOTARY SERVICE 6 M ONTH WARRANTY

DODGE `06 STRATUS

Only 55K. Brand new tires, plugs, wires, oil. Excellent Condition. $6,995 (570) 562-1963

DODGE `97 INTREPID

Red. 103,000 miles. AM/FM/Cassette. Good tires. Clean interior. Runs excellent, good reliable transportation. Inspection good until April 2012. $3,000 Price Negotiable (570) 674-5655

EAGLE `95 TALON

Only 97,000 Miles. Full custom body kit, dark green metallic with gray interior. Dual exhaust, 4 coil over adjustable struts. All new brakes, air intake kit, strut brakes, custom seats, custom white gauges, 2 pillar gauges, new stereo, alarm, custom side view mirrors. 4 cylinder automatic, runs excellent. $8,500. Call 570-876-1355 or 570-504-8540 (evenings)

FORD `08 ESCAPE

Call 829-7130 To Place Your Ad

DIVORCE No Fault $295 divorce295.com Atty. Kurlancheek 800-324-9748 W-B

Sell your own home! Place an ad HERE 570-829-7130

FORD ‘06 ESCAPE XLS 4WD. Alloy

wheels. DVD player. $8,190.

MARSH MOTORS 1218 Main St. Swoyersville, PA 570-718-6992 Buy-Sell-Trade

GEO `93 PRIZM

91,000 miles. Looks & runs like new. $2,300 or best offer, please call 570-702-6023

310

Attorney Services

Free Bankruptcy Consultation Payment plans. Carol Baltimore 570-822-1959

FREE CONSULTATION

for all legal matters Attorney Ron Wilson 570-822-2345 SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY Free Consultation. Contact Atty. Sherry Dalessandro 570-823-9006

Power windows. Power locks. Alloy wheels. $10,490

MARSH MOTORS 1218 Main St. Swoyersville, PA 570-718-6992 Buy-Sell-Trade

JAGUAR `00 S TYPE

4 door sedan. Like new condition. Brilliant blue exterior with beige hides. Car is fully equipped with navigation system, V-8, automatic, climate control AC, alarm system, AM/FM 6 disc CD, garage door opener. 42,000 original miles. $9,750 Call (570) 288-6009

JAGUAR `98 XK8

Convertible. 40k miles. Great condition. Silver with black interior. Garage kept. Recently inspected. V8/auto/ AC. AM/FM / 6 disc. $12,000 or best offer. 570-310-1287

KIA `08 RONDO

HONDA `05 ACCORD EXL. Titanium exteri-

Maroon with beige interior. All options. 78,000 miles. Still under warranty. Received 60,000 mile servicing. New tires. KBB Value $8,500. Asking only $7,900. A Must See! (570) 457-0553

HONDA `07 ACCORD V6 EXL. 77K miles. 1

Excellent condition, garage kept, 1 owner. Must see. Low mileage, 90K. Leather interior. All power. GPS navigation, moon roof, cd changer. Loaded. $9,000 or best offer. 570-706-6156

or, grey leather interior. Dual Airbags. ABS. Bucket Seats. CD changer. Cruise. Fog lights. GPS. All power. A/C. 104k. Sunroof / moonroof. $9,500. Please Call 570-814-0949

owner with maintenance records. Slate blue with leather interior. Sunroof. Asking $12,500. Call 570-239-2556

HONDAS

‘08 Accord LX-P 15K miles. Gray. Reduced! $17,200 ‘08 Accord LX-P 42K. Burgundy. Reduced! $16,500 ‘08 Accord LX 34K. Silver. Reduced! $15,200 ‘08 Civic LX 21K. Blue. New tires. $15,795 ‘08 Civic LX 30K. Bronze. Reduced. $13,900 OBO ‘05 Civic LX 24K. Black. 2 door coupe. $9,200 MAFFEI AUTO SALES 570-288-6227

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

VITO’S & GINO’S Wanted: Junk Cars & Trucks Highest Prices Paid!!

FREE PICKUP

288-8995

LEXUS `98 LS 400

LINCOLN 06

Town Car Limited

Fully loaded. 50,000 miles, Triple coated Pearlized White. Showroom condition. $16,900. (570) 814-4926 (570) 654-2596

WANTED!

ALL JUNK CARS! CA$H PAID

570-301-3602

Boat? Car? Truck? Motorcycle? Airplane? Whatever it is, sell it with a Classified ad. 570-829-7130

MAZDA `08 MIATA MX-5 CONVERTIBLE

Red. Power steering, auto, AC, CD. ONLY 5,500 MILES. $18,000 (570) 883-0143

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

AUTO SERVICE DIRECTORY

468

FORD `07 MUSTANG

Don’t Keep Your Practice a Secret!

Guaranteed Low Fees Payment Plan! Colleen Metroka 570-592-4796

GT CONVERTIBLE

Red with black top. 6,500 miles. One Owner. Excellent Condition. $17,500 570-760-5833

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

LAW DIRECTORY

FREE CONSULT

FORD ‘02 MUSTANG

V8, Auto, 1,400 miles, all options, show room condition. Call for info. Asking $24,995 Serious inquiries only. 570-636-3151

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

BANKRUPTCY

HYUNDAI ‘06 SONATA Low miles.

Mach I, 40th

XLT. 56,800 miles. Grey metallic with grey cloth interior. 2WD. Auto. Power windows & locks. Dual air bags. A/C. Alloy Wheels. Excellent condition. $14,500 Trades Welcome 570-328-5497

Attorney Services

FORD `90 MUSTANG GT

Must See. Sharp! Black, new directional tires, excellent inside / outside, factory stock, very clean, must see to appreciate. $3,500. For more information, call 570-2690042 Leave Message

ANNIVERSARY EDITION

LXI CONVERTIBLE

310

412 Autos for Sale

FORD `04 MUSTANG

63,000 highway miles, silver, runs great, $11,500. negotiable. 570-479-2482

Low miles - 54,000. V6. Leather interior. Great shape. A/C. Power door locks. $7,500. (570) 760-1005

412 Autos for Sale

Auto Parts

570-301-3602

460 AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE DIRECTORY 468

Auto Parts

CALL US! TO JUNK YOUR CAR

BEST PRICES IN THE AREA CA$H ON THE $POT, Free Anytime Pickup 570-301-3602

472

Auto Services

$ WANTED JUNK $ VEHICLES LISPI TOWING All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted Highest Prices Paid In CA$H

FREE PICKUP

570-574-1275

Need a Roommate? Place an ad and find one here! 570-829-7130

We pick up 822-0995

VITO’S & GINO’S Like New Tires $15 & UP! Like New Batteries $20 & UP! Carry Out Price 288-8995

WANTED

Cars & Full Size Trucks. For prices... Lamoreaux Auto Parts 477-2562


W / $ 10 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE & $ 5 0 0 N M AC C A P TIV E C A S H

19,495

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$

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L EAS E FOR :

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W / $ 75 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE

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L EAS E FOR :

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M O D EL# 22211

4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s

M SR P $23,905

20 ,995

AVA IL A B L E AT TH IS P R IC E!

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*Ta x a nd Ta g a d d itio na l. Prio rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib le fo rTypo gra phic a l Erro rs . All reb a tes & inc entives a pplied . **0 % APR in lieu o f reb a tes . As k fo rd eta ils . **As perN is s a n M o nthly Sa les V o lu m e R epo rta s o f Au g 2 0 11.

*$159 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 24 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $16,435; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h D o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity & Regis tra tio n F ees . S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $1000 N is s a n Reb a te & $500 N M AC Ca p tive Ca s h.

$

M SR P $23,820

M O D EL# 13112

4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s

STK#N 20528

2 .5 S SED AN

D U E L I N G N ISSAN S DUELING 2 0 12 N ISSAN ALTIM A 2 0 11N ISSAN R OG UE V S. VS.

TH E NUM BER 1 NISSAN DEAL ER IN TH E NE AND C ENTRAL PA REGIO N**

THE RACE IS ON! We Will Sell a a n n 75 Altimas dd 75 Rogues IN IN OCTOBER! OCTOBER!

S C AN H ERE FO R S ERVIC E S PEC IAL S

K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 3G


PAGE 4G

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

AM E ER RI CA C A ’S N EW EW

CA C A R A LTER LTER N A ATI TI VE

T H ESE C UST O M ERS H AV E IT...

HO W

ABO U T YO U ?

FR EE W ITH EVER Y VEH ICLE

VEH ICL ES IN AL L P R ICE R AN G ES Ou r Volu m e S a ve s You

$$$

Eve ryd a y!

48 HOUR SATISFACTION GUARANTEE

CAR S TR U CK S CON VER TIB L ES S U V’S VAN S

Exclusively atN ationw ide CarSales

Ifyou are dissatisfied w ith yourpurchase orchange yourm ind forany reason,bring yourvehicle back w ithin 48 hours or 200 m iles and in the sam e condition and receive a fullrefund.

FIN AN CIN G AS L O W AS

1.9

DO ES THAT? N O Q U ESTIO N S A SKED! WWHYHOBUYELSE NEW -BUY NATIO NW IDE!

%

AP R

H ere ere Are A re Just Ju st A Few Few O f O ur u r M oney on ey Saving Sav in g Values! V alu es! 2 011 H Y UN DA I SON A TA GLS

All New, P . W In d ow s, P . L ocks, K eyless En try, 3 to Choose F rom

$

N OW

17,993 *

2 011 JEEP LIB ER TY SP OR T

2 010 FOR D ED GE SEL A W D

2 011 FOR D TA UR US SEL

V6, 4x4, Alloys, L ow M iles, O n ly 4 L eft

#18326, F og L ights, Alloys, C D

#18332, K eyless En try, Alloys, CD , P . S eat

$

N OW

18 ,8 69 *

2 006 N ISSA N M UR A N O S A W D

2 010 TOYOTA COR OLLA LE

#18089A, P . W in d ow s, P . L ocks, K eyless En try, F resh Trad e, G old Check Certified

Au to, P . W in d ow s, P . L ocks, CD , 5 To Choose F rom

$

N OW

12,8 99 *

2 011 K IA SORENTO

AW D , Alloys, CD , P . W in d ow s, 4 To Choose F rom

$

18 ,998

*

2 010 H YUNDA ISA NTA FE GLS AW D , P . W in d ow s, Alloys, CD , 4 To Choose F rom

$

18 ,965 *

$

N OW

13,8 50 *

N OW

$

23,918 *

N OW

$

22,310 *

M ANAG ER’S SPECIAL! 2 010 H ONDA A CCORD EX V -6 CP E

$

22,450

*

2 010 FORD FUSION SE #18331, 4 Cyl, Alloys, P . W in d ow s, L ow M iles

$

15,98 8 *

O n ly 3 0 0 M ile s !!!

N OW

$

2 009 D OD GE N ITR O SE 4 X 4

P . W in d ow s, P . L ocks, CD , 3 L eftTo Choose F rom

N OW

$

#18157A, P . W in d ow s, CD , F resh Trad e, L ow M iles

13,995 *

N OW

24,8 59

*

14,540 *

2 008 P ON TIA C GR A N D P R IX

#18327, M oon roof, P . 3rd Row S eat, F og L ights, P . S eat, M u ch M ore

#18334, F resh Trad e, L ow M iles, G old Check Certified

$

31,790 *

2 011 FORD ESCA P E LIM ITED

#18258A, M oon roof, L eather, Heated S eats, F resh Trad e!

$

2 011 FOR D EX P EDITION X L 4 X 4

N OW

2 011 TOYOTA RAV 4

#18298, AW D , Alloys, CD , P . W in d ow s, D on ’tM iss This On e!

2 010 K IA FOR TE EX

4X4, M oon roof, L eather, Alloys, P . S eat, 3 L eftTo Choose F rom !

$

2 010 DODGE CA LIBER SX T

13,969 *

$

12,98 8 *

2 010 CH RYSLER SEBRING

#18290, 4 Cyl, Au to, P . W in d ow s, P . L ocks, K eyless En try

21,990 *

#18325, Au to, Alloys, CD , P . W in d ow s, P . L ocks, K eyless En try

$

N OW $

13,8 60 *

2 009 K IA RIO LX

#18295, Au to, A/C, CD , Rem ain d erofF actory W arran ty

$

9,998 *

O UR VO L LU UM E S SAV AV E ES S Y YO O U M O NE EY Y E EV VE ERYD R YD A AY! Y! V IS IT O U R

2N D

L O C ATIO N

AT 2 M ER ED ITH

H U R R Y, Y, S A L E EENN D S TTHH ISI S W EEK EEK EN EN D ! 290

M U N D Y S TR EET, W

S TR EET, C A R B O N D A L E, P A

C H EC K O U T O U R FU L L IN V EN TO R Y O F B O TH L O C ATIO N S AT

n a tio n w id e c a rs a le s .n e t M o n d a y- Frid a y 9 a m - 8 p m S a tu rd a y 9 a m - 5 p m

IL K ES - B A R R E AT TH E W

YO M IN G VA L L EY M A L L

B U Y N ATIO A T I O N W IDI D E A N D S AAVV E TH O U S A N D S ! TH

C A L L 3 0 1- C A R S

PRICES + TAX & TAGS. ARTWORK FOR ILLUSTRATION ONLY. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. OFFERS END 10/31/11.


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 5G

0.9% for24-60 m on ths on a ll n e w 2011 A c c ord , A c c ord Cros s tour, a n d P ilotm od e ls 0.9% for24-36 m on ths a n d 1.9% for37 to 60 m on ths on a ll n e w 2012 A c c ord , A c c ord Cros s tour, Civic (e xc lud e s Hyb rid s ), Od ys s e y, a n d P ilotm od e ls 0.9% for24-36 m on ths a n d 1.9% for37 to 60 m on ths on a ll n e w 2011 CR-V , Fit, a n d Od ys s e y m od e ls $0 DO W N

G AS M ILEAG E 28 CITY/39 HW Y

G AS M ILEAG E 23 C ITY/ 27 H W Y

$0 DO W N

2012 Hon d a

2012 H on d a

CIV IC L X

• M odel#FB2F5C EW • 140-hp 16-V alv e SO H C i-V TEC ® • 5-Speed Trans m is s ion • A ir C onditioning w ith A ir-Filtration Sy s tem • Pow er W indow s /Loc k s /M irrors • C ruis e C ontrol• R em ote Entry • 160-W att A M / FM /C D A udio Sy s tem w ith 4 Speak ers • A BS • D ual-Stage,M ultipleThres hold Front A irbags (SR S) • Front Side A irbags w ith Pas s enger-Side O c c upant Pos ition D etec tion Sy s tem (O PD S) • Side C urtain A irbags

$

***LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS THROUG H AHFC . $0 DOW N. 1S T PAY M ENT AND TAG S DUE AT DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $12,626.25

G AS M ILEAG E 17 CITY/24 HW Y

205/ 205/M OO.***.***

A CCO RD L X

P IL O T L X

• 250-hp 24-V alv e SO H C i-V TEC ® • 5-Speed A utom atic Trans m is s ion • 8 Pas s enger Seating • V ariable Torque M anagem ent® 4-W heelD riv e Sy s tem (V TM -4® ) • V ehic le Stability A s s is tTM (V SA ® ) w ith Trac tion C ontrol• Pow er W Indow s /Loc k s / M irrors • Front and R ear A ir C onditioning w ith A ir-Filtration Sy s tem • 229-W att A M /FM /C D A udio Sy s tem w ith 7 Speak ers inc luding Subw oofer • R em ote Entry • A BS • D ual-Stage, M ultiple-Thres hold Front A irbags (SR S) • Front Side A irbags w ith Pas s enger-Side O c c upant Pos ition D etec tion Sy s tem (O PD S)

$

2215/ 15/M OO.**.**

**LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS THROUG H AHFC . $0 DOW N. 1S T PAY M ENT AND TAG S DUE AT DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $13 ,770.00

$0 DO W N

G AS M ILEAG E 21 C ITY/ 27 H W Y

$0 DO W N

2012 H on d a

$

• M odel#C P2f3C EW • 177-hp 16-V alve D O H C i-V TEC ® Engine • 5-Speed A utom atic Transm ission • Pow er W indow s/Locks/M irrors • R em ote Entry • C ruise C ontrol• A ir C onditioning w ith A ir-Filtration System • 160-W att A M / FM /C D A udio System w ith 6 Speakers • V ehicle Stability A ssistTM (V SA ® ) w ith Traction C ontrol• A BS • Sual-Stage,M ultiple-Threshold Front A irbags (SR S) • D ual-C ham ber Front Side A irbags w ith Passenger-Side O ccupant Position D etection System (O PD S) • Side C urtain A irbags

305/ 305/M O.**** O . ****

2011 Hon d a

CR-V L X

• M odel#RE4H3B32 • 180-hp,DO HC i-V TEC ® 4-cylinder engine • 5-speed autom atic transm ission • RealTim eTM 4W D system • V ehicle Stability A ssistTM (V SA ® ) w ith traction control• A nti-lock braking system (A BS) • Dual-stage, m ultiple-threshold front airbags (SR5) • Front side airbags w ith passengerside O ccupant Position Detection System (O PDS) • Side curtain airbags w ith rollover sensor • C D Player • Pow er W indow s/Locks/M irrors • A /C

$

2239/ 39/M OO.*.*

*LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS , 3 6K THROUG H AHFC . $0 DOW N. 1S T PAY M ENT AND TAG S DUE AT DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $14,852.10

****LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS THROUG H AHFC . $0 DOW N. 1S T PAY M ENT AND TAG S DUE AT DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $18,528.00

*BAS E D ON 2008-2009 E PA M IL E AGE E S T IM AT E S , RE F L E CT ING NE W E PA F UE L E CONOM Y M E T HODS BE GINNING W IT H 2008-2009 M ODE L S . US E F OR COM PARIS ON PURPOS E S ONL Y . DO NOT COM PARE T O M ODE L S BE F ORE 2008. Y OUR ACT UAL M IL E AGE W IL L VARY DE PE NDING ON HOW Y OU DRIVE AND M AINT AIN Y OUR VE HICL E . AL L OF F E RS E XPIRE 10/ 31/ 2011.

M AT AT T B U R N E H O N D A 1110 WYOMING AVE. • SCRANTON • 1-800-NEXT-HONDA w w w. M a t t B u r n e H o n d a . c o m

M A AT TT T B U UR RN N EE

H O ON N DD A A PR R EE - O W W N N EE DD

T he N ew 2012’s A re O u t & W e’ve M a rked D o w n O u r Invento ry A cco rdingly F o r E xtra S a vings ! SH SH OO PP AT AT WW WW WW ..MM ATTB ATTBUURRNNEE HH OONNDD AA. .CCOOMM 99 H O N D A C IV IC C PE

B lack,61K M iles

$7,250

N ow

N avy,102K M iles

N ow

$9,950

03 JEEP LIBERTY 4W D N ow

05 LX,G ray,80K 04 EX,S ilver,92K

01 C HEV Y S-10 XC A B 4W D B eige,28K M iles

N ow

$9,999

10 INSIG HT EX B lue,21K M iles...........................NO W $18,250 10 INSIG HT EX G ray,22K...................................NO W $18,950 07 ELEM 08 ELEM 08 ELEM 09 ELEM

CIV IC

LX SDN G ray,36K................................NO W EX SDN W hite,41K,5 S peed...................NO W LX SDN G ray,25K................................NO W LX SDN R ed,21K................................NO W LX SDN S ilver,17K.............................NO W LXS SDN S ilver,16K...........................NO W

$14,950 $15,950 $16,500 $16,750 $17,500 $17,750

B lack,56K M iles

ACCORDS

06 A C C O RD LX SDN G old,37K.................................NO W 07 A C C O RD EX SDN G ray,51K..................................NO W 08 A C C O RD LXS C PE R ed,48K.......................................NO W B row n,40K M iles S ilve,38K M iles 08 A C C O RD LXP SDN N avy,24K.............................NO W N ow $14, 950 N ow $15,950 08 A C C O RD LXS C PE B lack,33K,....................................NO W 09 A C C O RD LXP SDN B urgandy,26K..............................NO W 10 A C C O RD LX SDN S ilver,28K................................NO W 09 A C C O RD EX SDN S ilver,35K................................NO W 07 SUBA RU 07 FO RD EXPLO RER 09 A C C O RD EX SDN S ilver,42K................................NO W IM PREZA A W D BA UER 4W D 10 A C C O RD LX SDN W hite,19K................................NO W S ilver,39K,W as $17,950 62K M iles,B row n N ow $16, 950 N ow $16,950 08 A C C O RD EXL SDN G ray,19K..............................NO W 09 A C C O RD EX SDN G reen,21K...............................NO W (2) 09 A C C O RD EX SDN B lack,19K.......................NO W 09 A C C O RD EXL SDN B lack,21K.............................NO W 09 A C C O RD EXL SDN R ed,21K...............................NO W 07 M A ZDA C X-7 10 TO Y O TA 10 A C C O RD EXL SDN W hite,25K............................NO W TO URING A W D C A M RY LE SDN G old,28K M iles

N ow

$17,950

60 M O S.

$14,950 $15,950 $16,950 $20,900

$9,750

H O N D A C R V 4W D 02 EX,S ilver,98K $10,750

04 LX,G old,95K

$10,750

05 FO RD EXPLO RER BA UER 4X4 W hite,72K,W as $14,500

N ow

$12,500

03 TO Y O TA C A M RY XLE SDN

G ray,83K M iles,W as $11,950 N ow

$9,950

02 SUBA RU IM PREZA O /B 4W D S ilver,54K M iles

N ow

$10,950

06 H Y U N D A I TU SC O N 4W D W hite,56K M iles

N ow

$12,500

PIL OT 4W D

09 PILO T EX W hite,46K.......................................NO W $24,750 09 PILO T EX B lack,34K........................................NO W $24,950

06 C HEV Y TRA ILBLA ZER 4W D

07 JEEP C O M PA SS LTD A W D Khaki,60K M iles

S ilver,61K,W as $13,750

09 TO Y O TA M A TRIX SXR

B lack,58K M iles

ENT EX R ed,67K M iles.........................NO W ENT LX R ed,68K M iles.........................NO W ENT LX S ilver,56K...............................NO W ENT EX R ed,11K M iles.........................NO W

N ow

36 m os

09 HY UNDA I SO NA TA G LS SDN

EL EM EN T 4W D

$13,250

1.9%

$17,950

04 SA A B 93 SEDA N

B lue,77K M iles

05 V O LV O S40I SDN

N ow

2

C CAL AL LL :1-800-N :1-800-NEE X XTH TH O ON NDD A A

N ow

03 HO NDA A C C O RD EXL V 6 SDN

B lack,41K M iles,W as $13,950

N ow

36 M O S.

$8750

08 C IV IC G old,73K M iles,W as $13,500 08 C IV IC S ilver,45K M iles $11,250 N ow $11,500 09 C IV IC 09 C IV IC 10 C IV IC 10 C IV IC

$12,750

1

HO NDA C IV IC SDN

08 PO NTIA C G 6 SDN

N ow

A CCO R D S ..9% ..9% 9% 9%

H O N D A ’S

IN S IGHT HYBRID

02 TO Y O TA HIG HLA NDER 4W D

C EE N NT T EE R R

$13,250

N ow

$13,950

2.9%

60 m os

$13,950 $16,750 $16,950 $16,950 $17,450 $17,950 $18,500 $18,950 $18,950 $19,500 $19,950 $20,500 $20,500 $20,750 $20,750 $22,500

O DYS S EY 09 O DY SSEY LX M oss,25K..............................NO W $22,500

06 C RV 06 C RV 07 C RV 09 C RV 08 C RV 08 C RV

CRV 4W D

EX S ilver,56K.............................................NO W EX M oss,31K............................................NO W EXL G old,78K...........................................NO W LX G reen,34K............................................NO W EXL R ed,63K............................................NO W EXLR ed,40K.............................................NO W

05 HO NDA C RV EX 4W D G ray,55K M iles

N ow

$15,950

08 NISSA N A LTIM A “S” SDN

$16,750 $16,950 $17,950 $19,750 $20,950 $21,500

D isclosure:1.9% - 36 m os,2.9% - 60 m os thru A .H .F.C .W -A -C on C ertified A ccords.C ertified H onda’s have 1yr - 12k B asic W arranty.B alance of 7yr - 100K P ow ertrain W arranty from in-service date.

W hite,13K M iles,W as $18,950 N ow

$16,950

09 TO Y O TA R A V 4 4W D

W hite,32K M iles

N ow

$21,500

09 SUBA RU IM PREZA A W D B lue,46K M iles

N ow

$15,950

07 DO DG E RA M 1500 Q UA D SLT 4X4 S ilver,61K,W as $17,950

N ow

$17,500

08 TO Y O TA TA C O M A C LUB C A B TRD 4X4

N avy,46K M iles,W as $26,500 N ow

$24,950

( (5 -1 -8 -8 -2 34 (5 57 70 0) )3 411 -11 4 40 00 0 • • 11 -8 80 00 0-8 82 22 2-2 211 11 0 0

1 1 1 0 W Y O M M

I N G A V E . • S C R A N T O N , PA

1 8509

w w w .m a ttb u rn e h o n d a .co m

on d a y - T

h u rs d a y 9 -8 :0 : 0 0 • F rid i d a y 9 -5 &

S a tu rd a y 9 -3 :3 :3 0


PAGE 6G

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

P RE -O W N E D

BUY’S OF THE W E E K

2008 S RX

W H ITE D IA M O N D / C A SH M ER E LEA TH ER , U LTR A V IEW SU N R O O F, XM /A M /FM /C D , O N STA R ,H EA TED M EM O RY SEA TS, 29,930 M ILES

$28,998


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 412 Autos for Sale

MERCEDES `92 500 SEL

White with gray leather interior, 17” custom chrome wheels, 4 new tires, new breaks front & rear. Full tune-up, oil change & filters done. Body and interior are perfect. Car has all the options. 133,850 miles. Original price: $140,000 new. This is the diplomat version. No rust or dings on this car Garage kept. Sell for $9,500. Call: 570-876-1355 or 570-504-8540 Evenings

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

PONTIAC `04 VIBE

TOYOTA ‘00 SOLARA SE SUPER CLEAN All power, new

White. New manual transmission & clutch. Front wheel drive. 165k highway miles. Great on gas. Good condition, runs well. $4,500 or best offer 570-331-4777

PORSCHE `85 944 Low mileage,

110,000 miles, 5 speed, 2 door, antilock brakes, air conditioning, power windows, power mirrors, AM/FM radio, CD changer, leather interior, rear defroster, tinted windows, custom wheels, $8,000. (570) 817-1803

SAAB `06 93 A E R O s p o r t .

Leather interior. Heated seats. Sunroof. Good condition. $8,000. Serious inquiries only. Call 570-760-8264

MERCEDES-BENZ `95 SUBARUAWD. `02 FORESTER SL 500 L. Red. Convertible, with removable hard top, dark Blue, camel interior, Summer Driving Only, Garage Kept. Very Good Condition, No Accidents. Classy Car.

New Price!

$8,000 or best offer or trade for SUV or other. 570-388-6669

MERCURY `95 GRAND MARQUIS 4 door, V8, fully

loaded, moon roof, new tires & brakes. Interior & exterior in excellent shape. 2 owners. Call (570) 822-6334 or (570) 970-9351

MITSUBISHI 02 Eclipse Convertible Black interior &

exterior 120,000 miles, very good condition in & out, new tires, new brakes. auto, clean title, $6,300. By owner. 570-991-5558

NISSAN `08 XTERRA

Grey, Mint condition. 35K miles. New, allseason tires. Sirius radio. 2 sets of mats, including cargo mats. $18,400. Call 570-822-3494 or 570-498-0977

$2,850. Hail damage. Runs great. Auto, air, CD, cassette, cruise, tilt. All power. 174K miles. Mechanical inspection welcomed. Call 570-561-9217

Line up a place to live in classified!

tires, new back brakes. 125,000 miles. $8000 OBO 570-417-8353

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

VOLKSWAGEN `04 Beetle - Convertible

GREAT ON GAS! Blue. AM/FM cassette. Air. Automatic. Power roof, windows, locks & doors. Boot cover for top. 22k. Excellent condition. Garage kept. Newly Reduced $14,000 570-479-7664 Leave Message

VOLKSWAGEN ‘00 BEETLE 2.0 automatic, air 67k miles $6400. 570-466-0999

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

CHEVROLET `71 MONTE CARLO SUBARU `98 OUTBACK Wagon. New Tires. $2,000 or best offer Inspection good till July 2012. 155,000 miles.

$3,900. (570) 899-8725

SUBURU ‘06 LEGACY GT door, LIMITED SEDAN 4 black,

approximately 76,000 miles. 2.5 liter engine, auto. asking $12,000. 570-510-3077

TOYOTA `05 COROLLA-S

68,700 miles. Automatic, power windows, locks, mirrors, air, cruise, keyless entry. Ground effects. $8,900 Negotiable 570-388-2829 or 570-905-4352

TOYOTA `10

Camry SE. 56,000 miles. Red, alloy wheels, black cloth interior. Will consider trade. $14,200 (570) 793-9157

(570) 650-8687

CHEVROLET `81 CORVETTE Very good condi-

tion. 350 engine, classic silver with black bottom trim, all original, registered as an antique vehicle, removable mirror tops. 66,000 miles, chrome wheels & tires in very good shape, leather interior, garage kept. Must see to appreciate. Asking $9,000 or willing to trade for a newer Pontoon boat. Call 570-545-6057

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 7G 415 Autos-Antique & Classic

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

CHEVY`75 CAMARO 350 V8. Original

OLDSMOBILE `68 DELMONT

WANTED: PONTIAC `78 FIREBIRD Formula 400

owner. Automatic transmission. Rare tuxedo silver / black vinyl top with black naugahyde interior. Never damaged. $6,000. Call 570-489-6937

Chrysler ‘68 New Yorker

Sedan. 440 Engine. Power Steering & brakes. 34,500 original miles. Always garaged. $6,800 (570) 883-4443

FORD `52 COUNTRY SEDAN CUSTOM LINE

STATION WAGON V8, automatic, 8 passenger, 3rd seat, good condition, 2nd owner. REDUCED TO $6,500. 570-579-3517 570-455-6589

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

LINCOLN `66

Continental Convertible

4 door. 67K miles. 1 owner since `69. Good frame. Teal green/white leather. Restorable. $2,500 570-287-5775 570-332-1048

MERCEDES 1975

Good interior & interior. Runs great! New tires. Many new parts. Moving, Must Sell. $2,300 or best offer 570-693-3263 Ask for Paul

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE INCLASSIFIED! $49,000 FORD ‘76 THUNDERBIRD

All original $12,000

MERCEDES ‘76 450 SL $24,000

MERCEDES ‘29

Kit Car $9,000 (570) 655-4884 hell-of-adeal.com

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

Must Sell! Appraised for $9,200 • All original

45,000 miles • 350 Rocket engine • Fender skirts • Always garaged Will sell for $6,000 Serious inquires only 570690-0727

PONTIAC `68 CATALINA 400 engine. 2

barrel carburetor. Yellow with black roof and white wall tires. Black interior. $4,995. Call (570) 696-3513

Boat? Car? Truck? Motorcycle? Airplane? Whatever it is, sell it with a Classified ad. 570-829-7130

PONTIAC 1937 Fully restored near

original. New paint, new interior, new wiring, custom tinted glass, new motor & transmission. Spare motor & trans. 16” wide white walls car in excellent condition in storage for 2 years. $14,000 or best offer. Serious inquiries ONLY. Call 570-574-1923

PORSCHE ‘78 911 SC TARGA 60,000 miles. 5

speed. Air. Power windows. Metallic brown. Saddle Interior. Meticulous original owner. Garaged. New Battery. Inspected. Excellent Condition. $25,000. OBO (610) 797-7856 (484) 264-2743

Berkshire Green, Originally purchased at Bradley-Lawless in Scranton. Car was last seen in Abington-Scranton area. Finder’s fee paid if car is found and purchased. Call John with any info (570) 760-3440

421

Boats & Marinas

CABELAS FISH CAT PANTHER 9’. Approximately 5

years old. Retails $699, selling $350. FIRM 570-288-9719

CUSTOM CREST 15’

Fiberglass boat with trailer. Outboard propulsion. Includes: 2 motors Erinmade, “Lark II series”

PRICE REDUCED! $2,400 NEGOTIABLE

570-417-3940

STARCRAFT ‘80 16’ DEEP V ‘90 Evinrude out-

board 70hp with tilt & trim— ‘92 EZ loader trailer. With ‘00 Tracker Series 60lbs foot pedal, 2 downriggers, storages, gallon tanks, 2 fish finders and more. MUST SEE. Make Best Offer. Call 866-320-6368 after 5pm.

427

CHEVY ‘08 3500 HD DUMP TRUCK 2WD, automatic.

Only 12,000 miles. Vehicle in like new condition. $19,000. 570-288-4322

GMC SIERRA ‘98 3500

4WD Stake Side, 350 V8, Auto. 75,000 miles on current engine. 12' wood bed, body, tires, interior good. Excellent running condition. New generator, starter, battery. Just tuned and inspected. $6,900. Call 570-656-1080

439

Commercial Trucks & Equipment

CHEVY `04 DUMP TRUCK

36k miles. 9’6” Boss power angle plow. Hydraulic over electric dump box with sides. Rubber coated box & frame. Very good condition. $22,500 firm. Call 570-840-1838

Motorcycles

‘96 HONDA

American Classic Edition. 1100 cc. 1 owner, under 20,000 miles. Yellow and white, extra chrome, VNH exhaust, bags, lights, MC jack, battery tender, helmets. Asking $3500 570-288-7618

DAELIM 2006

150 CCs. 4,700 miles. 70 MPG. New battery & tires. $1,500; negotiable. Call 570-288-1246 or 570-328-6897

Wanna make your car go fast? Place an ad in Classified! 570-829-7130.

439

Motorcycles

HARLEY ‘73

Rat Rod. 1,000 cc. Must see. Price reduction - $2,300 (570) 510-7231

HARLEY DAVIDSON `03 NIGHTTRAIN New rear tire. Very good condition. 23K miles. $8,500. Call 570-510-1429

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 Electra Glide, Ultra Classic, many chrome accessories, 13k miles, Metallic Emerald Green. Garage kept, like new condition. Includes Harley cover. $12,900 570-718-6769 570-709-4937

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘03 Dyna Wide Glide

Excellent condition garage kept! Golden Anniversary - silver/black. New Tires. Extras. 19,000 miles. Must Sell! $10,000. 570-639-2539

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘05 SCREAMING EAGLE V-ROD Orange & Black.

Used as a show bike. Never abused. 480 miles. Excellent condition. Asking $15,000 570-876-4034

HARLEY 2011 HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘05 V-ROD VRSCA Blue pearl, HERITAGE SOFTTAIL excellent condition, Black. 1,800 miles. ABS brakes. Security System Package. $16,000 firm. SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY 570-704-6023

To place your ad call...829-7130 726 427

Commercial Trucks & Equipment

Clothing

3,100 miles, factory alarm with extras. $10,500. or best offer. Tony 570-237-1631

726

Clothing

EVERYTHING MUST GO

439

Motorcycles

HARLEY DAVIDSON 2006 NIGHTTRAIN SPECIAL EDITION

#35 of 50 Made $10,000 in accessories including a custom made seat. Exotic paint set, Alien Spider Candy Blue. Excellent condition. All Documentation. 1,400 Asking $15,000 570-876-4034

Find Something? Lose Something? Get it back where it belongs with a Lost/Found ad! 570-829-7130

HSoft ARLEY DAVIDSON ‘80 riding FLH. King of the Highway! Mint original antique show winner. Factory spot lights, wide white tires, biggest Harley built. Only 28,000 original miles! Never needs inspection, permanent registration. $7,995 570-905-9348

HONDA ‘84 XL200R 8,000 original miles,

excellent condition. $1,000. 570-379-3713

439

Motorcycles

KAWASAKI ‘05

NINJA 500R. 3300 miles. Orange. Garage kept. His & hers helmets. Must sell. $2400 570-760-3599 570-825-3711

Kawasaki` 93 ZX11D NINJA LIKE NEW 8900 Original

miles. Original owner. V@H Exhaust and Computer. New tires. $3,800. 570-574-3584

MOTO GUZZI `03

1,100 cc. 1,900 miles. Full dress. Shaft driven. Garage kept. Excellent condition. $6000. Health Problems. Call 570-654-7863

POLARIS ‘00 VICTORY CRUISER 14,000 miles,

92 V-twin, 1507 cc, extras $6000. 570-883-9047

HYOSUNG `04 COMET

250. 157 Miles. Excellent Condition. $1,200. Call 570-256-7760

KAWASAKI ‘03

SUZUKI ‘77 GS 750

KLR 650. Green. Excellent condition. 6K Miles. $3,000 (570) 287-0563

Needs work. $1,200 or best offer 570-855-9417 570-822-2508

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

570-735-1487 WE PAY THE MOST IN CASH

BUYING 11am to 11pm

Women’s designer clothing & accessories new and almost new sold at 50% off.

