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WILKES-BARRE, PA

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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011

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FLOOD OF 2011: RECOVERY

Comeback, fight vowed

Vice President Biden to visit area Friday

W. Pittston residents want levee protection

Damage reporting gets under way By BILL O’BOYLE boboyle@timesleader.com

WEST PITTSTON – The streets in this flood-ravaged West Side community are lined with piles of mud-covered, watersoaked memories. One of several towns unprotected by the Luzerne County flood protection system, West Pittston residents and business owners are cleaning out from water levels that far surpassed Agnes Flood levels. Faced with the task of cleaning out their properties and assessing damage, these resilient people are determined to come back and even more determined to renew the fight to build a levee system along the Susquehanna River. The river reached a record high water mark of 42.66 feet early Friday, causing it to flow well beyond its banks and into the homes and businesses well past Wyoming Avenue, reaching points Agnes never touched in

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PATRIOTS 38 DOLPHINS 24 NATIONAL LEAGUE

ASTROS 5 PHILLIES 1 PIRATES 6 CARDINALS 5 NATIONALS 3 METS 2 AMERICAN LEAGUE

RAYS 5 ORIOLES 2 DJOKOVIC IS U.S. OPEN CHAMP

See FIGHT, Page 12A

Novak Djokovic held

on to beat defending champion Rafael Nadal 6-2, 6-4, 6-7 (3), 6-1 Monday night in a final filled with lengthy, mesmerizing points to win his first U.S. Open championship and third Grand Slam trophy of the year.

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INSIDE A NEWS: Obituaries 2A, 8A Local 3A Nation & World 5A Editorials 11A B SPORTS: 1B B BUSINESS: 8B Stocks 9B C HEALTH: 1C Birthdays 5C TV/Movies 6C Crossword/Horoscope 7C Comics 8C D CLASSIFIED: 1D

WEATHER Landon Dietterick Morning sun, showers late. High 80, low 57. Details, Page 10B

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

Joe Agolino, owner of Agolino’s Restaurant in West Pittston, takes a break from cleaning out his restaurant Monday morning.

West Pittston, Shickshinny, Duryea, Plymouth Township. Their own residents and leaders say damage caused by floods the past two weeks have left their towns disaster areas. Now they’re waiting for the president to agree. Steve Bekanich, director of Luzerne County’s emergency management agency, said federal funds can’t be freed up until President Barack Obama signs a feder-

al disaster declaration. Bekanich said he was hoping to see that document signed Monday, but believes it will come today or Wednesday. “There is no typical time frame,” said Mike Sweet, a spokesman for the Federal Emergency Management Agency who was dispatched to Luzerne County on Monday. He will tour the area and meet with officials to get a handle on the scope of the See REPORTING, Page 12A

KINGSTON – A woman trusted to watch a neighbor’s dog during the mandatory evacuation took advantage of the empty house by letting herself in and stealing items, according to charges filed. The looting was one of several incidents in the area when most people residing in the Wyoming Valley flood plain were ordered to vacate their houses when the Susquehanna River rose to record levels on Thursday and Friday. Police in the area arrested at least 11 people for looting. Luzerne County First Assistant District Attorney Jeffrey Tokach said the punishment is greater when a looter is convictSee LOOTERS, Page 6A

T E L L U S YO U R STO RY

SUSQUEHANNA RIVER warning system’s fate uncertain, 3A

WILKES-BARRE SHIFTS out of emergency mode, 6A

PARTS OF Jenkins Township still underwater, 10A

PLAINS TOWNSHIP businesses swamped, 3A

SCHOOL calendars need revamping, 7A

ROADS and bridges closed, 10A

SHICKSHINNY residents put blame on levee, 3A

EDWARDSVILLE’S Mark Plaza devastated, 7A

BARLETTA’S constituent recovery centers open, 12A

Flood victims can tell their stories at timesleader.com. Here are the options. Go to the TL home page or special flood page to add photos and write your story; email photos to timesleader-e8yexs@olapic.me; tweet photos to @TLNews from Instagram, PicPlz, Twitpic, Lockerz and Yfrog using Hashtag #floodpics.

Obama’s tax plans worry Social Security’s allies By ALAN FRAM Associated Press

09815 10011

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

Rob Schultz walks past the sign his fiancee spray-painted on the front of his building on Luzerne Avenue, West Pittston.

MORE INSIDE

Administration insists tax cut proposal would not impact ability to pay benefits.

6

By EDWARD LEWIS elewis@timesleader.com

Area towns await move by Obama By ANDREW M. SEDER aseder@timesleader.com

Alleged looters are arrested

WASHINGTON — Some Social Security advocates fear that President Barack Obama’s desire to cut taxes supporting the program will undermine its vaunted

stature as a self-financing pension system that provides checks to retirees based on contributions they made while working. For now, though, the administration insists — and many experts agree — that the proposal would have no impact on the program’s financial soundness or ability to pay benefits averaging $1,077 a month to 55 million recipients. Cutting Social Security taxes

is the keystone of Obama’s $447 billion plan to create jobs and leave more cash in people’s pockets, an effort by the president to bolster the ailing economy and his own 2012 re-election prospects. The payroll tax cut — an enlargement of one already in effect this year — would take a $240 billion bite out of Social Security revenues in 2012. Obama would replenish the lost FICA

(Federal Insurance Contribution Act) taxes with money from the overall federal budget — keeping Social Security whole but forcing the government to borrow more and further swelling the federal debt.. The problem with Obama’s proposal, critics say, is that propping up Social Security with general funds from the Treasury erodes its revered status as a selffunded insurance program in

which payroll taxes collected from workers pay benefits for retirees, the disabled and their survivors. The proposal would put Social Security into competition for scarce federal dollars with other programs, leaving it more exposed to budget-cutters. “As long as we could say it’s self-funded, we have the high ground” in defending the proSee SECURITY, Page 12A


K PAGE 2A

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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011

HOW TO HELP BLOOMSBURG -- Due to recent flooding, the Bloomsburg Fair Association is asking for volunteers to help with the cleanup efforts at the fairgrounds. All-time high flood waters hit the fairgrounds and help is needed. The Bloomsburg Fair is scheduled to begin Sept. 24. The fair has no phone service and it is asking anyone who wants to help in any way to stop by the fairgrounds at 620 W. Third St., Bloomsburg. MOUNTAIN TOP-- The Sons of the American Legion Post Mt. 781 are sponsoring a Flood Relief Drive effective immediately. Items or cash donation can be dropped off at the American Legion Mt. Post 781 on Church Road in Mountain Top 1-9 p.m. Monday through Friday, on Saturday and Sunday, noon to 9 p.m. Donations will be taken through Sept. 26. For more information, call (570) 474-2161 or log on to www.alpost781.org. Items sought include surgical masks, latex gloves, large sponges, scrub brushes, bleach cleaners, cleaning tools and large bags. WILKES-BARRE -- The Salvation Army of Wilkes-Barre is accepting donations of food, beverages, paper products and cleaning products. They can be dropped off at the Kidder Street location on Saturday or Sunday, or at the Pennsylvania Avenue location Monday. Financial donations can be sent to 17 S. Pennsylvania Ave., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701 or texted to 80888. Volunteers are needed to prepare food, serve food, help with administrative tasks, and drive canteens. For more information, contact Capt. Doug Richwine, 239-3262 or Captain Chaz Engel 302-547-0545. MOUNTAIN TOP -- The offices of GEM Riverside Rehabilitation, providers of physical, occupational and speech therapies, will be collecting cleaning supplies for the recent flood victims. The collection will continue through the month. New cleaning supplies can be dropped off at the following GEM Riverside locations: 80 N. Mountain Blvd. (Route 309) in Mountain Top (474-1171); 506 Hazle St. in Wilkes-Barre (2704366); and 27 Main St. in Dallas (674-2659). LUZERNE -- Gerrity’s Markets across Luzerne and Lackawanna counties are collecting cleaning supplies that will be donated to residents of the flood-ravaged communities that the super market chain serves. Gerrity’s will discount the purchase of these items, such as mops, bleach and sponges, by 10 percent and there will be containers to collect the items near the checkouts of every Gerrity’s store. Gerrity’s will also collect and match all donations made in their stores to the American Red Cross. PITTSTON -- There will be a clothing distribution to benefit families affected by the flood sponsored by Kids Klothes Line & the Keystone Rescue Mission Alliance at Our Lady of Mt Carmel Church, 237 William St., Pittston, on Sunday, 1 to 4 p.m. All clothing and shoes are available free, and there are no income requirements. Donations of clothing are being accepted. The event is to be hosted by Girl Scout Cadette/Senior Troop 30173. Email volcor@scrantonrescuemission.com or call Kathy at 570871-4795 to make a donation. LUZERNE – The borough hall, as well as the Swoyersville American Legion and Kingston VFW, are accepting personal items needed for flood victims. Items include toilet paper, soap, deodorant, shampoo, toothpaste and toothbrushes. Also needed are flood cleanup items, including latex gloves, scrub brushes, surgical masks, bleach, disinfectants, large sponges, garden gloves, paper towels, bathroom cleaner, mops and brooms. Items may be dropped off at the Luzerne Borough Building, Academy Street, Luzerne; Swoyersville American Legion, Shoemaker Street, Swoyersville; or the Kingston VFW, Wyoming Avenue, Kingston.

THE TIMES LEADER

Social Security dominates debate Romney, Perry throw verbal punches at GOP presidential debate in Florida. By MARK Z. BARABAK Los Angeles Times

Picking up where the last Republican presidential debate left off, Rick Perry and Mitt Romney scuffled Monday night over Social Security, trading barbs in the state with the most crucial elderly constituency in the country. The prickly tone of the nationally televised session was set with the first question from the studio audience in Tampa, Fla., asking how the government pension plan could be reformed without scaring off senior citizens. Perry, the Texas governor, soberly promised “a slam-dunk guarantee that program is going to be in place” for today’s elderly recipients and “those moving toward” receiving Social Security. He did not, however, back away from his provocative suggestion that Social Security was a “Ponzi scheme.” Romney seized on that language calling it “over the top, unnecessary and frightful to peo-

ple.” While the financing of Social Security merits discussion, the former Massachusetts governor said, Perry has gone much further, suggesting dismantlement of the program by turning control over to individual states, to operate as they choose. That, Romney said, “is likewise frightening” to senior citizens. Perry ignored the specifics and said simply that it was time for a thoughtful conversation about reforming the government pension system, rather than engaging in demagoguery — a remark that drew a roar from the supportive crowd of “tea party” faithful. He then sought to turn the issue around and attack Romney, saying he had once characterized the Social Security program as “criminal.” The debate at the Florida State Fairgrounds was sponsored by CNN, the Tea Party Express and dozens of tea party chapters around the country. Like the Southern California meeting, the session Monday night felt early on like a two-person debate, with the other six candidates standing sidelined until the moderator, CNN’s Wolf

By MARK GUYDISH mguydish@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE -- An otherwise routine Wilkes-Barre Area School Board work session Monday may have provided a hint of a looming debate on the fate of Meyers High School. During a brief update of construction and repair projects, the ongoing effort to find a water leak sparked a discussion about

the school itself. Board member Phil Latinski, who has pushed for a major reevaluation of how the district spends money on building maintenance, questioned the value of constant repairs to the turn-ofthe-century building. In June, Latinski moved to have the building closed, but the board voted instead to authorize an internal review on the feasibility of shifting roughly 1,000 students into remaining buildings. Dr. Mark Schiowitz, who was appointed to finish one year left in the term of Teresa McGuire when she resigned in December, said he previously would have

AP PHOTO

Former Mass.Gov. Mitt Romney, left, passes behind Texas Gov. Rick Perry during a break in Monday’s debate in Tampa, Fla.

Blitzer, asked them to react to Perry and Romney. Former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum said he has been talking about Social Security reform for well over a decade, displaying “the courage to tell the truth” in another state with a large elderly population. Rep. Ron Paul said he would like to see young people given a chance to opt out and invest

their money where they choose. Businessman Herman Cain declined to endorse or reject Perry’s language, saying, “I don’t care what you call it, it’s broken.” Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich drew an appreciate roar from the audience when he said he was not especially worried about Perry or Romney frightening voters “when Obama scares them every single day.”

voted for closing the school, but has reconsidered his position as he researched the topic. Schiowitz noted closing the school would require the district to bus more students, eliminate a community center in south Wilkes-Barre and increase the student population in other schools. He also noted one plan being discussed is to build a new senior high school and renovate one of the other two high schools to accommodate junior high and/or middle school students – an expensive proposition. Keeping three high schools could also give the district the option of creating a school that

focuses on one aspect of education, such as arts or science. Schiowitz, whose appointed term expires in December and who did not seek election to a full term, said he was not arguing for or against closing Meyers, but wanted the board to consider those factors. The board has debated the fate of Meyers for more than a decade, as enrollment shifted and new structural problems were discovered. The new study will look at the pros and cons of closing Meyers by the start of next school year, and must be completed by January.

Daniel E. Rozanski

Elinor C. Aufiero

September 11, 2011

September 11, 2011

E. Rozanski, 83, of the D aniel Hudson Gardens section of

Plains Township, passed away peacefully on Sunday evening, September 11, 2011, at the PartridgeTippett Nursing Facility, Wesley Village, Jenkins Township, following an illness. Born in Plains Township, on September 7, 1928, he was a son of the late Peter and Lottie Senderovitz Rozanski. He was a graduate of Plains Memorial High School, class of 1946, and was a decorated Army veteran of the Korean War. Danny was a self-employed general contractor and had built many homes and townhouses in the Plains Township, Wilkes-Barre, and Scranton areas for more than 40 years, doing business as Dan Rozanski Homes. Dan was also the former owner and operator of Plains Lumber on South Oak Street, Hudson, until his retirement in 1998. Danny was an avid Yankees fan and he also loved his Oakland Raiders football. He was a member of Ss. Peter and Paul Church, Plains Township, the Joseph E. Conlon American Legion Post 558, Plains Township, and a former member of Plains Township Sewer Authority Board. He was preceded in death by his wife, the former Mary Lou Gray on March 7, 2005; son, Daniel Jr. (Danny Boy) on June 7, 2004; brothers, Joseph and Bennie Rozanski. Surviving are a daughter, Joan

C. Aufiero, formerly of AshE linor ley, passed away peacefully at

Danielle Reed, and her husband, William, Moosic; grandsons, Matthew and Justin Reed, Moosic; four step granddaughters; 11 step greatgrandchildren; sister-in-law, Jeanne Gildea and her husband, Jerry, Plains Township; several nieces and nephews. Mr. Rozanski’s funeral will be conducted at 10 a.m. Wednesday in the Mark V. Yanaitis Funeral Home, 55 Stark St., Plains Township, with a Mass of Christian Burial at 10:30 a.m. in Ss. Peter and Paul Church, Plains Township. Interment will follow in the parish cemetery, Plains Township. Friends may call from 9 a.m. to the time of service Wednesday in the funeral home. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to The Wyoming Valley Chapter of the American Red Cross, 256 N. Sherman St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702. Memorial condolences or directions maybe accessed at www.yanaitisfuneralhome.com.

Camille R. Spring September 9, 2011

C

amille R. Spring, of Tioga Terrace Apartments died Friday, September 9, 2011, in the Tyler Memorial Hospital in Tunkhannock. She was born in Ashley, on January 23, 1937, daughter of the late Joseph and Ida Jacobosky Zardecki. Camille was a 1954 graduate of Ashley High School, and prior to her retirement she worked as a sales clerk in several Tunkhannock retail stores. She was preceded in death by her husband William F. Spring in 1954. More Obituaries, Page 8A

Surviving her are son, William, Forty Fort; daughters, Lynn Morris, Shohola Falls, Cathy Custer, West Richland, Wash., Holly Reynolds, Navarre, Fla.; six grandchildren; and one great grand-daughter. At Camille’s request there will be no funeral services. Interment of cremated remains will be in Sunnyside Cemetery, Tunkhannock. Arrangements are through the Sheldon-Kukuchka Funeral Home Inc., 73 W. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. Online condolences may be sent to the family at www.sheldonkukuchksfunerslhome.com.

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Board member questions Meyers High repairs Fate of aging high school has been debated for years as W-B Area examines options.

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the age of 99 surrounded by her daughter, son, and son-in-law on Sunday, September 11, 2011, in Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. Born on May 21, 1912, to the late Christopher Justin Chicknosky and Agatha Markosky Chicknosky in Breslau, Hanover Township, Elinor graduated from Hanover Township High School in 1929. Always adventurous and independent, Elinor set out on her own to obtain a position as a typist in New York City and live with family friends in New Jersey. Her faith was deeply tested twice, Upon returning to the Wyoming after her husband died; during the Valley, Elinor married Frank H. Au- Flood of 1972, when she lost all of fiero on June 21, 1934, and they her possessions and home; and in raised three children, Dominick, 1998 when her youngest son, Joseph, died. Just as when she was a Marlene and Joseph. Frank’s sudden death in 1944 left young widow, Elinor summoned an Elinor a widow responsible for rais- inner strength that belied her petite ing their three children, one only an persona. She showed her family infant, on her own. Focused on her how to revel in the good memories children, she sought employment and endure the sadness of his aband demonstrated the resilience sence. Fiercely independent, Elinor and tenacity that characterized her drove until she was 96 and lived on life. After working at Spencer Surgi- her own until she was 97. She loved cal Supports, she secured a position to garden, wear high heels, and reas a bookkeeper and sewing teacher gale her family with stories of her in 1950 at Singer Sewing Machine youth. When she joined the commuCompany until she retired in 1975. nity at Heritage House in WilkesA master seamstress, she taught Barre, she won over the nurses with many her art while employing her her sweet disposition and her evertalents to craft beautiful prom dress- present smile. In addition to the loss of her pares for her daughter. Elinor prudentents, husband, Frank, and son Joly managed her money to ensure her seph, she was preceded in death by family trips vacations to New York her brother, Joseph Chicknosky; sisCity, Atlantic City, and the Pocono ters, Mary Bolka, Sallie Filgueria, Mountains. Victoria Gilsky, and most recently When her grandchildren were Louise Gomez on September 2, born, she designed their clothes, 2011. neatly stitching in their personal laSurviving are her children, Dobel in each. She delighted them with minick Aufiero and his wife, Martihomemade baked goods, from Tur- na, Mountain Top; daughter, Markey Cookies at Thanksgiving to lene Mason, and her husband, RobEaster Pie to beautifully decorated ert, Kingston; daughter-in-law, AniItalian, Anise, and a host of other ta Michel; seven grandchildren; and cookies at Christmas. Elinor estab- 12 great-grandchildren. lished holiday traditions that rival Funeral services will be held at all. 9 a.m. on Thursday in the Nat & As much as Elinor did for her Gawlas Funeral Home, 89 Park family, she did for others. Elinor was Ave., Wilkes-Barre, with a Mass of a devoted member of the Holy Ros- Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in St. ary Church in Wilkes-Barre, often a Ignatius of Loyola Church, 339 N. daily attendee of Mass, with deep Maple Ave., Kingston. Interment faith in the prayers she said every will be in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Hamorning and night. She was a mem- nover Township. Family and friends ber and officer of the Holy Rosary may call from 5 to 8 p.m. Wednesday Church, The Sacred Heart and Ros- in the Nat & Gawlas Funeral Home. ary Society, Holy Rosary Federal In lieu of flowers, donations may Credit Union, and St. Nicholas Se- be made to Saint Vincent DePaul nior Citizens. With the Senior Citi- Kitchen, 39 East Jackson Street, zens, she traveled to cultural events, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701. Online conHawaii, and various other resorts dolences may be sent to www.nathroughout the United States. tandgawlasfuneralhome.com.

HARRISBURG (AP) — Tuesday’s “Pennsylvania Cash 5” jackpot will be worth at least $225,000 because no player matched the five winning numbers drawn in Monday’s game. Lottery officials said 46 players matched four numbers and won $310.50 each; 1,763 players matched three numbers and won $13.50 each; and 23,133 players matched two numbers and won $1 each Thursday’s “Pennsylvania Match 6 Lotto” jackpot will be worth at least $2.1 million because no player holds a ticket with one row that matches all six winning numbers drawn in Monday’s game

OBITUARIES Adonizio, John Sr. Aufiero, Elinor Berger, Phyllis Delaney, John Dzikoski, Sophie Gallagher George Haberski, Joseph Hanahue, Anne Hilbert, Lois Kasarda, Karen Knowles, Lisa Petersen, Roy Postupack, Richard Remus, Casimer Rozanski, Daniel Shumlas, Dolores Spring, Camille Wilson, Ruth Wylam, John Page 2A, 8A

BUILDING TRUST The Times Leader strives to correct errors, clarify stories and update them promptly. Corrections will appear in this spot. If you have information to help us correct an inaccuracy or cover an issue more thoroughly, call the newsroom at 829-7242. THE COLUMN on Page 2A Monday by Joe Butkiewicz should have said the Toby’s Creek catch basin is in Pringle. Also, in the final paragraph, the word dogged should have been dodged.

+(ISSN No. 0896-4084) USPS 499-710

Issue No. 2011-256 Newsroom

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 PAGE 3A

LOCAL

Warning system’s fate uncertain

PLAINS TOWNSHIP

NEWS

Testing in death continues

he state Department of Environmental Protection said MonT day it is awaiting testing on the air

By JON RISKIND Times Leader Washington Bureau

Future uncertain But Campbell said he is not sure what the long-term future holds for the river gauge system. That long-term funding picture could be a topic of discussion at the next meeting of the Susquehanna River Basin Commission, scheduled for Thursday. Susan Obleski, the basin commission’s spokeswoman, said that systemwide, from New York to Pennsylvania and points south, money was cobbled together by the commission, other state agencies and the National Weather Service to keep the river and rain gauges and other parts of the flood warning and forecasting system together for 2011. Even if Pennsylvania provides funding for 2012, “We do not know where the rest of the system stands for 2012,” said Obleski. She noted that it’s important, for the Wilkes-Barre area, for instance, to know what’s coming from the north when it comes to rainfall and river levels. While congressional earmarks – which involve lawmakers directing federal money for specific projects – are seemingly gone for the foreseeable future, an attempt will be made to persuade the White House to include funding for the system in President Obama’s proposed 2013 budget, which will be released in February. The river and rain gauge system has rarely in recent years been included in any administration’s budget, leaving it to Congress to appropriate the money. “With higher and higher hurdles” involved in obtaining federal funding specifically approved by Congress, river gauge system proponents will continue to look for other sources of funding, including from federal agencies that might be able to find money in their budgets even if they aren’t directed to by individual lawmakers. Obleski said she hopes federal officials can be persuaded that the flood warning and forecasting system saves more money than it costs. But state agencies, too, are feeling the pinch of budget constraints and having to make up for federal funding cuts. “It’s painful to think that a cost-effective program that protects public health, safety and welfare could be a part of this (federal) funding cut,” Obleski said. Funding supporters Despite their zeal for cutting federal spending, GOP Reps. Lou Barletta of Hazleton and Tom Marino of Lycoming Township have said the river gauge system is a good use of federal funds. Sen. Bob Casey, D-Scranton, also supports federal funding for the system. When the river gauge in Wilkes-Barre was lost Thursday night, the river crest height was forecast incorrectly in Luzerne County.

BRIEF

WEST PITTSTON

Funds for $2.4M forecasting and warning system axed in deficitreduction effort.

WASHINGTON – The Wilkes-Barre river gauge knocked out of commission by a roiling Susquehanna River on Thursday night will soon be replaced, and at a higher height. But the future of federal funding remains in doubt for the $2.4 million flood forecasting and warning system in New York and Pennsylvania and points south, which includes $1 million for the river gauges that track what is happening at the moment and the rain gauges that help predict future water levels. The system’s funding was eliminated by Congress for 2011, the victim of a push for spending cuts and deficit reduction. That left the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Geological Survey to pay $270,000 to maintain the river gauges in the state for the remainder of the year, said James Campbell, director of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Pennsylvania Water Science Center, which participates in running the system. The geological survey also contributes to keeping the system going. The state has committed to picking up that cost again for 2012, because it looks like pending federal spending bills for the federal fiscal year that begins Oct. 1 again won’t pay for the river gauges, Campbell said.

IN

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

John Zavada Jr. talks on his cellphone as he stands in the flood debris that was once his business, County Optical, on River Street in Plains Township.

Businesses heavily hit zynski, as she surveyed the pile, which said. Tuft-Tex Complex firms, Andy’s, Academy of Golf and others reeling. included a collection of lollipop molds Precautions failed By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES jandes@timesleader.com

PLAINS TWP. -- Michele Mleczynski had just opened her business, Sugar Artist Emporium, on River Street in Plains Township on April 2. Her shelves were filled with hundreds of products for bakers, and new merchandise for Halloween and Christmas had recently arrived. She also had equipment in the storage space for the coffee shop her son, Jeff, was about to open next door. On Monday morning, every bit of it was piled in a heap in front of the store in the Tuft-Tex Complex. Six other businesses in the strip center were also wiped out by Susquehanna River flooding that went up to the ceiling. “Welcome to our disaster,” said Mlec-

filled with river mud instead of chocolate. Mleczynski lost an estimated $65,000 in inventory and displays and said she was unable to obtain flood insurance as a renter. Federal assistance will be her only hope of reopening, she said. “Otherwise I will be out of business,” Mleczynski said, her voice cracking. “I’m trying not to think about how upsetting this is.” John Zavada Jr., owner of County Optical, estimated that he lost at least $400,000 in equipment, including a lens-cutting machine that cost $100,000. He also rents space in the Tuft-Tex Complex and said he was denied flood insurance because the government claimed he was not in a flood zone. “I wanted to buy it just in case,” he

He elevated one of his optical machines on cinderblocks 2 feet off the ground, but the water rose to the top of his business, knocking down ceiling tiles that were now part of the mud mixture coating his floor. “Everything’s gone – I’m talking everything,” he said. “Forty years down the drain in one day. At this point, I don’t know if we’re going to be able to come back.” Mike Musto, who owns the complex with several family members, said he has already hired five contractors to repair the building, hoping to have it ready for occupation in a month. He estimated the building and contents of his family’s business, Tuft-Tex Carpet, sustained about a million dolSee PLAINS, Page 7A

SHICKSHINNY

Citizens blame levee for damage to town Many residents said they now plan to move because they’ve suffered enough.

WILKES-BARRE

Manna House needs help

Volunteers of America’s Manna House Transitional Living Facility on River Street in Wilkes-Barre continues to be challenged by recent flooding. The basement of the facility flooded by seepage in that area. CEO William Jones said the eight previously homeless youths housed by the facility would not be able to return until the electrical system, compromised by flood water, was fixed and then inspected. In the meantime, options for temporary housing were being investigated, which would allow the youths to continue their efforts to reach goals such as employment and school attendance. WILKES-BARRE

County office relocates

The Luzerne County Domestic Relations office has relocated to second floor 85 E. Union St. as of today due to flood damage at the Bernard Brominski courthouse at River and North streets. The phone number for the office remains unchanged, said director Jim Davis. WILKES-BARRE

Volunteers from King’s

Students from King’s College in Wilkes-Barre will be volunteering in the community today in a flood relief effort. From 1:30 to 6 p.m., students from King’s and the Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Commerce will be distributing meals to families in West Pittston whose homes were flooded. The students will also be assisting in a cleanup effort in Exeter, helping flood victims remove items from their homes near Susquehanna Avenue.

By STEVE MOCARSKY smocarsky@timesleader.com

SHICKSHINNY – Residents’ emotions in this borough of less than 1,000 ran the gamut Monday as they began recovery from Friday’s flood devastation. One was resentment. “I’m going to go to the dike (in the Wyoming Valley) and put a big sign on it that says ‘Happy 150th Anniversary, Shickshinny. Here’s your gift.’ I don’t care what the politicians say. These people know what that dike is doing to them. It’s killing this town,” Shickshinny Fire Chief/Emergency Management Coordinator Kevin Morris said. Mayor Beverly Moore estimated 80 percent of the town was affected by flood waters that in lower-lying areas rose to the roofs of houses when the Susquehanna River crested at 42.66 feet. Morris and others believe the Wyoming Valley Levee System north of them did its job – keeping the water within the river banks. That is, until the waters pass through the system and hit downstream communities such as Shickshinny with greater force than ever because they can no longer spread out upstream.

quality of a West Pittston home to determine the cause of an Exeter woman’s death. County Coroner John Corcoran said Saturday Carol Mikols, 62, died while house sitting for her sister. Mikols Mikols was found inside a house at Susquehanna Avenue and Second Street in West Pittston. The state DEP and federal Environmental Protection Agency have been testing the air quality near the home since Friday. Kevin Sunday, a spokesman for the DEP, said Monday that oxygen levels in all other homes were normal, and the oxygen in the house Mikols was found in has half the normal level, mixed with an organic compound. That organic compound can be anything from carbon dioxide to methane, Sunday said, and EPA testing is still incomplete on what the compound is. Sunday said the DEP is continuing to monitor all houses in the development and trying to discern the compound and where it came from.

WILKES-BARRE AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Shickshinny resident Claude Harvey dumps the plaster from the walls of his North Canal Street home in a pile of debris outside for removal on Monday.

“This may be the death of the town and it’s mainly due to that dike,” Morris said. If it’s suggested that the Wyoming Valley would have been flooded without the levee, Morris believes fair is fair. “Let them share the pain. Why is Mrs. Smith on Main Street in Wilkes-Barre any better than Mrs. Smith on Main Street in Shickshinny?” “I think this is the end of the line. I hope not and I’m trying to be optimistic, but there are a lot of homeowners who just said, ‘I’ve had enough,’ ” Morris said. Cynthia Beach, 53, has lived with her husband, Doug, 54, at their 10 N. Sus-

quehanna Ave. home for about 30 years, but they don’t plan on staying there much longer. Hit by flood waters five times before, the past weekend’s disaster was the final straw. “We’ve been through it enough. We’re just tired. We’re not getting any younger,” Cynthia said. “The neighbors next door are leaving. They’re tired too.” The Beaches and their children, Andrew, 22, and Joseph, 19, were able to get some belongings moved out before the midnight evacuation, but they still lost a lot. “The government keeps promising this and promis-

ing that, and they’re never going to do anything,” Doug Beach said. “They don’t want to raise (a levee), so we’re just going to leave.” “Or let them tear (the house) down and give us the money,” Cynthia Beach said. A couple blocks north, Lillian Kresge, 85, sat in a lawn chair across the street from her home of 45 years watching her nephew, Aaron Jones and his son, Aaron Jr., wash her porch with a high-pressure sprayer. As she looked at her mudcovered belongings on the sidewalk, her voice cracked See BLAME, Page 7A

Chamber offers info

The Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Commerce has offered information for flood recovery for local businesses. The information can be found at www.gwbrecovery.org. • Businesses that need assistance can send in their information through a form on the site. That information will be forwarded to the offices dealing with recovery funding or if specific things such as help cleaning a business or general volunteer help is needed. The site includes: • Businesses that are offering free or discounted services to businesses and individuals affected by the flood are listed in the Resource section. • Business recovery information resources from Small Business Association posted on the site. • Businesses that are open and were not affected by flood waters.


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Judge rules Selenski’s attorneys must stay on case Jurist denied request from stand-by counsel for substitute attorneys.

By SHEENA DELAZIO sdelazio@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE – A Luzerne County judge on Monday made several rulings regarding the upcoming capital murder trial of Hugo Selenski, including that his stand-by attorneys will remain on

the case. Judge Joseph Van Jura made the rulings after attorneys last week made several requests in the trial scheduled to begin Sept. 19. Selenski, 38, of Kingston Township, faces two counts of homicide and several other related charges in the deaths of Tammy Fassett and Michael Kerkowski, both 37, in May 2002. Their bodies were discovered in a shallow grave outside Selenski’s

home in June 2003. If convicted of first-degree murder, Selenski faces either the death penalty or life in prison without parole. One request was made by Selenski’s stand-by counsel, attorneys John Pike, Robert Buttner and David Lampman, who asked that substitute attorneys be appointed to Selenski’s case. The attorneys said that because Selenski had expressed “displeasure” with them and re-

fused to discuss his case with them, substitute counsel should be appointed “even if it requires a continuance (of the trial),” and that Selenski said he wishes to have new counsel. Van Jura denied that request Monday, when he also denied several requests made by prosecutors. District Attorney Jackie Musto Carroll, Deputy Assistant District Attorney David Pedri and Assistant District Attorneys Jar-

rett Ferentino and Michael Melnick requested that jurors be permitted to see the property of Kerkowski, which Van Jura denied Monday. Van Jura also denied a request by prosecutors not to allow Selenski to introduce any evidence of an alibi at the time of the trial and a request to conduct a neuro-psychiatric evaluation of Selenski. Prosecutors also asked for a pre-trial hearing to be scheduled, which Van Jura granted, and set a

hearing for Thursday. Earlier this month, Van Jura allowed Selenski to represent himself at his trial, with the assistance of stand-by counsel. Selenski’s stand-by counsel can answer questions Selenski has throughout jury selection and trial but cannot actively participate in the case.

Township Supervisor Edward Whitebread told state police Walp was volunteering to take pictures of flooded homes and he witnessed Slominski arguing with Walp. Whitebread said he saw Slominski grab a sword from a shed and heard him say he was going to get Walp, the criminal complaint says. State police said in the complaint Slominski returned to the area with Walp holding a metal rake. A preliminary hearing is scheduled on Wednesday before District Judge John Hasay in Shickshinny.

found intoxicated on East Market Street at 9:30 a.m. Monday. • Peter Alexis reported Monday someone entered his vehicle and stole a global positioning system and a radio on South Hancock Street. • Maurice Jones reported Monday someone entered his Sambourne Street residence and stole a television and computer equipment. • Deanna Rochelle, of Plymouth, reported Monday someone stole two doors from her Jeep while it was parked in the area of 430 E. South St. • Joe Jendrzejewski, of North Meade Street, reported Sunday he was struck in the face with a glass of ice during a confrontation about parking near a garage. Police said they cited Tahid Green, of Philadelphia, with trespass regarding blocking the garage with a vehicle. Jendrzejewski refused medical attention, police said.

• Alexandre Ved, of Pocono Lake, reported Sunday a computer and a vehicle key were stolen during a burglary at 199 Spring St. • April Lynch reported Sunday someone slashed a tire on her vehicle while it was parked on Wyoming Street. • Police are investigating an armed robbery at the Turkey Hill on Carey Avenue that occurred at about 1:40 a.m. Thursday. A clerk told police a black male, 18 to 20 years old, approximately 5 feet, 4 inches tall entered the store with a handgun and demanded money from the cash register and a customer. The suspect, who wore a dark hooded sweatshirt, white T-

shirt, white gloves and a blue rag over his face, sped away in a Jeep, which was later found idling on Plymouth Avenue, police said. • Police are investigating an armed robbery that occurred at the Turkey Hill on South Main Street at about 12:05 a.m. Thursday. Police said a white male, approximately 5 feet, 8 inches tall, 170 pounds, entered the store concealing his face with a white sock. The suspect demanded money and cigarettes while holding a knife to the clerk, police said. • Police said they arrested Ajanee Wright, 21, of Courtright Street, on a charge of simple assault after April Longfoot

claimed he assaulted her on Wednesday. • Police said tires were slashed on a vehicle parked in the first block of South Sherman Street on Sept. 6. • Police said a global positioning system and a satellite radio were stolen from two vehicles on Wood Street on Sept. 6. • Treasa Ransome, of Hutson Street, reported on Sept. 6 someone entered her residence and stole two laptop computers and a video game system. • Kathlyn Gildea reported on Sept. 6 that someone stole the Pennsylvania license plate HCS-8037 from her vehicle while it was parked in the area of 278 N. Pennsylvania Ave.

Sheena Delazio, a Times Leader staff writer, may be reached at 8297235.

POLICE BLOTTER CONYNGHAM TWP. – A man was arrested on charges he threatened a volunteer during the Susquehanna River flood with a sword. Scott A. Slominski, 27, of Italy Street, Mocanaqua, was charged with terroristic threats, disorderly conduct and public drunkenness. He was arraigned Friday and jailed at the Luzerne County Correctional Facility for lack of $2,500 bail. According to the criminal complaint: Glenn Walp told state police at Shickshinny he was volunteering for the state Department of Environmental Protection taking pictures of flooded homes on Italy Street when Slominski approached his vehicle. Slominski was screaming at Walp and his wife to do something about the flood. Walp told Slominski to leave his wife alone.

WILKES-BARRE – City police reported the following: • Jim Geiger, of Walnut Street, reported Monday someone slashed his pool liner. • Police said they cited Jeremy Roper, 40, address listed as homeless, with public drunkenness when he was allegedly

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Obama wants action on jobs bill

B R I E F

President takes to the road with him. “We can’t afford to try to sell the package to these same political games, not now,” Obama said. the public. The president sent the By JULIE PACE and ERICA WERNER Associated Press

AP PHOTO

‘Cuban Five’ stage protest

Members of the Committee of Solidarity with Cuba protest Monday outside the U.S. embassy, dressed as five Cuban prisoners, to demand their release from a U.S. jail in San Salvador, El Salvador. The men known as the ‘Cuban Five’ were convicted in 2001 of trying to infiltrate U.S. military installations in South Florida, such as the Miami-based Southern Command headquarters. CIUDAD DEL CARMEN, MEXICO

6 oil workers are stable

workers who were rescued S ixaliveoil after floating for three days in

the Gulf of Mexico are stable and conscious, though suffering from bumps and bruises and sunburn after weathering a tropical storm, a doctor overseeing their treatment said Monday. All were transferred from a hospital run by Mexico’s state oil company, Petroleos Mexicanos, or Pemex, to a private clinic. One survivor transferred in a wheelchair was asked how he was feeling and he responded, “Good.” A Pemex official also said Bangladeshi oil worker Kham Nadimuzzaman died in the hospital after being rescued. Two other workers were found dead and rescue crews continued the search for the last of the 10 workers. The official could not be named because he was not authorized to speak to the news media. Authorities have not given a cause of death or identified the bodies.

DUBLIN

Katia hits Ireland, Britain Tropical Storm Katia shut down roads and power and led to one death Monday in Ireland and Britain, where residents braced for the strongest wind gusts in 15 years. Forecasters in both countries said Monday’s gusts topped 80 mph as the storm — previously a hurricane as it roared across the Atlantic — made driving, shipfaring and even walking dangerous in broad swathes of Ireland, Scotland and northern England. In northeast England’s County Durham, a driver died after a tree fell on a car on the highway, Durham police said. Officers later warned all drivers to be careful driving through the high winds. GOLDENDALE, WASH.

Concerns over poor air Firefighters gained better control of a wildfire that has destroyed more than 100 structures near Satus Pass, but health authorities warned residents in Eastern Washington about poor air quality Monday as a result of the fire. The wildfire burning about 10 miles north of Goldendale was 50 percent contained, despite hot, dry weather in the region. The fire has burned about 6 square miles, or more than 4,200 acres. A lack of wind has aided firefighters, but those light winds also mean smoke tends to hang over the region. GUATEMALA CITY

Candidates head to runoff Guatemala’s leading presidential candidates are headed for a November runoff after a retired general who had a commanding lead in the polls failed to win 50 percent of the vote. With 95 percent of the polling stations reporting Monday, preliminary results showed Otto Perez Molina of the Patriot Party with 36 percent support, followed by businessman Manuel Baldizon with 24 percent and Eduardo Suger with 16 percent. “We are going to double our efforts, now that we are in the second round,” Perez said after learning he would be in the runoff.

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama bluntly challenged Congress Monday to act immediately on his new jobs plan, brandishing a copy of the legislation in the Rose Garden and demanding: “No games, no politics, no delays.” Surrounded by police officers, firefighters, teachers, construction workers and others he said would be helped by the $447 billion package, the president said the only thing that would block its passage would be lawmakers deciding it wasn’t good politics to work

package to Congress later Monday, after unveiling it last week in a speech to a joint session of Congress. Then he’s heading out to try to sell it to the public, today in Ohio — home state of House Speaker John Boehner — and Wednesday in North Carolina. At the same time, the Democratic National Committee is backing up the effort with a new ad campaign in politically key states from Nevada to New Hampshire. The centerpiece of the plan cuts payroll taxes that pay for Social Security, giving a tax break to workers and businesses. There’s also new spending for teachers and school construction, and an

AP PHOTO

President Barack Obama, accompanied by Vice President Joe Biden and others, holds up a copy of his jobs plan Monday.

extension of jobless benefits, among other elements. Republican lawmakers who control the House have promised quick review of the legislation

and seem open to the tax-cutting elements, but some have already rejected new spending. Obama has said the plan

could be passed without adding to the nation’s deficit, and on Monday, the White House detailed the specifics of how the legislation would be paid for. It would rely on a series of tax hikes that have all previously been proposed by the White House and rejected by Republicans. They are: •$400 billion from limiting the itemized deductions for charitable contributions and other deductions that can be taken by individuals making over $200,000 a year and families making over $250,000; •$40 billion from closing loopholes for oil and gas companies; •$18 billion from requiring fund managers to pay higher taxes on certain income; •$3 billion from changing the tax treatment of corporate jets.

At least 75 die in Kenyan blast Gadhafi

defiant; oil hub attacked

Death toll from the gasoline pipeline explosion in Nairobi might still rise.

By TOM ODULA Associated Press

NAIROBI, Kenya — A leaking gasoline pipeline in Kenya’s capital exploded on Monday, turning part of a slum into an inferno in which at least 75 people were killed and more than 100 hurt. Flames leapt out from the pipeline in a radius of some 300 yards, setting shacks ablaze and incinerating scores of people. Reporters later saw clusters of charred bodies and blackened bones at the site. Some burned bodies floated in a nearby river filled with sewage. Homes had been built right up to the pipeline, the residents said. “I’ve lost count of the number of bodies,” said Wilfred Mbithi, the policeman in charge of operations in Nairobi as he stood at the scene. “Many had dived into the river trying to put out their flames.” Red Cross official Pamela Indiaka said the Red Cross is providing body bags and has dealt with 75 bodies so far. The death toll from the blast may still rise. Nearby, a young woman clawed through smoldering timbers, screaming in grief. Others wandered by the remains of the inferno, frantically dialing phone numbers that didn’t go through or staring around in disbelief. Fires still smoldered among the twisted wreckage of corrugated iron sheets and scattered possessions. Visibility was poor because of rain and smoke. Resident Joseph Mwangi, 34, said he was feeding his cow when people went running past him, calling out that there was a leak in the pipeline. He said others started drawing fuel and that he was going to go and get a bucket

Fifteen anti-Gadhafi forces killed in strikes deep within Western-backed territory. By BEN HUBBARD and HADEEL AL-SHALCHI Associated Press

AP PHOTO

Joseph Mwangi, 34, sits in a state of shock Monday after discovering the charred remains of two of his children at the scene of a fuel explosion in Nairobi, Kenya.

and get fuel too when he heard an explosion around 9 a.m. By then fuel had leaked into the river and parts of the river had also caught fire. People in

flames were jumping into the fiery, stinking mess, he said. Moments after speaking to the AP, Mwangi discovered two small charred bodies in

the burnt wreckage of his home. “Those were my children,” he said blankly, before collapsing on the ground sobbing.

Election for Weiner’s seat too close to call New York voters unhappy with the president may ties to the community. Republicans are working to frame the race as a elect a Republican for the first time. By BETH FOUHY Associated Press

NEW YORK — To gauge how politically weakened President Barack Obama has become, look to the 9th Congressional District in New York City, where voters unhappy with the president may elect a Republican for the first time. Today’s special election to replace former Democratic Rep. Anthony Weiner has become too close to call, with public opinion polling showing a slight edge for Republican Bob Turner, a retired media executive with no prior political experience. Panicked at the prospect of an embarrassing loss, Democrats have poured cash into the race and sent in their stars to try to save the party’s candidate, state Assemblyman David Weprin. He has been forced to defend Obama’s economic policies even as he tries to stress his own independence and close

referendum on Obama, even though turnout is usually low in a special congressional election. On Monday, House Republican Leader Eric Cantor argued that a Turner victory would be an “unprecedented win” and the latest evidence of voter dissatisfaction with Obama. “That district is not unlike the rest of the country. People are very unhappy with the economy tight now and, frankly, I would say unhappy with the lack of leadership on the part of this White House,” Cantor, of Virginia, told reporters in the Capitol. Back in the district that spans parts of Queens and Brooklyn, Turner campaigned with Rudy Giuliani, the popular former New York City Republican mayor. A Siena Poll released Friday showed Turner leading Weprin among likely voters, with 50-44 percent margin. The same poll found just 43 percent of voters approving of Obama’s job performance, while 54 percent said they disapproved.

Turner

Weprin

TRIPOLI, Libya — Fugitive leader Moammar Gadhafi urged his followers to fight on Monday in a brief message of defiance that carried wider resonance after twin attacks on a key oil hub and fierce resistance in a loyalist stronghold by fighters believed led by the former Libyan ruler’s son. The back-to-back strikes at the Ras Lanouf oil facility — killing at least 15 anti-Gadhafi forces — showed that blows can still be inflicted deep within territory held by the Western-backed opposition, which is struggling to break through the last Gadhafi bastions. Opposition reinforcements, including convoys of pickup trucks mounted with machine guns, converged outside the loyalistheld town of Bani Walid for a possible intensified assault after several failed attempts to drive out pro-Gadhafi forces. One opposition commander claimed Gadhafi’s son Seif al-Islam is leading loyalist forces massed in the town, about 90 miles southeast of Tripoli. It’s unlikely that pro-Gadhafi fighters can withstand a sustained siege on the town. But it’s unclear whether the showdowns in the last loyalist strongholds — including Gadhafi’s hometown of Sirte — will mark a crippling end or open a new phase of an underground insurgency and hit-andrun attacks against Libya’s new leadership. “We will not be ruled after we were the masters,” said the brief statement attributed to Gadhafi that was read on Syria’s Al-Rai TV by its owner Mishan al-Jabouri, a former Iraqi lawmaker and Gadhafi supporter. The message described Libya’s new leaders as “traitors” who are willing to turn over the country’s oil riches to foreign interests. “We will not hand Libya to colonialism, once again, as the traitors want,” said the statement, which pledged to fight against the “coup.” The firebrand words from Gadhafi contrast sharply with the staggering losses for his regime in recent weeks, including being driven from the capital Tripoli and left with only a handful of strongholds. Gadhafi’s whereabouts are unknown, but his followers claim he is still in Libya. Some of his family members have fled to neighboring Algeria and others to Niger, most recently his son al-Saadi.


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W-B police, fire back to regular routine; PEMA forms sought State police and National Guard patrols end. Pickup for debris will continue.

to normal working hours and shifts, Mayor Tom Leighton announced Monday. Drew McLaughlin, administrative coordinator for the city, said Pennsylvania State Police By BILL O’BOYLE and Pennsylvania National boboyle@timesleader.com Guard patrols have ceased. The City Council meeting that WILKES-BARRE – City police and fire personnel have returned was canceled Thursday has not

LOOTERS Continued from Page 1A

ed of a burglary-related offense during a state of emergency, such as a mandatory evacuation. “There is no looting crime per say in the crimes code, but it does say a theft is a second-degree felony if the offense happens during a natural disaster,” Tokach said. “It’s a much more severe penalty, with maximum penalties of 10 years in prison and a $25,000 fine.” Tokach said the grading of a theft charge depends on the value of property stolen. “Almost all thefts are misdemeanors, but it all depends on the value of the stolen property,” Tokach noted. “If the value exceeds more than $2,000 or if it’s a vehicle, it’s a third-degree felony.” Police charged Brenda Lee Wolfe, 29, of Eley Street, and two others with burglarizing a house on Eley Street on Friday. Sara Chicallo told police Wolfe had a key to her house to care for her dog while she evacuated. When she returned home, she noticed a television, a computer and other items gone, according to charges filed. Police allege they found the items in the Eley Street residence of Christopher Wilson, 40, and Marie Zuccaro, 32. Wolfe, Wilson and Zuccaro remained jailed at the county correctional facility for lack of $30,000 bail each. A second incident in Kingston occurred on Penn Street at about 8:45 p.m. Thursday. Police Chief Keith Keiper said two men entered a house and were confronted by the homeowner. “The owner got a good description of the two and our guys caught them a short time later,” Keiper said. Police charged Charles Wickiser III, 21, of Kingston, and Justin Todd Haden, 20, of Wilkes-Barre, with felony criminal trespass. They remained jailed at the county correctional facility for lack of $20,000 bail. Guard spots vehicle Two Pennsylvania National Guard members on patrol in South Wilkes-Barre during the evacuation on Friday spotted a suspicious vehicle dropping people off in the area of Plymouth Avenue just before 1 p.m. City police said they captured Maurice Hassan Barnes, 19, of High Street, Wilkes-Barre, and a 17-year-old boy hiding behind a shed on Diebel Avenue. Police said Barnes and the juvenile had gloves and knives, and tried to hide a bag containing money, computers and other items, according to charges filed. The items were taken from several houses in the evacuated area of South Wilkes-Barre, police said. Barnes was charged with burglary related offenses and remained the county prison for lack of $50,000 bail. The juvenile is expected to be charged in juvenile court. City police said they also arrested William Gronosky, 22, of Carey Avenue, Wilkes-Barre, and Kevin Williams Jr., 29, of Philadelphia, for allegedly entering a house on Brookside Street, an evacuated area hit by flooding, at about 11:30 p.m. Sunday. Gronosky and Williams claimed they were checking on the house for a friend, police said. Police said the homeowner confronted the two men, who were captured when they ran out the rear door. Gronosky and Williams were charged with burglary-related offenses and jailed at the county prison for lack of $10,000 bail each. At least two more people were arrested in Plymouth, but there were no names or details available as of presstime. Edward Lewis, a Times Leader staff writer, may be reached at 829-7196.

yet been reset, McLaughlin said. “An announcement of the meeting date will be coming soon,” he said. “We’re shooting for this week.” Butch Frati, the city’s director of operations, said the Department of Public Works will continue removing debris from flood-affected properties. He

said residents and businesses have been piling debris on the sidewalks and it will all be picked up. “Most of it has been removed,” Frati said. The flood gates were removed from the Market Street Bridge early Monday and the bridge was expected to be open for traf-

fic by last evening. McLaughlin said River Street was reopening to traffic at 5 p.m. yesterday. City officials have been going door to door in the Brookside section as well as Chilwick, West Beatty, Waller, Coon and Brookside streets and North Washington Street, Weir Lane and Pennsylvania Avenue passing pout di-

saster survey sheets from PEMA. The forms are to be completed and will give PEMA a preliminary estimate of property damage. “We need those completed forms returned to City Hall to the mayor’s office by next Monday at 4:30 p.m.,” McLaughlin said.


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SCHOOL DISTRICTS

Calendars already require revamping

Some schools were evacuation ticoke, Plymouth Mountain, Plymouth Flats area and The Muhcenters. Transportation for lenburg Christian Academy.” students also a concern. “Most of those kids aren’t even

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Crews continue the process of cleanup at the Kmart at the Mark Plaza in Edwardsville on Monday afternoon after last week’s flooding. Kmart suffered extensive loss of product and significant interior damage, a spokesperson said.

Mark Plaza businesses wrecked doors and everything was affectAll badly damaged and will be dated with an estimated 8 feet or into place,” she said. Spokespersons for Redner’s ed,” White said. more of flood water Thursday inclosed until further notice. John Grisham, chief accountand Kmart said they do not have to Friday. Some lose total income. Their loss won’t come close in damage estimates yet, but both ing officer for Arcadia Realty, the By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER tmorgan@timesleader.com

EDWARDSVILLE – After more than 20 years as a medical assistant, Diane Cowman and her husband, Shawn, were excited to open their own day care center. They worked for months to secure the required certification and approvals from the state. After a month in business, they were just beginning to turn the corner, Diane Cowman said. In a matter of hours last Thursday, their business and livelihood were gone. Their center, the Play Care Drop in Center, was among seven businesses in the Mark Plaza in Edwardsville that were inun-

PLAINS Continued from Page 3A

lars in damage. He said he has flood insurance on the property, but it doesn’t cover the contents of renters. About $100,000 in hospital beds, scooters and other equipment was ruined at Flexible Mobility, also in the Tuft-Tex building, said owner, Joe Kobi. He, his workers and family members used vans to haul out some merchandise Thursday morning but had to stop as the water rapidly approached his business. He stayed until the last moment possible, loading patient files into a van, the wa-

BLAME Continued from Page 3A

as she fought back tears. “You think you’re all right until you sit down, and then you fall apart.” Kresge has been hit by smaller floods before and has recovered. Can she do it again? “I don’t want to. I love my house. I hate the thoughts of having to leave it. But at this

dollars to that suffered by the plaza’s two flagship tenants, Redner’s Warehouse Market and Kmart, both of which sustained extensive interior damage and loss of product. But the emotional and financial strain is almost incalculable, Cowman said. “We were in there today, and it’s 50 times worse than I anticipated,” Cowman said Monday. “The one side of the wall is totally caved in. Light fixtures in the ceiling collapsed and came down.” Both she and Shawn left their jobs to start the day care, which opened on Aug.15. They can’t reopen at another site without going through the certification process again, meaning they now have no income, she said. “We had developed a customer base. Everything was falling

stores suffered extensive loss of product and significant interior damage as water topped the flood doors that have protected both structures in the past. Kmart’s flood gate could protect it from a 34-foot river crest, said spokeswoman Kim Freely, while Redner’s flood gate protected it up to 37 feet, said spokesman Eric White. The doors were no match for Friday’s 42.66 crest of the Susquehanna River. White said employees cleared the store of all perishable goods, including meat, and boxed and canned products on shelves up to 3 feet from the floor. “We did get some product out, but that was in the early stages when we were still looking at a 33-to-35-foot crest. Once it went over that, it got over the flood

plaza’s owner, said the four other businesses – Dollar General, That Bounce Place, Payless Shoes and Long John Silvers -- also sustained significant damage. All will be closed until further notice. “I saw pictures of Long John Silvers. Water was up to the drive-through. It was more like a float-through lane,” Grisham said. He said it’s not known yet whether any of the buildings in the plaza, which has been hit by at least two other serious floods in the past decade, sustained any structural damage. He said the buildings will be checked by a structural engineer. “It’s going to be a lot of cleanup. As soon as we can we will assess the situation,” Grisham said.

ter rising dangerously high as he floored it to higher ground. But Kobi didn’t stop there. He and workers hitched a boat back to the business and lifted merchandise up the businesses’ spiral staircase to the second floor, where it appeared to be untouched. Kobi is now running the business from his home and looking for a temporary site for his showroom. Businesses take hit Several other businesses in that stretch of River Street sustained extensive flood damage, including the River Road Self Service Car Wash, Curry Donuts, the Sunoco and Plains Food Store, the Auto Lodge

Sales and Service, Randy’s Southern Barbeque, the Birchwood Garden Center and Solovey’s Service. The foundation of Andy’s Family Restaurant was washed out. The Rydzewski family lost everything in the Academy of Golf Center, though the water didn’t reach their second floor dwelling. “My dad’s shop is destroyed,” said Jessica Rydzewski as she picked through the flood carnage hauled out of the business. She was trying to dry newspaper clippings, photos and scrapbook pages in the sun. “I’m trying to salvage some sentimentals from my high

school golf career,” she said as her brother, Nick, paused from his clean-up work to see if she was having any success. Chris May’s family members tried to polish mud-caked tools and parts from his business, the Lawn Doctor. He raised everything in the business at least 60 inches on shelves, but the water even reached fertilizer placed 10 feet high. The building never had more than 28 inches of water, so he thought he’d be in the clear. “Insurance will cover some, but not all,” May said.

point, I’m going to have to, I guess. We’ll see,” she said. Kresge, too, thinks Shickshinny deserves a levee. She and other residents feel slighted, ignored, even in TV news coverage, Kresge said. “You never see anything much about Shickshinny. It’s like we don’t exist.” Morris, the fire chief, said he and other officials began assessing the damage on Monday. “Normally that happens a lot quicker because the fire hall and the borough building aren’t af-

fected,” Morris said. But both took on 4 to 6 feet of water. The borough set up an emergency command center a few lots up from the fire hall on West Union Street in the garage of Bob McDaniels. American Red Cross representatives made their first appearance in Shickshinny on Monday. “Everything we got up to this point has been private donations. Shickshinny area takes care of Shickshinny when it comes to something like this,” Morris said.

Holly Morris, fire company president, said there would be food and supplies at the command center and the Methodist church on South Main Street. Mayor Moore, a nurse at Berwick Hospital, said she expected a tetanus clinic would be set up in the borough this week. As far as relief in the form of a levee, Moore said she doubts Shickshinny will ever see one. “I honestly think they would buy out the town before they would put a dike down here,” she said.

Jennifer Learn-Andes, a Times Leader staff writer, may be reached at 831-7333.

staying where they were,” Superintendent Tony Perrone said. By MARK GUYDISH School principals are scrutinizing mguydish@timesleader.com enrollment lists to see which stuArea public schools were large- dents have been displaced. “I told ly unscathed physically by last the principals we’re not marking week’s flood, but calendars may them absent,” Perrone said. have to be revamped just days inDecision being delayed to the new school year. Northwest Area is delaying a Some districts face significant reworking of school bus routes to decision on reopening schools get around damaged roads. And a until roads and bridges are inhandful of students in many dis- spected in the rural district, Acttricts displaced by severe damage ing Superintendent Gary Powlus to their homes may get an unex- said. “We’ve have our bus contracpected mini-vacation. The good news: In every dis- tors check every route, to see if trict contacted, administrators roads are passable,” Powlus said. praised community members, The district has set up a phone teachers and other employees for line to provide more information volunteering to help during the for students or families with transportation issues: 542-4126, crisis. “On our Facebook page, we put ext. 1005. Hanover Area and Pittston Arout a call for volunteers to help at the high school evacuation cen- ea, where the high schools also ter,” Lake-Lehman Superintend- housed evacuees, were in good ent James McGovern said. “With- enough shape to reopen quickly. in 15 minutes after posting, we Hanover Area resumed classes Monday. Pittston Area was set to had 50 volunteers.” Schools in many districts start today, with a two-hour deserved as evacuation centers, one lay. Wyoming Valley West, where reason some districts didn’t open their doors yet. While Lake-Leh- State Street Elementary hosted man High had only about 20 eva- about 285 evacuees during the cuees and was able to resume flooding, plans to open today. classes Monday, Dallas Middle The district kept buildings closed School hosted about 170 people Monday partly to clean up State seeking refuge from the floods, Street after evacuees left, but also and officials opted to postpone to allow time for staff to return the first day of school until high–tech and valuable items of Wednesday. The district had irreplaceable files to lower levels. planned a late start on Sept. 12 so Much of it had been moved to secthe new high school could be ond floors as a precaution. “We only have one school that’s completed. “We had the custodians in early not in the flood plain,” Superintoday and will again tomorrow,” tendent Chuck Suppon said. Dallas Superintendent Frank Gal- “That’s State Street.” Officials at all districts said icki said Monday as the staff cleaned up the middle school in they should get full reimbursepreparation of the return of stu- ment either from The Red Cross or from government emergency dents. Most schools-turned-refuge relief funds for any food or supplihad been emptied by Sunday, es used in evacuation centers. The impact on school calenthough Wilkes-Barre Area Superintendent Jeff Namey said there dars is up in the air. All those inwere still “some individuals at terviewed said they are waiting to GAR High School, which had see if the state Department of hosted more than 300 evacuees at Education grants a waiver to the 180-day school year in the wake of the peak of the crisis.” Wilkes-Barre Area had about the disaster, something that has 150 additional evacuees in the So- been done in the past. If so, the lomon/Plains building, and districts won’t have to make up about 100 at Heights/Murray any lost day that has been waived Elementary, but those centers by the state. had been closed by Sunday. The district decided to resume Diocese schools Three Diocese of Scranton classes Monday because the GAR center is in the gym, which is eas- schools were closed. Holy Rosary ily segregated from the students. in Duryea sustained damage and closed. Wyoming Area delay The diocese announed MonThe two districts in areas most day night that classes will resume deeply inundated reacted differ- on Sept. 19 at the former St. Maently to the flooding. Wyoming ry’s Elementary School , 742 Area, which includes heavily hit Spring St., Avoca. All parents West Pittston, opted to close all from Holy Rosary are invited to a schools until Monday, Sept. 19. parent meeting today at 7 p.m. at Tunkhannock Area in Wyoming Sacred Heart of Jesus Church, County, where floods inundated 529 Stephenson St., Duryea, the the Mehoopany and Evans-Falls diocese said. Good Shepherd Academy in areas, plans to open today. “Its extensive road damage Kingston and Wyoming Area Cathat will necessitate alternate bus tholic were closed until the public routes and bus stops,” Tunkhan- districts in which they reside reonock Superintendent Michael pen. By state law, school districts provide transportation for nonHealey said. The Tunkhannock Area High public school students in their School is still hosting about 40 district. In the case of Good Shepherd, evacuees “and will continue to do so as long as there is a need,” Hea- which is in Wyoming Valley West ley said. Transportation became a School District, that means problem for Greater Nanticoke school begins today. For WyomArea and Northwest Area as well. ing Area Catholic, which sits in Greater Nanticoke opted to open Wyoming Area School District, school Monday but warned on its school will resume Monday. website that there would be “no transportations for students liv- Mark Guydish, a Times Leader staff ing in Hunlock Creek, West Nan- writer, can be reached at 829-7161.

Manor Care VIP Grand Opening scheduled for this Wednesday, September 14th and Community Grand Opening scheduled for Thursday, September 15th have been postponed. Please look for our future date announcement! 296509

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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011

SOPHIE DZIKOSKI of the Korn Krest section of Hanover Township, passed away at home on Sunday, September 11, 2011. Funeral will be private and at the convenience of the family. There will be no calling hours. Arrangements have been entrusted to the Charles V. Sherbin Funeral Home, Hanover Township. ANNE M. HANAHUE, who died on Sunday, September 4, 2011, had funeral services rescheduled due to the inclement weather last week. The funeral Mass will be celebrated at 11 a.m. Saturday in St. Gregory’s Parish, 330 N. Abington Road, Clarks Green, with the Rev. John M. Lapera, pastor, officiating. Friends may call at the church from 10 a.m. until the time of the funeral Mass Saturday at the church. Interment will be privately held in St. Patrick’s Cemetery, Olyphant. The family kindly requests that flowers be omitted and memorial contributions are made in Anne’s honor to the Kingston Volunteer Fire Department, P.O. Box 1026, Kingston, PA 18704. RICHARD POSTUPACK, 67, of Boynton Beach, Fla., passed away on Friday, September 9, 2011. He was a son of the late Robert and Mildred (nee Mekelyta) Postupack, formerly of Wilkes-Barre. He is survived by his brother, Jim, of Naples, Fla. JOHN JOSEPH DELANEY, 80, of Pittston, passed away Saturday, September 10, 2011 in Wesley Village, Jenkins Township. Arrangements are pending from the Peter J. Adonizio Funeral Home, West Pittston. ROY P. PETERSEN, 77, of Drums, passed away Monday afternoon, September 12, 2011, in his residence. Arrangements are incomplete and will be announced in an upcoming edition. Harman Funeral Homes & Crematory Inc. (East), 669 W. Butler Drive, Drums, is assisting the family with the arrangements. JOHN A. ADONIZIO SR., 91, Hughestown, passed away Monday, September 12, 2011, in his home, surrounded by his loving family. A full obituary will run in Thursday’s edition of the Times Leader. Arrangements are pending from the Peter J. Adonizio Funeral Home, West Pittston. LOIS HILBERT (NEE LANDON), 100, died Sunday, September 11, 2011, in Florence, N.J. She was born in Kingston and raised in Kunkle. In addition to her parents, George and Anna Maude Landon, she was predeceased by husband, Paul E. Hilbert; brother, Tom Landon; and sister, Althea Jones. Surviving her are four children, 11grandchildren, 18 great-grandchildren, three great-great-grandchildren, and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be at 11 a.m. Wednesday at the Peppler Funeral Home, 122 Crosswicks St., Bordentown, N.J. Friends may call from 6 to 8 p.m. today and from 10 a.m. until the time of service Wednesday in the funeral home. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Trinity United Methodist Church, 339 Farnsworth Ave., Bordentown, NJ 08505. JOHN “JACK” W. WYLAM, 86, Taylor, died Monday, September 12, 2011, at Northeast Hospice Regional Hospital, Scranton. Preceding him in death were his wife, Mary (Smallacombe) Wylam, on July 17, 2003; parents, John and Lillian Williams Wylam; son, Patrick Paul Wylam; sisters, Lilly Mae Williams, Leah Pryor, Elizabeth Evans, Nancy DiSimone; infant, Elizabeth Wylam; brothers, Evan, Ben, Henry and Sabbath Wylam. Surviving him are four sons, two daughters, one brother, 18 grandchildren and 17 great-grandchildren. Private graveside services will be held Tuesday in the Holy Cross Cemetery, Old Forge, with the Rev. Francis Landry, C.P., pastor of St. Ann’s Basilica Parish. Interment will follow. Please visit www.KearneyFuneralHome.com to leave an online condolence.

OBITUARY POLICY The Times Leader publishes free obituaries, which have a 27-line limit, and paid obituaries, which can run with a photograph. A funeral home representative can call the obituary desk at (570) 829-7224, send a fax to (570) 829-5537 or e-mail to tlobits@timesleader.com. If you fax or e-mail, please call to confirm. Obituaries must be submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Obituaries must be sent by a funeral home or crematory, or must name who is handling arrangements, with address and phone number. We discourage handwritten notices; they incur a $15 typing fee.

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THE TIMES LEADER

Casimer F. Remus

Lisa A. Knowles

September 11, 2011

September 12, 2011

F. Remus, Tunkhannock, C asimer died Sunday, September 11,

2011, in the Hospice Community Care in Dunmore. He was born in Pittston, on September 12, 1920, son of the late Frank and Catherine Remus. He was a 1938 graduate of Pittston High School, an Army veteran of World War II, a graduate of The University of Scranton and the Newark College of Engineering, and a member of the Church of the Nativity BVM. Prior to his retirement, he was employed for 35 years as a mechanical engineer for the Bendix Corporation in South Montrose. Surviving is his wife, Cecilia Feschenko Remus; daughter, Catherine Shefski; sons, Casimer Jr., Christopher and Michael, and their families. A memorial Mass will be held at10 a.m. Thursday in the

Church of the Nativity BVM in Tunkhannock. Friends may call from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday at the Sheldon-Kukuchka Funeral Home, 73 W. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. A veteran’s service will be held at 7:30 p.m. by the Dennis Strong Post 457, Rough Hall American Legion 510, and VFW Post 3583.

George E. Gallagher September 10, 2011

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eorge E. Gallagher, 65, of Pony Trail Drive, Bloomsburg, passed away very unexpectedly September 10, 2011, at his home. He resided at his present address for 11 years. He previously lived in the Berwick area. George was born December 16, 1945, in Harrisburg and was a son of Margaret Hockenberry Gallagher of Millersburg and the late Martin Gallagher. He graduated from Upper Dauphin High School in1964. Following graduation, he took undergraduate courses through Penn State UniverHe is survived by his wife, the forsity. George was a dedicated employ- mer Diane Romberger, originally of ee of PP&L for 45 years. He spent Klingertown, recently celebrated the majority of those years working their 44th wedding anniversary on June 24, 2011. He also is survived by as a security training instructor. He a son, Scott E. Gallagher, and his retired in late 2010. wife, Shannon, Hunlock Creek; In addition, he served as the actdaughters, Sharon Haines and her ing chief of police for the Duncanhusband, Eric; Stephanie Law and non Police Department during the her husband, George, all of Blooms1970s. burg; five grandchildren, Alec and He was a member of St. Luke’s Megan Haines, Keara and Ryan GalLutheran Church, Bloomsburg, and lagher, and Lauren Law; brother formerly a member of Good Shep- Charles Gallagher and his wife, herd Lutheran Church in Berwick, Donna, Berrysburg; and sister, Barwhere he served on the church bara Hartman and Leo Hirsch, Milcouncil. lersburg. He was also a 32nd degree Mason Funeral services will be held at member of the Knapp Lodge F&AM noon Thursday in St. Luke Lutheran 462, Berwick, and he was also a Church, 9 St. Luke’s Way, Bloomsmember of the Caldwell Consistory. burg, with the Rev. Jeff Bohan his George was a wonderful hus- pastor officiating. Burial will be in band, father, grandfather and the New Rosemont Cemetery, Espy, friend. He had great love for his with Masonic Memorial services. wife, children and grandchildren. Visitation for friends will be held He was very active and enjoyed from 10 a.m. until the time of servicspending time with his grandchil- es Thursday in the church. dren. He also enjoyed hunting, garContributions in his memory dening and the outdoors. He was an may be made to the American avid fan of Penn State football, the Hearth Association, 1704 Warren Pittsburgh Steelers and the Phila- Ave., Williamsport, PA 17701, or the delphia Phillies. American Diabetes Association, He will be greatly missed by his 1701 N. Beauregard St., Alexandria, family and friends. VA 22311. Funeral arrangements are In addition to his father, he was under the direction of the James L. preceded in death by a brother, Hinckley Jr. Funeral Home, 1024 Bruce Gallagher. Market St., Berwick.

FUNERALS ARNOVITZ – Harriet, graveside funeral service 1 p.m. today in the Dalton Jewish Cemetery, Dalton. Shiva 4 to 7 p.m. today in the residence of Karen and Lou Marcus, 611 Monroe Ave., Scranton. BORZELL – John, funeral Mass 9:30 a.m. Wednesday in the Corpus Christi Immaculate Conception Church, 605, Luzerne Ave., West Pittston. Viewing 4 to 9 p.m. today in the church. BUTCHKO – John, funeral 9:30 a.m. today in the Lehman-Gregory Funeral Home Inc., 281 Chapel St., Swoyersville. Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in Holy Trinity Church, Swoyersville. CARUSO – Patricia, planned services have been postponed. Rescheduled service information will be published as soon as it becomes available. Updates will be posted at www.celebrateherlife.com. COLEMAN – Louise, memorial service 11 a.m. Friday, in the St. Mary’s Polish National Catholic Church Chapel, Pettebone Street, in Duryea. DAILEY – Roy, funeral 11 a.m. Thursday in the Harding-Litwin Funeral Home, 123 W. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. Friends may call 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. Wednesday. DECINTI – Isadora, funeral 9 a.m. today in the Nat & Gawlas Funeral Home, 89 Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in St. Nicholas Church, 226 S. Washington St., Wilkes-Barre. EVANS – Violet, services 11 a.m. today in the William A. Reese Funeral Chapel, 56 Rear Gaylord Ave., Plymouth. Friends may call 9 to 11 a.m. today with service to follow at 11 a.m. FREEMAN – Dennis, funeral 7 to 9 p.m. today in the McMichael & Rairigh Funeral Home Inc., 119-121 E. Third St., Berwick. Funeral service will be at noon Wednesday at the funeral home. Visitation 11 a.m. until noon Wednesday. GODFREY – Herbert, planned services have been postponed. Rescheduled service information will be published as soon as it becomes available. Updates will be posted at www.celebratehislife.com. HEISER – Charles, funeral 10 a.m. today in the Wroblewski Funeral

Home Inc., 1442 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort. Mass of Christian Burial at 10:30 a.m. in Holy Name/ St. Mary’s Church, 283 Shoemaker St., Swoyersville. HILL – Barbara, memorial Mass 7 p.m. Sept. 26 in the All Saints Church, 66 Willow St., Plymouth. KRESGE – Robert, funeral 11:30 a.m. today in the Bennett Presbyterian Church, 501 Bennett St., Luzerne. The family will receive friends 10:30 a.m. until time of service today in the church. LIPINSKI – Theresa, Memorial Mass 10 a.m. Saturday in the Holy Name/St. Mary’s Church, 283 Shoemaker St., Swoyersville. LORD – Albina, funeral noon today in the Hugh B. Hughes & Son Inc. Funeral Home, 1044 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort. Friends may call 10 a.m. until service time today in the funeral home. LUNGER – Martha, funeral 9:30 a.m. Wednesday in the SheldonKukuchka Funeral Home Inc., 73 W. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. Mass of Christian Burial at the Church of the Nativity BVM at 10 a.m. Friends may call at the funeral home 5 to 8 p.m. today. MACINTYRE – Rev. Robert, memorial service 11 a.m. Saturday at Church of Christ Uniting, Market and Sprague streets, Kingston. Friends may call 10 a.m. until the time of service Saturday. PEARSALL – Adrian, calling hours will be held from 4 to 7 p.m. Saturday and the Snowdon Funeral Home Shavertown. Funeral service will be at 2 p.m. Sunday at the Church of Christ Uniting. SIMKO – Helen, due to the flood, a Mass of Christian Burial will be at 11 a.m. today in St. Benedict Parish in St. Dominick Church, WilkesBarre. TENSA – Elaine, funeral has been canceled for this weekend. Stay tuned for a rescheduled date to appear in a weekend edition of The Times Leader. WALSH – Gerald, Memorial Mass held 1:30 p.m. Sept. 24, at Holy Family Parish, 828 Main St., Sugar Notch. YEDENAK – Mae, memorial service has been rescheduled for Friday at the Baloga Funeral Home Inc., 1201 Main St., Pittston (Port Griffith).

Michael Haberski, 58, J oseph Walkersville, Md., passed away

pont, the Rev. Joseph Verespy will be officiating. Interment will follow at St. Mary’s Help of Christians Cemetery, Chapel Street, Pittston. There will be no calling hours at the funeral home. Funeral services will be handled by Graziano Funeral Home Inc., Pittston Township, PA 18640. Memorial contributions can be made in Lisa’s name to the Luzerne County SPCA, 524 E. Main St., Fox Hill Road, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702.

Karen Ann Kasarda September 11, 2011 aren Ann Kasarda died unexpectedly Sunday, September 11, K 2011, in her home at Harveys Lake.

Born in Wilkes-Barre, Karen was a daughter of the late Thomas and Helen Molnar Kipiel. Karen graduated from Coughlin High School. She has resided at Harveys Lake for almost 50 years. She was the owner and operator of Horseman’s Supply, Harveys Lake. Karen enjoyed gardening and flowers and was a fan of the WilkesBarre Scranton Penguins, Philadelphia Flyers, Penn State Nittany Lions, the Pittsburgh Steelers and the American Quarter Horse Association. She was a member of Our Lady of Victory Church, Harveys Lake. Preceding Karen in death, in addition to her parents, were her husband, William M. Kasarda; and a brother, Thomas Kipiel. Surviving are her daughter; Janene Ann Kasarda, Harveys Lake; sister, Helen Martin, Harveys Lake; and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be held at 9 a.m. Thursday in the Harold C. Snowdon Funeral Home, Inc., 140

N. Main St., Shavertown. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 9:30 a.m. in Our Lady of Victory Church, Pole 26, Harveys Lake. The Rev. Daniel A. Toomey will officiate. Interment will be made in St. Mary’s of the Maternity Cemetery, W. Wyoming. Friends may call from 4 p.m. until 7 p.m. Wednesday at the funeral home. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be sent to Blue Chip Farms Animal Refuge, c/o Margaret Bart, 974 Lockville Road, Dallas, PA 18612-9465.

Ruth Wilson September 12, 2011 Wilson passed peacefully R uth from this life to the next on

Monday, September 12, 2011. Born in Wilkes-Barre, on October 25, 1926, she grew up in Forty Fort. Ruth graduated from the WilkesBarre General Hospital Nursing School. In 1948, she wed her sweetheart, Warren Wilson, on August 24, 1948. They celebrated 63 years together on August 24, 2011. Warren and Ruth moved to Allentown in 1959, where she enjoyed a long and satisfying life. Her greatest joys in life were her husband, Warren; her children, Ross Wilson and Daralyn Foster, and her five grandchildren, Justin, Adam and Zachary Gottwald, Joshua and Erin Wilson. She was a devoted member of St. Peter’s Lutheran Church, Allentown, where she taught each of her grandchildren in Sunday School. Ruth was a 22-year volunteer with the Miller Memorial Blood Center at Muhlenberg Hospital, and for 45 years, she was the Allentown Band’s goodwill ambassador. Ruth was a loyal helper in all band fundraising ventures and rarely missed a performance. Her last three years were spent bringing peace and tranquility to her friends and staff at Kirkland Village’s Rabold Unit. Ruth had a passion for fireworks,

the stirring strains of a Sousa march, dancing, lively conversation, her husband and family, and a good joke. Three words summarize her legacy. Ruth was: loving, caring and kind. She was much beloved and well-remembered by those whose lives she touched. A Celebration of Life will be held at noon on Saturday in the auditorium at Kirkland Village, Bethlehem. Arrangements are through Bachman, Kulik & Reinsmith Funeral Home, 17th & Hamilton Streets, Allentown. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the Hospice of the VNA of St. Luke’s, 1510 Valley Center Parkway, Suite 200, Bethlehem, PA 18017, or St. Peter’s Lutheran Church, 1933 Hanover Ave., Allentown, PA 18109.

