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The Times Leader timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE, PA

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011

TIMES LEADER PHOTO

$1.50

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

John Stopay, owner of Jon L. Stopay Candies, Plains Township, might rent space elsewhere.

Luzerne County EMA Director Stephen Bekanich discusses evacuations. At right is Jim Brozena.

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

People gather at the Black Diamond Bridge along West Academy Street in Wilkes-Barre to get a look at the river Thursday morning as the Susquehanna was rising.

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

Volunteers help sandbag Thursday at West Academy and Pickering streets, Wilkes-Barre.

Six days of desperation

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

A sign on a muddy chair in Jenkins Township reads ‘Home, where your story begins.’

The flood of 2011, hour by hour By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES jandes@timesleader.com

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Damage control employees from Dickson City clean up the Holy Rosary school in Duryea.

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Pumps remove water from the Miller Street area of Jenkins Township Monday.

“ I realized I was losing everything right in front of my eyes …”

2 p.m., Butler Township What day is it? Hanover Township Fire Chief Jeffrey It was a frequent response from Tudgay and other members of the townflood victims, responders and officials ship’s water rescue team brought two throughout Luzerne County when families to dry ground after their homes they tried to reconstruct the natural were surrounded by water from Nescodisaster that’s altering many lives. peck Creek. Rain from Tropical Depression Lee Tudgay thought of the weather forepounded the region, swelling the Suscast of continued rain. quehanna River to a record 42.66 feet “In the back of my mind, I knew the and testing the Wyoming Valley Levee system to the brink. Joe Sagliocco Susquehanna River was coming up. I Before the skies cleared on SaturJenkins Township just knew it was going to be a busy couple of days,” Tudgay said. day, more than 100,000 people were His hunch was correct. The team later evacuated, close to 1,500 buildings from Duryea to Shickshinny were battered or de- rescued eight people in Mocanaqua and four in Hastroyed and documented damage estimates ap- nover Township, in addition to handling numerous other emergency response calls and discovering proached the $30 million range. one of several seepage boils that developed at the Wyoming Valley Levee. WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 3:45 p.m., Wilkes-Barre 7 a.m., Wilkes-Barre Luzerne County emergency management offiThe Susquehanna River was at 7.41 feet but projected to reach 26 to 28 by Friday morning. Luzerne cials were informed the river crest projection had County workers started installing flood gate clo- increased to 38 feet, prompting them to summon sures on the two street-level portal openings in the emergency management representatives from the Wyoming Valley Levee in downtown Wilkes-Barre. See DAYS, Page 12A

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Erik Harvey removes wet plaster and lath board inside his brother’s home in Shickshinny.

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Crews clean up at the Mark Plaza along Route 11 in Edwardsville on Monday afternoon.

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Pauline Fenner, second from left, gets help from friends in salvaging photos in West Nanticoke.

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Lillian Kresge of Shickshinny looks over ruined belongings after the flood.

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Scranton Diocese Bishop Joseph Bambera announces a special collection for flood victims.

Plymouth Township supervisor Chairwoman Gale Conrad gives Mike Sweet of FEMA a tour.

39 years later: Devastating storms share many similarities Both Agnes and Lee followed nearly the same path north before stalling over NEPA. By EDWARD LEWIS elewis@timesleader.com

Aunt Agnes and nephew Lee. The two storm systems separated by 39 years share many similarities; both formed off the coast of the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico in the western Caribbean Sea

INSIDE

and followed nearly the same path north before stalling over Northeastern Pennsylvania and causing record flooding of the Susquehanna River. The memory of the 1972 flood is still so fresh that when the river rapidly rose and mandatory evacuations were ordered on Sept. 7 and 8, Luzerne County officials warned residents to expect an Agnes-type flood. It was that and then some. Several days of rain from Agnes

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TIMES LEADER FILE PHOTO

High water levels from the Susquehanna River are seen under the Water Street Bridge in Pittston.

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Penn State tops Temple Sports, 1C

B PEOPLE Birthdays C SPORTS Outdoors

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D BUSINESS Mutuals E VIEWS Editorial

caused the river to crest at 40.9 feet in Wilkes-Barre on June 24, 1972, breaching levees in Forty Fort and Wilkes-Barre and causing billions in damages. A strengthened levee system protected most of the Wyoming Valley when Tropical Depression Lee dumped heavy rain over three days, raising the water depth to 42.6 feet, breaking the Agnes crest record. Lee started out innocuously. A tropical wave was first detected by

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INSIDE: More flood coverage on Pages 2A, 10A, 16A

weather forecasters off the Yucatan Peninsula on Aug. 31. It developed into a tropical depression and was given the name Lee on Sept. 1. Moving north into the Gulf of Mexico, just as Agnes did, Lee became a Tropical Storm when wind speeds reached 45 mph the See RAIN, Page 7A

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011

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LUZERNE COUNTY

Mosquito spraying scheduled Aerial spraying to control mosquitoes that have bred as a result of the recent flooding in the Wyoming Valley is scheduled for Monday night. The state Department of Environmental Protection said a helicopter will apply the pesticide Dibrom on 45,000 acres in WilkesBarre and surrounding communities starting approximately 30 minutes before dusk. The pesticide has been used in North Carolina, Florida and Texas to control mosquitoes due to tropical weather activity in those areas, DEP said. In the event of adverse weather, the spraying will be rescheduled. Some mosquito species carry the West Nile virus, which causes brain inflammation. Mosquito samples carrying the virus have been identified in Luzerne County and 56 other counties. Four human cases have been confirmed statewide. People living in areas where samples have tested positive are at risk of contracting the virus. Residents can take steps to eliminate mosquito breeding areas: properly dispose of discarded items that can collect water; clean clogged rain gutters; turn over plastic wading pools when not in use; drill holes in the bottom of outdoor recycling containers. In addition, precautions can be taken to prevent mosquito bites, including the use of insect repellants and wearing long-sleeved shirts, long pants and socks when outdoors.

THE TIMES LEADER

Gases noted at site of death An autopsy was performed on Carol Ann Mikols of Exeter, but no cause of death has yet been determined.

By JERRY LYNOTT jlynott@timesleader.com

WEST PITTSTON – Testing of the air inside a house near the Susquehanna River where a woman was found on Sept. 9 identified two gases that lowered the oxygen level, officials said. Still to be determined is what killed Carol Ann Mikols, 62, of Exeter, said Kevin Sunday, a spokesman for the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. In an email Saturday, he said DEP

asked the federal Environmental Protection Agency to assist in analyzing the air. Samples were taken on Sept. 11. “The results show that the ambient air Mikols at the time of sampling was heavily laden with methane and carbon dioxide, reflecting the depressed levels of oxygen found in the home,” the DEP spokesman said. Mikols was watching the house at Susquehanna Avenue and Second Street for her sister, who was out of town. A neighbor found the body of Mikols in the basement of the house. The structure was not flooded by the

river that devastated other parts of the borough on Sept. 9 when it crested at a record level of 42.66 feet. An autopsy was performed Sept. 10 on Mikols, and the Luzerne County Coroner’s office has yet to determine the cause of her death. The office determined the death was an accident. “A coroner’s investigation is ongoing and will determine what role, if any, these compounds played in the death,” the DEP spokesman said. DEP also continues to investigate the matter, the spokesman said. Neighboring houses have been undergoing tests and the DEP spokesman said the results have shown “normal background levels” for oxygen and organic compounds.

SERVING UP HOT LUNCH AND HOPE

Diocese will collect items, cash

WILKES-BARRE

Wilkes providing loan help Wilkes University students and the Small Business Development Center (SBDC) will help businesses apply for federal disaster assistance. Junior and senior accounting majors from the Sidhu School of Business and Leadership and members of the school’s Students in Free Enterprise will help the SBDC provide consulting services to businesses that have lost important records and documents during the flooding. Services are available from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday at the SBDC. Appointments are encouraged but not required. The SBDC can be reached at 570 4084340 or at sbdc@wilkes.edu. Businesses and individuals seeking assistance should gather as much documentation as possible to support damage claims such as an asset value list; tax returns; financial statements for the past two or three years; photos taken before and after the flooding; and detailed insurance information. UNION TWP.

Northwest sets up flood fund

The Northwest Area School District has created a flood recovery fund for people within the district affected by the flooding. Donations will be used to supply food, shelter and clothing and can be made to: PNC Bank, 132 Main Road, Mocanaqua, PA 18655. Checks should be made payable to: NASD Flood Recovery Fund. EXETER

Blind Association lends services The Association for the Blind, 1825 Wyoming Ave., Exeter will provide a free lunch, the use of its bathrooms and computers to flood victims, cleanup crews and volunteers today from noon to 4 p.m. WILKES-BARRE

Wegmans donates food Wegmans has donated a tractor trailer load of non-perishable food to aid area flood victims. The truck arrived at the Northeast Regional Weinberg Food Bank in Wilkes-Barre Friday. Donated items included canned tuna, peanut butter, jelly, canned vegetables and soups, cereal and plastic cups, plates and cutlery, valued at approximately $90,000. The Wegmans Family Charitable Foundation donated $150,000 to the American Red Cross Wyoming Valley Chapter.

Lottery summary Daily Number, Midday Sunday: 8-1-2 Monday: 6-3-6 (6-6-7, double draw) Tuesday: 9-4-0 Wednesday: 6-3-4 Thursday: 1-6-5 Friday: 1-1-9 Saturday: 3-9-3 Big Four, Midday Sunday: 2-4-8-8 Monday: 7-4-8-5 Tuesday: 0-7-1-1 Wednesday: 1-5-6-7 Thursday: 3-7-1-0 Friday: 2-2-0-8 Saturday: 8-3-1-0 Quinto, Midday Sunday: 6-0-6-5-4 Monday: 4-8-1-2-5 Tuesday: 5-7-9-3-1 Wednesday: 3-3-8-9-4 Thursday: 7-7-7-8-6 Friday: 1-8-1-3-7 Saturday: 4-0-5-1-5 Treasure Hunt Sunday: 07-08-21-22-26 Monday: 12-13-22-23-28 Tuesday: 08-13-15-23-27 Wednesday: 02-07-08-10-25 Thursday: 06-14-16-24-25 Friday: 05-12-22-23-28 Saturday: 08-13-16-18-24 Daily Number, 7 p.m. Sunday: 1-3-0 Monday: 9-3-3 Tuesday: 6-3-2 Wednesday: 6-1-7 Thursday: 9-0-3 Friday: 3-5-2 Saturday: 7-7-7

SCRANTON

The Diocese of Scranton will hold Parish Intake Nights to provide people who were affected by flooding with gift cards to purchase food, clothing and other items necessary to help them recover. Staff members of Catholic Social Services, other diocesan offices and parish volunteers will provide assistance. The programs will be held from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday at the following locations in Luzerne, Wyoming and Susquehanna counties: • Holy Spirit Parish, 150 Main St., Mocanaqua • Corpus Christi Parish, 605 Luzerne Ave., West Pittston • Nativity BVM Parish, 99 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock • St. Brigid Parish, 17 Cottage St., Friendsville. The diocese also will hold a special collection this weekend at all parish Masses and the money will be allocated to the Diocesan Relief Fund for future disbursement to parishes and people in flood-damaged communities. Donations to special collection can be made out to Diocesan Relief Fund and mailed to: Diocese of Scranton, 300 Wyoming Ave., Scranton, PA 18503.

www.timesleader.com

Big Four, 7 p.m. Sunday: 8-3-5-7 Monday: 6-0-7-9 Tuesday: 7-4-7-2 Wednesday: 4-4-6-5 Thursday: 4-1-0-7 Friday: 3-9-4-1 Saturday: 7-1-7-0 Quinto, 7 p.m. Sunday: 1-0-2-1-3 Monday: 0-0-5-5-8 Tuesday: 3-0-6-6-8 Wednesday: 8-1-9-6-6 Thursday: 9-8-2-8-3 Friday: 2-4-5-7-1 Saturday: 4-7-2-2-8 Cash 5 Sunday: 01-08-26-28-43 Monday: 04-16-30-33-34 Tuesday: 11-15-20-32-43 Wednesday: 01-04-06-10-25 Thursday: 12-14-17-22-23 Friday: 05-07-11-16-24 Saturday: 02-11-13-19-33 DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

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atie Quinn, a waitress at Cork Bar & Restaurant, carries meals that will be packaged for takeout and given to flood victims of Wilkes-Barre’s Brookside section. The restaurant provided free lunches to flood victims with proof of residence in the affected area.

POLICE BLOTTER HANOVER TOWNSHIP – Heather Vest said the door to her apartment in Hanover Village was broken and that a computer and DVDs were stolen from her apartment between 6:20 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. • Thomas Priestman said Friday his above-ground swimming pool lining was punctured twice. WEST HAZLETON – State police filed charges against a driver who allegedly fled the scene of an accident Saturday. State police said Jose MartinezMartinez, 30, of Hazleton, backed his Nissan Frontier pickup into a legally parked vehicle, pushing it into a third vehicle on East Green Street at 8:40 a.m. Saturday, then left the scene. State police said they later located the truck to the rear of East Diamond Avenue in Hazleton. State police said they notified the owner, Martinez-Martinez, who admitted to driving the vehicle. State police filed citations on charges of careless driving, driving under suspension, driving without a license and other traffic charges. WILKES-BARRE – City police reported the following: • A 15-year-old boy who brought a toy handgun into a store on Old River Road Saturday afternoon was charged with disorderly conduct. The boy placed the handgun in his pants pocket and when confronted by the store owner, Sandra Martinez, became nervous and smashed it on the floor, police said. • Levar Leroy Marlow of 145 N. Sherman St. was charged with disorderly conduct and resisting arrest Saturday after he was apprehended during a foot chase near his residence. An officer responded to a report of a burglary at Building 145 of the Interfaith Heights apartments. En route to the complex he met the victim. He obtained a description of four possible suspects involved in an attempted break-in at the complex on Friday night. The officer later received a location of one of the suspects and went to his apartment to speak with him. Marlow ran into the hallway and then out of the building. He was ordered to stop

several times but refused and was later apprehended. A detainer was issued by Luzerne Count Adult Probation. • A West Pittston woman said her purse containing paperwork for dealing with the Federal Emergency Management Agency in connection with the recent flooding was stolen from her car Saturday while it was parked at 47 N. Franklin St. Gina Malsky of Spring Street said she left her purse on the front passenger seat. The passengerside window was smashed and the purse was stolen. She described it as a large, gray leather purse and said it contained $400 in cash, gift cards, credit cards, identification, a checkbook and the FEMA paperwork. If anyone finds the purse, return it to police headquarters. • A minivan ran into the rear of a pickup truck on Spring Street Saturday, but no one was injured in the crash. Police said Daniel Gulick of WilkesBarre was traveling south in a 1998 Plymouth Voyager and failed to stop, running into a 1991 Chevrolet Silverado that was stopped in traffic. Neither Gulick, a juvenile boy and infant girl who were passengers in the minivan, nor Michael Rogan of Wilkes-Barre, the driver of the pickup truck, were injured. The minivan sustained severe damage and was towed from the scene. • Brittany Steele of Towaco, N.J. reported that a sandbag placed on the hood of a vehicle belonging to Carol Bellock, also of Towaco, damaged it while it was parked in a lot at North and North Main streets Saturday. • John Nalepa reported Saturday that a blue, Next, 20-inch bicycle was stolen from the front porch of his residence at 54 Joseph Lane. • Courtney Sykes, 22, of Forty Fort, reported Saturday that a cell phone and cash were taken from her purse at the Hardware Bar on South Main Street. • Steven Moss, 54, of Shavertown, Kingston Township, reported Saturday that his green, 1996 Nissan Maxima was stolen from the 200 block of Hazle Avenue. The car had Pennsylvania license plate FDP-6708. • Grace Malagari, 80, of 33 Miner St., reported Saturday that a window at her residence was broken. • Theodore Priestash, 54, of High Street, reported Saturday that a display mannequin was stolen from in front of PC Services, 453 N. Main St.

MUNICIPAL BRIEFS

Match 6 Lotto Monday: 02-15-18-19-27-44 Thursday: 06-14-38-41-4849 Mega Millions Tuesday: 22-31-43-48-56 Megaball: 45 Megaplier: 04 Friday: 06-23-41-45-56 Megaball: 24 Megaplier: 04

WYOMING - Borough Council will hold a special meeting at 6:30 p.m. Sept. 26 in Council Chambers, 277 Wyoming Avenue. Agenda items include review of the proposed Walmart parking/8th Street intersection plan and review/approval of proposals for the borough’s insurance. Insurance proposals are due to the borough offices on or before noon Friday.

Powerball Wednesday: 16-41-42-50-59 powerball: 05 powerplay: 03 Saturday: 06-20-22-32-43 powerball: 11 powerplay: 02

NEWPORT TOWNSHIP - Ken Angradi, Township Tax Collector, reminds everyone that the discount period for Greater Nanticoke Area School tax bills for real estate ends Oct. 4. He also reminds property owners that County/Municipal 2011 real estate taxes are now in penalty; County/Municipal/School bills issued May 3 are also now in penalty, and those issued on Sept.1 are at discount until Oct. 31. For home collections, call 736-6319 for an appointment.

Glofka, Dorothy Jesso, Stephen Michalak, Dorothy Moran, Elizabeth Uzdilla, Katherine

POLITICAL BRIEFS WILKES-BARRE – A “KickOff” announcement will be held at 11:30 a.m. Monday at the Ramada in Wilkes-Barre for Republican candidate for Luzerne County District Attorney, Stefanie Salavantis. SWOYERSVILLE - The Committee to Elect Molly Hanlon Mirabito’s volunteer meeting is 5 p.m. Tuesday at the Swoyersville American Legion on Shoemaker Street. WILKES-BARRE – The Luzerne County Boroughs and Townships Association will meet at 6 p.m. Sept. 27 at Genetti’s in Wilkes-Barre. All Luzerne County Council candidates have been invited. There is a $10 fee for dinner. RSVP by Thursday to Gloria Kijek, 313-0330, or email luzcoborotwn@aol.com.

OBITUARIES

Page 15A

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L O C A L H E A LT H C A R E

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011 PAGE 3A

LOCAL LCCC event marks 10th anniversary of 9/11 attacks, introduces twin towers monument

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DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Geisinger CEO Dr. Glenn Steele said millions of dollars will be invested into CMC.

Geisinger: CMC won’t lose services

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

Enjoying a nice brew

Bob Whitmoyer of Bloomsburg takes a sip of Hofbrau Oktoberfest during Saturday’s Oktoberfest at Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs in Plains Twp.

Geisinger CEO says if Community Medical Center takeover goes through, Geisinger will want to keep patients in Scranton.

WILKES-BARRE

Budget to be discussed

By ANDREW M. SEDER aseder@timesleader.com

Though Scranton and Wilkes-Barre are just 15 miles apart, the head of the Geisinger Health System sees them as separate health care markets.That means Geisinger’s proposed takeover of Community Medical Center will not reduce the services available in “It’s taken Scranton, Dr. Glenn D. Steele me 11 years to Jr. said during a recent meeting with The Times Leader understand editorial board. that not only But any addition of specialare the mar- ty services, such as a transplant unit, would likely be inkets differstalled in one, not both, facilent, but the ities. “We’d have to pick and Steele said. cultures are choose,” Steele indicated that once different.” Geisinger’s acquisition of Geisinger CEO Dr. CMC is approved, the DanGlenn Steele ville-based health system will On Scranton and do all it can to keep patients Wilkes-Barre from leaving Scranton to seek care, including heading south on Interstate 81 to Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center in Plains Township. Though some specialty services that exist at each hospital will likely not be duplicated at the other – such as Geisinger Wyoming Valley’s new neonatal intensive care unit – Steele said both hospitals will continue to operate as tertiary care facilities and offer surgeries, emergency care and other basic health care services. Geisinger’s goal is to make CMC “the preeminent See GEISINGER, Page 10A

DON CAREY/TIMES LEADER PHOTO

First responders from Nanticoke place a World Trade Center artifact in the Walk of Honor 911 Memorial at LCCC during a remembrance ceremony Saturday.

Saddest day recalled College President Leary praises those who devote their lives to being first responders.

Thomas P. Leary, president of Luzerne County Community College, praises people who choose careers as first responders. He spoke at the 9/11 remembrance ceremony at the Walk of Honor ceremony Saturday at the Regional Public Safety Training Center at LCCC.

By CAMILLE FIOTI Times Leader Correspondent

NANTICOKE -- A gigantic American flag, suspended high in the air by two ladder trucks, flapped gently above the entrance of Luzerne County Community College’s Regional Public Safety Training Center on Saturday. Led by bagpipes and drums, a long procession of local first responders and members of the community made its way to the site of a new monument marking the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. At the front of the procession, a piece of steel from the World Trade Center was carried on a gurney to the monument -- a concrete replica of the twin towers. Bagpipe strains of “God Bless America” played as members of Boy Scout Troop #418 assisted in peeling back an Ameri-

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

can flag to unveil the artifact, which was then hoisted into its permanent home between the two “towers”. “As time passes, we have learned to live again, laugh again, and love again,” said college President Tom Leary. He commended people who choose careers in the emergency services field. “They’ve dedicated their

lives to each of us,” he said. “They know what it’s like to risk it all for another. We’ve seen this happen over and over again on 9/11.” The force of terrorism, as well as the force of nature, have only strengthened us, Leary said, as he thanked the first responders and volunteers See LCCC, Page 15A

Party is A+ effort for South W-B district CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

WVHCS CEO Cornelio Catena recently met with The Times Leader editorial board.

Post-sale, WVHCS upgraded, profitable By ANDREW M. SEDER aseder@timesleader.com

When for-profit Community Health Systems, Inc. purchased the nonprofit Wyoming Valley Health Care System for $271 million in April 2009, the deal came with a few promises. Chief among them was that not only would Wilkes-Barre not lose its community hospital, but promised improvements would make the facility profitable for the first time in years. In the 28 months since the purchase, the once-struggling system has made its way into the black, increased surgical offerings and broken ground on a $53 million expansion project that will double the size of the emergency department and add a Heart and Vascular Institute Tower that expands cardiac care facilities. And that’s not all. More than $2.2 million was spent to upgrade data center storage. An additional $1.6 million See CHS, Page 10A

Neighbors have fun while raising funds for community projects at annual Miner Park event. By STEVEN FONDO Times Leader Correspondent

WILKES-BARRE -- Miner Park was alive on Saturday with the sights and sounds of the annual District A Party in the Park on Saturday, as residents “This is our gathered to third year and raise money the we’re excited for neighborabout the re- hood. District A sponse thus is a five-perfar.” son commitLonnie Truskowski tee that is Of District A separate from the Wilkes-Barre voting district The group is the brainchild of five South Wilkes-Barre residents -Sue Greenfield, Lonnie Truskowski, Rick Gazenski, Rick Cronauer

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Bailey Smallcomb, 8, gets her face painted by Roxanne Bozek of Trading Places during the District A Party in the Park, Saturday.

and Steve Barrouk -- who formed the group in 2008 as a stopgap organization to improve the neighborhood when government is unresponsive. “This is our neighborhood, so we thought it would be a good

idea to come up with a few project ideas to help South Wilkes-Barre,” explained Truskowski. “This is our third year and we’re excited about the response thus far.” See PARK, Page 15A

Luzerne County Commissioners will hold public meetings on Monday and Wednesday to discuss the county’s 2012 budget. Department heads will discuss their spending requests and projected revenue during the meetings, which will be held in the commissioners’ meeting room at the county courthouse in Wilkes-Barre. Here’s the tentative schedule by department: Monday: 9 a.m., commissioners, administration and debt service; 9:30 a.m., election bureau; 9:50 a.m., treasurer; 10:10 a.m., controller; 10:30 a.m., tax collection; 11 a.m., coroner; 11:20 a.m., information technology; 11:40 a.m., clerk of courts; 1 p.m., courts, magistrates, orphans court, stenographers and jury commissioner; 1:20 p.m., probation services; 2 p.m., domestic relations; 2:20 p.m., prison; 2:50 p.m., purchasing; 3:10 p.m., Luzerne County Community College; and 3:30 p.m., boiler plant, building and grounds, engineer, levees, road and bridge, Wyoming Valley Airport, environmental special projects, Moon Lake Park and records management. Wednesday: 9 a.m., aging, children and youth, drug and alcohol, human services, mental health/mental retardation and transportation; 9:30 a.m., public defender; 9:50 a.m., sheriff; 10:10 a.m., prothonotary; 10:30 a.m., assessor; 11 a.m., planning commission; 11:20 a.m., register of wills; 11:40 a.m., veteran affairs; 1 p.m., district attorney; 1:20 p.m., mapping and GIS; 1:40 p.m., recorder of deeds; 2 p.m., emergency management; 2:20 p.m., security; 2:50 p.m., 911; 3:10 p.m., tax claim; 3:30 p.m., community development; 3:50 p.m., convention and visitors bureau; and 4:10 p.m., solid waste management. HARRISBURG

PennDOT helping out

The state Department of Transportation is offering flood victims replacement driver and vehicle products at no charge and extending deadlines for driver license and registration/ inspection renewals. Driver products include duplicate licenses, learner’s permits and photo identification cards. Motor vehicle products include replacement license plates and stickers, registration cards, duplicate titles and person with disability placards. The expiration date for vehicle registration and inspections due to expire on Sept. 30 has been extended until Oct. 14. The expiration date for driver licenses and identification cards due to expire between Sept. 8 and Oct. 13 has been extended until Oct. 14. Only customers in areas identified by FEMA as having been affected by flooding are eligible for the extension. Flood victims can apply for duplicate documents or renewals at state Driver License Centers (DLCs) or at Disaster Recovery Centers (DRCs). The DRC in Luzerne County is in the Advanced Technology Center at Luzerne County Community College in Nanticoke. Flood victims must complete a PennDOT MV-Flood form, available at disaster recovery centers or online at www.dmv.state.pa.us. Driver products will be available immediately at DLCs. Vehicle products and any products applied for at DRCs will be mailed to applicants or made available for pickup at a local DLC.


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Investigators are examining the site for information about the Reno air race crash

Plane crash death toll at 9

By SCOTT SONNER and MARTIN GRIFFITH Associated Press

AP PHOTO

Navy sailors pinned at ceremony

Nicholas Hanley, right, salutes Captain Phil McLaughlin under the presence of the Lone Sailor Statue at the Bremerton Harborside Marina on Friday during a Chief Petty Officer advancement ceremony for the USS Michigan. Hanley was one of 4,378 Navy sailors worldwide who were pinned on Friday. NEW YORK

RENO, Nev. — The death toll in the terrifying crash of a World War II-era plane during a Reno air race has risen to at least nine people, including the pilot and eight spectators, authorities said Saturday. The deaths include seven who were killed on the tarmac and two others who died at hospitals, Reno Deputy Police Chief Dave Evans said. The new death toll was announced at a briefing with local and federal investigators a day after the Friday afternoon crash. Authorities previously said that three people had perished in the crash. Investigators said they were examining the site, gathering information about the crash at the edge of a

Pumpkin shortage expected

grandstand area Friday. Authorities were encouraged by the large number of photos and videos available to them. Federal investigators were looking into what caused the 74-year-old pilot to lose control of his plane during the race. National Transportation Safety Board spokesman Terry Williams told The Associated Press Saturday that a team has arrived from Washington to join regional officials. He said it’s too early to say what caused the crash, though event organizers suggested a mechanical problem. As thousands watched in horror, the P-51 Mustang suddenly pitched upward, rolled and nose-dived toward the crowded grandstand. It then slammed into the tarmac and blew to pieces in front of the

By STEPHEN OHLEMACHER Associated Press

AP PHOTO

A P-51 Mustang airplane crashes into the edge of the grandstands at the Reno air race on Friday in Reno, Nev.

pilot’s family and a tight-knit group of friends who attend the annual event. It appears that other than the pilot, the injuries and deaths were caused by flying parts of the disintegrating plane — not a direct hit.

“It came down directly at us. As I looked down, I saw the spinner, the wings, the canopy just coming right at us. It hit directly in front of us, probably 50 to 75 feet,” Ryan Harris, of Round Mountain, Nev., told the AP.

ween after Hurricane Irene destroyed hundreds of pumpkin patches across the region, farmers say. Wholesale prices have doubled as farmers nurse their surviving pumpkin plants toward a late harvest. Some farmers are trying to buy pumpkins from other regions to cover orders. “I think there’s going to be an extreme shortage of pumpkins this year,” said Darcy Pray, owner of Darcy’s Family Farms in Keeseville, in upstate New York “I’ve tried buying from people down in the Pennsylvania area, I’ve tried locally here and I’ve tried reaching across the border to some farmers over in the Quebec area. There’s just none around.” Hurricane Irene raked the Northeast in late August, bringing torrents of rain that overflowed rivers and flooded fields along the East Coast and into southern Canada. Pray saw his entire crop, about 15,000 to 20,000 pumpkins, washed into Lake Champlain.

TEHRAN, IRAN

Deal in progress for hikers The defense lawyer for two Americans jailed in Iran moved ahead with bail arrangements on Saturday, as international efforts intensified to seal a freedom-for-bail deal for the hikers convicted of spying. Masoud Shafiei told The Associated Press he was in court, “following up the case” of Shane Bauer of Minnesota and Josh Fattal of Pennsylvania. Shafiei said he hopes Iran’s judiciary will clear the way for payment of $1 million in exchange for the Americans’ release. Bauer and Fattal were detained along the Iran-Iraq border in July 2009 with their friend Sarah Shourd. She was released last September with mediation by Oman after $500,000 was paid. They maintain their innocence. SANAA, YEMEN

Protesters storm university Thousands of anti-government protesters in Yemen stormed the capital’s main university Saturday, preventing the first day of classes from beginning and tearing down pictures of the longtime leader whose ouster they seek. The crowds are aiming to keep Yemen’s protest movement alive and out on the streets as the school year begins. Protests since February have failed to push President Ali Abdullah Saleh from power. He is currently in Saudi Arabia recovering from wounds sustained during an attack on the presidential compound in June. HENDERSONVILLE, TENN.

Mother on suicide watch A Middle Tennessee mother charged in the death of her newborn twins has been placed on suicide watch, and her lawyer says she has been given medication for her mental state while in jail. Lindsey Lowe, 25, was arrested Wednesday and is being held without bond after police say she smothered her two sons minutes after giving birth to them at her family’s home in Hendersonville, just north of Nashville. WSMV-TV reports that authorities are concerned about her and have placed her on suicide watch while she is being held in jail in Sumner County.

A

AP PHOTO

n Afghan man carries a lower part of a mannequin at Princess Fashion shop in Kabul, Afghanistan, Saturday.

Military gay ban ends Tuesday By JULIE WATSON Associated Press

SAN DIEGO — Celebrations will mark the final countdown to the historic end of the U.S. military’s ban on openly gay troops, and even more partying will take place once it is lifted Tuesday. But in many ways change is already here. Subtle acts over the past months have reshaped military society in preparation for the U.S. armed forces’ policy shift. Supporters of repeal compare it to the racial de-segregation of troops more than 60 years ago.

Campaign reviving issue of privatizing

Most top GOP presidential candidates in favor of partly privatizing Social Security.

GETTING A LEG UP ON FASHIONS

states are facing a N ortheastern jack-o’-lantern shortage this Hallo-

www.timesleader.com

Several have come out to their peers and commanders. A few have since placed photographs of their same-sex partners on their desks and attended military barbecues and softball games with their significant others. Air Force Lt. Col. Victor Fehrenbach, 42, came out on national TV in 2009 after the Air Force started discharge proceedings, which were later stalled by the repeal process. He reported for duty two AP PHOTO days later and was congratulated by colleagues. Fehrenbach was never kicked Victor Fehrenbach announced he was out and he will retire after 20 years in the gay in 2009 after the Air Force started discharge proceedings against him. Air Force on the first of October.

WASHINGTON — Most of the top Republicans running for president are embracing plans to partially privatize Social Security, reviving a contentious issue that fizzled under President George W. Bush after Democrats relentlessly attacked it. As President Barack Obama sidesteps ways to keep the retirement system viable, his would-be rivals are keen on letting younger workers divert part of their payroll taxes into some type of personal account to be invested separately from Social Security. Any kind of Former Mas- privatization sachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney is sacrilegious has a version. for liberals Reps. Michele and many Bachmann of moderates. Minnesota and Ron Paul of Tex- They say it as have said would drain younger work- resources ers should be allowed to invest from the more in alternative than 50 milplans. Texas lion people Gov. Rick Perry who now rehas raised the idea of letting ceive benewhole groups, fits. such as state and local government workers, opt out of Social Security. These proposals are popular among conservatives who believe workers could get a better return from investing in publicly traded securities. But most in the Republican race have been careful to say they would fight to preserve traditional Social Security for current retirees and those approaching retirement. Younger workers, they say, should have more options. Romney says the stock market collapse in 2008 shouldn’t scare workers away from investing in private accounts, but acknowledges it’s an issue. “Given the volatility of investment values that we have just experienced, I would prefer that individual accounts were added to Social Security, not diverted from it, and that they were voluntary,” Romney wrote in his book, “No Apology.” Any kind of privatization, however, is sacrilegious for liberals and many moderates. They say it would drain resources from the more than 50 million people who now receive benefits. Social Security experts say raising the privatization issue could give Democrats a potent political weapon.

Small inroads made into Gadhafi’s hometown Intense resistance has stalled forces of Libya’s new leadership. The Associated Press

AP PHOTO

Medics treat a wounded revolutionary fighter in a village near Sirte.

SIRTE, Libya — Revolutionary fighters struggled to make gains in an assault into Gadhafi’s hometown Saturday with bloody street-by-street battles against loyalist forces fiercely defending the most symbolic of the shattered regime’s remaining strong-

holds. The fresh attack into the Mediterranean coastal city of Sirte contrasted with a stalemate in the mountain enclave of Bani Walid where demoralized anti-Gadhafi forces tried to regroup after being beaten back by loyalist snipers and gunners holding strategic high ground. Intense resistance has stalled forces of Libya’s new leadership trying to crush the dug-in fighters loyal

to Gadhafi, weeks after the former rebels swept into Tripoli on Aug. 21 and pushed the country’s leader out of power and into hiding. Sirte and Bani Walid are the main bastions of backers of the old regime in Libya’s coastal plain, but smaller holdouts remain in the deserts of the center of the country — and another major stronghold, Sabha, lies in the deep south. Gadhafi’s location is still unknown.

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011 PAGE 5A

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CMYK SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011

THE TIMES LEADER

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CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011 PAGE 7A

W-B towing dispute turns into rally WILKES-BARRE – What started as a dispute between the owner of a towed car and the city’s contracted tower ballooned into a small political rally Friday, complete with placards, bull-horns and candidates eager to get their message out. The gathering in front of City Hall was organized by Forty Fort resident Mark Robbins, who since July has made allegations that citycontracted tower Leo Glodzik is involved in a kickback scheme with Mayor Thomas Leighton and Police Chief Gerard Dessoye. Robbins’ vehicle was towed June 1 by Glodzik’s company, LAG Towing, and Robbins contends he overcharged for the tow and that LAG damaged his vehicle. Robbins advertised Saturday’s event as a “protest against the Mayor and the City who allow monopoly pricing to exist,” but the protest morphed into a more general political rally. “I came here to make sure that

RAIN

the contracts that the city engages in are being upheld as they are supposed to be,” said Republican candidate for mayor Lisa Cope, who attended the event. “It seems to have turned into a political rally.” Cope was joined at the rally by other candidates, including Republican candidate for city controller Karen Ceppa and Libertarians Betsy Summers, candidate for mayor, and Tim Mullen, candidate for Luzerne County Council. All told about 20 turned out, holding placards reading messages like “corruption in Leighton land” and “government servants not masters.” “I’m surprised to see that he’s not from the city; that he’s an outsider that has an issue with the city,” Ceppa said of Robbins. “…I think people will start to see that it isn’t just the City of Wilkes-Barre, that there are people that live outside the city that have issues with the city, and I hope that people will recognize that when it comes time for the November election.”

far in the distance got into the mix. “Then you had Hurricane Katia well off the Atlantic coastline. Continued from Page 1A Moisture from Katia, even though it was far off the coast, got caught next day. up with Lee and it all moved Lee, which never became almost directly north from Virginstrong enough to be classified a hurricane, made landfall on Sept. ia, Maryland, Pennsylvania and New York. It was a constant 5 just west of Pecan Island, La. stream of moisture that sat in the “Lee was a very slow-moving storm from the start,” said Joanne same place for 24 to 48 hours. LaBounty, a meteorologist for the That’s why there was all the heavy rain over Pennsylvania.” National Weather Service in Isolated areas in the upper Binghamton, N.Y., which provides weather services for Northeastern Susquehanna River Basin of Pennsylvania. “When it became a southern New York and Pennsylvania received nearly 12 inches tropical storm and made landfall of rain from 8 a.m. on Sept. 6 to 8 in Louisiana, the forecast wasn’t a.m. on Sept. 8. Rainfall totals for sure where it was going to turn.” Luzerne County averaged 5 to 6 Lee eventually moved north inches to the east and 8 to 10 and northeast, slowed down inches in the west, NWS records almost to a stop over central say. Pennsylvania by a high pressure Agnes dropped generally 7 to system in the west, LaBounty 10 inches of rain across the resaid. gion, with reports of nearly 18 Light rain began falling on Sept. 4 and became heavier in the inches of rain in isolated areas in Pennsylvania and New York. following days when a hurricane

FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Betsy Summers, candidate for mayor, protests in front of W-B City Hall on Saturday.

City officials were not present during the event. City spokesman Drew Mclaughlin declined comment. Robbins said he hoped the event would bring like-minded people together, and he felt it did. “There’s a lot of people in WilkesBarre that have been victims of corruption, and that needed to suffer in silence,” Robbins said. “This is a forum where they can have a voice and meet other like-minded people.”

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CMYK PAGE 8A

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011

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THE TIMES LEADER

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State’s electoral vote reshuffling plan not done deal Proposal is sponsored by Pa. Senate Republican leader and endorsed by GOP governor.

(NCSL). “This is the year we can win all Roddey, the Allegheny County minimal effect on the presidential the statewide outcome. “There has not been a wide“It’s like unilateral disarma20 (electoral votes),” he said. GOP chairman and former elect- race,” Tory Mazzola said. Ed Rendell, the former two- ment,” Rendell said. “If every spread push nationally to go to “Why we would want to give up ed county executive. In Washington, a spokesman term governor who served as gen- state in the union did it, it might the district system in recent memhalf of them is beyond me.” ory,” said Tim Storey, an NCSL seThe state GOP’s annual fall fun- for the National Republican Con- eral chairman of the Democratic be more acceptable.” Pennsylvania appears to be the nior fellow. draiser Friday night in Harrisburg gressional Committee expressed National Committee in 2000, By PETER JACKSON Both Rendell and Gleason called the plan a “blatantly, only state considering such a was abuzz with talk about the a similarly dim view of the plan. Associated Press “We feel that this proposal odiously partisan” attempt to as- move this year, according to the warned that presidential candiplan, but even some of Corbett’s threatens to negatively alter the sure electoral votes for GOP presi- Denver-based National Confer- dates would bypass Pennsylvania HARRISBURG — Even though oldest allies were critical. “I think it will hurt us in the fall, political landscape of House races dential candidates regardless of ence of State Legislatures if the change becomes law. technically it’s not yet a bill, a plan to change how Pennsylvania particularly in 2012,” said Jim for Republicans and will have a awards its electoral votes in presidential elections has ignited a fiery debate over its fairness, its lePost Flood Damage Environmental Remediation gality and its effect on the state’s substantial clout in national politics. 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Applying for SBA Disaster Loans • Finding businesses willing to help with your Recovery with free or discounted services Bush was the last GOP candidate to do so, in 1988 — but Pileggi inWhat to do about unemployment • Where to turn for assistance with damaged equipment • and more. sists that his proposal is motivated by a spirit of fairness and not partisanship. “It’s not designed to help Republican voters or Democrat voters, but all voters, to make sure that their votes are more relevant,” the Delaware County lawmaker said in a telephone interview with radio station WPHTAM in Philadelphia as the public debate picked up steam. “It more accurately reflects the will of the people,” Corbett said. 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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011 PAGE 9A

Best Of The Back Mountain What are your top picks for our 2011 Readers Choice Awards? Vote for your favorite Back Mountain teacher, coach, restaurant, sandwich, store, etc. Nominate them by writing their name and location after each of the subjects listed below. Example: Teacher Mr. John Smith - Lake-Lehman. At least 25 categories must be submitted.

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Quick action saves the West Side Forty Fort’s EMA chief tells the story of a frightening discovery and fast response.

GEISINGER Continued from Page 3A

inpatient facility in that market,” he said. And part of the mission is to show the community very quickly that Geisinger will continue to be part of it. “When we expand our doctor group it takes four people for back-office billing and regulatory stuff, what have you. We have choices as to where we can place a lot of that back office because it does not have to be on our care-giving campuses. … We may very well put some of that back office stuff in the middle of Scranton. Because what we have to show to the community is that we’re building jobs. We can do that very easily.” Steele said that philosophy is partly reac-

CHS Continued from Page 3A

investment was made in the electronic medical records system and physical upgrades to manage and ensure primary and redundant electrical supply to the data center building costing more than $975,000 were also done. Investments in surgical technology have expanded the health system’s clinical capabilities. Included is about $2 million for new patient monitors and respiratory support systems, as well as specialized neurosurgical tools and

Andy Tuzinski, director of Forty Fort borough’s Emergency Management Agency, stands near the levee off River Street on Sept. 7, the day before flooding began to pose a real threat to the borough. Tuzinski, along with Mayor Boyd Hoats and Council President Joe Chacke, monitored the situation at the levee in Forty Fort. Trouble was averted when truckloads of fill were brought in to stabilize areas of weakness near the cemetery and soccer fields. PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

area to the Forty Fort exit of the Cross Valley Expressway, where borough emergency responders who had shut down Wyoming Avenue guided them to a staging area at the Pennsylvania State police training center. Road flares lit the way through a gateway made in the cemetery fence to the levee. The first trucks had arrived and were depositing material on the dike within an hour. “I’ve been doing this for 25 years and I’ve never seen that level of cooperation and the movement of resources; phenomenal,” Tuzinski said. “That’s just a sterling example of the inter- and intra-agency cooperation I received when I was trying to manage the operation. Everybody just rocked and rolled and got us what we needed and I just can’t thank them enough.” “I guess I’m fortunate in one aspect, that this isn’t the first time we’ve had to do this,” he added. “So when I call the National Guard or I call the Sheriff’s Department liaison it’s someone I’ve

tion to a “fear” in the Scranton area that Geisinger will come in and take away services and send patients to Wilkes-Barre for treatment. Geisinger wants to make very clear that won’t be the case and if anything, he said, the plan is to add services to CMC. CMC President and Chief Executive Officer Robert P. Steigmeyer said he understands the concerns but has done his part to alleviate them, saying Geisinger will be a great partner. “Absolutely there will be services that will be the same,” Steigmeyer added. He agreed with Steele that the long-range plans of expanding offerings and deciding which campus will host one specialty practice will be done with both campuses in mind. As part of its proposed deal, Geisinger has agreed to invest $158.6 million for capital projects into CMC. Among the planned

acquisition of the advanced daVinci robotic surgical system. The da Vanci system currently is used for urologic and gynecologic surgery and has great potential for other surgical specialties. Investments in new diagnostic and imaging equipment, including new X-ray, magnetic resonance imaging and stereotactic breast biopsy technology amount to almost $2.5 million. Cornelio Catena, the system’s chief executive officer, said the welcome that the Tennesseebased company has received since coming to Wilkes-Barre “has just been tremendous.” He said people wanted to save their

worked with in the past.” Tuzinski added he was lucky to have received an abundance of good ideas from emergency responders and that the command structure helped put them into action efficiently. Late Thursday night, the borough was running short on the road flares that were lighting the way through the cemetery, Tuzinski said, by way of example. “One of our firefighters had a brilliant idea; he went home and got some Christmas lights, and we hooked them up to a generator so we didn’t have to keep changing the flares,” he said. “I was a lucky guy that night. I had a lot off people coming up to me with a lot of great ideas, and I was able to say, that’s great. You handle that. That’s your baby… I was the conductor, so to speak, waving the wand, but these are the guys that did all the work.” Smart preparation again saved the borough from catastrophe the following morning, Tuzinski said.

upgrades would be new operating suites, improvements to the intensive care unit and the addition of an electronic health records system. At numerous times during the hour-long discussion, Steele made reference to the unique markets of Wilkes-Barre and Scranton and how long-held beliefs and attitudes have caused residents of each city to see itself as different and unattached from their neighbor. “It’s taken me11years to understand that not only are the markets different, but the cultures are different,” Steele said. Decisions about services to be offered at Geisinger and CMC will be made with the concerns of the Scranton community in mind. “We have to be fairly sensitive to some of the fears that our brethren in Scranton have,” Steele said. “Despite the fact that I’ve learned after 11 years that the cultures

hospital and CHS gave them the best option for doing that. The medical care landscape has changed dramatically since the time CHS has moved into Northeastern Pennsylvania. Three hospitals in the region have changed owners and three more are in the process of being purchased. If all the deals are approved, all of the hospitals in Scranton and Greater WilkesBarre will be owned by either Community Health or the Danville-based nonprofit Geisinger Health System. Other than Hazleton General Hospital and Marian Community Hospital in Carbondale, every

By 2 or 3 a.m. Friday, enough material had been dumped on the levee behind the cemetery to assure the Corps of Engineers the situation was under control. A few more trucks were on their way bringing fill to the levee, and Mericle suggested leaving them near the soccer field at the Luzerne County Recreational Complex. At 6:30 a.m. Friday, Forty Fort Public Works Director Bob Barnard went to check on the levee near the soccer field and discovered several large sand boils about 300 feet from the levee. Sand beneath the levee is designed to act as a passive relief well, alleviating pressure on the dike by allowing water to pass through, but the sand being pushed out meant the levee was being eroded. Tuzinski snapped a quick picture with his cell phone and sent it to county Flood Protection Authority Executive Director Jim Brozena. County Engineer Joe Gibbons arrived soon after and

are different and there’s this type of genetic barrier and in terms of travel either way, there’s still a fear that Geisinger will come in and build GWV even bigger and turn CMC into an ambulatory what have you.” Steele said that won’t be the case. “(CMC) will remain an extraordinarily active tertiary care hospital,” Steele said. Steele said too often people in Scranton are leaving the region for medical procedures, whether they’re going to New York, Philadelphia, Allentown or Johns Hopkins in Maryland. He said for whatever reason, people in Scranton don’t view coming to Wilkes-Barre as an option. And he said it’s not Geisinger’s primary goal to change that opinion. “Because it’s a different market basically and we think that people won’t … come to Wilkes-Barre for their care. People aren’t going to leave Scranton to have heart sur-

other hospital in Luzerne, Wyoming and Lackawanna counties could soon be operated by those two health systems. Catena, during a recent meeting with The Times Leader editorial board, said having two quality health care systems competing with each other makes both companies stronger and creates another beneficiary. “I think when you have two good strong systems, the group that benefits is the patients,” he said. He said that while the two systems have “a different philosophy … a different approach, you’ll see an increase in quality.” The two systems share at least

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determined more fill was needed to stave off erosion. But Gibbons said the county didn’t have enough trucks available to tackle the problem, so again they turned to Mericle. The hours of watching the operation, with an estimated 40 workers moving in and out of the danger zone in front of the dike, were tense, Tuzinski said, but the second shore-up operation moved as smoothly as the first. “I was concerned Friday night,” Tuzinski said. “The way I looked at it was, OK, I’ve got a major problem here, but we’re taking care of it.” “The best analogy I can think of is, you’re sitting there; you’re getting really bad chest pains and so you take an aspirin, and you call the hospital, go to the emergency room and everything will be fine. You wait and do nothing and you end up with a catastrophe. Fortunately, we had a huge aspirin tablet in the form of Rob Mericle and all the emergency responders.” “We avoided two catastrophes. We dodged two huge bullets,” he continued. “But the reason we dodged those bullets was because the plan worked. Whatever the plan was, whether it was a response plan, an evacuation plan, the plan worked.” For the rest of the night, EMA continued to monitor the levee and prepare for the return of borough residents. About 12:30 Saturday morning, 39 hours after he’d gotten up, Tuzinski crawled back into bed. “All of our contributions to the flood relief effort have been completely voluntary,” Mericle Construction said in a statement. “We have no intention to seek reimbursement and never did.”

gery at GWV. What people will do is they’ll go from CMC to what used to be Mercy Scranton. We don’t want to lose them. We want to expand.” So the decision has been made to institute the Geisinger brand in the new market, attracting new patients from the growing counties of Pike, Monroe and Wayne, which more closely align themselves with Scranton than Wilkes-Barre. Steele said the Wyoming Valley and South Wilkes-Barre Geisinger facilities will not lose a thing and they could gain some new patients from Lackawanna County or its surrounding counties. Geisinger competes for patients with the former Mercy – now Regional Hospital of Scranton – and Moses Taylor hospital. Forprofit operator Community Health systems took over Mercy earlier this year and its acquisition of Moses Taylor is pending.

one outlook; that the Scranton and Wilkes-Barre markets are separate and unique. That means that even though CHS now operates single hospitals in Tunkhannock, Nanticoke and Wilkes-Barre, and one in Scranton – Regional Hospital of Scranton -- with a second one, Moses Taylor pending, they are each viewed as separate entities, and Catena said they will continue to have duplication of services. “Wilkes-Barre and Scranton are really two different markets in health care, in shopping … I think there will be more collaboration up there but as far as patients from there coming over here”

that’s not likely right now, he said. But that could change. He said getting the CHS brand out there, though probably with another regionally based name, is a goal for the future. Once that happens, he said, hospitals might begin sharing more, referring more and attracting patients over county lines. “I think you’ll see more of a regional presence … You’ll see us grow beyond Wilkes-Barre, beyond Luzerne County,” Catena said. He said health care might do something few others have been able to do. “I think it will start to break down the barrier (between the counties),” Catena said.

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levee with it and undermining it and that’s not good.” The Army came back, took another look and told Tuzinski that he did now have a problem, then left to formulate a plan. By MATT HUGHES “Was I scared?” Tuzinski said. mhughes@timesleader.com “Yeah, I was scared, but when It was about 5:30 in the eve- you’re scared and things are startning on Thursday, Sept. 8, that ing to turn sour, you turn back on Forty Fort Emergency Manage- your training.” And that training, in the comment Director Andy Tuzinski knew he had a serious problem mand structure that everyone understood and followed, made the on his hands. He had gone down to the levee effort to salvage the levee probehind the Forty Fort Cemetery ceed like clockwork and helped to inspect its condition with May- save the borough and the West or Boyd Hoats and Council Presi- Side from inundation, Tuzinski said. dent Joe Chacke. Tuzinski’s day started Hoats, walking on the levee, discovered a spon- “We avoid- 12 hours earlier, at a 5:30 a.m. meeting with gy area. “Boyd described it as ed two ca- officials to plan for the possible evacuation of standing on Jello,” Tu- tasthe borough. Even as zinski said. “And everythe river rose faster one started to get really trophes. nervous at that point.” We dodged than predicted, the borough was able to disEarlier, around 4 p.m., two huge seminate evacuation borough firefighter Skip route notices efficiently Kozich, zoning officer bullets.” to make for an orderly Steven Nowroski and Andy Tuzinski Alan Brezinski from the Forty Fort EMA evacuation. The borough also borough Code Enforcekept close tabs on the ment Office had made their own inspection of the dike levee and investigated reported and found water seeping at “a seepage points, including a crack pretty good clip” from beneath in the levee near the cemetery that was found to not be an immethe levee. The Army Corps of Engineers diate concern. Developer Robert Mericle had was called in, but assured the borough the situation was under also notified the county engicontrol as long as the seepage re- neer’s office that he could volunteer equipment, materials and mained clear. “The levee is a living, breath- manpower as needed and had ing thing. It’s designed to have posted trucks and equipment on water pass through it in a safe standby, Tuzinski said. So when the problem was disway,” Tuzinski said. “If it’s clear, it just means the water’s running covered, all the pieces fell into clean through and it’s not causing place. State police vehicles escorted any kind of erosion; if its muddy that means it’s taking part of the Mericle trucks from the Pittston

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impacted municipalities. 5:30 p.m., Wilkes-Barre West Pittston Mayor Tony Denisco lost his optimism that his borough would make it through relatively unscathed when he attended the briefing at county EMA. “I thought maybe some miracle would happen that the Denisco water would just be on the street. I knew from the tone of their voices that we were in trouble,” Denisco said. 6 p.m., Wilkes-Barre Luzerne County evacuated about 50,000 people in low-lying areas that were not protected by the Wyoming Valley Levee. The river was now 12.66 feet. 6:15 p.m. Exeter Township Dan Fetch, the township’s emergency management agency director and fire chief, started knocking on doors, warning residents to heed the evacuation. The county’s warning about the rising river was serious. Fetch was “baptized” as a firefighter and emergency worker in the 1972 Agnes flood and had witnessed the Susquehanna’s “voraciousness and violence.” Many residents in the155 properties visited by Fetch and others bolted, but some wouldn’t budge. Fetch made it clear that roads would be flooded, and he couldn’t endanger the lives of emergency workers to rescue people who had ample notice to evacuate. “We kept track of the people who weren’t leaving and told them to put their Social Security numbers on their arm or their driver’s license in their shoe so we could identify them if something happened to them,” Fetch said. Some were later trapped, but there were no reported deaths or injuries. About 65 properties were flooded, including 32 mobile homes that were completely destroyed. 8 p.m., Wilkes-Barre, Kingston The Market Street Bridge over the Susquehanna River was closed to traffic and blocked with flood gate closures.

THURSDAY, Sept. 8:

4 a.m., Wilkes-Barre Luzerne County Commissioner Stephen A. Urban made his personal decision that people protected by the Wyoming Valley Levee must be evacuated because the river was predicted to rise to 39.9 feet. Urban The river was now at 21.65 feet. “I was always confident that the levee would hold, but I figured it was better for people to be out of the area,” he said. 6:10 a.m., Wilkes-Barre Luzerne County officials held a press conference to announce they were ordering an evacuation of levee-protected areas impacted by Agnes in 1972. 6:30 a.m., Wilkes-Barre County Emergency Manage-

ment Agency Director Steve Bekanich’s wife called him after she saw him on the televised press conference. “She said she could see it in my face and hear it in my voice that it’s going to get bad,” he said. She asked how bad it was going to get. “I told her I didn’t know,” he said. The Bekanich family lives in Plymouth, which was impacted by the evacuation. He struggled to be assertive about the importance of evacuating while trying not to panic people to the point that there would be mass chaos. “The not knowing what was coming – that was the scary part for me,” he said. 8 a.m., Plains Township John Stopay peered at his business, Jon L Stopay Candies, from a back road on high ground since River Street was blocked off. He wanted to see if there was still time to grab more items. The candy shop went through several floods since it was located there in 1972, but never had more than 18 inches of water. It was no use. He found four feet of water inside the building, which was still packed with display cases for his candy. The 73-year-old said he may rent another location for the holiday season to sell the candy manufactured elsewhere, but he’s not sure about the long-term plans for his business, which employs about 10 full-timers. Stopay’s father started the candy business in the 1940s. 8:30 a.m., Exeter Borough Councilman Richard Murawski realized it was likely the Susquehanna River would cross Susquehanna Avenue, threatening more than the roughly 20 homes on the river side of the street. He made the call to build a levee in the middle of the avenue running several blocks, requiring more than 60 loads of a clay material. At one point the man-made wall held back seven feet of water, he said. The councilman said he wasn’t willing to let the river hit more homes without a fight. “I was sweating bullets,” Murawski said. 9:30 a.m., West Pittston Valerie Horchos and her fiancé, Rob Schultz, tried to elevate antique wood furnishings from an out-of-state soda fountain shop inside their multi-unit building on the corner of Warren Street and Luzerne Avenue. They had traveled to Louisiana to pick up the furnishings because they’re trying to keep the character of the cavernous old building they’re remodeling. It has three storefronts, with one already redone in their quest to bring back window shopping. The door on the finished portion was salvaged from a townhouse in the Bronx. By that time, the Susquehanna had advanced within sight on both Warren Street and Luzerne Avenue. “You could see the reflection of the water,” Schultz said. They later returned to find about four feet on the first floor. They are hoping to salvage the furnishings but want some reassurances that a flood-protection solution will be implemented for their neighborhood before they proceed with renovations. “We want to stay here, but we want to make sure the building will be here 50 years from now,”

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AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Amber Blazick takes a break from removing ruined possessions and cleaning the inside of her rented home. With no school Monday, daughters Kylee and Emilee wait outside.

Horchos said. 11:30, Plains Township Jennifer Whitesell ran down her basement steps to grab the school clothing she had just purchased for her grandchildren. The Susquehanna River, normally a 10-minute walk away from her River Street home, gushed in, stopping her in her tracks. Would she be electrocuted or trapped? She dropped the shopping bags and fled up the basement stairs, rushing her family to the car. “It was scary. Up to that point, I was still under the illusion this was not a flood zone and that we’d be OK,” said Whitesell, who bought the property in 2006 from someone who assured her it had not been flooded in 1972. The basement filled up to the ceiling after the family left, and the flooring on the first floor may also be damaged. The family must come up with money to rewire the entire house before the

electricity may be restored. Noon, Forty Fort A crack was found in the concrete levee wall behind the Forty Fort Cemetery. The river level: 30.55 feet. 1 p.m., Kingston Luzerne County Chief Engineer Joe Gibbons arrived at the D&L Railroad levee closure by the Kirby Park tennis courts to set up sandbags. Gibbons had been up 36 hours without sleep making sure the levee flood gates and pumping stations were in order, and he was struggling to muster up another burst of energy. He Gibbons didn’t expect many citizen volunteers because the mandatory evacuation was hours away. He was wrong.

“I probably had 50 residents there helping me. One guy even told me to sit down for a few minutes and relax,” Gibbons recalled. “Here are all these people trying to help sandbag instead of staying home to try to save their own belongings. That was really nice.” 2 p.m., Wilkes-Barre Philadelphia native Seleda Matthews rounded up toiletries, clothes, food, important paperwork, identification, music, cell phones, chargers, books, coloring books, medication, her Bible and toys – including a Bratz doll head with tangled hair that her younger daughter put on the must-have list. She squeezed everything into bags and a suitcase and rushed her three children, ages 4, 9 and 20, from their Rowland Street apartment to the emergency shelter at GAR Memorial Junior/Senior High. Matthews never had to think

about flooding until she moved here a year ago. “There’s no need to worry. What will be will be. By the graces of God, we will be alright,” she said at the time. 3:45 p.m., Wilkes-Barre The Veterans Memorial Bridge in Wilkes-Barre closed, with the river at 34.52 feet. 4 p.m., Wilkes-Barre Flood victims paid little if any attention to the loud singing of Edward Rehill in the lobby seating area at GAR. The 86-year-old resident of the B’nai B’rith Apartments said he was crooning to exercise his voice and stay awake. At that moment, he was belting out a love song in Italian as two basketball games were under way in the nearby gymnasium. A few minutes earlier, he had had been leaning to the side as he dozed off in the folding chair. See DAYS, Page 13A

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Rehill said he wouldn’t get much sleep at the shelter because he has insomnia. He wasn’t worried about the belongings he left behind because he watched the levee construction and was confident it would hold up. “I just want to get back to my apartment,” he said. 4:30 p.m., Forty Fort Seepage was found by the cracked levee wall in the Forty Fort Cemetery, prompting officials to bring in heavy equipment and dump trucks with several hundred tons of rock and dirt to stabilize it. 4:51 p.m., Wilkes-Barre As the city streets became deserted, the owners of Salci Enterprises on South Main Street worked past the evacuation to finish loading more small equipment from the business into a vehicle. The family had been moving since 8:30 a.m. 5 p.m., Jenkins Township Joe Sagliocco fled his Main Street home, tears in his eyes, as water poured into his basement. He had spent the previous night moving belongings from his basement and was trying to grasp the possibility that the water wouldn’t stop there. “I had to go. I realized I was losing everything right in front of my eyes, and there was nothing I could do to stop it,” Sagliocco said. The property ended up with several feet on the first floor. He has flood insurance but had no idea what it will and won’t cover. Sagliocco, a Luzerne County probation officer, and his wife, Dorothy, built the property in 1994, thinking it would be out of harm’s way. Adding to their pain, someone later stole an antique milk can and three pieces of antique furniture that belonged to Dorothy’s family. The items had been behind the home nowhere near the water-damaged heap of belongings at the curb. “We’re trying to save stuff, and someone is stealing it,” Dorothy said. 7 p.m., Duryea Steve Milewski ran back to his Chittenden Street home to grab prescriptions. He took one last look at the Lackawanna River heading toward his home through the Holy Rosary Cemetery behind his property. Milewski had tried to get everything out of the basement, but it was too packed since he has no attic. “I thought I would get a few inches in the basement,” he said. He later found eight feet. 7:30 p.m., Plains Township About 100 customers and spectators packed the outdoor deck of the River Grille at the Waterfront Complex in Plains Township to watch the debris floating in the passing Susquehanna, which was now at 37.55 feet. General Manager Will Ouellette said the restaurant did not close because it is elevated and was accessible from the Cross Valley Expressway. “We’re high enough here that everyone was safe, and a lot of the evacuated people had nowhere to go. Many came to get a bite to eat,” he said. Propane tanks, sheds, massive trees, oil drums and a refrigerator were among the floating items spotted by people on the deck, he said. “We were all watching a lot of crazy debris going by,” he said. 9:30 p.m., Wilkes-Barre A Wilkes-Barre police officer stood at Market Street near Public Square to make sure nobody

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Bishop Joseph Bambera speaks to the press outside the Holy Rosary School in Duryea on Tuesday afternoon to announce a special collection for flood victims throughout the Diocese of Scranton. Bishop Bambera toured the school.

went near the Market Street Bridge flood gate as workers struggled to stop seepage from a compromised seal. It was tense because nobody knew for certain that the fix would work. As a precaution, the police officer faced his car away from the gate so he could jump in and floor it to higher ground if the gate burst. 11 p.m., Plymouth Township John Rinehimer, in full emergency response mode as chief of the township’s Tilbury Fire and Rescue, viewed a cell phone photo of his home sent by a neighbor. Rinehimer was the first property owner in the township to jack up his home on a new high foundation, which meant the first floor should be untouched at a river level of 41 feet. He and his wife didn’t move anything off the first floor. The picture showed he had first-floor flooding. “Well that didn’t work,” he told his wife. All firefighters in the Tilbury station had water in their residences, and the station was also flooded, Rinehimer said. “We know how to compartmentalize. We take care of the people in the town and also deal with our personal issues,” the chief said.

FRIDAY, Sept. 9

5 a.m., Wilkes-Barre Wyoming Valley Levee overseer Jim Brozena confirmed that the Susquehanna was cresting at 42.6 feet, which would push the levee to the max. The levee was designed to hold 41 feet, though it had a three-foot top board to handle waves and debris. Brozena alBrozena ways knew in the back of his mind that a flood exceeding Agnes was possible, but he didn’t expect to experience it during his

time as executive director of the county’s Flood Protection Authority. “Now it was right there, and that was very sobering,” he said. He praised engineering professionals, volunteers and a team of professionals from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers who helped respond to seepage and other problems arising from the prolonged and unprecedented stress on the flood control system. “I wasn’t running this alone,” he said. 6 a.m., Duryea It was just getting light out when Duryea resident Corey Wasko walked toward Chittenden Street to see if a relative’s home had water. His mouth literally hung open when he saw that neighborhood flooded to many second floors. He snapped photos with his cell phone showing the water had almost reached the wording on a stop sign. “It was intense. It was overwhelming,” he said. 6:30 a.m., Forty Fort Large boils were discovered at the levee behind the county recreational complex near the Wyoming Valley Airport in Forty Fort, requiring about 1,000 tons of dirt and rock. 7 a.m., Wyoming Valley The Susquehanna crested at 42.66 feet. 8 a.m., Plymouth With all the revisions in the river crest, borough coordinator Joe Mazur climbed the levee to make sure the water wasn’t going to spill into his municipality. He was in his 30s during Agnes and remembers the destruction “like it was yesterday.” The levee held, though many homes along the wall had basement flooding, probably from seepage, he said. Several businesses by the old Carey Avenue Bridge that are not protected by the levee also flooded. “I was the happiest person on earth that it didn’t go over the levee. The levee system really did its job. I can’t praise it enough,” he said.

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Cleaning begins on the Shickshinny Municipal Building on Monday. The Shickshinny area suffered severe damage in the flooding.

1 p.m., Plymouth Veronica Harrison had to return to her Beade Street apartment because emergency workers needed her to move a vehicle so they could address seepage at the Wyoming Valley Levee behind the property. The basement of the property was flooded, and she ran inside to grab some more clothes for her 11-year-old son. Already shaken by the chaos, she noticed the glass on the back door was smashed. She discovered numerous items had been stolen from the second floor, including video game systems, about 150 DVDs and a digital camera. The items were worth thousands, and many belonged to her son. “I just freaked out. I couldn’t even believe someone would do this to us,” said Harrison, who also lives with her boyfriend, Geoff Engle. 1:30 p.m., Wilkes-Barre Luzerne County officials announced that the Wyoming Valley Levee was under “extreme stress” because it had never been tested at river levels so high.

SATURDAY, Sept. 10

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

EMA people for various communities up and down the Susquehanna River gather at EMA headquarters in Wilkes-Barre to be updated on river levels Thursday morning.

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Bob Gray, Nicole Delvan, Jan Reszegi and Sean Gray clean up in Shickshinny, hit hard by the Susquehanna River flooding.

ered in muck. Several bottles of wine remained on the shelf, and one table was still upright with the utensils intact. “We will be back – bigger and better,” he vowed. 2:30 p.m., Wyoming Valley The evacuation was lifted for levee-protected residents.

SUNDAY, Sept. 11

11 a.m., Shickshinny The Susquehanna River finally receded enough to allow borough Mayor Beverly Moore to return to her Canal Street home to see the damage. Her home was elevated so the first floor was one foot above Agnes levels, and she ended up with three inches on the first floor. She was thankful the foundation survived. “I have never seen so much mud. There had to be 10 inches of that thick mud,” Moore said. About 80 percent of the properties in the borough were flooded, many to the second floor. “The starkness of seeing what happened to my town. I can tell you as mayor I cried,” Moore said.

Daylight, Wyoming Valley Residents in many municipalities not protected by the levee returned to their properties to assess the damage and haul out mud-caked, waterlogged belongings. 9:45 a.m., Jenkins Township Sam Marranca braced himself as he walked into his River Road restaurant, Café Italia, which got six feet of water on the main floor. “I was shocked. Shocked is the word,” he said. The thick door to the walk-in freezer had been blown off its hinges and ended up in another MONDAY, Sept. 12 room. Tables, barstools, equip10 a.m., Jenkins Township ment, silverware and wall picTownship Supervisor Stanley tures were in shambles and cov- Rovinski drove his pickup into a

flooded section in Port Blanchard. He had just made his rounds checking on flooded River Road properties and was headed into a bowl-shaped neighborhood known as “the patch” that was still filled with several feet of water. He came to offer words of comfort and supplies – paper towels, shovels, drinks, ready-to-eat meals and gloves. Several homes had only remnants of the foundation left, and the odor of sewage was overpowering. “It just reminds me of when you see these foreign countries in a war. It looked like there was a war here,” he said. “I’m just trying to do what I can do to help.” 4 p.m., Jenkins Township The Eighth Street Bridge linking the township and Wyoming reopened. Motorists were now able to pass through most of the areas devastated by flooding to see the damage firsthand. Workers in “the patch” continued to pump water out of streets and homes, forcing it back into the river. There was now plenty available space in the river banks. The Susquehanna had receded to 16.88 feet. Times Leader staff writers Jerry Lynott and Edward Lewis contributed to this report.


CMYK SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011

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K THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com ELIZABETH (BETTY) MORAN, of Dallas and formerly of Wilkes-Barre, passed away Saturday, September 17, 2011, at the Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. Funeral arrangements will be announced by E. Blake Collins Funeral Home, Wilkes-Barre.

DOROTHY M. GLOFKA, 94, of Wilkes-Barre Township, passed away Friday evening, September 16, 2011, at Little Flower Manor, Wilkes-Barre. Funeral arrangements are pending from the Bednarski & Thomas Funeral Home, 27 Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre.

Katherine Rita Uzdilla September 13, 2011 a prolonged illness, KatheA fter rine Rita (Kosker) Uzdilla, 77,

peacefully passed away Tuesday, September 13, 2011, at St. Agnes Hospital, Baltimore, Md. One of nine children, and affectionately known as “Kitty” or “Kate,” she was born and raised in Nanticoke. She was preceded in death by her parents, Katherine Hughes Kosker and James Kosker of Irvington, N.J.; and several siblings. She is survived by her daughter Arlene and husband, Kevin Prescott, of Parkton, Md.; son, Edward Uzdilla of Wilkes-Barre; daughter Barbara and husband, Paul Bowman, of Mountain Top; grandchildren, Melissa and Neil Prescott, Edward Uzdilla III, and Samantha and Bailey Bowman. Kate resided in Catonsville, Md., for the past 25 years. What she enjoyed most was spending time with her family, a good game of pinochle, “go fish,” checkers, shoe shopping, and, in her younger days, dancing. She was a superb baker with special recipes for chocolate chip cookies, pineapple raisin fill cookies, and her famous lemon meringue and coconut cream pies.

Interment was at St Mary’s Cemetery, Hanover Township. Do not stand at my grave and weep, I am not there; I do not sleep. I am a thousand winds that blow, I am the diamond glints on snow, I am the sun on ripened grain, I am the gentle autumn rain. When you awaken in the morning’s hush I am the swift uplifting rush Of quiet birds in circling flight. I am the soft starlight at night. Do not stand at my grave and cry, I am not there; I did not die. -----written by Mary Frye

Dorothy Michalak September 5, 2011 orothy “Dot” Michalak, 89, of Plymouth, was called by the D Lord, Monday morning, September

5, 2011. She was born May 12, 1922, in Hanover Township, a daughter of the late Peter Paulik and Mary Derkash Paulik. She worked at and was the coowner with her late husband, Al, of Paulik’s Furniture for 35 years. Dorothy was a Drum majorette at Plymouth High School and graduated in 1939. Upon graduation from Plymouth High, Dorothy attended Susquehanna University, where she became the school’s first head drum majorette. Al Michalak, Plymouth, with whom She was a beautiful lady, both in- Dot resided; and grandsons, John side and out, right to the end. She Jr., and Peter Jr. was an extremely devoted mother A private service will be held and always made sure her sons at- Wednesday at the S.J. Grontkowski tended Mass every Sunday. She also Funeral Home, Plymouth, with Paattended Mass for as long as she nachayda at 10:30 a.m. Divine Liturcould. She loved the Lord and in- gy will be presided over by Father stilled the love for the Lord in her Roman Petryshak and assisted by sons. Trying to be as fine a person her cousin, Brother Augustine Pauhas been a goal for them that will be lik, at 11 a.m. in Ss. Peter & Paul Uktough to achieve. Dot liked to watch rainian Catholic Church, 20 NotCatholic TV and especially Mother tingham St., Plymouth. Interment Angelica, however, she did miss see- will be held in Ss. Peter & Paul Uking Father Corapi later on. rainian Catholic Church Parish We love you so much, Dot. xxxx Cemetery, Plymouth. Dorothy was preceded in death Memorial donations may be sent by her devoted husband, Alexander, in Dorothy’s name to Ss. Peter and and her loving son John. Paul Ukrainian Catholic Church, 20 Dot is survived by sons Dr. Peter Nottingham St., Plymouth, PA Michalak of Tucson, Ariz., and Atty. 18651.

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Wanted: A few good troopers Due to a shortage of officers, State Police target recruits with special events.

They seemed to be achieving their goal. By noon, Weltmer said they had received about 100 visitors. Marsha Thompson, of Lawrenceville, N.J., drove two hours to By EILEEN GODIN attend the event. She has taken Times Leader Correspondent the written and oral exams reWYOMING - Flashing red and quired to become a cadet, but blue police lights lit up the State wanted an opportunity to talk Police Barracks in Wyoming on with a recruiter. Thompson, a correction offiSaturday not as a warning but as a welcoming sign to draw people cer, said she feels becoming a into their Come Get to Know Us state police officer would be “a good place to work.” Day. John Medrano, 25, of ScranOn the grounds of the barton, served with the racks, residents and military police for five those interested in beyears and wants to coming state police of- T O J O I N ficers had an opportu- To apply to become a move his career into the civilian side. nity to see a police hel- Pennsylvania State “I currently attend icopter with a see- Police Officer Penn State, and my through floor, a police visit www.psp.stateteacher sent me an recruitment vehicle, .pa.us or call 1-877email about today’s computer forensics, a PA-CADET for more information. event,” Medrano canine unit, motorcysaid. “I cannot wait cle unit, firearms used by specially trained emergency to get into the Police Academy.” Weltmer said it can take more response officers, and much than a year to get though trainmore. The Get to Know Us Day was ing. An applicant has to be beheld from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sat- tween 21 and 40 years old and has urday at the State Police, Troop to first pass a written and oral exam, a polygraph test and a backP, on Wyoming Avenue. With a shortage of about 300 ground check, he said. Once this officers statewide, Lieutenant is achieved, then they can beTodd Weltmer said the goal of come a cadet in the Pennsylvania the event was to attract those in- State Police Academy. Weltmer added applicants terested in becoming Pennsylvania State Troopers and give chil- with two years of active military dren an opportunity to see the experience can have 30 college police equipment and talk with credits waived. State Police officers from all officers.

tephen Jesso, 72, of West Main S Street, Plymouth, died Thursday afternoon, September 15, 2011,

at the Hampton House/Manor Care, Hanover Township. He was born in Kingston, a son of the late John and Dorothy Morgan Jesso. He graduated from Plymouth High School in 1955. Stephen had served in the U.S. Army during peace time. Prior to his retirement in 1998, he had been employed as a tractor trailer driver for 40 years. Mr. Jesso was a member of the Franklin Street Primitive Methodist Church, the American Legion and the V.F. W., all of Plymouth. He is survived by a son John, Plymouth; a daughter Dorothy Jesso, Trucksville; grandchildren, Stephen and Christopher; a sister, Sandy Long, Hunlock Creek; brothers, Dave, Plymouth, and Thomas, Orange; as well as several nieces and nephews.

By KAREN HAWKINS Associated Press

CHICAGO — Former Sen. Charles H. Percy, a successful Chicago businessman once widely viewed as a top presidential contender, described himself as “a conservative on money issues

but a liberal on people issues.” That unwavering commitment to moderate values often put the former Foreign Relations Committee chairman at odds with conservatives in the Republican party, including former President Richard Nixon, but that

ton at 91. Percy’s daughter, Sharon Rockefeller, announced in March 2009 that he had Alzheimer’s disease. His death was announced by the office of his son-in-law, West Virginia Sen. Jay Rockefeller.

PARK

pervise the widely attended 3on-3 basketball tournament to benefit the basketball booster club and the Meyers Quarterback Club also had a large fundraising booth at the event. “We try to help the various groups at the high school,” said organizer Sue Greenfield. “It’s why we’re here.” Greenfield said the group is currently looking for project ideas for 2012.

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DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Boys take part in a 3-on-3 basketball tournament during a Party in the Park at Miner Park Saturday.

Past District A projects include providing streetlights at Miner Park and the renovation of the South Wilkes-Barre Little League and softball facilities. The Wilkes-Barre Fire Department was on hand to demonstrate fire safety to children of all ages in their state-of-the-art “Fire Safety House” and the Red Cross mobile unit conducted a much-needed blood drive to replenish supplies diminished during the recent flooding. Meyers men’s basketball coach Pat Toole was at the event to su-

Kingston Fire Chief Frank Guido tolls the bell at LCCC during a 9/11 10-year remembrance ceremony Saturday. The ceremony featured an artifact from the World Trade Center being placed in a monument at the Regional Public Safety Training Center on the campus of Luzerne County Community College, Nanticoke.

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A funeral service will be held at 8 p.m. Monday from the William A. Reese Funeral Chapel, Rear 56 Gaylord Ave., Plymouth. Friends may call from 6 p.m. until the time of service Monday. The Plymouth American Legion will hold services at 7 p.m. Memorial donations may be sent to the Franklin Street Primitive Methodist Church, 185 Franklin St., Plymouth, PA 18651.

Funeral Home, 89 Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call from 4 to 6 p.m. today. TENSA – Elaine, funeral has been cancelled for this weekend. Stay tuned for a rescheduled date to appear in a weekend edition of The Times Leader. WALLACE – James, funeral 1 p.m. Saturday at the Betz-Jastremski Funeral Home, 568 Bennett St., Luzerne. WALSH – Gerald, Memorial Mass 1:30 p.m. Saturday at Holy Family Parish, 828 Main St., Sugar Notch. WINE – Mary, celebration of life 9:30 a.m. Monday with a Funeral Mass in the Church of Saint Nicholas, 226 S. Washington St., Wilkes-Barre. Friends will be received in the church from 9 to 9:30 a.m. Monday.

