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WILKES-BARRE, PA

ROLLIN’

SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011

R E D U C E D E D U C AT I O N F U N D I N G

ON THE

RIVER

CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Carol Hussa of the Wilkes-Barre YMCA hopes the River Common helps make people more active.

Area parents angry about planned cuts Some school boards propose cuts to kindergarten and pre-school programs. By STEVE MOCARSKY smocarsky@timesleader.com

S. JOHN WILKIN/THE TIMES LEADER

Karl Borton, left, director of River Common Programming and Outreach, and Vincent Cotrone, director of the RiverFest celebration.

Officials’ goal: Get area to embrace waterway WILKES-BARRE – A variety of events again are planned for the River Common this year that will likely draw some crowds. There will be fireworks, concerts and even a Dragon Boat race. But the downtown park along the Susquehanna River often is nearly empty and even the park’s ardent supporters agree it’s still underused.

“Not many places have a park like the River Common,” said Carol Hussa, ACHIEVE project coordinator for the Wilkes-Barre YMCA, which is located a block from the River Common. “But we have a culture here of people not being physically active. We have to build a culture of bicycling and See RIVER, Page 9A

$1.50

Recycling along the river seeking a bachelor’s degree in Environmental Planning. For the past academic year she Hughes has been studying at King’s College on a scholarship. Hughes, 21, said she has a

WILKES-BARRE – It has taken the efforts of a student from Belfast, Northern Ireland to lead the drive to place recycling containers along the $25 million River Common park. Catherine Hughes, an intern at Citizens for PennFuture in Wilkes-Barre, is working to make the River Common recycle-friendly. Hughes studies at Queens University Belfast, and she is

Peter Strecker is worried his son’s teacher might not notice a developmental issue if the teacher is burdened with a larger class and spends only half a day with his son. Helen Davis has the same fear for her daughter, who, like Strecker’s son, was set to start kindergarten at Rice Elementary School in the fall. Both parents plan to enroll their children in private schools if the Crestwood School Board decides to go ahead with plans to switch from full-day to halfday kindergarten as one of several measures to deal with reduced educational subsidies from the state. “I am not about to sacrifice my daughter’s education,” said Davis, 34, of Wright Township.

INSIDE: Budget cuts’ impact on sports programs, Page 16A Districts demonize the governor, Page 16A

Administrators and school board members across the state have been spending the last few months trying to shore up their budgets in a number of ways after Gov. Tom Corbett presented a 201112 budget that reduces education funding by about $1 billion statewide compared to 2010-11 funding. Cuts planned locally In Luzerne County, some school boards have planned cuts to kindergarten and pre-school programs. Many don’t intend to replace a portion of retiring teachers and do anticipate furloughing some others who teach subjects in the arts and humanities. See SCHOOL, Page 16A

See RECYCLING, Page 8A

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

An angry Debra Scott addresses the Hanover Area School Board on June 9.

Stories by BILL O’BOYLE boboyle@timesleader.com

A new name for a new world of communication and public service “Wilkes-Barre Publishing” gives way as the company continues to grow and evolve. Question: Can a business that is 104 years old define itself as cool, hip and new? You can be cool and hip at 104, no doubt about it, but “new?” Answer: Goodbye, Wilkes-

INSIDE

Barre Publishing Company; hello, Impressions Media. We have a new name, and it’s not just a clever moniker. It breaks the sound barrier, screaming, “We are now. We are the 21st century in the media world!” "The Wilkes-Barre Publishing Company, which owns The Times Leader along with many other publications, digital prod-

A NEWS Local 3A Nation & World 5A Obituaries 2A, 12A

ucts and related businesses, will now operate as Impressions Media," said Richard L. Connor, editor and publisher of The Times Leader and chief executive officer of Impressions

Scandal

U.S. Rep. Weiner to take leave News, 5A

Media. “If you have a message to deliver, an audience to reach or a product you need to sell, we are now your one-stop shopping solution. We will meet our customers’ needs for media in this mar-

B PEOPLE Birthdays C SPORTS Outdoors

5B 9C

D BUSINESS Mutuals E VIEWS Editorial

ket.” The Wilkes-Barre Publishing Company’s proud history and long-standing traditions will not be abandoned, Connor emphasized. "We are not truly saying goodbye to the name or its significance in the community," he said. “Like a favorite piece of clothing, the former name will stay in the house but occupy a

6D 2E

F ETC. Puzzles Travel G CLASSIFIED

different spot in the closet.” Prashant Shitut, president of Impressions Media, said, “It is only appropriate that our multimedia offerings are reflected in our name. As our strong traditional media brands continue to be vibrant, we have now embarked on a series of new digital media offerings that will only enSee IMPRESSIONS, Page 8A

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SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011

Taking steps to confront a killer

THE TIMES LEADER

ON THE TRAIL OF FUN

Big Four, Midday Sunday: 1-6-1-9 Monday: 2-6-8-0 Tuesday: 9-7-3-3 Wednesday: 3-0-7-4 Thursday: 3-7-1-6 Friday: 4-8-6-4 Saturday: 0-6-3-5

By STEVEN FONDO Times Leader Correspondent

H NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Walkers stretch it out before Saturday’s Breathe Deep Northeastern Pennsylvania Lung Walk at Kirby Park.

Entertainment for the Lung Walk was provided by recording artists Three Imaginary Boys, from WilkesBarre. “Pauline’s husband, Allan Makowski, was a dear friend and fishing buddy,” said Sam Greenberg of Kingston. “I see this as a great opportunity to make the community aware of lung cancer research and to remember those who have died from it.” According to the Centers

for Disease Control and Prevention, “more people in the United States die from lung cancer than any other type of cancer. This is true for both men and women.” “It looks like the rain’s clearing, so I plan to enjoy the day with my family,” smiled Traci Weinstock from Old Forge. “My father’s on the planning committee with Pauline, and I wanted to support them today in any way I could.”

Church closing to proceed Appeal to the Vatican won’t halt shuttering of Sacred Heart of W-B next Sunday. By JERRY LYNOTT jlynott@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE – Despite a request to delay the closing of Sacred Heart of Jesus Church until a pending appeal to the Vatican is heard, the Diocese of Scranton will proceed with its plan to have the last Mass celebrated in the church next Sunday.

William C. Engle

June 10, 2011

June 11, 2011

N.C., and Barbara Kalafut and her husband, Carl, Hanover Township; grandchildren, Mary Ellen Smith, Sevierville, Tenn., and Carl Kalafut, Hanover Township; as well as sisters, Lena Tome and her husband, William, and Marge Lipinski and her husband, Robert. Services will be held at 9:15 a.m. Tuesday from the Desiderio Funeral Home Inc., 679 Carey Ave., Hanover Township, with a Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. at Saint Robert Bellarmine Parish at Saint Aloysius Church with interment in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Hanover Township. Friends may pay their respects from 4 to 7 p.m. Monday at the funeral home. Memorial donations can be made in Elizabeth’s name to the Saint Robert Bellarmine Parish Building Fund at Saint Aloysius Church; or Hospice Home Care, 601Wyoming Ave., Kingston, PA, 18704. The family would like to thank the staffs at Little Flower Manor, Geisinger Wyoming Valley and Hospice Community Care for the extraordinary care that they provided to Betty.

Harold Deforest Canfield Jr. June 10, 2011 Harold De- and retired from the U.S. Air Force in forest Canfield 1970. He was a decorated Veteran of Jr., of Hanover the Korean and Vietnam Wars; his military career took him from East Township, died peacefully Haddam across the globe to duty staFriday morn- tions in Alaska, Arizona, Virginia, Koing, June 10, rea, and Thailand. His career 2011, at his spanned a quarter century, from 1945 home in As- to 1970. He received numerous commendations and honors throughout kam. Harold was born April 12, 1927, his career. The honor and patriotism in East Haddam, Conn., a son to he learned in the Air Force stayed Harold Deforest Sr., and Lillian with him throughout his life, as anyone who knew him can attest. (Woodward) Canfield. After retiring in 1970, Harold setHe was preceded in death by his parents; brothers, Ward Gorman tled in Luzerne County where he and Maurice Canfield; sister, He- raised his family and spent the last 41 len Gates; and son-in law Richard years of his life. He was the maintenance mechanic for the American LeStier. Harold will be deeply missed by gion in Wilkes-Barre and Convention his wife, Irene (Yeager) Canfield; Hall in Pittston for many years. Harold was a gifted man with a mebrother, Walter Canfield of East Haddam; and sister, Bessie Yeager chanical wit and talented hands; of East Haddam; also by his daugh- there was very little throughout his ters, Pat Stier, Diane Canfield Lex- life he could not repair. Harold was alie and husband, Kenneth, Lorraine ways quick to help family and friends Cogswell, and Bonnie Canfield Ko- any way he could with whatever they bal; and son Jamie Canfield and his needed. He spent many happy hours wife, Heather. Harold leaves be- in his later years in his shed tinkering hind a legacy of 14 grandchildren with projects and enjoying his retireand 13 great-grandchildren; as well ment. Services will be held at George as his beloved little dog, “Dollie.” A. Strish Funeral Home Inc., Harold was enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps, the U.S. Navy, 105 N. Main St., Ashley. Friends and family can call from 4 to 6 p.m. today.

Charles F. Finn June 4, 2011 harles F. Finn, 72, of WilkesC Barre, passed away Saturday morning, June 4, 2011, surrounded

by his daughters. Born February 21, 1939, in Wilkes-Barre, he was a son of the late Azita Finn. Prior to his retirement, Charles worked for American Furniture in Wilkes-Barre as a salesman. He was a U.S. Armed Forces Veteran. He was a member of Sacred Heart Church on Main Street, Wilkes-Barre, until it closed. Charles was preceded in death by his brother, Harry Finn; and his sisMore Obituaries, Page 12A

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

ikers and bikers hit the trail at the Greater Hazleton Area Civic Partnership’s Hike & Bike on Saturday. The event began at the Hazleton Rails to Trails trailhead.

Elizabeth McCormick Elizabeth “Betty” McCormick, 91, died at Hospice Home Care at Geisinger South Wilkes-Barre on Friday, June 10, 2011. Born March 1, 1920, in Plains Township, she lived in Hanover Township with her daughter, Barbara Kalafut. Betty worked as cook and baker until retiring in 1982. Betty was a member of Saint Aloysius Church in Wilkes-Barre, where she was a member of the Altar and Rosary Society. Betty was especially known in the church community for her baking skills. Betty was preceded in death by her husband, Arthur McCormick; brother, Sherman Grillini; and sisters, Amelia Serafini and Adeline Zawada. Survivors include her children, Robert McCormick and his wife, Sharon, Berwick, Mary Smith and her husband, Timothy, Stokesdale,

Lottery summary Daily Number, Midday Sunday: 1-2-9 Monday: 9-1-3 Tuesday: 2-5-6 Wednesday: 5-5-6 Thursday: 7-2-9 Friday: 8-4-3 Saturday: 7-7-4

The Lung Walk brings out a crowd of people eager to end the scourge of lung cancer.

Rain or not, an enthusiastic crowd gathered at Kirby Park on Saturday to participate in the inaugural Breathe Deep Northeastern Pennsylvania Lung Walk, sponsored by LUNGevity, the nation’s largest organization dedicated to research for the early detection, treatment and cure of lung cancer. “We’re expected a fine turnout today,” said event organizer Pauline Makowski. “We have 137 pre-registered and we’re anticipating a number of day-of registrations, as well.” “My husband died of lung cancer in June of 2009 and I just felt I had to make a difference in some way,” continued Makowski. “So I did some research and decided the LUNGevity Foundation was the group I wanted to work with.” The course for the event led the blue T-shirt clad walkers through Kingston and Wilkes-Barre and back to the pavilion at Kirby Park where refreshments were served.

www.timesleader.com

ter, Loretta Cole. Surviving are his daughters, Lisa Flanagan and her husband, Gary, Wilkes-Barre, Denise Marie Dorang and husband, Joseph, Wilkes-Barre, and Charline Langdon and husband, Michael, Pittston; grandchildren, Bridget Marie Dorang, Joseph Dorang, Meghan Flanagan, Katie Flanagan and Joey Langdon; as well as nieces and nephews. Interment will be private.

William C. Engle, 59, of Harveys Lake, died Saturday, June 11, 2011, in the Hospice Care of the VNA Inpatient Unit at Heritage House, Wilkes-Barre, after a courageous battle with melanoma cancer. Born in Wilkes-Barre, Bill was a son of the late Harold and Rosemary Hennebaul Engle. He was a graduate of Lake-Lehman High School. Bill worked as a supervisor for Intermetro Industries Corporation, Wilkes-Barre, and had been in their employment since 1972. He was a resident of Harveys Lake

since 1973. Surviving are sons, Christopher R. Engle and wife, Carrie, Wilkes-Barre, and Geoff Engle and companion, Veronica Harrison, Plymouth; brothers, Leonard Engle, Lake Township, Donald Engle, Harveys Lake; and Robert Engle, Lake Township; sister, June Steele and husband, Robert, Lake Township; as well as several nieces and nephews. Friends may call from 4 to 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Harold C. Snowdon Funeral Home Inc., 140 N. Main St., Shavertown. A private interment will be held at the convenience of the family in Memorial Shrine Park, Carverton. Memorial donations, if desired, may be made in Bill’s name to the charity of the donor’s choice.

Frank Rospendowski June 10, 2011 rank Rospendowski, 83, of Hobbie, concluded his journey in F this life at 8:15 p.m. Friday, June 10,

2011, in the Berwick Hospital Center under the loving care of his family. Born in Nanticoke, on August 29, 1927, a son of the late Frank and Lillian Smereski Rospendowski, he attended Slocum schools. He worked several years in the coal mines, and later he worked at his father-in-law’s saw mill, Moyers Grove. For over 30 years, he was employed by Consolidated Cigar, Berwick, and later at its McAdoo location, until retiring. Frank was a member of St. Peter’s United Church of Christ, Hobbie, where he was a former deacon and elder. He was a Little League and former Boy Scout leader, and he enjoyed woodworking and crafts. He was preceded in death by two sisters, Victoria Smith and Dorothy Guyer; half-sister, Blanche Hydock; and half-brother, Joseph Rospendowski. Frank will be remembered by his wife, the former Alverna Moyer, to whom he was married 62 years this past April 23; two sons, Michael Rospendowski and his wife, Gail, Hobbie, and Bruce Rospendowski

and his wife, Robyn, Hunlock Creek; grandchildren, Christopher Rospendowski, Hazleton, Jessica Rospendowski, Virginia, Captain Aaron Rospendowski, U.S. Army, stationed in Germany, Melanie Gardner, Indiana, and Brandon Rospendowski, Nanticoke; seven stepgrandchildren, Brooke Kubricki, Hobbie, Courtney Madl, Berwick, Monica Holderman, North Carolina, John Henchenski III, Bryan Henchenski, Kristin Henchenski, all of Hobbie, and Katherine Henchenski, Wilkes-Barre; 10 great-grandsons; three step-great-grandsons; as well as a sister, JoAnn Konsevitch, Bethlehem. “Forever in our hearts.” Services to honor his life and faith will be held at 11 a.m. Tuesday from St. Peters United Church of Christ, 613 W. County Road, Wapwallopen, with the Rev. Craig Stout presiding. He will be laid to rest in Silver Maple Cemetery, Hobbie. Calling hours will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. Monday in Heller Funeral Home, Nescopeck, or in the church from 10 to 11 a.m. prior to service Tuesday. Expressions of sympathy can be given to the memorial fund of the church.

Winifred R. Zabiegalski June 8, 2011 inifred R. Zabiegalski, 90, formerly of Korn Krest, Hanover W Township, passed away Wednesday,

marriages performed in Nanticoke. In addition to her husband and parents, she was preceded in death June 8, 2011, at the home of her son, by her sister, Catherine Kelly WarEdward, in Lebanon. ner. Born January 23, 1921, in EdSurviving are her son Edward J. wardsville, she was a daughter of Zabiegalski Jr., and his wife, Barbathe late John F. and Winifred James ra, of North Lebanon Township; Kelly. She was a graduate of the grandson Edward J. Zabiegalski III, Scranton State School for the Deaf. and his wife, Amy, of Robesonia; Winifred, during her working years, was employed at Duplan Silk and niece Dawn Bunnell of InverMill, Nanticoke, Glen Lyon Apparel, ness, Fla. Funeral services will be held at and finally for RCA/GE Electronics, 10 a.m. Monday from the Stanley S. Mountain Top. She was a lifetime member of the Stegura Funeral Home Inc., 614 S. S.S.S.D. and P.S.A.D. Winifred was Hanover St., Nanticoke, with a also a member of the K.C.D.S.C. of Mass of Christian Burial at 10:30 Central Pennsylvania and St. Stanis- a.m. in the primary site of St. Faustilaus Roman Catholic Church, Nanti- na Kowalska Roman Catholic Church (formerly Holy Trinity coke. She and her late husband, Ed- Church), Hanover Street, Nantiward J. Zabiegalski Sr., were mar- coke. Interment will be held in St. ried in St. Stanislaus Church on Oc- Stanislaus Cemetery, Nanticoke. tober 19, 1946, by the Rev. Daniel Friends may call from 5 to 8 p.m. toMcCarthy in one of the first ASL day.

Parishioners of the church on North Main Street made a public plea to Bishop Joseph Bambera in a letter that appears in today’s Times Leader. But the diocese, which was provided a copy of the letter by the newspaper on Saturday, indicated it will stick to its decision. Sacred Heart, which also includes St. John the Evangelist in its parish, was among those listed for closing in the 2009 restructuring plan begun by former Bishop Joseph Martino. The Sacred Heart WilkesBarre Foundation, which came into existence before the restructuring was announced, appealed the closing to the Vatican’s Congregation for Clergy. Bishop Bambera, who succeeded Bishop Martino, said he would accept the restructuring plans, but also allowed the appeals to the Vatican to proceed. In February, the diocese’s decision to close Sacred Heart was upheld, prompting the foundation to mount another appeal, this time to the Apostolic Signatura, the highest court of the church. The diocese set June 19 for the closing of Sacred Heart and announced the formation of St. Andre Bessette parish. The new parish will be made up of members of Sacred Heart, Holy Saviour Church on Hillard Street and St. Stanislaus Kostka on North Main Street. In a prepared statement, Bishop Bambera said many of the members of the affected parishes “expressed a desire to move forward and a hope that they will soon have a peaceful environment where they can worship and pray together.”

POLICE BLOTTER WILKES-BARRE – City police reported the following: • Police charged Shawn Bublo, 25, of Edwardsville, with multiple traffic violations following an apparent motor vehicle accident Saturday. Police said they found several downed utility poles and exploding transformers near a parked Chevrolet SUV with heavy front-end damage at the corner of North Penn Avenue and Butler Street at 1:03 a.m. Saturday. Police identified Bublo as the driver of the SUV. Police said they smelled alcohol on Bublo’s breath and found empty bottles of Twisted Tea, an alcoholic beverage, in the SUV. Police arrested Bublo on suspicion of driving under the influence, but a breath test found his blood alcohol content to be below the legal limit of .08 percent, leading police to drop the DUI charge. • Reginald Taylor, 29, of South Grant Street was charged with disorderly conduct Friday afternoon for allegedly refusing to comply with police orders to stop yelling in a public place on Carey Avenue. • Police cited Steven Dorsey, 32, of Edwardsville, and Rebecca Dorsey, 36, of Hanover Village, on charges they violated the city noise ordinance while on Beech Street at 6:05 a.m. Police said the Dorseys were arguing loudly on the street and that several residents in the area contacted police about the noise. • Police said someone smashed a window at Turkey Hill, 754 S. Main St. Saturday.

Quinto, Midday Sunday: 6-5-2-0-6 Monday: 7-8-3-0-4 Tuesday: 3-5-5-1-7 Wednesday: 4-9-5-5-1 Thursday: 2-2-8-4-5 Friday: 4-6-1-9-1 Saturday: 6-8-4-7-6 Treasure Hunt Sunday: 04-13-21-22-30 Monday: 03-05-17-25-27 Tuesday: 12-14-15-18-21 Wednesday: 10-12-16-20-23 Thursday: 04-07-08-10-29 Friday: 03-04-13-27-30 Saturday: 01-04-07-22-27 Daily Number, 7 p.m. Sunday: 7-8-1 Monday: 7-2-9 Tuesday: 8-7-8 Wednesday: 1-9-7 Thursday: 6-9-0 Friday: 3-8-5 Saturday: 1-6-0 Big Four, 7 p.m. Sunday: 1-7-9-0 Monday: 0-2-4-4 Tuesday: 7-0-6-9 Wednesday: 6-8-6-2 Thursday: 3-0-8-9 Friday: 0-0-4-8 Saturday: 0-3-4-4 Quinto, 7 p.m. Sunday: 5-8-9-0-9 Monday: 1-6-4-7-6 Tuesday: 7-7-7-2-8 Wednesday: 8-4-5-4-2 Thursday: 1-3-7-5-2 Friday: 4-0-3-2-9 Saturday: 9-2-1-9-5 Cash 5 Sunday: 15-16-30-39-40 Monday: 03-06-11-32-39 Tuesday: 07-36-38-39-42 Wednesday: 03-15-19-27-41 Thursday: 08-18-30-36-43 Friday: 01-10-16-30-31 Saturday: 01-07-20-21-37 Match 6 Lotto Monday: 02-21-22-25-28-37 Thursday: 02-03-10-11-35-43 Powerball Wednesday: 14-37-44-45-53 powerball: 29 powerplay: 05 Saturday: 16-18-27-36-50 powerball: 08 powerplay: 03 Mega Millions Tuesday: 29-32-35-47-52 Megaball: 13 Megaplier: 04 Friday: 18-21-27-37-38 Megaball: 07 Megaplier: 03

OBITUARIES Bell, Martha Boettinger, Robert Sr. Bushko, Mary Canfield, Harold Jr. Coliz, Eleanor Ejsmont, Alma Engle, William Evanchick, Peter Evans, Shirley Feldman, Sarah Finn, Charles Ganaposki, Regina Garinger, Arthur Gilroy, Edmund Greenfield, Laura McCormick, Elizabeth Rospendowski, Frank Sowa, Anna Yurgaitis, John Zabiegalski, Winifred Page 2A, 12A

BUILDING TRUST The Times Leader strives to correct errors, clarify stories and update them promptly. Corrections will appear in this spot. If you have information to help us correct an inaccuracy or cover an issue more thoroughly, call the newsroom at 829-7242.

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011 PAGE 3A

LOCAL

Getting rid of junk isn’t the only reason Luzerne County’s recycling is booming

Chance to help the Earth pounds of electronic She said the county hoped "We do this for equipment has been to fill 18 tractor-trailers collected, she said. with this assortment of no them… The people longer useful hardware. should realize how And 95 percent of it is recycled, she said. "We do this for them," Eco International, a DeNardi said. "We want much they are savrecycler from Vestal, to say thank you to every- ing the environN.Y., takes the tubes, one for participating. The ment.” glass, scrap metal and people should realize how Elizabeth DeNardi other miscellaneous much they are saving the Recycling coordinator parts and markets environment. They are them to manufacturers not contaminating the who use them in the earth with this material." DeNardi, who has been involved making of new products, according to with the recycling since the beginning, DeNardi. Doing so, the county works said the response each year tops the to "prevent household waste from beprevious year. She was confident Sat- ing placed in landfills or being illegally as litter," she urday’s totals would surmount last dumped year’s. Since 2003, more than 3.1 million See RECYCLE, Page 15A

By RALPH NARDONE Times Leader Correspondent

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

Eric Hadvance of Plymouth helps at Luzerne County’s electronics recycling day Saturday.

HANOVER TWP. – If you recycle it, they will come. Luzerne County Recycling Coordinator Elizabeth DeNardi found that out again this year at the county’s annual electronics recycling collection held on Saturday at the Hanover Area Junior/ Senior High School in Hanover Township. DeNardi estimated about 2,500 residents of Luzerne County paraded onto the school grounds in cars, pickup trucks, and sport utility vehicles to deliver an estimated 3,000 televisions and thousands of other assorted gadgets, including computers, answering machines, camcorders, copiers, microwaves, telephones, radios and more.

County eyes housing for 7 homeless with fed aid

I N

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Get a free ride Thursday

Riding on Luzerne County Transportation Authority buses will be free all day on Thursday for national Dump the Pump Day. Started in 2006 when gas prices were $3 per gallon, Dump the Pump Day is an effort to encourage people to ride public transportation and save money instead of driving a car. “If you leave your car behind to take the LCTA transportation network, you will be helping to reduce America’s dependence on oil and aid in the combat of climate change,” said Stanley Strelish, LCTA executive director. “Try us; you may like the quiet, comfortable, relaxing ride in one of our new hybrid buses, decide to use (LCTA) more often, leaving your car home,” he said. FORTY FORT

Sales people are needed

CANCER SURVIVORS

In an effort to recruit 40 experienced telemarketers and door-to-door sales representatives, energy marketer Gateway Energy Services Corp. will have an open house from 3 to 7 p.m. Monday at its satellite office at 190 Welles St. Qualified candidates with call center, sales or customer service experience are encouraged to bring a résumé so they can interview with a Gateway representative. So far, Gateway has hired more than 60 people to sell electricity in the PPL and PECO territories. Gateway also will host a mixer from 5 to 7 p.m. on Tuesday at the Forty Fort office for professionals in the sales and customer service industry. Gateway’s sales management will discuss advanced selling techniques and attendees can network with other professionals in their field. For more information, call 1-845-503-5240 or email hr@gesc.com.

A grant will pay rent for seven chronically homeless who want a place to live for up to five years.

By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES jandes@timesleader.com

HAZLETON

District on four-day week

Luzerne County government is looking for seven chronically homeless people who want a place to live, and the federal government will pay the rent for up to five years. The funding comes from a $370,140 grant the county received last year as part of the federal government’s push to get people into permanent housing. The program, known as Shelter Plus Care, is designed to provide long-term housing and supportive services for hard-to-reach homeless people with disabilities, such as mental illnesses or ongoing problems with drugs and/or alcohol, Program is according to the federdesigned to al government. provide longIn recent weeks, the term housing plight of the Wyoming and support- Valley homeless has received more public ative services tention with the death for homeless of two men in an abanpeople with doned South WilkesBarre house that disabilities, caught fire. such as menIn addition, REACH, tal illnesses a drop-in center for the homeless operating or ongoing out of St. Stephen’s problems with Episcopal Church in drugs and/or Wilkes-Barre, is closalcohol. ing in July. The government generally defines a chronically homeless person as a disabled person who has either been continuously homeless for a year or more or has had at least four episodes of homelessness in the past three years. County Human Services fiscal officer Mary Dysleski said three homeless individuals are in apartments funded by the program, and a fourth placement is in the works. The funding was intended to assist 11 individuals. Signing up additional participants has been a challenge because the county must obtain some documentation that candidates meet the chronically homeless definition, Dysleski said. “It’s easy if they stay at a shelter because they’re in contact with the shelter every day, but how do you verify that someone was living under a bridge or on the streets?” Dysleski said. Representatives of shelters that service the county are on a panel that meets monthly to monitor program participants, Dysleski said. Involving homeless shelters encourages referrals to the program, Dysleski said. The Commission on Economic Opportunity (CEO), which administers the

NEWPORT TWP. – Two area teenagers showed maturity beyond their years Saturday, organizing a charity walk to raise money for the American Cancer Society. Sarina Kinlaw, 14, and Krystal Daniele, 13, both of Glen Lyon, hosted the first ever “We Do Care’’ Walk for Breast Cancer Saturday morning in the Wanamie section of Newport Township. Kinlaw said she wanted to raise awareness of the disease after her grandmother was diagnosed with breast cancer two years ago. “My grandma was always sick,” she said. “I knew how much pain she was

See HOMELESS, Page 15A

See WALK, Page 11A

NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Genny Neyman, left, and Amy Jacobs share a laugh while sketch artist Angie Jordan draws their portraits Saturday afternoon during the Cancer Survivor Day celebration at Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center.

Day to celebrate life

About 400 people attended the annual event at Geisinger’s Henry Cancer Center.

Many participated Saturday in the Cancer Survivor Day event at the Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center in Plains Township. The family event featured food, games, basket raffles, face-painting, a bouncy place and free massages as well as music.

By B. GARRET ROGAN Times Leader Correspondent

PLAINS TWP. – Area cancer survivors and their loved ones gathered at the Frank M. and Dorothea Henry Cancer Center at Geisinger Wyoming Valley Saturday afternoon for the Cancer Survivor Day celebration. “The theme of today’s event is ‘celebrate life,’” said event organizer Mary Ann Olenick. The Swoyersville native and senior administrative assistant has organized the event for the past seven years. She expected around 400 people to attend the family event which featured food,

games, basket raffles, face painting, a bouncy place and free massages as well as music from DJ Nancy Kman of WILK radio station. Olenick, who had three family members diagnosed with cancer in a 14 month span 17 years ago, was chiefly

concerned with setting a positive tone for the event. “Every year we come out, we have some food, we dance and we have fun,” she said. See SURVIVOR, Page 15A

2 Glen Lyon teens show they care about cancer Girls host benefit walk for breast cancer awareness. By MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

The Hazleton Area School District will follow a four-day work week, Monday through Thursday, for the summer, district Business Manager Tony Ryba said. The hours will be effective from Monday until Aug. 19. All buildings will be closed on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, with the exception of the high school, Ryba said. WILKES-BARRE

Seniors to be honored

The 39th Annual Recognition Luncheon for The Foster Grandparent Program of Luzerne and Wyoming Counties will be held at noon Friday. The purpose of the event is to honor the 140 senior citizens who have served 20 hours each per week during this past year to tutor and mentor the special needs children of our area. BUTLER TOWNSHIP

Butterfly Guy will visit

The Butler Township Recreation Board will welcome The Butterfly Guy and dozens of his colorful friends to the Community Center at 6:30 p.m. Friday. At the event, children of all ages will witness the birth and handling of butterflies, view plenty of specimens and displays, and learn how Mikula to raise butterflies at home using simply household items. The Butterfly Guy, Hazleton-area Rick Mikula, is a world-renowned expert on butterflies. He is owner and operator of Hole-In-Hand Butterfly Farm and co-founder of www.Butterflywebsite.com, the first and largest website dedicated solely to butterflies. HUGHESTOWN

Picnic, social this week

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Joe Maloney, right, and Sarina Kinlaw, both of Glen Lyon, lead about 30 walkers in the ’We Do Care’ four-mile walk for breast cancer awareness.

The borough will hold a “Picnic in the Park” on Tuesday from noon to 5 p.m. in the borough park. The free event will feature entertainment, facepainting, games for all ages, food and refreshments. On Wednesday, St. Peter’s Lutheran Church will hold a Strawberry Social from 4 to 6 p.m. Strawberry shortcake and beverages will be served for a donation of $5, and other food will also be available. Takeout available from 4 to 4:30 p.m. For tickets call 654-1849 or 654-4948.


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SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011 PAGE 5A

Weiner requests leave of absence

B R I E F

Seeks treatment after sending sexually suggestive and explicit messages, photos to women online. By DAVID ESPO AP Special Correspondent

AP PHOTO

Moving to the beat in Tanzania

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton walks with Tanzania’s Foreign Affairs Minister Bernard Membo as they watch a cultural dance at Julius Nyerere International Airport in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania on Saturday. KABUL, AFGHANISTAN

Deadly month for civilians

WASHINGTON — Under pressure to resign in a sexting scandal, Rep. Anthony Weiner announced Saturday he was entering professional treatment at an undisclosed location and requested a leave of absence from Congress. An aide for the embattled New York lawmaker made the disclosure in a statement shortly after several Democratic party leaders demanded he quit for exchanging messages and photos ranging from sexually suggestive to explicit with several women online. “This sordid affair has become an un-

acceptable distraction for Representative Weiner, his family, his constituents and the House,” Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, the party chairwoman, said in a written statement calling for the 46-year-old married lawmaker lawmaker to step down. The House Democratic leader, Rep. Nancy Pelosi of California, said Weiner “has the love of his family, the confidence of his constituents and the recognition that he needs help. I urge Congressman Weiner to seek that help without the pressures of being a member of Congress.” Weiner’s spokeswoman, Risa Heller, said in the statement that the congressman departed during the morning “to seek professional treatment to focus on becoming a better husband and healthier person. In light of that, he will request a short leave of absence from the

House of Representatives so that he can get evaluated and map out a course of treatment to make himself well.” The statement did not say where he would receive treatment, or what type was involved. Others familiar with his plans said he had left New York by air. Also joining in calls for Weiner to quit was Rep. Steve Israel, D-N.Y, chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and a member of the party’s leadership. Pelosi also spoke with Weiner during the day to let him know that she, too, would be joining the calls for resignation. The developments occurred one day after Weiner acknowledged he had exchanged online messages with a 17year-old girl in Delaware. He said nothing improper had passed between the two of them.

AP PHOTO

Rep. Anthony Weiner, D-N.Y., carries his laundry to a laundromat near his home in the Queens borough of New York, Saturday.

Chemicals added to cancer risk list

AND THE WINNER BY A NOSE …

t least 21 people were killed in a series of attacks across Afghanistan A on Saturday as a U.N. agency announced that May had been the deadliest month for Afghan civilians since 2007. At least 15 civilians, including children and women, were killed when their crowded minivan struck a landmine in the restive province of Kandahar. The dead were eight children, four women and three men; another woman was injured. Kandahar is a southern province that’s known as the birthplace of the Taliban movement. It shares a border with the Baluchistan province of neighboring Pakistan, which is believed to be the safe haven for the Taliban leader Mulllah Omar and other senior commanders.

Formaldehyde in household items and styrene used for food containers have risks. The Associated Press

SPRINGERVILLE, ARIZ.

Wildfires pose health threat

An eye-stinging haze of smoke spewing from a gigantic wildfire in eastern Arizona added a potentially serious public health threat to the conflagration on Saturday as firefighters moved to counter spot fires erupting across the state line in New Mexico. The 640-square-mile blaze remained largely uncontained and firefighters worried that a predicted return of gusty southwesterly winds in the afternoon would cause it to grow even larger. “We expect the winds to be testing a lot of our lines out there,” fire spokeswoman Karen Takai said. The fire began spotting across the state line Friday night and 150 additional firefighters and several fire engines were sent to bolster forces already waiting in New Mexico, officials said. Concern about hazardous levels of air pollution spread beyond northeastern Arizona. PESHAWAR, PAKISTAN

Two explosions kill 25

Two explosions went off minutes apart in the northwest Pakistani city of Peshawar Sunday, killing 25 people and injuring nearly 100, officials said. The blasts occurred just after midnight in an area of the city that is home to political offices and army housing. The first explosion was relatively small and drew police and rescue workers to the site, said Dost Mohammed, a senior local police official. A large explosion rocked the area a few minutes later, causing the fatalities and injuring 95 people, said Mohammed Farooq, a doctor at a local hospital. The attack took place as CIA Director Leon Panetta and Afghan President Hamid Karzai were in Islamabad, some 95 miles (150 kilometers) from Peshawar, to speak separately with senior Pakistani officials about intelligence sharing and efforts to reconcile with the Taliban. TOKYO

Rally against nuclear power

Protesters held mass demonstrations against nuclear power across Japan on Saturday, the three-month anniversary of the powerful earthquake and tsunami that killed over 23,000 and triggered one of the world’s worst nuclear disasters. Streets in parts of Tokyo were completely jammed with thousands of chanting protesters, paralyzing sections of the city. Some marchers called for the country’s nuclear plants to be shut down immediately and for stricter radiation tests by the government. The magnitude-9 earthquake that hit March 11 off Japan’s northeast coast caused a massive tsunami that devastated the coastline.

A

AP PHOTO

competitor reaches for the finish line in a dragon boat during the Portland Rose Festival Dragon Boat Race in Governor Tom McCall Waterfront Park bowl area on Willamette River, Saturday, in Portland, Ore.

Suspect in embassy blasts killed Local men view the dead body of Fazul Abdullah Mohammed, front right, and another unidentified man in Mogadishu, Somalia. A Somali official says the al-Qaida operative behind the 1998 U.S. Embassy bombings in Kenya and Tanzania was killed in a shootout with Somali government forces Tuesday.

By MALKHADIR M. MUHUMED Associated Press

NAIROBI, Kenya — The al-Qaida operative behind the 1998 U.S. Embassy bombings in Kenya and Tanzania has been killed, a Somali official said Saturday. Somali officials have determined that a man killed by security forces on Tuesday was Fazul Abdullah Mohammed, said a spokesman for Somalia’s minister of information, Abdifatah Abdinur. “We’ve compared the pictures of the body to his old pictures,” he said. “They are the same. It is confirmed. He is the man and he is dead. The man who died is Fazul Abdullah.” Mohammed, a native of the Comoros Islands, was on the FBI’s most-wanted terrorist list and had a $5 million bounty on his head for allegedly planning the Aug. 7, 1998, embassy bombings. The blasts killed 224 people in Nairobi, Kenya and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania combined. Most of the dead were Kenyans. Twelve Americans also died.

AP PHOTO

A senior Obama administration official, speaking on condition of anonymity to discuss intelligence matters, said Mohammed was killed in a shootout with Somali government forces. “This is a big win for global counterterrorism efforts,” the official said.

“We commend the good work by the (Somali government forces),” the official added. “This is a very big deal. Fazul’s death removes one of the terrorist group’s most experienced operational planners in East Africa and has almost certainly set back operations.”

WASHINGTON — The strong-smelling chemical formaldehyde causes cancer, while styrene, a second industrial chemical that’s used worldwide in the manufacture of fiberglass and food containers, may cause cancer, the National Institutes of Health says. The NIH said Friday that people with higher measures of exposure to formaldehyde are at increased risk for certain types of rare cancers, including those affecting the upper part of the throat behind the nose. The chemical is widely used to make resins for household items, including paper product coatings, plastics and textile finishes. It also is commonly used as a preservative in medical laboratories, mortuaries and consumer products including some hair straightening products. The government says styrene is a component of tobacco smoke, and NIH says the greatest exposure to the chemical is through cigarette smoking. The two chemicals were among eight added to the government’s list submitted to Congress of chemicals and biological agents that may put people at increased risk of for cancer. Also on the list as a known carcinogen is a botanical agent called aristolochic acids, shown to cause high rates of bladder or upper urinary tract cancer in people with kidney or renal disease.

2008 emails show Palin eyeing VP slot By BECKY BOHRER Associated Press

JUNEAU, Alaska — Much of the country was taken by surprise when Sarah Palin became the Republican vice presidential candidate in August 2008, but newly released emails show the littleknown Alaska governor was angling for the slot months before Sen. John McCain asked her to join him on the GOP ticket. Earlier that summer, Palin and her

staff began pushing to find a larger audience for the governor, nudging the McCain campaign to notice her. Palin and her staff talked excitedly on June 19 about plans to repeal Alaska’s fuel tax. Ivy Frye, a longtime Palin aide and friend, said she would send details to McCain staffers when they became available. “They’re going to love it!” Frye wrote. “More vp talk is never a bad thing,

whether you’re considering vp or not. I still say President Palin sounds better tho ... " The emails showed that supporters across the country began suggesting to Palin that she would be a good vice presidential candidate as early as April. That attention increased after she appeared AP PHOTO on conservative commentator Glenn Beck’s “Headline News” show on CNN in Boxes containing Sarah Palin’s emails are seen Friday in Juneau, Alaska. early June.

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Proposed cuts hit poorest districts hardest because they receive the majority of state aid, official says

Do poorest Pa. schools have to take bigger cuts? to lose more money than would even be sent to other, wealthier HARRISBURG — When Gov. districts, he said. Buckheit and others suggest Tom Corbett chose to cut Pennsylvania’s way out of a projected that it would be fairer to ask multibillion-dollar budget defi- school districts to absorb a unicit, he started by taking a dispro- form per-student reduction in portionate chunk of state aid state aid, rather than the wild disaway from the state’s poorest parity in per-student reductions that resulted from the budget school districts. Why not approach it by taking plan Corbett proposed in March. A GOP budget bill that passed a disproportionate amount of state aid away from the districts the House last month would send that can best afford it — the about $240 million more than Corbett’s budget to wealthiest? public schools, al“That’s a great Buckheit and others though some of question,” said that extra money Jim Buckheit of suggest that it would be would go to wealththe Pennsylvania fairer to ask school disier districts such as Association of tricts to absorb a uniNorth Penn in School Adminis- form per-student reducMontgomery trators. County, whose subAt this point, tion in state aid, rather top lawmakers than the wild disparity in sidy would grow by nearly $3 million. appear to be in per-student reductions That’s a bigger the final weeks of that resulted from the boost than the assembling a budget budget that will budget plan Corbett pro- House’s plan would deliver deliver a heavy posed in March. to Harrisburg, Alreduction in state lentown, Erie and aid to public schools, and they are unlikely to some other school districts with reverse the approach to cuts in higher poverty rates that are state aid originally taken by Cor- planning layoffs. The House’s budget plan is bett. Corbett, a Republican, pro- now under consideration in the posed slashing more than $1 bil- Senate, where the Republican lion, or about 15 percent of fund- majority is working on it. Senate Majority Leader Doing for public school instruction Pileggi, R-Delaware, in the 2011-12 fiscal year that be- minic gins July1. The figure does not in- agreed that some poorer school clude pension payments for pub- districts still face disproportionlic school employees that are set ate reductions and said Republito rise by more than $320 million. can senators will press for more The proposed cuts fell most money for them when they meet heavily on the poorest districts because they receive the lion’s share of state aid, Corbett’s education secretary, Ron Tomalis, Mister “V” Construction Specializing in all types of Roofs, said. In fact, some districts stand Siding, Chimneys and Roof Repairs By MARC LEVY Associated Press

in the coming days in closed-door talks with their fellow Republicans in the House and governor’s office. “That will be an element of discussion that we have with the House and the governor,” Pileggi said. Pileggi would not say how much more money Senate Republicans will seek. Poorer school districts typically get a larger portion of their budgets from the state than

wealthier districts based on a formula developed by the Legislature that determines how the money is divided among school districts, The formula is designed to help districts that simply cannot raise as much from local taxes and that have higher poverty rates. But the distribution of money also must meet the political test of legislative approval. That means that some school districts get more money than they other-

wise would under the formula — a total of nearly $400 million extra over the past decade that the Philadelphia-based nonprofit Education Law Center of Pennsylvania says would have gone to poorer or needier districts. The issue is complicated, said Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Jake Corman, RCentre. A number of legislators who represent wealthier, growing suburban school districts are unhap-

py every year because the amount of state aid they get, while increasing in total dollars, is shrinking as a percentage of the school district’s budget. As a result, it would be tough for those legislators and school districts to accept disproportionately sized cuts in state aid, Corman said. “The school funding formula is very difficult,” he said. “I don’t know that anyone particularly likes it, but nobody knows how to change it to make it better.”

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ROME — Lady Gaga sang a few bars of her smash hit “Born This Way” and demanded the end of discrimination against gays as she proclaimed herself a “child of diversity” at a gay pride rally Saturday night in the ancient Circus Maximus. The star, whose “Born This Way” album recently topped 1 million sales in a week, delighted tens of thousands of people at a brief concert in the vast field where the ancient Roman masses would gather for spectacles. Wearing a green wig, she played the piano and sang a few numbers. But she devoted much of her appearance after an annual European gay pride parade to denounce intolerance and discrimination against gays and transgender people. Among the places she cited was the Middle East, Poland, Russia and Lithuania. Lady Gaga told the crowd she is often asked “How gay are you, Lady Gaga?” “My answer is: ’I am a child of diversity.”’ She also proudly cited her Italian roots — saying she was really named Stefania Giovanna Angelina Germanotta. And she told fans her costume — a sleek black top with one bare shoulder and billowing plaid skirt — were from the last collection of Gianni Versace. Decrying intolerance of homosexuality, Lady Gaga lamented that young people who are gay are susceptible to “suicide, selfloathing, isolation.” Many in the crowd had participated in an hours-long parade of colorful floats and brightly costumed marchers through Rome’s historic center before the rally. The events were part of the annual Europride day to encourage gay rights on the continent. Lady Gaga praised her audience for its “great courage” which she says inspires her. Europride organizers hope the event will draw attention to discrimination gays face in many parts of the world. The U.S. ambassador was among those who invited Lady Gaga to Rome.

“I am so honored to be here,” Lady Gaga said, recalling how, earlier in the day, she lay naked in silk sheets in her Lady Gaga hotel room and enjoyed the din of adoring fans and packs of photographers in the street below. Organizers said Rome was a significant choice of venue, since it is home to the Vatican, which staunchly opposes legislation that would recognize same-sex marriage or adoption by gay couples.

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The dragons are coming – boats, that is 48 boats to enter.” RiverFest organizers hope Cotrone talked about Rivertheir extravaganza will bring a Fest and how it has changed in new attitude toward the river. 12 years. By BILL O’BOYLE boboyle@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE – On a recent visit to the city, Vincent Cotrone’s brother-in-law wanted to see the River Common park. Cotrone is director of the annual RiverFest celebration, so he gladly showed the venue that is home to the 12th annual event. “He was absolutely amazed,” Cotrone said of his brother-inlaw’s reaction. “He said L.A. has nothing like this. He’s been gone from this area for 25 years, and he couldn’t believe this park was in Wilkes-Barre.” Cotrone, 45, said sometimes it takes an outsider’s perception for “hometowners” to appreciate what they have. Maybe a Dragon Boat Race will make people notice. Each of the long boats is powered by a team of 15 to 20 paddlers. Teams are being recruited for friendly competition. The event has become very popular elsewhere and Cotrone said a Dragon Boat Festival – a separate event – is planned for 2012, probably in September when the college students are back in school. “This will be a demonstration to Wyoming Valley and its people that we can do this,” Cotrone said. “Next year we expect

“We’re still evolving,” Cotrone said. “But when we moved to the River Common we ramped things up for RiverFest and it got bigger. We’re still learning how to program both sides of the river during the course of the three days.” Cotrone, an urban forester with Penn State Cooperative Extension, said the River Common gives RiverFest “the perfect spot.” He said for events like the Dragon Boat Race, the vantage points for viewing are plentiful. Cotrone said the mission of RiverFest remains constant – to get people to use the river and understand it and value it as a resource and not just look at it as a potential flood menace. Karl Borton Jr., director of River Common Programming and Outreach, said the Susquehanna River offers boating, fishing and, in some parts, swimming. “It’s an asset that we often overlook and it’s something that we should embrace and celebrate,” Borton said. “RiverFest is just one way that we are highlighting the river and its importance to our region.” RiverFest will be held Father’s Day Weekend – June 17, 18, 19 – and is expected to attract thousands of people to celebrate, as Cotrone says, the Susquehanna River. Activities available include: kayaking, environmental

CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

This stage from RiverFest last year previews what visitors can expect this year. A full schedule of performances is planned by organizers for June 17-19.

and educational workshops, live music and handcrafted artistry. Performers this year include Eddie Day and the Star Fires, MiZ, George Wesley, Don Shappelle and the Pick-Ups, K8, Kriki and Without Walls Dance Com-

pany. Cotrone is passionate about RiverFest. He exudes confidence and joy when he talks of the three-day event and how it continues to grow. Cotrone said there will be more activities and

more food vendors this year. Food will be available along River Street across from Millennium Circle and in Nesbitt Park near the kayak launch. “I urge everyone to take a kayak trip,” Cotrone said. “We have

trips of varying distances – shorter ones for first-time kayakers.” Cotrone said RiverFest offers something for everyone. “And I hope everyone comes out,” he said.

RECYCLING

Catherine Hughes said there are several local groups, businesses and organizations that Continued from Page 1A are willing to help make the personal interest in getting the project happen. She said if the recycle bins placed on the river- bins are purchased, there may front park and on Public Square a need for private investment and has met with city officials of some kind. to convince them of the need.

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

Catherine Hughes is spearheading a project to put recycling containers in the parks and throughout the city’s downtown. While there currently are trash cans, there are no recycling containers.

IMPRESSIONS Continued from Page 1A

hance the user experience for our audience and offer cost-effective, cutting-edge technology to our advertisers. “Whether it is a new iPad app or mobile technology, we have demonstrated that we are the pioneers in Northeastern Pennsylvania’s multimedia world,” Shitut added. Digital products and services offered by Impressions Media include: • Online Directory • Search Engine Marketing

• Reputation Management • Product/Service Promotion Video • Click to Call Lead Generation • Website Development • Real-Time Website Analytics • Social Media Consulting • Mobile Marketing, including: • Branded QR Codes • Interactive Mobile Landing Pages • Apps • SMS Text Message Marketing Statistics show nearly half of small businesses don’t have a website, while more than 60 percent of consumers who access

the Internet use it to buy goods or services. The website development service is the best example of opportunity for area businesses. All these solutions from Impressions Media not only offer initial development but on-going maintenance and hosting too. Jim Schilling, vice president of marketing and community relations for Wyoming Valley Health Care System, said, “Objectively and sincerely, The Times Leader is a great newspaper. They were among the first to introduce online as a marketing medium and we’ve been on board since the beginning because their implementation was flawless.” Chris Kostelnik, vice president

and store manager of Macy’s, Dickson City, had this to say about the company: “They are always staying ahead of the curve, not just on a regional level, but on a national level. They have a fresh approach to their online products. They’ve evolved so much over the past five years. I love that they always have new media channels available for me to reach my customers.” John Mellon, a business/marketing professor at Misericordia University in Dallas Township, applauded the new brand name. By switching the name from a “publishing company” to a “media company,” he said, the company has created “more of a

She said it didn’t take her long to notice the lack of public recycle bins in the city. She thought if they were installed, the city would be cleaner and more appealing, especially in the public recreation areas. City Administrative Coordinator Drew McLaughlin said officials will meet with Hughes and other PennFuture representatives to discuss the proposal. “The city has been looking at placing recycling containers on Public Square and River Common due to the increased activity coming up,” McLaughlin said. “We have to iron out a few issues – financing the containers and deciding who will handle them and the frequency of pickup.” McLaughlin said planning is under way and the city “definitely wants to get this done.” He said the city hasn’t gotten any cost estimates as yet for the containers. Hughes said she has muddled through the process of finding the right people to propose her idea to.

Hughes said she identified the main issue as the lack of funding to provide the receptacles and she intends to discuss the issue at a meeting this week. “If money was raised alternatively, would the city have the workforce and resources to pick up and maintain the additional bins?” she asked. Hughes said there are several local groups, businesses and organizations that are willing to help make the project happen. She said if the bins are purchased, there may be a need for private investment of some kind. She said PennFuture feels that working with the local groups and businesses in a joint campaigning effort to fund-raise money and also raise awareness throughout the community is important. “Recycling should be a standard behavior for everyone in our city and with a communityled approach, we could reach our goal,” Hughes said.

21st century connotation.” Mellon said that shedding the image — whether accurate or not — of being just a publishing company will help let businesses and readers know that there’s more to the company than newsprint and ink. And the new name, he added, will go a long way toward “helping to build better relationships with your customers by telling them what you have to offer them beyond a hard-copy newspaper.” The Times Leader has been publishing a daily newspaper since 1907. Through numerous changes and owners, it once again became the Wilkes-Barre Publishing Company in 2006.

The company has long been recognized for its award-winning journalism, and more recently for its record-breaking audience growth, ranked ninth in the nation and second in the state by The Audit Bureau of Circulations. Besides publishing newspapers, including The Times Leader, the Weekender, the Sunday Dispatch, Go Lackawanna, The Abington Journal, The Dallas Post and El Mensajero, the company operates numerous media websites and also offers commercial printing and packaging services along with its numerous digital marketing solutions for local businesses.

Fewer children in Pennsylvania census presents challenge to colleges, universities By GENARO C. ARMAS Associated Press

STATE COLLEGE — The collective graying of Pennsylvania’s population presents a demographic challenge for colleges and universities. Recently released 2010 census

figures showed the commonwealth’s population getting older, with the median age pushing past 40 as the first baby boomers reach retirement age. The flip side to the trend: fewer children. There were more than 2.7 mil-

lion Pennsylvania residents younger than 18 in 2010, down about 4 percent from 2.9 million a decade earlier, according to the Census Bureau. There were also fewer residents age 10-14 in 2010, and the percentage of homes with children also decreased.

The stats offer colleges a peek of what’s to come. Trends from the 2010 census echo similar trends from the 2000 count and earlier surveys that had caught the attention of higher education leaders, who have responded by seeking more out-of-state stu-

dents, including from overseas, and expanding efforts aimed at “nontraditional” students. David Kuskowski, director of marketing and recruitment for undergraduate admissions at Penn State, pointed to the northeastern and southwestern parts

of the state as areas of aging, as well as a few pockets of growth among younger residents, such as the Pittsburgh suburb of Cranberry Township. “We have seen it coming, and we are expecting not to see it improve,” Kuskowski said.


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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walking for exercise.” Hussa said too many people look for negatives, like worrying that they will get hit by a car if they try to cross River Street to get to the park. “I’m confident it will all be good some day,” she said. “Rome wasn’t built in a day. The city has pulled itself up by the bootstraps, and people will discover this park and use it.” Getting the community to embrace the River Common has been a difficult sell. People like Jim Brozena, executive director of the Luzerne County Flood Protection Authority and the engineer who devised incorporating a riverfront park into the flood protection system, has visions of the park becoming a place people flock to every day. “We want to be able to attract local people and people from New York City, Philadelphia and other places,” Brozena said. “We want to grow the park by holding quality events and also raise awareness of how the park improves the quality of our lives.” Cherrypicking ideas Brozena and Karl Borton, director of River Common Programming and Outreach, look to Hartford, Conn., -- where hundreds of thousands of people visit annually -- as an example of what they see the River Common evolving into. They said more than 160,000 people visited the River Common in 2010 and their goal for 2011 is to break the 200,000 mark. “We have looked at Hartford and smaller venues like Sunbury, Williamsport, Lock Haven and Harrisburg, and we’re cherrypicking the best ideas offered at each and we intend to offer them A B O U T R I V E R here,” Brozena said. “What will C O M M O N the River Common become? We really don’t know yet.” • Two 60-foot-wide portals with What we do know, Brozena is flood gates that can be opened or quick to point out, is that the Riv- closed as needed. er Common Park is one of the few • A 750-person amphitheater. venues that opens up to a city’s • A garden on the county courthouse’s south lawn. (Still under downtown. He said the combina- construction.) tion of a beautiful riverfront park • A fishing pier. next to a vibrant downtown will • About a half-mile of landscaped attract not only visitors, but big- walkways between the Market ger and better acts and attrac- Street Bridge and Wilkes University’s Dorothy Dickson Darte tions in the coming years. Center. Borton, 25, of Forty Fort, said • More than 250 trees, 500 every event at the River Com- shrubs and 50,000 perennials mon is coordinated with the city. along the River Common from the He said the city has worked with county courthouse south to South event planners to keep streets Street. open, provide crossing guards • Access to downtown WilkesBarre’s businesses and other and offer other services. amenities. “This area and this park will • Fountains, doggie-bag stations soon become a hot spot – a tour- and walking/biking paths. ist destination,” Borton said. • Website for more information: “With the support of sponsors rivercommon.org and from the community at-large, you will see a ripple effect that Borton and Brozena also want will grow the park.” Brozena and Borton have put people to come to terms with the River. Long together a busy summer for the Susquehanna park. In addition to the concerts thought of as an unclean villain and cultural events planned, Bro- that overflowed its banks and zena said the River Common has wreaked havoc on the Wyoming been the site for weddings – 10 Valley, the river has made a are scheduled for this year. Bro- comeback. Biologists and others zena said family oriented events have said the river is an urban waare a priority and he said talks are terway and can and should be ongoing with other event plan- used for fishing, boating, kayakners – like the annual Fine Arts ing and other activities. “It’s time for peoFiesta – to make the ple to come to the River Common their Brozena is quick to park and consider home. point out that the getting out on the “We want to have Brozena polka parties on the River Common Park is river,” River Common,” Bro- one of the few venues said, noting that three outfitting zena said. “We’re that opens up to a companies will be bringing the U.S. Arcity’s downtown. He renting kayaks and my Brass Band to the boats for visitors park and the Wyom- said the combination this summer. “Eving Seminary orches- of a beautiful riverery year we hear tra. There’s so much front park next to a more people say going on this year – vibrant downtown will that they never resomething for everyattract not only visalized how beautibody.” ful the river isBy holding events itors, but bigger and .”Borton said maylike these, Borton better acts and atflies have been and Brozena say that people will get ex- tractions in the com- hatching on the river and he sees posed to the park and ing years. that as a clear indivisit when events cation that the rivaren’t going on. To encourage dog walkers, Brozena er has a renewed vitality. “Mayflies can only exist where said doggie-bag stations are being installed so owners can clean the water is clean and each year we see them return,” Borton up after their pets. said. “The Susquehanna has Viewing fireworks been designated as one of the top The River Common will also recovering rivers in the U.S. It’s be marketed as a vantage point to time for people to appreciate havwatch the Kirby Park fireworks ing such natural beauty in their back yard.”Mayor Tom Leighton on the Fourth of July. “It offers the perfect place for said the River Common is a fanviewing,” Borton said. “We don’t tastic resource for the city and rewant to compete with the Kirby gion. He expects the park to conPark event; we want to offer an- tinue to attract visitors from other place where people can sit Northeastern Pennsylvania and and watch the spectacular dis- elsewhere. “This has extraordinary culturplay.”

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

John Riccetti of Shavertown, left, and Tom Swartwood of Dallas make their way down the Susquehanna River near the Black Diamond Bridge in South Wilkes-Barre on their way to Hunlock Creek as part of last year’s Wyoming Valley RiverFest and Sojourn.

S. JOHN WILKIN/THE TIMES LEADER

Josh and Rebecca Pesta check out the Susquehanna River and the new boat launch with their daughter Olivia, 3.

al and economic benefits to the city and its people,” Leighton said. “This full summer season of concerts, RiverFest, and other activities will really demonstrate what the River Common can become in the future.”Hussa has been conducting walking tours in the city for the YMCA. She said the goal is to get people to become more physically active. Hussa recently returned from a trip to Florence, Italy, and she said she came back with a renewed sense of pride in Wilkes-Barre and the River Common Park. “Don’t get me wrong, I love seeing so many concerts and events on the river,” she said. “But I want people to view the

park as a valuable and usable resource.” Parking concerns Brozena said many people have been reluctant to park downtown and walk a few blocks to the River Common. He said that mentality needs to be changed. “There are plenty of parking venues in the city,” Brozena said. “And when people park and walk to the park and then back, city businesses will benefit as well. Like I said, the park and the concept of having a riverfront park PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER adjacent to the downtown is still evolving. We’re confident the fu- Colin McClintock, 9, of Kingston, diligently works on his chalk ture is bright.” mural on the River Common sidewalk last October.


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NCAC COMMUNITY AWARDS PROGRAM

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RIVER COMMON JAM IN THE PARK MUSIC SERIES

THE TIMES LEADER

TRINITY PRESBYTERIAN RUMMAGE SALE

AIMEE DILGER PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

Anna Cervenak, left, Suzanne Slussar and Jack McNulty

www.timesleader.com

CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

John and Liz Swantek, Wilkes-Barre, and Matt Ralph, Pittsburgh, originally of Wilkes-Barre

Jen Mines, left, Becky Pickett, and Heather Mines, all from Dallas

Sisters-in law Margaret Murphy, left, and Nanci Langhorne, Wilkes-Barre Leo McGowan, left, and Kurt Bauman

Jessica Loughran, Dallas, left, and Anne Chairge, Pittston

Kenny Jones, Shavertown, Stephanie Baines, Wyoming

Jeff Witts, left, Elizabeth Balduino and Ruth Bianco

Karl Borton, Forty Fort, left, and Vinnie Cotrone, Kingston

Hank Williams, Shavertown, left, Allan Hobbs, Harveys Lake, and Charles Brandt, Shavertown

Ellyn Schindler, left, Debbie Phillips and Kate McMahon

Anthony Melf, Wilkes-Barre, left, and Deborah Lloyd, Kingston

Kate Totino, left, and Paula Terpak

Missy Liebner, Ashley, left, Michaelene Ostrum, Wilkes-Barre, and Sarah Lloyd, Kingston

Emily, left, mother Janette, and Chase Smith, Shavertown

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CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011 PAGE 11A

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in, and how much her treatments cost, and some people around here, they can’t pay for that.” “We found out that there’s a lot more breast “I’m glad cancer around here than we they ever thought there would grabbed have been,” the bull by said Daniele, the horns adding that in preparing for and start- the walk she learned many ed this her friends down here. of had family Communi- members who had breast canties don’t cer. do enough The girls, things like both students at Greater Nanthis.” ticoke Area Tom Kashatus Education CenNewport Twp. ter in NantiCommunity coke, said orgaOrganization nizing the walk provided a lesson in maturity. “We had to go to board meetings. We had to get it all approved. We had to put fliers up everywhere. We had to get people to come,” Kinlaw said.

SALES DRIVE

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Newport Township Police Chief Robert Impaglia, left, stops traffic as about 30 walkers cross Kirmar Parkway along Center Street in the Wanamie section of Newport Township during the ’We Do Care’ four-mile walk for breast cancer awareness on Saturday.

They also made dozens of pink ribbons and collected more than $600 from local businesses prior to the event. “I’m really proud of her,” said Krystal’s mother Jayme Daniele. “For two teens to come up with something this big; it’s pretty impressive.” “It’s unheard of,” said Newport Township Commissioner Jack Vishnefski before the walk. “It’s kind of what we need more of in this world.” A few dozen participants set off from the Newport Township

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Recreation Park around 10 a.m., and made two laps of a course around Wanamie, from Center Street to Vandermark Street to West Main Street, leading back to Center Street – four miles in all. Volunteers also sold hotdogs and a DJ performed. “I’m glad they grabbed the bull by the horns and started this down here. Communities don’t do enough things like this,” said Tom Kashatus, president of the Newport Township Community Organization.

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ROBERT W. BOETTINGER SR., 62, of Edwardsville, died Friday, June10, 2011, at Hospice Community Care, Wilkes-Barre. He was born in Newark, N.J., on February 14, 1949, a son of the late Joseph and Anna Harriott Boettinger. He was preceded in death by stepmother Dorothy Boettinger; and sister-in-law Kathleen Boettinger. Surviving are his wife of 29 years, the former Joan Gantz Boettinger; daughter Marlene Recinos; sons, Robert Boettinger Jr., David Czarnecki, Billy, Kenny and Chris Gantz; 10 grandchildren; sisters, Anna Masterton, Bertha Pershing, and Linda Garrity; brothers, Joseph, Little Joe and Thomas Boettinger, and Larry Stewart; as well as numerous nieces; nephews; and great-nieces and great-nephews. Private funeral services will be held from the George A. Strish Inc. Funeral Home, 105 N. Main St., Ashley. There are no calling hours. ELEANOR L. COLIZ, 88, of New Providence, N.J., and formerly of Forty Fort, died Friday, June 10, 2011, at Runnell Specialized Hospital, Berkeley Heights, N.J. She was born in Forty Fort, on August 6, 1922, a daughter of the late Russell and Mary (Kling) Cragle. She graduated from Forty Fort High School. Eleanor had resided in New Providence since 1950. Prior to her retirement, she worked as a librarian at the New Providence Library. She was preceded in death by her husband, James T. Coliz, 1988. Surviving are her sons, Gregory J. Coliz of High Bridge, N.J., and James R. Coliz, Louisville, Ky.. A private graveside service will be held at Albert Cemetery, Wright Township. Arrangements are entrusted to the Hugh B. Hughes & Son Inc. Funeral Home, 1044 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort. LAURA J. GREENFIELD, 40, of Harding, passed away unexpectedly Friday, June 10, 2011, in Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center, Plains Township. Funeral arrangements are pending from the Peter J. Adonizio Funeral Home, 802 Susquehanna Ave., West Pittston. Complete obituary will appear in the Monday edition. MARTHA I. BELL, 84, of Philadelphia, died April 29, 2011, at Abington Memorial Hospital. Born in Larksville, a daughter of the late Joseph and Mary Shone Sipple, she was the wife of Mark R. Bell Sr., who passed away in 1990, and the mother of Mark R. Bell Jr., who died in 2006. Surviving are her sons, David J. Bell, Hallstead, and Garry A. Bell, Philadelphia; her daughters, Janice Zumerling of Philadelphia and Darlene Mattocks of Columbia, Md.; sister, Anne Shepler of Harrisburg; five grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; and nieces and nephews. Relatives and friends are invited to Martha’s memorial service at 11 a.m. Saturday from the Plymouth Christian Church, 9 Main St., Plymouth. To share your fondest memories of Martha, visit www.lifecelebration.com. PETER EVANCHICK, 79, formerly of the East End Section of Wilkes-Barre and a guest at Summit Nursing Home, died Thursday, May 26, 2011, at the Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. Born in WilkesBarre, he was a son of the late George and Anna Purchot Evanchick. Peter was formerly employed by the John B. Stetz Clothing Store, Wilkes-Barre, as a sales person. Committal Service will be held at 11:30 a.m. Monday at St. Mary’s Cemetery, Hanover Township, with Deacon Leo Thompson officiating. Relatives and friends are invited to attend. Arrangements are by the Yeosock Funeral Home, 40 S. Main St., Plains Township. ARTHUR J. GARINGER, of Dallas, passed away Saturday, June 11, 2011, in Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center, Plains Township. Funeral arrangements are pending from The Richard H. Disque Funeral Home Inc., 672 Memorial Highway, Dallas.

OBITUARY POLICY The Times Leader publishes free obituaries, which have a 27-line limit, and paid obituaries, which can run with a photograph. A funeral home representative can call the obituary desk at (570) 829-7224, send a fax to (570) 829-5537 or e-mail to tlobits@timesleader.com. If you fax or e-mail, please call to confirm. Obituaries must be submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Obituaries must be sent by a funeral home or crematory, or must name who is handling arrangements, with address and phone number. We discourage handwritten notices; they incur a $15 typing fee.

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Alma Marie Cerreta Ejsmont

Edmund Frank Gilroy

June 10, 2011

June 10, 2011

Marie Cerreta Ejsmont, 73, A lma of Lily Lake Road, Slocum

Township, died Friday June 10, 2011, at the Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. She was born in Glen Lyon, a daughter of the late Anthony and Carrie (Butka) Luczak. She was a member of the graduating class of 1956 of the Newport Township High School. Alma had been a resident of Slocum Township since 1972. She worked in the garment industry as a machine operator and was employed most recently by Kay Wholesale gift of sight to others. It would and Klein Candy, retiring in 2000. She was a member of St. Mary’s please her to know if others could remember the tremendous gift of Church, Dorrance Township. Preceding her in death were helping those in need and consider brothers, Joseph, Edward, William, participation in an organ donation Theodore and Leonard Luczak; and program. Funeral services will be held at sisters, Louise Berneski and Do9:30 a.m. Tuesday from the George lores Bailey. Surviving are her husband of 22 A. Strish Inc. Funeral Home, 211 W. years, Wallace “Wally” Ejsmont, at Main St., Glen Lyon. A Mass of home; sons, Frank Cerreta and his Christian Burial will be held at 10 wife, Susan, Hanover Township, a.m. from Holy Spirit/St. Adalbert’s and James Cerreta, Mocanaqua, Church, Glen Lyon. Interment will and his companion, Selena Cobb; be in St. Adalbert’s Cemetery, Glen grandchildren, Jessica, Vinny, Do- Lyon. Friends may call from 5 to 8 minic and Anthony Cerreta; sister, p.m. Monday. In lieu of flowers, donations can Theresa Langan, Wanamie; brothers, Raymond Luczak, Mocanaqua, be made in Alma’s memory to the Robert Luczak, Shickshinny, and Medical Oncology Prescription Anthony Luczak, West Pittston; as Fund, 382 Pierce St., Kingston, PA well as numerous nieces and neph- 18704; or to Candy’s Place, 190 Welles St., Forty Fort, PA 18704. ews. The family would like to extend Among the many loves of Alma were cooking Polish ethnic dishes, their gratitude to Dr. Greenwald gardening, camping and listening to and the staff at Medical Oncology polka music. Her most favorite Associates, and also to the nursing thing, however, was spending qual- staff of the eighth floor of the Wilkes-Barre General Hospital for ity time with her beloved family. In her caring of others, Alma had the wonderful care given to Alma the great opportunity of giving the during her time of need.

and his wife, Stephanie, Hanover Township; stepson Eric Papp and his companion, Maggie, Plymouth; stepdaughter Autumn Coleman and her husband, Andrew, Plymouth; grandchildren, Erika Graham, Amanda and Emily Gilroy; stepgrandchildren, Khaia and Drew Coleman; brothers, Keith, Patrick and Michael Gilroy; sisters, Darlene Mapes, Barbara Bono, Jackie Price and Debbie Williams; godchildren, Brooklynn Bono and Julia Davison; as well as nieces; nephews; cousins; and aunts. Ed will be sadly missed and fondly remembered by so many. Funeral services for Ed will be held at 6:30 p.m. Monday from the Bednarski & Thomas Funeral Home, 27 Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre, with Deacon Pat Massino of Hospice of the Sacred Heart officiating. Private interment will be held at the convenience of the family. Friends may call from 4 p.m. until the time of service Monday at the funeral home.

June 10, 2011 R. Feldman, of Hillside S arah Street, Wilkes-Barre, passed

away Friday, June 10, 2011, at home after a lengthy illness. Born March 21, 1983, in WilkesBarre, she was a daughter of Robert and Karen Zych Feldman. She was a graduate of Simon’s Rock College and King’s College, and she also worked for the Barbizon Modeling Agency. In addition to her parents, she is survived by brother, Joseph Kovalick Jr., Minneapolis, Minn.; maternal grandfather Edmund Zych Sr.; uncles, Edmund and his wife, Megan Zych Jr., Wilkes-Barre Township, and Fred and his wife, Ann Feldman II, Downingtown; aunts, Joann James, Wilkes-Barre, Mary Jo and Jeff Leyh, Seekonk, Mass., and Denise Nardone, Old Forge; as well as numerous cousins. Funeral will be held at the convenience of the family from the Mam-

ary-Durkin Funeral Service, 59 Parrish St., Wilkes-Barre. Interment will be held in St Mary’s Byzantine Cemetery, Dallas. There will be no calling hours. Those who desire may give memorial contributions to Sarah Feldman Memorial Fund, c/o 215 Oakmont Lane, Mountain Top.

FUNERALS BROOKUS – Leo, funeral 9 a.m. Monday from the McCune Funeral Home, 80 S. Mountain Blvd., Mountain Top. Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. at the St. Jude’s Church, Mountain Top. Friends may call from 4 to 6 p.m. today at the funeral home. COGNIGNI – Edward, funeral noon Monday from the Corcoran Funeral Home Inc., 20 S. Main St., Plains Township. Mass of Christian Burial at 12:30 p.m. in St. Maria Goretti Church, Laflin. Friends may call from 4 to 6 p.m. today. The Parish Rosary Group will recite the Divine Mercy Chaplet and rosary in the church one half hour before the funeral Mass. All are invited to join them. COLEMAN – Sandra, funeral services 2 p.m. Monday at the Independent Bible Church, Main Street and Stephenson streets, Duryea. Friends may call from 5 to 8 p.m. today at the Kiesinger Funeral Services Inc., 255 McAlpine St., Duryea Friends may also call Monday at the Independent Bible Church, Duryea, from 1:30 p.m. until time of service. GILROY – Edmund, funeral 6:30 p.m. Monday from the Bednarski & Thomas Funeral Home, 27 Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call from 4 p.m. until the time of service Monday at the funeral home. HELLER – Madlyn, funeral 10:30 a.m. Monday from the Curtis L. Swanson Funeral Home, corner of routes 29 and 118, Pikes Creek. Mass of Christian Burial at 11 a.m. at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church, Lake Silkworth. Friends may call from 2 to 4 p.m. today. LABACH – Vincent, funeral 9:30 a.m. Tuesday from the Kopicki Funeral Home, 263 Zerbey Ave., Kingston. Military salute and Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. at Holy Name/St. Mary’s Church, Swoyersville. Friends may call from 4 to 7 p.m. Monday. MESAROS – Elizabeth, funeral 9:30 a.m. Monday from the BetzJastremski Funeral Home Inc., 568 Bennett St., Luzerne. Mass

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June 8, 2011

ohn T. Yurgaitis, 97, formerly of East Jackson Street, Wilkes-Barre, passed into Eternal Life Wednesday morning, June 8, 2011, in the Inpatient Unit of Hospice of the Visiting Nurses Association following an illness. Born May 26, 1914, in New Kensington, he was a son of the late John and Sophie Yurgaitis. He was educated in the city schools and previously attended Holy Trinity Roman Catholic Church prior to the consolidation of Our Lady of Hope Parish Community of Wilkes-Barre. Until his retirement, he worked as a truck driver for Matheson Transfer Co. of Forty Fort and previously for Pat Clune Transfer of Wilkes-Barre’s East End. He was preceded in death by his wife, Nellie (Kolotica) Yurgaitis, on November 28, 2000; by a brother, Joseph; and sisters, Julie Eleanor and Dorothy. Funeral services for Mr. Yurgaitis will be conducted at 11 a.m. Tuesday in the Chapel of Holy Trinity Roman Catholic Cemetery, Pa. Route No. 115, Bear Creek Township. The Rev. John L. Terry, pastor of Our Lady of Hope Parish, will offer the Rites of Committal. Relatives and friends are invited to go directly to the cemetery chapel for services. There will be no public calling hours. Funeral services and care of Mr. Yurgaitis’ family at this time are by the John V. Morris - Charles J. Leagus Funeral Home, 281 E. Northampton St., Wilkes-Barre Heights. To send the Yurgaitis family online words of comfort and friendship, please visit our website at www.JohnVMorrisFuneralHomes.com.