Dolores A. Shumlas September 10, 2011 olores A. Shumlas, 82, of Avoca, died unexpectedly Saturday D evening, September 10, 2011, in the Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center. She was the wife of Joseph Shumlas, whom she married on September 15, 1950. Dolores was born in Avoca, daughter of the late Frank and Nellie Guzior Zuba. She was a graduate of the Avoca High School and attended business school. After her marriage she moved to Bloomfield , N.J., where she worked as an executive administrative assistant for the Westinghouse Corporation. She returned to Avoca in 2000. Dolores was a member of Holy Mother of Sorrows Polish National Catholic Church, Dupont. She was preceded in death by two brothers and three sisters.

Joseph Michael Haberski September 8, 2011

isa A. (Rondomanski) Knowles, L 45, Pittston, died on Monday, September 12, 2011.

Born on August 6, 1966, in Scranton, she is a daughter of Robert and Barbara (Herbert) Rondomanski. She was married to husband, Leroy Knowles. Lisa was a graduate of Dunmore High School, class of 1984. In addition to her parents and husband, she is survived by Amanda Knowles, Pittston; brother, Robert Rondomanski, Dunmore; sister, Kim and her husband, Peter Carlen, Dupont; Amy and her husband, Shawn Peters, Meadville; and Beth Rondomanski, Peckville; nephews, Sam, Jesse, Shawn-Michael; nieces, Cameron and Abigale. The family would like to thank Dr. Rodrigo B. Erlich M.D., the staff at Geisinger Cancer Center, and Rosemarie Brusinski R.N. of Hospice Community Care for their care and compassion. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 10 a.m. Wednesday in the Sacred Heart of Jesus Church, Du-

www.timesleader.com

Surviving, in addition to her husband, are son, Robert, and daughter, Susan Graham, and her husband, Kevin, all of New Jersey; three grandchildren, Paul, Steven and Matthew; one brother; and three sisters. Funeral services will be held at 10:30 a.m. Friday in the Lokuta-Zawacki Funeral Home, 200 Wyoming Ave., Dupont, with a Funeral Mass at 11a.m. in Holy Mother of Sorrows Church, 212 Wyoming Ave., Dupont, to be celebrated by the Rev. Zbigniew Dawid, Pastor. Interment will be at the convenience of the family in Somerset Hills Memorial Park, Basking Ridge, N.J. Friends may call from 9 a.m. until the time of service Friday. In lieu of flowers contributions may be made to the Pittston Township Ambulance Association, 24 Bryden St., Pittston, PA 18640

M .J. JUD G E

M MON UM EN T CO. ON UM EN TS - M ARK ERS - L ETTERIN G

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suddenly on Thursday, September 8, 2011, in his home. Born April 2, 1953 in WilkesBarre and raised in the Georgetown section of Wilkes-Barre Township, he was a son of the late Stanley and Grace Walsh Haberski. Joe was a 1971 graduate of Wilkes-Barre Area School District and attended Wilkes College. Joe moved to Maryland 35 years ago and worked as a talented heavy-equipment diesel mechanic his entire career. He held certification from many heavy-equipment training centers including Terex, Howard County Vocational Technical School, and General Motors. Joe was an avid NASCAR fan and his favorite driver was Dale Earnhardt Sr. He was most proud to have been on an exclusive list of invitees to attend the Dale Earnhardt Legacy Celebration at DEI in North Carolina in 2004 to participate in a car show with his 2 limited edition “Intimidator” Monte Carlo edition cars. He was a lifetime member of the National Street Rod Association. In 1971, Joe was a recipient of the Wilkes-Barre Township “Good Citizenship Award.” He is survived by brothers, James, Harrisburg; John, Georgetown; sisters, Mary Ann Rayeski and husband Ron, Georgetown; Nancy Evanitus and husband Michael, Hunlock Creek; Eileen Martin and husband James, Mountain Top; 11 nieces and nephews; one great-niece; and one great-nephew. Private Interment services were handled by the Stauffer Funeral Home in Frederick, Md. A private Mass to celebrate Joe’s life will be held at the convenience of the family. Memorial donations can be made in Joe’s name to the American Diabetes Association, or the ASPCA of your choice.

Dr. Phyllis Berger September 10, 2011 Berger, of Kingston, D r.diedPhyllis Saturday, September 10,

2011, in the Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. Born September 4, 1922, in New York City, she was a daughter of the late Isidor and Ada Eichler and moved to Wilkes-Barre as an infant. Phyllis graduated from Meyers High School, class of 1940; Bucknell Junior College, class of 1942, and Pennsylvania College of Optometry, class of 1948. Phyllis met Irving Berger in 1945 at Optometry College, married after graduation in 1948 and just celebrated their 63rd wedding anniversary. They settled in Dallas in 1955 for 45 years before moving to Kingston in 1999. Irving and Phyllis opened a joint optometric practice, first in Hazleton, then in Shickshinny, and Dallas. She was the first woman optometrist in the area. Dr. Berger was a member of the Jewish Community Center, Temple Israel and its Sisterhood, where she was active for many years. She was also was a member of the Jewish Home in Scranton. She was preceded in death by her sister Evely Baum. Phyllis is survived by her beloved husband, Dr. Irving (Isadore) Berger; daughters, Alisa (Bob) Cotter, Philadelphia, and Judy Berger (Robin Singer), Atlanta, Ga.; son, Jay Berger (Maureen Ivy), Oakland, Calif.; three grandchildren, Jack Cotter, Emma Berger-Singer and Leah Berger-Singer. She is also survived by cousins, nieces, and nephews, and extended family Mary, Mary Ann, Elizabeth and Effie, who provided extra love and extraordinary care for Phyllis. Funeral services will be conducted at 11 a.m. Wednesday in the Rosenberg Funeral Chapel, 348 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre, with Rabbi Larry Kaplan officiating. Interment will be in Temple Israel Cemetery, Swoyersville. Shiva will be observed from 7 to 9 p.m. Wednesday and 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday at 445 N. Gates Ave., Apt 2, Kingston. Memorial contributions may be made to the Jewish Home of Scranton, 1101 Vine Street, Scranton, PA 18503. Condolences may be sent by visiting Dr. Berger’s obituary at www.rosenbergfuneralchapel.com.

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CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 PAGE 9A

County gets migration boost Data show other factors more responsible for N.Y. and N.J. resident moves than 9/11.

By STEVE MOCARSKY smocarsky@timesleader.com

C o nfidentia lO ffers

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Some might think the horror experienced by those who lived within sight of the World Trade Center on Sept.11, 2001, would be motivation enough to move somewhere farther away, someplace safer. A quick glance at migration data certainly might suggest just that. More than 10,000 New Yorkers moved to Luzerne County between1990 and 2008, nearly three quarters of them between 2001 and 2008, according to a report by the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton-based Institute for Public Policy and Economic Development. Over the same 18-year period, nearly 9,200 New Jersey residents moved to Luzerne County, and 61 percent of them came here between 2000 and 2008, the report states. Some former New York residents interviewed over the last several Find links to years have told the reports at Times Leader www.times reporters that leader.com 9/11 was a factor in their decision to move to Luzerne County. Many others pointed to other factors. Teri Ooms, executive director of the institute, believes it was those other factors that brought people here. “What we believe caused the movement was not 9/11, but more what the institute calls the westward migration,” Ooms said in a recent interview. Ooms concedes there is no specific research into reasons for the migration of which she is aware. But a closer look at the migration trends suggests that it was really the cost of living that drove New Yorkers and New Jersey residents to uproot and move west, she said. “People started leaving New York in the early ’90s and moving to New Jersey. The impetus was the cost of living – specifically housing,” Ooms said. But then as housing prices began to rise in New Jersey, both New York and New Jersey residents began moving to the “outer rings” of Pennsylvania – the Poconos – in the late 1990s and early 2000s, Ooms said. By 2002, those outer rings expanded and more of Northeastern Pennsylvania became home to the migrating Easterners through 2008. “Then the recession hit. And while migration here was still positive, it was not as great,” Ooms said.

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Teri Ooms, executive director of the Institute For Policy and Economic Development, shows a chart of migration trends. AP PHOTO

Shauna Camp and Anthony Camp, who lost their uncle, Faustino Apostol Jr., in the 9/11 terrorist attacks, look at the panel inscribed with his name at the 9/11 Memorial Plaza on Monday.

9/11 memorial opens to public Under tight security, a long line of people visit By JOHN VALENTI and EMILY NGO Newsday

Luzerne and Lackawanna counties are now on that outer rim of migration that Ooms doesn’t expect to extend much if any farther west, given the twohour or longer commute for people who live here but still work in New York or New Jersey. Ooms said data from the Internal Revenue Service shows that those migrating here were mostly from two economic classes – lowto moderate-income people who usually rent homes and middle- to upper middle-income earners, who can buy homes here in the $300,000 range that would sell in New York and New Jersey for $1 million or more. Those who rent usually end up taking jobs here in the retail and manufacturing industries. But for the higher-income migrants, Ooms said, the area is seeing “sales leakage.” “There are folks here who continue to commute and earn very good wages there,” Ooms said, but buying gasoline and food on their journey to and from work takes money from Northeastern Pennsylvania’s economy. “They also don’t have the free time to engage in the community because they’re spending 12, 14, 16 hours between work and their commute.” One of the goals of the institute

is to provide data that will help area economic and educational leaders develop strategies to promote the creation of better-paying jobs that will attract those former out-of-state residents to work locally. “Over time, the commute will get tiring, so people are going to look for work closer to home,” she said. Ooms said she and others at the institute were excited last year after completing their reports on the migration trends. “From the moment the institute opened (in 2004), there had just been talk about people leaving the area. ‘Why stay here? It’s a dying region,’ people would say. I didn’t think it was so. This area has weathered a lot of storms – the decline of coal, the decline of textiles. So it’s definitely been a region that has been able to sustain itself. … We didn’t think the region was shrinking and we set out to prove it,” Ooms said. The migration data from the IRS as well as 2010 Census figures gave Ooms and her staff the proof they were looking for. “There are more people migrating in than leaving. Even when factoring in birth rate and death rate, migration is more important. We believed there were more people migrating in than out and I think we proved it,” Ooms said.

NEW YORK — The sun cast its light on the glistening waterfalls and metal surfaces of the 9/ 11 Memorial, which opened for the first time to the public Monday — a permanent tribute to the nearly 3,000 people killed one decade and a day ago. Under tight security, a long line of visitors of a diverse range of ages and nationalities, many of them children, filed in to shake hands with New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, memorial president Joe Daniels, Council Speaker Christine Quinn and other officials. Memorial officials said visitors who reserved passes Monday represented 46 of the United States and 30 countries. “I love it,” said Jelena Watkins, who, accompanied by her husband, her parents and her two young children, was the first person into the memorial Monday. Watkins had come from London. Her brother, Vladimir Pomasevic, was killed at the World Trade Center. “It was a huge relief to see that it’s actually beautiful,” she said. “It’s the right feel. It’s just so right. It’s so spacious.” Another visitor, Eileen Cristina, 64, of Lititz, Pa., said she had volunteered in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, working as a massage therapist for workers at the Fresh Kills landfill site on Staten Island. She had first seen the memorial from the window of her hotel room and said: “There are no words ... I just said, ‘I can’t believe it.’ The enormity of the loss was very evident all over again. ... The enormity of the loss, the enormity of human kindness, the

the color of the memorial, leaving a lasting imprint. Certainly, the memorial has already become a fixture — and, focal point — of bustling lower Manhattan. Official signs directenormity of the suffering.” Before the official opening, ing visitors to the memorial have Anthoula Katsimatides, who lost been placed in nearby subway her 31-year-old brother at ground stations, an arrow pointing the zero on Sept. 11, 2001, said the way to the site. “For all those years there was sound of the waterfall dulled that of the active construction sites nothing there, now there’s somethat surround the memorial — thing that people can go to and see and visit from around the naand called seeing it emotional. “Hearing it. Being able to tion and world,” said David Byrne, of Atlanta, who touch it. Seeing it grew up in Fairfield, dance in the wind,” “It was a huge N.J., and lost his said Katsimatides, firefighter cousin, an actress who relief to see served as the liaison that it’s actually Andrew Desperito, 44, of East Patchto the family memogue, N.Y., in the atbers of those killed beautiful … It’s tacks. in the 1993 and 2001 just so right.” Katsimatides, attacks on the Trade Jelena Watkins who has served on Center. “Water is a Brother killed at WTC the memorial’s life-giving element. board of directors, And seeing it in such massive quantities is emotion- said being at the memorial made her feel “overcome with emoal.” The nation got its first glimpse tion.” “It’s so emotional that it’s finalof the memorial Sunday, as ceremonies from the site of the top- ly open,” she said. Officials have said more than pled World Trade Center towers gave the world a look at those 400,000 people have already made reservations to tour the names etched into the bronze. The memorial features 2,983 memorial and museum. Visitors to the memorial must names of those lost in the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the Twin make reservations for advance either online at Towers, the Pentagon and the passes, crash of United Flight 93 near www.911memorial.org or by callShanksville, Pa., as well as those ing 212-266-5200. Access to the of the six victims killed in the memorial is free, but visitors are World Trade Center bombing of urged to make a donation to develop and sustain “the National Feb. 23, 1993. “Yesterday (Sunday) was an September 11 Memorial and Muemotionally charged day,” said seum,” the website said. Groups of 10 or more should Michael Arad, architect of the 9/ 11 memorial. “Today, we’re start- call 212-266-5200 or email ing to bring the site back to the groups911memorial.org. Cristina said the entire experilife of New York.” Preparing for that opening, ence taught her one thing. “There is really nothing stronChristine Corday, 40, a Manhattan artist, wiped down the ger than the goodness of our felbronze parapets — noting how, low human beings,” she said. “A over time, the oil from the hands few bad people cannot outweigh of visitors will actually change that goodness.”


CMYK PAGE 10A

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011

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THE TIMES LEADER

Nanticoke ‘Patch’ section more like ‘basin’ man has beef with recycler JENKINS TOWNSHIP

Crews were operating pumps and hoses to shoot the water back to the river.

By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES jandes@timesleader.com

Loomis Street man says plastic bottles, jugs floated from Mascaro center.

By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER tmorgan@timesleader.com

NANTICOKE – A Loomis Street resident is questioning why the J.P. Mascaro recycling center on East Main Street failed to take action to prevent recyclables from escaping from the facility after it was hit by flooding on Thursday. John Bienick said he and other neighbors are upset that Mascaro left the front gate of the facility open during the flood, which allowed recyclables, including plastic jugs and bottles, to float away and accumulate along sections of their street. “It seems to be negligence,” Bienick said. “They left the gates open and the recyclables floated out and are strewn all over the place.” A reporter who toured the area Monday saw a small number of bottles and jugs deposited along the rail road tracks. The worst area was an embankment near the entrance of Loomis Street off the Sans Souci Parkway, which had several dozens bottles and jugs. Mike Mascaro, director of operations for the facility, said Monday said he was unaware that the gate had been left open during the flood. Workers were dispatched to clean up the area in question. Mascaro said flooding caught the facility, which accepts only recyclables, by surprise as it was not impacted by flooding that occurred in 2006. The water came up fast, leaving workers little time to react. “I had drivers who hardly got back in time to get their cars out,” he said. “People were fending for their lives, trying to get home to their families.” Mascaro said he believes Bienick was making too much out of the situation, given the devastation experienced by homeowners and businesses, including his company. He estimated the facility sustained about $1 million in damage caused by the flooding. Seven garbage trucks, which were parked for repairs, are a total loss, he said. He said the maintenance area got 4 feet of water and is also a total loss. “You have a tragedy here, and he wants to make a drama out of it,” Mascaro said. Bienick said the company knows it is in the flood plain and should have had a better contingency plan in place. “Why didn’t they have a flood preparedness plan?” he said. Mascaro employees were picking up the recyclables they could see, but Bienick said he’s concerned about others that are in the woods.

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JENKINS TWP. -- While many other Susquehanna River flood victims were busy lugging everything wet out of their properties Monday morning, a tiny neighborhood in Jenkins Township was still underwater. About a dozen homes in the Miller Street section known as “the patch” were still immersed in Susquehanna River water because the neighborhood is shaped like a bowl and doesn’t easily drain. Emergency crews were furiously operating pumps and hoses to shoot the water back to the river Monday. Miller Street resident Chris Fritz stood on a bank above the neighborhood watching the pumping. “Instead of calling it the patch, they should call it the basin,” Fritz said. He was trying to force himself into a jovial mood, saying he can offer a package deal on the giant propane tank, wood pallets and boat dock that the flood deposited in his yard. The rental property he owns was beyond repair. He walked along the elevated railroad tracks that run past the property to find the home off its foundation and in a mangled state. He said he did not have flood insurance. He was eager to get into properties owned by his grandmother and father to assess the damage because both had secondfloor flooding. He was thankful he was able to take a canoe to his grandmother’s home Saturday to rescue her cat. Miller Street resident Mary Ann Yatko embraced Fritz when she spotted him, wiping the tears from her eyes. “It was a cute little house,” she said of her property, which still had water on the first floor Monday. She had moved her belongings to the second floor, which was also flooded. Changing topography Yatko said she bought the Miller Street property about six years ago but has struggled with basement flooding when it rains since nearby culm banks were removed, changing the topography. She has three pumps in her basement. “It’s an amazing neighborhood. You can leave your doors open. Everybody watches out for one another,” Yatko said. A section of nearby River Road was also blocked off in the

ROAD CLOSINGS The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation is continuing to inspect roads and bridges for possible damage caused by flooding that hit the region last week. Department spokesman Michael Taluto said PennDOT has six bridge inspection teams on the road checking 258 bridges in Engineering District 4, which includes Lackawanna, Luzerne, Pike, Susquehanna, Wayne and Wyoming counties. Here is the latest list of road and bridge closings in Luzerne and Wyoming counties.

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Mary Ann Yatko wipes away a tear as she talks about her house that was still underwater on Miller Street in Jenkins Township Monday. Her property is the small house on the left.

township Monday as residents cleared out debris. Pittston Township resident Ron Panuski and his son, Michael, a Pittston Area High School senior, were at a River Road property Monday morning helping a friend. Panuski brought a generator and pressure washers to the home of Jason Herron, which had about 6 feet of water on the first floor. Panuski and his son spent Sunday helping another friend in Duryea. Herron said he bought the home in 2007 and was told by the sellers that only the basement had flooded in the past. He has flood insurance on the structure but was informed that it won’t cover the drywall that must be replaced on the entire first floor. He spent Sunday hauling almost all the contents of the first floor to the curb. He ripped up the soggy carpets and discovered the floors beneath had already started to bow. “I don’t ever want to go through this again,” he said. Herron’s wife, Trish, and two children are staying at the home of his cousin, Bill Horrocks, who was helping with the cleanup. “Trish is really upset because a lot of these things belonged to her grandmother, who passed away,” Horrocks said. River Road resident Joe Cernera said he has lived in his home for 60 years, and this was the most severe flooding to hit his property, with about 8 feet of water on the first floor. Cernera said he has “begged” township and Luzerne County officials to buy his property LUZERNE COUNTY: •The 8th Street Bridge in Wyoming opened Monday at around 4 p.m. •State Route 29 (Harvey’s Creek Road) lane restriction from Route 11 North to the intersection state Route 4001 Hartman Road in Lehman Township. •State Route 29 North traffic disruption due to road work at the Nanticoke/Wilkes-Barre exit. Expect minor delays. •State Route 239 is closed in both directions from the intersection of Ruckle Hill Road in Conyngham to the intersection of Pond Hill Road in Conyngham. •The Market Street Bridge opened in both directions between Route 11 (Wyoming Ave) in Kingston and

through a hazard mitigation program. He believes the raised Wyoming Valley Levee on the Susquehanna River caused more water to back up into his community. “We could deal with cellar flooding, but not this,” said his wife, Marion. The Cerneras had moved most of their first-floor furniture and appliances to the curb by Monday morning and were cutting up the rugs. Their floating refrigerator and dryer banged up against the drop ceiling, causing more damage. “I just feel like forgetting about it and going. We’re not spring chickens, me and him,” she said, noting that her son and his friends took the day off of work to help them.

ations, he said. “I want people to know that we will be back to business,” said company family member Nadine Milazzo Wesolowski. Milazzo plant manager Louis Degnan said the flood formed an eddy, or circular current, around the Milazzo property that knocked out a garage and the foundation of two houses on the property. “Every time it came around, it picked up more of our stuff,” he said. “It wasn’t the flow of the river. It was the backwater that came around.” Peter Mangione, owner of Mangione’s Service Station on River Road, struggled to force open the warped wood door to his business and found a mess of parts and equipment. He didn’t know when he would reopen Milazzo Industries and was in the process of workFloodwaters plowed through ing with his flood insurance adMilazzo Industries on River justors. Road, which makes Qik Joe Ice Melt. The water damaged sup- Pittston battered plies and equipment in the main In neighboring Pittston, the office, manufacturing facility, CVS Pharmacy on Kennedy product storage area and ga- Boulevard remained closed rage. Several residential rental from flooding Monday. properties at the complex were Cooper’s Seafood House susalso flooded. tained basement flooding, but “It’s devastating,” said one of the owners and workers ran sevthe company’s family members, eral pumps to keep the water Tom Allardyce. from rising to the first floor. The The roughly 24 employees of Pennsylvania Department of the family-owned business were Agriculture was at the business busy hauling out damaged Monday and gave approval for it items. to reopen, said owners Angela This is the company’s busy and Jack Cooper. time producing Qik Joe, said The Coopers were not sure company controller, Paul Hind- when they would reopen. marsh. The company will assess “We’re sleep deprived, but we the damage and come up with a were very lucky,” Angela Cooprecovery plan to resume oper- er said. River Street/Market Street in Wilkes-Barre on Monday night. •State Route 2004 in Jenkins Township. Police request that all large trucks avoid state Route 2004 (River Road). •State Route 2006 (Main Street) Duryea is closed from Phoenix Street to Stephenson Street. •State Route 3001 (Market Street) Nanticoke city is closed from the Industrial Park Entrance Road to Route 11 West Nanticoke and the West Nanticoke Bridge. •State Route 4013 (Mossville Road) in Fairmont Township is closed in both directions at the intersection of Bethel Hill Road to the intersection of state Route 118.

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•State Route 4015 (Bethel Hill Road) is closed from the intersection with Route 118 to the intersection of state Route 4024 (Talcott Hill Road) and State Route 118 in Fairmont Township. •State Route 4024 (Talcott Hill Road) in Ross Township is closed from the intersection with state Route 4015 (Bethel Hill Road) to the intersection with state Route 4021 (Broadway Road) in Pike County. WYOMING COUNTY: •State Route 29 is closed in both directions between Beaver Street in Noxen and Bigelow Lane in Monroe Township; between Maple Street and Tannery Street in Noxen and between state Route

www.timesleader.com

SCHEDULE CHANGES Events • The West Pittston Tour of Homes scheduled for Saturday has been canceled due to the flooding in West Pittston. Information on obtaining a refund will be published in a few days. Save your tickets and check info@ westpittstonhistory.org for details on refunds. • The 61st annual memorial service of the 1st Battalion, 109th Field Artillery, set for Sunday, will be rescheduled for Sept. 21 at 3 p.m. on the front lawn of the 109th Armory in Wilkes-Barre. • Due to the flooding, the Great Women of Northeast Pennsylvania event scheduled for today has been postponed. If you wish to attend or have purchased tickets, a new date will be announced soon. • The homemade soup sale at Noxen United Methodist Church scheduled for Sept. 17 has been canceled due to flooding. • The Beth Moore Simulcast planned Sept. 10 has been rescheduled to Oct. 1 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Forty Fort United Methodist Church, 26 Yeager Ave., Forty Fort. Tickets are still available. Current ticket holders must verify their attendance by calling 280-9589. • The Sept. 8 meeting for the Italian American Veterans of Luzerne County Post 1 is rescheduled to Thursday at St. Mary’s Antiochian Orthodox Church, 905 S. Main St. Dinner begins at 6 p.m. followed by the business session. • Due to flooding, The Italian American Association has canceled the September dinner meeting. The next scheduled event will be the Person of the Year Banquet on Oct. 9. Municipal services • Forty Fort borough recycling is canceled for the week of Sept. 12 and will resume on Sept. 26. Yard waste will be picked up the week of Sept. 19. • The Plymouth Borough Council meeting scheduled for today is rescheduled to Sept. 27. Religious services • The Wyoming Valley 9/11 Commemoration has been rescheduled for 6 p.m. Sunday. Representatives from fire and rescue services, local and state government, the religious community and citizens of our county will join to reflect on the tenth anniversary of the horror of Sept. 11, 2001. An honor guard will take part in the event as well as the Wyoming Seminary Madrigal. The hour of prayer, honor and memory will be followed by refreshments. The event will be held at the First Presbyterian Church, South Franklin and Northampton streets, Wilkes-Barre. Parking will be available at the Jewish Community Center and across from the YMCA. Bus service The Luzerne County Transportation Authority has resumed limited bus service. Routes and times might be altered due to road closures and conditions, according to Robb Henderson, operations manager. Education The work session of the Wyoming Area Board of Education scheduled for Thursday, has been postponed. A combined work session and regular meeting will be on Sept. 20 at 7 p.m. in the Secondary Center auditorium, 20 Memorial St., Exeter. 118 and Lake Road in Noxen, and between Creamery Road in Liberty and the end of the road. •State Route 29 is open from Tunkhannock until drivers come to the 29/292 junction (next to Lorbees Gas Station) due to a sinkhole. Drivers can check road conditions on more than 2,900 miles of state roads by calling 511 or visiting www.511PA.com. 511PA, which is free and available 24 hours a day, provides traffic delay warnings, weather forecasts, average traffic speeds on urban interstates and access to more than 500 traffic cameras. Regional Twitter alerts are also available on the 511PA website.

EMERGENCY FLOOD RESPONSE PROGRAM FOR MANUFACTURERS NEPIRC – the only organization funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania that focuses exclusively on assisting northeastern Pennsylvania’s manufacturers – has developed a comprehensive plan of action to help manufacturers recover from the recent flood and return to full production as quickly and affordably as possible. • Productivity Sharing Program • Clean-Up Equipment & Service Locator Program • Quick-Turnaround Recovery Loans • Business Recovery Assessment • FEMA, PEMA and Other Agency Liaison Program

For more information on these programs, visit our website www.nepirc.com/flood


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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 PAGE 11A

Editorial

OUR OPINION: IN GRATITUDE

Many in the area rose to challenge

T

HANK YOU. If you reacted to the Wyoming Valley’s flood emergency with grace and goodness, thank you. If you arrived from a distant state or from across the street as part of an American Red Cross disaster relief team and tended to people at an evacuation center, thank you. If you called over the backyard fence to check on a neighbor, thank you. Our gratitude gushes this week in ways unmatched by a raging river. We, like many of our readers in Northeastern Pennsylvania, are counting our blessings even amid a heartwrenching – and for many residents, life-altering – natural disaster. We are grateful it was not worse; and in those places where homes have been devastated in block after block, we are grateful that so many lives were spared. We are grateful that the people faced with monumental losses are being helped by people with seemingly limitless kindness. The one – and perhaps the only – good thing to emerge from the wreckage spawned by the tropical storm-aided flooding of September 2011 is this: We again have witnessed the greatness of which people are capable when guided by collaboration and compassion. We saw it in the faces of fatigued but unflappable emergency management agency workers. We caught glimpses of it as rescuers dangling from helicopters and boats plucked hapless victims from the current. We sense it daily, each time we get a new report of a gallant act or selfless giving. We know the names of only a fraction of the heroes of this calamity. We thank each of you who played a role, major or minor. We thank the meteorologists who issued warnings, the mayors who planned appropriately,

COME TO RESCUE ❏ American Red Cross. Mail checks to the Wyoming Valley Chapter of the American Red Cross at 256 N. Sherman St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702. Make the check payable to the Red Cross and on the memo line write “flooding.” Donate online at www.redcross.org. Or text “RED CROSS” to 90999; that will authorize a $10 contribution be made to its Disaster Relief Fund. The $10 will be added to your next month’s phone bill. For information, call (570) 823-7161. ❏ The Salvation Army of Wilkes-Barre. Financial donations can be sent to 17 S. Pennsylvania Ave., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701 or texted to 80888. For information, call (570) 824-8741.

the military personnel who responded to the scene and the many sand-baggers. Thank you to the police who protected, the pizza delivery drivers who persevered and the plumbers working even now to restore services. Thank you to the electric, gas and other utility workers on the streets, behind the scenes and on call. Thank you to the elected officials, firefighters, hospital employees, government workers, road crews, caregivers and others who stayed awake and sweated the details. If you followed orders to evacuate and stayed out of dangerous areas, thank you. If your business stayed open late, ordered extra supplies or gave away merchandise to aid in relief efforts, thank you. If you took care of someone else’s child or pet so they could fulfill their duties, thank you. Thank you to the givers of rubber gloves and of hugs. Thank you to everyone who acted with honor and humanity in the midst of a horrible situation. If you are not among them, it’s not too late. Please give generously to ongoing disaster relief efforts.

OTHER OPINION: UNEMPLOYMENT

Obama must keep pushing jobs plan

F

INALLY, President Obama is talking about the jobs crisis with the urgency it deserves, although his plan to address it, while bolder than expected, falls short of what’s needed. Of course, there is no bill yet, just the outlines of legislation that would put $450 billion into the economy. As outlined by the White House, it was heavy on tax cuts. The Social Security payroll tax, reduced from 6.2 percent of income to 4.2 percent last year, would go down further, to 3.1 percent, meaning an extra $1,500 per year for a worker making $50,000. Employers also would get tax credits to hire new employees, especially those who have been unemployed for more than six months. The bill, if passed, would ex-

tend unemployment benefits and spend $25 billion to modernize at least 35,000 public schools. It includes $35 billion to save the jobs of at least 280,000 teachers while hiring more. And the bill finally would get going on the “infrastructure bank” that the administration has been talking about for years, providing $10 billion in seed money to leverage private investment. Many economists say Obama’s jobs plan isn’t big enough to cure our economic morass, but it’s better than nothing. So we urge President Obama to make good on his threat to take his message to “every corner of this country.” The voters might start to notice who wants to do something about jobs and who doesn’t. Philadelphia Daily News

EDITORIAL BOARD RICHARD L. CONNOR Editor and Publisher JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ Vice President/Executive Editor

MALLARD FILLMORE

MARK E. JONES Editorial Page Editor PRASHANT SHITUT President/Impressions Media

Federal agencies had key role in mitigating flood loss FOR THOSE of us who lived through the Agnes flood of 1972, Thursday provided a sickening sense of déjà vu. Days and days of rain saturated the ground in advance of a hurricane pulling moisture from the Gulf of Mexico, which dumped even more rainfall. Small streams became raging torrents, and the Susquehanna River rose rapidly. As the Wyoming Valley faced catastrophe last week, unlike in 1972, the federal government is now a full partner with local emergency officials. It is worth noting how the federal government helped us avoid a great deal more loss of life and property, and how it will continue to help in the aftermath of unprecedented flooding. It is especially timely to consider the value of these government services as we are engaged in a national debate about government spending and reducing the federal deficit. The National Weather Service predicted the effect of rainfall in the entire Susquehanna River Basin for our local emergency officials, giving them time to evacuate those areas at greatest risk. When the Weather Service predicted that the river would rise to close to the level of protection afforded by the levee system, officials wisely ordered the evacuation of the levee-protected areas. Because of the advance notice provided by the National Weather Service, many residents had the time to move their belongings out of harm’s way before evacuating in an orderly manner. In 2002, the Army Corps of Engineers completed strengthening the levee system that protects much of the Wyoming Valley (at a cost of more than $200 million). The levee did its job beautifully. Potential weak spots were

MAIL BAG

PAUL E. KANJORSKI discovered and corrected quickly by the corps and county officials working together. The Federal Emergency Management Agency arrived in advance of the storm with supplies. The agency also provided solace to those homeowners who took advantage of its flood insurance program that they would recover some of the costs of their property damage, which is rarely covered by private homeowners insurance. In the weeks and months after the floodwaters have receded, FEMA also will provide assistance to area officials faced with reconstructing millions of dollars of public infrastructure. Although the federal government is our partner, the partnership is not designed to provide total compensation for the damages suffered by this devastating flood. Before we forget the devastation we just experienced, we should take advantage of the programs offered by the federal government to strengthen our homes and communities against future disasters. Under its hazard mitigation program, FEMA provides grants to homeowners living in flood plains to sell their homes or raise their homes to a higher elevation. The Army Corps of Engineers provides structural flood protection to entire communities, but projects such as the Wyoming Valley Levee System are undertaken only when they can be done in a cost-effective manner. The corps is required to conduct a benefit/cost analysis before constructing any new floodprotection project; there must be more than one dollar of benefit for every dollar expend-

ed. Unfortunately, in some communities the cost of protecting the structures in the flood plain does not justify the cost of constructing levees. As the federal budget continues to shrink, the corps will have fewer resources for new projects. Your federal tax dollars pay for the operations of the National Weather Service, the Army Corps of Engineers and the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Had we not spent hundreds of millions of federal dollars on monitoring the river, building a levee and subsidizing flood insurance premiums, the people of Northeastern and Central Pennsylvania would be spending tens of billions to clean up and rebuild from this devastating flood. Clearly the funds that helped our region prepare for the unprecedented rainfall we endured were wisely spent. Getting the federal budget under control for the first time since President Clinton left office is an important priority for the country. But when you hear politicians calling for cuts in spending, remember how that spending will affect you. Remember the National Weather Service, the Army Corps of Engineers and FEMA. Paul E. Kanjorski, of Nanticoke, is a former U.S. congressman who represented the 11th District, which includes parts of Luzerne and Lackawanna counties and all of three contiguous counties.

LETTERS FROM READERS

Plea for flooding help gets speedy response

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COMMENTARY

Your federal tax dollars pay for the operations of the National Weather Service, the Army Corps of Engineers and the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

volunteered with the American Red Cross on Thursday, the day of the Valley’s mandatory flood evacuation, at the Luzerne County Community College shelter. Because many people there – volunteers included – weren’t familiar with Nanticoke, I began to place calls to area businesses, restaurants, hospitals and churches, asking for donations of food. Father James Nash, of St. Faustina’s Roman Catholic Church, and the Rev. Tim Hall, of Nebo Baptist Church, responded immediately. Their congregants responded, too. It was a wonderful and holy thing to see. When contacting the Nanticoke Pizza Bella, I didn’t even ask for donations. I called only to see if it would deliver, if evacuees could afford a pizza. The next thing I saw, boxes of pizza were on the lunch counter that had been totally empty.

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I stayed only four hours, so I’m sure this is not a full list of churches and businesses that rapidly responded. The point is that in emergencies, immediate response is the kind that grabs your heart. As written in 2 Corinthians 1:4, “(God) comforteth us in all our tribulation, that we may be able to comfort them which are in any trouble, by the comfort wherewith we ourselves are comforted of God.” I think you can measure the quality of charity by its speed, and St. Faustina’s, Nebo Baptist and Pizza Bella must have

DOONESBURY

been given A+ grades by heaven on Thursday. Hilary Palencar Nanticoke

Volunteer work proves strength of community

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here are not enough words to thank the many people in Exeter who came to our part of Susquehanna Avenue to build dirt dams to keep the mighty Susquehanna River from flooding into the borough. We had heavy equipment operators, firefighters, police, neighbors, young people – all doing the backbreaking and exhausting work of moving dirt and filling sandbags. It was just unbelievable! We thank all of you so much! We are proud to be your neighbors. Judy and Jack Burke Exeter


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1972. “It should be mandated,” said Francesca Carannante, of Antonio’s Pizza on Wyoming Avenue. “We need protection. Who cares about a river view? Look around – the river is right here and it’s not a nice view.” Jim Brozena, executive director of the Luzerne County Flood Protection Authority, was the county engineer during the decision-making process with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on the proposed improvements to the levee system. “I can tell you that the decision to not build new levees in West Pittston and other areas was not because some of the residents there wanted to keep their view of the river,” Brozena said. “The CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER mitigation process was exten- Workers gut Antonio’s Pizza at Wyoming Avenue and Luzerne Avenue in West Pittston. The ressive and the Army Corps ulti- taurant was swamped by the Susquehanna last week. mately decided to raise the levee and not add on.” through floods before; in 1972 he worthy’s Montgomery Avenue BIDEN TO MAKE had 41⁄2 feet of water and now he home received up to 5 feet on the V I S I T T O T H E A R E A Brozena’s home flooded had more than 10 feet. first floor. Vice President Joe Biden is Brozena is also a flood victim. “I had a feeling this might hap“The reason for not doing the expected to visit Northeastern The water filled the basement at pen,” he said. “If they put up a project, we were told, was that it Pennsylvania on Friday to his home in West Pittston, comlevee like the one down in Forty would cost too much money to assess flood damage in the ing within one inch of his first region, sources said. Fort where people could walk build and wouldn’t save enough floor. His heating system, electriBiden, a native of Scranton, and use it as a recreational spot, property value,” Goldsworthy cal system, air conditioning, wawill visit the greater Pittston what’s wrong with that?” said. “Many residents along Susarea as part of his tour, ter heater and more were damAgolino said he wanted to quehanna Avenue and other sources said, adding details aged. thank the Wyoming Area foot- streets near the river were are still being worked out “Back in 1991 or so, we needed ball team and coaching staff for against building the levee beregarding the itinerary. to come up with a plan that was “As of right now, Vice coming down and helping re- cause they wanted to keep the most equitable to all,” Brozena President Biden will be here move all the debris from his aesthetic value of the river view.” said. “My answer today would Friday,” one source said. building. probably be much different. But “Schedules could change.” “I think everybody is doing a Questions raised Residents and property it never made financial sense to Goldsworthy said he didn’t regreat job helping out the flood owners in the region that have build levees in West Pittston.” ceive water at his house in 1972 victims,” he said. incurred damage from the Brozena will get an argument recent flooding are hopeful and he wants to know why he Agolino owns Pazzo’s on on that point today as people like that President Barack Obama Route 315 outside Pittston, and and other West Pittston resiCarannante and others work to will declare Pennsylvania a he said lunch will be served dents got so much water this gut their properties and begin disaster area. If that happens, there starting Monday, Sept. 19, time. the long road to recovery. Antofederal funding would be “Is it because they raised the from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. available to help the victims. nio’s had 2 feet of water in 1972; Brozena said that before the levees downstream?” Goldsworthe water level hit nearly 7 feet $150 million levee-raising pro- thy asked. “Was it because of the this time. got washed off their foundations ject was finalized, the Army new Eighth Street Bridge that “We’ve lost everything here,” Corps did look at constructing created a damming effect? We Carannante, 28, said. “Thankful- in Bloomsburg.” LaNunziata, owner of Crest dikes along the river in West Pitt- deserve those answers.” ly, we have a second location – at People working Monday were 353 Wyoming Ave. – so we can Cleaner, said he, his family, ston, Jenkins Township (Port workers and volunteers are Blanchard) and Plains Town- wearing surgical masks and rubhave some income.” She praised the efforts of her cleaning out the buildings they ship. He said the estimated pro- ber gloves. Their feet were covneighbors who are coming to- own. He said he is preparing an ject in 1991 was about $70 mil- ered with mud, and the stench of gether to rebuild and continue. itemized list to give to FEMA lion and the Corps ultimately de- the river was ever-present. Bobby O’Connell lives at 302 “But if we don’t get some pro- and PEMA. He has taken photos cided during the mitigation tection, people will start to move of the damage and kept all re- process not to go for that option. Wyoming Ave., next to AntoThe levee system was ulti- nio’s. He and his wife, Sharon, out,” Carannante said. “You ceipts. “Somebody came by and said mately raised from 36 feet to 41 have a Down syndrome son, Ian, don’t want to lose an entire town they found a wedding dress in feet, and that project, Brozena who has special needs. O’Conbecause of a river view.” Mike LaNunziata and his fa- one of our boxes seven blocks said, saved between $3 billion nell said they started to move ther own all the buildings in the away,” he said. “This is unbeliev- and $4 billion in potential dam- furniture and other items to age had the project not been higher ground, but the water block between Wyoming Avenue able.” came up so fast they had to evacJust down the street, Joe Ago- completed. and Linden Street. His buildings Former West Pittston Mayor uate. received as much as10 feet of wa- lino was sitting in front of his res“I think it’s terrible that there taurant puffing on a cigar, taking Bill Goldsworthy, who now ter. “I guess a levee would have a break from cleaning out his works for Gov. Tom Corbett, said aren’t any levees here,” O’Consaved all of us,” LaNunziata, 52, building. Agolino, 66, runs the he favored building dikes in West nell said. “I can’t understand it. I said. “One thing for sure, we’re popular restaurant that his fa- Pittston in 1991 and he remains really can’t believe it; it doesn’t not alone. I heard that houses ther opened in 1962. He has been in favor of a project now. Golds- make any sense.”

REPORTING Continued from Page 1A

devastation. If the president approves the disaster declaration request, Sweet said FEMA will bring in a mobile disaster recovery unit and begin meeting with affected property owners and residents. Instead of waiting for the presidential pen to be used, everyone should operate as if the declaration will be made, Sweet said. “Start the cleanup process as soon as you can. Don’t wait,” Sweet added. And, Bekanich said, the cleanup procedure should run concurrently with the documentation and reporting process. That process should work like this: Residents report damages to their municipal emergency management coordinators who in turn feed the information to county EMA staff. They compile the data and send it to the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency, which will then report to the Federal Emergency Management Agency office in Philadelphia. The information will be reviewed there and if recommended for approval, will be forwarded to FEMA headquarters in Washington where it will be reviewed once more. The disaster request will then be denied or recommended for approval by the president. Pennsylvania’s damage threshold for federal assistance is $16.5 million. That is sure to be reached in just two or three counties, and Gov. Tom Corbett declared emergencies in 42 counties. The threshold for Luzerne County alone is $1,049,402, and it’s

$92,463 in Wyoming County. Though damage data are still being compiled – millions of dollars in damage to hundreds of structures -- Bekanich sent a request to the governor Sunday night with a strong belief the county was safely above the threshold. A presidential disaster declaration could result in millions of funds being allocated for areas hit hardest by the flooding to help cover repairs not covered by insurance, such as medical costs, clothing, temporary housing and cleanup materials. Materials and equipment purchased before the declaration is signed would be covered, if they are documented. Sweet said anyone buying bleach, masks, mops, garbage bags and other clean-up items should save their receipts to be filed with their claim. Home and business owners also may be eligible for low-interest loans to cover some repairs or replacements. Tabulating the expenses can be tedious, but vital if residents want to get reimbursed. “It’s very important for residents to file preliminary damage reports as soon as possible with their local governments,” said Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency Director Glenn Cannon. “Local, county, state and federal staffers will conduct preliminary damage assessments … but it’s not possible for them to inspect every damaged property.” “Homeowners, renters, and business owners should document damage with photographs and detailed information on the losses they have sustained,” Cannon said. He added even those who don’t anticipate asking for federal assistance should provide information, as it could help local

MAKING DAMAGE REPORT Where residents can report property damage and loss: Exeter Borough: Borough building, 1101 Wyoming Ave., 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Those who can’t go to the building should call 654-3001, ext. 4 and leave their name, address and phone number. Hanover Township: Township office, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Bring estimated costs of damage. Residents also can call township EMA Director David Lewis at 825-1250. Nanticoke: Bring documents and pictures of damage to City Hall. For removal of flood debris, contact Holy Cirko, city administrator at 735-2800, ext. 109. Pumps are available to remove water from basements. Plains Township residents are asked to call 829-3439, ext. 4001 and leave their name, address and phone number and a township official will call you back. Plymouth Borough: Go to the

borough building at 162 W. Shawnee Ave. for a claim form or contact the borough at 779-1011 to provide details about property damage. Ross Township: Go to the Sweet Valley Fire Hall today from 6 to 8 p.m. If your municipality wasn’t on this list, call your municipal office for more information. Also, U.S. Rep. Lou Barletta has established Constituent Recovery Centers at: • Duryea Borough Building, 315 Main St., Duryea. • West Pittston Police Department/Borough Building, 555 Exeter Ave., West Pittston. • Bloomsburg Regional Technology Center, 240 Market St., Bloomsburg. • Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Business and Industry office, 2 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre (for business inquiries).

communities get money. People with flood insurance should call their insurance agents or the National Flood Insurance Program at 1-800-427-4661. Documentation is even more important for those without insurance to ensure they get adequate financial help. Without a “major disaster declaration,” the federal government and FEMA can only assist the state on meeting the highest priority emergency needs, Sweet said. Examples include providing generators for “critical infrastructure” such as hospitals and key government offices, but not for individual homes or businesses, and providing water and food to nonprofit agencies such as the Red Cross to distribute as needed. A “major disaster declaration” for individual assistance is granted by the Obama administration would allow FEMA to provide housing assistance to homeown-

ers and renters, as well as emergency grants and low-interest federal loans, he said. The priority is to help people who have been pushed from their homes by flooding maintain as much normalcy as possible, and that means trying to place them in houses or apartments. Mobile homes are provided if no other housing is available in the area, Sweet said. U.S. Sen. Bob Casey, D-Scranton, sent a letter to President Obama on Monday urging him to quickly approve Pennsylvania’s request for a major disaster declaration. “Tropical Storm Lee has resulted in the deaths of 13 Pennsylvanians and is the worst flooding in the region since Hurricane Agnes in 1972,” wrote Casey. “Time is of the essence and we must move quickly to ensure that the affected communities receive immediate relief and long-term assistance to begin rebuilding.”

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

Marisa Semenza and Megan C. Perez of U.S. Rep. Lou Barletta’s office advise flood victims looking for information Monday at the West Pittston Borough Building.

Barletta’s recovery centers hit hurdles

Staffers present to help, but do not have all the right answers or funding forms. By BILL O’BOYLE boboyle@timesleader.com

unprecedented, and it can be frustrating and confusing,” Barletta said. “Rest assured that my office is going to be here to help you, every step of the way. … I will do everything I can and I will fight to make sure the people receive the help they clearly deserve.” Valdez lives on Wyoming Avenue with her fiancé and their three children. She said the flooding has placed a lot of stress on her and her family. “We didn’t have time to move anything,” she said. “We’ve been cleaning out our home for the last two days. We weren’t expecting to get any water – we’re not in the flood zone.” Valdez said her neighborhood was issued a mandatory evacuation notice Thursday night. “We should have levees here like they do in Wilkes-Barre,” Valdez said, becoming emotional. “But we don’t have them because some people wanted a view of the river. Their view cost us our homes.” Valdez said she couldn’t qualify for flood insurance because she doesn’t live in the flood zone. She said her renter’s insurance policy doesn’t cover flooding. “We’re all here just looking for some help,” she said. Perez and Semenza said people came with a lot of questions. They advised flood victims to take pictures of their damaged property and compile a detailed list of everything lost. They said FEMA and PEMA teams will be in the area later this week to begin assessments. Doris Sorick of Park Street replaced her furnace three weeks ago. Her basement, with the furnace, received 5 feet of water. She also lost a freezer and a refrigerator and her husband, Joseph, lost his prized NASCAR memorabilia collection. “We didn’t get water in 1972,” Sorick said. “We’ve lived there for 43 years. I took a lot of photos. I have my list. Now we wait for help.”

WEST PITTSTON – Michelle Valdez came to the West Pittston Borough Building on Monday to ask about help to recover from flood damage. But at least one response she got was wrong and the application she hoped to file was not available. Valdez and many others wanted to find out how to apply for funding to help pay for the losses that the Susquehanna River flood waters caused to their homes, businesses and properties. U.S. Rep. Lou Barletta, R-Hazleton, established several constituent recovery centers – places where his staff members will help people who have questions with the federal disaster assistance procedures. One is at the borough building here. “I heard Barletta say on the radio that we can come here for applications for federal aid,” Valdez said. Those forms were not available Monday. Two Barletta staffers – Megan G. Perez from his Washington, D.C., office, and Marisa Semenza, a caseworker from the Taylor Borough district office – were on hand to assist flood victims. Perez and Semenza told them that President Barack Obama had declared Pennsylvania a disaster area and federal funding would be forthcoming. As of late Monday, the president had not made such a declaration, though it is expected. “Our people might have misunderstood some of the information they were provided,” said Shawn Kelly, Barletta’s communications director. Kelly said the congressman was in West Pittston late Monday touring the flood-ravaged town with Mayor Tony Denisco to assess the extensive damage there. Bill O’Boyle, a Times Leader staff “The scale of this disaster is writer, may be reached at 829-7218.

SECURITY Continued from Page 1A

gram from efforts to trim benefits, said Max Richtman, president of the nonprofit National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare. “This will make it much harder to make this case.” Last year, Social Security’s expenditures were $49 billion more than it collected in taxes, the first time it ran a deficit since 1983. Back then, the deficit prompted a bipartisan commission headed by Alan Greenspan to curb benefits, increase FICA taxes and gradually raise the retirement age to push the system back into the black and create a huge reserve for covering benefits of baby boomers who are starting to retire now. The 2008 recession, with a net loss of 6.8 million jobs, and some workers’ decisions to retire early amid the economy’s stubborn softness have reduced the system’s revenues. Social Security, created in 1935, pays its beneficiaries from payroll taxes collected from workers and companies and from interest earned by the trust

fund where those taxes are deposited. The government collected $638 billion in payroll taxes last year and its trust fund is worth around $2.5 trillion. That $2.5 trillion, though, is not sitting in a government vault. The government has borrowed it, and it’s one big component of the nation’s $14.3 trillion federal debt.. By law, the money is invested in special Treasury bonds — in effect a promise that the government will repay the Social Security system when the money is needed, plus interest. Meanwhile, with the federal budget running annual deficits exceeding $1 trillion, the government uses the trust fund cash to help pay for all its other programs. This has long fueled a debate over Social Security’s soundness. Critics say the program’s trust fund is nothing more than a mountain of IOUs, money the cash-strapped government would be hard pressed to repay. Others counter that a federal promise to provide Social Security with cash has always been as good as gold and any politician hedging on the bonds owned by the deeply popular program would do so at his own risk.


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timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

Novak Djokovic continues his impressive season by winning year’s final major. By HOWARD FENDRICH AP Tennis Writer

NEW YORK — Novak Djokovic produced a nearly perfect performance to match his nearly perfect season. Returning brilliantly, swatting winners from all angles, the No. 1-ranked Djokovic held on to beat defending champion Rafael Nadal 6-2, 6-4, 6-7 (3), 6-1 on Monday night in a final chock-full of lengthy, mesmerizing points to earn his first U.S. Open title and third Grand Slam trophy of 2011. Djokovic improved to 64-2 with 10 tournament titles in a simply spectacular year, one of the greatest in the history of men’s tennis — or any sport, for that matter. “I’ve had an amazing year,” Djokovic said, “and it keeps going.” Against No. 2 Nadal, Djokovic is 6-0, all in finals — three on hard courts, including Monday; two on clay; and one on grass at Wimbledon in July. Djokovic also won the Australian Open in January, and is only the sixth man in the 40-plus years of the Open era to collect three major titles in a single season. “Obviously I’m disappointed, but you know what this guy is doing is unbelievable,” Nadal said. Addressing Djokovic, Nadal added: “What you did this year is impossible to repeat, so well done.” The best win-loss record in the

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011

HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL: WEEK 2

TENNIS

Djokovic captures Open title

Valley West 51

Abington Heights 0

Berwick 38

North Pocono 28

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Hanover Area 36

Western Wayne 34

Spartans handle Comets

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Surrounded by Abington Heights defensemen, Eugene Lewis recovers his own fumbled ball.

By JOHN ERZAR jerzar@timesleader.com

AP PHOTO

Novak Djokovic reacts after winning the U.S. Open against Rafael Nadal in New York on Monday.

PAUL SOKOLOSKI OPINION

WVW pounds Abington Heights by 51

See OPEN, Page 5B

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KINGSTON – Wyoming Valley West just didn’t end its three-game losing streak to Abington Heights on Monday night. The Spartans stomped it into oblivion. Scoring on its first seven possessions of the first half, Valley West went on to pound its long-distance rival 51-0 at Spartan Stadium in a non-conference game. “We just had to keep the ball moving, keep scoring and do everything flawlessly,” said Valley West lineman Matt Reams, one of several seniors who never celebrated a victory over the Comets. “And we did. We didn’t commit many penalties at all. We wanted to keep sharp and keep the momentum moving.” Valley West (2-0) did all that, handing Abington (1-1) its worst loss in the seven years Joe Repshis has coached the two-

“We had a lot of things going on this week with the flood. Our whole team stuck together with what happened this week and we came out here and showed we’re a real team.” WVW QB Eugene Lewis

time defending District 2 Class 3A champion. By halftime, Valley West led 45-0, scoring eight more points than in its last four games combined with the Comets. “I didn’t imagine it at all,” Valley West quarterback Eugene Lewis said. “We had a lot of things going on this week with the flood. Our whole team stuck together with what happened this week and we came out here and showed we’re a real team.” The Spartans hadn’t practiced since last Wednesday except for a walk-though Sunday because of the evacuation of several communities which are part of the

school district. They didn’t miss a beat. Lewis had three rushing touchdowns and running back Tashawn Bunch added another as Valley West built a 28-0 lead at 10:03 of the second quarter. Lewis followed with a pair of 18-yard TD passes – one to Derrick Simms and the other to Dylan Flayhart. Kicker Nick Singer made it 45-0 with a 38-yard field goal at 2:24 of the second quarter. The Spartans took two knees on their final possession of the first half. “Valley West is very explosive offenSee WVW, Page 5B

NFL

Brady’s 517 yards lead Pats to big win over Dolphins

most in franchise history and the most allowed by Miami. Brady, who went 32 for 48, beMIAMI — Tom Brady threw came the 11th quarterback to his first interception since Octothrow for at least 500 yards. ber, so he wasn’t perfect in the Norm Van Brocklin set the reNew England Patriots’ opener. PATRIOTS cord of 554 yards in 1951. He was close, though. The capper came with 5:44 Brady threw for a team-releft and the Patriots leading 31cord 517 yards and four touch17. After they stopped Miami on downs, including a 99-yarder to DOLPHINS downs at the 1-foot line, Brady Wes Welker, and the reigning lined up in the shotgun on first AFC East champions started down and threw from his end with a victory for the eighth zone to Welker, who had slipped consecutive season Monday behind Benny Sapp near the 30night by beating the Miami Dolyard line. phins 38-24. Welker caught the pass in Defensive end Jared Odrick stride and sprinted untouched picked off a deflected pass to set up a Miami touchdown and end Brady’s for the score to complete the longest NFL-record streak of 358 passes with- play in Patriots history. Brady also threw touchdown passes out an interception. Otherwise Brady and the Patriots picked up where they on consecutive plays. He hit Aaron HerAP PHOTO left off last season, when he threw for 36 nandez for a 31-yard score, and when a TDs and his team led the league in scor- replay review determined the receiver Miami Dolphins coach Tony Sparano yells from the sidelines during the first was down at the 1, Brady threw to him half of Monday’s game against the New England Patriots in Miami. ing. New England totaled 622 yards, the again for a TD on the next play. By STEVEN WINE AP Sports Writer

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QB dilemma that is minus a snap decision

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he one thing Joe Paterno looks for in his starting quarterbacks is the one thing Penn State doesn’t have. A guy who can put the team on his shoulders and carry it through adversity. Paterno, Penn State’s legendary 84-year-old coach, always points to that famous length-of-the-field drive Kerry Collins put together against Illinois to save an unbeaten 1994 season as his current measuring stick. The guys he has throwing the ball now don’t come close to measuring up. Not against national title contenders like Alabama, anyway, because Rob Bolden didn’t make enough plays to give the Nittany Lions a chance Saturday and Matt McGloin didn’t make any. “We did OK,” Bolden said. “But it wasn’t enough to win this game.” It should be enough to make the Nittany Lions scrap their quarterback merry-go-round once and for all. Bolden has the ability to sustain drives, but too many times he can’t finish them. Alabama cruelly finished McGloin’s magical mystique of being some sort of comeback kid. The Lions are kidding themselves if they believe running two quarterbacks in and out of the huddle is going to work for them against the better teams in the country. Or their conference. “If I was running things, I would be the only guy out there,” Bolden said. He has a lot of support with that, especially from the Penn State fans who let out a cheer when McGloin left the field after a couple of three-andouts and Bolden came back to the huddle. Except Bolden didn’t exactly light up Beaver Stadium himself. He had a solid opening and a splendid finish while leading both scoring drives of Penn State’s 27-11 defeat. But between those two series, Bolden was just another quarterback who was washed away in the Tide. He had a chance to really make a difference Saturday, to get Penn State right back in the game early in the second half of a game they trailed 17-3. Bolden found Justin Brown running free down the left sideline with a couple steps on his defender. He not only overthrew Brown, Bolden threw the ball out of bounds. The next big completion Bolden makes to pull the Lions out of a rut will be his first. McGloin’s the guy for that. But even after the way he came off the bench and rallied the Lions to an Outback Bowl berth last season, he hasn’t been a clutch player for Penn State when the spotlight shines brightest. You look at his woeful 1-for-10 passing performance against Alabama and think back to the five interceptions he threw against Florida in an Outback Bowl loss, and it’s fair to wonder if McGloin has enough game for Penn State’s biggest games. “I thought the quarterbacks played a pretty good football game,” Paterno insisted. “There were a couple of bigtime throws out there that we didn’t come up with.” Maybe those drops will stop when Penn State drops the two-quarterback rotation and the team’s top receivers can get accustomed to catching balls coming out of the hand of just one. The problem is, neither one has given the Lions a clear advantage, or obvious disadvantage when he’s in there. Neither has determined the starting job. It’s time for the Lions coaching staff to do that, to make a decision on one or the other and stick with it. Before the Big Ten season becomes as big of a bust for Penn State as Alabama.

Paul Sokoloski is a Times Leader sports columnist. You may reach him at 970-7109 or email him at psokoloski@timesleader.com.


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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011

On the Mark

We are back after missing some time due to the flood, but all is good on the home front…..let’s hope to can pick up where I left off and continuing winning my loyal followers some cash. BEST BET: ACE OF PACE (8TH) VALUE PLAY: SUCCESS ROCKS (7TH)

POST TIME 6:30 p.m. All Races One Mile First-$4,800 Clm.Pace;clm.price $5,000 7 Sharkylee K.Kamann 1-9-7 Robinson trainee gets it all 9 Rampage G.Napolitano 5-9-6 Has to fire off the wings 1 Seeking The Gold N M.Simons 5-5-8 Rail can’t hurt chances 3 Artful Sky M.Kakaley 4-5-6 Best of the rest 2 Konjo N A.McCarthy 7-7-9 Not the best of openers 5 Western Ravenswood T.Buter 7-7-6 Really in a funk 4 Four Star Tommy J.Morrill 8-8-6 Been gapping 6 Highview Fella N H.Parker 6-4-6 Low 8 Mach To The Limit D.Ingraham 3-8-7 Missed some time Second-$12,000 Cond.Trot;n/w $6,500 last 5 6 Peace Bridge A.McCarthy 4-4-4 Completes the double 8 Ready For Freddie G.Napolitano 3-3-5 Has to find an early spot 9 R Sam H.Parker 1-6-1 Swooped by easier 4 Cassini Hall J.Pavia 2-2-3 Raced well in the mud 1 Rodeo Red M.Simons 3-2-5 New to the Bendick barn 2 Woody Marvel D.Ingraham 3-2-6 Stays on the pylons 3 Marion Monaco M.Kakaley 3-7-7 Back in from Chester 5 Smedshammer F.Del Cid 3-7-4 Couldn’t stay with lesser 7 South Jersey Honey S.Reisenweaver 3-6-4 Fills out the field Third-$9,700 Cond.Pace;n/w $4,000 last 5 3 Hanks Kid G.Napolitano 8-5-6 One more shot 1 He’s Great T.Buter 6-2-5 Been burning some coin 5 Caerleon Hanover M.Kakaley 2-8-6 Hung game as nails last wk 7 Escape Attack A.McCarthy 5-5-7 Rounds out the superfecta 2 Cannae Barron R.Allen 4-6-7 Rod Allen with a drive 6 Premier Flash A.Napolitano 6-6-8 Nickle training at .106 4 Arizona Liar D.Ingraham 6-7-7 Riding on rough times 8 Predator DVM M.Signore 8-1-1 Newcomer to the Downs 9 Powered By Zeus M.Romano 8-2-8 Comes off an awful effort Fourth-$9,700 Cond.Trot;n/w $4,000 last 5 2 South Jersey Flash G.Napolitano 1-7-9 Nap the difference 8 Fortissimo J.Morrill 5-6-5 Does retain Morrill 3 Like A Lexis J.Taggart 1-2-8 Prepped well for this 5 Folk Tail M.Kakaley 8-10-3 Tends to tire 1 Stogie Hanover A.McCarthy 3-9-7 Raced gamely on the engine 4 Photorama M.Simons 9-3-8 Hoover a winless trainer 6 Money Machine J.Pavia 5-2-2 Pavia trains and reins 7 Donnegal G.Wasiluk 8-5-4 Stopped badly on the lead 9 Captain Brady C.Norris 8-2-4 Last yet again Fifth-$14,000 Cond.Pace;n/w $9,000 last 5 2 Someheartsomewhere M.Kakaley 3-3-5 Enough late steam 6 Sandy Absolut G.Napolitano 2-1-3 Racing better in Nap’s hands 3 Four Starz Molly J.Pavia 5-4-1 Tries a belated rally 4 Fashion Ruffles A.Napolitano 1-2-2 Moves out of claimers 8 Clear Character M.Simons 2-4-3 Tough luck mare 7 Blue Moon Artist A.McCarthy 3-8-3 Try another color 5 Olivette Hanover T.Buter 5-4-7 3yr old tries older foes 1 Mohegan Miss J.Morrill 1-5-7 No repeat in sight 9 Tammibest D.Ingraham 3-3-9 Scratched-sick on 9-3 Sixth-$14,000 Clm.Pace;clm.price $25,000 1 Pandapocket J.Morrill 3-8-3 Inside post nets him a win 2 Great Dragon G.Napolitano 5-2-2 May try it from the pocket 3 Dragon AHS M.Kakaley 1-6-7 Tri as easy as 1-2-3 4 Loadedupntruckin W.Mullin 7-1-3 Mullin hops in the sulky 9 The Pan Flamingo A.McCarthy 2-4-4 Again draws the outside 5 Expect Success H.Parker 4-2-8 Been getting shuffled 6 A Fool For Mark D.Ingraham 1-4-7 Not up to these 7 Viper Hanover T.Buter 7-3-1 Swept away 8 Stonebridge Deco J.Antonelli 8-9-9 May be 99-1 at post Seventh-$14,000 Cond.Pace;n/w $9,000 last 5 5 Success Rocks G.Napolitano 6-3-5 Darkhorse of the night 1 Jim’s Guy M.Kakaley 6-5-1 Almost a winner of $400k life 2 Waylon Hanover T.Buter 7-9-5 Down a bit in class 3 Sody’s Moonshine A.Napolitano 3-3-7 Can fly off the gate 4 Indelible Hanover A.McCarthy 9-8-3 Having an off season 6 Tom Paine H.Parker 7-1-5 Newcomer to the Mohegan 7 Yankee Devil J.Pavia 7-2-6 Note the driver change 8 CCs Lover N J.Taggart 9-4-9 Swallowed up 9 Emerald Express M.Simons 3-6-8 Not from here Eighth-$22,000 Cond.Pace;n/w $17,000 last 5 4 Ace Of Pace A.McCarthy 1-5-1 Well only get faster 9 Mystical Diva M.Simons 5-1-7 Romped last time at PD 5 Cams Van Go G.Napolitano 2-2-2 Knocking on the door 7 Nifty Ace M.Kakaley 1-3-1 Winner of two of last three 8 Rock N Load J.Morrill 1-4-4 Second time lasix user 3 Enduring Delight M.Romano 2-5-2 In with tough bunch 2 Crown Lady A.Napolitano 2-5-7 Marks 2nd start for Fusco 6 All Heart Gal J.pavia 1-3-2 How much more is left? 1 Kayla’s Dream T.Buter 6-1-3 Levels off Ninth-$24,000 Clm.Hndcp Pace;clm.price $25-30,000 4 Border Fighting G.Napolitano 3-2-6 Finally gets the nod 8 Triple Major J.Morrill 1-1-5 Won this class last two 2 Sleek Hunter A.McCarthy 4-2-1 Makes first start for Oakes 3 Hoboken Hanover M.Kakaley 1-1-3 Going for three in a row 6 B Lo Zero A.Napolitano 2-3-2 Recent purchase 9 Expensive Toy M.Simons 4-3-1 This is a quality field 7 Strange Hanover J.Pavia 7-8-1 Lacks that late kick 5 Gaelic Thunder D.Ingraham 6-7-5 Well beaten last three 1 Mustang Art T.Buter 5-6-4 Flattened Tenth-$25,000 Cond.Pace;n/w $22,000 last 5 7 Showherthemoney M.Kakaley 8-9-1 Should jog 3 Forever Ivy C.Norris 3-5-4 Gives it her all 5 Astreas Notice A.Napolitano 5-2-6 Invades for Robinson barn 1 Ideal Nectarine T.Buter 7-4-1 Does have a lot of class 2 Giveittomestaight G.Napolitano 7-7-5 Going the wrong way 4 Ruffle’s Kiss J.Pavia 6-4-4 Pavia barn still off 6 Southwind Swallow A.McCarthy 6-6-6 Her form spree is long gone Eleventh-$9,800 Clm.Trot;clm.price $10,000 4 Mitleh Hadeed A.McCarthy 4-1-3 Note the new connections 3 Foxy Lady De Vie G.Napolitano 1-1-6 More strong Pena stock 2 Tameka Seelster J.Pavia 3-1-7 Certainly merits a look 8 Bobo’s Express T.Buter 1-1-1 Hard to knock 9 Hey Bubbi T.Raymer 6-1-1 Just too iffy 1 Crystal Sizzler M.Romano 3-6-1 Keeps faltering late 7 You Go Girl J.Morrill 5-1-5 Bounced off the score 5 Pinnochio A.Napolitano 8-6-4 I’ll take a pass on 6 Wildfire Bo W.Mann 6-6-6 No Twelfth-$10,000 Clm.Pace;clm.price $15,000 8 Treasure Hunter B.Clarke 1-1-7 Nice looking import 2 Prince Sail On G.Napolitano 5-3-3 In good hands 3 Tiza Mojo J.Taggart 2-3-4 Been getting overlooked 1 Steuben Blackjack M.Kakaley 3-8-4 First try for a tag 5 Stop Payment T.Buter 3-7-6 Gone downhill 4 Bungleinthejungle H.Parker 7-8-2 Out of sorts 6 Hey Scoob A.Napolitano 8-4-5 Looking for Shaggie 7 Terror On My Side A.McCarthy 4-5-4 2yr old overmatched 9 Here To Stay E.Nickle 2-9-9 Struggling pacer Thirteenth-$9,700 Cond.Trot;n/w $4,000 last 5 8 Smooth Muscles J.Morrill 8-4-8 Makes amends 4 Jeff’s Night Out M.Simons 2-8-8 Just missed as the favorite 3 Pucker Up Hanover G.Napolitano 3-1-x Goes as far as she can 2 Master Buckin Uhl A.Napolitano 8-7-6 Free falls in class 1 Detech A.McCarthy 6-9-5 Andrew drives for Schadel 5 Wingbat M.Kakaley 4-4-9 Keeps coming up short 6 Zero Boundaries M.Romano 4-6-7 Lacks any form 7 Political Pull R.Shand 6-2-5 Not with Shand in bike 9 Corky Duke J.Groff 5-7-6 ….next Fourteenth-$9,700 Cond.Pace;n/w $4,000 last 5 2 Born To Rockn Roll T.Buter 6-7-8 Sings a winning tune 7 Native Justice M.Simons 3-2-5 Versatile pacer 5 Mil Amores G.Napolitano 2-4-9 Happy with another check 4 Jjthejethorse J.Morrill 6-8-7 May need start over track 9 Literate Hanover M.Kakaley 8-3-6 Has to get used hard early 1 Gladiare Grande A.McCarthy 9-4-3 Hard one to figure 3 Mcardles Star A.Napolitano 4-4-7 Dim chance 6 Mister T-Rex B.Clarke 2-8-5 Never leaves the rail 8 Elaine T Cronos J.pavia 7-5-9 Off since May Fifteenth-$9,700 Cond.Pace;maidens 4 My Aching Back M.Kakaley 2-7-6 Only has to stay trotting 5 Muscle Source C.Norris 2-3-3 Stakes placed colt 6 Pine Tab M.Simons 4-3-2 From the Schnittker stable 1 Quantum Donato J.Morrill 8-5-6 Very green colt 2 Marion Manhattan A.McCarthy 8-6-6 Breaker 3 Act Out Hanover G.Napolitano 3-6-5 Another who shoes miscues 7 Fortythirdst Tim J.Taggart 4-4-6 Tiring leader 8 The Big Thea Thea T.Buter 6-7-7 Certain bomber 9 Andover Again H.Parker 7-4-5 One more race to go Sixteenth-$9,700 Cond.Pace;maidens 8 Bakin On The Beach J.Morrill 5-2-6 Burns the competition 1 Live On A.McCarthy 6-3-4 Lurks from the pole 2 Newspeak M.Simons 7-6-5 Mcardle colt 3 Mr Govianni Fra M.Kakaley 6-4-x First timer 4 Gotta Go Hanover J.Pavia 5-3-5 Use in exotics 5 Della Cruise M.Lancaster 2-7-2 Lancaster’s lone steer 6 Blue Sky Again G.Napolitano 4-8-10 Skies are dark 7 Bring It A.Napolitano 3-7-7 Auto toss 9 Savvy Savannah J.Taggart 7-7-3 See you tomorrow

Today's Games H.S. FIELD HOCKEY Montrose at Berwick Northwest at Elk Lake Hanover Area at GAR Pittston Area at Tunkhannock H.S. GOLF Holy Redeemer at Hanover Area Meyers at GAR Coughlin at Wyoming Area Pittston Area at Tunkhannock H.S. BOYS SOCCER Dallas at Hazleton Area, 7 p.m. Crestwood at Wyoming Valley West, 6:30 p.m. H.S. VOLLEYBALL (4:15 p.m. unless noted) MMI at Meyers GAR at Nanticoke Lake-Lehman at Wyoming Area COLLEGE FIELD HOCKEY Arcadia at King’s, 4 p.m. Misericordia at Alvernia, 7 p.m. MEN'S SOCCER Misericordia at Susquehanna, 7 p.m. Penn State-Berks at King’s, 7 p.m. WOMEN'S TENNIS Misericordia at Lehigh WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 14 H.S. CROSS COUNTRY Berwick, Crestwood, MMI Prep, Northwest, Wyoming Valley West at Crestwood Coughlin, Holy Redeemer, Meyers, Tunkhannock, Wyoming Seminary at Lake-Lehman Hazleton Area, Hanover Area, GAR, Nanticoke, Pittston Area at Wyoming Area H.S. FIELD HOCKEY Hazleton Area at Meyers Lackawanna Trail at Wallenpaupack Honesdale at Abington Heights Wyoming Seminary at Coughlin Wyoming Valley West at Delaware Valley Nanticoke at Crestwood

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THE TIMES LEADER

AMERICA’S LINE

By Mark Dudek For the Times Leader

L O C A L C A L E N D A R

S

7-2 9-2 3-1 4-1 6-1 8-1 10-1 20-1 15-1 4-1 3-1 7-2 9-2 10-1 6-1 8-1 15-1 20-1 4-1 3-1 7-2 8-1 9-2 6-1 15-1 10-1 20-1 7-2 8-1 4-1 3-1 9-2 10-1 6-1 15-1 20-1 3-1 9-2 4-1 7-2 6-1 8-1 10-1 15-1 20-1 9-2 3-1 4-1 7-2 6-1 10-1 8-1 15-1 20-1 8-1 6-1 3-1 7-2 4-1 9-2 15-1 20-1 10-1 5-2 4-1 3-1 10-1 12-1 5-1 6-1 15-1 20-1 5-2 3-1 6-1 5-1 4-1 10-1 15-1 20-1 12-1 3-1 5-2 6-1 8-1 9-2 7-2 12-1 8-1 5-2 5-1 7-2 4-1 6-1 15-1 12-1 20-1 3-1 4-1 7-2 6-1 8-1 9-2 10-1 15-1 20-1 8-1 7-2 3-1 4-1 10-1 6-1 15-1 9-2 20-1 3-1 4-1 7-2 10-1 9-2 8-1 15-1 6-1 20-1 7-2 3-1 9-2 8-1 10-1 4-1 6-1 15-1 20-1 3-1 4-1 9-2 10-1 7-2 6-1 8-1 15-1 20-1

Wyoming Area at Lake-Lehman Holy Redeemer at Dallas H.S. GOLF MMI Prep at Dallas Nanticoke at Lake-Lehman Berwick at Wyoming Valley West Crestwood at Wyoming Seminary H.S. BOYS SOCCER Tunkhannock at MMI Prep Holy Redeemer at GAR Wyoming Area at Wyoming Seminary Nanticoke at Lake-Lehman, 3:30 p.m. Pittston Area at Berwick Meyers at Hanover Area Hazleton Area at Coughlin H.S. GIRLS TENNIS Coughlin at Tunkhannock Crestwood at Pittston Area Dallas at MMI Prep GAR at Holy Redeemer Hazleton Area at Hanover Area Berwick at Wyoming Seminary Wyoming Valley West at Wyoming Area H.S. GIRLS VOLLEYBALL (4:15 p.m. unless noted) Coughlin at Hazleton Area Wyoming Valley West at Delaware Valley Berwick at Dallas Pittston Area at Crestwood Holy Redeemer at Tunkhannock MEN'S SOCCER Muhlenberg at Wilkes, 7 p.m. WOMEN'S SOCCER King’s at Alvernia, 7 p.m. Misericordia at Richard Stockton, 8 p.m. MEN'S TENNIS Lebanon Valley at Misericordia, 4 p.m. WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL King’s at DeSales, 7 p.m. Misericordia at Wilkes, 7 p.m.