State Police force not normally seen by the public.” There are two SERT teams in the state, SERT West and SERT East. Each team has divisions spread through each region. Skrutski said SERT East team, which includes his team based in Dunmore, has responded to 100 incidents this year. After cruising through some of the displays and talking with officers, Jacob Siley, 10, of Luzerne, said he is interested in becoming either a police officer or a lawyer. He said he liked the “cool equipment and firearms.” His favorite areas were the helicopter, the police dog, and the motorcycle.

didn’t deter him in the nearly 20 years he represented Illinois in the Senate. Percy sponsored a resolution calling for a special prosecutor in the Watergate scandal and became a critic of the Vietnam War. He died Saturday in Washing-

LCCC

FUNERALS CARUSO – Patricia, planned services have been postponed. Rescheduled service information will be published as soon as it becomes available. Updates will be posted at www.celebrateherlife.com. FONZO – Doris, funeral 11 a.m. Monday in the Metcalfe and Shaver Funeral Home Inc., 504 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming. Friends may call from 5 to 8 p.m. today. GODFREY – Herbert, planned services have been postponed. Rescheduled service information will be published as soon as it becomes available. Updates will be posted at www.celebratehislife.com. HILL – Barbara, memorial Mass 7 p.m. Sept. 26 in the All Saints Church, 66 Willow St., Plymouth. SAKOWSKI- Donna, funeral 6 p.m. today from the Nat & Gawlas

around the area had display tables showing their unique roles. Based out of Hazleton, Trooper Mark Applegate and his partner, Pach, a 3-year-old German shepherd, made friends easily. Pach’s friendly nature made him an easy favorite for children. But Pach is a member of the canine unit, specially trained to detect explosives and track people. Sgt. Tom Skrutski of the Special Emergency Response Team (SERT), came from Dunmore with a display of heavy body armor, a kevlar helmet, and five different guns. “The SERT team is the State Police version of a SWAT team,” he said. “This is a part of the

Former Illinois Senator and Chicago businessman Charles Percy dies at age of 91

Stephen Jesso September 15, 2011

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Trooper Tom Kelly, left, explains the use of a Taser as Jonathan Stemrich of Nuangola and Kris Wheelis of Hazleton listen at the State Police barracks in Wyoming on Saturday morning.

who helped the victims of last week’s flooding. “The response from our service people was the same,” he said. “They were stepping up to help each other.” Susan Porter Allen, a student at LCCC, sang the national anthem, and “Hold My Hand,” a song she wrote in honor of her nephew, who served in Afghanistan and became a triple amputee after being a victim of an IED. Phyllis Carlo of Newport Township presented a wreath in honor of all first responders and her son, Michael Scott Carlo, a New York firefighter with Engine #230 in Brooklyn who was killed at the World Trade Center on 9/ 11. He was 34. “He lived life to the fullest,” she said of her son. Wearing a necklace with a photo of Michael in his uniform, Carlo said her son had always wanted to be a firefighter, and followed in his older brother Robert’s footsteps. “They were both working that day,” she said. Robert, who was with a fire department in Harlem, was on his way to the World Trade Center that day, but was told to turn

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M O N U M EN T CO .

M onum ents -M arkers -Lettering 975 S.M A IN ST.H A N O VER TW P.

829-8138 N EXT TO SO LO M O N ’S CREEK

OBITUARY POLICY The Times Leader publishes free obituaries, which have a 27-line limit, and paid obituaries, which can run with a photograph. A funeral home representative can call the obituary desk at (570) 829-7224, send a fax to (570) 829-5537 or e-mail to tlobits@timesleader.com. If you fax or e-mail, please call to confirm. Obituaries must be submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Obituaries must be sent by a funeral home or crematory, or must name who is handling arrangements, with address and phone number. We discourage handwritten notices; they incur a $15 typing fee.

In L ovin g M em ory O f

Fran k E .T horn ton D ec. 31,1926 -Sep t. 18,2000

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

around and cover a station for firefighters who were dispatched to the scene. County Commissioner Stephen Urban recalled the crystal blue sky on that tragic day 10 years ago. “Beauty was in the air as thousands awoke, but beauty would not remain.” Urban said the tragedy affected him personally as he spoke about

In Memory of Our Friend

Joe Blaze

We Miss You. from your Polka Friends

his friend’s wife, who was killed in the Pentagon that day. “Remember the victims and remember their families,” Urban told the crowd. “And as you leave here today, never forget them, and God Bless America.”

G en etti’s

A fterFu nera lLu ncheons Sta rting a t$7.95 p erp erson

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Itw a seleven yea rsa go Jesus stretch ed outh isa rm sa nd took you a w a y. D ow n from H ea ven h e ca m e to spa re you suffering a nd pa in. In ourh om esyou a re a lw a ys rem em bered ;sw eetm em ories cling to yourna m e. Th ose w h o loved you in life d ea rly still love you in spirit th e sa m e! W e a ll love a nd m issyou very m uch ForeverIn O urH ea rts Sa d ly m issed by w ife D orothy, C hild ren ,G ra n d child ren , G rea t G ra n d child ren & G rea t G rea t G ra n d child ren


CMYK PAGE 16A

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011

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THE TIMES LEADER

IMPORTANT NUMBERS FOR FLOOD VICTIMS • FEMA - 1-800-621-FEMA 3362. Disaster assistance applicants with a speech disability or hearing loss and use TTY, should call 1-800-4627585 directly. For those who use 711 or Video Relay Service (VRS), call 1-800-621-3362. Register for assistance online at www.disasterassistance.gov, or using a web enabled mobile device at m.fema.gov, • Help Line -- 1-888-8291341 • Luzerne County Rumor

www.timesleader.com

Control -- 1-800-821-3716 • Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center, Plains Twp., 808-3100, is in the process of organizing medical clinics for the flood areas. • Wyoming Valley Health Care System, Wilkes-Barre, 829-8111. • Pennsylvania American Water -- 1-800-565-7292 or at infopa@amwater.com • PPL -- 1-800-342-5775 option 1 for emergencies. • UGI Electric and Natural Gas -- 1-800-276-2722 Residents in flooded areas must show a certificate from a licensed contractor stating flood damage has been repaired and it is safe to turn on electric services.

AID STATIONS

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

Tom Foley of Helpline says assessing flood victims’ emotional needs is part of his agency’s job in addition to providing them with immediate needs like finding a temporary shelter or a ride.

Different people will deal in different ways Most flood-related calls have been about filling immediate A week after the Susquehanna needs like finding temporary River crested at 42.6 feet and shelter and rides to disaster-reflooded portions of the Wyoming lief stations, but Foley said caseValley, affected residents are bu- workers who answer the phones sy submitting applications for in- try to assess clients’ needs holisurance claims, federal disaster stically. “If somebody calls and says relief grants and recovery loans, while the storm’s full cost is just they need a ride, then you get them a ride,” he said. “But then beginning to be tabulated. But the flood also placed an- in talking to them you find they other, harder-to-quantify burden haven’t had a good meal in a day on the emotional and mental or two, so you help them find a health of those affected by flood- good meal. Then you find out they need help cleaning, and it may be weeks ing up … When we’re or months before the “People dealing with the floodscale of that toll being situation we spend comes apparent, area so- need to a little more time with cial service providers process them trying to find out and mental health prowhat what their needs are.” fessionals said. Assessing their men“Right now, everybo- they’ve tal health needs is part dy’s dealing with the babeen of that process, Foley sic need of shelter,” said said. Pressure to get Tom Foley, director of through lives back to norHelpline. “I think in a and find a their mal and uncertainty couple weeks, when about how to pay for it they sit back and they’re safe way will take a mental toll in a house that’s at least to deal on many scrambling to livable and they’re working to get it repaired, with that.” clean up, but the flood’s then they’ll start to feel Linda Benson other, smaller ripples, it. Therapeutic like the disruption of “A lot of people are counselor with the school year, also still running on adrena- Tiffany Griffiths will have an impact on Psy.D. & families, he said. line,” he continued. Associates, Inc. Therapeutic coun“Here at Helpline we are, selor Linda Benson, a too. When people start specialist in treating to crash, that’s when trauma and post-traumatic something’s going to happen.” Foley’s agency, Helpline, was stress, said the flood was a traufounded after the flood of 1972 to matic event for those directly improvide a simple means to con- pacted in that it threatened their nect those in need with agencies homes, “their very essence of that can help. He said he and his safety.” Different people will deal with five full-time employees have been working around the clock that trauma in different ways, since the Susquehanna began to she said. Some may cope by talking rise last week. In its inaugural year, the agency received about about their experiences; some600 phone calls, Foley said; since times excessively; others will beSept. 7, when the river’s waters come distant, withdrawn and first started to rise, it has re- emotionally numb. Some may experience anger, seek to lay ceived more than 1,500. By MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

WHERE TO TURN The following agencies can provide emotional support or referrals to flood victims: • Helpline: 570-829-1341 or 888829-1341. helpline-nepa.info. Providing referrals to area agencies, including therapeutic and mental health providers. Available 24 hours/day. • Jewish Family Service of Greater Wilkes-Barre: 823-5137. Providing emotional support and referrals for flood victims. • Linda Benson: 602-7753. Licensed therapist at Tiffany Griffiths, Psy.D. & Associates, Inc., Exeter. Offering free group therapy sessions to flood victims. Call to schedule an appointment.

blame for their situation or become agitated easily. Others will experience somatic physical symptoms of stress like headaches and stomach pains. Some will have trouble concentrating and experience lapses in their shortterm memory, and others will turn to substance abuse as a way of coping. For a smaller group coping with post-traumatic stress disorder, the flood’s impact could cut deeper and become even harder to overcome. “People who were in Agnes; people who had other trauma in their lives will all of a sudden feel vulnerable again because old trauma is being triggered,” she said. To help those in need, Benson is offering free group therapy sessions for flood victims at her practice in Exeter, Tiffany Griffiths Psy.D. & Associates, Inc. “People need to process what they’ve been through and find a safe way to deal with that,” she said. “It could be talking to their family and friends; it could be journaling; it could be physical activities.” Jewish Family Service of Greater Wilkes-Barre is also making

its services available to those struggling to cope with the psychological and emotional impact of flooding. Executive Director Howard J. Grossman said the mental health impact of disasters like the flood can be forgotten in the rush to meet the physical needs of an individual or family. “They have a lot of responsibility now with the need to fill out the forms and get to the disaster center,” he said. “We know from experience that right away they’ll be a kind of governmental support that is feasible under the circumstances that we all find ourselves in. We wanted to get information out on the emotional side as well for people that need that after experiencing the devastation that occurred.” Like Helpline, Grossman said Jewish Family Service can provide referrals to a host of other agencies, but its employees also are available to lend a sympathetic ear if that’s what is needed. “What we like to do is have the person somehow get to our office, sit down and talk out what the problem may be,” he said. “If we can’t handle it we can refer them, or I’ll pick up the phone and call someone on behalf of the person.” Few have responded so far. One family has sought help from Jewish Family Service and no one has yet signed up for Benson’s therapy group, but Grossman and Benson expect many more to seek help as time passes and the gravity of what has happened starts to sink in. “People may start experiencing it around the holidays, when they can’t go back to their homes, and that’s not that far away,” Benson said. “Then you have the issue of displacement. You don’t belong anywhere now, where do you go? That has its cumulative effect over time.”

Ways to cope with trauma of flood Counselor says most important thing is to take care of yourself. By MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

The loss of property destroyed by flooding, the sense of danger and uncertainty left by evacuation orders and the stress of picking up the pieces are traumatic experiences that could take a heavy emotional toll on victims of the flood of 2011. As licensed counselor Linda Benson explained, people’s primitive instincts in the face of trauma tell them to fight, flee or freeze.

They may fight, seeking to place blame for their situation or lashing out at others; they may flee, seeking to throw up their hands and leave their devastated properties behind; or they may freeze, becoming withdrawn and confused about where to turn next. Benson, a specialist in posttraumatic stress, said there are ways to cope with the trauma of flooding and move beyond the initial shock. For those struggling to reconstruct their lives after the flood, she offers the following advice: • Take care of yourself: Cleaning up and repairing one’s property, filing insurance claims and navigating the government disaster relief network can be a

time-consuming and stressful process. Stress can also create physiological symptoms. Remember to eat well and frequently enough and to get enough rest. “Do what you have to do to take care of business, but at the same time, take care of yourself; that’s the main message,” Benson said. • Accept your situation: “Realize that you can’t just make this go away,” Benson said. “Whatever you’re feeling, accept your feelings (and) cope with them as best you can without lashing out in ways that will cause harm.” • Hold onto your sense of hope: Realize that your present experience, like all things, will

pass. Realize that others are suffering through similar problems and that you are not alone. If spirituality is important to you, turn to your spiritual beliefs for guidance and reassurance. • Keep your spirits up: Try to find some humor in your situation. Find safe distractions. “Funny movies are good, so are old re-runs,” Benson said. “Escape with a hobby, if you have one, at least some of the time.” • Reach out to others: Talking to neighbors facing the same situation can be therapeutic for many. Benson is offering free group therapy sessions to those affected by flooding. She can be reached at 602-7753.

Chapter of the Red Cross at 823-7161. • Wyoming County Chapter of the American Red Cross • The Pennsylvania Emerhas set up the following distrigency Management Agency (PEMA) and the Federal Emer- bution sites for cleaning supplies, water, comfort kits ingency Management Agency cluding personal care items, (FEMA) opened six Disaster and infant care, from 9 a.m. to Recovery Centers to help residents and business owners 6 p.m.: Falls Fire Hall, Church affected by the floods. Centers St., Falls; Mehoopany Fire Staare open from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. tion, Route 87, Mehoopany; Old Ken Mar Building, Route 6, daily. The three in NEPA are: • Luzerne County Communi- Meshoppen; Laceyville Fire ty College, 1334 S. Prospect St., Company, Main Street, Laceyville. For more information, call Nanticoke. 836-2626. • Wyoming County, 41 Phila• The Salvation Army has delphia Ave., Tunkhannock canteens providing lunch, • Columbia County Agricultural Center, 702 Sawmill Road, dinner, snacks and water at West Pittston Corps, Brookside Bloomsburg Street in Wilkes-Barre, Chester • Wyoming Valley Chapter Avenue in Wilkes-Barre, the of the American Red Cross West Nanticoke Fire Company, has emergency response vehiand the Shickshinny Fire Comcles distributing food in West Pittston, West Nanticoke, Shick- pany. Emotional and spiritual care is also being provided. For shinny and Plains Township. more information, contact Cleanup kits are available for Major Ed Binnix, 270-392pick-up at the Wyoming Valley 0392 or Lt. Jason Burnes, Chapter of the American Red Cross, 256 Sherman St., Wilkes- 901-601-7842. • The Northern Columbia Barre. Community and Cultural Cen• The Red Cross and Luter, 42 Community Drive, Benzerne County Community ton, is offering food. Also, College have set up a shelter “flood buckets” containing for displaced residents, and a cleaning supplies, garbage service center to assist with bags, disinfectants and paper other needs, including vouchers for clothing from the Salva- towels are available. Items for personal hygiene, such as hot tion Army, Wilkes-Barre, or Goodwill Industries Thrift Shop, showers, toothpaste, soap and other products, are also availKingston. For more informaable. For information, call 925tion, call The Wyoming Valley 0163.

FOR OTHER HELP The Times Leader is publishing information to help communities affected by the recent flooding. More information will be added as services become available. Service agencies and other news can be emailed to tlnews@timesleader.com. Please put “flood aid” in the subject line. Available help

• Mary R. Ehret, Nutrition Links Supervisor at Penn State Cooperative Extension, 16 Luzerne Ave., West Pittston, can answer questions about food safety and cleanup procedures. Call 825-1701. • The Angeline Elizabeth Kirby Memorial Health Center, 71 N. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre, will be offering well water testing bottles at a reduced cost pending evidence of flood by showing FEMA or insurance documents. For more information, call the Kirby Health Center at 8255450. • The Building Industry Association, 411 Main St., Kingston, advises residents to make sure contractors, electricians and plumbers are licensed and insured. Their Pennsylvania registration number can be verified at www.paattorneygeneral.gov or by calling 1-888-520-6680. The BIA can assist in providing a list of insured local contractors. Visit its website at www.bianepa.com or call 2873331. • Pennsylvania Department of Labor & Industry is offering federal disaster unemployment assistance (DUA) benefits to individuals, including self-employed workers, left jobless because of recent flooding. Applicants may file

by calling 1-877-FILE DUA (877-345-3382), 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday and 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday. Individuals using a text telephone (TTY) may call 1-888334-4046. Applicants should have their Social Security number and any documentation showing income. If help in searching for work is needed, residents can contact the local state CareerLink for assistance, visit www.pacareerlink.state.pa.us. • Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Commerce, in cooperation with the Greater Pittston and Greater Hazleton Chambers, has set up a Virtual Business Recovery Center to assist businesses. Business owners can fill out a “Get Help” form at www.gwbrecovery.org, or call 823-2101. • The Small Business Development Center at Wilkes University is offering help for businesses in filing disaster relief claims. Visit www.bdc@wilkes.edu or call 408-4343. Disaster relief claims can also be filed at www.disasterrecovery.gov. • NEPA Alliance, 1151 Oak St., Pittston Twp., has loan programs and other local government services which may be helpful to residents. For information, visit www.nepa-alliance.org or call 6555581 or 1-866-758-1929. • The Wilkes-Barre U.S. Post Office, 300 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, is holding mail for Wilkes-Barre residents who were flooded. If mail boxes are cleaned out and upright, mail will be delivered. Otherwise, residents may pick up their mail at the WilkesBarre Post Office with proper identification. Call 831-3400.


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Transgender woman and nun form bond TOM MOONEY REMEMBER WHEN

Putting pencil to lined paper back in 1951

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ometimes you set out looking for something, but what you find instead is a lot more interesting. I don’t remember why I was up in the attic. In a cardboard box under the eaves was a mishmash of faded holiday decorations, wires from forgotten electronics and God-knows-what-else. And there, amid the chaos, was a single green wooden school pencil, with no eraser.

MCT PHOTOS

Sister Margaret and Leane give each other a high five in Sister Margaret’s office at Covenant House in Hollywood, Calif. Leane is now living in an apartment where she is learning the skills of living on her own far away from the streets she once called her home.

Unlikely friends By ALEXANDRA ZAVIS Los Angeles Times

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ister Margaret Farrell peers uncertainly over her shoulder as she tries to maneuver a lumbering minivan across several lanes of morning traffic on the Hollywood Freeway. • “I used to drive a cute little nun’s car,” she says, shaking her head. • Her 23-year-old passenger, Leane, chuckles and leans out the window to guide her. • They make a cheerful pair: the Irish nun and the transgender woman.

Leane was kicked out of home at 13 and spent years cycling between group homes and the streets. Three years ago, she was diagnosed with late-stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Her mother, she says, would have nothing to do with her. So Sister Margaret became the family she wished she had, ferrying her to hospital appointments and supporting her through months of grueling treatment. Both say the unlikely friendship has been a source of strength and inspiration. Now Leane is worried about some lumps on her neck. They are headed from a Hollywood homeless shelter to the City of Hope in Duarte, Calif., to find out if the cancer is back. An open mind Sister Margaret, 51, grew up on a farm in southwest Ireland. County Cork is known as the “rebel county” for its history of resistance to English Pro-

CLARK VAN ORDEN/ THE TIMES LEADER

Sister Margaret drives Leane to City of Hope in Duarte, Calif., for a doctors appointment.

testant rule. But her Catholic parents insisted that their children be respectful of their Protestant neighbors. “Whatever they were or weren’t, it was none of our business,” she said. At 22, she joined the Religious Sisters of Charity, an order founded in Dublin in 1815. “I’m not a holy, pious per-

son, but I was always involved in social justice,” she said. “I guess that’s what my big thing was, to see where I could fulfill this need, this urge I had inside me to do something for the poor.” In 1998, the order sent her to California, where she lives in a Culver City apartment block with four other nuns.

Through her work with juvenile offenders, she learned about Covenant House California, which operates a shelter and transitional housing for homeless teenagers and young adults in Hollywood. The nonprofit, part of an international network of shelters founded by a Franciscan priest in 1969, was looking for someone to tend to the spiritual needs of the residents, who come from all faiths. “Ten years later, I’m still there,” Sister Margaret said. The first time Sister Margaret attended Mass at Church of the Blessed Sacrament in her adopted Hollywood parish, a mother told the congregation how she had come to accept her two gay sons. “It was surprising to see it done so openly,” Sister Margaret said. “It was great.” She was soon reminded that such acceptance is not universal. Gay and transgender See FRIENDS, Page 8B

MEET RICHARD MILLER

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ichard Miller is the new executive director of the Osterhout Free Library in Wilkes-Barre. Miller, 38, is a graduate of Berwick High School and Bloomsburg University, where he earned degrees in elementary education, secondary social studies and history. He also earned a master’s degree in library science from Connecticut State University. He and his wife, Kelly, have two children: Madeline 7, and Benjamin, 5. They live in Salem Township. How did you make the shift from working in schools, as a teacher, to library science? “I was a substitute teacher, and of course, the work was not full-time and the summers were off. So I looked for a part-time job, and I ended up working as the director of a very small rural public library in Columbia County. It wasn’t even state-aided. It was sort of outside the system. We were open nine hours a week, and by the time I left, it was 21 hours. It was a nice little library, and I was the sole employee. I was the director, the staff and the maintenance man combined into one. But it was a great thing, because it let me get in from the ground up.” And your next position was at the

Berwick Public Library? “Yes. I was sort of recruited, and I really enjoyed libraries, so I made the move. It was challenging. The library had been through five directors in six years, so I was number six. They were in need of some help and modernization, and I spent 1 1 years there. We ended up building a new building and changing our name to the McBride Memorial Library. Obviously, we had some very generous donors in the McBride family. It was quite an experience.” How do you feel about taking the reins at the Osterhout? “I’m really happy to be here. It was kind of a crazy introduction, with the flooding. On my very first day, our server crashed and we lost our email and internet presence. The

second day, it rained and rained and rained, and on the third day, we were packing up to vacate. On the fifth day, we were evacuated. But in some ways, the emergencies helped us get over the ‘getting to know you’ phase and I certainly got to know the staff a lot quicker. I really enjoy it here, because while I think I did some good things in Berwick and had a lot of good people I worked with, the Luzerne County Library System has much bigger libraries and serves a lot more people. There’s a lot more opportunities to do things that I could never do in a smaller library.” You’re surrounded by books all day. See MEET, Page 7B

••• Settled in my seat, I glanced around the fourth-grade classroom at Dodson Elementary School. There were a few kids I didn’t recognize, and I knew nothing about the teacher who would guide us through the next nine months, Miss Clarissa Hart. But I wasn’t worried on that day 60 years ago, for I had the latest in hightech academic gear right before me. Lying upon the flip-top desk was my brand new five-cent tablet of writing paper. Yes, things were a bit different for children starting the school year back then in Wilkes-Barre. Parents didn’t have to spring for $1,200 to buy their little darlings a laptop and an iWhosis. Instead, a day or two before classes started you’d send the kid down to the corner store with a nickel to pick up a paper-covered tablet to supplement the big sheets of lined paper the school provided. The teacher gave you the pencils, too — round green pencils with no erasers. There was a sharpener on the classroom wall. Bottom line: Kids attending the Wilkes-Barre public schools in 1951 were probably closer to the ancient Sumerians with their clay tablets and whittled styluses than they are to the children of today in the way they recorded and processed lessons. But maybe that wasn’t so bad. There is something to be said for the simplicity practiced less than a lifetime ago. With everything based on written textbooks, you actually studied your textbooks on the dining room table under your parents’ eye. There was no temptation to keystroke out of a learning program and start surfing the Web or adding to your stock of “friends.” The painful duty of homework was easier to get out of the way before the first cry of “Hi-yo Silver” from the big console radio in the living room. Simplicity manifested itself in other ways for the young circa 1951. The walk to school (no buses in those days) was often quite interesting, even educational. Mine took me past a porch with a parrot whose plumage was almost as colorful as his language. The bird made me think about distant lands, mythic voyages and the wonders of the natural world. You could pass the whole Philadelphia Zoo on a bus and because you’re busy punching the kid in the next seat not get anything out of it. Hey, maybe we didn’t dress like the models in today’s ads. But, I’ll tell you, you appreciated the clunky winter parkas when you were more likely to run into a flying saucer from Uranus than a weather cancellation. Class dismissed. Don’t forget your pencils. ••• While reflections on the past can be entertaining, they should not obscure the immense challenges of the present. Please help your Wyoming Valley brothers and sisters recover from the devastating flooding of hardly more than a week ago. When that task is done, support public measures that will prevent new disasters from overtaking us. Let us ensure that a century from now, the people of our community will look back on us and say, with awe and reverence, “They were our best.” Tom Mooney is a Times Leader columnist. Reach him at tmooney2@ptd.net


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t. John the Evangelist Church in Pittston was the setting for the April 30, 2011, wedding of Bridget McFarland and Randy Deeble. Monsignor John Bendik officiated the 2 p.m. double-ring ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Ann McFarland, Pittston, and James McFarland, Harding. She is the granddaughter of the late Michael and Victoria Stiliha and the late Joseph and Mary McFarland. The groom is son of Deborah Razawich, Pittston, and the grandson of Constance Niedzwiecki, Pittston. The bride chose Kimberly Charney and Nicole Howells, friends, as matrons of honor. Bridesmaids were Lindsay McFarland, sister-in-law of the bride, and Elizabeth Pagonis, Marguerite Sundberg and Shannan Rodgers, friends of the bride. Junior bridesmaid was Emily Howells and flower girl was Elizabeth Howells. The groom chose his friend, Richard Kopec, and his brother, Richard Mills, as his best men. Groomsmen were Michael McFarland and Brian McFarland, brothers of the bride; Matthew Niedzwiecki, cousin of the groom; and Brendon Timek, friend of the couple. Ring bearer was Crosby McFarland, godson of the bride. Preceding the nuptials an engagement party celebrating the couple, hosted by the parents of the bride, was held at Rooney’s Irish Pub. The bride was honored at a bridal shower, hosted by the mother of the bride, godmother of the bride and bridesmaids, at Andy’s Diner, Plains Township. A rehearsal dinner was hosted by Mr. and Mrs. Jason Razawich, mother and step-father of the groom, at Leggio’s Restaurant, Wilkes-Barre. An evening cocktail hour and reception celebrating the special occasion were held at the Waterfront Banquet Facility, Plains Township. Bridget is a 2003 graduate of Seton Catholic High School. She is a 2007 graduate of Temple University with a Bachelor of Science degree in education. She is employed at Bear Creek Community Charter School as an elementary special education teacher. Randy is a 2003 graduate of Pittston Area High School. He studied at Luzerne County Community College. He is employed by Pride Mobility Products as a welder in the machine shop. The couple honeymooned to Punta Cana, Dominican Republic. They reside in Pittston.

Cooper, Yurko

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ogether with their parents, Erin Cooper and Kevin Yurko announce their engagement and upcoming marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Harry and Deb Cooper, Dallas, Pa. Erin is a 2001 graduate of Dallas High School. She earned her bachelor’s degree in elementary and special education from Clarion University and a master’s degree in instructional technology from Wilkes University. She teaches special education in the Lake-Lehman School District. The prospective groom is the son of Emery and Maryann Yurko, Wyoming, Pa. Kevin is a 2000 graduate of Dallas High School. He earned his bachelor’s degree in finance with a minor in economics from Penn State University. Kevin is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ for Morgan Stanley Smith-Barney. The wedding will take place in October, 2011, at the Stroudsmoor Country Inn, Stroudsburg, Pa.

Sennett, Wright

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ometimes your first love can be ileen Ann Wright and Michael your last love, as was shown on Stephen Sennett were united in S E June 25, 2011, when Caren Jordan marriage June 4, 2011, at The Church

of St. Ignatius Loyola, Kingston, by the Rev. John Lapera. The bride is the daughter of William and Debra Wright, Mountain Top. She is the granddaughter of the late William and Rosemary Wright, Allentown, and the late John and Jean Zalik, Bear Lake. The groom is the son of William and Jane Sennett, Bear Creek. He is the grandson of the late Stephen and Elizabeth Sennett, Wilkes-Barre, and the late Michael and Anne Olinatz, Shavertown. The bride, given in marriage by her father, choose her sister, Elizabeth Arnold, as her matron of honor. Bridesmaids were Randi Piascik, sister of the groom, and Maddi Piascik, niece of the groom. The groom selected his brother-inlaw, Stephen Piascik, as his best man. Groomsmen were George Myron Baron, uncle of the groom, and Matthew Piascik, nephew of the groom. Scriptural readings were given by Timothy Gill, godfather and cousin of the bride, and Sue Barry, godmother and aunt of the groom. Melissa Librizzi and Kristen Klipfer, both cousins of the bride, presented the offertory gifts. Music was provided by Christina Snipas, soloist; Paula Mohutsky, flutist; and David Baloga, accompanist. A rehearsal dinner was hosted by the parents of the groom at Patte’s Sports Bar. The bride was honored at a bridal shower given by her mother, aunt, sister and sister-in-law at the Knights of Columbus, Mountain Top. The cocktail hour and reception were held at the Ramada Inn, WilkesBarre. The bride is a 1997 graduate of Crestwood High School. She graduated from the University of Pittsburgh in 2001 with a degree in statistics and economics. She is employed as an assistant vice president, deposit operations manager for First National Community Bank in Dunmore. The groom is a 1992 graduate of Bishop Hoban High School and a 1995 graduate of Luzerne County Community College. He is the owner and operator of Mike’s Auto and Detailing and the manager of Roche’s Garage, Wilkes-Barre. The couple honeymooned in Aruba. They reside in Kingston.

THE TIMES LEADER

Lipson and John Frederick Sallada III were married in a “Ceremony in the Sand” in Bridgehampton, Long Island. Having dated their freshman and sophomore years at Colgate University, Caren and John both graduated cum laude with the Class of 1997 and moved to opposite coasts. However, they kept in touch periodically through friends and emails and reconnected on New Year’s Eve 2010. They were engaged the following December. The bride is the daughter of Mark and Ellen Lipson, Pacific Palisades, Calif. The groom’s parents are Jack and Alice Sallada, Dallas. His grandparents, Jane Hartzell, Daytona Beach, Fla., and the late Rev. Howard Hartzell and the late Fritz and Marion Sallada, were long-time residents of Wyoming Valley. The couple was married with their brothers, Matthew Lipson and best man James Sallada, by their side. Caren and John also included in the wedding party their closest friends from their school years. A gathering to celebrate the couple’s upcoming marriage was held in Shavertown at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Mack Jr. and was also hosted by Mrs. Keene Cornell, Mrs. Hale Coughlin and Mr. and Mrs. F. Warren Breig Jr. The bride was honored by her bridesmaids at a wedding shower in Atlanta and another shower was given by the Lipsons’ friends in Pacific Palisades. The parents of the groom held a rehearsal dinner at the Seasons of Southampton and the wedding ceremony and reception were hosted by the bride’s parents at the Bridgehampton Bath and Tennis Club. Caren has had an active career in television production, playing an especially important role in producing the show “This Old House.” John has been employed by Marsh and McLennan for more than a dozen years and is a senior vice president, working as the causality placement leader for the southeast region. Following a honeymoon in both Southampton and the Turks and the Cacaos, the couple returned to their home in Atlanta and an enthusiastic welcome from their much loved dog, Jake.

Keane, Guerra

Dohman, Mooney

arah Courtney Keane and Alfredo randis Mooney and Christopher José Guerra were united in marS Dohman, together with their famB riage on Sept. 3, 2011, at two o’clock ilies, announce their engagement and in the afternoon at Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, Greensboro, N.C. The Rev. John Allen officiated. Sarah is the daughter of Drs. Susan and Thomas Keane and the granddaughter of Mrs. Gertrude Phillips and the late Frank Phillips, WilkesBarre, Pa., and the late Jane and John Keane, Glen Rock, N.J. Alfredo is the son of Sr. Ciro Guerra Ruiz and Sra. Cristina Lara Carillo, Escazú, Costa Rica. He is the grandson of Sr. Ciro Guerra Baldares and the late Sra. María Isabel Ruiz Ugalde and the late Sr. Ernesto Lara Bustamante and Sra. Adriana Carillo Echeverría. Sarah earned a Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry at Furman University. She is a Ph.D. candidate in biological chemistry at Indiana University, Bloomington, Ind. Alfredo earned a Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry at the Universidad de Costa Rica. He is also a Ph.D. candidate in biological chemistry at Indiana University. Given in marriage by her father, the bride was attended by Dr. Khanjan Baxi, Cleveland, Ohio, as her maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Ellen Heise Madden, Tampa, Fla., and Kristen Reeder, Bloomington, Ind. Srita. Estela Guerra Jimenez served as ring bearer. Daniel Fatjó, Tibas, Costa Rica, served as the best man. Groomsmen were Dr. Zachary Keane, Sydney, Australia, and Mr. Matthew Keane, Buffalo, N.Y., brothers of the bride. Ms. Emily Phillips, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., and Dr. Melania Guerra, Ithaca, N.Y., served as the program attendants. Readers were Mrs. Mary Gryziec, Hanover Township, Pa., godmother of the bride, and Dr. Zachary Keane. The parents of the bride hosted an informal barbeque at their home on Thursday evening to welcome out-oftown guests. The groom’s parents hosted the rehearsal dinner at the Proximity Hotel on Friday evening. A bridal luncheon, hosted by the bride’s grandmother, was held at Southern Lights. The groom’s parents also hosted a reception in Escazú, Costa Rica on Sept. 16. The couple honeymooned to Brazil. They reside in Bloomington, Ind.

approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Michael Mooney and Lorrie Fritz, Wilkes-Barre. She is the granddaughter of Jack Mooney and the late Mildred Mooney, Wilkes-Barre; the late Nathan Delong Fritz; and the late Dolores (Lorrie) Everett Fritz, Wilkes-Barre. The prospective groom is the son of Thomas Dohman, Schwenksville, and Jayne Dohman, Wilkes-Barre. He is the grandson of Delores and the late Joseph Dohman, Wilkes-Barre, and the late William and Louise Alger, West Pittston. Brandis is a 2000 graduate of G.A.R Memorial High School. She earned a Bachelor of Science degree in biology from Wilkes University in 2005 and a master’s degree in health care administration from King’s College in 2009. She is employed by sanofi pasteur as a vaccine specialist in Newport News, Va. Christopher is a 1998 graduate of G.A.R Memorial High School. He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in criminal justice from Indiana University of Pennsylvania in 2003. He is employed by Merrimac Detention Center as a counselor in James City County, Va. The couple will exchange vows at 3 p.m. on June 2, 2012, at the River Common in Wilkes-Barre with a reception to follow at the Genetti Hotel and Conference Center.

Kristan, Ricker ogether with their families, Patricia Kristan and Tate Ricker anT nounce their engagement and up-

coming marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Carol W. Kristan, Forty Fort, Pa., and John Kristan, Fairbanks, Ark. The prospective groom is the son of Karen Ricker and Dain Ricker, both of Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. The autumn ceremony is planned at Rose Run Country Club in Stow, Ohio.

Matrician, Wascavage iriah Tiffany Matrician and Michael Theodore Wascavage, M together with their families, an-

nounce their engagement and approaching marriage. Miriah is the daughter of Diane and Theodore Matrician, Barnesville. The bride-to-be is a 2002 graduate of Mahanoy Area High School. She graduated from Bloomsburg University in 2007 with a Bachelor of Science degree in medical imaging and is employed as a CT/X-ray technologist for Tyler Memorial Hospital. Michael is the son of Michael and Maureen Wascavage, Plains Township. He is the grandson of Theodore Morio, Plains Township; the late Dolores Morio; and the late Mary W. and Michael F. Wascavage, Pittston. The prospective groom is a 1997 graduate of Bishop Hoban High School. He graduated from Penn State University in 2002 with a Bachelor of Science degree in criminal law and justice. He is employed as a manager for Colours Inc. The couple will exchange vows on Oct. 15 at St. John the Evangelist Church in Pittston.

De Palma, Bryk Elko, Bonavina r. and Mrs. David Elko, Laurel Run, would like to announce the enM gagement and upcoming wedding of their daughter, Krista Elko, to Jamie Bonavina, the son of Anthony Bonavina, Wilkes-Barre, and Donna Bonavina, Hanover Township. The bride-to-be is the granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Albosta, Kingston, and the late Mr. and Mrs. David Elko Sr., Mountain Top. She is a 2005 graduate of G.A.R. Memorial High School and attended King’s College. She is working as an aide at The Schoolhouse, Hanover Township. The prospective groom is the grandson of the late Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Bonavina Sr., Hanover Township; Mr. and Mrs. Donald Rice, Shavertown; and Barbara Halesey, Dallas. He is a 2003 graduate of Meyers High School. He is working as a facility technician at SLS Inc. The couple plans to exchange vows on May 19, 2012, at St. Ignatius Church, Kingston.

aria De Palma and Anthony Bryk, together with their families, are D happy to announce their engagement

and upcoming marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Carmina and Corrado De Palma, West Orange, N.J. She is the granddaughter of Maria Bilancia and the late Rocco Bilancia, West Orange, N.J., and the late Giovanni and Addolorata De Palma, Molfetta, Italy. The prospective groom is the son of Diane and Anthony Bryk, Pittston Township. He is the grandson of the late George and Ann Kaminski, Dupont, and Anthony and Stella Bryk, Avoca. Daria is a 2003 graduate of Mount St. Dominic Academy. She earned her bachelor’s degree in advertising from The Pennsylvania State University in 2007. She is employed as a marketing product manager. Anthony is a 2000 graduate of Pittston Area High School. He earned his bachelor’s degree in landscape design/ management from The Pennsylvania State University in 2007. He is employed as an operations manager. The couple will exchange their vows on Sept. 22, 2012, in New Jersey.

The Pstraks r. and Mrs. Joseph Pstrak celebrated their 60th wedding anniM versary Sept. 15, 2011. They were married in the former St. Casimir’s Church, Larksville, by the late Rev. John J. Dastick. Mr. Pstrak is the son of the late Maksym and Julie Pstrak. Mrs. Pstrak is the daughter of the late Frank and Mary Stankunas. The couple has three sons and seven grandchildren. To mark the occasion a family dinner and trip to Las Vegas will follow.


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The Kazinskis r. and Mrs. Robert J. Kazinski, Larksville, are celebrating their M 40th wedding anniversary today.

The Melovitzes r. and Mrs. Ron Melovitz, Larksville, celebrated their M 50th wedding anniversary on Sept.

16. They were married Sept. 16, 1961, in St. Vincent’s Church, Plymouth, by the Rev. Edward T. Gallagher. Attendants were Anne Barrett Maher and the late Richard Maher. Mrs. Melovitz is the former Geri Jones. She is the daughter of the late Peter and Genevieve Lazarowicz, Shickshinny. She was employed by Weis Markets for 27 years. Mr. Melovitz is the son of the late Louis (Boots) Melovitz and Elizabeth Nemchick. He is retired after 29 plus years with Procter & Gamble, Mehoopany. The couple has two children, Robert, Plains Township, and Christine, West Pittston. They also have two grandchildren, David and Shelby Lynn. In honor of the occasion the couple will share a celebratory dinner hosted by their children with their family and friends, followed by a trip to Florida.

They were married Sept. 18, 1971, in the Laurel Run Primitive Methodist Church by the Rev. Wayne Yarnell. Maid of honor was Dana Williams, Tunkhannock, and best man was Edward Bodzio, Sugar Notch. Mrs. Kazinski is the former Cynthia Allen, daughter of the late Margaret and Frank Allen, Mountain Top. She was a former employee of RCA, Mountain Top. Mr. Kazinski is the son of the late Julia and John Kazinski, Plymouth. He is retired from the Northwest Area School District, where he was an educator for 34 years. They are the proud parents of the Rev. Robert Kazinski and his wife, Karyn, Honesdale, and Jill Smith and her husband, Tyler, Elizabethtown. They have four grandchildren, Brynne and Aaron Smith, Elizabethtown, and Seth and Ethan Kazinski, Honesdale. A celebratory dinner given by their children was held on Sept. 16. The couple will continue their celebration with a trip to Italy.

Western Stompers, King’s freshmen dance the day away The Charles T. Adams Country Western Stompers hosted the King’s College City Serve Freshman Class of 2015 on Aug. 26. College students joined the seniors in line dancing and incorporated a variety of their own steps. Classes are conducted 1-3 p.m. on Fridays at the Charles T. Adams Senior Center, 5 W. Market St., Wilkes-Barre. The public and new members are welcome. For more information, call 825-3484. Participants, from left, first row, are Rebecca Rush, Rita Kutney, John Perdue, instructor Helen Margison, Frankie Lobos and Leann Dudash. Second row: Mary Hoinski, Adrienne Fine, Karen Mullen, Anne Mushinsky, Eleanor Ritsick and Bernadine Clark. Third row: Maritz Arias, Mary Zavrotny, Brea Barnes, Stephanie Dosiak, Luann Sensale, Samantha Kennelly, Amanda Martin, Ryan Civello and Allyson Walsh. Fourth row: Tom McManus, John Liranzo, Mike Baldwin, Bryan Ferrari, Anthony Waite, Brandon Borzell, Derick Brown, Samuel Levandoski and Casey Martin.

Irene Latsko celebrates 90th birthday rene Latsko, a lifetime resident of IWilkes-Barre, cele-

The Sypniewskis rank and Lillian Sypniewski F celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on Aug. 19, 2011.

The couple was married in the Laurel Run Primitive Methodist Church. Frank retired from the U.S. Secret Service and continues to teach criminal justice at Keiser University. Lillian is a retired medical technologist. The couple resides in Lakeland, Fla. Their children are Frank Jr. and his wife, Ann, Ormond Beach, Fla., and Bret, Orlando, Fla. They have two grandchildren, Shane and Victoria Sypniewski.

brated her 90th birthday on Sept. 16, 2011. She is the daughter of John and Mary Wassil and the widow of John Lasko, who died in 1959. Mrs. Latsko was employed at Central Slipper and retired from the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center. She has two children, Maryann Szczecinski and Gregory Latsko, and eight grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren. Mrs. Latkso still enjoys gardening, cooking, baking apple pies and making juice from her grapevine. A Mass of Thanksgiving will be offered and a family dinner will be held to mark the occasion.

Misericordia education majors begin student teaching assignments Misericordia University teacher education majors recently received their fall student teaching assignments during an orientation program. Student teachers and their classroom assignments: Lauren Bowalick, Nanticoke and Hanover Area School Districts; Carrie Balla, Lake-Lehman and Dallas School Districts; Kristal Griffiths, Valley View Intermediate Center; Renae Gondella, Riverside and Tunkhannock School Districts; Rachel Ruane, North Pocono Mountain and Dunmore School Districts; Carolyn Gerni, Tunkhannock School District; Cara Nolan, Wilkes-Barre and Dallas School Districts; Melissa Taylor, Delaware Valley and Wallenpaupack School Districts; Michael Green, Morrisville Junior-Senior High School; Matthew Filingo, LakeLehman School District and West Side Career and Technical Center; Stephanie Do, Wyoming Valley West School District; and Jacqueline Barna, Roslund Elementary School, Tunkhannock School District. At orientation, from left, first row, are Bowalick, Barna, Filingo, Griffiths and Do. Second row: Ruane, Nolan, Gondella, Green, Gerni, Balla and Taylor.

Jackson L. Metcalf baptized Lee Metcalf, son of Lindsay Schobert and Mark Metcalf, Jwasackson baptized Sept. 11, 2011, at the

Huntsville United Methodist Church by the Rev. Jim Pall. Godparents are Michael Ozark, Harding, and Heather Sheetz, WilkesBarre. Jackson was born March 6, 2011, at Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center, Wilkes-Barre. He has a brother, Memphis, 9. Jackson is the grandson of Elaine Schobert and Michael Ozark, Harding, and Mark Metcalf Sr., Hanover Township. He is the great-grandson of Judie Metcalf, Hanover Township, and Richard and Terry O’Neill, Wilkes-Barre.

Exhange students from Spain welcomed at Seminary Upper School Wyoming Seminary Upper School recently welcomed 14 students from Spain in an exchange program with the Colegio Altair School in Madrid, Spain. During the twoweek visit, the Spanish students attended Upper School classes, lived in the school dormitories and with host families, visited the Lower School and toured the WilkesBarre area as well as New York City, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. Several Seminary students who visited Madrid and the Colegio Altair School during their spring break served as hosts for the visiting students. Some of the participants in the exchange program, from left, first row: Seo Jin Oh, student host; Ana Lopez, Madrid; Ovidio Blanco, Colegio Altair chaperone; Lucia Aroca, Madrid; Allison Yuscavage, host; Sun Ho Lee, host; Raquel Antoranz, Madrid; Sophia Lovito, host; Mary Thede, host; Marina Luchetti, Madrid; Sarah Knaggs, host; Christina Bradley, host; Victoria Arana, Madrid; Ana Marquez, Madrid; Paula Gutierrez, Madrid; Anna Warriner, host; Lucia Regalado, Madrid; Sheng Yun Xiao, host; Elena Alvaro, Madrid; Christine Gasper, Spanish faculty member and exchange organizer; and Carmen Perucha, Colegio Altair chaperone. Second row: Victor Caamano, Madrid; Aoran Zhang, host; Reilly Breig, host; Lucas Porto, Madrid; Jorge Carpio, Madrid; Ben Hornung, host; Brendan Larar, host; Pablo Sobrino, Madrid; Carlos Martin, Madrid: and Eric Cholish, host.

SOCIAL PAGE GUIDELINES The Times Leader allows you to decide how your wedding notice reads, with a few caveats. Wedding announcements run in Sunday’s People section, with black-and-white photos, free of charge. Articles must be limited to 220 words, and we reserve the right to edit announcements that exceed that word count. Announcements

must be typed or submitted via www.timesleader.com. (Click on the "people" tab, then “weddings” and follow the instructions from there.) Submissions must include a daytime contact phone number and must be received within 10 months of the wedding date. We do not run first-year anniversary announcements or announcements of weddings that took place more than a year ago. (Wedding

photographers often can supply you with a black-and-white proof in advance of other album photographs.) All other social announcements must be typed and include a daytime contact phone number. Announcements of births at local hospitals are submitted by hospitals and published on Sundays.

Out-of-town announcements with local connections also are accepted. Photos are only accepted with baptism, dedication or other religious-ceremony announcements but not birth announcements. Engagement announcements must be submitted at least one month before the wedding date to guarantee publication and must include the wedding date. We

cannot publish engagement announcements once the wedding has taken place. Anniversary photographs are published free of charge at the 10th wedding anniversary and subsequent five-year milestones. Other anniversaries will be published, as space allows, without photographs.

Drop off articles at the Times Leader or mail to: The Times Leader People Section 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Questions can be directed to Kathy Sweetra at 829-7250 or e-mailed to people@timesleader.com.


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Wilkes University plans 2011 homecoming activities Sept. 23-25 WILKES-BARRE: Wilkes University will hold its 2011 Homecoming weekend Sept. 23-25. Community organizations, bands and businesses are invited to attend or participate in the Homecoming parade at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday. For more information on participating in the parade, contact 1-800-WILKES-U, Ext. 4134. Alumni of the Sidhu School of Business and Leadership; ROTC; cross country; e-mentors; Sturdevant and Chesapeake Halls; psychology, communications studies, biology, political science and chemistry majors; and the classes of 1961, 1971, 1976, 1981, 1991, 2001 and 2006 are encouraged to attend reunion celebrations. The university will also

NAMES AND FACES Ryan James Susek, Plains Township, has been accepted for membership in The National Society of Collegiate Scholars (NSCS). He will be honored during an Induction Convocation this fall at Hendricks Susek Chapel at Syracuse University. NSCS is a member of the Association of College Honor Societies and is the nation’s only interdisciplinary honors organization for first and second year college students. Membership is by invitation only and is based on grades and class standing. Susek also attained the Dean’s List for both semesters his freshman year. He is the son of Dr. James

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12:30 p.m. – Dedication of be observing its 25th anniverSchmidt Stadium at the Ralsary of women’s soccer. ston Athletic Complex. Other alumni events: 1 p.m. – Homecoming football game. The Wilkes ColoFRIDAY 1 p.m. – Trolley tour of cam- nels take on the Widener Unipus and downtown Wilkes- versity Pride at Schmidt StaBarre led by Anthony T.P. dium. 4 p.m. – Tent Festival for reBrooks of the Luzerne County Historical Society. Tour de- union groups on Fenner Quadparts from the University Cen- rangle (Greenway). SEPT. 25 ter on Main Street. 10:30 a.m. – Blue and Gold 5:30 p.m. – Pints with ProBrunch at the Henry Student fessors at Center. Ancestral Colonel Weckesser Hall. 7:30 p.m. – “Soul” concert Awards will be presented to in front of the Farley Library. Dean Arvan ’55, Colleen Gries Band features three Wilkes Gallagher ’81, Harvey Rosen alumni. SATURDAY 11 a.m. – Tailgate Tent at the Ralston Athletic Complex. A pre-game tailgate party with an all-you-can-eat menu.

and Mary Ann Susek, Plains Township. Adam Stofila, 17, Shavertown, earned his private pilot’s license on Aug. 18. Stofila has been flying since age 15 and completed his solo flight on May 31, 2010. He continues his aviation studies and flight training through Tech Aviation Flight School located Stofila at the WilkesBarre/Scranton Airport. Stofila is a senior at Dallas High School and plans to continue his aviation studies at Luzerne County Community College and Marywood University after graduation. His future goal is to become a commercial airline pilot. He is the son of Sandra and Michael Stofila, Shavertown.

FAITH FOR TODAY “Train Up A Child In The Way He Should Go, And When He Is Old He Will Not Depart From It” (Prov. 22:6)

Rev. Bob “... Jesus said, “Let The Children Come To Me, And Do Not Hinder Them, For To Such Belongs The Kingdom Of Heaven.” (Matt. 19:14) How much Sponge Bob can you take? Better yet, how much Sponge Bob can your child take? Got your attention? You may have recently read about the study that warns that four year olds watching only nine minutes of Sponge Bob (probably could be any number of these delightful programs) can cause short-term attention and learning problems. Child development specialist Dr. Dimitri Christakis shares, “What kids watch matters, it’s not just how much they watch.”

Please understand I have nothing personal against Sponge Bob. Some of my best friends are sponges. Studies come and go. Some withstand the test of time, some don’t. As far as attention span and Sponge Bob… where was I? Oh, I have no oar in this water. What did cross my mind was the fact that so many children imbibe multiple hours of television programming every week. In those programs they are learning about life and its values. Probably many of those values are worthy. But, to what degree should Sponge Bob inculcate right and wrong, beauty and truth to your children? As parents, we all have an awesome responsibility in instilling uplifting and inspiring values in our children. They are hungry for information and guidance as they develop from toddlers to adults. As of yet you have not spent nine minutes reading this, so I trust I still have your attention. Allow me to suggest that beyond the television programming there is a medium worthy of both your and your children’s attention; the church! Here is a partial list of study results regarding children and regular church attendance: • Increase the average life expectancy of your children by 8 years • Significantly reduce your child’s use and risk from Alcohol, Tobacco and Drugs • Dramatically lower the risk of suicide • Help them rebound from depression 70% faster dramatically • Reduce their risk for committing a crime • Improve their attitude at school and increase their school participation • Improve their odds for a “very happy” life • Provide them with a life-long moral compass The writer of Proverbs knew what he was talking about. Children need wise and meaningful guidance. Jesus knew what the children needed; love, support, security, values, and a vision for their lives. Transport your child from Sponge Bob, to a place where he or she can learn of Jesus and a way of life that will span a lifetime! They can see Sponge Bob on a rerun, if you remember. EVENTS: Rally Day today following 10:00 a.m. worship. Enjoy food, ice cream sundaes and fellowship, under the tent, and watch the children bounce with joy and laughter in the Moonwalk. First Presbyterian Church is hosting the Wyoming Valley 911 Tenth Anniversary Service. Rescheduled from September 11 to this evening at 6:00 p.m. The community is invited. Representatives from police, fire and rescue services, local and state government officials, and religious leaders will join with members of our community to remember and to express gratitude. The Wyoming Seminary Madrigal Singers will inspire us with their music. Bring your children and invite neighbors to this service of memorial and gratitude.

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Children’s choir rehearsals, under the direction of Mr. John Vaida, are at 5:00 p.m. each Friday evening followed by pizza. This choir is open to children from Kindergarten through sixth grade. Adult choir rehearsals, under the direction of Mr. John Vaida are at 7:30 p.m. each Wednesday evening. Please call the church office for more information on these events.

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’63 and William Tarbart ’70. Colonel Blazers will be presented to Anne Heineman Batory ’68, Michael Mahoney and Richard Marchetti. Noon – Women’s soccer alumni game at Ralston Athletic Complex. The Wilkes University Athletic Hall of Fame ceremony will take place on Nov. 5. For more information about Homecoming events, go to www.wilkes.edu/homecoming, or contact Bridget Giunta Husted at 1-800-WILKES-U, Ext. 4134, or bridget.giunta@wilkes.edu.

GNA Elementary students receive spelling awards Students from GNA Elementary Center recently received the Dorothy Scott Spelling Award for their accomplishments in spelling. The award is given in memory of Dorothy Butka Scott, the mother of Principal Mariellen Scott, who was a spelling bee winner at Columbus School in Wanamie. At the awards ceremony, from left, are Megen Banas, Brendan Greene, Mariellen Scott, Daniel Murphy and Brooklyn Blank.


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High schoolers participate in Misericordia Diversity Camp Montessori opens school year with swim party Students and families of the Wyoming Valley Montessori School, Kingston, kicked off the school’s 42nd year with a swim party at the Valley Swim and Tennis Club, Shavertown. Participants enjoyed a lunch of pizza, pasta and salad. They also enjoyed swimming and a variety of games and activities. Some of the students in attendance, from left, first row: Adrianna Villarosa, Shavertown; Nicholas Werner, Wilkes-Barre; Zaiden Kaminsky, Mountain Top; Simon Scharrer; Wilkes-Barre; Toby Scharrer, Wilkes-Barre; and Ally Scharrer, Wilkes-Barre. Second row: Christina Hughes, Kingston, and Madeline Barletta, Hanover Township. Third row: Angelica Alday, Mountain Top; Sereina Brenhofer, alumni; Clare DellaValle, Shavertown; Alyssa Kristella, Lehman Township, alumni; Kevin McNulty, Kingston; Jonathan Allen, Nanticoke; Oscar Scharrer, Wilkes-Barre; Jacob Kristeller, Lehman Township; and Karima Scharrer, Wilkes-Barre.

Twenty-four high school students recently participated in the 201 1 Misericordia University Diversity Institute Summer Camp to become ambassadors for change. During the five-day, four-night program, students stayed on campus and were treated to cultural events, leadership workshops and field trips. The camp’s goal is to create student leaders who become engaged in their communities and become community advocates. Participants, from left, first row: Nikite Watson, MU student ambassador; Maggie Hoskins, MU student ambassador; Hillary Lynch, MU student ambassador; Melissa Delgado, Carlisle; Jenny Chi, Wilkes-Barre; Laura St. Preux, Wilkes-Barre; Sheila St. Preux, Wilkes-Barre; Katie Drayton, MU student ambassador; and Lauren Smicherko, MU student ambassador. Second row: Amanda Mikolaitis, Dallas; Victoria Wallace, Wilkes-Barre; Yarisa Pollanco, Hazleton; Amrita Pokhrel, Harrisburg; Nevaeh Canty-Smith, Wilkes-Barre; Josefa Romero, Wilkes-Barre; and Erica Acosta, camp director. Third row: Ashlee Venn, MU student ambassador; Sierra Hairson, Wilkes-Barre; Marissa Charney, Harding; Gerdwine Bourdeau, Wilkes-Barre; Lynn Aguilar, Wilkes-Barre; Nareli Alvarez, Gettysburg; Sharon Flores, WilkesBarre; Julio Chavez, New Oxford; and Katelyn Higgins, Wyoming. Fourth row: Brenda Nowalis, Misericordia University; Andrew Coco, Exeter; Dylan Pegg, West Wyoming; Luis Alvarez, Gettysburg; Elias Perez-Zetune, Gettysburg; Sean Bergold, Wilkes-Barre; Basu Dhungana, Orwigsburg; and Christelle Patrice, MU student ambassador. Fifth row: Scott Richardson, director of multicultural initiatives. Students from GAR, Coughlin, Hazleton, Meyers and Wyoming Area also attended the camp.

King’s College students begin student teaching experience

St. Jude students publish book of poetry Students from St. Jude School recently had their class book of original poetry professionally published. The former second-grade students worked on several types of poetry. An Author’s Tea was held to showcase the books. The students read their own poems and shared their books with family and friends. Refreshments were served after the readings. Poets from left, first row, are Vincent DeMarco, Dominic Alberti, Tea Amerise, Aubrey Ayre, Aaliyeh Sayed and Ella Urosevich. Second row: Ashleigh Button, Cameron Chalk, Anthony Strish, Millie Symbula, Collin Palmiter and Rachel Black. Third row: Jimmy Lavan, Sarah Stettler, Colin Wills, Anna Capaci, Carmen Geeslin and Gabrielle Tammarine. Fourth row: Julianna Powis, Emily Mahler, Lauren Patrick, Matthew Dean, Zachary Kehoe and Alex Rymar.

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Thirty-eight King’s College students have begun their 14-week student teaching experience in local elementary and high schools for the 201 1 fall semester. The supervised student-teaching experience is necessary to fulfill the college’s degree requirements and to obtain a Pennsylvania Teacher Certificate. Student teachers and their school assignments, from left, first row: Christopher Hacker, Heights Elementary; Clinton Staniorski, Salem Elementary; Cheryl Padden, Meyers; Kristine Evans, Tobyhanna Elementary Center; Jacquelyn O’Brien, Tobyhanna Elementary Center; Kelly Sandrock, Hazleton Area Career Center/ West Hazleton Middle School; Meredith Wolfe, Main Street Elementary; David Sandrowicz, Wyoming Valley West (WVW); Michael Palmerchuck, WVW Middle School; and Liz Brobst, WVW. Second row: Bob Richards, assistant professor of education; Megan Thorne, Lake-Lehman; Maria DeLucca, Pittston Area; Diana Darby, Dan Flood Elementary; Nicole Notarianni, John F. Kennedy Elementary; Jason Clark, GAR; Julie Budzyn, Kistler Elementary; Kacie Haddock, Dan Flood Elementary; Emily McCormick, McNichols Plaza Elementary; Tegan Holl, Honesdale High School; Rachel Sapak, Coughlin; and Dr. Denise Reboli, chairperson of the education department. Third row: Devin Hassay, WVW; Joe Parsons, Crestwood; Anthony Koval, Dallas Middle School; Brandon Rogan, GAR; Anthony Chadwick, GAR; William Healey, Coughlin; Tyler Freas, Main Street Elementary; Sam Cohen, State Street Elementary; and Dominick Mastroianni, Pittston Area. Fourth row: Anthony Scro, Coughlin; Larry Little, State Street Elementary; Nicole McGuire, Frances Willard Elementary; Stephanie Hughes, Schuyler Avenue Elementary; Devin Leffler, Dana Elementary; Keziah Block, Dan Flood Elementary; and Daniel Mickulik, Plains/Solomon Elementary. Also teaching are Tyler Albee, Crestwood, and Kayanne Barilla, Wyoming Seminary Lower School.

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King’s College students complete community service program WILKES-BARRE: Fifteen King’s College students recently completed part-time AmeriCorps positions, performing a combined total of more than 4,500 hours of community service during the 2010-2011 academic year and earning money toward their college educations. Program participants were: Jennifer Acuna, Lawrenceville, N.J.; Ariana Blackstock, Wyncote; Gabrielle Carbone, Pocono Lake; Justyna Cerefin, Burlington, N.J.; Tanya Cheeseman,

Freeland; Robert DeLullo, Montoursville; Giancarlo DiLonardo, Hawthorne, N.J.; Heather Elphick, Pen Argyl; Christine Guarino, Oak Ridge, N.J.; Emily Kesselring, Hazleton; Kirstie Nicol, New Durham, N. H.; Madeline Schiminger, Forest Hill, Md.; Carissa Smith, Scranton; Noemi Tlatenchi, Wilkes-Barre; and Christopher Tobias, WilkesBarre. The students worked at a variety of sites in the Wilkes-Barre community, including the Com-

mission on Economic Opportunity; Dan Flood Elementary School; King’s College English as a Second Language program, Big Brothers/Big Sisters, Slate Belt Nursing Home and RHC McKinney Clinic. AmeriCorps, a program of the Corporation for National and Community Service Agency, supports over 50,000 people each year who make significant service commitments. Students involved in the program complete 300 hours of service in one

year and receive a $1,100 Education Award from the agency. They also receive leadership training and help recruit additional volunteers. Many Pennsylvania college students enroll in AmeriCorps through the Scholars in Service to Pennsylvania program, which is administered by the Philadelphia Higher Education Network for Neighborhood Development and is monitored by PennSERVE, the Governor’s Office of Citizen Service.

Early Intervention Program earns kudos The Luzerne-Wyoming Counties Early Intervention Infant/Toddler and Preschool Programs recently received high praise following the State Office of Child Development and Early Learning’s Verification Process. The Early Intervention program, sponsored by the LuzerneWyoming Counties Mental Health/Mental Retardation Program, provides services and support to more than 300 infants and toddlers each month and is designed to help families with children who have developmental delays. Early Intervention services, including parent/ caregiver education, family support and developmental therapies such as physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy and special instruction are provided at no cost to families. For more information, call the Luzerne-Wyoming Counties MH/MR Program at 825-9441 or 1-800-816-1880. At the recent state visit, from left, first row: Marilee McDonough, supervisor, Early Intervention Services Coordination Unit, MH/MR Program; Lisa Parker and Staci Grant Kenney, regional early intervention advisers with the Departments of Education and Public Welfare. Second row: Judy Kresky, Early Intervention Program specialist, MH/MR Program; Char Dougherty, regional Early Intervention adviser; and Peter Rubel, administrator, Luzerne-Wyoming Counties MH/MR Program.

MMI student earns history award Joseph Michael McGraw received the 201 1 Woodmen of the World American History Award at MMI Preparatory School’s Awards Convocation. Frank Kulig, president of Lodge 390, presented the award. McGraw also received the Eckley B. Coxe Jr. Memorial Subject Awards in Spanish, Mathematics, Science, Social Science and English; the Jake Kislan ’56 Polanaise Society Award; the Joseph A Chaykowski ’48 Memorial Prize for Mathematics and Science; the Spanish Honor Society Award; and the John Steiner Gold Math Exam Award. From left are Kulig and McGraw.

The pre-kindergarten and kindergarten students at St. Jude School, Mountain Top, were treated to an educational and entertaining assembly sponsored by the Parent Teacher Guild and presented by the Harry Houdini Museum in Scranton. The program included interactive tricks, appearing and disappearing acts, slight of hand and more. At the show, from left, first row, are Emerson Zito, Ahyaan Sayed and Hannah Hickey. Second row: Emily Kuhcar, Aneesh Sharma and David Shrader. Third row: Bravo the Great, magician.

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Which is your favorite? “The one that impacted me the most was probably ‘All Is Quiet on the Western Front.’ It’s somewhat more of a ‘guys’ book, because it deals with war and it’s violent, but it also deals with the mundane issues. It’s really a well-written, thoughtful book, and it had a lasting impact.” What do you do to relax? “With two small children, I pretty much do whatever they want me to do. We read a lot, we play games together and spend a lot of time outdoors. We go to amusement parks, take them on trips and we like to spend a lot of time exploring places like fish hatcheries and duck ponds. We try to keep them amused and active, and — hopefully — learning.” What about you? Everybody needs some solo time. “I like to spend a lot of time outside. I enjoy doing things in the yard, like gardening. And I kind of dabble with home improvement. But I always

wish I was better at it. I’d love to have a house just to practice on, not the one I live in.” Music? “Depends on the mood. I like just about everything. I listen to the ’80s channel on XM when I’m driving. Also some country music. If I want quiet, I might have classical on. And the Rat Pack. For some reason, my daughter always responded to the voice of Frank Sinatra, so my kids know Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin. They really like it.” Do you follow sports? “I like college football. The game seems more pure and the games move a little better. And being in Pennsylvania, of course I like Penn State.” Favorite city? “Philadelphia.” Favorite vacation spot? “I like to visit and explore historical places like Gettysburg or Fredericksburg. Lately, it’s amusement parks with the kids ... Sesame Place, Great Adventure and all of that stuff.” Favorite food? “Chicken.” Always in the fridge? “Yogurt.” First car? “1981 Black Ford Fairmont that my grandfather gave

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me.” Favorite movie? “I’m not a big sci-fi fan, but I still stop whenever ‘Star Wars’ is on. I’ve watched that since my childhood.” Favorite TV show? “I don’t have much time for it these days, but I like ‘The Office.’ The show I always used to make time for was ‘Monk.’ And I still like ‘Seinfeld.’” Proudest professional moment? “As a library director, definitely the day we opened the new library. I was sort of the CEO of the capital campaign, so I was the public image of the library in the Berwick area. And we built that new building. It was a great moment for the town and for the area, and I had a lot of personal time invested in that. And I do have some other memories. One that stands out is helping a woman get online. She had tears in her eyes, because she was trying to send her grandson an email, and he was in the Army, serving in Iraq. And she had no idea how to do it. It was really touching, and was sort of a reminder of why we’re here and what we do. We’re here to help people.”

Registration begins at 9:30 a.m. Walk/Run begins at 11:00 a.m.

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N a tionw id e Ca r sa les Ca rbond a le is prou d to a nnou nce the a ppointm entofG eorge H a slin a s ou r G enera l Sa les M a na ger. G eorge brings 19 yea rs ofa u tom otiv e sa les ex perience. H e is a n ex pertin the H ighline a nd ex otics m a rket.

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From Ford to Fe rra ri You r on e s top p re - ow n e d c a r c e n te r If you d on ’t s e e it...W e c a n ge t it... If w e c a n ’t ge t it... It’s n e ve r b e e n b u ilt.


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dress the way she had always wanted. “You name it, I bought it: shoes, purses, hair, makeup,” she said. “Every night was a fashion show.” Her favorite look featured a wig of long brown hair with bangs, which she combined with tight jeans and glittery eye-shadow. She got high on crystal meth and learned where to go for blackmarket hormones. The estrogen injections made her face smoother, her chest fuller, her hips curvier. “I thought, ‘This is finally who you’re meant to be,”’ she said. She did not suspect she was ill until a lump appeared on her neck. Doctors at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center delivered the news: Without treatment, she had about six months to live. After surgery and a year of chemotherapy, she thought she had beaten the lymphoma. Then her back started to hurt. One day, she woke up in a Hollywood hotel

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room and couldn’t walk. Terrified tracted her with gossip magazines and indulged her cravings and alone, she dialed 911. for Toaster Strudel. Compassion creates a family “She didn’t judge me,” Leane At first, Leane didn’t know said. “That was how my mom what to make of the diminutive was supposed to be, how she was woman who burst into her hospi- supposed to treat me. But she tal room and chatted merrily in a never did.” After another round of surgery thick Irish accent. She thought nuns dressed in re- and more chemotherapy at Counligious habits. But Sister Marga- ty-USC, Leane’s doctors told her ret showed up at Providence there was nothing more they Saint Joseph Medical Center in could do. Leane wouldn’t give up. Burbank in jeans and a sweater, She was referred to City of Hope, her hair in a bob. Hospital staff where doctors recommended members had called Covenant more aggressive chemotherapy House for help: Leane was home- and a stem cell transplant. A social worker sat down with less, and the hospital couldn’t disLeane and Sister Margaret to precharge her to the streets. Leane weighed less than 100 pare them. Leane would need a pounds, she could barely walk room of her own to avoid infecand her hair was falling out in tions and someone to take her to appointments and support her clumps. “I couldn’t even look at myself. through the pain, nausea and I was just disgusted,” she said. vomiting. “I was thinking, “Oh, my God ... “And when the drugs and the money are gone, who is there? and she lives in a homeless shelter,”’ Sister Margaret said. Nobody.” Sister Margaret was there. She brought Leane fresh clothes, dis- See FRIENDS, Page 9B

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youth make up a disproportionate share of Covenant House residents. Many of them tell her they were kicked out of religious homes where they were taught that homosexuality is a sin and that they are going to Hell. Sister Margaret’s tiny, cluttered office has become their sanctuary. There, amid piles of donated clothes and toiletries, they know they will find a bracing MCT PHOTO cup of tea and a sympathetic ear. “I always tell them Jesus said, Leane looks around in her room at Covenant House in Hollywood, ‘Do not judge and you shall not be California, May 5, 2011, where she came after living on the streets judged,’ so I’m not going to judge and prostituting herself. anybody,” she said. dition she be identified only as house.” A hard life She was sent to a group home Leane. The Los Angeles Times Leane was born with a boy’s was able to confirm parts of her for gay and lesbian adolescents, body. But by age 5, she knew that account from public records and but she chafed at the rules and other sources. Attempts to reach continued to run away. she wanted to be a girl. By 15, she was selling her body “I put on some high heels and I her mother were unsuccessful. just loved how it made me feel,” Other family members declined in Hollywood to pay for hotel rooms because she didn’t want to she said, a dreamy look on her to be interviewed. Leane said she ran away fre- sleep on the streets. face. “Not the baggy clothes that I It was dangerous work. Leane quently from her home in Lancaswas forced to wear.” She says her parents would ter, but authorities would find her said she was held up at gunpoint, punish her when they caught her and send her back, to endure an- raped, robbed. One client stabbed in her mother’s shoes and make- other “whupping.” At 13, she was her in the chest and left her bleedup. When her mother remarried, arrested for truancy and sent to ing on the sidewalk. She was 16. But she found acceptance her stepfather asked if she was juvenile hall. Her mother, she among the transgender prostisaid, refused to take her back. gay. Leane said no. “She just gave me up like I was tutes who work Santa Monica “I liked boys and I wanted to be a woman, so I was straight,” she trash. ... I told her I want to be a Boulevard and other parts of Holwoman and she said you are not lywood. The money was fast and said. She spoke about her life on con- going to be a woman in this intoxicating. She could afford to

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Join the Swarm Of Spelling Bees!

Teachers, have you heard the buzz?

The Times Leader/Scripps NEPA Regional Spelling Bee is returning for the 2011-2012 school year. As always, the winner will make the trip to the National Spelling Bee in Washington D.C., compliments of The Times Leader. Students in grades 5, 6, 7, and 8, or students 12 - 15 years of age, are eligible to compete. Schools should enroll online with Scripps at www.spellingbee.com prior to October 17, 2011. Registering at this site also registers your school with The Times Leader for participation in the NEPA Regional Spelling Bee.

Schools should conduct their spelling bees no later than January 16, 2012 and register their winners online with Scripps at www.spellingbee.com by January 30, 2012. Register today. The Times Leader/ Scripps NEPA Regional Spelling Bee will be held on March 11, 2012 at The Woodlands Inn & Resort. *Note, spellers must not have reached their 15th birthday on or before August 31, 2011 or passed beyond the 8th grade on or before February 1, 2012.

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All participating schools will have access to online study materials provided by Scripps.


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FRIENDS Continued from Page 8B

Together, they prepared Leane’s final directives. “In my last hour, I asked for someone to please hold my hand,” Leane said. “And if some godly music was available, I would like some godly prayer music to be played.” Leane was desperate to see her mother. Sister Margaret got ahold of her stepfather by phone and explained the gravity of the situation. He told her Leane’s mother wasn’t interested. “It was so tragic,” Sister Margaret said. “She’s a human being. It doesn’t matter what she is or isn’t. That’s why I took her on as my project.” Moving on Leane has shelves full of wigs, makeup and fancy shoes. But since the stem-cell transplant in December, she rarely bothers with them. They are relics of a life she is determined to put behind her. These days she’d rather be in sweat pants and sneakers, with perhaps a pair of stud earrings to add a little sparkle. “I have learned to be comfortable in my own skin,” she says. “I know that I’m a woman in my heart and in my mind. So it doesn’t really matter how I dress.” Leane returns to City of Hope regularly for tests and has been hospitalized several times with infections and other complications.

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When she doesn’t have medical appointments, she likes to accompany Sister Margaret on her rounds to collect donations for Covenant House and go with her to church on Sundays. She recently moved from Covenent House into an apartment subsidized by the shelter and is planning to study for the high school equivalency exam. She thinks she might become a nurse. “I’d like to help other people who are sick,” she says. “Because I know how much it means to me and how it makes me feel to know that you have someone taking care of you.” In the van, Leane’s face brightens as they pull into City of Hope. She feels at home here, she says. Sister Margaret points out the flower beds, which are bursting with color. “Remember, we sat in the gardens sometimes,” she says. “And read our gossip magazines,” Leane adds. Inside, her oncologist, Dr. Joseph Alvarnas, checks the lumps on her neck. “These feel like salivary glands to me. These don’t feel like lymph nodes,” he tells her. Together, they go over her latest scans. “We don’t see any big tumor masses that we would worry about,” Alvarnas says. “I’m very happy.” Leane and Sister Margaret exchange high fives. “We did a great job, girl,” Leane says. “Yes, girl!” Sister Margaret replies.

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THE TIMES LEADER

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HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

Elizabeth Mantush

Kristin Filippini

Elizabeth Mantush, daughter of Don and Heather Mantush, celebrated her fifth birthday Sept. 14. Elizabeth is a granddaughter of John and Joan Balasavage and Donald and Nancy Mantush. She has a sister, Natalie, two weeks.

Kristin Filippini, daughter of Joseph L. Filippini, Leesburg, Fla., is celebrating her fifth birthday today, Sept. 18. Kristin is a granddaughter of Carol Gilvickas Filippini, Pittston, and Carl J. Filippini, Plains Township. She is a great-granddaughter of Marlene and Chuck Green, Wentzville, Mo. Kristin has a brother, Andrew, 8.

Timothy Michael-Michalek Timothy Michael-Michalek, son of Christa Michalek and Philip Michael, is celebrating his fourth birthday today, Sept. 18. Timothy is a grandson of Joseph and Carol Michalek, Kingston, and Edward and Jean Michael, Hanover Township. He is a greatgrandson of Josephine and Joseph Michalek Sr., Kingston. Timothy has a brother, Casey, 16, and a sister, Morghan, 12.

LCCC dental assisting program students graduate Luzerne County Community College recently awarded degrees to graduates of the college’s dental assisting program. Members of the graduating class attended a Dental Recognition Ceremony at the college’s Educational Conference Center. The graduates also received pins which were provided by the college’s Alumni Association. Recent graduates, from left, first row: Kelly Kuczynski, Bloomsburg; Jessica Brennan, Pottsville; Dezerae Sowersby, Treverton; Kyna Markowski, Berwick; Kathy Olivieri, Hazleton; and Yonoris Jimenez, Hazleton. Second row: Alina Doma, Wilkes-Barre; Adrienne Maurer, Bloomsburg; Renae Novitski, Kingston; Megan Bidlack, Towanda; Yenny Custodio, Hazleton; and Meranda Defazio, Landsford. Third row: Kaitlyn Hankinson, Mountain Top; Sashell Pottorff, Bloomsburg; Janelle Loomis, Mansfield; Cortney Travelpiece, Beach Haven; Lauren Castelli, Archbald; and Sherri D’Agostino, Moscow.

Isabella S. Hornick Isabella Sierra Hornick, daughter of Stacia Reed and Michael Hornick, Hanover Township, celebrated her second birthday Sept. 15. Isabella is a granddaughter of Tracy Schmidt, Hanover Township, and Alan and Donna Hornick, Hanover Township. She is a great-granddaughter of Madelene Schmidt and the late John R. Schmidt Sr., Hanover Township; Nancy Hornick and the late John Hornick, Exeter; and Gerry Strohl and the late Robert Strohl, Swoyersville. Isabella has a sister, Audrey Lynn.

Christian Martin Christian Martin, son of Jillian Martin, Dallas, celebrated his ninth birthday Sept. 15. Christian is a grandson of Katherine and Joseph Adams, Hanover Township, and John Martin and Lisa Vodzak, Plymouth. He is a greatgrandson of Maureen Dechant and John and Ruthann Martin, all of Hanover Township; the late Anthony Dechant; and the late Charlotte Martin.

Leo X. Seiger Leo Xavier Seiger, son of Jennifer and Charles Seiger, Warrior Run, celebrated his first birthday Sept. 9. Leo is a grandson of Pamela and Charles Seiger, Sugar Notch; Jo Ann and James Jimison, Wilkes-Barre; and the late James Lombargo. He has a brother, Charles, 4.

Payton A. Lepore Payton Angelina Lepore, daughter of Jeff and Amy Lepore, Kingston Township, is celebrating her 1 1th birthday today, Sept. 18. Payton is a granddaughter of Don and Pat Espenschied, Shavertown, and the late Gerald and Julia Lepore. She has a sister, Isabella, 6.

OUT-OF-TOWN BIRTHS

Fall student teaching begins for Wilkes education majors Eleven Wilkes University education majors are completing student teaching assignments for the fall 201 1 semester. These student teachers are working in high schools and elementary schools in districts throughout northeast Pennsylvania. Their areas of specialization range from secondary and elementary education to early childhood and special education. Student teachers, from left, first row: Carol Herman, Madison Township; Charmaine Aguilar, Wilkes-Barre; Jamie Kramer, Wilkes-Barre; Alyson Paulauskas, Shavertown; Brianna Koch, Berwick. Second row: Michael Cusumano, Old Forge; Sean Madden, Dunmore; Richard Cosgrove, Wilkes-Barre; Robert Oravitz, Mountain Top; James Histed Jr., Lake Ariel; Suzanne Murray-Galella, Tunkhannock.

and John and Diane Goss, Plymouth.