Bloom Again Tanning

918 Exeter Avenue, Rte. 92, Exeter PA 18643

(Next to Rodano’s Express) Hours: Tue-Fri: 11:00am-7:00pm Sat: 12:00pm-6:00pm

39 Prospect St • Nanticoke


PAGE 8G

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Motorcycles

UNITED MOTORS ‘08 MATRIX 2 SCOOTER

150cc. Purple & grey in color. 900 miles. Bought brand new. Paid $2,000. Asking $1,600 or best offer. (570) 814-3328 or (570) 825-5133

YAMAHA ‘11 YZ 450 Brand New! $6,900 (570) 388-2947

YAMAHA ‘97 ROYALSTAR 1300

12,000 miles. With windshield. Runs excellent. Many extras including gunfighter seat, leather bags, extra pipes. New tires & battery. Asking $4,000 firm. (570) 814-1548

442 RVs & Campers

AEROLITE 16 F E OOT

XPANDABLE

TRAVEL TRAILER Mint condition. 2 queen beds. Full bath. A/C. Fridge, stove & microwave. Outside shower & grill. Sleeps 5. New tires. $5,495 neg. 570-883-1324

CHEROKEE ‘10

Travel trailer. 39 ft., 4 slide outs, 3 bedrooms, 2 bath rooms, microwave, awning, tinted windows, Brand new. Have no pets or smokers. Much more!!!!! $33,000 (cell) 682-888-2880

DUTCHMAN 96’ 5TH WHEEL with slideout & sun

room built on. Set up on permanent site in Wapwallopen. Comes with many extras. $6,500. (570) 829-1419 or (570) 991-2135

EQUIPMENT/BOBCAT TRAILER

442 RVs & Campers

TRAVEL TRAILER 33 ft

Rear queen master bedroom, Walk thru bathroom. Center kitchen + dinette bed. Front extra large living room + sofa bed. Big View windows. Air, awning, sleeps 6, very clean, will deliver. Located in Benton, Pa. $4,900. 215-694-7497

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! 451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

BUICK `05 RENDEZVOUS BARGAIN!!

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

FLAGSTAFF `08 CLASSIC NOW BACK IN PA.

Super Lite Fifth Wheel. LCD/DVD flat screen TV, fireplace, heated mattress, ceiling fan, Hide-a-Bed sofa, outside speakers & grill, 2 sliders, aluminum wheels, , awning, microwave oven, tinted safety glass windows, fridge & many accessories & options. Excellent condition, $22,500. 570-868-6986

LAYTON ‘02 TRAVEL TRAILER

30 ft. Sleeps 9 - 3 bunk beds & 1 queen. Full kitchen. Air conditioning/ heat. Tub/shower. $6,900 (570) 696-1969

NEWMAR 36’ MOUNTAIN AIRE

5th wheel, 2 large slides, new condition, loaded with accessories. Ford Dually diesel truck with hitch also available. 570-455-6796

PACE ‘99 ARROW VISION

Ford V10. Excellent condition. 8,700 miles. 1 slide out. 2 awnings. 2 colored TVs, generator, back up camera, 2 air conditioners, microwave/convection oven, side by side refrigerator with ice maker, washer/dryer, queen size bed. $37,900 negotiable (570) 288-4826 (570) 690-1464

SUNLITE CAMPER

22 ft. 3 rear bunks, center bathroom, kitchen, sofa bed. Air, Fully self contained. Sleeps 6. New tires, fridge awning. $4500. 215-322-9845

DODGE `00 CARGO VAN 1500

88,500 miles. V6. Automatic. Good Condition. $2,300 (570) 793-6955

FORD `04 EXPLORER

Eddie Bauer Edition 59,000 miles, 4 door, 3 row seats, V6, all power options, moon roof, video screen $12,999. 570-690-3995 or 570-287-0031

FORD `90 TRUCK 17’ box. Excellent

running condition. Very Clean. $4,300. Call 570-287-1246

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

CADILLAC `99 ESCALADE 97k miles. Black

Shortbox. 1 owner. New truck trade! $4,495 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

with beige leather interior. 22” rims. Runs great. $8,500 Call 570-861-0202

CHEVROLET `06 COLORADO 4X4 REgular cab, 11,000

original miles. Black, 5 speed/5 cylinder, excellent condition! New tires. $14,000 negotiable. Call (570) 299-1538

CHEVROLET `10 SILVERADO 1500 Extended Cab V71

Package 4x4. Bedliner. V-8. 5.3 Liter. Red. Remote start. Garage kept. 6,300 miles $26,000 (570) 639-2539

4WD, Automatic. Loaded with options. Bedliner. 55,000 miles. $9,200. Call (570) 868-6503

CHEVY `00 SILVERADO

FORD ‘99 F150

1500. 4x4. 8’ box. Auto. A/C. 121K miles. $5,995. 570-332-1121

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD 02 F150

Extra Cab. 6 Cylinder, 5 speed. Air. 2WD. $4,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

FORD ‘02 RANGER XLT 2WD. Extended

cab. Power windows & locks. Remote starter. $5,890.

MARSH MOTORS

CHEVY `99 SILVERADO

Auto. V6 Vortec. Standard cab. 8’ bed with liner. Dark Blue. 98,400 miles. $6,899 or best offer 570-823-8196

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD ‘03 F150 XL Extended Cab. V6. 2WD. Low miles! $7,790.

MARSH MOTORS

HONDA `10 ODYSSEY

CHEVY ‘90 CHEYENNE

2500 series. 8 ft box with tool box. Heavy duty ladder rack. 150K miles. Great work truck. $1,500 570-406-5128

CHEVY ‘95 ASTRO

AWD. Good tires. V6. Auto. 149,000 miles. Power everything. Heavy duty tow package. Runs good. Just passed inspection. Kelly Blue Book $2,500. Selling: $1,650 (570) 855-8235

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

CHEVY ‘98 CHEYENNE 2500 2-wheel drive

1 owner! Local new truck trade! $3,495 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

CHRYSLER 02 TOWN & COUNTRY V6. Like new!

$5,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

4X4 SUV SALE

‘08 Chevy Trailblazer LT 15K miles. Moonroof. Black. $19,995 ‘08 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo 42K miles. Black. 6 cylinder. $16,995 ‘08 Honda CRV EX White. Moonroof. $19,900 ‘08 Chevy Trailblazer LT 29K miles. Tan. Moonroof. $17,995 ‘06 Chevy Trailblazer LT EXT Gray. 82K miles. $12,495 ‘04 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo SE Blue. Moonroof. Leather. 74K miles. $10,200 ‘04 Jeep Grand Cherokee 6 cylinder. Auto. 102K miles. Gray. $8,995 ‘04 Chrysler Town & Country Van Limited 78K miles. Blue. Every available factory option. $9,500 MAFFEI AUTO SALES 570-288-6227

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

MAZDA ‘04 TRIBUTE LX Automatic, V6

Sunroof, CD 1 owner Extra Clean! $4,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

MAZDA `03 TRIBUTE

4 door, 6 cylinder auto. All wheel drive. 1 owner. Very good condition. High highway miles. $3,250. Call 570-466-6368

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

MAZDA 03 MPV VAN V6. CD Player.

1 owner vehicle!! $3,495 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

`99 ML 320

Special Edition. Maroon, Fully loaded. Leather seats. TV/DVD, navigation, sun roof plus many other extras. 3rd seat . Only 1,900 Miles. Brand New. Asking $37,000 (570) 328-0850

JEEP `02 GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

SUZUKI `03 XL-7

85K. 4x4. Auto. Nice, clean interior. Runs good. New battery & brakes. All power. CD. $6,800 570-762-8034 570-696-5444

SUZUKI `07 XL-7 56,000 miles,

automatic, all-wheel drive, 4 door, air conditioning, all power, CD player, leather interior, tinted windows, custom wheels, $13,000 Call 570-829-8753 Before 5:00 p.m.

cylinder. Automatic. 120K miles. Remote start. Fiberglass cap & tonneau cover. $8,200 570-779-5812

TRACTOR TRAILERS

FREIGHTLINER ’97 MIDROOF 475 CAT & 10 speed transmission. $12,000 FREIGHTLINER ’99 CONDO 430 Detroit, Super 10 transmission. Asking $15,000.

Triple black, economical 6 cylinder. 4x4 select drive. CD, remote door opener, power windows & locks, cruise, tilt wheel. 108k highway miles. Garage kept. Super clean inside and out. No rust. Sale price $6,895. Scranton. Trade in’s accepted. 570-466-2771

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

JEEP `03 Rare. LIBERTY5 SPORT.

speed. 23 MPG. 102K highway miles. Silver with black interior. Immaculate condition, inside and out. Garage kept. No rust, maintenance records included. 4wd, all power. $6,900 or best offer, trades will be considered. Call 570-575-0518

JEEP `04 CHEROKEE 135,000 miles, auto-

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

JEEPAuto. 04 LIBERTY V6.

Black Beauty! $6,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

VOLVO `08 XC90 Fully loaded, moon

roof, leather, heated seats, electric locks, excellent condition. New tires, new brakes and rotors. 52,000 miles highway $26,500/ best offer. 570-779-4325 570-417-2010 till 5

457 Wanted to Buy Auto

ALL JUNK CAR & TRUCKS WANTED Highest Prices Paid In Cash!!! FREE REMOVAL Call V&G Anytime 288-8995

600 FINANCIAL

MERCURY `07 MARINER One owner. Luxury

FOR SALE Turn key business. Liquor license & patio license. Air conditioned. Lower level 1 bedroom apt. Reduced to $159,000 Owner Retiring. 570-929-3214

ERY GOOD CONDITION! 29,500 miles. 24X4 drive option, 4 door crew cab, sharp silver color with chrome step runners, premium rims, good tires, bedliner, V-6, 3.7 liter. Purchased at $26,900. Dealer would sell for $18,875. Asking $16,900 (570) 545-6057

MITSUBISHI `11

OUTLANDER SPORT SE AWD, Black interi-

or/exterior, start/ stop engine with keyless entry, heated seats, 18” alloy wheels, many extra features. Only 4,800 miles. 10 year, 100,000 mile warranty. $23,500. Willing to negotiate. Serious inquires only - must sell, going to law school. (570) 793-6844

MITSUBISHI `97 15’ CUBE VAN Cab over, 4 cylinder diesel engine. Rebuilt automatic transmission. Very good rubber. All around good condition inside & out. Well maintained. Ready to work. PRICE REDUCED! $6,195 or best offer Call 570-650-3500 Ask for Carmen

“We can erase your bad credit 100% GUARANTEED.” Attorneys for the Federal Trade Commission say they’ve never seen a legitimate credit repair operation. No one can legally remove accurate and timely information from your credit report. It’s a process that starts with you and involves time and a conscious effort to pay your debts. Learn about managing credit and debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

700 MERCHANDISE 702

Air Conditioners

TIRE: 1 Bridgestone tire,white lettering lots of rubber $25. 570-388-2723

708

Antiques & Collectibles

‘88 FRUEHAUF 45’ with sides. All aluminum, spread axle. $6,500.

610

4x4. garage kept. Showroom condition, fully loaded, every option 34,000 miles. DRASTICALLY REDUCED $14,900 (570)825-5847

630 Money To Loan

TOYOTA `00 TACOMA 4WD. Extra cab. 4

Sunroof, new tires, 115,930 miles MUST SELL Only $200/ month (570)760-0511

MITSUBISHI `08 RAIDER V

matic, four wheel drive, $6,500. (570) 237-6979

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

LEXUS `96 LX 450

Full time 4WD, Pearl white with like new leather ivory interior. Silver trim. Garage kept. Excellent condition. 84,000 miles, Asking $10,750 570-654-3076 or 570-498-0005

MERCEDES-BENZ

CHEVY 05 TRAILBLAZER LT Leather. Sunroof.

Highway miles. Like Brand New! $6,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

1218 Main St. Swoyersville, PA 570-718-6992 Buy-Sell-Trade

CHEVY `10 SILVERADO 4 Door Crew Cab

LTZ. 4 wheel drive. Excellent condition, low mileage. $35,500. Call 570-655-2689

451

2 storage trailers. 570-814-4790

1218 Main St. Swoyersville, PA 570-718-6992 Buy-Sell-Trade

SUNLINE SOLARIS `91

25’ travel trailer A/C. Bunk beds. New fridge & hot water heater. Excellent condition. $3,900. 570-466-4995

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

AWD, Fully loaded, 1 owner, 22,000 miles. Small 6 cylinder. New inspection. Like new, inside & out. $13,200. (570) 540-0975

CHEVROLET `97 SILVERADO with Western plow. Brand new 2010 tandem axle, 4 wheel electric brakes, 20’ long total, 7 x 16 wood deck, fold up ramps with knees, removable fenders for oversized loads, powder coat paint for rust protection, 2 5/16 hitch coupler, tongue jack, side pockets, brake away switch, battery, 7 pole RV plugs, title & more!! Priced for quick sale. $2,595 386-334-7448 Wilkes-Barre

451

Business Opportunities

BAR/TAVERN

ESTABLISHED BAKERY/SANDWICH ROUTE FOR SALE $40,000.

$ ANTIQUES BUYING $

Old Toys, model kits, Bikes, dolls, guns, Mining Items, trains & Musical Instruments, Hess. 474-9544 DOLLS: Porcelain, 12” in original boxes $10. each. 570-654-6283

Too many baby toys? Pass them on, sell them with an ad! 570-829-7130

JACKO ANTIQUES 134 Route 11,

Larksville (Next to Woody’s Fireplace & Pro-Fix) Oak Icebox. Mahogany Stack Bookcase, Oak Stack Bookcase. Lionel & American Flyer Trains, Coins. We do upholstery, furniture repair, chair caning, re-gluing, cloth & rush seats. We also buy Gold, Silver & Coins. 570-855-7197 or 570-328-3428

710

Appliances

APPLIANCE PA RT S E T C .

Used appliances. Parts for all brands. 223 George Ave. Wilkes-Barre 570-820-8162 CHEST FREEZER GE. 15.6 cu ft. 40 plus years old, but still working. $25. 570-696-4487 HOT WATER Heater 50 gallon electric Rudd pacemaker self cleaning, like new condition, purchased 8/14/08 light use in single family home with one woman in her 80’s $175. 570-926-5075 MICROWAVE: Kenmore countertop 1.2cu.ft, 1200watt, white. Great condition. $70. 855-9221 REFRIGERATOR with freezer, small $55. 474-2182

Retired Repairman top loading

Whirlpool & Kenmore Washers, Gas & Electric Dryers. 570-833-2965 570-460-0658 WALL OVEN, Maytag electric, white. excellent condition. $300. Kenmore stainless steel countertop electric range. 4 burner with center grill, good condition. $200. 675-0248 Why Spend Hundreds on New or Used Appliances? Most problems with your appliances are usually simple and inexpensive to fix! Save your hard earned money, Let us take a look at it first! 30 years in the business. East Main Appliances 570-735-8271 Nanticoke

712

Baby Items

AFGHAN pink & blue for baby $10. 570-574-5690 BABY GIRL CRIB BEDDING; Ladybug theme by Kidsline, includes sheet, bumper, quilt, crib skirt. Gently used, main colors pink, white and sage. asking $40.00 (570)706-0532

714

Bridal Items

STAMPS from 1920’s-1990, excellent condition, sold by sheet $10. to $15 570-654-6835

WEDDING package: ring pillow, money bag, apron, bushka, hanky, satin slippers. never used $100.570-654-6283

545

545

Marketing/ Product

Marketing/ Product

716

Building Materials

BATHROOM CABINET, white sink, chrome faucet, 32”hx49”wx23”d $75. 570-696-0187 BATHROOM SINK SET: Gerber white porcelain bathroom sink with mirror and medicine cabinet. Matching set. $80. 570-331-8183 KITCHEN CABINETS barley used, two 30x30 wall cabinets, Lazy Susan, 3 drawer cabinet, 9x30 drawer cabinet all for $350. neg. 570-497-0827 or 570-497-1662 Kitchen Cabinets: Merillat golden oak. 15 + 84” tall pantry. White formica countertops. Stainless Steel double sink. Newer Faucet. Great condition. $1,200. Call 570-499-6788 ROOFING SHINGLES desert sand color 2 squares $110. 570-256-3677

720

Cemetery Plots/Lots

MEMORIAL SHRINE CEMETERY 6 Plots Available

May be Separated Rose Lawn Section $450 each 570-654-1596

MEMORIAL SHRINE

LOTS FOR SALE 6 lots available at Memorial Shrine Cemetery. $2,400. Call 717-774-1520 SERIOUS INQUIRES ONLY

726

Clothing

BOYS CLOTHES size large 12-14, some 6-18 mostly name brands 30 items $35. Boys winter coats, size medium 10-12 Nike, Gap, Old Navy-$10. each or all for $25. 570-237-1583 JACKET 1 LL Bean Polartic fleece, size XL never worn, plum berry $30. 570-654-6835 LOAFERS 2 pair 9 1/2 1 brown, 1 black, new in box $10 each. 654-6283 PURSE, Gucci medium size tote, excellent condition. $335. 288-4451 TEENAGE BOYS/ young mens hoodies size large/x large, Southpole, Adidas, etc. $5. Boys Southpole jeans sizes 14,16,& 18 all excellent condition $5. 696-2537

545

Marketing/ Product

POPCORN/ CANDY/ICE CREAM SHOP Tunkhannock. Making over 25 flavors of popcorn. Ideal family business. Selling equipment supplies and inventory Turnkey operation. Full training. Unlimited potential $44,900. 570-650-2451

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage NISSAN `10 ROGUE SL AWD. Gray. Sunor attic and call the roof. Bose stereo system. Black, Classified departheated leather seats. Sunroof ment today at 5706,000 miles. $24,000 829-7130! (570) 696-2777

742

Furnaces & Heaters

COAL STOVE Surdiac with stainless steel black pipe, uses pea size coal asking $150. After 4 pm 570-654-7850 HEATER: Amish, oak cabinet, remote, used last year, like new $250. 570-654-6283 TANK oil hot water heater & 275 gallon oil tank. $50. 570-954-2701

744

Furniture & Accessories

AIR MATTRESS full size, new with pump $45. Mattress topper very thick, new with gel & feathers, full size $75. SOFA beige & rust tones, 8 way hand tied springs, great condition $300. 570-823-2709 BED: twin white platform bed with storage drawers complete, very good condition. $100 obo. 287-7162 BEDROOM SET: Light wood, French Provincial. Bed, chest, dresser and 2 night stands. $175 for all. Call 570-826-1743 CHAIR, seatlift, beige, very good condition, $375. Leave message 570-690-3085 COUCH & loveseat $300. Free chair. 2 end tables $50 each. Like new. 570-474-2397 CURIO walnut, solid wood, full sliding glass door paid $1200 sell for $500. Maytag laundry storage unit $55. 570-474-2182

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

DINING ROOM SET

Gold, wood, with breakfront. Server, table & 6 chairs. $1,500. Call 570-690-4248

DINING ROOM SET:

Cherry dining room set by Broyhill, table with two leafs, china cabinet with glass shelves, 6 chairs $1250.00 (570) 655-4456

545

Marketing/ Product

Furniture & Accessories

DINING ROOM TABLE with pad, 6 chairs, $75. 570-868-6732.

FURNISH FOR LESS

* NELSON * * FURNITURE * * WAREHOUSE * Recliners from $299 Lift Chairs from $699 New and Used Living Room Dinettes, Bedroom 210 Division St Kingston Call 570-288-3607

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

FURNITURE SALE

Virginia House Oak Dining Room Set: Includes 1 hutch, 1 buffet, table with 2 leaves, 2 arm chairs, 6 side chairs. Excellent condition, $1,750. La-Z-Boy 3 seat, 2 end reclining sofa: with fabric guard. Light tweed fabric. Excellent condition. $350. 25” GE color tv with remote $100. Queen size bed: $250. King Size Bed: $300. 5 drawer antique dark wood tall bureau: $50. Lexington Recollections Bedroom Set: Solid Oak, off white with brown tops. Includes: 2 twin bunk beds with guard and ladder. 9 drawer vanity dresser with mirror. 4 drawer chest bureau, 5 drawer lingerie chest, 2 drawer night stand, 4 drawer desk with hutch and chair. Twin beds can be set apart. Excellent condition. Asking $1,750 for all. Call 570-262-5028

FURNITURE SET

White Porcelean Queen Size Bed. Beautiful Head & Footboard. $300; White wicker hutch, 46x49 with dresser, 49x32, $300; White wicker chest of drawers with mirror. 58x38, $300. Also, Golden bedroom set with queen size bed, chest of drawers, dresser, mirror, 2 nightstands - $400 for all. 570-817-1174 KITCHEN TABLE: solid oak with white tile block top, 4 chairs, excellent condition $350. 570-675-0248

Motorcycle for sale? Let them see it here in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130 545

Marketing/ Product

Halloween is creeping up on us and The Times Leader would like to celebrate by publishing a photo of your child in costume!

10!

$

FOR SALE. Serious Inquiries Send Letter Of Interest to Box 2740 C/O Times Leader 15 N Main St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa 18711

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

WOMEN’S clothes name brands, sizes 4-8, small/medium $2-$10. 2 Cracker Factory sweaters $25. 570-417-3940

744

Surprise your child this Halloween!

NE PA TAX & ACCOUNTING PRACTICE

Negotiable 570-825-2456

Clothing

TUXEDOS. (2) Very good condition. sizes XL & XXL, $40 each. 570-655-2180

Gallery Of Ghouls

100+ stops, gross sales $4,000/gross profit $1000 per week. MUST be experienced, energetic, positive & motivated individual. Must have delivery vehicle. 717-271-4323

OPTICAL LAB FOR SALE $60,000

726

only Julia Simmons Age 9

Plus get a coupon for a free pumpkin from

Zehner Bros. Farms

906 Berwick-Hazleton Hwy., Nescopeck, PA

Publication is Monday, Oct. 31. Send your photo to arrive by Friday, Oct. 21 at 5:00 p.m. (One child per photo)

Drop off or return this completed form with your photo and a $10 payment to: THE TIMES LEADER, Gallery of Ghouls, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711. Include a self-addressed, stamped envelope to have your photo returned or pick it up at our office after October 31. Please include name on back of photo. Or e-mail your child’s photo with the information below to classifieds@timesleader.com. All entries must include phone number. Name _______________________________________________________________________________ Address ______________________________________________Phone __________________________ City _________________________________________________State _____ Zip ___________________ E-mail Address _________________________________________________________________________ Child’s name & Age _____________________________________________________________________ I’ve enclosed my check for: $______ Or, charge to credit card # ____________________________________ Expiration date ______/______ Security Code ________ Circle one:

Call The Times Leader Classifieds

829-7130 or Toll free 1-800-273-7130

Monday Through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Sat. 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

timesleader.com 717780

439

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 9G


PAGE 10G

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Bad Credit, No Credit New Credit Hotline WE CAN HELP!

A Benson Family Dealership

L TOELE! FR

1-855-313-LOAN

2010 JEEP PATRIOTS & COMPASS 4X4s WE BUY Starting at Only $15,995 CARS! NEW CARS Get Cash Now

2011 BUICK REGAL CXL TURBO

2011 BUICK ENCLAVE CXL

0%

0%

2012 BUICK LACROSSE CXL 2.9%

FINANCING AVAILABLE

FINANCING AVAILABLE

FINANCING AVAILABLE

SAVE $3,449

SAVE $4,105

SAVE $2,140

All Wheel Drive, Leather, Moonroof, Chrome Wheels

Leather Group, Moonroof, Chrome Wheels

Choose From 3, Too Many Options To List

29,741

$

FROM

$

2011 GMC TERRAIN ALL WHEEL DRIVE

40,280

2011 GMC TERRAIN ALL WHEEL DRIVE

2.9%

$

32,460

2011 GMC YUKON 4X4

2.9%

0%

FINANCING AVAILABLE

FINANCING AVAILABLE

FINANCING AVAILABLE

SAVE $1,065

SAVE $1,556

SAVE $5,764

SLE Equipment Pkg, Rear Camera

SLT-2 Pkg, Leather, V6, Moonroof, Chrome Wheels

25,995

$

2011 GMC YUKON XL 4X4 0%

FINANCING AVAILABLE

SAVE $6,715

SLT Equipment Pkg, Moonroof, Heated & Cooled Leather Seating, 20” Polished Wheels

48,795

$

$

33,499

2012 GMC ACADIA DENALI ALL WHEEL DRIVE 1.9%

2012 GMC CANYON CREW CAB 4X4 3.9%

FINANCING AVAILABLE

FINANCING AVAILABLE

SAVE $3,490

SAVE $2,452

White Diamond Tri Coat Paint Over Cashmere Leather

$

43,995

SLE Equipment Pkg, Pure Silver Beauty!

Choose from 3, SLE Pkg, Z-71 Pkg

$

28,373

$

38,191 2011 GMC SIERRA EXT CAB 1500 4X4 0%

FINANCING AVAILABLE

Power Tech Pkg, Choose From 15, Ext & Crew Cabs

FROM

USED CARS

28,250

$

2010 CHRYSLER SEBRING Low Miles............................................ $14,995

2010 JEEP COMMANDER 4X4 .................................................... $21,995

2010 JEEP GR. CHEROKEE LAREDO 4X4, 25K Miles ..................................... $21,995

2010 KIA RIO 2 In Stock ............................................ $11,995

2010 DODGE CHARGER Must See ............................................. $16,995 2011 BUICK REGAL CXL Heated Seats, 2 In Stock ........................ $22,995 2011 CHEVY MALIBU Stk#1799, Only ..................................... $15,995 2010 CHRYSLER 300 TOURING Stk#1797, Reduced ................................ $16,995 2010 DODGE GR. CARAVAN Stk#1796, Only ..................................... $17,995 2010 JEEP WRANGLER 4DR 4X4 .................................................... $22,995 2011 JEEP GR. CHEROKEE LAREDO 4X4 .................................................... $25,995 2011 FORD ESCAPE 4X4 .................................................... $22,995 2010 DODGE JOURNEY RT Leather ............................................... $21,995 2010 DODGE SEBRING CONV Sharp ................................................. $17,995

2011 BUICK LUCERNE CXL Hard to Find ........................................ $24,995 2011 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 Crew Cab, 4x4 ...................................... $24,995 2010 CHEVY MALIBU Stk#1740, 1 Owner ................................ $15,995

2010 DODGE AVENGER Leather, Must See! ................................ $15,995 2010 MITSUBISHI ENDEAVOR 4X4 .................................................... $18,995 2011 FORD ESCAPE LIMITED 4X4, Leather ........................................ $24,995 2011 DODGE NITRO 4X4 Sharp ................................................. $18,995 2010 CHEVY TRAVERSE 4X4 .................................................... $24,995

2010 TOYOTA COROLLA 1 Owner .............................................. $15,995 2010 CHEVY TAHOE Stk#1681, 20” Chromes ......................... $32,995 2010 HYUNDAI ACCENT 26K Miles ............................................ $11,995

2011 CHEVY SUBURBAN 4X4, 17K Miles ..................................... $35,995 2010 FORD EXPLORER XLT 14K Miles, 4x4 ...................................... $22,995

2010 CHEVY EXPRESS CARGO VANS 2 In Stock ............................................ $18,995 2010 MERCURY GR. MARQUIS 17K Miles ............................................ $16,995 2010 HONDA CIVIC 14K Miles, Only .................................... $16,995

2010 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 Extended Cab, 4x4, 18K Miles ................. $23,995 2010 DODGE RAM CREW CAB 4X4, 13K Miles ..................................... $24,995 2010 FORD TAURUS LIMITED 12K Miles ............................................ $24,995

2008 HUMMER H3 Local Trade, Must See ........................... $21,995 2009 CHEVY COLORADO CREW CAB Z-71 Pkg, 4x4 ....................................... $23,995 2009 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 Extended Cab, 4x4, 12K Miles ................. $24,995

2010 CHEVY EQUINOX 12K Miles, AWD, Sharp .......................... $25,995 2009 PONTIAC G5 21K Miles, Only .................................... $12,995 2009 CHEVY IMPALA Only 31K Miles ..................................... $14,995 2006 FORD 500 Only 16K Miles, Don’t Miss It .................. $13,995

*In stock vehicles only. Prices plus tax & Tags, All rebates applied. See Salesperson for Details. Financing must be approved thru ally bank. See dealer for details.

HOURS:

A Benson Family Dealership

Monday Thru Thursday 8:00am - 8:00pm Friday & Saturday 8:00am - 5:00pm


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 744

Furniture & Accessories

LOVESEAT hunter green, Lane, both sides recline, asking $125. Hunter green lane recliner/rocker $100. Fisher Price outdoor play house $100. Twin platform bed complete, 2 storage drawers, headboard, medium brown finish, like new, paid $350. asking $175. 570-704-8117

AFFORDABLE

MATTRESS SALE We Beat All Competitors Prices!

Mattress Guy

Twin sets: $159 Full sets: $179 Queen sets: $199 All New American Made 570-288-1898 MOVING FREE Beds, living room, kitchen set, toys & more. 814-0843 SECTIONAL: Lane 5 piece, light brown, One end is recliner other is chaise. $500. 824-7015 SOFA BED faux black leather, white upholstered chair, 9 x 12 black & white tweed carpet with two throw rugs, all good condition $50. 570-822 7903 SOFA gold, scroll wood trim $200. Brown & gold tweed chair & ottoman $150. 570-287-7379

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets

DALLAS 11 Washington St (Off Lower Demunds Road) Saturday & Sunday 10am - 5pm

746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets

746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets

NANTICOKE

WYOMING

7 Cherry Dr. Saturday & Sunday October 22 & 23 9am - 3pm Everything Priced to sell! Nickel & Brass headboard with full bed. Oak dining room furniture, living room furniture, bedroom furniture, kitchen items, silverware, lawn care items & equipment, Xmas items, snowblower, bookcases, antique desk, wall furnishings, misc tools, ladders, wool oriental rug & runner and a variety of misc items.

605 Wyoming Ave Sat. and Sun. Oct. 15 and 16 9am - 3pm Women's and mens clothes, toys and household, army equipment and supplies, movies, yard items, factory Singer sewing machine, too much to mention!

PITTSTON

149 Butler Street Sun. Oct. 16th 9am to 4pm Furniture, lamps, chandelier, Webber gas grill, electronics, household items, and much more

PLAINS

KINGSTON

66 HENRY STREET

Sun. Oct.. 16th, 10-2 Household items, pool supplies, collectibles.

Find Something? Lose Something? Get it back where it belongs with a Lost/Found ad! 570-829-7130

VERNON 2 STORY GARAGE SALE

529 SR 292 EAST 3 mi, Rt 292 W, from Centermoreland, or 3mi, on 292 E., from Route 29) Oct 15 and 16 Sat & Sun 9 - 5 household, Xmas, Hunting, HD motorcycle accessories, Antique tools and Antiques, clothing, Collectible Bears, games, much more

WEST WYOMING FLEA MARKET GREEN ACRES APARTMENTS 257 Church St. Sat. and Sun. Oct 15 & 16 9AM - 4PM Mainly Furniture, household, TV’s. Cash and carry

KINGSTON

6th Street

OPEN SPACE YEAR ROUND

AVAILABLE INSIDE & OUT ACRES OF PARKING OUTSIDE SPACES - $10 INSIDE SPACES $60 AND UP (MONTHLY)

Saturday 10am-2pm Sunday 8am-4pm R. 395 Northampton St. Sat & Sun October 15 and 16 9am - 2pm clothing, household books, miscellaneous. Something for everyone

LUZERNE

260 Charles Street Sat. & Sun. Oct. 15th and 16th 9am to 5pm No Early Birds Items to include 10 piece antique walnut dining room set, unusual handpainted teacart with drop leaf sides and removable glass tray, sofa, chair and ottoman, antique chairs, 1 straight leg, 2 rockers, 2 antique Persian rugs, book shelf, organ & bench, 2 sewing machines, kitchen set, cedar chest, bedroom furniture - 1 twin set, 2 full, collectible glassware, Lennox & Depression collection of candlewick, silver and silver plated, Currier & Ives dinnerware setting for twelve, small appliances, kitchen utensils and housewares,jewelry, something for everyone.

Purebred Animals? Sell them here with a classified ad! 570-829-7130

750

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

Jewelry

ENGAGEMENT RING

1/2 carat princess cut diamond solitaire set in 14K white gold. List price of $1,495, Purchased from Littman Jewelers for $900, willing to sacrifice at $700. Call 570-814-3383 INVICTA WATCH New Russian Diver, black case & bracelet, purple carbon dial, quartz movement. in yellow box $100. 287-8498

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! 752 Landscaping & Gardening

FORTY FORT

266 River Street Sunday, Oct-16 8am-3pm Antiques & collectibles, books, toys, appliances, men’s/women’s clothing & more.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 11G

WILKES-BARRE

LAWN TRACTOR. SEARS. 17 hp yard tractor, 6 speed, 42” cut, 180 hours total usage, new Battery. $750. 570823-0156, Ext 213, Osterhout Free Library, Mr. Pilch. Patrick & Deb’s Lawn Care See our ad under Call An Expert 1162 Landscape & Garden

754

Machinery & Equipment

SAWMILLS: from only $3997, make money & save money with your own bandmill - cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free info & DVD. www.NorwoodSawMills.com/ 300N. Ext 300N 1-800-578-1363 SNOWBLOWER Simplicity 10 hp / 36” chute. 5 speed forward/2 reverse electric start optional. $500. 655-9472

756

Medical Equipment

POWER CHAIR.

Jazzy Select series 6. Includes joy stick control and charged batteries. Asking $1,000. 570-709-2926 UNDERWEAR Perfit incontinence underwear, size XL, 14 paid package $5. each. 288-9940

758 Miscellaneous

WILKES-BARRE APARTMENT SALE!!!! 656 Mayflower

Crossing (off of Metcalf St between Meade and Sheridan) Sat and Sun October 15 & 16 7am -????? household, mens and women's clothing, something for everyone.

WILKES-BARRE

Highest Prices Paid In CA$H FREE PICKUP

AVON SPECIAL Mother’s Day Plates, (8) $1. each. Bar Stools with backs, (2), $5 each. Bookcase 2 shelves on wheels, very sturdy, oak finish $10. Scrubs, size 3X, some new and nearly new, $3 each. 570-823-4941 BRASS PLANTERS 4 large & 1 copper, very good condition all for $40. 570-735-6638 CD/DVD Sony player dvp-sr200p never used $10.; fishing wading boots thigh high & chest high $20.each pair; space heater $6.; maple round kitchen table & 4 chairs $125.; stiffle table lamp $15. 820-3359

from

W hatisGM Certified?Itisan additional... FA LL IN TO 12 m os.– 12,000 M ile Bum per-to-Bum perW arranty SAV ING S up to 48 M os–48,000 M ILES plus5 year–100,000 m ilePow ertrain LTD W arranty

2 0 11 20 1 1 C H E V Y C R U ZZEE L S

O riginalM SRPW hen N ew $17,175

SALE PRICE starting at

$$

DISHES Sango Island Flower. Oven, Dishwasher & Microwave safe. Great start-up set. No chips. 15 years old. $40. 474-9049

Wanna make your car go fast? Place an ad in Classified! 570-829-7130.

1 3 ,,9 4 7

2 0 11 20 1 1 C H E V Y M A L IIBB U L S

*

O riginalM SRPW hen N ew $22,540

SALE PRICE starting at

$$

1 5 ,,2 5 0

2200 11 1 1 CCHH E VVYY E Q U IINN O X L T AAWW D $$

*

1 0 AVA IL.

O riginalM SRPW hen N ew $26,210 SALE PRICE starting at

$$

1.9% APR

1 5 ,,4 8 0

2200 1111 CCHH E VVYY T R AAVEV E R S E AAWW D

2

AVA IL.

2 4 ,,5 0 0

1 4 ,,9 7 5

*

#Z2536,3.5LV6,A uto.,A /C PW ,PD L,Pow er M irrors, Pow er Seats,XM Satellite Radio,O nStar w /Turn-By-Turn N avigation,A M /FM C D , H eated FrontBucketSeats

*

5

AVA IL.

#Z2538,3.6LV6 A uto., Traction C ontrol,A /C ,8 Passenger,2nd & 3rd Row SplitBench,Pow er O ptions, Pow er D river Seat,Rear Spoiler,18” A lum .W heels,U ltra Sonic Rear Parking A ssist

#Z2519,2.4LD O H C A utom atic,A /C , D eep Tinted G lass,C ruise, Steering W heelRadio C ontrols,A M /FM C D , Pow er H eated M irrors, Rem ote Keyless Entry

O riginalM SRPW hen N ew $26,920 SALE PRICE starting at

5

AVA IL.

1.9% APR

2200 1111 C H E V Y IIMM P A L A L S

4

AVA IL.

1.9% APR

$$

APR

O n Select C ertified Preow ned Til 10/31

#Z2534,2.2LA uto.,A /C ,PW , PD L,D eluxe FrontBuckets,Running Boards, Traction C ontrol,XM Satellite Radio,O nStar w /Turn-By-Turn N avigation,Luggage Roof Rails, Pow er D rivers Seat

#Z2537,2.4LD O H C A utom atic,Rem ote Keyless Entry,A /C , PW ,PD L,Pow er M irrors, A M /FM C D ,FrontBucketSeats,Body Side M oldings

O riginalM SRPW hen N ew $23,941 SALE PRICE starting at

1.9

%

2 0 1111 C H E V Y H H R L T 20

5

AVA IL.