W H A T ’ S

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MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7 p.m. ROOT — St. Louis at Pittsburgh

By Roxy Roxborough LINE REPORT: On the NFL board, there is no line on the Rams - Giants game due to St. Louis QB Sam Bradford (questionable) and RB Steven Jackson (questionable). For the latest odds & scores, check us out at www.americasline.com. All other no line games are for teams that played last night. On the college football board, there is no line on the Northwestern - Army game due to Northwestern QB Dan Persa (questionable). BOXING REPORT: In the WBC welterweight title fight on September 17 in Las Vegas, Nevada, Floyd Mayweather Jr. is -$700 vs. Victor Ortiz at +$500; in the WBO welterweight title fight on November 12 in Las Vegas, Nevada, Manny Pacquiao is -$800 vs. Juan Manuel Marquez +$550. BASEBALL Favorite

Odds

Underdog

American League

1 3.5

IOWA

3

W Virginia Auburn Pittsburgh

Rays

8.0

ORIOLES

CINCINNATI

31

Akron

RED SOX

10

Blue Jays

BOWLING GREEN

8

Wyoming

RANGERS

9.0

Indians

Tigers

7.0

WHITE SOX

ROYALS

9.0

Twins

A’S

7.0

Angels

Yankees

8.5

MARINERS

National League Cards

7.5

PIRATES

MICHIGAN

29.5

Penn St

9.5

W MICHIGAN Mississippi

1

VANDERBILT

BOSTON COLL

7.5

Duke

GEORGIA TECH

14

Kansas

d-Colorado

9

Colorado St

c-Wisconsin

16

NO ILLINOIS

MINNESOTA

3

Miami-Ohio

FLORIDA

9

Tennessee Michigan St

8.0

Marlins

8.0

Nationals

REDS

9.0

Cubs

Phillies

7.5

ASTROS

NOTRE DAME

5

BREWERS

8.5

Rockies

N CAROLINA

10.5

D’backs

6.5

DODGERS

GIANTS

6.0

Padres

Favorite

Points

Underdog

Sunday SAINTS

7

TEMPLE C Michigan

METS

NFL

E Michigan

8

BRAVES

Virginia

Texas

3

UCLA

NEBRASKA

17

Washington

Texas Tech

20

NEW MEXICO

Northwestern

7

ARMY

Nevada

6

SAN JOSE ST

Bears

UAB

11.5

Tulane

LIONS

8

Chiefs

S CAROLINA

18

Navy

JETS

10

Jaguars

SAN DIEGO ST

7

Washington St

BILLS

NL

Raiders

KENTUCKY

7

Louisville

Houston

8

LA TECH Marshall

REDSKINS

4

Cards

Ravens

6

TITANS

STEELERS

14

Seahawks

Packers

10.5

PANTHERS

OHIO U

2.5

TEXAS A&M

36.5

Idaho

BALL ST

4.5

Buffalo ILLINOIS

VIKINGS

3

Bucs

Arizona St

1.5

Browns

2

COLTS

KANSAS ST

16

Kent St

Cowboys

3

49ERS

USC

15

Syracuse

Oklahoma

3.5

FLORIDA ST

Texans

NL

DOLPHINS

PATRIOTS

NL

Chargers

BRONCOS

NL

Bengals

Eagles

2

FALCONS

Monday GIANTS

NL

Rams

College Football Favorite

Points

Underdog

Thursday Lsu

3.5

MISS ST

Friday Boise St

18

TOLEDO

CONNECTICUT

5

Iowa St

NEW MEXICO ST MIAMI-FLORIDA

1

Utep

1.5

Ohio St

BYU

6

Utah

Oklahoma St

14

TULSA

Hawaii

20

UNLV

Stanford

10

ARIZONA

TCU

28

Monroe

VIRGINIA TECH

26

Arkansas St

C Florida

4

FLORIDA INT’L

ALABAMA

46

North Texas

ARKANSAS

24

Troy

Saturday

SNY --- Washington at N.Y. Mets 8 p.m. WQMY — Philadelphia at Houston 10 p.m. YES — N.Y. Yankees at Seattle SOCCER 2:30 p.m. FSN — UEFA Champions League, Arsenal at Dortmund 8 p.m. FSN — UEFA Champions League, AC Milan at Barcelona (same-day tape)

F O O T B A L L National Football League AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA Buffalo.................. 1 0 0 1.000 41 7 N.Y. Jets .............. 1 0 0 1.000 27 24 Miami.................... 0 0 0 .000 0 0 New England ....... 0 0 0 .000 0 0 South W L T Pct PF PA Houston ............... 1 0 0 1.000 34 7 Jacksonville......... 1 0 0 1.000 16 14 Tennessee........... 0 1 0 .000 14 16 Indianapolis ......... 0 1 0 .000 7 34 North W L T Pct PF PA Baltimore.............. 1 0 0 1.000 35 7 Cincinnati ............. 1 0 0 1.000 27 17 Cleveland............. 0 1 0 .000 17 27 Pittsburgh ............ 0 1 0 .000 7 35 West W L T Pct PF PA San Diego ........ 1 0 0 1.000 24 17 Denver ............. 0 0 0 .000 0 0 Oakland............ 0 0 0 .000 0 0 Kansas City ..... 0 1 0 .000 7 41 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA Washington ......... 1 0 0 1.000 28 14 Philadelphia......... 1 0 0 1.000 31 13 Dallas ................... 0 1 0 .000 24 27 N.Y. Giants .......... 0 1 0 .000 14 28 South W L T Pct PF PA New Orleans.......... 0 1 0 .000 34 42 Tampa Bay ............. 0 1 0 .000 20 27 Carolina.................. 0 1 0 .000 21 28 Atlanta .................... 0 1 0 .000 12 30 North W L T Pct PF PA Chicago................ 1 0 0 1.000 30 12 Detroit................... 1 0 0 1.000 27 20 Green Bay ............ 1 0 0 1.000 42 34 Minnesota ............ 0 1 0 .000 17 24 West W L T Pct PF PA San Francisco ..... 1 0 0 1.000 33 17 Arizona................. 1 0 0 1.000 28 21 St. Louis............... 0 1 0 .000 13 31 Seattle .................. 0 1 0 .000 17 33 Thursday's Game Green Bay 42, New Orleans 34 Sunday's Games Chicago 30, Atlanta 12 Buffalo 41, Kansas City 7 Houston 34, Indianapolis 7 Philadelphia 31, St. Louis 13 Detroit 27, Tampa Bay 20 Baltimore 35, Pittsburgh 7 Cincinnati 27, Cleveland 17 Jacksonville 16, Tennessee 14 San Francisco 33, Seattle 17 Arizona 28, Carolina 21 San Diego 24, Minnesota 17 Washington 28, N.Y. Giants 14 N.Y. Jets 27, Dallas 24 Monday's Games New England 38, Miami 24 Oakland at Denver, 10:15 p.m. Sunday, Sep. 18 Chicago at New Orleans, 1 p.m. Baltimore at Tennessee, 1 p.m. Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 1 p.m. Kansas City at Detroit, 1 p.m. Jacksonville at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m. Oakland at Buffalo, 1 p.m. Arizona at Washington, 1 p.m. Seattle at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. Green Bay at Carolina, 1 p.m. Cleveland at Indianapolis, 1 p.m. Dallas at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Denver, 4:15 p.m. Houston at Miami, 4:15 p.m. San Diego at New England, 4:15 p.m. Philadelphia at Atlanta, 8:20 p.m. Monday, Sep. 19 St. Louis at N.Y. Giants, 8:30 p.m.

NCAA

T V

MARYLAND CLEMSON

The AP Top 25 The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Sept. 10, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking: ...........................................................Record Pts Pv 1. Oklahoma (31) ............................ 1-01,440 1 2. Alabama (10)............................... 2-01,423 3 3. LSU (17) ...................................... 2-01,417 2 4. Boise St. (2)................................. 1-01,307 4 5. Florida St. .................................... 2-01,195 5 6. Stanford ....................................... 2-01,161 6 7. Wisconsin .................................... 2-01,091 8 8. Oklahoma St. .............................. 2-01,035 9 9. Texas A&M.................................. 1-01,025 7 10. South Carolina.......................... 2-0 892 12 11. Nebraska ................................... 2-0 889 10 12. Oregon....................................... 1-1 846 13 13. Virginia Tech ............................. 2-0 827 11

14. Arkansas.................................... 2-0 770 14 15. Michigan St. .............................. 2-0 602 17 16. Florida ........................................ 2-0 515 18 17. Ohio St....................................... 2-0 459 15 18. West Virginia............................. 2-0 416 19 19. Baylor ......................................... 1-0 371 20 20. South Florida ............................ 2-0 351 22 21. Auburn ....................................... 2-0 348NR 22. Arizona St.................................. 2-0 308NR 23. TCU ............................................ 1-1 161 25 23. Texas ......................................... 2-0 161 24 25. Mississippi St. ........................... 1-1 124 16 Others receiving votes: Michigan 100, Southern Cal 73, Houston 32, Maryland 32, UCF 31, Northwestern 19, Penn St. 18, BYU 14, Tennessee 13, Missouri 12, Washington 12, Georgia 8, Georgia Tech 2. USA Today Top 25 Poll The USA Today Top 25 football coaches poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Sept. 10, total points based on 25 points for first place through one point for 25th, and previous ranking: ..........................................................Record PtsPvs 1. Oklahoma (44) ........................... 1-01,453 1 2. Alabama (8) ................................ 2-01,410 2 3. LSU (7)........................................ 2-01,372 3 4. Boise State.................................. 1-01,214 5 5. Florida State ............................... 2-01,211 4 6. Stanford....................................... 2-01,165 6 7. Oklahoma State ......................... 2-01,072 7 8. Wisconsin ................................... 2-01,033 9 9. Texas A&M ................................. 1-01,001 8 10. Nebraska .................................. 2-0 911 10 11. South Carolina ......................... 2-0 863 12 12. Virginia Tech ............................ 2-0 842 11 13. Arkansas................................... 2-0 825 13 14. Oregon ...................................... 1-1 754 14 15. Michigan State.......................... 2-0 639 16 16. Ohio State ................................. 2-0 566 15 17. Florida ....................................... 2-0 498 18 18. Arizona State............................ 2-0 353 23 19. Auburn....................................... 2-0 331 22 20. West Virginia............................ 2-0 304 24 21. Texas ........................................ 2-0 260 21 22. South Florida............................ 2-0 230 NR 23. TCU ........................................... 1-1 211 25 24. Baylor......................................... 1-0 171 NR 25. Mississippi State ...................... 1-1 125 17 Others receiving votes: Michigan 97; Central Florida 49; Houston 43; Northwestern 31; Penn State 29; North Carolina 23; Missouri 21; Tennessee 21; Georgia Tech 9; Maryland 9; Clemson 8; Washington 7; California 6; San Diego State 3; Georgia 2; Iowa State 2; Brigham Young 1.

W L T Pts GF GA Columbus .................. 11 9 7 40 33 34 Sporting Kansas City 10 8 10 40 43 36 Philadelphia .............. 8 7 12 36 35 30 Houston ..................... 8 9 11 35 34 36 D.C. ............................ 8 7 10 34 37 35 New York ................... 6 6 15 33 42 38 Chicago...................... 4 8 15 27 30 35 New England............. 5 11 12 27 32 43 Toronto FC ................ 5 12 12 27 30 51 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF GA x-Los Angeles ........... 15 3 10 55 40 22 Seattle ........................ 13 6 9 48 43 31 FC Dallas................... 13 8 7 46 36 31 Real Salt Lake .......... 13 7 6 45 37 22 Colorado .................... 10 8 11 41 39 37 Portland...................... 9 12 6 33 33 41 Chivas USA............... 7 11 10 31 32 33 San Jose .................... 6 10 11 29 29 35 Vancouver ................. 4 13 10 22 28 43 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. x- clinched playoff berth Saturday's Games Real Salt Lake 2, Philadelphia 1 Monday's Games Sporting Kansas City 2, Los Angeles 2, tie Wednesday's Games Philadelphia 4, New England 4, tie Friday's Games Los Angeles 1, Colorado 0 Saturday's Games Real Salt Lake 2, Seattle FC 1 Sporting Kansas City 3, Houston 0 Philadelphia 0, Portland 0, tie Toronto FC 4, Columbus 2 New England 2, FC Dallas 0 New York 1, Vancouver 1, tie D.C. United 3, Chivas USA 0 San Jose 2, Chicago 0 Wednesday, Sept. 14 Houston at Columbus, 7:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 16 New England at Portland, 11 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 17 Colorado at Toronto FC, 1:30 p.m. Chivas USA at Chicago, 4 p.m. Columbus at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m. San Jose at Houston, 8:30 p.m. New York at FC Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Sporting Kansas City at Real Salt Lake, 9 p.m. D.C. United at Seattle FC, 9 p.m. Vancouver at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.

N A S C A R Sprint Cup Points Leaders Through Sep. 10 1. Kyle Busch, 2,012. 2. Kevin Harvick, 2,012. 3. Jeff Gordon, 2,009. 4. Matt Kenseth, 2,006. 5. Carl Edwards, 2,003. 6. Jimmie Johnson, 2,003. 7. Kurt Busch, 2,003. 8. Ryan Newman, 2,003. 9. Tony Stewart, 2,000. 10. Dale Earnhardt Jr., 2,000. 11. Brad Keselowski, 2,000. 12. Denny Hamlin, 2,000. 13. A J Allmendinger, 731. 14. Clint Bowyer, 719. 15. Greg Biffle, 713. 16. Mark Martin, 694. 17. Martin Truex Jr., 690. 18. Juan Pablo Montoya, 679. 19. David Ragan, 677. 20. Marcos Ambrose, 673. 21. Kasey Kahne, 673. 22. Joey Logano, 671. 23. Paul Menard, 667. 24. Jeff Burton, 618. 25. Jamie McMurray, 610. 26. Regan Smith, 589. 27. Brian Vickers, 571. 28. David Reutimann, 556. 29. Bobby Labonte, 539. 30. David Gilliland, 446. 31. Casey Mears, 387. 32. Dave Blaney, 349. 33. Andy Lally, 333. 34. Robby Gordon, 236. 35. Tony Raines, 129. 36. J.J. Yeley, 103. 37. Bill Elliott, 100. 38. Terry Labonte, 92. 39. Michael McDowell, 91. 40. Ken Schrader, 87. 41. David Stremme, 53. 42. Boris Said, 38. 43. Stephen Leicht, 20. 44. Michael Waltrip, 20. 45. Andy Pilgrim, 18. 46. Chris Cook, 17. 47. T.J. Bell, 14. 48. Brian Simo, 11. 49. Geoffrey Bodine, 6. 50. Brian Keselowski, 3.

Sprint Cup Money Leaders Through Sep. 10 1. Carl Edwards, $6,511,154 2. Kyle Busch, $4,896,379 3. Kevin Harvick, $4,706,934 4. Jimmie Johnson, $4,657,999 5. Kurt Busch, $4,582,251 6. Jeff Gordon, $4,570,424 7. Matt Kenseth, $4,565,074 8. Tony Stewart, $4,171,916 9. Clint Bowyer, $4,152,796 10. Denny Hamlin, $4,113,568 11. Ryan Newman, $4,030,948 12. Juan Pablo Montoya, $3,830,071 13. Brad Keselowski, $3,807,289 14. Jamie McMurray, $3,660,852 15. A J Allmendinger, $3,574,964 16. Marcos Ambrose, $3,567,879 17. Regan Smith, $3,523,608 18. Bobby Labonte, $3,478,953 19. David Reutimann, $3,297,836 20. David Ragan, $3,295,763 21. Kasey Kahne, $3,264,662 22. Greg Biffle, $3,198,078 23. Brian Vickers, $3,173,512 24. Dale Earnhardt Jr., $3,159,538 25. David Gilliland, $3,101,135 26. Joey Logano, $2,975,113 27. Paul Menard, $2,948,913 28. Mark Martin, $2,935,833 29. Martin Truex Jr., $2,921,763 30. Jeff Burton, $2,762,351 31. Trevor Bayne, $2,485,588 32. Dave Blaney, $2,370,275 33. Andy Lally, $2,277,793 34. Joe Nemechek, $2,192,023 35. Casey Mears, $2,076,333 36. Landon Cassill, $2,024,376 37. Robby Gordon, $1,921,916 38. Travis Kvapil, $1,891,145 39. J.J. Yeley, $1,780,227 40. Michael McDowell, $1,708,980 41. Mike Skinner, $1,438,718 42. Tony Raines, $932,125 43. Mike Bliss, $890,028 44. Terry Labonte, $882,627 45. David Stremme, $826,595 46. Bill Elliott, $663,887 47. Ken Schrader, $516,432 48. Scott Speed, $496,620 49. Michael Waltrip, $396,213 50. David Starr, $360,255

T E N N I S U.S. Open Results Sunday At The USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center New York Purse: $23.7 million Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Women Championship Sam Stosur (9), Australia, def. Serena Williams (28), United States, 6-2, 6-3. Doubles Women Championship Liezel Huber and Lisa Raymond (4), United States, def. Vania King, United States, and Yaroslava Shvedova (3), Kazakhstan, 4-6, 7-6 (5), 7-6 (3). Junior Singles Boys Championship Oliver Golding (13), Britain, def. Jiri Vesely (1), Czech Republic, 5-7, 6-3, 6-4. Girls Championship Grace Min, United States, def. Caroline Garcia (1), France, 7-5, 7-6 (3). Junior Doubles Boys Championship Robin Kern and Julian Lenz, Germany, def. Maxim Dubarenco, Moldova, and Vladyslav Manafov, Ukraine, 7-5, 6-4. Girls Championship Irina Khromacheva, Russia, and Demi Schuurs (6), Netherlands, def. Gabrielle Andrews and Taylor Townsend, United States, 6-4, 5-7, 10-5 tiebreak. Wheelchair Singles Women Championship Esther Vergeer (1), Netherlands, def. Aniek van Koot, Netherlands, 6-2, 6-1. Monday At The USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center New York Purse: $23.7 million Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Men Championship Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, def. Rafael Nadal (2), Spain, 6-2, 6-4, 6-7 (3), 6-1.

S O C C E R Major League Soccer EASTERN CONFERENCE

B O X I N G Fight Schedule Sept. 15 At El Paso, Texas, Jhonny Gonzalez vs. Rogers Mtagwa, 12, for Gonzalez’s WBC featherweight title; Miguel Roman vs. Antonio Jose, 10, super featherweights; Antonio Escalante vs. Pipino Cuevas Jr., 10, super featherweights. Sept. 17 At MGM Grand, Las Vegas (PPV), Victor Ortiz vs. Floyd Mayweather, 12, for Ortiz’s WBC welterweight title; Erik Morales vs. Pablo Cesar Cano, 12, for the vacant WBC super lightweight title; Jessie Vargas vs. Josesito Lopez, 10, junior welterweights. At Staples Center, Los Angeles (PPV), Saul Alvarez vs. Alfonso Gomez, 12, for Alvarez’s WBC super welterweight title. At Culiacan, Mexico, Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. vs. Ronald Hearns, 12, for Chavez’s WBC middleweight title. Sept. 21 At Newcastle, Australia, Anthony Mundine vs. Rigoberto Alvarez, 12, for the interim WBA World junior middleweight title. Sept. 23 At Cagliari, Italy, Moruti Mthalane vs. Andrea Sarritzu, 12, for Mthalane’s IBF flyweight title. At Fantasy Springs Resortcasino, Indio, Calif., Vicente Escobedo vs. Rocky Juarez, 10, junior lightweights. Sept. 24 At Club Chicago, Burbank, Ill., Roman Karmazin vs. Osumanu Adama, 12, IBF middleweight title eliminator. At Mexicali, Mexico, Jorge Arce vs. Simphiwe Nongqayi, 12, for Arce’s WBO super bantamweight title; Raul Martinez vs. Rodrigo Guerrero, 12, for the vacant IBF super featherweight title. At Mexico City, Adrian Hernandez vs. Gideon Buthelezi, 12, for Hernandez’s WBC light flyweight title. Sept. 25 At Krasnodar, Russia, Dmitry Pirog vs. Gennady Martirosyan, 12, for Pirog’s WBO middleweight title. Sept. 30 At Santa Ynez, Calif. (SHO), Ajose Olusegun vs. Ali Chebah, 12, WBC junior welterweight eliminator. Oct. 1 At Atlantic City, N.J. (HBO), Sergio Martinez vs. Darren Barker, 12, middleweights; Brian Vera vs. Andy Lee, 10, middleweights. At MGM Grand, Las Vegas, Toshiaki Nishioka vs. Rafael Marquez, 12, for Nishioka’s WBC junior featherweight title; Roman Gonzalez vs. Glenn Donaire, 12, for Gonzalez’s WBA World light flyweight title; Jesus Soto Karass vs. Yoshihiro Kamegai, 10, welterweights. Oct. 15 At Almaty, Kazakhstan, Gennady Golovkin vs. Lajuan Simon, 12, for Golovkin’s WBA World middleweight title. At Staples Center, Los Angeles (PPV), Bernard Hopkins vs. Chad Dawson, 12, for Hopkins’ WBC light heavyweight title; Antonio DeMarco vs. Jorge Linares, 12, for vacant WBC lightweight title; Kendall Holt vs. Danny Garcia, 12, for the vacant WBO-

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BULLETIN BOARD MEETINGS Crestwood Football Booster Club will be meeting on Tuesday, September 20 at 7 p.m. at King’s Restaurant. Any questions or concerns, please call Tony at 570-430-7517. Hanover Area Cheerleading Booster Club will hold a meeting Monday, September 19, at 7 p.m. in the Hanover Area cafeteria. Kingston/Forty Fort Little League will meet on Monday, September 19 at 6:30 p.m. at the Kingston Recreation Center. All interested members are welcome. Lake-Lehman Wrestlers, Parents, and Fans are invited to attend an important meeting on Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. in the Lake Lehman High School auditorium. Plans will be discussed for the Elementary, Jr. High and High School season. REGISTRATIONS/TRYOUTS Newport Biddy Basketball sign ups for grades 1-7 at K.M. Smith this Saturday September 17, and Sunday September 18 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. as well as next Thursday, September 22. PA Fusion Girls Travel Softball Team will be holding tryouts for the 2012 season this, Saturday, September 17. 12U will tryout at 10 a.m., 14U at 12 p.m., and 16U at 2 p.m. Tryouts will be held at the Nanticoke Little League field. We offer indoor winter training from November to March included in team registration. Tryouts also will be held Saturday, September 24, same times and same location. Any questions call Mark at 570902-5198. The Valley Regional Warriors will hold a 16U travel team tryout Friday, September 16 at 5 p.m. at the Freedom Park softball complex in Drums. New coach Ron Samsel urges all regional softball players who will be 16 or younger on January 1 to attend. The tryout will be held on Field 2 at the complex located at 413 W. Butler Drive in Drums. For more information, contact Samsel at 570-336-0707 or email at samsel@pa.metrocast.net. UPCOMING EVENTS King’s College Softball Golf Tournament, Sunday Sept 18 at Stone Meadows Golf Course. Shotgun start is noon and cost is $65 per golfer. The format is captain and crew. For information, contact Coach Gigliello at 570-208-5900 x 5397 orlisagigliello@kings.edu. Nanticoke Area Basketball Alumni will sponsor a golf tournament benefiting the Nanticoke Area Boy’s and Girls’ basketball programs on Saturday, October 1 at the Rolling Pines Golf Course near Berwick/.The tournament will be Captain and Crew format with a shotgun start at 9 a.m. Refreshments will be provided and prizes awarded for flight winners along with longest drive and closest-tothe-pin awards. A post-tournament awards ceremony and outing will follow at the West Side Park Clubhouse on Nanticoke. Sponsorships are also available for those who wish to support the basketball programs. All friends of Trojan and Trojanette Basketball are invited and encouraged to participate in this event that has become an enjoyable part of the Nanticoke Area- Basketball Tradition. For more information or to register, call Ken at 570-740-6049, or Alan at 570-735-2078. The Susquehanna Baseball Team will host its third annual Clay Shoot fundraiser on Saturday, October 8, at Martz’s Gap View Hunting Preserve in Dalmatia, Pa. The registration deadline is Thursday, October 6. Registration and refreshments begin at 8 a.m. and the event will take placer rain or shine. The morning session begins at 9 a.m. and the afternoon session at 1 p.m. The shoot is limited to 108 shooter (54 per session) on a first come fist served basis. A single-shooter entry fee is $60 which includes orientation and safety guidelines, 75 rounds of clay shooting, on course refreshments, a pig roast lunch, prizes, and more. The lunch is served between the two sessions from 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. Shooters are required to bring their own shotgun and shells. Eye protection is mandatory and ear protection is recommended.

Bulletin Board items will not be accepted over the telephone. Items may be faxed to 831-7319, dropped off at the Times Leader or mailed to Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250. NABO junior welterweight title; Paulie Malignaggi vs. Orlando Lora, 10, welterweights. Oct. 22 At Sinaloa, Mexico, Hugo Ruiz vs. Francisco Arce, 12, for Ruiz’s interim WBA World bantamweight title. Oct. 28 At Bangkok, Thailand, Pongsaklek Wonjongkam vs. Edgar Sosa, 12, for Wonjongkam’s WBC flyweight title. At Bally’s Event Center, Atlantic City, N.J., Tony Thompson vs. Eddie Chambers, 12, IBF heavyweight eliminator. Oct. 29 At Atlantic City, N.J. (SHO), Andre Ward vs. Carl Froch, 12, for Ward’s WBA and Froch’s WBC Super World welterweight titles. Nov. 5 At Copenhagen, Denmark, Robert Stieglitz vs. Mikkel Kessler, 12, for Stieglitz’s WBO super middleweight title. At TBA, Anselmo Moreno vs. Eric Morel, 12, for Moreno’s WBA Super World bantamweight title. At Quebec, Canada (SHO), Lucian Bute vs. Glen Johnson, 12, for Bute’s IBF super middleweight title. Nov. 6 At Tokyo, Takahiro Ao vs. Devis Boschiero, 12, for Ao’s WBC junior lightweight title; Shinsuke Yamanaka vs. Christian Esquivel, 12, WBC bantamweight eliminator; Toshiyuki Igarashi vs. Wilbert Uicab, 12, WBC flyweight eliminator. Nov. 12 At MGM Grand, Las Vegas (PPV), Manny Pacquiao vs. Juan Manuel Marquez, 12, for Pacquiao’s WBO welterweight title.


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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 PAGE 3B

Canzler gets call to help Tampa Bay in stretch run By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

Russ Canzler is in another pennant race. After helping the Durham reach the International League Governors’ Cup playoffs, the Hazleton Area grad is now trying to help the Tampa Bay Rays do the same. On Sunday, the 25-year-old got the call to the Majors for the first time in his career for manager Joe Maddon, another Hazleton native. The move on Sunday put Canzler in the middle of another

pennant race, this time for the American League East and Wild Card. Through two days, Canzler has yet to see action for Tampa Bay. After Monday’s win over Baltimore, the Rays are 6.5 games behind New York in third place in the A.L. East. Tampa is also now just three games behind Boston in the chase for the Wild Card. Tampa, which is riding a fivegame winning streak, has been hot lately winning eight of its last 11 to trim the Red Sox lead in the Wild Card by six games in 10

MAJOR LEAGUE ROUNDUP

Lee’s HR leads Astros vs. Phills The Associated Press

HOUSTON — Carlos Lee hit a two-run homer off former teammate Roy Oswalt and the Houston Astros beat the Philadelphia Phillies 5-1 on Monday night. Despite the loss, Philadelphia’s magic number for gaining at least a wild-card playoff spot dropped to one with St. Louis’ 6-5 loss to Pittsburgh. The Phillies are trying to make the playoffs for the fifth straight year. Oswalt (7-9), who pitched 10 seasons for the Astros, faced his former teammates for the first time at Minute Maid Park since he was traded to the Phillies in July 2010. Right fielder Hunter Pence, traded by Houston to the Phillies in July, also returned for the first time and got two hits off Brett Myers (5-13). Myers allowed six hits in eight innings. Nationals 3, Mets 2

NEW YORK — Steve Lombardozzi made his first big league hit and RBI count, driving in the go-ahead run in the seventh inning as the Washington Nationals beat the New York Mets. Starters Ross Detwiler and R.A. Dickey (8-12) were locked in early, each giving up one hit through four innings that took just 52 minutes. The Nationals took a 1-0 lead in the fifth with help from Mets third baseman David Wright’s fourth error in three games. Jayson Werth had three hits and Rick Ankiel and Wilson Ramos drove in runs for Washington, winners of two straight. Todd Coffey (5-1) got one out in the sixth, Tyler Clippard pitched two perfect innings and Drew Storen finished after walking Wright to start the ninth for his 35th save in 40 chances. Marlins 5, Braves 4

ATLANTA — Mike Stanton’s pinch-hit single in the 12th inning drove in the go-ahead run and the Florida Marlins beat Atlanta to extend the Braves’ slump. The Braves, coming off a 2-6 road trip, have lost four straight and nine of 12. They still lead St. Louis by 4 1/2 games in the NL wild-card race. Braves rookie right-hander Anthony Varvaro (0-2) walked John Buck to lead off the 12th. Pinch-runner Brett Hayes moved to second on Bryan Peterson’s sacrifice before Varvaro issued an intentional walk to Donnie Murphy.

waukee in the NL Central. St. Louis built a 4-3 lead against fourth-place Pittsburgh but lost for the seventh time this season when leading after seven innings. Ryan Doumit, back in the lineup a day after he sustained a chest bruise, tied it at 4 in the eighth with a double off Marc Rzepczynski (0-2). Cubs 12, Reds 8

CINCINNATI — Starlin Castro homered, scored four runs and drove in three while extending his career-high hitting streak to 13 games and leading the Chicago Cubs to a win over the Cincinnati Reds in the opener of a four-game series. Aramis Ramirez also had three hits, including a double and his 25th homer of the season, and Jeff Baker added a home run as the Cubs won a third consecutive game for the first time since Aug. 15 and matched their season high in runs. They also scored 12 in a 12-7 win over Milwaukee on June 16. Brandon Phillips hit two of Cincinnati’s four home runs and Juan Francisco hit a tapemeasure shot, but the Reds couldn’t avoid their third consecutive loss and fourth in five games.

days. That includes a three-game sweep of the Sox last weekend. On Sept. 2, Tampa was nine games behind Boston. The sizzling Rays still have 16 games remaining this season, consisting of two more in Baltimore then four at Boston. They also have seven games with the Yankees sandwiched around a three-game series at home against Toronto. They head to Boston this weekend for a four-game set beginning Thursday. After an off-day Sept. 19, Tampa Bay starts a fourgame stint in New York on Sept.

Tigers 14, White Sox 4

CHICAGO — Jhonny Peralta and Ryan Raburn ignited the Detroit Tigers offense with back-to-back homers in the second inning as the Detroit Tigers routed the Chicago White Sox for their 10th straight win. It’s the Tigers’ first 10-game Pirates 6, Cardinals 5 streak since they won 11 in a row in September 1968 before PITTSBURGH — Pedro Ciriaco hit a tiebreaking double going on to win the World Series that year. to cap a three-run rally in the Raburn finished the game eighth inning and the Pittswith four hits and three RBIs burgh Pirates stunned St. Louis, damaging the Cardinals’ and Peralta added two hits and three RBIs for the Tigers, who playoff chances. reduced their magic number to Albert Pujols hit his NLsix in the AL Central. leading 35th homer and drove Detroit starter Rick Porcello in three runs for St. Louis, (14-8) coasted to an easy victowhich had won five in a row to climb within 41⁄2 games of Atlan- ry. He allowed three runs on six hits in 6 2-3 innings. He was ta for the NL wild card. The Cardinals also began the day six tagged for one of Brent Morel’s two home runs. games behind first-place Mil-

(251) and on base percentage (.401) to go along with the fourth-highest batting average in the league hitting at a .314 clip and was third in hits with 149. He also blasted 18 home runs – good for 11th in the I.L. – and drove in the fifth-most RBI in the league with 83. He got hot in July after being named to the Triple-A All-Star game and accounted for the game’s lone runs with a three-run home run. He became just the second player in Top Star honors in the Triple-A All-Star game and

the I.L. MVP in the same season. After the mid-summer game for the Bulls, he hit .358 in July and .353 in August to get into contention for the league’s MVP award. Over the last two months – and four September games – he batted .362 with 10 home runs and 36 RBI in 56 games. Canzler, who graduated from Hazleton Area in 2004, joined the Rays organization last offseason as a minor league free agent after not being signed by the Chicago Cubs, who drafted him out of high school.

STANDINGS/STATS S TA N D I N G S

New York...................................... Boston .......................................... Tampa Bay ................................... Toronto ......................................... Baltimore ...................................... Detroit........................................ Chicago..................................... Cleveland .................................. Kansas City............................... Minnesota .................................

W 88 85 82 74 58 W 85 73 72 62 59

Texas ............................................ Los Angeles ................................. Oakland ........................................ Seattle...........................................

W 83 80 66 61

Philadelphia ................................. Atlanta........................................... New York...................................... Washington.................................. Florida...........................................

W 94 84 71 68 66

Milwaukee .................................... St. Louis ....................................... Cincinnati...................................... Pittsburgh..................................... Chicago ........................................ Houston ........................................

W 86 79 71 67 65 50

Arizona ......................................... San Francisco .............................. Los Angeles ................................. Colorado....................................... San Diego.....................................

W 85 76 72 69 63

All Times EDT AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str 57 .607 — — 6-4 W-1 — 2-8 L-5 61 .582 31⁄2 64 .562 61⁄2 3 8-2 W-5 73 .503 15 111⁄2 5-5 W-2 88 .397 301⁄2 27 3-7 L-3 Central Division L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str 62 .578 — — 10-0 W-10 73 .500 111⁄2 12 5-5 L-2 72 .500 111⁄2 12 4-6 W-1 86 .419 231⁄2 24 5-5 W-2 26 2-8 L-3 87 .404 251⁄2 West Division L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str 64 .565 — — 6-4 W-1 66 .548 21⁄2 5 7-3 L-1 19 6-4 L-1 80 .452 161⁄2 85 .418 211⁄2 24 3-7 L-2 NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str 50 .653 — — 6-4 L-2 63 .571 111⁄2 — 3-7 L-3 76 .483 241⁄2 13 4-6 L-3 77 .469 261⁄2 15 5-5 W-2 79 .455 281⁄2 17 6-4 W-3 Central Division L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str 62 .581 — — 5-5 W-1 68 .537 61⁄2 5 6-4 L-1 76 .483 141⁄2 13 4-6 L-3 17 5-5 W-1 80 .456 181⁄2 82 .442 201⁄2 19 6-4 W-3 34 3-7 W-1 97 .340 351⁄2 West Division L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str 62 .578 — — 7-3 L-1 70 .521 81⁄2 71⁄2 5-5 W-1 73 .497 12 11 7-3 L-1 141⁄2 5-5 W-2 77 .473 151⁄2 84 .429 22 21 3-7 W-1

AMERICAN LEAGUE Sunday's Games Detroit 2, Minnesota 1 Toronto 6, Baltimore 5 Tampa Bay 9, Boston 1 Cleveland 7, Chicago White Sox 3 Texas 8, Oakland 1 N.Y. Yankees 6, L.A. Angels 5 Kansas City 2, Seattle 1 Monday's Games Tampa Bay 5, Baltimore 2 Detroit 14, Chicago White Sox 4 L.A. Angels at Oakland, 10:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. Tuesday's Games Tampa Bay (Price 12-12) at Baltimore (Simon 4-8), 7:05 p.m. Toronto (Morrow 9-10) at Boston (Wakefield 6-6), 7:10 p.m. Cleveland (Masterson 11-9) at Texas (M.Harrison 11-9), 8:05 p.m. Detroit (Verlander 22-5) at Chicago White Sox (Floyd 12-10), 8:10 p.m. Minnesota (Pavano 8-11) at Kansas City (Chen 10-7), 8:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (J.Williams 3-0) at Oakland (Moscoso 8-8), 10:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (A.J.Burnett 9-11) at Seattle (Furbush 3-8), 10:10 p.m. Wednesday's Games Toronto at Boston, 1:35 p.m. Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Oakland, 3:35 p.m. Minnesota at Kansas City, 4:10 p.m. Cleveland at Texas, 7:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.

AMERICAN LEAGUE Rays 5, Orioles 2

BALTIMORE — B.J. Upton doubled twice and took two walks to set a Tampa Bay record by reaching base in nine straight plate appearances, and the resurgent Rays beat the Baltimore Orioles for their fifth straight victory. Ben Zobrist had three hits and three RBIs for the Rays, who have won eight of nine to move within three games of idle Boston in the AL wild-card race. Tampa Bay trailed the Red Sox by nine games on Sept. 2. Upton went 4 for 4 with a walk on Sunday against Boston, then reached base four successive times against the Orioles before striking out in the eighth inning. Eight times previously a Tampa Bay player got on base in eight straight plate appearances, the last one Upton in May 2008.

20. Canzler, who won the International League’s Most Valuable Player award last month, helped Durham reach the postseason winning the I.L. South before being dispatched by Columbus in the best-of-five series last week. Canzler had a phenomenal season for the Bulls leading the league in doubles with 40, slugging percentage at .530 and on base plus slugging percentage with a mark of .930. He was also second in the I.L. in runs scored (78), total bases

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B O X E S

Astros 5, Phillies 1 Philadelphia

Houston ab r h bi ab r h bi Rollins ss 4 0 1 0 JSchafr cf 4 0 0 0 Victorn cf 4 0 0 0 AngSnc ss 5 0 0 0 Pence rf 4 0 2 0 JMrtnz lf 4 3 3 0 Howard 1b 4 0 0 0 Ca.Lee 1b 3 1 2 2 Ibanez lf 2 1 1 0 Bogsvc rf 4 1 1 1 Ruiz c 4 0 1 0 Pareds 3b 3 0 1 1 Orr 2b 4 0 1 1 Altuve 2b 4 0 0 0 Mrtnz 3b 3 0 0 0 Quinter c 4 0 3 1 Polanc ph 0 0 0 0 Myers p 3 0 2 0 Oswalt p 3 0 0 0 Michals ph 1 0 0 0 Blanton p 0 0 0 0 Melncn p 0 0 0 0 Gload ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 33 1 6 1 Totals 35 512 5 Philadelphia....................... 010 000 000 — 1 Houston.............................. 000 220 10x — 5 DP—Philadelphia 1. LOB—Philadelphia 8, Houston 9. 2B—Pence (35), Ibanez (29), J.Martinez (11), Quintero (12). HR—Ca.Lee (16). SB—Pence (8), Orr (3). IP H R ER BB SO Philadelphia Oswalt L,7-9 ............ 7 11 5 5 2 2 Blanton ..................... 1 1 0 0 0 1 Houston Myers W,5-13.......... 8 6 1 1 1 4 Melancon ................. 1 0 0 0 2 0 HBP—by Oswalt (Ca.Lee). WP—Oswalt. Umpires—Home, Tim Welke;First, Jim Reynolds;Second, Vic Carapazza;Third, Andy Fletcher. T—2:22. A—22,231 (40,963).

Cubs 12, Reds 8 Chicago

Cincinnati

ab r h bi ab r h bi SCastro ss 4 4 3 3 BPhllps 2b 4 3 2 3 RJhnsn rf 5 2 2 1 Sappelt cf 5 0 0 0 ArRmr 3b 5 1 3 2 Votto 1b 5 0 2 1 JeBakr 1b 4 2 2 1 Bruce rf 4 0 2 0 R.Ortiz p 0 0 0 0 Alonso lf 4 1 0 0 JRussll p 0 0 0 0 Mesorc c 4 2 2 1 ASorin lf 5 0 2 3 JFrncs 3b 4 1 2 2 Campn lf 0 0 0 0 Janish ss 3 0 0 1 Byrd cf 5 1 1 0 Willis p 1 1 1 0 Soto c 5 0 1 2 Burton p 0 0 0 0 Barney 2b 5 2 2 0 Frazier ph 1 0 0 0 RLopez p 2 0 0 0 Fisher p 0 0 0 0 Cashnr p 0 0 0 0 Cairo ph 1 0 0 0 Montnz ph 1 0 0 0 Horst p 0 0 0 0 Gaub p 0 0 0 0 Heisey ph 1 0 0 0 LaHair 1b 0 0 0 0 Masset p 0 0 0 0 Totals 41121612 Totals 37 811 8 Chicago............................ 302 321 010 — 12 Cincinnati ......................... 030 011 021 — 8 E—S.Castro (27). DP—Chicago 1, Cincinnati 1. LOB—Chicago 5, Cincinnati 6. 2B—S.Castro 2 (32), Ar.Ramirez (35), A.Soriano (25), Soto (25), Votto (36), Mesoraco (2). HR—S.Castro (9), Ar.Ramirez (25), Je.Baker (3), B.Phillips 2 (14), Mesoraco (1), J.Francisco (3). SB—Barney (9). CS—Bruce (7). SF—Janish. IP H R ER BB SO Chicago R.Lopez W,5-6 ........ 51⁄3 9 5 5 1 4 Cashner ................... 2⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 1 1 Gaub ......................... 11⁄3 R.Ortiz ...................... 1 0 1 1 1 2 J.Russell .................. 2⁄3 1 0 0 0 0 Cincinnati Willis L,0-6 ............... 31⁄3 9 8 8 3 0 Burton....................... 2⁄3 1 0 0 0 1 Fisher ....................... 2 4 3 3 0 2 Horst ......................... 2 2 1 1 0 2 Masset...................... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Umpires—Home, Rob Drake;First, Alan Porter;Second, David Rackley;Third, Gary Darling. T—3:10. A—19,874 (42,319).

Home 46-27 42-29 42-33 38-36 33-40

Away 42-30 43-32 40-31 36-37 25-48

Home 45-29 33-40 39-33 34-39 30-42

Away 40-33 40-33 33-39 28-47 29-45

Home 46-29 44-31 39-32 36-39

Away 37-35 36-35 27-48 25-46

Home 49-22 44-28 31-41 41-33 28-44

Away 45-28 40-35 40-35 27-44 38-35

Home 51-22 41-34 37-35 34-42 35-40 27-45

Away 35-40 38-34 34-41 33-38 30-42 23-52

Home 45-27 41-34 36-35 38-36 30-42

Away 40-35 35-36 36-38 31-41 33-42

NATIONAL LEAGUE Sunday's Games Florida 4, Pittsburgh 1 Washington 8, Houston 2 Milwaukee 3, Philadelphia 2 St. Louis 6, Atlanta 3 Colorado 4, Cincinnati 1 San Francisco 8, L.A. Dodgers 1 San Diego 7, Arizona 6 Chicago Cubs 10, N.Y. Mets 6, 11 innings Monday's Games Pittsburgh 6, St. Louis 5 Chicago Cubs 12, Cincinnati 8 Washington 3, N.Y. Mets 2 Florida at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. Houston 5, Philadelphia 1 Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. San Diego at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. Tuesday's Games St. Louis (C.Carpenter 9-9) at Pittsburgh (Karstens 9-8), 7:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Dempster 10-11) at Cincinnati (Leake 11-9), 7:10 p.m. Florida (Hand 1-6) at Atlanta (Minor 5-2), 7:10 p.m. Washington (Wang 2-3) at N.Y. Mets (Gee 12-6), 7:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Hamels 14-7) at Houston (Happ 5-15), 8:05 p.m. Colorado (Rogers 6-5) at Milwaukee (Greinke 14-6), 8:10 p.m. Arizona (I.Kennedy 19-4) at L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 10-10), 10:10 p.m. San Diego (Luebke 5-9) at San Francisco (Cain 11-10), 10:15 p.m. Wednesday's Games Florida at Atlanta, 12:05 p.m. St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 12:35 p.m. Philadelphia at Houston, 2:05 p.m. San Diego at San Francisco, 3:45 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. Washington at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Colorado at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.

Nationals 3, Mets 2 New York ab r h bi ab r h bi Bixler ss 4 1 0 0 JosRys ss 4 0 0 0 Clipprd p 0 0 0 0 JuTrnr 2b 3 1 0 0 L.Nix ph 0 0 0 0 Duda rf 3 1 0 0 JGoms ph 1 0 0 0 DWrght 3b 3 0 1 1 Storen p 0 0 0 0 Pagan cf 3 0 1 1 Lmrdzz 2b 4 0 1 1 Bay lf 3 0 0 0 Zmrmn 3b 4 1 2 0 Evans 1b 4 0 1 0 Morse lf 4 0 0 0 Nickes c 3 0 0 0 Werth cf-rf 4 1 3 0 Dickey p 2 0 0 0 Ankiel rf-cf 4 0 1 1 Harris ph 1 0 0 0 Marrer 1b 4 0 1 0 Stinson p 0 0 0 0 WRams c 4 0 2 1 DHerrr p 0 0 0 0 Detwilr p 1 0 0 0 DCrrsc p 0 0 0 0 Coffey p 0 0 0 0 Byrdak p 0 0 0 0 Dsmnd ph-ss 2 0 0 0 Totals 36 310 3 Totals 29 2 3 2 Washington ....................... 000 011 100 — 3 New York ........................... 000 002 000 — 2 E—D.Wright (16). LOB—Washington 7, New York 5. 2B—Werth (25), Pagan (24). S—Detwiler, Pagan. IP H R ER BB SO Washington Detwiler .................... 52⁄3 3 2 2 3 2 Coffey W,5-1 ........... 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 Clippard H,33 .......... 2 0 0 0 0 1 Storen S,35-40........ 1 0 0 0 1 1 New York Dickey L,8-12 .......... 7 8 3 2 0 7 Stinson ..................... 2⁄3 1 0 0 0 0 D.Herrera ................. 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 D.Carrasco .............. 2⁄3 1 0 0 0 1 Byrdak ...................... 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 WP—Dickey 2. Umpires—Home, Jerry Meals;First, CB Bucknor;Second, Dan Iassogna;Third, Dale Scott. T—2:41. A—27,015 (41,800). Washington

Pirates 6, Cardinals 5 St. Louis

ab 5 3 1 0

r 1 1 0 0

h bi 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 0

SRonsn cf CPttrsn ph Pujols 1b Hollidy lf Brkmn rf Dotel p Rzpczy p

0 1 2 4 3 0 0

0 0 1 0 0 0 0

0 0 1 0 1 0 0

0 0 3 0 0 0 0

Salas p Freese 3b Descals 3b YMolin c Schmkr 2b-cf-rf Chamrs pr Lohse p Punto ph-2b

0 3 1 3

0 0 1 0

0 0 1 0

0 0 0 0

4 0 2 1

1 0 0 0

3 0 1 0

0 0 0 0

Furcal ss Jay cf Craig ph McCllln p

Pittsburgh Presley lf Walker 2b AMcCt cf D.Lee 1b dArnad pr-ss Doumit c Paul pr-rf GJones rf Ludwck ph BrWod 1b PAlvrz 3b JHrrsn ph-3b Cedeno ss Watson p Grilli p

ab 5 4 3 2

r 2 1 0 0

h bi 2 0 3 1 0 1 0 1

0 4 0 3 0 0 3

1 0 1 0 1 0 0

0 2 0 2 0 0 0

0 1 0 0 0 0 0

1 2 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

Jarmll ph-c 0 0 0 0 Lincoln p 2 0 0 0 Leroux p 0 0 0 0 Ciriaco ss 2 0 1 2 Hanrhn p 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 511 4 Totals 31 610 6 St. Louis ............................. 101 002 001 — 5 Pittsburgh .......................... 200 010 03x — 6 E—Presley (1). DP—St. Louis 1, Pittsburgh 2. LOB—St. Louis 6, Pittsburgh 7. 2B—Walker 2 (26), Doumit (10), Ciriaco (2). HR—Pujols (35). CS—Jay (6), Berkman (6). SF—Pujols, A.McCutchen, D.Lee. IP H R ER BB SO St. Louis Lohse........................ 6 8 3 3 1 3 McClellan H,4 .......... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Dotel H,3 .................. 1⁄3 0 1 1 1 1 Rzepczynski L,0-2 1 2 2 2 1 BS,1-1 ...................... 1⁄3 Salas......................... 1⁄3 1 0 0 0 0 Pittsburgh Lincoln ...................... 51⁄3 8 4 3 2 1 Leroux ...................... 11⁄3 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 Watson ..................... 1⁄3 Grilli W,2-1 ............... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Hanrahan S,37-40 .. 1 2 1 1 1 1 WP—Hanrahan. Umpires—Home, Sam Holbrook;First, Chad Fairchild;Second, Joe West;Third, Paul Schrieber. T—3:01. A—13,278 (38,362).

AP PHOTO

New York Mets starting pitcher R.A. Dickey throws against the Washington Nationals in the first inning of a game on Monday in New York.

A L

B O X E S

Rays 5, Orioles 2 Tampa Bay

Baltimore

ab r h bi ab r h bi Jnnngs lf 5 0 1 0 Angle cf 4 0 0 0 BUpton cf 3 3 2 0 Hardy ss 4 0 2 0 Longori 3b 5 0 0 0 Markks rf 3 0 0 0 Zobrist 2b 5 1 3 3 Guerrr dh 4 0 1 0 Damon dh 3 0 1 1 Wieters c 4 1 1 1 SRdrgz ss 5 0 2 1 C.Davis 3b 4 0 0 0 Ktchm 1b 4 0 1 0 MrRynl 1b 3 1 0 0 Loaton c 4 0 0 0 KHdsn lf 3 0 1 0 Guyer rf 3 1 1 0 Andino 2b 3 0 1 1 Joyce ph-rf 1 0 0 0 Totals 38 511 5 Totals 32 2 6 2 Tampa Bay......................... 003 010 100 — 5 Baltimore ............................ 000 011 000 — 2 E—C.Davis (5). DP—Tampa Bay 1. LOB—Tampa Bay 12, Baltimore 5. 2B—B.Upton 2 (23), Zobrist (45), Guyer (1), Andino (21). HR—Wieters (18). SB—Zobrist (17). SF—Damon. IP H R ER BB SO Tampa Bay Niemann W,10-7 ..... 72⁄3 6 2 2 2 5 0 0 0 0 0 Howell H,10 ............. 1⁄3 Jo.Peralta S,3-5 ...... 1 0 0 0 0 3 Baltimore Britton L,9-10........... 5 5 4 4 4 2 Accardo .................... 11⁄3 2 1 1 1 1 Z.Phillips .................. 2⁄3 1 0 0 0 0 Berken ...................... 1 1 0 0 0 2 Jakubauskas............ 1 2 0 0 0 0 Umpires—Home, Phil Cuzzi;First, Tom Hallion;Second, Bill Miller;Third, James Hoye. T—3:01. A—11,924 (45,438).

Tigers 14, White Sox 4 Detroit AJcksn cf Dirks pr-cf Ordonz rf RSantg pr-2b-ss DYong lf Kelly ph-lf MiCarr 1b Guillen 1b

ab 3 0 4

r 1 0 0

Chicago h bi 1 0 Pierre lf 0 0 AlRmrz ss 1 0 EEscor ss

2 3 2 5 1

1 2 0 2 0

1 3 0 2 0

2 1 0 1 0

Konerk 1b Flowrs 1b Przyns c Viciedo rf Rios dh Quentin ph-dh De Aza cf Morel 3b Bckhm 2b

ab 5 3 1

r 1 0 0

h bi 2 0 0 0 1 0

2 1 3 3 2

0 0 0 0 0

0 0 1 1 0

0 0 0 1 0

VMrtnz dh 4 2 2 1 2 0 0 0 Rhyms ph-dh 1 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 Avila c 5 1 2 2 4 2 2 2 OSants c 0 0 0 0 4 0 1 1 JhPerlt ss 5 1 2 3 Worth 2b 1 0 0 0 Raburn 2b-rf 5 3 4 3 Inge 3b 5 1 3 0 Totals 46142113 Totals 33 4 8 4 Detroit .............................. 032 126 000 — 14 Chicago............................ 110 000 101 — 4 E—De Aza (1). DP—Detroit 2, Chicago 2. LOB— Detroit 11, Chicago 6. 2B—R.Santiago (11), Mi.Cabrera (40), Avila (31), Raburn (19), Inge (9), Pierre (17), Beckham (17). HR—Jh.Peralta (19), Raburn (13), Morel 2 (7). IP H R ER BB SO Detroit Porcello W,14-8 ...... 62⁄3 6 3 3 3 3 Schlereth.................. 1 1 0 0 0 0 Perry ......................... 1⁄3 0 0 0 1 1 Pauley....................... 1 1 1 1 0 0 Chicago Danks L,6-12 ........... 5 11 8 7 3 5 Kinney ...................... 1 8 6 6 0 0 Lindsay ..................... 3 2 0 0 2 1 HBP—by Kinney (A.Jackson). WP—Porcello 2, Danks 2, Lindsay. PB—Avila. Umpires—Home, Mark Wegner;First, Mike Everitt;Second, Mike Winters;Third, Chris Guccione. T—3:04. A—22,750 (40,615).

T H I S D A T E I N B A S E B A L L Sept. 13 1925 — Brooklyn’s Dazzy Vance threw a no-hitter against the Philadelphia Phillies in the first game of a doubleheader to give the Dodgers a 10-1 win. 1932 — The New York Yankees beat Cleveland 9-3 and clinched the American League pennant. Joe McCarthy became the first manager to win flags in both leagues. 1936 — Bob Feller, 17, beat the Philadelphia A’s 5-2 on two hits. The Cleveland youngster fanned 17 batters for an American League record. 1965 — Willie Mays hit his 500th career home run off Houston’s Don Nottebart in a 5-1 San Francisco victory. 1971 — Frank Robinson hit his 500th career home run off Detroit’s Fred Scherman. The ninth-inning shot gave the Baltimore Orioles a split in a doubleheader against the Tigers. 1978 — The New York Yankees beat the Tigers 7-3 at Detroit to move into sole possession of first place for the first time after being 14 games out on July 19. 1986 — Texas hit a club record seven home runs, including two each by Darrell Porter and Ruben Sierra, as the Rangers beat the Minnesota Twins 14-1. The Rangers rocked starter Bert Blyleven for five home runs, raising his season total to 44 and breaking an American League record. 1995 — Alan Trammell and Lou Whitaker, the middle infield of the Detroit Tigers, set an American League record when they played in their 1,915th game together. 2004 — Eric Chavez singled in the winning run in the bottom of the 10th inning, leading Oakland to a wild 7-6 win over the Rangers in a game that was delayed in the ninth after Texas reliever Frank Francisco hurled a chair and hit two fans. Texas reliever Doug Brocail was screaming at a male fan and had to be restrained by his teammates and bullpen coach Mark Connor. Francisco then tossed a chair at a fan in a lower box to the left of the Rangers’ bullpen along the right-field line. The chair hit a man in the head and broke a woman’s nose. 2008 — Francisco Rodriguez set the major league record with his 58th save this season, closing out the Los Angeles Angels’ 5-2 win over Seattle. Rodriguez broke the mark of 57 set by Bobby Thigpen with the Chicago White Sox in 1990. 2008 — Hanley Ramirez and Jorge Cantu homered to help Florida beat Washington 4-2 and the Marlins became the second major league team to have three infielders with 30 homers. Ramirez’s homer was his 30th, and he joined first baseman Mike Jacobs (32) and second baseman Dan Uggla (30) for Florida this season. The Marlins joined the 2001 Oakland Athletics, who reached the mark with first baseman Jason Giambi (38), third baseman Eric Chavez (32) and shortstop Miguel Tejada (31). 2009 — Seattle’s Ichiro Suzuki became the first player in major league history with at least 200 hits in nine straight seasons. In the nightcap of doubleheader against the Texas, Suzuki beat out a slow roller to shortstop Elvis Andrus to break a tie with Willie Keeler. Keeler did it for eight consecutive seasons (1894-1901).

Former Series MVP Ramirez is arrested The Associated Press

WESTON, Fla. — Former World Series MVP Manny Ramirez was arrested Monday after a domestic dispute at his South Florida home and charged with battery, police said. Ramirez, 39, and his wife were arguing in their bedroom when he slapped her face, causing her to hit her head on their bed’s headboard, according to a police report. She told the deputy she was afraid the situation would escalate and called police. Ramirez denied hitting his wife, according to the report, telling a deputy she hit her head after he shrugged her. Ramirez’s wife had injuries consistent with her story, but did not want medical treatment. Ramirez retired in April from the Tampa Bay Rays after he tested positive for a performance-enhancing substance. Rather than face a 100-game suspension for a second violation of Major League Baseball’s drug policy, the 12-time All-Star left the game. Ramirez previously served a 50-game ban in 2009 with the Los Angeles Dodgers. Secondtime offenders get double that penalty. One of the games great sluggers, Ramirez was named MVP of the World Series in 2004 and helped Boston end an 86-year title drought. He was selected 13th overall by the Cleveland Indians in the 1991 amateur draft and rose quickly through the minor leagues with a youthful exuberance and natural charisma. He broke into the majors in 1993 and played his first full season the following year, when he finished second to the Royals’ Bob Hamlin in voting for Rookie of the Year. Ramirez went on to establish himself as one of the game’s most feared hitters, adopting a dreadlock hairdo that seemed to mirror his happy-golucky demeanor. He signed with the Red Sox as a free agent in December 2000, helping the long-suffering franchise win the World Series a few years later, then doing it again in 2007. The Red Sox traded him to the Dodgers in July 2008. He instantly became a fan favorite on the West Coast, with “Mannywood” signs popping up around town, as he led Los Angeles to the NL West title and a sweep of the Chicago Cubs in the playoffs. The clutch performances earned Ramirez a $45 million, two-year contract.


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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011

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THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

Bennett runs wild on Wildcats By PAUL SOKOLOSKI psokoloski@timesleader.com

LAKE ARIEL – Taking an early three-touchdown lead seemed to make the Hanover Area Hawkeyes relax a little bit. Fortunately for them, Parish Bennett never did. Bennett’s third rushing touchdown of the night Monday gave Hanover Area the lead to keep as the Hawkeyes held off determined Western Wayne, 36-34 at Western Wayne High School. “I think we just lost discipline,” Bennett said. “We got it back.” At least he did. Bennett carried 12 times on a 63-yard drive that chewed nearly seven minutes off the clock to open the second half, capping it with a 2-yard touchdown run

that broke a 21-21 halftime tie. The sleek junior running back finished the job by carrying the ball eight straight times before breaking the tie while breaking the goal line, boosting the Hawkeyes back into a 28-21 lead. Compared to the rest of his night, that was light work. Bennett finished with 230 yards on 33 carries and caught five passes for 58 yards, touching the ball on nearly 90 percent of Hanover Area’s running plays. If touching the ball that much tired out Bennett, it never showed. He polished off his big night with a 40-yard burst during Hanover Area’s final series, and capped it by sprinting to the end zone with a conversion run that left the Hawkeyes with a 36-27

lead. Bennett began the game with a couple more big runs – a 27yard dash to the end zone and a 38-yard sprint for a touchdown to give Hanover Area a quick 14-0 lead within the first two minutes of the first quarter. That advantage grew to 21-0 when quarterback Joe Ksiazkiewicz found Sinclair Saunders with a 23-yard touchdown pass. But Western Wayne tied it by intermission. Nathan Sosa got the Wildcats on the board with a four-yard touchdown run; Nikolai Pritchyk scored on another four-yard blast; and Chris Berger’s leaping 41-yard touchdown catch-andrun evened things at 21-21 just 81 seconds before halftime. Hanover Area .................

21

0 7

8 — 36

Western Wayne ............. 7 14 0 13 — 34 First Quarter HA – Bennett 27 run (Albert kick), 10:15 HA – Bennett 38 run (Albert kick), 10:05 HA – Saunders 23 pass from Ksiazkiewicz (Albert kick), 4:14 WW – Sosa 4 run (Berger kick), 0:30 Second Quarter WW – Pritchyk 4 run (Berger kick), 3:20 WW – Berger 41 pass from Rhodes (Berger kick), 1:21 Third Quarter HA – Bennett 2 run (Albert kick), 5:16 Fourth Quarter WW – Figueroa 9 run (kick failed), 11:39 HA – Ksiazkiewicz 1 run (Bennett run), 1:37 WW – Berger 16 pass from Rhodes (Berger kick), 0:40 Team Statistics Hanover W.Wayne First downs...................... 13 10 Rushes-yards ................. 46-217 38-157 Passing ............................ 126 145 Total Yards...................... 343 303 Comp-Att-Int ................... 9-17-1 6-12-1 Sacked-Yards Lost ........ 2-21 0-0 Punts-Avg........................ 1-38 0-0 Fumbles-Lost.................. 3-1 1-1 Penalties-Yards.............. 2-26 2-10 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING – HA, Bennett 33-230, Murphy 3-8, Ropietski 1-3, Zuder 1-0, Ksiazkiewicz 9- (minus 24); WW, Figueroa 18-56, Pritchyk 10-53, Sosa 7-31, Langendoerfer 1-11, C. Rosensweet 2-7. PASSING – HA, Ksiazkiewicz 9-17-1 126; WW, Rhodes 6-12-1 145. RECEIVING – HA, Bennett 5-58, Saunders 3-57, Conklin 1-11; WW, Berger 3-103, M. Rosensweet 2-28, Figueroa 1-14. INTS – HA, Conklin; WW, Berger.

Passing can’t help Redeemer

Holy Redeemer ............... 0 8 6 8 — 22 Susquehanna................... 14 6 6 6 — 32 First Quarter S – Stanley 13 run (kick failed), 3:39 S – Cowperthwait 13 pass from Stanley (Murnock run), 0:48 Second Quarter HR – Kerr 50 pass from Strickland (Cosgrove pass from Gawlas), 10:59 S – Marino 20 pass from Stanley (kick failed), 6:49 Third Quarter S – Pruitt 35 run (run failed) 8:20 HR – Cosgrove 40 pass from Gawlas (pass failed), 1:37 Fourth Quarter S – Murnock 2 run (run failed), 7:23 HR – Gawlas 6 run (Jones pass from Gawlas), 1:09 Team Statistics Redeemer Susq First downs................... 10 20 Rushes-yards .............. 22-(-45) 43-297 Passing ......................... 330 101 Total Yards................... 285 398 Comp-Att-Int ................ 13-24-3 7-15-0 Sacks By....................... 2-14 8-57 Punts-Avg..................... 1-25.0 3-34.0 Fumbles-Lost............... 3-1 8-0 Penalties-Yards........... 5-35 8-71 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING – HR, Villani 1-0, Team 2-(minus 5), Strickland 1-(minus 10), Gawlas 18-(minus 30). S, Pruitt 9-131, Stanley 16-77, Murnock 1260, Fowler 4-32, Team 2-(minus 3). PASSING – HR, Gawlas 9-12-0-229, Strickland 4-12-3-101. S, Stanley 7-15-0-101. RECEIVING – HR, Kerr 9-215, Cosgrove 288, Shandra 1-15, Gawlas 1-12. S, Cowperthwait 3-45, Marino 2-42, Darrow 1-18, Murnock 1-16. INTS – HR, None. S, Stanley, Murnock, Monks.

Turnovers help GAR get past Old Forge By RICK NOTARI For the Times Leader

By TOM ROBINSON For the Times Leader

SUSQUEHANNA – Susquehanna used the huge disparity in running attacks to repeatedly build what appeared to be comfortable leads in Monday’s non-league high school football game. The throwing of David Gawlas and Jimmy Strickland, along with the receiving of Eric Kerr, formed a passing attack that allowed Holy Redeemer to keep coming back before ultimately falling short. The Sabers made the most of eight sacks to help overcome Kerr’s nine catches for 215 yards and hold on for a 32-22 victory. Jesse Pruitt ran for 131 yards and a touchdown on just nine carries to lead Susquehanna. Quarterback Sean Stanley added 77 yards and James Murnock 60 while each scored a touchdown. The defending Lackawanna Football Conference Division 3 champion Sabers piled up 297 yards on the ground while holding the Royals to a net of minus-45. Susquehanna opened leads of 14-0 in the first quarter, 26-8 in the third quarter and 32-14 in the fourth quarter. Holy Redeemer, which has dropped 13 straight dating back to late in the 2009 season, made one last surge after Susquehanna turned primarily to reserves late in the game. The Royals scored with 1:09 left, forcing the Sabers to successfully handle an onside kick attempt to finally put away their first win of the season. David Gawlas ran 6 yards for the last score and passed to Kurt Jones for the two-pointer. Earlier, Gawlas threw a 40-yard touchdown pass to Thomas Cosgrove, who he also hit with a two-point conversion pass. Gawlas finished 9-for-12 for 229 yards and a touchdown. He had four completions of at least 40 yards, while Strickland, a sophomore who was mixed into the lineup throughout the game, had a 50-yard touchdown pass to Kerr for the first Holy Redeemer touchdown.

CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/FOR THETIMES LEADER

Old Forge’s Louis Febbo is taken down by a GAR defender.

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Pittston Area’s Kyle Gatusso breaks through the offensive line against Scranton at Charley Trippi Stadium in Pittston on Monday night.

PA capitalizes on miscues in win By JAY MONAHAN For The Times Leader

YATESVILLE – Last year seemed almost like Murphy’s Law for Pittston Area: everything that could possibly go wrong did for the Patriots. Two games into a new season with a new coach, it seems like the exact opposite. Pittston Area was awarded a total of six first downs off penalties on two late scoring drives as the Patriots overcame a sevenpoint, fourth-quarter deficit in a 21-14 victory over Scranton. Marc Romanczyk scored on a 1 yard run on a game-winning touchdown with 2:42 left. “It’s week to week,” said Pittston Area coach Mike Barrett. “A lot of these players aren’t used to being in these kinds of situations.” Scranton was plagued by several miscues. The Knights were penalized 17 times for 165 yards, including 70 yards in the Patriots’ final two scoring drives. Justin Wilk scored on a threeyard run with 10:11 remaining to tie the game at 14 apiece. Wilk

“It’s week to week. A lot of these players aren’t used to being in these kinds of situations.” Pittston Area coach Mike Barrett

led the Patriots with 59 yards on Pittston Area 21, Scranton 14 16 carries, and posted key first Scranton .............................................. 0 14 0 0 — 14 down runs in the final quarter. Pittston Area ...................... 7 0 0 14 — 21 First Quarter He also scored on an 11 yard run PA – Wilk 11 yard run (Musto kick), :23 Second Quarter in the first quarter. SCR – Jo. McCarthy 56 run (Redzetsky run 11:48 Pittston Area quarterback An- good), SCR – Ja. McCarthy 56 run (kick failed), 5:55 Third Quarter thony Schwab completed 13No scoring of-20 passes for 111 yards. Fourth Quarter PA – Wilk 3 run (Musto kick), 10:11 Schwab completed his first five PA – Romanczyk 1 run (Musto kick), 2:42 Team Statistics Scranton PittArea passes and connected on five First downs ...................... 9 17 passes of 10 or more yards. Rushes-yards.................. 25-186 40-153 ............................ 99 111 “We’ve kind of been holding Passing Total Yards ...................... 285 264 8-18-0 13-20-1 (Schwab) back,” said Barrett. Comp-Att-Int.................... Sacked-Yards Lost......... 0-0 0-0 “We’ve been trying to develop Punts-Avg. ....................... 4-29 4-31 3-2 1-1 the running game. Tonight we Fumbles-Lost .................. .............. 17-165 3-30 really let him go and he did a Penalties-Yards INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING – SCR: Ja. McCarthy 15-109, Jo. heck of a job.” McCarthy 3-60, Waiters 4-18, Czarkowski 3-9; PA: Romanczyk 12-29, Wilk 16-59, Gattuso 3-29, Scranton scored on identical Schwab 4-4, Houseman 1-34, Giambra 1-2, Team 3-(minus-4) 56 yard rushing touchdowns by PASSING – SCR: Waiters 8-18-0-99; PA: Jake and Joe McCarthy in the Schwab 13-20-1-111 RECEIVING – SCR: Czarkowski 4-24, Ja. second quarter. Jake McCarthy McCarthy 2-25, Robinson 1-22, Marichak 1-28; PA: Houseman 8-67, Roman 1-6, Starinsky 4-38 ran for 109 yards on 15 carries. INTS – SCR: Ja. McCarthy 1-0 MISSED FGS – None

down. Luke Height’s extra-point was good, and GAR led, 16-7 with 8:42 left in the third quarter. Old Forge was on the move again before the GAR defense made another play. Carey had rushed for 19 yards and a first down into Grenadiers territory, but while fighting for extra yards, Powell stripped the ball from the senior signal-caller and Ivan Jackson fell on the loose pigskin to regain possession. On third-and-1, Crawford scampered for 35 yards down the home sideline before hooking up with Powell two downs later for 17 yards to set up first-and-goal from the Old Forge 6. The senior then called his own number on a keeper to put GAR ahead, 22-7. The two-point pass failed. The Blue Devils tried to answer on their ensuing possession, driving to the GAR 15 on 10 plays, but Max Gates caused and recovered a fumble on an option play to give the ball back to Crawford and the Grenadiers. Wright had 67 yards on nine carries for the Grenadiers, and Powell hauled in four passes from Crawford for 74 yards. Crawford finished 6-for-11 passing for 83 yards, and scored GAR’s first touchdown, a 14-yard scramble from pressure on a pass play. Carey rushed for 161 yards on 16 carries for the Blue Devils but was intercepted three times by GAR. Febbo added 85 yards and Old Forge’s first touchdown.

WILKES-BARRE – It could have been the break Old Forge was looking for in an otherwise evenly played game between the Blue Devils and GAR on Monday night at Wilkes-Barre Memorial Stadium. Instead it turned into an opportunity for the Grenadiers’ unheralded defense to assert itself. And when opportunity knocked, the GAR defense answered. The Grenadiers forced four second-half turnovers and did not allow a touchdown in the second half until eight minutes were left on their way to a 29-14 win over Old Forge. Leading 9-7 at the half after Old Forge punter Dave Argust kicked a wayward snap out of the end zone for a safety with under a minute to play in the second quarter, GAR opened the third quarter on its own 43 following a nice return by Shaliek Powell. But disaster struck when a fumbled snap was recovered by the Blue Devils, turning the ball back – and momentum - over to the Old Forge offense. Two rushes by Blue Devils quarterback Colin Carey and another by tailback Lou Febbo set Old Forge up at the GAR 23 with second-and-8. Dropping back to pass, Carey was hurried into an incompletion by pressure from defensive linemen Shakir Soto and Elijah Greshman. The GAR duo did the same on third down, and as Carey tried to set up a screen for Febbo GAR 29, Old Forge 14 on fourth down, Greshman again Old Forge................................ 7 0 0 7 — 14 7 2 13 7 — 29 was there to force a third straight GAR ......................................... First Quarter OF – Febbo 2 run (Argust kick) 6:52 incompletion. The junior defenGAR—Crawford 14 run (Height kick) 0:43. sive lineman finished the night Second Quarter GAR – safety 0:39. with eight tackles for GAR. Third Quarter GAR – Wright 12 run (Height kick) 8:42 The defensive stand was the GAR – Crawford 8 run (pass fail) 4:49 Fourth Quarter turning point as the Grenadiers GAR – Crawford 80 run (Height kick) 11:08 rattled off 20 straight points on OF –Carey 1 run (Mancuso kick) 8:31 Old Forge GAR its next three possessions to take Team Statistics First downs.......................... 17 16 command of the game. Rushes-yards ..................... 48-251 41-271 ................................ 48 83 Dwayne Wright carried for 20 Passing Total Yards.......................... 299 354 yards on two carries after GAR Comp-Att-Int ....................... 4-15-3 6-11-0 Lost ............ 1-3 2-16 took over, and on third-and-5 Sacked-Yards Punts-Avg............................ 2-20.0 2-31.3 Fumbles-Lost...................... 2-2 4-3 from the Grenadiers 45, quarter7-63 11-91 back Darrell Crawford hooked up Penalties-Yards.................. INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS –Old Forge, Carey 16-161, Febbo 25with Powell for a 38-yard comple- 85, RUSHING Tomasetti 6-17; team 1-(minus-12).GAR:, Crawtion to give GAR first down from ford 13-148, Wright 9-67, Benton 8-44, Dempsey 813, Moore 3-(minus-1). the Old Forge 12. PASSING – Old Forge, Carey 4-15-3-48. GAR, 6-11-0-83. On the next snap, Wright car- Crawford RECEIVING – Old Forge, Argust 2-22, Welsh 1DeSando 1-8. GAR, Powell 4-74, Dempsey 2-9. ried up the middle before sprint- 11, INTS – GAR, Benton, Powell, Wright. ing to the corner for the touchMISSED FGS –none.

Despite lack of practice, Rangers knock off Meteors By JUSTIN BEITER For The Times Leader

MONTROSE – Northwest faced a challenge that many local high school football teams had to deal with this week. The Rangers had to temporarily put aside the problems caused by flooding, and turn their focus to football. Despite having limited practice time and dealing with a long bus ride to Montrose, Northwest did things well enough to win. Running back Tony Politz had his second consecutive big game, as he rushed for 164 yards and three touchdowns in the Rangers 30-8 victory. “We played exactly how I thought we were going to play,” Northwest coach Carl Majer said. “We literally had one walk-

through on Sunday and that was it. Give Montrose credit, they are head and shoulders better than they were last year. They are on the right track. We played our guys for a while then pulled them out to get ready for Old Forge. We’re a little bit dinged up and we have to get these guys ready for our next game.” Northwest (2-0) opened the scoring on its second possession after Tyler Kishbaugh recovered a fumble at the Montrose 31 giving the Rangers a short field to navigate. Politz was able to finish off the short scoring drive when he took a handoff on a sweep right, broke a tackle and scored on a 3-yard run. Early in the second quarter Politz took an option pitch and out-

ran the Meteors’ defense on a 57yard touchdown run to push the lead to 14-0. “Tony Politz is really coming into his own,” Majer said. “Our offensive line is really coming into their own. A lot of people ask how do you replace a Brett Rutkoski? But I think Tony is putting the critics to sleep and he has really taken this team under his wing.” Montrose (0-2) was able to make a big defensive play to get back in the game. Defensive End Brenton Warner intercepted a screen pass and returned it 16 yards for a touchdown. John Lawson ran in the two-point conversion to cut the lead to 14-8 midway through the second quarter. Northwest provided a strong an-

swer for the Montrose touchdown with an impressive scoring drive. Quarterback Gunner Majer connected with Jeremy Rittenhouse on a 28-yard pass play. Politz would then carry the load for Northwest, as he rushed four times for 31 yards and got the ball down to the 1-yard line. Majer would call his own number and score on a quarterback sneak to give his team a 21-8 lead at halftime. Northwest would also score on its opening drive in the second half when Politz again found the end zone on a 28-yard run. Montrose would try to mount a comeback, but its best drive of the third quarter was halted when Jim Begliomini recovered a fumble at the Northwest 30.

Northwest ............................... 14 7 6 3 — 30 Montrose................................. 0 8 0 0 — 8 First Quarter N-Tony Politz 3 run (Christian Foley kick) 7:49 N-Politz 57 run (Foley kick) 5:13 Second Quarter M-Brenton Warner 16 interception return (John Lawson run) 10:51 N-Gunner Majer 1 run (Foley kick) 5:43 Third Quarter N-Politz 28 run (kick failed) 6:49 Fourth Quarter N-Foley 45 field goal 11:53 Team Statistics Northwest Montrose First downs ................... 12 10 Rushes-yards............... 45-252 32-98 Passing ......................... 55 60 Total Yards ................... 307 158 Comp-Att-Int................. 6-13-1 5-15-1 Fumbles-Lost ............... 3-1 4-2 Penalties-Yards ........... 5-40 7-45 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING –Northwest: Tony Politz 20-164, 3TD; Gunner Majer 12-47, TD; Austin Mazonkey 921; Dalton Tomko 2-17; Adam Schechterly 2-3. Montrose: John Lawson 7-58; Will Ely 4-19; Dan Zapolski 3-17; Evan Castrogiovanni 5-12; Dylan Heeman 3-8; Tyler Tompkins 2-(-4); Dale Harder 1-(-5); Jermey Dibble 7-(-7). PASSING – Northwest: Majer 5-13-1, 55 yds.; Montrose: Dibble3-9-1, 36 yds.; Heeman 2-4-0, 24 yds.; Ely 0-1-0; Team 0-1-0. RECEIVING – Northwest: Jeremy Rittenhouse1-28; Foley 2-13; Mazonkey 1-8; Tyler Pegarealla 1-6. Montrose: Lawson 1-19; Castrogiovanni 1-16; Leo Mock 1-11; Nate Clark 1-8; Ely 1-6.


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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Bucks dominate Meyers Dunmore rides five touchdowns in about five minutes en route to win.

By TOM ROBINSON For the Times Leader

DUNMORE – The Dunmore Bucks scored two touchdowns in 31 seconds late in the second quarter and three more in less than six minutes early in the third quarter Monday night to break away from Meyers for a 45-0 romp in a non-league high school football game. Meyers, unable to practice the previous five days because of flooding issues, battled for the first 18 minutes before being overwhelmed by the stateranked Bucks, a District 2 Class A finalist a year ago. “We faced a lot of adversity this last week,” Meyers coach Corry Hanson said. “We practiced Tuesday. We were evacuated and we hadn’t practiced since. “When you go against a team like Dunmore – they play physical – when you have one day of practice it’s an uphill battle.” Dunmore led just 7-0 before scoring with 5:52 left in the first half. They ran away for a 45-0 advantage with 4:45 still to play in

the third quarter of a game that was originally scheduled for Friday night. “You have to give their kids a lot of credit,” said Dunmore coach Jack Henzes, the state’s active leader in career coaching victories. “We had our hands full the first quarter and a half. “They didn’t have the practice time for the things they had to get done. You could see they were a little tired and the uniformity wasn’t there.” Dunmore’s physical, tailbackoriented offense pounded away to take the game under control. Austin Seamon ran nine times for 104 yards and two touchdowns and Daiquon Buckley ran 10 times for 73 yards and two more scores. After they rotated much of the night and accounted for four of the first five touchdowns in the game-breaking outburst that the Bucks wrapped around halftime, freshman Sal Marchese took over and added 56 yards and a touchdown. Dunmore’s Mike Kolcharno intercepted a pass on the game’s first play, then picked up a Buckley fumble and advanced it 5 yards for the only touchdown of the first quarter. Seamon’s 14-yard run midway through the second quarter add-

ed to the lead. Chris Yurechko and Buckley ran for touchdowns in the final 1:25 of the half with the help of a Jordan Sweeney fumble recovery on the kickoff that came in between. The Bucks opened the second half by moving 80 yards in four plays, including a 49-yard Seamon touchdown. John Rinaldi’s 30-yard punt return helped set up an offense that scored on three out of five plays at one point while producing the 45-0 lead. Dunmore 45, Meyers 0 Meyers............................. 0 0 0 0 — 0 Dunmore ......................... 7 20 18 0 — 45 First Quarter DUN – Kolcharno 5 fumble return (Miller kick), 8:21 Second Quarter DUN – Seamon 14 run (kick failed), 5:42 DUN – Yurechko 1 run (Miller kick), 1:25 DUN – Buckley 17 run (Miller kick), :54 Third Quarter DUN – Seamon 49 run (kick failed), 10:41 DUN – Buckley 1 run (kick failed), 8:51 DUN – Marchese 43 run (kick failed), 4:45 Team Statistics Meyers Dunmore First downs ........................ 4 14 Rushes-yards.................... 32-71 33-236 Passing .............................. 7 80 Total Yards ........................ 78 316 Comp-Att-Int...................... 2-13-2 4-7-0 Sacked-Yards Lost .......... 0-0 1-6 Punts-Avg. ......................... 4-26.5 1-49 Fumbles-Lost .................... 3-1 3-0 Penalties-Yards ................ 6-40 5-25 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING – Meyers, Smith 12-46, Mahalak 5-15, Nelson 2-7, Proctor 7-5, Labatch 1-2, Kropp 1-0, Owen 4-(minus 4). Dunmore, Seamon 9-104, Buckley 10-73, Marchese 5-56, Dempsey 2-8, Kolcharno 0-5, Kujawski 2-1, Rogan 1-1, Yurechko 1-1, Team 2-(minus 2), Zilla 1-(minus 11). PASSING – Meyers, Labatch 2-12-1-7, Kropp 0-10-0. Dunmore, Dempsey 4-7-0-80. RECEIVING – Meyers, Reilly 1-5, Brominski 1-2. Dunmore, Kolcharno 3-53, Rinaldi 1-27. INTS – Dunmore, Kolcharno, Coviello. MISSED FGS – none.