Geisinger Medical Center, Danville

Bloomsburg Hospital Evans, Elizabeth and Neil, Stillwater, a son, Sept. 6. Grandparents are Kevin and Annette Evans, Orangeville,

Coulter, Molly and Dave, West Wyoming, a daughter, Sept. 2. Grandparents are Jerry and Claudia Coulter, Plains Township; Dawn Stone, Cobden, Ill.; and Bill Stone, Dongola, Ill.

OUT-OF-TOWN GRADUATIONS College of Saint Elizabeth, Morristown, N.J.

(SUNY), Courtland, N.Y.

Sean Esna, Drums, Bachelor of Arts degree.

Stephanie Fellin, Sugarloaf, a Bachelor of Science degree in foods and nutrition.

State University of New York

Temple University, School of Tourism and Hospitality Management, Philadelphia

Chelsea Brooks, Conyngham, a Bachelor of Science degree in tourism and hospitality management.

GUIDELINES

Children’s birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge Photographs and information must be received two full weeks before your child’s birthday. To ensure accurate publication, your information must be typed or computer-generated. Include your child’s

Registry

name, age and birthday, parents’, grandparents’ and great-grandparents’ names and their towns of residence, any siblings and their ages. Don’t forget to include a daytime contact phone number.

We cannot return photos submitted for publication in community news, including birthday photos, occasions photos and all publicity photos. Please do not submit precious or original professional photographs that

require return because such photos can become damaged, or occasionally lost, in the production process. Send to: Times Leader Birthdays, 15 North Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 187110250.

WIN A $50 GIFT CERTIFICATE If your child’s photo and birthday announcement is on this page, it will automatically be entered into the “Happy Birthday Shopping Spree” drawing for a $50 certificate. One winner will be announced on the first of the month on this page.


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Seminary homecoming set for Sept. 30-Oct. 1

IN BRIEF DALLAS: Gerald J. Wycallis Elementary School will hold Back to School nights at 7 p.m. on Sept. 22 for kindergarten, first grade, second grade and special subjects and at 7 p.m. on Sept. 29 for third grade, fourth grade and fifth grade. Parents and caregivers should report to the gymnasium.

nie Zinkavich, Class of 1999. Cost is $20 per person. Two morning alumni athletic events will kick off the Homecoming activities on Oct. 1, beginning with alumni tennis matches at the O. Charles Lull Tennis Center and an alumni soccer game at Nesbitt Field. A Homecoming Lunch will take place after the games at Nesbitt Field. The afternoon Homecoming soccer game at Nesbitt Field will feature the Blue Knights, led by head boys soccer coach the Rev. Charles Carrick, taking on the Trojans of Nanticoke High School. Halftime activities include presentations of the Alumni Service Awards and the Outstanding Young Alumnus Award to Kingston resident Stephen

KINGSTON: Wyoming Seminary Upper School will hold its annual Homecoming Weekend Sept. 30-Oct. 1. Reunion parties for the Classes of 1991, 1996, 2001 and 2006 will also be held. Activities will begin on Sept. 30 with lunch in Fleck Hall on the Upper School campus. The annual Varsity Club Sports Hall of Fame Reception and Banquet, honoring the school’s outstanding athletes, follows later in the evening in the Stettler Learning Resources Center. This year’s inductees include James Antinnes, Class of 1986; Alana Anzalone, Class of 2000; Quentin Harris, Class of 1997; Liza Rosenthal Rudick, Class of 1989; Matthew Walsh, Class of 1989; and An-

DALLAS: Misericordia University will hold a live theater presentation, “Heart Centered in God: Mother Catherine McAuley, the First Sister of Mercy,� on the life of the foundress of the Sisters of Mercy at 3 p.m. Friday in the Lemmond Theater in Walsh Hall. The program will feature Lisa and Lawrence McCullough and will be followed by a performance by the Misericordia University Irish Step Dancers. The performances are part of the week-long celebration of Mercy Week at the university.

Rosenthal, Class of 1993. A Faculty-Alumni Reunion Reception will be held at the Laycock House after the game and class reunion gatherings will take place at off-campus locations. All events except for the Sports Hall of Fame and class reunion parties are free for Wyoming Seminary alumni, but reservations are required. Alumni may register by mail, phone or online, using the Homecoming registration form at www.wyomingseminary.org/homecoming. For more information and reservations, contact Julie McCarthy Strzeletz, director of alumni programs, at 270-2142, or by email at jstrzeletz@wyomingseminary.org.

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Nanticoke Elementary students show their enthusiasm for music

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Wyoming Seminary opened its 168th academic year by welcoming new faculty and previous faculty members in new positions to its Lower School campus in Forty Fort. The new faculty and those in new positions include: Emily Bross, French and Mandarin Chinese teacher in the primary division and leader of the Aftercare Program; Sharon Conway, third grade teacher, previously served as an instructional aide and teaching assistant in the primary division at the Lower School; Amy Fetterman, instructional aide in the primary division; Jennifer Green, assistant in the primary division’s physical education program and fourth grade and kindergarten; Elizabeth O’Malley, sixthgrade English and sixth-grade study skills teacher. From left, first row, are O’Malley and Conway. Second row: Green, Bross and Fetterman.

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011

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CMYK

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THE TIMES LEADER

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011

HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL

Dawgs ‘thoroughly embarrassed’ by Dallas State-ranked Cougars power past Crusaders

Mountaineers compile nearly 500 yards of offense in victory.

By JOHN ERZAR jerzar@timesleader.com

DALLAS – Like last year’s loss, Berwick aided a Dallas scoring drive Saturday afternoon with a turnover. The Mountaineers needed no assistance thereafter, dominating Berwick on the way to a 53-20 victory in a Wyoming Valley Conference Division 3A football game. Junior quarterback Ryan Zapoticky led a Dallas offense that piled up 498 yards. The first-year starter was 10of-13 for 131 yards and two touchdowns and ran for 101 more and three scores. See DALLAS, Page 6C

By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Dallas’ Keifer Rogers makes a catch in front of Berwick’s Jake Pecorelli during Saturday’s game in Dallas.

COLLEGE SPORTS

Syracuse, Pittsburgh jumping to ACC

WILKES-BARRE – Playing a state-ranked opponent just three days after a game seemed like a bad combination for Coughlin. The Crusaders hosted Valley View, the seventh-ranked team in Class 3A according to the Harrisburg PatriotNews state rankings. While Coughlin dropped a 28-0 decision, the team stuck with the Cougars throughout the game, had a few big stops on defense and showed

PENN STATE FOOTBALL NITTANY LIONS

OPINION

Moore than anyone imagined

coach Ciro Cinti some good things in its second game in five days. “I had a good feeling about the week to be honest with HE WALKED you because I thought we FROM the field were more focused because hanging his we didn’t have a lot of downhead, which was time,” Cinti said. “I thought a curious sight we were prepared well but for a kid who did that’s a quality team. We had nothing but some lapses and that’s what make other happens…At least we came heads turn. and played hard.” Because Corey Moore lifted Valley View (3-0) dominat- GAR’s hopes so high. Such optimism should have been low against a strong team like See COUGARS, Page 6C Lakeland, because the Grenadiers were playing without their dangerous double-threat quarterback Darrell Crawford. He was injured during Monday’s victory over Old Forge, forcing GAR to hand the keys to its lightning-fast offense to a kid who never started a high school game before. All Moore did was hit the ignition and shift the Grenadiers into high gear. “I tried to do what I could do,” Moore said. Could anyone have done much more? His first play as a high school starter was a dart between two defenders that his wide receiver Shaliek Powell took for a 67-yard touchdown. And there was a lot Moore to come.

14

10

Gut-wrenching ‘W’

By AARON BEARD AP Sports Writer

See ACC, Page 4C

PAUL SOKOLOSKI

TEMPLE OWLS

Big East powers hope to give conference a bigger geographical footprint.

The Atlantic Coast Conference has received application letters from Pittsburgh and Syracuse to join the league, according to a high-ranking ACC official. At least 10 schools have reached out to the ACC during the recent period of uncertainty about conference realign“If you ment, the ofthink ficial told about this The AssociPress on nationally, ated Saturday. The official it’s obvideclined to ous that identify the world those is turning schools. The offiupside cial said presidents of the down …” league’s 12 Dick Baddour schools reNorth Carolina cently unaniathletic director mously approved raising the exit fee to $20 million — up from $12 million to $14 million — for any member leaving the conference. The person spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity because the league has not announced any of the moves. North Carolina State Chancellor Randy Woodson said he expects the league to make an announcement Sunday or Monday, but would not confirm the letters of application from Pitt and Syracuse. “The great thing is that the conference is strong and committed to a unanimous commitment to staying together,” Woodson said. “And to the extent that this is kind of a dramatic shift in conferences, we’re trying to be proactive and stay strong.” The Big East’s exit fee is $5 million, though schools wanting to leave must provide 27 months’ notice. A jump by Pittsburgh and Syracuse could lead to another dramatic shuffle in college athletics. Texas A&M already has announced its intention to join the Southeastern Conference, leaving the future of the Big 12

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ASSOCIATED PRESS

Penn State running back Michael Zordich, center, scores the winning touchdown getting past Temple’s Quinten White, left, and Ahkeem Smith, right, during the second Saturday in Philadelphia. Penn State won 14-10.

PSU’s 70 years of topping Temple nearly ends By DEREK LEVARSE dlevarse@timesleader.com

PHILADELPHIA – It’s fitting that this one would be settled by a disaster of a play. Penn State’s 14-10 win over Temple on Saturday at Lincoln Financial Field came down to recovering a fumbled snap on a day full of bizarre situations. A series of decisions that Penn State coaches called “gut feelings” -- others might call it “indigestion” -- had led the Nittany Lions to this.

Minutes away from their first lost to Temple in 70 years, the Lions: • Had so little faith in their two kickers, having already missed three field goals on the day, that they passed up a 40-yard attempt to tie the game, instead going for it on fourth-and-2. • Converted that fourth-and-2 on a Rob Bolden slant to Derek Moye, only to stall at the Owls’ 4-yard line. • Never got off a fullback dive call for Michael Zordich on third-and-2 from the 4. The center exchange between Matt

Stankiewitch and Bolden hit the turf. • Were rescued when Zordich fell on the loose ball for a gain of 1. • Sent out Evan Lewis for a 20-yard game-tying field goal attempt on fourthand-1, only to ice him with a timeout a moment later. • Abruptly reversed field and decided to go for it, handing it off to Brandon Beachum, who pounded up the middle for a first down at the 1. See PSU, Page 3C

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

Phils clinch NL East for 5th straight title

By ROB MAADDI AP Sports Writer

ty on the field. The Phillies had a been-there, done-that attitude toward winning the division last year, and this time was no different. Players ran onto the diamond a bit faster than usual, but they simply exchanged handshakes, hugs and high-fives as if this was an ordinary game in April. They did at least put on shirts and hats proclaiming themselves division

PHILADELPHIA — Roy Oswalt threw seven dominant innings, Raul Ibanez hit a grand slam and the Philadelphia Phillies clinched their fifth straight NL East title with a 9-2 victory over the St. Louis Cardinals on Saturday night. In a season where nothing less than a World Series championship would be considered a success, there wasn’t much of a par- See PHILLIES, Page 9C

AP PHOTO

Hunter Pence follows through on an RBI-double off Cardinals starter Jake Westbrook on Saturday in Philadelphia.

Anything but ‘shaky’ By the time he was finished Friday, the junior threw for a whopping 308 yards and four touchdowns while completing more than half of his 28 passes. “The last time he started a game was two years ago in ninth grade (football),” GAR coach Paul Wiedlich said. “We really only had two days to prepare. We thought he’d be a little shaky at times.” Moore nearly shook up the whole game. No, he didn’t lead the Grenadiers to victory over Lakeland. But he wasn’t to blame for GAR’s 34-31 defeat. The 52-yard touchdown bomb Moore threw to Lucas Benton and his ensuing conversion pass that pulled GAR within three midway through the fourth quarter spoke as much to his resiliency as his ability. That’s because true leaders never give in or give up, even when the game seems to be slipping away. And with his eye-opening performance, Moore may have slipped himself into GAR’s future plans this season. It’ll still be Crawford’s show when he returns. But the Grenadiers may be tempted to get a little more of Moore. “Who knows? He did a great job. Now we have a two-headed monster attack,” Wiedlich beamed. “We’re going to evaluate everybody.” It didn’t take Moore long to asses his own damage. He suffered a torn ACL in December, and tried his darndest to get back to the football field by August. “He worked his tail off rehabbing it,” Wiedlich said. All for the chance to go through exhausting double-sessions of preseason practice in the sweltering heat. All the while knowing there was a very good chance he wouldn’t play this season, because Crawford is the Wyoming Valley Conference version of Michael Vick as a passer and a runner. All because Moore wanted to be there for his team, on the slim chance the Grenadiers might need him. When they did, he gave them a real chance. Moore was asked after the game if he ever dreamed about putting together a 300-yard, four-touchdown passing day in his debut as a high school starter. “I dreamed,” he said solemnly, “to win the game.” That vision didn’t quite come into focus for him. But it’s clear now in an emergency, GAR has a chance.


K PAGE 2C

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011 C R O S S

AMERICA’S LINE

SAINTS

7

Bears

Odds

Underdog

LIONS

8

Chiefs

JETS

10

Jaguars

Yankees

9.5

BLUE JAYS

BILLS

4

Raiders

Rays

8.5

RED SOX

REDSKINS

4

Cards

Angels

8.5

ORIOLES

Ravens

6

TITANS

American League

Indians

8.5

TWINS

ROYALS

8.5

White Sox

Tigers

NL

A’S

MARINERS

7.5

Rangers

National League Brewers

9.0

REDS

STEELERS

14

Seahawks

Packers

10

PANTHERS

VIKINGS

3

Bucs

Browns

2

COLTS

Cowboys

3

49ERS

Texans

[3]

DOLPHINS

7

Chargers

4.5

NATIONALS

8.5

Marlins

PATRIOTS

BRAVES

8.0

Mets

BRONCOS

CUBS

NL

Astros

Giants

9.0

ROCKIES

PADRES

7.5

D’backs

DODGERS

7.5

Pirates

PHILLIES

NL

Cards

NOTE: There will be no over/under run total (which would be the overnight total) for all the Chicago Cubs home games due to the constantly changing weather reports at Wrigley Field. Please check with www.americasline.com for the latest Cubs run total on the day of the game. NFL Favorite

Points

Today's Games COLLEGE FIELD HOCKEY Montclair State at King’s, 1 p.m. MEN'S SOCCER King’s at St. Vincent , 1 p.m. MEN'S TENNIS Wilkes at Scranton Tournament MONDAY, SEPT. 19 H.S. FIELD HOCKEY Wallenpaupack at Hazleton Area Abington Heights at Lackawanna Trail Coughlin at Honesdale Meyers at Wyoming Seminary Crestwood at Wyoming Valley West Lake-Lehman at Nanticoke Dallas at Wyoming Area Delaware Valley at Holy Redeemer H.S. GOLF MMI Prep at Berwick Hazleton Area at Crestwood H.S. BOYS SOCCER Wyoming Valley West at Tunkhannock Dallas at Wyoming Seminary Crestwood at Meyers Hazleton Area at Holy Redeemer Pittston Area at Coughlin H.S. GIRLS TENNIS Pittston Area at Wyoming Seminary Tunkhannock at Wyoming Area Berwick at GAR Hanover Area at Dallas Hazleton Area at Crestwood Holy Redeemer at Coughlin MMI Prep at Wyoming Valley West H.S. GIRLS VOLLEYBALL (4:15 p.m. unless noted) Hazleton Area at North Pocono Delaware Valley at Coughlin Dallas at Pittston Area Berwick at Tunkhannock Crestwood at Holy Redeemer WOMEN'S SOCCER Washington at King’s, 7 p.m. WOMEN'S TENNIS Misericordia at Keystone, 3:30 p.m.

W H AT ’ S

Eagles

Bengals

2

FALCONS

[5]

Rams

Monday GIANTS

[]-denotes a circle game. A game is circled for a variety of reasons, with the prime factor being an injury. When a game is inside a circle, there is limited wagering. The line could move a few points in either direction, depending on the severity (probable, questionable, doubtful, out) of the injury. CFL Favorite MONTREAL

Points

Underdog

8

Winnipeg

Underdog

L O C A L C A L E N D A R

O N

VERSUS — PBR, PFIwestern.com Invitational, at Springfield, Mo. (same-day tape) SOCCER 2 p.m. or 4:30 p.m. FOX — Premier League, Chelsea at Manchester United (same-day tape) Eds: game airs pre- or post-NFL regional coverage VOLLEYBALL 3 p.m. VERSUS — Jose Cuervo Series, Miami Beach Pro, at Miami Beach, Fla. WNBA BASKETBALL 3 p.m. ESPN2 — Playoffs, first round, game 2, Connecticut at Atlanta 5 p.m. ESPN2 — Playoffs, first round, game 2, Minnesota at San Antonio Copyright 2011 World Features Syndicate, Inc.

T R A N S A C T I O N S FOOTBALL National Football League SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — Signed CB Kennard Cox. Placed DE Dexter Davis on injured reserve. COLLEGE NCAA — Denied the appeal of a four-game suspension given to South Carolina WR Darmiere Byrd. COKER — Named Jeremy Grubbs men’s assistant basketball coach.

F O O T B A L L National Football League

T V

AUTO RACING 2 p.m. ESPN — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Geico 400, at Joliet, Ill. 8:30 p.m. ESPN2 — NHRA, O’Reilly Auto Parts Nationals, at Concord, N.C. (same-day tape) GOLF 8 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Seve Trophy, final round, at Paris Noon TGC — PGA Tour, BMW Championship, final round, at Lemont, Ill. 2 p.m. NBC — PGA Tour, BMW Championship, final round, at Lemont, Ill. TGC — LPGA, Navistar Classic, final round, at Prattville, Ala. 7 p.m. TGC — Nationwide Tour, Boise Open, final round, at Boise, Idaho (same-day tape) 1 a.m. TGC — Champions Tour, Songdo Championship, final round, at Songdo, South Korea MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1:00 p.m. YES — N.Y. Yankees at Toronto 1:30 p.m. SNY— N.Y. Mets at Atlanta 4 p.m. ROOT — Pittsburgh at L.A. Dodgers 8 p.m. ESPN — St. Louis at Philadelphia MOTORSPORTS 8 a.m. SPEED — MotoGP World Championship, at Alcaniz, Spain 4 p.m. SPEED — MotoGP Moto2, at Alcaniz, Spain (sameday tape) NFL FOOTBALL 1 p.m. CBS — Jacksonville at N.Y. Jets FOX — Seattle at Pittsburgh 4:15 p.m. CBS — San Diego at Seattle 8 p.m. NBC — Philadelphia at Atlanta RODEO 8 p.m.

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THE TIMES LEADER

MEETINGS

AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T New England .................... 1 0 0 Buffalo ............................... 1 0 0 N.Y. Jets ........................... 1 0 0 Miami................................. 0 1 0 South W L T Houston ............................ 1 0 0 Jacksonville...................... 1 0 0 Tennessee........................ 0 1 0 Indianapolis ...................... 0 1 0 North W L T Baltimore........................... 1 0 0 Cincinnati .......................... 1 0 0 Cleveland.......................... 0 1 0 Pittsburgh ......................... 0 1 0 West W L T Oakland............................. 1 0 0 San Diego ......................... 1 0 0 Kansas City ...................... 0 1 0 Denver............................... 0 1 0 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Washington ...................... 1 0 0 Philadelphia...................... 1 0 0 Dallas ................................ 0 1 0 N.Y. Giants ....................... 0 1 0 South W L T New Orleans....................... 0 1 0 Tampa Bay .......................... 0 1 0 Carolina............................... 0 1 0 Atlanta ................................. 0 1 0 North W L T Chicago............................. 1 0 0 Detroit................................ 1 0 0 Green Bay ......................... 1 0 0 Minnesota ......................... 0 1 0 West W L T San Francisco .................. 1 0 0 Arizona.............................. 1 0 0 St. Louis ............................ 0 1 0 Seattle ............................... 0 1 0 Today's Games Chicago at New Orleans, 1 p.m. Baltimore at Tennessee, 1 p.m. Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 1 p.m. Kansas City at Detroit, 1 p.m. Jacksonville at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m. Oakland at Buffalo, 1 p.m. Arizona at Washington, 1 p.m. Seattle at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.

Pct 1.000 1.000 1.000 .000 Pct 1.000 1.000 .000 .000 Pct 1.000 1.000 .000 .000 Pct 1.000 1.000 .000 .000 Pct 1.000 1.000 .000 .000 Pct .000 .000 .000 .000 Pct 1.000 1.000 1.000 .000 Pct 1.000 1.000 .000 .000

1. Elk Lake, 47 2. Pleasant Valley, 84 3. Pittston Area, 87 4. Wyoming Valley West, 118 5. Lake-Lehman, 122 6. Dallas, 173 7. Montrose, 182 8. Mid Valley, 214 9. Valley View, 217 10. Wyalusing, 217 11. Susquehanna Comm, 236 12. Riverside, 296 Local Teams Pittston Area 1. Catherin Lombardo, Jr, 19:04 8. Bianca Bolton, Sr, 19:43 13. Kaitlynn Kuchta, Jr, 20:15 25. Kristen Lombard, Jr, 21:12 51. Emily Seaman, Jr, 23:18 63. Kristen Ferek, Jr, 25:05 Wyoming Valley West 5. Alexandria Plant, Jr, 19:28 17. Julia Mericle, Jr, 20:25 26. Emily Tyler, So, 21:31 30. Amy Paddock, Jr, 21:56 40. Arika Batusek, Fr, 22:48 59. Lydia Ellsworth, Jr, 24:41 75. Cassidy Heide, Jr, 27:56 Lake-Lehman 9. Kaylee Hillard, So, 19:46 10. Emily Sutton, So, 19:53 28. Allie Jayne, Sr, 21:41 29. Katie Heindel, Jr, 21:54 46. Mikayla Orrson, Sr, 22:59 54. Shelby Foster, Sr, 23:50 Dallas 24. Nell Adams, So, 21:08 31. Sarah Pomfret, Sr, 22:05 32. Chelsea Martin, Sr, 22:07 38. Allison Amos, So, 23:05 56. Christina Valenti, Fr, 24:01 65. Carly Manganello, sr. 25:15

The Duryea Little League will hold its monthly meeting on Sunday, September 25, 2011 at 7pm at the Duryea Field House. First nominations for Board Seats will be accepted. Hanover Area Cheerleading Booster Club has re-scheduled the September 12 meeting to Monday, September 19 at 7 p.m. at the High School. Wyoming Valley West High School Soccer Booster Club will meet on Tuesday, September 20, at 7 p.m. at Happy’s Pizza on Main Street in Plymouth. Parents of all junior and senior high soccer players are welcome and encouraged to attend. REGISTRATIONS/TRYOUTS

Boys

Team Finishes 1. Blue Ridge, 82 2. Wyoming Valley West, 119 3. Pleasant Valley, 135 4. Elk Lake, 142 5. Wyalusing, 155 6. Mid Valley, 176 7. E. Stroudsburg- S, 192 8. Valley View, 198 9. Dallas, 200 10. Scranton, 226 11. Lake-Lehman, 247 12. West Scranton, 280 13. Pittston Area, 286 14. Montrose, 352 15. Riverside, 357 16. Susquehanna Comm, 407 17. E. Stroudsburg- N, 505 Local Teams Wyoming Valley West 7. Bennet Williams, Jr, 16:45 10. Joe William Butkiewicz, Jr, 16:55 26. Andrew Huarilla, Jr, 17:54 33. Jeff Austin, So, 18:07 43. Dave Yunkunis, Jr, 18:17 58. Tyler Sutphen, fr, 18:49 76. Nathan Cheek, Jr, 19:22 Dallas 5. Kyle Borland, So, 16:37 9. Brenden Ehert, So, 16:53 53. Bryce Mattson, So, 18:39 63. Jake Bozentka, Fr, 19:01 70. Drew Harding, So, 19:16 72. Samuel Reinert, So, 19:16 79. Kiree Hall, Sr, 19:31 Lake-Lehman 6. Jacob Bevan, Sr, 16:39 13. Kieran Sutton, Jr, 17:02 59. Zack Vanloon, sr, 18:52 78. Chris Pinkerton, Jr, 19:31 91. Joel Austin, Jr, 20:25 100. Connor Daly, Sr, 21:03 Pittston Area 16. James Connors, Sr, 17:19 44. Tyler Cummings, Sr, 18:20 46. Dimitri Seha, So, 18:23 83. Brandon Zaffuto, Fr, 19:40 97. Patrick Dougherty, Sr, 21:01 106. Cody McLean, Jr, 22:01 Green Bay at Carolina, 1 p.m. Cleveland at Indianapolis, 1 p.m. Dallas at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Denver, 4:15 p.m. Houston at Miami, 4:15 p.m. San Diego at New England, 4:15 p.m. Philadelphia at Atlanta, 8:20 p.m. Monday's Games St. Louis at N.Y. Giants, 8:30 p.m. Sunday, Sep. 25 Houston at New Orleans, 1 p.m. Denver at Tennessee, 1 p.m. Detroit at Minnesota, 1 p.m. San Francisco at Cincinnati, 1 p.m. New England at Buffalo, 1 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. Miami at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Jacksonville at Carolina, 1 p.m. Kansas City at San Diego, 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. Baltimore at St. Louis, 4:05 p.m. Arizona at Seattle, 4:15 p.m. Green Bay at Chicago, 4:15 p.m. Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 4:15 p.m. Pittsburgh at Indianapolis, 8:20 p.m. Monday, Sep. 26 Washington at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.

S O C C E R Major League Soccer EASTERN CONFERENCE ......................................................... W L TPtsGFGA Columbus .......................................11 9 8 41 35 36 Sporting Kansas City ....................10 810 40 43 36 Philadelphia ................................... 8 712 36 35 30 Houston .......................................... 8 912 36 36 38 D.C. ................................................. 8 710 34 37 35 New York........................................ 6 615 33 42 38 Chicago .......................................... 5 815 30 33 37 Toronto FC..................................... 61212 30 32 52 New England ................................. 51212 27 32 46 WESTERN CONFERENCE ......................................................... W L TPtsGFGA x-Los Angeles................................15 310 55 40 22 Seattle .............................................13 6 9 48 43 31 FC Dallas .......................................13 8 7 46 36 31 Real Salt Lake ...............................13 7 6 45 37 22 Colorado.........................................10 911 41 40 39 Portland ..........................................1012 6 36 36 41 Chivas USA ................................... 71210 31 34 36 San Jose......................................... 61011 29 29 35 Vancouver ...................................... 41310 22 28 43 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. x- clinched playoff berth Wednesday's Games Columbus 2, Houston 2, tie Friday's Games Portland 3, New England 0 Saturday's Games Toronto FC 2, Colorado 1 Chicago 3, Chivas USA 2 Columbus at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m. San Jose at Houston, 8:30 p.m. New York at FC Dallas, 8:30 p.m. D.C. United at Seattle FC, 9 p.m. Sporting Kansas City at Real Salt Lake, 9 p.m. Vancouver at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 21 Chivas USA at D.C. United, 7:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at New York, 8 p.m.

www.timesleader.com

BULLETIN BOARD

C O U N T R Y

Team Finishes

INJURY REPORT: On the NFL board, Indianapolis QB Peyton Manning is out; Houston RB Arian Foster is probable; St. Louis QB Sam Bradford is probable and RB Steven Jackson is doubtful. For the latest odds & scores, check us out at www.americasline.com. BOXING REPORT: In the WBO welterweight title fight on November 12 in Las Vegas, Nevada, Manny Pacquiao is -$800 vs. Juan Manuel Marquez +$550. BASEBALL

P

At McDade Park

By Roxy Roxborough

Favorite

S

SUBMITTED PHOTOS

Luke Jones a junior from Elk Lake, crosses the finish line to win first place at the Cross Country meet at McDade Park

The Girls Cross Country race (above) at McDade Park is underway as the girls begin their long race to the finish line San Jose at Portland, 10:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 23 Philadelphia at Sporting Kansas City, 8:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24 Houston at FC Dallas, 4 p.m. Portland at New York, 7:30 p.m. Los Angeles at Columbus, 7:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at D.C. United, 7:30 p.m. San Jose at Colorado, 9 p.m. Seattle FC at Vancouver, 10:30 p.m. Toronto FC at Chivas USA, 10:30 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 25 New England at Chicago, 4 p.m.

N A S C A R Nationwide-Dollar General 300 Powered By Coca-Cola Results Saturday At Chicagoland Speedway Joliet, Ill. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 200 laps, 150 rating, 0 points, $68,175. 2. (10) Carl Edwards, Ford, 200, 126.7, 0, $64,950. 3. (1) Brian Scott, Toyota, 200, 117.4, 42, $58,293. 4. (6) Aric Almirola, Chevrolet, 200, 107.7, 40, $39,868. 5. (7) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 200, 108.6, 39, $27,100. 6. (5) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 200, 114.6, 38, $33,868. 7. (23) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 200, 99.4, 0, $22,950. 8. (11) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 200, 101.3, 36, $28,318. 9. (3) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 200, 106.8, 0, $21,760. 10. (12) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 200, 93.3, 34, $27,643. 11. (9) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 199, 94.9, 33, $25,868. 12. (16) Jason Leffler, Chevrolet, 199, 87.9, 33, $25,318. 13. (4) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 199, 86, 31, $26,968. 14. (13) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 198, 82.5, 30, $24,258. 15. (14) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet, 198, 82.5, 29, $26,348. 16. (19) Michael Annett, Toyota, 198, 69.5, 28, $23,588. 17. (15) Kenny Wallace, Toyota, 198, 74.7, 27, $23,503. 18. (17) Steve Wallace, Toyota, 198, 72.1, 26, $23,043. 19. (8) Joey Logano, Toyota, 198, 82, 0, $16,365. 20. (21) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 197, 68, 25, $24,098. 21. (18) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 197, 67.4, 23, $22,513. 22. (26) Timmy Hill, Ford, 195, 51.7, 22, $22,403. 23. (32) Joey Gase, Ford, 195, 50.6, 21, $22,668. 24. (25) Kevin Conway, Toyota, 195, 49.6, 20, $22,158. 25. (41) Eric McClure, Chevrolet, 195, 50.5, 19, $22,648. 26. (20) David Stremme, Chevrolet, 195, 70.7, 0, $21,913. 27. (24) Blake Koch, Dodge, 195, 60.2, 17, $15,735. 28. (42) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, 194, 43.3, 16, $21,683.

29. (36) Robert Richardson Jr., Chevrolet, 193, 43.4, 15, $21,533. 30. (29) Scott Wimmer, Dodge, 180, 51.3, 14, $21,723. 31. (33) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, suspension, 152, 57.9, 13, $21,288. 32. (39) Derrike Cope, Chevrolet, engine, 131, 39.2, 12, $21,178. 33. (22) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, accident, 65, 66.3, 0, $14,600. 34. (28) Matt Carter, Ford, vibration, 22, 39.1, 10, $14,490. 35. (34) Mark Green, Chevrolet, overheating, 19, 40, 9, $14,380. 36. (30) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, ignition, 15, 44.5, 8, $14,270. 37. (38) Carl Long, Ford, handling, 15, 38.7, 7, $14,150. 38. (27) Johnny Chapman, Chevrolet, overheating, 13, 36.6, 6, $14,090. 39. (43) Danny O’Quinn Jr., Ford, electrical, 13, 33.4, 5, $13,940. 40. (40) Chase Miller, Chevrolet, ignition, 10, 38.9, 4, $13,830. 41. (35) Dennis Setzer, Chevrolet, vibration, 9, 31.8, 0, $13,725. 42. (31) J.J. Yeley, Ford, vibration, 4, 32.5, 0, $13,520. 43. (37) T.J. Bell, Chevrolet, power steering, 2, 30.4, 0, $13,413. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 148.637 mph. Time of Race: 2 hours, 1 minute, 6 seconds. Margin of Victory: 8.568 seconds. Caution Flags: 3 for 11 laps. Lead Changes: 8 among 5 drivers. Lap Leaders: B.Scott 1;B.Keselowski 2-47;M.Wallace 48;B.Keselowski 49-89;C.Edwards 90-124;B.Keselowski 125-167;B.Scott 168-171;J.Leffler 172;B.Keselowski 173-200. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): B.Keselowski, 4 times for 158 laps;C.Edwards, 1 time for 35 laps;B.Scott, 2 times for 5 laps;J.Leffler, 1 time for 1 lap;M.Wallace, 1 time for 1 lap. Top 10 in Points: 1. R.Stenhouse Jr., 986;2. E.Sadler, 972;3. R.Sorenson, 939;4. A.Almirola, 922;5. J.Allgaier, 905;6. J.Leffler, 859;7. K.Wallace, 813;8. S.Wallace, 791;9. B.Scott, 778;10. M.Annett, 772. NASCAR Driver Rating Formula A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a race. The formula combines the following categories: Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Running Position While on Lead Lap, Average Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.

B O X I N G Fight Schedule Sept. 21 At Newcastle, Australia, Anthony Mundine vs. Rigoberto Alvarez, 12, for the interim WBA World junior middleweight title. Sept. 23 At Cagliari, Italy, Moruti Mthalane vs. Andrea Sarritzu, 12, for Mthalane’s IBF flyweight title. At Fantasy Springs Resortcasino, Indio, Calif., Vicente Escobedo vs. Rocky Juarez, 10, junior lightweights. Sept. 24 At Club Chicago, Burbank, Ill., Roman Karmazin vs.

Krunch Gold Fastpitch Softball is seeking a left handed slap hitter with great speed for fall 2011 and summer 2012. Prospective player should be a 2012 or later high school graduate with good academic standings and strong outfield skills. If you are looking for college exposure, we are the team to play for in Central, Pa. Very little local play. Team travels to highly attended events in Colorado, Florida, New Jersey, North Carolina, and Philadelphia region. We are also building a guest player list for 2011-2012. If you would like to showcase your skills to college coaches as a Krunch guest player please contact us. Our staff is available for private tryouts by appointment. All inquires will be kept confidential. Contact coach Steve Mumma at sonnyrrr@comcast.net or call 717-542-6578. Nanticoke Elementary Wrestling will hold a registration for grades K though 6 on Monday, September 19 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Johnny D’s Philly Cheese Steaks in Nanticoke. The cost per wrestler is $40 plus a $10 refundable single deposit. A copy of the wrestler’s birth certificate and proof of medical insurance is required. For further information call 570-735-1434. The Pace Setter Athletic Club of Northeastern Pa. will sponsor a series of basketball leagues this upcoming Fall. The leagues will be held at the Greater Scranton YMCA in Dunmore. The league line-up will include; Monday evenings 7th & 8th grade boys, Tuesday evenings Adult Men, Wednesday evenings girls 5th & 6th grade, Thursday evenings Adult Men, weekends (Sat. & Sun.) will feature a series of Tournaments from 5th grade all the way up to senior varsity. The Pace Setters will also present a six week Sports Specific Training Classes. These will be held on Sunday afternoons throughout Oct., Nov. and Dec. The program will feature two hour sessions. Hour one will deal with basketball skills, hour two will focus on weight training and conditioning. Interested parties may contact Pace Setter A.C., P.O. Box 36, West Scranton, Pa. or telephone 3477018 or 575-0941, or e-mail pacesetterbasketball@verizon.net WA Boys Basketball Fall League Registration: All boys in grades 1 through 6 at Wyoming Area are invited to participate in the WA Fall League. Play begins in early October. Registration will take place at the High School Gym between 7 p.m. and 8 p.m. on Monday, September 29, Wednesday September 21, and Monday September 26. Cost is $35 per player and includes a t-shirt. Please bring insurance information with you to registration. If you have any questions, please contact Coach Alex Brgona at 570-650-6385.

Bulletin Board items will not be accepted over the telephone. Items may be faxed to 831-7319, dropped off at the Times Leader or mailed to Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250. Osumanu Adama, 12, IBF middleweight title eliminator. At Mexicali, Mexico, Jorge Arce vs. Simphiwe Nongqayi, 12, for Arce’s WBO super bantamweight title; Raul Martinez vs. Rodrigo Guerrero, 12, for the vacant IBF super featherweight title. At Mexico City, Adrian Hernandez vs. Gideon Buthelezi, 12, for Hernandez’s WBC light flyweight title.

To all our flood affected customers:

Fondest Regards Ronne Kurlancheek and the Kurlancheeks staff

711621

We would like to help aid in your recovery process by offering: – Extended Lay-A-Way – One Year Interest-Free Financing – Extra Discounts On Replacement Furniture – Free Design – Free Insurance Appraisals


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Tight end Szczerba plays on despite heavy heart By DEREK LEVARSE dlevarse@timesleader.com

PHILADELPHIA -- Penn State senior tight end Andrew Szczerba received terrible news before leaving with the team for Philadelphia on Friday. His uncle Joe Szczerba, a sergeant with the New Castle County (Del.) police, was fatally stabbed after a foot chase in the early morning hours Friday, according to The News Journal in Wilmington, Del. According to the report, Joe Szczerba was responding to a call for a disorderly person and was stabbed while attempting to arrest the suspect. An officer of 18 years, Szczerba, 44, played football at Salesianum High School in Wilmington, as did his nephew Andrew. Andrew Szczerba made the trip with the team on Friday and started for the Lions. He was flagged for a false start on the team’s first play from scrimmage. He finished with two catches for 13 yards. Szczerba was not made avail-

PENN STATE

NOTEBOOK

foot-5, 277-pound Cadogan again donned a No. 83 jersey to serve as depth at tight end.

Infirmary report As coach Joe Paterno reable for comment after the game, but plenty of coaches and vealed on Thursday, wide receiver Curtis Drake continues teammates spoke for him. to struggle with his recovery “Our hearts all go out for Andrew,” offensive coordinator from a broken leg. Drake did not travel with the team this Galen Hall said. “For him to weekend despite playing last come through and play as many week against Alabama. The plays as he did, and for him to sophomore from Philadelphia play as good as he did, Andid not get to return to his drew’s a good football player. hometown after dealing with “With the tragedy on his soreness in non-contact drills in mind, I think that’s a tribute to practice this week. what type of person he is and Right tackle Chima Okoli what he feels about Penn returned from a sprained ankle State.” to start against the Owls, but The Lions were again thin at struggled in the early going tight end, requiring them to against the Temple pass rush. lean on Szczerba for most of the Backup tackle Mike Farrell game. Sophomore Kevin Haplea missed his second straight made the trip but only saw the game with a sprained knee. field sparingly after being cited Linebacker Michael Mauti for underage drinking last and receiver Justin Brown both week. missed a series apiece but reSophomore Nate Cadogan turned. was listed as a tight end for the Tailback Silas Redd dealt second straight game. An offen- with cramps late in the game and Brandon Beachum took sive tackle by trade, the 6-

Top true freshmen The first road game of the season means the first travel Back in the booth roster of the season. And makPaterno made a brief cameo ing the trip with the Lions were on the field Saturday, his first of six true freshmen. the season, but once again Cornerback Adrian Amos, spent the game up in the coach- wide receiver Bill Belton, kicker es booth. Sam Ficken, wide receiver Allen Walking without his cane, Robinson, offensive tackle DoPaterno went down to field novan Smith and defensive level before warm-ups to meet tackle Anthony Zettel all were with Temple coach Steve Adda- dressed for the Lions. zio and give a short walk Belton made his first appeararound. A nearby aide held onto ance of the season in the first Paterno’s cane for him. quarter, lining up in the slot. For a while it looked as if the Ficken was called upon for 84-year-old coach would work his first career field-goal aton the sideline, but the plan all tempt in the final seconds of along was to head back upstairs the first half, as he was better for the game. “I was afraid I’d run out of gas suited for the 49-yard try than Evan Lewis. on the sideline and get in the The low-trajectory kick was way,” Paterno said. “Or I’d be a swatted down at the line by distraction. I didn’t want the kids to be worried about where defensive tackle Shahid PaulI was standing until I can move hill, keeping the Owls ahead 10-7 at halftime. The block a little better. dropped the Lions to just 1-for-5 “I should be over that now.” on field goals on the season. Paterno did not come down Amos, Ficken and Robinson from the booth at halftime to had already burned their redtalk with his team, which shirts in the first two weeks. trailed 10-7 at the time. most of the snaps’ on the Lions’ game-winning drive.

PSU

FIRST QUARTER TU -- Bernard Pierce 2-yard run (Brandon McManus kick), 6:54. Drive: 8 plays, 82 yards, 4:05. Comment: A sloppy, sloppy start for the Nittany Lions sees Temple take advantage of a blown coverage and a few big penalties to strike first. Stephon Morris has a receiver get well behind him on third-and-7 for a gain of 33. Then Chaz Powell is beaten in the end zone, committing pass interference to prevent a chance at a touchdown. Michael Mauti gets flagged for a face mask to put the Owls inside the 5-yard line where Pierce picks up his third career touchdown against the Lions. TEMPLE 7, PENN STATE 0. SECOND QUARTER PSU -- Silas Redd 17-yard run (Evan Lewis kick), 4:57. Drive: 7 plays, 50 yards, 3:13. Comment: Matt McGloin takes over later in this one than the previous two games but gets good field position to work with at the 50. McGloin completed a key thirdand-5 to Justin Brown and the Lions get a boost from a face mask call against the Owls. That sets up Redd who creates space and cuts to freedom off right tackle, outrunning the defense to the end zone to knot things up. TU 7, PSU 7.TU -- McManus 40-yard field goal, 0:37. Drive: 8 plays, 39 yards, 4:12. Comment: With the Owls offense sputtering since the big first drive, Temple coach Steve Addazio elects for a change of pace and inserts Chester Stewart in at quarterback. The playbook changes dramatically as Stewart takes off on a few option keepers. That keeps the chains moving for a bit until the Lions clamp down and drop Stewart for a loss on third down. McManus comes on and hits his longest field goal of the season to quickly put the Owls back on top. TU 10, PSU 7.

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• Finally scored the winning touchdown on the next play when Zordich plunged across the goal line with 2:42 to play. Though Zordich will be remembered for the score, it was his quick reaction on the fumbled snap two plays earlier that saved Penn State from one of its more embarrassing losses in recent history. “I was supposed to get the ball there, so when that ball just dropped, I jumped right into the pile,” Zordich said. “Thankfully it bounced right in front of me and I was able to land on it. “There was a couple Temple guys there, a couple Penn State guys there, but I was pretty much the first one in that area. … Kind of a lucky play, really.” The Penn State defense tried its hardest to ensure it wouldn’t come down to luck. After talking about making big plays all week long, the Lions (2-1) forced three turnovers in the second half to give the team every possible chance to win. “Glad we came up with them today,” a relieved defensive coordinator Tom Bradley said afterward. “We hung in there, we hustled.” Tailbacks Bernard Pierce of Temple and Silas Redd of Penn State traded rushing scores in the first half and Temple added a 40-yard Brandon McManus field goal to take a 10-7 lead into the locker room. From there, Sean Stanley forced a Pierce fumble that Nick Sukay recovered at the Penn State 48. The offense handed it right back on the next play when Bolden telegraphed a pass to Moye that was picked off by the Owls’ Kee-ayre Griffin. In the fourth quarter, senior corner Chaz Powell came up with his first career interception, returning it 26 yards to the Temple 26. The offense went threeand-out and watched Lewis hammer a 36-yard field goal attempt solidly off the right upright. Undeterred, linebacker Michael Mauti also came up with his first career pick, diving in front of a pass at the Temple 44 to give the offense the ball back once again with 8:46 left in the game. “We could feel it, getting into the second quarter, the third quarter, that we were going to need to make a play (on defense to win the game),” Mauti said. “We knew we had to respond. We can’t hang our heads and say, ‘Man, (the offense) needs to pick it up.’ “All we can do is get the ball back to the offense.” And that almost wasn’t enough. It took12 plays and two fourthdown conversions after Mauti’s interception, but the offense finally rewarded the defense with a touchdown. Penn State continued to rotate both Bolden (9-of-17, 92 yards, 1 interception) and Matt McGloin (13-of-19, 124 yards) throughout the game. That rotation even extended into the fourth quarter. McGloin, who was under cen-

PENN ST. 14, TEMPLE 10 Penn St.................................... 0 7 0 7 — 14 Temple..................................... 7 3 0 0 — 10 A—57,323. PSU Tem First downs ........................... 18 13 Rushes-yards ....................... 36-92 30-74 Passing.................................. 216 123 Comp-Att-Int ......................... 22-37-1 12-28-2 Return Yards ........................ 71 22 Punts-Avg. ............................ 5-43.2 5-46.0 Fumbles-Lost........................ 2-0 3-1 Penalties-Yards.................... 7-69 4-30 Time of Possession ............. 30:41 28:22 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Penn St., Redd 16-86, Beachum 11-27, Zordich 2-2, Suhey 1-1, De.Smith 1-(minus 4), Team 4-(minus 7), Bolden 1-(minus 13). Temple, Be.Pierce 17-50, Stewart 9-16, Ma.Brown 2-11, J.Jones 1-4, Gerardi 1-(minus 7). PASSING—Penn St., McGloin 13-19-0-124, Bolden 9-17-1-92, Team 0-1-0-0. Temple, Gerardi 9-22-2-95, Stewart 3-6-0-28. RECEIVING—Penn St., Moye 7-112, Brown 6-62, Szczerba 2-13, De.Smith 2-11, Robinson 1-8, Moseby-Felder 1-4, Suhey 1-3, Beachum 1-2, Redd 1-1. Temple, J.Jones 5-48, Miller 3-45, Rodriguez 2-14, Ma.Brown 1-8, Be.Pierce 1-8.

AP PHOTOS

Penn State’s Drew Astorino, left, collides with Temple receiver Cody Booth, right, on a pass play late in the second half Saturday in Philadelphia.

Penn State’s Silas Redd crosses the goal line for a touchdown during the first half against Temple on Saturday in Philadelphia.

Penn State defender Michael Mauti, left, brings down Temple running back Bernard Pierce behind the line of scrimmage.

ter for the Lions’ lone scoring drive of the first half, took over again after Bolden tossed the interception in the third quarter and had the better of the play between the two. But when Mauti came up with his critical pick, Bolden was back out on the field -- another one of those “gut feelings,” according to quarterbacks coach Jay Paterno. “It feels good that they have

the confidence in me to do what needs to be done,” Bolden said. “Obviously you want to get in there in that situation, but at the same time you want to get the win,” McGloin said. “And if that’s what the coaches want to do, you have to accept that. You have to be calm, you have to help out any way you can.” On Saturday, it was just Penn State quarterback Rob Bolden looks for a receiver down enough. field during the second half against Temple on Saturday.

FOURTH QUARTER PSU -- Michael Zordich 1-yard run (Lewis kick), 2:42. Drive: 12 plays, 44 yards, 6:04. Comment: A dreadful game of offensive football (very offensive) finally ends with Temple inexplicably throwing the ball while sitting on a lead. Michael Mauti comes up with the interception of Mike Gerardi to set the Lions up at the Owls 44. Comedy ensues. Having missed three field goals already, Penn State twice forgoes a field goal on fourth down, including a fourth-and-1 from the 3-yard line after a fumbled snap on third down. After initially deciding to kick a 20-yard field goal for the tie, the Lions called timeout and sent the offense back out with Brandon Beachum gaining 2 yards on fourth-and-1. Zordich gets the call and finishes off the Owls with a goal-line plunge for the second straight season. PSU 14, TU 10. PLAY OF THE GAME There were a couple of close calls on offense at the end, but the defense certainly deserves this honor. Give it to junior linebacker Michael Mauti, who helped will the team to victory. His first career interception came on an excellent diving effort on a Mike Gerardi pass at the Owls 44 with 8:46 left in the game. Mauti, who got his bell rung earlier in the game had to miss a series to get concussion tests on the sideline before re-entering and making the big difference. DAY TO REMEMBER Not just Mauti, but the Lions defense as a whole came out with heads held high. Standout Temple RB Bernard Pierce had just 50 yards on 17 carries and lost a fumble against a muchimproved front seven. DAY TO FORGET The 57,323 who attended -- announced as Temple’s third-highest home crowd in program history -- saw a close game but a very, very ugly one. Offensive coaches on both sidelines traded off making puzzling decisions rotating between two quarterbacks apiece. Temple head coach Steve Addazio and offensive coordinator Scot Loeffler are going to be second-guessing themselves all week for continuing to put the ball in the air up 10-7 in the fourth.


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COLLEGE FOOTBALL ROUNDUP

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

N O T R E D A M E V S . M I C H I G A N S TAT E

AP PHOTO

Notre Dame running back Cierre Wood, left, beats Michigan State cornerback Johnny Adams to the corner of the end zone Saturday.

AP PHOTO

South Carolina running back Marcus Lattimore, center, struggles to hold on to the ball as he pushes through the Navy defense to cross the goal line for a touchdown during the first quarter Saturday at Williams-Brice Stadium, in Columbia, S.C.

Sooners claim win over ’Noles

The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Kenny Stills reached high to grab a 37-yard touchdown pass from Landry Jones midway through the fourth quarter for the tiebreaking score, and Oklahoma’s defense made the lead stand as the top-ranked Sooners beat No. 5 Florida State 23-13 on Saturday night. Javon Harris picked off two passes for the Sooners (2-0), who forced three turnovers and harassed both Florida State quarterbacks all night. The Seminoles (2-1) played the final 20 minutes without starting quarterback E.J. Manuel, who left in the third with a left shoulder injury.

No. 11 Nebraska 51, Washington 38 LINCOLN, Neb. — Taylor Martinez threw for two touchdowns and ran for a third to lead the Cornhuskers. Martinez looked to have put away the Huskies with his 6yard TD run, but Keith Price passed 52 yards to James Johnson for his fourth TD toss to make it a 13-point game with 4:27 left. Nebraska (3-0) won the third meeting of the teams in 364 days. Nebraska won in Seattle last September but lost in a rematch at the Holiday Bowl.

No. 12 Oregon 56, Missouri State 7 EUGENE, Ore. — LaMichael No. 2 Alabama 41, James ran for 204 yards and North Texas 0 three touchdowns, including a TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — Trent 90-yarder, and the Ducks Richardson and Eddie Lacy cruised. each had two long touchdown James’ 90-yard dash was runs and career rushing highs Oregon’s longest run since and No. 2 Alabama’s defense 1938. He also had a 1-yard TD smothered North Texas in a in the first quarter and a 5041-0 victory Saturday night. yarder in the third. Richardson scored three Darron Thomas threw for times — including a 58-yarder 206 yards and three touchand a career-long 71-yarder — downs for the Ducks (2-1). and had most of his 167 yards Lavasier Tuinei caught scoring on the two long ones to help passes of 8 and 34 yards, and the Crimson Tide (3-0) race Oregon sat most of its starters into its showdown with No. 14 early in the second half. Arkansas.

No. 7 Wisconsin 49, Northern Illinois 7 CHICAGO — Russell Wilson threw for 347 yards and three scores, Montee Ball rushed for another two TDs and the Badgers piled up more than 600 yards in the game at Soldier Field. Ball finished with 91 yards on 18 carries, James White added 100 yards and another score, and Nick Toon had two TD catches for the Badgers (3-0), who have won 31 straight against non-conference opponents in the regular season. No. 9 Texas A&M 37, Idaho 7 COLLEGE STATION, Texas — Cyrus Gray had three touchdowns and 101 yards rushing, and Ryan Tannehill threw for 337 yards and two scores in less than three quarters as the Aggies (2-0) shook off a sloppy start. No. 10 South Carolina 24, Navy 21 COLUMBIA, S.C. — Marcus Lattimore ran for a career-high 246 yards and three touchdowns to help the Gamecocks (3-0) hang on to defeat Navy. Lattimore carried 37 times and averaged 6.6 yards a carry. South Carolina ran 37 plays in the second half, and the sophomore touched the ball on 26 of them.

No. 13 Virginia Tech 26, Arkansas State 7 BLACKSBURG, Va. — Logan Thomas threw for 292 yards and two touchdowns for the Hokies, who are 3-0 for the first time since 2006. Thomas hit D.J. Coles with a short pass that Coles took 49 yards for a touchdown and found Danny Coale from 4 yards out. Thomas was 21 for 33 and also threw two interceptions.

to a field goal. His touchdown pretty much sealed it, allowing the Gators (3-0, 1-0) to push their winning streak in the series to seven games.

Miami 24, No. 17 Ohio State 6 MIAMI — Lamar Miller ran for 188 yards, Jacory Harris threw two first-quarter touchdown passes to Allen Hurns and Miami avoided matching its longest losing streak in 33 years by topping No. 17 Ohio State 24-6 on Saturday night. Ohio State quarterbacks Joe Bauserman and Braxton Miller combined to complete 4 of 17 passes. The Buckeyes simply seemed to give up on the game in the final minutes, not even bothering to try and stop the clock despite having three timeouts with Miami driving in the final minutes with a 17-6 lead. No. 18 West Virginia 37, Maryland 31 COLLEGE PARK, Md. — Geno Smith threw for a careerhigh 388 yards, and the Mountaineers (3-0) withstood a furious comeback. After WVU let a 24-point lead dwindle to 34-31 with 10:29 remaining, Smith directed a 14-play, 65-yard drive that produced a field goal with 4:42 left. The Terrapins (1-1) then moved to the West Virginia 35 before Eain Smith intercepted a Danny O’Brien pass with 1:13 remaining to saddle coach Randy Edsall with his first defeat at Maryland.

Clemson 38, No. 21 Auburn 24 CLEMSON, S.C. — No. 21 Auburn’s luck ended Saturday along with its 17-game winning streak as Tajh Boyd threw for 386 yards and four touchdowns in Clemson’s 38-24 victory over the defending national champions. Auburn (2-1) took a 14-0 lead in the first quarter before Boyd began hitting his targets over the final three periods. Clemson converted 10 straight thirddown attempts as it improved to 3-0 for the first time since 2007.

No. 23 Texas 49, UCLA 20 PASADENA, Calif. — Case McCoy passed for 168 yards and two touchdowns, D.J. Grant made his first three career TD catches, and the Longhorns avenged last season’s stunning home loss to the Bruins. Malcolm Brown rushed for 110 yards and a score, and Fozzy Whittaker ran for two more touchdowns for the Longhorns (3-0), who got solid production from two young quarterbacks. No. 23 TCU 38, Louisiana-Monroe 17 FORT WORTH, Texas — Greg McCoy returned the second-half kickoff 94 yards for a touchdown for the Horned Frogs. Three plays after McCoy’s sprint up the right sideline in front of the Louisiana-Monroe bench, the Warhawks (1-2) gave the ball back when Jyruss Edwards fumbled after a hit from Stansly Maponga. D.J. Yendrey recovered at the 28, setting up Matthew Tucker’s second TD run, a 1-yarder for a 35-17 lead less than 5 minutes into the second half.

No. 19 Baylor 48, Stephen F. Austin 0 WACO, Texas — Robert Griffin III continued his sterling start to the season and the No. 19 Baylor Bears celebrated their highest ranking since October 1991 by routing Stephen F. No. 14 Arkansas 38, Troy 28 Austin 48-0 Saturday night in a Iowa 31, Pittsburgh 27 FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. — game that was ended in the IOWA CITY, Iowa — James Ronnie Wingo rushed for a third quarter because of lightVandenberg threw three touchcareer-high 110 yards and ning. down passes in the fourth quarscored 3 touchdowns as No. 14 During a 41-minute wait late ter and Iowa rallied from a Arkansas defeated Troy 38-28 in the first half, with Baylor 17-point deficit to stun Pittson Saturday night. already up 31-0, the schools burgh 31-27 on Saturday. Wingo had touchdown runs agreed to skip halftime and to of 22 and 21 yards and also trim the final two quarters by 3 Michigan 31, caught a 6-yard touchdown pass minutes each. Eastern Michigan 3 for the Razorbacks (3-0), who ANN ARBOR, Mich. — DeNo. 20 South Florida 70, were outgained by the Trojans nard Robinson ran for 198 yards Florida A&M 17 457-454 in total offense. and accounted for three touchTAMPA, Fla. — B.J. Daniels downs, leading Michigan to a No. 16 Florida 33, threw for a career-high 382 31-3 win over Eastern Michigan Tennessee 23 yards and four touchdowns as on Saturday. GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Chris the Bulls (3-0) destroyed FlorArmy 21, Northwestern 14 Rainey had 233 total yards, ida A&M. including an 83-yard touchDaniels led South Florida to WEST POINT, N.Y. — Trent down catch, and the Gators touchdowns on eight of 10 Steelman scored three touchextended two decades of domdrives before leaving the game downs for the second straight inance in the Southeastern for good in the third quarter. week, including the gameConference series. Darrell Scott had a big night, winner on a 1-yard plunge with Rainey finished with 108 too, rushing for a career-best 2:49 remaining, and Army beat yards rushing, 104 yards receiv- 146 yards and scoring two TDs Northwestern 21-14 on Sating and blocked a punt that led on the ground. urday.

Irish prove ready for No. 15 Spartans Notre Dame finally breaks into win column after a pair of heartbreaking losses. By RICK GANO AP Sports Writer

SOUTH BEND, Ind. — Cierre Wood ran for two touchdowns, freshman George Atkinson III returned a kickoff 89 yards for a score and Robert Blanton had a late interception Saturday as Notre Dame beat No. 15 Michigan State 31-13 for its first win. The Spartans (2-1), who stunned Notre Dame in overtime a year ago with a game-winning TD pass off a fake field goal, tried to surprise the Irish with another fake near the end of the first half. Notre Dame (1-2) was ready this time. On fourth-and-goal from the 2, Ethan Johnson broke up a shovel pass attempt and the Irish led 21-10 at halftime. Michigan State’s Kirk Cousins, who had 11 straight completions at one juncture of the second half, was 34-for-53 for 329 yards but he was intercepted at the Notre Dame 6 with just under four minutes left by Blanton, who returned it 82 yards to the 12. The Spartans had just recovered a fumbled punt by Notre Dame’s John Goodman at the Irish 21 and were ready to set the stage for another frantic finish between the rivals. But with the Spartans trailing 28-13 and having a first and goal at the 3, Blanton came up with a juggling interception and took off on his long return that sealed the win. Notre Dame held the Spartans to 29 yards rushing on 23 carries. And Michigan State was hurt by its own sloppiness —12 penalties for 86 yards. Cousins completed 12 of his passes to B.J. Cunningham as the Spartans were forced

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in doubt. The board of regents at Oklahoma and Texas are meeting Monday to discuss the possibility of the universities leaving that conference. Big East spokesman John Paquette declined to comment on the possible defections. Pittsburgh spokesman E.J. Borghetti said athletic director Steve Pederson also wouldn’t comment. Syracuse AD Daryl Gross also declined comment. If the move goes forward, Pittsburgh and Syracuse would become the fourth and fifth schools to leave the Big East for the ACC in the past decade. Virginia Tech and Miami joined in 2004, and Boston College followed a year later as the ACC’s 12th member. Syracuse is a founding member of the Big East, and Pittsburgh joined the league in 1982. The ACC official said their letters of application were for full membership.

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to go to the air and play catch up. Notre Dame quarterback Tommy Rees overcame a first-half fumble and interception and finished 18 of 26 for 161 yards. Notre Dame pushed the lead out quickly the third quarter when Rees hit Michael Floyd on a 22-yard pass and then lofted a perfect 26-yarder to TJ Jones for a touchdown — the Irish were penalized on the ensuing kickoff for unsportsmanlike conduct after Jones made a hand signal following his catch. Wood’s 6-yard TD run capping a 92-yard drive that featured a 33yard pass from Rees to Floyd and another of 16 to Tyler Eifert helped the Irish to a 21-10 lead. Cousins came right back after a 42-yard kickoff return by Nick Hill gave the Spartans good field position. His 21-yard pass to Todd Anderson and an 11-yarder to Cunningham gave the Spartans a first down at the Irish 8. But after the drive stalled, MSU lined up for a field goal, only to have their attempt at trickery turned away. After Notre Dame took an early 7-0 lead on a Wood TD run, the teams traded turnovers twice. Atkinson — the son of the former NFL star defensive back — took a kickoff, broke to the sideline and sprinted in for the touchdown. It was Notre Dame’s first kickoff return for a TD by a freshman since Raghib Ismail returned two against Rice in 1988. North Carolina athletic director Dick Baddour said the ACC created a committee last year of athletic directors, university presidents and faculty athletic representatives to examine possible scenarios of both expansion and defections. Baddour, one of the four athletic directors on the committee, wouldn’t reveal specifics of those discussions nor comment specifically on Syracuse and Pittsburgh. “If you think about this nationally, it’s obvious that the world is turning upside down and you want the ACC ... to be in a position where we are strong in all areas, that all of our sports are strong, that our television packages are strong as well,” Baddour said shortly before kickoff of the Virginia-North Carolina game. Speaking on a pregame radio show, Virginia Tech athletic director Jim Weaver said: “We want to move forward and be the best we can be, and that’s what we’re going to do.” The New York Times first reported news of the talks involving the ACC on Friday.


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011 PAGE 5C

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CMYK PAGE 6C

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011

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THE TIMES LEADER

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Susquehanna stifles Nanticoke’s Wing-T gameplan Sabers hold Trojans to just seven points, a kickoff return for a TD in victory.

By PAUL SOKOLOSKI psokoloski@timesleader.com

SUSQUEHANNA TWP. – A special teams sophomore named Pat Hempel took the second-half kickoff all the way down the field and into the end zone, giving the Nanticoke Area Trojans sudden, new hope. Susquehanna quickly squashed it. Cooper Quick caught a 16-yard touchdown pass and Jesse Pruitt sealed the victory with a 46-yard

touchdown burst in the second half as the Sabers smothered Nanticoke Area and its tricky Wing-T offense, 26-7. “We had a great week of practice,” Susquehanna coach Richard Bagnell said. “My defensive coordinator (Carl Zukus) put together a gameplan for the Wing-T. “We shut their offense down, got them out of their gameplan.” That 84-yard touchdown return by Hempel, who ran untouched through the middle of the field and into the end zone, provided the Trojans with their only points. But it also provided them with a little life, cutting Susquehanna’s lead to 12-7 with almost two full

quarters to play. “We work on special teams every day at practice,” Nanticoke Area coach Ron Bruza said. The sudden score also gave the Sabers reason to worry. “Little bit,” Bagnell said. “That put them right back in the ballgame. When it’s 12-7 early in the second half, it’s anybody’s ballgame.” But the Sabers never allowed themselves to sweat. Thomas Maby intercepted a pass late in the third quarter and Quick cashed it in by working free in the end zone for a 16-yard touchdown catch on fourth down to put Susquehanna up 20-7. And after a fourth-down sack

thwarted Nanticoke Area’s lengthy, 51-yard drive that reached Susquehanna’s 15-yard line, Pruitt broke free for his clinching touchdown run. “We had some breaks that didn’t go our way,” said Bruza, whose team came off a bye week. “We hadn’t played in two weeks. I don’t think playing Monday was a hardship to them (the Sabers). They got two games in six days. You get 14 days off, what could you do? You can only get so much competition within your team.” Then the Trojans fought to provide competition to the other team. Greg Price scored on an eightyard screen pass and on a three-

Sluggish start stymies Royals Holy Cross scores the game’s first 28 points on its way to a four-touchdown victory By JOHN ERZAR jerar@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE – If Holy Redeemer can play like it did in the second half Saturday night, then it has a chance to be a competitive team. Unfortunately for the Royals, those first two quarters once again proved costly. Holy Cross’ three-pronged rushing attack was too much for Redeemer as it built a 34-point halftime lead on the way to a 49-24 non-conference football victory. “Three straight games we’ve come out of the gate pretty slow,” Redeemer first-year coach Joe Ostrowski said. “The first two quarters have been our Achilles the last couple of weeks, including tonight. And then we’ve played pretty sound football through the third and fourth quarters in three games.” Holy Cross (2-1) ran for 286 yards and six touchdowns in the first half. Quarterback/tailback Rob Heyen was the biggest problem as he finished the night with 242 yards and two touchdowns on

26 rushes. Fullback Joe Merli, who had 105 yards and four touchdowns, was also troublesome. So was tailback Tyler Hinkley, who chipped in 49 yards. “Holy Cross up front has good size,” Ostrowski said. “They run the ball well and to prepare for three solid players is tough.” The Holy Cross running game, though, was corralled for the most part in the second half despite the trio playing most of the final two quarters. The Crusaders managed just 90 yards. Meanwhile, Redeemer quarterback David Gawlas put some energy into the offense. The Royals (0-3) went on a 60-yard scoring drive on their first possession of the third quarter, with Gawlas connecting on passes of 13 yards to Tom Cosgrove and 34 yards to Matt Crofchick. Gawlas then capped it with an 11-yard TD run. Redeemer also received some much-needed running from the tailback spot as sophomore backup Vince Villani carried the load on the final scoring drive. Villani finished with 92 yards on seven carries. Gawlas went over 100 yards for the second time this season, rushing for 112 on 18 rushes. The offense, though, suffered a setback when receiver Eric Kerr was

TUNNEL HILL – Forcing Meyers to punt – or at least attempt to punt – was only the beginning for Lackawanna Trail in the first half Saturday night. Once the Mohawks went into punt formation, the Lions went to work on making the plays that turned the non-league football game into a rout. The Lions blocked two punts and tackled the punter for a loss another time while opening a 28point lead in the second quarter on the way to a 55-7 victory. Lackawanna Trail returned a punt for a score and partially blocked another during the second half while assuring that the final 11:42 would be played under the Mercy Rule.

DALLAS Continued from Page 1C

“Ryan has been a student of our program,” Dallas coach Ted Jackson said. “He’s been at my football camps since probably he was 10 years old. He was a great junior high quarterback for us and a great backup last year. “He was set back by his (elbow) injury, but he’s getting better every week. He missed 8-10 weeks in the summer of not being able to throw the ball.” Running back Jim Roccograndi was equally impressive, rushing for 170 yards and three touchdowns on 14 carries, pushing his season rushing total to 550 yards. Receiver Jason Simonovich caught six passes for 78 yards and wideout Shane Dunn added two receptions and seemed to be everywhere on the field on defense. “Plain and simple, the game comes down to you have to stop

Susquehanna 26, Nanticoke Area 7 Nanticoke .............................. 0 0 7 0 — 7 Susquehanna ....................... 0 12 8 6 — 26 First Quarter

Tunkhannock’s Luke Seaburg throws for 141 yards and a score in loss to the Comets. By JOSH HORTON For The Times Leader

PGW

David Gawlas (9) quarterback for Holy Redeemer eludes a Holy Cross defender and dashes into the end zone for a second quarter

sidelined for most of the game with a left ankle injury. Kerr, who had one catch, entered the game as the Wyoming Valley Conference’s reception leader. Holy Cross 49, Holy Redeemer 24 Holy Cross............................ 14 28 0 7 — 49 Holy Redeemer ................... 0 8 8 8 — 24 First Quarter HC – Hinkley 4 run (Hagan kick), 4:18 HC – Merli 1 run (Hagan kick), 2:01 Second Quarter HC – Heyen 62 run (Hagan kick), 11:47 HC – Merli 9 run (Hagan kick), 8:01 HR – Gawlas 19 run (Gawlas run), 5:52 HC – Merli 1 run (Hagan kick), 2:18 HC – Heyen 9 run (Hagan kick), 0:17 Third Quarter HR – Gawlas 11 run (Gawlas kick), 7:07 Fourth Quarter HC – Merli 1 run (Hagan kick), 6:58 HR – V.Villani 23 run (Gawlas kick), 4:44

Team Statistics Holy Cross Redeemer First downs ................ 23 15 Rushes-yards............ 56-376 33-224 Passing....................... 78 56 Total Yards ................ 454 280 Comp-Att-Int .............. 5-8-0 3-13-1 Sacked-Yards Lost... 0-0 2-9 Punts-Avg. ................. 1-4 3-36 Fumbles-Lost ............ 2-0 3-1 Penalties-Yards ........ 3-22 3-25 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING – Holy Cross, Heyen 26-242, Hinkley 8-49, Merli 16-105, McDonough 2-0, Klein 1-2, Gatto 1-(minus-2), team 2-(minus-20). Redeemer, Gawlas 18-112, Martin 1-1, P.Villani 4-6, Strickland 2-15, V.Villani 7-92, team 1-(minus-2). PASSING – Holy Cross, Heyen 4-6-0-63, McDonough 1-2-0-15. Redeemer, Gawlas 3-9-0-56, Strickland 0-4-1-0. RECEIVING – Holy Cross, Giancopolous 3-58, Meis 1-5, Hagan 1-15. Redeemer, Kerr 1-9, Cosgroce 1-13, Crofchick 1-34. INTS – Holy Cross, Giancopolous. MISSED FGS – none.

“We tried to change it up a little bit and put a rugby-style punt in,” first-year Meyers coach Corry Hanson said. “Our guys didn’t understand the concept. “I think we gave up three or four touchdowns just off punts.” Zach Goodrich blocked one punt and recovered another in the end zone during the second quarter. “I think at times last weekend against Lake-Lehman, we didn’t hustle,” Lackawanna Trail coach Steve Jervis said. “We really wanted to hustle more. “I think that showed up in the special teams.” The Lions improved to 3-0 and sent the Mohawks to 0-3 by controlling all phases of the game, but the special teams is where they had the biggest advantage

and made the plays to break the contest open. Meyers answered with a defensive score of its own after falling behind by 28. Dakota Owen intercepted a screen pass and returned it 21 yards for a touchdown. Cal Lisman kicked the extra point to make it 28-7 with 1:30 left in the half. In addition to its special teams and defensive contributions, Lackawanna Trail got touchdown runs from four players. Meyers gave up 100 points while losing twice in six days. The Mohawks have been outscored, 137-21, on the season. “Right now, these teams want it more than us,” Hanson said. “Until that changes, we’re not going to win football games.”

somebody,” Berwick coach Gary Campbell said. “We didn’t do it. We were thoroughly embarrassed.” Berwick (1-2) did score three touchdowns, but all were cosmetic in nature. By the time Matt Cashman returned a kickoff 81 yards for a score, Dallas (3-0) had built a 38-0 third-quarter lead. That defensive effort is what really pleased Jackson. Berwick running back Jeremy Freeman entered off a career-high 229 yards rushing against North Pocono on Monday. He finished with eight carries for 20 yards, his lowest regular-season game total since becoming a starter last year. Quarterback Jared Pierce was 10-of-19 for 102 yards, but was never in sync with his receiving corps that had more than its share of drops. By halftime, Dallas had outgained the Dawgs 304-78. “I’m thrilled with the defense. It’s about time, it’s about time,” Jackson said. “We’ve been wait-

ing for that for three weeks. They halftime made it 31-0. Dallas 53, Berwick 20 had some guys banged up up Berwick............................. 0 0 12 8 — 20 18 13 7 15 — 53 front, I know that, but (Freeman) Dallas................................ First Quarter DAL – Simonovich 21 pass from Zapoticky is a hell of a back. I’m very happy (kick blocked), 8:25 how our defense stopped him and DAL – Zapoticky 29 run (pass failed), 5:11 DAL – Zapoticky 61 run (kick blocked), 2:41 the quarterback keeper and the Second Quarter DAL – Simonovich 21 pass from Zapoticky traps with the quarterback.” (Napkora kick), 10:53 DAL – J.Roccograndi 11 run (run failed), 2:17 The onslaught began early as Third Quarter DAL – Zapoticky 3 run (Goodwin kick), 7:58 Berwick fumbled on its first play BER – Cashman 81 kick return (pass failed), from scrimmage. Eight plays later, 7:45 BER – Pierce 1 run (run failed), 0:00 Zapoticky hooked up with SimoFourth Quarter DAL – J.Roccograndi 50 run (Goodwin kick), novich for the first of two 21-yard 11:29 BER – Snyder 11 run (Jones from Curry), 7:07 touchdown passes. Then after DalDAL – Macosky 14 run (Macosky run), 0:38 Team Statistics Berwick Dallas las snuffed out a fake punt, ZapotFirst downs............................ 12 24 icky scored on a 29-yard run to Rushes-yards ....................... 28-89 37-367 Passing .................................. 112 131 complete a three-play drive. Total Yards............................ 201 498 “Offensively, if we could have Comp-Att-Int.......................... 11-20-0 10-13-0 Sacked-Yards Lost .............. 0-0 0-0 kept the ball out of (Dallas’) hands, Punts-Avg. ............................. 2-35.5 1-34 that would have been good,” Fumbles-Lost........................ 1-1 0-0 Campbell said. “Every phase of the Penalties-Yards.................... INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS – Berwick, Freeman 8-20, Pierce 8game was bad. We didn’t block 16, RUSHING Pecorelli 1-2, Potter 1-0, Cashman 2-5, Snyder 6-32, Curry 1-6, Trenholm 1-8. Dallas, J.Roccogranwell, we didn’t tackle well. It was di 14-170, Zapoticky 4-101, Artsma 3-24, Dunn 112, Wanek 2-(minus-8), Gately 1-(minus-4), Macosugly. It was downright ugly.” ky 6-40, M.Shutlock 1-23, Napkora 1-3, L.Brace 1-6, Zapoticky added a 61-yard TD Stegman 1-2, team 2-(minus-2). PASSING – Berwick, Pierce 10-19-0-102, Curry run late in the first quarter for an 1-1-0-10. Dallas, Zapoticky 10-13-0-131. – Berwick, Pecorelli 5-70, Klinger 18-0 lead. He tossed another 21- 1-2,RECEIVING Freeman 1-(minus-2), Steeber 1-12, Ladonis 220, Stout 1-10. Dallas, Simonovich 6-78, Dunn 2-21, yard score to Simonovich early in Gately 1-18, Rogers 1-14. INTS – none. the second and Roccograndi’s 11MISSED FGS – none. yard touchdown run just before

Lackawanna Trail 55, Meyers 7

No scoring Second Quarter SUS – Price 8 pass from Stanley (kick failed), 11:57 SUS – Price 3 run (pass failed), 7:44 Third Quarter GNA – Hempel 84 kickoff return (Badowski kick), 11:42 SUS – Quick 16 pass from Stanley (Stanley run), 0:02 Fourth Quarter SUS – Pruitt 46 run (kick failed), 2:28 Team Statistics Nanticoke Susq First downs ....................... 9 8 Rushes-yards ................... 41-49 32-160 Passing.............................. 101 32 Total Yards ....................... 150 192 Comp-Att-Int ..................... 6-19-1 3-8-0 Sacked-Yards Lost .......... 2-16 1-6 Punts-Avg.......................... 5-18.4 4-26.3 Fumbles-Lost.................... 0-0 2-1 Penalties-Yards................ 11-90 3-15 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING – GNA, Maslowski 30-67, Jezewski 2-9, Vitale 1-5, Matulewski 2- (minus 11), Decker 6(minus 21); SUS, Pruitt 9-85, Price 13-57, Stanley 9-19, TEAM 1- (minus 1). PASSING – GNA, Decker 6-19-1-101; SUS, Stanley 3-8-0-32. RECEIVING – GNA, Gavrish 3-34, Matulewski 2-45, Jezewski 1-22; SUS, Price 2-16, Quick 1-16. INTS – SUS, Maby. MISSED FGS – None.

Tigers stay winless after visit to ‘Pit’

Special teams falter as Lack. Trail routs Meyers By TOM ROBINSON For the Times Leader

yard touchdown run within a 4:13 span of the second quarter, giving the Sabers a 12-0 lead at halftime. Meanwhile, Nanticoke Area was held to a mere 38 rushing yards and 22 passing during the first half. About the only thing Susquehanna couldn’t execute was points after touchdowns. The Sabers missed two extra points and failed on a two-point conversion attempt. “Our extra point team is awful,” Bagnell said. “I don’t know what we’re going to do. We can’t find anyone who can make kicks.”

Meyers................................ 0 7 0 0 — 7 Lackawanna Trail .............. 7 21 13 14 — 55 First Quarter LT – Laytos 12 run (Murazzi kick), 4:35 Second Quarter LT – Greenley 8 run (Murazzi kick), 10:37 LT – Z. Goodrich recovered blocked punt in end zone (Murazzi kick), 5:26 LT – Aten 26 fumble return (Murazzi kick), 4:33 M – Lisman 21 interception return (Lisman kick), 1:30 Third Quarter LT – Murazzi 5 run (bad snap), 9:08 LT – Laytos 9 run (Murazzi kick), 3:02 Fourth Quarter LT – Darling 62 punt return (kick failed), 11:42 LT – C. Rosiak 4 run (Zedar run), 6:58 Team Statistics Meyers Trail First downs............................... 4 12 Rushes-yards .......................... 33-16 36-232 Passing ..................................... 44 37 Total Yards............................... 60 269 Comp-Att-Int ............................ 2-10-0 4-11-1 Sacked-Yards Lost ................. 4-36 1-9 Punts-Avg................................. 5-11.4 1-25.0 Fumbles-Lost........................... 3-2 2-1 Penalties-Yards....................... 3-18 6-52 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING – M, Proctor 14-32, Blankenship 2-8, Owen 2-4, Nelson 2-0, Smith 9-(-8), Labatch 3-(-8), Team 1-(-12). LT, Laytos 11-121, Greenley 7-36, M. Rosiak 6-32, Murazzi 3-11, Darling 4-10, Wallen 1-7, Symuleski 2-7, C. Rosiak 1-4, Z. Goodrich 1-4. PASSING – M, Labatch 1-7-0-28, Smith 1-3-016. LT, Darling 3-8-1-16, Z. Goodrich 1-1-0-21. RECEIVING – M, Miller 1-28, DeMarco 1-16. LT, Greenley 2-7, Lee 1-21, Laytos 1-9. INTERCEPTIONS – M, Owen. FIELD GOALS MISSED – None.