Shirley Evans

Anna B. Sowa June 11, 2011

Sarah R. Feldman

John T. Yurgaitis

J

dmund Frank Gilroy, 59, of Dallas, passed away early Friday E morning, June 10, 2011, at his home

following a long and courageous battle with esophageal cancer. Born in Wilkes-Barre on April 8, 1952, he was a son of Edmund Gilroy, of Wilkes-Barre, and Nancy (Miller) Scalfer, of Wilkes-Barre, and he had attended E.L. Meyers High School. Ed was the owner and operator of Gilroy Construction Co. for over 40 years. He was a member of the BIA of NEPA and the Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Commerce. Enjoying life to the fullest, Ed was fortunate enough to travel and explore many parts of the world. He was a loyal Dallas Cowboys and New York Yankee fan. For many years, you would see Ed playing softball, shooting pool or riding his Harley-Davidson. The dearest to us never really leave. Ed will always be with us; the way he cared, shared and made us happy. Ed affected us all in different ways; as a teacher and mentor. We will never be able to tell where his influence stops. Ed was preceded in death by his stepmother, Betty Gilroy; by his stepfather, Thomas Scalfer; as well as by his maternal grandparents, Noval and Pearl Wilson; and paternal grandparents, Edmund and Theresa Gilroy; and a brother-in-law James Bono. Ed is survived by his loving wife, Carol, Dallas; mother Nancy Scalfer, Wilkes-Barre; father Edmund Gilroy, Wilkes-Barre; daughter Alyson Graham and her husband, P.J., Wilkes-Barre; son Edmund Gilroy

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nna B. Sowa, 91, of Charles Street, Sheatown, Nanticoke, passed away peacefully Saturday, June 11, 2011, at her residence. She was born in Sheatown, Nanticoke, and was a daughter of the late Michael and Katherine Sowa. Anna attended Holy Trinity Parochial School and graduated from Newport High School, class of 1937. She was also a member of Holy Trinity Church, now St. Faustina Parish, and a member of the church’s Catholic Council of Women. Anna started her career as a secretary with the Department of Health, and then she worked for the Walter Sowa, Nanticoke; sister-inDepartment of Military Affairs from law Florence Sowa, Nanticoke; as 1947 through 1981. While working well as 19 nieces and nephews and at Indiantown Gap, she worked as their families. an Executive Secretary for five sucFuneral Services will be held at cessive Adjutant Generals, and in 12:30 p.m. Monday from the Gront1981 she received the Pennsylvania kowski Funeral Home P.C., 51-53 W. Meritorious Medal from Gov. Green St., Nanticoke, with a Mass of Thornburg. Christian Burial at1p.m. in St. FausShe was preceded in death, in ad- tina Parish, Holy Trinity Church, dition to her parents, by a sister, He- with the Rev. James Nash officiatlen; and brothers, Joseph, Stanley ing. Interment will be in Holy Trinand Edward; and a nephew Stanley ity Cemetery, Nanticoke. Friends Jr. and relatives are invited to attend Anna is presently survived by sis- calling hours from 5 to 7 p.m. today. ters, Hedwig Rowinski, Nanticoke, Donations in Anna’s name are to Marie Kowalski, Allentown, and be sent to the St. Faustina Building Theresa Sowa, Nanticoke; brother, Fund.

June 11, 2011

S

hirley Evans, 84, formerly of Plymouth, passed away Saturday, June 11, 2011, in ManorCare, Kingston. She was born on August 24, 1926, in Larksville, and was a daughter of the late Laura Keller Patton and the late Joseph Patton. Shirley was a 1944 graduate of Larksville High School. She was formerly a member of the First United Methodist Church, Union Sunday School, and The Sunshine Club in Dan Flood. She was preceded in death by her husband, Robert J. Evans; daughter Marilyn Cole; brothers, Leslie Patton and William Patton. Shirley is survived by her sons, Harold J. Cragle and his wife, Rebecca, Plymouth, and Brian Cragle, Plymouth; brothers, Howard Patton and Sheldon Patton, Mechanicsburg; two grandchildren; and nieces and nephews. A Funeral Service will be held at 7 p.m. Monday from the Williams-Hagen Funeral Home Inc., 114 W. Main St., Plymouth. Friends may call from 5 p.m. until the time of services Monday.

Regina C. Ganaposki June 11, 2011

of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in Holy Family Parish, Luzerne. Friends may call at the funeral home from 7 to 9 p.m. today. RAKOS – Sharon, funeral 9:30 a.m. Monday with a Mass of Christian Burial in St. Cecilia’s R.C. Church, 1700 Wyoming Ave., Exeter. Those attending the funeral are asked to go directly to the church. Friends may call from 6 to 8 p.m. today at the Metcalfe and Shaver Funeral Home Inc., 504 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming. STAHURA – Catherine, funeral 10 a.m. Monday from the Frank J. Bonin Funeral Home Inc., 542544 N. Wyoming St., Hazleton. Mass of Christian Burial 10:30 a.m. at the Parish of Ss. Cyril and Methodius at the Church of St. Joseph, 6th and Laurel streets, Hazleton. Friends may call from 4 to 8 p.m. today. A Christian Wake Service will be held today. WALTERS – William, committal service 11 a.m. Friday in the Oak Lawn Cemetery Chapel, 1250 S. Main St., Hanover Township. YARMEL – Mary, funeral 10:30 a.m. Monday from the Kopicki Funeral Home, 263 Zerbey Ave., Kingston. Friends may call from 4 to 7 p.m. today at the funeral home. ZABIEGALSKI – Winifred, funeral 10 a.m. Monday from the Stanley S. Stegura Funeral Home Inc., 614 S. Hanover St., Nanticoke. Mass of Christian Burial at 10:30 a.m. in the primary site of St. Faustina Kowalska Roman Catholic Church (formerly Holy Trinity Church), Nanticoke. Friends may call from 5 to 8 p.m. today.

Mary T. Bushko June 10, 2011 Mary T. Bushko, 87, of the Hanover Section of Nanticoke, passed away early Friday morning, June 10, 2011, at Community Geisinger South

Hospice of Wilkes-Barre. She was born November 29, 1923, in Nanticoke, and was a daughter of the late Barney and Anna Bohinski Borofski. Mary attended Nanticoke schools to the eighth grade and was a member of Holy Trinity Church, St. Faustina Parish, Nanticoke. She was also a member of the American Legion Auxiliary Post 350, Nanticoke, Polish National Alliance and the Christian Mothers of Corpus Christi Parish. A loving mother and grandmother, Mary enjoyed spending time with her family and sitting on her back porch in the summertime listing to polkas and Danny O’Donnell. She was preceded in death by her husband of 65 years, John T. Bushko; by daughters, Mary T.

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tient Unit of Hospice Community Care, Geisinger South Wilkes-Barre. Born in Mountain Top, she was a daughter of the late Isadore Mary (Novak) Ganaposki. Regina was a homemaker all her life and attended St. Nicholas Church, Wilkes-Barre. She was preceded in death by her sister, Dorothy Wills; and brothers, Joseph Ganaposki and Charles May. Surviving are her daughter Mary Josuweit and her husband, Sam, Bloomingdale; son Jeffrey Ganaposki, Marietta, Ga.; grandchildren, Melissa Rhein and her husband, Steve, Amy, Erik, Laura and Luke Josuweit, and Alia, Kagan and Mica Ganaposki; brother, Gerald Ganaposki, WilkesBarre; and nieces and nephews. Funeral services for Regina will be held at 7 p.m. Wednesday at Living Hope Bible Church, 35 S. Main St., Plains Township, with Pastor Mark DeSilva officiating. Interment will be in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Hanover Township. Memorial donations may be made to Living Hope Bible Church, 35 S. Main St., Plains Township, PA 18705. Arrangements are by the Corcoran Funeral Home Inc. Online condolences may be made at www.corcoranfuneralhome.com.

S erving N ortheast PA F or O ver 60 Y ears

M O N U M EN T CO .

We wish to thank all those who expressed love & concern for us upon the death of our beloved

Kotz and Antoinette Jenkins; brothers, Frank, Barney, Chester and Edward Borofski; sisters, Gertrude Ball and Julie Poteski; and granddaughters, Holly Bushko Croop, Brenda Lee Bushko and Dawn Bushko. Presently surviving are her sons, Anthony Bushko, Elizabeth, N.J., and John Bushko and wife, Barbara, Nanticoke; daughters, Deborah and husband, V.J. George, Nanticoke, and Theresa and husband, Gary Allabaugh, Nanticoke; sisters, Anna Sorber, Maryland, and Josephine Borofski, Wilkes-Barre; 24 grandchildren; 21 great-grandchildren; one greatgreat-grandson; numerous nieces and nephews; and sons-in-law, William D. Jenkins, Dallas, and Frank Kotz, Nanticoke. The funeral will be held at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday from the Grontkowski Funeral Home P.C., 51 W. Green St., Nanticoke, with a Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in St. Faustina Parish, Holy Trinity Church, with the Rev. James Nash officiating. Entombment will be in St. Francis Cemetery Mausoleum. Friends and relatives are invited to attend calling hours from 5 to 8 p.m. Monday.

egina C. Ganaposki, 77, of Wilkes-Barre, died Saturday R morning, June 11, 2011, at the Inpa-

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CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SURVIVOR Continued from Page 3A

Her sentiments were echoed by the event’s speaker, ovarian cancer survivor Karen Riley. “A little bit of rain, dark clouds and thunderstorms will not dampen our spirits,” she said as she enthusiastically addressed the crowd. The 61-year-old Scranton native who now resides in White Haven was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in October 2009. After undergoing chemotherapy for 18 months, she was clear of the disease. Her catscans have since repeatedly come back with clear results.

RECYCLE Continued from Page 3A

said. "It also removes the possibility of cadmium, lead and mercury from leaching into water supplies." She emphasized the recycling collection provides an opportunity for residents to get rid of unwanted electronics at no charge. One resident from the Back Mountain said the collection offered him a way to get rid of a junk television he had been trying to dump for years. A woman from Pittston said she was thrilled with being able to jettison her junk

HOMELESS Continued from Page 3A

program on the county’s behalf, also regularly visits homeless shelters to publicize the program, Dysleski said. Participants aren’t left on their own. Recipients of the free rent must agree to participate in programs that address their disabilities and prepare them for independence, Dysleski said. “We’re watching over them. We’re here to provide what they need to help them stay in their apartments so they don’t get out of control or get evicted,” she said. Appealing to landlords County officials believe that landlords are more willing to rent to the homeless if they’re assured the county will be monitoring the

She acknowledged there is a chance t the disease could return but pointed out the possibility of that happening does not enter her mindset. Riley, who lost her mother to breast cancer 40 years ago, was generous with advice for people who are dealing with the disease for the first time. “Always be positive,” she said. “Have faith in your doctors, in your family and in a spiritual being.” Riley repeatedly emphasized the importance of getting to know hospital staff when being treated for cancer. “Come to your doctor prepared and ask all of the questions you can think of. And trust your nurses; they are the best resource you will have,” Riley said. Dr. Kyo Chu, a surgical oncolowithout paying a landfill fee. Another man who drove 20 miles from Salem Township admitted he believes he is helping keep the environment clean. DeNardi said Luzerne County is one of the few remaining in Pennsylvania able to provide the service through funding from grant money through the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, from funds raised through the county’s recycling service fees and by sponsorship funds from the Electronic Manufacturers Recycling Management Company. The lion’s share of the material collected on Saturday will be recycled by next week, she said. tenants, Dysleski said. The grant will pay up to $529 per month in rent for a one-bedroom unit, Dysleski said. That dollar amount is set by the federal government. Participants may find their own apartments, though the dwellings must meet inspection guidelines. People interested in the program must fill out an application at CEO, which is located at 165 Amber Lane in Wilkes-Barre. Dysleski said she is confident the remaining slots will be filled. “I think they’re out there. It’s just doing the verification that’s difficult,” she said. Some eligible people also may not want to be helped, she said. “One of those pills that’s hard to swallow is that some don’t want to participate, and you can’t force them to do it, even though you know it would be beneficial to them,” Dysleski said.

N

E

gist who has been with the Henry Cancer Center for the past nine months and in practice for 15 years, also touted the importance of hope and positivity. “A cancer diagnosis will seem daunting and shocking at first but

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SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011 PAGE 15A

it is important to know that it does not mean the end,” he said. He pointed out there are often more options for treating and potentially curing the disease then a lot of cancer victims initially realize. Chu praised the Henry Cancer

Center and others like it, for being places where many different teams of doctors approach cancer from differing perspectives and varying philosophies. Chu also drew attention to the importance of regular screenings

and attention to symptoms for the general population. “The earlier the cancer is detected, the better the chance for someone like me to remove it and the better the chance for survival,” he said.

AN OPEN MESSAGE TO BISHOP BAMBERA Most Reverend Joseph C. Bambera, J.C.L., D.D. Bishop of Scranton Your Excellency, You have decided to close Sacred Heart of Jesus Church, North Main Street, Wilkes-Barre, after the 2 P.M. Sunday Mass on June 19, 2011. Recently faithful parishioners of Sacred Heart/St. John Parish exercised their right under Canon Law to continue the appeal process by petitioning the Congregation for the Clergy at the Vatican to suspend your intention to suppress the Sacred Heart/St. John Parish and close the Sacred Heart of Jesus Church. Parishioners have repeatedly requested that you keep your well publicized policy of not closing churches or suppressing parishes while an appeal is pending before the Congregation for the Clergy. Any unwillingness on your part to suspend the suppression of the parish and closure of the church would bode the question: “What’s the rush?”, since this action would undermine the authority of the Congregation for the Clergy by irreparably altering the parish and the church. Since the church is scheduled to be padlocked on June 19, 2011, the parishioners are publicly urging you as trustee of our parish property to: 1) maintain Sacred Heart of Jesus Church as a Worship Site; 2) protect the church, its contents and other parish property; and 3) not to give away or sell the church or other parish properties, nor any of its contents including the artwork and artifacts, until the parishioners’ appeal process is concluded at the Vatican. This faithful parish community has made significant contributions to the diocese and community throughout its 115 year history including exceptional financial support of Catholic education, community service, and an abundance of religious vocations. To allow the Sacred Heart of Jesus Church to remain open as a worship site until the Vatican can rule on our appeal is not an unreasonable request, considering the exemplary and prominent history of this parish. Thank you for your consideration, Faithful Parishioners of Sacred Heart/St. John Parish

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CMYK PAGE 16A

SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011

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THE TIMES LEADER

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School budget deficits forcing cuts in sports Some mid-grade teams will vanish; one district will make athletes buy their own shoes. By STEVE MOCARSKY smocarsky@timesleader.com

When it comes to school athletics, the ways in which students will feel budget cuts this school year will vary from district to district, school to school and sport to sport. In Wilkes-Barre Area, for example, seventh- and eighth-grade sports will be folded into junior high school sports. At Meyers High School, Athletic Director Mike Namey said, cuts would mainly affect the basketball program. But seventhand eighth-grade players “would not be denied any experiences on a junior high athletic team. They would still be a part of that.” Still, Namey said, it’s “certainly

possible” the students would see decreased playing time because playing time is subject to athletic ability, and there are only so many positions on a team. Seventh- and eighth-grade teams are considered “developmental teams,” Namey said. “But by the same token, playing on a junior high team instead of a seventh- or eighth-grade team would not necessarily be detrimental,” he said, noting that the school district didn’t have seventh- or eighth-grade teams when he graduated from Meyers. He said savings would be realized in decreased coach salaries and busing costs if the budget in its current form is adopted. “It’s critical for everyone to understand that these are cuts (amounting to about $200,000) are proposed and things we are trying to do to prepare for when we do get a final budget from Harrisburg and our school district. …

No one will truly know until the budget is finalized,” Namey said. At Hazleton Area, the largest district in Luzerne County with 10,000 students and 74 sports teams, Athletic Director Fred Barletta submitted program cuts totaling $130,000. That represents 11 percent of Hazleton Area’s $1.2 million athletic budget and is in addition to a 6-percent decrease from the 2010-11 school year. Barletta said he spent 29 years as a teacher and has come to appreciate the positive effects athletics have on academics. “Our student athletes have higher GPAs than the average, higher SAT results than the average in the school and a lower incidence of discipline than the average in our school. Is there a correlation or just a coincidence? I believe it’s a correlation,” he said. One area of savings comes from eliminating at least five as-

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

Assistant football coach at Hazleton Area High School Jim Drumheller inspects a football helmet purchased recently for the school’s football team. But cuts are on the way.

sistant coach positions. In an effort to be fair to student athletes, Barletta drew up a ratio of coaches to students for each team. He cut one assistant coach from softball because there were 6.3 players for each coach. He made no cuts to the boys’ track and field team because there

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Professor weighs in That risk is something Joe Rogan, a professor of teacher education at Misericordia University, says is real and is backed up by research. “There’s a ton of long-term research on early childhood education. … We’ve seen students doing better on state tests,” Rogan said of students who attended full-day kindergarten. Pre-school students also fare better in later school years. “It stays with them their entire lives. They’re much more likely to graduate from high school. And be successful later in life,” Rogan said. “It’s largely a result of getting kids started earlier. … It’s not a luxury, it’s a necessity. Those kids that come to school behind will stay behind. They’re just not going to catch up.” As far as a reduction in teachers, Rogan said the result is larger class sizes. “Class size alone doesn’t seem to be predictive of much of anything. If I lecture to 12 students, they learn as much as

girls’ basketball teams. The district will not re-establish seventhand eighth-grade football, and the cheerleading booster club will now pay for transportation to cheerleading competitions. Halting free shirts for coaches, at the suggestion of the school board, will save another $2,500.

Districts flunking governor’s budget

SCHOOL Public speaking classes: cut. After-school tutoring: gone. Some sports programs have been downsized as well. Strecker fears “first and foremost that my child might not get the best educational experience in public school. … If my child is behind in something, will it be caught? What if something doesn’t get picked up in first grade and they get too far behind?” said Strecker, 38, of Rice Township. Strecker was one of several Crestwood parents who refused to wait and see what happens. They did their homework on the educational and developmental effects of half-day versus full-day kindergarten and carefully examined whether the school district would realize a significant savings from switching and had an informational rally to present what they found. A similar scene played out Thursday night at a Hanover Area School Board meeting. Officials there have proposed cutting staff by 18 percent, consolidating schools, eliminating programs and raising taxes 0.9 mills. For more than an hour, the board heard from angry taxpayers and Leann Simasek, a teacher who brought some of her students to speak out against the board’s proposal to cut the visual arts program and eliminate her position. “You’re telling the kids they’re worthless,” Simasek had said. The Crestwood parents plan to present their findings on kindergarten cuts to the school board and administration and hope to convince the people in charge that their children will be put at risk while the district will not realize savings.

were 21 athletes for each of the three coaches. More savings came from no longer supplying footwear to athletes, a savings of $4,500 for the football team alone. Hazleton Area also will eliminate two of three ninth-grade boys’ basketball teams and one of two ninth-grade

But at the same time, he zeroed out several programs that will As local school boards and cost Luzerne County districts administrators scramble to re- $8 million combined, including duce budget deficits they attri- dual enrollment, which let high bute to state funding reduc- school students take college tions, many people have been classes, accountability block demonizing the man they say is grants that could be used for a the cause of their fiscal woes – variety of things within state Gov. Tom Corbett. guidelines, and reimbursement Luzerne County’s 11 school for money lost when students districts saw state aid drop $25 enrolled in charter schools. million for the 2011-12 school Przywara said it’s tough to adyear. But about $20 million of just because the education subthat, according to Corbett, was sidy in Corbett’s 2011-12 budget stimulus money that the federal doesn’t account for regular angovernment supplied only for nual increases for things such the 2009-10 and 2010-11 school as teacher salaries. Health inyears. surance premiums have jumped Wilkes-Barre Area Business 17 percent, and the district’s Manager Leonard Przywara pension obligation increased said the state warned school more than $800,000, he noted. districts when stimulus money “And the governor tied our was released that it would not hands by not letting us increase be a reliable source of contin- taxes more than 1.9 percent. ued funding, describRight now, we’re ing it as “a cliff you Our only allooking at a $3 milwere going to fall lion deficit. Our ondown” if districts re- ternative is to ly alternative is to lied on it for salaries use some of use some of the and other necessifund balance. Hopethe fund bal- fully, the Senate will ties. “We looked at pro- ance. Hopeful- bring back some adgrams and tried to ditional funding,” stay away from hir- ly, the Senate he said. ing new people,” will bring back State Rep. Eddie Przywara said. Day Pashinski, Dsome addition- Wilkes-Barre, said Dallas Business Manager Grant Pal- al funding.” the Senate “has it in fey said school distheir power” to reLeonard Przywara trict administrators Wilkes-Barre Area store some funding planned for a state and urged constitufunding reduction, ents to contact their “but I’m not sure we senators. “It’s not a thought the decrease would be done deal.” as much as it was.” Dallas lost State Rep. Tarah Toohil, R$896,000. Butler Township, said last week Some measures the district that more funding has been took include moving some placed into the education budtransportation in-house and get exceeding what Corbett providing in-house programs proposed. The Senate might inthat had been run by an inter- crease that funding even more mediate unit. before the June 30 final passage Przywara said Wilkes-Barre deadline. Area also had some cost reduc“The current House proposal tion plans, but he, too, was sur- cuts more money out of the fat prised by the magnitude of Department of Public Welfare state cuts. He said Corbett rein- Budget and adds money back stated education funding to into education,” Toohil said. 2008-09 levels, “but that was State Sen. Lisa Baker, R-Lehthree or four years ago and man Township, said some educosts have gone up.” cation funding will be restored, Corbett has noted he in- but it’s “not likely” it will be creased basic education fund- enough to make all cuts avoiding by 2.5 percent over last year. able. By STEVE MOCARSKY smocarsky@timesleader.com

S. JOHN WILKIN/THE TIMES LEADER

Peter Strecker talks about unintended negative consequences of educational budget cuts in Crestwood School District at a recent informational rally.

if I lecture to 30 students. But if a class size is manageable, teachers can be more creative. … If not, they get stuck in traditional teaching formats. They have no choice but to be less creative, do less projects, move around the room less,” Rogan said. “Once you get up in the 30s, you can’t deal with kids anymore, you’re dealing with a group. Instead of adjusting to kids’ needs, they expect the kids to adjust to the system and kids can’t always adjust. With smaller classes, you get to know the students better, you get to know their needs better and you can adjust,” Rogan said. Some students who struggle with the basics such as reading, writing and math often come to school looking forward to participating in art or music or sports, Rogan said, addressing cuts to those areas. “Without those, school becomes a drudgery for them,” he said. Value of pre-school Pre-school programs also prevent learning problems, Rogan said. Those students who do have developmental problems

can be helped when a classroom teacher notices signs early and collaborates with a special education teacher, Rogan said. “If a teacher has a large class, you get lost. It’s going to have a tremendously bad effect on kids with developmental disabilities,” Rogan said of cuts to early education programs and larger class sizes in primary grades. Strecker, a medical supplies salesman, said he is thankful he can afford to send his son to a full-day kindergarten at a private school. But he worries about the children of parents in the district who can’t afford it, such as a large portion of those living in White Haven. The median household income in White Haven is about $43,000, compared to the median household income for Rice Township, which is about $73,000. About 30 percent of White Haven households bring in less than $25,000 in income versus 15 percent of Rice Township households, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. State Rep. Tarah Toohil, RButler Township, had sent a representative to the Crestwood rally. As a proponent of full-day kindergarten, she said she

hopes school board members will “reassess their priorities” because the reduction would have “a negative impact on working families who will have to either pay for full-day kindergarten or pay for childcare services.” White Haven is part of Toohil’s district. Rogan and Helen Davis, who teaches English at Wilkes University, said the educational cuts are hardest on the least wealthy families. “It’s creating a class-based system that’s unfair. Parents who can afford to send their children to private school will get them the best education. Children in public schools will not get the same kind of education,” Davis said. “The kids who need education the most are the ones who are hurt the most,” Rogan said. Rogan said it’s the state’s responsibility to find funding for education, and he suspects that cuts are part of an effort to privatize schools. “I think there are politicians backing away from educating the entire society in favor of educating only some,” Rogan said.

AP PHOTO

Gov. Tom Corbett delivers his budget address for the fiscal year 2011-2012. School officials are trying to cope with cuts.


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UNINSURED 3rd annual VIM gala to raise funds to support free health care for those in need By HOLLY VAN LEUVEN For The Times Leader

Walking into Volunteers in Medicine on North Pennsylvania Avenue in Wilkes-Barre is a lot like visiting any doctor’s office — but there are some noticeable differences: in addition to comfortable vinyl chairs and smiling receptionists, there is the assurance of completely free medical care that welcomes working families without access to insurance. And, while the organization prepares for its largest annual fundraiser, patients are being greeted by a wall of 120 boxed disco balls. Volunteers in Medicine (VIM) is a nonprofit organization that helps meet the primary health care needs of the working uninsured and underinsured populations in Luzerne County. On June 17, VIM will hold its 3rd Annual Music, Memories & Medicine Gala at Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs to raise much-needed funds. There are 85 VIM locations throughout the United States, which vary in size and scope from community to community. The Wilkes-Barre branch was first envisioned by Dr. Susan Sordoni. The clinic opened in the summer of 2008 after Sordoni conducted a feasibility study. It revealed 35,000 working Luzerne County residents had no access to health insurance. A few grants received from private foundations helped make Sordoni’s vision tangible: the building adjacent to the former Buzzy’s Bazaar was purchased and renovated into a stateof-the-art health care center. Sordoni then sent letters to her colleagues, soliciting their talents and services to aid Luzerne County’s disenfranchised working class. Dr. Michele Kowalski-McGraw, of the Health and Wellness Center, Hazleton, and Dr. Lynne Coslett-Charlton, of OBGYN Associates, WilkesBarre, were among the first to respond. “Then we dragged our husbands in,” Coslett jokes. Dr. Patrick McGraw, of Eye Care Specialists, Kingston, and Dr. William Charlton, of Orthopedic Consultants, Kingston, also volunteer for VIM. “I met my husband over a cadaver at medical school,” Coslett says. “We both have a good understanding of what our careers mean to us. We are busy parents of four children, so connecting through VIM is nice. But we also have similar values, and we feel this is important: that hardworking people receive the care they need.” To be eligible to receive care at VIM, patients must be employed with a household income at or below 200 percent of the annually published Federal Poverty Guidelines. They

S.JOHN WILKIN/THE TIMES LEADER

Dr. Lynne Coslett-Charlton talks with a patient at the Volunteers in Medicine clinic in Wilkes-Barre.

“Even those patients apprehensive about a doctor’s visit just need to come. So many times health problems can be fixed if they are caught quickly enough. We are here to offer free, quality, and compassionate care. In a country like ours, with the testing capability we have, there is no reason why serious problems should go undiagnosed. We are really here for those who slip through the cracks.” Dr. Lynne Coslett-Charlton OBGYN Associates, Wilkes-Barre

IF YOU GO What: Volunteers in Medicine’s 3rd Annual Music, Medicine & Memories Gala with a ’70s theme When: Friday, June 17 from 6 to 11 p.m. at the Ball Room of Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs How much: Tickets $135 per person, Contact: Volunteers in Medicine 190 North Pennsylvania Ave, WilkesBarre Mon. – Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (570) 970-2864 www.vimwb.org

MEET ANDY MEHALSHICK ndy Mehalshick is the lead reporter at WBRE-TV. He has been with the station since 1985. Mehalshick, 50, is a gradu-

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ate of Hazleton High School and Wilkes College, where he received a degree in political science and also studied

journalism. He and has wife, Mary, have a daughter, Jacqueline, 21, a senior at Penn State University. They live in Sugarloaf. You majored in political science and initially had an interest in becoming a lawyer. What led you to a career in television journalism? “Even though I had a great interest and a love of the law and the legal system, I was always a student of the news. I’d be the guy watching Walter Cronkite, Huntley-Brinkley and John Chancellor. I was probably the only kid watching the nightly news when I was 9, 10 or 11 years old. When I went to Wilkes, I got involved with the college radio station, and one thing led to another. I started covering council, commissioner meetings and the Luzerne County Courthouse — not because it was my major, but because I liked being involved and being a part of what was happening.” You’ve said that in many ways as a reporter, you’ve always considered yourself a public servant. You’ve now been doing it for more than half of your life. What has sustained you? “I know this sounds corny, but helping people by getting to the truth. And again, I know

maybe I’m an old cornball, but the truth will set you free. Getting to the truth is a challenge in many ways, as we’ve seen in Luzerne County recently. It’s human nature to have little secrets, and that’s fine if it’s a personal or family thing, but when you’re a public official and it’s a secret that can affect others, people should know about that. I like getting to the truth.” When asked to name the most memorable story he ever covered, Mehalshick names a homicide, 20 years ago, of a 2-year old girl from South Wilkes-Barre. The child was killed by a member of her own family and her body was dumped into Solomon Creek. The family member later assisted in the search party. “When you went to the creek as the body was being brought out, you could hear a pin drop. That, by far, was the toughest live shot I’ve ever done. My daughter, at the time, was the same age. And to see this innocent little girl ... it angered me, and it also made me more pro-active when it came to crime reporting.” What do you do to relax? “I love boating.

I water ski and snow ski. And I spent a lot of time, when I can, with my daughter. She’s not a little girl anymore, but when she’s home, we play a lot of tennis. People think because you work in the media that you’re out there ‘in the mix’ and there’s a lot of country club visits and that kind of thing. That’s not me. I’m a working-class guy. I spend a lot of time with my family, and when my daughter is away, my wife and I have a lot of quality time. Walks, hikes — but my main hobby is boating.” Music? “Traditional rock: Aerosmith, KISS, AC/DC, Thin Lizzy, Boston.” Sports? “I’m a big Dallas Cowboys fan from way back. I started following them with Super Bowl V, when they lost to the Baltimore Colts on a field goal. And then they beat Miami the next year. I’m also a big Pittsburgh Pirates fan. I saw Roberto Clemente play in Pittsburgh back in the late ’60s and early ’70s. And I’m a big Boston Celtics fan.” See MEET, Page 9B

f you’re a genealogist, it never hurts to let the world know what you’re searching for, however obscure you think it might be. Publicizing your quest easily can pay big dividends. Several weeks ago Elsa Garey Roden of New York wrote to inquire about a popular book on Hadsell genealogy. She wasn’t even sure of the title. With an online search I was able to supply the name and author, but I was sad to report that the book is out of print. Then after I mentioned her search here, two readers wrote in to offer help — big-time help. DAR regent Kathleen Smith said that the DAR Library in Washington, D.C., has a copy. “One of my chapter members is going down there at the end of the month and if I knew what Elsa is looking for, we could try to copy it for her,” she said.” Simultaneously, Gina Evans of the Wyoming County Historical Society in Tunkhannock wrote to say that her group has the book as well and that Ms. Roden may visit and copy as much of it as she needs for just the cost of the copying. Of course I forwarded both emails to Elsa Garey Roden, and now she has a good shot at finding her vital information. Let’s give a couple of loud operaticstyle “bravas” to Kathleen and Gina. This is the way genealogists help one another, and it all starts with letting the public know what you’re looking for. Genealogy Records Update: Records from three Kingston Catholic churches and one funeral home will soon be available to the public, thanks to the ongoing microfilm project of the Northeast Pennsylvania Genealogical Society. The society has filmed records of St. Ignatius and two now-closed churches that have merged with St. Ignatius — St. Hedwig’s and St. Mary’s Annunciation. Also filmed are the records of the Maher Funeral Home. Included among the church records are anniversary programs, church closing programs, newspaper articles and other items. “These records will now be burned to DVDs and will be available for research at our library within the next month,” the society announced recently. The funeral home records will also be available soon. The society is also busy microfilming local high school yearbooks. To inquire about membership in the society, send an email to nepgsmail@gmail.com. The phone number is (570) 829-1765. The society’s library is at 639 Main Road, Hanover Township. It is open Thursdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and every second Saturday noon to 4 p.m. The group’s schedule of meetings for the season has ended and will resume in the fall. Vacation: As usual when summer nears I suggest that genealogists use some of their vacation time to visit sites associated with their ancestors. Let’s look at a few in the New York City area. The Lower East Side Tenement Museum, at Broome and Orchard streets, offers tours of authentic 19thcentury and early-20th-century tenement apartments, where many of our ancestors got their start. Ellis Island and Castle Garden, both at Battery Park, are the sites where from the mid-1800s to the mid-1900s immigrants from Europe disembarked. As our family patriots from World War II, Korea and the Cold War eras slip away from us, take some time to visit the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum on Pier 86, featuring the aircraft carrier Intrepid and submarine Growler, for the sights and feel of military life of a bygone era.

Tom Mooney is a Times Leader genealogy columnist. Reach him at tmooney2@ptd.net.


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r. and Mrs. Juan Gaia, Dallas, and Mr. and Mrs. Edward Blasco, D Elko, Bulloch Plains Township, announce the engagement and approaching marriage tephen B. and Mary Maffei of their daughter, Amy Rebecca BlasElko announce the engageS co, Philadelphia, to Paul Jeffrey Bullment and approaching marriage

of their son, Shawn David Elko, to Glenda JoAnna Bulloch. Shawn is the grandson of Lenore Maffei and the late James J. Maffei, Exeter; the late Regina Elko, West Pittston; Stephen Elko, Occoquan, Va.; and the late Mary Augaitis, Wilkes-Barre. Glenda is the daughter of Thomas and Mary Bagwell, Dahlonega, Ga., and Joan and Randy Sanders, Buford, Ga. She is the granddaughter of Louise Thompson and the late John Thompson, Lawrenceville, Ga.; the late Clifford Bagwell, Cumming, Ga.; and Virginia and Dallas Landress, Duluth, Ga. Shawn is a 1993 graduate of Herndon High School, Herndon, Va.. He graduated from UNC Asheville with a Bachelor of Arts degree in pure math and is employed as a teacher at University Community Academy in Atlanta, Ga. Glenda is a 1994 graduate of North Gwinnet High School, Suwanee, Ga.. She is pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree in special education at Brenau University and works as a transportation team leader for Gwinnett County Public Schools. The couple resides in Suwanee, Ga., with their children, Eliana Skye Elko, Jackson Bulloch, Clay Bulloch and Becca Bulloch. The wedding will take place June 14, 2011, on the beach in Maui, Hawaii. A dinner reception will be held in July at The Cafe, Plains Township, Pa.

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iffany Leigh Humko and Jeremy David Beagle, together with their parents, announce their engagement and approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of John Humko III and Sandy Humko, Shavertown. Tiffany is the granddaughter of Arlene Zibuck, Dallas; John Humko Jr., Wyoming; and the late Anna Humko. The prospective groom is the son of Brian and Kathy Beagle, Danville and Rome, Ohio. He is the grandson of Donald and Mary Lou Beagle, Danville, and George and Claire Holdren, Millville. Tiffany is a 1999 graduate of Bishop O’Reilly High School. She earned a bachelor’s degree in elementary education from East Stroudsburg University and a master’s degree from Nova University, Fort Lauderdale, Fla. She is employed by the Palm Beach County School District as a third-grade teacher at Highland Elementary School, Lake Worth, Fla. Jeremy is a 1999 graduate of Warrior Run High School and earned a bachelor’s degree in environmental science from East Stroudsburg University. He is employed by HSA Engineers and Scientists as an environmental scientist in West Palm Beach, Fla. Jeremy and Tiffany reside in Boynton Beach, Fla. They will exchange vows on July 2 and plan to honeymoon in Costa Rica.

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llison Elizabeth Reese and Robert Edward Button III, Larksville, A have announced plans for a June 2011

Miller, Kane ohn and Nickie Miller, Wyalusing, are pleased to anJnounce the engagement and up-

coming wedding of their daughter, Angela Marie, to James Kane. James is the son of Patricia McGraw, Ashley, and the late James Kane III. The bride-to-be is a graduate of Keystone College and is pursuing a Master of Business Administration degree at the University of Scranton. She recently obtained her state license for health and life insurance and is employed as an independent field agent. The prospective groom is a graduate of GAR Memorial High School. He is employed with i2m in Mountain Top as a chemical compounder. The couple will unite in marriage on Aug. 27, 2011, at the Sand Springs Country Club, Drums.

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lissa Jayne Smith and Stephen Henry Zurla, together with their families, announce their engagement and approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Richard Smith, Wilkes-Barre, and Cheryl Jayne Smith, Bear Creek Township. She is the granddaughter of the late Stanley and Sandra Zakaravicz, WilkesBarre, and the late Donald and Margaret Jayne, Tampa, Fla., formerly of Wilkes-Barre. The prospective groom is the son of Valerio Zurla, West Pittston, and Maureen Donovan, Avoca. He is the grandson of the Anna Zurla and the late Steven Zurla, West Pittston, and the late Henry and Florence Donovan, Avoca. The bride-to-be is a 1997 graduate of GAR Memorial High School and earned a bachelor’s degree in finance from Temple University in 2009. She is employed at The Vanguard Group in Malvern, Pa. The prospective groom is a 2001 graduate of Pittston Area High School and earned an associate’s degree in liberal arts from Montgomery County Community College and is attending Drexel University. He is employed at Synthes USA in Paoli, Pa. The couple resides in Phoenixville, Pa., with their dog, Buddy Lee. They will exchange vows on June 24, 2011, at Castel Grisch Winery in Watkins Glen, N.Y.

THE TIMES LEADER

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er, also of Philadelphia. The bride-to-be is the granddaughter of Mildred Blasco and the late Edward Blasco and the late Simon and Beverly Saba, all of Wilkes-Barre. She is a 2001 graduate of Bishop Hoban High School and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from University of the Arts. She is the director of design at Barton Como Accessories, Philadelphia. The prospective groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Buller, Silvis, Ill. He is the grandson of Carol Hurt and the late Richard Buller, Hampton, Ill., and Raymond Misfeldt and the late Audrey Misfeldt, Erie, Ill. He is a 1999 graduate of Erie High School and earned a Bachelor of Science degree from Saint Ambrose University. He is a senior freelance art director at Cline Davis and Mann, Princeton, N.J. The couple will exchange vows on Sept. 10, 2011, at the Le Meridien Hotel in Philadelphia.

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Ashford, Sokolowski and Justin D. AshJ anford,Sokolowski together with their families,

White, Walsh r. and Mrs. Brett D. Evans, Sweet Valley, Pa., are pleased M to announce the engagement and

upcoming marriage of their daughter, Felicia Ellen Walsh, to Adrian Anthony White, son of Anthony and Valerie White, McDonough, Ga. The bride-to-be is a 2004 graduate of Lake Lehman Jr.-Sr. High School and a 2007 graduate of Luzerne County Community College. She is a reservist in the United States Army and will graduate from King’s College with a bachelor’s degree in human resource management in May, 2012. The prospective groom is a 2003 graduate of Aviation High School, New York, and attended Fairmont College in West Virginia. He is also a reservist in the United States Army and will graduate from King’s College with a bachelor’s degree in business management in May, 2012. The couple was deployed to Iraq in 2008, where they fell in love. They will exchange vows on July 30, 2011, at the Ibero Star Rose Hall Beach Resort in Montego Bay, Jamaica.

The Licatas r. and Mrs. Angelo Licata, Swoyersville, will observe their 60th wedding anniversary June 16, 2011. They were married June 16, M 1951, in the former St. Mary’s Church, Swoyersville, now Holy Name/

St. Mary’s Church. Mrs. Licata is the former Helen Volack, daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Michael Volack, Swoyersville. Mr. Licata is the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Frank Licata, Swoyersville. The couple has three children: Frank, Mountain Top; JoAnn Kolojejchick, Gibbsboro, N.J.; and Theresa, Hanover Township. They also have five granddaughters: Dr. Kerri Licata, Chandler Ariz.; Amy Licata, Hershey; Kylie Licata, Mountain Top; and Sara and Jill Kolojejchick, Gibbsboro, N.J. A family dinner will be held to celebrate the occasion.

are excited to announce their engagement and approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of John and Lorraine Sokolowski, Plains Township. She is the granddaughter of Irene Savage, Wilkes-Barre; the late John Savage; and the late Anton and Anna Sokolowski, Scranton. The prospective groom is the son of David and Dianna Ashford, Edwardsville. He is the grandson of Irene Ashford, Wilkes-Barre; John Sedeski, Wilkes-Barre Township; the late William Ashford; and the late Dolores Sedeski. Jan is a 2001 graduate of E.L. Meyers High School. She studied business and marketing at Wilkes University and earned her national wedding and event planning certification from the US Career Institute in 2008. Justin is a 2001 graduate of Wyoming Valley West High School. He earned an associate’s degree in recording arts from Luzerne County Community College in 2003. Both the bride-to-be and the prospective groom are employed by Metz Culinary Management at Misericordia University. A Catholic wedding celebration is planned for July 3, 2011, in the Chapel at Misericordia.

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onell Catherine Tomaine and Gregory John Shalkowski, together with their families, announce their engagement and approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of James and Cindy Tomaine, Larksville. She is the granddaughter of the late Bernard and Phyllis Tomaine and the late Chester and Catherine Ciak. The prospective groom is the son of Walter and Kristine Shalkowski, Dickson City. He is the grandson of the late Walter and Helen Shalkowski and the late John and Ann Taylor. Lonell is a 2000 graduate of Wyoming Valley West High School and earned a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from The Pennsylvania State University in 2004. She is employed by Ceco Associates Inc., Scranton. Gregory is a 1999 graduate of Mid Valley High School and earned an associate’s degree in architectural engineering technology and a bachelor’s degree in structural design and construction engineering technology from The Pennsylvania State University in 2006. He is employed by the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, Dunmore. The couple will exchange vows Oct. 15, 2011, in St. John the Baptist Church, Larksville.

Avery A. Varzaly baptized very Ann Varzaly, daughter of Chris and Kristy Varzaly, Kingston, was baptized on May 29, 2011, by the A Rev. Joseph Verespy at Sacred Heart of Jesus Church,

Dupont. Avery wore a christening gown that was worn by her mother and aunts. Avery’s godparents are her aunt and uncle, Jonna Boyda, Moosic, and Mike Varzaly, Wilkes-Barre. Avery was born on Dec. 15, 2010. Avery’s grandparents are Debby Odgers, Moosic, and Patricia Varzaly, Plains Township, and the late Michael Varzaly. Avery has a sister, Valerie, 2. A lunch for family was held in Avery’s honor at Colarusso’s in Avoca.

wedding at the Shawnee Inn and Resort. Both are alumni of Wyoming Valley West High School. The bride-to-be is a graduate of Penn State University with a Bachelor of Science degree. She furthered her education at King’s College, where she obtained her teaching certificate. The future bride is employed at her alma mater, Wyoming Valley West, as a high school science teacher. The prospective groom is a graduate of Luzerne County Community College with an associate’s degree in criminal justice. He works at the family-run business, Button Oil in Mountain Top, and is a part-time realtor for Coldwell Banker Rundle. The couple will host a small wedding with family and friends on June 24, 2011, at the Shawnee Inn and Resort. They will be married by the bride’s brother, Gordon C. Reese III, who was ordained for the happy occasion. After a honeymoon in Florida, the couple will return home with children, Stone and Saige.

Serafini, McDonough ourtenay Jayne Serafini and Paul James McDonough Jr. were unitC ed in marriage on July 31, 2010, at

Messiah Lutheran Church, WilkesBarre, by the Rev. Mary Laufer. The bride is the daughter of James and Marylou Serafini, Wilkes-Barre. She is the granddaughter of the late William and Mary Lawry and the late Godfrey and Ruth Serafini. The groom is the son of Paul and Lynn McDonough, Wilkes-Barre. He is the grandson of Caroline Miller, Wilkes-Barre; the late Joseph Miller; and the late Frank and Joan McDonough. The bride was escorted down the aisle by her father and was attended by friend, Violet Ziegler, maid of honor, and bridesmaids, Dionne Fisher and Margo Serafini, sisters of the bride; Annika Serafini and Holly Serafini, sisters-in-law; and Heather Wittkopp and Anne Park, sisters of the groom. Flower girls were Brooke Fisher and Madison Serafini, nieces of the bride. The groom chose friend, Jeff Scott, as best man. Groomsmen were friends, Dan Boote, Ian Hughes, William Mangenello and Andrew Knorr and Anthony Serafini and James Serafini, brothers of the bride. Junior groomsmen were James Fisher and Tyler Serafini, nephews of the bride. Ring bearers were Liam Wittkopp, nephew of the groom, and Brett Serafini, nephew of the bride. The bride was honored at a bridal shower hosted by her mother at the River Grille, Plains Township. A rehearsal dinner was hosted by the parents of the groom at Costello’s, Kingston. A dinner reception was held at the Genetti Hotel and Conference Center, Wilkes-Barre. Mrs. McDonough is a graduate of E.L. Meyers High School and Wilkes University with a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing. She is employed by Manor Care as a registered nurse. Mr. McDonough is a graduate of E.L. Meyers High School and King’s College with a Bachelor of Arts degree in criminal justice. He is employed by Northeast Counseling as a blended case manager. The couple honeymooned in Aruba. They reside in Wilkes-Barre.


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The Scarnulises Donnora, Balester Whipple, Fraser

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arolyn Marie Whipple and Gary James Fraser were married on Sept. 3, 2010, at Steep Hill Beach on The Crane Estate in Ipswich, Mass. The Rev. LisaAnn Donegan officiated the wedding ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Elaine Whipple and the late Curtis Whipple, Courtdale, Pa. She is the granddaughter of the late Edward and Margret Baltz and Pierce and Alberta Whipple. The groom is the son of Gary Fraser, Haverhill, Mass., and Eleanor Sandiford, Petaluma, Calif. He is the grandson of Margaret Marnie and the late James Marnie and Donald and Beryl Fraser. The bride’s friend, Lynne Hernandez, served as maid of honor and the groom’s father served as best man. Bridesmaids were Allison Fraser, Michelle Goff, Carla Muscemeci and Lora Shrake. The groomsmen were Rodney Fraser, Michael Sandiford and Matthew Whipple. Addison Rae Whipple, niece of the bride, was the flower girl. Carolyn works at the Alzheimer’s Association in Watertown, Mass., as a vice president for development. Gary owns and operates his business, North Shore Closet Co. LLC in Beverly, Mass. The couple vacationed in Vermont for their honeymoon. They reside in Salem, Mass.

Walsh, Latona ean Walsh and Sarah Latona were S united in marriage on June 18, 2010, at Apple Tree Terrace at New-

berry Estates in Dallas. The wedding was officiated by the Rev. Gaetano Giordano. The bride is the daughter of Charles and Corinne Latona, Jenkins Township. Grandparents are Leo and Gertrude Latona, Plains Township, and the late Matthew and Veronica Collura. The groom is the son of Thomas A. Walsh, Pittston, and Rita C. Walsh, Kingston. Grandparents are Geraldine Walsh and the late Armstrong Walsh, Plains Township, and the late Frank and Stephanie Kwaitkowski. The bride chose her best friend, Allison Dorosky, as her maid of honor and Angela Marcinkevich as a bridesmaid. The flower girl was Morgan Stephanie Morrissey, niece of the groom. Anthony Walczak, godfather of the groom, served as best man. Groomsmen were Joseph Semyon and Eric Raitter Jr. Ring bearer was Tyler Michael Geasey, nephew of the groom. An evening reception was held at Apple Tree Terrace. The bride is employed by the Luzerne Intermediate Unit 18, Kingston. The groom is the owner of S&S Detailing and Customizing, Pittston Township. The couple resides in West Pittston with their two dogs, Bella and Dexter.

onald George Donnora and Susan Davenport, Smith R Ann Balester were married in a Smith and Jason Davenport morning ceremony on April 28, 2011, D onna were united in marriage on April on Indian Rocks Beach in Indian Rocks, Fla. The bride and groom are both natives of the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton area. Parents of the groom are Joseph and Evelyn Fleming, Pittston Township, Pa. Parents of the bride are the late James and Kathleen Balester, Kingston, Pa. The couple has five children/stepchildren, Shane, Christopher, Kevin, Tyler and Rachael. Ronald is a self-employed master mason. Susan is a student studying pharmacy technology. They reside in St. Petersburg, Fla.

The Ruccos

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eorge and Marilyn Rucco celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary June 11. The couple was married June 10, 1961, in St. Casimir’s Church, Pittston, by the late Rev. Leonard Gillis. Their maid of honor was Lois Melosky Bartuska. Bridesmaids were Carole Gregalis Kamage, Barbara Perch Gregalis and Anita Sorick Allen. The flower girl was Arlene Jones High. Best man was Frank De Ambrose. Ushers were David Vondrak, Joseph Gregalis Jr. and Cornelius Allen. George is the son of the late Anthony and Maria Rucco. He is retired from General Dynamics. Marilyn is the daughter of the late Joseph and Marian Gregalis. She is retired from Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center. The couple’s marriage has been blessed with two children, daughter, Mary, and son, George Jr., and his wife, Jean Marie. They also have twin granddaughters, Julia Marie and Olivia Marie Rucco. A Mass of Thanksgiving was celebrated at our Lady of the Eucharist Church, Pittston, on June 11, followed by a reception with family and friends.

9, 2011, at Cross Creek Community Church with Dr. Dave Earley, uncle of the bride, officiating. The bride is the daughter of Dan and Susan Smith, Sweet Valley. She is the granddaughter of George and Beverly Bacon, Sweet Valley, and Anna Mae Smith and the late Carl Smith, Ruggles Hollow. The groom is the son of Lynn Davenport, Wilkes-Barre. He is the grandson of Joyce Sralik and Dorothy Davenport, both of Wilkes-Barre. The bride, escorted by her father, chose her twin sister, Kelly Smith, as her maid of honor. Bridesmaids were her sisters, Sarah and Rebecca Smith; sister of the groom, Caitlin Davenport; honorary sister of the bride, Abigail Bachman; and friend of the bride, Suheiry Feliciano. Sara Aulisio, friend of the bride and groom, was chosen as the flower girl. The groom chose his close friend, Jonathan Broscious, as his best man. Groomsmen were Daniel Earley, cousin of the bride, and Daniel Martin, Joshua Seibert, Andrew Stout and Jody Hoch, friends of the groom. Following their evening ceremony, a reception was held at the Waterfront Banquet Facility in WilkesBarre, with local DJ Frankie Carll providing entertainment. The bride was honored at a bridal shower given by her mother and twin sister in the Hayfield House at Penn State Wilkes-Barre. The family of the groom hosted a rehearsal dinner at The Checkerboard Inn, Trucksville. Donna earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from Penn State University in 2005. She is pursuing her Master of Arts degree in creative writing at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia. She is employed with Cultural Care Au Pair as a local childcare coordinator. Jason graduated from Bishop Hoban High School in 2002. He earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology from Wilkes University and his Master of Arts degree in human services with an emphasis in marriage and family counseling from Liberty University. He is employed as a behavior specialist consultant for Evergreen Behavioral Intervention for Children. The couple honeymooned in Colonial Williamsburg, Va. The couple would like to thank the Dallas and Kunkle fire companies, the emergency surgeons at Geisinger Medical Center, Wilkes-Barre, and most of all God, for making their lives together possible following Donna’s near-fatal car accident at Harveys Lake last June.

The Kreitzers

r. and Mrs. Francis Scarnulis M celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on May 20, 2011. They

he children of Joseph and Josephine Kratz Kreitzer, NantiT coke, happily announce their parents’

were married at St. John’s Russian Orthodox Church, Edwardsville, and at Holy Trinity Church, Wilkes-Barre. Mrs. Scarnulis is the former Maryann Kasarda, daughter of the late Anna and John Kasarda. She graduated from Edwardsville High School in 1956 and was employed by the garment industry for many years and is employed by the Catholic Youth Center daycare. Mr. Scarnulis is the son of the late Anthony and Antoinette Scarnulis. He graduated from G.A.R. Memorial High School in 1958. He served in the United States Army and is retired from the Wilkes-Barre police force. He is employed as a security guard at Luzerne County Children and Youth Services, Wilkes-Barre. The couple has three children: Mark and his wife, Donna, Saylorsburg; Donald and his wife, Maria, Macungie; and Ronald and his wife, Joyce, Plains Township. They have six grandchildren, Anthony, Brittany, Matthew, Olivia, Ashley and Jacob Scarnulis. The couple was surprised at a dinner party given by their sons.

50th wedding anniversary. Joe and Josephine were married on May 13, 1961, at the Holy Cross Exaltation Church, Buttonwood. Joseph is the son of the late Joseph and Sophie Kreitzer, Hanover Green. Josephine is the daughter of the late Charles and Stella Kratz, Buttonwood. They have been blessed with six children, Carl, Stephen, Linda, Joseph, Susan and Brian. They are also blessed with 10 grandchildren, Missy, Lisa, Jordan, Kyle, Kelly, Stephen, Aaron, Nathan, Ella and Logan and two great-grandchildren, Maddie and Sophia. They were treated to a brunch at East Mountain Inn by their children and their families.

BIRTHS Nesbitt Women’s & Children’s Center at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital Osipower, Kristin and Robert, Dallas, a daughter, May 31. Lazo, Amber and Michael, Mountain Top, a son, May 31. Lupinski, Courtney and Jeremy Murphy, Edwardsville, a daughter, May 31. Dipasquale, Lisa and Cameron Pollard, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, May 31. Kilduff, Erin Burns and Patrick C., Dallas, a son, June 1. Younker, Lori and Jason, Sugar Notch, a daughter, June 1. Moyer, Lisa and Matthew, Noxen, a daughter, June 1. Coyne, Karen and Kevin, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, June 3. Malorie, Janelle and Eric Charles DePew, Scranton, a son, June 3. Bailey, Amber and Shawn Kochanski, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, June 3.

The Martins

Vaow, Heather and Joseph Gordon Jr., Kingston, a daughter, June 3. Lemanski, Holly and Daniele Raynes, Laurel Run, a son, June 4.

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obert and Diane Martin, Bear Creek Township, will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary on June 17. They were married on June 17, 1961, at the former Christ Lutheran Church, North Washington Street, Wilkes-Barre, by the Rev. Raymond Reed. Their attendants were Doris Oliver Musser and J. Ellsworth Haas. Mrs. Martin is the former Diane Searfoss, daughter of the late Eugene and Hilda Searfoss. Mr. Martin is the son of the late Edward and Anna Mae Martin. They are the owners and operators of Robert H. Martin Plastic Specialties, Bear Creek Township. The couple has one son, Darren, and his wife, Lisa, Bear Creek. They also have twin grandchildren, Lauren and Alex.

Dupre, Tracy and Robert, Kingston, a son, June 5. Clothier, Tracy and Patrick Son, Kingston, a daughter, June 5. Glaser, Jessica and Russell Escobar, Wilkes-Barre, a son, June 6. Kimball, Patricia and Gary Woodring, McAdoo, a son, June 6. Williams, Brittany and Bradley Frame, Hanover Township, a son, June 6.

OUT-OF-TOWN BIRTHS Bloomsburg Hospital Belles, Samantha and Arnold Roberts, Benton, a daughter, June 6. Grandparents are Arnold D. Roberts Jr., Lightstreet; Tammy Watts, Orangeville; and Craig and Tracy Schaffer, Benton.

WVW council helps raise money for Children’s Association Wyoming Valley West High School Student Council recently assisted the Wyoming Valley Children’s Association with its annual walk-a-thon. A donation day was held at the high school and $500 was raised and donated to the association. Student council vice-president Cody Swan was also a member of the planning committee. For their enthusiasm and support the Student Council was awarded the Walk-A-Thon Spirit Award for 2011. Members of the Student Council, from left, first row, are Katie Lipski, Desiree Holena, Samantha Lukasavage, Janki Patel and Imani Mullings. Second row: Karen Wills, Student Council adviser; Alex Jamilowski; Jimmy Kopec; Swan; Jocelyn Sickler; Will Butkiewicz; and Tom Griffith, Student Council adviser.

The Shemanskis erald and Mary Shemanski, Honey Pot, are celebrating their 40th G wedding anniversary today, June 12.

They were married at St. Mary’s of Czestochowa Church, Nanticoke, by the Rev. John J. Piontek. The couple has two children, Gerald S. Shemanski and his wife, Amber, and Jennifer Wozniak and her husband, Daniel, all of Honey Pot. They have three grandchildren, Jay and Derek Shemanski and Brandon Wozniak, all of Honey Pot. The couple plans to celebrate with their family at a special dinner.

SOCIAL PAGE GUIDELINES The Times Leader allows you to decide how your wedding notice reads, with a few caveats. Wedding announcements run in Sunday’s People section, with black-and-white photos, free of charge. Articles must be limited to 220 words, and we reserve the right to edit announcements that exceed that word count. Announcements

must be typed or submitted via www.timesleader.com. (Click on the "people" tab, then “weddings” and follow the instructions from there.) Submissions must include a daytime contact phone number and must be received within 10 months of the wedding date. We do not run first-year anniversary announcements or announcements of weddings that took place more than a year ago. (Wedding

photographers often can supply you with a black-and-white proof in advance of other album photographs.) All other social announcements must be typed and include a daytime contact phone number. Announcements of births at local hospitals are submitted by hospitals and published on Sundays.

Out-of-town announcements with local connections also are accepted. Photos are only accepted with baptism, dedication or other religious-ceremony announcements but not birth announcements. Engagement announcements must be submitted at least one month before the wedding date to guarantee publication and must include the wedding date. We

cannot publish engagement announcements once the wedding has taken place. Anniversary photographs are published free of charge at the 10th wedding anniversary and subsequent five-year milestones. Other anniversaries will be published, as space allows, without photographs.

Drop off articles at the Times Leader or mail to: The Times Leader People Section 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Questions can be directed to Kathy Sweetra at 829-7250 or e-mailed to people@timesleader.com.


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IN BRIEF

www.timesleader.com

LAMP REPAIR

LEHMAN TWP.: Penn State Wilkes-Barre Continuing Education is offering a limited number of scholarships for its Summer Youth Programs. The scholarships, underwritten by Procter & Gamble’s Live, Learn and Thrive Program and the Penn State Wilkes-Barre Alumni Constituent Society, help defray the costs of attending the summer camps. The scholarships will cover the cost of the camp tuition and are awarded on a first-come, firstserved basis for those who qualify. Penn State Wilkes-Barre Continuing Education is

offering 29 academic and personal enrichment and six athletic camps this summer. Camps run during the weeks of July 11-15, 18-22, and 25-29 and are designed to engage elementary and middle-school-aged children in creative, scientific, imaginative and physical fitness activities. For more information, contact Georgia Egan at 570-675-9219 or gle15@psu.edu, or visit www.wb.psu.edu/ce/youth. WILKES-BARRE: Luzerne County Head Start Inc. will accept applications for Head Start and PA Pre-K Counts

programs for the 2011-2012 school year 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays from June 7-23 at 23 Beekman St., WilkesBarre. One exception will be on June 15 when the hours are 2-7 p.m. To schedule an appointment, call 570-829-6231 or 1-800-551-5829. Walk-ins also welcome. Proof of child’s age, immunization record, diagnosed disability documentation (if applicable), medical insurance coverage and verification of one year’s income (either previous 12 months or last calendar year) are required.

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Dr. David Troynacki Welcomes his daughter Dr. Mallory Troynacki to his Dental Practice. Mallory Troynacki recently graduated from the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine with a doctorate in dental medicine. Mallory is a 2004 graduate of Pittston Area High School where she was valedictorian of her class. She then attended the University of Pittsburgh for undergraduate studies to pursue a Bachelor of Science degree. In 2007, she was granted early acceptance into the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine. During this time, Mallory received the Dean’s academic scholarship. Her dental training included general and cosmetic dentistry, root canal therapy, prosthondics, periodontics, restoration of implants, oral surgery, and pediatric dentistry. Mallory is the daughter of Dr. David and Maureen Troynacki. Dr. Troynacki will begin work with her father, Dr. David Troynacki, and her brother, Dr. David Troynacki Jr., at their Wilkes-Barre area office in July with expanded office hours. Tuesday through Friday. New patients, including children, are welcome and can schedule by calling 825-2247.

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HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

Juliauna Rasmus-Bieble Taylor M. Karasek Taylor Mateo Karasek, son of Tracy Karasek and Jesse Matias, celebrated his third birthday June 1 1. Taylor is a grandson of Debra Karasek, Edward Blesedell and Vivian Matias.

Brody Martin Brody Martin, son of Dr. Bryan and Laine Martin, Danville, is celebrating his third birthday today, June 12. Brody is a grandson of James and Linda Sheerer, Avoca, and Don and Jane Martin, Duryea. He has a brother, Brycen, 4.

Juliauna Rasmus-Bieble, daughter of D’andra Rasmus and John Bieble Jr., Nanticoke, is celebrating her third birthday today, June 12. Juliauna is a granddaughter of Becky Rasmus, Nanticoke, and John and Michele Bieble, Plymouth. She is a greatgranddaughter of Alan and Rita Rasmus, Nanticoke, and Leroy and Anna Webb, Wilkes-Barre. Juliauna is a great-great-granddaughter of Dorothy Rasmus, Nanticoke. She has two sisters, Tiahma, 6, and Shaylah, 5 months.

Dickinson Law Alumni hold annual dinner The Northeastern Pennsylvania Chapter of the General Alumni of Dickinson School of Law, Pennsylvania State University recently held its annual dinner program. This year’s honorees were Luzerne County Judge Lewis Wood Wetzel, Dallas, and Senior Deputy Attorney General Joseph Patrick McGowan, Scranton. The honorees were introduced by Arthur Piccone and Jim Gillotti. Attorney Sandor Yelen, Wilkes-Barre/ Kingston, was elected to his 36th consecutive term as president. A special keynote address was delivered by Phillip J. McConnaughay, dean of Dickinson School of Law. Guests at the program included recent graduates and senior students. Attorneys David Schwager and Jane Smedley served as chairpersons for the dinner program. Committee members were Lackawanna County Judge Carmen Minora and attorneys Zygmunt A. Bialkowski, Conrad Falvello, Arthur L. Piccone, Irwin Schneider and Sandor Yelen. At the dinner program, from left, first row: John Thomas, Bankruptcy Court Judge; Robin Simpson, Commonwealth Court Jurist; Victor Stabile; McConnaughay; attorney Anthony Falvello; Yelen; J. Michael Eakin, Supreme Court Justice; Thomas Vanaskie, Jurist Third Circuit Court of Appeals; Lewis Wood Wetzel, Luzerne County Judge; and Mary Leavitt, Commonwealth Court Jurist. Second row: Minora; Gregory Chelak, Pike County Judge; Joseph Kameen, Pike County Judge; Zygmunt Bialkowski Jr., committee member; McGowan; Schwager; John Miravich, alumni president; attorney Conrad Falvello, committee member; Harold Thompson, Senior Judge Pike County; Joseph Musto, former Luzerne County Judge; and Piccone.

Rory O’Brien

Rory O’Brien, daughter of Lisa and Kenny O’Brien, Dallas, is celebrating her fifth birthday today, June 12. Rory is a granddaughter of Irene and Robert Cardillo, Swoyersville, and Mary and Terrence O’Brien, Inkerman.

Pittston Area students compete in Envirothon Pittston Area High School students recently competed in the annual Luzerne County Envirothon competition at PPL’s Susquehanna Riverlands. Students from local school districts competed in the event which tested students on their knowledge of forestry, soil, aquatics and wildlife. Members of the team from left, first row, are Sara Kielbasa, Shelby Bentler and Brandi Burke. Second row: Letitia Warunek, Kaylene Sutkowski, Cara Capozucca, Heather Marsico and Ashley Drouse. Third row: Chris Musto, Dominic Lussi and Joe Caprari, coach.

King’s students enter health pre-professional honor society Twenty-eight King’s College students were recently inducted to Pennsylvania Lambda Chapter, King’s College, of Alpha Epsilon Delta, the national health pre-professional honor society. The society is dedicated to the encouragement and recognition of excellence in pre-professional health scholarship and science. Requirements for entry are an overall grade point average of 3.4 and the same minimum in the sciences following at least five semesters of coursework. Inductees, from left, first row, are Amanda Bowden, Morgan Boyce, Stephanie Bronson, Sara Ciarlo, Kayleen Cuddy, and Danielle Dunham. Second row: William Elliot, Chelsea Graziano, Sarah Guzinski, Hillary Hanwell, Megan Inama, Kristen Justice and Kristopher Kelly. Third row: Cathryn Kinsman, Kelci Koch, Dawn Long, Shannon McGowan, Danielle Murray, Minh Nguyen and Erin Perry. Fourth row: Amy Sperling, Ashley Stephens, Meghan Sternat, Abigail Torres, Amanda Yakobitis, Jessica Savino, Cerise Rapp and Kaley Kennedy.

GUIDELINES

Children’s birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge Photographs and information must be received two full weeks before your child’s birthday. To ensure accurate publication, your information must be typed or computer-generated. Include your child’s

name, age and birthday, parents’, grandparents’ and great-grandparents’ names and their towns of residence, any siblings and their ages. Don’t forget to include a daytime contact phone number.

We cannot return photos submitted for publication in community news, including birthday photos, occasions photos and all publicity photos. Please do not submit precious or original professional photographs that

require return because such photos can become damaged, or occasionally lost, in the production process. Send to: Times Leader Birthdays, 15 North Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 187110250.

WIN A $50 GIFT CERTIFICATE If your child’s photo and birthday announcement is on this page, it will automatically be entered into the “Happy Birthday Shopping Spree” drawing for a $50 certificate. One winner will be announced on the first of the month on this page.

PINNACLE REHAB IS A FAMILY RUN PHYSICAL THERAPY PRACTICE LOCALLY OWNED BY KEVIN AND BRIDGET BARNO. OUR CARING TEAM OF HIGHLY SKILLED AND EXPERIENCED PROFESSIONALS CAN PINPOINT THE SOURCE OF YOUR PROBLEM TO TREAT THE CAUSE AS WELL AS YOUR SYMPTOMS. OUR EXPERT TEAM OF PHYSICAL THERAPISTS HAVE OVER 75 YEARS COMBINED EXPERIENCE AND ALL TREATMENT PROGRAMS ARE SPECIFIC TO THE INDIVIDUAL TO GET YOU BACK TO THE THINGS YOU LIKE TO DO. WE PERFORM A COMPLETE EVALUATION TO DETERMINE THE TRUE SOURCE OF YOUR SYMPTOMS WHICH CONSISTS OF A THOROUGH INTERVIEW OF YOUR SYMPTOM HISTORY, STRENGTH TESTING, AND FLEXIBILITY TESTING. OUR FINDINGS FROM THE EVALUATION WILL HELP US PUT TOGETHER A TREATMENT PLAN SPECIFIC TO YOUR NEEDS.

WE OFFER TREATMENTS FOR: • ARTHRITIS • NECK AND BACK PAIN • DISC INJURIES • WORK INJURIES • AUTO ACCIDENTS • FOOT AND ANKLE INJURIES

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WE ALSO OFFER: GOLF STRENGTHENING PROGRAMS: WE USE OUR FINDINGS FROM YOUR EVALUATION TO DESIGN A TREATMENT PLAN SPECIFIC TO YOUR SWING TO IMPROVE YOUR FLEXIBILITY, TO DECREASE PAIN, IMPROVE YOUR STRENGTH TO GIVE YOU MORE DISTANCE OFF THE TEE, AND IMPROVE YOUR ENDURANCE SO YOU CAN FINISH STRONG. MASSAGE THERAPY FOR THERAPEUTIC AND RELAXATION PURPOSES: MANY PEOPLE CONSIDER MASSAGE THERAPY TO BE JUST ABOUT PAMPERING, BUT IT HAS IMPORTANT HEALTH BENEFITS. WHEN MASSAGE IS INCORPORATED AS PART OF YOUR REGULAR WELLNESS ROUTINE IT CAN IMPROVE MUSCLE FUNCTION AS WELL AS CIRCULATION AND LYMPH FLOW. WE HAVE JUST MOVED TO OUR NEW, CONVENIENT LOCATION ON THIRD AVENUE, LOCATED NEXT TO ROLLER KING AND NEAR THE KINGSTON REC CENTER. RENOVATED BY KAPPLER CONTRACTING AND DECORATED BY BARBARA CAPONE INTERIORS, PINNACLE REHAB OFFERS A CLEAN, FRESH ENVIRONMENT WHICH IS PLEASING TO THE EYE AND REFLECTIVE OF OUR HIGH STANDARD OF CARE. WITH A COMBINATION OF CURTAINED AREAS AND PRIVATE TREATMENT ROOMS, WE HAVE KEPT THE SENSE OF INTERACTION THAT OUR PATIENTS LOVE WHILE MAINTAINING PRIVACY. EACH TREATMENT AREA HAS ADJUSTABLE LIGHTING FOR YOUR COMFORT, AND WE HAVE ADDED NEW EQUIPMENT TO HELP YOU GET THE MOST OUT OF YOUR PHYSICAL THERAPY EXPERIENCE. THERE IS AMPLE PARKING IN OUR LOT AND IT IS VERY EASY TO TURN ON AND OFF THIRD AVENUE. BEING LOCATED NEAR THE PIERCE STREET BRIDGE AND THE CROSS VALLEY EXPRESSWAY MAKES OUR THERAPY CLINIC ACCESSIBLE TO PEOPLE ON BOTH SIDES OF THE RIVER AS WELL AS SURROUNDING MOUNTAIN REGIONS. WE WILL CONTINUE OUR TRADITION OF PROVIDING EXPERT, ONE ON ONE PHYSICAL THERAPY CARE BECAUSE WE FEEL THAT OUR “HANDS-ON” APPROACH IS ESSENTIAL TO ACHIEVE OPTIMAL OUTCOMES IN AREAS OF PAIN REDUCTION, RANGE OF MOTION, STRENGTH, AND GETTING PEOPLE BACK TO DOING THE ACTIVITIES THEY LOVE. WE OFFER EVENING APPOINTMENTS THREE NIGHTS A WEEK TO ACCOMMODATE PEOPLE WHO WORK, AND ACCEPT MOST MAJOR INSURANCES. MOST INSURANCES DO NOT REQUIRE A REFERRAL.

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SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011

HONOR ROLL

HONOR ROLL

Good Shepherd Academy

Wyoming Valley West Middle School

Good Shepherd Academy recently announced the Honor Roll for the third quarter. Grade 6: High Honors: Artemisia Ashton, Kristen Coffay, Emily Easton, Lia Fredericks, Andrew Lacina, Jonathan Rokosz, Lauren Serafin, Brian Springer, Eamon Tuttle. Honors: Alexis Bigus, Mackenzie Byers, Ryan Castle, Austin Christo, Christopher Draina, Stephen Glova, Sean Judge, Brendan Kennedy, Alex Larralde, Jeremy Mayerski, Molly McHale, Anthony Molitoris, Nicole Mrugal, Katherine Neville, Joshua Perta, John Seasock, Kaylee Soboleski, Cienna Tohme, Davis Weaver, Christopher Zim. Grade 7: High Honors: Colin Ray Craven, Catherine Falzone, Courtney Kijek, Michael Waugh. Honors: Matthew Barat, Joshua Betz, Kaitlyn Ceppa, Madelyn Charney, Jarrett Gabriel, Madeline Grant, Hudson Hicks, David Iskra, Kathryn Jeffries, Carrie Ann Kinney, Macy Klocko, Lydia Lawson, Aidan Lynn, Matthew Moleski, Alexis Ornoski, Juliana Pillets, Mark Pointek, Rose Randazza, Kelcie Shovlin, Brianna Stilp, Connor Stone, Abigail Stucker, Dylan Swithers, Carissa Wozinski. Grade 8: High Honors: Benjamin Brubaker, Ryan Crossin, Robert Dougherty, Cameron Gill, Tara Judge, Arvind Murali, Briana Scorey, Timothy White. Honors: Derek Belsky, Walter Blejwas, Elena Bruning-Martin, Gerald Bush, Nicole Calomino, Eric Flower, Hannah Griffiths, Kaitlyn Gushka, Christina Kalie, Alex Kotch, Johanna Kultys, Lauren Manganello, Alicia Moore, Lindsay Musial, Benjamin Nause, Rachel Platko, Brandon Povilitus, Justin Prenga, Phoebe Ritsick, Scott Roper, James Slavinski, Katelyn Stemrich.

