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Could your health care disappear? NATION & WORLD, 5A

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WILKES-BARRE, PA

Pa.’s bad roads costly to drivers Report: Average motorist loses $1,320 yearly due to lousy travel conditions. By ANDREW M. SEDER aseder@timesleader.com

Two out of every three major urban roads in the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre region are in poor or mediocre condition, underscoring the transportation dilemma the state faces, according to a report released Wednesday by a national transportation

organization. And using those roads is costing the average driver an additional $1,320 per year in extra vehicle operating costs as a result of driving on roads in need of repair, lost time and fuel due to congestion-related delays. The report, “Future Mobility in Pennsylvania: The Cost of Meeting the State’s Need for Safe and Efficient

WilkesBarrebound traffic stops on the Veterans Memorial Bridge on Wednesday as construction workers move concrete barriers. PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

See ROADS, Page 10A

Sit down on the job? Not during Day of Caring

Thursday, May 30, 2013

Joe Paterno estate suing the NCAA Family of late coach, some trustees and former players fault Freeh report, sanctions. By GENARO C. ARMAS AP Sports Writer

STATE COLLEGE — The estate of the late Penn State coach Joe Paterno and several university trustees and former players plan to sue the NCAA over the landmark sanctions against the university for the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse scandal. The Paterno family’s attorney, Wick Sollers, told Bob Costas on the NBC Sports Network’s “Costas Tonight” show that aired Wednesday evening that former coaches and faculty members are part of the suit. Excerpts from Costas’ interviews with Sollers and other representatives for the family were provided by the network. According to NBC Sports Network, Sollers said NCAA President Mark Emmert and Oregon State President Edward Ray — who was chairman of the

Clark Van Orden/The Times Leader

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olunteers from Mondelez International clean the Salvation Army chapel in Wilkes-Barre on Wednesday as part of the United Way of Wyoming Valley’s annual Day of Caring community service blitz. For more about the service projects performed and United Way awards presented, see Page 3A.

Sallie Mae will split, become two companies Longtime student loan firm to spin off consumer banking arm, perhaps by next year.

By ANDREW M. SEDER aseder@timesleader.com

Student loan giant Sallie Mae announced Wednesday it plans to split into two separate, publicly traded companies and it has a new chief executive officer to guide the company through the change. Newark, Del.-based Sallie Mae, which has offices throughout the country — including a center in Hanover Township that employs 900 — anticipates the split, if given final approval by its board, could be completed within 12 months. Company spokeswoman Nikki Lavoie noted the company expects the anticipated split “to have limited impact on our workforce size,” which stands at 7,000

company wide. Effective immediately, John F. Remondi has taken over the CEO duties, succeeding Albert Lord, who is retiring and also stepping down as vice chairman. Remondi has served as president and chief operating officer since 2011 and was chief financial ofRemondi ficer and vice chairman before that. Sallie Mae, formally named SLM Corp., issued a release Wednesday saying its board authorized management to pursue separation of the comSee SALLIE, Page 10A

NCAA’s executive committee — are also named in the planned litigation. The lawsuit also takes issue with the Paterno NCAA’s use of former FBI director Louis Freeh’s scathing findings for the university on the scandal in levying the strict sanctions last July. Among the penalties were a four-year bowl ban, steep scholarship cuts and a $60 million fine. The NCAA also vacated 111 wins from Paterno’s record, meaning he would no longer hold the title of major college football’s winningest coach. Sollers, in an interview Wednesday with The Associated Press, said lawyers planned to file the lawsuit today in state court in Centre County, home of Penn State’s flagship campus. The suit would ask for the sancSee PATERNO, Page 10A

Hit-and-run suspect ID’d in court filing John Kuniskas was behind wheel, say lawyers for victim of fatal Mother’s Day incident. By SHEENA DELAZIO sdelazio@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE – Court papers filed in Luzerne County Court identify a man who lives less than a mile from Jean Darsky, who was fatally injured outside her Jenkins Township home on May 12, as the driver of the vehicle that struck the 65-yearold woman. “Hitting (and killing) a mother on Mother’s Day is unbelievable enough,” said attorney Edward Ciarimboli, who represents Darsky’s son, Mark, and his moth-

er’s estate in a yet-to-be-filed lawsuit. “But not stopping and rendering aid is unconscionable. You can’t just run Darsky someone over and not stop.” Ciarimboli and attorney Kevin Clancy Boylan filed court papers Tuesday asking for the preservation of evidence and other requests. Jean Darsky, of 302 Westminster Road in Jenkins Township, was struck and killed by a vehicle on May 12 while standing See DRIVER, Page 10A

Seeing double 5 times over 5 sets of twins at Holy Redeemer: What are the odds of that? By MARK GUYDISH mguydish@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE — Disclaimer one: If we get the names mixed up, it’s because there were five sets of twins at one time. Disclaimer two: If we get any facts mixed up, see disclaimer one, and add that the interview took place 35 impatient minutes before their much an-

INSIDE

ticipated graduation, in the din of the Kirby Center lobby loaded with proud parents and grinning teens gabbing in unison. That said, after learning there were five sets of twins in caps and gowns at Holy Redeemer’s commencement Wednesday, the most obvious question is: What are the odds? Not quite as high as you might ex-

A NEWS: Local 3A Nation & World: 5A Obituaries: 6A, 7A Editorials: 9A

INSIDE: The Holy Redeemer graduating class of 2013, Page 8A

pect. The Centers for Disease Control says there are 33.1 twin births per 1,000 births in the U.S., or 3.3 percent. At Holy Redeemer you have five sets of twins, or 10 students, among See TWINS, Page 8A

Crunched Syracuse shuts out the Pens. SPORTS, 1B

Weather: 10A B SPORTS: 1B B BUSINESS: 8B Stocks: 8B

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Twins Louis and John Jablowski of WilkesBarre Township describe their sibling relationship before the Holy Redeemer graduation on Wednesday.