CLARKS SUMMIT – For Abington Heights, the last week seemed as if it lasted forever. After being blown out by Wyoming Valley West, the Comets responded in a big way. They took control of the game early and never gave it back as they defeated Tunkhannock 35-6 on Saturday afternoon. The Comets (2-1) used a combination of a successful air attack and an equally successful ground game to defeat the Tigers (0-3). It didn’t take the Comets long to get on the scoreboard. With 9:29 remaining in the opening quarter, Quinn Karam found his way into the end zone for a 3-yard touchdown. Brandon Pacyna added the PAT and the Comets led 7-0. Sean Rock then extended the Comets lead to 14-0 with a 39yard jaunt. Pacyna split the uprights with the PAT with just 23 seconds remaining in the first quarter. However, the Comets offense was just heating up. The end zone became a familiar place for Karam as he scored his second rushing touchdown of the game with 9:20 remaining in the first half. He broke loose of Tunkhannock defenders and traveled 15 yards into the end zone. After the rushing attack put on its show, the passing game took off in the third quarter. Dante Pasqualichio found soph-

COUGARS Continued from Page 1C

ed the line of the scrimmage early, amassing 258 of its 372 yards rushing in the first half. In that time, the Cougars defensive line only gave up 1 yard on the ground to the Crusaders on 13 carries, and didn’t give up a first down until midway through the second quarter as they opened a 21-0 lead after the first 24 minutes of play. The Cougars got on the board on their first possession when Tyler Phillips broke loose for a 51-yard score. Phillips (15 carries for 119 yards) scampered for a 47-yard TD dash on Valley View’s third possession of the game as it went up 14-0 with 2:27 left in the first quarter. That was the worst the Crusaders (1-2) looked throughout the game. The defense tightened after that only allowing Phillips to run for 19 more yards in the contest. Coughlin’s defensive unit gave up just 14 more points the rest of the way and that was against Valley View’s first team, which only left the game on its final drive. “We have a lot of seniors so they’ve been playing for three years, and it’s a senior-dominated team and they’re used to doing what we’ve been doing,” Valley View coach George Howanitz said. “They get off the ball low and they’ve kind of done what we’ve coached them to do and it’s shown the last couple

omore J.C. Show in the end zone for a 35-yard touchdown with 8:55 showing on the clock. Pasqualichio then put the game into the mercy rule by completing an 11-yard touchdown pass to Jerry Langan. Tunkhannock got on the board with 5:47 remaining in the game. Luke Seaberg threw a perfect pass, hitting Josh Colley in stride for a 65-yard touchdown. The extra point was blocked by a host of Comet defenders who busted across the line of scrimmage. Pasqualichio completed15 passes for 236 yards and two touchdowns. Karam had two touchdowns on five carries. He accumulated 25 yards in the game. Josh Robinson led the Tunkhannock ground attack with 12 rushes for 51 yards.

Abington Heights 35, Tunkhannock 6 Tunkhannock................... 0 0 0 6 — 6 Abington Heights ............ 14 7 14 0 — 35 First Quarter AH – Karam 3 run (Pacyna kick) 9:29 AH – Rock 39 run (Pacyna kick) 0:23 No scoring Second Quarter Karam 15 run (Pacyna kick) 9:20 Third Quarter AH – Show 35 pass from Pasqualichio (Pacyna kick) 8:55 AH – Landgan 11 pass from Pasqualichio (Pacyna kick) 4:59 Fourth Quarter TUN – Colley 65 pass from Seaberg (kick blocked) 5:47 Team Statistics Tunk Abington First downs ....................... 9 11 Rushes-yards................... 31-73 23-193 Passing ............................. 141 238 Total Yards ....................... 214 431 Comp-Att-Int..................... 5-11-1 10-15-0 Sacked-Yards Lost.......... 2-14 2-10 Punts-Avg. ........................ 6-29 3-36 Fumbles-Lost ................... 3-2 1-0 Penalties-Yards ............... 3-30 5-55 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING – AH, Karam 5-25, Rock 2-39, Langan 3-26, Degilio 3-(minus-1), Fox 5-42, Carrol 1(minus-4), Mills 4-66, Kilbourn 1-0; TUN, Edmonson 8-25, Seaberg 4- (minus-10), Robinson 1251, Muckin 3-2, Coolbaugh 3-6 PASSING – AH, Pasqualichio 9-15-0-236, Carroll, 1-1-0-2; TUN, Seaberg 5-11-1-141. RECEIVING – AH, Degilio 1-74, Show 4-70, Riggi 1-19, Langan 2-39, Henzes 1-13; TUN, Edmonson 1-20, Colley 3-107, Custer 1-14 INTS – AH, Show. MISSED FGS – none.

weeks.” Pat Jeffers added a pair of 7yard rushing scores for the Cougars, one in the second quarter and another in the third. Coughlin’s Joe Parsnik had a decent game all over the field. He pulled out a 40-yard kickoff return to begin the game. On offense, he passed for 53 yards and carried the ball nine times for just 4 yards against the vaunted Cougar defense. On the defensive side of the ball, the senior swarmed to the ball recovering a fumble and making more than 10 tackles. “The kid is just a great kid,” Cinti said about Parsnik. “I can’t say enough good things about the kid; it wouldn’t do him justice because that’s the kind of kid he is. He’s unselfish and he’ll do anything to win.” Valley View 28, Coughlin 0 Valley View.......................... 14 7 7 0 — 28 Coughlin............................... 0 0 0 0 — 0 First Quarter VV – Phillips 51 run (kick blocked) 7:33 VV – Phillips 47 run (Jeffers run) 2:27 Second Quarter VV – Jeffers 7 run (Brady kick) 11:03 Third Quarter VV – Jeffers 7 run (Brady kick) 6:11 Team Statistics Valley View Coughlin First downs ............... 19 2 Rushes-yards........... 61-372 22-37 Passing ..................... 7 71 Total Yards ............... 379 106 Comp-Att-Int............. 1-6-0 5-11-2 Sacks By................... 1-5 0-0 Punts-Avg. ................ 2-28.0 7-34.4 Fumbles-Lost ........... 3-1 1-1 Penalties-Yards ....... 5-43 4-32 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING – VV, Jeffers 20-120, Muhammad 1-4, Phillips 15-119, Kapinus 8-68, Callejas 5-20, Lalli 2-36, TEAM 2-(minus-21), Ossont 6-19, Williams 1-4, Wolfel 1-3. COU, Evans 8-40, Parsnik 9-4, Pilch 2-(minus-8), TEAM 1-(minus-1), Mahmoud 1-0, King 1-2 PASSING – VV, Callejas 1-6-0-7, Santarelli 00-0-0. COU, Pilch 3-6-0-18, Parsnik 2-5-1-53 RECEIVING – VV, Wartman 1-7. COU, Monroe 2-49, Mahmoud 2-19, Evans 1-3 INTS – VV, Rupe, Lalli. MISSED FIELD GOALS – none


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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011 PAGE 7C

             US Senator Robert P. Casey, Jr. Honorary Co-Chair

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011

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NFL SUNDAY E A G L E S V S . FA L C O N S

S TA N D I N G S All Times EDT AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct New England ........................... 1 0 0 1.000 Buffalo...................................... 1 0 0 1.000 N.Y. Jets .................................. 1 0 0 1.000 Miami........................................ 0 1 0 .000 South W L T Pct Houston ................................... 1 0 0 1.000 Jacksonville............................. 1 0 0 1.000 Tennessee............................... 0 1 0 .000 Indianapolis ............................. 0 1 0 .000 North W L T Pct Baltimore.................................. 1 0 0 1.000 Cincinnati ................................. 1 0 0 1.000 Cleveland................................. 0 1 0 .000 Pittsburgh ................................ 0 1 0 .000 West W L T Pct Oakland.................................... 1 0 0 1.000 San Diego ................................ 1 0 0 1.000 Kansas City ............................. 0 1 0 .000 Denver ..................................... 0 1 0 .000 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct Washington ............................. 1 0 0 1.000 Philadelphia............................. 1 0 0 1.000 Dallas ....................................... 0 1 0 .000 N.Y. Giants .............................. 0 1 0 .000 South W L T Pct New Orleans.............................. 0 1 0 .000 Tampa Bay ................................. 0 1 0 .000 Carolina...................................... 0 1 0 .000 Atlanta ........................................ 0 1 0 .000 North W L T Pct Chicago.................................... 1 0 0 1.000 Detroit....................................... 1 0 0 1.000 Green Bay ................................ 1 0 0 1.000 Minnesota................................ 0 1 0 .000 West W L T Pct San Francisco ......................... 1 0 0 1.000 Arizona..................................... 1 0 0 1.000 St. Louis................................... 0 1 0 .000 Seattle ...................................... 0 1 0 .000 Sunday, Sep. 18 Chicago at New Orleans, 1 p.m. Baltimore at Tennessee, 1 p.m. Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 1 p.m. Kansas City at Detroit, 1 p.m. Jacksonville at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m. Oakland at Buffalo, 1 p.m. Arizona at Washington, 1 p.m. Seattle at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. Green Bay at Carolina, 1 p.m. Cleveland at Indianapolis, 1 p.m. Dallas at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Denver, 4:15 p.m. Houston at Miami, 4:15 p.m. San Diego at New England, 4:15 p.m. Philadelphia at Atlanta, 8:20 p.m. Monday, Sep. 19 St. Louis at N.Y. Giants, 8:30 p.m. Sunday, Sep. 25 Houston at New Orleans, 1 p.m. Denver at Tennessee, 1 p.m. Detroit at Minnesota, 1 p.m. San Francisco at Cincinnati, 1 p.m. New England at Buffalo, 1 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. Miami at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Jacksonville at Carolina, 1 p.m. Kansas City at San Diego, 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. Baltimore at St. Louis, 4:05 p.m. Arizona at Seattle, 4:15 p.m. Green Bay at Chicago, 4:15 p.m. Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 4:15 p.m. Pittsburgh at Indianapolis, 8:20 p.m. Monday, Sep. 26 Washington at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.

PF 38 41 27 24

PA 24 7 24 38

PF 34 16 14 7

PA 7 14 16 34

PF 35 27 17 7

PA 7 17 27 35

PF 23 24 7 20

PA 20 17 41 23

PF 28 31 24 14

PA 14 13 27 28

PF 34 20 21 12

PA 42 27 28 30

PF 30 27 42 17

PA 12 20 34 24

PF 33 28 13 17

PA 17 21 31 33

W E E K 1 H I G H S A N D L O W S POINTS Most 42, Green Bay vs. New Orleans 41, Buffalo at Kansas City 38, New England at Miami 35, Baltimore vs. Pittsburgh 34, New Orleans at Green Bay 34, Houston vs. Indianapolis Fewest 7, Indianapolis at Houston 7, Kansas City vs. Buffalo 7, Pittsburgh at Baltimore 12, Atlanta at Chicago 13, St. Louis vs. Philadelphia TOTAL YARDS Most 622, New England at Miami 488, Miami vs. New England 477, New Orleans at Green Bay 477, Carolina at Arizona 431, Detroit at Tampa Bay Fewest 187, Minnesota at San Diego 209, San Francisco vs. Seattle 213, Kansas City vs. Buffalo 219, Seattle at San Francisco 236, Indianapolis at Houston RUSHING YARDS Most 237, Philadelphia at St. Louis 190, Oakland at Denver 170, Baltimore vs. Pittsburgh 167, Houston vs. Indianapolis 163, Buffalo at Kansas City 163, Jacksonville vs. Tennessee Fewest 38, Denver vs. Oakland 43, Tennessee at Jacksonville 45, N.Y. Jets vs. Dallas 56, Tampa Bay vs. Detroit 64, Dallas at N.Y. Jets 64, Indianapolis at Houston 64, Seattle at San Francisco NET PASSING YARDS Most 516, New England at Miami 403, Carolina at Arizona 396, New Orleans at Green Bay 390, Miami vs. New England 330, San Diego vs. Minnesota Fewest 28, Minnesota at San Diego 99, Oakland at Denver 105, Kansas City vs. Buffalo 124, San Francisco vs. Seattle 155, Cincinnati at Cleveland 155, Seattle at San Francisco TIMES SACKED BY OPPONENT Most 5, Seattle at San Francisco 5, Atlanta at Chicago 5, Chicago vs. Atlanta 5, St. Louis vs. Philadelphia 5, Denver vs. Oakland PASSES HAD INTERCEPTED Most 3, Pittsburgh at Baltimore FUMBLES LOST Most 4, Pittsburgh at Baltimore TURNOVERS TIMES LOSING BALL ON FUMBLES LOST OR INTERCEPTIONS Most 7, Pittsburgh at Baltimore (4 fumbles; 3 interceptions) FIRST DOWNS Most 31, San Diego vs. Minnesota Fewest 10, Minnesota at San Diego FIRST DOWNS RUSHING Most 12, Philadelphia at St. Louis 12, Houston vs. Indianapolis Fewest 1, Tampa Bay vs. Detroit 1, N.Y. Jets vs. Dallas 1, Tennessee at Jacksonville FIRST DOWNS PASSING Most 21, San Diego vs. Minnesota Fewest 3, Minnesota at San Diego FIRST DOWNS BY PENALTY Most 6, Denver vs. Oakland TIME OF POSSESSION Most 39:38, Jacksonville vs. Tennessee TOP PASSING PERFORMERS 517, Brady, NWE at MIA (32-48, 4 TD) 422, C. Newton, CAR at ARI (24-37, 2 TD) 419, Brees, NOR at GBY (32-49, 3 TD) 416, Henne, MIA vs. NWE (30-49, 2 TD) 342, Romo, DAL at NYJ (23-36, 2 TD) 335, Rivers, SND vs. MIN (33-48, 2 TD) 335, Sanchez, NYJ vs. DAL (26-44, 2 TD) 319, M. Ryan, ATL at CHI (31-47, 0 TD) 312, Cutler, CHI vs. ATL (22-32, 2 TD) 312, A. Rodgers, GBY vs. NOR (27-35, 3 TD) 309, Kolb, ARI vs. CAR (18-27, 2 TD) 305, Grossman, WAS vs. NYG (21-34, 2 TD) 305, Stafford, DET at TAM (24-33, 3 TD) 304, Orton, DEN vs. OAK (24-46, 1 TD) TOP RUSHING PERFORMERS 150, D. McFadden, OAK at DEN (22 att., 0 TD) 122, L. McCoy, PHL at STL (15 att., 1 TD) 121, Benson, CIN at CLE (25 att., 1 TD) 116, Be. Tate, HOU vs. IND (24 att., 1 TD) 112, F. Jackson, BUF at KAN (20 att., 0 TD) 107, R. Rice, BAL vs. PIT (19 att., 1 TD) 100, M. Turner, ATL at CHI (10 att., 0 TD)

JAGUARS VS. JETS

Not really homecoming for Vick Memories of No. 7 will be vivid during his return to play in the Georgia Dome. By PAUL NEWBERRY AP Sports Writer

Jacksonville RB Jones-Drew gave up touchdown to ensure victory by Jaguars in 2009.

ATLANTA — Matt Ryan is confident and self-assured, not the least bit threatened by the quarterback who came before him. Yet he knows how this works. When Michael Vick returns to Atlanta for the first time as Philadelphia’s starter, there will be no escaping the comparisons between No. 7 and Matty Ice. Plenty of FalUP NEXT cons fans will be wearing PHILADELVick’s old jerPHIA at ATLANTA sey and cheerTV: 8:20 p.m., ing for the guy NBC (WBRE-28) who played in LINE: Eagles Atlanta for a 1 by 2 ⁄2 half-dozen LAST MEETthrilling seaING: Eagles beat Falcons sons. If he 31-17, Oct. 17, leads the Ea2010 gles (1-0) to another victory Sunday night, some of those same fans will undoubtedly be muttering that their team should’ve stuck with the guy who went to prison for nearly two years. None of which is fair to Ryan, of course. “I don’t worry about it,” he insisted. “That’s the nature of the NFL right now. In the age we’re in and the media-driven sport we’re in, you’re going to answer those questions. It’s part of the deal.” Whose house? Even Vick gave a shout-out to the guy who filled his shoes. When someone asked if he planned to declare the Georgia Dome “my house” — as Deion Sanders did in the 1990s after returning to Atlanta in a visiting uniform — the Eagles quarterback quickly shot down the idea. “That’s not my house,” Vick said. “That’s Matt Ryan’s house. I’m just a visitor.” Ryan has every right to be proud of his resume in Atlanta. He’s led the Falcons (0-1) to three straight winning seasons, something no other quarterback — not even Vick — pulled off. Heck, they’d never even strung together two in a row before he arrived in 2008. The Falcons have gone to the playoffs twice with Ryan at the helm, and they’re coming off a 13-3 season and NFC South championship. The only thing he’s missing is a postseason victory, and there’s still plenty of time

Infamous kneel-down still haunts fantasy game By DENNIS WASZAK Jr. AP Sports Writer

AP FILE PHOTO

Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Michael Vick, left, reacts with Asante Samuel after throwing a long bomb against the Atlanta Falcons during the fourth quarter of a 2009 game.

for that. “He’s one of the young starters in this league, and he’s going to be one of the great ones,” Vick said. “He just has to keep working as he continues to get better. I’m excited for him.” But Vick still casts a long shadow in these parts. Love him or hate him, there’s no doubt he made Atlanta a relevant NFL franchise. Great memories Most everyone has their favorite memory, whether it was the Vick-led Falcons becoming the first visiting team ever to win a playoff game at Lambeau Field, or maybe it was that year they made it all the way to the NFC championship game. Most everyone

remembers some improbable run — the overtime touchdown in Minnesota, perhaps? — or a throw no one else could’ve made. Fair enough. Those were dazzling times. But this is Ryan’s team now, and he’s doing just fine. “I’m going to get in his ear and I’m going to tell him, ’Don’t even listen to it, don’t read about it. When they ask you a question, just say I’m going to play ball,”’ Falcons tight end Tony Gonzalez said. “But you know what? I don’t even have to say that to Matt. What I know of Matt, he’s a poised guy. He’s not going to let that creep into his mind. He’s going to go out there play like he always does and make plays for us.” Ryan certainly needs to make

more plays than he did in the season opener. He was sacked five times and had two of Atlanta’s three turnovers in an ugly 30-12 loss to the Chicago Bears. The Falcons also struggled to wrap up tackles, letting a couple of short throws turn into plays of more than 50 yards. Now, the Atlanta defense has to deal with Vick, who wasn’t especially sharp in Philadelphia’s opener but still threw for 187 yards, ran for 98 more and tossed a couple of touchdown passes. “He’s the best running quarterback ever to play the game, and his passing is very much improved,” Falcons defensive tackle Corey Peters said. “I think he’s a top-five quarterback passing the ball as well.”

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Maurice Jones-Drew and Mark Sanchez had everyone talking the last time the Jacksonville Jaguars and New York Jets played each other. It was all about one guy’s kneeldown and the other’s near-meltdown on that November afternoon two years ago. There was Jones-Drew taking a knee at the 1-yard line despite having a clear path to the end zone to help the Jaguars run out the clock UP NEXT and kick the winning field JACKSONgoal, sending VILLE fantasy football at N.Y. JETS fans into a fren- TV: 1 p.m., CBS (WYOU-22) zy. LINE: Jets by 10 “The fans ob- LAST MEETviously, (with) ING: Jaguars fantasy, they hat- beat Jets 24-22, ed it,” Jones- Nov. 15, 2009 Drew said. “At the same time, fantasy is a fun thing, it’s a hobby for me. It doesn’t pay the bills. So I have to take care of what pays the bills, you know?” And, that’s whatever it takes to win on the field, of course. The Jaguars (1-0) and Jets (1-0) will meet again for the first time since at MetLife Stadium on Sunday. Sanchez’s postgame press conference that day raised lots of eyebrows when he pulled out a sheet of paper and read off a list of prepared remarks. It was a curious move that some called arrogant, while others thought it was just plain silly. He was a rookie then and believed he had cost his team a few victories with spotty play. With the Jets holding a late 22-21 lead in the teams’ last matchup, the Jaguars were driving down the field when New York coach Rex Ryan made the bold decision to allow the Jaguars to score. This way, Ryan thought, the Jets could get the ball back with about a minute left for a winning drive of their own. Instead, Jones-Drew took the handoff and went off left tackle and stunningly dropped to a knee at the 1. A few moments later, Josh Scobee kicked a 21-yard field goal as time expired.

S E AT T L E V S . P I T T S B U R G H

Only Week 2, but Steelers out to reboot season Ben Roethlisberger and Co. are looking for strong start that eluded them in opener.

By WILL GRAVES AP Sports Writer

PITTSBURGH — The Pittsburgh Steelers insist they don’t have a panic button. An erase button? Absolutely. The defending AFC champions see their baffling — not to mention decisive — 35-7 loss to rival Baltimore last week as something a little control/alt/ delete can’t fix. “I forgot about that game already,” said quarterback Ben Roethlisberger. Good idea. The Steelers (0-1) haven’t started a season with consecutive losses during Roethlisberger’s eight-year career. He has no

UP NEXT SEATTLE at PITTSBURGH TV: 1 p.m., Fox (WOLF-56) LINE: Steelers by 131⁄2 LAST MEETING: Steelers beat Seahawks 21-0, Oct. 7, 2007

plans to start now heading into Sunday’s home opener against Seattle (0-1). “Talking to (defensive coordinator Dick) LeBeau, we used our mulligan on the first tee and we got 17 more holes to birdie,” Roethlisberger said. The Seahawks didn’t implode for an entire game as the Steelers did. Instead, they saved it a 59second span in the fourth quarter, letting a comeback against

AP FILE PHOTO

Pittsburgh QB Ben Roethlisberger (7) throws a pass over Seattle linebacker Julian Peterson (59) during a 2007 game.

San Francisco evaporate as quickly as it took the 49ers Ted Ginn Jr. to return a kickoff and a punt for touchdowns. It was a sobering dose of real-

ity for the defending NFC West champions, who had hoped to solve their quarterback issues by bringing in Tarvaris Jackson. Instead, Jackson spent most of the

first week in his new gig trying to stay upright behind a shaky offensive line that allowed him to get sacked five times and harassed countless others. Now Jackson has to face a Pittsburgh defense eager to show the doubters the group of 30-somethings isn’t as old or as slow as the Ravens made it look. Not exactly the best time for a young team trying to find its footing to visit Heinz Field. “There is never a good time to play these guys,” said Seattle coach Pete Carroll. “It’s always difficult.” This week, perhaps, more than most. Coach Mike Tomlin expects his players to be “angry” after getting squashed by the Ravens, though safety Troy Polamalu — who got involved in a dustup at the end of the game out of frustration — isn’t quite ready to promise vengeance.


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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AMERICAN LEAGUE ROUNDUP

Zobrist spellz doom for BoSox The Associated Press

BOSTON — Ben Zobrist hit a two-run homer off Jon Lester on Saturday to lead the Tampa Bay Rays to a 4-3 victory over the Red Sox and trim Boston’s lead in the AL wild-card race to three games. Jeff Niemann (11-7) pitched five solid innings for Tampa Bay, which has won seven of its last eight against Boston. The Red Sox have lost 10 of their last 13 games since Sept. 3, when they led the wild-card race by nine games. Rangers 7, Mariners 6

SEATTLE — Josh Hamilton had four hits, including a homer, and drove in three runs to help the Texas Rangers outslug the Seattle Mariners 7-6 on Saturday night, extending their division lead to 41⁄2 games over the Los Angeles Angels in the AL West. The Angels lost 6-2 to the Baltimore Orioles Saturday afternoon. Orioles 6, Angels 2

BALTIMORE — The Los Angeles Angels’ shaky playoff hopes took another blow Saturday night when Ervin Santana yielded five first-inning runs in a 6-2 loss to the Baltimore Orioles. Desperately needing a win to stay within striking distance of first-place Texas in the AL West and Boston in the wild-card chase, Los Angeles fell flat for the second night in a row against the last-place Orioles. Athletics 5, Tigers 3

OAKLAND, Calif. — Gio Gonzalez pitched seven innings for his 14th win and Oakland turned three double plays in the first five innings and the Athletics beat the

RIVERA TIES MLB SAV E R ECORD WITH 601ST TORONTO — Mariano Rivera tied the major league saves record, earning the 601st of his career and matching Trevor Hoffman while preserving the New York Yankees’ 7-6 win over the Toronto Blue Jays on Saturday. The 41-year-old Rivera was perfect in pitching the ninth inning for his 42nd save of the season. Rivera struck out Colby Rasmus looking to start the ninth, then retired Brett Lawrie on a broken-bat grounder to first. While some in the crowd of 39,288 headed for the exits, most stayed to watch as Rivera got Eric Thames on a routine fly to center.

Detroit Tigers 5-3 on Saturday. Coco Crisp drove in the deciding run with an RBI single over the head of shortstop Jhonny Peralta in the second inning while Josh Willingham singled twice and scored for Oakland. Royals 10, White Sox 3

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Mike Moustakas hit his third home run in four games and Jeff Francoeur hit a three-run homer and the Kansas City Royals beat the Chicago White Sox 10-3 Saturday night for their seventh straight victory. MINNEAPOLIS — Carlos Santana hit his 25th home run and Jeanmar Gomez pitched effectively into the seventh inning before leaving with an injury Saturday as the Cleveland Indians beat the Minnesota Twins 10-4.

Gallardo, Braun push Brewers closer to title CINCINNATI — Yovani Gallardo struck out a careerhigh 13 and Ryan Braun hit his third home run in two nights to help the Milwaukee Brewers inch closer to a Central Division championship with a 10-1 win over the Cincinnati Reds on Saturday night. Yuniesky Betancourt also homered and Gallardo pulled off the rare feat of striking out four batters in one inning as the Brewers lowered their magic number to five with their fourth win in their last five games and St. Louis’s loss at Philadelphia. Any combination of Milwaukee wins and Cardinal losses adding up to five gives the Brewers their first division championship since 1982, when they won the American League East. Gallardo’s previous singlegame strikeout high was 12,

PHILLIES Continued from Page 1C

champs. The fans didn’t even scream all that loud, even when the Phillie Phanatic ran on the field with a big flag that said 2011. Once they reached the clubhouse, however, the Phillies popped open the bubbly and celebrated their achievement. With the Four Aces leading the way, the Phillies are seeking their third NL pennant in four years and second World Series title. They’ve taken care of the first step. Now they’ll use the 12 remaining games to get ready for the postseason. It’s still uncertain who the Phillies will face in the best-of-five first round when the

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which he’d reached four times, including last Sunday. He threw 117 pitches, 75 of them strikes, in his six innings, giving up just two hits, one run, and two walks. Braves 1, Mets 0

ATLANTA — Tim Hudson struck out 10 and Chipper Jones hit an RBI single in the eighth inning as the Atlanta Braves held their NL wild-card edge by beating the New York Mets 1-0 Saturday. The Braves began the day with a 31⁄2-game lead over St. Louis for the wild card. Hudson (15-10) held the Mets to four hits over eight innings. Cubs 2, Astros 1

CHICAGO — Rodrigo Lopez and the Chicago Cubs handed Houston its record 100th loss Saturday, shutting down the Astros 2-1. NL playoffs begin Oct. 1. The major league-leading Phillies (98-52) are four wins away from setting a single-season club record. Oswalt (8-9) allowed no runs and five hits, striking out seven. Brad Lidge got one out in the eighth after Michael Stutes ran into trouble, and Ryan Madson finished with a seven-run cushion. St. Louis fell 41⁄2 games behind Atlanta in the wild-card race. They had won eight of nine to narrow the gap from 81⁄2 back on Sept. 6. Cardinals starter Jake Westbrook (12-9) allowed one earned run and five hits in 3 1-3 innings. He’s given up two earned runs or less in 11 of his 16 road starts this season, but fell to 8-4 away from home.

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STANDINGS/STATS S TA N D I N G S New York...................................... Boston .......................................... Tampa Bay ................................... Toronto ......................................... Baltimore ......................................

W 91 87 84 76 62

x-Detroit........................................ Cleveland ..................................... Chicago ........................................ Kansas City.................................. Minnesota ....................................

W 88 74 73 67 59

Texas ............................................ Los Angeles ................................. Oakland ........................................ Seattle...........................................

W 87 82 69 63

x-Philadelphia ............................... Atlanta ............................................ New York ....................................... Washington ................................... Florida ............................................ Milwaukee .................................. St. Louis ..................................... Cincinnati.................................... Pittsburgh................................... Chicago ...................................... Houston...................................... Arizona ......................................... San Francisco .............................. Los Angeles ................................. Colorado....................................... San Diego..................................... x-clinched division

W 98 87 72 71 69 W 89 82 74 68 67 51 W 87 81 74 70 64

AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division L Pct GB WCGB 59 .607 — — 64 .576 41⁄2 — 3 67 .556 71⁄2 75 .503 151⁄2 11 88 .413 29 241⁄2 Central Division L Pct GB WCGB 64 .579 — — 75 .497 121⁄2 12 14 78 .483 141⁄2 86 .438 211⁄2 21 91 .393 28 271⁄2 West Division L Pct GB WCGB 65 .572 — — 69 .543 41⁄2 5 83 .454 18 181⁄2 24 88 .417 231⁄2 NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division L Pct GB WCGB 52 .653 — — 65 .572 12 — 80 .474 27 15 79 .473 27 15 83 .454 30 18 Central Division L Pct GB WCGB 63 .586 — — 69 .543 61⁄2 41⁄2 78 .487 15 13 83 .450 201⁄2 181⁄2 85 .441 22 20 100 .338 371⁄2 351⁄2 West Division L Pct GB WCGB 64 .576 — — 70 .536 6 51⁄2 76 .493 121⁄2 12 80 .467 161⁄2 16 87 .424 23 221⁄2

L10 4-6 2-8 7-3 6-4 7-3

Str W-1 L-1 W-1 L-1 W-4

Home 46-27 44-32 42-33 39-37 37-40

Away 45-32 43-32 42-34 37-38 25-48

L10 8-2 4-6 2-8 7-3 1-9

Str L-1 W-2 L-7 W-7 L-7

Home 45-29 39-33 33-42 39-39 30-44

Away 43-35 35-42 40-36 28-47 29-47

L10 7-3 5-5 5-5 4-6

Str W-1 L-2 W-1 L-1

Home 49-29 44-31 42-35 38-42

Away 38-36 38-38 27-48 25-46

L10 6-4 5-5 2-8 6-4 6-4

Str W-1 W-1 L-1 L-2 W-2

Home 52-23 47-30 31-44 41-35 28-44

Away 46-29 40-35 41-36 30-44 41-39

L10 4-6 8-2 4-6 3-7 6-4 4-6

Str W-2 L-1 L-2 L-1 W-2 L-3

Home 52-23 41-34 40-37 34-44 37-40 28-46

Away 37-40 41-35 34-41 34-39 30-45 23-54

L10 6-4 7-3 6-4 4-6 3-7

Str L-2 W-6 W-1 L-2 W-1

Home 45-27 44-34 38-38 38-38 31-42

Away 42-37 37-36 36-38 32-42 33-45

AMERICAN LEAGUE Friday's Games Baltimore 8, L.A. Angels 3 Toronto 5, N.Y. Yankees 4 Boston 4, Tampa Bay 3 Kansas City 7, Chicago White Sox 6 Cleveland 7, Minnesota 6 Detroit 3, Oakland 1 Seattle 4, Texas 0 Saturday's Games N.Y. Yankees 7, Toronto 6 Cleveland 10, Minnesota 4 Oakland 5, Detroit 3 Tampa Bay 4, Boston 3 Baltimore 6, L.A. Angels 2 Kansas City 10, Chicago White Sox 3 Texas 7, Seattle 6 Sunday's Games N.Y. Yankees (F.Garcia 11-7) at Toronto (Morrow 9-11), 1:07 p.m. L.A. Angels (Weaver 17-7) at Baltimore (Simon 4-8), 1:35 p.m. Tampa Bay (Price 12-12) at Boston (Wakefield 7-6), 1:35 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Danks 6-12) at Kansas City (Chen 11-7), 2:10 p.m. Cleveland (Masterson 11-10) at Minnesota (Pavano 8-12), 2:10 p.m. Detroit (Verlander 23-5) at Oakland (Moscoso 8-8), 4:05 p.m. Texas (M.Harrison 12-9) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 14-12), 4:10 p.m. Monday's Games Baltimore at Boston, 1:05 p.m., 1st game Minnesota at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m. Seattle at Cleveland, 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Baltimore at Boston, 7:10 p.m., 2nd game NATIONAL LEAGUE Friday's Games

Chicago Cubs 4, Houston 3, 12 innings Florida 3, Washington 0 St. Louis 4, Philadelphia 2, 11 innings Milwaukee 6, Cincinnati 3 N.Y. Mets 12, Atlanta 2 San Francisco 9, Colorado 1 San Diego 2, Arizona 0 L.A. Dodgers 7, Pittsburgh 2 Saturday's Games Chicago Cubs 2, Houston 1 Atlanta 1, N.Y. Mets 0 Florida 4, Washington 1, 13 innings Philadelphia 9, St. Louis 2 Milwaukee 10, Cincinnati 1 San Francisco at Colorado, 8:10 p.m. Arizona at San Diego, 8:35 p.m. Pittsburgh at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Sunday's Games Milwaukee (Greinke 14-6) at Cincinnati (Willis 0-6), 1:10 p.m. Florida (Hand 1-7) at Washington (Wang 2-3), 1:35 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Gee 12-6) at Atlanta (Beachy 7-2), 1:35 p.m. Houston (Myers 5-13) at Chicago Cubs (Dempster 10-12), 2:20 p.m. San Francisco (Cain 11-10) at Colorado (Rogers 6-5), 3:10 p.m. Arizona (J.Saunders 11-12) at San Diego (Harang 13-6), 4:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (Lincoln 1-2) at L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 10-10), 4:10 p.m. St. Louis (C.Carpenter 9-9) at Philadelphia (Hamels 14-8), 8:05 p.m. Monday's Games St. Louis at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Atlanta at Florida, 7:10 p.m. Houston at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m. San Diego at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Pittsburgh at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.

A M E R I C A N L E A G U E

Raburn lf 4 0 2 0 Wlngh lf 3 1 2 0 MiCarr 1b 3 0 0 0 DeJess rf 3 0 1 0 VMrtnz dh 4 0 2 0 Pnngtn ss 4 0 1 0 JhPerlt ss 3 1 1 1 Allen 1b 4 1 1 0 Inge 3b 3 0 0 0 KSuzuk c 1 2 0 1 Guillen ph 1 1 1 0 SSizmr 3b 4 1 2 1 Worth 2b 3 0 0 0 Kelly ph 1 0 1 2 OSants c 3 0 1 0 Avila ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 34 311 3 Totals 33 512 5 Detroit................................. 000 001 002 — 3 Oakland.............................. 021 000 02x — 5 E—Mi.Cabrera (12). DP—Detroit 1, Oakland 3. LOB—Detroit 7, Oakland 9. 2B—Kelly (6). SB— Crisp (42). CS—DeJesus (3). SF—Jh.Peralta, K.Suzuki. IP H R ER BB SO Detroit Porcello L,14-9........ 7 9 3 3 3 4 Coke ......................... 2⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 Perry ......................... 1⁄3 3 2 2 1 0 Oakland G.Gonzalez W,14-12 ................... 7 8 1 1 2 4 Balfour H,25............. 1 0 0 0 0 1 A.Bailey .................... 1 3 2 2 0 2 Umpires—Home, Jim Reynolds;First, Mike DiMuro;Second, Andy Fletcher;Third, Eric Cooper. T—2:46. A—19,451 (35,067).

Indians 10, Twins 4

N AT I O N A L L E A G U E R O U N D U P

The Associated Press

J

Yankees 7, Blue Jays 6 New York

Toronto ab r h bi ab r h bi Jeter ss 5 1 1 0 McCoy ss 3 0 1 3 Grndrs cf 3 3 3 2 KJhnsn 2b 4 0 0 0 Teixeir 1b 5 1 2 0 Bautist rf 3 0 0 0 Cano 2b 2 1 0 1 Lind 1b 4 1 1 0 AlRdrg 3b 4 1 2 3 Cooper dh 4 1 1 0 Swisher rf 4 0 0 0 Rasms cf 4 2 2 1 Dickrsn rf 0 0 0 0 Lawrie 3b 4 1 1 1 JMontr dh 4 0 1 0 Loewen lf 2 1 0 0 Gardnr lf 4 0 2 0 EThms lf 1 0 0 0 AuRmn c 3 0 0 0 JMolin c 2 0 1 1 ErChvz ph 1 0 0 0 Teahen ph 1 0 0 0 RMartn c 0 0 0 0 Arencii c 0 0 0 0 Totals 35 711 6 Totals 32 6 7 6 New York ........................... 000 104 200 — 7 Toronto............................... 040 200 000 — 6 E—Au.Romine (1), Loewen (2), Rasmus (3). DP— New York 1, Toronto 2. LOB—New York 5, Toronto 2. 2B—Granderson (23), Teixeira (24), McCoy (7), Rasmus (8), J.Molina (11). 3B—Gardner (8). HR— Granderson (40), Al.Rodriguez (16). S—McCoy. SF—Cano. IP H R ER BB SO New York Colon ........................ 4 7 6 6 1 3 Proctor...................... 1 0 0 0 1 1 Laffey W,3-2 ............ 1 0 0 0 0 0 Noesi H,4 ................. 1 0 0 0 0 1 R.Soriano H,22........ 1 0 0 0 0 3 Ma.Rivera S,42-47 . 1 0 0 0 0 1 Toronto H.Alvarez ................. 6 9 5 5 1 1 C.Villanueva L,6-4 BS,1-1 ...................... 1 2 2 2 0 0 Drabek...................... 2 0 0 0 1 3 HBP—by H.Alvarez (Cano). WP—H.Alvarez. Umpires—Home, CB Bucknor;First, Dan Iassogna;Second, Dale Scott;Third, Jerry Meals. T—2:50. A—39,288 (49,260).

Rays 4, Red Sox 3 Tampa Bay

Boston ab r h bi Ellsury cf 3 0 1 2 Pedroia 2b 4 0 0 0 AdGnzl 1b 2 0 0 0 D.Ortiz dh 3 0 0 0 Reddck rf 2 0 1 0 CJcksn ph 1 0 0 0 DMcDn rf 0 0 0 0 Sltlmch c 4 0 0 0 Crwfrd lf 4 2 2 0 Aviles 3b 4 1 3 1 Gthrght pr 0 0 0 0 Scutaro ss 3 0 0 0 Totals 30 4 6 3 Totals 30 3 7 3 Tampa Bay......................... 201 010 000 — 4 Boston ................................ 002 000 100 — 3 DP—Tampa Bay 1, Boston 1. LOB—Tampa Bay 4, Boston 6. 2B—Jennings (9), Aviles (15). HR—Zobrist (16). SB—Ellsbury (37), Gathright (1). CS— Damon (5), Ellsbury (14). S—B.Upton, Scutaro. SF—Ellsbury. IP H R ER BB SO Tampa Bay Niemann W,11-7 ..... 5 4 2 2 2 6 M.Moore H,1............ 3 2 1 1 2 2 Jo.Peralta S,4-6 ...... 1 1 0 0 0 2 Boston Lester L,15-8 ........... 7 5 4 4 4 5 D.Bard....................... 1 0 0 0 0 0 F.Morales................. 1 1 0 0 0 0 WP—M.Moore, Lester. Balk—F.Morales. Umpires—Home, Brian Knight;First, Jerry Layne;Second, Bob Davidson;Third, Hunter Wendelstedt. T—3:12. A—37,682 (37,065). Jnnngs lf BUpton cf Longori 3b Zobrist 2b Damon dh SRdrgz ss Brignc ss Ktchm 1b Guyer rf Fuld rf Loaton c

ab 3 3 3 4 3 2 1 4 4 0 3

r 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0

h bi 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

Indians 10, Twins 4 Cleveland

ab 4 5 5 5 4 4 5 4 5

r 1 3 2 1 1 0 0 1 1

h bi 0 0 3 2 4 1 2 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1

Minnesota

ab r h bi Revere cf 5 1 2 0 Plouffe ss 5 1 0 0 Cuddyr dh 4 1 2 1 Parmel 1b 3 1 3 3 LHughs 3b 4 0 0 0 Tosoni lf 3 0 0 0 Dnklm 2b 4 0 3 0 Benson rf 4 0 0 0 RRiver c 3 0 0 0 Tolbert ph 1 0 0 0 Butera c 0 0 0 0 Totals 41101410 Totals 36 410 4 Cleveland......................... 260 000 002 — 10 Minnesota........................ 001 010 020 — 4 E—Chisenhall (9), Tosoni (3). DP—Cleveland 1. LOB—Cleveland 8, Minnesota 8. 2B—Kipnis (7), LaPorta (20), Revere (6). 3B—Kipnis (1), Carrera (2). HR—C.Santana (25), Parmelee (1). IP H R ER BB SO Cleveland J.Gomez W,4-2 ....... 62⁄3 7 2 2 2 3 Judy .......................... 2⁄3 2 2 2 1 0 R.Perez .................... 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 J.Smith H,13............ 2⁄3 Putnam ..................... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Minnesota Swarzak L,3-7 ......... 12⁄3 7 7 7 1 0 Oliveros .................... 11⁄3 1 1 1 1 1 Liriano....................... 2 2 0 0 0 3 Hoey ......................... 1 1 0 0 0 0 Duensing.................. 1 0 0 0 0 1 Perkins ..................... 1 0 0 0 0 1 3 2 2 2 0 Capps ....................... 2⁄3 Al.Burnett ................. 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 R.Perez pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. WP—J.Gomez. Umpires—Home, Mark Wegner;First, Mike Everitt;Second, Mike Winters;Third, Chris Guccione. T—3:08. A—38,805 (39,500). Fukdm rf Kipnis 2b ACarer ss CSantn c Hafner dh LaPort 1b Chsnhll 3b Carrer cf Crowe lf

Athletics 5, Tigers 3 Detroit AJcksn cf Ordonz rf Dirks rf

ab 4 4 0

r 0 1 0

Oakland h bi ab r h bi 0 0 JWeeks 2b 5 0 3 1 3 0 Crisp cf 5 0 2 2 0 0 Matsui dh 4 0 0 0

Orioles 6, Angels 2 Los Angeles MIzturs 3b Bourjos cf HKndrc 2b TrHntr dh Trumo 1b

ab 4 4 3 3 4

r 0 0 1 0 0

h bi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

Baltimore Angle cf Hardy ss Markks rf Guerrr dh Wieters c C.Davis 3b-1b MrRynl 1b J.Bell 3b Reimld lf Andino 2b

ab 2 4 4 4 2

r 1 1 0 1 2

h bi 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 1 0

V.Wells lf 4 0 1 1 4 0 1 0 Trout rf 4 1 1 0 1 1 1 3 Aybar ss 3 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 BoWlsn c 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 Callasp ph 0 0 0 0 4 0 1 0 Mathis c 0 0 0 0 Totals 29 2 4 2 Totals 30 6 7 5 Los Angeles....................... 000 010 001 — 2 Baltimore ............................ 500 000 01x — 6 E—Trout (2). DP—Los Angeles 1, Baltimore 1. LOB—Los Angeles 5, Baltimore 6. 2B—Wieters (27), C.Davis (9). 3B—V.Wells (4). HR—Hardy (27), Mar.Reynolds (34). SB—Angle (7). SF— Bo.Wilson. IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles E.Santana L,11-12.. 7 5 5 5 3 3 Richards................... 1 2 1 1 1 1 Baltimore Britton W,10-10 ....... 7 3 1 1 2 7 Strop ......................... 1 0 0 0 1 0 Ji.Johnson ............... 1 1 1 1 1 2 HBP—by E.Santana (Reimold, Mar.Reynolds). Umpires—Home, Alfonso Marquez;First, Laz Diaz;Third, Ed Rapuano. T—2:22. A—31,099 (45,438).

Rangers 7, Mariners 6 Texas

Seattle ab r h bi ISuzuki rf 4 1 2 2 Seager 3b 4 1 2 2 Ackley 2b 4 0 0 0 Carp 1b 4 1 1 2 AKndy dh 3 1 1 0 W.Pena Napoli c 5 1 3 0 ph-dh 1 0 0 0 N.Cruz dh 5 0 1 0 J.Bard c 3 0 0 0 Germn pr-dh 0 0 0 0 Olivo ph-c 1 0 0 0 DvMrp rf 4 1 1 0 Ryan ss 1 1 1 0 Gentry cf 3 0 1 1 LRdrgz ss 3 0 0 0 EnChvz ph-cf 1 0 0 0 TRonsn lf 4 0 1 0 MSndrs cf 2 1 0 0 Liddi ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 39 714 7 Totals 35 6 8 6 Texas.................................. 013 300 000 — 7 Seattle ................................ 040 020 000 — 6 DP—Seattle 1. LOB—Texas 10, Seattle 3. 2B—J.Hamilton (29), Napoli 2 (24), Seager (10), T.Robinson (12). HR—Andrus (5), J.Hamilton (23), A.Beltre (26), Carp (10). SF—Mi.Young. IP H R ER BB SO Texas C.Lewis W,13-10 .... 52⁄3 8 6 6 1 7 D.Oliver H,15........... 11⁄3 0 0 0 0 3 M.Gonzalez H,8 ...... 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 M.Adams H,5........... 2⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 Feliz S,27-33 ........... 1 0 0 0 0 2 Seattle A.Vasquez L,1-4 ..... 3 7 5 5 1 3 Gray .......................... 21⁄3 4 2 2 1 0 C.Jimenez................ 2⁄3 0 0 0 1 1 Ruffin ........................ 1 1 0 0 0 1 J.Wright .................... 2 2 0 0 1 1 A.Vasquez pitched to 1 batter in the 4th. Umpires—Home, Brian Gorman;First, Dan Bellino;Second, Tony Randazzo;Third, Larry Vanover. T—2:55. A—22,159 (47,878). Kinsler 2b Andrus ss JHmltn lf MiYong 1b ABeltre 3b

ab 4 5 5 2 5

r 1 2 1 0 1

h bi 0 0 2 1 4 3 1 1 1 1

Royals 10, White Sox 3 Chicago

Kansas City ab r h bi ab r h bi Pierre lf 3 0 0 1 AGordn lf 4 0 2 1 AlRmrz ss 4 0 2 0 MeCarr cf 5 1 3 1 Konerk 1b 4 0 0 0 Butler dh 4 0 2 0 Rios cf 4 1 1 1 Hosmer 1b 5 2 1 0 Viciedo rf 4 0 1 0 Francr rf 5 1 1 3 A.Dunn dh 4 0 1 0 Mostks 3b 4 3 3 2 Flowrs c 4 1 1 0 S.Perez c 5 1 3 0 Morel 3b 1 1 0 0 Getz 2b 3 0 1 1 EEscor ph 1 0 0 0 AEscor ss 4 2 2 2 Bckhm 2b 3 0 0 0 Totals 32 3 6 2 Totals 39101810 Chicago............................ 010 000 200 — 3 Kansas City ..................... 000 321 13x — 10 E—Getz (7), Moustakas (10). DP—Chicago 2, Kansas City 1. LOB—Chicago 6, Kansas City 9. 2B—Viciedo (2), Hosmer (26), A.Escobar (20). 3B—Getz (3), A.Escobar (8). HR—Rios (11), Francoeur (19), Moustakas (4). SB—Me.Cabrera (19). S—Pierre, Getz. IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Z.Stewart L,2-5 ....... 5 11 5 5 2 2

Ohman...................... 1 3 2 2 1 0 Kinney ...................... 2 4 3 3 0 2 Kansas City Teaford W,2-0 ......... 6 4 1 1 2 4 Adcock S,1-1 ........... 3 2 2 2 1 1 Ohman pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. WP—Adcock. Umpires—Home, Greg Gibson;First, Angel Hernandez;Second, Todd Tichenor;Third, Tim Tschida. T—2:47. A—31,264 (37,903).

N AT I O N A L L E A G U E Phillies 9, Cardinals 2 Philadelphia ab r h bi ab r h bi Furcal ss 5 0 1 0 Rollins ss 5 2 4 0 Jay cf 4 1 1 0 Victorn cf 3 2 2 3 Pujols 1b 4 1 1 0 Utley 2b 4 1 0 0 Brkmn lf 4 0 3 1 Howard 1b 3 0 0 0 Freese 3b 4 0 1 1 Pence rf 3 1 2 2 Descals pr-3b 0 0 0 0 Ibanez lf 5 1 1 4 Craig rf 4 0 0 0 Polanc 3b 3 1 1 0 YMolin c 4 0 2 0 Ruiz c 4 1 0 0 Schmkr 2b 3 0 0 0 Oswalt p 3 0 0 0 Salas p 0 0 0 0 Stutes p 0 0 0 0 Rzpczy p 0 0 0 0 Lidge p 0 0 0 0 Dotel p 0 0 0 0 Gload ph 0 0 0 0 Chamrs ph 1 0 0 0 Mayrry ph 1 0 0 0 Westrk p 1 0 0 0 Madson p 0 0 0 0 Rhodes p 0 0 0 0 CPttrsn ph 1 0 0 0 MBggs p 0 0 0 0 McCllln p 0 0 0 0 Theriot 2b 2 0 1 0 Totals 37 210 2 Totals 34 910 9 St. Louis ............................. 000 000 020 — 2 Philadelphia....................... 100 101 06x — 9 E—Furcal (10), Descalso (8). DP—St. Louis 1. LOB—St. Louis 8, Philadelphia 10. 2B—Y.Molina (29), Pence (38). HR—Victorino (17), Ibanez (19). SB—Berkman (1). S—Victorino. IP H R ER BB SO St. Louis Westbrook L,12-9 ... 31⁄3 5 2 1 5 1 Rhodes..................... 2⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 M.Boggs................... 1 0 0 0 2 0 McClellan ................. 1 1 1 1 0 1 Salas......................... 1 0 1 0 0 1 2 3 3 0 1 Rzepczynski ............ 2⁄3 Dotel ......................... 1⁄3 2 2 2 0 0 Philadelphia Oswalt W,8-9........... 7 5 0 0 0 7 Stutes H,12.............. 2⁄3 4 2 2 0 0 Lidge H,7.................. 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 Madson .................... 1 1 0 0 0 0 Salas pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. HBP—by Rzepczynski (Utley). Umpires—Home, Bruce Dreckman;First, Gary Darling;Second, Paul Emmel;Third, Rob Drake. T—3:04. A—45,470 (43,651).

nati, 37;Maybin, San Diego, 36;JosReyes, New York, 36;Braun, Milwaukee, 31;Pagan, New York, 31. PITCHING—IKennedy, Arizona, 19-4;Kershaw, Los Angeles, 19-5;Halladay, Philadelphia, 18-5;Gallardo, Milwaukee, 17-10;ClLee, Philadelphia, 16-7;DHudson, Arizona, 16-10;THudson, Atlanta, 15-10. STRIKEOUTS—Kershaw, Los Angeles, 236;ClLee, Philadelphia, 223;Lincecum, San Francisco, 212;Halladay, Philadelphia, 211;Gallardo, Milwaukee, 196;AniSanchez, Florida, 191;IKennedy, Arizona, 182. SAVES—Kimbrel, Atlanta, 45;Axford, Milwaukee, 43;Putz, Arizona, 40;HBell, San Diego, 38;Hanrahan, Pittsburgh, 38;Storen, Washington, 37;LNunez, Florida, 35;BrWilson, San Francisco, 35.

St. Louis

Brewers 10, Reds 1 Cincinnati ab r h bi ab r h bi C.Hart rf 5 1 1 0 BPhllps 2b 4 0 0 0 Morgan cf-lf 4 2 2 1 Frazier 2b 0 0 0 0 Braun lf 5 1 3 4 Renteri ss 3 0 1 0 CGomz cf 0 0 0 0 Janish ss 0 0 0 0 Fielder 1b 3 0 1 0 Votto 1b 3 0 0 0 Loe p 0 0 0 0 Bruce rf 3 0 0 0 DeLCrz p 0 0 0 0 Alonso lf 4 1 1 1 McGeh 3b 5 0 0 0 JFrncs 3b 3 0 0 0 YBtncr ss 4 2 2 2 Stubbs cf 3 0 0 0 JoWilsn ph-ss 1 0 0 0 TrWood p 0 0 0 0 Lucroy c 3 1 0 0 Mesorc c 3 0 0 0 Maldnd ph-c 1 0 0 0 Volquez p 2 0 0 0 Counsll 2b 3 2 1 0 Arrdnd p 0 0 0 0 Gallard p 2 0 0 0 Fisher p 0 0 0 0 LSchfr ph 0 0 0 0 Heisey cf 1 0 0 0 Hwkns p 0 0 0 0 Kotsay ph-1b 1 1 1 3 Totals 37101110 Totals 29 1 2 1 Milwaukee........................ 100 101 340 — 10 Cincinnati ......................... 010 000 000 — 1 E—Y.Betancourt (19), Stubbs (3). DP—Milwaukee 2, Cincinnati 1. LOB—Milwaukee 6, Cincinnati 4. 2B—C.Hart (20), Kotsay (12). HR—Braun (31), Y.Betancourt (12), Alonso (5). SB—B.Phillips (11). CS—Votto (5). S—L.Schafer. IP H R ER BB SO Milwaukee Gallardo W,17-10 ... 6 2 1 1 2 13 Hawkins.................... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Loe ............................ 1 0 0 0 0 0 De La Cruz............... 1 0 0 0 1 1 Cincinnati 2 Volquez L,5-6 .......... 6 ⁄3 6 5 5 3 6 Arredondo ................ 1⁄3 1 1 1 0 0 Fisher ....................... 2⁄3 4 4 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 3 Tr.Wood ................... 11⁄3 HBP—by Volquez (Morgan). WP—Gallardo, Volquez. Umpires—Home, Bill Miller;First, Tom Hallion;Second, Phil Cuzzi;Third, Mike Estabrook. T—3:01. A—39,766 (42,319).

AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—AdGonzalez, Boston, .336;MiYoung, Texas, .333;MiCabrera, Detroit, .333;VMartinez, Detroit, .326;Ellsbury, Boston, .318;DOrtiz, Boston, .315;Kotchman, Tampa Bay, .309. RUNS—Granderson, New York, 131;Kinsler, Texas, 112;Ellsbury, Boston, 110;AdGonzalez, Boston, 103;Bautista, Toronto, 102;MiCabrera, Detroit, 102;Cano, New York, 99;AGordon, Kansas City, 99. RBI—Granderson, New York, 113;Cano, New York, 112;AdGonzalez, Boston, 111;Teixeira, New York, 104;MiYoung, Texas, 102;Konerko, Chicago, 101;Bautista, Toronto, 100. HITS—AdGonzalez, Boston, 198;MiYoung, Texas, 198;Ellsbury, Boston, 193;MeCabrera, Kansas City, 191;AGordon, Kansas City, 182;MiCabrera, Detroit, 179;Cano, New York, 179. DOUBLES—Francoeur, Kansas City, 45;AGordon, Kansas City, 45;Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 45;MiCabrera, Detroit, 44;Cano, New York, 44;Ellsbury, Boston, 43;AdGonzalez, Boston, 43. TRIPLES—AJackson, Detroit, 11;Granderson, New York, 10;Bourjos, Los Angeles, 9;Aybar, Los Angeles, 8;AEscobar, Kansas City, 8;Gardner, New York, 8;JWeeks, Oakland, 8. HOME RUNS—Bautista, Toronto, 42;Granderson, New York, 40;Teixeira, New York, 37;MarReynolds, Baltimore, 34;Kinsler, Texas, 29;Konerko, Chicago, 29;DOrtiz, Boston, 29. STOLEN BASES—Gardner, New York, 45;Crisp, Oakland, 42;ISuzuki, Seattle, 40;Ellsbury, Boston, 37;Andrus, Texas, 35;RDavis, Toronto, 34;Revere, Minnesota, 30;BUpton, Tampa Bay, 30. PITCHING—Verlander, Detroit, 23-5;Sabathia, New York, 19-8;Weaver, Los Angeles, 17-7;CWilson, Texas, 16-7;Nova, New York, 15-4;Lester, Boston, 15-8;Haren, Los Angeles, 15-9;RRomero, Toronto, 15-10;Shields, Tampa Bay, 15-11. STRIKEOUTS—Verlander, Detroit, 238;Sabathia, New York, 224;FHernandez, Seattle, 215;Shields, Tampa Bay, 214;Price, Tampa Bay, 206;CWilson, Texas, 198;Weaver, Los Angeles, 188. SAVES—Valverde, Detroit, 45;MaRivera, New York, 42;League, Seattle, 34;CPerez, Cleveland, 33;Walden, Los Angeles, 31;Papelbon, Boston, 30;SSantos, Chicago, 29.

Milwaukee

F R I D AY ’ S L A T E B O X E S Tigers 3, Athletics 1 Detroit

Oakland ab r h bi ab r h bi AJcksn cf 4 0 0 0 Crisp cf 4 0 1 0 Kelly rf 4 1 2 2 JWeeks 2b 4 0 0 0 DYong lf 5 0 0 0 Matsui lf 4 0 0 0 MiCarr 1b 1 0 1 0 Wlngh dh 4 1 1 1 VMrtnz dh 3 0 2 0 DeJess rf 3 0 2 0 Avila c 4 0 0 0 Pnngtn ss 3 0 0 0 JhPerlt ss 4 1 1 0 Allen 1b 3 0 0 0 Betemt 3b 3 0 1 1 Powell c 3 0 0 0 Inge 3b 1 0 0 0 Sogard 3b 3 0 0 0 RSantg 2b 4 1 2 0 Totals 33 3 9 3 Totals 31 1 4 1 Detroit................................. 001 001 100 — 3 Oakland.............................. 010 000 000 — 1 DP—Oakland 2. LOB—Detroit 9, Oakland 3. 2B—V.Martinez (35), Crisp (27). 3B—Betemit (3), R.Santiago (3). HR—Kelly (5), Willingham (27). S— Kelly. IP H R ER BB SO Detroit Fister W,9-13........... 8 3 1 1 0 5 Valverde S,45-45.... 1 1 0 0 0 1 Oakland Cahill L,11-14 .......... 62⁄3 9 3 3 4 4 Breslow .................... 11⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 De Los Santos......... 1 0 0 0 0 2 HBP—by Cahill (A.Jackson). WP—Cahill. Umpires—Home, Eric Cooper;First, Jim Reynolds;Second, Mike DiMuro;Third, Andy Fletcher. T—2:25 (Rain delay: 0:16). A—31,022 (35,067).

Braves 1, Mets 0 New York

ab r h bi Bourn cf 4 0 0 0 Prado lf 3 0 1 0 C.Jones 3b 4 0 2 1 Uggla 2b 3 0 0 0 McCnn c 3 0 0 0 Fremn 1b 1 0 0 0 AlGnzlz ss 3 0 0 0 Heywrd rf 2 1 0 0 THudsn p 2 0 0 0 Constnz ph 0 0 0 0 Kimrel p 0 0 0 0 Totals 30 0 4 0 Totals 25 1 3 1 New York ........................... 000 000 000 — 0 Atlanta ................................ 000 000 01x — 1 DP—New York 1, Atlanta 1. LOB—New York 5, Atlanta 7. 2B—C.Jones (31). S—Constanza. IP H R ER BB SO New York Dickey L,8-13 .......... 72⁄3 3 1 1 6 4 Byrdak ...................... 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 Atlanta T.Hudson W,15-10 . 8 4 0 0 2 10 Kimbrel S,45-51 ...... 1 0 0 0 0 3 WP—T.Hudson. Umpires—Home, Ted Barrett;First, Tim McClelland;Second, Marvin Hudson;Third, Brian Runge. T—2:22. A—46,763 (49,586). JosRys ss Pagan cf DWrght 3b Duda rf Bay lf Evans 1b Thole c RTejad 2b Dickey p Byrdak p

ab 3 4 4 4 4 3 2 3 3 0

r 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

h bi 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0

Mariners 4, Rangers 0

Atlanta

Cubs 2, Astros 1 Houston

ab 4 0 0 1 5 3 3 1 3 1

r 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

h bi 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

Chicago

ab SCastro ss 4 Campn cf-lf 3 ArRmr 3b 3 C.Pena 1b 3 LaHair rf 2 Montnz rf 0 ASorin lf 3 Marshll p 0 Barney 2b 4 Soto c 4

Texas

Seattle ab r h bi ab r h bi Kinsler 2b 4 0 1 0 ISuzuki rf 3 0 0 0 Andrus ss 4 0 1 0 Ryan ss 4 1 1 0 JHmltn lf 4 0 0 0 Ackley 2b 4 1 1 0 MiYong 3b 3 0 0 0 Olivo c 4 0 1 0 ABeltre dh 3 0 0 0 Carp 1b 4 0 1 1 DvMrp rf 3 0 0 0 W.Pena dh 3 0 1 0 Torreal c 3 0 0 0 Seager 3b 3 0 0 0 Morlnd 1b 3 0 0 0 TRonsn lf 3 0 0 0 EnChvz cf 3 0 2 0 C.Wells cf 2 2 1 1 Totals 30 0 4 0 Totals 30 4 6 2 Texas.................................. 000 000 000 — 0 Seattle ................................ 003 000 10x — 4 E—Kinsler (11). DP—Texas 1, Seattle 1. LOB— Texas 3, Seattle 5. HR—C.Wells (11). IP H R ER BB SO Texas C.Wilson L,16-7 ...... 61⁄3 6 4 1 2 8 M.Lowe..................... 2⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 Feldman ................... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Seattle Beavan W,5-5.......... 8 4 0 0 0 3 League ..................... 1 0 0 0 0 3 HBP—by C.Wilson (W.Pena). WP—C.Wilson. Umpires—Home, Larry Vanover;First, Brian Gorman;Second, Dan Bellino;Third, Tony Randazzo. T—2:37. A—17,607 (47,878).

Padres 2, Diamondbacks 0 Arizona

r 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

h bi 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0

JSchafr cf DelRsr p Wrght p Bourgs cf Barmes ss JMrtnz lf Ca.Lee 1b Altuve pr-2b Bogsvc rf Quinter ph MDwns 2b-1b 4 0 0 0 RLopez p 2 0 0 0 Pareds 3b 4 0 3 0 DeWitt ph 1 0 0 0 Corprn c 2 0 0 0 R.Ortiz p 0 0 0 0 Shuck ph-cf 2 0 0 0 JRussll p 0 0 0 0 Melncn p 0 0 0 0 K.Wood p 0 0 0 0 Sosa p 2 0 0 0 Byrd cf 0 0 0 0 CJhnsn ph 1 0 1 0 Towles c 0 0 0 0 AngSnc ph 1 0 1 0 Totals 37 1 9 0 Totals 29 2 5 1 Houston.............................. 100 000 000 — 1 Chicago.............................. 100 100 00x — 2 E—Corporan (6), Ar.Ramirez (14), LaHair (1). LOB—Houston 13, Chicago 9. 2B—J.Schafer (10), Barmes (26), S.Castro (33). HR—LaHair (2). SB— Paredes (5), Campana (22). IP H R ER BB SO Houston Sosa L,2-5 ............... 6 4 2 2 5 5 Del Rosario.............. 1⁄3 1 0 0 1 0 W.Wright .................. 2⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 Melancon ................. 1 0 0 0 0 1 Chicago R.Lopez W,6-6 ........ 6 4 1 0 2 7 R.Ortiz H,1 ............... 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 J.Russell H,6 ........... 1⁄3 1 0 0 0 1 K.Wood H,21 ........... 11⁄3 2 0 0 1 2 Marshall S,5-9 ......... 1 2 0 0 1 1 Umpires—Home, Marty Foster;First, Bill Welke;Second, David Rackley;Third, Jeff Nelson. T—3:16. A—39,377 (41,159).

M A J O R L E A G U E L E A D E R S NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—Braun, Milwaukee, .333;JosReyes, New York, .332;Votto, Cincinnati, .320;Kemp, Los Angeles, .315;Pence, Philadelphia, .311;ArRamirez, Chicago, .308;SCastro, Chicago, .306. RUNS—Braun, Milwaukee, 101;JUpton, Arizona, 100;Kemp, Los Angeles, 99;Votto, Cincinnati, 98;Pujols, St. Louis, 96;JosReyes, New York, 93;CGonzalez, Colorado, 92. RBI—Howard, Philadelphia, 113;Kemp, Los Angeles, 111;Fielder, Milwaukee, 110;Tulowitzki, Colorado, 105;Braun, Milwaukee, 103;Votto, Cincinnati, 98;Pujols, St. Louis, 93. HITS—SCastro, Chicago, 194;Bourn, Atlanta, 183;Pence, Philadelphia, 178;Votto, Cincinnati, 178;Braun, Milwaukee, 176;Kemp, Los Angeles, 175;BPhillips, Cincinnati, 170;ArRamirez, Chicago, 170. DOUBLES—Pence, Philadelphia, 38;JUpton, Arizona, 38;Votto, Cincinnati, 37;Braun, Milwaukee, 36;CaLee, Houston, 36;Tulowitzki, Colorado, 36;5 tied at 35. TRIPLES—JosReyes, New York, 16;Fowler, Colorado, 15;Victorino, Philadelphia, 15;Bourn, Atlanta, 10;SCastro, Chicago, 9;SSmith, Colorado, 9;Parra, Arizona, 8. HOME RUNS—Pujols, St. Louis, 35;Uggla, Atlanta, 34;Fielder, Milwaukee, 33;Howard, Philadelphia, 33;Kemp, Los Angeles, 33;Stanton, Florida, 32;Braun, Milwaukee, 31;Bruce, Cincinnati, 31. STOLEN BASES—Bourn, Atlanta, 55;Kemp, Los Angeles, 39;Bonifacio, Florida, 38;Stubbs, Cincin-

San Diego ab r h bi Maybin cf 3 0 0 0 Bartlett ss 3 1 2 0 Guzmn 1b 4 1 1 1 Hundly c 4 0 1 0 Denorfi rf 4 0 0 0 Blanks lf 3 0 0 0 Cnghm lf 0 0 0 0 OHudsn 2b 1 0 0 0 Darnell 3b 2 0 1 0 Parrino 3b 1 0 0 0 Stauffr p 1 0 0 0 Bass p 0 0 0 0 Hermid ph 1 0 0 0 Qualls p 0 0 0 0 H.Bell p 0 0 0 0 Totals 31 0 5 0 Totals 27 2 5 1 Arizona ............................... 000 000 000 — 0 San Diego .......................... 200 000 00x — 2 E—G.Parra (2), Shaw (1). DP—Arizona 1, San Diego 1. LOB—Arizona 4, San Diego 6. 2B—Bloomquist (10), C.Young (35), Hundley (14). SB—O.Hudson (18). S—Stauffer. IP H R ER BB SO Arizona Miley L,3-2 ............... 6 5 2 2 3 3 Shaw ......................... 1 0 0 0 1 1 Ziegler ...................... 1 0 0 0 0 2 San Diego Stauffer W,9-12 ....... 62⁄3 4 0 0 0 6 1 0 0 0 0 Bass H,4................... 1⁄3 Qualls H,20.............. 1 0 0 0 0 1 H.Bell S,38-43 ......... 1 0 0 0 0 1 WP—Miley. Umpires—Home, Adrian Johnson;First, Fieldin Culbreth;Second, Gary Cederstrom;Third, Lance Barksdale. T—2:22. A—28,605 (42,691). Blmqst ss GParra lf J.Upton rf MMntr c A.Hill 2b CYoung cf Overay 1b RRorts 3b Miley p Shaw p Brrghs ph Ziegler p

ab 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 2 0 1 0

r 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

h bi 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Dodgers 7, Pirates 2 Pittsburgh

Los Angeles ab r h bi ab r h bi 4 1 1 1 DGordn ss 4 2 2 1 4 0 2 0 Sellers 3b 2 1 0 0 Loney Doumit c 4 0 2 0 ph-1b 1 1 1 3 D.Lee 1b 4 0 0 0 Kemp cf 4 0 2 1 GJones rf 4 1 1 0 JRiver lf 4 0 0 1 Ludwck lf 4 0 0 0 Sands rf 3 1 1 0 PAlvrz 3b 1 0 0 0 Barajs c 3 0 1 1 RCeden ss 4 0 0 0 Mitchll 1b 3 1 1 0 Locke p 1 0 0 0 Kuo p 0 0 0 0 JHughs p 0 0 0 0 Elbert p 0 0 0 0 Ciriaco ph 1 0 0 0 A.Ellis ph 1 0 0 0 DMcCt p 0 0 0 0 Guerrir p 0 0 0 0 Moskos p 0 0 0 0 JCarrll 2b 4 1 1 0 Resop p 0 0 0 0 Kuroda p 2 0 0 0 Jarmll ph 1 0 0 0 Miles ph-3b 2 0 1 0 Burres p 0 0 0 0 Paul ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 33 2 6 1 Totals 33 710 7 Pittsburgh .......................... 010 001 000 — 2 Los Angeles....................... 012 004 00x — 7 E—Kemp (5), D.Gordon (9). DP—Los Angeles 1. LOB—Pittsburgh 7, Los Angeles 5. 2B—Walker (28), Sands (12), Barajas (13). HR—Presley (3), Loney (10). SB—D.Gordon 2 (21), J.Rivera (2). CS—Sands (3). IP H R ER BB SO Pittsburgh Locke L,0-2.............. 3 5 3 3 2 0 J.Hughes.................. 1 1 0 0 0 0 D.McCutchen .......... 11⁄3 3 3 3 1 2 Moskos..................... 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 Resop ....................... 1⁄3 1 1 1 0 0 Burres....................... 2 0 0 0 0 0 Los Angeles Kuroda W,12-16...... 6 5 2 1 2 7 Kuo ........................... 1 0 0 0 0 2 Elbert ........................ 1 1 0 0 0 1 Guerrier .................... 1 0 0 0 1 2 PB—Barajas. Umpires—Home, Mark Carlson;First, Tim Timmons;Second, Mike Muchlinski;Third, Jeff Kellogg. T—3:14. A—41,148 (56,000). Presley cf Walker 2b


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PITTSBURGH – Steve MacIntyre said the deaths of enforcers Derek Boogaard, Rick Rypien and Wade Belak over the summer were a “shockâ€? but it’s wrong to link their role as fighters to the incidents. “To the guys who fight, like myself, when you assume they all are like that, that’s a tremendous insult,â€? MacIntyre said. “It’s an awful thing what happened, and I think the NHL and the players association are doing the right thing to help guys out. But as far as putting a big blanket on it, it’s not right.â€? • During Saturday’s scrimmage, Group B defeated Group A 5-1. The line of Tyler Kennedy-Evgeni Malkin-Steve Sullivan dominated the contest, combining for four goals and seven assists. For Group A, Brian

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PENGUINS NOTEBOOK Strait assisted on a goal by James Neal to avoid being shut out. • As expected, Sidney Crosby did practice Saturday but avoided contact drills. Dustin Jeffrey also skated and moved well on the ice. • With a new contract already in place, Geoff Walker has brought a different ap-

proach to this season’s training camp. Now that he doesn’t have to worry about landing a job with WilkesBarre/Scranton, Walker said he can focus all his energy on his game. “I’ve been in Pittsburgh since August training, so I’m pretty comfortable with things and I just want to keep building,� Walker said. And losing. One of Walker’s goals in the summer was to come into camp leaner and quicker. He said he lost 10

pounds and reduced his body fat by two percent. “I feel a lot faster out there and I’m ready for a big season this year,� he said. Walker spent some time on the ice with Malkin during Saturday’s scrimmage, something he was well aware of. “When you’re out there with guys like that, I’ll catch myself looking to get him the puck, even if he isn’t open,� Walker said. “That’s something you have to watch. You need to stick to your game.�

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Steve MacIntyre Penguinsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; left-winger

PITTSBURGH â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Last season, left wing Steve MacIntyre posted 93 penalty minutes in 34 games with the Edmonton Oilers â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a pretty modest total for an enforcer. But thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good reason for the sub-100 penalty minute total. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really not MacIntyreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fault, after all when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re 6-5, 250-pounds with hands the size of cinder blocks, willing opponents arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t easy to find. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I go into a fight to hurt you. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not going in there to play patty-cake,â&#x20AC;? MacIntyre said after Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s practice. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an approach that MacIntyre, 31, takes into every game, whether that will be with Pittsburgh or Wilkes-Barre/Scranton. But thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more than fighting to his game. MacIntyre understands that todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s enforcer must be able to play and contribute in other aspects of the game as well. Become a well-rounded player, he said, and by doing so he can become an even more intimidating figure on the ice. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think intimidationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 90 percent mental and 10 percent physical. Obviously, I want to be intimidating. But the way the game has changed I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be one-dimensional,â&#x20AC;? MacIntyre said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have to execute in other parts of the game.â&#x20AC;? After spending most of the last four seasons with the Oilers, MacIntyre said he decided to sign with the Pittsburgh organization in the offseason because of its successful track record. He wants to be part of a winner, he said, and this is the place to do it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wherever they have me pegged (either Pitsburgh or Wilkes-Barre), Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll go down with my work boots and work hat and accomplish what I can do,â&#x20AC;? MacIntyre said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everybody knows I can fight and hit, but I just have to play a consistent game every night.â&#x20AC;? If MacIntyre spends time with Wilkes-Barre/Scranton this season, finding willing opponents wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be as much of a problem as it is in the NHL. He spent parts of four seasons in the AHL and has developed a reputation as one of the toughest players in hockey. He knows players in the AHL will come looking for a matchup. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I was in the American League, a lot of guys were coming for me,â&#x20AC;? MacIntyre said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to, but they were coming. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been around for a while and I have a little bit of a reputation. If they can hang in there and do well, beat me, whatever, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a feather in their hat.â&#x20AC;? And itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a feather that not many have earned when they square off against MacIntyre. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I might have a couple screws loose, but I enjoy (fighting),â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You get

O

Deaths have nothing to do with enforcer job

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I go into a fight to hurt you. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not going in there to play pattycake.â&#x20AC;?

By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

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LW MacIntyre: Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prepared â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;to hurt youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Veteran winger knows his role, but hopes to add more than PIMs for Pens organization.

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CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011 PAGE 11C

NASCAR

Kenseth on pole as Chase begins Kevin Harvick has the worst qualifying run of all Cup contenders, placing 30th. By JENNA FRYER AP Auto Racing Writer

JOLIET, Ill. — Matt Kenseth will open the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship on the pole at Chicagoland Speedway. Kenseth had the fastest qualifying lap Saturday with a speed of 183.243 mph in his Roush Fenway Racing Ford. It easily held off Paul Menard, who turned a lap at 183.125 in a Richard Childress Racing Chevrolet, and Kurt Busch, who qualified third at 183.032 in a Penske Racing Dodge. It’s just the sixth pole in 12 full seasons for Kenseth, and second this year. And with track position

so critical, it puts him in position for a strong run in the opening race of the 10-event Chase. “My cars have just been fast and driving really good,” Kenseth said. “I have always tried really hard. I have probably done a little better job at not overdriving the car. That has been a fault of mine in qualifying in the past, overdriving and driving the corner too hard and messing up the rest of the corner. “Back in the day when it was easier to pass it probably wasn’t as important to us as it is today. Maybe I am a little better at it, but the main thing is the cars have been really fast.” Busch, winner of the inaugural 2004 Chase, was pleased to qualify third. “It was a great qualifying effort for us. We feel like getting off to a strong start in the Chase is important, and it starts with qualify-

ing,” Busch said. Chase drivers took spots four through six, as Ryan Newman, Carl Edwards and Brad Keselowski kept Kenseth in sight. “That is a fast lap for (Kenseth),” noted Edwards of his RFR teammate. Non-Chase drivers Greg Biffle and Brian Vickers were seventh and eighth, and points co-leader Kyle Busch was ninth. His Joe Gibbs Racing teammate Joey Logano, who is not Chase eligible, rounded out the top 10. Five-time defending champion Jimmie Johnson qualified 12th, and Hendrick Motorsports teammate Dale Earnhardt Jr. 19th. Four-time champion Jeff Gordon was 23rd, Tony Stewart qualified 26th and Denny Hamlin was 27th. Kevin Harvick was the lowest qualifying Chase driver at 30th.

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THE TIMES LEADER

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011 PAGE 13C

LOCAL ROUNDUP

Coughlin remains unbeaten WILKES-BARRE -- Madysen Jones and Caitlin Wood each scored a goal as Coughlin remains unbeaten (3-0-1) after defeating Wallenpaupack 2-1 in high school field hockey play Saturday. Paige Tedik made seven saves in the win. Evie Decker had 19 saves for Wallenpaupack. Wallen- 0 paupack Coughlin 1

1

--

1

1

--

2

First half: 1. COU, Madysen Jones (Megan Lercera), 22:56; Second half: 2. COU, Caitlin Wood (Alyssa Monaghan), 18:56; 3. WAL, Chelsea Mann, 8:27. Shots: COU 21, WAL 8. Saves: COU 7 (Paige Tedik), WAL 19 (Evie Decker). Corners: COU 12, WAL 6.