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Division 4A ........................... W L PF PA CP Wyoming Valley West .......... 2 0 72 7 17 Hazleton Area ....................... 1 1 46 49 9 Williamsport ........................... 1 1 44 45 9 Division 3A ........................... W L PF PA CP Crestwood ............................. 2 0 40 12 17 Pittston Area.......................... 2 0 66 20 17 Dallas ..................................... 2 0 76 34 16 Berwick................................... 1 1 44 47 8 Coughlin................................. 0 1 14 28 0 Tunkhannock......................... 0 1 6 45 0 Division 2A-A....................... W L PF PA CP Hanover Area ........................ 2 0 51 46 14 Northwest (A) ........................ 2 0 68 32 14 GAR ........................................ 2 0 63 26 13 Nanticoke ............................... 1 0 48 14 7 Wyoming Area ...................... 0 1 34 40 0 Holy Redeemer ..................... 0 2 46 70 0 Meyers ................................... 0 2 14 82 0 Lake-Lehman ........................ 0 2 35 69 0 Friday, Sept. 9 Crestwood 21, Pocono Mtn. West 6 All others postponed Saturday, Sept. 10 Dallas 48, Scranton Prep 20 Hazleton Area 32, Williamsport 21 Lackawanna Trail 48, Lake-Lehman 28 Monday's Results Wyoming Valley West 51, Abington Heights 0 Hanover Area 36, Western Wayne 34 Susquehanna 32, Holy Redeemer 22 Dunmore 45, Meyers 0 Berwick 38, North Pocono 28 Northwest 30, Montrose 8 GAR 29, Old Forge 14 Pittston Area 21, Scranton 14 Cancelled Games Columbia-Montour Vo-Tech at Nanticoke Wyoming Area at West Scranton Today's Game Coughlin at Tunkhannock, 4:15 p.m. Friday Games GAR at Lakeland Hanover Area at Mid Valley Hazleton Area at Delaware Valley Lake-Lehman at Wyoming Area Meyers at Lackawanna Trail Northwest at Old Forge Stroudsburg at Williamsport Pittston Area at Crestwood Pleasant Valley at Wyoming Valley West Saturday's Games Berwick at Dallas, 1 p.m. Nanticoke at Susquehanna, 1 p.m. Tunkhannock at Abington Heights, 1 p.m. Valley View at Coughlin, 2 p.m. Holy Cross at Holy Redeemer, 7 p.m.

WVW Continued from Page 1B

sively and we knew that coming in,” Repshis said. “They made big plays early on, made some quick scores and did a great job getting us off the field on offense. Credit to them.” The second half was played exclusively by the reserves, and they added a score – a 13-yard TD pass from Michael Baur to Quincy Patrick. The backups also preserved the shutout – Valley West’s first in the last 40 games – by holding Abington scoreless. “I know we have a lot of playmakers offensively,” Valley West coach Pat Keating said. “We get a lot of attention there. But you know what? We just played two pretty good football teams and we’ve given up seven points in two weeks. My defensive staff has done a great job putting the game plans together, and the kids have done a tremendous job coming out and executing the game plans.” Abington had just 2 yards rushing on nine carries in the first half. The passing game had some success late in the second quarter, but for the most part was also limited. Bunch and Ian Labar teamed up for one sack, Trey Cowman had another and defensive end Chris Coleman picked off a pass.

Wyoming Valley West 51, Abington Heights 0 Abington Heights............... 0 0 0 0 — 0 Wyoming Valley West ...... 20 25 0 6 — 51 First Quarter WVW – Lewis 1 run (kick failed), 6:51 WVW – Bunch 14 run (kick failed), 4:27 WVW – Lewis 5 run (Good from Lewis), 0:07 Second Quarter WVW – Lewis 9 run (Lewis run), 10:03 WVW – Flayhart 18 pass from Lewis (Singer kick), 8:53 WVW – Simms 18 pass from Lewis (Singer kick), 5:40 WVW – Singer 38 FG, 2:24 Fourth Quarter WVW – Patrick 13 pass from Baur (kick failed), 10:14 Team Statistics Abington WVW First downs ......................... 9 17 Rushes-yards..................... 20-61 42-169 Passing................................ 91 141 Total Yards ......................... 152 310 Comp-Att-Int ....................... 11-30-2 7-8-0

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Derrick Simms (No. 5) for Wyoming Valley West carries the ball just shy of the end zone during Monday night’s game. Sacked-Yards Lost............ 2-14 0-0 Punts-Avg. .......................... 6-31 2-29 Fumbles-Lost ..................... 0-0 3-0 Penalties-Yards ................. 3-22 5-35 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING – Abington, Pasqualichio 4-(minus-10), Digilio 2-1, Fox 7-28, Rock 3-8, Karam 219, Langan 1-7, S.Kontz 1-8. WVW, Lewis 12-98,

Bunch 16-63, Brody 2-1, Bolling 3-14, Baur 4-(minus-7), Yashinski 1-4, team 4-(minus-4). PASSING – Abington, Pasqualichio 8-24-1-78, Carroll 3-6-1-13. WVW, Lewis 5-5-0-107, Kilhenney 1-2-0-21, Baur 1-1-0-13. RECEIVING – Abington, Pacyna 1-5, Riggi 1-1, Jam.Henzes 1-3, Sanderson 2-22, Show 2-38, Fiorillo 1-9, D.Kontz 1-9, Karam 1-2, Jak.Henzes 1-2.

WVW, Simms 3-60, Flayhart 2-47, Lewis 1-21, Patrick 1-13. INTS – WVW, Coleman, Mason. MISSED FGS – none.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 PAGE 5B

Serena fined $2,000

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modern era was John McEnroe’s 82-3 in 1984, although that included two Grand Slam titles, because he lost in the French Open final and didn’t enter the Australian Open. Roger Federer was 81-4 in 2005 with two majors, exiting twice in the semifinals. Rod Laver (twice) and Don Budge are the only men to win all four Grand Slam tournaments in a year. Djokovic attributes his rise this season to a number of factors, including a vastly improved serve, better fitness — owing, at least in part, to a gluten-free diet he doesn’t like to discuss in any detail — and a seemingly endless reservoir of confidence that dates to December, when he led Serbia to its first Davis Cup title. That’s where Djokovic began a 43-match winning streak that ended with a semifinal loss to Federer in the French Open semifinals. The only other blemish on Djokovic’s 2011 record was a loss to Andy Murray in the Cincinnati Masters final last month; Djokovic stopped playing while trailing, citing a painful shoulder. That was the 24-year-old Serb’s last match before heading to Flushing Meadows. His shoulder was fine, clearly, and while he was treated by a trainer for a bad back three times in the late going Monday — perhaps the reason his serves slowed to the 90s mph in the fourth set — he overcame it. With both men playing fantastic, court-covering defense, there were more than two dozen points that lasted at least 15 strokes. Nadal won a trio of major titles in 2010, including beating Djokovic in the U.S. Open final. But this rematch was more of a mismatch, with Djokovic quickly turning things around after falling behind 2-0 in each of the first two sets. Only in the third set did Djokovic really falter for a few moments, getting broken while serving for the match at 6-5, then being outplayed in the tiebreaker. But in the fourth set, Djokovic was in control from the start, breaking in the opening game with a forehand winner, then cruising from there. When Djokovic ended it with another forehand winner, he raised his arms, then tossed aside his racket and dropped to the court. He pulled off his shirt and threw it into the stands, then put on a dark hat with “FDNY” written on it — a nod to Sunday’s 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, which both he and Nadal mentioned during the trophy ceremony. Of all of Djokovic’s skills, the one that separated him the most across the 4-hour, 10-minute final was his return. He repeatedly sent serves back over the net and at Nadal’s feet, forcing errors or taking control of the point, helping Djokovic accumulate an astounding 26 break points and convert 11. Consider this: When Nadal completed his career Grand Slam by winning last year’s U.S. Open, he was broken a total of five times in seven matches. Another telling statistic: Four times Monday, Nadal broke Djokovic — only to have Djokovic break right back in the next game. That’s exactly what happened

NEW YORK — Serena Williams was fined $2,000 by the U.S. Open on Monday for berating the chair umpire during the final. Tournament referee Brian Earley issued his ruling a day after Williams was cited by chair umpire Eva Asderaki for a code violation for verbal abuse during a 6-2, 6-3 loss to Sam Stosur in the women’s singles championship match at Flushing Meadows. A statement issued by the U.S. Tennis Association said the fine “is consistent with similar offenses at Grand Slam events.” Williams earned $1.4 million at the U.S. Open: $900,000 for finishing as the runner-up, plus a $500,000 bonus for having come in first place in the U.S. Open Series standings, which take into account results at hard-court tuneup tournaments. The USTA also said Grand Slam committee director Bill Babcock conducted his own review and determined “Williams’ conduct, while verbally abusive, does not rise to the level of a major offense under the Grand Slam Code of Conduct.” That means Williams does not face further disciplinary action — which could have included a fine and suspension from a Grand Slam tournament — under the “probationary period” she was put under after yelling at and threatening a line judge after a foot-fault call at the end of her loss to Kim Clijsters in the 2009 U.S. Open semifinals.

in the third game of the second set, which lasted 17 minutes and featured a bit of everything: 22 points; eight deuces; six break points; a time violation warning against Nadal (Djokovic was admonished later in the set); complaints by both men that the glare from the Arthur Ashe Stadium lights was bothersome; seven exchanges that lasted at least 10 strokes. After a 28-shot point, Djokovic leaned over and put his hands on his knees, his chest heaving. Nadal was the one who faltered, though. He double-faulted to set up break point No. 6, then — on a great defensive lob by Djokovic — put an overhead into the net. The final — delayed a day to Monday by rain for the fourth consecutive U.S. Open — was marked by spectators calling out during points or as the players were in their service motions, and while that’s perhaps to be expected in New York (as opposed to, say, the staid All England Club), Djokovic and Nadal were bothered by it, and the chair umpire repeatedly chastised the unruly crowd. Once he adjusted to the conditions, Djokovic disguised shots well, rearing back and ripping big shots off both wings — often right near lines, if not right on them. He wound up with 55 winners — 23 more than Nadal — and all in all, put on a masterful display of as diverse a game as one can have. He excelled at everything — serving, returning, volleying, groundstrokes and the sort of constant movement and retrieving with which Nadal usually frustrates opponents. Nadal, of course, is no slouch himself. At 25 years old, he owns 10 Grand Slam titles. He has acknowledged, though, that Djokovic holds a psychological advantage. Late in Monday’s first set, Djokovic hit two drop shots that the normally relentless and indefatigable Nadal didn’t even bother to chase.

Freeman powers Berwick’s run game past North Pocono for first win By JOHN MEDEIROS jmedeiros@timesleader.com

BERWICK -- Berwick coach Gary Campbell described Jeremy Freeman’s running style with a smile. “Ba boom! Ba boom! Ba boom!” All Campbell forgot was to raise his arms after he said it. Freeman ran for a career-best 229 yards and three touchdowns as Berwick won its home opener 38-28 over North Pocono at Crispin Field on Monday “You realize it (during the game), but you just kind of forget about it,” Freeman said of his gaudy numbers. “You just want to do all you can for your team.” Freeman toted the ball 25 times for the Bulldogs and gained at least 5 yards on 14 of

his attempts. He had scoring runs of 34 and 16 yards on third downs, and a 2-yard plunge midway through the fourth quarter that stood as the winning score. His previous best was 140 yards against Pittston Area in Week 8 of last season. Berwick jumped out to a 17-0 lead by scoring on its first three possessions. Quarterback Jared Pierce opened the scoring with a 10-yard draw, and Alex Oliver booted a 40-yard field goal from the right hash mark. Freeman then capped a nine-play, 77-yard drive by bursting free from the line on a third-and-6 to reach the end zone from 34 yards out. Jake Pecorelli had interceptions on North Pocono’s first two possessions, returning the second 21 yards to the North Po-

cono 25, setting up Oliver’s field goal. “Pec did a great job, and the whole secondary really picked us up,” Campbell said of his revamped unit. “We won the turnover battle tonight. I don’t know how many years it’s been since that happened.” Berwick may have won the battle, but the war was far from over. North Pocono got on the board with a John Gething 2yard run. On the ensuing kickoff, Conor Rosen forced a fumble by Pecorelli, which was recovered by Ryan Sheerer. Quarterback Jack Williams took the first snap of the drive and went around the left side for a 41-yard score to make it 17-14. “After our first game, where

we made mistakes, it starts to creep into your head,” Campbell said. “What way can we answer the bell? “We learned against Crestwood we needed to get outside. Then we could run our offense.” Berwick gave North Pocono more of Freeman than it could handle. Freeman’s 35-yard run on second-and-14 from the 18 moved the Bulldogs into Trojans territory. Austin Heinemann’s TD-saving tackle from behind was in vain, as Freeman ran over a trio of North Pocono defenders for a 16-yard score with three minutes left in the third quarter. “The line did very well blocking for me,” Freeman said. “We had some young kids start up there. They wanted to get the touchdowns.”

North Pocono remained resilient, marching 96 yards in 13 plays to make it 24-21 with less than nine minutes remaining in the game. After Gething fumbled the kickoff and was tackled at his 4-yard line, he took the ball nine times in the drive for 81 yards, including the final 6 to make it a three-point game. Freeman had runs of 10 and 30 yards on his next two touches as Berwick featured him up the gut on a six-play drive that put Berwick ahead by 10. The Bulldogs tacked on an insurance touchdown with play-action to Freeman, freezing the Trojans’ defense so Pierce could connect with a wide-open Will Updegrove for a 20-yard score. North Pocono ................

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Berwick........................... 10 7 7 14 — 38 First Quarter B -- Pierce 10 run (Oliver kick), 7:00. B -- Oliver 40 field goal, 4:26. Second Quarter B -- Freeman 34 run (Oliver kick), 8:13. NP -- Gething 2 run (Sheerer kick), 5:12. NP -- Williams 41 run (Sheerer kick), 4:53. Third Quarter B -- Freeman 16 run (Oliver kick), 3:04. Fourth Quarter NP -- Gething 6 run (Sheerer kick), 8:50. B -- Freeman 2 run (Oliver kick), 5:49. B -- Updegrove 20 pass from Pierce (Oliver kick), 2:56. NP -- Gething 28 pass from Williams (Sheerer kick), 1:35. Team Statistics N.Pocono Berwick First downs..................... 19 19 Rushes-yards ................ 41-243 48-343 Passing........................... 79 38 Total Yards..................... 322 381 Comp-Att-Int .................. 5-22-2 5-7 Sacked-Yards Lost ....... 1-13 0-0 Punts-Avg....................... 3-37 .7 2-30 .5 Fumbles-Lost................. 1-0 2-1 Penalties-Yards............. 4-20 3-40 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING – NP, Gething 25-155, Williams 846, Batzel 3-21, Fisher 5-21; BER, Freeman 25229, Pierce 12-58, Cashman 4-46, Steeber 3-9, Snyder 1-4. PASSING – NP, Williams 5-22-2-79; BER, Pierce 5-7-0-38. RECEIVING – NP, Finella 2-28, Waldsmith 223, Gething 1-28; BER, Pecorelli 2-7, Updegrove 1-20, Cashman 1-6, Steeber 1-5 INTS – BER, Pecorelli 2 MISSED FGS – None


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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011

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COLLEGE FOOTBALL

HIGH SCHOOL SOCCER

Mohawks, Knights, Royals win The Times Leader Staff

It was a week late, but the Wyoming Valley Conference boys soccer season finally got underway for three teams on Monday. Meyers, Holy Redeemer and Lake-Lehman all opened their schedules with a win. A trio of other schools, which were scheduled for season-openers on Monday were pushed back once again. Those three teams – Pittston Area, Wyoming Seminary and Tunkhannock – did not play Monday. The Patriots were slated to host Wyoming Area, while the Blue Knights and Tigers were set for road contests at Berwick and Nanticoke, respectively.

H.S. FIELD HOCKEY

There are still three teams – Coughlin, Crestwood and Dallas – that have not played a conference game yet. Crestwood and Dallas are set for matches tonight, while Coughlin is slated to play Wednesday. Meyers 6, GAR 2

Cal Lisman scored a hat trick for the Mohawks, while David Oram scored twice and Jesse Macko also found the back of the net. Dennis Hynes and Justin Galbraith kicked in goals for the Grenadiers.

Meyers .......................................................... 2 4 — 6 GAR............................................................... 0 2 — 2 First half: 1. MEY, Cal Lisman (Fernando Ramirez) 13:04; 2. MEY, Lisman (Caleb Simpson) 38:51 Second half: 1. MEY, Jesse Macko 44:38; 2. MEY, Lisman (Billy Trowbridge) 54:58; 3. MEY, Da-

vid Oram (Joel Tlatenchi) 75:12; 4. MEY, Oram (Simpson); 5. GAR, Dennis Hynes; 6. GAR, Justin Galbraith (Hynes) Shots: MEY 22, GAR 14; Saves: MEY 12 (David Oram), GAR 2 (Jonathon Zionce); Corners: MEY 0, GAR 3.

Holy Redeemer 2, Hanover Area 1

Brendan Leahigh had an unassisted score to help Holy Redeemer defeat Hanover Area. Chris Pawlenock scored with an assist from Tyler Kukosky. For Hanover Area Austin Bogart scored the only goal with an assist from Pat Cook.

Holy Redeemer .............................................. 0 2 — 0 Hanover Area ................................................. 0 — 0 Second half: 1. HR, Chris Pawlenock (Tyler Kukosky), 59:47; 2. HR Brendan Leahigh, 62:36; 3. HA, Austin Bogart (Pat Cook), 65:27. Shots: HR 23, HA 30; Saves: HR 19 (Ian McGrane), HA 14(Dan Tomko); Corners: HR 6, HA 5.

Lake-Lehman 9, MMI 3

The two-time defending Division II champion Black Knights picked up the win with the help of Chris Herrick’s three goals and Chris Edkins’ two scores. Pat O’Brien, Austin Harry, Dan Williams and Jeremy Jayne also scored for Lehman. Alex Van Hoekelen scored all three for the Preppers.

MMI................................................................ 1 2 — 3 Lake-Lehman............................................... 7 2 — 9 First half: 1. LL, Chris Herrick (Chris Edkins) 32:15; 2. LL, Herrick (Kyle Paulson) 29:32; 3. LL, Edkins (Kenny Kocher) 26:51; 4. LL, Edkins (Dave Eury) 21:08; 5. MMI, Alex Van Hoekelen 20:15; 6. LL, Herrick (Greg Ciravolo) 16:40; 7. LL, Pat O’Brien (Edkins) 1:52; 8. LL, Austin Harry (Jay Dawsey) 1:07 Second half: 1. MMI, Van Hoekelen (penalty kick) 27:15; 2. LL, Dan Williams (Jeremy Jayne) 25:33; 3. MMI, Van Hoekelen (Sisock) 10:34; 4. LL, Jayne (Harry) 2:04 Shots: MMI 5, LL 20; Saves: MMI 9 (Yannes), LL 4 (John Butchko, Hartman, Chabala); Corners: MMI 0, LL 5.

LOCAL ROUNDUP

Dollan’s WVW bests Cougars in volleyball goal lifts Spartans to victory The Times Leader Staff

The Times Leader Staff

KINGSTON – Casey Dolan scored unassisted in the extra period as Wyoming Valley West edged Dallas 3-2 in a Wyoming Valley Conference field hockey match at Spartan Stadium. Kelcie Hromisin and Maura Anistranski also scored for the Spartans. Ashley Dunbar scored twice for Dallas. Dallas.................................................... 1 1 0 — 2 Wyoming Valley West ....................... 1 1 1 — 3 First half: 1. WVW, Kelcie Hromisin, 8:13; 2. DAL, Ashley Dunbar (Jenny Cave), 3:17; Second half: 3. DAL, Dunbar (Katie Comitz), 14:06; 4. WVW, Maura Anistranski (Danielle Grega), 4:21; OT: 5. WVW, Casey Dolan, 3:09. Shots: DAL 10, WVW 12; Saves: DAL 9, WVW 8; Corners: DAL 7, WVW 7

Holy Redeemer 2, Lake Lehman 1

Lauren Bernardi had two assists as Holy Redeemer defeated Lake Lehman. Bernardi assisted in the scoring efforts for Ashley Bernardi and Gretta Ell. Tracy Snyder scored Lake Lehman’s only goal with an assist from Kate Yonski. Holy Redeemer........................................ 1 1 — 2 Lake Lehman............................................ 0 1 — 1 First half: 1. HR, Ashley Bernardi (Lauren Bernardi) 23:17. Second half: 2. LL, Tracy Snyder (Kate Yoniski), 10:28; 3. HR, Gretta Ell (L. Bernardi), 1:00 Shots: HR 5, LL 1; Saves: HR 0, LL 3; Corners: HR 7, LL 3.

Lackawanna Trail 7, Meyers 1

Clarissa Egglesgon and Alexa Rzcudill each two scores and two assists, as they lead Lackawanna Trail to a win. Cameron Crock, Shelby Crossdale, and Daria Lewandowski each scored with assists by Casey Buck and Nicole Rosa. Kelly Mahalak was unassisted in Meyers only score. Meyers .......................................................4 3 — 7 Lackawanna Trail..................................... 0 1 — 1 First half: 1. LAC, Clarissa Egglesgon, 24:54; 2. LAC, Cameron Cook (Egglesgon), 20:16; 3. LAC, Alexa Rzcudill (Nicole Rosa), 10:53; 4. LAC, Shelby Crosdale, 8:54 Second half: 5. Egglesgon (Rzcudill), 20:27; 6. Rzcudill, 12:25; 7. MEY, Kelly Mahalak, 4:59; 8. LAC, Daria Lewandowski (Casey Buck),: 48 Shots: MEY 9, LAC 19; Saves: MEY 7 (Rianna Smith), LAC 8 (Courtney Ditchey); Corners: MEY 6, LAC 5.

Coughlin 8, Hazleton Area 2

Madison Jones had three scores and Caitlin Woods had two scores to lead the Crusaders to a huge win over the Cougars. Selena Garzio was the lone scorer for Hazleton with an assist by Kayla Garzio. Coughlin .................................................... 5 3 — 8 Hazleton Area .......................................... 1 2 — 2 First half: 1. COU, Madison Jones (Alyssa Monaghan), 29:10; 2. COU, Rosa Bartoletti, 27:06; 3. Jones, 23:58; 4. HAZ, Selena Garzio (Kayla Garzio), 19:28; 5. COU, Caitlin Woods (Marissa Leccara), 12:37; 6. Jones (woods), 8:03. Second half: 7. S. Garzio 29:37; 8. Monaghan (Jones), 25:44; 9. Woods (Kyra Castano), 11:51; 10. Monaghan (Leccara), 3:07. Shots: COU 24, HAZ 17; Saves: COU 14(Paige Tetik), HAZ 16(Leesa Baren, Kaitlyn McHugh); Corners: COU 5, HAZ 5.

HAZLETON – Stephanie Feraphin lead the way with 10 service points, three aces, six kills, and three blocks as Wyoming Valley West defeated Hazleton Area 3-2 by scores of 25-12, 25-3, 23-25, 13-25, 25-12 in a Wyoming Valley Conference girls volleyball game Monday night. Jocelyn Amico had 26 assists and 10 service points, while Maggie D’Angelo contributed with 18 digs and eight service points and Juliette Schmid had 10 digs. For Hazleton Area Meg Daranko had 20 digs and 15 blocks, and Jessica Thorne had 19 digs and eight blocks. North Pocono 3, Coughlin 1

The Trojans cruised to the 25-11, 25-7, 23-25, 25-9 victory led by Kelli Bray (8 kills, 4 blocks, 4 aces) and Nicole Malec (18 assists). For Coughlin, Kirby Shibay

posted five assists and eight digs. Danielle Georgetti notched eight assists and six digs and Julie Hughes netted seven digs.

GOLF

Wyoming Seminary 175, MMI 180

Frank Henry shot a 42 and earned medalist honors to lead Wyoming Seminary to victory over MMI 175-180 at Valley Country Club (par35). Andrew Golden fired a 43, John Zirnheed a 43, and Branden Carr a 46 to assist in the win. Jeff Lotz (43), Casey McCoy (44), Sam Harmon (46), and Sean Ducaji-Reap (47) led MMI.

GIRLS TENNIS

Coughlin 5, Wyoming Valley West 0

Jenna Lutchko defeated Christa Talposh 6-2, 6-1 in singles competition to lead the

Crusaders over the Spartans. Summer Lentini defeated Cathy Byrnes 6-3, 6-2, and Julie Barry defeated Devin Ryman 6-4, 6-2. In doubles action Eryn Harvey and Grace Fazzi beat Danielle Patterson and Nicole Henderson 7-5, 6-0, and Julia DeMiller and Becca Elmy knocked off Laura Monto and Brandi Zikowski 6-2, 7-6. Holy Redeemer 5, Berwick 0

Fallyn Boich defeated Brooke Wharton 6-3, 6-0 in singles action to lead Holy Redeemer to a shutout win over Berwick. Nellie Chmil defeated Kasey Backer 6-0, 6-0, and Emily Suchocki defeated Julia Fonte 6-2, 6-4. In doubles, Allison Muth and Sahina Dougherty beat Jessica Dennis and Kenzi Goulstone 6-1, 4-6, 6-2 followed by a win from Beth Schmil and Trish Harenza over Tara Egrie and Laurel Fidrick 6-1, 6-0.

NHL

Chiarelli: Savard will get his name on Cup emotional return to the TD Garden in street clothes in Game 6, drawing cheers BOLTON, Mass. — Boston from the crowd. As his teamBruins forward Marc Savard mates knocked their sticks will get his name on the against the boards, fans Stanley Cup after all. chanted his name and waved General manager Peter signs encouraging the Chiarelli said Monday at the Bruins to “Win it for Horteam’s charity golf tournaton.” ment that Savard’s name will “I feel good,” he told rebe inscribed on the trophy porters at the golf tournawith his teammates. Savard ment. “I just started skating, played in only 25 games last so it hasn’t been that long on season because of post-conthe ice. But I’ve been workcussion syndrome and mising out for a long time.” sed the entire playoffs as the Horton, who was second Bruins won their first NHL on the team with 26 goals in title since 1972. the regular season, scored According to the guidethe goals that clinched two lines posted on the NHL AP PHOTO seven-game series this postwebsite, to get on the Cup a player must play at least 41 Boston Bruins goaltender Tim Tho- season — in the first round against the Montreal Canagames in the regular season mas poses with the Stanley Cup diens and in the third against or one in the Stanley Cup fi- during the Boston Bruins Foundathe Tampa Bay Lightning. nals. In 1994, the league add- tion golf tournament at The InHe had said he has not ed a clause that would allow ternational Golf Club in Bolton, watched replays of the hit a team to petition the com- Mass., Monday. missioner for permission to have other players since he was in the hospital. “I get asked a lot how I’m doing and that’s listed in extenuating circumstances. Chiarelli said the request had been granted. nice,” he said. “But I don’t watch it.” The Bruins open training camp on Friday, That’s the good news for Savard, who did not play after a Jan. 22 hit from Colorado’s completing the shortest summer in franchise Matt Hunwick — Savard’s second concussion history. Players spent the summer celebrating in 10 months. Chiarelli said Savard will not their championship and hosting the Stanley Cup in their hometowns. play this season, either. Defenseman Johnny Boychuk said he “He’s not in a good spot still. He still has recurring headaches; he still has post-concus- brought the Cup to Children’s Hospital in Edsion stuff,” Chiarelli said. “He’s not playing monton, and to his parents’ house. Although this year. Frankly, I don’t think he’ll play again. he was used to being recognized in Boston, he said, he was also stopped on the street in EdThat’s my opinion, my layperson’s opinion.” His teammate said they will miss his scoring monton, and by the manager at the local grotouch — he averaged 90 points in the four sea- cery store there. “You want to kind of keep the party going,” sons before he missed large chunks of time with the injuries — and his presence in the forward Milan Lucic said. “But there is a time that you need to come back and start focusing locker room. “It’s tough to hear, obviously,” Bruins for- on next season. obviously, that point is now.” At a “State of the Bruins” town hall with ward Patrice Bergeron said. “He’s one of your friends and you want him to do well and come season ticket-holders on Monday night, owner back at 100 percent. I’m happy they’re doing Jeremy Jacobs said there’s no reason the team that, not risking his health. That said, it’s sad can’t repeat. “A person once said, ’Winning isn’t everyto see.” The Bruins had better news on forward thing.’ I don’t think that person every lifted Nathan Horton, who was knocked out of the that Cup,” owner Jeremy Jacobs told the Stanley Cup finals against Vancouver with a crowd at the TD Garden. “Everybody loved bone-jarring — and late — hit from Canucks this year. It was spectacular. And hopefully defenseman Aaron Rome in Game 3. Rome was we’re able to deliver on it. We’ve got the same team, the same organization. They know what suspended for the rest of the series. Horton, who did not play again, made an it takes to win now.” By JIMMY GOLEN AP Sports Writer

AP PHOTO

Oklahoma head coach Bob Stoops speaks during a news conference in Norman, Okla., on Monday. A person with knowledge of the situation says Texas and Oklahoma officials met amid speculation that the Sooners are considering leaving the Big 12.

Are Sooners next to leave Big 12? The Associated Press

A person with knowledge of the situation says Texas and Oklahoma officials met over the weekend amid speculation that the Sooners are considering leaving the Big 12. Texas President William Powers Jr., athletic director DeLoss Dodds and women’s athletic director Chris Plonsky were among a group of Texas officials who went to Oklahoma on Sunday, according to a person at a Big 12 school who spoke on condition of anonymity because they are not authorized to speak publicly about the meeting. The person also said Oklahoma president David Boren was present at the meeting, which was first reported by the Austin American-Statesman. Oklahoma officials are reportedly considering leaving the Big 12 after Texas A&M’s recent decision to leave the conference with hopes of joining the Southeastern Conference. On Sept. 2, Boren said multiple conferences have expressed interest in the Sooners and that he expected a decision possibly this month. That could be a move to the Pac-12 or remaining in a revised Big 12 that could be searching for a team to replace Texas A&M. Pac-12 Commissioner Larry Scott has indicated his conferencewouldnotbethefirsttopursue expansion but would monitor the situation nationwide and possibly react to events. Texas officials have publicly stated their desire to keep the Big 12 intact. The league was nearly torn apart in 2010 as Nebraska went to the Big Ten and Colorado went to the Pac-12. The Pac-12 also courted Texas, Texas Tech, Oklahoma and Oklahoma State butthoseschoolschosetostayin the Big 12. Since then, Texas has signed a 20-year, $300 million deal with ESPN for its new Longhorn Network, a 24-hour showcase for Texas athletics that has caused several Big12 members to worry it gives the Longhorns too much power and influence, especially in the areas of exposure and recruiting. The Aggies announced recentlythattheywillleavetheBig 12 if possible, only to run into a hurdle as Baylor and other schools declined to waive their right to sue over such a departure. The SEC last week voted to accept the Aggies if the legal headaches can be taken care of. SEC Commissioner Mike Slive said Monday that the 12member conference has “started to look at schedules for 2012-13” for 13 teams.

Bettors call NV regulators after USC-Utah change

LAS VEGAS — Sports bettors in Nevada are complaining to state gambling regulators over a scoring change in last weekend’s USC-Utah football game that didn’t affect the outcome, but swung the betting result in many sports books from the Utes to the Trojans. Enforcement chief Jerry Markling of the Nevada Gaming Control Board told The Associated Press on Monday that regulators have been taking calls from gamblers and casinos and are trying to resolve disputes after Pac-12 officials changed the score of Saturday night’s game two hours after it ended. He said it’s not yet clear whether any of the queries will become full-fledged complaints that the board will investigate and rule on, deciding whether individual bettors or the house should have won. “In most cases, the house rules probably are sufficient,” he said. “In some cases, they may not be and in those cases then we’ll take it and conduct an investigation and make a determination.” USC ultimately won 23-14, scoring its last touchdown on the final play of the game when Matt Kalil blocked a 41-yard field goal attempt and Torin Harris returned it for a touchdown. But the touchdown wasn’t counted in the box score at first because of an excessive celebration penalty USC committed when its bench poured out onto the field to celebrate the block and the win. Right after the game, the score was given as 17-14. USC was favored by roughly 8.5 points in most sports books in Sin City. Two hours after the game, the Pac-12 said the unsportsmanlike conduct penalties are dead ball fouls by rule, but this one was automatically declined by rule because the game ended. The conference then clarified its stance on Sunday, saying the referees on the field called the play properly. “There was a miscommunication between the officials and the press box that led to the confusion about the final score,” Tony Corrente, Pac-12 coordinator of football officiating, said in a statement. Normally, the change wouldn’t have meant much. But in the betting world, it caused major concern as USC bettors who had scrapped their tickets or thought they were losers found themselves poring over the technicalities of house rules, trying to see how their casino was supposed to handle the situation.

AP poll fix gives ’Bama 1 more 1st-place vote The Associated Press

No. 2 Alabama gained a firstplace vote in the latest Associated Press college football poll and No. 1 Oklahoma lost one after a mistake in the entry of the ballots was corrected. When the rankings were fixed Monday, Alabama had 10 firstplace votes and Oklahoma 31 while South Carolina and Nebraska switched places. The Gamecocks are now No. 10, the Cornhuskers No. 11. Also, Texas moved from No. 24 into a tie for 23rd with TCU. The extra first-place vote gives Alabama 1,423 points. Ok-

lahoma has 1,440 points. The mixup started Sunday with an amended ballot from voter Mike DiRocco of the Florida Times-Union. “I transposed the results of the Arizona-Missouri game and had Missouri winning,” he said. “When I realized that, I readjusted my ballot and sent it in.” “Got it,” said the confirmation email from the AP. But instead of subbing DiRocco’s previous ballot, the new one was inadvertently attached by the AP to Sal Interdonato of the Times Herald-Record of Middletown, N.Y.


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 PAGE 7B

Despite win, Eagles have long way to go PHILADELPHIA — A convincing 18-point victory in the season opener would leave most teams feeling satisfied about their performance. Not the Philadelphia Eagles. Not this year. The Eagles have a long way to go if they’re going to fulfill their goal of winning the Super Bowl. Beating the St. Louis Rams 31-13 on Sunday was a nice start. Still, there’s plenty room for improvement. “We’ve got a lot of things to work on after the game yesterday,” coach Andy Reid said Monday. “The players, I could tell by the comments that they were humble and they understand the situation that we’ve got to continue to get better.” The revamped defense struggled mightily against the run. St. Louis rushed for 154 yards, including Steven Jackson’s 47-yard touchdown on the Rams’ first play from scrimmage. The overhauled offensive line had problems protecting Mi-

chael Vick. He was sacked three times and took several hits. Vick was off, too, despite a solid all-around effort. He made several big plays, especially scrambling, but also had his worst passing game (14 for 32) as a starter with the Eagles. Vick threw for 187 yards and two touchdowns, and ran for 100 until two kneeldowns cost him two yards. “The only thing I can dwell on right now is the things that we didn’t do so well,” Vick said. “I felt like I could have done better. I’m thankful for the victory, don’t get me wrong, but I could have been a little cleaner and I told Andy that.” With three new starters on the offensive line, including a rookie center, and one starter playing a new position, it’s going to take some time for the group to get used to each other. Vick did his best to handle blitzes by doing what he’s always done under pressure. He ran away from it. Teams had success blitzing the Eagles late last season and the Rams tried it. But Vick doesn’t plan to stay in the pocket and absorb hits. “If teams want to do it each and every week, we’ll have counters for it or we’ll have ways to beat it,” he said. “That was part of the reason I was able to run for a 100

AP PHOTO

Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Michael Vick scrambles during the second quarter of a game against the St. Louis Rams Sunday in St. Louis.

yards. I trained myself this offseason to be able to do that. So, however it happens, however we get it done, that’s what it’s going to be. I’m pretty sure we’re going to do a great job at getting better with the blitzing. It’s all about situations and putting guys in the right positions at that right time.” LeSean McCoy ran for 122 yards, including a game-sealing 49-yard score. DeSean Jackson brushed aside all the talk about him not being happy because he doesn’t have a new contract, and caught six passes for 102 yards and one touchdown. “I think it speaks for the heart and determination I have to play this game regardless of off-thefield issues,” Jackson said. “I’m here to work, I’m here to play

football and do it at a high level. Any time I can go out there and perform and help my team win, I think it speaks for itself.” On the defensive side, it was a positive debut for new coordinator Juan Castillo in his first game since switching over from coaching the offensive linemen. Led by Jason Babin, who was the first of the big-name free agents signed by the Eagles, the pass rush put plenty of pressure on Sam Bradford and took him down five times. Nnamdi Asomugha, the biggest of the free-agent signings, wasn’t perfect. He committed a pass-interference penalty and allowed a long gain. But the starstudded secondary held the Rams to181yards passing and no scores.

27 Unique Holes One Breathtaking Course

Panthers’ linebacker Jon Beason out for season The Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Carolina Panthers linebacker Jon Beason will miss the rest of the season with a torn left Achilles tendon. The team announced on Monday the results of an MRI exam that revealed the tear Beason sustained in a 28-21loss at Arizona in the season opener Sunday. He was carted off the field in the second half. Beason signed a $51 million, six-year deal this summer, includ-

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did his best to try and calm his team, shaking hands with his players afterward and reminded them it was just three miserable hours in a four-month marathon. Still, for a team playing against the usual high expectations, to fall woefully short of them even for a week was disheartening. “We knew going into the game that we were going to face a lot of adversity, but we normally stay positive and respond to it,” Brown said. “But I think everything we did, as far as responding to it, wasn’t in the right way.” It’s hardly time to panic. Yet it has been so long since the Steelers were manhandled so completely even the team’s most even-keeled guys lost their cool. Safety Troy Polamalu, a day after signing a contract extension that will keep in with the team through 2014, found himself mixing it up with several Ravens out of frustration.

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leader like Jon,” said Carolina outside linebacker Thomas Davis, who has missed much of the previous two seasons with a torn knee ligament. “He’s a guy who comes in day-in and day-out and gives you everything he has. It’s going to be extremely tough for us. “But we have some guys who have to step up now. You know, Dan Connor is a guy who has stepped up and played well for us in the past.”

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PITTSBURGH — Go ahead, pick your descriptive term. The Pittsburgh Steelers probably used it following a stunning 35-7 loss to Baltimore on Sunday. Safety Ryan Clark called it “a whipping.” Several players went with “humbling.” Linebacker James Harrison considers it “a reality check” while offensive tackle Willie Colon labeled it “embarrassing.” Whatever it was, it wasn’t nearly good enough for a team that spent training camp talking about taking the next step after a crushing Super Bowl defeat. The offense, the one considered the team’s most potent since quarterback Ben Roethlisberger took over eight years ago, turned it over seven times. The defense, the one that’s shouted down any suggestion that it’s starting to get too old, allowed Baltimore running back Ray Rice to go over 100 yards and failed to take the ball away once. The best team in the AFC a year ago didn’t look like the best team — or even the second-best team — in the AFC North. Wide receiver Antonio Brown spent Monday dutifully going through tape highlighting the ugly details. “A lot of guys would have never expected us to come out with a game like that,” Brown said. Particularly the Steelers. Though coach Mike Tomlin

707972

By ROB MAADDI AP Pro Football Writer

The Associated Press

$33.00

FREE PICKUP AND DELIVERY

Must Present Coupon. One coupon per foursome. Cannot be used in tournaments or with any other promotion. TL

Monday Special $32 Senior Day Mon-Thurs $28 Ladies Day Thursday $28 Weekends After 1 p.m. $36 GPS CART INCLUDED 868-GOLF

GET YOUR CRAFT READY FOR THE WINTER!

• Navy Tops • Helm Seats • Side Curtains • Winter Covers • Stern Curtains • Boat Cushions • Cleaning, Waxing & Detailing

570-288-6459

260 Country Club Drive, Mountaintop

www.blueridgetrail.com

509

Building/ 746 Garage Sales/ Construction/ Estate Sales/ Skilled Trades Flea Markets

MASON’S LABORER

Needed. Must have experience & knowledgement of masonry work. Valid PA driver’s license required. Please call 570822-4266 or 570-

527 Food Services/ Hospitality

SOUS CHEF Apply in person:

Isabella Restaurant

1140 Route 315 Wilkes-Barre, PA

533

Installation/ Maintenance/ Repair

AUTOBODY PERSON

Tools are required. Some experience needed. Apply in person at Bob’s Auto Center 445 West Union St. Nanticoke, PA 18634

AUTOBODY TECH OR PAINTER

Minimum 5 years experience. Great starting salary ,benefits. Good working environment. Must have own tools. Call Steve @ 779-0621 or stop in. Behind Dunkin Donuts in Plymouth.

542

DURYEA

216 Swetland St Saturday, Sept 17 9am - 3pm 3 Family Yard Sale!

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! 746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets

KINGSTON

Logistics/ Transportation

ROLL OFF TRUCK DRIVER

Class A or Class B CDL. Preferred 2 years experience. Full time + ample overtime. Benefits include company paid health insurance, holidays, vacation and 401k. Send resume to c/o The Times Leader Box 2750 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250

LINE UP A SUCCESSFUL SALE IN CLASSIFIED! Do you need more space? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way to clean out your closets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

Grace Episcopal Church, Butler St. behind Dairy Queen THURSDAY 9/15, 9-3PM FRIDAY 9/16, 9-12PM Bag Day

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

300682

With Super Bowl talk, Birds know there is plenty left to improve after opening win.

Steelers left to regroup after ulgly loss to Ravens

Wyoming Ave., Kingston www.raycoeuro.com

746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets

BUYING

US/FOREIGN/ CANADIAN COINS & CURRENCY HIGHEST PREMIUMS FOR SILVER DOLLARS & BETTER COINS

GOLD & SILVER

JEWELRY & INGOTS STERLING SILVER Old Postcards & Local Photo’s, Lead Soldiers & Old Toys, Mining & Military Stuff, Old Crocks, Jugs Local Advertising

941

900 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 906 Homes for Sale

WYOMING

For Sale by Owner. Double Block, easily convertible to single. Kitchen, living room, 3 bedrooms & bath each side. New 2 car garage. 66’x100’ lot. Asking $160,000. Call 570-693-2408

915 Manufactured Homes

STAMPS

PAYING RECORD HONEST CA$H PRICES

Over 35 years, a respected coin dealer.

HERITAGE GALLERIES DALLAS, PA

Across from Dallas Agway on Rt. 415 Look for blue & white signs NEW HOURS TUES-FRI, 10-6 SAT, 10-5 570-674-2646

Too many baby toys? Pass them on, sell them with an ad! 570-829-7130

815

Dogs

DOGS, FREE Cocker Spaniel Puppy. 9 months old. Call 570-379-3898

815

Dogs

TOY POODLE PUPPIES 4 for sale AKC 570-450-0997

HUNLOCK CREEK

Move in ready & affordable 2 bedroom located in quiet, country setting. $14,000. Financing available with minimum down. 570-477-2845

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

HUNLOCK CREEK

Quiet country setting. Lots available. $295 per month. Includes water, sewer & trash. Call Bud 570-477-2845

Apartments/ Unfurnished

FORTY FORT

AMERICA REALTY RENTALS OUT OF FLOOD ZONE!

ALL UNITS MANAGED CALL FOR AVAILABILITY 1 BEDROOM starting at $465+utilities. NO PETS/ SMOKING/ LEASE/EMPLOYMENT VERIFICATION / APPLICATION. Appliances, laundry, parking, modern, very clean standards. 570-288-1422

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

JENKINS TWP.

3rd floor, 1 bedroom. All utilities included. Refrigerator & stove. No pets. Available end of September $600 month. call 570-655-0539

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE FindYourIdeal IN CLASSIFIED!

Employee!Placean Doyouneedmore space? adandendthe Ayardorgaragesale search! in classified is thebestway 570-829-7130 askforanemploy- to cleanoutyourclosets! You’rein bussiness mentspecialist withclassified!


Today

CMYK $24.96 BBY Best Buy earnings $50 Best Buy’s report is expected to ’11 show two important trends: How 40 comfortable consumers are 30 about spending, and how the $33.56 electronics retailer is doing in 20 shifting its focus from big-ticket Operating est. $0.60 merchandise to tablets and gadEPS $0.52 gets. Investors also want to 2Q ’11 2Q ’12 know if the company has been able to cut down the size of its Price-to-earnings ratio: 8 stores to lower its costs. Firstbased on past 12 months’ results quarter earnings fell 12 percent, Dividend: $0.64 Div. Yield: 2.6% partly because it spent more to promote its top products. Source: FactSet

I N

Small cars are expected to get a lot of attention at the Frankfurt International Auto Show. Tuesday and Wednesday are preview days for the media. Cars like the Volkswagen Up subcompact and Mercedes-Benz’s B-Class hatchback are expected to appeal to buyers looking for vehicles that are small and fuel efficient. Though the economy has been slowing, there are 1,007 exhibitors, up from 781 in the Mercedes-Benz’s B-Class hatchback last show, in 2009.

SECTION

timesleader.com

WALL STREET S&P 1,162.27 +8.04

Small cars are the stars

The special congressional committee formed to reduce the deficit holds its first hearing Tuesday. Douglas Elmendorf, director of the Congressional Budget Office, is scheduled to testify. The committee must find $1.5 trillion to cut from the federal budget over the next 10 years. It will vote to recommend a plan by Nov. 23, and Congress must vote on it by Dec. 23. If a bill isn’t passed by Jan. 15, $1.2 trillion in cuts will automatically take place.

BUSINESS

THE TIMES LEADER

DOW 11,061.12 +68.99

Cutting the budget

NASDAQ 2,495.09 +27.10

Stocks stage late rally

A late afternoon rally pushed the stock market higher for only the second day this month. Major indexes spent most of Monday lower as investors worried that Greece could be edging closer to default. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note reached another record low as investors piled into U.S. government debt on fears that Europe’s debt crisis could spread. The euro fell to a sevenmonth low against the dollar. J.J. Kirnahan, chief options strategist at T.D. Ameritrade, said reports that China planned to buy a significant amount of Italian bonds contributed to the sudden reversal. “The last 16 minutes was insane,” he said. Worries over Europe’s debt crisis drove traders into Treasurys, pushing the yield on the 10-year Treasury note to 1.87 percent, the lowest since the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis began keeping daily records in 1962.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011

Heat pushes corn higher By CHIP CUTTER and CHRISTOPHER LEONARD AP Business Writers

B R I E F

NEWYORK—Foodpricescould rise next year because an unseasonably hot summer likely damaged much of this year’s corn crop. The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimated Monday that a surplus of 672 million bushels of corn will be left over at the end of next summer. The estimated surplus is down from last month’s forecast and well below levels that are considered

healthy. This spring, farmers planted the second-largest crop since World War II. But high temperatures stunted the plants. “We just didn’t have a good growingyear,”saidJasonWard,ananalyst with Northstar Commodity in Minneapolis. “It was too hot, too warm, too dry at the wrong time.” The price of corn was relatively unchangedat$7.33abushelonMonday. While that’s down from its peak of$7.99reachedinJune,it’sstillnear-

ly twice the price paid last summer. More expensive corn drives food prices higher because corn is an ingredient in everything from animal feed to cereal to soft drinks. It takes about six months for corn prices to trickle down to products at the grocery store. Many food producers are already being squeezed by the higher prices. Chicken producer Sanderson Farms Inc. reported its third straight quarterly loss late last month, in part, because of increased costs for feed.

AP FILE PHOTO

Corn crops are harvested near Farmingdale, Ill., last month. Food prices could rise next year because an unseasonably hot summer likely damaged much of this year’s corn crop.

‘Jeopardy!’ computer gets a job By JIM FITZGERALD Associated Press

Business reopening announcements welcome

The Times Leader will publish the names of businesses that have reopened after the recent flooding, or which are in affected communities and remained open. Notices will appear twice; send them to tlbusiness@timesleader.com, or bring or mail them to The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711.

Help for manufacturers

NEPIRC has developed a comprehensive plan of action to help manufacturers recover from the recent flood and return to full production as quickly and affordably as possible. Programs include production matching for businesses that have lost capacity, cleanup equipment and service locator, recovery loans and recovery assessment. NEPIRC also is working to establish a liaison position with FEMA and PEMA for recovery programs. To learn more, call Paul Peter Olszewski at 570-819-8966 Ext. 123 or 570-510-7914 or Paul@NEPIRC.com.

BofA slashing 30,000 jobs

Bank of America will cut about 30,000 jobs over the next few years in a bid to save $5 billion per year. The cost-cutting drive is part of a broader effort to reshape and shrink the nation’s largest bank as it copes with fallout from the housing bust. Bank of America stock has lost half its value this year, largely over problems related to poorly-written mortgages it acquired with its 2008 purchase of Countrywide Financial Corp.

Growth forecast lowered

Economists with the National Association for Business Economics predict that the economy will grow 1.7 percent this year — down from the group’s May prediction of 2.8 percent expansion. For 2012, the group is forecasting growth of 2.3 percent, compared to a May forecast of 3.2 percent growth.

$3.63 $4.06 07/17/08

$3.63

$2.61

B

AP FILE PHOTO

Bob McDevitt, president of Local 54 of the Unite-HERE casino workers union, addresses a protest in July outside Resorts Casino Hotel in Atlantic City, N.J. The union’s contract with nine of Atlantic City’s 11 casinos expires Thursday, and the union has been aggressively fighting proposals for wage cuts and benefit contributions for its 14,000 members.

Casino union in fight

By WAYNE PARRY Associated Press

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. — New Jersey’s casino industry has never been this down on its luck: Over the last 41/2 years, Atlantic City’s gambling halls have lost $1.5 billion worth of business and thousands of jobs as casinos open in surrounding states, and the sluggish economy has gamblers spending less freely. So with union contracts with nine of the 11 casinos expiring on Thursday, both the casinos and the workers are trying to make up lost ground at the other’s expense. The union, Local 54 of Unite-HERE, has come out swinging, accusing casinos of wanting to institute a “sharecropper economy,” a loaded term in the majority African-American city that’s also the nation’s second-largest gambling resort. It

has picketed one casino three times, handed out leaflets on the Boardwalk urging customers not to patronize gambling halls that mistreat workers, and told convention groups to take their business elsewhere. So far the effort has resulted in three canceled conventions at Resorts Casino Hotel, the casino the union has gone after the hardest for the drastically reduced salaries it paid its workers after buying the struggling property in December and saving it from closing. But one Resorts executive says the union is on a “crazy path of self-destruction” that fails to recognize the industry’s ongoing hard times. It has been the union’s most aggressive stance since 2004, when it went on strike for 34 days before reaching a new deal. And while no one is talking about another

strike just yet, union president Bob McDevitt freely admits the union is out to show its muscle as talks remain bogged down. “We’ve had it,” said McDevitt, whose union represents 14,000 housekeepers, food and beverage servers, janitors and other service workers. Resorts is one of two casinos not involved in contract talks, but McDevitt said its cost cutting has influenced the contract proposals of the other casinos, which are looking to reduce pay by $3 an hour. In addition, McDevitt said, the casinos want union members to start contributing for the first time toward the cost of their health and pension benefits. Over the past seven years, workers’ base pay has risen by only 55 cents an hour because the union has been adamant about protecting health benefits, McDevitt said.

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. — Enough with the fun and games. Watson is going to work. IBM’s supercomputer system, best known for trouncing the world’s best “Jeopardy!” players on TV, is being tapped by one of the nation’s largest health insurers to help diagnose medical problems and authorize treatments. WellPoint Inc., which has 34.2 million members, will integrate Watson’s lightning speed and deep health care database into its existing patient information, helping it choose among treatment options and medicines. “This very much fits into the sweet spot of what we envisioned for the applications of Watson,” said Manoj Saxena, general manager of an IBM division looking at how the computer can be marketed. Lori Beer, an executive vice president at Indianapolis-based WellPoint, agreed. “It’s really a game-changer in health care,” she said. The WellPoint application will combine data from three sources: a patient’s chart and electronic records that a doctor or hospital has, the insurance company’s history of medicines and treatments, and Watson’s huge library of textbooks and medical journals. IBM says the computer can then sift through it all and answer a question in moments, providing several possible diagnoses or treatments, ranked in order of the computer’s confidence, along with the basis for its answer. “Imagine having the ability within three seconds to look through all of that information, to have it be up to date, scientifically presented to you, and based on that patients’ medical needs at the moment you’re caring for that patient,” said WellPoint’s chief medical officer, Dr. Sam Nussbaum.

New information technology made a difference in flood LAST WEEK, nobody was worried about technology. They were worried about saving their homes, or their belongings, or, if they weren’t in the danger zone, watching the situation develop. Would the levee system hold? Would it be a repeat of Agnes? I wasn’t around when Agnes came through, but I knew the stories. And I can tell you that there is one major difference. Information. Granted, the river gauge was wrong. That’s a big deal, but it’s a mechanical failure.

Emergency responders were able to put this capability to good use, and local and federal government officials were able to react and respond to TECH TALK developing situations in a way they The point is that the common percouldn’t dream of in the 1970s. son on the street had much more The same technology helped us. information at their fingertips than Reporters were able to capture phothey did in 1972. Even though local tographs and send in stories without media (including ourselves) were ever leaving the field or stopping to evacuated, we were able to continue pull out a laptop. Our audience providing information to our audience, helped, too. We received scores of and, in the case of The Times Leader, submitted story tips, information, we were operating on a 24-hour news photographs and videos from the cycle, so you could visit our website at public, all of which immediately beany time and see what was going on. came available to everyone else. Another point: Anyone with a smartOther advances in technology made phone can transmit information init possible to put the paper together stantaneously to anyone else. from a couple of hotel rooms. In the

NICK DELORENZO

1970s, that would have been impossible on such short notice. The point: As much as we may become frustrated with technology, complain about its cost or see it as a luxury rather than a necessity, in this case it was incredibly useful. Emergency personnel were able to get things done quickly. Government officials were able to remain in communication with their people in the field. And we were able to keep the public informed, more completely than ever before. Nick DeLorenzo is director of Interactive and New Media for The Times Leader. Email him at ndelorenzo@timesleader.com.


CMYK ➛

T

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DOW 11,061.12

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+68.99

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

p

S&P 500 1,162.27 1,240

+8.04

NASDAQ 2,495.09

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+27.10

2,640

S&P 500

Close: 1,162.27 Change: 8.04 (0.7%)

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StocksRecap NYSE 4,482 4,834 1461 1579 15 275

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DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. AMEX Index NASDAQ S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

NASD 1,952 2,031 1411 1156 8 247

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11062.03 4368.87 423.44 7047.85 2206.45 2495.36 1162.52 12241.34 680.58

10824.76 4248.10 415.85 6894.70 2155.26 2438.40 1136.07 11968.59 664.93

11061.12 4361.97 423.43 7047.12 2189.54 2495.09 1162.27 12240.72 679.76

+68.99 -7.02 +3.54 +2.11 -16.91 +27.10 +8.04 +81.29 +5.80

+0.63% -0.16% +0.84% +0.03% -0.77% +1.10% +0.70% +0.67% +0.86%

t t t t t s t t t

A MO QTR t t t t t t t t t

t t s t t t t t t

S YTD -4.46% -14.58% +4.55% -11.51% -0.85% -5.95% -7.58% -8.38% -13.26%

Overlooked mid caps Mid-sized companies are worth a look when stocks are volatile. But many investors don’t realize that mid caps offer the growth potential of small companies as well as the stability of larger ones. So they tend to avoid the stocks when the market falls. That’s why the S&P 400 Mid Cap index has fallen 16 percent since its recent high on July 22. The S&P 500 has fallen 14 percent. But mid caps are cheap: the S&P 400 is trading at only 13 times what analysts expect it to earn in the next year. That’s down from 17 on July 22. These are three of the best-performing stocks in the mid cap index since July 22. PRICE CHANGE SINCE JULY 22

Advance Auto Parts (AAP)

+8%

0%

WEEK BEGINNING: JULY AUG. AUG. AUG. AUG. AUG. SEPT. 25 1 8 15 22 29 5

Mid-cap stocks have lagged the S&P 500 since stocks began falling July 22.

-5 -10

S&P 500 (large caps) July 22 to Sept. 12

-14%

S&P 400 (mid caps)

-15

-17%

-20

S&P 600 (small caps)

-18%

-25 MONDAY PRICE

$60.41

52-WEEK PRICE

PRICE-EARNINGS RATIO (based on the past 12 mos.)

$49.50–72.32

14

MARKET VALUE

$4.5 billion

Advance has thrived in a slowing economy as people have saved money by fixing their own cars. Its secondquarter income rose 12 percent and surprised investors. Credit Suisse analyst Gary Balter thinks Advance will rise 16 percent to $70 in the next 12 months because investors expect the economy to remain weak. Eastman Kodak (EK)

+22%

3.05

1.75–5.95

lost money

$821 million

Kodak has fallen 30 percent in two years as it has struggled to adapt to the growth of digital cameras. Its stock jumped when investors learned it might sell its 1,100 patents, which analysts think could be worth $500 million to $3 billion. Selling its patents could earn the company more than its entire market value. Hansen Natural (HANS)

+7%

86.22

44.50–90.24

31

$7.6 billion

Hansen said it had $484 million in sales of its Monster brand drinks in the second quarter, a 28 percent increase from the previous year. Hanson isn’t the only energy-drink maker, but many of its competitors target only young men. Hansen has won customers by selling zero-calorie and low-carb drinks to women. SOURCE: FactSet

Francesca Levy, Elizabeth Gramling • AP

Mutual Funds Name

YTD NAV Chg %Rtn

Alliance Bernstein BalShrB m 13.66 +.06 -1.1 CoreOppA m 11.21 +.08 -2.6 American Beacon LgCpVlInv 16.43 +.11 -11.3 LgCpVlIs 17.33 +.11 -11.1 American Cent EqIncInv 6.75 +.01 -5.4 GrowthInv 24.07 +.13 -6.8 IncGroA m 22.45 +.13 -5.9 UltraInv 22.00 +.17 -2.9 American Funds AMCAPA m 17.64 +.11 -6.0 BalA m 17.39 +.05 -2.0 BondA m 12.58 -.03 +5.6 CapIncBuA m 47.84 -.16 -2.4 CapWldBdA m21.17 -.08 +5.5 CpWldGrIA m 31.09 -.16 -11.6 EurPacGrA m 35.59 -.29 -14.0 FnInvA m 33.42 +.07 -8.4 GrthAmA m 27.92 +.10 -8.3 HiIncA m 10.72 -.07 -0.1 IncAmerA m 15.99 -.02 -1.5 IntBdAmA m 13.67 -.02 +3.4 IntlGrInA m 27.67 -.33 -9.6 InvCoAmA m 25.32 +.11 -9.3 MutualA m 23.82 +.11 -4.8 NewEconA m 23.43 -.03 -7.5 NewPerspA m25.67 -.06 -10.3 NwWrldA m 48.21 -.52 -11.7 SmCpWldA m33.79 -.19 -13.0 TaxEBdAmA m12.35 ... +7.5 USGovSecA m14.61 -.02 +6.5 WAMutInvA m26.06 +.13 -3.2 Artio Global IntlEqI 25.18 -.32 -16.5 IntlEqIII 10.43 -.13 -16.3 Artisan Intl d 19.55 -.15 -9.9 IntlVal d 23.36 -.20 -13.8 MdCpVal 19.38 +.09 -3.5 MidCap 32.91 +.29 -2.1 Baron Asset b 52.17 +.22 -5.6 Growth b 48.47 +.14 -5.4 SmCap b 22.23 +.06 -6.5 Bernstein DiversMui 14.73 ... +5.5 IntDur 14.24 -.04 +6.5 TxMIntl 12.81 -.19 -18.6 BlackRock EqDivA m 16.67 ... -4.1 EqDivI 16.71 ... -3.9 GlobAlcA m 18.59 ... -3.5 GlobAlcC m 17.33 ... -4.0 GlobAlcI d 18.68 ... -3.4 CGM Focus 26.56 +.08 -23.7 Mutual 24.52 +.08 -16.8 Realty 25.33 +.10 -5.1 Calamos GrowA m 49.03 +.34 -8.1 Cohen & Steers Realty 58.06 +.25 +0.1 Columbia AcornA m 26.21 +.10 -9.4 AcornIntZ 36.00 -.39 -9.8 AcornZ 27.06 +.10 -9.2 DivBondA m 5.16 -.01 +5.4 DivrEqInA m 8.86 +.04 -11.7 StLgCpGrZ 12.43 +.15 +0.1 TaxEA m 13.45 ... +8.9 ValRestrZ 43.17 -.03 -14.1 DFA 1YrFixInI 10.35 -.01 +0.6 2YrGlbFII 10.23 -.01 +0.9 5YrGlbFII 11.35 -.02 +5.5 EmMkCrEqI 18.69 -.19 -14.6 EmMktValI 29.16 -.32 -18.3 IntSmCapI 14.22 -.17 -16.1 USCorEq1I 9.88 ... -9.3 USCorEq2I 9.69 ... -10.9 USLgCo 9.09 ... -7.0 USLgValI 17.70 ... -11.1 USSmValI 21.40 ... -16.1 USSmallI 18.62 ... -12.4 DWS-Scudder EnhEMFIS d 10.49 -.04 -1.2 HlthCareS d 24.35 +.09 0.0 LAEqS d 42.28 -.68 -20.4 Davis NYVentA m 30.80 +.08 -10.3 NYVentC m 29.63 +.08 -10.8 NYVentY 31.17 +.08 -10.1 Delaware Invest DiverIncA m 9.46 -.03 +5.8 Dimensional Investme IntCorEqI 9.28 -.12 -15.7 IntlSCoI 14.72 -.18 -12.9

Name

YTD NAV Chg %Rtn

IntlValuI 14.45 -.23 Dodge & Cox Bal 64.52 +.23 Income 13.48 -.04 IntlStk 29.25 -.33 Stock 95.02 +.53 Dreyfus Apprecia 37.71 +.09 EmgLead ... ... TechGrA f 28.66 +.45 Driehaus ActiveInc 10.51 ... Eaton Vance HiIncOppA m 4.20 -.02 HiIncOppB m 4.20 -.02 LrgCpValA m 15.95 +.09 NatlMuniA m 9.21 ... NatlMuniB m 9.21 +.01 PAMuniA m 8.76 ... FMI LgCap 14.62 +.09 FPA Cres d 25.82 -.05 NewInc m 10.84 ... Fairholme Funds Fairhome d 25.66 -.05 Federated ToRetIs 11.44 -.02 Fidelity AstMgr20 12.78 -.02 AstMgr50 14.82 -.03 Bal 17.72 +.04 BlChGrow 41.68 +.34 Canada d 53.38 -.88 CapApr 23.33 +.13 CapInc d 8.84 -.06 Contra 64.89 +.31 DiscEq 20.31 +.09 DivGrow 24.76 +.06 DivrIntl d 26.05 -.29 EmgMkt d 22.68 -.25 EqInc 38.21 +.21 EqInc II 15.75 +.09 ExpMulNat d 19.96 +.07 FF2015 11.05 -.02 FF2035 10.63 ... FF2040 7.41 ... Fidelity 30.27 +.13 FltRtHiIn d 9.47 -.02 Free2010 13.25 -.02 Free2020 13.27 -.02 Free2025 10.92 -.01 Free2030 12.97 -.01 GNMA 11.92 -.02 GovtInc 10.84 -.02 GrowCo 81.51 +.63 GrowInc 16.68 +.08 HiInc d 8.54 -.07 Indepndnc 21.94 +.07 IntBond 10.92 -.03 IntMuniInc d 10.38 ... IntlDisc d 28.19 -.41 InvGrdBd 7.71 -.02 LevCoSt d 24.06 +.04 LowPriStk d 33.86 +.06 Magellan 62.61 -.02 MidCap d 25.72 +.13 MuniInc d 12.88 ... NewMktIn d 16.00 -.08 OTC 52.95 +.70 Puritan 17.23 +.02 RealInv d 25.82 +.09 Series100Index 8.19 +.06 ShIntMu d 10.83 ... ShTmBond 8.52 -.01 SmCapStk d 15.69 +.07 StratInc 11.14 -.04 StratRRet d 9.69 -.03 TotalBd 11.08 -.03 USBdIdxInv 11.82 -.03 Value 59.61 +.22 Fidelity Advisor NewInsA m 19.05 +.09 NewInsI 19.26 +.08 StratIncA m 12.46 -.04 ValStratT m 22.30 +.04 Fidelity Select Gold d 53.20 -1.43 Pharm d 12.31 -.05 Fidelity Spartan 500IdxAdvtg 41.30 +.29 500IdxInstl 41.30 +.28 500IdxInv 41.30 +.29 ExtMktIdI d 33.90 +.20 IntlIdxIn d 29.79 -.45 TotMktIdAg d 33.79 +.23 TotMktIdI d 33.79 +.23 First Eagle GlbA m 44.71 -.24 OverseasA m 21.44 -.27

-19.3 -7.1 +4.0 -18.1 -11.1 -1.2 -24.7 -11.8 -3.5 +1.0 +0.3 -11.7 +7.6 +7.0 +5.9 -6.3 -2.8 +2.0 -27.9 +5.7 +1.1 -3.1 -2.0 -4.5 -8.2 -7.9 -2.5 -4.1 -9.9 -12.6 -13.6 -13.9 -13.0 -13.0 -8.5 -2.2 -7.0 -7.1 -5.6 -1.4 -2.1 -3.4 -4.8 -5.4 +7.0 +6.8 -2.0 -8.2 -0.3 -9.9 +5.7 +6.2 -14.7 +6.7 -15.3 -6.0 -12.5 -6.3 +8.1 +6.2 -3.6 -2.9 +0.7 -6.3 +3.8 +1.7 -19.9 +3.9 +2.6 +5.9 +6.6 -13.2 -4.4 -4.2 +3.9 -13.9 +4.1 +1.8 -6.3 NA -6.3 -10.1 -15.0 -7.0 -7.0 -3.6 -5.4

Name

YTD NAV Chg %Rtn

Forum AbStratI 10.99 +.02 +1.6 FrankTemp-Franklin CA TF A m 7.00 ... +7.8 Fed TF A m 12.02 +.01 +9.4 GrowB m 39.64 +.20 -7.4 Growth A m 41.55 +.21 -6.9 HY TF A m 10.13 -.01 +9.0 Income A m 2.03 ... -2.4 Income C m 2.04 -.01 -3.2 IncomeAdv 2.01 -.01 -2.8 NY TF A m 11.72 +.01 +7.8 RisDv A m 31.59 +.09 -3.8 StrInc A m 10.26 -.06 +1.9 US Gov A m 6.94 -.01 +5.8 FrankTemp-Mutual Beacon Z 11.09 -.02 -8.7 Discov A m 25.67 -.16 -9.8 Discov Z 26.04 -.15 -9.6 QuestZ 16.02 -.02 -7.5 Shares A m 18.59 -.03 -9.1 Shares Z 18.77 -.03 -8.9 FrankTemp-Templeton Fgn A m 5.83 -.14 -16.5 GlBond A m 13.53 -.17 +2.5 GlBond C m 13.56 -.16 +2.2 GlBondAdv 13.50 -.16 +2.7 Growth A m 15.52 -.20 -12.8 World A m 13.21 -.12 -11.0 Franklin Templeton FndAllA m 9.45 -.06 -8.3 GE S&SProg 36.82 +.19 -8.5 GMO EmgMktsVI 12.09 -.10 -10.7 IntItVlIV 18.47 -.23 -13.7 QuIII 20.27 +.09 +1.9 QuVI 20.27 +.08 +1.9 Goldman Sachs HiYieldIs d 6.85 -.05 -1.0 MidCapVaA m31.50 +.13 -12.3 MidCpVaIs 31.81 +.14 -12.0 Harbor Bond 12.35 -.03 +3.3 CapApInst 36.01 +.31 -1.9 IntlInstl d 51.55 -.73 -14.9 IntlInv m 50.95 -.73 -15.1 Hartford CapAprA m 28.29 +.05 -18.3 CapAprI 28.34 +.04 -18.2 CpApHLSIA 35.98 +.10 -15.1 DvGrHLSIA 17.85 +.12 -8.4 TRBdHLSIA 11.54 -.01 +6.1 Hussman StratGrth d 12.85 -.05 +4.6 INVESCO CharterA m 15.43 +.05 -4.5 ComstockA m 14.15 +.07 -9.4 ConstellB m 19.12 +.08 -8.6 EqIncomeA m 7.90 +.02 -7.1 GlobEqA m 9.91 -.03 -7.7 GrowIncA m 17.11 +.11 -10.5 HiYldMuA m 9.27 -.01 +7.8 PacGrowB m 18.95 -.16 -15.1 Ivy AssetStrA m 23.27 -.20 -4.7 AssetStrC m 22.50 -.20 -5.2 JPMorgan CoreBondA m 11.90 -.02 +6.2 CoreBondSelect11.89 -.02 +6.4 HighYldSel 7.71 -.05 -0.7 IntmdTFSl 11.20 ... +6.2 ShDurBndSel 11.02 -.01 +1.6 USLCpCrPS 18.62 +.10 -9.9 Janus BalT 23.99 +.04 -3.3 OverseasT d 36.99 -.63 -27.0 PerkinsMCVT 20.89 +.05 -7.4 TwentyT 58.21 +.42 -11.4 John Hancock LifAg1 b 11.07 +.01 -9.9 LifBa1 b 12.16 -.01 -5.0 LifGr1 b 11.81 +.01 -8.0 RegBankA m 11.50 +.20 -21.4 SovInvA m 14.35 +.09 -8.2 TaxFBdA m 9.95 ... +7.6 Lazard EmgMkEqtI d 18.89 -.25 -12.9 EmgMktEqO m19.26 -.26 -13.1 Legg Mason/Western CrPlBdIns 11.10 -.04 +5.6 MgdMuniA m 15.97 ... +9.4 Longleaf Partners LongPart 26.32 +.14 -6.9 Loomis Sayles BondI 14.36 -.06 +4.2 BondR b 14.30 -.06 +4.0 Lord Abbett

Name

YTD NAV Chg %Rtn

AffiliatA m 9.79 +.05 -15.0 BondDebA m 7.54 -.04 +0.7 ShDurIncA m 4.54 -.01 +1.8 ShDurIncC m 4.57 -.01 +1.2 MFS MAInvA m 17.62 +.10 -7.9 MAInvC m 17.00 +.10 -8.4 TotRetA m 13.46 +.03 -3.1 ValueA m 20.66 +.11 -8.8 ValueI 20.76 +.11 -8.6 Manning & Napier WrldOppA 7.22 -.14 -16.1 Merger Merger m 15.66 ... -0.8 Metropolitan West TotRetBdI 10.53 -.02 +4.9 TotRtBd b 10.53 -.02 +4.6 Morgan Stanley Instl MdCpGrI 36.60 +.02 -2.0 Natixis InvBndY 12.42 -.04 +5.9 StratIncA m 14.68 -.07 +2.8 StratIncC m 14.76 -.06 +2.3 Neuberger Berman GenesisIs 44.92 +.16 -2.3 GenesisTr 46.47 +.17 -2.5 SmCpGrInv 16.92 +.29 -5.4 Northern HYFixInc d 7.02 ... +1.2 Oakmark EqIncI 26.27 -.01 -5.3 Intl I d 15.57 -.36 -19.8 Oakmark I d 38.44 +.32 -6.9 Old Westbury GlbSmMdCp 13.58 -.07 -10.6 Oppenheimer CapApB m 35.66 +.16 -7.4 DevMktA m 31.32 -.34 -14.1 DevMktY 31.05 -.33 -13.9 GlobA m 52.82 +.03 -12.5 GoldMinA m 49.80 -1.23 -0.1 IntlBondA m 6.58 -.04 +3.0 IntlBondY 6.58 -.04 +3.1 MainStrA m 29.56 +.25 -8.7 RocMuniA m 15.71 ... +7.7 RochNtlMu m 6.89 ... +9.6 StrIncA m 4.18 -.03 +1.7 PIMCO AllAssetI 12.17 -.07 +2.5 AllAuthIn 10.78 -.08 +3.8 ComRlRStI 8.99 -.09 +4.7 DivIncInst 11.34 -.06 +3.0 EMktCurI 10.47 -.08 0.0 FloatIncI 8.33 -.04 -5.4 HiYldIs 8.83 -.08 -0.1 InvGrdIns 10.65 -.07 +5.4 LowDrA m 10.40 -.03 +1.4 LowDrIs 10.40 -.03 +1.6 RealRet 12.19 -.06 +10.5 RealRtnA m 12.19 -.06 +10.2 RlRetAIns 12.97 -.07 +19.7 ShtTermIs 9.81 -.01 +0.3 ToRtIIIIs 9.62 -.04 +2.7 ToRtIIIs 10.57 -.04 +3.7 TotRetA m 10.99 -.04 +3.3 TotRetAdm b 10.99 -.04 +3.4 TotRetC m 10.99 -.04 +2.8 TotRetIs 10.99 -.04 +3.6 TotRetrnD b 10.99 -.04 +3.4 TotlRetnP 10.99 -.04 +3.5 Permanent Portfolio 48.56 -.32 +6.0 Pioneer PioneerA m 36.46 +.20 -10.6 Principal L/T2020I 11.12 ... -4.6 SAMConGrB m12.21+.02 -6.9 Prudential Investmen 2020FocA m 15.17 +.07 -4.5 BlendA m 15.80 +.08 -8.2 EqOppA m 12.76 +.06 -8.1 HiYieldA m 5.29 -.03 +1.1 IntlEqtyA m 5.30 -.07 -14.4 IntlValA m 17.35 -.18 -15.8 JenMidCapGrA m26.22+.14 -4.2 JennGrA m 17.66 +.15 -2.2 NaturResA m 48.99 -.43 -14.2 SmallCoA m 18.18 +.08 -10.4 UtilityA m 10.12 ... -0.1 ValueA m 13.22 +.06 -10.3 Putnam GrowIncA m 11.72 ... -13.1 GrowIncB m 11.50 ... -13.5 IncomeA m 6.94 +.02 +5.9 Royce LowStkSer m 15.97 -.07 -12.5 OpportInv d 9.58 +.06 -20.7 PAMutInv d 10.42 +.03 -10.6 PremierInv d 19.05 -.02 -6.4

Name

YTD NAV Chg %Rtn

ValPlSvc m 11.87 +.02 Schwab 1000Inv d 34.68 +.24 S&P500Sel d 18.34 +.13 Scout Interntl d 27.18 -.30 Selected American D 37.30 +.09 Sequoia Sequoia 131.82 -.02 T Rowe Price BlChpGr 37.01 +.32 CapApprec 19.38 +.10 DivGrow 21.36 +.11 DivrSmCap d 14.74 +.07 EmMktStk d 30.54 -.35 EqIndex d 31.43 +.22 EqtyInc 21.29 +.12 FinSer 11.15 +.08 GrowStk 30.51 +.21 HealthSci 31.08 +.11 HiYield d 6.41 -.04 IntlBnd d 10.29 -.03 IntlDisc d 39.14 -.41 IntlGrInc d 11.32 -.13 IntlStk d 12.46 -.14 IntlStkAd m 12.41 -.14 LatinAm d 45.45 -.77 MediaTele 51.09 +.12 MidCapVa 21.51 +.03 MidCpGr 54.15 +.22 NewAmGro 30.95 +.18 NewAsia d 17.72 -.12 NewEra 45.68 -.22 NewHoriz 32.43 +.20 NewIncome 9.74 -.02 OrseaStk d 7.24 -.06 R2015 11.42 ... R2025 11.32 +.01 R2035 11.31 +.01 Rtmt2010 14.91 ... Rtmt2020 15.61 +.01 Rtmt2030 16.09 +.01 Rtmt2040 16.06 +.02 ShTmBond 4.84 -.01 SmCpStk 30.91 +.16 SmCpVal d 32.22 +.16 SpecInc 12.25 -.03 TaxFHiYld d 10.75 ... Value 21.03 +.12 ValueAd b 20.79 +.11 Templeton InFEqSeS 16.81 -.33 Third Avenue Value d 43.93 -.09 Thornburg IncBldC m 17.50 -.14 IntlValA m 23.79 -.36 IntlValI d 24.33 -.37 Tweedy Browne GlobVal d 21.12 -.45 Vanguard 500Adml 107.51 +.74 500Inv 107.49 +.75 AssetA 22.80 +.13 BalIdxAdm 20.87 +.07 BalIdxIns 20.87 +.07 CAITAdml 11.23 ... CapOp d 29.37 +.29 CapOpAdml d67.87 +.66 CapVal 9.11 +.04 Convrt d 12.21 -.01 DevMktIdx d 8.54 -.11 DivGr 13.96 +.06 EmMktIAdm d34.03 -.44 EnergyAdm d113.23 -.07 EnergyInv d 60.28 -.04 Explr 66.11 +.58 ExtdIdAdm 37.15 +.21 ExtdIdIst 37.15 +.21 FAWeUSIns d80.23 -1.05 GNMA 11.19 -.02 GNMAAdml 11.19 -.02 GlbEq 15.83 -.07 GrowthEq 10.31 +.10 GrthIdAdm 29.94 +.21 GrthIstId 29.94 +.21 HYCor d 5.58 -.02 HYCorAdml d 5.58 -.02 HltCrAdml d 53.52 +.09 HlthCare d 126.79 +.21 ITBondAdm 11.94 -.05 ITGradeAd 10.16 -.04 ITIGrade 10.16 -.04 ITrsyAdml 12.16 -.03 InfPrtAdm 27.99 -.11 InfPrtI 11.40 -.04 InflaPro 14.25 -.05 InstIdxI 106.79 +.75 InstPlus 106.79 +.74