C MY K N AT I O N

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Thursday, May 30, 2013

C MY K PAGE 5A

Health care policies may miss mark

I N BR I E F

Affordable Care Act to prompt cancellation this fall of noncompliant policies. By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Many people who buy their own health insurance could get surprises in the mail this fall: cancellation notices because their current policies aren’t up to the basic standards of President Barack Obama’s health care law. They, and some small businesses, will have to find replacement plans — and that

has some state insurance officials worried about consumer confusion. Rollout of Obama the Affordable Care Act is going full speed ahead, despite repeal efforts by congressional Republicans. New insurance markets called exchanges are to open in every state this fall. Middle-class consumers who don’t get coverage on the job will be able to pick private health plans, while low-income people will

be steered to an expanded version of Medicaid in states that accept it. The goal is to cover most of the nation’s nearly 50 million uninsured, but even Obama says there will be bumps in the road. And discontinued insurance plans could be another bump. Also, it doesn’t seem to square with one of the president’s best known promises about his health care overhaul: “If you like your health care plan, you’ll be able to keep your health care plan.” But supporters of the overhaul are betting that consumers won’t object once they

realize the coverage they will get under the new law is superior to current bare-bones insurance. For example, insurers will no longer be able to turn people down because of medical problems. Other bumps on the road to the new health care law include potentially unaffordable premiums for smokers unless states act to waive them, a new $63-per-head fee that will hit companies already providing coverage to employees and dependents, and a long-term care insurance program that had to be canceled because of the risk it could go belly up The Obama administration

did not respond directly to questions about the potential fallout from cancellation notices. Instead, Health and Human Services spokeswoman Joanne Peters released a prepared statement saying: “Beginning in October, individuals and small businesses will be able to shop for insurance in the marketplace, where we are already seeing that increased competition and transparency are leading to a range of options for quality, affordable plans.” Large employer plans that cover most workers and their families are unlikely to be affected.

AP PHOTO

Into the wild blue yonder

Graduating Air Force cadets throw their caps Wednesday at the completion of the commencement ceremony for the class of 2013 at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado. In the background, a group of World War II warplanes do a flyover.

Railways unsafe? Don’t be so sure

One cool polar bear display

SEATTLE

Plea pending in massacre

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he Army staff sergeant charged with slaughtering 16 villagers during one of the worst atrocities of the Afghanistan war has agreed to plead guilty in a deal to avoid the death penalty, his attorney told The Associated Press on Wednesday. Staff Sgt. Robert Bales is scheduled to enter guilty pleas to charges of premeditated murder June 5 at Joint Base Lewis-McChord south of Seattle, said lawyer John Henry Browne. A sentencing-phase trial set for September will determine whether he is sentenced to life in prison with or life without the possibility of parole. The judge and commanding general must approve a plea deal.

Statistics show train accidents, fatalities on decline nationally over past decade. By JOSH FUNK AP Business Writer

PROVIDENCE, R.I.

Chafee plans party switch

Independent Rhode Island Gov. Lincoln Chafee is joining the Democratic Party ahead of his 2014 bid for a second term, his spokeswoman said Wednesday, confirming a move that Chafee has been talking about for months as a way to better position himself for re-election. Chafee would not immediately address his party switch when asked about it Wednesday after he exited a ferry from Block Island to the mainland, saying only that he would be announce his decision at his local board of canvassers this morning. The governor, a former Republican senator, became a political independent in 2007, the year after he lost re-election to the U.S. Senate.

CHICAGO

Study: Stop infections via ICU

Infections in U.S. hospitals kill tens of thousands of people each year, and many institutions fight back by screening new patients to see if they carry a dangerous germ, and isolating those who do. But a big study suggests a far more effective approach: Decontaminating every patient in intensive care. Washing everyone with antiseptic wipes and giving them antibiotic nose ointment reduced bloodstream infections dramatically in the study at more than 40 U.S. hospitals. The practice could prove controversial, because it would involve even uninfected patients and because experts say it could lead to germs becoming more resistant to antibiotics. But it worked better than screening methods, now required in nine states.

BEIRUT

Assad eyeing 2014 election

Syria’s foreign minister laid out a hard line Wednesday, insisting that Bashar Assad will remain Syria’s president at least until elections in 2014 and might run for another term, conditions that will make it difficult for Syria’s opposition to agree to U.N.-sponsored talks on ending Syria’s civil war. Any deal reached in such talks would have to be put to a referendum, Walid al-Moallem said in a TV interview, introducing a new condition that could complicate efforts by the U.S. and Russia to bring the two sides together at an international conference in Geneva, possibly next month. The comments by al-Moallem, a regime stalwart with decades in top positions, reflected a new confidence by Assad’s government. , which had seemed near collapse during a rebel offensive last summer but has scored a number of battlefield successes in recent weeks.

AP PHOTO

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nuka, the first polar bear born in the tropics, swims in his new enclosure at the Singapore Zoo on Wednesday. Modeled closely after the arctic habitat, the enclosure helps replicate the climate of the arctic by including an ice cave and a large pool filled with giant ice blocks.