H.S. FIELD HOCKEY

Lackawanna Trail 3, Hanover Area 0

Shelby Croasdale netted two goals to lead Lackawanna Trail to a victory over Hanover Area. Cameron Crock scored a goal of her own while Tiffany McCary had nine keeper saves. For the Hawks, Courtney Ditchey recorded five saves in goal. Lackawanna Trail....................................... 3 0 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 3 Hanover Area............................................. 0 0 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 0 First half: 1. LAC: Shelby Croasdale (Alexia Rzicdilo) 26:32; 2. LAC: Cameron Crock 16:32; 3. Croasdale (Crock) 13:40. Shots: LAC 12, HAN 5; Saves: LAC 5 (Courtney Ditchey), HAN 9 (Tiffany McCary); Corners: LAC 7, HAN 4.

Wyoming Valley West 1, Selinsgrove 0

Ricki Stefanides scored the only goal of the game to lead Wyoming Valley West to a victory against Selinsgrove. Kelcie Arominison notched the assist while Kaitlyn Smicherko recorded seven saves in goal for the Spartans. For Selinsgrove, Gabby Pagana had three goalie saves. Selinsgrove ................................................ 0 0 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 0 Wyoming Valley West ............................... 1 0 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 1 First half: 1. Ricki Stefanides (Kelcie Arominison), 27:18) Shots: SEL 9, WVW 9; Saves: SEL 3 (Gabby

Pagana), WVW 7 (Kaitlyn Smicherko); Corners: SEL 13, WVW 8.

out, making four saves.

H.S. GIRLS TENNIS

Misericordia comes up short

Holy Redeemer 5, Wyoming Valley West 0

Fallyn Boich defeated Christa Talpash in first singles 6-0, 7-5 to give Holy Redeemer a victory against Wyoming Valley West on Friday. Nellie Chmil held off Cathy Byrnes 6-2, 6-3 in No. 2 singles while Emily Suchocki defeated Devin Ryman in third singles 6-0, 6-4. In doubles action, Allison Muth and Shaina Dougherty beat Danielle Patterson and Nicole Henderson 7-6, 6-2, while the team of Trish Harenza and Beth Chmil defeated Megan Tanner and Brandi Zikowski 6-2, 6-4. Holy Redeemer 5, Hazleton Area 0

Nellie Chmil defeated Megan Hudock 6-1, 6-3, and Emily Suchocki handled Erika Grula 6-3, 6-3 to lead the Royals to a victory over Hazleton Area on Saturday. Fallyn Boich added a win in No. 1 singles, defeating Amanda Pliska 6-2, 6-3. Allison Muth and Shaina Dougherty defeated Hayley Price and Abby Provost 6-2, 6-1, while Trish Harenza and Beth Chmil defeated Jolene Pawlowski and Ashlee Mirarchi 6-4, 6-4 in doubles action.

COLLEGE FIELD HOCKEY Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s knocks off Scranton

Senior captain Shawna Walp delivered the game-winning goal 10:35 into the overtime period on a penalty corner to lead Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to a 1-0 win over visiting University of Scranton at McCarthy Stadium. Megan Withrow picked up her second consecutive shut-

The Misericordia field hockey team dropped its home opener to unbeaten Montclair State by the score of 5-0 at Mangelsdorf Field. Leading 1-0 at halftime, the Red Hawks broke the game open with four second half goals to improve to 6-0. Wilkes defeated

Shelli Whittington scored Wilkesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; only goal of the game with 20:38 left in the first half in their 3-1 defeat at the hands of Widener University. Widener then scored three unanswered goals in the second half to pick up the win. Jenna Schall and Lindsey Davenport had a combined five saves in goal for the Colonels.

COLLEGE MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TENNIS Monarchs roll

Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s knocked off host Susquehanna 8-1 in the season opener. Chris Cozzillio set the tempo with a win at No. 1 singles by scores of 6-2, 6-0. Tim Carroll and Tony Bevevino picked up wins at second and third flights respectively. The Monarchs swept the doubles matches.

COLLEGE WOMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TENNIS

Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s loses season opener

Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s College fell to Susquehanna in their fall season opener 8-1. Sophomore Emily Biffen picked up the win for the Lady Monarchs at No. 4 singles by scores of 6-3, 6-3. Sara Lynn played to a tough loss at No. 1 singles taking Julia Lerner to a tiebreaker in all three sets.



     

         

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CMYK PAGE 14C

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011

OUTDOORS

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

Like humans, most animals headed for higher ground

Wildlife affected by rising waters, too By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

Last weekend’s flooding displaced tens of thousands of people who had to evacuate their houses as the Susquehanna River rose to record levels. But they weren’t the only ones forced out of their homes. Wildlife that lived near, or even in, the river were also forced to get out as the flood waters rose, and that led to several unique sightings. Fish were spotted jumping in the floodwaters in West Pittston. Several people saw deer swimming through the flooded river, and a skunk was spotted paddling out of the water to dry land. Like us, most species of wildlife sought higher ground well before the river rose. Most of them survived. After all, floods on the Susquehanna River have occurred for centuries and wildlife has always persevered. Still, depending on the species and where it lives, wildlife deals with a flood in different ways. Considering the Susquehanna River crested to a record 42.66 feet in Wilkes-Barre last week, this was no ordinary flood. It was one that pushed many species to the limit. Here’s a look at what wildlife did to survive and how they fared during last week’s flood: Fish The common perception is that fish get swept downriver when the floodwaters rage, but that’s not entirely true. Geoff Smith is a Susquehanna River biologist for the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission. Later this month, he’ll be out on the river to study how certain species of fish fared with the flood. In the meantime, Smith suspects that most of the fish populations that inhabit the river made it through without a significant loss. “They feel it coming and move to areas without current,” Smith said. “That includes flooded towns where they use such areas as a current break.” Some species, such as carp and quillback, actually take advantage of the flooded backwaters to spawn. Others use the high water event to find new homes. Smith said it’s possible that species such as the flathead catfish, which is native to western Pennsylvania but has recently been expanding its range up the Susquehanna, to migrate that way. “The floodwaters provide areas that they can use to bypass dams,” Smith said. “There’s some concern about it because we don’t know how they will impact other fish populations.” By seeking refuge from the current, most fish are able to avoid being swept down the river. The ones that could be more susceptible to the fast, deep current are the younger fish, Smith said. “With the timing of this flood, it’s hard to tell how the younger fish were affected because they may be large enough to ride it out, or not,” he said. “Smaller baitfish could be impacted though. We’ll be monitoring this in the coming years to get a better idea.” While the current presents one issue for fish, perhaps the bigger risk is the contaminated water itself. Raw sewage from treatment plants and petroleum chemicals from heating oil tanks and gas stations could have an impact on all fish species. Smith said the PFBC will be monitoring the situation closely. While fish survive a flood by simply getting out of the current, what happens when the floodwaters recede? Can they become stranded? Smith said it’s possible and does happen, but generally fish sense the water level falling and follow it back to the river. “In most cases they make it back,” he said. One side benefit of the flood is the new habitat it created for fish species. The newly formed piles of submerged debris can become havens for fish, Smith said. While fish utilize slow-moving water to survive a flood, others species seek the refuge of mud. Freshwater mussels that inhabit the river likely closed up their shells during the flood – which meant they weren’t filtering water, and simply hunkered down in the mucky bottom. Smith said mussels are mobile but they could be at risk depending on how much sediment covers them and if they get swept downriver. As far as any significant impact to fish populations

OUTDOOR NEWS

OUTDOORS

Beaver survival a bright spot in rough week

I

JOE BUTKIEWICZ/THE TIMES LEADER

This black rat snake was spotted escaping the flooded Susquehanna River in Wyoming County last Sunday. Snakes that inhabit the river survive floods by heading to higher ground or climbing trees.

in the river, Smith said he doesn’t expect major losses but more will be known when he and other PFBC biologists begin surveying work later this month. “Flood events have happened over the history of the river, and these species still persist,” Smith said. “Over time they’ve proven that they’ve got the means to make it by seeking out the refuge they need.” Reptiles and Amphibians Less mobile than fish, some species of frogs, turtles and salamanders are vulnerable to being caught in the current and swept down the river. Even more at risk are the eggs and recently-hatched young. Rick Koval, a naturalist and a member of the Pennsylvania Reptile and Amphibian Technical Committee, said the Susquehanna River is a haven for many species of amphibians, including frogs and toads. During a high water event, frogs and toads do what most other wildlife does – seek higher ground. “I believe a lot of them survived by doing that,” Koval said. The impact, he added, could lie with tadpoles that are emerging into adults. “They can get washed down and perish,” Koval said. “The timing of the flood means it’s less of an impact than if it happened in the spring, when you have more egg masses and tadpoles.” As far as turtles, the Susquehanna is home to several species, including the map turtle which spends the majority of its life in the river. Aside from seeking higher ground, Koval said turtles will shelter themselves behind large boulders to withstand the current. Like frogs, however, the concern lies with the eggs. “They deposit their eggs in open, sandy areas along the bank and they were probably washed away,” Koval said. The egg clusters of salamanders were also probably washed away. Several species use the vernal pools along the river to lay their eggs. Those pools are engulfed by the floodwater, Koval said, and the eggs are likely gone. Snakes likely made it through the flood in good shape because they are terrestrial, meaning they can maneuver well on land. Even the Northern watersnake and Eastern ribbon snake, which are mainly aquatic, can survive on dry land. And unlike frogs, turtles and salamanders, snakes have another means to survive a flood. “They can climb trees, which they likely did,” Koval said. “Snakes probably suffered the least impact.” A side benefit from the flood could be realized

40,000 pheasants that had been raised and were ready for release for this fall’s hunting have perished or escaped,” said Bob Boyd, Game Commission Bureau of Wildlife Management assistant director, who oversees operations of the agency’s four game farms. “We are doing all that we can to recapture escaped birds still in the area, but losses may total up to 40 percent of According to Pennsylvania Game the total pheasant production planned Commission executive director Carl Roe, the same flooding that devastated for this year and has compelled us to re-evaluate fall pheasant stocking property and adversely affected the lives of tens of thousands of Pennsylva- plans. The disruption will delay the announcement of how many pheasants nians also impacted Game Commiswill be stocked in each county. Not sion properties and resources, includonly were birds lost, but both farms ing two game farms in Lycoming County, which caused the loss of thou- received major damage to holding fields and buildings, which may jeoparsands of ring-necked pheasants. The dize plans to double production levels agency also has cancelled the public next year. tours of the Loyalsock and Northcen“It is too late in the production seatral game farms – originally scheduled son to raise more pheasants or to for Sept. 25. purchase pheasants from private prop“We are beginning the assessment agators to replace these losses,” Boyd process, but it appears that 30,000 to said.

Devastating flood impacts PGC lands; pheasant losses in excess of 30,000 birds

TOM VENESKY

next spring ponded areas that remain will become breeding grounds for amphibians. But in the meantime some species could suffer some long-term losses. “The frogs, turtles and salamanders were probably impacted the most because of the loss of tadpoles and eggs,” Koval said. “We’re going to have some losses.” Mammals The river is also home to several furbearer species, such as beaver, mink and muskrat. Beaver and mink – including their young, are very mobile and likely got out of the river area before the water started to rise, according to Pennsylvania Game Commission mammal section supervisor Matt Lovallo. As the water began to rise, beavers evacuated their lodges and bank dens for higher ground, he said. There may have been localized impacts with muskrats, however. Those with a late litter are more susceptible to the swift current and could’ve been washed away, Lovallo said. “There’s a common perception that the 1972 flood knocked back muskrat populations, but we haven’t documented that in harvest rates,” Lovallo said. “We will be watching the harvest this year, but I think the impacts will be localized and I don’t expect a significant decline.” Once again, the timing of the flood played a key role in the ability for several species to survive. Beavers and muskrats have time to return to the river and rebuild huts, lodges and bank dens in time for winter. If the flood hit in December, Lovallo said, beavers would’ve been dealt an impact because their winter food caches would’ve been washed away. Tim Conway, PGC spokesman for the Northeast Region, said his office hasn’t received many calls regarding wildlife stranded or displaced by the flood. He acknowledged that a significant number of wildlife was displaced by the high water and there probably were some losses, but the impact wasn’t major. “These events have happened for generations and these animals know to get to higher ground,” Conway said. With so many animals displaced from the flood, Conway said it wouldn’t be uncommon to find them taking up refuge in urban areas and homes. “Be aware when you’re going through your house. It’s always a possibility to find raccoons or opossums on an upper floor or in your attic,” Conway said. If you do find wildlife in your home, Conway advised to leave an opening and it will likely leave as human activity picks up.

BULLETIN BOARD THE PENNSYLVANIA BOARD OF GAME COMMISSIONERS will hold its next meeting on Oct. 3-4, in the auditorium of the agency’s Harrisburg headquarters at 2001 Elmerton Ave., just off the Progress Avenue exit of Interstate 81, in Harrisburg. On Monday, Oct. 3, the Board will gather public comments and hear Game Commission staff reports beginning at 8:30 a.m. Doors to the meeting room will open at 7:45 a.m. Registration for those interested in offering public testimony limited to five minutes - also will begin at that time. Following public comments, the Board will receive a report on a recent survey of hunting license buyers from Dr. Coren Jagnow, Bureau of Information and Education’s Human Dimensions Division chief and author of the survey. On Tuesday, Oct. 4, beginning at 8:30 a.m., the Game Commission will take up its prepared agenda, which will be posted on the agency’s website prior to the meeting. Doors to the meeting room will open at 7:45 a.m. For those unable to attend this meeting, the Game Commission will webcast the

meeting beginning with the Game Commission staff reports on Monday, immediately following the conclusion of public comments. The full board meeting on Tuesday will be webcast beginning at 8:30 a.m. An icon will be posted on the agency’s website (www.pgc.state.pa.us) on Monday and Tuesday to access the webcasts. THE EASTERN PENN DEAF BASS ANGLERS will host a river bass tournament Sept. 18 at Nesbitt Park. The fee is $40 per boat, with a lunker option of $10. Limit is six bass with a minimum length of 12 inches. A second tournament will be held on Oct. 16 with the same fee and six-bass limit, and a 15inch minimum size. For more information, contact Vincent Sabatini at basslunker40@aol.com.

Bulletin Board items will not be accepted over the telephone. Items may be faxed to 831-7319, dropped off at the Times Leader or mailed to Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N. Main St., WilkesBarre, PA 18711-0250.

t’s rare that a bass tournament gets cancelled. When it does happen, severe thunderstorms or lightening are usually the cause. But a fishing tournament being cancelled by water? It happens. For the last three weeks, Bob Makaravage has tried to hold the championship round for his Wednesday night bass tournament at Harveys Lake. After completing a 10-week tournament season during the summer, the field was set, prize money was allotted and anglers eagerly anticipated the event. They tried to hold it on Aug. 31 but had to cancel due to Hurricane Irene. Makaravage tried again the next week, on Sept. 7, and again had to call things off due to the looming flood headed our way. And this past Wednesday the tournament was delayed again because so many anglers were busy recovering from flood damage. Storms, lightening and water… three factors that can cancel a fishing tournament. The postponement of a bass tournament is minor compared to the impacts of last week’s flood. The water took a heavy toll on many residents throughout Luzerne County, as well as wildlife. But not everything in nature was dealt a blow. A relatively new beaver pond that I had been watching progress since last fall escaped the flood relatively unscathed. While we rely on levee systems to protect us from floodwater, the beavers at this pond made their own flood protection. And it worked. I visited the pond last Saturday expecting the beavers’ work to be washed away by a creek that was transformed into a raging river the previous three days. But I found just the opposite. The main dam at the bottom of the pond – a structure stretching almost 50 feet and four feet high in spots, was intact and suffered little damage. The mass of mud and sticks held the creek at bay, and here and there the high water spilled over the top of the dam. Upstream the beavers had made three smaller dams above the pond. I noticed this last fall and wondered why. On Saturday, I got an answer, or at least what I believe to be a reason behind the smaller dams. Before the flood hit, each of the dams created a small pool that slowed the flow of the creek before it entered the pond. During the flood, with the creek running full blast, the dams lessened the force just enough to reduce the rush of water that could’ve pounded the main dam into pieces. The smaller dams did take a hit, however. Portions were washed away and there was some scouring in the pools behind them. But the system worked. The pools acted as retention ponds – similar to those that we build to hold stormwater, and the dams served as current breaks. And the main dam, which created the larger pond and provided a flooded sanctuary for the beaver lodge, held. Aiding the situation is the wetlands itself. Acres of marsh surround the pond, and much of the water that spilled through the first three dams harmlessly flooded into the thick grass and was basically held in place. If managed properly, water doesn’t have to be the destructive force that it turned into last week. The beavers proved that floodwaters can be tamed and controlled with a little ingenuity and hard work.

Tom Venesky covers the outdoors for The Times Leader. Email him at tvenesky@timesleader.com.


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

WILKES VS. ALBRIGHT

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011 PAGE 15C

KING’S VS. STEVENSON

Defense wilts under Kirchon powers potent Monarchs challenge by Albright QB throws for career-best 320 yards, 3 TDs in second career start for King’s.

Lions roll to 675 yards of offense, score nine TDs against Colonels.

51

The Times Leader Staff By The Times Leader Staff

READING – Wilkes always seems to have trouble when it plays at Albright. That was evident once again on Saturday as the Colonels allowed the second-most points in school history in a 65-26 loss to the Lions. It was the most point given up by the Colonels since Cortland State scored 67 in 1991 and the Colonels also gave up 675 total yards, including 545 through the air. The Colonels (0-2 overall, 0-1 MAC) took a 7-3 lead in the second quarter after a 55-yard touchdown pass from Alex George to Tim Bousson at the 13:29 mark. But Albright (3-0, 1-0) took a 17-7 lead scoring on consecutive drives. Wilkes got right back in it with another score, this time an 11-yard strike from George (16-26, 236 yards) to Todd Eagles (six catches, 63 yards) to trim the lead the 17-13, but after that Wilkes was held to just 13 points the rest of the way while the Lions poured on 48 more. Albright quarterbacks T.J. Luddy and Adam Galczynski had no problem cutting through the Wilkes secondary. Luddy was a perfect 7-for-7 for 142 yards and two scores, while Galczynski connected on 20 of 26 passes for 377 yards and three touchdowns. Lions receiver Scott Pillar had a huge game nabbing nine balls for 220 yards and a pair of touchdowns. George, a sophomore, was also Wilkes’ leading rusher going for 67 yards on12 carries. Aux Wogou added a 1-yard TD plunge for the Colonels in the third quarter and freshman Andrew Regan punched in a 6-yard score

65

ALBRIGHT

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WILKES

late in the fourth. Wilkes plays its first home contest of the season next week and will celebrate homecoming when it faces Widener. Albright 65, Wilkes 26 Wilkes ................................................. 0 13 7 6 — 26 Albright ............................................... 3 21 20 21 — 65 First Quarter ALBRIGHT – Loiodice 28 field goal 5:08 Second Quarter WILKES – Bousson 55 pass from George (Arentz kick) 13:29 ALBRIGHT – Pillar 27 pass from Luddy. (Loiodice kick) 11:11 ALBRIGHT – Holmes 4 run. (Loiodice kick) 5:16 WILKES – Eagles 11 pass from George (kick blocked) 2:25 ALBRIGHT – Holmes 1 run. (Loiodice kick) 0:34 Third Quarter ALBRIGHT – Reinhardt 3 pass from Galczynski. (Loiodice kick) 11:49 ALBRIGHT – Bakala 9 pass from Galczynski. (Loiodice kick) 8:50 ALBRIGHT – Bakala 40 pass from Galczynski. (Loiodice kick) 6:55 WILKES – Wogou 1 run. (Arentz kick) 5:55 Fourth Quarter ALBRIGHT – Pillar 52 pass from Luddy. (Loiodice kick) 13:02 ALBRIGHT – Webb blocks punt, recovered in end zone. (Loiodice kick) 11:42 ALBRIGHT – Johnson 26 pass from Eldridge. (Murray kick) 7:01 WILKES – Regan 6 run. (Arentz kick) 4:47 Team Statistics Wilkes Albright First downs ........................................... 25 30 Rushes-yards ....................................... 39-180 42-130 Passing.................................................. 292 545 Total Yards ........................................... 472 675 Comp-Att-Int ......................................... 18-33-1 29-35-1 Sacks-Yards Lost ................................ 3-23 1-8 Punts-Avg. ............................................ 3-18.7 2-37.5 Fumbles-Lost ....................................... 3-3 0-0 Penalties-Yards ................................... 4-45 10-87 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING –ALB, Holmes 18-60, Groff 8-75, Luddy 2-0, Eldridge 1-1, Galczynski 6-16, McNair 1-0, Reinhardt 3-15; WILKES, Garvin 2-9, Berntsen 4-20, Wogou 8-58, George 12-67, Tivald 8-38, Regan 4-23 PASSING –ALB, Luddy 7-7-142, Eldridge 2-2-1-26, Galczynski 20-26-1-377; WILKES, Berntsen 2-6-0-56, George 16-26-1-236, Carpenter 0-1-0-0 RECEIVING –ALB, Bakala 4-70, Holmes 3-71, Groff 1-0, Pillar 9-220, McNair 2-64, Reinhardt 1-3, Johnson 1-26, Shilko 6-73, Wade 2-18; WILKES, Cesaire 1-0, Bennett 1-50, Eagles 6-63, Wogou 3-45, Tivald 1-9, Regan 1-(minus-2), Driscoll 1-6, Bousson 2-59, Curry 2-62 INTS –ABL, Bergery; WILKES, Reese

COLLEGE SPORTS

King’s hands Wm. Paterson first volleyball loss of season The Times Leader Staff

Heather Bowman led all players with 20 kills and 17 digs to help lead King’s past previously undefeated William Paterson 3-1 at McGrane Gymnasium. The scores were 25-22, 25-20, 25-21 and 25-21. Amanda Horton triggered the offense with 18 assists and four aces, while Lauren Rockhold had eight kills and 25 digs. Women’s volleyball Misericordia loses pair

The Misericordia University volleyball team dropped a pair of matches to Marymount and Catholic on Saturday afternoon in Washington, D.C. by the scores of 25-15, 23-25, 14-25, 23-25 and 25-16, 25-18, 25-4, respectively. Krystal Burford led the Cougars with 13 kills while Cailin McCullion added 11 kills and 33 digs. Wilkes drops two

Wilkes lost a pair of matches at Baptist Bible in three sets, falling to the host Knights 26-24, 25-17, 25-18 before dropping a 3-0 decision to Lycoming 25-10, 25-15, 25-10. Paige Trusty led the Colonels on the day with 17 kills and 13 digs.

MEN’S SOCCER

Misericordia stays unbeaten

Eric Kishbaugh scored a pair of goals to lift the Cougars to a 4-0 win over Arcadia at Mangelsdorf Field. Dan Pinto had a goal and an assist, and Josh Pfahl added a goal as Misericordia improved to 5-0 on the season. Colonels downed by E’town

Visiting Elizabethtown scored a goal in each half to record a 2-0 win over Wilkes. Dave Marr finished with seven saves in net for the Colonels. King’s wins in OT

The Monarchs earned a 1-0 overtime victory at Juniata when Joey Bender scored on a penalty kick with just 49 seconds remaining. Mark Labbadia recorded his fourth shutout of the season while making five saves.

WOMEN’S SOCCER

Lady Cougars win

Laura Roney had a goal and an assist to lead Misericordia to a 3-0 win against host Moravian. Erin McGreal and Alyssa Mocion also netted goals for the Lady Cougars.

Lady Monarchs drop decision

King’s scored first but couldn’t stop a late Juniata charge as the Lady Monarchs fell 2-1. Brianne Schmidt scored her fourth goal of the season -- and her fourth in four games -- while goalie Lauren Duguid made seven saves. Wilkes tastes victory

Katy Fissel scored the game-winning goal with 10 minutes left in the second half to propel Wilkes to a 1-0 win over visiting Widener University. Sam Lindo recorded three saves in net.

OWINGS MILLS, Md. – In 2010, King’s waited until the ninth week of the season to notch head coach Jeff Knarr his first career win. In his second season, he didn’t have to wait nearly as long. The Monarchs pounded Stevenson, 51-26 on Saturday to even their record at 1-1 and get the coach his second career victory. King’s, which is 1-0 in the MAC for the first time since 2006, started the scoring early taking a 7-0 lead after an 8-yard TD run by Jordan Haddock at the 10:52 mark of the first quarter. The Monarchs

The Colonels took sixth place out of eight teams at the Cougar Classic. They were led by Dan Lykens, who placed 54th in a time of 29:57.

135

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2011 Public Notice At Genesis HealthCare, LLC no person shall on the grounds of race, color, religion, gender, sexual orientation, national origin, disability, marital status, amnesty, veteran status or disability, be excluded from participation in, be denied benefits of, to discrimination in the provision of any care or any service. This policy of nondiscrimination extends to all employment practices, which include but are not limited to hiring, promotion, discipline, termination, assignment of employees to patient services and all staffing privileges. Under no circumstances will the application of this policy result in the segregation or resegregation of buildings, floors, and rooms for any of the aforementioned reasons. This policy applies to all Genesis HealthCare locations and related entities including: Riverstreet Manor and Riverview Ridge.

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COUGHLIN CLASS OF '91 20TH REUNION scheduled for Sat., Oct.8, 2011 from 7pm-11pm at Rodano's in Wilkes-Barre. Cost is $40 per person. Please send your payment to: Class of 91, PO Box 1583, Plains PA, 18705. Any questions please e-mail coughlin91reunion @yahoo.com.

MONTY SAYS

King’s places seventh

The King’s College cross country teams gained valuable experience running the Cougar Classic at Misericordia. The Monarchs finished seventh overall led by a 31st place finish from Patrick Gramling in a time of 30:37.

WOMEN’S CROSS COUNTRY

Misericordia wins Cougar Classic

Marina Orrson (24:27) and Kelsey Cameron (25:26) finished in the top three to lead the Lady Cougars to a first place finish at the Cougar Classic.

never relinquished a lead after that point and their biggest lead of the game was at 51-19 late in the fourth quarter. Quarterback Joe Kirchon had a monster game for King’s tossing for a careerhigh 320 yards and three touchdowns in just his second career start. Two of his TD passes went to Jay Torres, who grabbed a team-high nine catches for 144 yards. The first was a 19-yard score in the second quarter to give the team a 14-0 lead and the second went for 28 yards in

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Lady Colonels place sixth

The Wilkes University women’s cross country team placed sixth out of 10 teams in the Cougar Classic. Michelle Wakeley led the way with a time of 26:11, placing sixth. Lady Monarchs finish tenth

Catherine Falcone finished in a time of 31:11, good for 43rd place as the King’s women’s squad earned a 10th place finish at the Cougar Classic.

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Cougars finish first

Wilkes in Cougar Classic

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MEN’S CROSS COUNTRY

The Misericordia University men’s cross country team placed five runners in the top 11 on their way to a first place finish at the Cougar Classic. Josh Krall (27:48) finished third while A.J. Limongelli (28:12), Bill Cooney (28:29), Kyle Suponcic (28:33) and Dave McLean (28:36) were eighth through 11th, respectively.

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the third to put the Monarchs ahead 38-17. Kirchon also connected with Glenn Ford (3 receptions, 32 yards) for a 12-yard score, which put King’s up 4819 with 9:17 to go in the game. Eric Ofcharsky paced the Monarchs ground game rumbling for a game-high 82 yards and a touchdown on 20 carries. He also busted out for a 91-yard kickoff return for a TD. Mike Lloyd added three field goals for the Monarchs, hitting from 24, 22 and 43 yards. King’s returns home next week to face Albright for homecoming.

King's 51, Stevenson 26 King’s......................... 7 17 14 13 — 51 Stevenson ................ 0 10 9 7 — 26 First Quarter KING'S -- Haddock 8 run (Lloyd kick) 10:52 Second Quarter KING'S -- Torres 19 pass from Kirchon.

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(Lloyd kick) 13:27 STEVENSON -- DeShields 59 pass from Hopson. (Perau kick) 12:40 KING'S -- Ofcharsky 1 run. (Lloyd kick) 9:34 KING'S -- Lloyd 24 field goal 1:02 STEVENSON -- Perau 28 field goal 0:00 Third Quarter KING'S -- Ofcharsky 91 kickoff return (Lloyd kick) 14:48 STEVENSON -- DeShields 64 pass from Hopson (Pareu kick) 14:06 KING'S -- Torres 28 pass from Kirchon (Lloyd kick) 11:21 STEVENSON -- Team safety 6:02 Fourth Quarter KING'S -- Lloyd 22 field goal 12:34 KING'S -- Ford 12 pass from Kirchon (Lloyd kick) 9:17 KING'S -- Lloyd 43 field goal 2:02 STEVENSON -- Miller 53 pass from Jorgenson (Perau kick) 1:01 Team Statistics Stevenson King's First downs ............. 24 27 Rushes-yards......... 16-46 44-232 Passing ................... 376 320 Total Yards ............. 422 549 Comp-Att-Int........... 25-39-0 20-41-2 Sacks-Yards Lost .. 1-8 0-0 Punts-Avg. .............. 4-36.5 1-40.0 Fumbles-Lost ......... 1-0 0-0 Penalties ................. 4 3 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING – STE, Hopson 7-26, Paul 8-28, Joregensen 1-(minus-8); KING’S, Spencer 1068, Kirchon 1-2, Haddock 7-66, Klein 1-(minus-3), Ofcharsky 20-82, McGrath 3-17 PASSING – STE, Hopson 20-41-2-282, Jorgensen 6-10-0-94; KING’S, Kirchon 25-390-320, Daly 0-1-0-0 RECEIVING – STE, Red 4-26, Miller 9-137, Paul 2-6, DeShields 6-174, Farmer 1-4, Crawley 1-11, Barbour 3-18; KING’S Ford 3-32, Greene 1-33 Torres 9-144, Haddock 6-22, Ofcharsky 3-15, McGrath 1-8, Armellino 2-66 INTS – KING’S, McHugh, Yablonsky

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CMYK PAGE 16C

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011

W

E

A

T

H

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THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

NATIONAL FORECAST

67° 43°

TODAY Mostly sunny

MONDAY

Mostly sunny, a shower

75° 56°

FRIDAY

SATURDAY Partly sunny

Sunny

75° 59°

72° 56°

72° 53°

Atlantic City 70/55

Yesterday Average Record High Record Low

Heating Degree Days*

Yesterday Month to date Year to date Last year to date Normal year to date

61/44 72/52 87 in 1991 36 in 1986 12 45 53 61 79

*Index of fuel consumption, how far the day’s mean temperature was below 65 degrees.

Precipitation

Yesterday Month to date Normal month to date Year to date Normal year to date

Sun and Moon

Sunrise 6:47a 6:48a Moonrise Today 10:17p Tomorrow 11:07p

Today Tomorrow

Brandywine Valley

Highs: 66-72. Lows: 48-53. Partly to mostly cloudy.

Philadelphia 72/53

Temperatures

The Finger Lakes

Highs: 67-70. Lows: 41-52. Mostly sunny skies and dry conditions.

Reading 69/47

Delmarva/Ocean City

Highs: 69-74. Lows: 53-65. Partly to mostly cloudy, chance of light showers.

0.00” 6.37” 2.21” 45.07” 27.22” Sunset 7:08p 7:06p Moonset 12:46p 1:40p

Susquehanna Wilkes-Barre Towanda Lehigh Bethlehem Delaware Port Jervis Last

Stage Chg. Fld. Stg 7.60 -0.36 22.0 4.59 -0.69 21.0

New

2.86

0.54

16.0

5.56 -0.25

18.0

First

Sept. 20 Sept. 27 Oct. 3

Home Grown Locally Owned and Operated

Forecasts, graphs and data ©2011

Weather Central, LP For more weather information go to:

www.timesleader.com

Full

National Weather Service

607-729-1597

88/79

88/73 55/44

City

Yesterday

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Buffalo Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Las Vegas Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis

55/45/.00 72/56/.00 63/51/.00 62/48/.00 63/47/.00 63/54/.00 67/50/.00 66/52/.00 90/68/.00 74/52/.00 66/54/.00 85/73/.03 91/73/.51 73/53/.00 90/72/.00 70/64/.00 90/78/.00 65/55/.00 66/49/.00

Today Tomorrow 52/42/sh 78/62/c 67/55/c 66/49/s 70/52/s 74/56/c 73/63/pc 71/58/pc 92/72/t 78/50/s 71/61/pc 88/73/s 89/74/t 74/64/pc 92/69/s 71/62/s 88/79/t 67/61/pc 65/49/sh

City

Yesterday

Amsterdam Baghdad Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Dublin Frankfurt Hong Kong Jerusalem London

63/54/.00 106/75/.00 72/50/.00 73/46/.00 68/57/.00 59/50/.00 70/57/.00 95/82/.00 93/64/.00 64/50/.00

Oct. 11

52/44/r 78/60/c 72/60/pc 68/51/s 71/58/r 79/58/pc 73/60/pc 74/61/sh 91/71/t 80/54/s 71/57/sh 88/74/s 91/73/t 76/58/t 94/73/s 75/63/s 88/80/t 70/56/pc 74/54/s

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Myrtle Beach 70/61/.00 Nashville 79/59/.00 New Orleans 85/68/.00 Norfolk 65/61/1.40 Oklahoma City 90/59/.00 Omaha 56/52/.02 Orlando 90/73/.00 Phoenix 96/77/.00 Pittsburgh 65/49/.00 Portland, Ore. 59/53/.06 St. Louis 69/57/.02 Salt Lake City 73/56/.01 San Antonio 88/72/.56 San Diego 69/62/.00 San Francisco 72/52/.00 Seattle 62/52/.02 Tampa 92/76/.00 Tucson 89/66/.00 Washington, DC 64/56/.00

WORLD CITIES

Today Tomorrow 61/50/sh 106/78/s 71/53/pc 61/50/sh 66/44/pc 59/50/c 63/51/r 90/82/t 86/64/s 60/49/c

63/57/sh 107/75/s 72/52/s 64/48/c 65/41/s 63/46/sh 62/48/sh 89/79/t 83/61/s 64/54/c

City

Yesterday

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Paris Rio de Janeiro Riyadh Rome San Juan Tokyo Warsaw

79/61/.00 63/45/.00 59/48/.00 66/55/.00 81/68/.00 104/72/.00 84/59/.00 85/73/.27 88/79/.00 64/37/.00

Today Tomorrow 78/62/c 82/65/pc 87/72/pc 74/61/pc 90/65/t 70/51/sh 89/73/pc 103/78/s 71/51/pc 71/58/sh 78/65/t 75/61/s 92/75/t 72/65/s 71/55/s 64/57/sh 91/74/t 92/69/s 71/56/c

80/65/t 81/63/t 88/71/t 75/60/s 86/66/s 78/61/s 89/72/t 105/78/s 72/59/r 74/55/pc 78/59/t 80/56/s 92/74/t 76/65/s 74/55/s 69/57/pc 91/72/t 95/69/s 73/59/pc

This morning will be cool and brisk with a low of 43 and light winds. We will have a nice, mostly sunny day, and it will warm up to 67. Sunday night temperatures will drop to the mid 40s, and we will see clear skies. Monday will reach a high of 68 with partly cloudy skies and drop down to the mid 40s at night. Fall temperatures are here, and it's time to break out those jackets. - Michelle Rotella

Today Tomorrow 73/51/t 68/48/s 59/43/c 61/54/sh 73/65/s 107/80/s 82/64/pc 84/78/t 89/76/c 73/57/c

76/54/pc 68/54/s 58/45/c 64/57/sh 74/63/pc 106/77/s 73/57/t 85/77/t 85/73/t 72/52/sh

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78/62

92/72

89/74

ALMANAC Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Int’l Airport River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.

71/56

76/55

90/67

The Jersey Shore

Wilkes-Barre 68/45

69/53

71/62

52/42

New York City 69/53

Harrisburg 66/49

78/50

Highs: 67-70. Lows: 51-59. Partly cloudy.

Pottsville 64/44

State College 65/45

73/63

Highs: 64-68. Lows: 41-45. Partly cloudy skies.

Poughkeepsie 66/42

65/49

72/54

The Poconos

Binghamton 69/44 Towanda 68/42

74/48

71/61

TODAY’S SUMMARY

Albany 67/44

Scranton 66/44

64/57

Cloudy, showers

Syracuse 69/47

NATIONAL FORECAST: An area of scattered precipitation will be spread from the western Gulf Coast, along the Mississippi River Valley and into the Upper Midwest and Great Lakes. Expect scattered thunderstorms along the southern Mississippi Valley, with showers extending north of the Great Lakes.

73° 56°

68° 44°

REGIONAL FORECAST Today’s high/ Tonight’s low

Morning showers to sun

Partly sunny

THURSDAY

WEDNESDAY

TUESDAY

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CMYK

BUSINESS

SECTION

timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

D

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011

RON BARTIZEK LOCAL BUSINESS

Baby steps holding back U.S. economy

AP PHOTO

William Scott, 79, enters a post office to mail a letter in Worthington, Ohio. Scott said he usually visits the post office three times a week to send mail.

Will it be the death of delivery?

A

By RANDOLPH E. SCHMID Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Imagine a nation without the Postal Service. No more birthday cards and bills or magazines and catalogs filling the mailbox. It’s a worst-case scenario being painted for an organization that lost $8.5 billion in 2010 and seems headed deeper into the red this year. “A lot of people would miss it,” says Tony Conway, a 34-year post office veteran who now heads the Alliance of Nonprofit Mailers. Businesses, too. The letter carrier or clerk is the face of the mail. But hanging in the balance is a $1.1 trillion mailing industrythatemploysmorethan8million people in direct mail, periodicals, catalogs, financial services, charities and other businesses that depend on the post office. Ernest Burkes Sr. says his bills, magazines and diabetes medication are mailed to his home in Canton, in northeast Ohio, and he frequently visits the post office down the street to send first-class mail, mostly documents for the tax service he runs. As his business increased over the past threedecades,sohastheloadofmail he sends, and it’s still pretty steady. “I don’t know what I’d do if they’d close down the post offices,” said Burkes, who doesn’t use rival delivery services such as UPS or FedEx. “They need to help them, just like they helped some of these other places, automobiles and others.” Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe is struggling to keep his money-losing organization afloat as more and more people are ditching mail in favor of the Internet, causing the lucrative first-class mail flow to plummet. Donahoe has a plan to turn things around, if he can get the attention of Congress and pass a series of hurdles, including union concerns. “The Postal Service is not going out of business,” postal spokesman David Partenheimer said. “We will continue to deliver the mail as we have for more than 200 years. The postmaster general has developed a plan that will return the Postal Service to financial stability. We continue to do what we can on our own to

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Taryn and Ron Bath get an estimate for cleaning and repair of their mother’s house on Race Street in West Pittston from Gary Roccograndi (right) a contractor from Kingston.

After flood, victims search for the right contractor By ANDREW M. SEDER

aseder@timesleader.com

N

ot many positive things can be said about the devastation caused by last week’s floodwaters. But there are a few bright spots. There were neighbors helping neighbors; businesses and organizations donating cleaning supplies, serving hot meals and offering expertise and manpower to assist with fortifying the stressed levee system and clearing debris; and the region’s unemployed contractors, painters, plumbers, electricians and handymen are now finding work. However, all of those positives are temporary and more than counterbalanced by shuttered businesses, displaced families and lost paychecks, say local economic observers. John Sumansky, the chairman of the business department at Misericordia University, said he hates to say there are positives coming out of such a horrific event but he does expect to see “a blip” in the unemployment data for the metropolitan statistical area that includes Luzerne, Lackawanna and Wyoming counties. In addition to the companies that will physically be rebuilding, the flood could create work for other businesses, including hazardous cleanup and debris removal companies, architects, computer network engineers and

landscapers. Contractors already were out and about last week visiting flood-damaged businesses and homeowners. A painter was handing out business cards at the flooded Tuft-Tex complex in Plains Township, offering a deal that included the first day of work for free and no payment required until the customer’s insurer sends a check to cover the damages. The scene played out throughout river towns at homes needing windows replaced and businesses needing new boilers installed. And while jobs are jobs, Sumansky said these are not the long-term sustainable jobs the economy needs. See FLOOD, Page 3D

HELP WITH GETTING HELP In the aftermath of the recent storms that caused extensive damage to properties along the Susquehanna River, property owners will be looking for all types of contractors, electricians, plumbers, etc. to make repairs to their real estate. Danielle Policare, executive officer of the Building Industry Association of NEPA, offered these tips for finding reliable services: • Hire a licensed and insured contractor. Make sure they have a Pennsylvania registration number (this does not apply to home builders, only contractors). To check if a contractor is registered, go to www.paattorneygeneral.gov or call 1-888-5206680. • Do your homework. Ask for references and contact those references. • Get a start/finish date. • Call the BIA at 287-3331 for a list of qualified businesses. • Check for complaints filed with the Better Business Bureau • Get a signed contract with all of the details included.

See POSTAL, Page 4D

U.S. gets chance to catch up on credit card security By PETER SVENSSON AP Technology Writer

NEW YORK — The next time you swipe your credit card at check-out, consider this: It’s a ritual the rest of the world deems outdated and unsafe. The United States is the only developed country still hanging on to credit and debit cards with those black magnetic stripes, the kind you swipe through retail terminals. The rest of the industrialized world has switched —or is in the process of switching — to “smart” chip-based cards. The problem with that black magnetic stripe on the back of your credit card is that it’s about as secure as writing your account information on a postcard: everything is in the clear and can be copied. Card fraud, and the measures taken to prevent it, costs U.S. mer-

chants, banks and consumers billions each year. The smart cards can’t be copied, which greatly reduces the potential for fraud. Smart cards with built-in chips are the equivalent of a safe: they can hide information so it can only be unlocked with the right key. Because the important information is hidden, the cards can’t be replicated. But the stripes have been so entrenched in the vast U.S. payment system that banks, payment processors and retailers have failed to reach consensus on how to revamp it, leaving the U.S. behind the rest of the world. “The card system in this country has been dysfunctional for a long time,” says Mallory Duncan, general counsel of the National Retail Federation. “We have far, far too much fraud because we

have a very antiquated payment system relative to the rest of the world. This is something they should have fixed a long time ago.” Now there are serious moves to swap conventional cards for smart cards in a few years. Last month, Visa announced new policies that will give U.S. banks a reason to issue smart cards and stores several reasons to accept them, starting in 2015. Eric Schindewolf, product manager for smart cards at Wells Fargo & Co., says Visa’s announcement is a “watershed” moment. AP PHOTO “I think that the U.S. has reached a Two smart cards are displayed in tipping point. You’ll begin to see more London. Smart cards with built-in and more smart cards in the hands of chips, are the equivalent of a safe: See CARDS, Page 3D

they can hide information so it can only be unlocked with the right key.

couple of recent business stories struck me as jarring and sad illustrations of what ails the American economy. Both contained news that most people would consider positive, but with a back story that is not encouraging. One, about plans by the Darden restaurant chain — operators of Olive Garden, Red Lobster and other national brands — to cut calories and sodium in its meals, offered some hope that fighting the nation’s disturbing trend toward obesity might become a corporate cause. But the “breakthrough moment,” as First Lady Michelle Obama dubbed it, was clouded by this; the company is committing to a 10 percent reduction by 2016 and 20 percent over the next decade. Why not next week? Is this really the best we can do any more, a modest improvement that will take 10 years to institute. And should we be cheering or jeering an announcement like this? I’m inclined to the latter, because I think this shows how lethargic and unimaginative some sectors of the U.S. business community have become, even as they try to curry favor with politicians and the public through symbolic but largely meaningless promises. More significant, I think, was news that after years of resistance, U.S. credit card issuers will finally introduce the more secure “chip and pin” cards in use virtually everywhere else in the world. Well, at least they’re moving toward the chip part. The technology places account information on a tiny electronic chip embedded in the plastic, rather than on the black magnetic strips that have been used decades. What’s the difference? Information on the strips can be easily copied by thieves who can then go on spending sprees on your account. The chip is more difficult to crack. Alas, Visa says it will not mandate the second security check, which would require that users verify their purchase by entering a four-digit code, just as you do with an ATM card. The combination of the hard-to-read chip and PIN greatly reduce the instance of fraud. As an added check, the card never leaves your sight, since it’s inserted into a reader that incorporates the typing pad. “The card system in this country has been dysfunctional for a long time,” said Mallory Duncan, general counsel of the National Retail Federation. “We have far, far too much fraud because we have a very antiquated payment system relative to the rest of the world. This is something they should have fixed a long time ago.” What’s it worth? An economist who studies these things says that in 2006, criminals skimmed off 9 cents out every $100 charged to cards in the U.S. In Spain, where the cards have been used for years, it was 2 cents. Because card issuers absorb the bulk of the cost of fraud, you would think they’d have moved faster on this. And since it can take card holders years to straighten out the damage caused by stolen account information, you might think the government would have leaned on banks to adopt the proven technology. After all, we’re constantly reminded that consumer spending represents 70 percent of American economic activity; wouldn’t it make sense to help consumers feel more secure in their spending? Not to mention the savings to banks from less fraud, which could be passed on in lower interest rates. But that’s not how we’ve been doing things. Instead we coddle multinational corporations — many of the largest credit card-issuing banks got billions in bailout money — while adopting a caveat emptor attitude toward citizens. By the way, the cards will be introduced in 2015, not next week.

Ron Bartizek, Times Leader business editor, may be reached at rbartizek@timesleader. com or 570-970-7157.


CMYK PAGE 2D

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011

CORPORATE LADDER COMMONWEALTH ENERGY GROUP

Karen Labbate, Shavertown, was recently named vice president of sales for the energy consulting business headquartered in Dickson City. She is responsible for the direction and Labbate management of all sales and business development operations. Labbate has 15 years of business-to-business sales and marketing experience and is a member of various trade and networking agencies.

UGI UTILITIES INC.

Robert F. Beard was recently named president and chief executive officer of the natural gas and electric utility company. He is responsible for all aspects of the UGI Gas and Electric Division operations, as well as Utilities Beard Finance, Human Resources and Public Affairs functions. Beard has more than 20 years experience in the natural gas utility industry and, most recently, served as vice president of marketing,

rates and gas supply for the company. He holds a bachelor’s degree in petroleum and natural gas engineering and a master’s degree in management from Penn State University.

KING’S COLLEGE

Fifteen new full-time faculty members have joined the local college for the 201 1-12 academic year. In addition, the college has hired a graphic designer. Elizabeth Butler is a graphic designer, writer and editor in the college’s marketing and advertising department. She is responsible for producing publications for various Butler offices on campus, designing promotional pieces and writing and editing content. Butler is a King’s graduate and holds a degree in mass communications with a minor in marketing. Lea Anstett is a mathematics instructor. She holds a bachelor’s degree from King’s and previously served as an adjunct professor. Andrea Baer is an instruction/ reference librarian with the rank of assistant technical professor. She holds a bachelor’s degree from University of Arkansas and both master’s and doctorate degrees from the University of Washington, Seattle. Stephanie Justice-Bitner is a visiting assistant professor of biology. A doctoral candidate at Penn State University College of Medicine, she holds a bachelor’s degree from Colorado State

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candidate at Penn State University, he holds a master’s degree in education from Penn State and a bachelor’s degree from the New Jersey Institute of Technology. Marlene Knaub is an instructor of education. She holds a bachelor’s degree from College Misericordia and a master’s degree from the College of Notre Dame, Maryland. She previously served as an adjunct professor at King’s. Thomas Mackaman is an assistant professor of history. He holds a doctorate degree from the University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Minnesota. Kyle Mummey is an assistant clinical professor in the college’s Physician Assistant program. He holds a master’s degree in physician assistant studies from King’s. Justine Samanas is an assistant clinical professor in the college’s Physician Assistant program. She holds a master’s degree in physician assistant studies from King’s. Richard Schwanger is assistant technical professor of accounting. He holds an MBA from St. Joseph’s University, Philadelphia, and a bachelor’s degree from Bloomsburg University. He began teaching at King’s during the spring semester. Submit announcements of business promotions, hirings and other events to Corporate Ladder by email to tlbusiness@timesleader.com; by mail to 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250; or by fax to (570) 8295537. Photos in jpg format may be attached to email.

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University and a master’s degree from University of Nebraska. Julie Belanger is an assistant professor of chemistry. She holds both master’s degree and doctorate degrees from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and a bachelor’s degree from Rochester Institute of Technology. DeBorah A. Carr is an assistant professor of education. She holds an undergraduate degree from King’s and both master’s and doctorate degrees from Lehigh University. She previously served as an adjunct professor at King’s. Daniel Clasby is assistant professor of history. A doctoral candidate at Indiana University, he holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Illinois and a master’s degree from Southern Illinois University. He previously served as assistant director of graduate programs and as an adjunct professor at King’s. Janelle DeWitt is an assistant professor of philosophy. A doctoral candidate at the University of California, Los Angeles, she holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Chicago. Lee Evans is assistant technical professor of education. Evans holds both bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Bloomsburg University. She previously served as an adjunct professor at King’s. Ray Gamache is assistant professor of mass communications. He holds a doctorate degree from the University of Maryland, College Park, and both bachelor’s and master’s degrees from West Virginia University. Gerardo Giordano is an assistant professor of physics. A doctoral

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9.11

WYOMING VALLEY • 9.11 COMMEMORATION A GATHERING FOR MEMORIAL AND GRATITUDE

Representatives from fire and rescue services, local and state government, the religious community and citizens of our county will join to reflect on the tenth anniversary of the horror of Sept. 11, 2001. An honor guard will take part in the event as well as the Wyoming Seminary Madrigal Singers.The commemoration will honor the bravery of those first responders who risked life and limb to save the innocent, and the men and women of the United States Armed Forces who have been fighting to ensure that it never happens again. Participants will also honor the memories of those who died and continue to give comfort to those family and friends who live on. Please join us for an hour of prayer, honor and memory. Refreshments will follow.

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SUNDAY. SEPT. 18, 2011 • 6 P.M. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

Corner of South Franklin and Northampton streets Wilkes-Barre • Parking available at the Jewish Community Center and across from the WMCA

REFLECTIONS FROM CLERGY AND REPRESENTATIVES OF LOCAL AND STATE GOVERNMENT Sponsored by the Jewish Community Center, the Wyoming Valley Interfaith Council, The First Presbyterian Church & The Times Leader.

M ostIn su ran ces A ccepted . M ostIn su ran ces D o N O T R equ ire A R eferral w w w .pin n aclereh abilitation .n et

THE TIMES LEADER

BUSINESS AGENDA WILKES-BARRE CHAMBER CEOTO-CEO FORUM: Tuesday, 7:309:30 a.m., Westmoreland Club, 59 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. $30 for chamber CEOs. Reservations required; call 823-2101, ext. 1 13 or email jeankile@wilkesbarre.org. GREATER SCRANTON WOMEN’S NETWORK MEETING: Wednesday, noon, Country Club of Scranton, Clarks Summit. First of a program series entitled, “Strong Women Leading Today.” Jim Jeffery, president, Baptist Bible College & Seminary, will speak about using your knowledge and skills to be the best leader you can be. Call 342-771 1 or visit www.scrantonchamber.com for reservations. NEPA ALLIANCE ANNUAL DINNER: Thursday, 5:30 p.m., Genetti Hotel & Conference Center, 77 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre. $65

BUSINESS AWARDS Wyoming Valley Motors recently earned a top Magna Society award from Audi, recognizing the local car dealer as one of the 1 13 top Audi dealerships in the United States. The Magna Society acknowledges Audi dealers that deliver exceptional customer service, maintain strong Carr sales and demonstrate excellence in all areas of business. John J. Carr, a financial adviser associated with the Northwest-

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for members, $75 for non-members. Keynote speaker is Dr. Lois Margaret Nora, interim president and dean, The Commonwealth Medical College, Scranton. For information, call Suzanne Slusser at 655-5581 or 866-758-1929. HSMAI MIXER: Thursday, 5:30 p.m., Carl Von Luger, 301 N. Washington Ave., Scranton. $20 for members, $25 for non-members or $15 for students. Robert Dickert, owner of Carl Von Luger, will prepare some of his favorite dishes, tell his story and discuss what it takes to be a downtown business owner. Reservations required; email muggsie3@comcast.net. Submit announcements of business meetings, seminars and other events to Business Agenda by email to tlbusiness@timesleader.com; by mail to 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 1871 10250; or by fax to (570) 829-5537. Photos in jpg format may be attached to email.

ern Mutual Financial Network, Wilkes-Barre, recently earned the Charted Advisor for Senior Living professional designation from The American College, Bryn Mawr. Geisinger Health System has been included in the 201 1 InformationWeek 500, a list of companies that are leaders in their use of innovative technology. This is the eighth time Geisinger has been included in the list. Geisinger’s electronic health records system, launched in 1995, has paved the way for several information exchange programs, including the Keystone Health Information Exchange which includes nearly 30 health care systems, 18 hospitals, 10 practices and 49 long-term care centers sharing access to seven hospitals and 40 community practices.

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EBay making bid for hipper image By RACHEL METZ AP Technology Writer

SAN JOSE, Calif. — EBay’s name is synonymous with auctions, but that’s created an image problem for the online marketplace. These days, most of the things people purchase on the site aren’t sold through auctions; they have fixed prices. And, the majority of items for sale are new — not musty antiques or old collectibles. Richelle Parham, eBay Inc.’s chief marketing officer, says plenty of people see eBay as an auction-focused marketplace, despite the reality. “We need to change that perception,” she says. The company wants to be seen as an e-commerce innovator, rather than a staid auction site. To promote that image, eBay is embarking on a major ad campaign aimed at consumers who shop on smartphones. At the same time, eBay hopes it will change consumers’ perceptions about the company. The campaign, eBay’s first big marketing effort in several years, comes in the midst of a multi-year effort to improve the buying and selling experience on eBay.com. It’s

FLOOD Continued from Page 1D

“These are going to be temporary. At best what the construction companies will do is put in temporary workers. In four to six weeks, they’ll all be gone,” Sumansky said. He said those who are employed at businesses that were affected by the flood might offset the temporary employment bump because they will be out of work until their employer rebuilds or reopens. “It might be a wash,” Sumansky said. Anthony Liuzzo, director of the master of business administration program at Wilkes University, said he sees very little positive coming out of this disaster. He said families and businesses already struggling to pay their bills will now

the 16-year-old company’s first campaign to focus on mobile shopping — a small but rapidly growing revenue source. The company was one of the first to offer an iPhone app through Apple’s App Store when it opened in mid-2008, and in the last three years, eBay’s various smartphone and tablet apps have been downloaded more than 50 million times. People aren’t just using the apps to browse. They’re buying. In 2010, the value of goods purchased from the site using mobile devices totaled $2 billion. This year, eBay predicted that figure would double, and mobile vice president Steve Yankovich says the company will unquestionably top its $4 billion goal. Mobile apps are bringing in new users, too. Between January and July, nearly 500,000 new eBay shoppers joined up and made their first purchase via mobile. Given this, eBay is emphasizing the idea that people can shop on its site at anytime, anywhere, for anything. The TV commercials and other ads eBay will start rolling out on Wednesday are geared toward three types of mobile-happy shoppers it identified through market research:

have to come up with funds to rebuild. He said “there will be a redistribution of wealth” and while some sectors will benefit, others will suffer. “This in no way will be categorized as stimulating the economy,” Liuzzo said. But one industry Liuzzo and Sumansky both noted as beneficiaries of the flood are those in the building trades. Danielle Policare, the executive officer of the Building Industry Association of Northeastern Pennsylvania, said there is no doubt that builders and related businesses will be “slammed” with work as a result of the flood. She said that while she hates to see work created from something so bad, “at least something good is coming out of it.” Contractors who have laid off staff and have been employing a

the fashionista, the electronics junkie and the auto parts and accessory fan, all of whom are in different situations when shopping inspiration strikes. Parham says these three kinds of consumers were chosen as the focus, in part, because they tend to own smartphones (eBay believes 60 percent of the people that it considers “fashion enthusiasts” and 65 percent of “electronics enthusiasts” are so equipped, for example). The campaign will be unveiled over the next 11 weeks, to coincide with the holiday shopping season. In addition to commercials, the campaign includes print, online and outdoor ads. There will also be movie theater ads, many of which will air as one of the last commercial spots before the familiar announcement urging moviegoers to turn off their cell phones. Forrester analyst Sucharita Mulpuru says it makes sense that eBay is concentrating its campaign on mobile shopping, since the market is still pretty small and the shopping experience is generally bad. Also, Mulpura notes: there are not yet a lot of products that people feel comfortable buying on their phones.

skeleton crew the past few years will be recalling employees to handle the workload. David. R. Balent, who runs an Exeter-based construction company, said the work comes at an opportune time. He said business has been slow in recent years “with the bad economy and people being so budget conscious.” As painful as it is to see friends and neighbors going through what they are, he is glad he can help them get their lives back in order. “It just tugs at your heartstrings, though,” Balent said. His office phone has been knocked out but his cell phone has been ringing constantly and he believes he’ll have his busiest fall in a decade. Balent said he’s likely to add three more employees to his staff of six in the next few weeks. Others expect a surge in business, but not everyone will be hiring to handle the increased work-

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U.S. consumers,” Schindewolf says. Smart cards are recognizable by the fingernail-sized gold contacts embedded on one side. Through the contacts, a chip inside the card can transmit information to a terminal when slid into a slot. Here’s how a smart card works in practice: When it’s time to settle the bill at “Le Gaspard de la Nuit,” a tiny restaurant just off the Place de la Bastille in Paris, the waiter brings to the table a wireless payment terminal. The customer inserts his chip-equipped “smart” credit card and enters his code on the keypad. Voila! The foie gras is paid for without the card leaving the customer’s sight, and the combination of chip and PIN code kept the transaction safe from fraud. The U.S. payments industry has so far been locked up in a “chicken and egg” quandary, Schindewolf says. Stores had little reason to install terminals for smart cards if banks didn’t issue them, and aside from some contactless cards, banks didn’t issue them because stores wouldn’t accept them. The impasse has left U.S. businesses and consumers struggling with higher fraud rates. Richard Sullivan, the senior economist in payments research at the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, says that in 2006, 9 cents out every $100 paid by card in the U.S. ended

load. Alan Grula, who owns Grula Electric, LLC in Wilkes-Barre Township, said he has been getting calls from flood victims and he expects an uptick in business as residents and businesses start to get a sense of the damage and begin the process of rebuilding. But he believes his staff of four, which includes himself, will not grow. Mike Scibek, who owns a drywall company in Swoyersville that employs six, said he has not received many calls but expects them to begin pouring in any day. “I think it’s too early,” he said. Drywall will be on the list of things to do but it’s not one of the first calls made. Usually cleanup, basement pumping, electrical and flooring come first. He said while it’s possible he will have to bring on some temporary employees, it’s not likely. All in all, Liuzzo does not expect

up in the pockets of criminals. The comparable figure for Spain was 2 cents. Sullivan believes the use of smart cards there is a big reason for the difference. Other factors play a role, too. Spaniards, for instance, are less likely to shop online. Javelin Strategy & Research puts the amount of fraud based on stolen card numbers in the U.S. at $14 billion. Fraud based on new card accounts created using stolen identities adds billions more — the total cost of identity fraud in the country is $37 billion. Visa’s move comes as industry experts are warning that U.S. merchants are set to become targets for fraudsters in other countries where payment systems already have tighter security. Since counterfeit magnetic-stripe cards are now difficult to use in other countries, these criminals will probably ship the cards to the U.S. That prospect is especially worrisome now that Mexico and Canada, are adopting smart cards, experts say. “There’s already evidence that that type of channel for fraud is increasing in the U.S.,” says Sullivan. Javelin puts the cost of moving to chipbased cards at about $8 billion, mostly for upgrading payment terminals in stores. The retail federation’s Duncan calls Visa’s move a necessary step, but not a fully satisfactory one. One of the shortcoming he sees is that it doesn’t mandate the use of PIN codes with smart cards, so even if the cards can’t be copied, they could still be used on a signature basis if stolen.

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Jude Sidari of Northeast Biohazard Remediation treats a house on Montgomery Avenue in West Pittston for mold and mildew. Contractors are expected to be busy as the region recovers from last week’s flooding.

the flood to be a factor in the region’s unemployment rate, which stood at 9.4 percent in July – the most recently released data – “be-

cause (damage) was confined to specific areas and the great majority of the area was not personally affected.”


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OFFICE COACH

SMALL TALK

Manager must avoid playing favorites

Hard-to-compare health insurance challenges businesses

By MARIE G. MCINTYRE McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Q: On a recent employee opinion survey, my staff gave me a terrible rating on favoritism. I have no idea why they feel that I’m biased, since I try to be very consistent in applying policies and enforcing rules. I do have a closer connection with certain employees, because we share common interests, but no one receives any special treatment. What can I do about this? A: Since you are dealing with perceptions, not facts, your employees may have a completely different interpretation of your behavior. Suppose, for example, that “common interests” cause you to regularly have lunch with particular staff members or chat with them more frequently. The others could easily view this extra attention as favoritism. Let us further suppose that you decide to send one of your lunch buddies to a professional conference. Although this decision may have been based solely on her need for training, others might see it as a perk for one of your pets. An accumulation of such examples can earn you a reputation for playing favorites, even if that is not your intention. The first step towards better survey scores is to objectively evaluate your interactions with employees, then make an effort to distribute your attention more equally. If the survey were conducted by your human resources department, you might also consider asking the HR manager to conduct confidential follow-up interviews with your staff. The moral of this story is that managers should always be aware of the messages sent by their actions. While it’s perfectly normal to enjoy the company of some people more than others,

you must be careful not to make that preference obvious. Q: Our new regional manager was transferred here after being demoted from a higher-level position. This guy has no idea what our jobs involve and apparently doesn’t care. He seems to believe that cutting costs will help him return to the corporate “ivory tower,” so he has started randomly reducing our work hours. Previously, schedules were posted two weeks in advance, but now they can change at a moment’s notice. Employees are frequently called at home and told not to come in the next day or instructed to leave as soon as they arrive at the office. Meanwhile, the work is piling up. How can we end this nightmare? A: If this chaos is a reflection of your new leader’s management style, then his recent demotion is completely understandable. Before approaching him, however, you need to determine the driving force behind these cost reductions. If slicing payroll was his own original idea, you should help your manager see how staff shortages could actually harm the business. But if he is simply responding to orders from above, then you need to demonstrate the benefits of a more orderly implementation plan. Either way, the key is to convince your disorganized boss that the current strategy might make him look bad to upper management. If returning to corporate is his ultimate objective, then that’s the best way to influence him. Marie G. McIntyre is a workplace coach and the author of “Secrets to Winning at Office Politics.” Send in questions and get free coaching tips at http://www.yourofficecoach.com.

By MIKE ARMSTRONG The Philadelphia Inquirer

Nothing exasperates smallbusiness owners more than the cost and complexity of health insurance. The mood of men and women who have built businesses can go from manic excitement about what they do to utter frustration when the conversation turns to the annual chore of trying to pick a health plan that won’t bust the budget. Many of them switch insurance providers every year, chasing lower cost. Or they trim plan benefits to try to hold down the level of the premium increases. These are smart people who seek out and find the lowest prices for all sorts of goods and services. Why can’t they successfully chip away at the cost of their health insurance plans? A new paper by a Boston University management professor and several colleagues points the finger at an economics concept called “search frictions.” In an interview, James Rebitzer said

such frictions occur whenever consumers cannot easily compare the options available to them, and that’s especially true of those who try to buy individual and small group health plans. If search frictions sounds at all familiar, it may be because the 2010 Nobel Prize for economics went to three economists, including MIT’s Peter A. Diamond, for their work on the concept in the 1970s and 1980s. Their research explored labor markets where there can be a large number of job openings at the same time a lot of people are unemployed. A similar disconnect occurs with health insurance. Businesses have to buy it every year. There are dozens of health insurance plans to pick from, and at all sorts of prices. It’s hard to compare one plan with another. So what does a businessperson do? Hire an insurance broker or consultant to make sense of it all and offer a recommendation. Small businesses, in fact, are doing what they need to do to

lower costs in a market-based system. According to Rebitzer’s paper, published in the August 2011 issue of the American Economic Review, the trouble is the system doesn’t work. Search frictions increase the cost of health insurance in the small-group market 29 percent on average, concludes the paper. While there is competition among insurers, the fog of uncertainty gives them great pricing power. So instead of being forced by competition to offer equivalent plans at low prices, insurers offer all sorts of plans at prices set above their marginal cost. After a lot of math, Rebitzer and his colleagues concluded that search frictions are a factor in transferring about 13.2 percent of the “consumer surplus” from policyholders to insurers. Much of it was spent on marketing by insurers of all those plans. The Pennsylvania Insurance Department held three public hearings in August on how it should construct such an exchange where patient advocates,

POSTAL Continued from Page 1D

achieve this plan and we need Congress to do its part to get us there.” He acknowledged that if Congress doesn’t act, the post office could reach a point next summer where it doesn’t have the money to keep operating. Donahoe and his predecessor, John Potter, have warned for years of the problems and stressed that the post office will be unable to make a mandated $5.5 billion payment due Sept. 30 to a fund for future medical benefits for retirees. A 90-day delay on the payment has been suggested, but postal officials and others in the industry say a long-term solution is needed. Donahoe has one. It includes laying off staff beyond the 110,000 cutinthepastfouryears,closingas many as 3,700 offices, eliminating Saturday delivery and switching from the federal retirement plan to

AP PHOTO

Postmistress Anne Nix weighs mail on the M/V Sophie C on Lake Winnipesaukee in Meredith, N.H. The vessel is the nation’s only inland floating post office.

one of its own. Cliff Guffey, president of the American Postal Workers Union, called the proposal “outrageous, illegal and despicable.” A contract signed in March protects many workers from layoffs. Guffey said the attempt to change

that now “is in utter disregard for the legal requirement to bargain with the APWU in good faith.” Other unions, including the National Association of Letter Carriers, are negotiating their contracts with the post office. On Thursday, the Postal Service

insurers, and business groups offered their two cents. (If you missed it, you can catch a very long video of it on the department’s website.) Among those testifying was Gerry McGlone, middle-market practice leader at Trion, an insurance broker and consultant with 320 employees in King of Prussia. He defended his industry’s role, calling the services provided “an extension to the HR departments” of employers. The fees and commissions paid are not “an unnecessary expense,” he said. “I will say that I think we’ve come a long way as an industry as far as transparency on fees. And if we can’t create value, we shouldn’t get paid. But I’m very, very confident that we do create a lot of value in the process.” Brokers and consultants may indeed help employers and their employees navigate the health system, Rebitzer said. But his advice for businesses hiring brokers echoes Ronald Reagan: “Trust, but verify.” said it would review 252 mail processing facilities across the country overthenextthreemonthsforpossible closing. Currently there are 487 such offices, including one in Scranton, which is among those under review. The Internet, along with the advent of online bill paying, has contributed to a sharp decline in mail handled by the post office, from 207billionin2001to171billionlast year. Although the price of stamps has increased from 34 cents to 44 centsoverthesameperiod,itisnot enough to cover the post office’s bills, in part because of higher labor costs. Yet one of the biggest problems isn’t mail flow or labor or other costs.Rather,it’sarequirementimposed by Congress five years ago thatthepostofficesetaside$55billion in an account to cover future medical costs for retirees. The idea was to put $5.5 billion a year into the account for 10 years. That’s $5.5 billion the post office doesn’t have.

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MarketPulse SOFT LANDING Cotton’s price drop means breathing room for apparel companies. Makers of socks, underwear and other clothes had been getting squeezed by cotton’s rise from 49 cents per pound at the start of 2009 to $2.15 in March. But it has since dropped more than 40 percent, and financial analysts say investors will really see the benefits next year. If cotton prices stay where they are, and if the price increases that apparel companies pushed through earlier this year stick, profit margins will be fatter. Citi analyst Kate McShane says Hanesbrands and Phillips-Van Heusen would likely be winners because cotton is such a big part of their annual bills.

RAH RAH Be wary when a company appoints a former financial analyst to its board. Odds are that the person was a former cheerleader for the company, says research from Harvard Business School and AQR Capital Management. The researchers found 51 examples from 1993 to 2006 where an analyst went from covering a company to joining its board. Of them, 82 percent previously had a “Buy” rating on the stock. Out of all the other analysts covering the company, only 57 percent had “Buy” ratings. One effect: Once former cheerleaders join the board as independent directors, companies often boost CEO compensation.

PAINFULLY GOOD? Prices for solar equipment are falling so fast that panel makers are going bankrupt. Solyndra shut down last month, even after receiving a $528 million federal loan. One of the reasons that it cited was “a severe compression of prices.” But the trend may actually be good for the industry, some analysts say. It’s forcing solar manufacturers to lower their costs enough to eventually survive without government incentives. For now, investors should focus on solar makers with already low costs, says Kaufman Bros. analyst Jeffrey Bencik. He suggests First Solar, whose costs are about 30 percent lower than rivals’ costs.

Change in cotton price per pound 350 percent 300 250 200 150 100 50 0 -50 ’06 ’07

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Stan Choe, Kristen Girard • AP

Time to brace for a plunge? Economic forecaster Harry Dent is known for his wild stock market predictions. In a new book, he warns that the Dow Jones industrial average could fall to about 3,000 by 2013. But not all of Dent’s estimates have been accurate in the past. He talks with The Associate Press about what investors should do now.

InsiderQ&A

What’s your forecast for what’s ahead? We see another crash kind of similar to what we saw in 2008, 2009. ...The stimulus is trying to fight 92 million baby boomers who have peaked in their spending. (They’ve) bought all of the houses they’re going to buy in their lifetime and are looking to save and pay down debt, not spend and borrow, which the government is trying to get them to do. We’ve said for years, this stimulus is ultimately going to fail. It will always work at first, but then the economy will flop back.

Dent

What’s the timing on all of this? We think that this crash has already started. It looks like the stock markets peaked in late April, when the first wave down in a broader crash (began). This first wave down will probably go a little lower. Maybe the Dow goes below 10,000 in October. Then we think there will be a strong year-end rally, because our indicators show that the economy will be a lot stronger than people expect in the fourth quarter. ... Then we go into a deeper, third wave in 2012 and it continues maybe perhaps into 2013 or so. So this is going to take a couple years. You’ve acknowledged that you’ve made some wrong calls in the past, including a prediction that the Dow would rise between 32,000 and 40,000 in 2008. That didn’t happen. So what should investors take away from these estimates? We’re saying: Sell on bounces. We just told investors when the S&P 500 bounced to 1,230 after this recent mini-crash in August, sell. Get out of stocks. Aggressive investors can re-buy if we do go lower in October, because we do think there’s going to be a strong year-end rally. And, then if we rally again in December or early January, sell. Protect yourself. So where should people put their money? You’ve mentioned you like the dollar. Our ultimate haven for protection is the U.S. dollar. One thing all these crazy gold bugs (are saying) is that the dollar is going to crash and gold is going to go up to $5,000 (an ounce). They’re going to be so dead wrong on that. ... I think (the dollar) could be up 30 to 50 percent over the next few years when everything else is crashing. But what do you say to critics who argue that market timing is just too dangerous? Shouldn’t most long-term investors just stay the course? In long-term bull markets, like 1983 to 2007, yes, that’s a good thing to do. It is hard to time the markets, and people who do it usually lose. But when you get into an extended downturn ... you need to be either in safer investors where you can sleep at night, like long-term bonds when (interest) rates go up. Or you’re going to have to do some kind of timing. ... If you’re not willing to time the market, you shouldn’t be in it, because it’s going to be very volatile. This is not one of those times that buy-and-hold will work.

Taking refuge in defense

Treasury yields rebound

CHEAP DEFENSE STOCKS Friday’s close (NOC): Forward P/E: Annual dividend: Dividend yield: Avg. target price: YTD change:

Stocks of defense contractors have plunged this year on worries about cuts to military spending.

$54.82 7.8 $2.00 3.6% $65.13 -7%

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 2.06 percent this week after five major central banks gave support to European lenders. That encouraged investors to move out of bonds and into riskier investments like stocks. Mortgage rates remained at their lowest level in six decades. The average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage fell to 4.09 percent, down from 4.12 percent.

InterestRates

Money market mutual funds

Raytheon stock is down 9 percent this year. Northrop Grumman is down 7 percent. And General Dynamics is down 15 percent. That’s far worse than the 3 percent drop in the S&P 500. Some financial analysts say investors are overreacting to plans to cut the defense budget. It’s true that the cuts could affect the stocks in the short term, but spending isn’t in a permanent decline, says Citi analyst Jason Gursky. The government plans to cut at least $350 billion in military spending over the next decade as part of an agreement reached this summer to reduce the deficit. A special deficit-reduction committee is expected to announce more cuts later this year. But Gursky notes that public support for defense programs is strong. Terror threats and tensions with countries like Iran and

North Korea will likely mean further spending. Government agencies like the CIA and NASA will still need the contractors’ products and services. Now may be the time to buy these stocks. They’re trading below their historical averages, which suggests “significant upside opportunities,” says Bernstein analyst Doug Harned. Lockheed Martin is trading at 9.1 times what it’s expected to earn over the next 12 months. That number is known as the forward price-to-earnings ratio. Lockheed’s P/E has averaged 15.6 over the past 10 years. Raytheon’s P/E is 7.9, below its average of 15.5. The S&P’s P/E is 11.3. Most defense contractors also have a dividend yield above 3 percent. That beats the 2.06 percent yield on the 10-year Treasury note. The S&P 500’s average dividend yield is 2.3 percent.

SOURCE: FactSet

COMPANY

Friday’s close (RTN): Forward P/E: Annual dividend: Dividend yield: Avg. target price: YTD change:

PRIME FED Taxable—national avg RATE FUNDS Selected Daily Govt Fund/Cl D FRIDAY 3.25 .13 Tax-exempt—national avg 6 MO AGO 3.25 .13 Alpine Municipal MMF/Investor 1 YR AGO 3.25 .13

$42.13 7.9 $1.72 4.1% $53.82 -9%

Friday’s close (GD): Forward P/E: Annual dividend: Dividend yield: Avg. target price: YTD change:

$60.60 8.0 $1.88 3.1% $81.79 -15%

Friday’s close (LMT): Forward P/E: Annual dividend: Dividend yield: Avg. target price: YTD change:

$76.03 9.1 $3.00 3.9% $85.83 +9%

U.S. BOND INDEXES Broad market Lehman Triple-A corporate Moody’s Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman Municipal Bond Buyer U.S. high yield Barclays Treasury Barclays

TREASURYS 3-month T-Bill 1-year T-Bill 6-month T-Bill 2-year T-Note 5-year T-Note

0.01 0.10 $ 2,500 min (888) 785-5578

1WK

CHANGE 1MO 3MO 1YR

2.38 4.19 3.73 5.01 8.66 1.11

0.06 0.06 0.14 0.00 0.16 0.08

FRIDAY YIELD

1WK

0.12 0.01 0.17 0.92

-0.01 0.02 -0.02 0.00 0.12

t s r t s

t t t t t

-0.15 -0.14 -0.17 -0.29 -0.53

0.16 0.34 0.20 0.83 2.39

0.07 0.01 0.17 0.80

0.13 0.07

t t

t -0.70 t -0.60

3.72 4.77

1.92 3.25

%CHG 1MO

%RTN 1YR

s t s t s t

t t s t s t

NAME

TICKER

52-WK HIGH LOW

-0.18 -0.40 -0.07 0.10 0.67 -0.52

3.29 5.31 4.22 5.95 8.81 2.46

CHANGE 1MO 3MO 1YR

Exchange-Traded Funds

52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN RANK %RTN LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD

TICKER

0.01 0.15 $ 10,000 min (800) 243-1575

FRIDAY YIELD

10-year T-Note 2.05 30-year T-Bond 3.32 Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.

Chip Cutter Kristen Girard • AP

LocalStocks

MIN INVEST PHONE

YIELD

FRIDAY CLOSE

CHG WK

2.25 4.06 3.36 4.86 6.61 1.03

52-WK HIGH LOW

%CHG 1WK

Direx SOX Bull 3X

SOXL

33.35

7.79

30.5

55.7

23.2

Direxion TechBull 3x

TYH

37.25

6.65

21.7

39.7

18.6

iPath LgExt Rus2000

RTLA

46.70

8.01

20.7

35.7

...

ProShs UltraPro QQQ

TQQQ

74.61

12.75

20.6

42.5

-27.3 28.4

Air Products

APD

74.58 4

98.01

82.36

3.97

5.1

s

t

6.4

15

2.8

ProSh Ultra Semi

USD

34.43

5.74

20.0

31.1

Amer Water Works

AWK

22.50 9

30.70

29.69

1.01

3.5

s

s 17.4 +34.54

1 16.6a

18

3.1

Direxion SCapBull 3x

TNA

45.92

7.13

18.4

26.7

6.5

Amerigas Part LP

APU

36.76 5

51.50

43.32

0.58

1.4

s

s -11.2 +6.18

3 13.5

27

6.8

Pro UltPro Russ2000

URTY

50.48

7.82

18.3

27.0

-46.0

Aqua America Inc

WTR

19.28 6

23.79

21.93

0.81

3.8

s

s

-2.4 +10.05

2

2.3

22

3.0

ProShs Ultra S&P500

UPRO

57.35

8.15

16.6

24.9

-61.6

Arch Dan Mid

ADM

26.00 3

38.02

28.62

1.51

5.6

s

t

-4.9—11.92 4

-3.9

9

2.2

Direxion LCapBull 3x

BGU

58.91

8.39

16.6

25.4

15.3

AutoZone Inc

AZO

213.52 0 327.00 331.25 16.76

5.3

s

s 21.5 +51.33

1 28.2

18

...