-11.5 -6.7 -6.3 -15.6 -9.9 +2.0 -2.9 -4.6 -6.0 -6.8 -13.4 -6.4 -9.4 -21.3 -5.1 +2.6 -0.6 +5.3 -10.8 -15.0 -12.4 -12.5 -19.9 -1.2 -9.3 -7.5 -6.2 -7.6 -12.4 -3.2 +5.1 -13.2 -4.0 -6.0 -7.5 -2.8 -5.0 -6.9 -7.8 +1.4 -10.2 -10.8 +1.9 +7.2 -9.9 -10.0 -15.9 -15.1 -4.8 -14.6 -14.4 -11.3 -6.3 -6.4 -6.2 -1.3 -1.3 +7.7 -11.6 -11.6 -17.3 -7.6 -15.1 -1.9 -14.6 -6.4 -6.4 -9.3 -10.0 -10.0 -14.5 +6.6 +6.6 -11.4 -4.4 -4.7 -4.7 +2.9 +2.9 +4.4 +4.4 +9.8 +6.7 +6.6 +9.1 +11.9 +11.9 +11.8 -6.3 -6.3

Name

I

N

YTD NAV Chg %Rtn

InstTStPl 26.36 +.18 IntlExpIn d 13.81 -.18 IntlGr d 16.75 -.20 IntlGrAdm d 53.34 -.62 IntlStkIdxAdm d22.54 -.29 IntlStkIdxI d 90.18 -1.17 IntlStkIdxIPls d90.20-1.17 IntlVal d 26.87 -.33 LTGradeAd 10.19 -.04 LTInvGr 10.19 -.04 LifeCon 15.95 ... LifeGro 20.38 +.02 LifeMod 18.67 +.01 MidCapGr 17.90 +.16 MidCp 18.69 +.10 MidCpAdml 84.90 +.44 MidCpIst 18.76 +.10 MidCpSgl 26.79 +.14 Morg 16.78 +.13 MuHYAdml 10.56 ... MuInt 13.88 ... MuIntAdml 13.88 ... MuLTAdml 11.19 ... MuLtdAdml 11.17 ... MuShtAdml 15.95 ... PrecMtls d 25.70 -.45 Prmcp d 60.45 +.26 PrmcpAdml d 62.76 +.27 PrmcpCorI d 12.77 +.06 REITIdx d 18.34 +.08 REITIdxAd d 78.28 +.34 STBond 10.70 -.02 STBondAdm 10.70 -.02 STBondSgl 10.70 -.02 STCor 10.71 -.02 STFedAdml 10.95 -.01 STGradeAd 10.71 -.02 STsryAdml 10.86 -.01 SelValu d 17.35 +.10 SmCapIdx 31.03 +.22 SmCpIdAdm 31.09 +.23 SmCpIdIst 31.09 +.22 SmGthIdx 19.95 +.13 SmGthIst 20.01 +.13 SmValIdx 14.01 +.11 Star 18.24 -.01 TgtRe2010 22.28 -.01 TgtRe2015 12.14 ... TgtRe2020 21.29 ... TgtRe2030 20.37 +.01 TgtRe2035 12.14 +.01 TgtRe2040 19.86 +.01 TgtRe2045 12.48 +.01 TgtRetInc 11.42 -.01 Tgtet2025 12.00 ... TotBdAdml 11.04 -.02 TotBdInst 11.04 -.02 TotBdMkInv 11.04 -.02 TotBdMkSig 11.04 -.02 TotIntl d 13.47 -.18 TotStIAdm 29.14 +.20 TotStIIns 29.14 +.19 TotStISig 28.12 +.19 TotStIdx 29.13 +.20 TxMCapAdm 58.39 +.38 TxMIntlAdm d 9.82 -.13 TxMSCAdm 24.54 +.18 USValue 9.48 +.06 ValIdxIns 18.87 +.12 WellsI 22.12 -.02 WellsIAdm 53.60 -.04 Welltn 29.70 +.06 WelltnAdm 51.31 +.12 WndsIIAdm 41.80 +.24 Wndsr 11.86 +.07 WndsrAdml 40.01 +.24 WndsrII 23.55 +.13

-6.9 -17.2 -13.4 -13.3 -14.5 -14.5 -14.4 -16.4 +13.5 +13.4 -1.5 -7.0 -3.8 -5.8 -8.0 -7.9 -7.8 -7.9 -6.9 +8.0 +7.3 +7.4 +8.1 +3.2 +1.5 -3.7 -8.1 -8.1 -7.3 +1.3 +1.4 +2.8 +2.9 +2.9 +1.8 +2.6 +1.9 +2.2 -7.5 -10.7 -10.6 -10.6 -9.0 -8.9 -12.5 -3.5 -0.1 -2.3 -3.7 -6.0 -7.3 -7.6 -7.6 +2.5 -4.9 +6.6 +6.6 +6.5 +6.6 -14.5 -6.9 -6.9 -6.9 -7.0 -6.7 -15.2 -9.7 -6.1 -8.2 +3.8 +3.9 -3.2 -3.1 -7.3 -11.6 -11.6 -7.3

Yacktman Focused d 17.76 +.09 +0.5 Yacktman d 16.57 +.09 +0.2

R

10-YR T-NOTE 1.95%

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

2,700

1,280

Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

A

Close: 2,495.09 Change: 27.10 (1.1%)

2,400 10 DAYS

2,900

M

Nasdaq composite

2,520

1,440

1,040

E

98.01 74.58 30.70 22.50 51.50 36.76 23.79 19.28 38.02 26.00 318.79 213.52 15.31 6.01 32.50 18.77 17.49 5.59 52.95 34.25 39.50 28.98 71.77 57.22 27.16 16.91 28.95 21.75 42.50 17.55 38.69 27.63 13.63 4.91 21.02 8.15 9.84 6.29 18.71 13.09 13.74 7.00 55.00 46.50 59.45 45.31 36.30 29.80 27.45 18.07

p

E

V

I

E

q

GOLD $1,809.90

+.03

W

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 PAGE 9B EURO $1.3585

-46.50

q

CRUDE OIL $88.19

-.0071

Stocks of Local Interest

NAME

TKR

AirProd AmWtrWks Amerigas AquaAm ArchDan AutoZone BkofAm BkNYMel BonTon CIGNA CVS Care CocaCola Comcast CmtyBkSy CmtyHlt CoreMark Entercom FairchldS FrontierCm Genpact HarteHnk Heinz Hershey Kraft Lowes

APD AWK APU WTR ADM AZO BAC BK BONT CI CVS KO CMCSA CBU CYH CORE ETM FCS FTR G HHS HNZ HSY KFT LOW

DIV

LAST

CHG

YTD %CHG

2.32 .92 2.96 .66 .64 ... .04 .52 .20 .04 .50 1.88 .45 .96 ... ... ... ... .75 .18 .32 1.92 1.38 1.16 .56

77.56 28.52 42.76 21.07 27.02 316.18 7.05 19.98 6.08 43.68 36.78 69.38 21.14 22.54 17.90 33.00 4.99 12.33 6.94 15.84 7.65 50.14 56.75 34.25 19.13

-.83 -.16 +.02 -.05 -.09 +1.69 +.07 +.06 -.16 +.80 +.28 +.01 +.23 -.15 +.24 +.19 -.07 +.50 +.12 +.23 +.36 -.43 +.19 -.26 +.17

-14.7 +12.8 -12.4 -6.3 -10.2 +16.0 -47.2 -33.8 -52.0 +19.1 +5.8 +5.5 -3.3 -18.8 -52.1 -7.3 -56.9 -21.0 -28.7 +4.2 -40.1 +1.4 +20.4 +8.7 -23.7

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

NAME

TKR

95.00 91.22 24.98 10.28 65.19 29.06 20.25 17.34 71.89 72.74 67.72 67.52 17.11 60.00 44.65 12.45 56.78 33.53 38.95 57.90 42.20 34.25

M&T Bk McDnlds NBT Bcp NexstarB PNC PPL Corp PennMill PenRE PepsiCo PhilipMor ProctGam Prudentl SLM Cp SLM pfB SoUnCo Supvalu TJX UGI Corp VerizonCm WalMart WeisMk WellsFargo

MTB MCD NBTB NXST PNC PPL PMIC PEI PEP PM PG PRU SLM SLMpB SUG SVU TJX UGI VZ WMT WMK WFC

69.23 72.14 17.51 3.87 42.70 24.10 13.15 8.91 59.68 54.26 57.56 44.54 10.92 36.50 23.60 6.40 41.11 25.81 30.61 48.31 35.87 22.58

p

+.95

DIV

LAST

CHG

YTD %CHG

2.80 2.44 .80 ... 1.40 1.40 ... .60 2.06 2.56 2.10 1.15 .40 4.63 .60 .35 .76 1.04 2.00 1.46 1.16 .48

72.35 86.19 18.17 6.15 48.17 27.98 20.11 9.09 60.14 66.02 61.83 46.80 13.01 43.00 41.81 7.52 52.49 28.62 35.25 51.82 38.18 24.10

+1.85 +1.16 +.43 +.24 +1.79 +.03 -.02 +.05 +.15 +.12 -.01 +.66 +.30 -1.00 +.16 +.05 +.70 +.09 +.01 +.46 +.62 +.58

-16.9 +12.3 -24.8 +2.7 -20.7 +6.3 +52.0 -37.4 -7.9 +12.8 -3.9 -20.3 +3.3 -1.9 +73.7 -21.9 +18.2 -9.4 -1.5 -3.9 -5.3 -22.2

Name

Last Chg %YTD

Combined Stocks Name

Last Chg %YTD

ABB Ltd 17.99 -.10 AEP Ind 24.68 +.12 AES Corp 10.40 +.07 AFLAC 34.18 +.35 AGCO 39.75 -1.24 AGL Res 39.94 +.07 AK Steel 8.17 -.05 AMR 3.27 -.08 AOL 14.75 +.03 ASM Intl 25.60 +1.11 AT&T Inc 27.88 +.34 AbtLab 50.51 +.08 AcadiaRlt 20.43 -.20 Accenture 50.02 +.20 AcmePkt 49.52 +3.93 ActionSemi 1.91 -.02 ActivsBliz 11.49 +.07 AdamsEx 9.63 ... AdobeSy 25.20 +.56 AMD 6.71 +.19 Adventrx 1.22 +.16 Aeropostl 10.18 -.03 Aetna 38.44 +.44 Agilent 33.41 +.05 AkamaiT 20.91 +.14 AlcatelLuc 3.02 -.09 Alcoa 11.55 -.03 AlignTech 16.42 -.65 Allergan 78.18 -.39 AlliBInco 8.06 -.01 AlliantEgy 38.55 +.12 Allstate 25.27 +.46 AlphaNRs 29.69 -1.12 AlteraCp lf 36.16 +1.55 Altria 26.54 +.17 AmBev s 32.15 -.24 Amazon 216.56 +5.17 Ameren 29.20 +.27 Amerigrp 42.37 -2.06 AMovilL s 23.30 -.09 AMovilA s 23.24 -.11 ACapAgy 28.98 +.59 AmCapLtd 8.29 +.17 AEP 37.12 +.32 AmExp 47.46 +.18 AmIntlGrp 23.58 +.22 AmSupr 6.17 +.13 AmTower 52.30 -.08 AmWtrWks 28.52 -.16 Ameriprise 42.02 +.29 Ametek s 35.99 -.39 Amgen 54.06 +.01 AmkorT lf 4.49 +.19 Anadarko 70.31 +.52 AnalogDev 32.83 +.72 ABInBev 50.22 -.82 Annaly 17.95 +.14 Apache 94.65 -.47 Apple Inc 379.94 +2.46 ApldMatl 10.86 +.14 Arbitron 34.54 +1.00 ArcelorMit 17.43 -.33 ArchCoal 18.95 -.57 ArmHld 27.76 +.30 ArmourRsd 7.44 +.01 ArubaNet 18.72 +.34 AssuredG 11.25 -.10 AstraZen 43.84 -.48 Atmel 9.05 +.36 ATMOS 33.08 +.01 Autodesk 26.72 +1.31 AutoData 48.31 +.69 AveryD 25.78 -.17 AvisBudg 11.45 -.29 Avon 21.20 +.10 BB&T Cp 21.33 +.43 BHP BillLt 76.83 -.34 BJs Whls 51.05 +.13 BP PLC 36.43 +.43 BP Pru 108.46 +.12 Baidu 144.23 +.60 BakrHu 57.70 +.91 BallardPw 1.42 +.01 BallyTech 28.04 -.25 BcoBrades 16.63 -.56 BcoSantSA 7.50 -.37 BcoSBrasil 8.69 -.22 BkHawaii 38.86 +.78 BkAtl A h .70 -.05 Barclay 9.18 +.07 Bar iPVix rs 46.25 +.42 BarnesNob 11.47 +.09 BarrickG 53.33 -1.22 Baxter 53.30 +.14 BedBath 58.01 +1.72 BerkHa A 103800 +1528 BerkH B 69.24 +1.47 BestBuy 24.96 +.46 BigLots 31.59 -.13 BioRadA 91.72 -.51 Blackstone 12.31 +.10 BlockHR 13.26 +.13 Boeing 62.39 +.60 BostonSci 6.22 +.02 Brinker 20.20 +.19 BrMySq 29.44 +.28 Broadcom 33.06 -.38 BrcdeCm 3.98 +.20 Buckeye 62.21 -.28 CA Inc 19.92 +.21 CB REllis 14.12 +.07 CBS B 22.20 +.06 CH Engy 52.97 +.18 CMS Eng 19.06 +.25 CSS Inds 16.02 +.44 CSX s 19.51 -.07 CblvsNY s 15.97 -.02 Cadence 9.03 +.14 CalDive 2.77 +.36 CalaStrTR 8.32 -.02 Calpine 14.34 +.43 Cameco g 20.70 -.64 Cameron 49.30 +1.02 CampSp 30.70 -.15 CdnNRs gs 33.88 -.47 CapOne 42.58 +.80 CapsteadM 12.82 +.14 CardnlHlth 39.93 -.25 CarMax 26.75 +.43 Carnival 31.49 +.81 Caterpillar 83.87 -.09 Cavium 33.10 +2.19 CedarF 19.78 -.40 CelSci .39 ... Celgene 60.32 +.55 Cemex 4.86 -.09 CenterPnt 19.54 +.02 CFCda g 24.31 -.81 CVtPS 35.02 +.16 CntryLink 33.35 +.28 Cephln 80.70 +.09 ChrmSh 2.43 -.14 Checkpnt 14.08 +.19 Cheesecake26.14 +.54 ChesEng 30.76 +.38 Chevron 95.91 +.72

-19.9 -4.9 -14.6 -39.4 -21.5 +11.4 -50.1 -58.0 -37.8 -26.9 -5.1 +5.4 +12.0 +3.2 -6.8 -11.2 -7.6 -10.3 -18.1 -18.0 -53.3 -58.7 +26.0 -19.4 -55.6 +2.0 -25.0 -16.0 +13.8 +1.6 +4.8 -20.7 -50.5 +1.6 +7.8 +3.6 +20.3 +3.6 -3.5 -18.7 -18.7 +.8 +9.7 +3.2 +10.6 -51.1 -78.4 +1.3 +12.8 -27.0 -8.3 -1.5 -39.4 -7.7 -12.8 -12.0 +.2 -20.6 +17.8 -22.7 -16.8 -54.3 -45.9 +33.8 -4.7 -10.3 -36.4 -5.1 -26.5 +6.0 -30.1 +4.4 -39.1 -26.4 -27.0 -18.9 -17.3 +6.6 -17.5 -14.3 +49.4 +.9 -5.3 -33.5 -18.0 -29.6 -36.1 -17.7 -39.1 -44.4 +23.0 -18.9 +.3 +5.3 +18.0 -13.8 -13.6 -27.2 +3.7 -11.7 -13.0 +11.3 -4.4 -17.8 -3.3 +11.2 -24.1 -24.8 -6.9 -18.5 -31.1 +16.5 +8.3 +2.5 -22.3 -9.4 -32.5 +9.3 -51.1 -10.2 +7.5 -48.7 -2.8 -11.7 -23.7 0.0 +1.8 +4.2 -16.1 -31.7 -10.5 -12.2 +30.5 -52.5 +2.0 -52.8 +24.3 +17.3 +60.2 -27.8 +30.8 -31.5 -31.5 -14.7 +18.7 +5.1

Name

Last Chg %YTD

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Name

Last Chg %YTD

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Name

Last Chg %YTD

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Name

Last Chg %YTD

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TE Connect27.95 TECO 17.74 THQ 1.64 TaiwSemi 11.94 Talbots 2.90 TalismE g 14.55 Target 50.11 TataMotors 15.09 TeckRes g 39.47 Teleflex 53.56 TelefEsp s 17.80 TelMexL 16.33 Tellabs 4.08 TempleInld 31.08 TmpDrgn 26.09 TenetHlth 4.52 Tenneco 28.82 Teradyn 11.82 Terex 13.02 Tesoro 23.78 TevaPhrm 37.92 TexInst 26.28 Textron 15.39 ThermoFis 51.09 3M Co 78.22 THorton g 45.62 TimeWarn 29.20 TorDBk g 73.32 Total SA 44.62 Toyota 68.17 TrCda g 41.66 Transocn 54.95 Travelers 48.96 TrimbleN 35.56 TrinaSolar 10.05 TriQuint 6.02 TycoIntl 40.28 Tyson 16.68 UBS AG 11.92 UDR 25.98 US Airwy 4.85 US Gold 6.24 USEC 1.88 UniSrcEn 36.50 UnilevNV 30.90 UnionPac 84.29 Unisys 15.81 UtdContl 17.96 UtdMicro 1.91 UPS B 63.87 UtdRentals 15.64 US Bancrp 22.35 US NGs rs 9.84 US OilFd 34.42 USSteel 27.05 UtdTech 71.13 UtdhlthGp 46.26 UnumGrp 22.31 UrbanOut 24.85 Vale SA 26.65 Vale SA pf 24.45 ValeantPh 39.52 ValenceT h 1.07 ValeroE 22.34 ValpeyFsh 2.55 ValVis A 3.69 VangREIT 55.24 VangEmg 41.00 VangEur 41.02 VangEAFE 30.74 VantageDrl 1.49 VeriFone 36.14 Verisign 29.35 VertxPh 47.78 VestinRMII 1.29 ViacomA 54.52 ViacomB 43.88 VimpelCm 10.26 VirgnMda h 24.37 Visa 87.45 VishayInt 10.59 VistaGold 4.41 Vivus 8.20 Vodafone 25.39 Vornado 83.24 WalMart 51.82 Walgrn 35.66 WalterEn 85.15 WarnerCh 14.00 WsteMInc 30.83 WeathfIntl 16.13 WellPoint 63.38 WellsFargo 24.10 Wendys Co 4.89 WernerEnt 22.40 WestellT 2.22 WDigital 28.86 WstnUnion 15.79 Weyerh 16.73 WmsCos 25.86 Windstrm 12.51 WiscEn s 30.73 WT EmCur 21.95 Worthgtn 14.16 Wyndham 29.79 Wynn 151.72 XL Grp 19.42 XcelEngy 23.97 Xerox 7.52 Xilinx 30.78 YRC rsh .40 Yahoo 14.26 Yamana g 16.54 YingliGrn 4.28 YumBrnds 52.06 Zimmer 53.72 ZionBcp 16.39 ZollMed 40.82 Zweig 2.98 ZweigTl 3.11

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-21.0 -.3 -72.9 -4.8 -66.0 -34.4 -16.7 -48.6 -36.2 -.5 -22.0 +1.2 -39.8 +46.3 -15.1 -32.4 -30.0 -15.8 -58.1 +28.3 -27.3 -19.1 -34.9 -7.7 -9.4 +10.6 -9.2 0.0 -16.6 -13.3 +9.5 -20.9 -12.1 -10.9 -57.1 -48.5 -2.8 -3.1 -27.6 +10.5 -51.5 -22.7 -68.8 +1.8 -1.6 -9.0 -38.9 -24.6 -39.6 -12.0 -31.3 -17.1 -17.9 -11.7 -53.7 -9.6 +28.1 -7.9 -30.6 -22.9 -19.1 +39.7 -36.3 -3.4 -24.8 -39.6 -.2 -14.8 -16.4 -15.0 -26.6 -6.3 -10.2 +36.4 -11.0 +18.9 +10.8 -31.8 -10.5 +24.3 -27.9 +84.5 -12.5 -4.0 -.1 -3.9 -8.5 -33.4 -37.9 -16.4 -29.3 +11.5 -22.2 +5.8 -.9 -32.1 -14.9 -15.0 -11.6 +4.6 -10.3 +4.4 -2.7 -23.0 -.6 +46.1 -11.0 +1.8 -34.7 +6.2 -89.2 -14.3 +29.2 -56.7 +6.1 +.1 -32.4 +9.6 -11.0 -12.6

Foreign Exchange & Metals CURRENCY CLOSE USD per British Pound 1.5813 Canadian Dollar .9968 USD per Euro 1.3585 Japanese Yen 77.37 Mexican Peso 12.9662 METALS Copper Gold Platinum Silver Palladium

CLOSE 3.95 1809.90 1809.40 40.16 710.25

PVS. %CH. 6MO. 1YR. -.0051 -.32% 1.6071 1.5354 -.0005 -.05% .9729 1.0354 -.0071 -.52% 1.3890 1.2718 -.06 -.08% 81.88 84.15 +.3008 +2.32% 11.9118 12.9292 PVS. 3.99 1856.40 1837.90 41.57 737.10

%CH. -0.93 -2.50 -1.55 -3.39 -3.64

6MO. -5.83 +27.32 +1.55 +11.77 -7.00

1YR. +13.80 +45.36 +16.74 +99.72 +34.57

Story Stocks

A late afternoon rally pushed the stock market higher for only the second day this month. Major indexes had spent most of Monday lower as investors worried that Greece could be edging closer to a default. The yield on the 10-year M&F Worldwide MFW Colfax Close: $24.24 3.87 or 19.0% The banking service holding company said it will sell itself to shareholder MacAndrews & Forbes Holdings for $25 per share. $30 25

$16.77

Close: $20.98 -2.06 or -8.9% The pump and valve maker said it will buy Charter International, which owns two engineering businesses, in a $2.4 billion deal. $30

J

J A 52-week range

Vol.: 1.7m (16.2x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $468.66 m

S $28.31 PE: 4.7 Yield: ...

20 $13.49

Close: $27.15 1.34 or 5.2% The identification badge maker said fourth-quarter earnings jumped 37 percent on foreign currency gains and improved efficiency. $35 30

25

20 15

Treasury note reached another record low as investors piled into U.S. government debt. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 68.99, or 0.6 percent, to 11,061.12. The S&P 500 rose 8.04, or 0.7 percent, to 1,162.27. CFX Brady BRC

25 J

J A 52-week range

Vol.: 1.9m (8.0x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $914.12 m

S $28.75

PE: 29.6 Yield: ...

20 $24.44

J

J A 52-week range

S $38.73

PE: 14.2 Vol.: 378.2k (1.2x avg.) Yield: 2.7% Mkt. Cap: $1.34 b


CMYK PAGE 10B

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011

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THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

NATIONAL FORECAST

80° 57°

TODAY Morning sun, showers late

FRIDAY

SUNDAY Mostly sunny

67° 41°

63° 41°

65° 55°

75° 58°

SATURDAY Sunny

Mostly sunny

THURSDAY Partly sunny, a shower

WEDNESDAY A.m. showers, sun

MONDAY Mostly sunny

70° 45°

Syracuse 81/58

Poughkeepsie 82/62

The Finger Lakes

Wilkes-Barre 81/59 New York City 82/65 Reading 83/64

Atlantic City 81/71

Yesterday Average Record High Record Low

Cooling Degree Days*

Yesterday Month to date Year to date Last year to date Normal year to date

77/58 74/54 97 in 1931 36 in 1917 3 46 731 871 583

*Index of fuel consumption, how far the day’s mean temperature was above 65 degrees.

Precipitation

Yesterday Month to date Normal month to date Year to date Normal year to date

Sun and Moon

Sunrise 6:42a 6:43a Moonrise Today 7:30p Tomorrow 7:56p Today Tomorrow

Highs: 78-84. Lows: 51-58. Chance of thunderstorms. Isolated thunderstorms early tonight.

Brandywine Valley

Highs: 82-84. Lows: 67-69. Mostly sunny and warm. Partly cloudy tonight.

Philadelphia 84/67

Temperatures

74/53

Delmarva/Ocean City

Highs: 83-87. Lows: 64-72. Mostly sunny and warm. Partly cloudy tonight.

trace 6.10” 1.52” 44.80” 26.53” Sunset 7:17p 7:15p Moonset 7:55a 8:54a

Susquehanna Wilkes-Barre Towanda Lehigh Bethlehem Delaware Port Jervis Last

Stage Chg. Fld. Stg 16.93 -5.22 22.0 10.12 -3.71 21.0 2.86

0.54

16.0

7.18 -0.80

18.0

New

First

Sept. 20 Sept. 27 Oct. 3

Full

Forecasts, graphs and data ©2011

Weather Central, LP For more weather information go to:

www.timesleader.com National Weather Service

607-729-1597

Oct. 11

86/67

79/56

88/65

93/67

105/77 100/75

60/46

91/77

88/73 58/49

City

Yesterday

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Buffalo Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Las Vegas Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis

52/48/.00 86/61/.00 82/60/.68 81/56/.00 75/56/.00 88/56/.00 84/57/.00 81/60/.28 100/64/.00 84/53/.00 82/59/.00 86/74/.00 100/68/.00 86/59/.00 88/70/.00 72/62/.00 92/79/.00 84/58/.00 89/65/.00

City

Yesterday

Amsterdam Baghdad Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Dublin Frankfurt Hong Kong Jerusalem London

70/59/.00 102/77/.00 68/54/.00 72/61/.00 73/37/.00 63/54/.00 73/57/.00 91/81/.00 87/66/.00 70/59/.00

Today Tomorrow 60/46/r 88/65/s 85/67/s 80/65/s 78/55/t 89/60/s 73/58/s 79/60/t 105/77/pc 74/53/t 79/54/pc 88/73/s 100/75/s 84/58/pc 90/74/pc 72/61/pc 91/77/pc 69/53/s 69/46/s

ALMANAC Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Int’l Airport River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.

82/65

72/61

The Jersey Shore

Pottsville 80/59

Harrisburg 82/61

73/58 64/54

Highs: 76-81. Lows: 57-62. Mostly sunny and warm. Slight chance of thunderstorms tonight. Highs: 80-83. Lows: 65-71. Mostly sunny and warm. Partly cloudy tonight.

69/46 79/54

The Poconos

Albany 81/61

Towanda 83/58

State College 80/57

72/46

TODAY’S SUMMARY

Binghamton 81/57

Scranton 80/59

72/54

75° 50°

REGIONAL FORECAST Today’s high/ Tonight’s low

NATIONAL FORECAST: A frontal boundary will trigger scattered showers and thunderstorms from the eastern Great Lakes into northern New England today. A few of these storms may be strong to severe. Monsoonal flow will also produce scattered showers and thunderstorms from the eastern Great Basin into portions of the Southwest and the central and southern Rockies.

56/45/r 90/67/s 84/62/pc 79/59/pc 69/55/pc 90/66/pc 67/55/pc 65/52/sh 100/74/pc 65/53/t 68/48/pc 88/75/s 100/74/s 74/53/c 91/75/pc 73/64/pc 90/77/s 62/49/pc 59/39/s

City

Myrtle Beach 88/64/.00 Nashville 86/59/.00 New Orleans 90/66/.00 Norfolk 87/70/.00 Oklahoma City 99/57/.00 Omaha 91/61/.00 Orlando 92/73/.00 Phoenix 99/77/.00 Pittsburgh 76/56/.03 Portland, Ore. 72/58/.00 St. Louis 90/60/.00 Salt Lake City 81/59/.00 San Antonio 100/67/.00 San Diego 73/63/.00 San Francisco 68/61/.00 Seattle 64/57/.00 Tampa 91/76/.00 Tucson 90/68/.02 Washington, DC 84/64/.00

WORLD CITIES

Today Tomorrow 63/52/sh 105/77/s 80/69/pc 72/52/s 66/46/s 61/51/sh 71/51/s 89/79/t 88/65/s 63/51/pc

62/50/sh 104/76/s 78/66/sh 65/49/s 69/48/s 62/48/sh 66/47/s 90/81/t 87/64/s 63/49/pc

Yesterday

City

Yesterday

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Paris Rio de Janeiro Riyadh Rome San Juan Tokyo Warsaw

73/54/.00 77/52/.00 59/50/.00 73/59/.00 73/68/.00 104/75/.00 82/61/.00 91/79/.01 88/77/.00 73/55/.00

Today Tomorrow 86/69/s 89/61/pc 90/72/s 87/68/s 100/67/pc 75/49/pc 92/71/s 99/78/pc 80/59/pc 77/52/s 89/57/pc 77/58/pc 100/73/pc 73/63/pc 66/54/pc 72/54/s 92/74/s 94/71/pc 86/67/s

86/68/s 85/58/t 91/73/pc 88/69/s 83/60/t 61/47/sh 91/71/s 96/79/pc 74/52/pc 72/53/s 74/52/t 78/60/pc 96/72/s 72/63/pc 67/54/pc 69/54/s 91/74/pc 94/71/pc 86/64/pc

Today Tomorrow 71/54/t 77/59/sh 61/51/sh 66/51/pc 81/70/sh 105/77/s 86/66/pc 87/77/t 85/75/t 75/55/s

73/54/t 63/45/sh 62/49/sh 63/46/s 75/66/sh 106/77/s 85/66/pc 88/77/t 86/75/t 69/50/s

Cooler air will be entering our region as a series of cold fronts sweep through the area. You can expect to see a few showers later today. We can expect a high of 80 and a low of 57. Wednesday morning we could still see a passing shower or two with a high in the mid 70s and a low of 58. By Thursday, fall like temperatures will settle in and we can expect highs in the mid 60s and lows dipping down into the 40s for the remainder of the week. - Kurt Aaron

Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snow flurries, i-ice.

BILL H U ES S ER

G ENERA L CO NTRA CTO R

A LL REM ODELING Q u a lity Is A fford a ble! 35 Yea rs Exp erien ce.

Kitchen s • Ba throom s A d d ition s • W in d ow s Doors • Dryw a ll • Porches Deck s • S id in g • & Roofin g

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Are you at risk for prostate cancer? Free prostate screening. Regular screening can help detect prostate cancer at an early stage, when it is most treatable. Men over 50 and men older than 40 with a family history of prostate cancer are at risk. Join us for this free screening to determine your risk of prostate cancer. The Henry Cancer Center Geisinger Wyoming Valley 1000 E. Mountain Blvd.,Wilkes-Barre Friday, September 16th from 12:30 pm to 3:30 pm

© Geisinger Health System

706236

Screening available by appointment only. Please call 570.808.6153 to register.


K

Well, another nonprofit foundation has weighed in on an obesity study. And, no surprise, we’re fat, people. In fact, the study by the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is called “F as in

Fat.” (Pennsylvania was named the 19th most obese state in the country) Maybe taking this quiz will inspire us to drop a few pounds. 1. In the past year, how many states saw their obesity rates rise? a) 9 b) 16

Free tai chi class set Tai chi from the Arthritis Foundation, a free relaxation class, will be held from 3 to 4 p.m. on Sept. 28 in the ballroom at the Irem Country Club, 1340 Country Club Road, Dallas. The class will continue every Wednesday through Nov. 16 at $45 per person. The class, which will be taught by certified instructor Mark R. Reinhart, is designed to improve the quality of life for people with arthritis using Sun-style tai chi. This style includes agile steps and exercises that may improve mobility, breathing and relaxation. The movements don’t require deep bending or squatting, which makes it easier and more comfortable to learn. To make a reservation, call 675-1866 by Sept. 27. Geisinger gala set The auxiliary at Geisinger Medical Center will hold its annual Lighting Up Tomorrow Gala from 6 p.m. to midnight on Oct. 1 on the grounds of Geisinger-Woodbine, 115 Woodbine Lane, Danville. This year’s gala will support Mission Cataract, a free cataract surgery program for those without health insurance; No One Dies Alone, a program that trains volunteers to sit with and comfort patients at the end of life; and The Child Advocacy Center, a division of the Janet Weis Children’s Hospital that was created to help reduce the number of interviews being conducted during child abuse investigations. The event will begin with cocktails, hors d’oeuvres and a silent auction followed by dinner and a live auction, with music and dancing until midnight. Black-tie attire is preferred. To purchase tickets, make a sponsorship or donate auction items, contact Nikki Rump at 271-6257. For more information or RSVP online, visit www.geisinger.org/gala. Asian inspired fund raiser Wyoming Valley Children’s Association will hold its Harvest Moon fundraiser from 6 to 9 p.m. on Oct. 6 at the Woodland’s Inn & Resort, state Route 315, Plains Township. Cost is $100 per person. Proceeds will benefit WVCA’s Early Equals Excellence program for underserved and disadvantaged children who are at risk for school failure because of poverty, behavior issues or language barriers. The Asian-inspired event, hosted by Chef Kate Gabriel, will feature an outdoor cocktail hour followed by a stationed dinner paired with first-class wines. Entertainment will be provided by Jamie Orfanella playing a Japanese Shakuhachi flute and guitarist and songwriter Billy Rogan. For tickets, sponsorship opportunities or to donate items for the basket raffle, call 714-1246 or email info@wvcakids.org. Health briefs are limited to nonprofit entities and support groups. To have your health-oriented announcement included, send information to Health, Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., WilkesBarre, PA 18711-0250; by fax: 829-5537; or e-mail health@timesleader.com. Information must be received at least two weeks in advance.

4. Four years ago, how many states had obesity rates at 30 percent of higher? a) 1 b) 12 c) 27 5. Which is the only state with an obesity rate lower than 20 percent? a) California b) Colorado

HEALTH timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

IN BRIEF

c) 37 2. During that same span, how many states saw their obesity rates fall? a) 0 b) 3 c) 9 3. How many states have obesity rates of 30 percent or higher? a) 8 b) 12 c) 22

HIV-AIDS: 30 years later

By JOSEPH DOLINSKY Times Leader Correspondent

Thirty years ago the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report reported the first cases of Pneumocystis pneumonia in young gay men and marked the official beginning of what would become the AIDS epidemic in the United States. Today the treatment, perception and

scope of the disease has changed drastically. The fact remains, however, that when left untreated and undiagnosed, HIV/AIDS can be overpowering and deadly. HIV, or Human Immunodeficiency Virus, can lead to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, or AIDS. The HIV/AIDS virus attacks and weakens the immune system, the body’s defense mecha-

nism that wards off bacteria, viruses and other infectious diseases. A weakened immune system can leave the body vulnerable to many other life-threatening sicknesses including cancers. Weight loss, lack of energy, fevers and sweating are a few of the early symptoms of HIV/AIDS. Despite advances in treatments and medicines, no one should become complacent

about HIV/AIDS. There is no cure for the HIV infection. Treatment spans a lifetime. Andrew Buleza, president and co-founder of WE CARE, a Wilkes-Barre-based AIDS support group, was diagnosed in 1982. He recalls having to line up 87 pills on his kitchen table for one day’s worth of treatment. Today, See AIDS, Page 3C

Dr. Oz changes his focus As the economy affects health care, TV’s syndicated doctor and Emmy winner adapts along with his viewers By RICK BENTLEY McClatchy Newspapers

D

r. Mehmet Oz — better known as Dr. Oz — appeared on “The Oprah Winfrey Show” and launched his own syndicated show in 2009 as a way of spreading useful medical information to millions of people. He never realized that an economic collapse would make his show a primary diagnostic source for many of his viewers. “We did a free clinic last year in Houston and 90 percent of the people in that clinic had jobs. They’re working, but they have no benefits,” Dr. Oz says during an interview at the Beverly Hilton. “So I’ve changed. I thought I was just talking to the walking well, but I now realize we are the primary source of health information for a large population who doesn’t have insurance.” Dr. Oz doesn’t take that responsibility lightly. Everything he says on the show is checked and rechecked by a group of medical students because he knows people may act on his advice. Dr. Oz’s show began broadcasting new episodes Monday. His show is

Everything Dr. Mehmet Oz says on his show is checked and rechecked by a group of medical students because he knows people may act on his advice.

one of the many syndicated shows bought by local stations to fill their schedules when there’s no network programming. The “Dr. Oz” show, which has won two consecutive Emmys for outstanding daytime talk show host, stands out from other syndicated shows because of the health issues. Dr. Oz

Study: BMI and waist size linked to death risks for Black women By JEANNINE STEIN Los Angeles Times

disease or cancer at the beginning of the study. In 13 years of follow-up, researchers found that for women who had a BMI of 20 or higher, every five-unit rise in BMI was linked with an 18 percent increase in the risk of death during the study period. A BMI between 18.5 and 24.9 is considered normal weight, while 25 to 29.9

Being obese and having a larger waist may be linked with a higher risk of dying for African American women, a study finds. Body mass index and waist circumference were examined in 33,916 women who were part of the ongoing Black Women’s Health Study and had never smoked and didn’t have cardiovascular See OBESITY, Page 3C

makes house calls — through your TV sets. “Too often we see our doctors as technicians and that’s not a healthy relationship,” Dr. Oz says. “Very overtly on the show we have tried to get into that space. I can’t do the operSee OZ, Page 3C

c) Alabama 6. At 34.4 percent, which state has the highest obesity rate? a) Alabama b) Alaska c) Mississippi ANSWERS: 1: b; 2: a; 3: b; 4: a; 5: b; 6: c. From The Times Leader wire service

SECTION

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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011

ASK DR. H DR. MITCHELL HECHT

Don’t give up on using statins for cholesterol Q: I have high cholesterol but cannot tolerate any statin medications, including Zocor, Lipitor and Pravastatin due to severe muscle pain and

cramps. I’ve also tried taking them with CoQ10 supplements, but that didn’t work either. I can’t tolerate niacin. My doctor is worried that I’m going to have a heart attack if I don’t take something. What can I do? — M.F., Northfield, N.J. A: It sounds like any of the statins taken daily are not going to be tolerated. You’ve already tried adding the over-the-counter supplement Coenzyme Q10, which does help some folks offset muscle aches and pains that statins may cause. It works by giving your mitochondria (produce the energy to power cells) a bit of “octane boosting” effect. In cases like yours, I’d suggest 400mg per day of CoQ10. Since statins are the most effective evidence-based treatment for the prevention and treatment of heart disease and stroke, rather than abandoning them altogether, I would suggest that you see if you can tolerate a long acting statin drug like Lipitor or Crestor taken only once a week at its starting dose. There is evidence (American Journal of Cardiology; Feb. 1, 2009) that once a week Crestor is safe, generally tolerated and effective in previously statin-intolerant folks like you. While not as effective as daily dosing, the study showed a 17 percent in total cholesterol, a 23 percent reduction in LDL “bad” cholesterol and a 5 percent increase in HDL “good” cholesterol. If that’s tolerated and your LDL cholesterol is still too high, I’d then try to increase to twice a week and reassess tolerability and lab results. If that’s tolerated and your LDL is still not to goal, I’d wait about 3 months and then try increasing the frequency to three times a week and see how it goes. I’ve even had statin-intolerant folks like yourself do okay on every other day dosing with nearly the same LDL, triglyceride and HDL results as the daily dosing when using a long-acting statin like Lipitor or Crestor (but not shorter-acting statins like Pravastatin or Zocor). Weekly, bi-weekly or otherwise, the bottom line is that anything you can do to improve your cholesterol levels beyond what diet and exercise can do will help reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease. Dr. Mitchell Hecht is a physician specializing in internal medicine. Send questions to him at: “Ask Dr. H,” P.O. Box 767787, Atlanta, GA 30076. Personal replies are not possible.

709074

NUTRITION QUIZ: Obesity rates


CMYK PAGE 2C

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011

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Eye-rubbing in pets may be indicator of glaucoma PENNY IS A 10-year-old cocker spaniel who has had her share of ear problems. Pat isn’t sure whether Penny is having a problem now, but she is noticing a new behavior. Penny is rubbing the left side of her face on the carpet, and she’s started to do it more frequently. Pat thinks Penny is specifically rubbing her left eye. There is some redness around the eye and the eyeball. Pat first thought Penny may have gotten something on her face, but she no longer believes that to be the case. Well, Pat, there is a problem. That’s the easy part. Determining the underlying problem is the not-so-easy part. I am going to assume that Penny is indeed rubbing her eye and not some other area close to it. So we can conclude there must be something irritating Penny’s left eye or the lids around it. There are many possibilities that can cause eye irritation. Penny may have damaged the corneal layer of the eye, causing significant discomfort. The cornea is a very specialized layer of clear cells that covers the colored

YOUR PET

through constant production within the eye and constant drainage out of the eye. If this system is disturbed, usually affecting the drainage, the pressure within the eye can increase; if JEFF KAHLER, D.V.M. left untreated, this increased pressure will destroy the retina at the back of the eye, causportion of the eye, the iris. The pupil is behind ing blindness. the cornea. Damage to the cornea can come This process can be extremely painful and is from contact with anything that can score or considered an emergency. puncture the tissue. Foreign material in the In humans with acute glaucoma, the ineye is but one possibility. crease in pressure and corresponding discomPenny may have developed a conjunctivitis fort can be communicated to the doctor and or inflammation of the conjunctiva. The contherapy immediately performed. Pets do not junctiva is a very thin layer of tissue that covusually do this, at least early on, although ers the inside of the eyelids and eyeball itself. It Penny may have done so with her rubbing can become inflamed from an allergic rebehavior. sponse or a bacterial infection or a combinaPenny needs immediate veterinary attention of both. This list can go on, but there is tion. If she does have glaucoma and there is one possible cause that is potentially very still sight present, we may be able to save her serious and could lead to blindness. Cocker eye. If not, she will need to have treatment spaniels are a high-incidence breed for this done to alleviate her pain. This might include disease. removal of her nonfunctioning eye. Penny may have glaucoma. Glaucoma occurs because of increased pressure within the Jeff Kahler is a veterinarian in Modesto, Calif. eye. The eye is actually filled with a viscous Questions can be submitted to Your Pet in care of fluid that supports its round structure. The LifeStyles, The Modesto Bee, P.O. Box 5256, Modfluid is maintained at a constant pressure esto CA 95352.

Drink up, scrub up: Wash portable water bottle daily By JUDY HEVRDEJS Chicago Tribune

CLEANING TIPS

With hundreds of portable reusable water bottles on the market, choosing one depends on what you need it for (a workout, cycling, desk duty), how you sip (via straw, spout, etc.) and whether you like glass, stainless steel or plastic. Once you’ve chosen a bottle, though, treating it right and keeping it clean is crucial to keeping you healthy -- especially during warm humid weather that encourages bacteria growth. Have you left a sports bottle half filled in a hot car or stashed it in a damp place (read: sweaty gym bag) or forgotten it for days with leftover juice or sports drink dribbled all over the mouthpiece? Bacteria loves that, creating bad smells and bad tastes. “People have to remind themselves that those bottles are just like their glasses and plates and other dishware at home,” says

A few bottle-cleaning caveats from Dr. Georges Benjamin. • Brushes: Use a brush if you can’t reach all areas of a water bottle with your fingers. • Dry them well: “Make sure you’re using a clean cloth or paper towel. If you can, air dry them.” • Dishwasher tip 1: If it doesn’t say “dishwasher safe,” don’t put it in the dishwasher. “If it’s plastic, you can deform it, it will melt and it won’t fit right,” he says, of a

HEALTH CALENDAR TODAY AL-ANON PARENT SUPPORT GROUP: 7:15 p.m., Nesbitt Medical Center, 562 Wyoming Ave., Kingston (ER entrance). Call 603-0541 or (866) 231-2650. ARTHRITIS LAND EXERCISE: 10:30-1 1:30 a.m., John Heinz Institute, 150 Mundy St., WilkesBarre Township. Call 826-3738. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT: 78:30 p.m., Annunciation Roman Catholic church, 122 S. Wyoming St. Hazleton. Call (877) 438-351 1; 4:30-5:30 p.m., Hospice for the Sacred Heart, Center for Education, 340 Montage Mountain Road, Moosic. Call 706-2400. BI-POLAR/DEPRESSION SUPPORT: for those with bi-polar disorder or fighting chronic depression, 6:30 p.m., Community Counseling Services board room, 1 10 S. Pennsylvania Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Call 954-9184. BRAIN TUMOR SUPPORT GROUP: hosted by Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center,

Dr. Georges Benjamin, who heads the Washington, D.C.based American Public Health Association. “They need to be cleaned.” “Once a day, you should take it home and clean it out,” he says, “and hot soapy water will do the job.” Regularly washing the bottle is important, especially if it’s held something sticky (juice or sports drink) or pulpy. 5:30-7 p.m., Candy’s Place, Suite 120, 190 Welles St., Forty Fort. For information, call Sara Beyer at 808-6407. BREAST-FEEDING INFORMATION: Greater Pittston La Leche League, 10 a.m., St. Maria Goretti Church, Laflin. Call (800) 4328007. CELEBRATE RECOVERY: 12-step, bible-based recovery program for hurts, habits and hang ups, 6:30 p.m., Cross Creek Community Church, Carverton Road, Trucksville. Call Dave at 7065104. FAMILY CAREGIVERS SUPPORT GROUP 1-3 p.m. at the Edwardsville Senior Center, Russell Street, Edwardsville. Ambulance services, nursing home care are among the topics. Refreshments will follow this free event. For more information, call Doris at 824-5994 or Ruth Ann at 4773422. GASTRIC BYPASS SUPPORT: 5-8 p.m. Dorranceton United Methodist Church, 549 Wyoming Ave., Kingston. Call 864-3289. GENTLE YOGA CLASS FOR CANCER PATIENTS AND OTHERS: 5:30-6:45 p.m., Candy’s Place,

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bottle’s seals and lids. • Dishwasher tip 2: “Sometimes temperatures are such that some chemicals (can) leach out and that can be a health hazard.” And if you’re concerned about plastics, consider this caveat from Consumer Reports: “Check your reusable water bottles to see whether they’re polycarbonate. If they are, or if you’re not sure, replace them with stainless steel or glass-lined bottles.”

190 Welles St., Forty Fort. Free to cancer patients (doctor’s note required for all patients); $5 per class or $30 per month for all others. Call 714-8800. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS: noon, basement of St. Stanislaus Church, West Church and Maple streets, Nanticoke; 6:30 p.m., Blessed Sacrament Church, 21 1 E. Main St., Wilkes-Barre; 8-9 p.m., Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, 190 S. Main St., WilkesBarre; 8 p.m., Nesbitt Medical Arts Building, 534 Wyoming Ave., Kingston. Call (866) 935-4762. NICOTINE ANONYMOUS: a fellowship of men and women helping each other to live free of nicotine, 6-7 p.m., Salvation Army, 17 South Pennsylvania Ave., WilkesBarre. Call Joanne at 829-2169. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS: 7-8 p.m., Town Hill Methodist Church, 417 Town Hill Road, Shickshinny. Call Barbara at 256-7735 or visit www.oa.org. SENIORS EXERCISE: Group strength/stretch exercise and

degree in counseling from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.

Ann Crisanti, Michelle Jones, Stacey Kiss and Jane Mizerak recently joined the staff of the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute. Crisanti, fiscal director, holds a bachelor’s degree in accounting from the University of Scranton; Jones, registry staff assistant, holds a medical office assistant associate’s degree from Cazenovia College; Kiss, cancer registrar, holds a bachelor’s degree in mass communications and a master’s degree in health care administration from King’s College; and Mizerak, registry staff assistant, holds a certificate as a medical office assistant from Luzerne County Community College.

Dr. David Liskov, Kingston, was appointed medical director of First Hospital Wyoming Valley, Kingston. Liskov, a psychiatrist, holds Liskov bachelor’s and master’s degrees in biochemistry from the University of Scranton. He received his medical degree from Autonomous University of Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico, and the University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore.

Rhoda Tillman, Shavertown, was recently appointed senior peer counselor coordinator for Community Counseling Services, Tunkhannock. She will oversee Tillman a program that provides one-to-one support and counseling in the homes of consumers 60 years of age and older who are experiencing minor emotional issues, and who are unable or unwilling to use mental health services in an office setting. Tillman holds an undergraduate degree from Brown University, Providence, R.I.; a master’s degree from Rhode Island College, Providence; and a doctorate

Dr. Nicole Balchune, has joined the medical practice at Balchune GeisingerKingston. She earned her medical degree from the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine and completed a residency in internal medicine at Lankenau Hospital, Wynnewood, Pa. She also holds undergraduate degrees in radiology and business management from Misericordia University, Dallas.

BLOOD DRIVES

ule, visit: redcrossblood.org or call 1-800-REDCROSS (7332767). Area blood donation sites include: Today, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Luzerne County Community College, Prospect Street and Middle Road, Nanticoke. Thursday, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 1 1 1 1 East End Blvd., Plains Township; 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Wilkes University Henry Student Center, 84 W. South St., Wilkes-Barre. Saturday, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Christ United Methodist Church, 175 S. Main Road, Mountain Top; 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Kistler Elementary School, 301 Old River Road, Wilkes-Barre. Sept. 20, noon-6 p.m., Thomas P. Saxton Medical Pavilion, 468 Northampton St., Edwardsville; 12:30-6 p.m., Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4909, 403 Main St., Dupont. Sept. 26, noon-6 p.m., Dallas American Legion, 730 Memorial Highway, Dallas. Sept. 27, noon-6 p.m., American Legion Post 644, 259 Shoemaker St., Swoyersville. Sept. 29, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., King’s College Campus Center, 133 N. River St., Wilkes-Barre; 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Geisinger South, Father Joseph Streit Center, 50 Roosevelt Terrace, WilkesBarre. Sept. 29, 10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Misericordia University Insalaco Center, 301 Lake St., Dallas.

Dr. Trong Le, pediatric and adult allergist, recently joined Geisinger-Forty Fort. He previously served at the pediatric urgent care center at Geisinger South WilkesBarre, a campus of Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center.

MCT PHOTO

To sanitize your favorite portable water bottle you may need a brush or other utensil to actually clean the places in the corners, particularly in the And while some new bottle de- bottom and around the tops and signs separate in the middle for the insides of the lids.

easy cleaning, if a bottle doesn’t and “you can’t get your fingers in there,” says Benjamin, “you may need a brush or other utensil to actually clean the places in the corners, particularly in the bottom and around the tops and the insides of the lids.” Don’t stop there, he adds: “Some come with their own straws and you’ve got to clean

HEALTH PEOPLE

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those as well.” But it’s just water, you grumble. “Even with plain water, if you drink half of the water and you leave it in the hot car, that too can run the risk of bacteria growing. Your mouth has got lots of germs,” says Benjamin. “It may not be a big risk, but there’s certainly a risk there.” relaxation classes for adults 55 and older, 10:15 a.m., Thomas P. Saxton Medical Pavilion, 468 Northampton St., Edwardsville. Call 552-4550. SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASE CLINIC: for Wilkes-Barre residents only, 1-4 p.m., Kirby Health Center, 71 N. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. Call 208-4268. TRAUMA SUPPORT: day program for female trauma victims, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Nanticoke. Call Linda O’Boyle at 735-7590. WEIGHT LOSS SUPPORT: Take Off Pounds Sensibly, weigh-in 5:30-6:15 p.m., meeting to follow, Exaltation of the Holy Cross Church, Hanover Township. Contact Tess at 825-6312.

WEDNESDAY

LUZERNE COUNTY: The Wyoming Valley Chapter of the American Red Cross hosts community blood drives throughout the month. Donors who are 17 years of age or older, weigh at least 1 10 pounds and are in relatively good health or 16 years old and have a parental permission form completed, may give blood every 56 days. To learn more about how to donate blood or platelets or to schedule a blood donation, call 1-800-REDCROSS (7332767). In addition to those listed below, blood drives are conducted at the American Red Cross Regional Blood Center, 29 New Commerce Blvd., Hanover Industrial Estates, Ashley, Mondays and Tuesdays from 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.; and Sundays 7:30 a.m. to noon. Appointments are suggested but walk-ins are accepted. Platelet appointments can be made by calling 823-7164, ext. 2235. Blood drives also take place from 9 a.m. to noon on the first and third Monday of each month at the Hazleton Chapter of the American Red Cross,165 Susquehanna Blvd., Hazleton. For a complete donation sched-

ABUSE SUPPORT: a community support group for victims and survivors of domestic violence in the Wilkes-Barre area. 6:30 pm Childcare is provided. Call 1-800-

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Andrew takes two to three pills in the morning and two to three pills in the evening, a sign that treatments and medicines are advancing. But as new advances in medicine arrive, the price of that medication rises. A joint study by top research teams at Johns Hopkins, Cornell, Boston and Harvard universities concluded that the lifetime cost of fighting HIV can reach nearly $618,900, with prescriptions composing 70 percent of those costs. State and federal funds allow Buleza to be able to afford his medication. Atripla®, a medication he currently takes, claims to be as powerful as three HIV pills in one dose, according to the manufacture’s website. The medication leaves Buleza dizzy and exhausted for about 6-8 hours, a side effect that he has learned to cope with by taking it right before bed. The results speak for themselves. Once having weighed a mere 97 pounds, Buleza is now a healthy 150 pounds due in large part to proper medication. When diagnosed in 1982, Bule-

OBESITY Continued from Page 1C

is considered overweight, and 30 and above is considered obese. For overweight women the risk of death from cardiovascular disease was two times higher, and for obese women it was three times higher compared with normalweight women. Having a higher BMI was associated with a greater risk of death from cardiovascular disease, but not from cancer — having a BMI of 35 or higher was connected with a higher risk of death from other causes. Excluding women who had a waist size of less than 26

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ation on you, but I can give the confidence to ask questions and prepare yourself mentally. “Plus, I’ve got better visuals than your local doctor.” Dr. Oz wants to convey how important it is to pay attention to health.

• Abstain from sexual activity or be in a long-term mutually monogamous relationship with an uninfected partner. • Limit your number of sex partners. • Correct and consistent condom use. Latex condoms are highly effective at preventing the transmission of HIV and some other sexually transmitted diseases. “Natural” or lambskin condoms do not provide sufficient protection against HIV infection. • Get tested and treated for STDs and insist that your partners do, too. • Male circumcision has also been shown to reduce the risk of HIV transmission during vaginal sex. • Do not inject drugs. If you cannot stop injecting drugs, use clean needles and works when injecting and get counseling. • Obtain medical treatment immediately if you think you were exposed to HIV. Sometimes, HIV medications can prevent infection if they are started quickly. This is called post-exposure prophylaxis. • Participate in risk reduction programs. The local health department can provide referrals. Source: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

za said “one milliliter of my blood, the size of a pin head, contained 445,000 copies of AIDS. Now I have none. People aren’t dying like they used to.” Know your status Individuals who are unaware they have HIV/AIDS are at the greatest risk because the therapies and medications that can

In 13 years of follow-up, researchers found that for women who had a BMI of 20 or higher, every five-unit rise in BMI was linked with an 18 percent increase in the risk of death during the study period.

lead to better health and an extended life are not accessed. Knowledge may also prevent the disease from being transmitted sexually to another partner, causing statistics to rise. At the end of 2006, an estimated 1,106,400 people in the United States were living with the HIV infection, with 21 percent undiagnosed – a number that rose from an estimated 800,000 in 1998, ac-

inches, every five-unit gain in waist circumference was associated with a 12 percent increase in the risk of death during the study period. For women who were not obese, having a larger waist was still linked with a higher risk of dying. While BMI is generally used by health professionals to chart weight, waist circumference is another tool often employed to determine if some-

one is overweight or obese. Visceral or abdominal fat is thought to carry more health hazards, since in some studies it has been linked to a greater risk of Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. “The present findings indicate that the risk of death in black women increases with increasing BMI of 25 or higher, similar to the pattern in white populations,” said lead author Deborah Boggs in a news release. “Our findings highlight the importance for women to maintain a healthy weight and keep extra inches off the waist in order to decrease their risk of death.” The study was released Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine.

After putting off getting a colonoscopy, when he finally did have the test, the doctors found a pre-cancerous polyp. “I now spend a lot of time trying to figure out why I was so stupid and didn’t do what I tell everyone else to do,” Dr. Oz said. “What I realized is that people don’t do something because of what they know but how they feel. I felt good so I kept putting the tests

off.” He’s been treated and, except for some weight loss, is doing fine. The lesson he learned from his own medical experience: No matter how much information he gives out, it means nothing unless the practices are put to use. That’s why this season he will push even harder to make his medical points connect to the audience.

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years old should be tested at least once in their life. Those who are at greater risk or have parents with the virus should be tested once a year. Testing facilities keep patients anonymous and results can be obtained within one to two weeks. The most common HIV tests use blood or saliva to test for antibodies that are produced by the immune system once HIV enters

the body. The tests are pain free, and there are rapid HIV tests that can generate results in mere minutes. All positive tests are followed up by a mandatory second test for confirmation. The next steps are finding treatment and support. The Wyoming Valley Aids Council (WVAC) offers a buddy system that places newly diagnosed individuals with those in the community who have been longtime survivors of HIV/AIDS. The volunteers help individuals deal with the lifelong commitment. The program helps establish healthy relationships and can also be a lifeline for those shunned by their families and friends. “People with HIV want to be around other people with HIV,” said a spokesperson for WVAC case management who asked to remain anonymous. “There are many myths out there and we hook people up with long-term survivors to help dispel those myths.” One of the easiest ways to quell myths is to become knowledgeable about HIV/AIDS. Understanding how the virus is contracted, how to prevent it and what to do if you think you have been exposed are key. Knowledge is power. It can save your life.

PEDIATRIC HEALTH CLINIC for infants through age 1 1, former Seton Catholic High School, 37 William St., Pittston. Registrations accepted from 4:305:30 p.m. the first and third Thursday of each month. Parents are required to bring their children’s immunization records. For more information, call 8556035.

VOLUNTEERS IN MEDICINE: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday, 190 N. Pennsylvania Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Primary and preventive health care for the working uninsured and underinsured in Luzerne County with incomes less than two times below federal poverty guidelines. For appointments, call 970-2864.

WHERE TO GET TESTED

HOW TO PREVENT HIV/AIDS

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For More Information: www.protecspine.com

250 Pierce St., Suite 108, Kingston • (570) 287-5560 Michele Holincheck CRNP • Charles A. Stevens MSPT

• The Wyoming Valley Aids Council, 183 Market St., Kingston, 570718-1816 • Planned Parenthood: Wilkes-Barre Medical Center, 63 N. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre, 570-824-8921 • Wilkes-Barre City Health Department, 71 N. Franklin St., WilkesBarre, 570-208-4268

RESOURCES AND EVENTS The following organizations can provide facts on HIV/AIDS as well as programs offering support. • WECARE HIV/AIDS Support Network, Inc., visit www.wecarewb.org or email wecarewb@aol.com • Wyoming Valley Aids Council, www.wvacinc.org • United Way Northeastern Regional HIV Planning Coalition, www.unitedwaywb.org/hiv • The Wright Center Medical Group, P.C., 640 Madison Ave., Scranton, www.thewrightcenter.org Help raise awareness and funding • AIDS Walk, Sunday, The University of Scranton. Registration is $10 and begins at 10 a.m. All proceeds benefit the Scranton Temple Health Center HIV/AIDS clinic. Register by calling 570-941-4253 or visit www.scranton.edu/chew

cording to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Although the numbers infected are growing, in the last 10 years, there are more ways than ever to combat the disease. Testing and prevention are just two methods used to slow the spread of HIV in the United States. The main key is to be tested. According to the CDC, every person between the ages of 13 and 64

FREE MEDICAL CLINICS BACK MOUNTAIN FREE MEDICAL CLINIC: 6:30 p.m. Fridays, 65 Davis St., Shavertown. Volunteers, services and supplies needed. For more information, call 696-1 144. BMW FREE COMMUNITY HEALTH CLINIC: 6-8 p.m., second Thursday, New Covenant Christian Fellowship Church, rear entrance, 780 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre. Free basic care for people without health insurance and the underserved. Call 8229605. CARE AND CONCERN FREE HEALTH CLINIC: Registration 5-6:30 p.m. Wednesdays, former Seton Catholic High School, 37 William St., Pittston. Basic health care and information provided. Call 954-0645.

THE HOPE CENTER: Free basic medical care and preventative health care information for the uninsured or underinsured, legal advice and pastoral counseling, 6 p.m.-8 p.m. Mondays; free Chiropractic evaluations and vision care, including free replacement glasses, for the uninsured or underinsured, 6-8 p.m. Thursdays; Back Mountain Harvest Assembly, 340 Carverton Road, Trucksville. Free dental hygiene services and teeth cleanings are available 6-8 p.m. on Mondays by appointment. Call 696-5233 or email thehopecenterwv@gmail.com.

WILKES-BARRE FREE CLINIC: 4:30-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays and 5:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m. on the first Wednesday, St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 35 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. Appointments are necessary. Call 793-4361. A dental clinic is also available from 1 to 3 p.m. Tuesday by appointment. Call 570-2355542. Physicians, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, RNs, LPNs and social workers are needed as well as receptionists and interpreters. To volunteer assistance leave a message for Pat at 793-4361.


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424-5600. Services are free and confidential. ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP: 7 p.m., Wesley Village, 209 Roberts Road, Jenkins Township. Call 655-2891, ext. 402. AQUATIC EXERCISE AND AEROBICS: 3:30-4:30 p.m. and 5:306:30 p.m., John Heinz Institute, 150 Mundy St., Wilkes-Barre Township. Call 826-3738. ARTHRITIS AQUATIC PROGRAM: 2:30-3:15 p.m., Greater Pittston YMCA, 10 N. Main St., Pittston. Call 655-2255. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT: “In Loving Memory” support group for parents who have lost a child, 7 p.m., at the home of Norm and Peg Ball, Tunkhannock. For information or address, call 836-3324. CO-DEPENDENTS ANONYMOUS: 6:30-7:30 p.m., Edwardsville Apartment Complex community room, 9 Beverly Drive, Edwardsville. Call Nancy, 331-0235. DIABETIC EDUCATION PROGRAM: sponsored by Allied Services Home Health, 10 a.m.noon, John Heinz Institute Patient Dining Room, 150 Mundy St., Wilkes-Barre Township. Call 830-2070. EXERCISE CLASS: 10:15-1 1:30 a.m., standing strong chair class, Candy’s Place, 190 Welles St., Forty Fort. Free to cancer patients (doctor’s note required for all patients); $5 per class or $30 per month for all others. Call 714-8800. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS: 7:30 p.m., 333 Broad St., Hazleton. Call Help Line, 829-1341. HIV TESTING: free, walk-in service

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IMMUNIZATION CLINIC: 1-4 p.m., Kirby Health Center, 71 N. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. Free for children ages 6 weeks to 18 years. Must have a current immunization record and call 2084268 for an appointment. MEDITATION AND DEEP RELAXATION CLASSES: for all physical levels. Learn ancient breathing techniques to enhance all vital systems in the body and experience a sense of peace and deep relaxation; 5:30-6:30 p.m., Candy’s Place, 190 Welles St., Forty Fort. Cost is $5 per class or $30 per month. The first class is free. Call 714-8800. NAR-ANON: support group for families affected by the disease of drug addiction; 7 p.m., United Methodist Church, 175 S. Main Road, Mountain Top. Call 2623793. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS: 7 p.m., basement of St. Stanislaus Church, West Church and Maple streets, Nanticoke; 8 p.m., Nesbitt Medical Arts Building auditorium, 534 Wyoming Ave., Kingston. Call (866) 935-4762. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS: beginners’ meeting, 7:30 p.m., Dorranceton United Methodist Church, 549 Wyoming Ave., Kingston. Call Diane, 822-6239 or visit www.oa.org. SENIORS EXERCISE: group strength/stretch exercise and relaxation classes for adults 55 and older, 10:15 a.m., Thomas P. Saxton Medical Pavilion, 468 Northampton St., Edwardsville. Call 552-4550.

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SUNRISE STRETCH: sponsored by Area Agency on Aging for Luzerne and Wyoming Counties, 7:30 a.m., Swallow Street, Pittston. Call 822-1 158.

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message at 340-4842. CHEMOTHERAPY SIDE EFFECTS: 6-7:30 p.m., Candy’s Place, 190 Welles St., Forty Fort. Call 714-8800 for reservations.

WEIGHT LOSS SUPPORT: Take Off Pounds Sensibly, weigh-in 5:30-5:55 p.m., briefing 6-6:30 p.m., Lehman United Methodist Church, call 675-1682 between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m.; 6-6:45 p.m. weigh-in and 7 p.m. meeting, West Pittston Borough Building; weigh-in 5:30-6 p.m., 6 p.m. meeting, Trinity Presbyterian Church, 105 Irem Road, Dallas, call 639-5464.

GENTLE YOGA CLASS FOR CANCER PATIENTS & OTHERS: 5:30-6:45 p.m., Candy’s Place, 190 Welles St., Forty Fort. Free to cancer patients (doctor’s note required for all patients); $5 per class or $30 per month for all others. Call 714-8800. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: 7-8:30 p.m., First Baptist Church, 52 E. Eighth St., Wyoming. Facilitated by the Rev. Jeffrey Klansek, non-denominational and elements of spirituality are discussed. Call Klansek at 552-1391 or 552-4181.

THURSDAY ADDICTION HELP: Recovery Through Jesus, 1 1 a.m., Christ Community Church, 100 W. Dorrance St., Kingston. Call 283-2202.

HIV CLINIC: for Wilkes-Barre residents only, 2-4 p.m., Kirby Health Center, 71 N. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. Call 208-4268 for information.

AL-ANON: 10 a.m., Nebo Baptist Church, 75 S. Prospect St., Nanticoke; 7 p.m., Brick United Methodist Church, 935 Foote Ave., Duryea; 7:30 p.m., Misericordia University, Mercy Center, 301 Lake St., Dallas Township (first building on right). Call 603-0541 or (866) 231-2650.

IMMUNIZATION CLINIC: 9-1 1 a.m.,

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Kirby Health Center, 71 N. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. Free for children ages 6 weeks to 18 years. Must have a current immunization record and call 2084268 for an appointment.

for people with anxiety, panic attacks and depression, 7-9 p.m., Dorranceton United Methodist Church, 549 Wyoming Ave., Kingston. Call Peggy at 2880266.

LUPUS SUPPORT GROUP: including an Autoimmune Disease Support Group with the objective of Overcoming Obstacles Creatively with Art, 1 1 a.m., Lupus Foundation of PA, 615 Jefferson Ave., Scranton. Call (888) 995-8787 or visit www.lupuspa.org.

RECOVERY THROUGH JESUS: a bible-based addiction recovery group, 1 1 a.m., Christ Community Church, 100 W. Dorrance St., Kingston. Call 283-2202 or visit www.ccchurchtoday.org.

NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS: noon-1 p.m., St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 35 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre; 8-9:30 p.m., Central United Methodist, South Franklin and Academy streets, Wilkes-Barre. Call (866) 9354762.

The health calendar is limited to nonprofit entities and support groups. To have your health-oriented event listed here, send information to Health, Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 1871 1-0250; by fax: 829-5537; or e-mail health@timesleader.com. New and updated information must be received at least two weeks in advance. To see the complete calendar, visit www.timesleader.com and click Health under the Features tab.

OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS: 7-8 p.m., Clearbrook, 1003 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort. Call Lori at 814-3051 or visit www.oa.org. RECOVERY INC.: support group

ALATEEN: 7:30 p.m., Misericordia University, Mercy Center, 301 Lake St., Dallas Township. Call 603-0541. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT: 67:30 p.m., Geisinger Wyoming Valley Spiritual Center, East Entrance, 1000 East Mountain Blvd., Plains Township. Call 808-5539 or go to Geisinger.org/ events to register.

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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 PAGE 5C

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

General seeks volunteers Logan M. Schneikart

Austin S. Ryman

Logan Michael Schneikart, son of Melissa and Paul Schneikart, Wilkes-Barre, is celebrating his seventh birthday today, Sept. 13. Logan is a grandson of Maureen and Michael Garbush and Lucille and Fred Schneikart, all of Wilkes-Barre. He is a greatgrandson of Florence Garbush, Wilkes-Barre. Logan has two brothers, Tyler, 1 1, and Michael, 2.

Austin Scott Ryman, son of Scott and Joy Ryman, Mountain Top, is celebrating his 12th birthday today, Sept. 13. Austin is a grandson of the Rev. and Mrs. Lawrence Reed, Harveys Lake, and Martin and Brenda Ryman, Wapwallopen. He has a sister, Brooke, 1.

PETS OF THE WEEK

Wilkes-Barre General Hospital’s Volunteer Department seeks friendly and courteous adults, seniors and church and school service groups to work flexible hours doing such activities as assisting visitors in the surgical waiting room, greeting visitors at the information desk, answering phones, making deliveries, and taking the Volunteer Hospitality Cart to patients’ rooms. For more information or to sign up, contact Daria Kochanievich, volunteer coordinator at 570-552-1 199. Wilkes-Barre General Hospital volunteers, from left, are Richard Coombs, Mountain Top, and Joan Williams, Kingston.

Residents of B’nai B’rith Apartments attend session on arthritis Residents of the Martin D. Popky B’nai B’rith Apartments enjoyed an educational program hosted by the staff of St. Luke’s Villa of the Diocese of Scranton, formerly Heritage House. The physical therapy department from Genesis Rehab at St. Luke’s Villa provided tips for coping with arthritis. Participants, first row, are Kristen Makowski, service coordinator for B’nai B’rith; Shirley Burmeister; Zita Cavanaugh; Collette Wanyo; Marian Cromack; and Fran Slusarz. Second row: Melissa Bednar, case manager for Little Flower Manor, St. Therese Residence and St. Luke’s Villa; Sherre Sabecky admissions/marketing coordinator for St. Luke’s Villa; Jeanne Fox; Catherine O’Brien; Michael Dudascik; Dorothy Hodakowski; Rose Young; Anne Tucker; and Regina Dimirco.

Meadows Center residents enjoy Hawaiian luau

Name: Boo Sex: male Age: 4 months old About this cat: neutered

Name: Allie Sex: female Age: 4 months old About this cat: spayed

How to adopt: Call or visit the Hazleton Animal Shelter, 101 North Poplar St. (corner of Hemlock) in Hazleton. Phone 4540640. Hours for adoptions are Monday through Saturday from 1 to 4 p.m.; Sunday 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Business hours are Monday through Saturday 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wish List: donations of cat food, cleaning supplies, paper products, and blankets are in need.

The Auxiliary of the Meadows Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, Dallas, sponsored a Hawaiian luau for its residents. The center’s pavilion was decorated in an island theme and hula music was provided by George Rittenhouse. Teen volunteers helped escort residents and served snacks and tropical refreshments. At the festivities are residents, staff, family, teen and auxiliary volunteers, seated: Sara Kopczynski, Emily Harchar, Antoinette Bauman, Esther Price, Mary Roushey and Matthew Roncevich. Standing: Mary and Bob Law, Betty Sorchik, Leicha Cilvik, Cynthia Sickler, Peter Klein, Nancy Space, Millie Yanchik, Rittenhouse, Margaret Smith, Madison Nardone, Heidi Marr, Susan Charnetski, Mary Wilkes, Jane Holbrook, Mike Terninko, Nick James and Marilyn Gregorski.

NEWS FOR SENIORS

Allied Services honors finance employees Allied Services Corporate Division employees gathered to celebrate three employees with a combined 60 years of service in the Patient Finance Department. Honorees, from left, are Judy Korgeski, director, Patient Finance; Kathy Coolican, supervisor, patient finance, 25 years; Tracy Tuey, patient finance representative, 20 years; Marilyn Ardo, patient finance representative, 15 years; and Vince Splendido, AVP, patient finance/materials management.

served to commemorate “Hispanic Heritage Day.” A mini lecture on nutrition will be presented by Laura Sickler, a Editor’s note: Due to recent flood- dietary intern from Marywood ing, please contact your senior University. The shuffleboard center or group to ensure these team will have a playoff from activities have not been canceled 12:30 to 2 p.m. and facilities are still operational. Photographs of local history EXETER: The Cosmopolitan will be available for viewing 9 Seniors, a Project HEAD club, a.m.-2 p.m. Friday and 10 a.m.-2 will travel to Mount Airy Casino p.m. Saturday. Two center hison Wednesday. For more intorians will be available to disformation, contact Joanne at cuss local history and area his655-2720. tory buffs are encouraged to Recent 50/50 winners are Lou Bryja, Edith Jones, Johanna participate. There will also be an indoor flea market. For more Malinowski, Frank Onda and information, call 388-2623. Frances Poluske. Theresa Blasavage won the special game, JENKINS TWP.: The Jenkins and the bingo jackpot winner Township Senior Citizens will was Edith Jones. meet at 6 p.m. today at the Jenkins Township Hose CompaFALLS: The Falls Senior ny. President Jean Mudlock will Center, Route 92, will provide preside. The annual corn roast free blood pressure screenings will be held. at 11:15 a.m. Thursday by a Hosts are Carol Matusavage nurse from Golden Living Center. A special lunch will be and Bernice Podrasky. Bingo

will follow. New members are invited. KINGSTON: Dr. Ken Maynor will discuss “Memory Loss.” At 11 a.m. today at the Kingston Senior Center, 680 Wyoming Ave. “Relaxation Therapy” techniques will be offered on Thursday. For more information, call 287-1102. NANTICOKE: The Rose Tucker Center at Special Care Hospital, 128 W. Washington St., will celebrate Hispanic Heritage Day on Thursday. Special Care Hospital Dietary Services will present “Use of Calcium for Healthy Bones.” Monday is Apple Day. For more information, call 735-1670. PITTSTON: The St. Joseph’s Senior Social Club will meet at 2 p.m. Thursday in St. Rocco’s school auditorium on Oak

Street. New members are welcome to join. Plans for the second annual Tasting Party will be discussed. Yearly dues will be collected. Hosts are Gertie Kichilinsky, Marion Licata, Evelyn Levendowski, and Oz Abraham Lispi. Games will follow the social. A trip to Hollywood Casino will take place on Oct. 27. Cost is $25 with a rebate of $25 for slot play and $5 toward a buffet. SHICKSHINNY: The Shickshinny Senior Center, 19 W. Vine St., will host Karen Loucks from Seniors Helping Seniors at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday for a discussion about scams. For more information, call 5424308. WILKES-BARRE TWP.: The Tequila Rose chapter of The Red Hat Society will meet at 1 p.m. today at American Legion Post 7815, 54 Chestnut St.

GUIDELINES

Children’s birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge Photographs and information must be received two full weeks before your child’s birthday. To ensure accurate publication, your information must be typed or computer-generated. Include your child’s

name, age and birthday, parents’, grandparents’ and great-grandparents’ names and their towns of residence, any siblings and their ages. Don’t forget to include a daytime contact phone number.

We cannot return photos submitted for publication in community news, including birthday photos, occasions photos and all publicity photos. Please do not submit precious or original professional photographs that

require return because such photos can become damaged, or occasionally lost, in the production process. Send to: Times Leader Birthdays, 15 North Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 187110250.

WIN A $50 GIFT CERTIFICATE If your child’s photo and birthday announcement is on this page, it will automatically be entered into the “Happy Birthday Shopping Spree” drawing for a $50 certificate. One winner will be announced on the first of the month on this page.