NAMES AND FACES Rachael Marie Pugh, daughter of Alan and Brenda Pugh, recently graduated from Ave Maria School of Law. She is part of the last graduating class of 90 students who began at a campus in Ann Arbor, Mich., and completed their degrees in North Naples. Pugh is a Pugh Dallas High School graduate. She earned an associate’s degree in marketing and a bachelor’s degree in business from King’s College. Jennie Hampton, Wilkes-Barre, a senior majoring in history and theology at King’s College, is participating in a three-week study abroad experience travelling from Venice, Italy, to Istanbul, Turkey. The program, “Geographies of Europe,” was designed to investigate the creation, transformation, and enforcement of the boundaries of EuropeHampton an identity through the case studies of ghettoized Jews of early modern Venice and marginalized Muslim Turks in contemporary Europe. Hampton is among a group of 16 King’s students who will explore the culture and history of southeast Europe. History professors Daniel Clasby

Miss Troy, principal, Wyoming Valley West Middle School, recently announced the following students who have attained Honor Roll status for the third marking period. Grade 8: High Honors with Distinction: Eric Acosta, Mark Baron, Brady Davison, Madeleine Dwyer, Nicholas Elko, Julie Green, Brian Grodzki, Kristin Innocenti, Abigail Kane, Rachel Langan, Matthew Lyons, Ashlyn Narins, Rebecca Ritsick, Kara Ann Romanowski, Emily Rossmell, Jessica Savage, Daniel Taren, Brooke Weiss. High Honors: Santino Alunni, Steven Appenzeller, Evan Barber, Arika Bartusek, Abigail Baur, Dominique Bekanich, Lauren Bezek, Kira Bidding, Corrine Bonnerwith, April Bonoski, Juliana Bottaro, Emily Brown, Mia Cain, Kayley Carey, David Casterline Jr., Alexandria Chaban, Joley Chen, Yazmine Cooley, Emily Coslett, Kaitlyn Coslett, Julia Crossin, Devin Cwalina, Dylan De Armitt, Leah Desousa, Allison Detwiler, Jarod Elko, Bailey Endler, Haille Evans, James Fender, Ashlyn Finnegan, Sydney Fry, Talyah Gabara, Haley Gayoski, Kameron Grant, Emily Greskewicz, John Gruver, Taylor Gugliotti, Kady Gurtis, Sabrina Hamersley, Lauren Hannagan, Collin Hanson, Emily Harden, Ashlee Harry, Paige Heckman, Ashlyn Heid, Maria Hoskins, Janelle Husted, Andrew Iorio, Kevin Johnson, Madison Kachinko, Megan Kane, Amandeep Kaur, Colin Keefer, Andrew Kerrigan, Natalia Kindler, Karlee Kioske, Samuel Kornfeld, Jared Kozich, Jeremy Kozich, Amanda Krashnak, Stefany Krasson, Kyle

and Nicole Mares and Kim Fabbri, coordinator of the Scholars in Service Program, coordinated the program. Hampton is a president-elect of Phi Alpha Theta, a member of the History Society, and Q&A and Education clubs. She is also an admission assistant. She is the daughter of Delbert and Doreen Hampton. Brooke Rowe, Forty Fort, has been recognized by the United States Achievement Academy as a student of excellence. The Academy recognizes fewer than 10% of all high school students. Rowe, a student at West Side Career and Technology Center, was nominated for this honor by Miss Kimelewski, a history teacher at the school. The Academy recognizes students upon the recommendation of teachers and other qualified sponsors and upon the Standards for Selection set forth by the Acad-

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Krushinski, Vinny Le, Nikolas Lecce, Cheyenne Leonard, Alexis Lewis, Zi Xiang Lin, Bethany Lindsey, Keith Lowe, Christopher Lupole, Joshua Maniscalco, Hunter May, Keefe Mcdougal, Hunter Mcgrane, Brianna Miller, Laura Monto, Syrah Musto, Evelyn Nadeak, Amy Naugle, Emily Nice, Ryan Nork, Alyssa O’Boyle, Landis Ostroski, Garvin Paisley Jr., Racheal Paisley, Reilly Peters, Jason Radginski, Britany Richardson, Sophie Rittenhouse, Matthew Ruger, Bailey Ryneski, Contessa Salgado, Alexandra Schappert, Jonathan Schwartz, Sabrina Scott, Alyssa Shaver, Lucy Shemo, Susan Simmons, Elizabeth Slusser, Myranda Stark, Morgan Stash, Dominic Steiner-Butchko, Carly Thomas, Gail Thorne, Hayley Tigue, Julianna Turnbach, Tiffany Usavage, Julia Usefara, Alexa Vargo, Morgan Wheeler, Megan Wiernusz, Sabrina Wilkins, Nathan Williams, James Wright, Mariah Yantz, Francis Yuhas, Logan Zavada, Edward Zawatski. Honors: Abraheem Abdelqader, Malak Abuelhawa, Jyllian Barchi, James Barnett Jr., David Bird, Shane Borisuck, Tyler Brobst, Jordan Bruno, Jermichael Bunch, Aleesha Bunting, Lacey Caprari, Milan Caprari, Naseim Case, Mary Cielo, Noah Collins, Devon Dante, Kelsey Decker, Ameer Dingle, Joseph Eck, Haley Edwards, Patrick Emel, Sara Essaidi, Mitchell Evan, Chase Fasciano, Samantha Finney, Shawn Frazier, Justine Gaines, Emily Galasso, Carlie Gardner, Joseph Gavenonis, Gavyn Giza, Lacey Good-Wright, Maxon Goodrich, William Gregory, Caeleigh Griffiths, Alyssa Gross, Paige Haigh, Caitlin Hargrave, Richard Haughwout, Dillon Hector, Cristopher Herrera, Ashlee Hogan, Samantha Howell, Abigail Hudock, Justin Hughes, Daniel Jeffrey, Erika Jenkins, Desiree

emy. The Standard for Selection include academic performance, interest and aptitude, leadership Rowe qualities, responsibility, enthusiasm, motivation to learn and improve, attitude and cooperative spirit and dependability. Rowe is the daughter of Paul and Rita Rowe. Bobbie Lynn Richardson, a senior at GAR Memorial Junior-Senior High School, and Sydney Fisher, a first-grade student at Solomon/Plains Memorial Elementary School, were awarded prizes by the Wyoming Valley Poetry Society, in conjunction with the Fine Arts Fiesta, for their poems submitted in a poetry writing contest. Richard-

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son, a member of English teacher Christina Kluger’s Poetry Club, received a first-place certificate in Richardson the Young Adult category for her poem entitled “Inspiration.” Fisher, a student in Maura Bukeavich’s Fisher class, was awarded second place in the grades 1-3 category for her poem entitled “The Tiny Kitten.” Both students read their works at the Fine Arts Fiesta held in May on Public Square.

THE TIMES LEADER Magoski, Prachi Majamundar, Madison Makarewicz-Korey, Samantha Malesky, Alejandro Martinez, David Mccue, Jahquan Mcintosh, Tyler Mcnulty, Kaitlyn Meighan, Megan Menzel, Jennifer Miller, Justin Montalvo, Christian Mountjoy, Samantha Packer, Ashlynd Perkins, Karen Pickering, Rebecca Podskoch, Mark Popson, Caitlin Prebish, William Ramsey, Alexa Remakus, Logan Rock, Hannah Rogers, Chloe Ruckle, Amanda Scarcella, Courtney Schraeder, Wayne Smith, Joshua Sokoloski, Kaitlyn Stoodley, Emily Urbanovitch, Jason Wall, Colin Warnke, Lawrence Wesneski, Caitlin Westerholm, Kristopher Wolfe, Tyler Wozniak, Alexandra Yanchick, Dillon Yuhas, Joshua Zavada, Aeryona Zim. Honors: Anthony Barbose, Michael Bazadona, Cynthia Bednarski, Alexa Biscotto, Kris Blanco, Louis Brennan, Lorraine Breslin, Dorian Budziak-Featherstone, Sara D’Andrea, Nicolas Delazzari, Ulysses Denman, Kyle Deutschman, Edward Doreskewicz, Adam Edwards, Kaley Ellard, Thomas Evans, Heaven-Lee Ewing, Kyle Federici, Michael Fisher, Connor Gaffney, Matthew Gilroy, Garrett Giza, Bryan Gourley, Alexandria Grablick, Christopher Heylek, Ryan Hogan, Jonathan Howells, Nicole Hunter, Gianna Jannuzzi, Kayla Kavetski, Daniel Kozick, Paul Kubicki, Kyle Kulp, Morgan Kultys, Ryan Kwastavich, Zoe Lambert, Cassandra Laureano, Alaena Lloyd, Matthew Mackiewicz, Timothy Markert, Logan Matenus, Tyler Mckenna, Gabriella Mcmahon, Kaitlin Melodick, Olivia Miller, Mariah Monseur, Elyzabeth Nadeak, AugustLane Palchanis, Thomas Pashinski, Britany Pavone, Emma Phillips, Matthew Pitcavage, Jocelyn Polney, Grant Powell, Shannon Purcell, Donald Reynolds, Rafe Rickard, Savanna Robinson, Haley Sartin, Nicholas Scarpelli, Christopher Schneider,

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Dominic Shandra, Alyssa Simmers, Melissa Solack, Joel Sorber, Ronny Sosa, Seth St Clair, Victoria Stasukinas, Michael Tandoh Jr.., Caleb Trojan, Jessica Valdez Nolasco, Stephen Vassello, Marc Volack, Emily Walton, Jamie Webb Jr., Devon Weidman, Bailey Welki, Brentley Wilbur, Drew Wilkinson, Jason Williams, Clare Winton, Kyra Yaglowski, Tyler Yankosky, Jason Zavala. Grade 6: High Honors with Distinction: Payton Boler, Drea Buczeskie, Danielle Cook, Casey Cryan, Lauren Devens, Erin Gibbons, Kayley Gibbons, Natalie Gruver, Megan Guarilia, Brittany Hebda, Melinda Holena, Katelyn Johnson, Meghan Klinges, Jenna Koch, Jacob Lesoine, Thomas Lyall, Megan Marinos, Morgan Mcintyre, Samantha Pritchard, Diederick Reitsma, Gabriela Smicherko, Morgan Sullivan, Lauren Thoryk, Justin Vought, Paige Williams, Madison Yoh. High Honors: Elizabeth Abraham, Hamid Al-Hawa, Courtney Allabaugh, Aaron Austin, Ariel Banks, Eric Baron, Ian Bayley, Dominick Bayo, Eric Bealla, Zachary Benczkowski, Stephen Berger, Ryan Bird, Blake Blackwell, Emily Boney, Alexander Brandreth, Shane Brandt, Matthew Brennan, Carol Brewster, Carylanne Burrier, Joseph Butcher, Matthew Butchko, Austin Canavan, Mariah Carey, Madelyn Casier, Ryan Casterline, Ashley Collura, Morgan Collura, Taylor Cook, Elizabeth Crossin, Colleen Cwalina, Damian Davies, Madeline Delarche, Nina Dellarte, Jonathon Derhammer, Bianca Difebo, Brooke Dombroski, Courtney Dorshefski, Ashley Duda, Sierra Dudek, Gianna Dutter, Amanda Finney, Nicole Finney, Logan Fluegel, Bernadine Fox, Liam Gabriel, Amber Gesek, Mykala Gillespie, Joyssen See HONOR ROLL, Page 8B

Wyoming Seminary students participate in music festivals Seventeen Wyoming Seminary Upper School students recently were selected to perform in district, regional and state chorus, band and orchestra festivals. The festivals are organized by the Pennsylvania Music Educators Association and honor students for excellence in voice and instrumental music. Students named to District Orchestra were Matthew Blom, Wilkes-Barre; Jonas Crass, Scranton; Kelsey Dolhon, Kingston; Constanze Huenting, Rhede, Germany; Scott Kwiatek, Lake Ariel; and Margaret Rupp, Dallas. Dolhon and Huenting also were named to the Regional Orchestra. At the end of the festival season, from left, are Dolhon, Huenting, Blom, Crass, Kwiatek and Rupp.

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SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011 PAGE 7B

MMI sixth-graders recognized for Science Fair projects Students at MMI Preparatory School were recently honored for their achievements in the sixth-grade Science Fair. The projects were graded on the criteria of scientific thought, experimental methods, analytical approach, presentation and judge’s opinion. Seniors who are part of the school’s Science National Honor Society mentored the sixthgrade students on their projects. Science Fair winners, from left, are Katie Eschenbach, Drums, third place; Joshua Narrow, Hazleton, second place; and Frank Seratch, Hazleton, first place.

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Juggler Rob Smith Magic of Bill Dixon Kid’s Talent Show FREE Kid’s basket Rafe Karaoke Night! ‘Kiss Theater’ performers UMC “Step by Step Praise Bandâ€? Martial Arts demo ‘Grove Theater’ singers Ping Pong Tourney! Basket & Cash Drawings on the grounds Sat, 25th Caricatures by John O’Connell Face Paintings by Danielle For full lineup of entertainment go to www.goh.org

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CMYK PAGE 8B

SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011

HONOR ROLL Continued from Page 6B

Gonzalez, Dorothy Goss, Lauren Greenwald, Nicole Harper, Luke Hoskins, Dani Iorio, Keith Jackson, Dylan Jolley, Morgan Josefowicz, Maya Kornfeld, Stephen Kotch, William Kotchik, Eric Krushinski, Russell Kutish, Eric Latoski, Sarah Lawson, Jonathan Libby, Jacklyn Lindsey, Kyra Tani Little, Grant Loose, Chelsea Mackiewicz, Katie Mackiewicz, Nina Magnotta, Morgan Marinos, Madison Matello, Celes-

te Mccarley, Joseph Motovidlak, Luke Mountjoy, Kerri Mulligan, Lilly Nestor, Joseph Novitski, Riley O’Neil, Roshan Patel, Alicia Pedana, Courtney Pellam, Jared Perdikis, Amber Perez, Bryden Peters, Ryley Phillips, Olivia Pieczynski, David Pilcavage, Loren Pizano, Christopher Polk, Matthew Proski, Kyle Puterbaugh, Melodi Raskiewicz, Jordan Reilly, Ryan Reino, Ariana Rinaldi, Brittany Ritsick, Annamarie Rodriguez, Chad Romanowski, Ashley Rood, Tacarra Roper, Brydon Rukstalis, Michael Saracino Iv, Kaylin Sarris, Nicholas Sedeski, Sabrina Seitz, Kaycee Seiwell, Rebecca Shields, Brandi Sholtis, Sheylah Silva,

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Lauryn Simmons, David Sites, Kylie Slatky, Taylor Smith, Kristina Specht, Amber Springer, Amanda Sura, Dominik Tarnawczyk, Abigail Thomas, Kristi Tomcho, Cole Ungvarsky, Michael Walsh IV, Ian Warunek, Trevor Weiss, Ryleigh White, Andrew Wiedwald, Olivia Winters, Stanley Zaneski. Honors: Mohamed Abuelhawa, Khalil Adams, Kiera Allabaugh, Anastasia Allen, Michael Allunis, Anessa Bartusek, Francesco Bellia, Cheyenne Blackhawk, Courtney Borland, Gabriella Bottaro, Morgan Brennan, Tyeira Brown, Meghan Butler, Gabriella Cappucci, Gabrielle Care, Ethan Collura, Joshua Cook, Courtney Costello,

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Destinee Dominick, Michael Duvall Jr.., Evelyn Egenski, Aaron Farrow, Alyssa Fasciano, Nicole Favia, Haylee Fedor, Kyle Footman, Noah Frace, Sarah Gacek, David Gavlick, Haley George, Morgan Gronkowski, Jarrett Guziejka, Adam Harbaugh, Emilee Heil, Kasen Heim, Faith Hockenberry, Colyn Inniss, Juliette Jacobosky, Daisy Jaimes-Mattox, Dominick Kay, Bryan Kemmerer, Ethan Kemmerer, Noah Kemmerer, Jill Ktytor, Samantha Lacomy, Shawn Lamoreaux, Robert Lane, David Lazinsky, Brandon Maute, Brittany Mays, Adam Mccue, Zachery Mcmanus, Christopher Melovitz, Payton Mendygral,

THE TIMES LEADER Michael Mera, Madison Michak, Joshua Montalvo, Nicholas Mooney, Courtney Mountjoy, Logan Myers, Brianna Naudus, Michael Orlando, Jasmine Pearson, Kendra Percodani, Brandon Pieszala, Robert Poluske, Benjamin Quiroz, Ashlynn Rader, Austin Redmond, Matthew Repko, Sarah Roman, Velvet Salgado, Kyra Santasania, Angela Schneider, Sydney Scott, Kiara Serrano, Christine Shandra, Jake Shemo, Lindsey Shovlin, Giana Skaff, Mark Smith, Richard Sott, Anthony Spinelli, Kristi Starosta, Erin Steibel, Jacob Taffera, Connor Taylor, Kaylee Thomas, Carlos Torres-Teran, Andrew

Congratulate Your Favorite Graduate in The Times Leader Graduate keepsake ake edition Saturday, July 9, 2011.

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Our Lady of Victory at Harveys Lake will conduct the Annual Blessing of the Boats, Sunday June 12th at 3:30 PM, at the Wardens Place Dock, which is directly in front of the Church. As usual, all denominations are welcome to bring any water craft that floats to the general blessing, and then the individual “Drive-By” blessing. There is no better way to start out the summer boating season, then to ask God to protect us all, and grant us a summer of safe enjoyment with family and friends. For further information, please call 639-1535.

at Harvey’s Lake, continues to host the annual devotions to Our Lady of Fatima.

kes-Barre Area Wilkes-Barre o-Tech School Vo-Tech oming Area Wyoming oming Seminary Wyoming oming Valley West Wyoming

Scranton Prep School Scranton School for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Chilrden Tunkhannock Area West Side Career and Technology Center

Tuck Jr., John Usavage, Natalia Vivanco, Irwin Wainwright, Keisha Watkins, Audrea Welles, Shay Wilkinson, Amanda Williams, Imari Wimbush, Cassandra Wright, Brandy Zimmerman.

OUR LADY OF VICTORY,

These schools will be featured:

Coughlin Crestwood Dallas GAR Greater Nanticoke Area Hanover Area Hazleton Area

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This month’s service will be on Monday the 13th at 7:00 PM and will continue the 13th of each month at 7:00 PM through October 13, 2011. These beautiful and inspirational devotions consist of the Rosary, Hymns and Benediction.

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Congratulations We’re proud of you and your accomplishments Enjoy your college experience, Mom and Dad

Send to: The Times Leader Grads, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Name ____________________________________________________ Address __________________________________________________ City ____________________________ State ____ ZIP _____________ Phone ___________________________ Your Message ______________________________________________

Drop off or mail this form with a photo of your favorite grad along with a personal message of congratulations. Neatly print the grad’s name and school along with the name and phone number of the person submitting the ad on the back of your photo. Include a selfaddressed, stamped envelope to have your photo returned or pick it up at our office after July 12, 2011.

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OUT-OF-TOWN GRADUATION The University of Scranton Bachelor and Associate degrees: Luzerne County: Samuel W. Alba, Wilkes-Barre Township; Rebecca S. Antal, Dupont; Leah E. Arcuri, Plains; Michael C. Baloga, Exeter; Elyse C. Benoit, Shavertown; Richard W. Berry, Forty Fort; Laura V. Bonawits, Plymouth; Ian J. Butterwick, Forty Fort; Samuel Calabrese, Exeter; Christopher Carey, Duryea; Jared Castellani, Larksville; Mae Lynn Chan, Kingston; Edward A. Colarusso, Yatesville; Emily L. Deubler, Dallas; Barry J. Eiden, Avoca; Melissa A. Fasciana, Pittston Township; Anna Fusco, West Wyoming; Alison R. Grant, Dallas; Judith A. Gunshannon, Luzerne; William F. Gunshannon, Luzerne; James M. Hockenbury, Hanover Township; Sean W. Hogya, White Haven; Daniel M. Jackowitz, Avoca;

OUT-OF-TOWN GRADUATIONS

Danielle M. Justave, Harding; Philip J. Kachmar, Kingston; Adam M. Kasmark, Forty Fort; Michael P. Kelley, West Pittston; Ashley L. Kelly, Pittston Township; Amy E. Klug, Mountaintop; Laura L. Krafjack, Avoca; Susan N. Krogulski, Shavertown; Victoria A. Lombardo, Exeter; Nicholas M. Mantione, Plains Township; Kenna L. Margevich, Wapwallopen; Christine E. Marley, Dallas; Alysia R. McGlynn, Larksville; Krista M. McGlynn, Pittston; Mary-Elizabeth Metzo, WilkesBarre; John P. Miller, Hanover Township; Michael A. Molitoris, Plains; Sara E. Nardone, Shavertown; Jeffrey A. Orloski, Mountain Top; Jessica J. Palmeri, Kingston; Emily R. Popson, Shavertown; Stephanie R. Pugh, Luzerne; Ashley L. Ramsey, Larksville; Krystal A. Robinson, Shavertown; Elizabeth M. Ryan, Dallas; Allison N. Sampson, Sugarloaf; Matthew R. Saporito, Forty Fort; Salvatore P. Sciacca, Wyoming; Lauren L. Shuleski, Duryea; Jeffrey M. Sokoloski, Forty Fort; Michele E. Suchecki, Sugarloaf; Danielle N. Torres, Mountain Top; Kira N. Wagner,

Chatham University, Pittsburgh

Bucknell University, Lewisburg

Rushtin Y. Chaklader, Shavertown, Bachelor of Science degree in biomedical engineering, summa cum laude. Scott M. Henry, Shavertown, Bachelor of Arts degree in philosophy and religion. Kelli M. Kuzo, Berwick, Master of Science degree in education. Sarah E. Marianacci, Dallas, Bachelor of Science degree in business administration in management, magna cum laude. Michael Q. Russin, Pittston, Bachelor of Science degree in business administration in management, cum laude. Robert D. Seeley, Shavertown, Bachelor of Science degree in electrical engineering. Luke D. Swenson, Newfoundland, Bachelor of Arts degree in geology. Cara D. Ziegler, Drums, Bachelor of Science degree in chemical engineering.

Danni Lynn Petyo, Wilkes-Barre, Bachelor of Arts degree in global policy studies and a minor in religion. Kara McEntee, Bear Creek Township, Master of Professional Writing degree.

Clarion University, Clarion

Matthew Kelly, West Wyoming, Bachelor of Science degree in physics.

Drew University, Madison, N.J.

Guy M. Carpenter, Dallas, Bachelor of Arts degree. Danielle M. Gregor, West Wyoming, Bachelor of Arts degree.

Drexel University – Earle Mack School of Law, Philadelphia Samantha Fowler, Berwick, Juris Doctor degree.

Grove City College, Grove City

Alyssa Killian, Benton, Bachelor of Science degree in biology. Chelsea Hosler, Berwick, Bachelor of Arts degree in sociology and

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Sugarloaf; Megan M. Walsh, Laflin; Patrick N. Wende, Bear Creek Township; Megan M. Yekel, Wilkes-Barre. Wyoming County: Rita A. DiLeo, Factoryville; Maria A. Gubbiotti, Falls; Dana A. Hardisky, Nicholson; April L. Kern, Nicholson; Samantha N. Migliori, Falls; Benjamin W. Redan, Tunkhannock. Doctor of Physical Therapy degree: Luzerne County: Anthony J. Balent, Luzerne; and Deidre A. McGlynn, Larksville. Master’s degree: Luzerne County: Sarah A. Alrumikhani, Kingston; Paul M. Bonczek, Avoca; Jonathan L. Bradshaw, West Pittston; Matthew I. Calabro, Kingston; Andrea Cannavale, Ashley; Kelly A. Capece, Hanover Township; Charles Chernavsky, Wilkes Barre; Derek J. Ciaruffoli, Shavertown; Michael W. Corbett, Exeter; Joseph L. Cumbo, West Wyoming; William J. Davis, Trucksville; Kristen R. DeBarry, Mountain Top; Gary J. DiMattia, Pittston; Nancy J. Dines, Kingston; Nicole J. Fisher, Wilkes Barre; Roberta A. Fratzola, Pittston; Eve A. Gerulsky, Wilkes-

history. Alena Bartolai, Swoyersville, Bachelor of Arts degree in sociology.

Lycoming College, Williamsport

Frank Lettieri, Old Forge, Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry. Lauren Mesko, Old Forge, Bachelor of Science degree in biology, cum laude. Stephanie Stromwall, Old Forge, Bachelor of Arts degree in criminal justice. Maura Tomassoni, Old Forge, Bachelor of Science degree in biology. Kelly Rose, Wilkes-Barre, Bachelor of Arts degree in business, cum laude.

McDaniel College, Westminster, Md.

Carrie A. Lindeman, Wilkes-Barre, master’s degree in deaf education.

Mercyhurst College, Erie

Casey Harvilla, Swoyersville, Bachelor of Arts degree in art therapy.

Muhlenberg College, Allentown

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Barre; Susan J. Gilroy-King, Ashley; Maura A. Goodwin, Forty Fort; Harry Hahnebach, WilkesBarre; Lisa M. Hayes, Dallas; Lindsay A. Horvath, Swoyersville; Matthew C. Kelly, Wyoming; Lori A. Losen, Drums; Stephanie E. Lynch, Pittston; Tara A. Mleczynski, Harveys Lake; John C. O’Bell, West Pittston; Lauren A. Pascoe, Plymouth; Amy R. Polashenski, Mountain Top; Jennifer A. Pollick, Wyoming; Azhar M. Salama, Kingston; Robert D. Santarelli, Pittston; Megan Saracino, Wilkes Barre; Erin A. Sciandra, Hughestown; Tessa M. Scrobola, Wyoming; Beth L. Sindaco, Wilkes-Barre; Erica M. Smith, Mountain Top; Allison A. Stets, Mountain Top; Susan Stoddard, Laflin; David A. Strunk, Nanticoke; Andrea A. Styczen, Kingston; Brittany L. Swingle, Plymouth; Christopher J. Turon, West Wyoming; Elizabeth A. Vohar, Swoyersville; Amber A. Wade, Forty Fort; and Samantha D. Zambotti, Sugarloaf. Wyoming County: Katherine A. Dietrich, Nicholson; Marja N. Litwin, Nicholson; and Tammy L. Myers, Tunkhannock.

Steven Finkelstein, Kingston, Bachelor of Arts degree in music.

University of Vermont, Burlington, Vt.

Robert J. Dzieciol, Avoca, Bachelor of Science degree in mechanical engineering. Caitlin M. Dugan, White Haven, Bachelor of Science degree in molecular genetics.

Virginia Intermont College, Bristol, Va.

Cheryl Lynn Mazaleski, Duryea, Bachelor of Science degree in equine studies.

Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, Mass. Amanda Lea Blom, Wilkes-Barre, Bachelor of Science degree in biology and biotechnology with distinction.

Youngstown State University, Youngstown, Ohio

Robert Slepsky, Mountain Top, Bachelor of Arts degree in political science.

Heights-Murray students raise money for Red Cross through bracelet sale The Heights-Murray Elementary Student Council recently sold heart bracelets in memory of employee Linda Yelland to raise money for the Wilkes-Barre Chapter of the American Red Cross. Some of the participants, from left, first row, are Chelsea Sypniewski, Tina Nguyen, Jennifer Ajao and Magaly Martinez. Second row: Desmond McCance, Michael Vreeland, Jacob Delaney, Joseph Rey, Jacob Garmes, Ashlee Zingale, Paige Hall and Promese Pendarvis. Third row: Karen Caffrey, student council adviser; Michael Woychio; Rakim Salaam; Austin Yelland; Jarod Engle; Cody Dzurisin; Angelo Najera; Jesse Gosart; and T.J. Lavelle.

Graham Academy students participate in ‘Equestrian Experience,’ learn about horse care Kate Conyngham’s class at The Graham Academy, Luzerne, recently participated in a special ‘Equestrian Experience’ provided by Joseph and Charlotte Casarella. The students learned about the care and daily needs of horses, including topics such as feeding, grooming and height measuring. They were also able to lead and ride a horse during the event. With Apache the horse, from left, are Shay, Conyngham, Joseph Casarella, Marcus, Michael, Jeffery, Charlotte Casarella and Jonathan.

SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011 PAGE 9B

VIM Continued from Page 1B

must not have private or federally funded health insurance, such as medical assistance. Services are available only to Luzerne County residents. To determine eligibility, prospective patients may schedule a screening appointment with VIM volunteers to review necessary documentation, such as recent pay stubs and W-2s. Free services available to approved patients include primary medical care, laboratory services, diagnostic testing, women’s health care, drug-dispensing services, mental health assessment, and counseling services. A team of more than 20 of the area’s highest caliber doctors in various fields treat patients by appointment at the clinic or at their offices when more specialized attention is needed. Dr. Kimberly Ference has helped secure more than $250,000-worth of medication to patients. Christine Gaughan, director of nursing, helps maintain the VIM schedule and arranges free treatment for patients outside of the Wilkes-Barre office. Lay volunteers also provide much of the manpower behind the organization. The staff includes students from Fortis, King’s College, and Wilkes University, and the help of enthusiastic community members is always appreciated. The clinic serves 4,500 registered patients between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, and offers extended hours on Thursday until 8 p.m. Since VIM opened three years ago, it has seen more than 8,300 unique visits. The office, with 10 fully equipped exam rooms, sometimes schedules more than 25 appointments per day. “Our average demographic is adults between 25 and 55, and demand is steady,” Kelly Ranieli, the VIM’s executive director, explains. She cites the recent cancellation of state-subsidized Adult Basic insurance program and the uncertain economy for a recent influx of patients. While amendments to federal insurance laws that now allow children to stay on their parents’ health care plans have seen the number of tween-to-twenties visitors drop, Ranieli says, overall, the number of uninsured residents is not decreasing. While the quality of the facility and the dedication of the volunteers provide the VIM team with a strong sense of pride and accomplishment, Dr. Coslett and Ranieli agree that the real dream is the day the clinic does not have to exist, when everyone has access to quality, affordable health insurance. That certainly does not mean VIM is cutting corners while working toward Dr. Sordoni’s vision. In January 2011, a free den-

Drs. Pat McGraw and Michele Kowalski-McGraw attend the Volunteers In Medicine’s 2010 Gala.

tal clinic with 5 treatment rooms and an X-ray machine was opened on site. It quickly accrued 450 patients and an additional 400 cram the waiting list. “The difficulty with time and space in the dental clinic,” Ranieli explains, “is that patients often come in excruciating pain, which is generally the result of a problem that needs four or five visits to resolve before the patient can reduce visits to every six months.” While even the medical center, which is booking three weeks in advance, may seem jam-packed, Coslett compares the wait to a typical office’s schedule. She says, “Even those patients apprehensive about a doctor’s visit just need to come. So many times health problems can be fixed if they are caught quickly enough. We are here to offer free, quality, and compassionate care. In a country like ours, with the testing capability we have, there is no reason why serious problems should go undiagnosed. We are really here for those who slip through the cracks.” VIM’s ongoing challenge, however, is to meet patient demand with limited funds. VIM receives no state or federal aid; it relies entirely on the support of individuals, businesses, and foundations. VIM’s biggest fundraiser is its annual Music, Memories & Medicine Gala. Chaired by Debbie and Alan Hollander with the assistance of Drs. Coslett and KowalskiMcGraw and their husbands, the event will be held this year at the Ball Room of Mohegan Sun, which is being transformed for the evening into a disco hall. Entertainment will be provided by The 70s Band, New York’s No. 1 disco band, and guests are encouraged to dig their go-go boots and leisure suits out of the closet for a night of dining and dancing. Tickets are available through the VIM office for $135 per person. The staff hopes that by curing their Saturday Night Fever, guests can help assuage the daunting lack of medical care available to their hardworking neighbors.

Eye Health and Vision Professional

MEET Continued from Page 1B

Favorite city? “New York.” Favorite vacation spot? “Southern Jersey. Cape May. Stone Harbor. Avalon.” Favorite food? “Steak.” Always in the fridge? “Gatorade.” First car? “A blue 1969 Plymouth Roadrunner.” Favorite movies? “ ‘And Justice For All’ and ‘All The President’s Men.’ And I like science fiction. ‘Star Wars’ and ‘Star Trek.’ I like the possibilities that science fiction shows you, and the hope for the

future.” Proudest professional moment? “We did an Internet predator sting in 2007, where we worked with police departments and had our producer posing as a 13-year old girl in local chat rooms. And we helped the police — they did the work — but we helped facilitate the arrest of six people. We worked it for about two years, and I’m proud of it, because I think we got some bad people off the street. They all pleaded guilty. That’s what journalism should be: advocacy and being pro-active.” Alan K. Stout writes about local people. Reach him at 829-7131.

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SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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CMYK

SPORTS

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timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

C

SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011

5-HOUR ENERGY 500 AT POCONO

One lucky mishap

PAUL SOKOLOSKI OPINION

Amid changes, Gordon back in gear for success

I

FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

The Shell/Pennzoil Dodge of Kurt Busch gets fueled up for the qualifying run Saturday.

Kurt Busch earns pole in backup By JOHN ERZAR jerzar@timesleader.com

LONG POND – Kurt Busch had about a two-minute window Saturday to amend a gaffe made while preparing for the 5-Hour Energy 500. The result even surprised him. Busch turned what could have been a dire situation into the pole position, using a backup car to earn the best starting spot for today’s NASCAR Sprint Cup race at Pocono Raceway. The two-time Pocono winner will start on the pole for the first time in his 21 races at the 2.5-mile trioval. He piloted his No. 22 Dodge owned by Roger Penske around the track at 171.579 mph, well off the track record of 172.533 set by KaSee POCONO, Page 12C

By JOE SOPRANO jsoprano@timesleader.com

FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Jeff Gordon qualified third with a speed of 171.350 mph Saturday at Pocono Raceway.

5 - H O U R E N E R GY 5 0 0 Q U I C K FA C T S Where: Pocono Raceway, Route 115, Long Pond When: 1 p.m. today Length: 200 laps/500 miles Pole winner: Kurt Busch Defending champ: Denny Hamlin Television: TNT, with pre-race

NASCAR has lots of drive to go green

show starting at noon. Radio: MRN (locally WSJR 93.7 FM) Race time forecast: Temperatures in the mid-70s with a chance of isolated thunderstorms throughout the race.

Chance of precipitation ranges from 30-60 percent.

MORE INSIDE •For a race notebook and more stories, facts and figures, see Pages 12C, 14C

When talk of environmentally friendly activities comes up, NASCAR is probably not the first sport that comes to mind. After all, 43 cars barreling around a track for three or four hours isn’t the type of thing to make environmentalists feel all warm and fuzzy inside. But if Mike Lynch has anything to do with it, that is a perception that will soon be changing. “We started out to develop and implement a green strategy across the sport,” said Lynch, NASCAR’s managing director of green innovation. “It’s about conservation, job creation and strengthening American energy independence.” To that end, NASCAR began using Sunoco Green E15, a 15 percent enthanol blend fuel made with corn grown by American farmers, in its top three series. “If we can show how well it See GREEN , Page 12C

I N T E R N AT I O N A L L E A G U E

HORSE RACING

Rehabbing Zimmerman bats Syracuse past SWB

Long shot seizes Belmont glory Animal Kingdom-Shackleford rubber match never develops; Ruler On Ice scores upset.

All-star third baseman for the Nats has big offensive game vs. Yankees.

3

CHIEFS

2

YANKEES

By LINDSAY KRAMER For The Times Leader

SYRACUSE, N.Y. – Third baseman Ryan Zimmerman’s stay with the Syracuse Chiefs is expected to be very temporary. It’s already lasted too long for Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. Zimmerman, who joined the Chiefs on Saturday for a rehab assignment, showed heads-up glove work, drove in the goahead run and then scored the winning run as the host Chiefs edged the Yankees 3-2 in the first of a four-game set at Alliance Bank Stadium. See YANKEES , Page 5C

By RICHARD ROSENBLATT AP Sports Writer

NEW YORK — Kentucky Derby winner Animal Kingdom nearly fell at the start. Preakness winner Shackleford faded in the stretch. The Belmont Stakes was up for grabs. And it was 24-1 long shot Ruler on Ice who delivered a huge upset Saturday in the final leg of the Triple Crown, splashing his way to a threequarter length victory over Stay Thirsty. As expected, Shackleford led from the start but when the field of 12 turned for home in the 11⁄2-mile Belmont, he tired in the muck as long shots Ruler On Ice and Stay Thirsty passed him by. “Ruler wasn’t slowing down,” winning jockey AP PHOTO Jose Valdivia Jr. said. “It was a great feeling the Jockey Jose Valdivia Jr. celebrates after Ruler last sixteenth of a mile.” On Ice won the Belmont Stakes. The 24-1 long shot paid $51.50, $26 and $13.60.

See BELMONT , Page 5C

t’s clear Jeff Gordon is shifting back into gear. Now that NASCAR’s transmission gear ratios for Pocono Raceway have changed, so has Gordon’s luck. He finished third in Saturday’s qualifying run for today’s 5-Hour Energy 500 at Pocono, marking his best starting position at the tricky track since qualifying second for the June 2009 race. “I just pushed the car as hard as I could,” Gordon said after roaring to a lap time of 171.350 mph in his qualifier. “I didn’t think I had the best lap, to be honest with you.” It could have been much worse for Gordon. It could have been last year. That’s when a luckless losing streak sent him to a winless season for the second time in three years, trying the patience of even the normally affable Gordon. A bad decision on tires cost him certain victory at Las Vegas. He got caught in a bad pileup on the track at Texas and didn’t get a win in a race he led most of the way. A bad tire got him in Michigan and a bad battery cost him a shot at winning in Charlotte. After eight near-misses at victory lane, his bad temper boiled over when NASCAR came back to Texas. After he was wrecked under caution by Jeff Burton, Gordon sauntered straight up the track and shoved Burton into a barrier. By the end of the season, there was no holding back his frustration. A guy still to look out for Partly because of it, his Hendrick Motorsports team shuffled crew chiefs – putting Gordon in the hands of Alan Gustafson and sending Gordon’s sixyear chief Steve Letarte over to work with Dale Earnhardt Jr. New faces, new season, new results. During the second NASCAR race of this season, Gordon snapped his winless skein by capturing Phoenix. That started a string of four top-five finishes in 12 races for Gordon, which boosted him into 13th place in the current points standings. That’s not enough to make him an automatic qualifier for the Chase for the Cup just yet, but there’s a lot of racing season remaining. And a lot of hope where Gordon is concerned. “I’m so proud of the work that’s been done with this team to make some gains,” Gordon said. “I think the performance has picked up in a big way.” It seems as if his bad luck of last season is out of the way. Even as he’s about to turn 40 in August, Gordon is still a guy to look out for. He is tied with Cale Yarborough with 83 wins, the fifth-most victories in NASCAR history, and is one away from joining Bobby Allison and Darrell Waltrip in third place. Gordon’s place in NASCAR’s lore is already set, as he’s one of just four drivers with four Cup titles. Four of Gordon’s race victories have come at Pocono Raceway, where a win today would match Bill Elliott’s track record of five wins. Gordon is already at the top of the track’s record book with 918 laps led. And now that NASCAR’s gear ratios have changed to make shifting more conducive at tracks such as Pocono – where stricter ratios over the past three years made shifting nearly impossible – Gordon could push into overdrive. “I wasn’t a fan of when they took it away,” said Gordon, who suggested the change will give drivers “more opportunity to pass. “I’m glad it’s back.” So is Gordon. All it took was a shifting of crew chiefs and a boost to his hopes to make him a threat again.

Paul Sokoloski is a Times Leader sports columnist. You may reach him at 970-7109 or email him at psokoloski@timesleader.com.


K PAGE 2C

SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011

EXTRA INNINGS SPORTS IN BRIEF

LOCAL WRESTLING

L-L clinic under way

The second annual Summer Wrestling Clinic is under way but is offering last-chance registrations for wrestlers wishing to seek coaching and instruction from nearly a dozen NCAA and PIAA wrestling coaches. The eight-week clinic, which started June 6, is held from 5:30-7:30 every Monday and Wednesday until July 27 at Lake-Lehman High School. The registration cost is $180 per wrestler for the remainder of the seven weeks. This summer’s program is highlighted by former American Univeristy head coach Mark Cody, the 2011 NCAA Division I National Coach of the Year, who will be at the clinic on June 15. The Eagles finished in fifth place at the NCAA championships this spring and produced three All-Americans. Cody was named head coach at Oklahoma University in April. Registered participants will have 32 total hours of on-themat wrestling with other notable instructors including: Rob Koll (Cornell – No. 1 ranking this past season, nine All-Americans in last four years), Kerry McCoy (Maryland - two-time Olympian, 2009 ACC Coach of the Year), Dave Crowell (Nazareth H.S. - five-time PIAA Coach of the Year) and 2007 PIAA Class 2A champion Scott Davis. Questions about registration can be obtained by contacting Jack Davis at (814) 538-9034 or Tom Williams at (570) 2552903.

L O C A L C A L E N D A R Today's Events SENIOR LEGION BASEBALL (5:45 p.m. unless noted) Nanticoke at Greater Pittston Mountain Top at Old Forge Wilkes-Barre at Swoyersville Plains at Tunkhannock Northwest at Back Mountain Monday, June 13 H.S. BASEBALL PIAA Class 3A Semifinals Tunkhannock vs. Blue Mountain at King’s College, 4:30 p.m. SENIOR LEGION BASEBALL (5:45 p.m. unless noted) Old Forge at Plains Wilkes-Barre at Nanticoke Northwest at Hazleton Greater Pittston at Swoyersville Mountain Top at Tunkhannock Back Mountain at Plains Wednesday, June 15 SENIOR LEGION BASEBALL (5:45 p.m. unless noted) Mountain Top at Greater Pittston Tunkhannock at Hazleton Nanticoke at Old Forge Wilkes-Barre at Back Mountain Friday, June 17 SENIOR LEGION BASEBALL (5:45 p.m. unless noted) Wilkes-Barre at Plains Back Mountain at Nanticoke Hazleton at Mountain Top Saturday, June 18 SENIOR LEGION BASEBALL (5:45 p.m. unless noted) Northwest at Greater Pittston, 2 p.m. Wilkes-Barre at Old Forge, 2 p.m. Swoyersville at Tunkhannock, 2 p.m.

T R A N S A C T I O N S BASEBALL National League SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS—Agreed to terms with INF Bill Hall. Placed 2B Freddy Sanchez on the 15-day DL. Eastern League TRENTON THUNDER—Announced RHP Brad Halsey was assigned to the team from Tampa (FSL).

FOOTBALL

Canadian Football League EDMONTON ESKIMOS—Signed DB Lenny Walls.

COLLEGE

SAM HOUSTON STATE—Announced junior men’s basketball F Erik Williams is transferring from Marquette.

B O X I N G

W H A T ’ S

O N

S

P

O

R

T

S

THE TIMES LEADER G O L F

T V

AUTO RACING 6 a.m. SPEED — 24 Hours of Le Mans, finish of race, at Le Mans, France 1 p.m. FOX — Formula One, Canadian Grand Prix, at Montreal TNT — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Pocono 500, at Long Pond, Pa.

COLLEGE BASEBALL

AMERICA’S LINE By Roxy Roxborough BASEBALL Favorite

Odds

Underdog

American League

1 p.m. ESPN — NCAA Division I playoffs, super regionals, game 3, Mississippi St. at Florida 4 p.m. ESPN — NCAA Division I playoffs, super regionals, game 3, Stanford at North Carolina or Oregon St. at Vanderbilt 7 p.m. ESPN2 — NCAA Division I playoffs, super regionals, game 3, Arizona St. at Texas or Oregon St. at Vanderbilt 10 p.m. ESPN2 — NCAA Division I playoffs, super regionals, game 3, or Oregon St. at Vanderbilt (if necessary)

TIGERS

-$107

Mariners

YANKEES

-$148

Indians

Red Sox

-$160

BLUE JAYS

ORIOLES

-$125

Rays

2 p.m. VERSUS — Criterium du Dauphine, final stage, Pontcharra to La Toussuire, France (same-day tape) 4 p.m. VERSUS — Tour de Suisse, stage 2, Airolo to Crans-Montana, Switzerland (same-day tape)

Braves

CYCLING

GOLF

8 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Italian Open, final round, at Turin, Italy 1 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, Greater Hickory Classic, final round, at Conover, N.C. 3 p.m. CBS — PGA Tour, St. Jude Classic, final round, at Memphis, Tenn. 7 p.m. TGC — LPGA, State Farm Classic, final round, at Springfield, Ill. (same-day tape)

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

1 p.m. YES — Cleveland at N.Y. Yankees 1:30 p.m. WQMY — Chicago Cubs at Philadelphia SNY/ROOT — N.Y. Mets at Pittsburgh 8 p.m. ESPN — Cincinnati at San Francisco

MOTORSPORTS

1 p.m. SPEED — MotoGP Moto2, British Grand Prix, at Silverstone, England (same-day tape) 2 p.m. SPEED — MotoGP World Championship, British Grand Prix, at Silverstone, England (same-day tape) 3 p.m. SPEED — FIM World Superbike, at San Marino (same-day tape)

NBA BASKETBALL

8 p.m. ABC — Playoffs, finals, game 6, Dallas at Miami

P I A A B A S E B A L L P L AY O F F S All teams are listed by (district-seed, record)

CLASS 4A

FIRST ROUND Results Spring-Ford 15, Spring Grove 1 Council Rock South 8, Monsignor Bonner 3 Manheim Township 3, Williamsport 1 Nazareth 6, Council Rock North 2 Methacton 6, Cedar Cliff 2 Conestoga 10, Frankford 2 Seneca Valley 8, Erie McDowell 5 Peters Township 6, DuBois 1 QUARTERFINALS Results Spring-Ford 6, Council Rock South 5 Manheim Township 5, Nazareth 0 Conestoga 13, Methacton 3 Seneca Valley 6, Peters Township 4 SEMIFINALS Monday, June 13 •Spring-Ford (1-1, 24-4) vs. Manheim Twp. (3-2, 18-7) at War Memorial Stadium, Ephrata, 6 p.m. •Conestoga (1-2, 20-4) vs. Seneca Valley (7-1, 18-3-1) at Green Township Park, Scotland, 4 p.m. CHAMPIONSHIP Friday, June 17 Semifinal winners at Medlar Field, State College, 6 p.m. __________

CLASS 3A FIRST ROUND Results Mechanicsburg 10, Franklin Towne Charter 0 Tunkhannock 11, Jersey Shore 7 Twin Valley 3, Neumann-Goretti 1 Blue Mountain 5, Upper Moreland 3 Northern York 11, Somerset 0 Punxsutawney 11, Hampton 1 Elizabeth Forward 13, Carrick 2 Grove City 6, Chartiers Valley 3 QUARTERFINALS Results Tunkhannock 4, Mechanicsburg 1 Blue Mountain 9, Twin Valley 3 Northern York 6, Punxsutawney 1 Elizabeth Forward 2, Grove City 1 SEMIFINALS Monday, June 13 •Tunkhannock (2-1, 18-2) vs. Blue Mountain (11-1, 20-4) at King's College, 4:30 p.m. •Northern York (3-3, 21-5) vs. Elizabeth Forward (7-1, 23-0) at Somerset H.S., 4 p.m. CHAMPIONSHIP Friday, June 17 Semifinal winners at Medlar Field, State College, 1 p.m. __________

CLASS 2A FIRST ROUND Results Oley Valley 10, Nueva Esperanza 1 Salisbury Township 7, Towanda 0 Danville 6, Lake-Lehman 5 York Catholic 13, Springfield Township 1 Riverside 1, Karns City 0 Saegertown 4, Laurel 3 Bedford 3, Waynesburg Central 2 Martinsburg Central 4, Mohawk 2 QUARTERFINALS Results Salisbury Township 9, Oley Valley 3 Danville 6, York Catholic, 5 Riverside 10, Saegertown 7 Martinsburg Central 8, Bedford 1 SEMIFINALS Monday, June 13 •Salisbury Township (11-1, 19-6) vs. Danville (4-1, 15-7) at Stump Stadium, Pine Grove, 6:30 p.m. •Riverside (7-1, 18-5) vs. Central (6-1, 18-5) at First Commonwealth Field, Homer City, 6 p.m. CHAMPIONSHIP Friday, June 17 Semifinal winners at Medlar Field, State College, 3:30 p.m. __________

Fight Schedule

CLASS A

June 11 At Roseland Ballroom, New York (SHO), Hector Sanchez vs. Vincent Arroyo, 10, junior welterweights;Luis Del Valle vs. Dat Nguyen, 10, featherweights. At Auditorio Miguel Barragan, Mexico, Austin Trout vs. David Lopez, 12, for Trout’s WBA World light middleweight title. June 16 At Olympiapark, Munich, Marco Huck vs. Hugo Hernan Garay, 12, for Huck’s WBO cruiserweight title. June 17 At Panama City, Panama, Anselmo Moreno vs. Lorenzo Parra, 12, for Moreno’s WBA Super World bantamweight title;Gennady Golovkin vs. Kassim Ouma, 12, for Golovkin’s WBA World middleweight title. At Austin, Texas (ESPN2), Karim Mayfield vs. Steve Forbes, 10, welterweights;Fernando Guerrero vs. Michael Medina, 10, middleweights. June 18 At Mendoza, Argentina, Jonathan Barros vs. Celestino Caballero, 12, for Barros’ WBA featherweight title;Juan Carlos Cano vs. Rudy Santiago Ruiz, 10, featherweights. At Guadalajara, Mexico (HBO), Saul Alvarez vs. Ryan Rhodes, 12, for Alvarez’s WBC junior middleweight title;Jason Litzau vs. Adrien Broner, 10, junior lightweights;Jose Osorio vs. Alex Monterroza, 10, junior lightweights;Sergio Villanueva vs. Onalvi Sierra, 10, featherweights. June 24 At Pechanga Resort and Casino, Temecula, Calif. (ESPN2), John Molina vs. Robert Frankel, 10, lightweights;Michael Dallas Jr. vs. Mauricio Herrera, 10, lightweights. June 25 At Cologne, Germany, Felix Sturm vs. Matthew Macklin, 12, for Sturm’s WBA Super middleweight title. At St. Louis (HBO), Tavoris Cloud vs. Yusaf Mack, 12, for Cloud’s IBF light heavyweight title;Bermane Stiverne vs. Ray Austin, 12, WBC heavyweight eliminator;Devon Alexander vs. Lucas Matthysse, 12, junior welterweights;Cornelius Bundrage vs. Sechew Powell, 12, for Bundrage’s IBF junior middleweight title;Guillermo Jones vs. Ryan Coyne, 12, for Jones’ WBA World cruiserweight title. At Parque Andrés Quintana Roo, Mexico, Humberto Soto vs. Motoki Sasaki, 12, for Soto’s WBC lightweight title;Antonio Lozada Jr. vs. Roberto Ortiz, 12, junior welterweights;David De La Mora vs. Gerardo Marin, 12, bantamweights;Arturo Badillo vs. Cesar Gandara, 12, junior bantamweights.

FIRST ROUND Results Reading Central Catholic 3, Masterman 2 Calvary Christian 9, Tri-Valley 4 Muncy 8, Old Forge 3 Salisbury-Elk Lick 5, Lancaster Country Day 0 Bishop McCort 7, Neshannock 1 Mercyhurst Prep 3, Coudersport 2 Serra Catholic 10, Elk County Catholic 5 Bishop Carroll 7, Chartiers Houston 6 QUARTERFINALS Results Reading Central Catholic 8, Calvary Christian 3 Muncy 7, Salisbury-Elk Lick 0 Mercyhurst Prep 3, Bishop McCort 1 Serra Catholic 6, Bishop Carroll 3 SEMIFINALS Monday, June 13 •Reading Central Catholic (3-1, 10-13) vs. Muncy (4-1, 20-5) at Stump Stadium, Pine Grove, 4 p.m. •Mercyhurst Prep (10-1, 17-3) vs. Serra Catholic (7-3, 19-2) at Slippery Rock University, 4 p.m. CHAMPIONSHIP Friday, June 17 Semifinal winners at Medlar Field, State College, 10:30 a.m.

W N B A EASTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct Chicago............................. 2 1 .667 Indiana............................... 2 1 .667 New York .......................... 2 1 .667 Connecticut ...................... 1 1 .500 Washington ...................... 1 2 .333 Atlanta ............................... 0 3 .000 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct San Antonio.................... 3 0 1.000 Minnesota....................... 3 1 .750 Los Angeles ................... 2 1 .667 Seattle ............................. 1 1 .500 Phoenix........................... 0 2 .000 Tulsa ............................... 0 3 .000 Saturday's Games Indiana 86, New York 80 Chicago 84, Washington 77 San Antonio 86, Atlanta 74 Today's Games Tulsa at Connecticut, 3 p.m.

GB — — — 1 ⁄2 1 2 GB — 1 ⁄2 1 11⁄2 21⁄2 3

WHITE SOX

-$147

A’s

Rangers

-$120

TWINS

ANGELS

-$150

Royals

National League D’backs

-$115

MARLINS

PIRATES

-$120

Mets

PHILLIES

-$200

Cubs

-$152

ASTROS

BREWERS

-$155

Cards

ROCKIES

-$185

Dodgers

PADRES

-$110

Nationals

GIANTS

-$120

Reds

NBA Favorite

Points

Underdog

NBA Finals HEAT

5.5

Mavericks

NHL Favorite

Odds

Underdog

Monday BRUINS

-$135/ +$115

Canucks

B A S E B A L L

S O C C E R

International League

Major League Soccer

North Division W L Pct. Lehigh Valley (Phillies).......... 38 23 .623 Yankees.................................. 32 28 .533 Pawtucket (Red Sox) ............. 31 30 .508 Syracuse (Nationals) ............. 26 34 .433 Buffalo (Mets) ......................... 27 36 .429 Rochester (Twins).................. 24 35 .407 South Division W L Pct. Durham (Rays)......................... 33 28 .541 Gwinnett (Braves) ................... 33 29 .532 Charlotte (White Sox) ............. 28 33 .459 Norfolk (Orioles) ...................... 23 38 .377 West Division W L Pct. Columbus (Indians) ................. 40 22 .645 Louisville (Reds) ...................... 37 26 .587 Indianapolis (Pirates)............... 32 32 .500 Toledo (Tigers) ........................ 27 37 .422 Saturday's Games Charlotte 3, Pawtucket 1 Louisville at Lehigh Valley, 12th inning, late Syracuse 3, Yankees 2 Rochester 11, Toledo 5 Indianapolis 1, Gwinnett 0 Columbus at Buffalo, late Norfolk at Durham, late Today's Games Charlotte at Pawtucket, 1:05 p.m. Columbus at Buffalo, 1:05 p.m. Louisville at Lehigh Valley, 1:35 p.m. Yankees at Syracuse, 2 p.m. Gwinnett at Indianapolis, 2:05 p.m. Norfolk at Durham, 5:05 p.m. Rochester at Toledo, 6 p.m. Monday's Games Charlotte at Pawtucket, 6:05 p.m. Rochester at Toledo, 7 p.m. Yankees at Syracuse, 7 p.m. Gwinnett at Indianapolis, 7:05 p.m. Norfolk at Durham, 7:05 p.m. Louisville at Lehigh Valley, 7:05 p.m. Columbus at Buffalo, 7:05 p.m.

GB — 51⁄2 7 111⁄2 12 13 GB — 1 ⁄2 5 10 GB — 31⁄2 9 14

Eastern League

Eastern Division W L Pct. GB Trenton (Yankees) ................. 38 24 .613 — 1 New Hampshire (Blue Jays) . 37 24 .607 ⁄2 New Britain (Twins) ............... 33 27 .550 4 Reading (Phillies)................... 33 27 .550 4 Portland (Red Sox) ................ 20 39 .339 161⁄2 Binghamton (Mets) ................ 19 41 .317 18 Western Division W L Pct. GB Harrisburg (Nationals)............. 34 25 .576 — Bowie (Orioles) ........................ 31 31 .500 41⁄2 Altoona (Pirates) ...................... 30 30 .500 41⁄2 Richmond (Giants) .................. 30 31 .492 5 Erie (Tigers) ............................. 29 31 .483 51⁄2 1 Akron (Indians)......................... 29 33 .468 6 ⁄2 Saturday's Games Bowie at Portland, ppd., rain Erie 8, New Britain 2 Altoona 11, Reading 1, 3 innings, susp. Akron at Harrisburg, 7 p.m. Richmond 2, New Hampshire 0 Trenton 4, Binghamton 2 Today's Games Bowie at Portland, 12 p.m., 1st game Binghamton at Trenton, 1:05 p.m. Altoona at Reading, 1:05 p.m. Erie at New Britain, 1:35 p.m. Richmond at New Hampshire, 1:35 p.m. Akron at Harrisburg, 2 p.m. Bowie at Portland, 2:30 p.m., 2nd game Monday's Games No games scheduled

B A S K E T B A L L NBA FINALS (Best-of-7) Dallas 3, Miami 2 Tuesday, May 31: Miami 92, Dallas 84 Thursday, June 2: Dallas 95, Miami 93 Sunday, June 5: Miami 88, Dallas 86 Tuesday, June 7: Dallas 86, Miami 83 Thursday, June 9: Dallas 112, Miami 103 Sunday, June 12: Dallas at Miami, 8 p.m. x-Tuesday, June 14: Dallas at Miami, 9 p.m. x-if necessary NBA LEADERS PLAYOFFS / INCLUDES GAMES OF FRIDAY, JUNE 10, 2011 SCORING AVERAGE ................................................ G FG FT PTS AVG Durant, OKC ......................... 17 155140 487 28.6 Nowitzki, DAL....................... 20 183173 561 28.1 Rose, CHI ............................. 16 149111 434 27.1 Howard, ORL ....................... 6 51 60 162 27.0 Anthony, NYK....................... 4 33 29 104 26.0 Wade, MIA ............................ 20 175134 498 24.9 Westbrook, OKC.................. 17 135121 405 23.8 James, MIA........................... 20 165118 476 23.8 Bryant, LAL ........................... 10 83 50 228 22.8 Randolph, MEM ................... 13 100 87 289 22.2 Paul, NOR............................. 6 42 39 132 22.0 Granger, IND ........................ 5 43 14 108 21.6 Aldridge, POR ...................... 6 53 19 125 20.8 Pierce, BOS.......................... 9 68 30 187 20.8 Ginobili, SAN ........................ 5 31 32 103 20.6 Parker, SAN.......................... 6 43 31 118 19.7 Allen, BOS ............................ 9 57 24 170 18.9 Johnson, ATL ....................... 12 87 34 226 18.8 Bosh, MIA ............................. 20 131109 371 18.6 Terry, DAL ............................ 20 117 68 341 17.1 Deng, CHI ............................. 16 98 52 270 16.9 Landry, NOR......................... 6 31 33 95 15.8 Brand, PHL ........................... 5 34 10 78 15.6 Lawson, DEN........................ 5 26 21 78 15.6 Ariza, NOR ........................... 6 35 16 93 15.5 Crawford, ATL ...................... 12 61 42 185 15.4 Wallace, POR....................... 6 30 28 91 15.2 Conley, MEM........................ 13 71 44 197 15.2 Smith, ATL ............................ 12 69 40 181 15.1 Gasol, MEM.......................... 13 72 51 195 15.0 Garnett, BOS........................ 9 56 22 134 14.9 Miller, POR ........................... 6 33 19 89 14.8 Stoudemire, NYK................. 4 21 16 58 14.5 Bynum, LAL .......................... 10 57 30 144 14.4 Hilario, DEN.......................... 5 22 27 71 14.2 Holiday, PHL......................... 5 24 12 71 14.2 Rondo, BOS ......................... 9 51 24 126 14.0 Nelson, ORL......................... 6 31 11 79 13.2 Gasol, LAL ............................ 10 47 36 131 13.1 Harden, OKC........................ 17 66 66 221 13.0 Matthews, POR .................... 6 27 16 78 13.0 Duncan, SAN........................ 6 33 10 76 12.7 Boozer, CHI .......................... 16 77 48 202 12.6 Odom, LAL ........................... 10 45 27 121 12.1 Gallinari, DEN ...................... 5 19 15 60 12.0 Marion, DAL ......................... 20 101 36 238 11.9 Martin, DEN .......................... 5 24 11 59 11.8 Hill, SAN................................ 6 20 26 70 11.7 Felton, DEN .......................... 5 18 18 58 11.6 Iguodala, PHL ...................... 5 22 10 57 11.4 Young, PHL .......................... 5 25 7 57 11.4 FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE ................................................................ FGFGAPCT Howard, ORL ........................................ 51 81.630 Brand, PHL ............................................ 34 62.548 Paul, NOR.............................................. 42 77.545 Bynum, LAL........................................... 57 105.543 Allen, BOS ............................................. 57 109.523 Gasol, MEM........................................... 72 141.511 Roy, POR............................................... 22 44.500 Lawson, DEN......................................... 26 52.500 Nowitzki, DAL........................................183 369.496 Miller, POR ............................................ 33 67.493 Wade, MIA.............................................175 357.490 Martin, DEN........................................... 24 50.480 Hilario, DEN........................................... 22 46.478 Duncan, SAN......................................... 33 69.478 Granger, IND ......................................... 43 90.478 Rondo, BOS .......................................... 51 107.477 Harden, OKC......................................... 66 139.475 Matthews, POR ..................................... 27 57.474 Marion, DAL ..........................................101 215.470 Bosh, MIA ..............................................131 282.465 Terry, DAL .............................................117 252.464 Parker, SAN........................................... 43 93.462 Ibaka, OKC ............................................ 67 145.462 James, MIA............................................165 358.461 Aldridge, POR ....................................... 53 115.461 Pierce, BOS........................................... 68 148.459 Odom, LAL ............................................ 45 98.459 Landry, NOR.......................................... 31 68.456 Durant, OKC ..........................................155 345.449

EASTERN CONFERENCE ..............................................................WLTPtsGFGA Philadelphia ........................................ 634 22 16 11 New York............................................. 527 22 21 13 Columbus............................................ 436 18 14 15 D.C....................................................... 454 16 18 24 Houston ............................................... 356 15 17 17 New England ...................................... 374 13 11 18 Toronto FC.......................................... 257 13 13 23 Chicago ............................................... 148 11 15 19 Sporting Kansas City ......................... 164 7 12 19 WESTERN CONFERENCE ..............................................................WLTPtsGFGA Los Angeles ........................................ 826 30 20 12 FC Dallas ............................................ 734 25 17 12 Seattle.................................................. 546 21 16 13 Real Salt Lake .................................... 633 21 14 7 San Jose.............................................. 544 19 20 16 Colorado.............................................. 437 19 16 14 Chivas USA ........................................ 445 17 16 14 Portland ............................................... 552 17 15 18 Vancouver ........................................... 167 10 14 20 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. Wednesday's Games Columbus 2, Real Salt Lake 1 Thursday's Games Sporting Kansas City 0, Chicago 0, tie Friday's Games New York 2, New England 1 Saturday's Games Philadelphia 1, Real Salt Lake 1, tie San Jose 4, D.C. United 2 Chivas USA at Houston, late Vancouver at Seattle FC, late Colorado at Portland, late Toronto FC at Los Angeles, late Today's Games Chicago at Columbus, 4 p.m. Sporting Kansas City at FC Dallas, 7 p.m. Wednesday, June 15 Toronto FC at New England, 8 p.m. Friday, June 17 San Jose at Sporting Kansas City, 8:30 p.m. Saturday, June 18 Seattle FC at Toronto FC, 7 p.m. Chicago at New England, 7:30 p.m. Columbus at Houston, 8:30 p.m. D.C. United at Real Salt Lake, 9 p.m. Los Angeles at Colorado, 9 p.m. Philadelphia at Vancouver, 10 p.m. FC Dallas at Chivas USA, 10:30 p.m. Sunday, June 19 New York at Portland, 10 p.m.

N C A A B A S E B A L L Division I Baseball Super Regionals (Best-of-3) The visiting team plays as home team for Game 2 a coin flip determines home team for Game 3 x-if necessary At Davenport Field Charlottesville, Va. Saturday, June 11: Virginia 6, UC Irvine 0, Virginia leads series 1-0 Sunday, June 12: Virginia (53-9) vs. UC Irvine (42-17), 1 p.m. x-Monday, June 13: Virginia vs. UC Irvine, TBA At Boshamer Stadium Chapel Hill, N.C. Friday, June 10: North Carolina 5, Stanford 2, UNC leads series 1-0 Saturday, June 11: North Carolina (49-14) vs. Stanford (35-21), 3 p.m. x-Sunday, June 12: North Carolina vs. Stanford, 4 p.m. At Carolina Stadium Columbia, S.C. Saturday, June 11: South Carolina 5, Connecticut 1, SC leads series 1-0 Sunday, June 12: Connecticut (45-19-1) vs. South Carolina (49-14), 7 p.m. x-Monday, June 13: Connecticut vs. South Carolina, TBA At Alfred A. McKethan Stadium Gainesville, Fla. Friday, June 10: Florida 11, Mississippi State 1 Saturday, June 11: Mississippi State 4, Florida 3, series tied 1-1 x-Sunday, June 12: Florida (49-17) vs. Mississippi State (38-24), 1 p.m. At Dick Howser Stadium Tallahassee, Fla. Saturday, June 11: Texas A&M 6, Florida State 2, A&M leads series 1-0 Sunday, June 12: Florida State (45-18) vs. Texas A&M (46-19), 4 p.m. x-Monday, June 13: Florida State vs. Texas A&M, TBA At Hawkins Field Nashville, Tenn. Friday, June 10: Vanderbilt 11, Oregon State 1, Vanderbilt leads series 1-0 Saturday, June 11: Vanderbilt (51-10) vs. Oregon State (41-18), 9 p.m. x-Sunday, June 12: Vanderbilt vs. Oregon State, TBA At UFCU Disch-Falk Field Austin, Texas Friday, June 10: Arizona State 3, Texas 1 Saturday, June 11: Texas 5, Arizona State 1, series tied 1-1 Sunday, June 12: Texas (47-17) vs. Arizona State (43-16), 7 p.m. At Stephen Schott Stadium Santa Clara, Calif. Saturday, June 11: Dallas Baptist (43-17) vs. California (35-21), 8 p.m. Sunday, June 12: Dallas Baptist vs. California, 10 p.m. Monday, June 13: Dallas Baptist vs. California, TBA

H O C K E Y National Hockey League STANLEY CUP FINALS (Best-of-7) Vancouver 3, Boston 2 Wednesday, June 1: Vancouver 1, Boston 0 Saturday, June 4: Vancouver 3, Boston 2, OT Monday, June 6: Boston 8, Vancouver 1 Wednesday, June 8: Boston 4, Vancouver 0 Friday, June 10: Vancouver 1, Boston 0 Monday, June 13: Vancouver at Boston, 8 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 15: Boston at Vancouver, 8 p.m. x-if necessary NHL Leaders Through games of Friday, June 10, 2011 Goal Scoring Name Team........................................................GP G David Krejci Boston .......................................... 2311 Martin St. Louis Tampa Bay ............................. 1810 Sean Bergenheim Tampa Bay ......................... 16 9 Alexandre Burrows Vancouver........................ 23 9 Daniel Sedin Vancouver ................................... 23 9 Nathan Horton Boston ...................................... 21 8 Brad Marchand Boston..................................... 23 8 Danny Briere Philadelphia ............................... 11 7 Logan Couture San Jose.................................. 18 7 Ryan Kesler Vancouver.................................... 23 7 Patrick Marleau San Jose................................. 18 7 Michael Ryder Boston ...................................... 23 7 Devin Setoguchi San Jose............................... 18 7 Joel Ward Nashville .......................................... 12 7 James van Riemsdyk Philadelphia ................. 11 7 Ryane Clowe San Jose .................................... 17 6 Vincent Lecavalier Tampa Bay ........................ 18 6 David Legwand Nashville................................. 12 6 Teddy Purcell Tampa Bay ................................ 18 6 Teemu Selanne Anaheim ................................ 6 6 Steven Stamkos Tampa Bay............................ 18 6 Kevin Bieksa Vancouver .................................. 23 5 Assists Name Team ..................................................... GP A Henrik Sedin Vancouver ................................ 2319 Patrice Bergeron Boston ................................ 2114 Joe Thornton San Jose .................................. 1814 Vincent Lecavalier Tampa Bay...................... 1813 Dan Boyle San Jose........................................ 1812 Steve Downie Tampa Bay.............................. 1712 Ryan Kesler Vancouver.................................. 2312 Pavel Datsyuk Detroit ..................................... 1111 Claude Giroux Philadelphia ........................... 1111 David Krejci Boston ........................................ 2311

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T E N N I S

FedEx PGA Tour

ATP World Tour

St. Jude Classic At TPC Southwind Memphis, Tenn. Yardage: 7,239; Par: 70 Third Round Robert Karlsson ..........................66-65-68—199-11 Harrison Frazar ...........................71-65-64—200-10 John Merrick ................................66-69-67—202 -8 Retief Goosen .............................68-71-64—203 -7 Fredrik Jacobson ........................71-65-68—204 -6 Keegan Bradley...........................67-67-70—204 -6 Cameron Tringale .......................71-68-66—205 -5 Blake Adams................................72-67-66—205 -5 Carl Pettersson ...........................69-69-67—205 -5 Kris Blanks ...................................66-71-68—205 -5 Stephen Ames .............................69-68-68—205 -5 Charles Howell III........................72-67-67—206 -4 Ryuji Imada ..................................70-68-68—206 -4 Brandt Snedeker .........................71-66-69—206 -4 Colt Knost.....................................66-68-72—206 -4 Greg Chalmers ............................72-69-66—207 -3 D.J. Trahan ..................................74-67-66—207 -3 Jonathan Byrd ..............................71-68-68—207 -3 Tim Herron ...................................73-65-69—207 -3 Troy Matteson ..............................70-67-70—207 -3 George McNeill ...........................70-67-70—207 -3 David Hearn.................................69-70-69—208 -2 Lee Westwood.............................69-70-69—208 -2 Robert Allenby.............................70-71-67—208 -2 Shane Bertsch .............................71-67-70—208 -2 Camilo Villegas............................69-69-70—208 -2 Scott Stallings..............................69-68-71—208 -2 Fabian Gomez .............................67-70-71—208 -2 Jhonattan Vegas..........................73-69-66—208 -2 Chris Couch .................................71-70-68—209 -1 Marco Dawson.............................68-72-69—209 -1 Jerry Kelly ....................................72-69-68—209 -1 Jimmy Walker ..............................69-70-70—209 -1 Rod Pampling ..............................75-66-68—209 -1 David Mathis ................................65-72-72—209 -1 Andres Gonzales ........................75-65-70—210 E Michael Putnam...........................71-69-70—210 E Cameron Percy ...........................70-70-70—210 E Boo Weekley ...............................68-72-70—210 E Chad Campbell ...........................72-69-69—210 E Ben Curtis ....................................71-68-71—210 E Kevin Kisner.................................66-72-72—210 E Brian Davis...................................71-70-69—210 E John Rollins .................................70-70-71—211 +1 Paul Stankowski ..........................71-69-71—211 +1 Will MacKenzie............................71-70-70—211 +1 Zach Johnson ..............................73-68-70—211 +1 Kent Jones ...................................68-70-73—211 +1 Todd Hamilton .............................72-70-69—211 +1 Marc Turnesa ..............................72-68-72—212 +2 Mike Small ...................................72-69-71—212 +2 Shaun Micheel.............................68-71-73—212 +2 Jeff Quinney.................................68-73-71—212 +2 Dicky Pride...................................70-71-71—212 +2 Spencer Levin .............................72-69-71—212 +2 John Senden ...............................69-73-70—212 +2 Geoff Ogilvy .................................71-70-72—213 +3 Rich Beem ...................................72-68-73—213 +3 Kirk Triplett...................................73-68-72—213 +3 Heath Slocum ..............................68-73-72—213 +3 Jim Renner...................................72-69-72—213 +3 Craig Barlow.................................70-72-71—213 +3 John Daly .....................................69-73-71—213 +3 D.J. Brigman ................................72-68-74—214 +4 Aron Price ....................................69-71-74—214 +4 Steve Flesch ................................70-71-73—214 +4 Nick O’Hern .................................71-66-77—214 +4 Johnson Wagner.........................74-68-72—214 +4 Padraig Harrington .....................70-72-72—214 +4 Kevin Stadler ...............................73-69-72—214 +4 Richard S. Johnson ....................74-68-72—214 +4 Garrett Willis ................................71-71-72—214 +4

AEGON Championships At The Queen's Club London Purse: $1.02 million (WT250) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Semifinals Andy Murray (2), Britain, def. Andy Roddick (3), United States, 6-3, 6-1. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (5), France, def. James Ward, Britain, 6-3, 7-6 (7). Doubles Quarterfinals Bob and Mike Bryan (1), United States, def. Juan Martin del Potro, Argentina, and Radek Stepanek, Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-7 (4), 10-3 tiebreak. Max Mirnyi, Belarus, and Daniel Nestor (2), Canada, def. Robert Lindstedt, Sweden, and Horia Tecau (7), Romania, 6-3, 3-6, 10-7 tiebreak. Semifinals Bob and Mike Bryan (1), United States, def. Oliver Marach, Austria, and Marcin Matkowski (5), Poland, 6-2, 6-1. Mahesh Bhupathi and Leander Paes (3), India, def. Max Mirnyi, Belarus, and Daniel Nestor (2), Canada, 6-7 (7), 7-6 (6), 10-8 tiebreak. Gerry Weber Open At Gerry Weber Stadion Halle, Germany Purse: $1.1 million (WT250) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Semifinals Philipp Kohlschreiber, Germany, def. Gael Monfils (3), France, 6-3, 6-3. Philipp Petzschner, Germany, def. Tomas Berdych (2), Czech Republic, 7-6 (7), 2-6, 6-3. Doubles Semifinals Rohan Bopanna, India, and Aisam-ul-Haq Qureshi (1), Pakistan, def. Christopher Kas and Philipp Kohschreiber, Germany, 5-7, 6-3, 11-9 tiebreak.