#12045B,1.8LEC O TEC VVT D O H C 4 C yl.,6 Speed M anualTrans., A /C ,PW ,PD L,FrontBucketSeats, 16” SteelW heels,XM Satellite Radio, O nStar w /A uto C rash Response & Turn-By-Turn N avigation,A M / FM C D /M P3

COOKBOOKS Weight Watchers set of 4. New. $15. 570-472-1646

DISHES service for 8 + serving pieces. white with delicate pink rose pattern. $35. 654-3755. CONDUCTED BY: The Women of St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church 35 S. Franklin St. WED 10/19 10AM-4PM THUR 10/20 10AM-1PM THURSDAY IS BAG DAY. Mini boutique, will run 2 days. Light lunch available.

ecia l P urchase u rch a se S p ecial

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted

570-574-1275

243 Madison Street Sunday, Oct-16 9am-? Jewelry, watches & loose tools. Proceeds go toward funeral costs of a Loved One.

V ISIT U S 24/7 w w w .valleychevrolet.com

*

O riginalM SRPW hen N ew $35,790 SALE PRICE starting at

$$

1.9% APR

2 6 ,,9 2 1

*

*Prices plus tax & tags. Prior use daily rental on select vehicles. Select pictures for illustration purposes only. Low APR to well qualified buyers. Not responsible for typographical errors.

K E N W A L L A CE ’S

821-2772 •1-800-444-7172

V A L L E Y 601 K IDDE R S TRE E T, W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A CHE V ROL E T

Mon.-Thurs. 8:30-8:00pm; Fri. 8:30-7:00pm; Sat. 8:30-5:00pm

EXIT 170B OFF I-81 TO EXIT 1. BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH LIGHT. JUST BELOW WYOMING VALLEY MALL.


PAGE 12G

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 13G

Ken Pollock

SAVE NOW!

DRIVE NOW!

A TOP 10 IN THE NATION SUZUKI SALES VOLUME DEALER.**

DON’T MISS YOUR CHANCE!

EVERY NEW SUZUKI IN STOCK PRICED TO SELL NOW

2012 SUZUKI SX4 SEDAN

Stk#S1732

2012 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA 4WD 2011 SUZUKI KIZASHI S AWD

Stk# S1782

Stk# S1682

LE Popular Package, Power Windows/ Locks, Keyless Entry, CD

18,289* 16,999* $

$

MSRP $ Ken Pollock Sale Price

- 1,000* - 500***

Manufacturer Rebate $ Suzuki Owner Loyalty

$ SALE PRICE

15,499*

2012 SUZUKI SX4 PREMIUM CROSSOVER ALL WHEEL DRIVE Stk#S1744

Power Windows/Locks, Keyless Entry, CD $

MSRP $ Ken Pollock Sale Price

18,019* 16,999* $

- 500* - 500***

Manufacturer Rebate $ Suzuki Owner Loyalty

SALE PRICE $

15,999*

Navigation, Automatic, Power Windows/Locks, CD $ MSRP $ Ken Pollock Sale Price

Automatic, AM/FM/CD, Power Windows/ Locks, Keyless Entry

23,143* 21,499* $

$

MSRP w/ Add Ons $ Ken Pollock Sale Price Manufacturer Rebate Suzuki Owner Loyalty

$ SALE PRICE

24,154* 22,749* $

- 750* - 500***

Manufacturer Rebate $ Suzuki Owner Loyalty

- 1,000* - $ 500***

19,999*

SALE PRICE $

ARE YOU A MEMBER... OF THE

y m e I lov ki suzu b! u l c r ca

21,499*

2011 SUZUKI EQUATOR CREW CAB SPORT

Stk#S1642

Automatic, Power Windows/Locks, CD, Bedliner $

25,404* 23,499* - 3,000* - 500***

MSRP $ Ken Pollock Sale Price $ Manufacturer Rebate $ Suzuki Owner Loyalty Rebate

SALE PRICE

$

19,999*

* ALL PRICES + TAX & REGISTRATION. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. ALL REBATES AND DISCOUNTS INCLUDED. **BASED ON SUZUKI NATIONAL SALES VOLUME REPORTS FOR 2010. THIS IS A COMBINED OFFER. MAKE YOUR BEST DEAL ON A PACKAGE PRICE. ***OWNER LOYALTY REBATE, MUST HAVE OR OWN SUZUKI VEHICLE IN HOUSEHOLD. +2011 SUZUKI KIZASHI JD POWERS HIGHEST RANKD MIDSIZE VEHICLE (APPEAL) STUDY JULY 2011. OFFERS END OCT 31, 2011.

81 INTERSTATE

ROUTE 315 ROUTE 315

KEN POLLOCK SUZUKI

CLOSE TO EVERYWHERE! WE’RE EASY TO FIND!

JUST OFF EXIT 175 RTE I-81 • PITTSTON

704982

EXIT 175


PAGE 14G

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SAVE $$$

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By Signature Building Systems

On Your Foundation or Complete TurnKey Service

Homes Starting From $59,700

Ask About Our “BYOB” Program

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294342 717645

(289


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 15G 412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale


PAGE 16G

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 758 Miscellaneous

762

FREE AD POLICY

The Times Leader will accept ads for used private party merchandise only for items totalling $1,000 or less. All items must be priced and state how many of each item. Your name address, email and phone number must be included. No ads for ticket sales accepted. Pet ads accepted if FREE ad must state FREE. One Submission per month per household. You may place your ad online at timesleader.com, or email to classifieds@ timesleader.com or fax to 570-831-7312 or mail to Classified Free Ads: 15 N. Main Street, WilkesBarre, PA. Sorry no phone calls. FREEZER Kenmore upright, 20.6 cu. ft. Excellent condition $175.570-239-7886 FREIGHT CARGO HOLDERS 2 adjustable up to 10’ aluminum $80. 570-817-5287

GARAGE SALE LEFTOVER ITEMS

Golf bag, new $45. Christmas outdoor lights, cheap. Craft supplies, cheap. 30” TV $25. Golf balls $2. a dozen. Tower fan $8. Golf clubs $2. Snow boards $10. Solid oak futon $200. Mini refrigerator $30. Crystal chandelier $30. 570-823-7977

GARAGE SALE LEFTOVERS Take all for $50. 570-820-3359

GLASS DOOR. 4 way glass door for bath tub. $25 570-331-8183 HESS TRUCKS: 1990-2010 Hess trucks new boxed $325. Diecast 1/24 JR’s 04 500th win Ser#d $275. 570-654-7752

LEFTOVER GARAGE SALE ITEMS

Monitor, keyboard, mouse, 2.8 processor desktop computer $75. Panasonic microwave $15. Toaster oven $15. Cherrywood night stand $10. Piano bench $10. 2 cabinets & red countertop, $75. pitcher & bowl $10. Oval coffee/tea maker $10. Cloth 3 drawer storage bin $5. Antique push garden edger $50. 570-868-5625

POOL TABLE

Antique 9’ regulation, AL Sterling Co. Manufacture date early 1900’s, ball return, leather pockets, oak frame. Price negotiable. Serious inquiries only. Call 570-654-8063 PRINTER brand new in box HP D4260 ink jet printer $175. Storm door with glass & screen 41’W X 80”L $45. Bathroom Vanity 60X22” with cast iron blue sink, off white with formica top $75. Mercury outboard metal gas tank $35 Standard size double kitchen sink green $20. 570-477-5957 ROLLOUT TRAYS with runners for cabinets, brand name, fawnsaranac, size 2 at $24.24, 2 at 24.36 all 4 are brand new, never used, sell all 4 for $50. 788-1571 SNOW TIRES, P225 /60R16, set of four, good tread, from Ford Freestar. $125. 570-594-4992

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified! STORAGE AUCTION LEFTOVERS Barbie dolls, unopened in boxes, 25 total $150 or best offer. Disney VHS tapes, plastic cases 95 total $60 or best offer. Cabbage Patch dolls, some unopened, some used 25 dolls $75 or best offer. call 570-650-3450 TELEVISION, 27” color, $35. Fax, printer, copier, combo machine. $25. Both very good condition. 570-639-7174 TIRES Chaperal snow s only used for 3000 miles Paid $245. will sell for $110. 570-256-3677 TONNEAU COVER Extang Tri-fecta, Fits 07-up Silverado 5’8” bed $180. 570-2875428 TOW STOW CAR DOLLY 2” ball 5000 pounds max tongue wt. ramps, spare tire &straps tire size 18.5x8.50-8 heavy duty made in USA $300 call 570-696-2169 WHEELS & TIRE SET (4) five spoke with mounted tires for Ford Windstar P21565R16 $300. 570-696-2212

Musical Instruments

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

PIANO

WANTED JEWELRY

Baldwin oak upright, excellent condition, includes bench, cushion & light. $1,200. OBO. Moving piano is at buyers expense. 570-430-9051 VINTAGE UNIVOX UNI WAH (UNIWAH) PEDAL in very good condition. Works and sounds great with that vintage Wah Wah sound. Also works as volume pedal. $129 Call Rick at 2832552 rick@ wyomingvalley.net

766

Office Equipment

COPIER/fax machine, Canon, unused toner cartridge, good condition $50. 735-0191

Let the Community Know! Place your Classified Ad TODAY! 570-829-7130

768

Personal Electronics

HAM RADIO, Yausu FT-767-GX Transceiver with MD-1 desk mike, SP-767P speaker/phone patch. Like new, box & manual $700. 570-288-8362

772

Pools & Spas

POOL, above ground, 21’ pool with filter & covers. $999 or best offer. 570-592-4685

776 Sporting Goods BIKE boys, like new $25. 570-574-5690 FOOSEBALL TABLE electronic $100. Headboards & footboards, boys & girls $20. Sinks 1 tan & 2 white $20. each call 570-262-7923. NORDIC TRACK, good condition $50. 570-735-0191 WEIGHT LIFTING SET UP complete, padded weight bench with upper body & leg work out. Approximate 800 lbs of free weights, dumbells, curl bars, not olympic weights $275.570-606-4353

782

Tickets

PENN STATE TICKETS October 29, 2011 vs. Illinois Section WH-15 yard line - seat backs. (2) at $100 each 570-675-5046 after 6 PM

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise BUYING COINS, gold, silver & all coins, stamps, paper money, entire collections worth $5,000 or more. Travel to your home CASH paid. Marc 1-800-488-4175

NEED CASH?

We Buy: Gold & Gold coins,

Silver, Platinum, old bills, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Diamonds, Gold Filled, Sterling Silver Flatware, Scrap Jewelry, Military items, old Tin & Iron Toys, Canadian coins & paper money, most foreign money (paper/coin). Visit our new location @ 134 Rt. 11, Larksville next to WOODY’S FIRE PLACE & PRO FIX.

We make house calls!

Buyer & seller of antiques! We also do upholstering. 570-855-7197 570-328-3428

The Video Game Store 28 S. Main W.B. Open Mon- Sat, 12pm – 6pm 570-822-9929 / 570-941-9908

$$ CASH PAID $$ VIDEO GAMES & SYSTEMS Highest $$ Paid

Guaranteed Buying all video games & systems. PS1 & 2, Xbox, Nintendo, Atari, Coleco, Sega, Mattel, Gameboy, Vectrex etc. DVD’s, VHS & CDs & Pre 90’s toys,

The Video Game Store

1150 S. Main Scranton Mon - Sat, 12pm – 6pm 570-822-9929

VITO’S & GINO’S Wanted: Junk Cars & Trucks Highest Prices Paid!! FREE PICKUP

288-8995

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 17G 815

Dogs

DOGS: FREE to good home!! 1 is a full breed beagle; 20 lbs; 8 years old. 2ND is a Beagle/ Rottweiller mix; 30 lbs; 8 years old. Both house trained, excellent with children & very playful. Anita at 407-1135

PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 36G FOR ADDITIONAL AUTO ADS

GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS!

WILKESBARREGOLD

Top Quality! West German Show line. Hips & Health Guaranteed. cbk9.com or 570-327-5541

IRISH SETTERS

(570)48GOLD8 (570-484-6538)

Beautiful puppies, AKC registered. $300. Call 570-746-3637

Highest Cash Pay Outs Guaranteed

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED!

Mon-Sat 10am -6pm Closed Sundays

1092 Highway 315 Blvd (Plaza 315) 315N .3 miles after Motorworld

We Pay At Least 80% of the London Fix Market Price for All Gold Jewelry Visit us at WilkesBarreGold.com Or email us at wilkesbarregold@ yahoo.com

CALL AN EXPERT

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

Professional Services Directory

NEWFOUNDLAND/LAB CROSS PUPPIES $350.

CHIHUAHUA PUPS $300.

1054

All shots and vet certified. 570-648-8613

800 PETS & ANIMALS 805

Birds

PINEAPPLE CONURES Hand fed, hand

raised, tame, sold elsewhere for $399. On sale for $199 each. Call 570-472-3914

810

Cats

ROTTWEILER PUPS German lines.

2 females. Ready to go. $550. 570-592-5515 570-654-0678 St. Bernard, Poms, Yorkies, Maltese, Husky, Boxer, Doberman, Golden, Dachshund, Poodle, 570-453-6900 570-389-7877 AKC DOBERMAN PINCHER PUPPIES Ready October 22, Call 570-436-5083s

1000 SERVICE DIRECTORY 1024

Building & Remodeling

1st. Quality Construction Co.

Roofing, siding, gutters, insulation, decks, additions, windows, doors, masonry & concrete. Insured & Bonded.

Senior Citizens Discount! State Lic. # PA057320

CATS & KITTENS 12 weeks & up.

All shots, neutered, tested,microchipped

VALLEY CAT RESCUE

824-4172, 9-9 only CATS 2 bonded male cats, 2 years old/ Free to good home. 829-2674 KITTENS 7 weeks all black, liter trained, free to good home. 518-779-3015. KITTENS FREE 570-693-1088 KITTENS, FREE to good home. 9 weeks old. Kingston 570-239-8391

815

Dogs

Find that new job. The Times Leader Classified section.

All Types Of Work New or Remodeling Licensed & Insured Free Estimates 570-406-6044

1039

ANATOLIAN GUARD DOG PUPPY Male. 10 weeks old. Great with children and animals $350. 570-578-4503

BOSTON TERRIER / PUG PUPPIES 4 males - $275

Call 829-7130 to place an employment ad.

Collect Cash. Not Dust. Sell it in The Times Leader Classified section.

CELLAR RESURFACING

Chimney construction, hauling, small demolition, stucco, porches, sidewalks. Insured. Licensed. I Return All Calls! 570-457-5849

CHIMNEY REPAIRS Parging. Stucco.

Stainless Liners. Cleanings. Custom Sheet Metal Shop. 570-383-0644 1-800-943-1515 Call Now! COZY HEARTH CHIMNEY Chimney Cleaning, Rebuilding, Repair, Stainless Steel Lining, Parging, Stucco, Caps, Etc. Free Estimates Licensed & Insured 1-888-680-7990 570-840-0873

BRADFORD CLOCKS

Complete cabinet & movement restoration. Pickup & delivery available. Fast, dependable, quality work. 50+ years in business. Call 1-800-772-0178

DOBERMAN PINSCHER

Puppies AKC, red & rust, ears cropped. Only 2 availableCooper’s Dobermans 570-542-5158

DOG: FREE to a loving home! 9 year old terrier mix. House trained, great with kids, very friendly & playful 689-2309

A-1 1 ABLE CHIMNEY Rebuild & Repair Chimneys. All types of Masonry. Liners Installed, Brick & Block, Roofs & Gutters. Licensed & Insured 570-735-2257

1045 Clock, Watch Jewelry

3 females - $375 Born 8/1/11 Ready to go! Call 570-825-5659 or 570-793-3905

Do you need more space? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way to clean out your closets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

Chimney Service

ONLY ONL NLY ONE N LE LEA LEADER. E DER. timesleader.com

1048

Call 829-7130 to place an ad. ONLY ONL NL LY ONE N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER. timesleader.com

Masonry. Specializing in waterproofing basements with stone walls. Lic. & insured. 570-468-3988 570-780-8339

*** AFFORDABLE*** General Masonry & Concrete

NO JOB TOO BIG OR TOO SMALL! Masonry /Concrete Work. Licensed & insured. Free est. John 570-573-0018 Joe 570-579-8109 C&C Masonry and Concrete. Absolutely free estimates. Masonry & concrete work. Specializing in foundations, repairs and rebuilding. Footers floors, driveways. 570-840-9913 570-346-4103

J&J MASONRY INC.

Additions, all remodeling, siding, decks, foundations, concrete driveways, sidewalks, porches, stucco, brick pavers, stone, brick & retaining wall. 570-735-6805 Free Estimates LicPA039027

10% OFF All Inside Work! Basement water

NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION

Place your pet ad and provide us your email address

A+ MASONRY All aspects of

MC GERARD & SONS

PA HIC055885

Call 829-7130

wormed. $475 each 570-477-3398

www.bianepa.com

www.qualitydesignbuild.com

ENHANCE YOUR PET CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE

ALASKAN MALAMUTE & SHIBA INU PUPPIES ACA. Shots &

Call the Building Industry Association of NEPA to find a qualified member for your next project. call 287-3331 or go to

800-404-3995

TO CONSIDER....

You can then use your account to enhance your online ad. Post up to 6 captioned photos of your pet Expand your text to include more information, include your contact information such as e-mail, address phone number and or website.

ALL OLDER HOMES SPECIALIST 825-4268. Remodel / Repair Kitchen & Baths

General Remodeling Seamless Gutters Energy Audits Insurance Repairs “We take the Fear out of Remodeling”

PAWS

This will create a seller account online and login information will be emailed to you from gadzoo.com “The World of Pets Unleashed”

570-299-7241 570-606-8438

Concrete & Masonry

Computer Repairs

CBVirus, COMPUTER CARE Spyware,

Malware & Worm Removal. General maintenance. Loaners available. Free Pick up & delivery local area.

570-814-2365

Purebred Animals? Sell them here with a classified ad! 570-829-7130

proofing, concrete floors, parging foundation walls, foundation repair & rebuild, finish basements. PROMPT SERVICE FREE ESTIMATES QUALITY WORKMANSHIP www.mcgerard.com Licensed & Insured 570-941-9122

Williams & Franks Inc Masonry contractors. Chimney, stucco & concrete. 570-466-2916

1057Construction & Building

GARAGE DOOR

Sales, service, installation & repair. FULLY INSURED HIC# 065008 CALL JOE 570-606-7489 570-735-8551

PEI ENTERPRISES, INC.

Residential & Commercial

Building, Remodeling, Maintenance, Management, Landscaping & Preservation. PALic#079784 (570) 496-0277

WWW. PEIENTERPRISESINC . COM

PHILLIPS CONSTRUCTION 33 yrs experience Complete Construction Services

Roofing, siding, windows, additions, decks, etc. Licensed & Insured. 570-788-2283 FREE ESTIMATES

1078

Dry Wall

DAUGHERTY’S DRYWALL INC.

Remodeling, New Construction, Water & Flood Repairs

570-579-3755 PA043609

MARK ANDERSON DRYWALL COMPANY SINCE 1987 Hanging & finishing. Swirreled & Textured ceilings. Water damage & Plaster Repair 570-760-2367

MARK STACK DRYWALL

Hanging & finishing. Textured & swirl ceilings. State licensed & insured. 30 years experience 570-574-7237

1078

Dry Wall

MIRRA DRYWALL Hanging & Finishing Drywall Repair Textured Ceilings Licensed & Insured Free Estimates

(570) 675-3378 1084

Electrical

GRULA ELECTRIC LLC

Licensed, Insured, No job too small.

570-829-4077

SLEBODA ELECTRIC Master electrician Licensed & Insured Service Changes & Replacements. Generator Installs. 868-4469

1093

Excavating

Excavating, Grading, drainage, tree removal, lot clearing, snow plowing, stone / soil delivery. No job too small Reasonable Rates 570-574-1862

1105 Floor Covering Installation AT HOME SELECTIONS Carpet, hardwood vinyl. Free carpet removal. Free installation. Zero interest financing. Free Estimates. 570-655-8004

C & S CARPET INSTALLATION

27 YRS EXPERIENCE Professional, Courteous Service Discount To Flood Victims 570-736-6204 or 570-991-3219

90 N. First Street Stroudsburg, PA 800-600-3033

Free shop at home service. HIC PA026831

FALCONE’S CITY CARPET CENTER

35 N. Main St, Pittston

Flood damage– free estimates! All your flooring needs & window treatments 570-498-0977, 570822-3494, or 570592-4060.

1129 Gutter Repair & Cleaning

GUTTER CLEANING Window Cleaning.

Regulars, storms, etc. Pressure washing, decks, docks, houses,Free estimates. Insured. (570) 288-6794 Professional Window & Gutter Cleaning Gutters, carpet, pressure washing. Residential/commercial. Ins./bonded. Free est. 570-283-9840

1132

Handyman Services

All in a Call

FLOOD CLEAN UP, hardwood floors, tile vct, drywall / finishing, painting, power washing. Free Est. Dependable & Reliable. Package deals available. Call 570-239-4790

ALL MAINTENANCE WE FIX IT

Electrical, Plumbing, Handymen, Painting Carpet Repair & Installation All Types Of Repairs

Handyman Services

1135

Hauling & Trucking

FLOOD VICTIMS Call LICENSED GENERAL CONTRACTOR

823-3788 / 817-0395

POCAHONTAS

We do cleanups basements, garages, etc. Yard waste removal, small deliveries. Buying Old Wood Furniture Same day service.

Plumbing, heating electrical, painting, roofs, siding, rough & finished carpentry - no job too big or small. Free Estimates. Call anytime. 570-852-9281

Problem Solvers Power washing,

CASTAWAY HAULING JUNK REMOVAL

793-8057 826-1883

WClean ILL HAUL ANYTHING cellars,

RUSSELL’S

1162 Landscaping/ Garden

LICENSED & INSURED 30+ years experience. Carpentry, painting & general home repairs. FREE ESTIMATES 570-406-3339

BRUSH UP TO 4’ HIGH, MOWING, EDGING, TRIMMING SHRUBS, HEDGES, TREES, MULCHING, LAWN CARE, GUTTERS, FALL CLEAN UP. FULLY INSURED. FREE ESTIMATES 570-829-3261 TOLL FREE 1-855-829-3261

Property Maintenance

The Handier Man

We fix everything! Plumbing, Electrical & Carpentry. Retired Mr. Fix It. Emergencies 23/7

299-9142

1135

Hauling & Trucking

attics, yards & metal removal. Call John 570-735-3330

Patrick & Deb’s Deb’s Landscaping Landscaping, basic handy man, cleaning, moving & free salvage pick up. AVAILABLE FOR FALL CLEAN UPS! Call 570-793-4773

1183

AA CLEANING

A1 Always hauling, cleaning attics, cellar, garage, one piece or whole Estate, also available 10 & 20 yard dumpsters.655-0695 592-1813or287-8302 AAA CLEANING A1 GENERAL HAULING Cleaning attics, cellars, garages. Demolitions, Roofing & Tree Removal. Free Est. 779-0918 or 542-5821; 814-8299 A.S.A.P Hauling Estate Cleanouts, Attics, Cellars, Garages, we’re cheaper than dumpsters!. Free Estimates, Same Day! 570-822-4582 AAA Bob & Ray’s Hauling: Friendly & Courteous. We take anything & everything. Attic to basement. Garage, yard, free estimates. Call 570-655-7458 or 570-905-4820

Masonry

CHOPYAK MASONRY New Chimneys/ Repairs Sidewalks, Steps, Concrete Free Estimates Fully Insured

570-674-7588

STONE MASON

47 Years Experience Creative. All types of masonry. Precast stone, pavers, stucco & general remodeling. Call 570-301-8200

TOM’S CONCRETE & MASONRY

Brick, block, walks, drives, stucco, stone, steps, chimneys porches and repairs. Lic. & insured. 570-283-5254

1189 Miscellaneous Service

VITO’S & GINO’S

AFFORDABLE JUNK REMOVAL

Cleanups/Cleanouts Large or Small Jobs FREE ESTIMATES (570) 817-4238

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted Highest Prices Paid In CA$H FREE PICKUP

570-574-1275

Wanted: Junk Cars & Trucks Highest Prices Paid!!

FREE PICKUP

288-8995 1195

Movers

BestDarnMovers Moving Helpers Call for Free Quote. We make moving easy. BDMhelpers.com 570-852-9243

1204

Painting & Wallpaper

“AA+ C LASSICAL”

ALL KINDS OF HAULING & JUNK REMOVAL

TREE/SHRUB REMOVAL REMOVAL Estate Cleanout Free Estimates 24 HOUR SERVICE SMALL AND LARGE JOBS! 570-823-1811 570-239-0484

1204

Painting & Wallpaper

DAVID WAYNE PAINTING Scranton to Hazleton

Nobody beats our prices! 570-762-6889

Mike’s $5 & Up

landscaping, tree removal, grass cutting, home repairs, plumbing, sheet rock, painting, fall clean ups. Insured & Licensed 570-751-6140

570-814-9365

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your MIKE SCIBEK DRYWALL basement, garage Hanging & finishing, design ceilings. or attic and call the Free estimates. Licensed & Insured. Classified depart570-328-1230 ment today at 570829-7130!

Motorcycle for sale? Let them see it here in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

1132

All phases. Complete int/ext paint & renovations Since 1990 Free Estimates Licensed-Insured 570-283-5714 A & N PAINTING Airplane Quality at Submarine Prices! Interior/Exterior, pressure washing, decks & siding. Commercial/Residential. Over 17 years experience! Free estimates. Licensed & Insured

570-820-7832

Flood damage? We can help Paint, drywall, Drywall repair, Power washing 15 yrs. Exp. Fully insured 570-215-0257 EXECUTIVEPAINTING.BIZ House in Shambles? We can fix it! Cover All Painting & General Contracting PA068287. Serving Northeast PA & North Jersey since 1989. All phases of interior & exterior repair & rebuilding. Call 570-226-1944 or 570-470-5716 Free Estimates And yes, I am a lead paint removal certified contractor

M. PARALIS PAINTING

Int/ Ext. painting, Power washing. Professional work at affordable rates. Free estimates. 570-288-0733

WITKOSKY PAINTING Interior

Exterior, Free estimates, 30 yrs experience 570-826-1719 or 570-288-4311

1213

Paving & Excavating

EDWARD’S ALL COUNTY PAVING & SEAL COATING

Modified stone, laid & compacted. Hot tar and chips, dust and erosion control. Licensed and Insured. Call Today For Your Free Estimate

570-474-6329 Lic.# PA021520 Mountain Top

PAVING & SEAL COATING Patching, Sealing, Residential/Comm Licensed & Insured PA013253 570-868-8375

1249 Remodeling & Repairs Refinish your bath tub for as low as $299 for jobs scheduled by Oct-14. Includes non skid, SAVE $110!

Call Perma Glaze 1-800-292-6502

REMODELING /RESTORATION from ceilings to

floors, plastering, drywall, painting, carpeting, linoleum, also stucco, dryvit, foundation repairs. Residential/Commercial. 30+ years experience.Insured. Call John 570-235-5185

1252

Roofing & Siding

FALL ROOFING Special $1.29 s/f Licensed, insured, fast service 570-735-0846

J.R.V. ROOFING

570-824-6381 Roof Repairs & New Roofs. Shingle, Slate, Hot Built Up, Rubber, Gutters & Chimney Repairs. Year Round. Licensed/Insured ŠFREE EstimatesŠ *24 Hour Emergency Calls*

1294 Tile & Repair

TILE! TILE!TILE!

Tile, Stone & Marble Installations Floors,Walls & Tubs 20 Yrs. Experience Rick 570-864-8595

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!


PAGE 18G

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

OCTOBER

Intelligence goes a long way.

MANAGERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SPECIAL

2012 SUZUKI SX4 AWD CROSSOVER

Intuitive A legendary legendary Saab engine Intuitivetechnology. technology.Brilliant Brilliant design. design.A SaabTurbo Turbo engine with Addroad-gripping road-gripping AWD XWD anditâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s withananEPA-est. EPA-est.33 33mpg mpghwy. hw.Add and aa -5 Sport no-brainer. The all-new no-brainer.The all-new99-5 Sports Sedan. Sedan.Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s aathinking thinking manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;smachine. machine.

MSRP $18,019

SPECIAL

$15,995

Stock #300017 The power of engineering.

AMERICAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S #1 WARRANTY 100,000-mile/7-year *

100,000-Mile /7-Year Power train Limited Warranty. Fully Transferable. No Deductible.

000 mo. for mos. For ForqualiďŹ ed qualiďŹ ed lessee lessees 399//mo. for XX 39 mos.

$

$

$ 20XX 2011 Saab SaabModel Turbo

0%APR for XX mos.

20XX Saab Model for qualiďŹ ed buyers2

1

1

0,000 signing(after (after all offers). Includes Tax, title,fees license, dealerequipment fees andextra. optional equipment extra. $3,558due due at at signing all offers). Includes security security deposit.Tax,deposit. title, license, dealer and optional

1 Low-mileage lease of a specially equipped 2011 Saab Turbo. Example based on survey. Each dealer sets its own price.Your payments may vary. Payments are for a specailly equipped 2011 Saab Turbo with an MSRP of $40,700. 39 monthly payments total $15,556. Option to purchase at lease end for an amount to be determined at lease signing. Must approve lease. Must take delivery from dealer stock by 05/31/11. Mileage charge of $.25/mile over 32,500 miles. Lessee pays for maintenance, repair and excess wear. Payments may be higher in some states. Not available with other offers. Residency restrictions apply.Vehicle subject to availability.

713 N STATE ST., CLARKS SUMMIT, PA â&#x20AC;˘ 570-586-6676 â&#x20AC;˘ WWW.CHERMAKAUTO.COM M-TH 8-7 â&#x20AC;˘ F 8-5 â&#x20AC;˘ SAT 8-1

JOSEPH CHERMAK INC.

713 North State Street, Clarks Summit, PA 18411 570-586-6676 fax: 570-586-9466 www.chermaksaab.com

*See dealer for details. Includes $500 rebate and $500 Suzuki Owner Loyalty.

Pre-Owned Cars

Pre-Owned Saabs

2010 Suzuki Kizashi SE AWD

2008 Suzuki SX4 AWD

2011 Chevrolet 2500 Cargo Van

$18,995

$13,995

$21,995

18K Miles

34K Miles

23K Miles

2004 Saab 9-3 ARC Convertible

2008 Saab 9-3 Sedan

$12,995

$19,995

100K MILES

2008 Toyota Tacoma 4x4

2007 Honda Accord EX

$CALL$

$17,995

2006 Chrysler PT Cruiser

44K Miles

60K Miles

$8,495

2008 Saab 9-3 Sedan 31K MILES

MANAGERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SPECIAL

$18,995 2004 Chevrolet Impala LS

2001 Subaru Outback Ltd. SW

2004 Chevrolet HD 2500 4x4

$8,995

$9,995

$23,995

Freshly Serviced

Freshly Serviced

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

19K MILES

412 Autos for Sale

Pierce Street

MOTORS

2009 Saab 9-7x Aero

$29,995

$28,995

X WHEEL DRIVE,THINK SNOW! 12K MILES

35K MILES

JOSEPH CHERMAK INC.

713 North State Street â&#x20AC;˘ Clarks Summit, PA 18411 570-586-6676 â&#x20AC;˘ fax: 570-586-9466 www.chermaksaab.com

41K Miles

412 Autos for Sale

2011 Saab 9-3 Sedan XWD

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

 " ! #

"( +$(   (+,&.(4 3($' )13 ,//(',$5( '(.,(3 ,5+ 0$0&,0* 10 5+( 4215 .'i0* 16 %$c- $0' 16 +$e $ c$4+ '1w0 2$/ 1 + 4 i t i ' e r e0t I) %$' c e % $  % $ . / e e t 1 w + e e ' . $ 2 r  t H r $ U e R . R# " $0' c  1r $ )ree

2008 Hyundai Elantra

4 Cylinder /Automatic

$9,995 STK #81360B

2007 Hyundai Sonata SE 6 Cylinder/ Autostick

$10,995 STK#2242A

2005 Ford Escape XLT

2007 Jeep Liberty Sport

2006 Chevrolet Cobalt

$7,995

$9,995

$7,995

2006 Chrysler PT Cruiser

2006 Ford Mustang V6

6 Cylinder/Automatic STK#3319A

2006 Suzuki Aerio

4 Cylinder/Manual

6 Cylinder/Automatic

STK# 81703A

STK#81488A

4 Cylinder/Automatic

4 Cylinder/Automatic

STK#31249A

STK# 36010

$5,995

$7,995

6 Cylinder/Automatic

$8,995 STK#31256A

006 Jeep Liberty Sport

6 Cylinder/ Automatic

$8,995 STK#81594A

2004

Volkswagan Passat 4 Cylinder/ Autostick

$8,795 STK#81627A

 ,(3&( 53((5  ,0*4510       

!,( 163 (05,3( 23( 10(' ,0(0513 10.,0( $5  2,(3&(453((5/151340(2$ &1/ 1..1 64 10 )$&(%11-  )$&(%11- &1/ 2,(3&(45/15134


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 19G

SUNDAY REAL ESTATE

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

THE TIMES LEADER

SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER.

Smith Hourigan Group

Century21SHGroup.com

Amazing views highlight Eaton Hills two-story Story and photos by Marianne Tucker Puhalla Advertising Projects Writer This is one of those homes with a hilltop setting that offers breathtaking views in every direction. Make sure you see 18 Deerfield Dr., in the Eaton Hills development, just outside Tunkhannock. It offers an interesting mix of old world charm and up-to-date amenities, plus an open floor plan with views that you can marvel at from nearly every room. Listed by Melissa Swick, of ERA Brady Associates, for $495,000, this 5,259-square-foot executive home on 2.34 acres features Brazilian cherry flooring and an amazing amount of Italian marble. Amenities include a three-car garage, modern kitchen and large rear deck. This four-bedroom, three and a half bath home has a cream Drivit exterior

WE WILL SELL YOUR HOUSE OR ERA WILL BUY IT! *

and plenty of attention grabbing details, such as a two-story front porch with columns and an amazing two-story foyer with dramatic split staircase. This foyer is where you get your first look at this home’s magnificent windows, including an atrium window overhead. You also get your first look here at the Italian marble tile floor that fans out through the first floor leading to the kitchen and laundry room. To the right of the foyer, columns delineate the open 17-by-15 living room with triple windows front and side and the Brazilian cherry floor. To the left of the foyer, the 17-by-13 dining room has a similar open design with more of the flooring and a triple window front. French doors set on an angle lead from the foyer to the rear-facing 15-by18 kitchen. The kitchen has the cherry flooring, and antique blue cabinets

topped by striking white Corian countertops. There is an amazing amount of cabinet storage including numerous pantry cabinets and a large dresser-style island with a black and green marble countertop. This island hosts an electric cooktop and breakfast bar seating. Appliances include a wall oven, microwave and refrigerator. A breakfast room also has cherry hardwood flooring, a double side window and atrium doors that open rear to an oversized deck. There is a nearby built-in wet bar with wine rack that is designed with entertaining in mind. Columns flank the opening to the right to the 17-by-21 family room. This stunning room has floor-to-ceiling windows and doors that reach up into the vaulted ceiling, and a corner-set fireplace with Continued

Lewith & Freeman Real Estate, Inc.

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 1:00-2:30

620 HOOVEN ST., DURYEA

DIR: Main Street through Pittston, R onto Parsonage Street which turns into Foote Ave, Left onto Hooven @ Town Tavern. Home on Left. Anne Marie Janus; (570)899-0704 MLS#11-1457 $85,600

Searching for your dream home? We Can Help! Kingston: 288.9371 Hazleton: 788.1999

17 DONALD CT., WILKESBARRE

DIR: Take Carey Ave to Simpson St., turn right onto Plymouth St., turn left onto Willow St., then turn left onto Donald Ct. Donna Clarke 570-262-0608 MLS#11-2969 $199,900

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 11:00-1:00

Shavertown: 696.3801 Mountain Top: 474.9801

Wilkes-Barre: 822.1160 Clarks Summit: 585.0600

Atlas Realty, Inc.

829-6200 • www.atlasrealtyinc.com OPEN HOUSE TODAY

314 EDWARD ST., DURYEA $249,000 Wonderful neighborhood, this 4 bedroom 10 year old home has it all. Extra room on 1st flr, great for mother in-law suite or rec room. Modern oak kitchen, living room, central air, in ground pool, fenced yard and attached 2 car garage. Great family home! Call Nancy 237-0752 or Melissa 237-6384. Dir: Main St. Duryea turn onto Stephenson St, make turn on Brown, turn onto Edward.

0-4 2:3

78 HICKORY ST., WILKESBARRE

DIR: Wilkes-Barre Blvd to Lehigh St right onto Hickory home on left. Jenn Davison 793-1033 MLS#11-3458 $48,900

ERA1.com

ONE Mountaintop Office SOURCE 12 N Mountain Blvd. REALTY (570) 403-3000

Proudly serving our community for 23 years.

Open House - New Listing! pm 2:00 0 3 12:

1 GRANDVIEW AVE, HANOVER TWP Discover the values in this welcoming 3-bedroom home. Some of the delights of this very special home are hardwood floors, deck, fully fenced yard and screened porch. A captivating charmer that handles all your needs! CALL MICHAEL 760-4961 $100,000 DIR: From San Souci to St. Mary’s Road. Make first right onto Elma Dr, left onto Grandview.

Open House! pm : 00 0- 2 0 : 12

11 DIVISION ST , SHAVERTOWN 11-1873 Lead a happy life in this spacious 3 bedroom home on a double lot. Enjoy the tranquility of a quiet neighborhood. Lovely details in this outstanding home include finished walk-out basement with fireplace, hardwood floor in dining room, whirlpool tub,

covered patio and an oversized 2 car garage. CALL JACK 878-6225 $160,000 DIR: From Dallas--Rte 309S to left on E Center Hill (at Burger King), right onto Lehigh to right on Division.

83 LUZERNE ST, HANOVER TWP 11-2256 Comfortable and nicely maintained 3 bedroom split-level home. Eat-in kitchen, hardwood floors, family room with propane stove and driveway with off-street parking. CALL FLO 371-2881 $108,000 DIR: Carey Ave to Oxford right on Luzerne-property on left.