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Wipeout (N) (CC) ABC News Special Unheard interviews News (:35) (TVPG) Jacqueline Kennedy. (N) (CC) Nightline Married... Married... All in the All in the Newswatc Seinfeld Mad Abt. Mad Abt. With With Family Family h 16 (TVPG) You You NCIS “Pyramid” (CC) NCIS: Los Angeles NCIS: Los Angeles Access Letterman (TV14) “Imposters” (TV14) “Familia” (TV14) Hollyw’d It’s Worth What? America’s Got Talent Parenthood (N) (CC) News at 11 Jay Leno “BFFs” (N) (TVPG) (N) (CC) (TVPG) (TVPG) 90210 Adrianna seeks Ringer “Pilot” (N) Excused TMZ (N) Extra (N) Paid Prog. redemption. (CC) (TV14) (TVPG) (TVPG) (TVPG) Great Performances Singer Jack- Legends of Folk: The Village Nightly Charlie ie Evancho. (CC) (TVG) Scene (CC) (TVG) Business Rose (N) MLB Baseball Philadelphia Phillies at Houston Astros. From Minute Are You Are You Maid Park in Houston. (N) (Live) (CC) Smarter? Smarter? Glee “New York” (CC) Raising Raising News First News Love-Ray- Paid Prog. (TV14) Hope Hope Ten 10:30 mond Without a Trace (CC) Criminal Minds (CC) Criminal Minds (CC) Criminal Minds (CC) (TVPG) (TVPG) (TVPG) (TVPG) NCIS “Pyramid” (CC) NCIS: Los Angeles NCIS: Los Angeles News Letterman (TV14) “Imposters” (TV14) “Familia” (TV14) Are You Are You Don’t For- Don’t For- The 10 Love-Ray- Excused King of Smarter? Smarter? get get News mond (TVPG) Queens 90210 Adrianna seeks Ringer “Pilot” (N) PIX News at Ten Jodi Seinfeld Seinfeld redemption. (CC) (TV14) Applegate. (N) (TVPG) (TVPG) MLB Baseball Philadelphia Phillies at Houston Astros. From Minute Phillies Phl17 Maid Park in Houston. (N) (Live) Post News Rocky III (PG, ‘82) ››› Sylvester Stallone, Mr. T, Talia Rocky III (PG, ‘82) ››› Shire. (CC) Sylvester Stallone, Mr. T. (CC) Jack & Sarah (R, ‘95) ››› Richard E. Grant, Samantha The Ray Lucia Show (TVG) Mathis, Judi Dench. River Monsters: Un- Human Planet “Arc- Human Planet (CC) Human Planet “Archooked (TVPG) tic” (TVPG) (TVPG) tic” (TVPG) Extermi- Extermi- Extermi- Extermi- Extermi- Extermi- Extermi- Exterminator nator nator nator nator nator nator nator CNBC Titans “Quincy 60 Minutes on CNBC American Greed Mad Money Jones” Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 John King, USA (CC) (N) (CC) (5:53) (:23) Daily Colbert Kevin James: Sweat (8:58) (:29) Tosh.0 WorkaDaily Colbert Scrubs Scrubs Show Report Small Stuff Tosh.0 Tosh.0 (TV14) holics Show Report SportWinning World Team Tennis Finals: St. Louis Aces vs. Washington Kastles. SportsNite (N) (CC) Boys in ’net IMsNite (N) Golf From Charleston, S.C. (Taped) the Hall PACT Choices Let Us Daily Mass The Holy CTV Special Presen- The Annual Solemn EWTN Re- The Holy Threshold of Hope We Face Love Rosary tation Novena to St. Ann ligious Rosary (TVG) Cash Cab Cash Cab Dirty Jobs “Asphalt Auction Auction Auction Auction Dirty Mon- Dirty Mon- Auction Auction (CC) (CC) Paver” (TVPG) Kings Kings Kings (N) Kings (N) ey ey Kings Kings Shake It Good Luck Shake It Wizards- So RanTinker Bell and the Great Fairy A.N.T. So RanWizards- WizardsUp! (CC) Charlie Up! (CC) Place dom! Rescue (G, ‘10) ›› Voices of Mae Farm dom! Place Place (TVG) (TVG) (TVG) (TVG) (TVG) Whitman. (CC)

Kourtney Kourtney & Khloé & Khloé SportsCenter (N) ESPN (Live) (CC) NFL 32 (N) (Live)

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The 2011 Miss Universe Pageant Women vie Keeping Up With the Chelsea E! News for the crown. (CC) (TVPG) Kardashians Lately Rise Up (Season Pre- 2011 World Series of 2011 World Series of Baseball Tonight (N) SportsCenter (N) miere) (N) Poker Poker (Live) (CC) (Live) (CC) NFL Live (N) (CC) Hey Rookie, WelNFL’s Greatest Games (N) Super Rise Up (N) come/NFL Bowl America’s Funniest Bruce Almighty (PG-13, ‘03) ›› Jim Carrey, Evan Almighty (PG, ‘07) ›› Steve Carell, The 700 Club (N) (CC) Home Videos (CC) Morgan Freeman. Morgan Freeman, Lauren Graham. (TVG) Iron Chef America Cupcake Wars Cupcake Wars Chopped (TVG) Chopped Champions Chopped “Flower (TVG) (N) Power” Special Report With FOX Report With The O’Reilly Factor Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van The O’Reilly Factor Bret Baier (N) Shepard Smith (N) (CC) Susteren (CC) Little House on the Little House on the Little House on the Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier Prairie (CC) (TVG) Prairie (CC) (TVG) Prairie (CC) (TVPG) (TVPG) (TVPG) (TVPG) (TVPG) (TVPG) (TVPG) Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Top Shot “Turn the Top Shot “Turn the Stars Stars Stars Stars Stars Stars Stars Stars Corner” (N) (TVPG) Corner” (TVPG) Property Property Hunters House My First For Rent Property The Un- House Hunters House Hunters Virgins Virgins Int’l Hunters Place (N) (N) (TVG) Virgins sellables Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Unsolved Mysteries Unsolved Mysteries American Pickers American Pickers Picker Sisters (CC) Picker Sisters “It’s a (CC) (TVPG) (CC) (TVPG) “Mole Man” (TVPG) (CC) (TVPG) (TVPG) Sign” (CC) That ’70s That ’70s The Sub- The Sub- Teen Mom (CC) Teen Mom “Stay With Teen Mom Maci and Ryan fight Awkward. Show Show stitute stitute (TVPG) Me” (TVPG) over custody. (N) (TVPG) (N) iCarly Victorious Big Time Sponge- My Wife My Wife George George Friends Friends That ’70s That ’70s (TVG) Rush Bob and Kids and Kids Lopez Lopez (TVPG) (TVPG) Show Show Fame “Reflections” Fame “Signs” (TV14) Top Secret! (PG, ‘84) ›› Val Kilmer, Lucy Top Secret! (PG, ‘84) ›› Val Kilmer, Lucy (TVPG) Gutteridge, Christopher Villiers. Gutteridge, Christopher Villiers. NASCAR Race Hub Pass Time Pass Time Am. Am. Dumbest Dumbest Pass Time My Ride Am. Am. Trucker Trucker Rules Trucker Trucker Stuff Stuff (N) (N) Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Repo Repo Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Games Games Star Trek Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome (PG-13, ‘85) ››› Mel The Bourne Ultimatum (PG-13, ‘07) ››› Matt Damon, Alphas Gibson, Tina Turner, Angelo Rossitto. Julia Stiles, Joan Allen. King of King of Seinfeld Seinfeld The Office The Office The Office The Office The Office The Office Conan (N) (CC) Queens Queens (TVPG) (TVPG) (CC) (CC) (CC) (CC) (CC) (CC) Act One (‘63) ›› George Hamilton, Jason Young Man With a Horn (‘50) ››› Kirk Ace in the Hole (‘51) ›› Kirk Douglas, Jan Robards, Eli Wallach. Douglas, Lauren Bacall. (CC) Sterling, Porter Hall. (CC) LA Ink “Gone Too Big Sexy “Big Bad What Not to Wear What Not to Wear Big Sexy “Big Bikini What Not to Wear Far” (CC) (TVPG) Love” (CC) (TV14) “Heather” (TVPG) “Ebony” (N) (TVPG) Beach” (TV14) “Heather” (TVPG) Law & Order “GunLaw & Order “Venom” Rizzoli & Isles (CC) Law & Order (CC) Law & Order “BotCSI: NY “Pay Up” (CC) play” (TV14) (TV14) (TV14) (TV14) tomless” (TV14) (TV14) World of Johnny Scaredy Looney Looney World of King of King of American American Family Family Gumball Test Squirrel Tunes Tunes Gumball the Hill the Hill Dad Dad Guy (CC) Guy (CC) Bizarre Foods With Bizarre Foods With Caribbean Beach Killer Beach Houses Bizarre Foods With Bizarre Foods With Andrew Zimmern Andrew Zimmern Weekend (TVPG) (N) (TVPG) Andrew Zimmern Andrew Zimmern Sanford & Sanford & All in the All in the M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Love-Ray- Love-Ray- Love-Ray- (:42) Everybody Roseanne Son Son Family Family (TVPG) (TVPG) mond mond mond Loves Raymond Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Necessary Roughness Victims Unit Victims Unit Victims Unit Victims Unit Victims Unit (CC) (TVPG) (5:50) Undateable Basketball Wives LA La La’s The T.O. Celebrity Rehab With Celebrity Rehab With Basketball Wives LA “Hour 5” (TV14) (TV14) Life Show Dr. Drew Dr. Drew (TV14) Charmed “Hulkus Charmed “Vaya Con Downsized (CC) Downsized (N) (CC) Downsized (CC) Downsized (CC) Pocus” (TVPG) Leos” (TVPG) (TVPG) (TVPG) (TVPG) (TVPG) Dharma & Dharma & America’s Funniest Old Chris- Old Chris- How I Met How I Met WGN News at Nine Scrubs Scrubs Greg Greg Home Videos (CC) tine tine (N) (CC) (TVPG) (TVPG) Chef Lou I.N.N. Beaten Tarone Rehabili- Sweets Press Box Let’s Talk Local News (N) Classified Topic A News Path tation Show

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OPEN MIC

with Marty Reynolds and Chuck Artim All Musicians Invited NO COVER OAK ST • PITTSTON TWP. 654-1112

OUR LADY OF VICTORY,

at Harveys Lake, continues to host the annual devotions to Our Lady of Fatima.

This month’s service will be Tuesday, September 13 at 7:00 PM and will continue the 13th of each month at 7:00 PM through October 13, 2011. These beautiful and inspirational devotions consist of the Rosary, Hymns and Benediction. All the faithful are welcome. For further information call 639-1535. Handicap parking and access is available.

BEL L ES

C O N S TR U C TIO N C O .

EN ERG Y S AVIN G S W IN DO W S AL E FREE Trip le Pa ne Up gra d e o n a ll Plygem L ifestyle W ind o w s

APOLLO 18 (DIGITAL) (PG-13) 12:20PM, 2:55PM, 5:05PM, 7:45PM, 10:10PM BUCKY LARSON: BORN TO BE A STAR (DIGITAL) (R) 12:35PM, 3:00PM, 5:25PM, 7:50PM, 10:15PM COLOMBIANA (DIGITAL) (PG-13) 1:20PM, 4:35PM, 7:25PM, 10:05PM CONTAGION (DIGITAL) (PG-13) 12:50PM, 3:30PM, 6:10PM, 8:50PM COWBOYS & ALIENS (DIGITAL) (PG-13) 12:25PM, 6:45PM CRAZY, STUPID, LOVE (DIGITAL) (PG-13) 3:35PM, 9:30PM CREATURE (DIGITAL) (R) 12:45PM, 3:10PM, 5:35PM, 8:00PM, 10:25PM DEBT, THE (DIGITAL) (R) 12:30PM, 3:40PM, 6:55PM, 9:55PM FINAL DESTINATION 5 (3D) (R) 4:55PM, 10:15PM FRIGHT NIGHT (2011) (3D) (R) 1:30PM, 7:35PM HELP, THE (DIGITAL) (PG-13) 12:15PM, 3:45PM, 7:10PM, 10:30PM ONE DAY (Digital) (PG-13) 9:35PM OUR IDIOT BROTHER (DIGITAL) (R) 1:10PM, 3:25PM, 5:50PM*(EXCEPT SAT 9/10), 8:05PM*(EXCEPT SAT 9/10), 10:20PM RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES (DIGITAL) (PG-13) 12:05PM, 2:35PM, 5:15PM, 7:55PM, 10:35PM

SARAH’S KEY (Digital) (PG-13) 1:55PM, 4:45PM, 7:15PM, 9:45PM

SHARK NIGHT (3D) (PG-13)

12:40PM, 3:05PM, 4:05PM, 5:20PM, 7:40PM, 8:45PM, 10:00PM

SHARK NIGHT (DIGITAL) (PG-13) 1:50PM, 6:30PM

SMURFS, THE (3D) (PG) SPY KIDS: ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD (3D) (PG) 12:05PM, 2:25PM, 4:40PM, 7:05PM, 9:25PM

SPY KIDS: ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD (DIGITAL) (PG) 12:55PM, 3:15PM, 5:55PM, 8:20PM WARRIOR (DIGITAL) (PG-13)

C AL L

824- 7220 PA012959

All Showtimes Include Pre-Feature Content

(Parenthesis Denotes Bargain Matinees)

1:00PM, 2:30PM, 4:10PM, 5:45PM, 7:20PM, 8:55PM, 10:30PM

Avoid the lines: Advance tickets available from Fandango.com

*DOES NOT PLAY ON SATURDAY, 9/10. SNEAK PREVIEW OF “I DON’T KNOW HOW SHE DOES IT” WILL PLAY INSTEAD.

NO PASSES

You must be 17 with ID or accompanied by a parent to attend R rated features. Children under 6 may not attend R rated features after 6pm

***$2.50 Additional Charge for 3D Attractions.*** No passes, rain checks, discount tickets accepted to these features D-Box Motion Seats are the admission price plus an $8.00 surcharge

825.4444 • rctheatres.com

• 3 Hrs. Free Parking At Participating Park & Locks with Theatre Validation •Free Parking at Midtown Lot Leaving After 8pm and All Day Saturday & Sunday.

AR E YOU R K ITCH EN CAB IN ETS W OR N & D IR TY? IS YO U R W H O L E K ITCH EN S H O W IN G IT’S AG E? M AYBE IT ’ S T IM E FO R AN AFFO RDABL E K IT CHEN M AK EO V ER!

TaxCreditApproved M axim um Efficiency& Sound Control

S id ing Exp erts To o !

SPECIAL EVENTS Sneak Peak Saturday 9:10 Only *I Don’t Know How She Does It - PG13 - 100 Min 7:00

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6:00 6:30

News

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704376

Daily grid contains updated information

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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011

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PREMIUM CHANNELS Devil Hard Knocks: A Decade of NFL HBO (5:00) ›› Training Camps (CC) (TVPG) (CC) Gumbel

Minority Report (PG-13, ‘02) ››› Tom Cruise, Colin Unstoppable (PG-13, ‘10) ››› Farrell, Samantha Morton. A cop tries to establish his in- Denzel Washington, Chris Pine. nocence in a future crime. (CC) (CC)

Knight and Day (6:05) (PG-13, ‘10) ›› Tom

MAX Cruise. A woman becomes the reluctant partner of a fugitive spy. (CC)

(500) Days of Summer (5:45) MMAX (PG-13, ‘09) ››› Joseph Gordon-Levitt. (CC) The Hurt Locker (5:15) (R, ‘08)

SHO ››› Jeremy Renner, Anthony Mackie. iTV. (CC)

The Social Network STARZ (5:10) ››› (CC) Double Identity TMC (5:15) (R, ‘10) Val Kilmer. (CC)

Unstoppable

Boxing

Drumline (PG-13, ‘02) ››› Nick Cannon, She’s Out of My League (R, ‘10) (:45) Skin Zoe Saldana. Rivalry between two drummers ›› Jay Baruchel, Alice Eve, T.J. to the threatens a college band. (CC) Miller. (CC) Max

Phone Booth (R, ‘02) ›› Colin Due Date (R, ‘10) ›› Robert Farrell, Kiefer Sutherland, Forest Downey Jr., Zach Galifianakis. Whitaker. (CC) Premiere. (CC)

(:35) Hotel Erotica “Bedroom Fantasies 2” Activities at a romantic resort hotel. (TVMA)

Thirst (R, ‘08) Lacey Chabert. Two couples struggle to survive in the California desert.

The Big C Web Ther- Web Ther(CC) apy apy (TVMA) (TV14) (TV14)

Weeds (CC) (TVMA)

The Big C Weeds (CC) (CC) (TVMA) (TVMA)

Tangled (7:15) (PG, ‘10) ››› Voices of Easy A (PG-13, ‘10) ››› Emma John Q (10:35) (PG-13, ‘02) ›› Stone. (CC) Denzel Washington. (CC) Mandy Moore, Zachary Levi. (CC) Maximum Velocity (6:50) (PG-13, Across the Line: The Exodus of Remember Me (PG-13, ‘10) ›› Robert Pattin‘03) Dale Midkiff, Michael IronCharlie Wright (8:25) (R, ‘10) son. Love begins to heal the troubled spirit side, Wendy Carter. (CC) of a rebellious young man. Aidan Quinn. (CC)

TV TALK 6 a.m. 22 The Daily Buzz (TVG) 6 a.m. CNN American Morning (N) 6 a.m. FNC FOX and Friends (N) 7 a.m. 3, 22 The Early Show (N) 7 a.m. 56 Morning News with Webster and Nancy 7 a.m. 16 Good Morning America Laura Bush; Nancy Brinker; Tyra Banks; Bobby Bowden; the book Love Times Three. (N) 7 a.m. 28 Today Author Michael Moore; fashion finds; Lady Antebellum performs; actress Olivia Munn. (N) 7:30 a.m. 44.3 Vine Talk Violinist Philippe Quint; chef Tim Love; actor Ron Darling. (TVPG) 8 a.m. 56 Better Ambush makeover; recipes for back to school. (N) (TVPG) 9 a.m. 3, 22 Anderson Nicole Snooki Polizzi; Kathy Griffin; Daniel Radcliffe. (N) (TVG)

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9 a.m. 16 Live With Regis and Kelly Sarah Michelle Gellar; Diane Sawyer; Guinness Week. (N) (TVPG) 9 a.m. FNC America’s Newsroom (N) 10 a.m. 16 The Ellen DeGeneres Show David Arquette; the United States Air Force Band performs. (N) (TVG) 10 a.m. 53 The Steve Wilkos Show Teens take DNA tests to determine who fathered children. (TV14) 11 a.m. 56 Maury Men take lie-detector tests to prove their fidelity. (TV14) 11 a.m. 16 The View Dick and Lynne Cheney; Kristin Chenoweth performs. (N) (TV14) 11 a.m. 53 The Wendy Williams Show (N) (TVPG) 11 a.m. FNC Happening Now (N) noon 56 Jerry Springer A woman and her children live with her pimp, who says he is not her boyfriend.

(TV14) noon 28 The Nate Berkus Show Nate’s new New York City home, from demolition to design to final reveal. (N) (TVPG) 1 p.m. CNBC Power Lunch (N) 2 p.m. 3, 22 The Talk Stevie Nicks performs; guest co-host Molly Shannon. (N) (TV14) 2 p.m. 56 Dr. Phil The parents of Casey Anthony break their silence. (N) (TVPG) 2 p.m. 28 The 700 Club (TVPG) 3 p.m. 3 The Doctors (N) (TVPG) 3 p.m. 22 Swift Justice With Jackie Glass The plaintiff and her grandchildren’s mother quarrel over a car. (N) (TVG) 3 p.m. 56 Rachael Ray Products to help with potty training; macaroni and cheese. (N) (TVG) 3 p.m. 28 The Dr. Oz Show Warning signs of ovarian cancer; three tests for the disease. (N) (TVPG)

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CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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Boyfriend who won’t pay for seat upgrade on plane is lacking in class Dear Abby: Your response to “Not Ungrateful in San Diego” (July 13) missed the mark. Her boyfriend of eight months is flying in business class to France, but he’s only paying for a coach ticket for her? I was a divorce lawyer for 31 years (now retired), so I know a few things about relationships. While Claude had no obligation to pay her way to France, once he invited her, he displayed a troubling character flaw. If he was going to pay her way, he should have paid for her to sit with him in business class. Her seat in coach is a warning sign: She’ll always be in the back of the plane, the

DEAR ABBY ADVICE bus or his life. Of course buying business class seats for the two of them is expensive, but if he’s going to take her to his family’s chateau, he should treat her as an equal — or not do it at all. — Paul in Saratoga, Calif. Dear Paul: I appreciate your viewpoint, one which is shared by many other readers. The responses to that letter were an interesting mix. My newspaper readers comment: Dear Abby: “Not Ungrateful” is unbelievable! My long-legged husband

UNIVERSAL SUDOKU

cannot sit in coach unless he is in an exit row, and those seats aren’t always easy to get. Because I’m short, I don’t need the extra space and, if I am assigned an exit seat, I gladly give it up to a tall person. That woman will be in France with her boyfriend. I would go in the BAGGAGE compartment for such an opportunity. — Happy to Trade Places Dear Abby: A less-expensive option for long-legged fliers is to buy an extra coach seat. Claude could purchase three seats together. That way he could sit sideways and put items in the central seat. Neither my wife nor I have long legs, but we fly this way for comfort on long flights. — Stephen in Tucson, Ariz.

CRYPTOQUOTE

Dear Abby: When Claude offered to treat her to the trip, he put himself in the role of a “host.” A host does not treat himself to steak while offering hamburger to his guest. I am accompanying my husband on a business trip. His company will pay for him to fly business class and I will purchase a coach ticket for myself. My husband insists on flying coach with me, saying that a gentleman would never fly in a different class than his wife. — We’re in It Together

Dear Abby: By all means, “Not Ungrateful” should go to France as planned. Her seatmate in coach could be a delightful person — maybe even someone with whom she’d rather spend the rest of her life. — Bettie in Albuquerque

Dear Abby: My husband always sits in business class while I sit in coach when we travel long distances. He has a back problem and I don’t. Why spend a lot of money on something so fleeting? We have plenty of time

To receive a collection of Abby’s most memorable — and most frequently requested — poems and essays, send a business-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $3.95 ($4.50 in Canada) to: Dear Abby’s “Keepers,” P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included.)

together once we arrive at our destination. I have never thought of myself as subservient — just practical. — Enjoys Life in Coach

HOROSCOPE BY HOLIDAY MATHIS

GOREN BRIDGE WITH OMAR SHARIF & TANNAH HIRSCH PREVIOUS DAY’S SOLUTION

ARIES (March 21-April 19). Your plans are more ambitious than you first realized, though they are still very much within the realm of possibility. You will need a lot of help. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You will have limits placed on what you can and can’t do. The funny part is that you actually welcome the rules and impositions because you want to be challenged. How else are you going to become great? GEMINI (May 21-June 21). You’ll see 10 possible solutions to a problem, while the average person sees maybe one. So speak up. The world needs to hear your advice, even if they don’t take it. CANCER (June 22-July 22). When you look around your home, you see a lot of things you really need — and a lot of things you don’t. Instead of increasing the number of things you own, scale down the number of things you want. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). You won’t be worried about your image or what others are thinking about you. You’ll have an impact on someone’s life, and that makes you feel absolutely marvelous. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). It is said that misfortune brings a fool to his senses. But you don’t have to be a fool to receive the wakeup call. Minor accidents, for instance, a slight slip or spill, will remind you to slow down. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). There is such a thing as being too diplomatic. A line will be drawn today, and you’ll be moved to take a stand. You will have the opportunity to declare a loyalty.

CROSSWORD

ON THE WEB For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com

MINUTE MAZE JUMBLE BY MICHEAL ARGIRION & JEFF KNUREK

HOW TO CONTACT: Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069

SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Do something out of the ordinary. You’ll be in a social mood, though you might have to initiate the fun to make it happen. Call a friend to go bargain hunting or to take a bike ride on a scenic route. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). Because of your selflessness, you’ll make a favorable impression on someone interesting. This person will, at some later date, help you out. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Your excitement over a project will be contagious. Make sure that you also have a specific plan. Work it through on your own before you share it. Your instructions will be followed to the letter. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You will look back to when a problem first began. You might recognize that it started with circumstances very much like the ones you encounter today. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). You don’t want to be the “bad guy,” but someone might put you in that position anyway. It’s because you have such a soft way of delivering the hard facts. TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (Sept. 13). You’ll have more time with someone who makes your heart beat a little faster. Take in new scenery in October. Unexpected visitors bring excitement at the end of 2011. January ushers in a different routine and increased energy and vitality. Your success will be intertwined with the success of family. Cancer and Capricorn people adore you. Your lucky numbers are: 9, 14, 3, 20 and 16.


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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135

LEGAL NOTICE DEADLINES

100 ANNOUNCEMENTS 110

Legals/ Public Notices

Saturday 12:30 on Friday

Lost

ALL JUNK CARS WANTED!!

Sunday 4:00 pm on Friday Monday 4:30 pm on Friday

ŠCALL ANYTIME ŠFREE REMOVAL ŠCA$H PAID ON THE SPOT

Tuesday 4:00 pm on Monday Wednesday 4:00 pm on Tuesday

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Thursday 4:00 pm on Wednesday

ALL JUNK CAR & TRUCKS WANTED

Friday 4:00 pm on Thursday Holidays call for deadlines You may email your notices to

Highest Prices Paid!!!

mpeznowski@ timesleader.com

FREE REMOVAL Call Vito & Ginos Anytime 288-8995

or mail to The Times Leader 15 N. Main Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711

120

or fax to 570-831-7312

For additional information or questions regarding legal notices you may call Marti Peznowski at 570-970-7371 or 570-829-7130

Found

All Junk Cars & UP Trucks LINE A GREAT DEAL... Wanted IN CLASSIFIED! Highest Prices Paid In CA$H FREE

570-574-1275 FOUND, Bird, someone’s pet, North end Wilkes-Barre. Call to identify. (570) 899-8970 FOUND, GPS, on Saturday, in Pittston on Williams St. across from St. John’s Church. 570-472-8300

Legals/ Public Notices

LEGAL NOTICE The Wyoming Valley West School DIstrict Board of Directors Regular September Meeting for General Purposes is schedule for Wednesday, September 14, 2011. The work Session will be held at 7:00pm followed by the Board Meeting. The meeting will be held at the Middle School Auditorium, Chester Street, Kingston, and is open to the public. The Middle School is handicapped accessible from the side of the building.

A Special Meeting of the Dallas Township Board of Supervisors to discuss a Curative Amendment to the Township’s Zoning Ordinance and an agreement between the Township and Chief Gathering, LLC, will be held on Wednesday, September 14, 2011 at 7:30P.M. in the Township Meeting Room located at 2919 SR309 Highway, Dallas PA. Interested parties are urged to attend. MEETING NOTICE The Special Meeting for General Purposes of the Joint Operating Committee of the Wilkes-Barre Area Career & Technical Center scheduled for Monday, September 12, 2011 is cancelled and will be combined with the Regular Meeting on Monday, September 19th, 2011 at 6:30 p.m., at the school on Jumper Road in Plains Township. Gary Smith Chairperson

MEETING NOTICE REMINDER: Luzerne County Retirement Board will meet September 13, 2011 at 2 pm in the Commissioner’s Meeting Room, Luzerne County Courthouse.

LEGAL NOTICE On July 20-21, 2011, the Pennsylvania State Board of Nursing indefinitely suspended Megan Suzanne Chopack, license no. PN285687, because she has been charged with the acquisition or possession of a controlled substance by misrepresentation, fraud, forgery, deception, or subterfuge. Chopack last practiced in Luzerne County.

150 Special Notices

150 Special Notices

Joanne Wood Board Secretary

Legals/ Public Notices

PUBLIC NOTICE The Wilkes-Barre Paid Uniformed Police Pension Fund Board (OLD) will meet on Thursday, September 15, 2011 at 2:00 p.m., in City Council Chambers, Fourth Floor, City Hall, 40 East Market Street, WilkesBarre, PA for the transaction of general business. If special accommodations are required for persons with disabilities, notify Jack McCutcheon at 570-208-4112 or jmccutcheon@wilkes -barre.pa.us, in advance.

To place your ad Call Toll Free 1-800-427-8649 PUBLIC NOTICE

The Board of Trustees of the Bear Creek Community Charter School will hold a special meeting on Thursday, September 15, 2011 beginning at 6:00 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Bear Creek Community Charter School located at 2000 Bear Creek Boulevard, Bear Creek Township, Pennsylvania. Meetings are open to the public. Individuals requiring assistance are asked to contact the school office in advance of the meeting. For more information visit www.bearcreeksch ool.com or contact the school office at (570) 820-4070. Jim Smith, Board Secretary

MEETING NOTICE

PICKUP

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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 PAGE 1D

135

Legals/ Public Notices

LEGAL NOTICE On June 13, 2011, the PA State Board of Nursing indefinitely suspended, retroactive to February 8, 2011, license of Shannon Regan Caraballo, license no. PN257825L, of Edwardsville, Luzerne County, based on findings that she is addicted to alcohol or is addicted to hallucinogenic or narcotic drugs or other drugs which tend to impair judgement or coordination, so long as such dependence shall continue, or she has become mentally incompetent.

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406

150 Special Notices

ATVs/Dune Buggies

HAWK 2011 UTILITY ATV

NEW!! Full size adult ATV. Strong 4 stroke motor. CVT fully automatic transmission with reverse. Electric start. Front & rear luggage racks. Long travel suspension. Disc brakes. Dual stage head lights. Perfect for hunters & trail riders alike. BRAND NEW & READY TO RIDE. $1,695 takes it away. 386-334-7448 Wilkes-Barre

Dear heart of Jesus in the past I have asked for many favors, this time I ask you this special one “Mention the Favor”. Take it dear heart of Jesus and place it within your heart where your father sees it. Then in his merciful eyes it will become YOUR favor not mine. Amen. 3 times for 3 days then publish & your favor will be granted. Grateful thanks for granting miracles. N. T.

HONDA`09 RECON TRX 250CC/Electric shift. Like New. REDUCED $3,650. (570) 814-2554

TOMAHAWK`10

409

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CADILLAC `94 DEVILLE SEDAN

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ACURA `06 TL

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for heavy equipment, backhoes, dump trucks, bull dozers HAPPY TRAILS TRUCK SALES 570-760-2035 542-2277 6am to 8pm

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AUDI `96 QUATTRO

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BMW `01 X5

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Full size 4 wheel drive trucks

AUDI `05 A4 1.8T Cabriolet Convert-

BMW `00 323I Black w/ tan leather

CADILLAC ‘03 DeVille. Excellent

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GMC4WD, ‘96 JIMMY SLE Hunter Green, 4 door, CD, 168,000 miles. $2,100 obo. (570) 262-7550

HONDA `02 ACCORD SE Sedan, good tires, new brake lining, 154,000 highway miles. belts changed, power windows, moonroof, good A/C, good basic transportation. $3500 (570) 675-0324

4.4i. Silver, fully loaded, tan leather interior. 1 owner. 103k miles. $8,999 or best offer. Call 570-814-3666

BMW `07 328xi

Black with black interior. Heated seats. Back up & navigation systems. New tires & brakes. Sunroof. Garage kept. Many extras! 46,000 Miles. Asking $20,500. 570-825-8888 or 626-297-0155 Call Anytime!

BMW `93 325 IC Convertible,

New tires and brakes. Needs work. $1,000. Call 570-674-2630

Metallic Green Exterior & Tan Interior, 5 Speed Transmission, Heated Seats. 2nd Owner, 66k Miles. Excellent Condition, Garage Kept, Excellent Gas Mileage. Carfax available. Price reduced $7,995 or trade for SUV or other. Beautiful / Fun Car. 570-388-6669

150 Special Notices

150 Special Notices

Child Care

Line up a place to live in classified!

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150 Special Notices

ACURA `02 RSX

142,000 miles, 5 speed, $5,600 570-239-9316

A6 station wagon. 143k miles. 3rd row seating. $2,800 or best offer. Call 570-861-0202

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am/fm cd cassette, Excellent work car high miles but runs very well. $1,900 (570) 855-3040

3.0 V6. Silver. New tires & brakes. 130k highway miles. Leather interior. Heated Seats. $7,500 or best offer. 570-905-5544

150 Special Notices

330

ual, front wheel drive, 4 door, antilock brakes, air conditioning, air bags, power locks, power windows, power mirrors, AM/FM radio, CD player, leather interior, sun roof, rear windshield wiper, tinted windows, $3,500 570-654-8469

TOYOTA `00 ECHO 2 door, 5 speed,

LEGAL NOTICE The work session of the Wyoming Area Board of Education scheduled for Thursday, September 15, 2011 has been postponed. There will be a combined work session/regular meeting on Tuesday, September 20, 2011, at 7:00 p.m. in the auditorium of the Secondary Center, 20 Memorial Street, Exeter.

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PUBLIC NOTICE The Rice Township Zoning Board meeting originally scheduled for Wednesday, September 14, 2011 at 7:00 p.m., concerning Polonia Estates Phase 3 for the dimensional front yard variances of 13 homes, is cancelled until further notice. The Rice Township Board of Supervisors will hold its monthly municipal meeting on Tuesday, September 13, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. The October monthly municipal meeting will be held on Tuesday, October 4, 2011 at 7:00 p.m., moved from October 11, 2011. The remaining municipal meeting dates are November 8, 2011 and December 13, 2011 at 7:00 pm. The meetings will be held at the Rice Township Municipal Building, 3000 Church Road, Mountaintop, PA 18707. Donald A. Armstrong Secretary/Treasurer

409

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www.acmecarsales.net

11 AUDI S5 QUATTRO CONVERTIBLE Sprint blue/black & tan leather, 7 speed, auto turbo, 330 HP, Navigation, (AWD) 08 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX SE

blue, auto V6 08 FORD FUSION SE grey, auto, V6 07 CHRYSLER 300 LTD AWD silver, grey leather 06 PONTIAC G6 Silver, 4 door auto 06 DODGE STRATUS SXT RED. 05 TOYOTA CAMRY XLE silver, grey leather, sunroof 05 VW NEW JETTA gray, auto, 4 cyl 05 CHEVY MALIBU Maxx White, grey leather, sunroof 04 NISSAN ALTIMA SL 3.5 white, black leather, sun roof 03 AUDI S8 QUATTRO Mid blue/light grey leather, Navigation, (AWD) 02 BUICK PARK AVE Silver, V6 01 SATURN LS 300 Blue 01 VOLVO V70 STATION WAGON, blue/grey, leather, AWD 99 CHRYSLER CONCORDE gold 98 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS black 98 SUBARU LEGACY SW white, auto, 4 cyl. (AWD) 98 HONDA CIVIC EX, 2 dr, auto, silver

SUVS, VANS, TRUCKS, 4 X4’s

08 CADILLAC ESCALADE Blk/Blk leather, 3rd seat, Navgtn, 4x4 07 FORD ESCAPE XLT green/tan lint 4x4 07 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT Blue grey leather, 7 passenger mini van 06 HYUNDAI SANTA FE GLS, green, auto, V6, awd 06 BUICK RENDVEOUS Ultra blue, tan leather, 3rd seat AWD 06 PONTIAC TORRANT Black (AWD) 06 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN ES, red, 4dr, entrtnmt cntr, 7 pass mini van 05 FORD F150 XLT SUPER CREW TRUCK Blue & tan, 4 dr. 4x4 05 CHEVY EQUINOX LS Black, AWD 05 GMC ENVOY SLE, Silver, 3rd seat, 4x4 05 FORD ESCAPE XLT Silver 4 x4 05 BUICK RANIER CXL gold, tan, leather, sunroof (AWD) 05 GMC SIERRA X-Cab, blk, auto, 4x4 truck 04 FORD EXPLORER LTD pearl white, black leather, 3rd seat 4x4 04 FORD EXOEDITION XLT, blue/grey leather, 3rd seat, entertainment center, 4x4 4 04 GMC TAHOE LT gray letaher, 3rd seat, 4x4 04 MITSUBISHI ENDEAVOR XLS red, auto, V6, 4x4 3rd seat, 4x4 LT hemi, blue/ grey, 3rd seat, 4x4 04 CHEVY SUBURBAN LS, pewter silver, 3rd seat, 4x4 04 NISSAN XTERRA SE blue, auto, 4x4 03 FORD WINDSTAR LX green 4 door, 7 passenger mini van 03 CHEVY 1500, V8, X-cab, white, 4x4 7 pass. mini van 02 CHEVY 2500 HD Reg. Cab. pickup truck, green, auto, 4x4 01 FORD F150 XLT Super Cab 4x4 truck, white & tan 00 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO XCAB

2wd truck, burgundy & tan 00 GRAND CARAVAN SPORT, dark blue, 4 door, 7 pass mini van 99 FORD F150 XLT grey, reg cab, 73,000 miles, 4x4 truck 99 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD gold/tan leather, sun roof, 4x4 99 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO, grey, auto, 4x4 98 EXPLORER XLT Blue grey leather, sunroof, 4x4

LOWEST PRICES GUARANTEED

570-378-2566

WE DO PARTIES • Office • Business • Birthday • School • Fundraisers • Celebrations

Delivered to you or At The Shack

The Snack Shack 750 Wilkes-Barre Twp Blvd Wilkes-Barre (570)-270-2929

To Advertise Call Tara 570-970-7374

BMW `99 M3

Convertible with Hard Top. AM/FM. 6 disc CD. 117 K miles. Stage 2 Dinan suspension. Cross drilled rotors. Cold air intake. All maintenance records available. $14,695. 570-466-2630

BUICK `03 LESABRE

35k miles, V-6. Power steering, brakes & windows. A/C, Nice, clean car. $7,300. Call 570-674-3185

DODGE `06 STRATUS Only 55K. Brand

new tires, plugs, wires, oil. Excellent Condition. $6,995 (570) 562-1963

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

Rare, Exclusive Opportunity To Own...

CHEVROLET ‘06 CORVETTE CONVERTIBLE

2002 BMW 745i

The Flagship of the Fleet New - $87,000 Midnight Emerald with beige leather interior. 61K miles. Mint condition. Loaded. Garage Kept. Navigation Stunning, Must Sell! $20,000 $18,600

‘26 FORD MODEL T Panel Delivery

100 point Concours quality restoration. Red with black fenders. Never Driven. 0 miles on restoration. RARE! $40,000 $38,000 $36,500

1954 MERCURY MONTEREY WOODY WAGON 100 point restoration. $130,000 invested. 6.0 Vortec engine. 300 miles on restoration. Custom paint by Foose Automotive. Power windows, a/c, and much more! Gorgeous Automobile! $75,000 $71,000 $69,900

From an Exotic, Private Collection

Call 570-650-0278

BUICK `05 LESABRE Garage kept. 1 owner. Local driving, very good condition. 53,500 miles. Asking $9,700 (570) 457-6414 leave message

CADILLAC `04 SEVILLE SLS Beige. Fully loaded

Excellent condition. Runs great. New rotors, new brakes. Just serviced. 108,000 miles. Asking $5,000. OR BEST OFFER (570) 709-8492

CADILLAC ‘06 STS AWD, 6 cylinder, Silver, 55,000 miles, sunroof, heated seats, Bose sound system, 6 CD changer, satellite radio, Onstar, parking assist, remote keyless entry, electronic keyless ignition, & more! $16,500 570-881-2775

CHEVROLET `00 CORVETTE

V-8. 5.7 liter. 345 Horse Power. Automatic. 56,000 miles. Pewter metallic. Hatch Back. Glass top. Air conditioning. Leather interior. Power seat, locks & windows. Bose AM/FM stereo. Cassette/CD Player. Very good to excellent condition. $17,500 SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY

(570) 696-0424

CHEVROLET `03 IMPALA 97,000 miles, $3,300. 570-592-4522 570-592-4994

CHEVROLET `04 CORVETTE COUPE Torch red with

black and red interior. 9,700 miles, auto, HUD, removable glass roof, polished wheels, memory package, Bose stereo and twilight lighting, factory body moldings, traction control, ABS, Garage kept - Like New. $27,000 (570) 406-2462

CHEVROLET `86 CORVETTE 4x3 manual, 3 overdrive, 350 engine with aluminum heads. LT-1 exhaust system. White with red pearls. Custom flames in flake. New tires & hubs. 1 owner. 61,000 original miles. $8,500 (570) 359-3296 Ask for Les

CHEVY `95 CORVETTE Yellow, auto, 67,300

miles. New tires & brakes. Removable top, leather. Air power locks & windows, new radio. Good condition. $12,000. 287-1820

Silver beauty, 1 Owner, Museum quality. 4,900 miles, 6 speed. All possible options including Navigation, Power top. New, paid $62,000 Must sell $45,900 570-299-9370

CHEVY `05 EQUINOX

LT (premium package), 3.4L, 47,000 miles. All wheel drive, power moonroof, windows, locks & seats. Leather interior, 6 cd changer, rear folding seats, keyless entry, onstar, roof rack, running boards, garage kept. $13,750. 570-362-1910

CHEVY `07 AVEO LT Power window/door locks. Keyless entry. Sunroof. A/C. Black with tan leather interior. 22,000 original miles. AM/FM/CD. New tires. $12,000 (570) 287-0815

CHEVY ‘11 MALIBU LT Moonroof. 7K miles. $19,740

412 Autos for Sale

CHEVY`01 MALIBU LS

Shinny midnight blue metallic. Like new with all power options: sunroof, rear spoiler and aluminum wheels. Very well maintained. $4,295. (570) 313-5538

CHRYSLER ‘95

NEW YORKER

21K miles. Garage kept - like new. Fully loaded. Automatic. Total power: steering, seats, windows. Cruise & traction control. Alarm system & much more. $6,700 negotiable (570) 823-5236

DODGE 05 MAGNUM Clean Car. Local Trade-in. $10,880

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

Wanna make your car go fast? Place an ad in Classified! 570-829-7130.

EAGLE `95 TALON

88k miles. No rust. New tires. Runs excellent. $1,800. Call 570-693-3275

Only 97,000 Miles. Full custom body kit, dark green metallic with gray interior. Dual exhaust, 4 coil over adjustable struts. All new brakes, air intake kit, strut brakes, custom seats, custom white gauges, 2 pillar gauges, new stereo, alarm, custom side view mirrors. 4 cylinder automatic, runs excellent. $8,500. Call 570-876-1355 or 570-504-8540 (evenings)

135

135

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

FORD `94 ESCORT

Legals/ Public Notices

Legals/ Public Notices

NOTICE TO BIDDERS SEALED PROPOSALS will be received by the Controller of Luzerne County at his office in the Penn Place Building, 20 North Pennsylvania Avenue, Wilkes-Barre, PA, 18701-3509, until 9:30 A.M. (Prevailing Time), Wednesday, September 21, 2011 for the following project: 1. Bridge #15310 Repairs over Kitchen Creek, Fairmount Township, PA All bid submissions must have the bidder’s name and date affixed to every page on the proposal. Bids will be opened 10:00 A.M. (Prevailing Time) on Wednesday, September 21, 2011, at the Luzerne County Controller’s Office. PROPOSALS must be accompanied by a certified check, bid bond, bank cashier's or trust company treasurer's check in the amount of ten per cent (10%) of the total amount of the bid, made payable to the Treasurer of Luzerne County. If the Bidder shall fail or refuse to enter into the contract after being given the award, the proceeds of the check deposited by him shall be used as liquidated damages by the County for his failure or refusal to comply. Bid packages may be obtained at the offices of Quad Three Group, Inc., 37 North Washington Street, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 18701; Telephone 570-8294200, Extension 338, Attention: Amanda Thomas. Documents may be obtained with non-refundable sum of $50.00 each, plus cost of shipping and handling. No partial sets of documents will be obtainable. All checks for sets of Bidding and Contract Documents shall be made payable to the Architect, Quad Three Group, Inc. All questions regarding this project should be directed to Michael Heim, P.E., Quad Three Group, Inc. at (570) 8294200, mheim@quad3.com. Interested bidders will be given until Friday, September 16, 2011 at 4:00pm to submit any questions. All bids shall be enclosed in envelopes (inner and outer) both of which shall be sealed and clearly labeled with the words "SEALED BID FOR (NAME OF PROJECT BEING BID ON)”, name of bidder and date and time of bid opening. Facsimile bids will not be accepted or considered. By signing and submitting a bid, each Bidder shall be deemed to have consented in writing, within the meaning of 16 P.S. Section 18702 (e), to such extended date for the Contract to be awarded. Each contractor and each subcontractor shall be licensed in the community where the work will occur. Bidders are permitted to access the site. The Bidding Documents and Forms of Proposal may be examined at the following sites during regular business hours: Quad Three Group, Inc., 37 North Washington Street, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 18701, telephone 570-8294200, facsimile 570-829-3732. Luzerne County Engineer’s Office, 65 Reichard Street, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 18705, telephone 570-825-1600, facsimile 570-825-1606. Mandatory Pre-Bid Conferences will be held as follows: 1. Bridge # 15310 Repairs over Kitchen Creek, Fairmount Township, PA will be held at the project site Thursday, September 15, 2011 at 10:00 am. County Bridge #15310 is located on Shedy Hill Road (T654) approximately 0.1 miles from the intersection of Mossville Road (S.R.4013). Luzerne County does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, family, and handicapped status in employment or the provision of services. Luzerne County Opportunity Employer.

is

an

Equal

Luzerne County reserves the right to reject any or all bids, or any part or items of the bids. The County requires that all Bids shall comply with the bidding requirements specified in the Instructions To Bidders. The County may, at its discretion waive informalities in Bids, but is not obligated to do so, nor does it represent that it will do so. Luzerne County Douglas A. Pape, Chief Clerk


PAGE 2D 135

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011

Legals/ Public Notices

135

Legals/ Public Notices

TO THE TAXPAYERS AND RESIDENTS OF TUNKHANNOCK AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT, WYOMING COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Board of School Directors (the “Board”) of Tunkhannock Area School District, Wyoming County, Pennsylvania (the “School District”), proposes to adopt at a meeting of the Board of School Directors that is to be held not more than thirty (30) days nor less than three (3) days from the date of advertisement of this Notice a resolution (the "Resolution") authorizing, among other things, the incurrence of nonelectoral indebtedness by the School District to be evidenced by a certain note of the School District (the “Note”). The caption and summary of the Resolution to be considered by the Board at such meeting is as follows: A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF SCHOOL DIRECTORS OF TUNKHANNOCK AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT, WYOMING COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA, SETTING FORTH ITS INTENT TO ISSUE A GENERAL OBLIGATION NOTE, SERIES OF 2012, IN THE PRINCIPAL AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED SIX HUNDRED FIFTEEN THOUSAND DOLLARS ($615,000) PURSUANT TO THE ACT OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA, 53 PA.C.S. CHAPTERS 80-82, AS AMENDED, REENACTED AND SUPPLEMENTED, KNOWN AS THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT UNIT DEBT ACT (THE "ACT"); FINDING THAT A PRIVATE SALE BY NEGOTIATION IS IN THE BEST FINANCIAL INTERESTS OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT; DETERMINING THAT SUCH NOTE SHALL EVIDENCE NONELECTORAL DEBT OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT; SPECIFYING THAT SUCH INDEBTEDNESS IS TO BE INCURRED TO PROVIDE FUNDS TO FINANCE A PROJECT OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT WHICH COLLECTIVELY CONSISTS OF, AMONG OTHER THINGS: (1) PLANNING, DESIGNING, ACQUIRING, CONSTRUCTING, INSTALLING, FURNISHING AND EQUIPPING OF ALTERATIONS, RENOVATIONS, ADDITIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS TO THE EXISTING FACILITIES OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT; (2) ADDITIONAL CAPITAL PROJECTS OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT TO THE EXTENT APPROVED BY THE BOARD OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT; AND (3) PAYING THE COSTS AND EXPENSES OF ISSUING THE NOTE; SETTING FORTH THE REASONABLE ESTIMATED USEFUL LIVES OF THE PROJECTS TO BE FINANCED BY THE NOTE; ACCEPTING A PROPOSAL FOR THE PURCHASE OF SUCH NOTE AT PRIVATE SALE BY NEGOTIATION; PROVIDING THAT SUCH NOTE, WHEN ISSUED, SHALL CONSTITUTE A GENERAL OBLIGATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT; FIXING THE DENOMINATION, DATED DATE, INTEREST PAYMENT DATES, INTEREST RATES, REDEMPTION PROVISIONS AND PLACE OF PAYMENT OF THE PRINCIPAL OF AND INTEREST ON SUCH NOTE; AUTHORIZING SPECIFIED OFFICERS OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT TO CONTRACT WITH THE PAYING AGENT FOR ITS SERVICES IN CONNECTION WITH THE NOTE; SETTING FORTH THE SUBSTANTIAL FORM OF THE NOTE EVIDENCING THE DEBT; AUTHORIZING EXECUTION AND ATTESTATION OF SUCH NOTE; PROVIDING COVENANTS RELATED TO DEBT SERVICE APPLICABLE TO SUCH NOTE TO THE EXTENT REQUIRED BY THE ACT AND PLEDGING THE FULL FAITH, CREDIT AND TAXING POWER OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT IN SUPPORT THEREOF; CREATING A SINKING FUND IN CONNECTION WITH SUCH NOTE, TO THE EXTENT REQUIRED BY THE ACT; DESIGNATING THE PAYING AGENT TO BE THE SINKING FUND DEPOSITARY; PROVIDING A COVENANT TO INSURE PROMPT AND FULL PAYMENT FOR SUCH NOTE WHEN DUE; SETTING FORTH REGISTRATION AND TRANSFER PROVISIONS WITH RESPECT TO SUCH NOTE; AUTHORIZING AND DIRECTING SPECIFIED OFFICERS OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT TO DO, TO TAKE AND TO PERFORM CERTAIN SPECIFIED, REQUIRED, NECESSARY OR APPROPRIATE ACTS TO EFFECT THE ISSUANCE OF THE NOTE, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, THE PREPARATION OF A DEBT STATEMENT AND BORROWING BASE CERTIFICATE, AND THE FILING OF SPECIFIED DOCUMENTS WITH THE DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, ALL AS REQUIRED BY THE ACT; DECLARING THAT THE DEBT TO BE EVIDENCED BY SUCH NOTE, TOGETHER WITH ALL OTHER INDEBTEDNESS OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT, WILL NOT BE IN EXCESS OF ANY APPLICABLE LIMITATION IMPOSED BY THE ACT; AUTHORIZING PROPER OFFICERS OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT TO DELIVER THE NOTE UPON THE APPROVAL OF THE DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT; SETTING FORTH CERTAIN COVENANTS PRECLUDING THE SCHOOL DISTRICT FROM TAKING ACTIONS WHICH WOULD CAUSE THE NOTE TO BECOME AN "ARBITRAGE BOND" OR A "PRIVATE ACTIVITY BOND" AS THOSE TERMS ARE USED IN THE INTERNAL REVENUE CODE OF 1986, AS AMENDED (THE "CODE"), AND APPLICABLE REGULATIONS PROMULGATED THEREUNDER; AUTHORIZING AND DIRECTING THE PREPARATION, EXECUTION AND DELIVERY OF ALL OTHER REQUIRED DOCUMENTS AND THE TAKING OF ALL OTHER REQUIRED ACTION; PROVIDING WHEN THIS RESOLUTION SHALL BECOME EFFECTIVE; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY OF PROVISIONS; AND REPEALING ALL RESOLUTIONS OR PARTS OF RESOLUTIONS INSOFAR AS THE SAME SHALL BE INCONSISTENT HEREWITH. A copy of the full proposed text of the Resolution described above, which includes a copy of the substantial form of the Note evidencing the nonelectoral indebtedness to be incurred by the School District, may be examined by any citizen at the office of the Secretary of the School District, located at the Business Office of the School District, 41 Philadelphia Avenue, Tunkhannock, Pennsylvania 18657, on regular business days (Monday through Friday) between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., prevailing time. The Resolution currently on file will be completed by the insertion of certain information and will be amended prior to adoption by the Board to reflect the details of the proposal for the purchase of such indebtedness (the "Purchase Proposal" or “Commitment Letter”) presented to the Board at such meeting by the Purchaser (the "Purchaser"). The Resolution may be amended in any other respect upon final adoption by the Board as the Board may deem necessary or appropriate or as may be required by the Commitment Letter of the Purchaser presented at such meeting. THE RESOLUTION CURRENTLY ON FILE, AMONG OTHER THINGS, ESTIMATES THE PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF THE NONELECTORAL INDEBTEDNESS TO BE INCURRED BY THE SCHOOL DISTRICT WILL NOT EXCEED $615,000; HOWEVER, SUCH AMOUNT MAY BE INCREASED OR DECREASED PRIOR TO FINAL ADOPTION. If the Resolution is adopted, a notice of adoption, including a summary of any omitted details (including the amount of indebtedness to be incurred and the principal amount of the Note to be issued, the purchase price for the Note, the interest rate to be borne by the Note, the maturity dates and redemption provisions of the Note, and a summary of any other amendments made on final adoption) will be advertised after adoption and posted in accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Unit Debt Act. This Notice is published in compliance with the Local Government Unit Debt Act of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Secretary Tunkhannock Area School District Wyoming County, Pennsylvania

412 Autos for Sale

FORD `04 MUSTANG Mach I, 40th

ANNIVERSARY EDITION V8, Auto, 1,400 miles, all options, show room condition. Call for info. Asking $24,995 Serious inquiries only. 570-636-3151

Boat? Car? Truck? Motorcycle? Airplane? Whatever it is, sell it with a Classified ad. 570-829-7130

FORD `07 MUSTANG 63,000 highway

miles, silver, runs great, $11,500. negotiable. 570-479-2482

135

Legals/ Public Notices

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

FORD `87 F150

CROSSROAD MOTORS

116k, rebuilt transmission, new radiator. Runs great. $1,250. Call 570-864-2339

Selling your Camper? Place an ad and find a new owner. 570-829-7130

FORD `90 MUSTANG GT

Must See. Sharp! Black, new directional tires, excellent inside / outside, factory stock, very clean, must see to appreciate. For more information, call 570-269-0042 Leave Message

135

Legals/ Public Notices

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE THE CITY OF WILKES-BARRE ZONING HEARING BOARD A public hearing will be held in City Council Chambers, Fourth Floor, City Hall, 40 East Market Street, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, on Wednesday, September 21, 2011, at 4:30 p.m., Daylight Savings Time, relative to the following zoning appeal application: a) Noel George Miller for the property located at 29 North Welles Street for a variance to waive the maximum allowable building coverage of a lot from 40% increased to 53% in order to construct a 14’ x14’ shed within an R-1 zone. b) Yaroslav Kenyu for the property located at 85 Dillon Street for a variance to waive the required rear yard setback from 25’ down to 19’ in order to construct a 12’ x 31’ deck with a roof within an R-1 zone. c) Theresa Tyler-Smith for the property located at 780 South Main Street for a special exception to operate a daycare center for 60 children and 12 employees in the lower section of a church within an R1 zone. d) Veronica Castillo for the property located at 189 Carey Avenue for a variance to section 1409 (d) Home Occupation to sell Avon products not produced on the premises. A variance to Section 1409 (b) to exceed the maximum square footage of signage from 2 square feet increased to 10 square feet within an M-I zone. e) Myrlande St. Preux for the property located at 281 High Street for a variance to convert a former church building into a single family home within an M-1 zone. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS MAY APPEAR AT SUCH HEARING. CASES WILL NOT NECESSARILY BE CALLED IN THE ORDER LISTED ABOVE. DISABILITIES NOTICE: This Hearing is being held at a facility which is accessible to persons with disabilities. Please notify Mr. Jack McCutcheon, SPHR if special accommodations are required. Such notification should be made within one (1) week prior to the date of this hearing. Mr. McCutcheon can be reached at (570) 208-4112 or by FAX at (570) 208-4124 or by e-mail at jmccutcheon@wilkesbarre.pa.us By Order of the Zoning Hearing Board of the City of Wilkes-Barre William C. Harris, Director of Planning & Zoning/Zoning Officer THE CITY OF WILKES-BARRE IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/ AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER THOMAS M. LEIGHTON, MAYOR NOTICE TO BIDDERS The Luzerne County Controller will receive sealed proposals at the Luzerne County Controller's Office, Penn Place Building, 20 North Pennsylvania Avenue, WilkesBarre, PA 18701-3509 until 10:00 A.M., prevailing time, Wednesday, September 21, 2011 and publicly opened immediately thereafter for:

570-825-7988

700 Sans Souci Highway WE SELL FOR LESS!! ‘10 DODGE CARAVAN SXT 32K, Power sliding doors, Factory warranty! $17,799 ‘09 DODGE CALIBER SXT 2.0 Automatic, 24k Factory Warranty! $13,199 ‘08 HONDA RIDGELINE RTL 32K, Factory Warranty, Leather Sunroof. Wholesale Price........ $23,699 ‘08 CHRYSLER SEBRING CONV. Limited Edition, 45K, Leather, Heated Seats, 3.5 6 Cylinder $16,399

08 Chevy Impala LS 4 door, only 37K! 5 Yr. 100K factory warranty $12,699 ‘08 Chevy IMpala LS 60k $10,799 ‘05 Honda CRV EX One owner, just traded, 65k $13,999 01 Dodge Durango 4x4 SLT Only 54k! $7799 ‘01 Lincoln Town Car Executive 754K $6299 ‘00 Chevy Venture Only 56L $4899

FORD `97 MUSTANG GT

Convertible. Auto. Dark green with tan leather interior. Very good condition. $3,750 firm. Call 570-824-8152

FORD ‘02 MUSTANG

GTRedCONVERTIBLE with black

top. 6,500 miles. One Owner. Excellent Condition. $18,500 570-760-5833

Wanna make a speedy sale? Place your ad today 570829-7130.

ACCORD EX

HONDA `07 ACCORD

CONTRACT DOCUMENTS, including the PROJECT MANUAL, may be examined and obtained at the Luzerne County Purchasing Department, Penn Place Building, 20 Pennsylvania Boulevard, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701 for no charge, Zero (0) Dollars. CONTRACT DOCUMENTS may be examined at the Luzerne County Engineers Office.

V6 EXL. 77K miles. 1 owner with maintenance records. Slate blue with leather interior. Sunroof. Asking $12,500. Call 570-239-2556

A mandatory Pre-Bid Meeting shall be held at the Luzerne County Engineer’s Office, 65 Reichard Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA, Thursday, September 15, 2010 at 1:00 P.M., local time for all interested bidders.

Convertible. 40k miles. Great condition. Silver with black interior. Garage kept. Recently inspected. V8/auto/ AC. AM/FM / 6 disc. $12,000 or best offer. 570-310-1287

BIDS may be held by OWNER for a period of not to exceed sixty (60) days from the date of the opening of BIDS for the purpose of reviewing the BIDS and investigating the qualifications of Bidders, prior to awarding of the CONTRACT. By signing and submitting a bid, each Bidder shall be deemed to have consented in writing, within the meaning of 16 P.S. Section 18702 (e), to such extended date for the Contract to be awarded. Any questions regarding this project may be directed to Mr. Christopher J. Belleman, P.E., Assistant County Engineer, at (570) 820-6348, or at chris.belleman@luzernecounty.org. Luzerne County does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, family or handicapped status in employment or the provision of services. Luzerne County is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Chief Clerk, Douglas A. Pape

Highest Prices Paid!!

JAGUAR `98 XK8

250 General Auction

412 Autos for Sale

KIA `08 RONDO

Maroon with beige interior. All options. 78,000 miles. Still under warranty. Received 60,000 mile servicing. New tires. KBB Value $8,500. Asking only $7,900. A Must See! (570) 457-0553

LEO’S AUTO SALES 92 Butler St Wilkes-Barre, PA 570-825-8253

CHEVY ‘98 MALIBU

4 door, 4 cylinder auto. $1,650

288-8995

JAGUAR `01 SEDAN S1 TYPE 12,000 MILES Old ladies car. Like

new! leather interior. Asking $10,900. Located in Dallas.570-675-1185

JEEP `96 GRAND CHEROKEE LARADO 6 cylinder, 97k

miles, excellent condition, Florida Car. $3,995, 3 month’s warranty. Call 570-417-4731

LEXUS `05 GX 470

Gray with gray leather interior. Like new condition. Garage kept. 60K miles. Navigation, premium audio, DVD & 3rd row seat. $25,950 (570) 417-1212

LEXUS `98 LS 400

Excellent condition, garage kept, 1 owner. Must see. Low mileage, 90K. Leather interior. All power. GPS navigation, moon roof, cd changer. Loaded. $9,000 or best offer. 570-706-6156

LINCOLN 06

Town Car Limited

Fully loaded. 50,000 miles, Triple coated Pearlized White. Showroom condition. $16,900. (570) 814-4926 (570) 654-2596

LINCOLN ‘89 TOWN CAR

A Classic with class. Sedan. 302 V-8. Cruise control. Auto windows/doors. 6way seat control. Runs great. 95,987 miles. $3,995

CHRYSLER ‘09 TOWN & COUNTRY VAN

Great family or business vehicle. Cruise control. Stow & Go option. 40,775 miles. 16/23 MPG. $18,995

CADILLAC ‘99 LIMO S&S

6 door. V-8 engine. Garage kept. Perfect for a business. 46,642 miles. $8,000

JAGUAR ‘88 XJ7 Great project car!

12 cylinder. Engine needs work. 53,002 miles. $1,000

FIAT ‘72 BERTONE

For the purist or collector! 4speed. Runs well. 70,322 miles. $3,900 570-270-0777 570-760-3714

1350 NORTH RIVER ST

250 General Auction

412 Autos for Sale

04 SUNFIRE MERCURY `95 2PONTIAC door. Automatic. 42K. Sunroof. GRAND MARQUIS Power windows. 4 door, V8, fully

TOYOTA `01 SOLARA SE 180k miles all high-

loaded, moon roof, new tires & brakes. Interior & exterior in excellent shape. 2 owners. Call (570) 822-6334 or (570) 970-9351

MINI ‘08 COOPER

2 door, automatic, leather, sky roof, boost cd, fogs $18,880

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

MINI COOPER`08 CLUBMAN Ssilver Sparkling

metallic. Roof and mirror caps in black. Black leather interior. Automatic steptronic paddles. Dual moon roof. Cold weather package. Dynamic stability control. Excellent Condition. 33,600 miles. Just Serviced. 30 MPG City. Factory warranty to 50K miles. $20,995 (570) 472-9909 (570) 237-1062

Red. Power steering, auto, AC, CD. ONLY 5,500 MILES. $18,000 (570) 883-0143

exterior 120,000 miles, very good condition in & out, new tires, new brakes. auto, clean title, $5400. By owner. 570-991-5558

MERCEDES `92 500 SEL

MERCEDES-BENZ `95 SL 500 Convertible, with removable hard top, dark Blue, camel interior, Summer Driving Only, Garage Kept. Very Good Condition, No Accidents. Classy Car. Price Reduced! $13,995 or trade for SUV or other. 570-388-6669

MERCURY 99 GRAND MARQUIS Automatic. A/C. Fully powered. Price is negotiable. 570-654-0229

35K miles. New, allseason tires. Sirius radio. 2 sets of mats, including cargo mats. $18,400. Call 570-822-3494 or 570-498-0977

matic, 2 door, antilock brakes, air conditioning, air bags, power locks, power windows, power mirrors, power seats, all power, AM/FM radio, CD changer, keyless entry, leather interior, custom wheels, $28,000. Call after 5:00 p.m. 570-403-5343

VE

PONTIAC `05 GRAND PRIX

Sedan. White. Great condition. Sunroof, tan leather interior. Recently maintained. 70k miles. $5,000. Call 570-954-7459

Complete repair shop, tools, lift, air compressor, tire machine. Over 1000 items approximately 50 vehicles! FOR DETAILS CALL: L.A.G. AUCTION SERVICES (570) 883-1276 or www.lagauctions.com Lic.# AU002629L BUYER’S PREMIUM

SUBARU `98

OUTBACK WAGON 155,000 miles.

Inspection good till 7/12. New Tires. $4,500. (570) 899-8725

Attorney Services

ADOPTION DIVORCE CUSTODY Estates, DUI ATTORNEY MATTHEW LOFTUS 570-255-5503

310

Automatic, power windows, locks, mirrors, air, cruise, keyless entry. Ground effects. 68,700 miles. Asking $9,395 570-388-2829 or 570-905-4352

TOYOTA `10

Camry SE. 56,000 miles. Red, alloy wheels, black cloth interior. Will consider trade. $14,200 (570) 793-9157

VOLKSWAGEN `04 Beetle - Convertible

GREAT ON GAS! Blue. AM/FM cassette. Air. Automatic. Power roof, windows, locks & doors. Boot cover for top. 22k. Excellent condition. Garage kept. Newly Reduced $14,000 570-479-7664 Leave Message

To place your ad Call Toll Free 1-800-427-8649 415 Autos-Antique & Classic

CADILLAC `80 COUPE DEVILLE Excellent condition, $3,000 located in Hazleton. 570-454-1945 or 561-573-4114

$10,880

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

Let the Community Know! Place your Classified Ad TODAY! 570-829-7130

SUBURU ‘06 LEGACY GT door, LIMITED SEDAN 4 black,

approximately 76,000 miles. 2.5 liter engine, auto. asking $12,000. 570-510-3077

(570) 650-8687

CHEVROLET `76 PICKUP Very Good Condition! Low miles! $7500. FIRM 570-905-7389 Ask for Lee

CHEVY `68 CAMARO SS 396 automatic,

400 transmission, clean interior, runs good, 71K, garage kept, custom paint, Fire Hawk tires, Krager wheels, well maintained. $23,900 Negotiable 570-693-2742

AUTO SERVICE DIRECTORY

468

Auto Parts

472

Auto Services

AUTO BODY & PAINTING Dealer discounts. Call Rick 570-779-1803

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted Highest Prices Paid In CA$H

FREE PICKUP

$ WANTED JUNK $ VEHICLES LISPI TOWING We pick up 822-0995

VITO’S & GINO’S Like New Tires $15 & UP! Like New Batteries $20 & UP! Carry Out Price 288-8995

BEST PRICES IN THE AREA CA$H ON THE $POT, Free Anytime Pickup 570-301-3602

Cars & Full Size Trucks. For prices... Lamoreaux Auto Parts 477-2562

150 Special Notices

150 Special Notices

WANTED

Attorney Services

Free Bankruptcy Consultation Payment plans. Carol Baltimore 570-822-1959

FREE CONSULTATION

BANKRUPTCY

for all legal matters Attorney Ron Wilson 570-822-2345

Guaranteed Low Fees Payment Plan! Colleen Metroka 570-592-4796

SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY Free Consultation. Contact Atty. Sherry Dalessandro 570-823-9006

DIVORCE No Fault $295 divorce295.com Atty. Kurlancheek 800-324-9748 W-B

Find homes for your kittens! Place an ad here! 570-829-7130

FREE CONSULT

TOYOTA `05 COROLLA-S

CHEVROLET `71 MONTE CARLO SUBARU 06 FORESTER $2,000 or best offer ONLY!!

CALL US! TO JUNK YOUR CAR

250 General Auction 310

POSTPONED

SPORT AWD

Air, new tires & brakes, 31,000 miles, great condition. $11,995. 570-836-1673

570-301-3602

10% BUYERS PREMIUM WE ACCEPT ALL CREDIT CARDS! AUCT: MARVA MYSLAK AU-3247L WWW.AUCTIONZIP.COM ID #3473 FOR INFO: 570-822-8249 Jewelry, Coin & Linen Auction on Monday, September 26 at 4:30 p.m.

PUBLIC AUCTION

SUBARU `02 FORESTER

L. AWD. Red. $2,850. Hail damage. Runs great. Auto, air, CD, cassette, cruise, tilt. All power. 174K miles. Mechanical inspection welcomed. Call 570-561-9217

570-574-1275

ARKSVILLE

SEPTEMBER 10, 2011 - 1:00 PM JADEN’S AUTO WORKS 1461 N. RIVER ST. PLAINS, PA 18705 RE-LOCATING OUT OF STATE! TERMINATING BUSINESS!!

SAAB `06 93

A E R O s p o r t . Leather interior. Heated seats. Sunroof. Good condition. $9,000. Serious inquiries only. Call 570-760-8264

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

Wednesday, Sept. 14th 4:30 P.M. Collectibles, household, furniture, advertising, box lots, Hall Is Full As Usual!!!

250 General Auction

Low mileage, 110,000 miles, 5 speed, 2 door, antilock brakes, air conditioning, power windows, power mirrors, AM/FM radio, CD changer, leather interior, rear defroster, tinted windows, custom wheels, $8,000. (570) 817-1803

way. 4 cylinder, auto. 1 owner, all power, am/fm/cd. Moon roof, rear spoiler, remote starter. All record receipts. $3,900 (570) 693-0648

PONTIAC `04 VIBE

White. New manual transmission & clutch. Front wheel drive. 165k highway miles. Great on gas. Good condition, runs well. $4,500 or best offer 570-331-4777

AUCTIONS BY MARVA 213 E. L A ., L UZERNE

Blue/white top & white interior. Recent documented frame-off restoration. Over $31,000 invested. will sell $19,900. 570-335-3127

NISSAN `08 XTERRA Grey, Mint condition.

MAZDA 2 `11 NISSAN `09 370Z Low mileage, 197 miles. Selling due to death in family. Lime TOURING-MAG green. Loaded. $14,000. Call 570-788-4354 BLACK 11,200 miles, autoWhite with gray leather interior, 17” custom chrome wheels, 4 new tires, new breaks front & rear. Full tune-up, oil change & filters done. Body and interior are perfect. Car has all the options. 133,850 miles. Original price: $140,000 new. This is the diplomat version. No rust or dings on this car Garage kept. Sell for $9,500. Call: 570-876-1355 or 570-504-8540 Evenings

PONTIAC ‘69 FIREBIRD 400 CONVERTIBLE

MITSUBISHI 02 Eclipse Convertible SUBARU `05 LEGACY Black interior &

2.5 S. Silver/black interior. 41,800 miles. Excellent condition. CD Player. New tires. $13,900 (570) 675-8835

570-301-3602

AC. Runs & looks great! $5,495. DEALER 570-868-3914

PORSCHE `85 944

ALL JUNK NISSAN `08 ALTIMA CARS! CA$H PAID MX-5 CONVERTIBLE

Be Ready! 2 door. 6 cylinder. Metallic sand. $12,999

412 Autos for Sale

WANTED!

MAZDA `08 MIATA JEEP 03 WRANGLER SPORT Winter’s Coming -

412 Autos for Sale

BUICK ‘96 REGAL

4 door, 6 cylinder, auto, 105K. $1,550 Current Inspection On All Vehicles DEALER

FREE PICKUP

TITLE TAGS FULL NOTARY SERVICE 6 M ONTH WARRANTY

6 CD changer. Moonroof. Heated seats. Power locks. Black with beige leather interior. 104,000 miles. $8,900 (570) 474-9563 (570) 592-4394

Luzerne County reserves the right to waive any informalities, irregularities, defects, errors or omissions in the Bidding, or to reject, any or all Bids or parts thereof.

Wanted: Junk Cars & Trucks

08 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 4x4, Regular Cab, 63K, Factory Warranty $13,999

Description of Work: The scope of this project generally includes, but is not limited to; miscellaneous roof repairs to the following Luzerne County facilities: Minimum Security Prison, Emergency Management Agency (EMA), Voting Machine Warehouse, Transportation Building, Levee Maintenance Building, Office of Community Development, Springbrook Water Company Building, and the Office of Human Services, as outlined in the specifications.

The successful Bidder will be required to furnish and pay for a satisfactory Performance Bond and a Labor and Material Payment Bond.

VITO’S & GINO’S

‘08 Subaru Special Edition 42k, 5 speed, AWD. Factory warranty. $13,999 ‘08 Chrysler Sebring Conv 4 cylinder, 40k $12,399

HONDA `03

Submitted bids must be accompanied by a certified check, bid bond, bank cashier’s or trust company treasurer’s check as Bid Security in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the total amount of the bid made payable to the Treasurer of Luzerne County. If the Bidder shall fail or refuse to enter into the contract after being given the award, the Bid Security shall be used as liquidated damages by the County for the Bidders failure or refusal to comply.

HONDAS

‘08 Accords Choose from 3. Low miles. Factory warranty. Starting at $16,495 ‘08 Civic LX Blue. 20 K miles. Factory warranty. $15,800 ‘08 Civic LX Gray. 26K. 1 owner. $14,400 ‘04 Civic 4 door. Auto. $8,495 ‘04 Honda Pilot 4x4. Auto. AC. $11,200 ** ** ** ** ** ** ‘10 Chevy Impala LT 6 cylinder. Auto. Leather. Low Miles. ‘02 Chrysler Sebring 4 cylinder. Auto. Air. $4,900 ** ** ** ** ** ** MAFFEI AUTO SALES 570-288-6227

08 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4 34K, Red $15,799

LUZERNE COUNTY BUILDINGS MISCELLANEOUS ROOF REPAIRS

Bid envelopes will be plainly marked in bold letters on the outside stating the project name, name and address of bidder. Mark on envelope “Sealed Bid – Do Not Open”. All bid submissions must have the bidders name and bid date affixed to each page of the proposal.

412 Autos for Sale

Octagon Family Restaurant 375 W Main St, Plymouth, PA 18651 570-779-2288 Open Wed.-Sun. at 4pm

3 Year Anniversary

Specials!!

* 35 cent wings * * $7.95 large pies * * Buy One Get One 1/2 Off Dinners * Home of the Original ‘O-Bar’ Pizza


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 PAGE 3D

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

CHEVROLET `81 CORVETTE Very good condi-

CHEVY`75 CAMARO 350 V8. Original

DESOTO CUSTOM ‘49 4 DOOR SEDAN

FORD `52 COUNTRY SEDAN CUSTOM LINE

OLDSMOBILE `68 DELMONT

tion. 350 engine, classic silver with black bottom trim, all original, registered as an antique vehicle, removable mirror tops. 66,000 miles, chrome wheels & tires in very good shape, leather interior, garage kept. Must see to appreciate. Asking $9,000 or willing to trade for a newer Pontoon boat. Call 570-545-6057

owner. Automatic transmission. Rare tuxedo silver / black vinyl top with black naugahyde interior. Never damaged. $6,000. Call 570-489-6937

Chrysler ‘68 New Yorker

Sedan. 440 Engine. Power Steering & brakes. 34,500 original miles. Always garaged. $6,800 (570) 883-4443

FORD SALEEN ‘04 281 SC Coupe

Job Seekers are looking here! Where's your ad? 570-829-7130 and ask for an employment specialist

1,000 miles document. #380 Highly collectable. $28,500 570-472-1854

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

NEW LOW PRICES!

1999 Ford Escort Sport ZX2

Sunroof, Loaded

2000 GMC Jimmy 4Dr

4x4, Loaded!

4,490

4,990

2002 Hyundai Elantra GLS

2000 Ford Taurus Wagon

$

* $

88K, Like New!

*

FORD `30 MODEL A Tudor sedan. Road

ready. Engine rebuilt. Interior upholstery in very good condition. 2nd brake light and turn signals added for safety. In primer, ready for your color. Asking $8,500 or best offer. Call 570-675-4237

Air, PW, PDL

5,590* $2,990*

$

2003 Kia Spectra LS

2002 Hyundai Elantra GLS

LINCOLN `66

Continental Convertible

4DR, Sunroof, Air, All Power

Air, 4-Cyl, Auto, 4DR

4,990*

5,990*

$

$

*All Prices Plus Tax & Tags.

MOTOR TWINS

706270

CALL STEVE MORENKO 2010 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming

718-4050

3 on the tree with fluid drive. This All American Classic Icon runs like a top at 55MPH. Kin to Chrysler, Dodge, Plymouth, Imperial Desoto, built in the American Midwest, after WWII, in a plant that once produced B29 Bombers. In it’s original antiquity condition, with original shop & parts manuals, she’s beautifully detailed and ready for auction in Sin City. Spent her entire life in Arizona and New Mexico, never saw a day of rain or rust. Only $19,995. To test drive, by appointment only, Contact Tony at 570-899-2121 or penntech84th@ gmail.com

4 door. 67K miles. 1 owner since `69. Good frame. Teal green/white leather. Restorable. $2,500 570-287-5775 570-332-1048

412 Autos for Sale

0

DOWN*

W Y O M I N G VA L L E Y

MERCEDES 1975

Good interior & interior. Runs great! New tires. Many new parts. Moving, Must Sell. $2,300 or best offer 570-693-3263 Ask for Paul

MERCEDES-BENZ `73 450SL with Convertible

removable hard top, power windows, AM /FM radio with cassette player, CD player, automatic, 4 new tires. Champagne exterior; Italian red leather interior inside. Garage kept, excellent condition. $31,000. Call 825-6272

OLDSMOBILE `68 DELMONT DRASTICALLY

barrel carburetor. Yellow with black roof and white wall tires. Black interior. $4,995. Call (570) 696-3513

Coupe Good condition. Call for details (570) 881-7545

steve@yourcarbank.com www.wyomingvalleyautomart.com

Travel

MAZDA `88 RX-7

CONVERTIBLE 1 owner, garage kept, 65k original miles, black with grey leather interior, all original & never seen snow. $7,995. Call 570-237-5119

STUDEBAKER ‘31 Rumble seat,

415 Kidder Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702 570.822.8870

380

miles, garage kept, triple black, leather interior, carriage roof, factory wire wheels, loaded, excellent condition. $5,500. Call Mike 570-237-7660

PONTIAC `68 CATALINA 400 engine. 2

*For qualified Buyers. Bi-weekly payments greater than 17 1/2 % of monthly net income, additional down-payment may be required. Costs to be paid by Buyer at delivery: registration, taxes, title, doc fee.

Travel

LINCOLN `88 TOWN CAR 61,000 original

REDUCED!! This model only produced in 1967 & 1968. All original 45,000 miles, Color Burgundy, cloth & vinyl interior, 350 rocket engine, 2nd owner. Fender skirts, always garaged. Trophy winner at shows. Serious inquiries only, $7,500. 570-690-0727

$ 380

STATION WAGON V8, automatic, 8 passenger, 3rd seat, good condition, 2nd owner. REDUCED TO $6,500. 570-579-3517 570-455-6589

380

Travel

380

Travel

421

STARCRAFT ‘80 16’ DEEP V ‘90 Evinrude out-

board 70hp with tilt & trim— ‘92 EZ loader trailer. With ‘00 Tracker Series 60lbs foot pedal, 2 downriggers, storages, gallon tanks, 2 fish finders and more. MUST SEE. Make Best Offer. Call 866-320-6368 after 5pm.