Nationwide Tour

Rex Hospital Open At TPC Wakefield Plantation Raleigh, N.C. Yardage: 7,257; Par: 71 Third Round Troy Kelly ...........................................68-70-63—201 Ryan Armour......................................68-66-67—201 Martin Flores .....................................66-67-68—201 Danny Wax.........................................67-68-67—202 Kyle Reifers .......................................65-70-67—202 Kyle Thompson .................................68-66-68—202 Scott Brown .......................................69-63-71—203 Gary Christian....................................66-71-67—204 Greg Owen ........................................68-67-69—204 Brian Vranesh ....................................69-69-67—205 Josh Geary ........................................71-67-67—205 Luke List.............................................67-70-68—205 Rahil Gangjee....................................70-66-69—205 Andy Bare...........................................66-73-67—206 Aaron Watkins ...................................69-68-69—206 B.J. Staten..........................................69-68-69—206 Michael Sims .....................................66-70-70—206 J.J. Killeen .........................................66-70-70—206 Rob Oppenheim................................70-68-69—207 Tim Wilkinson ....................................69-68-70—207 Jeff Brehaut .......................................69-68-70—207 Elliot Gealy.........................................68-69-70—207 Paul Claxton.......................................69-68-70—207 James Hahn.......................................70-66-71—207 Brian Stuard.......................................70-65-72—207 Matthew Richardson.........................65-70-72—207 Scott Gardiner ...................................71-70-67—208 Scott Dunlap ......................................71-69-68—208 Brice Garnett .....................................71-68-69—208 Jason Schultz ....................................71-68-69—208 Jason Kokrak.....................................69-70-69—208 Jake Younan-Wise ...........................70-69-69—208 Will Wilcox .........................................68-73-68—209 Camilo Benedetti...............................73-68-68—209 Charles Warren.................................69-72-68—209 Matt Every ..........................................72-68-69—209 John Riegger .....................................73-67-69—209 Geoffrey Sisk.....................................70-70-69—209 Seamus Power..................................69-69-71—209 Justin Bolli..........................................71-68-70—209 David Branshaw ................................68-70-71—209 Matt Hendrix.......................................68-69-72—209 Erik Compton.....................................68-68-73—209 Cliff Kresge ........................................68-73-69—210 Brendon Todd ...................................73-67-70—210 Darron Stiles......................................69-71-70—210 Nick Flanagan....................................71-68-71—210 Andrew Buckle ..................................69-69-72—210 Chris Nallen .......................................71-67-72—210 Brent Delahoussaye .........................69-68-73—210 Todd Bailey ........................................71-70-70—211 Omar Uresti .......................................73-68-70—211 James Sacheck.................................73-67-71—211 Ty Tryon .............................................75-64-72—211 Mathew Goggin .................................71-68-72—211 Russell Knox .....................................70-68-73—211 Tommy Biershenk.............................68-70-73—211 Justin Peters......................................65-72-74—211 Edward Loar ......................................72-69-72—213 Brock Mackenzie ..............................70-71-72—213 Jon Mills .............................................71-70-72—213 Doug Barron.......................................73-68-72—213 Ron Whittaker ...................................72-69-72—213 James Nitties .....................................69-72-72—213 Andrew Svoboda ..............................70-70-73—213 Patrick Sheehan ................................70-71-73—214 Scott Weatherly .................................71-70-73—214 Richard T. Lee...................................71-70-73—214 Won Joon Lee ...................................70-71-74—215 Ryan Hietala ......................................73-68-74—215 Clayton Rask .....................................68-73-75—216 John Kimbell......................................72-68-78—218

LPGA

State Farm Classic At Panther Creek Country Club Springfield, Ill. Yardage: 6,746;Par: 72 Third Round Yani Tseng .................................. 67-66-66199 Mindy Kim ...................................64-67-69—200 Brittany Lincicome......................67-69-66—202 Shanshan Feng ..........................68-65-69—202 Cristie Kerr ..................................70-67-66—203 Juli Inkster ...................................67-70-67—204 Wendy Ward ...............................68-69-67—204 Sophie Gustafson ......................69-70-66—205 Se Ri Pak ....................................69-68-68—205 Paula Creamer............................68-68-69—205 Stacy Lewis.................................70-72-64—206 Angela Stanford..........................73-67-66—206 Suzann Pettersen.......................70-67-69—206 Pornanong Phatlum ...................72-69-66—207 Meena Lee ..................................69-71-67—207 Mika Miyazato .............................71-68-68—207 Michelle Wie ...............................72-67-68—207 Amanda Blumenherst ................68-67-72—207 Jiyai Shin .....................................66-68-73—207 Na Yeon Choi .............................70-72-66—208 Brittany Lang ...............................68-70-70—208 Gerina Piller ................................69-69-70—208 Catriona Matthew........................68-69-71—208 Morgan Pressel ..........................68-69-71—208 Eun-Hee Ji ..................................69-73-67—209 Natalie Gulbis..............................72-69-68—209 Mina Harigae ..............................70-71-68—209 Jimin Kang...................................70-71-68—209 I.K. Kim ........................................70-70-69—209 Amy Yang ....................................72-68-69—209 Moira Dunn .................................68-71-70—209 Sarah Jane Smith.......................69-70-70—209 Kyeong Bae.................................69-69-71—209 Christina Kim ..............................71-72-67—210 Seon Hwa Lee ............................73-69-68—210 Lindsey Wright............................71-71-68—210 Sun Young Yoo ..........................72-70-68—210 Chella Choi .................................72-69-69—210 Marcy Hart...................................71-68-71—210 Belen Mozo .................................70-69-71—210 Maria Hjorth ................................72-66-72—210 Karen Stupples...........................69-68-73—210 Jennifer Johnson........................69-67-74—210 Hee Young Park .........................69-73-69—211 Michele Redman ........................69-72-70—211 Nicole Hage ................................71-68-72—211 Amy Hung ....................................72-71-69—212 Kristy McPherson.......................71-72-69—212 Vicky Hurst ..................................70-72-70—212 Ryann O’Toole............................72-69-71—212 Yoo Kyeong Kim ........................69-70-73—212 Azahara Munoz...........................72-70-71—213 Minea Blomqvist.........................70-70-73—213 Danah Bordner ...........................68-72-73—213 Haeji Kang...................................69-71-73—213 Beatriz Recari .............................73-69-72—214 M.J. Hur .......................................70-71-73—214 Jane Park ....................................73-68-73—214 Mi Hyun Kim................................70-68-76—214 Grace Park ..................................75-68-72—215 Karrie Webb ................................74-69-72—215 Katie Futcher...............................73-69-73—215 Stephanie Louden ......................70-72-73—215 Jin Young Pak ............................71-71-73—215 Jenna Pearson ...........................68-73-74—215 Hee Kyung Seo ..........................70-71-74—215

WTA

e-Boks Sony Ericsson Open At Farum Arena Copenhagen, Denmark Purse: $220,000 (Intl.) Surface: Hard-Indoor Singles Semifinals Lucie Safarova (4), Czech Republic, def. Petra Martic, Croatia, 1-6, 6-4, 6-2. Caroline Wozniacki (1), Denmark, def. Mona Barthel, Germany, 6-1, 6-2. Doubles Semifinals Kristina Mladenovic, France, and Katerzyna Piter, Poland, def. Jessica Moore, Australia, and Xu YiFan, China, 6-4, 7-5. AEGON Classic Saturday At Edgbaston Priory Club Birmingham, England Purse: $220,000 (Intl.) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Semifinals Daniela Hantuchova (4), Slovakia, def. Ana Ivanovic (2), Serbia, 6-7 (2), 6-3, 6-2. Sabine Lisicki, Germany, def. Peng Shuai (3), China, 6-3, 6-1. Doubles Semifinals Olga Govortsova, Belarus, and Alla Kudryavtseva (2), Russia, def. Casey Dellacqua, Australia, and Chanelle Scheepers, South Africa, 7-5, 4-6, 10-2 tiebreak. Sara Errani and Roberta Vinci (3), Italy, def. Liezel Huber and Lisa Raymond (1), United States, 1-6, 7-6 (5), 10-8 tiebreak.

H O R S E

R A C I N G

Pocono Downs Results Friday Jun 10, 2011 First - $15,000 Trot 1:53.4 5-Bambino Hall (Ge Napolitano Jr) 9.00 5.80 4.00 3-Swan In A Million (Ma Kakaley) 4.00 2.60 6-Winuendo (Ra Schnittker) 15.60 EXACTA (5-3) $32.40 TRIFECTA (5-3-6) $410.40 SUPERFECTA (5-3-6-4) $466.00 Second - $12,000 Pace 1:51.3 1-Real One And Only (Ge Napolitano Jr) 4.00 2.80 2.10 2-Cruzin Bayou (An Napolitano) 12.20 5.60 7-Tireman (Ty Buter) 3.80 EXACTA (1-2) $45.20 TRIFECTA (1-2-7) $460.00 SUPERFECTA (1-2-7-5) $660.20 DAILY DOUBLE (5-1) $27.40 Third - $7,000 Trot 1:57.3 4-Here Comes Monte (Ma Romano) 79.00 21.80 8.20 2-Funny Briefs (Ty Buter) 12.80 7.40 3-Fast Vacation (Jo Pavia Jr) 3.20 EXACTA (4-2) $436.00 TRIFECTA (4-2-3) $1,231.40 SUPERFECTA (4-ALL-ALL-ALL) $129.00 Fourth - $12,000 Pace 1:50.4 7-Sand Savage (An McCarthy) 8.40 3.80 4.40 1-Johnny Absolut (Ji Taggart Jr) 3.40 2.80 5-Monet C C (Da Ingraham) 7.20 EXACTA (7-1) $28.80 TRIFECTA (7-1-5) $136.40 SUPERFECTA (7-1-5-6) $424.80 Scratched: Split Ticket Fifth - $12,000 Pace 1:51.1 4-Chaco Hanover (Ge Napolitano Jr) 7.80 3.20 2.60 1-Mountain Rocket (Ma Kakaley) 3.00 2.10 3-White Mountain Top (An Napolitano) 5.20 EXACTA (4-1) $15.00 TRIFECTA (4-1-3) $156.00 SUPERFECTA (4-1-3-8) $660.20 PICK 3 (4-ALL-4) $41.00 PICK 3 (ALL-7-4) $41.00 Sixth - $22,000 Trot 1:53.1 8-Big Boy Lloyd (Ge Napolitano Jr) 4.20 3.20 2.20 1-My Leap Of Faith (Mi Simons) 4.20 3.60 3-Budget Gap (Ke Sizer) 3.00 EXACTA (8-1) $21.80 TRIFECTA (8-1-3) $46.80 SUPERFECTA (8-1-3-6) $161.20 Seventh - $7,000 Pace 1:53.3 4-Chase The Sun (Mi Simons) 19.80 7.60 6.00 6-Lavern’s Art (Ge Napolitano Jr) 6.00 2.40 5-Great Balldini (Jo Pavia Jr) 3.00 EXACTA (4-6) $98.80 TRIFECTA (4-6-5) $248.60 SUPERFECTA (4-6-5-7) $2,404.80 Eighth - $60,000 Trot 1:53.3 3-Margarita Mary (Ge Napolitano Jr) 6.60 3.60 2.20 4-Autumn Escapade (Ra Schnittker) 2.80 2.20 1-Spectacular Bay (Jo Pavia Jr) 4.20 EXACTA (3-4) $9.60 TRIFECTA (3-4-1) $40.40 SUPERFECTA (3-4-1-2) $105.40 Ninth - $15,000 Pace 1:52.3 3-Doin Time Together (Ge Napolitano Jr) 2.40 2.60 2.60 8-Whogoesfirst (Jo Pavia Jr) 10.00 4.00 5-Pansai Yamamoto (Ma Kakaley) 6.40 EXACTA (3-8) $22.80 TRIFECTA (3-8-5) $329.60 SUPERFECTA (3-8-5-6) $711.80 PICK 4 (8-4-3-3 (4 Out of 4)) $204.60 Tenth - $60,000 Trot 1:52.0 3-Winning Mister (Ge Napolitano Jr) 2.80 2.10 2.10 5-Coach Fox (La Stalbaum) 3.40 3.00 4-Four Starz Speed (Ma Kakaley) 3.20 EXACTA (3-5) $9.80 TRIFECTA (3-5-4) $19.80 SUPERFECTA (3-5-4-2) $118.60 Eleventh - $7,000 Pace 1:53.4 5-No Mo Parking (Ge Napolitano Jr) 3.20 2.80 2.10 7-Atlantic Filly (La Stalbaum) 24.80 16.20 9.80 2-Heavenly Helen (Jo Pavia Jr) 4.00 EXACTA (5-7) $59.40 EXACTA (7-5) $149.40 TRIFECTA (5-7-2) $148.80 TRIFECTA (7-5-2) $690.00 SUPERFECTA (5-7-2-3) $707.40 SUPERFECTA (7-5-2-3) $1,413.20 Twelfth - $15,000 Pace 1:53.1 2-Shark Ingested (Ge Napolitano Jr) 4.80 3.40 2.40 3-Pandapocket (Ma Kakaley) 3.20 2.60 8-Town Treasure (Ke Sizer) 4.60 EXACTA (2-3) $11.80 TRIFECTA (2-3-8) $76.00 SUPERFECTA (2-3-8-7) $234.40 PICK 3 (3-5-2) $22.20 PICK 3 (3-7-2) $22.20 Scratched: Tgif Thirteenth - $7,000 Pace 1:53.4 6-Escape Attack (Jo Pavia Jr) 8.40 3.40 3.60 9-Imperious (Ma Kakaley) 3.60 2.40 5-Sammy Savannah (An McCarthy) 3.60 EXACTA (6-9) $34.20 TRIFECTA (6-9-5) $137.40 SUPERFECTA (6-9-5-2) $1,235.80 Fourteenth - $7,000 Trot 1:57.1 6-Lotsa Speed Nz (Ge Napolitano Jr) 7.00 2.60 3.00 1-Vijay Star (Ty Buter) 2.40 2.40 3-Persistent Spur (To Schadel) 3.40 EXACTA (6-1) $13.80 TRIFECTA (6-1-3) $57.00 SUPERFECTA (6-1-3-7) $151.60 Fifteenth - $11,000 Pace 1:53.2 2-Caramel Chinno (Ge Napolitano Jr) 4.80 2.40 3.00 7-Aspiration (An Napolitano) 4.60 3.60 6-Beforethedaystarts (Ma Kakaley) 2.60 EXACTA (2-7) $37.80 TRIFECTA (2-7-6) $130.80 SUPERFECTA (2-7-6-3) $387.40 Scratched: Sandy Absolut Sixteenth - $15,000 Trot 1:55.4 4-Ride In Style (La Stalbaum) 3.80 3.80 2.20 2-Decolletage (Mi Simons) 5.80 3.00 6-Marion Monaco (Ho Parker) 2.40 EXACTA (4-2) $20.20 TRIFECTA (4-2-6) $80.00 SUPERFECTA (4-2-6-5) $193.40 LATE DOUBLE (2-4) $21.20 Total Handle-$244,404


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N AT I O N A L L E A G U E R O U N D U P

Utley, Lee help Phils club Cubs The Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — Chase Utley homered and drove in four runs to back Cliff Lee’s eight strong innings and lead the Philadelphia Phillies to a 7-1 win over the Chicago Cubs on Saturday. Lee (6-5) passed teammate Roy Halladay for the league lead in strikeouts, recording seven to up his season total to 107. He allowed four hits and one run while walking two. Utley gave Philadelphia the early lead with a two-run double in the first and provided some insurance with a two-run homer in the eighth. Shane Victorino had three hits, scored three runs and drove in one for Philadelphia, which has won three of four. Ryan Howard and Raul Ibanez also had RBIs for Philadelphia. Darwin Barney had two hits for the Cubs, who have dropped 10 of 12. Lee improved to 4-0 in five career starts against the Cubs. The left-hander has worked at least seven innings in nine of his 14 starts this season. It was the fourth time he has gone at least eight innings, including one complete game. Pirates 3, Mets 2.

PITTSBURGH — James McDonald allowed two runs in six effective innings, Andrew McCutchen hit a two-run double and the Pittsburgh Pirates beat the New York Mets 3-2 on Saturday night. Jose Tabata and Josh Harrison each had two hits and a scored a run, and Garrett Jones had an RBI double among his two hits for Pittsburgh, which had lost its previous two. Baseball’s leading hitter, Jose Reyes had two hits and Ruben Tejada and Carlos Beltran each also had two hits for the Mets.

New York lost for the second time in seven games. Reds 10, Giants 2

SAN FRANCISCO — Mike Leake pitched eight scoreless innings and also got two hits off Tim Lincecum as the Cincinnati Reds gave the San Francisco ace one of his worst beatings ever in a 10-2 victory over the Giants on Saturday. Brandon Phillips hit a tworun double and scored twice and Joey Votto knocked the two-time Cy Young award winner out with an RBI double in the fifth inning to give the Reds their second win in three games in San Francisco. Brewers 5, Cardinals 3

MILWAUKEE — Rickie Weeks hit a go-ahead, two-run homer and Zack Greinke outpitched fellow Cy Young winner Chris Carpenter to lift the Milwaukee Brewers over the St. Louis Cardinals 5-3 on Saturday night. Milwaukee, the hottest team in baseball over the last month, pulled within a half-game of St. Louis for the division lead. Diamondbacks 9, Marlins 5

MIAMI — Kelly Johnson’s three-run double highlighted a six-run fourth inning that helped the Arizona Diamondbacks defeat Florida 9-5 on Saturday night, sending the slumping Marlins to their ninth loss in 10 games. Braves 6, Astros 3, 10 innings

HOUSTON — Brian McCann hit a three-run homer in the 10th inning, lifting the Atlanta Braves to their fifth straight win, 6-3 over the Houston Astros on Saturday night. McCann’s shot to right field off Brandon Lyon scored Jordan Schafer and Dan Uggla to put Atlanta on top 5-2.

AMERICAN LEAGUE ROUNDUP

A-Rod plunked after HR in Yankees win The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Alex Rodriguez was hit by a pitch after he homered, Bartolo Colon pitched two-hit ball into the seventh inning before he hurt himself, and the New York Yankees beat the Cleveland Indians 4-0 on a misty, windy Saturday afternoon. Curtis Granderson hit his 20th homer of the season and Rodriguez got plunked by Indians starter Mitch Talbot a day after the teams’ benches cleared, adding another chapter to what has been a testy homestand for the Yankees. Talbot was ejected after hitting A-Rod, and the Yankees didn’t respond in kind. Instead, they sent Cleveland to its 13th loss in 17 games and left the Indians barely clinging to first place in the AL Central for one more day. Red Sox 16 Blue Jays 4

TORONTO — John Lackey made up for a terrible first start in Toronto this season, No. 9 hitter Jason Varitek homered and drove in four runs and the Boston Red Sox routed the Toronto Blue Jays 16-4 on Saturday. Lackey (4-5) delivered six strong innings in his second start since going on the disabled list after giving up nine runs in 6 2-3 innings against the Blue Jays on May 11. The right-hander was charged with four runs on six hits and two walks. He struck out a season-high eight. David Oritz hit a three-run homer and Dustin Pedroia drove in three runs as Boston amassed 18 hits. The Red Sox

batted around twice and every starter drove in at least one run in piling up the most runs allowed by the Blue Jays this season. Things got so bad for Toronto, utility man Mike McCoy pitched the ninth inning. Twins 8, Rangers 1

MINNEAPOLIS — Scott Baker pitched a five-hitter for his fourth complete game and Alexi Casilla had three hits and scored two runs, leading the Minnesota Twins to an 8-1 win over Texas Rangers on Saturday. Delmon Young had three hits and two RBIs for Minnesota, which has won eight of 11. Baker (4-4) struck out seven in his first complete game since Aug. 14, 2009. Tigers 8, Mariners 1

DETROIT — Max Scherzer found his form after three rocky starts, Austin Jackson tripled twice and the Detroit Tigers beat the Seattle Mariners 8-1 on Saturday night. Victor Martinez had three hits and two RBIs and Jhonny Peralta homered for the Tigers, who moved within one percentage point of first-place Cleveland in the AL Central after being as many as eight games behind in early May. White Sox 3, Athletics 2

CHICAGO — Brent Lillibridge helped make John Danks a winner with a homersaving catch in the eighth inning, and the Chicago White Sox beat the Oakland Athletics 3-2 on Saturday night.

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SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011 PAGE 3C

STANDINGS/STATS S TA N D I N G S Boston ............................................ New York ....................................... Tampa Bay..................................... Toronto........................................... Baltimore........................................

W 38 35 33 32 30

Cleveland....................................... Detroit............................................. Chicago.......................................... Kansas City ................................... Minnesota ......................................

W 34 35 32 28 25

Texas ............................................... Seattle .............................................. Los Angeles .................................... Oakland ...........................................

W 36 33 30 28

Philadelphia ................................. Atlanta........................................... Florida........................................... New York...................................... Washington..................................

W 39 37 32 31 28

St. Louis ....................................... Milwaukee .................................... Cincinnati...................................... Pittsburgh..................................... Chicago ........................................ Houston ........................................

W 38 37 34 31 25 24

San Francisco ............................... Arizona........................................... Colorado ........................................ Los Angeles .................................. San Diego ......................................

W 36 35 31 29 29

AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division L Pct GB WCGB 26 .594 — — 27 .565 2 — 21⁄2 30 .524 41⁄2 33 .492 61⁄2 41⁄2 31 .492 61⁄2 41⁄2 Central Division L Pct GB WCGB 28 .548 — — 29 .547 — 1 35 .478 41⁄2 51⁄2 36 .438 7 8 39 .391 10 11 West Division L Pct GB WCGB 30 .545 — — 32 .508 21⁄2 31⁄2 61⁄2 35 .462 51⁄2 38 .424 8 9 NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division L Pct GB WCGB 26 .600 — — 28 .569 2 — 31 .508 6 4 33 .484 71⁄2 51⁄2 81⁄2 36 .438 101⁄2 Central Division L Pct GB WCGB 28 .576 — — 1 28 .569 ⁄2 — 32 .515 4 31⁄2 5 32 .492 51⁄2 38 .397 111⁄2 11 41 .369 131⁄2 13 West Division L Pct GB WCGB 29 .554 — — 30 .538 1 2 32 .492 4 5 36 .446 7 8 36 .446 7 8

AMERICAN LEAGUE Friday's Games N.Y. Yankees 11, Cleveland 7 Seattle 3, Detroit 2 Baltimore 7, Tampa Bay 0 Boston 5, Toronto 1 Oakland 7, Chicago White Sox 5 Texas 9, Minnesota 3 Kansas City 4, L.A. Angels 2 Saturday's Games N.Y. Yankees 4, Cleveland 0 Boston 16, Toronto 4 Minnesota 8, Texas 1 Detroit 8, Seattle 1 Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox 3, Oakland 2 Kansas City at L.A. Angels, 9:05 p.m. Sunday's Games Cleveland (Tomlin 7-3) at N.Y. Yankees (F.Garcia 4-5), 1:05 p.m. Seattle (F.Hernandez 6-5) at Detroit (Porcello 6-3), 1:05 p.m. Boston (Lester 8-2) at Toronto (Drabek 4-4), 1:07 p.m. Tampa Bay (W.Davis 4-5) at Baltimore (Matusz 1-0), 1:35 p.m. Oakland (Moscoso 2-2) at Chicago White Sox (Humber 5-3), 2:10 p.m. Texas (M.Harrison 5-5) at Minnesota (Liriano 3-6), 2:10 p.m. Kansas City (Mazzaro 0-1) at L.A. Angels (Chatwood 3-3), 3:35 p.m. Monday's Games Cleveland at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Detroit, 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE Friday's Games Philadelphia 7, Chicago Cubs 5

L10 8-2 6-4 5-5 4-6 6-4

Str W-8 W-2 L-1 L-3 W-4

Home 19-13 19-16 14-16 15-16 20-16

Away 19-13 16-11 19-14 17-17 10-15

L10 2-8 7-3 6-4 4-6 8-2

Str L-3 W-1 W-1 W-2 W-1

Home 20-12 19-12 15-17 21-20 8-16

Away 14-16 16-17 17-18 7-16 17-23

Str L-1 L-1 L-6 L-1

Home 20-13 18-15 14-19 14-15

Away 16-17 15-17 16-16 14-23

L10 5-5 7-3 1-9 6-4 5-5

Str W-2 W-5 L-1 L-1 W-1

Home 23-12 17-13 15-20 15-17 14-12

Away 16-14 20-15 17-11 16-16 14-24

L10 5-5 7-3 6-4 6-4 2-8 3-7

Str L-2 W-2 W-1 W-1 L-2 L-3

Home 18-12 24-9 20-15 14-17 12-19 12-21

Away 20-16 13-19 14-17 17-15 13-19 12-20

L10 6-4 5-5 6-4 4-6 5-5

Str L-1 W-1 W-3 L-3 L-1

Home 18-12 20-13 15-15 15-16 14-24

Away 18-17 15-17 16-17 14-20 15-12

L10 6-4 5-5 2-8 1-9

N.Y. Mets 8, Pittsburgh 1 Florida 6, Arizona 4 Atlanta 11, Houston 4 Milwaukee 8, St. Louis 0 Colorado 6, L.A. Dodgers 5 Washington 2, San Diego 1 San Francisco 3, Cincinnati 2 Saturday's Games Philadelphia 7, Chicago Cubs 1 Cincinnati 10, San Francisco 2 Atlanta 6, Houston 3, 10 innings Pittsburgh 3, N.Y. Mets 2 Arizona 9, Florida 5 Milwaukee 5, St. Louis 3 L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, 8:10 p.m. Washington at San Diego, 8:35 p.m. Sunday's Games Arizona (D.Hudson 6-5) at Florida (Hand 0-1), 1:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (D.Davis 0-5) at Philadelphia (Oswalt 3-4), 1:35 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Capuano 4-6) at Pittsburgh (Correia 8-4), 1:35 p.m. Atlanta (Hanson 7-4) at Houston (Myers 2-5), 2:05 p.m. St. Louis (Westbrook 6-3) at Milwaukee (Marcum 6-2), 2:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (R.De La Rosa 2-0) at Colorado (Jimenez 1-6), 3:10 p.m. Washington (Zimmermann 4-6) at San Diego (Stauffer 2-4), 4:05 p.m. Cincinnati (Volquez 4-2) at San Francisco (J.Sanchez 4-4), 8:05 p.m. Monday's Games N.Y. Mets at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Arizona at Florida, 7:10 p.m. Atlanta at Houston, 8:05 p.m. Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m. San Diego at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Cincinnati at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.

AP PHOTO

T

he Phillies’ Chase Utley stands on second base after his two-run double gave the Phillies a lead in the bottom of the first inning on Saturday. Utley added a two-run homer in the eighth to cap the scoring as the Phillies beat the Chicago Cubs, 7-1. son (20), Teixeira (19), Al.Rodriguez (13). CS—Posada (2), Gardner 2 (9). IP H R ER BB SO Cleveland Talbot L,2-3 ............. 52⁄3 4 2 2 2 4 R.Perez .................... 11⁄3 2 1 1 0 0 Pestano .................... 1 1 1 1 0 2 New York Colon W,5-3 ............ 62⁄3 2 0 0 1 6 Robertson H,11....... 11⁄3 3 0 0 0 4 Logan........................ 1 0 0 0 0 1 HBP—by Talbot (Al.Rodriguez). Balk—Robertson. Umpires—Home, Dan Iassogna;First, CB Bucknor;Second, Mike Muchlinski;Third, Dale Scott. T—2:49. A—47,048 (50,291).

Red Sox 16, Blue Jays 4 Boston

N AT I O N A L L E A G U E Phillies 7, Cubs 1 Chicago Philadelphia ab r h bi ab r h bi SCastro ss 3 1 0 0 Rollins ss 4 1 0 0 Barney 2b 4 0 2 0 Victorn cf 5 3 3 1 Montnz rf 4 0 1 1 Utley 2b 5 1 2 4 ArRmr 3b 4 0 0 0 Howard 1b 5 1 1 1 DeWitt lf 4 0 1 0 Polanc 3b 4 0 1 0 Soto c 2 0 0 0 Ibanez lf 4 0 1 1 C.Pena 1b 3 0 0 0 DBrwn rf 3 0 0 0 Colvin cf 3 0 0 0 Ruiz c 2 1 1 0 Garza p 2 0 0 0 Cl.Lee p 3 0 1 0 Marshll p 0 0 0 0 Mrtnz ph 0 0 0 0 LeMahi ph 1 0 0 0 Bastrd p 0 0 0 0 CColmn p 0 0 0 0 Totals 30 1 4 1 Totals 35 710 7 Chicago.............................. 001 000 000 — 1 Philadelphia....................... 200 000 23x — 7 E—Garza (3), Barney (6). DP—Philadelphia 1. LOB—Chicago 4, Philadelphia 9. 2B—Victorino (7), Utley (2), Ibanez (14). HR—Utley (2). S— M.Martinez. IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Garza L,2-6.............. 6 5 2 1 3 4 Marshall ................... 1 3 2 2 0 0 C.Coleman............... 1 2 3 3 1 1 Philadelphia Cl.Lee W,6-5 ........... 8 4 1 1 2 7 Bastardo ................... 1 0 0 0 0 0 Umpires—Home, Adrian Johnson;First, Alan Porter;Second, Fieldin Culbreth;Third, Gary Cederstrom. T—2:50. A—45,738 (43,651).

Reds 10, Giants 2 Cincinnati

San Francisco ab r h bi ab r h bi Burriss Stubbs cf 3 2 1 1 2b-ss 5 0 0 0 BPhllps 2b 6 2 1 2 MTejad 3b 3 0 0 0 Votto 1b 5 1 3 1 Gillaspi 3b 1 0 0 0 Bruce rf 5 1 1 1 Huff 1b 3 0 0 0 Rolen 3b 3 0 0 1 CStwrt 1b 1 0 0 0 Cairo 3b 0 1 0 0 C.Ross lf-cf 4 0 1 0 FLewis lf 2 0 0 0 Schrhlt rf 4 0 1 0 Hanign c 3 2 2 1 Rownd cf 2 0 1 0 Janish ss 5 0 2 1 RRmrz p 0 0 0 0 Leake p 4 1 2 0 SCasill p 0 0 0 0 JGoms ph 0 0 0 1 JaLopz p 0 0 0 0 Fisher p 0 0 0 0 Affeldt p 0 0 0 0 Torres ph 0 1 0 0 BCrwfr ss 2 0 0 0 Mota p 0 0 0 0 Burrell ph-lf 2 1 1 2 Whitsd c 4 0 2 0 Linccm p 1 0 0 0 Hall 2b 2 0 0 0 Totals 361012 9 Totals 34 2 6 2 Cincinnati ......................... 012 040 102 — 10 San Francisco ................. 000 000 002 — 2 E—Votto (1). DP—San Francisco 1. LOB—Cincinnati 10, San Francisco 8. 2B—Stubbs (13), B.Phillips (13), Votto (16), Janish (7), Leake (2), C.Ross (10). HR—Burrell (6). SB—Bruce (5). CS—F.Lewis (2). SF—Rolen. IP H R ER BB SO Cincinnati Leake W,6-2 ............ 8 4 0 0 1 8 Fisher ....................... 1 2 2 2 1 0 San Francisco Lincecum L,5-5 ....... 4 7 7 7 4 1 Mota.......................... 2 2 0 0 2 0 R.Ramirez................ 1 2 1 1 0 3 S.Casilla................... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Ja.Lopez .................. 2⁄3 1 2 2 4 1 Affeldt ....................... 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 Lincecum pitched to 4 batters in the 5th. HBP—by Leake (Rowand). WP—Lincecum 2. Umpires—Home, Jeff Nelson;First, Mike Estabrook;Second, Bill Welke;Third, Tim Tschida. T—3:14. A—41,735 (41,915).

Brewers 5, Cardinals 3 St. Louis

ab 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 2 1 0

r 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0

h bi 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

Milwaukee

ab r h bi RWeks 2b 3 1 2 2 Morgan cf 4 0 0 0 Braun lf 4 0 1 0 Fielder 1b 3 2 1 1 McGeh 3b 3 1 1 0 C.Hart rf 4 0 1 2 Counsll ss 3 0 0 0 Lucroy c 3 0 0 0 Greink p 2 1 1 0 JoWilsn ph 1 0 0 0 Loe p 0 0 0 0 Axford p 0 0 0 0 Totals 34 3 7 3 Totals 30 5 7 5 St. Louis ............................. 000 101 100 — 3 Milwaukee.......................... 010 004 00x — 5 DP—St. Louis 1. LOB—St. Louis 4, Milwaukee 4. 2B—Pujols (10), Y.Molina (16), Schumaker (6), Descalso (13), C.Hart (8). HR—Berkman (16), R.Weeks (12), Fielder (18). IP H R ER BB SO St. Louis C.Carpenter L,1-6... 6 5 5 5 2 4 M.Boggs................... 2 2 0 0 1 3 Milwaukee Greinke W,6-1 ......... 7 7 3 3 0 9 Loe H,11 .................. 1 0 0 0 0 1 Axford S,17-19 ........ 1 0 0 0 0 2 Umpires—Home, Angel Campos;First, Andy Fletcher;Second, Derryl Cousins;Third, Ron Kulpa. T—2:26. A—41,930 (41,900). Theriot ss Jay rf Pujols 1b Brkmn lf Rasms cf YMolin c Schmkr 2b Descals 3b Crpntr p MHmlt ph MBggs p

Pirates 3, Mets 2 New York JosRys ss RTejad 2b Beltran rf DnMrp 3b Pagan cf Bay lf Duda 1b RPauln c Dickey p Pridie ph

ab 5 4 4 4 2 4 4 4 2 1

r 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

h bi 2 0 2 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

Pittsburgh Tabata lf JHrrsn 3b Watson p Veras p Hanrhn p AMcCt cf Walker 2b Overay 1b GJones rf Cedeno ss

ab 4 3 0 0 0 3 3 4 3 1

r 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

h bi 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0

BrWod ss-3b 3 0 1 0 Toregs c 3 0 0 0 JMcDnl p 2 0 0 0 TiWood p 0 0 0 0 Paul ph-rf 1 0 0 0 Totals 34 210 2 Totals 30 3 8 3 New York ........................... 100 010 000 — 2 Pittsburgh .......................... 012 000 00x — 3 DP—New York 2, Pittsburgh 2. LOB—New York 9, Pittsburgh 6. 2B—Duda (2), A.McCutchen (14), G.Jones (8). SB—Beltran (1), Dan.Murphy (4), J.Harrison (1). CS—Jos.Reyes (5). IP H R ER BB SO New York Dickey L,3-7 ............ 8 8 3 3 2 4 Pittsburgh Ja.McDonald W,4-4 6 8 2 2 3 2 Ti.Wood H,1 ............ 1 1 0 0 0 0 Watson H,1 .............. 1⁄3 0 0 0 1 0 Veras H,11............... 2⁄3 1 0 0 0 1 Hanrahan S,16-16 .. 1 0 0 0 0 1 HBP—by Dickey (A.McCutchen). WP—Ja.McDonald. Umpires—Home, Jerry Layne;First, Bob Davidson;Second, Hunter Wendelstedt;Third, Brian Knight. T—2:19. A—39,273 (38,362).

Diamondbacks 9, Marlins 5 Arizona

ab 4 5 5 5 4 5 3 3 2 0

r 2 1 0 1 1 1 2 0 1 0

h bi 1 2 1 3 2 1 1 1 1 0 2 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0

Florida

ab r h bi Coghln cf 5 1 1 1 Infante 2b 5 1 1 0 Morrsn lf 4 1 2 1 GSnchz 1b 4 1 2 2 Stanton rf 4 1 1 1 Dobbs 3b 4 0 0 0 J.Buck c 4 0 0 0 Bonifac ss 3 0 2 0 Vazquz p 1 0 0 0 Sanchs p 1 0 0 0 Cousins ph 1 0 0 0 Mujica p 0 0 0 0 Helms ph 1 0 1 0 Totals 36 911 8 Totals 37 510 5 Arizona ............................... 100 620 000 — 9 Florida ................................ 101 030 000 — 5 DP—Florida 1. LOB—Arizona 6, Florida 6. 2B—K.Johnson (13), J.Upton (15), Montero (16), G.Sanchez (15), Bonifacio (9). 3B—G.Parra (2), Morrison (1). HR—R.Roberts (9), S.Drew (4), Coghlan (5), G.Sanchez (11), Stanton (16). SB— C.Young 2 (8). S—I.Kennedy. IP H R ER BB SO Arizona I.Kennedy W,7-2 ..... 8 8 5 5 1 9 Heilman .................... 1 2 0 0 0 1 Florida Vazquez L,3-6 ......... 32⁄3 7 7 7 3 6 Sanches ................... 21⁄3 3 2 2 1 3 Mujica ....................... 3 1 0 0 0 3 HBP—by Mujica (C.Young). WP—Sanches. Umpires—Home, Bill Miller;First, James Hoye;Second, Tom Hallion;Third, Phil Cuzzi. T—2:46. A—25,321 (38,560). RRorts 3b KJhnsn 2b J.Upton rf S.Drew ss CYoung cf Monter c Nady 1b GParra lf IKnndy p Heilmn p

Braves 6, Astros 3, 10 innings Atlanta

Houston ab r h bi ab r h bi Schafer cf 4 1 2 0 Bourgs lf 5 0 1 0 Uggla 2b 3 2 2 0 Bourn cf 4 1 1 0 McCnn c 4 1 1 3 Pence rf 5 2 2 1 C.Jones 3b 5 1 2 1 Ca.Lee 1b 5 0 3 2 Fremn 1b 5 0 1 0 Kppngr 2b 5 0 1 0 AlGnzlz ss 5 0 1 0 CJhnsn 3b 5 0 1 0 Hinske lf 5 1 2 2 Barmes ss 3 0 0 0 Kimrel p 0 0 0 0 Corprn c 4 0 1 0 MaYng rf-lf 5 0 2 0 Lyles p 1 0 0 0 Minor p 2 0 1 0 Escaln p 0 0 0 0 DHrndz ph 1 0 0 0 Michals ph 1 0 0 0 OFlhrt p 0 0 0 0 WLopez p 0 0 0 0 Venters p 0 0 0 0 Melncn p 0 0 0 0 Conrad ph 1 0 0 0 MDwns ph 0 0 0 0 Linernk p 0 0 0 0 Lyon p 0 0 0 0 Mather ph-rf 1 0 0 0 FRdrgz p 0 0 0 0 Totals 41 614 6 Totals 38 310 3 Atlanta........................... 001 100 000 4 — 6 Houston ........................ 200 000 000 1 — 3 E—Keppinger (2). DP—Atlanta 1, Houston 2. LOB—Atlanta 9, Houston 9. 2B—C.Jones 2 (19), Freeman (16), Minor (1), Pence 2 (19), Ca.Lee 2 (15). 3B—Bourn (5). HR—McCann (8), Hinske (8). SB—Schafer (6), Bourgeois (15). CS—Ma.Young (1). S—Schafer, Barmes. IP H R ER BB SO Atlanta Minor......................... 6 4 2 2 2 4 O’Flaherty ................ 1 2 0 0 0 1 Venters..................... 1 1 0 0 0 1 Linebrink W,2-1....... 1 1 0 0 1 0 Kimbrel ..................... 1 2 1 1 0 1 Houston Lyles ......................... 61⁄3 8 2 2 2 5 Escalona .................. 2⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 W.Lopez................... 1 0 0 0 0 2 Melancon ................. 1 1 0 0 0 1 Lyon L,3-3................ 0 3 4 4 1 0 Fe.Rodriguez........... 1 2 0 0 0 2 Lyon pitched to 4 batters in the 10th. Umpires—Home, Gary Darling;First, Paul Emmel;Second, Bruce Dreckman;Third, Rob Drake. T—3:20. A—32,117 (40,963).

A M E R I C A N L E A G U E Yankees 4, Indians 0 Cleveland

ab 4 4 3 4 4 4 3 3 3

r 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

h bi 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 1 0

New York

ab r h bi Jeter ss 4 0 0 0 Grndrs cf 4 1 1 1 Teixeir 1b 3 1 1 1 AlRdrg 3b 3 1 1 1 ENunez 3b 0 0 0 0 Cano 2b 2 0 0 0 Swisher rf 3 1 1 0 Posada dh 3 0 1 0 Gardnr lf 3 0 2 0 Cervelli c 3 0 0 0 Totals 32 0 5 0 Totals 28 4 7 3 Cleveland ........................... 000 000 000 — 0 New York ........................... 000 101 11x — 4 E—Choo (4), R.Perez (3), Phelps (1). DP—Cleveland 1. LOB—Cleveland 6, New York 3. 2B—Hannahan (10), Gardner (8). HR—GranderBrantly lf ACarer ss GSizmr cf CSantn 1b Choo rf LaPort dh Phelps 2b Hannhn 3b Marson c

Ellsury cf Pedroia 2b AdGnzl 1b Sutton ph-1b

ab 6 5 3 2

r 1 2 2 0

h bi 2 1 3 3 1 1 1 0

Toronto YEscor ss CPttrsn lf Bautist rf Lind 1b Encrnc dh-3b JMolin c RDavis cf J.Nix 3b-2b McCoy 2b-p

ab 3 5 3 4

r 0 0 0 2

h bi 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0

Ortiz dh 3 2 2 3 4 1 2 2 Camrn ph-dh 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 Lowrie 3b 5 0 0 1 4 0 1 2 Crwfrd lf 5 1 1 1 4 0 0 0 Scutaro ss 6 3 4 1 4 0 1 0 J.Drew rf 5 2 2 1 Varitek c 3 3 2 4 Totals 44161816 Totals 33 4 6 4 Boston.............................. 004 171 030 — 16 Toronto ............................ 000 202 000 — 4 LOB—Boston 10, Toronto 7. 2B—Pedroia 2 (11), Ad.Gonzalez (21), Lind (6), R.Davis (10), McCoy (3). HR—Ortiz (16), Varitek (3), Encarnacion (2). SF—C.Crawford. IP H R ER BB SO Boston Lackey W,4-5 .......... 6 6 4 4 2 8 Wheeler.................... 1 0 0 0 0 0 Hottovy ..................... 1 0 0 0 2 1 Bowden .................... 1 0 0 0 1 0 Toronto Morrow L,2-4 ........... 41⁄3 10 9 9 3 4 2 3 3 1 0 Frasor ....................... 2⁄3 Dotel ......................... 1 2 1 1 0 0 Rzepczynski ............ 1 1 0 0 0 2 Janssen .................... 2⁄3 3 3 3 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 Rauch ....................... 1⁄3 McCoy ...................... 1 0 0 0 0 0 HBP—by Dotel (J.Drew), by Morrow (Lowrie). WP—Rzepczynski. PB—J.Molina. Umpires—Home, Mark Carlson;First, Jeff Kellogg;Second, Eric Cooper;Third, Tim Timmons. T—3:35. A—39,437 (49,260).

Twins 8, Rangers 1 Texas

Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi Kinsler 2b 4 0 1 0 Revere cf 5 2 2 0 Andrus ss 4 0 0 0 ACasill ss 4 2 3 1 JHmltn dh 4 0 1 0 Cuddyr 1b 3 1 2 1 ABeltre 3b 4 0 1 0 DYong lf 4 1 3 2 N.Cruz rf 3 0 0 0 Tosoni dh 3 1 0 0 Morlnd 1b 3 0 0 0 Valenci 3b 3 1 0 0 Napoli c 3 1 1 0 Dnklm rf 4 0 1 2 DvMrp lf 3 0 1 1 RRiver c 4 0 0 0 EnChvz cf 3 0 0 0 Tolbert 2b 4 0 1 1 Totals 31 1 5 1 Totals 34 812 7 Texas.................................. 000 000 010 — 1 Minnesota .......................... 510 100 10x — 8 DP—Texas 1, Minnesota 1. LOB—Texas 3, Minnesota 5. 2B—A.Beltre (17), A.Casilla (8), Cuddyer (9), D.Young (6). SB—Revere (5), A.Casilla (9). SF—Cuddyer. IP H R ER BB SO Texas C.Lewis L,5-7 .......... 11⁄3 7 6 6 2 1 4 2 2 0 5 Bush ......................... 42⁄3 Tateyama ................. 1 1 0 0 0 0 Rhodes..................... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Minnesota S.Baker W,4-4 ......... 9 5 1 1 0 7 Bush pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. WP—C.Lewis. Umpires—Home, Paul Nauert;First, Doug Eddings;Second, Vic Carapazza;Third, Dana DeMuth. T—2:31. A—40,420 (39,500).

Tigers 8, Mariners 1 Seattle

Detroit ab r h bi AJcksn cf 5 1 3 2 Kelly 3b 5 0 1 1 Boesch rf 4 2 3 0 C.Wells rf 1 0 0 0 MiCarr 1b 3 1 1 0 VMrtnz dh 4 1 3 2 Dirks lf 4 0 0 0 JhPerlt ss 4 1 1 2 Avila c 3 1 1 0 Santiag 2b 4 1 1 0 Totals 29 1 5 1 Totals 37 814 7 Seattle ................................ 000 001 000 — 1 Detroit................................. 210 003 11x — 8 E—Olivo (5). DP—Seattle 1, Detroit 1. LOB—Seattle 4, Detroit 7. 2B—Boesch (15), V.Martinez (17). 3B—I.Suzuki (2), A.Jackson 2 (5). HR—Jh.Peralta (9). SF—Ryan. IP H R ER BB SO Seattle Pineda L,6-4 ............ 51⁄3 8 6 5 1 4 4 1 1 0 0 J.Wright .................... 12⁄3 Gray .......................... 1 2 1 1 0 0 Detroit Scherzer W,8-2 ....... 7 4 1 1 2 4 Benoit ....................... 1 1 0 0 0 0 Purcey ...................... 1 0 0 0 0 0 HBP—by Pineda (Mi.Cabrera). WP—Pineda. Umpires—Home, Mike Everitt;First, John Tumpane;Second, Cory Blaser;Third, Mike Winters. T—2:23. A—38,398 (41,255). ISuzuki rf Ryan ss Smoak 1b AKndy 2b Olivo c Peguer lf Carp dh Figgins 3b Halmn cf

ab 4 3 4 4 4 3 2 2 3

r 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

h bi 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0

White Sox 3, Athletics 2 Oakland

Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi Crisp cf 4 1 1 0 Lillirdg lf 3 1 0 0 Pnngtn ss 3 1 1 0 AlRmrz ss 3 1 1 0 Matsui dh 2 0 0 1 Quentin rf 4 0 0 1 DeJess pr 0 0 0 0 Konerk 1b 4 0 1 0 Wlngh lf 3 0 1 1 Rios cf 3 0 2 0 CJcksn rf 4 0 0 0 A.Dunn dh 2 0 0 0 SSizmr 3b 4 0 0 0 RCastr c 3 1 1 1 KSuzuk c 3 0 0 0 Bckhm 2b 3 0 1 0 Barton 1b 2 0 1 0 Morel 3b 4 0 0 0 JWeeks 2b 2 0 0 0 Totals 27 2 4 2 Totals 29 3 6 2 Oakland.............................. 000 101 000 — 2 Chicago.............................. 001 101 00x — 3 E—Ziegler (2), K.Suzuki (3), Pennington (7), R.Castro (1), Al.Ramirez (10). DP—Oakland 3, Chicago 1. LOB—Oakland 4, Chicago 12. 2B—Crisp (13). HR—R.Castro (3). SB—Pennington (6), Lillibridge (6), Al.Ramirez (3), Quentin (1). CS— J.Weeks (1). S—Pennington, J.Weeks. SF—Matsui. IP H R ER BB SO Oakland G.Gonzalez L,5-5 ... 51⁄3 5 3 2 7 2 Ziegler ...................... 1 0 0 0 1 0 Breslow .................... 1⁄3 0 0 0 1 1 Devine ...................... 11⁄3 1 0 0 0 1 Chicago Danks W,2-8............ 72⁄3 4 2 2 2 4

0 0 0 1 1 Crain S,1-2 .............. 11⁄3 HBP—by G.Gonzalez (Beckham). WP—G.Gonzalez 2. Balk—G.Gonzalez. Umpires—Home, Ed Hickox;First, Ed Rapuano;Second, Brian O’Nora;Third, Alfonso Marquez. T—3:01. A—24,391 (40,615).

T H I S D A T E I N B A S E B A L L June 12 1922 — Hub Pruett struck out Babe Ruth three consecutive times in the St. Louis Browns’ 7-1 victory over the New York Yankees. 1928 — Lou Gehrig of the New York Yankees had two triples and two homers in a 15-7 victory over the Chicago White Sox. 1939 — The Baseball Hall of Fame was officially dedicated at Cooperstown, N.Y. 1954 — Milwaukee’s Jim Wilson pitched the year’s only no-hitter, blanking the Philadelphia Phillies 2-0. 1959 — The San Francisco Giant’s Mike McCormick tossed a 3-0, five-inning no-hitter against the Philadelphia Phillies. Richie Ashburn singled in the top of the sixth for the Phillies, but the hit didn’t count because the game was stopped by rain. 1970 — Dock Ellis of the Pittsburgh Pirates hurled a 2-0 no-hitter in the first game of a doubleheader against the San Diego Padres. Ellis walked eight and hit a batter, and Willie Stargell hit two homers.

F R I D AY ’ S L A T E B O X E S Royals 4, Angels 2 Kansas City

Los Angeles ab r h bi MIzturs 3b 4 0 1 0 TrHntr rf 4 1 1 0 HKndrc 2b 4 1 1 1 Abreu dh 4 0 1 1 V.Wells lf 3 0 1 0 Aybar ss 4 0 1 0 Trumo 1b 4 0 0 0 BoWlsn c 3 0 1 0 Callasp ph 1 0 0 0 Bourjos cf 3 0 1 0 Totals 34 4 8 4 Totals 34 2 8 2 Kansas City ....................... 100 102 000 — 4 Los Angeles....................... 000 002 000 — 2 DP—Los Angeles 2. LOB—Kansas City 8, Los Angeles 6. 2B—Me.Cabrera (14), B.Pena (5), A.Escobar (8), H.Kendrick (15). HR—Me.Cabrera (9), Butler (6). SB—Me.Cabrera (8). IP H R ER BB SO Kansas City Francis W,3-6 .......... 61⁄3 8 2 2 1 3 G.Holland H,3.......... 12⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 Soria S,9-14 ............ 1 0 0 0 0 2 Los Angeles E.Santana L,3-6 ...... 7 7 4 4 5 5 Takahashi ................ 2 1 0 0 0 0 WP—Francis, E.Santana 2. Umpires—Home, Todd Tichenor;First, Gerry Davis;Second, Greg Gibson;Third, Sam Holbrook. T—2:41. A—38,254 (45,389). AGordn lf MeCarr cf Hosmer 1b Francr rf Butler dh Mostks 3b B.Pena c Getz 2b AEscor ss

ab 4 5 4 4 3 3 3 4 4

r 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 0

h bi 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 2 1

Nationals 2, Padres 1 Washington

San Diego ab r h bi Denorfi cf 3 1 1 0 Bartlett ss 3 0 1 0 Hawpe rf 3 0 0 0 Ludwck lf 3 0 1 1 Rizzo 1b 1 0 0 0 Cantu 3b 4 0 0 0 Forsyth 2b 3 0 0 0 KPhlps ph 1 0 1 0 Richrd pr 0 0 0 0 RJhnsn c 3 0 0 0 Hundly ph 1 0 0 0 Latos p 1 0 0 0 Venale ph 1 0 0 0 Frieri p 0 0 0 0 Headly ph 1 0 0 0 Luebke p 0 0 0 0 Neshek p 0 0 0 0 Totals 29 2 4 2 Totals 28 1 4 1 Washington ....................... 020 000 000 — 2 San Diego .......................... 000 001 000 — 1 E—Rizzo (1). DP—Washington 2. LOB—Washington 4, San Diego 7. 2B—Denorfia (6), Ludwick (10). HR—Morse (10). CS—Desmond (3). S—Marquis, Bartlett. IP H R ER BB SO Washington Marquis W,7-2......... 6 3 1 1 3 5 Clippard H,15 .......... 2 0 0 0 1 3 Storen S,13-14........ 1 1 0 0 1 1 San Diego Latos L,4-7 ............... 6 4 2 2 2 6 Frieri ......................... 1 0 0 0 0 2 Luebke ..................... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Neshek ..................... 1 0 0 0 1 0 HBP—by Marquis (Rizzo). Umpires—Home, Wally Bell;First, Laz Diaz;Second, Scott Barry;Third, John Hirschbeck. T—2:44. A—23,211 (42,691). Berndn cf-lf Dsmnd ss Werth rf L.Nix lf Clipprd p Stairs ph Storen p Morse 1b Espinos 2b WRams c Cora 3b Marqus p Ankiel cf

ab 4 4 4 3 0 1 0 3 4 2 2 1 1

r 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

h bi 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Giants 3, Reds 2 Cincinnati

San Francisco ab r h bi Burriss Stubbs cf 5 0 1 0 ss-2b 4 0 1 0 BPhllps 2b 5 1 3 0 MTejad 3b 3 1 2 1 Votto 1b 2 0 0 0 FSnchz 2b 2 0 1 0 Bruce rf 4 0 1 0 BCrwfr ss 3 0 0 0 Rolen 3b 4 1 1 0 C.Ross rf 4 0 2 1 Heisey lf 3 0 0 1 Burrell lf 3 0 0 0 Hanign c 4 0 2 1 Affeldt p 0 0 0 0 Janish ss 4 0 0 0 Romo p 0 0 0 0 TrWood p 2 0 0 0 Cain ph 1 0 0 0 FLewis ph 1 0 1 0 BrWlsn p 0 0 0 0 Arrdnd p 0 0 0 0 Schrhlt ph 1 0 1 1 Bray p 0 0 0 0 Huff 1b 4 0 2 0 Ondrsk p 0 0 0 0 Rownd cf-lf 3 0 2 0 CStwrt c 4 1 1 0 Vglsng p 1 0 0 0 Torres cf 0 1 0 0 Totals 34 2 9 2 Totals 33 312 3 Cincinnati ........................... 000 110 000 — 2 San Francisco.................... 100 010 001 — 3 Two outs when winning run scored. E—Heisey (1), Burriss (3). DP—Cincinnati 1, San Francisco 2. LOB—Cincinnati 9, San Francisco 12. 2B—M.Tejada 2 (13), Huff (12). 3B—Rolen (2). CS—Burriss (3). S—Tr.Wood, Burriss, Vogelsong. IP H R ER BB SO Cincinnati Tr.Wood ................... 8 11 2 2 3 4 Arredondo L,0-1...... 1⁄3 0 1 1 2 0 Bray........................... 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 Ondrusek ................. 0 1 0 0 1 0 San Francisco Vogelsong................ 6 8 2 2 3 6 Affeldt ....................... 1 0 0 0 0 2 Romo ........................ 1 0 0 0 0 3 Br.Wilson W,5-1...... 1 1 0 0 0 1 Ondrusek pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. Umpires—Home, Tim Tschida;First, Jeff Nelson;Second, Mike Estabrook;Third, Bill Welke. ab r h bi


CMYK PAGE 4C

SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

YANKEESSUNDAY Hazleton grad adapts well to IL ball, Rays chain

PHILLIES PROSPECTS

Single-A infielder swings hot bat

YA N K E E S I N M I N O R S

Highly regarded hurlers help Trenton Editor’s Note: The Scranton/

Editor’s Note: The Philadelphia Phillies minor league system has lost some highly regarded prospects during the last few years with many trades being made to help the parent club. But that doesn’t mean the cupboard is bare. The Phillies have produced more young talent and might have more pieces to deal if they need to make a midseason trade this season. Here are how some of the top prospects in the Philadelphia organization are faring this season:

Wilkes-Barre Yankees have taken a page from their parent club by winning championships. SWB has racked up four consecutive International League North Division titles and more could be on the way because the minor league system is stacked with top prospects that are close to contributing at the Triple-A or Major League level, according to Baseball America.

By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

Joe Savery: A first baseman, who is a former pitcher in the organization, continues to swing a hot bat for Class-A Clearwater. He’s hitting .314 with 12 extrabase hits and 21 RBI in 188 at-bats for the Threshers. He’s also posted a .370 on base percentage. Double-A Reading’s Matt Rizzotti had an offweek and was Savery passed by Savery for the organizational lead in batting average. Rizzotti, a designated hitter for the R-Phils, is Rizzotti hitting .307. Brody Colvin: The team’s top pitching prospect, according to Baseball America, was hamColvin pered with an injury earlier this season and is starting to get stretched out. He has pitched well enough to Biddle win in his last four starts, but has no wins to show for it. In 33 1⁄3 innings this Aumont season he’s 0-2 with a 4.05 ERA with 26 strikeouts and just 13 walks. In his last start, he allowed just one run over five innings against the Tampa Yankees. Jesse Biddle: The Phillies’ No. 1 pick from 2010, pitched on Friday and was hit with a loss for Low-A Lakewood allowing four runs in 4 2⁄3 innings. The 19-year-old is 3-6 with a 4.13 ERA for the BlueClaws with 51 strikeouts in 61 innings. Phillippe Aumont: One of the three players acquired by the Phillies in the Cliff Lee deal in December 2009, he got off to a rocky start in the organization last year when the Phillies tried to make him a full-time starter. The plan backfired as the 6-foot-7, 255-pound righty finished 3-11 with a 5.68 ERA in the minors. This year, as a reliever, he’s posted a 2.43 ERA in 24 appearances for Double-A Reading, with a 1-5 mark and four saves.

KEVIN MINGORA/THE MORNING CALL

Durham’s Russ Canzler rounds third base after hitting a grand slam against Lehigh Valley at Coca-Cola Park in Allentown Tuesday. For the Hazleton native, it was the first home run he hit in Pennsylvania during his eight-year minor league career.

Canzler a hit in Triple-A ALLENTOWN – The shot soared off the big slugger’s bat, heading high over the leftfield wall at Coca-Cola Park and on its way to yet another surprise in a season Russ Canzler has filled with them. It was more than just the first grand slam of his Triple-A career. The fact it came on the first pitch he saw and the first swing he took in Pennsylvania since playing high school ball less than an hour up the road at Hazleton Area High School made the moment even more meaningful to Canzler. “That was great man,” Canzler said Tuesday, after his first-inning slam began a

PHOTO COURTESY OF DURHAM BULLS

teams. “Not really,” Canzler said. “It’s pretty neat to have two guys from the same homePAUL SOKOLOSKI town in the same organization, especially since it’s not 9-1 bashing by his Durham Bulls over the Lehigh Valley really a baseball town. But I was looking for the opportuIronPigs. nity to get in the big leagues “That goes down, for me, as one of my all-time favorite sooner than later. And Tampa Bay seems to have a hishome runs.” tory of giving guys that He’s hit plenty of them. chance.” Canzler’s blast Tuesday Still, it was probably no was the 73rd home run of his coincidence Maddon gave eight-year minor league caCanzler his first invitation to reer, and gave him 355 camajor league camp in spring reer RBI. training for a couple weeks But this time, a whole this year, then Canzler section of supporters from earned his first trip to Trihis hometown cheered. Including his parents Mike ple-A ball. “Everything everybody and Janice, Canzler estitold me about him from here mates he initially had about was true,” Canzler said of 15 ticket requests from peoMaddon. “He’s a first-class ple in the Hazleton area. “That number grew a little guy, a great baseball guy. We were able to work together.” bit,” said Canzler, a 25-yearNow Canzler’s working on old infielder. “I haven’t been a dream. able to play anywhere close He entered midweek batto home anywhere in my ting .285 for the Triple-A career.” Durham Bulls, with seven That journey began when homers, 19 doubles and was the Chicago Cubs drafted Canzler out of Hazleton Area among the team leaders with 33 RBI this season. High in the 30th round of “You never know what the 2004 Major League kids are going to do when Baseball June amateur they come up to Triple-A,” draft. He put up good num- said Durham manager Charlie Montoyo, who once bers in the Cubs’ farm played for the Scranton/ system, batting .272 with 67 homers and 322 Wilkes-Barre Red Barons. “He has been a pleasant RBI but never played surprise. He can hit, plays above Double-A during the game the right way, he’s seven seasons. a leader. So he signed with the “I like him a lot.” Tampa Bay Rays as a minor Canzler admitted it took a league free agent during the lot of adjustment to jump up offseason, where the major to the highest level of minor league club is managed by league baseball. fellow Hazleton native Joe “A lot of these guys have Maddon. good experience, a lot of the Yet, Canzler said the fact pitchers have major league he spent his high school time,” Canzler said. “The years playing on Hazleton Area’s Joe Maddon Field had game’s a little bit faster, too. little to do with his choice of As a hitter, I just have to be

OPINION

at the top of my game.” As a fielder, he’s learning a new game. Mainly a first baseman and outfielder through his pro career, Canzler is regularly playing third base for the Bulls. His inexperience at the position proved costly – when Canzler’s throwing error gave the IronPigs their only run Tuesday. “He’s never really played third base that much,” Montoyo defended. “Last year he played outfield and first base. So far, he’s been outstanding. If he hits like he’s been hitting, I’ve got to play him everywhere.” That could lead to the call-up Canzler’s spent his whole life looking for. He believes his hot start to his initial Triple-A season has him major league ready, and with parent Tampa Bay’s continuing struggles at first base, there have been a few cries from big league fans in Florida to call up Canzler. “It’s going good,” Canzler said. So well, in fact, Canzler might not be in the minor leagues anymore when Durham visits the Scranton/ Wilkes-Barre Yankees – who play just up the road from Hazleton – from Aug. 16 through 19. And his parents might be moved into a new home in Clayton, N.C., by then. But that won’t keep Canzler from hearing the hoots and hollers coming from Hazleton. “I go up there every offseason for a little while,” Canzler said. “That’ll always be my home and hold a special place in my heart.” Because to him, a trip back near Hazleton is always like hitting a grand slam.

Dellin Betances: The No. 3 overall prospect for the Yankees and the top pitching prospect, Betances continues to be productive at Double-A Trenton. His ERA has steadily risen in the last three weeks, but it would be difficult for the mark to get much lower than it was then. His ERA still remains at Betances a stellar 1.75. He’s posted a 3-1 record with 58 strikeouts and only 34 hits allowed in 51 1⁄3 innings for the Thunder. Banuelos On Thursday, he threw six shutout innings against Reading in a no-decision. Manny Banuelos: The No. 2 pitching prospect in the organization and the No. 4 overall prospect for the Yankees, Banuelos had his worst outing of the year for Trenton last week when he allowed nine hits and five runs in four innings against Reading. The 20-year-old right-hander did not pick up the loss in the game and his record is still 2-0. His ERA is still a very respectable at 2.84, with 45 strikeouts in 50 2⁄3 innings. Gary Sanchez: The catcher, who is rated the No. 2 overall prospect in the organization, was playing for Single-A Charleston before being sent back to spring training last week for what several media outlets have reported as attitude problems. Sanchez, who has been touted by many as the organization’s best hitting prospect, reportedly declined to enter a recent game as a replacement and didn’t want to catch in the bullpen either. He returned to the RiverDogs last week and has gone 3-for-14 since returning. His season stats after Friday are a .235 average, with four home runs and 21 RBI in 36 games. Notable: Tampa third baseman Robert Lyerly leads all Yankee minor leaguers in batting average, hitting .322 in 239 at-bats before Saturday’s game.

Today in SWB History The 2004 season didn’t conclude with the Red Barons finishing with a winning record. The team posted a 69-73 mark that year, but it did have a memorable streak. From May 26 to June 13, the Barons won a franchise-record 10 consecutive road games. On June 12, 2004, SWB defeated Louisville, 10-6, in 10 innings after rallying back from deficits in the sixth and eighth. Mark Budzinski was 4-for-5 for the Red Barons in the game. The longest road win streak was later tied by the Yankees from April 8-25 in 2009.

U P C O M I N G YA N K E E S S C H E D U L E

Today at Syracuse 2 p.m.

Monday at Syracuse 7 p.m.

Tuesday at Syracuse 7 p.m.

Thursday Columbus 7:05 p.m.

Friday Columbus 7:05 p.m.

Saturday Columbus 7:05 p.m.

June 19 Columbus 1:05 p.m.

June 20 Norfolk 7:05 p.m.

June 21 Norfolk 7:05 p.m.


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011 PAGE 5C

AMERICAN LEGION ROUNDUP

Greater Pittston edges Hazleton The Times Leader staff

HAZLETON – Chris Murphy tossed a one-hit complete game to earn a 3-1 Wyoming Valley American Legion victory for Greater Pittston over Hazleton on Saturday. Murphy helped his cause at the plate with three hits and one run. PJ Bone contributed two hits and an RBI for Greater Pittston. Robert Seigendall doubled for Hazleton’s lone hit. Matt Benyo produced an RBI.

AP PHOTO

Ruler On Ice, center, with jockey Jose Valdivia Jr.; Stay Thirsty, second from right, and jockey Javier Castellano; and Shackleford, right, with Jesus Castanon, run during the Belmont Stakes. Ruler On Ice won; Stay Thirsty was second; and Shackleford was fifth.

BELMONT Continued from Page 1C

The much-hyped rubber match between Shackleford and Animal Kingdom never developed on a rainy day at Belmont Park. Shackleford finished fifth, while Animal Kingdom had a frightful start, never moved into contention and finished sixth. Jockey John Velazquez nearly fell off when Animal Kingdom collided with Monzon just after the start. He somehow managed to get his left foot back into the stirrup, but by then it was too late. Animal Kingdom had dropped more than 13 lengths off the lead, and did well to finish in the middle of the pack. “The horse almost fell down,” said Graham Motion, Animal Kingdom’s trainer. “Johnny couldn’t believe the horse stayed up. He lost his iron. It took him until halfway around the turn to get his foot back in the iron. It’s disappointing not to give the horse a chance to run his race.” An elated Valdivia, riding in his first Belmont, described the final seconds of the race while on

the gallop back to the winner’s circle. “I’m a couple of yards from the wire and I’m thinking, ‘Oh my god, oh my god, I’m going to win the Belmont,”’ he said. A crowd of 55,779 turned out hoping to see a stretch showdown between Animal Kingdom and Shackleford — the first Derby vs. Preakness winners in the Belmont in six years. But that vanished once the Derby winner was knocked around in a bad bit of racing luck. “It was unbelievable,” Velazquez said. “They came over on me and clipped heels and I almost came off. I had a horrible trip. No way was he going to make up that much ground. He’s still a great horse.” The Belmont has a history of surprise finishes, from spoiled Triple Crown attempts to stunning shockers. Only two favorites have won since Thunder Gulch in 1995, and long shots have been the norm. Last year, it was 13-1 Drosselmeyer, two years ago Summer Bird at 11-1, and three years ago Da’ Tara at 38-1. Birdstone spoiled Smarty Jones’ bid for a Triple Crown in 2004 at odds of 36-1 and Sarava

ended War Emblem’s Triple try in 2002 at 70-1 odds. The win left Lori Hall, who owns Ruler On Ice with her husband George, shaking. “It was amazing, because we really were the underdog,” she said. Ruler On Ice’s victory makes it three years in a row a different horse has won each of the Triple Crown races, and next year it will be a 33-year gap since Affirmed swept the Derby, Preakness and Belmont in 1978. Ruler On Ice, trained by New Jersey-based Kelly Breen, did not run in the first two legs of the Triple Crown. The 3-year-old gelding didn’t have enough graded stakes earnings to qualify for the Derby, but vindicated his trainer’s faith by defeating a field that included the first seven finishers in the Run for the Roses. The winning time for the oldest and longest race in the Triple Crown was a slow 2:30.88. While Shackleford and jockey Jesus Castenon shot to the lead from the outside No. 12 post, Ruler On Ice stalked him all the way around the track. Stay Thirsty and Brilliant Speed were close behind but they weren’t going to catch Ruler On Ice once he

took over with about an eighthof-a-mile to go. Ruler On Ice, a temperamental sort fitted with blinkers for the first time to keep him focused, returned $51.50, $26 and $13.60. Stay Thirsty, owner Mike Repole’s second-best 3-year-old behind the sidelined Uncle Mo, paid $19.40 and $10.80. Brilliant Speed was third and returned $7.90 to show. The $2 win payoff is the eighth highest in Belmont history. Sarava’s $2 win payoff of $142.50 is the record. Nehro, second in his last three races, including the Derby, was fourth, followed by Shackleford, Animal Kingdom, Mucho Macho Man, Santiva, Monzon, Master of Hounds, Prime Cut and Isn’t He Perfect. Shackleford’s trainer Dale Romans said before the race he expected his colt to break first and then see how far he can go. It wasn’t far enough. “He had it his way,” Romans said. “We had it the way we wanted. He just didn’t hang on. We’re so proud of the way he performed. I was down, but I would never get too down running at this level of race.”

Trainer reflects on filly’s historic win in 2007 By ED MCNAMARA Newsday

Four years ago, Rags to Riches made history at Curlin’s expense. The Kentucky Oaks winner edged the Preakness hero by a head to become the first filly to win the Belmont Stakes in 102 years. Steve Asmussen saddled his second Belmont runner Saturday, when Nehro finished fourth, 71⁄2 lengths behind 24-1 winner Ruler On Ice. The twotime Eclipse Award winner still wonders how his first one didn’t win. “I’ve been thinking about Curlin a lot this week,” Asmussen said Friday. “I can’t believe it happened, but I watched it. It happened. She ran incredible. They came home in 48 going a mile and a half. Some things are just completely out of your hands.” The stretch duel between the filly and the huge chestnut colt

YANKEES Continued from Page 1C

Syracuse starter Tommy Milone (4-4) picked up the win by scattering eight hits and fanning eight in seven innings, giving up a run only on designated hitter Brandon Laird’s sixth-inning solo shot. Zimmerman, a National League all-star for Washington in 2009, is returning from surgery he had May 3 for a torn abdominal muscle that he suffered early this season. He singled in his first at-bat in the first but saved his damaging blow for the seventh. With the game knotted 1-1,

BELMONT

Curlin’s Belmont still bugs Asmussen, anyway. “The next day, the next week ... four years later, and I still can’t believe he got beat,” he said. “But he did.”

was among the most memorable in Belmont history. Tom Durkin captured the moment with his race call: “They’re going head to head. It’s going to be very close. It’s ... a filly in the Belmont!” There’s a racing saying that you get paid for what you do, but that you pay for it, too. It was a glorious day for Rags to Riches, but she would never have another. She became ill that summer, and she suffered a leg injury when second in her comeback race in September at Belmont. She never ran again, and trainer Todd Pletcher announced her retirement six months later. Curlin became Horse of the Year that season and in 2008.

No luck of the Irish T.J. Comerford has worked for his old friend Aidan O’Brien for 14 years. The assistant trainer deputized for the Irish genius in the Belmont, in which Master of Hounds ran a disappointing 10th of 12. Comerford flew in from Ireland on Tuesday with Master of Hounds and Viscount Nelson, who was eighth in the Grade I Woodford Reserve Manhattan. They were scheduled to return today to Shannon Airport in southwest Ireland. “I’ve been very busy with the two of them this week,” Comerford said Friday. He’ll be even busier starting

Tuesday, the first of Royal Ascot’s five days. He’ll be coming from O’Brien’s Ballydoyle base with runners for the world’s most prestigious meet. Comerford said he’ll make round-trip flights to England on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. Pletcher will send out his first two Royal Ascot runners Tuesday (Bridgetown) and Friday (More Than Real, owned by celebrity chef Bobby Flay). In between, Pletcher plans to visit Ballydoyle, the world’s most famous stable. So he and Comerford might cross paths there Wednesday. The affable Irishman got in a friendly dig at Pletcher, America’s most successful trainer. “When I saw him the other day,” Comerford said, “I told him, ’Come over to see us and we’ll teach you how to train one.””

Yankees starter D.J. Mitchell (4-5) walked Corey Brown to lead off the inning and Matt Antonelli bunted him to second. One out later, Zimmerman singled to left to drive in Brown. Zimmerman took second on a wild pitch, and Chris Marrero drilled a single to center for the two-run cushion. The Yankees pulled within 3-2 courtesy of an RBI single from Laird in the eighth, but wasted their last chance by hitting into a game-ending double play with runners on first and second. After several innings of huffing and puffing with nothing to show for it, the Yankees finally took a chunk out of Milone in the sixth. With one out, Laird

pounded a Milone offering over the left-field wall to tie the game at 1-1. Mitchell came into the contest as Scranton/Wilkes-Barre’s road ace, with a 4-0 record and a 1.24 ERA in games away from home. But the Chiefs were rude to Mitchell from the start. They loaded the bases with two outs in the bottom of the first, but Mitchell wriggled out of that by getting Jesus Flores to fly out to deep center. The pitcher couldn’t keep it in the ballpark the next inning. Syracuse outfielder Jesus Valdez launched a solo shot to left to put the first run on the scoreboard. The Yankees were primed to answer in the top of the third,

when Luis Nunez led off with a double and took third on Gustavo Molina’s single. Greg Golson then chopped a grounder to Zimmerman at third, who smoothly fired a strike home to nab Nunez. Milone then fanned Ramiro Pena and induced Jordan Parraz to fly out. Scranton/Wilkes-Barre made more noise in the fourth, when Kevin Russo lashed a two-out single and took third on a hit by Dan Brewer. Brewer stole second, but both runners were stuck where they were when Milone struck out Nunez. RHP Andrew Brackman (2-5, 6.75) will take the mound for the Yankees in today’s 2 p.m. game vs. Chiefs RHP Erik Arnesen (0-2, 4.91)

NOTEBOOK

Greater Pittston ab 4 4 3 2 3 3 2 1 2 2

DeBana cf McDermott ss Nowicki 3b Musto c Murphy p Bone lf Eramo rf Carroll rf Drahus 1b O’Brien 2b Harris ph Totals

r 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0

h bi 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

Hazleton

Stawick 2b Kline rf Barletta cf Benyo ss Vigna 1b Bayzick p Rubasky c Seach lf Chirico dh Sullivan ph Seigendall 1 0 0 0 3b Gawel ph 27 3 7 2 Totals

ab 1 3 2 3 3 3 2 0 2 1

r 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

h bi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 23 1 1 1

Greater Pittston ....................... 010 100 1 — 3 Hazleton ................................... 100 000 0 — 1 2B – Seigendall, McDermott, Murphy IP H R ER BB SO Greater Pittston Murphy (W)............... 7 1 1 1 2 6 Hazleton Bayzick (L)................. 7 7 3 1 2 6

Swoyersville 5, Back Mountain 2

Tyler McGovern and Marc Noyalis pitched matching complete-game five-hitters, as Swoyersville and McGovern came away with the win, beating Back Mountain in Wyoming Valley American Legion play. Nick Hogan (double), Chris Clocker and Tyler Potoski each had a hit and an RBI for Swoyersville. Eric Ringsdorf and Brian Stepniak (RBI) had two hits

apiece for Back Mountain. Back Mountain Swoyersville ab r h bi ab r h bi Malloy cf 4 1 0 0 Hogan lf 1 0 1 1 Everett 2b 3 0 0 0 Leonard ss 2 1 0 0 Ruch 1b 2 0 0 1 Pechulis 3b 3 1 0 0 Noyalis p 3 1 1 0 Clocker 1b 1 1 1 1 Yursha lf 3 0 0 0 McGovern p 2 0 0 0 Condo ss 0 0 0 0 Potoski c 3 0 1 1 Ringsdorf dh 2 0 2 0 Wilson 2b 0 0 0 0 Stepniak 3b 3 0 2 1 Duffy dh 3 0 0 0 Narcum c 2 0 0 0 Zielen cf 3 1 1 0 Patel rf 2 0 0 0 Usefara rf 2 1 1 0 Totals 25 2 5 2 Totals 20 5 5 3 Back Mountain......................... 010 010 0 — 2 Swoyersville ............................ 003 011 x — 5 2B – Noyalis, Hogan IP H R ER BB SO Back Mountain Noyalis (L)................. 6.0 5 5 5 3 4 Swoyersville McGovern (W) ......... 7.0 5 2 2 4 4

Nanticoke 11, Swoyersville 4

Nanticoke came from behind to score seven runs in the fifth inning in an American Legion win over Swoyersville. Nanticoke totaled 15 hits, including three hits each by Eric Hauer and Dominick Policare. Policare doubled and tripled, while Anthony Ioanna recorded three RBI on two hits. Chris Clocker was the only multi-hit batter for Swoyersville. Swoyersville Hogan lf Leonard ss Pelchulis 3b Clocker c McGovern 1b Zielen cf Sabol 2b Yuhas cf Usefara p Duffy ph Wilson p Totals

ab 3 4 4 2 3 3 2 3

r 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1

h bi 1 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1

2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 27 4 5 4

Nanticoke ab r h bi Zwiebel 2b 5 2 2 0 Yudichak c 4 2 1 0 Ioanna ss 4 1 2 3 Hauer cf 4 2 3 2 Policare 3b 4 2 3 2 Tsevdos rf 4 1 2 1 Jezewski lf 4 1 1 0 Decker p 2 0 0 0 Lukaszewski ph 1 0 1 2 Passetti p 0 0 0 0 Ivan 1b 0 0 0 0 Clawson dh 3 0 0 0 Totals 35111510

Swoyersville.......................... 220 000 0 — 4 Nanticoke .............................. 200 072 X — 11 2B – Ioanna, Lukaszewski, Policare; 3B – Policare IP H R ER BB SO Swoyersville Wilson (L).................. 4 8 7 7 1 3 Usefara...................... 2 7 4 4 1 1 Nanticoke Decker (W) ............... 5.2 4 4 3 3 5 Passetti ..................... 1.1 1 0 0 0 1

H.S. BASEBALL

Conference all-stars selected by coaches The Times Leader staff

The Wyoming Valley Conference baseball coaches have selected all-star teams from both Division I and Division II. In addition, a senior all-star squad will be announced this week, with those picked playing in a senior all-star game at 4 p.m. on June 23 at Wilkes. WVC Division I All-Stars MVPs: Mike Healey (TUN) and Mike Papi (TUN) First team: Tom Alexander (WVW), Matt Barletta (TUN), Kyle Custer (TUN), Travis DeBona (DAL), Anthony Grillini (COU), Mike Healey (TUN), Dylan Maloney (WA), Ron Musto (PA), Marc Noyalis (DAL), Mike Papi (TUN), Steve Ruch (HR), Josh Savokinas (PA) Second team: P.J. Bone (WA), Bobby Briggs (NAN), Carl Cara (HAZ), Christian Choman (HR), Rich Condeelis (TUN), T.J. Lashock (BER), Mark Malloy (HR), John Medvecky (HAZ), Kody Nowicki (WA), Joe Pechulis (WVW), Anthony Zaloga (HAZ), Matt Zielen (WVW) Honorable mention: Anthony Caladie (CRE), Dave Calovi (BER), Dom Gulius (COU),

Chris Murphy (WA), Paul Narcum (DAL), Tyler Potoski (WVW), Ted Ritsick (HR), Tyler Rubasky (HAZ), Joe Yudichak (NAN)

WVC Division II All-Stars MVP: Bryan Mathers (LL) First team: Justin Cornell (LL), Cory Dickson (HAN), Corey Dubil (MEY), Nick Eck (WST), Josh Everett (LL), Victor Garcia (MEY), Bryan Mathers (LL), Tyler McGovern (LL), Ryan Murphy (LL), Dakota Owen (MEY), Kurt Pericci (HAN), Zack Yursha (LL) Second team: Cole Barbacci (LL), Joe DiMaggio (MEY), Mickey Ferrence (HAN), Ryan Forte (MMI), Aaron Kollar (MMI), Ross Lavan (MEY), Matt Lukachinsky (HAN), Bob Polachek (SEM), Justin Romanoski (WST), Mike Sulcoski (HAN), Max Wiles (SEM), Spencer Youngman (SEM) Honorable mention: Curt Barbacci (LL), Skyler DiPasquale (NW), Matt Jugus (WST), Zack Kollar (HAN), John Nargoski (MEY), Adam Paulauskas (LL), Craig Skudalski (SEM), Fran Swankoski (MMI), Mike View (HAN), Dan Yencha (MMI)

HIGH SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL

WVC all-star game tonight The Times Leader staff

The Wyoming Valley Conference boys volleyball senior allstar game will be held at 7 p.m. today at Lake-Lehman High School. Doors will open at 6 p.m. Players must bring $5 to cover the cost of T-shirts. All members of the first-team and second-team coaches’ allstars are asked to be present for certificates. First-teamers will also be presented with awards.

no; Abington Heights’ Andy McLane and Eric Wasser; Dallas’ Kevin Hine; Tunkhannock’s Paul Henn; Lake-Lehman’s Ryan Evans; Hazleton Area’s Dwaine Gilley and Trevor Marszalek

TEAM 2 ROSTER Coughlin’s Michael Shmakov, Brian Suchoski and Justin Coskey; Wyoming Valley West’s Ridge Scott; Wyoming Area’s Tony Richards and Cody Gates; Nanticoke’s Cael Evans; Meyers’ TEAM 1 ROSTER Keyton Winder; North Pocono’s Holy Redeemer’s Pete Alexis, Tim Cummings and Matt BartJohn McCarthy and Nick Saraci- kowski


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S TA N L E Y C U P F I N A L S

Goaltender Thomas’ play going to waste vs. Canucks Bruins star has allowed 6 goals in 5 games during finals, but Boston trails in series, 3-2

By GREG BEACHAM AP Sports Writer

VANCOUVER, British Columbia — Tim Thomas is giving a masterful performance in his net during the Stanley Cup finals. He’s also doing an excellent job masking the frustration that must be coursing through him. The Bruins’ star goalie has allowed just six goals by the Vancouver Canucks in five games, yet Boston is heading home facing elimination in Game 6 on Monday. Vancouver moved to the brink of its first NHL title with a 1-0 victory Friday — the Canucks’ second 1-0 home win in a series dominated by the home teams. Unless they hold off the Canucks at TD Garden, they won’t get one last chance to figure it out. “The plan was for us to score more than them, which I guess we have, but ...” Thomas said, his voice trailing off. Indeed, the Bruins have outscored Vancouver 14-6 in the series, but 12 of those goals were in two blowout wins in Boston. The West Coast hasn’t been nearly as kind to the Bruins in a series in a series that’s been colored by dangerous hits, diving and taunting — but dominated by stellar goaltending from Thomas and Rober-

GAME 6 VANCOUVER AT BOSTON 8 p.m., Monday TV: NBC, WBRE-28

to Luongo. “It’s very close,” Luongo said Saturday before boarding a plane to Boston. “It’s at our fingertips right now. The next two days are going to be very important to stay focused, and come Monday night, we have the game of our lives. We’re ready to do whatever it takes to win.” While Luongo has been alternately brilliant and hopeless, Thomas is Boston’s only constant in the series, scrambling around his crease in a textbook performance of a goaltending style that won’t be found in any instruction manual. The Bruins won two blowout games at home, but they haven’t caught a break in Vancouver. Thomas stopped 24 shots in Game 5, but he failed to get to Maxim Lapierre’s third-period winner, scored off a canny rebound of Kevin Bieksa’s shot behind his net. An estimated 100,000 fans in downtown Vancouver’s streets erupted in a sea of celebration when Lapierre scored.