Four Star McCabe Realty

$625,000 BACK MOUNTAIN “ FA N TA S T I C HOME” overlooking Francis Slocum State Park W/ 5 BR’s, Ultra modern master bath, “Out of this World” Florida Room W/ built in Bar, multiple garage stalls & more! All on over 6 acres of pure privacy!

Hunlock Crk.-On 1.12 Acres W ! NE TING LIS

Wilkes-Barre-Colonial

Kingston-Nice Neighborhood W ! NE TING LIS

(570) 674-9950 • (570) 824-1499 • (570) 654-4428

Forty Fort-Great Area

Jerry Busch, Jr. Is Ready To Work For “You!” Call Jerry Today 709-7798

GERALD L. BUSCH REAL ESTATE, INC. Pat Is Ready To Work For “You!” 288-2514 Call Pat Today 885-4165 EMAIL: JERRYBUSCHJR@AOL.COM Each Office is Independently Owned And Operated.

KINGSTON VICTORIOUS VICTORIAN!

3,680SF, 2-story home with 2-story home on 1.12 acres, 10 rooms, 4 bedrooms and 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, family room with hardwood and wood 2.5 baths. Kitchen with cherry cabinets, formal dining room burning fireplace, in-ground with hardwoods & butlers pool, hot tub, 2-car garage and plenty of storage space, cleared pantry, laundry room, 3-season room with door to patio, family lot and private driveway. room, master BR & bath. Eric Feifer 283-9100 x29 Pat Silvi 283-9100 x21 MLS#11-3764 $175,000 MLS#11-2502 $214,900

Great Forty Fort location! 9 room ranch located in a great All the work is done for you! Kingston neighborhood. Retro kitchen and baths. Great room Remodeled 2-story on a corner with gas fireplace and abundant lot with a garage and private book shelves, formal dining driveway, 3 bedrooms 1 and 3/4 room, 5 bedrooms, 3 full baths. baths, living room, dining room. In Move-In Condition! Architecturally built. Screened porch Maribeth Jones 696-6565 Jeff Brown 283-9100x 44 MLS 11-3722 $175,000 MLS#11-2206 $129,900

Two Of ces To Serve You Better: 1149 Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort 570.283.9100 28 Carverton Road, Shavertown 570.696.2600 Visit our website: www.poggi-jones.com

Genuine character is expressed throughout every inch of this classic home situated on a lovely residential street. It features 9 rooms, 5 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, modern kitchen with granite counter tops and stainless steel appliances, lots of woodwork - huge newel post. Wrap around porch , screened porch, deck and a two car garage. And Yes.... It does have a Turret! $259,000 Call Pat Busch 885-4165

263490

Call Lisa Joseph at 715-9335 or Virginia Rose at 714-9253 for more information.

WYOMING COUNTY CENTERMORELAND 30 ACRES

NEW LISTING KINGSTON

Victorian Office, excellent condition, 5 zone gas heat, central air with paved off street parking. Beautiful inside and out! Call Pat Busch $299,900

This country estate features 30 acres of prime land w/ a pretty home w/ a modern kitchen, 2 full modern baths, bright family room, den with living room and 3 good size bedrooms. The property has open fields & wooded land, a stream, several fieldstone walls & lots of road frontage. Equipment and & rights included. Call Jerry Busch Jr $489,000

Huge Rooms! Lots of Space ! This home has a huge living room and dining room, den, 2 full baths, 3-4 bedrooms, a massive yard and a larage garage with a second floor for storage.Don’t Wait ! Call Jerry Busch Jr $149,900

You We are number 1, because we care.

57 North Main St., Shavertown, PA Time Plaza, Rt. 115, P.O. Box 1051, Blakeslee, PA

TWINS AT WOODBERRY MANOR

Prices Start at $219,900

WILKES-BARRE WITH HIGH TRAFFIC LOCATION

FOR PROMPT REAL ESTATE APPRAISALS, CALL GERALD L. BUSCH APPRAISAL SERVICE 288-2514

pm :30 0-2 1:0

Spectacular 3br 2 1/2 bath twin on great lot offers beautiful hardwood floors on 1st flr and stunning kitchen with granite counter tops and stainless steel appl. Large master suite with wonderful bath & closet. All modern amenities, stately entry and staircase, composite deck, central air, gas heat, 1 car garage. Dir: Rt 309S to Mountain Top, R at triangle to R onto Nuangola Rd. R into Woodland Estates to enter Woodberry Manor. R onto Woodberry Dr, R onto Twins Lane.

$247,000 HARVEYS LAKE “NEW LISTING” Unique Contemporary Log home W/ 2 levels, W/ tons of charm and character throughout! High on the hill W/ a wonderful view of the lake & private setting on a dead end street. In ground heated pool nestled up to the woods, vinyl fencing, 2 baths, newer roof, ductless A/C & more! Only 3 minutes from the public boat launch. *Owner is licensed agent

$298,500 $229,900 YATESVILLE PITTSTON TWP. “NEW LISTING” “NEW LISTING” Beautiful home in Wonderful home “WILLOW VIEW” on a huge Country that shows “Pride size lot 240x150 of Ownership.... in a private setting, Spacious “Florida just off the beaten Room” leading to path plus aTerrific a private back yard view from the front porch! Dual furnace system, 2 baths, central A/C & Ductless sys- W/ extensive landscaping, 2 car garagebrand new roof, 3 baths , 4 BR’s & LL Family room. Lovely home! tem, fireplace & more!

RUSTLE THROUGH THE LEAVES & CHECK OUT YOUR NEW HOME! !

© 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Af liates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.

Open House!

www.lewith-freeman.com

Now Hiring New Agents To Help Service Our Growing Inventory Follow Us On:

Moosic

Wapwallopen

10.98

Luzerne

S!

ACRE

Room to roam on 10.98 acres with outbuildings, woodsy settings and cleared acreage. Sweet single story home with deck, new windows and hardwood floors. Additional acreage available. MLS# 11-3299 Won’t last long at $110,000. Call Tracy 332-8764.

CED! REDU

Great house on nice lot, great back yard! Showings by appointment only, call Stacey L Lauer Mobile : (570) 262-1158 today! MLS# 11-2511 $80,000

G LISTIN NEW

Three bedroom one bath home with formal dining room and den in need of TLC. Call Tracy McDermott 696-2468 for more info. MLS# 11-3658 WOW! $35,900

Plymouth

G LISTIN NEW

Lovely older home of gracious layout feautures remodeled eat-in kitchen, collonades between LR and DR, covered porch, osp, many other upgrades. Call Tracy McDermott 696-2468. MLS# 11-3748 $49,000

717414

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 1:00-3:00


PAGE 20G

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Eaton Hills

Continued from front page

oak surround. An adjacent powder room has more of the Italian marble flooring and a white pedestal sink. A tiled laundry has a closet, side window, a utility sink and storage cabinets. A 13-by-15 den is located off the foyer and offers a double window. A full bath nearby has more of the Italian marble flooring and a tiled walk-in shower. In addition to having a wide-open staircase with atrium window nearby, a skylight adds natural light to the second floor hall. Upstairs, the vaulted master bedroom measures 16-by-17 and has three front facing and three sidefacing windows. The master bath offers two separate walk-in closets, a triple vanity, walk-in shower and a jetted tub set into a corner of windows. A second-floor family room has a vaulted ceiling and a series of four roof windows. The second full bath offers a decorative vanity on legs with a black and tan cultured stone top with two sinks and a one-piece tub and shower surround. Bedrooms two, three and four range in size from 12by-12 to 14-by-14 and have large windows and closets, including two walk-ins, and cream Berber carpeting. There is a pull-down to attic storage and two additional storage rooms in the basement. The basement level includes a finished 15-by-20 game room featuring cream Berber carpeting and two ground level windows. This property has oil baseboard hot water heat, central air conditioning, and public sewer and water utilities. For more information, or to make an appointment to see extraordinary property, contact Melissa Swick of ERA Brady Associates, (570) 836-3848;(570) 574-7808. SPECIFICATIONS: Two-story 5,259 sq. ft. BEDROOMS: 4 BATHS: 3 full, 1 half PRICE: $495,000 LOCATION: 18 Deerfield Dr., Eaton Hills, Tunkhannock AGENT: Melissa Swick REALTOR: ERA Brady Associates, (570) 836-3848; (570) 574-7808 906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

BACK MOUNTAIN

BEAR CREEK VILLAGE 333 Beaupland

DALLAS

DALLAS

DALLAS

900 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

10-1770

906 Homes for Sale Having trouble paying your mortgage? Falling behind on your payments? You may get mail from people who promise to forestall your foreclosure for a fee in advance. Report them to the Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency. Call 1-877FTC-HELP or click on ftc.gov. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

AVOCA

314 Packer St. Remodeled 3 bedroom with 2 baths, master bedroom and laundry on 1st floor. New siding and shingles. New kitchen. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3174 $99,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

BACK MOUNTAIN

Beautiful 5 bedroom, 2.2 baths & FANTASTIC “Great Room” with built in bar, private brick patio, hot tub & grills! 4 car garage with loft + attached 2 car garage. Situated on over 6 acres of privacy overlooking Francis Slocum with a great view of the lake! Lots of extras & the kitchen is out of this world! MLS#11-3131 $625,000 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

BACK MOUNTAIN

NEW LISTING Wonderful Back Mountain find in Elmcrest development. Big enough to raise four daughters with 3 bedroms, 3 baths, woodburning fireplace, hot tub, replacement windows and hardwood floors under new carpeting, all on a large lot with fieldstone walls. MLS#11-3279 $247,500 McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

1215 Mountain Rd. Well maintained ranch home set on 2 acres with apple trees on property. This home offers 3 bedrooms, sunroom & enclosed porch. Lower level with brick fireplace. 2 car garage. $172,500 MLS# 11-2436 Call Geri 570-696-0888

BEAR CREEK

Meadow Run Road Enjoy the exclusive privacy of this 61 acre, 3 bedroom, 2 bath home with vaulted ceilings and open floor plan. Elegant formal living room, large airy family room and dining room and gorgeous 3 season room opening to large deck with hot tub. Modern eat in kitchen with island, gas fireplace, upstairs and wood burning stove downstairs. This stunning property boasts a relaxing pond and walking trail. Sit back and savor the view MLS 11-3462 $443,900 Sandy Rovinski Ext. 26 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

Living room has awesome woodland views and you will enjoy the steam/ sauna. Lake and tennis rights available with Association membership. (membership optional). Minutes from the Pocono's and 2 hours to Philadelphia or New York. $259,000 Maria Huggler CLASSIC PROPERTIES 570-587-7000

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BERWICK 319 East 10th St

Remodeled 4 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage, large lot (No Flood Zone) Columbia County. Low Taxes! $105,000, 570-204-6550 c-investments.com

BERWICK

Proposed new construction “Ranch Condo” in Green Briar with a 1 car garage, community pool & tennis in a great adult community. $229,900 MLS# 10-1105 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

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DALLAS

H1145 ANDYPERSON SPECIAL 6th Avenue

Lots of potential! $36,500 Can see online c-investments.com 570-204-6550

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248 Overbrook Rd. Lovely 4 bedroom cape cod situated in a private setting on a large lot. Vaulted ceiling in dining room, large walk in closet in 1 bedroom on 2nd floor. Some replacement windows. Call Today! MLS 11-2733 $125,000 Jay A. Crossin Extension 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

DALLAS

DALLAS

Fantastic home with a large family room with fireplace. You will love the kitchen and get ready for “Summer Fun” in the private in ground pool. MLS# 11-1141 $257,500 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

DALLAS

FOR SALE BY OWNER 50% below Market Value. Fixer upper. Not in flood zone. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. Corner lot. $46,500. (570) 394-9537 BERWICK

123 Orchard East Exceptionally well maintained 2 bedroom 1 3/4 bath. 1st floor condo. Patio off each bedroom. 1 car stall for parking. Access to golf course and 2 pools. MLS 11-3395 $109,900 Jay A. Crossin Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

Nice 3 bedroom home on a deep lot with large eat in kitchen. MLS#11-3387 $118,800 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

23 Rice Court If you've reached the top, live there in this stunning 3,900 sq. ft., 4 bedroom, 4 bath home in a great neighborhood. Offers formal living room, dining room, 2 family rooms, florida room, and kitchen any true chef would adore. Picture perfect condition. The basement is heated by a separate system. SELLER PROVIDING HOME WARRANTY. MLS#11-1005 $349,900 Call Barbara Metcalf 570-696-0883

400 Shrine View Elegant & classic stone & wood frame traditional in superb location overlooking adjacent Irem Temple Country Club golf course. Living room with beamed ceiling & fireplace; large formal dining room; cherry paneled sunroom; 4 bedrooms with 3 full baths & 2 powder rooms. Oversized in-ground pool. Paved, circular drive. $550,000 MLS# 11-939 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

Mortgage & Appraisal Services Call a mortgage or appraisal specialist today to assist you in buying or selling your property!

Over 60 Years of Appraisal Experience

Joseph J. Mantione Broker PA Certified Residential Appraiser

www.jjmaginc.com m

Pat McHale Associate Broker PA Certified Residential Appraiser

Brian Walker Sales Associate PA Certified Residential Appraiser

CALL US WITH YOUR APPRAISAL NEEDS!! TAX APPEAL • ESTATE • HOME EQUITY BANKRUPTCY • DIVORCE • REFINANCE

197 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming, PA 18644 •

(570) 613-9080

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

DALLAS

DALLAS

DALLAS

DALLAS SCHOOL DISTRICT

NEWBERRY ESTATES $109,000 2 bedroom, 2 bath unit in move in condition. Lease purchase available. $1,400/month with $4,800 assist at closing. Call Nancy Eckert 570-696-0882 or Terry Eckert 570-696-0843

REDUCED PRICE! Secluded on a hill but part of High Point Acres. 2 story Colonial, 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths. Large family room with fireplace and sliding door to screened porch. Community Swimming Pool. 2 car garage. Central AC. Wooded lot. $265,000. 11-1077 Besecker Realty 570-675-3611

NEW CONSTRUCTION 2,400 sq feet $329,000 OPEN HOUSE SUNDAYS, 11-1

patrickdeats.com 570-696-1041

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

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100% Financing Wooded and private Bi-Level in Dallas School District. This home features 1 Car Garage, 3 Bedrooms, 1 3/4 Bath and nice updates. Plenty of room on your private 2 acre lot.100% USDA Financing Eligible. Call for details.

REDUCED PRICE $166,000 Call Cindy King 570-690-2689

www.cindykingre.com

570-675-4400

Real Estate Briefs –– Prepared by The Times Leader Advertising Department

Atlas Realty donates to the Care & Concern Ministries Recently the Agents of Atlas Realty Inc. gathered to present a $1,000 check to the Care & Concern Ministries of St. John the Evangelist Parish. Agents donated a portion of their commission from sales of homes and properties in Pittston and surrounding area. Donations were matched by the broker. Pictured in the photo are: Melissa Hudzinski (agent), Rev. Richard J. Cirba, Julio Caprari (agent), Nancy Bohn (agent), Tom Salvaggio (agent), Deacon Jim Cortegerone, Angie Dessoye (agent), Terry Guasto (agent), Phil Semenza (agent), Michelle Reap (agent), Charles A. Adonizio, III (Broker/Owner of Atlas Realty), Joe Caprari (agent), Dr. Michael Imbrogno (Care & Concern Free Health Clinic), Peggy Burke (Director of the Food Pantry), Sharon Imbrogno, RN (Care & Concern Free Health Clinic), Mgsr. John Bendik, Keri Best (agent), Luann Sperrazza (agent), and Colleen Turant (agent).


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 21G

Hard to come up with

20%DOWN

TO PURCHASE YOUR NEW HOME? You don’t have to! Free up money for: Savings • New Furniture • Decorating Renovation • Unexpected Expenses

~ McCabe Offers ~

LOW DOWN PAYMENT OPTIONS $0 Down Rural Housing Loans

3.5% Down on FHA Loans

$0 For Qualified Veterans

5% Down Option on Conventional Loans

CALL US TODAY TO EXPLORE YOUR LOW DOWN PAYMENT OPTIONS!

570-714-4200

www.mccabemortgagegroup.com 400 Third Avenue, Suite 100 • Kingston, PA 18704 Superior Home Mortgage Corp. d/b/a McCabe Mortgage Group licensed in PA: Licensed by the Pennsylvania Department of Banking . Company NMLS# 2743. Branch NMLS# 386319. Based on a 30 year fixed rate loan in the amount of $200,000: 20% Downpayment of $40,000, 4.625%/4.678% APR; 3.5% Downpayment of $7,000, 4.75%/5.651% APR; 5% Downpayment of $10,000, 4.75%/5.438% APR. Rates provided as of 8/2/2011. Superior Home Mortgage Corp. d/b/a McCabe Mortgage Group is a private corporation organized under the laws of the State of New Jersey. It has no affiliation with the US Dept of Housing and Development, the US Department of Veterans Affairs, the US Department of Agriculture or any other government agency. Some products may not be available in all states where Superior Home Mortgage Corp. d/b/a McCabe Mortgage Group operates. Credit and collateral are subject to approval. Terms and conditions apply. This is not a commitment to lend. Programs, rates, terms and conditions are subject to change without notice.

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

DALLAS

DALLAS

Smith Hourigan Group

Smith Hourigan Group Smarter. Bolder. Faster.

Mountaintop 570-474-6307

Smarter. Bolder. Faster.

David Dav idd P. Hou Hourigan ourig rig

Open House Today • 1:00-3:00PM

800SF ranch featuring 2 bedrooms, living room, kitchen, one bath & laundry room. Perfect for the person who travels; updated kitchen, bath, carpeting, drywall. MLS#10-3628 Reduced to $79,900 Maribeth Jones 570-696-6565

Sell your own home! Place an ad HERE 570-829-7130

DALLAS

DRUMS

OCTOBER 9 12 - 2PM

$685,000

Laflin Road – Jenkins Township 10 acre parcel Perfect for walking trail or trailers Not in flood plain

Call Ruth K. Smith 570-696-1195 / 570-696-5411 Walters Associate OPEN HOUSE TODAY O’Connor Real Estate Sunday, October 16th Real Estate (570) 715-7700 (570) 283-3148 12:00-3:00pm

Asking $500,000

Any reasonable offer will be considered 2 DEER MEADOWS, DALLAS

Sand Springs 12 Sand Hollow Rd. Nearly new 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath town home. Huge Master with 2 closets full bath. 1 car attached garage, wooded lot, end unit. Cul-de-sac. Great golf community. MLS 11-2411 $172,000 Call Connie Eileen R. Melone Real Estate 570-821-7022

DUPONT FRANKLIN TWP. Orange Road Lush setting on almost 5 acres bordered by magnificent stone walls. Fish pond, large garage, barn, separate offices for storage or in-house business, home with 9 rooms, 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, 2 half baths all on 3 floors. 4400SF in total. Home needs TLC! MLS#11-1628 Reduced to $299,000 Maribeth Jones 570-696-6565

Lovely 3 bedroom 2400 sq. ft. Cape Cod with modern eat-in kitchen, large sunroom and family room. Master bedroom with master bath. Central air, gas heat and 2 car garage. Very well landscaped with beautiful paver sidewalks. Quiet neighborhood. $229,000 Dir: Rt. 309 to Hillside Rd., L on Chase, L on Huntsville, R on Oak

Call David P. Hourigan 570-474-6307 • 570-715-7750

570-675-4400

DALLAS

1305 Oak Drive, Shavertown

The Ice Lakes - Beautiful custom built and finished three year old home on a lakefront lot. Fabulous custom kitchen with Viking appliances. Two story family room with fireplace. Master suite includes outside balcony, pretty tile bath and huge walk-in closet with built-ins. Extensive trim and hardwood floors throughout. Easily finished walk out basement, four car garage and much more! DIR: Turn onto Ice Harvest Dr. from Nuangola Rd. Proceed 2 blocks to house on R.

167 Center St. 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath 2 story home with garage and driveway. Newer kitchen and bath. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3561 $69,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

Beautiful 2 Story Home in Excellent condition in Dallas school district. 4 Bed, 3.5 Bath, Master bedroom with mstr bath and walk-in closet, Modern kitchen with granite countertops and tile flr, study/library with custom cabinetry and stone fireplace. In-ground heated pool, security system and attached 2 car garage in a nice neighborhood. MLS - 11-3680 $459,000 Directions: Dallas Highway to Dallas, left on Machell Ave, Right on Deer Meadows Drive, 1st house on Right.

Call Betty 654-0138 906 Homes for Sale

NEPA’S #1 Real Estate Website!

DUPONT

992 SALES IN 2010* Top 500 Largest Brokers in the U.S.

Steve Farrell Owner/Broker

KINGSTON OFFICE (570) 718-4959 OR (570) 675-6700 Looking for a large home? Here it is! 6 bedrooms with first floor master bedroom and modern bath. Very large modern kitchen. Living room, dining room, family room, enclosed porch, air conditioning, paved drive with parking area. MLS 11-2385 $163,000 Besecker Realty 570-675-3611

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

Looking for a Home?

New Listing

Do U TEXT?

Land DALLAS TWP.

LUZERNE

Get photos and listing information instantly deliveredd to your phone through Classic’s Text-On-Demand

Text “CP” to 59559 GPS determines your current location

New Listing Great potential, 5BR, sunroom, 2nd fl laundry, garage MLS#11-3609

4.5 ac on Rt 309, near New Goss Manor plus .093 ac parcel MLS#11-3616

Mary Cordaro 570-905-6693

Mary Cordaro 570-905-6693 or Carol Shedlock 570-407-2314

Quickly get full listing info for all active MLS listings with PHOTOS

The only TEXT to VIEW technology in NEPA! PLAINS TOWNSHIP

• First Floor Master Bedroom • Central Air • Master Bath with walk-in closet • Gas Heat • Two Additional Bedrooms • Large Living Room • One full and 1/2 additional Baths • Formal Dining Room • Elegant Kitchen • All with Gorgeous Stone Fronts

Reduced

$198,900

KINGSTON

$72,900

Whitney Lopuhovsky 570-718-4959

NORTH POCONO

3 apts fully rented + 3397 sq ft office space on 1st floor. MLS#11-2637

$210,000

Whitney Lopuhovsky 570-718-4959

COMMERCIAL LEASE

New porch, great room w/open floor plan, huge garage, deep yard, many xtras MLS#11-1838

Great Space! 3397 sq ft office space on 1st floor for lease. MLS#11-2708

Whitney Lopuhovsky 570-718-4959

Whitney Lopuhovsky 570-718-4959

$132,500

*CLOSED SALES BASED ON COMPANY WIDE SALES FOR NORTHEASTERN PA FROM 1/1/2010 to 12/31/2010

CLARKS SUMMIT

Commercial WYOMING

Reduced FORTY FORT

Well maintained 3BR 2 story, eat in kitchen, large rooms, garage MLS#11-1176

Listed By: Carol Shedlock Regional Sales Manager 570-407-2314

*JLP PROVIDED THROUGH THE SAVE PROGRAM

Reduced LUZERNE

Dir: River St. Plains to development

Reduced

$39,900

$75,000

TY

www.cindykingre.com

Reservoir Road Privacy on this one acre parcel with a Cape Cod home. Hardwood floors, two bedrooms and one bath on first floor, great room and library with bedroom and bath on second floor. Workshop basement, pond, attached garage. Must see! MLS#11-2966 $219,900 Maribeth Jones 570-696-6565

Ruth K. Smith

Open House - Sunday, Oct. 16 • 1-3pm th

HO ME WA RR AN

SHORT SALE! Charming 3 Bedroom Cape Cod with 1 Car Garage in great neighborhood. Close to Park/Rec Center. Dallas School District. Priced as Short Sale, subject to bank approval. $92,000 Call Cindy 570-690-2689

418 Ice 418 41 Ice Harvest Harvest D Drive, riive, Mountaintop

Shavertown 570-696-1195

TUNKHANNOCK

$2,500

*Ranking as of Jan. 2011

POCONO MOUNTAIN


PAGE 22G

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Scenic Hilltop Location

• 1.5 - 2 Acres • Custom Built Homes • Restricted Covenants

Wyoming Area School District

• On Cul-de-sac No Thru Traffic • Road Access Completed By Winter

Pride Builders Exclusive Builder

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

• Exeter Township within

SOLD SOLD

Hurry! Only 4 Lots Left

a mile of Applewood Golf Course • Located in a beautiful area not effected by recent flooding

Buy Now For Spring Building Wyoming Area School District

Located in a beautiful area not effected by recent flooding.

Call for an appointment

(570) 283-0327


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 906 Homes for Sale

DURYEA

DURYEA

1219 SOUTH ST. Renovated 1/2 double with 3 bedrooms in nice neighborhood. Own for what it takes to rent. All new windows. For more info and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 11-2523 $54,900 Call Phil 570-313-1229

38 Huckleberry Lane Blueberry Hills 4 BEDROOMS, 2.5 baths, family room with fireplace, 2 car garage, large yard. Master bath with separate jetted tub, kitchen with stainless steel appliances and island, lighted deck. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 11-3071 $329,000 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

DURYEA

DURYEA

302 Cherry St. Don’t miss out on this charming 2 story which boasts Pride of Ownership. Move in condition with many updates. Modern eat in kitchen, dining room is open to living room, 2 bedrooms, 1 3/4 baths. As a bonus enjoy the view from your large upper floor living area with gas fireplace and sliding doors that lead to a spacious balcony. Beautiful manicured corner lot. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3512 $129,900 Call Terry 570-885-3041 Angie 570-885-4896

P E N D I N G

PurebredAnimals? Sell themherewith a classifiedad! 570-829-7130

548 ADAMS ST. Charming, well maintained 3 bedroom, 1 bath home located on a quiet street near Blueberry Hills development. Features modern kitchen with breakfast bar, formal dining room, family room with gas stove, hardwood floors in bedrooms, deck, fenced yard and shed. MLS#11-2947 $112,500 Karen Ryan 283-9100 x14

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

DURYEA

DURYEA REDUCED

EXETER

EXETER

FORTY FORT

Vinyl sided 4 bedroom spacious home with a great eat in kitchen, 1 3/4 baths & much more. Near the local schools. PRICE REDUCED $119,900 MLS# 11-1144 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

OPEN HOUSE

GREAT REDUCED PRICE! Charming home with hardwood floors, fireplace & Built in's, formal dining room, 2 car garage, sunporch & neat as a pin throughout! Nice location on a tree lined street away from the hustle & bustle! $114,900 MLS# 10-4472 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

NOT IN FLOOD ZONE 5 rooms. For sale by owner. 2 bedrooms and bath upstairs, 3 rooms and 1/2 bath downstairs, corner lot with small yard. $56,000 570-885-4913 570-885-3367

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

DURYEA

PRICE REDUCED! 314 Bennett Street Refashioned 3 or 4 bedroom, two full modern baths. Two story, 2300sf, with level yard with lovely new landscaping and 1 car garage. New EVERYTHING in this charming must see property. Custom blinds throughout the home. Great neighborhood with Park beyond the backyard. MLS# 11-3776 $174,900 Call Patti 570-328-1752 Liberty Realty & Appraisal Services LLC

DURYEA REDUCED

P E N D I N G

EDWARDSVILLE

1140 SPRING ST. Large 3 bedroom home with new roof, replacement windows, hardwood floors. Great location! For more information and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com. MLS 11-2636 $104,900. Call Tom 570-262-7716

Purebred Animals? Sell them here with a classified ad! 570-829-7130

EXETER

Nice size 4 bedroom home with some hardwood floors, large eat in kitchen with breakfast bar. 2 car garage & partially fenced yard. Close to everything! $92,900 MLS# 11-1977 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

EXETER 9 Williams St. Large 4 bedroom home with nice rear deck, replacement windows, off street parking. Possible apartment in separate entrance. Loads of potential. For more info and pictures visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-2091 $69,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

EDWARDSVILLE

DURYEA

805-807 Main St. Multi-Family. Large side by side double with separate utilities. 3 bedrooms each side with newer carpet, replacement windows and newer roof. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 11-3054 $89,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

411 JONES ST. Beautiful 2 story English Tudor with exquisite gardens, surrounding beautiful in ground pool, private fenced yard with a home with too many amenities to list. Enjoy the summer here! Screened in porch and foyer that just adds to the great living space of the home For more info and photos: visit:www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 11-2720 $229,900 Call Phil 570-313-1229

NEW LISTING 3 bedroom Townhouse has 1st floor laundry and recently added sunroom. Move in ready. MLS#11-2965 $119,000 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

EXETER

93 Washington St. Looking for a large home? You found it! This home was gutted down to studs in 1990 and family room addition added in ‘93. Vinyl sided and vinyl windows. 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths. Oak kitchen, tile, gas fireplace in family room and gas hot water heat. Pull down attic for storage. Nice home just needing your own personal touch! MLS 11-3324 $85,000 Mark R. Mason 570-331-0982 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

908 Primrose Court Move right into this newer 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath Townhome with many upgrades including hardwood floors throughout and tiled bathrooms. Lovely oak cabinets in the kitchen, central air, fenced in yard, nice quiet neighborhood. MLS 11-2446 $123,000 Call Don Crossin 570-288-0770 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-287-0770

Sunday 12pm-5pm

362 Susquehanna Ave

Completely remodeled, spectacular, 2 story Victorian home, with 3 bedrooms and 1.5 baths, new rear deck, full front porch, tiled baths and kitchen, granite countertops, all Cherry hardwood floors throughout, all new stainless steel appliances and lighting, new oil furnace, washer dryer in first floor bath. Great neighborhood, nice yard. $174,900 (30 year loan, $8,750 down, $887/month, 30 years @ 4.5%) 100% OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE Call Bob at 570-654-1490

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

EXETER REDUCED

128 JEAN ST. Nice bi-level home on quiet street. Updated exterior. Large family room, extra deep lot. 2 car garage, enclosed rear porch and covered patio. For more information and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 11-2850 $184,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

Need a Roommate? Place an ad and find one here! 570-829-7130

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

FORTY FORT REDUCED!

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

FORTY-FORT

HANOVER TWP

HANOVER TWP.

167 Slocum St Handyman special. 3 bedrooms, 1.5 bath, two story. Nice lot/neighborhood. Being sold as is. $45,000 570-954-8825 or email gckar1@yahoo.com

GLEN LYON

187 South Street 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, modern kitchen, security system, beautifully landscaped patio, pond & above ground pool are just a few of the touches that make this home so appealing. Great neighborhood! Close to major highways. MLS #11-2370 $129,000 Call Debra at 570-714-9251

You’ll look long & hard to ever find a beautiful Double like this one! Huge 120x130 lot with detached 2 car garage & loft , modern kitchens, 1.5 baths , pocket doors & so much more! $118,500 MLS# 11-1167 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

Let the Community Know! Place your Classified Ad TODAY! 570-829-7130

HANOVER TWP.

HANOVER

1301 Murray St. Very nice duplex, fully rented with good return in great neighborhood. For more information and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-2149 $124,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

22 DEXTER STREET GREAT GREAT BUY FIRE SALE! $4,000. Won’t last long. Call 570-780-3009

HANOVER TOWNSHIP

Reduced! Bi-Level. 1,750 sq ft. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 1 car garage. New carpeting, paint, etc. Large lot. Asking $99,900. Deremer Realty 570-477-1149

PRICE REDUCED! 290-292 Lee Park Ave Very nice all brick double block with front and back porches. Beautiful yard with mature plantings; 3 bedrooms, 1 bath on each side. Out of the flood zone! MLS#11-1988 $129,900 Christine Pieczynski 570-696-6569

5 Raymond Drive Practically new 8 year old Bi-level with 4 bedrooms, 1 and 3/4 baths, garage, fenced yard, private dead end street. For more info and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 11-3422 $179,000 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

HANOVER TWP.

8 Diamond Ave. Don’t worry about winter in this fully insulated home with new windows. 3 floors of living space lets you spread out and enjoy this house. Large family room addition plus 4 bedrooms, 1 1/2 baths, 1st floor laundry, large corner lot. Modern kitchen with granite counters. For more information and photos visit www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS #11-622 $119,000 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

DeRemer Realty

Phone: 22 DeRemer Drive, Sweet Valley (570) 675-0520 or (570) 477-1149 Hunlock Creek P.O. PA 18621 E-MAIL: mderemer@icontech.com 110 Oxford St., Hanover Township (Lee Park Section) Beautiful up-dated Bi level with 4 bedrooms, large family room, two full large baths & modern kitchen. Finished lower level, deck. Plenty of off street parking with garage, driveway & back yard access from alley if needed. Ready to move in with new wall to wall & painting etc. MLS #11-280

Reduced to $99,900 Anxious seller, make reasonable offer!

Please call Bob DeRemer for all your appraisal needs. Certified, reasonable rates

Heritage Homes Promise: Competitive Pricing No Hidden Costs N pggrades p Noo H Hidden Upgrades

714548

906 Homes for Sale

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 23G

The Somerville - 2,210 sq. ft. Starting at $211,900

The Mayfield - 2,202 sq. ft. Starting at $196,300

The Brentwood - 2,131 sq. ft. Starting at $177,800

The Bedford C - 2,098 sq. ft. Starting at $176,800

Northeastern Pennsylvania’s builder for over four decades Scan to visit our website!

2808 Scranton/Carbondale Highway Blakely, PA 18447 570-383-2981 • www.heritagehomesltd.com

Featuring:


PAGE 24G

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

906 Homes for Sale

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

906 Homes for Sale

HANOVER TWP. HANOVER TWP.

Attractive, Well Maintained & Constructed!

3 bedroom, living room, dining room, new carpet, new kitchen (appliances included), enclosed patios, floored attic with electricity, 1.5 baths, hardwood floors, storage sheds, new roof, windows, vinyl siding, central air, gas heat, in-ground pool with new liner, washer & dryer included, heated garage. Excellent location & much more! For more information call 570-824-7196

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

HANOVER TWP. KORN KREST

322 Spring Street Out of the flood area. 2 family home. One with 2 bedrooms, the other with 3 bedrooms. Needs TLC. 50x125ft lot. Walking distance to schools grade 7-12, kindergarten & 1st. $49,000.

Kwiatkowski Real Estate 570-825-7988

LIBERTY HILLS 209 Constitution Avenue Fantastic view from the deck and patio of this 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath vinyl sided 2 story home. Four years young with so many extras. A dream home! MLS# 11-2429 $299,900 Call Florence 570-715-7737

Great home. First floor Master Bedroom, Huge walk-in closet, Master bathroom suite with sunken tub and tile shower. Two Family rooms, both overlooking the patio, valley and river. Breathtaking views from the gourmet kitchen. VERY HIGH AND VERY DRY !!!! Pick your lot now…$350,000

Smith Hourigan Group 570-474-6307

HANOVER TWP.

2 story in good condition with 3 bedrooms, 1 full bath, eat-in kitchen, 2 car garage, fenced yard & new gas heat. MLS # 10-4324 Reduced to $44,000 Call Ruth at 570-696-1195 or 570-696-5411

Great buys ………VERY HIGH AND VERY DRY !!!! The Views at Eagle View in Jenkins Township are outstanding. You’ll never find a better time to buy your lot. Put a deposit on any lot and build when you are ready. We are a custom builder and will build to your plan or modify one of ours to be your “Dream Home”. Trade your flood property for one of our lots/home packages.

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

HANOVER TWP.

HARDING

HARDING

HARDING

HARVEYS LAKE

HARVEYS LAKE

19 Garrahan Street Attractive 2-story in great neighborhood. Newer roof, newer 2nd floor replacement windows, newer split A/C system, large eat-in kitchen, bedroom pine flooring, walk-up attic & a mostly fenced yard. REDUCED $59,900 MLS#11-1754 Call Steve Shemo (570) 288-1401 (570) 793-9449

131 THEODORE ST., Beautiful bi-level located in Hex Acres, a quiet country setting, yet minutes from town. This home features quality workmanship and finishes and is in absolute move-in condition. Features modern kitchen and baths, lower level family room, sunroom, deck and above ground pool. All on a large nicely landscaped lot. MLS#11-2901 $160,000 Karen Ryan 283-9100 x14

605 Apple Tree Road NOT AFFECTED BY THE SEPTEMBER 2011 FLOOD.White split stone Ranch with 1500 sq. ft. of living space. 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, propane gas fireplace with stone mantel. Custom kitchen with oak cabinets with pull outs. Granite counter tops and island, plaster walls, modern tile bath, open floor plan. 2nd kitchen in lower level. Electric heat, wood/coal burner in basement. Central air, 2 stoves, 2 dishwashers, 2 microwaves, 2 fridges, front load washer and dryer included. Automatic generator. Attached 2 car garage and detached 3 car garage. Home in near perfect condition. For more info and photos view: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-2968 $229,900 Call Lu Ann 570-602-9280

Route 92 “Picture Perfect” View. If you are looking for exceptional value in a rural property, then don’t pass up this 4 bedroom, 2 bath home. Beautiful Landscaping. Includes riverfront property. 1/2 mile from public boat launch. Not in Flood Zone. $150,000 MLS 11-2996 Call Arlene Warunek 570-650-4169

New Listing. Unique Contemporary Log home with full finished lower level family room, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, beautiful stone fireplace, heated In ground pool & a great view of the lake! Very private setting nestled up against the woods, high on the hill. Loads of charm & character, “One of a kind” home. *Agent owned. MLS11-3754 $247,000 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

Smith Hourigan Group (570) 696-1195

Find the perfect friend.