Rep. Bachmann: I’m not returning The tea party favorite is not seeking re-election to fifth term. The Associated Press

ST. PAUL, Minn. — Michele Bachmann, the Minnesota congresswoman whose sharply conservative views on social and fiscal issues elevated her to a leader of the tea party movement, announced Wednesday she will not seek a fifth term but insisted the decision was unrelated to ethics inquiries or her near-loss last fall. It was a sudden turn for the fostermom-turned-politician. She left the door open to other, unspecified political options. Bachmann was traveling in Russia as part of a congressional delegation and

was not available for interviews. In a lengthy video message to supporters, she said her decision “was not influenced by any concerns about my being re-elected.” Ron Carey, a former chief of staff to Bachmann, said he suspects she was anticipating a tough battle ahead and seemed to be stuck in place in Congress. “This is a great chance to exit stage right rather than have a knockdown, drag-out re-election fight,” said Carey, also a former state GOP chairman. “The reality also set in that she is not a favorite of Republican leadership, so she is not going to be rising up to a committee chair or rising up in leadership.” Her departure next year is part of a larger shift involving the leading per-

AP PHOTO

Rep. Michele Bachmann, R- Minn., will not run for re-election in 2014.

sonalities of the tea party. Stalwarts like former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, former Rep. Allen West of Florida and former South Carolina Sen. Jim DeMint have left elected office to move into conservative organizations and commentary roles.

Weather Service is upgrading computers Forecasters: $25 million project needed to better protect public from storms. By TAMARA LUSH Associated Press

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — When forecasters from the National Weather Service track a hurricane, they use models from several different supercomputers located around the world to create their predictions. Some of those models are more accurate than others. During Hurricane Sandy last October, for instance, the model from the European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasting in the United Kingdom predicted eight days before landfall that the large storm would

hit the East Coast, while the American supercomputer model showed Sandy drifting out to sea. The American model eventually predicted Sandy’s landfall four days before the storm hit — plenty of time for preparation — but revealed a potential weakness in the American computer compared to the European system. It left some meteorologists fuming. “Let me be blunt: The state of operational U.S. numerical weather prediction is an embarrassment to the nation and it does not have to be this way,” wrote Cliff Maas, a professor of atmospheric sciences at the University of Washington on his weather blog. Meteorologists agree that the two American supercom-

AP PHOTO

National Hurricane Center Director Rick Knabb talks about the pending 2013 Atlantic hurricane season.

puters that provide storm models are underpowered — which is why the National Weather Service plans on upgrading those computers in the next two years. The two main forecasting com-

puters — one in Orlando, Fla. and the other in Reston, Va., — will receive $25 million in upgrades as part of the Hurricane Sandy supplemental bill that was recently approved by Congress.

OMAHA, Neb. — The nation’s railroads are safer than ever, despite recent high-profile accidents such as this week’s fiery derailment in Maryland. Derailments and crossing accidents have steadily declined nationwide even as businesses have come to increasingly rely on trains to move their raw materials and products. The number of train accidents fell 43 percent to 1,712 between 2003 and last year, while the number of incidents at rail crossings dropped 34 percent to 1,960. And the total number of deaths declined 19 percent to 705 over the decade. Railroads have been investing in their equipment and track, their employee training and in technological tools to help detect problems before they can derail a train. Fewer derailments means fewer delayed deliveries and less need for railroads to reroute traffic for hours or even days. That all helps the industry’s bottom line. “There’s a strong incentive in the industry to maintain and invest in infrastructure,” said Allan Zarembski, an industry veteran who now leads the railroad engineering and safety program at the University of Delaware. “Last year was the safest year on record for the railroad industry,” said Federal Railroad Administration spokesman Warren Flatau. That might surprise anyone who saw the video of a smoldering CSX train after a chemicalfueled explosion near Baltimore Tuesday. Early indications are that the train struck a truck at a private crossing before the derailment. The Maryland accident comes on the heels of the derailment of a commuter train in Bridgeport, Conn., earlier this month. More than 70 people were injured when a second train struck the one that derailed. And last weekend, a freight train crash in Rockview, Mo., injured seven people and destroyed a highway overpass, which could take a year to repair. A trust fund should be established to ensure the upkeep and safety of the nation’s rail system, U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut said Wednesday, labeling the recent incidents a call to action. “Lack of public trust and confidence in safety and reliability threaten to undermine the entire rail system,” Blumenthal said.

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Thursday, May 30, 2013

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Holy Redeemer grads celebrate Holy Redeemer Class of 2013 Valedictorian: Cassandra Gill Salutatorian: Cody James Januszko Graduates: Vito Thomas Aiello Sara Emily Altemose Vincent James Amarando Nicholas Joseph Ambrulavage Danielle Elizabeth Angle Mathijs Arts Jeremy Jacob Astolfi Emily Jeanne Becker Fallyn Marie Boich James R. Bond Amy Nicole Boris Krzysztof Michael Bozentka Abigail Ann Bruno Meghan Ann Burns Taylor Lynne Christina Burwell Nadine Marie Carlo John Cecere Bethany Veronica Chmil Cornelia Catherine Chmil Rachael Catherine Coassolo Matthew Timothy Collins Thomas Shea Cosgrove Matthew Robert Michael Crofchick Kelsey Lynn Crossin Melissa R. Cruz Elizabeth Erin DeMichele Kaitlyn Nichole Donnelly Tyler Edward Daniel Dougherty Marissa Ann Durako Elizabeth Marie Eaton Tyler Michael Elias Callie Evans George Patrick Evans Michael Joseph Faux Shane Thomas Flannery Mitchell W. Ford Joshua Allen Foust Brianne Elizabeth Frascella Kyle Patrick Gainard Eric Thomas Gdovin Sophīa Leanore Geiser Alexandra Adriana Gentilesco Erica Marie Gernhart Cassandra Gill Clarissa Gingell Danielle Nicole Gorski Margaret Mary Guarnieri Daniel J.C. Gushanas Tricia Jacqueline Harenza Jeremy M. Heiser Krista Ann Heller Autumn Rose Henrie Richard Joshua Hoggarth Dakota Leigh Hollock-Sinclair Matthew Jason DelBalso Isely John Joseph Jablowski III Louis Alexander Jablowski Cody James Januszko Robert William Jones John Joseph Jurta Anna Christine Kachmarski Tyler Michael Kastendieck Geetika Khanna Eamon David Theodore Klinges Mary Kathryn Kolojejchick Maria Sara Kopczynski Kellie Marie Ann Kopko

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

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oly Redeemer graduate Sarah Warnagiris of Hunlock Creek gets a kiss from her dad, Bob, outside the F.M. Kirby Center in Wilkes-Barre after commencement on Wednesday night. It was the school’s sixth commencement since the Wilkes-Barre Catholic high school was renamed. The Class of 2013 includes 157 members.