Direxion FinBull 3x

FAS

14.09

2.00

16.5

17.3

-37.9

Bank of America

BAC

Bk of NY Mellon

BK

-9.4 +3.36

3

6.01 2

15.31

7.23

0.25

3.6

s

t -45.8—46.35 5 -24.6

...

0.6

iPath LgExt S&P500

SFLA

55.00

7.70

16.3

27.6

...

18.77 2

32.50

21.14

1.22

6.1

s

t -30.0—15.54 4

-7.0

10

2.5

Direxion MCapBull3x

MWJ

34.93

4.90

16.3

29.9

15.9

25

3.1

8

0.1

Bon Ton Store

BONT

5.59 1

17.49

6.48

0.24

3.8

s

t -48.8—19.95 4 -24.1

CIGNA Corp

CI

34.25 7

52.95

46.40

3.52

8.2

s

t 26.6 +34.06

CVS Caremark Corp

CVS

28.98 7

39.50

36.22

-0.28

-0.8

s

t

CocaCola

KO

57.22 0

71.77

71.23

2.33

3.4

s

s

Comcast Corp A

CMCSA 16.91 6

27.16

22.94

2.03

9.7

s

t

4.9 +32.92

1

1.0

16

2.0

Community Bk Sys

CBU

21.75 4

28.95

23.99

1.56

7.0

s

t -13.6 +13.40

2

5.4

12

4.0

Community Hlth Sys

CYH

17.01 1

42.50

18.80

1.14

6.5

t

t -49.7—38.88 5 -12.8

7

...

Entercom Comm

ETM

4.81 1

13.63

5.50

0.44

8.7

s

t -52.5—22.21 4 -20.3

5

...

Fairchild Semicond

FCS

8.15 5

21.02

13.76

1.93

16.3

s

t -11.9 +55.48

1

-6.3

10

...

Frontier Comm

FTR

6.29 3

9.84

7.11

0.29

4.3

s

t -26.9 —.25

3

-2.7

44 10.5

Genpact Ltd

G

13.09 6

18.71

16.28

0.67

4.3

s

s

3 9.4a

22

1.1

1

3.9

4.2 +24.43

2

1.7

15

1.4

8.3 +27.07

1 12.2

14

2.6

7.1 +1.24

Harte Hanks Inc

HHS

7.00 3

13.74

8.46

1.17

16.0

s

s -33.8—16.82 4 -17.8

12

3.8

Heinz

HNZ

46.50 6

55.00

51.52

0.95

1.9

t

t

4.2 +12.32

2

7.6

17

3.7

Hershey Company

HSY

45.31 0

59.45

59.42

2.86

5.1

s

s 26.0 +28.60

1

4.8

23

2.3

Kraft Foods

KFT

29.80 9

36.30

35.06

0.55

1.6

s

s

11.3 +15.35

2

3.5

20

3.3

Lowes Cos

LOW

18.07 3

27.45

20.38

1.42

7.5

s

t -18.7 —2.16

3

-5.5

13

2.7

M&T Bank

MTB

69.23 2

95.00

74.15

3.65

5.2

s

t -14.8—11.47 4

-6.2

11

3.8

McDonalds Corp

MCD

72.14 9

91.22

88.29

3.26

3.8

s

s 15.0 +21.30

2 21.2

18

2.8

NBT Bncp

NBTB

17.50 3

24.98

19.27

1.53

8.6

s

t -20.2 —5.11

4

-0.8

11

4.2

Nexstar Bdcstg Grp

NXST

3.87 5

10.28

6.50

0.59

10.0

r

t

8.5 +50.81

1

9.3

72

...

PNC Financial

PNC

42.70 4

65.19

51.34

4.96

10.7

s

t -15.4 —4.09

3

-4.1

8

2.7

PPL Corp

PPL

24.10 0

29.06

28.80

0.85

3.0

s

s

9.4 +12.73

2

1.7

12

4.9

Penn Millers Hldg

PMIC

13.15 0

20.25

20.14

0.01

0.0

s

s 52.2 +47.01

1

...

...

...

Penna REIT

PEI

8.80 1

17.34

9.56

0.52

5.8

t

t -34.2—15.40 4 -17.2

...

6.3

PepsiCo

PEP

59.25 3

71.89

62.05

2.06

3.4

r

t

1.7

16

3.3

Philip Morris Intl

PM

54.26 9

72.74

69.08

3.18

4.8

s

s 18.0 +29.99

1 12.0a

16

4.5

Procter & Gamble

PG

57.56 7

67.72

64.33

2.49

4.0

s

t

2

3.6

16

3.3

Prudential Fncl

PRU

44.54 4

67.52

51.45

5.31

11.5

s

t -12.4 —5.04

4

-5.4

8

2.2

SLM Corp

SLM

10.92 5

17.11

13.48

0.77

6.1

s

t

7.1 +21.93

2 -22.9

10

3.0

0.3

-5.0 —3.86 0.0 +8.56

SLM Corp flt pfB

SLMpB 36.50 4

60.00

43.96

-0.04

-0.1

t

t

Southn Union Co

SUG

44.65

42.10

0.45

1.1

s

s 74.9 +76.08

23.60 9

3

...

0.0 1

... 10.5

11.0

22

1.4

TJX Cos

TJX

41.11 0

56.78

57.25

5.46

10.5

s

s 29.0 +35.38

1 16.3

17

1.3

UGI Corp

UGI

25.81 5

33.53

28.90

0.63

2.2

s

t

-8.5 +7.59

3

6.5

13

3.6

Verizon Comm

VZ

30.61 8

38.95

36.72

1.48

4.2

s

s

2.6 +23.07

2

7.1

16

5.4

WalMart Strs

WMT

48.31 5

57.90

52.65

1.29

2.5

s

t

-2.4 +1.69

3

3.8

12

2.8

Weis Mkts

WMK

35.87 6

42.20

39.09

1.53

4.1

s

r

-3.1 +10.52

2

2.9

15

3.0

Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quarters. Rank classifies a stock’s performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).

Short on confidence COMPANY

TICKER

CLOSE

52-WK LOW

Ecolab Pall News Corp. CVS Caremark Forest Laboratories Peabody Energy Capital One Financial Expeditors Int’l of Washington Public Service Enterprise

ECL PLL NWSA CVS FRX BTU COF EXPD PEG

$51.31 43.51 16.20 36.67 32.83 46.09 43.52 44.16 33.60

$43.81 39.10 12.88 29.10 30.03 41.20 35.94 40.14 27.97

Investors are piling onto these stocks, betting that they will fall. These are the S&P 500 companies with the biggest increases in investors shorting their shares over the last three months. When investors short a stock, they borrow a share and sell it. Later, if it falls in price as the investors expect, they can buy back the stock and pocket the difference as a profit. Short interest in Ecolab jumped more than 400 percent in three months, for example. The cleaning and pest-control company has reported at least 10 percent per-share profit growth in seven of the last 10 years, and Credit Suisse analysts say its core business still looks strong. But Ecolab is in the process of buying Nalco

Holding, a water treatment company, for $5.4 billion. The water business has less stable profits and more competition, and worries about the merger mean Credit Suisse has just a “Neutral”

SOURCE: Credit Suisse; FactSet

Data through Sept. 14

Stock Screener

Pro UltPro MidCap400

UMDD

59.53

8.06

15.7

29.3

-40.9

ProShs UltRegBk

KRU

30.69

3.96

14.8

17.8

-16.1

ProShs UltPro Dow30

UDOW

113.35

14.50

14.7

19.2

22.6

ProSh Ultra Tech

ROM

58.42

7.40

14.5

26.2

19.5

ProSh Ult Cons Svcs

UCC

50.03

6.03

13.7

20.6

28.8

Barc Long B LevS&P

BXUB

68.77

8.31

13.7

22.9

25.4

Direx Matls Bull 3x

MATL

27.27

3.24

13.5

23.8

...

ProShs Ultra QQQ

QLD

84.89

10.04

13.4

27.3

33.4

Direxion DvMktBull3x

DZK

38.77

4.48

13.1

1.8

-22.6

ProSh Ultra Indls

UXI

37.85

4.32

12.9

21.2

9.6

ProSh Ult Rus2KG

UKK

39.50

4.42

12.6

21.7

21.6

Direxion REst Bull3x

DRN

54.96

6.02

12.3

21.4

5.9

ProShs Ultra R2K

UWM

33.71

3.63

12.1

18.7

13.1

Internet HOLDRs Tr

HHH

82.22

8.66

11.8

25.7

34.4

Direxion EngyBull 3x

ERX

46.67

4.87

11.7

17.0

54.2 49.4

B2B Internet HldTr

BHH

1.03

0.11

11.4

32.0

Fact SPBull USDBear

FSU

20.88

2.14

11.4

8.4

...

Direx Hlthcre Bull3x

CURE

31.70

3.24

11.4

18.5

...

ProShs Ult R1K Gr

UKF

48.95

4.95

11.3

20.4

19.2

ProSh Ult R1K Value

UVG

25.11

2.55

11.3

11.8

4.9

ProSh Ultra Fincl

UYG

44.67

4.49

11.2

13.1

-20.9

ProSh Ultra SmCap

SAA

38.55

3.87

11.2

18.3

18.1

ProShs Ultra S&P500

SSO

44.07

4.39

11.1

16.8

14.2

ProSh Ult Rus2KV

UVT

23.68

2.33

10.9

15.6

3.8

Rydex 2x SP 500

RSU

37.59

3.67

10.8

16.2

15.2

SPDR S&P Semiconduct

XSD

48.70

4.71

10.7

15.8

14.4

ProShs UltMSCI Japan

EZJ

59.55

5.65

10.5

5.6

-8.5

Fact S&PBullTBdBear

FSE

13.32

1.27

10.5

9.2

...

ProSh Ultra MidCap

MVV

55.49

5.24

10.4

19.7

17.9

ProSh Ult RusMCV

UVU

30.77

2.80

10.0

15.0

9.7

CS VS InvVix STerm

XIV

7.24

0.65

9.9

-0.5

...

Barc LongC LevS&P

BXUC

125.57

11.16

9.8

16.0

18.2

ProSh Ult Rus MCG

UKW

42.99

3.80

9.7

20.1

23.2

ProShs Ultra Dow30

DDM

53.73

4.72

9.6

13.0

17.8

iShs PHLX SOX

SOXX

51.85

4.50

9.5

17.0

17.6

Gugg Airline

FAA

29.21

2.54

9.5

8.5

-17.1

ETracs Sht 1mo VIX

AAVX

96.42

8.33

9.5

-0.5

...

iShare Germany

EWG

19.47

1.65

9.3

-0.8

-4.6

52-WK HIGH

1-YR CHANGE

AVG. BROKER RATING*

3 MO. RISE IN SHORT INTEREST

$57.19 59.50 18.35 39.50 40.52 73.95 56.26 57.15 34.22

3.4% 9.5 19.2 25.4 5.6 3.1 11.2 1.0 8.3

1.2 1.6 1.4 1.2 1.8 1.3 1.4 1.6 1.5

439% 287 241 233 214 194 191 187 174

rating on the stock. Moody’s Investors Service has also said that it plans to cut Ecolab’s debt rating once it finishes the acquisition. *1=buy;2=hold;3=sell

p p p p

Dow industrials

+4.7%

WEEKLY

Nasdaq

+6.3% WEEKLY

LARGE-CAP

S&P 500

+5.4%

WEEKLY

SMALL-CAP

Russell 2000

+6.0%

WEEKLY

p q p q p q p q

+6.4%

MO -0.6%

YTD +12.0%

MO -1.2%

YTD +8.2%

MO -3.3%

YTD

+9.6%

MO -8.9%

YTD


CMYK ➛

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011

SPECIALTY FUNDS

YTD

Conservative Allocation (CA) Moderate Allocation (MA) Health (SH) Natural Resources (SN) Real Estate (SR) Technology (ST)

0.70 -1.53 4.01 -9.38 3.37 -4.66

5.42 6.56 12.60 10.54 9.68 11.09

5.33 3.82 4.27 1.52 1.84 9.48

5YR* 3.29 2.24 3.64 6.05 -1.34 4.73

BALANCED Target-Date 2000-2010 (TA) Target-Date 2011-2015 (TD) Target-Date 2016-2020 (TE)

0.18 -1.08 -0.91

5.99 6.00 6.64

4.39 3.63 3.83

2.85 2.21 1.87

INTERNATIONAL Divers. Emerging Mkt. (EM) Europe Stock (ES) Foreign Small/Mid Val (FA) Foreign Large Blend (FB) Foreign Large Growth (FG) Foreign Small/Mid Gr. (FR) Foreign Large Value (FV) World Allocation (IH) World Stock (WS)

-13.69 -12.59 -10.23 -11.24 -9.54 -9.15 -11.30 -2.23 -6.78

-3.49 -3.77 3.61 -2.24 1.09 5.04 -3.46 5.20 3.81

7.64 -1.13 3.73 -0.68 1.99 6.20 -1.68 4.02 2.39

5.42 -2.24 0.95 -2.01 0.02 1.47 -2.85 3.08 0.25

YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW AMF ARM b +1.3 -1.3 7.51 7.38 Acadian EmgMkts d -12.7 +5.5 21.65 17.23 AdvisorOne AmerigoN -7.3 +1.1 14.44 11.49 Alger Group CapApInsI -.3 +6.4 23.01 17.83 CapApprA m ... +6.5 16.12 12.46 MdCpGInsI -5.8 +1.0 16.21 11.99 SmCpGrthO -7.4 +3.2 36.82 26.37 SmCpInstI -7.3 +2.8 31.94 23.01 Allegiant IntBdI +3.5 +6.0 11.75 11.13 UltShtBdI +.3 +3.0 10.05 9.99 Alliance Bernstein BalShrA x +2.6 +1.3 16.02 13.88 BalShrB x +2.0 +.5 15.00 13.02 BalWlthStrA x -3.7 +1.4 12.55 10.86 BalWlthStrC x -4.3 +.6 12.49 10.81 CoreOppA m +2.3 +1.1 13.02 10.20 GlTmtcGA m -13.6 +2.3 81.41 62.48 GlblBondA m +3.8 +7.6 8.58 8.30 GlblBondC m +3.2 +6.9 8.61 8.33 GrowA m -1.3 +.5 40.29 32.07 GrowIncA m +.9 -1.3 3.69 2.99 HighIncA m +.4 +9.6 9.31 8.61 HighIncC m -.1 +8.7 9.41 8.71 IntDivA m +5.3 +4.2 14.78 14.15 IntGrA m -12.8 -1.4 16.42 12.81 IntermBdA m +5.6 +6.4 11.17 10.64 IntlValA m -17.7 -8.7 14.78 10.65 IntlValAdv -17.6 -8.5 15.06 10.87 LgCapGrA m -2.3 +4.3 27.62 21.39 MuInCAA m +7.6 +4.2 11.05 10.14 MuInNYA m +7.4 +4.4 10.09 9.39 MuInNatlA m +7.9 +4.2 10.10 9.33 SMCpGrA m +.3 +4.6 7.15 4.93 SmMidValA m -11.8 +2.9 19.24 14.12 TxMgdWlApStAd -8.6 -2.8 13.16 10.51 WlthApprStr -8.5 -1.9 13.09 10.33 WlthApprStrA m -8.7 -2.2 13.07 10.31 Allianz NFJDivVlA m -2.5 -2.1 12.40 10.14 NFJDivVlC m -2.9 -2.8 12.44 10.17 NFJEqIncD b -2.4 -2.1 12.42 10.16 NFJIntVlA m -9.3 +2.7 22.38 17.78 NFJSmCVlA m -.8 +5.4 31.65 25.22 NFJSmCVlC m -1.4 +4.6 30.29 24.09 Alpine DynDiv d -13.4 -5.6 5.14 3.73 InRelEstY d -18.9 -6.6 27.18 20.69 UlShTxAdv d +1.5 +3.0 10.06 10.03 Amana Growth m -4.4 +4.4 26.22 21.70 Income m -3.4 +5.1 34.50 28.54 American Beacon BalAMR -2.2 +1.8 13.01 11.45 IntlEqAMR d -11.3 -2.0 18.52 13.95 IntlEqInv -11.7 -2.6 18.33 13.78 LgCpVlAMR -7.1 -1.4 20.86 16.77 LgCpVlInv -7.5 -1.9 20.02 16.07 SmCpVlInv -10.4 +.8 21.35 15.94 American Cent BalInv +2.2 +3.3 16.43 14.48 CAHYldMu +7.8 +3.6 9.73 8.81 CAInTFBdIv +7.7 +4.5 11.51 10.73 CALgTxF +8.9 +4.1 11.19 10.12 DivBdInv +5.7 +6.9 11.18 10.61 EmgMktInv d -13.4 +3.7 9.64 7.61 EqGrowInv -.2 +.2 22.97 18.56 EqIncA m -2.6 +1.4 7.66 6.47 EqIncC m -3.0 +.7 7.66 6.47 EqIncInv -2.4 +1.6 7.66 6.47 Gift -.6 +8.0 31.42 23.83 GinMaeInv +6.2 +6.8 11.30 10.72 GlGold d +1.3 +15.3 27.52 21.60 GovBdInv +6.3 +6.8 11.65 10.96 GrowthAdv m -2.4 +3.8 27.66 22.00 GrowthInv -2.2 +4.1 28.11 22.36 HeritA m -3.3 +9.0 22.99 17.20 HeritInv -3.1 +9.3 23.65 17.65 InTTxFBInv +7.0 +4.8 11.34 10.63 IncGrInv -1.1 -.9 26.22 21.34 IncGroA m -1.3 -1.1 26.19 21.32 InfAdjAdv m +10.8 +7.0 13.17 11.52 InfAdjI +11.0 +7.3 13.22 11.56 IntlBd +8.2 +6.1 15.34 13.40 IntlDisIv d -11.1 +.2 11.78 8.94 IntlGrInv d -8.8 +.3 12.19 9.69 LS2025Inv +.1 +3.6 12.40 10.98 LgCoVlInv -5.1 -3.0 5.95 4.81 MdCpValIv -6.2 +3.4 13.49 10.86 NTEqGrIns -.1 +.4 10.54 8.53 NTGrthIns -1.9 +4.4 12.93 10.29 NTLgCmVlI -5.1 -3.0 9.09 7.35 OneChAgg -2.4 +3.1 13.01 11.01 OneChCon +1.9 +4.2 11.58 10.58 OneChMod -.5 +3.5 12.34 10.81 RealEstIv +7.2 -2.0 21.50 16.65 SelectInv +1.2 +4.3 42.46 32.61 ShTmGovIv +1.4 +3.8 9.89 9.71 SmCpValAdv m -11.7 +2.6 9.59 7.38 SmCpValIv -11.5 +2.9 9.63 7.42 StrAlAgIv -2.5 +3.2 8.17 6.89 StrAlMd -.6 +3.6 6.95 6.05 StrAlMd m -.8 +3.4 6.94 6.00 UltraInv +1.4 +3.4 25.30 19.53 ValueInv -6.1 -.8 6.14 4.97 VistaInv -4.5 +2.3 18.59 14.12 ZeC15Inv +6.9 +7.9 112.46 103.24 American Funds AMCAPA m -1.9 +2.0 20.44 16.43 AMCAPB m -2.4 +1.2 19.52 15.75 BalA m +1.4 +3.1 19.07 16.67 BalB m +.9 +2.3 18.99 16.62 BondA m +5.3 +3.9 12.61 12.05 BondAmerB m +4.7 +3.1 12.61 12.05 CapIncBuA x -.2 +2.2 53.07 46.85 CapIncBuB x -.7 +1.4 53.07 46.85 CapWldBdA m +5.1 +6.7 21.53 20.18 CpWldGrIA x -8.0 +1.0 38.88 31.09 CpWldGrIB x -8.5 +.2 38.66 30.89 EurPacGrA m -11.0 +1.1 45.12 35.59 EurPacGrB m -11.5 +.4 44.65 35.12 FnInvA m -4.2 +1.6 40.16 32.11 FnInvB m -4.7 +.9 40.03 32.00 GlbBalA x NA NA 25.99 23.52 GrthAmA m -4.3 +1.0 32.93 26.91 GrthAmB m -4.7 +.2 31.89 26.00 HiIncA m +.4 +5.8 11.61 10.69 HiIncMuA m +7.2 +2.5 14.26 13.10 IncAmerA x +1.1 +2.5 17.74 15.57 IncAmerB x +.5 +1.6 17.60 15.45 IntBdAmA m +3.3 +3.9 13.74 13.30 IntlGrInA m -6.6 NA 34.29 27.63 InvCoAmA x -5.2 -.3 30.12 24.74 InvCoAmB x -5.7 -1.1 29.99 24.63 LtdTmTxEA m +5.6 +4.3 16.04 15.29 MutualA x -.7 +1.7 27.24 23.04 NewEconA m -4.2 +2.4 27.54 22.74 NewPerspA m -6.6 +2.8 31.04 25.32 NewPerspB m -7.1 +2.0 30.55 24.87 NwWrldA m -10.0 +5.7 57.43 48.21 STBdFdofAmA m +1.1 NA 10.18 10.03 SmCpWldA m -10.4 +2.7 41.61 33.30 TDR2010A m +1.2 NA 9.61 8.91 TDR2015A m +.1 NA 9.70 8.80 TDR2020A m -1.0 NA 9.67 8.58 TDR2025A m -2.6 NA 9.84 8.45 TDR2030A m -3.3 NA 10.11 8.57 TaxEBdAmA m +7.4 +3.9 12.50 11.53 TaxECAA m +8.5 +3.8 16.60 15.19 USGovSecA m +6.2 +6.0 14.79 13.66 WAMutInvA m +1.4 +.5 29.72 24.90 WAMutInvB m +.9 -.2 29.54 24.70 Aquila HITaxFA m +5.4 +3.9 11.58 11.04 TaxFORA m +7.4 +4.4 11.20 10.35 Arbitrage ArbtrageR m +3.3 +4.4 13.03 12.51 Ariel Apprec b -8.5 +2.5 47.12 35.78 Ariel b -16.3 -1.3 53.61 38.04 Artio Global GlobHiYldA b -1.5 +7.2 11.15 9.98 IntlEqA b -14.5 -2.9 31.51 24.53 IntlEqIIA b -14.1 -2.0 13.28 10.35 Artisan IntSmCpIv d -9.7 +3.2 21.58 17.31 Intl d -7.3 -.5 24.23 19.55 IntlVal d -9.9 +2.3 29.31 23.36 MdCpVal +.6 +5.1 22.79 18.25 MidCap +2.6 +8.1 38.34 28.45 SmCapVal -6.4 +3.4 18.61 14.30 Aston Funds MidCapN b -12.4 +5.7 34.58 25.53 MtgClGrN b -.2 +4.3 26.14 21.78 TAMROSmCN b -7.0 +3.8 23.56 17.87 BBH BrdMktFxI d +.6 +4.0 10.47 10.35 IntlEqN d -6.7 -.3 14.21 11.77 +1.5 +6.1 15.80 13.09 TaxEffEq d

WK NAV CHG 7.41

-.01

17.63 +.07 12.37 +.48 20.64 14.49 13.37 29.67 25.82

+1.03 +.74 +.70 +1.79 +1.54

11.44 9.99

-.06 ...

14.99 14.05 11.22 11.18 11.77 66.64 8.47 8.49 36.10 3.33 8.64 8.74 14.71 13.41 11.09 11.24 11.47 24.20 10.88 10.04 10.00 6.07 15.57 11.17 11.03 11.00

+.46 +.45 +.18 +.19 +.64 +2.70 -.06 -.06 +1.96 +.18 -.05 -.05 -.02 +.40 -.08 +.43 +.43 +1.30 -.02 -.02 -.02 +.39 +.84 +.50 +.46 +.46

10.92 10.95 10.95 18.53 28.30 27.01

+.49 +.49 +.50 +.47 +1.19 +1.13

3.88 +.11 21.03 -.59 10.06 +.01 23.62 +1.10 30.47 +1.09 11.93 14.60 14.42 17.90 17.14 17.39

+.33 +.46 +.45 +.85 +.82 +.95

15.66 9.46 11.47 11.02 11.12 7.78 20.74 6.96 6.95 6.96 27.93 11.26 26.42 11.61 24.85 25.27 19.75 20.32 11.31 23.59 23.55 12.85 12.90 14.93 9.52 10.00 11.66 5.20 11.74 9.53 11.64 7.95 11.77 11.13 11.45 19.68 38.23 9.84 7.93 7.97 7.39 6.44 6.43 22.96 5.33 15.95 111.94

+.47 ... -.01 -.01 -.06 -.03 +1.09 +.23 +.22 +.22 +1.35 -.03 -.68 -.04 +1.31 +1.33 +.96 +.98 -.02 +1.24 +1.23 -.12 -.12 +.06 +.17 +.21 +.29 +.26 +.51 +.50 +.61 +.40 +.38 +.21 +.30 +.67 +1.96 -.01 +.41 +.41 +.24 +.17 +.17 +1.13 +.24 +.79 -.52

18.41 17.57 17.88 17.83 12.54 12.54 48.46 48.52 21.10 32.22 32.07 36.81 36.33 34.80 34.73 23.98 29.14 28.14 10.75 13.94 16.24 16.13 13.65 28.39 26.33 26.24 16.01 24.69 24.26 26.73 26.23 49.12 10.11 34.83 9.22 9.16 8.98 8.92 9.07 12.34 16.42 14.57 27.29 27.08

+.88 +.84 +.54 +.57 -.07 -.07 +.46 +.55 -.15 +.97 +1.02 +.93 +.91 +1.45 +1.51 +.34 +1.32 +1.28 -.04 +.01 +.23 +.25 -.04 +.39 +1.12 +1.17 -.03 +.98 +.80 +1.00 +.97 +.39 ... +.85 +.16 +.21 +.23 +.29 +.31 -.01 -.01 -.06 +1.36 +1.35

11.53 11.11

-.02 -.02

13.01 +.04 38.78 +2.29 40.63 +2.13 10.01 -.07 25.16 +.31 10.64 +.16 17.97 20.11 24.42 20.21 34.50 15.77

+.38 +.41 +.86 +.92 +1.88 +.87

27.99 +1.57 24.08 +1.03 19.68 +1.07 10.36 ... 12.18 +.28 14.55 +.68

YTD 5-YR FUND %RTN %RTN BNY Mellon BalFd -4.3 +3.0 BondFd +4.6 +6.4 EmgMkts -15.1 +6.1 IntlM -13.4 -4.2 IntmBdM +3.5 +5.8 LgCpStkM -6.3 -.2 MidCpStM -7.6 +2.8 NtlIntM +6.9 +4.9 NtlShTM +1.9 +3.0 PAIntMu +6.4 +4.3 Baird AggrInst +6.3 +6.2 CrPlBInst +6.2 +7.6 IntBdInst +5.3 +6.3 IntMunIns +6.7 +5.6 ShTmBdIns +1.8 +4.0 Barclays Global Inv LP2020R m -.1 +2.0 Baron Asset b -1.3 +2.0 Growth b -1.4 +3.2 Partners b -8.9 0.0 SmCap b -1.6 +3.9 Bernstein CAMuni +5.6 +4.4 DiversMui +5.4 +4.5 EmgMkts -15.8 +4.4 IntDur +6.1 +6.9 IntlPort -15.0 -6.9 NYMuni +5.2 +4.5 ShDurDivr +1.9 +2.7 ShDurPlu +1.1 +2.5 TxMIntl -14.9 -7.0 Berwyn Income d +1.0 +7.6 BlackRock BalCapA m +1.4 +1.4 BasicValA m -6.5 -.7 BasicValC m -7.0 -1.5 CorBdInvA m +4.1 +4.8 Engy&ResA m -10.0 +5.8 EqDivA m -.1 +2.8 EqDivR b -.3 +2.5 EquitDivC m -.6 +2.1 GlbDynEqA m -5.6 +3.1 GlobAlcA m -1.6 +5.4 GlobAlcB m -2.2 +4.6 GlobAlcC m -2.1 +4.6 GlobAlcR m -1.8 +5.1 HiYldInvA m +.2 +6.8 HthScOpA m +3.2 +6.9 InflPrBndA m +9.6 +7.3 InflPrBndC m +8.9 +6.5 IntlOppA m -11.4 +1.2 LCCrInvA m -1.4 -1.3 LCCrInvC m -2.1 -2.2 LatinAmA m -19.5 +11.4 LgCapValA m -4.4 -2.6 LowDurIvA m +1.4 +3.2 MidCpValEqA m -7.9 +1.1 NatMuniA m +8.2 +4.2 NatMuniC m +7.7 NA NatResD m -7.5 +6.5 S&P500A b -2.3 0.0 TotRtrnA m +3.3 NA U.S.GovtBdInvA m+5.7 +5.7 USOppsIvA m -10.0 +5.0 ValOpptyA m -5.2 -.9 Brandywine BlueFd -7.7 -2.4 Brandywin -9.2 -2.7 Brown Advisory GrowEq d -.8 +6.4 Brown Cap Mgmt SmCo Is d -.4 +10.7 Buffalo MidCap d -6.3 +4.1 SmallCap d -9.8 +1.7 USAGlob d -3.1 +4.2 CG Capital Markets CrFixIn +5.3 +7.3 EmgMktEq -13.9 +5.4 IntlEqInv -12.2 -2.0 LgCapGro -2.9 +2.7 LgCapVal -3.1 -2.0 CGM Focus -18.8 +.9 Mutual -13.3 +3.7 Realty -2.3 +5.7 Calamos ConvC m -1.8 +3.8 ConvertA m -1.2 +4.6 GlbGrIncA m +.7 +4.3 GrIncA m +1.6 +4.6 GrIncC m +1.1 +3.8 GrowA m -4.0 +2.5 GrowB m -4.5 +1.8 GrowC m -4.6 +1.8 MktNuInA m +1.3 +2.6 Calvert BalancedA m +1.4 +1.4 BondA m +4.9 +5.0 EquityA m +.3 +3.1 IncomeA m +3.9 +4.0 ShDurIncA m +1.3 +4.6 Cambiar ConInv d -7.7 +4.0 OppInv -7.6 -.2 Causeway IntlVlInv d -11.9 -2.0 Champlain Investment ChSmlComp b -1.6 +6.5 Clipper Clipper +.6 -2.4 Cohen & Steers Realty +3.5 +.1 Colorado BondShares COBdShrs f +3.7 +4.3 Columbia AcornA m -4.9 +3.4 AcornC m -5.4 +2.6 AcornIntA m -7.6 +4.3 AcornIntZ -7.4 +4.7 AcornSelA m -13.5 +1.3 AcornSelZ -13.4 +1.6 AcornUSAZ -4.9 +1.7 AcornZ -4.7 +3.7 BondZ +5.6 +6.3 CATaxEA m +9.0 +4.2 CntrnCoreA m -4.3 +3.5 CntrnCoreZ -4.0 +3.8 ComInfoA m -5.1 +6.8 ComInfoC m -5.6 +6.0 DivBondA m +4.9 +5.7 DivBondI +5.1 +6.1 DivIncA m -.6 +1.9 DivIncZ -.4 +2.1 DivOppA m +.6 +2.3 DivrEqInA m -7.7 -.9 EmMktOppA m -16.1 +5.7 EnrNatRsZ -8.5 +5.5 EqValueA m -7.4 -.9 GlbEqA m -7.3 0.0 HYMuniZ +7.9 +2.3 HiYldBdA m +1.4 +6.7 IncBldA m +2.3 +5.0 IncOppA m +2.3 +6.9 IncomeZ +6.1 +6.7 IntlOpZ -12.9 -1.5 IntlVaZ -10.9 -2.8 IntmBdZ +4.9 +6.4 ItmMunBdZ +7.5 +4.5 LarCaCorZ -4.7 +.6 LfBalA m -1.7 +4.1 LfGrthA m -5.2 +2.1 LgCpGrowA m -2.4 +2.4 LgCpGrowZ -2.3 +2.6 LgCpIxA b -2.2 +.1 LgCrQuantA m +1.3 -.1 LtdDurCrdA m +1.9 +4.6 MAIntlEqA m -12.1 -3.2 MAIntlEqZ -11.9 -2.9 MNTaxEA m +8.1 +4.6 Mar21CA m -11.3 -.6 Mar21CC m -11.8 -1.3 Mar21CZ -11.1 -.3 MarFocEqA m -2.6 +2.4 MarFocEqZ -2.5 +2.7 MarGrIA m -1.2 +1.8 MarGrIZ -1.0 +2.1 MdCapGthZ -.8 +6.1 MdCapIdxZ -3.8 +4.3 MdCpValOppA m -9.4 +.5 MdCpValZ -7.2 +.7 MdCpVlA m -7.4 +.4 MidGrOppA m -12.5 +3.9 ORIntmMuniBdZ +6.9 +4.5 PBAggA m -3.2 +1.7 PBModA m -.4 +3.8 PBModAggA m -2.0 +2.7 PBModConA m +1.3 +4.4

YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR

BLEND -2.0 LB 9.4 1.1 1.5

MV

-5.9 6.6 3.3 0.3 -8.3 7.5 4.3 2.0

-2.4 13.8 6.0 3.1 -6.9 12.2 4.2 1.7

SV

U

T

U

GROWTH LG 1.0 16.3 4.8 2.8

MB

SB

0.6 18.5 6.8 4.8

MG

-3.5 17.8 5.6 3.7

SG

A

L

S

THE TIMES LEADER

Fund Focus FundFocus

Vanguard TotIntl d

VGTSX

BOND FUNDS Interm-Term Bond (CI) Interm. Government (GI) High Yield Muni (HM) High Yield Bond (HY) Muni National Interm (MI) Muni National Long (ML) Muni Short (MS)

4.74 5.76 7.17 0.27 6.24 7.62 2.93

4.79 5.27 1.84 4.82 3.03 2.50 1.97

7.73 6.15 4.01 8.96 5.17 5.27 3.03

5.86 5.97 1.45 5.49 4.21 3.51 3.18

11.69 13.51 12.40 11.86 13.24 9.48 13.72 13.70 12.99 12.90

10.12 12.94 9.93 8.91 12.81 7.47 10.14 12.73 12.85 12.13

10.45 13.38 10.05 9.33 13.09 8.07 11.32 13.51 12.98 12.80

+.21 -.07 -.07 +.27 -.05 +.41 +.61 -.02 -.01 -.02

10.94 10.92 11.31 11.89 9.81

10.42 10.43 10.80 11.21 9.65

10.88 10.84 11.18 11.86 9.70

-.05 -.06 -.04 -.02 -.01

16.01 14.28 14.97 +.30 61.72 57.95 22.80 27.42

48.04 43.04 16.85 20.23

54.54 50.53 18.74 23.39

+2.59 +2.20 +1.09 +1.22

14.88 14.77 35.25 14.42 16.62 14.55 12.71 11.96 16.74

14.09 14.14 27.27 13.57 12.72 13.94 12.53 11.86 12.81

14.67 -.03 14.70 -.03 28.05 +.09 14.18 -.10 13.28 +.38 14.47 -.02 12.70 -.01 11.92 -.01 13.38 +.38

13.71 12.93 13.20 +.16 23.51 27.93 26.17 9.66 44.83 19.12 19.21 18.74 13.50 20.75 20.22 19.34 20.08 7.95 32.53 11.69 11.67 36.24 12.53 11.57 77.62 16.58 9.75 12.57 10.47 10.47 72.62 16.72 11.47 11.07 42.71 21.41

19.79 22.04 20.60 9.19 29.30 16.00 16.07 15.67 11.21 18.21 17.76 17.00 17.63 7.30 26.78 10.54 10.53 28.78 9.61 8.87 55.86 12.49 9.60 9.57 9.48 9.48 52.16 13.76 10.98 10.34 32.29 15.58

21.41 23.93 22.35 9.45 35.36 17.35 17.43 16.98 11.80 18.96 18.50 17.67 18.35 7.35 29.25 11.47 11.44 29.69 10.73 9.88 60.38 13.96 9.61 10.54 10.33 10.33 59.42 14.99 11.18 10.95 35.30 18.10

+.61 +1.17 +1.09 -.06 +.92 +.68 +.69 +.66 +.37 +.37 +.36 +.34 +.36 -.04 +1.11 -.12 -.13 +.56 +.59 +.54 -.19 +.73 -.02 +.52 -.01 -.01 +1.79 +.77 -.08 -.04 +1.71 +1.14

27.37 21.31 23.67 +1.34 30.08 21.17 24.12 +1.49 14.14 10.90 12.68 +.63 51.09 36.04 43.55 +2.33 18.56 14.20 15.84 +.88 28.58 21.54 23.64 +1.31 27.30 21.51 24.32 +1.27 8.88 8.27 8.61 -.05 18.12 14.64 14.88 -.09 11.61 8.87 9.28 +.27 16.09 12.70 14.33 +.77 9.64 7.82 8.50 +.37 36.39 24.95 28.25 +1.77 30.21 23.18 25.55 +1.11 30.53 23.25 26.07 +.84 20.92 21.03 11.56 34.35 34.45 58.70 58.21 53.27 12.33

17.94 18.03 9.91 28.79 28.94 45.32 45.16 41.33 11.00

19.07 19.19 10.83 31.85 31.92 51.23 50.66 46.36 12.06

+.51 +.52 +.24 +1.21 +1.21 +2.54 +2.51 +2.29 +.21

28.83 16.06 40.25 16.36 16.71

25.58 15.37 31.42 15.78 16.00

27.53 +.86 15.99 -.07 35.88 +1.66 16.18 -.06 16.37 -.02

16.38 14.64 16.20 +.94 20.38 15.37 16.96 +.71 14.08 10.49 10.95 +.31 16.46 12.12 14.35 +.77 68.26 56.06 62.36 +2.41 67.46 51.81 60.05 +2.24 9.19

8.95

9.12

...

32.30 29.58 43.72 43.82 29.34 30.20 32.32 33.38 9.62 7.70 15.48 15.56 48.80 40.48 5.17 5.18 14.06 14.07 8.58 10.96 10.33 26.05 11.35 8.08 10.11 2.88 10.95 10.16 10.14 12.67 15.39 9.31 10.69 14.17 11.92 12.62 25.60 26.18 26.37 6.00 10.12 12.97 13.15 5.46 14.61 13.61 14.94 24.39 24.94 22.34 22.76 30.76 12.93 8.63 14.81 14.79 12.42 12.61 11.00 11.22 11.11 10.99

24.85 22.70 35.35 35.48 21.95 22.67 23.54 25.65 9.14 6.75 12.36 12.43 37.62 31.09 4.94 4.95 11.79 11.80 7.04 8.64 8.13 18.44 8.95 6.47 9.18 2.66 10.22 9.20 9.55 9.82 11.98 8.97 10.02 11.54 10.20 10.15 20.00 20.47 21.69 4.84 9.89 10.18 10.33 4.97 10.80 10.02 11.05 19.63 20.07 17.46 17.77 22.50 9.66 6.55 11.29 11.27 8.81 11.85 9.21 9.97 9.57 10.07

27.52 25.12 36.86 36.99 23.81 24.47 27.15 28.42 9.50 7.40 13.66 13.75 42.42 35.04 5.13 5.14 12.84 12.86 7.70 9.26 8.30 21.16 9.59 6.85 9.82 2.69 10.49 9.33 9.94 10.43 12.53 9.23 10.67 12.50 10.91 11.01 22.64 23.17 23.62 5.48 9.93 10.56 10.72 5.39 12.06 11.18 12.34 22.12 22.64 20.09 20.48 26.42 10.81 7.13 12.46 12.44 9.91 12.56 9.83 10.45 10.10 10.50

+1.41 +1.28 +.59 +.60 +1.19 +1.22 +1.61 +1.46 -.06 -.01 +.71 +.72 +3.16 +2.61 -.04 -.04 +.59 +.60 +.29 +.44 -.02 +.54 +.47 +.28 +.01 ... +.09 -.02 -.11 +.32 +.43 -.08 -.02 +.66 +.25 +.48 +1.35 +1.38 +1.21 +.28 -.04 +.30 +.31 -.01 +.67 +.62 +.69 +1.15 +1.18 +1.13 +1.16 +1.32 +.54 +.35 +.69 +.69 +.50 -.01 +.32 +.20 +.26 +.10

FUND

YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK %RTN %RTN HI LOW

WK NAV CHG

SIIncZ +1.4 +4.2 10.03 9.89 9.90 -.02 SelSmCapZ -16.4 -.5 18.98 13.49 14.84 +.82 ShTmIncA m +1.3 +4.0 10.04 9.91 9.92 -.02 ShTmMuZ +1.9 +3.3 10.59 10.46 10.55 -.01 SmCaVaIIA m -8.0 +.9 15.40 11.29 12.58 +.73 SmCaVaIIZ -7.8 +1.2 15.51 11.37 12.68 +.73 SmCapCrZ -7.4 +2.6 17.49 12.95 14.73 +.83 SmCapIdxA b -5.8 +1.7 19.02 14.47 15.84 +.84 SmCapIdxZ -5.7 +2.0 19.08 14.52 15.90 +.84 SmCpGthIZ -4.4 +5.4 36.99 25.70 30.22 +1.83 SmCpValIA m -10.9 +.9 47.80 37.11 39.90 +2.16 SmCpValIZ -10.7 +1.2 50.20 38.99 41.93 +2.28 StLgCpGrA m +2.8 NA 14.32 10.70 12.69 +.51 StLgCpGrZ +3.1 +6.0 14.43 10.76 12.80 +.52 StrInvZ -9.0 +1.1 20.96 16.24 17.42 +.71 StratAllocA m -.6 +1.2 10.04 8.87 9.27 +.23 StratIncA m +4.0 +6.7 6.28 5.95 6.04 -.02 StratIncZ +4.1 +7.0 6.21 5.88 5.96 -.03 TaxEA m +8.8 +4.2 13.73 12.35 13.43 -.02 TaxEBdA m +8.1 +4.1 3.88 3.51 3.81 -.01 TaxEZ +8.9 +4.4 13.73 12.35 13.43 -.01 USGovMorA m +8.0 +6.8 5.58 5.18 5.55 -.01 ValRestrZ -10.4 +.1 54.18 41.79 45.05 +1.85 ValueA m -9.7 -2.5 12.23 9.64 10.36 +.52 ValueZ -9.5 -2.2 12.25 9.66 10.38 +.51 Commerce Bond +5.7 +7.7 20.51 19.73 20.39 -.11 Constellation SndsSelGrI +3.7 +6.7 11.49 8.51 10.55 +.53 SndsSelGrII +3.5 +6.4 11.29 8.38 10.36 +.51 Credit Suisse ComStrA m -2.2 +1.6 10.12 7.87 9.09 -.17 DFA 1YrFixInI +.6 +2.9 10.38 10.31 10.35 -.01 2YrGlbFII +.9 +3.1 10.24 10.13 10.23 -.01 5YearGovI +3.3 +4.8 11.17 10.69 11.02 ... 5YrGlbFII +5.2 +5.1 11.75 10.78 11.32 -.05 EMktsSoCo -14.7 +9.0 15.50 12.24 12.41 -.08 EmMkCrEqI -14.2 +9.5 23.21 18.50 18.78 -.10 EmMktValI -18.1 +9.2 38.10 28.85 29.25 -.23 EmMtSmCpI -14.1 +11.4 25.24 20.14 20.40 -.31 EmgMktI -12.5 +8.3 32.37 26.08 26.48 -.02 GlEqInst -8.1 +.4 14.76 11.57 12.24 +.51 Glob6040I -2.6 +2.9 13.69 11.90 12.35 +.29 InfPrtScI +12.3 NA 12.67 11.09 12.24 -.14 IntGovFII +7.6 +7.6 13.08 12.09 12.93 -.09 IntRlEstI -2.2 NA 5.59 4.51 4.91 +.01 IntSmCapI -12.0 +.1 18.94 14.22 14.91 +.52 IntlValu3 -14.4 -2.1 18.91 13.52 14.32 +.59 LgCapIntI -10.5 -1.3 21.80 16.66 17.40 +.53 RelEstScI +5.3 -.8 25.04 19.33 22.62 +.85 STMuniBdI +2.3 +2.9 10.38 10.21 10.36 -.01 TMIntlVal -14.7 -1.9 16.56 11.80 12.52 +.53

FUND

YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG

Dimensional Investme IntCorEqI -11.7 -.8 12.33 IntlSCoI -9.3 +1.6 18.73 IntlValuI -14.5 -2.3 20.21 Dodge & Cox Bal -4.0 -.1 75.65 GlbStock -12.1 NA 9.72 Income +3.9 +6.7 13.62 IntlStk -14.6 -.8 38.80 Stock -7.0 -3.1 118.20 Domini Social Invmts SocEqInv m +.4 +1.0 32.94 Dreyfus Apprecia +2.3 +2.1 42.23 AtvMdCpA f -5.0 -2.8 36.88 BasSP500 -2.0 +.4 27.98 BondIdxIn b +6.1 +6.2 10.99 BstSMCpGI +.4 +4.9 16.19 BstSmCpVl -10.4 -.2 25.11 CAAMTBdZ +8.3 +3.9 14.88 DiscStkR b -6.2 +.4 33.52 Dreyfus -5.2 +.6 9.80 EmergMarI d -17.8 +5.5 13.95 EmgLead -19.7 -6.2 22.39 EmgMkts m -17.8 +5.4 13.87 GNMA Z b +6.5 +6.4 16.32 GrowInc -5.9 -.1 15.40 HiYldI -.9 +5.9 6.84 IntBndA f +6.5 +11.0 17.44 IntIncA f +6.2 +6.4 13.66 IntMuBd +7.5 +4.6 13.87 IntlStkI -7.8 NA 14.75 IntlStkIx -11.5 -2.7 16.44 MidCapIdx -4.0 +4.0 31.27 MuniBd +7.5 +3.6 11.55 NJMuniA f +7.6 +3.9 13.08 NYTaxEBd +7.3 +4.3 15.18 OppMdCpVaA f -10.1 +4.6 38.37 SIMuBdD b +3.0 +3.7 13.31 SP500Idx -2.2 +.1 37.66 SmCapIdx -5.7 +1.9 22.75 SmCoVal -19.1 +7.1 32.83 StratValA f -9.8 -.7 30.96 TechGrA f -6.3 +5.1 35.24 WldwdeGrA f +2.6 +2.9 44.68 Driehaus ActiveInc -3.6 +4.9 11.35 EmMktGr d -6.9 +8.5 34.42 Dupree KYTxFInc +7.5 +4.8 7.87 Eagle CapApprA m -3.6 +1.5 29.88 MidCpStA m -9.4 +1.3 29.41

9.28 9.72 +.32 14.72 15.33 +.43 14.45 15.31 +.63 63.16 7.47 13.15 29.25 92.29

66.67 7.82 13.47 30.48 99.43

+2.38 +.29 -.05 +.90 +4.94

26.35 29.71 +1.58 34.58 28.18 22.89 10.38 11.88 18.69 13.35 26.47 7.80 10.94 16.59 10.87 15.25 12.22 6.16 16.53 12.94 13.00 12.29 12.60 23.92 10.53 11.86 13.92 28.05 13.02 31.04 17.39 21.96 23.85 26.71 37.11

39.09 31.20 24.94 10.93 14.09 20.63 14.53 28.61 8.48 11.14 11.07 16.28 13.24 6.20 17.03 13.58 13.84 12.63 13.20 26.77 11.31 12.79 14.92 30.72 13.28 33.81 19.26 24.39 25.70 30.45 40.75

+1.47 +1.75 +1.28 -.06 +.83 +1.22 -.03 +1.42 +.47 -.03 ... -.03 -.04 +.65 -.02 +.02 -.08 -.03 +.18 +.38 +1.33 -.01 -.02 -.02 +1.75 -.02 +1.74 +1.02 +1.55 +1.26 +2.24 +1.31

10.47 10.50 29.19 29.98

-.01 -.31

7.33

7.82

-.01

24.59 26.91 +1.44 22.57 24.99 +1.33

ATTENTION MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS

Let us Maximize Your Reimbursements! √ No Set Up Fee √ As Low as 4% Of Collections √ Guaranteed Results √ References Provided √ 24 Years Experience

Increase Your Revenue and Decrease Your Overhead 887 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming • 800-326-8223 • www.mbamedbill.com TMMkWVal -6.2 -1.2 16.73 12.83 13.98 +.76 TMMkWVal2 -6.1 -1.1 16.11 12.35 13.45 +.72 TMUSEq -2.5 +.7 14.81 11.94 13.08 +.68 TMUSTarVal -10.2 -1.5 23.61 17.57 19.23 +1.02 TMUSmCp -7.4 -.2 25.49 18.76 21.17 +1.17 USCorEq1I -4.3 +1.1 12.09 9.56 10.43 +.55 USCorEq2I -5.9 +.4 12.07 9.42 10.23 +.54 USLgCo -1.9 +.6 10.76 8.84 9.59 +.50 USLgVal3 -5.9 -1.3 17.21 13.17 14.33 +.78 USLgValI -6.0 -1.5 22.48 17.20 18.72 +1.02 USMicroI -8.1 +.2 15.13 11.19 12.61 +.71 USSmValI -11.0 -.7 28.21 20.67 22.70 +1.30 USSmallI -7.3 +2.2 23.76 17.48 19.71 +1.09 USTgtValI -10.7 +.1 18.31 13.54 14.79 +.78 USVecEqI -8.2 -.3 12.00 9.12 9.92 +.53 DWS-Investments DrSmCpVlA m -11.9 +1.6 39.85 29.77 32.41 +1.64 LgCapValA m -2.8 +.7 18.78 15.64 16.84 +.64 LgCapValS -2.7 +1.0 18.79 15.64 16.84 +.64 DWS-Scudder BalA m -2.7 +1.1 9.59 8.42 8.78 +.21 CATFIncA m +8.1 +4.2 7.46 6.70 7.28 ... CapGrA m -6.0 +1.8 58.29 46.45 51.17 +2.72 CapGrS -5.8 +2.0 58.70 46.81 51.59 +2.75 EnhEMFIS d -1.9 +4.3 11.53 10.32 10.42 -.11 Eq500S -2.1 +.3 153.28 125.96 137.23 +7.05 GNMAS +6.1 +6.7 15.82 15.04 15.71 -.07 GlbTS d -11.5 -1.9 25.90 20.19 21.09 +.80 GrIncS -.7 +.4 18.11 14.51 16.13 +.85 GvtSc m +5.6 +6.4 9.04 8.62 9.00 -.04 HiIncA m +.3 +5.5 4.96 4.52 4.58 -.01 HlthCareS d +3.9 +3.9 28.50 22.68 25.29 +1.03 IntTFrS +7.3 +4.9 11.72 10.91 11.67 -.02 IntlS d -15.1 -4.9 49.01 36.50 38.46 +1.45 LAEqS d -19.3 +6.4 53.68 39.99 42.90 -.06 MATaxFrS +8.5 +4.9 14.82 13.29 14.45 -.01 MgdMuniA m +7.0 +4.6 9.22 8.39 8.97 ... MgdMuniS +7.2 +4.8 9.24 8.40 8.98 ... REstA m +4.9 -.4 20.57 15.81 18.43 +.71 SPInxS -2.2 +.2 18.13 14.90 16.23 +.83 ShDurPS +.1 +3.4 9.64 9.27 9.28 -.02 StrHiYldTxFA m +6.6 +3.7 12.51 11.18 11.99 +.01 StrHiYldTxFS +6.8 +3.9 12.52 11.19 12.00 +.01 StrValA m -5.7 -5.4 35.44 27.95 30.75 +1.54 TechA m -3.4 +3.2 14.76 11.40 13.03 +.92 Davis FinclA m -9.2 -3.4 33.73 27.94 28.84 +.85 NYVentA m -7.3 -1.2 36.90 30.00 31.84 +1.12 NYVentB m -7.9 -2.1 35.33 28.65 30.37 +1.07 NYVentC m -7.8 -2.0 35.60 28.88 30.63 +1.08 Delaware Invest CorpBondA m +5.2 +8.1 6.35 5.76 5.95 -.08 DiverIncA m +5.0 +8.6 9.84 9.14 9.38 -.11 EmgMktA m -15.1 +7.9 17.03 12.91 13.60 +.10 ExtDurBdA m +10.0 +10.4 6.75 5.92 6.48 -.13 GrowOppA m +7.1 +7.7 26.18 18.83 22.87 +1.12 LgValA m +.4 -1.0 16.67 13.36 14.94 +.64 LtdDvIncA m +3.6 +6.0 9.14 8.83 9.07 -.07 OpFixIncI +6.1 +7.9 9.95 9.31 9.86 -.09 OptLgCpIs -1.0 +1.9 13.21 10.39 11.93 +.63 OptLgValI -1.0 +.2 11.42 9.34 10.19 +.46 TaxFIntA m +6.1 +4.3 12.08 11.26 11.90 -.02 TaxFMNA m +7.7 +4.4 12.71 11.67 12.54 -.02 TaxFPAA m +7.3 +4.4 8.13 7.36 7.93 ... TaxFUSAA m +7.1 +4.1 11.64 10.62 11.37 -.01 Diamond Hill LngShortA m -1.4 0.0 17.32 15.05 16.03 +.54 LngShortI -1.2 +.4 17.52 15.23 16.22 +.54 LrgCapI -3.6 +1.1 16.12 13.20 14.28 +.64 -9.1 +2.1 27.74 21.93 23.45 +1.02 SmCapA m

CATEGORY MORNINGSTAR RATING™ ASSETS EXP RATIO MANAGER SINCE RETURNS 3-MO YTD 1-YR 3-YR ANNL 5-YR-ANNL

Foreign Large Blend HHHHI $31,366 million 0.26% Michael Perre 2008-08-05 -10.6 -11.4 -2.6 +1.1 -0.4

TOP 5 HOLDINGS Nestle SA HSBC Holdings PLC BHP Billiton Limited Novartis AG BP Plc

*– Annualized 52-WEEK WK HI LOW NAV CHG

FUND

This fund has beaten about 85 percent of its peers over the past 10-year period. One reason is the below-average expense ratio at this fund, which offers broad exposure across foreign stocks.

710046

PERCENT RETURN 1YR 3YR*

VALUE -4.0 LV 5.9 0.1 -3.1

M

710046

Mutual Fund Categories

SMALL-CAP MID-CAP LARGE-CAP

PAGE 6D

SmCpGrthA m -2.3 Eaton Vance DivBldrA m -3.4 FlRtHIA m -.1 Floating-Rate A m -.4 FltRateC m -.9 FltRtAdv b -.4 GovOblA m +3.1 HiIncOppA m +1.3 HiIncOppB m +.8 IncBosA m +1.5 LrgCpValA m -7.7 LrgCpValC m -8.2 NatlMuniA m +7.8 NatlMuniB m +7.2 NatlMuniC m +7.2 PAMuniA m +6.3 PaTxMgEMI d -11.7 StrIncA m +1.2 StratIncC m +.8 TMG1.0 -3.3 TMG1.1A m -3.6 TMGlbDivIncA m -3.4 TMGlbDivIncC m -4.0 TaxMgdVlA m -6.9 WldwHealA m +2.0 FAM Value -5.8 FBR FBRFocus m -5.2 FMI CommStk -4.5 Focus -7.0 LgCap -2.2 FPA Capital m +.6 Cres d -.9 NewInc m +2.0 Fairholme Funds Fairhome d -24.0 Federated CapAprA m -6.8 ClvrValA m -4.8 HiIncBdA m +1.3 InterConA m -13.7 KaufmanA m -11.3 KaufmanC m -11.5 KaufmanR m -11.3 KaufmnSCA m -13.8 MuniSecsA f +8.2 MuniUltA m +1.1 PrdntBr m -1.1 StrValA m +6.8 StratIncA f +3.3 TotRetBdA m +4.7 USGovSecA f +3.9 Fidelity AstMgr20 +1.8 AstMgr50 -1.3 AstMgr85 -5.9 Bal +.6 BlChGrow +.4 BlChVal -9.7 CAMuInc d +8.2 CASITxFre d +3.8 CTMuInc d +7.5 Canada d -6.1 CapApr -2.8 CapInc d -1.4 ChinaReg d -13.4

+5.6 44.54 30.51 37.23 +2.58 +.5 10.68 +3.2 9.50 +2.8 9.41 +2.0 9.09 +2.8 9.10 +5.8 7.65 +5.2 4.52 +4.5 4.52 +6.3 6.00 -1.4 19.26 -2.1 19.25 +.5 10.03 -.2 10.03 -.2 10.03 +1.9 9.25 +8.1 53.81 +6.6 8.26 +5.8 7.80 +.3 574.45 -.1 25.66 -.8 10.51 -1.6 10.49 -1.5 17.94 +5.0 10.74

8.84 8.92 8.86 8.55 8.57 7.39 4.19 4.20 5.59 15.58 15.57 8.44 8.44 8.44 8.22 44.48 8.03 7.58 474.62 21.27 8.77 8.75 14.66 8.92

9.45 +.41 9.03 +.01 8.98 +.01 8.67 +.01 8.68 +.01 7.51 -.02 4.21 -.01 4.22 ... 5.62 -.01 16.66 +.80 16.67 +.79 9.22 +.01 9.22 +.02 9.22 +.01 8.79 +.03 45.12 -.17 8.03 -.08 7.58 -.07 512.83+26.76 22.97 +1.20 9.09 +.27 9.07 +.27 15.74 +.76 9.54 +.29

+.1 49.50 40.07 42.69 +1.85 +4.1 51.90 42.54 47.24 +2.29 +5.6 27.67 22.15 23.95 +1.23 +5.3 33.81 25.34 28.22 +1.56 +2.9 17.03 14.19 15.26 +.73 +5.7 47.08 33.26 41.43 +1.77 +5.0 28.71 25.21 26.32 +.45 +4.0 11.05 10.79 10.84 ... +2.5 36.53 24.89 27.04 +1.33 +.5 -.6 +7.0 -.2 +1.1 +.5 +1.1 +.7 +3.3 +2.1 +.1 0.0 +7.5 +6.3 +5.2

20.00 15.75 7.77 55.09 5.89 5.56 5.89 28.37 10.32 10.06 5.21 4.80 9.45 11.48 7.93

16.20 12.52 7.21 41.41 4.57 4.31 4.57 20.92 9.34 10.01 4.23 4.20 9.04 11.02 7.66

17.72 13.67 7.27 43.08 4.87 4.60 4.88 22.57 10.12 10.05 4.68 4.58 9.08 11.37 7.87

+.69 +.67 -.05 +1.38 +.17 +.16 +.17 +1.19 -.01 ... -.26 +.15 -.07 -.09 -.01

+4.2 +3.4 +1.6 +3.1 +4.7 -4.5 +4.2 +4.3 +4.8 +5.7 +1.5 +8.3 +9.1

13.17 16.27 14.51 19.40 50.03 11.88 12.34 10.78 11.80 63.77 27.45 9.95 34.07

12.43 14.41 11.92 16.95 38.46 9.16 11.33 10.49 11.01 50.75 22.01 8.79 27.61

12.86 15.10 12.61 18.19 43.84 9.67 12.21 10.76 11.77 54.63 24.64 8.94 28.16

+.06 +.25 +.41 +.51 +2.50 +.42 -.02 -.02 -.03 +.37 +1.44 +.04 -.06

FUND

PCT 1.11 0.91 0.78 0.74 0.72

YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG

Contra ... ConvSec -6.1 DiscEq -5.5 DivGrow -8.3 DivStk -3.7 DivrIntl d -10.1 EmergAsia d -10.3 EmgMkt d -13.8 EqInc -8.8 EqInc II -8.8 Europe d -14.2 ExpMulNat d -4.3 FF2015 -.5 FF2035 -4.2 FF2040 -4.3 Fidelity -1.6 Fifty -.6 FltRtHiIn d -1.0 FocStk +.7 FocuHiInc d +2.6 FourInOne -3.5 Fr2045 -4.6 Fr2050 -5.1 Free2000 +1.6 Free2005 ... Free2010 -.4 Free2020 -1.4 Free2025 -2.6 Free2030 -3.0 FreeInc +1.6 GNMA +7.0 GlbCmtyStk d -9.7 GlobBal d -1.1 GovtInc +6.5 GrDiscov +.5 GrStr d -4.8 GrowCo +3.0 GrowInc -4.2 HiInc d +.3 Indepndnc -4.8 InfProtBd +11.1 IntBond +5.4 IntGovt +5.1 IntMuniInc d +6.0 IntlCptlAppr d -10.0 IntlDisc d -11.2 IntlSmCp d -8.2 InvGrdBd +6.5 Japan d -13.3 LargeCap -5.6 LatinAm d -13.1 LevCoSt d -10.5 LowPriStk d -1.9 MAMuInc d +8.0 MIMuInc d +7.0 MNMuInc d +7.0 Magellan -9.7 MdCpVal d -7.3 MeCpSto -3.2 MidCap d -2.1 MtgSec +5.6 MuniInc d +7.9 NJMuInc d +7.1 NYMuInc d +7.4 NewMille -.1 NewMktIn d +5.5 Nordic d -18.2 OHMuInc d +7.2 OTC +2.3 Overseas d -13.1 PAMuInc d +7.4 PacBasin d -10.0 Puritan -.4 RealInv d +4.3 RelEstInc d +1.8 SerEmMktDbt NA Series100Index -2.1 ShIntMu d +3.6 ShTmBond +1.7 SmCapRetr d -6.9 SmCapStk d -15.0 SmCpGr d -4.3 SmCpOpp -6.4 SmCpVal d -10.4 StSelLgCV -5.7 StkSelec -5.6 StrDivInc +2.9 StratInc +4.1 StratRRet d +2.7 StratRRnI d +2.7 TaxFrB d +8.1 Tel&Util +5.8 TotalBd +5.8 Trend +1.2 USBdIdx NA USBdIdxAd NA USBdIdxInv +6.2 Value -8.9 ValueDis -6.7 Worldwid d -4.4 Fidelity Advisor AstMgr70 -3.9 BalT m +.3 CapDevO -.4 DivIntlA m -10.2 DivIntlIs d -10.0 DivIntlT m -10.4 EmMktIncI d +5.4 EqGrowA m +.1 EqGrowI +.3 EqGrowT m -.1 EqIncA m -4.4 EqIncI -4.2 EqIncT m -4.5 FltRateA m -1.2 FltRateC m -1.7 FltRateI d -1.1 Fr2010A m -.9 Fr2015A m -1.0 Fr2020A m -1.9 Fr2020I -1.7 Fr2020T m -2.1 Fr2025A m -3.1 Fr2030A m -3.6 Fr2030I -3.4 Fr2035A m -4.9 Fr2040A m -5.0 GrowIncI -4.0 GrowOppT m +3.1 HiIncAdvA m -1.4 HiIncAdvI d -1.2 HiIncAdvT m -1.3 LeverA m -10.3 LeverC m -10.8 LeverI -10.1 LeverT m -10.4 LrgCapI -5.6 Mid-CpIIA m -5.5 Mid-CpIII -5.4 MidCpIIT m -5.6 MuniIncA m +7.8 MuniIncI +8.0 NewInsA m -.4 NewInsC m -.9 NewInsI -.2 NewInsT m -.6 OverseaI d -12.4 ShFixInI +2.0 SmCapA m -6.9 SmCapI -6.7 SmCapT m -7.1 StSlctSmCp d -6.0 StkSelMdCpA m -5.6 StkSelMdCpT m -5.8 StratIncA m +4.0 StratIncC m +3.4 StratIncI +4.0 StratIncT m +3.9 TotBondA m +5.5 TotBondI +5.7 ValStratT m -9.5 Fidelity Select Banking d -20.4 Biotech d +9.2 BrokInv d -21.8 Chemical d +.4 Computer d -5.8 ConsStpl d +4.8 DefAero d +.4 Electron d -3.2 Energy d -3.2 EnergySvc d -5.8 Gold d +3.8 HealtCar d +3.6 Industr d -8.9 Leisure d -.3 Materials d -6.6 MedDeliv d +7.4 MedEqSys d +1.9 NatGas d -6.0 NatRes d -4.3 Pharm d +5.1 SelctUtil d +7.5 SoftwCom d -.6 Tech d -5.2

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73.22 27.62 24.96 31.04 16.30 32.85 32.86 27.86 48.11 19.84 35.01 23.65 12.05 12.45 8.71 35.76 19.58 9.91 15.43 9.57 29.24 10.33 10.23 12.37 11.38 14.42 14.75 12.40 14.86 11.65 12.01 18.55 24.07 10.98 15.40 22.27 94.85 19.75 9.24 26.75 13.12 10.95 11.16 10.44 14.03 35.83 23.10 7.75 11.87 19.10 60.50 31.59 35.22 12.27 12.20 11.76 77.46 17.57 10.79 26.87 11.25 12.95 11.90 13.33 32.26 16.63 38.84 11.94 62.30 35.56 11.10 27.42 19.18 29.71 10.98 10.31 9.45 10.83 8.55 22.78 21.72 17.84 12.24 13.13 11.52 28.16 11.67 11.67 10.11 10.09 11.16 17.66 11.16 75.57 11.85 11.85 11.85 75.87 16.04 20.56

59.99 22.23 19.72 24.00 13.22 26.05 26.97 22.43 37.53 15.48 25.40 19.00 10.73 10.38 7.24 28.14 15.39 9.33 11.33 8.82 24.60 8.54 8.38 11.73 10.32 12.88 12.88 10.64 12.64 11.05 11.30 14.18 20.67 10.26 11.59 17.20 71.95 15.96 8.46 20.43 11.39 10.45 10.58 9.89 11.13 28.19 18.80 7.31 9.33 15.22 47.52 22.90 22.59 11.38 11.45 11.08 60.40 13.20 8.81 1.45 10.69 11.94 11.03 12.28 25.70 15.34 26.35 11.11 46.35 26.91 10.30 22.93 16.53 23.00 10.04 9.97 7.92 10.54 8.43 16.75 14.88 13.00 8.79 8.64 9.13 22.23 9.97 11.00 9.04 9.02 10.27 14.96 10.64 57.55 11.63 11.63 11.16 57.46 12.60 16.22

67.65 23.59 21.29 25.98 14.40 27.09 27.47 22.72 40.04 16.51 26.88 20.88 11.24 10.95 7.64 31.57 17.50 9.51 13.75 8.96 26.04 9.02 8.87 12.09 10.77 13.48 13.54 11.18 13.30 11.36 11.91 15.47 22.06 10.81 13.67 19.45 85.68 17.41 8.59 23.17 12.80 10.89 11.04 10.36 11.60 29.35 19.52 7.69 9.69 16.58 51.29 25.45 35.22 12.22 12.12 11.73 64.66 14.78 9.62 26.87 11.18 12.86 11.77 13.17 29.09 15.89 28.10 11.87 56.22 28.24 10.98 23.46 17.69 26.75 10.20 9.98 8.56 10.81 8.52 18.81 16.66 14.77 10.05 13.13 9.92 24.30 10.73 11.15 9.70 9.68 11.06 16.67 11.06 68.19 11.78 11.78 11.78 62.59 13.60 17.83

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17.52 15.99 12.00 17.47 17.75 17.31 13.89 60.58 64.58 60.28 25.01 25.77 25.37 9.92 9.92 9.90 12.21 12.17 12.80 12.88 12.79 12.46 13.11 13.17 12.51 13.38 18.69 39.30 10.50 9.98 10.55 38.29 36.42 38.73 37.60 20.29 19.17 19.42 19.03 13.08 13.03 21.47 20.43 21.71 21.21 20.39 9.32 27.83 29.15 26.86 20.94 21.76 21.94 13.09 13.06 13.22 13.08 11.17 11.15 28.43

14.93 13.95 9.27 13.86 14.10 13.72 12.85 45.61 48.62 45.41 20.33 20.94 20.62 9.34 9.33 9.32 10.89 10.82 11.15 11.22 11.14 10.65 11.12 11.17 10.43 11.13 15.03 29.00 9.33 8.86 9.37 27.76 26.35 28.10 27.24 16.21 15.44 15.65 15.32 12.06 12.00 17.64 16.85 17.82 17.45 15.53 9.18 21.38 22.41 20.62 14.99 16.68 16.82 12.30 12.28 12.44 12.30 10.64 10.62 21.52

15.69 14.98 10.65 14.40 14.65 14.26 13.30 54.00 57.60 53.72 21.70 22.37 22.01 9.52 9.52 9.50 11.40 11.34 11.73 11.81 11.72 11.21 11.71 11.77 10.97 11.71 16.57 35.50 9.48 9.00 9.53 30.88 29.29 31.27 30.30 17.66 16.92 17.15 16.79 13.00 12.94 19.84 18.86 20.07 19.59 16.21 9.29 22.95 24.07 22.14 17.40 18.90 19.05 12.47 12.44 12.60 12.46 11.06 11.04 23.42

+.40 +.42 +.43 +.38 +.39 +.38 -.16 +2.81 +3.00 +2.79 +.91 +.94 +.92 +.02 +.02 +.02 +.17 +.17 +.21 +.21 +.21 +.24 +.27 +.27 +.30 +.32 +.76 +1.95 +.04 +.04 +.05 +1.76 +1.66 +1.78 +1.72 +.91 +.76 +.77 +.76 -.02 -.02 +.88 +.84 +.89 +.87 +.48 ... +.85 +.89 +.82 +.98 +1.05 +1.05 -.03 -.03 -.04 -.03 -.06 -.06 +1.16

-12.2 19.65 +5.8 89.00 -6.4 55.95 +11.9 111.04 +7.9 62.42 +7.8 73.98 +3.7 84.35 +2.3 54.98 +5.0 62.56 +4.4 89.62 +16.7 55.36 +4.4 146.37 +4.8 26.12 +7.2 100.86 +10.2 74.58 +4.0 61.69 +7.2 31.96 +1.2 37.23 +7.9 40.76 +6.4 14.14 +2.6 53.59 +8.4 90.51 +7.5 105.02

13.37 66.44 38.50 78.60 47.05 63.54 64.63 37.21 40.68 55.81 44.40 107.53 19.02 78.65 56.25 42.33 23.16 28.07 27.11 11.54 45.75 71.47 79.62

14.74 79.66 41.02 95.90 53.12 71.02 73.42 46.83 50.52 70.05 53.06 129.11 21.20 90.80 63.43 53.38 27.94 31.19 33.26 12.71 51.89 81.42 90.64

+.94 +3.57 +1.97 +4.57 +3.71 +1.89 +5.16 +4.23 +1.48 +2.53 -1.57 +5.29 +1.42 +4.02 +2.69 +2.88 +1.34 +1.28 +.59 +.35 +2.34 +5.62 +5.66

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YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG

Fidelity Spartan 500IdxAdvtgInst NA NA 500IdxInstl NA NA 500IdxInv -1.9 +.4 ExtMktIdI d -5.7 +3.3 FdSpIntIv +10.9 +8.3 IntlIdxIn d -10.9 -2.2 TotMktIdI d -2.6 +1.1 First American RealA m +4.3 +1.2 First Eagle FndofAmY b -2.4 +4.5 GlbA m -.4 +6.3 Gold m +7.8 +18.8 OverseasA m -2.6 +5.4 USValueA m +2.6 +5.2 First Investors BlChipA m -3.7 -.8 GrowIncA m -3.1 +.4 IncomeA m +1.5 +3.4 InvGradeA m +5.6 +5.7 OpportA m -2.5 +2.5 TaxEA m +7.6 +4.4 TotalRetA m +.4 +3.4 FrankTemp-Franklin AZ TF A m +8.2 +4.2 AdjUSA m +1.3 +3.4 AdjUSC m +.9 +3.0 BalInv m -10.2 -2.2 CA TF A m +7.7 +3.9 CA TF C m +7.2 +3.3 CAHY A m +9.7 +3.5 CAInTF A m +9.1 +3.8 CAInt A m +7.4 +4.2 CO TF A m +9.1 +4.1 CT TF A m +7.4 +4.1 CaTxFrAdv +7.8 +4.0 China A m -9.9 +11.7 ChinaAdv -9.7 +12.1 CvtSc A m -4.8 +3.6 DynaTechA m +1.0 +6.0 EqIn A m -4.0 -1.1 FL TF A m +7.3 +4.2 FLRtDAAdv -1.4 +2.3 Fed TF A m +9.2 +4.5 Fed TF C m +8.8 +3.9 FedIntA m +8.0 +4.8 FedIntrmT/FincC m+7.6 +4.2 FedLmtT/FIncA m +3.6 +3.9 FedTxFrIA +9.3 +4.6 FlRtDAC m -1.7 +1.6 FlRtDAccA m -1.4 +2.1 FlxCpGr A m -3.5 +3.1 FlxCpGrAd -3.4 +3.3 GA TF A m +8.7 +4.3 GoldPrAdv -7.0 +19.7 GoldPrM A m -7.1 +19.4 GoldPrM C m -7.7 +18.5 GrowAdv -2.3 +3.3 GrowB m -3.0 +2.2 GrowC m -3.0 +2.2 Growth A m -2.5 +3.0 HY TF A m +9.0 +4.0 HY TF C m +8.6 +3.4 HighIncA m +1.8 +6.8 HighIncAd +1.4 +6.9 HighIncC m +.9 +6.2 InSCGrAd -11.6 +5.0 Income A m -.5 +3.6 Income C m -1.4 +2.9 IncomeAdv -.9 +3.6 IncomeB m -1.2 +2.7 IncomeR b -1.2 +3.1 Ins TF C m +8.5 +3.5 InsTF A m +8.8 +4.1 LMGvtSecA m +1.5 +4.5 LoDurTReA m +1.0 +4.8 MATFA m +8.6 +3.9 MD TF A m +7.7 +4.0 MITFA m +8.0 +4.1 MNTFA m +8.4 +4.7 MO TF A m +8.6 +4.3 NC TF A m +8.3 +4.4 NJ TF A m +7.7 +4.4 NY TF A m +7.6 +4.5 NY TF C m +7.1 +3.9 NYIntTFA m +7.9 +4.7 NatResA m -6.9 +8.8 OHTFA m +8.5 +4.3 OR TF A m +8.3 +4.7 PA TF A m +8.8 +4.5 PR TF A m +7.4 +4.1 RealRetA m +1.2 +5.0 RisDivAdv +.2 +1.1 RisDv A m +.1 +.8 RisDv C m -.5 +.1 SmCpValA m -11.3 +1.1 SmCpVlAd -11.1 +1.3 SmMCpGAdv -5.3 +3.8 SmMdCpGrA m -5.5 +3.5 StrInc A m +1.9 +6.7 StrIncAdv +2.0 +7.0 Strinc C m +1.5 +6.3 TotRetAdv +4.9 +6.5 TotalRetA m +4.7 +6.2 TotalRetC m +4.5 +5.8 US Gov A m +5.8 +6.4 US Gov C m +5.4 +5.8 USGovtAdv +5.9 +6.5 Utils A m +10.8 +5.4 Utils C m +10.4 +4.8 VA TF A m +8.3 +4.3 FrankTemp-Mutual Beacon A m -6.0 -2.2 Beacon Z -5.7 -1.9 Discov A m -6.7 +2.2 Discov C m -7.2 +1.5 Discov Z -6.6 +2.5 DiscovR b -6.9 +2.0 Euro A m -12.0 +.3 Euro Z -11.8 +.6 QuestA m -5.2 +1.8 QuestZ -5.0 +2.1 Shares A m -5.8 -1.5 Shares C m -6.3 -2.2 Shares Z -5.7 -1.2 FrankTemp-Templeton BricA m -18.4 +4.4 DvMk A m -12.4 +4.3 Fgn A m -12.2 0.0 Frgn Adv -12.2 +.2 Frgn C m -12.7 -.7 GlBond A m +1.3 +10.9 GlBond C m +1.0 +10.5 GlBondAdv +1.4 +11.2 GlOp A m -9.7 -.6 GlSmCo A m -15.1 +1.0 Growth A m -8.6 -4.0 Growth Ad -8.4 -3.7 Growth C m -9.1 -4.7 IncomeA m -6.3 +4.0 IncomeC m -6.5 +3.6 World A m -7.3 -.9 Franklin Templeton ConAllcC m -1.2 +3.9 ConAllctA m -.7 +4.7 CoreAll A m -5.1 0.0 EmMktDtOp +3.4 +9.2 FndAllA m -5.2 -.9 FndAllC m -5.6 -1.5 GlbEqA -6.4 NA GrAllcA m -3.6 +3.6 HYldTFInA +9.2 +4.2 TemHdCurA m +1.9 +5.4 TemMdTaC m -2.2 +3.9 TemMdTarA m -1.6 +4.7 GE ElfunInc +6.2 +5.8 ElfunTr -.9 +1.9 ElfunTxE +7.8 +4.9 S&SInc +6.4 +5.7 S&SProg -4.5 +1.0 Gabelli AssetAAA m -3.6 +3.7 EqIncomeAAA m -1.9 +2.6 GoldAAA m +4.5 +17.6 GrowthAAA m -5.8 +.5 SmCpGrAAA m -6.8 +4.9 UtilA m +3.6 +4.8 UtilAAA m +3.4 +4.8 UtilC m +2.9 +4.0 Value m -2.3 +2.7 Gartmore LrgCapA m -3.8 +.7 Gateway GatewayA m -.5 +1.2 Goldman Sachs BalStrA m -2.2 +2.1 CapGrA m -2.8 +1.3 G&IStrA m -3.8 +.3 GovtIncA m +5.5 +5.8 GrIncA m -10.5 -3.5 GrOppA m -7.0 +6.0 GrStrA m -6.3 -1.7 HiYieldA m -.6 +5.3 LgCapValA m -10.5 -2.5 MidCapVaA m -8.1 +1.6 ShDuGovA m +.8 +4.5 SmCpValA m -6.2 +2.1 StrIntEqA m -15.0 -3.9 Greenspring Greensprretl d -2.7 +4.1 GuideMark CoFxIncSvc b +5.2 +5.5 GuideStone Funds AggAllGS4 -6.0 -.7 BlcAlloGS4 -.2 +3.5 GrAlloGS4 -3.4 +1.5 GrEqGS4 -.7 +2.1 IntEqGS4 -11.8 -1.7 LowDurGS4 x +1.7 +4.4 MedDurGS4 x +5.6 +7.0 ValEqGS4 -4.6 -2.3 Harbor Bond +3.1 +7.7 CapApInst +3.1 +4.1 CapAprAdm b +2.9 +3.9 CapAprInv b +2.8 +3.7 HiYBdInst d +1.4 +6.6 IntlAdm m -11.6 +1.8 IntlGr d -12.9 -1.0 IntlInstl d -11.5 +2.1 IntlInv m -11.7 +1.7 SmCpGr -10.1 +3.7 SmCpVal -3.9 +.4 Harding Loevner EmgMkts d -13.7 +5.0 Hartford AdvHLSFIB b -2.5 +1.8 AdvHLSIA -2.3 +2.1 AdviserA m -2.6 +1.7 BalAlA m -1.8 +2.8 CapAppIIA m -9.7 +2.1