AP PHOTO

Bruins goalie Tim Thomas makes a save as defenseman Johnny Boychuk looks on Friday during the Stanley Cup finals.

Henrik Sedin said. “You don’t get too many opportunities to finish off a Stanley Cup final, and we have to make the most of it.” Vancouver had won four of its previous five road playoff games before the back-to-back routs in

Hundreds of those fans turned out at Vancouver’s airport on Saturday, standing eight deep behind a barrier. They screamed and waved signs in the terminal while sending off their team. “This is our chance,” captain

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Boston. In a tense Game 5, the Canucks acknowledged they had to resort to trickery and luck just to get one goal against Thomas, who might be the next on a small list of players to win the Conn Smythe Trophy as the playoff MVP from the losing team. Thomas would prefer to win the big silver prize, and he remains confident the Bruins can do it. He hopes Boston can gather momentum back home, where the Bruins embarrassed the Canucks on energy drawn partially from Vancouver defenseman Aaron Rome’s dangerous late hit in Game 3 on Boston forward Nathan Horton, who’s out for the series. “It seems like so far this series, the home crowds have helped the teams,” said Thomas, who has a jaw-dropping .971 save percentage in the finals, stopping 165 of Vancouver’s 171 shots. “It’s not always the case, but going home for Game 6, we hope it’s the case one more time.” The Canucks would love to

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wrap up their franchise’s first title without going through the tension of a Game 7, although they emerged from Game 5 feeling more relief than elation. Vancouver had the NHL’s highest-scoring offense and best power play during the regular season, but the Canucks have been forced to play a different game just to survive in the finals. So far, they’re just getting away with their meager offensive output because Luongo has been sharp at the biggest moments. Luongo was pulled from Game 4 after giving up 12 goals in just over four periods, but the veteran Olympic gold medal-winner’s shutout in Game 5 proved he has a knack for big games, no matter what his critical fans in Vancouver might think.

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NBA FINALS

Down 3-2, the Heat turning up on LeBron James MIAMI — The hammer Dirk Nowitzki is so close to escaping is pounding away harder than ever at LeBron James. The Dallas Mavericks are a victory from claiming the title that James came to Miami to win. It would forever alter Nowitzki’s reputation, which has already been elevated enormously during this series as he’s ignored injury and illness. And James is now the target of all the criticism Nowitzki long endured, the one shouldering most of the blame as things go wrong. “That’s just a part of the game if you’re the star or the face of the franchise,” Nowitzki said Saturday. “If you win, it’s great for you, and everybody looks at you. And if you lose, you’re going to get hammered. It’s just part of the business. I think we understand that, we’ve been around long enough. I got hammered the last 13 years, basically. So hopefully this year I can make the hammering go away for a year.” He has two shots at it. The Mavs can win their first title tonight, or Tuesday if the Heat force a seventh game. That would require a stronger effort from James, who this time a year ago was coming off his second straight MVP award and was three weeks from becoming among the most sought-after free agents in sports history. Now he’s the guy who can’t produce in the fourth quarters, with 11 total points in five games, the one with the big name but the puny stats who had to spend part of his off day answering all sorts of questions about what’s happened to him. • Are those 44 minutes per game you’re playing too much? “I wouldn’t say it’s too much. I

GAME 6 DALLAS AT MIAMI 8 p.m., today TV: ABC, WNEP-16

don’t think so,” James said. “I don’t feel like I’m hurting my team for the time I’m out there. I don’t feel like it’s too much.” • Is something wrong with your shot technique? “At this point, I don’t think technique has anything to do with it,” James said. “Shots go in, shots don’t go in. I don’t stop to think about my technique or anything like that.” • Are you simply feeling the pressure of the finals stage? “I think the game of basketball can be pressure,” James said. “It doesn’t matter if it’s the finals or the conference finals or first round. Playoff basketball is all about pressure, how you can handle it.” James did allow that perhaps he hasn’t been as aggressive in the fourth quarter because Dwyane Wade has been playing so well. Wade is averaging 28.4 points — 11 more than James, who also trails Chris Bosh. “He’s one of the best players in the world,” Wade said. “So we’re not necessarily concerned about him to that extent. I want him to play and feel confident.” James noted that he did have a triple-double last game, but even with 17 points, 10 rebounds and 10 assists, he said, “I had a bad game in a lot of people’s eyes. I understand that.” Nowitzki knows the feeling. He has been the lone big star on a Dallas team that’s won 50 games for11 straight seasons, yet he’s known best for his failures: the collapse after a 2-0 lead over Miami in the 2006 finals, the first-round loss to

peared to be mocking his recent illness on a video that made the rounds Friday. Nowitzki called it “a little childish, a little ignorant,” but denied that it would give him any added motivation to claim the ring he’s been chasing for 13 years. “We’re one win away from my dream, what I’ve worked on for

half my life,” Nowitzki said. “This is really all I’m worried about, this is all I’m focusing on, and not really the off-the-court stuff that happened.” James and Wade downplayed

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N O T E B O O K By TIM REYNOLDS AP Sports Writer

MIAMI — Heat guard Dwyane Wade says his bruised left hip will not be an issue for Game 6 of the NBA Finals. Wade went through some of Miami’s practice on Saturday, took part in the regular team shooting games afterward and pronounced himself fully fit for tonight’s win-or-else game against the Dallas Mavericks. Dallas leads the best-of-seven series 3-2. “He’ll be ready to go,” Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said. Wade was injured in the first quarter of Game 5, retreating to the locker room for treatment and staying in for a second round after halftime before returning to the floor. He finished Game 5 with a team-high 23 points. “This is just another day of getting treatment and getting rest,” Wade said Saturday. YOUNG FAN HONORED: At Game 6 of the NBA finals tonight, the Heat will honor the memory of Henry Buchanan, a 7-year-old from Hollywood, Fla., who died Wednesday. Health officials suspect meningitis as the cause, though tests are still pending. Friends of Henry’s family reached out to the team Saturday with e-mails about how the boy would often wear Heat jerseys and played basketball whenever he could. The team invited his family to Game 6 and planned to show his photo on the video screen before the game.

Heat public address announcer Michael Baiamonte also planned to reach out to the boy’s family, since Henry was a fan of his in-game calls.

BY THE NUMBERS: Scoring in the NBA will be down about 1 percent this season. In 1,312 games last year, NBA teams scored a combined 263,091 points. Through 1,310 games this season, they’re at 259,925 — which works out, on average, as two fewer points per game.

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Miami’s Wade says he isn’t worried about hip

the video, but even if their intentions weren’t malicious, it gave Heat haters yet another reason to dislike the team that already provided so many from the moment they came together last summer.

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eighth-seeded Golden State in the first round the next year after winning 67 games. He was tagged as soft — a label many European players receive — and given derisive nicknames such as No-win-ski or No-ring-ski. But he showed plenty of toughness Saturday when he fired back at Wade and James after they ap-

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PRO GOLF

Karlsson leads by 1 in Memphis Karlsson, 41, is in his first full on this course in seven rounds. European Tour veteran looking final two holes, dropping to 11 un“Robert looks like he’s not goder and one stroke ahead of Har- year on the PGA Tour after earnfor his first win on the PGA ing an exemption by finishing in ing to fall back,” Goosen said. rison Frazar. Tour. Frazar is a shot behind. Frazar said he thought Karls- the top125 on the money list with “Playing really solid. Need to get By TERESA M. WALKER AP Sports Writer

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Robert Karlsson shot a 2-under 68 Saturday to remain atop the leaderboard through three rounds at the St. Jude Classic. Karlsson looked ready to run away from the field, leading by as much as five strokes on the back nine. But the Swede closed with his only bogeys of the day on the

son was in total control of the tournament so he focused only on playing. He got hot and birdied three of his final four holes to finish with a 64 that got him to 10 under. That included rolling in a 42-footer for birdie on No. 18. John Merrick (67) is third, followed by Retief Goosen, who turned in the best 18-hole score this week at TPC Southwind before being matched by Frazar. Fredrik Jacobson (68) and Keegan Bradley (70) are tied for fifth.

11 events in 2010. That included a second-place finish here a year ago, when he lost a four-hole playoff to Lee Westwood in his best showing yet on the tour. He is trying to become the seventh first-time winner on tour this year and the first player to win his first title in Memphis since Dicky Pride in 1994. But Karlsson is no stranger to closing out tournaments. He has won 11 times on the European Tour and has yet shoot over par

another round like this in tomorrow to get a chance to catch him.” Of course, Goosen made his remarks before Karlsson’s final two holes. Karlsson was leading by four until he bogeyed No. 17 after sticking his approach into a greenside bunker. He blasted out to 14 feet and just missed the par putt. Frazar finished up on 18 with his big birdie putt, and Karlsson’s second shot on the final hole landed well right of the

AP PHOTO

Robert Karlsson, right, talks with playing partner Keegan Bradley before teeing off on the third hole on Saturday in Memphis, Tenn.

green. With water on the other side, Karlsson’s chip bounced once and stopped in the longer grass

NFL

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

short of the green. Trying to save par, he came up 2 feet short and settled for a bogey that trimmed his lead to a mere stroke.

SWIMMING

Evans breaks 2 Master’s world marks Now 39, the four-time Olympic champion sets records in the 400 and 800 freestyles. AP PHOTO

West Virginia athletic director Oliver Luck, left, and head football coach Dana Holgorsen answer questions Friday.

The Associated Press

He was to be just offensive coordinator this season, but now will also be head coach. By JOHN RABY AP Sports Writer

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — Last December, Oliver Luck brimmed with confidence that offensive coordinator Dana Holgorsen, a night owl, and lameduck coach Bill Stewart, an early riser and family man, could work together in a unique arrangement for the 2011 season. Unhappy about the Mountaineers’ lack of production, West Virginia’s athletic director hired Holgorsen away from Oklahoma State, where his offense had put up ridiculous numbers. Holgorsen would run West Virginia’s offense while Stewart would coach the team one final season before slipping into an administrative job. Six months later, the arrangement had fallen apart, and now Holgorsen, two weeks shy of his 40th birthday, is a college head coach for the first time. “At the time, I thought it made a lot of sense,” Luck said Friday night. “I thought it was good management practice. With hindsight, folks could certainly disagree.” Stewart resigned Friday during a meeting with Luck, clearing the way for Holgorsen’s promotion and capping a tumultuous two weeks in which both Holgorsen and Stewart made headlines for the wrong reasons. An intoxicated Holgorsen was escorted out of a casino last month, although no charges were filed. More recently, a reporter said Stewart had approached him shortly after Hol-

gorsen’s hiring to “dig up” dirt on his eventual successor. During a news conference in Morgantown, both Holgorsen and Luck tried to sidestep questions about the issues that had gotten the university plenty of media attention. Luck said the recent developments had to be addressed. “I think it was a combination of things,” Luck said. “The program ... is more important than any individual, is more important than any coach, any player, and clearly, this was becoming a distraction for our football program. “It was the right thing to do.” Holgorsen will carry dual duties as offensive coordinator and head coach in the upcoming season and will hire an offensive coordinator down the road. “This is the chance of a lifetime. I understand that,” Holgorsen said. He said he had yet to talk to his players but said nothing has changed as far as focus goes. “Kids are resilient,” Holgorsen said. “Change is tough, but it’s least tough on kids. The one thing that will be preached every day is unity.” Growing up in Mount Pleasant, Iowa, Holgorsen recalled watching the teams of WVU Hall of Fame coach Don Nehlen, who led the Mountaineers to two undefeated regular seasons and retired after the 2000 season. “He set the standard for what it’s like here, both on and off the field,” Holgorsen said. “And I look forward to living up to those standards as well. ... I understand what the expectations are to wear the blue and gold, you know, and those expectations both on and off the field are something I look forward to living up to.”

AP PHOTO

Some communities, like Latrobe, where the Pittsburgh Steelers annually hold preseason practice, may lose the opportunity to host NFL training camps if the lockout drags on.

Camp sites sweating lockout Communities where training camps are held may miss out this year due to work stoppage. By DAVE CAMPBELL AP Sports Writer

MINNEAPOLIS — Jake’s Stadium Pizza has been a fast-food fixture on the Minnesota State University campus for nearly four decades. This summer, they’re cooking that thin crust with crossed fingers in Mankato, Minn. The NFL lockout, now headed toward its fourth month, is threatening a revenue-driving, profile-raising event for this small, family-owned business: Vikings training camp. “We’re hoping they get it done, because it’s not just us. It’s the whole state that will suffer,” said Wally Boyer, the owner of the joint where players from Jim Marshall to John Randle have recuperated after many a draining workout. Fans, too, have long made that familiar walk down Stadium Road after watching practice to fill up and cool off. If the work stoppage lingers long enough to keep teams from holding traditional training camps, the hit would be felt far beyond Minnesota, and it wouldn’t just be about losing money. In upstate New York, the Jets have trained on the SUNY Cortland campus the last two years. “Just their presence alone has stimulated people. It’s just good

for the mental health of the community,” said Cortland State football coach Dan MacNeill. “For our people, it’s been fun. It has impacted the football program. We don’t have normal use of our facilities. But an NFL franchise, no matter where you go, there’s a heck of a following.” Seventeen of the 32 NFL teams last year held training camp at their year-round facilities, reflecting a trend toward cost-and-time efficiency in an era in which chemistry is built and conditioning established well before the two-a-day grind in August. But the other 15 teams still take their show on the road, many of them to slower-paced cities and small colleges where their presence is a big deal — and a big financial boon. Some people make a summer vacation out of watching their favorite team run drills and scrimmages. Day-trippers at least stop for a bite to eat on the way out of town. The Cardinals have held camp at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff since 1988, and the school’s Rural Policy Institute estimated it brought $7 million to the local economy last year, with an overall impact of $10 million. There were over 38,000 visitors, 81 percent of those from out of town, along with 122 jobs created by the camp. In southern Minnesota, a 90minute drive from the Twin Cities, Vikings training camp makes a $5 million impact on

TENNIS

Venus readies for Eastbourne tourney after injury layoff The Associated Press

EASTBOURNE, England — Fit again after the toughest injury layoff of her career, Venus Williams said Saturday that a sixth Wimbledon title is within her reach despite more than four months off the tour. Williams, 30, will play her first match since January at the Eastbourne International grass-court tournament next week after recovering from a hip injury.

She will be joined at the Wimbledon warmup by younger sister Serena, who hasn’t played in nearly a year since winning a fourth singles title at the All England Club. “In terms of winning these tournaments, that’s what we are here for,” Venus said. “We’re not here for results, so we are going to do our best to take home two titles on this road. “Whether it can happen ... remains to be seen. But that’s what we aim for every time we hit the

court.” Venus will play Andrea Petkovic of Germany in the first round at Eastbourne. Petkovic was her opponent when she had to retire because of the injury from a thirdround match at the Australian Open. Serena Williams has been sidelined because of foot surgery and blood clots in her lung. She returned to practice in April and will open her Eastbourne campaign against Tsvetana Pironkova of Bul-

garia. Many players would be happy to simply ease back into competitive action, but that attitude isn’t in the Williams sisters’ psyche. It says a lot about the state of women’s tennis that the sisters will be considered contenders for the Wimbledon title should they emerge unscathed from Eastbourne. Caroline Wozniacki of Denmark is ranked No. 1 but hasn’t won a Grand Slam title.

the region, said Anna Thill, president of the Greater Mankato Convention and Visitors Bureau. Last year, it drew 60,000 visitors from at least 30 states, and a few foreign countries. The university charges $7 for parking near the practice fields, but that’s only part of the story. The school also receives tremendous exposure. “They do bring people here, and young people are introduced to the campus. There’s certainly a marketing value to the Vikings being here that is difficult to determine,” said Michael Cooper, the university’s media relations director. Whether it’s Westminster, Md., Anderson, Ind., or Spartanburg, S.C., the reflected glamour of having an NFL team in town for a few weeks can go a long way. “You can’t put a price on it, to be honest. Newspaper articles go out every day that have Georgetown, Ky., as the dateline. It puts the community on the map,” said John Simpson, executive director of the Georgetown/Scott County Tourism Commission. The Bengals train at Georgetown College, about 100 miles south of Cincinnati. The Vikings’ presence was enough to get Jake’s Stadium Pizza a mention in Sports Illustrated once. Boyer said his business spikes about 20 percent during camp. “It’s a lot of frosting on the cake,” he said.

BLUE RIDGE TRAIL GOLF CLUB

JUNIOR LEAGUE

Starting Thursday June 16th, 2011. Students Must Be Between 10-18 Years Old. Students Must Have Their Own Clubs.

Tee off between 7:00 AM - 8:15 AM. The league will be playing the Trail Course, and the fee is only $10.00 for 9-holes! Please call to sign up as soon as possible. The field is limited to the first 36 students. After their round, golf lessons by PGA Professional, Brian Llewellyn will be offered. Lessons available from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM. The rate is $20.00 per student which is optional.

Contact Tony Barletta 868.4653

286762

Holgorsen takes over reins at West Virginia

FULLERTON, Calif. — Janet Evans hasn’t lost her touch for breaking world records, setting new Master’s marks in the 35-39 age group 15 years after her last competitive race. The four-time Olympic gold medalist swam the 400-meter freestyle in 4 minutes, 23.82 seconds Saturday at the Janet Evans Invitational and four hours later she shattered the 800-freestyle record with a time of 8:59.06. “I think it really shows me Evans where my training is and it’s right about where I thought it was,” Evans said. The 39-year-old mother of two returned to the pool in October in an attempt to qualify for the 2012 London Olympics. The 400 Saturday was her first competitive race since the 1996 Atlanta Games, where she failed to qualify for the 400 freestyle and finished sixth in the 800 freestyle. “It was really good. I wanted to go 4:30 so I was really happy,” she said after the 400. Evans has been training under longtime coach Mark Schubert. “I thought well, we’ll do it for three months and we’ll see how it’s going,” Schubert said. “She just always said, ’Just be honest with me, if you don’t think I can do this tell me and I’ll stop.’ “Her practices just got better and better. She was surprising me all the time in practice and surprising herself.” Evans tore through the water Saturday with the same voracious strokes that made her famous more than 20 years ago. She was 17 when she set the world record in the 400 freestyle in winning one of three gold medals at the 1988 Seoul Games, and later set world marks in the 800 and 1,500 freestyle. “I was pleased with my time,” said Evans, who swam solo in the 800. “I know there’s some things I need to work on and I know exactly what they are, so I think it’s good.”


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OUTDOORS Fishing, hiking and rafting programs help veterans cope with physical and emotional wounds

Nature’s healing power By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

KIDDER TWP. – On his back, right shoulder and ankle, Juan Rivera carries reminders of the year he served in Iraq. Rivera, 32, suffered injuries in those places while he was deployed to Iraq from 2004 to 2005. But, even INFO ON P R O G R A M S worse than the wounds, For more inhe lost severformation on al close Hunts for Healfriends in ing or the Iraq, includWounded Waring Spc. rior program, visit Segun Akinwww.huntstade, whose forhealing.org name is enand www.woundedwarriorpro- graved on a bracelet that ject.org. Rivera wears on his wrist. For five days last week, Rivera was able to put behind the pain of his injuries and the haunting reminders of the friends he lost. He did it by taking his family to Francis Walter Dam to participate in a Wounded Warriors outing. Wounded Warriors is a rehabilitative program that helps soldiers wounded in Afghanistan and Iraq to recover and transition back into civilian life. Last week’s event was hosted by Hunts for Healing and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and Rivera and his family were kept busy with a variety of outdoors activities, including fishing, geocaching, whitewater rafting and hiking. “You just focus on so many other things when you’re out here,” said Rivera, who lives in Staten Island, N.Y. “We stay busy constantly, but we also have plenty of time to just relax in such a quiet place. That’s what I really like.” Several mentors help out with each Wounded Warrior outing, and most are veterans themselves. Even though they didn’t sustain physical injuries when they served, the men-

TOM VENESKY OUTDOORS

Feeding bears spells trouble for all involved

F

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Veteran Juan Rivera of Staten Island, N.Y., holds a photo of himself and his family whitewater rafting down the Lehigh River earlier in the day during a Hunts for Healing Foundation camp for veterans and their families at Francis E. Walter Dam.

tors also find “healing” simply by helping out other veterans. “Working with these guys is just as healing for me as it is for them,” said Mike Dreisch, a Gulf War veteran who also served in Somalia. “You get a sense of family when you’re doing this.” Much of that family atmosphere is made possible by Mindy Piccotti, director of Hunts for Healing. Piccotti owns Ringneck Ridge Hunting Preserve in Laceyville and uses the facility to host eight to 10 Wounded Warrior outings each year. Piccotti is passionate about her Hunts for Healing program and the Wounded Warrior outings, partly because she is a veteran herself, having

PERHAPS NOTHING PUTS an end to a long winter and a rainy spring than a warm, summer day spent catching largemouth bass on a farm pond or smallmouths in the Susquehanna River. Anglers will have the opportunity to do

served as an Army medic during Vietnam. Piccotti was 18 years old at the time and she found herself treating wounded soldiers with serious, life-threatening injuries. Many times, Piccotti said, the soldiers would ask her if they would be all right. All too often she couldn’t give them an answer. But with Hunts for Healing and the Wounded Warrior programs, Piccotti can do something to create a positive outcome for those who served. “I have answers for them now,” she said. “We’re all getting healed.” Whether it’s through a pheasant hunt at Ringneck Ridge or spending a week

just that when bass season for all inland lakes, ponds and rivers opens on Saturday. . Soon after, numerous bass tournaments will kick off across Luzerne County and the northeast region. “Just as the opening day of trout marks

outdoors at the Francis Walter Dam, Piccotti said nature provides the ultimate remedy for the wounded soldiers. “They’re coming back and they’re connecting out here,” she said. “If you get out there in the morning and just listen to the woods wake up, you’ll get something out of it. You’ll heal.” Larry White, who helps as a mentor and is a veteran of Desert Storm and Iraqi Freedom, said last week’s Wounded Warrior outing was unique because the activities were designed to include entire families. “When they sustain an injury over there, it affects the entire family unit,” White said. “These activities are

the start of the fishing season, the first day of bass starts the summer fishing season,” said John Arway, executive director of the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission. “This spring was pretty wet and cold and we saw license

designed to embrace the family spirit and strengthen it. “That’s a special person that has come back a hero. We want to give them a place where they can heal and bond.” Rivera did just that. He said he and his children were able to fish for the first time and, despite his injuries, he even went on a bike ride with his kids. “We learned how to fish and the biking was a challenge but it was fun,” Rivera said. “Being here is just so relaxing and quiet and everyone has been so supportive of myself and my family. It really gives you a positive outlook on things.”

sales fall. But we’ve got a long summer ahead of us and plenty of excellent fishing available all around the state. I think anglers will be excited for the warm weather and will be out in large numbers.”

OUTDOORS NOTES SHAD POPULATIONS DOWN IN PA.: The Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission is seeking public comment on the addition of Susquehanna River American shad to the state Wildlife Action Plan, the document that prescribes conservation measures for species and their critical habitat before they become rarer and more costly to protect and restore. “Populations of American shad have been considerably reduced throughout the East Coast, including Pennsylvania, primarily as a result of dams which have impeded movement of fish to spawning areas,” said Dave Day, PFBC conservation coordinator. “Adding the species to the state Wildlife Action Plan would highlight the importance of this species and would provide the commission with more flexibility to fund, or receive funding for, projects that benefit the species within the drainage of the Susquehanna River.” Public comments will be accepted online or in writing through Wednesday, July 6. Comments can be submitted online at: http://fishandboat.com/promo/form/ swg_amend.htm. Written comments must be postmarked no later than July 6. Written comments must be postmarked no later than July 6 and should be sent to: American Shad/WAP/Public Comments, c/o Dave Day, Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission, P.O. Box 67000, Harrisburg, Pa. 17106-7000. DEADLINE SET FOR RUFFED GROUSE DRAWING: The

drawing for the Ruffed Grouse Society’s (RGS) National Fundraiser Drawing is closing in and participants have only until June 30 to purchase one of the remaining one thousand tickets to be sold. Purchasers will have an opportunity to win one of three high-end shotguns, with the first prize a one-of-a-kind Remington Model 1100 F-Grade 28 Gauge (skeet choke) semi-automatic shotgun with exhibition-grade wood with a fitted steel butt-plate on the stock and an inlaid skeleton cap on the pistol grip. Other guns include a Caesar Guerini RGS 50th Commemorative APEX grade over and under 28-gauge and a Kimber Valier Grade II; 20 gauge side by side with 28-inch barrels. Tickets for the drawing are $100 and are available at all RGS events or by calling 888-564-6747 or e-mail at: rgs@ruffedgrousesociety.org . The drawing will be held June 30 at RGS Headquarters in Coraopolis, Pa. Proceeds from this raffle will be used to restore and protect grouse and woodcock habitat. VACATIONERS TURN OUT FOR FISH-FOR-FREE DAY: Hundreds of vacationers from across the state participated in half a dozen special fishing events held on Memorial Day, the first of two statewide Fish-For-Free Days this year hosted by the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission. “This year we decided to try something different and hold the Fish-For-Free events on holidays,” said PFBC Executive Director John Arway. “We know that many families and

their friends spend these holidays at parks and waterways. Our events made it easy for adults and kids who had never fished before to learn the basics of the sport at their favorite vacation spots.” Fish-for-Free Days allow anyone (resident or non-resident) to legally fish. No fishing license is required to fish on these days. All other fishing regulations apply. The second Fishfor-Free Day is Labor Day, Sept. 5. The PFBC’s staff held fishing programs, conducted demonstrations and distributed fishing and boating information at six popular waterways, including Lake Wallenpaupack. The events were held in conjunction with Cabela’s “Wanna Go Fishing for Millions?” national contest. As part of the contest, fish were tagged in eight waters. Every tag carries a prize. The Cabela’s contest started May 14 and runs through July 14. Anglers can register through the PFBC website at www.fishandboat.com/fishformillions.htm for a chance at landing the $2.2 million prize. So far, anglers have landed nearly a dozen prize-winning fish from state waters. And with the popular bass season beginning June18, the PFBC expects more contest fish to be caught. More information on where to find bass and how to catch them is available on the PFBC website at: http://fishandboat.com/bass.htm. Among the tools anglers can use are interactive maps, which allow users to search for waters by name or county.

orget the written warning. That’s the first step that a Pennsylvania Game Commission Wildlife Conservation Officer is supposed to take when they encounter someone intentionally feeding bears. Based on what happened last week at Merli-Sarnoski Park in Lackawanna County, I think it’s time that WCOs forgo the written warning and skip right to issuing citations, which carry a $100 to $200 fine. Here’s what happened. A few weeks ago the PGC Northeast Regional Office was made aware of a bear visiting the park’s beach and picnic areas. Those visiting the park got a kick out of seeing a bear and decided to feed it. At first the bear would approach to within yards of people to accept a handout. As the easy meals became more frequent, the once-wild bear began to approach within feet and even inches. Anglers at the park tossed the bear bluegills and perch. There are pictures of a young man lying on the ground within inches of the bear and another with the bruin on top of a picnic table while people sat on the benches. It was a hoot. And it was also deadly … for the bear. A WCO recently went to the park and found the bear in the picnic area after it was closed. Hoping to chase the bear away once and for all, the WCO fired non-lethal rubber buckshot at the bruin, forcing the animal to flee into the woods. But it came back, and some park-goers ignored warnings and continued to feed the bear. They basically fed it to death. Considering the bear was now habituated to eating out of people’s hands, the PGC was left with no choice but to dispatch it. The risk was too great. “I don’t think people realize how enormously powerful these animals are,” said Tim Conway, the PGC’s information and education supervisor for the northeast region. “Even getting swatted by a bear can cause a tremendous amount of damage to a person.” That includes the 75-pound male that used to roam the picnic area at MerliSarnoski Park. Conway said putting a bear down is a last resort, and it’s something that WCOs don’t like to do. But when people continue to feed one, they are unknowingly sealing the bear’s fate. A bruin that has grown accustomed to being fed by people usually can’t be relocated to another area because it will just seek out more handouts from more people. It’s a pattern of behavior that can’t continue. “Eventually what would happen is the bear could possibly turn on somebody,” Conway said. “We just can’t take that chance.” Perhaps the saddest thing of all is the entire situation could’ve been avoided by simply resisting the temptation to feed a bear. It’s that simple. Unfortunately, the feeding of bears isn’t limited to the incident at MerliSarnoski Park. Conway said there are bear complaints and issues being generated from all over the region. “We are getting bombarded with bear problems and it’s probably one of the worst years I’ve ever seen,” he said. “Our WCOs are running ragged responding to them all.” And that means the potential for a bear-feeding situation to escalate into a bear-human conflict is very real. “We have been steadfast in our message, year after year, that feeding wildlife, especially black bears, will only end in trouble,” said Steve Schweitzer, the PGC’s Northeast Region Office director. Now, maybe it’s time that such incidents end in fines. Tom Venesky covers the outdoors for The Times Leader. Reach him at tvenesky@timesleader.com


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AT PLAY

Upper 90 Revolution U17B team places second

Mohawk to play baseball at Iona

AT P L AY P O L I C Y

The Times Leader will accept photos, standings and stories from readers about youth and adult recreation activities. We’re also encouraging anyone in a league – darts, pool, Frisbee, etc. – to submit standings and results to us. E-mailed photos should be sent in a jpeg format. Those that are not in a jpeg format might not be published. All submitted items should have contact information as well Meyers baseball player John Nargoski recently signed a to ensure publication. letter of intent to continue his academic and athletics caItems will not be accepted reer at Iona College. A three-year letter winner and twoover the telephone. They time all-conference selection, Nargoski helped guide the may be e-mailed to Mohawks to a District 2 Class 2A and the PIAA Eastern tlsports@timesleader.com The Upper 90 Revolution U17B team recently participated in the UK Elite College Show- quarterfinals in 2010 and the District 2 quarterfinals this with “At Play” in the subject, case at Bloomsburg University. The team placed second in the teal division with a record year. Pictured, seated, from left: Megan Nargoski, mother; faxed to 831-7319, dropped of 1-1-1. The team is pictured. Front row: Josh Tarnalicki and Aaron Smith. Back row: Roque John Nargoski and John Nargoski, father. Standing: Mioff at the Times Leader or Martinez, Noah Beltrami, John Kilduff, Bill Trowbridge, Joey Tona, Tom Sebia, Luke Height, chael Slusark, Assistant Coach; Michael Elias, Vice Princimailed to Times Leader, c/o Alex van Hoekelen, David Oram, Eric Fino and Rob Havard, Director of Coaching for the pal; Diane McFarlane, Guidance Counselor; Matt Skrepenak, Sports, 15 N. Main St., Upper 90 Soccer Training Academy. Head Coach; and Michael Namey, Athletics Director. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250.

Dallas swimmer, diver lauded

Rick Evans, a representative from the Wyoming Valley Chapter of PIAA Swimming Officials, recently presented that group’s 2010-11 awards to Dallas High School swim and diving team members Chris Tamanini and Sarah Zerfoss. Tamanini was awarded the Donna Blaum Award for "Outstanding Male Swimmer of the Year." Zerfoss was selected as the "Outstanding Female Diver." Pictured, from left: Romayne Mosier, Dallas High School Head Swim Coach; Chris Tamanini; Rick Evans; Sarah Zerfoss; Arie VanKuyk, Dallas High School Diving Coach; and Nancy Roberts, Dallas High School Athletic Director

Holy Redeemer swimmer saluted Dallas girl stars in fencing event

Julie Ann Mahle, a sophomore member of the girls swimming and diving team from Holy Redeemer High School, was recently honored. Members of the Wyoming Valley Chapter of the PIAA Swimming Officials voted Mahle as the Class 2A Female Swimmer of the Year and she was presented a plaque for her achievements this past season. The award is given in memory of Alex Pawlenok and Bob Turnbaugh and was presented to Mahle during the Holy Redeemer sports awards banquet in May. Pictured, from left: Anita Sirak, Principal of Holy Redeemer High School; Bob Mahle, father: Julie Ann Mahle; Robert McGinley, grandfather; and Mara Pawlenok and Beth Mangan, coaches of the Holy Redeemer girls swimming team.

Grave Diggers 12U travel baseball team captures tournament The Northeast Grave Diggers 12U travel baseball team won the ECTB Homerun Sizzler Tournament. The win qualified the team for the ECTB National Championship Series Tournament. The team is sponsored by the Metcalfe and Shaver Funeral Home, of Wyoming. Team members, first row, from left: Batboy Seth Kopcza, Steven Shamnoski (Jenkins Twp), Hunter Maxwell (Forty Fort), Leroy Fettig (Plains Twp), Tim Cavanaugh (Plains Twp) and Kyle Ofier (Pittston Twp) Second row: Coach Joe Delucca, Chase Nowak (Miners Mills), Josh Kopcza (Wyoming), David McCue (Kingston), Joe Delucca (Pittston Twp), Cole Keating (Wyoming), Coach Tony Nowak, Derek Distasio (Mt Top) and Coach Jerry Keating.

Re-United soccer team goes 3-0 at Whitewater Cup Classic Re-United went 3-0 at the Memorial Day Whitewater Cup Classic. Pictured are the members of the team. From left, first row: Morgan “Migs” Mancini and Morgan “Kazi” Maharty, Second row: Kasey “KB” Barry, Morgan “Squirrel” Kile, Emily Sutton, Emily Orrson, Autumn Atkinson and Maury “Cro’’ Cronauer. Third row: Dallas Kendra, Meghen “Henny” Waite, Megan “Wheelz” White, Shoshana “Sho Time” Mahoney, Sam “Nora” Acacio, and Nora Fazzi. The soccer team was coached by Russ Kile.

Luby Kiriakidi, a freshman from Dallas High School, recently participated in the U.S. High School Fencing Championships in Cleveland. She finished second in the Women’s Foil competition. Luby is a member of the Wilkes Fencing Club at ‘Arts YOUniverse’ in Wilkes-Barre, where she is coached by her father, Semion Kiriakidi. For information about the Wilkes Fencing Club, visit www.wilkesfencingclub.com.

Plymouth Shawnee Indians feted

The Plymouth Shawnee Indians C Team coaches held an end-of-the-season party. Each girl was presented with a trophy, medal and picture of the squad. The C team consisted of, top row, from left: Alyssia Bevan, Co-Captain; Emily Frace, Captain; Hailey Williams, Co-Captain; and Skylar Ellard, Co-Captain. Bottom row: Alexandria Stasukinas, Kendra Jollimore, Emily Bevan, Kassidy Ellard and Mary Pashinski. Absent from photo was Aryonna Wainwright. Coaches for the 2010 season were Nichole Powell, Cherie Stone and Amanda Stone.

Berwick receiver to play at ESU

Sean Ridall, who played wide receiver for the Berwick football team, will continue his education and football career at East Stroudsburg University. Pictured, from left: Gary Campbell, head coach; Jesse Ridall, father; Sean Ridall; and Jackie Ridall, mother.


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How well do you know the U.S. Open? FRONT NINE (5 points each) 1. Who is the only player to win the U.S. Junior Amateur, the U.S. Amateur and the U.S. Open? a.) Jack Nicklaus b.) Johnny Miller c.) Tiger Woods 2. Who was the last player to go through sectional qualifying and win the U.S. Open? a.) Lucas Glover b.) Michael Campbell c.) Steve Jones 3. Which player is missing the U.S. Open to complete the Grand Slam? a.) Walter Hagen b.) Sam Snead c.) Raymond Floyd 4. Who won the U.S. Open the last time the final round was 36 holes? a.) Ken Venturi b.) Tony Jacklin c.) Billy Casper 5. Who has been runner-up the most times at the U.S. Open? a.) Arnold Palmer b.) Phil Mickelson c.) Greg Norman 6. This player won the U.S. Open for his only PGA Tour victory that decade. a.) Jack Fleck b.) Lou Graham c.) Steve Jones 7. Who was the most recent player to shoot 63 in the U.S. Open? a.) Johnny Miller b.) Thomas Bjorn c.) Vijay Singh 8. Name the youngest winner of the U.S. Open? a.) John McDermott b.) Bobby Jones c.) Tiger Woods 9. Who finished runner-up to Ernie Els the last time the U.S. Open was held at Congressional? a.) Tom Lehman b.) Colin Montgomerie c.) Jeff Maggert

BACK NINE (10 points each) 10. Which major have Americans won the fewest times over the last 10 years? a.) Masters b.) U.S. Open c.) PGA Championship 11. The first U.S. Open at Newport Country Club was postponed one month to October for what reason? a.) The Harvard-Yale football game. b.) A turf disease killed all the greens on the back nine. c.) The America’s Cup 12. Who was the only player to break par all four rounds without winning the U.S. Open? a.) Curtis Strange b.) Ernie Els c.) Steve Elkington 13. Who was the last U.S. Open champion who went through local and sectional qualifying? a.) Johnny Goodman b.) Ben Hogan c.) Orville Moody 14. Who was the last player to win the U.S. Open in his first attempt? a.) Francis Ouimet b.) Tony Manero c.) Ernie Els 15. Name the oldest U.S. Open champion. a.) Raymond Floyd b.) Hale Irwin c.) Tom Kite 16. Which player captured the final leg of the Grand Slam by winning the U.S. Open? a.) Gary Player b.) Ben Hogan c.) Jack Nicklaus 17. Who has lost in a U.S. Open playoff a record three times? a.) Chris Dimarco b.) Phil Mickelson c.) Arnold Palmer 18. Who was the last player not to break par in any round and still win the U.S. Open? a.) Angel Cabrera b.) Geoff Ogilvy c.) Lee Janzen

19th hole (15-point bonus) In the last 100 years, only one player has won the U.S. Open twice on the same course. Name him: a.) Walter Hagen b.) Ralph Guldahl c.) Jack Nicklaus

Parity one major factor

Tour play hasn’t been so wide open since ’90s By DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer

Four players have taken their turns at No. 1, the highest number between U.S. Opens in the 25-year history of the world ranking. Four players won their first major in the last 12 months. Four others captured their first World Golf Championship. And it’s largely because of a guy who’s not even playing. The presence Tiger Woods brings to golf is felt even more strongly in his absence. Woods will not be at Congressional, missing the U.S. Open for the first time in 17 years because of lingering injuries to his left leg. Some could argue he has been missing for the last year as he has tried to mend his personal life, his health and his golf swing. He has gone 18 months without winning, paving the way for a new generation of stars to emerge. And they have. Graeme McDowell started it off by winning the U.S. Open at Pebble Beach, and he peeled back a massive layer of Woods’ mystique at the end of the year by overcoming a four-shot deficit in the final round and beating him in a playoff at the Chevron World Challenge. Louis Oosthuizen (British Open), Martin Kaymer (PGA Championship) and Charl Schwartzel (Masters) — all of them in their 20s — won the next three majors. Lee Westwood ended Woods’ five-year stay atop the world ranking, and Kaymer and Luke Donald since have gone to No. 1 in the world during the last four months. None of that seemed possible when Woods was on top of his game, dominating to such a degree that he won nearly 30 percent of his tournaments and made it look as though no one else had a chance. Are players getting better? Or were they always this good and no one noticed as long as Woods was winning so often? Maybe it takes Woods being gone to realize just how good he was. “Some of the younger players came along when Tiger was on a tear, and they were in his shadow,” Mark O’Meara said. “He was bigger than life. But now that Tiger is somewhat removed from the game, they’ve been able to shine.” With the absence of Woods — and to a lesser extent, Phil Mickelson, who has only one win in the last year — the new landscape in golf features parity not seen in some 20 years. When the 111th edition of the U.S. Open begins outside the nation’s capital in Bethesda, Md., no one will stand out as a clear favorite. “Tiger has been the dominant player in this generation, really since the mid-’90s,” Stewart Cink said. “Eventually, he won’t be anymore. Maybe that’s already happening — we don’t know. He won so many tournaments, maybe there were just less available to win.” That sounds like Colin Montgomerie’s theory from years ago on why it was so hard to win majors. Montgomerie reasoned that Woods was winning two a year, leaving only two majors for everyone else.

T H E 111 T H U . S . O P E N G O L F C H A M P I O N S H I P • J U N E 1 6 - 1 9 HOLE PAR YDS

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 OUT IN TOT

4 402 3 233 4 466 4 470 4 413 5 555 3 173 4 354 5 636 3 218 4 494 4 471 3 193 4 467 4 490 5 579 4 437 4 523 36 3,702 35 3,872 71 7,574

2 1

3 4

5

%CRKVCN UKVG 75 1RGP for the

Clubhouse

Congressional Country Club

9 8 6

The U.S. Open championship takes place at the Congressional Country Club Blue Course, which also played host to the 1964 and 1997 championships. Northern Ireland’s Graeme McDowell, the first European to win the U.S. Open in 40 years, looks to defend his crown.

Television coverage

10 13 11 12 18 15 16

14

17

(all times EDT)

First- and second-rounds June 16-17, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., ESPN. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., NBC Sports. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. ESPN

FA C T S A N D FIGURES

Bethesda, Md. (Blue Course)

7

Third-round June 18, 2 p.m. to 8 p.m., NBC Sports Final-round June 19, 1:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., NBC Sports

SOURCE: USGA

AP

“Some of the younger players came along when Tiger was on a tear, and they were in his shadow. He was bigger than life. But (with) Tiger somewhat removed from the game, they’ve been able to shine.”

Now, they’re all up for grabs. Ten players have won the last 10 majors. Only two of those players, Mickelson and Angel Cabrera, had won before. The last time Woods had to skip a major, because of season-ending knee surgery in 2008, there was debate whether an asterisk would be placed next to the winner’s name because Woods wasn’t in the field. There will be no talk of an asterisk at Congressional. Even if Woods were around, this U.S. Open lives up to its name — open. “Anybody can win,” Davis Love III said. “You can’t say it’s going to be either Tiger or Phil or (Jim) Furyk or Luke Donald. It’s wide open. It’s like when Greg Norman was the favorite and everybody looked to him. I don’t know if you can pick a favorite for the U.S. Open.” The U.S. Open is known as the toughest test in golf, and the challenges come from all over. The fairways are narrow, the rough tends to be thick, the greens as firm as any all year. Par tends to be a good score at the U.S. Open, and par can sometimes feel like a birdie. McDowell won at Pebble Beach last year at even-par 284. Four of the last six U.S. Opens have been won at even par or worse. “I know I’m going to have to prepare myself for the feeling that I am playing badly, even when I’m not,” former U.S. Open champion Geoff Ogilvy said. “I have to convince myself that par golf — or even 1 or 2 over — is good. It’s just so different from any other week on tour.”

ranking. Donald has finished in the top 10 in his last 10 tournaments worldwide, and his chipping and putting would seem to be a good fit for the U.S. Open. Westwood has the most experience contending in a major, even though he hasn’t won yet. It was only Mark O’Meara three years ago when he stood PGA Tour player over a 15-foot birdie putt on the last hole at Torrey Pines to get into a playoff, only to leave it Even the golf course is differshort. ent from the last U.S. Open at He also missed a par putt that Congressional in 1997, won by kept him out of a playoff at TurnErnie Els. berry, and he lost a 54-hole lead The closing hole was a par 3, which proved to be anticlimactic. to Mickelson at the Masters. American golf is not as bad as The championship effectively it might seem at the moment. was decided on the 17th, when Montgomerie stood forever over Finishing off majors is a different story. A year ago, Dustin Johnson a 5-foot par putt before missing had a three-shot lead going into it, and Tom Lehman in the last the last round and shot 82, the group pulled a 7-iron into the highest score in the U.S. Open by water. Rees Jones again has tweaked the course, and the 17th a 54-hole leader in nearly 100 years. Nick Watney had a threehole from 1997 is now the 523shot lead at the PGA Championyard 18th hole. ship last year and shot 80. The old No. 18 has been That’s not exclusive to Amerflipped around, and now is a icans, though. Rory McIlroy of daunting par-3 10th. Northern Ireland had a four-shot Players champion K.J. Choi, lead going into the final round at Anthony Kim and Woods have the Masters this year, and the won at Congressional in the 22-year-old closed with an 80. three years it hosted the AT&T “I don’t know how Dustin and National. That might not mean Nick were feeling whenever they anything with the course set up were going into the last round as a major. leading, but it’s a new experiThe best bet might be someence,” McIlroy said. “They’re one from outside the United majors, and you want to try and States. get your first one out of the way For one thing, out of all the and kick on.” majors, Americans have had the McIlroy’s mistake eventually least success in their national allowed Schwartzel to win. Johnopen during the last 10 years — son’s blunders gave way to just four wins, with two of those McDowell, while Watney’s blowby Woods. International players up in the PGA Championship have won the last four majors, and another victory would mark ultimately set the stage for the longest drought in the majors Kaymer to win in a playoff over Bubba Watson (only after Johnfor an American since the Masson was penalized for a bunker ters began in 1934. he didn’t know he was in). All of And perhaps even more troublesome for American players — them are young, all were new to major championship experience. they have been shut out of the Such is the way golf is going at top three in the Masters, British the moment, especially with Open and U.S. Open dating to Woods not much of a factor on last year. The headliners, if there is such the golf course — and not a factor at all as long as he’s at a thing these days, would start home trying to heal himself. with the guys at the top of the

BETHESDA, Md. (AP) — Facts and figures for the 111th U.S. Open golf championship: Dates: June 16-19. Site: Congressional Country Club (Blue Course). The course: Devereux Emmet designed the original course, which opened in 1924. The club was used for training by the Office of Strategic Services during World War II. After the war, the club hired Robert Trent Jones to revamp the course and make it worthy of a U.S. Open. His son, Rees Jones, has since remodeled the course. It has hosted the U.S. Open in 1964, 1997 and 2011, along with the 1976 PGA Championship. The PGA Tour has held 10 tournaments at Congressional — the Kemper Open, Booz Allen Classic and AT&T National. Length: 7,574 yards. Par: 36-35—71. Format: 72 holes of stroke play. Cut: Top 60 and ties, and anyone within 10 strokes of the lead after 36 holes. Playoff, if necessary: 18 holes of stroke play on June 20. Field: 156 players. Purse: TBA ($7.5 million in 2010). Winner’s share: TBA ($1.35 million in 2010) Defending champion: Graeme McDowell. Last year: Graeme McDowell of Northern Ireland became the first European in 40 years to win the U.S. Open. He made only one birdie in a final round of 3-over 74 for a one-shot victory over Gregory Havret. Dustin Johnson began the final round with a three-shot lead, only to make triple bogey on the second hole on his way to an 82, opening the way for Ernie Els, Phil Mickelson and Tiger Woods to take advantage. Woods bogeyed five of his opening 10 holes. Els and Mickelson stayed in the game through the back nine. No one could catch McDowell, who finished at even-par 284. Last time at Congressional: Ernie Els won his second U.S. Open by closing with a 1-under 69. He hit 5-iron into the dangerous 17th for par, then made a 5-foot par putt on the 18th. Tom Lehman hit into the water on the 17th, while Colin Montgomerie missed a par putt on the 17th to miss another chance in a major. U.S. Open champions at Congressional: Ken Venturi (1964), Ernie Els (1997). Tiger Tales: Tiger Woods will not play the U.S. Open (leg injuries) for the first time since 1994. Noteworthy: Americans have not finished among the top three in three of the last four majors. Key statistic: Ten players have won the last 10 majors.

U. S. O P E N H I STO RY BETHESDA, Md. (AP) — A look at some of the anniversaries of this year’s 111th U.S. Open, to be played June 16-19 at Congressional: 100 years ago (1911): John McDermott became the first American-born player to win a major, and at 19, he remains the youngest player to ever win the U.S. Open. One year after losing to Alex Smith in a playoff, McDermott nearly blew the U.S. Open at Chicago Golf Club by closing with a 79. McDermott made a birdie on the 18th hole to force a playoff, and he shot 80 the next day to defeat Mike Brady (82) and George Simpson (86). 75 years ago (1936): Tony Manero won his only major championship, closing with a 67 at Baltusrol to deny Harry “Lighthorse” Cooper in the second straight major of 1936. Cooper, who blew

a three-shot lead over Horton Smith at the Masters, was four shots clear of Manero going into the final 18 holes of the U.S. Open. But on the Upper Course at Baltusrol, Manero charged past him and to win by two shots. 50 years ago (1961): Gene Littler won his only major in the U.S. Open at Oakland Hills, closing with a 68 for a oneshot victory over Bob Goalby and Doug Sanders, the 54-hole leader. Jack Nicklaus, in his final major as an amateur, tied for fourth. Littler became the eighth player to win a U.S. Amateur and U.S. Open title. This U.S. Open also was noteworthy for being the first time since 1940 that Ben Hogan failed to finish in the top 10. He closed with rounds of 73-73 to tie for 14th. 25 years ago (1986): Raymond Floyd was 43 when he won at Shinnecock Hills

to become the oldest U.S. Open champion, a record that would only last four years. It came two months after Jack Nicklaus won the Masters at age 46. The U.S. Open returned to Shinnecock Hills for the first time in 90 years, and the course put up a strong fight with its vicious wind in the early rounds. Floyd closed with a 66 to rally against Greg Norman, who had the 54-hole lead in every major that year and captured only one of them. 10 years ago (2001): Retief Goosen of South Africa won his first U.S. Open in a major that proved Tiger Woods to be mortal. Woods had just won an unprecedented fourth successive major, but he was no match for Southern Hills in the U.S. Open and he tied for 12th. Goosen won a playoff that should never have been. With a one-shot lead, he missed a 12-foot birdie putt on the 18th hole, then

missed the short par putt and fell into a tie with Mark Brooks. Earlier, Stewart Cink was trying to clear the stage and missed an 18-inch putt that he felt was meaningless. Turns out it cost him a spot in the playoff. Goosen shot 70 to beat Brooks by two shots in the playoff. 5 years ago (2006): Geoff Ogilvy hit a beautiful chip to 6 feet and holed the par putt on the 18th hole for what he figured would be good enough for second place in at Winged Foot. Phil Mickelson had a one-shot lead when he drove into the left rough, struck a tree with his next shot while going for the green, found a plugged lie in the bunker and wound up making double bogey to lose by one shot. Ogilvy closed with a 72 to finish on 5-over 285. He became the first U.S. Open champion since Hale Irwin in 1974 — at Winged Foot — to win without breaking par in any round.

ANSWERS: 1. c; 2. a; 3. b; 4. a; 5. b; 6. a; 7. c; 8. a; 9. b; 10. b; 11. c; 12. a; 13. c; 14. a; 15. b; 16. a; 17. c; 18. b; 19. c


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sey Kahne in 2004 but strong enough for the pole. What was more impressive is Busch did so in his backup car after wrecking his main ride in the second practice session Friday. “Quite a bit of emotions today, especially after having to bust out the backup car from yesterday’s mishap,” Busch said. “To go out there today, if it was raining we’d be starting last. Luckily the weather held out and we’re on the pole.” Weather was “It was an a big worry Satamazing urday as gray clouds hovered swing of over the track. events. It was even a bigger concern Just an for Busch, who honest would have ‘thank you’ started in the back of the field to my if qualifying guys, eswas rained out. Precipitation pecially held off the ones through qualifying, although back at there was a the shop slight mist in preparing the air at the of the ARthe cars.” start CA race that folKurt Busch lowed. The ARPole winner CA race ended after 58 of 80 laps because of fog. “It was an amazing swing of events,” Busch said. “Just an honest ‘thank you’ to my guys, especially the ones back at the shop preparing the cars. To pull the backup out that’s a pole-winning car, that’s something you really wouldn’t hear about back in the day.” Equally surprising was Paul Menard, who gained the second starting position and will take the green flag a little after 1 p.m. today alongside Busch. Menard had been terrible in qualifying at Pocono in his eight races at the track, starting no better than17th and 33rd or worse four times. Menard admitted he was hoping for rain, where the field would have then been set by practice speed from Friday’s first session. (The field would have been set by owners points only if Friday’s practices and Saturday’s qualifying were rained out). “We definitely thought it would rain out qualifying today,” said Menard, who drives the No. 27 Chevrolet for Richard Childress Racing. “So we did one mock run (Friday) early in practice to try to post a good time. Kinda thought that would be our qualifying run, honestly.” Carl Edwards was the fastest driver in Friday’s first practice, but couldn’t duplicate the feat in qualifying. He wobbled his No.

GREEN Continued from Page 1C

works in a race car, that will be a real strong statement for biobased fuels,” Lynch said. Driver Clint Bowyer agrees. “This whole country needs to be paying attention to this American ethanol partnership,” Bowyer said. “It’s cutting down emissions by 50 percent, so can you imagine if every single car on the road in the U.S. was using it just how much of an impact it would have.” For the people that produce and support ethanol linking up with NASCAR was an easy decision. “We make fuel and they run race cars,” said Tom Buis, CEO of Growth Energy, a group of American ethanol producers. “We couldn’t think of a better partnership.” To hear Buis the partnership is as simple as black and white – well actually, red, white and blue. “No sport is more American and no fuel is more American,” Buis said. So far, according to both Lynch and Buis, the deal has gone off without a hitch. “The whole transition is so under the radar, it’s just not something (the drivers) have on their minds,” Lynch said. Teams are also getting a bit more horse power with the E15 fuel.

FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Kurt Busch is all smiles Saturday as he walks through the garage area after capturing the pole for today’s 5-Hour Energy 500.

FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Paul Menard looks at the tower to see his qualifying speed of 171.422 mph was the second fastest of the day at Pocono Raceway on Saturday

5 - H O U R Pos. Driver ............................... 1. Kurt Busch ............................ 2. Paul Menard ......................... 3. Jeff Gordon ........................... 4. Denny Hamlin ....................... 5. Regan Smith ......................... 6. Carl Edwards ........................ 7. Marcos Ambrose .................. 8. Ryan Newman ...................... 9. David Reutimann ................. 10. Mark Martin......................... 11. David Ragan....................... 12. Clint Bowyer ....................... 13. Jamie McMurray................. 14. Jimmie Johnson................. 15. Tony Stewart ...................... 16. Juan Montoya..................... 17. Kasey Kahne ...................... 18. Bobby Labonte................... 19. Joey Logano ....................... 20. Brad Keselowski ................ 21. Dale Earnhardt Jr. ............. 22. J.J. Yeley ............................ 23. Brian Vickers ...................... 24. Andy Lally ........................... 25. Landon Cassill.................... 26. Sam Hornish Jr. ................. 27. Matt Kenseth....................... 28. A.J. Allmendinger .............. 29. Joe Nemechek ................... 30. David Gilliland .................... 31. Martin Truex Jr................... 32. Kevin Harvick ..................... 33. Jeff Burton .......................... 34. Kyle Busch.......................... 35. Casey Mears ...................... 36. Michael McDowell ............. 37. Greg Biffle........................... 38. Tony Raines ....................... 39. Scott Riggs ......................... 40. Dave Blaney ....................... 41. Mike Bliss............................ 42. Scott Wimmer..................... 42. T.J. Bell ...............................

E N E R G Y

Number/Make

No. 22 Dodge No. 27 Chevrolet No. 24 Chevrolet No. 11 Toyota No. 78 Chevrolet No. 99 Ford No. 9 Ford No. 39 Chevrolet No. 00 Toyota No. 5 Chevrolet No. 6 Ford No. 33 Chevrolet No. 1 Chevrolet No. 48 Chevrolet No. 14 Chevrolet No. 42 Chevrolet No. 4 Toyota No. 47 Toyota No. 20 Toyota No. 2 Dodge No. 88 Chevrolet No. 46 Chevrolet No. 83 Toyota No. 71 Ford No. 51 Toyota No. 38 Ford No. 17 Ford No. 43 Ford No. 87 Toyota No. 34 Ford No. 56 Toyota No. 29 Chevrolet No. 31 Chevrolet No. 18 Toyota No. 13 Toyota No. 66 Toyota No. 16 Ford No. 37 Ford No. 81 Chevrolet No. 36 Chevrolet No. 32 Ford No. 7 Dodge No. 50 Toyota

Speed

171.579 171.422 171.350 171.174 171.165 171.057 170.836 170.532 170.348 170.200 170.177 170.126 169.908 169.872 169.856 169.702 169.671 169.607 169.520 169.501 169.447 169.444 169.441 169.370 169.307 169.278 169.224 169.176 169.170 169.119 169.113 169.084 168.932 168.890 168.666 168.218 167.773 167.395 167.264 167.057 166.867 own. pts. 166.633

5 0 0

L I N E U P 5-Hour Energy 500 scouting report

Good in one race and bad in the other last four years at Pocono Surprise qualifier who never started higher than 17th here. Has four Pocono victories, but last was in June 2007. Has won two of the last three races at Pocono. Has improved from his starting position in last four Pocono races. Two Pocono wins and dominated in runner-up finish in 2009. Qualified OK here in 2010, but ended up with two DNFs. Since winning in July 2003, Pocono finishes been a mixed bag. Finished third in June 2009, but below average in other races. Old school driver has been a runner-up six times here. Aside from a fifth in Aug. 2008 has been pedestrian here. Steady here since 2007, with the exception of one glitch. Has just three top-10s in 16 Pocono starts and none in last four. Led 96 laps last time here, but came home in 10th place. Has 10 top-10s in last 11 Pocono starts, including a win. Finished eighth in last two June races at Pocono. Won in June 2008, but mostly runs hot and cold at Pocono. Was one of Pocono’s best from 1999-2001, posting three wins. Third-year Cup drivers still trying to get a grip on the track. Made Pocono debut last year and placed 21st and 20th. Recent Pocono results probably means winless streak goes on. Hasn’t placed better than 35th in last four Pocono races. Missed both races last year while recovering from blood clots. First Cup race at Pocono, so the learning curve is steep. Was 41st in August 2010, his only career start at Pocono. One of his best track, with two 11th in 2010 and two top-10s. Has solid finishes, but no top-10s here since June 2008. Pretty much a middle-of-the-pack guy at Pocono. Success here early before becoming a start-and-park driver. Has struggled mightily at Pocono since first race here in 2007. Ninth here in last race broke string of mediocrity at Pocono. Drove to a pair of fourth-place finishes here in 2010. Solid but unspectacular in most of his 34 Pocono starts. Runner-up last year, but has a huge amount of problems here. Things haven’t gone as planned after being strong here in 2007. Has started and finished in the back in previous four starts here. Win last August broke streak of mostly ho-hum finishes here. Making the field is a victory after how things have gone. Only one top-10 at Pocono in 10 starts and won’t get another. Has four consecutive DNFs at Pocono, but doesn’t park it now. Former Cup regular has found his niche in Nationwide Series. Forgettable weekend thus far in practice and qualifying. It’s his first crack at Pocono and only second career Cup race.

COMPILED BY JOHN ERZAR

99 Ford between turns 2 and 3 and settled for sixth, his best start in a June Pocono race since earning the same spot in 2008. Regan Smith, who will start fifth, held the pole throughout the middle portion of qualifying until a couple Pocono heavy hitEven more important to consumers that aren’t concerned about trading paint on a Sprint Cup track, the fuel should be anywhere from 17 cents to 89 cents cheaper at the pump than old-fashion gasoline. But don’t run out to the nearest Sunoco looking for the E15 just yet. The gas won’t be commercially available until later this year. But, according to Buis, it won’t be long before consumers will be able to pull up to pumps that will allow them to select a fuel mix with up to 30 percent ethanol. NASCAR’s green initiatives go beyond the new gas powering its race cars and trucks, however. “There are so many NASCAR green initiatives that you can’t keep up with them all,” Bowyer said. “This is very good for this sport and our fans.” Lynch was quick to point out NASCAR’s recycling program, which he said is the biggest such program in sports. But at Pocono Raceway, there is an even bigger symbol of the sport’s effort to be more environmentally friendly. The track is powered by the world’s largest solar farm at a sporting venue. “Pocono is always a big week,” Lynch said, adding that the track’s solar farm makes it even more so for him. “We are incredibly proud of it.”

ters took their laps. Denny Hamlin bumped Smith and then he was bumped by Jeff Gordon before Busch took control a short time later. Gordon will start third and Hamlin fourth. Both lead active drivers with four Pocono victories each.

“I got a little concerned right before I went out because there were a couple of good cars that weren’t getting themselves in the top 10,” Gordon said. “(Greg) Biffle went like two cars before me and he was way back.”

S P R I N T C U P P O I N T S S TA N D I N G S Pos. Driver .......................................... Points 1. Carl Edwards ................................... 485 2. Jimmie Johnson .............................. 445 3. Dale Earnhardt Jr............................ 444 4. Kevin Harvick................................... 442 5. Kyle Busch ....................................... 425 6. Kurt Busch ....................................... 414 7. Matt Kenseth .................................... 412 8. Tony Stewart ................................... 393 9. Clint Bowyer..................................... 391 10. Ryan Newman ............................... 382 11. Denny Hamlin................................ 381 12. Greg Biffle ...................................... 377 13. Jeff Gordon .................................... 364 14. Mark Martin.................................... 357 15. Juan Montoya ................................ 357 16. A.J. Allmendinger.......................... 352 17. David Ragan .................................. 344 18. Kasey Kahne ................................. 339 19. Marcos Ambrose ........................... 338 20. Paul Menard .................................. 331 21. Brad Keselowski ........................... 324 22. Martin Truex Jr. ............................. 324 23. David Reutimann .......................... 301 24. Jeff Burton ..................................... 301 25. Joey Logano .................................. 300 26. Brian Vickers ................................. 292 27. Jamie McMurray............................ 290 28. Bobby Labonte .............................. 287 29. Regan Smith .................................. 282 30. David Gilliland ............................... 224 31. Dave Blaney .................................. 203 32. Casey Mears ................................. 198 33. Robby Gordon............................... 150 34. Andy Lally ...................................... 140 35. Tony Raines .................................. 109 36. Bill Elliott......................................... 100 37. Ken Schrader ................................ 73 38. J.J. Yeley ....................................... 44 39. Terry Labonte ................................ 40 40. Michael McDowell......................... 40 41. David Stremme ............................. 24 42. Michael Waltrip ............................. 20 43. Brian Keselowski........................... 3 44. Steve Park ..................................... 2 45. Trevor Bayne ................................. 0 46. Ricky Stenhouse Jr. ..................... 0 47. Steve Wallace ............................... 0 48. Landon Cassill............................... 0 49. Mike Skinner.................................. 0 50. Travis Kvapil .................................. 0 51. Mike Bliss....................................... 0 52. Hermie Sadler ............................... 0 53. Patrick Carpentier ......................... 0 54. David Starr..................................... 0 55. Johnny Sauter ............................... 0 56. Robert Richardson Jr................... 0 57. Dennis Setzer................................ 0 58. T.J. Bell .......................................... 0 59. Scott Wimmer................................ 0 60. Joe Nemechek .............................. 0 61. Todd Bodine .................................. 0 62. Scott Riggs .................................... 0 63. Kevin Conway ............................... 0 64. Derrike Cope ................................. 0

Behind Races Poles Won Top-5 Top-10 DNF

Leader -40 -41 -43 -60 -71 -73 -92 -94 -103 -104 -108 -121 -128 -128 -133 -141 -146 -147 -154 -161 -161 -184 -184 -185 -193 -195 -198 -203 -261 -282 -287 -335 -345 -376 -385 -412 -441 -445 -445 -461 -465 -482 -483 -485 -485 -485 -485 -485 -485 -485 -485 -485 -485 -485 -485 -485 -485 -485 -485 -485 -485 -485 -485

13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 12 11 10 9 5 5 12 2 11 5 2 1 1 8 1 1 12 9 12 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 13 1 1 1 0

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Hornish happy just to get a shot at Pocono Former IndyCar champion has one-race deal to drive today for Front Row Motorsports. By ANDREW M. SEDER aseder@timesleader.com

LONG POND — Sam Hornish Jr. got the call from Front Row Motorsports a week ago offering him a one-race deal opportunity for today’s 5-Hour Energy 500, the Sprint Cup Series race at Pocono Raceway. For some, a race at the triangular track would be a daunting task met with dread. But not Hornish. With six career starts at Pocono, Hornish has an average finish of 17th. “If I wouldn’t have been such an idiot the first time I came here (he finished 42nd) then it would have been a lot better than that,” Hornish, 31, said while standing in front of his team’s hauler in the garage area at the 2.5-mile racetrack in Monroe County. “That first time I came here I qualified 41st and I finished 42nd. I was involved in three accidents before the halfway point,” said Hornish, recalling the June 8, 2008 race. He learned that day that the track is unforgiving, patience is a virtue and the goal isn’t to be up front early but to be in contention at the end. Using his open-wheel

racing skills, he’s made the most of his limited runs at Pocono. The three-time IndyCar champion – and 2006 winner of the Indianapolis 500 – has four top-10 finishes in his six races at the track, including a fourth-place finish in the August 2008 race. “I love coming here,” Hornish said. “It’s one of my favorite tracks on the circuit. A lot of other people don’t like it. I don’t know why.” He has never won a Sprint Cup series race, but he has two topfive finishes, including one at Pocono. Hornish had spent the past three years racing in the No. 77 Mobile1 Racing car owned by Roger Penske. When the sponsor pulled out after last year, Penske opted to run a one-car operation with the No. 2 Miller Lite Dodge driven by Brad Keselowski and Hornish, still under contract but without a Cup ride, turned to driving part time for Penske in the Nationwide Series. In five races in that NASCAR circuit, he has one top-10 finish and sits 26th in the standings. But he’s never lost hope that he would get some “one-off” rides on the Sprint Cup series this year. “Even when I knew I wasn’t going to be running full time in the Cup series, I said I hope I get something at Pocono. Of all the

AP PHOTO

Qualifying at 169.728 mph, Sam Hornish Jr. will start in the 26th position for today’s Sprint Cup race in Long Pond.

of the No. 38 Ford, was committed to race a Camping World Truck Series race in Texas this weekend. “You’ve got to enjoy coming to a track where you’ve had success,” Hornish said. “I’m hoping we can go out there and have a good time.” And while he noted a win is every driver’s goal, he said realistically he’s at Pocono to help get Front Row Motorsports and owner Bob Jenkins into the all-important top 35 in the owner’s standings. A spot in the top 35 guarantees a team gets to race each weekend. Currently, the team is 38th, 22 points behind the 35th position. “Our big thing is we don’t need a home run. We need a double. They’re obviously trying to get back into the top 35. My big thing for them is to be able to go out and run a smart race, (stay) out of trouble and if we can get out of here with a top 20 that would be great.” As for plans the rest of the year, Hornish said there’s nothing he can report. But he knows that a good run today at Pocono, where he’ll start 26th, could draw the attention of other owners looking for a driver.

places I thought that I might get an opportunity to come and run at … this was the one I thought I had the best chance.” Hornish said his solid record at the track, plus the fact he lives in Defiance, Ohio – about the same distance from Pocono in miles (515) as the Pocono race itself (500) – made Pocono a good bet. He plans to take advantage of the Andrew M. Seder, a Times Leader opportunity that arose because staff writer, may be reached at 570Travis Kvapil, the normal driver 829-7269.


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011 PAGE 13C

Shrin er’s H ospitals ForChildren an d Irem Tran sportation Fu n d

G O LF TO URN AM EN T D a te : July 9, 2 011 Tim e : 8:00 A.M . (Sh otg un ), 1:30 P .M . (Sh otg un ) (check one) F or m a t: 4 P e r son Scr a m b le (Ca p ta in & Cr e w ) E n tr y F e e : $75 P e r P e r son Participant entry feeis not tax deductible

Includes:G reens Fees,Cart,Prizes,SocialHour andB uffet Dinner. A .M.SO CIA LHO UR — 12 NO O N, A .M.B UFFET— 1 P.M. P.M.SO CIA LHO UR — 5 :30 P.M.,P.M.B UFFET— 6:30 P.M. Entries w illcloseonJuly 6,or after 1st 36 team s areineachshotgun. N AM E : PH O N E: P AY M E N T TY P E : N AM E : PH O N E: P AY M E N T TY P E :

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PAYM EN T M UST BE RECEIVED BY JULY 6,2011 H O L E SP O N SO R $100 C AR T SP O N SO R $250 ______________________ ______________________ TO UR N AM E N T SP O N SO R $500 ______________________ Sponsor Donations aretax deductible

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M a k e c h e c k s p a ya b l e to : I re m H o sp i ta l To u rn a m e n t R e turn c he c k s a lo ng w ith this re g istra tio n to : Irem Hosp ita l Tou rna m ent 397 C o untry C lub R o a d ,D a lla s,P A 18612.