Michael Kosik Ann Olivia Kotch Sydney Leah Kotch Matthew Bernard Kotulak Nicholas Bernard Kotulak Jacob Walter Kozak John Edward Kozak Marnie Kusakavitch Katelyn Ann Laskowski Amanda Catherine Latoski Brendan Matthias Leahigh Ashley Marie Leighton Patrick Hoban Loftus Michael Charles LoGrande Thomas Daniel Madigan Julie Ann Mahle Alexandria Marie Malacari Selina Elizabeth Malacari Gerald Maloney Morgan Leigh Mancini Ennio Mancuso Tyler Joseph Margalski Andrew Alexander Mark Brandon Joseph Marx Violeta M. Mattei Nicholas Reilly McCarroll Stephanie Lorraine McCole Patrick Walsh McHale Derek Thomas McManus Maria Sophia Elizabeth Mengak Timothy Menta

Edmund Francis Meszczynski Kasey Lynn Miller Jason Michael Mitchell Jessica Marie Mitchell Michael Mocion Michael Morrison Louis Albert Murray Jeremy Edward Myslowski Angeli Nause Jenna Victoria Nitowski Nadia Attar Novak Devon Alexandra Nowicky Patrick F. O’Boyle, Jr. Noah Orlandini-Sapack Daniel Thomas Ostrowski Michael Charles Pahler Megan Lynn Phillips Samantha Mae Pierce Lauren Marie Pikul Brittany Ann Pilch Cameron J. Pinto Victoria L. Reggie Kayla Marie Rhiel Thérèse Anne Roughsedge Joseph E. Ruiz Grace Elizabeth Rychwalski Scott Calvin Safka Morgan Joseph Manuel Mark Santayana Daniel James Seasock Alexis Morgan Shemanski

Joshua Stephen Siecko Andrea Rose Siejna Grace M. Sipler Matthew Slavoski Cody Jay Smith Eva Marie Geneviève Smith Sydney Anne Burke Smith Joanna Marie Sobeck Rachel Mary Sowinski Christina Marie Springer Alexander David Stashik Shawn William Stefanski Kristen Leah Stepanski Alexander James Stevens Kaitlyn Marie Stochla Jacob Stone Frazee Cole Sutphen III Joseph Francis Szczechowicz III Leanne Theresa Tabit Ryan Joseph Tabit Teresa Ann Toomey Adam Tyler Turosky Aaron James Urbanski Sarah Nicole Warnagiris Christopher Robert Welgosh David Allan Wert Kelsey Williams Sarah Kathryn Williams Carleena Elizabeth Wozniak

2013 Scripps National Spelling Bee becomes family affair Multiple contestants in this L O O S E E L I M I N A T E D A F T E R E A R LY S U C C E S S year’s Scripps event following Grant Loose, a middle school 218 and corstudent at Wyoming Valley rectly spelled in a sibling’s footsteps. By JOSEPH WHITE AP Sports Writer

OXON HILL, Md. — She looks like her sister. She spells like her sister, tracing the letters on her palm as she calls out the letters. Her goal is become the back half of the first set of sibling champions in National Spelling Bee history. Eleven-year-old Vanya Shivashankar of Olathe, Kan., qualified Wednesday for the semifinals of the 86th Scripps National Spelling Bee. She handled “intaglio” and “horologium” with no problem. “My sister’s more like a bubbly person,” said Vanya’s sister, 2009 champion Kavya Shivashankar. “You can see that onstage, that she’s really excited to be there. I think I felt the same way, but it just showed dif-

West who won the regional bee sponsored by The Times Leader, was not listed among the 42 spellers who advanced through the Scripps National Spelling Bee preliminaries round on Wednesday. According to the spelling bee’s Twitter feed, Loose was Speller

“chauvinism” and “hegemonic” on Wednesday. But that alone wasn’t enough to earn him a place in today’s semifinals.

ferently.” Forty-two of the 281 spellers advanced, having tallied the most points in a formula that combined Wednesday’s onstage rounds with a computer test that included a section on vocabulary for the first time. Officials originally announced 41 semifinalists, but added one more after a review of the written test. The semifinals are this afternoon, with the finals set for tonight. The winner gets $30,000 in cash and prizes and

a huge trophy. Making the cut are several returning favorites, including a speller with a sibling story similar to the Shivashankars. Thirteen-year-old Arvind Mahankali of New York, who finished third each of the last two years, is getting eager support from 9-yearold brother Srinath. Two years ago, Arvind hilariously mispronounced “Jugendstil” as “You could steal” and saluted the crowd after he misspelled the word. Now he’s more

bit more low-key and appears unfazed by anything, while Srinath talks up a storm and playfully bragged he will need only one year to win the title once he makes the national bee. Eighteen spellers at this year’s bee have at least one relative who has competed previously. Vanya, who tied for 10th last year, isn’t the only one with a chance to make sibling history this year: 13-year-old Ashwin Veeramani of North Royalton, Ohio, is the brother of 2010 winner Anamika Veeramani. A win by Vanya, Arvind or Ashwin would continue the recent tradition of Indian-American winners. There have been five in a row and 10 of 14, a run that started in 1999 when Nupur Lala captured the title in 1999 and was later featured in the documentary “Spellbound.”