Pole 165 Lakeside Drive A truly unique home! 7,300 sq.ft. of living on 3 floors with 168' of lake frontage with boathouse. Expansive living room; dining room, front room all with fireplaces. Coffered ceiling; modern oak kitchen with breakfast room; Florida room; study & 3 room & bath suite. 5 bedrooms & 4 baths on 2nd. Lounge, bedroom, bath, exercise room & loft on 3rd floor. In-ground pool & 2story pool house. AC on 3rd floor. $1,149,000 MLS# 10-1268 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

WE NEED YOUR HELP!

Seller willing to help pay Buyer's closing costs!!

Anonymous Tip Line Luzerne County Sheriffʼs Office

SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP

STORM DAMAGE?

ALL TYPES OF REMODELING Roofing • Siding • Structural Repairs and Replacement • Drywall • Interior Damage We Will Work With Your Insurance Company! Prompt – Reliable – Professional MICHAEL DOMBROSKI CONSTRUCTION

Collect Cash. Not Dust.

25 Years Experience

570-406-5128 / 570-406-9682 PA#031715 • Fully Insured

Rae Dziak 714-9234

(570) 288-9371

Sell it in The Times Leader Classified section.

rae@lewith-freeman.com

21 Burndale Road, Dallas

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified! HARDING

NE

W NE

3-4BR Cape Cod. Modern kitchen w/all appliances. HW, carport, 2 driveways, heated pool, sunroom. Handicap $109,000 accessible. $145,900

803 E. Northampton St., Wilkes-Barre Twp.

30 Tamanini Drive, Wyoming

PE 3 ND W IN EE G KS IN !

LD O S

Call 829-7130 to place an ad.

The Classified section at timesleader.com

Looking to buy a home? Place an ad here and let the sellers know! 570-829-7130

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

Call 829-7130 to place your ad.

Looking to buy a home? Place an ad here and let the sellers know! 570-829-7130

ONLY ONL NLY NL L ONE N LE L LEA LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

SERENITY

Enjoy the serenity of country living in this beautiful two story home on 2.23 acres. Great for entertaining inside and out. 3 car attached garage with full walk up attic PLUS another 2 car detached garage. WOW! A MUST SEE! For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS#11-831 $267,000 Call Nancy 570-237-0752 Melissa 570-237-6384

ONLY ONL NL LY ONE N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER. timesleader.com

$334,900

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

310 Lockville Rd.

W

PR

PR

ICE

ICE

!

!

112 E. First Street, Exeter

$76,500

RIVER SHORES… We still have two great properties in West Pittston’s River Shores….. we have a spec with 3400 square feet of living space with huge home theater and loft, high ceilings and two Fps. We also have a building lot for a custom home of any size.

We have started our landscaping at Eagle View…. making these spectacular lots even more outstanding.

1-888-796-5519

4 BR, 2 bath, garage, Wyoming Area Schools!

BEAUTIFUL HOMES ANY SIZE in the Pittston area….. with rooms overlooking the valley and river below, large Great Rooms with fireplace and a keeping room off the kitchen opening to the outstanding rear yard. WE WILL CUSTOM DESIGN YOUR OWN DUPLEX RANCH HOME FOR $299,900. Larger homes with 4 or 5 bedrooms priced below $400,000. These lots are outstanding with rear yards that will be the envy of your friends. VERY HIGH AND VERY DRY !!!!

New Residential Construction Custom Remodeling Kitchen and Baths Land Development

rank F arey C Construction, Inc. Where High Quality Is The Standard

Office: 570-655-2374 Direct: 570-237-1444

w w w. f r a n k c a r e y c o n s t r u c t i o n . c o m

Celebrations Area Businesses To Help Make Your Event a Huge Success!

DJ

Jazmyn Floral

Johnny Super Star

Fresh flowers for any occasion.

Your party entertainer! Free magic show for kids of all ages with personal DJ, Now booking Christmas & New Year Eve Events! DON’T DELAY, CALL TODAY!

PARTIES, WEDDINGS, FUNERALS, PROM & MORE.

516 N. Main St. • W-B Daily Delivery. Mon-Fri 9am-4pm Sat 9am-1pm

Serving all of Lackawanna & Luzerne County

BEVERAGES

WYO. VALLEY BEVERAGE Rt. 11 Edwardsville

KEYSTONE LIGHT FLORAL

Barry’s Floral Shop

176 S. Mountain Blvd. Mountaintop, PA

570-474-9848

www.barrysfloralshop.com

$16.97 BEST CRAFT BEER SELECTION AROUND!

CLUB 79

Banquet room available for Parties! Birthdays, Sweet 16s, Baby Showers & More! $200 for 4 hours.

825-8381 • 793-9390 Free Pool Wed & Fri 8-10

• Weddings • Parties • Dances • Karaoke

www.TheLesserEvilDJ.com Check us out on Facebook! (570) 954-1620 Nick (570) 852-1251 Allen

570-407-2703

DUNDEE BEVERAGE

Catering For All Occasions! We specialize in Italian/American Cuisine

Keyco Plaza San Souci Parkway

TEMPORARILY CLOSED DUE TO FLOODING

& His Performing Dogs

Now Booking 2011 -2012 dates for • Weddings • Bazaars/Fairs • Parties for Any Occasion

www.GrooveTrainband.com

654-8368

Ringling, Barnum & Bailey and his All American Canine Friends. Now taking engagements for all fall and winter holiday parties, childrens parties & every where people gather!

570-756-2881

WE DO PARTIES

The Lesser Evil DJ

BEVERAGES

TIM THE CLOWN

NEPA’s premier Dance Band

DJ

CATERING Banquet facility at West Wyoming Hose Co. #1 or we’ll bring it to you!

PARTIES

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

Bring your own food. Bartender Available.

570-270-5113

(570)-430-3299

12 OZ. 30 PACK CANS

PARTIES

FLORAL

We’re Your One Stop Pumpkin Place... Try our delicious Pumpkin Ice Cream, Pumpkin Rice Pudding, Pumpkin Sundaes, Pumpkin Flurries, Pumpkin Shakes and Pumpkin Whoopie Pies

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

Twelve Twenty-Four High Energy, full-scale holiday rock orchestra concert! 11/19 @ 7pm - Hazleton Castle Performing Arts Center, 12/9 @ 7pm - Tunkhannock Auditorium 12/4 @ 6pm - Pittston Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Get the full schedule @ www.TwelveTwentyFour.net

• Office • Business • Birthday • School • Fundraisers • Celebrations

Delivered to you or At The Shack

The Snack Shack 750 Wilkes-Barre Twp Blvd Wilkes-Barre (570)-270-2929

PARTY HALLOWEEN SPECTACULAR

Featuring The Poets & Frankie and the Corvette’s, Dani-elle & Donna Trusky Genetti Manor, Dickson City

Saturday, October 29 – Doors open at 5pm Deluxe Buffet & Cash Bar. $35 pp

383-0207 or 343-2429 or 457-2808 (evening)

To Advertise Call Tara 570-970-7374


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY,OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 25G

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

HAZLE TOWNSHIP

JENKINS TWP. (Eagle View)

KINGSTON

KINGSTON

KINGSTON

LAFLIN

LAKE SILKWORTH

LUZERNE

MOUNTAIN TOP 460 S. Mtn

MOUNTAIN TOP PRICE REDUCED

738 Pardeesville Rd.

Blvd.

Home/Lot Package Beautiful custom built home with a stunning river view overlooking the Susquehanna River and surrounding area. Custom built with many amenities included. A few of the amenities may include central A/C, master bedroom with master bath, ultramodern kitchen, hardwood floors, cathedral ceiling, and a 2 car garage. There are are many other floor plans to choose from or bring your own! For more details & photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-2642 $375,000 Call Kim 570-466-3338

HAZLETON

714 E. Samuels Ave TERRACE Living at a great price!!! 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths. Many “UPGRADED” features: Newer Central Air, Newer Roof, “Complete” Security System,and Epoxy Overlay Flooring in Garage, all add to the comfort of this home. Newer paint,carpets and custom window treatments make it move in ready. Call Karen for a personal showing. $164,900 Century 21 Select Group - Hazleton 570-582-4938

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

HAZLETON

Double – 6 rooms, 3 bedrooms, 1 bath each, separate utilities, fenced yard, walk up attic. Priced to sell. MLS –11-3099 $32,400 Call Ann Marie Chopick 570-760-6769

570-288-6654

HUGHESTOWN

189 Rock St. Spacious home with 4 bedrooms and large rooms. Nice old woodwork, staircase, etc. Extra lot for parking off Kenley St. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3404 $104,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

JENKINS TOWNSHIP 2 Owen Street

Find Something? Lose Something? Get it back where it belongs with a Lost/Found ad! 570-829-7130

10 Miller Street 3 bedroom, 1 bath ranch recently damaged by flooding. No structural issues, roof is good, will need basement and first floor renovations. Large lot, off-street parking with carport, nice location. MLS#11-3646 Originally 129,000 Reduced to $42,500! Eric Feifer 570-283-9100 x29

JENKINS TWP.

297 Susquehannock Drive Settle into summer with this great 2 story home on quiet cul-de-sac with private back yard and above ground pool. Deck with awning overlooking yard! 4 bedrooms, 2.5 bath home in Pittston Area School District with family room, eat in kitchen, central a/c and garage. Full unfinished basement MLS 11-2432 $259,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

JENKINS TWP.

475 S. Main St. 3 bedroom, 1 bath, 2 story home with vinyl replacement windows, vinyl siding, large yard and off street parking. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3545 $79,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

Find the perfect friend.

23 Mead St. Newly remodeled 2 story on a corner lot with fenced in yard and 2 car garage. 4 bedrooms, 1 bath, 1,660 sq. ft. For more information and photos visit www.atlas realtyinc.com $84,900 MLS 10-3684 Call Bill 570-362-4158

Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 570-474-2340

ONLY ONL NLY NL L ONE N LE L LEA LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

KINGSTON

129 S. Dawes Ave. 4 bedroom, 1 bath, large enclosed porch with brick fireplace. Full concrete basement with 9ft ceiling. Lots of storage, 2 car garage on double lot in a very desirable neighborhood. Close to schools and park and recreation. Walking distance to downtown WilkesBarre. Great family neighborhood. Carpet allowance will be considered. For mor info and photos visit: www.atlas realty.inc.com $129,900 MLS #11-1434 Call Tom 570-262-7716

P E N D I N G

KINGSTON

171 Third Ave

KINGSTON

So close to so much, traditionally appointed 3 bedroom, 3 bath townhome with warm tones & wall to wall cleanliness. Modern kitchen with lots of cabinets & plenty of closet space throughout, enjoy the privacy of deck & patio with fenced yard. MLS 11-2841 $123,000 Call Arlene Warunek 570-650-4169

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

KINGSTON 58 S. Welles Ave

Large charmer had been extensively renovated in the last few years. Tons of closets, walk-up attic and a lower level bonus recreation room. Great location, just a short walk to Kirby Park. MLS 11-3386 $129,000 Call Betty at Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 570-287-1196 ext 3559 or 570-714-612

Spacious 2 story home on lovely tree lined street. Includes 3 bedrooms, 3 baths (1 on each floor), Living room, dining room, family room, office and kitchen. All new windows, fresh paint. MLS 11-2676 $136,000 Call Kathy 570-696-5422

SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP 570-696-1195 76 N. Dawes Ave. Very well maintained 2 bedroom home with updated kitchen with granite counter. Large sunroom over looking private back yard. Attached garage, large unfinished basement. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-2278 $129,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

KINGSTON

Stately brick 2-story featuring formal living room with fireplace, formal dining room, modern cherry kitchen, knotty pine study, spacious family room, sunroom, computer room, TV room, 4 bedrooms, 5 baths. Finished basement. Hardwood floors in living room, dining room, bedrooms & study. Lovely fenced yard, 1 car garage. Well built steel constructed home in a great location! $339,000 MLS#11-2250 Call Ruthie (570) 714-6110

Smith Hourigan Group 570-287-1196

KINGSTON

LAFLIN

Completely remodeled, mint, turn key condition, 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, large closets, with hardwoods, carpet & tile floors, new kitchen and baths, gas heat, shed, large yard. $134,900, seller will pay closing costs, $5000 down and monthly payments are $995/month. Financing available. WALSH REAL ESTATE 570-654-1490

KINGSTON

KINGSTON

Find Your Ideal Employee! Place an ad and end the search! 570-829-7130 ask for an employment specialist

621 Gibson Avenue BY OWNER. Brick Cape Cod with hardwood floors. 3 bedroom, family room, 2 bath, living room with fireplace, two car garage with loads of storage, partially finished basement. Price Reduced! $179,900 Call (570) 333-5212 No Brokers Please.

Seller Wants To Deal!

Stately home on a corner lot with a lot of nooks, crannies & built-ins. Lower level living quarters that would be a Teens dream! Formal dining room, fireplace, formal entry & more! $199,500 MLS# 11-1452 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

Smith Hourigan Group (570) 696-1195

JENKINS TWP. BACK ON THE MARKET

Call 829-7130 to place your ad.

KINGSTON

JENKINS TWP.

This 2 story, 3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath home is in the desired location of Jenkins Township. Sellers were in process of updating the home so a little TLC can go a long way. Nice yard. Motivated sellers. MLS 11-2191 $89,900 Call Karen

The Classified section at timesleader.com

Very attractive home with a 2 car garage, new family room & stainless steel appliances. Ample off street parking. NEW PRICE $142,600 MLS# 10-4452 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

Spacious ranch with 4 bedrooms, 1 3/4 baths, 18x22 Family room with fireplace on a 102x150 lot. Fantastic view from the rear deck! MLS# 11-2609 $147,500 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

LAFLIN

OPEN HOUSE

Sunday 12pm-5pm 46 Zerby Ave Lease with option to buy, completely remodeled, mint, turn key condition, 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, large closets, with hardwoods, carpet & tile floors, new kitchen and baths, gas heat, shed, large yard. $134,900 (30 year loan @ 4.5% with 5% down; $6,750 down, $684/month) 100% OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE Call Bob at 570-654-1490

KINGSTON REDUCED

167 N. Dawes Ave. Move in condition 2 story home. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, hardwood floors, ceramic throughout. Finished lower level, security system For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-1673 $154,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

33 Market St. Commercial/residential property featuring Ranch home with 3 bedrooms, newly remodeled bathroom, in good condition. Commercial opportunity for office in attached building. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3450 $169,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

Find the perfect friend. The Classified section at timesleader.com

Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONLY ONL NLY NL L ONE N LE L LEA LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

582 Gibson Ave FOR SALE BY OWNER Tastefully remodeled traditional in one of Kingston's finest and convenient neighborhoods. Features include: hardwoods and tile throughout, 5 bedrooms, 2 Full baths, 2 half baths, modern kitchen, finished basement/entertainment room, finished attic, office with fireplace, huge deck, inground pool, 8 person hot tub, 2 car garage. If you want Kingston, you need to see this property. Asking price $282,500 (570) 899-0236

5 Fairfield Drive Motivated seller! Move right in just in time to entertain for the holidays in this 3 bedroom 2.5 bath home in a private setting. Prepare for the festivities in this spacious gourmet kitchen with stainless steel appliances and Subzero refrigerator. Your guests can enjoy the spectacular view of the West mountains. Must see to appreciate all of the amenities this home has to offer. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-1686 $314,900 Call Keri 570-885-5082

LAFLIN

22 Dogwood Drive Beautifully kept home on a quiet dead-end street. Handicap accessible. Convenient Laflin location, close to interstate and turnpike. Last home on street makes it very private and quiet! Home features large basement with extra ceiling height, living room opens to modern, eat-in kitchen, 4 bedrooms, 2 full baths. Beautifully landscaped yard with large deck and pond. MLS#11-3432 $218,900 Chris Jones 570-696-6558

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

Lake house completely remodeled interior and exterior. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, laundry room and carport. Deeded lake Access MLS 11-2345 $88,000 Barbara Strong 570-762-7561 ANTONIK & ASSOCIATES 570-735-7494

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

LARKSVILLE

Very well maintained double-block has 4 bedrooms on one side & 2 bedrooms on the other. Live in 1 side & rent the other, or keep as investment. Very good rents coming in on both sides. Includes 3-car garage & off street parking. MLS# 11-2964 $124,900 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

LARKSVILLE

Losing Hair House Hunting? Reduce the anxiety with triple assurance of good location, extensive renovations and new kitchen and baths that come with this lovely two story with great rear deck. Comforting price too - just $119,900. MLS 11-1856. Call Tracey McDermott 570-696-2468

LAKE NUANGOLA Lance Street

LUZERNE

Very comfortable 2 bedroom home in move in condition. Great sun room, large yard, 1 car garage. Deeded lake access. Reduced $119,000 Call Kathie MLS # 11-2899

4 bed, 1 1/2 bath. WOW - Talk about Charm! Stained glass windows, HUGE rooms, beautiful woodwork and wood floors plus storage. Nice 162 sq ft enclosed porch, 1886 sq ft. Massive storage unit outback, can be converted to a multiple car garage. Endless possibilities here. Just needs the right person to love it back to life. MLS 11-3282. $139,900. Call/text for Details. Donna Cain 570-947-3824

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

LUZERNE REDUCED!

262 WALNUT ST. Nicely redone 2 story on large fenced corner lot. Updates include, vinyl siding, windows, electric service & wiring, newer carpeting, 2 zoned gas heat and all new 2nd floor (gutted and reinsulated. 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, large eat in kitchen, 1st floor laundry and attached shed that could be a nice 2nd bath. Shed and off street parking for 6 cars. MLS 11-2564 $109,900 Mark R. Mason 570-331-0982 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

MOOSIC

Furnished home. Greenwood Section 3 Bedroom ranch, well maintained. Furniture and appliances included. Beautiful neighborhood & yard. $145,000 negotiable Call 570-430-7017

MOUNTAIN TOP

330 Charles St. Very nice 2 bedroom home in move in condition with updated kitchen and baths. Nice yard with shed and potential off street parking. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3525 $59,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

257 Main Road S 2 bedroom Ranch. Large rear yard. Hardwood floors! Large eat-in kitchen. Large living room with hardwood and family room with carpet. New roof in 2011! Ideal starter home. MLS#11-1966 $119,000 Call Jim Graham at 570-715-9323

Find the perfect friend.

Find the perfect friend.

(570) 288-6654

LAKE SILKWORTH

Brand new Ranch, approximately 50 yards from lake. 3 bedroom, 2 baths, laundry room, full basement. Deeded lake access. MLS 11-2346 $135,000 Barbara Strong 570-762-7561 ANTONIK & ASSOCIATES 570-735-7494

The Classified section at timesleader.com

Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONLY ONL NLY NL L ONE N LE L LEA LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

The Classified section at timesleader.com

SUNDAY 10/16 1:00 TO 3:00 Large well cared for home! 4 bedrooms, lots of storage. Enjoy your summer in your own 18x36, In-ground, Solar Heated Pool, complete with diving board and slide. Pool house with bar and room for a poker table! Large L-shaped deck. Don't worry about the price of gas, enjoy a staycation all summer long! Family room with gas fireplace. 4 zone, efficient, gas hot water, baseboard heat. Hardwood floors. Huge eat-in kitchen with large, movable island. Large, private yard. Replacement windows. Home warranty included. $222,900 MLS# 11-382 Call Michael Pinko (570) 899-3865

Smith Hourigan Group 570-474-6307

MOUNTAIN TOP

Bow Creek Manor 316 Cedar Manor Dr Meticulously maintained 4 bedroom, 3 1/2 bath two story on almost 1 acre. Master bedroom suite. 2 family rooms. 2 fireplaces. Office/den. Large deck overlooking a private wooded yard. 3 car garage. $349,900, or rent for $1,800 / month with the option to buy. MLS 11-3286 Please Call Bob Kopec Humford Realty 570-822-5126

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

www.66patriotcircle.com or call for details. (267) 253-9754

MOUNTAINTOP

129 Timberwood Dr.

4-5 bedrooms, 2.5 baths. 4,500 above ground sq. ft. Whirlpool tub, master suite (approx 650 sq. ft.) 2 story grand foyer with oak staircase, hardwood floors, formal dining room. Great room has cathedral ceiling and fireplace. Library, deck, 3 car garage, security system. $595,000 More info at: forsalebyowner.com List # 20712604 570-474-2993

MOUNTAINTOP

29 Valley View Dr. Raised ranch on corner lot. Spacious two car garage leads to finished lower level. Modern kitchen & bath, tile floors. MLS#11-2500 $184,900 Call Julio Caprari: 570-592-3966

Looking to buy a home? Place an ad here and let the sellers know! 570-829-7130

MOUNTAIN TOP

MOUNTAIN TOP

NEW LISTING – Nestled on just under an acre just minutes from 81S this colonial offers 2194 sq. ft. of living area plus a finished basement. Enjoy your summer evenings on the wrap around porch or take a quick dip in the above ground pool with tier deck. The covered pavilion is ideal for picnics or gatherings And when the winter winds blow cuddle in front of the gas fireplace and enjoy a quiet night. Price to sell, $185,900 Ann Marie Chopick 570-760-6769

Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONLY ONL NLY NL L ONE N LE L LEA LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

66 Patriot Circle This 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath TOWN HOUSE is in excellent move in condition in a very quiet subdivision close to town. It is being offered fully furnished, decorated and appointed. This TOWN HOUSE is in the desirable Crestwood School District and is close to shopping, restaurants, fitness centers and more! Preview this home

(570) 288-6654

130 CHURCH ROAD The feel of a true colonial home with double entry doors off the foyer into the living room and dining room. Spacious kitchen breakfast area, family room leading to a fenced rear yard. 3-season room with cathedral ceiling. Hardwood floors, fireplace, recently remodeled 2.5 bath and 2-car garage. Located on 3.77 acres, all the privacy of country living yet conveniently located. MLS#11-2600 PRICE REDUCED $183,900 Jill Jones 696-6550

Need a Roommate? Place an ad and find one here! 570-829-7130

Real Estate Briefs –– Prepared by The Times Leader Advertising Department

Rebecca Tomlinson Joins Class Properties

The Attorney To Call When Buying A Home • Complete Real Estate Legal Services • Title Insurance • Rapid Title Search & Closing • Evening & Weekend Appointments

Angelo C. Terrana Jr. ATTORNEY AT LAW Suite 117 Park Building, 400 Third Avenue, Kingston, PA (570) 283-9500

714078

Homeowners Warranty Included Pardeesville,Beautiful 6 Year Old, 2 Story Colonial 3 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths, Modern Eat In kitchen, Formal Dining Room, Divided Living Room, French doors between kitchen & Dining Room. Lighted Stairway. Great location for someone working at Humboldt or Valmont industrial parks that does not want to live in the city. Basement has superior wall system and is plumbed for another Bath room. MLS 11-3175 $220,000 Call Tony Wasco 570-855-2424 Trademark Realtor Group 570-613-9090

Steve Farrell, Owner/Broker of Classic Properties, is proud to announce that a new agent has joined Classic Properties in Kingston. Rebecca Tomlinson recently switched careers after 10+ years in college admissions. She was drawn to real estate for two reasons. First, she has enjoyed buying and selling homes both for herself and in conjunction with family and friends over the past 8 years. Second, she was greatly impressed with the professionalism of Carol Shedlock, Regional Manager of our Kingston Office, who assisted Rebecca with her last purchase. “The family-like atmosphere where everyone is professional, polite and helpful” is what drew her to Classic. You can contact Rebecca in our Kingston office at 718.4959 or on her cell phone at 460.2020. Please join us in welcoming Rebecca.


PAGE 26G

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

15,000 SF Commercial Bldg w/variety of uses. 4.6 acre lot w/plenty of pkg. MLS#10-1110 JUDY 714-9230

Prime location former Convention Hall. Wonderful opportunity for professional offices. Pkg for 100+ cars. Zoned Hwy Business. MLS#11-3654 MARGY SIMMS 6960891

Completely redone 3 story building w/finished LL. Zoned Commercial. MLS#11-1172 JIM 715-9323

3.895 Acres on W-B Blvd- 700 front feet provides excellent exposure. Utilities, access road, possible KOZ opportunity. MLS#111346 VIRGINIA ROSE 2889371

Creative business investment opportunity. 10,000 SF bldg on 3 acres. MLS#11-3121 SUSAN LONGO 714-9264

Outstanding brick bldg! Parking for 7-10 cars. MLS#08-2790 PEG 714-9247

5700 SF in Prime downtown location. Suitable for office/residence. Full basement, private parking, Zoned C3. MLS#11-345 MARGY 696-0891

Great investment - Turn key gas station w/convenient mart. Prime location. MLS#11-1810 GERI 696-0888

Wonderful opportunity for commercial bldg w/ice cream stand, storefront & apt. Also storage bldg. MLS#11-554 CORINE 715-9321 or MATT 714-9229

Multi-purpose bldg w/2 Great location on busy Rte Commercial Bdg located on 309! Office Bldg w/1500 SF of space busy Rte 309. 4000 SF of space. Off apts, OSP, storefront w/warehouse & garages. MLS#11-2238 & 2270 SF warehouse. MLS#11-2094 street pkg. MLS#11-2096 ANDY 714-9225 or JUDY 714-9230 ANITA REBER 788-7501 ANITA REBER 788-7501

Move-in ready. Use the entire bldg or rent space out. Ten offices, 3 baths, off street pkg. MLS#11-995 TRACEY 696-0723 or JUDY 714-9230

Prime location - 8000 SF multi-use bldg. 1st flr office/commercial space & 2 apts on 2nd flr. MLS#11-508 RHEA SIMMS 696-6677

4 Sty brick office bldg, more than half rented. High traffic area. 2 lots included for pkg. MLS#11-1045 ANDY 714-9225 or MARGY 696-0891

3 BR, Ranch w/gar+ Prime location ZONED HWY COMMERCIAL- 4 BR Cape attached bldg. Zoned HWY COMM. Ideal for office or sm business. MLS#10-4367 Cod on 100x556 lot. MLS#11-229 RAE 714-9234 RAE 714-9234

Great location for professional High traffic Route 11 Unique Building Established turn-key w/6000 SF Showroom/Garage, & May be converted to suit your needs office. Private drive in rear. Zoned C-3. restaurant w/2 apts. Business & Property being sold "as is". MLS#10-4362 Apt above. MLS#11-2106 w/zoning approval. MLS#11-302 building priced to sell! MLS#11-130 TINA 714-9251 ANITA REBER 788-7501 DAVID 970-1117 ANDY 714-9225

Prime commercial storefront + 3 spacious Apts. Parking lot in rear. MLS#10-3764 DONNA S 788-7504

Great corner property. Auto repair & body Ranch style home includes 2990SF shop w/state certified paint booth. Commercial space. MLS#11-459 2nd flr storage. MLS#11-2842 LISA 715-9335 ANDY 714-9225

Multi-Purpose Bldg Great business opportunity! Bar 2 bldgs zoned commercial. Excellent opportunityConvenient location on State St - Adjacent lot 1 consists of retail space & apts, the Established Restaurant for sale in busy w/liquor license plus 2 unit dwelling. available. MLS#10-4590 MLS#11-1164 other is a 2-story home. MLS#10-4056 shop ctr. Business only. MLS#11-2782 MARGY 696-0891 or MIKE J 970-1100 Sandy 970-1110 or David R 970-1117 MIKE JOHNSON PAT G 788-7514

900 SF Commercial space on 1st flr. 900 SF 2 BR apt on 2nd flr. Billboard also available to rent on bldg. MLS#10-4309 TINA 714-9251

2700SF of opportunity! 1st Could be great loft flr open space w/2.5 baths. 2nd flr Apt. style home or new home for your business. Priced to sell! MLS#10-2749 Zoned Lt Industrial. MLS#11-1276 DAVID R 970-1117 Mary Donovan 696-0729

Warehouse space Rental space - office & Attractive office space Prime location on Prime Location 32,000SF, Memorial Hwy. Unique space-many 1900SF - 12 pkg spaces. MLS#09- in excellent condition. Good visibility. $350/MO. Office or mixed use space warehouse, 500SF to 15000SF. MLS#09- 30+ parking, including trailer spaces $500/MO. Zoned commercial. MLS#11-3547 2115 For "rent" only. MLS#10-4503 possibilities. Zoning B-2. MLS#11-669 3085 MLS#08-1305 JULIO ACOSTA 239-6408 MATT 714-9229 BARBARA M 696-0883 MARK 696-0724 MARGY 696-0891 VIRGINIA ROSE 288-9371

’ 261.59

’ .49 105 72.14’

13 4.5 0’

13 4.5 0’

30

137 .00’

8’ 3.8 14

35

18,309.98 SF

4’ 2. 5 22

17,818.61 SF

3 34

9’ 6.3 10

9’ 8.6 16

VE RI ED RN BO OS

158 ’ 82.70

NEW Phase IV-B in Pittston Area (Jenkins Twp.)

LD SO

Willow View Development

9’ 6.9 13

33 33

3.3 23, 3,90 903 90 9 03 ..35 3 SF SF 23,903.35

LD SO

9’ 6.3 10

’ .57 94

LD SO

K 0’ AR 5.0 LP 12 A G NE 0’ DO 25.0 1

1’ 3.3 15

15 3.6 2’

22,266.25 SF

28

11577 15

’ .57 94

35,644.32 SF

5.03 4,44 4, 445 44 4 45 .0 SF SF 24,445.03

137 .70 ’

5’ 2.9 20

29

7,81 18 8.6 61 SF F 818 81 8 ..61 17,818.61

32

20,855.99 SF

16,657.29 SF

82 .70 ’

0’ 6.0 33

6’ 5.0 11

Development Development

HUMFORD REALTY INC. (570)822-5126 ext.3 HUMFORD.COM

31 31,609.33 SF

4 46 .67 ’

’ 140.74

7’ 136.0

8’ 159.0

PHASE IVB

JENKINS TWP.

Build Immediately! 137.00’

Build immediately in the developments only cul-de-sac. All utilities available.

10 lots available from $66,000!

Close to Everything!

Next to Pittston High School Centerpoint Industrial Park: 4 minutes Route 81 and Turnpike: 4 minutes Mohegan Casino: 6 minutes Avoca Airport: 10 minutes Center City Wilkes-Barre: 16 minutes Center City Scranton: 19 minutes Travel time calculated by Mapquest

HUMFORD REALTY INC. Rob Finlay, Broker (570)822-5126 ext. 3 humford.com


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 27G

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

NANTICOKE

PENN LAKE

PITTSTON

HEIGHTS SECTION

ENORMOUS 4+ bay garage!! Plus 1 more garage for gadgets! Pretty 4 bedroom Cape with a supplemental coal unit and a beautiful view from the back yard. NEW PRICE!!

$85,900

MLS# 11-2088 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

NANTICOKE

This very nice family home, as it has been for many years, with a detached garage, 1 3/4 baths, 4 bedrooms & so much more is waiting for your private tour. MLS #11-2654 $78,600 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

NANTICOKE

25 Shea Street NEW LISTING

25 Shea St (Left on prospect, Left on State, Left on Shea)

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23 1PM - 3PM CAPE ANN: Large & Bright, 3 bedrooms, eat-in kitchen, Carrara Glass Bathroom, Finished Lower Level, Family Room (knotty pine) with BAR. Oil heat, very large lot. Estate. View the mountains from the front porch. #11-2970 $99,000 Go To The Top... Call JANE KOPP REAL ESTATE 570-288-7481

NANTICOKE

414 E. Grove Street 3 bedroom, 1 bath, 2 story with off street parking, backyard, new oil furnace, windows, wiring, kitchen, bath, flooring & paint. Excellent condition. $88,500. Sellers pays 1st year property tax. Call Bill Remey @ 570-714-6123

NANTICOKE

HOME FOR SALE

Crestwood School District. Stunning Cape Cod (architecturally designed). Three bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths 2 car garage on one acre. Features include: large front porch, deck, beautiful kitchen with corian countertops, breakfast nook & island. black appliances; hardfloors, formal dining room with wainscoting. Two story vaulted family room with fireplace; first floor master bedroom/ bath with jacuzzi, walk in shower & vanity dressing area built in; abundant closets, den on first floor plus laundry; second story has 2 additional bedrooms & bath. Full basement. Please call or email for details. $349,900 Dee Fields, Associate Broker 570-788-7511

deefieldsabroker@gmail.com

PITTSTON

10 Garfield St. Looking for a Ranch??? Check out this double wide with attached 2 car garage on a permanent foundation. Large master bedroom suite with large living room, family room with fireplace, 2 full baths, laundry room, formal dining room, vaulted ceilings throughout and MORE! For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 10-2463 $89,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

Job Seekers are looking here! Where's your ad? 570-829-7130 and ask for an employment specialist

PITTSTON

Privacy abounds this beauty on almost 3 acres of “Pure Privacy” tucked away from the hustle & bustle of everyday stress. 4 bedrooms, 1 3/4 baths with a 2 car detached garage & workshop. This 19x30 master bedroom will knock your socks off! MLS #11-2705 $252,000 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

PITTSTON 12 George Street

VERY CUTE HOME 2 bedrooms, 1

bath room, offstreet parking, well maintained, natural woodwork, hardwood floors, new carpet, kitchen floor, drop in stove, large deck, new heating system. $33,000. 570-902-5244

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

Two story single with 7 rooms, 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, new windows, modern kitchen, some appliances included, electric service, some carpeting and hardwood floors. Call Rita for details $68,900 570-954-6699 Walsh Real Estate 570-654-1490

PITTSTON

NEW COLUMBUS

19 Academy St

214 Elizabeth St. 3 bedroom, Victorian, semi modern kitchen, 1 full - 2 1/2 baths. 1st floor laundry, gas heat, finished lower level with walk out, large shed. A must see at this price. For additional info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-1677 $79,900 Call Lu-Ann 570-602-9280

PITTSTON

31 Tedrick St. Very nice 3 bedroom with 1 bath. This house was loved and you can tell. Come see for yourself, super clean home with nice curb appeal. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3544 $89,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

Find Something? Lose Something? Get it back where it belongs with a Lost/Found ad! 570-829-7130

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

PITTSTON

PITTSTON TWP.

PLAINS

PLYMOUTH

SHAVERTOWN

754 Laurel St. Absolutely beautiful move in condition. This 2 bedroom Ranch home with fully finished basement is in excellent condition. Come and see for yourself. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 11-3796 $129,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

3 unit income property on extra deep lot with frontage on 2 streets. Single family home next door (MLS#11-2228) also for sale. Possible commercial use with rezoning. $78,000 MLS#11-2244 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

1 Willow St. Attractive bi-level on corner lot with private fend in yard. 3-4 bedrooms and 1.5 baths. Finished lower level, office and laundry room MLS 11-2674 $104,900 Jay A. Crossin Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

PLAINS

PLYMOUTH 6 Mooney Road

Exquisite 4 bedroom 2 story. Formal living room with floor to ceiling brick fireplace. Formal dining room. Beautiful eat in kitchen with cherry cabinetry, granite counters & stainless steel appliances. Stunning custom staircase. Master suite with ash hardwood floors, his & her closets & private balcony. Master bath with cherry vanity & granite counters. Spacious 24x28 family room with entertainment unit & bar. Office with builtins. Sunroom. 3 car garage. Completely updated and well maintained. This home is conveniently located on 2.5 park like acres just minutes from the Cross Valley. Call for your appointment today! $519,000. MLS#11-2008 Call Ruthie (570) 714-6110

Handy Man Special

Double Block on Cornelia Street. BEING SOLD AS IS NOT IN FLOOD ZONE. 6 rooms per side. Newer furnances & roof. Large lot & nice neighborhood. $35,000 ALL SERIOUS OFFERS CONSIDERED 570-655-9731

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

PITTSTON REDUCED!

95 William St. 1/2 double home with more square footage than most single family homes. 4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, ultra modern kitchen and remodeled baths. Super clean. For more information and photos visit www.atlas realtyinc. com MLS 11-2120 $59,000 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

PITTSTON TOWNSHIP

PITTSTON

51 Plank St. 4 bedroom Victorian home completely remodeled with new kitchen & baths. New Berber carpet, modern stainless steel appliances in kitchen. Private yard, wrap around porch, corner lot with off street parking. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 11-2864 $99,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

P E N D I N G

PITTSTON

64 Thistle St

Great family home with 3 bedrooms, family room off semi modern kitchen. Nice woodworking, newer roof, and upgraded electrical & over sized 1 car garage. MLS 11-2306 $89,900 Call Nancy Answini 570-237-5999 JOSEPH P. GILROY REAL ESTATE 570-288-1444

New Listing. Wonderful home on a huge country size lot, in a private setting, just off the beaten path. Economical Dual heat system, central A/C plus ductless unit, Lower Level family room, detached 2 car garage, fireplace & a great view from the front porch! MLS 11-3733 $229,900 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

PITTSTON TWP.

10 Norman St. Brick 2 story home with 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, large family room with fireplace. Lower level rec room, large driveway for plenty of parking. Just off the by-pass with easy access to all major highways. For more info and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com. MLS 11-2887 $172,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

Peaceful living with easy drive to town. Beautifully maintained 3Bedroom Ranch on 1.5 acres, 2 car garage, gas fireplace, hardwoods, large deck... Lots to see. Call today for a private showing. MLS 10-3480 $138,700 Five Mountains Realty 570-542-2141

PITTSTON TWP.