Must Sell! Appraised for $9,200

427

• All original

45,000 miles • 350 Rocket engine • Fender skirts • Always garaged

Commercial Trucks & Equipment

CHEVY `04 DUMP TRUCK

36k miles. 9’6” Boss power angle plow. Hydraulic over electric dump box with sides. Rubber coated box & frame. Very good condition. $22,500 firm. Call 570-840-1838

Will sell for $6,000 Serious inquires only 570690-0727

CHEVY ‘08 3500 HD DUMP TRUCK 2WD, automatic.

PONTIAC 1937 Fully restored near

Only 12,000 miles. Vehicle in like new condition. $19,000. 570-288-4322

original. New paint, new interior, new wiring, custom tinted glass, new motor & transmission. Spare motor & trans. 16” wide white walls car in excellent condition in storage for 2 years. $14,000 or best offer. Serious inquiries ONLY. Call 570-574-1923

439

Motorcycles

‘96 HONDA

American Classic Edition. 1100 cc. 1 owner, under 20,000 miles. Yellow and white, extra chrome, VNH exhaust, bags, lights, MC jack, battery tender, helmets. Asking $3500 570-288-7618

PORSCHE ‘78 911 SC TARGA 60,000 miles. 5

speed. Air. Power windows. Metallic brown. Saddle Interior. Meticulous original owner. Garaged. New Battery. Inspected. Excellent Condition. $25,000. OBO (610) 797-7856 (484) 264-2743

BMW ‘07 K1200 GT

Low mileage. Many extras. Clean. $9,500 (570) 646-2645

DAELIM 20064,700 150 CCs.

miles. 70 MPG. New battery & tires. $1,500; negotiable. Call 570-288-1246 or 570-328-6897

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

WANTED: PONTIAC `78 FIREBIRD Formula 400

HARLEY ‘01 DAVIDSON Electra Glide, Ultra

Berkshire Green, Originally purchased at Bradley-Lawless in Scranton. Car was last seen in Abington-Scranton area. Finder’s fee paid if car is found and purchased. Call John with any info (570) 760-3440

421

Boats & Marinas

Classic, many chrome accessories, 13k miles, Metallic Emerald Green. Garage kept, like new condition. Includes Harley cover. $12,900 570-718-6769 570-709-4937

Boats & Marinas

CABELAS FISH CAT PANTHER 9’. Approximately 5

HARLEY 2011 HERITAGE SOFTTAIL Black. 1,800 miles.

years old. Retails $699, selling $350. FIRM 570-288-9719

ABS brakes. Security System Package. $16,000 firm. SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY 570-704-6023

439

Motorcycles

HARLEY DAVIDSON `03

100th Anniversary Edition Deuce. Garage kept. 1 owner. 1900 miles. Tons of chrome. $38,000 invested. A must see. Asking $18,000. OBO 570-706-6156

HARLEY DAVIDSON `03 NIGHTTRAIN New rear tire. Very good condition. 23K miles. $8,500. Call 570-510-1429

HARLEY DAVIDSON `07

Road King Classic FLHRC. Burgundy / Cream. Driver & Passenger back rest, grips, battery tender, cover. Willie G accessories. 19k miles. $14,400 or best offer. Call 262-993-4228

HARLEY DAVIDSON

‘03 Dyna Wide Glide Excellent condition garage kept! Golden Anniversary - silver/black. New Tires. Extras. 19,000 miles. Must Sell! $10,000. 570-639-2539

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘05 SCREAMING EAGLE V-ROD Orange & Black.

Used as a show bike. Never abused. 480 miles. Excellent condition. Asking $15,000 570-876-4034

380

Blue pearl, excellent condition, 3,100 miles, factory alarm with extras. $10,500. or best offer. Tony 570-237-1631

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘08 SPORTSTER XL 1200 Low Rider.

6,700 miles. Lots of chrome & extras. Perfect condition. $7,000 or best offer (570) 709-8773

HARLEY DAVIDSON 2006 NIGHTTRAIN

SPECIAL EDITION #35 of 50 Made $10,000 in accessories including a custom made seat. Exotic paint set, Alien Spider Candy Blue. Excellent condition. All Documentation. 1,400 Asking $15,000 570-876-4034

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘92 DAYTONA DYNA SPECIAL EDITION

Bike #770 of 1,770 made. Many extras. Must sell. 13,300 miles. Get on this classic for only $6,995 570-477-1109

570-256-7760

$6,900 (570) 388-2947

Travel

380

Travel

Motorcycles

HSoft ARLEY DAVIDSON ‘80 riding FLH. King of the Highway! Mint original antique show winner. Factory spot lights, wide white tires, biggest Harley built. Only 28,000 original miles! Never needs inspection, permanent registration. $7,995 570-905-9348

HONDA `03 REBEL

250. Black with red rebel decal. 65MPG. Excellent condition. 1,800 miles. $1,750 or best offer. Call 570-262-6605

HONDA 2005 SHADOW VLX600, White, 10,000 miles & new back tire. $3,000 (570) 262-3697 or (570) 542-7213

KAWASAKI ‘03 KLR 650

$3,400 (570) 287-0563

KAWASAKI ‘05

NINJA 500R. 3300 miles. Orange. Garage kept. His & hers helmets. Must sell. $2400 570-760-3599 570-825-3711

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘05 V-ROD VRSCA

ROW BOAT 12’ HYOSUNG157`04 COMET 250. Miles. & TRAILER Excellent Condition. YAMAHA ‘11 YZ 450 Aluminum, new $1,200. Call Brand New! tires, new wiring on trailer, $699. neg. 570-479-7114

439

380

Travel

STAYCATIONS

Kawasaki` 93 ZX11D NINJA LIKE NEW 8900 Original

miles. Original owner. V@H Exhaust and Computer. New tires. $3,800. 570-574-3584

MOTO GUZZI `03

1,100 cc. 1,900 miles. Full dress. Shaft driven. Garage kept. Excellent condition. $6000. Health Problems. Call 570-654-7863

POLARIS ‘00 VICTORY CRUISER 14,000 miles,

92 V-twin, 1507 cc, extras $6000. 570-883-9047

Q-LINK LEGACY `09

250 automatic. Gun metal gray. MP3 player. $3,000. Great first motorcycle. 570-696-1156

SUZUKI ‘77 GS 750

Needs work. $1,200 or best offer 570-855-9417 570-822-2508

380

Travel

BUS TRIPS, SHOWS, LAST MINUTE DEALS & MORE Visit NEW YORK CITY

Eastern Caribbean

Paul McCartney’s Ocean Kingdom NYC Ballet

Royal Caribbean’s EXPLORER OF THE SEAS

January 27-Feb 6, 2012

Sat. Sept. 24 Matinee Performance w/ Exclusive “Meet a Dancer” Backstage Tour! $180 per person Visit our website or call today!

NYCTrip.com 570-714-4692

RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL • Saturday, 11/12 - 1pm show • Saturday, 11/19 - 1pm show • Saturday, 11/26 - 1pm show • Monday, 11/28 - 2pm show • Wednesday, 11/30 - 2pm show • Saturday, 12/3 - 2pm show

• Wednesday, 12/7 - 2pm show • Saturday, 12/10 - 2pm show • Wednesday, 12/14 - 2pm show • Saturday, 12/17 - 2pm show • Wednesday, 12/21 - 2pm show • Wednesday, 12/28 - 1pm show

1-800-432-8069

Royal Travel & Tours

ALL INCLUSIVE TRAVEL DEALS

NY GIANTS FOOTBALL TICKETS • 9/19 - Rams • 10/16 - Bills • 10/30 - Dolphins • 11/20 - Eagles

• 12/4 - Packers • 12/18 - Redskins • 1/1 - Cowboys

1-800-432-8069

STUCKER TOURS 655-8458

www.stuckertours.com ATLANTIC CITY OVERNITE 9/18 or 11/13

HILTON ACCOM., $10 FOOD, $40 SLOTPLAY $99 MACKINAC ISLAND, MI 9/24-30 DELUXE ACCOM. GRAND HOTEL, 9 MEALS INCL. 2 ELEGANT 5-COURSE DINNERS, FERRY RIDE WITH VIEWS OF LAKE HURON, FORD MUSEUM, CARRIAGE TOUR, FRANKENMUTH TOUR $1,149 FINGER LAKES WINE TOUR 10/16-17 CRUISE & LUNCHEON WINE TASTING $199 HAUNTED SALEM 10/22-23 $189 RADIO CITY XMAS SHOW 11/28 $92

• Disney World Specials • Universal Studio, Florida • Bridal Registry • Destination Weddings • Family & School Reunions • Las Vegas Trips • Honeymoon Packages • Worldwide Cruises & Vacations • Cancun & Punta Cana Vacations • Gift Certificates For All Occasions

300 Market St., Kingston, PA 18704 288-TRIP (288-8747) info@tentrip.com

Fall Fishing is the best of the year! DON’T MISS OUT! (315) 375-8962 • www.blacklake4fish.com daveroll@blacklakemarine.com

$50 off Promotion Available Now!

COOKIES TRAVELERS

COOKIESTRAVELERS.COM

Branson, Missouri October 15-22, 2011 8 shows + $1,025 pp/ double occupancy Call for details!

Just Great Tours 570-829-5756

BROADWAY SHOW BUS TRIPS

570-815-8330

NYC San Gennario Festival 9/24 - $40 Nascar 10/2 - $159 **FOOTBALL** PSU vs. Alabama 9/10 Bus & Tailgate Only $50 PSU @ Temple 9/17 $125 Or Bus & Tailgate $50 Notre Dame at Pittsburg 9/23-9/25 $375 PSU vs. E. Michigan 9/24 $109 Or Bus & Tailgate $50 PSU vs. Iowa 10/8 $129 Or Bus & Tailgate $50 Steelers vs. Titans 10/8 & 10/9 $389 lower; $359 upper Steelers vs. Jaguars 10/15 & 10/16 $389 lower; $359 upper PSU vs. Purdue 10/15 $139 lower Or Bus & Tailgate $50

www cameohousebustours com www.cameohousebustours.com

Sat. Sept. 24, 2011 SENECA FALLS, NY In 1848 five women changed the face of equality with the first women’s rights convention, the goal was to free women from their legal bonds and gain control of their rights. Find out how and why it began here! Call for Anne for details and a brochure 570-655-3420

UNITED MOTORS ‘08 MATRIX 2 SCOOTER

Rear queen master bedroom, Walk thru bathroom. Center kitchen + dinette bed. Front extra large living room + sofa bed. Big View windows. Air, awning, sleeps 6, very clean, will deliver. Located in Benton, Pa. $4,900. 215-694-7497

Floorboards,V&H Pipes, White walls,Garage Kept. 6K Miles $5,200 (570) 430-0357

150cc. Purple & grey in color. 900 miles. Bought brand new. Paid $2,000. Asking $1,600 or best offer. (570) 814-3328 or (570) 825-5133

YAMAHA ‘97 ROYALSTAR 1300

12,000 miles. With windshield. Runs excellent. Many extras including gunfighter seat, leather bags, extra pipes. New tires & battery. Asking $4,000 firm. (570) 814-1548

JERSEY BOYS Wed. Nov 9 $150 for Front Mezz seating PHANTOM OF THE OPERA Wed. Nov. 9 $150 Orchestra Seats **RADIO CITY XMAS SHOW** Mon. Nov. 28th $85 2pm show Wed. Dec. 14th $90 2pm show 2nd Mezz seating

CALL ROSEANN @ 655-4247 TO RESERVE YOUR SEATS

TO PLACE YOUR AD HERE, CONTACT TARA AT 970-7374 • twilliams@timesleader.com

SUNLITE CAMPER

TRAVEL TRAILER 33 ft

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

BUICK `05 RENDEZVOUS CXL BARGAIN!!

AWD, Fully loaded, 1 owner, 22,000 miles. Small 6 cylinder. New inspection. Like new, inside & out. $13,900. (570) 540-0975

CADILLAC `99 ‘96 SUNLINE TRAILER 97k ESCALADE miles. Black 23’. Excellent con-

442 RVs & Campers

dition. Sleeps 3 or 4 people. Reduced to $5,500 negotiable. 570-453-3358

with beige leather interior. 22” rims. Runs great. $8,500 Call 570-861-0202

CHEROKEE ‘10

CHEVROLET `10 SILVERADO 1500 Extended Cab V71

Travel trailer. 39 ft., 4 slide outs, 3 bedrooms, 2 bath rooms, microwave, awning, tinted windows, Brand new. Have no pets or smokers. Much more!!!!! $33,000 (cell) 682-888-2880

DUTCHMAN 96’ 5TH WHEEL with slideout & sun

room built on. Set up on permanent site in Wapwallopen. Comes with many extras. $6,500. (570) 829-1419 or (570) 991-2135

Package 4x4. Bedliner. V-8. 5.3 Liter. Red. Remote start. Garage kept. 6,300 miles $26,000 (570) 639-2539

CHEVROLET `97 SILVERADO with Western plow. 4WD, Automatic. Loaded with options. Bedliner. 55,000 miles. $9,200. Call (570) 868-6503

CHEVY `00 SILVERADO

EQUIPMENT/BOBCAT TRAILER 1500. 4x4. 8’ box. Auto. A/C. 121K miles. $5,995. 570-332-1121 Brand new 2010 tandem axle, 4 wheel electric brakes, 20’ long total, 7 x 16 wood deck, fold up ramps with knees, removable fenders for oversized loads, powder coat paint for rust protection, 2 5/16 hitch coupler, tongue jack, side pockets, brake away switch, battery, 7 pole RV plugs, title & more!! Priced for quick sale. $2,595 386-334-7448 Wilkes-Barre

FLAGSTAFF `08 CLASSIC

Super Lite Fifth Wheel. LCD/DVD flat screen TV, fireplace, heated mattress, ceiling fan, Hide-a-Bed sofa, outside speakers & grill, 2 sliders, aluminum wheels, water purifier, awning, microwave oven, tinted safety glass windows, raised panel fridge & many accessories & options. Excellent condition, $22,500. 570-868-6986

NEWMAR 36’ MOUNTAIN AIRE

239 Spring Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702

Come relax & enjoy great fishing & Tranquility at it’s finest. Housekeeping cottages on the water with all the amenities of home.

22 ft. 3 rear bunks, center bathroom, kitchen, sofa bed. Air, Fully self contained. Sleeps 6. New tires, fridge awning. $4500. 215-322-9845

30 ft. Sleeps 9 - 3 bunk beds & 1 queen. Full kitchen. Air conditioning/ heat. Tub/shower. $6,900 (570) 696-1969

Call for details 570-820-8450

442 RVs & Campers

SUZUKI `07 C50T CRUISER EXCELLENT CONDITION Windshield, Bags,

TRAVEL TRAILER

no air needed

Labadee ~ San Juan ~ St. Maarten ~ St. Thomas

BLACK LAKE, NY

Motorcycles

LAYTON ‘02

departs Bayonne, NJ,

703969

Limited tickets to

439

5th wheel, 2 large slides, new condition, loaded with accessories. Ford Dually diesel truck with hitch also available. 570-455-6796

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

CHEVY `10 SILVERADO

4 Door Crew Cab LTZ. 4 wheel drive. Excellent condition, low mileage. $35,500. Call 570-655-2689

CHEVY `99 SILVERADO

Auto. V6 Vortec. Standard cab. 8’ bed with liner. Dark Blue. 98,400 miles. $6,899 or best offer 570-823-8196

CHEVY 02 AVALANCHE

4X4. 130K highway miles. Cloth seats. Hitch. No rust. Mechanically excellent. Roof rack. Gray tones. $7,950. 570-239-2037

CHEVY ‘03 TRAILBLAZER LTZ

4WD, V6, leather, auto, moonroof $10,740

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

CHEVY 05 TRAILBLAZER LT

Leather. Sunroof. Highway miles. Like Brand New! $6,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

CHEVY ‘07 HHR LT Moonroof $13,784

PACE ‘99 ARROW VISION

Ford V10. Excellent condition. 8,700 miles. 1 slide out. 2 awnings. 2 colored TVs, generator, back up camera, 2 air conditioners, microwave/convection oven, side by side refrigerator with ice maker, washer/dryer, queen size bed. $37,900 negotiable (570) 288-4826 (570) 690-1464

SUNLINE `06 SOLARIS

Travel Trailer. 29’, mint condition, 1 slide out a/c-heat. Stove, microwave, fridge, shower inside & out. Many more extras, including hitch equipment and sway bars. Reduced. $12,500. Call 570-842-6735

SUNLINE SOLARIS `91

25’ travel trailer A/C. Bunk beds. New fridge & hot water heater. Excellent condition. $3,900. 570-466-4995

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

CHEVY ‘90 CHEYENNE

2500 series. 8 ft box with tool box. Heavy duty ladder rack. 150K miles. Great work truck. $1,500 570-406-5128

CHEVY ‘95 ASTRO

AWD. Good tires. V6. Automatic. 149,000 miles. Power everything. Heavy duty tow package. Runs good. Just passed inspection. $2,000 (570) 855-8235

FORD `87 E150

Great work truck. New inspection. $2,000. Call anytime before 8pm. (570)690-8243


PAGE 4D

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

6 YR./100,000 MILE COMPREHENSIVE LIMITED WARRANTY COVERAGE

VEHICLE HISTORY REPORT FULL TANK OF GAS & MUCH MORE!

169-POINT INSPECTION

FINANCING AVAILABLE FOR UP TO M O S.

24/7 ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE

WARRANTY IS FULLY TRANSFERABLE

2008 LINCOLN MKZ AWD

Most with Pwr. Leather Heated Seats, Moonroof, ABS, Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry with Keypad, 6 Disc CD, Memory Seat, Heated Mirrors, Parking Sensors

LOW MILES!

2007-2008 LINCOLN MKX AWD

Most with Pwr. Leather Heated Seats, Moonroof, 6 Disc CD, Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry w/Keypad, Cruise Control, SYNC, Memory Seat, Navigation Sys., Parking Sensors

TO CHOOSE FROM

STARTING AT

2010 LINCOLN TOWNCAR LIMITED

Most with Pwr. Leather Heated Seats, 6 Disc CD, Keyless Entry w/Keypad, Memory Seat, Pwr. Adjustable Pedals, Parking Sensors, Remote Trunk Lid, Wood Trim

LOW MILES!

TO CHOOSE FROM

FREE STATE INSPECTION AS LONG AS YOU OWN THE CAR!

13K MILES! TO CHOOSE FROM

STARTING AT

TO CHOOSE FROM

STARTING AT

TO CHOOSE FROM

STARTING AT

TO CHOOSE FROM

LOW MILES! STARTING AT

LOW MILES!

TO CHOOSE FROM

TO CHOOSE FROM

STARTING AT

15K MILES!

6.6 HD DURAMAX DIESEL CREW CAB

8,500 MILES! *Tax and tags extra. Security Deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. See salesperson for details. All payments subject to credit approval by the primary lending source, Tier 0 rate. Special APR financing cannot be combined with Ford cash rebate. “BUY FOR” prices are based on 72 month at $18.30 per month per $1000 financed with $2,500 down (cash or trade). Photos of vehicles are for illustration purposes only. Coccia Ford is not responsible for any typographical errors. No Security Deposit Necessary. See dealer for details. Sale ends SEPTEMBER 30, 2011.

CALL NOW 823-8888 1-800-817-FORD Overlooking Mohegan Sun 577 East Main St., Plains

Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B

VISIT US AT WWW.COCCIACARS.COM


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

HONDA `10 ODYSSEY

451

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 PAGE 5D Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

JEEP 09 COMMANDER AWD. Alloys. $19,880

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

CHEVY ‘98 CHEYENNE 2500 2-wheel drive

1 owner! Local new truck trade! $3,495 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

DODGE `99 DURANGO SLT 5.9 V8, Kodiak

Green, Just serviced. New brakes. Tow package. AC. Very good condition. Runs & drives 100%. 68,000 miles. Asking $6,850 or best offer (570) 239-8165

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD ‘00 TAURUS STATION WAGON

3rd seat. Local new car trade! $3,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

FORD `04 EXPLORER

Eddie Bauer Edition 59,000 miles, 4 door, 3 row seats, V6, all power options, moon roof, video screen $12,999. 570-690-3995 or 570-287-0031

FORD `04 FREESTAR

Limited. Leather. 7 passenger.Remote doors. DVD player, premium sound. Rear A/C. 57,800 miles. $8,995. Call 570-947-0771

FORD `06 RANGER

2WD, regular cab, 4 Cylinder, 5 speed, CD/radio & cruise control. 64K miles. All maintenance records available. Truck is very clean! $7,700 (570) 401-0684

FORD `90 TRUCK

17’ box. Excellent running condition. Very Clean. $4,300. Call 570-287-1246

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD 02 F150 Extra Cab. 6

Cylinder, 5 speed. Air. 2WD. $4,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

FORD 03 RANGER

Special Edition. Maroon, Fully loaded. Leather seats. TV/DVD, navigation, sun roof plus many other extras. 3rd seat . Only 1,900 Miles. Brand New. Asking $37,000 (570) 328-0850

HONDA 06 CRV SE Leather & Moonroof. $18,745

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

HUMMER ‘06 H3 Leather & moonroof $20,880

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

JEEP `02 GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO

Triple black, economical 6 cylinder. 4x4 select drive. CD, remote door opener, power windows & locks, cruise, tilt wheel. 108k highway miles. Garage kept. Super clean inside and out. No rust. Sale price $6,895. Scranton. Trade in’s accepted. 570-466-2771

JEEP `03 LIBERTY

SPORT. Rare. 5 speed. 23 MPG. 102K highway miles. Silver with black interior. Immaculate condition, inside and out. Garage kept. No rust, maintenance records included. 4wd, all power. $6,900 or best offer, trades will be considered. Call 570-575-0518

JEEP 06 GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO

Moonroof. Alloys. Low Miles. $15,880

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

JEEP 06 WRANGLER Eagle Edition. Auto. V-6. $18,990

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD 05 ESCAPE XLT Sunroof, leather,

Local New SUV Trade! $6,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

LEXUS `06 GX 470

Cypress Pearl with ivory leather interior. Like new condition, garage kept. All service records. Brand new tires. All options including premium audio package, rear climate control, adjustable suspension, towing package, rear spoiler, Lexus bug guard. 48,500 miles.

$27,450

(570) 237-1082

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

MAZDA ‘04 TRIBUTE LX

Automatic, V6 Sunroof, CD 1 owner Extra Clean! $4,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

JEEP ‘07 CHEROKEE

Only 23,000 miles! $19,750

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

MAZDA 03 MPV VAN V6. CD Player.

1 owner vehicle!! $3,495 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

MITSUBISHI `08 RAIDER V

ERY GOOD CONDITION!

29,500 miles. 24X4 drive option, 4 door crew cab, sharp silver color with chrome step runners, premium rims, good tires, bedliner, V-6, 3.7 liter. Purchased at $26,900. Dealer would sell for $18,875. Asking $16,900 (570) 545-6057

MITSUBISHI `11

OUTLANDER SPORT SE AWD, Black interi-

or/exterior, start/ stop engine with keyless entry, heated seats, 18” alloy wheels, many extra features. Only 4,800 miles. 10 year, 100,000 mile warranty. $23,500. Willing to negotiate. Serious inquires only - must sell, going to law school. (570) 793-6844

MITSUBISHI `97 15’ CUBE VAN Cab over, 4 cylinder diesel engine. Rebuilt automatic transmission. Very good rubber. All around good condition inside & out. Well maintained. Ready to work. PRICE REDUCED! $6,195 or best offer Call 570-650-3500 Ask for Carmen

NISSAN ‘10 FRONTIER SE

6K miles! Automatic. $19,950

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD ‘99 F150

4x4. Short box. Auto. 4.6L. V8. 1 Owner!! $4,495. Call For Details! 570-696-4377

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

JEEP ‘07 PATRIOT 4WD - Alloys $17,440

GMC `04 4500 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924 Duramax Diesel engine. Aluminum 16’ft Mickey box truck; allison automatic transmission; heavy duty tuck-away lift gate with roll up rear door; translucent roof; exhaust brakes; inside adjustable mirrors; Oak floor; new heavy duty batteries and new tires; under CDL. Excellent condition. 114k miles. $17,500 OBO (570) 855-7197 (570) 328-3428

LEXUS `96 LX 450 Full time 4WD, Pearl white with like new leather ivory interior. Silver trim. Garage kept. Excellent condition. 84,000 miles, Asking $10,750 570-654-3076 or 570-498-0005

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

SUZUKI `07 XL-7 56,000 miles,

automatic, all-wheel drive, 4 door, air conditioning, all power, CD player, leather interior, tinted windows, custom wheels, $13,000 Call 570-829-8753 Before 5:00 p.m.

TRACTOR TRAILERS

FREIGHTLINER ’97 MIDROOF 475 CAT & 10 speed transmission. $12,000 FREIGHTLINER ’99 CONDO 430 Detroit, Super 10 transmission. Asking $15,000. ‘88 FRUEHAUF 45’ with sides. All aluminum, spread axle. $6,500. 2 storage trailers. 570-814-4790

VOLVO `08 XC90 Fully loaded, moon

roof, leather, heated seats, electric locks, excellent condition. New tires, new brakes and rotors. 52,000 miles highway $26,500/ best offer. 570-779-4325 570-417-2010 till 5

457 Wanted to Buy Auto

ALL JUNK CAR & TRUCKS WANTED Highest Prices Paid In Cash!!!

$11,995

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

451

JEEP 08 COMPASS

4 WD. Auto. CD. $15,880

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

PONTIAC 02 MONTANA V6. Nice

Inexpensive Van! $2,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

SATURN `04 VUE

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

MERCURY `07 MARINER One owner. Luxury

4x4. garage kept. Showroom condition, fully loaded, every option 34,000 miles. REDUCED $15,900 (570)825-5847

65K, Auto, Loaded. Needs transmission/airbags. Book value $10,000. Sell $3,000 or best offer (570) 829-2875 (570) 332-1252

FREE REMOVAL Call V&G Anytime 288-8995 Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

Building/ Construction/ Skilled Trades

EXPERIENCED HEAVY EQUIPMENT MECHANIC Must have Class B

CDL, clean driving record, have own tools, be a selfstarter. Fax resume with work experience to: 570-675-5739

HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR/DRILLER

Minimum 2 years experience operating top hammer & DTH drills. Fax 570693-0170 or email mlever@verizon.net

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

MASON’S LABORER

Needed. Must have experience & knowledgement of masonry work. Valid PA driver’s license required. Please call 570-822-4266 or 570-704-7952

522

Education/ Training

CHILDCARE TEACHERS NEEDED

Degree or childcare experience preferred. MT Top, Wilkes-Barre. 570-905-3322

PART-TIME SCHOOL COUNSELOR

(Licensed Social Worker preferred but Certified School Counselor will also be accepted) to work with “at-risk” youth in an alternative school setting. Hours to be discussed at interview. Please contact Randy Spencer at rspencer@youth servicesagency.org. FBI, child, criminal and medical clearances are required upon hiring.

TEACHER

Little People Day Care 280 Hanover Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702

527 Food Services/ Hospitality

SOUS CHEF Apply in person:

Isabella Restaurant

503

Accounting/ Finance

TAX PREPARER

Free Tax School. Earn extra income after taking course. Flexible schedules. Small fee for books & supplies. STARTS 9/20 LIBERTY TAX Edwardsville & Wyoming 288-4007 Pittston & Plains 883-7829 Wilkes-Barre & Hanover Twp 208-1096

506 Administrative/ Clerical OFFICE ASSISTANT: Part Time $10/hour Must be compassionate and friendly. Dependable and flexible. Minimum 2 years experience. Knowledge in all Microsoft applications. Send resume to info@cancer wellnessnepa.org No Phone Calls. Deadline is Sept. 13.

OFFICE POSITION NEEDED Nardone Brothers Bakery is currently accepting Resumes for our office located in the Hanover Industrial Park. The successful candidate should have experience in working in a fast paced office setting. The candidate should be able to multi task and have experience working in a fast paced office setting. In addition to this the candidate should also have experience in processing transactions, handling incoming phone calls, and interacting with our customers on a daily basis. Customer Service/Call Center Service is a plus. Experience using Microsoft applications such as Excel and Word are necessary. This is a permanent full time position with the starting salary beginning at $10.00 per hour. Benefit package also supplied.

Do you need more space? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way to clean out your closets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

For immediate consideration please forward a current resume to:

Nice, clean interior. Runs good. New battery & brakes. All power. CD. $6,800 570-762-8034 570-696-5444

John Surdy Controller Nardone Brothers Bakery Inc. 420 New Commerce Blvd Wilkes Barre, PA 18706

SUZUKI4x4. `03 XL-7 85K. Auto.

509

1140 Route 315 Wilkes-Barre, PA

533

Installation/ Maintenance/ Repair

AUTOBODY PERSON

Tools are required. Some experience needed. Apply in person at Bob’s Auto Center 445 West Union St. Nanticoke, PA 18634

AUTOBODY TECH OR PAINTER Minimum 5 years

experience. Great starting salary ,benefits. Good working environment. Must have own tools. Call Steve @ 779-0621 or stop in. Behind Dunkin Donuts in Plymouth.

542

Logistics/ Transportation

DRIVERS NEEDED: Maxum Petroleum is currently seeking Transport Drivers (CDL Class A) with Hazmat and Tanker for our Scranton, PA location. Not an over the road trucking company. We offer a full benefit package available the first of the month following 30 days of employment including 401K company match. We offer DOT roadside and annual achievable safety bonus programs based on your safety performance. Paid holidays, sick days and vacation days are provided as well. EOE Requirements: Class A Commercial Drivers License, HAZMAT & Tanker endorsements, Must have two years verifiable experience and clean driving record, Positive Attitude/Willing to Work Apply online at http://www. maxumpetroleum. com/careers.aspx

ROLL OFF TRUCK DRIVER Class A or Class B

CDL. Preferred 2 years experience. Full time + ample overtime. Benefits include company paid health insurance, holidays, vacation and 401k. Send resume to c/o The Times Leader Box 2750 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250

542

Logistics/ Transportation

NES RENTALS NES RENTALS, a leader in a multi-billion dollar rental industry for construction is looking to make immediate hires for the following positions in the PITTSTON, PA area:

DRIVER

You will operate multi-dimensional construction equipment, delivery trucks, including tractor trailer combinations to pick up and deliver equipment to and from customer work sites, and is able to train in safe usage of the equipment. H.S. diploma (or equivalent), the ability to lift 70 lbs., have a valid CDL license, satisfactory driving record, and knowledge of federal motor carrier regulations is required. Two years of commercial driving experience involving the movement of trucks and construction equipment including oversized loads required. Knowledge of safety procedures for securing and transporting cargo is also essential. NES RENTALS offers competitive wages, medical/ dental, vision, tuition reimbursement, and 401(k).

For consideration, apply online at our Careers center at www. nesrentals. com/careers.

NES recognizes and values diversity. We are an EOE/AA/M/F/D/V employer.

545

Marketing/ Product

TELEMARKETING

Our Call Center is expanding in Wilkes-Barre. Immediate openings for day & night shifts. Excellent base rate + lucrative bonus plan. Call 570-825-9402

548 Medical/Health

ASSIST THE ELDERLY CareGivers America is hiring CareGivers & CNAs for nonmedical homecare services. No Experience Needed. Flexible hours, Competitive pay, Referral Bonuses, more. Luzerne & Wyoming Counties. Apply online at: www.caregivers america.com or 570-585-4624

COMMUNITY HOME WORKER Full time Monday

though Friday 11AM until 7PM to work with individuals with intellectual disabilities in a community home. Experience is helpful, paid training is provided. Valid drivers license is required. For information or application, call IMPACT SYSTEMS, Inc. at (570) 829-3671. Starting Salary is $8.85 per hour. + benefits Drug free workplace EOE

LONG TERM CARE POSITIONS: • Director of

Therapeutic Recreation – must be a Qualified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist, Activities Professional licensed /registered in PA or eligible for certification, an occupational therapist or an occupational therapy assistant or has 2 years experience in a social/recreational program within the last 5 years with one full time in patient activities in a health care setting. • LPN – 7-3 & 3-11 Full Time • RN Supervisor – Full Time Float 3-11/11-7 between Little Flower Manor & St. Luke’s Villa. Flexible schedule and great starting rate, plus sign-on bonus. • C.N.A. – 3-11/11-7 Full & Part Time • Resident Assis tant for Person al Care – part time all shifts • Cook, Dietary Aide and Porter – per diem AM and PM shifts Apply: LITTLE FLOWER MANOR 200 S. Meade St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702 pmelski@lfmstr.com Fax: 570-408-9760 EOE

708

600 FINANCIAL 610

Business Opportunities

IceBusy CreamWest Parlor/Deli Side

Shopping Center. Soft & Hard Ice Cream, soups, sandwiches, hotdogs. Interior & exterior furniture included. All equipment, inventory & supplies & LLC included. $39,900 No Real Estate 570-287-2552

LIQUOR LICENSE $19,500. CALL JOHN 570-357-3055 NE PA TAX & ACCOUNTING PRACTICE

FOR SALE. Serious Inquiries Send Letter Of Interest to Box 2740 C/O Times Leader 15 N Main St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa 18711

630 Money To Loan “We can erase your bad credit 100% GUARANTEED.” Attorneys for the Federal Trade Commission say they’ve never seen a legitimate credit repair operation. No one can legally remove accurate and timely information from your credit report. It’s a process that starts with you and involves time and a conscious effort to pay your debts. Learn about managing credit and debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

700 MERCHANDISE 702

Air Conditioners

AIR CONDITIONERS (2) $40 each 570-824-3825

708

Antiques & Collectibles

$ ANTIQUES BUYING $

Old Toys, model kits, Bikes, dolls, guns, Mining Items, trains & Musical Instruments, Hess. 474-9544 COINS Walking Liberty Halves 1928S1936D-1938-P-1939 S $90. 287-4135

JACKO ANTIQUES

134 Route 11, Larksville (Next to Woody’s Fireplace & Pro-Fix) Oak Icebox. Mahogany Stack Bookcase, Oak Stack Bookcase. Lionel & American Flyer Trains, Coins. We do upholstery, furniture repair, chair caning, re-gluing, cloth & rush seats. We also buy Gold, Silver & Coins. 570-855-7197 or 570-328-3428

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

MILLER BEER collectors tin $20. Music Box from SF music box company $20. Italian plate Colosseum $20. 570-760-4830 PIANO Livingston upright player piano, pump style with approximate 35 music rolls, ground level removal. $100. 5-piece drum set, Sonor Force 1003 includes bass, snare, floor tom, 2 top toms, zildian high-hat, crash and ride cymbals, also, all stands, seat cymbal case & noise pads. $425. (570) 287-1646 RECORD ALBUM COLLECTION 46 total $10. for all. 570-825-9744 SMURF DOLLS hand crocheted, papa & smurefette dolls. Very good condition $50. 570-814-4315

Antiques & Collectibles

YEARBOOKS: Coughlin H.S. 26, 28, 32, 34, 43-44, 46, 49, 51-55, 61, 63, 67, 86-88, 94; GAR H.S. 34-37, 4247, 55-56, 61, 7273, 80, 84, 05, 06, Meyers H.S.: 60, 74-77, Wyoming Valley West H.S. 6869, 71, 73, 78, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 90, 93; Old Forge H.S. 66, 72, 74; Kingston H.S. 38-45, 49, 64; Plymouth H.S. 2933, 35, 37, 38-39, 46-48, 53-55, Hanover H.S. 5152, 54; Berwick H.S. 52-53, 56-58, 60, 67, 68-69; Lehman H.S. 73-76, 78, 80; Westmoreland H.S. 52-54; Nanticoke Area H.S. 76; Luzerne H.S. 51-52, 56-57; West Pittston H.S. Annual 26-28, 31-32, 54, 59-60, 66; Bishop Hoban H.S. 72-75; West Side Central Catholic H.S. 65, 75, 80-81, 84; Pittston H.S. 63; St. Mary’s H.S. 29; Northwest H.S. 73, 76, 77, 78; Lake Lehman H.S. 74, 76, 78 Call 570-825-4721

710

Appliances

APPLIANCE PA RT S E T C .

Used appliances. Parts for all brands. 223 George Ave. Wilkes-Barre 570-820-8162 COFFEE POT electric 8 cup by Farberware excellent condition $20. 570-814-4315 FREEZER upright, 11.3 Cu ft Fridgidare excellent condition $75. 570-417-4177 MICRO-WAVE, Litton $20. Call 570-825-9744 PRESSURE COOKER electric Wolfgang Puck Bistro Collection 7.5 quart complete with inner basket for steaming, instruction/ recipe book & additional glass lid for serving. Never used. $50.479-1463

Retired Repairman top loading

Cemetery Plots/Lots

CEMETERY PLOTS FOR SALE (4) Four plots, all together. Crestlawn Section of Memorial Shrine Cemetery in Kingston Twp. $600 each. Willing to split. For info, call (570) 388-2773

CEMETERY PLOTS

Plymouth National Cemetery in Wyoming. 6 Plots. $450 each. Call 570-825-3666

CEMETERY PLOTS (3) together. Maple Lawn Section of Dennison Cemetery. Section ML. $450 each. 570-822-1850

FOREST HILLS CEMETERY Carbondale,

Philadelphia suburb near the old Nabisco & Neshaminy Mall. 2 graves + concrete vault with possibility of double deck. Estimated Value $7,000. Asking $5,000. Call 570-477-0899 or 570-328-3847

MEMORIAL SHRINE CEMETERY 6 Plots Available

May be Separated Rose Lawn Section $450 each 570-654-1596

MEMORIAL SHRINE

LOTS FOR SALE 6 lots available at Memorial Shrine Cemetery. $2,400. Call 717-774-1520 SERIOUS INQUIRES ONLY

726

Clothing

BOOTS: size 9 1/2 ladies black leather tall riding boots. $40. Size 10 Ariat ladies black leather tall riding boots. $50. Size 11 black leather ladies tall riding boots. $40.00 All very good condition. 570-436-1668

Whirlpool & Kenmore Washers, Gas & Electric Dryers. 570-833-2965 570-460-0658

CLOTHES women’s 2x tops, jeans, sneakers, purses $2-$6. Puzzles .50$3. Good condition. 570-288-2989

WASHER & DRYER GE (energy star) gas dryer, like new, rarely used. $500 both or best offer. 570-407-1135

DRESS JACKET LEATHER with belt, genuine deer skin, ladies, approximate size 10 $40. 570-868-0440

Why Spend Hundreds on New or Used Appliances? Most problems with your appliances are usually simple and inexpensive to fix! Save your hard earned money, Let us take a look at it first! 30 years in the business. East Main Appliances 570-735-8271 Nanticoke

712

Baby Items

BACKLESS BOOSTER SEAT with lap bar 30-60 lbs $5. Car seat, gray with blue trim, good condition $30. Stroller, green & cream plaid asking $30. Baby bath tub with shower $15. Wooden changing table asking $50. 239-5292 CRIB white sleigh Crib $125. Car seat and extra base $50. 570-287-2884 STROLLER blue Cosco $50. Jeep stroller, green, 3 wheel jogger with Ipod hookup $75. 2 umbrella strollers mint green & Winnie the Pooh, excellent condition $25. each. Pack N Play crib $65. 570-735-0448

714

Bridal Items

CENTERPIECES, 20, silver frosted calla lily, 32” high, $20 each. CHAIR COVERS, 130 ivory linen look, for folding chair, $162.50. for all. NAPKINS, 120 ivory linen look, large, $32.50 for all. CHAIR SASH, 130, chocolate satin, $65 for all. OVERLAY TABLECLOTH, 1490”, chocolate satin. $98 for all. TABLE CLOTH, 6 120” ivory, round, linen, $48 for all. TULLE, 2 bolts, white, 54” x 40 yards, $15 for both. TULLE, 2 bolts, chocolate brown, 54” x 40 yards, $15 for both. MIRRORS, 20 - 16”, for tables, $80 for all. 570-472-3820 WEDDING GOWN white size 11, sleeveless with a lot of beading $200. 570-542-2218

716

Building Materials

STATUES ELVIS PRESLEY (4) Call for details $20. each. 570-868-5066

BATHROOM SINK SET: Gerber white porcelain bathroom sink with mirror and medicine cabinet. Matching set. $80. 570-331-8183

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED!

PAVER BLOCK used herringbone with edging, around 400. Reasonable. 570-654-0907

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

720

STORM DOOR left hand Forever, white complete with all hardware & brackets. Very good condition. $80. 570-814-4315

PURSE, Louis Vuitton, zippered top & shoulder bag, $325. 570-288-4451

728

Commercial/ Industrial Equipment

INDUSTRIAL DIESEL GENERATOR Spartan Model

SG-7500D. 418cc. Direct injection, remote control, electric start, cart. New. $2,500. Call 570-474-6926

730

Computer Equipment & Software

LAPTOP S: off lease hp laptop>p4mc , 2.25ram,40hd,cdrw +dvd,wifi.w7ult,ofc1 0,antivirus+more. free, new battery + bag $200. Off lease compaq laptop>p4 mc,2.0ram,60hd,cd rw+dvd,wifi.w7ult,of c10,antivirus+more.f ree, new battery +bag-free delivery. $225.570.862.2236 PRINTER Lexmark All-in-One USB Ink Jet X6170. Fax, Copy, Scan, Print. Very good condition cable. $25. 570-696-1267.

732

Exercise Equipment

EXERCISE STEPPER with weights $20. 570-592-8853 TREADMILL Weslo electric, $50. 570-760-4830 WEIDER HOME GYM /crosstrainer. will consider offers $90. 570-690-6674 WEIGHT BENCH. Weider Pro. Pull down & leg extension. 21/2 to 35 lb. weights, excellent condition $80. 570-606-6624

742

Furnaces & Heaters

COAL STOVE Pittston Happy Thought for kitchen or basement, 6 burner, tan cream color $400. neg. 570-654-9993 FIREPLACE unvented natural gas fireplace with wood mantel $350. 570-779-3332 HEATER Kerosene $25. Oil boiler, runs great $80. 570-760-4830 HEATER: vent free natural gas & propane, mount on wall or floor, new in box with warranty, thermostat & blower. Call after 6 pm $190. 675-0005

744

Furniture & Accessories

CHEST of drawers. French Provincial. Solid wood. $95. 570-905-4818

744

Furniture & Accessories

BED, queen size, complete, 2 matching nightstands $400. Couch, leather, $225. Rocking Chair, white wicker $30. End table, wicker white, $25. End table, glass top $20. 570-288-4451 BEDROOM SET dark oak, frame, 2 night stands, chest of drawers, double dresser with mirrors for $400. Living room set floral print with coffee table & end tables glass for $300. Grill $30. 570-824-3825 BEDROOM SET, 6 piece, dresser, mirror, chest, full or queen size headboard, 2 night stands, black marble finish with gold trim. $350.814-5477 BEDROOM SET, FREE, 5 pieces, includes dresser w/ mirror, chest, 2 night stands, headboard & footboard. Must pick up. Call 570-379-2240 after 4pm. COFFEE TABLE 39” square, wood & glass $40. 570-430-9231 COMPUTER DESK $25. 570-592-8853 COMPUTER DESK, Sauder, drawers & shelves for storage, excellent condition $85. Hutch/TV Cabinet, Sauder, 2 drawers, like new $75. (570) 735-1730 (570) 239-4864 COUCH & Loveseat, plush blue $70. New day bed with quilt/pillows $150. Dresser dark wood $50. 570-283-9085 DESK & matching dresser $50. Antique children’s desk $100. Cherry wood kitchen set, 4 chairs $75. Set of oak end tables $50. Queen size bedframe & headboard $75. Armoire 1940’s $100. 570-328-3169 ENTERTAINMENT CENTER, solid Oak $150. COMPUTER DESK, Sauder, good condition $20. 570-474-1648

FURNISH FOR LESS

* NELSON * * FURNITURE * * WAREHOUSE * Recliners from $299 Lift Chairs from $699 New and Used Living Room Dinettes, Bedroom 210 Division St Kingston Call 570-288-3607 HUTCH: hunter green & wood hutch $40. Twin bedroom set complete, dresser with mirror, chest, 2 night stands for $150. Dining room set with dry sink & oak hutch $300. Computer desk $50. 570-592-7723 LAMPS (2) parlor stand up, grey metal & black. $25 each. 570-740-1246 LOVE SEAT blue & white print $75. Beige entertainment center with wheels comes with free 24” color TV, all for $65. 2 end tables, 1 matching coffee table, loads of storage, medium color wood $75. for all 3. 570-696-0187 LOVE SEAT, sofa bed, burgundy, like new excellent condition. $100. 570-283-5524

AFFORDABLE

MATTRESS SALE We Beat All Competitors Prices!

Mattress Guy

Twin sets: $159 Full sets: $179 Queen sets: $199 All New American Made 570-288-1898 PATIO SET green, 66x36 glass top table & 2 end chairs, 2 bench, type chairs all with cushions. $55. Black entertainment center with glass doors & storage for CDs & DVDs 60wx49hx19d $50. 570-868-5450 RACE CAR BED: twin size Little Tikes bed frame, red with black tires, toy box hood, headboard 2 section shelf. Paid $275. must see! sell for $100. 570-825-7331 RECLINER Red Leather $30. 570-287-2517 ROCKER/RECLINER beige, like new, rarely used. $250 or best offer. 570-407-1135 SECTIONAL: Beautiful 3 piece Sage green microfiber . Must see to appreciate. Paid $2,500 new, asking $850. 570-212-8445

746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets

DURYEA

216 Swetland St Saturday, Sept 17 9am - 3pm 3 Family Yard Sale!


PAGE 6D

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011

746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets

746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets

746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets US/FOREIGN/ CANADIAN COINS & CURRENCY HIGHEST PREMIUMS FOR SILVER DOLLARS & BETTER COINS

KINGSTON

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

49 Jones St Hudson Section Saturday 9/17 Multi-Family Sale! High-End Designer Porch Sale (Prada, Kate Spade,Tadashi, DianeVonF). Baby girl clothes, Chico Stroller Set, Baby swing, furniture, antique style bedroom set, front door, window, bricks, home decor, kitchen, clothing of all kinds. We have everything!

JEWELRY & INGOTS STERLING SILVER Old Postcards & Local Photo’s, Lead Soldiers & Old Toys, Mining & Military Stuff, Old Crocks, Jugs Local Advertising

STAMPS

excellent condition. $675. Residential circuit switch panel & connector plugs $225. 570-855-0095

Too many baby toys? Pass them on, sell them with an ad! 570-829-7130

756

758 Miscellaneous

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted Highest Prices Paid In CA$H

Over 35 years, a respected coin dealer.

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! 548 Medical/Health

548 Medical/Health

HERITAGE GALLERIES DALLAS, PA

Across from Dallas Agway on Rt. 415 Look for blue & white signs NEW HOURS TUES-FRI, 10-6 SAT, 10-5 570-674-2646

752 Landscaping & Gardening ARE YOU TIRED OF BEING RAKED? Call Joe, 570823-8465 for all your landscaping and cleanup needs. See our ad in Call an Expert Section.

RNs

Part Time-Every other weekend

LPNs

Medical Equipment

WHEEL CHAIR very good condition $95. 570-905-4818

PAYING RECORD HONEST CA$H PRICES

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Machinery & Equipment

HONDA GAS GENERATOR 5,000 watts,

GOLD & SILVER

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! Land for sale? Place an ad and SELL 570-829-7130

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

754

BUYING

PLAINS

Grace Episcopal Church, Butler St. behind Dairy Queen THURSDAY 9/15, 9-3PM FRIDAY 9/16, 9-12PM Bag Day

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

FREE PICKUP

570-574-1275 BACKPACK Billabong $15. Twilight book collection $20. 2 cassette decks both $40. Computer monitor Dell $20. 570-760-4830 BASEBOARD type heaters (3) 3’ Lasco. $35. each. Carnival punch bowl set $100. 905-4818

Housekeeping Aides

Patrick & Deb’s Lawn Care See our ad under Call An Expert 1162 Landscape & Garden

BEDLINER: 89 Chevy S10 truck bedliner, standard 6’ cab $25. Four barrel carb running from running Chevy motor $50. 5 used storm windows 29x53.5” $50. all. 570-740-1246 after 5pm.

Activities Assistant

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

Per Diem 7-3, 3-11 & 11-7

CNAs

Full Time 7-3 & 3-11 Part Time 7-3, 3-11 & 11-7 Full & Part Time Day Shift

Full Time Prior experience with the aged preferred

570-735-1487

For More Information Or To Schedule an Interview Contact 877-339-6999 x1 Email Jobs@horizonhrs.com

WE PAY THE MOST IN CASH

BUYING 11am to 11pm

395 Middle Road, Nanticoke Pa

758 Miscellaneous HEATER: Rudd Ever Kleen 40gl power vent natural gas hot water heater. Used a couple months. It has the power vent already attached. $700. Astra Crest cream colored stone sink, This is brand new in the box which measures 34x22 $50. 570-793-3982

BOOK/STORAGE CASE, Child’s Step 2 Life & Hide, like new, $20. TOYBOX & SHELVES, matching set, Elmo, like new, $25. Fisher price Smart Cycle 36 years, like new with box + 4 games Cost 4185 sell for $50. 570-735-2694 CLOCK Seth Thomas Tambor clock working 460. Stein with army men, Avon $15. Stein with horses, Avon $15. Penn reel fishing pole $18. 570-574-0271 FOOD SAVER 6 containers, new + lids & hose. $20. 814-4315

Line up a place to live in classified! GARAGE SALE LEFT OVER ITEMS

Dog Kennel $20. Doll collection $30. Ceramic Christmas tree $14. Spiderman toys $30. Toy cars large lot $10. Star Wars & Star Trek action figures 3 for 410. Tin wind up toys $5. each. 868-5438

GARAGE SALE LEFT OVER ITEMS

Vicks humidifier with extra filter $10. Women’s champion deluxe ice skates size 9, new $20. Sauder printer stand oak color $10. Medline foldable wheelchair, excellent condition $80. 457-2147

GARAGE SALE LEFT OVER ITEMS

XBOX games $4. each or $3 for $10. CDs $3 each. Disney pins $3 each & up. Hard cover books $3. each. Paper back books .50 each. Boys navy blazers $5. each. Baskets .50 each. Fishing poles $3 & up. Women’s small tops & sweaters .50 each. German text boos .50 each. 570-822-5560

GARAGE SALE LEFTOVER ITEMS

10’X20’ king canopy $75. Granite top kitchen & wine rack $75. Papasan chair & base $40. Sharp swivel microwave $30. 570-287-2884

Competitive Pay Rates, Benefits & Shift Differentials

412 Autos for Sale

758 Miscellaneous BOOK & CD “Power Trading/ Power Living”, with cd. Learn the keys to investing in the stock market. Regular $99. sell $39 or best offer. 570*288-2949

39 Prospect St • Nanticoke

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

GLASS DOOR. 4 way glass door for bath tub. $25 570-331-8183

412 Autos for Sale

LIGHT FIXTURES (2) 4 light fluorescent oak trim, like new $35. 570-417-4177 MOTORCYCLE HELMETS (3) $15 each. ALBUMS 60s & 70s $3. singles, $5. doubles. 570-328-3169 PAINTBALL GUN 98 custom Tippman, 3 CO2 tanks, cleaning kit, 3,000 paintballs $100. 570-430-9231 REINDEER on wagon small lights. white, new condition. $15 GRILL electric ceramic 12x12, non stick, smoke free, new in box $15. AIR COMPRESSOR DC 12 volt new in box $10. PAPER SHREDDER Arora, like new $10. 570-655-2154 SEWING MACHINE Concept 11 $100. Nordic trac $50. Exercise bike free. Must pick up. 570-825-0178 SNOWBLOWER, Yard Machine. 8HP, 24” width, Dual Auger electric start engine. Auger does not spinneeds work $150. 570-474-1648

JUST TRADED SPECIALS LOADED WITH LOCAL TRADES 2007 DODGE CHARGER SE

2009 CHEVY COBALT LT

2010 JEEP WRANGLER X 4DR 4X4

$

12,995

2011 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO 4X4

All New Body Style, Preferred Equipment

27,995

$

2010 CHRYSLER SEBRING TOURING CONV

27K Pampered Miles, Tons of Warranty

$

18,995

2007 GMC YUKON DENALI XL

One Owner, New GMC Trade, Moonroof, AWD

26,995

$

Just Traded, Extra Sporty!

$

11,995

2010 FORD FOCUS SE

One Owner, Perfectly Maintained

$

14,995

2003 MERCURY MOUNTAINEER 4X4

Just Traded, Only 80K Miles, 7 Passenger

$

8,995

2005 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO 4X4

Local Trade, Power Galore, Hurry On This One!

$

10,995

$

24,995

2011 FORD ESCAPE XLT 4X4

All The Toys, Factory Warranty

$

23,995

2003 CHEVY SILVERADO XCAB 4X4

Local One Owner, High Miler, Low, Low Price!

$

7,995

2010 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT’S

Choose From 3, Tons Of Warranty

$

From

18,995

*Tax and Tags Extra.

HOURS:

A Benson Family Dealership

Monday Thru Thursday 8:00am - 8:00pm Friday & Saturday 8:00am - 5:00pm

NASCAR TICKETS tickets. NASCAR

2 Sprint Cup Series AAA 400 at Dover International Speedway on Sunday October 2, 2011. Tickets at Start/Finish Line, Row 1. $130. Call 570-262-5153

784

Tools

RETROFIT LASER GUIDE for most 10” miter saws, works great! $12. call 570-696-1267

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified! 786 Toys & Games TONKA metal yellow dump truck, sturdy built in excellent condition $10. 570-735-6638

TELEVISION, 51” Samsung, new in box, $500 cash only. 570-407-0588

762

Musical Instruments

ALTO SAXOPHONE Selmer AS500 Like New $550. 570-574-2853 GUITAR 6-string acoustic: carlo robelli, soft case, strings, & picks included $250. or best offer. 570-855-3113 ORGAN: Hammond “Elegante” console 2 keyboards, full pedal board, with matching padded storage bench. $800. 570-735-1730 PIANO: From our rec room to yours. A great sounding Kimball studio piano & bench in excellent condition. $850. 570-735-3050

TRUMPET-Yamaha YTR 2335 with case. Great shape, hardly used. Perfect for pro or novice. $650. 929-1086

774

Restaurant Equipment

RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT

Bev Air 2 door refrigerator/ sandwich prep table, Model SP48-12, $1300. For details

RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT

Black Beauty, 29K Miles

Tickets

SOMERSET TURN OVER MACHINE Model # SPM45, $500; ALSO, Bunn Pour Over Coffee Machine, Model # STF15, $225 For more info, call

570-498-3616

RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT

Somerset Dough Sheeter, Model CAR-100. Only 1 available. $1,500 Call for more info

570-498-3616

776 Sporting Goods ANGLERS TOUCH 7’ 2 piece rod & Zebco Spin Cast Omega Z03 Reel $65. Micro Lite IMG Graphite 8ft 2 piece rod and Shimano Symetre Reel $60. Fenwick 6’ 6” 2 piece rod &d Shimano spinning side Stab Reel $35. Firm. Call 570-8257251 after 5pm GOLF BAG, Precise professional, black/ navy standup bag, putter tube, ball holder, 6 pockets in excellent condition. $25. 570-696-1267. POP-UP cloth paintball bunker/tentnew, red & black. $20. Huffy Micro bike blue, $10. Bike, Next Brand, Wipeout, red, 20” $30. Skateboards $8. each. Plastic bike ramp set, new 50. 570-239-5292

780

Televisions/ Accessories

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER with 27” tv, excellent condition $100. 287-0023 TELEVISION: GE. 28” works good, needs remote $80. 570-740-1246 TV 27” Panasonic $40. 570-283-9085

794

906 Homes for Sale

WILKESBARREGOLD

(570)991-7448 (570)48GOLD8

1092 Highway 315 Blvd (Plaza 315) 315N .3 miles after Motorwold Mon-Sat 10am - 8pm Closed Sundays

Highest Cash Pay Outs Guaranteed We Pay At Least 78% of the London Fix Market Price for All Gold Jewelry Visit us at WilkesBarreGold.com Or email us at wilkesbarregold@ yahoo.com

800 PETS & ANIMALS 810

Cats

Stereo/TV/ Electronics

Video Game Systems/Games

ION DRUM ROCKER Great way to learn

drums! Ion Drum Rocker kit for use with Rock Band, on the Xbox 360. Heavy duty aluminum frame. Comes with 3 durable cymbals. Great rebound on pads, works perfectly. PULSE bass pedal also included, along with drum throne, Rock Band 2 and Beatles Rock Band. $175 for all. 570-814-3383

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

NEED CASH?

We Buy: Gold & Gold coins,

Silver, Platinum, old bills, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Diamonds, Gold Filled, Sterling Silver Flatware, Scrap Jewelry, Military items, old Tin & Iron Toys, Canadian coins & paper money, most foreign money (paper/coin). Visit our new location @ 134 Rt. 11, Larksville next to WOODY’S FIRE PLACE & PRO FIX.

We make house calls!

Buyer & seller of antiques! We also do upholstering. 570-855-7197 570-328-3428

$$ CASH PAID $$ VIDEO GAMES & SYSTEMS Highest $$ Paid

Guaranteed Buying all video games & systems. PS1 & 2, Xbox, Nintendo, Atari, Coleco, Sega, Mattel, Gameboy, Vectrex etc. DVD’s, VHS & CDs & Pre 90’s toys,

The Video Game Store

1150 S. Main Scranton Mon - Sat, 12pm – 6pm 570-822-9929

VITO’S & GINO’S Wanted: Junk Cars & Trucks Highest Prices Paid!!

Having trouble paying your mortgage? Falling behind on your payments? You may get mail from people who promise to forestall your foreclosure for a fee in advance. Report them to the Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency. Call 1-877FTC-HELP or click on ftc.gov. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

ASHLEY

19 Davis St. Very affordable single family, 3 bedroom, 2 bath starter home in a good location. MLS #10-4026 $29,900 Call Jay Crossin Ext. 23 Crossin Real Estate 570-288-0770

AVOCA

CATS & KITTENS 12 weeks & up.

All shots, neutered, tested,microchipped

VALLEY CAT RESCUE

824-4172, 9-9 only

815

Dogs

PAWS TO CONSIDER.... ENHANCE YOUR PET CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE

314 Packer St. Remodeled 3 bedroom with 2 baths, master bedroom and laundry on 1st floor. New siding and shingles. New kitchen. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3174 $99,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

AVOCA

Call 829-7130 Place your pet ad and provide us your email address This will create a seller account online and login information will be emailed to you from gadzoo.com “The World of Pets Unleashed” You can then use your account to enhance your online ad. Post up to 6 captioned photos of your pet Expand your text to include more information, include your contact information such as e-mail, address phone number and or website.

The Video Game Store 28 S. Main W.B. Open Mon- Sat, 12pm – 6pm 570-822-9929 / 570-941-9908

BACK MOUNTAIN 900 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

TV, 32” RCA , excellent condition, works great, $50. 570-474-1648

TOILET SEAT Sons Anarchy, airbrushed $85. 570-477-1269 TV 19” Samsung tube 15. Giant Southwest Picture $75. Wooden Teepee Southwest Shelf Stand $60. Southwest Rug, olive green with leaf imprint, approximate. 5x7 asking $40. 570-239-5292

WANTED JEWELRY

TV Phillips 32” HD TV/PIP great for playing video games. $85. 570-696-0187

782

906 Homes for Sale

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

TV 30" Panasonic, cable ready with remote. Perfect picture. $80. Call 570-655-8883.

788

Call 570-498-3616

Sport Pkg, White Beauty, Factory Warranty

Televisions/ Accessories

TIRES 225/70/R16 M&S 6/32’S tread very good condition. $130. 570-855-3113

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

A Benson Family Dealership

780

DOG, FREE Cocker Spaniel Puppy. 9 months old. Call 570-379-3898 GOLDEN RETRIEVER MIX, free to good home, 3 years old. Looks like 90% retriever. Up to date with all shots, house broken, very good & friendly with people & children. Excellent temperament,walks well on a leash. Can no longer keep. 570-443-9798. Serious inquiries only.

PUPPIES 570-453-6900 570-389-7877

ROTTWEILER PUPPIES

3 ACA registered male puppies. Parents on premises. Vet checked, 1st shorts. Tails docked, dew claw removed. 6 weeks old. $850 570-604-5734

912 Vine Street Over 3,500 square feet of living space with large detached 2 car garage and office– Vinyl Siding, Newer windows, Spacious Rooms. MUST BE SEEN! $159,900. MLS #10-3956 Call Pat McHale 570-613-9080

133 Frangorma Dr Bright & open floor plan. 5 year old 2 story. 9' ceiling 1st floor. Custom kitchen with stainless steel appliances. Family room with 14' ceiling & fireplace. Convenient location. MLS# 11-2572 $359,000 Call Geri 570-696-0888

BEAR CREEK

475 East Ave. Top to bottom re-do for this beautiful 3 bedroom, 1.75 bath, 2 story home located in the Meadow Run Lake community of Bear Creek. Tranquil setting, modern interior all re-done, granite countertops in the kitchen, exterior with new landscaping and stone patio with lake frontage to name a few! MLS 11-1643 $329,900 Call Jay A. Crossin 570-288-0770 Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

BEAR CREEK

6650 Bear Creek Blvd

Well maintained custom built 2 story nestled on 2 private acres with circular driveway - Large kitchen with center island, master bedroom with 2 walk-in closets, family room with fireplace, custom built wine cellar - A Must See property! $299,900 MLS# 10-4312 Call Geri 570-696-0888

Selling a Business? Reach more potential buyers with an ad in the classified section! 570-829-7130

BUYING JUNK VEHICLES $300 AND UP

$125 EXTRA IF DRIVEN, DRAGGED OR PUSHED IN!

NOBODY Pays More 570-760-2035

Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm • Happy Trails!

527 Food Services/ Hospitality

527 Food Services/ Hospitality

Dietary Supervisor

Our 121 bed skilled nursing and rehabilitation center seeks an experienced candidate to assist with scheduling, ordering supplies, direct supervision of kitchen staff etc. Long term care or experience in a healthcare setting is a plus! Competitive Salary & Benefits

For More Information Or To Schedule an Interview Contact 877-339-6999 x1 Email Jobs@horizonhrs.com

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified 395 Middle Road, Nanticoke Pa is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! 548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health You’re in bussiness with classified!

FREE PICKUP

288-8995

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE IN CLASSIFIED!

TOY4 for POODLE PUPPIES sale AKC 570-450-0997

845

Pet Supplies

DOG CRATE lARGE METAL WIRE $75. 570-779-3332

Doyouneedmorespace? Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale A yard or garage sale in classified in classified is the best way is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness You’re in bussiness with classified! with classified!

East Mountain 101 East Mountain Blvd. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702

ON-SITE JOB FAIR Full Time CNAs 2-10 shift Open House Wednesday, September 14 1pm – 7pm ALL ATTENDEES HAVE A CHANCE TO WIN A $50 GAS GIFT CARD!


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 906 Homes for Sale

BEAR CREEK VILLAGE

470 Lewis Drive Great house in great condition! Unique 1 1/2 story with 4 bedrooms & 2 1/2 baths on 2 acre wooded lot. Fireplaces in living room, dining room & family room. Modern kitchen with stainless appliances & breakfast bar. Hardwood floors. Flexible floor plan. MLS#11-2408 $349,9000 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

CONYNGHAM

DALLAS

DALLAS

DALLAS

DALLAS

DURYEA

EDWARDSVILLE

EXETER

FORTY FORT

160 Reservoir Road Lots of charm in this renovated century home, living room with fireplace, formal dining room, wonderful private setting with 18x36 in-ground pool and 2 car garage. MLS#11-1807 $235,000. Call Geri 570-696-0888

20 OAK DRIVE WOW! This home offers replacement windows, newer hot water heater, gas fireplace, hardwood floors, sun porch, large fenced rear yard, flagstone patio, heated inground pool, finished lower level, located in the Lehman School District. Just minutes from Harveys Lake, why not join the Beach Club this summer! It is a MUST SEE HOME! MLS#11-1258 $154,900 Bob Cook 696-6555 Jill Jones 696-6550

3 Crestview Dr. Well-constructed and maintained sprawling multilevel with 5,428 square feet of living space. Living room & dining room with hardwood floors & gas fireplace; eat-in kitchen with island; florida room. 5 bedrooms, 4 baths; 2 half-baths. Lower level rec room with wet bar & fireplace. leads to heated in-ground pool. Beautifully landscaped 2 acre lot. $575,000 MLS# 11-1798 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

REDUCED PRICE! Secluded on a hill but part of High Point Acres. 2 story Colonial, 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths. Large family room with fireplace and sliding door to screened porch. Community Swimming Pool. 2 car garage. Central AC. Wooded lot. $265,000. 11-1077 Besecker Realty 570-675-3611

805-807 Main St. Multi-Family. Large side by side double with separate utilities. 3 bedrooms each side with newer carpet, replacement windows and newer roof. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 11-3054 $89,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

9 Williams St. Large 4 bedroom home with nice rear deck, replacement windows, off street parking. Possible apartment in separate entrance. Loads of potential. For more info and pictures visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-2091 $69,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

OPEN HOUSE

JUST REDUCED! Great starter home! Three bedroom 2 story with living room & dining room. Nice sized kitchen. Lower level recreation room, 3 season porch, detached 1 car garage. Nice yard. Reduced to $75,000. MLS#11-2863 Call Ruthie (570) 714-6110

167 Main Street

1 YEAR HOMEOWNERS WARRANTY Nicely kept 2 story with 4 bedrooms, 1 & 1/2 baths, great wrap around porch, lovely back yard. In desirable Conyngham, PA. Close to Rt 80 and Rt 81. Nearby Shopping. Large eat in kitchen with dining area. “A MUST SEE” $159,000 MLS# 11-1146 Call Tony Wasco 570-855-2424 Trademark Realtor Group 570-613-9090

LINEUP LINE UP ASUCCESSFULSALE A GREAT DEAL... INCLASSIFIED! IN CLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! 468

Auto Parts

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 PAGE 7D

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

468

Auto Parts

DALLAS 20 Fox Hollow Drive

DALLAS Well maintained two story with fully finished lower level awaits its new family. 4-6 bedroom, 3.5 bath, 2 fireplaces. One year home warranty included. Wonderful neighborhood. Double lot. $310,000 MLS #11-1806 Call Tracy Zarola 570-696-0723

468

Harry’s UPull It

Auto Parts

AS ALWAYS ****HIGHEST PRICES***** PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED VEHICLES!!! DRIVE IN PRICES Call for Details (570) 459-9901 Vehicles must be COMPLETE !!

Plus Enter to Win $500.00 Cash!! DRAWING TO BE HELD SEPTEMBER 30 www.wegotused.com 548 Medical/Health

548 Medical/Health

210 42nd St. E Beautiful 3300 sq.ft. custom built Tudor home on 3.7 +/acres with stream, pond & gorgeous landscaping in a great country like setting. A home you'll be proud to own. MLS#10-4516 $ 399,900 Call Barbara Metcalf 570-696-0883

DALLAS

211 Hillside One Enjoy the comforts & amenities of living in a beautifully maintained townhouse, 3/4 Bedrooms, family room with fireplace out to deck. Bright & airy kitchen, finished lower level, Tennis, Golf & Swimming are yours to enjoy & relax. Maintenance free living. PRICE REDUCED! $210,000 MLS# 10-1221 Call Geri 570-696-0888

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

DALLAS

548 Medical/Health

248 Overbrook Rd. Lovely 4 bedroom cape cod situated in a private setting on a large lot. Vaulted ceiling in dining room, large walk in closet in 1 bedroom on 2nd floor. Some replacement windows. Call Today! MLS 11-2733 $125,000 Jay A. Crossin Extension 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

We are seeking candidates for a variety of positions in our Wilkes-Barre facility, including: Automation Mechanics Canister Technicians Materials Handlers Materials Coordinators Pharmacists Pharmacy Technicians Supervisors

To place your ad call...829-7130

DRUMS

DURYEA

226 S. Hunter Hwy

EXETER

DALLAS

314 Loyalville Road Very Nice 3 bedroom, 2 bath doublewide on 2 acres with detached 2 car garage and well maintained yard. Home has Anderson Thermopane windows, wood burning fireplace in TV room, walk-in closet, wall heater in full basement, 16x23.6 & 9.6x8.4 rear deck, 9.6x8.4 front deck, glass sliding door in kitchen, central air, black walnut trees, peach tree, paved driveway etc. MLS# 11-2679 REDUCED!!! $165,000 Five Mountains Realty 570-542-2141

26x40, 2 bedroom 1 bath ranch on a 103x200 lot. Fully landscaped with double lot paved driveway. Call 570-788-6798

DURYEA

1140 SPRING ST. Large 3 bedroom home with new roof, replacement windows, hardwood floors. Great location! For more information and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com. MLS 11-2636 $119,900. Call Tom 570-262-7716

PRICE REDUCED! 314 Bennett Street Refashioned 3 or 4 bedroom, two full modern baths. Two story, 2300sf, with level yard with lovely new landscaping and 1 car garage. New EVERYTHING in this charming must see property. Custom blinds throughout the home. Great neighborhood with Park beyond the backyard. MLS# 11-3776 $ 174,900 Call Patti 570-328-1752 Liberty Realty & Appraisal Services LLC

128 JEAN ST. Nice bi-level home on quiet street. Updated exterior. Large family room, extra deep lot. 2 car garage, enclosed rear porch and covered patio. For more information and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 11-2850 $189,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

EXETER

Looking to buy a home? Place an ad here and let the sellers know! 570-829-7130

DURYEA REDUCED

DURYEA DALLAS CUSTOM FAMILY HOME 37 MAPLE ST.

Built 2007. 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, double car attached garage, dining room, family room, living room, 125x125 lot, deck. Don’t hesitate, Dallas Schools, 2 story, gas heat, central air, whirlpool tub, walk-in closet, cherry kitchen, stone fireplace, full basement $275,000. Call (570) 498-0825 or email nmarr@ comcast.net.

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

DALLAS

NEW CONSTRUCTION 2,400 sq feet $329,000

patrickdeats.com 570-696-1041

Find homes for your kittens! Place an ad here! 570-829-7130

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

548 Medical/Health

548 Medical/Health

1219 SOUTH ST. Renovated 1/2 double with 3 bedrooms in nice neighborhood. Own for what it takes to rent. All new windows. For more info and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 11-2523 $54,900 Call Phil 570-313-1229

411 JONES ST. Beautiful 2 story English Tudor with exquisite gardens, surrounding beautiful in ground pool, private fenced yard with a home with too many amenities to list. Enjoy the summer here! Screened in porch and foyer that just adds to the great living space of the home For more info and photos: visit:www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 11-2720 $234,900 Call Phil 570-313-1229

DURYEA

SUNDAY, SEPT. 17 11a.m. -12:30p.m. 180 E. First Street $134,900 for a 5 room ranch, with spacious yard, enclosed porch and Central Air. 5 Rooms, 3 Bedrooms and full Bath. MLS #10-4365 Call Pat McHale 570-613-9080

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

EXETER

EDWARDSVILLE

Sunday 12pm-5pm

362 Susquehanna Ave

Completely remodeled, spectacular, 2 story Victorian home, with 3 bedrooms and 1.5 baths, new rear deck, full front porch, tiled baths and kitchen, granite countertops, all Cherry hardwood floors throughout, all new stainless steel appliances and lighting, new oil furnace, washer dryer in first floor bath. Great neighborhood, nice yard. $174,900 (30 year loan, $8,750 down, $887/month, 30 years @ 4.5%) Owner financing available. 570-654-1490

Smith Hourigan Group 570-287-1196

FORTY FORT REDUCED!

EXETER 1301 Murray St. Very nice duplex, fully rented with good return in great neighborhood. For more information and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-2149 $124,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

SATURDAY, SEPT. 17 12:30PM - 2:00PM 164 E. First Street $134,900 for an ALL BRICK, ranch with finished basement. Features include hardwood floors, plaster walls, finished basement rooms and car port. MLS #10-4363 Call Pat McHale 570-613-9080

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EXETER

This Cape Cod is in fabulous condition. It features living room, dining room, 4 bedrooms, 2 full baths, closets galore, family room, gas heat, central air & fully fenced back yard. Great location. Take a walk or ride a bike around the neighborhood. $218,500 MLS 11-1804 Call Judy Rice 570-714-9230

HANOVER

Diamond in the rough! This 3 bedroom, 1 bath home is looking for a new owner to restore its beauty! Living room and Dining room features hardwood floors, original woodwork and beautiful French Doors. Large kitchen with pantry in need of some updating. 1 car Garage and private driveway. Call Jesicca Skoloda 570-237-0463 JesiccaSkoloda Realtor@gmail.com MLS# 11-2741 $44,500 570-696-2468

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

HANOVER TOWNSHIP 710 Church Street

213 S USQUEHANNA A VE

38 Huckleberry Lane Blueberry Hills 4 BEDROOMS, 2.5 baths, family room with fireplace, 2 car garage, large yard. Master bath with separate jetted tub, kitchen with stainless steel appliances and island, lighted deck. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 11-3071 $329,000 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

145 Short Street Meticulously maintained ranch on lot 100x140. 6 rooms, 3 bedrooms, 1 full bath on main level. Finished lower level with family room, full bath, laundry room, craft room & storage. MOVE IN CONDITION. New Low Price $94,900. MLS #11-2541 Call Pat McHale 570-613-9080

548 Medical/Health

548 Medical/Health

One of a kind property could be used as a single family home or two unit. Wyoming Area schools. $125,000 MLS#11-2811 Call John 570-714-6124

SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP

Motorcycle for sale? Let them see it here in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130 548 Medical/Health

Join us for an Open House! Open House: Date →

Wed, Sept 14th

EXETER TOWNSHIP RAISED RANCH 680 Appletree Rd.

Single family, 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, double car attached garage, kitchen, dining room, family room, living room, utility room, fireplace, oil heat, window unit, unfinished basement, 1.25 acres, deck. Screened porch. Private setting. $149,000 Call 570-388-3915 after 6:00 p.m. to set an appointment

Location→

Hanover Crossings One Great Valley Boulevard Wilkes-Barre, Pa 18706

Join us for an Open House or apply online at: www.cvscaremark.com/careers Questions: Call (570) 820-4144

CVS Caremark is an equal opportunity employer supporting a drug-free work environment.

HANOVER TWP

EXETER TWP.

311 Lockville Rd Stately brick 2 story, with inground pool, covered patio, finished basement, fireplace and wood stove 3 car attached garage 5 car detached garage with apartment above. MLS#11-1242 $739,000 Call Joe or Donna, 613-9080

Time→

2:30pm – 6:30pm

Exceptionally well care for home in move in condition. Everything is new, roof, siding, windows, porches, kitchen and baths. MLS 11-2309 $119,000 Jay A. Crossin CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770 ext. 23

187 South Street 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, modern kitchen, security system, beautifully landscaped patio, pond & above ground pool are just a few of the touches that make this home so appealing. Great neighborhood! Close to major highways. MLS #11-2370 $133,000 Call Debra at 570-714-9251

HANOVER TWP.

275 Phillips Street

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Well kept 2 bedroom ranch with new kitchen, fenced yard, one car garage. $79,900 MLS #11-638 Call Tracy Zarola 570-696-0723


PAGE 8D

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

HANOVER TWP.

HARDING

HARVEYS LAKE

JENKINS TWP.

KINGSTON

KINGSTON REDUCED

LAFLIN

LUZERNE

MOUNTAIN TOP

NANTICOKE

71 Knox St. Larger Bi-level in small development. Eat in kitchen with new floor countertops and dishwasher. Large 2 tiered deck, 20x10, with roll out awning. Back yard backs up to woods. New carpet, painting and much more. MLS 11-2649 $139,900 Call Mary Ann 570-715-7733 CENTURY 21 SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP 570-474-6307

131 THEODORE ST., Beautiful bi-level located in Hex Acres, a quiet country setting, yet minutes from town. This home features quality workmanship and finishes and is in absolute move-in condition. Features modern kitchen and baths, lower level family room, sunroom, deck and above ground pool. All on a large nicely landscaped lot. MLS#11-2901 $160,000 Karen Ryan 283-9100 x14

Pole 131 Lakeside Drive Lake front home with 2-story livable boathouse! Year round home offers fireplace, cathedral ceiling, cedar paneling. Boat house has a patio for grilling, open dock space as well as enclosed area for your boat. 2nd floor is a studio style kitchenette/ living room, full bath plus a deck. Take a look! MLS#11-1379 PRICE REDUCED! $384,900 Bob Cook 262-2665 Jill Jones 696-6550

297 Susquehannock Drive Settle into summer with this great 2 story home on quiet cul-de-sac with private back yard and above ground pool. Deck with awning overlooking yard! 4 bedrooms, 2.5 bath home in Pittston Area School District with family room, eat in kitchen, central a/c and garage. Full unfinished basement MLS 11-2432 $259,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

5 Fairfield Drive Motivated seller! Don’t travel to a resort. You should see the house that comes with all of this!!! Live in your vacation destination in the 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath home with gourmet kitchen and fabulous views. Enjoy the heated inground pool with cabana, built-in BBQ and fire pit in this private, tranquil setting. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-1686 $314,900 Call Keri 570-885-5082

807 North Street NEW LISTING Lovely modern large ranch with 4 or 5 bedrooms including a master suite with walk in closet.Full finished basement with a separate room presently used as a functioning beauty shop and 1/2 bath. Beautiful back yard with 2 covered patios, one with hot tub. Gas heat, all hardwood floors on first level, professional landscaping, neutral decor, oversized 1 car garage, lots of closets and storage & much more. MLS#11-3139 $172,000 (570) 237-1032 (570) 288-1444

66 Patriot Circle This 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath TOWN HOUSE is in excellent move in condition in a very quiet subdivision close to town. It is being offered fully furnished, decorated and appointed. This TOWN HOUSE is in the desirable Crestwood School District and is close to shopping, restaurants, fitness centers and more! Preview this home

HANOVER TWP.