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Five sets of twins graduating from Holy Redeemer High School pose for a photo at the F.M. Kirby Center before commencement. Pairwise, from left: Comelia and Bethany Chmil, Louis and John Jablowski, John and Jacob Kozak, Ryan and Leanne Tabit, and Nick and Matt Kotulak.

TWINS Continued from Page 1A

157 grads — about 6 percent of the class. Not astronomical, but enough to make one (twin Louis Jablowski) muse “There must have been something in the water that year.” The second obvious question: How many of you used your twinship to play tricks on teachers. “I did,” Matt Kotulak said with a mischievous grin. Really, what was it? “No, I was just kidding, we never did that stuff.” C’mon. There are five sets of twins and 12 years of education — that’s 120 studentyears. What are the odds no one pulled a prank? “Well, there was the one time a teacher was going to give me detention, and when he asked my name I said John Jablowski,” Louis said with a chuckle. Did it work? “No, John was in his class, so the teacher knew him,” Louis added. Turns out the teacher wasn’t really going to send him to detention, either … until after the lie. OK, Cornelia and Bethany Chmil fessed up, “sometimes we would tell teachers we were the other one.” The joke wasn’t that teachers couldn’t tell them apart — they are fraternal twins who look a lot alike but are distinguishable. The joke was in confusing teachers about which name belonged to which face. One more obvious question: Five sets of twins at the nexus

between forced unity by dint of family and the free choice of adulthood; are you planning to go your separate ways and prove your independence, or do you find yourselves pursuing similar majors at the same college? “I’m going to Wilkes University,” Bethany Chmil said, “for pharmacy.” Sister Cornelia is headed to Misericordia University for speech pathology. Score one for “separate ways” then? “University of Pittsburgh for occupational therapy,” Leanne Tabit said, while brother Ryan is off to Drexel for bio-medical engineering. Rival cities in the same state, different segments of the medical profession … a psychologist could fill a treatise dissecting that one. “King’s College, undeclared,” Nick Kotulak said. Ditto brother Matt chimed. Hmmm … does that count as two for “same pursuit?” “King’s, for history,” Jacob Kozak said. “King’s, for computer science,” brother John offered, creating a decidedly split decision — unless Jacob focuses on computer history. And our last set of twins? “I’m going to Penn State University, main campus, to study music,” Louis Jablowski said. “Harvard,” brother John (to be precise, it’s John III) offered with a straight face, before cracking a smile. “No. I’m kidding. I’m going to LCCC, general studies.” He may be joking, but Harvard LCCC sounds like a great new hybrid school. Or maybe they are twins who went their separate ways …


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Thursday, May 30, 2013

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ROADS Continued from Page 1A

Mobility,” finds that throughout Pennsylvania: • Thirty seven percent of major roads and highways provide motorists with a rough ride. • About 42 percent of state bridges show significant deterioration or do not meet current design standards. • The state’s major urban roads are becoming increasingly congested, with drivers wasting increasing amounts of time and fuel. • Pennsylvania’s rural noninterstate traffic fatality rate is significantly higher than the fatality rate on all other roads in the state. The study was commissioned and released by TRIP, which is a national transportation research group based in Washington, D.C., and sponsored by highway construction interests and insurance companies. “As the General Assembly looks at a transportation funding measure, there’s a lot of discussion about the cost,” said Jason Wagner, managing director of the Pennsylvania Highway Information Association. “The TRIP report quantifies the cost of not addressing this problem, and that cost is almost three times greater than the $3.5 billion annual transportation funding gap. Of even greater concern is the safety threat

DRIVER Continued from Page 1A

in front of her house. The driver of the vehicle left the scene, according to police. Court papers identify John Kuniskas, 36, of 1072 Westminster Road, as the driver of a 2005 Ford F350 that allegedly struck Darsky. Kuniskas could not be reached for comment Wednesday, and it was unclear Wednesday if he had retained legal counsel. Kuniskas’ home is eighttenths of a mile from the Darsky home. Westminster Road runs from state Route 315 to Jumper

SALLIE Continued from Page 1A

pany’s existing businesses into two, separate, publicly traded entities — an education loan management business and a consumer banking business — to “unlock value and enhance long-term growth potential.” “By separating our current operations into two businesses, we will facilitate focus on Sallie Mae’s growing consumer banking business and management of its education loan portfolios,” Remondi said.

Shareholders’ stake

The strategic plan will create two companies, each initially owned by Sallie Mae’s existing

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

Construction crews resurface the east-bound lanes of the Veterans Memorial Bridge on Wednesday.

that a deficient transportation system represents, especially in Pennsylvania’s rural areas.” The TRIP report calculated the cost to motorists of insufficient roads in the state’s largest urban areas. Data show that at $1,320 per driver, this region actually had the lowest additional operating costs, with Philadelphia, at $1,798, reporting the highest.

Report highlights

Other highlights of the 20page study include data that show more people are using state roadways and those that Road, about a three-mile stretch. The attorneys filed a notice that a lawsuit will be filed in the case, listing Kuniskas, and his business, Evolving Water Systems, as defendants, as well as a man who allegedly sold Kuniskas the truck. The two families did not know each other, but knowing who caused the accident is the first step “on a long road” for Mark Darsky in terms of the grieving process, Ciarimboli said. “There is some comfort knowing who the individual is, but there are still a lot of unanswered questions,” he said. Ciarimboli said as an attorney representing Darsky it is his responsibility to protect each

shareholders. Sallie Mae would form an education loan management business composed of the company’s portfolios of federally guaranteed (FFELP) and private education loans, as well as most related servicing and collection activities. Remondi will continue as its CEO. Sallie Mae’s private education loan origination and servicing businesses, including Sallie Mae Bank, the Sallie Mae Upromise Rewards program and the private education loans it currently holds, will operate separately under the Sallie Mae brand. This will be a consumer education lending franchise with expertise in helping families save, plan and pay for college. Joseph DePaulo, executive vice president, banking and finance, will lead this business as its CEO.