43.24 45.59 48.31 41.87 11.71 38.58 39.77

41.02 39.68 39.68 31.97 10.00 29.79 32.34

43.24 43.24 43.23 35.55 11.59 31.22 35.38

+2.22 +2.22 +2.22 +1.85 -.12 +.98 +1.82

20.65 16.02 18.47 +.56 28.62 49.61 37.88 24.09 17.69

22.92 41.98 29.32 20.73 15.24

25.28 46.19 36.59 22.08 16.76

+1.04 +1.24 -.94 +.37 +.59

22.89 15.92 2.58 9.96 30.90 10.07 15.99

18.79 12.62 2.39 9.37 22.61 9.18 14.00

20.31 13.85 2.43 9.74 26.51 9.84 14.89

+1.00 +.70 ... -.11 +1.44 -.02 +.42

11.11 8.91 8.90 50.62 7.23 7.22 9.73 12.37 11.75 12.01 11.20 7.22 42.33 42.61 16.51 33.69 17.94 11.68 9.26 12.15 12.14 12.03 12.06 10.55 12.16 9.25 9.25 52.75 53.63 12.32 53.67 51.50 49.28 48.48 46.25 45.75 48.41 10.39 10.53 2.06 2.06 2.08 17.81 2.30 2.32 2.29 2.29 2.27 12.33 12.19 10.56 10.48 11.92 11.73 12.21 12.52 12.32 12.51 12.35 11.99 11.98 11.54 45.14 12.76 12.21 10.57 12.16 11.53 36.06 36.09 35.55 48.15 49.53 42.73 41.47 10.71 10.72 10.70 10.47 10.45 10.44 6.97 6.93 6.99 12.72 12.66 11.92

9.93 8.84 8.84 38.97 6.48 6.47 8.68 11.08 10.93 10.65 10.12 6.47 34.92 35.18 13.49 26.05 14.90 10.75 8.65 10.93 10.93 11.19 11.21 10.25 10.94 8.64 8.64 41.46 42.16 11.03 44.28 42.44 40.44 39.81 38.03 37.62 39.74 9.31 9.44 1.90 1.90 1.91 14.46 2.00 2.02 1.98 1.99 1.97 11.06 10.93 10.40 10.28 10.64 10.58 11.12 11.47 11.14 11.29 11.13 10.72 10.71 10.72 31.63 11.50 11.08 9.49 10.77 10.93 30.07 30.10 29.67 35.99 37.05 32.09 31.20 10.23 10.24 10.23 10.02 10.00 9.99 6.63 6.59 6.65 11.17 11.13 10.77

10.86 8.85 8.84 42.41 6.99 6.98 9.50 12.15 11.64 11.75 10.97 6.98 35.89 36.16 14.19 30.46 15.97 11.54 8.74 12.00 12.00 12.00 12.03 10.54 12.01 8.74 8.74 46.50 47.29 12.07 49.51 47.42 45.10 43.62 41.53 41.09 43.54 10.12 10.26 1.93 1.93 1.94 14.85 2.07 2.08 2.05 2.06 2.04 12.15 12.00 10.45 10.29 11.64 11.48 12.01 12.45 12.17 12.34 12.11 11.70 11.69 11.50 36.98 12.56 12.03 10.43 11.72 11.03 32.87 32.88 32.34 39.54 40.72 36.36 35.25 10.26 10.27 10.25 10.32 10.30 10.29 6.94 6.90 6.96 12.53 12.48 11.77

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13.16 13.26 31.31 31.00 31.71 31.01 22.76 23.22 18.76 18.92 22.28 22.03 22.47

10.92 11.01 25.67 25.35 26.04 25.40 17.33 17.71 15.87 16.02 18.32 18.09 18.49

11.35 11.45 26.55 26.20 26.92 26.27 18.12 18.52 16.29 16.45 19.26 18.99 19.44

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15.97 26.96 7.89 7.80 7.71 14.10 14.12 14.06 19.77 7.91 20.04 20.05 19.54 3.01 3.01 16.39

12.13 21.80 5.83 5.77 5.68 13.31 13.34 13.27 15.23 6.05 15.52 15.54 15.09 2.55 2.55 13.11

12.39 22.35 6.13 6.07 5.97 13.32 13.35 13.28 15.95 6.32 16.26 16.28 15.81 2.58 2.58 13.75

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14.04 14.27 13.55 12.80 11.43 11.25 9.48 16.21 10.42 10.44 14.58 14.90

12.99 13.21 10.97 11.96 9.36 9.22 7.83 13.92 9.34 9.24 13.00 13.43

13.30 13.53 11.75 12.40 9.77 9.63 8.14 14.64 10.15 9.96 13.56 13.88

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11.65 45.85 12.03 11.79 43.40

11.05 37.87 11.02 11.14 35.66

11.60 -.05 41.00 +1.94 11.82 -.02 11.70 -.04 38.43 +1.80

53.83 22.30 38.86 33.47 36.89 6.71 6.66 6.00 17.39

43.24 18.32 30.39 27.01 28.92 5.69 5.65 5.06 13.83

47.19 19.85 37.32 29.58 31.62 6.10 6.05 5.41 15.23

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16.07 13.14 14.22 +.64 26.98 24.64 25.74 +.55 10.76 22.87 11.30 15.90 22.50 25.09 11.72 7.47 12.67 39.04 10.50 43.45 11.22

9.77 18.64 9.82 14.78 17.41 19.11 9.70 6.80 9.77 29.79 10.20 32.96 8.24

9.95 20.60 10.10 15.66 18.74 21.35 10.07 6.87 10.55 33.01 10.29 37.04 8.70

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25.20 22.16 23.17 +.48 9.80

9.30

9.75

-.05

12.87 12.83 13.20 20.70 14.65 13.49 14.48 15.59

10.38 11.70 11.32 16.24 11.44 13.20 13.51 12.24

11.11 12.11 11.89 18.76 11.85 13.32 14.23 13.32

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12.45 41.22 40.99 40.71 11.33 66.94 13.07 67.42 66.74 14.38 22.13

11.89 31.97 31.79 31.61 10.53 51.13 10.15 51.55 50.95 10.56 16.88

12.32 37.86 37.63 37.37 10.74 53.16 10.77 53.60 52.98 11.57 18.83

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52.86 43.23 44.63

-.07

20.77 20.55 15.65 12.07 15.27

+.62 +.62 +.45 +.24 +.61

18.08 17.90 13.60 10.56 11.60

18.97 18.78 14.30 11.06 12.60


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW DsEqHLSIA -1.1 +.6 13.06 10.48 DvGrHLSIA -4.2 +1.7 21.31 17.35 DvGrHLSIB b -4.4 +1.4 21.25 17.28 EqIncA m -1.7 +1.7 13.87 11.51 FloatRtA m -1.5 +2.3 9.01 8.28 FloatRtC m -2.0 +1.5 9.00 8.27 FloatRtI -1.4 +2.5 9.01 8.29 GrOpHLSIA -3.9 +2.6 28.94 22.22 GrOppA m -4.4 +2.1 29.88 23.01 InOpHLSIA -12.5 +2.1 13.31 10.57 IndHLSIA -2.1 +.2 28.54 23.55 InflPlC m +10.5 +6.6 12.39 10.95 InflPlusA m +11.0 +7.4 12.54 11.08 MdCpHLSIA -8.5 +3.6 28.80 21.81 MidCapA m -8.7 +3.0 24.30 18.39 MidCapY -8.4 +3.5 26.64 20.18 SmCoHLSIA -1.8 +3.2 20.69 14.64 StkHLSIA -6.3 0.0 44.46 35.52 TRBdHLSIA +5.6 +5.3 11.55 10.81 TRBdHLSIA b +5.3 +5.0 11.48 10.76 TotRetBdA m +5.0 +4.9 10.84 10.36 TotRetBdY +5.3 +5.4 10.99 10.50 USHLSIA +4.0 +3.3 10.92 10.36 ValHLSIA -6.8 +.5 11.68 9.25 Heartland SelectVal m -7.8 +3.0 31.69 25.09 Value m -6.3 +1.3 49.29 36.03 ValuePlus m -9.2 +7.2 32.45 24.50 Henderson IntlOppA m -9.7 +.3 23.63 18.39 IntlOppC m -10.2 -.4 22.36 17.36 Hotchkis & Wiley MidCpValI -14.4 -1.5 26.50 18.74 Hussman StrTotRet d +5.5 +8.2 12.86 12.04 StratGrth d +3.4 -.1 13.41 11.84 ICM SmCo -10.9 +1.3 32.78 24.99 ICON Energy -4.4 +7.2 23.11 16.10 ING CorpLeadB +2.8 +4.3 23.25 18.05 GNMAIncA m +5.8 +6.3 9.13 8.71 GlREstA m -3.2 -1.6 17.57 14.39 TRPGrEqI -.3 +2.6 59.45 46.93 INVESCO AmerValA m -7.1 +2.1 30.05 23.31 CharterA m -1.2 +3.1 17.60 14.67 ComstockA m -5.0 -.8 17.20 13.72 ConstellA m -3.6 -1.8 25.19 20.01 ConstellB m -4.2 -2.5 22.55 18.02 CorpBondA m +4.5 +6.2 7.00 6.62 DevMkt A m -8.0 +8.9 34.78 29.65 DivDivA m -5.2 +1.2 13.18 10.79 DivDivInv b -5.2 +1.3 13.18 10.79 DynInv b -3.5 +1.9 25.54 18.78 EnergyA m -7.0 +6.9 47.82 32.44 EqIncomeA m -3.9 +1.9 9.17 7.75 EqIncomeB m -4.0 +1.7 9.00 7.61 EqIncomeC m -4.4 +1.1 9.04 7.64 EqWSP500A m -3.1 +2.0 33.96 26.99 GlHlthCrA m +3.1 +2.4 31.40 24.69 GlbCEqtyA m -11.2 -3.7 14.16 11.12 GlobEqA m -3.2 -2.0 11.88 9.67 GrowIncA m -6.0 -.3 20.86 16.65 GrwthAllA m -1.3 +.4 11.66 10.23 HiYldA m -1.2 +6.7 4.35 3.96 HiYldMuA m +8.1 +2.4 9.67 8.64 HiYldMuC m +7.5 +1.7 9.65 8.63 IntlGrA m -7.7 +1.6 30.19 24.55 IntlGrI d -7.4 +2.0 30.61 24.93 MidCapGrA m -7.6 +5.2 33.16 24.46 MidCpCrA m -5.6 +3.5 25.34 20.28 MuniIncA m +7.7 +2.8 13.53 12.23 PacGrowB m -13.2 +1.6 22.83 18.92 RealEstA m +3.6 -.5 24.43 19.11 SmCapGrA m -2.7 +4.2 33.17 24.18 SmCapValA m -13.3 +3.4 19.72 14.20 SmCpGrA m -5.1 +2.8 12.71 9.43 Summit b -3.1 +1.2 12.89 10.29 TxFrInmA3 m +6.8 +5.2 11.59 10.92 USGovtA m +5.6 +6.0 9.34 8.82 USMortA m +5.4 +4.8 13.32 12.84 Ivy AssetSTrB m -2.8 +7.4 26.30 21.58 AssetStrA m -2.3 +8.3 27.32 22.30 AssetStrC m -2.8 +7.4 26.44 21.68 AssetStrY m -2.3 +8.2 27.36 22.34 GlNatResA m -13.9 +1.7 24.76 17.07 GlNatResC m -14.4 +.9 21.47 14.86 GlNatResI d -13.8 NA 25.26 17.38 GlbNatrlY m -13.9 +1.9 25.06 17.26 HiIncA m +2.2 +8.5 8.69 7.97 IntlValA m -12.6 +2.0 17.98 13.96 LgCpGrA m +1.3 +4.0 14.27 11.36 LtdTmBdA m +2.4 +5.3 11.37 11.00 JPMorgan AsiaEqSel d -16.8 +6.2 39.72 31.01 CoreBdUlt +6.2 +7.4 11.92 11.35 CoreBondA m +6.0 +7.0 11.92 11.35 CoreBondC m +5.5 +6.3 11.97 11.41 CoreBondSelect +6.1 +7.2 11.91 11.35 CorePlBdS +5.0 +6.9 8.33 8.06 DiversMidCapGrA m-6.9 +3.0 24.04 17.86 EmgMktE d -13.3 +7.1 25.15 20.46 EqIdxSel -2.0 +.4 30.97 25.44 FEmMkEqIs d -13.2 +7.2 25.41 20.68 GovtBdSelect +9.1 +7.4 11.62 10.64 HighStatS -1.1 +.2 15.53 14.97 HighYldA m -.4 +6.9 8.39 7.67 HighYldSel -.1 +7.2 8.42 7.70 HighYldUl -.1 +7.2 8.41 7.70 IntlVlSel d -12.8 -2.7 14.82 11.07 IntmdTFIs +6.1 +4.6 11.19 10.64 IntmdTFSl +6.0 +4.5 11.20 10.65 IntrAmerS -2.6 -.3 25.37 20.33 IntrepidValS -4.9 -1.4 25.08 19.88 InvBalA m -1.2 +3.7 12.83 11.51 InvConGrA m +.6 +4.3 11.53 10.82 InvConGrC m +.2 +3.7 11.50 10.79 InvGrInA m -2.8 +2.5 13.60 11.71 InvGrowA m -4.7 +1.3 14.55 11.93 LgCapGrSelect +2.3 +6.0 23.10 17.82 LgCapValSel -8.6 -2.1 11.74 9.23 MdCpGrSel -3.5 +1.8 25.60 20.39 MidCapGrSel -6.7 +3.3 25.77 19.15 MidCapVal m -3.6 +1.6 25.38 20.21 MidCpValI -3.3 +2.1 25.82 20.57 MktExpIxSel -4.8 +2.7 12.01 9.10 MorBacSeU 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WldWGrIs -10.0 -.4 32.36 25.30 Jensen Inst -3.7 +2.6 29.44 23.73 J b -4.0 +2.3 29.42 23.71 John Hancock BalA m -4.4 +5.2 16.07 13.96 BondA m +3.7 +7.3 15.91 15.41 ClsscValA m -10.5 -7.1 18.18 14.07 LgCpEqA m -9.7 +5.4 27.84 21.73 LifAg1 b -6.4 +.4 13.36 10.74 LifBa1 b -2.9 +2.8 13.73 11.94 LifCo1 b +1.7 +5.2 13.24 12.59 LifGr1 b -5.3 +1.6 13.85 11.51 LifMo1 b ... +4.2 13.24 12.14 RegBankA m -17.8 -8.6 15.50 11.05 SovInvA m -4.2 0.0 17.12 14.04 StrIncA m +1.1 +7.6 6.88 6.50 StrIncC m +.6 +6.9 6.88 6.50 TaxFBdA m +7.5 +4.0 10.17 9.28 Keeley SmCapVal m -8.5 0.0 27.77 20.31 SmCpValI -8.3 NA 27.95 20.83 Kinetics Paradigm d -6.8 -.2 25.22 19.70 LKCM SmCpEqI d +2.6 +3.1 25.71 17.50 LSV ValueEq -7.2 -3.3 15.16 11.67 Laudus GrInvUSLCGr d +3.3 +6.9 14.13 10.83 InMktMstS d -10.2 +2.5 20.78 16.63 IntlFxInc d +7.1 NA 12.84 11.46 IntlMstrI d -10.3 +2.4 20.78 16.62 Lazard EmgMkEqtI d -12.4 +8.2 22.42 18.62 EmgMktEqO m -12.6 +7.9 22.82 18.99 Legg Mason/Western AggGrowA m +.2 +.1 126.28 94.48 AggGrowI +.5 +.6 134.39 100.20 AggrsvGrC m -.2 -.5 110.13 82.81 ApprecA m -2.6 +1.9 14.82 12.35 CAMncpA m +9.1 +4.4 16.40 14.85 CrBdFI b +6.1 +6.3 11.95 11.28 CrBdInst +6.2 +6.6 11.95 11.27 CrPlBdFI b +5.1 +6.9 11.16 10.67 CrPlBdIns +5.3 +7.2 11.16 10.68 EqIncBldA m +.1 +.6 13.71 11.65 FdmACValA m -10.4 -1.6 14.87 11.46 MdCpCoA m -7.6 +2.6 23.57 17.90 MgdMuniA m +9.3 +5.2 16.13 14.47 MgdMuniC m +8.8 +4.7 16.14 14.48 MuBdLtdA m +7.9 +4.5 6.54 6.00 MuBdLtdC b +7.6 +3.9 6.55 6.01 MuBdNYA m +8.1 +5.1 13.86 12.49 OpportntC m -30.4 -10.4 11.81 7.03 SpecInvC m -16.2 -2.9 34.33 24.30 ValueC m -7.0 -8.4 42.42 33.10 ValueInst -6.3 -7.5 49.78 39.04 Leuthold AssetAl m -2.6 +2.8 11.35 9.73 CoreInv d -2.3 +3.9 18.39 15.61

NAV 11.65 18.66 18.58 12.44 8.45 8.44 8.45 24.85 25.58 10.90 25.64 12.11 12.25 23.74 20.09 22.06 17.35 38.37 11.48 11.40 10.76 10.91 10.59 10.03

WK CHG +.62 +.93 +.92 +.53 +.01 +.01 +.01 +1.29 +1.30 +.19 +1.32 -.13 -.14 +1.10 +.93 +1.02 +1.01 +1.99 -.07 -.08 -.08 -.08 -.04 +.52

26.90 +1.02 41.04 +1.37 27.09 +1.37 19.04 +.46 17.96 +.43 20.52 +1.20 12.76 12.71

-.06 -.19

26.96 +1.48 19.15 +.60 20.70 +1.09 9.09 -.02 15.57 +.27 54.33 +3.04 25.19 15.98 14.79 22.44 20.06 6.82 30.44 11.49 11.48 21.47 38.52 8.14 7.99 8.03 29.78 27.55 11.60 10.40 17.90 10.78 3.99 9.29 9.27 25.45 25.84 27.51 21.88 13.12 19.37 22.07 27.83 15.62 10.52 11.45 11.57 9.28 13.28

+1.16 +.60 +.71 +1.15 +1.02 -.08 -.14 +.45 +.44 +1.19 +1.23 +.26 +.25 +.27 +1.58 +.87 +.34 +.46 +.90 +.22 -.01 +.01 +.01 +.59 +.60 +1.54 +.95 -.02 +.26 +.78 +1.59 +.92 +.64 +.63 -.02 -.06 +.01

22.94 23.85 23.06 23.89 18.60 16.08 19.00 18.84 8.02 14.49 13.16 11.18

+.36 +.38 +.36 +.38 +.27 +.23 +.27 +.27 -.04 +.35 +.77 -.04

31.51 11.87 11.87 11.92 11.86 8.26 20.01 21.16 27.72 21.39 11.54 14.99 7.73 7.76 7.75 11.69 11.17 11.18 22.34 21.71 11.97 11.08 11.04 12.35 12.81 21.35 9.95 22.49 21.46 22.29 22.70 10.19 11.48 11.47 10.12 15.99 11.02 10.66 11.03 32.55 35.47 10.27 10.25 9.75 19.54

-.56 -.05 -.05 -.05 -.05 -.03 +1.17 +.13 +1.42 +.13 -.08 -.05 -.01 ... -.01 +.48 -.02 -.02 +1.22 +1.14 +.26 +.13 +.13 +.38 +.55 +1.13 +.52 +1.06 +1.25 +1.06 +1.08 +.53 -.01 -.02 -.01 +.61 -.01 ... ... +1.50 +1.65 -.01 -.02 +.51 +1.02

24.61 24.62 12.15 57.09 10.68 31.46 10.37 29.07 8.69 38.27 21.63 22.42 28.48 3.07 27.80 61.16 41.82

+.66 +.67 +.45 +2.80 -.08 +1.79 +.45 +1.59 -.03 +.65 +.79 +1.03 +1.47 -.01 +1.49 +3.37 +1.46

26.32 +.70 42.86 +.62 27.07 +.95 25.91 +1.32 25.88 +1.32 14.59 15.52 14.92 23.49 11.50 12.46 12.80 12.20 12.48 12.04 14.98 6.50 6.50 9.94

+.37 -.10 +.77 +1.06 +.44 +.29 +.08 +.40 +.17 +.74 +.72 -.04 -.04 -.01

22.85 +1.35 23.02 +1.36 21.72 +.75 22.05 +1.34 12.59 +.59 12.99 17.27 12.52 17.26

+.60 +.45 +.05 +.45

19.00 19.38

-.14 -.14

111.09 118.34 96.77 13.35 16.29 11.85 11.84 11.07 11.07 12.58 12.26 19.68 15.95 15.96 6.46 6.47 13.66 7.67 26.56 36.15 42.67

+6.91 +7.37 +6.00 +.63 -.04 -.06 -.07 -.06 -.07 +.48 +.55 +1.04 -.02 -.02 -.01 -.01 -.01 +.39 +1.64 +2.18 +2.58

10.20 +.04 16.44 +.09

YTD 5-YR FUND %RTN %RTN Litman Gregory MasIntlIntl d -12.0 +.9 Longleaf Partners Intl -14.9 -2.0 LongPart -2.9 -.9 SmCap +1.1 +3.2 Loomis Sayles BondI +4.6 +7.5 BondR b +4.4 +7.1 FixIncI +4.3 +8.3 GlbBdI +5.2 +7.3 GlbBdR b +5.0 +7.0 Lord Abbett AffiliatA m -10.9 -3.2 BalA m -5.1 +2.2 BondDebA m +1.3 +6.3 BondDebC m +.8 +5.6 CptStrcA m -3.7 +2.1 DevGrowA m -1.1 +9.2 DevGrowI -.8 +9.6 FdmtlEqtyA m -6.9 +2.5 FdmtlEqtyC m -7.2 +1.8 FltRateF b -1.3 NA HYMuniBdA m +4.4 -1.2 IncmA m +5.2 +8.1 MidCpValA m -6.1 0.0 NatlTaxFA m +7.8 +3.1 ShDurIncA m +2.0 +6.1 ShDurIncC m +1.3 +5.3 SmCpValA m -11.4 +3.2 SmCpValI -11.2 +3.5 TotRetA m +5.7 +7.0 MFS BondA m +4.3 +7.3 ConAlocA m +1.6 +5.2 CoreEqA m -3.4 +1.9 GovtSecA m +5.9 +6.4 GrAllocA m -2.4 +3.0 GrowA m -.8 +5.3 GrowI -.6 +5.6 IntDivA m -7.5 +1.2 IntlNDisA m -6.6 +3.3 IntlNDisI -6.4 +3.6 IntlValA m -2.6 +1.3 IsIntlEq -9.5 +.9 LtdMatA m +1.3 +3.5 MAInvA m -3.6 +1.7 MAInvC m -4.1 +1.1 MAInvGrA m +.4 +3.7 MdCpValI -4.1 +2.0 MidCapGrI -4.4 +.3 ModAllocA m -.2 +4.2 MuHiIncA f +7.6 +3.2 MuIncA m +7.5 +4.5 MuLtdMtA m +4.5 +4.1 NewDiscA m -7.0 +6.6 ResBdA m +5.0 +6.5 ResBondI +5.1 +6.7 ResIntlA m -8.5 -.9 ResIntlI -8.3 -.6 ResearchA m -3.4 +2.3 ResearchI -3.1 +2.6 TotRetA m -.8 +2.1 TotRetC m -1.4 +1.5 UtilA m +4.6 +7.7 UtilC m +4.0 +6.9 ValueA m -4.8 +.2 ValueC m -5.3 -.5 ValueI -4.7 +.5 MainStay AlCpGrI -2.8 +.9 EquityI -5.7 +.2 HiYldCorA m +2.5 +6.0 HiYldCorC m +2.0 +5.2 IntlI -9.7 -1.4 LgCapGrA m +.4 +4.7 MAPI -5.7 +.6 S&PIdxI -2.1 +.2 SelEqI -7.6 +.6 Mairs & Power GrthInv -5.2 +1.8 Managers Bond +6.3 +7.3 MgrsPIMCOBd +3.7 +7.7 TmSqMCGrI -5.3 +3.9 TmSqMCGrP -5.4 +3.7 Manning & Napier PBConTrmS +1.9 +5.4 PBExtTrmS -1.8 +3.5 PBModTrmS -.7 +3.8 WrldOppA -12.7 +.7 Marsico 21stCent m -11.2 -.7 Focus m -2.7 +2.0 Grow m -.4 +1.8 MassMutual PremIntlEqtyS -4.9 +2.6 SelBRGlAlcS -2.5 NA SelIndxEqZ -2.6 +.2 MassMutual Inst PremCoreBndS +5.8 +6.8 Matthews Asian China d -13.1 +15.4 GrInc d -4.8 +8.2 India d -17.9 +9.5 PacEqInc d -4.8 NA PacTiger d -6.4 +10.8 Members BondA m +5.7 +5.1 BondB m +5.1 +4.3 DivIncA m +2.8 +3.3 DivIncB m +2.3 +2.5 HighIncA m +1.7 +6.1 HighIncB m +1.2 +5.3 IntlStk A m -7.5 -.9 IntlStk B m -7.9 -1.6 LgCapGA m -2.1 +2.2 LgCapGB m -2.7 +1.4 LgCapVA m -.4 -2.6 LgCapVB m -.9 -3.4 MidCapGA m -.6 +1.6 MidCapGB m -1.0 +.8 Merger Merger m -.1 +2.9 Meridian MeridnGr d -5.0 +5.8 Value d -8.3 +1.0 Merk HrdCurInv b +4.4 +7.3 Metropolitan West Hi-YldBdM b -1.2 +7.8 LowDurBd b +1.2 +2.9 LowDurBdI +1.2 +3.1 TotRetBdI +4.6 +8.4 TotRtBd b +4.4 +8.1 Morgan Stanley FocGrA m +4.8 +7.4 USGovSecB m +6.8 +3.7 Morgan Stanley Instl EmgMktI d -12.3 +5.5 GrwthI +5.8 +6.6 IntlEqI d -8.3 -1.0 IntlEqP m -8.4 -1.3 MdCpGrI +1.3 +8.8 MdCpGrP b +1.1 +8.5 SmCoGrI d -7.1 +3.0 USRealI +1.8 -.5 Munder Funds MdCpCrGrA m -.8 +3.6 MdCpCrGrY -.6 +3.9 Nations LgCpIxZ -2.0 +.4 Nationwide BdIdxIn d +6.1 +6.3 DesModSvc b -1.8 +2.1 FundD x -3.6 -1.4 IDAggSrv b -5.7 0.0 IDModAgSv b -4.0 +1.1 IntlIdxI x -11.2 -2.4 MCMkIxI d -4.1 +4.0 S&P500Is x -2.1 +.3 Natixis CGMTgtEqA m -16.1 +1.8 InvBndA m +5.6 +8.3 InvBndC m +5.1 +7.4 InvBndY +5.8 +8.5 StratIncA m +3.9 +7.1 StratIncC m +3.3 +6.3 ValI -6.4 -.4 Neuberger Berman GenesAdv b +1.1 +5.9 GenesisInv +1.4 +6.3 GenesisIs +1.5 +6.5 GenesisTr +1.3 +6.2 GuardnInv -3.7 +1.5 PartnrInv -11.3 -1.1 SmCpGrInv +.2 +3.2 SocRespInv -4.9 +1.7 New Covenant Growth -5.0 -.8 Nicholas Nichol -.2 +3.6 Northern BdIndx +6.1 NA FixedIn +5.2 +5.8 GlbREIdx d -6.4 -3.7 HYFixInc d +.8 +5.5 HiYMuni +7.9 +1.0 IntTaxE +7.4 +4.4 IntlIndex d -11.1 -2.6 MMIntlEq d -11.8 -1.6 MMMidCap -4.2 +2.8 ShIntUSGv +2.4 +4.3 SmCapVal -7.3 +.4 StkIdx -2.6 +.1 TaxE +9.2 +4.7 Northern Instl EqIdx A -2.6 +.3 Nuveen HiYldMunA m +8.8 -1.5 HiYldMunC m +8.4 -2.0 HiYldMunI +8.9 -1.3 IntMunBdI +6.0 +4.4 IntlValA m -10.2 +.9 LtdTmMuA m +5.1 +4.3 LtdTmMuC m +4.7 +3.9 LtdTmMunI +5.2 +4.5 NWQVlOppA m -1.1 +9.0 TwIntlValI d -10.1 +1.1 TwVlOppI -1.0 +9.2 Oakmark EqIncI -2.7 +4.7 Global I d -11.8 +1.0 Intl I d -15.7 0.0 IntlSmCpI d -15.8 -.5 Oakmark I d -2.4 +2.4 Select I d -.3 +.7 Old Westbury GlbSmMdCp -7.0 +6.6 MuniBd +4.9 +4.7 NonUSLgCp -13.1 -2.2 RealRet -2.2 +4.4

52-WEEK HI LOW

WK NAV CHG

16.61 12.65 13.24 +.39 16.21 12.43 13.05 +.38 31.74 25.15 27.43 +1.25 31.17 23.16 26.80 +1.29 15.00 14.95 14.60 17.58 17.42

14.02 13.97 13.08 16.28 16.13

14.42 ... 14.36 ... 14.15 +.02 17.07 -.11 16.91 -.11

12.45 11.31 8.12 8.14 12.63 24.83 26.37 14.05 13.34 9.44 11.88 2.96 18.23 10.89 4.68 4.71 34.93 36.97 11.45

9.54 9.57 7.51 7.53 10.64 17.23 18.25 11.11 10.53 8.72 10.64 2.80 13.98 9.71 4.54 4.57 25.45 26.96 10.58

10.27 9.89 7.58 7.60 11.21 21.06 22.39 12.03 11.40 8.88 11.01 2.88 15.43 10.48 4.55 4.57 27.86 29.51 11.00

+.53 +.25 ... ... +.37 +1.50 +1.60 +.56 +.53 +.01 ... -.03 +.72 -.01 ... -.01 +1.50 +1.59 -.08

13.77 13.18 19.20 10.58 14.99 45.26 47.00 14.66 23.72 24.37 26.76 19.94 6.27 20.83 20.11 16.76 14.80 10.26 14.23 7.78 8.59 8.12 27.29 10.78 10.78 16.73 17.27 26.90 27.41 14.85 14.92 18.25 18.19 24.78 24.55 24.89

13.24 12.26 15.70 9.99 12.74 36.10 37.40 12.10 19.57 20.11 22.71 15.56 6.10 17.16 16.57 13.09 11.56 7.90 12.65 7.03 7.79 7.84 19.63 10.31 10.32 13.36 13.81 22.06 22.48 13.30 13.37 15.01 14.96 20.19 19.99 20.28

13.43 12.71 17.13 10.53 13.58 41.56 43.19 12.51 20.43 21.01 23.94 16.24 6.14 18.44 17.79 15.32 12.78 8.99 13.30 7.50 8.35 8.11 22.17 10.67 10.67 13.92 14.38 24.12 24.60 13.78 13.84 16.87 16.81 21.56 21.34 21.66

-.11 +.17 +.87 -.05 +.40 +2.31 +2.41 +.30 +.32 +.33 +.55 +.52 -.01 +.92 +.89 +.89 +.62 +.48 +.28 -.01 -.01 -.01 +1.23 -.07 -.08 +.43 +.44 +1.23 +1.26 +.35 +.35 +.66 +.65 +1.01 +1.00 +1.01

26.26 39.47 6.04 6.01 33.18 7.84 34.85 31.56 38.19

20.59 31.80 5.72 5.70 25.23 6.19 28.31 26.04 30.39

22.78 33.87 5.76 5.74 26.20 7.08 30.08 28.36 32.26

+1.32 +1.34 -.01 ... +.80 +.36 +1.30 +1.45 +1.25

78.14 62.18 67.99 +3.41 26.95 10.76 15.44 15.31

25.28 10.26 11.99 11.88

26.41 -.25 10.58 -.07 13.30 +.72 13.17 +.71

13.55 12.69 13.05 +.11 16.56 14.40 15.17 +.48 13.59 12.28 12.71 +.27 9.62 7.22 7.52 +.16 15.35 11.35 12.67 +.70 19.41 15.51 17.61 +.95 21.37 16.66 19.29 +1.07 16.02 12.83 13.73 +.41 11.51 10.11 10.56 +.21 12.75 10.51 11.41 +.58 11.67 10.81 11.60

-.07

31.71 18.68 23.02 14.60 25.02

24.92 16.40 17.48 13.10 21.40

25.50 16.91 17.65 13.43 21.93

-.12 -.03 -.23 -.01 -.42

10.69 10.69 11.92 11.98 7.22 7.31 11.60 11.42 17.28 15.85 13.19 13.01 7.17 6.59

10.08 10.08 10.87 10.92 6.73 6.82 9.45 9.27 13.90 12.74 11.04 10.85 5.58 5.15

10.63 10.63 11.47 11.53 6.83 6.92 9.80 9.62 15.57 14.26 11.92 11.72 6.35 5.82

-.06 -.06 +.23 +.23 ... -.01 +.24 +.24 +.83 +.76 +.53 +.51 +.27 +.25

16.29 15.21 15.76 +.10 48.86 37.41 42.34 +1.93 30.70 24.18 26.49 +1.40 13.17 11.64 12.68 +.02 11.02 9.93 9.99 8.68 8.50 8.52 8.68 8.50 8.52 10.79 10.27 10.50 10.79 10.27 10.50

-.01 -.01 -.01 -.05 -.05

40.47 30.37 37.40 +1.57 9.58 8.43 8.93 -.03 27.91 27.57 15.02 14.84 42.69 41.32 15.53 16.27

23.39 20.87 11.93 11.77 32.52 31.49 11.58 12.73

23.81 25.59 12.48 12.32 37.83 36.59 13.17 14.51

-.11 +1.13 +.45 +.45 +1.25 +1.20 +.52 +.58

31.44 23.89 27.67 +1.49 32.11 24.36 28.28 +1.52 26.48 21.78 23.73 +1.21 11.80 11.14 11.73 -.07 9.98 8.79 9.17 +.23 14.84 12.04 13.00 +.59 9.35 7.54 8.04 +.34 9.86 8.27 8.72 +.30 8.14 6.25 6.50 +.17 16.60 12.67 14.19 +.71 11.45 9.40 10.19 +.47 11.46 12.76 12.68 12.77 15.59 15.68 20.45

8.34 11.98 11.90 11.98 14.51 14.58 16.02

9.33 12.40 12.31 12.41 14.83 14.91 17.42

+.56 -.05 -.05 -.05 +.08 +.09 +.94

31.21 37.62 52.08 53.91 16.40 29.93 20.82 28.13

23.34 28.06 38.80 40.24 12.68 22.67 14.69 21.81

27.92 33.68 46.65 48.26 14.28 24.44 17.91 24.22

+1.13 +1.37 +1.89 +1.96 +.60 +1.31 +1.28 +1.01

33.62 27.29 29.34 +1.23 49.59 39.24 43.39 +1.99 10.98 10.72 8.91 7.55 8.46 10.70 11.58 10.60 13.04 10.73 16.57 16.89 10.94

10.35 10.02 7.17 6.96 7.64 9.76 8.95 8.51 10.01 10.24 12.77 13.88 9.68

10.92 10.45 7.75 6.99 8.26 10.51 9.38 8.77 11.17 10.56 14.12 15.12 10.64

-.06 -.07 +.10 -.03 ... -.01 +.33 +.18 +.62 -.04 +.76 +.78 -.02

13.56 11.14 12.08 +.62 16.07 16.06 16.07 9.16 27.27 11.13 11.09 11.07 36.81 27.40 36.94

13.77 13.76 13.76 8.70 22.66 10.68 10.64 10.62 32.15 22.80 32.28

15.03 15.02 15.02 9.10 23.39 11.12 11.07 11.06 34.67 23.53 34.82

+.04 +.04 +.04 -.01 +.46 -.01 -.02 -.01 +.90 +.46 +.89

29.81 23.93 21.01 15.20 45.29 30.73

25.45 18.77 15.57 11.68 37.16 24.58

27.00 19.83 16.37 12.10 40.30 27.37

+.72 +.72 +.44 +.14 +2.18 +1.64

16.95 13.28 14.12 +.47 12.34 11.56 12.12 -.02 11.63 8.91 9.23 +.21 11.60 9.67 10.46 +.04

YTD 5-YR FUND %RTN %RTN Oppenheimer AMTFrMunA m +10.8 -2.9 ActAllocA m -3.9 -1.2 AmtFrNYA m +8.0 +2.2 CAMuniA m +10.0 -1.3 CapApA m -2.4 -.2 CapApB m -3.0 -1.0 CapApprY -2.1 +.2 CapIncA m +3.7 -1.8 CmdtStTRY -.5 -7.3 CoreBondY +6.1 -2.5 DevMktA m -12.7 +10.7 DevMktN m -12.9 +10.2 DevMktY -12.5 +11.0 DevMktsC m -13.1 +9.9 DiscoverA m +3.8 +6.6 EqIncA m -8.1 +2.1 EquityA m -4.2 -.2 GlobA m -7.3 +.5 GlobC m -7.8 -.3 GlobOpprA m -3.3 +3.5 GlobY -7.1 +.8 GoldMinA m -.3 +21.6 GoldMinC m -.8 +20.7 IntlBondA m +2.7 +8.2 IntlBondC m +2.0 +7.4 IntlBondY +2.7 +8.6 IntlDivA m -10.2 +2.7 IntlGrY -4.4 +3.4 IntlGrowA m -4.7 +2.9 IntlSmCoA m -15.2 +5.2 LmtTmMunA m +5.5 +3.0 LmtTmMunC m +5.0 +2.3 LtdTmGovA m +1.5 +3.1 LtdTmNY m +5.2 +3.8 LtdTmNY m +4.3 +3.0 MainSSMCA m -6.7 +.7 MainSSMCY -6.4 +1.2 MainStSelA m -5.6 0.0 MainStrA m -3.7 -.2 PAMuniA m +8.3 +2.2 QuBalA m -2.6 +.5 QuOpportA m -2.1 +3.3 RisDivA m -1.1 +2.1 RisDivY -1.0 +2.4 RocMuniA m +7.8 +2.5 RocMuniC m +7.2 +1.6 RochNtlMC m +9.1 -5.1 RochNtlMu m +9.7 -4.4 SmMidValA m -6.7 -.2 SrFltRatA m -.3 +3.4 SrFltRatC m -.7 +2.9 StrIncA m +1.5 +6.5 StrIncY +1.9 +6.8 StratIncC m +1.0 +5.7 USGovtA m +6.2 +5.5 ValueA m -5.9 -.8 ValueY -5.6 -.4 Osterweis OsterStrInc d +1.9 +7.2 Osterweis d -8.6 +1.5 PIMCO AAstAAutP +3.6 NA AllAssetA m +2.4 +5.7 AllAssetC m +1.9 +5.0 AllAssetI +2.8 +6.4 AllAssetsD b +2.5 +5.9 AllAstP +2.7 NA AllAuthA m +3.4 +7.0 AllAuthC m +2.7 +6.1 AllAuthIn +3.7 +7.6 CRRtStAdm b +2.9 +5.4 CmRlRtStA m +2.6 +5.2 CmRlRtStC m +2.1 +4.4 CmRlRtStD b +2.6 +5.2 ComRRStP +2.8 NA ComRlRStI +3.0 +5.7 DivIncInst +2.8 +7.7 EMktCurI ... +6.0 EmMktsIns +5.3 +8.1 FdIdxTRI -1.2 +5.9 FloatIncI -4.9 +1.5 ForBdIs +4.6 +6.9 ForBondI +9.3 +10.1 ForUnhgD b +9.0 +9.6 GNMA A m +6.8 +7.6 GlobalIs +8.9 +9.0 Hi-YldD b +.4 +6.1 HiYldA m +.4 +6.1 HiYldAdm b +.5 +6.2 HiYldIs +.7 +6.5 InvGrdIns +5.1 +9.3 LgTmGovIs +20.7 +10.9 LowDrA m +1.4 +5.1 LowDrC m +1.2 +4.6 LowDrIIIs +1.7 +4.8 LowDrIs +1.7 +5.5 LowDurD b +1.5 +5.2 LowDurP +1.6 NA ModDurIs +3.3 +7.6 RealRet +9.8 +7.9 RealRetAd b +9.6 +7.7 RealRetD b +9.5 +7.5 RealRetnP +9.7 NA RealRtnA m +9.5 +7.4 RealRtnC m +9.1 +6.9 RlEstStRetI +19.4 +4.8 RlRetAIns +18.0 +9.6 ShTermAdm b +.2 +3.0 ShtTermA m +.1 +2.9 ShtTermIs +.3 +3.2 StkPlusIs -2.0 +.6 ToRtIIIIs +2.7 +8.0 ToRtIIIs +3.5 +8.0 TotRetA m +3.1 +7.8 TotRetAdm b +3.2 +8.1 TotRetC m +2.5 +7.0 TotRetIs +3.4 +8.3 TotRetrnD b +3.1 +8.0 TotlRetnP +3.3 NA PRIMECAP Odyssey AggGr d -3.2 +4.8 Growth d -4.4 +2.7 Stock d -1.8 +2.5 Parnassus EqIncInv -2.7 +4.6 Pax World Bal b -2.2 +1.2 Payden CoreBd +2.9 +5.3 EmMktBd d +5.3 +8.2 GNMA +6.7 +7.2 HighInc d +1.3 +5.0 Permanent Portfolio +7.3 +10.8 Pioneer Bond Y +4.7 +7.1 CulValA m -8.1 -1.3 CulValY -7.9 -.9 EqInc A m +1.4 +.4 GlobHiYA m -1.9 +5.6 GlobHiYY -1.6 +6.0 HiYldA m -2.3 +5.8 IndependA m +.2 +.2 MidCpValA m -8.1 +.6 MuniA m +9.0 +3.9 PioneerA m -6.5 -.3 PioneerY -6.2 +.1 StratIncA m +2.4 +7.6 StratIncC m +1.8 +6.8 StratIncY +2.6 +8.0 ValueA m -7.1 -4.3 Principal BdMtgInst +5.4 +5.0 DivIntI -8.7 -1.5 EqIncA m -1.5 +.3 HiYldA m +.4 +7.3 HiYldII +.3 +8.5 InfProI +10.3 +1.8 IntIInst -12.3 -2.6 IntlGrthI -8.4 -3.3 L/T2010I +.3 +1.7 L/T2020I -2.0 +1.3 L/T2020J m -2.2 +.8 L/T2030I -3.0 +1.0 L/T2030J m -3.2 +.5 L/T2040I -4.0 +.6 L/T2050I -4.5 +.3 LCBIIInst -4.3 +.4 LCGIIInst -1.1 +3.2 LCGrIInst -.5 +4.5 LCIIIInst -7.0 -4.8 LCVlIInst -4.3 -2.7 LgCGrInst -2.8 +1.9 LgCSP500I -1.9 +.4 LgCValI -3.0 -2.0 MCVlIInst -6.4 +2.4 MGIIIInst -2.2 +4.2 MidCapBleA m +3.2 +5.4 PrSecInst +1.3 +5.0 ReEstSecI +5.2 +.3 SAMBalA m -1.6 +3.1 SAMBalC m -2.1 +2.4 SAMConGrA m -3.3 +1.5 SAMConGrB m -3.8 +.7 SAMStrGrA m -4.6 +.5 SCGrIInst -3.7 +5.1 SCValIII -9.6 -1.0 Prudential Investmen 2020FocA m -.1 +4.0 2020FocZ +.2 +4.3 BlendA m -3.6 +2.1 EqOppA m -3.7 +1.8 HiYieldA m +1.5 +7.2 IntlEqtyA m -10.2 -4.7 IntlValA m -11.7 -2.0 JenMidCapGrA m +.7 +5.8 JenMidCapGrZ +1.0 +6.1 JennGrA m +2.9 +3.7 JennGrZ +3.1 +4.0 NatlMuniA m +7.5 +3.8 NaturResA m -12.1 +9.0 ShTmCoBdA m +2.3 +5.7 SmallCoA m -5.6 +3.2 SmallCoZ -5.2 +3.5 UtilityA x +3.1 +1.4 ValueA m -6.0 -.7 Putnam AmGovtInA x +6.8 +8.2 AstAlBalA x -2.3 +1.7 AstAlGrA m -5.5 +.6 CATxEIncA m +7.9 +3.8 DivIncTrC m -2.1 +2.8 DivrInA m -1.7 +3.6 EqIncomeA m -4.0 +1.4 GeoPutA m -.8 -2.2 GlbEqA m -3.4 -1.5 GlbHltCrA m -3.2 +.7 GrowIncA m -8.7 -3.4 GrowIncB m -9.2 -4.1 HiYldA m -.7 +6.3 IncomeA m +5.9 +7.4 IntlCpOpA m -13.8 +1.0 IntlEqA m -13.1 -4.1 InvestorA m -4.8 -2.5 +.8 MultiCapGrA m -5.7

M

U

52-WEEK HI LOW 6.64 10.29 12.06 8.31 47.30 41.60 49.53 9.02 4.26 6.67 37.42 36.17 37.05 35.91 68.32 26.53 9.59 67.42 63.28 32.57 67.57 51.97 49.10 7.04 7.01 7.04 13.03 30.92 31.05 24.84 14.70 14.64 9.47 3.34 3.32 22.74 23.92 13.18 34.21 11.37 16.43 28.00 16.91 17.30 16.91 16.88 7.36 7.37 35.48 8.42 8.43 4.45 4.44 4.44 9.73 24.01 24.49

5.63 8.76 10.25 7.11 38.23 33.86 39.90 8.34 3.18 6.39 30.51 29.46 30.23 29.22 46.15 20.69 7.76 52.79 49.42 25.48 52.96 40.62 38.64 6.37 6.35 6.37 10.66 24.89 24.97 19.73 13.88 13.82 9.30 3.14 3.13 17.17 18.06 10.81 28.26 9.89 14.18 24.75 13.91 14.22 14.49 14.47 6.25 6.27 27.31 7.88 7.89 4.17 4.16 4.16 9.23 18.87 19.27

T

U

WK NAV CHG 6.29 9.22 11.13 7.83 42.53 37.33 44.57 8.71 3.65 6.61 31.83 30.73 31.56 30.47 58.57 22.33 8.46 55.97 52.39 28.75 56.15 49.68 46.92 6.56 6.53 6.55 11.02 26.66 26.73 20.90 14.46 14.41 9.37 3.28 3.26 19.06 20.07 12.05 31.19 10.72 14.98 25.83 15.25 15.59 15.72 15.69 6.87 6.89 29.88 7.97 7.98 4.17 4.17 4.16 9.69 20.54 20.99

-.01 +.23 ... ... +2.09 +1.83 +2.19 +.10 -.01 -.05 +.17 +.17 +.18 +.16 +4.13 +.98 +.43 +3.18 +2.97 +1.35 +3.19 -1.35 -1.29 -.06 -.06 -.07 +.24 +.78 +.78 +.42 -.01 ... ... ... ... +1.04 +1.10 +.74 +1.88 +.02 +.29 +.55 +.73 +.74 +.01 +.01 -.01 ... +1.36 +.01 +.01 -.04 -.03 -.04 -.04 +1.10 +1.13

11.92 11.38 11.40 -.16 29.59 23.71 24.77 +.64 11.34 12.77 12.63 12.86 12.79 12.86 11.28 11.19 11.35 9.58 9.54 9.35 9.57 9.68 9.69 11.82 11.27 11.66 6.19 9.22 10.97 11.62 11.62 12.05 10.78 9.54 9.54 9.54 9.54 10.93 12.56 10.77 10.77 10.34 10.77 10.77 10.77 11.35 12.38 12.38 12.38 12.38 12.38 12.38 5.36 13.28 9.95 9.95 9.95 9.25 9.87 10.67 11.77 11.77 11.77 11.77 11.77 11.77

10.48 11.92 11.79 12.01 11.94 12.01 10.43 10.34 10.49 7.47 7.45 7.33 7.47 7.55 7.56 11.28 10.29 10.92 4.84 8.33 10.31 10.29 10.29 11.25 9.55 8.81 8.81 8.81 8.81 10.33 10.00 10.27 10.27 9.90 10.27 10.27 10.27 10.51 11.13 11.13 11.13 11.13 11.13 11.13 4.10 10.66 9.81 9.81 9.81 7.45 9.44 10.21 10.69 10.69 10.69 10.69 10.69 10.69

10.64 11.95 11.82 12.04 11.97 12.04 10.59 10.49 10.65 8.32 8.28 8.10 8.30 8.41 8.42 11.31 10.47 11.26 5.20 8.37 10.70 11.33 11.33 12.04 10.37 8.89 8.89 8.89 8.89 10.62 12.40 10.40 10.40 10.01 10.40 10.40 10.40 10.77 12.11 12.11 12.11 12.11 12.11 12.11 4.92 12.78 9.81 9.81 9.81 8.03 9.61 10.55 10.96 10.96 10.96 10.96 10.96 10.96

-.21 -.19 -.17 -.20 -.19 -.20 -.20 -.19 -.21 -.65 -.64 -.63 -.65 -.66 -.66 -.09 -.08 -.11 +.16 ... -.05 +.04 +.04 -.01 ... -.02 -.02 -.02 -.02 -.10 -.16 -.03 -.03 -.03 -.03 -.03 -.03 -.06 -.14 -.14 -.14 -.14 -.14 -.14 -.04 -.26 -.01 -.01 -.01 +.33 -.05 -.06 -.07 -.07 -.07 -.07 -.07 -.07

18.79 14.24 15.95 +.77 17.24 13.28 14.73 +.69 15.48 12.66 13.91 +.55 28.61 23.79 25.44 +.98 24.21 20.34 21.71 +.62 10.75 10.36 10.51 15.02 14.03 14.47 10.73 10.14 10.69 7.43 6.89 6.98

-.09 -.23 -.03 ...

49.93 41.82 49.15 +.27 9.71 19.73 19.81 28.07 10.95 10.75 10.82 12.46 23.06 13.69 43.93 44.09 11.17 10.93 11.17 12.26

9.40 16.03 16.11 22.50 9.83 9.67 9.31 9.54 17.83 12.07 35.34 35.47 10.80 10.57 10.80 9.60

9.59 16.68 16.77 25.50 9.83 9.67 9.59 11.25 19.42 13.24 38.15 38.30 10.82 10.59 10.82 10.52

-.05 +.58 +.58 +1.11 -.07 -.07 +.15 +.63 +.96 ... +1.89 +1.90 -.04 -.04 -.04 +.49

10.75 11.00 18.88 8.24 11.77 8.71 12.63 9.76 11.92 12.56 12.51 12.53 12.51 12.79 12.31 10.36 9.03 10.21 11.15 11.53 8.82 9.58 10.37 14.30 12.11 15.14 10.32 18.74 13.54 13.40 14.65 14.12 16.18 12.54 10.63

10.27 8.91 15.62 7.55 10.54 7.79 9.64 7.82 10.69 10.86 10.81 10.60 10.57 10.63 10.11 8.45 7.35 7.95 8.80 9.36 7.07 7.90 8.23 10.97 8.84 12.20 9.51 14.60 11.86 11.73 12.29 11.82 13.12 8.82 7.98

10.63 9.24 16.95 7.59 10.75 8.54 10.12 8.23 11.20 11.43 11.37 11.22 11.19 11.30 10.78 9.16 8.19 9.22 9.49 10.15 7.96 8.62 9.04 12.22 10.40 13.69 9.61 16.89 12.45 12.31 13.12 12.62 14.19 10.40 8.73

-.09 +.22 +.62 -.03 ... -.09 +.35 +.20 +.15 +.31 +.30 +.35 +.35 +.40 +.40 +.46 +.42 +.49 +.47 +.49 +.42 +.45 +.45 +.61 +.63 +.57 -.10 +.65 +.29 +.29 +.44 +.43 +.59 +.68 +.48

17.54 18.17 19.01 15.19 5.65 6.85 22.79 30.80 31.96 20.23 21.02 15.01 62.22 11.72 22.83 23.86 11.30 16.32

13.78 14.24 15.00 12.13 5.27 5.30 17.35 23.93 24.77 15.71 16.28 13.73 46.02 11.41 16.98 17.74 9.36 12.63

15.88 16.46 16.59 13.36 5.31 5.56 18.19 27.57 28.63 18.57 19.31 14.75 50.20 11.42 19.16 20.08 10.38 13.84

+.78 +.81 +.87 +.66 -.01 +.19 +.66 +1.49 +1.56 +1.06 +1.10 -.01 +.78 -.03 +1.06 +1.10 +.26 +.68

9.92 11.69 13.36 8.12 8.17 8.28 16.67 12.69 9.94 51.85 14.68 14.41 8.00 6.98 38.57 21.83 13.95 55.49

9.44 10.11 10.97 7.22 7.46 7.56 13.14 11.26 7.87 40.32 11.44 11.23 7.27 6.68 29.31 16.78 11.28 43.05

9.84 10.54 11.62 7.80 7.47 7.57 14.33 11.69 8.43 43.33 12.30 12.09 7.34 6.90 30.75 17.41 12.20 47.87

-.06 +.22 +.40 -.01 -.06 -.06 +.71 +.30 +.30 +1.36 +.58 +.59 -.03 -.02 +1.15 +.49 +.64 +2.79

A

L

S

YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NYTxEIncA m +6.9 +4.1 8.73 7.98 TaxEIncA m +7.6 +4.1 8.73 7.29 TaxFHYldA m +7.3 +3.2 12.07 10.96 USGovtInA m +5.9 +8.3 14.56 13.94 VoyagerA m -15.5 +3.6 25.49 18.33 RS GlNatResA m -3.4 +6.6 41.60 30.60 PartnersA m -8.9 +1.1 36.00 27.26 ValueA m -12.7 0.0 27.62 20.92 RS Funds EmgMktsA m -16.3 +7.4 27.44 21.44 Rainier CoreEqIns -3.5 +.4 27.29 21.85 SmMdCEqI -4.5 +1.1 38.15 28.17 SmMidCap b -4.7 +.8 37.20 27.45 RidgeWorth HighYI +1.3 +6.0 10.19 9.37 IntmBndI +5.6 +6.8 10.96 10.27 InvGrBdI +7.0 +5.6 12.52 11.51 LgCpVaEqI -6.7 +1.0 13.79 11.01 MdCpVlEqI -11.5 +4.7 13.15 9.58 SmCapEqI -5.2 +4.2 15.12 11.71 TtlRetBndI +7.6 +7.6 11.08 10.28 USGovBndI +1.0 +3.7 10.11 10.05 Royce LowStkSer m -8.9 +5.7 19.92 14.69 MicrCapIv d -10.3 +5.0 19.30 14.62 OpportInv d -16.0 +1.0 13.10 9.27 PAMutCnslt m -7.1 +1.8 11.80 8.89 PAMutInv d -6.4 +2.8 13.00 9.79 PremierInv d -2.1 +7.4 22.95 17.05 SpecEqInv d -6.0 +5.2 22.54 17.87 TotRetInv d -5.7 +2.1 14.28 11.41 ValPlSvc m -7.4 +1.0 14.72 11.27 ValueSvc m -6.3 +5.4 14.21 10.42 Russell EmgMktsS -13.1 +7.6 21.93 17.71 GlRelEstS -5.5 -2.8 38.69 31.12 GlbEqtyS -7.9 NA 9.68 7.82 IntlDMktI -12.3 -2.9 34.67 26.73 InvGrdBdS +4.7 NA 22.89 21.41 ItlDvMktS -12.3 NA 34.64 26.70 ShDurBdS +1.2 +4.3 19.51 19.12 StgicBdI +4.7 +6.4 11.19 10.56 StratBdS +4.7 NA 11.32 10.68 USCoEqtyI -5.5 -.4 30.16 24.20 USCoreEqS -5.5 NA 30.16 24.20 USQntvEqS +1.0 NA 32.13 25.59 USSmMdCpS -7.7 NA 25.30 19.02 Russell LifePoints BalStrA m -2.9 +2.1 11.09 9.75 BalStrC b -3.3 +1.3 11.00 9.66 BlStrR3 b -2.9 +1.9 11.12 9.77 GrStrA m -5.2 +.5 10.69 8.99 GrStrC b -5.6 -.2 10.55 8.86 Rydex Nsdq100Iv +3.8 +6.7 15.82 12.56 Rydex/SGI MCapValA m -7.4 +3.6 35.77 27.38 MgFtrStrH b -4.8 NA 26.76 24.22 SEI DlyShDurA +2.2 +4.6 10.76 10.53 IdxSP500E -2.0 +.3 37.43 30.72 IntlEq A -11.6 -6.2 9.66 7.46 IsCrFxIA +5.8 +6.6 11.21 10.66 IsHiYdBdA +1.4 +6.3 7.64 7.10 IsItlEmDA +5.2 +8.9 11.64 10.96 IsItlEmMA -16.0 +4.5 12.62 10.04 IsLrgGrA -.2 +2.2 23.83 19.08 IsLrgValA -4.8 -2.6 17.69 14.13 IsMgTxMgA -3.0 -.3 13.20 10.74 TxEIntMuA +6.8 +4.7 11.45 10.80 SSGA EmgMkts b -13.5 +5.2 23.98 19.04 EmgMktsSel b -13.3 +5.4 24.06 19.12 IntlStkSl b -13.5 -4.1 11.17 8.33 S&P500Idx b -2.6 +.2 22.42 18.41 Schwab 1000Inv d -2.4 +.7 40.64 33.21 CoreEqInv d -3.9 -.2 18.63 14.86 DivEqSel d -1.2 +.2 14.09 11.53 FUSLgCInl d -4.6 NA 10.51 8.44 IntlIndex d -10.5 -2.1 19.10 14.76 S&P500Sel d -1.9 +.5 21.33 17.62 SmCapIdx d -6.6 +2.7 23.55 17.74 TotBdMkt +5.9 +3.8 9.59 9.05 TotStkMSl d -2.4 +1.2 24.91 20.31 Scout Interntl d -11.8 +2.1 35.42 27.18 Selected AmerShS b -7.1 -1.0 44.52 36.26 American D -6.9 -.7 44.53 36.31 Sentinel CmnStkA m -2.9 +1.9 34.23 27.88 GovtSecA m +4.7 +6.7 11.24 10.34 ShMatGovA m +1.5 +4.3 9.36 9.17 SmallCoA m +.3 +4.5 8.96 6.60 Sequoia Sequoia +6.0 +3.6 147.36 121.50 Sit USGovSec +2.8 +5.9 11.40 11.23 Sound Shore SoundShor -8.2 -1.3 34.47 26.58 Spectra Spectra A m +.2 +8.6 13.59 10.39 Stadion MgdPortA m -6.4 +2.9 11.00 9.41 State Farm Balanced -.4 +3.8 57.34 51.34 Growth -4.5 +1.6 57.76 47.12 MuniBond +7.5 +5.5 8.87 8.35 Stratton MoDivREIT d +2.4 +.9 29.76 23.14 MultiCap d -10.7 -.6 39.64 30.36 SmCapVal d -2.0 +2.0 55.88 41.38 T Rowe Price Balanced -.6 +3.3 20.55 17.99 BlChpGAdv b +1.9 +3.1 42.05 32.89 BlChpGr +2.0 +3.3 42.14 32.92 CapApprec -1.5 +4.0 21.83 18.83 CorpInc +5.9 +6.4 10.12 9.48 DivGrow -1.7 +1.7 24.86 20.40 DivrSmCap d -1.9 +5.7 18.37 12.86 EmEurMed d -20.0 -2.5 24.84 18.01 EmMktBd d +3.4 +7.7 13.86 13.05 EmMktStk d -12.8 +5.5 36.99 30.04 EqIndex d -2.1 +.3 36.77 30.19 EqtyInc -5.4 -.2 25.53 20.55 EqtyIncAd b -5.5 -.4 25.49 20.51 EurStock d -10.1 -.1 17.41 12.80 FinSer -17.3 -6.8 15.40 10.88 GNMA +5.4 +6.5 10.24 9.76 GloStk d -7.7 -.9 19.20 15.69 GrStkAdv b -.3 +2.6 34.77 27.48 GrStkR b -.5 +2.4 34.34 27.20 GrowInc -3.1 +1.0 21.84 17.85 GrowStk -.2 +2.9 35.09 27.70 HealthSci +7.4 +8.3 37.03 26.71 HiYield d -.2 +6.8 7.00 6.40 HiYldAdv m -.3 +6.5 6.99 6.38 InsLgCpGr -.7 +4.0 17.84 14.12 InstlEmMk d -12.6 +5.6 33.75 27.41 InstlHiYl d +.3 +7.1 10.13 9.27 InstlLgCV -6.2 -.5 13.84 11.02 IntlBnd d +5.5 +6.8 10.66 9.69 IntlBndAd m +5.4 +6.5 10.65 9.68 IntlDisc d -7.8 +2.8 47.45 39.13 IntlGrInc d -10.8 -1.9 14.86 11.32 IntlStk d -9.1 +1.1 15.35 12.41 IntlStkAd m -9.1 +.9 15.29 12.36 LatinAm d -19.3 +10.6 57.59 42.38 MDTaxFBd +7.1 +4.5 10.75 9.89 MdCpVlAdv b -5.6 +2.8 25.58 20.35 MediaTele +3.2 +10.4 58.18 44.99 MidCapE -2.7 +6.5 31.15 23.50 MidCapVa -5.4 +3.1 25.71 20.47 MidCpGr -2.5 +6.4 65.35 50.71 MidCpGrAd b -2.7 +6.2 64.12 49.72 NewAmGro -1.6 +5.5 36.02 28.43 NewAsia d -7.4 +12.7 20.25 17.47 NewEra -9.6 +5.4 58.14 42.44 NewHoriz +1.6 +6.4 39.08 28.09 NewIncome +4.6 +6.8 9.81 9.36 OrseaStk d -9.2 NA 9.24 7.24 PerStrBal -1.0 +3.9 20.30 17.65 PerStrGr -2.6 +2.3 24.84 20.82 PerStrInc +.1 +4.7 16.86 15.26 R2015 -1.3 +3.3 12.72 11.13 R2025 -2.7 +2.6 12.99 11.01 R2035 -3.7 +2.0 13.28 10.98 Real d +4.1 -1.0 20.10 15.84 Ret2020R b -2.4 +2.4 17.43 14.97 Ret2050 -3.8 NA 10.58 8.73 RetInc +.4 +4.2 13.71 12.52 Retir2005 +.2 +4.1 12.00 10.93 Rtmt2010 -.6 +3.6 16.31 14.59 Rtmt2020 -2.0 +2.9 17.67 15.19 Rtmt2030 -3.3 +2.2 18.71 15.65 Rtmt2040 -4.0 +2.0 18.92 15.58 Rtmt2045 -3.9 +2.0 12.60 10.40 SciTech -.6 +6.6 30.02 22.63 ShTmBond +1.4 +4.4 4.91 4.83 SmCpStk -5.8 +3.8 38.74 29.27 SmCpVal d -6.1 +2.8 39.53 30.60 SmCpValAd m -6.3 +2.5 39.27 30.38 SpecGrow -4.2 +1.8 19.27 15.69 SpecInc +2.5 +6.2 12.70 12.22 SpecIntl d -9.5 +1.1 11.78 9.38 SumMuInc +7.6 +4.5 11.38 10.39 SumMuInt +6.8 +4.9 11.59 10.91 TaxFHiYld d +7.4 +3.1 11.09 10.04 TaxFInc +7.3 +4.4 10.15 9.29 TaxFShInt +3.6 +4.1 5.66 5.51 TrRt2010Ad b -.7 +3.4 16.23 14.51 TrRt2020Ad b -2.2 +2.7 17.56 15.09 TrRt2030Ad b -3.5 +2.0 18.59 15.53 TrRt2030R b -3.6 +1.7 18.49 15.43 TrRt2040Ad b -4.1 +1.7 18.79 15.47 TrRt2040R b -4.3 +1.5 18.70 15.39 TxFIncAdv b +7.1 +4.1 10.16 9.29 USBdEnIdx d +5.9 +6.6 11.57 10.95 VATaxFBd +8.1 +4.6 11.89 10.87 Value -5.7 -.1 25.63 20.21 ValueAd b -5.8 -.2 25.36 19.99 TCW EmgIncI +3.5 +11.5 9.03 8.54 SmCapGrI -7.8 +7.6 33.27 23.77 TotRetBdI +4.7 +8.9 10.44 9.86 TotRetBdN b +4.5 +8.6 10.79 10.20 TFS MktNeut d -2.3 +6.8 15.66 14.11 TIAA-CREF BdPIns +5.1 +5.6 10.49 10.06 BondIn +5.2 +6.0 10.78 10.24 EqIx -2.6 +.8 10.45 8.49 Gr&IncIn -.2 +3.8 10.01 8.09 Gr&IncRtl b -.3 +3.6 12.13 9.78 HYlIns d +2.3 +7.6 10.11 9.40 InfL +11.2 +7.1 12.17 10.83 IntEqIdxRet d -10.8 -2.4 18.45 14.29 IntlE d -10.6 -2.2 18.15 14.06 IntlEqIn d -18.7 -2.6 10.80 7.71 -18.8 -2.8 11.12 7.94 IntlEqRmt d

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011 PAGE 7D

WK NAV CHG 8.55 -.01 8.56 -.01 11.67 -.01 14.40 -.07 20.04 +1.04 36.31 +.66 30.13 +1.45 22.62 +1.21 22.38

-.06

24.29 +1.37 31.95 +2.08 31.13 +2.02 9.45 -.02 10.78 -.07 12.29 -.02 11.90 +.55 10.44 +.49 12.95 +.68 10.94 -.04 10.09 -.01 16.63 15.76 10.15 9.86 10.90 19.93 19.62 12.33 12.43 11.85

+.59 +.60 +.63 +.46 +.51 +.86 +1.00 +.50 +.58 +.43

18.11 33.61 8.18 27.81 22.25 27.77 19.19 10.90 11.03 26.28 26.28 28.85 21.07

-.08 +.55 +.33 +.78 -.11 +.77 -.04 -.06 -.06 +1.32 +1.33 +1.54 +1.23

10.07 9.98 10.10 9.38 9.24

+.18 +.18 +.18 +.24 +.24

15.02 +.93 29.98 +1.71 24.54 -.29 10.74 33.49 7.78 11.15 7.12 11.35 10.21 21.64 15.27 11.70 11.43

-.02 +1.72 +.20 -.06 -.03 -.16 -.03 +1.07 +.76 +.61 -.02

19.53 -.11 19.62 -.11 8.73 +.30 19.95 +1.02 36.30 16.17 12.59 9.20 15.42 19.19 19.71 9.54 22.20

+1.86 +.89 +.65 +.46 +.46 +.98 +1.10 -.05 +1.14

28.41 +.93 38.50 +1.35 38.56 +1.35 30.34 +1.47 10.78 -.02 9.24 -.02 7.77 +.41 137.07 +5.23 11.36

-.02

29.08 +1.63 12.21 +.62 9.63 +.01 53.14 +1.12 50.10 +2.10 8.85 -.02 26.79 +.95 33.17 +1.72 48.62 +2.15 18.99 38.81 38.90 20.00 9.87 22.34 15.52 18.74 13.10 30.78 32.90 22.24 22.18 13.48 11.72 10.19 16.67 31.79 31.37 19.46 32.10 32.52 6.43 6.42 16.27 28.12 9.33 11.84 10.31 10.30 40.47 11.87 12.94 12.89 45.78 10.55 22.29 53.40 27.08 22.43 57.05 55.93 32.47 17.76 47.15 34.04 9.69 7.57 18.67 22.31 15.89 11.74 11.72 11.78 18.04 15.86 9.37 12.94 11.36 15.25 16.11 16.71 16.73 11.16 26.65 4.84 32.45 33.93 33.67 16.95 12.31 9.73 11.17 11.56 10.76 9.97 5.65 15.17 15.99 16.58 16.48 16.60 16.51 9.98 11.51 11.74 22.01 21.76

+.57 +2.21 +2.21 +.72 -.12 +1.09 +.85 +.08 -.20 -.11 +1.69 +1.07 +1.06 +.48 +.65 -.03 +.53 +1.78 +1.75 +.97 +1.80 +1.55 -.02 -.02 +.89 -.12 -.01 +.56 -.01 -.01 +.92 +.42 +.34 +.34 -.44 -.01 +.94 +2.43 +1.50 +.95 +3.12 +3.06 +1.70 -.08 +1.25 +1.81 -.07 +.27 +.55 +.88 +.31 +.32 +.41 +.48 +.62 +.49 +.39 +.21 +.21 +.34 +.51 +.63 +.69 +.46 +1.49 -.01 +1.70 +1.87 +1.85 +.78 +.03 +.24 -.01 -.02 +.01 -.01 -.01 +.35 +.50 +.63 +.63 +.68 +.68 -.01 -.06 -.01 +1.10 +1.08

8.54 -.12 27.06 +1.76 9.94 -.02 10.27 -.02 14.38 +.26 10.39 10.70 9.29 9.02 10.92 9.55 11.92 14.96 14.73 8.06 8.30

-.06 -.07 +.48 +.51 +.61 ... -.13 +.50 +.49 +.29 +.31

YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW LCVal -9.4 -1.6 14.21 10.97 LgCGIdx +.6 +3.4 13.98 11.12 LgCVIdx -4.7 -1.9 13.24 10.61 LgGrIns +.3 +3.2 11.34 9.17 Life2015 b -.7 +2.6 11.75 10.49 Life2020 b -1.7 +1.9 11.71 10.27 Life2025 b -2.8 +1.2 11.64 9.98 Life2030 b -3.7 +.6 11.55 9.70 Life2035 b -4.5 +.4 11.68 9.61 Life2040 b -4.8 +.5 11.91 9.75 LrgeCapVal -9.6 -1.8 14.16 10.93 MidCapGrwthRe -3.5 +4.4 21.53 16.06 MidValIn -5.0 +1.8 18.85 14.55 MidValRmt -5.2 +1.5 18.75 14.46 SCEq d -7.3 +.5 16.21 12.07 SPIndxIn -2.0 +.5 15.37 12.69 Target SmCapVal -4.6 +3.3 22.86 17.70 Templeton InFEqSeS -12.0 -.4 22.33 16.81 Third Avenue IntlVal d -9.5 -1.1 18.74 14.82 RealEsVal d -10.0 -4.0 24.71 20.28 SmCapVal d -4.5 -.4 22.86 18.15 Value d -14.1 -2.9 54.81 43.78 Thompson Plumb Bond +2.8 +7.9 11.71 11.28 Thornburg IncBldA m -2.1 +5.3 20.23 17.31 IncBldC m -2.5 +4.6 20.23 17.31 IntlValA m -11.2 +1.8 30.95 23.79 IntlValC m -11.7 +1.1 29.10 22.35 IntlValI d -11.0 +2.2 31.63 24.33 LtdTMuA m +5.3 +4.6 14.44 13.83 LtdTMul +5.6 +4.9 14.44 13.83 Value A m -9.7 -.4 37.64 27.94 Value I d -9.5 -.1 38.32 28.48 Thrivent LgCapStkA m -6.0 -1.4 23.91 19.14 MuniBdA m +8.0 +4.5 11.51 10.57 Tocqueville Gold m +3.4 +21.5 93.00 73.76 Touchstone SdCapInGr +4.1 +7.1 15.91 11.72 Transamerica AssAllCvC m -.3 +3.2 11.71 10.79 AssAllGrA m -5.7 -.1 13.00 10.56 AssAllGrC m -6.0 -.7 12.71 10.31 AstAlMdGrA m -4.0 +1.6 12.77 10.85 AstAlMdGrC m -4.4 +.9 12.72 10.79 AstAlModA m -1.3 +3.0 12.40 11.08 AstAlModC m -1.7 +2.4 12.35 11.00 Transamerica Partner StockIdx x -2.1 +.3 9.12 7.49 Trust for Credit Un TCUUltrShGov +.6 +2.9 9.62 9.59 Tweedy Browne GlobVal d -8.1 +.9 25.26 21.12 UBS GlobAllA m -6.2 +.3 10.59 9.14 UBS PACE IntlEqP d -9.4 -3.6 14.17 11.06 LgCoVlP d -6.9 -1.4 18.21 14.66 LrCoGrP d -1.3 +2.2 19.85 15.63 StrFInP d +8.2 +9.1 15.06 13.94 US Global Investors GlobRes m -11.7 +4.1 13.01 8.96 WrldPrcMnr m -15.5 +9.1 22.94 17.38 USAA AggGrow -1.6 +1.6 36.19 28.47 BalStrat -1.6 +2.4 14.37 12.61 CABond +10.5 +3.5 10.50 9.13 CapGrowth -8.6 -2.0 7.30 5.82 Cornerst -2.6 +2.3 24.31 21.46 EmergMkt -17.4 +5.2 22.33 17.52 GNMA +5.1 +6.3 10.47 10.03 Grow -3.1 +.1 15.94 12.70 GrowInc -5.2 +.1 16.29 13.02 HYOpp +1.0 +6.8 8.80 8.08 Income +5.7 +6.9 13.20 12.64 IncomeStk +.1 -2.4 13.29 10.75 IntermBd +4.9 +7.0 10.66 10.23 Intl -10.1 +.2 26.98 21.03 PrcMtlMin +3.4 +22.0 46.36 36.62 S&P500M -2.6 +.2 20.43 16.78 ShTmBond +1.8 +5.0 9.27 9.15 SmCapStk -7.6 +.9 15.18 11.37 TaxEInt +7.5 +4.6 13.24 12.34 TaxELgTm +8.9 +3.8 13.31 11.87 TaxEShTm +3.7 +3.9 10.80 10.57 TgtRt2030 -1.8 NA 12.17 10.70 TgtRt2040 -4.5 NA 11.89 10.04 VABond +8.5 +3.9 11.21 10.20 Value -6.1 0.0 14.82 11.70 WorldGro -6.0 +1.8 20.62 16.75 Unified Wntergrn m -.8 +5.6 15.10 12.82 VALIC Co I ForgnVal -12.3 -1.0 10.37 7.72 IGrowth -1.6 +3.8 12.06 9.53 IntlEq -11.0 -3.0 7.04 5.47 MdCpIdx -3.8 +4.1 23.03 17.63 Scie&Tech -2.3 +6.2 17.81 13.61 SmCpIdx -8.2 +.7 15.90 11.93 StockIdx -2.1 +.2 27.02 22.29 VALIC Co II IntSmCpEq -12.6 -1.5 14.60 11.47 MdCpVal -10.9 +.3 18.23 13.74 SocResp -1.6 +.6 12.14 9.97 Van Eck GloHardA m -7.1 +10.2 57.73 40.74 IntlGoldA m +1.7 +21.9 26.26 20.50 Vanguard 500Adml -1.9 +.5 125.74 103.29 500Inv -2.0 +.4 125.72 103.28 AssetA -2.4 -.6 26.44 21.72 AssetAdml -2.4 -.5 59.37 48.76 BalIdx +1.3 +3.7 22.62 20.01 BalIdxAdm +1.3 +3.8 22.62 20.02 BalIdxIns +1.4 +3.9 22.62 20.02 BalIdxSig +1.3 +3.9 22.38 19.80 CAIT +7.5 +4.3 11.28 10.51 CAITAdml +7.6 +4.4 11.28 10.51 CALT +8.3 +3.7 11.44 10.40 CALTAdml +8.4 +3.8 11.44 10.40 CapOp d -8.0 +2.1 36.17 27.76 CapOpAdml d -8.0 +2.2 83.55 64.14 CapVal -12.9 +.2 12.21 8.66 Convrt d -5.6 +5.2 14.20 11.97 DevMktIdx d -11.0 -2.1 11.03 8.54 DevMktsIdxIP d -11.0 NA 114.06 88.32 DivAppInv ... +2.3 23.00 19.13 DivEqInv -3.2 +.6 22.43 17.91 DivGr +2.1 +3.7 15.71 13.12 EMStIxSgl d -13.5 NA 40.42 32.40 EmMkInsId d -13.5 +7.2 31.98 25.64 EmMktIAdm d -13.5 +7.1 42.03 33.69 EmMktStkIdxIP d -13.5 NA 106.38 85.31 EmerMktId d -13.6 +7.0 31.97 25.62 EnerIxAd d -.8 +6.9 58.97 39.76 EnergyAdm d -3.1 +6.4 141.63 103.69 EnergyInv d -3.1 +6.3 75.42 55.21 EqInc +1.9 +1.4 22.40 18.70 EqIncAdml +1.9 +1.5 46.95 39.20 EurIdxAdm d -11.7 -2.6 70.05 51.01 EurStkISg d -11.6 NA 27.10 19.74 EuroInsId d -11.6 -2.6 29.88 21.76 EuropeIdx d -11.8 -2.7 30.06 21.88 ExDuTrIxI +34.4 NA 33.49 22.23 ExMktIdSig -5.5 +3.0 39.55 29.97 ExplAdml -4.0 +2.4 77.12 56.80 Explr -4.2 +2.3 82.81 60.99 ExtdIdAdm -5.5 +3.0 46.03 34.87 ExtdIdIst -5.5 +3.0 46.03 34.89 ExtdMktIdxIP -5.5 NA 113.61 86.54 ExtndIdx -5.7 +2.8 45.99 34.84 FAWeUSIns d -11.4 NA 101.95 80.23 FAWeUSInv d -11.6 NA 20.32 15.98 FLLT +8.3 +4.7 11.72 10.74 FLLTAdml +8.3 +4.8 11.72 10.74 FTSESocIs -2.5 -1.8 8.17 6.68 FTSESocIv -2.6 -1.9 8.17 6.68 FinIdxAdm d -16.0 -12.9 17.65 12.74 GNMA +6.5 +7.0 11.22 10.57 GNMAAdml +6.6 +7.1 11.22 10.57 GlbEq -7.7 -1.1 19.58 15.77 GlbREIInv d -10.1 NA 21.02 17.74 GrIncAdml -1.1 -.7 47.06 38.52 GroInc -1.1 -.8 28.82 23.59 GrowthEq +.4 +1.3 11.93 9.46 GrowthIdx ... +3.4 34.36 27.46 GrthIdAdm +.1 +3.6 34.35 27.47 GrthIstId +.1 +3.6 34.35 27.47 GrthIstSg +.1 NA 31.81 25.44 HYCor d +3.3 +6.2 5.88 5.50 HYCorAdml d +3.4 +6.3 5.88 5.50 HYT/E +8.0 +4.3 10.74 9.82 HealCAdm d +5.2 +2.6 32.80 26.44 HltCrAdml d +8.3 +3.8 59.75 49.92 HlthCare d +8.2 +3.7 141.57 118.26 I-TCBII +6.6 NA 27.77 26.13 ITBond +9.1 +8.1 11.99 10.98 ITBondAdm +9.1 +8.2 11.99 10.98 ITGradeAd +6.1 +7.2 10.51 9.79 ITIGrade +6.0 +7.1 10.51 9.79 ITTsry +8.6 +7.8 12.19 11.11 ITrsyAdml +8.7 +7.9 12.19 11.11 InTecIdAdm d -1.3 +4.9 34.32 27.15 InfPrtAdm +11.2 +7.3 28.49 25.02 InfPrtI +11.2 +7.3 11.60 10.19 InflaPro +11.1 +7.2 14.51 12.74 InstIdxI -1.9 +.5 124.86 102.59 InstPlus -1.9 +.6 124.87 102.60 InstTStId -2.5 +1.2 31.14 25.23 InstTStPl -2.5 +1.2 31.14 25.23 IntlExpIn d -14.2 0.0 17.92 13.81 IntlGr d -10.1 +1.1 21.17 16.75 IntlGrAdm d -10.0 +1.2 67.38 53.34 IntlStkIdxAdm d -11.3 NA 28.57 22.54 IntlStkIdxI d -11.3 NA 114.31 90.18 IntlStkIdxIPls d -11.3 NA 114.32 90.20 IntlStkIdxISgn d -11.4 NA 34.29 27.04 IntlVal d -13.2 -1.7 34.50 26.87 ItBdIdxIn +9.2 +8.2 11.99 10.98 ItBdIdxSl +9.1 NA 11.99 10.98 L-TGBII +20.3 NA 30.65 24.86 LTBond +15.2 +9.1 13.65 11.53 LTGradeAd +11.9 +8.2 10.26 8.99 LTInvGr +11.8 +8.1 10.26 8.99 LTTsry +20.3 +9.6 13.18 10.46 LTsryAdml +20.4 +9.7 13.18 10.46 LgBdIdxIs +15.4 +9.2 13.65 11.53 LgCpIdxAdm -2.0 +1.0 31.62 25.85 LgCpIdxInstl -2.0 +1.0 130.15 106.40 LgCpIdxInv -2.1 +.9 25.29 20.67 LgCpIdxSg -2.0 NA 27.58 22.55 LifeCon +.3 +3.4 17.10 15.67 LifeGro -3.6 +1.1 23.83 19.85 LifeInc +2.4 +4.4 14.52 13.89 LifeMod -1.2 +2.6 20.85 18.24 M-C400GrIdxI -.1 NA 139.76 107.21 M-C400ValIdxI -7.1 NA 128.85 98.69 MATx-ExInv +7.9 +4.6 10.51 9.72 MatIdxAdm d -7.6 +6.0 45.64 35.27

NAV 11.84 12.76 11.55 10.33 10.96 10.76 10.52 10.28 10.25 10.42 11.79 18.24 16.20 16.10 13.41 13.82

WK CHG +.58 +.67 +.58 +.62 +.26 +.30 +.34 +.37 +.42 +.44 +.57 +.91 +.82 +.81 +.73 +.71

19.65 +.94 17.58 +.44 15.32 20.85 19.98 44.44

+.29 +.34 +.88 +.42

11.49

-.02

17.90 17.91 24.73 23.22 25.29 14.42 14.42 30.56 31.16

+.27 +.27 +.58 +.54 +.59 -.02 -.02 +1.81 +1.85

20.89 +1.05 11.35 -.02 89.47 -2.08 14.61 +.74 11.07 11.31 11.03 11.42 11.35 11.51 11.43

+.13 +.46 +.45 +.31 +.31 +.22 +.22

8.12 +.38 9.62

...