CMYK PAGE 14C

SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011

S

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THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

Menard grabs second spot after hoping for rain By DEREK LEVARSE dlevarse@timesleader.com

LONG POND — Like everyone else at Pocono this weekend, Paul Menard and his team saw the weather forecast for Saturday. With the possibility of rain interrupting qualifying and setting the field for today’s 5Hour Energy 500 according to practice speeds, Menard went all out on Friday. And the 30year-old, still looking for his first Sprint Cup victory, finished with the second-highest practice speed. “We were really hoping for

NASCAR

NOTEBOOK rain (Saturday) so we could be starting second (today),” Menard said. “If we saw raindrops, we were gonna make sure to say it.” But the rain held off early Saturday afternoon, forcing Menard to earn his spot through qualifying. No matter. Menard and his No. 27 Chevrolet finished second anyway, posting a speed of 171.422 to

join pole-sitter Kurt Busch in the front row for today’s race. “To go out there and qualify second by actually getting a lap down was cool,” Menard said. “It’s more meaningful that way.” For Menard, this is the second-highest start of his career, having won the pole once (Daytona, 2008). His best finish came later that season at Talladega, where he took second. His best start at eight previous tries at Pocono Raceway had been 17th. Track temperatures are often a concern for qualifying, where a cooler surface leads to better

times. But overcast skies made sure that didn’t impact Menard’s run, despite him being the 43rd car out of 44 to take his turn. “We really thought it would rain, so we posted a good lap in practice, which made us go out late,” Menard said. “When you look at hourly forecasts, it was 70 degrees from start to finish, so the track conditions didn’t change a lot. “It might have gotten a little bit hotter, but I think we got a little bit of cloud cover right at the end of qualifying, so that probably helped.”

Quickly skinned It didn’t take long to determine which one of the 44 cars would be the odd one out for today’s field of 43. Mike Skinner, two weeks shy of his 54th birthday, wrecked in relatively violent fashion for a qualifying run. The veteran lost control of his No. 60 Toyota in turn 1, sliding out and smashing hard into the SAFER barrier on the inside wall and tearing apart his front end. Skinner was in line to claim the 43rd and final spot, which instead went to Scott Wimmer

because of the crash. George wins ARCA race The weather held out long enough to get in all of the Sprint Cup qualifying, but the ensuing ARCA race wasn’t as fortunate. Saturday’s Pocono 200 went to Tim George Jr., who held the lead when the race was called after 58 laps out of 80. Cousins Chase Mattioli and Nick Igdalsky – grandsons of track owners Drs. Joe and Rose Mattioli – finished 18th and 19th, respectively. Hazleton native Steve Fox took 29th.

QUALIFYING DAY FOR THE 5-HOUR ENERGY 500

Kurt Busch looks up at the leaderboard after getting out of his Shell/Pennzoil Dodge to see his speed of 171.579 mph after capturing the pole for today’s Sprint Cup race at Pocono Raceway.

FRED ADAMS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Lee Dodson, a crew member of Landon Cassill, rests against the race car waiting in line for qualifying. Cassill qualified 25th in his Chevrolet, turning in a speed of 169.307 mph.

The Home Depot Toyota of Joey Logano and the other teams get their cars ready for qualifying. At 169.520 mph, Logano will start 19th today

Faulty restart gives Hornaday a victory “Good way to steal one,” Points leader Johnny Sauter Hornaday said while sitting black-flagged for pass before down for his postrace interview. crossing start-finish line. Sauter led three times for a

FORT WORTH, Texas — Ron Hornaday Jr. got his record 48th career NASCAR Trucks Series victory in the caution-filled race at Texas despite crossing the finish line in second place Friday night. Johnny Sauter pulled away on the final restart with two laps left, but the series points leader was black-flagged by NASCAR because he dropped from the outside lane to the inside in front of Hornaday’s Chevrolet before crossing the start-finish line. Sauter was dropped to 22nd place.

Crews of various teams deliver tires to the garage for the qualifying runs Saturday at Pocono Raceway in Long Pond.

S P R I N T

NASCAR TRUCK SERIES

By STEPHEN HAWKINS The Associated Press

The crew of Kyle Busch gets the M&M’s Toyota ready for qualifying. He’ll start 34th after qualifying at 168.890 mph.

race-high 58 laps (of 168) at the 11⁄2-mile, high-banked Texas track. He spun his Chrevrolet’s tires on the restart as he dropped down the track. “We both spun the tires and I left a lane down there for him,” Sauter said while walking back to the garage. Asked if he would appeal the ruling, Sauter harshly responded, “It’s official, isn’t it?” There were a track-record 10 cautions for 46 laps. The race also set Texas records with 11 leaders and 19 lead changes — the most dramatic coming without the leading car being passed. “As soon as the green dropped, he dropped in my lane, I was yelling, ‘He’s in my lane!

Better stick by the rules! He’s in my lane!”’ Hornaday said. “If they didn’t black flag him and gave it to him, I would have been fine either way. ... But they stuck to their guns and it was a call. I would have expected it if it was me.” Hornaday and crew chief Jeff Hensley said teams were warned repeatedly during the drivers’ meeting before the race about staying in their chosen lanes on restarts. The 52-year-old Hornaday, driving for Kevin Harvick Inc., won for the third time in Texas. Hornaday and Sauter are the only series regulars with wins in the first nine races this season. Sauter still held onto the series points lead, by eight over Hornaday going into an extended break before the next race July 7 in Kentucky.

Race...................................... Pole 1. Daytona ............................ Earnhardt Jr. 2. Phoenix ............................ Edwards 3. Las Vegas ........................ Kenseth 4. Bristol................................ Edward 5. Atlanta............................... Montoya 6. Martinsville....................... McMurray 7. Texas ................................ Ragan 8. Talladega ......................... J.Gordon 9. Richmond......................... Montoya 10. Darlington ...................... Kahne 11. Dover .............................. Johnson 12. Charlotte ........................ Keselowski 13. Kansas............................ Ku.Busch Race...................................... 14. Pocono ........................... 15. Michigan......................... 16. Infineon .......................... 17. Daytona .......................... 18. Kentucky ........................ 19. Loudon ........................... 20. Indianapolis.................... 21. Pocono ........................... 22. Watkins Glen ................. 23. Michigan......................... 24. Bristol.............................. 25. Atlanta ............................ 26. Richmond....................... 27. Chicagoland................... 28. Loudon ........................... 29. Dover .............................. 30. Kansas............................ 31. Charlotte ........................ 32. Talladega ....................... 32. Martinsville..................... 34. Texas.............................. 35. Phoenix .......................... 36. Homestead-Miami ........

Date Today June 19 June 26 July 2 July 9 July 17 July 31 Aug. 7 Aug. 14 Aug. 21 Aug. 27 Sept. 4 Sept. 10 Sept. 18 Sept. 25 Oct. 2 Oct. 9 Oct. 15 Oct. 23 Oct. 30 Nov. 6 Nov. 13 Nov. 20

Winner

C U P

Bayne J.Gordon Edwards Ky.Busch Harvick Harvick Kenseth Johnson Ky.Busch Smith Kenseth Harvick Keselowski Laps Miles 200 500 200 400 110 218.9 160 400 267 400.5 301 318.5 160 400 200 500 90 220.5 200 400 500 266.5 325 500.5 400 300 267 400.5 300 317.4 400 400 267 400 334 501 188 500 500 263 501 334 312 312 267 400.5

S C H E D U L E

Second

Edwards Ky.Busch Stewart Edwards Johnson Earnhardt Jr. Bowyer Bowyer Hamlin Edwards Martin Ragan Earnhardt Jr. 2010 Pole Ky.Busch Ku.Busch Kahne Harvick new race Montoya Montoya Stewart Edwards Kahne Johnson Hamlin Edwards McMurray Keselowski Johnson Kahne J.Gordon Montoya Hamlin Sadler Edwards Kahne

Third

Gilliland Johnson Montoya Johnsn Ky.Busch Ky. Busch Edwards J.Gordon Kahne Keselowski Ambrose Logano Hamlin 2010 Winner Hamlin Hamlin Johnson Harvick new race Johnson McMurray Biffle Montoya Harvick Ky.Busch Stewart Hamlin Reutimann Bowyer Johnson Biffle McMurray Bowyer Hamlin Hamlin Edwards Edwards

Fourth

Labonte Harvick Ambrose Kenseth Kenseth Montoya Biffle Earnhardt Jr. Ragan Kahne Ky.Busch Ku.Busch J.Gordon

Fifth

Ru.Busch Newman Newman Menard Newman J.Gordon Menard Harvick Edwards Newman Vickers Allmendinger Edwards TV Coverage 1 p.m. TNT 1 p.m. TNT 3 p.m. TNT 7:30 p.m. TNT 7:30 p.m. TNT 1 p.m. TNT 1 p.m. ESPN 1 p.m. ESPN 1 p.m. ESPN 1 p.m. ESPN 7:30 p.m. ABC 7:30 p.m. ESPN 7:30 p.m. ESPN 2 p.m. ESPN 2 p.m. ESPN 2 p.m. ESPN 2 p.m. ESPN 7:30 p.m. ABC 2 p.m. ESPN 2 p.m. ESPN 3 p.m. ESPN 3 p.m. ESPN 3 p.m. ESPN


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011 PAGE 15C

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CMYK PAGE 16C

SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011

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THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

NATIONAL FORECAST Thunderstorms to party sunny

WEDNESDAY

80° 54°

MONDAY

THURSDAY

Partly sunny

Partly sunny

Partly sunny

75° 53°

75° 53°

FRIDAY

Mostly cloudy, storms

80° 57°

Today’s high/ Tonight’s low

New York City 79/61 Reading 87/58

Atlantic City 87/62

Yesterday Average Record High Record Low

Cooling Degree Days*

77/66 77/56 95 in 1947 34 in 1972

Yesterday Month to date Year to date Last year to date Normal year to date

7 61 140 136 71

*Index of fuel consumption, how far the day’s mean temperature was above 65 degrees.

2011

Brandywine Valley

Highs: 84-86. Lows: 60-61. Chance of showers and thunderstorms today. Showers ending tonight.

Philadelphia 87/63

Temperatures

The Finger Lakes

Highs: 64-76. Lows: 50-55. Decreasing clouds today. Mostly clear tonight.

Wilkes-Barre 80/55

Pottsville 81/54

Harrisburg 85/57

87/55

Delmarva/Ocean City

Highs: 84-89. Lows: 63-69. Chance of showers and thunderstorms today. Showers ending tonight.

Yesterday Month to date Normal month to date Year to date Normal year to date

Sun and Moon

Sunrise 5:30a 5:30a Moonrise Today 5:27p Tomorrow 6:38p Today Tomorrow

0.11” 0.55” 1.43” 21.91” 15.63” Sunset 8:37p 8:37p Moonset 2:41a 3:23a

River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday. Susquehanna Stage Chg. Fld. Stg Wilkes-Barre 2.73 -0.07 22.0 Towanda 1.67 -0.08 21.0 Lehigh Bethlehem 2.86 0.54 16.0 Delaware Port Jervis 3.14 -0.04 18.0 Full

Last

New

First

June 15 June 23 July 1

July 8

GOLF CLUB

BEAT THE HEAT!

TOP NAME AIR CONDITIONERS AND DEHUMIDIFIERS

IN STOCK AND READY TO GO!

RS IN STO OCK MOST AIR CONDITIONERS STOCK FROM 5,000 TO 29,000 BTU window, wall, casement and portable

SAVE NOW!

Weather Central, LP For more weather information go to:

www.timesleader.com National Weather Service

607-729-1597

62/44

HDLCD3250

89/76

little chance for precipitation. Showers and storms return on

City

Yesterday

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Buffalo Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Las Vegas Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis

60/45/.00 88/72/.00 86/71/.00 64/57/.19 76/59/.00 92/70/.00 63/54/.02 83/64/.00 95/76/.00 80/53/.00 81/59/.00 82/73/.01 95/71/.00 81/66/.10 93/75/.00 63/59/.00 91/76/.00 54/51/.01 68/52/.02

City

Yesterday

Amsterdam Baghdad Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Dublin Frankfurt Hong Kong Jerusalem London

61/48/.00 106/81/.00 84/66/.00 73/50/.00 70/54/.00 57/41/.00 70/55/.00 95/79/.00 84/61/.00 64/45/.00

Today Tomorrow 60/48/c 92/69/t 89/64/t 65/56/t 67/51/sh 90/66/t 64/54/s 64/57/pc 100/75/s 87/55/s 69/54/s 89/75/pc 98/76/s 74/56/s 93/72/s 64/58/pc 89/76/t 63/50/s 73/58/pc

61/47/c 90/66/s 81/60/pc 68/55/sh 67/53/sh 88/61/s 68/59/s 70/52/s 100/77/s 86/55/pc 73/55/s 88/74/pc 98/75/s 78/58/pc 95/74/s 68/60/pc 91/77/t 65/54/s 77/62/t

City

Yesterday

Myrtle Beach Nashville New Orleans Norfolk Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Ore. St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, DC

84/68/.00 93/70/.00 94/75/.00 90/69/.00 90/68/.23 74/55/.00 93/71/.00 96/74/.00 79/63/.11 65/55/.00 82/69/.04 75/55/.00 94/75/.00 66/61/.00 59/52/.00 62/52/.00 93/74/.00 98/63/.00 91/76/.00

WORLD CITIES

Today Tomorrow 68/55/pc 101/82/s 92/70/s 77/52/pc 65/42/pc 61/45/sh 73/54/c 87/82/t 89/61/s 59/55/sh

73/59/sh 102/79/s 93/67/s 73/55/sh 56/43/s 59/43/pc 74/55/sh 88/81/t 86/60/s 64/50/pc

City

Yesterday

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Paris Rio de Janeiro Riyadh Rome San Juan Tokyo Warsaw

82/52/.00 70/59/.00 79/55/.00 64/48/.00 75/64/.00 109/79/.00 75/63/.00 89/73/2.06 73/70/.00 72/54/.00

Today Tomorrow 88/71/t 88/63/pc 93/76/t 91/68/t 100/73/s 76/63/t 93/72/t 102/73/s 73/51/pc 72/55/pc 83/64/pc 78/54/pc 100/72/s 65/56/pc 65/55/pc 68/52/pc 91/76/t 99/67/s 90/65/t

88/70/pc 87/65/pc 95/75/s 81/62/s 100/75/pc 82/69/t 95/74/t 102/76/s 73/51/pc 67/55/sh 84/67/t 79/51/pc 100/73/s 68/59/pc 70/55/pc 67/53/sh 92/79/t 100/68/s 82/62/pc

Thursday and Friday, all with temperatures hovering around 80 degrees. - Newswatch 16 Weather Department

Today Tomorrow 80/53/t 68/52/sh 72/55/pc 68/55/c 74/63/s 109/87/s 81/64/s 85/78/t 75/68/c 75/55/pc

84/56/t 55/50/sh 79/61/s 70/52/sh 76/62/s 107/82/s 82/66/pc 86/77/t 76/66/t 73/50/s

Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snow flurries, i-ice.

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Forecasts, graphs and data ©2011

for today, fol-

90/65

76/69

100/73

ALMANAC Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Int’l Airport

Precipitation

thunderstorms

64/58

The Poconos

Poughkeepsie 76/55

69/54

64/54

The Jersey Shore

Towanda 77/52

State College 79/51

64/54

75° 60°

Highs: 80-87. Lows: 61-66. Chance of showers and thunderstorms today. Showers ending tonight.

73/58 79/61

Highs: 78-83. Lows: 51-55. Chance of showers and thunderstorms today. Showers ending tonight.

Binghamton 72/51

Scranton 80/55

71/51

TODAY’S SUMMARY

Albany 74/55

with a chance of showers and

68/52

Partly sunny

80° 60°

REGIONAL FORECAST Syracuse 72/55

The forecast for this week starts

SATURDAY Morning storms, p.m. sun

80° 60°

NATIONAL FORECAST: A low pressure system will generate showers and thunderstorms throughout much of the Eastern Seaboard today. High pressure will build in behind this system, bringing dry and pleasant weather to the Great Lakes. Meanwhile, showers and thunderstorms will be possible from Arkansas and Missouri into the northern Plains and northern Rockies.

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CMYK

BUSINESS

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THE TIMES LEADER

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SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011

IN THE WORKPLACE DIANE STAFFORD

Employers must address social media

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Mike Pitcavage, owner of Endless Mountain Solar in Wilkes-Barre, stands among the solar panels on the roof of his business.

FIGHT FOR SOLAR POWER

heats up By EILEEN GODIN

Times Leader Correspondent

During the past three years, solar energy has blossomed in Pennsylvania, creating a green sustainable energy source and new jobs, but a hiccup in the state requirements could have a detrimental effect on the industry. Pennsylvania’s solar industry exploded when state tax incentives were initiated in 2009, called the PA Sunshine Program combined with the Alternative Energy Portfolio Standards Act enacted in 2004, also known as the AEPS Act. nia. This is enough to satThe PA Sunshine “Solar created in Pennsylvania isfy the state’s solar reProgram, a four-tiered rebate program, is deshould stay in Pennsylvania, Why quirements over the next three years, said Pitcavsigned to be an incenshould utility companies charge age. tive for residential and “It is basic economics, small commercial busiPA customers fees for energy supply and demand,” Pitness to install solar pancavage said. els. created in other states?” A.J. Bittner, president “Currently we are in A.J. Bittner, of Keystone Energy LLC. the fourth tier,” said President of Keystone Energy LLC. in Luzerne, still mainMike Pitcavage, presitains a sunny outlook on dent of Endless Mounthe industry. The end of solar is not near, he said. tain Solar in Wilkes-Barre. “The Sunshine Pro“The tax credits and rebates did what they gram is estimated to end late this summer.” were supposed to do,” Bittner said. “It is just that Under the AEPS Act, utility companies are the industry is beginning to outpace the portforequired to purchase a growing percentage of lio.” electricity generated by solar facilities, called The Sunshine Program did create new jobs solar renewable energy credits. The goal is to and is providing a clean, renewable form of enerreach .5 percent of electricity produced by sogy, he said. Pitcavage estimated 600 solar comlar energy by 2020. panies popped up in Pennsylvania and about Solar Renewable Energy Credit, or SREC, is 5,000 new jobs were created. one megawatt of power generated by a solar “The system just needs to be reworked,” Bittnfacility. Businesses and homeowners can iner said. crease the return on their solar panels by sellPitcavage said part of the problem, is the AEPS ing excess SRECs to electric companies. Act does not require Pennsylvania utilities to According to Vote Solar, a nonprofit solar advocacy group, there are about 71 megawatts See SOLAR, Page 3D of solar energy being generated in Pennsylva-

AP PHOTO

Above: BrightSource shows BrightSource Energy’s Luz Power Tower in Israel’s Negev Desert.

Israel plans expansion of solar-generated power By MOSHE EDRI Associated Press

KIBBUTZ KETURA, Israel — Israel is planning an expansion of its solar-generated electricity with preparations to bring the first of more than 40 new solar plants onto the grid this summer. Arava Power is building the plants, including the 100 million shekel ($30 million) Ketura Sun solar field in Israel’s scorching Negev desert, which will begin providing electricity to some 1,000 residents this summer. Israel is pushing to become a world leader in alternative energy, with the government backing cutting-edge technologies and setting a goal to have 10 percent of its electricity generated by alternative means by 2020. Israel depends almost entirely for its energy on imported coal and natural gas. Its gas supply from Egypt has become more volatile since President Hosni Mubarak’s February ouster because of attacks on the pipeline and criticism in Egypt over the pricing of the exports. “Our goal is to green the grid so much that Israel will be the first major economy that will transform itself from carbon-based to solarbased,” Arava President Yosef Abramowitz said Friday. Once connected, the 20-acre (8-hectare) Ketura solar plant will produce nearly 5 megawatts. It is expected to sell power to Israel’s Electric Company for 1.52 shekels (45 cents) per kilowatt-hour See ISRAEL, Page 3D

Employees are allowed to discuss the conditions of their employment with co-workers — in the break room, in the parking lot or on Facebook. That was the National Labor Relations Board’s basic position involving an unfair labor practices case the agency brought against an employer. The backstory: A worker — at home, on Facebook — had posted derogatory comments about a supervisor. Co-workers read the post, “liked it” and In most workplaces, added barbs. The employemployees are “at er fired the will.” Texting or original author tweeting workers for violating a can be fired simply company policy that barred because the boss doesn’t think a post employees from depicting reflects well on the the company “in any way” company or the on social individual. media. But the labor relations board said that the policy was too broad and that it infringed on the rights of workers — union and non-union — to engage in “protected concerted activities.” In settling the case, the employer agreed to narrow its policy so it did not restrict employees from discussing wages, hours and working conditions with co-workers and others while not at work. Employment law attorney Shelly Freeman warned people attending last week’s Heartland Labor and Employment Law Conference in Overland Park, Kan., that case law and regulatory opinions are building more slowly than the social media use they’re trying to control. In most workplaces, employees are “at will.” Texting or tweeting workers can be fired simply because the boss doesn’t think a post reflects well on the company or the individual. Lawyers and government agencies will successfully object if the firings violate laws governing discrimination, harassment or other legal protections, such as the “concerted activities” cited in the above Facebook case. But if and until the law catches up with social media use, any worker concerned with job security and any employer concerned with protecting an image online should make sure they’re on the same page. Organizations need a social media policy that’s specific and updated. Employees should know exactly what it says. Diane Stafford is the workplace and careers columnist at The Kansas City Star. Her “Your Job” blog at economy.kansascity.com includes daily posts about job-related issues of wide interest. Readers may write to her at: Kansas City Star, 1729 Grand Blvd., Kansas City, Mo. 64108-1413, or by email at dstaffordkcstar.com.

Surprise Dad with a heavy-hitting Father’s Day at the Baseball Hall of Fame IF YOU don’t have plans for Father’s Day, may I suggest a jaunt over the state line and into Cooperstown, N.Y? Next weekend is full of events at the home of the Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. On Father’s Day, Sunday, June 19, the Third Annual Hall of Fame Classic, a seven-inning legends exhibition game featuring several Hall of Fame members and a score of other retired major league players, will play ball at the historic Doubleday Field at 2 p.m. The game is preceded by a parade

ANDREW M. SEDER STEALS & DEALS down Main Street that steps off at noon from the corner between Main and Fair streets. Hall of Fame members scheduled to be featured in the game include Andre Dawson, Goose Gossage, Phil Niekro, Jim Rice, Ozzie Smith and Dick Williams. Other former major leaguers who just didn’t rise to the level of “Hall of Famer” will also be on hand, including Willie Wilson, Doug Glanville and Bill Lee. All will ride on trolleys in the

parade. Make it a weekend if you can. Thanks to Price Chopper, a visit to the Hall of Fame on Saturday will be free. Just show your Price Chopper AdvantEdge Card at the ticket counter at you’ll be admitted for free, up to a family of four per card. The museum is open from 9 a.m. until 9 p.m. While the Hall of Flame Classic has become an annual event, so has Stanton Lanes’ “Kids Bowl Free” summer program. This year’s theme is “Say No To Drugs, Say Yes To Bowling,” and aims to give area youth a safe environment for summer recreation. The alley has also invited

law enforcement officers to “provide safety tips during the free bowling times,” said Stanton Lanes’ proprietor Paul Waliczek. Stanton Lanes will provide each area elementary, middleor high- school-aged student, three free games of bowling every Tuesday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Thursday from noon to 5 p.m. starting this week. The only charge would be shoe rental if needed. “Yes, it is a significant investment on our part,” said Terri Vesek, general manager of Stanton Lanes, “but we believe it is an investment in our community’s future. Bowling is a lifetime sport that can be enjoyed by anyone — any

age, any size and any background. We believe this program will give the kids something to do this summer that is positive and constructive.” There are other facets to the program, including enrollment in the President’s Fitness Challenge. For more information contact Vesek at 824-4661. I’m always a proponent of deals that benefit both myself and others. And Wendy’s has such an offer.. For just a $1 donation, customers at participating Wendy’s restaurants in Northeast and Central Pennsylvania can get a Frosty key tag through July 31. By showing the key tag on subsequent visits to participating Wendy’s, custom-

ers will receive a free Jr. Frosty with any purchase as often as they wish through December 31, 2011. Wendy’s will donate 50 percent of the net proceeds of key tag sales to the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption and the local Wendy’s Wonderful Kids program in Northeast and Central Pennsylvania. The other 50 percent of the proceeds will be donated to local chapters of the American Red Cross. You win, the charities win. Andrew M. Seder, a Times Leader staff writer, may be reached at 570829-7269. If you know of any local steals or deals, send them to aseder@timesleader.com.


CMYK PAGE 2D

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SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011

BUSINESS AGENDA MAEA Human Resources Roundtable

The Northeast Pennsylvania Manufacturers and Employers Association will hold a Human Resources Roundtable from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. on Monday, June 20 at the Top of the 80’s, Hazleton. Lunch will be served at noon. Cost is $36 per person for members or $72 per person for non-mem-

BUSINESS AWARDS Bruce S. Zero and James F. Mundy, of Powell Law, Scranton, were recently named Super Lawyers by Philadelphia Magazine. They are among the five percent of Zero Pennsylvania lawyers who have received that designation. Mundy has been on the list every year since the program began Mundy and Zero has been on the list since 2007. Pennoni Associates, a consulting engineering and design firm headquartered in Philadelphia with branch offices in WilkesBarre and Scranton, was recently ranked No. 92 on Engineering News Record’s annual list of the Top 500 Design Firms. Robert W. Munley III, a partner in the regional law firm of Munley, Munley & Cartwright, recently earned the classification of “AV Rated Attorney� by MartindaleHubbell, the authoritative resource for information on Munley III the worldwide legal profession. Munley’s “AV Preeminent� certification is a peer rating acknowledging his legal skill set and is the highest professional rating an attorney can attain. Choice One Community Federal

bers. Detective Christopher Orozco, of the Hazleton Police Department, will discuss Gang Awareness. He will provide information on gangs operating in Northeastern Pennsylvania, the history of gangs, understanding gang mentality and gang identifiers such as tattoos, dress, writings and graffiti. For more information or to register, contact Gina Whalen at 6220992 or by email at gwhalen@maea.biz.

Credit Union, Wilkes-Barre, recently received an Honorable Mention in the Pennsylvania Credit Union Association’s Annual Publications and Website Awards. The awards honor outstanding achievement in marketing efforts by credit unions for their annual reports, newsletters, and websites. Julie McKelvey, owner of MiracleEar Center, Wilkes-Barre, recently earned the 2010 Platinum Club Award from the Miracle-Ear franchise organization. The award is presented to the top franchisees for achievement in adhering to compliance standards and excelling in four weighted sales performance categories. David and Bill Maines, of Maines Food & Paper Inc., were recently named Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year 2011 New York Award finalists. The awards program recognizes entrepreneurs who demonstrate excellence and extraordinary success in such areas as innovation, financial performance and personal commitment to their businesses and communities. The Maines brothers were selected as a finalist from nearly 70 nominations by a panel of independent judges. The Maine Food Source, which operates a location in Forty Fort, is a subsidiary of the company. Peoples Neighborhood Bank, Hallstead, recently received the Pillars of the Community Award from the Federal Home Loan Bank of Pittsburgh. The local bank was honored for its outstanding work across the region in the areas of affordable housing and community revitalization. The bank has branches in Wyoming, Lackawanna and Susquehanna counties.

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CORPORATE LADDER SEMIAN REAL ESTATE GROUP

Scott J. Weiland, Clarks Summit, was recently appointed senior vice president of the commercial division of the group. He has a vast amount of experience in the commercial real estate arena and was previously employed by The Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce as vice president of operations.

FIRST NATIONAL COMMUNITY BANCORP INC.

Thomas J. Melone, Pittston, was recently appointed to the board of directors for the parent company of Dunmore-based First National Community Bank. Melone serves as a partner for the Albert B. Melone Company, a leading provider of accounting, tax and consulting services throughout the Northeastern Pennsylvania region. He leads the firm’s Tax Preparation and Advisory Services line as well as its Small Business Advisory and Consulting Services business line. He also has extensive experience in the financial management of public school districts operating in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. He is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and the Pennsylvania Institute of Certified Public Accountants. Kendrick C. Smith, Dunmore, was recently appointed vice president/ treasury officer of First National Community Bank. He is responsible for overseeing Smith the treasury operations and investments of FNCB, implementing strategies to increase capital, establishing financial goals and executing money managing activities. Smith earned his Chartered Financial Analyst designation in 1995. Phillip Ogren, Kingston, was recently appointed vice president/ information technology officer. He oversees the Information Technology Ogren and Oper-

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ations departments at First National Community Bank. Ogren has more than 25 years of experience in software development and technology operations, most recently serving as a vice president of Cred-UComp, Inc. He holds a bachelor’s degree in finance and commerce from Wilkes University.

THE INN AT POCONO MANOR

John Gadbois was recently named sales manager for the historic resort. He is responsible for nurturing existing corporate and association customers, as well as developing new Gadbois sources of business. A 21-year veteran of the hospitality industry, Gadbois most recently worked for Fairmont Hotels and Resorts. He is a graduate of Orange County Community College.

FRANKLIN SECURITY BANK

The Plains Township bank recently added four new members to its Board of Directors. William J. Cunningham, former NBA player and coach, holds a degree in history from the University of North Carolina. He has spent his post retirement years researching Cunningham and investing in novel and entrepreneurial entities as well as making substantive investments in equity funds specializing in de novo and community banks and thrifts. Gerard Michael Karam is a managing partner at the law firm of Mazzoni, Karam, Petorak and Valvano. He holds a bachelor’s degree in accounting from St. JoKaram seph’s University, Philadelphia, and is a graduate of the Loyola University School of Law, Chicago, Ill. Karam is a former chief public defender for Lackawanna County and a former assistant city solicitor for the city of

THE TIMES LEADER Scranton. Robert J. Knowles Jr. is the owner of Knowles Insurance Agency, Scranton. He holds a bachelor’s degree in economics from the College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, Knowles Jr. Mass. Knowles is currently vice chairman of Mercy Health Partners and a member of the Performing Arts Authority. John P. Rodgers is employed by the law firm of Caverly, Shea, Phillips and Rodgers. He is also the managing member of Royal Star Bus Lines, LLC, Royal Star Limo, LLC and Rodgers Hummus Kings, LLC as well as president of WAR Enterprises, Inc., trading and doing business as LizRick Travel. Rodgers holds an honors degree in economics from Penn State University. He serves as a member of the Executive Committee of the Wilkes-Barre Law and Library Association and is the founder and president of Northeast Revenue Service, LLC which provides municipal and financial advisory services.

THE INSTITUTE FOR ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH OF NORTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA The Institute recently added two new professional staff members with expertise in water quality assessment and geospatial analysis. Thomas Barnard, Exeter, is a research scientist. He designs and oversees the Institute’s water quality research program. Barnard is a professional engineer with more than 25 years experience in water resources and water quality management. He is the author of training manuals, technical papers and textbooks relating to water quality monitoring and applications of numerical models to water resources infrastructure. He has extensive experience in Northeastern Pennsylvania, including water supply and water quality issues in the Susquehanna River Basin. Brian Naberezny, Exeter, is a geospatial analyst. He designs and implements the Institute’s

www.timesleader.com

Geographic Information System program, which will help analyze trends in water quality associated with Marcellus energy development. Naberezny holds a bachelor’s degree in surveying and a master’s degree in spatial information science and engineering from the University of Maine. His expertise includes developing automated systems for the collection, computation, processing and analysis of spatial information. He also presents training and educational workshops related to geospatial technologies and surveying. He is the owner of Naberezny Mapping and Positioning Solutions and is a member of the board of directors of the Pennsylvania Society of Land Surveyors.

FIRST LIBERTY BANK

Barbara Toczko-Maculloch, Wyoming, was recently appointed regional manager and vice president of the bank’s Wealth Management Group. She is responsible for the supervision of the marketing and Toczko-Maculloch sales activities of the department, which consists of the First Liberty Trust Department, First Liberty Investment Services, and Nottingham Advisors. Toczko-Maculloch has more than 25 years of experience in the banking industry and created and established the Private Banking Wealth Management divisions for M&T Investment Group and PNC Bank in northeastern Pennsylvania. She holds a bachelor’s degree with a concentration in banking from Misericordia University.

PRUDENTIAL POGGI & JONES Barbara Gunton, Pittston Township, recently joined the professional sales team in the firm’s Forty Fort office. She holds an associate’s degree in legal secretarial science from Keystone Junior College Gunton and attended Vintage Real Estate Academy. She is a member of the WilkesBarre Association of Realtors.

          







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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011 PAGE 3D

SOLAR Continued from Page 1D

SUBMITTED PHOTO

CAN DO, Inc., Greater Hazletonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economic development organization, held its 55th annual dinner Tuesday at Best Western Genetti Inn & Suites, in Hazleton. Among those in attendance were, from left, W. Kevin Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Donnell, CAN DO president; Congressman Lou Barletta, the eveningâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s speaker; Dr. Edgar L. Dessen, CAN DO founder and chairman emeritus; and John J. Spevak, CAN DOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chairman of the board.

CAN DO, Inc. celebrates longevity at annual dinner Times Leader Staff

clude: Dr. Edgar L. Dessen,, chairman emeritus; David M. McCarthy, vice chairman; Dr. John Madden, vice chairman; Patrick Ward, vice chairman; W. Kevin Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Donnell, president; Llewellyn F. Dryfoos III, secretary; Robert Judd, treasurer; Joseph F. Lettiere, vice president of sales and marketing; Nancy R. Stasko, assistant secretary; and Patricia Gendler, assistant secretary. Arthur A. Tarone, Daniel Jorgensen and Gary Danish were elected as at-large members of the executive committee. Those elected to the CAN DO Board of Directors as at-large members were: George Andrews, Charles Burkhardt, Tim Cole, Anthony J. Dixon, Esq., Llewellyn F. Dryfoos, III, Brian Earley, James Edwards, Peter J. Fagan, Esq., Eugene F. Gallagher, William F. Genetti, Frank George, Martha M. Herron, Daniel Jorgensen, Robert Judd, Jane Kanyock, Jeff Kovalick, John Madden, Terry Malloy, Paul Malone, David M. McCarthy, Rick Morelli, Ken Okrepkie, Jerry Panisak, Jan Pasdon, Lonnie Polli, John Schwear, Alexander Sloot, John J. Spevak, Arthur A. Tarone, Matthew Turowski, Esq., Patrick Ward and Joseph Zeller.

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Pocono Raceway president Brandon Igdalski walks near the panels at the Pocono Raceway Solar Farm.

and Massachusetts for $525. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One main reason for this is Pennsylvania allows out-ofstate systems to register to sell their SRECs in PA,â&#x20AC;? Igdalsky said. To fix this problem state Rep. Chris Ross, R-Chester, proposed Bill 1580 to increase the amount of solar energy utility companies are required to purchase between the years 2012 and 2015. Katy Gresh, a spokeswoman with the state Department of Environmental Protection, said â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pennsylvania taxpayers and ratepayers have offered extraordinarily generous support for the solar industry over the past several years, both through the AEPS mandate and through the $180 million in grants and rebates included in the 2008 Alternative Energy Investment Act.â&#x20AC;?

She said as good as the programs have worked, other factors need to be considered. â&#x20AC;&#x153;While we want to see continued growth of this and other energy industries across the commonwealth, we need to keep in mind that all costs associated with the solar renewable energy credit market are passed on to ratepayers. We will continue to monitor this situation going forward, and we will seek to strike the appropriate balance that is sustainable both for this industry and for ratepayers.â&#x20AC;? Pitcavage said he would also like to see Pennsylvania utilities only buy SRECs generated within the state. This could boost the price of SRECs up again and make Pennsylvaniaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s solar market more competitive with neighboring states. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Solar created in Pennsylva-

nia should stay in Pennsylvania,â&#x20AC;? Bittner said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why should utility companies charge PA customers fees for energy created in other states?â&#x20AC;? Despite this, Igdalsky firmly believes the $18 million solar farm was worth the investment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a good business move,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For one it was the right thing to do. We have shown the sports world and fans that solar can be done and done right.â&#x20AC;? Pitcavage said he has heard of several solar companies and specially trained solar technicians migrating to New Jersey where the market is strong. He plans on weathering this drop and stay in the area. Bittner said with any new industry, glitches arise, but believes solar will be around for a long time.

plant being built nearby is expected to provide one-third of the electricity needed to power the Red Sea resort city Continued from Page 1D of Eilat, 30 miles (50 kilometers) to the south. for 20 years. Last year, Israel dedicated A 125-acre (50-hectare)

a smaller on-grid solar project â&#x20AC;&#x201D; an $8.5 million collection of 40 solar panel systems that supplies 2 megawatts, enough to power about 500 homes. Israel has dozens of solar

fields, but most are pilot projects to test new technologies. Abramowitz said the company aims to produce 400 megawatts at a cost of $2 billion.

ISRAEL



HAZLETON -- CAN DO, Inc., Greater Hazletonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economic development organization, celebrated another year during its 55th annual dinner held Tuesday at Best Western Genetti Inn & Suites, Hazleton. Board Chairman John J. Spevak shared details of CAN DOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s previous year, including how the organization is coping with challenging economic times. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a year of transition as we continue to deal with a difficult economy while remaining focused on our mission, which is to improve the quality of life in Greater Hazleton through the creation of employment opportunities. While land sales have been slow, we are looking to rely on different revenue sources, including our water and sewer utilities, railroad operations and leasing activity, to help sustain our organization and improve it for the future,â&#x20AC;? he said. It was also announced that in May, during CAN DOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual meeting, the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s board of directors elected officers and at-large board members. In addition to Spevak being elected chairman, CAN DO officers approved for 2011-2012 in-

purchase SRECs generated within the state. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Currently, solar energy credits from Ohio and Washington, D.C. are being purchased by Pennsylvania utility companies,â&#x20AC;? Pitcavage said. Lissette Santana, spokesperson from electric company PPL, confirmed recently her company purchased 25,000 SRECs for an eight-and-a-halfyear period for $149 per SREC. When asked where the solar credits were from, she responded, â&#x20AC;&#x153;it was one winning bidder, location is undisclosed.â&#x20AC;? Pitcavage and Bittner have noted the selling price utility companies are paying for SRECs have dropped as a result. Pocono Raceway President Brandon Igdalsky, has seen this drop first hand. Overseeing the largest solar farm at a sporting venue in the world, the Pocono Raceway solar farm has 40,000 solar panels and produces enough energy to power the race track facility and 1,000 local homes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our system is expected to generate roughly 3.6 to 3.8 million kilowatt hours each year,â&#x20AC;? Igdalsky said. Igdalsky said the prices of SRECs have dropped from $300 to $80. New Jersey, for example, is selling SRECs for $655,

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SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011

OFFICE COACH

Firm’s cell-phone policy needs to be revisited

By MARIE G. MCINTYRE McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Q: Our office has an outdated cell phone policy that doesn’t address text messaging. It simply says “If an employee receives an important call on their cell phone, they are to leave the office and proceed into the hall to take the call.” At least half of our employees keep cell phones on their desk and do a lot of texting during the workday. Many people feel that management needs to step up and deal with this issue, because texting distracts people and reduces productivity. Don’t you think we should have a texting policy? A: Actually, your company needs a more general guideline, not another specific rule. Phone calls and texts are only two examples of the many personal pursuits that can make people less productive. Others might include online shopping, running errands, reading magazines, exploring social media, or anything else that takes time away from work. For that reason, your policy should simply indicate that during work hours, employees are expected to avoid engaging in personal activities which interfere with productivity. Providing examples would be helpful, as long as the policy clearly states that the list is not comprehensive. Management should introduce the new policy in a staff meeting, allowing time for questions and discussion. If texting has been a particular problem, then that issue should be specifically addressed. For example: “Texting has become a significant distraction from work for some employees. From now on, everyone is expected to limit texting about personal matters to breaks and lunch. Exceptions can be made for critical situations.” After that, anyone who continues to over-text should be dealt with individually. Finally, this would also be an excellent time to eliminate that rather silly “call in the hall” cell phone rule. Al-

Phone calls and texts are only two examples of the many personal pursuits that can make people less productive. Others might include online shopping, running errands, reading magazines, exploring social media, or anything else that takes time away from work.

lowing personal conversations on a desk phone, while banishing mobile talkers to the corridor, makes absolutely no sense. Q: I recently applied for the supervisory position in my department, but management selected an applicant from outside the company. Although my boss said I was not qualified for the position, he has now asked me to train the woman who was hired. If he thinks I’m not qualified, how can he expect me to train someone else? A: While your confusion is understandable, your manager’s request actually does make sense. External candidates are typically chosen for their management expertise, industry experience or some other useful attribute. What they lack, however, is an understanding of their new surroundings. As a knowledgeable insider, you are being asked to orient this woman to the company, not teach her how to supervise. Although your recent rejection may have left you feeling slightly resentful, you need to recognize that training your boss presents a valuable opportunity. Not only will she see that you are well-regarded, but you will also be able to impress her with your competence and helpful spirit. If you handle this interaction wisely, she might even recommend you for the next supervisory opening. Marie G. McIntyre is a workplace coach and the author of “Secrets to Winning at Office Politics.” Send in questions and get free coaching tips at http://www.yourofficecoach.com, or follow her on Twitter officecoach.

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www.timesleader.com

Senators want to stamp out ‘shoe tax’ By ROB HOTAKAINEN McClatchy Newspapers

AP FILE PHOTO

WASHINGTON — U.S. consumers would see a sharp drop in the price of imported shoes — and that’s nearly all shoes sold in the United States — if a bipartisan group of senators is successful in stamping out the nation’s “shoe tax.” “It is kind of a hidden tax, and getting rid of it would be nice to do,” Democratic Sen. Maria Cantwell of Washington state, a member of the Senate Finance Committee, said Wednesday. Cantwell has teamed up with Democratic Sen. Patty Murray of Washington state and Republican Sens. Roy Blunt of Missouri and Pat Roberts of Kansas to promote the Affordable Footwear Act, which would eliminate roughly half the duties on imported shoes. Cantwell, the measure’s chief sponsor, said consumers were paying a tax of up to 40 percent

Manager Melissa Kotonski restocks the shelves the Famous Footwear store in Aurora, Ohio. Senators are trying to stomp out a shoe taxthat they say could save consumers hundreds of millions of dollars.

in some cases. Backers said the legislation would lead to more sales for retailers and more savings for consumers. While the bill has yet to arouse any opposition, it’s a hit with the shoe industry. Last year, it would have eliminated about $800 million of the $2 billion collected on imported children’s and low-cost shoes. “It would be fantastic. ... It would allow (consumers) to buy a second pair or buy a pair that they

normally would have to put off another month,” said Bill Snowden, a shoe distributor from Bellevue, Wash., and the senior vice president of Topline Corp., which employs 100 people. The shoe tax, which dates to the 1930s, originally was aimed at protecting a manufacturing sector that’s all but disappeared in the United States, according to the American Apparel & Footwear Association, a national trade organization. Over the last two decades,

nearly all shoe production has moved outside the country. The group said that 99 percent of the shoes bought in the United States last year were produced internationally,makingitvirtuallyimpossible for Americans to avoid the tax. While tariffs on different shoes vary, they might result in a $15 pair of shoes selling for as much as $25, Snowden said. In past years, Snowden said, it’s been difficult to get members of Congress to focus on shoes, given their preoccupation with war, the economy and other big issues of the day. Even though the legislation has stalled, Snowden said it had won supportfrommanyDemocratsand Republicans in both houses of Congress. “There have been so many other major, major pressing issues ... that it gets bypassed, unfortunately,” he said. Cantwell said that could happen again this year.

FDA: Some chicken may have small amount of arsenic By MARY CLARE JALONICK Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday that some chicken meat may contain small amounts of arsenic, though the agency is stressing that the amount is too tiny to be dangerous to people who eat it. The FDA said Wednesday that a new study developed by the agency shows that an ingredient in chicken feed that contains arsenic, called Roxarsone, may makeitswayintopartsofthebird that are eaten. Previous studies have indicated that the arsenic was eliminated with chicken waste. Pfizer Inc., which makes the feed ingredient, said Wednesday that it will pull it off the market in the United States. Had the company not stopped sales, the FDA could have eventually banned the product since it contains a known carcinogen. Many poultry producers have already stopped feeding their birds the ingredient, which has been used since the 1940s to kill parasites and promote growth. The FDA said that people

shouldnotstopeatingchickenthat may have been fed the drug. Michael Taylor, FDA’s deputy commissioner for foods, said the study raised “concerns of a very low but completely avoidable exposure to a carcinogen.” Pfizer said in a statement that a subsidiary, Alpharma LLC, is suspending sales next month in response to the FDA findings. The company said it is waiting a month so producers have time to transition their birds off the drug. The ingredient will also be pulled off the market for swine and turkeys, though the FDA only studied chickens. Scott Brown, of Pfizer Animal Health’s Veterinary Medicine Research and Development division, said the company also sells the ingredient in about a dozen other countries. He said Pfizer is reaching outtoregulatoryauthoritiesinthose countriesandwilldecidewhetherto sell it on an individual basis. In the study of 100 chickens, the FDA found that chickens that had

eaten the Roxarsone had higher levels of inorganic arsenic — as opposed to organic arsenic, which is naturally occurring — in their livers than chickens which had not eaten the Roxarsone. Inorganic arsenic is more toxic than the naturally occurring form. The agency attempted to study levels of arsenic found in chicken muscle — breasts and legs, for example—inadditiontotheliversbut that test ran into complications. An agency official said Wednesday that they would expect about 40 times less arsenic to be found in the muscle than in the liver. Roxarsone has long been a concern for environmental and consumer groups worried about its presence in chicken waste and the resulting effects on human health in areas with high chicken production. Maryland state lawmakers have attempted to force a ban in that state, saying the arsenic ends up in the Chesapeake Bay. “Arsenic in chicken production poses a risk not only to human

health, but to the environment,” said Michael Hansen, a senior scientist with Consumers Union, which publishes Consumer Reports. “We need to get arsenic out of food production altogether.” Consumers Union and other groups praised the FDA’s move but asked the agency to go further and encourage bans of other animal drugsthatcontainarsenic.TheFDA said it is looking at another drug made by Pfizer, Nitarsone, which contains arsenic and is fed to chickens and turkeys but is used much lessfrequentlythanRoxarsone.Officials said they are in talks with the companyaboutthatdrugbutdonot have any data specific to it. The National Chicken Council, which represents companies that produce and process chickens, said in a statement that the ingredient has been used to maintain good health in chickens for many years, and that it is used in “many, but not all” flocks. “Chicken is safe to eat,” the group said.

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MarketPulse SMALLER CUSHIONS Strong profits mean companies are sitting on more cash than ever, but there’s a catch. Their obligations are rising too. Companies have more in lease payments, debt repayments and other items that they’re contractually required to pay. That means their cash cushions may not be as fat as some had thought, says Credit Suisse analyst David Zion. Investors had hoped those cash cushions would go toward dividend increases and acquisitions. At the end of 2010, companies in the S&P 500 had enough cash to pay for six months of their contractual obligations, according to Zion. That’s better than 2007, when companies had less than four months’ worth. But it’s the same level they had in 2004.

PERU’S YOUR PROBLEM Mining stocks tanked Monday, and it wasn’t because of weaker metals prices. Blame Peru. Ollanta Humala won the country’s presidency, and the leftist former army officer talked early in the campaign about higher taxes and royalties on businesses. Peru’s stock market dropped 12.4 percent Monday, the day after the election, on worries he will be anti-business. Phoenix-based miner Southern Copper (SCCO) lost nearly as much, 11.3 percent. Peruvian mines produce about 7 percent of the world’s copper and 16 percent of its silver, says Deutsche Bank. Standard & Poor’s says it’s too early to change its ratings on Peruvian companies. Humala has recently said he’s more like Brazil’s last president, who oversaw strong economic growth, than Venezuela’s, who has nationalized businesses.

Growing cash troves Cash holdings of S&P 500 companies, by quarter $950b 900 850 800 750 700 650 600

2007

2008

2009

2010

Source: Standard & Poor’s Indices

BRINGING UP THE REAR Utilities and telecoms have been some of the best stocks since May because investors want companies that will hold up in a slowing economy. But here’s one note of caution: These industries turned in the worst profit results last quarter. Total earnings for utilities in the S&P 500 index grew just 0.1 percent. At Southern Co., for example, firstquarter earnings per share fell 17 percent after a milder winter meant fewer heaters were running. That led to less electricity demand for Southern. Telecom profit growth was hardly better, at 0.5 percent for the industry. Financial analysts don’t expect the pair to do much better this quarter. They forecast profit to rise 1.5 percent for telecoms and drop 1.6 percent for utilities.

Q2 estimated earnings growth by industry in the S&P 500 MATERIAL PRODUCERS

48.2%

ENERGY

37.2

FINANCIAL

20.3

INDUSTRIAL

13.5

CONSUMER DISCRETIONARY

10.7

TECHNOLOGY

10.5

CONSUMER STAPLES

6.2

TELECOMMUNICATIONS

1.5

HEALTH CARE

1.0

Data through June 9 Source: FactSet

UTILITIES

-1.6

Stan Choe, Kristen Girard • AP

When bad things happen to good companies Don Cleven, portfolio manager of the Touchstone Mid-Cap Value fund (TCVAX), likes to own shares in companies that have temporary problems but that are still good long-term bets. Top holdings include energy company AGL Resources and software maker Synopsys. He recently talked about his strategy.

InsiderQ&A

Mid-cap stocks have risen 31 percent over the past year. Is it tougher to find values? The market is still up a lot in the last two years. But I would say we’re selectively bullCleven ish. Not all stocks have gone up together. We’re finding interesting ideas in (companies that do well later in economic recoveries). Could you give some examples? So you have one like Quest Diagnostics (DGX). Quest is the largest domestic clinical lab. But ultimately, their volume is tied to patient visits: people going to the doctor. Patient visits really struggled during the recession, which is ultimately tied to employment, insurance (and) increasing co-pays. Even though their business is currently depressed because of this issue ... they are showing some signs of stabilization.

Some real estate is rising

Real estate has been one of the best investments of 2011 — if you’re talking about commercial real estate. Real estate investment trusts, known as REITS, have been hot. Mutual funds that own REITs, which control apartment complexes, shopping centers and other commercial property, returned 9.5 percent this year through Tuesday. They returned 31.3 percent and 27.1 percent the last two years. “The REIT industry is in a state of nirvana,” Citi analyst Michael Bilerman wrote in a report. REITs are attractive in part because they pay at least 90 percent of their income as dividends. Financial analysts say several factors are behind their rise this year: • Low interest rates. The 10-year Treasury’s yield is below 3 percent. That’s forcing income investors to look elsewhere. Health Care REIT (HCN), which owns assisted living facilities, yields 5.5 percent. Associated

Estates Realty (AEC), an apartment owner, yields 4.2 percent. Low rates also make borrowing cheaper and has created a “Snow White magic mirror making everyone (in the REIT industry) look pretty, at least for the moment,” FBR analyst Sri Nagarajan wrote in a report. • Improving demand. The U.S. homeownership rate fell in the first quarter to its lowest level since 1998. That means more renters are apartment hunting. For health care REITs, investors expect the first wave of baby boomers to start heading to assisted living and senior centers. A caveat: the REIT rally has brought down their dividend yields. Equity REITs have an average yield of 3.4 percent. That’s above the yield on the 10-year note, but below the 4.7 percent that REITs averaged the last five years. Another concern: the slowing economy. It could hurt office building owners.

15.3% 15.3 15.0

Self storage

PRIME FED Taxable—national avg RATE FUNDS Flex-funds Money Market/Retail FRIDAY 3.25 .13 Tax-exempt—national avg 6 MO AGO 3.25 .13 Alpine Municipal MMF/Investor 1 YR AGO 3.25 .13

Timber Apartment buildings

11.3

Office buildings/industrial

8.9

Shopping centers, other retail

5.9

Health care

-4.0

Lodging/resorts

10.3

ALL EQUITY REITS

3.0

S&P 500

SOURCES: National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts; Standard & Poor's

LocalStocks

TICKER

Data through June 7

Bon Ton Store

BONT

6.08 2

17.49

7.60

CIGNA Corp

CI

29.12 0

50.70

49.09

CVS Caremark Corp

CVS

26.84 9

39.50

37.21

-0.76

-2.0

t

s

7.0 +17.98

CocaCola

KO

49.47 9

68.77

65.39

-0.14

-0.2

t

s

-0.6 +28.08

Comcast Corp A

CMCSA 16.76 7

27.16

23.89

-0.34

-1.4

t

t

Community Bk Sys

CBU

21.33 3

28.95

23.16

-0.26

-1.1

Community Hlth Sys

CYH

22.33 2

42.50

25.75

-0.94

Entercom Comm

ETM

4.97 4

13.63

8.19

Fairchild Semicond

FCS

7.71 7

21.02

16.69

So the company is being overly cautious to help ease this new CEO into the role? Right.

APD

64.13 9

96.00

91.17

1.54

1.7

s

s

Amer Water Works Amerigas Part LP

AWK

19.83 9

30.70

28.59

-0.46

-1.6

t

APU

39.97 3

51.50

43.05

-1.18

-2.7

t

Aqua America Inc

WTR

16.65 7

23.79

21.36

-0.34

-1.6

t

t

Arch Dan Mid

ADM

24.42 4

38.02

29.54

-0.85

-2.8

t

t

6.5 +54.59

0.01 0.15 $ 2,500 min (888) 785-5578

2.73 4.97 3.68 5.26 7.14 1.81

-0.03 -0.02 0.00 -0.01 0.26 -0.05

FRIDAY YIELD

1WK

0.03 0.19 0.09 0.39 1.56

0.00 0.00 0.00 -0.02 -0.04

s s s t t

t t t t t

-0.05 -0.18 -0.07 -0.38 -0.54

0.17 0.37 0.21 0.83 2.39

0.17 0.05 0.31 1.02

10-year T-Note 2.97 30-year T-Bond 4.18 Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.

-0.02 -0.05

t t

t -0.34 t -0.06

3.72 4.77

2.38 3.53

%CHG 1MO

%RTN 1YR

TREASURYS 3-month T-Bill 1-year T-Bill 6-month T-Bill 2-year T-Note 5-year T-Note

CHANGE 1MO 3MO 1YR t t t t s t

t t t t s t

-0.35 0.09 -0.78 0.14 -2.34 -0.27

S Choe K Girard • AP

TICKER

3.29 5.31 4.58 5.95 9.52 2.46

CHANGE 1MO 3MO 1YR

Exchange-Traded Funds NAME

52-WK HIGH LOW

FRIDAY CLOSE

CHG WK

2.35 4.24 3.47 4.86 6.61 1.35

52-WK HIGH LOW

%CHG 1WK

iPath ShtExt Rus1000

ROSA

34.45

6.45

23.0

18.0

...

iPath ShtExt Rus2000

RTSA

37.73

5.76

18.0

43.5

... -59.1

Direx China Bear 3x

CZI

17.20

2.33

15.7

22.6

iPath ShtEnh EAFE

MFSA

78.75

9.90

14.4

2.2

...

DRV

14.03

1.61

13.0

10.8

64.8

2 10.1

18

2.5

Direxion REst Bear3x

s 13.0 +47.28

1 12.3a

18

3.1

iPath ShtExt S&P500

SFSA

37.31

3.94

11.8

27.4

...

t -11.8 +13.49

3 13.6

28

6.9

Direx SOX Bear 3X

SOXS

69.77

7.31

11.7

27.6

72.7

-5.0 +29.24

2

1.9

22

2.9

Dir Dly Gold Bear2x

DUST

47.93

4.83

11.2

1.8

...

-1.8 +18.79

3

-4.8

9

2.2

ProShs UltPro ShtR2K

SRTY

20.75

2.03

10.8

20.1

-66.8 394.1

AutoZone Inc

AZO

4.72

1.7

s

s

1 25.6

16

...

Direxion SCapBear 3x

TZA

42.08

4.07

10.7

19.9

Bank of America

BAC

10.50 1

16.10

10.80

-0.48

-4.3

t

t -19.0—29.88 5 -19.3

20

0.4

Direx LatAm Bear 3x

LHB

18.34

1.73

10.4

1.5

-59.7

Bk of NY Mellon

BK

23.78 3

32.50

26.27

-0.63

-2.3

t

t -13.0 +2.89

-1.7

13

2.0

Direxion TechBear 3x

TYP

24.20

2.22

10.1

22.1

141.1

-2.03 -21.1

t

t -40.0—27.28 5 -19.6

58

2.6

-0.52

s

s 33.9 +43.91

9

0.1

iPath Beta Lead

LEDD

49.12

4.43

9.9

-0.1

...

ProShs UltPro ShtQQQ

SQQQ

28.81

2.52

9.6

20.7

-59.9

Frontier Comm

FTR

Genpact Ltd

G

Harte Hanks Inc

183.70 0 299.60 290.20

0.2 +35.28

0.01 0.11 $ 2,500 min (800) 325-3539

1WK

Broad market Lehman Triple-A corporate Moody’s Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman Municipal Bond Buyer U.S. high yield Barclays Treasury Barclays

52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN RANK %RTN LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD

You like to own companies that have temporary problems. What stocks in your portfolio fit that model? I’ll give you a brand new one, which is Newell Rubbermaid (NWL). The stock was punished for lowering guidance not only because the consumer is weaker than they expected but also because of inflationary (pressures). Rubbermaid (uses) a lot of plastic, that’s resin. ... The third reason that they didn’t say, which I think makes it kind of interesting here, is that they’re about to announce their new CEO. I really think one of the main reasons they were doing this is they had already chewed through the cushion of their guidance and they didn’t want to hand new guidance to a new CEO to turn around and disappoint (investors). So I think they’re clearing the decks for the new incoming CEO that should be announced in weeks.

Air Products

MIN INVEST PHONE

YIELD

FRIDAY YIELD

U.S. BOND INDEXES

2.9% 3.4 2.7 3.5 3.6 5.3 1.7 3.4 2.0

COMPANY

One of your top holdings is Cintas (CTAS), the uniform company. What’s the story there? Cintas is the largest uniform rental company in the country. Obviously, it’s partially tied to employment. Right now, even though the employment picture is slowly recovering, it’s still pretty bleak. ... (But) everyone sees Cintas trucks rolling around. They’re already coming into the building. If, in the building, somebody hires three more people, you’re hanging up three more uniforms, there’s no incremental cost. It’s all profit. As employment slowly improves, it drives very strong, very attractive incremental (profit) margins. And the stock is cheap anyways on a cash-flow basis.

Money market mutual funds

DIVIDEND YIELD

YTD RETURNS, INCLUDING DIVIDENDS

The 10-year Treasury’s yield remained below 3 percent last week, close to its lowest level since December. Investors frightened by the slowing recovery bought Treasurys in search of safety, and higher Treasury prices mean lower yields. Mortgage rates also fell. The average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage fell to 4.49 percent last week from 4.55 percent a week earlier.

InterestRates

Most kinds of real estate investment trusts have done better than the rest of the stock market this year. And they have bigger yields.

So Quest’s growth is ahead of them? Exactly. As people start going back to the doctor, you’ll see incremental volume (increase). What happens is they’re already running their plants, and they’re already running to the doctor (to get lab tests). So if they’re just picking up more tests, that’s really ... very healthy profit for them.

Why do you like this strategy — focusing on the bad things happening to good companies? One of the inefficiencies remaining in the market is this obsession with near-term (results). If you’re willing to take advantage of lack of visibility because you are patient and can look in the long term, you can find some great values. ... Even at times when the market is expensive, you can always find stocks that are cheap that people are just unwilling to wait around (for) because they don’t think this is a quarter where everything is going to get better.

Treasury yields near 2011 low

-1.0

4 1

9.3

3

5.8

15

1.3

2 10.9

13

2.9

9.2 +34.40

2

2.7

18

1.9

t

t -16.6 +8.60

3

6.8

12

4.1

-3.5

t

t -31.1—31.41 5

-7.2

8

...

-0.19

-2.3

t

t -29.3—22.22 4 -15.2

-0.38

-2.2

t

s

6.9 +82.60

1

0.3

3

7

...

12

...

6.96 4

9.84

7.90

-0.43

-5.2

t

t -18.8 +10.61

0.2

56

9.5

13.09 4

18.71

15.24

-0.29

-1.9

t

s

0.3—10.09 4 1.5a

24

1.2

HHS

7.59 1

13.74

8.00

0.19

2.4

t

t -37.4—31.55 5 -18.3

10

4.0

Heinz

HNZ

42.88 9

55.00

52.84

-0.36

-0.7

s

s

6.8 +19.96

3

8.3

17

3.6

Hershey Company

HSY

45.31 7

58.20

53.92

-0.59

-1.1

t

s 14.4 +6.74

3

1.6

24

2.6

Kraft Foods

KFT

27.59 8

35.44

33.79

-0.31

-0.9

t

s

7.2 +18.96

3

4.6

20

3.4

Lowes Cos

LOW

19.35 4

27.45

22.26

-1.14

-4.9

t

t -11.2 —4.78

4

-5.1

16

2.5

3

M&T Bank

MTB

72.03 6

96.15

84.41

-1.38

-1.6

t

t

-3.0 +10.90

McDonalds Corp

MCD

65.31 9

83.08

80.36

-0.18

-0.2

t

s

4.7 +19.27

-3.7

14

3.3

3 22.0

17

3.0

NBT Bncp

NBTB

19.27 3

24.98

20.82

0.03

0.1

t

Nexstar Bdcstg Grp

NXST

3.64 6

9.26

6.75

0.03

0.4

t

t -13.8 +2.76

4

1.9

12

3.8

t 12.7 +23.18

3

5.3

...

...

PNC Financial

PNC

49.43 7

65.19

59.07

-0.27

-0.5

t

t

-2.7 -1.42

4

-0.6

9

2.4

PPL Corp

PPL

24.10 7

28.38

26.95

-0.47

-1.7

t

s

Penn Millers Hldg

PMIC

11.98 9

17.72

17.10

-0.05

-0.3

t

2.4 +10.79

3

1.5

12

5.2

s 29.3 +17.12

3

...

...

...

Penna REIT

PEI

10.03 7

17.34

14.65

-1.62 -10.0

t

s

0.8 +17.22

3 -11.0

...

4.1

PepsiCo

PEP

60.32 8

71.89

68.69

-0.28

-0.4

t

s

5.1 +10.66

3

5.2

18

3.0

Philip Morris Intl

PM

42.94 9

71.75

67.35

-1.64

-2.4

t

s 15.1 +54.84

1 14.5a

16

3.8

Procter & Gamble

PG

58.92 7

67.72

64.70

-0.73

-1.1

t

s

0.6 +7.69

3

6.0

17

3.2

Prudential Fncl

PRU

48.56 6

67.52

59.04

-2.22

-3.6

t

t

0.6 +3.44

4

-3.8

9

1.9

SLM Corp

SLM

10.05 9

17.11

15.75

-0.55

-3.4

t

s 25.1 +37.95

2 -20.7

9

2.5

SLM Corp flt pfB

SLMpB 32.41 0

60.00

58.00

-0.50

-0.9

s

s 32.4

0.0

...

8.0

Southn Union Co

SUG

20.49 9

30.50

28.81

-0.53

-1.8

s

s 19.7 +32.30

... 2

5.0

14

2.1

TJX Cos

TJX

39.56 7

54.94

49.49

-1.53

-3.0

t

t

11.5 +8.46

3 17.6

16

1.5

UGI Corp

UGI

24.90 7

33.53

30.92

-0.42

-1.3

t

t

-2.1 +21.65

3

8.0

13

3.4

Verizon Comm

VZ

25.79 8

38.95

35.19

-0.44

-1.2

t

t

-1.6 +40.12

2

9.1

21

5.5

WalMart Strs

WMT

47.77 5

57.90

52.72

-0.94

-1.8

t

s

-2.2 +5.53

4

4.2

12

2.8

Weis Mkts

WMK

32.56 7

41.82

38.12

-0.38

-1.0

t

t

-5.5 +16.70

3

1.7

15

3.0

Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quarters. Rank classifies a stock’s performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).

Stock Screener

SMDD

23.37

1.96

9.2

19.2

-64.3

MWN

39.87

3.22

8.8

16.5

82.2

Direxion DvMktBear3x

DPK

35.54

2.84

8.7

5.6

63.5

iPath ShtEnh EmMkts

EMSA

86.67

6.87

8.6

0.4

...

Direxion EmMktBear3x

EDZ

19.51

1.54

8.6

1.0

-65.4

Barc ShortC LevS&P

BXDC

41.57

3.27

8.5

22.8

...

Direxion FinBear 3x

FAZ

50.57

3.80

8.1

17.2

191.4 -49.1

ProSh UltSh RealEst

SRS

15.58

1.16

8.0

7.1

ProShs UltSht Europe

EPV

47.27

3.51

8.0

3.5

58.9

ProSh UltSht R2KG

SKK

44.07

3.07

7.5

14.2

130.4

ProShs UltSht Brazil

BZQ

16.20

1.12

7.4

-2.5

-44.1

ProSh UltSht R2K

TWM

47.53

3.23

7.3

13.4

100.4

Barc iPath Sugar

SGG

82.03

5.43

7.1

19.1

89.0

Direxion LCapBear 3x

BGZ

39.18

2.55

7.0

14.9

117.7

ProSh UltraSht Tel

TLL

39.17

2.53

6.9

5.3

160.3

ProSh UltSh Tech

REW

63.04

4.07

6.9

14.8

150.5

ProSh UltShtNasdBio

BIS

40.07

2.57

6.9

7.7

-52.0

Direxion EngyBear 3x

ERY

16.24

1.04

6.8

0.8

22.2

ProShs UltSht S&P500

SPXU

17.60

1.11

6.7

15.0

-54.9

Direx Russia Bull3x

RUSL

49.00

3.05

6.6

14.6

...

ProSh UltSht SmCap

SDD

50.81

3.15

6.6

13.1

105.6

ProSh UltShtRMCG

SDK

50.58

2.99

6.3

12.7

98.1

ProSh Ultr Sh Chi 25

FXP

28.88

1.72

6.3

2.5

-35.1

ProSh Ultra Sht QQQ

QID

55.62

3.29

6.3

13.6

178.7

ProSh UltraSht MidC

MZZ

43.14

2.47

6.1

12.6

107.5

Fact TBBull S&PBear

FSA

28.60

1.65

6.1

10.4

...

ProSh UltSh Semi

SSG

52.94

3.01

6.0

19.3

176.4 118.6

ProSh UltShtRMCVal

SJL

53.77

3.02

6.0

10.0

Dirx DlyRtlBear2x

RETS

26.17

1.46

5.9

19.2

...

ProShs UltSht R3K

TWQ

15.17

0.83

5.8

10.3

-41.9

Prosh UltSht R1KV

SJF

31.87

1.73

5.7

8.5

-39.5

ProSh UltSh EAFE

EFU

24.51

1.32

5.7

3.9

-50.8

ProSh UltSht Emkts

EEV

31.33

1.69

5.7

0.8

-48.6

Direx Agbiz Bear 3x

COWS

39.29

2.13

5.7

3.4

...

ProSh UltSht Fin

SKF

66.94

3.52

5.6

11.4

186.6

Dirx Dly NG Bear2x

GASX

19.64

1.03

5.5

-0.6

...

Stocks to take to the bank

Financial stocks have become an investing hot potato. But that doesn’t mean you should avoid them altogether. If you do, you’ll lose out on some strong companies. Taken as a whole, the financial industry isn’t doing well: Financial companies in the S&P 500 are down 7 percent this year, more than any other industry group in the index. They’ve been pulled down by giants like AIG, which has fallen 42 percent this year. AIG and other financial institutions took too many risks in the bubble years, fueling the financial crisis. But many regional banks took fewer risks. They had a straightforward business model: Provide bank accounts and loans to local customers. For some, that approach has brought steady returns. Here are the 10 stocks in the S&P 1,500 bank group with the best one-year total return. Sterling Bancshares, the best performer of the group, is a holding company for Sterling Bank, which serves small businesses in Texas. Cathay General Bancorp operates mostly in California. And Signature Bank serves New York City. SOURCE: FactSet

Pro UltPro ShtMid400 Direxion MCapBear3x

COMPANY

q TICKER

TOTAL RETURNS

YTD

1 YR

DIV. YIELD

EPS

Sterling Bancshares Inc.

SBIB

14.2%

60 9% 60.9%

0.0%

0.0

Cathay General Bancorp

CATY

-9.5

49.0

0.3

-0.1

Signature Bank

SBNY

8.8

47.6

0.0

2.5

Texas Capital Bancshares Inc.

TCBI

14.6

43.5

0.0

1.0

Bank of the Ozarks Inc.

OZRK

10.0

39.1

1.5

3.8

SVB Financial Group

SIVB

6.2

36.0

0.0

2.2

F.N.B. Corp.

FNB

7.1

35.0

4.7

0.7

East West Bancorp Inc.

EWBC

-5.4

23.6

1.1

0.8

Commerce Bancshares Inc.

CBSH

4.4

23.3

2.2

2.5

Prosperity Bancshares Inc.

PRSP

7.3

22.2 22.2

1.7

2.7

Data through midday June 9

q q q

Dow industrials

-1.6%

WEEKLY

Nasdaq

-3.3% WEEKLY

LARGE-CAP

S&P 500

-2.2%

WEEKLY

SMALL-CAP

Russell 2000

-3.5%

WEEKLY

q p q q q p q q

-5.1%

MO +3.2%

YTD -6.5%

MO -0.3%

YTD -5.0%

MO +1.1%

YTD

-6.7%

MO -0.5%

YTD


CMYK ➛

SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011

Mutual Fund Categories SPECIALTY FUNDS

YTD

PERCENT RETURN 1YR 3YR*

5YR*

Conservative Allocation (CA) 2.61 Moderate Allocation (MA) 2.11 Health (SH) 12.01 Natural Resources (SN) -1.55 Real Estate (SR) 5.70 Technology (ST) -0.13

12.20 15.32 26.89 27.68 21.18 24.77

3.96 2.27 8.02 -5.60 0.93 5.14

4.26 3.69 6.48 7.03 1.23 7.00

BALANCED Target-Date 2000-2010 (TA) Target-Date 2011-2015 (TD) Target-Date 2016-2020 (TE)

2.47 2.43 2.28

13.58 15.56 15.93

2.57 1.49 1.49

4.08 3.71 3.48

INTERNATIONAL Divers. Emerging Mkt. (EM) Europe Stock (ES) Foreign Small/Mid Val (FA) Foreign Large Blend (FB) Foreign Large Growth (FG) Foreign Small/Mid Gr. (FR) Foreign Large Value (FV) World Allocation (IH) World Stock (WS)

-2.41 4.00 2.32 1.27 1.33 1.68 2.24 1.92 1.53

23.30 28.83 29.89 24.11 25.54 32.18 23.94 17.52 22.28

-0.05 -4.28 0.06 -3.83 -2.29 0.40 -4.15 1.75 -0.92

10.19 2.73 4.27 1.98 3.85 4.60 1.31 4.90 3.19

YTD 5-YR FUND %RTN %RTN AMF ARM b +1.0 -1.1 Acadian EmgMkts d -.6 +10.5 AdvisorOne AmerigoN +.6 +3.5 Alger Group CapApInsI +2.3 +8.9 CapApprA m +2.1 +8.8 MdCpGInsI +2.6 +3.4 SmCpGrthO +2.4 +5.7 SmCpInstI +2.3 +5.2 Allegiant UltShtBdI +.3 +3.3 Alliance Bernstein BalShrA m +4.9 +2.9 BalShrB m +4.4 +2.1 BalWlthStrA m +1.6 +3.5 BalWlthStrC m +1.3 +2.7 CoreOppA m +5.6 +3.5 GlTmtcGA m -4.3 +6.3 GlblBondA m +2.7 +8.3 GlblBondC m +2.3 +7.5 GrowA m +2.2 +2.0 GrowIncA m +5.5 +1.1 HighIncA m +4.5 +11.8 HighIncC m +4.1 +10.9 IntGrA m -.7 +2.6 IntlValA m -1.7 -3.7 IntlValAdv -1.6 -3.5 LgCapGrA m +2.4 +6.0 LgCapGrAd +2.5 +6.3 MuInCAA m +4.4 +3.9 MuInNYA m +4.1 +4.1 MuInNatlA m +4.4 +3.9 SMCpGrA m +6.0 +5.6 SmMidValA m -1.3 +5.4 TxMgdWlApStAd ... +.1 WlthApprStr +.5 +1.1 WlthApprStrA m +.3 +.8 Allianz NFJDivVlA m +3.6 +.5 NFJDivVlC m +3.3 -.3 NFJEqIncD b +3.6 +.5 NFJIntVlA m +1.5 +6.7 NFJSmCVlA m +2.2 +7.0 NFJSmCVlC m +1.9 +6.1 Alpine DynDiv d +1.3 -2.1 InRelEstY d +.8 -.9 UlShTxAdv d +.8 +3.1 Amana Growth m -.2 +6.7 Income m +2.5 +7.2 American Beacon BalAMR +1.5 +3.6 IntlEqAMR d +4.4 +2.5 IntlEqInv +4.1 +2.0 LgCpVlAMR +.6 +1.4 LgCpVlInv +.3 +.9 SmCapAMR -.7 +3.9 SmCpVlInv -1.0 +3.3 American Cent BalInv +2.8 +4.1 CAInTFBdIv +4.6 +4.3 DivBdInv +3.1 +6.9 EmgMktInv d -2.0 +8.8 EqGrowInv +2.7 +1.7 EqIncA m +1.7 +3.5 EqIncC m +1.4 +2.8 EqIncInv +1.8 +3.8 Gift +1.9 +8.4 GinMaeInv +3.3 +6.7 GlGold d -14.7 +11.2 GovBdInv +2.9 +6.5 GrowthAdv m +.6 +5.5 GrowthInv +.7 +5.8 HeritA m +1.7 +10.0 HeritInv +1.8 +10.2 InTTxFBInv +4.1 +4.6 IncGrInv +2.5 +1.0 IncGroA m +2.4 +.8 InfAdjAdv m +5.0 +6.3 InfAdjI +5.2 +6.6 IntlBd +6.0 +5.9 IntlDisIv d +.3 +3.5 IntlGrInv d +2.9 +4.3 LS2025Inv +2.3 +4.9 LgCoVlInv +1.8 -.3 MdCpValIv +.7 +5.8 NTEqGrIns +2.6 +1.9 NTGrthIns +.8 +6.1 NTLgCmVlI +1.5 -.4 OneChAgg +1.9 +4.9 OneChCon +2.8 +5.1 OneChMod +2.4 +5.0 RealEstIv +6.9 +.2 SelectInv +3.2 +4.9 ShTmGovIv +.8 +3.9 SmCpValAdv m -3.0 +5.5 SmCpValIv -2.9 +5.8 StrAlAgIv +1.8 +4.9 StrAlMd +2.3 +5.0 StrAlMd m +2.2 +4.8 UltraInv +2.5 +3.6 ValueInv +1.0 +1.9 VistaInv +.4 +3.1 American Funds AMCAPA m +1.8 +3.6 AMCAPB m +1.4 +2.8 BalA m +2.6 +4.2 BalB m +2.3 +3.5 BondA m +3.4 +4.0 BondAmerB m +3.0 +3.2 CapIncBuA m +3.8 +4.2 CapIncBuB m +3.5 +3.4 CapWldBdA m +4.6 +7.0 CpWldGrIA m +2.4 +4.7 CpWldGrIB m +2.0 +3.9 EurPacGrA m +1.5 +5.6 EurPacGrB m +1.2 +4.8 FnInvA m +2.3 +3.8 FnInvB m +2.0 +3.1 GrthAmA m +.4 +2.7 GrthAmB m +.1 +1.9 HiIncA m +4.8 +7.3 HiIncMuA m +3.6 +2.2 IncAmerA m +4.2 +4.1 IncAmerB m +3.8 +3.3 IntBdAmA m +2.2 +4.0 IntlGrInA m +3.3 NA InvCoAmA x +.3 +1.9 InvCoAmB x -.1 +1.2 LtdTmTxEA m +3.2 +4.1 MutualA m +2.7 +3.5 NewEconA m +2.4 +5.1 NewPerspA m +1.0 +5.8 NewPerspB m +.7 +5.0 NwWrldA m -.3 +10.3 STBdFdofAmA m +.7 NA SmCpWldA m -.4 +5.9 TDR2010A m +3.0 NA TDR2015A m +2.6 NA TDR2020A m +2.4 NA TDR2025A m +2.1 NA TDR2030A m +1.9 NA TaxEBdAmA m +4.0 +3.6 TaxECAA m +4.2 +3.4 USGovSecA m +2.7 +5.7 WAMutInvA m +3.7 +2.1 WAMutInvB m +3.3 +1.4 Aquila HITaxFA m +3.0 +3.8 Arbitrage ArbtrageR m +1.4 +4.1 Ariel Apprec b +3.1 +5.6 Ariel b +.2 +2.3 Artio Global GlobHiYldA b +5.1 +9.0 IntlEqA b -1.3 +1.3 IntlEqIIA b -1.4 +2.2 Artisan IntSmCpIv d +3.1 +7.4 Intl d +2.7 +3.1 IntlVal d +3.0 +6.4 MdCpVal +6.5 +7.1 MidCap +3.7 +8.9 SmCapVal +2.3 +6.8 Aston Funds MidCapN b -1.0 +8.8 MtgClGrN b +.8 +4.8 TAMROSmCN b +.9 +6.4 BBH BrdMktFxI d +.9 +4.5 IntlEqN d +4.0 +3.4 TaxEffEq d +5.1 +7.6 BNY Mellon BalFd +1.6 +5.1 BondFd +3.1 +6.6 EmgMkts -2.4 +10.8 IntlM +2.0 +.1 +2.4 +5.9 IntmBdM

52-WEEK WK HI LOW NAV CHG 7.51

7.36

7.43

...