are using them spend more time behind the wheel and put more miles on their vehicles. Findings include: * Vehicle miles of travel in the state increased 16 percent from 1990 to 2011 and are expected to increase another 15 percent by 2030. * Traffic congestion in the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre area is worsening, causing 20 annual hours of delay for the average motorist. The average Scranton/Wilkes-Barre driver wastes an average of nine gallons of fuel each year due to

aspect of the case and gather all possible information. Jean Darsky was retrieving a political flier from her mailbox when she was struck by a vehicle driven by Kuniskas, according to Boylan and Ciarimboli’s filing. The attorneys say Kuniskas’ vehicle is at the state police barracks in Wyoming. No charges have been filed in the case. The Luzerne County District Attorney’s Office last week turned over the criminal case to the state Attorney General’s Office, citing District Attorney Stefanie Salavantis “has a close personal relationship with one of the witnesses who came forward in the case.” The Darsky family attorneys

The company release indicated that if completed, the separation would be effected via a tax-free distribution of common stock to Sallie Mae’s shareholders. The details of the planned separation, including the precise allocation of assets between the two companies, remain under consideration at this time. Based on current plans and Sallie Mae’s March 31 financial information: • The education loan management business’ principal assets are likely to consist of about $118.1 billion in FFELP loans, $31.6 billion in private education loans, $7.9 billion of other interest-earning assets and a leading education loan servicing platform that services loans for about 10 million federal education loan customers,

congestion. Both of those totals were the lowest of the five metro regions included in the study. Most of the findings are not news to state motorists but something that each driver knows and experiences firsthand. “Our roads are a mess,” said Donna Palermo, the head of the Greater Hazleton Chamber of Commerce.

Traffic and commerce

The report makes it clear that “commuting and commerce in Pennsylvania are requested that the Ford truck be left untouched so that testing can be conducted, and that the attorneys be permitted to photograph, measure and inspect the truck. The attorneys also asked to conduct a search for evidence in the case before filing an actual complaint because information remains unknown. Ciarimboli said Stephen Doty of Clarks Summit recently contacted him regarding the vehicle, which was allegedly sold to Kuniskas in April. Though records still list Doty as the owner, Ciarimboli said, it is a possibility the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation is behind on updating records.

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com constrained by growing traffic congestion, which will increase in the future unless additional highway and transit capacity is provided.” Tom Lawson, a partner of the area engineering firm Borton-Lawson and president of the Pennsylvania Highway Information Association, has been an outspoken advocate for additional funding for not only infrastructure upgrades and repairs but also annual maintenance to keep future costs in check. At a recent forum on the region’s economy, Lawson said some businesses want to locate in Northeastern Pennsylvania but are hampered by the infrastructure. Site Selection magazine’s 2010 survey of corporate real estate executives found that transportation infrastructure was the third most important selection factor in site location decisions, behind only work force skills and state and local taxes. The cost estimate to add a third lane on Interstate 81 over the 30-mile stretch between Scranton and Hazleton would be about $1.5 billion to $2 billion, Lawson said. Funding, or lack thereof, he said, needs to be addressed and action needs to be taken now, not when costs will be even greater. He also added that “the amount of freight traffic over the next 20 years is expected to explode” and as more product is brought to ports in northeastern cities that’s only going to clog Interstates 80, 81 and 380 even more.

Darsky’s attorneys say the claims in the yet-to-be-filed complaint exceed a seven-figure monetary amount, and that Kuniskas can “currently … sell his properties and assets, transfer and/or withdraw funds from his personal and business accounts … with knowledge that (Darsky) has a substantial claim against the businesses and himself,” court papers state. Because of that possibility in regards to Kuniskas and Doty, the attorneys asked that both men be prohibited from selling assets or any other property. A hearing has been scheduled for July 8 before a county judge to consider the attorneys’ requests.

BILL TARUTIS/ TIMES LEADER FILE PHOTO

Sallie Mae’s loan servicing center in the Hanover Industrial Estates has about about 100 open positions.

including 4.8 million customer accounts serviced under the company’s contract with the

U.S. Department of Education. In aggregate, this company will own approximately 95 percent

PATERNO Continued from Page 1A

tions and agreement between school and the NCAA to be deemed unlawful and the penalties overturned, he said. The suit would also ask for unspecified damages and court costs, Sollers said, though the family would donate any net proceeds to charity. “The broader goal is to get the truth out,” Sollers said. “This narrative that’s in public that was perpetuated by the NCAA’s adoption of the deeply flawed Freeh report … cannot stand.” Freeh accused Paterno and three former university officials of concealing allegations against Sandusky, a retired defensive coordinator. Sandusky was sentenced to at least 30 years in prison after being convicted last year of dozens of criminal counts of abuse, including allegations on and off campus. Paterno died in January 2012. His family and the former school officials have vehemently denied they took part in a cover-up. The suit is designed “to redress the NCAA’s 100 percent adoption of the Freeh Report. … The reality is that consent decree was imposed through coercion and threats behind the scenes and there was no ability for anyone to get redress,” Sollers told Costas. “There was no board approval, there was no transparency, and there was no consideration of this consent decree.” The NCAA said Wednesday it had not received any such lawsuit and could not comment. “Despite our request, the Paterno family has not shared any information about its planned legal action,” chief legal officer Donald Remy said in a statement. “We remain committed to working with Penn State toward the continued successful completion of our voluntary agreement with the university and to working” with the NCAA’s independent monitor, former U.S. Sen. George Mitchell. Penn State spokesman Dave La Torre said the school itself was not a party to any litigation that might be filed by the Paterno family and remained committed to “full compliance” to the sanctions.

of Sallie Mae’s existing assets and remain obligated for the company’s senior indebtedness. • The consumer banking business’ assets are likely to include about $9.9 billion of total assets composed primarily of private education loans and related origination and servicing platforms, cash and other investments, and the Sallie Mae Upromise Rewards program. The two separate companies initially will be owned by Sallie Mae stockholders, but the separation of the businesses does not require a shareholder vote. The company, which just celebrated its 40th anniversary, is still looking to fill close to 100 positions at its Hanover Township loan servicing center, Lavoie said.