21.90 +.33 9.36 +.16 11.58 +.39 15.58 +.72 17.86 +.96 14.85 -.11 10.52 +.23 18.83 -.38 32.45 12.98 10.20 6.14 22.03 17.86 10.43 14.26 14.21 8.12 13.13 11.90 10.42 21.86 44.36 18.28 9.16 12.66 13.15 12.97 10.80 11.16 10.52 11.10 12.62 17.57

+1.76 +.22 ... +.23 +.31 -.05 -.02 +.81 +.76 -.01 -.06 +.67 -.06 +.63 -1.27 +.94 -.01 +.65 -.02 -.01 ... +.25 +.30 -.01 +.62 +.72

13.90 +.18 8.10 10.82 5.72 19.74 15.66 13.18 24.28

+.27 +.56 +.19 +.99 +.87 +.75 +1.25

11.90 +.33 15.04 +.75 10.91 +.59 48.59 +.77 25.13 -.69 112.55 112.52 23.71 53.23 21.43 21.43 21.43 21.20 11.21 11.21 11.26 11.26 30.57 70.65 9.60 12.47 8.95 92.54 20.84 19.74 14.53 33.14 26.22 34.46 87.25 26.20 49.39 117.23 62.41 20.47 42.91 53.92 20.86 23.00 23.12 32.76 33.49 65.10 69.88 38.98 38.98 96.21 38.92 83.11 16.55 11.63 11.63 7.37 7.36 13.75 11.18 11.18 16.49 18.09 42.14 25.81 10.83 31.44 31.44 31.44 29.12 5.60 5.60 10.56 29.62 55.49 131.47 27.20 11.86 11.86 10.10 10.10 12.11 12.11 31.09 27.82 11.33 14.16 111.79 111.80 27.60 27.61 14.31 17.39 55.38 23.36 93.47 93.49 28.03 27.93 11.86 11.86 30.26 13.41 10.04 10.04 12.99 12.99 13.41 28.24 116.22 22.58 24.63 16.24 21.13 14.23 19.18 121.46 109.15 10.45 38.85

+5.78 +5.78 +1.04 +2.34 +.64 +.63 +.63 +.63 -.02 -.02 -.02 -.02 +1.49 +3.44 +.53 +.25 +.30 +3.11 +1.01 +1.07 +.63 ... -.01 -.01 -.02 -.01 +1.95 +3.93 +2.09 +.88 +1.84 +2.04 +.79 +.87 +.87 -.63 +1.75 +4.06 +4.35 +2.04 +2.04 +5.02 +2.03 +1.83 +.36 -.02 -.02 +.43 +.42 +.74 -.03 -.03 +.59 -.09 +2.15 +1.32 +.62 +1.72 +1.71 +1.71 +1.59 ... ... ... +1.14 +2.06 +4.89 -.33 -.13 -.13 -.10 -.10 -.08 -.08 +2.09 -.28 -.11 -.14 +5.75 +5.75 +1.42 +1.43 +.32 +.44 +1.42 +.53 +2.12 +2.12 +.63 +.73 -.13 -.13 -.39 -.23 -.19 -.19 -.19 -.19 -.23 +1.44 +5.93 +1.15 +1.26 +.29 +.77 +.12 +.52 +6.65 +4.88 -.03 +1.57

YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW MdGrIxInv -2.2 +3.5 27.56 20.60 MdPDisGr x +.3 NA 18.36 15.96 MdPDisInv x +1.5 NA 17.34 15.39 MdVlIxInv -5.1 +1.0 23.09 17.80 MgC300GrI +.6 NA 101.28 82.00 MgC300IxI -1.7 NA 91.61 75.76 MgC300VlI -4.1 NA 84.01 67.43 MgdPGrInv x -1.8 NA 18.91 15.92 MidCapGr -.5 +4.8 21.74 16.28 MidCapIdxIP -3.5 NA 111.65 86.72 MidCp -3.7 +2.4 22.57 17.52 MidCpAdml -3.6 +2.6 102.47 79.59 MidCpIst -3.6 +2.6 22.64 17.58 MidCpSgl -3.6 NA 32.34 25.12 MktNtrlIv d +8.6 +.8 10.50 9.51 Morg -1.9 +2.4 19.82 15.50 MorgAdml -1.8 +2.5 61.49 48.09 MuHYAdml +8.1 +4.3 10.74 9.82 MuInt +7.1 +4.8 13.92 13.04 MuIntAdml +7.2 +4.9 13.92 13.04 MuLTAdml +8.0 +4.5 11.33 10.39 MuLong +8.0 +4.4 11.33 10.39 MuLtd +3.1 +3.8 11.17 10.95 MuLtdAdml +3.1 +3.9 11.17 10.95 MuSht +1.4 +2.9 15.96 15.84 MuShtAdml +1.4 +2.9 15.96 15.84 NJLT +7.0 +4.2 11.97 11.05 NJLTAdml +7.0 +4.3 11.97 11.05 NYLT +7.1 +4.3 11.39 10.52 NYLTAdml +7.2 +4.3 11.39 10.52 OHLTte +7.5 +4.7 12.29 11.27 PALT +7.6 +4.3 11.34 10.48 PALTAdml +7.6 +4.4 11.34 10.48 PacIdInst d -9.5 -.8 11.28 9.45 PacIdSgnl d -9.6 NA 25.59 21.44 PacIdxAdm d -9.6 -.9 73.70 61.74 PacificId d -9.7 -1.0 11.35 9.50 PrecMtls d -3.6 +10.0 28.35 22.29 Prmcp d -4.1 +3.1 71.63 58.13 PrmcpAdml d -4.0 +3.2 74.34 60.35 PrmcpCorI d -3.1 +3.5 15.02 12.14 R1000GrIdxI +.5 NA 123.46 102.36 R1000ValIdxI -4.8 NA 119.74 95.34 R2000IdxI -8.1 NA 130.63 98.63 R3000IdxI -2.6 NA 121.10 98.73 REITIdx d +4.9 -.1 21.00 16.17 REITIdxAd d +5.0 0.0 89.61 69.01 REITIdxInst d +5.0 +.1 13.87 10.68 REITIdxSg d +5.0 NA 23.92 18.42 S-M600IdxI -5.6 NA 137.13 106.08 S-TGBII +1.4 NA 25.64 25.52 STBond +2.9 +5.0 10.77 10.48 STBondAdm +2.9 +5.1 10.77 10.48 STBondSgl +2.9 NA 10.77 10.48 STCor +1.8 +4.6 10.91 10.70 STFed +2.5 +4.9 11.03 10.69 STFedAdml +2.6 +5.0 11.03 10.69 STGradeAd +1.9 +4.7 10.91 10.70 STIGradeI +1.9 +4.8 10.91 10.70 STTsry +2.2 +4.4 10.95 10.62 STsryAdml +2.3 +4.5 10.95 10.62 SdBrdMItP +.8 +.3 51.24 40.47 SelValu d -3.5 +1.9 20.68 16.31 SmCapIdx -6.1 +2.7 38.92 29.23 SmCapIdxIP -6.0 NA 112.50 84.94 SmCpIdAdm -6.0 +2.8 38.97 29.26 SmCpIdIst -6.0 +2.9 38.97 29.28 SmCpIndxSgnl -6.0 NA 35.11 26.38 SmGthIdx -4.0 +4.9 25.10 17.95 SmGthIst -3.9 +5.1 25.15 18.00 SmValIdx -8.3 +.4 17.52 13.31 SmVlIdIst -8.2 +.6 17.57 13.35 StLCInst +1.2 +.1 25.38 20.63 StLCPlus +1.2 +.1 50.16 41.29 StSmCpEq -3.3 +.3 21.75 15.89 Star -1.0 +3.3 20.35 17.89 StratgcEq -.9 -.3 21.15 15.75 TWStkIInv d -7.7 NA 21.09 17.10 TelSerAd d -3.0 +1.4 37.17 30.14 TgtRe2005 +3.5 +4.7 12.37 11.55 TgtRe2010 +1.7 +4.1 23.61 21.53 TgtRe2015 ... +3.5 13.18 11.83 TgtRe2020 -1.0 +3.0 23.57 20.79 TgtRe2030 -2.8 +1.9 23.37 19.90 TgtRe2035 -3.7 +1.6 14.18 11.85 TgtRe2040 -4.0 +1.6 23.31 19.39 TgtRe2045 -4.0 +1.6 14.64 12.18 TgtRe2050 -4.0 +1.6 23.21 19.30 TgtRetInc +3.5 +5.3 11.73 11.04 Tgtet2025 -2.0 +2.5 13.53 11.74 TotBdAdml +6.2 +6.7 11.06 10.43 TotBdInst +6.3 +6.7 11.06 10.43 TotBdMkInv +6.2 +6.6 11.06 10.43 TotBdMkSig +6.2 +6.7 11.06 10.43 TotIntl d -11.4 -.4 17.08 13.47 TotStIAdm -2.5 +1.2 34.44 27.89 TotStIIns -2.5 +1.2 34.44 27.89 TotStISig -2.5 +1.2 33.24 26.92 TotStIdx -2.6 +1.1 34.43 27.88 TxMBalAdm +2.8 +3.7 21.03 19.28 TxMCaIn -2.2 +1.0 34.05 27.73 TxMCapAdm -2.2 +.9 68.52 55.80 TxMGIAdm -2.0 +.5 61.13 50.22 TxMGIIn -1.9 +.5 29.75 24.44 TxMInist d -11.2 -1.9 12.71 9.83 TxMIntlAdm d -11.1 -2.0 12.70 9.82 TxMSCAdm -5.3 +2.3 30.32 22.74 TxMSCIst -5.3 +2.3 30.39 22.80 USGro -.2 +1.6 20.27 15.91 USGroAdml -.1 +1.8 52.51 41.21 USValue -1.7 -2.3 11.27 9.00 UtiIdxAdm d +11.2 +4.1 36.78 32.26 ValIdxAdm -4.3 -1.6 22.78 18.18 ValIdxIns -4.2 -1.6 22.78 18.18 ValIdxSig -4.2 NA 23.70 18.92 ValueIdx -4.4 -1.8 22.78 18.18 VdHiDivIx +2.3 NA 18.28 15.25 WellsI +4.9 +6.1 22.85 21.46 WellsIAdm +4.9 +6.2 55.36 52.00 Welltn -.5 +4.0 33.11 29.25 WelltnAdm -.4 +4.1 57.18 50.51 WndsIIAdm -3.2 -.9 50.09 40.47 Wndsr -7.3 -1.8 14.68 11.35 WndsrAdml -7.3 -1.7 49.54 38.31 WndsrII -3.3 -1.0 28.22 22.80 ex-USIdxIP d -11.4 NA 107.98 84.98 Vantagepoint AggrOpp -10.2 +1.7 12.34 9.35 AllEqGr -5.7 +.6 21.64 17.42 ConsGro ... +3.4 24.77 22.89 CorBdIxI +6.0 +6.2 10.51 9.95 EqInc -3.7 +.4 9.53 7.75 GrInc -3.6 +.6 10.50 8.59 Growth -4.9 -.7 9.36 7.61 Intl -7.1 -1.3 10.32 8.37 LgTmGro -3.4 +2.0 23.01 19.62 TradGro -1.9 +2.6 23.56 20.83 Victory DivrStkA f -9.4 -.3 16.59 13.09 InstDivSt -8.9 0.0 11.59 9.18 Virtus BalA m +.9 +3.0 14.27 12.21 EmgMktsIs -.6 +10.5 9.72 8.26 ForOppX -.5 +1.3 24.60 21.29 MulSStA m +2.1 +5.8 4.91 4.74 MulSStC b +2.1 +5.6 4.96 4.79 RealEstA m +5.4 -.3 32.38 24.97 Waddell & Reed DivOppsA m -6.9 +.3 16.11 12.74 Waddell & Reed Adv AccumA m -2.3 +1.4 8.15 6.50 AssetStrA m -2.3 +8.7 10.45 8.60 BondA m +5.7 +5.2 6.51 6.13 ContIncA m +.2 +5.0 8.89 7.31 CoreInv A m -.8 +3.3 6.66 5.15 GlbBondA m +.9 +5.9 4.08 3.96 HiIncA m +1.5 +6.9 7.31 6.78 MuniBondA m +7.1 +5.2 7.45 6.88 MuniHiInA m +6.7 +4.0 4.89 4.50 NewCncptA m -3.0 +7.3 12.65 9.63 SciTechA m ... +6.5 11.67 9.20 SmCapA m -4.5 +6.2 18.01 12.77 VanguardA m +1.7 +3.5 8.89 7.06 Wasatch LgCpVal d -6.7 +1.7 15.12 11.98 Lng/Sht d -.1 +4.7 13.76 11.38 SmCapGr d -2.4 +4.9 44.20 32.57 Weitz PartVal -2.0 +.6 22.57 17.82 ShtIntmInc +2.0 +5.5 12.57 12.35 Value +.8 -1.8 30.97 25.29 Wells Fargo AdjRatI +1.6 +3.3 9.15 9.08 AdvCpGrI -4.7 +.9 17.99 13.89 AstAlcA f +1.1 +1.4 20.05 17.29 AstAlllcA f +.5 +3.3 12.76 11.50 AstAlllcAdm +.7 +3.5 12.83 11.58 AstAlllcB m ... +2.5 12.63 11.35 AstAlllcC m ... +2.5 12.36 11.11 CmnStkInv -6.6 +4.8 22.81 17.35 EmgMktEqA f -8.2 +10.7 23.83 20.07 EndSelI -3.3 +.9 10.89 8.54 GovScInst +6.2 +6.7 11.32 10.70 GovSecInv +5.9 +6.2 11.34 10.72 GrI +8.0 +10.7 40.76 28.86 GrowInv +7.6 +10.1 37.95 26.98 GrowthAdm +7.9 +10.6 39.76 31.65 IntlBdIs +7.5 +9.2 12.57 11.20 OpportInv -7.5 +2.0 42.61 32.72 Otlk2020I +.9 +3.7 14.59 13.25 Otlk2030I -2.2 +2.7 15.48 13.35 Otlk2040I -4.4 +2.2 17.32 14.28 PrecMetA f +5.1 +19.1 96.97 76.70 PrmLrgCoGrA f +2.3 +6.9 10.38 7.97 SCpValInv -7.4 +4.2 34.38 26.92 STMuBdInv +2.8 +3.8 9.99 9.84 ShDurI +2.1 +5.1 10.52 10.27 SmCapValA f -7.4 +4.2 33.83 26.49 SmCpOpAdm -8.0 +3.9 37.23 28.96 TotRetBAd +6.6 +7.2 13.17 12.31 TotRetBdI +6.8 +7.5 13.16 12.29 UlSTMInA f +1.1 +3.1 4.83 4.80 UlSTMInI +1.4 +3.5 4.82 4.80 UlSTMInIv +1.1 +3.1 4.83 4.80 UltSTInI +.6 +2.4 8.57 8.51 WBGrBl m -5.4 +.2 12.02 9.93 WlthConAl m +.3 +3.7 11.05 10.37 WlthModBl m -2.3 +2.2 11.60 10.32 Westcore PlusBd d +5.8 +5.8 11.10 10.63 Select d -8.3 +5.9 23.81 17.41 William Blair EmgMktGIn -12.3 +3.6 16.46 13.58 InslIntlG -11.5 -.4 15.14 12.24 IntlGrI d -11.9 -.6 23.53 18.92 IntlGrN m -12.0 -.9 22.99 18.47 Yacktman Focused d +3.8 +9.6 19.40 16.79 Yacktman d +3.7 +8.5 18.21 15.73

NAV 23.91 16.74 15.98 19.79 93.61 82.36 72.77 16.89 18.90 96.85 19.56 88.88 19.63 28.05 10.44 17.69 54.90 10.56 13.85 13.85 11.18 11.18 11.16 11.16 15.94 15.94 11.75 11.75 11.27 11.27 12.12 11.24 11.24 9.77 22.16 63.81 9.82 25.72 63.13 65.54 13.35 112.54 103.78 108.42 107.99 18.99 81.05 12.55 21.64 116.11 25.63 10.70 10.70 10.70 10.71 10.95 10.95 10.71 10.71 10.86 10.86 45.62 18.10 32.63 94.38 32.69 32.69 29.46 21.05 21.11 14.68 14.73 23.11 45.68 18.25 18.72 18.16 17.91 32.46 12.14 22.68 12.42 21.87 21.07 12.60 20.64 12.96 20.54 11.54 12.37 11.00 11.00 11.00 11.00 13.96 30.52 30.52 29.45 30.50 20.27 30.40 61.17 54.71 26.63 10.30 10.29 25.72 25.78 18.21 47.19 9.93 36.72 19.68 19.68 20.48 19.67 16.86 22.35 54.15 30.53 52.74 43.62 12.44 41.98 24.57 88.04

WK CHG +1.23 +.33 +.22 +.95 +5.17 +4.22 +3.43 +.47 +1.16 +4.82 +.97 +4.42 +.97 +1.40 +.03 +1.04 +3.22 ... -.03 -.03 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.02 -.02 -.02 -.02 -.02 -.02 -.02 +.26 +.58 +1.68 +.26 -.43 +2.94 +3.05 +.64 +5.90 +5.17 +6.18 +5.58 +.73 +3.11 +.49 +.84 +6.13 ... -.02 -.02 -.02 -.02 -.01 -.01 -.02 -.02 -.01 -.01 +2.41 +.85 +1.82 +5.27 +1.83 +1.82 +1.65 +1.23 +1.23 +.78 +.79 +1.25 +2.47 +1.00 +.47 +1.01 +.62 +1.15 +.13 +.39 +.28 +.58 +.71 +.47 +.79 +.49 +.78 +.11 +.37 -.06 -.06 -.06 -.06 +.31 +1.58 +1.57 +1.52 +1.57 +.49 +1.57 +3.16 +2.81 +1.37 +.34 +.34 +1.36 +1.36 +.98 +2.53 +.51 +1.59 +.93 +.93 +.97 +.93 +.76 +.21 +.51 +.89 +1.55 +2.06 +.65 +2.21 +1.15 +1.94

10.18 18.68 23.62 10.45 8.32 9.32 8.35 8.68 20.69 21.75

+.52 +.85 +.40 -.06 +.38 +.48 +.43 +.22 +.69 +.58

14.08 +.72 9.87 +.49 13.42 +.38 9.00 -.03 22.21 ... 4.75 -.01 4.80 -.01 29.23 +1.15 13.73 +.59 7.32 9.12 6.44 8.16 5.90 3.97 6.81 7.32 4.72 10.89 10.39 14.78 8.21

+.44 +.14 -.07 +.31 +.31 -.03 -.02 -.03 ... +.69 +.59 +.94 +.49

12.89 +.55 12.62 +.35 38.56 +2.14 20.17 +.95 12.47 -.01 28.60 +1.18 9.11 15.67 18.81 12.08 12.16 11.92 11.67 19.31 20.99 9.63 11.27 11.29 37.05 34.47 36.13 12.23 35.89 13.87 14.06 15.22 92.55 9.46 30.15 9.98 10.37 29.67 31.48 13.05 13.04 4.82 4.82 4.82 8.51 10.60 10.68 10.78

... +.94 +.73 +.20 +.21 +.20 +.19 +1.03 +.11 +.55 -.05 -.05 +2.21 +2.06 +2.16 -.04 +2.03 +.22 +.39 +.54 -3.03 +.55 +1.22 ... -.01 +1.21 +1.49 -.08 -.07 ... ... ... ... +.39 +.10 +.24

11.03 -.05 19.33 +1.04 13.99 -.16 12.72 +.16 19.69 +.26 19.22 +.25 18.35 +.68 17.15 +.67


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timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011

KEVIN BLAUM

RICHARD L. CONNOR

IN THE ARENA

OPINION

They’ve earned our unending appreciation THE STRONG WIND and heavy rain visited upon Northeastern Pennsylvania from the remnants of Hurricane Irene had come and gone. Damage done, the satiated watershed enveloping Pennsylvania towns north of the Wyoming Valley could absorb “no mas.” So began the sequence of events two weeks ago that left the “Valley with a Heart” battered but not broken. At that time the river running through it was 4 feet high. Desperate for a stretch of sunny September days, those people working and living within sight of the Susquehanna River watched as Tropical Storm Lee, laden with precipitation from the Gulf of Mexico, began chasing Irene north through the eastern United States. Covering Irene’s tracks was the category 1 Hurricane Katia, making her way up the Atlantic coast. Katia kept Lee bottled up. Slowing his progress over land and us, together they created another more perfect storm. Invading from the south, Lee dropped incredible amounts of water on the Wyoming Valley and points strategically located north of our position. Rainfall was measured in multiple inches and it would all run down upon us in the rising currents of a raging river. The Susquehanna was preparing its ascent. By Wednesday (Sept. 7) the Susquehanna River at Wilkes-Barre was approaching 15 feet. Twenty-four hours later much of the Wyoming Valley was under a mandatory evacuation order. Agnes. Jim Brozena, Executive Director of the Luzerne County Flood Protection Authority already had assumed his position in the war room of the emergency management offices on Water Street. In the face of Lee’s massive assault, “Team Brozena” would deploy the Valley’s defenses designed to save lives and protect as much property as was humanly possible. They did a masterful job. Brozena, a 1978 graduate of Penn State University, served more than two decades as Luzerne County’s chief engineer. During that time he developed a vast network of professional relationships built on a foundation of talent, competency and respect. No one knows more about the Valley’s levee system. Perhaps no other person could have mustered the battalion of pros, local officials, first responders and volunteers necessary to avert total catastrophe and local economic Armageddon. Sheriffs’ deputies and other officials were dispatched along the levee system to check for problem areas, “boils,” anything that might cause concern. Police, firefighters, public works employees, heavy equipment operators and more courageously stood in harm’s way, shoring up “hot spots” and seepage along the barrier. The water pressure was enormous. The alternative, unthinkable. Area engineering firms Borton & Lawson, A&E, Quad 3 offered assistance to their friend and colleague in charge. Col. Dave Andrews, commander of the Baltimore District of the Army Corps of Engineers, arrived on scene, as did so many others. In the aftermath, Brozena had praise for everyone: “It was a perfect response to a perfect storm.” He added, “Perhaps it was divine intervention.” It was both. It also was the tireless work of former Congressman Paul Kanjorski who relentlessly pursued the millions of dollars in federal funding earmarks required to raise the levees and protect as much of the Wyoming Valley as possible. It took a decade of steadfast determination against powerful opposition in Washington, but Kanjorski would not give up. He fought for the money and won. The levee project was built, and in one week it prevented roughly $4 billion in unimaginable destruction. It preserved the economy of the Wyoming Valley and its very network of commerce. To Jim and Paul, to everyone who assisted them and those now helping families in need, please accept the appreciation of a grateful community. Kevin Blaum’s column on government, life and politics appears every Sunday. Contact him at kblaum@timesleader.com.

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GOP hopefuls need to work on real issues Editor’s Note: Bill Thompson and I have lots of “formers” behind our names. All of the “former” designations are like a roadmap of our newspaper and writing careers. Bill was a longtime columnist at the Times Leader before leaving to work with me at other newspapers. We have become so intertwined we don’t just finish each other’s sentences; we start them. Lately we have been calling ourselves “Lerner and Lowe” because of collaborations on opinion pieces. We do not know which one of us is which. Anyway, here’s one from “Lowe,” on Gov. Rick Perry. Both of us were in Texas watching Perry’s rise to political fame and power more than 20 years ago. We have some insight.

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By LIZ SIDOTI

AP Political Editor

ASHINGTON — The economy needs to be fixed. On this, Democrats and Republicans agree. They part ways over how to do it and, specifically, what role the federal government should play. • “Ultimately,” President Barack Obama tells Congress, “our recovery will be driven not by Washington, but by our businesses and our workers. But we can help.” His argument that government has a responsibility to do so probably doesn’t sit well with an America that’s down on Washington. • Texas Gov. Rick Perry, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and other Republicans competing for his job take a different tack as they court a tea party-infused GOP electorate: The economy will thrive, they say, if Washington simply gets out of the way. As Perry puts it: “Smaller government, less spending, fewer regulations.”

At the heart of the 2012 presidential race is an issue as old as the country itself. Is it the federal government’s responsibility to address what ails the nation, in this case the economy? And if so, to what degree? What is the right balance? History tells us that, try as we might, we may never answer those questions; we’ve been debating them ever since the Jeffersonians and the Federalists squabbled over states’ rights vs. a strong central government. In the end, the Constitution assigned certain powers to the federal government while reserving others to states. But the tension in America between the purely local and a faroff central government has never gone away. Nor, perhaps, should it in an ever-evolving democracy. These days, Republicans argue for a limited government, claiming that lower taxes and less regulation will encourage job creation. Democrats advocate a more robust government, one that provides more services, pours more money into the economy and, in Obama’s case, raises taxes on the nation’s highest earners. “We’ve been in this pattern for decades. These are the terms of our politics probably for the next generation, too,” said Charles Kesler, who teaches government at Claremont McKenna College and edited “Saving the Revolution: The Federalist Papers and the American Founding.” Given the scripts, the question that ultimately determines who wins the presidency might be this: What do Americans want from their government?

AP PHOTO

Bob Sells, president, Mid-Atlantic Business Unit for Titan America gives House Majority Leader Eric Cantor a brief tour of facilities during a jobs event at Titan Americain Henrico County Va.

For many, the answer is difficult to articulate. Larry Parkin, a conservative who hosts a discussion group on the Federalist Papers with the South Pinellas 9.12 Patriots in St. Petersburg, Fla., just started collecting Social Security, which he calls a contract with the government. The 65-year-old Coast Guard retiree expects the country to secure the borders and protect the nation. Beyond that, he says: “I expect them to be less intrusive than they are. I expect them to have a limited role.” But he struggles to identify exactly where the line between too much and too little government lies. Ask Ashley Stilos, a liberal in Fayetteville, Ark., the same question and she says one of the government’s roles is to take care of its people, adding: “Every individual should have the right to pursue happiness from an equal

fighting ground, and that’s not the way it is in society.” Is it the government’s job to make that playing field level? The 27-year-old university loan specialist says: “They have the power to make it more equal, and it’s their responsibility to do that.” Americans’ views of government have shifted in recent years, according to an analysis of Associated Press exit polls. In 1992, more than half of voters thought government was doing too many things better left to businesses and individuals. But by 2008, a majority, for the first time, wanted government to do more to solve the nation’s problems. That didn’t last long after Obama took office. In quick fashion, he signed into law an economic stimulus plan, oversaw an autoSee RECOVERY, Page 6E

RICK PERRY MUST BE STARTING to feel a little like that coyote he shot a while back. This time around, it’s Perry who’s under the gun and wearing a bull’s-eye on his face, so to speak. The rhetorical lead was flying at, around and straight through the Texas governor during Monday’s televised debate in Tampa, Fla., as his seven rivals for the Republican presidential nomination paid tribute to his newly won front-runner status by making him the focal point of their intramural wrath and ridicule. To his credit, Perry weathered the onslaught with good humor, if not always great answers to the questions that were hurled at him and the verbal land mines that were strewn in his path by his fellow candidates and debate moderator Wolf Blitzer of the Cable News Network. Previous front-runner Mitt Romney and the other GOP hopefuls have made Perry feel as welcome as a gate-crasher since he barged into the race on Aug. 6 and the aspiring commanders in chief were in no mood for fellowship by the time they all gathered for the CCN/Tea Party Express debate at Tampa’s Florida State Fairgrounds. Perry was forced to defend himself on topics ranging from Social Security (does he really think it’s a Ponzi scheme?) to vaccinations for young girls (why in the world would he order Texas kids inoculated against a sexually transmitted disease that causes cervical cancer?) and just about everything else he has said, done or written during his long political career in the Lone Star State. The jury is very much out on whether Perry can withstand the in-house barrage through future debates, party caucuses and presidential primaries, not to mention the national media scrutiny and assorted potshots from Democrats who would rather see Perry washed out in the preseason than go one-on-one against President Obama in the 2012 election. There is no shortage of “expert” opinion suggesting that Perry’s relatively sheltered background in Texas may have left him woefully unprepared for the national spotlight that has wilted so many presidential candidates before him — even some who jumped into the campaign with a big splash only to float quietly into the sunset, adrift on a raft of auspicious beginnings and failed aspirations. Can we say “Howard Dean,” boys and girls? Rick Perry is no Howard Dean, of course, and he can thank his lucky stars for that. So far, at least, he has stayed calm and focused, neither smitten with his sudden national notoriety nor intimidated by the array of media critics and political opponents aligned against him. On the other hand, it’s early in the game. We’re still months away from the first caucuses and primaries; Perry could march on to the nomination or find himself back in Texas hunting coyotes long before next year’s scorching summer. Meanwhile, the Republican campaign continues to be a bafflement. In Monday’s debate, the candidates squabbled among themselves over issues that might best be described as “inside baseball” and barely addressed the nation’s all-consuming obsession: the economy. The man the eight candidates want to unemploy, President Obama, has been barnstorming the nation in support of See CONNOR, Page 6E


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➛ S E R V I N G T H E P U B L I C T R U S T S I N C E 18 81

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011

THE TIMES LEADER

Editorial

www.timesleader.com

OUR OPINION: FLOOD HELP

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Amber Blazick and her daughters assess the losses outside their rented Plymouth Township home, hit by flooding.

Your donations offer gifts of hope

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ON’T ASK yourself whether you can afford to give money to ongoing flood-recovery efforts in Northeastern Pennsylvania. Survey the damage, hear the victims and then ask this: Under these circumstances, why would anyone choose not to give? Please donate generously to organizations such as these: ❏ American Red Cross. Mail checks to the Wyoming Valley Chapter of the American Red Cross at 256 N. Sherman St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702. Make the check payable to the Red Cross and on the memo line write “flooding.” For information, call (570) 823-7161. ❏ Salvation Army of WilkesBarre. Financial donations can be sent to 17 S. Pennsylvania Ave., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701. For information, call (570) 824-8741.

❏ United Way of Wyoming Valley. Contribute through the agency’s website, at www.unitedwaywb.org, or mail checks to the agency at 8 W. Market St., Suite 450, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701. Make checks payable to “Flood Relief Fund of the United Way of Wyoming Valley.” Area businesses interested in donating products or making a monetary corporate contributions should call (570) 270-9106. ❏ Wyoming County United Way. Donate via the agency’s website, at www.wyomingcountyunitedway.org/give, or mail contributions to Wyoming County United Way, P.O. Box 399, Tunkhannock, PA 18657. Your gift can help victims stay sheltered and fed, possibly regain certain material goods and, more important, recover some hope.

QUOTE OF THE DAY “Hang on. This is no time to give up.” Vice President Joe Biden The former Scranton resident offered encouragement to homeowner Jimmy Pliska, one of the Duryea residents whose property was demolished or badly damaged during this month’s flooding. Biden toured the area with elected officials including Gov. Tom Corbett and U.S. Sen. Bob Casey on Friday morning.

OTHER OPINION: GOP DEBATE

Latest from Obama: Different words, same failing effect THOSE PEOPLE who are impressed by words seem to think that President Barack Obama made a great speech to Congress earlier this month. But, when you look beyond the rhetoric, what did he say that was fundamentally different from what he has been saying and doing all along? Are we to continue doing the same kinds of things that have failed again and again, just because Obama delivers clever words with style and energy? Once we get past the glowing rhetoric, what is the president proposing? More spending! Only the words have changed – from “stimulus” to “jobs” and from “shovel-ready projects” to “jobs for construction workers.” If government spending were the answer, we would by now have a booming economy with plenty of jobs, after all the record trillions of dollars that have been poured down a bottomless pit. Are we to keep on doing the same things, just because those things have been repackaged in different words? Or just because Obama now assures us that “everything in this bill will be paid for”? This is the same man who told us that he could provide health insurance to millions more people without increasing the cost. When it comes to specific proposals, President Obama repeats the same kinds of things that have marked his past policies – more government spending for the benefit of his

COMMENTARY THOMAS SOWELL political allies, the construction unions and the teachers’ unions, and “thousands of transportation projects.” The fundamental fallacy in all of this is the notion that politicians can “grow the economy” by taking money out of the private sector and spending it wherever it is politically expedient to spend it – so long as they call spending “investment.” Has Obama ever grown even a potted plant, much less a business, a bank, a hospital or any of the numerous other institutions whose decisions he wants to control and override? But he can talk glibly about growing the economy. Arrogance is no substitute for experience. That is why the country is in the mess it is in now. Obama says he wants “federal housing agencies” to “help more people refinance their mortgages.” What does that amount to in practice, except having the taxpayers be forced to bail out people who bought homes they could not afford? No doubt that is good politics, but it is lousy economics. Whatever his deficiencies in economics, Barack Obama is a master of politics – including the great political game of “Heads I

win and tails you lose.” Any policy that shows any sign of achieving its goals will of course be trumpeted across the land as a success. But, in the far more frequent cases where the policy fails or turns out to be counterproductive, the political response is: “Things would have been even worse without this policy.” It’s heads I win and tails you lose. Thus, when unemployment went up after the massive spending that was supposed to bring it down, we were told that unemployment would have been far worse if it had not been for that spending. Are we really supposed to fall for ploys like this? The answer is clearly “yes,” as far as Obama and his allies are concerned. Our intelligence was insulted even further in President Obama’s speech to Congress, when he set up this straw man as what his critics believe – that “the only thing we can do to restore prosperity is just dismantle government, refund everybody’s money, and let everyone write their own rules, and tell everyone they’re on their own.” Have you heard anybody in any part of the political spectrum advocate that? If not, then why was the president of the United States saying such things, unless he thought we were fools enough to buy it – and that the news media would never call him on it? Thomas Sowell is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305. His website is www.tsowell.com.

Tea and sympathy? Not from this party In ‘war on terror’, U.S. could be its own worst enemy

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T LAST WEEK’S Republican presidential candidates’ debate in Tampa, moderator Wolf Blitzer asked Rep. Ron Paul a question that inadvertently gave everyone watching a peek into the tea party’s heart of darkness. The CNN anchor asked Paul to address the hypothetical case of a 30-year-old man with a good job and good income who decides not to buy health insurance because he’s healthy. In Blitzer’s scenario, something terrible happens to the man and he slips into a coma, but he has no health insurance to cover the cost of care. “Who pays for that?” Blitzer asked. After making a perfunctory statement denouncing “welfarism” and “socialism,” Paul said that the young man should assume responsibility for himself and not expect the government to take care of him. When Blitzer pressed on with the scenario, adding that the comatose man needs intensive care for six months, the audience hooted. “That’s what freedom is all about, taking your own risks,” Paul said over audience ap-

plause. The CNN anchor must have believed he had the fiery Libertarian cornered. “But congressman,” Blitzer said, “are you saying that society should just let him die?” That’s when some in the audience shouted “yeah.” It was a chilling moment reminiscent of the previous GOP presidential debate when the mere mention of the fact Texas Gov. Rick Perry executed 234 people during his tenure drew raucous applause. To say there is a cold-bloodedness – and a touch of blood-thirstiness – in recent tea party events would be an understatement. We know that empathy is on the wane in our political discourse even as poverty has increased. Many people feel that protecting their own interests at the expense of the commonweal is the only rational course of action. This thinking is as shortsighted as it is un-American. Certainly no one expects the Republican primary process to resemble the Lincoln-Douglas debates, but it shouldn’t remind us of the Romans cheering the lions against the Christians, either. Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

DID WE win the war on terrorism? Ten years after 9/11, Osama bin Laden is dead, and al-Qaida is fractured. There’s been no second attack. So people ask: Did we

win? Not really. What we’ve won is hard knowledge that cost us dearly. And what we’ve lost – well, that will cost us even more. We know now (and many knew at the start) that there never was a “war on terrorism.” The Bush administration used that term to rally the country at a terrible time, but it was badly misleading. It misdiagnosed the nature of the struggle. This was not a conventional war such as World War II in which victory could be won by bullets. At the broader level, it was a battle of ideas that would take decades to play out. At the narrow level, it should have been a very specific effort to crush the jihadi network that had attacked us: al-Qaida. Yet in 2001, we were accustomed to fighting states and didn’t know how to confront an enemy that was stateless. And so we went to war against states. Let me be clear. I believe we had no choice but to declare war on the Afghan Taliban that was host to bin Laden. However, we were smart enough, initially, to rely on local Afghan ground forces to do the fighting, helped by our air strikes and commandos. After that, the Bush administration’s grandiose approach to war against terrorism did us in.

COMMENTARY TRUDY RUBIN Instead of cleaning up the al-Qaida network in Afghanistan and Pakistan, Bush rushed to war in Iraq, which had no al-Qaida. Our shift in focus permitted al-Qaida to flourish in Pakistan and ignored the return of Taliban networks to Afghanistan. Meantime, the gross mishandling of postwar Iraq helped create an al-Qaida monster in that country, where there hadn’t been one. It also inspired jihadis elsewhere. And here’s the biggest irony: We invaded Iraq because the Bush team convinced itself, despite much evidence to the contrary, that Iraq was home to al-Qaida – along with a nuclear program. Yet it was wealthy Saudis who financed al-Qaida and other jihadis. And, after 2001, nuclear-armed Pakistan became home base for al-Qaida and its allies. But we didn’t sufficiently confront these two allies, focusing instead on Iraq. Gradually we learned these bitter lessons over the last decade, at a huge cost in lost U.S., Iraqi, and Afghan lives. We developed new strategies for combating stateless terrorists. We learned how to coordinate intelligence-gathering, make use of new technology (including drones) and follow the terrorist money trail. That prevented attacks and broke up networks. Jihadi attacks on Pakistani army and gov-

ernment sites finally persuaded Pakistan’s government to crack down on some militants, but its cooperation with us is still halfhearted. Otherwise, how could bin Laden have lived in Abbottabad for five years? What we now know is that the effort to disrupt, dismantle and deter jihadi groups from attacking us must continue for a long time. Al-Qaida might be on the ropes, but it has spawned many affiliates that want to hit us and Europe. Those networks can be curbed or broken, but not wholly defeated. Eventually, they will implode or lose their attraction. The good news: This already is happening in the Middle East, where young people have been galvanized by Arab rebellions in which radical jihadis played no part. The bad news: Al-Qaida clones in Pakistan still hope to take over this nuclear-armed state. And so, the war against terrorist networks will continue – with far more precision and focus. Our struggle to balance security needs and civil rights will be ongoing. We’ll learn to live with a certain degree of insecurity, as Europeans and Israelis have long done. We’ve realized this is not World War III; the jihadi threat remains real, but we can’t let this threat consume us.

Trudy Rubin is a columnist and editorial board member for the Philadelphia Inquirer. Readers may write to her at: Philadelphia Inquirer, P.O. Box 8263, Philadelphia, PA 19101, or by email at trubin@phillynews.com.

Editorial Board RICHARD L. CONNOR Editor and Publisher JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ Vice President/Executive Editor

MARK E. JONES Editorial Page Editor PRASHANT SHITUT President/Impressions Media

RICHARD L. CONNOR Editor and Publisher PRASHANT SHITUT President

JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ Vice President/Executive Editor RICHARD DEHAVEN Vice President/Circulation

ALLISON UHRIN Vice President/ Chief Financial Officer


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Save Social Security with a few adaptations THE GREAT Social Security Debate, Proposition 1: Of course it’s a Ponzi scheme. In a Ponzi scheme, the people who invest early get their money out with dividends. But these dividends don’t come from any profitable or productive activity – they consist entirely of money paid in by later participants. This cannot go on forever because at some point there just aren’t enough new investors to support the earlier entrants. Word gets around that there are no profits, just money transferred from new to old. The merry-go-round stops, the scheme collapses and the remaining investors lose everything. Now, Social Security is a pay-as-you-go program. A current beneficiary isn’t receiving the money she paid in years ago. That money is gone. It went to her parents’ Social Security check. The money in her check is coming from her son’s FICA tax today – i.e., her “investment” was paid out years ago to earlier entrants in the system and her current benefits are coming from the “investment” of the new entrants into the system. Pay-as-you-go is the definition of a Ponzi scheme. So what’s the difference? Ponzi schemes are illegal, suggested one of my colleagues on “Inside Washington.” But this is perfectly irrelevant. Imagine that Charles Ponzi had lived not in Boston but in the lesser parts of Papua New Guinea where the securities and fraud laws were, shall we say, less developed. He runs his same scheme among the locals – give me (“invest”) one goat today, I’ll give (“return”) you two after six full moons – but escapes any legal sanction. Is his legal enterprise any less a Ponzi scheme? Of course not. So what is the difference? Proposition 2: The crucial distinction between a Ponzi scheme and Social Security is that Social Security is mandatory. That’s why Ponzi schemes always collapse and Social Security has not. When it’s mandatory, you’ve ensured an endless supply of new participants. Indeed, if Charles Ponzi had had the benefit of the law forcing people into his scheme, he’d still be going strong – and a perfect candidate for commissioner of the Social Security Administration. But there’s a catch. Compulsion allows sustainability; it does not guarantee it. Hence ... Proposition 3: Even a mandatory Ponzi scheme such as Social Security can fail if it cannot rustle up enough new entrants. You can force young people

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ANOTHER VIEW

A photograph by Don Carey and words by Mark E. Jones

COMMENTARY CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER into Social Security, but if there just aren’t enough young people in existence to support current beneficiaries, the system will collapse anyway. When Social Security began making monthly distributions in 1940, there were 160 workers for every senior receiving benefits. In 1950, there were 16.5; today, three; in 20 years, there will be but two. Now, the average senior receives in Social Security about a third of what the average worker makes. Applying that ratio retroactively, this means that in 1940, the average worker had to pay only 0.2 percent of his salary to sustain the older folks of his time; in 1950, 2 percent; today, 11 percent; in 20 years, 17 percent. This is a staggering sum, considering that it is apart from all the other taxes he pays to sustain other functions of government, such as Medicare whose costs are exploding. The Treasury already steps in and borrows the money required to cover the gap between what workers pay into Social Security and what seniors take out. When young people were plentiful, Social Security produced a surplus. Starting now and for decades to come, it will add to the deficit, increasingly so as the population ages. Demography is destiny. Which leads directly to Proposition 4: This is one Ponzi scheme that can be saved by adapting to the new demographics. Three easy steps: Change the cost-of-living measure, means test for richer recipients and, most important, raise the retirement age. The current retirement age is an absurd anachronism. Bismarck arbitrarily chose 70 when he created social insurance in 1889. Clever guy: Life expectancy at the time was under 50. When Franklin Roosevelt created Social Security, choosing 65 as the eligibility age, life expectancy was 62. Today it is almost 80. FDR wanted to prevent the aged few from suffering destitution in their last remaining years. Social Security was not meant to provide two decades of greens fees for baby boomers. Of course it’s a Ponzi scheme. So what? It’s also the most vital, humane and fixable of all social programs. The question for the candidates is: Forget Ponzi – are you going to fix Social Security? Charles Krauthammer’s email address is letters@charleskrauthammer.com.

ook beyond the obvious and glimpse the potential prince. See through today’s troubles and set your eyes on tomorrow’s opportunity for astonishL ing transformations.

Papers are alive and thriving in small-town U.S. basis. That’s not what keeps them selling at such a good clip; it’s the steady stream of news that readers can only get from JUDY MULLER that publication – the births, deaths, crimes, sports and local shenanigans that only matter to to live there too. But they also tell it with courage, standing up the 5,000 or so souls in their circulation area. It’s more than a to powerful bullies – from coal papers. little ironic that small-town But at the risk of sounding as company thugs in Kentucky to corrupt politicians in the Texas papers have been thriving by if I’m whistling past the gravepracticing what the mainstream Panhandle. yard, I’d like to point out that media are now preaching. “Hyp“If we discover a political there are thousands of newspaer-localism,” “citizen journalofficial misusing taxpayer pers that are not just surviving but thriving. Some 8,000 weekly funds,” an editor in Dove Creek, ism,” “advocacy journalism” – these are some of the latest papers still hit the front porches Colo., told me, “we wouldn’t hesitate to nail him to a stump.” buzzwords of the profession. and mailboxes in small towns But the concepts, without the You might be thinking that across America every week and, fancy names, have been around attitude would be fundamental for some reason, they’ve been for ages in small-town newspaleft out of the conversation. So a for anyone who claims to be a pers. couple of years ago, I decided to journalist. The Los Angeles The “holy trinity” of weekly Times certainly nailed those head back to my roots, both papers consists of high school officials in Bell, Calif., to the geographic and professional sports (where even losing teams proverbial stump in its award(my first job was at a weekly), benefit from positive spin), winning expose of municipal to see how those community obituaries (where there’s no corruption. But just imagine papers were faring. And what I need to speak ill of the dead how much more difficult that found was both surprising and because everyone in town aljob would have been if those inspiring. Times reporters lived next door ready knows if the deceased At a time when mainstream was a jerk) and the police blotto the officials they were writnews media are hemorrhaging ter. The latter can be addictive, ing about – or, as sometimes and doomsayers are predicting the death of journalism (at least happens in a small town, if they even to outsiders. These items, had been related to one of them. often lifted intact from the disas we’ve known it), take heart: passionate log of the sheriff’s Practicing journalism with The free press is alive and well gusto comes with a price tag in dispatcher, are the haikus of in small towns across America, a small community – from being Main Street: “Man calls to rethanks to the editors of thousands of weeklies who, for very shunned in the checkout line at port wife went missing 3 months ago.” the grocery store to losing a little money and a fair amount The business models of these of aggravation, keep on telling it major advertiser. small-town papers are just as Of course, most of these like it is. Sometimes they tell it intriguing as the local news. In newspapers are not uncovering gently, in code only the locals 2010, the National Newspaper understand. After all, they have major scandals on a regular WE’VE BEEN hearing a lot of depressing news in recent years about the dire financial prospects for big daily news-

COMMENTARY

Association provided some heartening survey statistics: More than three-quarters of respondents said they read most or all of a local newspaper every week. And a full 94 percent said they paid for their papers. And what of the Internet threat? Many of these smalltown editors have learned a lesson from watching their big-city counterparts: Don’t give it away. Many weeklies, from the Canadian Record in the Texas Panhandle to the Concrete Herald in Washington’s Cascade Mountains, are charging for their Web content, and, because readers can’t get that news anywhere else, they’re willing to pay. I wouldn’t be so bold as to predict the future, not in a media landscape that is constantly shifting. But when we engage in these discussions about how to “monetize” journalism, it’s refreshing to remember a different kind of bottom line, one that lives in the hearts of weekly newspaper editors and reporters who keep churning out news for the corniest of reasons – because their readers depend on it. Judy Muller, a journalism professor at the University of Southern California, is the author of “Emus Loose in Egnar: Big Stories From Small Towns.” She wrote this for the Los Angeles Times.

LETTERS FROM READERS

Legion tourney deemed success

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he American Legion Post 644 Swoyersville thanks the players, sponsors, volunteers and all those who made donations to our second annual golf tournament at Sands Springs Country Club. It was a huge success. Funds raised will go toward our veterans’ death benefits.

MOUNTAIN LAURELS Mountain Laurels is a regular series of letters from readers conveying thanks to individuals or groups for their support, help or kindness.

fort the scared and confused residents. Despite traffic jams and mayhem throughout the Wyoming Valley, Tammy and her staff continued to be professional until all the residents were moved to safer locations. Thank you so much! Cindy Donlin Activities director Laurels Health & Rehab Kingston

Donald Rokus American Legion Post 644 Swoyersville

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he staff and residents of the Laurels Health & Rehab in Kingston wish to thank the Keystone Ambulance Company for its help during the recent evacuation. The crew members were extremely kind and courteous. Their smiling faces and pleasant attitudes did a lot to com-

Picnic in the Park helps playground

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he Quality Hill Playground Association, Nanticoke, recently held its annual “Picnic in the Park” fundraising event. The event began at 4 p.m. Aug. 27 with traditional picnic food and ended with a fantastic fireworks display. Despite the looming hurricane, the party-goers enjoyed

the activities and entertainment; more than 500 people attended. The playground association sends a sincere thank-you to every person who supported this year’s event. Thanks to “Gone Crazy,” an area band that provided several hours of entertainment, playing a popular array of music. Also, thank you to the many businesses and patrons who donated items to the auction, such as gift certificates, products and services. The event would not have been possible without the many supporters who gave up their time to prepare the park before the event, work during the event and help to clean up. We also would like to recognize the many participants who brought food items or donated in some way. Though the supporters are too numerous to mention by name in

this letter, please know that we have recognized you at our meetings. Your support this year made a tremendous difference for us, and it will help us continue to run and maintain a very safe and family-friendly playground. Ken Gill President Nicole Kruczek Vice president Ryan Verazin Treasurer and Sandy Bohn Secretary The Quality Hill Playground Association Nanticoke

Car show aids injured veteran

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n Aug. 21, the Plains Boys Club and the Polish American Veterans Club held the fourth annual Helping Hands Car Show, which benefited Dave Morgan, a WilkesBarre native who suffered a traumatic brain injury in a head-on crash while serving as

a military police officer in Kuwait. The event was a huge success! I thank all of the area businesses that generously donated to the car show. We had such an outpouring of donations that there are too many donors to list individually. I also thank the Polish American Veterans Club for the use of its facility, all the members of the Plains Boys Club and the Ladies Auxiliary for their time and effort in helping bring this benefit together, and D.J. Tony K and Handshakes & Head Butts for the entertainment. Most important, we thank Dave Morgan for his service to our country. Joseph Rogalski President Plains Boys Club

Resident grateful for food bill help

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ore than a week ago, I was in Aldi grocery store and bought an order that

cost more than I had with me. I thank the gentleman who paid the balance on my food bill. I will keep you in my prayers. I. Rowe Wilkes-Barre

Family thanks event supporters

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hank you to everyone who attended the Stephen G. Semanek Memorial Poker Run and Event that was held Aug. 13 at Chacko’s Family Bowling Center in WilkesBarre. We appreciate all your support, kindness and generous donations. Our family always will be grateful to the people and businesses that have been so supportive during this time of our lives. Patricia Opsitos On behalf of the Semanek/Opsitos families Swoyersville


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LETTERS FROM READERS

Report suspected program fraud

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’m not against helping people who really need help. That is what makes this country civilized; but we really need to get a handle on the amount of fraud going on in our entitlement programs. From welfare, Medicaid, Medicare and disability, to government employee entitlements, there is just too much lying, cheating and stealing going on which, in turn, is only compounding our deficit problems. The straw that broke my camel’s back was standing in line at a grocery store in Nanticoke behind a young couple who purchased more than $300 worth of groceries, much of it soda, on a New York welfare card. They then berated the cashier because their hot, roasted chicken was not covered by the card. The “straw” was that when I was returning my cart in the parking lot, I saw them loading their welfare food into a late model, black Mercedes-Benz

with New York plates. I still had my pen and shopping list in hand, so I wrote down their license plate number just to quell my anger, the same anger I hear from a lot of people at what they see in the grocery stores. While on the Internet, I decided to search “New York welfare fraud” and found a simple form I could print and send anonymously to report my experience. I won’t ever know the outcome, but I felt compelled to do it. We have doctors overbilling Medicaid and Medicare, people collecting disability who aren’t disabled, some government employees receiving pensions and benefits to which they are not entitled, and a lot of people on welfare who shouldn’t be. Our taxes are, in many cases, going up and up just to cover pension and benefit costs, while the average working person is struggling to survive. The only way to slow this rampant fraud is to start reporting it. No one is going to check for fraud unless complaints are lodged.

So don’t get mad when you suspect entitlement fraud, report it. It’s easy. It’s not only your right; it’s what we used to call your civic duty. J.E. Smith Larksville

Carrier criticizes ‘cleanliness teams’

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am an employee of the U.S. Postal Service, and I am a mail carrier in Plymouth. Recently, the postmaster there made what I considered to be an incredible statement, considering the financial state of the postal service. He stated that there were “cleanliness teams” traveling to different post offices to see if items such as rubber bands, paperclips or personal items were left at the mail carriers’ assigned work areas (cases). Granted, there are people at the postal service, even in Plymouth, who probably would make Felix Unger roll over in his grave, but considering the fact that we are

the amount of money being put into the system by way of the payroll tax by 50 percent for the employee and employer will strengthen the system. How many new jobs were created when the payroll tax was reduced by 2 percent? Will all of these new jobs produce enough tax revenue to fund the trust fund so that retirees can still buy goods and services as they do now? Why not simply increase the monthly checks for seniors? You can be certain that they will spend what they get and that would increase commerce and create new jobs. I also am not sure why AARP is not in full attack mode to stop this attack on Social Security funding.

facing close to a $9 billion deficit by the end of this fiscal year, do we really need salaried individuals driving around and checking on who left rubber bands or their caps at their work areas? If these people were on a wage system, I am sure they would be earning in excess of $25 an hour for performing this duty. At a time when the postal service’s popularity is very low, judging by the recent blogs that I read at a New York Times website, isn’t it time for the postal service to finally act responsibly? Dana Disraeli Wilkes-Barre Township

Writer: Simple fix to Social Security

Les Williams Nanticoke

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or many years I have heard that the Social Security Trust Fund will run out of money in my lifetime. Currently I hear that we must revise Social Security so that this entitlement program can survive. I am not sure how reducing

Phone merger seen as good move

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am sure we are all very thankful that Hurricane Irene is long gone. However, the cleanup continues.

I have heard from many friends and family members about how they communicated during and after the storm. Sounds as if many people held onto their cell phones and that allowed them to communicate throughout the storm. I can only imagine what it might have been like for someone who had no power, was in the dark and wasn’t able to communicate with anyone. I have been following the potential merger between AT&T and T-Mobile. It sounds as though their merger will drastically help wireless coverage across rural parts of Pennsylvania, especially parts of the state that were without power for prolonged periods. As you know, winter storms in this part of the state can be as wicked as Irene, causing vast power outages. If we can get increased coverage and better communication during bad storms as a result of AT&T and T-Mobile merging, then I am all for the merger! Christopher Lynch Throop

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LETTERS FROM READERS

Writer lauds Barletta’s staff

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thank Congressman Lou Barletta and his congressional staff for helping me to get a copy of my military service records (DD-214). His staff was polite, professional and caring. I had been trying to get a copy of these records for nearly six months. Less than three weeks after contacting Congressman Barletta’s office, my records arrived in the mail. I am very pleased with the service I received from my congressman. I hope that he will be in office for years to come. Spencer Jahnke Dunmore

Gas well sites weathered storm

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mid all the destruction brought to our area by last week’s historic floods, it might surprise some people to learn that none of our region’s hundreds of natural gas well sites was compromised – disappointing some who had sought to use the flood as pretext for shutting down responsible resource development. On Sept. 9, hours after President Obama declared a state of emergency in Pennsylvania, several anti-Marcellus groups blasted press releases demanding the state “shut down all drilling now” for the “sake of public health and safety.” Later that day, even as the waters continued to rise, anther group ordered its members to “do some weekend driving with cameras and notebooks,” hoping to snap pictures of sites turned upside down by the flood. But as these folks found out, there weren’t many pictures to take. And there’s a reasonfor this: Before a site can be constructed in a flood plain, operators have to secure a special Chapter 105 permit from the state and have that permit and

SEND US YOUR OPINION Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification. Letters should be no more than 250 words. We reserve the right to edit and limit writers to one published letter every 30 days. • Email: mailbag@timesleader.com • Fax: 570-829-5537 • Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., WilkesBarre, PA 1871 1

their flood plan approved by the Army Corps of Engineers. Undeterred, activists scoured the Internet for images of flooded-out well sites to send to the press. It took about a day to figure out their pictures actually came from Pakistan. With this silliness now hopefully behind us, the long and difficult task of putting our Valley back together has begun in earnest. It’s an effort that will require lots of people, lots of money and more than a little bit of patience. And it’s one our industry is committed to supporting and expediting in every way that it can. William desRosiers Harveys Lake

Support your local pharmacist

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he recent closing of the Borders bookstore in Dickson City has me wondering what the residents of Luzerne County would think if they lost the services of their local pharmacists. The possibility is real. The similarities between what shut Borders and the economic pressures facing retail pharmacy are quite striking, except for one thing: Books are a commodity, drugs purchased at a pharmacy and the services provided by a pharmacist are not. Those warehouse-like mailorder operations are huge profit centers for companies. Oh sure, they will “allow” local pharmacies to fill your immediate needs, such as antibiotics and diarrhea medicine. The problem is that neither an independent pharmacy nor a chain pharmacy

could stay in business with those few prescriptions. If the mail-order pharmacy trends continue unchecked, the days of having a trusted pharmacist to ask if this medication is right for you will come to an end. What does this do to the local economy? Large companies that depend on local commerce for their survival seem to have no problem sending millions of their dollars out of state each year for mail-order pharmacy services. City, county and state governments do the same thing, with your tax dollars being shipped out of state. This makes about as much sense as the unemployed factory worker who hopes to get a local manufacturing job spending his unemployment check at Walmart on a kitchen table made in China. It would be one thing if the drugs purchased via PBMowned mail order actually reduced or even contained an employer’s drug cost, but they don’t. Virtually every CEO will tell you they have not seen their company drug bill decrease – ever – in spite of the fact that more drugs than ever have gone generic in the last five years. As a pharmacy, we have seen our sales decrease in the past five years due to increased generics available for the same amount and type of prescriptions filled. The problem is the PBMs are retaining those savings at the employer’s expense to fatten the bottom line. It’s simple: They pay the pharmacy $17, then turn around and bill the employer as much as $217 and keep the difference. So what can you do to save money and support the local

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economy? First, be sure you have a relationship with your local pharmacist. He or she knows the most about you and your medication. Second, ask him if the drug on which you are spending your $40 mailorder co-pay for a three-month supply has a similar generic drug available. Then fill it at his store. It might cost you three $10 co-pays to do it, but you are still saving $10, and you are creating local jobs. Don’t forget, that mail house didn’t try to help you. The local pharmacist took the time. If you send that generic off to be filled by mail, your local pharmacist might not be there next year. Today it is Borders; who will it be tomorrow? Frank Lombardo Pharmacist and owner Cook’s Pharmacy of Shavertown

to Pakistan but had told no one of his intentions. He agreed to sell. After negotiations with Father Julien Henry representing Sister Teresa, the price he set was lower than the value of the land on which it stood. After praying at a nearby mosque, Dr. Islam visited his house and wept. He said to Father Julien from outside the home: “I received that house from God. I give it back to him.” If this manner of generous behavior on the part of a Muslim seems strange to us American Christians, especially in the light of the tragedies of Sept. 11, 2001, it is because we are most often exposed to the works of extremist Muslims. Peace-loving Muslims are numerous in Islam today, especially in the Gulen movement that underscores education and interfaith dialogue as channels of peace.

Extreme Muslims are in minority Care Act mandate offends physician I

Charles DeCelles Dunmore

n 1952 the future Mother Teresa of Calcutta had obtained ecclesiastical permission to leave the Loreto Sisters to found a new congregation of religious women, the Missionary Sisters of Charity. Many of her former students had joined her as novices. Soon Teresa realized that the apartment she and her novices lived in was not adequate for their needs. They began to pray for a larger, more permanent mother house. Sister Teresa approached a Dr. Islam, a Jesuiteducated Muslim and former magistrate, to purchase his attractive property surrounding a courtyard, built on a main road in Calcutta. Islam was planning to move

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object in the strongest terms to mandating birth control with no co-pays under the Affordable Care Act. Birth control subsidized largely by taxpayers is widely available to all women. Demanding that we further subsidize other people’s birth control by increasing our insurance premiums in these days when families are struggling just to make ends meet is an outrage. The mandate violates my conscience and that of many of my fellow doctors, nurses and pharmacists. It is undisputed that one of the operations of contraceptives is to

render the endometrium hostile to implantation so that if fertilization occurs, the newly conceived child may be lost to an early abortion. I also strongly object to the inclusion of free sterilization, as well as abortifacient pills such as Ella, which can work weeks after a person’s biological beginning to cause an abortion. And what of Catholic employers and others who oppose birth control but are now going to be compelled to participate in these plans and/or offer it to their employees? This flies in the face of the conscience protections that Americans historically have enjoyed. Further, reducing Catholic health care will hurt many of the sickest people, as the Catholic Church is the largest provider of care to HIV/AIDS patients worldwide. Do you really want to shut off this source of care? The conscience provisions attached to the rule are so narrowly crafted that they would appear to force Catholic institutions to make free birth control and sterilization available in health plans, or cease hiring and providing services to non-Catholics. Ask yourself this: If the government says that your business has to engage in acts that violate your conscience, are you truly free? If “Obamacare” persists in this, there is a strong possibility that the Catholic hospitals in the country would close. That is about 15 percent of all hospitals. Is that what this country needs? Is more birth control and early abortion worth that much to the current administration? Dr. Frank Schell Luzerne


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industry bailout and presided over the second installment of money to keep Wall Street afloat. A health care system overhaul came a year later. By 2010, 56 percent of voters were back to saying that government was overreaching, while just 38 percent said government should be more active. It was the most government wary view among independents that the exit poll has recorded, with 65 percent saying government should do less, while 28 percent said it should do more. Nowadays, people across the political spectrum seem to want very little from Washington. A CNN/Opinion Research Corporation poll in June found that 63 percent of people think the government is doing too much, while 33 percent want it to do more. And the sentiments of independents, who typically decide close elections, generally mirrored Americans at large. No sooner did eight Republicans take the debate stage at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, Calif., than did they rail against the federal government requiring states to act a certain way, lambast Washington overreach, and argue that fewer regulations and lower taxes would compel businesses to hire again. “They’re looking for a president that will say we’re going to lower the tax burden on you and we’re going to lower the regulation impact on you, and free them to do what they do best: create jobs,” said Perry, who has staked his candidacy on a promise to make the federal government as inconsequential as possible to people’s lives. He and the others were posturing before a GOP electorate shaped by the tea party, whose existence can be attributed in part to a disgust by citizens over the growth of government — and federal spending — under George W. Bush, a Republican, and Obama, a Democrat. “I believe in a lot of what the tea party believes in,” Romney said. “The tea party believes that government’s too big, taxing too much, and that we ought to get to

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his recently unveiled jobs program and yet the GOP debate was weirdly devoid of proposals for putting Americans back to work. Perry, ex-Massachusetts Gov. Romney and former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman argued about whose state produced the most — or least — jobs on their watch but offered virtually nothing in the way of a jobs plan for the country. At some point, it won’t be enough to simply blame Obama for the unemployment problem; voters will expect the president’s opponent, whoever he or she may be, to offer a solution. Republicans scored lots of political points in recent weeks

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the work of getting Americans to work.” Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann said Washington needs to stay out of education and health issues, claiming: “We have the best results when we have the private sector and when we have the family involved. We have the worst results when the federal government gets involved.” And Texas Rep. Ron Paul opposes the federal government from having any role that isn’t explicitly laid out in the Constitution. One night later, Obama pressed Congress to immediately pass a $450 billion plan to create jobs and jolt the economy, arguing that government was at least partly responsible for fixing it, helping Americans who are hurting and upgrading the nation’s crumbling roads, bridges and schools. “This task of making America more competitive for the long haul, that’s a job for all of us,” he said, adding: “For government and for private companies. For states and for local communities — and for every American citizen.” He countered the pitch from conservatives and the tea party that heavily cutting government spending and eliminating a chunk of government regulations is the best solution to the economic woes, saying: “This larger notion that the only thing we can do to restore prosperity is just dismantle government, refund everybody’s money, and let everyone write their own rules, and tell everyone they’re on their own — that’s not who we are. That’s not the story of America.” And he reached back to history to try to prove his point. Obama argued that its workers and entrepreneurs made America’s economy great, the envy of the world. But he also noted that government was responsible for the Transcontinental Railroad, the National Academy of Sciences, the first land grant colleges, the G.I. Bill, the nation’s highway and air systems, the public school system, research that led to the Internet and the computer chip. Americans will hear these competing visions of government for the next 14 months before casting a vote that will offer a glimpse into Americans views of the scope of government — a temporary clarity at best as the debate as old as our founding rages on. and months blasting Obama for his failure to propose a specific plan for improving the economy. Now that he has put a plan on the table, they’ll be hard-pressed to reject it without offering an alternative — or forfeiting any claim to credibility on economic issues. Republicans in Congress seem content to oppose the Obama plan and wait for a Republican president to take office in January 2013. But unless Obama’s wouldbe successors start focusing on the economy instead of each other, defeating Obama might be easier said than done. Bill Thompson Richard L. Connor is editor and publisher of The Times Leader. He can be reached at rconnor@timesleader. com

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heir Aunt Lauren will treat 5-year-old Bren- director said, “is about how the Kirby Center is perden and 2-year-old Nicholas to the show, ceived in the community. It’s all really, really positive. their mom, Alisa Scarantino, will come That’s what it’s all about.” along to help take care of the boys, For 25 years the Kirby, which celebrates its INSIDE: and they all expect to have a grand time at the quarter-century mark this month, has given the For More on The F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts. community the opportunity to experience evF.M. Kirby Center, See Page 4 & 6F “Any time you go to the Kirby, you feel like erything from opera to folk music to kids shows you’re going someplace special,” Scarantino, to rock concerts to international films. 34, of Dunmore, said last week, shortly after she picked “(My daughter) Iris and I saw a great one about Afriup the tickets to next month’s “Max and Ruby: Bunny ca,” said Kirby fan Gary Johnson, 60, of Sweet Valley, Party” at the box office. who also enjoys Philharmonic performances and was That’s just the kind of sentiment Marilyn Santarelli thrilled to see B.B. King in concert. likes to hear. “What I become most excited about,” the executive See VISION, Page 4F

TIMELINE

The F.M. Kirby Center is an architectural masterpiece that has stood the test of time, nestled in its corner on Public Square in downtown Wilkes-Barre. Though it’s now a shining beacon of arts-and-entertainment success, the road to this point was not always easy. We take a look back at the Kirby Center and how it became the venue we know and love today. ••• • In 1937 the M.E. Comerford 45movie theater chain, in Pennsylvania and New York, decided to station its flagship location where the Kirby Center stands today on Public Square. It would replace a bus terminal, a printing company, a stonecutter and a drugstore. • On Aug. 18, 1938, the Comerford Movie Theater opened its doors to the public with a showing of the movie “Alexander’s Ragtime Band.” • In 1949, due to an anti-trust lawsuit, ownership of the Comerford Theater was transferred to the Penn Paramount Company. The building was then renamed the Paramount Theater. • Due to economic hardship and the changing landscape of the cinema, with urban redevelopment after Tropical Storm Agnes in 1972, the Paramount closed its doors in late 1977. It was then transferred to a new owner and used as a venue for touring concerts and closed-circuit television boxing matches in the late 1970s and early 1980s. • A remodel took place in an effort to accommodate various smallbusiness operations at the venue. The lobby was gutted, brass and

bronze door frames were cut, and curved-glass display cases and the brass and marble exterior ticket booth were removed. The building then fell into general disrepair. • A group of local residents working under the name S.T.O.P. (Save The Old Paramount) were successful in having the building added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1978, but even so it remained nearly abandoned. • In 1985 Albert Boscov, owner of one of the nation’s largest, privately owned department-store chains, Boscov’s, along with August L. Simms, Fred M. Kirby II and the Kirby Foundation, put together a drive to raise the necessary $3.3 million for the acquisition and restoration of the theater. • The Paramount Civic Center project launched on Dec. 21, 1985. It was renamed the F.M. Kirby Center. • On Friday, Sept. 19, 1986, the Kirby Center’s doors opened with a gala performance of the American Ballet Theatre’s premiere of its “Celebration Tour” and a performance by the Wilkes-Barre Ballet Theatre to Ravel’s “Bolero.” • In 2005 the board of directors of the Kirby Center launched a $750,000 fundraising campaign titled, “Take Your Seats, Please.” This money went toward refurbishing sections of the theater’s interior as well as improving technical capabilities. • After four months of refurbishment, the F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts offered an open house for the public on Sept. 29, 2006, with a screening of “Alexander’s Ragtime Band,” the same film that opened the Comerford Movie Theater 68 years prior.

The staff behind the scenes of Kirby’s art and entertainment By SARA POKORNY spokorny@timesleader.com

Whatmostseewhentheylook at the F.M. Kirby Center is a venuethathasanever-expandingvariety of arts and entertainment. While this is true, the people who work behind the very stage that plays host to these acts should not be overlooked. This tight-knit team works around the clock to ensure everyone, from the audience to the artists themselves, has the best possible experience during their time at the Kirby. Though a single job title may be given to a staff member, it’s clear his or her duty goes beyond one definition. We spoke to some of the major players of the Kirby Center operation, a fraction of the many folks who make every performance inviting and exciting, a total experience for everyone involved. ••• Marilyn Santarelli, 61, Wilkes-Barre, Executive Director Santarelli has been a part of the Kirby family for 12 years. As executive director, she oversees all aspects of shows and the facil-

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These faces may not be so familiar considering they remain mostly behind the scenes at The F.M. Kirby Center. From left: Ralph Walp, front of house manager; Joanie Brenton, director of membership and corporate giving; Nora Blessner, director of major gifts; Anne Rodella, boxoffice manager; Marian Hagan, development assistant; Marion Kendzor, administrative assistant; Drew Taylor, director of operations; Maria Sacco, finance manager; Michael Dale, technical director; Jeanne Aber, marketing assistant; Will Beekman, director of marketing and sales; and Marilyn Santarelli, executive director, in foreground.

ity itself as well as keeps an eye on the future of the organization. ForSantarelli,it’saboutseeing the impact the arts have on the

surrounding community, wheth- dancers, or the introduction of a er it be through Kirby Kidz, a form of entertainment not often workshop program for schoolage aspiring actors, singers and See STAFF, Page 6F


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The Sunday Crossword

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis

CRYPTOGRAMS

ARIES (March 21-April 19). Getting good news is like hooking a big fish. But for that to happen, you’ll have to cast your line. Enter contests, send out your resume, and make a play for the other exciting prizes in life. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You are not on the earth to judge and punish your fellow travelers. Sometimes their actions will frustrate and anger you, and in that case, you’ll put your energy into holding back and cooling off. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Someone will flirt with you. Maybe the advance is unwelcome, but you can’t help but be flattered by the effort. You’ll likely deflect the attention, careful not to get this person’s hopes up. CANCER (June 22-July 22). Your faith in a certain person knows no bounds. You feel certain that he or she will always come through and overcome — that solutions are never far away. Transfer some of that faith to yourself, and you’ll be doing great. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). You know when you’re wasting your time, and yet sometimes you can’t stop yourself. There is something so wonderfully compelling about going off track. In the end, this may prove a very successful diversion. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). You may be a speck of dust on a speck of dust, and you may also be the center of the universe. Stand under the stars tonight, and try to feel the vast distance between you and galaxies that are 13 billion light years away. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). You will be slow to commit and wisely so. Once you give your word, you are likely to follow through no matter what. Your attitude dictates the outcome. If anyone can make it happen, you can. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). You are feeling so generous. If you could buy lunch for everyone in the room, you would. You’d even include dessert. What you can’t do for “everyone,” you’ll at least do for “someone.” SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). Your creativity will shine as you pull simple elements together to make something wonderfully, magically intricate. Not everyone around will understand what you are doing, but they will all sense the specialness of it. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Success depends on applying your efforts faithful