21.65 15.30 20.07

-.48

14.44 10.72 13.42

-.39

23.01 16.12 16.21 36.82 31.94

16.35 11.44 10.83 24.61 21.29

21.18 -.72 14.80 -.51 14.57 -.59 32.81 -1.42 28.49 -1.22

10.05 10.00 10.01 16.02 15.00 12.55 12.49 12.84 81.41 8.58 8.61 40.02 3.67 9.31 9.41 16.42 14.78 15.06 27.62 28.91 11.09 10.12 10.12 7.11 19.24 13.16 13.09 13.07

12.87 12.08 10.22 10.19 9.10 58.26 8.16 8.18 29.24 2.69 8.36 8.46 12.10 11.10 11.32 19.67 20.58 10.14 9.39 9.33 4.25 13.41 9.94 9.65 9.63

...

15.45 -.22 14.46 -.21 11.97 -.22 11.91 -.22 12.15 -.29 73.84 -3.05 8.46 +.01 8.48 ... 37.40 -.93 3.48 -.07 9.17 -.08 9.27 -.08 15.26 -.47 13.43 -.39 13.70 -.40 25.36 -.68 26.57 -.71 10.67 ... 9.83 ... 9.79 ... 6.41 -.24 17.43 -.52 12.22 -.33 12.11 -.34 12.09 -.33

12.40 9.37 11.69 12.44 9.41 11.72 12.42 9.39 11.71 22.38 16.82 20.94 31.65 23.14 29.18 30.29 22.14 27.90

-.25 -.25 -.25 -.65 -.65 -.63

5.14 3.90 4.67 27.18 18.82 26.16 10.06 10.03 10.04

-.15 -.62 ...

26.22 20.05 24.65 34.50 26.30 32.34

-.64 -.50

13.01 18.52 18.33 20.86 20.02 21.83 21.35

11.17 13.44 13.18 15.91 15.29 15.09 14.82

12.47 17.18 17.00 19.38 18.59 19.67 19.22

-.17 -.60 -.59 -.44 -.42 -.63 -.62

16.37 11.56 11.16 9.64 22.85 7.66 7.66 7.66 30.85 11.10 27.26 11.50 27.57 28.00 22.51 23.14 11.39 26.22 26.19 12.40 12.45 15.24 11.78 12.19 12.39 5.95 13.49 10.48 12.87 9.09 13.01 11.58 12.34 21.04 41.39 9.89 9.59 9.63 8.17 6.95 6.94 24.63 6.14 18.30

13.65 10.73 10.61 6.73 17.04 6.21 6.21 6.21 21.19 10.72 18.88 10.96 20.11 20.43 14.84 15.23 10.63 19.69 19.67 11.52 11.56 13.03 7.87 8.46 10.23 4.56 10.43 7.84 9.40 6.96 10.06 9.99 10.03 14.57 29.72 9.71 6.99 7.02 6.30 5.63 5.62 17.78 4.77 12.38

15.82 11.24 10.93 8.80 21.41 7.31 7.30 7.31 28.65 11.06 22.25 11.32 25.62 26.03 20.77 21.36 11.09 24.53 24.50 12.36 12.41 14.63 10.74 11.29 11.92 5.60 12.65 9.82 11.97 8.54 12.29 11.28 11.83 19.62 38.99 9.80 8.71 8.75 7.71 6.66 6.65 23.22 5.77 16.77

-.21 +.01 ... -.29 -.48 -.12 -.12 -.12 -1.02 -.01 -1.32 ... -.67 -.68 -.75 -.78 ... -.55 -.54 ... ... -.18 -.39 -.37 -.19 -.10 -.26 -.22 -.31 -.17 -.28 -.14 -.20 -.78 -1.03 ... -.25 -.25 -.18 -.11 -.11 -.61 -.11 -.59

20.44 19.49 19.07 18.99 12.56 12.56 53.07 53.07 21.53 38.88 38.66 45.12 44.65 40.16 40.03 32.93 31.89 11.61 14.26 17.74 17.60 13.74 34.29 30.12 29.99 16.04 27.24 27.48 31.04 30.55 57.43 10.18 41.61 9.61 9.70 9.67 9.84 10.11 12.54 16.63 14.79 29.67 29.46

15.28 14.67 15.49 15.44 12.02 12.02 43.95 43.91 19.51 29.35 29.16 33.17 32.78 29.89 29.81 25.00 24.17 10.55 13.10 14.61 14.51 13.30 25.76 23.39 23.30 15.29 21.52 20.50 23.12 22.72 43.88 10.03 30.53 8.44 8.33 8.08 7.89 7.94 11.53 15.19 13.66 22.58 22.43

19.16 18.26 18.20 18.15 12.42 12.42 51.34 51.30 21.18 36.41 36.17 42.00 41.53 37.31 37.23 30.57 29.58 11.45 13.66 17.07 16.92 13.58 32.11 27.98 27.88 15.76 25.86 25.94 28.91 28.44 54.45 10.10 38.69 9.38 9.39 9.29 9.35 9.56 12.07 15.95 14.16 28.05 27.83

-.47 -.44 -.32 -.29 ... ... -.90 -.90 -.11 -1.08 -1.08 -1.24 -1.23 -1.06 -.99 -.81 -.78 -.08 +.01 -.27 -.27 ... -.88 -.71 -.66 ... -.42 -.73 -.80 -.79 -1.30 ... -1.07 -.10 -.12 -.15 -.19 -.20 ... +.01 +.02 -.44 -.45

11.60 11.04 11.36

...

12.93 12.42 12.78 +.01 46.84 32.10 43.72 -1.05 53.61 35.47 48.69 -1.52 11.15 10.27 10.86 31.51 24.07 29.03 13.28 10.11 12.22

-.10 -.76 -.32

21.58 24.23 29.31 22.79 37.48 18.61

20.50 22.29 27.92 21.38 34.89 17.24

-.69 -.74 -.73 -.55 -.94 -.40

34.58 24.75 31.61 25.71 20.23 24.33 23.56 15.56 21.36

-.82 -.46 -.81

10.47 10.27 10.43 14.21 10.78 13.58 15.74 12.05 15.06

... -.29 -.34

14.99 17.13 21.25 16.84 24.84 13.37

11.69 9.59 11.15 -.21 13.47 12.94 13.31 ... 12.40 9.07 11.56 -.29 11.86 8.78 10.99 -.35 13.24 12.81 13.05 +.01

YTD 5-YR FUND %RTN %RTN LgCpStkM +1.3 +2.5 MidCpStM +1.6 +5.0 NtlIntM +4.0 +4.7 NtlShTM +1.2 +3.1 PAIntMu +3.6 +4.1 SmCpStkM -.3 +1.4 Baird AggrInst +4.0 +6.2 CrPlBInst +4.4 +7.8 IntBdInst +3.8 +6.5 IntMunIns +4.0 +5.4 ShTmBdIns +1.8 +4.4 Barclays Global Inv LP2020R m +2.4 +3.4 Baron Asset b +1.5 +3.1 Growth b +4.1 +4.2 Partners b +.6 +2.8 SmCap b +5.0 +5.3 Bernstein CAMuni +3.3 +4.2 DiversMui +3.1 +4.4 EmgMkts -1.8 +9.7 IntDur +3.7 +6.9 IntlPort -1.7 -2.8 NYMuni +3.1 +4.3 ShDurDivr +1.2 +2.8 ShDurPlu +.9 +2.8 TxMIntl -1.7 -2.9 Berwyn Income d +2.1 +8.5 BlackRock BalCapA m +5.8 +3.3 BasicValA m +1.0 +2.2 BasicValC m +.7 +1.4 Engy&ResA m ... +5.8 EqDivA m +3.0 +4.1 EqDivR b +2.8 +3.8 EquitDivC m +2.7 +3.3 GlbDynEqA m +.5 +5.6 GlobAlcA m +1.9 +7.1 GlobAlcB m +1.5 +6.2 GlobAlcC m +1.5 +6.3 GlobAlcR m +1.7 +6.7 GovtInIvA m +2.4 +4.9 HiIncA m +5.1 +7.7 HiYldInvA m +4.7 +8.4 HthScOpA m +9.6 +10.0 InflPrBndA m +4.3 +6.7 InflPrBndC m +4.0 +5.9 IntlOppA m +.4 +5.2 LCCrInvA m +7.2 +1.0 LCCrInvC m +6.7 +.2 LatinAmA m -7.6 +17.8 LgCapValA m +5.1 +.1 LowDurSvc b +1.9 +3.6 MidCpValEqA m +2.2 +4.1 NatMuniA m +4.4 +3.9 NatResD m +.6 +7.3 S&P500A b +1.7 +1.9 TotRtrnA m +2.6 NA USOppInvC m -.7 +6.8 USOppsIvA m -.4 +7.6 ValOpptyA m +1.3 +.7 Brandywine BlueFd -3.0 -.8 Brandywin +.5 -.3 Bridgeway UltSmCoMk d -1.8 -1.2 Brown Advisory GrowEq d +2.4 +8.2 Brown Cap Mgmt SmCo Is d +5.7 +11.9 Buffalo MidCap d +.5 +5.9 SmallCap d -.9 +4.5 USAGlob d +1.6 +6.5 CG Capital Markets CrFixIn +3.1 +7.3 EmgMktEq -1.7 +10.3 IntlEqInv +1.6 +2.2 LgCapGro +.7 +4.0 LgCapVal +3.1 +.5 CGM Focus -13.4 +2.4 Mutual -9.4 +4.7 Realty +5.0 +9.3 Calamos ConvC m +.5 +4.8 ConvertA m +.8 +5.6 GlbGrIncA m +1.7 +5.9 GrIncA m +2.2 +5.4 GrIncC m +1.8 +4.6 GrowA m ... +3.6 GrowB m -.4 +2.9 GrowC m -.4 +2.9 MktNuInA m +.9 +3.1 Calvert BalancedA m +1.9 +2.2 BondA m +2.9 +5.0 EquityA m +3.4 +4.8 IncomeA m +3.6 +4.4 ShDurIncA m +1.9 +5.1 Cambiar OppInv +2.7 +2.8 Champlain Investment ChSmlComp b +3.8 +8.0 Clipper Clipper +4.1 -.7 Cohen & Steers Realty +6.1 +2.9 Colorado BondShares COBdShrs f +1.9 +4.3 Columbia AcornA m +.8 +5.1 AcornC m +.5 +4.3 AcornIntA m +1.2 +7.5 AcornIntZ +1.3 +7.9 AcornSelA m -6.0 +3.9 AcornSelZ -5.9 +4.2 AcornUSAZ +2.0 +3.7 AcornZ +.9 +5.4 BondZ +3.1 +6.2 CntrnCoreA m +1.5 +6.1 CntrnCoreZ +1.7 +6.3 ComInfoA m -.8 +9.4 ComInfoC m -1.1 +8.6 DivBondA m +3.1 +5.8 DivBondI +3.3 +6.2 DivIncA m +2.4 +4.1 DivIncZ +2.5 +4.4 DivOppA m +4.5 +4.6 DivrEqInA m +.6 +1.6 EmMktOppA m -2.8 +11.3 EnrNatRsZ -1.4 +6.3 EqValueA m +.9 +1.8 FlRateA m +2.7 +3.5 GlblTechA m -2.2 +8.3 HYMuniZ +3.9 +2.0 HiYldBdA m +4.7 +7.9 IncBldA m +3.7 +6.0 IncOppA m +4.5 +7.9 IncomeZ +4.6 +6.9 IntlOpZ -3.3 +2.0 IntlVaZ +2.1 +1.2 IntmBdZ +3.3 +6.5 ItmMunBdZ +4.4 +4.3 LarCaCorZ +.8 +2.8 LfBalA m +2.0 +5.5 LgCpGrowA m +1.7 +4.2 LgCpGrowZ +1.8 +4.5 LgCpIxA b +1.8 +2.1 LgCrQuantA m +3.3 +1.5 LtdDurCrdA m +2.7 +5.2 MAIntlEqA m -.3 +.6 MAIntlEqZ -.3 +.9 Mar21CA m -2.3 +2.0 Mar21CC m -2.6 +1.2 Mar21CZ -2.2 +2.2 MarFocEqA m -2.3 +2.8 MarFocEqZ -2.2 +3.0 MarGrIA m -.1 +2.4 MarGrIZ ... +2.6 MdCapGthZ +5.1 +7.6 MdCapIdxZ +3.1 +6.0 MdCpValOppA m +1.7 +3.5 MdCpValZ +2.2 +3.3 MdCpVlA m +2.0 +3.1 MidGrOppA m -1.3 +6.1 ORIntmMuniBdZ +4.1 +4.3 PBAggA m +1.8 +3.6 PBModA m +2.5 +5.1 PBModAggA m +2.1 +4.4 PBModConA m +2.6 +5.3 SIIncZ +1.6 +4.6 SelSmCapZ -5.3 +2.7 ShTmMuZ +1.2 +3.4 SmCaVaIIA m +1.5 +3.5 SmCaVaIIZ +1.7 +3.7 SmCapCrZ ... +5.0 SmCapIdxZ +.9 +3.8 SmCpGthIZ +3.6 +7.2

SMALL-CAP MID-CAP LARGE-CAP

PAGE 6D

VALUE LV 3.8 21.1 -1.7 0.1

YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR

2.3 17.8 4.4 2.9 0.0 19.5 7.7 4.8

M

BLEND LB 1.8 16.7 0.5 3.4

MV

4.3 27.8 3.6 5.3 1.8 24.3 4.9 4.3

SV

U

T

U

GROWTH -0.5 LG 19.4 -0.7 3.3

MB

5.8 30.2 1.5 5.9

MG

SB

2.8 32.3 5.1 5.2

SG

A

L

S

3.37 2.96 3.62 4.42 3.64 4.26 1.76

7.55 4.71 2.53 17.02 3.66 2.79 2.22

6.98 6.28 1.90 8.53 4.44 3.73 2.86

FUND

This fund is one of two Morningstar picks in the European stock category. A key focus is protecting investors in down markets, as in 2008, when the fund fared better than nearly all its peers. FrankTemp-Mutual Euro A m

CATEGORY MORNINGSTAR RATING™ ASSETS EXP RATIO MANAGER SINCE RETURNS 3-MO YTD 1-YR 3-YR ANNL 5-YR-ANNL

TEMIX

BOND FUNDS Interm-Term Bond (CI) Interm. Government (GI) High Yield Muni (HM) High Yield Bond (HY) Muni National Interm (MI) Muni National Long (ML) Muni Short (MS)

THE TIMES LEADER

Fund Focus FundFocus

5.96 5.78 1.15 6.97 4.01 3.23 3.10

★★★★✩ $796 million

-0.6 +3.0 +13.6 -0.1 +5.4

TOP 5 HOLDINGS

PCT

*– Annualized 52-WEEK HI LOW 9.48 6.90 13.68 8.96 13.75 12.73 13.01 12.85 12.96 12.13 12.97 8.70

WK NAV CHG 8.75 -.25 12.45 -.50 13.27 ... 12.94 ... 12.59 ... 11.69 -.49

10.91 10.88 11.31 11.79 9.81

10.76 10.77 11.12 11.63 9.76

... -.01 ... -.01 ...

16.01 13.29 15.46

-.26

10.42 10.41 10.80 11.21 9.64

61.10 57.22 22.80 26.93

44.23 40.23 15.39 18.53

56.11 -1.84 53.34 -1.45 20.69 -.88 24.97 -.81

14.96 14.84 35.25 14.27 16.62 14.61 12.72 11.96 16.74

14.09 14.14 25.49 13.54 12.58 13.94 12.53 11.82 12.66

14.47 +.01 14.50 -.01 32.71 -.72 14.00 -.02 15.36 -.53 14.30 ... 12.65 ... 11.94 -.01 15.47 -.54

13.71 12.76 13.44 23.51 27.93 26.17 44.83 19.12 19.21 18.74 13.50 20.75 20.22 19.34 20.08 11.23 4.97 7.95 32.53 11.60 11.58 36.24 12.52 11.57 77.62 16.58 9.75 12.57 10.47 72.62 16.72 11.47 38.87 42.71 21.41

18.95 20.96 19.64 26.49 14.48 14.55 14.19 10.22 17.00 16.56 15.85 16.46 10.60 4.41 7.10 25.80 10.54 10.53 26.06 8.95 8.28 55.35 11.95 9.55 9.18 9.48 47.67 12.57 10.83 27.63 30.23 14.24

22.55 25.84 24.19 39.29 17.98 18.05 17.60 12.56 19.78 19.26 18.42 19.13 10.96 4.88 7.80 31.06 11.01 11.00 33.63 11.66 10.77 69.27 15.35 9.72 11.69 10.08 64.62 15.61 11.22 35.55 39.10 19.33

-.10 -.43 -.61 -.58 -1.69 -.31 -.32 -.31 -.29 -.32 -.31 -.29 -.31 ... -.05 -.07 -.42 -.02 -.02 -1.04 -.37 -.34 -2.21 -.43 -.01 -.34 +.01 -2.11 -.36 -.02 -1.27 -1.39 -.61

FUND

YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG

SmCpValIA m SmCpValIZ StLgCpGrA m StLgCpGrZ StrInvZ StratAllocA m StratIncA m StratIncZ TaxEA m TaxEBdA m TaxEZ USGovMorA m ValRestrZ ValueA m ValueZ Commerce Bond Constellation SndsSelGrII DFA 1YrFixInI 2YrGlbFII 5YearGovI 5YrGlbFII EMktsSoCo EmMkCrEqI EmMktValI EmMtSmCpI EmgMktI GlEqInst Glob6040I InfPrtScI IntGovFII IntRlEstI IntSmCapI IntlValu3 LgCapIntI RelEstScI STMuniBdI TMIntlVal TMMkWVal TMMkWVal2 TMUSEq TMUSTarVal TMUSmCp USCorEq1I USCorEq2I USLgCo USLgVal3 USLgValI USMicroI USSmValI USSmallI

-2.3 -2.2 +5.3 +5.5 +.3 +2.9 +4.3 +4.4 +5.2 +4.6 +5.3 +6.0 -2.0 -.5 -.4

+3.7 +3.9 NA +7.8 +4.2 +3.0 +7.2 +7.5 +4.0 +3.8 +4.2 +6.9 +2.8 +.3 +.5

43.74 45.92 13.20 13.30 19.20 9.66 6.13 6.06 13.14 3.73 13.14 5.49 49.42 11.43 11.46

-1.19 -1.26 -.45 -.46 -.59 -.17 -.03 -.03 +.01 +.01 +.01 ... -1.60 -.25 -.25

+3.9

+7.8 20.44 19.62 20.27

...

+1.5

+6.4 10.83

+.6 +.6 +1.9 +3.2 -2.0 -1.8 -3.2 -1.7 -1.1 +1.4 +2.2 +5.9 +3.3 +8.0 +1.7 +1.0 +1.6 +6.0 +1.5 +.8 +2.8 +2.9 +2.0 -.7 +.4 +1.9 +1.5 +1.9 +3.8 +3.7 -.8 -1.5 +.8

+3.2 +3.3 +4.8 +5.0 NA +14.8 +15.2 +16.7 +13.5 +3.4 +4.7 NA +7.2 NA +4.2 +3.0 +2.6 +1.5 +2.9 +3.2 +1.3 +1.5 +2.6 +.9 +1.8 +3.3 +2.8 +2.5 +1.4 +1.3 +2.1 +1.8 +4.3

47.76 50.13 14.05 14.16 20.96 10.04 6.28 6.21 13.79 3.89 13.79 5.49 54.18 12.23 12.25

10.38 10.30 11.17 11.75 15.50 23.21 38.10 25.24 32.37 14.76 13.69 11.92 12.91 5.59 18.94 18.91 21.80 24.64 10.41 16.56 16.73 16.11 14.81 23.61 25.49 12.09 12.07 10.76 17.21 22.48 15.13 28.21 23.76

34.92 36.63 9.38 9.43 14.82 8.17 5.82 5.76 12.35 3.51 12.35 5.17 37.85 9.27 9.28

7.46 10.16 10.31 10.13 10.69 10.78 11.62 16.71 28.24 18.23 23.42 10.65 11.08 11.09 12.09 3.71 13.30 13.45 15.92 17.26 10.21 11.75 11.84 11.39 10.91 16.00 17.19 8.71 8.62 8.07 12.26 16.02 10.30 18.50 15.89

-.31

10.36 ... 10.21 ... 10.91 -.04 11.23 +.02 14.42 -.40 21.64 -.65 34.84 -1.01 23.50 -.70 30.15 -.92 13.56 -.48 13.02 -.30 11.68 -.23 12.51 -.09 5.42 -.11 17.29 -.76 17.02 -.84 19.88 -.91 22.81 -1.03 10.32 -.01 14.88 -.73 15.38 -.49 14.81 -.47 13.74 -.39 21.29 -.75 23.00 -.78 11.15 -.33 11.08 -.34 10.01 -.28 15.88 -.51 20.74 -.66 13.64 -.49 25.15 -.84 21.47 -.74

FUND

YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG

Apprecia +4.5 AtvMdCpA f +3.6 BasSP500 +1.8 BondIdxIn b +3.1 BstSMCpGI +4.8 BstSmCpVl -2.6 CAAMTBdZ +4.6 DiscStkR b +1.4 Dreyfus +1.4 EmergMarI d -3.9 EmgLead -3.4 EmgMkts m -3.9 GNMA Z b +3.6 GrowInc +1.5 GrtChinaA m -12.1 HiYldA m +5.0 HiYldI +5.1 IntBndA f +4.8 IntIncA f +4.1 IntMuBd +4.5 IntlStkI +2.3 IntlStkIx +1.8 MidCapIdx +3.1 MuniBd +3.9 NJMuniA f +3.8 NYTaxEBd +4.1 OppMdCpVaA f +2.6 SIMuBdD b +1.9 SP500Idx +1.7 SmCapIdx +.9 SmCoVal -3.0 StratValA f +1.2 TechGrA f -.7 WldwdeGrA f +7.4 Driehaus ActiveInc +1.4 EmMktGr d -.3 Dupree KYTxFInc +4.6 Eagle CapApprA m -.5 MidCpStA m -2.2 SmCpGrthA m +4.6 Eaton Vance DivBldrA m +1.3 FlRtHIA m +3.2 Floating-Rate A m +2.7 FltRateC m +2.4 FltRtAdv b +2.8 GovOblA m +1.8 GtrIndiaA m -11.7 HiIncOppA m +5.0 HiIncOppB m +4.7

+4.0 -.5 +2.3 +6.0 +6.5 +2.3 +3.6 +3.1 +3.2 +10.6 -2.5 +10.4 +6.3 +3.1 +16.9 +7.5 +7.7 +10.9 +6.5 +4.3 NA +1.3 +5.7 +3.3 +3.5 +4.1 +8.1 +3.7 +2.0 +3.7 +11.1 +2.7 +7.5 +5.6

42.06 36.88 27.98 10.85 15.90 25.11 14.90 33.52 9.80 13.95 22.39 13.87 15.94 15.40 55.00 6.84 6.84 17.20 13.45 13.89 14.75 16.44 31.27 11.58 13.10 15.22 38.37 13.33 37.66 22.56 32.83 30.96 34.86 44.68

31.31 26.58 20.96 10.38 10.86 18.32 13.35 24.46 7.21 10.59 15.03 10.51 15.25 11.14 37.67 6.16 6.17 16.53 12.82 13.00 11.01 11.91 21.87 10.53 11.86 13.92 25.47 13.02 28.92 15.98 21.96 22.81 23.69 33.33

39.92 -.71 34.01 -.90 26.03 -.59 10.72 ... 14.71 -.44 22.42 -.84 14.19 +.01 31.00 -.88 9.10 -.24 13.02 -.32 ... 12.94 -.31 15.90 ... 14.33 -.35 44.14 -2.96 6.72 -.05 6.72 -.06 16.87 -.25 13.41 -.01 13.57 ... 14.01 -.34 15.19 -.39 28.74 -.89 11.05 ... 12.47 +.01 14.62 ... 35.08 -1.32 13.20 ... 35.17 -.80 20.61 -.68 29.25 -1.04 28.83 -.72 32.26 -1.33 42.64 -1.06

+6.2 11.35 10.76 11.14 +12.4 34.42 24.28 32.11 +4.6 7.92

7.33

7.68

-.06 -.94 ...

+2.8 29.72 22.76 27.79 -.68 +3.7 29.41 21.40 26.97 -.87 +7.9 43.18 27.21 39.87 -1.40 +3.1 +4.2 +3.8 +3.0 +3.8 +5.8 +8.9 +6.5 +5.8

10.68 8.45 10.00 9.50 8.92 9.44 9.41 8.91 9.36 9.09 8.60 9.04 9.10 8.61 9.05 7.65 7.39 7.49 29.97 22.32 24.87 4.52 4.07 4.45 4.52 4.08 4.46

-.25 -.02 -.02 -.02 -.02 -.01 -.09 -.04 -.03

27.37 19.61 24.87 -.85 30.08 19.53 26.68 -1.21 16.00 11.20 14.50

-.43

14.01

-.35

9.95 13.09

50.00 32.88 46.21 -1.69 18.21 13.25 16.99 28.58 20.78 25.98 27.18 19.45 25.51

-.54 -.96 -.64

8.88 8.27 8.50 18.12 13.48 16.99 11.61 8.33 10.74 16.09 11.42 14.87 9.64 7.28 9.04

-.01 -.44 -.33 -.44 -.20

36.39 24.44 30.12 -.96 30.21 22.53 26.68 -.51 30.09 19.95 28.06 -1.15 20.92 21.03 11.56 34.35 34.45 58.70 58.21 53.27 12.33

17.92 17.99 9.20 26.77 26.92 41.56 41.47 37.95 11.18

19.61 -.42 19.73 -.42 10.94 -.21 32.09 -.66 32.16 -.67 53.36 -2.35 52.87 -2.33 48.39 -2.13 12.06 -.12

28.83 16.05 39.34 16.32 16.71

24.05 15.37 28.43 15.64 16.36

27.73 -.37 15.80 +.01 37.02 -1.12 16.25 -.01 16.55 -.01

20.38 13.98 18.85

-.56

16.46 11.28 15.14

-.42

67.79 51.94 64.53 -1.26 66.63 46.42 61.75 -2.69 9.20

8.95

9.06

...

32.30 29.58 43.72 43.82 29.34 30.20 32.21 33.38 9.62 15.44 15.51 48.80 40.48 5.12 5.13 14.06 14.07 8.58 10.96 10.33 26.05 11.35 9.11 22.24 10.11 2.88 10.95 10.16 9.96 12.67 15.39 9.25 10.72 14.17 11.92 25.60 26.18 26.37 5.95 10.11 12.97 13.15 14.61 13.61 14.94 24.39 24.94 22.06 22.47 30.40 12.93 8.63 14.81 14.79 12.42 12.67 11.00 11.22 11.11 10.99 10.03 18.98 10.60 15.40 15.51 17.49 19.08 36.99

22.85 21.11 31.37 31.44 21.15 21.72 21.26 23.54 9.14 11.18 11.24 35.02 29.19 4.91 4.92 10.95 10.95 6.29 7.97 7.65 16.96 8.21 8.44 16.79 9.18 2.58 9.81 9.28 9.35 9.17 12.11 8.91 10.02 10.58 9.42 18.39 18.81 19.77 4.39 9.75 9.44 9.56 10.63 9.95 10.85 17.36 17.74 15.54 15.80 19.75 8.96 5.98 10.46 10.45 8.51 11.85 8.38 9.30 8.82 9.50 9.89 12.85 10.46 10.17 10.25 11.92 13.35 23.42

29.16 26.68 40.34 40.44 25.88 26.59 29.12 30.09 9.40 14.49 14.57 44.37 36.72 5.09 5.10 13.30 13.31 8.07 10.13 9.61 22.85 10.48 9.01 20.41 9.59 2.83 10.74 9.69 9.91 11.58 14.42 9.18 10.46 13.23 11.35 23.59 24.13 24.64 5.59 10.08 11.98 12.13 13.28 12.34 13.58 22.20 22.70 20.32 20.70 27.99 11.88 8.00 13.74 13.72 11.17 12.33 10.34 10.80 10.56 10.70 9.97 16.81 10.53 13.88 13.99 15.90 17.02 32.73

-1.40 -1.29 -2.31 -2.32 -1.37 -1.47 -1.27 -1.50 -.01 -.32 -.32 -1.45 -1.21 -.01 -.01 -.22 -.22 -.21 -.25 -.25 -.78 -.26 -.03 -.67 +.02 -.02 -.11 -.08 -.01 -.47 -.44 -.02 ... -.34 -.23 -.69 -.70 -.56 -.12 -.01 -.43 -.45 -.40 -.38 -.42 -.73 -.75 -.63 -.64 -.99 -.38 -.28 -.40 -.40 -.53 ... -.26 -.19 -.23 -.14 -.01 -.50 ... -.50 -.50 -.52 -.56 -1.41

USTgtValI -.7 +2.9 18.31 USVecEqI +1.0 +2.3 12.00 DWS-Investments DrSmCpVlA m -2.5 +4.2 39.85 LgCapValA m +2.9 +3.0 18.78 LgCapValS +3.0 +3.3 18.79 DWS-Scudder BalA m +1.2 +2.7 9.59 CATFIncA m +4.5 +3.9 7.47 CapGrA m -1.2 +3.7 58.29 CapGrS -1.1 +4.0 58.70 EnhEMFIS d +.6 +6.2 11.53 Eq500S +1.8 +2.3 153.28 GNMAS +4.2 +6.8 15.66 GlbTS d +1.0 +2.2 25.90 GrIncS +3.2 +2.5 18.10 GvtSc m +3.8 +6.5 9.00 HiIncA m +4.3 +6.8 4.96 HlthCareS d +11.1 +6.7 28.50 IntTFrS +4.2 +4.6 11.76 IntlS d -1.0 -.5 49.01 LAEqS d -9.0 +11.8 53.68 MgdMuniA m +4.3 +4.5 9.25 MgdMuniS +4.4 +4.7 9.26 REstA m +6.7 +2.4 20.25 SPInxS +1.7 +2.1 18.13 ShDurPS +1.7 +4.2 9.64 StrHiYldTxFA m +3.8 +3.6 12.52 StrHiYldTxFS +3.9 +3.8 12.53 StrValA m +.8 -2.7 35.44 TechA m -1.4 +5.2 14.76 Davis FinclA m -1.9 -.7 33.73 NYVentA m -.3 +1.1 36.90 NYVentB m -.8 +.3 35.33 NYVentC m -.7 +.4 35.60 Delaware Invest CorpBdIs +5.0 +9.0 6.35 DiverIncA m +3.9 +9.0 9.84 EmgMktA m -2.6 +12.8 17.03 GrowOppA m +11.4 +8.7 25.30 LgValA m +5.9 +1.7 16.67 LtdDvIncA m +2.5 +6.1 9.05 OpFixIncI +4.1 +8.0 9.87 OptLgCpIs +.7 +3.0 13.16 OptLgValI +4.2 +2.5 11.42 TaxFIntA m +3.4 +4.1 12.12 TaxFMNA m +4.4 +4.1 12.74 TaxFPAA m +3.7 +4.2 8.13 TaxFUSAA m +4.0 +3.9 11.64 Diamond Hill LngShortA m +2.2 +1.1 17.32 LngShortI +2.4 +1.5 17.52 LrgCapI +3.0 +3.3 16.12 SmCapA m -.4 +3.8 27.74 Dimensional Investme IntCorEqI +1.4 +3.3 12.33 IntlSCoI +1.9 +5.0 18.73 IntlValuI +.9 +2.8 20.21 Direxion DynHYBdI b +2.0 +.9 14.95 Dodge & Cox Bal +2.9 +2.1 75.65 GlbStock +1.0 NA 9.72 Income +3.7 +7.1 13.60 IntlStk ... +3.6 38.80 Stock +2.4 -.3 118.20 Domini Social Invmts SocEqInv m +3.4 +2.7 32.81 Dreyfus

12.42 16.49 8.39 10.94

-.58 -.35

28.99 35.87 -1.01 14.73 17.89 -.34 14.73 17.90 -.34 7.98 6.70 43.03 43.36 10.39 114.86 15.04 19.11 13.35 8.62 4.53 21.24 10.91 37.27 40.77 8.39 8.40 13.93 13.58 9.49 11.18 11.19 26.65 10.37

9.17 7.13 53.81 54.21 10.81 143.20 15.61 24.09 16.80 8.94 4.86 27.06 11.44 44.83 48.37 8.85 8.86 18.81 16.94 9.52 11.84 11.85 32.90 13.30

-.16 ... -1.46 -1.46 -.03 -3.25 -.02 -.70 -.43 -.03 -.03 -.60 ... -1.42 -1.63 ... ... -.80 -.38 -.02 +.01 +.01 -.75 -.54

26.45 28.46 27.23 27.44

31.15 34.22 32.72 32.99

5.76 9.14 12.20 16.72 12.15 8.83 9.26 9.44 8.49 11.26 11.67 7.36 10.62

6.01 ... 9.38 -.02 15.59 -.52 23.78 -.73 15.81 -.29 9.03 +.03 9.81 +.01 12.14 -.39 10.84 -.21 11.69 ... 12.29 ... 7.75 ... 11.17 +.01

14.67 14.79 12.40 21.10

16.62 16.81 15.26 25.69

-.08 -.08 -.24 -.80

8.79 11.23 13.00 17.31 14.38 18.19

-.53 -.74 -.89

14.09 14.50

-.18

59.93 7.14 13.15 27.90 87.05

-.95 -.72 -.69 -.69

71.88 -1.59 8.99 -.30 13.57 ... 35.71 -1.27 109.97 -3.21

24.27 30.62

-.83

IncBosA m +4.8 LrgCpValA m -1.0 LrgCpValC m -1.3 NatlMuniA m +4.7 NatlMuniB m +4.3 NatlMuniC m +4.3 PAMuniA m +5.0 PaTxMgEMI d -.4 StrIncA m +2.3 StratIncC m +2.0 TMG1.0 +.9 TMG1.1A m +.7 TMGlbDivIncA m +3.9 TMGlbDivIncC m +3.6 TaxMgdVlA m -.7 WldwHealA m +10.4 FAM Value +2.7 FBR FBRFocus m -4.1 FMI CommStk +2.8 Focus +2.8 LgCap +3.3 FPA Capital m +6.4 Cres d +3.7 NewInc m +1.7 Fairholme Funds Fairhome d -11.9 Federated CapAprA m -3.0 ClvrValA m +2.7 HiIncBdA x +4.3 InterConA m +1.9 KaufmanA m -.7 KaufmanB m -1.0 KaufmanC m -1.0 KaufmanR m -.7 KaufmnSCA m -.4 MuniSecsA f +4.6 MuniUltA m +.7 PrdntBr m -4.4 StrValA m +5.8 StratIncA f +3.9 TotRetBdA m +3.0 USGovSecA f +2.5 Fidelity AstMgr20 +2.3 AstMgr50 +2.2 AstMgr85 +1.3 Bal +2.4 BlChGrow +1.4 BlChVal +1.9 CAMuInc d +4.5 CASITxFre d +2.4 CTMuInc d +4.4 Canada d -1.2 CapApr +.9 CapInc x +4.3 ChinaReg d -2.0 Contra +.1 ConvSec +2.5 DiscEq +2.2 DivGrow +.1 DivStk +1.5 DivrIntl d +.7 EmergAsia d +.9 EmgMkt d -2.0 EqInc +1.1

+7.5 6.00 +1.0 19.26 +.3 19.25 +.5 10.03 -.2 10.03 -.2 10.03 +2.3 9.25 +13.6 53.81 +7.4 8.26 +6.5 7.80 +2.0 574.45 +1.6 25.66 +1.7 10.51 +1.0 10.49 +.7 17.94 +7.4 10.68

5.47 15.13 15.14 8.44 8.44 8.44 8.22 39.71 8.10 7.65 435.73 19.51 8.44 8.43 14.12 8.19

5.92 -.04 17.95 -.41 17.97 -.37 9.09 +.01 9.09 +.01 9.09 +.01 8.79 -.01 50.93 -.98 8.22 -.02 7.75 -.02 537.18 -10.64 23.99 -.48 9.92 -.24 9.90 -.23 16.79 -.32 10.32 -.17

+2.5 49.12 38.16 46.58 -1.07 +5.4 51.90 38.90 47.81 -1.27 +8.3 27.49 20.91 25.78 +8.1 33.81 23.07 31.20 +5.1 17.00 13.23 16.12

-.39 -.80 -.31

+6.8 47.08 30.86 43.83 -1.33 +6.5 28.71 23.99 27.78 -.37 +4.2 11.07 10.82 10.92 +.01 +5.7 36.53 28.24 31.36

-.41

+2.7 +1.9 +8.1 +4.8 +4.0 +3.5 +3.5 +4.1 +3.8 +3.0 +2.2 -1.0 +1.7 +8.2 +6.4 +5.4

20.00 15.75 7.77 55.09 5.89 5.56 5.56 5.89 28.37 10.34 10.05 5.65 4.80 9.45 11.48 7.93

15.48 11.60 7.11 37.34 4.37 4.13 4.13 4.38 19.09 9.34 10.01 4.26 3.76 8.58 11.02 7.66

18.44 14.76 7.63 50.86 5.45 5.15 5.15 5.46 26.09 9.89 10.04 4.52 4.58 9.26 11.29 7.84

-.49 -.40 -.09 -1.78 -.20 -.19 -.19 -.19 -1.00 +.01 ... +.09 -.08 -.02 -.02 -.01

+4.8 +4.7 +4.0 +4.1 +5.8 -1.2 +3.9 +4.3 +4.6 +7.4 +2.7 +10.2 +13.7 +4.8 +6.3 +.3 +3.8 +2.5 +1.9 +11.4 +8.7 +.7

13.17 16.27 14.51 19.40 49.64 11.88 12.37 10.81 11.84 63.77 27.33 9.95 34.07 72.91 27.62 24.96 31.04 16.30 32.85 32.86 27.86 48.11

12.01 13.52 10.85 15.94 34.78 9.04 11.33 10.49 11.01 46.30 20.41 8.47 25.11 54.99 21.07 19.05 21.79 12.06 23.93 23.40 20.32 35.94

12.99 15.71 13.58 18.61 45.98 11.01 11.92 10.68 11.53 57.48 25.56 9.58 31.87 67.74 25.92 23.02 28.45 15.19 30.36 30.91 25.82 44.63

-.08 -.23 -.34 -.31 -1.62 -.30 +.02 +.01 +.01 -2.00 -.81 -.16 -1.16 -1.94 -.76 -.60 -.90 -.39 -.91 -.99 -.76 -1.16

FUND

YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG

EqInc II +1.2 EuCapApr d +1.8 Europe d +1.9 ExpMulNat d +.4 FF2015 +2.6 FF2035 +2.0 FF2040 +2.0 Fidelity +2.4 Fifty +1.7 FltRtHiIn d +1.6 FocStk +3.7 FocuHiInc x +4.1 FourInOne +2.2 Fr2045 +2.0 Fr2050 +1.9 Free2000 +2.4 Free2005 +2.4 Free2010 +2.5 Free2020 +2.5 Free2025 +2.4 Free2030 +2.2 FreeInc +2.3 GNMA +3.9 GlbCmtyStk d -2.5 GlobBal d +2.7 GovtInc +2.9 GrDiscov +3.7 GrStr d +.5 GrowCo +4.4 GrowInc +1.3 HiInc d +4.4 Indepndnc +.3 InfProtBd +5.0 IntBond +3.5 IntGovt +2.6 IntMuniInc d +3.3 IntSmOpp d +2.3 IntlCptlAppr d +.3 IntlDisc d -.3 IntlSmCp d +3.6 InvGrdBd +3.9 Japan d -9.6 LargeCap x +.8 LatinAm d -3.9 LevCoSt d +1.4 LgCpVal +2.4 LowPriStk d +4.5 MAMuInc d +4.2 MIMuInc d +3.6 MNMuInc d +3.9 Magellan -1.3 MdCpVal d +1.6 MeCpSto +.8 MidCap x +1.7 MtgSec +3.5 MuniInc d +4.3 NJMuInc d +3.2 NYMuInc d +4.0 NewMille +2.8 NewMktIn d +4.2 Nordic d +1.7 OHMuInc d +4.1 OTC +3.4 Overseas d +.6 PAMuInc d +3.9 PacBasin d -1.9 Puritan +2.4 RealInv d +5.3 RelEstInc d +3.9 Series100Index +.9 ShIntMu d +2.1 ShTmBond +1.5 SmCapRetr x +1.5 SmCapStk x -.5 SmCpGr d +3.3 SmCpOpp +1.6 SmCpVal d -2.6 StkSelec +1.1 StrDivInc +6.3 StratInc +4.6 StratRRet d +3.7 StratRRnI d +3.8 TaxFrB d +4.3 Tel&Util +6.6 TotalBd +3.8 Trend +3.3 USBdIdxInv +3.3 Value +1.2 ValueDis +1.5 Worldwid d +2.0 Fidelity Advisor AstMgr70 +1.8 BalT m +2.2 CapDevO +2.9 DivIntlA m +.9 DivIntlIs d +1.1 DivIntlT m +.8 EmMktIncI d +4.1 EqGrowA m +3.5 EqGrowI +3.6 EqGrowT m +3.4 EqIncA m +3.1 EqIncI +3.2 EqIncT m +2.9 FltRateA m +1.5 FltRateC m +1.1 FltRateI d +1.6 Fr2010A m +2.4 Fr2015A m +2.4 Fr2020A m +2.3 Fr2020T m +2.3 Fr2025A m +2.2 Fr2030A m +2.0 Fr2035A m +1.8 Fr2040A m +1.8 GrowIncI +1.4 GrowOppT m +4.6 HiIncAdvA m +4.9 HiIncAdvI d +5.0 HiIncAdvT m +4.9 LeverA m +1.5 LeverC m +1.2 LeverI +1.6 LeverT m +1.4 LrgCapI +.7 Mid-CpIIA m -1.1 Mid-CpIII -1.0 MidCapA m -.1 MidCapT m -.1 MidCpIIT m -1.2 NewInsA m -.1 NewInsC m -.4 NewInsI +.1 NewInsT m -.2 OverseaI d +1.7 ShFixInI +1.6 SmCapA m +4.1 SmCapC m +3.8 SmCapI +4.3 SmCapT m +4.0 StSlctSmCp d +2.1 StratIncA m +4.6 StratIncC m +4.1 StratIncI +4.6 StratIncT m +4.5 TechA m -1.8 TotBondA m +3.7 TotBondI +3.8 ValStratT m +1.6 Fidelity Select Biotech d +14.4 BrokInv d -9.1 Chemical d +7.5 CommEq d -.6 Computer d -.1 ConsStpl d +5.4 DefAero d +5.5 Electron d +2.1 Energy d +6.8 EnergySvc d +5.7 FinSvc d -8.2 Gold d -10.2 HealtCar d +11.8 Industr d +1.2 Materials d +.5 MedDeliv d +16.2 MedEqSys d +10.3 NatGas d +1.2 NatRes d +3.7 Pharm d +11.5 SelctUtil d +6.3 SoftwCom d +.9 Tech d -1.5 Telecom d +5.0 Fidelity Spartan 500IdxInv +1.9 ExtMktIdI d +1.8 FdSpIntIv +4.5 IntlIdxIn d +2.1 TotMktIdI d +1.9 First American RealA m +5.8 First Eagle FndofAmY b +6.0 GlbA m +2.4

+.2 +1.7 +2.5 +2.1 +4.4 +3.2 +3.0 +3.4 +.9 +4.7 +5.8 +6.7 +3.3 +3.1 +2.7 +4.3 +4.2 +4.5 +4.0 +3.9 +3.3 +4.4 +7.2 NA +6.4 +6.4 +4.9 +4.3 +7.1 -4.7 +8.6 +5.0 +5.8 +5.8 +5.9 +4.5 -1.2 +2.0 +2.8 +4.7 +5.5 -4.5 +3.8 +14.1 +4.2 -1.5 +5.6 +4.4 +4.4 +4.4 +.4 +3.3 +2.4 +3.7 +5.1 +4.3 +4.2 +4.5 +5.6 +9.6 +5.2 +4.5 +9.7 +.5 +4.3 +6.4 +4.5 +1.2 +4.8 NA +4.0 +2.7 +9.0 +5.8 +6.0 NA +5.4 +2.7 +2.3 +8.4 +4.5 +4.5 +4.5 +4.0 +6.8 +5.9 +6.0 +1.8 +1.1 +4.9

19.84 21.27 35.01 23.65 12.05 12.45 8.71 35.76 19.26 9.91 15.26 9.57 29.24 10.33 10.23 12.37 11.38 14.42 14.75 12.40 14.86 11.65 11.94 18.55 24.07 10.97 15.24 22.26 93.53 19.75 9.24 26.75 12.21 10.86 11.21 10.48 11.28 14.03 35.83 23.10 7.60 11.87 19.10 60.50 31.59 11.52 42.57 12.32 12.24 11.79 77.46 17.57 10.79 31.78 11.07 12.97 11.94 13.36 32.26 16.63 38.84 11.97 62.30 35.56 11.12 27.12 19.18 29.23 10.98 9.45 10.82 8.54 22.78 21.72 17.84 12.24 16.78 28.16 11.65 11.67 10.11 10.09 11.19 17.63 11.16 75.18 11.71 75.87 16.04 20.56

14.86 14.36 23.88 17.70 10.07 9.53 6.64 25.78 13.85 9.37 10.30 8.79 22.66 7.83 7.66 11.34 9.77 12.11 11.96 9.81 11.61 10.74 11.30 12.22 18.76 10.26 10.46 15.60 64.17 14.60 8.31 18.16 11.39 10.39 10.58 9.89 7.91 9.92 25.96 16.16 7.24 9.65 13.84 44.77 21.30 8.87 30.93 11.38 11.45 11.08 58.10 12.44 8.05 22.04 10.69 11.94 11.03 12.28 23.28 15.01 24.58 11.11 41.75 25.84 10.30 19.97 15.52 20.33 9.60 7.23 10.54 8.39 15.40 14.68 11.86 7.90 12.35 20.13 9.11 10.72 8.48 8.46 10.27 13.42 10.64 51.59 11.16 53.86 11.82 14.47

18.43 19.38 31.93 21.90 11.59 11.66 8.14 32.92 17.93 9.83 14.15 9.23 27.57 9.64 9.52 12.18 11.03 13.88 14.08 11.75 14.02 11.48 11.74 16.71 22.90 10.63 14.19 20.54 86.81 18.50 9.09 24.42 12.12 10.77 10.91 10.19 10.63 12.93 32.93 22.03 7.57 10.11 17.70 56.73 28.83 10.77 40.10 11.91 11.86 11.50 70.65 16.20 10.07 27.90 11.05 12.56 11.46 12.88 29.95 15.92 34.93 11.64 56.79 32.66 10.73 25.58 18.28 27.06 10.62 8.82 10.71 8.53 20.50 19.49 16.21 11.02 15.20 26.02 11.16 11.33 9.89 9.88 10.79 16.96 10.96 69.59 11.55 69.53 14.86 19.03

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17.52 15.99 12.00 17.47 17.75 17.31 13.89 60.10 64.02 59.82 25.01 25.77 25.37 9.92 9.92 9.90 12.21 12.17 12.80 12.79 12.46 13.11 12.51 13.38 18.69 38.91 10.50 9.98 10.55 38.29 36.42 38.73 37.60 20.29 19.17 19.42 21.62 21.81 19.03 21.40 20.39 21.62 21.15 20.39 9.30 27.83 24.75 29.15 26.86 20.94 13.09 13.06 13.22 13.08 27.46 11.17 11.15 28.43

13.68 13.11 8.35 12.66 12.86 12.55 12.54 41.10 43.77 40.93 18.61 19.16 18.87 9.38 9.38 9.36 10.22 10.14 10.34 10.33 9.81 10.19 9.51 10.14 13.76 26.08 8.99 8.57 9.03 25.91 24.75 26.22 25.46 14.73 14.07 14.22 15.48 15.64 14.00 16.21 15.50 16.37 16.04 14.13 9.14 20.76 18.70 21.65 20.11 13.43 12.02 12.00 12.14 12.01 18.34 10.64 10.62 19.76

16.62 15.33 11.00 16.19 16.46 16.04 13.32 55.85 59.52 55.59 23.53 24.25 23.86 9.85 9.84 9.83 11.78 11.73 12.24 12.24 11.82 12.40 11.74 12.55 17.51 36.01 10.22 9.70 10.26 34.93 33.20 35.35 34.30 18.84 17.71 17.94 20.01 20.19 17.58 19.91 18.96 20.12 19.67 18.82 9.29 25.68 22.82 26.91 24.78 18.89 12.66 12.63 12.80 12.65 24.57 10.96 10.94 26.30

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58.55 42.21 63.99 19.74 42.57 57.47 59.81 34.61 37.16 48.20 51.47 40.37 100.51 17.59 47.18 39.12 21.95 25.57 24.65 10.20 41.81 63.21 70.10 37.43

83.45 47.66 102.66 26.36 56.35 71.41 77.14 49.37 55.75 78.60 56.51 45.87 139.28 23.54 68.25 57.73 30.25 33.61 36.05 13.48 51.34 82.58 94.14 48.74

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36.36 29.12 10.41 28.13 29.40

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-.37 -.59

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YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG

Gold m -5.4 +15.6 OverseasA m +2.2 +7.4 USValueA m +3.4 +5.7 First Investors BlChipA m +1.8 +1.2 GrowIncA m +3.4 +2.4 IncomeA m +3.9 +4.4 InvGradeA m +4.3 +5.9 OpportA m +4.2 +4.3 TaxEA m +4.3 +4.1 TotalRetA m +3.3 +4.6 FrankTemp-Franklin AZ TF A m +4.0 +3.8 AdjUSA m +.8 +3.6 AdjUSC m +.5 +3.2 BalInv m -1.2 +.2 BioDis A m +9.0 +7.5 CA TF A m +4.4 +3.7 CA TF C m +4.1 +3.1 CAHY A m +4.0 +2.8 CAInTF A m +4.8 +3.3 CAInt A m +3.5 +3.8 CO TF A m +5.1 +3.7 CaTxFrAdv +4.4 +3.8 China A m +.7 +15.9 ChinaAdv +.8 +16.2 CvtSc A m +2.4 +5.6 DynaTechA m +2.6 +7.4 EqIn A m +.6 +.9 FL TF A m +4.1 +4.0 FLRtDAAdv +2.2 +3.4 Fed TF A m +5.2 +4.1 Fed TF C m +4.9 +3.5 FedIntA m +4.2 +4.4 FedLmtT/FIncA m +2.0 +3.8 FedTxFrIA +5.1 +4.2 FlRtDAC m +2.1 +2.7 FlRtDAccA m +2.2 +3.1 FlxCpGr A m -.1 +4.6 FlxCpGrAd ... +4.9 GoldPrAdv -13.9 +18.2 GoldPrM A m -14.0 +17.9 GoldPrM C m -14.3 +17.1 GrowAdv +1.5 +5.0 GrowB m +1.1 +4.0 GrowC m +1.1 +4.0 Growth A m +1.4 +4.8 HY TF A m +5.3 +3.7 HY TF C m +5.1 +3.2 HighIncA m +5.1 +8.0 HighIncC m +4.3 +7.4 InSCGrAd +1.2 +7.9 Income A m +5.0 +5.7 Income C m +4.7 +5.3 IncomeAdv +4.7 +5.8 IncomeB m +4.6 +4.9 IncomeR b +4.4 +5.3 InsTF A m +4.9 +3.6 LoDurTReA m +1.9 +5.2 MATFA m +5.1 +3.6 MD TF A m +3.6 +3.5 MITFA m +4.6 +3.8 MNTFA m +4.9 +4.4 MO TF A m +4.6 +3.9 NC TF A m +4.7 +4.1 NJ TF A m +3.8 +4.0 NY TF A m +4.3 +4.2 NY TF C m +4.0 +3.6 NYIntTFA m +4.3 +4.3 NatResA m +1.4 +10.0 OHTFA m +4.8 +3.9 OR TF A m +4.7 +4.3 PA TF A m +4.8 +4.1 PR TF A m +3.9 +3.9 RealRetA m +2.5 +5.6 RisDivAdv +3.9 +3.1 RisDv A m +3.8 +2.9 RisDv C m +3.4 +2.1 SmCpGI C m +.6 +4.7 SmCpValA m -3.0 +3.1 SmCpVlAd -2.9 +3.4 SmMCpGAdv +1.1 +5.7 SmMdCpGrA m +1.0 +5.5 StrInc A m +4.1 +7.6 StrIncAdv +4.2 +7.9 Strinc C m +3.9 +7.2 TotRetAdv +4.3 +6.9 TotalRetA m +4.3 +6.6 US Gov A m +3.2 +6.3 US Gov C m +3.0 +5.8 USGovtAdv +3.3 +6.5 Utils A m +7.2 +5.9 Utils C m +7.0 +5.3 VA TF A m +4.8 +4.0 FrankTemp-Mutual Beacon A m +3.2 +.8 Beacon C m +3.0 +.1 Beacon Z +3.4 +1.1 Discov A m +2.7 +5.7 Discov C m +2.4 +4.9 Discov Z +2.8 +6.0 DiscovR b +2.6 +5.4 Euro A m +3.0 +5.4 Euro Z +3.1 +5.7 QuestA m +3.0 +4.7 QuestC m +2.6 +4.0 QuestZ +3.2 +5.0 Shares A m +3.3 +1.4 Shares C m +3.0 +.7 Shares Z +3.5 +1.7 FrankTemp-Templeton BricA m -3.3 +9.9 DvMk A m -1.4 +8.7 EmgMktIs -1.9 +9.1 Fgn A m +6.0 +4.8 Frgn Adv +6.1 +5.1 Frgn C m +5.7 +4.1 GlBond A m +4.1 +11.9 GlBond C m +3.8 +11.5 GlBondAdv +4.1 +12.2 GlOp A m +4.0 +3.8 GlSmCo A m -1.5 +4.7 Growth A m +5.3 +.1 Growth Ad +5.5 +.3 Growth C m +4.9 -.7 IncomeA m +3.2 +7.2 IncomeC m +3.1 +6.8 World A m +3.6 +2.7 Franklin Templeton ConAllcC m +1.5 +5.0 ConAllctA m +1.8 +5.8 CoreAll A m +2.5 +2.6 FndAllA m +4.4 +2.2 FndAllC m +4.1 +1.5 GrAllcA m +1.4 +5.4 HYldTFInA +5.4 +3.9 TemHdCurA m +4.3 +5.8 TemMdTaC m +1.4 +5.2 TemMdTarA m +1.8 +6.0 GE ElfunTr +2.8 +3.8 ElfunTxE +4.2 +4.6 S&SInc +3.9 +5.7 S&SProg +.8 +3.4 GMO DomBdVI +1.0 +5.7 EmgDbtIII +5.6 +10.2 EmgDbtIV +5.6 +10.3 EmgMktII NA NA EmgMktIII NA NA EmgMktIV NA NA EmgMktV NA NA EmgMktsVI NA NA ForIII +2.7 +1.1 ForIV +2.7 +1.1 ForSmCaS +3.7 +7.0 InCorEqIV +3.8 +2.0 IntCEqIII +3.8 +1.9 IntCEqVI +3.8 +2.0 IntGEqIII +3.4 +4.5 IntGEqIV +3.4 NA IntIVlIII +3.6 +1.1 IntItVlIV +3.6 +1.1 IntlSmIII +4.6 +5.3 QuIII +4.1 +3.8 QuIV +4.1 +3.9 QuVI +4.1 NA StFxInVI +4.8 +2.4 TxMdIEIII +4.1 +2.7 USCorEqVI +3.8 +1.8 Gabelli AssetAAA m +2.6 +6.0 EqIncomeAAA m +3.4 +4.8 GoldAAA m -12.0 +13.7 GrowthAAA m -2.1 +1.8 SmCpGrAAA m +.4 +6.8 UtilA m +4.8 +6.2 UtilAAA m +4.7 +6.2 UtilC m +4.5 +5.4 Value m +3.7 +4.7 Gartmore LrgCapA m +2.8 +2.9 Gateway GatewayA m +1.0 +2.3 Goldman Sachs BalStrA m +2.1 +3.7 CapGrA m ... +2.6 G&IStrA m +2.4 +2.4 GovtIncA m +2.5 +5.5 GrIncA m -.1 +.1 GrOppA m -.1 +7.8 GrStrA m +2.4 +1.2 HiYieldA m +4.2 +6.8 LgCapValA m +.2 +.9 MidCapVaA m +1.2 +4.3 ShDuGovA m +.6 +4.8 SmCpValA m +.7 +4.5 StrIntEqA m +1.4 +1.0 Greenspring Greensprretl d ... +5.0 GuideStone Funds AggAllGS4 +1.7 +1.8 BlcAlloGS4 +2.6 +4.8 GrAlloGS4 +2.1 +3.4 GrEqGS4 -.1 +2.7 IntEqGS4 +1.9 +2.6 LowDurGS4 +1.5 +4.6 MedDurGS4 +3.4 +7.0 SmCapGS4 +4.1 +3.1 ValEqGS4 +2.9 +.3 Harbor Bond +3.3 +8.2 CapApInst +2.2 +4.9 CapAprAdm b +2.1 +4.6 CapAprInv b +2.0 +4.5 HiYBdInst d +3.7 +7.5 IntlAdm m +3.2 +6.9 IntlGr d -3.4 +2.4 IntlInstl d +3.3 +7.1 IntlInv m +3.1 +6.7 MidCpGr +4.2 +5.9 SmCpGr +2.1 +6.3 SmCpVal +3.6 +1.9 Harding Loevner

35.84 26.19 32.12 -1.14 24.05 19.09 23.16 -.22 17.64 14.38 16.89 -.25 22.89 15.79 2.58 9.92 30.52 10.11 15.95

17.70 11.56 2.34 9.26 20.56 9.18 13.18

21.49 14.80 2.53 9.74 28.34 9.65 15.39

-.45 -.32 -.02 -.01 -.70 ... -.20

11.11 8.93 8.93 50.62 79.21 7.25 7.24 9.73 12.40 11.81 12.01 7.22 42.33 42.61 16.51 33.26 17.94 11.69 9.26 12.16 12.16 12.08 10.49 12.16 9.25 9.25 52.42 53.26 53.67 51.50 49.28 48.18 46.05 45.56 48.13 10.39 10.53 2.06 2.08 17.81 2.30 2.32 2.29 2.29 2.27 12.19 10.48 11.95 11.73 12.22 12.55 12.33 12.51 12.36 12.01 11.99 11.57 45.14 12.78 12.22 10.57 12.16 11.53 35.71 35.75 35.26 37.10 48.15 49.53 42.73 41.47 10.71 10.72 10.70 10.42 10.40 6.88 6.84 6.90 12.72 12.66 11.93

9.93 8.84 8.84 36.40 53.99 6.48 6.47 8.68 11.08 10.93 10.65 6.47 30.90 31.10 12.86 23.50 13.78 10.75 8.88 10.93 10.93 11.19 10.25 10.94 8.87 8.87 37.91 38.44 37.13 35.67 34.25 36.66 35.11 34.74 36.62 9.31 9.44 1.87 1.88 13.18 1.97 1.99 1.96 1.97 1.95 10.93 10.17 10.64 10.58 11.12 11.47 11.14 11.29 11.13 10.72 10.71 10.72 27.63 11.50 11.08 9.49 10.77 10.62 27.50 27.54 27.18 25.18 33.28 34.23 28.77 27.98 9.94 9.95 9.94 9.80 9.79 6.63 6.59 6.65 10.17 10.14 10.77

10.57 8.85 8.84 46.66 74.76 6.86 6.85 9.14 11.82 11.34 11.45 6.85 40.10 40.38 15.56 30.95 16.80 11.34 9.18 11.69 11.68 11.68 10.43 11.69 9.18 9.18 48.13 48.93 45.85 43.94 41.88 45.33 43.27 42.81 45.27 9.91 10.05 2.03 2.04 16.99 2.22 2.24 2.20 2.21 2.19 11.70 10.43 11.39 11.16 11.76 12.17 11.85 12.05 11.80 11.46 11.45 11.21 40.27 12.27 11.77 10.16 11.48 11.27 34.06 34.09 33.61 33.67 43.25 44.51 38.83 37.68 10.62 10.63 10.62 10.34 10.33 6.84 6.80 6.86 12.22 12.18 11.52

+.01 ... ... -1.12 -2.45 +.03 +.03 +.04 +.02 ... ... +.03 -.78 -.78 -.40 -1.08 -.36 ... -.02 +.02 +.01 -.01 ... +.01 -.01 -.01 -1.68 -1.70 -2.05 -1.97 -1.88 -.99 -.96 -.95 -.99 +.01 +.01 -.01 -.01 -.55 -.03 -.03 -.03 -.03 -.03 -.01 -.03 -.01 +.01 +.01 -.01 +.01 +.01 +.01 +.01 +.01 ... -1.39 -.01 -.01 +.01 +.02 -.08 -.35 -.35 -.35 -1.11 -1.18 -1.21 -1.27 -1.23 -.05 -.05 -.05 -.04 -.03 ... ... ... -.08 -.08 +.01

13.16 13.04 13.26 31.31 31.00 31.71 31.01 22.76 23.22 18.76 18.53 18.92 22.28 22.03 22.47

10.67 10.53 10.78 25.55 25.28 25.88 25.31 19.07 19.45 15.15 15.06 15.24 18.05 17.83 18.20

12.63 12.51 12.73 29.97 29.65 30.36 29.67 21.69 22.14 18.09 17.85 18.25 21.33 21.07 21.51

-.27 -.27 -.27 -.65 -.65 -.66 -.65 -.50 -.51 -.32 -.33 -.33 -.42 -.43 -.43

15.97 26.96 17.50 7.89 7.80 7.71 14.08 14.10 14.04 19.77 7.91 20.04 20.05 19.54 3.01 3.01 16.39

11.70 19.55 12.75 5.54 5.49 5.42 12.79 12.81 13.28 14.77 5.62 14.70 14.71 14.31 2.43 2.42 12.25

14.69 25.17 16.39 7.40 7.33 7.23 13.89 13.91 13.85 18.43 7.33 18.74 18.75 18.25 2.89 2.89 15.38

-.15 -.30 -.22 -.24 -.23 -.23 -.08 -.09 -.09 -.59 -.27 -.60 -.60 -.59 -.06 -.05 -.43

14.04 14.27 13.55 11.43 11.25 16.21 10.42 10.40 14.58 14.90

12.35 12.54 10.22 9.05 8.94 12.91 9.34 8.25 12.37 12.63

13.68 -.17 13.92 -.16 12.72 -.34 10.92 -.24 10.74 -.24 15.39 -.33 9.94 +.01 10.19 -.14 14.07 -.22 14.39 -.22

45.57 12.06 11.56 43.40

35.00 11.02 10.96 33.17

42.53 -1.05 11.56 ... 11.52 -.01 40.54 -.96

4.21 9.63 9.62 15.87 15.91 15.81 15.79 15.82 13.43 13.76 15.11 32.18 32.20 32.15 25.36 25.37 24.29 24.28 9.00 21.83 21.85 21.84 15.85 16.22 12.51

3.86 7.93 7.92 11.08 11.11 11.04 11.03 11.05 9.87 10.10 10.28 22.83 22.84 22.81 17.75 17.76 17.38 17.37 6.04 17.16 17.17 17.17 14.93 11.52 9.63

3.86 9.61 9.60 13.77 13.80 13.71 13.70 13.72 12.49 12.79 14.21 30.13 30.14 30.11 23.96 23.97 22.63 22.62 8.56 20.82 20.84 20.83 15.85 15.16 11.90

53.83 22.30 36.71 33.47 36.89 6.71 6.66 6.00 17.32

38.79 16.60 27.43 24.66 25.80 5.86 5.83 5.34 12.68

50.22 -1.32 21.01 -.49 31.44 -1.56 30.73 -.90 34.07 -.90 6.38 -.10 6.33 -.10 5.70 -.09 16.17 -.54

-.02 -.01 -.01 -1.37 -1.37 -1.37 -1.36 -1.37 -.33 -.34 -.40 -.79 -.80 -.79 -.64 -.64 -.63 -.63 -.22 -.44 -.44 -.44 +.05 -.41 -.21

16.07 12.35 15.20

-.25

26.98 24.00 26.21

-.35

10.76 22.67 11.30 15.90 22.50 25.09 11.72 7.47 12.67 39.04 10.50 43.38 11.22

9.32 17.33 9.23 14.78 17.40 18.37 9.09 6.81 9.68 27.65 10.21 30.34 8.19

10.41 -.14 21.20 -.53 10.77 -.20 15.27 +.01 20.98 -.53 22.93 -.72 11.01 -.26 7.34 -.06 11.81 -.29 36.34 -1.10 10.29 ... 39.77 -1.24 10.37 -.33

25.20 22.58 24.20

-.37

12.87 12.83 13.20 20.26 14.65 13.49 14.48 16.54 15.59

9.50 10.93 10.51 14.50 10.65 13.20 13.51 10.87 11.41

11.99 12.43 12.54 18.88 13.68 13.39 14.04 15.06 14.53

-.31 -.17 -.25 -.55 -.39 ... ... -.50 -.30

12.45 40.02 39.82 39.56 11.33 66.94 13.07 67.42 66.74 9.88 14.38 22.00

11.78 29.37 29.22 29.06 10.49 46.37 9.49 46.69 46.21 6.63 9.86 15.62

12.40 37.52 37.32 37.07 11.15 62.08 11.95 62.55 61.88 8.96 13.14 20.29

-.02 -1.02 -1.01 -1.01 -.06 -2.23 -.48 -2.24 -2.22 -.39 -.42 -.54


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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW EmgMkts d -2.5 +10.5 52.86 39.98 Hartford AdvHLSFIB b +1.6 +3.5 20.77 16.86 AdvHLSIA +1.7 +3.8 20.55 16.69 AdviserA m +1.6 +3.4 15.65 12.65 BalAlA m +2.4 +4.3 12.07 9.82 CapAppIIA m -.1 +5.1 15.27 10.84 CapApr C m -4.0 +1.4 32.29 24.42 CapAprA m -3.7 +2.1 36.47 27.43 CapAprB m -4.0 +1.3 32.09 24.29 CapAprI -3.6 NA 36.51 27.39 ChksBalsA m +.5 NA 10.04 8.27 CpApHLSIA -.9 +4.3 45.67 33.13 CpApHLSIB b -1.1 +4.0 45.25 32.82 DivGrowA m +2.0 +3.9 20.65 15.66 DivGrowI +2.2 NA 20.59 15.61 DsEqHLSIA +4.0 +2.6 13.02 9.59 DvGrHLSIA +2.2 +4.2 21.31 16.18 DvGrHLSIB b +2.1 +4.0 21.25 16.13 EqIncA m +3.4 +4.0 13.87 10.54 FloatRtA m +2.3 +3.4 9.01 8.48 FloatRtC m +2.0 +2.6 9.00 8.47 FloatRtI +2.5 NA 9.01 8.49 GlbAllAstA m +.7 NA 11.83 10.49 GlbGrthIA -.1 +1.0 17.09 12.01 GrAlA m +1.9 +3.9 12.45 9.54 GrOpHLSIA +2.4 +4.4 28.94 20.00 GrOppA m +2.0 +4.0 29.88 20.77 GrOppL m +2.0 +4.2 30.70 21.32 HiYdHLSIA +5.5 +8.8 9.74 8.16 InOpHLSIA ... +6.1 13.31 9.62 IndHLSIA +1.8 +2.2 28.54 21.47 InflPlC m +4.7 +5.9 12.20 10.95 InflPlusA m +5.1 +6.7 12.32 11.08 MCVlHLSIA +.7 +4.6 11.26 7.92 MdCpHLSIA +2.3 +6.3 28.80 20.62 MidCapA m +1.9 +5.6 24.30 17.48 MidCapC m +1.6 +4.9 21.25 15.36 Sm-CpGrHLSIA +6.6 +5.8 24.81 15.28 SmCoHLSIA +6.4 +4.7 20.65 13.32 StkHLSIA +.9 +2.6 44.46 32.79 TRBdHLSIA +3.2 +5.3 11.54 10.81 TRBdHLSIA b +3.2 +5.1 11.46 10.76 TotRetBdA m +2.9 +4.9 10.76 10.36 USHLSIA +2.1 +3.3 11.17 10.36 ValHLSIA +1.2 +3.6 11.68 8.77 Heartland SelectVal m -.1 +5.3 31.69 23.25 Value m +1.2 +2.9 48.48 33.76 ValuePlus m -.9 +9.6 32.39 22.65 Henderson IntlOppA m +3.9 +4.6 23.63 17.63 IntlOppC m +3.5 +3.8 22.36 16.69 Homestead Value d +4.4 +2.0 34.22 25.45 Hotchkis & Wiley LgCapValA m -1.2 -3.1 17.55 13.12 Hussman StrTotRet d +.7 +7.3 12.86 12.04 StratGrth d +.8 -.6 13.53 11.84 ICON Energy +4.7 +7.8 23.11 14.53 ING CorpLeadB +7.1 +6.1 23.25 16.10 GNMAIncA m +3.8 +6.4 9.01 8.71 GlREstA m +3.3 +2.0 17.57 13.21 IntlVal A m +1.4 +.3 12.72 9.85 RussiaA m +4.1 +10.3 46.06 29.77 TRPGrEqI -.3 +3.9 58.73 42.62 INVESCO AmerValA m +2.7 +5.0 30.05 21.92 AsPacGrA m +2.1 +14.5 32.41 23.46 CapDevA m +2.7 +2.3 18.51 12.71 CharterA m +3.5 +5.2 17.60 13.78 ComstockA m +1.7 +1.6 17.20 12.78 ComstockB m +1.7 +1.4 17.20 12.78 ComstockC m +1.3 +.8 17.20 12.78 ConstellA m -.3 -.7 24.89 18.32 ConstellB m -.7 -1.4 22.32 16.53 CorpBondA m +4.2 +6.6 6.95 6.50 DevMkt A m -.5 +13.3 34.78 26.42 DivDivA m +1.9 +3.8 13.18 10.32 DivDivInv b +1.8 +3.9 13.18 10.32 DynInv b +5.2 +4.2 25.36 16.86 EnergyA m +3.5 +8.2 47.82 29.38 EnergyInv b +3.5 +8.2 47.65 29.28 EqIncomeA m +1.7 +4.0 9.17 7.32 EqIncomeB m +1.6 +3.8 9.00 7.18 EqIncomeC m +1.4 +3.3 9.04 7.21 EqWSP500A m +3.1 +4.2 33.96 24.54 EuroGrA m +7.2 +4.8 34.74 24.35 FloatRtA m +2.5 +3.0 7.88 7.34 GlHlthCrA m +12.8 +5.3 31.40 23.28 GlHlthCrI m +12.8 +5.3 31.41 23.28 GlS&MGrA m +2.8 +5.2 21.01 15.30 GlbCEqtyA m +.3 0.0 14.16 10.77 GlobEqA m +4.3 +.3 11.88 8.65 GrowIncA m +1.1 +2.4 20.86 15.61 HiYldA m +3.7 +8.3 4.35 3.97 HiYldMuA m +3.6 +2.1 9.67 8.64 HiYldMuC m +3.4 +1.3 9.65 8.63 IntSmCoA m +3.9 +6.7 20.52 13.59 IntlGrA m +3.5 +5.8 30.19 22.22 MidCapGrA m +1.2 +7.3 33.16 22.79 MidCpCrA m +2.5 +5.7 25.34 19.97 MuniIncA m +4.0 +2.5 13.56 12.23 PacGrowB m -3.5 +4.9 22.83 17.74 RealEstA m +5.3 +1.9 24.15 17.40 SP500IdxA m +1.7 +2.0 14.74 11.04 SmCapEqA m +4.1 +4.7 13.91 9.20 SmCapGrA m +5.4 +6.2 32.98 21.79 SmCapValA m -2.4 +6.9 19.72 14.03 SmCpGrA m +4.1 +4.9 12.67 8.61 Summit b +.8 +2.0 12.76 9.42 TechInv b +2.5 +5.8 36.18 24.41 TxFrInmA3 m +3.9 +4.8 11.59 10.92 USMortA m +2.9 +4.6 13.25 12.84 Ivy AssetSTrB m +1.2 +8.2 26.09 19.73 AssetStrA m +1.6 +9.1 27.05 20.34 AssetStrC m +1.2 +8.3 26.22 19.82 AssetStrY m +1.6 +9.1 27.10 20.38 GlNatResA m -2.0 +4.6 24.76 15.21 GlNatResC m -2.3 +3.8 21.47 13.26 GlNatResI d -1.9 NA 25.26 15.47 GlbNatrlY m -2.0 +4.8 25.06 15.38 HiIncA m +5.1 +9.5 8.69 8.11 HiIncC m +4.8 +8.6 8.69 8.11 IntlValA m +.6 +6.3 17.98 12.73 LgCpGrA m ... +3.9 14.05 10.40 LtdTmBdA m +1.8 +5.5 11.37 11.00 MdCpGrA m +1.9 +8.1 18.85 12.90 PacOppA m -.7 +11.4 17.89 13.52 ScTechA m +3.1 +9.4 35.64 26.06 ScTechY m +3.1 +9.5 37.12 27.12 JPMorgan CoreBondA m +3.2 +6.9 11.75 11.35 CoreBondC m +2.9 +6.2 11.81 11.41 DiversMidCapGrA m+2.7 +5.5 23.81 16.11 EqIdxA m +1.7 +2.0 30.96 23.22 GovtBdA m +4.0 +6.6 11.32 10.65 HighStatA m +1.9 +.8 15.38 14.95 HighYldA m +4.4 +8.5 8.39 7.61 InvBalA m +1.9 +5.0 12.83 10.95 InvBalC m +1.6 +4.4 12.68 10.83 InvConGrA m +2.1 +5.2 11.53 10.44 InvConGrC m +1.8 +4.6 11.50 10.41 InvGrInA m +1.5 +4.3 13.60 10.99 InvGrowA m +1.0 +3.4 14.55 11.14 MidCapVal m +3.4 +4.2 25.35 18.63 SmCapEqA m +3.5 +7.8 37.65 27.07 SmCapEqR5 +3.7 +8.3 41.02 29.41 USEquityA m +.1 +4.6 10.99 8.23 Janus BalC m +2.8 NA 26.68 22.89 BalJ +3.1 +7.3 26.72 23.33 BalS b +3.0 NA 26.72 22.91 ContrJ -6.3 +1.6 15.36 12.32 EntrprsJ +2.8 +7.7 65.02 44.79 FlxBdJ +3.9 +8.2 11.06 10.34 FortyA m -2.7 +5.2 35.77 28.15 FortyS b -2.8 +5.0 35.28 27.80 Gr&IncJ +2.8 +1.0 33.60 25.62 HiYldJ d +4.1 +8.3 9.35 8.33 J -.2 +3.5 31.19 23.93 OrionJ d -2.7 +6.8 12.81 9.24 OverseasJ d -8.7 +9.5 53.66 40.10 PerkinsMCVJ +2.0 +6.1 24.66 18.87 PerkinsSCVJ +.1 +7.6 25.96 20.61 RsrchJ +1.0 +6.5 31.84 22.92 ShTmBdJ +1.6 +5.3 3.14 3.07 TwentyJ -3.4 +6.1 68.99 54.09 WorldwideJ d -1.1 +2.4 49.99 37.89 Janus Aspen Bal Is +3.3 +7.7 30.37 25.49 FortyIs -2.4 +5.9 37.85 29.55 IntlGrIs -9.8 +10.6 59.90 44.00 JanusI -.1 +4.1 26.02 19.97 MidCpIs +2.8 +7.8 42.69 29.34 WldWGrIs -.9 +2.7 32.36 24.54 Jensen J b +2.1 +4.6 29.42 22.57 John Hancock BalA m ... +6.8 16.07 13.44 BondA m +4.1 +7.9 15.91 14.93 ClsscValA m +1.5 -3.4 18.18 13.47 HiYldA m +.3 +4.4 4.08 3.51 IntlCoreA m +3.4 +1.4 32.28 22.86 LgCpEqA m -1.9 +7.8 27.84 21.04 LgCpEqC m -2.2 +7.0 25.76 19.46 LifAg1 b +1.1 +2.8 13.36 9.89 LifBa1 b +2.2 +4.7 13.73 11.31 LifCo1 b +3.2 +6.2 13.24 12.16 LifGr1 b +1.5 +3.9 13.85 10.84 LifMo1 b +2.9 +5.5 13.24 11.53 RegBankA m -6.4 -5.8 15.50 12.04 SmCapEqA m +2.8 +4.0 27.78 17.16 SovInvA m +1.2 +2.2 17.12 13.24 StrIncA m +4.1 +8.5 6.88 6.27 StrIncC m +3.8 +7.8 6.88 6.26 TaxFBdA m +4.2 +3.9 10.19 9.28 Keeley SmCapVal m -.2 +1.6 27.77 18.33 Kinetics Paradigm d -1.1 +1.6 25.22 18.31 LKCM SmCpEqI d +6.3 +4.2 24.94 15.68 Laudus GrInvUSLCGr d +2.5 +8.0 13.87 9.84 InMktMstS d +1.9 +6.2 20.78 14.61 IntlFxInc d +5.3 NA 12.47 10.66 IntlMstrI d +1.9 +6.0 20.78 14.61 Lazard EmgMktEqO m -2.9 +12.6 22.82 17.13 Legg Mason/Western AggGrowA m +5.9 +1.9 124.09 82.78 AggGrowB m +5.5 +1.1 106.37 71.52 AggrsvGrC m +5.6 +1.3 108.34 72.65 ApprecA m +1.3 +3.7 14.82 11.52 CAMncpA m +4.9 +4.0 16.41 14.85 EqIncBldA m +3.0 +1.6 13.71 10.94 EquityO -.5 +2.4 13.34 10.17 FdmACValA m -1.5 +1.1 14.87 10.75 GovtSecsA m +4.8 +6.6 10.70 10.17

WK NAV CHG 49.77 -1.01 19.87 19.66 14.97 11.58 13.94 29.51 33.36 29.32 33.40 9.56 41.96 41.56 19.33 19.28 12.26 19.93 19.87 13.15 8.89 8.88 8.90 11.22 15.60 11.76 26.49 27.31 28.06 9.66 12.46 26.67 11.53 11.67 10.39 26.61 22.43 19.59 22.77 18.79 41.36 11.25 11.19 10.63 10.67 10.90

-.34 -.33 -.25 -.19 -.52 -.85 -.95 -.84 -.95 -.16 -1.26 -1.25 -.41 -.41 -.26 -.44 -.43 -.24 -.03 -.03 -.03 -.22 -.59 -.24 -1.00 -1.04 -1.07 -.05 -.38 -.60 -.02 -.02 -.28 -.79 -.67 -.60 -.79 -.70 -1.06 -.01 -.01 -.02 +.02 -.21

29.15 -.77 44.35 -1.19 29.56 -.50 21.91 20.71

-.75 -.72

32.05

-.87

16.08

-.37

12.21 -.12 12.39 +.04 20.98

-.49

21.73 -.38 9.00 +.01 16.71 -.49 11.79 -.37 42.37 +.90 54.35 -1.72 27.91 30.76 16.85 16.74 15.94 15.94 15.92 23.22 20.79 6.88 32.94 12.44 12.43 23.42 42.85 42.70 8.70 8.53 8.57 31.69 32.94 7.78 30.14 30.14 19.56 13.10 11.20 19.39 4.27 9.05 9.04 19.48 28.53 30.12 23.75 12.83 21.53 22.51 13.77 12.74 30.13 17.59 11.55 11.92 33.22 11.36 13.16

-.72 -.74 -.58 -.36 -.39 -.39 -.40 -.75 -.68 ... -.73 -.27 -.28 -.78 -1.55 -1.54 -.14 -.14 -.13 -.82 -1.12 -.03 -.62 -.63 -.57 -.31 -.30 -.40 -.04 ... +.01 -.49 -.75 -1.06 -.51 ... -.43 -.91 -.31 -.37 -.99 -.74 -.42 -.37 -1.26 ... -.07

23.89 -.96 24.79 -.99 24.01 -.97 24.83 -.99 21.18 -.75 18.35 -.65 21.62 -.76 21.44 -.77 8.43 -.04 8.43 -.04 16.68 -.56 12.99 -.41 11.18 ... 17.35 -.52 16.59 -.66 32.49 -1.55 33.84 -1.62 11.66 11.71 22.07 28.92 11.13 15.30 8.24 12.39 12.23 11.30 11.26 12.93 13.59 23.91 34.97 38.13 10.22

+.02 +.01 -.66 -.66 +.03 -.01 -.04 -.16 -.16 -.09 -.09 -.23 -.33 -.49 -.94 -1.02 -.23

25.67 25.73 25.73 13.71 60.75 10.64 32.83 32.37 31.35 9.17 29.09 11.55 46.24 23.02 24.00 29.70 3.10 63.52 46.05

-.39 -.39 -.39 -.54 -1.44 -.01 -1.10 -1.09 -.87 -.08 -.73 -.38 -1.79 -.49 -.47 -.83 ... -2.08 -1.35

29.24 -.45 34.88 -1.13 51.50 -1.94 24.24 -.63 39.79 -.97 29.85 -.86 27.60

-.43

15.29 -.29 15.79 -.07 16.92 -.35 3.81 -.10 30.13 -.83 25.50 -.77 23.57 -.72 12.41 -.34 13.13 -.24 13.07 -.09 13.03 -.30 12.90 -.15 13.71 -.27 25.36 -.98 15.85 -.33 6.80 -.03 6.80 -.03 9.75 +.01 24.93

-.76

23.06

-.83

22.84

-.78

12.90 19.61 12.37 19.61

-.41 -.51 -.08 -.51

21.55

-.51

117.39 100.53 102.43 13.89 15.85 13.04 12.33 13.48 10.70

-3.18 -2.74 -2.78 -.33 ... -.22 -.35 -.38 +.03

YTD 5-YR FUND %RTN %RTN LSAllc70A m +1.9 +3.1 LSAllc85A m +1.7 +1.9 LgCpGrA m -.6 +2.6 MdCpCoA m +1.8 +5.0 MgdMuniA m +5.2 +4.8 MgdMuniC m +4.9 +4.2 MuBdLtdA m +4.3 +4.1 MuBdLtdC b +4.2 +3.5 MuBdNYA m +4.7 +4.8 MuHiIncA m +3.7 +3.4 OpportntC m -12.6 -5.8 SmCpGrA m +2.0 +5.1 SpecInvC m -1.8 +.5 ValueC m -1.9 -7.0 Leuthold AssetAl m +1.5 +3.7 CoreInv d +3.0 +5.2 Longleaf Partners Intl -.3 +2.2 LongPart +5.5 +1.5 SmCap +8.7 +6.5 Loomis Sayles BondR b +6.1 +8.3 GlbBdR b +5.3 +7.4 SmCpVaR b +1.3 +4.6 Lord Abbett AffiliatA m -.6 0.0 AffiliatC m -1.0 -.6 AlphaA m +.7 +6.6 BalA m +2.3 +4.6 BondDebA m +4.9 +7.6 BondDebB m +4.7 +6.9 BondDebC m +4.6 +6.9 ClsscStckA m -3.5 +3.2 CptStrcA m +2.1 +4.1 DevGrowA m +2.4 +9.3 FdmtlEqtyA m +1.8 +4.9 FdmtlEqtyC m +1.5 +4.2 FltRateF b +2.2 NA GrOpportA m +1.5 +7.8 HYMuniBdA m +2.4 -1.0 HiYldA m +5.2 +8.7 IncmA m +5.2 +8.6 IntlCorEqA m +3.5 +2.8 MidCpValA m +3.6 +2.6 NatlTaxFA m +4.3 +2.8 ShDurIncA m +2.1 +6.4 ShDurIncC m +1.8 +5.7 SmCpBlnA m +4.3 +2.4 SmCpValA m -.3 +6.2 TotRetA m +3.7 +7.0 MFS AggGrAlA m +2.2 +4.0 BondA m +4.5 +7.9 ConAlocA m +2.8 +6.2 CoreEqA m +1.4 +4.2 CoreGrA m +.2 +2.8 GlTotRtA m +4.3 +5.5 GovtSecA m +2.6 +6.2 GrAllocA m +2.6 +4.9 GrAllocB m +2.2 +4.2 GrAllocC m +2.2 +4.2 GrowA m ... +6.2 HiYLDOpA m +5.1 +6.6 HighIncA m +4.5 +6.7 HighIncI +4.7 +7.0 IntDivA m +3.2 +5.0 IntlNDisA m +3.6 +6.8 IntlNDisI +3.7 +7.1 IntlValA m +4.5 +4.1 LtdMatA m +1.5 +3.8 MAInvA m +1.7 +4.2 MAInvC m +1.5 +3.5 MAInvGrA m +1.9 +5.0 MdCpValI +3.2 +4.0 MidCapGrI +.2 +1.1 ModAllocA m +2.8 +5.7 ModAllocC m +2.5 +5.0 MuHiIncA f +3.6 +2.9 MuIncA m +3.6 +4.1 MuLtdMtA m +2.5 +4.0 NewDiscA m +3.9 +9.6 NewDiscI +4.0 +9.9 ResBdA m +3.7 +6.7 ResBondI +3.8 +6.9 ResIntlA m +4.1 +3.5 ResIntlI +4.3 +3.8 ResearchA m +.9 +4.3 ResearchI +1.1 +4.6 TotRetA m +2.5 +3.7 TotRetB m +2.2 +3.0 TotRetC m +2.2 +3.0 UtilA m +8.4 +10.0 UtilC m +8.1 +9.2 ValueA m +2.5 +2.9 ValueC m +2.2 +2.1 ValueI +2.6 +3.2 MainStay ConvertA m +1.6 +7.0 FltgRateA m +1.8 +3.8 HiYldCorA m +4.2 +6.9 HiYldCorC m +3.9 +6.0 LgCapGrA m +2.3 +6.0 Mairs & Power GrthInv +1.2 +3.3 Managers AMGFQGlAA m +1.9 +1.7 Bond +5.9 +8.1 MgrsPIMCOBd +3.6 +8.1 Manning & Napier Internati +6.0 +7.0 PBConTrmS +2.8 +6.1 PBExtTrmS +2.8 +5.3 PBMaxTrmS +.8 +4.2 PBModTrmS +2.6 +5.3 WrldOppA +4.3 +5.9 Marshall SmCpGrInv d -1.2 +8.0 Marsico 21stCent m -2.3 +1.7 FlexCap m -.2 NA Focus m -2.4 +2.4 Grow m +.1 +2.2 MassMutual PremIntlEqtyS +5.3 +6.4 SelFundmtlValS +1.3 +3.3 SelGlAlcS +1.6 NA SelIndxEqS +1.7 +2.0 SelIndxEqZ +1.8 +2.2 SelMdCpGrEqIIA m+2.7 +6.7 SelMdCpGrEqIIL +2.7 +7.0 SelMdCpGrEqIIS +2.9 +7.2 SlSmGrEqS +2.4 +4.5 MassMutual Inst PremCoreBndS +3.8 +6.8 Masters’ Select IntlIntl d +2.1 +5.0 Matthews Asian China d -2.7 +20.7 GrInc d +.3 +10.5 India d -6.8 +16.9 PacEqInc d -.5 NA PacTiger d -1.2 +14.4 Merger Merger m +2.6 +4.0 Meridian MeridnGr d +.9 +8.0 Value d -2.1 +3.2 Merk HrdCurInv b +4.8 +7.3 Metropolitan West Hi-YldBdM b +4.5 +9.5 LowDurBd b +2.0 +3.4 TotRtBd b +3.3 +8.4 Morgan Stanley FocGrA m +3.4 +7.5 StrategiA m +2.3 +4.3 USGovSecB m +3.7 +3.5 Muhlenkamp Muhlenkmp -.1 -3.5 Munder Funds MdCpCrGrA m +3.1 +5.0 Nations LgCpIxZ +1.9 +2.3 Nationwide DesModSvc b +1.8 +3.7 FundD m +2.8 +.9 IDAggSrv b +1.6 +2.5 IDModAgSv b +1.9 +3.2 IntlIdxA m +1.6 +1.4 S&P500Svc m +1.7 +1.8 Natixis CGMTgtEqA m -7.7 +4.0 InvBndA m +5.1 +8.7 InvBndC m +4.8 +7.9 StratIncA m +6.4 +8.4 StratIncC m +6.0 +7.6 Neuberger Berman FocusInv +1.2 -.4 GenesAdv b +3.9 +6.9 GenesisInv +4.1 +7.2 GenesisTr +4.0 +7.1 GuardnInv +3.1 +3.6 PartnerTr b +.2 +1.8 PartnrAdv b +.2 +1.6 PartnrInv +.3 +2.0 SmCpGrInv +2.0 +3.7 SocRespInv +2.9 +4.2 SocRespTr b +2.8 +4.0 New Covenant Growth +1.8 +1.5 Income +2.7 +3.0 Nicholas Nichol +3.8 +5.1 Northeast Investors Northeast +3.1 +3.6 Northern BdIndx +3.0 NA FixedIn +3.4 +5.9 GlbREIdx d +3.8 NA HYFixInc d +5.2 +7.0 HiYMuni +4.0 +.7 IntTaxE +4.3 +4.2 IntlIndex d +4.1 +2.0 MMIntlEq d +1.0 NA MMMidCap +4.0 NA MMSmCp +2.2 NA MdCapIndx +4.8 +6.1 ShIntUSGv +1.3 +4.4 SmCapIdx +1.4 +3.5 SmCapVal +.5 +3.1 StkIdx +3.3 +2.5 TaxE +5.3 +4.3 Nuveen HiYldMunA m +4.3 -1.8 HiYldMunC m +4.0 -2.3 IntlValA m -3.1 +3.3 LtdTmMuA m +2.9 +4.1 LtdTmMuC m +2.8 +3.7 NWQVlOppA m -.9 +9.8 NWQVlOppC m -1.2 +9.0 Oakmark

52-WEEK HI LOW 13.61 10.70 14.05 10.59 25.94 19.52 23.57 16.28 16.13 14.47 16.14 14.48 6.55 6.00 6.56 6.01 13.87 12.49 14.24 12.82 11.81 8.51 19.16 12.91 34.33 25.20 42.42 31.94

NAV 12.89 13.15 24.11 21.68 15.54 15.55 6.31 6.32 13.39 13.45 9.63 17.51 31.12 38.14

WK CHG -.27 -.32 -.59 -.76 +.02 +.02 ... ... +.02 +.04 -.52 -.59 -1.34 -.97

11.35 9.13 10.65 18.39 14.75 17.38

-.21 -.38

16.21 12.42 15.29 31.49 23.47 29.82 30.43 21.32 28.82

-.31 -.77 -.76

14.95 13.36 14.78 17.25 15.22 17.09 29.10 19.73 26.72

-.11 -.13 -.76

12.45 12.44 26.82 11.31 8.12 8.15 8.14 31.31 12.63 24.70 14.05 13.34 9.44 25.24 11.88 8.04 2.93 13.57 18.20 10.89 4.68 4.71 17.50 34.93 11.45

9.21 9.21 18.28 9.20 7.25 7.27 7.27 23.51 9.92 15.15 10.18 9.69 9.30 16.65 10.64 7.27 2.73 9.70 12.60 9.71 4.57 4.60 11.71 23.99 10.58

11.48 -.27 11.46 -.27 24.30 -.83 10.77 -.20 7.98 -.07 8.01 -.07 8.00 -.07 28.56 -.73 11.95 -.22 21.82 -.98 13.15 -.27 12.48 -.26 9.32 -.03 22.96 -.86 10.98 +.04 7.92 -.06 2.92 -.01 12.64 -.36 17.03 -.37 10.28 +.01 4.61 -.01 4.64 -.01 15.82 -.49 31.32 -1.00 10.89 -.02

15.49 13.76 13.18 19.19 18.85 14.26 10.46 14.99 14.80 14.76 44.89 6.60 3.56 3.56 14.66 23.72 24.37 26.76 6.27 20.83 20.11 16.47 14.70 10.23 14.23 14.06 7.78 8.59 8.10 27.05 28.39 10.68 10.69 16.73 17.27 26.84 27.35 14.85 14.85 14.92 18.25 18.19 24.78 24.55 24.89

11.44 12.82 11.58 14.18 14.14 11.77 9.99 11.63 11.48 11.45 32.94 5.90 3.20 3.20 10.57 16.65 17.10 20.17 6.17 15.86 15.32 12.17 10.35 7.15 11.74 11.58 7.03 7.79 7.84 17.64 18.48 10.21 10.21 11.86 12.24 19.94 20.31 12.61 12.61 12.66 13.61 13.57 19.03 18.86 19.11

14.58 -.37 13.65 -.05 12.92 -.14 17.98 -.45 17.62 -.46 13.82 -.22 10.29 ... 14.28 -.29 14.09 -.30 14.05 -.29 41.89 -1.13 6.50 -.06 3.51 -.03 3.51 -.03 13.95 -.36 22.66 -.58 23.28 -.60 25.70 -.65 6.20 ... 19.47 -.44 18.83 -.42 15.55 -.34 13.75 -.39 9.42 -.33 13.76 -.21 13.58 -.21 7.33 +.02 8.15 +.01 8.00 ... 24.78 -.94 26.01 -.99 10.64 -.02 10.64 -.02 15.84 -.42 16.36 -.43 25.19 -.64 25.67 -.65 14.33 -.16 14.34 -.16 14.40 -.16 17.63 -.33 17.57 -.33 23.31 -.41 23.07 -.41 23.42 -.41

17.35 13.31 16.26 9.55 9.14 9.48 6.04 5.61 5.96 6.01 5.59 5.94 7.79 5.45 7.21

-.45 -.02 -.02 -.02 -.22

78.14 61.08 73.02 -1.25 10.84 9.58 9.76 26.67 24.82 26.58 10.76 10.16 10.64

-.02 -.02 -.02

9.82 13.55 16.56 17.76 13.59 9.62

9.38 13.23 15.94 16.61 13.20 8.98

-.25 -.11 -.33 -.54 -.21 -.37

21.58 13.55 18.78

-.82

15.35 14.70 19.41 21.11

11.14 10.15 13.80 14.86

13.93 13.59 17.65 19.38

-.42 -.47 -.59 -.65

16.02 11.36 11.51 12.75 12.75 16.64 17.11 17.56 19.91

11.38 8.58 9.41 9.59 9.59 11.55 11.85 12.14 13.39

15.19 10.63 10.96 11.91 11.91 15.36 15.79 16.22 17.67

-.50 -.21 -.18 -.27 -.27 -.43 -.45 -.45 -.70

6.90 12.41 13.45 13.34 11.72 7.04

11.40 10.62 11.38 +.01 16.61 11.42 15.36 31.71 18.68 23.02 14.60 24.40

23.75 15.52 17.02 12.07 18.18

-.61

28.57 -1.10 18.10 -.30 20.02 -.01 14.15 -.23 23.17 -.69

16.28 15.49 16.19

-.06

48.43 33.72 44.97 -1.34 30.70 22.54 28.30 -.77 13.17 10.84 12.78

-.20

11.02 10.07 10.79 8.68 8.30 8.65 10.79 10.27 10.52

-.08 -.02 -.04

39.73 26.34 36.91 -1.49 17.31 13.74 16.50 -.31 9.58 8.43 8.76 +.01 58.49 46.64 53.77 -1.21 30.86 21.78 28.75

-.78

26.48 19.85 24.75

-.56

9.98 8.27 9.54 14.84 11.06 13.91 9.35 6.96 8.69 9.86 7.69 9.28 8.11 5.92 7.52 11.38 8.55 10.63

-.16 -.26 -.23 -.21 -.23 -.24

11.46 12.76 12.68 15.59 15.68

8.53 11.86 11.78 13.84 13.90

10.26 12.49 12.40 15.39 15.47

-.25 -.04 -.04 -.13 -.13

21.34 31.08 37.44 53.67 16.40 22.96 19.80 29.93 20.28 28.13 19.27

16.07 21.93 26.35 37.80 11.95 16.51 14.26 21.51 13.49 20.55 14.10

19.86 -.47 28.69 -.68 34.57 -.82 49.55 -1.17 15.29 -.35 21.21 -.62 18.28 -.54 27.65 -.80 18.24 -.72 26.20 -.66 17.94 -.45

33.62 24.97 31.53 23.20 22.35 22.99

-.78 -.01

49.59 37.40 45.13 -2.51 6.42

5.79

10.88 10.72 8.91 7.55 8.46 10.74 11.58 10.60 12.98 11.40 13.43 10.73 9.52 16.45 16.89 10.95

10.35 10.02 6.57 6.77 7.64 9.76 10.10 7.94 9.06 7.76 12.32 10.24 6.50 11.64 12.66 9.68

10.70 +.01 10.34 -.01 8.46 -.26 7.43 -.06 8.05 +.01 10.27 ... 10.73 -.32 9.84 -.30 11.92 -.42 10.36 -.32 12.34 -.39 10.46 +.01 8.59 -.31 15.05 -.46 15.78 -.36 10.35 ...

6.18

-.04

16.07 16.06 27.27 11.09 11.05 36.81 35.93

13.77 13.76 21.58 10.68 10.64 29.40 28.70

14.68 +.01 14.67 +.01 25.25 -.71 10.97 ... 10.93 ... 34.76 -.85 33.90 -.83

YTD 5-YR FUND %RTN %RTN EqIncI +2.5 +6.5 GlSelI d +4.2 NA Global I d -1.3 +4.4 Intl I d +2.0 +5.0 IntlSmCpI d -.9 +4.6 Oakmark I d +2.4 +4.5 Select I d +4.1 +1.9 Old Mutual Advisor F FocusedZ d +1.1 +4.2 Old Westbury FixedInc +2.6 +6.5 GlbSmMdCp +3.1 +9.6 LgCapEq -1.2 +.5 MuniBd +2.6 +4.6 NonUSLgCp +.8 +1.9 RealRet +2.2 +5.8 Olstein AllCpVlC m -1.0 -.3 Oppenheimer AMTFrMunA m +5.4 -3.4 AMTFrMunC m +5.0 -4.2 ActAllocA m +2.2 +.9 ActAllocC m +1.8 +.2 AmtFrNYA m +2.9 +1.8 BalA m +3.2 -1.6 CAMuniA m +4.8 -1.7 CapApA m +.8 +1.4 CapApB m +.4 +.6 CapApC m +.4 +.7 CapApprY +.9 +1.9 CapIncA m +4.6 -.7 ChampIncA m +5.5 -19.9 CmdtStTRA m +6.8 -8.8 CmdtStTRY +7.1 -8.4 CoreBondA m +4.0 -2.7 CoreBondY +4.2 -2.4 DevMktA m -3.0 +15.3 DevMktN m -3.1 +14.9 DevMktY -2.9 +15.7 DevMktsC m -3.3 +14.5 DiscoverA m +7.3 +7.1 EqIncA m +1.7 +5.1 EquityA m +1.8 +2.0 GlobA m +3.8 +4.1 GlobC m +3.5 +3.3 GlobOpprA m +1.7 +5.2 GlobOpprC m +1.3 +4.4 GlobY +3.9 +4.5 GoldMinA m -12.6 +19.3 GoldMinC m -12.8 +18.4 IntlBondA m +4.0 +9.3 IntlBondC m +3.7 +8.5 IntlBondY +4.1 +9.6 IntlDivA m +.7 +6.5 IntlDivC m +.4 +5.8 IntlGrY +5.3 +7.1 IntlGrowA m +5.1 +6.6 IntlSmCoA m -5.9 +8.3 IntlSmCoY -5.7 +8.8 LmtTmMunA m +3.0 +2.9 LmtTmMunC m +2.6 +2.1 LtdTmGovA m +1.2 +3.3 LtdTmGovY +1.3 +3.6 LtdTmNY m +2.4 +3.7 LtdTmNY m +2.1 +2.9 MainSSMCA m +2.1 +2.8 MainSSMCC m +1.8 +2.0 MainSSMCY +2.3 +3.2 MainStSelA m -4.3 +1.2 MainStrA m -1.1 +1.4 MainStrC m -1.4 +.7 ModInvA m +2.8 -.1 PAMuniA m +4.2 +1.9 QuBalA m +1.7 +2.3 QuOpportA m +2.6 +5.2 RisDivA m +2.8 +4.1 RisDivY +2.9 +4.4 RocMuniA m +3.1 +2.1 RocMuniC m +2.8 +1.3 RochNtlMC m +5.1 -5.3 RochNtlMu m +5.4 -4.5 SmMidValA m +2.8 +2.3 SrFltRatA m +3.4 +4.5 SrFltRatC m +3.1 +4.0 StrIncA m +4.6 +7.7 StrIncY +5.0 +8.1 StratIncC m +4.5 +7.0 USGovtA m +3.0 +5.3 ValueA m +2.8 +2.2 ValueY +3.0 +2.6 Osterweis OsterStrInc d +3.0 +7.8 Osterweis d +2.0 +4.6 PIMCO AllAssetA m +4.3 +6.7 AllAssetC m +4.0 +5.9 AllAssetsD b +4.4 +6.8 AllAuthA m +4.8 +7.8 AllAuthC m +4.4 +6.9 CmRlRtStA m +6.6 +4.6 CmRlRtStC m +6.2 +3.8 CmRlRtStD b +6.6 +4.6 DevLocMktD b +4.8 +7.1 EmgMktA m +3.8 +8.5 ForUnhgD b +5.4 +8.9 GNMA A m +3.8 +7.4 Hi-YldD b +4.3 +7.4 HiYldA m +4.3 +7.4 HiYldC m +3.9 +6.6 LowDrA m +1.9 +5.5 LowDrC m +1.8 +5.0 LowDurD b +2.0 +5.6 RealRetD b +4.9 +7.0 RealRtnA m +4.9 +6.9 RealRtnC m +4.6 +6.4 ShtTermA m +.8 +3.2 ShtTermD b +.8 +3.3 TotRetA m +3.0 +8.3 TotRetB m +2.7 +7.5 TotRetC m +2.7 +7.5 TotRetrnD b +3.1 +8.4 PRIMECAP Odyssey AggGr d +5.3 +8.1 Growth d +4.1 +5.6 Stock d +2.5 +4.3 Pacific PortOptCA m +2.3 +4.8 Parnassus EqIncInv +1.8 +7.0 Parnassus -3.1 +5.7 Pax World Bal b +2.9 +3.1 Payden CoreBd +2.8 +5.6 EmMktBd d +4.6 +9.4 GNMA +3.6 +7.1 HighInc d +4.1 +6.1 ShortBd +1.4 +4.3 Permanent Portfolio +4.6 +10.5 Perritt MicroCap d -3.6 +2.0 Pioneer Bond A m +3.9 +7.2 CulValA m +1.3 +1.7 CulValC m +.9 +.9 EqInc A m +4.4 +2.4 GlobHiYA m +4.3 +7.5 GlobHiYC m +4.0 +6.7 GrOppA m +3.6 +3.7 HiYldA m +4.5 +7.9 HiYldC m +4.1 +7.1 IndependA m +1.6 +1.1 MidCpValA m +2.1 +3.3 MuniA m +4.7 +3.5 PioneerA m +.3 +2.3 SmCapEq m +3.5 +6.8 StratIncA m +3.7 +8.2 StratIncC m +3.3 +7.4 ValueA m -.6 -2.7 Principal BdMtgInst +4.3 +5.2 CaptApprtnA m +.6 +3.6 DivIntI +1.0 +1.7 EqIncA m +3.3 +2.3 HiYldA m +4.6 +8.9 HiYldC m +4.4 +8.1 HiYldII +4.7 +9.9 InfProI +4.6 +1.2 IntIInst +1.2 +1.6 IntlGrthI +1.6 -.3 L/T2010I +2.9 +3.1 L/T2020I +2.6 +3.2 L/T2020J m +2.4 +2.8 L/T2030I +2.4 +3.1 L/T2030J m +2.3 +2.6 L/T2040I +2.1 +2.8 L/T2050I +2.1 +2.7 L/TSIInst +3.3 +2.9 LCBIIInst +.6 +2.6 LCGIIInst +1.1 +4.8 LCGrIInst +1.6 +6.1 LCIIIInst +1.9 -1.8 LCVlIInst +1.8 -.5 LgCGrInst -2.0 +3.0 LgCSP500I +1.8 +2.3 LgCValI +3.4 +.4 MCVlIInst +1.8 +4.8 MGIIIInst +4.0 +5.7 MidCapBleA m +7.8 +7.3 PrSecInst +6.0 +6.8 ReEstSecI +7.1 +2.9 SAMBalA m +2.2 +4.7 SAMBalC m +1.9 +4.0 SAMConGrA m +1.8 +3.5 SAMConGrB m +1.5 +2.7 SAMConGrC m +1.5 +2.7 SAMFleIncA m +3.1 +5.7 SAMStrGrA m +1.5 +2.7 SCGrIInst +3.9 +6.1 SCValIII -.9 +1.5 Prudential Investmen 2020FocA m +1.3 +5.4 2020FocC m +1.0 +4.7 2020FocZ +1.4 +5.7 BlendA m +1.6 +4.1 EqIncC m +2.7 +6.7 EqOppA m +2.7 +3.8 GovtIncA m +2.9 +6.0 HiYieldA m +4.4 +8.5 HlthSciA m +12.9 +10.0 IntlEqtyA m +2.7 -.8 IntlValA m +2.7 +2.4 JenMidCapGrA m +4.2 +7.2 JenMidCapGrZ +4.4 +7.5 JennGrA m +1.9 +4.4 JennGrZ +2.1 +4.7 NatlMuniA m +4.4 +3.6 NaturResA m -4.4 +10.2 ShTmCoBdA m +2.5 +6.1 SmallCoA m +3.0 +5.3 SmallCoZ +3.2 +5.5 StkIndexI +2.0 +2.4 TotRetBdA m +4.6 +7.9 +5.7 +3.1 UtilityA m

M

U

52-WEEK HI LOW 29.68 24.50 12.39 9.18 23.93 18.07 21.01 15.47 15.20 10.99 45.29 34.67 30.73 23.12

T WK NAV CHG 28.42 -.43 11.53 -.32 22.18 -.59 19.79 -.53 14.24 -.28 42.31 -1.02 28.57 -.86

22.80 17.52 21.32 12.00 16.95 13.05 12.43 11.63 11.60

11.47 12.18 10.01 11.56 7.99 8.74

-.29

6.08 6.05 9.80 9.59 10.78 10.38 7.59 43.91 38.64 38.37 45.96 8.85 1.98 3.91 3.93 6.58 6.57 35.38 34.19 35.04 33.93 60.54 24.84 8.99 62.68 58.79 30.23 27.90 62.84 43.58 41.23 6.71 6.69 6.71 12.36 12.09 29.38 29.50 23.20 23.08 14.30 14.24 9.40 9.39 3.23 3.22 20.86 18.84 21.94 12.22 32.03 30.88 8.94 10.48 15.72 27.08 15.90 16.27 15.27 15.25 6.74 6.76 32.95 8.38 8.39 4.37 4.37 4.37 9.48 22.45 22.91

+.01 +.01 -.19 -.18 +.01 -.16 +.02 -1.01 -.90 -.90 -1.06 -.08 -.02 ... +.01 -.03 -.03 -.78 -.76 -.77 -.75 -2.36 -.71 -.19 -1.94 -1.83 -1.02 -.94 -1.94 -2.30 -2.18 -.09 -.08 -.08 -.33 -.32 -.95 -.96 -.55 -.55 +.02 +.02 -.02 -.02 ... +.01 -.63 -.56 -.65 -.29 -.72 -.70 -.13 +.01 -.31 -.37 -.34 -.35 +.03 +.04 +.01 +.02 -.90 -.02 -.02 -.05 -.05 -.04 -.01 -.47 -.48

11.92 11.32 11.87 29.59 23.18 27.64

-.02 -.58

12.77 12.63 12.79 11.28 11.19 10.04 9.84 10.07 11.27 11.66 11.62 11.79 9.54 9.54 9.54 10.77 10.77 10.77 11.91 11.91 11.91 9.95 9.95 11.77 11.77 11.77 11.77

5.63 5.60 8.06 7.89 10.25 8.76 7.11 35.13 31.16 30.93 36.63 7.90 1.79 2.95 2.96 6.28 6.27 27.05 26.20 26.78 26.09 41.54 19.30 7.08 48.55 45.61 24.99 23.08 48.68 33.84 32.22 6.06 6.04 6.06 9.67 9.47 21.89 21.98 16.18 16.04 13.88 13.82 9.35 9.34 3.14 3.13 15.89 14.44 16.70 10.25 25.88 24.99 7.66 9.89 13.29 23.73 12.81 13.10 14.49 14.47 6.25 6.27 24.73 8.05 7.97 4.00 4.00 3.99 9.23 17.37 17.73

-.47

11.79 +.01 15.95 -.41 12.03 -.32 11.90 ... 10.71 -.26 11.14 -.04

13.43 10.16 12.44 6.64 6.60 10.29 10.08 12.06 10.69 8.31 46.92 41.33 41.05 49.10 9.02 2.02 4.25 4.26 6.63 6.62 37.42 36.17 37.05 35.91 67.85 26.53 9.59 67.42 63.28 32.57 30.08 67.57 51.45 48.74 7.04 7.01 7.04 13.03 12.75 30.92 31.05 24.84 24.68 14.70 14.64 9.47 9.46 3.34 3.32 22.56 20.39 23.71 13.18 34.21 33.00 9.27 11.37 16.43 28.00 16.89 17.28 16.91 16.88 7.36 7.37 35.48 8.42 8.43 4.45 4.44 4.44 9.65 24.01 24.49

U

11.68 11.57 11.70 10.43 10.34 7.15 7.03 7.17 9.60 10.50 9.72 11.25 8.72 8.72 8.72 10.27 10.27 10.27 11.02 11.02 11.02 9.85 9.85 10.69 10.69 10.69 10.69

12.44 -.09 12.29 -.09 12.46 -.09 10.95 -.05 10.84 -.05 9.51 -.02 9.31 -.03 9.53 -.03 11.04 -.11 11.27 +.01 11.02 -.10 11.76 +.01 9.41 -.07 9.41 -.07 9.41 -.07 10.50 -.02 10.50 -.02 10.50 -.02 11.69 -.03 11.69 -.03 11.69 -.03 9.90 -.01 9.90 -.01 11.03 -.03 11.03 -.03 11.03 -.03 11.03 -.03

18.79 13.54 17.34 17.24 12.44 16.03 15.48 11.83 14.53

-.54 -.49 -.41

12.21 10.04 11.73

-.19

28.61 22.33 26.70 -.56 45.09 31.93 39.22 -2.05 24.21 18.74 23.01 10.75 15.02 10.60 7.43 10.25

10.33 13.49 10.14 6.80 10.05

-.48

10.59 -.02 14.60 +.03 10.50 -.01 7.31 -.05 10.16 -.01

49.73 39.10 47.94

-.43

29.58 21.04 26.45

-.87

9.76 19.73 19.53 28.03 10.95 10.91 31.08 10.82 11.00 12.41 23.06 13.69 43.93 33.07 11.17 10.93 12.26

9.34 15.23 15.05 20.80 9.61 9.58 21.40 8.86 9.00 8.74 17.02 12.07 32.45 21.94 10.45 10.22 9.50

9.73 -.02 18.39 -.30 18.18 -.30 26.37 -.55 10.67 -.09 10.63 -.08 28.26 -1.03 10.40 -.14 10.57 -.14 11.41 -.41 21.57 -.51 12.87 +.02 41.00 -.81 29.99 -.85 11.10 -.04 10.86 -.04 11.32 -.27

10.69 41.71 11.00 18.88 8.24 8.30 11.77 8.28 12.63 9.76 11.92 12.56 12.51 12.53 12.51 12.79 12.31 11.09 10.36 8.97 10.11 11.15 11.53 8.70 9.58 10.37 14.30 11.99 15.08 10.32 18.47 13.54 13.40 14.65 14.12 13.93 11.70 16.18 12.54 10.63

10.00 32.20 7.82 14.67 7.63 7.68 10.37 7.77 8.96 7.03 9.90 10.02 9.97 9.72 9.69 9.70 9.21 9.98 7.79 6.74 7.21 8.41 8.77 6.42 7.18 7.59 10.22 7.92 11.31 9.09 12.98 11.10 11.00 11.40 10.97 10.84 10.59 12.13 7.74 7.25

10.62 38.79 10.22 17.90 8.08 8.14 11.22 8.16 11.68 9.12 11.49 11.96 11.91 11.85 11.83 12.02 11.53 10.94 9.63 8.37 9.42 10.39 10.80 8.03 8.95 9.64 13.28 11.05 14.30 10.21 17.24 12.98 12.84 13.82 13.32 13.13 11.51 15.09 11.22 9.57

17.34 15.56 17.95 18.87 13.79 15.19 9.83 5.65 27.89 6.85 22.79 30.53 31.67 19.65 20.41 15.05 62.22 11.72 22.83 23.86 30.18 14.36 11.30

12.68 11.44 13.09 13.74 10.50 11.12 9.44 5.15 18.60 4.92 16.48 22.15 22.91 14.42 14.94 13.73 40.42 11.38 15.67 16.37 22.68 13.55 8.55

16.09 -.48 14.43 -.43 16.66 -.49 17.48 -.51 12.94 -.41 14.25 -.40 9.75 ... 5.57 -.04 26.28 -.94 6.36 -.19 21.15 -.65 28.54 -.83 29.61 -.86 18.40 -.49 19.12 -.51 14.48 +.01 54.58 -2.09 11.55 -.01 20.90 -.72 21.86 -.74 28.20 -.64 14.20 -.04 10.77 -.24

-.04 -.83 -.30 -.34 -.06 -.06 -.08 -.01 -.34 -.26 -.18 -.24 -.24 -.27 -.27 -.30 -.30 -.08 -.25 -.20 -.26 -.24 -.23 -.22 -.21 -.23 -.38 -.41 -.36 -.04 -.66 -.21 -.21 -.30 -.28 -.29 -.09 -.39 -.45 -.30

A

L

S

YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW ValueA m +1.9 +1.7 16.32 12.03 ValueZ +2.0 +2.0 16.34 12.05 Purisima TotReturn b ... +2.5 21.99 15.64 Putnam AmGovtInA m +4.0 +8.0 9.88 9.44 AstAlBalA m +2.2 +3.5 11.69 9.63 AstAlConA m +2.8 +4.3 9.57 8.67 AstAlGrA m +1.4 +3.1 13.36 10.47 AstAlcCoY +2.9 +4.6 9.59 8.69 CATxEIncA m +3.7 +3.3 8.12 7.22 ConvInGrA m +3.1 +6.0 21.47 17.05 DivIncTrC m +3.4 +4.4 8.17 7.76 DivrInA m +3.6 +5.2 8.28 7.86 EqIncomeA m +5.0 +4.4 16.67 12.17 EqIncomeY +5.0 +4.7 16.67 12.16 GeoPutA m +3.1 -.7 12.69 10.54 GlbEqA m +9.4 +2.0 9.94 7.07 GlbHltCrA m +12.7 +4.9 51.85 38.52 GrowIncA m +1.6 -.3 14.68 10.83 GrowIncB m +1.3 -1.1 14.41 10.64 HiYldA m +4.3 +7.9 8.00 7.19 HiYldAdvA m +4.5 +8.3 6.16 5.59 IncomeA m +5.2 +7.7 6.97 6.68 IntlCpOpA m +1.5 +5.6 38.57 26.65 IntlEqA m +2.7 +.6 21.83 15.39 InvestorA m +1.8 -.3 13.95 10.30 MultiCapGrA m +1.2 +2.9 55.41 38.86 MultiCapVal m +1.0 +2.4 13.49 9.47 NYTxEIncA m +3.6 +3.9 8.74 7.98 TaxEIncA m +4.1 +3.8 8.73 7.29 TaxFHYldA m +3.3 +2.8 12.07 10.96 USGovtInA m +3.9 +8.3 14.44 13.94 VoyagerA m -5.8 +6.4 25.49 18.17 VoyagerY -5.7 +6.7 26.54 18.93 RS GlNatResA m +1.0 +6.0 41.60 28.30 PartnersA m +1.0 +3.0 36.00 25.15 SmCpGrthA m +6.9 +6.5 48.62 31.25 ValueA m -1.8 +2.9 27.62 20.34 RS Funds CoreEqA m -1.9 +6.2 45.58 35.06 EmgMktsA m -6.4 +12.3 27.44 20.93 Rainier CoreEq b -.2 +1.8 27.05 19.62 SmMidCap b +2.1 +2.5 36.86 24.52 RidgeWorth CapAprI +1.6 +4.5 11.89 8.30 HiIncI +5.8 +10.2 7.41 6.43 HighYI +5.5 +7.4 10.19 9.08 IntlEIxI +3.1 +.6 14.44 10.43 IntmBndI +3.0 +6.7 11.03 10.27 InvGrBdI +3.8 +5.3 12.56 11.51 LgCpVaEqI +.9 +3.7 13.79 10.31 MdCpVlEqI +1.8 +8.7 13.15 9.20 SmCapEqI +1.3 +5.9 14.96 10.74 SmCapGrI +3.5 +2.4 17.87 11.41 TtlRetBndI +3.5 +7.2 11.17 10.28 USGovBndI +.9 +4.0 10.11 10.05 RiverNorth CoreOpp m +4.0 NA 12.99 11.85 Royce LowStkSer m -1.2 +7.7 19.92 13.10 MicrCapIv d -2.2 +6.9 19.30 13.18 OpportInv d -3.5 +4.1 13.10 8.66 PAMutCnslt m +1.0 +3.7 11.80 8.20 PAMutInv d +1.5 +4.8 13.00 9.00 PremierInv d +3.7 +8.5 22.95 15.59 SpecEqInv d -1.7 +7.2 22.54 16.60 TotRetInv d +.8 +4.1 14.28 10.49 ValPlSvc m -.4 +2.9 14.72 10.56 ValueSvc m +2.1 +7.3 14.21 9.58 Russell EmgMktsS -1.7 +12.4 21.93 16.15 GlRelEstS +2.5 +1.0 38.69 29.56 GlbEqtyS +1.4 NA 9.68 7.05 InvGrdBdS +3.2 NA 22.89 21.41 ItlDvMktS +.8 NA 34.64 25.14 ShDurBdS +1.6 +4.7 19.51 19.04 StratBdS +3.5 NA 11.32 10.68 TaxExBdS +3.1 +4.3 22.80 21.61 TxMgdLgCS +1.5 +2.5 21.38 15.52 USCoreEqS +.3 NA 30.16 22.31 USQntvEqS +5.0 NA 31.96 23.47 USSmMdCpS +.4 NA 25.30 17.14 Russell LifePoints BalStrA m +2.3 +4.1 11.09 9.21 BalStrC b +1.9 +3.3 11.00 9.14 BalStrS +2.3 +4.3 11.18 9.29 BlStrR3 b +2.2 +3.8 11.12 9.23 EqGrStrC b +1.3 +1.0 9.39 7.07 GrStrA m +1.9 +3.0 10.69 8.39 GrStrC b +1.6 +2.3 10.55 8.30 GrStrR3 b +1.9 +2.8 10.73 8.42 Rydex Nsdq100Iv +.1 +7.0 15.71 11.31 Rydex/SGI MCapValA m +.1 +5.5 35.77 26.44 MgFtrStrH b +1.1 NA 26.76 23.75 SEI DlyShDurA +1.5 +4.7 10.72 10.53 SSGA EmgMkts b -1.2 +10.0 23.98 17.43 EmgMktsSel b -1.1 +10.3 24.06 17.50 IntlStkSl b +2.3 +.8 11.17 8.10 S&P500Idx b +1.8 +2.3 22.42 16.82 Schwab 1000Inv d +1.9 +2.7 40.64 30.66 CoreEqInv d +2.4 +2.2 18.63 13.72 DivEqSel d +2.9 +2.4 14.09 10.70 FUSLgCInl d +1.6 NA 10.51 7.80 FUSSMCIns d -.8 NA 11.78 7.99 GNMA +3.7 +6.7 10.48 10.04 HlthCFoc d +11.7 +5.9 18.52 13.53 IntlIndex d +2.5 +2.0 19.10 13.92 MktTrAlEq d +1.8 +2.6 13.06 9.58 MktTrBal d +2.1 +3.4 16.16 13.43 PremInc d +2.8 NA 10.54 10.16 S&P500Sel d +1.9 +2.5 21.33 16.07 SmCapIdx d +1.2 +5.0 23.44 16.02 TaxFreeBd +4.2 +4.8 11.72 10.95 TotBdMkt +3.0 +3.7 9.45 9.05 TotStkMSl d +2.1 +3.2 24.91 18.46 Scout Interntl d +1.4 +6.2 35.42 25.58 Selected AmerShS b -.3 +1.3 44.52 34.31 American D -.1 +1.7 44.53 34.33 Sentinel CmnStkA m +2.8 +4.1 34.23 25.50 GovtSecA m +2.7 +6.7 11.24 10.34 ShMatGovA m +1.4 +4.6 9.38 9.17 SmallCoA m +5.7 +6.1 8.91 6.12 Sequoia Sequoia +7.9 +4.8 147.36 112.47 Sit USGovSec +2.1 +6.1 11.39 11.12 Sound Shore SoundShor +.5 +1.7 34.47 25.73 Spectra Spectra A m +2.5 +11.2 13.59 9.47 Stadion MgdPortA m -3.6 NA 11.00 9.41 State Farm Balanced +2.1 +5.1 57.34 48.83 Growth +1.4 +3.9 57.76 44.03 MuniBond +4.4 +5.2 8.91 8.35 Stratton SmCapVal d +2.9 +2.9 55.63 38.32 T Rowe Price Balanced +2.6 +5.0 20.55 16.65 BlChpGAdv b +.8 +3.9 41.32 29.78 BlChpGr +.9 +4.1 41.37 29.79 CapApprec +3.4 +6.0 21.79 17.72 CorpInc +4.8 +6.8 10.11 9.39 DivGrow +3.1 +3.6 24.86 18.76 DivrSmCap d +4.7 +7.2 18.27 11.50 EmEurMed d -.2 +4.9 24.84 16.84 EmMktBd d +4.3 +9.0 13.86 12.48 EmMktStk d -3.0 +10.2 36.99 27.25 EqIndex d +1.8 +2.2 36.77 27.55 EqtyInc +1.1 +2.2 25.53 19.42 EqtyIncAd b +1.0 +2.0 25.49 19.39 EurStock d +7.5 +5.4 17.41 11.42 ExtMktIdx d +1.8 +5.1 18.09 12.31 FinSer -5.6 -3.9 15.40 11.94 GNMA +3.1 +6.4 10.10 9.76 GlbTech +4.4 +11.2 10.79 7.10 GloStk d -1.5 +1.9 19.20 14.47 GrStkAdv b -.3 +4.0 34.38 24.96 GrStkR b -.4 +3.7 33.98 24.72 GrowInc +2.3 +3.1 21.84 16.40 GrowStk -.2 +4.2 34.67 25.15 HealthSci +14.9 +11.1 36.63 24.60 HiYield d +4.7 +8.3 7.00 6.33 HiYldAdv m +4.6 +8.1 6.99 6.32 IntlBnd d +5.4 +6.9 10.66 9.07 IntlBndAd m +5.4 +6.7 10.65 9.06 IntlDisc d +2.9 +6.4 47.45 33.63 IntlEqIdx d +2.4 +2.3 13.08 9.40 IntlGrInc d +3.9 +2.4 14.86 10.56 IntlStk d +1.3 +4.7 15.35 11.12 IntlStkAd m +1.3 +4.5 15.29 11.10 LatinAm d -8.1 +17.0 57.59 42.02 MDTaxFBd +3.8 +4.2 10.77 9.89 MdCpVlAdv b +2.2 +5.6 25.58 19.51 MediaTele +3.6 +12.3 58.18 39.43 MidCapVa +2.2 +5.9 25.71 19.62 MidCpGr +3.2 +7.9 65.35 46.81 MidCpGrAd b +3.1 +7.7 64.12 46.05 NewAmGro +2.0 +7.2 35.86 25.64 NewAsia d -.4 +16.8 20.17 15.33 NewEra -1.1 +6.6 58.14 37.45 NewHoriz +5.2 +7.1 38.26 25.10 NewIncome +2.9 +6.9 9.81 9.36 OrseaStk d +3.5 NA 9.24 6.61 PerStrBal +2.5 +5.5 20.30 16.30 PerStrGr +2.2 +4.3 24.84 18.93 PerStrInc +2.6 +5.9 16.86 14.34 R2015 +2.4 +5.0 12.72 10.30 R2025 +2.0 +4.5 12.99 10.06 R2035 +1.8 +4.2 13.28 9.97 Real d +6.5 +1.7 19.88 13.79 Ret2020R b +1.9 +4.2 17.43 13.78 Ret2050 +1.7 NA 10.58 7.94 RetInc +2.6 +5.3 13.71 11.91 Retir2005 +2.7 +5.4 12.00 10.28 Rtmt2010 +2.5 +5.2 16.31 13.60 Rtmt2020 +2.2 +4.8 17.67 13.96 Rtmt2030 +1.9 +4.4 18.71 14.24 Rtmt2040 +1.7 +4.2 18.92 14.18 Rtmt2045 +1.6 +4.2 12.60 9.45 SciTecAdv b +2.7 +8.5 29.88 20.31 SciTech +2.8 +8.5 30.02 20.37 ShTmBond +1.4 +4.7 4.91 4.83 SmCpStk +2.7 +6.0 38.67 26.31 SmCpVal d -.6 +4.2 39.53 28.50 SmCpValAd m -.7 +4.0 39.27 28.31 SpecGrow +1.4 +4.1 19.27 14.14 SpecInc +3.5 +7.0 12.70 11.74 SpecIntl d +2.7 +5.2 11.78 8.43 SumMuInc +4.1 +4.2 11.40 10.39 SumMuInt +4.1 +4.8 11.64 10.91

SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2011 PAGE 7D

WK NAV CHG 15.01 -.44 15.03 -.44 20.28

-.54

9.73 11.12 9.36 12.47 9.38 7.59 20.68 8.02 8.13 15.53 15.53 12.20 9.37 49.52 13.55 13.29 7.85 6.06 6.94 35.53 20.17 12.99 51.24 12.37 8.37 8.37 11.39 14.38 22.34 23.28

+.02 -.21 -.09 -.30 -.09 +.02 -.28 -.05 -.05 -.37 -.37 -.14 -.21 -1.27 -.33 -.33 -.05 -.03 ... -1.22 -.55 -.30 -1.50 -.36 +.01 +.01 +.03 -.02 -.90 -.94

37.97 -1.04 33.41 -.84 44.55 -1.56 25.44 -.60 41.70 25.03

-.94 -.79

24.91 -.76 33.36 -1.23 11.01 -.35 7.27 -.06 10.04 -.08 13.23 -.44 10.57 +.01 12.00 ... 12.91 -.28 12.05 -.36 13.87 -.37 15.93 -.68 10.61 -.01 10.11 ... 12.54

-.19

18.05 17.18 11.66 10.72 11.83 21.10 20.51 13.22 13.37 12.91

-.70 -.67 -.41 -.33 -.36 -.62 -.43 -.34 -.44 -.49

20.48 -.48 36.71 -1.14 9.00 -.26 22.08 -.02 31.93 -1.08 19.36 -.02 11.00 -.03 22.21 +.01 19.91 -.49 27.97 -.68 30.06 -.68 22.94 -.81 10.63 10.53 10.72 10.66 8.77 10.09 9.95 10.13

-.19 -.19 -.19 -.19 -.23 -.23 -.22 -.22

14.48

-.47

32.38 26.06

-.74 -.11

10.69

...

22.30 22.38 10.32 20.86

-.56 -.57 -.31 -.47

37.90 17.23 13.17 9.79 10.65 10.44 17.73 17.66 12.09 15.51 10.41 19.94 21.37 11.41 9.35 23.22

-.92 -.44 -.30 -.23 -.40 -.01 -.36 -.55 -.34 -.25 -.01 -.45 -.71 ... ... -.57

32.82 -1.00 41.32 41.35

-.88 -.88

32.19 10.66 9.28 8.19

-.63 -.01 ... -.26

139.53 -2.71 11.37

...

31.98

-.78

12.48

-.46

9.92

-.01

55.22 53.79 8.69

-.47 -.77 ...

51.04 -1.39 19.73 38.39 38.47 21.00 9.88 23.53 16.56 23.38 13.44 34.21 34.35 23.86 23.81 16.13 16.53 13.37 10.07 9.83 17.79 31.81 31.42 20.60 32.10 34.79 6.88 6.87 10.37 10.36 45.19 12.09 13.83 14.42 14.37 52.13 10.34 24.12 53.57 24.24 60.39 59.23 33.65 19.10 51.61 35.24 9.62 8.63 19.45 23.42 16.39 12.17 12.28 12.45 18.55 16.56 9.91 13.31 11.65 15.73 16.80 17.61 17.71 11.80 27.44 27.57 4.87 35.35 35.90 35.66 17.95 12.57 11.04 10.93 11.37

-.33 -1.08 -1.08 -.25 ... -.41 -.65 +.38 -.04 -1.01 -.78 -.45 -.45 -.60 -.58 -.36 -.01 -.46 -.53 -1.00 -.99 -.40 -1.01 -.97 -.06 -.06 -.12 -.12 -1.10 -.39 -.41 -.46 -.46 -1.88 +.01 -.53 -2.20 -.54 -1.74 -1.71 -.79 -.52 -1.59 -1.12 -.01 -.27 -.35 -.55 -.22 -.22 -.28 -.31 -.75 -.34 -.25 -.15 -.15 -.24 -.34 -.42 -.45 -.30 -1.13 -1.13 ... -1.17 -1.07 -1.06 -.48 -.08 -.33 +.01 ...

YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW TaxFHiYld +3.9 +2.8 11.09 10.04 TaxFInc +3.9 +4.2 10.17 9.29 TaxFShInt +2.3 +4.1 5.66 5.51 TotMktIdx d +1.6 +2.8 15.50 11.46 TrRt2010Ad b +2.4 +4.9 16.23 13.54 TrRt2010R b +2.3 +4.6 16.14 13.46 TrRt2020Ad b +2.1 +4.5 17.56 13.88 TrRt2030Ad b +1.7 +4.1 18.59 14.15 TrRt2030R b +1.6 +3.9 18.49 14.07 TrRt2040Ad b +1.6 +4.0 18.79 14.08 TrRt2040R b +1.4 +3.7 18.70 14.02 TxFIncAdv b +3.8 +3.8 10.18 9.29 USBdEnIdx d +3.2 +6.5 11.43 10.95 USTrInt +3.9 +7.4 6.26 5.74 VATaxFBd +4.8 +4.3 11.91 10.87 Value +2.4 +2.6 25.63 19.05 ValueAd b +2.3 +2.5 25.36 18.88 TCW DivFocN b +2.1 +1.1 11.63 8.27 EmgIncI +5.8 +12.4 8.99 7.89 RltvVlLCI +1.6 +.6 14.92 10.64 SelEqI +2.0 +4.7 18.90 13.43 SmCapGrI -1.7 +9.5 33.27 22.23 TotRetBdI +3.0 +8.4 10.44 9.87 TotRetBdN b +2.9 +8.2 10.79 10.21 TFS MktNeut d +3.7 +8.5 15.63 13.63 TIAA-CREF EqIxRtl b +1.9 +2.7 10.62 7.85 Gr&IncRmt +2.9 +5.6 10.11 7.40 Gr&IncRtl b +2.9 +5.7 12.11 8.86 IntEqIdxRet d +2.0 +1.7 18.45 13.36 IntlEqRmt d -.8 +3.0 11.12 7.45 Life2010 b +2.5 +4.3 11.66 9.92 Life2015 b +2.4 +4.1 11.75 9.76 Life2020 b +2.3 +3.6 11.71 9.50 Life2025 b +2.1 +3.2 11.64 9.22 Life2030 b +2.0 +2.7 11.55 8.93 Life2035 b +1.9 +2.7 11.68 8.82 Life2040 b +1.7 +2.9 11.91 8.98 LrgeCapVal +.2 +1.4 14.16 10.43 MdgAllRtl b +2.6 +4.2 10.47 8.61 MidCapGrwthRe +3.7 +6.1 21.40 14.24 MidValRmt +2.8 +4.2 18.75 13.30 ScChEqR +.8 +2.9 11.77 8.89 SmCapEqRe d +1.0 +2.7 15.95 10.66 SmCpBlIdxRet d -.2 +3.3 15.30 10.47 Target SmCapVal +1.7 +5.3 22.86 16.32 Templeton InFEqSeS +3.4 +4.6 22.33 16.43 Thomas White ThmsWIntl d +1.0 +4.6 18.61 13.62 Thompson Plumb Bond +3.8 +8.6 11.71 11.26 Thornburg IncBldA m +3.6 +7.5 20.23 16.76 IncBldC m +3.3 +6.8 20.23 16.76 IntlValA m +3.2 +6.3 30.95 22.42 IntlValC m +2.8 +5.6 29.10 21.14 LtdTMuA m +3.2 +4.4 14.34 13.83 LtdTMuC m +3.0 +4.1 14.37 13.85 LtdTmIncA m +4.0 +6.3 13.51 13.02 Value A m +2.7 +3.7 37.64 27.99 Thrivent HiYieldA m +4.5 +7.8 4.97 4.48 IncomeA m +4.1 +6.2 8.88 8.26 LgCapStkA m ... +.8 23.91 18.12 MidCapA m +1.7 +4.2 16.67 11.32 MuniBdA m +4.4 +4.2 11.53 10.57 Tocqueville Gold m -7.7 +18.7 91.56 62.51 Tocquevil m +.4 +3.1 24.34 18.49 Touchstone MdCpGrA m +1.8 +4.7 25.74 17.45 Transamerica AssAllCvA m +3.3 +5.0 11.79 10.30 AssAllCvC m +3.0 +4.4 11.71 10.25 AssAllGrA m +3.0 +2.5 13.00 9.68 AssAllGrC m +2.7 +1.8 12.71 9.47 AstAlMdGrA m +2.9 +3.7 12.77 10.16 AstAlMdGrC m +2.7 +3.1 12.72 10.11 AstAlModA m +3.3 +4.6 12.40 10.38 AstAlModC m +3.0 +4.0 12.35 10.33 TransEqA m -.1 +.8 10.36 7.47 Transamerica Partner CoreBd b +3.1 +6.3 11.17 10.68 StockIdx b +1.8 +2.2 9.12 6.84 Trust for Credit Un TCUShDur +.9 +3.9 9.79 9.69 TCUUltrShGov +.4 +3.2 9.62 9.59 Turner MidGrInv +3.2 +5.8 39.73 25.89 Tweedy Browne GlobVal d +2.0 +4.4 25.26 20.55 Tweedy, Browne Value +1.1 +3.8 20.15 16.20 UBS GlobAllA m +.7 +2.6 10.59 8.65 UBS PACE AltStrP d -.3 +.8 9.91 9.03 GlFxIP d +4.9 +6.8 12.43 10.54 GvtSecP d +3.1 +6.9 13.84 12.94 IntlEqP d +3.8 +.4 14.17 10.46 LgCoVlP d +1.8 +1.5 18.21 13.68 LrCoGrP d +.8 +3.5 19.68 14.07 PcIntFIP d +2.6 +5.4 12.24 11.80 SmMdGrP d +3.7 +5.8 18.26 11.79 SmMdVlP d +.5 +3.2 18.95 13.34 StrFInP d +4.5 +8.9 15.06 13.94 US Global Investors GlobRes m -5.2 +4.6 13.01 8.20 WrldPrcMnr m -16.2 +9.1 22.94 14.75 USAA AggGrow +1.3 +2.4 36.18 25.76 BalStrat +3.8 +4.1 14.37 11.77 CABond +4.7 +2.8 10.51 9.13 CapGrowth +.4 +1.2 7.30 5.42 Cornerst +2.8 +4.4 24.31 19.93 EmergMkt -4.0 +10.2 22.33 16.68 ExtMktIdx +1.7 +4.9 14.01 9.87 GNMA +2.9 +6.4 10.35 10.03 Grow +.2 +1.2 15.87 11.64 GrowInc +.9 +2.1 16.29 12.03 HYOpp +5.8 +8.4 8.80 7.81 Income +3.6 +6.9 13.09 12.58 IncomeStk +4.3 -.2 13.29 9.76 IntermBd +5.4 +7.5 10.66 9.88 Intl +4.2 +5.1 26.98 19.18 PrcMtlMin -12.3 +19.0 43.83 31.88 S&P500M +3.2 +2.5 20.43 15.33 ShTmBond +1.6 +5.3 9.27 9.13 SmCapStk +.4 +3.3 15.13 10.45 TaxEInt +4.3 +4.4 13.28 12.34 TaxELgTm +4.9 +3.4 13.32 11.87 TaxEShTm +2.2 +3.8 10.77 10.57 TgtRt2030 +2.6 NA 12.17 9.91 TgtRt2040 +1.9 NA 11.89 9.17 VABond +5.1 +3.6 11.21 10.20 Value +2.8 +2.7 14.82 10.89 WorldGro +4.4 +5.5 20.62 15.01 Unified Wntergrn m +2.9 +7.5 14.87 11.38 VALIC Co I ForgnVal +5.1 +3.9 10.37 7.43 GlobStrat +5.1 +7.9 12.31 9.79 IGrowth +1.5 +4.5 12.01 8.69 IntlEq +1.6 +.9 7.04 5.14 IntlGrI +3.5 +5.0 12.34 8.73 LgCapGr +.2 +3.6 12.45 9.17 MdCpIdx +3.2 +5.8 23.03 15.91 Scie&Tech +2.1 +8.0 17.81 12.11 SmCpIdx -.1 +3.3 15.90 10.85 StockIdx +1.8 +2.1 27.02 20.61 VALIC Co II IntSmCpEq +.9 +1.9 14.60 10.37 MdCpVal -.4 +3.4 18.23 13.11 SmCpVal +.7 +2.9 14.93 10.17 SocResp +2.4 +2.6 12.10 9.10 StratBd +4.4 +6.9 11.48 9.99 Van Eck GloHardA m -2.1 +11.5 57.73 35.75 IntlGoldA m -11.3 +19.3 25.83 17.34 Vanguard 500Adml +1.9 +2.5 125.74 94.17 500Inv +1.9 +2.4 125.72 94.17 AssetA +1.4 +1.4 26.44 20.82 AssetAdml +1.5 +1.5 59.37 46.75 BalIdx +2.5 +4.8 22.62 18.76 BalIdxAdm +2.6 +5.0 22.62 18.76 CAIT +4.3 +4.1 11.33 10.51 CAITAdml +4.3 +4.2 11.33 10.51 CALT +4.5 +3.4 11.48 10.40 CALTAdml +4.5 +3.5 11.48 10.40 CapOp d -.1 +5.2 36.17 26.50 CapOpAdml d -.1 +5.3 83.55 61.22 CapVal ... +3.7 12.21 8.32 Convrt d +1.6 +7.4 14.20 11.18 DevMktIdx d +1.7 +1.9 11.03 8.04 DivAppInv +3.2 +3.9 22.97 17.53 DivEqInv +2.0 +2.5 22.43 16.31 DivGr +4.1 +5.6 15.67 12.11 EmMktIAdm d -1.5 NA 42.03 30.72 EmerMktId d -1.6 +11.8 31.97 23.35 EnergyAdm d +7.1 +7.9 141.63 96.08 EnergyInv d +7.1 +7.8 75.42 51.16 EqInc +5.1 +3.3 22.40 16.93 EqIncAdml +5.1 +3.4 46.95 35.49 EurIdxAdm d +5.7 +2.6 70.05 49.10 EuropeIdx d +5.6 +2.5 30.06 20.92 ExMktIdSig +2.1 NA 39.55 26.97 ExplAdml +3.4 +4.2 76.59 51.04 Explr +3.3 +4.0 82.27 54.82 ExtdIdAdm +2.1 +5.1 46.03 31.39 ExtndIdx +2.0 +4.9 45.99 31.37 FAWeUSInv d +.7 NA 20.32 14.76 FLLTAdml +4.6 +4.4 11.74 10.74 GNMA +3.7 +6.9 11.16 10.57 GNMAAdml +3.7 +7.0 11.16 10.57 GlbEq +2.4 +2.3 19.58 14.38 GrIncAdml +2.0 +.9 47.06 35.26 GroInc +1.9 +.8 28.82 21.60 GrowthEq +1.6 +2.2 11.73 8.66 GrowthIdx +1.2 +4.6 34.10 24.93 GrthIdAdm +1.3 +4.7 34.11 24.93 GrthIstSg +1.3 NA 31.58 23.08 HYCor d +5.0 +7.0 5.88 5.35 HYCorAdml d +5.0 +7.2 5.88 5.35 HYT/E +4.2 +4.0 10.76 9.82 HltCrAdml d +12.9 +6.5 59.40 46.57 HlthCare d +12.9 +6.4 140.74 110.34 ITBond +4.6 +7.7 11.87 10.98 ITBondAdm +4.7 +7.8 11.87 10.98 ITGradeAd +4.4 +7.4 10.51 9.79 ITIGrade +4.3 +7.2 10.51 9.79 ITTsry +3.8 +7.3 12.08 11.11 ITrsyAdml +3.9 +7.4 12.08 11.11 InfPrtAdm +5.1 +6.6 26.84 25.02 InflaPro +5.0 +6.5 13.66 12.74 IntlExpIn d +.7 +4.5 17.92 12.47 IntlGr d +1.1 +5.1 21.17 14.92 IntlGrAdm d +1.2 +5.3 67.38 47.49 IntlStkIdxAdm d +.7 NA 28.57 25.19

NAV 10.55 9.76 5.61 14.41 15.65 15.56 16.69 17.48 17.38 17.59 17.50 9.77 11.30 6.01 11.50 23.90 23.65

WK CHG +.01 ... ... -.36 -.23 -.23 -.33 -.42 -.42 -.45 -.45 +.01 ... ... +.01 -.56 -.55

10.79 -.30 8.89 -.03 13.73 -.39 17.66 -.51 28.85 -1.83 9.94 -.04 10.28 -.05 15.27

-.13

9.88 9.42 11.29 17.11 10.14 11.30 11.31 11.20 11.05 10.88 10.93 11.13 13.07 10.06 19.61 17.45 10.96 14.42 13.80

-.25 -.24 -.29 -.52 -.36 -.15 -.18 -.20 -.23 -.25 -.28 -.29 -.38 -.17 -.62 -.53 -.27 -.55 -.51

20.93

-.56

20.73

-.74

17.41

-.45

11.70 +.01 19.28 -.39 19.28 -.40 28.90 -.77 27.16 -.73 14.23 +.01 14.25 ... 13.42 +.01 34.76 -.51 4.89 8.83 22.23 15.26 11.09

-.04 -.02 -.61 -.43 ...

79.85 -3.68 22.66 -.53 23.41

-.88

11.48 11.40 12.16 11.88 12.10 12.04 11.94 11.87 9.53

-.13 -.13 -.33 -.32 -.27 -.27 -.19 -.20 -.30

11.01 8.52

-.01 -.20

9.77 9.61

... ...

36.33 -1.50 24.29

-.50

19.13

-.37

10.05

-.21

9.39 -.11 12.21 -.15 13.32 -.01 13.26 -.37 17.04 -.33 18.23 -.58 12.11 -.01 16.56 -.61 17.36 -.56 14.47 +.03 11.29 18.68

-.31 -.90

33.41 13.80 9.79 6.75 23.24 20.76 12.84 10.31 14.74 15.15 8.66 13.00 12.43 10.61 25.33 37.63 19.09 9.21 13.75 12.90 12.65 10.71 11.67 11.22 10.88 13.81 19.53

-1.01 -.25 +.01 -.20 -.45 -.55 -.44 -.02 -.42 -.42 -.06 -.01 -.28 -.03 -.75 -1.84 -.43 -.01 -.41 +.01 ... ... -.21 -.26 +.02 -.33 -.50

14.41

-.29

9.71 11.82 11.17 6.53 11.52 11.57 21.17 16.37 14.34 25.25

-.32 -.23 -.29 -.19 -.35 -.36 -.66 -.63 -.52 -.57

13.73 16.82 13.48 11.36 11.41

-.41 -.45 -.50 -.28 -.06

51.22 -1.99 21.91 -1.00 117.51 117.48 24.79 55.68 21.81 21.82 10.98 10.98 10.98 10.98 33.21 76.72 11.02 13.53 10.23 21.62 20.80 14.97 39.26 29.86 129.59 69.01 21.28 44.60 64.51 27.67 36.19 70.12 75.30 42.12 42.08 18.86 11.35 10.98 10.98 18.28 43.82 26.83 10.96 31.90 31.91 29.55 5.80 5.80 10.31 57.86 137.10 11.49 11.49 10.05 10.05 11.64 11.64 26.67 13.57 16.79 19.55 62.24 26.53

-2.67 -2.67 -.56 -1.24 -.32 -.31 ... ... ... ... -1.21 -2.80 -.44 -.28 -.30 -.32 -.57 -.22 -1.01 -.77 -2.98 -1.58 -.37 -.80 -2.44 -1.05 -1.25 -2.63 -2.83 -1.46 -1.46 -.55 ... -.01 -.01 -.47 -.94 -.57 -.27 -.87 -.87 -.80 -.04 -.04 +.01 -.58 -1.37 +.01 +.01 -.01 -.01 +.02 +.02 +.01 ... -.43 -.68 -2.16 -.77