38 Frothingham St. Four square home with loads of potential and needs updating but is priced to reflect its condition. Nice neighborhood. Check it out. For more info and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 11-3403 $69,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

Do you need more space? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way to clean out your closets! You’re in bussiness with classified! 99 1/2 Pine St. The owner of this house took pride in its upkeep. It is meticulous. Home has 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, eat in kitchen, living room and dining room. Walkout basement with paneled walls and heat. Large yard with newer one car detached garage, accessed from rear alley. MLS 11-3555 $48,000 Call Terry 570-885-3041 Angie 570-885-4896

PITTSTON TWP. REDUCED

122 PARNELL ST. Beautiful bi-level home on corner lot. 7 rooms, 3 bedrooms, newer roof and windows. Fenced in yardFor more info and phtos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.om MLS 11-2749 $189,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

PITTSTON TWP. STAUFFER POINT 42 Grandview Drive NEW PRICE

PLAINS

17 N. Beech Road (N. on Main St., Plains, turn right in Birchwood Hills and onto Beech Rd, House on right) Lovely updated Ranch home with 3 bedrooms, 1 bath. 1 car garage in the very desirable Birchwood Hills development. Electric heat, newer roof, great curb appeal. Huge fenced in back yard with new shed, plenty of closets and storage. www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3003 $139,900 Call Keri Best 570-885-5082

P E N D I N G

PLAINS 18 ABBOTT ST two story, single

family, 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, offstreet parking, eatin kitchen, dining room, office/study, living room, utility room, electric heat, Quiet neighborhood, not in the flood area, near school and cross valley. New roof, replacement windows, tile floor in the kitchen, hardwood floors in the bedrooms. Ceiling fans and Air units. Full basement. Large lot with driveway, covered patio with attached carport. Price includes appliances and some window treatments. $80,000 Call 570-592-2837 KEYSTONE SECTION 9 Ridgewood Road

906 Homes for Sale

PITTSTON 175 Oak Street 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, 1st floor laundry room, 3 season porch, fenced yard and off street parking. MLS#11-1974 PRICE REDUCED! $89,000 Call Patti 570-328-1752 Liberty Realty & Appraisal Services LLC

993 Sunrise Dr. Horizon Estates Fabulous end unit townhome provides luxurious, carefree living. 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths with 1st floor master suite. Ultra kitchen with granite and stainless appliances. Dining room with built in cabinet. 2 story living room with gas fireplace and hardwood. 2 car garage, maintenance free deck, nice yard that can be fenced. Low HOA fee for snow removal and grass cutting. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3488 $289,900 Call Terry 570-885-3041 Angie 570-885-4896

Stunning ranch home in lovely neighborhood. Built in 2003. Beautifully landscaped yard. Screen porch, deck with awning off master bedroom, tons of storage. Oversize 2 car garage. Attention to detail throughout. MLS 11-3004 $189,900 Call Christine Kutz Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

PLAINS

PITTSTON 85 La Grange St

Good investment property. All units are rented. All utilities paid by tenants. MLS 11-1497 $83,900 Gloria Jean Malarae 570-814-5814 CLASSIC PROPERTIES 570-718-4959 ext. 1366

PITTSTON TWP.

PITTSTON TWP.

48 Lewis St. Move right into this cute Cape Cod. It is in a nice neighborhood and has a first floor master bedroom. This is a must see! MLS 11-3277 $149,900 Call Joe Caprari 570-239-9663

P E N D I N G

better than new end unit condo, with 1st floor master bedroom and bath, Living room with gas fireplace, hardwood floors in living, dining room & kitchen, granite countertops and crown molding in kitchen, with separate eating area, lst floor laundry, heated sunroom with spectacular view, 2 additional bedrooms, full bath and loft on the 2nd floor, 2 car garage, gas heat and central air, priced to sell $274,500 MLS 11-2324 call Lu-Ann 602-9280

additional photos and information can be found on our web site, www. atlasrealtyinc.co m

PLAINS

Large 4 bedroom, 1 bath home on extra deep lot with frontage on 2 streets. Multi family unit (MLS #11-2244) next door also for sale. Possible commercial use with rezoning. $93,500 MLS# 11-2228 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

TOTAL BEAUTY 1 ACRE- PRIVACY Beautiful ranch 2

bedrooms, 1 bath, attic for storage, washer, dryer & 2 air conditioners included. New Roof & Furnace Furnished or unfurnished. Low Taxes! New price $118,500

570-885-1512

PLAINS TOWNHOME Completely remod-

eled In quiet plains neighborhood. 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath. with finished basement/3rd bedroom. Hardwood floors, central air, electric heat, new roof & appliances. $118,000 Motivated Seller! (570) 592-4356

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

PLAINS

Updated 2-story, 3 bedroom, 2 bath home has 1 car garage & carport, fenced rear yard with tiered deck and more. MLS#11-3655 $152,000 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

Mobile home on permanent foundation with basement & built-in garage. Two parking areas, rear patio. Pleasant road off the beaten path. 11-3372 $36,000 Call Betty at Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 570-287-1196 ext 3559 or 570-714-612

PRINGLE

372 Hoyt Street

This two story home has 4 bedrooms with space to grow. First floor has gas heat and second floor has electric heat. Off street parking for one in back of home. MLS 11-640 $59,900 Call Karen

Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 570-474-2340

SHAVERTOWN

200 Woodbine Road

Distinctive 2 story. Outstanding outside and in. Beautiful brick paver driveway and walkway lead into a grand foyer with oak staircase. Hardwoods and marble floors throughout. Retreat to a full finished basement with stone fireplace, wet bar and full bath. Deck, patio and sprinkler system. MLS 11-1463 $429,900 Call Arlene Warunek 570-650-4169

Smith Hourigan Group (570) 696-1195

SHAVERTOWN

4 Genoa Lane There is much attention to detail in this magnificent 2 story, 4 bedroom, 2 full bath all brick home on double corner lot. Large family room with brick fireplace, all oak kitchen with breakfast area, master suite, solid oak staircase to name a few. MLS #11-3268 $525,000 Jay A. Crossin Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-07770

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

SHAVERTOWN 58 Longdale Ave

New Construction 1,980 SF. 2 story, 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, large kitchen, laundry room, living room, family room, dining room, 2 car garage, front porch & rear deck. Large 70’x225’ flat lot. $245,000 Call (570) 674-5173

Find the perfect friend. The Classified section at timesleader.com

Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONLY ONL NLY NL L ONE N LE L LEA LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

Smith Hourigan Group 570-287-1196

SHAVERTOWN

Lovely 3 bedroom 2400 sf Cape Cod with modern eat-in kitchen, large sunroom & family room. Master bedroom with master bath. Central air, gas heat & 2 car garage. Very well landscaped with beautiful paver sidewalks. Quiet neighborhood. $229,000 Call Ruth Smith 570-696-1195 or 570-696-5411

SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

SHICKSHINNY

17 Main Road REDUCED

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

SWEET VALLEY

TRUCKSVILLE

570 Grassy Pond Rd

Nice Country BiLevel on 40 acres with 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, kitchen, living room, family room, office & laundry room. Plus attached oversized 2 car garage with workshop, rear deck & 3 sheds. MLS 11-1094 $319,900 Five Mountains Realty 570-542-2141

SWOYERSVILLE

2 Unit Duplex & Double Block with a 4 Bay Garage. Family owned for many years. BIG REDUCTION $100,000 MLS# 09-1643 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

Enjoy the spectacular view of all seasons from this lovely “Colonial“ situated on over 4 acres of pure country living PLUS privacy, yet only 15 minutes from Dallas. Great kitchen, 2.5 baths & attached 2 car garage. NEW PRICE! $279,900 MLS# 11-1238 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

WANAMIE

SWOYERSVILLE

120 Barber St. Nice Ranch home, great neighborhood. MLS 11-3365 $109,000 Call David Krolikowski 570-288--0770 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

SWOYERSVILLE

171 Oliver St. Very well maintained 2 story home. 3 bedrooms and a bath with gas heat. Front room was former store front which would make a nice size family room/den! Many possibilities MLS 11-1451 $74,000 Mark R. Mason 570-331-0982 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

Beautiful 2 story, 3 bedroom home. Modern kitchen & bath. Nice yard. Gas heat. $69,900. Call 100% OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE Call Bob at 570-654-1490

SHICKSHINNY SWOYERSVILLE Completely remodeled 3 bedroom, 1.75 bath brick & aluminum ranch on over 4 acres with Pond. New stainless steel appliances, 2 car attached and 1 car built-in garage, paved driveway, open front porch, 3 season room, rear patio, brick fireplace & property goes to a stream in the back. PRICE REDUCED $179,900 MLS# 10-4716 Five Mountains Realty 570-542-2141

TUNKHANNOCK

Looking to buy a home? Place an ad here and let the sellers know! 570-829-7130

SWOYERSVILLE Lovely Country setting for the cute BiLevel on 5.34 acres. Property features 4 Bedrooms, 1.75 baths, living room, kitchen, family room & laundry room. Plus 2 car attached garage, 30' X 35' detached garage and 14' X 28' shed. MLS 11-1335 $210,000 Five Mountains Realty 570-542-2141

Well maintained 3 bedroom, 2 bath double wide in nice neighborhood. Many updates. Landscaped & fenced yard with pool, large deck & koi pond! $99,700 MLS#11-2253 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

Estate. Nice brick front ranch home on a corner lot. 1 car attached garage, circle driveway, central air. 2 bedrooms, 1 full bath with 2 showers, Full basement with brand new water proofing system that includes a warranty. Great location. MLS 11-2127 $115,500 Call/text for Details. Donna Cain 570-947-3824

PRICE REDUCED! 950 Center St. Unique property. Well maintained - 2 story 10 year old set on 3.56 acres. Privacy galore, pole barn 30x56 heated for storage of equipment, cars or boats. A must see property. GEO Thermal Heating System.Only 10 minutes from interstate 81 & 15 minutes to turnpike. MLS#10-3802 $249,900 Call Geri 570-696-0888

WAPWALLOPEN 359 Pond Hill Mountain Road

This 4 bedroom home features a great yard with over 2 acres of property. Situated across from a playground. Needs some TLC but come take a look, you wouldn’t want to miss out. There is also a pond at the far end of the property that is used by all surrounding neighbors. This is an estate and is being sold as is. No sellers property disclosure. Will entertain offers in order to settle estate. MLS 11-962 $64,900 Call Karen

Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 570-474-2340

WEATHERLY

SALE BY OWNER Fully furnished. 4 bedrooms, 2 full baths, eat-in kitchen, fireplace. Includes all furniture. Maytag washer/dryer, dishwasher, freezer & screened in porch. Double car garage. $75,000 Or best offer. For Appointment Call 570-427-8116

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

WEST HAZLETON

SWEET VALLEY

23 Wesland Avenue

SWOYERSVILLE Immaculate 2 story home in nice area with kitchen, living room, dining room, family room, laundry & 3/4 bath on 1st floor. 4 Bedrooms, full bath & walk-in closet on 2nd floor. Plus new roof, 2 tier deck, 2 car garage, paved driveway & above ground pool. MLS 11-1526 $230,000 Five Mountains Realty 570-542-2141

Purebred Animals? Sell them here with a classified ad! 570-829-7130

Luxurious End Townhouse

3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, hardwood floors, gas heat, Central Air, master bath with whirlpool tub plus shower, 2nd floor laundry, lovely landscaped fenced yard, 1 car garage. MLS#11-3533 $209,900 Call Nancy Palumbo 570-714-9240

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

100 Warren St 16,000 sq. ft. commercial building with warehouse / offices. Great location. 1 block west of Route 93. Approx. 3 miles from 80/81 intersection. Many possibilities for this property--storage lockers; flea market; game/ entertainment center; laundromat; auto garage. $119,000 Call Karen at Century 21 Select Group - Hazleton 570-582-4938

PurebredAnimals? Sell themherewith a classifiedad! 570-829-7130


T

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KINGSTON

HANOVER TWP.

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 1:00-3:00 PM

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 1:00-2:30 PM

Lot 1 Woodberry Dr.

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OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 1:00-2:30 PM

KINGSTON This 6BR, 2 bath 3 story makes a perfect family home at a price you can afford! Great location. Close to schools & shopping. Home warranty! MLS# 11-3760 BARBARA M. 696-0883 $130,000

HANOVER TWP. If you’re a fan of city lights, enjoy them from the custom-built deck of this stunning Contemporary in a great neighborhood. Picture perfect condition. Nothing to do but move-in! MLS# 11-3663 BARBARA M. 696-0883 $275,000

MOUNTAINTOP Preview this 4BR, 3bath 2 story model w/ lots of HW & tile. Granite counters in kit, MSTR Suite w/2 walk-in closets & tiled bath w/ dbl vanities, shower & whirlpool. Home/ lot packages available. TERRY D. 715-9317 Dir: 309S. to Right on S Main, Right on Nuangola, RIght on Fairwood Blvd. to end. Straight into Woodberry Manor. Right on Woodberry Dr.

DALLAS DAKOTA WOODS - Carefree Condo -Bright & spacious w/3 BR’s, 1st flr master, study/library, kit w/granite & upscale app’ls, 2 car gar. MLS#11-3208 RHEA 696-6677 $379,000 Dir: Rt 309N to R into Dakota Woods.

SHAVERTOWN Picture perfect Ranch w/ finished basement w/ wet bar, HW floors, C/A, charming fenced yard w/ deck. MLS# 11-1663 MARK 696-0724 $148,000 Dir: 309N - L on Ferguson

SWEET VALLEY Inviting home - 90ft Lakefront & covered dock Huge great rm w/FP, built-ins, long window seat w/great lakeview - Modern kitchen, 1st flr Master & wonderful 3 season porch - also lakefront. Lg pantry for entertaining - Guest rooms for a crowd! MLS# 11-2954 RHEA 696-6677 $340,000 Dir: Rt.118W - L @ Sheldon’s Diner - Go 2.5 miles - Turn R at Davis Trophy at stop sign turn R on Lakeview - Property on L.

PLAINS

PITTSTON

DALLAS

PENN LAKE

MOUNTAINTOP

LAFLIN

PLAINS Beautiful 3BR Ranch larger than it appears on a quiet street. Lower level almost finished. A must see! MLS# 11-3077 MARY M. 714-9274 $229,000

PITTSTON Neat as a pin! Don’t miss this 3BR, 2.5 bath home meticulously updated & completely movein ready. Modern kitchen & baths & so much more! MLS# 11-3706 MIKE D. 714-9236 $164,000

DALLAS Elegant 2story w/4BRs, 3 baths, granite kitchen, FR w/ FP, spa shower, landscaper’s dream yard, deck, patio, A/C. MLS# 11-2364 SUSAN P. 696-0876 $399,900

PENN LAKE Architecturally designed custom home. Beauty form & function combo. Great 3BR home on 1+ acre at Penn Lake. So much to experience! Crestwood schools. MLS#11-3227 DEE 788-7511 $349,900

MOUNTAINTOP Spectacular 2 story in excellent condition with upgrades galore! A true beauty & great value! MLS# 11-3758 LISA 715-9335 $369,900

SHAVERTOWN

DALLAS

4145 Lakeview Drive

275 Ferguson Avenue

10 Dakota Dr

DALLAS Enjoy this gracious 4BR Tudor home on 5+ acre lot w/ mature landscaping. HW flrs thru-out, 4 FPs, & built in bookcases enhance this architecturally designed home. The MBR & bath located on the first flr w/3 add’l BRs, a sunroom & 2 baths on the 2nd flr. Lovely views over look stone patio & yard. MLS#10-3053 RHEA 696-6677 $599,000

BEAR CREEK

LAFLIN Beautiful Tudor home in excellent condition. 4BRs, 3 baths, newly updated with HW flrs, new appliances - Corian, new roof, decks, driveway, 2 car garage. MLS# 10-4093 SHIRLEY 714-9281 $212,000

BEAR CREEK Beautiful home on 4acre lot in Laurelbrook Estates. 3BR, 3 bath, LR/office, formal DR, modern kitchen leads to deck & much more! MLS# 11-3668 SANDY 970-1110 or DAVID 970-1117 $349,900

SHAVERTOWN Exquisite Back Mountain home. 5BRs, 7 baths. Viking appliances. All the amenities you desire. Private wooded lot. MLS# 11-3321 JOAN 696-0887 $899,000

OPEN HOUSES - SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16TH, 2011

WWW.LEWITH-FREEMAN.COM

Smith Hourigan Group 358 South Memorial Highway, Shavertown

(570)696-1195 Visit Us @ century21SHGroup.com Open House Today • 1:00-3:00PM

$229,900

Step back into yesterday in this 4 BR 1 BA Victorian with a wrap around porch to die for! HW on 1st floor, all original wood trim, doors, and leaded glass. Mod oak kit w/island and some original cupboards. Built in 1898 with state of the art geo thermal heating and cooling. House sits on 5.2 acres with fruit trees and a piece of land across the street by babbling Bowmans Creek. Directions-From Dallas Rte 29 for app 20 minutes then R on Church road, prox h house on R. From Tunkhannock L on K Keelersburg Road, after crossing bridge R on Church house on L.

I’m Sue Barre. I sell houses, and I can sell yours. (570) 696-5417

Shavertown

REAL ESTATE

696-3801

Swoyersville Kingston

Shavertown Dallas Twp. Dallas Tunkhannock Shavertown Shavertown Shavertown Dallas Shavertown Shavertown Dallas Trucksville Dallas Trucksville Sweet Valley Sweet Valley Dallas Duryea Pittston Twp. Wyoming

84 Watkins St. 12:30-2PM Lewith & Freeman 267 Grove St. 1-3PM Elegant Homes BACK MOUNTAIN & SURROUNDS 11 Division St. 12-2PM Century 21 Signature Properties 9 Forest Dr. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 315 W. Center Hill Rd. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 54 Church Rd. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 1305 Oak Dr. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 11 Shaver Ave. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 91 Shaver Ave. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 10 Dakota Dr. 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman 30 Sutton Farms Rd. 2-3PM Lewith & Freeman 275 Ferguson Ave. 3-4PM Lewith & Freeman 7 Glenriddle Lane 12:30-2PM Lewith & Freeman 244 Carverton Rd. 2-3:30PM Lewith & Freeman 9 Circle Dr. 12-1:30PM Lewith & Freeman 133 Frangorma Dr. 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman 298 Pall Rd. 3:30-4:30PM Lewith & Freeman 4145 Lakeview Dr. 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman 2 Deer Meadows 12-3PM O’Connor Real Estate PITTSTON/NORTH & SURROUNDS 411 Jones St./CANCELLED 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty 122 Parnell St. 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty 1702 W. 8th St./CANCELLED 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty

Avoca Harding Duryea Harding Wyoming Laflin Exeter Exeter Duryea

Mountaintop Mountaintop Mountaintop Mountaintop Mountaintop Mountaintop Mountaintop Mountaintop Mountaintop Drums White Haven Hazleton

314 Packer St. 2:30-4PM Atlas Realty 310 Lockville Rd. 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty 314 Edward St. 2:30-4PM Atlas Realty 131 Theodore St. 12-1:30PM Prudential Poggi & Jones 22 Tenth St. 2-4PM McDermott & McDermott Real Estate 117 Haverford Dr. 2-4PM Lewith & Freeman 527 Cherry Dr. 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman 112 E. First St. 12-1PM Lewith & Freeman 620 Hooven St. 1-2:30PM ERA One Source Realty MOUNTAINTOP & SURROUNDS 126 Brook Hollow 1:30-3:30PM Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 310 Deer Run 1:30-3:30PM Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 418 Ice Harvest Dr. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 478 Strawberry Lane 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 45 Waterman Dr. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 432 Ice Harvest Dr. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 460 S. Mountain Blvd. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group Lot 1 Woodberry Dr. 1-3PM Lewith & Freeman 1 Albert Rd. 1:30-3PM Lewith & Freeman HAZLETON & SURROUNDS 158 Buck Ridge Dr. 1:30-3:30PM Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 22 Thunder Dr. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 668 Emerald Court 1:30-3PM ERA One Source Realty

WE WILL SELL YOUR HOUSE OR ERA WILL BUY IT!

Two-story Townhomes

WHITE HAVEN

• 1st floor master • Formal Dining Room • Eat-in Kitchen • Loft • Valuted Ceilings • Front Porch • Garage • Garden Area

Beautiful New Construction Townhouses in Crestwood school district. 100% USDA Financing Available. Right off I-80 and minutes from turnpike. 2 sty foyer, forced air, central a/c walk-n closet, & master bath. Walk-out basement, 1 car garage & stone exterior. Choose from many upgrades. Low maintanence fees. MLS#09-3082 $105,000

WILKESBARRE

MOUNTAINTOP

WILKESBARRE

Great starter home fenced yard with swing 3 three season porches full walk up attic concrete basement near N. MAIN close to GEN HOSP, St Stans Church. Quiet 1-way str & neighborhood newly painted thru out new kit cab stained glass window in LR hardwood thru out needs finish or carpet, 5 ceiling fans,Bonus toilet in basement new windows Reasonable offers consid, OUT OF FLOOD AREA Owner wants SOLD. MLS#11-1779 $64,000

Charming 2 story 3 bedroom home. Laminate flooring in the kitchen and dining room. New roof (August 2010), replacement windows, paved drive and a fenced yard. MLS#11-2181 $52,500

MULTI-FAMILY

MULTI-FAMILY

Find us in our convenient Location: Wyoming Avenue to Union Street. Turn onto Mill Hollow in Luzerne

WILKESBARRE

Beautiful 2 story home with gorgeous floors on first level, a warming kitchen with cherry cabinets, family room, laundry room off back entrance, storage garage was converted into a mother-in-law apartment with own entrance, off street parking for multiple vehicles. MLS#11-2852 $99,900

KINGSTON

Investment or Buyers here you go! Large double block in good condition, off street parking, great size back yard & offers plenty more ! Please contact Amanda for showings 570-706-5534. MLS#11-3774 $119,900

PLYMOUTH

Great Investment Propery out of flood zone with many updates.Situated on a large corner lot with off street parking for several cars. Fully rented at 600 per month. MLS#11-3608 $94,900

DIR: North on 309 just past hospital take right onto 9th Street, take second left to Emerald Ct. MLS#11-3536 $48,500

PLAINS

Excellent location, come see this 3 bedroom ranch conveniently located just minutes off the cross valley x-way. Nicely updated eat-in kitchen with Pergo floors. 1yr old roof & seamless gutters. Large & level lot w/shed & OSP. Full partial finished basement w/new windows & w/playroom w/gas space heater (very efficient). Move-in condition.(3rd BR is a laundry room but can easily be converted back) MLS#11-3168 $114,900

Stunning 4BR, 2 story w/ 3975SF, finished lower level walks out to pool! Granite kitchen, 3-zoned heat & nice room sizes! MLS# 11-2270 $398,500

• Will work with insurance companies to assist flood victims • Customized floor plans to suit your budget • Complete packages starting at $89,900* • Take advantage of low interest rates

Proud builder of affordable handicapped accessible housing.

*Includes foundation and excavation

1-866-823-8880

Licensed in Wilkes-Barre

Mountaintop (570) 403-3000

ONE SOURCE REALTY

Clarks Summit Peckville Moscow Lake Ariel

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New Price $450,000

HANOVER TOWNSHIP

WHITE HAVEN

Home being sold in as is condition short sale opportunity ! MLS#11-3457 $79,900

Home has some renovations. Hardwood floors refinished, all new carpeting on second floor. Kitchen and bath new flooring also. Entire home freshly repainted. Close to shopping and river. One block from river and did not get any flooding. Plenty of off street parking. Clean and ready to move in. MLS#11-3771 $59,900

If you are buying or selling anywhere in the county, I can help you! Only if you call! Direct Line - Jim (570) 715-9323

Totally remodeled 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom Ranch located on a corner lot in Ashley. Modern kitchen and bath, new carpeting. New vinyl siding. Also private driveway with fenced in yard. MLS#11-1532 $95,000

New Listing ~ Dallas

MOUNTAINTOP

Beautiful new construction in Crestwood school district. Home features include Hardwood floors, Anderson windows, 2 zone forced air, & much more. Spacious kitchen w/ island, tile, & maple. Walk-out basement ready to finish w/ Superior Walls foundation. Very quiet neighborhood centrally located near dining, shopping, & interstate. MLS#10-4123 $299,000

ERA1.com Toll Free 877-587-SELL

(570) 587-9999 (570) 489-8080 (570) 842-2300 (570) 698-0700

Mt Top Scranton Stroudsburg Lehighton

MOUNTAINTOP

Less than 5 years old. This 4 bed 2.5 bath home features a beautiful kitchen w/custom maple cabinets, granite counters w/ island, and dining area. Large FR with stone FP. Nice lot and landscaping, newly paved drive, 2 car garage, rear deck, 2 zone heat & central a/c. Quiet neighborhood. MLS#11-2047 $299,000

(570) 403-3000 (570) 343-9999 (570) 424-0404 (610) 377-6066

MOUNTAINTOP

SHORT SALE Opportunity! Open house 7/24 2-4pm. Have instant equity on this classic 7 bedroom 5 bath Victorian on 1.5 acres in Glen Summit, w2w hardwood floors throughout, custom counters & cabinets, finished basement & attic. Enjoy the private community lake, tennis courts, & trails. MLS#08-4560 $135,000

Accredited Buyer Representative Certified Residential Broker, E-Pro Graduate Realtors Institute Seniors Real Estate Specialist

Sunita Arora Broker/Owner

Conditions and limitations apply; including but not limited to: seller and house must meet specific qualifications, and purchase price will be determined solely by ERA Franchise Systems LLC, C b based ased d upo upon a d discount isc of the home’s appraised value value. Additionally, a second home must be purchased through a broker designated by ERA Franchise Systems LLC. ) ©2008 ERA Franchise Systems LLC. All Rights Reserved. ERA® and Always There For You® are registered trademarks licensed to ERA Franchise Systems LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.

New Listing ~Kingston

Forty Fort Modern 2BR, AC, parking, garbage & water included. Great location. No Pets, No Smoking. $575/mo. plus utilities

Pittston Modern 2BR, first floor, new deck, all appl., 1 year lease, no pets, no smoking. $500/mo. plus utilities

…………Is Developing Nicely! See our spec home and lots today!

ASHLEY

Call 1-866-823-8880 For An Appointment Anytime!

DALLAS

: 0-3

298 Pall Road, Sweet Valley

$173,900 DIR: RT 309N, L on Pioneer, immediate L on Sutton Road, R on Buldord Road, R on Sutton Farms Road, DIR: Rt. 118W, bear L at Olive’s Restaurant (formerly Sheldon’s Diner) L on Pall, property on L. home on R.

Pretty 4BR Bi-level! LR, DR, 3BRs, HW, finished lower level FR w/ FP, 3 full baths, 2 car garage. 2120SF. Nice lot! MLS# 11-2282 $204,900

www.susquehannamodularhomes.com Motivated Seller! Very Spacious cape cod located in Elmcrest development. Nicely landscaped yard, Beautiful built-ins with original wood work highlight each room. Stone fireplace in living room with hardwood floors under carpet, all new updated electrical. MLS#11-2246 $179,900

rae@lewith-freeman.com

Plains Modern 2BR, 2nd floor, great location. No pets, no smoking. $550/mo. plus utilities

THE TIME TO BUILD IS NOW DALLAS

Rae Dziak 714-9234

RENTALS

Market Analysis is always Free with no Obligation. Just call.

One of a kind! Custom built log home on quiet street near College Misericordia. Great Room with traditional fireplace. Master bedroom opens to deck.Spacious kitchen/dining room with many windows and skylights. Loft for easy third bedroom. Built in 2 car garage and basement access. MLS#11-3026 $275,000

570.288.9371

NEW LOT

Jim Graham Associate Broker

668 EMERALD CT., HAZLETON

• Built in environmentally controlled facilities (out of the elements) • Year-round Building Season

www.lewith-freeman.com

Dallas - 1, 2, 3 and 4 Christine Avenue Great land building lot in nice neighborhood. 120x134 plus extra small parcel. Dallas School District. Public Water & Sewer. $47,500

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 1:30-3:00PM

$249,500

• Less than half the time to complete project • Built to the strictest BOCA codes

Lewith & Freeman Real Estate, Inc.

(570) 474-9801

Open House Sundays • 1-3PM

125 Frangorma Drive

MODULAR HOMES Building a Modular Home Provides Many Benefits Over Stick Built...

Call Marcie Petrucelli 570.714.9267 or Marie Montante 570.714.9279

2:0

Back Mountain’s Quietest Sub-Division Only Steps from 309 And A $10,000 Price Reduction!

SUSQUEHANNA

Unit pricing starts at $269,000

OPEN HOUSES TODAY

Prices Starting in the $170s

A great place to nurture your family in this lovely 3 bed, 3 bath traditional.

2-3 Bedrooms with 1st Floor Master Distinctive Design & Architecture

30 Sutton Farms Road, Shavertown

Watch this Community come to life by becoming a Bell Weather Resident. There has never been a better time to join us…

(570) 696-0894

LUXURY CONDOMINIUMS

(570) 288-9371

Pure Indulgence... Luxury Condominums nestled in a quiet corner of Northeast Pennsylvania

Deanna Farrell

Project now owned and under development by Audi Management IV LLC

714045

54 Church Rd., Tunkhannock

WILKES-BARRE & SURROUNDS Wilkes-Barre 42 Frederick St. 12-1:30PM Prudential Poggi & Jones Wilkes-Barre 822 Scott St. 12-2PM Realty World Rubbico Real Estate Wilkes-Barre 29 Thompson St. 12-2PM Realty World Rubbico Real Estate Wilkes-Barre 17 Donald Court 1-3PM ERA One Source Realty Wilkes-Barre 78 Hickory St. 11AM-1PM ERA One Source Realty HANOVER/ASHLEY/NANTICOKE & SURROUNDS Hanover Twp. 8 Diamond Ave. 2:30-4PM Atlas Realty Hanover Twp. 1 Grandview Ave. 12:30-2PM Century 21 Signature Properties Hanover Twp. 83 Luzerne St. 1-2:30PM Century 21 Signature Properties Nanticoke Hanover St. 12-2PM Five Mountains Realty Hanover Twp. 35 Somerset 12:30-2PM Prudential Poggi & Jones Nanticoke 414 E. Grove St. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group KINGSTON/WEST SIDE & SURROUNDS Kingston 167 N. Dawes Ave. 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty Kingston 76 N. Dawes Ave. 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty Forty Fort 86 Walnut St. 1:30-3:30PM Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate Luzerne Waypoint Townhomes 1-3PM ERA One Source Realty Larksville 80 E. 4th St. 12-1:30PM McDermott & McDermott Real Estate Larksville 37 Luzerne Ave. 12-2PM Realty World Tom Hart Realty Kingston 58 S. Welles Ave. 2-3:30PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group Kingston 29 N. Landon Ave. 2-4PM Lewith & Freeman Swoyersville 198 Dana St. 12-1:30PM Lewith & Freeman

I you enjoy contemporary If drama, take a look at this 4,000+ sq. ft. impressive 5 BR, 4 BTH masterpiece cradled on 4+ acres of grounds. Its innovative design offers family privacy, yet spacious rooms p for entertainment. Great vviews from decks & patio. MLS#11-3761 Just $349,000 This 6 BR, 2 BTH 3 story traditional makes a perfect family home. It’s the home you’ve been waiting for at a price you can afford. Great location, close to schools and shopping. MLS#11-3760 Only $130,000

Smith Hourigan Group (570) 696-1195

DALLAS TOWNSHIP Spectacular wooded and rolling topography provides backdrop for one of the Back Mountains most successful new neighborhoods. Created by Halbing-Amato Developers, you can work with Summit Pointe Builders to design your dream home or choose your own builder. Offers public, water, sewer, gas, electric, phone and cable.

Priced from $52,900 to $89,900.

Call Kevin Smith (570) 696-5420 Kevin.Smith@Century21.com

Directions: From Kingston. Route 309 to a right on Center Street. Left at the “T” onto Ondish Road. Follow 3/4 mile to Saddle Ridge Entrance on the Right.

1046 N. Memorial Hwy., Dallas Across From Agway

(570) 675-4400

www.gordonlong.com !

W G NETIN S LI

RT 239 CAMBRA

Wonderful Views from this well Built Ranch Home on 2 ACRES, Full Finished Basement. Two Car Heated Garage.

Asking $159,900

Lewith & Freeman Real Estate

(570) 696-3801 • (570) 696-0883 Direct metcalf@epix.net Barbara F. Metcalf Associate Broker

69 N. MEMORIAL HIGHWAY, SHAVERTOWN, PA 18708

Call Richard Anytime for appointment 570.406.2438 Listing#11-3414


PAGE 30G

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

WEST PITTSTON

WEST WYOMING 438 Tripp St

WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE

WYOMING

YATESVILLE REDUCED!

Beautifully maintained double block on large landscaped lot (5 lots). Many updates, hardwood under carpet, ceiling fans, plaster walls and off street parking for 9! Must See! MLS # 11-2651 $110,000 Call Christine Kutz for details. Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

29 Amber Lane Remodeled 2 bedroom Ranch home with new carpeting, large sun porch, new roof. Move right in! For more info and photos please visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-749 $79,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

Spacious 3 unit in very nice condition & has been owner occupied for over 40 years. 3 bedrooms each unit, vinyl sided and most all replacement windows, 2 furnaces, ample parking & a lot of old charm! Nice location on tree lined street. MLS#11-3253 $142,500 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

WEST PITTSTON

16 Miller St. 4 bedroom Cape Cod, one with hardwood floors. Central air, nice yard in Garden Village. For more info and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 11-3645 $129,900 Call Tom Salvaggio 570-262-7716

OPEN HOUSE

Sunday 12pm-5pm Completely remodeled home with everything new. New kitchen, baths, bedrooms, tile floors, hardwoods, granite countertops, all new stainless steel appliances, refrigerator, stove, microwave, dishwasher, free standing shower, tub for two, huge deck, large yard, excellent neighborhood $154,900 (30 year loan @ 4.5% with 5% down; $7,750 down, $785/month) 100% OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE Call Bob at 570-654-1490

WHITE HAVEN

3 bedroom, bath, kitchen, living, dining room each side. Recently remodeled. Quiet neighborhood. Did not receive any water damage at all. No Realtors, please. $87,500 570-945-7423 Leave A Message

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

WEST PITTSTON 322 SALEM ST. REDUCED

Great 1/2 double located in nice West Pittston location. 3 bedrooms, new carpet. Vertical blinds with all appliances. Screened in porch and yard. For more information and photos visit www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS#10-1535 $49,900 Charlie VM 101

P E N D I N G

WEST PITTSTON

OPEN HOUSE SAT. & SUN. 12-5 232 North Street Completely remodeled two story home with, 2 bedroom & 1.5 baths. New kitchen, bath, carpet, tile, hardwoods, all appliances, including washer & dryer in upstairs bath. This is an awesome home with lots of extra amenities, large closet space, driveway, nice yard and neighborhood. $139,900 with $5,000 down, financing at 4.5% 30 yrs, monthly payment of $875. 100% OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE Call Bob at 570-654-1490

WEST WYOMING

White-Haven Pocono's. Nice 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Ranch. Great Vacation Home or Year round Home. Community Lake & other amenities. Close to Hunting, Fishing, Golf and Skiing. Close to Rt 80. All offers contingent to bank short sale approval. REDUCED! $70,900 MLS# 11-765 Call Tony Wasco 570-855-2424 Trademark Realtor Group 570-613-9090

WHITE HAVEN 28 Woodhaven Dr S

NEW LISTING Great 2-story with newer roof, flooring, windows & central air. Large driveway, fenced rear yard with patio & shed. 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths & 1st floor laundry. MLS# 11-3256 $84,900 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARE

Nice home, great price. 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, wood floors, off street parking, Approx 1312sq ft. Currently rented out for $550 monthly, no lease. Keep it as an investment or make this your new home. MLS 11-3207 $46,000 Call/text for Details. Donna Cain 570-947-3824

WILKES-BARRE

Very affordable for what this 3 bedroom, 1.5 home has to offer! Good room sizes, convenient location and “THE PRICE IS RIGHT!” MLS#11-3346 $49,900 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

134 Brown Street Nicely remodeled, spacious 2-story with attached garage on corner lot. Modern, eat-in kitchen with stainless steel appliances; large lower level Theatre Room and additional rec room with dry bar and 5th bedroom. Newer roof, mostly newer replacement windows & gas furnace. MLS# 11-1817 REDUCED TO $79,900 Call Steve Shemo (570) 288-1401 (570) 793-9449

WILKES-BARRE

156 Sherman Street HANDYMAN SPECIAL. Extra Large duplex with 7 bedrooms, 2 baths, fireplace, screened porch, full basement and 2 car garage on double lot in WilkesBarre City. $59,500 ERA BRADY ASSOCIATES 570-836-3848

WILKES-BARRE

221 Brown Street

100 Sheridan St. Nicely maintained home with fenced yard and detached garage. 3 bedrooms, 1/2 baths, 1st floor laundry room. Nice porch, ready to move in. Near Little Flower Manor. MLS 11-1947 $69,900 Call Connie EILEEN R. MELONE REAL ESTATE 570-821-7022

WILKES-BARRE

P E N D I N G

100 Solomon St. Beautiful split level in quiet neighborhood. 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, rec room w/wet bar and family room w/access to laundry room. Pristine hardwood floors throughout main level. Large fenced yard and screened porch. Priced to sell! MLS 11-3354 $122,500 Debbie McGuire 570-332-4413 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

298 Lehigh St. Absolute move in condition. New roof, furnace, water heater and kitchen cabinets. 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, great deck and fenced yard. The entire house was recently insulated. Large driveway with parking for 4 cars. Definitely not a drive-by. MLS 11-2248 $95,300 Call Connie 570-821-7022 EILEEN R. MELONE REAL ESTATE 570-821-7022

Great first home or down size. Nice clean move in ready no lawn work here. 2 car detached garage and best of all the Mortgage is probably lower than your rent payment. $52,500 MLS# 11-871 Call Tony Wasco 570-855-2424 Trademark Realtor Group 570-613-9090

26-28-30 Blackman Street Nice investment triplex conveniently located on bus route close to schools. Grosses over $3,000/month! Separate gas, electric & water; parking for 10+ cars. MLS#11-423 Call Steve Shemo (570) 288-1401 (570) 793-9449

Beautifully restored 1890 Queen Anne with working elevator located in Wilkes-Barre's Historic District built by Fred Kirby close to riverfront parks and downtown shops and restaurants. This architectural gem has six bedrooms & 5 baths and a modern kitchen with granite counters and SS appliances. Original 2-story carriage house with for two cars. Hot tub included. MLS 11-2316. $329,900 Call Darren Snyder Marilyn K Snyder Real Estate 570-825-2468

WILKES-BARRE

Pine Ridge Estates 168 Mayock St. Just like new, 3 bedroom Townhome with 1st floor master bedroom and bath, 1st floor laundry with front load washer and dryer, kitchen with stainless appliances, freshly painted, neutral flooring. Window treatments. For additional info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 11-3711 Priced to sell at $159,000 Call Lu-Ann 570-602-9280

WILKES-BARRE

Rolling Mill Hill Section

231 Poplar St. Well-Maintained 3 bedroom home in Move-in condition. Hardwood floors, upgraded appliances & great storage space. Private driveway and nice yard. MLS# 10-4456 $75,000 Barbara Young Call 570-466-6940

COLDWELL BANKER, RUNDLE REAL ESTATE 570-474-2340 Ext. 55

WILKES-BARRE SOUTH

35 Murray St. Large well kept 6 bedroom home in quiet neighborhood. Off street parking, good size back yard. Owner very motivated to sell. MLS 10-3668 $79,900 Call Don Crossin 570-288-0770 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

WILKES-BARRE

74 Empire St. N Do you have an older child that wants his or her own space? Here it is, the lower level is finished & has its own private entrance & small kitchenette. 3 bedroom, 1 3/4 baths home in very good condition & ready for a new owner. Enclosed upper & lower porches. Laundry area off kitchen. MLS#11-3459 $84,000 Lou Pellegrino 570-417-3427

2 story Brick, Stucco & Wood home. Gas baseboard heat. 3 bedrooms, 1 1/2 bath. Beautiful hardwood floors. Semi-modern kitchen. Lower-level family room with fireplace. New, lower price! 11-2987 $79,900 BESECKER REALTY 570-675-3611

COLDWELL BANKER WILKES-BARRE SOUTH RUNDLE REAL ESTATE 570-474-2340 x22

49 Hillard St. Great 3 bedroom home with large modern kitchen. Ductless air conditioning on 1st floor. Laundry on 2nd floor. Nice deck and fenced in yard. Off street parking for 2 cards via rear alley MLS 11-2896 $85,000 Call Shelby Watchilla 570-762-6969 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

WILKES-BARRE

49 Hillard St. Great 3 bedroom home with large modern kitchen. Ductless air conditioning on 1st floor. Laundry on 2nd floor. Nice deck and fenced in yard. Off street parking for 2 cards via rear alley MLS 11-2896 $85,000 Call Shelby Watchilla 570-762-6969 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770 WILKES-BARRE 54 PENN ST. SALE BY OWNER

WILKES-BARRE 292 W. 3rd St. Charming Ranch in great location with 7 rooms, 3 bedrooms, finished basement, sunroom, central air. Newer roof and windows, hardwood floors. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-2946 REDUCED $119,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE Exquisite Inside! 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath, formal dining room, family room, modern eat-in kitchen, Master bedroom and bath, front and side porches, rear deck, 2 car attached garage. Property is being sold in “as is” condition. MLS 11-1253 Huge Reduction! $179,000 Jean Malarae 570-814-5814 CLASSIC PROPERTIES 570-718-4959 ext. 1366

WILKES-BARRE

64 West River St

WILKES-BARRE

123 Fern Ridge Rd.

PRICE REDUCED! In Community of

WEST PITTSTON 2 FAMILY HOME

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

P E N D I N G

60 Kulp St. 3-4 bedroom, 2 story home with well kept hardwood floors throughout. Private driveway with parking for 2 cards and nearly all replacement windows. MLS 11-2897 $65,000 Jay A. Crossin Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

NEW CONCRETE DRIVEWAY NO FLOODING HERE

WILKES-BARRE

74 Frederick St

This very nice 2 story, 3 bedroom, 1 bath home has a large eat in kitchen for family gatherings. A great walk up attic for storage and the home is in move-in condition. MLS 11-1612 $63,900 Call Karen

3 bedroom, 2 story, with brick & stucco siding. Beautiful hardwood floors. Semi-modern kitchen. Finished basement with fireplace. Covered back porch. Priced to sell. $79,900. MLS 11-2987 Besecker Realty 570-675-3611

WILKES-BARRE

Centrally located, this triplex is fully occupied and has 2 bedrooms in each unit. Nicely maintained with one long term tenant on 3rd floor and off street parking. An annual income of $17,520 makes it an attractive buy. $79,000 MLS 11-825 Ann Marie Chopick 570-288-6654

McLean St. Large home featuring 2200SF of living space Hardwood floors on first, new carpeting on second. Modern eat-in kitchen with laundry, 3 to 4 bedrooms, fenced rear yard, gas heat. MLS#11-2659 $86,500 Maribeth Jones 570-696-6565

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE

Great price! 3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath, needs some love. High ceilings, open floor plan downstairs, extra room upstairs for closet, office, storage, whatever you need. Subject to short sale, bank approval. $37,900 MLS 11-3134 Call/text for Details. Donna Cain 570-947-3824

MINERS MILLS SECTION Business commercial zoning (previous dental office) & gracious attached home with updated roof, furnace, water heater and kitchen. Hardwood and pine floors, 3 bedrooms, large living room and formal dining room, 1-car garage & carport. MLS#111009 Reduced to $102,000 Maribeth Jones 570-696-6565

Motorcycle for sale? Let them see it here in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

61 Pittston Ave. Stately brick Ranch in private location. Large room sizes, fireplace, central A/C. Includes extra lot. For more information and photos visit www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS #10-3512 PRICE REDUCED $189,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200 VM 101

909

AVOCA

WYOMING

Location, Location, location! Either you are looking to raise your family or just work from home this amazing brick ranch style property has it all. Zoned commercial, 3 very large bedrooms and 3 1/2 baths, full finished basement, library room, oversized living room, formal dining room and so much more. You have to see it to appreciate. Call today for a private tour of the property. 1 year Home Warranty. MLS 11-1870 PRICE REDUCTION!!! OWNER WANTS OFFERS $299,000 Call Tony Wasco 570-855-2424 Trademark Realtor Group 570-613-9090

WYOMING

MOTIVATED SELLER!! Nicely maintained 2-story traditional in great neighborhood. Modern oak kitchen, open layout in family room/den with new floors, above ground pool in fenced rear yard. 1-car detached garage with workshop area, all on a nice wide lot. MLS#11-2428 REDUCED TO $139,900 Call Steve Shemo (570) 288-1401 (570) 793-9449

New Listing. Beautiful home in “Willow View” that shows “Pride of Ownership” throughout! Spacious Florida room that leads to a private yard with extensive landscaping, brand new roof, 3 baths, 4 bedrooms, lower level family room & more! MLS 11-3714 $298,500 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

YATESVILLE PRICE REDUCED

25 St. Mary’s St. 3,443 sq. ft. masonry commercial building with warehouse/office and 2 apartments with separate electric and heat. Perfect for contractors or anyone with storage needs. For more information and photos log onto www.atlas realtyinc.com. Reduced to $89,000 MLS #10-3872 Call Charlie 570-829-6200 VM 101

DUPONT

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

Single family home with a separate building containing a 1 bedroom apartment and 5 car garage all on 1 lot. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-2828 Priced to sell at $85,000 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

DURYEA REDUCED!!!!

921 Main St. Over 2000 sq. ft. commercial space currently used for local business, two 2 bedroom apartments with 1 rented, garage, off street parking. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS #11-1965 Price negotiable, please make an offer $167,000 Call Tom 570-282-7716

EDWARDSVILLE 12 Reid st. Spacious Bi-level home in semi-private location with private back yard. 3 season room. Gas fireplace in lower level family room. 4 bedrooms, garage. For more informtion and photos visit wwww.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 10-4740 $149,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200 VM 101

Find Your Ideal Employee! Place an ad and end the search! 570-829-7130 ask for an employment specialist

Income & Commercial Properties

EDWARDSVILLE

89-91 Hillside St. Out of the flood plain, this double has potential. Newer roof and some windows have been replaced. Property includes a large extra lot. MLS 11-3463 $87,000 Call Roger Nenni Ext. 32 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 5770-288-0770

HAZELTON

Income & Commercial Properties

608 Wyoming Ave

YATESVILLE

570-760-6769 Remodeled 2-3 bedroom with eat-in kitchen & oak cabinets; large dining room with oak flooring; laundry room on first floor with 1/2 bath; ceramic tile master bath with granite vanity and walk in linen closet; extra large master bedroom; wrap porch; partially fenced; concrete basement; ceiling fans; stained glass windows; gas heat; wood floor attic; shed; close to mall; quiet, safe neighborhood. Nice view. Move in condition, no repairs needed. Low real estate taxes. $87,500. 570-970-8065, or email aleta59@msn.com

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

WILKES-BARRE

Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 570-474-2340

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

26 Bubblo St. Absolutely beautiful renovation. This 3 bedroom, 1 bath Cape Cod has it all. New roof and kitchen with stainless appliances, bath, flooring, doors windows 1st floor laundry, paint inside and out. High efficiency hot air furnace and central air. Extremely efficient home, newly insulated throughout. Nice deck and newly landscaped yard to enjoy. Nothing to do but move your stuff right in MLS 11-3318 $134,900 Mark R. Mason 570-331-0982 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

909

173-175 Zerby Ave. Great income property with additional garage space (34x38) room for 3 cars to rent! Live in one half and have your mortgage paid by the other! $12,000+ potential income! MLS # 11-1111 REDUCED! $59,900 Call John Shelley 570-288-0770 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

Purebred Animals? Sell them here with a classified ad! 570-829-7130

Spacious double with 6 rooms, 3 bedrooms, 1 bath each, semi-modern kitchens & baths, separate heat and electric, fenced yard. Plenty of storage with walk up basement. $34,500 MLS 11-1637 Ann Marie Chopick 570-760-6769

570-288-6654

JENKINS TWP.

Main St. 1 story, 2,600 sq. ft. commercial building, masonry construction with offices and warehousing. Central air, alarm system and parking. Great for contractors or anyone with office/storage needs. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 11-3156 $84,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

KINGSTON

366 Pierce St. Commercial building for sale.Highly desirable corner location with parking for approximately 25 vehicles. Would be attractive for any retail or commercial operation. MLS 11-2763 $300,000 Jay A. Crossin Extension 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

KINGSTON

584 Wyoming Ave. MOVE-IN READY! Three large offices along with a reception area with builtin secretarial/paralegal work stations; a large conference room with built-in bookshelves, kitchenette and bathroom. Lower level has 7 offices, 2 bathrooms, plenty of storage. HIGHLY visible location, offstreet parking. Why rent office space? Use part of building & rent space- share expenses and build equity. MLS#11-995 $414,900 Judy Rice 570-714-9230 Call Tracy Zarola 570-696-0723

KINGSTON LIGHT

INDUSTRIAL

134 Page Ave. Light industrial complex consisting of main building (8,417 S/F) with offices and shop areas. Clear-span warehouse (38’x144’); and pole building (38’x80’) on 1.16 acres. MLS 11-1320 $299,000 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

909

Income & Commercial Properties

KINGSTON REDUCED!!

47 N. Thomas St. Well maintained duplex in a nice area of Kingston. 2nd floor unit is occupied. New roof, new heating system, brand new in ground pool recently installed. Laundry hook-up for both units in basement. Newer roof and exterior recently painted. MLS 11-1199 $129,500 Jay A. Crossin 570-288-0770 Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

KINGSTON

Wellness Center / professional offices. Lease Space Available. Brick and stucco facade offered on building exterior while interior features built-in offices with natural woodwork and glass. Modern style lofts allow for bonus interior space and warehouse space is offered as Built to Suit. --SPACES AVAILABLE: 1200 SF, 1400 SF, 4300 SF (Warehouse space, also offered as built to suit) --Custom Leases from $8.00-$12.00/ square feet based on terms. --Price/ square foot negotiable depending on options. (ASK ABOUT OUR FREE RENT) --Property ideal for a medical, business, or professional offices. --100+ Parking Spaces. Call Cindy 570-690-2689 www.cindykingre.com

570-675-4400

LARKSVILLE HUGE REDUCTION!

462 W. State St. Lower End Pizza! Established profitable business for sale. Restaurant, bar, game room, separate dining room. Parking for 35 cars. Turnkey operation. Additional parking lot included. For lease or sale $175,000 Call Jay Crossin Ext. 23 Crossin Real Estate 570-288-0770

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

NANTICOKE

Hanover & West Ridge St MANY POSSIBILITIES WITH THIS PROPERTY! Has been used in the past as student housing, but could also be used as private home, offices or commercial property. Many new updates - well taken care of. Off street parking. $100,000 570-956-4883

NANTICOKE NEW PRICE!!

423 E. Church St. Great 2 family in move in condition on both sides, Separate utilities, 6 rooms each. 3 car detached garage in super neighborhood. Walking distance to college. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-1608 $123,000 Call Tom 570-262-7716

Land for sale? Place an ad and SELL 570-829-7130


STAYCATIONS

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 909

Income & Commercial Properties

909

Income & Commercial Properties

PITTSTON

WEST WYOMING

35 High St. Nice duplex in great location, fully occupied with leases. Good investment property. Separate utilities, newer furnaces, gas and oil. Notice needed to show. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3222 $89,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

379-381 Sixth St. Perfect first home for you with one side paying most of your mortgage. Would also make a nice investment with all separate utilities and nice rents. Large fenced yard, priced to sell. Don’t wait too long. Call today to schedule a tour. MLS 11-1453 REDUCED!! $84,900 Mark R. Mason 570-331-0982 CROSS REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

PLAINS

107-109 E. Carey St. High traffic, high potential location with enough space for 2 second floor apartments. A stones throw away from the casino. Large front windows for showroom display. Basement & sub-basement for additional storage or workspace.

PRICE REDUCED $110,000 MLS# 10-1919 Call Stanley (570) 817-0111

Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 570-474-2340

PLYMOUTH

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

WILKES-BARRE

495-497 S. Grant St

Nice double block in good condition with 2 bedrooms on each side. New vinyl siding. Bathrooms recently remodeled. Roof is 2 years old. Fully rented. Tenants pay all utilities. MLS 11-580. $55,500 Call Darren Snyder Marilyn K Snyder Real Estate 570-825-2468

WYOMING PRICE REDUCED! 155 E Walnut St. Good investment property knocking on your door. Don't miss out, come and see for yourself. Also included in the sale of the property is the lot behind the home. Lot size is 25X75, known as 147 Cherry St. $82,000 MLS# 10-2666 Call Karen

Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 570-474-2340

WEST HAZLETON

3 bedroom townhouse. 1.5 bath, 1 car garage yard. Only 4 years old. $112,500 each or buy all 6 for $650,000 Garry Tokanets Broker Mountain City Realty 570-384-3335

WEST PITTSTON

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 31G

BUS TRIPS, SHOWS, LAST MINUTE DEALS & MORE Collette’s Shades of Ireland Save Time & BLACK LAKE, NY Money in Advance!

Come relax & enjoy great fishing & Tranquility at it’s finest. Housekeeping cottages on the water with all the amenities of home.

NYC Sightseeing, Broadway Shows & Special Holiday Events:

• Tickets in Advance &“In Hand”! • Great Broadway Seats! • Museum Admissions! • 9/11 Memorial Tickets & Tours • NYC Nutcracker Ballet Tickets! • Radio City Christmas Spectacular • New Year’s Eve Gala Party! • Inside the Statue of Liberty Tours (closes 10/28!)

Fall Fishing is the best of the year! DON’T MISS OUT! (315) 375-8962 • www.blacklake4fish.com daveroll@blacklakemarine.com

The NYC Ticket Machine: http://nycsightseeing.nyctrip.com 570-714-4692 www.NYCTrip.com

$50 off Promotion Available Now!

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

WEST WYOMING 331 Holden St 10-847

Mediterranean

June 10 - June 22, 2012

RCCL’s Serenade of the Seas - Barcelona, Monte Carlo, Florence, Rome, Naples, Venice, Ravenna, Croatia, back to Barcelona

Call for details 570-820-8450

Royal Travel & Tours

239 Spring Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702

570-815-8330

Fall Wine Tour in the Finger Lakes

JERSEY BOYS Wed. Nov 9 $150 for Front Mezz seating WICKED Wed. Nov. 9 $159 Orchestra Seats

**FOOTBALL**

October 22, 2011 $99 per person includes: Bus Chateau Lafayette, Penguin Bay, Hazlett, Lunch at Seneca Harbor Station, Fulkerson’s and Glenora Wine Cellars

PSUvs.Purdue10/15$139lowerOrBus&Tailgate$50 PSUvs.Illinois10/29$129OrBus&Tailgate$50 PSUvs.Nebraska11/12Bus&Tailgate$50

Radio City Christmas Show

**RADIO CITY XMAS SHOW**

RADIOCITYCHRISTMASSPECTACULAR

December 8, 2011 $109 per person includes: Bus and show ticket. GREAT SEATS! 601 Market St., Kingston • PA

Mon. Nov. 28th $85 2pm show Wed. Dec. 14th $90 2pm show 2nd Mezz seating

12/2,12/4,12/9,12/11,12/16&12/17

CALL ROSEANN @ 655-4247 TO RESERVE YOUR SEATS

CallforPricing!

570-288-9311

COOKIESTRAVELERS.COM

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Magic Your Way Vacation Package including a

Disney Value Resort and Theme Park tickets, you’ll get the Disney Quick-Service Dining Plan, FREE! From only $73 per person, per day. For a family of 4 save $467. Limited availability. Airfare not included. Call Now!

300 Market St., Kingston, PA 18704 288-TRIP (288-8747) info@tentrip.com

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570-823-4141 • 15 S. Main St. •Wilkes-Barre • BoscovsTravel.com/WLCS

CONTACT TARA AT 970-7374 twilliams@timesleader.com

285 Wyoming Ave. First floor currently used as a shop, could be offices, etc. Prime location, corner lot, full basement. 2nd floor is 3 bedroom apartment plus 3 car garage and parking for 6 cars. For more information and photos go to www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS #10-4339 $169,900 Call Charlie VM 101

Jennifer Kozlansky, BFA The Waverly Comm instructor featured in the Abington Journal Many possibilities for this building. 40 + parking spaces, 5 offices, 3 baths and warehouse. $425,000 Maria Huggler CLASSIC PROPERTIES 570-587-7000

Book October 17-22, 2011 for great special offers on hundreds of cruises! Offer vary by cruise line. Contact your Boscov’s Travel Cruise Specialist for more information.

COOKIES TRAVELERS BROADWAY SHOW BUSTRIPS

Music Lessons Great Investment Opportunity. 2 Storefronts & attached 3 bedroom home all rented out with separate utilities. $125,000 MLS# 11-2185 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

April 22 - May 1, 2012 Dublin, Kilkenny, Waterford, Crystal, Blarney Castle, Ring of Kerry, Lierick, Cliffs of Moher, Galway & Castle Stay

Don’t Miss the Best Deals of theYear During National Cruise VacationWeek

BEGINNER, INTERMEDIATE & ADVANCED

ANDREA BOGUSKO MUSIC CO. The Music Store That Families Put Their Trust In

Rentals & Lessons on All Instruments • Financing and Discounted Prices

REPAIRS/BOOKS/SUPPLIES PIANOS/DRUMS/GUITARS AMPS/BAND INSTRUMENTS VIOLINS 1150 Wilkes-Barre Twp. Blvd. Wilkes-Barre,Twp., PA 18702 Find Your Ideal (570) 829-3679

Employee! Place an ad and end the search! 570-829-7130 ask for an employment specialist 148 S. Main Street • Pittston, PA 18640

Music

Summer Specials! $250 Off 1st Months Rent, & $250 Off Security

Rock Street Music

The Children’s Martial Arts Center of NEPA

655-6076-Store • 328-1385-Cell RockStreetMusic.com

Sales • Lessons • Rentals Amps • Guitars • Keyboards PA Systems • Drums

& vintage music hall

Call now and reserve your Quality ‹ Washer & Dryer child’s spot! musical ‹ Central Air The first class is FREE, and if you decide instruments to join, take advantage or our Back to ‹ Fitness Center School Special – The first 3 months, & supplies ‹ Swimming Pool

‹ Easy Access to including your uniform for just $89.00. Buy-Sell-Trade I-81 Hapkido Tae Kwon Do 255 W. Main St. Check Institute Mon – Fri. 9 –5 on us out ok Nanticoke, PA 18634 210 Division St. • Kingston 44 Eagle Court Facebo (570) 735-0252 www.htkdi.com Wilkes-Barre, PA Lessons, hall rentals, sound rentals MASTER 18706 (Off Route 309) 287-4290 Vince Sperduto Setups and repairs

570-823-8400

Parking lot on right side of building

cedarvillage@ affiliatedmgmt.com

Teach them how to fly!

Train/Hobby Shop

Kid Power! Featuring:

7th Dan 30 Yrs. of Experience

760-0077

390 Tioga Ave. Kingston, PA 570-288-7865

www.sakurabudokan.com

learn to play an instrument.

Deposit With Good Credit. Hilltop Music Shop 1 bedroom starting @ $690

570-825-0700 1170 Highway 315 Wilkes-Barre, PA 18705

Martial Arts

info@nemusiccenter.com

Tae Kwon Do

Come In and Try Two FREE Classes!

Music Lessons

Apartment and Start Playing! www.jenniferkozlansky.com Homes Remember it is NEVER too late to

(570) 290-0659Ask About Our

Martial Arts

O O H C O O H C AIN & HOBBY SHOP TR

570-824-3471

24 New Street, Hudson, PA Specializing in Trains & Plastic Model Kits HO.. N.. O/O27 and G

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

To Advertise Call 829-7130

Find Your Ideal Employee! Place an ad and end the search! 570-829-7130 ask for an employment specialist

Boat? Car? Truck? Motorcycle? Airplane? Whatever it is, sell it with a Classified ad. 570-829-7130


PAGE 32G

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

We’re No. 1 in virtually every way; We are bold in saying so!

We are No. 1 in:

• Lead Generation • Market Share • Professional Education • Agent Productivity • Brand Name Awareness • The Minds of Buyers and Sellers • Advertising

And we are No. 1 in the eyes of most of our national competitors, who understand that RE/MAX continues to be the home of top producers who outperform their agents year after year. Linda Teberio, MBA

Owner/Sales Associate RE/MAX Precision Properties 570.824.9800 (Office) 570.824.9802 (Direct) lindateberio@remax.net Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your www.RPPNEPA.com basement, garage

or attic and callthe the Fair Housing Act. RE/MAX International is an Equal Opportunity Employer and supports ©2009 RE/MAX International, Inc. All rights reserved. Classified departRE/MAX® Sales Associates are independent contractors affiliated with independently owned and ment today at 570operated RE/MAX® franches. 091544 829-7130!


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 912 Lots & Acreage

912 Lots & Acreage

BUILDING LOT for sale in the beautiful mountains at Eagle Rock Resort, a gated community. 1/4 acre totally wooded with small stream in back yard. 2 free rounds of golf monthly. Free access to public pool, tennis courts and more. Public water and sewer available. Must sell to support son’s college tuition. Please make reasonable offer. Call 610-562-9204.

JENKINS TWP.

DALLAS

$135,000 SPECTACULAR WATER VIEW! 2 acres overlooking Huntsville Reservoir. Building site cleared but much of woodlands preserved. Perc & site prep done. MLS # 11-2550. Call Christine Kutz for details. Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

Hospital St. Eagle View Great residential lot overlooking the Susquehanna River for a stunning view of the river and surrounding area. Build your dream home on this lot with the best river and valley views in Luzerne County. Gas, telephone, electric and water utility connections are available. For more details & photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-2640 $125,000 Call Kim 570-466-3338

LEHMAN

DALLAS acres. Wooded

63 parcel. 5,000’ roadfront on 2 paved roads. Level & rolling. In Dallas Twp. $425,000 Besecker Realty 570-675-3611

DALLAS

New Goss Manor lots. Prices ranging from $59,900 to $69,900. Public water, sewer, gas & electric available. Call Kevin Smith 570-696-1195 or 570-696-5420

SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP

DURYEA

44.59 ACRES

Industrial Site. Rail served with all utilities. KOZ approved. For more information and photos visit www.atlas realtyinc.com $2,395,000 MLS#10-669 Call Charlie

EXETER Ida Acres, Wyoming

Area School District. 6 lots remain, starting at $38,000. Private setting. Underground utilities. 570-947-4819

EXETER of flood area.

Out 100x125ft. All utilities in place. Building moratorium does not apply to this lot. $45,000 reduced to $42,000 Call 570-655-0530

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

HARDING

Mt. Zion Road One acre lot just before Oberdorfer Road. Great place to build your dream home MLS 11-3521 $29,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

HARVEYS LAKE SELLER SAYS

SELL! Land with Lake View 90' x 125' Lot with View of the Lake. Sewer Permit Required. $19,000 MLS# 10-2523 Call Cindy 570-690-2689

www.cindykingre.com

570-675-4400

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE IN CLASSIFIED!

New Listing!

Market Street OVERLOOKING THE HUNTSVILLE GOLF COURSE. Own and build your own dream house overlooking the 10th green at the prestigious Huntsville Golf Course. Picturesque setting in the Back Mountain area of Lehman. Near Penn State College, Lehman. Accessed by Market St., downtown Lehman corner off Rt. 118 or passed the Huntsville dam. Driveway in place, septic approved. All on over 1 acre of prime 10th green view land. MLS#11-2860 $107,000 Bob Cook 570-696-6555

MOUNTAIN TOP

130 CHURCH RD Looking for land to build your dream home on? 5.23 acres awaits! This wooded parcel offers 600+ feet of road frontage. Public water. Public sewer available. This parcel can also be perk tested for on-lot system. MLS#11-2898 $46,900 Jill Jones 696-6550

912 Lots & Acreage

MOUNTAIN TOP

Several building lots ready to build on! ALL public utilities! Priced from $32,000 to $48,000! Use your own Builder! Call Jim Graham at 570-715-9323

NEW PRICING!!! EARTH CONSERVANCY LAND FOR SALE *61 +/- Acres Nuangola $99,000 *46 +/- Acres Hanover Twp., $79,000 *Highway Commercial KOZ Hanover Twp. 3 +/- Acres 11 +/- Acres *Wilkes-Barre Twp. 32 +/- Acres Zoned R-3 See additional Land for Sale at www.earth conservancy.org 570-823-3445

NEWPORT TOWNSHIP 1 mile south of L.C.C.C. 2 lots available. 100’ frontage x 228’ deep. Modular home with basement accepted. Each lot $17,000. Call 570-714-1296

PLAINS TWP.

20 LOTS

in an approved subdivision. Easy access to Rt 81 & PA Tpke. 1/2 mile from Mohegan Sun Casino. $275,000. 772-260-0901

SHAVERTOWN LAND Harford Ave.

4 buildable residential lots for sale individually or take all 4! Buyer to confirm water and sewer with zoning officer. Directions: R. on E. Franklin, R. on Lawn to L. on Harford. $22,500 per lot Mark Mason 570-331-0982 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

SUGAR NOTCH

273 Broadhead Ave Wooded building lot. All utilities - gas electric, sewer & cable TV. Call for appointment $19,900 MLS# 10-2967 Call Vieve Zaroda (570) 474-6307 Ext. 2772

Smith Hourigan Group 570-474-6307

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

MOUNTAIN TOP

BACK MOUNTAIN

Huntsville Dam Area

BUILDING LOT 17.96 acres. Beautiful, slopping, wooded, lot, with privacy & great views. Last lot in development with public sewer, gas & underground utilities. 8 minutes to Kingston on Hillside Rd. $47,500 570-283-0547

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 33G 918 Miscellaneous for Sale

333 Oakmont Lane Owner had property surveyed.Copies available upon request. Property was partially cleared for a home 2-3 years ago MLS 11-3300 $39,900 John Shelley 570-288-0770 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

MOUNTAIN TOP 487(Lot#3)

Mountain Blvd. S Vacant commercial land. Not yet assessed for taxes. Map on property available with setbacks, etc. High traffic area. All utilities available. Call for appointment $49,900 MLS#11-1004 Call Vieve Zaroda (570) 474-6307 Ext. 2772

Smith Hourigan Group 570-474-6307

MOUNTAIN TOP

Crestwood Schools! 126 Acres for Sale! Mostly wooded with approx. 970 ft on Rt. 437 in Dennison Twp. $459,000 Call Jim Graham at 570-715-9323

Shopping for a new apartment? Doyouneedmorespace? Classified lets A yard or garage sale you compare costs in classified without hassle is the best way or worry! tocleanoutyourclosets! Get moving You’re in bussiness with classified! with classified!

Souci Parks, Like new, several to choose from, Financing &Warranty, MobileOneSales.net Call (570)250-2890

LAUREL RUN ESTATES

We have mobile home sites for new and used single & double wides.

Veteran’s Bring your VA Entitlement Certificate

And If You Qualify, I Can Help You Find And Purchase A Home In Luzerne County! Right now there are hundreds of homes listed in our MLS in this county that may qualify for 100% VA financing. Let’s sit down and talk, make a plan, and help you get ‘moving” into a home. Dee Fields, Associate Broker 570-788-7511

deefieldsabroker@gmail.com

1 bedroom, 2nd floor. No pets. Drug free. Non smoking. Proof of employment & background check. Heat & hot water provided. $600/month + 1 month security. Call (570) 693-2415 Leave message.

941

SPRINGBROOK

2 bedroom. Clean. Needs no work. Remodeled throughout. Owner financing. $14,000. 570-851-6128 or 610-767-9456

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified! 918 Miscellaneous for Sale

ASHLEY

SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP

924

Out of State Properties

FLORIDA SOUTH WEST COAST 3 bedroom, 2 bath Only $139,900. Similar unit sold for $325k. Stainless, granite, storage, covered parking, close to golf, 5 minutes downtown & Gulf. Special final weekend special for incentives. Call now 877-888-7601 NY STATE land liquidation sale ends this month. Large Acreage - Waterfront - Lots with Camps. Top Hunting Lands. Over 150 tracts. ALL BARGAINS 800-2297843 www. landandcamps.com NY STATE lAND SALE. 33 acres on bass lake $39,900. 5 acres borders sandy creek forest with deer creek $19,900. 40 new properties. www. landfirstny.com 1-888-683-2626 VIRGINIA eastern shore, waterfront lots. Call Bill 757824-0808 visitomp.com

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

930 Wanted to Buy Real Estate

DALLAS WANTED TO BUY

5 or more acres in the Dallas School District. Not to be divided - to build our dream home. 570-510-5226 570-675-9340

WE BUY HOMES 570-956-2385 Any Situation

938

Apartments/ Furnished

ASHLEY

Furnished room in private home includes meals & laundry. $50 weekly plus help with yard, some cooking. Prefer male. Must be clean no drugs. 570-561-9121

HANOVER TWP. 2 BEDROOM

3 Oaklawn Ave. For lease, available immediately, 2 bedrooms, 1 bath room, stove provided, washer/dryer hookup, off-street parking, no pets, 1st floor duplex Newly remodeled and painted. Hardwood Floors. $600/per month, water and sewer paid, $600/ security deposit. Call (570)417-8874 after 10:00 a.m. for a private showing

LUZERNE

WHITE HAVEN

WOOD FRAME STORAGE BUILDING 1750 sq ft main

floor, 1750 sq ft basement, 475 sq ft 3 rooms, finished with rest room. City water/sewer. Zoned R-3, but zoning variance is possible. 10'W X 8'H garage door. Taxes $643. As Is. $14,000. OBO Call (570) 656-1080

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

Apartments/ Unfurnished

1 or 2 bedroom apt. $475 or $500 per month. Off street parking, stove, refrigerator, sewer. Porch/patio. Credit check, No pets. Call 570-715-7732

ASHLEY

Single 1 bedroom apartment. Off street parking. Washer dryer hookup. Appliances. Bus stop at the door. $550. Water Included. 570-954-1992

BACK MOUNTAIN

Sunny, spacious 1 bedroom. Modern kitchen. Large dining room. Large living room. Private entrance. Off street parking. Nice views. Lawn privileges. Deep well water. No pets. No smoking. References please. $565, heat included. 570-477-5010

DALLAS

2 bedroom. 2 story. 1.5 bath. Fridge & stove. Laundry hook up. Private entrance. Deck. Off street parking for 2 cars. No pets. 1 year lease. Credit check & references required. $660/month. 570-696-0842 Leave message.

DALLAS

Newberry Estates Furnished 3 bedroom, 2 bath completely redone condominium. Rent includes maintenance fee and country club fee. $1500 per mo. NO PETS. Maribeth Jones 570-696-6565

DALLAS TWP

CONDO FOR LEASE: $1,800. 2 bedroom/ 2 Bath. Call Us to discuss our great Amenity & Maintenance program! Call 570-674-5278

To place your ad call...829-7130 Dallas, Pa. MEADOWS APARTMENTS 220 Lake St. Housing for the elderly & mobility impaired; all utilities included. Federally subsidized program. Extremely low income persons encouraged to apply. Income less than $12,250. 570-675-6936, 8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

EDWARDSVILLE

Spacious, freshly painted, 2 bedrooms, 1 bath. Convenient location. Refrigerator and stove provided, washer/dryerhook-up, no pets, no smoking. $510/month. Call 570-357-3628

FORTY FORT

LARGE WOODED LOTS

overlooking Wilkes-Barre Call 570-823-8499 CELL 570-241-1854

Apartments/ Furnished

WYOMING

915 Manufactured Homes

ASHLEY PARK Laurel Run & San

938

Four rooms and bath, stove, refrigerator, washer and dryer. Water and sewer included. No pets. $350/per month, Plus utilities & security deposit. Call (570) 288-2617

938

Apartments/ Furnished

WILKES-BARRE

FULLY FURNISHED 1 BEDROOM APT.

ŠShort or long term ŠExcellent Neighborhood ŠPriv. Tenant Parking Š$700 includes all utilities. No pets. (570) 822-9697

Need to rent that Vacation property? Place an ad and get started! 570-829-7130

All utilities included. Clean 4 room 2nd floor. Appliances. Covered parking. Non smoking, no pets. Starting at $635/month. 570-714-2017

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

FORTY FORT

AMERICA REALTY RENTALS “ALL UNITS MANAGED”

VARIOUS LOCATIONS Call for availability 1-2 bedrooms, all modern. • Employment/ Application Required • No Pets/ Smoking • Leases • Very Clean Standards 288-1422

Lookingfortherightdeal onanautomobile? Turntoclassified. It’s ashowroomin print! Classified’s got thedirections!

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

FORTY FORT

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

KINGSTON

Available November 1. 1st floor, beautifully maintained spacious 2 bedroom, 2 bath apartment in great neighborhood. Large living / dining area. Extra large eat-in kitchen with washer/dryer hookup. Hardwood floors throughout. Front porch, screened back porch. Excellent storage, central air. Off street parking. $950 + utilities. Call 570-510-4778 from 9am-5pm for an appointment

Newly remodeled, 2nd & 3rd floor, 2 bedroom, appliances included, central air, off street parking. $525 + utilities. No pets. Call 570-287-9631 or 570-696-3936

FORTY FORT

Penn St. 1/2 Double. 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath. Gas heat. Fully carpeted. 4 closets. Yard. Parking. Washer/ dryer hookup. No Section 8. No pets. $725 + utilities. 570-714-1530

Large, modern 2 bedroom, 2nd floor apartment. Eat in kitchen with all appliances. Spacious living room, bath, a/c units, laundry, off street parking. Great location. No pets or smoking. $575 + utilities. Call 570-714-9234

FORTY FORT Newly renovated,

great neighborhood. 2nd floor. Non smoking. Oak floors, new carpet in master bedroom. new windows, 4 paddle fans, bath with shower. Stove & fridge, dishwasher. Off street parking, coin- op laundry. $600 + gas, electric & water. References required, no pets 570-779-4609 or 570-407-3991

GLEN LYON

1st floor, 4 room, renovated apartment. Gas or electric heat. Washer/ dryer hook up. Off street parking. Application process required. $375 per month + utilities & security. 570-714-1296

GLEN LYON 2 bedrooms, wash-

er, dryer, fridge, stove, yard. $450. 1st & last. Details call 570-468-9943

HANOVER TWP. Out of flood zone.

KINGSTON

Nice first floor apartment. 2 bedroom. Stove, fridge, washer & dryer. Lots of storage space. $650. Heat included. Call 570-333-4567

KINGSTON

KINGSTON Rear 23 E Vaughn

2 bedroom, off street parking, $450 per month + utilities. Security deposit required. NO PETS. AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY 570-690-0564 or 570-823-7564

KINGSTON Remodeled 2 bed-

room, dining & living room, off street parking. All new appliances. $600/ month + utilities, security & references. Water & sewer included. Absolutely No Pets. Call 570-239-7770

KINGSTON

S. Thomas Ave. 2 bedroom, 2nd floor. Nice area. Stove & fridge. $575 per month + utilities. No pets. Call (570) 760-8684 KINGSTON

SDK GREEN ACRES HOMES 11 Holiday Drive

Kingston “A Place To Call Home” Spacious 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts 3 Bedroom Townhomes Gas heat included

Beautiful 2nd floor, 3 bedroom. Wall to wall carpet, large living room & kitchen, 2nd floor porch with spectacular views, washer/ dryer hookup. Garbage & sewer included. $650/ month + utilities & security. 570-592-4133

24hr on-site Gym Community Room Swimming Pool Maintenance FREE Controlled Access Patio/Balcony and much more... Call Today or stop by for a tour! 570-288-9019

HARVEYS LAKE

KINGSTON

1 bedroom, LAKE FRONT apartments. Wall to wall, appliances, lake rights, off street parking. No Pets. Lease, security & references. 570-639-5920

JENKINS TOWNSHIP W ell insulated -

Low cost utilities! Nice, 2nd floor, 5 rooms. Includes: gas range, ceiling fans, knotty pine enclosed porch, Off street parking. $400 + utilities (gas heat), security & references. Non smoking. 655-1907 or 570-814-2297

KINGSTON 131 S. Maple Ave.

4 room apartment 2nd floor. Heat & hot water included. Coin Laundry. Off street parking. No pets/smoking. $645 570-288-5600 or 570-479-0486

KINGSTON

2 bedroom, 1 bath. $600. Water included. New tile, carpet, dishwasher, garbage disposal, Washer/Dryer hookup - Large yard Double Security Facebook us at BOVO Rentals 570-328-9984

KINGSTON

3rd floor - living room, eat in kitchen. Heat included. One bedroom & spare room. Close to town & Kingston Corners. $575/month 631-821-8600 x103

KINGSTON

795 Rutter Ave Screened porch, kitchen downstairs, upstairs living room, bedroom & bathroom. $575/month + utilities. No pets. 570-417-6729

KINGSTON Bright modern

apartment; 1st floor, galley kitchen, dining area, living room, 1 bedroom & bath. Gas heat, central air, ample storage, coin-op washer/ dryer on premises, off-street parking. Outside maintenance provided. Heat & utilities by tenant. No Pets. No Smoking.

ROSEWOOD REALTY 570-287-6822

FREE

Spacious 3rd floor, 2 bedrooms, porch, off street parking. Heat & water included. New fridge & stove. $550 + security.Call 570-287-5282

KINGSTON

Spacious, totally remodeled 2 bedroom, 1 bath. All appliances, laundry in unit. A/C. Screened porch. Off street parking. No pets, no smoking. $750 + utilities. Call 570-714-9234

It's that time again! Rent out your apartment with the Classifieds 570-829-7130

HOUSING

Available Immediately

2222

KINGSTON

1 BEDROOM 2 BEDROOM 3 BEDROOM

WILKES-BARRE

2 BEDROOMS 1st & 2nd floor

WILKES-BARRE

2 BEDROOM Modern, near Mohegan Sun All Apartments Include: APPLIANCES MAINTENANCE SEWER FEES

Ask about our good credit discount!

570-899-3407 Tina Randazzo Property Mgr

LARKSVILLE

3 bedroom, 1 bath. $775. With discount. All new hardwood floors and tile. New cabinets / bathroom. Dishwasher, garbage disposal. Washer/dryer hookup. Off street parking. Facebook us at BOVO Rentals 570-328-9984

LARKSVILLE Very clean, 1st floor

3 Bedroom with modern bath and kitchen. New flooring, large closets. Off Street Parking, fenced yard. Water & garbage included. Tenant pays electric & gas service. $575/month. No pets. One year lease. 570-301-7723

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

LUZERNE

1 bedroom, wall to wall, off-street parking, coin laundry, water, sewer & garbage included. $495/ month + security & lease. HUD accepted. Call 570-687-6216 or 570-954-0727

LUZERNE

41 Mill Street 1st floor, 2 bedroom, large bath with shower, stove, refrigerator and dishwasher, washer/dryer hookup, 1 car attached garage. Fieldstone working fireplace. Non Smoking. Too many extras to mention, call for more details. $700 + utilities. 570-288-3438 Midtowne Apartments 100 E. 6th Street, Wyoming PA 18644

Housing for

Extremely Low & Very Low Income

Elderly, Handicapped & disabled. 570-693-4256 ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED Rents based on income. Managed by EEI

MOOSIC

4 rooms, 2nd floor, heat, water, sewer included. $695. Security /references 570-457-7854

MOUNTAIN TOP

1 Bedroom apartments for elderly, disabled. Rents based on 30% of ADJ gross income. Handicap Accessible. Equal Housing Opportunity. TTY711 or 570-474-5010 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer.

MOUNTAIN TOP WOODBRYN 1 & 2 Bedroom.

No pets. Rents based on income start at $405 & $440. Handicap Accessible. Equal Housing Opportunity. 570-474-5010 TTY711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Immediate Opennings!

NANTICOKE

1, 2, OR 3 BEDROOMS AVAILABLE 1st month deposit

and rent a must. 516-216-3539 Section 8 welcome

NANTICOKE

1125 S. Hanover St. 1 bedroom apartment. 570-301-7725

NANTICOKE

1st floor, 1 bedroom. Heat, water, garbage & sewage included. Off street parking. All appliances included. $530 + security. Call 570-406-5221

NANTICOKE

2 bedroom, 1st floor. Large eat in kitchen, fridge, electric stove, large living room, w/w carpeting, master bedroom with custom built in furniture. Ample closet space. Front/back porches, off street parking, laundry room available. No dogs, smoking, water, sewer, garbage paid. $575/mo + gas, electric, security, lease, credit, background check. Call (570)696-3596 NANTICOKE 2nd Floor apartment for a tenant who wants the best. Bedroom, living room, kitchen & bath. Brand new. Washer/dryer hookup, air conditioned. No smoking or pets. 2 year lease, all utilities by tenant. Sewer & garbage included. Security, first & last month’s rent required. $440.00 570-735-5185

Looking to buy a home? Place an ad here and let the sellers know! 570-829-7130

NANTICOKE

347 Hanover St. 1 bedroom, 1st floor, wall to wall carpet, eat-in kitchen with appliances, washer/ dryer hookup, porch & shared yard. $400. New energy efficient gas furnace. Call 570-814-1356

NANTICOKE

603 Hanover St 2nd floor, 1 bedroom. No pets. $550 + security, utilities & lease. Photos available. Call 570-542-5330

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Motorcycle for sale? Need a Roommate? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Let them see it here Place an ad and in the Classifieds! find one here! Classified’s got 570-829-7130 570-829-7130 the directions!

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

NANTICOKE APT FOR immediRENT Available

ately, 2 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, all appliances provided, washer/dryer on premises, off-street parking, Pets Negotiable. Garbage included. Tenant responsible for all other utilities. Quiet neighborhood, enclosed porch with mountain view. Wall-to_wall carpet, freshly painted. 1 Year lease, background/credit check + references. $550/ mo 1st month plus security., Call (718) 510-7059 after 9:00 a.m.

NANTICOKE

First floor, 1 bedroom. Sewer & garbage included. Cats ok. $375 + utilities & security. Call 570-740-2009

NANTICOKE

Modern 3 room, wall to wall carpet, washer/dryer hookup, fridge & range. Water sewer, garbage & off street parking included. $430/mo. No pets. Call 570-735-3479

NANTICOKE

Spacious 2 bedroom apartment. Living room, kitchen, pantry, washer/ dryer. No pets. Sewer & trash included. $485/mos. 570-262-5399

OLD FORGE

Get out of the flood zone! 4 rooms with basement. All appliances. Off street parking. Fresh paint & new carpet. $575 per month includes heat, water & sewage. No pets. No smoking. DAYTIME

570-760-9144 EVENING

570-457-8983

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

PITTSTON

1 or 2 bedroom, wall to wall carpeting. Off street parking. Stove, fridge, porch, sewer, garbage. $440/ month. No Pets (570) 947-5113

PITTSTON

2 apartments available. 2 bedrooms. All appliances included. All utilities paid; electricity by tenant. Everything brand new. Off street parking. $675-$750 + security & references. Call 570-969-9268

PITTSTON

Š2 bedroom, 1st & 2nd floor, $475. Š2 bedroom, 2nd floor, $550. Š3 bedroom, 1st & 2nd floor, $650. Š3 bedroom, 2nd floor, $575. Call Bernie 888-244-2714

ROTHSTEIN REALTORS 570-288-7594

PITTSTON

2 bedroom, 2nd floor, bath, kitchen, living room. Heat & water included. $575/ month. 1st month & security. No pets 570-451-1038

PITTSTON

Modern 2 bedroom, 2nd floor. Includes appliances. Laundry hookup. Heated garage, off street parking. Heat, sewer, water & garbage included. $695/mos. + security & lease. No smoking/pets. 570-430-0123

PITTSTON

Out Of Flood. 4 room apt. Laundry room, enclosed porch, off street parking, newly painted. Heat, water & hot water included. $650/month. Security required. Call 570-954-7849

PITTSTON TWP.

Large 3 bedroom in great location. No pets. Non smoking. Off-street parking. Includes water & sewer. $800 + electric, security & last month. 570-237-6000

PITTSTONHUGHESTOWN Completely remod-

eled, modern 2 bedroom apt. Lots of closet space, with new tile floor and carpets. Includes stove, refrigerator, washer, dryer, gas heat, nice yard and neighborhood, no pets. $600/month $1000 deposit. 570-479-6722

Need a Roommate? Place an ad and find one here! 570-829-7130

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

PLYMOUTH

Newly remodeled. 3 rooms & bath. Stove & fridge. Heat, hot water, electricity, garbage & sewer included. $535 + security. No pets. 1 year lease. Call 570-779-2258 after 12 noon

PRINGLE

Large, newly remodeled! 1st floor. 1 bedroom. Off street parking. Washer/ dryer hook up. $800/month. Call (570) 675-5747

SCRANTON

GREEN RIDGE SECTION Large 1 bedroom. Heat included. Bathroom, eat in kitchen, living room. Off street parking. $650/month (631) 821-8600 x103

SWOYERSVILLE ENERGY EFFICIENT 1 bedroom + 4

rooms. Very modern & clean. 1st floor, washer, dryer, off street parking, new carpeting 1st month & security required. Ample storage space. Quiet & respectful building. No pets, no smoking. $500 + utilities. Call 267-872-4825

SWOYERSVILLE

Slocum St 1 1/2 bedroom, Range, refrigerator, washer & dryer included. Tile bath, yard, off street parking. $575, utilities by tenant. Security, references, lease. 570-287-5775 570-332-1048

WARRIOR RUN

1 bedroom, water & sewer included, stove, fridge, $400 plus security & reference. Call 570-301-8200

WEST PITTSTON

1st floor, 1 bedroom. Stove, refrigerator, microwave included. Washer/dryer hook up. Off street parking. $550 per month + security & references. No pets Call (570) 388-4242

WEST PITTSTON

Gorgeous pet friendly 2 bedroom apartment. $700 + first / last, utilities & security. Call 570-430-3100

WEST PITTSTON

Spacious 1 bedroom apartment, 2nd floor. Recently renovated. Gas heat - new, efficient furnace. Sewer & appliances included. Off street parking. Security. No pets. $500 + utilities. 570-586-0417 West Pittston, Pa. GARDEN VILLAGE APARTMENTS 221 Fremont St. Housing for the elderly & mobility impaired; all utilities included. Federally subsidized program. Extremely low income persons encouraged to apply. Income less than $12,250. 570-655-6555, 8 am-4 pm, Monday-Friday. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

WEST WYOMING

934 SHOEMAKER AVE

3 bedrooms, wall to wall carpet, gas heat, laundry hookup, private driveway. No Pets. $525 + utilities. Security & references. 570-693-4226

WILKES-BARRE

Mayflower Crossing Apartments 570.822.3968 2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms - Light & bright open floor plans - All major appliances included - Pets welcome* - Close to everything - 24 hour emergency maintenance - Short term leases available

Call TODAY For AVAILABILITY!! www.mayflower crossing.com Certain Restrictions Apply*

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

WILKES-BARRE

1 bedroom. Heat & hot water included, $550 month + Security required 973-879-4730


PAGE 34G

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

   



 

Space Available - Mundy Street - Wilkes-Barre

FOR LEASE 6000 SF Medical - Office Mundy Street - Wilkes-Barre

Ideal for medical, office, rehab, etc. Located next to Allied Services John Heinz Campus and side entrance to Home Depot. Easy access to Interstate 81. Call for details (570) 822-5126 Explore these Prime Commercial Properties Exclusively from Humford â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Now Available For Lease and Sale FOR LEASE Country Club Shopping Center 4,500 SF - End Cap (former Movie Gallery)

FOR LEASE WB Center 39 Public Square 2,800 SF Wilkes-Barre

Space could be expanded to 10,000/sf or subdivided. Additional parking lot could be paved for high traffic tenant.

Apartments/ Unfurnished

WILKES-BARRE

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

WILKES-BARRE LARGE 1 BEDROOM Parrish Street.

2nd floor 4 rooms, Kitchen & Bath, $450 plus Utilities/per month, Call (570) 332-8792 711 N. Washington St. Recently remodeled 3 bedroom, hardwood floors, gas heat, 1st floor laundry room, $750. month + utilities. 11-2981. Call Geri 570-696-0888

WILKES-BARRE

135 Westminster St., 2nd floor, 2 bedrooms, living room. Laundry hookup. Recently renovated. Pet friendly. $475 + utilities. Call 570-814-9700

WILKES-BARRE bedroom, 1 bath

2 apartment near General Hospital. $525 utilities, first, last & security. No pets. 570-821-0463 570-417-3427

To place your ad call...829-7130

WILKES-BARRE

2nd floor, 1 bedroom, refrigerator & stove included. Off street parking. $485 month + security, references & utilities.

Call 570-822-8671

WILKES-BARRE 447 S. Franklin St.

Must see! 1 bedroom, study, off street parking, laundry. Includes heat and hot water, hardwood floors, appliances, Trash removal. $575/mo Call (570)821-5599

WILKES-BARRE

HEIGHTS Townhouse type apartments. 2 bedrooms, Stove , Fridge, washer/ dryer hookup. Offstreet parking. Utilities by tenant. No Pets. $495/month 570-825-8355 6 to 8 pm ONLY WILKES-BARRE

LAFAYETTE GARDENS

SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR! 113 Edison St. Quiet neighborhood. 2 bedroom apartments available for immediate occupancy. Heat & hot water included. $625 Call Aileen at 570-822-7944

WILKES-BARRE LODGE Formerly The Travel Lodge 497 Kidder St., Wilkes-Barre Rooms Starting at: Daily $44.99 + tax Weekly $189.99 + tax Microwave, Refrigerator, WiFi, HBO 570-823-8881 www.Wilkes BarreLodge.com

WILKES-BARRE Mayflower Section

Rent with Option to buy 1 bedroom apartment available. Nice Area. Duplex (1 unit ready now). Easily convertible into a 6 room, 2 bath single when purchased. Carpeting, Hardwood, & some appliances included. 570-823-7587

WILKES-BARRE NORTH 813 North

Washington Street Large 1 bedroom, 2nd floor, eat-in kitchen with appliances, new carpet & paint, enclosed back porch, coin-op laundry. Heat, hot water & cable included. Tenant pays electric. $520 + security, no pets. Call 570-814-1356

WILKES-BARRE SOUTH

Near Wilkes U. 2 bedroom apartment. A lot of closet space. Hardwood floors, water & sewer included. Coin Op Laundry. $520 + security & references 570-814-5122

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in bussiness with classified!

WILKES-BARRE SOUTH SECURE BUILDINGS 1 & 2 bedroom

apartments. Starting at $440 and up. References required. Section 8 ok. 570-332-5723

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

Public Square

Apartments/ Unfurnished

WYOMING

TOWNHOUSE

WILKES-BARRE

South Welles St. 1 bedroom, 3rd floor. Covered back porch. Heat, hot water, sewer & garbage included. $425 + security. Section 8 Welcome. 570-589-9767 WILKES-BARRE Â&#x160;1 bedroom water included Â&#x160;2 bedroom water included Â&#x160;1 bedroom efficiency water included Â&#x160;2 bedroom single family Â&#x160;3 bedroom single family HANOVER Â&#x160;4 bedroom large affordable Â&#x160;2 bedroom NANTICOKE Â&#x160;2 bedroom large, water included PITTSTON Â&#x160;Large 1 bedroom water included PLAINS Â&#x160;1 bedroom water included KINGSTON Â&#x160;3 Bedroom Half Double McDermott & McDermott Real Estate Inc. Property Management 570-821-1650 (direct line) Mon-Fri. 8-7pm Sat. 8-noon

Carpet, tile bath, appliances, washer / dryer hookup, sewer, parking by front door. $600 + Utilities, Security & Lease. No smoking, no pets. 570-693-0695

944

Commercial Properties

Center City WB WE HAVE SPACE Come see us nowyouâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be surprised! Affordable modern office space available at the Luzerne Bank Building on Public Square. Rents include heat, central air, utilities, trash removal and nightly cleaning - all without a sneaky CAM charge. Super fast internet available. Access parking at the new intermodal garage via our covered bridge. 300SF to 5000SF available. We can remodel to suit. Brokers protected. Call Jeff Pyros at 570-8228577 for details.

COMMERCIAL RETAIL SPACE

800 to 2400 sql. ft. available starting at $750/month

Established Wilkes-Barred Shopping Center 973-879-4730

DOLPHIN PLAZA

WILKES-BARRE/SOUTH 3 bedroom town-

house style. Washer/dryer hook up. Full basement. Tenant pays utilities. $475/month + security. Fenced backyard. 570-824-4266

Rte. 315 1,700 - 2,000 SF Office / Retail 4,500 SF Office Showroom, Warehouse Loading Dock Call 570-829-1206

1 bedroom apartment. Wall to wall carpet. Appliances furnished. Coin op laundry. Heat, water & sewer included. $550/month. Call 570-687-6216 or 570-954-0727

WYOMING

OFFICE OR RETAIL

WYOMING

Corner of Wyoming Ave & Breese St. 2nd floor, 3 bedrooms. Parking. Includes appliances, water, sewer & garbage. No pets. $700 + utilities & security. Call 570-609-5050

Contact Rob Finlay, CLS â&#x20AC;˘ 570.822.5126 www.humford.com â&#x20AC;˘ Broker Protected 944

Commercial Properties

OFFICE OR STORE NANTICOKE

1280 sq ft. 3 phase power, central air conditioning. Handicap accessible rest room. All utilities by tenant. Garbage included. $900 per month for a 5 year lease. 570-735-5064.

OFFICE SPACE Bennett St. Luzerne

1100 to 1600 sq ft, 1st floor, off street parking. Call 570-283-3184

PITTSTON COOPERS CO-OP

Lease Space Available, Light manufacturing, warehouse, office, includes all utilities with free parking. I will save you money!

RETAIL SPACE

FORTY FORT Sublet in high traffic West Side area. 2,000SF +/$1,000/month includes all utilities. Great retail location! Please call The Flower Warehouse at 570-714-2570

944

Commercia Propertie

HI--Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;--DRI! FORTY FORT...PRIME

FORTY FORT

Free standing building. Would be great for any commercial use. 1900 sq. ft. on the ground floor with an additional 800 sq. ft in finished lower level. Excellent location, only 1 block from North Cross Valley Expressway and one block from Wyoming Ave (route 11) Take advantage of this prime location for just $895 per month! 570-262-1131

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

Center Dallas Shopping

R E A L T Y 941

LUZERNE

Out of flood plain. 2,200 SF. Near Cross Valley Highway. Loading dock. Newly painted. 570-288-6526

Turn key medical facility formally occupied by Geisinger Hospital. Space has 10 exam rooms, x-ray, minor procedure room, 2 Physician offices, Lab & nurses station.

944

Commercial Properties

315 PLAZA

900 & 2400 SF Dental Office direct visibility to Route 315 between Leggios & Pic-ADeli. 750 & 1750 SF also available. Near 81 & Cross Valley. 570-829-1206

WAREHOUSE / COMMERCIAL 2,275 Sq. Ft. Build-

ing in Wilkes-Barre. Loading dock, plenty of parking. Call 570-814-8106

WAREHOUSE/LIGHT MANUFACTURING OFFICE SPACE PITTSTON Main St.

12,000 sq. ft. building in downtown location. Warehouse with light manufacturing. Building with some office space. Entire building for lease or will sub-divide. MLS #10-1074 Call Charlie 570-829-6200 VM 101

947

Garages

GARAGE STALL

For storage located in KINGSTON. Electric & automatic door. $75/month. Call 570-466-6334

950

Half Doubles

AVOCA

3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, off-street parking, $600 per month, 1st month security deposit. Plus utilities. Call 570-457-2372 after 4:00 p.m.

FEATURES: â&#x20AC;˘ High TrafďŹ c, C1 Zoned. â&#x20AC;˘ Commercial or Professional â&#x20AC;˘ PLENTY OF PARKING â&#x20AC;˘ NEW EXTERIOR: CULTERED STONE/DRIVET, 2-TONE (STUCCO LOOK) â&#x20AC;˘ NEW ROOF: MARCH THIS YEAR â&#x20AC;˘ 2 Modern ofďŹ ces; 1 new â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;09 â&#x20AC;˘ CENTRAL AIR (optional)

Call (570) 288-2195

OFFICENTERS - Pierce St., Kingston

GLEN LYON

Renovated apartment. Washer/dryer hook up. Off street parking. New furnace. Available November 1st. application process required. $500 per month + utilities & security. Call 570-714-1296

HANOVER TWP.

3 bedrooms, 1 bath. New stove, carpeting & kitchen floor. Freshly painted. Washer/dryer hookup. Off street parking. Absolutely no pets. $595+ utilities, security & lease. Call (570) 829-3219

Professional OfďŹ ce Rentals

Full Service Leases â&#x20AC;˘ Custom Design â&#x20AC;˘ Renovations â&#x20AC;˘ Various Size Suites Available Medical, Legal, Commercial â&#x20AC;˘ Utilities â&#x20AC;˘ Parking â&#x20AC;˘ Janitorial Full Time Maintenance Staff Available

For Rental Information Call:

1-570-287-1161

CELEBRATING 113 YEARS OF SERVICE Joseph Moore, CRB, Broker/Owner

1898-2011

Nancy Judd, Assoc. Broker...............287-8276 Steve Shemo.......................................793-9449

BUY NOW BEFORE ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Sâ&#x20AC;&#x153;TOO LATEâ&#x20AC;?

134 PAGE AVENUE, KINGSTON Light industrial complex consisting of main building (8,417 s.f.) with offices & shop areas; clear-span warehouse (38â&#x20AC;&#x2122; x 144â&#x20AC;&#x2122;); and pole building (38â&#x20AC;&#x2122; x 80â&#x20AC;&#x2122;) on 1.16 acres. MLS#11-1320 JOE MOORE $299,000

837 Wyoming Ave., Kingston

33-37 TENER STREET, LUZERNE High Traffic - Good visibility. This 6,000 sq. ft. masonry building is clear span. Multiple uses - professional - commercial, etc. 18 storage/ warehouse units included. MLS#11-2787 JOE MOORE $325,000

716092

H U M F O R D 941

2 units available - 2,800 SF & 725 SF - located on the top (10th) floor. Overlooking the Wyoming Valley. Tenant improvement allowance. Call for more details.

Anchored by Thomasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Super Foodtown with 8 inline tenants. Center has strong sales volume and is located on the coming home side of Route 309, which is also the main thruway from Wyoming County to/from Wilkes-Barre.

Dallas

FOR LEASE Dallas Shopping Center 3,000 SF


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 950

Half Doubles

HANOVER TWP.

Completely remodeled 2 bedroom, 1 bath, wall to wall carpet. Stove, washer/dryer hook up. Off street parking. $750/month + first, last & security. Includes water, sewer & trash. No pets. No smoking. References & credit check. 570-824-3223 269-519-2634 Leave Message

953 Houses for Rent

DALLAS

Lovely 4 bedroom home nestled on 2 acres of land in a quiet, private setting. 2 story deck, above ground pool, large yard, private drive. Oil heat. Washer and dryer included. $1050 + security, utilities & references. Water and Sewer included. Call 570-675-7529

KINGSTON

Half Double- 5 bedroom, 1 Bath $875 with discount. All new carpet, dishwasher, garbage disposal, appliances, Large Kitchen, new cabinets, Washer/dryer hookup, Double Security. Facebook us @ BOVO Rentals 570-328-9984

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

LARKSVILLE

3 bedroom, 1 bath half double, Freshly cleaned & painted. Tenant pays all utilities including sewer. $550 plus security. Call (570) 332-5723

LARKSVILLE

3 bedrooms, wall to wall carpeting, washer/ dryer hookup, stove, dishwasher, finished basement, garage, sewer & garbage included. $700 + utilities & security. No pets. 570-7442789 or 256-3256

NANTICOKE

3 bedroom. Washer dryer hookup. $600 + utilities. Call 570-954-7919

DRUMS

SAND SPRINGS Golf Community 2400 sq. ft. Townhouse. Modern kitchen, 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, 2 stall garage. 3 minutes to interstates 81 & 80. $1350 + utilities. Call 570-582-4575

DUPONT Lackawanna

316 Ave. Lease, with option to buy, available Nov. 1st. 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, refrigerator & stove provided, off-street parking. $565/per month. Call after 6pm 570-362-1160

HARVEY’S LAKE

WARDEN PLACE 2 bedroom house with lake rights. Stone fireplace with gas heat insert, knotty pine & carpets throughout. $750/month + some utilities & security. References a must. Call 570-639-5293

KINGSTON

361 Reynolds Street 3 bedrooms. $750 per month + utilities. Security deposit required. NO PETS. AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY 570-690-0564 or 570-823-7564

KINGSTON 54 Krych St.

Single: 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath, gas heat, wall to wall, kitchen with stove & refrigerator. Quiet street. No pets. Not Section 8 approved. $675/mo. 570-288-6009

PITTSTON

PLAINS TWP.

2 bedroom, 1/2 double with eat in kitchen, including stove and refrigerator, washer & dryer hook-up, plenty of off street parking, large yard. Sewer and refuse included. Lease, NO PETS $595 + utilities 570-829-1578

PLYMOUTH

Shawnee Ave. 3 bedrooms, back yard, basement. $550/mo. plus utilities and sewer. 570-332-5723

W. PITTSTON/ JENKINS TWP 2 bedroom 1/2 dou-

ble. Tile kitchen & bath. Off street parking. $600 + utilities. 570-237-2076

WILKES-BARRE

46 Waller St. 3 bedrooms, appliances. Newly renovated, nice neighborhood. NO PETS! $650 + utilities, security & lease. 570-592-1328 570-332-1216

WILKES-BARRE 549 S. Main St.

3 bedrooms, kitchen, living room, dining room, basement. $500 month. No pets. Call 570-824-4899 or 570-239-4340

WILKES-BARRE

HEIGHTS-MODERN 2.5 bedrooms, new stove, carpeted, hook ups, gas heat, no pets. $525 per month + utilities & $350 security. 570-824-8786

962

Newly remodeled. Front porch, foyer entrance, hardwood floors, living room, dining room, 4 bedrooms, 2 fireplaces, 2.5 baths, granite kitchen, sun room, basement with plenty of storage, no pets, no smoking. $1,600/month

570-472-1110 Nice Area

MOUNTAIN TOP

316 Cedar Manor Dr (Bow Creek Manor) 4 bedroom, 3 1/2 bath 2 story on almost 1 acre. Master bedroom suite. Two family rooms. Two fireplaces. Office/den. Large deck overlooking a private wooded yard. 3 car garage. Rent for $1,800 per month with the option to buy. MLS #11-3286 Please Call Bob Kopec Humford Realty 570-822-5126

MOUNTAIN TOP

953 Houses for Rent

953 Houses for Rent

NANTICOKE

DO YOU OWN A HOME THAT YOU'D LIKE TO RENT TO A QUALIFIED RENTER?

Hanover Section Small, recently renovated 3 bedroom, 1 bath home. Nice neighborhood. $650 + utilities & security Call Sharon 570-899-8034

NANTICOKE

Single family home for rent. Three bedrooms, one bath, kitchen with all appliances including dishwasher, laundry room with washer and dryer included. Off street parking with Single Car garage. $650 / month + security deposit. Utilities by tenant. Call Monica Lessard

570-287-1196 Ext. 3182

POCONOS

Beautiful Chalet. 1,500 sq. ft., 3 bedroom, 2 bath. Easy access. Appliances included. Washer/ Dryer. Stone fireplace. Great school district. Hardwood floors. Available now. $1,250. Call 831-206-5758

SHAVERTOWN

Near Burger King 3 bedroom, 1-1/2 bath, 3 season room, hardwood floors, off street parking & gas heat. 1 year Lease for $900/month + 1 month security. Garbage, sewer, refrigerator, stove, washer/dryer & gas fireplace included. (570) 905-5647

SWOYERSVILLE

2 bedroom single home, large rooms, stove included. Washer dryer hookup, covered patio. $650 per mo + utilities & security. 570-650-2494

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

I have immediate qualified renters looking for Homes or Townhomes to lease. Please contact me asap for details and areas, including Drums, Conyngham or Mountaintop areas. Dee Fields, Associate Broker 570-788-7511

deefieldsabroker@gmail.com

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified! 962

KINGSTON HOUSE Nice, clean furnished room, starting at $315. Efficiency at $435 month furnished with all utilities included. Off street parking. 570-718-0331

971 Vacation & Resort Properties

SEDONA, AZ

7 night vacation at beautiful Los Abrigados Resort & Spa. Any week through January 31. $750 570-417-1212

1 B edroom Sta rting a t $675.00 • Includes gas heat, w ater,sew er & trash • C onvenient to allm ajor highw ays & public transportation • Fitness center & pool • P atio/B alconies • P et friendly* • O nline rentalpaym ents • Flexible lease term s M ond a y - Frid a y 9 -5 Sa turd a y 1 0-2

822-27 1 1

w w w .liv ea tw ilk esw ood .com * Restrictions Ap p ly

CEDAR VILLAGE

WILKES-BARRE/NORTH

Near General hospital. Single 3 bedrooms, appliances, gas heat, $540 + utilities. Call (570) 824-1431

WYOMING

Beautiful 2 bedroom, 1 bath. A/C. All appliances included. New wall to wall carpet. Attached garage, off street parking, large yard with patio, in school zone. No pets. No smoking. Quiet Neighborhood. $1,100 + security & utilities. Call 570-237-5632

Find homes for your kittens! Place an ad here! 570-829-7130 941

Apartments Unfurnishe

Apartment Homes

Ask About Our Summer Specials! $250 Off 1st Months Rent, & $250 Off Security Deposit With Good Credit. 1 bedroom starting @ $690

Featuring:

‹ ‹ ‹ ‹ ‹

Washer & Dryer Central Air Fitness Center Swimming Pool Easy Access to I-81 Mon – Fri. 9 –5 44 Eagle Court Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706 (Off Route 309)

570-823-8400 cedarvillage@ affiliatedmgmt.com

941

Apartments Unfurnishe

EAST MOUNTAIN APARTMENTS The good life... close at hand

Regions Best Address

• 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.

• 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.

MOUNTAINTOP

www.EastMountainApt.com

3 bedrooms, 2 baths, large eat in kitchen. Garage. Huge deck overlooks woods. Washer/dryer, dishwasher, fridge, sewer & water included. Credit check. $1,100 + security, No pets, no smoking. Proof of income required. Call (570) 709-1288

NANTICOKE

Desirable Lexington Village Nanticoke, PA Many ranch style homes. 2 bedrooms 2 Free Months With A 2 Year Lease $795 + electric

SQUARE FOOT RE MANAGEMENT 866-873-0478

Room 962

Room

Bear Creek Township Rooms starting at Daily $39.99 + tax Weekly $179.99 + tax WiFi HBO Available Upon Request: Microwave & Refrigerator

(570) 823-8027

www.casinocountrysideinn.com info@casinocountrysideinn.com

822-4444

Find the perfect newpet. The Classified section at timesleader.com

W IL K E SW O O D A PAR TM E NTS

WILKES-BARRE

Clean, 2 bedroom, duplex. Stove, hookups, parking, yard. No pets/no smoking. $495 + utilities. Call 570-868-4444

Rooms

Rent to Own - Lease Option Purchase 5 bedroom 2 bath 3 story older home. Completely remodeled in + out! $1500 month with $500 month applied toward purchase. $245K up to 5 yrs. tj2isok@gmail.com

Countryside Inn

PLAINS

31 Center Street For lease, available November 1st. 2 bedrooms, 1 bath room, refrigerator and stove provided, washer/dryer hookup, off-street parking, no pets, Newly remodeled, new appliances, carpet & hardwood flooring. References required. $525./per month, plus utilities, $525./security deposit. Call (570) 262-9181

KINGSTON

Executive Home well maintained.

Casino

38 Fulton St. Half Double. 2 bedrooms, living & dining rooms, 1 bathroom, newly remodeled, off-street parking, $625/per month, plus security deposit. 570-299-7103

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 35G

288-6300

www.GatewayManorApt.com

IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE

Immediate Occupancy!!

Efficiencies available @30% of income

MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS

61 E. Northampton St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701 • Affordable Senior Apartments • Income Eligibility Required • Utilities Included! • Low cable rates; • New appliances; • Laundry on site; • Activities! •Curbside Public Transportation

Please call 570-825-8594 D/TTY 800-654-5984

We Need Your Help!

Anonymous Tip Line 1-888-796-5519 Luzerne County Sheriff’s Office

Call 829-7130 to place your ad.


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 PAGE 36G

Automatic, Pwr. Mirrors, Advance Trac with Electronic Stability Control, Side Curtains, AM/FM/CD, Pwr. Door Locks, Remote Keyless Entry, Tilt Wheel, Air

MPG

MPG

Auto., Air, Pwr. Mirrors, SYNC, Advance Trac with Electronic Stability Control, Side Curtains, AM/FM/CD, Tilt Wheel, PL, Sport Appearance Pkg., Rear Spoiler, Cruise Control, 15” Alum. Wheels. Winter Pkg., Heated Seats, Keyless Entry w/Keypad WAS.........$18,160 FORD REBATE...............-500 OFF LEASE REBATE......-500 FORD REGIONAL DISCOUNT OFF MSRP....-70 COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP....-76

WAS.........$15,680 FORD REBATE...............-500 OFF LEASE REBATE......-500

27 Mos. *Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 27 month lease 23,625 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 10/31/11.

MPG

Remote Keyless Entry, AM/FM/CD, Pwr. Door Locks, Air, Anti-Theft Sys., Side Curtain Air Bags, Side Impact Air Bags, Message Center, MyKey

27 Mos. *Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 27 month lease 23,625 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 10/31/11.

MPG

Auto., AM/FM/CD, Anti-Theft Sys., AC, PL, Side Curtain Air Bags, 16” Steel Wheels, PW, Tilt Wheel, Instrument Cluster, Pwr. Side Mirrors, Message Center, Keyless Entry, Fog Lamps, MyKey

WAS.........$19,385 FORD CREDIT REBATE......-500 OFF LEASE REBATE......-500 COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. .-386

WAS.........$18,390 FMCC REBATE...............-500 OFF LEASE REBATE......-500 COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP....-91

27 Mos. *Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 27 month lease 23,625 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 10/31/11.

APR

M O S.

PLUS

Auto., CD, 16” Alum. Wheels, Tilt, Safety Pkg., 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Side Impact Air Bags, Message Center, Cruise Control, PL, PW WAS.........$21,540 FORD REBATE...............-500 FORD BONUS REBATE....-1,500 OFF LEASE REBATE...-1,250 COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. .-291

*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 27 month lease 23,625 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 10/31/11.

27 Mos.

APR

APR Auto., AM/FM/CD, Alum. Wheels, Tilt Wheel, Pwr. Seat, Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius Satellite Radio, Message Center, Pwr. Moonroof, SYNC, PL, PW

PLUS

M O S.

WAS.........$25,065 FORD REBATE...............-500 FORD BONUS REBATE....-1,500 OFF LEASE REBATE. . .-1,250 FORD REGIONAL DISCOUNT OFF MSRP....-445 COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. .-871

Auto., AM/FM/CD, Alum Wheels, Tilt, PW, PDL, Pwr. Seat, Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry w/Keypad, Message Center,

PLUS

M O S.

WAS.........$29,280 FORD REBATE...............-500 FORD BONUS REBATE....-1,500 OFF LEASE REBATE. . .-1,250 FORD REGIONAL DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.-1,445 COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. . .-1,086

27 Mos. *Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 27 month lease 23,625 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 10/31/11.

27 Mos. *Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 27 month lease 23,625 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 10/31/11.

*Tax and tags extra. Security Deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 27 month lease 23,625 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. See salesperson for details. All payments subject to credit approval by the primary lending source, Tier 0 rate. Special APR financing cannot be combined with Ford cash rebate. “BUY FOR” prices are based on 72 month at $18.30 per month per $1000 financed with $2,500 down (cash or trade). Photos of vehicles are for illustration purposes only. Coccia Ford is not responsible for any typographical errors. No Security Deposit Necessary. See dealer for details. Sale ends OCTOBER 31, 2011.

CALL NOW 823-8888 1-800-817-FORD Overlooking Mohegan Sun 577 East Main St., Plains

Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B

WWW.COCCIACARS.COM

Times Leader 10-16-2011  

The Wilkes-Barre Times Leader 10-16

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