HARDING

8 Diamond Ave. Loads of space in this modernized traditional home. 3rd floor is a large bedroom with walk-in closet. Modern kitchen, family room addition, deck overlooking large corner lot. Not just a starter home but a home to stay in and grow! For more information and photos visit www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS #11-622 $119,000 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

HANOVER TWP.

HANOVER GREEN Excellent condition & location. 3 bedroom, new kitchen, appliances included, 1 1/2 bath with separate tub & shower. Living room, dining room, with new carpet. Large family room with hardwood floors under new carpeting. 2 enclosed patios. Laundry room with washer/dryer included. Central AC, gas heat, pull down floored attic. 2 sheds. New roof. Vinyl siding. Windows. Inground pool. Garage. 65 x 100 lot. Much more! Asking $209,000 570-824-7196 NO REALTORS

HANOVER TWP.

LIBERTY HILLS Reduced!

Beautiful 2 bedroom home with loft area that can easily be converted to a 3rd bedroom. This home has 2.5 baths, security system, whole house entertainment system with speakers in every room and outside. Great modern kitchen. 2 car garage, skylights, huge deck and patio. There is a huge walkout basement that is rough plumbed for a bathroom. Too much to list here, this house is a must see. MLS #10-4589 $310,000 Call John Polifka 570-704-6846 Antonik and Associates 570-735-7494

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HANOVER TWP.

2 story in good condition with 3 bedrooms, 1 full bath, eat-in kitchen, 2 car garage, fenced yard & new gas heat. MLS # 10-4324 $49,900 Call Ruth at 570-696-1195 or 570-696-5411

HARVEYS LAKE

INCLASSIFIED!

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

JENKINS TWP. BACK ON THE MARKET

KINGSTON

663 Westmoreland Avenue

167 N. Dawes Ave. Move in condition 2 story home. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, hardwood floors, ceramic throughout. Finished lower level, security system For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-1673 $154,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

Find Something? Lose Something? Get it back where it belongs with a Lost/Found ad! 570-829-7130

KINGSTON

SERENITY

Enjoy the serenity of country living in this beautiful two story home on 2.23 acres. Great for entertaining inside and out. 3 car attached garage with full walk up attic PLUS another 2 car detached garage. WOW! A MUST SEE! For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS#11-831 $267,000 Call Nancy 570-237-0752 Melissa 570-237-6384

POLE 265 LAKESIDE DRIVE 44’ of lakefront! This home offers recently remodeled kitchen with Cherry cabinetry, granite counters. Hardwood floors through the kitchen and dining area. Stone fireplace, enclosed porch to enjoy the lake view! The boathouse has a second level patio, storage area, plus dock space. A must see! MLS#11-2018 $369,900 Bob Cook 570-262-2665

HARDING

23 Mead St. Newly remodeled 2 story on a corner lot with fenced in yard and 2 car garage. 4 bedrooms, 1 bath, 1,660 sq. ft. For more information and photos visit www.atlas realtyinc.com $84,900 MLS 10-3684 Call Bill 570-362-4158

KINGSTON KINGSTON 125 3rd Ave

HUNLOCK CREEK 605 Apple Tree Road White split stone Ranch with 1500 sq. ft. of living space. 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, propane gas fireplace with stone mantel. Custom kitchen with oak cabinets with pull outs. Granite counter tops and island, plaster walls, modern tile bath, open floor plan. 2nd kitchen in lower level. Electric heat, wood/coal burner in basement. Central air, 2 stoves, 2 dishwashers, 2 microwaves, 2 fridges, front load washer and dryer included. Attached 2 car garage and detached 3 car garage. Home in near perfect condition. For moe info and photos view: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-2968 $229,900 Call Lu Ann 570-602-9280

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

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HARVEYS LAKE

143B GROVE ST., Like to entertain? This floor plan lends itself to that with a large kitchen, formal dining and living rooms. A car enthusiast? This garage will hold 4 cars comfortable. Enjoy a hot tub, this workout room has one and French doors opening to the rear yard. Spacious bedrooms, wood burning fireplace. The list goes on and on! Did I mention you are just ¼ of a mile from the lake?! MLS#11-1994 $249,900 Jill Jones 696-6550

12 Oakdale Drive Completely remodeled 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath home with detached garage & carport on approx 1.5 acres in a nice private setting. MLS# 11-1776 $129,900 Five Mountains Realty 570-542-2141

JENKINS TOWNSHIP

Well kept 2 story with 3 bedrooms and 1.5 baths situated on a nice street in Kingston. Newer roof, furnace, water heater, electric service. Replacement windows throughout. Basement has high ceilings, ideal for re-finishing or workshop! MLS 11-2167 $144,000 Jay A. Crossin CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

KINGSTON This remodeled home sits in a quiet neighborhood on a corner lot. Enjoy an open layout with new carpet, beautiful tile, and fresh paint in neutral tones. A Large yard and a park across the street is another highlight! 6 month home warranty. Call Jesicca Skoloda 570-237-0463 JesiccaSkoloda Realtor@gmail.com MLS# 11-2741 $89,999 570-696-2468

JENKINS TWP. (Eagle View)

Home/Lot Package Beautiful custom built home with a stunning river view overlooking the Susquehanna River and surrounding area. Custom built with many amenities included. A few of the amenities may include central A/C, master bedroom with master bath, ultramodern kitchen, hardwood floors, cathedral ceiling, and a 2 car garage. There are are many other floor plans to choose from or bring your own! For more details & photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-2642 $375,000 Call Kim 570-466-3338

Charming 2-1/2 story with 3 bedrooms on 2nd + a 4th (12x24) on 3rd, full bath upstairs, half bath with laundry on 1st floor, lots of closet space, finished walk-out basement and much more! MLS 11-2340 $189,000 Jay A. Crossin CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770 ext. 23

129 S. Dawes Ave. 4 bedroom, 1 bath, large enclosed porch with brick fireplace. Full concrete basement with 9ft ceiling. Lots of storage, 2 car garage on double lot in a very desirable neighborhood. Close to schools and park and recreation. Walking distance to downtown Wilkes-Barre. Great family neighborhood. Carpet allowance will be considered. For mor info and photos visit: www.atlas realty.inc.com $129,900 MLS #11-1434 Call Tom 570-262-7716

KINGSTON

29 Landon Ave N Striking curb appeal with charm to spare! Hardwood floors throughout the first floor, beautiful arched doorways, gas fireplace, lots of closet space, modern kitchen and a large updated main bath. MLS#11-3075 $144,900 Call Mary Price 570-696-5418 570-472-1395

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE LINEUP Doyouneedmorespace? ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! A yard or garage sale Doyouneedmorespace? INCLASSIFIED! A yard or garage sale in classified Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness You’re in bussiness You’re in bussiness with classified! with classified! with classified!

Rutter Ave. End Unit Townhouse Owner Relocating. 1st floor open plan with living room, dining area & kitchen, plus powder room. Lower level finished with 3rd bedroom, laundry room & storage area. 2 bedrooms & 2 baths on the 2nd floor. MLS # 11-1267 $279,500 Call Ruth 570-6961195 / 570-696-5411

LUZERNE REDUCED!

76 N. Dawes Ave. Very well maintained 2 bedroom home with updated kitchen with granite counter. Large sunroom over looking private back yard. Attached garage, large unfinished basement. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-2278 $139,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

KINGSTON

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

KINGSTON

BEAUTIFUL HOME

KINGSTON

OPEN HOUSE

Sunday 12pm-5pm 46 Zerby Ave Lease with option to buy, completely remodeled, mint, turn key condition, 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, large closets, with hardwoods, carpet & tile floors, new kitchen and baths, gas heat, shed, large yard. $134,900 (30 year loan @ 4.5% with 5% down; $6,750 down, $684/month) WALSH REAL ESTATE 570-654-1490

LAKE SILKWORTH

Brand new 3 bedroom home at Lake Silkworth on large lot. Deeded lake access. MLS 11-2346 $148,900 FIRM Barbara Strong 570-762-7561 ANTONIK & ASSOCIATES 570-735-7494

262 WALNUT ST. Nicely redone 2 story on large fenced corner lot. Updates include, vinyl siding, windows, electric service & wiring, newer carpeting, 2 zoned gas heat and all new 2nd floor (gutted and reinsulated. 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, large eat in kitchen, 1st floor laundry and attached shed that could be a nice 2nd bath. Shed and off street parking for 6 cars. MLS 11-2564 $109,900 Mark R. Mason 570-331-0982 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

MESHOPPEN

SUNDAY, SEPT-18 12:30PM - 2:30PM 322 N Sprague Ave Spacious 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath home with three season porch, nice yard & private driveway. MLS# 11-965 $61,900 Call Barbara at 570-466-6940

COLDWELL BANKER RUNDLE REAL ESTATE

LAFLIN

14 Peachwood Dr. Beautiful 4 bedroom, 3.5 bath in a great neighborhood! Contains a home network with cabling through entire house for easy internet hookup and access in all rooms. Family room with home theater speakers. Entertainment room with home theatre (projector screen) and Bose system in lower level. Modern eat in kitchen with granite counter tops. Landscaped lot and yard with times sprinkler system and lighting. For mor info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 11-3169 $319,900 Call Kim 570-466-3338

Sale by Owner

3 bedroom, 2 bath, full furnished family room, screened porch, dining room, updated kitchen, all appliances. Excellent condition - ideal location! Gas heat/ ductless AC. Must see to appreciate! $149,900 570-288-8002

ROTHSTEIN REALTORS 570-288-7594

LAKE SILKWORTH

570-474-2340 Ext 55

806 Nandy Drive Unique 3 bedroom home perfect for entertaining! Living room with fireplace and skylights. Dining room with builtin china cabinets. Lower level family room with fireplace and wetbar. Private rear yard withinground pool and multiple decks. MLS#11-3064 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

TOWNHOUSE 3 bedroom. 1.5 bath. Finished basement. Central air. All appliances included. $105,900. This property will be reduced $1,000 every 2nd day until sold. MLS 11-608 Call Bernie 888-244-2714

SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP

KINGSTON

LAFLIN

www.66patriotcircle.com or call for details. (267) 253-9754

MOUNTAIN TOP

LAFLIN

310 Lockville Rd.

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE LINEUP IN CLASSIFIED! ASUCCESSFULSALE SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP

Job Seekers are looking here! Where's your ad? 570-829-7130 and ask for an employment specialist

549 Charles Ave. A quality home in a superior location! Features: large living room; formal dining room with parquet flooring; oak kitchen with breakfast area; 1st floor master bedroom & bath suite; bedroom/ sitting room; knotty pine den; half-bath. 2nd floor: 2 bedrooms & bath. Finished room in lower level with new carpeting & wetbar. Central air. 2-car garage. Inground concrete pool with jacuzzi. $324,900 MLS# 10-1633 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

Novak Road

Tastefully remodeled home at Lake Silkworth can be used year round or as a summer home Central air, deeded lake rights included. MLS 11-2345 $95,000 Barbara Strong 570-762-7561 ANTONIK & ASSOCIATES 570-735-7494

LARKSVILLE

111 Falcon Drive Brand new since 2004, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, central air, 2 car garage, shed, 6 car driveway. Roof, kitchen, furnace, a/c unit and master bath all replaced. Modern kitchen with granite island, tile floors, maple cabinets. Fireplace in family room, large closets, modern baths. Stamped concrete patio. For more information and photos visit www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS #11-1166 $279,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

Looking to buy a home? Place an ad here and let the sellers know! 570-829-7130

LARKSVILLE

Lovely, nearly completed, renovated Victorian farmhouse sits high on 7.81 acres featuring panoramic pastoral views, high ceilings, original woodwork, gutted, rewired, insulated and sheetrocked, newer roof, vinyl siding, kitchen and baths. Gas rights negotiable. Lots of potential with TLC. Elk Lake School District. $165,000 MLS# 11-525 Call 570-696-2468

72 Fieldstone Way Stunning 4 bedroom 2 story! 2 story family room fireplace. Granite kitchen, stainless steel appliances, new sprinkler system, dining room and living room hardwood, 2.5 bath. Nice yard. MLS#11-492 $348,000 Call Jim Graham at 570-715-9323

Bow Creek Manor 316 Cedar Manor Dr Meticulously maintained 4 bedroom, 3 1/2 bath two story on almost 1 acre. Master bedroom suite. 2 family rooms. 2 fireplaces. Office/den. Large deck overlooking a private wooded yard. 3 car garage. $349,900, or rent for $1,800 / month with the option to buy. MLS 11-3286 Please Call Bob Kopec Humford Realty 570-822-5126

MOUNTAIN TOP

NEW LISTING – Nestled on just under an acre just minutes from 81S this colonial offers 2194 sq. ft. of living area plus a finished basement. Enjoy your summer evenings on the wrap around porch or take a quick dip in the above ground pool with tier deck. The covered pavilion is ideal for picnics or gatherings And when the winter winds blow cuddle in front of the gas fireplace and enjoy a quiet night. Price to sell, $185,900 Ann Marie Chopick 570-760-6769

MOUNTAINTOP

Modern bi-level, 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath, tile kitchen and bath floor. New appliances, gas hot water furnace and architectural roof. Family room, 3-season room and deck. 2 car garage, large yard. Move-in condition. Convenient location. Reduced to $230,000 OBO. Call (570) 403-6252 or (570) 823-7540.

NANTICOKE REDUCED 210 Beechwood Dr NEW LISTING Rare brick & vinyl tri-level featuring 8 rooms, 4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, family room with fireplace, rear patio, sprinkler system, alarm system & central air. $214,900 CALL DONNA 570-613-9080

Looking to buy a home? Place an ad here and let the sellers know! 570-829-7130

This very nice family home, as it has been for many years, with a detached garage, 1 3/4 baths, 4 bedrooms & so much more is waiting for your private tour. MLS #11-2654 $78,600 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

NANTICOKE

111 E. Grand St. One half double block. 3 bedrooms, plaster walls, aluminum siding & nice yard. Affordable @

(570) 288-6654

MOUNTAIN TOP

NANTICOKE

MOUNTAIN TOP

MOUNTAIN TOP

257 Main Road S 2 bedroom Ranch. Large rear yard. Hardwood floors! Large eat-in kitchen. Large living room with hardwood and family room with carpet. New roof in 2011! Ideal starter home. MLS#11-1966 $119,000 Call Jim Graham at 570-715-9323

1 William St. Treat yourself to this appealing 2-3 bedroom home with delightful enclosed porch, hardwood floors, carport, fenced yard, new water heater, fridge and recent weatherization. MLS 11-2442 $79,900 Call Mary Ann 570-715-7733 CENTURY 21 SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP 570-474-6307

8PM

$34,900

Call Jim Krushka

Towne & Country Real Estate Co. 570-735-8932 or 570-542-5708

NANTICOKE

619 S. Hanover St Nicely appointed brick 3-unit. Owner occupied 1st floor with eat-in kitchen & refinished pine flooring. $600/mo projected 1st floor rent. 2 additional units include a $400/mo rented 2 bedroom 2nd floor unit and a 1 bedroom 3rd floor unit. Most windows replaced throughout. Heated 2-car detached garage, rear covered patio, fenced-in side yard. MLS#11-2538 $134,900 Call Steve Shemo (570) 288-1401 (570) 793-9449

NANTICOKE

Rear 395 E. Washington St. 2 family home with 2 bedrooms each side, separate utilities, great income earning potential. One side occupied, one available for rent. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-2425 $59,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

NANTICOKE

W. Green St. Nice 2 bedroom Ranch syle home, gas heat, finished basement, vinyl siding, deck. Move in Condition. Affordable @

$89,500

Losing Hair House Hunting? Reduce the anxiety with triple assurance of good location, extensive renovations and new kitchen and baths that come with this lovely two story with great rear deck. Comforting price too - just $119,900. MLS 11-1856. Call Tracey McDermott 570-696-2468

Find homes for your kittens! Place an ad here! 570-829-7130

35 Patriot Circle Interior unit with oak laminate on 1st floor. Rear deck faces the woods! MLS#11-1986 $106,000 Call Jim Graham at 570-715-9323

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

Call Jim

Towne & Country Real Estate Co. 570-735-8932 or 570-542-5708

25 West Washington St. Move right into this very nice 3 bedroom 1 bath home. Lots of natural woodwork and a beautiful stained glass window. Kitchen appliances and wall to wall carpeting approximately 1 year old. Home also has a one car detached garage. $79,900 MLS 11-347 Call John 570-704-6846 Antonik & Associates, Inc. 570-735-7494

NOXEN

Country living on 1 acre outside of Noxen. 3 Bedroom mobile home excellent condition separate garage, 2 covered porches. Newer roof. Owner says SELL! REDUCED! $80,000 Shari Philmeck ERA BRADY ASSOCIATES 570-836-3848


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

PENN LAKE

PITTSTON

PITTSTON REDUCED!

HOME FOR SALE

Crestwood School District. Stunning Cape Cod (architecturally designed). Three bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths 2 car garage on one acre. Features include: large front porch, deck, beautiful kitchen with corian countertops, breakfast nook & island. Stainless steel appliances; hardfloors, formal dining room with wainscoting. Two story vaulted family room with fireplace; first floor master bedroom/ bath with jacuzzi, walk in shower & vanity dressing area built in; abundant closets, den on first floor plus laundry; second story has 2 additional bedrooms & bath. Full basement. Please call or email for details. Dee Fields, Associate Broker 570-788-7511

deefieldsabroker@gmail.com

PITTSTON

10 Garfield St. Looking for a Ranch??? Check out this double wide with attached 2 car garage on a permanent foundation. Large master bedroom suite with large living room, family room with fireplace, 2 full baths, laundry room, formal dining room, vaulted ceilings throughout and MORE! For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 10-2463 $89,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

PITTSTON

Privacy abounds this beauty on almost 3 acres of “Pure Privacy” tucked away from the hustle & bustle of everyday stress. 4 bedrooms, 1 3/4 baths with a 2 car detached garage & workshop. This 19x30 master bedroom will knock your socks off! MLS #11-2705 $252,000 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

PITTSTON

175 Oak Street 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, 1st floor laundry room, 3 season porch, fenced yard and off street parking. MLS#11-1974 PRICE REDUCED! $89,000 Call Patti 570-328-1752 Liberty Realty & Appraisal Services LLC

PITTSTON

44 Lambert St

Beautiful, cozy home. Upstairs laundry, lots of closet space.Tastefully renovations. extra large driveway.low maintenance.thermostats in each room. all measurements approximate. MLS 11-2210 $89,900 David Krolikowski CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

906 Homes for Sale

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

PITTSTON

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

PITTSTON TWP. PLAINS TOWNHOME Completely remodeled In quiet plains STAUFFER POINT neighborhood. 42 Grandview Drive

better than new end unit condo, with 1st floor master bedroom and bath, Living room with gas fireplace, hardwood floors in living, dining room & kitchen, granite countertops and crown molding in kitchen, with separate eating area, lst floor laundry, heated sunroom with spectacular view, 2 additional bedrooms, full bath and loft on the 2nd floor, 2 car garage, gas heat and central air, priced to sell $277,000 MLS 112324 call Lu-Ann 602-9280

2 bedroom, 1.5 bath. with finished basement/3rd bedroom. Hardwood floors, central air, electric heat, new roof & appliances. $118,000 Motivated Seller! (570) 592-4356

PLYMOUTH

161-63 Orchard St Well cared for double block – 6/3/1 on each side. Live in one side and let a tenant pay your mortgage. $59,900 MLS #11-2174 Call Pat McHale 570-613-9080

51 Plank St. 4 bedroom Victorian home completely remodeled with new kitchen & baths. New Berber carpet, modern stainless steel appliances in kitchen. Private yard, wrap around porch, corner lot with off street parking. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 11-2864 $99,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

Sunday, Sept-11 1:30pm to 3pm 404 N. Main St. This is a treasure! Move-in condition. 6 Rooms, 3 Bedrooms and Full bath on second floor. Newer furnace, water heater & good electrical service. $47,900. MLS# 06-2951 Call Pat 570-613-9080

PITTSTON TWP.

PITTSTON

87 Jenkins Court For Sale, but owner will consider rental or rent with option to buy! Quiet location. 63x65 lot, with plenty of room for off street parking. Home features newer drywall and composite flooring in living room and dining room. Picture perfect home has 2 large bedrooms, modern kitchen and bath and NEW furnace. NEW PRICE! $109,900 Pat McHale 570-613-9080

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

PITTSTON

92 Tompkins Street Totally remodeled 2-story; 7 rooms, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2-car garage, deck, rear fence. MLS# 11-2770 NEW PRICE! $108,000 CALL JOE OR DONNA 570-613-9080

906 Homes for Sale

122 PARNELL ST. Beautiful bi-level home on corner lot. 7 rooms, 3 bedrooms, newer roof and windows. Fenced in yardFor more info and phtos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.om MLS 11-2749 $209,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

PITTSTON TWP.

HIGH & DRY.

No Flood worries here!

20 Fairlawn Drive STAUFFER HEIGHTS RANCH, containing 2,300 sq. ft. finished space on lot 100x90. Unique 1960’s home – has bedrooms on main level & living area below. Features large, eat in kitchen. Side entrance to main level room creates possibility for in home office. New Price $115,000. MLS #10-4198 Call Pat McHale 570-613-9080

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified! 906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

SHAVERTOWN

SHICKSHINNY

WEST PITTSTON

WEST WYOMING 438 Tripp St

additional photos and information can be found on our web site, www. atlasrealtyinc.com

PLAINS

Job Seekers are looking here! Where's your ad? 570-829-7130 and ask for an employment specialist

PRINGLE

NEW LISTING 3 bedroom Townhouse in “Rivermist” with 2.5 bath, 1 car garage & all new carpeting & painted interior throughout! MLS#11-3153 $184,500 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

PLAINS

1610 Westminster Rd

DRASTIC REDUCTION Gorgeous estate like property with log home plus 2 story garage on 1 acres with many outdoor features. Garage. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS# 11-319 $300,000 Call Charles

PLAINS

17 N. Beech Road (N. on Main St., Plains, turn right in Birchwood Hills and onto Beech Rd, House on right) Lovely updated Ranch home with 3 bedrooms, 1 bath. 1 car garage in the very desirable Birchwood Hills development. Electric heat, newer roof, great curb appeal. Huge fenced in back yard with new shed, plenty of closets and storage. www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3003 $139,900 Call Keri Best 570-885-5082

Do you need more space? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way to clean out your closets! You’re in bussiness with classified! PLAINS KEYSTONE SECTION 9 Ridgewood Road

TOTAL BEAUTY 1 ACRE- PRIVACY Beautiful ranch 2

bedrooms, 1 bath, attic for storage, washer, dryer & 2 air conditioners included. New Roof & Furnace Furnished or unfurnished. Low Taxes! $123,500

SUNDAY, SEPT. 18 11 A.M. - 1 P.M. 50 Broad Street High & Dry NO FLOOD WORRIES HERE! Solid, meticulous, 1500 S.F., brick ranch, containing 6 rooms, 3 bedrooms and 1 full bath on the main level and full bath in basement, situated on 1.03 Acres. NEW kitchen with granite counter tops, wood cabinetry, new stove, dishwasher, microwave, tiled floors. Bath has new tile floor and tub surround, double vanity and mirrors. Lower level has summer kitchen, full bath and large, drywalled area. Oversize, 2 car garage/ workshop and shed. Property has been subdivided into 4 lots. Call Pat for the details. $249,900. Pat McHale (570) 613-9080

138 Wakefield Road Inviting contemporary with breathtaking sunsets features an open floor plan, ultra kitchen, hardwoods throughout, twosided gas FP, spalike master bath, very generous room sizes, 5 bedrooms, 4 baths, finished walk-out lower level. $532,000 MLS #11-952 Call Tracy Zarola 570-696-0723

SHAVERTOWN

200 Woodbine Road

5 bedrooms, 1 & 3/4 baths, 2 car garage, family room plus den or office. On a dead end street.

New Price!! $139,900

MLS# 11-960 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

SHAVERTOWN

1195 Sutton Road Attractive, wellmaintained saltbox on 2 private acres boasts fireplaces in living room, family room & master bedroom. Formal dining room. Large Florida room with skylights & wet bar. Oak kitchen opens to family room. 4 bedrooms & 3 1/2 baths. Finished lower level. Carriage barn $449,000 MLS# 10-3394 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

906 Homes for Sale

Distinctive 2 story. Outstanding outside and in. Beautiful brick paver driveway and walkway lead into a grand foyer with oak staircase. Hardwoods and marble floors throughout. Retreat to a full finished basement with stone fireplace, wet bar and full bath. Deck, patio and sprinkler system. MLS 11-1463 $429,900 Call Arlene Warunek 570-650-4169

Smith Hourigan Group (570) 696-1195

SHAVERTOWN

855 Park Avenue Huge home ready for your family to move right in! 5 bedrooms including huge master suite, 3.5 baths, hardwood floors, stainless appliances, fireplace, huge lot with fenced area. $192,000 MLS #11-2540 Joan Matusiak 570-696-0887 Tracy Zarola 570-696-0723

91 GATES ROAD, Great 3 bedroom ranch home on over 2 acres of land! This home offers an oversized garage with carport in rear. A large tiled sunroom to enjoy year round. Master bedroom with ¾ bath. First floor laundry. Schedule your appointment today! MLS#11-1911 $152,900 Jill Jones 696-6550

SUGARLOAF

610 Fourth Street Stately 4 bedroom home, new ultra modern kitchen, 13/4 baths, off street parking 1 car. Fenced yard, new windows, paint & carpet. Just move in! MLS#11-986 $127,000 Call Lynda (570) 696-5418

Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-1195

WEST PITTSTON

OPEN HOUSE

Sunday 12pm-5pm Completely remodeled home with everything new. New kitchen, baths, bedrooms, tile floors, hardwoods, granite countertops, all new stainless steel appliances, refrigerator, stove, microwave, dishwasher, free standing shower, tub for two, huge deck, large yard, excellent neighborhood $154,900 (30 year loan @ 4.5% with 5% down; $7,750 down, $785/month) 570-654-1490

6 Acre Horse Farm

NEW PRICE! 855 Park Ave Huge home ready for your family to move right in! 5 bedrooms including huge master suite, 3.5 baths, hardwood floors, stainless appliances, fireplace, huge lot with fenced area. MLS #11-2540 $185,000 Tracy Zarola 570-696-0723

SHAVERTOWN

Professional Office Rentals

Full Service Leases • Custom Design • Renovations • Various Size Suites Available Medical, Legal, Commercial • Utilities • Parking • Janitorial Full Time Maintenance Staff Available

1-570-287-1161

12 Windy Drive New construction in the exclusive Slocum Estates. Stone & Stucco exterior. All the finest appointments: office or 5th bedroom, hardwood floors, crown moldings, 9' ceilings 1st & 2nd floor. Buy now select cabinetry & flooring. MLS #11-1987 $499,000 Call Geri 570-696-0888

Wonderful cozy home on a corner lot with in-ground pool, yard and carport. Across the street from Fox Hill Country Club. MLS#11-194 $129,900 Call Jolyn (570) 696-5425 108 Hilltop Dr. Sunday, 9/18 1pm to 3pm Owner relocating, make an offer! Private ranch on 6 acres. Hardwood floors in Living Room, halls & Bedrooms. Great kitchen. Dining area, sliding doors to huge composite deck overlooking pool and fenced yard. 24x40 3 bay stable / garage. Plenty of room for horses or just to enjoy! 11-2539 $225,000 Call Michael Pinko (570) 899-3865

Smith Hourigan Group 570-474-6307

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

SWEET VALLEY REDUCED!

380 Lantern Hill Rd Stunning describes this impressive 2 story with views from every room. Architectural design which features gourmet kitchen with granite tops. Office with built-ins. Finished lower level with 2nd kitchen. Family room with French doors out to rear yard. 4 car garage. $ 775,000 MLS# 11-1241 Call Geri 570-696-0888

Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-1195

WEST PITTSTON

OPEN HOUSE SUN. 12-5 232 North Street Completely remodeled two story home with, 2 bedroom & 1.5 baths. New kitchen, bath, carpet, tile, hardwoods, all appliances, including washer & dryer in upstairs bath. This is an awesome home with lots of extra amenities, large closet space, driveway, nice yard and neighborhood. $139,900 with $5,000 down, financing at 4.5% 30 yrs, monthly payment of $875. (Owner financing available also.) Call Bob at 570-654-1490

WEST PITTSTON 4 Oliver Road Located in the back part of Oliver Road in a very private part of North Lake in Sweet Valley. Yearning to be restored, lake front cape cod in a very tranquil setting was formerly used as a summer home. MLS 11-2113 $99,000 Jay Crossin CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770 ext. 23

WEST PITTSTON 322 SALEM ST.

Well cared for and nicely kept. A place to call home! Complete with 2 car oversized garage, central air, first floor laundry, eat in kitchen. Convenient to shopping, West Pittston pool and ball fields. PRICE REDUCED! $134,500 MLS 11-583 Call Judy Rice 570-714-9230

REDUCED

SHAVERTOWN

OFFICENTERS - Pierce St., Kingston

For Rental Information Call:

Great New Construction on 2 Acres with 1 year Builders Warranty! 2 Story home with 4 bedrooms, 2.5 Baths, Living Room, Dining Room, Kitchen, Breakfast Room & Laundry Room. Dining Room has tray ceiling, gas fireplace in living room & whirlpool tub in Master Bath. Plus 2 car attached garage, open front porch & rear deck. MLS 11-2453 $275,000 Five Mountains Realty 570-542-2141

SHAVERTOWN

SHAVERTOWN

570-885-1512

WILKES-BARRE

129 & 131 Matson Ave Double Block, 6 rooms + bath on each side. $79,000 Call 570-826-1743

1400 N. Washington St Nice 2 story in need of some TLC with low taxes, near the casino. Roof is 5 yrs young. Newer water heater (installed '09), replacement windows throughout, 100 AMP electric, tiled bath, wallto-wall carpeting entire 1st floor. MLS 11-2383 $58,900 Donald Crossin CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

WILKES-BARRE

728 Montgomery Ave

SHAVERTOWN

Let’s Make A Deal!

906 Homes for Sale

WILKES-BARRE

WHITE HAVEN 123 Fern Ridge Rd.

PITTSTON

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED!

Sunday, Sep-18 1:30PM to 3:00PM 151 Broad Street Stately 2 Story, features 8 Rooms, 4 bedrooms, 1 3/4 baths & 2 Car Detached Garage. NEW kitchen with maple cabinetry, tile back splash, island; pantry closet & more. New 1st floor Bath. New 2nd Floor Laundry Area. BRAND NEW Oilfueled Furnace & Wiring. REFINISHED Hardwood flooring $129,900 MLS#10-2922 Call Pat 570-613-9080

95 William St. 1/2 double home with more square footage than most single family homes. 4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, ultra modern kitchen and remodeled baths. Super clean. For more information and photos visit www.atlas realtyinc. com MLS 11-2120 $59,000 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 PAGE 9D

Great 1/2 double located in nice West Pittston location. 3 bedrooms, new carpet. Vertical blinds with all appliances. Screened in porch and yard. For more information and photos visit www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS#10-1535 $49,900 Charlie VM 101

WEST PITTSTON

329 Wyoming Ave. If a 3-4 bedroom move in ready property featuring large living room and dining room with hardwood floors, spacious modern tiled kitchen, spectacular bath w/walk in shower and jetted tub, 1st floor laundry and 3/4 bath, roomy master bedroom with double closets might be what you’re looking for - visit the Open House or call PAT for an appointment MLS 11-2424 $179,900 Pat Gazenski 570-954-9038 CENTURY 21 SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP 570-287-1196 Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

PRICE REDUCED! In Community of

White-Haven Pocono's. Nice 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Ranch. Great Vacation Home or Year round Home. Community Lake & other amenities. Close to Hunting, Fishing, Golf and Skiing. Close to Rt 80. All offers contingent to bank short sale approval. REDUCED! $75,900 MLS# 11-765 Call Tony Wasco 570-855-2424 Trademark Realtor Group 570-613-9090

WILKES-BARRE

221 Brown Street

WILKES-BARRE

100 Sheridan St. Nicely maintained home with fenced yard and detached garage. 3 bedrooms, 1/2 baths, 1st floor laundry room. Nice porch, ready to move in. Near Little Flower Manor. MLS 11-1947 $69,900 Call Connie EILEEN R. MELONE REAL ESTATE 570-821-7022

WILKES-BARRE

120 Dagobert St

Beautiful 3 bedroom. 1.75 bath home, within walking distance of schools and parks. Partially finished basement, mud room, hardwood floors, paved driveway - 3 car deep. Large rear and side yard. Just waiting for a new owner, come take a look! MLS 11-1634 $82,900 570-696-2468

WILKES-BARRE

WEST WYOMING

292 W. 3rd St. Charming Ranch in great location with 7 rooms, 3 bedrooms, finished basement, sunroom, central air. Newer roof and windows, hardwood floors. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-2946 REDUCED $119,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

194 Academy Street This spacious home features large living room & dining room, rich cherry cabinets, 1st floor laundry and additional finished rooms on 3rd floor. MLS #11-1534 Call Julio 570-239-6408 $47,500

122 Oak Street Very nice oak kitchen with tile floor! Fenced in yard. 3 nice size bedrooms. Large living room and large dining room + 2 modern baths with tile & pedestal sink! Nice neighborhood! Built-in window seats in middle bedroom. Rear shed - 4 window air conditioners. MLS#11-2481 $119,500 Call Jim Graham at 570-715-9323

Great first home or down size. Nice clean move in ready no lawn work here. 2 car detached garage and best of all the Mortgage is probably lower than your rent payment. $55,000 MLS# 11-871 Call Tony Wasco 570-855-2424 Trademark Realtor Group 570-613-9090

WILKES-BARRE

231 Poplar St. Nice 3 bedroom home in move-in condition. Hardwood floors in living & dining room. Upgraded appliances including stainless double oven, refrigerator & dishwasher. Great storage space in full basement & walk-up attic. REDUCED PRICE $75,000 MLS# 10-4456 Barbara Young Call 570-466-6940

COLDWELL BANKER, RUNDLE REAL ESTATE 570-474-2340 Ext. 55

WILKES-BARRE

254 N. Penna. Ave Not a drive-by. This clean, 3-4 bedroom has a newly added 1st floor laundry room and powder room. All new floor coverings, replacement windows. Interior freshly painted, updated electric, etc. Ready to move in. Off street parking for 2 cars and a large, fenced-in back yard w/storage shed. Across street from playground. MLS 11-1713 REDUCED! $44,500 Call Michelle T. Boice 570-639-5393 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE IN CLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way to cleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

125 New Alexander Very spacious two bedroom, 2.5 bath split-level with open floor plan. Nice private yard, 1 car garage. MLS# 111420 Call Mike (570) 714-3801 $94,500

298 Lehigh St. Absolute move in condition. New roof, furnace, water heater and kitchen cabinets. 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, great deck and fenced yard. The entire house was recently insulated. Large driveway with parking for 4 cars. Definitely not a drive-by. MLS 11-2248 $95,300 Call Connie 570-821-7022 EILEEN R. MELONE REAL ESTATE 570-821-7022


PAGE 10D

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011

906 Homes for Sale

WILKES-BARRE

35 Hillard Street

Great neighborhood surrounds this updated 2 story home with original woodwork. 3 bedroom, 1 bath, 1,500sf oak eat-in kitchen, hardwood floors, stained glass windows, large rooms, fenced yard, deck. Zoned R1 Single Family Zone. New Price $79,900 MLS #11-599 Call Tracy Zarola 570-696-0723

WILKES-BARRE

49 Hillard St. Great 3 bedroom home with large modern kitchen. Ductless air conditioning on 1st floor. Laundry on 2nd floor. Nice deck and fenced in yard. Off street parking for 2 cards via rear alley MLS 11-2896 $85,000 Call Shelby Watchilla 570-762-6969 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

WILKES-BARRE

60 Kulp St. 3-4 bedroom, 2 story home with well kept hardwood floors throughout. Private driveway with parking for 2 cards and nearly all replacement windows. MLS 11-2897 $65,000 Jay A. Crossin Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

WILKES-BARRE

YATESVILLE PRICE REDUCED

FOR SALE BY OWNER. Move in condition! 3 bedroom. 1.5 bath. Hardwood floors. Gas heat. Dining room, living room, kitchen & detached garage. $55,000 (570) 239-6308

WILKES-BARRE PARSONS

REASONABLE OFFERS ACCEPTED

262 Stucker Ave & Lot-10 Virginia Drive 7 room (3 bedrooms), 1 1/2 baths. Lower Level has family room and 1 car attached garage. To settle Estate. $84,900. 10-2472 Call Joe Bruno 570-824-4560 JANE KOPP REAL ESTATE 570-288-7481

WILKES-BARRE TOWNSHIP

Double block, 3 bedrooms. Sunroom, kitchen, dining room & parlor. Oil heat, baseboard, water. Driveway & garage. 50x150 foot lot fenced in. $25,000 + closing. Call 570-822-2382

WYOMING

WILKES-BARRE

67 Courtright St

YATESVILLE REDUCED!

61 Pittston Ave. Stately brick Ranch in private location. Large room sizes, fireplace, central A/C. Includes extra lot. For more information and photos visit www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS #10-3512 PRICE REDUCED $189,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200 VM 101

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

909

Income & Commercial Properties

AVOCA

PRICE REDUCED!! Three bedroom,one bath home located within walking distance to General Hospital. Amenities include front porch, eat-in kitchen. All appliances inc. washer and dryer included. Being sold “As Is”, no warranties expressed or implied. Permit parking available. MLS 11-760 $39,900 Call Stan Pearlman 570-868-2478 COLDWELL BANKER RUNDLE REAL ESTATE 570-474-2340 ext. 49

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

WILKES-BARRE

89 Simpson St., This well kept 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath home offers an open living room/ dining room floor plan. Master bedroom with its own office area. Plenty of closets in addition to the walk-up attic for storage! Off-street parking, large deck overlooking the fenced rear yard. Just move right in! $79,900 Jill Jones 696-6550

WILKES-BARRE 943 Scott Street

REDUCED! Beautifully landscaped 3 bedroom in Parsons. Newer windows, vinyl siding, flag stone front porch & walk. Remote controlled awning, maintenance free back porch. MLS 10-3315 $65,000 Call Arlene Warunek 570-650-4169

G IN D N PE

Smith Hourigan Group (570) 696-1195

171 SUSQUEHANNA AVE Well kept home on beautiful street. Very large rooms, bedrooms have hardwood floors. Fenced yard, 1 car garage. Not in flood zone.New Price $70,000 MLS #10-2608 Call Mark Nicholson 570-696-0724 Tracy Zarola 570-696-0723

WYOMING

608 Wyoming Ave

Location, Location, location! Either you are looking to raise your family or just work from home this amazing brick ranch style property has it all. Zoned commercial, 3 very large bedrooms and 3 1/2 baths, full finished basement, library room, oversized living room, formal dining room and so much more. You have to see it to appreciate. Call today for a private tour of the property. 1 year Home Warranty. MLS 11-1870 REDUCED!!! $325,000 Call Tony Wasco 570-855-2424 Trademark Realtor Group 570-613-9090

WYOMING

For Sale by Owner. Double Block, easily convertible to single. Kitchen, living room, 3 bedrooms & bath each side. New 2 car garage. 66’x100’ lot. Asking $160,000. Call 570-693-2408

25 St. Mary’s St. 3,443 sq. ft. masonry commercial building with warehouse/office and 2 apartments with separate electric and heat. Perfect for contractors or anyone with storage needs. For more information and photos log onto www.atlas realtyinc.com. Reduced to $89,000 MLS #10-3872 Call Charlie 570-829-6200 VM 101

BACK MOUNTAIN

Great Investment Opportunity Prime Location On Rt.118 Turn Key Gas Station W/Convenient Mart. 2 Fuel Pumps, (1) Diesel. MLS # 11-1809 $299,000. Call Geri 570-696-0888

DUPONT

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

WYOMING

Price Reduced Motivated Seller!! Nicely maintained 2-story traditional in great neighborhood. Modern oak kitchen, open layout in family room/den with new floors, above ground pool in fenced rear yard. 1-car detached garage with workshop area, all on a nice wide lot. MLS#11-2428 $147,900 Call Steve Shemo (570) 288-1401 (570) 793-9449

909

Income & Commercial Properties

DURYEA REDUCED!!!!

909

Income & Commercial Properties

KINGSTON LIGHT

909

Income & Commercial Properties

LUZERNE

909

Income & Commercial Properties

PLYMOUTH

912 Lots & Acreage

912 Lots & Acreage

BEAR CREEK

LAFLIN Lot#9 Pinewood Dr

BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME one of the last

INDUSTRIAL

New Listing!

12 Reid st. Spacious Bi-level home in semi-private location with private back yard. 3 season room. Gas fireplace in lower level family room. 4 bedrooms, garage. For more informtion and photos visit wwww.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 10-4740 $149,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200 VM 101

WILKES-BARRE REDUCED

29 Amber Lane Remodeled 2 bedroom Ranch home with new carpeting, large sun porch, new roof. Move right in! For more info and photos please visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-749 $79,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Single family home with a separate building containing a 1 bedroom apartment and 5 car garage all on 1 lot. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-2828 Priced to sell at $85,000 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

921 Main St. Over 2,000 S/F of commercial space + 2 partially furnished apartments, garage, and off street parking. Great convenient location. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS #11-1965 $167,500 Call Tom 570-282-7716

EDWARDSVILLE

173-175 Zerby Ave. Great income property with additional garage space (34x38) room for 3 cars to rent! Live in one half and have your mortgage paid by the other! $12,000+ potential income! MLS # 11-1111 REDUCED! $59,900 Call John Shelley 570-288-0770 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

EDWARDSVILLE

134 Page Ave. Light industrial complex consisting of main building (8,417 S/F) with offices and shop areas. Clear-span warehouse (38’x144’); and pole building (38’x80’) on 1.16 acres. MLS 11-1320 $299,000 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

NANTICOKE

47 N. Thomas St. Well maintained duplex in a nice area of Kingston. 2nd floor unit is occupied. New roof, new heating system, brand new in ground pool recently installed. Laundry hook-up for both units in basement. Newer roof and exterior recently painted. MLS 11-1199 $129,500 Jay A. Crossin 570-288-0770 Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 570-474-2340

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

KINGSTON REDUCED!!

FORTY FORT

Commercial Property with approx. 5000 sq. ft. with an office, storage & a 2nd floor apt in a high traffic area. $196,000 MLS# 11-945 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

HANOVER TOWNSHIP 22 W. Germania St

47 N. Thomas St. Well maintained duplex in a nice area of Kingston. 2nd floor unit is occupied. New roof, new heating system, brand new in ground pool recently installed. Laundry hook-up for both units in basement. Newer roof and exterior recently painted. MLS 11-1199 $139,500 Jay A. Crossin 570-288-0770 Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

LARKSVILLE This 6,600 sq. ft. concrete block building has multiple uses. 5 offices & kitchenette. Over 5,800 sq. ft.. warehouse space (high ceilings). 2 overhead doors. $86,500 MLS 10-1326 Bob Kopec HUMFORD REALTY 570-822-5126

KINGSTON

366 Pierce St. Commercial building for sale.Highly desirable corner location with parking for approximately 25 vehicles. Would be attractive for any retail or commercial operation. MLS 11-2763 $300,000 Jay A. Crossin Extension 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

Line up a place to live in classified!

KINGSTON 7 Hoyt St

Nice duplex zoned commercial, can be used for offices as well as residential. All separate utilities. Keep apt. space or convert to commercial office space. Adjacent lot for sale by same owner. MLS 11-2176 $85,900 Jay A. Crossen CROSSEN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770 ext. 23

* * JUST LISTED * * 51 Charles St. Country living 5 minutes from town. Immaculate condition. Newer replacement windows. Modern kitchen w/oak cabinets. Hardwood floors throughout. Beautiful landscaped lot. Fenced in yard. A must see! MLS #11-2807 $119,900 Call Geri 570-696-0888

LARKSVILLE HUGE REDUCTION!

423 E. Church St. Great 2 family in move in condition on both sides, Separate utilities, 6 rooms each. 3 car detached garage in super neighborhood. Walking distance to college. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-1608 $127,500 Call Tom 570-262-7716

PITTSTON

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

570-288-6654

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

COURTDALE

Live in one and rent the others to pay for your mortgage! This Multi-Unit features gorgeous hardwood floors in the 1st level apartment. Second Level apartment has 4 bedrooms! Lower Level apartment has cozy efficiency. Plenty of parking and a 2 car carport is another highlight. Call Jesicca Skoloda 570-237-0463 JesiccaSkoloda Realtor@gmail.com MLS# 11-2741 $124,999 570-696-2468

175’x130’ sloping lot with some trees. Public sewer, water, gas. $7,500. 570-287-5775 or 570-332-1048

DALLAS

Located in Top Rated Dallas Schools 2 Acres $39,500 5 Acres $59,900 We challenge anyone to find similar acreage in this desirable of a location at these prices. Costs to develop land make this irreplaceable inventory at these prices and gives the next owner instant equity at our expense. Call owner. 570-245-6288

DALLAS 118 Glendale Road Well established 8 unit Mobile Home Park (Glen Meadow Mobile Home Park) in quiet country like location, zoned commercial and located right off Interstate 81. Convenient to shopping center, movie theater. Great income opportunity! Park is priced to sell. Owner financing is available with a substantial down payment. For more details and photos visit www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-1530 $210,000 Call Kim 570-466-3338

PITTSTON

35 High St. Nice duplex in great location, fully occupied with leases. Good investment property. Separate utilities, newer furnaces, gas and oil. Notice needed to show. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3222 $89,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

PITTSTON

Duplex. Aluminum siding, oil heat, semi - modern kitchens, long term tenant. On a spacious 50’ x 150’ lot. Motivated Seller. REDUCED. $42,900 Anne Marie Chopick 570-760-6769

WEST HAZLETON

3 bedroom townhouse. 1.5 bath, 1 car garage yard. Only 4 years old. $112,500 each or buy all 6 for $650,000 Garry Tokanets Broker Mountain City Realty 570-384-3335

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

WILKES-BARRE

Stately brick building in Historic district. Wonderful 1st block S Franklin. Formerly Lane's. 5700sq ft + full basement for storage. Great professional space. Well maintained. Private parking & garden. MLS#11-345 $495,000 570-696-3801 Call Margy 570-696-0891

WYOMING 14 West Sixth St.

Former upholestry shop. 1st floor in need of a lot of TLC. 2nd floor apartment in good condition & rented with no lease. Storage area. Off street parking available.

PRICE$65,000 REDUCED!

New Goss Manor lots. Prices ranging from $59,900 to $69,900. Public water, sewer, gas & electric available. Call Kevin Smith 570-696-1195 or 570-696-5420

SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP

DRUMS Lot 7 Maple Dr.

Private yet convenient location just minutes from interstates. You can fish in your own back yard in the Nescopeck Creek or use the nearby state game lands. Perfect for your vacation cabin or possible year round home! MLS#11-1492 $14,900 Jill Jones 696-6550

DURYEA

44.59 ACRES

Industrial Site. Rail served with all utilities. KOZ approved. For more information and photos visit www.atlas realtyinc.com $2,395,000 MLS#10-669 Call Charlie

HARDING

LOCKVILLE RD

2.3 ACRES Sacrifice $37,000. Not perked. 570-760-0049

JENKINS TWP.

Contact Judy Rice 714-9230 MLS# 11-572

570-288-6654

462 W. State St. Lower End Pizza! Established profitable business for sale. Restaurant, bar, game room, separate dining room. Parking for 35 cars. Turnkey operation. Additional parking lot included. For lease or sale $175,000 Call Jay Crossin Ext. 23 Crossin Real Estate 570-288-0770

Spacious 1791 sq. ft. 1/2 double with wrap around porch, shed & garage. Semi modern kitchen & bath. 3 bedrooms with gas heat and plenty of storage. $24,900 Ann Marie Chopick 570-760-6769

SCRANTON

KINGSTON REDUCED!!

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED! Lawrence St. Nice 3 unit property. Lots of off street parking and bonus 2 car garage. All units are rented. Great income with low maintenance $139,900 MLS# 10-2675 Call Karen

High Traffic - Good visibility. This 6,000 sq. ft. masonry building is clear span. Multiple uses - professional commercial, etc. 18 storage/warehouse units included. MLS#11-2787 $325,000 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

24 Fairway Drive Great level lot for building your dream home. Easy access to Route 115, PA Turnpike and Rt. 81. Lot size is 1+ acres. MLS#11-2635 $36,000 Karen or Ray Bernardi 371-8347 or 406-0393

Let the Community Know! Place your Classified Ad TODAY! 570-829-7130

WYOMING PRICE REDUCED!

PITTSTON Township Blvd.

MAKE AN OFFER! Ideal location between WilkesBarre & Scranton. Ample parking with room for additional spaces. Perfect for medical or professional offices. Contact agent to show. Contact Judy Rice 570-714-9230 MLS# 10-1110

285 Wyoming Ave. First floor currently used as a shop, could be offices, etc. Prime location, corner lot, full basement. 2nd floor is 3 bedroom apartment plus 3 car garage and parking for 6 cars. For more information and photos go to www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS #10-4339 $169,900 Call Charlie VM 101

Hospital St. Eagle View Great residential lot overlooking the Susquehanna River for a stunning view of the river and surrounding area. Build your dream home on this lot with the best river and valley views in Luzerne County. Gas, telephone, electric and water utility connections are available. For more details & photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-2640 $125,000 Call Kim 570-466-3338

Land for sale? Place an ad and SELL 570-829-7130

on available lots in desirable Laflin. Convenient location near highways, airport, casino & shopping. DIRECTIONS Rt 315 to laflin Rd; make left off Laflin Rd onto Pinewood Dr. Lot is on corner of Pinewood Dr. and Hickorywood Dr. MLS 11-3411 atlas realtyinc.com Call Keri Best 570-885-5082

915 Manufactured Homes

ASHLEY PARK

Laurel Run & San Souci Parks, Like new, several to choose from, Financing &Warranty, MobileOneSales.net Call (570)250-2890

HUNLOCK CREEK

Move in ready & affordable 2 bedroom located in quiet, country setting. $14,000. Financing available with minimum down. 570-477-2845

HUNLOCK CREEK

MOUNTAIN TOP

Crestwood school district. 50 acres. Pond & mixed terrain. Surveyed & perked. Rte 437. $187,500 570-510-7914

MOUNTAIN TOP

Crestwood Schools! 126 Acres for Sale! Mostly wooded with approx. 970 ft on Rt. 437 in Dennison Twp. $459,000 Call Jim Graham at 570-715-9323

Quiet country setting. Lots available. $295 per month. Includes water, sewer & trash. Call Bud 570-477-2845

927

Vacation Locations

POCONO TIMESHARE

Worldwide priveleges. 1 bedroom. Furnished. 40% off. Call 845-536-3376

930 Wanted to Buy Real Estate

WE BUY HOMES 570-956-2385 Any Situation

MOUNTAIN TOP

Several building lots ready to build on! ALL public utilities! Priced from $32,000 to $48,000! Use your own Builder! Call Jim Graham at 570-715-9323

NEW PRICING!!! EARTH CONSERVANCY LAND FOR SALE *61 +/- Acres Nuangola $99,000 *46 +/- Acres Hanover Twp., $79,000 *Highway Commercial KOZ Hanover Twp. 3 +/- Acres 11 +/- Acres *Wilkes-Barre Twp. 32 +/- Acres Zoned R-3 See additional Land for Sale at www.earth conservancy.org 570-823-3445

NEWPORT TOWNSHIP 1 mile south of L.C.C.C. 2 lots available. 100’ frontage x 228’ deep. Modular home with basement accepted. Each lot $17,000. Call 570-714-1296

NEWPORT TWP.

WANAMIE 1/2 acre building lot. Leveled & cleared. Utilities available. Must sell. All offers considered. 570-855-8463

Need to rent that Vacation property? Place an ad and get started! 570-829-7130

PITTSTON 19 Ziegler Road

Picture a sunrise over the mountain. Ready to build, residential lot. Secluded entrance road from Route 502. Priced to sell! Underground telephone and electric service in place. Make this the site of your future home. MLS#11-486 $55,000 Ron Skrzysowski (570) 696-6551

RED ROCK MOUNTAIN

1.298 acre plot on Red Rock Mtn. Direct access to Mountain Springs Lake and to Game Lands 57 & 13. Ricketts Glen State Park. Pickups / 4x4 access. $6,900. $500 down, $123.48 monthly. For maps and plot plan. Call 570-864-3055

SHAVERTOWN LAND Harford Ave.

4 buildable residential lots for sale individually or take all 4! Buyer to confirm water and sewer with zoning officer. Directions: R. on E. Franklin, R. on Lawn to L. on Harford. $22,500 per lot Mark Mason 570-331-0982 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

915 Manufactured Homes

ASHLEY

1995 Colony Keystone 16’ X 76’ Mobile Home. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, laundry room & bonus sun room included. Large corner lot + 2 sheds. Lot Fee only $240/ month. Priced to sell at $20,000. 45 Tamara Hill, Ashley Park. For a showing leave a message at 570-417-8704

938

Apartments/ Furnished

PLYMOUTH FURNISHED APARTMENT FOR RENT

utilities all paid Call 570-881-0636

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

ASHLEY

Modern 2nd floor, 2 bedrooms. All appliances, off street parking. No pets. $500 + utilities. 570-820-9606

AVOCA

Spacious 2 bedroom, 2nd floor. No pets. $485 / month + security. Call 570-328-3773

BACK MOUNTAIN

3 large 1 bedroom apts, 3 kitchens with appliances, 3 baths. Apts. have access to one another. No lease. $795 for all 3 apts ($265 per apt.) Convenient to all colleges and gas drilling areas.

Call for more info 570-696-1866

BEAR CREEK

New 3 room apartment. All utilities included except electric. No smoking & no pets. $650 + security and references. Furnished or unfurnished. Call 570-954-1200

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

DALLAS

1 bedroom, near Misericordia. Lease, security, references required. Absolutely no pets/no smoking. $495/month + some utilities 570-298-2478 or 570-417-0144

DALLAS

1st floor apartment. Off street parking. Heat & Hot water included. No pets. Available October 1. $600 / month. Call 570-675-5873

DALLAS

Remodeled 2 bedroom. Washer/dryer hook up. No Pets. $525/month + utilities & security deposit. Call (570) 862-7432

DALLAS TWP

CONDO FOR LEASE:

$1,800. 2 bedroom/ 2 Bath. Call Us to discuss our great Amenity & Maintenance program! Call 570-674-5278 Dallas, Pa. MEADOWS APARTMENTS 220 Lake St. Housing for the elderly & mobility impaired; all utilities included. Federally subsidized program. Extremely low income persons encouraged to apply. Income less than $12,250. 570-675-6936, 8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Apartments/ Unfurnished

DUPONT 2 bedroom with

office, off street parking, w/d hookup, non smokers. $440/per month plus utilities. Call (908)362-8670

EDWARDSVILLE

2 apartments. Spacious. Each with 2 bedrooms, 2nd floor, off street parking. Washer/ dryer hook up & dishwasher, refrigerator. $450/$600 month + 1 year lease /security, references & utilities. No pets. Non Smoking. Not approved for Section 8. Call Rudy at 570-288-6626

EXETER

2 bedroom, 2nd floor. Off-street parking, washer, dryer, range included. Central air, gas heat. $625 month + security and references. 570-299-7103

941

Senior Apartments

Call for appointment

570-654-5733 Monday - Friday 8am-12pm. Equal Housing Opportunity

EXETER

2ND FLOOR Kitchen with appliances, new cupboards, new vinyl flooring. Large living room, 2 bedrooms, all rooms are large. New bathroom. Washer/dryer. Wall to Wall carpeting. Lighted off street parking. Gas heat. Utilities by tenant. Security, lease & references. No pets. $650/month. 570-714-9331

FORTY FORT

5 room, 2 bedroom apartment. $585. Includes all utilities except phone & cable. Call 570-287-2765

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

FORTY FORT 1st floor. 1 bedroom

Kitchen, living room, bath, front porch. Heat, water & sewer included. Off street parking. Washer/Dryer hookups. $550 + security 570-574-2829

Motorcycle for sale? Let them see it here in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

W IL K E SW O O D A PAR TM E NTS

1 B edroom Sta rting a t $675.00 • Includes gas heat, w ater,sew er & trash • C onvenient to allm ajor highw ays & public transportation • Fitness center & pool • P atio/B alconies • P et friendly* • O nline rentalpaym ents • Flexible lease term s M ond a y - Frid a y 9 -5 Sa turd a y 1 0-2

822-27 1 1

w w w .liv ea tw ilk esw ood .com * Restrictions Ap p ly

CEDAR VILLAGE

Apartment Homes

Ask About Our Summer Specials! $250 Off 1st Months Rent, & $250 Off Security Deposit With Good Credit. 1 bedroom starting @ $690

Featuring:

‹ ‹ ‹ ‹ ‹

Washer & Dryer Central Air Fitness Center Swimming Pool Easy Access to I-81 Mon – Fri. 9 –5 44 Eagle Court Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706 (Off Route 309)

570-823-8400 cedarvillage@ affiliatedmgmt.com

Apartments/ Unfurnished

FORTY FORT

AMERICA REALTY RENTALS OUT OF FLOOD ZONE!

ALL UNITS MANAGED CALL FOR AVAILABILITY 1 BEDROOM starting at $465+utilities. NO PETS/ SMOKING/ LEASE/EMPLOYMENT VERIFICATION / APPLICATION. Appliances, laundry, parking, modern, very clean standards. 570-288-1422

FORTY FORT

Large, modern 2 bedroom, 2nd floor apartment. Eat in kitchen with all appliances. Spacious living room, bath, a/c units, laundry, off street parking. Great location. No pets or smoking. $625 + utilities. Call 570-714-9234

GLEN LYON 1 bedroom 2nd floor

apartment available with new carpet. Building has been remodeled & security system installed. OSP. Stove & refrigerator included. No pets. Security deposit & credit check required. $450/month Call Judi 570-474-6307 or 570-715-7736

SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP

HANOVER Modern 1st floor,

3 room apartment. Nice kitchen & bath. 1 bedroom. Parking. Gas heat. Water included. No pets. $435/month. Coldwell Banker Gerald L. Busch Real Estate 570-288-2514

HANOVER TWP. Available Now!

Beautiful 2nd floor, 3 bedroom. Wall to wall carpet, large living room & kitchen, 2nd floor porch with spectacular views, washer/ dryer hookup. Garbage & sewer included. $650/ month + utilities & security. Call (570) 592-4133

HARVEYS LAKE

1 bedroom, LAKE FRONT apartments. Wall to wall, appliances, lake rights, off street parking. No Pets. Lease, security & references. 570-639-5920

HARVEY’S LAKE

Recently remodeled 2 bedroom, 2 bath. 1st floor. Laundry hookup. Off-street parking. Available Sept 15. $625. References & security. 570-592-3023 or 570-793-9072

JENKINS TWP.

3rd floor, 1 bedroom. All utilities included. Refrigerator & stove. No pets. Available end of September $600 month. call 570-655-0539

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE

Immediate Occupancy!!

Efficiencies available @30% of income

MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS

61 E. Northampton St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701 • Affordable Senior Apartments • Income Eligibility Required • Utilities Included! • Low cable rates; • New appliances; • Laundry on site; • Activities! •Curbside Public Transportation

Please call 570-825-8594 D/TTY 800-654-5984

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

APT RENTALS 1 BEDROOM 2 BEDROOM 3 BEDROOM

MOUNTAIN TOP WOODBRYN 1 & 2 Bedroom.

KINGSTON

4 room apartment 2nd floor. Heat & hot water included. Coin Laundry. Off street parking. No pets/smoking. $695 570-288-5600 or 570-479-0486

WILKES-BARRE 1st & 2nd floor

KINGSTON 2 bedroom, 1 bath.

1 BEDROOM

2 2nd floor. Nice area. Stove & fridge. $750 per month includes heat & water. No pets or smoking. Call (570) 332-8765

KINGSTON large 2 bedroom,

rooms with closets. Plenty of storage. Laundry with washer & Dryer. . $650 / month. Call 570-332-3222 KINGSTON 595 MARKET ST

BRAND NEW

2 bedroom apartment. $650 + utilities. No pets / No smoking. Off street parking, air, new appliances & microwave, laundry. Security, references & Background check required. 570-288-4508

KINGSTON Newly remodeled 2

bedroom, central heat & air, off-street parking, wall to wall, washer/dryer hookup, No pets. $475 Call 570-288-9507

KINGSTON No pets/smoking.

Very nice 1st floor 1-2 bedroom apartment. All appliances, including washer/dryer. New carpeting. First month + security & lease. Credit Check required. Tenant pays all utilities. $600/month (570) 331-3504

KINGSTON Rutter Ave.

REDUCED! 1 bedroom 1st floor, large living room, neutral decor. Gas heat, water included. Off street parking. No pets. $410 plus security & lease. 570-793-6294 KINGSTON

SDK GREEN ACRES HOMES 11 Holiday Drive

Kingston “A Place To Call Home” Spacious 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts 3 Bedroom Townhomes Gas heat included

2 BEDROOMS

WYOMING

All Apartments Include: APPLIANCES CARPETING SEWER OFF ST PARKING MAINTENANCE Lease & Credit Check Required

Call 899-3407 Tina Randazzo Property Mgr

LUZERNE 1 bedroom, wall to wall, off-street parking, coin laundry, water, sewer & garbage included. $495/ month + security & lease. HUD accepted. Call 570-687-6216 or 570-954-0727

LUZERNE 1st floor. 1 bedroom. Stove, refrigerator, washer/dryer hook up included. Off street parking. $475/month + security. Call (570) 466-3603

LUZERNE

41 Mill Street 1st floor, 2 bedroom, large bath with shower, stove, refrigerator and dishwasher, washer/dryer hookup, 1 car attached garage. Fieldstone working fireplace. Non Smoking. Too many extras to mention, call for more details. $720 + utilities. 570-288-3438

LUZERNE

Cozy 1 bedroom, 2nd floor. Kitchen, living area. New flooring, private entrance, yard access. Off street parking. $440/mo. Water & trash included. Security & 1 year lease. No pets. Call (570) 760-5573 Midtowne Apartments 100 E. 6th Street, Wyoming PA 18644

KINGSTON

Spacious 3rd floor, 2 bedrooms, porch, off street parking. Heat & water included. New fridge & stove. $550 + security.Call (570) 287-5282

To place your ad Call Toll Free 1-800-427-8649

KINGSTON

Very nice, 3 rooms & bath. All utilities. Parking. Non-smoking. No pets. $575. Single Occupancy Call 570-287-3985

962

Rooms

Elderly, Handicapped & disabled. 570-693-4256 ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED Rents based on income. Managed by EEI

MINERS MILLS

Cozy 1 bedroom, 3rd floor apartment. Heat, hot water, stove & fridge included. $430 / month. Call 570-472-3681

MOUNTAIN TOP 1 Bedroom apart-

ments for elderly, disabled. Rents based on 30% of ADJ gross income. Handicap Accessible. Equal Housing Opportunity. TTY711 or 570-474-5010 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer.

Mountain Top

1st floor. 1 or 2 bedrooms. Laundry, facilities, porch. No pets. $600/month + utilities, security, lease & credit check. (570) 868-6503

962

Rooms

Rooms starting at Daily $39.99 + tax Weekly $179.99 + tax WiFi HBO Available Upon Request: Microwave & Refrigerator

(570) 823-8027

www.casinocountrysideinn.com info@casinocountrysideinn.com

Apartments/ Unfurnished

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

EAST MOUNTAIN APARTMENTS

NANTICOKE

1st floor, 1 bedroom, water, heat and sewage incl. Off street parking, coin operated washer & dryer, NO PETS $495/month (570) 417-4311 or (570) 696-3936

NANTICOKE

2-3 bedrooms, 2nd floor, heat, sewage, water garbage included. No pets. $595 + security. 570-735-3350 NANTICOKE 2nd Floor apartment for a tenant who wants the best. Bedroom, living room, kitchen & bath. Brand new. Washer/dryer hookup, air conditioned. No smoking or pets. 2 year lease, all utilities by tenant. Sewer & garbage included. Security, first & last month’s rent required. $440.00 570-735-5185

NANTICOKE 2nd floor, 1 bedroom

non smoking. Water & sewer included. No pets. 1 year lease + references. $380/month + security & utilities. Call 570-735-3719

NANTICOKE 3 bedroom, wall to

wall carpet, offstreet parking, $595 per month+ utilities, security, lease. HUD accepted. Call 570-687-6216 or 570-954-0727

NANTICOKE FRONT STREET

Second floor, across from the park. Renovated, available Sept. 1. 3 bedroom unit $600/month; owner pays gas/water/ sewer/garbage. Tenant pays electric. Security deposit, application & credit check required. No pets. Agent, Wendy 570-336-6162

Regions Best Address

• 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.

• 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.

822-4444

288-6300

www.GatewayManorApt.com

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

KILLIAN REAL ESTATE 570-752-1300

Sell your own home! Place an ad HERE 570-829-7130

NANTICOKE Spacious 2 bedroom apartment. Huge closet, washer & dryer included. No pets. No smoking. Sewer & trash included. $495/month. 570-262-5399

PITTSTON

2 bedroom. All appliances included. All utilities paid; electricity by tenant. Everything brand new. Off street parking. $750 + security & references 570-969-9268

PITTSTON room apartment,

3 2nd floor, wall to wall carpet, off street parking. Enclosed porch. $450/month + utilities & security. No pets 570-655-1222

PITTSTON 77 S. Main Street

2 bedroom, 2nd floor. $400 + utilities. No pets. 570-654-6737 570-212-2908 570-362-4019

PITTSTONHUGHESTOWN Completely remod-

eled, modern 1 bedroom apt. Lots of closet space, with new tile floor and carpets. Includes stove, refrigerator, washer, dryer, gas heat, nice yard and neighborhood, no pets. $600/month $1000 deposit. 570-479-6722

PLAINS

Large 3 bedroom. Recently updated Off street parking, w/d. No smoking, no pets. $675 incl. WATER & SEWER 570-820-8822

Large, modern 2 bedroom 2nd floor. Living room with hardwood. Eat in kitchen with all appliances. Convenient location. No pets. No smoking. $550 + utilities. Call 570-714-9234

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

PLYMOUTH

2nd floor, 2 bedrooms, living room, kitchen with appliances, remodeled, off street parking, $350/month + utilities & security. No pets. 570-288-3756

FORTY FORT

AMERICA REALTY SHOP/OFFICE RENTALS “2 GENERATIONS OF STANDARDS” UNDER WAY MANAGED UNITS

DIKE PROTECTED

SOON TO BE AVAILABLE EUROPEAN STYLE RETAIL SHOPS OR OFFICES Leases Starting At $550. Busy Rte 11 Location

Applications Being Entertained

570-288-1422

SUGAR NOTCH

Charming 2 bedroom. Wall to wall carpeting, completely renovated. $450/mo. Tenant responsible for own utilities. 570-822-6184

SWOYERSVILLE

1st floor. 1 bedroom studio apartment. Stove & Refrigerator. Wall to wall carpeting. All utilities paid except electric. $595 + security. Call 570-287-3646

W. WYOMING

2 bedroom. Appliances. New carpet. Fresh paint. $500/month + security, utilities & references. Off street parking. Absolutely no smoking or pets! Call (570) 693-1288

Find Something? Lose Something? Get it back where it belongs with a Lost/Found ad! 570-829-7130

WEST PITTSTON

1 bedroom, newly remodeled, fridge & stove, off street parking, $450 plus utilities. Small pets welcome. Call 570-357-1138

2nd floor 1 bedroom. Kitchen with appliances and attic storage. Heat, water & sewer included. Quiet neighborhood, out of flood zone. 1 year lease. No pets. $540 + first, last & security. Credit check & references required. 570-466-1545 West Pittston, Pa. GARDEN VILLAGE APARTMENTS 221 Fremont St. Housing for the elderly & mobility impaired; all utilities included. Federally subsidized program. Extremely low income persons encouraged to apply. Income less than $12,250. 570-655-6555, 8 am-4 pm, Monday-Friday. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

WILKES-BARRE

Mayflower Crossing Apartments 570.822.3968 2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms - Light & bright open floor plans - All major appliances included - Pets welcome* - Close to everything - 24 hour emergency maintenance - Short term leases available

Call TODAY For AVAILABILITY!! www.mayflower crossing.com Certain Restrictions Apply*

WILKES-BARRE

123 GEORGE AVE 2nd floor, 2 bedroom. Stove, dishwasher, washer/ dryer hook up. $550 per month + utilities & security. 460 SCOTT ST 1st floor, 1 bedroom. Stove, refrigerator, washer/dryer hookup. $450 per month + utilities & security. No pets, lease, credit check, references. 570-472-9494

WILKES-BARRE

2 & 3 bedroom, 1 bath apartments near General Hospital $525 & $575 + utilities, first, last & security. No pets. 570-821-0463 570-417-3427

WILKES-BARRE 1 bedroom. Heat &

hot water included, $600 month + Security required 570-237-5397

944

ZION GROVE

Newer log home in gated community. Cathedral ceiling in living room & kitchen. Propane free standing stove. Master suite with loft. Guest suite with separate entrance. Large rec room over 2 car garage. 3 bedrooms/3 baths. 5 miles from Humboldt Ind. Park. 1 year lease required. $1,400/mo. Call Debbie 570-474-6307 or 570-715-7746

SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR! 113 Edison St. Quiet neighborhood. 2 bedroom apartments available for immediate occupancy. Heat & hot water included. $625 Call Aileen at 570-822-7944

SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP 944

Commercial Properties

ASHLEY

WILKES-BARRE LODGE Formerly The Travel Lodge 497 Kidder St., Wilkes-Barre Rooms Starting at: Daily $44.99 + tax Weekly $189.99 + tax Microwave, Refrigerator, WiFi, HBO 570-823-8881 www.Wilkes BarreLodge.com

WILKES-BARRE Maffett St

Just off Old River Road. 7 room, 3 bedroom, 2nd floor duplex. Off street parking, deck in rear. Ample closet / storage. Neutral decor. Appliances included. $625 + utilities, security & lease. No pets. 570-793-6294

WILKES-BARRE SOUTH SECURE BUILDINGS

1 & 2 bedroom apartments. Starting at $440 and up. References required. Section 8 ok. 570-332-5723

WILKES-BARRE SOUTH

TWO APARTMENTS 2 bedroom & a 1/2 half double. Water & sewer included. Off street parking. Serious inquiries only. $600 & 850. month . 570-242-3327

WILKES-BARRE

TWO SPACIOUS 5 ROOM 2 bedroom apartments. First & second floor. Available 9/1 and 10/1. Rent + utilities. Lease & security. No pets. $550 & $625 570-650-3008 or 570-881-8979

WILKES-BARRE West River Street

Hazleton St. Modern office for lease only. Visible from Rt309 & I-81 with easy access to both. Adaptable to many uses. Tenant pays utilities. $5,000/month Contact Judy Rice 714-9230 MLS# 11-851

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

DOLPHIN PLAZA

Rte. 315 1,700 - 2,000 SF Office / Retail 4,500 SF Office Showroom, Warehouse Loading Dock Call 570-829-1206

FORTY FORT

Free standing building. Would be great for any commercial use. 1900 sq. ft. on the ground floor with an additional 800 sq. ft in finished lower level. Excellent location, only 1 block from North Cross Valley Expressway and one block from Wyoming Ave (route 11) Take advantage of this prime location for just $995 per month! 570-262-1131

OFFICE SPACE

645 Mercer Ave. Recently remodeled with off street parking Call Jay Extension 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

WILKES-BARRE

Thinking of starting a business? Looking to relocate? Have you considered a "Co-op" with another small business? $675 per month rent plus utilities Modern office building, 4 offices, conference room, reception area, supply room, kitchen and full-bath. Handicap access and off street parking. Or propose a lease/ option to purchase and negotiate your terms. Dee Fields, Associate Broker 570-788-7511

Studio, 1, 2, or 3 bedroom. Starting at $400. All utilities included. 826-1934 WILKES-BARRE Š1 bedroom water included Š2 bedroom water included Š4 bedroom half double Š1 bedroom efficiency water included Š2 bedroom single family HANOVER Š4 bedroom large affordable Š2 bedroom NANTICOKE Š2 bedroom large, water included PITTSTON ŠLarge 1 bedroom water included OLD FORGE Š2 bedroom exceptional water included Plains Š1 bedroom water included McDermott & McDermott Real Estate Inc. Property Management 570-821-1650 (direct line) Mon-Fri. 8-7pm Sat. 8-noon

WYOMING 2ND FLOORimmediAPT Available ately, 2 bedrooms, refrigerator and stove provided, $650.00/per month, Heat paid. Call 570-351-4651

328 Kennedy Blvd. Modern medical space, labor & industry approved, ADA throughout, 2 doctor offices plus 4 exam rooms, xray and reception and breakrooms. Could be used for any business purpose. Will remodel to suit. For lease $2,200/MO. Also available for sale MLS #11-751 Call Charlie VM 101

PITTSTON COOPERS CO-OP

Lease Space Available, Light manufacturing, warehouse, office, includes all utilities with free parking. I will save you money!

315 PLAZA

900 & 2400 SF Dental Office direct visibility to Route 315 between Leggios & Pic-ADeli. 750 & 1750 SF also available. Near 81 & Cross Valley. 570-829-1206

WAREHOUSE/LIGHT MANUFACTURING OFFICE SPACE PITTSTON Main St.

12,000 sq. ft. building in downtown location. Warehouse with light manufacturing. Building with some office space. Entire building for lease or will sub-divide. MLS #10-1074 Call Charlie 570-829-6200 VM 101

WAREHOUSE/OFFICE

5,000 square foot warehouse, 1,500 square foot office off I-81, Exit 165. Call 570-823-1719

WEST PITTSTON

Lease 9,000 sq. ft. for $600/month net. Clean, 1/2 bath. Owner. 908-852-4410

WILKES-BARRE

KINGSTON

1 bedroom apartment available. Hardwood flooring & appliances included. Heat, water, sewer & trash also included. Walking distance to Wilkes University. Pet Friendly. Available Sept. 1. $600. 570-969-9268

WILKES UNIVERSITY CAMPUS

Commercial Properties

PITTSTON

Carpet, tile bath, appliances, washer / dryer hookup, sewer, parking by front door. $600 + Utilities, Security & Lease. No smoking, no pets. Call 570-693-0695

WILKES-BARRE

LAFAYETTE GARDENS

WILKES-BARRE / KINGSTON Efficiency 1 & 2

bedrooms. Includes all utilities, parking, laundry. No pets. From $390. Lease, security & references. 570-970-0847

Apartments/ Unfurnished

TOWNHOUSE

FLOOD SPECIAL

2nd floor. 4 rooms. heat & water included. short term lease available. $500 month. Call 570-814-1957

941

WYOMING

PLAINS TWP. 50 Chamberlain St.

WEST PITTSTON

PLAINS

The good life... close at hand

www.EastMountainApt.com

Immediate Opennings!

Housing for

Bear Creek Township

941

No pets. Rents based on income start at $405 & $440. Handicap Accessible. Equal Housing Opportunity. 570-474-5010 TTY711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Extremely Low & Very Low Income

FREE

24hr on-site Gym Community Room Swimming Pool Maintenance FREE Controlled Access Patio/Balcony and much more... Call Today or stop by for a tour! 570-288-9019

Apartments/ Unfurnished

Sun porch. Wall to wall carpet. Plenty of parking. $800/ month - heat, water, sewage & garbage paid by owner. NO PETS! Call (570) 474-5568

KINGSTON 131 S. Maple Ave.

$600. Water included. New tile, carpet, dishwasher, garbage disposal, Washer/Dryer hookup - Large yard Double Security Facebook us at BOVO Rentals 570-328-9984

941

MOUNTAIN TOP 2nd floor. 6 rooms.

KINGSTON

$675/month Gas heat included in this 2 bedroom apartment. Security & references required. No pets. 570-288-4200

KINGSTON bedroom,

Two Apartments

1 BEDROOM. $425. Newly remodeled, off street parking. 2 BEDROOM. $525. Newly remodeled, off street parking. 570-602-0758

941

FORTY FORT

EXETER

222 SCHOOLEY AVE. EXETER, PA Accepting applications for 1 bedroom apartments. Quality apartments for ages 62 and older. Income limits apply. Rent only $437 month. *Utilities Included *Laundry Facilities *On Site Management *Private parking

Apartments/ Unfurnished

Casino Countryside Inn

941

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 PAGE 11D

OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT