Issuu on Google+

CMYK

VOUCHER FOR ONLY

10

$

300951

20

$

The Times Leader timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE, PA

SPORTS SHOWCASE

By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER tmorgan@timesleader.com

YANKEES 9 RAYS 2

BLUE JAYS 11 ANGELS 2 NATIONAL LEAGUE

BREWERS 1 PIRATES 0 PHILLIES 11 NATIONALS 3 IL BASEBALL

years in prison on corruption charges. It all began to fall apart in the summer of 2007. That’s when Ciavarella has said he became aware that he, Conahan, then also a judge, and INSIDE: Lit- others were under federal intle phrase, vestigation relating to a huge improbe of the PA and Western pact, Page PA Child Care juvenile de7A tention centers. Much about his criminal case is in dispute. But all agree that local developer Robert Mericle, who built the centers, had walked into Ciavarella’s chambers one day with a stunning offer.

Four years ago Mark Ciavarella was living a life that most people dream to have. As president judge of Luzerne County, he had reached the pinnacle of his legal career. He lived in a spacious, comfortable Wright Township home. He and his family enjoyed frequent trips to Penn State football games, and vacationed at a luxurious condominium he and his good friend, Michael Conahan, owned in Florida. CLARK VAN ORDEN FILE PHOTO/THE TIMES LEADER Today, the disgraced ex-judge is known $1M finder’s fee He told Ciavarella he wanted to pay him Mark Ciavarella, second from left, is sworn is a president judge of Luzerne County as inmate 15008-067, a number assigned to him by the federal Bureau of Prisons on in 2007. Others, from left, are daughter Nicole, wife, Cindy, Judge Patrick Toole and son, Marco. Thursday after he was sentenced to 28 See CIAVARELLA, Page 7A

Line of controversy Teacher, E D U C AT I O N

student grades linked

CHIEFS 4 SWB YANKS 2 W-B Triathlon today On the surface, today’s Wilkes-Barre Triathlon looks to be on par with earlier runnings of the Back Mountain race. Like past years, torrid, rainy weather is Con McCole expected that is sure to make the cycling course altogether eventful for local athletes vying with out-of-area talent. For race directors, however, this year’s triathlon means more. Athletes, volunteers and race directors will celebrate the 30th running of the Wilkes-Barre Triathlon this morning.

Effort is on way to connect educators’ evaluations to how well students do on tests. By MARK GUYDISH mguydish@timesleader.com

INSIDE A NEWS: Obituaries 2A, 13A Local 3A Nation & World 4A B PEOPLE: Birthdays 5B C SPORTS: Outdoors 10C D BUSINESS: Stocks 6D E VIEWS: Editorials 2E F ETC: Puzzles 2F Books 5F G CLASSIFIED: 1G

WEATHER Lukas Phillips. Periods of rain. High 76, low 64. Details, Page 16C

6

09815 10077

$1.50

A stumble cost Ciavarella his world

The former judge’s acceptance of a ‘finder’s fee’ proved a key element in his successful prosecution.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

Pipes are off loaded from a flat-bed truck at the staging area of Appalachian Pipeline Contractors off Keelersburg Road in Wyoming County.

Gas pipeline projects slowed by area concerns INSIDE: Dallas parents stand their ground, page 16A.

By MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

The natural gas pipeline Williams Field Services LLC is building in Wyoming County will link two of America’s energy arteries that feed the East Coast’s appetite for heat and power. The 33.5-mile American steel leviathan will scale mountains and snake below the Susquehanna River and Bowman’s Creek as it makes its way south. Williams and its construction contractors have begun clearing hillside easements, digging trenches and, at a staging area off Keelersburg Road in Tunkhannock Township, they have stacked hundreds of segments of 2-foot diameter, green anti-corrosive epoxy coated pipe in preparation for burial. Williams hopes the pipeline will be in place and moving 250 million cubic feet of natural gas per day to market by October,

Existing Transco Pipeline

Dallas School District Campus

but the company’s plans have slowed to a crawl in Dallas Township, where residents have opposed the project and township officials have taken their time in carefully reviewing the plans. Dallas Township is where the gathering lines will join the main Transco interstate pipeline and is thus a vital link in the chain for both companies.

Proposed Site of Metering Stations

pipeline will connect with the Tennessee Gas Pipeline near Springville, Susquehanna County, carrying Marcellus Shale gas from wells operated by Cabot Oil and Gas. Serving Cabot wells The pipeline may eventually transport gas for other companies, but initially it will only serve Cabot wells, said Mike Dickinson, manager of operations and technical services for William’s Appalachian Basin region. Dickinson said Williams was approached by Cabot about building the pipeline. Williams Field Services LLC is a separate company from Williams Production and Exploration, the company’s drilling arm, and competes for the business of many gas drilling companies.

Williams and another company, Chief Oil and Gas, are seeking approvals to build so-called gathering lines to transport gas extracted from wells in Susquehanna and Wyoming counties to the Transco Pipeline, linking with the interstate pipeline about a quarter-mile from the Dallas School District campus. To the north, the Williams See PIPELINE, Page 16A

Grading teachers by looking at grades of students? It’s an idea long discussed but rarely done; touted by reformers pushing for accountability, opposed by teacher unions as too simplistic, and evoking doubts even among educators who agree with the theory but fret about the fairness. Well, ready or not, here it comes. Under Gov. Tom Corbett, Pennsylvania is moving aggressively to implement a teacher INSIDE: Goals evaluation sys- for system laid tem that would out, Page 8A. include student standardized test results. “The intent at this point is that this would become effective with the 2012-13 school year,” said Tim Eller, state Department of Education press secretary. The state has conducted a pilot program involving four Local Education Agencies, an umbrella term including school districts, charter schools, career and technical centers and intermediate units. No Luzerne County LEA participated. The effort ramps up this fall as the state seeks more volunteers to join the pilot program. Eller said the goal is to have up to 20 percent of LEAs statewide using sample evaluation systems. Participation can be done at the school or even classroom level, he added. Luzerne County superintendents contacted said their districts either had not made a decision about participating, or ruled it out. “We talked about it, but we reSee TEACHERS, Page 8A


K PAGE 2A

➛ timesleader.com

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

DETAILS WEEKLY LOTTERY SUMMARY Daily Number, Midday Sunday: 7-1-8 Monday: 4-1-1 Tuesday: 7-4-6 Wednesday: 7-5-6 Thursday: 4-3-6 Friday: 1-5-4 Saturday: 3-8-6 Big Four, Midday Sunday: 3-9-9-7 Monday: 1-3-8-1 Tuesday: 3-2-2-0 Wednesday: 7-1-2-5 Thursday: 3-7-6-5 Friday: 9-3-0-5 Saturday: 0-4-5-4

FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Rick Derringer and Gary Wright perform Saturday night at the F.M. Kirby Center as part of Hippiefest 2011.

Hippiefest’s acts far out Cavaliere, Derringer, Wright, Farner and Mason in finest ’60s and ’70s form at Kirby. R E V I E W By BRAD PATTON Times Leader Correspondent

WILKES-BARRE – It was a night full of peace, love and the glorious sounds of the classic rock of the 1960s and 1970s as “Hippiefest 2011” grooved its way to town Saturday. The five artists who took the stage of the F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts – Felix Cavaliere, Rick Derringer, Gary Wright, Mark Farner and Dave Mason – have been responsible for writing, recording or producing records that have sold in excess of 100 million copies. Cavaliere, a 1997 inductee of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as an original member of the Rascals (first known as the Young Rascals), kicked things off with his patented blue-eyed soul. His first number, 1967’s “I’ve Been Lonely Too Long” set the tone for the evening, as did his follow-ups “Groovin’ ” and “People Got To Be Free.” Cavaliere deftly worked bits and pieces of other classic songs, including three by the Temptations, into his selections and did a fine cover of Wilson Pickett’s “In The Midnight Hour.” He capped his 30-minute performance by leading the audience in a great sing-along version of “Good Lovin’,” his former group’s first No. 1 from 1966. Next up was Derringer, who showed off his guitar prowess from the moment he took the stage, especially on opening number “Still Alive and Well” and a scorching solo version of “The Star Spangled Banner,” which led into his professional wrestling anthem, “Real American.” He then did searing versions of “Hang On Sloopy,” his 1965 No. 1 song with his first group, The McCoys, and “Rock and Roll, Hoochie

Jane Lambert Kilduff Delaney

J

August 11, 2011

D

More Obituaries, Page 13A

Storm damaging to Broyan farm

Koo,” which ended with more of Derringer’s guitar pyrotechnics. Wright, who had success Hail damages crops, and both as a solo artist and as trees are knocked down in co-leader of Spooky Tooth, southern Luzerne County. followed with an impressive four-song set, showing off his skills on the keytar (the comBy JERRY LYNOTT bination keyboard and guitar jlynott@timesleader.com he helped pioneer). After treating the crowd to NESCOPECK TWP. – High two songs by Spooky Tooth, winds and hail accompanied a including “Better By You, Betfierce thunderstorm that ripped ter By Me,” Wright then did a through the Broyan Farm late dazzling version of his 1976 Saturday afternoon snapping solo tune “Dream Weaver” trees and damaging crops. and its equally successful folThe storm blew in around 5 lowup single “Love Is Alive.” p.m., when Jennifer Broyan said Derringer came out to add his she and her husband, Francis, distinctive guitar to the latter were on their way to a picnic. tune, returning the favor as Their oldest children were at Wright had joined him for home and called to alert them of “Rock and Roll, Hoochie Koo” the storm. earlier in the evening. “We came back to find all of After intermission, Farner, our stuff shredded to pieces,” formerly of Grand Funk Railshe said. road, took over for a highly It could be a total loss, she energetic 30-minute set, beadded. “We’ll know better in ginning on keyboards for time.” much of “Footstompin’ MuThe National Weather Service sic” then guitar on his former in Binghamton, N.Y. issued a seband’s big hit cover of “The Loco-Motion” and a fine renvere thunderstorm warning for dition of “Bad Time.” the area. Even though he surprised The storm developed in the more than a few in the crowd Berwick area and headed across of approximately 800 by not the Susquehanna River towards playing “We’re An American the area where interstates 80 Band,” he more than made up and 81 meet in the southern part for it with a simply epic verof Luzerne County, said Mitch sion of “Closer To Home (I’m Gilt, a hydro meteorologist with Pepper plants on the Broyan Farm in Nescopeck Township show Your Captain).” damage inflicted by hail during Saturday’s thunderstorm. the NWS. Mason, who found fame as a There were reports of trees member of Rock and Roll Hall traffic was limited to a single nickel-sized, riddled the tomadown and large hail, said Gilt. of Famers Traffic before lane while Pennsylvania Depart- toes and peppers and other “There was lots of hail,” he ment of Transportation crews crops. launching a highly successful said, some of it dime-sized. cleared the roadway. solo career, then capped the “Our plants look like you took Wind gusts reached approxievening with great versions of By 5:30 p.m. the storm had a weed-whacker to them,” said mately 60 mph, he added. his former group’s “Dear Mr. passed and the damage had been Broyan. There were no indications of a done. Fantasy” and “Feelin’ Alright” A neighboring farm was hit as tornado, he pointed out. and his solo hits “Only You On the way back to her farm well, but storm damage was limState police at Hazleton re- on Zenith Road, Broyan ran into ited to narrow path it followed. Know and I Know” and “We ported trees down along Inter- the hail storm. “Everything was “It just seems like a real fine Just Disagree.” He also played state 80 near mile marker 257. completely white,” she said. a tasty cover of Bob Dylan’s line,” said Broyan. “All Along The Watchtower” There were no accidents, but At the farm, hail, some of it as a tribute to Jimi Hendrix. The Hippiefest tour runs OBITUARIES through October and will be at the Keswick Theater in Bianco, Kathleen Glenside (outside PhiladelAugust 13, 2011 Daubert, Gertrude phia) on Tuesday. The next ane Lambert Kilduff Delaney, 94, Delaney, Jane concert at the Kirby Center is a resident of Dallas, passed away Hatten, Mildred Steve Earle and The Dukes peacefully Saturday, August 13, and Duchesses on Aug. 23. Hooper, Charles 2011, surrounded by her family.

Donald A. Reich onald A. Reich, of West Broad Street, Nanticoke, passed away on his 76th birthday, Thursday, August 11, 2011, at the Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. Born in Nanticoke, he was a son of the late August and Lillian Yefko Reich. He attended the Nanticoke schools and graduated from Nanticoke High School. Prior to retiring, Mr. Reich had been employed at the former Irem Temple A.A.O.N.M.S. Mosque, Wilkes-Barre, in maintenance for over 30 years. A person of great mechanical aptitude, he also worked as a prop technician at the Kirby Center, Wilkes-Barre, and was a member of the Theatrical Union. He was an active member of the Christian and Missionary Alliance Church, Nanticoke, until its closing. More recently, he joined the Hunlock Creek United Methodist Church. Donald was well known as a very talented carpenter and handyman and was involved in the maintenance of his church as well as doing home renovations. He also enjoyed doing automobile repairs. He now joins his beloved wife of 53 years, the former Kathryn Hallman, who passed away on January

PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

Fran Broyan surveys the damage done to his tomato plants on his family’s farm in Nescopeck Township after Saturday’s hail storm. The storm also knocked down trees in the area.

24, 2010; and his daughter Cheryl Woodward who passed away on March 7, 2001. Surviving is his brother, Robert G. Reich and his wife, Sandrea, Kimberling City, Mo.; nephews, Jonathan and Thomas Reich; and four great-nephews and two great-nieces. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Monday from Davis-Dinelli Funeral Home, 170 E. Broad St., Nanticoke, with the Rev. Terry Hughes, his pastor, officiating. Interment will follow in Nanticoke Cemetery. Visitation will be from 2 to 4 p.m. today and one hour prior to the funeral service on Monday.

Born in Kingston on October 13, 1916, she was a daughter of the late Lawrence Lambert and Gertrude McGinty Lambert. She was preceded in death by her husband Thomas E. Kilduff; her brother, Lawrence Lambert; her second husband, Joseph Delany; and her grandson Raymond Kilduff. Jane was a graduate of St. Mary’s High School, Wilkes-Barre, class of 1934, and College Misericordia, class of 1938. She started her professional teaching career in the Kingston School District teaching math and other subjects for over 30 years. She especially loved being the cheerleading coach for 23 years. Jane married Thomas E. Kilduff of Plains Township and resided in Kingston. She later remarried to Joseph Delaney of Madison Street in Wilkes-Barre, a fellow St. Mary’s graduate and longtime friend. She is survived by her son Thomas P. Kilduff of Dallas. Also surviving are three grandchildren; Dr. Patrick Kilduff and his wife, Erin Burns Kilduff, Jane Kilduff-Molino and her husband, Mike, Molino, and Lynn Kilduff and his wife, Felixa Wingen; and three great-grandchildren, Rory Mullin, Brayden Kilduff and Andrew Kilduff. Jane was an active member of St. Ignatius Church in Kingston and a longtime member of the Altar and Rosary Society. She later became a member of St. John’s Parish in Wilkes-Barre and participated in the women’s auxiliary including various fundraising events. She was also a member of the Donegal Society and the Pi Delta Kappa Honor Society. She previously served as Historian on the Board of Directors for

Kislan, Dr. Thomas Major, Eva Nicholson, David Nulton, Malcolm Popson, Joseph Reich, Donald Searfoss, Gerard

Page 2A, 13A the Wyoming Valley West Employee’s Federal Credit Union. Her lifelong passion was College Misericordia where she served in many capacities including Past President of the Alumni Association. She was one of the oldest living graduates. Jane loved teaching. She was fortunate to have been beloved by many friends, former students, and colleagues. She always took great pleasure and pride from their interactions. The family is grateful to The Village at Greenbriar, Mercy Center of Dallas, Hospice of the Sacred Heart, and Dr. John Carey for the quality care and kindness provided to Jane over the last several years. The funeral will be held at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday in Blessed Sacrament Chapel, Mercy Center, Dallas. Interment will be in St. Ignatius Cemetery, Pringle. Friends may call from 5 to 8 p.m. Tuesday at MaherCollins Funeral Home, 360 N. Maple Ave., Kingston. Memorial donations in her name can be made to the College Misericordia Alumni Association, 301 Lake St., Dallas, PA 18612. Condolences can be sent to the family at www.maher-collins.com.

WHO TO CONTACT Missed Paper................................829-5000 Obituaries ......................................829-7224 Advertising ......................................829-7101 Classified Ads ................................829-7130 Newsroom......................................829-7242

+(ISSN No. 0896-4084) USPS 499-710

Issue No. 2011-224 Newsroom

829-7242 jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com

Circulation

Jim McCabe – 829-5000 jmccabe@timesleader.com

Published daily by: Impressions Media 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Periodicals postage paid at Wilkes-Barre, PA and additional mailing offices Postmaster: Send address changes to Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Delivery Monday–Sunday $3.50 per week Mailed Subscriptions Monday–Sunday $4.35 per week in PA $4.75 per week outside PA

Quinto, Midday Sunday: 2-1-6-7-8 Monday: 4-0-0-1-4 Tuesday: 5-2-3-6-6 Wednesday: 3-7-7-6-6 Thursday: 7-0-5-2-3 Friday: 1-5-1-2-4 Saturday: 3-0-4-1-6 Treasure Hunt Sunday: 06-08-18-23-24 Monday: 09-11-14-25-29 Tuesday: 03-10-19-28-30 Wednesday: 03-08-09-21-28 Thursday: 06-09-13-22-26 Friday: 01-10-15-18-30 Saturday: 08-15-18-20-21 Daily Number, 7 p.m. Sunday: 6-9-1 Monday: 1-0-3 Tuesday: 2-2-4 Wednesday: 4-9-8 Thursday: 7-5-6 Friday: 4-5-0 Saturday: 9-7-9 Big Four, 7 p.m. Sunday: 6-4-7-3 Monday: 1-3-0-8 Tuesday: 7-0-3-2 (6-9-5-6, double draw) Wednesday: 7-1-9-0 Thursday: 7-8-0-2 Friday: 9-0-3-0 Saturday: 5-4-4-3 Quinto, 7 p.m. Sunday: 5-0-5-7-9 Monday: 2-6-3-5-0 Tuesday: 2-1-5-4-2 Wednesday: 2-4-8-9-8 Thursday: 6-6-1-2-3 Friday: 6-9-1-2-1 Saturday: 7-9-6-5-0 Cash 5 Sunday: 08-11-16-35-37 Monday: 05-07-14-21-28 Tuesday: 03-12-16-26-35 Wednesday: 08-13-16-25-33 Thursday: 04-19-27-39-43 Friday: 07-15-19-29-32 Saturday: 05-15-23-41-42 Match 6 Lotto Monday: 03-04-10-29-33-36 Thursday: 01-09-23-25-37-47 Mega Millions Tuesday: 11-19-39-45-54 Megaball: 15 Megaplier: 04 Friday: 09-43-51-54-55 Megaball: 13 Megaplier: 04 Powerball Wednesday: 11-18-36-41-46 powerball: 38 powerplay: 04 Saturday: 09-12-35-50-58 powerball: 04 powerplay: 02

BUILDING TRUST The Times Leader strives to correct errors, clarify stories and update them promptly. Corrections will appear in this spot. If you have information to help us correct an inaccuracy or cover an issue more thoroughly, call the newsroom at 829-7242. A STORY ON PAGE 6B of Saturday’s edition of The Times Leader misidentified the committee president for the Wilkes-Barre Triathlon. The story should have said that Jim Harris is the race’s committee president. THE COLUMN BY Richard L. Connor in today’s Views section should have said triathlete Con McCole has two daughters also participating in the Wilkes-Barre triathlon today.


CMYK ➛ timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

LOCAL Placards a way to help new park With government assistance unavailable, the scenic River Common looks to the people.

By MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

Left to right, Charles Barber, Luzerne Foundation; Jim Brozena, county Flood Protection Authority; and Frank Pasquini, Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Business and Industry, meet on the River Common naming rights program.

WILKES-BARRE – The River Common is offering area residents, businesses and organizations the chance to make their mark on Luzerne County’s newest park. The River Common is launching a new naming opportunities program by selling permanent name placards to be placed on benches along the common and the Susquehanna River levee trail system. The placards may be purchased in perpetuity for a $2,500 tax-deductible donation, with the option available to spread payment over five years. Pro-

G E T I N V O LV E D

To reserve a bench placard or to request more information about naming opportunities at the River Common, contact Karl Borton at 823-2101 x128 or The Luzerne Foundation at 714-1570.

ceeds from the program will fund programming at the park, as no public funding is available to support event, organizers said. “No government dollars are available to support programming; we have to look to private philanthropy in our region,” program coordinator Frank Pasquini said. “All of this goes to offset some of the costs of the events we put on,” said Jim Brozena, executive director of the Luzerne County Flood Protection AuthorSee PLACARDS, Page 12A

Scranton When Square is cool co-stars in new film’s premiere

Story of ‘Forged’ is set against the backdrop of city that shows through as a character all its own. By TYLER MILES For The Times Leader

SCRANTON – The gritty tale of redemption between a father and son shot in Scranton more than two years ago received a downtown premiere Friday night at Marquee “The people Cinema on Lackawanna Avenue. get behind “It feels amazing and humbling that their own our hometown was town. They able to see the film that pretty much know that provided us with Scranton is the production valthe main ue through its locations, its help and character just the communihere, and ty coming out now they’re com- and during production,” said Joe Van ing here to Wie, a Scranton native and executive enjoy it.” producer for the Jaime Tirelli film. Actor The Scranton premiere sold out quickly and left some still pouring in after the last tickets were gone. Moviegoers got the opportunity to have an authentic red carpet experience and take time to speak to and have their photo taken with the cast and crew. The men behind the movie opened up, speaking with audience members before the film and hosting a question-and-anSee FILM, Page 6A

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 PAGE 3A

I N

B R I E F

WILKES-BARRE TWP.

Mosquito spraying set The Luzerne County Conservation District, in conjunction with the state Department of Environmental Protection, will be spraying Wilkes-Barre Township for mosquitoes, in attempt to combat West Nile virus, on Wednesday and Thursday. The spraying will be done by helicopter, and will occur between 7 and 9 p.m. As of Friday, there have been 35 confirmed cases of mosquitoes infected with West Nile virus found in Luzerne County. Six of those were found, collectively, in Wilkes-Barre, Ashley, Edwardsville, Plains Township and Swoyersville as of Aug. 12, according to the DEP. West Nile virus is a mosquito-borne disease that can cause encephalitis, a brain inflammation that can be passed on to birds, animals and humans. WILKES-BARRE

Scholarships to be given Citizens Bank is seeking applications for its TruFit Good Citizen Scholarship program offering scholarships up to $7,500 to students whose volunteer efforts have made a difference in their communities. The program is open to high school seniors and current college students attending or planning to attend a federally accredited four-year college. Twenty scholarships totaling $50,000 will be awarded to students who reside in or plan to attend college in Citizens Financial Group’s 12-state region. One winner will receive $7,500; four winners each will receive $5,000; and 15 winners each will receive $1,500. Applicants are asked to write an essay of no more than 500 words or to tape a 90-second video explaining the responsibility and leadership skills they have exhibited. For details and to apply, go to www.citizensbank.com/ scholarship. The deadline is Sept. 16. WILKES-BARRE

Help group wins grants

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Young ballerinas giggle at Robyn Fannon’s scarecrow costume while they wait to dance at the Summer’s Cool on the Square community party Saturday.

W-B event offers something for all ages By MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

ONLINE

WILKES-BARRE – Public Square got a little silly Saturday. Folks donned balloon hats and perused llamas, goats and chickens in a petting zoo; kids sporting face paint leapt in a bounce house, and young ballerinas performed plies and arabesques, all in Wilkes-Barre’s central plaza. For the third consecutive year, the city hosted its Summer’s Cool on the Square community party to showcase its downtown. In the evening, the city relaxed open container laws to allow downtown bars

To see video, scan this QR code into your smartphone or visit www.timesleader.com

Wilkes-Barre started the festival three years ago to promote the revitalization of the city’s downtown. It cut children’s activities from last year’s program to save costs because they were not well attended, but brought them back this year. It seemed to work better this time, as dozens of families packed the Square in the early afternoon. “They don’t have this at all in New York,” said Denise Jimemez, of New York City, who was in town visiting relatives. “It looks like everyone’s from the community. Everyone’s friendly.”

and restaurants to sell alcohol to customers outdoors, but in the afternoon the event was all about family fun. “I think it’s great,” said city resident Charla Ulitchney. “I think the city should do more things like this to show people that Wilkes-Barre’s not a bad place to live; that there’s actually things to do.” See SQUARE, Page 8A

Memories go on the block at Dallas school auction Nostalgia rules the day as people snap up their favorite artifacts from an old school building.

By MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Dallas High School English teacher Sarah Kashatus of Harveys Lake bids on shelves from her old classroom at the Dallas High School auction Saturday.

event when “I’m attached to the auction these. They were began shortly after 10 a.m. from a teacher Though many who has since were professionals, seek- passed on handing items to ed them down to resell or recycle for profit, me.” some also Sarah Kashatus came seeking 9th grade English teacher the chance take home a piece of their alma mater, or at least bid it a final farewell. “My husband and I are both graduates of Dallas High School; our kids

DALLAS TWP. – Wooden desks, music stands, overhead projectors and all varieties of education’s hardware hit the auction block at the Dallas School District campus Saturday, first by the item, then by the truckload. The school district hosted the auction to liquidate unneeded items from the now-demolished old Dallas High School. The newly constructed high school opens this month. About 20 bidders had arrived at the See AUCTION, Page 6A

In the last two months, Jewish Family Service of Greater Wilkes-Barre has received two grants that will enable specialized services to be implemented over the next year. The first grant is for $1,500 from the Foundation for the Jewish Elderly of Eastern PA and will reach out to Jewish elderly for the national Benefits Check Up program that was originated by the National Council on Aging. Benefits CheckUp includes more than 2,000 public and private benefits programs from all 50 states, such as prescription drugs, nutrition, energy assistance, financial, legal health care, Social Security, housing, in-home services, tax relief, transportation educational assistance, employment and volunteer services. The second grant is from the Mazon: A Jewish Response to Hunger, and will enable food to be stocked in the pantry called Sarah’s Table in the JFS office. It will also help accomplish other tasks such as reaching at least 150 households and a minimum of 30 grandparents or relative caregivers raising grandchildren. For more information on these grants or programs call 8235137. SUGAR NOTCH

Borough has recycling bin The borough of Sugar Notch will have a recycling bin available for residents to drop off items. The bin is located on Chestnut Street, and residents may drop off items including newspapers and plastics, and will be placed there on a trial basis to see if residents use the bin, and if more need to be placed in the borough. HANOVER TOWNSHIP

3 escape injury in crash Three people escaped from a car that crashed and burned early Saturday morning on state Route 309, police said. A 2010 Chevrolet Malibu traveling south left the roadway, struck a rock embankment and rolled over around 2:24 a.m., police said. The occupants were able to get out of the vehicle before it caught fire and left the scene before police and fire personnel arrived. The occupants were later identified and were not injured. Police are investigating the crash and charges are pending.


K PAGE 4A

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

I N

B R I E F

N

A

T

I

O

N

&

W

O

R

L

D

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

Bachmann takes Iowa straw poll

Texas Gov. Rick Perry enters the GOP presidential fray just before the first major test of campaign. The Associated Press

Mother, children die in fire

A woman walks out of a damaged complex Saturday in Jackson, Miss. Authorities say a mother and her four young children died as a result of an early-morning fire at their Jackson apartment. Investigators believe the fire might have begun in a kitchen. It is under investigation.

Texas Gov. Rick Perry speaks Saturday at the Red State Gathering in Charleston, S.C., where he announced his run for president in 2012.

AP PHOTO

western town, where nearly 17,000 Iowans cast ballots during a daylong political festival, a late-summer ritual held every four years. In speeches throughout the day, candidates scouted for support by assailing Obama and offering themselves as the answer to an America plagued by high unemployment, rising debt and stock

market swings. Meanwhile, Obama begins a bus tour through the Midwest on Monday. It’s his first as president and will take him to prairie communities in Minnesota and through Iowa and Illinois. Obama’s standing in these states, like elsewhere, has grown precarious as the economy has slumped.

Mideast struggles flare on 2 fronts

MOUNT GRETNA, PA.

Bus crash leaves 14 hurt

he driver of a Greyhound bus bound for St. Louis lost control on T the Pennsylvania Turnpike early Sat-

urday, sending the bus careering across the highway and up an embankment before it landed on its side on the interstate, briefly trapping a woman and sending 14 people to hospitals, authorities said. Rescue crews freed the woman who was trapped in the wreckage in a rural area about a mile east of the LebanonLancaster exit, turnpike spokesman Carl DeFebo said. Twenty-nine people, including the driver, were aboard, said Greyhound spokeswoman Maureen Richmond, though a turnpike spokesman said he had information that the total might be 25 because of possible duplicates on the driver’s manifest. Officials at three hospitals said 14 people altogether were brought in. Four uninjured passengers were picked up by another bus; the conditions of the others were unclear.

Meanwhile, an American contractor is kidnapped in Lahore, Pakistan.

The Associated Press

JERUSALEM

Israelis protest living costs

Tens of thousands of Israelis poured into streets across the country Saturday for a fourth consecutive week, exanding their protest movement against the nation’s high cost of living from major central cities to smaller ones in outlying areas. The mass demonstrations have become a weekly ritual this summer, delivering Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s government its most serious domestic crisis. Last week, more that a quarter of a million people turned out — primarily in Tel Aviv — for one of the largest demonstrations in Israeli history. In contrast, this week’s gatherings were more modest and aimed at focusing attention on the country’s poorer areas. Whereas last week’s massive turnout was mainly in Tel Aviv, this week saw the protests spread from Nahariya in the north, on the Lebanon border, to the port city of Eilat at Israel’s southernmost tip.

AP PHOTO

Mohamed Ibrahin Issak from southern Somalia, right sitting, and relatives lower the body of his 2-year-old son into a grave Saturday after the child died in a refugee camp in famine-stricken Mogadishu, Somalia.

More aid on way to starving Somalia

The World Food Program is reaching more areas of the famine-stricken east African country. By KATHARINE HOURELD Associated Press

MOGADISHU, Somalia — The World Food Program said Saturday that it is expanding its food distribution efforts in famine-struck Somalia, where the U.N. estimates that only 20 percent of people needing aid are getting it. Some of those from the outlying regions have walked for days to the capital for help, only for it to be too late. In the pediatric ward in one of Somalia’s best-equipped hospitals, a shriveled baby lies motionless on a crowded ward;

a doctor said he weighs less than he did at birth. Doctors push a feeding tube down the nose of a skeletal 3-year-old, his body covered in sores. Mothers lay their babies between the cots on the floor because there are no beds left. Benadir hospital lacks equipment, nutritional supplements and even beds, but its a refuge most of the families here have walked for miles to get to, carrying children who got weaker by the hour. Many arrive too late to be saved; both Ali Abukar, the baby, and Ibrahim Abukar Abdi, the 3-year-old, died shortly after the Associated Press spoke to their mothers. That’s why aid agencies urgently need to increase their efforts to reach families beyond the Somali capital, said Valerie Amos, the U.N.’s top humanitarian official, on Saturday. Wastelands in the battle-scarred capital are being transformed

into makeshift camps as families move in and set up shelters, hoping for help. The U.N. estimates that 2.8 million Somalis need food aid, and 2.2 million of them live outside the capital in areas controlled by Islamist rebels, who have forbidden many aid agencies to work in their territory, including the U.N.’s World Food Program. But WFP is already getting aid to some areas in southern Somalia that had been inaccessible a month ago, said one official. “We are expanding our activities in Mogadishu and we are looking to dramatically increase those activities over the coming days and weeks as the security situation in the city permits,” said Stanlake Samkange, the WFP regional director in East and Central Africa. More aid was getting to southern Somalia as well, he said.

CINCINNATI

Seized diamond on block

A large yellow diamond — known as the “Golden Eye” — seized in a federal drug and money-laundering investigation in northeast Ohio is going on the auction block with the minimum starting bid set at $900,000. The 43.51-carat diamond belonged to a northeast Ohio businessman who was convicted of money laundering and conspiracy. Prosecutors said he tried to sell to an undercover FBI agent the diamond and an estate once owned by boxer Mike Tyson, all for $19.5 million and a boat. The gem — about an inch long, almost 3⁄4-inch wide and nearly 1⁄2-inch deep — was seized in the sting operation and forfeited to the federal government. HAVANA, CUBA

Castro no-show for 85th

Longtime Cuban leader Fidel Castro turned 85 Saturday, but the now-retired Castro skipped the nationwide celebrations that had been taking place all week. The exhibition centre Expocuba was holding three days of celebrations Friday through today under the slogan "Fulfilling dreams." Castro led the country until late July 2006, when he stepped down provisionally in what was later to be confirmed with a formal exit.

U.K.’s riots raise questions about U.S. problems By JESSE WASHINGTON AP National Writer

A black man killed by police. Mobs of looters. Cities charred and shaken. The riots in London mirror some of the worst uprisings in modern U.S. history. And there are more parallels: Stubborn poverty and high unemployment, services slashed, a breakdown of social values, social media that bring people together at the speed of the Internet, and finally, a handful of attacks, isolated and hard to explain, by bands of U.S. youths. Americans might wonder: Could the flames and violence that erupted in Britain scar this country, too? “History shows that the social tinder for such eruptions of massive violence

and looting is usually widespread poverty without hope, and the spark is typically an incident of police brutality in the absence of a culture of police accountability,” said Benjamin Todd Jealous, CEO of the NAACP. “Such conditions exist in almost every major American city.” Others, like British Prime Minister David Cameron, blame “criminality, pure and simple.” That echoes descriptions of behavior in places like Philadelphia and Chicago. The recent violence raises frightening memories of past racial unrest — the police club fracturing black civil rights marcher John Lewis’ skull in 1965 Alabama, or the cinderblock smashing white truck driver Reginald Denny’s head in

1992 Los Angeles. But in American cities there is now more diversity in law enforcement and political leadership. Jervey Tervalon, a writer who grew up in Los Angeles and edited the anthology “Geography of Rage: Remembering the Los Angeles Riots of 1992,” senses tension today comes from people who can’t find work or support their families. Marc Morial, CEO of the National Urban League, says budget cuts that lead to less jobs for young people could create problems: “I’m not prepared to say riots could happen here, but we need to pay close attention. To counteract negativity in young people, you have to create positive things.”

Syrian tanks, security agents and pro-regime gunmen fanned out into the streets of two towns to root out protesters demanding the ouster of President Bashar Assad in a sweep Saturday that killed at least three people. Meanwhile in Libya, rebels fought their way into a strategic town as the struggle against leader Moammar Gadhafi’s In Syria, the forces contin- heaviest asued. In Pakistan, an Ameri- sault was in can was kid- the Mediternapped when ranean coastgunmen broke al city of into his house Latakia. in Lahore. In Syria, the heaviest assault was in the Mediterranean coastal city of Latakia, where a day earlier thousands had turned out in protests. At least 20 tanks and armored personnel carriers rolled into the city’s elRamel neighborhood amid intense gunfire that sent many residents fleeing the area, according to Rami Abdul-Rahman, head of the London-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. In Libya, rebels fought their way into the strategic city of Zawiya west of Tripoli on Saturday in their most significant advance in months, battling snipers on rooftops and heavy shelling from Gadhafi’s forces holding the city. Zawiya, 30 miles from the capital, is a key target for rebels waging a new offensive that is an attempt to break the deadlock in combat that has held for months in the center and east of the country. Gunmen in Lahore, Pakistan, kidnapped an American development expert after tricking his guards and breaking into his house Saturday. The U.S. Embassy identified the victim as Warren Weinstein, the Pakistan country director for J.E. Austin Associates, a development contractor.

Look in THE TIMES LEADER for today’s valuable inserts from these advertisers:

Some inserts, at the advertisers’ request, only appear in selected neighborhoods. If you would like to receive an insert that you do not currently receive, please call the advertiser.

704860

AP PHOTO

AMES, Iowa — Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann won a test vote of Iowans on Saturday, a show of popularity and organizational strength for the tea party favorite five months before the state’s caucuses kick off the GOP presidential nominating season. The result is the first indication of what Iowans think of the field of Republicans competing for the chance to challenge President Barack Obama next fall. But it’s hardly predictive of who will win the winter Iowa contest, much less the party nod or the White House. Rather, Saturday’s outcome suggests that Bachmann has a certain level of support and, perhaps even more important, the strongest get-out-the-vote op-

eration and widest volunteer base in a state whose caucuses require those elements. Texas Rep. Ron Paul finished a close second while former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty placed a distant third. “We have a lot more work to do,” Pawlenty said, making clear he wasn’t dropping out despite a disappointing finish. The results of the nonbinding vote, held on the Iowa State University campus, came just hours after Texas Gov. Rick Perry entered the race. “I full well believe I’m going to win,” Perry told South Carolina voters on a conference call before delivering his first speech as a candidate. “It’s time to get America working again,” he declared in Charleston, S.C. “America is not broken. Washington, D.C. is broken.” Despite Perry’s best efforts to overshadow the day, the epicenter of the presidential contest was in this Mid-


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 PAGE 5A

SUMMER SALE! BOTH LOCATIONS

7 GEORGE AVE. (PARSONS SECTION)

WILKES-BARRE • 270-3976

Prices Effective Sunday August 14, 2011 thru Saturday August 20, 2011

L’S E I H C S

80% LEAN GROUND BEEF

Shurfine

12 oz./12 pk. Cans

4 8

1

2 ea.

$ 22

KOOL AID or COUNTRY TIME DRINK MIX 8 qt.

1

ea.

KETCHUP 24 oz.

98

61¢

¢

79

¢

ea.

ICEBERG HEAD LETTUCE

lb.

Assorted Varieties

1

$ 29

Assorted Varieties

99

¢

ea.

ANY A NY SIZE SIIZ S SIZ IZ ZE E PKG PK P KG..!! KG PKG.!

99

99

¢

¢

ea.

Swiss

lb.

with GOLD CARD

ICE TEA & DRINKS 64 oz.

99

60¢

ea.

Sahlen’s

HAM OFF THE BONE

4

$ 99

Shurfine

HAMBURGER, WHEAT HAMBURGER or HOT DOG ROLLS 8 ct. pkg.

lb.

DELI GOURMET AMERICAN CHEESE

3

$ 98

SAVE AT LEAST

2.50

with GOLD CARD

TROPICANA PURE PREMIUM ORANGE JUICE or TROP50 JUICE BEVERAGES

OVEN ROASTED TURKEY BREAST

1.70 on 2

3

lb.

2.98 on 2

1

29 lb.

1

49

with GOLD CARD

with GOLD CARD

All Varieties - 7.5-9 oz. pkg.

6 $10

SAVE AT LEAST

for

3.38 on 6 MUST BUY 6,

with GOLD CARD

Lesser Quantities $2.00 Each

GREEN’S ICE CREAM or KEMP’S FROZEN YOGURT All Varieties - 1.5 qt. cont. SAVE AT LEAST

MUST BUY 3,

5.97 on 3

Lesser Quantities $2.50 Each

3 $6 for

with GOLD CARD

SHURFINE SODA

All Varieties - 2 ltr. btl.

1

44

with GOLD CARD

WISE POTATO CHIPS

Varieties of Regular, Flavored or NY Deli - 8.75-10 oz. bag SAVE AT LEAST

BUY I, GET 1

20¢

79

¢

SAVE AT LEAST

3.99

Follow Us On FACEBOOK TWITTER (Schiels Market) & on the Web at www.schielsmarkets.com

FREE with GOLD CARD

HOLSUM BREAD

King or Country Style - 23 oz. loaf BUY I, GET 1

SAVE AT LEAST

with GOLD CARD

ea.

Quality Rights Reserved, Not Responsible For Typographical Errors

for

LINDY’S HOMEMADE ITALIAN ICE 6 COUNT

with GOLD CARD

1.51

MONEY ORDERS

2 $3

HOT, LEAN or CROISSANT POCKETS

2.99

lb.

Shurfine Products Are DOUBLE-YOURMONEY-BACK GUARANTEED!

with GOLD CARD

All Varieties - 13.5-14.7 oz. pkg.

1.78 on 2

EASTERN FRESH BROCCOLI CROWNS

2 $4 for

KELLOGG’S POPTARTS

SAVE AT LEAST

No Stems...No Waste

for

KELLOGG’S CEREAL

SAVE AT LEAST

99

2 $5

Includes 9 oz. Rice Krispies, 11.3 oz. Cocoa Krispies, 9.2 oz. Corn Pops, 8.7 oz. Apple Jacks or Froot Loops, 15.3 oz, Honey Smacks or 18 oz. Corn Flakes

FREE with GOLD CARD

BUMBLE BEE CHUNK WHITE TUNA IN WATER 5 oz. can

SAVE AT LEAST

SAVE AT LEAST

5% SENIOR DISCOUNT ON TUESDAY

3

99

All Varieties - 50 fl. oz.

Shurfine Deli Gourmet

SCHIEL’S FRESH SMOKED MEATS PEPSI NOW AVAILABLE IN BOTH LOCATIONS 24 oz. bottles - 6 pks. All Varieties Kielbasa, Pepperettes, Sausage, $ 98 2 Chicken, Ribs and much more!

White Only

4

99

WISK LIQUID LAUNDRY DETERGENT

6 oz. pkg.

It’s Grill Time!

¢

SAVE AT LEAST

with GOLD CARD

with GOLD CARD

with GOLD CARD

EASTERN PEACHES, CALIFORNIA NECTARINES, CALIFORNIA RED AND BLACK PLUMS

REG. or JUMBO HOT DOGS 70¢

2.00

SAVE AT LEAST

Shurfine

1 Lb. Pkg.

SAVE AT LEAST

ea.

1/2 PINT GRAPE TOMATOES

SAVE AT LEAST

12 ct. Double Roll Bath Tissue or 8 ct. Paper Towels

lb. lb

with GOLD CARD

with GOLD CARD

SHURFINE HOMESTYLE ROASTER

Shurfine

SAVE AT LEAST

ANY SIZE PKG.!

CHARMIN BASIC BATH TISSUE or BOUNTY BASIC PAPER TOWELS

All Varieties - 59 oz. cont.

$ 88

1.51

lb.

99

¢

99

for $ 88

SAVE AT LEAST

ALL NATURAL SPLIT CHICKEN BREASTS

ANY SIZE PKG.!

AN ANY A NY N Y SI SIZ S SIZE IZE IZ PKG.! PK PKG P KG..!! KG

Assorted Varieties

SAVE AT LEAST 3.88 on 4

Sanderson Farms Grade “A”

Shursave Fresh

NG ER LO M M U ALL S

30 HANOVER ST. WILKES-BARRE 970-4460

LIMIT 5

70¢

79

¢

with GOLD CARD

Scan this with your smartphone to visit our website now!

At Our George Ave. (Parsons) Location


CMYK PAGE 6A

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

N

E

W

S

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Moviegoers crowd the lobby of Marquee Cinema on Friday night for the premiere of ’Forged,’ which was set and filmed in Scranton.

FILM BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Joe Maloney, owner of NAPW Agricultural & Commercial Salvage in Kingston, checks out a filing cabinet in a trailer at the Dallas High School auction Saturday morning. The school district auctioned unneeded items from the now-demolished former high school.

Auctioneer Steve Traver accepts a bid for an item. The old high school has been torn down. The new one opens this month.

AUCTION Continued from Page 3A

POLICE BLOTTER WILKES-BARRE – A man was arraigned Friday on charges he twice violated a protection from abuse order and provided police with a false name. Tariq Lakkey McLean, 25, of Madison Street, Wilkes-Barre, was charged with two counts of violating a PFA and a single count of giving false identification to police. He was jailed at the Luzerne County Correctional Facility for lack of $6,000 bail. Police allege a woman was at the Luzerne County Courthouse for a hearing on Thursday when she was given a message from McLean to withdraw the PFA. McLean also approached the woman on North Main Street, Wilkes-Barre, on July 28, begging her to take him back, according to the criminal complaints. Police said in a separate criminal complaint that McLean provided a false name while officers investigated a report that a toddler was on a porch roof at his apartment on Oct 9. A hearing on the alleged PFA violations is scheduled on Aug. 23 in county court. A preliminary hearing on the false identification charge is scheduled on Aug. 17 in Wilkes-

Bill Feldman of Shavertown carries a desk chair that he bought for $1 at the Dallas High School auction on Saturday. Many people sought items that had special memories for them.

memento without needing to take home a lot of unwanted items, Traver said. Traver, of Dallas, said he agreed to conduct the auction because he is from the community and wanted to see it done in a way that would allow community members to compete evenly with scrappers and dealers. He didn’t charge the usual 10 percent auctioneers premium for the same reason. “I just didn’t want to see an auctioneer from outside the area come in when I’m here in Dallas,” he said. “I’m getting a commission, but at the end of the day, there’s going to be no profit.” Whatever profit the sale generates for the school district will be used to start a foundation that the school can draw on to cover miscellaneous expenses, Bruce Goeringer said.

swer session after the screening. Actor Jaime Tirelli, who played the role of Caesar, a villain in “Forged,” was humbled by Friday’s sold-out crowd. “The people get behind their own town. They know that Scranton is the main character here, and they’re coming here to enjoy it,” Tirelli said. The emotional film follows a man recently released from prison for the death of his wife. His son, now 13, seeks vengeance while Chuco, portrayed by actor Manny Perez, must redeem himself while working to avoid his former criminal affiliations. “They’re going to have some interesting reactions. It’s not a comedy. It’s a lot of drama, but it’s a very character-driven movie,” said Tirelli. “It’s about real people’s lives and how they deal with difficulties and all sorts of obstacles thrown in front of them.” “It is a very hopeful film, even though you have to go to that very dark and gritty place,” said director William Wedig. The city of Scranton is a major

’Forged’ star Jaime Tirelli, executive producer Joe Van Wie and writer-director William Wedig were at the film premiere Friday.

factor in the movie. The setting nearly becomes a character in the film as the cold, wintry landscape of the region helps propel the story forward. The history of iron and coal that was once so rich in Northeastern Pennsylvania adds even more presence to the piece. “Scranton was such a key player in this movie. My God, the old lace mill, the houses, and the areas where we shot, they’re just incredible,” Tirelli said. The film, which was originally planned to be shot in Texas, would have had a totally different soul if those plans came to fruition. But after Van Wie read the script and suggested that the

crew think about using Scranton as the setting, the film fell into place perfectly. “This, to me, is really the film that I’m happy that I made. I would have been happy with that film (shot in Texas), but I’m much more proud of this film,” said Wedig. “I’m glad that we made this choice because it was a collective decision, and I’m really happy that we went the way that we did.” The film is tentatively set to be released on DVD and Netflix in September and is currently available for pre-order on Amazon.com. The final local showing is set for today at 4 p.m.

“You wear our reputation on your face and we take that very seriously.” – Thomas Engle

Professional Eye Care You Can Count On

Route 315/Plaza 315, Wilkes-Barre Across from the Woodlands Open Mon.-Thurs. 10:45-7:00 Fri. 10:45-5:00 Sat. 10:45-3:00

208-1111

www.engleeyewear.com

293144

went here,” said Jan Goeringer, wife of school board president Dr. Bruce Goeringer. “I’m just here more for sentimental reasons than anything; just hoping to pick up a souvenir. Sarah Kashatus of Harveys Lake, a ninth-grade English teacher at Dallas High School, purchased a pair of cubbyholestyle folding cabinets that formerly sat in her classroom. “I’m attached to these,” she said. “They were from a teacher who has since passed on handed them down to me.” “It’s a little emotional; it is,” she said as she watched other articles from the old school go up for sale. Auctioneer Steve Traver first auctioned off the items by row, giving the winning bidder the choice of all items in the row, with each item costing the price of the winning bid. The remaining items were then auctioned by lot. That way members of the community were free to purchase a

Continued from Page 3A

Barre Central Court. HANOVER TWP. – State police Bureau of Liquor Control Enforcement reported the following: • Carriage Stop Beer, LLC, 2500 East End Blvd., Plains Township, was recently cited with operating the licensed establishment without a valid health permit and selling malt or brewed beverage in excess of 192 fluid ounces in a single sale to one person. • Action Beverage Inc., 133 Welles St., Forty Fort, was recently cited with issuing checks in payment for malt or brewed beverages when the establishment had insufficient funds.

TL

FREELAND – State police at Hazleton said Rebecca L. Yunckes, 24, of Freeland Village, was cited with disorderly conduct after a loud party in her apartment early Tuesday morning. WILKES-BARRE – City police reported the following: • Kevin Kompinski of 117 E. Main St. reported Saturday that both passenger side windows were smashed on his vehicle while it was parked in the rear of his residence.

Kountry Wood Cabinets, Inc.

TL


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

N

E

W

S

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 PAGE 7A

‘Kids for cash:’ A phrase’s uncertain birth Varied stories circulate about the origin of the three words an ex-judge says ruined him. By MARK GUYDISH mguydish@timesleader.com

In his defiant comments prior to sentencing Thursday, former Luzerne County Judge Mark Ciavarella accused Assistant U.S. Attorney Gordon Zubrod of changing “the whole tenor of this case and the public’s perception” when he “uttered three words … kids for cash.” While that moniker caught on locally and nationally as the preferred shorthand for complex charges against Ciavarella and fel-

low ex-Judge Michael Conahan, Zubrod has never laid claim to coining the phrase. In fact the lanky prosecutor rarely, if ever used the phrase – at least in public. Zubrod did, however, use another term Ciavarella frequently railed against: “quid pro quo,” Latin for “something for something.” The lead prosecutor never wavered from his contention that money Ciavarella and Conahan received from the owner and the builder of two private juvenile detention facilities was a direct exchange for actions the jurists took on the bench to benefit those facilities.

IMPRISONED

Former Luzerne County Judge Mark Ciavarella is being held at the Federal Detention Center in Philadelphia until the Bureau of Prisons determines where he will serve his sentence.

“Quid pro quo” is a common term in legal arguments. “Kids for cash,” on the other hand, was heard on the street far more often than in the courtroom. And one man laid claim to being the original source of the phrase early in the scandal. “I was the first person to make that comment,” West Pittston Attorney Michael Cefalo said. “As soon as this happened, when they

said they were getting money for kids I said, ‘Hey, that’s kids for cash!’ It was picked up by a public relations firm that was sending out information material concerning the progress of the case, and it started spreading from there.” Did the local lawyer feel cheated when he heard Ciavarella crediting someone else with the phrase? Cefalo laughed then grew more somber. “Let me tell you what really upset me,” he said. “Everyone in our profession is painted with the same brush now. We’re all crooks, we all can’t be trusted, we’re all bad people.” The 28-year sentence U.S. District Judge Edwin Kosik gave to Ciavarella is a balm to that wound,

Cefalo said. “Finally, somebody made a statement. The judge said, ‘You did wrong, you violated the public trust.’ ” Cefalo represents numerous children and their parents in a civil suit seeking damages for hardships they claim resulted from Ciavarella’s actions as juvenile court judge. He said the harsh sentence probably doesn’t help his clients on legal or monetary grounds but, “It helped them psychologically. “I think the kids were vindicated,” he said. “I think Judge Kosik said to those kids, ‘Somebody heard your voices, somebody recognized what you’re going through, and we’re not going to tolerate that kind of conduct.’ ” Cefalo has no concrete proof he

was the first to utter the alliteration. But he did claim it fairly soon after the phrase became ubiquitous, and no one has stepped forward to dispute his contention. As to Ciavarella’s insistence that the phrase was wrongly applied to his crime – the reason, the ex-judge insisted, that he rejected an earlier plea bargain and went to trial – Cefalo saw it as the classic rationalization of the common crook. “You have to understand the dynamics,” Cefalo said. “The guy believes that he didn’t do anything wrong. There are a lot of people who do that, for whatever reason, whatever mental process they go through. Until the day he dies, he’s never going to believe he did anything wrong.”

PETE G. WILCOX FILE PHOTO/THE TIMES LEADER

Former Judge Mark Ciavarella, seen with his wife, Cindy, was sentenced to 28 years in prison after conviction on corruption charges.

CIAVARELLA Continued from Page 1A

a nearly $1 million finder’s fee for helping Mericle secure the contract to build PA Child Care. Ciavarella took the money, despite the fact, he’s admitted in court, that he knew it was a conflict of interest given he was the presiding juvenile court judge at the time. That decision would be a key element in the 39-count indictment filed in 2009 that led to his conviction in February on 12 charges, including racketeering, money laundering, mail fraud and tax evasion. Conahan pleaded guilty last year to one count of racketeering conspiracy and is awaiting sentencing. “When he took the money, that is where he went wrong,” said William Ruzzo, Ciavarella’s attorney and longtime friend. Ruzzo has been friends with

Ciavarella since the late 1960s or early ’70s. The men met while both were tending bar at a tavern in Luzerne. They remained friends as they worked their way through college, then law school. “Everyone liked him,” Ruzzo said. “He was a friend to everyone, the kind of person who would do anything for a friend.” Mike Butera, a Pittston attorney, said he got to know Ciavarella about 35 years ago, when they were both began practicing law in Luzerne County. “As a lawyer he had a reputation of working very hard for his clients. He was very intelligent, very honorable. He was outgoing and had a great sense of humor. He was just a good guy,” Butera said. Puzzling change Today, the men say they can only wonder why Ciavarella, who had dedicated his life to the law, suddenly decided to break it. “If I could tell you why he took the money, I’d be a guru. I don’t

know why he took it,” Ruzzo said. “I think Mark just thought he hit the lottery. Someone comes in and offers you close to a million dollars . . . He should have known it was wrong.” Scranton attorney Ernest Preate, a former Pennsylvania state attorney general who served time for mail fraud, said he suspects Ciavarella got caught up in the “good ol’ boys’ network that’s operated in the county for years. “I think it was just business as usual,” Preate said. “The wink and the nod and the cash under the table.” Fred Martens, a private investigator who formerly served as head of a state commission that investigated organized crime, said he believes Ciavarella and Conahan were buoyed by that atmosphere. “Nobody ever thinks they’ll get caught,” Martens said. That’s particularly true for in Luzerne County, Martens said, which has long had a reputation

CLARK VAN ORDEN FILE PHOTO/THE TIMES LEADER

Mark Ciavarella, former Luzerne County judge, worked as a painter while awaiting his sentencing, which came on Thursday.

for back-door deals. “Between their arrogance of being a judge and the fact they came from Luzerne County, their chance of getting caught was less than zero,” he said. “If there was not a federal investigation, you never would have seen a prosecution. They would have done this the next 15 years.” Darker portrait Federal prosecutors painted a much different, darker portrait of Ciavarella at his trial. To them, he was a greedy tyrant who needlessly incarcerated youths at PA Child Care and Western PA Child Care. He and Conahan then used their positions as judges to extort money from Powell based on the threat

they would stop sending juveniles to the centers, prosecutors alleged. Jurors rejected the government’s case relating to Powell, acquitting Ciavarella of all charges. The panel found him guilty of accepting the payment from Mericle and other charges associated with that. Ciavarella continues to adamantly deny he ever jailed juveniles in exchange for cash. He had a chance to plead guilty to lesser charges that would have carried a lesser sentence, but refused to do so because it would require him to admit he took a kickback or bribe, Ruzzo said. “It was Mark’s view that he would rather lose (at trial) than admit to taking a bribe or kick-

back,” Ruzzo said. Butera said he understands why Ciavarella took that position. While acknowledging Ciavarella didn’t follow rules designed to protect juveniles’ rights, Butera said he’s convinced Ciavarella – despite all those who say otherwise – truly believed decisions he made in juvenile court were in the best interest of the youths. “To plead guilty you have to raise your hand and take an oath and say I’m guilty of what’s charged. He couldn’t do that and the only alternative was to go to trial,” Butera said. “I respect him for doing that, but you have to question his decision to do that. He paid an absolutely horrible price.”


CMYK PAGE 8A

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

N

E

W

S

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

Education official outlines change plan The state wants to expand a pilot program this fall to roughly one-fifth of schools.

By MARK GUYDISH mguydish@timesleader.com

Anti-abortion views taken to the street

Mary Rakos, who was accompaGroup lines 8th Street to nied by her son, James, 8 months deliver message that abortion old, said she has been actively inmust be stopped. volved in the cause for more than By GERI GIBBONS Times Leader Correspondent

WEST WYOMING – Amidst the Saturday morning traffic at the top of 8th Street in West Wyoming, upwards of 20 local residents gathered to draw attention to what they believe is very important: that abortion is wrong and that it should be stopped. “Abortion is not a constitutional right,” said Paul McHale, one of the silent protesters. “Life, beginning at conception, is a right.” McHale said abortion makes it impossible for a human being to live out the life that God has planned for that person. He reflected on the many experiences that people have such as schooling, employment and building families. He, like the other protesters gathered, believe abortion prevents lives from unfolding. Ada Magni said Saturday was chosen by the group because on Aug. 13, 1913, the Lady of Fatima was reported to have appeared to a group in Portugal, encouraging them to work to stop abortion and to value human life.

SQUARE Continued from Page 3A

“I think it’s nice just to show off the Square,” said Jeff Poole, of Plains Township, who attended the event with his wife, Kristen, daughter Elizabeth and son Nathan. “It’s just a good time to come out and meet some new people.” Events for children included face-painting, a bounce house, a petting zoo, pony rides, entertainment by a clown and a children’s dance performance, but the most popular by far with kids

two years. She said that although having children brought challenges, she believed children were a great gift, both to their parents and the community. The silent protesters held signs with messages such as “Stop Abortion Now,” “Defund Planned “Abortion is not a consti- Parenthood” and “Choose tutional right. Life.” Some of Life, beginthe signs included photos of baning at conbies. ception, is a Many cars right.” passing by their Paul McHale honked Anti-abortion horns or gave a protester “thumbs up” of support. The group included members of area churches such as St. Monica’s, West Wyoming; Gate of Heaven, Dallas, and Our Lady of Victory, Harveys Lake. Many members of the group are associated with Pennsylvanians for Human Life and they encouraged residents to contact their local churches to obtain more information about future events. and parents alike was 15-year-old aspiring magician and balloon artist Justin Davis of Plymouth. Davis, who goes by the stage name JustinCrediBle, said at 2 p.m. he had been working nonstop for four hours. About 20 people stood in line as Davis spoke, twisting balloon animals into shape all the while, but he said he didn’t mind the crowd. “If I hand out a balloon and a kid gives me a big smile it makes my day,” he said. The event continued into the evening, with live music performances by Mother Nature’s Sons, Robb Brown Band and Dr. K’s Motown Review.

using the new system side-byside with existing systems in those schools in January. The ultimate goal is to have a new evaluation system in place in those pilot districts for the 201213 school year, with other districts phased in during the following two years, Dumaresq told the Senate. The system being tested looks at student results in the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment tests, at results in locally administered standardized tests such as 4Square and at the Pennsylvania Value Added Assessment Measurements, which are derived by statistical analysis of PSSA results in an effort to see if students improved as much as

TEACHERS Continued from Page 1A

ally haven’t done anything,” Hanover Area’s Anthony Podczasy said. The district already has its hands full with the closing of Lyndwood Elementary School and the need to reconfigure other schools to accommodate those students, he added. “We’re not considering becoming part of the pilot program at this time,” DalGalicki las Superintendent Frank Galicki said. “We want to get the new high school organized.” “We haven’t committed,” Perrone Crestwood Superintendent Dave McLaughlin Smith wrote in an email. Fairness of system All those interviewed voiced concern about the fairness of any system that rates teachers based on student test scores. For starters, Greater Nanticoke Area Superintendent Tony Perrone noted, a teacher working with special education students will get very different test results than a teacher with regular education or gifted students, regardless of teaching prowess. “If we put learning support kids in with a good teacher, in the end that teacher gets punished because he’s working with kids in that area,” Perrone said. He also cited the well-documented finding that standardized test results correlate to family income. Greater Nanticoke has one of the highest rates of lowincome enrollment in the county – almost 54 percent in 2009-10 –

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

Gov. Tom Corbett, seen Friday on a tour of Lord & Taylor in Wilkes-Barre Township, has been pushing for a teacher evaluation system based on how students do on standardized tests.

putting teachers there at a demographic disadvantage compared to some others if standardized tests are the lone yardstick. “A teacher in my school would never do as well as a teacher in Dallas,” Perrone said. Dallas School District’s low-income enrollment is less than 18 percent. Galicki agrees that factors beyond a teacher’s control make the use of standardized test results in evaluations problematic. “How do you level the playing field?” he asked. “It’s an age-old question. Is it going to be fair to compare those teachers that have advanced level courses with those who teach students with developmental needs?” While the state notes that teacher unions have participated in the first pilot program, the Pennsylvania State Education Association – the state’s largest union – is cool to the current proposal, even as it acknowledg-

es a new teacher evaluation system is needed. PSEA President Jim Testerman has told The Associated Press, “There need to be multiple measures, not just multiple standardized tests. Let’s look at student projects and portfolios that really demonstrate what a student knows and can do.” Eller said the plan is to bypass those concerns by looking only at whether a student’s test results improve, not at the degree of improvement. “This system does not focus on how much growth has occurred,” he said. “It just says growth has to occur. There is no minimum requirement as long as student growth has occurred.”

expected. The state is looking only for improvement in results – student academic growth – and does not consider the amount of growth, Eller said. All that test data ultimately make up one-half of a teacher’s evaluation. The other half is determined by more traditional evaluation systems such as classroom observation. In grades and subjects in which standardized tests aren’t given, the state is mulling ways to quantify achievement, Eller said. All of this comes at a cost. Dumaresq estimated the Department of Education will need another $2.2 million to bring the project to fruition.

such a move could make the new evaluation system more palatable. “I have no problem as long as it’s measuring growth and not accomplishment,” Suppon said, citing a textbook hypothetical: A teacher with numerous special education students may actually see bigger test score gains than a teacher with gifted students, but the latter would have better test results overall. Looking at the gains and not just the scores can give a truer measure of each teacher’s success. Eller said the proposal under review would look at mandatory state standardized tests and optional standardized tests given by most districts. The review is at the classroom and building level. The evaluations also would include Pennsylvania’s “Value Added Assessment System,” which is not a different test, but a statistical analysis of PSSA results designed to measure student improvement in those tests. All that data would be used to determine half a teacher’s evaluation score. The other half would be more traditional observation of teachers and other subjective measures. Regardless of how the final system uses test results, Eller noted it will not touch the third rail of education reform: teacher pay.

Determining pay The system would be used to evaluate teachers statewide, but the state won’t require districts to use the system in determining teacher pay or bonuses. While the new system would give districts a uniform evaluation system that could be used to establish merit pay, each district would have to negotiate that idea into the teacher contract. Eller said the goal of devising Measuring growth the new system “is to assure that Wyoming Valley West Super- the most effective teachers are in intendent Chuck Suppon said front of the classroom.”

Taste It!

Unlike some other bagged ice,

YOU CAN’T!

No chemical taste to alter your favorite beverage

Bayo’s Ice… Manufactured Locally

Does Hearing Aid Advertising HaveYou Confused? Come to the hearing experts for common sense answers to your questions. Your hearing deserves the best. • Knowledge and ExperienceDoctors of Audiology, over 60 years of combined service • Convenient DownTown Locations-ParkingValidated • FullTime ServiceMonday through Friday

Call us and arrange a no obligation consultation

AUDIOLOGY & HEARING CENTERS www.audiologyhearing.com WILKES-BARRE

34 S. MAIN ST PROVINCIALTOWERS 700358

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Donna Magni prays the rosary while John Witkosky holds an antiabortion sign in West Pittston along 8th Street on Saturday morning. About 20 people came out to protest abortion.

In testimony before the state Senate Education Committee, state Deputy Secretary Carolyn Dumaresq cited recently released results of teacher evaluations as proof the present system is inadequate. Statewide, 99.4 percent of all teachers were rated “satisfactory.” In Luzerne County school districts, 99.7 percent of 2,559 teachers were rated satisfactory. Such figures, Dumaresq said, are

too perfect to be true. Current evaluations are devised by each district, though most follow a template proposed by the state. The systems hinge heavily on observation of teachers and scrutiny of their work, looking for qualities defined by researcher Charlotte Danielson, who published “Framework for Teaching” in 1996. Dumaresq described an effort to design a new system using student test results. The state used $800,000 from the Gates Foundation to devise a new system and test it in four districts beginning in January. The state wants to expand that pilot program this fall to roughly onefifth of public schools, and begin

822-6122

PECKVILLE

1339 MAIN ST BESEN MEDICAL BLDG

383-0500

SCRANTON

321 SPRUCE ST BANK TOWER

343-7710


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 PAGE 9A


CMYK PAGE 10A

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

BUILDERS HONOR SUCCESS

N

E

S

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

Man arrested in alleged attack on tow truck driver By MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

W

WILKES-BARRE – A WilkesBarre man was arrested Saturday, accused of attacking city towing business operator and self-styled watchdog Bob Kadluboski with a knife. Kadluboski said the man rushed him with a box cutter at about 9:30 a.m. Saturday. Police later arrested the man Kadluboski identified as the suspect, Todd Miller Masterman, 52, of Lehigh Street, in woods off state Route 315 in Plains Township, near Coccia Ford. Kadluboski is the owner of City-Wide Towing in WilkesBarre and a regular attendee at city council meetings, where his outbursts have led council members to draft new rules governing public comment and decorum. He said Saturday he had just returned from a routine tow and was fastening the chain that bars

access to his yard on New Fredrick Street when he saw Masterman standing near a black car parked on Masterman Stanton Street, about 150 feet away. Masterman rushed at him with the knife, which resembled a box cutter, Kadluboski said. “All of a sudden I seen him start screaming that I towed his car,” he said. “He approached me with a knife and attempted to put it to my throat… He was threatening ‘I’ll (expletive) kill you; I’ll kill you; you towed my car.’ ” Kadluboski said he backed up into his pickup truck, lifted his shirt and reached for a handgun he had stashed at his waist, at which point Masterman backed away and fled into the black car.

Kadluboski said he then ran toward the car to read the license plate, at which point Masterman tried to run him over. Kadluboski then called 911. Wilkes-Barre police said they found the black car on Route 315 and that Masterman fled into a woods behind Coccia Ford. Officers used a police dog, which located Masterman in the brush, police said. An officer saw a box cutter with a green handle on the middle console of the car and took possession of it, according to the affidavit of probable cause. Masterman was arrested and arraigned before District Judge Mike Dotzel, Wilkes-Barre Township, on charges of aggravated and simple assault, terroristic threats and resisting arrest. He was committed to the county prison for lack of $20,000 bail. Kadluboski said he had towed a vehicle owned by Masterman

from a private lot about six weeks ago and he sent Masterman certified letters stating he had custody the vehicle, but Masterman never responded. Kadluboski said he had never seen the man before Saturday. Kadluboski said it wasn’t the first time he has been attacked on the job, but he said Saturday it was the closest call he had so far. “This came out of pure blue skies; it was unprovoked,” he said. “It just goes to show you how quick you could get killed. You’re in a relaxed mood doing a routine job and all of a sudden a lunatic appears with a weapon trying to kill you. “It just shows you the dangers in Wilkes-Barre,” Kadluboski added, unable to resist taking a pot-shot at the city’s leaders. “They want you to believe. Well, when I saw him running at me with a knife in his hand, I believed I was in for trouble.”

In top photo, Building Industry Association of Northeastern Pennsylvania officials finalize the list of 24 Keystone Award recipients Saturday night at Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs in Plains Township. From left: Tony Policare, owner, Gear Marketing; Danielle Policare, executive officer, BIA of NEPA; Charlie Kasko, vice president, Signature Building Systems, and Joe Peterson, owner, Hanover Homes North Corporation. In above photo, Danielle Policare, center, reviews Keystone Award presentations with Top Value Kitchens owner Bob Nause, right, and his daughter Angeli.

POLICE BLOTTER HANOVER TWP. – Township police reported the following: • Police are investigating the reported theft of approximately $350 worth of Crest teeth whitening strips and Alli weight loss kits from the CVS on Carey Avenue on Friday afternoon. A man in his 20s left the store with the merchandise around 3:25 p.m. and fled on a bicycle towards Wilkes-Barre. • A bicyclist struck while trying to cross the Sans Souci Parkway on Friday afternoon refused medical treatment. Keith Murphy, 32, of Knox

Street, cut in front of 2004 Jeep Grand Cherokee driven by Nancy Spelman, 27, of Nanticoke, near the Sunoco gas station. Spelman was traveling north when the accident occurred. HAZLE TWP. – State police are investigating the reported theft of a 2011 Toyota RAV 4 from Liberty Court. Emily and Bruce Peabody said the vehicle was parked and locked when it was stolen between 11:30 p.m. Friday and 5:45 a.m. Saturday. The vehicle is gray with Pennsylvania license plate GKR 2132. Anyone with information about the reported stolen vehicle is asked to contact state police at 570 459-3890.

Call Back Mountain Quarry 570-256-3036

700644 7 7006 70 0 006 00 44 4

NEED TOP SOIL? Screened & Blended • Delivery Available

This Weekend - August 12, 13 & 14

40-50%OFF Patio Furniture % Pottery, Statuary, 50 OFF Fountains & Bird Baths Trees, Shrubs, Perennials, 40-50%OFF and Seasonal Garden Decor Hurry While Supplies Last!

(Must present coupon at time of purchase. Expires 8/14/11.)

Mon.-Fri. 10-6, Sat. 10-5, Sun. 12-5

petwonderlandbzbgardengifthome.com

700997

Blackman Blackm Square 508 Blackman S St. (Side Lower Level) Wilkes-Barre Pa (570) 208-0515

704684

All Seasons Garden Center, Gift Store, Boutique & Home Decor


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 PAGE 11A

704300


CMYK PAGE 12A

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

PLACARDS Continued from Page 3A

ity. “While all of the events that we put on are free to the public, they aren’t necessarily free to us.” There are 22 benches with backs in the park and along the levee, and about 20 more without backs, Brozena said. When those have been exhausted, placards will go up for sale on the light fixtures on the common and at the base of trees. For the right price, the opportunity is available to name nearly anything in the park, including the amphitheater, fishing dock and pathways. “My personal and professional wish would be a gift big enough to name the Northampton Street portal,” Pasquini said. But organizers also pointed out that the placards will be small and subtle enough to not detract from the aesthetics of the park. “It’s going to be unobtrusive,” Brozena said. “It’s not like we’re going to have a big sign with a neon arrow.”

THE TIMES LEADER

“These things that are physical attachments to the park, a lot of people have attachments to them psychically. It’s building that kind of legacy that people kind of enjoy.” Charles Barber Luzerne Foundation CEO

“These things that are physical attachments to the park, a lot of people have attachments to them psychically,” said Luzerne Foundation CEO Charles Barber. “It’s building that kind of legacy that people kind of enjoy.” The Luzerne Foundation is acting as fiduciary for the project, ensuring donations are used for their intended purpose. River Common Director of Programming and Outreach Karl Borton said the park’s annual operating budget exceeds $100,000, and more than 75 percent of that is spent on programming. The common hosted more than 60

events in its inaugural season and will host more than 70 this summer, ranging in cost from a few hundred dollars for smaller activities to tens of thousands for large festivals like RiverFest, Borton said. “We want to get to the point where we are replicating events like MusicFest in Bethlehem,” Borton said. “We want to be attracting thousands of people to our area for the weekend. We want this park to be a destination for thousands.” The program has already sold its first placard. Guard Insurance purchased a bench placard in memory of long-time employee Mary Ann Phillips, who passed away in February following a battle with breast cancer. “Mary Ann was a great person and gave to everyone,” said Elaine Sola, Guard’s assistant vice president of regulatory compliance and a friend of Phillips. “She did not do a lot for herself; she was always doing things for others, so we wanted to give back to her. We picked the bench closet to Guard; someplace that people could visit and think of Mary Ann and enjoy the River Common.”

www.timesleader.com

MADE IN AMERICA

Toyota Camry is the “Most American” Car for the third consecutive year. ††

Glitzy Pets Rocks! They Sparkle, You Shine S LIGHT UP!

by

OV ER

400

C A RS

AVAIL AB LE

SOLD IN SCRANTON

Sizes 8 1/2 - 3 M-W Widths

Shop 10 to 8 Mon. thru Fri. 10 to 5 Sat. 1 to 5 Sun.

United Penn Plaza, Kingston, PA 18704

287-8765

In 2009 and 2010, Toyota Scion of Scranton was recognized with t prestigious President’s Award for excellence in each of a the sseries of categories, including Customer Sales Satisfaction and Customer Service Satisfaction. C

GERALD F. KAVANAGH,

WE SALUTE YOU. GERALD F. KAVANAGH

One of Pennsylvania’s largest inventories of Toyotas, insuring that you’ll find YOUR new Toyota.

Over 100 certified employees dedicated to the Toyota brand AND to serving you.

60,000 square-foot brand-new state-ofthe-art facility all dedicated to the Toyota brand.

One of the only brand new environmentally friendly Toyota Certified collision centers in the country.

Luxury customer lounge with Wi-Fi and flat screen TVs for your comfort and convenience during your service visit.

Featuring the ONLY Dunkin’ Donuts in a Toyota Dealership in the United States.

BRANCH:

US Air Force

RANK:

SMSGT (Senior Master Sergeant)

War:

Vietnam 1968-1969

HOMETOWN: Dallas

Years Served: 23

• PA State INSPECTIONS • Service CAR WASH • PRIORITY Shuttle Service • COMPLIMENTARY Loaner Car

erence! We Make The Diff

Each Sunday, we’ll run a photo with the person’s name, hometown, branch, rank, years served and if applicable, the war or battle fought. Sub mit your 200 dpi digital photo to promotions@timesleader.com or mail your photo and information to us. The Times Leader 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA. 18711.

266352

SEND A PHOTO OF A VETERAN OR AN ACTIVE DUTY MEMBER OF YOUR FAMILY.

*All offers end close of business Wednesday, August 31, 2011 or while supplies last. All offers exclude 1st payment, tax, tags, $125 processing fee and $650 acquisition fee on lease offers. Quantities as of 08/09/2011. †Finance and lease offers require tier 1 plus credit approval through Toyota Financial Services. All leases are based on 12,000 miles per year. No security deposit required for all leases. Available unit counts include both in stock and incoming units for all model years and trim levels for series described. **Cash Back offers includes funds from Toyota of Scranton, Toyota Financial Services and Toyota Motor Sales combined. Vehicle must be in stock units — Prior sales excluded. Customer must present ad at time of purchase. Camry cash back, APR and lease contracts must finance or lease through Toyota Financial Services. Tundra cash back and APR offer must finance through Toyota Financial Services. †† According to Cars.Com’s annual “American-Made Index,” rank in July 2010. See dealer for details. 2011 Impact Advertising 11TSS-IVC-WTL0814 11


K ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com DAVID J. NICHOLSON, 24, of Zerby Avenue, Kingston, and formerly of Swoyersville, died Friday, August 12, 2011, at his home. Funeral arrangements are pending from the Hugh B. Hughes & Son Inc. Funeral Home, 1044 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort.

Gerard G. Searfoss August 10, 2011 erard G. “Jerry” Searfoss, of Ossining, N.Y., and Long G Beach Island, N.J., died peacefully

Wednesday, August 10, 2011, surrounded by his family. Mr. Searfoss was born January 15, 1935, in Wilkes-Barre, a son to the late Lester and Mary Dean. He was a graduate of St. Peter’s Prep and received his bachelor’s degree in Marketing at St. Peter’s College in New Jersey. Jerry proudly served in the U.S. Army from which he was honorably discharged, and continued his service as a Major in the National Guard. Mr. Searfoss enjoyed a distinguished 43-year career in philanthropy in the area of child welfare and health care. Jerry’s career began as a sales representative with the American Tobacco Co. He became a noted philanthropic executive with the Muscular Dystrophy Association, where he worked with Jerry Lewis and helped produce the first Muscular Dystrophy Telethon. He then became the National Associate Director of Fund Raising for the Boys Clubs of America. At Boys Club, he worked with Board Chairs Herbert Hoover and then President Richard M. Nixon. Jerry was renowned for his 25year career with White Plains Hospital as Senior Vice President. At the hospital he created the Development Department and designed and oversaw major campaigns that raised over $25 million collectively for the hospital. He was influential in fostering relationships with White Plains Hospital’s most inspiring donors whose names are etched on buildings and pavilions through the White Plains Hospital campus, including the Norman and Adele Morris Ambulatory Surgery Pavilion, the Generoso Pope Critical Care Unit, the Flanzer Pavilion and Dickstein Cancer Center. Jerry was key in encouraging board members to engage friends and colleagues to recognize that philanthropy was a catalyst for major expansion planning for White Plains Hospital. Jerry will be remembered as a man dedicated to his family and friends and the communities with which he was involved. He was a member of The Exchange Club of White Plains, Knights of Columbus, Knights Templar, Ancient Order of Hibernians and The American Legion. On Long Beach Island, he and his wife were active in the community as members of the Beach Haven Park Yacht Club and parishioners of St. Francis of Assisi Parish. All of his family, friends and colleagues commented on his wit, his unique sense of humor and his generosity. These qualities touched all those around him. Jerry is survived by his wife, Holly Benedict Searfoss; his daughters, Michele Holsgrove (Kenneth) and Lynn Breen (Jeremy); his sons, Paul and Gerard Searfoss (Kate); and brothers, Francis and Robert Searfoss; and two step-children, Heather DiFalco and Todd Benedict (Stacey); as well as 11 grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his brother, John. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Jerry’s memory to White Plains Hospital, White Plains, NY 10601; Hospice & Palliative Care of Westchester, 311 North St., Ste. 204, White Plains, NY 10605; or St. Francis of Assisi Parish, Brant Beach, NJ 08008. Jerry will be reposing at the Beecher Funeral Home, Pleasantville, N.Y., from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. Monday. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 11 a.m. Tuesday at Holy Innocents R.C. Church, Pleasantville, N.Y. A private family burial will be held.

OBITUARY POLICY The Times Leader publishes free obituaries, which have a 27-line limit, and paid obituaries, which can run with a photograph. A funeral home representative can call the obituary desk at (570) 829-7224, send a fax to (570) 829-5537 or e-mail to tlobits@timesleader.com. If you fax or e-mail, please call to confirm. Obituaries must be submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Obituaries must be sent by a funeral home or crematory, or must name who is handling arrangements, with address and phone number. We discourage handwritten notices; they incur a $15 typing fee.

O

B

I

T

U

A

R

I

E

S

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 PAGE 13A

Mildred M. Hatten

Malcolm M. Nulton

August 11, 2011

August 3, 2011

F

our days after celebrating her 100th birthday with family and friends, Mildred M. Hatten, of Kingston, peacefully passed away Thursday, August 11, 2011. Born on August 7, 1911, in Mount Carmel, Mildred was a daughter of late Michael and Mary Zdanowicz Kaminski, and resided there until moving to Kingston in the 1930s. Mildred was a strong, independent woman who, despite the adversity she faced, was kind, loving, supportive and generous with everyone she encountered. She spent many years in Mount Carmel working in a bakery to help support her family. Upon the closing of the Mount Car- band, Covar; Joseph P. Palmentere, mel bakery, Mildred relocated to and Larisa A. Palmentere; her greatKingston to work for the Blue Rib- granddaughter, Caroline J. Sears; bon Bakery, and subsequently for and her sister Irene Higgins, Parma the bakery department of Percy Heights, Ohio. She is also survived Browns until its closing in the late by nieces, nephews, cousins and “adopted” family members who she 1970s. Her newfound leisure time was kept close to her heart. Funeral services will be held at quickly occupied with all of the things she loved; most important to 10:30 a.m. Monday from Holy Family Parish, Bennett Street, Luzerne. her was spending time with those Family and friends are invited to atshe loved. Additionally, she found tend a one-hour viewing at the great pleasure in gardening, read- church beginning at 9:30 a.m., foling, regular trips “to town” and in lowed by a Mass of Christian Burial. baking for her family and neighbors. Interment will be at Chapel Lawn Mildred was a member of St. Ignati- Memorial Park, Dallas. us of Loyola Parish, Kingston. Arrangements are being handled In addition to her parents, she by Lehman-Gregory Funeral Home, was preceded in death by her hus- 281 Chapel St., Swoyersville. band, Thomas D.; and by her sister In lieu of flowers, memorial conJean Varano. tributions may be made in Mildred’s Mildred is survived by her daugh- memory to Boys Town National ter, Nancy H. Palmentere, and her Headquarters, 200 Flanagan Blvd., husband, Joseph, of Forty Fort; son, PO Box 6000, Boys Town, NE Thomas M. Hatten, and his wife, 68010; or St. Jude Children’s HospiMarcia, of Philadelphia; her grand- tal, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, children, Tara P. Sears and her hus- TN 38105.

Joseph Popson August 11, 2011 Joseph Pop- rad, of Jupiter, Fla.; brothers, John son, 85, of Popson of Durham, N.C., and Mike Swoyersville, Popson of Swoyersville; sister, Josedied Thursday, phine June of Morrisville; grandchilAugust 11, dren, Neil Mucha of Burlington, Vt., 2011, at home. Doug Mucha of Kingston, and Cory Born in Damon and Clay Damon of Jupiter, Swoyersville Fla.; step-grandchildren, Justine Fieron July 28, man of Dallas, Kim Krupsha and hus1926, he was a son of the late Jo- band, Christian, and Shannon Lispi seph and Elizabeth Stefanko Pop- and husband, Neil; as well as six son. great-grandchildren and numerous He attended Swoyersville nieces and nephews. schools and was a member of St. Funeral service for Joseph will Nicholas Byzantine Catholic be held at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday Church, Swoyersville. He was em- from the Lehman-Gregory Funeral ployed at the Harry E. Colliery for Home Inc., 281 Chapel St., Swoyersa short time. Joe retired from the ville, with a Office of Christian Burial Gibbons Brewery in 1968 after with Liturgy at 10 a.m. in St. Nicholas working there for 38 years. Byzantine Catholic Church, SwoyersJoe was a U.S. Navy Veteran ville. Celebrate for the Liturgy will be serving in the South Pacific. After his Honorable Discharge from the Father Michael Popson, nephew of service he joined the American Le- the deceased. Interment will be held gion Post 644 Swoyersville, where in St. Mary’s Byzantine Cemetery, he was a life member, and he was Dallas. Family and friends may call also a member of the VFW Post from 6 to 9 p.m. Monday evening, 283 Kingston. Joe loved sports, es- with Panachida services conducted at 8:30 p.m. pecially baseball and football. Memorial contributions can be He was preceded in death by his first wife, Madeline Warrick Pop- made to St. Nicholas Byzatine Cason, who passed in August of 1964; tholic Church, Swoyersville, c/o 526 and sisters, Mary Filipko and Betty Church St., Wilkes-Barre Twp., PA 18702; or Hospice of the Sacred Somerville. Surviving are his wife of 44 Heart, 600 Baltimore Dr., Wilkesyears, the former Celia Pilecki; Barre, PA 18701. Joe’s family would like to acknowldaughters, Diane Mucha and her husband, Tom, of Kingston, Mary edge Dr. John Carey, the Hospice of Jo Kenney and her husband, Keith, the Sacred Heart, and all his family of West Palm Beach, Fla., and Car- and friends and coworkers for their ol Damon and her husband, Con- support during this difficult time.

Dr. Thomas A. Kislan, DDS August 12, 2011 Dr. Thomas tions. He loved flying and became a A. Kislan, flight instructor at the Hazleton MuCDR, U.S. Na- nicipal Airport where he helped vy (Ret.) 82, of many aspiring pilots receive their piHarleigh, went lots’ licenses. One of his proudest home to God days was when his son, Thomas, reFriday eve- ceived his own pilot’s license and ning, August gave him his own Naval Flying wings 12, 2011, after as a gift. bravely battling a long illness. He He was a member of the former Sawas born September 18, 1928, in cred Heart Church of Harleigh and is Eckley. Eckley is where he grew up a member of Queen of Heaven Parish and met his childhood sweetheart at Our Lady of Grace Church. and future wife, Janet Ferko. Preceding him in death are his He attended Foster Township three infant boys, Alan, Brian and JoHigh School and then Wilkes Col- seph; his mother Mary P. Kislan; and lege where he received a degree in father, Andrew Kislan, of Eckley; and Chemistry. He was then awarded a brother, Carl Kislan of Northampton. scholarship to attend the prestiSurviving are his wife, Janet (Fergious U.S. Naval Flight Academy ko) Kislan of Harleigh; son Dr. Thoin Pensacola, Fla. He earned his mas P. Kislan and his wife, Dr. Sandra Naval Flying wings in 1950 and Krokos-Kislan, Drums; and grandson proceeded to fly the SNJ fighter, who he adored, Ryan T. Kislan; sisF4U Corsair fighter, PBY Catalina ters-in-law, Patricia Ferko of West Haand P2V anti-submarine aircraft. zleton and Elaine (Ferko) Superdock He won awards for expert marks- of Bloomsburg. manship in torpedo bombing and Family and friends are invited gunnery. to attend a Mass of Christian After completing active duty in Burial at 9:30 a.m. Monday in the the Navy, Tom attended New York Queen of Heaven Parish at Our Lady University and received a degree of Grace Church. Viewing will be held in Doctor of Dental Surgery. He re- from 4 to 7 p.m. today at the Joseph turned to the Hazleton area and A. Moran Funeral Home, 229 W. 12th opened a private dental practice on St., Hazleton. Interment will be in 15th Street where he practiced the Calvary Cemetery, Drums. dentistry for over 40 years. Memorial donations may be made He continued to serve his coun- to the John Heinz Pediatric Fund, 150 try as a pilot and dentist in the U.S. Mundy St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702; Naval Reserves for over 25 years. or the Hazleton Blind Association, In 1976, he was promoted to the 1201 N. Church St., Hazleton, PA rank of Commander. He resided in 18202. Harleigh and was active in many Condolences can be sent through community and dental organiza- www.moranfuneralhome.com.

ST.M A RY’S

M O N U M EN T CO .

M onum ents -M arkers -Lettering 975 S.M A IN ST.H A N O VER TW P.

829-8138 N EXT TO SO LO M O N ’S CREEK

M .J. JUD G E

M MON UM EN T CO. ON UM EN TS - M ARK ERS - L ETTERIN G

8 2 9 -4 8 8 1

N extto the Big Co w o n Rt. 309

M

alcolm M. Nulton, of Penfield and Irondequoit, N.Y., passed away Wednesday, August 3, 2011. He was a son of the late Merl and Marjorie (Sherbine) Nulton. Mal was a U.S. Army Veteran and member of American Legion Post 1229. He was a member of Humboldt Lodge IOOF, Penfield Fire Co. and Penfield Country Club. He was Past Master of John A. Robertson Masonic Lodge No.1032, Past President of Penfield Rotary, Penfield Business Association, Rochester Genesee Valley Funeral Directors Association and New York State Funeral Directors Association. He worked with the Penfield Recreation Department and served on the Penfield Planning and Zoning Boards. He also served on the Board of at Bay Village and Oakwood Cemetery. Mal is survived by his wife Joanne Cady Nulton; daughter Lynn Nulton; son and his wife, Malcolm and Cathy Miller Nulton; five grandchildren, Lindsay Gray Moulton and her husband, Chris Moul-

ton; Mark, Lisa and Michael Nulton; brother-in-law and his wife, James and Barbara Cady; as well as several nieces, nephews and cousins. Services were held August 5 and 6 in Penfield, N.Y. Those wishing may make donations may do so to the Penfield Fire Co. or the American Lung Association in Mal’s memory. Arrangements are by the Jennings, Nulton & Mattle Funeral Home Inc.

Eva M. Major August 12, 2011 va M. Major, 71, of Monroe Township, went home to be E with her Savior Friday, August 12,

2011, at the Northeast Pennsylvania Hospice, Scranton. Mrs. Major was born February 14, 1940, in Falls, a daughter of the late Albert and Eva Johnson Porter. She graduated from the Preston High School in Clifford. She had been employed as a nurse’s aide at the Sparr Nursing Home in Drums. Eva enjoyed gardening, taking care of her grandchildren and crafting, including sewing, crocheting and knitting. Mrs. Major attended the Bowman’s Creek Free Methodist Church. She is survived by her husband of 52 years, Darrel E. Major; children, Dale Major and Rose A. Prussock of Wapwallopen; Bruce Major and Beth Spaide of Drums; Bonnie Dodd and her husband, Richard, of Etters; and Mark Major and his wife, Brea, of Shavertown; 11 grandchildren; one great-granddaughter; and

sisters, Betty Belcher of Clifford and Verna Hobart of Salisbury, N.C. Funeral will be held at 11 a.m. Tuesday from the Curtis L. Swanson Funeral Home Inc., corner of routes 29 and 118, Pikes Creek, with the Rev. Lynn Mokwa, pastor of the Bowman’s Creek Free Methodist Church, officiating. Interment will be in the Kocher Cemetery, Ruggles. Friends may call from 6 to 8 p.m. Monday.

FUNERALS CHACKO – Elizabeth, funeral 9:30 a.m. Monday from the Wroblewski Funeral Home Inc., 1442 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort. Mass of Christian Burial to be celebrated at 10 a.m. in Holy Trinity Church, 116 Hughes St., Swoyersville. Family and friends may call 4 to 8 p.m. today at the funeral home. CONNOR – Catherine, funeral 9:30 a.m. Monday from the Hugh P. Boyle & Son Funeral Home Inc., 416 Wyoming Ave., Kingston. Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in St. Ignatius of Loyola Church, 339 N. Maple Ave., Kingston. Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m. today and 8:30 a.m. until the time of service Monday. FARRELL – Dorothy, funeral 9 a.m. Monday from the Corcoran Funeral Home Inc., 20 S. Main St., Plains Township. Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in St. Andre Bessette Parish, St. Stanislaus Kostka Church, North End section of Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m. today. HATTEN – Mildred, funeral 10:30 a.m. Monday from Holy Family Parish, Bennett Street, Luzerne. Family and friends are invited to attend a one-hour viewing at the church beginning at 9:30 a.m., followed by a Mass of Christian Burial. MCCOLE – Johanna, funeral 9 a.m. Monday from the Peter J. Adonizio Funeral Home, 802 Susquehanna Ave., West Pittston. Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church, Pittston. Friends may call 4 to 7 p.m. today at the funeral home. Those attending the brunch immediately after Mass are asked to respond before 7 p.m. today by email to pjafd@verizon.net. PETROSKI – Dianne, funeral 9:30 a.m. Monday from the Harold C. Snowdon Funeral Home Inc., 140 N. Main St., Shavertown. Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in Gate of Heaven Church, Dallas. Friends may call 4 to 7 p.m. today and 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. Monday at the funeral home. PODGARSKI – Nicholas, family and friends gather 9 a.m. Monday in St. Mary Assumption Byzantine Catholic Church, Wilkes-Barre. Viewing 2 to 5 p.m. today at the Mark V. Yanaitis Funeral Home, 55 Stark St., Plains Township. Parastas at 3 p.m. today. REEDY – Elwood, funeral 10 a.m. Monday from the H. Merritt Hughes Funeral Home Inc., 211 Luzerne Ave., West Pittston. Friends may call 4 to 7 p.m. today. REINARD – Theresa, funeral 10 a.m. Tuesday at the Corcoran Funeral Home Inc., 20 S. Main St., Plains Township. Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m. Monday.

Charles ‘Scooch’ Hooper

Gertrude H. Daubert

August 13, 2011

August 12, 2011 H. Daubert, of Dexter G ertrude Street, Hanover Township, died

“Scooch” Hooper, 75, of C harles Kingston, died Saturday morn-

ing, August 13, 2011, at Hospice Care of the VNA Heritage House, Wilkes-Barre. Charles was born in Wyoming on January 14, 1936. He was a son of the late Claude and Rachel (Amos) Hooper. Scooch owned and operated Johnny and Charles’ Roofing Co. for many years before his retirement. He was a very unselfish and caring individual who would help anyone in need. He was a devoted and caring father and grandfather. He enjoyed spending time in the outdoors camping, fishing and hunting. He also enjoyed gardening and the company of his dog, Lucky. Charles was preceded in death by brothers, Raymond and Claude Hooper. Surviving are a son, Charles Hooper Jr., Edwardsville; daughters, Susan Hooper, Edwardsville; Carol Kocher and her husband,

Emory, Kingston; and Michelle Gagatek and her husband, Michael, Swoyersville; five grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; sister, Rachel Cool, Swoyersville; as well as numerous nieces and nephews. Private funeral services will be held from the Andrew Strish Funeral Home, 11 Wilson St., Larksville. Private interment will be held at a later date.

Kathleen DeSimone Bianco August 11, 2011 athleen D. Bianco, 89, died Thursday, August 11, 2011, in K McLean, Va. Her husband of 60

years, Angelo C. Bianco, and her children were at her side. Born in Marlboro, Mass., on December 1, 1921, she was a graduate of St. Ann’s Academy in Marlboro and Regis College in Weston, Mass., where she earned a degree in Romance languages. She was recruited by the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) as an intelligence analyst and was posted in Rome, Italy. She continued her career with the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) after its formation in 1947, serving in Washington, D.C., and abroad along with her husband. Following her retirement from the CIA, she worked for more than 20 years as a substitute language teacher and tutor for Langley High School’s language department. She was the sister of the late Joseph DeSimon; and the daughter of the late Cristano and Maria DeSimone. In addition to her immediate family, she is survived by 12 grandchildren and one great-grandchild. She is also survived by one brother, Emilio DeSimone of Marlboro, Mass.; brother-in-law Albert Bianco of Pittston; sisters-in-law, Constance De-

G en etti’s

A fterFu nera lLu ncheons Sta rting a t$7.95 p erp erson

H otelBerea vem entR a tes

825.6477

Simone of Marlboro and Rose Bianco of Roanoke, Va.; as well as several nieces and nephews. She belonged to St. Luke Catholic Church, The OSS Society and the Regis College Alumni Association. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 11:30 a.m. Thursday at Luke Catholic Church, 7001Georgetown Pike, McLean, Va., with visitation preceding the service from 10 to 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the National Association for Down Syndrome. Funeral arrangements are by the Murphy Falls Church Funeral Home.

Friday, August 12, 2011, after a lengthy illness. Born May 3, 1946, in Wilkes-Barre, she was a daughter of the late James and Gertrude Green Carbohn. She was a graduate of Hanover High School, class of 1965. Gertrude worked in various jobs in the Wyoming Valley. She was, for many years, a member of Veterans of the Vietnam War, Post 2, Kingston. She and her husband, Carl, would have celebrated their 45th wedding anniversary September 17. In addition to her husband, she is survived by children, Patricia and her husband, Shelley Kolbert, Sunbury, Carl and his wife, Michelle Daubert, Ken and his wife, Roberta Daubert, Hanover Township, and Cindy and her husband, Michael Wren, Edwardsville; grandchildren, Ashlie, Carl, Emily and Katie Daubert; Ryan Kolbert; Katie, Nicole and Sean Brennan; and Edward, Udzilla, Michael, Bailea, Jacob, Hannah and Alicia Wren; great-grandchildren, Natali and Brody McCarthy; brother, James Carbohn, Hanover Township; sisterin-law Ann Horridge, Kingston; as well as several nieces and nephews. The family wished to extend their heartfelt thanks to the members of the Hanover Township Ambulance Association for their kindness and care during her illness. Viewing will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. Monday from the Mamary-Durkin Funeral Service, 59 Parrish St., Wilkes-Barre. Those who desire may give memorial contributions to the Hanover Township Ambulance Association, the S.P.C.A., or to a charity of the donor’s choice. More Obituaries, Page 2A

D U PO N T M O N U M E N T S H O P,IN C .

S erving N ortheast PA F or O ver 60 Y ears

B ronze • G ranite • M ausoleum s • M arkers• M ausoleum s • Personalized m em orials m onum entsand Pre-p lanning services • C ustom d esign service available at no charge • O ne ofthe largest & m ost unique m onum ent d isp lays • Ind oor show room • W elllighted outd oor d isp lay • E asy accessfrom R te. 81 north & south

• A llengraving d one on p rem ises • C em etery lettering • C leaning & R estoration

H ours: O p en d aily 9A M - 5PM • S aturd ay 9A M To N oon (A nytim e B y A p p ointm ent)

“R em em brance is an everlasting gift... T he p recious m em ory ofyour love.”

V isit us at: w w w .d up ontm onum entshop .com


CMYK PAGE 14A

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

MUNICIPAL BRIEFS NUANGOLA – The borough will have the annual general cleanup day for borough residents 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Aug. 27. Items will be accepted at the recycling center only and residents must supply proof of residency before any items are dropped off. The following will not be taken: ashes, tree logs, stumps, logs, any type of construction wood or materials such as plywood, painted wood, railroad ties, commercial contractor waste, roofing material, asbestos, etc., combustible items, firearms, batteries, oil, antifreeze or any type of hazardous material or items with protruding nails, tires, electronics such as television sets, microwaves, personal computers, etc., refrigerators, air conditioners, dehumidifiers, Freon products or propane tanks. All fluids must be removed from all items such as mowers, leaf blowers, snow blowers. If there are any questions, contact Doug Fawbush or leave a message on the borough answering machine at 868-5808. There are a few Centennial Books available for sale. All preordered books have been delivered or mailed. The cost of the booklet is $35 for pickup or an additional fee of $5 to mail. The memorial centennial pathway leading to the front doors of the municipality is being planned for installation at the end of August. KINGSTON TWP. – The township board of supervisors reminds residents that it is unlawful to have any collection of standing water, except for agricultural purposes, in which mosquitoes are likely to breed, unless such collection of water is treated or maintained to prevent mosquito breeding. Residents can help prevent the spread of mosquitoes by following simple procedures to eliminate standing water. Some of the procedures are: change water in birdbaths once a week, keep swimming pools and outdoor hot tubs chlorinated, turn wading pools upside down when not in use, and check you property for containers or receptacles that can accumulate water. By eliminating stagnant water township residents can help prevent the spread of mosquitoes. Mosquitoes are known to carry diseases including West Nile Virus. Residents are also encouraged to sign up to the township emailing list on the website www.kingstontownship.com. Receive up-to-date information regarding happenings in the township on your home computer. Residents can also contact the township on the Facebook page on the website link. For more information, contact the township administration office at 696-3809.

N

E

Eastern Metal Recycling Highest Prices for Scrap Metals

W

S

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

Looking Looking For For That That New New Job? Job?

Is Your Smile Ready To Make A Great Impression?

• Copper • Brass • Aluminum • Stainless • Rads • Motors • Batteries • Light Iron • Heavy Steel • Cast Iron & Cars

The Right Dentist Can Make All The Difference! Exceptional Dental Care Cosmetic & Restorative Dentistry Warm & Comforting Environment State-Of-The-Art Dental Facility

Located on Rt. 309 in Hazleton behind the Driver’s License Center

Dr. Gary Nataupsky

Call 454-4442 for prices, directions and hours

Riverside Commons, 575 Pierce St., Suite 201, Kingston 570-331-8100 • www.dr-gmn.con

COME HANG OUT WITH YOUR LITTLE ONE HERE AT Shooting STARZ GYMNASTICS Classes offered from walking to 18 years Fall Classes scheduled for September 6-October 29 8 Week Sessions 570-822-1212 CLASSES FILL QUICKLY! Registration begins August 15 (TOMORROW)!!! $10.00 OFF* Session for all who register on Monday Aug. 15 * Opening Day Only, must present ad

National Gymnastics Day - September 18th, 2011 • 11 to 3

Will showcase performances of class and team gymnasts 250 Johnson Street • Wilkes-Barre Township www.shootingstarzgym.com

BEL L ES

C O N S TR U C TIO N C O . PA012959

ABO VE AL L THE BES T RO O F!

N ATIO N AL AW ARD W IN N IN G C O M PAN Y S EL EC T S H IN G L E M AS TER

824- 7220

WE WANT YOUR GOLD & ANYTHING OF VALUE A NYTHING O FV ALUE

HIGHEST CASH PAID Receive your best offer and come visit us!

Always Buying: Gold, Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry, Broken Jewelry, Co C ost osttum me Je J ewe welry, A ntiq iq ques, C oins ns Costume Jewelry, Antiques, Coins WE CARRY BIAGI WATCH BATTERIES ITALIAN BEAD ONLY $4 BRACELETS! INSTALLED!

G & SELLING LARGE DIAMONDS SPECIALIZED IN BUYIN

705123

Mon-Fri 10-6 • Sat 11-6

Visit Us On Facebook

701405

476 Bennett Street, Luzerne • 570-288-1966


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

CLICK: OUTRAGEOUS TRUNK SHOW

N

E

W

S

CLICK: PARTY ON THE ROOFTOP IN W-B

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 PAGE 15A

CLICK: COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY GARDEN PARTY

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

From left, Beth Ann Britt, Karen Bednarski and Helen Bacumpas BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Teresa Ei and Stacey Szafran

Julie Imel of Scranton, left, Micah Woodard of Scranton, and Victoria Morahan of Dunmore

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

From left, Andrea Petrasek, Janet Flack and Anthony T.P. Brooks

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Dana Middleton and Jen Hess

Megan Gilroy of Luzerne, left, and Trish Danei of Pittston

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Morey and Yolanda Oldweiler

FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Jerry and Connie Lisman

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Maureen and John Magda, both of Wilkes-Barre

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Audrey and Charles Beleski

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Anna and Catie Thomas

Susan and Sonny Witkowski of Glen Lyon, left, and Neil and Joan Bavitz of Wanamie

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Barbara O’Hara, left, Emily Brooks-Novakowski, Pat Merman

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Amanda Sewatsky and Meredith Colohan

Ed Lupico of Wilkes-Barre, left, Shawna Teer of Dallas, and Linda Gramlich of Bear Creek

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Matthew Thomas-Malani with Betsy Condron

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Eileen and Allyson Kacmarski

Lisa Sanfilippo, left, Wilma Snopek and Gwen Blasi, all of WilkesBarre

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Carol Hannon and Ron Antolick

News. Events. Captured Moments.

Now you can create your own online photo gallery. Start sharing your collection today at photos.timesleader.com. m.

266693

Reader submitted photos that’s as easy as drag and drop or a simple click and upload.


CMYK PAGE 16A

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

N

E

W

S

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

Parents group wants change in gas line plan Activists say connecting lines to Transco pipeline in remote spot would enhance safety.

By MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

Dallas School District parents have been among the most vocal and persistent opponents of the pipelines and associated projects planned by Chief Oil and Gas and Williams Field Services LLC. Beginning as an offshoot of the Gas Drilling Awareness Coalition, a group of parents opposing the proposals of both companies, the DallasParentsTaxpayerGrouphas coalesced around the issue. Some also got their children involved in the group, Kids Against Pump Station, or KAPS, in February, when Chief was seeking to build a compressor station in the township. Dozens of opponents have packed public meetings to voice

concerns with the project and grilled representatives and experts brought in to speak on behalf of the two companies. Though they succeeded in convincing Chief Oil and Gas to relocate its planned compressorstationoutofthetownship, Kim Jacobs, a vocal member of the Dallas Parents Taxpayer Group whohastwochildrenattendingthe high school, said she still has concerns about the two planned pipelines. She believes the companies have not provided enough information about the condition of the Transco Pipeline, the oldest portions of whichdateto1958,andthemaintenance of the pipeline to ease parents’ concerns about tapping into the line so close to the school district grounds. She referred to Chief Operations Manager Steve Hamilton’s com-

Chief spokeswoman Kristi Gittins said in an email. “ROW agreements are private negotiations with individual landowners; we do not have the power of eminent domain.” Williams Appalachian Basin Operations and Technical Services Manager Mike Dickinson said the Hildebrandt Road site sits near a curve in the Transco Pipeline that hooks south toward more densely populated areas just east of the school district. “If you move a half mile to the east, it really drops off,” Dickinson said. “If you move a half-mile to the west it gets worse. You’ve got the school district there; you’ve got the municipal building. … All the issues you’re looking at here would be even worse as you got closer to those more populated areas. From a safety standpoint you absolutely could do that … you’re just going to have more people upset.”

the proposed site but would not tap into the main there. Instead, they wouldturneast,followingthepipeline to a less populated area within a mile of the proposed site and tap into the pipeline there. “Bottom line, do we want them here at all; no, but if they are coming here, let them spend the extra money and go to a more remote location, not by the schools,” Jacobs said. “Chief, I think, has had six hearings now. With the money you’re spending on all these hearings, just take your money and spend a little extra and go east. I believe if they would do that, then we would call the dogs off.”

its proposed metering station, Chief has called on several experts to answer residents’ questions and respond to their concerns. A fire and explosives expert testified in July that if there was an explosion at the Chief metering station, the flames would not reach school buildings or the nearby Fellowship Free Evangelical Church. A real estate expert also testified the metering station and pipeline would not diminish property values in the township. Both witnesses were called by Chief. But Jacobs said Chief paid both witnesses to testify at the hearings andtheirtestimonyisthereforenot credible. “They brought in … experts paid by the gas companies to tell us what the gas companies want us to know,” Jacobs said. She said she and her organization are pressing the gas companies to accept an alternative proExpert testimony posal in which the gathering lines In ongoing zoning hearings for would meet the Transco pipeline at

ments at a February compressor station tour in Susquehanna County, in which Hamilton reportedly said the compressor station then proposed at the Hildebrandt Road site would be less of a danger than thepipelineforwhichit’spreparing gas. “The station is new, but the pipeline’s old,” Jacobs said. Jacobs also said the township’s decision regarding the pipelines will set a precedent for how the township handles similar proposals in the future, and she wants the municipality to get it right. “It’s just really a concern about the future,” she said. “If this was like a three-month contract then, yeah, whatever, but this isn’t temporary. This is going to be here forever and the Dallas schools will be hereforever,andpipelinesblowup. There are accidents. It happens.”

Companies’ position Butbothcompaniessaidtheproposed site is the best available for them to tap into the line. “This route was the best route obtainable through the least populousareaswhereChiefwasableto obtain right-of-way agreements,”

NEW GAS PIPELINES

DIMOCK

SPRINGVILLE

AUBURN

29

EXISTING TENNESSEE GAS PIPELINE

SUSQUEHANNA COUNTY WYOMING COUNTY WILLIAMS PROPOSED PIPELINE ROUTE LEMON

PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

Mike Dickinson, manager of operations and technical service for Williams Field Services LLC, surveys the right-of-way site for the gas pipeline off of Route 92 in Wyoming County.

WASHINGTON

PIPELINE

29 92

Continued from Page 1A

He said the gathering line will connect to two pipelines for two reasons. The first is that the Tennessee Gas Pipeline, which runs through some of Pennsylvania’s most productive gas fields, is at maximum capacity. The second is what Dickinson called flow assurance. “If you’ve got all your pipeline going to one place and that pipeline To see additional has a compressor photos, visit station go down or www.times has some kind of leader.com problem, you’re stuck,” he said. Chief in January was the first to submit plans for a natural gas compressor station, two metering facilities, a communications tower and several storage tanks to be built on a 5-acre property off Hildebrandt Road, 1,150-feet from the border of the school district campus. Those plans drew intense criticism from the Gas Drilling Awareness Coalition and an offshoot group of parents of Dallas School District students that galvanized around the issue. Chief in late February decided to relocate its compressor station and submitted revised plans for a metering station. Chief also removed a 100-foot communications tower, a flare device and a chemical tank from the metering station permit request. Williams followed in March, submitting its plans for a metering station. Municipal discussions Both companies are in discussions with Dallas Township officials but are still awaiting zoning approval for their plans. Williams crossed a major hurdle Tuesday when it was given conditional land development and subdivision approval for its pipeline, but the township contends it will still need zoning approval for its metering station, for which it has not applied. Williams and the township have for several weeks been holding discussions to iron out disputed issues, including whether zoning approval is required for the portion of the gathering line

MEHOOPANY

TUNKHANNOCK TWP.

6

6 BOWMAN’S CREEK

TUNKHANNOCK

SUSQUEHANNA RIVER

OVERFIELD

92

EATON

WILLIAMS CONSTRUCTION STAGING AREA

29

FALLS

292

MONROE

NORTHMORELAND

The right-of-way work site for the pipeline off Route 92 in Wyoming County.

that would cross the township. “It’s a use for the township land which we feel that the township ordinance authorizes us to not necessarily prohibit but to have a say in the use of the land,” Township Solicitor Tom Brennan said. “Any time anybody builds anything in our township they need land use approval and they need zoning approval as well.” Brennan and Williams’ attorneys have been negotiating the settlement since June. Williams representatives declined to discuss those negotiations for this story. Brennan wouldn’t discuss the substance of negotiations either, but said last week that the two parties were close to hammering out a deal. Should the plan again be derailed, he said the township has not ruled out resolving the dispute in court, but added he believes both parties would prefer a compromise. Township Supervisor Frank Wagner also said the dispute could wind up in court, though he added he believes both parties would prefer to forge an agreement.

‘Under protest’ Chief Oil and Gas in May submitted plans for a portion of its pipeline to township officials “under protest” because its attorneys contended land development and zoning approval aren’t required for pipelines. Chief representatives have appeared twice before the township zoning hearing board in ongoing hearings. Chief spokeswoman Kristi Gittins said she did not wish to address the discussions taking place at the hearings, but said Chief has “been cooperative with all local officials to move this project along, regardless of whether something is within their purview of authority.” Much of the concern expressed by the community about the plans for the two pipelines and associated facilities has centered on the presence of certain chemicals, including the odorizing agent mercaptan, in tanks at the site. The Dallas School Board passed a motion stating its opposition to Chief’s planned, but later scrapped, compressor station. It also paid an attorney to repre-

309

Y OUNT C G Y MIN WYO NE COUNT R LUZE

WILLIAMS PROPOSED PIPELINE ROUTE

DALLAS TWP.

FRANKLIN

KEY

N

WILLIAMS PIPELINE CHIEF PIPELINE

CHIEF PROPOSED PIPELINE ROUTE

309 415

LAKE LEHMAN

INTERSTATE PIPELINES

EXISTING TRANSCO PIPELINE DALLAS SCHOOL DISTRICT CAMPUS

RIVER/CREEK KINGSTON

DALLAS

sent the board at a hearing when the board’s solicitor couldn’t attend due to a scheduling conflict. “The board was not in favor of the compressor station or the metering stations when they included the slop tanks or the mercaptan tanks or any other chemical storage on site,” said Dallas School Board member Karen Kyle. “My understanding is that Chief alone is before the zoning hearing board and they have re-

moved any of those things the board was objected to.” Kyle said the board will continue to make the safety and welfare of students its first priority, but will respect the township’s decisions regarding zoning. Williams is hoping to receive approval soon because the company’s pipeline is scheduled to go online in two months. Gittins said Chief had hoped to have broken ground on its pipeline in Dal-

HIGHWAYS MUNICIPAL BORDERS

las Township by now. “There’s gas in Susquehanna County that is curtailed, or bottled or shut in because there is no pipeline to transport it … those are royalties that are not being paid in Susquehanna County today,” Dickinson said. “They’re shut in dollars to Williams, so we’re excited; they’re shut in dollars to Cabot, but they’re shut in also to landowners and taxpayers and school boards.”


CMYK

PEOPLE

SECTION

timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

B

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

TOM MOONEY REMEMBER WHEN

It’s wagons ho for ‘Maverick’ and ‘Gunsmoke’

N

Stephanie Jones, 48, of Burton, Mich., and associate director of pre-college programs at Kettering University in Flint, rides her 2006 Harley-Davidson Softail Deluxe in Flint, Mich. MCT PHOTO

Record numbers of women learning and loving to ride in mid-life By PATRICIA MONTEMURRI Detroit Free Press

D

ETROIT — Janice Perzigian began 2011 on a quest to find out what makes people happy. “I can’t tell you how many people said it was the freedom of riding a motorcycle, the wind in their face, even just looking at their motorcycle that made them happy,” recounts Perzigian, the 48-year-old director of marketing and public relations for Cornerstone Schools in Detroit. By April, she had signed up for a motorcycle riding class at Motor City Harley-Davidson in Farmington Hills, Mich. Before the class even

started, Perzigian shelled out $18,000 for a 2011 Fat Boy Lo and another $5,000 to customize it to her petite frame. “It’s fabulous,” gushes Perzigian, of Royal Oak, Mich. “It fits my personality — sophisticated, yet with some attitude and some style. It’s got a bit of shine, a bit of chrome. People come running up to see it.” Women in Michigan are riding motorcycles in record numbers. In the past 10 years, the number of licensed Michigan bikers who are women has nearly doubled, from about 37,000 to 64,000 — a trend that also plays out nationally. Thanks to women like Perzigian, the stereo-

type of the “biker chick” — that good-time floozy content riding the back of the bike — is fading into the distance. “While many women first learned to enjoy motorcycling sitting behind a man, today’s female biker doesn’t want to ask for rides anymore,” says Jennifer Loberman, 40, who left a career in banking and rode her motorcycle into a new job as marketing director for Motor City Harley-Davidson. “She wants to choose when she’s going, where she’s going and who she’s going with.” Genevieve Schmitt, founder of the online See MOTORCYCLE, Page 10B

MEET FATHER GERALD GURKA

F

ather Gerald Gurka is the pastor at St. John The Baptist Church in Larksville. He is a graduate of John S. Fine High School in Nanticoke and King’s College, where he ma-

jored in literature. He also attended St. Pius X Seminary in Dalton and Mount St. Mary’s Seminary in Maryland. He was ordained a priest in 1980 and, four years ago, received a master’s degree in creative writing from Wilkes University. Gurka, 56, has served at numerous parishes within the diocese and has been at St. John’s for 10 years.

DON CAREY/ THE TIMES LEADER

When did you first begin to feel a calling to the priesthood? “I thought about it in grade school. You’d see the priest in church, and I was an altar server, and I just thought it was neat to do something for God. God blesses us with so many gifts and blessings, and I thought about the Bible and the stories of the disciples following him. I thought, ‘God does so much for us. It would be nice to so something for Him.’ And that started at an early age.” What are the things that you enjoy the most

about your ministry? “The joy of being able to introduce people to God, especially with the RCIA (Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults) program, where people come back to church. It’s also the joy of helping people make faith a part of their life and helping them realize that faith isn’t magic, and that God isn’t a magician with lighting bolts out to get you. Faith is really common-sensical. Faith is a loving relationship. And many times, we don’t think of that as God. We kind of think of God as the gatekeeper and that he’s out to punish us or reward us, but it’s not that. It’s a lifestyle of trust and love. And if I can help people experience that .. that’s the greatest joy.” Your love for writing has crossed paths with your work as a pastor. You’ve written plays that have been presented at your

church at Christmastime, Easter and during the summer bazaar. All have a message of faith, yet some are more lighthearted. In fact, today at 2 p.m. at the bazaar, members of St. John’s will be presenting “The Pierogi Wedding, Part 2.” Can you tell us a little about it? “It’s entirely new. Even if you didn’t see the first one, it stands on its own. The plot is Charles Dickens’ ‘Great Expectations’ meets ‘The Adams Family,’ with a twist of ‘Harry Potter,’ Lemony Snicket, ‘Doctor Doolittle’ and ‘Star Wars.’ " That’s quite a combo. What is it that inspires you to write? “I just enjoy sharing a story. I love creating characters, or researching characters. And I love the fact that we become of another time and See MEET, Page 10B

ews Flash: TV networks to offer more of the same old stuff this season. The presidents of NBC, CBS, ABC, ESPN, CNN and other major outlets glance nervously about my oak-paneled Rockefeller Center conference room. They know I am mightily displeased. They probably have visions of moving vans stopping in front of their Hollywood mansions, while tow trucks hook up their Rolls Royces. “Ladies and gentlemen,” I say to them, drawing out my words as they sweat, “here are my orders for the fall TV programming schedule. Anyone who drags his feet will be — shall we say — ‘canceled.’” I draw a finger across my throat, and the air is rent by gasps. You can’t imagine how pleased I was by my sudden appointment as grand high lord and majesty of American TV programming. At last I can restore sanity to the airwaves. But back to the executives. “First,” I say, “you will restore my all-time favorite comedy show, ���Caesar’s Hour.’ I don’t care where you get the people to replace Sid Caesar and Carl Reiner. It was creative, imaginative, topical and featured actors who honed their skills in clubs and resorts. Carol Burnett and Dick Van Dyke were also fantastic: I want them back, too.” I pause, waiting for their hands to stop quivering so they can write things down on the cheap notepads I’ve given them. “Remember the westerns?” I smile. “What ever happened to the cowboys and lawmen?” The execs all look at one another with that “not I, not I” expression meaning that every last one of them is guilty as sin. “We will have ‘Maverick’ again, I say. “We will also have ‘Wagon Train’ and ‘Gunsmoke’ and ‘Bonanza.’ Understand, kemo sabe?” Boy, I’m good at tightening the screws. “And remember those soap operas you killed because too many people over 35 were watching them? Well, they’re back, too. Put that in your front loader and wash it.” A man in an Armani suit raises a shaky hand. “But sssssssir,” he stammers. “Wwwwhere will we get all the time for these old … I mean, please forgive me, sir, these ccccclassic shows?” I’m glad the sniveling knave spoke up. That was my next point. “Effective within 72 hours, reality and talk-info programming will be cut to one hour a week per network. That includes you, History Channel. You will also inform all NBA teams that they will play the final two minutes of every televised game in 120 seconds flat — no timeouts, even for injury. News will be delivered in concise 15-minute packages. Panels of analysts from political primaries to Eagles football are banned.” The executives sway in their chairs, moaning piteously. I almost feel sorry for the bums, but I have a responsibility to my fellow viewers. “Because we need some food for thought. We will bring back ‘All in the Family’ and ‘The Smothers Brothers.’ You say you don’t have the right people? FIND THEM,” I hiss, leaning menacingly toward the cowering network honchos. I notice one wimp trying to hide. “You, from ESPN, the ‘Friday Night Fights’ start next week – from Madison Square Garden. And make sure there’s a strong undercard.” You know, I think this is working. By the time I ask “Who’s going to bring back Bishop Sheen?” they all raise their hands and shout “I, sir.” Ah, the golden age returns. I’m heading for the store to buy some chips and sodas. Glass bottles of soda. Don’t touch that dial.

Tom Mooney is a Times Leader columnist. Reach him at tmooney2@ptd.net.


CMYK PAGE 2B

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

O

C

C

A

S

I

O

N

S

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

Johnson, Miller Rothman, Bender

H

eather Rothman and Aron Bender, together with their families, announce their engagement and approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Howard and Gillian Rothman, West Pittston. She is the granddaughter of Daisy Elizabeth Day and the late Charles Ronald Day, London, England, and the late Katherine and Charles Rothman, Plymouth. The prospective groom is the son of Norman and Linda Bender, Hanover Township. He is the grandson of the late Frances and Samuel Rubin, Wilkes-Barre, and the late Lillian and Morris Bender, Wyoming. The bride-to-be is a 2004 graduate of Wyoming Area High School and is pursuing a marketing degree at Misericordia University. She is employed by Intermetro Industries. The prospective groom is a 2000 graduate of Wyoming Valley West High School. He is a 2006 graduate of Wilkes University, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in computer science. He is employed by Mohegan Sun. The couple will exchange vows on April 22, 2012, at Temple B’nai B’rith, Kingston.

Mae Perles celebrates 100th birthday

M

ae Perles, Kingston, celebrated her 100th birthday August 11. Born and raised in Kingston, she is the former Mae Wyce, the eldest of nine children who include Nell Corey, New Jersey, and Ray Wyce, Florida. Deceased sisters and brothers include Judy Gallagher, Aldona Washko, Delia Babcock, Milda Scalise, Albie Wyce and William Wyce. Mae was formerly employed by Sheldon’s Pharmacy and Arlan’s Department Store. She is the oldest lifetime member of the former St. Mary’s Annunciation Church, Kingston, and had the sad honor of locking the doors to her beloved church in November of 2009. Mae has six children: Nona Carey, Kingston; Patricia Fetko, Larksville; David Perles, Panama City, Fla.; Donna Chadwick, Plymouth; Cyndi Boatright, Mission Viejo, Calif.; and the late William Perles. She also has 12 grandchildren, one deceased grandson, and 16 greatgrandchildren. Mae enjoys reading, cooking (especially her delicious soups), shopping, her beautiful flower garden, going out to dinner, and spending time with family and friends. A family luncheon was held at Cooper’s Restaurant, Pittston, in Mae’s honor attended by family and friends from California, Florida, New Jersey, Nevada and Montana. Guests were entertained by musician Peter Truszowski who played some of Mae’s favorite songs. Mae’s daughter, Cyndi, surprised her with a limousine ride to and from her party. A balloon release was also done by Mae’s family to honor her on her very special day.

BIRTHS

ohn and Margaret Johnson, proudly announce JtheNanticoke, wedding of their daughter,

Kristine, to Jonathan Miller. The wedding was held July 18 on the Carnival Fascination cruise ship, Jacksonville, Fla. The happy couple resides in their new house in Canton, N.Y., where Krissy is an athletic trainer at St. Lawrence University and Jonathan is a manager at Price Chopper.

Pre-schoolers graduate at Cookie Corner The Cookie Corner, West Wyoming, held its 31st graduation and end-of-the-year programs for all pre-school students. The programs included songs, rhythm band, poetry, sign language and the presentation of certificates and diplomas. Refreshments were served at the conclusion of each program for children and guests. Staff members are: pre-kindergarten: Toni Tabone, teacher; Anne Schwartz, assistant teacher; and Ellen Campbell, teacher assistant; three- and four-year-old groups: Joan Urban, teacher; and Doris Conant and Theresa Guzik, teacher assistants; and pre-school day care staff: Doreen Gay, teacher; Nicole Friscia, Sue Lanning and Katie Lampman, teacher assistants. Morning pre-kindergarten graduates (top), from left, first row, are Logan Aloe, Grant Stegman, Allyson Spangenberg, Mikayla Cresho, Kinley Pocceschi, Joshua Jones, Olivia Rucco and Julia Rucco. Second row: Sam Barrouk, Trevor Kruszka, Lily Byron, Alec Kapacs, Olivia, Noah Hiedcavage and Paige Minich. Third row: Olivia Garbush, Sadie Frusciante, Johnny Getzie, Niko Napkora, Logan Elick, Karlie Gustinucci, Michael Steinberger and Luke Barhight. Abigail Houston also graduated. Afternoon pre-kindergarten graduates (middle), from left, first row, are Tessa Kopetchny, Jennifer Passeri, Aiden Sheperis, Paul Stevenson, Madison Triola, Krista Sadowski and Kate Walters. Second row: Lillian Besancon, Leah Fox, Joseph Colarusso, Casey Burke, Nathan Swetz and Tyler Miller. Third row: Luke Hendrzak, Abigail Ford, Kaitlyn Reedy, Andrew Wilk, William Jones, Chase Reynolds and Benjamin Vols. Day care pre-kindergarten graduates (bottom), from left, first row, are Brady Noone, Emma Kuharchik, Benecio Carpentier, Nora Philbin and Matthew Rusinchak. Second row: Ava Busch, Camille Marianacci, Preston Klem, Dane Schutter, Abigail Butler, Jack Mulhern and Gabby Rogaski. Drew Dixon also graduated.

The Grays red and Charlotte Gray, Hanover Township, are celebrating F their 40th wedding anniversary

today, Aug. 14, 2011. They were married Aug. 14, 1971, in St. George’s Maronite Church, WilkesBarre, by the Rev. David El Mouallem. Mrs. Gray is the daughter of the late Liz and J. Paul Thomas. Mr. Gray is the son of the late Fred and Betty Gray. They have three children, Jennifer Keller and her husband, Bill, Hanover Township; Jeff Gray and his wife, Mindy, Hanover Township; and Kelly Kablick and her husband, John, Kingston. They have four grandchildren, Mason Gray, Sydney Keller, Tyler Keller and Cole Kablick. Mr. and Mrs. Gray celebrated their anniversary with a family dinner.

IN BRIEF PLAINS TWP.: Solomon/Plains Junior High School will hold its annual meet-and-greet open house 6:30 p.m. Aug. 22 at the school, 43 Abbott St. Parents, guardians and students in seventh and eighth grades are invited to attend. Attendees should enter through the gym entrance. All participants will have the opportunity to meet faculty, staff and administration of the school and to learn about all areas of the school environment. Discussions will take place on school policies and procedures, student activities and events and student athletics. The event is scheduled to conclude by 8 p.m. and a tour of the facility will be available. Light refreshments will be served. For more information contact the school at 826-7224.

ter, July 26.

Barre, a son, July 28.

Weislogel, Haley, Pittston, a daughter, July 26.

Gushock, RuthAnn and Albert, Nanticoke, a son, July 28.

Fitzpatrick, Kevonna and Lewis Levern Epps II, Wilkes-Barre, a son, July 26.

Guskiewicz, Esmeralda and William, Plymouth Township, a daughter, July 28.

Robinson, Stephanie and Albert Neely, Nanticoke, a daughter, July 27.

Tressler, Katie and William, Pocono Lake, a son, July 28.

Jackubowski, Michelle and Michael, Swoyersville, a daughter, July 25.

Carney, Danielle and Andy, West Hazleton, a daughter, July 27.

McCarroll, Colleen and Andrew Ridley, Edwardsville, a son, July 28.

Rogan, Amber and Edward, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, July 25.

Geiger, Alexis A. and Kevin W., WilkesBarre, a son, July 27.

Viera, Jennifer and Norberto Ogando, Wilkes-Barre, a son, July 29.

Williams, Adrienne and Thomas, Dallas, a daughter, July 25.

Lindbuchler, D’Andra and Fred, Wyoming, a son, July 28.

Muhammad, Aisha and Justin McIver, Exeter, a son, July 29.

Siegfried, Desiree and Robin, Shickshinny, a son, July 25.

Duda, Kristen and Thomas Brewer, Nanticoke, a daughter, July 28.

Kauwell, Megan and Jason, Dallas, a daughter, July 29.

Shultz, Megan and John, Dallas, a daugh-

Shefler, April and Jason Asbury, Wilkes-

Gadola, Marie and Michael Onuschak,

Nesbitt Women’s and Children’s Center at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital Wandel, Jessica and Shawn, Edwardsville, a daughter, July 25.

Hazleton, a son, July 29. Schultz, Christina and Shawn Elliott, Hanover Township, twin son and daughter, July 29. McManus, Leita and Shawn, Kingston, a daughter, July 29. Shea, Sarah and Brandon, Nanticoke, a daughter, July 30. Saunders, Nikki and Argus, Sweet Valley, a daughter, Aug. 2. Gober, Amanda and Adam Gottstein, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, Aug. 2. Krantz, Jenny and Kristopher Fox, Nanticoke, a son, Aug. 2. Min, Zhu Wen and Ming Zhi Lin, Pittston, a daughter, Aug. 2.

MEETINGS Wednesday WILKES-BARRE: E.L. Meyers High School Class of 1952 1 p.m. at Norm’s Pizza and Eatery.

Sept. 6 MOUNTAIN TOP: The Rice Elementary PTA 6 p.m. in the school library. Note: time has been changed from previous meetings. All parents, grandparents and guardians are encouraged to attend. Babysitting will be available. For more information contact Annette Weiss at 868-0245.


K ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

O

C

C

A

S

I

O

N

S

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 PAGE 3B

The Zerfosses

Evangelista, Montigney

Zoolkoski, Swiney

anelle Elizabeth Montigney and Brian Paul Evangelista were united Jin marriage on May 7, 2011, at the

Hayfield House, Penn State WilkesBarre Campus. The bride is the daughter of Bernard and Cheryl Montigney, Hunlock Creek. The groom is the son of John and JoAnn Evangelista, Taylor. The bride was escorted down the aisle by her father. She chose her cousin, Amanda Montigney, as maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Grace Ciak-Linton, Molly Bybee and Aubrie Pfirman, all friends of the bride. Brynn Evangelista, daughter of the groom, was the flower girl. The groom chose his son, Chase Evangelista, as best man. Groomsmen were Bernard Montigney, brother of the bride, and Chris Canfield and Jason Stants, friends of the groom. Ring bearer was Chase Evangelista, son of the groom. A shower was given by the mother of the bride, family of the bride and bridal party at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, Dallas. The rehearsal dinner was hosted by the parents of the bride at their home. The cocktail hour and reception were held at A Touch of Class, Wilkes-Barre. The bride is a 2005 graduate of Northwest Area High School. She graduated from Misericordia University with a degree in biology. She is employed at Sam’s Club, Wilkes-Barre. The groom is a 2001 graduate of Riverside High School. He is employed at Gress Refrigerated Service, Scranton. The couple honeymooned on a Royal Caribbean cruise to Bermuda and the Caribbean. They reside in Hunlock Creek.

Max R. Wendolowski baptized

Betsy Zoolkoski, SahuarC arlita,and Ariz., formerly of Mountain

Top, announce the marriage of their daughter, Julie Ann, to Kelly Ford Swiney, son of Mary Altieri, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, and William Swiney, Dove Canyon, Calif. Julie and Kelly were married Dec. 4, 2010, in St. Bede’s Chapel on the campus of The College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, Va. Julie is a graduate of Crestwood High School. She earned a Bachelor of Science degree in business administration from The College of William & Mary and a Master of Science degree in education from the University of Massachusetts. She is the head field hockey coach at Slippery Rock University. Kelly is a graduate of Walsh Jesuit High School. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in managerial economics from Allegheny College and a Master of Science degree in sports management from California University of Pennsylvania. He is the head baseball coach at Allegheny College. A bridal shower was held at the Top of The Eighties by Beverly Tinney, cousin of the bride. The groom’s aunt, Mary Altieri, hosted a shower at her Stow, Ohio, residence. The groom’s parents entertained at a rehearsal dinner in the William & Mary Alumni House. Following the dinner, Carl Zoolkoski Jr. held a welcome reception for out-of-town guests at the Alumni House. Marita Charles, aunt of the bride, hosted a breakfast for the bridesmaids in the Williamsburg Hospitality House. An evening reception was held at Ford’s Colony Country Club. The couple honeymooned to Australia and New Zealand. They reside in Meadville, Pa.

r. and Mrs. Frank Zerfoss, Wilkes-Barre, will celebrate M Fabian, Migliorino their 25th wedding anniversary Aug. Stout, Regnosky 16, 2011. arly Fabian and Michael MiglioThey were married August 16, C rino, together with their par- J ohn and Dodie Regnosky, Dallas, 1986, in St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, ents, announce their engagement announce the engagement of their Mountain Top. Maid of honor was and approaching marriage. daughter, Heather Regnosky, Mill Cathy Naessig, cousin of the bride, and best man was Charles Perez, brother of the bride. Frank is the son of Frank I. Zerfoss, Bloomsburg, and the late Lois Zerfoss. He is a graduate of Crestwood High School and attended Luzerne County Community College. After serving in the United States Air Force, Frank was associated with the family business, Frank’s Market, and has been employed at the Lord and Taylor Distribution Center for the past 20 years. Mary Lou is the daughter of Charles and Mary Lou Perez, WilkesBarre. She is a graduate of Meyers High School and King’s College, magna cum laude. Mary Lou has been employed as the director of the Foster Grandparent Program, Luzerne and Wyoming Counties, for over 22 years. She was the 2010 recipient of the King’s College Alumni Award for Service to Society. They are the proud parents of a daughter, Jocelyn Zerfoss, a college student and an employee at Wegman’s. They commemorated their anniversary with a con-validation ceremony in St. Nicholas Roman Catholic Church and a luncheon at the Genetti Hotel and Conference Center. Following the festivities, they celebrated with a family vacation in Myrtle Beach, S.C.

The bride-to-be is daughter of Dr. Thomas and Carol Fabian, Port Charlotte, Fla. She is the granddaughter of Katherine and Nichols Fabian, Melbourne, Fla., and Phyllis and Vern Russell, Venice, Fla. The prospective groom is the son of Diana Giovannini, Yatesville, and the late Ronald Migliorino. He is the grandson of Dora Giovannini, Dallas; the late Joseph Giovannini; and the late Anthony and Betty Migliorino. Carly is a 2000 graduate of Port Charlotte High School, Florida. She earned her Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry and biology from the University of Tampa in 2004. She performed four years of graduate studies at The New England College of Optometry, Boston, and earned her Doctor of Optometry Degree in 2010. She works as an optometrist for Pearle Vision, Peabody, Mass. Michael is a 2000 graduate of Wyoming Area High School. He earned his Bachelor of Science degree in marketing and advertising from the University of Tampa in 2004. He works as an integrated marketing and communications manager for Checkers Drive-In Restaurants Inc., Tampa, Fla. The couple resides in Tampa, Fla. They will exchange vows Nov. 12, 2011, at The Ritz Carlton, Naples, Fla.

Hall, to Andrew Stout, Lock Haven. The bride-to-be is the granddaughter of Jack and Mary Regnosky, West Pittston, and the late George and Jane Hackling, Kunkle. The prospective groom is the son of Mary Jacobs, Hughesville; the stepson of Michael Jacobs, Dallas; and the son of James Stout, Oreville. He is the grandson of James and Louise Stout, Shavertown; Jean Thompson and the late Donald Thompson Jr., Williamsport; and the step-grandson of Nelson Jacobs, Myerstown, and Theresa Jacobs, Williamsport. The bride-to-be is a 2006 graduate of Dallas High School and 2010 graduate of Mansfield University of Pennsylvania, graduating summa cum laude with a bachelor’s degree in elementary education. She is employed as a substitute teacher for Keystone Central School District, Jersey Shore Area School District and Loyalsock Township School District. The prospective groom is a 2008 graduate of Dallas High School and is pursuing his bachelor’s degree in recreational management at Lock Haven University of Pennsylvania. He is employed as a counselor for Krislund Camp, Madisonburg. The couple is planning a June 2012 wedding.

Wendolowski, son of M axRayRyan and Kelly Wendolowski, Mountain Top, was

baptized on July 10, 2011, at St. Jude’s Parish, Mountain Top, by the Rev. Joseph Evanko. Godparents are Aly Byorick and Ken Roman, both of Nanticoke. Max was born on May 17, 2011, at Moses Taylor Hospital in Scranton. He is the grandson of Barbara Byorick, Nanticoke; the late Frank Byorick; and the late Raymond and Ann Wendolowski. He has four brothers, Robby, Ryan, Matthew and Luke and a sister, Haley Rae. Max’s family and friends celebrated his baptism with a garden party at his home given by his parents.

Cali G. Oravic baptized Oravic, daughter of Josh Nicole Oravic, Jenkins TownC aliandGrace ship, was baptized July 31, 2011, by Deacon Jean at St. Jude Church in Mountain Top. Cali’s godparents are Melissa Richardson, aunt, and Marco Ciavarella, uncle. Cali was born on May 25, 2011. She is the granddaughter of Mark and Cindy Ciavarella and Rick and Maureen Oravic. Cali has a brother, Chase, 2.

Henrie, Fahley cott Henrie and Shelley Fahley, together with their families, are S pleased to announce their engage-

McArdle, Jasnoski llen Tosh, West Pittston, and Charles Jasnoski, Deltona, Fla., E are pleased to announce the engage-

ment and upcoming marriage of their daughter, Ann Jasnoski, to John McArdle, son of Edward and Susan McArdle, Duryea. The bride-to-be is a graduate of Pittston Area High School and earned a bachelor’s degree in English from Elizabethtown College. She also earned her master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from Bloomsburg University. She is an English teacher in the Scranton School District. The prospective groom is a graduate of Pittston Area High School. He is employed at Fox Hill Country Club in Exeter. The couple will exchange vows Oct. 1, 2011, at the Nativity of Our Lord Parish in Duryea.

ment. The prospective groom is the son of George Henrie, Thornhurst, and Cheryl Winters, Philadelphia. He is a graduate of Bishop Egan and served four years of active duty with the United States Army in Germany. Scott has been employed for the last 12 years with a local security company. The bride-to-be has one son, Jude Fahley, and is the daughter of the late Francis “Red” and Judith Czarnecki, Sugar Notch. She is a graduate of Hanover Area High School and earned a Bachelor of Business Administration degree from Wilkes-University and a Master of Public Administration degree from Marywood University. She is selfemployed. The couple will exchange wedding vows September, 2011, at the First Presbyterian Church, Wilkes-Barre, with a reception to follow at the Woodlands Inn and Resort.

Zimmerman, Hoffman atie Zimmerman and Jason Hoffman, together with their families, K announce their engagement and

approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Keith and Terry Zimmerman, York, Pa. Katie is the granddaughter of Jack Ginter and the late Virginia Ginter, York, Pa., and Roy and Elizabeth Zimmerman, Lakeland, Fla. Katie is a 2002 graduate of West York Area High School and a 2006 graduate of Penn State Harrisburg. She is employed by Barnes & Noble and manages the Penn State York and Penn State Hershey Medical Center bookstores. The prospective groom is the son of Paula Hoffman, Pittston, Pa., and Keith Hoffman, Exeter Township, Pa. Jason is the grandson of the late Mary and Ben Gritzen, West Wyoming, Pa., and Rose Hoffman and the late Edward Hoffman, Old Forge, Pa. Jason is a 2001 graduate of Wyoming Area High School and a 2006 graduate of Penn State Harrisburg. He is employed by Voith Turbo as an applications engineer. The couple is planning a 2012 wedding.

The Egberts

r. and Mrs. Richard Egbert, Mountain Top, formerly of Little M Falls, N.J., celebrated their 50th wed-

ding anniversary Aug. 12, 2011. Mrs. Egbert is the former Lillian Smith, daughter of the late William and Barbara Smith, Dorrance. Mr. Egbert is the son of the late George and Rose Egbert Jr., Caldwell, N.J. Mr. Egbert is retired from Singac Supply Plumbing and Heating, where he managed the company for 60 years. Mrs. Egbert is a retired senior tax accountant for ADP. They have a daughter, Robin, Budd Lake, N.J., and three grandchildren. A celebration dinner party for the anniversary couple was held at the Wright Township Fire Hall on Aug. 13, 2011.

SOCIAL PAGE GUIDELINES The Times Leader allows you to decide how your wedding notice reads, with a few caveats. Wedding announcements run in Sunday’s People section, with black-and-white photos, free of charge. Articles must be limited to 220 words, and we reserve the right to edit announcements that exceed that word count. Announcements

must be typed or submitted via www.timesleader.com. (Click on the "people" tab, then “weddings” and follow the instructions from there.) Submissions must include a daytime contact phone number and must be received within 10 months of the wedding date. We do not run first-year anniversary announcements or announcements of weddings that took place more than a year ago. (Wedding

photographers often can supply you with a black-and-white proof in advance of other album photographs.) All other social announcements must be typed and include a daytime contact phone number. Announcements of births at local hospitals are submitted by hospitals and published on Sundays.

Out-of-town announcements with local connections also are accepted. Photos are only accepted with baptism, dedication or other religious-ceremony announcements but not birth announcements. Engagement announcements must be submitted at least one month before the wedding date to guarantee publication and must include the wedding date. We

cannot publish engagement announcements once the wedding has taken place. Anniversary photographs are published free of charge at the 10th wedding anniversary and subsequent five-year milestones. Other anniversaries will be published, as space allows, without photographs.

Drop off articles at the Times Leader or mail to: The Times Leader People Section 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Questions can be directed to Kathy Sweetra at 829-7250 or e-mailed to people@timesleader.com.


CMYK SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

NAMES AND FACES earned the Outstanding AcaKelly Capece, Hanover Township; demic Award in History; and Susan GilroyO’Bell earned the Outstanding King, Ashley; Academic Award in Community and John Counseling. O’Bell, West Pittston, were Eric W. Hillard received the among the 34 Martin U. Dougherty Emerging graduate Leader Award students of at Penn State The UniWilkes-Barre’s Capece versity of annual StuScranton who dent Governwere honored ment Associfor their ation Leadacademic ership and achievements Athletics at the College Hillard Awards cereof Graduate mony. The award, established and Continby Florence C. Dougherty in uing EducaGilroy-King memory of her late husband, tion comhonors a student who has mencement ceremonies. Cademonstrated the qualities of pece earned the Outstanding leadership, service, scholarAcademic Award in Family ship, citizenship and character Nurse Practitioner; Gilroy-King through involvement in cam-

pus and community activities. Joseph J. Homza Jr. received the John R. Murphy Award for Excellence in Leadership and Service at Penn State Wilkes-Barre’s annual Student Government Association Leadership and Athletics Homza Awards ceremony. The award, sponsored by Rick Barry, a former Penn State Wilkes-Barre student and Walker Award recipient, recognizes a graduating senior whose outstanding qualities of leadership, service, scholarship, citizenship and character have been directed into programs and service on campus and in the community.

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

Bu ying Gold Jew elry D ia m onds,Pla tinu m , Pu re S ilver,S terling, Indu stria l & Coin S ilver

Y

N

E

W

S

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

A little water never hurt anyone A hearing device like no other

Every few years, technology takes a significant leap forward. Thanks to Nanotech™, the industry’s most robust moisture protection, ReSound Alera™ is protected from corrosion, inside and out. The most advanced features ever offered by ReSound, including 2.4GHz wireless capabilities, are now even safer from the elements. You can improve your hearing in even the most difficult listening environments. Sound is crisper, cleaner and works more like natural hearing to provide a truly advanced listening experience.

See the revolutionary ReSound Alera Hear the exceptional surround sound quality Learn if ReSound Alera is right for you Call us today to schedule your appointment - space is limited!

403 Third Avenue Kingston, PA

(570) 714-2656

1132 Memorial Highway Dallas, PA www.asbyzeigler.com

(570) 675-8113

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

T

A ntiqu e Jewelry (Brok en OK) Dental Gold,Gold Filled Eyeglasses,Etc.

K IN G T U T ’S

G O L D R E PA IR H U T

700016

824-4150

322 N. PENN A VE. W -B

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

LUCAS FARMS

Still In Hanover Twp. & Now Another Location In Shickshinny! Call 825-9720 for more info!

Both Locations Open 7 Days a Week

LUCAS FARMS SWEET CORN IT’S YUMMY! $3.99 DOZ.

PICKLING CUCUMBERS

ONE WEEK ONLY!! LOWEST PRICE OF THE SEASON

ZUCCHINI GREEN BELL PEPPERS CABBAGE

VINE RIPENED TOMATOES 5 LB. WHITE POTATOES ASPARAGUS WHOLE SEEDLES WATERMELON

69¢ lb.

3/ $100

79¢ lb. 39¢lb. 99¢ lb.

250 $ 49 2 $ 50 3 $

bunch

Fan Us On Facebook! Open Everyday 9am -6pm Specials Good thru 8/20/11

702648

610 Nanticoke Street, Hanover Twp. Breslau Section • 825-9720

You’re Invited to the...

Experience the

Irem Country Club Bridal Show

OASIS

On Sunday, September 11

Noon until 4 p.m. in our outdoor covered pavilion

The perfect setting for your perfect day

Tour our beautiful grand ballroom throughout the day.

- Region’s only High-Field Open MRI - 270 degree unobstructed view - Manages a wide array of patients, including children and adults up to 650 lbs.

Registration is free! Come meet an array of you make your dream day come true.

Choose NEPA Imaging Center for diagnostic confidence and complete patient comfort.

*Must be present to be eligible for door prizes

Registration F orm

___________________________________________________________________________ ___ __________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________ _ You may also register via email: lknauer@iremcountryclub.com or phone: 675-1134, ext. xt 100. 100

702776

Wedding

ls Imagee by Dave Gardner of Stills

COUNTRY CLUB

WHERE PATIENTS ARE PEOPLE

296477 701398

PAGE 4B


CMYK âž›

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

N

E

W

S

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 PAGE 5B

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

Meyers Class of ’66 will hold reunion Sept. 3 Tiahma Rasmus-Bieble

Nolan J. Hedglin

Skylar B. Urbanski

Gianna Donahue

Tiahma Rasmus-Bieble, daughter of D’andra Rasmus and John Bieble Jr., Nanticoke, celebrated her seventh birthday Aug. 10. Tiahma is a granddaughter of Becky Rasmus, Nanticoke, and John and Michele Bieble, Plymouth. She is a great-granddaughter of Alan and Rita Rasmus, Nanticoke, and Leroy and Anna Webb, Wilkes-Barre. Tiahma is a great-great-granddaughter of Dorothy Rasmus, Nanticoke. She has two sisters, Juliauna, 3, and Shaylah, 7 months.

Nolan James Hedglin, son of Jim and Melanie Hedglin, Dallas, is celebrating his sixth birthday today, Aug. 14. Nolan is a grandson of Richard and Kay Love, Dallas, and the late James and Ann Hedglin. He is a greatgrandson of Evelyn Love, Pittston; the late Percy and Bessie Love; Audrey Rogers, Vernon; and the late Robert Rogers. Nolan has a sister, Madison, 4, and two brothers, Joseph, 23, and Jimi, 27.

Skylar Bethany Urbanski, daughter of Melissa Pilch, Nanticoke, and Keith Urbanski, Warrior-Run, is celebrating her fourth birthday today, Aug. 14. Skylar is a granddaughter of Donna Pilch, Nanticoke; Frank and Erin Pilch, Plains Township; and Dave and Carol Conklin, Hanover Township. She is a great-granddaughter of Rosemary Pilch, Warrior Run, and the late Frank Pilch Sr.

Gianna Donahue, daughter of Bob Donahue and Jamie Donahue, Nanticoke, is celebrating her eighth birthday today, Aug. 14. Gianna is a granddaughter of Bob and Tierney Donahue, Nanticoke, and Ed and Karen Sumski, Scranton. She is a great-granddaughter of James and Phyllis Knight, Nanticoke, and Tillie Smith, Scranton. Gianna has a sister, Marli, 2.

Alexis D. Lecitshon Alexis Dayana Lecitshon, daughter of Deseray Kearney and Francis Lecitshon Jr., celebrated her third birthday Aug. 1 1. Alexis is a granddaughter of Diane and Tom Sepkoski, Grace Lecitshon and the late Francis Lecitshon Sr. She is a great-granddaughter of Carolyn Kearney. Alexis has a sister, Trinity, 1 1 months.

Olivia G. Davis

Natalie A. Vincelli

Ryan M. Stevens

Olivia Grace Davis, daughter of Judy Davis, Hanover Township, and Alex Greiner, Garnet Valley, is celebrating her third birthday today, Aug. 14. Olivia is a granddaughter of Audrey Davis, Hanover Township; the late Jack Davis; Vivian Leimsider, Garnet Valley; and the late Allen Leimsider.

Natalie Alicia Grace Vincelli, daughter of Christine and Gary Vincelli Jr., Shavertown, is celebrating her fifth birthday today, Aug. 14. Natalie is a granddaughter of Cecelia Vincelli, Dallas; the late Gary Vincelli; and Frank and Charlene Panuccio, Shavertown. She is a greatgranddaughter of Beatrice Romanowski, Fairview, N.C. Natalie has a brother, Nicholas, 6.

Ryan Mark Stevens, son of Mark and Melissa Stevens, Kingston, is celebrating his eighth birthday today, Aug. 14. Ryan is a grandson of Nancy Mazzillo, Kingston, and Richard and Joanne Stevens, Wilkes-Barre. He is a greatgrandson of John and Nancy Borsavage, Plymouth, and Viola Stevens, Mountain Top. Ryan has a sister, Rylie, 6.

E.L. Meyers High School Class of 1966 is planning its 45th anniversary reunion 6-1 1:30 p.m. Sept. 3 at the Genetti Hotel and Conference Center, Wilkes-Barre. An icebreaker will take place 7 p.m. Sept. 2 at the Barney Inn, Horton and Barney streets, Wilkes-Barre. Anyone interested in attending the reunion should call Jane Hirel at 8237654 or Janice Brizgint at 822-8795 to make your reservation. Reservations will be accepted until Aug. 20. Reunion committee members at the last meeting, from left, first row, are Irene Kruger Race, Diane Holodick Demchak, Janice Olex Brizgint and Judy Isaac Seroska. Second row: Scott Smith, Jane Rau Hirel, Ned Mcguire, Ron Lidondici, Rick Harris, Ron VanWhy and Bob Aston.

Delta Kappa Gamma chapter awards scholarship The Alpha Rho Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma recently held its spring dinner meeting at Costello’s Restaurant, Edwardsville. After the dinner a scholarship was awarded to Andrea Buchman, a local education major. A short business meeting took place after the scholarship presentation. From left, are Cecelia Chmiola, chairman of the scholarship committee; Buchman; and Kim Socash, co-president of the Alpha Rho Chapter.

Students complete University of Success program Madelyn I. Burdett Madelyn Ivy Burdett, daughter of Matthew and Melissa BenfanteBurdett, Pittston, is celebrating her fourth birthday today, Aug. 14. Madelyn is a granddaughter of Sandy and Carol Benfante, Harding, and Bob and Marlene Chamberlain, Pittston.

CiarĂĄn P. Bilbow CiarĂĄn Patrick Bilbow, son of Kimberly and Patrick Bilbow, Avoca, celebrated his sixth birthday Aug. 9. CiarĂĄn is a grandson of Eugene Philbin and the late Susan Philbin, Avoca, and the late Robert and Doris Bilbow, Pittston. He has two brothers, Brady Quinn, 3, and Reilly Robert, 8 months.

Brandi L. and Donald D. Shovlin III

Brandi Lynn and Donald David Shovlin III, daughter and son of Donald Shovlin, Wilkes-Barre, and Elaine Shovlin, Mountain Top, are celebrating their 10th birthdays today, Aug. 14. Brandi and Donald are the grandchildren of Joyce Arnold, Mountain Top; the late Charles Arnold; and Donald and Kathy Shovlin, both of Wilkes-Barre. They have a brother, Brian, 21.

Four middle school students from Luzerne County recently completed the University of Success Summer Institute at The University of Scranton. The program provides mentoring and tutoring in academics and social and cultural opportunities designed to motivate students to complete high school successfully and to enroll in postsecondary education. It is sponsored by the Prudential Foundation, Met Life Foundation, Charles Frueauff Foundation and the McGowan Charitable Fund. Participants, from left: Margaret Loughney, precollege program director; Andrea Mantione, director of Leahy Community Health and Family Center at The University of Scranton; Kasey Barry, Mountain Top, Crestwood Middle School; Cristopher Herrera, Kingston, and Devon Dante, Edwardsville, both from Wyoming Valley West Middle School; and Dominick Harvey, Wilkes-Barre, GAR Memorial Junior/Senior High School.

GUIDELINES

Children’s birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge

dr. penny mericle dr. samantha abod s.s brac .

e

place

We cannot return photos submitted for publication in community news, including birthday photos, occasions photos and all publicity photos. Please do not submit precious or original professional photographs that

require return because such photos can become damaged, or occasionally lost, in the production process. Send to: Times Leader Birthdays, 15 North Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 187110250.

2006 Orthopedic Journal Study

62% of Patients who used the

Bionicare Knee System

DID NOT HAVE KNEE REPLACEMENT SURGERY

www.bionicare.com

NEED BRACES?

190 welles street • forty fort, pa 18704 (570) 287-8700 braceplaceorthodontics.com

PAIN FREE KNEE CONSULTATION

Frank A. Berman, D.D.S.      

 $)'%* $ %$)# "( %$('+) + "(( -&$( + $  ". ) + ,. *( $ "' '( )% $)". ()' )$ )) $ $ +' ) # % %$".  #%$)(

FREE INITIAL CONSULTATION

 ")'$) + )')#$) %' "& &$ ) $)( ,% '     $)%"'$) , )  &&'%+ '" &&" $    ) " $ (*")(  %(#)  $ $'" $) ()'. %' ) $) ' # ".  # " !%+'(  ')   *# $'( $) ()  $ ) %$%'  '%+ ' Frank A. Berman D.D.S.  ") $)" '%+ ' %() %)' $(*'$( &)

NEUROPATHY CENTER

517 Pierce Street, Pierce Plaza, Kingston

KINGSTON • (570) 287-5560

www.frankberman.com

Michele Holincheck CRNP

Phone 570-718-6000

273571

name, age and birthday, parents’, grandparents’ and great-grandparents’ names and their towns of residence, any siblings and their ages. Don’t forget to include a daytime contact phone number.

If your child’s photo and birthday announcement is on this page, it will automatically be entered into the “Happy Birthday Shopping Spree� drawing for a $50 certificate. One winner will be announced on the first of the month on this page.

296494

Photographs and information must be received two full weeks before your child’s birthday. To ensure accurate publication, your information must be typed or computer-generated. Include your child’s

WIN A $50 GIFT CERTIFICATE


CMYK PAGE 6B

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

P

E

O

P

L

E

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

CLICK: AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY’S ENDURE BIKE-A-THON

Oren Helbok and Brian Hufnagle

Cathy Stanski and Skip Sensbach

FRED ADAMS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

T

he third annual Endure Bike-a-thon, sponsored by the American Cancer Society, drew hundreds of cyclists Sunday morning in Wilkes-Barre. Starting at Wilkes University, riders took off on any one of three different routes that varied in length and difficulty. The most challenging was a 62-mile course along the Sus-

quehanna River that also includeda climb up to Lake Winola. A 36-mile hilly course wound through the Back Mountain, while the 12-mile route went along the Susquehanna from the River Common to Hanover Township. This year’s event was expected to raise $30,000.

Kelly and Mike Adamshick

Ed and Nina Russo

Robert Shivers and Joseph Marchese

Matt Beekman and Kurt Kresge

OUT-OF-TOWN GRADUATIONS Kaplan University, Chicago, Ill. (Online)

Kathy Million, Shamokin, a bachelor’s degree in psychology. Lelenie Glover, Albrightsville, a Master of Arts degree in teacher education. Devon Graham, Tamaqua, an Associate of Applied Science degree in paralegal studies. Geanine Traband, Shickshinny, an Associate of Science degree in interdisciplinary studies. John Columbo, Mountain Top, a bachelor’s degree in business administration.

Lisa Stankevich-Jesse, Dallas, a Bachelor of Science degree in health sciences. Mary Quiggle-Pickering, Meshoppen, a bachelor’s degree in accounting.

College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, Va.

Jan Bartels, Meshoppen, a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree.

Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Va.

Savannah College of Art and Design, Savannah, Ga.

Shannon Dingle, Shavertown, a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in animation with a minor in technical direction.

Virginia-Maryland Regional

Stephanie Konecke, Wyoming, a Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry, magna cum laude. Megan Hoops, Mountain Top, a Bachelor of Arts degree in interdisciplinary studies. Gracemarie Mike, Shavertown, a Master of Arts degree in English.

OUT-OF-TOWN DEANS’ LISTS Colgate University, Hamilton, N.Y.

Bryce Mongeon, Mountain Top.

Hartwick College, Oneonta, N.Y.

Christian Laputka, Freeland.

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, N.Y.

Santina Betti, Jessup; Steven Anthony, Harveys Lake; Allison Welling, Duryea; Andrew Hess, Harding; Edward Leslie, WilkesBarre.

Looking for UGG’s

Black • Red • Silver Purple • Gold

158 Memorial Hwy. Shavertown

1.800.49.SHOES

704569

Classic Short ‘Sparkles’


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

N

E

W

S

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 PAGE 7B

University of Scranton announces Honors Program graduates SCRANTON: Local students recently graduated from the University of Scranton’s Honors Program. The program supports the university’s tradition of excellence and its dedication to freedom of inquiry and personal development. Students’ work in the Honors Program culminates with a year-long senior project. Samuel Calabrese, Exeter, completed the program with his thesis, “Lessee Accounting Standards.” He was mentored by Brian Carpenter, professor of accounting and Alperin Teaching Fellow. Calabrese majored in accounting with a minor in math. He has been accepted into the five-year MBA program at the university. Mae Chan, Kingston, presented her thesis, “Effects of Burial Time and Puncture Location on the Breaking Strength of Acorns.” She was mentored by Janice Voltzow, professor and chair of the biology department. Chan majored in biophysics with a minor in mathemat-

Chan

Gubbiotti

ics. She will attend the Pennsylvania College of Optometry at Salus University in the fall, where she received a Presidential Scholarship. Maria Gubbiotti, Falls, completed her thesis, “Isolation and Identification of Candidate Redox Receptor Proteins Using an Improved Phenylarsine Oxide Affinity Method.”ShewasmentoredbyTimothy Foley, associate professor of chemistry. Gubbiotti majored in biochemistry and cell and molecular biology. She was the recipient of the Goldwater Scholarship, the Frank O’Hara Award for Highest GPA in College of Arts and Sciences in 2008 and 2009, the Rose Kelly Award in 2009 and the Excellence in Biochemistry Cell and Molecular Biology Senior Department Award. She plans to attend Jefferson Medical College to pursue an MD/Ph.D combined degree. Danielle Torres, Mountain Top,

Torres

Walsh

majored in biology and philosophy and was also a member of the Special Jesuit Liberal Arts Honors Program. She was mentored by Janice Voltzow, professor and chair of the biology department. Megan Walsh, Laflin, presented her thesis, “College Students’ Attitudes on Smoking Cessation.” She was mentored by Aukje Lamonica, instructor, exercise science and sport. Walsh majored in nursing with a concentration in nutrition and a minor in psychology. She was an American Psychiatric Nurses Association Janssen Scholar and a member of Sigma Theta Tau, Alpha Lambda Delta and Alpha SigmaNuhonorsocieties.Shewasthe recipient of the Frank O’Hara Award in 2009 and 2010 and Academic Excellence in Nursing Award. Walsh plans to attend the University of Pennsylvania’s Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Program in the fall.

Gulick/Durkin families reunite in Virginia Beach The Gulick/Durkin families recently held a reunion in Virginia Beach, Va. The families have been meeting every other year since the early 1990’s for a week at beaches such as Nags Head, Kiawah Island and Isle of the Palms. Some members of the Gulick/Durkin families are originally from WilkesBarre and Sugar Notch. The late Jack Gulick grew up on South Main Street, Wilkes-Barre, and the late Jeanne Durkin Gulick grew up on Freed Street, Sugar Notch. Nancy Durkin, a retired teacher from Hanover Township, still resides on Freed Street, where she has lived since her birth 87 years ago. Her brother, Joe Durkin, retired from Texaco and lives in Texas with his wife, Ann. Family members at this year’s reunion, from left, first row, are Andrew Winner, Ann Durkin, Nancy Durkin, Joe Durkin, Jimmy Durkin, Jerry Durkin, Gina Durkin, Katie Mackessy, Isaac Winner and Nora Abshire. Second row: Amanda Durkin, Maureen Durkin Abshire, Tony Durkin, Kelly Mackessy, Emma Mackessy, Margaret Brown, Joe Brown, Anne Gulick, Abella Lubago, John Brown, Molly Mackessy, Jimmy Mackessy, Jeanne Gulick and Jim Gulick. Third row: Jerry Durkin, Tracey Durkin, Rosey Durkin, Joanne Cox, Dr. Jacqualyn Cox Veasey, Brian Veasey, Danny Mackessy, Jill Miller, Michael Mackessy, Susan Lubago, Mary Ann Brown, Jovanna Marquez, Peggy Gulick Mackessy, Steve Brown, Pat Bohan and Molly Bohan. Fourth row: Jim Cox, Jim Durkin, Jimmy Cox, Mary Sue Durkin DiGiovanni, Nate Gulick, Laura Gulick, Sean Gulick, John Gulick, Tony Durkin, Sean Gulick, Ann Gulick Brown, Rob Winner and Erin Winner.

Get all the advertising inserts with the latest sales.

700031

Call 829-5000 to start your home delivery.

Glitzy Pets Rocks! They Sparkle, You Shine S LIGHT UP!

by

WAREHOUSE SALE Gateway Shopping Center Edwardsville, PA

Sunday, August 14 - Saturday, August 20, 2011 Sunday-Friday 9am-6pm - Saturday 9am-4pm Cash & Credit Cards ONLY No Checks Sizes 8 1/2 - 3 M-W Widths

Shop 10 to 8 Mon. thru Fri. 10 to 5 Sat. 1 to 5 Sun.

United Penn Plaza, Kingston, PA 18704

287-8765

Great Deals On:

Home Decor • Candles • Gift Products • Gift Wrap Seasonal items & Much More! Up to 80% OFF


CMYK SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

704091

PAGE 8B


CMYK âž›

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

N

E

W

S

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 PAGE 9B

Wyoming Seminary to begin classes for new school year

Misericordia University National Student Speech-Language and Hearing Association Chapter wins award The Misericordia University National Student Speech-Language and Hearing Association (NSSLHA) Chapter received the Membership Award and Chapter of the Year Award at the recent Pennsylvania Speech-Language-Hearing Association convention in Pittsburgh. Members of NSSLHA, from left, first row: Katie Lawlor, Hillsdale, N.J.; Abigail Bomboy, Dallas; Kristin Hoffman, Douglassville; Haley Ellis, Bangor; Ambria Andrasi, Shickshinny; Mary Kate Baran, Bethlehem; Jill Cline, Hellertown; Victoria Florman, Prospect, Conn.; Heather Arnold, Beaver; Marissa Cirrilla, Rutherford, N.J. Second row: Kelsey Davis, Clarks Summit; Kayla Darcey, Hillsdale, N.J.; Sarah Collins, Stowe; Debbie Kortze, Bernville; Hazley Williams, Bloomsburg; Gina Grant, National Park, N.J.; Kim Walsh, Laflin; Katie Gabriele, Plains Township; Abby Mitchell, Hughestown. Third row: Brianne Lavelle, Ridgefield, N.J.; Brianna McLaughlin, Dallas; Claire Cellary, Gloversville, N.Y.; Jillian Dunn, Ashley; Katie Kugler, Wyoming; Ashley Zimmerman, East Stroudsburg; Nicole Weaver, Gap. Fourth row: Amanda Undersinger, Florida, N.Y.; Hillary Hoover, Trucksville; Lori Cimino, assistant professor of speech-language pathology; Kristen Mixon, Garden City, N.Y.; Sarah Castaldi, Scranton; Amanda Tomaselli, Trucksville; Meghan Kenney, Woodbury, Conn.; Laura Bennett, Dingmans Ferry; Cassie Foy, Southbury, Conn.; Sarah Nelson, Morris Plains, N.J.; Emily Stokes, Dillsburg. Fifth row: Kim Hartman, Dallas; Frank Nutt, Montgomery, N.Y.; and Sara Petersen, Beachwood, N.J.

MOUNTAIN TOP ALUMINUM Glass & Screen Enclosures Patio Roofs, Awnings, Carports & Decks NO GIMMICKS LOWEST PRICE HIGHEST QUALITY

Insured, with references Call for your free estimate

(570) 474-6213 Serving NEPA since 1983!

PA033148 mttopaluminum.com

kindergarten and kindergarKINGSTON: Wyoming ten students and their parSeminary, with campuses in Kingston and Forty Fort, ents will take place at the will begin its 168th year of same time. The opening convocation classes at the end of Aufor primary grades will be gust. The Upper School, King- held Aug. 31. All parents of preschool, ston, will register boarding pre-kindergarten and kinand day students Aug 2728 for grades nine through dergarten students are encouraged to attend a Par12 and postgraduate. New students will participate in ents’ Back to School Night 6 p.m. Aug. 26. orientation activities Aug. A similar Back to School 27-28 and freshmen will Night for parents of chilattend a special Freshman dren in first and second Retreat Aug. 28. A special grades will be held 7 p.m. opening-of-school convocation service will be held at Aug. 31 and for third and fourth grades 7 p.m. Sept. the Upper School Aug. 29. The Lower School, Forty 1. An orientation session Fort, will open for its first day of classes Aug. 30 with for middle school students will take place 7 p.m. Sept. a convocation for students 6. in fifth through eighth For more information, grades. Orientation for new call the Upper School at Lower School students in 270-2160, the Lower School grades 1-8 will be held 10 at 718-6610, or visit online a.m.-noon Aug. 29 and an at www.wyomingseminaOpen House for new and ry.org. returning preschool, pre-

If you have been Injured in an Accident We can help you! Call today to ďŹ nd out how. No recovery - No Fee!

Call for a no-cost, no-obligation meeting PENN STATE FOOTBALL TRIPS $139pp Bus, Game Ticket, Hoagie & Soda October 8th Iowa, October 15th Purdue * Homecoming, October 29th Illinois 8 DAY FALL DISCOVER IRELAND TOUR ďšş OCTOBER 17 ďšş 24, 2011 $1,995pp Inc: Roundtrip Air, First Class Hotels, Irish Breakfast Daily, 6 Dinners, Complete Sightseeing, All Taxes

9 DAY RHINE RIVER CRUISE  OCTOBER 27  NOVEMBER 4 ABOARD THE MS AMADEUS PRINCESS * Amsterdam • Dusseldorf • Cologne • Strasbourg • Basel * from $2,799pp Inc: Bus to Newark, Roundtrip ights, 7 Night River Cruise, 20 Meals, Unlimited Wine with Dinner, Entertainment, Tax BAHAMAS CRUISE ABOARD THE CARNIVAL PRIDE  FEBRUARY 19  26 * Orlando • Nassau • Freeport * from $799pp Inc: Bus to Baltimore, 7 Night Cruise, All Meals & Entertainment, Tax NETHERLANDS, BELGIUM & PARIS  APRIL 23  MAY 3 FEATURING HISTORIC BRUGES & FLORIADE $3,849pp Inc: Roundtrip Air, First Class Hotels, Breakfast Daily, 4 Dinners, Sightseeing, Tax VENICE & GREEK ISLE CRUISE  APRIL 26  MAY 5 ABOARD THE SPLENDOR OF THE SEAS * Venice • Bari • Corfu • Santorini • Kusadasi • Katakolon * from $2,599pp Inc: Roundtrip Bus, Air Flights to Venice, First Class Hotel, Breakfast, Sightseeing Tour of Venice, 7 Night Cruise with All Meals & Entertainment aboard the Splendor of the Seas, Transfers and Tax

601 Market St., Kingston, PA

288-9311

James V. Pyrah, Esq. Angela Forlenza Stevens, Esq.

(570) 718-4900 www.pyrahstevens.com

575 Pierce St., River Commons Suite 303 • Kingston, PA

W. PETERS ENTERPRISES

• Complete Landscape Service • Shrubbery, Top Soil • Retaining Walls • Patios, Sidewalks • Trucking • Snow Removal • Septic Systems Installed

FAMILY OWNED FULLY INSURED FREE ESTIMATES 735-6150

  !     

"   

+)" 0+ 0%" "- "!"/"*6 1))"- 2"*0 *+3 *! $"0 "4 ",0'+*( +##"-/ +*

MBSE

0%" '**+20'2" (// 0%" /)-0 /, '+1/ & 0%" /#" /" 1-" (// +- 0%"



"

-",'! '*0"** " +* /"(" 0 )+!"(/ .1--5  0%" -/ -" )!" 0+ (/0 0%" +##"-/

  

"4%'(-0'*$   ,+-0 "!* (1/ 0%" 2(1" +# "- "!"/"*6 0- "-2' " 

-" *+0 "" 5+1- 10%+-'6"! "- "!"/"*6 !"("- !(&-&&")."',

     #  





    * 









7  .   77   7 777 

 

.   7& 7 &









    *

+3 0%-+1$% 1$1/0  

  ! "#$" %# $"    #$ !# ##%#$ # #!# "  %  "  % #  #$ !#    

8$,.$%.( 10.; 61 37$.,>(' &7561/(45 6+417*+ (4&('(5(0< #,0$0&,$. (48,&(5 $6 2$46,&,2$6,0* '($.(45 6+417*+ 7*756    16 (8(4;10( 9,.. 37$.,); '8(46,5('  /106+ .($5( 2$;/(06 %$5(' 10  1)   .(55 $ 57**(56(' '($.(4 &1064,%76,10 4(57.6,0* ,0 $ 616$. *4155 &$2,6$.,<(' &156 1)   !($.(4 &1064,%76,10 /$; 8$4; $0' &17.' $))(&6 ;174 $&67$. .($5( 2$;/(06 =0&.7'(5 '(56,0$6,10 &+$4*( $0' 4(/,7/  $&-$*( ":&.7'(5 6,6.( 6$:(5 4(*,564$6,10 .,&(05( )((5 ,0574$0&( '($.(4 24(2 $0' $'',6,10$. 126,105 16$. /106+.; 2$;/(065 (37$.    $5+ '7( $6 5,*0,0* ,0&.7'(5  &$2,6$.,<(' &156 4('7&6,10  $&37,5,6,10 )(( $0' >456 /106+5 .($5( 2$;/(06 1)   1 5(&74,6; '(215,6 4(37,4(' 16$. 2$;/(065 (37$.   6 .($5( (0' .(55(( 2$;5 )14 $0; $/17065 '7( 70'(4 6+( .($5( $0; 1)>&,$. )((5 $0' 6$:(5 4(.$6(' 61 6+( 5&+('7.(' 6(4/,0$6,10 (:&(55 9($4 $0' 75( 2.75 /,.( 18(4  

/,.(5 $0' $   8(+,&.( 6740,0 )(( 74&+$5( 126,10 $6 .($5( (0' )14   2.75 6$:(5 $0' $0; 16+(4 )((5 $0' &+$4*(5 '7( 70'(4 6+( $22.,&$%.( .($5( $*4((/(06 ,0 (:$/2.( 5+190 $6( $22.,(5 10.; 61 5(.(&6 (4&('(5(0< 1'(. ($4   8(+,&.(5    >0$0&,0* )14  /106+5 $6  2(4 /106+ 2(4 

>0$0&(' 14   >0$0&,0* )14  /106+5 $6   2(4 /106+ 2(4 

>0$0&(' ":&.7'(5 .($5(5 $0' %$..110 &1064$&65 756 6$-( '(.,8(4; 1) 8(+,&.( %; 7*756    16 (8(4;10( 9,.. 37$.,); (( '($.(4 )14 '(6$,.5 (:&.75,105 $0' .,/,6$6,105 10 (4&('(5(0< 6$4 (48,&( 4(2$,' $,06(0$0&( 14 1))(4 '(6$,.5   76+14,<(' (4&('(5(0< !($.(45 () &()" $'#()& ,$(' ! %%   () .$+$, !(&


CMYK PAGE 10B

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

P

E

O

MOTORCYCLE Continued from Page 1B

magazine WomenRidersNow.com, says the emergence of the serious female biker is a reflection of the growing financial and business clout of women as they climb corporate ladders and become small-business entrepreneurs. Schmitt says surveys show that today’s female biker is a community role model, earns $50,000 or more and is college-educated. Female biker clubs — such as the Free Spirit Chapter out of Motor City Power Sports in Bloomfield Hills and Women in the Wind chapters — “are the new bridge clubs” of the century, says Schmitt. When Stephanie Jones gets on her 2006 Harley-Davidson Softail Deluxe motorcycle, it often takes her to work at Kettering University in Flint, Mich., where she’s associate director of pre-college programs. Jones, 49, was a Harley-Davidson cover model for a special brochure the iconic motorcycle company published for female riders. She first rode on a motorcycle that belonged to her then-husband. But she took her first motorcycling lessons from her pastor, who instructed Jones and four other women in the parking lot of Ebenezer Ministries in Burton, Mich., about 10 years ago. Since then, Bishop Urundi Knox started a motorcycle ministry. And Jones and about 14 other members ride on Sundays to visit N’S

GWE

MCT PHOTO

Rider coach Michelle Goodhand, 58, of West Bloomfield, left, teaches Olga Malykh, 28, of Ann Arbor, motorcycle safety at Washtenaw County Community College. The number of licensed woman motorcyclists has doubled in the past 10 years.

the sick and homebound. Since she became a rider, two sisters and a brother in other states also have taken to motorcycling, as has her son. “I’m kind of petite and my bike is kind of big, and it looks like I can’t handle it,” says Jones. “When people see me on the bike, they are surprised, because I’m a professional at work and the secretary at church.” Jones gets as many comments on her biker clothes as on her bike. She wears ostrich cowboy boots and a helmet that matches. Her latest look is white jeans with a white Harley-Davidson vest to match. When doing her motorcycle ministry, she’s got a vest with a patch that reads: “Ebenezer Ministries. On Fire for the Lord.” While an increasing number of

Starting at $40

779 WYOMING AVE. • KINGSTON 283.5610 • 287-4715

L

E

of women,” says Bach. “Women are more willing to spend a little more on their clothes and be a little more fashionable than the guys. The boys are satisfied with a black Harley T-shirt. The women are willing to buy a little bling.” There’s no bling evident, however, on a sweltering Sunday behind a warehouse in Farmington Hills, Mich., where six would-be motorcyclists are taking nitty-gritty beginner motorcycle lessons. They’re learning how to throttle without stalling and how to negotiate a series of loops and curves without tipping over. Their instructor is Michelle Goodhand, 58, a dental hygienist from West Bloomfield, Mich. She started riding in 2001, with a boyfriend at the handlebars. “It was pretty boring back there,” says Goodhand. She took a class, but flunked her first road test. Undeterred, she tried again, passed the test, bought a bike, rode15,000 miles the first year and dumped the boyfriend. “He was the kind of guy who got threatened by me having my own bike,” says Goodhand. Now, she spends most weekends teaching. Three of her four children now ride motorcycles, too.

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

MEET Continued from Page 1B

Housewives.” First car? “A 1972 Plymouth Duster. I’d still have it, but the floor boards rusted out.” Favorite films? “Under the Tuscan Sun,” “Adams Family Values,” “101 Dalmatians” and “Home Alone 2.” Favorite quote? “I believe in miracles. I do. I do. I do.” - Jeremy Sumpter What are you reading? “Old Friend from Far Away: The Practice of Writing Memoir” by Natalie Goldberg and “The Name of The Rose” by Umberto Eco. Proudest moment? “My ordination. It was something I always thought about and thought it was for other people, and then it was happening to me. I just thank God that I arrived at that moment in my life. It’s not that it was a point of achievement for me, but at that moment, I could then move forward and do something good for God in that manner, as a priest.”

another place in a story. I would hope that we would identify with what happens to the characters, and maybe it will help us to make our own lives better, or challenge our own lives, or make us reach for goals that we never thought possible. Or to dream. I love stories that make me dream.” Favorite music? “I like to collect movie soundtracks. And I like Carly Simon, Sting, Annie Lennox and Josh Groban.” Other hobbies or interests? “I like to garden, though I don’t do it as often as I’d like. And I love to go to a good movie or Broadway play.” Favorite city? “New York.” Favorite place to vacation? “London. And Disney in Orlando.” Always in the fridge? “Milk, ice cream and low-fat chicken.” Follow sports? “I like the Alan K. Stout writes about area New York Yankees.” people for the Meet feature. Reach Guilty pleasure? “Desperate him at 970-7101.

The Bathtub W izard

AVENUE SALON

Goldwell Hair Color

women are discovering the allure of motorcycles, manufacturers have in turn discovered the growing female market. Krista Bach, 31, rides 55 miles one way on a motorcycle from Adrian, Mich., to her job as clothing manager for Motor City Harley-Davidson. She sees the increase in women riders in sales at the store. “You see a lot more ladies riding in independently or with a group

P

G etitReglazed -Be Am azed!

Tub & Tile Refinishing Packages Avail - Any Color, 5 yr Warranty Fiberglass Repairs Professional Tile Repairs & New Installs “You Pick ʻEm, I Stick ʻEm.” Locally Owned & Operated

208-9800

gwensalon.com

O fferi n g Q u al i ty I n Perso n al C are

E.O.E.

240353

T h e M eado w s M an o r

703115

M ead ow s C om plex • 200 L ak e Street • D allas • 675-9336

SHHH! ENDS SUNDAY

WE CAN’T KEEP THIS SPECIAL A SECRET VERY LONG

1/2 POUND LOBSTER TAIL DINNER

19.99

$

2 DOZEN STEAMED CLAMS

Served with French Fries & Cole Slaw

$

7.99

CABANA NOW OPEN

WATERFRONT PITTSTON 654-6883

www.coopers-seafood.com

703227

304 KENNEDY BLVD.


CMYK

SPORTS timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

IL BASEBALL

SECTION

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

W I L K E S - B A R R E T R I AT H L O N

Mistakes Organizers hope for special race doom the Yanks vs. Syracuse I F YO U GO

What: WilkesBarre Triathlon

When: 7:30 a.m. today

Reliever Logan Kensing failed to cover home and allowed two game-changing homers.

C

Where: Race starts with swim at Harveys Lake boat launch.

After swimming 1.5 kilometers at out-of-area talent. Rain is expected, but 30th For race directors, however, this Harveys Lake, triathletes will reannual Back Mountain event will trieve their bicycles for the second year’s triathlon means more. go off at 7:30 a.m. today. Athletes, volunteers and race di- stage – a 40-km course that runs By JAY MONAHAN For The Times Leader

LEHMAN TWP. – On the surface, today’s Wilkes-Barre Triathlon looks to be on par with earlier runnings of the Back Mountain race. Like past years, torrid, rainy weather is expected that is sure to make the cycling course altogether eventful for local athletes vying with

By LINDSAY KRAMER For The Times Leader

SYRACUSE, N.Y. – Errors both mental and physical by reliever Logan Kensing doomed Scranton/Wilkes-Barre on Saturday night. Kensing surrendered the tying run in the seventh inning when he failed to cover home on a wild pitch and then gave up a pair of solo homers in the eighth as the Syracuse Chiefs rallied for a 4-2 win at Alliance Bank Stadium. Jhonatan Solano and Seth Bynum ripped the back-to-back shots to snap a CHIEFS 2-2 tie and send the Yankees to their fifth straight loss in YANKEES the second game of a four-game set here. With one out, Solano drilled a 1-0 pitch over the left-field fence for a 3-2 Chiefs lead. Two pitches later, on a 1-1 count, Bynum went the opposite way to right to pad the cushion to 4-2. Syracuse reliever Josh Wilkie then set the Yankees down in order to close the game. Kensing’s mental lapse allowed Syracuse pull even in the seventh. With two outs and Roger Bernadina on second, Kensing struck out Chris Marrero on a wild pitch. The ball scooted well past catcher Gustavo Molina, allowing Marrero to reach first. When Kensing didn’t cover home, Bernadina came all the way around to tie the game at 2-2. That answered a run Scranton/Wilkes-Barre pushed across in the sixth against Syracuse starter Tommy Milone. Greg Golson singled with one out and came in on a double by Jordan Parraz. Yankees starter Greg Smith had no decision to show for his strong outing. Smith pitched 5 1/3 innings, giving up one earned run and one walk and striking out three. The Chiefs tied the game in the fourth. With one out, Seth Bynum lofted a high fly to deep center that got caught in a swirling wind. Centerfielder Golson circled under it and got a glove on it, but it fell to the grass for a triple that drove in Solano. Smith wriggled out of further harm by getting Jeff Frazier to line out and Corey Brown on a

rectors will celebrate the 30th running of the Wilkes-Barre Triathlon this morning. Start time for the swimming portion of the race – the first leg of the triathlon – is set for 7:30 a.m at Harveys Lake. “We’re hoping everybody has a great race,” said Wilkes-Barre Triathlon director Joanne Gensel. “This is special for everyone who has helped out this event because it’s such a landmark number for us.”

through Harveys Lake, Noxen, Kunkle, Dallas Township, Dallas, Jackson Township and ends at the Penn State Wilkes-Barre Campus in Lehman Township. Triathletes begin and end the final leg of the race – an 11-km running trek – at Penn State WilkesBarre. As of Tuesday, Wilkes-Barre See TRIATHLON, Page 4C

4 2

See YANKEES, Page 4C

AP PHOTOS

Brendan Steele watches his bunker shot on the 18th hole during the third round of the PGA Championship Saturday at the Atlanta Athletic Club in Johns Creek, Ga.

Who’s in first?

Unknowns top leaderboard as stars falter By PAUL NEWBERRY AP National Writer

AP PHOTO

Jason Dufner hits a drive on the fourth hole during the third round of the PGA Championship Saturday at the Atlanta Athletic Club.

Keegan Bradley, another guy playing in his first major, bounced back from a double bogey at the first hole for a 69 that left him just one stroke back heading to the final round, another perfect fit for what is developing as the theme of the year’s final major.

Who are these guys anyway? “Coming up to the final hole with the sun going down,” Bradley said, “that was kind of cool.” Tiger Woods, defending PGA champion Martin Kaymer and several other See PGA, Page 4C

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

Cubs place Zambrano on disqualified list Chicago pitcher walked out on team after being ejected for brush-back pitches on Friday night. By By CHARLES ODUM AP Sports Writer

ATLANTA — The Chicago Cubs placed Carlos Zambrano on the disqualified list Saturday and said the righthander would receive no pay and have no part in team activities for 30 days. Zambrano cleaned out his locker and left the team after giving up five homers and being ejected from Friday night’s

Saturday that Zambrano’s actions, including a brush-back pitch to Chipper Jones that led to the ejection, were “inBraves second baseman Dan Uggla has extended his hitting streak to 33 tolerable.” games with a first-inning single off “This was the most stringent Chicago’s Randy Wells. penalty we could enforce without The streak, which began on July 5, is a release,” Hendry said. the longest in the majors this season Cubs pitcher Ryan Dempster and the longest in Atlanta Braves had similarly strong words. history. Uggla entered Saturday night’s game “He’s made his bed. Let him sleep batting .370 (47 for 127) with 14 in it,” Dempster said. homers and 31 RBIs during the streak. “It’s not like it’s something new.” Hendry said Major League Baseball 10-4 loss to the Braves. He did not return and the players’ association would disto the team Saturday. General manager Jim Hendry said See ZAMBRANO, Page 4C

Uggla’s streak at 33

OPINION

W-B Triathlon: The race that Ruth built

T

PGA CHAMPIONSHIP

JOHNS CREEK, Ga. — Brendan Steele is playing in his first major championship. Jason Dufner has never won a tour event. Hard to tell at the PGA Championship. The no-names stayed cool on a sweltering Saturday at Atlanta Athletic Club, setting up a final round that will be short on recognizable faces but could end a major drought for the Americans. Steele shot 4-under 66 and was tied with Dufner, who joined him at 7-under 203 with a 68. “It’s a great week for me just to be in the field,” Steele said. “To have a chance to actually win in my first major is really something special.”

PAUL SOKOLOSKI

Cubs pitcher Carlos Zambrano reacts in the second inning against Braves Friday at in Atlanta.

o the Wilkes-Barre Triathlon, Bill Ruth may as well be Babe Ruth. It has been years since Bill Ruth last hit the waters of Harveys Lake and biked and ran his way through the Back Mountain. But his feats on that course still stand as legendary in Wilkes-Barre lore. He hit the biggest home run in Wilkes-Barre Triathlon history when Ruth survived a bloody bike crash to win the event’s second race in 1983. “I did go down pretty hard. I rolled the tire,” Ruth remembered. “I landed down on my right side, kind of slid on my bike down a hill, hit a curb and just tattooed my wheel.” But what happened next propelled Wilkes-Barre to national fame. Ruth picked up his bike, carried it the last mile of the bike course, then completed the ensuing 10-mile run with gravel engrained in his hip to capture his second straight WilkesBarre race. “I wasn’t even sure, do you have to finish (the bike course) with your bike? Can I leave my bike there?” Ruth wondered. “I figured, ‘It’s only a mile up the hill.’ Back then, it really wasn’t that big of a deal.” Ruth didn’t realize it at the time, but when he ran that last mile with his battered bike on his shoulder, he also was carrying the Wilkes-Barre Triathlon to prominence. Soon after, Mizuno began using a picture from Ruth’s triumph over tragedy for promotional opportunities. And in the process, Wilkes-Barre’s course was endorsed. Photo was good publicity “It was good publicity for me, and it was good for the race,” said Ruth, who was living in Bethlehem at the time but has since retired to Estes Park, Colo. “It got around. The following weekend after that, I was out in Seattle to do a race. I ended up not finishing, but everybody knew (about his WilkesBarre feat). Everybody was making jokes about it.” Largely because of that, people started taking the Wilkes-Barre race seriously. Before that, Ruth remembers a course woven with unavoidable obstacles. He says one participant, Steve Valkos, was stung by a swarm of bees before crashing into a cow during the same race in Wilkes-Barre’s early years. But holy cow, nothing ever seemed to stop the race. The Wilkes-Barre triathlon is still going for its 30th consecutive year, an anniversary that begins at 7:30 a.m. today at Harveys Lake. Ruth is well aware that his resiliency gave the event a push during its formative years. “That was a great race,” Ruth said. “It was well put on. It got everything kind of started back East.” It was Ruth who started this long run for Wilkes-Barre, winning three of the event’s first races. And the only time he didn’t finish first, in 1984, he didn’t enter. But he always encouraged others to sign up. “It was something I recommended to everybody,” Ruth, 58, said. “I’d always tell the guys, ‘You’ve got to go to Wilkes-Barre.’ I’d tell the pros.” Through the years, the pros have come and gone. But the tale of Ruth lives on. It wasn’t baeball’s Sultan of Swat calling his shot with a point of the bat. But when Wilkes-Barre needed a face to epitomize the spirit of its race, it could always point to the legend that Ruth built.

Paul Sokoloski is a Times Leader sports columnist. You may reach him at 970-7109 or email him at psokoloski@timesleader.com.


K PAGE 2C

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

By ROXY ROXBOROUGH BASEBALL Favorite

Odds

Underdog

American League INDIANS

8.5

Twins

Angels

7.5

BLUE JAYS

YANKEES

8.5

Rays

Tigers

9.5

ORIOLES

WHITE SOX

8.5

Royals

Rangers

8

Red Sox

8.5

A’S MARINERS

National League REDS Giants

9

Padres

8

MARLINS

PHILLIES

7.5

Nationals

BRAVES

8

Cubs

BREWERS

8

Pirates

DODGERS

7

Astros

D’BACKS

10

Mets

CARDS

9

Rockies

W H A T ’ S

O N

T V

Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Sunday, Aug. 14 AUTO RACING 1 p.m. ESPN — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Heluva Good! Sour Cream Dips, at Watkins Glen, N.Y. 3:30 p.m. ABC — IRL, IndyCar, MoveThatBlock.com Indy 225, at Loudon, N.H. DIVING 3 p.m. NBC — U.S. Championships, men’s platform, at Los Angeles EXTREME SPORTS 4:30 p.m. NBC — Dew Tour, Portland Invitational, at Portland, Ore. GOLF 11 a.m. TNT — PGA of America, PGA Championship, final round, at Johns Creek, Ga. 2 p.m. CBS — PGA of America, PGA Championship, final round, at Johns Creek, Ga. 3 p.m. TGC — USGA, U.S. Women’s Amateur Championship, championship match, at Barrington, R.I. LITTLE LEAGUE 6 p.m. ESPN2 — Playoffs, Mid-Atlantic Regional Final, teams TBD, at Bristol, Conn. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m. YES — Tampa Bay at N.Y. Yankees 1:30 p.m. WQMI — Washington at Philadelphia 2:10 p.m. ROOT — Pittsburgh at Milawaukee 8 p.m. ESPN — Colorado at St. Louis MOTORSPORTS 8 a.m. SPEED — MotoGP World Championship, Czech Grand Prix, at Brno, Czech Republic 6 p.m. SPEED — MotoGP Moto2, Czech Grand Prix, at Brno, Czech Republic (same-day tape) TENNIS 1 p.m. ESPN2 — WTA, Rogers Cup, championship match, at Toronto 3 p.m. ESPN2 — ATP World Tour, Rogers Cup, championship match, at Montreal Copyright 2011 World Features Syndicate, Inc.

T R A N S A C T I O N S BASEBALL American League CLEVELAND INDIANS — Assigned RHP Cody Anderson to Mahoning Valley (NYP). MINNESOTA TWINS — Placed INF Alexi Casilla on the 15-day DL. OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Optioned 2B Adam Rosales and LHP Jordan Norberto to Sacramento (PCL). Recalled INF Brandon Allen and RHP Bruce Billings from Sacramento. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Agreed to terms with 1B Lyle Overbay. Placed 1B-OF Xavier Nady on the 15-day DL. Designated RHP Juan Jaime for assignment. CHICAGO CUBS — Placed RHP Carlos Zambrano on the disqualified list. LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Called up 2B Justin Sellers from Albuquerque (PCL). PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Assigned 3B Carlos Rivero from Lehigh Valley (PCL) to Reading (EL). PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Placed 1B Derrek Lee on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Aug. 10. Recalled INF Josh Harrison from Indianapolis (IL). Agreed to terms with OF Candon Myles. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS — Assigned 3B Chris Constantino to Johnson City (Appalachian). SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS—Placed OF Andres Torres on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Brandon Belt from Fresno(PCL). Eastern League TRENTON THUNDER — Announced LHP Josh Romanski was assigned to Tampa (FSL). FOOTBALL National Football League DALLAS COWBOYS — Signed WR Curtis Clay. Released WR Titus Ryan. HOUSTON TEXANS — Signed WR Devard Darling and RB Javarris Williams. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS — Signed LB Gerris Wilkinson and P Brent Bowden. LB Alvin Bowen and WR John Matthews. ST. LOUIS RAMS — Released LB David Vobora. HOCKEY National Hockey League CALGARY FLAMES — Signed D Scott Hannan to a one-year contract. HORSE RACING THOROUGHBRED RACING ASSOCIATION — Announced the Board of Directors elected Joe Harper director and Josh Rubenstein alternate director representing Del Mar Thoroughbred Club and Lee Dillard director representing Thistledown. COLLEGE COLORADO STATE — Suspended FB Kivon Cartwright, WR Byron Steele and WR Ezra Thompson indefinitely for breaking team rules. Announced OT Justin Becker and WR Tony Drake are academically ineligible.

I N T E R N A T I O N A L L E A G U E North Division W Pawtucket (Red Sox) ............. 68 Lehigh Valley (Phillies).......... 68 Yankees.................................. 62 Syracuse (Nationals) ............. 53 Buffalo (Mets) ......................... 50 Rochester (Twins).................. 46

L 51 53 59 65 69 74

Pct. GB .571 — .562 1 .512 61⁄2 .449 141⁄2 .420 18 .383 221⁄2

South Division W Durham (Rays) ....................... 67 Gwinnett (Braves) .................. 66 Charlotte (White Sox)............ 57 Norfolk (Orioles)..................... 44

L 51 54 63 75

Pct. GB .568 — .550 2 .475 11 .370 231⁄2

West Division W Columbus (Indians) ................. 76 Indianapolis (Pirates)............... 64 Louisville (Reds) ...................... 61 Toledo (Tigers) ........................ 57 Saturday's Games Indianapolis 5, Louisville 4 Syracuse 4 ,Yankees 2 Buffalo 7, Durham 6 Gwinnett 4, Pawtucket 2 Toledo at Lehigh Valley, 6:35 p.m. Columbus at Rochester, 7:05 p.m. Norfolk at Charlotte, ppd., rain Today's Games Durham at Buffalo, 1:05 p.m. Pawtucket at Gwinnett, 2:05 p.m. Indianapolis at Louisville, 2:05 p.m. Norfolk at Charlotte, 2:15 p.m. Yankess at Syracuse, 5 p.m. Toledo at Lehigh Valley, 5:35 p.m.

L 45 57 60 64

Pct. GB .628 — .529 12 .504 15 .471 19

E A S T E R N L E A G U E Eastern Division W New Hampshire (Blue Jays) . 67 Reading (Phillies)................... 59 Trenton (Yankees) ................. 59 New Britain (Twins) ............... 58 Portland (Red Sox) ................ 50 Binghamton (Mets) ................ 50 Western Division W 67 66 64 62 57 53

Harrisburg (Nationals)............. Bowie (Orioles) ........................ Richmond (Giants) .................. Akron (Indians)......................... Erie (Tigers) ............................. Altoona (Pirates) ......................

L 52 59 59 60 69 70 L 52 52 55 58 62 64

Pct. GB .563 — .500 71⁄2 .500 71⁄2 .492 81⁄2 .420 17 .417 171⁄2 Pct. GB .563 — 1 .559 ⁄2 .538 3 1 .517 5 ⁄2 .479 10 .453 13

Y O R K L E A G U E

McNamara Division W L Staten Island (Yankees) ........ 36 19 Brooklyn (Mets) ...................... 32 24 Hudson Valley (Rays)............ 27 27 Aberdeen (Orioles) ................ 19 35

Pct. GB .655 — .571 41⁄2 .500 81⁄2 .352 161⁄2

Pinckney Division W L 33 23 31 23 32 24 28 27 25 29 22 33

Pct. GB .589 — .574 1 .571 1 .509 41⁄2 .463 7 .400 101⁄2

Auburn (Nationals) ................. Williamsport (Phillies) ............ Mahoning Valley (Indians) .... Jamestown (Marlins) ............. Batavia (Cardinals)................. State College (Pirates)...........

Stedler Division W Vermont (Athletics) ................. 27 Connecticut (Tigers) ............... 24 Tri-City (Astros) ....................... 24 Lowell (Red Sox) ..................... 22

O

R

E

N A S C A R

Friday's Games Harrisburg 3, Trenton 2 Erie 6, Portland 2 Altoona 7, Reading 0 Richmond 6, Binghamton 2 New Britain 4, Bowie 3 New Hampshire 7, Akron 1 Saturday's Games Portland 8, Erie 4 Bowie 8, New Britain 5. Altoona 6, Reading 3 Binghamton 7, Richmond 0 New Hampshire 5, Akron 3 Trenton at Harrisburg, 7 p.m. Today's Games Erie at Portland, 1 p.m. Akron at New Hampshire, 1:35 p.m. New Britain at Bowie, 4:05 p.m., 1st game Trenton at Harrisburg, 6 p.m. Reading at Altoona, 6 p.m. Richmond at Binghamton, 6:35 p.m. New Britain at Bowie, 6:35 p.m., 2nd game

N E W P E N N

C

Yu-Ling Hsieh .........................................70-71—141 Olivia Jordan-Higgins.............................72-69—141 Benedikte Grotvedt ................................73-69—142 Whitney Wade.........................................73-69—142 Sara Brown..............................................71-71—142 Veronica Felibert ....................................70-72—142 Kathleen Ekey .........................................70-72—142 Misun Cho ...............................................70-72—142 Jenny Gleason ........................................71-71—142 Izzy Beisiegel ..........................................72-70—142

Columbus at Rochester, 6:05 p.m. Monday's Games Yankees at Syracuse, 7 p.m. Durham at Buffalo, 7:05 p.m. Toledo at Lehigh Valley, 7:05 p.m. Columbus at Rochester, 7:05 p.m. Pawtucket at Gwinnett, 7:05 p.m. Indianapolis at Louisville, 7:05 p.m. Norfolk at Charlotte, 7:15 p.m.

AMERICA’S LINE

S

L 27 28 31 32

Pct. GB .500 — .462 2 .436 31⁄2 .407 5

Friday's Games Tri-City 9, Hudson Valley 4, 1st game Auburn 12, Staten Island 3 Vermont 6, Batavia 3 Lowell 6, Jamestown 5 Brooklyn 10, Mahoning Valley 6 Connecticut 4, State College 1 Tri-City 2, Hudson Valley 1, 2nd game Williamsport 7, Aberdeen 3 Saturday's Games Staten Island 5, Auburn 0 Brooklyn 2, Mahoning Valley 1 Connecticut 6, State College 4 Vermont 8, Batavia 3 Hudson Valley at Tri-City, 7 p.m. Lowell at Jamestown, 7:05 p.m. Williamsport at Aberdeen, 7:05 p.m. Today's Games Vermont at Batavia, 1:05 p.m. Lowell at Jamestown, 1:05 p.m. Auburn at Staten Island, 4 p.m. Hudson Valley at Tri-City, 5 p.m. Brooklyn at Mahoning Valley, 5:05 p.m. Williamsport at Aberdeen, 5:35 p.m. Connecticut at State College, 6:05 p.m.

P G A PGA Championship Scores At Atlanta Athletic Club, Highlands Course Johns Creek, Ga. Purse: $8 million Yardage: 7,467;Par: 70 Third Round Brendan Steele .................................69-68-66—203 Jason Dufner .....................................70-65-68—203 Keegan Bradley.................................71-64-69—204 Scott Verplank ...................................67-69-69—205 Steve Stricker ....................................63-74-69—206 Anders Hansen .................................68-69-70—207 D.A. Points.........................................69-67-71—207 David Toms .......................................72-71-65—208 Charl Schwartzel...............................71-71-66—208 Robert Karlsson ................................70-71-67—208 Adam Scott ........................................69-69-70—208 John Senden .....................................68-68-72—208 Ben Crane ..........................................71-72-66—209 Nick Watney.......................................70-71-68—209 Luke Donald ......................................70-71-68—209 Spencer Levin ...................................71-70-68—209 Brendon de Jonge ............................68-72-69—209 Lee Westwood ..................................71-68-70—209 Jim Furyk ...........................................71-65-73—209 Hunter Mahan....................................72-72-66—210 Francesco Molinari ...........................72-71-67—210 Alexander Noren ...............................70-72-68—210 Matt Kuchar........................................71-71-68—210 Bill Haas .............................................68-73-69—210 Phil Mickelson ...................................71-70-69—210 Ryan Palmer ......................................71-70-69—210 Sergio Garcia ....................................72-69-69—210 Scott Piercy .......................................71-68-71—210 Brandt Jobe .......................................68-69-73—210 Brian Davis.........................................69-73-69—211 Bill Lunde ...........................................71-71-69—211 Kevin Na.............................................72-69-70—211 Gary Woodland ................................. 70-70-71-211 Trevor Immelman..............................69-71-71—211 Simon Dyson .....................................68-72-71—211 Mark Wilson.......................................69-71-71—211 K.J. Choi.............................................70-73-69—212 Bubba Watson ...................................74-68-70—212 Ian Poulter..........................................74-68-70—212 Johnson Wagner...............................71-69-72—212 Jerry Kelly ..........................................65-73-74—212 Jhonattan Vegas ...............................70-68-74—212 Chris Kirk ...........................................72-72-69—213 Bryce Molder .....................................74-69-70—213 Matteo Manassero ............................68-74-71—213 Robert Allenby ..................................72-70-71—213 Harrison Frazar .................................72-69-72—213 Charles Howell III..............................72-68-73—213 Yuta Ikeda..........................................73-68-72—213 K.T. Kim .............................................73-71-70—214 John Rollins .......................................72-72-70—214 Mike Small .........................................73-71-70—214 Miguel Angel Jimenez......................69-73-72—214 Johan Edfors .....................................71-70-73—214 Robert Garrigus ................................70-70-74—214 Kevin Streelman................................73-71-71—215 Ricky Barnes......................................69-75-71—215 Rory Sabbatini ...................................73-69-73—215 Davis Love III.....................................68-71-76—215 Zach Johnson....................................71-72-73—216 Andres Romero.................................72-70-74—216 Seung-yul Noh ..................................71-70-75—216 Ross Fisher .......................................71-69-76—216 Rory McIlroy ......................................70-73-74—217 Padraig Harrington ...........................73-69-75—217 Michael Bradley ................................70-74-74—218 Y.E. Yang ...........................................71-73-74—218 Rickie Fowler.....................................74-69-75—218 Peter Hanson.....................................71-71-76—218 Pablo Larrazabal...............................70-73-76—219 Edoardo Molinari...............................75-69-76—220 Ryan Moore .......................................75-69-76—220 Sean O’Hair .......................................71-73-77—221 Shaun Micheel...................................66-78-77—221 Paul Casey.........................................72-72-78—222

L P G A Futures Scores Saturday At Richmond Country Club Richmond, Va. Purse: $100,000 Yardage: 6,278; Par: 72 Second Round Leaders Sophia Sheridan .....................................70-66—136 Mo Martin.................................................70-67—137 Min Seo Kwak .........................................65-73—138 Natalie Sheary.........................................68-70—138 Maria Laura Elvira...................................71-68—139 Jane Rah..................................................69-70—139 Brittany Johnston ....................................68-71—139 Ashli Bunch .............................................71-69—140 Cara Freeman .........................................69-71—140 Lisa Ferrero .............................................69-71—140 Sydnee Michaels ....................................69-71—140 Stephanie Na...........................................71-70—141 Cydney Clanton ......................................70-71—141 Daniela Iacobelli .....................................66-75—141

Nationwide Series Zippo 200 at The Glen At Watkins Glen International Watkins Glen, N.Y. Lap length: 2.45 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (1) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 85 laps, 142.9 rating, 0 points, $35,150. 2. (6) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 85, 111.8, 0, $31,475. 3. (8) Joey Logano, Toyota, 85, 109, 0, $21,875. 4. (2) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 85, 134.4, 0, $17,425. 5. (3) Carl Edwards, Ford, 85, 121, 0, $18,000. 6. (7) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 85, 107, 0, $13,350. 7. (5) Ron Fellows, Chevrolet, 85, 111.3, 37, $12,600. 8. (17) Aric Almirola, Chevrolet, 85, 92.9, 36, $18,693. 9. (11) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 85, 99.1, 35, $18,893. 10. (4) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 85, 98.1, 34, $21,543. 11. (19) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 85, 87.5, 33, $19,643. 12. (13) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 84, 84.4, 32, $20,268. 13. (15) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 84, 83.5, 31, $18,218. 14. (16) Brian Scott, Toyota, 84, 82.1, 30, $17,668. 15. (12) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 84, 78.7, 29, $18,918. 16. (14) Steve Wallace, Toyota, 84, 79.8, 28, $17,543. 17. (10) James Buescher, Chevrolet, 84, 86.1, 0, $17,493. 18. (9) Jason Leffler, Chevrolet, 84, 84.9, 26, $17,418. 19. (27) Michael Annett, Toyota, 83, 65, 25, $17,343. 20. (26) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 83, 64.8, 24, $18,768. 21. (22) Tim George Jr., Chevrolet, 83, 59.2, 23, $10,775. 22. (23) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet, 83, 66.6, 22, $17,193. 23. (25) Alex Kennedy, Chevrolet, 82, 52.6, 21, $17,518. 24. (31) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 82, 51.5, 20, $17,018. 25. (24) Casey Roderick, Ford, 82, 64, 19, $17,568. 26. (33) Kyle Kelley, Chevrolet, 81, 50.5, 18, $10,430. 27. (34) Tomy Drissi, Ford, 79, 42.7, 0, $10,375. 28. (39) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 78, 36.5, 16, $10,305. 29. (37) Blake Koch, Dodge, 77, 46.6, 15, $18,138. 30. (42) Derrike Cope, Chevrolet, transmission, 69, 36.5, 14, $17,003. 31. (32) Timmy Hill, Ford, 66, 47.4, 13, $16,643. 32. (18) Kenny Wallace, Toyota, overheating, 64, 61.2, 12, $16,583. 33. (41) Dennis Setzer, Dodge, brakes, 63, 33.4, 11, $16,548. 34. (40) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, oil pump, 56, 36.1, 10, $16,488. 35. (35) Eric McClure, Chevrolet, accident, 53, 40.2, 9, $16,453. 36. (28) Jason Bowles, Toyota, transmission, 52, 54.9, 8, $9,950. 37. (20) Andrew Ranger, Dodge, suspension, 42, 63.6, 7, $9,900. 38. (21) J.R. Fitzpatrick, Ford, transmission, 34, 58.9, 6, $9,855. 39. (38) Dan Clarke, Chevrolet, engine, 21, 39.3, 5, $16,288. 40. (36) Mark Green, Chevrolet, brakes, 6, 34.6, 4, $9,695. 41. (30) J.J. Yeley, Dodge, brakes, 4, 32.7, 0, $9,655. 42. (29) T.J. Bell, Dodge, brakes, 4, 31.4, 0, $9,615. 43. (43) Jeff Green, Chevrolet, brakes, 1, 30.3, 1, $9,534. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 106.582 mph. Time of Race: 1 hour, 57 minutes, 14 seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.974 seconds. Caution Flags: 2 for 5 laps. Lead Changes: 6 among 2 drivers. Lap Leaders: Ku.Busch 1-8; Ky.Busch 9; Ku.Busch 10-24; Ky.Busch 25-49; Ku.Busch 50-55; Ky.Busch 56-77; Ku.Busch 78-85. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): Ky.Busch, 3 times for 48 laps; Ku.Busch, 4 times for 37 laps. Top 10 in Points: 1. R.Stenhouse Jr., 816; 2. R.Sorenson, 806; 3. E.Sadler, 792; 4. A.Almirola, 746; 5. J.Allgaier, 736; 6. J.Leffler, 703; 7. K.Wallace, 686; 8. S.Wallace, 636; 9. B.Scott, 626; 10. M.Annett, 623. NASCAR Driver Rating Formula A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a race. The formula combines the following categories: Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Running Position While on Lead Lap, Average Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.

Sprint Cup Series Heluva Good! Sour Cream Dips at The Glen Lineup Saturday qualifying At Watkins Glen International Watkins Glen, N.Y. Lap length: 2.45 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 126.421 mph. 2. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford, 126.041. 3. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 125.984. 4. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 125.663. 5. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 125.654. 6. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 125.314. 7. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 125.238. 8. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 125.202. 9. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 124.968. 10. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 124.940. 11. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 124.915. 12. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 124.908. 13. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 124.904. 14. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 124.791. 15. (51) Boris Said, Chevrolet, 124.701. 16. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 124.550. 17. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 124.451. 18. (4) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 123.998. 19. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 123.854. 20. (83) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 123.682. 21. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 123.663. 22. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 123.635. 23. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 123.517. 24. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 123.507. 25. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 123.476. 26. (13) Casey Mears, Toyota, 123.455. 27. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 123.436. 28. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 123.433. 29. (37) Scott Speed, Ford, 123.379. 30. (55) J.J. Yeley, Ford, 123.283. 31. (7) Robby Gordon, Dodge, 123.176. 32. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 122.956. 33. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota, 122.956. 34. (50) T.J. Bell, Chevrolet, 122.929. 35. (32) Andrew Ranger, Ford, 122.373. 36. (71) Andy Lally, Ford, 122.196. 37. (60) Mike Skinner, Toyota, 122.130. 38. (36) Ron Fellows, Chevrolet, 121.993. 39. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota, 121.660. 40. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 121.419. 41. (34) David Gilliland, Ford, 120.339. 42. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, owner points. 43. (38) Terry Labonte, Ford, past champion. Failed to Qualify 44. (35) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 121.904. 45. (46) Brian Simo, Ford, 119.291.

B

O

A

R

D

THE TIMES LEADER

chael Lozada, 12, lightweights. At the Convention Center, Acapulco, Mexico, Juan Palacios vs. Armando Torres, 12, for Palacios’ WBA minimumweight title; Miguel Roman vs. Abraham Rodriguez, 12, super featherweights; Oliver Flores vs. Hector Javier Marquez, 12, super featherweights. At Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Las Vegas (SHO), Joseph Agbeko vs. Abner Mares, 12, for Agbeko’s IBF and WBC Silver bantamweight titles; Eric Morel vs. Daniel Quevedo, 10, bantamweights. Aug. 19 At Dover Downs Hotel & Casino, Dover, Del., Amir Mansour vs. Dominick Guinn, 12, for the NABO interim heavyweight title. At Hammond, Ind. (ESPN2), Mauricio Herrera vs. Ruslan Provonikov, 12, junior welterweights; David Diaz vs. Hank Lundy, 10, lightweights. At Juan Vicens Auditorium, Puerto Rico, Cesar Seda, Jr. vs. Yan Barthelemy, 10, bantamweights. Aug. 20 At Agua Caliente, Mexico, Argeniz Mendez vs. Juan Carlos Salgado, 12, for the vacant IBF junior lightweight title. Aug. 26 At Donetsk, Ukraine, Viacheslav Senchenko, vs. Marco Avendano, 12, for Senchecko’s WBA World welterweight title; Karoly Balzsay vs. Stas Kashtanov, 12, for the vacant WBA World super middleweight title. Aug. 27 At Erfurt, Germany, Alexander Povetkin vs. Ruslan Chagaev, 12, for the vacant WBA World heavyweight title; Robert Helenius vs. Sergei Liakhovich, 12, for Helenius” WBA and WBO Inter-Continental heavyweight titles. At HP Pavilion, San Jose, Calif. (HBO), Marcos Maidana vs. Robert Guerrero, 12, for Maidana’s WBA World junior welterweight title. At TBA, Mexico, Adrian Hernandez, vs. Gideon Buthelezi, 12, for Hernandez’s WBC light flyweight title. Aug. 31 At Hobart, Australia, Daniel Geale vs. Eromosele Albert, 12, for Geale’s IBF middleweight title; Garth Wood vs. Johannes Mwetupunga, 12, middleweights. At Tokyo, Koki Kameda vs. David De La Mora, 12, for Kameda’s WBA World banatamweight title. Sept. 3 At Beau Rivage Resort & Casino, Biloxi, Miss., Jan Zaveck vs. Andre Berto, 12, for Zaveck’s IBF welterweight title. Sept. 10 At Wroclaw, Poland (HBO), Vitali Klitschko vs. Tomasz Adamek, 12, for Klitschko’s WBC heavyweight title. At Belfast, Northern Ireland, Paul McCloskey vs. Breidis Prescott, 12, WBA junior welterweight eliminator. At Boardwalk Hall, Atlantic City, N.J. (HBO), Yuriorkis Gamboa vs. Daniel Ponce de Leon, 12, featherweights. Sept. 17 At MGM Grand, Las Vegas (PPV), Victor Ortiz vs. Floyd Mayweather, 12, for Ortiz’s WBC welterweight title; Erik Morales vs. Lucas Matthysse, 12, for the vacant WBC super lightweight title; Jessie Vargas vs. Josesito Lopez, 10, junior welterweights. At Staples Center, Los Angeles (PPV), Saul Alvarez vs. Alfonso Gomez, 12, for Alvarez’s WBC super welterweight title. At Sinaloa, Mexico, Hugo Ruiz vs. Francisco Arce, 12, for Ruiz’s interim WBA World bantamweight title. Sept. 23 At Cagliari, Italy, Moruti Mthalane vs. Andrea Sarritzu, 12, for Mthalane’s IBF flyweight title. Sept. 24 At Club Chicago, Burbank, Ill., Roman Karmazin vs. Osumanu Adama, 12, IBF middleweight title eliminator. Sept. 30 At Santa Ynez, Calif. (SHO), Ajose Olusegun vs. Ali Chebah, 12, WBC junior welterweight eliminator. Oct. 1 At Atlantic City, N.J. (HBO), Sergio Martinez vs. Darren Barker, 12, middleweights; Brian Vera vs. Andy Lee, 10, middleweights. At MGM Grand Las Vegas, Toshiaki Nishioka vs. Rafael Marquez, 12, for Nishioka’s WBC junior featherweight title. Oct. 15 At Almaty, Kazakhstan, Gennady Golovkin vs. Lajuan Simon, 12, for Golovkin’s WBA World middleweight title. At Staples Center, Los Angeles (PPV), Bernard Hopkins vs. Chad Dawson, 12, for Hopkins’ WBC light heavyweight title; Antonio DeMarco vs. Jorge Linares, 12, for vacant WBC lightweight title. Oct. 29 At Atlantic City, N.J. (SHO), Andre Ward vs. Carl Froch, 12, for Ward’s WBA and Froch’s WBC super welterweight titles. Nov. 12 At MGM Grand, Las Vegas (PPV), Manny Pacquiao vs. Juan Manuel Marquez, 12, for Pacquiao’s WBO welterweight title.

M L S EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF GA 9 7 7 34 24 22 8 5 9 33 27 20 6 6 13 31 39 35 7 7 9 30 32 30 7 6 9 30 33 33 6 7 10 28 28 28 4 11 11 23 25 46 4 10 9 21 22 33 2 7 14 20 25 32

Columbus ................... Philadelphia ............... New York.................... Sporting Kansas City D.C. ............................. Houston ...................... Toronto FC................. New England.............. Chicago ......................

WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF GA Los Angeles .............. 13 3 9 48 35 20 FC Dallas................... 12 6 6 42 31 24 Seattle ........................ 11 5 9 42 35 27 Colorado .................... 9 6 10 37 35 31 Real Salt Lake .......... 10 6 6 36 30 17 Chivas USA............... 7 8 9 30 30 26 Portland...................... 7 10 5 26 28 35 San Jose .................... 5 8 10 25 25 30 Vancouver ................. 3 12 9 18 25 40 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. Saturday's Games Seattle FC 0, Chivas USA 0, tie Toronto FC 1, Real Salt Lake 0 Columbus 3, New England at 1 New York 2, Chicago 2, tie D.C. United 4, Vancouver 0 FC Dallas at Philadelphia, 8 p.m. Colorado at San Jose, 10:30 p.m. Today's Games Portland at Houston, 9 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 17 Houston at New England, 7:30 p.m. Portland at Sporting Kansas City, 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 18 D.C. United at Chicago, 9 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 20 Philadelphia at Columbus, 7:30 p.m. New York at New England, 7:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Houston, 8:30 p.m. Seattle FC at FC Dallas, 9 p.m. Chivas USA at Colorado, 9 p.m. Vancouver at Portland, 10 p.m. San Jose at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 21 Toronto FC at Chicago, 7 p.m. D.C. United at Sporting Kansas City, 8:30 p.m.

MoveThatBlock.com Indy 225 Lineup Saturday qualifying At New Hampshire Motor Speedway Loudon, N.H. Lap length: 1.058 miles (Car number in parentheses) All cars Dallara chassis, Honda engine 1. (10) Dario Franchitti, 170.843 mph. 2. (2) Oriol Servia, 169.831. 3. (82) Tony Kanaan, 169.698. 4. (06) James Hinchcliffe, 169.590. 5. (28) Ryan Hunter-Reay, 169.570. 6. (6) Ryan Briscoe, 169.451. 7. (9) Scott Dixon, 169.114. 8. (5) Takuma Sato, 169.044. 9. (3) Helio Castroneves, 168.886. 10. (83) Charlie Kimball, 168.434. 11. (4) J.R. Hildebrand, 168.047. 12. (27) Mike Conway, 167.852. 13. (12) Will Power, 167.011. 14. (19) Alex Lloyd, 166.877. 15. (7) Danica Patrick, 166.834. 16. (77) Alex Tagliani, 166.809. 17. (59) E.J. Viso, 166.536. 18. (22) Tomas Scheckter, 166.381. 19. (14) Vitor Meira, 166.253. 20. (18) James Jakes, 165.265. 21. (24) Ana Beatriz, 164.958. 22. (26) Marco Andretti, 164.722. 23. (38) Graham Rahal, 163.816. 24. (34) Sebastian Saavedra, 162.285. 25. (67) Ed Carpenter, 161.734. 26. (78) Simona de Silvestro, 157.437. 27. (30) Pippa Mann.

F I G H T S C H E D U L E Aug. 10 At Tokyo, Kazuto Ioka vs. Juan Hernandez, 12, for Ioka’s WBC minimumweight title. Aug. 12 At St. Charles, Mo. (ESPN2), Antwone Smith vs. Kermit Cintron, 10, junior middleweights. Aug. 13 At Broadbeach, Australia, Michael Katsidis vs. Mi-

GB — 11⁄2 3 51⁄2 61⁄2 91⁄2

WESTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct 17 5 .773 13 9 .591 13 10 .565 13 10 .565 9 13 .409 1 21 .045

GB — 4 41⁄2 41⁄2 8 16

Minnesota ...................... San Antonio ................... Phoenix .......................... Seattle............................. Los Angeles................... Tulsa ...............................

Friday's Games Washington 64, New York 63 Minnesota 79, Chicago 76 Los Angeles 93, Phoenix 90, OT Saturday's Games Connecticut 82, Washington 75 Indiana 81, New York 71 Atlanta at Seattle, 10 p.m. Today's Games Chicago at San Antonio, 3 p.m. Tulsa at Minnesota, 7 p.m.

C F L EAST DIVISION WL 51 52 33 15

T Pts PF PA 0 10 152 113 0 10 222 161 0 6 152 144 0 2 128 178

WEST DIVISION WL 52 52 15 16

T Pts PF PA 0 10 194 172 0 10 173 154 0 2 150 172 0 2 147 229

Winnipeg................................... Montreal.................................... Hamilton.................................... Toronto .....................................

Calgary ..................................... Edmonton ................................. B.C. ........................................... Saskatchewan..........................

Thursday's Game Montreal 27, Edmonton 4 Friday's Game Calgary 45, Saskatchewan 35 Saturday's Games

MEETINGS Checkerboard Inn Bowling League will have a meeting in the meeting room at Chacko’s Family Bowling Center on Wednesday, August 17 at 7 p.m. League Business will be discussed prior to the start of the 2011-2012 season. All teams must be represented and all bowlers are welcome. PRACTICES Coughlin Varsity and CoughlinSolomon/Plains Junior High Fall Cross Country Teams will begin practice on Monday morning, August 15, at 8 a.m. at the Coughlin Gym in Wilkes-Barre. Practices will be held Monday though Friday. All athletes must have their physicals forms completed and handed in prior to practice. Physicals forms may also be picked up at practice. Meyers varsity soccer will begin practice Monday, August 15, at 5:00 p.m. at Gibby Field. All players in grades 9 through 12 must report. Any questions, please call Coach Nolan at 829-0697. REGISTRATIONS/TRYOUTS Pa. Fusion Girls Travel Softball Team will be holding first try outs for 2011-2012 season for 12u,14u,16u travel teams on the following dates: 12u: Sept 3 at 10 a.m.; 14u: Sept 3 at noon; 16u: Sept 3 at 2 p.m. All try outs will be held Nanticoke Little League Field. For more info call, Mark at 570-902-5198. A second tryout will be held Sept 10 and a third tryout will be held Sept 17. Stripes & Strikes Softball Program will be holding tryouts for the 2012 season in four age groups: 10u, 12u, 14u and 16u. For more information or an individual tryout by appointment, contact Vince Trivelpiece at 570-233-3925 or vince11@ptd.net. Tryouts will be held at the following times at the 17th Street Field in Hazleton: Aug. 17: U16, 6 p.m.; U14, 7:15 p.m.; Aug. 19: U12 7:15 p.m.; U10, 6 p.m.; Aug. 20: U16, 10 a.m.; U16, 11:15 a.m.; U10, 1 p.m.; Aug. 23: U16, 6 p.m.; U14, 10 a.m.; U10, 7:15 p.m. Valley Regional Warriors14U travel team has announced tryouts for the 2011-2012 season. The tryouts will be held Aug. 12 and Aug. 26 starting at 6 p.m. each day at the Freedom Park softball complex in Drums, which is located at the rear of 413 W. Butler Dr., Drums. For more information, contact Warriors head coach Bill Corraat 570-578-1774 or bcorra@live.com. West Pittston Little League will hold Fall Ball registration Monday, August 15 from 6 – 8 p.m. at the Little League Field. Little League will cost $25 and Junior/Senior

Toronto at Hamilton, 7 p.m. Winnipeg at B.C., 10 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 18 Saskatchewan at Toronto, 7:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 19 B.C. at Edmonton, 9 p.m.

League will be $45. Wyoming Valley Flames Travel Softball Team will be holding tryouts for their 2012 teams August 20 at the Ashley Babe Ruth field. U10 and U12 tryouts will begin at 12 p.m., and U14 and U18 tryouts will begin at 1 p.m. For more information contact Bob at 570-7356621 or Pat at 570-466-9644. UPCOMING EVENTS 52nd Annual JCC Golf Tournament, honoring Satan Smulyn will be held Monday, September 12 at the Fox Hill Country Club. There is a 1 p.m. shotgun start and there will be dinner and prizes following the tournament. All are welcome. For more information, please contact Bull Buzza at 570-824-4646 ext 232. 2011 Dunmore Missy League ASA 14U All-Star Tournament will be held from August 18-21 at Sherwood Park in Dunmore. Format is double elimination and cost is $150 plus one new ball. The event is open to all REC level all-star teams. No travel teams! For additional information call Dino Darbenzio at 570-650-5159 or email at ddarbenzio@yahoo.com. Cavanaugh’s Grille 7th Annual Golf Tournament for the benefit of the Mountaintop Hose Company No. 1 and the Marian Sutherland Kirby Library will be held Friday, September 9, at the Mountain Laurel Golf Course. The tournament will have a 1 p.m. shotgun start with a captain and crew format. Refreshments will be provided at the course and a dinner will follow at Cavanaugh’s grill. Golfers are welcome at $80 per entry, along with sponsors at $50. Contact Kevin at 570-881-6307 or Gary at 570-760-8847. Hazleton City View BMX will hold its next local race at 2 p.m. Sunday. Cost for current riders is $5/points or $10/trophy and points. Registration is from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. Other races in August are scheduled for Aug. 18, Aug 21, and Aug. 28. The 1st Annual Quad point Coal Cracker race is on Aug. 27. Hazleton City View holds practices on Tuesdays and possibly Thursdays during August. New riders are welcome any time during the local BMX season. Bring your bike, long sleeve shirt, long pants and helmet. Some equipment may be available at the track to borrow. Trial membership is $25 for 30 days and $5 for most local races or $45 annual membership and $5 for most local races. All scheduled events are tentative based on weather, track condition, and availability of volunteers. Please call or check facebook the day of the event. For more information about Hazleton City View BMX, contact us via email at bmx@hazletoncityview.com, or visit facebook.com/HazletonBMX. You can contact Track Director, Jack Longo at 570-956-3747.

Bulletin Board items will not be accepted over the telephone. Items may be faxed to 831-7319, emailed to tlsports@timesleader.com or dropped off at the Times Leader or mailed to Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250.

signed players. March 19 — Last day to place a player on unconditional release waivers and pay 30 days termination pay instead of 45 days. April 2 — Last day to request unconditional release waivers on a player without having to pay his full 2012 salary. April 4 — Opening day, St. Louis at Florida. Active rosters reduced to 25 players. July 10 — All-Star game, Kansas City, Mo. July 31 — Last day to trade a player without securing waivers. Sept. 1 — Active rosters expand to 40 players. Dec. 3-6 — Winter meetings, Nashville, Tenn.

Longest Hitting Streaks Since 1901 (x-active streak):

EASTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct 16 7 .696 14 8 .636 13 10 .565 10 12 .455 10 14 .417 5 15 .250

Indiana............................ Connecticut.................... New York ....................... Atlanta............................. Chicago .......................... Washington....................

CAMPS The Hanover Area Baseball team will be holding a baseball camp Wednesday, August 24, from 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. at the high school. The camp is part of Steve Zuranski’s senior project and the money will go to Breast Cancer Awareness. The cost is $20 and is open to anyone grades 2-7 residing in the Hanover Area School District. You can register the day of the camp or to pre-register call Mike at 2628291.

B A S E B A L L

W N B A I R L

BULLETIN BOARD

www.timesleader.com

Player, Team, Year ...............................................No. Joe DiMaggio, New York (A), 1941 .................... 56 Pete Rose, Cincinnati, 1978 ................................ 44 George Sisler, St. Louis (A), 1922 ...................... 41 Ty Cobb, Detroit, 1911 ......................................... 40 Paul Molitor, Milwaukee, 1987............................. 39 Jimmy Rollins, Philadelphia, 2005-06 ................ 38 Tommy Holmes, Boston (N), 1945 ..................... 37 Chase Utley, Philadelphia, 2006......................... 35 Luis Castillo, Florida, 2002 .................................. 35 Ty Cobb, Detroit, 1917 ......................................... 35 Benito Santiago, San Diego, 1987...................... 34 Dom DiMaggio, Boston (A), 1949 ....................... 34 George McQuinn, St. Louis (A), 1938 ................ 34 George Sisler, St. Louis (A), 1925 ...................... 34 x-Dan Uggla, Atlanta, 2011 ............................... 33 Heinie Manush, Washington, 1933..................... 33 Rogers Hornsby, St. Louis (N), 1922 ................. 33 Hal Chase, New York (A), 1907 .......................... 33 Vladimir Guerrero, Montreal, 1999 ..................... 31 Ken Landreaux, Minnesota, 1980 ....................... 31 Rico Carty, Atlanta, 1970 ..................................... 31 Willie Davis, Los Angeles, 1969.......................... 31 Sam Rice, Washington, 1924.............................. 31 Nap Lajoie, Cleveland, 1906 ............................... 31 Andre Ethier, L.A. Dodgers, 2011....................... 30 Ryan Zimmerman, Washington, 2009................ 30 Moises Alou, New York (N), 2007....................... 30 Willy Taveras, Houston, 2006 ............................. 30 Albert Pujols, St. Louis, 2003 .............................. 30 Luis Gonzalez, Arizona, 1999 ............................. 30 Sandy Alomar Jr., Cleveland, 1997 .................... 30 Eric Davis, Baltimore, 1997.................................. 30 Nomar Garciaparra, Boston, 1997 ..................... 30 Jerome Walton, Chicago (N), 1989 .................... 30 George Brett, Kansas City, 1980 ........................ 30 Ron LeFlore, Detroit, 1976 .................................. 30 Stan Musial, St. Louis (N), 1950 ......................... 30 Goose Goslin, Detroit, 1934 ................................ 30 Bing Miller, Phi (A), 1929 ..................................... 30 Tris Speaker, Boston (A), 1912........................... 30 Baseball Calendar Aug. 15 — Last day to sign selections from 2011 amateur draft who have not exhausted college eligibility. Aug. 17-18 — Owners’ meetings, Cooperstown, N.Y. Sept. 1 — Active rosters expand to 40 players. Sept. 30 or Oct. 1 — Playoffs begin. Oct. 19 — World Series begins, city of NL champion. October-November — Free agent period to sign exclusively with former teams, first five days after World Series ends. Nov. 14-15 — General managers’ meetings, Milwaukee. Nov. 15-16 — Owners’ meetings, Milwaukee. Nov, 23 — Last day for teams to offer salary arbitration to their former players who became free agents. Dec. 5-8 — Winter meetings, Dallas. Dec. 7 — Last day for free agents offered salary arbitration to accept the offers. Dec. 11 — Collective bargaining agreement expires. Dec. 12 — Last day for teams to offer 2012 contracts to unsigned players. 2012 Jan. 5-15 — Salary arbitrating filing. Jan. 18 — Exchange of salary arbitration figures. Feb. 1-21 — Salary arbitration hearings, St. Petersburg, Fla. Feb. 19 — Voluntary reporting date for pitchers, catchers and injured players. Feb. 24 — Voluntary reporting date for other players. March 2 — Mandatory reporting date. March 2-11 — Teams may renew contracts of un-

B R I T I S H S O C C E R Premier League Team GP W D Bolton .................................. 1 1 0 Wolverhampton.................. 1 1 0 Liverpool ............................. 1 0 1 Norwich ............................... 1 0 1 Sunderland ......................... 1 0 1 Wigan .................................. 1 0 1 Arsenal................................ 1 0 1 Aston Villa........................... 1 0 1 Fulham ................................ 1 0 1 Newcastle ........................... 1 0 1 Chelsea............................... 0 0 0 Everton................................ 0 0 0 Manchester City................. 0 0 0 Manchester United ............ 0 0 0 Stoke ................................... 0 0 0 Swansea ............................. 0 0 0 Tottenham .......................... 0 0 0 West Bromwich Albion...... 0 0 0 Blackburn............................ 1 0 0 Queens Park Rangers ...... 1 0 0

L GF GA Pts 0 4 0 3 0 2 1 3 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 1 0 4 0

League Championship Team GP W D L GF GA Pts Southampton...................... 2 2 0 0 4 1 6 Brighton............................... 2 2 0 0 3 1 6 Derby................................... 2 2 0 0 3 1 6 Millwall................................. 2 1 1 0 4 2 4 Reading............................... 2 1 1 0 4 2 4 Middlesbrough ................... 2 1 1 0 3 2 4 Ipswich ................................ 2 1 0 1 3 1 3 Crystal Palace.................... 2 1 0 1 3 2 3 Peterborough ..................... 1 1 0 0 2 1 3 Blackpool ............................ 1 1 0 0 1 0 3 Cardiff.................................. 1 1 0 0 1 0 3 Birmingham ........................ 2 1 0 1 2 2 3 Hull....................................... 2 1 0 1 1 1 3 West Ham ........................... 2 1 0 1 1 1 3 Leicester ............................. 2 1 0 1 1 2 3 Portsmouth ......................... 2 0 1 1 2 3 1 Watford................................ 2 0 1 1 2 3 1 Barnsley .............................. 2 0 1 1 0 1 1 Burnley................................ 2 0 1 1 2 4 1 Nottingham Forest............. 2 0 1 1 0 2 1 Doncaster ........................... 2 0 0 2 1 3 0 Coventry ............................. 2 0 0 2 0 2 0 Leeds................................... 2 0 0 2 1 4 0 Bristol City .......................... 1 0 0 1 0 3 0

◆ BUILDING TRUST The Times Leader strives to correct errors, clarify stories and update them promptly. Sports corrections will appear in this spot. If you have information to help us correct an inaccuracy or cover an issue more thoroughly, call the sports department at 829-7143.


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 PAGE 3C

YANKEESSUNDAY

PHILLIES PROSPECTS

Colvin leading the way on the farm

OF Parraz is having a good year after a rough spring

YA N K E E S P R O S P E C T S

Montero is tops in Yanks’ system

Editor’s Note: Here’s a look at the Phillies’ top prospects, according to MLB.com, how they are faring and where they are currently playing:

Editor’s Note: Here’s a look at the Yankees’ top 10 prospects according to MLB.com, where they are now and how they are faring:

By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

1. Brody Colvin, starting pitcher, Single-A Clearwater: The right-hander who is celebrating his 21st birthday today, has a 2-6 record in 18 starts with a 4.65 ERA and 62 strikeouts in 93 innings. 2. Sebastian Valle, catcher, Single-A Clearwater: The 21year-old is batting .301 with five home runs, 39 RBI and an onbase percentage of .327 in 309 at-bats for the Threshers. 3. Jesse Biddle, starting pitcher, Low-A Lakewood: The lefthanded first-round pick from 2010 has a 5-8 record with a 3.11 ERA and 115 strikeouts in 1182⁄3 innings. 4. Trevor May, starting pitcher, Single-A Clearwater: The strikeout machine picked up his second complete-game shutout of the season last week when he fanned nine in seven innings to improve his record to 9-6. 5. Aaron Altherr, outfielder, Short Season Single-A Williamsport: For the Crosscutters, he’s batting .295 in 51 games. 6. Cesar Hernandez, second base, Single-A Clearwater: The switch-hitting 21-year-old has played in 100 games for the Threshers this year, posting a .249 average with four home runs, 33 RBI and 19 stolen bases. 7. Justin De Fratus, reliever, Triple-A Lehigh Valley: A righty, he’s made 20 appearances for the IronPigs this season, going 2-2 with a 4.34 ERA after being promoted from Reading. 8. Jiwan James, outfielder, Single-A Clearwater: The 22year-old is batting .274 with three homers, 28 RBI and 22 stolen bases in 442 at-bats. 9. Jonathan Pettibone, starting pitcher, Single-A Clearwater: The 21-year-old right-hander is part of a deep staff in Clearwater and has started 23 games for the Threshers, posting an 8-10 record with a 3.14 ERA in 140 1⁄3 innings. 10. Phillippe Aumont, relief pitcher, Triple-A Lehigh Valley: The righty, who was one of the chips in the Cliff Lee trade to Seattle in 2009, doesn’t have an impressive record (1-5) this season – which started in Double-A Reading – but he’s held minor league hitters to a .222 batting average in 36 games with the R-Phils and the IronPigs.

1. Jesus Montero, catcher, Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre: Montero is hitting .283 with 13 home runs and 55 RBI in 96 games for the Yankees. 2. Manny Banuelos, starting pitcher, Triple-A Scranton/ Wilkes-Barre: The 20-year-old lefty has made three starts for the Yankees since being promoted. He’s posted a 0-1 record with 16 Ks in 16 2⁄3 innings. Overall in the minors, he’s fanned 110 in 112 innings. 3. Dellin Betances, starting pitcher, Double-A Trenton: A right-hander for the Thunder, he’s 4-6 with 115 strikeouts and a 3.42 ERA in 1051⁄3 innings. 4. Gary Sanchez, catcher, Single-A Charleston: For the RiverDogs, he has blasted seven home runs in his last 10 games, including a two-home-run-day on Aug. 3 and Aug 10. For the season, he has belted 17 longballs to go along with a .256 batting average and 52 RBI in 82 games and 301 at-bats. With a .332 average in his last 10 games, he’s raised his average nearly 30 points. 5. Austin Romine, catcher, Double-A Trenton: The 21-yearold backstop is hitting .283. He has five home runs and 44 RBI in 71 games for the Thunder. He is currently on the disabled list. 6. Slade Heathcott, outfielder, Single-A Tampa: The No. 1 pick from 2009 was promoted to Tampa and hit the DL with a shoulder issue after playing just one game. His minors totals consist of a .279 average with five home runs. He hasn’t played since June 29. 7. Adam Warren, pitcher, Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre: He hasn’t won a start since June, but hasn’t been bad in those nine starts with a 3.48 ERA in that time. Overall for the Yankees, he’s made 23 starts and going 6-5 with a 3.39 ERA and one complete game. Batters are hitting just .256 against the righty. 8. David Phelps, pitcher, Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre: For SWB, he has made 14 starts, going 4-6 with a 3.38 ERA and fanning 74 in 85 1⁄3 innings and has been on the disabled list. His comeback to Triple-A appears imminent. He made a rehab start in the Gulf Coast League Saturday and picked up the win allowing just two hits in five scoreless innings. 9. Andrew Brackman, pitcher, Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre: He has lowered his ERA more than half down to 6.86. He has a 2-6 record and has allowed 70 walks and 74 hits in 811⁄3 innings, but he’s made dramatic improvements over his last few outings. In his last two appearances, he has allowed just one walk and one hit in 5 2⁄3 innings. 10. Cito Culver, shortstop, Short Season Staten Island: The switch-hitting first round draft pick from 2010 (32nd overall) won’t turn 19 until the end of this month and is hitting .278 with 31 RBI and five stolen bases in 51 games for the ShortSeason Yankees.

LOCALS IN MINORS

Hot Canzler comes to town for four By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

Russ Canzler: The Hazleton Area grad, who is an outfielder for Durham, the Triple-A affiliate of the Tampa Bay Rays, will makes his first appearance at PNC Field as a professional this week when Durham faces Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Tuesday through Friday. He has been hot lately raising his batting average over the .300 mark, now at .318 with 16 home runs, 35 doubles and 72 RBI in 108 games for the Bulls as he is now third in the International League in batting average. Over his last 10 games, the former Cubs prospect is hitting a lusty .500 (22-for-44) with three home runs and a triple. Cory Spangenberg: An Abington Heights grad and the 10th overall draft pick by the Padres last month got off to a stellar start for the Short-Season Eugene (Ore.) Emeralds and was promoted to Class-A Fort Wayne (Ind.) in the Midwest League. After struggling early on for the Tin Caps, he’s picked up the pace with five two-hit games out of his last seven to raise his batting average to .212 (22for-104) with 12 RBI and six stolen bases in 27 games. Overall in the minors, he’s batting .289 with two homers, 32 RBI and 16 stolen bases in 52 games.

DON CAREY TIMES LEADER PHOTO.

SWB Yankees left fielder Jordan Parraz puts the ball in play during a game with the Gwinnett Barves Tuesday. Parraz is the only Yankee that began the season with the team to have a batting average over .300

Enjoying his time at PNC By JOSH HORTON For The Times Leader

Jordan Parraz didn’t really impress the Yankees organization during spring training. However, he turned things around quickly once the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees opened their season in Lehigh Valley. “At the end of spring training I was struggling and felt pretty bad. I felt good and then I lost it, so I figured I would just start earlier, because I felt like I was getting beat,” Parraz said. “I started doing it on my own in Lehigh Valley and it felt good and haven’t really gone back since.” One of the reasons he hasn’t gone back to his old ways is because he hasn’t had much reason to. Parraz has been consistently around .300 this year – being the only Scranton/Wilkes-Barre player who started the season with the team to be or above the mark currently– and has done so under the radar. Mike Lamb and Terry Tiffee have hit .300 or better, but joined the team a few months into the season. “To be honest with you, he has surprised the heck out of me this year,” Scranton/ Wilkes-Barre Yankees hitting coach Butch Wynegar said. “He didn’t have the best spring, but he has been terrific

“To be honest with you, he has surprised the heck out of me this year. He didn’t have the best spring, but he has been terrific for us this season and works so hard.” Butch Wynegar Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees hitting coach on Jordan Parraz

for us this season and works so hard. It’s great to see a guy work that hard and have it pay off.” In addition to his hard work, Parraz feels the key to being successful at the Triple-A level is to make sure you don’t get too excited when you’re playing well and to make sure you don’t get down on yourself when you’re going through a funk. “I feel like Butch has really helped me out a lot, it’s just one of those things when you have ups and downs. But everyday you got to show up to the ballpark and continue to battle and try and put up some good numbers,” Parraz said. “Hopefully I do that and hopefully I put up some good numbers and hopefully I get noticed and I get an opportunity at the next level.” The opportunity he seeks at the next level is something he has never gotten before in eight seasons of professional baseball. He had an interesting offseason to say the least. In the

past two years, the Scranton/ Wilkes-Barre outfielder has been a part the Kansas City Royals and Boston Red Sox organizations in addition to the Yankees. Parraz played the entire 2010 season with the Omaha Royals in Triple-A. He finished the 2010 campaign hitting .266 with 11 homers and drove in 66 runs in 123 games for the Royals top farm club. “It was just one of those situations where I needed a new environment,” Parraz said. “I was in a good situation with the Royals and they treated me well. It was just things didn’t work out the exact way I wanted them to and I kind of had a bad start to the year.” The new scenery has been kind to Parraz as he is hitting for a high average and is a big part of the Scranton/WilkesBarre lineup. “I am happy to be a part of the Yankees. It’s one of those things where you’re happy to be a part of such a big organization,” Parraz said. “Everything about it is top notch.

You can’t complain and the facility is nice and everything else is great.” Parraz said that his success this year has been even keeled. “Sometimes you feel really, really good and you’re not getting hits and sometimes you feel really, really bad and you are getting hits,” Parraz said. “You have to try to stay even keeled, no matter what you’re doing.” Parraz’s success this season reaches beyond just hitting. He is a big part of the outfield and his arm has earned him respect around the league. “I like to throw guys out, but it’s nice when teams show you some respect by not running on you,” Parraz said. “That’s a great feeling, but I love getting the opportunity to throw guys out.” Parraz has enjoyed the personal experience, but he also wants his teammates to do well and especially wants the team as a whole to perform well. “Hopefully as a team we can get on a roll and play some quality baseball,” Parraz said. “You never know with the playoff race, but it’s one of those things where you just have to go out there and try your best and have fun with your teammates and hopefully everyone is getting better as the season goes on.”

UPCOMING SCHEDULE

Today at Syracuse 5 p.m.

Monday at Syracuse 7 p.m.

Tuesday Durham 7:05 p.m.

Wednesday Durham 7:05 p.m.

Thursday Durham 7:05 p.m.

Friday Durham 7:05 p.m.

Aug. 20 at Rochester 7:05 p.m.

On This Date Gary Bennett wasn’t known as a power-hitting catcher or even a top prospect like Jesus Montero. But on Aug. 16, 1998, the Red Baron had one of the best offensive performances in Scranton/Wilkes-Barre history. He piled up a franchise-record 13 total bases in a win over Buffalo. In the game he slammed three home runs. Bennett is the only player in SWB history to go deep three times in one game. The three bashes were one of a few good stories for the Red Barons in the game as they trailed Buffalo 10-3, but came back to win 15-10 in a 14-inning thriller on Bennett’s 14th-inning grand slam. The Barons also slugged a team-record seven home runs in the game.


CMYK PAGE 4C

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

S

P

O

R

T

S

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

ARENA FOOTBALL

Former WBS Pioneers finally find arena football glory Ex-coach Les Moss and several ex-Pioneers win title with Jacksonville. DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

It will be two years ago this week when the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Pioneers advanced to ArenaCup X and left Las Vegas without a trophy. That loss wrapped up a successful run of two trips to the af2 title game in three years for the Pioneers. A few days after that loss, the team was put up for sale and team’s future was sacked when the af2 folded and teams joined the new Arena Football League. That left one of the most prominent professional sports teams in the Wyoming Valley was without a title.

Fans of the now-defunct team may have celebrated Friday night as the Pioneers finally won their championship. Moss Sort of. The Jacksonville Sharks, which is comprised of six former Pioneers, won ArenaBowl XXIV defeating the Arizona Rattlers 73-70 for the league’s championship. The Sharks won the title in dramatic fashion when quarterback Aaron Garcia found Jeron Harvey in the end zone as time expired in the fourth quarter to give the team the title. Jacksonville is coached by former Pioneers head and assistant coach Les Moss, who has led the team the last two years. Moss coached the Pioneers in 2004 and

2005 then returned to the club as assistant to Rich Ingold for the run in 2009. Moss’ defensive coordinator in Jacksonville is also a familiar face in Jake Grande, who held the same post for Wilkes-Barre/Scranton. Grande, a former captain for Wilkes University, coached the Pioneers defense for four years. Those are just two of the ties the Pioneers had in Friday night’s championship game in Arizona. Three former Wilkes-Barre/ Scranton players participated in the title game and had a huge role in the victory. Kirby Griffin, Micheaux Robinson and Justin Parrish had big games for Jacksonville. Robinson was Defensive Player of the Year for the Pioneers in 2009 piling up 14 interceptions in the regular season. On Friday, he earned the Defensive Player of the Game honor and came up with

PGA Continued from Page 1C

stars are watching from home, failing to make the cut. U.S. Open champion Rory McIlroy, who came into the week as the favorite, struggled to a 74 with his ailing wrist and won’t be a factor on Sunday. Into the void stepped several Americans known only to the most ardent golf fans. But they’ve put the U.S. in position to capture its first major title since Phil Mickelson won the 2010 Masters. Since then, it’s an 0-for-6 drought, this country’s longest of the modern Grand Slam era. The 34-year-old Dufner, who had not made a cut since late May, showed his moxie after a couple of three-putt bogeys knocked him out of the lead. He bounced back with a birdie at the 15th, the longest par-3 on the course, and made it two in a row by rolling in a 12-footer at the next hole. He’s got the closest thing to a home-course advantage among the leaders — he lives about two hours away in Auburn, Ala., and is used to playing in the blistering heat and on Bermuda greens. “Maybe I’m a little bit surprised to be in the final group at a major,” Dufner said. “But I’m not surprised to be playing well on this type of golf course.” Steele, a 28-year-old Californian, birdied five of the first 10 holes, shaking off a double bogey at the seventh when he drove into a swale on the left, tried to putt it on and watched in dismay as the ball rolled back to his feet. Bradley, the 25-year-old nephew of LGPA Hall of Famer Pat Bradley, got off to a jittery start. He drove his first shot into a bunker, did the same with the second and wound up taking a doublebogey 6. But he quickly steadied himself, dropping only one more shot with a bogey at the seventh on the way to a 204. “That was a tough first hole, but I really calmed down after that,” he said. “It didn’t really bother me much at all. I played

YANKEES Continued from Page 1C

groundout. Scranton/Wilkes-Barre connected against Milone early, battering him for two hits in each of the first two innings. That paid off with the first run of the game in the second, when Brandon Laird’s single to center drove in Terry Tiffee. The flipside of the start, how-

TRIATHLON Continued from Page 1C

Triathlon officials said they were expecting 500 participants, including those in the team events, to compete in the race. The anniversary edition of the triathlon brought out many area athletes to the race for this year. “We’re hoping to have 500 bodies,” stated Gensel. “But there are a lot of locals this year. As far as actual number of entries, it’s on par with what we typically total.”

AP PHOTOS

Trevor Immelman hits out of a bunker on the first hole during the third round of the PGA Championship Saturday.

WHERE ARE THEY NOW? Here’s a list of former notable Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Pioneers where they were this season and how their teams fared: Les Moss, Coach, Jacksonville Sharks (17-4 won ArenaBowl XXIV) Jake Grande, Defensive Coordinator, Jacksonville Kirby Griffin, RB Jacksonville Jacob Hobbs, OL/DL Jacksonville Justin Parrish, DL, Jacksonville Micheaux Robinson, DB, Jacksonville Irving Campbell, WR Pittsburgh Power (9-9) LaBrose Hedgeman, DB Utah Blaze (9-9) Ryan Vena, QB, Philadelphia Soul (6-12)

what was possibly the biggest pick off of his pro career when he nabbed a pass from Arizona QB Nick Davila and returned it eight yards. ble bogey. Masters champion Charl Schwartzel was at 208 after a 66, trying to win a second major title before the year is done. “The course is just very penalizing,” the South African said. “I just played a little bit more — I want to say conservative maybe — but more clever. A few of the holes that were inviting me the first two rounds, I took with a bit more caution.” David Toms, who won the PGA the last time it came to Atlanta in 2001, went even lower with a 65 and also was five shots back. He was sparked by a long eagle putt at the 12th, and followed with birdies at 13 and 14. He made another birdie at the tough closing hole after a 5-iron from 190 yards barely cleared the water. “I thought I got it in there pretty tight,” Toms said. “But obviously, the way the crowd oohed and aahed up there, I was glad to get over the water.” He won his only major title with a gutsy call at that same hole in 2001. Clinging to a oneshot lead over Mickelson, Toms chose to lay up short of the water with his second shot. He knocked a wedge 12 feet from the hole and made the par putt to hold off Lefty. Toms started feeling good vibes as he walked up to the 15th, where there’s a plaque marking his most memorable shot from 2001 — a hole-in-one. “People were saying stuff in the crowd about doing it again, that kind of thing, and you flash black to this time, this week, 10 years ago,” he said. “A lot of memories for sure. The golf course is different. The golf course if much more demanding, so I have to play extremely well.” Mickelson shot 69 but still had a lot of work to do, going to Sunday seven strokes off the lead. McIlroy went the wrong way on Moving Day, but he did catch a break at the par-3 17th. His tee shot landed on a rock wall along the bunker, bounced at least 50 feet in the air and came down on the green. He smiled and made par.

really well.” There were some familiar names lurking near the top. Forty-seven-year-old Scott Verplank had two late birdies for a 69 and headed to the clubhouse at 205, his creaky body holding up in the heat. Steve Stricker, the topranked American in the world at age 44, was another stroke back after a 69 of his own. Neither of the old-timers has won a major title. Maybe this will be their week. “It feels great,” Verplank said. “I don’t feel a day older than a hundred.”

Jim Furyk was in the mix until he put two balls in the water at the 18th and took double bogey. The 73 dropped him to 209, a daunting six strokes off the lead. He was joined by the world’s topranked players, No. 1 Luke Donald (68) and No. 2 Lee Westwood (70). Donald closed within a shot of the lead until a brutal finish. He drove into a bunker at the 18th and had no choice but to blast out into the fairway. Then, going at the flag a little too aggressively, he dunked his third shot in the water and wound up taking dou-

ever, were the Yankees wasted opportunities. Parraz grounded into a double play in the first and Luis Nunez did the same in the second to choke off any more potential scoring. Jorge Vazquez ended the first inning with a landmark strikeout. It was the 990th time a Yankees hitter had fanned this season, the most in franchise history. The team had been tied with the 2001 Red Barons in that department. Vazquez was the appropriate

LOOKING AHEAD

hitter to clear that bar. He came into the contest pacing the International League with 145 strikeouts, and fanned four more times

Saturday. Note – Pitcher Scott Proctor is back in the New York organization. According to ESPN New York.com., New York has signed Proctor, 34, to a minor-league deal after Atlanta released him Saturday. The right-handed reliever pitched for New York from 2004-2007. Proctor appeared in 31 games out of the bullpen for the Braves this season, going 2-3 with a 6.44 ERA in 29 1/3 innings.

Shavertown’s Kelly Ciravolo looks to repeat her 2010 championship at the triathlon. Ciravolo prevailed with an eight-second victory over Jessica Chong, of Allentown, with a 2:20.20 time. Monica Obsitos, of Wilkes-Barre, was two minutes behind with a third-place showing. No Wyoming Valley participant has ever finished first in the men’s individual race. Prior to 2006, the Wilkes-Barre Triathlon stood as a professional event. Local competition is looking to claim its first men’s individual title from Doug Clark, of Morris-

town, N.J., whose time of 2:04:38 was nearly two minutes faster than the competition last year. Fans can watch the swim course near The Harveys Lake Beach Club. The bike and running courses can be viewed from near the Penn State-Wilkes-Barre campus. During cycling and running competiton, many Back Mountain roads will be blocked off to public access. For the second consecutive year, rain is forecast for the Wilkes-Barre Triathlon. According to Accuweather, scattered rain is scheduled to hit Lehman

Township tomorrow morning. Last year’s race was marred by torrential rains that brought 0.87 inches of precipitation that fogged vision and slowed down cyclists.. “I swam in it last year, and it was difficult to navigate in the waters,” said Kelly Leighton, of Harrisburg, who is competing as an individual for the first time in an Olympic-distanced triathlon. “Hopefully, we can avoid racing in the rain again this year. “If it happens, it happens. It’s nothing I haven’t practiced in before.”

What: Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees vs. Syracuse Chiefs When: 5 p.m. today Where: Alliance Bank Stadium Probables: Scranton/Wilkes-Barre RHP Adam Warren (6-5, 3.39) vs. Syracuse RHP Yunesky Maya (1-8, 5.30)

•Jeff Hughley, who caught five passes for 84 yards and a touchdown for the Sharks on Friday, was a premier kick returner for the Tulsa Talons in af2 from 2007-09. He set league records for all-purpose yards in 2009, which included a three-TD performance in a win against the Pioneers. •Jacob Hobbs, another former Pioneer defensive lineman, is also listed on the Sharks roster, but was inactive after being on injured reserve earlier in the season. •Ingold last coached in the AFL for the Dallas Vigilantes in 2010. He was let got by the team after six games. He was picked to be head coach of the Lafayette Wildcatters in the Southern Indoor Football PIONEER PIECES League for the 2011 season, but •Davila also quarterbacked team’s season was cancelled beSpokane when it beat Wilkes- fore it started due to lack of workBarre/Scranton in the ArenaCup ers compensation insurance coverage. game in Las Vegas in 2009.

Four plays later, a 14-yard pass from Garcia landed in Griffin’s hands. The very next play, Griffin finished the Pioneer connection with a 4-yard TD run to give the Sharks a 53-49 lead with 5:22 left in the game. The teams then alternated scores before the dramatic finish. Griffin, a running back, totaled 13 yards on the ground in addition to the 14-yard reception. Robinson’s interception was the only one in the game and he also broke up two passes. Parrish, a defensive lineman, only had two tackles in the game but he registered the only sack for Jacksonville.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Texas legislator downplays possibility of A&M to SEC

By KRISTIE RIEKEN AP Sports Writer

A Texas legislator doesn’t believe Texas A&M will leave the Big 12 to join the Southeastern Conference before a hearing in front of his committee Tuesday. State Rep. Dan Branch, the chairman of the Texas House Committee on Higher Education, called a hearing before his committee for Tuesday with Big 12, SEC and Texas A&M officials. Texas A&M soon moved up a meeting of the board of regents from Aug. 22 to Monday that includes an agenda item about conference realignment. He said it would be “inappropriate” for Texas A&M to switch conferences before the hearing. “I’m told by A&M officials that it is not an attempt to pre-empt legislators questions and that this will take perhaps a week to two weeks to work out anyway, if a bid is extended,” Branch said. He added that his understanding that the item on the agenda is simply to “authorize the president to enter into negotiations with the SEC if a bid is extended.” Branch wants to talk with officials to find out how such a move would impact the state and other Texas schools in the Big 12. “If a bid has been extended by the SEC at that point, then what I

ZAMBRANO Continued from Page 1C

cuss Zambrano’s statements about his baseball future. Cubs manager Mike Quade said Friday night that Zambrano told team personnel he might retire. “There’s not much worse than running out on your teammates in the middle of a ballgame,” Hendry said on a conference call. Hendry said he apologized to Braves general manager Frank Wren for the actions by Zambrano on the same night Atlanta honored former manager Bobby Cox. Zambrano was ejected by plate umpire Tim Timmons in the fifth inning after throwing two inside pitches to Jones, the second going all the way to the backstop. The brush-back pitches followed homers by Freddie Freeman and Dan Uggla. “It was uncalled for, the pitch to Chipper Jones,” Hendry said. “I feel that anything at all to detract from Bobby Cox’s night other than usual competition is totally intolerable.” Asked if he knew where Zambrano was on Saturday, Hendry said: “I have no idea.” Jones said Hendry’s comments were “a class move. I appreciated it.” Added Jones: “I like Carlos. I’ve always liked Carlos. He’s an intense competitor. Unfortunately, sometimes that hurts him.” Cubs third baseman Aramis Ramirez said Zambrano would be welcomed back by his teammates, but only if he made changes. “If he changes his attitude, he’s more then welcome,” Ramirez

hope to hear from them is the merits of that proposal, why that’s a positive deal for the state of Texas and for Texas A&M University and our student athletes and what are the economics of that,” he said. “I also hope to hear the consequences and the effects of such a move on our other Tier I institution, the University of Texas at Austin, and emerging Tier I school Texas Tech University and even Baylor University and the overall effect on the Big12 Conference.” Texas A&M considered switching to the SEC last year before staying in the Big12. Now that the Aggies seem to be looking to move again, many are worried that it could jeopardize the future of the Big 12. The remaining nine athletics directors are “rock solid together” and “unequivocal” in their commitment to the Big12 while Texas A&M is considering its options, according to a conference official with knowledge of the discussions among the other ADs. That official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the talks, said there was conversation about adding a 10th member should Texas A&M leave for the SEC. There was no mention of what school the league might pursue. said. “He’s got to think a little bit more. He’s one man. It’s not just one time. A lot of people have tried to help him. He won’t let them.” Zambrano was placed on the restricted list for six weeks and sent to anger management last season after a verbal altercation with then-teammate Derrek Lee. In 2009, he was suspended following a tirade against an umpire in which he threw a baseball into the outfield and slammed his glove against the dugout fence. Outfielder Marlon Byrd said he talked with Zambrano. “He said that he’s doing better today,” Byrd said. “That’s it.” Asked about Zambrano being placed on the disqualified list, Byrd said: “That’s business. They have to do what they have to do.” In 2007, Zambrano signed a deal adding $91.5 million over five seasons through 2012. He was to earn $17.85 million this season and $18 million in 2012. He is 9-7 with a 4.82 ERA. Zambrano’s name was mentioned in trade rumors before the July 31 deadline. He said on July 28 he wanted to remain with the Cubs. “I do want to stay here but at the same point I want this team to make some changes,” Zambrano said. “If we want to win here, we need to make some changes. If I have to go, I have to go but I still have the Cubs in my heart.” A message was left Saturday seeking comment from Barry Praver, Zambrano’s agent. Hendry said Praver indicated Zambrano is not retiring. The Cubs did not immediately announce a corresponding roster move for Zambrano.


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 PAGE 5C

OFFICE

• 5 minutes from I-81 • Excellent power & telecom • Has kitchenette & 5 training rooms • Natural light from 10 windows

• 1 mile from I-81 • Near Geisinger Medical Center • 4 private offices • Conference room

INDUSTRIAL

• 6,427 SF to 108,939 SF available • New construction, fall completion • 30’ to 33’ ceiling clear height • 14 loading doors, 1 drive-in

• • • •

Less than 1 mile from I-81and I-476 Energy-efficient T-bay lighting Wet sprinkler Large parking areas

195 Research Drive CenterPoint Commerce & Trade Park East, Jenkins Township

600 Baltimore Drive Corporate Center at East Mountain, Plains Township • 1,664 SF available • Excellent condition • Ample parking • Reliable power, telecom

345 Enterprise Way (Parcel 7A) CenterPoint Commerce & Trade Park West, Pittston Township

225 Stewart Road Hanover Industrial Estates, Hanover Township • 8,523 SF available • Former training center • Excellent condition • Ample on-site parking

FLEX

• 6,631 SF to 21,085 SF available • 3,239 SF office • 29’11” to 33’6” ceiling clear height • Quick access to I-81, I-476

• 3 loading doors, 1 drive-in • Energy efficient T-bay lighting • Wet sprinkler • Large parking areas

✦ BUILDING READY SITES ✦

Super Walmart

180 Welles Street Cross Valley West Professional Building, Forty Fort • 41,544 SF to 121,446 SF available • ¼ mile from S.R. 309 • 16’ and 26’ ceilings • 25 loading doors

395 Enterprise Way (Parcel 7B) CenterPoint Commerce & Trade Park West, Pittston Township

• 1 drive-in door • New T-8 lighting • On-site trailer storage • Very affordable lease rates

• 4.06 acre site • Designed for up to 32,500 SF • Good for office & industrial users • Cleared and graded

• Fully permitted & approved • All utilities • Less than 1 mile from I-81 and I-476 • Adjacent to Super Walmart

5B

5A 5B

5A

5-11 Elmwood Road Crestwood Industrial Park, Wright Township • 1 drive-in door 0 153 SF available ill bl •4 40,153 • Has 3,190 SF main office • Quick access to I-81, I-80 • Has 908 SF shipping/receiving office • 30’2” to 33’ ceiling clear height • Energy efficient T-bay lights • 14 loading doors

175 Enterprise Way (5A) and 195 Enterprise Way (5B) CenterPoint Commerce & Trade Park West, Pittston Township • 9.00 and 9.39 acre sites • Designed for 44,800 SF & 24,000 SF • Good for office & industrial users • Fully permitted and approved

• All utilities • Less than 1 mile from I-81 and I-476 • Cleared and graded • Highway visibility

For more information on the above properties, call Bob Besecker, Jim Hilsher, Bill Jones, or Dan Walsh.

B R O K E R AG E D I V I S I O N

21 N. Church St., Hazleton

57 New Frederick Street, W-B

www.mer icle.com/brokerage

127 Import Road, Pittston

30 Wood Street, Wilkes-Barre

40 W. Frack Street, Frackville

• 24,150 SF office building

• 4,000 SF warehouse

3 00 000 0 SF pole l barn/23.38 b /23 /2 3 38 acres • 3,000

• 35,250 SF light industrial building

i ffi • 2,615 SF medical office building i i

• Handicap accessible

• 2 ground level overhead doors

• 13’ - 16’ ceilings

• 30 parking spaces

• Divisible to two 1,300 SF spaces

• Garage for 3 vehicles

• Parking for 12 cars

• 3 ground level overhead doors

• 21’ Ceilings, 2 dock doors

• 16 off-street parking spaces

• $299,000 ... Al Guari/Dave Daris

• $5.00/SF NNN ... John Rokosz

• $349,000 ... Ron Koslosky

• $475,000 ... Steve Barrouk

• $185,000 ... Dan Naylor

570.823.1100

Visit our Web site to see hundreds of buildings and sites from

1,000 SF to 1,000,000 SF

Developing Pennsylvania’s I-81 Corridor for 25 Years.


CMYK PAGE 6C

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

M

A

AMERICAN LEAGUE ROUNDUP

Posada returns with slam, 6 RBIs The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Jorge Posada hit a grand slam and drove in six runs in his first game since being benched six days ago, and Phil Hughes made his case to remain in the New York Yankees’ rotation with six effective innings in a 9-2 victory Saturday that ended the Tampa Bay Rays’ fivegame winning streak. Curtis Granderson hit his 33rd homer to tie Jose Bautista for the big league lead and Robinson Cano had two hits and scored twice to help the Yankees rebound from a loss to the Rays on Friday night. Posada laced a bases-loaded single off Jeremy Hellickson (10-8) in the second to give New York a 2-0 lead. He singled in the fourth then hit his 10th homer and 10th career slam in the fifth off Brandon Gomes. Hughes (3-4) gave up four hits and two runs. He walked one and struck out seven. Blue Jays 11, Angels 2

TORONTO — Adam Lind hit a grand slam, Edwin Encarnacion and Mark Teahen also went deep and the Toronto Blue Jays beat the Los Angeles Angels 11-2 on Saturday. All three homers came off Angels ace Jered Weaver, who allowed eight runs and eight hits, both season highs, in 4 2-3 innings, his shortest outing of the year. The right-hander, who had won eight of his previous nine decisions, saw his AL-leading ERA rise from 1.78 to 2.13. Weaver (14-6) was pitching for the first time since Aug. 5 after serving a six-game suspension for throwing over the head of Detroit’s Alex Avila in a July 31 loss. The Angels ace originally appealed the suspension, but decided last Saturday to serve his puni-

shment in full. Rangers 7, Athletics 1

OAKLAND, Calif. — Colby Lewis and four relievers combined on a five-hitter and the Texas Rangers beat the Oakland Athletics 7-1 on Saturday. Ian Kinsler had two hits and three RBIs for Texas, which increased its AL West lead to three games over the Los Angeles Angels. Mike Napoli and Elvis Andrus hit run-scoring doubles off A’s starter Trevor Cahill as the Rangers (68-52) moved a season-best 16 games over .500 with their seventh consecutive victory over Oakland. Jemile Weeks singled, doubled and tripled for Oakland, which committed four errors, had two wild pitches and lost for the seventh time in 11 games. Indians 3, Twins 1

CLEVELAND — Asdrubal Cabrera hit a three-run homer and Josh Tomlin pitched shutout ball into the seventh inning, leading the Cleveland Indians to a 3-1 victory over the Minnesota Twins on Saturday night. Cabrera connected in the third, driving a 1-0 pitch from Brian Duensing (8-11) over the wall in left for his 20th homer. Shin-Soo Choo hit a leadoff single and Jason Donald walked before Cabrera went deep. BALTIMORE — Miguel Cabrera homered in a five-run sixth inning that featured six consecutive two-out hits, and the Detroit Tigers rallied to beat the Baltimore Orioles 6-5 Saturday night. Detroit trailed 5-0 in the second before mounting its biggest comeback of the season.

Howard, Oswalt help Phils top clumsy Nats PHILADELPHIA — Ryan Howard homered and drove in four runs and Roy Oswalt pitched seven solid innings to lead the Philadelphia Phillies to an 11-3 victory over the mistake-prone Washington Nationals on Saturday. Oswalt (5-7), making his second start since coming off the 15-day DL Aug. 6 with a back injury, gave up three runs on six hits in seven innings. The Nationals committed three costly errors that led to seven runs. Brewers 1, Pirates 0

MILWAUKEE (AP) — Marco Estrada pitched five innings in a spot start, combining with four relievers on a three-hitter, and Yuniesky Betancourt homered to carry the NL Central-leading Milwaukee Brewers to a 1-0 victory over the Pittsburgh Pirates on Saturday. Giants 3, Marlins 0

MIAMI — Tim Lincecum allowed two hits in seven scoreless innings and Jeff Keppinger provided a first-inning solo home run to lead the San Francisco Giants past the Florida Marlins 3-0 on Saturday night. Lincecum (11-9) walked three, struck out 10 and hit a batter while lowering his league-leading road ERA to 2.08. He has given up one run or less in six of his last seven starts overall. Reds 13, Padres 1

CINCINNATI — Miguel Cairo and Ryan Hanigan each homered twice, and the Reds hit seven in all off starter Tim

O

Stauffer and the Padres bullpen — matching a San Diego record — while powering their way to a 13-1 victory on Saturday night. The Reds won their fourth straight game — one shy of their season high — with their biggest home run splurge of the season. Cubs 8, Braves 4

ATLANTA — The latest entry in Dan Uggla’s improbable hitting streak was not enough for Atlanta as Starlin Castro and Darwin Barney each had four hits to help the Chicago Cubs beat the Braves 8-4 on Saturday night. Uggla had a first-inning single and a fourth-inning homer off Randy Wells (4-4) to extend his hitting streak to 33 games. The majors’ longest streak this season began on July 5 when Uggla was hitting .173. It is the longest streak in Atlanta Braves history. Rockies 6, Cardinals 1

ST. LOUIS — Carlos Gonzalez hit a three-run homer, Jason Hammel pitched into the seventh inning and the Colorado Rockies beat the St. Louis Cardinals 6-1 on Saturday night. Diamondbacks 6, Mets 4

PHOENIX (AP) — Ryan Roberts hit a three-run homer and the Arizona Diamondbacks came from behind to win for the 33rd time this season with a 6-4 victory over the New York Mets on Saturday night. Daniel Hudson (12-8) allowed four runs, two earned, on eight hits in eight innings.

R

L

E

A

G

U

E

B

A

S

E

B

A

L

L

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

STANDINGS/STATS ry;Second, Laz Diaz;Third, Wally Bell. T—2:55. A—43,214 (41,900).

S TA N D I N G S Boston ............................................ New York ....................................... Tampa Bay..................................... Toronto........................................... Baltimore........................................

W 73 72 64 60 45

Detroit............................................. Cleveland....................................... Chicago.......................................... Minnesota ...................................... Kansas City ...................................

W 64 60 58 52 50

Texas ............................................ Los Angeles ................................. Oakland ........................................ Seattle...........................................

Philadelphia................................... Atlanta ............................................ New York ....................................... Washington ................................... Florida ............................................

W 68 65 53 50 W 78 70 58 57 56

Milwaukee .................................... St. Louis ....................................... Cincinnati...................................... Pittsburgh..................................... Chicago ........................................ Houston ........................................

W 69 64 59 56 52 38

Arizona ......................................... San Francisco .............................. Colorado....................................... Los Angeles ................................. San Diego.....................................

W 67 65 56 53 53

AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division L Pct GB WCGB 44 .624 — — 46 .610 11⁄2 — 55 .538 10 81⁄2 59 .504 14 121⁄2 72 .385 28 261⁄2 Central Division L Pct GB WCGB 55 .538 — — 57 .513 3 111⁄2 60 .492 51⁄2 14 67 .437 12 201⁄2 69 .420 14 221⁄2 West Division L Pct GB WCGB 52 .567 — — 55 .542 3 8 66 .445 141⁄2 191⁄2 67 .427 161⁄2 211⁄2 NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division L Pct GB WCGB 41 .655 — — 50 .583 81⁄2 — 61 .487 20 111⁄2 62 .479 21 121⁄2 63 .471 22 131⁄2 Central Division L Pct GB WCGB 51 .575 — — 56 .533 5 6 61 .492 10 11 62 .475 12 13 68 .433 17 18 81 .319 301⁄2 311⁄2 West Division L Pct GB WCGB 53 .558 — — 55 .542 2 5 65 .463 111⁄2 141⁄2 64 .453 121⁄2 151⁄2 171⁄2 68 .438 141⁄2

Giants 3, Marlins 0 L10 7-3 6-4 7-3 4-6 2-8

Str W-1 W-1 L-1 W-1 L-3

Home 37-22 40-24 31-28 30-29 28-35

Away 36-22 32-22 33-27 30-30 17-37

L10 6-4 6-4 6-4 2-8 4-6

Str W-3 W-2 L-1 L-2 W-1

Home 33-25 33-25 24-33 27-30 31-32

Away 31-30 27-32 34-27 25-37 19-37

L10 7-3 5-5 4-6 5-5

Str W-2 L-1 L-2 L-1

Home 39-23 32-25 31-26 29-30

Away 29-29 33-30 22-40 21-37

L10 8-2 7-3 3-7 4-6 2-8

Str W-1 L-1 L-4 L-1 L-1

Home 42-19 35-23 25-32 32-23 24-38

Away 36-22 35-27 33-29 25-39 32-25

L10 8-2 6-4 5-5 2-8 7-3 2-8

Str W-2 L-1 W-4 L-2 W-1 L-4

Home 43-15 31-27 34-29 26-32 29-33 19-40

Away 26-36 33-29 25-32 30-30 23-35 19-41

L10 6-4 4-6 5-5 5-5 6-4

Str W-5 W-1 W-1 W-1 L-2

Home 35-26 35-25 28-31 29-34 23-36

Away 32-27 30-30 28-34 24-30 30-32

AMERICAN LEAGUE Friday's Games Detroit 5, Baltimore 4 Cleveland 3, Minnesota 2 Tampa Bay 5, N.Y. Yankees 1 L.A. Angels 5, Toronto 1 Kansas City 5, Chicago White Sox 1 Texas 9, Oakland 1 Boston 6, Seattle 4 Saturday's Games Toronto 11, L.A. Angels 2 N.Y. Yankees 9, Tampa Bay 2 Texas 7, Oakland 1 Detroit 6, Baltimore 5 Cleveland 3, Minnesota 1 Kansas City at Chicago White Sox, 7:10 p.m. Boston at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. Sunday's Games Minnesota (Slowey 0-0) at Cleveland (D.Huff 1-1), 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Shields 11-9) at N.Y. Yankees (F.Garcia 10-7), 1:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Haren 12-6) at Toronto (Cecil 4-5), 1:07 p.m. Detroit (Fister 4-12) at Baltimore (Jo-.Reyes 5-9), 1:35 p.m. Kansas City (Francis 4-12) at Chicago White Sox (Danks 4-9), 2:10 p.m. Texas (M.Harrison 10-8) at Oakland (Harden 3-2), 4:05 p.m. Boston (Wakefield 6-4) at Seattle (Furbush 2-4), 4:10 p.m. Monday's Games Minnesota at Detroit, 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Baltimore at Oakland, 10:05 p.m. Texas at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Toronto at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE Friday's Games Washington 4, Philadelphia 2

Cincinnati 5, San Diego 3 Florida 2, San Francisco 1 Atlanta 10, Chicago Cubs 4 Milwaukee 7, Pittsburgh 2 St. Louis 6, Colorado 1 Arizona 4, N.Y. Mets 3 L.A. Dodgers 1, Houston 0, 10 innings Saturday's Games Milwaukee 1, Pittsburgh 0 Philadelphia 11, Washington 3 Chicago Cubs 8, Atlanta 4 Cincinnati 13, San Diego 1 San Francisco 3, Florida 0 Colorado 6, St. Louis 1 Arizona 6, N.Y. Mets 4 Houston at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Sunday's Games San Diego (LeBlanc 0-2) at Cincinnati (Willis 0-2), 1:10 p.m. San Francisco (Vogelsong 9-2) at Florida (Volstad 5-8), 1:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Garza 5-9) at Atlanta (Beachy 5-2), 1:35 p.m. Washington (Wang 1-2) at Philadelphia (Halladay 15-4), 1:35 p.m. Pittsburgh (Morton 9-6) at Milwaukee (Marcum 10-3), 2:10 p.m. Houston (Lyles 1-6) at L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 7-14), 4:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Capuano 9-10) at Arizona (Marquis 8-6), 4:10 p.m. Colorado (Rogers 6-1) at St. Louis (E.Jackson 1-1), 8:05 p.m. Monday's Games St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. San Francisco at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Houston, 8:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. Florida at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. N.Y. Mets at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.

A M E R I C A N L E A G U E

Minnesota .......................... 000 000 100 — 1 Cleveland ........................... 003 000 00x — 3 E—Tolbert (4). DP—Minnesota 1. LOB—Minnesota 5, Cleveland 8. 2B—Morneau (13). 3B—Donald (1). HR—A.Cabrera (20). SB—A.Cabrera (16). CS—Fukudome (3). S—Fukudome. IP H R ER BB SO Minnesota Duensing L,8-11 ..... 62⁄3 9 3 3 2 9 Al.Burnett ................. 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 Dumatrait.................. 1⁄3 Capps ....................... 2⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 Cleveland Tomlin W,12-5......... 61⁄3 4 1 1 1 2 J.Smith H,9 .............. 1⁄3 1 0 0 0 0 R.Perez H,10........... 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 Sipp H,20 ................. 1 0 0 0 0 0 C.Perez S,25-28 ..... 1 0 0 0 0 1 PB—Mauer. Umpires—Home, Doug Eddings;First, Dana DeMuth;Second, Kerwin Danley;Third, Paul Nauert. T—2:34. A—30,619 (43,441).

Tigers 6, Orioles 5

N AT I O N A L L E A G U E R O U N D U P

The Associated Press

J

Yankees 9, Rays 2 Tampa Bay

New York ab r h bi ab r h bi Jnnngs lf 4 1 2 1 Gardnr lf 4 0 2 0 Damon dh 4 1 1 0 Jeter ss 5 0 2 0 Longori 3b 4 0 1 0 Grndrs cf 4 2 2 1 Zobrist 2b 3 0 0 1 Teixeir 1b 5 2 2 1 Brignc ss 1 0 0 0 Cano 2b 4 2 2 0 Ktchm 1b 4 0 0 0 ENunez 2b 0 0 0 0 BUpton cf 3 0 1 0 Swisher rf 2 1 0 0 Fuld cf 1 0 0 0 ErChvz 3b 4 1 1 1 Joyce rf 2 0 0 0 Posada dh 5 1 3 6 SRdrgz ss-2b 3 0 0 0 Martin c 4 0 1 0 Chirins c 3 0 0 0 Totals 32 2 5 2 Totals 37 915 9 Tampa Bay......................... 000 002 000 — 2 New York ........................... 020 052 00x — 9 E—Jeter (8). DP—Tampa Bay 1, New York 1. LOB—Tampa Bay 4, New York 11. 2B—B.Upton (15), Teixeira (18), Cano (30). 3B—Damon (5). HR—Jennings (4), Granderson (33), Posada (10). IP H R ER BB SO Tampa Bay Hellickson L,10-8 .... 41⁄3 8 4 4 2 4 3 3 3 2 0 B.Gomes .................. 2⁄3 C.Ramos .................. 2 3 2 2 2 1 J.Cruz ....................... 1 1 0 0 0 2 New York P.Hughes W,3-4 ..... 6 4 2 2 1 6 Wade ........................ 2 1 0 0 0 1 Noesi ........................ 1 0 0 0 0 1 HBP—by Hellickson (Gardner). WP—Wade. Umpires—Home, Tom Hallion;First, Bill Miller;Second, James Hoye;Third, Phil Cuzzi. T—3:01. A—47,804 (50,291).

Blue Jays 11, Angels 2 Los Angeles

Toronto ab r h bi ab r h bi MIzturs 2b 4 0 0 0 YEscor ss 5 3 2 0 Bourjos cf 3 0 0 0 EThms lf 2 2 1 0 TrHntr dh 3 1 1 0 Encrnc 1b 4 2 2 3 Trumo 1b-rf 3 0 0 1 Lind dh 4 1 1 5 V.Wells rf 3 0 0 0 Arencii c 5 0 1 1 Branyn 1b 1 0 0 0 Teahen rf 4 1 1 1 Callasp 3b 4 1 2 1 Lawrie 3b 4 0 2 0 HKndrc lf 4 0 1 0 RDavis cf 4 1 1 0 Mathis c 1 0 0 0 JMcDnl 2b 4 1 2 1 Romine ss 2 0 0 0 Totals 28 2 4 2 Totals 36111311 Los Angeles .................... 000 010 001 — 2 Toronto ............................ 210 053 00x — 11 E—Romine (1). DP—Toronto 1. LOB—Los Angeles 5, Toronto 6. 2B—Callaspo (19), Y.Escobar (20), E.Thames (14), R.Davis (21), Jo.McDonald (7). 3B—Tor.Hunter (2), Lawrie (1). HR—Callaspo (5), Encarnacion (11), Lind (20), Teahen (4). S— Romine, E.Thames. SF—Trumbo, Lind. IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles Weaver L,14-6 ........ 42⁄3 8 8 8 2 3 1 0 0 0 0 Cassevah................. 1⁄3 Pineiro ...................... 2 3 3 2 1 0 R.Thompson............ 1 1 0 0 0 1 Toronto R.Romero W,11-9 .. 7 2 1 1 2 3 T.Miller ..................... 1 0 0 0 1 1 L.Perez..................... 1 2 1 1 0 2 HBP—by R.Romero (Mathis). WP—T.Miller. Umpires—Home, Gary Darling;First, David Rackley;Second, Alan Porter;Third, Rob Drake. T—2:39. A—27,185 (49,260).

Rangers 7, Athletics 1 Texas

Oakland ab r h bi JWeeks 2b 4 0 3 0 SSizmr 3b 4 0 0 0 Matsui dh 3 0 0 0 Wlngh lf 4 1 1 0 DeJess rf 4 0 1 1 Allen 1b 2 0 0 0 CJcksn Morlnd 1b 4 1 1 0 ph-1b 2 0 0 0 Torreal c 4 0 1 0 Sweeny cf 3 0 0 0 EnChvz cf 3 3 1 0 Powell c 3 0 0 0 Sogard ss 3 0 0 0 Totals 37 711 6 Totals 32 1 5 1 Texas.................................. 000 001 132 — 7 Oakland.............................. 000 000 100 — 1 E—S.Sizemore (10), Sogard (1), J.Weeks 2 (11). DP—Oakland 1. LOB—Texas 4, Oakland 5. 2B—Kinsler 2 (28), Andrus (17), Napoli (16), J.Weeks (13), Willingham (19), DeJesus (17). 3B—J.Weeks (7). SB—J.Weeks (13). CS—Torrealba (2). IP H R ER BB SO Texas C.Lewis W,11-8 ...... 61⁄3 3 1 1 0 8 D.Oliver .................... 0 1 0 0 0 0 Uehara H,16 ............ 2⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 M.Adams.................. 1 1 0 0 0 2 Feliz .......................... 1 0 0 0 1 1 Oakland Cahill L,9-11 ............ 71⁄3 7 4 3 0 4 Fuentes .................... 0 1 1 1 0 0 De Los Santos......... 2⁄3 1 0 0 0 0 Breslow .................... 1 2 2 2 1 1 Fuentes pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. D.Oliver pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. WP—Cahill, De Los Santos. Umpires—Home, Marvin Hudson;First, John Tumpane;Second, Ted Barrett;Third, Brian Runge. T—2:52. A—25,160 (35,067). ab 5 5 4 4 4 4

Kinsler 2b Andrus ss JHmltn lf MiYong 3b N.Cruz rf Napoli dh

r 0 1 2 0 0 0

h bi 2 3 1 1 2 0 1 1 1 0 1 1

Indians 3, Twins 1 Minnesota Span cf Tolbert 2b Mauer c Mornea 1b Kubel rf

ab 4 4 4 4 4

r 0 0 0 1 0

h bi 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0

Thome dh Valenci 3b DYong lf Nishiok ss

3 3 3 3

0 0 0 0

0 0 1 1

Totals

0 0 1 0

32 1 5 1

Cleveland Choo rf Donald 2b ACarer ss CSantn c Duncan dh Chsnhll ph-dh Fukdm cf LaPort 1b Hannhn 3b Carrer lf Totals

ab 3 4 3 4 3

r 1 1 1 0 0

h bi 0 0 2 0 2 3 0 0 1 0

1 3 4 4 3 32

0 0 0 2 0 2 0 1 0 0 310

0 0 0 0 0 3

Tigers 6, Orioles 5 Baltimore ab r h bi ab r h bi AJcksn cf 5 0 0 0 Pie lf 4 0 0 0 Dirks lf 5 1 1 0 Hardy ss 4 0 0 0 Ordonz rf 4 1 2 0 Markks rf 4 0 0 0 Kelly pr-rf 0 0 0 0 AdJons cf 4 1 1 0 MiCarr 1b 2 1 1 3 Guerrr dh 4 1 2 2 VMrtnz dh 3 1 2 0 Wieters c 4 1 1 0 JhPerlt ss 4 1 1 0 C.Davis 1b 4 1 2 0 Avila c 3 1 1 1 Reimld pr 0 0 0 0 Raburn 2b 4 0 1 2 J.Bell 3b 3 0 0 0 RSantg 2b 0 0 0 0 MrRynl ph 1 0 0 0 Betemt 3b 4 0 0 0 BDavis 2b 4 1 2 3 Totals 34 6 9 6 Totals 36 5 8 5 Detroit................................. 000 105 000 — 6 Baltimore ............................ 050 000 000 — 5 E—Raburn (12). DP—Baltimore 1. LOB—Detroit 5, Baltimore 4. 2B—Dirks (9), Ordonez (7), Avila (21). HR—Mi.Cabrera (23), Guerrero (10), B.Davis (1). SF—Mi.Cabrera. IP H R ER BB SO Detroit Scherzer W,12-7..... 7 7 5 4 0 10 Coke H,6 .................. 1 0 0 0 0 2 Valverde S,35-35.... 1 1 0 0 0 1 Baltimore Guthrie L,5-16 ......... 52⁄3 8 6 6 2 1 Jakubauskas............ 21⁄3 1 0 0 1 1 M.Gonzalez ............. 1 0 0 0 0 1 Umpires—Home, Bill Welke;First, Jeff Nelson;Second, Vic Carapazza;Third, Marty Foster. T—2:48. A—24,114 (45,438). Detroit

N A T I O N A L L E A G U E Phillies 11, Nationals 3 Washington

Philadelphia ab r h bi ab r h bi Ankiel cf 4 0 0 0 Rollins ss 4 3 1 1 Espinos 2b 4 0 0 0 Victorn cf 5 2 2 0 Zmrmn 3b 4 1 1 0 Utley 2b 5 1 1 0 Morse 1b 4 1 2 1 Mrtnz 2b 0 0 0 0 Werth rf 3 0 1 0 Howard 1b 4 2 2 4 L.Nix lf 4 1 1 1 Pence rf 3 1 1 1 WRams c 4 0 0 0 Ibanez lf 4 0 0 2 Dsmnd ss 3 0 2 1 Ruiz c 4 1 1 1 Lannan p 1 0 0 0 WValdz 3b 5 1 1 0 Balestr p 1 0 0 0 Oswalt p 1 0 0 1 Cora ph 1 0 0 0 BFrncs ph 1 0 0 0 HRdrgz p 0 0 0 0 Stutes p 0 0 0 0 Matths p 0 0 0 0 JGoms ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 34 3 7 3 Totals 3611 910 Washington ..................... 020 001 000 — 3 Philadelphia .................... 205 001 03x — 11 E—Morse (6), Desmond (17), Espinosa (11). LOB—Washington 6, Philadelphia 9. 2B—Morse (28), L.Nix (13). HR—Howard (26). SF—Ibanez. IP H R ER BB SO Washington Lannan L,8-8............ 3 4 7 1 5 1 Balester .................... 3 1 1 0 0 3 H.Rodriguez ............ 1 2 2 2 1 1 Mattheus................... 1 2 1 1 1 0 Philadelphia Oswalt W,5-7........... 7 6 3 3 1 5 Stutes ....................... 2 1 0 0 1 1 H.Rodriguez pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. WP—Balester, Mattheus, Oswalt. Umpires—Home, Hunter Wendelstedt;First, Chris Conroy;Second, Jerry Layne;Third, Bob Davidson. T—2:41. A—45,570 (43,651).

Brewers 1, Pirates 0 Pittsburgh

ab 4 4 3 4 3 0 0 3 3 3 1 0 1

r 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

h bi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

Milwaukee

ab r h bi C.Hart rf 3 0 1 0 Morgan cf 4 0 1 0 Braun lf 3 0 1 0 Fielder 1b 3 0 1 0 McGeh 3b 4 0 1 0 YBtncr ss 3 1 1 1 HrstnJr 2b 4 0 0 0 Lucroy c 4 0 1 0 Estrad p 1 0 1 0 Greink ph 0 0 0 0 Saito p 0 0 0 0 Hwkns p 0 0 0 0 FLopez ph 1 0 0 0 FrRdrg p 0 0 0 0 Axford p 0 0 0 0 Totals 29 0 3 0 Totals 30 1 8 1 Pittsburgh .......................... 000 000 000 — 0 Milwaukee.......................... 010 000 00x — 1 DP—Pittsburgh 1. LOB—Pittsburgh 4, Milwaukee 10. 2B—Estrada (1). 3B—Paul (4). HR—Y.Betancourt (9). SB—Braun (22). S—Correia, Greinke. IP H R ER BB SO Pittsburgh Correia L,12-11 ....... 62⁄3 7 1 1 3 3 Resop ....................... 1⁄3 1 0 0 1 1 D.McCutchen .......... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Milwaukee Estrada W,3-7 ......... 5 1 0 0 0 5 Saito H,7 .................. 1 0 0 0 0 1 Hawkins H,18 .......... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Fr.Rodriguez H,8 .... 1 1 0 0 0 2 Axford S,34-36 ........ 1 1 0 0 1 1 Umpires—Home, John Hirschbeck;First, Scott BarAMcCt cf Diaz rf GJones 1b Walker 2b Ludwck lf JHrrsn pr DMcCt p Doumit c PAlvrz 3b Cedeno ss Correia p Resop p Paul lf

San Francisco ab C.Ross lf 4 Kppngr 2b 4 PSndvl 3b 3 A.Huff 1b 4 Schrhlt rf 4 OCarer ss 4 Rownd cf 4 CStwrt c 3 Linccm p 2 Fontent ph 1 Affeldt p 0 BrWlsn p 0

r 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

h bi 1 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Florida

ab r h bi Bonifac ss 4 0 1 0 Amezg 2b 4 0 0 0 Morrsn lf 3 0 0 0 Stanton rf 3 0 0 0 Dobbs 3b 4 0 1 0 GSnchz 1b 3 0 0 0 Petersn cf 3 0 1 0 J.Buck c 3 0 0 0 Vazquz p 1 0 0 0 Helms ph 1 0 0 0 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 MDunn p 0 0 0 0 Ceda p 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 3 6 2 Totals 29 0 3 0 San Francisco.................... 100 011 000 — 3 Florida ................................ 000 000 000 — 0 E—Morrison (5). LOB—San Francisco 4, Florida 8. 2B—A.Huff (21), Schierholtz (22). HR—Keppinger (5). SB—Bonifacio (28). S—Vazquez. IP H R ER BB SO San Francisco Lincecum W,11-9.... 7 2 0 0 3 10 Affeldt H,12.............. 1 0 0 0 0 1 Br.Wilson S,35-39 .. 1 1 0 0 1 2 Florida Vazquez L,7-10....... 7 5 3 3 0 10 Cishek ...................... 2⁄3 1 0 0 1 1 M.Dunn..................... 2⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 Ceda ......................... 2⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 HBP—by Lincecum (Stanton). WP—Vazquez 2. Umpires—Home, Ron Kulpa;First, Angel Hernandez;Second, D.J. Reyburn;Third, Ed Rapuano. T—2:29. A—25,013 (38,560). Reds 13, Padres 1 Cincinnati ab r h bi ab r h bi Venale rf 3 0 1 0 Sappelt lf-cf 5 0 2 0 Bartlett ss 4 0 1 0 Janish ss 5 0 0 0 Maybin cf 3 0 1 0 Votto 1b 3 2 2 1 Tekotte cf 1 0 0 0 Alonso 1b 1 0 0 0 Blanks 1b 4 1 2 1 Bruce rf 3 3 2 2 OHudsn 2b 3 0 0 0 Cairo 2b 4 2 2 4 Hamrn p 0 0 0 0 Stubbs cf 4 2 2 0 Thtchr p 0 0 0 0 TrWood p 0 0 0 0 RJhnsn ph 0 0 0 0 Frazier 3b 3 2 1 1 Hundly c 4 0 1 0 Hanign c 4 2 2 5 Cnghm lf 2 0 0 0 HBaily p 3 0 0 0 Bass p 0 0 0 0 Arrdnd p 0 0 0 0 AlGnzlz 2b 2 0 0 0 FLewis ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Forsyth 3b 4 0 0 0 Stauffr p 1 0 1 0 Darnell lf 2 0 0 0 Totals 33 1 7 1 Totals 36131313 San Diego ........................ 000 100 000 — 1 Cincinnati ......................... 315 020 02x — 13 DP—San Diego 1. LOB—San Diego 7, Cincinnati 1. 2B—Stubbs (17). HR—Blanks (3), Votto (19), Bruce (25), Cairo 2 (7), Frazier (4), Hanigan 2 (5). SB— Maybin (30). IP H R ER BB SO San Diego Stauffer L,7-9........... 3 7 9 9 2 1 Bass .......................... 2 3 2 2 0 1 Hamren..................... 2 0 0 0 0 4 Thatcher ................... 1 3 2 2 0 1 Cincinnati H.Bailey W,7-5 ........ 7 6 1 1 1 7 Arredondo ................ 1 0 0 0 0 2 Tr.Wood ................... 1 1 0 0 0 2 HBP—by Tr.Wood (Ro.Johnson). Umpires—Home, CB Bucknor;First, Dan Iassogna;Second, Dale Scott;Third, Jerry Meals. T—2:50. A—31,374 (42,319). San Diego

Rockies 6, Cardinals 1 St. Louis ab r h bi ab r h bi EYong lf 4 2 2 0 Furcal ss 3 0 1 0 RBtncr p 0 0 0 0 Jay cf 3 0 1 0 Fowler cf 3 1 0 0 Craig ph 1 0 0 0 CGnzlz rf 5 1 2 4 MBggs p 0 0 0 0 Tlwtzk ss 4 1 0 0 Pujols 1b 3 0 0 0 Helton 1b 3 0 1 2 Hollidy lf 3 1 0 0 Alfonzo c 4 0 1 0 Brkmn rf 4 0 1 0 M.Ellis 2b 4 0 2 0 Freese 3b 4 0 0 1 Nelson 3b 4 0 0 0 YMolin c 3 0 1 0 Hamml p 3 0 1 0 Theriot 2b 3 0 1 0 Roenck p 0 0 0 0 JGarci p 1 0 0 0 MtRynl p 0 0 0 0 CPttrsn ph 1 0 0 0 Belisle p 0 0 0 0 Rzpczy p 0 0 0 0 Schmkr S.Smith ph-lf 0 1 0 0 ph-cf 1 0 1 0 Totals 34 6 9 6 Totals 30 1 6 1 Colorado ............................ 003 020 001 — 6 St. Louis ............................. 000 000 100 — 1 DP—Colorado 3, St. Louis 1. LOB—Colorado 7, St. Louis 5. 2B—C.Gonzalez (19), Helton (24), Theriot (22), Schumaker (15). HR—C.Gonzalez (18). CS— Fowler (9). IP H R ER BB SO Colorado Hammel W,7-11 ...... 61⁄3 5 1 1 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 Roenicke H,3........... 2⁄3 Mat.Reynolds........... 1⁄3 1 0 0 0 1 Belisle....................... 2⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 R.Betancourt ........... 1 0 0 0 0 2 St. Louis J.Garcia L,10-6 ....... 5 6 5 5 4 3 Rzepczynski ............ 3 1 0 0 1 1 M.Boggs................... 1 2 1 1 1 0 WP—Hammel, J.Garcia. Umpires—Home, Paul Schrieber;First, Chad Fairchild;Second, Joe West;Third, Sam Holbrook. T—3:02. A—40,172 (43,975). Colorado

Cubs 8, Braves 4 Chicago

Atlanta ab r h bi ab r h bi SCastro ss 5 1 4 2 Bourn cf 5 0 1 0 Barney 2b 5 1 4 1 Prado lf 5 1 1 0 ArRmr 3b 4 1 1 1 Fremn 1b 5 0 2 0 C.Pena 1b 5 0 1 2 Uggla 2b 3 2 2 1 Byrd cf 5 0 0 0 C.Jones 3b 4 1 3 1 ASorin lf 4 0 1 0 AlGnzlz ss 5 0 1 1 Campn pr-lf 1 1 1 0 D.Ross c 4 0 2 0 Colvin rf 5 2 2 0 Constnz rf 4 0 0 1 Marml p 0 0 0 0 D.Lowe p 2 0 0 0 Soto c 5 1 0 0 Conrad ph 1 0 0 0 R.Wells p 2 0 0 0 CMrtnz p 0 0 0 0 Smrdzj p 0 0 0 0 Varvar p 0 0 0 0 Marshll p 0 0 0 0 Hinske ph 1 0 0 0 DeWitt ph 1 1 0 1 Sherrill p 0 0 0 0 R.Ortiz p 0 0 0 0 JRussll p 0 0 0 0 RJhnsn rf 0 0 0 0 Totals 42 814 7 Totals 39 412 4 Chicago.............................. 100 022 030 — 8 Atlanta ................................ 000 101 011 — 4 E—Marshall (1), C.Jones (5), Prado (7). LOB—Chicago 9, Atlanta 11. 2B—C.Pena (16), Colvin (6), C.Jones 2 (25). 3B—Colvin (1). HR—Uggla (27). SB—Bourn (43). S—R.Wells. SF—Ar.Ramirez, C.Jones. IP H R ER BB SO Chicago R.Wells W,4-4 ......... 5 8 2 2 0 1 Samardzija H,10 ..... 1 0 0 0 0 0 Marshall H,24 .......... 1 0 0 0 0 0 R.Ortiz ...................... 1⁄3 2 1 1 0 0 J.Russell .................. 1 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 Marmol S,27-34 ...... 2⁄3 Atlanta D.Lowe L,7-11......... 6 10 5 3 0 6 C.Martinez ............... 11⁄3 2 3 2 0 2 Varvaro..................... 2⁄3 1 0 0 0 0 Sherrill ...................... 1 1 0 0 0 0 R.Wells pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. HBP—by R.Wells (Uggla). Umpires—Home, Jeff Kellogg;First, Eric Cooper;Second, Mark Carlson;Third, Tim Timmons. T—3:10. A—49,781 (49,586).

Diamondbacks 6, Mets 4 New York

Arizona ab r h bi ab r h bi Pagan cf 5 0 1 0 Blmqst ss 3 1 1 0 Harris 2b 3 0 0 0 RRorts 3b 4 2 2 3 DWrght 3b 4 0 0 0 J.Upton rf 3 1 1 1 Duda 1b 3 0 0 0 Monter c 2 0 0 1 Bay lf 4 1 0 0 CYoung cf 4 0 0 0 RPauln c 4 1 2 0 Gldsch 1b 4 0 0 0 Baxter rf 4 2 2 1 KJhnsn 2b 4 1 1 0 RTejad ss 4 0 2 2 GParra lf 3 1 1 0 Pelfrey p 2 0 1 1 DHdsn p 2 0 1 1 DCrrsc p 0 0 0 0 Putz p 0 0 0 0 Hairstn ph 1 0 0 0 Beato p 0 0 0 0 Parnell p 0 0 0 0 JuTrnr ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 35 4 8 4 Totals 29 6 7 6 New York ........................... 020 200 000 — 4 Arizona ............................... 200 031 00x — 6 E—R.Paulino (6), R.Roberts (10). DP—Arizona 1. LOB—New York 6, Arizona 4. 2B—R.Paulino (12), R.Tejada (7), R.Roberts (20), K.Johnson (23). 3B—Baxter (1). HR—R.Roberts (16). SB—J.Upton (18). S—D.Hudson. SF—Montero. IP H R ER BB SO New York Pelfrey ...................... 4 4 3 2 0 3 D.Carrasco L,1-3 .... 1 1 2 2 1 1 Beato......................... 2 2 1 1 0 3 Parnell ...................... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Arizona D.Hudson W,12-8 ... 8 8 4 2 2 4 Putz S,29-33............ 1 0 0 0 0 1 Pelfrey pitched to 1 batter in the 5th. HBP—by D.Carrasco (Bloomquist), by Pelfrey (J.Upton). PB—Montero. Umpires—Home, Lance Barksdale;First, Gary Cederstrom;Second, Cory Blaser;Third, Fieldin Culbreth. T—2:17. A—33,552 (48,633).

T H I S D A T E I N B A S E B A L L Aug. 14 1937 — The Detroit Tigers scored 36 runs (16-1 and 20-7) against the St. Louis Browns in a doubleheader sweep to set major league record. Pete Fox of the Tigers scored eight of the runs in the doubleheader. 1958 — Vic Power of the Cleveland Indians stole home twice, in the eighth and 10th innings, in a 10-9 win over Detroit. He had only three steals all year. 1961 — The Philadelphia Phillies dropped their 17th straight game, a 9-2 loss to Dick Ellsworth and the Chicago Cubs. It was also the 11th consecutive complete game thrown against the Phillies. 1969 — On an off-day after a three-game sweep by the Astros in Houston, the New York Mets fell to third place, 91⁄2 games behind the Chicago Cubs.

1971 — St. Louis right-hander Bob Gibson pitched a no-hitter, blanking the Pittsburgh Pirates 11-0. Jose Cruz made a running catch of Milt May’s 400-foot drive to center in the seventh inning and third baseman Joe Torre made a leaping stab of Dave Cash’s bad-hop grounder in the eighth inning. 1981 — Jeff Burroughs of the Seattle Mariners hit three home runs in a 13-3 rout of the Minnesota Twins in the second game of a doubleheader. 1982 — Pete Rose of the Philadelphia Phillies, in his first at-bat of a 15-11 victory over the Montreal Expos, passed Hank Aaron and moved into first place on the all-time at-bat list with 12,365. 1987 — Oakland’s Mark McGwire set a major league rookie record with his 39th homer of the season to help the A’s to a 7-6, 12-inning victory over the California Angels. McGwire gave the A’s a 5-3 lead in the sixth when he hit the two-run homer off Don Sutton. 1998 — Baltimore’s Chris Hoiles became the ninth major leaguer and first catcher to hit two grand slams in one game. Hoiles homered in the third inning off Charles Nagy and in the eighth against Ron Villone to lead the Orioles to a 15-3 victory over the Cleveland Indians. 2002 — Trevor Hoffman became the first reliever in major league history to have 30 or more saves in eight straight seasons in San Diego’s 6-2 win over the New York Mets. 2006 — Matt Diaz went 4-for-5 with a homer, tying an NL record by hitting safely in 10 consecutive atbats, and Chipper Jones homered in three straight plate appearances to lead Atlanta to a 10-4 victory over Washington. 2007 — Atlanta manager Bobby Cox set a dubious record in the Braves’ 5-4 victory over San Francisco. Cox was tossed after the fifth for arguing a called third strike — the 132nd ejection of his career to break the mark set by Hall of Famer John McGraw. 2008 — Jim Thome, Paul Konerko, Alexei Ramirez and Juan Uribe hit consecutive homers in the sixth inning to tie a major league record and the White Sox beat the Royals 9-2. Thome hit a two-out, three-run shot off Joel Peralta. Konerko followed with his 12th homer and Ramirez hit his 11th before Robinson Tejeda came on to pitch. Uribe, homerless in his 107 previous at-bats, greeted him with his fourth of the year. 2008 — Oakland reliever Brad Ziegler started his career by not allowing a run in 39 consecutive shutout innings — including the eighth — to tie a 59year-old major league record for relievers set by Cleveland’s Al Benton in 1949. Tampa Bay’s B.J. Upton ended Ziegler’s run with an RBI double in the ninth. 2009 — Felix Pie became the fourth player in Orioles history to hit for the cycle, and Baltimore tied club records for extra-base hits and doubles in a 16-6 rout of the Los Angeles Angels. 2010 — Alex Rodriguez of the New York Yankees hit three homers in an 8-3 victory over the Kansas City Royals. Rodriguez drove in five runs, taking over the major league RBIs lead with 97. Today's birthdays: Esmil Rogers 26;Clay Buchholz 27;Leo Nunez 28;Juan Pierre 34.

F R I D AY ’ S L A T E B O X E S Diamondbacks 4, Mets 3 New York

Arizona ab r h bi ab r h bi Pagan cf 5 1 2 0 RRorts 2b 4 0 0 0 Harris 2b 4 0 1 1 GParra lf 4 0 0 0 DWrght 3b 3 0 0 0 J.Upton rf 3 1 2 1 Duda 1b 3 0 0 0 Monter c 4 0 0 0 Bay lf 4 1 3 1 CYoung cf 4 0 0 0 Thole c 4 0 0 0 Nady 1b 0 1 0 0 Pridie rf 3 0 0 1 Gldsch 1b 2 0 1 0 RTejad ss 4 0 1 0 Brrghs 3b 3 1 2 0 Gee p 2 0 0 0 Ransm ss 3 1 1 2 Baxter ph 1 0 0 0 IKnndy p 2 0 1 1 Igarash p 0 0 0 0 Cowgill ph 1 0 0 0 Byrdak p 0 0 0 0 DHrndz p 0 0 0 0 Acosta p 0 0 0 0 Putz p 0 0 0 0 Hairstn ph 1 1 1 0 Totals 34 3 8 3 Totals 30 4 7 4 New York ........................... 000 010 011 — 3 Arizona ............................... 130 000 00x — 4 DP—New York 1. LOB—New York 9, Arizona 4. 2B—Bay (10), Hairston (8), Burroughs (3), Ransom (2), I.Kennedy (1). HR—J.Upton (24). SF—Harris. IP H R ER BB SO New York Gee L,10-4............... 5 5 4 4 1 3 Igarashi .................... 2 1 0 0 0 2 Byrdak ...................... 2⁄3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Acosta ...................... 1⁄3 Arizona I.Kennedy W,15-3... 7 6 1 1 3 5 Da.Hernandez H,17 1 1 1 1 0 0 Putz S,28-32............ 1 1 1 1 0 0 HBP—by Gee (Nady), by I.Kennedy (Duda). WP— I.Kennedy. Umpires—Home, Fieldin Culbreth;First, Lance Barksdale;Second, Gary Cederstrom;Third, Cory Blaser. T—2:36. A—25,701 (48,633).

Red Sox 6, Mariners 4 Boston

Seattle ab r h bi ISuzuki rf 5 1 1 0 FGtrrz cf 4 2 2 0 Ackley 2b 4 0 2 1 Carp dh 5 0 3 3 Smoak 1b 1 0 0 0 Seager 3b 3 0 1 0 AKndy Sltlmch c 4 1 2 0 3b-1b 5 0 0 0 Reddck rf 3 1 1 2 Olivo c 4 0 1 0 Aviles 3b 3 0 1 1 LRdrgz ss 3 1 1 0 Roinsn lf 4 0 1 0 Totals 37 613 6 Totals 38 412 4 Boston ................................ 020 012 100 — 6 Seattle ................................ 210 100 000 — 4 E—L.Rodriguez (3). DP—Seattle 1. LOB—Boston 8, Seattle 11. 2B—Ad.Gonzalez (36), Pedroia (27), I.Suzuki (16), Carp (8). HR—Lowrie (4), D.Ortiz (24), Reddick (6). SB—Pedroia (23), C.Crawford (14), F.Gutierrez 2 (10). CS—Pedroia (6). S—Pedroia, Seager. SF—Aviles. IP H R ER BB SO Boston Lackey W,11-8 ........ 6 10 4 4 2 3 F.Morales H,4.......... 2⁄3 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 3 D.Bard H,27 ............. 11⁄3 Papelbon S,27-28... 1 1 0 0 0 1 Seattle Beavan L,3-3 ........... 61⁄3 11 6 6 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 Gray .......................... 12⁄3 Cortes....................... 1 1 0 0 0 0 Lackey pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. WP—Lackey 2, D.Bard. Umpires—Home, Ed Hickox;First, Mark Ripperger;Second, Brian O’Nora;Third, Alfonso Marquez. T—3:08. A—40,682 (47,878). Ellsury cf Lowrie ss AdGnzl 1b Pedroia 2b D.Ortiz dh Crwfrd lf

ab 5 5 4 4 5 4

r 0 1 1 0 1 1

h bi 1 0 1 1 2 0 2 0 2 2 1 0

Rangers 9, Athletics 1 Texas

Oakland ab r h bi JWeeks 2b 4 0 0 0 SSizmr 3b 4 0 0 0 Matsui lf 2 0 0 0 Sogard ss 1 0 0 0 Wlngh dh 3 1 1 0 CJcksn 1b 4 0 2 1 DeJess rf 3 0 0 0 KSuzuk c 3 0 0 0 Powell ph 1 0 0 0 Sweeny cf 3 0 1 0 Pnngtn ss 3 0 1 0 Rosales lf 1 0 0 0 Totals 38 911 8 Totals 32 1 5 1 Texas.................................. 060 300 000 — 9 Oakland.............................. 000 001 000 — 1 E—DeJesus (3), Pennington (17). DP—Oakland 1. LOB—Texas 4, Oakland 8. 2B—En.Chavez 2 (10), Willingham (18), C.Jackson 2 (17). 3B—Mi.Young (6). IP H R ER BB SO Texas C.Wilson W,11-5..... 6 4 1 1 3 7 Tateyama ................. 1 0 0 0 0 2 M.Lowe..................... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Feldman ................... 1 1 0 0 1 1 Oakland McCarthy L,5-6 ....... 31⁄3 8 7 5 0 0 Magnuson ................ 32⁄3 3 2 1 2 2 Norberto................... 2 0 0 0 0 0 Umpires—Home, Brian Runge;First, Marvin Hudson;Second, John Tumpane;Third, Ted Barrett. T—2:54. A—20,288 (35,067). Kinsler 2b Andrus ss JHmltn lf Gentry cf MiYong 3b Quntnll 3b N.Cruz rf Napoli dh Morlnd 1b Torreal c EnChvz cf-lf

ab 5 4 5 0 5 0 3 4 4 4 4

r 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 2

h bi 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 3 1

Dodgers 1, Astros 0, 10 innings Houston

Los Angeles ab r h bi Miles 2b 5 0 0 0 Lindlm p 0 0 0 0 Blake 3b 5 1 1 0 Ethier rf 2 0 0 0 Kemp cf 5 0 1 1 JRiver lf 4 0 1 0 Velez pr-2b 0 0 0 0 Loney 1b 2 0 2 0 DNavrr c 1 0 0 0 Sellers ss 3 0 0 0 MacDgl p 0 0 0 0 Guerra p 0 0 0 0 GwynJ ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Eovaldi p 2 0 0 0 Guerrir p 0 0 0 0 JCarrll ph-ss 2 0 0 0 Totals 30 0 3 0 Totals 32 1 5 1 Houston ........................ 000 000 000 0 — 0 Los Angeles ................. 000 000 000 1 — 1 No outs when winning run scored. DP—Los Angeles 2. LOB—Houston 5, Los Angeles 12. 2B—Blake (7). 3B—J.Rivera (1). S— Bourgeois. IP H R ER BB SO Houston Norris ........................ 7 2 0 0 4 8 Fe.Rodriguez........... 2 1 0 0 3 1 Da.Carpenter L,0-2. 0 2 1 1 1 0 Los Angeles Eovaldi ..................... 6 2 0 0 4 3 Guerrier .................... 1 0 0 0 0 3 MacDougal .............. 1 1 0 0 0 1 Guerra ...................... 1 0 0 0 0 0 Lindblom W,1-0....... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Da.Carpenter pitched to 3 batters in the 10th. Umpires—Home, Gerry Davis;First, Angel Campos;Second, Mike Estabrook;Third, Greg Gibson. T—2:55. A—33,642 (56,000). Shuck rf Altuve 2b Bourgs cf Ca.Lee 1b JMrtnz lf Pareds 3b Barmes ss Corprn c DCrpnt p Norris p Bogsvc ph FRdrgz p Quinter c

ab 2 4 3 2 4 4 4 4 0 2 1 0 0

r 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

h bi 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0


CMYK SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 PAGE 7C

704173

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com


CMYK PAGE 8C

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

N

F

L

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

PITTSBURGH STEELERS

Pittsburgh looks rusty in opening loss to Washington Steelers coach says his team was outplayed in every aspect of the game. By WILL GRAVES AP Sports Writer

PITTSBURGH — Pittsburgh Steelers coach Mike Tomlin expected some rust in his team’s preseason opener. What he didn’t expect? To see the defending AFC champions get so thoroughly dominated. The Steelers struggled on both sides of the ball in a 16-7 loss to the Washington Redskins on Friday. And while throwing a dud when the games don’t really count is hardly a problem for one of the most veteran teams in the league, looking uninterested while doing so doesn’t sit well with its coach. “Quite frankly we got outplayed in just about all areas — blocking, tackling, running, throwing, kicking,” Tomlin said.

AP PHOTO

Pittsburgh Steelers cornerback Donovan Warren watches from the sidelines before a preseason football game against the Washington Redskins in Landover, Md., on Friday.

“That team was better prepared tonight than us. They showed it.” The Steelers managed just 186 total yards against one of the NFC’s worst teams a year ago and struggled to get the defense off the field. Washington moved the ball with ease, racking up 452

yards. Only some flawed execution by the Redskins in the red zone and spotty kicking from Shayne Graham kept the final score from being more lopsided. “There weren’t a lot of things to feel good about,” Tomlin said. Particularly in the training

DT Patterson is back at Eagles’ practice BETHLEHEM — Mike Patterson, who collapsed and suffered a seizure at practice just 10 days ago, has returned to the Philadelphia Eagles. Patterson did not practice Saturday, but was in uniform doing strength and conditioning drills with trainer Rick Burkholder and several other teammates for the first time since his scary episode on an adjacent field. Patterson didn’t answer questions, but he did smile broadly and tell reporters, “I feel great,” while leaving the practice field. Patterson, a 300-pound defensive tackle, was diagnosed with a brain AVM after collapsing during one of the team’s training camp practices at Lehigh University on Aug. 3. He was taken from the field in an ambulance and hospitalized for three days. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — David Garrard’s sore back is getting better. Jacksonville’s quarterback even hopes to play in next week’s preseason game against Atlanta. Garrard returned to the practice field Saturday after missing more than a week of training camp. He threw passes during the team’s morning walkthrough and was expected to take repetitions with the first-team offense Saturday evening. “I’m tired of sitting around and watching,” Garrard said. “But I’m not going to try to overdo myself with too many extra things.” The 33-year-old Garrard left practice Aug. 4 because of back pain and could barely walk the following day. He spent the last week working with team trainers, but sat out Thursday night’s preseason opener at New England. Rookie Blaine Gabbert started in his place and had an up-anddown debut. Garrard made the trip and helped Gabbert from the sideline. Garrard wanted to play, especially since he missed the 2010 season finale because of a finger injury. “It’s been a while since I’ve been out there under the lights with the fans yelling,” Garrard said. “It was frustrating to a certain extent, but it’s still preseason. I didn’t get too bent out of shape.” SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS SAN FRANCISCO — Rookie Colin Kaepernick will get his shot to compete with Alex Smith for the 49ers’ starting quarterback job. While coach Jim Harbaugh still considers it Smith’s spot to lose, he said Saturday nobody has earned the position

series on the field together. Defensive stars James Harrison and Troy Polamalu didn’t even play to help keep them fresh for when the games start counting next month. Good thing, because even the defensive starters looked a step slow in the first quarter as the Redskins drove it the length of the field. “I think we allowed them to drive the ball down the field a little bit too long, maybe 90 yards, but we just need to get back on the field and correct that,” said linebacker LaMarr Woodley. “That’s why it’s called the preseason, so we can go back and correct mistakes like that.” Tomlin downplayed the loss of organized team activities and mini-camps — both of which were scuttled by the NFL lockout — saying it’s something the entire league has been forced to deal with. Quarterback Dennis Dixon, hoping to make the team as the third quarterback or get moved in

PHILADELPHIA EAGLES

CAMP ROUNDUP

The Associated Press

room. Veteran cornerback Ike Taylor broke his left thumb and will miss at least two weeks, possibly longer if surgery is required. “It could be worse,” Taylor said. “It will heal. Everybody plays injured.” What the Steelers didn’t do, at least on Friday, was play with any sense of urgency. Call it a side effect when so many of the key spots are already locked up. Pittsburgh did little in free agency before landing wide receiver Jerricho Cotchery on Thursday, opting to re-sign its own free agents in hopes of going one step farther than it did a year ago. The starters on both sides of the ball barely broke a sweat, standard procedure for Tomlin in the first exhibition. Ben Roethlisberger completed 2 of 3 passes; Rashard Mendenhall ran it just once. Mike Wallace caught it just once, though he missed a sure touchdown when Roethlisberger overthrew him on a deep pattern during their only

NY JETS

Jackson stars in return

so far in training camp. In addition, San Francisco will consider adding an experienced backup on the heels of a 24-3 loss at New Orleans on Friday night in the 49ers’ exhibition opener and Harbaugh’s NFL coaching debut. Kaepernick, a second-round draft pick out of Nevada, completed 9 of 19 passes for 117 yards and threw two interceptions. He played most of the game. The 2005 No. 1 overall pick, Smith was 2-for-7 for 10 yards.

DALLAS COWBOYS ARLINGTON, Texas — When center Andre Gurode reported to Dallas Cowboys training camp with a recently repaired knee, Phil Costa was bumped up to the first team. Gurode returned to play Saturday and immediately regained his spot over the ball in front of Tony Romo. However, Costa may not be going far. Team owner Jerry Jones practically promised Costa a spot in the starting lineup, either in Gurode’s place at center or perhaps at left guard, where rookie David Arkin is playing. Jones says he’ doesn’t know “if anyone has had a better preseason than he’s had.”

Leonhard is ready to be in action By DENNIS WASZAK Jr. AP Sports Writer

NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick has said that often the biggest gains a player will make come between his first and second seasons. But what happens when the time between the first and second seasons is a lockout, with no supervised workouts, mini-camps or OTAs? Yet some of brightest lights in training camp have been second-year players who had the lost offseason. HOUSTON TEXANS HOUSTON — When the Houston Texans hired Wade Phillips as their new defensive coordinator in January, defensive tackle Shaun Cody wanted to know immediately what that meant for him. The 6-foot-4, 304-pound Cody is expected to start at nose tackle this season, a pivotal position in Phillips’ 3-4 scheme. Cody had plenty of questions about his new role, and Phillips reassured him that he was good enough — and big enough — to handle it. Phillips likes what he’s seen in training camp from Cody and backup Earl Mitchell. He’s also looking for big years from first-round pick J.J. Watt and veteran Antonio Smith, projected as the Texans’ starting defensive ends.

a trade to a place where he can compete for playing time, did little to distinguish himself in the fourth quarter. He made a couple of nifty moves with his feet but his arm was spotty, completing just 1 of 10 passes for 29 yards. The lone offensive bright spot came from reserve running back Isaac Redman, who scored Pittsburgh’s only touchdown on a 22yard run in which he spun away from defenders and kept his legs moving until he reached the end zone. “Anytime I get the ball in my hands I try to make the best out of it, and I feel like once I’m able to get into a rhythm and get into a game, there’s a lot more I can do than get one or two yards,” Redman said. The Steelers return to training camp Sunday at Saint Vincent College before beginning preparations to face the Philadelphia Eagles on Thursday. After a clunker in the opener, it can’t come soon enough.

AP PHOTO

Philadelphia Eagles wide receiver DeSean Jackson catches a pass during the afternoon walk through at Lehigh University in Bethlehem on Saturday.

Wide receiver sharp in first practice The Associated Press

BETHLEHEM — So much for DeSean Jackson falling behind during his holdout. The Eagles’ electrifying wide receiver made a series of sensational catches Saturday morning, Jackson’s first practice since he ended his 11-day holdout Monday. It was Jackson’s first chance to work against the Eagles’ threeheaded cornerback monster of Pro Bowl picks Asante Samuel, Nnamdi Asomugha and Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie, and Jackson picked up right where he left off at the end of his recordsetting 2010 Pro Bowl season. Jackson made two long touchdown catches, both times working against Samuel, his close friend and a four-time Pro Bowl DB. “Any time I get to go against him, I like to work on my game just as well as he likes to go against me, because he probably won’t face any other receivers as

fast as me,” Jackson said. “We were able to get in some good work vs. each other. I got some work against Nnamdi too today. It’s great for me to improve. All that helps toward my game.” Jackson has scored 26 touchdowns in three seasons, and 19 of them have gone for at least 30 yards. “He’s a big part of the team,” Samuel said. “It’s great to get a special talent out there to compete with.” Jackson has 110 catches for 2,223 yards and 15 touchdowns as a receiver the last two years and already owns the franchise record with four punt return touchdowns. “It’s great to get DeSean back,” quarterback Michael Vick said. “The connection that we were able to develop last year and just today out there on the field, it’s extraordinary, and I look forward to working with him all year. I’m glad he’s on my team.” So is coach Andy Reid, whose

teams have never missed the playoffs since the Eagles drafted Jackson. “He’s got fresh legs compared to the other guys, who are tired,” Reid said. “He always has a little bounce in his step anyway. He’s got that great speed, and the nice part is that you can tell he’s been working. He was able to function at a high level out here, and that’s a plus.” Jackson spent his holdout in his native Southern California. After participating in a team-organized autograph session, Jackson signed additional autographs for several minutes and talked and joked with several youngsters attending practice before meeting with the media. “Actually, it was a lot of fun,” Jackson said. “Felt good to get back in the swing of things. My teammates were happy to have me back. I’ve just got to get everything on the run. My legs are feeling good. I’m feeling fresh, ready to get back out there and begin contributing to my team.”

FLORHAM PARK, N.J. — Jim Leonhard took off his helmet and banged it a few times against his surgically repaired right leg. With each clank off the protective sleeve, the New York Jets safety was just showing how far he’s come in eight months. Even though it had coach Rex Ryan more than a little nervous. “He’s taking his helmet and hitting it and it’s just like, ‘Stop it. Just stop right now. You don’t need to do that!”’ Ryan said laughing. “He doesn’t think there is any difference. He literally was smacking it. He feels that good.” So good, in fact, that Leonhard will be completing his comeback from his injury when he starts for the Jets in the team’s preseason opener at Houston on Monday night. “It feels good,” Leonhard said of his leg. “It feels pretty much as good as it did before. I haven’t had any pain, any swelling or anything like that. Still, up to this point, no setbacks and I feel very comfortable going into this game.” Leonhard broke his shin last Dec. 3 when he collided with wide receiver Patrick Turner during team drills. A stabilizing rod was placed through Leonhard’s tibia, but his season was over and his future in doubt. “It was really tough during the season, just seeing the guys go through that run and knowing that we had a team that could’ve done something special,” Leonhard said. “Missing that, that was frustrating.” While the Jets made a run to the AFC championship game for the second straight year, Leonhard was stuck at home as a spectator and knowing the team could’ve used him. “I was mainly watching the games at home and I was driving my wife crazy,” he said. “She almost turned the TV off a couple of times.” The loss of Leonhard was a huge blow to the Jets, who acknowledged that their safety, who called the defensive signals in the secondary, would be sorely missed. “Actually, we felt like our season was over with,” cornerback Darrelle Revis said, “because of the type of impact he has on the defense.” Leonhard stayed around the team at the beginning of his rehabilitation, zipping around the training facility in a scooter that had a handmade Wisconsin license plate with “JIM 36” on it. He traded that in to the Jets’ training staff a few months ago when he was able to walk on his own again. “I’m done with that,” he said, laughing. “I hope I never see it again.”


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

➛ WWW.TIMESLEADER.COM/SPORTS

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 PAGE 9C

AT PLAY

Cheerleader selected for parade Jenkins Township all-stars

Samantha Tencza, a sophomore at Dallas High School, is one of more than 500 high school cheerleaders and dancers from across the U.S. who will be performing in the world famous London New Year’s Day Parade. Samantha is the daughter of Jennifer and Jaime Sorber, of Dallas, and Brian and Erica Demchak, of Ashley. She is the granddaughter of Pat and Ed Tencza, of Hanover Township, and Mary and Ron Demchak, of Plymouth Township. Samantha has five brothers, CJ, Jake, Brandan, Jaime and Kyle. The individuals invited to perform in the parade qualified for the trip after being selected as an all-American at one of the summer camps hosted by Universal Cheerleaders Association (UCA), National Cheerleaders Association (NCA), United Spirit Association (USA), Universal Dance Association (UDA) and National Dance Alliance (NDA). All-Americans are selected to try out based on superior cheerleading skills at camps across the country. For more information, visit www.varsity.com or contact Mike Fultz at (800) 238-0286 or mfultz@varsityspirit.com.

Pictured are the Jenkins Township 9-10 year old All-Stars. First row, from left: Jacob Noone, Logan McGowan, Mikey Pugliese, Joey Silinskie, Matt Lanzendorfer. Second row: Nick Prociak, Tyler Mozeleski, Kyle Mlodzienski, Nicky Scavo, Joseph Stella, Santo Insalaco. Third row: Coaches Tom Mozeleski, Rich Lanzendorfer, Jay McGowan and Joe Stella.

Royals win crown

Mountain Top all-stars

Pictured are the 12 year old all-stars from Mountain Top. First row, from left: Curtis Tokach, Derek Distasio, Jimmy Albee, Michael Leri, Ryan LeRoy, Noah Modrovsky. Second row: Tim Kindler, Sam Majdic, Lance Blass, Kyle Richards, Connor Sheloski, Johnny Kehl. Third row: coach Jeff Tokach, coach Steve Modrovsky and manager Rick LeRoy.

Vipers win tourney

Mets crowned champions

Heights Baseball crowned the Mets 2011 champions of the Cal Ripken baseball league. The Mets were sponsored by the Georgetown Deli. Pictured are team memers. First row, from left: Rico Quiroz, Michael Drozda, T.J. Lavelle, Robbie Shinal, Rocco Pugliese. Second row: Ryan Ondish, Justin Remphry, Kadin Taylor, Christopher Clark, Jervan Young, coach Rob Shinal. Third row: coach Dave Pugliese, Joe Krugel (team sponsor); coach Mike Drozda and coach Tim Lavelle. Missing from the photo are Malachi Williams and Diamond Currie.

West Side Little League’s major league Royals were the American Division winner and playoff champions. They finished the season with a 20-2 overall record. They defeated the Kingston/FF Phillies in the championship game 6-5. Pictured are team members. First row, from left: Kenny Vought, Adam Detwiler, Justin Matos, Jake Shemo,Cade Fahey. Second row: Coach Tom Austin, Dave Wildey, Dominic Shandra, Tyler Yankosky, Tim Payavis, Aaron Austin, and manager Wayne Yankosky. Missing from the photo, Ross Thompson

Kingston/Forty Fort wins title

Wyoming Valley U12 Vipers won theValley Regional Summer Fastpitch Classic in Drums. The Vipers defeated the JayDawgs (Bloomsburg) 8-4 in the championship game. The Vipers posted a perfect 6-0 record in the tournament, outscoring opponents, 84-13. Pictured are team members. First row, from left: Leandra Ramos, Taylor Brown, Karly Bennett, Erin Morris, Sarah Benscoter, Kristen Coffay. Second row: Miranda Bohn, Audi Welles, Colleen Cwalina, Meg Armstrong. Third row: Coaches Mark Brown, Jay Bohn, Sean Welles and manager Steve Armstrong.

Crew goes undefeated

Chaos finishes second

The Luzerne County Chaos U10 softball team took second place in the Babe Ruth Middle Atlantic Regional tournament. Pictured are team members: First row, from left: Faith Jones, Courtney Cragle, Hope Jones, Jaden Belles, Sara Whitsell,Tiana Wren, Nikki Cragle. Second row: Kaeley Zatorski, Emily Elick, Brinley Sobeck, Morgan Bienkowski. Third row: Coaches Dan Zatorski, Ann Elick, Ed Bienkowski and Doug Jones.

Kingston/Forty Fort’s11-12 year old Little League softball all-star team won the District 31 championship. Pictured are team members. First row, from left: Samantha Amato, Bailey Welki, Chloe Ruckle, Payton Boler, Melinda Holena, Gia Dutter and Mackenzie Rood. Second row: Manager Dave Levenoskie, Karissa Levenoskie, Katey Johnson, Madison Blejwas, Lauren Greenwald, Brittany Hebda, Coach Rob Hebda and Coach Joe Amato.

The Crew soccer team traveled to Wildwood, N.J., to compete in the Beach Blast Soccer Tournament. The Crew completed the two-day event undefeated and in the process outscored their opponents 17-4. Pictured are team members. First row, from left: Shane Searfoss. Second row: Hailee Dumont, Sammy Sebia, Emilee Masi. Third row: Christen Kimmerle, Kaden Washburn, Frankie Castellana Steven Johnson Jr. Fourth row: Coach Steve Johnson, Pavel Svintozelskiy, Nick Stavinski and Mike Sullin.

Orioles take league championship

Nanticoke wins District 16 title

Nanticoke Little League won the 10-11 Year Old District 16 softball tournament this season. Pictured are team members.

Back Mountain Orioles finished their season with a record of 18-3 to win the American League championship as well as the overall league championship. Pictured are team members. First row, from left: Dominic Angelicola, Matt Mathers, Dalton Simpson, Kyle McAndrew, Matt Magnotta, Alex Charlton, Charlie Wilson. Second row: Coach Phillips, Coach Mathers, Jimmy Hunter, Kyle Archer, Charles Giacometti, Devin Robbins, Zach Charlton, Dustin McGeehan, Coach Archer and Coach Simpson.

AT P L AY P O L I C Y The Times Leader will accept photos, standings and stories from readers about youth and adult recreation activities. We’re also encouraging anyone in a league – darts, pool, Frisbee, etc. – to submit standings and results to us. E-mailed photos should be sent in a jpeg format. Those that are not in a jpeg format might not be published. All submitted items should have contact information as well to ensure publication. Items will not be accepted over the telephone. They may be e-mailed to tlsports@timesleader.com with “At Play” in the subject, faxed to 831-7319, dropped off at the Times Leader or mailed to Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250.


CMYK PAGE 10C

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

S

P

O

R

T

S

OUTDOORS

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

Trapping and tagging bruins crucial to establishing seasons

Keeping tabs on bear population Tagging a bear Here’s a step-by-step look at how PGC biologist Kevin Wenner processes a trapped bear: STEP 1: Estimate the bear’s weight and administer the appropriate amount of drug to sedate the bruin.

TOM VENESKY OUTDOORS

Lion of a story behind big cat’s arrival in East

B

STEP 2: Apply ointment in the eyes to keep them moist and place a blindfold over the bear’s face to keep out dirt.

TOM VENESKY PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

Wildlife Conservation Officer Rick Finnegan, left, shoots a dart containing a sedative drug into a trapped bear last weekend in Sullivan County. The bear was trapped and tagged by the Pennsylvania Game Commission in an effort to gain data on population changes and harvest rates. By TOM VENESKY | tvenesky@timesleader.com

LAPORTE, SULLIVAN COUNTY – Pennsylvania Game Commission wildlife biologist Kevin Wenner and Wildlife Conservation Officer Rick Finnegan walked into the dark forest on State Game Lands 13 hoping to find a bear. A rustling on the forest floor seconds later confirmed that they had. Wenner spent nine days over the last two weeks trapping and tagging bears on SGL 13. The work augments trapping efforts that the PGC does across the state as it attempts to tag a certain number of bears. The information gleaned from the work gives the agency crucial data used to establish seasons and gauge bear populations. Wenner’s trapping efforts focused on a 25-mile stretch on the game lands. To capture bears, he made nine sets baited with donuts and rigged with a cable restraint designed to snag and hold bears by the front paw. In addition to the cable restraints, Wenner also set two culvert traps in the area. But it was the former that produced the results as Wenner captured and tagged 11 bears that were caught in the cable restraints. “The cable tightens to a certain diameter until an L-shaped lock kinks the cable so it holds,” Wenner said. “It basically handcuffs the bear.” Any bear visiting the baited sets would most likely do so at night. As a result, Wenner set out in the early morning hours to check the sets. Last Saturday, minutes before rain started pouring, Wenner and Finnegan discovered a 170-female bear in the second set checked that morning. Equipped with a CO2-powered rifle, Finnegan cautiously approached the trapped bear and fired a tranquilizer dart into the bruin. Within minutes the bear was unconscious. Soon after, Wenner and several volunteers went to work. The Game Commission has been trapping and tagging bears on SGL 13 since 2006. Bears are plentiful there, Wenner said, but not as big as those found in agricultural and suburban areas. “In those places bears are eating from dumpsters or corn and other grains from farm fields,” he said. “Here, they primarily feed on blackberries, blueberries and beech nuts, so they don’t grow as large.” The biggest bear trapped this year was a 208-pound male. In addition to capturing 11 bruins, Wenner said a large coyote was also caught in a cable restraint set. It was released unharmed. “Tagging bears is our primary

method for marking a portion of the population to look at harvest rates and management,” Wenner said. “We want to support and justify having extended seasons and other management changes, so the more bears we tag the stronger our data is.” After a trapped bear is unconscious, Wenner and his crew have about 45 minutes to process the bruin. That includes placing a tag in each ear, pulling a tooth to determine the animal’s age, tattooing an identification number inside the upper lip and weighing the bear. The entire process takes about a half hour. Wenner takes several steps to ensure the bear’s health isn’t compromised. Because the bruin can’t blink while it is sedated, Wenner coats its eyes with an ointment to keep them moist. A blindfold is placed over the bear’s head to prevent dirt from getting in it’s eyes. Wenner also constantly monitors the bear’s body temperature. If it rises above normal – 101 degrees for a bear, Wenner lowers the animal’s body temperature by pouring water over the pads of its feet. “Bears perspire through the pads of their feet, so applying water there is the best way to cool them down if we have to,” he said. Also, Wenner keeps the bear’s on its stomach with its legs underneath to

Expansive habitat keeps harvest numbers down While State Game Lands 13 consistently produces high numbers of bears when it comes to trapping efforts, that doesn’t necessarily correspond with a high harvest for Sullivan County during hunting season. Last year hunters harvested 57 bears in Sullivan County, compared to 68 the year before. WCO Rick Finnegan said while there are plenty of hunters and bears on State Game Lands 13 each season, the low harvest may be a result of the expansive habitat. SGL 13 consists of approximately 50,000 acres and is the largest game lands in the state. It borders SGL 57 and Sullivan County in general is home to a significant amount of state forest land. “There’s just so much wooded area and swamp habitat for bears up here,” Finnegan said. “I’m sure that’s one reason for the low harvest here.”

support its weight. That way, he said, there isn’t any excessive pressure placed on the internal organs. Occasionally Wenner will capture a bear that was trapped and tagged in previous years. This year he caught a female bruin that was trapped twice before. The first time was in 2006 when the sow was four years old. At that time, the bear had cubs and weighed 134 pounds. Last year the bear was caught again – this time about a mile away. It had one cub and it’s weight remained at 134 pounds. This year, Wenner said, the bear was captured again at the same location as last year. This time the female bear didn’t have any cubs and it’s weight was 174 pounds. “Even though the bears may not be extremely large in this area, the population is very healthy,” Wenner said. “We encountered two sows this year that had three cubs – that’s a good sign of a healthy population.”

STEP 3: Place a tag in each ear. “This is the most important step because if, for some reason, the bear comes out of the drug early at least we have it tagged,” Wenner said.

STEP 4: Pull a tooth to determine the bear’s age.

STEP 5: Tattoo an identification number inside the upper lip. “Males fight and the tags can get ripped out,” Wenner said. “The tattoo is a back-up to the tags.”

STEP 6: Take the bear’s weight.

Wildlife Conservation Officer Rick Finnegan, left, and biologist Kevin Wenner approach a bear trapped in a cable restraint last weekend in Sullivan County.

STEP 7: Administer a reversal drug. “We have to wait 40 minutes to do this because it’s important that the other drug has worn off,” Wenner said. “That way the bear isn’t confused and can use it’s muscles when it comes to.”

oundaries didn’t matter to this particular mountain lion. Throughout its journey earlier this summer, the big cat paid no regard to borders and property lines – the very concepts that dictate where we spend our lives. For wildlife, manmade boundaries don’t apply. Things like habitat, predators and competition from rivals dictate where a wild animal will spend its time, not a line drawn on a map. Finding a suitable place to live takes work, and a lot of roaming around. A mountain lion that was killed by a vehicle on a Connecticut road late one night in June proved it. Earlier in the month mountain lion sightings began popping up regularly throughout the area of Greenwich, Conn. Like all states in the East, mountain lions are considered extinct. When a multitude of sightings are reported in the same general area, suspicion is raised. The Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection had been working with local police departments to investigate the sightings when the unthinkable happened. They were presented with concrete evidence that at least one mountain lion did truly exist in Connecticut – the first such documented to exist in more than 100 years. It’s a shame that the animal met its demise thanks to the bumper of a 2006 Hyundai. But the accident became a tragedy when wildlife officials discovered the story behind the mountain lion. Laboratory tests of the animal’s DNA revealed that it had originated in South Dakota – specifically the Black Hills region. That means the large cat traveled more than 1,500 miles from it’s home range to Connecticut. “We’ve always known that these large carnivores have enormous dispersal capacities, and this is a testament to that,” said Matt Lovallo, the mammal section supervisor for the Pennsylvania Game Commission. “But this movement… this is really unique.” Biologists believe the cat left South Dakota and headed east through Minnesota and Wisconsin. Multiple sightings and several photos of a mountain lion in those two states turned up in the spring of last year, providing evidence that a large cat was there. Officials believe it was the Connecticut mountain lion, and they matched DNA samples to scat, blood and hair that were found in Wisconsin. But after that last sighting in the northeast corner of Wisonsin on May 20, 2010, the cat disappeared. More than a year went by before a new batch of sightings – this time in Connecticut, were generated. But where did the cat go after it left Wisconsin? Biologists belive it traveled through the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, across southern Ontario and into New York before reaching Connecticut. “The really interesting thing is it made it from the Upper Peninsula to New York undetected,” Lovall said. There’s little doubt that the mountain lion was indeed wild and not a domestic animal that was released. The 140-pound male, which is believed to be between two and five years old, was not neutered or declawed and had no implanted micro-chips. So now that we know that a truly wild mountain lion traveled through six states and one Canadien province to reach nearby Connecticut, does that mean one day a big cat could move into Pennsylvania? Does it mean that other mountain lions will be coming from the west to inhabit eastern states? “The possibility is open that you might have other long-range disbursements,” Lovallo said. “But this is an odd disbursement event. An isolated incident and not evidence of a movement of mountain lions into the east.” Tom Venesky covers the outdoors for The Times Leader. Reach him at tvenesky@timesleader.com


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 PAGE 11C

TENNIS

AP PHOTO

Mardy Fish celebrates his victory over Janko Tipsarevic during semifinal play at the Rogers Cup tennis tournament on Saturday in Montreal. Fish won 6-3, 6-4 to move on to the final.

Fish reaches final in Montreal Top-ranked American on tour tops Serb Janko Tipsarevic in semifinals.

From Times Leader wire services

MONTREAL — Mardy Fish reached his third ATP final in as many events on Saturday as the American sixth seed defeated Serb Janko Tipsarevic, 6-3, 6-4, to earn a shot at the Montreal Masters title. The top American, who is ranked eighth on the ATP, will play the winner from a match between world number one Novak Djokovic and French 13th seed Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, who defeated two-time winner Roger Federer in the third round. Fish has been swimming with

the tide on summer cement in the U.S. Open run-up after winning the Atlanta trophy a month ago and playing the ensuing Los Angeles final against Latvian Ernests Gulbis. The 29-year-old skipped the Washington ATP stop last week to rest a heel injury and has exceeded all of his expectations in Canada, where he has only played — and lost — twice before. Fish won two titles in summer 2010 and is looking for more success this season. He will head to the Open in just more than a fortnight as the top American with good friend Andy Roddick trailing second on 12th. Fish becomes the first from his country to play a Canadian

final since Andre Agassi in 2005. Agassi and Roddick also won trophies in Canada. Fish needed 76 minutes to claim victory, earning three breaks of serve and sending over six aces. Serbian Davis Cup player Tipsarevic had beaten seventh seed Tomas Berdych and Spain’s number 15 Fernando Verdasco this week on his way into the final four. Fish took the first set in just more than half an hour and went up a quick break in the second only to lose it for 2-2. But the American seed got it back for a 4-3 margin and served out victory on his second match point, a netted backhand from Tipsarevic. Fish improved to 3315 on the season.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

NC State hopes it’s in good hands Receiver T.J. Graham has spent the offseason working on eliminating dropped passes. By JOEDY McCREARY AP Sports Writer

RALEIGH, N.C. — Receiver T.J. Graham’s speedy feet seldom have failed him. His hands? That’s another story. The son of a former Olympic sprinter and track coach enters his senior season at North Carolina State as the team’s top returning option at wide receiver. The Wolfpack’s most prolific return man in school history clearly doesn’t want to fumble away his final year. He says he’s had some drops but that was a matter of not being focused. So in the offseason, he’s taken the time to become a better leader and “making my hands a lot surer.” Toward that, he worked on a variety of drills to improve his handeye coordination and become a more complete receiver. He caught tennis balls. He covered his face before snagging footballs. He flipped light switches off and on before making catches. “T.J. definitely worked really hard this summer catching the ball,” said new quarterback — and old friend — Mike Glennon. “I’ve definitely

OUTDOORS NEWS THE SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN Commission (SRBC www.srbc.net) announced last week that 18 separate water withdrawals approved by SRBC in 6 Pennsylvania counties remain temporarily suspended due to localized lower stream flow levels. Streams have responded positively to recent rainfall events, reducing the number of suspended water withdrawals by more than half this week. The vast majority of the temporarily suspended withdrawals are related to water for natural gas projects. The suspended withdrawals are part of SRBC’s passby flow requirement to protect aquatic

AP PHOTO

North Carolina State wide receiver T.J. Graham reaches for a pass during a practice in Raleigh, N.C.

seen improvement during this camp.” That can only help the Wolfpack’s transition at quarterback as redshirt junior Glennon is taking over for three-year starter Russell Wilson. Graham will be the team’s most experienced wideout as both starting receivers from last year are gone. He caught 25 passes for 316 yards with four touchdowns in 2010, and has made 10 starts in three years. “We came in together, T.J. was the first guy I met when I came here,” Glennon said. “We talked throughout our senior years (in high school) and we kind of envisioned ourselves coming here to-

gether, being a quarterback-receiver tandem, and now that is finally here.” Both Glennon and Graham seem ready for it. Graham has come a long way from his days growing up in north Raleigh, calling himself “a late bloomer” whose growth spurt didn’t come until he was about 16 years old. His father, Trevor Graham, was a member of the Jamaican 4x400-meter relay team at the Seoul Olympics in 1988. Once his son got older, the former coach of Justin Gatlin, Marion Jones and other world-class sprinters taught him how to become faster.

resources and downstream water users. When streams drop below pre-determined protective flow levels, project sponsors who are required to meet SRBC’s passby requirement must stop taking water. They cannot resume taking water until streams have recovered above the protected level for at least 48 hours. SRBC and its regulated project sponsors monitor real-time stream flow data generated by stream gages maintained and operated by the U.S. Geological Survey. Regulated project sponsors also are required to install tamper-proof water meters that automatically record their water withdrawals on a daily basis. SRBC requires that information be reported quarterly, in addition to continuous spot-inspec-

tions conducted by SRBC field staff working out of the field office in Sayre, Bradford County, Pennsylvania. Water withdrawals temporarily suspended as of Aug. 11 in the northeast region: BRADFORD COUNTY Chesapeake Appalachia, Chemung River (Barrett) and Sugar Creek (Isbell) Healthy Properties, Sugar Creek Talisman Energy, Fall Brook, Seeley Creek, Sugar Creek, Towanda Creek, and Tributary to North Branch Sugar Creek Tennessee Gas Pipeline, Towanda Creek Towanda Country Club, Little Wysox Creek WYOMING COUNTY Sugar Hollow Trout Park and Hatchery, Hatchery Effluent


CMYK PAGE 12C

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

S

P

O

R

T

S

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Luck enjoying college QB passed on being NFL’s No. 1 draft pick By ANTONIO GONZALEZ AP Sports Writer

By RICK GANO AP Sports Writer

SOUTH BEND, Ind. — Notre Dame’s quarterback derby has evolved into a two-man showdown between Dayne Crist and Tommy Rees. Coach Brian Kelly said Saturday the two are pretty much even after one week of camp. “It’s very, very competitive between Dayne and Tommy,” Kelly said. “Too close to call at this point.” Crist was the starter until sustaining a season-ending knee injury Oct. 30 against Tulsa that required surgery. Rees relieved in that game and led the Irish on a four-game winning streak, including a Sun Bowl victory over Miami, which gave the Irish an 8-5 record in Kelly’s first season. “They both have done very good things. So right now I would say theyareneck-and-neck,”Kellysaid. Rees got a lot of repetitions with the first team Saturday, so he could be more fairly evaluated. “Dayne has been getting most of the first-team reps, so we wanted to

be able to give a balanced evaluation,” Kelly said. The 6-foot-4, 235-pound Crist has a stronger arm, but the 6-foot-2, 215-pound Rees has a nice touch and a quick release. Both are comfortable in Kelly’s spread offense. It started off as a four-man derby with Andrew Hendrix and freshman Everett Golson also in the mix, but Kelly said Saturday it was too difficult to get practice repetitions for all four. Earlier, the coach had said he’d probably pick the starter after 19 practices, which would fall around the third week of August. “We kind of thought we’d need that second week (to decide),” Kelly said. “It’s still a battle between those two, not that Everett and Andrew haven’t made progress. They just haven’t got as much work.” Kelly said speed slot receiver Theo Riddick, who was shifted from running back a year ago and became one of the top big-play threat before an ankle injury sidelined him for four games, could be used again in the backfield. “It’s available to us, whether we need to do it or whether we feel like it has to happen is another thing,” Kelly said. “But we’ll always be prepared if we ever get short-handed that Theo can line up at the running back position.”

Ex-Notre Dame coordinator involved in 7-hour standoff

By TOM COYNE Associated Press

GRANGER, Ind. — Former Notre Dame football defensive coordinator and NFL player Corwin Brown was taken from his home Friday night with a self-inflicted gunshot wound after a nearly seven-hour standoff, police said. St. Joseph County Metro Homicide Commander Tim Corbett said Friday night he did not know whether Brown’s injuries were life-threatening. Police say they heard gunshots inside the home shortly after they arrived about 1 p.m. in response to a reported domestic dispute. Brown’s wife and children exited the house sometime later and police say they began trying to talk him out using cellphones and a bullhorn. Police said Brown, who was a tri-captain of the Michigan football team in 1992, asked to talk to several friends during the standoff. Shortly before it ended, someone could be heard saying through the bullhorn: “Be a Michigan man today. Step up to your obligation.” Several seconds later the person said: “Please don’t let me down. Please!” Moments later a fire truck and ambulance rushed to the front of the house. The ambulance left moments later. Police would not identify the person who had been talking to Brown. Police said Brown’s wife, Melissa, had a bruise on her head when she left the house earlier in the day. Their children were not hurt. Police could be heard urging

Brown, 41, throughout the day to give up or to give them a call. “We’d appreciate it if you’d let us know you’re Brown OK,” one officer said through the bullhorn. Sgt. Matt Blank, a St. Joseph County police spokesman, said Brown came out of the house several times during the standoff only to go back inside.

live a life of relative anonymity. Even though Luck’s stature has grown in popularity on campus, it’s not even close to what it would be had he turned pro. “There are times people are sitting at the table in the dining hall talking about him,” senior linebacker Shayne Skov said, “and they don’t even realize he’s sitting at the table with them.” Luck relishes that environment. The way he sees it, the NFL will always be there. Soaking in Stanford’s nuances is something he’ll never be able to do again, and he’s not wasting a final opportunity. Luck takes part in a soccer scrimmage each spring with other football players against the women’s team. The guys lost 5-4 this year. He has lived down the hall from golfer Michelle Wie, run into former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice inside the football gym, attended Olympic sporting events and mingled with executives from most major Silicon Valley companies — all on the Stanford campus. Yet his favorite chance meeting? Talking with actor Steve Carell during a charity football event at Stanford days after “The Office” television series filmed its final episode. “I wanted to cry,” Luck said. “Yup, that’s Andrew. He’s kind of goofy,” said Luck’s sister, Mary Ellen, a sophomore on the Stanford volleyball team. “We tease him all the time.” Luck’s true love comes in the same place as so many other Stanford students — in the classroom. Among the reasons he returned was to finish his degree in

SANTARELLI Ready Mixed Concrete & Vibrated Block Company

BUILD WITH THE BEST! Call Mark Oley 693-2200 www.santarellireadymix.com

3

966 Shoemaker Avenue West Wyoming

DAYS ONLY! THURS. AUG. 18 to SAT. AUG. 20

100 LIBERTY SAFES IN STOCK COME JOIN US...

Glock, Benelli, Liberty Browning, Nikon Factory Reps On Site

• Snacks & Refreshments • Enter in a Drawing to WIN a FREE GLOCK

FREE RANGE BAG, T-SHIRT, BOX AMMO & HAT, WITH PURCHASE OF A GLOCK

104 ALDEN MTN. RD., NANTICOKE • 735-3776 or 1-800-281-0716 Layaways Available - Delivery Available www.piestraksgunshop.com Mon.-Fri. 11-7pm • Sat. 9am-5pm

architecture, an appreciation that stemmed from spending the first 11 years of his childhood growing up in Europe. His father, Oliver, a former NFL quarterback and the current athletic director at West Virginia, was a longtime executive in the World League of American Football and NFL Europe. The family lived in different parts of Germany and later London, and Luck was constantly scribbling mock-ups of the centuries-old buildings and futuristic soccer stadiums in his notepad. During annual winter road trips, he would sit in the back seat of his parents’ car with Mary Ellen designing ski resorts. “Always scribbling,” Oliver said. Luck enjoyed soccer far more than football — like most kids in Europe — and playing the sport in his early years helped him develop the footwork so many have compared to Peyton Manning, whom Luck spoke with for guidance before making a final decision to return to Stanford. Only when the family moved to Houston did Luck’s football stardom take off. He also was never shy in the classroom, part of the reason he was attracted to Stanford, and his father believes the high marks often led some to question his son’s passion for sports — which is still the one criticism he gets at times. For those who know Luck best, he’s more competitive than anybody. When Luck and his father drove out from Texas to Stanford to move out the Honda Accord before his sophomore season, they made a pit stop at the Grand Canyon. Luck wasn’t

satisfied just gazing at one of Mother Nature’s most spectacular views. He persuaded his father to hike down to the bottom and back up — all in the same day. “Everything with Andrew turns into an athletic competition,” Oliver said. The first time Harbaugh ever met Luck was on a recruiting trip to his Houston high school. Searching for the coach’s office, Harbaugh bumped into Luck while he was bouncing around the weight room. “He was just getting after it. He was running from machine to machine,” Harbaugh said. “I came by, it was kind of as he was running to another machine, and he shook my hand and said, ‘Coach Harbaugh, nice to see you. I’d love to talk, but I’ve got to get my workout in.”’ That competitive drive has lifted Luck and academics-first Stanford into the ranks of college football heavyweights. Luck, the Heisman runner-up to Auburn’s Cam Newton, enters this season as the overwhelming favorite for college football’s most famous award, a player many believe is the most NFLready quarterback in more than a decade. Coming off a 12-1 season capped with an Orange Bowl victory over Virginia Tech, the Cardinal were one bad half against Oregon from playing for the national title. Luck set school records for TD passes (32), completion percentage (70.7 percent) and passing efficiency (170.2) last season to help the Cardinal finish fourth in the final AP poll, the school’s best ranking since the unbeaten 1940 team finished second.

IREM COUNTRY CLUB

Stone Meadows Golf Course 18 Holes

Invites The Public To Play On THURSDAYS $30 Per Person or $100 Per Foursome (Cart Included)

Call 675-4653 For Tee Times

Buy One Round of Golf at Regular Price,

Get One FREE $ 29 Weekday $ 38 Weekend Expires 9/30/11 Must present coupon

(Proper Golf Attire Required)

(570) 472-3870

Rt. 115, Just South of Bear Creek! www.stonemeadowsgolf.com

OUR LADY OF VICTORY HARVEYS LAKE ANNUAL MEMORIAL GOLF TOURNAMENT Friday, September 9th, 2011 At Mill Race Golf Course in Benton. $80.00 per person includes: Green Fee, Golf Cart, Open Bar, Lunch. Hors D’oeuvres, Dinner, Beer and Soda back at the Church Hall. Grand Cash Prize $5,000, and many other cash prizes and raffles. For further information, please call Mike or Merry Ann at (570) 639-5426, or Helen at (570) 639-1535.

ALL ARE WELCOME!

237614 701664

Notre Dame is trying to decide between Dayne Crist and Tommy Rees.

AP PHOTO

Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck passes during practice in Stanford, Calif. Luck turned down a chance to be the NFL draft’s top pick to stay at Stanford one more year.

285614

Coach: QB derby is ‘too close to call’

253747

AP PHOTO

Notre Dame quarterback Dayne Crist throws a pass during the first half of the Blue Gold Game in April.

STANFORD, Calif. — Andrew Luck was a freshman, just a few weeks into his first college football season, when then-Stanford coach Jim Harbaugh called the quarterback to his office. It was good news. Harbaugh was ready to make Luck the starter. His reaction, however, was nothing like Harbaugh expected. “He told me he didn’t think he had earned it,” Harbaugh revealed to The Associated Press this week. “He didn’t think he had beaten anybody out. And as excited that he would be to start, he didn’t feel like he had won the job by beating anybody out.” Luck ended up redshirting in 2008, and who knows what might’ve transpired if he didn’t? If Harbaugh had his way, Luck might already have played his last college game or even won a Heisman Trophy. “That’s profound right there,” said Harbaugh, now the San Francisco 49ers coach. “That always resonates with me.” When it comes to making big decisions, Luck doesn’t go the conventional route. The strong-armed and quickfooted junior turned down a chance to be the NFL’s top pick to stay with the Cardinal this year, announcing his desire to return in a one-sentence news release by the school in January. While he could be cashing in on millions already, Luck’s life is far less glamorous. The architecture major pedals around campus on a rather ordinary mountain bike to his usual parking space: a rusty rack outside Stanford’s football facility. On a recent morning, he had a quick workout in a stained white T-shirt with the sleeves cut off and worn-down black shorts. Afterward, he grabbed a ham and egg sandwich on ciabatta bread with an iced coffee from “Jimmy V’s Sports Cafe” inside the athletic offices and scarfed it down all while doing yet another interview with a reporter. Then it’s off to class. Football meetings. Practice. And, of course, studying. “It’s just the way we do things around here,” he said. Luck wouldn’t have it any other way. The unique setting at Stanford is his personal bubble, a place filled with future online innovators, venture capitalists and politicians that allows him to


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

S

P

O

R

T

S

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 PAGE 13C

AUTO RACING

Chase outsiders getting tense New points system has more teams competing for spot in the Chase for the Cup. By JOHN KEKIS AP Sports Writer

AP PHOTO

Kurt Busch celebrates winning the Nationwide Series race at Watkins Glen International in Watkins Glen, N.Y., Saturday.

Kurt Busch wins Nationwide race Sprint Cup driver was subbing for Brad Keselowski, who is injured.

By JOHN KEKIS AP Sports Writer

WATKINS GLEN, N.Y. — Chalk up one for the team. Subbing for injured Penske Racing teammate Brad Keselowski, Kurt Busch held off Jimmie Johnson on a green-whitecheckered finish to win the Nationwide Zippo 200 at Watkins Glen International on Saturday. Busch beat his Sprint Cup nemesis by nearly a second for his third victory in 12 Nationwide races. He also deprived brother Kyle of his 50th career victory, which would have broken a tie with Mark Martin for the most in series history. Joey Logano edged Kyle Busch for third, and Carl Edwards was fifth. Paul Menard, Ron Fellows and Nationwide regulars Aric Almirola, Trevor Bayne and Elliott Sadler rounded out the top 10. Ricky Stenhouse Jr. maintained his series lead with a 15th-place finish. Stenhouse leads Reed Sorenson by 10 points, Sadler is another 14 back, and Almirola is fourth. Five years ago, Kurt Busch held off Robby Gordon for a Nationwide win in a fender-banging finish around the 11-turn, 2.45-mile circuit. Busch expected a replay this time, but it never materialized.

“I didn’t know where we were on fuel, I didn’t really care,” Busch said after crew chief Todd Gordon’s two-stop strategy worked to perfection. “It was one of those feelings of like, we’re going to see this race on ESPN Classic if we could have gotten to duel it out at the end. It just didn’t work out for him (Kyle).” The race was mostly a battle between the Busch brothers until the second caution of the race flew with two laps remaining in regulation. They took turns leading the entire 85 laps of the race, with Kyle leading 48 laps and Kurt, who started on pole, ahead for 37. Kyle’s chances took a big hit when he was forced to pit on lap 17 with his car beginning to overheat. Steam was pouring out of the release valve on the right side of hood after his No. 18 Toyota went off course and picked up a wad of grass on the front splitter. Still, thanks to the first caution of the race, Kyle was able to save fuel, pitted for what he hoped was the last time on lap 50, and gained a 3-second lead over his brother after Kurt’s final stop on lap 55. Kyle led Kurt by 0.893 seconds with 10 laps to go, with Edwards 2.2 seconds back in third as the three distanced themselves from the rest of the pack. Kurt closed to his brother’s back bumper when both encountered heavy traffic.

WATKINS GLEN, N.Y. — Kurt Busch likes where he sits in the Sprint Cup standings as he prepares to try for a rare season sweep at NASCAR’s two road courses. “I’m glad that we’re in a more comfortable position and having an 88-point cushion on that cutoff,” Busch, fourth in the standings, said Saturday before qualifying a disappointing 27th for today’s Cup race at Watkins Glen International. “You can gain 40something points in a race. Right now we have a two-race cushion. I’m glad that we can sit on the outside of the fence and not be one of those guys trying to race their way in.” NASCAR’s new points system has created more drama than ever since the 10-race Chase for the Cup was instituted in 2004. Race winners earn 43 points, plus three bonus points for the victory. Winners also can earn an extra point for leading a lap and leading the most laps, bringing their total to a possible maximum of 48 points. All other drivers in the finishing order are separated by one-point increments, with the second-place finisher earning 42, third 41, and so on. The top 10 drivers in the standings and the two drivers with the most victories in 11th to 20th place earn spots for the Chase. If the postseason had begun Saturday, the wild cards would have gone to Brad Keselowski, who sits 18th in points but has two wins, and Denny Hamlin, who is 11th with one win. With five races remaining — Watkins Glen, Michigan, Bristol, Atlanta and Richmond — before the Chase cutoff, the tension is mounting. “If you take the points system and look at it, I’d be willing to say where we are right now, there’s more questions about who’s going to make the Chase than we’ve ever had,” said Jeff Burton, who has yet to register a top 10 and sits 24th in points. “You can make a solid argument there’s six or seven teams, maybe eight or nine teams, that could go either way. That puts a lot of people in the mix to be excited or disappointed.” Dale Earnhardt Jr. sits in 10th place with 641 points, just one point ahead of two-time Cup champ Tony Stewart. They’re the only drivers in the top 10 without a victory, giving hope to Clint Bowyer and Paul Menard of Richard Childress Racing, and Roush Fenway’s Greg Biffle, among others. “It’s changed for some of those guys,” said Bowyer, who sits 12th, 41 points behind Earnhardt

AP PHOTO

Kyle Busch waits in his car after winning the pole during qualifying for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series race at Watkins Glen International on Saturday in Watkins Glen, N.Y.

but only three ahead of Biffle. “For us, we don’t have a win. Our best shot is to race our way into the top 10. I truly believe that. But for some of these wild-card guys, getting a second win is a big deal.” Earnhardt was collateral damage in a seven-car accident on the road course at Sonoma in June. The crash triggered by Stewart put a hole in the radiator of Earnhardt’s No. 88 Chevy and his engine eventually blew, leading to just his second DNF since 2009. Earnhardt is both confident and wary about his position in the standings. “They want some of us to slip back there, some of us who haven’t won a race,” said Earnhardt, who notched his first top 10 in seven races last week at Pocono and has three top 10s in 11 starts at Watkins Glen. Despite racing with a broken left ankle and sore back, Keselowski zoomed into the playoff picture with a stunning win a week ago at Pocono, holding off Kyle Busch for his second victory of the season. Still, he’s only 19

points ahead of 21st-place Juan Pablo Montoya, the defending race winner at Watkins Glen. “To say that we would win this week would be a little unrealistic expectation,” said Keselowski, who finished 20th at WGI last year in his first career Cup start at the track, then improved to 10th at Sonoma in June. “I’ve slowly been improving. I’d like to get a good, stout finish. If we can just keep chipping away and just keep getting a little bit better, get a top 16, a top10, that would be a hell of a day.” Menard had that kind of day two weeks ago at Indianapolis when he held off Jeff Gordon to win the Brickyard 400, then followed that with a 10th at Pocono. “But one victory doesn’t guarantee anything,” Menard said. “I think Brad kind of proved that last week — two is obviously better than one. That’s what we’re working hard on, getting a second one. Then we’ll feel pretty good. We’ve got to try to get win No. 2 and take some risks that we might not take otherwise.” Hamlin has four top-10 finishes

in five starts at Watkins Glen. Still, his team has struggled mightily. Since his win at Michigan, Hamlin has only one top 10. “Everyone has to do their job and do it well, and we’ve just struggled to do that consistently. That’s something we’ve got to work on. It’s just frustrating when mistakes cost us week in and week out,” said Hamlin, who won eight races last year but fell short of dethroning five-time Cup champion Jimmie Johnson. The frustration struck again Saturday during qualifying. Hamlin lost control coming out of the Carousel turn, a sweeping right-hander, and he was unable to prevent the right side of his No. 11 Toyota from slamming the guard rail that lines the track. Rain is in the forecast for today, which could affect strategy as it did a week ago at Pocono. Many thought the race might be over when it was red-flagged with Joey Logano leading, but after a 1 hour, 40-minute rain delay, NASCAR was able to get it in and Keselowski responded with his impressive win.

DIVING

Kristian Ispen rallies to win U.S. 3-meter springboard championship By BETH HARRIS AP Sports Writer

LOS ANGELES — Kristian Ipsen rallied to win the 3-meter springboard title at the U.S. diving championships Saturday, doing the toughest final three dives among the top contenders. Ipsen totaled 499.50 points in the six-dive final at UCLA, getting back into contention in the fourth round with a dive that earned marks of 9.0 and higher. Drew Livingston was second at 495.30.TroyDumaisledalltheway until the final round when he dropped to third and finished with 490.30. His oldest brother, Justin, who turned 33 Saturday, was fifth in his first nationals since 2005, while their younger brother Dwight was 10th among 12. Ipsen earned loud cheers for his fourth dive, a reverse 11⁄2 with 31⁄2 twists that moved him from fourth to second.

“I hadn’t done that dive since February,” he said. “I felt really comfortable with it.” Ipsen finished strongly on his last dive, a forward 21⁄2 somersaults with three twists pike that carries a 3.9 degree of difficulty, close to being one of the toughest dives in the sport. “It’s a new dive for me. I wanted to try it at this meet and test it,” he said. “You have to be consistent on everything. If you have a smaller list and you don’t have one of those big dives, I don’t know that it’s going to get you on the medals podium.” Ipsen and Troy Dumais teamed to finish fourth in springboard syn-

chro at the recent world championships in Shanghai, where the Chinese swept all 10 diving medals. Troy Dumais received marks ranging from 8.0 to 8.5 for his last dive, a reverse 21⁄2 somersaults with 11⁄2 twists pike. His brother Justin did the same dive and earned slightly lower marks. “I went for it. I just missed the end of it,” Troy said. “I’m happy with the way I set up every dive. I was usually a little off on my entries. Normally I hit my entries.” Troy said he planned to add one or two big optional dives to his list for next season. The Dumais brothers, who grew up in Ventura, Calif., hadn’t com-

peted against each other in years. Their parents watched, along with their sister. “It was fun. Just because it didn’t work doesn’t mean I didn’t enjoy it,” said Troy, who at 31 is trying to make his fourth Olympic team. Dwight added, “It definitely brings back some memories.” Dwight, who is 25, hit the board with his right foot on his third dive, dropping him from fourth to near

the bottom. “It just happens when you push thelimit,”hesaid.“Iwasfuriousbecause I know I can do that dive. You realize funnier things have happened and you just got to stay within yourself.” Brittany Viola completed her comeback from two foot surgeries, easily winning the 10-meter platform. The 3-meter synchro title went

to Kassidy Cook and Cassidy Krug, who had 301.86. Amanda Burke and Summer Allman were second at 266.64, followed by Gabriella Agostino and Logan Kline at 250.80. Viola led all but one of the five rounds, totaling 348.75. She didn’t have the highest degree of difficulty, but the 24-year-old former Miami diver was consistent throughout.

WILKES-BARRE GOLF CLUB

27 Unique Holes One Breathtaking Course

472-3590

Tuesday thru Friday Play & Ride for Just

1001 FAIRWAY DR., WILKES-BARRE, PA

Sign Up Today for Wilkes-Barre Golf Club

Chairman’s Day Saturday, August 20

SENIORS 55+

WEEKDAYS

24 $ 30 $

SAT & SUN (after 1PM)

CART & GREENS FEE

(Excludes Tournaments)

CALL AHEAD FOR TEE TIMES

- Must Present Coupon - Valid Up To Four Players Exp. 9-1-11

Weekday Special $33.00

Must Present Coupon. One coupon per foursome. Cannot be used in tournaments or with any other promotion. TL

Monday Special $32 Senior Day Mon-Thurs $28 Ladies Day Thursday $28 Weekends After 1 p.m. $36 GPS CART INCLUDED 868-GOLF

260 Country Club Drive, Mountaintop

www.blueridgetrail.com

300682

Diver finished competition with toughest final three dives among top contenders.


CMYK PAGE 14C

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

Fuel Up with

Get all the Money-Saving Coupons, Classifieds, News & Sports, TV Listings, Puzzles, Comics, PARADE, Recipes, Travel and more with your subscription to The Times Leader. Call 829-5000 to start your home delivery today!

You Could Win A FREE GAS CARD.

295 Mundy St. Wilkes-Barre

570-270-WASH

A new winner each day, so enter as often as you like.

25

$

Bingo’s

Hoagies Great Hoagies

ONLY

2

$

50

503 Slocum Street Swoyersville • 287-4001 Mon-Sat 9-3 or until sold out

or a

Gas Card Each Day

500

$

GET A FREE TIMES LEADER WITH EVERY CAR WASH!

Grand Prize Gas Card

Read The Times Leader daily to see if you’re a winner.

CONGRATULATIONS

Pauline Naparsteck of Pittston! Winner of the Sunday August 7th $25 Gas Card.

Valid at these locations:

Claim your prize at The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, during normal business hours. Photo ID required.

Pittston By-Pass 801 Wyoming Ave. West Pittston Pittston Gateway Shopping Center Edwardsville

Fuel Up Contest Rules:

Now through Aug. 27, 2011 The Times Leader is giving away a $25 gas card each day. Register for your chance to win by filling out the official entry form below and dropping it off at a participating location. Additional entry forms may be available at store locations. Enter as often as you like at any location. No purchase necessary. The Times Leader will also award a $500 gas card at the end of the contest to the grand prize winner. Read The Times Leader each day to see if you’re a winner! All contest forms will be picked up each Thursday

Limited Time Offer.

during the contest period, and prizes will be awarded through a random drawing of all entries collected for that week. Grand prize will be drawn on Aug. 26, 2011, from entries collected Aug, 19, 2011 through noon on Aug. 25, 2011. Grand prize winner will publish on Aug. 28th. Must be 18 or older to enter. Employees of The WilkesBarre Publishing Company or any of its divisions or of any of the participating sponsors are not eligible for prizes. Winners can pick up their prize at The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, during normal business hours. Any prizes not claimed by Sept. 30, 2011 will be forfeit.

Plus tax. Excludes Premium Subs, BBQ Pulled Pork and Double Meat. Additional charge for extras. Exp. 8-14-11. ©2011 Doctor’s Associates Inc. SUBWAY®is a registered trademark of Doctor’s Associates Inc. All rights reserved.

Drop Off Your Entry Form At One Of These Locations. Humphrey’s Bootery & Bags Orloski’s Car Wash & Lube Shop Bingo’s Hoagie’s Subway - 3 locations

ELMER SUDDS SUDDS ELMER

DISCOUNT TOBACCO OUTLET

Homemade Delicious Food Done Right 11 Beers On Tap 70 Plus Varieties of Seasonal Microbrews

(570) 829-5910

• Cigars • Cigarettes • Pipe & Chewing Tobacco • RYO • Zippo Lighters • Accessories • Lottery

Hanover Township Near Carey Ave. Bridge Mon. - Fri. 9AM-8PM Sat. 9AM - 6PM

HAPPY HOUR EVERYDAY 5PM - 7PM New Expanded Menu

4 FLAT SCREEN TV’s FREE WiFi ACCESS NEW LARGE PARKING LOT ON EMPIRE STREET!

475 E. Northampton St. (Cor. Northampton & Empire)

Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702 570-829-7833 (Just a minute from downtown and the Mohegan Sun Arena) Kitchen and Bar Hours: Sunday - Monday 5pm-2am • Tuesday - Saturday 4pm-2am

Schiel’s Family Market - 2 locations Ochman’s Coins & Jewelry The Computer Shop Northeast Ace Hardware - 2 locations

ICE CREAM Reg. Size Soft Serve Cones

7 George Ave.

¢ 99 All Large

(PARSONS SECTION)

Wilkes-Barre • 270-3976 30 Hanover Street Wilkes-Barre • 970-4460

Sundaes

Fred... Frank... Food & Fun!

$199

NEW ITEM!

Soft Strawberry and Strawberry Vanilla Twist

RT. 309 Wilkes-Barre Twp. Blvd. (Near Home Depot)

300023

Tobacco Junction

Cooks Pharmacy Cross Valley Federal Credit Union - 6 locations Tobacco Junction Elmer Sudds Malacari Produce

NORTHEAST

Name: ______________________________________ Phone: _________________ E-mail Address: ______________________________________________________

FULL MENU

Wood Pellets

COME SEE WHAT YOU’RE MISSING!

a ton and FREE DELIVERY!

COME FOR DINNER, STAY FOR MUSIC!

249

with this coupon. Valid at two locations! 629 S. Main St., Old Forge and 1129 Northern Blvd., Clarks Summit. Expires 8/31/11

629 S Main St., Old Forge, PA 18518 570-457-5495 1 129 N h B l d 1129 Northern Blvd., Clarks Summit, PA 18411 570-586-4882

FRIDAY 8/19 TIGHTLY WOUND

Get more at our website thenakedgrapeplains.info

15 N. River Street • Weis Plaza • Plains 570.970.2426 • 570.821.9825 293121

$

Please return completed entry form to a participating store by noon on Aug. 25, 2011. Winners will be chosen through a random drawing. Forms mailed to or dropped off at The Times Leader office will not be acepted.

Address: ____________________________________________________________ City: __________________________________ State: ______ Zip: _____________ Do you subscribe to The Times Leader? ❑ Yes ❑ No Would you like to subscribe? ❑ Yes ❑ No

No purchase necessary. Prizes have no cash value and are nontransferable. Winners agree to having their name and photo used for publicity. Copies may be examined at our 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre office. The winners will be determined through random drawing from all entries received during duration of promotion. This newspaper cannot answer or respond to telephone calls or letters regarding the contest. Sponsors’ employees and their immediate families are not eligible to enter.

timesleader.com

300841

www.northeastace.com


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

S

P

O

R

T

S

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 PAGE 15C

SOCCER

Real Madrid coach won’t let suspension quiet him Jose Mourinho was suspended for five matches for criticizing soccer officials. By PAUL LOGOTHETIS AP Sports Writer

MADRID — Looking calm and unruffled, Jose Mourinho returned to face the Spanish media for the first time since April when a famous outburst earned him a five-match sanction from UEFA. And the Real Madrid coach had a clear message for all ahead of today’s Spanish Supercup first-leg match against Barcelona: “No one will shut me up.” Saturday was the Portuguese coach’s first news conference in Spain since a 3-2 defeat to Zaragoza, which came after a 2-0 loss to Barcelona in the Champions League semifinals on April 27. Then, Mourinho went on a long-

winded rant claiming Barcelona’s recent successes were down to preferential treatment from referees and UEFA. When asked what he had learned from the entire episode, Mourinho was clear again: “I learned you can’t tell the truth.” Mourinho refused to give his thoughts on Barcelona, including when asked if he thought the three-time defending Spanish champion’s squad was perhaps among the all-time greats. “I don’t talk about Barcelona. I only talk about my team,” Mourinho said at Santiago Bernabeu Stadium, where the club said 57,000 fans came out to watch an open training session that took on more of a summer beach party. But that lighthearted atmosphere did not translate indoors to the season’s first news conference. While Mourinho looked as

poised and assured as ever, the season was already heating up thanks to the Portuguese coach’s choice of words. Including when it came to the two Champions League matches he still has to miss as part of his ban. “I won’t talk about the Champions League for as long as I’m sanctioned,” Mourinho responded when asked if a 10th European Cup was the top priority this season. But he also celebrated UEFA’s reduction of his original ban. “I’ve had some important victories during my career but for an organism like UEFA, which is not a normal or democratic organism, to reduce my sanction has tremendous significance. Tremendous significance,” he said. “They didn’t reduce it any more because they would have found themselves in an uncomfortable situation so for me it’s a

AP PHOTO

Real Madrid’s coach Jose Mourinho reacts during a news conference at Santiago Bernabeu stadium in Madrid, Spain, on Saturday.

great victory. Either way, as long as I’m sanctioned, I won’t talk about the Champions League.” UEFA’s appeal panel ruled that while Mourinho’s formal fivematch sanction should stand, two

matches instead of one would be suspended for three years. Mourinho served one match of the ban last season when he missed the semifinal return leg, a 1-1 draw at the Camp Nou that sent

Barcelona to the final where it beat Manchester United. Mourinho was content with his squad, despite no big-name signings this summer. Sunday’s first leg at the Bernabeu offered a good test for the season ahead, when Madrid will look to end Barcelona’s run of three straight league titles. The return leg is on Wednesday at the Camp Nou. “For me this is an isolated tournament and it doesn’t have much to do with what will happen next. Look at what happened at Inter (Milan) — we lost the supercup ... and then won the treble,” Mourinho said. “It’s the most important tournament of the season and the least important of the season.” Mourinho said while the structure at Madrid had changed since general director Jorge Valdano was fired in May, his own role had not altered drastically.

CYC L I N G

Coloradan Wells wins Leadville 100 race Mountain bike race lacked big name competitors it has had in last few years.

451

‘90 CHEVY CHEYENNE 2500 series. 8 ft

330

Child Care

DAYCARE

in my Kingston home. Licensed. Accepting Lackawanna & Luzerne CCC. 570-283-0336

To place your ad call...829-7130

ARNIE STAPLETON AP Sports Writer

LEADVILLE, Colo. — The Leadville 100 MTB lacked the star power of years past. There was no shortage of spunk. Todd Wells, the national crosscountry mountain bike champion, won the nation’s highest-altitude endurance test with the second-fastest time in the race’s history Saturday. Wells, from Durango, Colo., traversed the grueling, 100-mile course in a lung-searing 6 hours, 23 minutes, 38 seconds. That was about seven minutes slower than Levi Leipheimer’s record-setting time of a year ago but well ahead of everyone else. Austrian Alban Lakata was second in 6:27:57 after a flat tire early on, and Alex Grant of Salt Lake City finished third in 6:35:32. The Leadville 100 features no prize money, just pride and climbs of 14,000 vertical feet at elevations ranging from 9,000 to 12,500 feet. Like 2009 champion Lance Armstrong, Leipheimer skipped this year’s “Race Across the Sky.” Leipheimer is competing in the Tour of Utah in preparation for the USA Pro Cycling Challenge next week in Colorado. Armstrong gave fans a glimmer of hope by showing up two minutes before the start of a qualifier last month. But there was no similar sprint to the start line Saturday for the seven-time Tour de France winner. Also sitting this one out was six-time champion Dave Wiens who finished second and fourth the last two years as the race exploded in popularity and drew world-class competition, and Jeremy Horgan-Kobelski, last year’s runner-up. “It doesn’t matter,” said Wells, who bested his mark of 6:30:31 last year when he took third. “I wanted to win regardless of who was going to come.” Wells was on pace to challenge Leipheimer’s record time of 6:16:37 until a spoiled stomach that bothered him much of the race took its toll at the end. “It started to get cramping and knot up a little bit,” he said. “It’s hard. You’ve got to eat a lot out there. It’s a long race. But then you’re going so hard, too, it’s hard to digest everything.” Wells said he didn’t want to burn himself out trying to beat Leipheimer’s splits on the way back.

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

box with tool box. Heavy duty ladder rack. 150K miles. Great work truck. $1,500 570-406-5128

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

524

506 Administrative/ Clerical

PROGRAM ASSISTANT

HONDAS

‘10 Accord LX Premium. Gray. 2k Miles. Alloys. Power seats. $20,895. ‘08 Accords Choose from 3. Low miles. Factory warranty. Starting at $16,495 ‘08 Civic EX Silver, 25K miles. Moonroof. Alloys. $16,400 ‘08 Civic LX Blue. 20 K miles. Factory warranty. $15,800 ‘08 Civic LX Gray. 26K. 1 owner. $14,400 ‘04 Civic 4 door. Auto. $8,495 ‘08 Pilot EXL DVD player. Green. Moonroof. AWD. $21,500 MAFFEI AUTO SALES 570-288-6227

MITSUBISHI 02 Eclipse Convertible Black interior &

exterior 120,000 miles, very good condition in & out, new tires, new brakes. auto, clean title, $5900. By owner. 570-991-5558

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

Chrysler ‘68 New Yorker

Sedan. 440 Engine. Power Steering & brakes. 34,500 original miles. Always garaged. $6,800 (570) 883-4443

427

Commercial Trucks & Equipment

CHEVY `04 DUMP TRUCK

36k miles. 9’6” Boss power angle plow. Hydraulic over electric dump box with sides. Rubber coated box & frame. Very good condition. $22,500 firm. Call 570-840-1838

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

Maternal & Family Health Services, a non-profit health care agency offering prenatal, family planning, and related women’s’ health services is currently looking for a Program Assistant for our Administrative office in WilkesBarre to provide clerical support and customer service to our Community Services Department. This position involves a full range of moderate to complex clerical and secretarial assignments including assisting with grant preparation. The successful candidate for this multifaceted position requires an individual who is able to handle multiple priorities. This includes excellent proofreading and editing skills, ability to organize meetings and take minutes, excellent customer service and phone skills, strong organizational and interpersonal skills and experience with standard office software including Microsoft Outlook, Word and Excel. We offer an excellent benefit package including medical, dental and vision coverage, generous 401(k), employee assistance program, and paid leave. Visit www.mfhs.org to learn more about us. Interested candidates respond with resume by 08/22/11 to: Human Resources Maternal & Family Health Services 15 Public Square, Suite 600 Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701 Fax: 570-823-7042 Email: jobs@mfhs.org eoe m/f d/v

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE IN CLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

542

Logistics/ Transportation

DRIVER

UNIVERSITY Bucknell University seeks to hire a Director of Biomedical Engineering Laboratories to provide technical support for all laboratory facilities and activities, including instruction and technical projects. For additional information and to apply, please go to www. bucknell.edu/jobs. Bucknell is an EEO/ AA Employer.

Line up a place to live in classified! 533

412 Autos for Sale

Engineering

Installation/ Maintenance/ Repair

Triad Isotopes, Inc. is seeking a Part Time Driver for its Wilkes-Barre Pharmacy. Candidate must be willing to work at least 20 hours per week plus on call and weekend rotation. Position requires safe delivery of medical products with a company vehicle, lifting up to 50lbs. and good customer service skills. Candidate must be at least 21 years of age with a valid PA driver’s license. Must also successfully complete drug screen & criminal background check. Apply Monday through Friday from 10am to 1pm at 300 Laird Street., Suite C, WilkesBarre. EOE/AA.

AUTO BODY LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... TECHNICIAN Experienced, highly

motivated, quality workmanship, ability to work independently. Must have own tools. Paid holidays, vacation, medical benefits. Please call 570-836-6556

Want to join a wining team? Dove Vinyl Windows has an employment opportunity in the following area:

MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN The ideal candidate

would have the ability to troubleshoot machinery for repair and maintenance. Have a work history in the Maintenance field for a minimum of five years. Knowledge in both hydraulics and electrical is necessary. Please complete application on-site, fax or email resume to: Dove Vinyl Windows 767 San Souci Parkway Wilkes Barre, PA 18706 Fax: 570-823-9940 Email: kpagoda@ dovewindows.com No phone calls please. EOE

538

Janitorial/ Cleaning

JANITORIAL

Cleaners early am shift in an upscale retail store in Midway Shopping Center. Weekends required. Must have reliable transportation. Must have a clean police report. EOE. Executive Management Services 1-866-718-7118 ext#30

539

Legal

COURT REPORTER POSITION

Schuylkill County Courts Pottsville, PA Please submit resumes to: Schuylkill County Courthouse Court Administrator’s Office 401 N. Second St. Pottsville, PA 17901

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

DRIVERS

Bulkmatic Transport Company is looking for drivers in Hazelton, PA and surrounding areas. Driver applicants must have a class A CDL, good work history & clean MVR. 2 years driving experience required up to age 25 then 1 year experience is required. Dry bulk tank experience and HAZMAT a plus but not required. Must pass a DOT physical and drug screen. Excellent benefits. Apply in person at 291 Catawissa Ave. Williamsport, PA 17701 or at www.bulkmatic.com

DRIVERS

CDL A, Full / Part Time, local work. Experience & clean MVR a must. $18/hour + overtime 888-567-7616

DRIVERS

Vitran Express, Inc. LTL regional trucking has openings for full time tractor/trailer CDL Class A City and Road drivers with hazmat & twin endorsements, and 2 years safe driving for Wilkes- Barre/ Scranton area. Full-time includes: • Local rate: $18.50/hour • Road rate: $0.46/mile • Blue Cross/Blue Shield medical benefits • Free life & long term disability • 401(k) • Paid holidays, vacations, & personal days For details please call Hank @ 800-248-0293. E.O.E.

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

542

Logistics/ Transportation

Drivers

CONTRACT DRIVERS

Put your vehicle to work part-time and earn extra income delivering packages to nursing homes. Great supplemental income. Great tax benefits. Great Company to work for! Fuel-Surcharge Protection as fuel costs rise. Routes are round-trip from Wilkes-Barre, PA. You must have a winning attitude, appearance, and a fuel-efficient minivan or car. Call 800818-7958 for a personal interview! www.scriptfleet.com Drivers

$7,500

Sign on Bonus for Teams! Split $.513 per mile $2,000 Sign on Bonus Solo Drivers Start at $.437 per mile With Only 1 year OTR experience. CDL-A HazMat

566

Sales/Retail/ Business Development

SALES ASSOCIATE

Wojanis Supply Company, Inc., in business 30+ years, is seeking an oil and gas sales associate for the northeastern quadrant of Pennsylvania. This individual will be responsible for delivering supplies and assessing supply needs for oil rigs located in Northeastern Pennsylvania – Wilkes-Barre, Scranton, Williamsport areas. Candidates must have a pick up truck for deliveries to drill sites. Very competitive hourly wage plus mileage reimbursement. Excellent opportunity with growth potential. EOE/M/F/V/D. Email cover letter and resume to: chriss@wojanis.com

877-628-3748 www.Drive NCTrans.com

600 Shopping for a new apartment? FINANCIAL Classified lets you compare costs - 610 Business without hassle Opportunities or worry! LUNCH OPPORTUGet moving NITY in existing with classified! restaurant. Inde548 Medical/Health

CASE MANAGEMENT POSITION Persons with disabilities strongly encouraged to apply. Due to recent growth, opportunity exists for a Full Time Case Management Coordinator to become part of our team. This position provides assessments, identifies resources and information referrals, service coordination and case management for persons with disabilities located throughout multiple NEPA counties. Good organizational and communication skills are a must. Social service experience and the ability to travel throughout NEPA counties is a requirement. Proficiency in Excel and Word is desired. To view job descriptions, postings and to apply go to www.NEPACIL.org. E.O.E./ADA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS RN’S, LPN’S, CNA’S

Lackawanna/ Luzerne Counties •Private Duty Nurses Experience preferred/Vents/Trachs •Facility Staffing Per Diem RN’s, LPN’s, CNA’s CareGivers America 570-587-4000 nicolec@care giversamerica.com

pendent operation with an existing Wilkes-Barre Business. Must have own resources and capital. Serious inquiries only. Call 570-287-7191 extension 1

900 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 909

800 PETS & ANIMALS 815

Dogs

POODLE PUPPIES

AKC. 1 male. 2 females. $525. (570) 450-0997

Income & Commercial Properties

WYOMING

608 Wyoming Ave

Location, Location, location! Either you are looking to raise your family or just work from home this amazing brick ranch style property has it all. Zoned commercial, 3 very large bedrooms and 3 1/2 baths, full finished basement, library room, oversized living room, formal dining room and so much more. You have to see it to appreciate. Call today for a private tour of the property. MLS 11-1870 REDUCED!!! $325,000 Call Tony Wasco 570-855-2424 Trademark Realtor Group 570-613-9090

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! 941 You’re in bussiness with classified!

Apartments/ Unfurnished

Apartments/ Unfurnished

WILKES-BARRE

2nd floor, 1-2 bedrooms, heat and hot water included. No washer/dryer hookup. Balcony, eat in kitchen. Section 8 accepted $525 per month 570-829-4798 after 12 noon.

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

950

Half Doubles

LUZERNE

3 bedroom, electric stove, modern kitchen/bath & laundry, large closets & attic storage. Very clean in quiet neighborhood with yard. Tenant responsible for utilities. No Pets. $600. (570) 760-5573

Over 47,000

people cite the The Times Leader as their primary source for shopping information. *2008 Pulse Research

HANOVER TWP. Lee Park

2nd floor, living room, eat in kitchen, 2 bedroom, wall to wall, rear porch, washer & dryer. Water, garbage & sewer included. No pets. $440/month + 1st, last, security, & references. 570-606-3256

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

PUPPY SALE

Akita, Basset, Bernese, Doxie, Chihuahua, Lab, English Bull Dog, Doberman, Pom, Great Pyrenees, Corgi, Siberian 570-714-3101 570-347-5808

What DoYou HaveTo Sell Today?

NANTICOKE

Very clean, nice, 2 bedroom. Heat, hot water, stove, fridge, 2 air conditioners included. W/d availability. Large closets. Security, $565/mo. 570-736-3125

SHIH-TZU MIX PUPPIES

Parents on premises Shots Current. $400 570-401-1838

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE LINEUP IN CLASSIFIED! ASUCCESSFULSALE Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way to cleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

941

IN CLASSIFIED!

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

PITTSTON

Modern 2 bedroom. Washer/dryer hook up. Some off street parking. Wall to wall carpeting. $460 includes sewer & garbage. NO PETS. Call (570) 417-2063

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONLY ONL NLY L ONE N LE LLEA LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com


CMYK PAGE 16C

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

W

E

A

T

H

E

R

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

NATIONAL FORECAST Periods of rain

76 64°

Partly sunny

FRIDAY

SATURDAY Periods of rain

80° 62°

Syracuse 76/65

New York City 78/69 Reading 78/66

Atlantic City 82/71

Yesterday Average Record High Record Low

Cooling Degree Days*

Yesterday Month to date Year to date Last year to date Normal year to date

79/60 81/61 98 in 1944 42 in 1930 5 83 610 722 462

*Index of fuel consumption, how far the day’s mean temperature was above 65 degrees.

Precipitation

Yesterday Month to date Normal month to date Year to date Normal year to date

Sun and Moon

Sunrise 6:12a 6:13a Moonrise Today 8:12p Tomorrow 8:37p Today Tomorrow

Brandywine Valley

Highs: 80-81. Lows: 68-69. Showers and thunderstorms likely across the region.

Philadelphia 81/69

Temperatures

The Finger Lakes

Highs: 73-78. Lows: 61-67. Showers and thunderstorms likely across the region.

Delmarva/Ocean City

Highs: 80-84. Lows: 66-74. Showers and thunderstorms likely across the region.

0.10” 3.47” 1.25” 34.14” 23.16” Sunset 8:04p 8:03p Moonset 7:05a 8:06a

Susquehanna Wilkes-Barre Towanda Lehigh Bethlehem Delaware Port Jervis Last

Stage Chg. Fld. Stg 1.56 -0.16 22.0 0.75 -0.30 21.0

New

2.86

0.54

16.0

3.59

-0.16

18.0

First

Full

Aug. 21 Aug. 27 Sept. 4 Sept. 12

Forecasts, graphs and data ©2011

Weather Central, LP For more weather information go to:

www.timesleader.com National Weather Service

607-729-1597

91/69

100/81 88/73 94/77

91/79

88/74 60/49

City

Yesterday

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Buffalo Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Las Vegas Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis

62/54/.00 93/72/.00 81/63/.75 82/66/.00 83/62/.00 86/72/.59 83/63/.62 84/61/.00 89/75/.86 87/56/.00 82/67/.00 86/74/.00 99/77/.00 88/67/.00 92/83/.01 70/63/.00 94/79/.57 78/66/.09 80/62/.61

City

Yesterday

Amsterdam Baghdad Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Dublin Frankfurt Hong Kong Jerusalem London

66/57/.00 113/84/.00 88/77/.00 73/59/.00 63/46/.00 64/55/.00 73/61/.00 93/82/.00 82/66/.00 70/61/.00

Today Tomorrow 61/51/r 91/69/t 84/71/t 79/68/t 74/67/t 85/65/t 77/65/pc 75/68/t 100/81/s 90/66/t 77/64/sh 88/74/pc 94/77/t 79/63/sh 102/82/t 75/64/s 91/79/t 76/62/pc 80/63/s

ALMANAC Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Int’l Airport River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.

83/64

75/64

61/51

Wilkes-Barre 73/64

83/69

90/66

Highs: 73-76. Lows: 62-65. Showers and thunderstorms likely across the region.

Poughkeepsie 73/66

Pottsville 75/63

Harrisburg 77/66

66/55

The Jersey Shore

Towanda 73/61

State College 72/60

77/65

78° 60°

Highs: 79-83. Lows: 68-71. Showers and thunderstorms likely across the region.

78/69

77/64

The Poconos

Albany 76/66

96/62 80/63

TODAY’S SUMMARY

Binghamton 73/61

Scranton 74/64

67/57

Partly sunny, a T-storm

75° 63°

REGIONAL FORECAST Today’s high/ Tonight’s low

78° 61°

75° 65°

Partly sunny, a T-storm

80° 60°

Partly sunny, shower

Heavy rain east, showers west

THURSDAY

WEDNESDAY

TUESDAY

MONDAY

°

62/50/r 89/68/s 86/68/t 71/66/t 77/68/t 88/65/pc 79/67/s 74/64/sh 103/81/s 90/65/pc 80/63/s 89/75/sh 99/79/pc 82/61/s 104/81/s 77/65/s 91/80/t 77/64/s 81/65/s

City

70/57/sh 111/85/s 87/74/t 81/63/pc 62/45/s 63/48/pc 81/61/t 91/83/t 83/64/s 72/52/pc

68/54/pc 110/82/s 82/70/t 72/57/pc 59/53/pc 64/52/sh 73/56/t 90/82/t 84/65/s 73/55/pc

Today Tomorrow

Myrtle Beach 84/73/.00 87/74/t 89/72/s Nashville 90/70/.00 87/63/pc 85/67/s New Orleans 93/79/.45 93/79/t 94/81/s Norfolk 88/72/.17 85/71/t 85/70/t Oklahoma City 91/69/.12 93/72/s 97/74/pc Omaha 79/68/.00 83/63/s 79/66/t Orlando 92/76/.00 95/79/t 94/79/t Phoenix 101/86/.00 109/85/pc 109/84/pc Pittsburgh 85/60/.00 77/62/t 76/59/t Portland, Ore. 67/57/.00 72/58/pc 70/58/pc St. Louis 91/70/.00 83/62/s 85/66/pc Salt Lake City 96/63/.00 89/68/t 89/65/pc San Antonio 97/79/.00 98/76/t 100/76/pc San Diego 69/65/.00 73/64/s 75/65/s San Francisco 69/54/.00 67/54/s 71/54/s Seattle 66/53/.00 67/57/pc 67/56/pc Tampa 91/81/.00 94/78/t 94/76/t Tucson 97/74/.00 98/77/pc 98/76/pc Washington, DC 86/74/.41 83/69/t 85/67/t

WORLD CITIES

Today Tomorrow

Yesterday

City

Yesterday

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Paris Rio de Janeiro Riyadh Rome San Juan Tokyo Warsaw

77/57/.00 82/66/.00 82/54/.00 73/61/.00 91/68/.00 111/82/.00 82/59/.00 85/77/.20 95/81/.00 75/61/.00

Today Tomorrow 75/56/t 77/64/t 88/64/pc 72/54/t 75/67/s 115/90/s 88/72/s 88/79/t 91/79/pc 75/61/t

Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snow flurries, i-ice.

76/57/t 72/63/sh 86/66/c 70/53/s 74/64/s 114/85/pc 90/71/s 87/78/t 90/80/t 81/62/pc

Those with outdoor plans aren't sitting pretty this Sunday. Periods of heavy rain will be moving through the region, with even the potential for flash flooding in the strongest downpours. A powerful area of low pressure is moving into the area from the Great Lakes, and it's pulling a wealth of moisture in off the Atlantic Ocean. In fact, a coastal storm is expected to develop later tonight and allow for even more rain to come in off the coast right through Tuesday. When all is said and done, widespread parts of the region could see 1 to 2 inches of rain, with isolated amounts approaching 3 to 4 inches. The good news is that it will be spread out over the next 48 hours, helping to prevent any serious river flooding. -Ryan Coyle

703290

TODAY

NATIONAL FORECAST: Rain and thunderstorms are expected across the Northeast today. Some thunderstorms could be strong to severe and could also contain heavy rainfall. Thunderstorms are also possible in the Mid-Atlantic, Southeast, central Texas and the Southwest. High pressure will bring dry conditions to the Midwest.


CMYK

BUSINESS

SECTION

timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

D

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

Med vendors OK for now As hospitals consolidate, purchasing decisions could migrate out of area By ANDREW M. SEDER aseder@timesleader.com

Officials of the companies planning to merge with Scranton’s Community Medical Center and acquire Moses Taylor Health Systems have pledged to retain all existing vendor relationships. And they say local providers will have the oppor-

tunity to hold onto contracts as they expire, provided they offer quality products and services at competitive prices. Corporate purchasing power could mean savings in some cases. But from a community relations perspective, supporting local businesses could assure patients and benefactors that their hospitals are still, well, theirs. “A lot of these things will shake out as we transition and merge,” said Wendy K. Wilson, spokeswoman for Community Medical Center, which accept-

ed a merger offer from Geisinger Health Systems that includes a commitment to invest $158.6 million in capital projects. She said the hospital has always operated by awarding contracts and choosing companies based on “what’s best for the hospital and what’s best for the patients.” Community Health Systems Inc., a for-profit hospital operator based in Tennessee, has an See HOSPITAL, Page 3D

RON BARTIZEK BUSINESS LOCAL

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

HCSC Laundry and Linens driver Vinny Sicuretta, left, delivers linens to Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center supply chain team leader Matt Philistine.

I

Fed’s low rates are no fix for economy

By PAUL WISEMAN AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON — The Federal Reserve’s plan to keep interest rates super-low for at least two more years is great news for mortgage refinancers and other borrowers. For retirees and others who need interest income, it’s a threat. Nor will low rates likely revive a depressed home market, energize a weak economy or reassure frightened consumers. They’re also putting pressure on Americans’ pensions. The consulting firm Milliman Inc. said this week that 100 of the nation’s largest pension funds were $254 billion short of what they need to meet obligations to retirees July 31, up from a $186 billion shortfall at the end of June. Low interest rates were the main reason for the widening gap. The sinking rates flow from the Fed’s federal funds rate, which the Fed has kept near zero since the depths of the financial crisis in December 2008. The funds rate is the rate banks charge each other for overnight loans. It indirectly affects rates for credit cards and some business loans. Longer-term yields are determined by traders. These yields are also near record lows, driven down by investors seeking the safety of U.S. Treasurys. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note, which influences longterm mortgage rates, set a record low of 2.03 percent after the Fed’s announcement Tuesday. Earlier in the day, the yield had been 2.34 percent. As recently as Friday, it was 2.56 percent. The average rate on a 30-year fixed loan fell last week to a yearly low of 4.32 percent after the Fed’s announcement. Mortgage brokers say refinanSee RATES, Page 2D

U.S. raises version of pricey Japanese Kobe beef

C

AZENOVIA, N.Y. — Half a world away from the secretive farms that produce Japan’s legendary Kobe beef, Jerry Wilson raises the American version of the meat that will become $50 steaks and $13 burgers. The chocolatey brown cattle at Wilson’s Meadows Farm don’t technically produce Kobe beef — that term is reserved for the Japanese super highend cut famous for its succulent taste and eyepopping prices. Wilson calls his meat “American Style Kobe Beef.” Other ranchers use similar names like “Kobe-style beef” or “wagyu beef,” a reference to the breed of cattle. Whatever the name, domestic production of the pricey product has grown from practically nothing a dozen years ago to a flourishing boutique niche, with recent growth fueled in part by a

AP PHOTO

Farm manager Tod Avery as he stands with Wagyu cattle at Meadows Farm in Cazenovia, N.Y. Kobe beef from the United States can’t be called Kobe.

See BEEF, Page 3D

Mid-August means time to start planning Back to School bargains BACK TO SCHOOL sales displays have taken over area malls, big box stores, circulars and drug stores. While many sales are geared toward students, an office supplies store is thanking teachers. On Saturday at Staples’ Arena Hub Plaza location in Wilkes-Barre Township, a Teacher Appreciation Day is being held. It will include free thank you gift bags, coupon savings and a sneak peek at must-have new items for your classroom. Free gift bags are available to the first 100 teachers per location. The event takes place locally from 9 a.m. to noon. Shop at the Wyoming Valley Mall or Viewmont Mall, bring receipts totaling $75 or more to customer service and request a back to school gift pack that includes two spiral notebooks,

Restaurant is return to roots for lawyer

key Hill Minit Marts and get a free 32 ounce Big Chiller fountain drink or 16.9 bottle of Turkey Hill water for free. STEALS & DEALS There are plenty of coupons in this week’s Times Leader including five in two folders, and a pack of pencils. The the Shur Save circular that will double your $1 manufacturer coupons. receipts must be from the same day You must have a total purchase in and the same mall but can be from excess of $25 to use the coupons. multiple stores. The store has some good deals if Wendy’s 99 cent value menu is you pair coupons with the doublers. always a good option for those with Here are some smart ways to save: limited budgets but good taste in • The $1 off five boxes of Scotties food. And there are two additions that have been added. The Crispy Chicken tissues is one of them. They’re on sale Caesar Wrap and a Monterey Chicken five boxes for $5. Get the five for $3 when using the coupon and doubler. Sandwich are available for a limited • Gain dish detergent is on sale, time. two bottles for $4. Use the $1 off two How does a $10 off a $20 purchase at Smokey Bones sound? Probably not bottles coupon and the doubler and get two for $2. as good as it will taste. Enjoy! • Pull out that envelope of coupons www.smokeybones.com/10off20/ you’ve been clipping over the past few 080811.html weeks and grab the one for $1 off two For a limited time, purchase any Totino’s pizza rolls. Shur Save has a Homestyle sandwich or wrap at Tur-

ANDREW M. SEDER

deal where you can buy three boxes for $4 and then you’ll get a fourth box free. Well use the coupon and doubler to pay $2 for four boxes. I’m glad to see more grocers using this wonderful promotion that really benefits those of us who take the extra time to clip coupons. Price Chopper has done it, so has Weis. Now Shur Save has joined the fun. Here are other good uses of coupons in today’s Times Leader at area retailers: • Take the $1 off Scott paper towels to CVS where a six-roll pack is already on sale for $5. You’ll pay $4. • Rite Aid has Brut products buyone, get-one free. There’s a $1 off coupon that makes the deal even sweeter. Andrew M. Seder, a Times Leader staff writer, may be reached at 570-829-7269. If you know of any local steals or deals, send them to: aseder@timesleader.com.

t’s probably not a coincidence that restaurateur rhymes with entrepreneur. If there’s any business in which success requires more dedication and involvement I haven’t yet come across it. I don’t mean national chains like Olive Garden or T.G.I. Friday’s, with their corporatized menus and careerist employees. And certainly not fast food franchises that promise huge financial returns selling burger specials, but only to those who come into the game with plenty of money to spare. Undoubtedly many of the people behind the counters and hidden away in the kitchens at those places work hard to deliver decent food and a good customer experience. But it’s not the same as for someone who has his personal pride as well as his bank account tied up in a notoriously fickle business. So, what’s a lawyer doing in the dining room? For Tom Ford, buying the Metro in Dallas was something of a homecoming, at least to the hospitality industry. His family owned a small resort near Stroudsburg called Manitou Cottages, and he helped manage it, which meant he “also was the lifeguard and groundskeeper” and did anything else that needed doing. Last year, 27 years into a career specializing in business law, he got the itch to invest in his own enterprise. What he calls “a confluence of events,” including a longterm relationship with the previous owners, who also operate Arena Bar and Grill in Wilkes-Barre, led him to the restaurant that occupies the former boiler room of the Native Textiles factory. “The more I looked at it, the Metro had all of the elements I was looking for,” such as a staff in place, past success and a good business plan, Ford said. Not that the new owner isn’t going to tweak things; he’s working on an entirely new menu for the fall. But while a self-described “foodie,” Ford knows his place, and it’s not in the kitchen. For that he hired Tony Macri, who “has been a restaurateur and chef for as long as I’ve been a lawyer.” “My role is to be the owner,” and that includes going table to table every night making sure patrons are happy. “I enjoy interacting with our guests and our employees,” he said. I wondered if this was just a fling, but Ford, who is 55, assured me he’s in for the long haul and not just someone who imagines himself sitting at a corner table, eyeing the patrons over a martini while “As Time Goes By” plays in the background. “I negotiated and signed a longterm lease,” he said. “I’m not looking at an end game.” Ford, who lives in Mountain Top, showed his dedication even before taking over in January. He spent the last few months of 2010 working nights at the Arena “getting trained” and the first half of this year acclimating himself to the new challenge. Ford’s approach offers some valuable lessons for anyone hankering to run a small business: • Know your limits. “As a restaurateur I’m a pretty good lawyer,” he says. • Hire the expertise you lack. • If possible, keep your day job, at least until the business gets its footing. • Enjoy what you’re doing, because you’ll be doing it a lot. “I am putting in a lot of hours,” he acknowledges. But, “above all it’s been a great deal of fun.”

Ron Bartizek, Times Leader business editor, may be reached at rbartizek@timesleader.com or 570-970-7157.


CMYK PAGE 2D

â&#x17E;&#x203A;

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

CORPORATE LADDER MISERICORDIA UNIVERSITY

The university recently added two new staff members. Lauren Smith, Hunlock Creek, is the electronic communications coordinator. She is responsible for creating content and maintaining electronic communications with several of the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Smith constituencies, engaging them through social media networks including Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and YouTube. Smith previously served as assistant to the communications coordinator at the Marywood University Constituency Relations Office, Scranton. She holds a bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in communications with a concentration in advertising and public relations

from Marywood. Jeffrey Demko, Pittston, is the human resources administrator. He assists the human resources director and staff in benefit administration, the development and execution of training programs, management training and performance evaluation training. Demko holds a bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in history from Penn State University and is a U.S. Army veteran.

ALLIED SERVICES

Tracy Hunt, Jermyn, was recently promoted to assistant vice president, In-Home Services, for Alliedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Integrated Health System. She has been employed by Allied for 18 Hunt years and holds a degree from Marywood University, Scranton.

BORTON LAWSON

BUSINESS AGENDA GOLF OUTING & ON COURSE TRADESHOW: Thursday, Mountain Valley Golf Course, Barnesville. Registration 8:30-10:30 a.m., shotgun start at 1 1 a.m. 18 holes of golf, cart, breakfast, cocktails and hors dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; oeuvres, buffet dinner. $500 per foursome. Reservations required. For more information call Leann at 570-455-1509 or email lfallabel@hazletonchamber.org. MAEA SAFETY ROUNDTABLE: Friday, 1 1 a.m.-1 p.m., Pottsville Club, 201 S. 26th St., Pottsville.

BUSINESS AWARDS Bruce Thomas, associate vice president, Guest Services, Geisinger Health System, was recently named Penn State Hotel and Restaurant Society Alumnus of the Year. A 1980 graduate of Penn State, Thomas is currently a society member. He will re-

RATES Continued from Page 1D

cers are rushing to lock in those rates. Applications to refinance jumped nearly 22 percent last week from the week before, the Mortgage Bankers Association said. Refinancing made up more than 75 percent of mortgage applications, it said. But tantalizing mortgage rates arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t luring many buyers into a broken housing market. Even as refinancing soars, home purchase applications have barely budged. Potential buyers have plenty of reason to stay on the sidelines. Many canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t buy because the home they live in is worth less than the mortgage they owe on it. Or they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sell their house. In Cincinnati, Jeff and Jo Ann Hawkins slashed the price on

$36 for members, $72 for non members. Topics include business burglary prevention tips and steps to take if your business has been burglarized. To register, call 622-0992 or email crobbins@maea.biz. DON WILKINSON AGENCY EMPLOYER TAX SEMINAR: Aug. 24, 10 a.m., Hanover Area Jr./Sr. High School auditorium, 1600 Sans Souci Parkway, Hanover Township. Free and open to all employers in Luzerne County. Focus will be on changes mandated by Act 32 of 2008 for withholding earned income tax. Registration required; call 822-

B

U

S

I

Ben Sevenski, Dallas, was recently promoted to client manager at the local architecture and engineering design firm. He will focus on enhancing and expanding client relationships and managing Sevenski requests from targeted clients engaged in infrastructure and midstream development. Sevenski joined the firm in May 2010. He holds a bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in civil engineering from the University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown and is a registered professional engineer. Submit announcements of business promotions, hirings and other events to Corporate Ladder by email to tlbusiness@timesleader.com; by mail to 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 1871 1-0250; or by fax to (570) 8295537. Photos in jpg format may be attached to email.

0555 or email rheydt@centaxgroup.com. NETWORKING MIXER: Aug. 24, 5-7 p.m., Fairfield Inn, 884 Kidder St., Wilkes-Barre. Free for Wilkes-Barre Chamber members. Reservations required; call 8232101, ext. 1 13 or email jeankile@wilkes-barre.org. WILKES-BARRE CHAMBER GOLF TOURNAMENT: Aug. 26, Blue Ridge Trail Golf Club, Mountain Top. Registration at 10 a.m.; shotgun start at 1 1 a.m. $125 per person, $440 per foursome. Reservations required; call 8232101, ext. 1 13 or email jeankile@wilkes-barre.org.

ceive the award at the annual PSHRS Alumni Awards Reception on Oct. 5, in State College. Blaise Alan Dente, Pittston, chef/ owner of Denteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Catering Service, is one of nine people named honorary fellows by the American Academy of Chefs, the honor society of the American Culinary Federation. Dente is an active member of ACF Profes-

Submit announcements of business honors and awards to Business Awards by email to tlbusiness@timesleader.com; by mail to 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 1871 1-0250; or by fax to (570) 829-5537. Photos in jpg format may be attached to email.

their home by $100,000 in the course of a year. They got zero offers. Low rates are also squeezing retirees who typically keep most of their savings in safe but lowyielding certificates of deposit money market accounts. Typically, investors would be advised at age 65 to keep at least 60 percent of their money in such safe investments. Investing in stocks could expose them to losses, if they had to withdraw their money before the market had time to recover. Older investors are commonly advised to have 70 percent or more in fixed-income investments. Top-yielding one-year CDs are paying an average of just 1.2 percent. Five-year certificates are topping out at 2.4 percent. Inflation is running at an annual rate of about 3.6 percent, so these instruments wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even keep up with the cost of living.

The meager returns are forcing some retirees to take on more risk. Carol Clemens, 65, of Edmond, Okla., has given up supersafe fixed-income investments. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s putting more of her retirement savings in stocks of companies that pay dividends yielding at least 4 percent. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That security is difficult for people to give up, but when you have no choices you have to take calculated risks,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s forcing a lot of retired people to do.â&#x20AC;? The Fed might have made it impossible for many retirees to rely just on interest-bearing accounts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Fedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pledge illustrates the peril of being100 percent conservative in your investments,â&#x20AC;? says Greg McBride, a senior financial analyst at Bankrate.com. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your entire income stream is hitched to the Fedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wagon, and it wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be moving for two years.â&#x20AC;?

sional Chefs of Northeast Pennsylvania and currently serves as chapter president.

N

E

S

S

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

Airlines protest passenger protection rules By LINDA LOYD The Philadelphia Inquirer

PHILADELPHIA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sweeping pro-consumer passenger rights rules go into effect August 23 that require airlines to refund baggage fees for lost checked luggage and to pay more for involuntarily bumping passengers on over-booked flights. The rules, designed to protect airline consumers from unfair and deceptive practices, extend fines to foreign carriers and to international flying by U.S. airlines, if passengers are stuck on airport tarmacs for more than four hours. The new requirements have been praised by passenger rights advocates, but criticized by the airline industry for adding costs and challenges that could lead to higher ticket prices and more cancellations. Spirit Airlines Inc. and Allegiant Air, joined by Southwest Airlines Co., are challenging one or more of the provisions, including a requirement that advertised fares include all government taxes and fees. Airlines previously could list taxes and some passenger fees separately from an advertised fare, as long as they were prominently footnoted or linked. The U.S Transportation Department filed a rebuttal with the U.S. Court of Appeals in

Washington on Aug. 4, defending the full-fare advertising rule to help the public ascertain the true cost of air travel. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The new rules have gone further than any such protections in the history of U.S. commercial aviation,â&#x20AC;? said Kevin Mitchell, chairman of the Business Travel Coalition in Radnor. Kate Hanni, executive director of FlyersRights.org, said the comprehensive provisions cover reporting of flight delays, increased bumping compensation, international flights in the tarmac delay rule, and fee refunds for lost bags, among other protections. Airlines were successful in delaying until Jan. 24 implementation of some measures, such as prompt notification of flight delays and cancellations; allowing passengers to cancel a reservation, without penalty, within 24 hours, and publishing full fares in advertising. Starting Aug. 23, airlines must disclose on their websites all optional or â&#x20AC;&#x153;ancillaryâ&#x20AC;? charges. This will be a â&#x20AC;&#x153;linkâ&#x20AC;? to a page listing all the fees, Hanni said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not exactly what we had hoped for. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not going to give you the ability to compare apples to apples amongst other carriers. We are still fighting for that.â&#x20AC;? The Transportation Depart-

ment is contemplating an additional rule that would force airlines to provide their â&#x20AC;&#x153;ancillaryâ&#x20AC;? fee information to travel agents and online ticket distribution systems, such as Expedia and Travelocity, so that consumers can compare the fee-inclusive fares of various airlines. Now, travel agencies and corporate travel managers cannot â&#x20AC;&#x153;transact the extra fees on a given flight because they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have them,â&#x20AC;? Mitchell said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know who is really higher because you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have all this on a side-by-side basis. There are a zillion fees,â&#x20AC;? he said. The International Air Transport Association, a trade group for 230 airlines worldwide, called the provisions â&#x20AC;&#x153;troublesomeâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;a significant intrusion into the commercial marketplace. We are happy that they postponed some aspects of it for six months,â&#x20AC;? said spokesman Perry Flint. One new measure imposes fines on foreign airlines that keep passengers on tarmacs at U.S. airports for more than four hours. Last year the DOT imposed a three-hour tarmac delay rule on domestic carriers, a move the industry said has resulted in more flight cancellations to avoid the threat of fines up to $27,500 per passenger.

President Castro opens Cuba to private enterprise By TRACY WILKINSON Los Angeles Times

HAVANA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; They began with a hose and a few rags when Amilcar Santa Cruz and his 30 siblings and cousins set up a car wash in Havanaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Miramar district, a little family business to help make ends meet. And thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all it was for several years. But in the last few months, the business has exploded. The car wash today is a bustling piece of new Cuban enterprise, complete with metal roofing, fluorescent lighting, a cafe and a full line of air fresheners to hang from the rearview mirror. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone here is real hardworking,â&#x20AC;? Santa Cruz said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all about quality.â&#x20AC;? Cuba has embarked on a far-

AP PHOTO

Javier Acosta, owner of the Parthenon, prepares a table in his private restaurant in Havana.

reaching experiment to salvage its depleted and, until now, tightly regulated Marxist economy. By significantly expanding permits for Cubans to open their

own businesses and hire other Cubans, the communist government has launched the island on See CUBA, Page 3D

PARK FREE FOR 3 HOURS!

ON BOSCOVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PARKING DECKS - OR IF THEYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE FILLED, AT ANY CITY PARKING LOT - WITH ANY PURCHASE OF $2.00 OR MORE. PARK FREE ON SATURDAY & SUNDAY AT BOSCOVS For your convenience, you can now have your parking ticket validated for three hours free parking by any of our salespeople on all 5 floors, our Country Kitchen, or at the courtesy desk on the 4th floor.

Now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easier than ever to shop at Boscovâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s!

Open Daily 10 A.M. to 9 P.M. and Sunday 11 A.M. to 5 P.M.

PRACTICAL EDUCATION AT A PRACTICAL PRICE

FOR 21ST-CENTURY EDUCATORS Wilkes offers a variety of masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, professional development and certificate programs for todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s educator. Highlights include:              

        Tuition less than the state rate. Now thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s practical.

268259

Learn more and view our fall schedule at

         


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

CUBA Continued from Page 2D

its most remarkable change in years, an expansion of free enterprise that was unthinkable when Fidel Castro was in full control. But his more pragmatic younger brother, Raul, who formally took over in 2008, has ordered a long list of reforms that include slashing the state workforce by up to 1 million people, eliminating many of the subsidies that dominated life here and, most recently, promising to ease travel off the island by Cubans. Change, of course, comes in fits and starts. Most Cubans probably have yet to feel much in the way of new prosperity, and many among the crop of fledgling entrepreneurs continue to complain of burdensome red tape and the taxes they are required to pay. With credit virtually nonexistent, most must scramble for other sources of capital, such as remittances from relatives in the United States or Europe. Still, a walk along the seafront Malecon, or through graceful Old Havana, or in any residential neighborhood, down a street of crumbling facades or past freshly painted colonial homes reveals a buzz of activity. Hand-lettered signs have popped up, seemingly every few yards, announc-

BEEF Continued from Page 1D

ing a new restaurant, hair salon or cellular telephone repair shop. Cuba’s economic experiment has the potential to transform its society. The new policy creates jobs, circulates money and stirs a new mentality that values quality and competition. It will not completely remake the economy, however, because for the most part the new work involves services and not production. But it’s an important beginning. As of July 19, according to Deputy Labor Minister Carlos Mateu, more than 325,900 Cubans had taken out licenses to open, run or work at private businesses involving nearly 200 designated activities, including hairstyling, carpentry, shoemaking and dance instruction. Another important change is that proprietors no longer have to hire only relatives — with the proper license, they can employ any Cuban. Nowhere is the boom bigger than in restaurants. The Cuban government first permitted privately run eateries, known as paladares, from the Spanish word for “palate,” in the difficult 1990s, when the nation was reeling from the collapse of the Soviet empire and the loss of its major sponsor. But the paladares operated with crippling restrictions, and only the hardiest survived. Today you can easily find anything from the simplest pizza to true gourmet dining. By a rough estimate, more than 100 restaurants have opened in recent months. Japan, where Kobe is the capital city. Japanese ranchers are notoriously secretive about their techniques, giving rise to stories that they ply their small herds with beer (to stimulate appetite in hot weather) and have sake massaged into their skin (thought to stimulate muscles). Kobe is fatty, but not in a bad way. The thin veins are laced in so uniformly that cuts really do look like marble. Wagyumeathasahigherproportionof unsaturated fat — the “good” kind of fat — when compared to meats from other breeds. It’s the fat that helps give the beef a flavor and mouth melt that sendstasterstothethesaurusinsearch of adjectives like velvety, scrumptious, silky and savory. “You mention fat and it’s like saying ‘rat poison.’ We’ve been conditioned to believe that all fat that you eat is bad. And that’s simply not true, especially with wagyu,” said Robert Estrin, coowner of Lone Mountain Ranch Cattle

ban on Japanese beef because of reportsoffoot-and-mouthdisease.While American ranchers might not be able to match the mystique of Japanese Kobe and much of the domestic productiscross-bred,theysaytheirproduct compares to the legendarily luscious stuff. “We can get through any door we want,” said Wilson, watching his highpriced herd crowd a bucket of barley dumped on the ground. “All we have to do is a taste test.” Kobe is to beef what a Maserati is to sports cars: the epitome of pricey, exclusive luxury items. Steaks can retail for more than $100 at high-end restaurants and specialty stores. Don’t look for it plastic-wrapped in the meat aisle of your local supermarket. True Kobe beef comes from wagyu cattle raised in the Hyogo prefecture of See BEEBEEFF, Page 4D

B

U

S

I

N

E

S

S

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 PAGE 3D

HOSPITAL Continued from Page 1D

agreement in place to take over Moses Taylor, which includes Moses Taylor Hospital in Scranton and Mid-Valley Hospital in nearby Peckville. The July 19 announcement came about two months after CHS closed on the $150 million purchase of the three-hospital Mercy Health Partners system. That trio included Regional Hospital of Scranton, Tyler Hospital in Tunkhannock and Special Care Hospital in Nanticoke. Two years ago, CHS made its first foray into Northeastern Pennsylvania when it paid $271 million for Wyoming Valley Health Care System and the affiliated Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. Spokespersons from several of the hospitals uniformly said they buy from a mix of local, regional and national businesses, and that’s not likely to change. But one local business owner says things already are different. Colleen Morda, a former Wyoming Valley Health Care System employee who formed her own medical billing company a few years ago, said in her estimation “bigger is not always better when it comes to health care.” Morda, who co-owns Physician Practice Management in Wilkes-Barre, said “the sale was supposed to help our community. I see it as hurting us because it’s taking jobs away.” Morda had a contract with Anesthesiologist Associates in Wilkes-Barre, but when Wilkes-Barre General was sold, that group lost its contract with the hospital, which then hired individual practitioners as employees. The billing was shifted to a company already doing business with CHS and Morda’s firm lost business. Allen Minor, a business professor at Misericordia University who specializes in health care, said Morda’s worries “are a legitimate concern.” He said he would not be surprised to see the Geisinger and CMC deal lead to very few changes because both are local and have a familiarity with local vendors. “With CHS, I’m not sure,” Minor said. “CHS always looks for the best price they can get.” He said the company often deals with national vendors and it’s likely once the existing contracts expire at the local hospitals, those familiar national vendors may be brought in for bidding. GEISINGER AND CMC Geisinger Health System, a not-for-profit based in Danville, has a pending merger agreement that would make Community Medical Center a campus of the health system.Dave Jolley, a Geisinger spokesman, said CMC would follow the parent company’s purchasing policy if a merger is approved by the state. He said that policy

BILL TARUTIS/ FOR THE TIMES LEADER

A tractor trailer from Hospital Central Services, Inc. & Affiliates (HCSC) Laundry and Linens arrives at the loading dock at Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center in Plains Township.

basically states that market competitiveness and quality of services are taken into account when considering contracts and if the existing contract holder meets those two requirements “we would like to continue those relationships.” He said the CMC leadership team would be responsible for handling most contracts and only in a handful of instances would approval from Geisinger officials in Danville be required. When that happens, the final decisions are influenced by input and recommendations made by local system leaders, he said. Jolley said while he has no doubt bulk purchasing in conjunction with other members of the health system could mean lower purchase prices, CMC would not be forced to join in. CHS MOVES IN Community Health Systems has been active in Pennsylvania in recent years, buying more than a dozen hospitals including those in Easton, Berwick and Pottstown. Last month CHS announced it had an agreement to purchase the Moses Taylor Health Care System. No financial information was announced. Wilkes-Barre General has been in the CHS family long enough to have experience selecting vendors. “As part of our fiscal responsibility to our patients and the communities we serve, Wilkes-Barre General Hospital strives to purchase quality supplies and services at the most efficient cost,” said James P. McGuire, a hospital spokesman in a statement. “To do this, we contract with an array of local, regional and national suppliers and service providers — a practice we have observed for years. Decisions regarding vendor selection are made locally, based on an evaluation the vendor’s ability to provide the services or supplies required in the most cost-efficient manner.” Gladys G. Bernet, a spokeswoman for the three former Mercy hospitals now un-

der the CHS umbrella, said the change in ownership has not changed their approach to vendor contracts. “Though Regional Hospital is part of a national organization, we strive to be an active partner within our community by looking for opportunities to use local suppliers when we can. Even when we were affiliated with Catholic Health Partners, we had access to group purchasing, so we have always used a mix of local, regional and national vendors to support our operations,” Bernet said. Moses Taylor also uses a mixture of vendors from all over the country. “Historically, Moses Taylor Health Care System has chosen suppliers based on quality, product, service and price,” said Sandy Osieski, a Moses Taylor spokeswoman. “We anticipate very few changes in our vendor relationships. Moses Taylor felt that it was very important to continue to invite local vendors to bid after our closing is completed and CHS has agreed to continue our current practice.” LOSING THAT LOCAL FEEL? McGuire said that Wilkes-Barre General has been “an integral part of the Greater Wyoming Valley community for more than 130 years.” And in that time, the selection of local vendors has been commonplace. “Our hospital is proud to utilize local suppliers and businesses whenever they can meet our patients’ needs,” McGuire added. McGuire said that the company’s commitment to more than $200 million in upgrades to the local health system is proof that the local workforce is utilized. “Our commitment to local businesses can also be seen in the construction of our new $53 million Emergency Department and Heart & Vascular Institute tower, targeted for completion in 2012. The project employs scores of construction workers, engineers, electricians, plumbers and artisans from the Wyoming Valley and across Pennsylvania,” McGuire said.


CMYK PAGE 4D

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

B

U

S

I

N

E

S

S

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

SMALL TALK

OFFICE COACH

Avoid in-home work isolation

Employee’s resentment hurts his cause

MIAMI — About a year ago, Mark Pierson started a consulting firm from his kitchen table after being laid off from his job at an engineering firm. He had envisioned stress-free days with no commute and no interruptions. A few months at home changed his mind. “I felt so disconnected from the real world,” he said. Like Pierson, I discovered working from home can be an isolating. I love being able to start my work day when I feel like it or take a break to pick up my son from the bus stop. But after decades in loud newsrooms, I miss being able to run an idea past a colleague for instant feedback. Now everything is just, well, quiet. Clearly, more American workers are confronting the transition. National studies indicate that the ranks of the self-employed have increased during the economic downturn, with most one-man shops setting up from home. At the same time, U.S. Census data show an increasing number of companies are permitting workers to set up offices at home — 61 percent more employees considered home their primary place of work in 2009 than in 2005. Beyond those making an initial transition, workers at home for years find themselves struggling to stay motivated during the economic slump. Here are a few ways to stay at the top of your game when you work from home: ESTABLISH A STRUCTURE: Lorna Owens, a Miami life coach, author and motivational speaker, suggests structuring your time by starting the day

Q: My manager and I are concerned about one of my longterm employees who has a very negative attitude. “Jerry” has been here for more than 20 years, but has not been promoted because of his job performance. He sometimes lets his resentment about this come to the surface. We recently got a new department head, and Jerry is having trouble adjusting to the change in management style. He doesn’t seem to understand that his poor attitude is going to cause him problems with the new boss. What can we do to help him? A: In my coaching practice, I frequently encounter otherwiseintelligent people who are allowing anger or resentment to kill their careers. The key to breaking this self-destructive pattern is to help them make the connection between their own behavior and the outcomes that matter to them. The first step, therefore, is to find out what Jerry wants at this stage of his career. Is he concerned about job security? Are there particular projects he would like to undertake? Is he

with a to-do list. She also recommends going into your home office with purpose, dressing nicely and having set work hours. “Without structure, your brain wonders aimlessly,” she said. FIND A MENTOR: To keep motivated, Owens turns to a mentor to bounce ideas off or come up with new strategies. Having a mentor gives you a virtual office feel, like a co-worker who is only a phone call away, she said. Even more, when you feel isolated or in a slump, there’s someone who can help you overcome it. NETWORK: Laurel Touby imagined spending her days in a big New York loft, hobnobbing with the elite. But she soon discovered freelancing was a difficult and lonely job. In 1994, Touby and a friend started throwing parties to meet other media members and combat the feeling of isolation. She wound up building her parties into MediaBistro.com, a job-posting and community website for media types. She sold the site in 2007 for $23 million. Today, Touby still believes that anyone who works from home should participate in meetups or join a professional association. “It is the best way to feel more connected,” she said. USE THE INTERNET: With Facebook, FriendFeed, Twitter, Skype and the rest of the volumes of communication tools, people running home-based businesses can be plugged into a 24/7 stream of connectivity with others around the world. These social media sites can act as virtual water coolers during the day. Robin Ramkissoon works from home doing IT support and computer consulting. On a given work day, Ramkissoon might

talk to 60 people by phone who need computer help, which he says helps him feel connected. But he still turns to online social media sites, where he keeps up with friends and can even see them face-to-face through videoconferencing. GET OUT OF THE HOUSE: Don’t wait for an invitation to get out from behind your desk. Take the initiative and organize functions that bring you together with potential clients, former colleagues or existing customers. They could be business-oriented networking sessions, weekly lunches or purely social get-togethers. Either way, you are forging relationships with people just as you did when you were working in a corporate office, but now you are taking the initiative. TRY A CHANGE OF VENUE: Several writer friends of mine have confessed that they wrote their entire books from Starbucks where they were motivated by the background noise and even bounced ideas off other regulars. But etiquette experts warn that certain professions aren’t conducive and the coffee shop environment could diminish a sense of professionalism. Those people may prefer to rent a cubicle once a week in shared offices, a concept becoming common in most cities. Another option is sharing home office space. I know a couple of graphic designers who do this. It helps them feel like they have a co-worker and are in a regular office environment. What home-based workers like Pierson and me are discovering is the temporary feeling of isolation can be overcome: Just because you work alone, doesn’t mean you have to go it alone.

By MARIE G. MCINTYRE McClatchy-Tribune News Service

BEEF Continued from Page 3D

Co. in Golden, N.M. Estrin raises “full blood” or 100 percent wagyu cattle. There are about 150 U.S. producers in the American Wagyu Association, many of them with 25 head or less, said Michael Beattie,

still hoping for a promotion? He needs to begin considering how his current actions may affect his future goals. Once you understand Jerry’s desires and interests, the next step is to help him recognize certain organizational realities. The unavoidable truth is that organizations are power hierarchies in which the people above you have the ability to make decisions that affect your life. If these higherups view you as unproductive or uncooperative, decisions will not be made in your favor. Another inescapable fact is that a change in management inevitably signals the dawn of a new day. An executive with a fresh perspective is quite likely to modify existing policies, programs and practices. While this is understandably disconcerting for long-term employees, those who respond with negativity and resistance may find themselves on the next layoff list. If you can help Jerry see that he is only hurting himself, you will be doing him a big favor. However, you and your boss also need to learn that actions have predictable consequences. By abdicating your management responsib-

ilities and choosing to tolerate Jerry’s unacceptable performance, you have also contributed to this problem.

executive director of the industry group. The largest, Boise, Idahobased Snake River Farms, slaughters10,000 to15,000 head of wagyu ayear—averythinsliceoftotalannual U.S. commercial slaughter of around 34 million. Snake River’s Jay Theiler said their wagyu business is growing about 20 percent a year, with growth coming not only from steaks, but from hamburger, hot

dog and barbecue meat. “It’s very small here,” Beattie said of the wagyu business. “But the potential for this breed to grow is huge.” U.S. officials stopped the import of meat from Japan last year after foot-and-mouth disease reports. So connoisseurs dropping $145 for a pair of12-ounce wagyu rib-eyes are likely purchasing from a domestic producer or from Australia.

DEMAND THE BEST! Call Mark Oley 693-2200 www.santarellireadymix.com

Q: Do you think it would be okay to send a complimentary email about my boss to her manager? Or would that just look as though I’m “sucking up”? A: There’s a big difference between sucking up and sincere appreciation. Suck-ups flatter their superiors in order to achieve some self-centered goal, like getting a raise or a better performance review. Genuinely appreciative people are simply expressing their true feelings. Since most managers don’t receive too many compliments, I’m sure your supervisor will be both surprised and pleased by your kind words. And considering all the bad bosses out there, it’s nice to let upper management know about the good ones. So as long as you mean what you say, you should definitely send that email. Marie G. McIntyre is a workplace coach and the author of “Secrets to Winning at Office Politics.” Send in questions and get free coaching tips at http://www.yourofficecoach.com.

ALL JUNK CARS & TRUCKS WANTED

SANTARELLI Ready Mixed Concrete & Vibrated Block Company

Highest Prices Paid In Cash. Free Pickup. Call Anytime. 966 Shoemaker Avenue West Wyoming

253747

By CINDY KRISCHER GOODMAN McClatchy Newspapers

VITO & GINO 288-8995 •

Forty Fort

BEAUTY POISE GRACE DIGNITY HUMOR CARE LOYALTY PATIENCE RESILIENCE presents

Any way you say it, she’s one of a kind. To nominate your Great Woman of Northeast Pennsylvania submit the form below or visit timesleader.com/women by August 15th. Then join us to honor her on September 13th at a fabulous High Tea at Glenmaura!



Nominee _______________________________________________________________ Title/Occupation__________________________________________________________ Address________________________________________________________________ City ______________________________________________Phone ________________ Email _________________________________________________________________ Nominated by ______________________________________Phone ________________

701881

702206

Submit this form with a brief paragraph about your nominee’s contributions and accomplishments and mail it to The Times Leader, 15 N. Main Street, Wilkes Barre PA 18711 by August 15th or nominate online at timesleader.com/women.


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

B

U

S

I

N

E

S

S

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 PAGE 5D

MarketPulse IPO MARKET DRIES UP The wild swings in the stock market have made companies reluctant to go forward with their initial public offerings. Ten companies postponed their IPOs this past week and one company slashed the size of its deal after the S&P 500 fell 1.7 percent, said Nick Einhorn, a research analyst at Renaissance Capital. “That’s an abnormally high pace,” he says. During calmer times, typically just two or three companies postpone their IPOs. Companies delay their public offerings when markets are volatile because they’ll get less money for the shares they sell. Moreover, if an IPO stock falls the first day it’s traded, investors may decide it’s not worth owning. “It can take a while for the perception to reverse itself,” Einhorn says.

Delayed IPOs

WHY MCDONALD’S LOOKS TASTY With the economy uncertain, Goldman Sachs is recommending that investors buy McDonald’s. The stock did well during the recession. And analyst Michael Kelter recently upgraded the company to “buy” from “neutral” and added it to the firm’s list of top picks. Kelter predicts that McDonald’s stock will rise 20 percent on a total return basis over the next year. For one, its costs are going down. Beef prices, one of McDonald’s biggest expenses, have fallen 28 percent from their highs earlier this year. Sales have remained strong. And the stock looks relatively cheap, trading at about 14 times Goldman’s 2012 earnings estimates.

A few companies that pulled their offerings this week

Cathay Industrial Biotech Ltd. Deal size: $6.9M Why it postponed: Oil prices fell 2 percent this week. That makes alternative fuels, Cathay’s main product, less appealing.

HomeStreet Inc. (HMST) & Midland States Bancorp (MSBI) Deal size: : $7.8M, $5M Why it postponed: Financial stocks had the worst declines of any of the 10 industry groups in the S&P 500 this past week. Regional banks also continue to struggle with ultra-low interest rates that suppress earnings. Source: Nick Einhorn, Renaissance Capital

DUBIOUS HONORS The last few weeks in the markets were good ones for people who like superlatives. Major stock indexes have been breaking records and passing benchmarks all month. On Thursday, the Dow Jones industrial average had changed directions every day for seven sessions, the longest streak of zigzags this year. Last week was the first time in history that the Dow had a change of 400 points or more for four consecutive days. And by Aug. 2, the Dow had its longest losing streak since the financial meltdown of 2008 – eight days.

C. Cutter, F. Levy, J. Sohn • AP

Slow and steady Investing in high-quality global corporations that offer good dividends isn't a get-rich-quick plan. But Simon Hallett, a fund manager at New Jersey-based investment firm Harding Loevner, argues that the average investor shouldn't be treating the stock market like a casino. And with the Dow down 7.2 percent so far this month, boring looks appealing. Hallett says investors should own companies that can eke out revenue gains even in a tough economy. He says that's true even when the stock market is soaring. It will pay off in the long term.

InsiderQ&A

The average investor is terrified of owning stocks right now. What's the argument for staying the course? Companies are in better shape than many soverHallett eigns around the world. Companies have already come through a tremendous storm in the last two or three years, and they've actually emerged in better shape. ... I'm not saying that anybody is going to get very high returns, even after a market fall of 20 percent, but I think that if you're going to have any chance of getting an acceptable return over the next five years you have to stay the course. But I'm not one of these people who say you should never time the market. I actually think you should rarely time the market, but there are occasions when you should. What are those occasions? When valuations reach a place where you can't see anything that's offering reasonable future returns. I think there is a buying opportunity if you have cash. But you have to have cash! I hate it when people say it's a buying opportunity — what with? What kind of company generates the kind of safety and long-term returns you're looking for? We've owned Nestle for 22 years ... there have been four or five years where Nestle has done very little as a stock and it is never egregiously exciting. But that means, of course, that it never gets desperately overvalued, it never gets desperately cheap, it's just kind of fairly priced. But its returns over 15 odd years, if you pay tax on the dividends and reinvest the dividends, have been about 12 percent. So investors should own companies that are comparable to Nestle. Like what? In Europe, we own Unilever. We have about 13 percent of our international fund in French stocks: household names like Loreal, LVMH, and Air Liquide which is a big industrial gas company. The kind of companies that pretty consistently generate 8 percent to 10 percent returns. That maybe doesn't sound that exciting. But those are the kind of returns you should be expecting from stocks. In some ways the kind of companies that we own can be defined by the kind of companies we don't own. ... This sounds very clever now but wasn't particularly clever for a number of years — we haven't owned big banks. ... We weren't pretending to forecast what happened in 2007 and 2008, but it struck us we were not particularly keen on low margins and high leverage. Leverage always goes wrong in the end. There's a flight to quality in bear markets. But what do you tell investors who want to chase high returns in a bull market? It's fine to seek higher returns if you can get them and get out. I think the whole thing about this kind of approach is, we historically have lagged in bull markets and made it up in bear markets. So the long term return has been much better than the market, and by avoiding the worst of the downdraft but staying invested, you actually do better than most other people.

Treasury yields plunge

Silver is back?

Silver has rebounded as stocks have fallen.

Silver is looking attractive again as investors search for safe places for their money. Silver has risen about 2 percent over the last week while the S&P 500 has fallen 2 percent. Silver closed Friday at $39.11 an ounce. Like gold, silver is seen as a hedge against inflation and a falling dollar. It’s also used to make products like cell phones, solar panels and burn treatments. Phillip Streible, a senior market strategist at MF Global, says individual investors should have about 3 percent to 5 percent of their portfolio in silver. But be cautious: Silver is more volatile than gold and its price can fluctuate by 5 percent in one day. Remember that silver dropped from its peak of $48.60 on April 29 to $35.29 in just a week. That was a 27 percent fall. Streible’s advice: Watch prices carefully, and buy silver in small amounts. Some options:

e $50 an ounce

InterestRates

Silver

$39.11 +26% YTD

45 40

Money market mutual funds

PRIME FED Taxable—national avg RATE FUNDS Selected Daily Govt Fund/Cl D FRIDAY 3.25 .13 Tax-exempt—national avg 6 MO AGO 3.25 .13 Alpine Municipal MMF/Investor 1 YR AGO 3.25 .13

35

J 2011

F

M

A

M

J

J

Exchange-traded funds

Individual stocks

Silver coins, bars

Analysts say exchange traded funds that own silver are one of the best ways to invest. Morningstar’s Abraham Bailin says the iShares Silver Trust (SLV) is appealing because it’s one of the largest ETFs that owns silver. The price of the ETF closely tracks the price of silver.

Investors should buy companies that mine silver and pay a dividend, says Spencer Patton, chief investment officer for the hedge fund Steel Vine Investments. Pan American Silver (PAA) is one of the few companies that specialize in silver production. Its earnings are expected to rise 180 percent this year. It has a 0.3 percent dividend yield. Freeport McMoran (FCX) also mines silver, but it gets most of its revenue from gold and copper. It has a 2.2 percent yield.

Investors can physically own silver. It’s easy to buy and sell through dealers. But the price may be marked up at least 5 percent for a dealer’s commission. Investors also need to pay fees for delivery, storage and insurance. And they’ll pay fees when they’re ready to sell.

TICKER

0.01 0.16 $ 2,500 min (888) 785-5578

2.38 4.46 3.57 5.07 8.75 1.34

-0.05 0.15 0.21 0.05 1.19 -0.15

FRIDAY YIELD

1WK

0.01 0.11 0.06 0.19 0.96

0.00 -0.02 0.03 -0.08 -0.28

r t s t t

r t r t t

-0.13 -0.15 -0.11 -0.34 -0.50

0.16 0.34 0.20 0.83 2.39

0.11 0.03 0.18 0.92

10-year T-Note 2.26 30-year T-Bond 3.72 Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.

-0.29 -0.10

t t

t -0.47 t -0.21

3.72 4.77

2.11 3.51

%CHG 1MO

%RTN 1YR

TREASURYS 3-month T-Bill 1-year T-Bill 6-month T-Bill 2-year T-Note 5-year T-Note

CHANGE 1MO 3MO 1YR t t t t s t

t t t t s t

52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN RANK %RTN LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD

NAME

TICKER

52-WK HIGH LOW

-0.08 -0.11 -0.24 0.05 0.37 -0.31

3.29 5.31 4.22 5.95 8.75 2.46

CHANGE 1MO 3MO 1YR

Exchange-Traded Funds

LocalStocks COMPANY

0.01 0.12 $ 10,000 min (800) 243-1575

1WK

Broad market Lehman Triple-A corporate Moody’s Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman Municipal Bond Buyer U.S. high yield Barclays Treasury Barclays

A

MIN INVEST PHONE

YIELD

FRIDAY YIELD

U.S. BOND INDEXES

30 25

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell sharply last week, briefly touching a record low. Investors, still seeking safety after a historic week of market highs and lows, pushed prices up and yields down Friday even as stocks pared some of their dramatic losses from earlier in the week. The average rate for a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage fell to 4.32 percent last week from 4.39 percent.

FRIDAY CLOSE

CHG WK

2.25 4.21 3.36 4.86 6.61 1.26

52-WK HIGH LOW

%CHG 1WK

Direx Russia Bear3x

RUSS

46.47

7.40

18.9

40.1

...

PwShs 3x Italian TBd

ITLT

19.41

3.05

18.6

17.3

...

Barc iPath GlobCarbn

GRN

21.66

3.01

16.1

-3.0

-21.0

CS VS 2x Vix ShTm

TVIX

39.74

5.32

15.5

89.1

...

Air Products

APD

72.81 4

98.01

81.99

-0.26

-0.3

t

t

-9.9 +12.62

2

7.3

15

2.8

Dir Dly Gold Bull2x

NUGT

34.45

4.25

14.1

-2.4

...

Amer Water Works

AWK

21.72 8

30.70

28.23

1.05

3.9

t

t

11.6 +30.52

1 13.8a

17

3.3

Barc iPath Vix ST

VXX

34.13

3.82

12.6

47.4

47.9

Amerigas Part LP

APU

36.76 4

51.50

41.59

0.91

2.2

t

t -14.8 +4.66

3 13.2

26

7.1

CS VS Vix ShtTerm

VIIX

73.88

8.18

12.5

46.8

...

Aqua America Inc

WTR

18.90 6

23.79

21.49

0.51

2.4

t

t

-4.4 +13.92

2

1.6

21

2.9

iPath LE VIX MT

VZZB

41.14

4.35

11.8

20.9

...

Arch Dan Mid

ADM

26.00 2

38.02

27.28

-1.36

-4.7

t

t

-9.3 —8.82

4

-6.0

9

2.3

ProShs Vix ST Fut

VIXY

73.22

7.74

11.8

46.3

...

AutoZone Inc

AZO

203.05 9 302.00 287.61

8.87

3.2

t

s

5.5 +39.28

1 26.5

16

...

Fact GoldBullSPBear

FSG

42.55

4.35

11.4

44.2

...

Bank of America

BAC

t

t -46.1—44.65 5 -24.0

...

0.6

ProShs Ultra Gold

UGL

103.38

9.51

10.1

19.4

102.2

Bk of NY Mellon

BK

Bon Ton Store

BONT

CIGNA Corp

6.31 1

15.31

7.19

-0.98 -12.0

19.34 1

32.50

19.99

-2.80 -12.3

t

t -33.8—17.59 4

-7.1

9

2.6

DB Gold DoubLong

DGP

62.27

5.68

10.0

18.9

102.3

5.59 1

17.49

5.99

-1.50 -20.0

t

t -52.7—25.91 4 -24.1

46

3.3

CI

31.39 6

52.95

43.79

-1.40

-3.1

t

t 19.4 +31.15

1

4.5

8

0.1

DB 3x Long UST

LBND

31.98

2.56

8.7

32.2

19.6

CVS Caremark Corp

CVS

26.84 6

39.50

33.25

-0.90

-2.6

t

t

-4.4 +16.49

2

0.5

13

1.5

Direx 10yrTrBull 3x

TYD

71.82

5.40

8.1

16.3

17.0

CocaCola

KO

54.92 9

69.82

67.14

0.37

0.6

t

t

2.1 +23.83

2

11.4

13

2.8

Fact TBBull S&PBear

FSA

37.48

2.80

8.1

41.7

...

Comcast Corp A

CMCSA 16.76 4

27.16

20.64

-1.24

-5.7

t

t

-5.6 +15.87

2

-1.0

15

2.2

CS VS 2x Vix MidTm

TVIZ

56.58

4.26

8.1

21.1

...

Community Bk Sys

CBU

21.76 2

28.95

22.85

-1.56

-6.4

t

t -17.7 +1.45

3

4.9

12

4.2

Direx 30YTrBull 3x

TMF

49.22

3.64

8.0

29.6

7.0

Community Hlth Sys

CYH

17.60 1

42.50

20.01

-1.63

-7.5

t

t -46.5—34.93 5 -11.4

7

...

ProShs ShtRegBk

KRS

68.83

4.94

7.7

16.4

-5.8

Entercom Comm

ETM

4.97 2

13.63

6.30

-0.74 -10.5

t

t -45.6 —7.76

6

...

ProSh Ultr Sh Chi 25

FXP

34.74

2.40

7.4

20.3

-8.3

Fairchild Semicond

FCS

7.71 5

21.02

13.52

0.10

0.7

t

t -13.4 +66.50

1

-3.2

10

...

Mkt Vect Gold Miners

GDX

59.22

3.80

6.9

-0.8

22.8

Frontier Comm

FTR

6.29 2

9.84

6.95

0.19

2.8

t

t -28.6 +1.32

3

-2.3

43 10.8

PwShs Italian TBond

ITLY

20.02

1.30

6.9

5.6

...

Genpact Ltd

G

13.09 5

18.71

15.89

-0.47

-2.9

t

t

2 2.8a

23

1.1

Mkt Vect JrGoldMin

GDXJ

35.00

2.27

6.9

-8.0

41.9

Harte Hanks Inc

HHS

7.39 1

13.74

7.65

-0.44

-5.4

t

t -40.1—22.34 4 -18.5

10

4.2

Global X PureGoldMin

GGGG

15.12

0.94

6.6

-2.1

...

Heinz

HNZ

44.62 7

55.00

51.00

-0.08

-0.2

t

t

3.1 +16.62

2

7.6

17

3.8

ProShUlt 20+yr Treas

UBT

102.84

6.22

6.4

20.9

10.8

Hershey Company

HSY

45.31 8

59.45

55.85

-0.30

-0.5

t

t 18.5 +24.20

2

3.3

21

2.5

...

Kraft Foods

KFT

28.85 8

36.30

34.40

-0.47

-1.3

t

t

9.2 +20.54

2

3.4

20

3.4

Lowes Cos

LOW

18.07 2

27.45

19.51

-0.64

-3.2

t

t -22.2 -+1.22

3

-5.4

14

2.9

M&T Bank

MTB

70.30 2

95.00

73.04

-5.61

-7.1

t

t -16.1—10.98 4

-6.6

10

3.8

McDonalds Corp

MCD

71.04 9

89.57

86.50

1.42

1.7

s

s 12.7 +23.34

2 22.6

17

2.8

NBT Bncp

NBTB

18.73 2

24.98

19.43

-1.56

-7.4

t

t -19.5 —2.93

4

0.9

12

4.1

Nexstar Bdcstg Grp

NXST

3.64 7

10.28

7.64

0.77

11.2

s

t 27.5 +61.18

1

11.2

85

...

PNC Financial

PNC

44.97 1

65.19

46.88

-4.30

-8.4

t

t -22.8—14.82 4

-5.0

7

3.0

PPL Corp

PPL

24.10 5

28.73

26.00

-0.56

-2.1

t

t

-1.2 +3.67

3

-1.1

11

5.4

Penn Millers Hldg

PMIC

11.98 5

17.72

14.45

-0.72

-4.8

t

t

9.2 +20.42

2

...

...

...

Penna REIT

PEI

9.75 2

17.34

10.70

-1.13

-9.6

t

t -26.4 —4.32

4 -14.5

...

5.6

PepsiCo

PEP

60.10 3

71.89

63.18

-1.49

-2.3

t

t

3

2.5

16

3.3

Philip Morris Intl

PM

50.54 8

72.74

66.63

-2.71

-3.9

t

t 13.8 +33.44

1 9.6a

15

3.8

Procter & Gamble

PG

57.56 4

67.72

61.14

0.55

0.9

t

t

-5.0 +5.27

3

2.9

16

3.4

Prudential Fncl

PRU

47.37 2

67.52

50.95

-3.04

-5.6

t

t -13.2 —6.13

4

-5.2

8

2.3

SLM Corp

SLM

10.92 5

17.11

13.89

-0.16

-1.1

t

t 10.3 +20.50

2 -21.0

10

2.9

SLM Corp flt pfB

SLMpB 32.41 6

60.00

46.49

-6.71 -12.6

t

t

...

0.0

Southn Union Co

SUG

22.02 9

44.65

41.04

0.45

1.1

t

s 70.5 +78.25

1 10.3

21

1.5

TJX Cos

TJX

39.56 9

56.78

53.89

1.38

2.6

t

t 21.4 +30.74

1 16.1

17

1.4

UGI Corp

UGI

25.81 3

33.53

27.74

-0.09

-0.3

t

t -12.2 +8.12

3

5.3

12

3.7

Verizon Comm

VZ

29.10 6

38.95

34.30

-0.75

-2.1

t

t

-4.1 +19.56

2

7.0

15

5.7

WalMart Strs

WMT

48.31 2

57.90

49.75

-0.73

-1.4

t

t

-7.8 +1.42

3

4.4

12

2.9

Weis Mkts

WMK

32.99 6

42.20

37.96

-1.85

-4.6

t

t

-5.9 +12.61

2

2.3

15

3.1

4.5 +13.34

-3.3 —.07

6.1

4 -16.7

... 10.0

Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quarters. Rank classifies a stock’s performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).

Short sellers’ favorite stocks

After a week of market turmoil, some regulators COMPANY TICKER are blaming a familiar target: short selling. That’s a Rubicon Technology Inc. RBCN strategy in which traders bet that a stock will fail. Northern Oil & Gas Inc. NOG France, Belgium, Italy and Spain Ebix Inc. EBIX said Thursday they would ban short-selling of certain financial ITT Educational Services Inc. ESI stocks for 15 days. The theory is that short sellers Medifast Inc. MED will have an incentive to spread rumors about a Diamond Foods Inc. DMND company if they want its stock to fall. With global Coinstar Inc. CSTR markets at their most volatile since the financial KB Home KBH crisis of 2008, speculation is more likely to escalate into panic selling. Fears that the French banking Overseas Shipholding Group Inc. OSG system was in danger sent global stocks plummetSavient Pharmaceuticals Inc. SVNT ing Wednesday. At least part of that concern came from an unfounded story in a British newspaper But many criticize the ban. Britain implemented that said French bank Société Générale was a similar measure in 2008, but a drop in British struggling. financial stocks only accelerated. In the U.S.,

Stock Screener

SOURCE: FactSet

Data through Aug. 11

SHARES SOLD SHORT

53.5% 41.9 40.4 37.6 37.3 36.2 34.4 34.3 33.8 33.3

iPath ShtExt Rus2000

RTSA

53.79

3.18

6.3

99.1

iPath ShtExt Rus1000

ROSA

48.79

2.86

6.2

53.3

...

Barc iPath10yrTrBull

DTYL

62.56

3.57

6.1

11.5

21.4

UBS 2x MoLevLong MLP

MLPL

32.39

1.77

5.8

-6.8

36.1

Barc iPath USTrFlat

FLAT

54.37

2.85

5.5

9.7

3.9

Barc iPathUSTrLgBull

DLBL

59.96

3.11

5.5

16.4

19.0

RBS Gold Trendpilot

TBAR

31.55

1.59

5.3

9.6

...

PwShs Gold Fund

DGL

61.15

3.01

5.2

9.4

43.9

Barc iPathS&P VIX MT

VXZ

56.38

2.78

5.2

12.1

-35.4

Barc iPath Platinum

PGM

41.95

2.06

5.2

2.2

16.2

iShares Gold Trust

IAU

17.04

0.82

5.1

9.5

45.7

ETFS Gold Trust

SGOL

173.30

8.37

5.1

9.5

45.6

ProShUlt 7-10yr Trs

UST

99.65

4.83

5.1

10.8

13.7

SPDR Gold Trust

GLD

169.97

8.22

5.1

9.5

45.5

ProShs VIX MT Fut

VIXM

69.07

3.31

5.0

12.1

...

Barc iPath PrecMet

JJP

100.30

4.64

4.9

7.0

62.0

iPath ShtEnh EmMkts

EMSA

107.31

5.01

4.9

29.3

...

E-Tracs Gold

UBG

46.92

2.15

4.8

9.8

46.1

ETFs Asian Gold

AGOL

173.82

8.01

4.8

9.6

...

ETF Phys Platinum

PPLT

178.20

8.16

4.8

2.1

16.9 -7.3

Internet Infrast HT

IIH

2.87

0.13

4.7

-14.1

iPath Treas 5yr Bull

DFVL

55.37

2.49

4.7

10.1

...

E-Tr Lg Platinum

PTM

21.01

0.95

4.7

2.1

16.6

PIMCO 15+yr US TIPS

LTPZ

63.73

2.79

4.6

10.1

18.7

Barc ShortC LevS&P

BXDC

52.10

2.27

4.6

42.4

-21.5

PowShs Global Gold

PSAU

46.57

1.99

4.5

-3.9

22.8

CLOSING PRICE

$12.79 17.81 15.27 73.13 16.90 66.81 40.70 6.22 17.01 3.96

1-YR PRICE CHANGE

P/E

-51.1% 8.9 -15.9 2.5 -43.9 53.3 -13.6 -45.9 -52.8 -72.9

10 127 10 7 13 53 24 N/A N/A N/A

plenty of stocks are still being sold short. These are the stocks in the S&P 1,500 index that have the most shares sold short, according to FactSet.

q q q q

Dow industrials

-1.5%

WEEKLY

Nasdaq

-1.0% WEEKLY

LARGE-CAP

S&P 500

-1.7%

WEEKLY

SMALL-CAP

Russell 2000

-2.4%

WEEKLY

q q q q q q q q

-9.7%

MO -2.7%

YTD -10.1%

MO -5.5%

YTD -10.4%

MO -6.3%

YTD

-15.8%

MO -11.0%

YTD


CMYK ➛

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

Mutual Fund Categories SPECIALTY FUNDS

YTD

Conservative Allocation (CA) Moderate Allocation (MA) Health (SH) Natural Resources (SN) Real Estate (SR) Technology (ST)

0.10 -2.79 -0.50 -9.13 0.13 -7.40

PERCENT RETURN 1YR 3YR* 6.87 8.35 11.59 16.58 13.08 16.01

4.12 1.98 0.80 -1.59 -0.14 3.70

5YR* 3.57 2.58 3.58 4.21 -0.46 6.32

BALANCED Target-Date 2000-2010 (TA) Target-Date 2011-2015 (TD) Target-Date 2016-2020 (TE)

-0.15 -1.55 -1.59

8.13 8.54 9.10

2.81 1.61 1.68

3.31 2.72 2.37

INTERNATIONAL Divers. Emerging Mkt. (EM) Europe Stock (ES) Foreign Small/Mid Val (FA) Foreign Large Blend (FB) Foreign Large Growth (FG) Foreign Small/Mid Gr. (FR) Foreign Large Value (FV) World Allocation (IH) World Stock (WS)

-12.25 -8.86 -7.28 -8.02 -7.45 -7.19 -7.80 -2.14 -6.69

4.33 5.61 12.91 7.11 10.30 15.29 5.49 8.79 9.28

1.21 -4.98 0.88 -3.53 -1.41 2.59 -4.49 2.01 -0.92

6.04 -1.21 1.81 -0.93 0.88 2.36 -1.75 3.40 0.92

YTD 5-YR FUND %RTN %RTN AMF ARM b +1.4 -1.1 Acadian EmgMkts d -11.4 +5.7 AdvisorOne AmerigoN -8.5 +1.6 Alger Group CapApInsI -2.8 +7.2 CapApprA m -2.8 +7.2 MdCpGInsI -6.9 +1.9 SmCpGrthO -10.0 +4.2 SmCpInstI -9.6 +3.7 Allegiant UltShtBdI +.2 +3.1 Alliance Bernstein BalShrA m -.5 +1.4 BalShrB m -1.0 +.7 BalWlthStrA m -4.1 +1.9 BalWlthStrC m -4.5 +1.2 CoreOppA m -1.7 +1.7 GlTmtcGA m -12.9 +4.7 GlblBondA m +3.7 +7.9 GlblBondC m +3.2 +7.1 GrowA m -4.1 +1.6 GrowIncA m -3.6 -1.2 HighIncA m +.7 +9.9 HighIncC m +.3 +9.1 IntDivA m +4.8 +4.3 IntGrA m -11.4 -.8 IntermBdA m +5.5 +6.5 IntlValA m -13.3 -7.3 IntlValAdv -13.1 -7.0 LgCapGrA m -4.2 +5.2 LgCapGrAd -4.1 +5.4 MuInCAA m +6.8 +4.3 MuInNYA m +6.6 +4.5 MuInNatlA m +7.1 +4.3 SMCpGrA m -3.1 +6.5 SmMidValA m -14.2 +3.1 TxMgdWlApStAd -9.0 -2.2 WlthApprStr -9.0 -1.2 WlthApprStrA m -9.1 -1.5 Allianz NFJDivVlA m -5.2 -2.2 NFJDivVlC m -5.7 -3.0 NFJEqIncD b -5.2 -2.2 NFJIntVlA m -8.2 +3.3 NFJSmCVlA m -4.0 +5.1 NFJSmCVlC m -4.4 +4.3 Alpine DynDiv d -12.1 -5.0 InRelEstY d -15.4 -5.0 UlShTxAdv d +1.2 +3.0 Amana Growth m -6.9 +5.0 Income m -5.1 +5.2 American Beacon BalAMR -3.4 +2.3 IntlEqAMR d -6.9 -.5 IntlEqInv -7.3 -1.1 LgCpVlAMR -8.7 -.9 LgCpVlInv -9.1 -1.4 SmCpVlInv -12.5 +1.5 American Cent BalInv -.2 +3.2 CAInTFBdIv +7.0 +4.6 DivBdInv +5.4 +7.1 EmgMktInv d -11.0 +4.8 EqGrowInv -3.9 0.0 EqIncA m -5.5 +1.4 EqIncC m -5.8 +.7 EqIncInv -5.3 +1.7 Gift -2.5 +8.0 GinMaeInv +6.2 +7.0 GlGold d -6.4 +11.5 GovBdInv +5.7 +6.9 GrowthAdv m -5.0 +4.4 GrowthInv -4.9 +4.7 HeritA m -4.6 +9.1 HeritInv -4.4 +9.4 InTTxFBInv +6.4 +4.9 IncGrInv -4.9 -1.0 IncGroA m -5.1 -1.3 InfAdjAdv m +12.0 +7.2 InfAdjI +12.1 +7.4 IntlBd +9.1 +6.4 IntlDisIv d -8.9 +1.3 IntlGrInv d -5.7 +1.4 LS2025Inv -1.1 +3.9 LgCoVlInv -8.0 -3.0 MdCpValIv -8.9 +4.0 NTEqGrIns -3.9 +.3 NTGrthIns -4.6 +5.0 NTLgCmVlI -7.9 -2.9 OneChAgg -3.6 +3.4 OneChCon +.9 +4.4 OneChMod -1.6 +3.8 RealEstIv +3.1 -1.2 SelectInv -1.2 +4.3 ShTmGovIv +1.5 +3.9 SmCpValAdv m -13.3 +3.6 SmCpValIv -13.2 +3.8 StrAlAgIv -3.7 +3.5 StrAlMd -1.7 +3.9 StrAlMd m -1.8 +3.6 UltraInv -1.4 +3.8 ValueInv -8.2 -.2 VistaInv -6.0 +2.5 American Funds AMCAPA m -4.5 +2.5 AMCAPB m -5.0 +1.7 BalA m -1.4 +3.1 BalB m -1.8 +2.4 BondA m +5.1 +4.0 BondAmerB m +4.6 +3.3 CapIncBuA m -1.2 +2.3 CapIncBuB m -1.7 +1.5 CapWldBdA m +6.1 +7.0 CpWldGrIA m -7.3 +1.6 CpWldGrIB m -7.7 +.8 EurPacGrA m -8.0 +2.2 EurPacGrB m -8.4 +1.5 FnInvA m -6.6 +1.4 FnInvB m -7.0 +.6 GlbBalA m NA NA GrthAmA m -6.7 +1.0 GrthAmB m -7.1 +.2 HiIncA m -.3 +6.0 HiIncMuA m +6.0 +2.5 IncAmerA m -.9 +2.4 IncAmerB m -1.4 +1.6 IntBdAmA m +3.4 +4.1 IntlGrInA m -4.7 NA InvCoAmA m -7.2 -.2 InvCoAmB m -7.6 -1.0 LtdTmTxEA m +5.2 +4.4 MutualA m -3.9 +1.7 NewEconA m -4.9 +3.4 NewPerspA m -6.6 +3.3 NewPerspB m -7.0 +2.5 NwWrldA m -7.9 +6.8 STBdFdofAmA m +1.1 NA SmCpWldA m -9.6 +3.7 TDR2010A m +.1 NA TDR2015A m -1.1 NA TDR2020A m -2.1 NA TDR2025A m -3.9 NA TDR2030A m -4.6 NA TaxEBdAmA m +6.5 +4.0 TaxECAA m +7.3 +3.9 USGovSecA m +5.6 +6.1 WAMutInvA m -2.6 +.4 WAMutInvB m -3.0 -.3 Aquila HITaxFA m +4.8 +4.0 Arbitrage ArbtrageR m +2.0 +4.4 Ariel Apprec b -8.7 +4.0 Ariel b -14.7 +.5 Artio Global GlobHiYldA b -.1 +7.8 IntlEqA b -10.5 -1.7 IntlEqIIA b -10.5 -.8 Artisan IntSmCpIv d -8.9 +4.0 Intl d -3.5 +.7 IntlVal d -8.2 +3.5 MdCpVal -2.3 +5.6 MidCap -4.3 +7.9 SmCapVal -8.4 +4.3 Aston Funds MidCapN b -14.0 +6.4 MtgClGrN b -2.6 +4.2 TAMROSmCN b -8.0 +5.2 BBH BrdMktFxI d +.7 +4.2 IntlEqN d -3.7 +.7 TaxEffEq d -1.7 +5.9 BNY Mellon BalFd -4.2 +3.6 BondFd +4.8 +6.7 -13.4 +6.9 EmgMkts

52-WEEK HI LOW 7.51

7.38

WK NAV CHG 7.43 +.01

21.65 16.92 17.90

-.93

14.44 10.99 12.20

-.20

23.01 16.12 16.21 36.82 31.94

16.64 11.64 11.20 24.61 21.32

20.12 -.12 14.09 -.06 13.22 +.02 28.85 -.07 25.16 -.06

10.05

9.99

9.99

-.01

16.02 15.00 12.55 12.49 13.02 81.41 8.58 8.61 40.29 3.69 9.31 9.41 14.84 16.42 11.15 14.78 15.06 27.62 28.91 11.09 10.12 10.12 7.15 19.24 13.16 13.09 13.07

13.29 12.46 10.57 10.52 9.44 60.78 8.30 8.33 29.65 2.78 8.68 8.78 14.15 12.81 10.64 11.30 11.53 19.68 20.60 10.14 9.39 9.33 4.41 13.75 10.19 9.97 9.94

14.60 13.67 11.27 11.22 11.31 67.24 8.49 8.51 35.10 3.18 8.73 8.83 14.69 13.62 11.11 11.85 12.09 23.72 24.86 10.84 10.00 9.97 5.86 15.15 11.12 10.97 10.95

-.19 -.18 -.10 -.10 -.16 -.71 -.04 -.05 -.18 -.07 -.27 -.27 +.04 -.15 +.04 -.39 -.40 -.36 -.38 ... +.01 ... +.03 -.43 -.19 -.16 -.16

12.40 9.73 10.61 12.44 9.76 10.64 12.42 9.75 10.63 22.38 17.65 18.75 31.65 23.69 27.41 30.29 22.64 26.18

-.26 -.27 -.27 -.38 -.08 -.08

5.14 3.73 3.98 -.04 27.18 20.69 21.95 -.51 10.06 10.03 10.05 +.01 26.22 20.64 23.00 34.50 27.11 29.95

-.21 -.31

13.01 18.52 18.33 20.86 20.02 21.35

11.45 14.44 14.15 16.29 15.64 15.00

11.78 15.32 15.14 17.59 16.85 16.99

-.17 -.24 -.24 -.50 -.48 -.53

16.43 11.56 11.18 9.64 22.97 7.66 7.66 7.66 31.42 11.30 27.26 11.62 27.66 28.11 22.99 23.65 11.39 26.22 26.19 13.17 13.22 15.24 11.78 12.19 12.40 5.95 13.49 10.54 12.93 9.09 13.01 11.58 12.34 21.50 42.46 9.89 9.59 9.63 8.17 6.95 6.94 25.30 6.14 18.59

13.92 10.73 10.61 7.29 17.32 6.45 6.44 6.45 21.84 10.72 19.76 10.96 20.46 20.80 15.62 16.03 10.63 19.96 19.93 11.52 11.56 13.40 8.31 9.19 10.52 4.68 10.64 7.97 9.57 7.14 10.39 10.27 10.33 15.83 30.25 9.71 7.06 7.09 6.50 5.78 5.78 18.08 4.92 12.99

15.29 11.43 11.12 7.99 19.97 6.75 6.75 6.76 27.40 11.30 24.42 11.58 24.18 24.58 19.49 20.05 11.28 22.68 22.65 12.98 13.02 15.06 9.76 10.34 11.52 5.04 11.40 9.17 11.32 7.71 11.63 11.02 11.32 18.92 37.33 9.85 7.79 7.82 7.30 6.37 6.36 22.33 5.21 15.70

-.09 ... +.06 -.29 -.33 -.12 -.12 -.11 -.03 +.17 +1.31 +.15 -.19 -.19 +.20 +.20 +.01 -.41 -.41 +.29 +.29 +.14 -.05 -.09 -.04 -.14 -.21 -.13 -.07 -.19 -.09 ... -.06 +.55 -.46 +.03 -.27 -.27 -.05 -.03 -.03 -.13 -.13 +.23

20.44 19.52 19.07 18.99 12.61 12.61 53.07 53.07 21.53 38.88 38.66 45.12 44.65 40.16 40.03 25.99 32.93 31.89 11.61 14.26 17.74 17.60 13.74 34.29 30.12 29.99 16.04 27.24 27.54 31.04 30.55 57.43 10.18 41.61 9.61 9.70 9.67 9.84 10.11 12.54 16.63 14.79 29.72 29.54

15.39 14.76 16.07 16.00 12.05 12.05 46.35 46.31 20.18 31.09 30.90 35.64 35.16 30.82 30.70 23.52 25.46 24.58 10.69 13.10 15.25 15.13 13.30 27.27 23.97 23.85 15.29 22.17 21.25 24.00 23.55 47.91 10.03 31.92 8.75 8.62 8.36 8.16 8.21 11.53 15.19 13.66 23.52 23.34

17.91 17.11 17.49 17.42 12.55 12.55 48.40 48.40 21.29 32.62 32.43 38.07 37.60 34.07 33.95 24.15 28.39 27.43 10.76 13.85 16.08 15.95 13.69 29.17 25.91 25.79 15.98 24.06 24.08 26.72 26.25 50.28 10.12 35.12 9.12 9.05 8.88 8.80 8.95 12.28 16.31 14.51 26.21 26.03

-.22 -.21 -.16 -.16 +.04 +.04 -.47 -.48 +.01 -.73 -.73 -.79 -.78 -.38 -.38 -.33 -.34 -.33 -.36 -.11 -.14 -.15 +.06 -.37 -.51 -.51 +.02 -.31 -.40 -.24 -.24 -1.08 +.01 -.67 -.05 -.05 -.06 -.10 -.11 -.04 -.07 +.17 -.38 -.38

11.60 11.04 11.49 +.03 12.93 12.51 12.85 +.11 47.12 33.37 38.69 -1.29 53.61 37.48 41.43 -1.92 11.15 10.17 10.22 31.51 25.01 26.31 13.28 10.52 11.09 21.58 24.23 29.31 22.79 38.34 18.61

16.43 18.31 22.46 17.27 26.08 13.42

-.34 -.48 -.20

18.46 -.08 21.12 -.21 25.20 -.35 19.68 -.15 32.80 +.11 15.49 -.36

34.58 25.11 27.46 26.14 20.54 23.51 23.56 16.18 19.46

-.40 -.32 -.49

10.47 10.38 10.38 14.21 11.63 12.58 15.80 12.36 14.09

-.03 -.09 -.12

11.69 9.84 10.48 -.11 13.51 12.94 13.45 +.05 12.40 9.94 10.25 -.53

YTD 5-YR FUND %RTN %RTN IntlM -9.3 -2.8 IntmBdM +3.7 +6.0 LgCpStkM -8.2 +.3 MidCpStM -8.2 +3.3 NtlIntM +6.2 +5.0 NtlShTM +1.9 +3.1 PAIntMu +5.9 +4.4 SmCpStkM -9.8 +.1 Baird AggrInst +6.1 +6.4 CrPlBInst +6.1 +7.9 IntBdInst +5.3 +6.6 IntMunIns +6.1 +5.7 ShTmBdIns +2.0 +4.2 Barclays Global Inv LP2020R m -1.1 +2.3 Baron Asset b -3.4 +2.6 Growth b -3.2 +4.3 Partners b -10.7 +1.3 SmCap b -2.9 +5.4 Bernstein CAMuni +5.2 +4.5 DiversMui +4.9 +4.6 EmgMkts -14.3 +5.0 IntDur +6.0 +7.1 IntlPort -11.3 -5.8 NYMuni +4.8 +4.5 ShDurDivr +1.8 +2.8 ShDurPlu +1.2 +2.6 TxMIntl -11.4 -5.9 Berwyn Income d +.1 +7.9 BlackRock BalCapA m -.7 +1.6 BasicValA m -9.3 -.4 BasicValC m -9.7 -1.2 CorBdInvA m +3.9 +4.9 Engy&ResA m -7.9 +4.1 EqDivA m -3.1 +2.3 EqDivR b -3.3 +1.9 EquitDivC m -3.5 +1.5 GlbDynEqA m -6.2 +3.4 GlobAlcA m -1.9 +5.6 GlobAlcB m -2.4 +4.8 GlobAlcC m -2.4 +4.8 GlobAlcR m -2.2 +5.3 HiIncA m +.2 +6.5 HiYldInvA m +.1 +7.2 HthScOpA m -.2 +6.9 InflPrBndA m +10.6 +7.5 InflPrBndC m +10.1 +6.7 IntlOppA m -7.5 +2.4 LCCrInvA m -4.9 -1.4 LCCrInvC m -5.5 -2.3 LatinAmA m -19.0 +11.8 LgCapValA m -7.7 -2.9 LowDurIvA m +1.5 +3.3 MidCpValEqA m -9.9 +1.7 NatMuniA m +6.9 +4.2 NatResD m -7.0 +4.6 S&P500A b -5.4 +.2 TotRtrnA m +3.3 NA U.S.GovtBdInvA m+4.9 +5.7 USOppsIvA m -11.3 +5.6 ValOpptyA m -8.3 -.6 Brandywine BlueFd -9.9 -2.3 Brandywin -9.4 -2.2 Bridgeway UltSmCoMk d -12.1 -1.9 Brown Advisory GrowEq d -2.3 +7.2 Brown Cap Mgmt SmCo Is d -3.4 +11.9 Buffalo MidCap d -9.0 +5.2 SmallCap d -12.0 +3.0 USAGlob d -5.4 +4.9 CG Capital Markets CrFixIn +5.1 +7.5 EmgMktEq -12.8 +5.6 IntlEqInv -9.1 -.9 LgCapGro -5.6 +3.3 LgCapVal -6.2 -1.9 CGM Focus -19.0 -.9 Mutual -13.7 +2.7 Realty -3.1 +6.8 Calamos ConvC m -4.8 +3.5 ConvertA m -4.3 +4.3 GlbGrIncA m -3.5 +4.0 GrIncA m -2.2 +4.5 GrIncC m -2.6 +3.7 GrowA m -5.8 +3.4 GrowB m -6.2 +2.6 GrowC m -6.2 +2.6 MktNuInA m -.1 +2.7 Calvert BalancedA m -1.3 +1.5 BondA m +4.0 +5.0 EquityA m -1.9 +3.7 IncomeA m +3.5 +4.2 ShDurIncA m +1.4 +4.8 Cambiar ConInv d -9.7 +4.9 OppInv -10.8 +.1 Causeway IntlVlInv d -6.3 -.3 Champlain Investment ChSmlComp b -4.0 +7.6 Clipper Clipper -3.2 -2.6 Cohen & Steers Realty -.1 +1.1 Colorado BondShares COBdShrs f +3.2 +4.4 Columbia AcornA m -6.7 +4.2 AcornC m -7.2 +3.4 AcornIntA m -6.0 +5.3 AcornIntZ -5.8 +5.6 AcornSelA m -13.8 +2.7 AcornSelZ -13.6 +3.0 AcornUSAZ -7.1 +2.5 AcornZ -6.5 +4.5 BondZ +5.7 +6.5 CATaxEA m +8.1 +4.4 CntrnCoreA m -6.2 +4.5 CntrnCoreZ -6.1 +4.8 ComInfoA m -9.2 +8.1 ComInfoC m -9.6 +7.3 DivBondA m +4.9 +5.9 DivBondI +4.9 +6.3 DivIncA m -4.4 +1.9 DivIncZ -4.3 +2.1 DivOppA m -2.8 +2.1 DivrEqInA m -9.1 -.7 EmMktOppA m -14.0 +6.2 EnrNatRsZ -8.5 +3.6 EqValueA m -9.0 -.6 FlRateA m -2.0 +2.4 GlbEqA m -6.9 +.4 GlblTechA m -10.0 +7.0 HYMuniZ +6.5 +2.3 HiYldBdA m +.3 +6.9 IncBldA m +1.6 +5.1 IncOppA m +1.0 +6.9 IncomeZ +6.4 +7.1 IntlOpZ -11.5 -.6 IntlVaZ -7.1 -1.3 IntmBdZ +4.9 +6.6 ItmMunBdZ +6.8 +4.7 LarCaCorZ -6.8 +1.0 LfBalA m -2.3 +4.5 LfGrthA m -7.2 +2.4 LgCpGrowA m -5.5 +2.7 LgCpGrowZ -5.4 +2.9 LgCpIxA b -5.4 +.3 LgCrQuantA m -2.6 -.1 LtdDurCrdA m +2.6 +5.0 MAIntlEqA m -9.7 -2.1 MAIntlEqZ -9.6 -1.9 Mar21CA m -13.2 0.0 Mar21CC m -13.6 -.7 Mar21CZ -13.0 +.3 MarFocEqA m -4.8 +2.8 MarFocEqZ -4.6 +3.0 MarGrIA m -3.5 +2.1 MarGrIZ -3.3 +2.3 MdCapGthZ -3.1 +6.6 MdCapIdxZ -6.5 +4.5 MdCpValOppA m -10.2 +1.1 MdCpValZ -10.1 +.7 MdCpVlA m -10.2 +.5 MidGrOppA m -14.5 +4.5 ORIntmMuniBdZ +6.2 +4.5 PBAggA m -4.4 +2.0 PBModA m -1.2 +4.1 PBModAggA m -3.0 +3.1 +.9 +4.7 PBModConA m

SMALL-CAP MID-CAP LARGE-CAP

PAGE 6D

VALUE -5.8 LV 7.8 -2.1 -3.2

YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR

BLEND -5.8 LB 8.5 -1.7 1.8

MV

-9.3 7.3 1.8 0.4 -11.6 8.7 3.5 2.6

M

-5.2 16.8 2.4 3.7 -9.1 15.4 1.5 2.6

SV

U

T

U

SB

-2.4 22.5 2.1 5.4

MG

-6.3 22.2 1.9 4.6

SG

L

S

THE TIMES LEADER

Fund Focus FundFocus

GROWTH -2.9 LG 17.1 0.6 3.2

MB

A

Management of this stock-and-bond fund recently switched from a six-person committee to a single manager, Robert Gerber. That's consistent with the structure at most of Lord Abbett's other funds. Lord Abbett BalA m

LABFX

BOND FUNDS Interm-Term Bond (CI) Interm. Government (GI) High Yield Muni (HM) High Yield Bond (HY) Muni National Interm (MI) Muni National Long (ML) Muni Short (MS)

4.80 5.51 6.09 -0.15 5.69 6.73 2.70

5.41 5.07 2.40 6.61 3.26 2.89 1.98

7.66 6.88 3.26 8.07 5.05 4.79 3.01

6.11 6.07 1.47 5.81 4.30 3.58 3.19

NAV 9.77 13.14 7.92 11.25 13.47 12.99 12.78 10.57

WK CHG -.14 +.04 -.14 +.03 ... ... +.01 -.09

10.93 10.91 11.31 11.83 9.81

10.90 10.87 11.22 11.82 9.74

+.06 +.03 +.04 +.05 -.01

16.01 13.69 14.89

-.05

61.72 57.95 22.80 27.42

44.56 40.23 15.47 18.84

53.41 49.59 18.36 23.08

-.08 -.20 -.38 -.23

14.96 14.84 35.25 14.27 16.62 14.61 12.72 11.96 16.74

14.09 14.14 27.55 13.57 13.11 13.94 12.53 11.86 13.21

14.66 14.68 28.55 14.21 13.85 14.45 12.70 11.95 13.94

+.04 +.03 -1.37 +.06 -.21 +.03 +.01 ... -.22

13.71 12.93 13.08

-.16

23.51 27.93 26.17 9.66 44.83 19.12 19.21 18.74 13.50 20.75 20.22 19.34 20.08 4.97 7.95 32.53 11.69 11.67 36.24 12.53 11.57 77.62 16.58 9.75 12.57 10.47 72.62 16.72 11.47 11.07 42.71 21.41

-.09 -.62 -.58 +.02 -.16 -.17 -.18 -.18 -.19 -.18 -.18 -.17 -.17 -.16 -.23 -.13 +.21 +.20 -.67 -.09 -.09 -.58 -.17 -.06 -.16 -.04 -.20 -.24 -.03 +.12 -.54 -.50

10.42 10.43 10.80 11.21 9.65

18.95 21.38 20.00 9.19 26.77 14.99 15.05 14.69 10.61 17.50 17.08 16.35 16.95 4.54 7.30 25.82 10.54 10.53 28.12 8.95 8.28 55.86 12.02 9.61 9.30 9.48 48.60 12.89 10.98 10.34 31.27 14.40

20.98 23.20 21.69 9.46 36.20 16.84 16.91 16.49 11.72 18.90 18.45 17.62 18.29 4.60 7.39 28.28 11.58 11.56 30.98 10.35 9.54 60.72 13.48 9.64 10.31 10.25 59.78 14.51 11.22 10.89 34.79 17.51

27.37 19.61 23.10 +.06 30.08 19.53 24.06 -.06 16.00 11.20 12.99

-.69

14.14 10.14 12.48

-.13

51.09 32.88 42.24

-.66

18.56 13.40 15.38 28.58 20.78 23.06 27.30 20.01 23.76

-.26 -.41 ...

8.88 8.27 8.62 +.03 18.12 14.64 15.07 -.77 11.61 8.90 9.61 -.09 16.09 11.76 13.94 -.18 9.64 7.52 8.23 -.17 36.39 24.75 28.19 -.59 30.21 22.74 25.42 -.19 30.53 21.94 25.87 +.53 20.92 21.03 11.56 34.35 34.45 58.70 58.21 53.27 12.33

17.94 18.03 9.41 27.35 27.47 42.58 42.44 38.84 11.00

18.49 18.59 10.38 30.66 30.75 50.29 49.77 45.55 11.89

-.05 -.05 +.02 +.01 ... +.24 +.24 +.22 -.04

28.83 16.05 40.25 16.36 16.71

24.56 15.37 29.16 15.78 16.00

26.81 15.88 35.11 16.15 16.41

-.11 -.04 -.45 -.09 -.10

16.38 14.82 15.85 20.38 14.34 16.37

-.53 -.43

14.08 10.52 11.65

-.20

16.46 11.29 14.00

-.14

68.26 52.71 59.99 -1.23 67.46 50.90 57.96 +.97 9.20

8.95

9.11

-.02

32.30 29.58 43.72 43.82 29.34 30.20 32.32 33.38 9.62 7.73 15.48 15.56 48.80 40.48 5.16 5.17 14.06 14.07 8.58 10.96 10.33 26.05 11.35 9.11 8.08 22.24 10.11 2.88 10.95 10.16 10.14 12.67 15.39 9.31 10.72 14.17 11.92 12.62 25.60 26.18 26.37 6.00 10.12 12.97 13.15 14.61 13.61 14.94 24.39 24.94 22.34 22.76 30.76 12.93 8.63 14.81 14.79 12.42 12.67 11.00 11.22 11.11 10.99

23.29 21.50 33.94 34.04 21.31 21.89 21.74 24.01 9.14 6.75 11.45 11.52 36.01 29.99 4.94 4.95 11.30 11.31 6.65 8.22 8.25 17.32 8.44 8.53 6.12 17.20 9.18 2.66 10.01 9.20 9.55 9.82 12.46 8.97 10.02 10.76 9.72 9.48 18.63 19.07 20.30 4.52 9.89 10.21 10.34 10.74 10.04 10.97 17.95 18.35 16.07 16.35 20.65 9.20 6.19 10.75 10.74 8.65 11.85 8.65 9.59 9.10 9.78

26.98 24.65 37.50 37.62 23.73 24.39 26.54 27.86 9.53 7.36 13.38 13.46 40.61 33.56 5.15 5.15 12.35 12.36 7.44 9.12 8.51 21.17 9.43 8.53 6.88 18.77 9.73 2.68 10.45 9.27 10.01 10.60 13.06 9.27 10.63 12.23 10.84 10.77 21.93 22.43 22.85 5.27 10.03 10.86 11.00 11.80 10.95 12.08 21.64 22.14 19.63 20.00 25.81 10.51 7.07 12.07 12.06 9.68 12.51 9.71 10.36 10.00 10.46

-.09 -.09 -.18 -.19 -.21 -.32 -.12 -.09 +.08 -.03 -.29 -.29 -.23 -.20 +.02 +.01 -.18 -.18 -.06 -.19 -.39 -.07 -.24 -.28 -.15 -.12 -.12 -.10 -.07 -.30 -.05 -.01 -.25 +.02 +.01 -.23 -.11 -.15 -.33 -.35 -.39 -.10 -.06 -.16 -.16 -.46 -.43 -.47 -.09 -.10 -.02 -.03 +.08 -.01 -.09 -.28 -.28 -.04 +.01 -.10 -.07 -.09 -.05

FUND

YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK %RTN %RTN HI LOW

WK NAV CHG

SIIncZ +1.6 +4.4 10.03 9.89 9.94 -.02 SelSmCapZ -17.2 +.7 18.98 12.91 14.71 -.42 ShTmIncA m +1.6 +4.1 10.04 9.91 9.96 -.02 ShTmMuZ +1.9 +3.4 10.60 10.46 10.56 ... SmCaVaIIA m -10.2 +1.6 15.40 10.43 12.28 -.36 SmCaVaIIZ -10.0 +1.8 15.51 10.50 12.38 -.36 SmCapCrZ -8.7 +3.7 17.49 11.95 14.52 -.45 SmCapIdxA b -8.1 +2.4 19.02 13.38 15.46 -.37 SmCapIdxZ -8.0 +2.6 19.08 13.43 15.52 -.37 SmCpGthIZ -6.3 +6.2 36.99 23.49 29.62 -.43 SmCpValIA m -12.3 +1.8 47.80 34.97 39.28 -1.38 SmCpValIZ -12.1 +2.1 50.20 36.70 41.27 -1.44 StLgCpGrA m +1.1 NA 14.32 9.78 12.48 +.04 StLgCpGrZ +1.4 +7.3 14.43 9.84 12.59 +.05 StrInvZ -9.5 +1.7 20.96 15.21 17.32 -.37 StratAllocA m -1.6 +1.5 10.04 8.46 9.17 -.09 StratIncA m +3.4 +6.8 6.28 5.95 6.03 -.10 StratIncZ +3.6 +7.1 6.21 5.88 5.96 -.10 TaxEA m +7.9 +4.3 13.79 12.35 13.37 -.06 TaxEBdA m +7.1 +4.1 3.89 3.51 3.79 -.02 TaxEZ +7.9 +4.5 13.79 12.35 13.36 -.06 USGovMorA m +8.1 +7.1 5.57 5.18 5.57 +.05 ValRestrZ -10.9 +.8 54.18 39.20 44.80 -.61 ValueA m -11.4 -2.4 12.23 9.50 10.16 -.26 ValueZ -11.3 -2.1 12.25 9.52 10.18 -.26 Commerce Bond +5.5 +7.9 20.51 19.73 20.43 +.01 Constellation SndsSelGrI -.3 +7.2 11.49 7.88 10.14 -.05 SndsSelGrII -.5 +6.9 11.29 7.76 9.96 -.06 Credit Suisse ComStrA m -2.3 -.4 10.12 7.40 9.08 +.04 DFA 1YrFixInI +.7 +3.0 10.38 10.31 10.36 ... 2YrGlbFII +.9 +3.2 10.30 10.13 10.24 +.01 5YearGovI +3.0 +4.8 11.17 10.69 11.03 +.05 5YrGlbFII +5.2 +5.2 11.75 10.78 11.45 +.06 EMktsSoCo -12.1 NA 15.50 12.45 12.93 -.51 EmMkCrEqI -11.8 +10.7 23.21 18.47 19.44 -.77 EmMktValI -14.9 +10.5 38.10 29.40 30.61 -1.42 EmMtSmCpI -10.2 +13.1 25.24 20.71 21.48 -.77 EmgMktI -11.3 +9.2 32.37 25.32 27.03 -1.11 GlEqInst -8.3 +1.2 14.76 11.00 12.26 -.23 Glob6040I -2.7 +3.5 13.69 11.38 12.40 -.11 InfPrtScI +13.6 NA 12.67 11.09 12.53 +.28 IntGovFII +6.8 +7.7 12.99 12.09 12.94 +.17 IntRlEstI -1.2 NA 5.59 4.21 4.96 -.03 IntSmCapI -9.2 +1.2 18.94 13.97 15.44 -.07 IntlValu3 -10.0 -.5 18.91 14.40 15.16 -.31 LgCapIntI -7.2 -.2 21.80 16.96 18.16 -.21 RelEstScI +1.0 -.1 25.04 19.04 21.74 +.53 STMuniBdI +2.3 +3.0 10.41 10.21 10.37 ... TMIntlVal -10.5 -.3 16.56 12.55 13.22 -.27

FUND

YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG

Dimensional Investme IntCorEqI -8.4 +.4 12.33 IntlSCoI -7.4 +2.5 18.73 IntlValuI -10.1 -.7 20.21 Dodge & Cox Bal -5.6 +.1 75.65 GlbStock -11.2 NA 9.72 Income +4.1 +7.0 13.62 IntlStk -11.0 +.3 38.80 Stock -8.9 -2.8 118.20 Domini Social Invmts SocEqInv m -2.5 +1.5 32.94 Dreyfus Apprecia +.4 +2.0 42.23 AtvMdCpA f -7.8 -2.3 36.88 BasSP500 -5.2 +.6 27.98 BondIdxIn b +5.7 +6.4 10.97 BstSMCpGI -2.7 +5.5 16.19 BstSmCpVl -13.7 +.4 25.11 CAAMTBdZ +7.5 +4.0 14.90 DiscStkR b -8.0 +.9 33.52 Dreyfus -7.5 +1.0 9.80 EmergMarI d -16.3 +6.4 13.95 EmgLead -19.4 -5.2 22.39 EmgMkts m -16.4 +6.2 13.87 GNMA Z b +6.6 +6.7 16.32 GrowInc -7.6 +.9 15.40 GrtChinaA m -20.8 +13.3 55.00 HiYldI -.7 +6.3 6.84 IntBndA f +7.5 +11.4 17.26 IntIncA f +6.0 +6.6 13.64 IntMuBd +6.9 +4.7 13.89 IntlStkI -5.0 NA 14.75 IntlStkIx -7.8 -1.6 16.44 MidCapIdx -6.6 +4.2 31.27 MuniBd +6.5 +3.6 11.58 NJMuniA f +6.6 +3.9 13.10 NYTaxEBd +6.4 +4.4 15.22 OppMdCpVaA f -11.5 +5.6 38.37 SIMuBdD b +3.0 +3.8 13.33 SP500Idx -5.4 +.3 37.66 SmCapIdx -7.9 +2.5 22.75 SmCoVal -19.1 +8.8 32.83 StratValA f -11.0 -.1 30.96 TechGrA f -9.3 +6.7 35.24 WldwdeGrA f +2.4 +3.2 44.68 Driehaus ActiveInc -3.2 +5.2 11.35 EmMktGr d -5.3 +9.4 34.42 Dupree KYTxFInc +7.0 +5.0 7.92 Eagle CapApprA m -6.2 +1.9 29.88

9.33 10.15 13.85 15.73 15.39 16.20 60.85 7.42 13.15 29.97 88.26

65.57 -1.51 7.90 -.26 13.49 -.06 31.79 -.91 97.34 -2.79

24.62 28.84 32.54 26.58 21.43 10.38 11.05 18.32 13.35 25.24 7.41 10.94 15.36 10.87 15.25 11.52 38.66 6.20 16.53 12.94 13.00 11.81 12.82 22.47 10.53 11.86 13.92 26.60 13.02 29.69 16.07 22.39 23.18 25.37 34.90

-.33

38.33 -.41 30.27 -.35 24.12 -.40 10.93 +.08 13.66 +.07 19.87 -.63 14.48 -.06 28.08 -.48 8.27 -.14 11.34 -.63 ... 11.26 -.63 16.32 +.27 13.01 -.24 39.77 -2.23 6.26 -.25 17.20 +.07 13.59 +.07 13.80 +.02 13.01 -.12 13.75 -.13 26.03 -.05 11.25 -.03 12.72 -.04 14.85 -.03 30.25 -.68 13.30 +.01 32.71 -.55 18.80 -.44 24.41 -1.31 25.37 -.67 29.46 -.16 40.67 -.47

10.50 10.55 26.69 30.49 7.33

-.09 -.04 -.33

-.26 -.60

7.81 +.01

23.10 26.18

-.47

Caution! Hot Summer Ahead

The Pool Guys Pool

Blowout

Buster Crabb Above Grounds

- $1595 $ 18’ 1895 $ 24’ 2395 15’

6” Top Rail, 8” Upright, 52” Deep

Includes: 1 H.P. Pump, Filter, Ladder, Heavy Liner, Vac Kit, Leaf Skimmer

Save UP To 50% On All Fence & Deck Pools

Inground Safety Cover Sale 16ft x 32ft -

$899

In Ground & Above Ground Any Size Any Style Any Shape

LINER SALE

Save Now

— Call For Estimates —

Sun. 11am-3pm Mon.-Fri 10am-6pm Sat. 11am-4pm TMMkWVal -8.8 TMMkWVal2 -8.7 TMUSEq -5.6 TMUSTarVal -12.2 TMUSmCp -9.1 USCorEq1I -7.0 USCorEq2I -8.4 USLgCo -5.1 USLgVal3 -8.5 USLgValI -8.6 USMicroI -9.8 USSmValI -13.0 USSmallI -9.1 USTgtValI -12.7 USVecEqI -10.3 DWS-Investments DrSmCpVlA m -13.5 LgCapValA m -5.2 LgCapValS -5.0 DWS-Scudder BalA m -3.5 CATFIncA m +7.0 CapGrA m -8.4 CapGrS -8.3 EnhEMFIS d -2.0 Eq500S -5.3 GNMAS +6.3 GlbTS d -10.1 GrIncS -4.8 GvtSc m +5.5 HiIncA m -.4 HlthCareS d -.5 IntTFrS +6.6 IntlS d -11.1 LAEqS d -19.0 MATaxFrS +7.6 MgdMuniA m +6.2 MgdMuniS +6.3 REstA m +.9 SPInxS -5.4 ShDurPS +.4 StrHiYldTxFA m +5.8 StrHiYldTxFS +5.9 StrValA m -8.9 TechA m -6.1 Davis FinclA m -7.5 NYVentA m -8.5 NYVentB m -9.0 NYVentC m -8.9 Delaware Invest CorpBdIs +6.0 CorpBondA m +5.8 DiverIncA m +5.2 EmgMktA m -15.7 GrowOppA m +5.0 LgValA m -3.5 LtdDvIncA m +3.6 OpFixIncI +6.0 OptLgCpIs -3.6 OptLgValI -3.1 TaxFIntA m +5.4 TaxFMNA m +6.9 TaxFPAA m +6.3 TaxFUSAA m +6.2 Diamond Hill LngShortA m -3.9 LngShortI -3.7 LrgCapI -6.3 -9.9 SmCapA m

-1.1 -1.0 +.9 -.7 +.7 +1.4 +.9 +.8 -1.0 -1.1 +1.3 +.2 +3.2 +.8 +.3

16.73 16.11 14.81 23.61 25.49 12.09 12.07 10.76 17.21 22.48 15.13 28.21 23.76 18.31 12.00

13.64 13.13 12.72 18.84 20.81 10.17 10.00 9.32 14.00 18.28 12.39 22.23 19.36 14.49 9.72

-.36 -.35 -.21 -.66 -.65 -.20 -.22 -.15 -.36 -.48 -.47 -.89 -.53 -.51 -.28

+1.9 39.85 29.21 31.83 +.7 18.78 15.17 16.44 +1.0 18.79 15.17 16.44

-.77 -.18 -.18

+1.4 9.59 +4.2 7.47 +1.9 58.29 +2.2 58.70 +4.6 11.53 +.5 153.28 +7.0 15.82 -.9 25.90 +.4 18.11 +6.6 9.03 +5.7 4.96 +3.9 28.50 +4.9 11.76 -3.7 49.01 +6.6 53.68 +4.9 14.87 +4.7 9.25 +4.9 9.26 +.6 20.57 +.4 18.13 +3.7 9.64 +3.8 12.52 +4.0 12.53 -5.6 35.44 +5.1 14.76

12.02 11.57 11.18 16.23 17.32 8.90 8.78 8.29 12.50 16.33 10.37 18.93 16.07 12.59 8.51

8.15 6.70 43.67 44.02 10.32 117.98 15.04 20.24 13.48 8.62 4.53 21.28 10.91 38.01 39.99 13.29 8.39 8.40 15.35 13.95 9.34 11.18 11.19 27.42 10.60

8.71 7.24 49.87 50.26 10.41 132.72 15.80 21.44 15.47 9.02 4.58 24.22 11.63 40.27 43.06 14.39 8.94 8.95 17.72 15.70 9.34 11.96 11.97 29.68 12.67

-.06 -.04 -.24 -.24 -.21 -2.23 +.14 -.61 -.27 +.08 -.15 -.22 ... -.98 -.64 -.07 -.07 -.07 +.30 -.26 -.09 -.17 -.17 -.48 -.07 -.27 -.67 -.65 -.65

-1.7 -.9 -1.8 -1.7

33.73 36.90 35.33 35.60

27.47 28.84 27.55 27.77

29.38 31.41 29.99 30.24

+8.9 +8.6 +8.9 +8.2 +8.6 -.9 +6.1 +8.1 +2.3 +.6 +4.4 +4.4 +4.5 +4.2

6.35 6.35 9.84 17.03 26.18 16.67 9.12 9.87 13.21 11.42 12.12 12.74 8.13 11.64

5.76 5.76 9.14 12.91 17.32 12.62 8.83 9.31 9.65 8.73 11.26 11.67 7.36 10.62

6.01 -.06 6.01 -.06 9.43 -.02 13.50 -.57 22.41 -.18 14.36 -.25 9.09 +.02 9.85 +.03 11.62 -.04 9.97 -.17 11.86 ... 12.49 -.04 7.89 -.04 11.32 -.08

-.9 -.6 +.7 +2.1

17.32 17.52 16.12 27.74

14.93 15.06 12.65 21.63

15.62 15.81 13.88 23.25

-.10 -.10 -.25 -.48

CATEGORY MORNINGSTAR RATING™ ASSETS EXP RATIO MANAGER SINCE RETURNS 3-MO YTD 1-YR 3-YR ANNL 5-YR-ANNL

Moderate Allocation HHHII $1,089 million 1.18% Robert Gerber 2005-06-30 -10.7 -5.7 +5.9 +3.0 +2.5

TOP 5 HOLDINGS Lord Abbett Affiliated I Lord Abbett Capital Structure I Lord Abbett High Yield I Lord Abbett Bond-Debenture I Lord Abbett Intl Dividend Inc I

*– Annualized 52-WEEK HI LOW 11.86 9.26 13.24 12.81 9.48 7.13 13.72 9.26 13.75 12.73 13.01 12.85 12.96 12.13 12.97 8.84

FUND

MidCpStA m -11.5 SmCpGrthA m -5.1 Eaton Vance DivBldrA m -5.5 FlRtHIA m -.9 Floating-Rate A m -1.2 FltRateC m -1.6 FltRtAdv b -1.1 GovOblA m +2.9 GtrIndiaA m -20.0 HiIncOppA m +1.1 HiIncOppB m +.4 IncBosA m +1.0 LrgCpValA m -9.9 LrgCpValC m -10.3 NatlMuniA m +6.3 NatlMuniB m +5.8 NatlMuniC m +5.8 PAMuniA m +5.8 PaTxMgEMI d -10.0 StrIncA m +1.2 StratIncC m +.9 TMG1.0 -5.9 TMG1.1A m -6.0 TMGlbDivIncA m -2.8 TMGlbDivIncC m -3.2 TaxMgdVlA m -9.1 WldwHealA m -.4 FAM Value -6.7 FBR FBRFocus m -10.0 FMI CommStk -6.4 Focus -8.2 LgCap -4.6 FPA Capital m -1.1 Cres d -1.6 NewInc m +2.0 Fairholme Funds Fairhome d -25.3 Federated CapAprA m -9.3 ClvrValA m -7.2 HiIncBdA m +.6 InterConA m -10.0 KaufmanA m -11.1 KaufmanC m -11.5 KaufmanR m -11.3 KaufmnSCA m -13.6 MuniSecsA f +7.1 MuniUltA m +1.0 PrdntBr m +3.0 StrValA m +2.3 StratIncA f +2.8 TotRetBdA m +4.4 USGovSecA f +4.2 Fidelity AstMgr20 +1.7 AstMgr50 -1.6 AstMgr85 -6.4 Bal -1.4 BlChGrow -3.1 BlChVal -10.5 CAMuInc d +7.5 CASITxFre d +3.7 CTMuInc d +6.7 Canada d -6.6 -7.5 CapApr

+1.8 29.41 21.74 24.41 +6.4 44.54 27.92 36.16 +.2 10.68 +3.2 9.50 +2.8 9.41 +2.0 9.09 +2.8 9.10 +5.9 7.65 +4.8 29.97 +5.5 4.52 +4.7 4.52 +6.5 6.00 -1.5 19.26 -2.2 19.25 +.6 10.03 -.2 10.03 -.2 10.03 +2.1 9.25 +9.1 53.81 +6.8 8.26 +5.9 7.80 +.5 574.45 +.1 25.66 -.4 10.51 -1.2 10.49 -1.6 17.94 +5.2 10.74

8.55 9.00 8.94 8.64 8.65 7.39 22.49 4.19 4.19 5.60 15.43 15.41 8.44 8.44 8.44 8.22 43.69 8.06 7.60 448.64 20.07 8.65 8.64 14.40 8.52

-.12 -.55

9.28 -.19 9.00 -.31 8.94 -.31 8.64 -.29 8.65 -.29 7.52 +.04 22.53 -.96 4.23 -.12 4.23 -.13 5.63 -.17 16.33 -.43 16.32 -.43 9.14 -.21 9.14 -.21 9.14 -.21 8.79 -.14 45.99 -1.89 8.06 -.09 7.61 -.08 499.31 -8.78 22.38 -.39 9.20 -.17 9.18 -.17 15.37 -.36 9.31 -.17

+1.2 49.50 38.16 42.29

-.79

+4.3 51.90 40.92 44.84

-.96

+6.8 27.67 20.91 23.47 +6.5 33.81 23.40 27.84 +3.3 17.03 13.42 14.89

-.31 -.52 -.31

+5.8 47.08 30.86 40.73 +.33 +5.2 28.71 24.31 26.14 -.09 +4.1 11.05 10.79 10.84 +.01 +1.9 36.53 25.54 26.59 -1.42 +.7 -.5 +7.2 +.9 +2.7 +2.1 +2.7 +2.6 +3.3 +2.1 0.0 0.0 +7.6 +6.5 +5.5

20.00 15.75 7.77 55.09 5.89 5.56 5.89 28.37 10.34 10.06 5.49 4.80 9.45 11.48 7.93

15.93 11.97 7.21 40.19 4.56 4.30 4.56 20.10 9.34 10.01 4.23 4.02 9.04 11.02 7.66

17.25 13.33 7.27 44.93 4.88 4.60 4.88 22.62 10.06 10.05 4.87 4.40 9.08 11.37 7.92

-.10 -.20 -.25 -1.37 -.04 -.04 -.04 -.54 -.02 ... +.06 -.02 -.16 +.01 +.07

+4.5 +3.9 +2.2 +3.3 +5.0 -3.9 +4.3 +4.4 +4.9 +5.5 +1.6

13.17 16.27 14.51 19.40 50.03 11.88 12.37 10.81 11.84 63.77 27.45

12.26 13.86 11.22 16.25 35.60 9.16 11.33 10.49 11.01 48.50 20.53

12.87 15.05 12.54 17.82 43.96 9.67 12.17 10.77 11.72 54.34 23.44

+.01 -.08 -.16 -.07 -.10 -.28 +.01 +.02 +.04 +.97 -.15

FUND

PCT 16.93 16.81 14.95 14.01 13.21

YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG

CapInc d -2.3 ChinaReg d -11.8 Contra -2.5 ConvSec -7.2 DiscEq -6.5 DivGrow -9.8 DivStk -5.9 DivrIntl d -7.6 EmergAsia d -8.3 EmgMkt d -11.5 EqInc -10.2 EqInc II -10.3 EuCapApr d -9.9 Europe d -9.6 ExpMulNat d -7.2 FF2015 -.9 FF2035 -5.0 FF2040 -5.0 Fidelity -3.8 Fifty -4.2 FltRtHiIn d -2.4 FocStk -2.6 FocuHiInc d +.9 FourInOne -4.4 Fr2045 -5.4 Fr2050 -6.0 Free2000 +1.4 Free2005 -.3 Free2010 -.9 Free2020 -1.9 Free2025 -3.2 Free2030 -3.7 FreeInc +1.4 GNMA +6.9 GlbCmtyStk d -10.1 GlobBal d -.7 GovtInc +5.8 GrDiscov -2.0 GrStr d -7.2 GrowCo -1.0 GrowInc -6.9 HiInc d -1.0 Indepndnc -6.6 InfProtBd +12.1 IntBond +5.4 IntGovt +4.8 IntMuniInc d +5.5 IntlCptlAppr d -7.5 IntlDisc d -8.3 IntlSmCp d -5.6 InvGrdBd +6.4 Japan d -11.4 LargeCap -8.5 LatinAm d -13.3 LevCoSt d -11.9 LgCpVal -8.1 LowPriStk d -3.7 MAMuInc d +6.8 MIMuInc d +6.3 MNMuInc d +6.1 Magellan -9.7 MdCpVal d -10.3 MeCpSto -6.1 MidCap d -6.5 MtgSec +5.8 MuniInc d +7.1 NJMuInc d +6.2 NYMuInc d +6.5 NewMille -3.6 NewMktIn d +4.9 Nordic d -13.9 OHMuInc d +6.5 OTC -1.8 Overseas d -8.4 PAMuInc d +6.5 PacBasin d -5.1 Puritan -1.7 RealInv d +.6 RelEstInc d +.9 SerEmMktDbt NA Series100Index -5.0 ShIntMu d +3.5 ShTmBond +1.8 SmCapRetr d -9.3 SmCapStk d -17.4 SmCpGr d -5.7 SmCpOpp -8.9 SmCpVal d -12.9 StkSelec -7.8 StrDivInc +.4 StratInc +3.5 StratRRet d +2.1 StratRRnI d +2.1 TaxFrB d +7.2 Tel&Util -.1 TotalBd +5.6 Trend -2.6 USBdIdx NA USBdIdxAd NA USBdIdxInv +5.9 Value -10.7 ValueDis -8.7 Worldwid d -4.7 Fidelity Advisor AstMgr70 -4.3 BalT m -1.7 CapDevO -3.2 DivIntlA m -7.4 DivIntlIs d -7.2 DivIntlT m -7.5 EmMktIncI d +4.8 EqGrowA m -2.5 EqGrowI -2.3 EqGrowT m -2.6 EqIncA m -5.9 EqIncI -5.7 EqIncT m -6.0 FltRateA m -2.6 FltRateC m -3.0 FltRateI d -2.4 Fr2010A m -1.3 Fr2015A m -1.4 Fr2020A m -2.4 Fr2020I -2.2 Fr2020T m -2.5 Fr2025A m -3.7 Fr2030A m -4.2 Fr2035A m -5.6 Fr2040A m -5.7 GrowIncI -6.8 GrowOppT m -1.1 HiIncAdvA m -2.2 HiIncAdvI d -2.0 HiIncAdvT m -2.0 IntrDiscA m -8.5 LeverA m -11.7 LeverC m -12.1 LeverI -11.6 LeverT m -11.8 LrgCapI -8.4 Mid-CpIIA m -8.2 Mid-CpIII -8.1 MidCpIIT m -8.3 MuniIncI +7.1 NewInsA m -2.8 NewInsC m -3.3 NewInsI -2.7 NewInsT m -3.0 OverseaI d -7.9 ShFixInI +2.0 SmCapA m -7.4 SmCapI -7.2 SmCapT m -7.5 StSlctSmCp d -8.6 StkSelMdCpA m -8.8 StkSelMdCpT m -9.0 StratIncA m +3.4 StratIncC m +2.9 StratIncI +3.5 StratIncT m +3.3 TotBondA m +5.5 TotBondI +5.7 ValStratT m -10.3 Fidelity Select Banking d -22.9 Biotech d +1.2 BrokInv d -21.8 Chemical d -.4 CommEq d -15.8 Computer d -6.7 ConsStpl d +1.3 DefAero d -4.3 Electron d -10.2 Energy d -3.3 EnergySvc d -2.3 Gold d -2.3 HealtCar d -.2 Industr d -11.5 Leisure d -2.6 Materials d -7.2 MedDeliv d +3.5 MedEqSys d -1.0 NatGas d -5.7 NatRes d -4.4 Pharm d +2.7

+8.5 +10.0 +4.1 +4.2 -1.9 +1.4 +1.3 -.8 +7.7 +4.6 -2.1 -2.3 -1.3 -.9 +.5 +3.6 +1.6 +1.5 +1.6 +.1 +3.7 +4.6 +5.8 +1.7 +1.4 +1.0 +4.0 +3.5 +3.7 +3.0 +2.7 +2.0 +4.1 +7.6 NA +5.5 +6.7 +3.5 +3.1 +6.7 -6.1 +7.2 +3.7 +6.7 +6.0 +6.1 +4.8 -.6 +.2 +2.6 +5.8 -5.8 +1.9 +9.2 +.6 -4.3 +4.2 +4.8 +4.8 +4.7 -.9 +.6 +.8 +2.5 +5.3 +4.7 +4.6 +4.9 +5.1 +9.0 +1.2 +4.8 +9.6 -2.4 +4.7 +5.0 +3.3 0.0 +3.9 NA NA +4.1 +2.6 +7.3 +3.0 +4.6 NA +3.9 +.6 +.9 +7.9 +3.8 +3.8 +5.0 +1.4 +6.9 +4.4 NA NA +6.2 -.4 -1.1 +2.9

9.95 34.07 73.22 27.62 24.96 31.04 16.30 32.85 32.86 27.86 48.11 19.84 21.27 35.01 23.65 12.05 12.45 8.71 35.76 19.58 9.91 15.43 9.57 29.24 10.33 10.23 12.37 11.38 14.42 14.75 12.40 14.86 11.65 12.01 18.55 24.07 10.97 15.40 22.27 94.85 19.75 9.24 26.75 13.12 10.95 11.21 10.48 14.03 35.83 23.10 7.75 11.87 19.10 60.50 31.59 11.52 42.57 12.32 12.24 11.79 77.46 17.57 10.79 25.65 11.25 12.97 11.94 13.36 32.26 16.63 38.84 11.97 62.30 35.56 11.12 27.42 19.18 29.71 10.98 10.31 9.45 10.82 8.55 22.78 21.72 17.84 12.24 16.78 28.16 11.67 11.67 10.11 10.09 11.19 17.66 11.16 75.57 11.83 11.83 11.83 75.87 16.04 20.56

8.71 27.41 56.08 21.65 19.05 22.29 12.27 25.37 25.94 21.97 36.55 15.10 15.46 25.74 18.03 10.32 9.80 6.83 26.06 14.52 9.36 10.43 8.82 23.40 8.06 7.89 11.53 9.99 12.40 12.28 10.09 11.94 10.89 11.30 13.39 19.71 10.26 10.72 16.09 66.63 14.82 8.46 18.57 11.39 10.45 10.58 9.89 10.59 27.49 17.14 7.31 9.68 14.15 47.52 21.51 9.00 31.56 11.38 11.45 11.08 58.10 12.81 8.16 5.26 10.69 11.94 11.03 12.28 23.71 15.34 26.40 11.11 42.31 26.89 10.30 21.53 15.75 22.30 9.92 9.98 7.42 10.54 8.43 15.48 14.87 12.01 8.12 12.59 20.64 9.44 11.00 8.78 8.77 10.27 14.46 10.64 53.44 11.63 11.63 11.16 55.56 12.01 14.95

8.90 28.69 65.96 23.32 21.06 25.65 14.08 27.87 28.09 23.33 39.42 16.25 17.16 28.30 20.23 11.20 10.86 7.58 30.85 16.86 9.40 13.30 8.86 25.79 8.94 8.79 12.07 10.74 13.42 13.47 11.11 13.21 11.35 12.01 15.41 22.15 10.89 13.33 18.96 82.30 16.91 8.53 22.74 12.92 10.92 11.12 10.34 11.92 30.29 20.07 7.71 9.91 16.08 51.20 25.03 9.67 36.95 12.13 12.09 11.67 64.61 14.31 9.33 25.65 11.23 12.80 11.71 13.11 28.07 15.87 29.55 11.83 53.96 29.74 10.92 24.73 17.45 25.85 10.31 10.03 8.30 10.82 8.54 18.33 16.19 14.80 9.88 13.59 23.72 10.46 11.13 9.65 9.63 11.01 15.74 11.08 65.64 11.77 11.77 11.77 61.33 13.37 17.79

-.25 -1.01 +.06 -.31 -.27 -.45 -.28 -.34 -1.39 -1.06 -1.24 -.54 -.18 -.30 -.24 -.05 -.14 -.10 -.06 -.04 -.27 -.03 -.27 -.29 -.13 -.14 -.01 -.04 -.06 -.10 -.11 -.14 -.01 +.18 +.01 -.03 +.13 -.04 +.07 -.14 -.33 -.31 +.14 +.28 +.06 +.10 +.03 -.19 -.20 -.33 +.06 -.19 -.37 -.53 -.26 -.21 -.69 +.02 +.04 +.02 -.53 -.18 -.18 +.04 +.12 +.01 ... +.04 -.35 -.28 +.08 +.02 -.17 -.60 +.02 -.58 -.13 +.57 -.12 -.17 -.17 +.03 ... -.68 -.37 -.12 -.23 -.52 -.32 -.09 -.13 +.01 +.01 +.02 -.15 +.04 -.87 +.09 +.09 +.09 -1.47 -.28 -.07

+2.9 +2.6 +1.9 -2.3 -2.0 -2.5 +9.0 +2.6 +3.0 +2.4 -1.7 -1.4 -1.9 +3.3 +2.6 +3.7 +3.4 +3.3 +2.6 +2.8 +2.3 +2.3 +1.5 +1.2 +1.0 -.1 +3.2 +6.3 +6.6 +6.4 -.1 +1.2 +.5 +1.5 +1.0 +1.9 +4.0 +4.2 +3.7 +4.6 +3.7 +2.9 +3.9 +3.4 +.1 +3.0 +5.2 +5.5 +4.9 +1.5 +.3 +.1 +7.8 +7.0 +8.1 +7.8 +6.6 +6.9 +1.1

17.52 15.99 12.00 17.47 17.75 17.31 13.89 60.58 64.58 60.28 25.01 25.77 25.37 9.92 9.92 9.90 12.21 12.17 12.80 12.88 12.79 12.46 13.11 12.51 13.38 18.69 39.30 10.50 9.98 10.55 35.58 38.29 36.42 38.73 37.60 20.29 19.17 19.42 19.03 13.05 21.47 20.43 21.71 21.21 20.39 9.32 27.83 29.15 26.86 20.94 21.76 21.94 13.09 13.06 13.22 13.08 11.17 11.15 28.43

14.13 13.38 8.53 13.42 13.65 13.30 12.85 42.17 44.94 41.98 18.92 19.49 19.19 9.37 9.37 9.36 10.48 10.40 10.63 10.69 10.62 10.09 10.49 9.80 10.44 13.97 26.89 9.21 8.77 9.25 27.28 26.20 25.00 26.53 25.74 15.06 14.69 14.85 14.60 12.00 16.50 15.77 16.68 16.33 15.11 9.18 20.98 21.89 20.32 13.83 16.15 16.31 12.30 12.28 12.44 12.30 10.64 10.62 20.37

15.62 14.69 10.35 14.86 15.11 14.71 13.29 52.62 56.11 52.36 21.35 22.01 21.67 9.41 9.41 9.40 11.36 11.29 11.68 11.75 11.67 11.14 11.64 10.89 11.62 16.09 34.03 9.45 8.97 9.50 30.05 30.38 28.84 30.76 29.82 17.13 16.43 16.66 16.31 12.88 19.36 18.41 19.57 19.12 17.05 9.31 22.83 23.94 22.03 16.92 18.26 18.41 12.44 12.41 12.58 12.43 11.09 11.07 23.22

-.15 -.06 -.06 -.16 -.16 -.16 -.23 -.20 -.21 -.19 -.42 -.42 -.42 -.27 -.27 -.26 -.06 -.07 -.09 -.10 -.10 -.13 -.14 -.16 -.18 -.31 ... -.31 -.29 -.30 -.20 -.31 -.30 -.31 -.30 -.39 -.08 -.07 -.07 +.02 +.02 +.02 +.02 +.02 -.28 ... -.67 -.69 -.64 -.39 +.06 +.06 -.14 -.14 -.14 -.14 +.05 +.04 -.54

-12.3 19.65 +5.2 89.00 -4.8 55.95 +13.1 111.04 +4.9 30.20 +10.4 62.42 +8.0 73.98 +3.8 84.35 +3.0 54.98 +2.7 62.56 +3.4 89.62 +14.2 55.28 +4.6 146.37 +5.1 26.12 +8.2 100.86 +10.1 74.58 +4.3 61.69 +7.5 31.96 -1.2 37.23 +6.0 40.76 +6.8 14.14

13.81 61.55 38.90 72.58 20.37 42.57 60.55 60.46 34.61 37.87 50.46 42.17 100.51 18.32 72.53 51.35 39.12 21.95 26.42 25.15 10.72

14.27 73.83 41.01 95.11 22.33 52.66 68.62 69.97 43.43 50.49 72.69 49.93 124.33 20.58 88.67 62.99 51.41 27.15 31.31 33.22 12.42

-1.34 -.42 -1.92 +.99 +.17 -.10 -.38 -1.14 +.38 -.67 -1.54 +2.85 -.63 -.25 +.03 +.47 -.63 -.01 -.19 -.02 -.01

www.timesleader.com

YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG

SelctUtil d +.3 +1.8 53.59 SoftwCom d -4.6 +9.5 90.51 Tech d -7.5 +9.3 105.02 Fidelity Spartan 500IdxInstl NA NA 45.59 500IdxInv -5.2 +.6 48.31 ExtMktIdI d -8.2 +3.8 41.87 FdSpIntIv +9.9 +8.4 11.58 IntlIdxIn d -7.3 -1.0 38.58 TotMktIdI d -5.7 +1.3 39.77 First American RealA m +.6 +2.2 20.65 First Eagle FndofAmY b -5.1 +4.9 28.62 GlbA m -1.4 +6.5 49.61 Gold m +1.1 +15.4 35.84 OverseasA m -1.2 +6.0 24.09 USValueA m -1.0 +4.8 17.69 First Investors BlChipA m -6.5 -.6 22.89 GrowIncA m -5.9 +.7 15.92 IncomeA m +.1 +3.4 2.58 InvGradeA m +6.6 +6.2 9.96 OpportA m -5.3 +2.8 30.90 TaxEA m +6.8 +4.5 10.11 TotalRetA m -1.2 +3.7 15.99 FrankTemp-Franklin AZ TF A m +6.8 +4.2 11.11 AdjUSA m +1.2 +3.5 8.91 AdjUSC m +.9 +3.1 8.90 BalInv m -12.6 -2.0 50.62 BioDis A m -4.4 +5.6 79.76 CA TF A m +6.5 +3.9 7.25 CA TF C m +6.1 +3.3 7.24 CAHY A m +8.2 +3.4 9.73 CAInTF A m +7.9 +3.8 12.40 CAInt A m +6.4 +4.3 11.81 CO TF A m +8.0 +4.1 12.01 CaTxFrAdv +6.6 +4.0 7.22 China A m -10.1 +11.5 42.33 ChinaAdv -9.9 +11.9 42.61 CvtSc A m -6.4 +3.9 16.51 DynaTechA m -2.1 +6.7 33.69 EqIn A m -6.2 -.9 17.94 FL TF A m +6.3 +4.2 11.69 FLRtDAAdv -1.6 +2.4 9.26 Fed TF A m +8.1 +4.5 12.16 Fed TF C m +7.8 +3.9 12.16 FedIntA m +7.1 +4.9 12.08 FedLmtT/FIncA m +3.4 +3.9 10.54 FedTxFrIA +8.2 +4.6 12.16 FlRtDAC m -1.9 +1.7 9.25 FlRtDAccA m -1.7 +2.2 9.25 FlxCpGr A m -6.1 +3.4 52.75 FlxCpGrAd -6.0 +3.7 53.63 GoldPrAdv -10.4 +16.9 53.67 GoldPrM A m -10.5 +16.6 51.50 GoldPrM C m -10.9 +15.7 49.28 GrowAdv -4.9 +3.8 48.48 GrowB m -5.5 +2.8 46.25 GrowC m -5.5 +2.8 45.75 Growth A m -5.0 +3.6 48.41 HY TF A m +8.0 +4.0 10.39 HY TF C m +7.7 +3.5 10.53 HighIncA m +.6 +6.9 2.06 HighIncAd +.2 +7.0 2.06 HighIncC m -.2 +6.3 2.08 InSCGrAd -8.6 +5.8 17.81 Income A m -2.5 +3.5 2.30 Income C m -2.8 +2.9 2.32 IncomeAdv -2.4 +3.7 2.29 IncomeB m -3.1 +2.6 2.29 IncomeR b -3.2 +3.1 2.27 Ins TF C m +7.6 +3.6 12.33 InsTF A m +7.9 +4.1 12.19 LoDurTReA m +1.4 +4.9 10.48 MATFA m +7.7 +4.0 11.95 MD TF A m +6.5 +4.0 11.73 MITFA m +7.2 +4.2 12.22 MNTFA m +7.5 +4.8 12.55 MO TF A m +7.3 +4.3 12.33 NC TF A m +7.1 +4.4 12.51 NJ TF A m +6.5 +4.4 12.36 NY TF A m +6.5 +4.5 12.01 NY TF C m +6.1 +3.9 11.99 NYIntTFA m +7.0 +4.7 11.57 NatResA m -5.9 +7.1 45.14 OHTFA m +7.7 +4.4 12.78 OR TF A m +7.4 +4.7 12.22 PA TF A m +7.6 +4.5 10.57 PR TF A m +6.3 +4.2 12.16 RealRetA m +1.4 +5.0 11.53 RisDivAdv -2.5 +1.6 36.06 RisDv A m -2.6 +1.3 36.09 RisDv C m -3.1 +.6 35.55 SmCpGI C m -8.2 +3.4 37.10 SmCpValA m -13.8 +1.2 48.15 SmCpVlAd -13.6 +1.4 49.53 SmMCpGAdv -7.6 +4.5 42.73 SmMdCpGrA m -7.7 +4.2 41.47 StrInc A m +1.9 +7.0 10.71 StrIncAdv +2.1 +7.2 10.72 Strinc C m +1.7 +6.5 10.70 TotRetAdv +5.3 +6.8 10.47 TotalRetA m +5.1 +6.5 10.45 US Gov A m +5.9 +6.6 6.97 US Gov C m +5.6 +6.1 6.93 USGovtAdv +6.0 +6.8 6.99 Utils A m +3.3 +4.1 12.72 Utils C m +3.0 +3.6 12.66 VA TF A m +7.1 +4.3 11.93 FrankTemp-Mutual Beacon A m -6.8 -1.6 13.16 Beacon Z -6.6 -1.3 13.26 Discov A m -7.3 +2.7 31.31 Discov C m -7.7 +2.0 31.00 Discov Z -7.1 +3.0 31.71 DiscovR b -7.4 +2.5 31.01 Euro A m -9.5 +1.7 22.76 Euro Z -9.4 +2.0 23.22 QuestA m -5.6 +2.3 18.76 QuestC m -6.0 +1.6 18.53 QuestZ -5.4 +2.6 18.92 Shares A m -6.9 -1.1 22.28 Shares C m -7.3 -1.8 22.03 Shares Z -6.8 -.8 22.47 FrankTemp-Templeton BricA m -17.6 +4.1 15.97 DvMk A m -11.7 +4.4 26.96 EmgMktIs -8.9 +5.5 12.47 Fgn A m -7.3 +1.5 7.89 Frgn Adv -7.2 +1.7 7.80 Frgn C m -7.7 +.7 7.71 GlBond A m +3.2 +11.4 14.10 GlBond C m +2.9 +10.9 14.12 GlBondAdv +3.3 +11.7 14.06 GlOp A m -8.5 +.2 19.77 GlSmCo A m -12.2 +2.2 7.91 Growth A m -6.8 -2.8 20.04 Growth Ad -6.6 -2.6 20.05 Growth C m -7.2 -3.5 19.54 IncomeA m -4.6 +4.7 3.01 IncomeC m -5.1 +4.4 3.01 World A m -7.1 -.1 16.39 Franklin Templeton ConAllcC m -1.2 +4.3 14.04 ConAllctA m -.8 +5.0 14.27 CoreAll A m -6.2 +.7 13.55 EmMktDtOp +4.1 +9.5 12.80 FndAllA m -5.4 -.3 11.43 FndAllC m -5.8 -1.0 11.25 GrAllcA m -4.3 +4.0 16.21 HYldTFInA +8.2 +4.2 10.42 TemHdCurA m +4.4 +5.8 10.44 TemMdTaC m -2.4 +4.3 14.58 TemMdTarA m -1.9 +5.1 14.90 GE ElfunTr -3.1 +2.6 45.85 ElfunTxE +6.8 +5.0 12.06 S&SInc +6.0 +5.9 11.71 S&SProg -6.4 +1.5 43.40 Gabelli AssetAAA m -5.4 +4.1 53.83 EqIncomeAAA m -4.1 +2.5 22.30 GoldAAA m -2.9 +13.9 36.71 GrowthAAA m -7.6 +.8 33.47 SmCpGrAAA m -8.1 +5.7 36.89 UtilA m +.2 +4.3 6.71 UtilAAA m +.2 +4.3 6.66 UtilC m -.3 +3.5 6.00 Value m -4.7 +3.1 17.39 Gartmore LrgCapA m -6.5 +.4 16.07 Gateway GatewayA m -2.0 +1.3 26.98 Goldman Sachs BalStrA m -2.0 +2.4 10.76 CapGrA m -5.6 +1.5 22.87 G&IStrA m -3.5 +.7 11.30 GovtIncA m +5.0 +5.9 15.90 GrIncA m -12.7 -3.4 22.50 GrOppA m -9.5 +6.6 25.09 GrStrA m -6.0 -1.2 11.72 HiYieldA m -1.0 +5.6 7.47 LgCapValA m -12.8 -2.6 12.67 MidCapVaA m -10.3 +1.5 39.04 ShDuGovA m +.8 +4.6 10.50 SmCpValA m -8.1 +2.9 43.45 StrIntEqA m -10.9 -2.6 11.22 Greenspring Greensprretl d -4.4 +4.1 25.20 GuideMark CoFxIncSvc b +5.0 +5.7 9.76 GuideStone Funds AggAllGS4 -6.5 0.0 12.87 BlcAlloGS4 -.7 +3.9 12.83 GrAlloGS4 -3.8 +2.0 13.20 GrEqGS4 -4.2 +2.5 20.70 IntEqGS4 -8.4 -.6 14.65 LowDurGS4 +1.6 +4.5 13.49 MedDurGS4 +5.3 +7.2 14.48 SmCapGS4 -5.5 +2.3 16.69 ValEqGS4 -7.4 -2.2 15.59 Harbor Bond +3.8 +8.1 12.45 CapApInst -.4 +4.7 41.22 CapAprAdm b -.6 +4.5 40.99 CapAprInv b -.7 +4.3 40.71 HiYBdInst d ... +6.6 11.33 IntlAdm m -7.0 +3.2 66.94 IntlGr d -11.6 -.1 13.07 IntlInstl d -6.8 +3.5 67.42 IntlInv m -7.1 +3.1 66.74 SmCpGr -10.6 +5.0 14.38 SmCpVal -5.7 +.8 22.13 Harding Loevner EmgMkts d -12.8 +5.9 52.86 Hartford AdvHLSFIB b -3.8 +2.4 20.77 AdvHLSIA -3.7 +2.6 20.55 AdviserA m -3.8 +2.2 15.65 BalAlA m -2.3 +3.3 12.07 CapAppIIA m -11.0 +2.7 15.27

45.33 48.41 -.36 66.14 78.08 -1.98 73.15 88.41 -.03 39.68 37.17 29.80 10.00 30.34 30.14

41.81 -.70 41.81 -.69 34.60 -.35 11.51 +.25 32.51 -.48 34.26 -.53

15.63 17.92 +.35 21.67 39.95 27.32 19.78 14.64

24.59 -.18 45.72 -.41 34.31 +1.34 22.39 -.14 16.16 -.19

18.08 11.82 2.39 9.37 20.94 9.18 13.48

19.71 13.45 2.41 9.87 25.77 9.81 14.66

-.40 -.20 -.08 -.02 -.26 -.02 -.09

9.93 8.84 8.84 37.41 56.88 6.48 6.47 8.68 11.08 10.93 10.65 6.47 33.67 33.90 13.29 24.22 14.30 10.75 8.76 10.93 10.93 11.19 10.25 10.94 8.76 8.76 38.97 39.53 39.29 37.74 36.20 37.19 35.56 35.18 37.14 9.31 9.44 1.90 1.90 1.91 14.37 2.00 2.02 1.98 1.99 1.97 11.06 10.93 10.32 10.64 10.58 11.12 11.47 11.14 11.29 11.13 10.72 10.71 10.72 28.84 11.50 11.08 9.49 10.77 10.80 28.54 28.57 28.17 25.92 33.55 34.53 29.67 28.84 10.24 10.25 10.24 10.02 10.00 6.63 6.59 6.65 11.07 11.03 10.77

10.77 8.86 8.85 41.28 65.61 6.94 6.93 9.42 12.07 11.58 11.68 6.93 35.83 36.09 14.07 29.54 15.60 11.48 8.76 11.93 11.92 11.93 10.54 11.94 8.76 8.76 45.25 46.02 47.71 45.70 43.50 42.47 40.47 40.04 42.40 10.08 10.22 1.92 1.92 1.93 15.34 2.04 2.06 2.03 2.03 2.01 12.09 11.95 10.34 11.59 11.39 11.96 12.39 12.07 12.24 12.02 11.62 11.61 11.43 37.38 12.52 11.98 10.35 11.65 11.08 31.96 31.98 31.48 30.72 38.46 39.60 35.49 34.42 10.31 10.32 10.31 10.37 10.35 6.97 6.93 6.99 11.78 11.73 11.69

-.03 ... ... -1.07 -.66 -.03 -.03 -.03 +.01 +.03 -.04 -.03 -2.33 -2.35 -.18 +.05 -.32 -.02 -.30 ... -.01 +.05 +.02 ... -.30 -.30 -.15 -.15 +2.21 +2.11 +2.01 -.31 -.30 -.30 -.31 -.06 -.07 -.06 -.06 -.07 -.21 -.06 -.06 -.05 -.06 -.06 +.01 +.01 -.06 ... -.03 -.01 +.03 -.03 -.03 -.04 +.01 ... +.06 -.36 +.02 -.02 -.01 -.08 -.03 -.29 -.29 -.29 -.05 -.79 -.81 -.04 -.04 -.21 -.21 -.21 -.03 -.03 +.10 +.10 +.10 -.03 -.03 -.02

10.92 11.01 25.92 25.61 26.27 25.65 18.02 18.40 15.52 15.41 15.62 18.32 18.09 18.49

11.41 11.50 27.06 26.74 27.43 26.78 19.05 19.45 16.58 16.35 16.74 19.21 18.95 19.38

-.27 -.27 -.60 -.60 -.61 -.61 -.31 -.32 -.40 -.39 -.40 -.38 -.39 -.39

12.13 21.23 .92 5.95 5.89 5.80 13.25 13.27 13.28 15.33 5.98 15.21 15.22 14.79 2.52 2.51 12.71

12.52 -.83 22.55 -1.15 12.47 -.49 6.47 -.22 6.41 -.21 6.31 -.21 13.67 -.19 13.69 -.19 13.63 -.19 16.21 -.56 6.53 -.19 16.58 -.56 16.60 -.55 16.13 -.54 2.65 -.07 2.64 -.08 13.78 -.44

12.64 12.84 10.49 11.96 9.36 9.22 13.34 9.34 8.90 12.71 12.99

13.30 13.52 11.61 12.48 9.75 9.61 14.53 10.11 10.20 13.53 13.83

35.97 11.02 11.14 33.87

40.11 -.51 11.76 ... 11.69 +.05 37.65 -.67

40.32 17.17 28.55 25.39 26.81 5.69 5.65 5.06 13.15

46.29 -.38 19.42 -.22 34.70 +1.65 29.02 -.27 31.18 -.43 5.97 -.02 5.93 -.02 5.31 -.02 14.85 -.08

-.06 -.06 -.18 -.23 -.25 -.25 -.13 -.06 -.06 -.08 -.08

12.60 13.82

-.25

24.57 25.34

-.12

9.55 17.68 9.51 14.78 17.41 19.09 9.39 6.83 9.77 28.89 10.20 31.03 8.62

9.97 -.09 20.01 -.27 10.13 -.13 15.61 +.17 18.28 -.61 20.79 -.10 10.11 -.18 6.90 -.20 10.28 -.35 32.20 -.30 10.30 +.01 36.29 -1.07 9.12 -.25

22.16 22.75

-.28

9.30

9.73 +.05

9.83 11.29 10.86 14.98 11.55 13.20 13.51 11.02 11.69

11.02 -.15 12.04 -.11 11.81 -.14 18.10 -.07 12.30 -.17 13.36 -.04 14.24 +.03 13.67 -.25 12.94 -.30

11.89 29.72 29.56 29.39 10.53 49.94 10.15 50.32 49.76 9.97 15.62

12.40 36.57 36.35 36.11 10.60 55.96 10.94 56.41 55.77 11.51 18.47

-.02 -.06 -.06 -.06 -.31 -.91 -.02 -.91 -.91 -.18 -.23

43.23 45.18 -1.39 17.26 17.09 12.98 10.11 11.13

18.80 18.61 14.12 11.00 12.42

-.23 -.23 -.17 -.07 -.22


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW DsEqHLSIA -4.1 +.7 13.06 9.78 DvGrHLSIA -6.7 +1.8 21.31 16.69 DvGrHLSIB b -6.8 +1.5 21.25 16.62 EqIncA m -4.5 +1.6 13.87 10.93 FloatRtA m -2.5 +2.2 9.01 8.40 FloatRtC m -3.0 +1.4 9.00 8.39 FloatRtI -2.5 NA 9.01 8.40 GrOpHLSIA -5.1 +3.4 28.94 20.52 HiYdHLSIA +1.4 +7.7 9.77 8.53 InOpHLSIA -9.2 +3.1 13.31 10.59 IndHLSIA -5.3 +.4 28.54 22.02 InflPlC m +11.8 +6.9 12.39 10.95 InflPlusA m +12.3 +7.7 12.54 11.08 MdCpHLSIA -9.9 +4.2 28.80 20.79 MidCapA m -10.1 +3.6 24.30 17.61 MidCapY -9.9 +4.0 26.64 19.25 SmCoHLSIA -4.5 +3.8 20.69 13.42 StkHLSIA -8.0 +.7 44.46 33.53 TRBdHLSIA +5.2 +5.5 11.54 10.81 TRBdHLSIA b +5.0 +5.2 11.46 10.76 TotRetBdA m +4.7 +5.1 10.79 10.36 TotRetBdY +5.0 +5.5 10.94 10.50 USHLSIA +4.3 +3.6 11.17 10.36 ValHLSIA -9.2 +.7 11.68 9.00 Heartland SelectVal m -9.0 +3.6 31.69 23.64 Value m -5.3 +2.5 49.29 34.06 ValuePlus m -10.0 +8.1 32.45 22.65 Henderson IntlOppA m -7.0 +1.4 23.63 17.97 IntlOppC m -7.4 +.7 22.36 16.98 Hotchkis & Wiley MidCpValI -17.0 -.8 26.50 17.93 Hussman StrTotRet d +3.8 +7.4 12.86 12.04 StratGrth d +2.0 -.4 13.47 11.84 ICM SmCo -12.2 +2.1 32.78 23.02 ICON Energy -5.1 +4.9 23.11 14.91 ING GNMAIncA m +5.9 +6.6 9.13 8.71 GlREstA m -3.7 -.7 17.57 14.28 TRPGrEqI -3.7 +3.2 59.45 43.35 INVESCO AmerValA m -8.8 +2.7 30.05 22.12 CharterA m -3.6 +3.4 17.60 13.91 ComstockA m -7.4 -.4 17.20 13.14 ConstellA m -5.8 -1.2 25.19 18.73 ConstellB m -6.3 -1.9 22.55 16.87 CorpBondA m +4.9 +6.5 7.00 6.62 DevMkt A m -7.3 +9.8 34.78 28.99 DivDivA m -7.7 +1.5 13.18 10.51 DivDivInv b -7.6 +1.6 13.18 10.51 DynInv b -5.0 +2.7 25.54 17.24 EnergyA m -5.3 +5.1 47.82 30.18 EqIncomeA m -5.9 +2.1 9.17 7.51 EqIncomeB m -6.0 +1.9 9.00 7.37 EqIncomeC m -6.4 +1.3 9.04 7.40 EqWSP500A m -6.6 +2.3 33.96 25.22 GlHlthCrA m +.1 +2.7 31.40 23.28 GlS&MGrA m -6.0 +2.8 21.01 16.02 GlbCEqtyA m -10.3 -2.9 14.16 11.12 GlobEqA m -3.7 -1.7 11.88 8.99 GrowIncA m -8.7 -.1 20.86 15.99 GrwthAllA m -2.6 +.9 11.66 9.77 HiYldA m -1.4 +7.0 4.35 3.99 HiYldMuA m +6.7 +2.4 9.67 8.64 HiYldMuC m +6.2 +1.7 9.65 8.63 IntlGrA m -4.7 +2.7 30.19 23.43 IntlGrI d -4.5 +3.1 30.61 23.78 MidCapGrA m -8.9 +6.1 33.16 23.43 MidCpCrA m -8.2 +3.7 25.34 19.97 MuniIncA m +6.7 +2.9 13.56 12.23 PacGrowB m -10.4 +2.6 22.83 18.64 RealEstA m -.2 +.3 24.43 19.07 SmCapGrA m -5.0 +4.9 33.17 22.26 SmCapValA m -14.5 +4.2 19.72 14.03 SmCpGrA m -6.9 +3.6 12.71 8.67 Summit b -5.8 +.9 12.89 9.65 TxFrInmA3 m +6.1 +5.2 11.59 10.92 USGovtA m +4.9 +6.0 9.26 8.82 USMortA m +4.8 +4.8 13.28 12.84 Ivy AssetSTrB m -1.4 +7.2 26.30 20.78 AssetStrA m -.9 +8.1 27.32 21.47 AssetStrC m -1.4 +7.3 26.44 20.88 AssetStrY m -.9 +8.1 27.36 21.51 GlNatResA m -9.5 +1.9 24.76 15.97 GlNatResC m -9.9 +1.2 21.47 13.91 GlNatResI d -9.4 NA 25.26 16.26 GlbNatrlY m -9.5 +2.1 25.06 16.15 HiIncA m +1.5 +8.7 8.69 8.00 IntlValA m -10.2 +3.1 17.98 13.75 LgCpGrA m -2.4 +3.9 14.27 10.54 LtdTmBdA m +2.5 +5.5 11.37 11.00 PacOppA m -11.0 +7.9 17.89 14.61 JPMorgan AsiaEqSel d -10.4 +8.7 39.72 30.74 CoreBdUlt +5.6 +7.5 11.87 11.35 CoreBondA m +5.4 +7.1 11.87 11.35 CoreBondC m +5.0 +6.5 11.93 11.41 CoreBondSelect +5.5 +7.3 11.86 11.35 CorePlBdS +4.5 +7.1 8.33 8.06 DiscEqUlt -5.8 +1.6 17.35 13.35 DiversMidCapGrA m-8.9 +3.7 24.04 16.58 EmgMktE d -12.9 +7.9 25.15 20.56 EqIdxSel -5.2 +.5 30.97 23.84 FEmMkEqIs d -12.9 +8.1 25.41 20.78 FIntlVaIs d -7.8 -1.0 14.89 11.56 GovtBdSelect +8.3 +7.5 11.52 10.64 HighStatS +.2 +.5 15.53 15.09 HighYldA m -.9 +7.1 8.39 7.68 HighYldSel d -.6 +7.4 8.42 7.71 HighYldUl d -.7 +7.5 8.41 7.71 IntlEqSel d -8.5 -1.2 20.94 16.34 IntlVlSel d -7.8 -1.2 14.82 11.49 IntmdTFIs +5.6 +4.7 11.21 10.64 IntmdTFSl +5.5 +4.6 11.22 10.65 IntrAmerS -5.5 -.3 25.37 18.84 IntrepidValS -7.5 -1.6 25.08 19.01 InvBalA m -2.2 +3.9 12.83 11.19 InvConGrA m -.2 +4.4 11.53 10.64 InvConGrC m -.6 +3.8 11.50 10.60 InvGrInA m -4.2 +2.8 13.60 11.23 InvGrowA m -6.5 +1.5 14.55 11.38 LgCapGrSelect -2.0 +6.0 23.10 16.33 MdCpGrSel -6.2 +2.2 25.60 20.39 MidCapGrSel -8.7 +4.0 25.77 17.72 MidCapVal m -6.4 +1.9 25.38 19.05 MidCpValI -6.1 +2.4 25.82 19.38 MktExpIxSel -7.1 +3.2 12.01 8.45 MorBacSeU +4.8 +8.2 11.47 11.22 MtgBckdSel +4.7 +8.0 11.47 11.22 MuniIncSel +5.2 +4.5 10.21 9.67 ReEstSel -.5 -1.1 17.67 13.66 ShDurBndSel +1.5 +4.3 11.08 10.94 ShMuniBdI +2.5 +3.4 10.68 10.43 ShtDurBdU +1.8 +4.5 11.08 10.94 SmCapEqA m -5.4 +6.2 37.83 27.41 SmCapSel -5.2 +6.6 41.19 29.76 TxAwRRetI +6.6 +3.7 10.42 9.85 TxAwRRetS +6.4 +3.5 10.41 9.84 USEquit -7.3 +3.0 10.99 8.42 USLCpCrPS -7.9 +4.3 22.11 17.01 Janus BalJ -1.3 +6.0 26.72 23.68 BalS b -1.4 NA 26.72 22.91 ContrJ -17.3 -1.1 15.36 11.37 EntrprsJ -7.0 +6.1 65.02 46.47 FlxBdJ +5.0 +8.2 11.06 10.34 FortyA m -7.5 +4.2 35.77 28.29 FortyS b -7.6 +4.0 35.28 27.93 Gr&IncJ -5.5 -.6 33.64 26.10 HiYldJ d ... +7.3 9.35 8.41 J -6.8 +2.0 31.19 24.48 OrionJ d -14.3 +4.1 12.81 9.42 OverseasJ d -23.1 +4.4 53.66 37.09 PerkinsMCVJ -6.2 +4.2 24.66 19.09 PerkinsSCVJ -8.2 +6.2 25.96 20.63 RsrchJ -6.6 +5.1 31.84 23.63 ShTmBdJ +1.3 +5.0 3.14 3.07 TwentyJ -8.6 +4.3 68.99 54.56 WorldwideJ d -10.5 +.4 49.99 39.10 Janus Aspen Bal Is -1.2 +6.4 30.37 25.28 IntlGrIs -22.8 +5.9 59.90 41.52 WldWGrIs -10.2 +.7 32.36 25.30 Jensen Inst -6.5 +3.1 29.44 23.02 J b -6.7 +2.9 29.42 23.00 John Hancock BalA m -5.4 +5.0 16.07 13.87 BondA m +4.1 +7.7 15.91 15.41 ClsscValA m -9.8 -5.7 18.18 13.66 LgCpEqA m -11.5 +4.0 27.84 21.76 LifAg1 b -7.3 +.9 13.36 10.19 LifBa1 b -3.6 +3.2 13.73 11.67 LifCo1 b +1.2 +5.4 13.24 12.54 LifGr1 b -6.0 +2.1 13.85 11.16 LifMo1 b -.7 +4.5 13.24 11.91 RegBankA m -19.9 -8.7 15.50 11.41 SovInvA m -5.3 +.6 17.12 13.44 StrIncA m +1.5 +7.8 6.88 6.43 StrIncC m +1.1 +7.0 6.88 6.42 TaxFBdA m +6.5 +4.2 10.19 9.28 Keeley SmCapVal m -10.5 0.0 27.77 18.76 SmCpValI -10.3 NA 27.95 20.83 Kinetics Paradigm d -8.5 -.1 25.22 18.84 LKCM SmCpEqI d +.4 +3.5 25.71 15.92 LSV ValueEq -9.0 -3.2 15.16 11.56 Laudus InMktMstS d -8.0 +3.6 20.78 15.82 IntlFxInc d +8.2 NA 12.69 11.43 IntlMstrI d -8.1 +3.5 20.78 15.80 Lazard EmgMkEqtI d -11.8 +9.0 22.42 18.62 EmgMktEqO m -11.9 +8.6 22.82 18.99 Legg Mason/Western AggGrowA m -3.6 +.3 126.28 87.14 AggGrowB m -4.1 -.5 108.07 75.18 AggGrowI -3.3 +.8 134.39 92.40 AggrsvGrC m -4.0 -.3 110.13 76.39 ApprecA m -5.7 +2.2 14.82 11.80 CrBdFI b +6.0 +6.6 11.95 11.28 CrBdInst +6.1 +6.9 11.95 11.27 CrPlBdFI b +4.8 +7.2 11.16 10.67 CrPlBdIns +5.1 +7.5 11.16 10.68 EqIncBldA m -3.2 +.3 13.71 11.41 FdmACValA m -11.6 -1.0 14.87 11.12 MdCpCoA m -9.4 +3.1 23.57 16.88 MgdMuniA m +7.9 +5.1 16.13 14.47 MgdMuniC m +7.5 +4.6 16.14 14.48 MuBdLtdA m +6.8 +4.5 6.55 6.00 MuBdLtdC b +6.6 +3.8 6.56 6.01 MuBdNYA m +6.8 +5.0 13.87 12.49 OpportntC m -31.4 -8.7 11.81 7.03 SpecInvC m -17.7 -1.5 34.33 24.52 ValueC m -10.1 -7.7 42.42 32.81 ValueInst -9.5 -6.8 49.78 38.32

NAV 11.31 18.20 18.13 12.08 8.40 8.39 8.40 24.54 9.28 11.32 24.81 12.26 12.40 23.45 19.78 21.71 16.87 37.69 11.46 11.39 10.76 10.91 10.90 9.78

WK CHG -.15 -.40 -.40 -.18 -.30 -.30 -.31 -.12 -.27 -.14 -.42 +.26 +.26 -.27 -.23 -.26 -.08 -.82 +.07 +.07 +.06 +.06 +.12 -.18

26.56 -.47 41.48 -1.06 26.83 -1.12 19.62 18.53

-.45 -.42

19.90 -1.00 12.55 +.21 12.53 +.17 26.56

-.83

19.02

-.42

9.13 +.10 15.49 -.05 52.45 -.18 24.75 -.68 15.59 -.18 14.47 -.35 21.93 -.27 19.62 -.24 6.87 -.06 30.67 -.94 11.23 -.37 11.23 -.36 21.14 -.22 39.21 -.60 8.01 -.17 7.86 -.17 7.89 -.17 28.72 -.45 26.75 -.25 17.88 -.34 11.72 -.27 10.34 -.17 17.46 -.48 10.64 -.08 4.01 -.14 9.22 -.09 9.20 -.09 26.26 -.34 26.65 -.34 27.10 -.33 21.26 -.40 13.05 -.05 19.99 -.42 21.31 +.47 27.16 -.10 15.40 -.74 10.33 -.06 11.13 -.11 11.54 ... 9.24 +.11 13.28 +.10 23.28 -.07 24.19 -.07 23.40 -.07 24.23 -.07 19.55 -.14 16.92 -.12 19.97 -.14 19.80 -.15 8.03 -.25 14.89 -.20 12.68 ... 11.22 +.01 14.88 -.95 33.94 11.84 11.84 11.90 11.83 8.25 15.04 19.58 21.25 26.81 21.47 12.41 11.49 15.19 7.74 7.77 7.76 17.25 12.35 11.14 11.15 21.66 21.12 11.84 11.01 10.97 12.17 12.57 20.44 21.85 21.00 21.66 22.05 9.94 11.46 11.46 10.09 15.34 11.03 10.66 11.04 31.98 34.84 10.38 10.36 9.43 19.03

-1.27 +.07 +.07 +.07 +.07 -.03 -.25 -.13 -.85 -.44 -.87 -.29 +.20 -.09 -.25 -.25 -.25 -.37 -.28 +.03 +.03 -.34 -.47 -.11 -.06 -.07 -.16 -.21 -.11 -.12 -.13 -.11 -.11 -.08 +.04 +.04 +.02 +.34 ... +.02 +.01 -.53 -.57 +.03 +.02 -.17 -.36

24.50 -.17 24.50 -.17 12.10 -.21 54.97 +.20 10.69 -.03 31.21 -.19 30.77 -.18 28.75 -.28 8.71 -.25 27.16 -.13 10.17 -.05 38.92 -1.05 21.18 -.33 22.01 -.62 27.47 -.23 3.08 -.01 60.06 -.44 41.70 -.53 26.18 -.19 43.49 -1.06 26.99 -.33 25.16 25.14

-.26 -.26

14.43 -.15 15.65 -.12 15.04 -.52 23.00 -.46 11.38 -.17 12.34 -.18 12.71 -.12 12.07 -.18 12.37 -.15 11.73 -1.12 14.80 -.25 6.56 -.16 6.56 -.16 9.89 -.03 22.36 22.52

-.52 -.52

21.33

-.03

21.57

-.15

12.34

-.34

17.70 -.20 12.65 +.07 17.70 -.19 19.14 19.53

-.93 -.88

106.87 91.38 113.79 93.15 12.93 11.87 11.87 11.07 11.08 12.17 12.10 19.29 15.82 15.83 6.42 6.43 13.56 7.56 26.07 34.95 41.21

-1.30 -1.13 -1.37 -1.14 -.20 -.01 -.01 -.02 -.01 -.14 -.29 -.46 -.07 -.07 ... ... -.03 -.40 -.82 -.76 -.89

YTD 5-YR FUND %RTN %RTN Leuthold AssetAl m -3.1 +2.6 CoreInv d -2.6 +3.8 Longleaf Partners Intl -10.0 0.0 LongPart -3.3 +.1 SmCap -1.0 +4.4 Loomis Sayles BondI +4.9 +8.0 BondR b +4.7 +7.6 FixIncI +4.4 +8.8 GlbBdI +6.8 +7.8 GlbBdR b +6.6 +7.5 Lord Abbett AffiliatA m -12.4 -3.2 BalA m -5.7 +2.5 BondDebA m +.7 +6.6 BondDebC m +.3 +5.9 CptStrcA m -4.9 +2.6 DevGrowA m -3.9 +9.8 DevGrowI -3.7 +10.2 FdmtlEqtyA m -9.1 +2.5 FdmtlEqtyC m -9.4 +1.8 FltRateF b -2.5 NA HYMuniBdA m +4.0 -1.0 IncmA m +6.2 +8.5 MidCpValA m -8.1 +.6 NatlTaxFA m +6.9 +3.1 ShDurIncA m +2.0 +6.3 ShDurIncC m +1.6 +5.5 SmCpValA m -12.4 +4.1 SmCpValI -12.3 +4.4 TotRetA m +5.7 +7.2 MFS BondA m +4.5 +7.7 ConAlocA m +1.2 +5.6 CoreEqA m -6.1 +2.5 CoreGrA m -4.0 +2.0 GovtSecA m +5.4 +6.6 GrAllocA m -3.2 +3.5 GrowA m -4.1 +5.7 IntDivA m -5.2 +2.2 IntlNDisA m -4.8 +4.4 IntlNDisI -4.6 +4.7 IntlValA m -.6 +2.3 IsIntlEq -5.0 +2.3 LtdMatA m +1.6 +3.7 MAInvA m -5.3 +2.3 MAInvC m -5.7 +1.6 MAInvGrA m -2.7 +4.3 MdCpValI -6.3 +2.6 MidCapGrI -7.3 +.7 ModAllocA m -.9 +4.7 MuHiIncA f +6.4 +3.3 MuIncA m +6.4 +4.5 MuLtdMtA m +4.2 +4.2 NewDiscA m -7.0 +8.7 ResBdA m +5.2 +6.8 ResBondI +5.2 +7.0 ResIntlA m -4.9 +.4 ResIntlI -4.7 +.7 ResearchA m -6.0 +2.8 ResearchI -5.8 +3.1 TotRetA m -1.7 +2.5 TotRetC m -2.2 +1.9 UtilA m -.1 +7.1 UtilC m -.5 +6.3 ValueA m -6.5 +.5 ValueC m -6.9 -.2 ValueI -6.4 +.8 MainStay AlCpGrI -6.5 +1.0 EquityI -6.9 +.4 HiYldCorA m +1.7 +6.3 HiYldCorC m +1.1 +5.4 IntlI -6.3 -.4 LgCapGrA m -2.6 +5.3 MAPI -7.0 +1.0 S&PIdxI -5.3 +.4 SelEqI -8.4 +.8 Mairs & Power GrthInv -8.7 +2.0 Managers Bond +6.5 +7.8 MgrsPIMCOBd +4.2 +8.0 TmSqMCGrI -8.3 +4.5 TmSqMCGrP -8.4 +4.4 Manning & Napier PBConTrmS +1.9 +5.8 PBExtTrmS -2.6 +4.2 PBModTrmS -1.2 +4.5 WrldOppA -7.3 +2.8 Marsico 21stCent m -13.0 -.1 FlexCap m -5.7 NA Focus m -4.8 +2.4 Grow m -2.9 +2.1 MassMutual PremIntlEqtyS -5.3 +3.3 SelBRGlAlcS -2.9 NA SelIndxEqZ -5.8 +.4 SlSmGrEqS -10.6 +2.9 MassMutual Inst PremCoreBndS +5.9 +7.1 Masters’ Select IntlIntl d -9.1 +1.9 Matthews Asian China d -10.1 +16.6 GrInc d -5.1 +8.5 India d -12.1 +13.1 PacEqInc d -3.8 NA PacTiger d -3.2 +12.3 Members BondA m +5.4 +5.2 BondB m +4.8 +4.5 DivIncA m +1.0 +3.5 DivIncB m +.5 +2.7 HighIncA m +.4 +6.2 HighIncB m +.1 +5.4 IntlStk A m -5.3 0.0 IntlStk B m -5.6 -.8 LgCapGA m -5.2 +2.7 LgCapGB m -5.7 +1.9 LgCapVA m -3.3 -2.7 LgCapVB m -3.8 -3.4 MidCapGA m -2.8 +2.6 MidCapGB m -3.1 +1.8 Merger Merger m -.6 +3.1 Meridian MeridnGr d -7.7 +6.5 Value d -10.8 +1.7 Metropolitan West Hi-YldBdM b -1.5 +8.0 LowDurBd b +1.4 +3.0 LowDurBdI +1.4 +3.2 TotRetBdI +4.4 +8.6 TotRtBd b +4.2 +8.3 Morgan Stanley FocGrA m +3.1 +8.3 USGovSecB m +6.2 +3.8 Morgan Stanley Instl EmgMktI d -10.9 +6.0 GrwthI +3.1 +7.5 IntlEqI d -4.3 +.4 IntlEqP m -4.4 +.2 MdCpGrI +.9 +10.1 MdCpGrP b +.7 +9.8 SmCoGrI d -7.8 +4.6 USRealI -1.1 +.7 Munder Funds MdCpCrGrA m -3.8 +3.7 MdCpCrGrY -3.6 +4.0 Nations LgCpIxZ -5.2 +.6 Nationwide BdIdxIn d +5.9 +6.5 DesModSvc b -2.5 +2.5 FundD m -6.0 -1.0 IDAggSrv b -6.4 +.6 IDModAgSv b -4.5 +1.6 IntlIdxI d -7.4 -1.1 MCMkIxI d -6.8 +4.2 S&P500Is d -5.3 +.5 Natixis CGMTgtEqA m -16.7 +1.0 InvBndA m +5.8 +8.7 InvBndC m +5.4 +7.9 InvBndY +6.1 +8.9 StratIncA m +4.1 +7.6 StratIncC m +3.6 +6.8 ValI -9.3 -.3 Neuberger Berman GenesAdv b -1.7 +5.6 GenesisInv -1.5 +6.0 GenesisIs -1.4 +6.2 GenesisTr -1.6 +5.9 GuardnInv -5.5 +1.9 PartnrInv -11.6 -.9 SmCpGrInv -2.7 +3.6 SocRespInv -6.0 +2.3 New Covenant Growth -7.1 -.4 Nicholas Nichol -3.7 +3.6 Northeast Investors Northeast -2.8 +2.5 Northern BdIndx +5.8 NA FixedIn +5.3 +6.1 GlbREIdx d -5.8 -2.6 HYFixInc d +1.0 +6.0 HiYMuni +6.7 +1.0 IntTaxE +6.7 +4.5 IntlIndex d -7.4 -1.4 MMIntlEq d -9.8 -.8 MMMidCap -7.0 +3.3 MMSmCp -8.6 +1.1 ShIntUSGv +2.6 +4.5 SmCapVal -9.7 +1.1 StkIdx -5.3 +.4 TaxE +8.2 +4.8 Northern Instl EqIdx A -5.7 +.5 Nuveen HiYldMunA m +7.3 -1.5 HiYldMunC m +6.9 -2.0 HiYldMunI +7.4 -1.3 IntMunBdI +5.4 +4.5 IntlValA m -8.9 +1.5 LtdTmMuA m +4.6 +4.3 LtdTmMunI +4.8 +4.5 NWQVlOppA m -5.2 +8.3 TwIntlValI d -8.8 +1.8 TwVlOppI -5.0 +8.6 Oakmark EqIncI -2.9 +4.9 Global I d -10.7 +1.9 Intl I d -11.8 +1.5 IntlSmCpI d -11.8 +1.7 Oakmark I d -5.1 +3.0 Select I d -3.6 +1.2

52-WEEK HI LOW

WK NAV CHG

11.35 9.35 10.15 18.39 15.04 16.40

-.03 -.13

16.21 12.97 13.80 -.25 31.74 23.60 27.32 -.43 31.17 21.65 26.25 -1.02 15.00 14.95 14.60 17.54 17.38

13.81 13.76 12.87 16.28 16.13

14.52 14.46 14.17 17.38 17.22

-.19 -.19 -.18 -.02 -.02

12.45 11.31 8.12 8.14 12.63 24.83 26.37 14.05 13.34 9.44 11.88 2.96 18.23 10.89 4.68 4.71 34.93 36.97 11.45

9.44 9.47 7.48 7.50 10.26 15.45 16.36 10.43 9.92 8.82 10.64 2.80 13.02 9.71 4.56 4.59 24.03 25.45 10.58

10.09 -.29 9.85 -.23 7.58 -.20 7.60 -.20 11.06 -.19 20.47 -.14 21.74 -.16 11.75 -.23 11.14 -.22 8.82 -.37 11.03 -.16 2.92 -.02 15.11 -.20 10.44 -.09 4.57 -.02 4.60 -.02 27.52 -.79 29.15 -.83 11.04 +.04

13.77 13.18 19.20 19.01 10.53 14.99 45.26 14.66 23.72 24.37 26.76 19.94 6.27 20.83 20.11 16.76 14.80 10.26 14.23 7.78 8.59 8.10 27.29 10.78 10.78 16.73 17.27 26.90 27.41 14.85 14.92 18.25 18.19 24.78 24.55 24.89

13.24 11.92 14.58 14.48 9.99 12.03 33.38 11.42 18.23 18.73 21.45 15.16 6.10 16.09 15.53 12.17 10.73 7.29 12.12 7.03 7.79 7.84 17.79 10.31 10.32 12.86 13.27 20.44 20.83 12.87 12.93 14.47 14.42 19.42 19.23 19.51

13.53 -.15 12.66 -.02 16.64 -.29 16.88 -.12 10.51 +.11 13.47 -.13 40.18 -.23 12.82 -.17 20.83 -.14 21.41 -.15 24.45 -.13 17.05 -.24 6.17 -.01 18.13 -.30 17.50 -.29 14.85 -.12 12.49 -.16 8.71 +.02 13.21 -.07 7.46 -.07 8.30 -.04 8.10 +.02 22.19 -.32 10.72 ... 10.72 ... 14.47 -.20 14.95 -.21 23.46 -.34 23.92 -.34 13.68 -.14 13.74 -.14 16.17 -.26 16.11 -.26 21.18 -.58 20.98 -.57 21.28 -.58

26.26 39.47 6.04 6.01 33.18 7.84 34.85 31.56 38.19

19.47 30.10 5.72 5.70 25.36 5.68 26.80 24.37 29.33

21.92 33.43 5.75 5.72 27.18 6.87 29.68 27.43 31.98

-.33 -.65 -.13 -.14 -.80 -.02 -.60 -.46 -.69

78.14 61.14 65.48 -1.30 26.95 10.76 15.44 15.31

25.28 10.26 11.59 11.50

26.55 10.65 12.87 12.75

-.22 -.02 -.12 -.12

13.55 12.69 13.04 16.56 13.86 15.04 13.59 12.05 12.64 9.62 7.42 7.98

-.02 -.18 -.13 -.17

15.35 14.70 19.41 21.37

12.40 12.85 17.23 18.80

-.48 -.09 -.07 -.05

16.02 12.10 13.88 11.51 9.74 10.52 12.75 9.80 11.08 19.91 13.53 15.67

-.01 -.10 -.18 -.23

11.26 10.76 14.24 15.33

11.65 10.81 11.61 +.05 16.61 12.45 13.68

-.04

31.71 18.68 23.02 14.60 25.02

25.34 16.40 18.03 13.03 20.33

26.39 16.86 18.90 13.57 22.68

-.51 -.39 -.59 -.17 -.57

10.65 10.65 11.92 11.98 7.22 7.31 11.60 11.42 17.28 15.85 13.19 13.01 7.17 6.59

10.08 10.08 10.62 10.67 6.73 6.82 9.31 9.15 13.09 12.07 10.38 10.22 5.21 4.82

10.62 +.11 10.62 +.11 11.29 -.07 11.34 -.08 6.78 -.19 6.88 -.19 10.03 -.12 9.86 -.12 15.08 -.09 13.82 -.09 11.57 -.19 11.38 -.20 6.21 -.04 5.70 -.03

16.29 15.21 15.68 +.09 48.86 34.57 41.16 30.70 23.08 25.78

-.37 -.59

11.02 10.00 10.05 8.68 8.45 8.56 8.68 8.46 8.56 10.79 10.27 10.53 10.79 10.27 10.53

-.36 -.05 -.05 ... -.01

40.47 27.81 36.78 +.01 9.58 8.43 8.91 +.07 27.91 27.57 15.02 14.84 42.69 41.32 15.53 16.27

23.13 19.20 11.83 11.67 30.02 29.07 10.60 12.44

24.17 -.85 24.95 ... 13.02 -.09 12.85 -.09 37.67 +.19 36.45 +.18 13.07 -.04 14.09 +.17

31.44 22.35 26.83 +.02 32.11 22.79 27.42 +.02 26.48 20.39 22.96

-.38

11.77 11.14 11.74 +.10 9.98 8.46 9.10 -.05 14.84 11.34 12.71 -.20 9.35 7.17 7.98 -.10 9.86 7.90 8.67 -.08 8.14 6.36 6.82 -.09 16.60 11.92 13.79 -.02 11.45 8.83 9.91 -.16 11.46 12.76 12.68 12.77 15.59 15.68 20.45

8.54 11.98 11.90 11.98 14.27 14.34 15.38

9.26 12.48 12.39 12.49 14.93 15.01 16.88

-.12 -.09 -.09 -.09 -.24 -.24 -.44

31.21 37.62 52.08 53.91 16.40 29.93 20.82 28.13

21.93 26.35 36.43 37.80 11.98 21.90 13.49 20.57

27.14 32.73 45.32 46.90 14.01 24.36 17.39 23.95

+.09 +.12 +.16 +.17 -.11 -.57 -.19 -.22

33.62 25.62 28.70

-.41

49.59 37.98 41.88

-.19

6.42

5.80

5.83

-.24

10.95 10.72 8.91 7.55 8.46 10.74 11.58 10.60 13.04 11.40 10.73 16.57 16.89 10.95

10.35 10.02 7.17 7.02 7.64 9.76 9.22 8.43 9.32 7.76 10.24 11.87 13.00 9.68

10.92 10.48 7.75 7.05 8.20 10.46 9.75 9.04 10.84 9.40 10.58 13.73 14.62 10.57

+.09 +.03 -.02 -.21 -.05 +.03 -.13 -.11 -.10 -.20 +.08 -.40 -.25 +.01

13.56 10.40 11.74

-.20

16.07 16.06 16.07 9.19 27.27 11.10 11.04 36.81 27.40 36.94

13.77 13.76 13.76 8.70 22.88 10.68 10.62 30.73 23.01 30.85

14.92 -.29 14.91 -.29 14.92 -.29 9.08 -.01 23.74 -.19 11.10 ... 11.04 +.01 33.26 -.36 23.88 -.19 33.40 -.37

29.81 23.93 21.01 15.20 45.29 30.73

24.53 18.55 16.40 11.76 34.94 23.20

26.94 20.08 17.11 12.68 39.19 26.47

-.16 -.26 -.62 -.21 -.62 -.09

YTD 5-YR FUND %RTN %RTN Old Westbury GlbSmMdCp -6.3 +7.7 MuniBd +4.4 +4.9 NonUSLgCp -10.5 -1.3 RealRet -2.4 +4.7 Oppenheimer AMTFrMunA m +9.5 -2.9 ActAllocA m -4.6 -.6 AmtFrNYA m +6.1 +2.2 CAMuniA m +8.2 -1.3 CapApA m -4.8 +.6 CapApB m -5.3 -.2 CapApprY -4.6 +1.0 CapIncA m +2.4 -1.4 CmdtStTRY -2.2 -10.4 CoreBondY +6.0 -2.3 DevMktA m -12.4 +11.3 DevMktN m -12.7 +10.9 DevMktY -12.3 +11.7 DevMktsC m -12.8 +10.5 DiscoverA m +.5 +7.3 EqIncA m -9.7 +2.7 EquityA m -6.8 +.4 GlobA m -7.3 +1.6 GlobC m -7.8 +.9 GlobOpprA m -6.5 +4.6 GlobY -7.2 +2.0 GoldMinA m -6.4 +18.3 GoldMinC m -6.8 +17.4 IntlBondA m +4.2 +8.7 IntlBondC m +3.8 +8.0 IntlBondY +4.4 +9.1 IntlDivA m -8.0 +3.8 IntlGrY -3.6 +4.3 IntlGrowA m -3.8 +3.8 IntlSmCoA m -12.7 +6.2 LmtTmMunA m +4.8 +3.1 LmtTmMunC m +4.2 +2.3 LtdTmGovA m +1.4 +3.2 LtdTmNY m +4.5 +3.9 LtdTmNY m +3.7 +3.1 MainSSMCA m -9.0 +1.3 MainSSMCY -8.8 +1.7 MainStSelA m -10.2 -.4 MainStrA m -7.5 -.4 PAMuniA m +6.7 +2.1 QuBalA m -3.8 +1.4 QuOpportA m -4.3 +3.9 RisDivA m -3.6 +2.6 RisDivY -3.4 +2.9 RocMuniA m +5.8 +2.4 RocMuniC m +5.3 +1.6 RochNtlMC m +7.9 -5.0 RochNtlMu m +8.4 -4.3 SmMidValA m -9.3 +.3 SrFltRatA m -.6 +3.5 SrFltRatC m -.9 +3.0 StrIncA m +1.9 +6.8 StrIncY +2.1 +7.0 StratIncC m +1.5 +6.0 USGovtA m +5.4 +5.6 ValueA m -8.7 -.4 ValueY -8.5 0.0 Osterweis OsterStrInc d +1.1 +7.2 Osterweis d -7.9 +2.6 PIMCO AAstAAutP +4.6 NA AllAssetA m +2.8 +5.9 AllAssetC m +2.4 +5.1 AllAssetI +3.2 +6.5 AllAssetsD b +2.9 +6.0 AllAstP +3.1 NA AllAuthA m +4.3 +7.0 AllAuthC m +3.9 +6.2 AllAuthIn +4.6 +7.7 CRRtStAdm b +3.5 +3.5 CmRlRtStA m +3.3 +3.2 CmRlRtStC m +2.9 +2.4 CmRlRtStD b +3.4 +3.2 ComRRStP +3.5 NA ComRlRStI +3.7 +3.7 DevLocMktI +3.0 +6.6 DivIncInst +2.7 +7.9 EmMktsIns +4.5 +8.2 FloatIncI -4.3 +1.8 ForBdIs +3.4 +6.9 ForBondI +9.5 +10.2 GlobalIs +8.7 +9.0 Hi-YldD b -.2 +6.3 HiYldA m -.2 +6.3 HiYldAdm b -.1 +6.5 HiYldC m -.6 +5.5 HiYldIs ... +6.7 InvGrdIns +5.1 +9.6 LgTmGovIs +15.3 +10.3 LowDrA m +1.8 +5.3 LowDrC m +1.6 +4.9 LowDrIIIs +2.0 +5.0 LowDrIs +2.1 +5.7 LowDurD b +1.9 +5.4 LowDurP +2.0 NA ModDurIs +3.5 +7.8 RealRet +10.8 +8.1 RealRetAd b +10.6 +7.8 RealRetD b +10.5 +7.6 RealRetnP +10.7 NA RealRtnA m +10.5 +7.6 RealRtnC m +10.2 +7.1 RlEstStRetI +16.6 +5.8 RlRetAIns +19.6 +9.9 ShTermAdm b +.4 +3.1 ShtTermA m +.4 +3.0 ShtTermIs +.5 +3.4 StkPlusIs -4.6 +.9 ToRtIIIIs +3.3 +8.4 ToRtIIIs +3.9 +8.3 TotRetA m +3.8 +8.2 TotRetAdm b +3.9 +8.5 TotRetC m +3.4 +7.4 TotRetIs +4.1 +8.7 TotRetrnD b +3.9 +8.4 TotlRetnP +4.0 NA PRIMECAP Odyssey AggGr d -6.9 +6.1 Growth d -8.4 +3.1 Stock d -5.2 +2.7 Parnassus EqIncInv -3.1 +5.8 Pax World Bal b -3.7 +1.5 Payden EmMktBd d +4.6 +8.4 GNMA +6.7 +7.5 HighInc d ... +5.1 Permanent Portfolio +6.8 +10.3 Pioneer Bond Y +4.4 +7.4 CulValA m -7.1 -.6 CulValY -6.9 -.2 EqInc A m -2.6 +.1 GlobHiYA m -.2 +6.3 GlobHiYY +.1 +6.6 HiYldA m -3.0 +6.0 IndependA m -3.0 +.5 MidCpValA m -10.4 +.9 MuniA m +7.7 +4.0 PioneerA m -8.5 0.0 PioneerY -8.3 +.4 StratIncA m +2.3 +7.8 StratIncC m +1.9 +7.0 StratIncY +2.5 +8.2 ValueA m -9.1 -4.4 Principal BdMtgInst +5.4 +5.2 DivIntI -6.5 -1.0 EqIncA m -4.3 +.5 HiYldA m ... +7.6 HiYldII -.6 +8.6 InfProI +11.3 +2.0 IntIInst -8.4 -1.5 IntlGrthI -6.6 -3.0 L/T2010I ... +2.2 L/T2020I -2.8 +1.8 L/T2020J m -3.0 +1.3 L/T2030I -3.9 +1.5 L/T2030J m -4.1 +1.0 L/T2040I -4.8 +1.1 L/T2050I -5.4 +.8 LCBIIInst -7.0 +.7 LCGIIInst -4.0 +3.8 LCGrIInst -3.1 +5.7 LCIIIInst -8.7 -4.5 LCVlIInst -6.7 -2.6 LgCGrInst -6.3 +2.3 LgCSP500I -5.2 +.5 LgCValI -6.1 -2.2 MCVlIInst -9.2 +2.2 MGIIIInst -5.4 +4.6 MidCapBleA m +.3 +5.7 PrSecInst +2.2 +5.5 ReEstSecI +1.5 +1.2 SAMBalA m -2.6 +3.6 SAMBalC m -3.1 +2.8 SAMConGrA m -4.8 +2.1 SAMConGrB m -5.3 +1.3 SAMStrGrA m -6.4 +1.0 SCGrIInst -6.3 +5.9 SCValIII -12.0 0.0 Prudential Investmen 2020FocA m -2.8 +4.2 2020FocZ -2.7 +4.5 BlendA m -6.0 +2.4 EqOppA m -6.7 +2.0 HiYieldA m +.8 +7.5 IntlEqtyA m -5.8 -3.4 IntlValA m -8.2 -.8 JenMidCapGrA m -3.0 +6.2 JenMidCapGrZ -2.8 +6.5 JennGrA m -.7 +4.3 JennGrZ -.5 +4.6 NatlMuniA m +6.7 +3.9 NaturResA m -11.1 +7.4 ShTmCoBdA m +2.6 +6.0 SmallCoA m -6.8 +4.3 SmallCoZ -6.5 +4.5 UtilityA m -.8 +.6 ValueA m -8.8 -1.0 Putnam AmGovtInA m +6.5 +8.4 AstAlBalA m -3.4 +1.9 AstAlGrA m -6.5 +.8 CATxEIncA m +7.1 +3.8 DivIncTrC m -1.5 +3.2 DivrInA m -1.1 +4.0 EqIncomeA m -6.9 +1.4 GeoPutA m -2.6 -2.0 GlbEqA m -2.7 -1.3 GlbHltCrA m -5.0 +.9 GrowIncA m -10.5 -2.8 GrowIncB m -10.8 -3.5 HiYldA m -1.7 +6.5 IncomeA m +5.8 +7.7 -10.3 +2.0 IntlCpOpA m

M

U

52-WEEK HI LOW

T

U

WK NAV CHG

16.95 12.69 14.23 -.06 12.43 11.56 12.06 +.05 11.63 8.48 9.50 -.15 11.60 9.04 10.44 +.11 6.64 10.29 12.06 8.31 47.30 41.60 49.53 9.02 4.26 6.67 37.42 36.17 37.05 35.91 68.32 26.53 9.59 67.42 63.28 32.57 67.57 51.45 48.74 7.04 7.01 7.04 13.03 30.92 31.05 24.84 14.70 14.64 9.47 3.34 3.32 22.74 23.92 13.18 34.21 11.37 16.43 28.00 16.91 17.30 16.91 16.88 7.36 7.37 35.48 8.42 8.43 4.45 4.44 4.44 9.66 24.01 24.49

5.63 8.31 10.25 7.11 35.63 31.57 37.18 8.16 3.02 6.39 29.63 28.68 29.35 28.53 41.91 20.44 7.25 50.89 47.72 25.04 51.06 36.22 34.48 6.37 6.35 6.37 10.40 23.33 23.40 17.88 13.88 13.82 9.30 3.14 3.13 15.99 16.82 10.63 27.06 9.89 13.50 24.17 13.15 13.45 14.49 14.47 6.25 6.27 25.48 7.99 8.00 4.19 4.19 4.18 9.23 17.94 18.33

6.25 9.15 11.00 7.75 41.49 36.46 43.46 8.60 3.59 6.63 31.93 30.83 31.64 30.58 56.67 21.93 8.23 55.94 52.40 27.79 56.11 46.66 44.10 6.68 6.66 6.68 11.29 26.89 26.98 21.52 14.42 14.36 9.38 3.27 3.25 18.59 19.56 11.47 29.95 10.62 14.80 25.25 14.87 15.21 15.51 15.49 6.84 6.86 29.06 7.99 8.00 4.21 4.20 4.20 9.65 19.94 20.36

-.12 -.08 -.17 -.12 -.30 -.27 -.31 -.04 -.03 +.01 -.80 -.78 -.79 -.78 +.16 -.52 -.10 -1.09 -1.02 +.34 -1.08 +2.48 +2.34 -.06 -.06 -.06 -.09 ... ... +.25 -.10 -.11 ... -.02 -.02 -.17 -.18 -.17 -.46 -.13 -.12 -.44 -.17 -.17 -.28 -.27 -.14 -.14 -.54 -.28 -.28 -.10 -.11 -.10 +.09 -.33 -.34

11.92 11.45 11.49 29.59 23.67 24.96

-.17 -.37

11.34 12.77 12.63 12.86 12.79 12.86 11.28 11.19 11.35 9.58 9.54 9.35 9.57 9.68 9.69 11.27 11.82 11.66 9.22 10.97 11.62 10.78 9.54 9.54 9.54 9.54 9.54 10.93 12.15 10.77 10.77 10.34 10.77 10.77 10.77 11.35 12.38 12.38 12.38 12.38 12.38 12.38 5.36 13.28 9.95 9.95 9.95 9.25 9.87 10.67 11.77 11.77 11.77 11.77 11.77 11.77

-.07 -.11 -.11 -.11 -.11 -.11 -.08 -.07 -.07 +.14 +.14 +.14 +.14 +.14 +.14 -.14 -.24 -.17 -.30 -.08 +.03 +.04 -.30 -.30 -.30 -.30 -.30 -.11 +.40 -.03 -.03 +.03 -.03 -.03 -.03 -.02 +.22 +.22 +.22 +.22 +.22 +.22 +.28 +.47 -.04 -.04 -.04 -.17 -.06 +.01 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.01

10.48 11.96 11.83 12.04 11.98 12.04 10.43 10.34 10.49 7.18 7.15 7.03 7.17 7.26 7.27 10.09 11.30 10.92 8.42 10.31 10.29 9.55 8.82 8.82 8.82 8.82 8.82 10.33 10.00 10.27 10.27 9.90 10.27 10.27 10.27 10.51 11.13 11.13 11.13 11.13 11.13 11.13 3.84 10.66 9.84 9.84 9.84 7.29 9.44 10.21 10.69 10.69 10.69 10.69 10.69 10.69

10.86 12.15 12.01 12.25 12.17 12.25 10.80 10.70 10.87 8.79 8.75 8.57 8.78 8.89 8.90 10.80 11.35 11.22 8.46 10.60 11.38 10.38 8.90 8.90 8.90 8.90 8.90 10.67 11.88 10.46 10.46 10.06 10.46 10.46 10.46 10.82 12.23 12.23 12.23 12.23 12.23 12.23 4.95 12.97 9.84 9.84 9.84 7.88 9.70 10.61 11.07 11.07 11.07 11.07 11.07 11.07

18.79 13.61 15.34 +.01 17.24 12.44 14.11 -.15 15.48 11.95 13.43 -.20 28.61 22.51 25.35

-.08

24.21 19.32 21.37

-.09

15.02 14.03 14.46 -.32 10.73 10.14 10.73 +.17 7.43 6.89 6.94 -.21 49.93 40.53 48.91 +.53 9.71 19.73 19.81 28.07 10.95 10.75 10.82 12.46 23.06 13.69 43.93 44.09 11.17 10.93 11.17 12.26

9.40 15.59 15.67 21.35 10.01 9.85 9.07 8.86 17.35 12.07 33.29 33.41 10.78 10.55 10.79 9.60

9.61 16.86 16.94 24.49 10.08 9.91 9.57 10.89 18.94 13.13 37.34 37.47 10.86 10.63 10.86 10.30

-.05 -.32 -.32 -.19 -.31 -.31 -.24 -.09 -.50 -.16 -.62 -.62 -.16 -.16 -.16 -.08

10.75 11.00 18.88 8.24 11.77 8.71 12.63 9.76 11.92 12.56 12.51 12.53 12.51 12.79 12.31 10.36 9.03 10.21 11.15 11.53 8.82 9.58 10.37 14.30 12.11 15.14 10.32 18.74 13.54 13.40 14.65 14.12 16.18 12.54 10.63

10.27 8.34 15.27 7.59 10.54 7.79 9.69 7.42 10.26 10.38 10.33 10.07 10.04 10.05 9.53 7.96 6.87 7.36 8.61 8.98 6.55 7.37 7.86 10.62 8.13 11.53 9.51 14.36 11.43 11.31 11.75 11.29 12.51 7.90 7.41

10.66 9.46 16.47 7.62 10.66 8.62 10.57 8.39 11.17 11.33 11.28 11.12 11.09 11.20 10.68 8.90 7.95 8.98 9.31 9.90 7.67 8.33 8.75 11.85 10.06 13.30 9.75 16.30 12.32 12.19 12.92 12.43 13.92 10.12 8.50

-.02 -.06 -.15 -.27 -.35 +.17 -.14 +.04 -.05 -.10 -.10 -.11 -.11 -.12 -.13 -.15 -.07 -.06 -.19 -.16 -.01 -.14 -.15 -.12 +.01 -.01 -.15 +.36 -.09 -.09 -.12 -.12 -.16 -.09 -.29

17.54 18.17 19.01 15.19 5.65 6.85 22.79 30.80 31.96 20.23 21.02 15.05 62.22 11.72 22.83 23.86 11.30 16.32

12.79 13.21 13.90 11.34 5.27 5.30 17.63 22.31 23.09 14.59 15.13 13.73 42.17 11.42 15.68 16.38 9.12 12.22

15.44 15.99 16.17 12.95 5.31 5.83 18.92 26.57 27.58 17.93 18.64 14.70 50.75 11.49 18.92 19.82 10.05 13.44

+.02 +.02 -.15 -.22 -.16 -.09 -.34 +.10 +.10 -.04 -.04 -.07 +.21 -.05 -.13 -.14 -.01 -.26

9.89 11.69 13.36 8.12 8.17 8.28 16.67 12.69 9.94 51.85 14.68 14.41 8.00 6.98 38.57

9.44 9.87 10.76 7.22 7.57 7.67 12.65 10.83 7.29 39.87 11.17 10.96 7.31 6.68 27.92

9.89 +.10 10.47 -.14 11.50 -.21 7.77 -.01 7.58 -.21 7.69 -.21 13.90 -.26 11.53 -.20 8.49 -.14 42.53 -.32 12.07 -.32 11.85 -.31 7.31 -.31 6.92 -.03 31.98 -.46

A

L

S

YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW IntlEqA m -8.2 -2.7 21.83 16.73 InvestorA m -6.6 -1.6 13.95 10.55 MultiCapGrA m -7.4 +1.5 55.49 40.00 NYTxEIncA m +5.9 +4.2 8.74 7.98 TaxEIncA m +6.7 +4.2 8.73 7.29 TaxFHYldA m +6.2 +3.2 12.07 10.96 USGovtInA m +6.0 +8.6 14.55 13.94 VoyagerA m -16.4 +4.8 25.49 18.56 RS GlNatResA m -4.8 +4.5 41.60 29.07 PartnersA m -11.8 +.9 36.00 25.54 ValueA m -14.3 0.0 27.62 20.74 RS Funds EmgMktsA m -16.0 +7.7 27.44 21.44 Rainier CoreEqIns -6.8 +.5 27.29 20.33 SmMdCEqI -6.9 +1.5 38.15 25.70 SmMidCap b -7.1 +1.3 37.20 25.11 RidgeWorth HighYI +.5 +6.2 10.19 9.40 IntmBndI +5.5 +7.0 11.03 10.27 InvGrBdI +6.3 +5.6 12.56 11.51 LgCpVaEqI -9.4 +1.0 13.79 10.60 MdCpVlEqI -12.6 +5.3 13.15 9.21 SmCapEqI -8.0 +4.9 15.12 11.04 TtlRetBndI +6.7 +7.6 11.17 10.28 USGovBndI +1.0 +3.8 10.11 10.05 Royce LowStkSer m -8.8 +6.5 19.92 13.46 MicrCapIv d -9.0 +6.0 19.30 13.50 OpportInv d -17.0 +2.1 13.10 8.83 PAMutCnslt m -7.8 +2.6 11.80 8.24 PAMutInv d -7.2 +3.6 13.00 9.06 PremierInv d -2.9 +7.6 22.95 15.84 SpecEqInv d -8.6 +6.2 22.54 16.68 TotRetInv d -6.9 +2.8 14.28 10.72 ValPlSvc m -9.8 +1.3 14.72 10.56 ValueSvc m -7.4 +5.8 14.21 9.61 Russell EmgMktsS -12.1 +7.9 21.93 17.71 GlRelEstS -5.6 -1.2 38.69 31.12 GlbEqtyS -7.0 NA 9.68 7.32 IntlDMktI -9.0 -1.8 34.67 26.94 ItlDvMktS -9.0 NA 34.64 26.91 StgicBdI +4.6 +6.7 11.19 10.56 StratBdS +4.6 NA 11.32 10.68 USCoEqtyI -7.9 0.0 30.16 22.72 USCoreEqS -7.9 NA 30.16 22.72 USQntvEqS -2.4 NA 32.13 23.94 USSmMdCpS -9.6 NA 25.30 17.46 Russell LifePoints BalStrA m -2.9 +2.6 11.09 9.48 BalStrC b -3.3 +1.9 11.00 9.41 BalStrS -2.8 +2.9 11.18 9.56 BlStrR3 b -2.9 +2.4 11.12 9.51 GrStrA m -5.2 +1.2 10.69 8.65 GrStrC b -5.5 +.4 10.55 8.57 GrStrR3 b -5.1 +1.0 10.73 8.69 Rydex Nsdq100Iv -1.8 +7.6 15.82 11.56 Rydex/SGI MCapValA m -10.0 +3.7 35.77 26.94 MgFtrStrH b -1.3 NA 26.76 23.75 SEI DlyShDurA +2.3 +4.8 10.76 10.53 IdxSP500E -5.2 +.5 37.43 28.77 IntlEq A -7.7 -5.1 9.66 7.44 IsCrFxIA +5.7 +6.8 11.19 10.66 IsHiYdBdA +1.5 +6.6 7.64 7.12 IsItlEmDA +5.3 +9.1 11.64 10.93 IsItlEmMA -14.2 +5.1 12.62 10.04 IsLrgGrA -2.8 +2.8 23.83 17.83 IsLrgValA -7.4 -2.6 17.69 13.60 IsMgTxMgA -5.8 -.1 13.20 10.05 TxEIntMuA +6.2 +4.8 11.48 10.80 SSGA EmgMkts b -12.7 +5.3 23.98 19.04 EmgMktsSel b -12.6 +5.6 24.06 19.12 IntlStkSl b -9.0 -2.7 11.17 8.67 S&P500Idx b -5.3 +.5 22.42 17.27 Schwab 1000Inv d -5.5 +.9 40.64 31.49 CoreEqInv d -6.5 +.1 18.63 13.81 DivEqSel d -4.5 0.0 14.09 10.87 FUSLgCInl d -7.7 NA 10.51 8.02 FUSSMCIns d -11.1 NA 11.78 8.11 IntlIndex d -6.6 -.9 19.10 15.04 S&P500Sel d -5.2 +.7 21.33 16.50 SmCapIdx d -9.1 +3.5 23.55 16.26 TotBdMkt +5.6 +3.9 9.57 9.05 TotStkMSl d -5.5 +1.5 24.91 18.93 Scout Interntl d -7.7 +3.4 35.42 27.24 Selected AmerShS b -8.3 -.7 44.52 34.76 American D -8.2 -.4 44.53 34.80 Sentinel CmnStkA m -5.0 +2.1 34.23 26.03 ShMatGovA m +1.8 +4.5 9.38 9.17 SmallCoA m -2.7 +5.2 8.96 6.17 Sequoia Sequoia +3.3 +4.4 147.36 114.29 Sit USGovSec +2.6 +6.0 11.40 11.19 Sound Shore SoundShor -11.5 -.9 34.47 26.44 Spectra Spectra A m -2.4 +9.6 13.59 9.71 Stadion MgdPortA m -6.4 NA 11.00 9.41 State Farm Balanced -1.0 +4.0 57.34 50.11 Growth -5.5 +1.9 57.76 45.34 MuniBond +6.7 +5.6 8.91 8.35 Stratton MoDivREIT d -1.9 +1.3 29.76 23.14 MultiCap d -12.5 -1.0 39.64 29.85 SmCapVal d -4.3 +2.3 55.88 38.59 T Rowe Price Balanced -1.8 +3.6 20.55 17.14 BlChpGAdv b -1.9 +3.5 42.05 30.34 BlChpGr -1.7 +3.7 42.14 30.36 CapApprec -2.9 +4.4 21.83 18.05 CorpInc +6.3 +6.8 10.12 9.48 DivGrow -4.6 +2.0 24.86 19.18 DivrSmCap d -4.2 +6.7 18.37 11.80 EmEurMed d -20.0 -2.3 24.84 18.01 EmMktBd d +3.9 +8.1 13.86 13.05 EmMktStk d -11.3 +6.2 36.99 29.78 EqIndex d -5.3 +.5 36.77 28.29 EqtyInc -8.2 -.1 25.53 20.00 EqtyIncAd b -8.4 -.3 25.49 19.95 EurStock d -6.4 +1.4 17.41 12.35 FinSer -18.2 -6.4 15.40 11.12 GNMA +5.6 +6.8 10.24 9.76 GloStk d -6.8 0.0 19.20 15.07 GrStkAdv b -3.8 +3.1 34.77 25.39 GrStkR b -3.9 +2.9 34.34 25.13 GrowInc -6.2 +1.3 21.84 16.74 GrowStk -3.6 +3.4 35.09 25.59 HealthSci +1.5 +8.2 37.03 24.73 HiYield d -.4 +7.0 7.00 6.40 HiYldAdv m -.7 +6.8 6.99 6.39 InsLgCpGr -4.0 +5.0 17.84 13.00 InstlEmMk d -11.3 +6.3 33.75 27.12 InstlHiYl d -.2 +7.4 10.13 9.28 InstlLgCV -8.5 -.4 13.84 10.85 IntlBnd d +7.0 +7.1 10.66 9.69 IntlBndAd m +6.9 +6.8 10.65 9.68 IntlDisc d -5.2 +4.0 47.45 36.33 IntlGrInc d -6.2 -.6 14.86 11.43 IntlStk d -7.2 +1.9 15.35 12.08 IntlStkAd m -7.3 +1.7 15.29 12.05 LatinAm d -18.7 +11.0 57.59 42.38 MDTaxFBd +6.2 +4.5 10.77 9.89 MdCpVlAdv b -8.9 +3.1 25.58 19.80 MediaTele -.2 +11.4 58.18 41.30 MidCapE -6.9 +6.8 31.15 21.79 MidCapVa -8.8 +3.4 25.71 19.92 MidCpGr -6.7 +6.7 65.35 47.74 MidCpGrAd b -6.8 +6.5 64.12 46.94 NewAmGro -4.9 +6.3 36.02 26.47 NewAsia d -4.6 +14.3 20.25 16.96 NewEra -10.2 +3.7 58.14 39.38 NewHoriz -2.1 +7.1 39.08 25.75 NewIncome +4.6 +7.0 9.81 9.36 OrseaStk d -5.9 NA 9.24 7.10 PerStrBal -2.2 +4.4 20.30 16.79 PerStrGr -4.1 +2.8 24.84 19.49 PerStrInc -.6 +5.1 16.86 14.75 R2015 -2.4 +3.9 12.72 10.61 R2025 -4.0 +3.1 12.99 10.37 R2035 -5.2 +2.6 13.28 10.26 Real d +1.9 +.1 20.10 15.27 Ret2020R b -3.6 +2.9 17.43 14.18 Ret2050 -5.3 NA 10.58 8.17 RetInc -.3 +4.5 13.71 12.17 Retir2005 -.5 +4.6 12.00 10.57 Rtmt2010 -1.4 +4.1 16.31 14.00 Rtmt2020 -3.3 +3.4 17.67 14.38 Rtmt2030 -4.7 +2.8 18.71 14.67 Rtmt2040 -5.5 +2.5 18.92 14.60 Rtmt2045 -5.3 +2.6 12.60 9.73 SciTech -4.8 +8.2 30.02 20.95 ShTmBond +1.6 +4.5 4.91 4.83 SmCpStk -7.8 +4.6 38.74 26.97 SmCpVal d -8.2 +3.4 39.53 28.50 SmCpValAd m -8.4 +3.2 39.27 28.31 SpecGrow -6.0 +2.4 19.27 14.55 SpecInc +2.2 +6.5 12.70 12.10 SpecIntl d -6.5 +2.2 11.78 9.15 SumMuInt +6.1 +5.1 11.64 10.91 TaxFHiYld +6.3 +3.1 11.09 10.04 TaxFInc +6.4 +4.5 10.17 9.29 TaxFShInt +3.4 +4.2 5.66 5.51 TrRt2010Ad b -1.6 +3.9 16.23 13.93 TrRt2020Ad b -3.4 +3.2 17.56 14.29 TrRt2030Ad b -4.9 +2.5 18.59 14.57 TrRt2030R b -5.0 +2.3 18.49 14.48 TrRt2040Ad b -5.6 +2.3 18.79 14.49 TrRt2040R b -5.8 +2.0 18.70 14.42 TxFIncAdv b +6.0 +4.1 10.18 9.29 USBdEnIdx d +5.6 +6.8 11.57 10.95 VATaxFBd +7.3 +4.6 11.91 10.87 Value -8.6 +.1 25.63 19.58 ValueAd b -8.7 -.1 25.36 19.40 TCW EmgIncI +4.9 +12.0 9.03 8.50 SmCapGrI -11.1 +8.7 33.27 22.57 TotRetBdI +4.5 +9.2 10.44 9.86 TotRetBdN b +4.3 +8.9 10.79 10.20 TFS MktNeut d -1.6 +6.5 15.66 13.77 TIAA-CREF BdPIns +4.6 +5.8 10.49 10.06 BondIn +5.1 +6.2 10.78 10.24 EqIx -5.7 +1.1 10.45 7.92 Gr&IncIn -4.0 +3.9 10.01 7.52 HYlIns d +.9 +7.7 10.11 9.40 InfL +12.3 +7.3 12.17 10.83 IntEqIdxRet d -7.2 -1.2 18.45 14.47 IntlE d -7.0 -1.0 18.15 14.25 -12.6 -.8 10.80 7.82 IntlEqIn d

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 PAGE 7D

WK NAV CHG 18.39 -.35 11.92 -.20 46.88 -.25 8.50 -.01 8.52 -.02 11.61 -.09 14.54 +.15 19.82 -.51 35.77 +.44 29.20 -1.09 22.21 -.73 22.47

-.74

23.47 31.14 30.35

-.20 -.20 -.20

9.44 -.34 10.79 +.08 12.23 +.03 11.55 -.33 10.31 -.42 12.57 -.16 10.88 +.07 10.10 ... 16.65 15.99 10.03 9.78 10.81 19.75 19.07 12.20 12.10 11.72

-.07 -.36 -.47 -.14 -.15 -.07 -.23 -.16 -.12 -.02

18.31 -.83 33.59 -.24 8.26 -.16 28.87 -.37 28.83 -.38 10.92 +.01 11.05 +.01 25.62 -.47 25.62 -.47 27.88 -.33 20.64 -.32 10.07 9.98 10.15 10.10 9.38 9.25 9.42

-.10 -.10 -.10 -.10 -.13 -.12 -.12

14.21

-.08

29.11 -.78 25.45 +.19 10.76 +.06 32.39 -.54 8.12 -.07 11.16 +.03 7.18 -.22 11.36 -.21 10.42 -.43 21.07 -.16 14.85 -.37 11.36 -.18 11.39 +.03 19.70 -1.17 19.78 -1.18 9.18 -.12 19.40 -.32 35.14 -.51 15.74 -.27 12.16 -.19 8.90 -.19 9.55 -.26 16.10 -.21 18.56 -.31 19.19 -.41 9.54 +.08 21.50 -.33 29.71

-.37

37.98 38.03

-.75 -.75

29.69 -.56 9.28 +.02 7.54 -.13 133.60 +1.70 11.37 +.03 28.05

-.77

11.89

-.04

9.63

...

52.80 -.09 49.60 -.50 8.82 +.04 25.67 +.38 32.49 -.61 47.51 -.45 18.75 37.39 37.48 19.72 9.95 21.69 15.16 18.75 13.24 31.29 31.82 21.56 21.51 14.04 11.59 10.24 16.85 30.69 30.30 18.84 30.98 30.72 6.46 6.44 15.73 28.55 9.36 11.55 10.48 10.47 41.58 12.49 13.20 13.15 46.12 10.50 21.51 51.63 25.90 21.63 54.62 53.56 31.36 18.29 46.82 32.78 9.72 7.85 18.45 21.97 15.78 11.61 11.56 11.59 17.66 15.67 9.22 12.87 11.28 15.12 15.90 16.46 16.46 10.99 25.54 4.86 31.74 33.17 32.92 16.63 12.32 10.05 11.53 10.70 9.92 5.65 15.03 15.79 16.34 16.24 16.34 16.25 9.92 11.51 11.69 21.33 21.10

-.14 -.21 -.20 -.28 -.04 -.32 -.09 -2.16 -.27 -1.12 -.53 -.56 -.56 -.20 -.70 +.13 -.09 -.10 -.10 -.27 -.10 -.01 -.22 -.22 ... -1.02 -.32 -.35 +.02 +.02 -.46 -.25 -.12 -.12 -.37 -.04 -.51 -.21 +.02 -.51 +.04 +.05 -.02 -.46 -.26 -.12 +.04 -.10 -.17 -.27 -.12 -.11 -.12 -.14 +.45 -.16 -.11 -.08 -.08 -.12 -.16 -.19 -.21 -.13 -.07 ... -.52 -.78 -.79 -.25 -.11 -.19 +.01 -.12 -.03 ... -.13 -.16 -.19 -.19 -.21 -.21 -.04 +.09 -.01 -.48 -.47

8.70 -.23 26.10 -.04 9.97 +.05 10.31 +.05 14.49

-.07

10.38 -.04 10.72 +.04 9.00 -.13 8.67 -.08 9.49 -.30 12.04 +.26 15.57 -.23 15.33 -.21 8.66 -.18

YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW IntlEqRmt d -12.7 -1.0 11.12 8.05 LCVal -11.6 -1.3 14.21 10.86 LgCVIdx -7.5 -2.0 13.24 10.32 LgGrIns -3.6 +3.5 11.34 8.49 Life2015 b -1.4 +3.0 11.75 10.04 Life2020 b -2.6 +2.3 11.71 9.78 Life2025 b -3.8 +1.7 11.64 9.50 Life2030 b -4.7 +1.1 11.55 9.20 Life2035 b -5.7 +.9 11.68 9.09 Life2040 b -6.0 +1.0 11.91 9.25 LrgeCapVal -11.7 -1.5 14.16 10.81 MidCapGrwthRe -5.8 +4.8 21.53 14.69 MidValIn -8.0 +2.0 18.85 13.98 MidValRmt -8.1 +1.7 18.75 13.90 SCEq d -8.9 +1.4 16.21 11.04 SPIndxIn -5.2 +.6 15.37 11.92 Target SmCapVal -6.9 +3.7 22.86 16.52 Templeton InFEqSeS -8.2 +1.2 22.33 17.53 Third Avenue IntlVal d -7.6 -.5 18.74 14.29 RealEsVal d -7.6 -2.1 24.71 20.38 SmCapVal d -5.4 0.0 22.86 17.17 Value d -10.8 -1.5 54.81 43.29 Thompson Plumb Bond +3.7 +8.2 11.71 11.28 Thornburg IncBldA m -2.4 +5.5 20.23 17.31 IncBldC m -2.8 +4.8 20.23 17.31 IntlValA m -8.2 +2.9 30.95 23.52 IntlValC m -8.6 +2.1 29.10 22.18 IntlValI d -8.0 +3.3 31.63 24.05 LtdTMuA m +4.8 +4.6 14.39 13.83 LtdTMul +5.1 +5.0 14.40 13.83 Value A m -11.0 +.3 37.64 28.16 Value I d -10.8 +.7 38.32 28.65 Thrivent LgCapStkA m -7.7 -1.1 23.91 18.25 MidCapA m -10.9 +1.9 16.67 11.47 MuniBdA m +7.1 +4.6 11.53 10.57 Tocqueville Gold m -.4 +18.6 91.56 66.60 Touchstone SdCapInGr -.1 +7.6 15.91 10.85 Transamerica AssAllCvC m -.5 +3.4 11.71 10.51 AssAllGrA m -6.8 +.3 13.00 9.94 AssAllGrC m -7.2 -.3 12.71 9.71 AstAlMdGrA m -4.9 +1.9 12.77 10.45 AstAlMdGrC m -5.2 +1.3 12.72 10.38 AstAlModA m -2.0 +3.3 12.40 10.67 AstAlModC m -2.3 +2.7 12.35 10.60 Transamerica Partner StockIdx b -5.4 +.4 9.12 7.02 Turner MidGrInv -7.1 +4.6 39.79 26.53 Tweedy Browne GlobVal d -5.9 +2.0 25.26 21.18 UBS GlobAllA m -5.2 +1.1 10.59 8.99 UBS PACE IntlEqP d -5.8 -2.4 14.17 11.16 LgCoVlP d -7.9 -1.1 18.21 13.94 LrCoGrP d -3.7 +2.9 19.85 14.45 StrFInP d +7.3 +9.3 15.06 13.94 US Global Investors GlobRes m -11.7 +1.9 13.01 8.22 WrldPrcMnr m -18.2 +6.4 22.94 15.66 USAA AggGrow -4.6 +1.7 36.19 26.14 BalStrat -2.0 +2.9 14.37 12.11 CABond +8.8 +3.4 10.51 9.13 CapGrowth -8.6 -1.7 7.30 5.63 Cornerst -2.5 +2.8 24.31 20.58 EmergMkt -15.8 +5.9 22.33 17.52 GNMA +5.1 +6.6 10.47 10.03 Grow -6.7 +.4 15.94 11.73 GrowInc -7.8 +.5 16.29 12.31 HYOpp +1.1 +7.2 8.80 8.04 Income +5.4 +7.1 13.17 12.64 IncomeStk -4.1 -2.6 13.29 10.09 IntermBd +5.4 +7.4 10.66 10.17 Intl -5.5 +1.7 26.98 20.53 PrcMtlMin -2.9 +18.9 43.83 33.63 S&P500M -5.3 +.5 20.43 15.74 ShTmBond +1.9 +5.1 9.27 9.15 SmCapStk -8.8 +1.5 15.18 10.56 TaxEInt +6.7 +4.7 13.28 12.34 TaxELgTm +7.9 +3.9 13.32 11.87 TaxEShTm +3.3 +3.9 10.79 10.57 TgtRt2030 -2.4 NA 12.17 10.22 TgtRt2040 -4.9 NA 11.89 9.46 Value -8.0 +.3 14.82 11.10 WorldGro -4.0 +2.9 20.62 15.60 Unified Wntergrn m -.7 +5.8 15.10 12.06 VALIC Co I ForgnVal -7.7 +.5 10.37 7.95 IGrowth -4.3 +4.3 12.06 8.86 IntlEq -7.6 -1.9 7.04 5.55 IntlGrI -5.1 +2.0 12.34 9.38 MdCpIdx -6.5 +4.3 23.03 16.34 Scie&Tech -4.1 +8.2 17.81 12.57 SmCpIdx -10.4 +1.7 15.90 10.96 StockIdx -5.3 +.4 27.02 21.16 VALIC Co II IntSmCpEq -9.7 -.4 14.60 11.06 MdCpVal -13.0 +.7 18.23 13.50 SocResp -4.8 +.8 12.14 9.31 Van Eck GloHardA m -7.3 +8.9 57.73 37.40 IntlGoldA m -5.1 +18.8 25.83 18.35 Vanguard 500Adml -5.2 +.7 125.74 96.73 500Inv -5.2 +.6 125.72 96.71 AssetA -5.7 -.4 26.44 21.65 AssetAdml -5.6 -.3 59.37 48.60 BalIdx -1.0 +4.0 22.62 19.23 BalIdxAdm -.8 +4.1 22.62 19.23 BalIdxIns -.8 +4.1 22.62 19.23 BalIdxSig -.8 NA 22.38 19.02 CAIT +6.8 +4.4 11.33 10.51 CAITAdml +6.9 +4.5 11.33 10.51 CALT +7.3 +3.8 11.48 10.40 CALTAdml +7.4 +3.9 11.48 10.40 CapOp d -11.1 +3.2 36.17 26.59 CapOpAdml d -11.1 +3.3 83.55 61.44 CapVal -15.0 +1.2 12.21 8.56 Convrt d -6.7 +5.6 14.20 11.65 DevMktIdx d -7.5 -1.0 11.03 8.72 DevMktsIdxIP d -7.4 NA 114.06 91.24 DivAppInv -3.3 +2.5 23.00 18.08 DivEqInv -6.1 +1.0 22.43 16.59 DivGr -1.9 +3.6 15.71 12.45 EMStIxSgl d -12.1 NA 40.42 32.34 EmMkInsId d -12.0 +7.7 31.98 25.59 EmMktIAdm d -12.1 +7.7 42.03 33.62 EmMktStkIdxIP d -12.0 NA 106.38 85.31 EmerMktId d -12.2 +7.5 31.97 25.54 EnerIxAd d -1.4 +4.6 58.97 37.17 EnergyAdm d -2.5 +4.1 141.63 97.32 EnergyInv d -2.5 +4.1 75.42 51.81 EqInc -1.6 +1.4 22.40 17.63 EqIncAdml -1.6 +1.5 46.95 36.95 EurIdxAdm d -6.5 -1.1 70.05 53.42 EurStkISg d -6.5 NA 27.10 20.67 EuroInsId d -6.5 -1.0 29.88 22.79 EuropeIdx d -6.6 -1.2 30.06 22.91 ExDuTrIxI +20.3 NA 31.21 22.23 ExMktIdSig -8.1 NA 39.55 27.63 ExplAdml -7.1 +3.1 77.12 52.08 Explr -7.2 +2.9 82.81 55.92 ExtdIdAdm -8.1 +3.5 46.03 32.16 ExtdIdIst -8.0 +3.5 46.03 32.17 ExtdMktIdxIP -8.0 NA 113.61 86.54 ExtndIdx -8.1 +3.3 45.99 32.13 FAWeUSIns d -8.4 NA 101.95 80.26 FAWeUSInv d -8.5 NA 20.32 16.00 FLLT +7.4 +4.8 11.74 10.74 FLLTAdml +7.5 +4.9 11.74 10.74 FTSESocIs -6.5 -1.5 8.17 6.27 FTSESocIv -6.6 -1.6 8.17 6.27 FinIdxAdm d -17.5 -12.2 17.65 12.74 GNMA +6.5 +7.3 11.22 10.57 GNMAAdml +6.6 +7.4 11.22 10.57 GlbEq -7.3 -.7 19.58 15.05 GlbREIInv d -7.5 NA 21.02 17.87 GrIncAdml -4.4 -.6 47.06 35.89 GroInc -4.5 -.8 28.82 21.99 GrowthEq -3.3 +1.7 11.93 8.84 GrowthIdx -3.5 +3.9 34.36 25.63 GrthIdAdm -3.5 +4.0 34.35 25.63 GrthIstId -3.4 +4.0 34.35 25.64 GrthIstSg -3.5 NA 31.81 23.74 HYCor d +1.7 +6.2 5.88 5.50 HYCorAdml d +1.8 +6.3 5.88 5.50 HYT/E +6.9 +4.3 10.76 9.82 HealCAdm d +.3 +2.7 32.80 24.87 HltCrAdml d +4.5 +3.8 59.75 47.30 HlthCare d +4.4 +3.7 141.57 112.06 I-TCBII +7.2 NA 27.77 26.13 ITBond +8.7 +8.3 11.95 10.98 ITBondAdm +8.8 +8.4 11.95 10.98 ITGradeAd +6.5 +7.6 10.51 9.79 ITIGrade +6.4 +7.5 10.51 9.79 ITTsry +7.9 +7.9 12.10 11.11 ITrsyAdml +8.0 +8.0 12.10 11.11 InTecIdAdm d -4.6 +6.5 34.32 25.30 InfPrtAdm +12.2 +7.5 28.49 25.02 InfPrtI +12.3 +7.5 11.60 10.19 InflaPro +12.2 +7.4 14.51 12.74 InstIdxI -5.2 +.7 124.86 96.09 InstPlus -5.1 +.7 124.87 96.10 InstTStId -5.6 +1.5 31.14 23.51 InstTStPl -5.6 +1.5 31.14 23.51 IntlExpIn d -10.7 +1.4 17.92 13.47 IntlGr d -7.8 +1.9 21.17 16.09 IntlGrAdm d -7.7 +2.0 67.38 51.23 IntlStkIdxAdm d -8.5 NA 28.57 22.91 IntlStkIdxI d -8.5 NA 114.31 91.67 IntlStkIdxIPls d -8.5 NA 114.32 91.68 IntlStkIdxISgn d -8.5 NA 34.29 27.49 IntlVal d -10.3 -.8 34.50 27.46 ItBdIdxIn +8.8 +8.5 11.95 10.98 ItBdIdxSl +8.8 NA 11.95 10.98 L-TGBII +14.3 NA 29.57 24.86 LTBond +11.7 +8.9 13.43 11.53 LTGradeAd +9.6 +8.4 10.26 8.99 LTInvGr +9.6 +8.3 10.26 8.99 LTTsry +14.5 +9.0 12.80 10.46 LTsryAdml +14.6 +9.1 12.80 10.46 LgBdIdxIs +11.8 +9.1 13.43 11.53 LgCpIdxAdm -5.2 +1.2 31.62 24.16 LgCpIdxInstl -5.2 +1.2 130.15 99.45 LgCpIdxInv -5.3 +1.1 25.29 19.32 LgCpIdxSg -5.2 NA 27.58 21.07 LifeCon -.7 +3.7 17.10 15.36 LifeGro -4.9 +1.6 23.83 19.06 LifeInc +1.6 +4.7 14.52 13.77 LifeMod -2.4 +3.0 20.85 17.66 M-C400GrIdxI -3.0 NA 139.76 107.21 M-C400ValIdxI -9.6 NA 128.85 98.69 MATx-ExInv +7.1 +4.7 10.56 9.72

WK NAV CHG 8.92 -.18 11.56 -.33 11.21 -.23 9.93 ... 10.88 -.06 10.66 -.09 10.41 -.12 10.17 -.12 10.12 -.14 10.28 -.15 11.51 -.33 17.81 +.14 15.70 -.17 15.60 -.18 13.17 -.25 13.36 -.23 19.16

-.30

18.41

-.58

15.65 -.15 21.39 -.65 19.79 -.28 46.15 -1.86 11.59

-.05

17.96 17.97 25.57 24.03 26.14 14.39 14.40 30.14 30.73

-.21 -.21 -.59 -.56 -.61 +.01 +.02 -1.10 -1.12

20.51 13.37 11.30

-.24 -.17 ...

86.18 +4.03 14.03

-.08

11.04 11.17 10.90 11.32 11.25 11.43 11.36

-.07 -.15 -.15 -.13 -.13 -.09 -.09

7.89

-.14

32.71 +.18 22.41

-.11

9.46

-.07

12.04 -.11 15.42 -.38 17.42 -.07 14.78 +.12 10.52 +.04 18.22 +.45 31.46 -.09 12.93 -.23 10.09 -.08 6.14 -.12 22.04 -.36 18.20 -.90 10.47 +.11 13.73 -.13 13.81 -.26 8.18 -.25 13.14 +.02 11.40 -.18 10.52 -.10 22.98 -.35 41.63 +2.53 17.68 -.29 9.19 -.01 12.49 -.28 13.10 -.03 12.91 -.09 10.78 -.01 11.10 -.13 10.47 -.15 12.36 -.30 17.96 -.27 13.91

-.17

8.53 10.53 5.94 10.56 19.19 15.37 12.86 23.48

-.22 -.09 -.05 -.08 -.03 -.02 -.31 -.40

12.29 14.68 10.56

-.15 -.26 -.19

48.53 +.27 23.45 +1.04 108.84 108.82 22.92 51.45 20.96 20.97 20.97 20.74 11.18 11.18 11.20 11.20 29.54 68.26 9.37 12.33 9.31 96.31 20.16 19.14 13.97 33.70 26.67 35.04 88.72 26.65 49.09 117.98 62.81 19.77 41.43 57.07 22.08 24.34 24.48 29.33 32.59 63.00 67.64 37.94 37.94 93.65 37.89 85.93 17.12 11.58 11.58 7.07 7.06 13.51 11.22 11.22 16.55 18.61 40.71 24.93 10.43 30.33 30.33 30.33 28.08 5.55 5.55 10.49 28.25 53.55 126.88 27.44 11.86 11.86 10.18 10.18 12.06 12.06 30.05 28.08 11.44 14.30 108.10 108.11 26.72 26.73 14.89 17.83 56.77 24.11 96.49 96.50 28.94 28.86 11.86 11.86 28.83 13.05 9.89 9.89 12.40 12.40 13.05 27.33 112.47 21.85 23.83 16.08 20.84 14.12 18.94 117.90 106.23 10.41

-1.81 -1.82 -.39 -.87 -.11 -.10 -.10 -.10 ... ... -.03 -.03 -.24 -.55 -.18 -.21 -.13 -1.36 -.24 -.25 -.18 -1.46 -1.15 -1.52 -3.84 -1.15 -.90 -1.88 -1.01 -.23 -.50 -.88 -.34 -.38 -.37 +1.03 -.36 -.46 -.50 -.42 -.42 -1.03 -.42 -1.65 -.33 -.02 -.02 -.13 -.13 -.61 +.16 +.16 -.38 -.48 -.86 -.53 -.04 -.22 -.22 -.22 -.21 -.16 -.16 -.06 -.16 -.14 -.32 +.06 +.15 +.15 +.02 +.02 +.21 +.21 -.17 +.65 +.27 +.33 -1.80 -1.80 -.41 -.41 -.19 -.23 -.71 -.42 -1.65 -1.65 -.49 -.75 +.15 +.15 +.89 +.10 -.09 -.09 +.40 +.40 +.10 -.40 -1.68 -.33 -.36 -.09 -.27 -.01 -.15 +1.05 -1.36 +.02

YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW MatIdxAdm d -8.6 +6.4 45.64 32.60 MdGrIxInv -5.1 NA 27.56 18.92 MdPDisGr -1.0 NA 18.36 15.28 MdPDisInv +.3 NA 17.34 14.98 MdVlIxInv -8.0 NA 23.09 17.37 MgC300GrI -3.1 NA 101.28 76.74 MgC300IxI -4.9 NA 91.61 70.89 MgC300VlI -6.8 NA 84.01 65.64 MgdPGrInv -3.1 NA 18.91 15.20 MidCapGr -3.9 +5.4 21.74 14.98 MidCapIdxIP -6.4 NA 111.65 86.72 MidCp -6.5 +2.8 22.57 16.28 MidCpAdml -6.5 +3.0 102.47 73.90 MidCpIst -6.5 +3.0 22.64 16.33 MidCpSgl -6.5 NA 32.34 23.33 MktNtrlIv d +8.3 0.0 10.45 9.51 Morg -5.2 +2.6 19.82 14.36 MorgAdml -5.1 +2.8 61.49 44.55 MuHYAdml +6.9 +4.4 10.76 9.82 MuInt +6.5 +4.9 13.99 13.04 MuIntAdml +6.5 +5.0 13.99 13.04 MuLTAdml +7.0 +4.6 11.37 10.39 MuLong +7.0 +4.5 11.37 10.39 MuLtd +2.9 +3.9 11.20 10.95 MuLtdAdml +2.9 +3.9 11.20 10.95 MuSht +1.3 +2.9 15.98 15.84 MuShtAdml +1.4 +3.0 15.98 15.84 NJLT +6.1 +4.4 12.03 11.05 NJLTAdml +6.2 +4.4 12.03 11.05 NYLT +6.4 +4.4 11.43 10.52 NYLTAdml +6.4 +4.5 11.43 10.52 OHLTte +6.5 +4.7 12.34 11.27 PALT +6.7 +4.4 11.38 10.48 PALTAdml +6.8 +4.5 11.38 10.48 PacIdInst d -8.7 -.6 11.28 9.38 PacIdSgnl d -8.7 NA 25.59 21.28 PacIdxAdm d -8.7 -.6 73.70 61.26 PacificId d -8.7 -.7 11.35 9.36 PrecMtls d -8.2 +7.6 28.35 19.77 Prmcp d -7.0 +3.5 71.63 55.28 PrmcpAdml d -7.0 +3.6 74.34 57.38 PrmcpCorI d -6.4 +3.8 15.02 11.35 R1000GrIdxI -3.0 NA 123.46 102.52 R1000ValIdxI -7.6 NA 119.74 95.34 R2000IdxI -10.4 NA 130.63 98.63 R3000IdxI -5.6 NA 121.10 98.73 REITIdx d +.5 +.6 21.00 16.17 REITIdxAd d +.5 +.7 89.61 69.01 REITIdxInst d +.6 +.7 13.87 10.68 REITIdxSg d +.5 NA 23.92 18.42 S-M600IdxI -7.9 NA 137.13 106.17 S-TGBII +1.4 NA 25.64 25.52 STBond +2.8 +5.2 10.77 10.48 STBondAdm +2.9 +5.3 10.77 10.48 STBondSgl +2.9 NA 10.77 10.48 STCor +2.0 +4.8 10.91 10.72 STFed +2.5 +5.1 11.03 10.69 STFedAdml +2.6 +5.2 11.03 10.69 STGradeAd +2.1 +4.9 10.91 10.72 STIGradeI +2.1 +5.0 10.91 10.72 STTsry +2.2 +4.5 10.95 10.62 STsryAdml +2.3 +4.7 10.95 10.62 SdBrdMItP -2.6 +.4 51.24 37.64 SelValu d -7.0 +2.3 20.68 15.69 SmCapIdx -8.8 +3.3 38.92 26.88 SmCapIdxIP -8.7 NA 112.50 84.94 SmCpIdAdm -8.7 +3.5 38.97 26.91 SmCpIdIst -8.7 +3.5 38.97 26.92 SmCpIndxSgnl -8.7 NA 35.11 24.26 SmGthIdx -6.7 +5.6 25.10 16.39 SmGthIst -6.6 +5.8 25.15 16.43 SmValIdx -11.0 +.9 17.52 12.82 SmVlIdIst -10.8 +1.1 17.57 12.86 StLCInst -2.8 +.1 25.38 19.26 StLCPlus -2.8 +.1 50.16 38.55 StSmCpEq -6.0 +.8 21.75 14.61 Star -2.0 +3.7 20.35 17.22 StratgcEq -4.5 -.1 21.15 14.58 TWStkIInv d -7.3 NA 21.09 16.48 TelSerAd d -5.4 +2.4 37.17 28.93 TgtRe2005 +2.9 +5.1 12.37 11.29 TgtRe2010 +.9 +4.5 23.61 20.83 TgtRe2015 -1.0 +3.9 13.18 11.36 TgtRe2020 -2.1 +3.4 23.57 19.84 TgtRe2030 -4.0 +2.4 23.37 18.82 TgtRe2035 -4.9 +2.1 14.18 11.22 TgtRe2040 -5.2 +2.1 23.31 18.38 TgtRe2045 -5.1 +2.1 14.64 11.60 TgtRe2050 -5.2 +2.1 23.21 18.44 TgtRetInc +3.1 +5.6 11.73 10.84 Tgtet2025 -3.1 +2.9 13.53 11.14 TotBdAdml +5.8 +6.9 11.06 10.43 TotBdInst +5.8 +6.9 11.06 10.43 TotBdMkInv +5.7 +6.8 11.06 10.43 TotBdMkSig +5.8 NA 11.06 10.43 TotIntl d -8.5 +.6 17.08 13.43 TotStIAdm -5.6 +1.4 34.44 26.02 TotStIIns -5.6 +1.5 34.44 26.02 TotStISig -5.6 NA 33.24 25.11 TotStIdx -5.7 +1.3 34.43 26.01 TxMBalAdm +.9 +3.9 21.03 18.69 TxMCaIn -5.2 +1.2 34.05 25.82 TxMCapAdm -5.2 +1.2 68.52 51.95 TxMGIAdm -5.2 +.7 61.13 47.04 TxMGIIn -5.2 +.7 29.75 22.89 TxMInist d -7.5 -.8 12.71 10.01 TxMIntlAdm d -7.4 -.9 12.70 10.00 TxMSCAdm -7.6 +2.8 30.32 21.04 TxMSCIst -7.6 +2.9 30.39 21.10 USGro -2.8 +2.3 20.27 14.70 USGroAdml -2.8 +2.5 52.51 38.09 USValue -5.1 -2.0 11.27 8.57 UtiIdxAdm d +3.1 +2.6 36.78 32.21 ValIdxAdm -7.0 -1.6 22.78 17.69 ValIdxIns -7.0 -1.6 22.78 17.69 ValIdxSig -7.0 NA 23.70 18.41 ValueIdx -7.1 -1.7 22.78 17.69 VdHiDivIx -2.0 NA 18.28 14.43 WellsI +3.5 +6.2 22.85 21.10 WellsIAdm +3.6 +6.3 55.36 51.11 Welltn -1.9 +4.2 33.11 28.27 WelltnAdm -1.9 +4.3 57.18 48.83 WndsIIAdm -5.7 -.7 50.09 38.41 Wndsr -10.1 -1.3 14.68 10.99 WndsrAdml -10.0 -1.2 49.54 37.07 WndsrII -5.7 -.8 28.22 21.64 ex-USIdxIP d -8.4 NA 107.98 86.60 Vantagepoint AggrOpp -11.8 +2.8 12.34 9.27 AllEqGr -6.9 +1.3 21.64 16.45 ConsGro -.6 +3.7 24.77 22.21 CorBdIxI +5.7 +6.4 10.49 9.95 EqInc -5.3 +.8 9.53 7.33 GrInc -6.1 +1.0 10.50 8.07 Growth -7.6 0.0 9.36 7.20 Intl -4.2 -.5 10.32 8.08 LgTmGro -4.3 +2.6 23.01 18.76 TradGro -2.7 +3.0 23.56 19.98 Victory DivrStkA f -10.5 +.6 16.59 12.83 InstDivSt -10.0 +.8 11.59 9.01 Virtus BalA m -.8 +3.3 14.27 11.74 EmgMktsIs -.8 +11.0 9.72 7.86 ForOppX +1.4 +2.2 24.60 20.01 MulSStA m +2.5 +6.1 4.91 4.73 MulSStC b +2.5 +5.8 4.96 4.77 RealEstA m +1.1 +.4 32.38 24.43 Waddell & Reed DivOppsA m -7.7 +.5 16.11 11.85 Waddell & Reed Adv AccumA m -4.9 +1.3 8.15 6.06 AssetStrA m -.9 +8.5 10.45 8.28 BondA m +5.5 +5.4 6.50 6.13 ContIncA m -1.5 +5.3 8.89 6.96 CoreInv A m -1.9 +3.9 6.66 4.76 GlbBondA m +1.2 +5.9 4.08 3.99 HiIncA m +1.0 +7.0 7.31 6.79 MuniBondA m +6.3 +5.2 7.45 6.88 MuniHiInA m +5.5 +3.9 4.89 4.50 NewCncptA m -5.7 +8.0 12.65 8.95 SciTechA m -4.9 +7.2 11.67 8.77 SmCapA m -7.1 +6.7 18.01 11.69 VanguardA m -2.1 +3.4 8.89 6.55 Wasatch LgCpVal d -8.7 +1.9 15.12 11.65 Lng/Sht d -3.5 +3.9 13.76 10.81 SmCapGr d -5.7 +5.8 44.20 29.97 Weitz PartVal -4.7 +1.2 22.57 16.73 ShtIntmInc +2.0 +5.7 12.57 12.35 Value -2.2 -1.3 30.97 23.85 Wells Fargo AdvCpGrI -7.5 +1.4 17.99 12.90 AstAlcA f -3.3 +1.3 20.05 16.50 AstAlllcA f -.3 +3.5 12.76 11.07 AstAlllcAdm -.2 +3.7 12.83 11.15 AstAlllcB m -.8 +2.7 12.63 10.93 AstAlllcC m -.8 +2.7 12.36 10.70 CmnStkInv -9.3 +5.4 22.81 16.61 EmgMktEqA f -8.7 +10.8 23.83 18.89 EndSelI -5.8 +1.4 10.89 7.87 GovScInst +5.8 +6.9 11.30 10.70 GovSecInv +5.6 +6.4 11.32 10.72 GrI +2.9 +11.1 40.76 26.80 GrowInv +2.6 +10.5 37.95 25.06 GrowthAdm +2.9 +10.9 39.76 31.98 IntlBdIs +8.6 +9.4 12.40 11.20 OmgGrA f -8.0 +8.0 41.19 28.71 OpportInv -9.6 +2.7 42.61 31.07 Otlk2020I +.4 +4.1 14.59 12.86 Otlk2030I -3.1 +3.3 15.48 12.68 Otlk2040I -5.5 +2.7 17.32 13.54 PrecMetA f -1.4 +15.8 93.72 73.23 PrmLrgCoGrA f -2.2 +7.6 10.38 7.43 SCpValInv -10.3 +3.7 34.38 26.41 STMuBdInv +2.6 +3.9 9.99 9.84 ShDurI +1.9 +5.2 10.52 10.27 SmCapGrI -12.0 +6.8 15.34 10.35 SmCapValA f -10.2 +3.7 33.83 26.00 SmCpOpAdm -10.5 +4.4 37.23 27.40 TotRetBAd +6.3 +7.4 13.17 12.31 TotRetBdI +6.4 +7.7 13.16 12.29 UlSTMInA f +1.0 +3.2 4.83 4.80 UlSTMInI +1.2 +3.5 4.82 4.80 UlSTMInIv +1.2 +3.2 4.83 4.80 UltSTInI +.6 +2.5 8.57 8.50 WBGrBl m -6.9 +.6 12.02 9.35 WlthConAl m -.4 +3.8 11.05 10.14 WlthModBl m -3.4 +2.5 11.60 9.90 Westcore PlusBd d +5.6 +6.1 11.10 10.63 Select d -8.4 +7.5 23.81 16.41 William Blair EmgMktGIn -11.5 +5.1 16.46 13.29 InslIntlG -9.6 +.6 15.14 12.16 IntlGrI d -10.0 +.4 23.53 18.92 IntlGrN m -10.2 +.1 22.99 18.47 Yacktman Focused d +1.2 +10.3 19.40 15.90 Yacktman d +1.1 +9.1 18.21 15.01

NAV 38.42 23.20 16.65 15.96 19.18 90.17 79.67 70.70 16.73 18.25 93.93 18.98 86.21 19.04 27.20 10.41 17.09 53.03 10.49 13.81 13.81 11.12 11.12 11.16 11.16 15.95 15.95 11.70 11.70 11.23 11.23 12.06 11.19 11.19 9.86 22.38 64.45 9.92 24.50 61.17 63.50 12.89 108.70 100.74 105.71 104.60 18.19 77.63 12.02 20.72 113.32 25.63 10.71 10.71 10.71 10.76 10.96 10.96 10.76 10.76 10.87 10.87 44.10 17.45 31.69 91.64 31.74 31.74 28.60 20.45 20.50 14.25 14.30 22.19 43.87 17.73 18.52 17.50 18.00 31.66 12.07 22.51 12.30 21.63 20.82 12.45 20.38 12.81 20.29 11.49 12.23 10.99 10.99 10.99 10.99 14.42 29.55 29.55 28.52 29.53 19.90 29.48 59.31 52.91 25.75 10.73 10.72 25.10 25.16 17.73 45.95 9.58 34.06 19.11 19.11 19.89 19.11 16.16 22.06 53.46 30.08 51.95 42.51 12.07 40.72 23.95 91.02

WK CHG +.23 +.05 -.06 -.03 -.15 -.83 -1.40 -1.88 -.12 +.01 -.25 -.05 -.23 -.06 -.08 +.02 -.06 -.17 -.06 +.01 +.01 -.02 -.02 +.01 +.01 ... ... -.02 -.02 -.01 -.01 -.03 -.01 -.01 -.12 -.26 -.74 -.11 +.76 -1.15 -1.19 -.18 -.90 -2.14 -2.55 -1.58 +.42 +1.81 +.28 +.48 -2.69 +.05 +.02 +.02 +.02 -.02 +.05 +.05 -.02 -.02 +.05 +.05 -.61 -.20 -.51 -1.46 -.51 -.51 -.46 -.19 -.19 -.33 -.32 -.32 -.62 -.33 -.16 -.10 -.32 -.61 +.04 -.01 -.05 -.15 -.22 -.15 -.27 -.16 -.26 +.05 -.11 +.08 +.08 +.08 +.08 -.24 -.45 -.45 -.43 -.46 -.11 -.43 -.87 -.89 -.43 -.15 -.15 -.57 -.57 -.09 -.22 -.15 -.17 -.45 -.44 -.46 -.44 -.23 -.03 -.06 -.37 -.65 -.92 -.20 -.67 -.52 -1.75

10.00 -.15 18.44 -.31 23.49 -.07 10.46 +.09 8.18 -.16 9.08 -.15 8.11 -.09 8.95 -.15 20.49 -.21 21.57 -.15 13.92 9.75

-.25 -.17

13.20 -.04 8.99 -.13 22.64 -.15 4.79 -.06 4.84 -.06 28.03 +.63 13.64

-.15

7.12 -.12 9.25 -.02 6.44 +.04 8.04 -.06 5.84 -.04 3.99 -.04 6.83 -.23 7.29 -.02 4.69 -.03 10.59 -.06 9.88 -.06 14.37 -.19 7.90 +.01 12.61 12.18 37.26

-.18 -.11 -.37

19.62 12.47 27.75

-.29 -.01 -.17

15.21 17.99 12.05 12.12 11.90 11.65 18.74 20.88 9.38 11.27 11.29 35.33 32.88 34.46 12.36 34.08 35.10 13.80 13.93 15.04 86.82 9.05 29.23 9.98 10.37 12.41 28.76 30.63 13.04 13.03 4.82 4.82 4.83 8.52 10.44 10.63 10.67

-.23 -.21 -.12 -.12 -.12 -.12 -.17 -.52 -.13 +.15 +.15 +.01 +.01 +.01 +.07 -.19 -.40 ... -.08 -.16 +4.12 -.03 +.13 -.01 +.03 -.05 +.13 -.67 +.10 +.10 -.01 ... ... -.02 -.18 -.02 -.09

11.05 +.05 19.29 +.02 14.12 12.99 20.11 19.63

-.44 -.11 -.18 -.18

17.90 +.18 16.73 +.14


CMYK PAGE 8D

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

B

U

S

I

N

E

S

S

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

FASHION FLOORS’ SAVINGS UP TO 75%!! Here is just a sample

G BRIN U YO R R FLOO ENTS M E R EASU

SAXO TEXTNY OR URE Y

ER B R E B

M

virgin 100% erber B Wool LTIMATE

are

our c A Sup hoice! er desig Carpet ne easy d for ca comp are els sq. ft. MANY GREre! ewhere COLORA AT $2.79 TIONS! s

sq. ft.

THE U AUTY! re IN BE elsewhe

$6.99

sq. ft.

q. ft.

comp

MULT SAXI OCOLOR NY

URED TEXTXONY SA

r maste Stain 100% ction in prote tiful u A bea nish yfi Saxon

.99

ere $2

lsewh

are e comp

sq. ft. sq. ft.

comp

GREA VALU T FINA ES! N AVAI CING LABL E!

are els sq. ft. ewhere $

ELEG PLUSANT H

Great for busy those a Kids ro reas, Famil oms, y room s

comp

1.99 s

q. ft.

Rich, and b Thick, eautifu l! AT SUPE RULY RB CA RPET .99 sq !

sq. ft ewhere . $3

are els

. ft.

PLUS MANY OTHERS TO CHOOSE FROM!! Immediate installation is available on our huge assortment of quality carpet, ceramic tile and vinyl flooring. Save big during this fabulous STOCK REDUCTION SALE. Choose from solid color saxonys, luxurious plushes, sculptured styles, berbers, indoor-outdoor, bath carpet and grass turf. Ceramic and vinyl in hundreds of patterns and colors. EVERY CARPET, CERAMIC TILE AND VINYL FLOOR IS ON SALE...NOW!!!

Schedule of Events

HUMFORD EQUITIES AND REALTY

4:00 PM – Midtown Village Festival. 5:00 PM – USAC Amateur Race 6:00 PM – Jack Williams Youth Races Ages U6, 7-10, 11-14. 6:30 PM – Pro/Elite Twilight Race 8:00 PM - Pro/Elite Awards 8:30 PM - Meet the Riders Party at Rodano’s!

Midtown Entertainment 4:00 P.M. to 4:20 P.M. Exhibition – Emerald Step Dancers 4:30 P.M. to 5:45 P.M. Band – Original Worship 6:00 P.M. to 6:30 P.M. Exhibition – Martin’s Karate School 6:30 P.M. to 8:00 P.M. Band – A.G.C.

Promoting Health & Fitness, Youth Development and Downtown Revitalization in NEPA!

HARDWOOD FLOORING • LAMINATE FLOORING HARD WOO D FL OOR ING

ING OOR L F E INAT LAM A beautifulldy ne desig n of tio collec and rs lo o c rns patte

REMN CARP ANT ET & V S UP INY

TO

L

OFF

NO-WAX VINYL FLOORING

• Mannigton • Armstrong • Congoleum

sq. ft.

Financing Plans Available To Fit Any Budget! 431 Market Street, Kingston Store Hours: Mon., Wed., 9 a.m.–6 p.m. Thur. 9 a.m.–8 p.m. Tue., Fri. 9 a.m.–5 p.m. • Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m.

570-287-4354

sq. ft.

MIC CERTA L I EUSA! In Made

UP TO

OFF

WIN A NEW BIKE!

KIDS 14 and under! Get Pre Registered for the races by 8/21 and be entered to win a Brand New Bicycle from Jack Williams Tire! Don’t Wait! Go To

NEPAcycling.com

Photography by Shadow Catcher, Ltd.

703232

3” or 5”

Wid Hand sq. ft. Scrap e comp are els Plank ped ewhere $4.49 sq. ft.


CMYK

THE TIMES LEADER

VIEWS

SECTION

timesleader.com

E

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

RICHARD L. CONNOR OPINION

Start to finish, our triathlon one great race

AP FILE PHOTOS

Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., is loaded onto an airplane in Tucson, Ariz., as she is transferred to a rehabilitation center in Houston, in January. Giffords recovered from a gunshot wound to the head.

GIFFORDS’ RECOVERY RENEWS FOCUS ON COVERAGE GAP FOR VETERANS By CURTIS TATE McClatchy Newspapers

W

ASHINGTON — From the critical moments after she suffered a gunshot wound to the head in January to her triumphant return to Congress last week for a vote on the debt limit deal, Rep. Gabrielle Giffords owes her recovery in no small part to veterans with similar injuries. Doctors and rehabilitation specialists have learned a great deal from the treatment of traumatic brain injuries in combat veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan. One in five veterans of those wars has suffered some form of traumatic brain injury, most commonly concussions from roadside bombs. Yet veterans’ health care doesn’t consistently cover cognitive rehabilitation therapy, the same therapy that’s helped Giffords and other wellknown figures — such as Sen. Tim Johnson of South Dakota and ABC News correspondent Bob Woodruff — get their lives back to normal after major brain traumas. “If we fail to give people the tools they need to do that, then we’ve shut them out of society,” said Susan Connors, the president of the Brain Injury Association of America.

injuries, they need more than just to learn how to walk and talk again. Cognitive rehabilitation can include speech and communication therapies, and therapies to boost memory and social skills and relearn routine tasks such as getting dressed and shopping at the grocery store. Connors compared it to elementary school. Except that “you aren’t learning it for the first time; you are relearning it,” she said. Pentagon spokeswoman Cynthia Smith said in an email that under the Tricare insurance plan, which covers members of the military, rehabilitation therapy “must be medically necessary and appropriate care keeping with accepted norms for medical pracA photo of U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords since she was shot was posted to her tice in the U.S.” public Facebook page by her aides in June. The woman in the background is Brain-injury advocates say Tricare her mother Gloria Giffords. The photo was taken May 17 at TIRR Memorial Hermann Hospital in Houston, the day after the launch of space shuttle and civilian health-insurance providEndeavour and the day before she had her cranioplasty. ers deny payment for cognitive rehabilitation on the basis that it isn’t proWhile some veterans are getting ve“It is a national disgrace,” said Paul ven effective, despite its wide emry good treatment, advocates say, oth- Rao, the president of the American brace in the medical community and ers are finding it difficult to get ther- Speech-Language Hearing Associ- by the Department of Veterans Afapy or even the testing to determine ation and Johnson’s speech therapist. whether they need it. When people suffer traumatic brain See GIFFORDS, Page 6E

August brings multiple jolts for Obama presidency By TOM RAUM Associated Press

WASHINGTON — It has been a lousy month for President Barack Obama. And August is not yet two weeks old. Running for re-election, he’s getting beaten up from the political left for making too many concessions and for abandoning the positions on which he campaigned. And he’s being attacked from the right by Republican conservatives who claim his spending and taxing policies are hampering the economic recovery. Over the past days, Obama has been confronted with humiliating blows on both the economy and in Afghanistan, while polls show deteriorating public support for both him and Congress amid growing public disillusionment with the nation’s policymaking process. Usually, August is a steamy, lazy time in the nation’s capital when not much gets doneandwhenbothCongressandusually the president go on vacation. But so far this month, the government avoided — just narrowly — a first-ever default on its financial obligations as it came just hours within beginning to run out of cash to pay its bills. A last-minute compromise with Republicans helped avoid the default but wasn’t enough to keep the government’s credit rating from being downgraded one notch from AAA to AA-plus by Standard & Poor’s. Americans want their presidents to be problem solvers. But polls suggest that a

AP PHOTO

President Barack Obama delivers a statement in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, Aug. 2, 2011, following the Senate’s passing of the debt ceiling agreement.

majority of the public has lost faith in the ability of both the president and Congress to fix the ailing economy. More than two years into Obama’s presidency, the nation’s unemployment rate remains painfully high, and the Federal Reserve warns there’s little chance of major economic growth over the next two years. “Obama’s trapped. He’s trapped by what happens with the financial crisis in Europe. He faces a Congress where Republicans will stop him dead in the tracks on his economic and jobs proposals,” said Thomas Mann, a scholar at the Brookings Institution. “And there’s a near consensus of pundits that he’s fundamentally flawed as a consequence of his personality.” In its downgrade, S&P cited the inability of the political parties to find common ground on getting the U.S. financial house in order — and poor prospects for doing so anytime soon.

A Washington Post poll released Wednesday showed that just 26 percent — barely one in four — have even some faith the government can solve its economic problems. And 71 percent see S&P’s political analysis in its downgrade — lambasting the nation’s policymaking process — as accurate. Obama’s restive Democratic base grumbles about his concessions to Republicans. TheycitehisfailuretoallowtheBushtaxcuts toexpireattheendoflastyearforthewealthy; his failure to get more education and construction-project spending in the deal that averted a government shutdown this past spring; and his decision to drop his push for tax increases as part of last week’s compromise to raise the government’s debt ceiling. The stock market has plunged more than 1,000 points from late July as investorsworriedaboutthetwineconomicperils of a financial meltdown in Europe and

political near-paralysis in Washington. The tumble, which continued Wednesday with a 519-point drop in the Dow industrials, along with slower-than-expected U.S. economic growth, reinforces expectations that the economy could be on the verge of slipping back into a new, or “double dip,” recession. Obama spoke from the White House earlier in the week in an attempt to calm markets, claiming that “lack of political will” — notthenation’sfinancialstatus—ledtothe debt deadlock and the downgrade. But it did not have its intended effect. Tomany,hisperformancereinforcedfears thatObamahasbeendoingtoolittletotryto fix the economy and promote job creation. Tryingtoanswersuchcriticism,thepresident was going to a battery factory in Holland,Mich.,onThursdaytopromotehisjobs agenda, followed by an economic-themed bus tour through the Midwest next week. He’s going to Martha’s Vineyard with his family on vacation at the end of this month. Shouldn’t Obama do something extraordinary, given the severity of the economic problem,suchascuttinghisvacationshortor summoning Congress back into session? Presidential spokesman Jay Carney, responding to that question at his daily briefing, said the president is “focused on the things that he can do that can be effective. ... When you say ‘extraordinary,’ I mean ... if you’re talking about a stunt, I don’t think a stunt is what the American people are looking for.”

IRONIC AS IT MAY BE, this test of fitness and endurance we will witness in today’s triathlon in the Back Mountain grew from a latenight discussion in a bar. I was there along with several friends but, like much of the 1980s, some nights are a blur. My recollection over the years was that we were at a tavern called “Monty’s” in Luzerne, just off the Dallas highway. My late friend Rusty Flack, whose mental acuity for long ago facts exceeded mine, said we were at Uptown. I loved watching him feign a slow-burning temper tantrum to correct me when I said “Monty’s” was the birthplace of the Back Mountain Triathlon. “Uptown,” he would growl. He was correct but I could not give him any quarter. Someone will be missed here in the recreation of that night and the group involved. I know Lee Turner was there and so were Steve Alinikoff and Dr. Harry Reich. Someone knew we needed a person who knew endurance events and had an eye and knack for detail. Tim Bauman was our man. We were discussing our amazement at the strenuous challenge of the Ironman Race and its fitness-fanatical contestants when someone said a shorter, easier version was still called a triathlon and was an event where we could compete. Many of us were runners. Hardly anyone had ever cycled seriously, and a few of us had at one time been competitive swimmers. No one in the group had ever attempted all three. “Triathlon?” someone asked to no one in particular. “Where can we find one?” No one knew. “Let’s start our own,” said a voice among the din of bar noise. We all agreed this would be a splendid idea, one sounding particularly keen at midnight in a bar. I said The Times Leader would sponsor the event. And so, 30 years ago the local triathlon began. We fumbled our way through the first one with many of us competing. The bicycle course was extremely demanding. The swim, at a mile, was too long. We started the race with the swim and everyone standing together at the beach at Harveys Lake with no placings for ability or predicted times. The gun went off at that first race and several competitors never made it or barely made it to the water before being trampled by the crowd. Luckily there were no injuries. Now, the best athletes are at the front. Bill Ruth of Bethlehem won both the first race and the second one. In the latter he had an accident not far from the Misericordia campus and carried his bike to the transition area where the run began. Injured with a leg wound, he took off on the run segment and defended his first title with another win. Nearly everyone in my group from the bar who competed now claims to have beaten all of the others in the first two. None of us bothers to check the official results from those years to be certain. Dreams die hard. One of my personal favorite stories from the first triathlon involves my friend, Lee Turner, who was among those I trained with that summer. He was an experienced runner, especially compared to me. He also thought he was a better swimmer, but did not realize I had been swimming early mornings all winter at the YMCA with a group from The Times Leader. In that group was reporter Jane Adonizio, who also competed in several of the triathlons. She went on to be an area television personality. On race day Turner and I drove to Harveys Lake together and placed our bicycles next to one another in stands. He expected that was the last time he would see me until he greeted my arrival at the finish line. We entered the lake side-by-side and I saw him fall behind as we raced. He had lost sight of me. Turner emerged from the swim confident he had beaten me. When he arrived at the spot where we placed our bikes, mine was gone. “Poor Richard,” he said he muttered. “Someone stole his bike.” He is the only person I am certain I finished ahead of from our group. See CONNOR, Page 6E


K PAGE 2E

➛ S E R V I N G T H E P U B L I C T R U S T S I N C E 18 81

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

THE TIMES LEADER

Editorial

www.timesleader.com

OUR OPINION: TOURISM INDUSTRY

BILL O’BOYLE/THE TIMES LEADER

Gov. Tom Corbett touts tourism in Northeastern Pennsylvania, but will he safeguard the region’s wild and scenic areas?

Guv misses boat on protecting wilds

G

OV. TOM Corbett’s kayak trip in Northeastern Pennsylvania last week, ostensibly to promote tourism, gave many people the same queasy sensation as when they first saw presidential candidate Michael Dukakis perched in an army tank. It just felt fake. The governor, whose Susquehanna River excursion covered parts of Wyoming and Luzerne counties, rightly acknowledged that drawing visitors to the state’s outdoor recreation spots and rural businesses is “essential to our local economies.” Indeed, Pennsylvania relies on a robust tourism industry, catering to state park patrons and museum-goers, anglers and skiers. But as a tourism official from the Endless Mountains Visitors Bureau attested, state funding for marketing its destinations has been on a steady decline. Similarly, state dollars have been yanked in this year’s budget from the agency that oversees the state park system; the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources will receive $55 million, down from $82 million. Meanwhile, the natural gas industry continues to make in-

roads into many of Pennsylvania’s most wild and pristine places, raising concerns about habitat destruction and other potential harms. If prime trout streams get spoiled, how will the state account for the lost dollars from visiting fishermen? Will hunting revenues be hurt as drilling pads pop up across the Northern Tier? Does anyone expect birdwatchers to book motel rooms in territory bustling with heavy trucks and other sounds of industry? The governor continues to try to float past these and other issues, saying an extraction tax on the natural gas industry isn’t necessary. On this matter, he’s all wet. A healthy tourism industry and a strong natural gas industry might be able to co-exist. However, Corbett and the General Assembly need to ensure that adequate safeguards are in place to protect our wild areas; those safeguards include beefed up regulations regarding natural gas exploration and a drilling tax dedicated in part to environmental cleanup. Please, governor, don’t leave the residents of our beautiful, mountain regions up a creek without a paddle.

QUOTE OF THE DAY “I’ve represented people who committed third-degree murder who have gotten seven to eight years. It’s quite a shock.” Al Flora One of the attorney’s representing former Luzerne County Judge Mark Ciavarella last week suggested that his client’s 28-year prison sentence constitutes “cruel and unusual punishment.” Ciavarella, who was found guilty of racketeering and other charges earlier this year, intends to appeal his conviction and sentence.

OTHER OPINION: HEAD INJURIES

Retailer offers aid to young athletes

D

ICK’S SPORTING Goods aims to score big against head injuries among young athletes with its plans to provide free concussion screenings for up to 1 million middle and high school students. The purpose of this worthwhile project, called Protecting Athletes through Concussion Education, or PACE, is to raise awareness of the dangers associated with concussions and to produce baseline results for athletes before they are injured. Once they have baseline readings, doctors and coaches can use them to more accurately diagnose a concussion

and monitor an athlete’s recovery. That should ensure players won’t return to competition before their brains are sufficiently healed to play safely. Dick’s is teaming up with the testing program ImPACT. The 20-minute test is used by most professional and college sports teams, but outside the Pittsburgh area, not many high schools use it. Dick’s hopes to change that by offering a free 12-month subscription to ImPACT, which includes testing, clinics and training programs, to the first 3,335 schools that apply for PACE. Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Republicans and public left holding debt disaster bag IN DON Marquis’ classic satirical book, “Archy and Mehitabel,” Mehitabel the alley cat asks plaintively, “What have I done to deserve all these kittens?” That seems to be the pained reaction of the Obama administration to the financial woes that led to the downgrading of America’s credit rating, for the first time in history. There are people who see no connection between what they have done and the consequences that follow. But President Barack Obama is not likely to be one of them. He is a savvy politician who will undoubtedly be satisfied if enough voters fail to see a connection between what he has done and the consequences that followed. To a remarkable extent, he has succeeded, with the help of his friends in the media and the Republicans’ failure to articulate their case. Polls find more people blaming the Republicans for the financial crisis than are blaming the president. Why was there a financial crisis in the first place? Because of runaway spending that sent the national debt up against the legal limit. But when all the big spending bills were being rushed through Congress, the Democrats had such an overwhelming majority in both houses of Congress that nothing the Republicans could do made the slightest difference. Yet polls show that many people today are blaming the Republicans for the country’s

COMMENTARY THOMAS SOWELL financial problems. But, by the time Republicans gained control of the House of Representatives, and thus became involved in negotiations over raising the national debt ceiling, the spending that caused that crisis in the first place already had been done – and done by Democrats. Had the Republicans gone along with President Obama’s original request for a “clean” bill – one simply raising the debt ceiling without any provisions about controlling federal spending – would that have spared the country the embarrassment of having its government bonds downgraded by Standard & Poor’s credit-rating agency? To believe that would be to believe that it was the debt ceiling, rather than the runaway spending, that made Standard & Poor’s think that we were no longer as good a credit risk for buyers of U.S. government bonds. In other words, to believe that is to believe that a congressional blank check for continued record spending would have made Standard & Poor’s think that we were a better credit risk. If that is true, then why is Standard & Poor’s still warning that it might have to downgrade America’s credit rating yet again? The national debt ceiling is only one of the many false assurances that the government

In short, the Republicans have now been maneuvered into being held responsible for the spending orgy that Democrats alone had the votes to create. gives the voting public. The national debt ceiling has never actually stopped the spending that causes the national debt to rise to the point where it is getting near that ceiling. The price of getting the deal has been having the Republicans agree to sit on a special bipartisan congressional committee that either will come to an agreement on spending cuts before Thanksgiving or will have the budgets of both the Defense Department and Medicare cut drastically. Since neither side can afford to be blamed for a disaster like that, this virtually guarantees that the Republicans will have to either go along with whatever new spending and taxing that the Democrats demand or risk losing the 2012 election by sharing the blame for another financial disaster. In short, the Republicans have now been maneuvered into being held responsible for the spending orgy that Democrats alone had the votes to create. Republicans have been had – and so has the country. The recent, short-lived budget deal turns out to be not even a Pyrrhic victory for the Republicans. It has the earmarks of a Pyrrhic defeat. Thomas Sowell is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305. His website is www.tsowell.com.

A record number of Americans have Congress’ number THE AMERICAN people believe all kinds of things. Three years ago, for example, a Harris Poll found that 71 percent believe in angels but only 47 percent believe in evolution. That’s not all. Skepticism on global warming has been increasing, and surprising numbers believe all kinds of nonsense about the U.S. government’s role in the 9/11 attacks. Yet politicians who’ve been counting on voter gullibility in the recent debt-ceiling debacle ought to be worried, because in this case, people seem to have a pretty good idea of what happened. First, they know it was a clown show. In a recent poll by the Pew Research Center and The Washington Post, respondents were asked to characterize the budget talks in a single word. Sixty-six percent branded them “ridiculous,” 42 percent used some form of “disgust,” and 36 percent used a version of “stupid.” If that’s not clear enough, a new New York Times/CBS News poll found that 82 percent of Americans disapprove of the way Congress is doing its job – a record. And whom do the voters mostly blame? Well, Pew found that 42 percent said their impression of congressional Republicans had grown less favorable, but only 30 percent said the same of congressional Democrats.

COMMENTARY DANIEL AKST The effect was less pronounced in the Times/CBS poll, which found that 72 percent disapproved of how congressional Republicans handled the talks, while 66 percent disapproved of how Democrats handled them. But when you look at how respondents felt about the issues, it’s clear they overwhelmingly reject the GOP’s stance. By a 62-29 landslide of opinion, they said creating jobs is now a higher priority than cutting spending. And 63 percent said that, in cutting the deficit, taxes should be raised on households earning $250,000 or more annually. That’s in keeping with a bevy of other polls showing that Americans either support higher taxes to close the deficit, or believe they are unavoidable. Finally, when asked if each party should stick to its position or compromise to get things done, 85 percent chose compromise. It’s hard not to conclude that the voters place the blame on congressional Republicans. The positions endorsed by large majorities – focusing on jobs, taxing the rich and compromising for the greater good – were those of Democrats, not the GOP. And despite an epic display of negotiating

ineptitude by President Barack Obama, people seem to be giving him the benefit of the doubt. Asked about his performance in the debttalks, Times/CBS respondents were evenly divided, with 46 percent approving and 47 percent disapproving – a much better rating than given to either party in Congress. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., has made it clear that the Republicans’ primary aim is to defeat Obama in the next election, and they seem to be conducting themselves accordingly, digging in their heels at every turn no matter what the consequences. A headline in the satirical newspaper the Onion captured this approach nicely: “Obama Turns 50 Despite Republican Opposition.” The strategy makes a certain sense. After all, if the goal is to shrink government, why not discredit Washington by gumming up the works? And if budget cuts stifle a fragile economic recovery, well, a poor economy is usually a very bad thing for a sitting president. But the polls show that most Americans want government to work – and to create jobs. All of which suggests that the GOP is pursuing a strategy likely to backfire when the president faces re-election in 2012. Daniel Akst, a columnist for Newsday, is the author of “We Have Met the Enemy: Self-Control in an Age of Excess” from Penguin Press.

Editorial Board RICHARD L. CONNOR Editor and Publisher JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ Vice President/Executive Editor

MARK E. JONES Editorial Page Editor PRASHANT SHITUT President/Impressions Media

RICHARD L. CONNOR Editor and Publisher PRASHANT SHITUT President

JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ Vice President/Executive Editor RICHARD DEHAVEN Vice President/Circulation

ALLISON UHRIN Vice President/ Chief Financial Officer


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

F

O

Our political process is a system that works OF ALL the endlessly repeated conventional wisdom in today’s Washington, the most lazy, stupid and ubiquitous is that our politics is broken. On the contrary. Our political system is working well (I make no such claims for our economy), indeed, precisely as designed – profound changes in popular will translated into law that alters the nation’s political direction. The process has been messy, loud, disputatious and often rancorous. So what? In the end, the system works. Exhibit A is Wisconsin. Exhibit B is Washington itself. The story begins in 2008. The country, having lost confidence in Republican governance, gives the Democrats full control of Washington. The new president, deciding not to waste a crisis, attempts a major change in the nation’s ideological trajectory. Hence his two signature pieces of legislation: a near-$1 trillion stimulus, the largest spending bill in galactic history; and a health care reform that places one-sixth of the economy under federal control. In a country where conservatives outnumber liberals 2-1, this causes a reaction. In the 2010 midterms, Democrats suffer a massive repudiation at every level. In Washington, Democrats suffer the greatest loss of House seats since 1948. In the states, they lose more than 700 state legislative seats – the largest reversal ever – resulting in the loss of 20 state chambers. The tea party-propelled, debtconscious Republicans then move to confront their states’ unsustainable pension and health care obligations – most boldly in Wisconsin, where the new governor proposes a radical reorientation of the power balance between public-sector unions and elected government. In Madison, the result is general mayhem – drum-banging protesters, frenzied unions, statehouse occupations, opposition legislators fleeing the state to prevent a quorum. A veritable feast of creative democratic resistance. In the end, however, they fail. The legislation passes. Then, further resistance. First, Democrats turn an otherwise sleepy state Supreme Court election into a referendum on the union legislation, the Democrats’ candidate being widely expected to overturn the law. The unions/Democrats lose again. And then Tuesday, recall elections for six Republican state senators, three being needed to return the Senate to Dem-

MAIL BAG

R

U

M

ANOTHER VIEW

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 PAGE 3E

A photograph by Aimee Dilger and words by Mark E. Jones

COMMENTARY CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER ocratic control and restore balance to the universe. Yet despite millions of union dollars, the Republicans hold the Senate. The unions/Democrats lose again. The people spoke; the process worked. Yes, it was raucous and divisive, but change this fundamental should not be enacted quietly. This is not midnight basketball or school uniforms. This is the future of government-worker power and the solvency of the states. It deserves big, serious, animated public debate. Precisely of the kind Washington (exhibit B) just witnessed over its debt problem. You know: The debt-ceiling debate universally denounced as dysfunctional, if not disgraceful, hostage taking, terrorism, gunto-the-head blackmail. Spare me the hysteria. What happened was that the 2010 electorate, as represented in Congress, forced Washington to finally confront the national debt. It was a triumph of democratic politics – a powerful shift in popular will finding concrete political expression. But only partial expression. Debt hawks are upset that the final compromise doesn’t do much. But it shouldn’t do much. They won only one election. They were entrusted, as of yet, with only one-half of one branch of government. But they did begin to turn the aircraft carrier around. The process did bequeath a congressional super-committee with extraordinary powers to reduce debt. And if that fails, the question – how much government, how much debt – will go to the nation in November 2012. Which is also how it should be. The conventional complaint is that the process was ugly. Big deal. You want beauty? Go to a museum. Democratic politics was never meant to be an exercise in aesthetics. Moreover, without this long ugly process, the debt issue wouldn’t even be on the table. We’d still be whistling our way to Greece. The process is working. Notice how the loudest complaints about “broken politics” come from those who lost the debate. It’s understandable for sore losers to rage against the machine. But there’s no need for the rest of us to parrot their petulance. Charles Krauthammer’s email address is letters@charleskrauthammer.com.

oes the sunflower seed question why it wasn’t fortunate enough to be deposited in a far-away field or why it hasn’t been granted more favorable D growing conditions? Or does it simply sprout, bringing color and beauty to its corner of the world?

Eisenhower’s calm leadership a fitting model WHEN Dwight D. Eisenhower was elected president in 1952, he came to office convinced that among the obligations he assumed was that of calming the nation. His predecessors, Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Harry Truman, had governed through a series of crises and calamities – World War II, the Berlin Crisis, the Soviet atomic bomb, the Korean War, the 1952 steel strike – and Ike believed that Washington’s fixation with crisis was unsettling to the American people and destabilizing to the economy. With that in mind, he set out to project an aura of calm command, and consistently sought a place between the anti-communist Republicans who anchored the right wing of his party and the New Deal Democrats who pulled that party to its left. It was, Eisenhower liked to say, his “Middle Way,” a “practical working basis between extremists” arrived at through patient and temperate negotiation. Few lessons of Eisenhower’s era have been more lost on the heirs to his political legacy. The events of the past two weeks have included many political sins, but among the most striking is the rush of America’s leaders to court crisis rather than exhibit sober, sound leadership. For weeks, Republican House members risked economic calam-

mitment to reducing tensions and seeking compromise did not always serve him or the country well. In the area of civil rights, he JIM NEWTON sought in vain for a center, imagining falsely that those who demanded recognition of their ity by their refusal to raise the debt ceiling – an act that dozens rights were just as “extreme” as those who sought to suppress of Congresses have routinely those rights. Indeed, Eisenhower approved in the decades since acknowledged that there should Eisenhower’s presidency. Some be an exception for compromise seemed to enjoy it. As U.S. Rep. in matters of moral urgency, Michele Bachmann said glibly: though he unfortunately did not “Someone has to say no. I will.” And House Speaker John Boehn- place civil rights in that category. But even there, his legacy is er fairly shouted when he proinstructive. For congressional claimed, “I stuck my neck out a Republicans who were willing to mile.” jeopardize America’s credit, it In public, Eisenhower would not be caught shouting or boast- would be a defense to say that they were taking a stand on a ing (in private, he had a withermatter of moral principle. If so, ing temper), but his devotion to subdued leadership was founded however, what is the great principle that undergirded this fiasco? on more than personal style. He Is it immoral to raise the debt believed that the American peoceiling, as such stalwart conserple were naturally industrious vatives as Ronald Reagan did so and that, left alone, American business was entrepreneurial and often without incident? Or is the moral abomination, perhaps, the innovative. willingness to raise taxes, as Some of those same notions, Obama had hoped to do as part though expressed in different of a larger deficit-reduction packlanguage, underscore the stakes age? today. The few calm voices in The latter is closer to the our politics warn that business and investment are paralyzed by Republican mark, but it, too, falls apart as a moral proposition. uncertainty. Millions of AmerJohn Podesta, who served as icans are out of work in part chief of staff in the Clinton White because employers are reluctant House, recently pointed out to to add jobs while the governthe U.S. Conference of Mayors ment is so tumultuous. No busithat the entire amount of reveness can be reassured by congressional leaders who fume and nue that Obama was seeking bicker as the government careens could have been achieved merely by allowing the Bush tax cuts to toward the precipice. In fairness, Eisenhower’s com- expire, returning the top margin-

COMMENTARY

No business can be reassured by congressional leaders who fume and bicker as the government careens toward the precipice. al tax rate in the U.S. code from 35 percent to 39 percent, where it was when Clinton left office. As Podesta noted, the country hardly seemed afflicted by the Clinton-era rates; the economy grew, many Americans prospered and Clinton actually produced budget surpluses. In fact, those surpluses were the first – and last – by any president since, yep, Eisenhower. And the Eisenhower prosperity – rapid economic growth and real, sustained increases in household income – occurred in an era when the top bracket of taxpayers paid federal income taxes of 91 percent on all income above $400,000 a year (admittedly, a lot of money in 1959). In light of that history, can a 4 percent rise in the top marginal rate of taxes constitute such a moral imperative that elected leaders are entitled to refuse to compromise on principle? Eisenhower believed in balanced budgets, and unlike his successors, he actually delivered them. That’s because he was a leader, not a shouter. Jim Newton is the Los Angeles Times’ editor-at-large and the author of “Eisenhower: The White House Years,” to be published in October.

LETTERS FROM READERS

A Valley visit is much enjoyed

W

hile in the Wyoming Valley to observe my sister’s 80th birthday, I had a chance to get to the Lyndwood section of Hanover Township, where I grew up. I decided to ride through the old neighborhood, and I must say that Lyndwood residents should be commended for the way the neighborhood looks; the lawns and landscaping are beautiful. I am proud to say that I grew up there. May the Lord bless all of you and keep Lyndwood looking as great as it does. That same day, I attended Holy Cross in Buttonwood and had the opportunity to address people there and reminisce about the old times in Buttonwood. The people were so kind and hospitable. It was a pleasure to be with them. Thank you; it was such a great experience. Rev. Edward J. Kaczorowski Bear, Del.

MOUNTAIN LAURELS Mountain Laurels is a regular series of letters from readers conveying thanks to individuals or groups for their support, help or kindness.

Fire victims thank helpful neighbors

O

n Aug. 1 my family’s home was destroyed by fire. The generosity we have been shown by family, friends, neighbors and even strangers has been overwhelming. A special thanks goes to the Red Cross. I have lived in Pittston my whole life and to see the way everyone comes together in tragedy leaves me speechless. We are – and will always be – so grateful to everyone. We thank everyone for their thoughts and prayers. We are so thankful that we are alive, and that’s all that really matters. However, so many questions are left unanswered as to why it took 18 to 20 minutes for a fire department to reach our house when

there are two fire companies less than five minutes away. I will be looking into this to find some answers. Mary Danaher Hughestown

A lovely tribute on Lithuanian Day

I

thank Carol Gargan and Chester Kulesa, Anthracite Heritage Museum directors, for the outstanding tribute paid to my late father, Bronis Voveris. A wonderful choral tribute honoring my dad and Lithuanian Heritage Day at McDade Park, Scranton, was performed by former members of the King’s College Men in Red Glee Club and Chanteuses. Thank you all. Ronald Voveris and family Yatesville

Time to roll up our sleeves, get down to business

W

ell, here we are: Standard & Poor’s downgraded our nation’s debt rating, there is anger over what has happened in Washington, the economy is fragile and the Chinese have called us “irresponsible” for not having our financial house in order. Clearly not the country I want to pass on to my children. So what do we do? Do we rant about the things we see are wrong? Do we stop reading the newspaper so we don’t know? Or do we do what generations of Americans have done in the past: Roll up our sleeves and make a difference, big or small, to improve the situation. I think we’d all agree the key to getting the country on better footing is to augment genuine job growth. So what can you do? • Buy American. For example, if you have the chance to buy a car, consider cars made in the United States. Most people know that Toyota, Honda and BMW have plants here; but do you know which models come

out of these plants? Know what models are made in the United States and please give them your full consideration. Make sure the GM, Ford or Chrysler product you’re considering is made in the United States if that is your choice, as some are assembled in other countries. • Buy American No. 2. Read labels and check to see where clothing, food and other items are made or grown. Every dollar we spend on Americanmade or grown goods helps to support jobs. We have many good (fair) trading partners, but there are others who manipulate their currencies to gain an upper hand. Know which they are and make good choices. • Start your own business. If you have an idea for a product or service, calculate the risk, develop a plan, identify a market and – if most point in the right direction – go for it. Some of the greatest businesses in history have been started during difficult economic times (GE, FedEx, CNN and Microsoft, to name a few).

• If you own a business, make that capital investment you’ve been delaying or hire a new sales person to drive new business. • If you’re not working and collecting unemployment, look for work. Get the résumé cranked up, call companies that might be hiring, network and find your next opportunity. The truth is, companies are shying away from hiring people who have been on unemployment for a long time. They worry about loss of skills; don’t let this be you. It’s in everyone’s interest to have a high-performing work force. This has never been a country of victims, and now is not the time to start. We all can make a difference; and every act, big or small, will help. President Bill Clinton coined a great saying: There’s nothing wrong with America that can’t be fixed by what’s right with America. Let’s prove him right. Chris Hackett Kingston Township


CMYK PAGE 4E

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

P

E

R

S

P

E

C

T

I

V

E

S

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

Debt is a sideshow on national stage while job creation is No. 1 priority THE STORY is still jobs. House Speaker John Boehner doesn’t think so. He joyfully BRIAN GILMORE declared that the Republican Party got tea party and now the Republicans, “98 percent” of what it wanted in the debt was of concern to only 7 percent of those who responded. limit deal. In fact, poll after poll reveals that But that deal didn’t create a single the public considers jobs to be the job. In fact, it is likely to cost jobs, subject their elected officials should with all the cuts that are going to be address. required. Little wonder: Unemployment is at Lost in the months of debate over 9.1 percent. For whites, the rate is 8.1 the debt issue was the fact that the percent; for blacks, it is at 15.9 perAmerican people are much more cent. For Hispanics, the rate is more concerned about jobs than the debt. than 11 percent. More than half of the respondents Long-term unemployment – the in a CBS News/New York Times poll measure of those people unemployed at the end of June stated that the issue of jobs and the economy was the for more than six months – provides an even more distressing story. Of the most pressing one. The country’s unemployed, 44 percent fall into this debt, one of the favorite issues of the

COMMENTARY

MAIL BAG

category. These numbers are worse than the numbers recorded during the Great Depression. Republicans like to assert that a huge spike in federal regulations under President Obama and taxes are behind the lousy economy and slow job growth. Not true, even according to David Frum, the conservative columnist and a former special assistant to President George W. Bush. Frum recently noted that new federal regulations under Obama have been insignificant in number and there have been no new tax increases on businesses put forth by the Obama administration. While the Republicans are completely resistant to additional government spending to create jobs, they have offered no alternative policy. But there are jobs that can be immediately created right away if only

the political infighting would cease. The nation’s bridges, roads and tunnels are falling apart. The nation’s 86,000 miles of coastline also present an opportunity to employ workers. According to Tony Munoz, editor-in-chief of “Maritime Executive” magazine, more than $5 billion in receipts from the Harbor Maintenance Tax trust fund is available to put people back to work in the nation’s maritime system. State and local governments across the country are strapped for cash to keep workers employed; these entities could use some support from the federal government to assist their economies and keep people on the payrolls. These are just three examples. But most of all, consider the Commerce Department report that recently described the 2008 recession as

more of an economic depression. The government must act as decisively as President Franklin Roosevelt did during the Great Depression and get people back to work now. Republicans continue to focus on the strange goal of maintaining tax advantages for the superrich and slashing government, even amid this job crisis. And Obama, at least until now, has failed to prioritize jobs. Instead of scoring partisan political points, our elected officials must do what the people want and need: Create jobs now. Brian Gilmore is a writer for Progressive Media Project, a source of liberal commentary on domestic and international issues; it is affiliated with The Progressive magazine. Readers may write to the author at: Progressive Media Project, 409 E. Main St., Madison, Wis. 53703; e-mail: pmprojprogressive.org.

LETTERS FROM READERS

Your vote will decide economy

freely determine what vocation you chose to pursue. This will be done by selectively giving out college loans and forcing people into brackets set up by committees who profess to know what’s good for the country, not you. In the Armed Forces today they might promise to put you in cryptography, but when you enlist put you into photography. They call it “fulfilling the needs of the service.” That’s what will be done in a socialist state! Ask any person who came of age in the 1930s in England. They will set you straight. The resistance to classical economics by liberal progressives can be explained by naiveté and ignorance or by a rigid, ideological stance that will suffer anything to hold down our economy and leaves many problems, such as our “fiscal crisis,” irreconcilable. If you want “cradle to the grave” security with the government in complete control

W

e are in the throes of deciding what form of economy we will have. Will we continue to have a free market? Or will we have a planned economy? First, we must understand that collectivism and individual liberty are antithetical. Therefore, to speak of social democracy is nonsense. If you embrace socialism, you will lose your individual liberties. President Obama seemingly has embraced socialism and will, with collectivism, take away our freedoms. Progressive/collectivists will nationalize whole industries and will kill the competitive drive so necessary to a strong economy. Think about the government takeover of college loans, mortgages (nine out of 10), GM and Chrysler. This is only the beginning. You will lose your right to

49th Annual

of you, vote for a liberal/ progressive; if you want to make your own life choices, vote conservative or libertarian. James U. Sinclair Wright Township

Writer pins blame on ruling class

I

n response to columnist Kevin Blaum’s commentary (“Raise ceiling through use of executive power,” July 31): You, sir, are the true tyrant, with your backing of socialism programs and the unsustainable debt that is destroying this country. When I was 10 years old, working as a pin boy, I received my first check – which had Social Security taxes removed. I didn’t like it, but trusted the government. When I was 23, the Great Society programs were created, and my question was

Admission Just $8!!

WEDNESDAY, SEPT 7TH - ALAN JACKSON TRIBUTE THURSDAY, SEPT 8TH - NOMAD: “NORTH OF THE MASON DIXON” FRIDAY, SEPT. 9TH - BADLEES SATURDAY, SEPT 10TH - BLUES BROTHERHOOD SATURDAY, SEPT 10TH - RYAN PELTON AS ELVIS SUNDAY, SEPT 11TH - MARK HINDS AS KENNY ROGERS SUNDAY, SEPT 11TH - RICK K AND THE ALL NIGHTERS OTHER EVENTS INCLUDE

Barnyard Olympics - Sunday, Sept. 11th at 3pm in the Arena; Tractor Obstacle Rodeo - Sunday, Sept. 11th at 5pm in the Arena; 4-H Fun Horse Show - Friday, Sept. 9th at 6pm in the Arena; Fair Princess Contest - Saturday, Sept. 10th at 1pm in the Amphitheater

FIREWORKS FINALE - SUNDAY,SEPT.11th @ 9pm This year’s fireworks will be better than ever! Pack a blanket or some chairs and come enjoy the show Fireworks Done by Pizza Paul

SUNDAY, SEPT 11TH

The Luzerne County Fair invites All Military Personnel and their immediate families to the fair FREE of Charge from 12-4pm on Sunday, September 11th. All Military personnel AND their family members must have proper Military PHOTO id for admittance.

PARADE - SUNDAY, SEPT 11TH

Legion Riders, Fire Trucks, Ambulances And Bagpipers Will Be Entering The Fairgrounds At High Noon & Parade Around The Grounds To The Horse Arena.

FAIR HOURS:

Wednesday & Thursday - 4PM - 11:00PM • FRIDAY - 4PM - 11:30PM Saturday - 11AM - 11:30PM • Sunday 11AM - 9:30PM

3605 Route 118 • Lehman, Pennsylvania 570.675.FAIR www.luzernecountyfair.com

“who will pay for this?” When I was 25, the Democrats weren’t satisfied with the taxes being confiscated, and they made it legal to spend Social Security money to fund their programs. Then they added more entitlements to fund other programs with borrowed money that has increased today with a debt of $14.2 trillion. We are borrowing 40 cents for every dollar we spend, and your ilk are calling the people who produce this wealth “radicals”! This class warfare has to end, and the programs for the deadbeats and other groups sucking on the teat of the government must come to a conclusion. We in the private sector have suffered enough and have no confidence in the ruling intelligentsia who reward the incompetent and punish the productive. All government departments should be scaled back or elim-

inated. Government is an obstacle to full employment and freedoms. Let your construction lawyer or community organizers try to raise the debt by using the 14th Amendment and we will have them impeached. The president and the Democrats brought the country to this predicament. Let them and only the aforementioned principles take full credit for this Keynesian failure. Joe Souder Berwick

Fortune says you must climb to top

I

have a piece of loose-leaf paper hanging in my office. It is positioned behind where I sit at my desk, mainly so my homeless clients can see it as they sit in front of my

desk – in hopes that they will read it and that the words might assist them in looking at things differently within their lives. I wrote the words there. Originally, the statement came from a fortune cookie many years ago, seemingly at a troubled time in my life. Had I not had troubles when I opened the cookie, perhaps the fortune would have been read and the tiny piece of paper discarded. But the words gave me a bit more courage than I previously had. I always will remember the message: “The woman on the top of the mountain did not fall there.” She couldn’t possibly have. She had to climb – over the peaks and through the valleys. She couldn’t possibly have fallen on the top of the mountain. Any mountain. Lisa Caruthers West Pittston


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

E

R

S

P

E

C

T

I

V

E

S

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 PAGE 5E

LETTERS FROM READERS

Corruption probe needs a backbone

W

ith his 28-year prison sentence, former Luzerne County Judge Mark Ciavarella is the only person in the whole public corruption probe who got what he deserved. Everybody else seemed to get off with one to five years, which just shows us that things apparently are not changing in Luzerne County as long as you play ball. Even with the federal government handling this, people still seem to not have to pay the full price for what they did. If anyone else, who was not well-known or had connections in Luzerne County, did these things, they would go to jail immediately – not years later while awaiting sentencing. One example: Brian Dunn, former Wilkes-Barre school director, pleaded guilty in October 2010 but wasn’t required to report to prison until the following month. Also, I think the people of Luzerne County deserve to know who paid for these jobs as school teachers. They should lose their jobs and pensions, since they got the jobs illegally. Why has nobody asked about these teachers’ jobs? Pat Kelley Wilkes-Barre

Plenty of blame, solutions to share

T

P

he following quote is not from a tea party member or so-called conservative. In fact, it isn’t even from a Republican. This quote is from then-senator and now President Barack Obama from the

SEND US YOUR OPINION Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification. Letters should be no more than 250 words. We reserve the right to edit and limit writers to one published letter every 30 days. • E-mail: mailbag@timesleader.com • Fax: 570-829-5537 • Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., WilkesBarre, PA 1871 1

Senate floor in 2006. “The fact that we are here today to debate raising America’s debt limit is a sign of leadership failure,” he said. “It is a sign that the U.S. government can’t pay its own bills. It is a sign that we now depend on ongoing financial assistance from foreign countries to finance our government’s reckless fiscal policies.” Consider the quote an example of how backward Washington works. In 2006, President George Bush requested the debt ceiling be raised. The bill was passed by a vote of 52-48. All Republicans voted for the ceiling to be raised. All Democrats voted against the measure. What possibly could have changed in five years that both parties have done a complete 180 from their previous stances? The debt ceiling has been increased 37 times since 1980 under both political parties, reaching more than $13 trillion. You would think that $13 trillion would have created paradise for every American – not the broke country with nearly 10 percent unemployment we see now. Below are some of my common-sense fixes for America. Federal income tax: When almost 50 percent of a country’s population does not pay income tax, there is something wrong. My fix would be that everyone should have to pay something, whether it be half a percent or up to 15 percent for the richest. There

also must be no tax credits or deductions for anything except family members for which you care. For corporations there should be one flat-tax rate and no tax credits. Energy: There is no way our economy can recover when gas prices are $4 a gallon. We must drill in our own country and offshore to help stimulate price drops. By doing this, we would keep billions of dollars in our country and create tens of thousands of jobs. Jobs: We need a fair-trade, not a free-trade, policy. Currently, we have the Democrats taxing and regulating our businesses out of the country, and the Republicans making it easy for them to leave with trade treaties and policies that are better for other countries than for the United States. Immigration: If someone is not here legally, then he or she should by no means receive any taxpayer money. Employers who hire illegal immigrants should be punished severely. In Washington, it is no longer “how we can fix the problem?” These so-called leaders put Band-Aids on problems that need surgery. President Obama had it right in 2006. America not only has a problem with debt, but also a problem with failed leadership. United we stand. Divided we fall. Gary Bitler Mill City

Obama earns A+ in wrong course

W

hen President Obama took office, he went on a world tour apologizing for being an American and for what America stood. Now, he wants to continue his spending spree with his czars and his expansion of government. The future of Obama’s America is being revealed daily. Is anyone paying attention? Obama makes our dollars worthless by printing more of them. Do we like the high gas prices, as oil rigs sit idle off our coast and as it costs more to buy foreign oil? Obama has strained our military. Has America ever fought a 10-year war without the desire of winning? Obama wants to increase government entitlements by granting amnesty to those who are not citizens. I give him an A+ at transforming this nation into a socialist dictatorship. He and the established elite of Washington, with the exception of a few, are giving new meaning to the words “hope and change.” Chuck Watkins Sugar Notch

Help required at Legal Services

E

very U.S. citizen – no matter race, age, gender, faith, sexual orientation, ethnicity, disability or financial circumstance – should expect to be treated fairly in matters affecting critical areas of life such as housing. But what happens when people with little or no financial means became embroiled in the civil legal system? More often than not, they

cannot afford to pay for an attorney to help them make good decisions with regard to a legal claim or defense, and end up losing important rights to those with money and easy access to that system. At North Penn Legal Services, among the many important legal rights that we focus on are basic human needs such as housing. Because demand for our services is so great, and because funding cuts have reduced our staff, we have to limit cases we accept to emergency issues. Our agency understands the problems and issues affecting low-income people, since we have been a regional provider of civil legal aid for more than 45 years. We help low-income people throughout 20 counties in Northeastern Pennsylvania, including Luzerne and Lackawanna counties, by representing them in lawsuits or by providing information, advice and community legal education in a variety of matters such as family, consumer, education, employment and disability law. We defend our clients from evictions from public or subsidized housing, mortgage foreclose, bankruptcy, utility shut-offs and private landlord-tenant cases. We also support those clients who try and manage their legal problem on their own. Housing has become one of the more prominent issues undertaken by our staff. During the 2009-10 year, our agency handled 480 housing problems – accounting for 32.7 percent of the total number of clients assisted. In one case, a distraught man came to a North Penn Legal Services office for help and told staff: “I think I was unlawfully evicted from my apartment and I don’t know what to do.” During his initial interview, the man confided in

one of our paralegals that he lost his job and became depressed and overweight. Ultimately, our advocate was able to provide the client access to five resources that produced immediate and positive change. North Penn Legal Services delayed his eviction, while other agencies found him another place to live, access to mental health services, access to résumé writing and other job-retaining skills, and access to health and nutrition services so he could learn how to maintain a healthy weight. The efforts of our legal services advocate interrupted the vicious poverty cycle in which this client was living and gave him an opportunity to stabilize his life. This is a very difficult time for North Penn Legal Services. In order to effectively serve clients such as this one and more than 275,000 other eligible low-income people in our service area, we need your help. Our staff works tirelessly on behalf of low-income people to ensure they have equal access to justice. Last year, we accepted 10,304 new cases and closed 10,523 cases. This is a 2 percent increase over services from the prior fiscal year. Federal and state funding cuts already have resulted in staff layoffs and reductions in benefits. We continue to turn more people away because we simply don’t have the resources to help. Please help us preserve access to justice for all citizens. We appreciate your interest and invite you to contact us to learn more. For ways you can help, please visit our website: www.northpennlegal.org. Victoria Coyle Executive director North Penn Legal Services Bethlehem

CLEARANCE FIREGLASS POOLS - NO LINER TO REPLACE - EVER!

BEST TIME TO BU Y

SAVE TO

$4000 www.AquaLeisurePoolsAndSpas.com

s #1 America’ s er System Pool Wat

703611

MAIL BAG


CMYK ➛

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

sign, Alinikoff rose from the table and threw down his napkin. “I quit then,” he said. It’s a scene that still causes the original group to convulse with Continued from Page 1E laughter. Occasionally I tell someone I My second funniest memory used to compete in triathlons. I involves the planning group for always notice the cast-away glance the first two triathlons. of disbelief. We met on the third floor of The I still marvel when I see WilkesTimes Leader offices and on this Barre’s Con McCole. He was in the day in particular we were meeting first race and has participated in over lunch. Several of us had realevery one of them for 30 years. His ized after the first race that we had no earthly idea what we were doing. daughter will race today as well. Most of the rest of us, however, are After two years, several things gimpy with rebuilt knees and new seemed obvious: We needed to shorten the swim and, perhaps, the hips and a variety of other maladies time has wrought. We’ve run, and the bicycle course needed revisiting. Most were in agreement fallen apart and our shadows of our old running, biking and swimon these points. However, one of the committee ming selves. Hell, several in the group from members, Steve Alinikoff, obthat initial late night bar discusjected strongly to any changes in sion do not even drink any longer. the original course. Many things, other than our “You’ll ruin its integrity,” he said aching and old bodies, have in a somber tone, as if invoking a changed over the years. The disthreatened change in the U.S. Constitution. “I won’t stand for it.” tances of the race changed. The numbers of racers expanded and Lee Turner barely stopped then contracted. Professional triathchewing but looked up from his letes at one time competed in greasandwich to say a decision had ter numbers. The list of variables been made and it was final. over the years goes on and on. “Steve,” he deadpanned. “It’s One aspect has not changed. over.” The organization that Bauman Defending the purity of the helped piece together has held original idea and the course de-

CONNOR

Midway Between Tunkhannock & Dallas

570-298-2150

“Your Most Complete Fireplace and Chimney Experts”

HOURS: Tues. 12-5 • Wed. - Fri. 10-5 • Sat. 10-2

DELIVERY & INSTALLATION AVAILABLE

ON ALL CBR®600RR MODELS

AS LOW AS

2.99% FIXED APR

*

FOR 36 MONTHS ON APPROVED CREDIT

$

800

BONUS BUCKS ON SELECT MODELS**

NORTH AMERICAN

WARHORSE

Exit 1 off Rt. 380 1000 DUNHAM DR. DUNMORE, PA www.nawarhorse.com (570) 346-2453

SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS

SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS honda.com ALWAYS WEAR A HELMET, EYE PROTECTION AND PROTECTIVE CLOTHING. NEVER RIDE UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF DRUGS OR ALCOHOL, AND NEVER USE THE STREET AS A RACETRACK. honda.com ALWAYS WEAR A HELMET, PROTECTION AND PROTECTIVE CLOTHING. NEVER Fixed RIDE UNDER THE INFLUENCE OBEY THE LAW AND READ YOUREYE OWNER’S MANUAL THOROUGHLY. *2.99% APR financing avail-OF DRUGS OR ALCOHOL, AND NEVER USE THE A RACETRACK. READ YOUR OWNER’S able for customers who qualify for STREET super AS preferred creditOBEY tier THE for LAW up AND to 36 months through MANUAL Honda THOROUGHLY. Financial *2.99% Fixed APR financing available for customers who qualify for super credit tier for up toOffer 36 months through Honda Services. Payment example: 36 monthly payments of $29.08 forpreferred each $1,000 financed. good on all new Financial Services. Payment example: 36models. monthly payments of $29.08may for each $1,000 financed. Offer good on new andwith unregistered and unregistered CBR600RR/RA Not all buyers qualify. Higher rates apply forallbuyers lower credit ratings.models. Offer ends **$800 Bonus Bucks valid on for 2011, 2010with & 2009 models. Bucks CBR600RR/RA Not all10/3/11. buyers may qualify. Higher rates apply buyers lowerCBR600RR/RA credit ratings. Offer ends Bonus 10/3/11. **$800 redeemable onlyonfor purchase at dealer on purchase date. cash value. Non-transferable. Redemption value Bonus Bucks valid 2011, 2010 & 2009 CBR600RR/RA models. BonusNo Bucks redeemable only for purchase at dealer on purchase date. notcash to value. exceed $800. OfferRedemption ends 8/31/11. with participating Honda Dealers for complete details.for No Non-transferable. value notCheck to exceed $800. Offer ends 8/31/11. Check with participating Honda Dealers CBR ® isdetails. a trademark Hondaof Motor Co., Co., Ltd.Ltd. ©2011 Honda Motor Co., Inc.12-1120 (07/11) 12-1120 complete CBR® is a of trademark Honda Motor ©2011American American Honda Motor Co., Inc. (07/11)

Youth Challenge Bicycle Races Age Groups: 6 and under, 7-10, 11-14. Saturday August 27, 2011 at 6:00 PM Downtown Wilkes-Barre

Win a New Bicycle!

Get Pre Registered at NEPAcycling.com by August 21 and be entered in a drawing for a Brand New Specialized Bicycle courtesy of Jack Williams Tire!

$10 Registration – Free Race T-shirt & Medals for all Participants, Free Rodano’s Pizza, Midtown Village Festivities, Live Music and Stay for the exciting Blue Cross of Northeastern Pennsylvania Go to

NEPAcycling.com

704000

Pro/Am Twilight Criterium Race!

E

W

S

THE TIMES LEADER

Imperfect and impure as the setting was for a physical endurance event, that night at the bar paved the way for an event that in fact has achieved our vision. Competitors far and wide constantly agree that this race stands out among all others for the wonderful course and even more so from the hospitality and friendliness of our people. The Times Leader is back as a sponsor this year and we could not be prouder. Psst. And, by the way, here’s a secret: I beat all of my friends in both of the first two races, prior to my carefully planned retirement from competition. Richard L. Connor is editor and publisher of The Times Leader. Reach him at rconnor@timesleader.com.

GIFFORDS Continued from Page 1E

fairs. Part of the problem is cost, typically $27,000 for one hour a day of treatment over six months. “Insurance companies don’t want to pay for quality-of-life improvements,” said Sandra Farmer, the president of the Brain Injury Association of North Carolina. But, she added, the future benefits outweigh the upfront costs. “If you go ahead and get maximum rehab early on, the long-term costs will be diminished be-

K evin M . B a rno , M P T • K . B ridgetB a rno , P T Sha ro n M a rra nca , M P T • H a l G la tz, M P T • M a ria H a ll, P TA

PAFortunately IN TW eRC anAVR eadET heL MS... ap!

K evin M . B arno M PT

A rthritisord isc p roblem sin yoursp ine can cause p ain in yourarm sorlegs. W here you have you r physicaltherapy is you r choice.

M ostIn su ran ces d o n otrequ ire a referral. W E A R E N O W A G H P PR O V ID ER

520 T hird A venu e • K ings to n

C A L L 714-6460 T O D A Y ! w w w .pinna clereha bilita tio n.net

www.timesleader.com

cause the person will become more independent.” Smith said the Defense Department provided 45,000 hours of treatments last year that incorporated cognitive rehabilitation techniques, but she wouldn’t say how many hours an individual veteran might have received. Farmer said that wasn’t enough. “They’re lucky if they get three weeks of therapy,” she said. “I think the military is trying much harder than they used to, but there are gaps.” The VA does provide cognitive rehabilitation, and for veterans who live in areas far from the nearest center, offers it in the form of a video conference.

P inna cle R eh a b ilita tion A s s ocia tes

AGE M A SS N O W PY A R E TH A B LE A V A IL

Schedule your Chimney Cleaning TODAY!

I

together - fitted as tightly as joints connecting two sections of pipe. Volunteers and the many local families that have hosted visiting athletes continue to abound. Some of them, such as Dave and Lisa Daris, come from that original Times Leader family that sponsored and helped produce the first triathlon 30 years ago. They are out there today volunteering, as they always have been. When the idea was hatched that night, many of us had a vision for the triathlon that was clearer and brighter in the morning light. We wanted a race that would attract people from all over the country and we wanted them to see the vast natural beauty of this area and feel the warmth of friendship of our people.

K . B rid get B arno PT

CLEANING BUILDING REPAIRING RELINING COMPLETE BRICK & STONE FIREPLACE CONSTRUCTION

V

296786

PAGE 6E

308 Lincoln St. • Duryea • WindowWorld.com


CMYK

etc.

Entertainment

Travel

Culture

timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

SECTION F SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

FOTOLIA.COM PHOTO

Indulge in all Kennett Square has to offer as the epicenter of Pennsylvania’s mushroom country.

Indulge in mushroom country’s fungal fun By DIANE W. STONEBACK The Morning Call (Allentown)

theSecondCommandmentthatforbidsidolatry,untilRembrandtbroke with time-honored artistic convention and began using live models. Still more radical was his use of a modelwhomanyhistoriansbelieve was a Jewish man likely from Rembrandt’sAmsterdamneighborhood —wheremanySephardicJewssettled after fleeing the Iberian Peninsula during the Inquisition. In the seven reunited oil-on-oak panel paintings that are the cornerstone of the exhibit, Rembrandt’s young modelconveysavarietyofthoughtAP PHOTO ful gazes that bring him to life in a way no artist had done before — A visitor views two paintings attributed to Rembrandt van Rijn and departs from the then-cus- at the ‘Rembrandt and the Face of Jesus’ exhibit, now on display

Kennett Square, at the epicenter of Pennsylvania’s mushroom country, offers mushroom lovers the chance to indulge in an all-day fungus foray — from breakfasting on a mushroom and cheese omelet at one of artist Andrew Wyeth’s former haunts to downing a tasty mushroom freezer pop. In this town of 5,000 residents, ringed by mushroom farms producing 65 percent of all mushrooms grown in the United States, you can take mushroom cooking classes,learnwhichwinespairbest with mushroom foods and sign up for a mushroom-of-the-month club membership. Before your mushroom adventure ends, you also can taste and buy specially seasoned mushroom snack chips, purchase mushroom gifts and procure a mouthwatering array of exotic fresh mushrooms to take home. About the only other experience that could cap such a visit — touring a windowless, temperaturecontrolled mushroom house on one of the farms — is available to private individuals just once a year. If it’s on your bucket list of culinary experiences, head for Kennett Square’s 26th Annual Mushroom Festival Sept. 9, 10 and 11 (www.mushroomfestival.org) when tours will be available for a few mushroom houses. Not able to spend a whole day indulging in mushrooms? If other members of your crowd don’t love mushrooms as much as you do, try selling them on making a half-day visit to the area’s other nearby attractions — Longwood Gardens, Winterthur, the Brandywine River Museum,HagleyMuseumorBrandywineBattlefield—beforehitting the mushroom lovers’ trail. Make The Mushroom Cap, in downtown Kennett Square, your first stop. Owner Kathi Lafferty is a grand source of mushroom information. The coordinator of the massive Mushroom Festival that draws 100,000 mushroom fans, wife of a third-generation mushroom grower and mother of a fourth-generation mushroom grower also is the creator of a tasty line of crispy, dried-not-fried mushroom snacks called Snack N Shrooms you can sample in the shop. Lafferty also has created a mushroom powder for sprinkling on pizzas, popcorn and salads. She offers a mushroom-of-the-month club and mushroom growing kits. In addition, her shop is filled with other mushroom-based specialty foods, fresh mushrooms, mushroom souvenirs and mushroom cookbooks. You also can get some education here, so you won’t be in the dark about how mushrooms are produced. The shop’s back room contains a 12-minute video about the mushroom industry and offers glimpses of the industry’s history, including a scale model of a mushroom growing house. “It’s amazing to know that many people have no idea how mushrooms are cultivated,” Lafferty observes. “They think they’re simply found in the woods or grow in caves.” The Woodlands Retail Store, across the street from the head-

See REMBRANDT, Page 4F

See MUSHROOMS, Page 4F

Tattoo art on display at LCCC By MARY THERESE BIEBEL mbiebel@timesleader.com

He already has several tattoos, but Derek Zielinski is saving some of his skin for a portrait of his young son, Dylan. “It will cover the lower ribs on my left side, probably IF YOU GO from my belt line What: ‘Tattoo Art’ to just below my exhibit armpit,” said the Where: Schulman proudfather,who Gallery, Campus intends to have Center, Luzerne an artist from County Community Ohio re-create College, 1333 S. Prosthe portrait he pect St., Nanticoke When: 9 a.m. to 5 painted when the p.m. Monday through boy was 6 Friday through Sept. 10 months old. More info: 740-0727 “Mylady’sgonnabegettingadifferent portrait,” said Zielinski, 28, of Wilkes-Barre,whoexpectshe’lltakecareof that tattoo himself. Zielinski sports enough body art to call his tattoos a collection. So do his friends Chris and Rhi Wallace, both 30, of Larksville,whorunAPsychicUnicorntattoostudio on Wyoming Avenue in Kingston. Rhi Wallace said her “30-plus” tattoos so far adorn only her left side, leaving plenty of room for future creative expression. “You’re actually walking around with a living piece of art,” her husband said, explaining some of the appeal. “I love the permanence of it,” Zielinski said. Zielinski and the Wallaces are among the artists whose work will be on display through Sept.10 in a “Tattoo Art” exhibit at Luzerne County Community College’s Schulman Gallery, which is billing the pieces as “artwork by area tattoo artists before it touches the skin.” See TATTOOS, Page 4F

Top of page from left to right: Tattoo artist Rhi Wallace of Larksville designed this elephant; Derek Zielinski of Wilkes-Barre painted this portrait of his son, Dylan, and plans to have another tattoo artist put it on his body; Zielinski designed this image of his dog, whose name is Brad Pit. Above: At first glance, this tattoo art by Chris Wallace of Larksville might appear to be a flower or starburst. Try looking from another angle and you’ll see the skull.

‘Rembrandt and the Face of Jesus’ on exhibit in Philly By JOANN LOVIGLIO Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — A new exhibit at the Philadelphia Museum of Art takes a fresh look at religious paintings, drawings and prints by one of history’s most revered artists. “Rembrandt and the Face of Jesus” recently debuted in Philadelphia, after its three-month premiererunattheLouvreMuseumin Paris. It’s the only East Coast stop for the exhibit, which continues throughOct.30andcontainsworks from public and private collections in the United States and Europe. The exhibition of more than 50 works by the Dutch master and his pupils notably includes a

group of oil paintings of Jesus Christ that have not been seen togethersincetheyleftRembrandt’s Amsterdam studio in 1656. Timothy Rub, chief executive officer and director of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, called the show “a rare moment to observe the image of Jesus through the imagination of this artistic genius whose life was devoted to representations of biblical truths.” Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-1669) revolutionized the artistic portrayal of biblical themes, which for more than1,000 years rigidly represented Christ as an unemotional and formalized figure. These “true” images of Jesus were copied from ancient prototypes,inparttoavoidviolating

at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The exhibit is scheduled to run through Oct. 30.


CMYK PAGE 2F

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011

D

I

V

E

R

S

I

O

N

S

THE TIMES LEADER

HOROSCOPE

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE

8/14/11

BONUS PUZZLE KEEPING QUIET Matt Skoczen

DIAGRAMLESS

www.timesleader.com

The Sunday Crossword

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis

CRYPTOGRAMS

ARIES (March 21-April 19). You will alternate between two kinds of mindfulness. One moment, you’re tuned in to the people around you and present with the conversation and work at hand. The next, you are focused on experiencing your inner world. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You love to be surprised by humor and camaraderie. It’s also important to plan for future good times. The fun you anticipate will bring your endorphins up almost as much as the fun you’re actually having. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). In order to learn from your mistakes, you have to be willing to make them in the first place. Your habit of being hard on yourself after the fact isn’t helping. Ease up. It’s OK not to get it right every time. CANCER (June 22-July 22). You are the total package, and you show it today. Not only do you have the skills to make a situation work; you have the heart. You really care about making life better for the people around you. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). You have ways of putting yourself in a better mood. Music may be involved, or special efforts in the mirror. Employ your methods now. If you can’t come pleasantly to the situation at hand, it’s best not to come at all. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Flirting is fundamental to the action of the day. A breezy rapport will be necessary to sell an idea or product, or perhaps to sell yourself in a certain role. You’ll make lighthearted connections. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). You’ll put in the extra effort to take good care of yourself. Since you know that lack of sleep and poor nourishment make you cranky, you’ll be sure to get a healthy helping of both in the week ahead. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). It may feel to you like you just had a vacation (one that wasn’t tremendously relaxing to boot). And yet, you would still benefit from a mini-break. Get away to refresh your mind and outlook. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). Chances are that you are wasting time or losing an opportunity because of the way your home is currently laid out. Implement improvements to your workspace or organizational systems. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Tension makes you rigid. Being relaxed makes you flexible. A special relationship will thrive because you strike just the right balance between these two states. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You can’t properly concentrate around a lot of clutter. The problem is that you have too much stuff and not enough places to put it. You’ll remedy the situation in steps. Take step one today: Eliminate 10 items. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). One way to keep someone’s attention is to hang a kind of promise in the air and then withdraw it. It’s the old “carrot on a