C MY K PAGE 2

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Thursday, May 30, 2013

www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER

20 local ‘Learning Workers’ graduate Program works with those who favorite things about Learning Workers. have struggled academically, “She taught me how to do lost faith in education system. simple math and told me to alBy TESS KORNFELD Times Leader intern

WILKES-BARRE — Volunteers of America’s Learning Works program graduated 20 “Learning Workers” Wednesday at a dinner in the SheehyFarmer Campus Center at King’s College. Learning Works is an afterschool program that works with fifth- through eighth-graders from Kistler Elementary, Dobson Elementary and Meyers Junior/Senior High School. The students were recruited by teachers and guidance counselors after struggling academically and losing faith in the education system. Shannon Doyne, project manager of Learning Works, said the goal of the program is to teach students skills that lead to academic success and to present them with a variety of career paths. “We are building the leaders of the future by empowering them to start down the road to a career that makes them happy and fulfilled,” Doyne said. Starting in January, each student had a one-on-one weekly tutoring session with a King’s College mentor, a relationship that lasts the whole semester. Students had the chance to learn about their mentors’ successes and how they ended up at this point in life. Khariana Hughes, a fifth-grader at Kistler Elementary, said her mentor, Morgan, was one of her

ways do my best,” Hughes said. In addition to tutoring sessions, guests known as “career presenters” talked to the Learning Workers once a week to give career advice. Doyne said they tried to bring in people from a wide variety of occupations such as an EMT, a state fish and boat commissioner and a pizza restaurant owner so the kids know they can accomplish whatever they want. Alex Rivera, also a fifth-grader at Kistler Elementary, wants to be an artist when he grows up and said he was inspired by a tattoo artist who talked to them about his career. During the ceremony, every Learning Worker gave a presentation on the dream career of his or her choice and received a special certificate in front of family members and teachers in the audience. Sue Henry, radio personality at WILK-FM since 2002 and King’s College alumna, also spoke about the value of hard work. “Hard work pays off!” Henry said and made the audience repeat the phrase enthusiastically back at her. “The secret is out with you. You already know the secret to hard work,” Henry said. The program has a great track record. Last spring, 28 Learning Workers, out of 29, had higher grades since entering the program. “My grades were very low.

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

Tylee Moore, right, of Dodson Elementary School, receives her graduating diploma from Sarina Drevenak, learning coach, far left, and congratulations from Shannon Doyne, project manager, Learning Works, The Magnolia Project, during Wednesday’s Learning Works graduation dinner at King’s College in Wilkes-Barre. Moore’s PowerPoint presentation was on ‘Becoming A Teacher.’

Once I started Learning Workers, I started getting A’s, B’s and C’s,” Hughes said. Doyne said at the end of Learning Works, students are more focused on their school work and they seem happier. Mecca Davis, a seventh-grader at Meyers, said she is more interested in school now and her attitude has improved. “I’ve gotten better in school

and I’ve gotten better as a person,” Davis said. “My attitude is better than it was before. Before it was bad, but now it is a little better.” Part of the kids’ success is thanks to their learning coach, Sarina Drevenak. She visits the students’ homes every other week for an hour and helps them get more organized and sets goals.

“I find it rewarding when you see a smile on a kid’s face. Just to see the kid succeed in doing something they didn’t think they could do,” Drevenak said. Because of Learning Works, Rivera is confident that he will be “a smart kid one day.” “Without Learning Works, I don’t know what I would have done,” Rivera said.

REVIEW

Legendary jam band has played Toyota Pavilion seven times since 2005.

Surveillance system change at city garage draws rave from board member.

By BRAD PATTON Times Leader Correspondent

By JERRY LYNOTT jlynott@timesleader.com

The 2013 summer-concert season officially got under way Wednesday with the Dave Matthews Band’s annual trek up Montage Mountain. Appearing only one year and one day after its previous performance at the Toyota Pavilion, the popular jam band from Charlottesville, Va., took the stage at 8:25 with an extended, stellar version of “Warehouse.” Neither the DMB nor opening band moe. is a stranger to Scranton: Each has played here numerous times and each has released a live album recorded in the Electric City. Including Wednesday night’s performance, DMB has played the Toyota Pavilion seven times since June 2005, when it sold out its initial show at the Scranton amphitheater (a later show was released in the band’s “Live Trax” series). Usually a headliner in its own right, moe., a jam band formed at the University at Buffalo in 1989, has played the Scranton Cultural Center a number of times, including a Feb. 28, 2001, appearance documented on “Warts and All, Volume One.” Only playing two shows as part of this tour, moe. opened Wednesday’s show with a well-received 45-minute set. The band’s final tune segued nicely into the theme from “The Office,” which delighted the multitudes of Dunder-Mifflin fans in attendance. The core members of the Dave Matthews Band

WILKES-BARRE — An upgrade to a fiber-optic connection improved the Hawkeye Security Solutions cameras in the Park & Lock East garage, said a member of the board of the nonprofit corporation overseeing the operation of the city’s surveillance system. The switch from copper wire cost about $2,000 for hardware to make the connection, said Lou Lau, a Hawkeye board member and Wilkes-Barre city employee, at the board’s regular monthly meeting on Wednesday. “The improvement there is fantastic,” Lau said. The garage is located on the corner of North Washington and East Market streets, across from City Hall. The Wilkes-Barre Parking Authority’s two other garages, Park & Lock Central and North, have wireless connections. The Intermodal garage, operated by the city, should have more than 60 cameras operational in another month. Of the nearly 250 cameras that make up the system in the downtown and neighborhoods, about 18 of them are down for repairs or because of network issues, Lau said. The parking authority is the system’s sole paying customer for the $2 million system that went on line in 2010 and was built with state and federal money. The authority has a contract the runs to the end of the year and has an outstanding balance of $15,428 for April and May. It paid an identical amount for February and March. Board member Greg Barrouk, who also works for the city, delivered the treasurer’s report and said there were no deposits made this month. Hawkeye began May with a cash balance of $4,835 and had a total of $3,620 in expenses, leaving it with a cash balance of $1,215. The largest expense was $3,570 from Legion Security for monitoring the system at police headquarters. At the beginning of the month Legion reduced its hours to 88 weekly from around-the-clock coverage. It did so after the Wilkes-Barre Area School Board voted against renewing its threeyear, $270,000 contract with Hawkeye.

JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

The Dave Matthews Band delivered another well-received performance at Montage Mountain on Wednesday night.

– Dave Matthews (lead vocals, acoustic guitar), Boyd Tinsley (violin), Stefan Lessard (bass guitar) and Carter Beauford (drums, backing vocals) – were once again joined by electric guitarist extraordinaire Tim Reynolds and the horn section of Jeff Coffin (saxophone) and Rashawn Ross (trumpet) for Wednesday’s show. They all casually strolled onto the stage, tuned up for a minute or two, then launched into the opening number to an uproarious reaction from the large crowd. The stage seemed simpler than in past years – the video screens weren’t used until about the sixth song, and there were no elaborate lights or much of a set design. Just seven musi-

cians and their instruments stretching the boundaries of each song as they have been doing for more than two decades. The band followed “Warehouse” with “The Idea of You” and new song “Rooftop” before finding a great groove on “One Sweet World” and “Captain” in the early part of the show. “Why I Am” with its mention of the “GrooGrux King,” a nickname of deceased member LeRoi Moore, was the most enthusiastically received in the early going. “I was telling a friend about this place a day or two ago,” Matthews said after the first song. “You know, it’s this big canvas stretched out kind of thing. But every time we play here, we always have a great time.

THE TIMES LEADER

“Thank you so much, good to see you,” he shouted as the crowd cheered wildly. After hitting its stride with “#41” and “Belly Belly Nice” (another number from most recent album, 2012’s “Away from the World”), the band slowed it down a little for “Sleep to Dream Her,” which segued nicely into “Hunger for the Great Light.” The band then got the crowd back on its feet for extraordinary, extended workouts on “Where Are You Going,” “Squirm” and “You Might Die Trying.” The DMB was working its way through longtime fan favorite “Jimi Thing” as this article was being written. Due to an early deadline, a complete review of the DMB’s performance was not available at press time.

MIDDAY DRAWING DAILY NUMBER - 6-5-5 BIG 4 - 3-0-5-8 QUINTO - 1-1-6-1-6 TREASURE HUNT 06-09-14-18-22 NIGHTLY DRAWING DAILY NUMBER - 5-5-1 BIG 4 - 7-5-3-8 QUINTO - 7-9-6-2-2 CASH 5 01-05-19-41-43 POWERBALL 09-14-17-49-57 POWER BALL - 02

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IN BRIEF WILKES-BARRE

Selenski records handed over Prosecutors in the case of Hugo Selenski, charged in a double homicide, filed court papers Wednesday verifying they’ve handed over Selenski’s medical records. Prosecutors were ordered to do so last week after a county judge imposed sanctions after Selenski’s attorneys said prosecutors engaged in “misconduct” in obtaining the records. Judge Fred Pierantoni ordered the prosecutors to hand over any Selenski medical records and delete any related files from office computers. Selenski, 39, of Kingston Township, is awaiting a June 24 trial in the May 2002 deaths of Michael Kerkowski and Tammy Fassett, both 38 at the time. Selenski might face the death penalty if convicted of first-degree murder. In December, his attorneys said prosecutors obtained medical and psychiatric records of Selenski, even though at no time has Selenski made either his mental or physical health an issue. Also on Wednesday, Pierantoni said a pretrial hearing will be held June 6.

timesleader.com

THURSDAY, MAY 30, 2013

LOCAL No county action on vote expected Election Board solicitor doesn’t see county filing requests seeking new Hazleton Area School Board election. By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES jandes@timesleader.com

Luzerne County Election Board solicitor Mike Butera doesn’t expect the county to file any requests seeking a new Hazleton Area School Board election as suggested by some residents and county officials. The results of that school board race are in question because Luzerne County’s election office failed to inform neighboring Carbon and Schuylkill

counties of Steve Hahn’s withdrawal from the ballot, and ELECTION he ended up receiving more than 500 votes in those jurisdictions. Candidates can file court paperwork in Carbon and Schuylkill counties seeking a new election before the counties submit their official certified results to the state on June 10, but some say that burden should fall on Luzerne County, which made the error. For starters, Butera said he does not know if the county would have standing to seek a special election. The election code says any can-

2013

didate aggrieved by the actions of the election board can file petitions with the court, and Butera said that wouldn’t apply to Luzerne County. “Theoretically, Luzerne County is not aggrieved by anything,” Butera said. Timing concerns Timing also is an issue, Butera said. The county election board would have to discuss and decide to seek a new election and then obtain council approval to file litigation, which is required by home rule, he said. Butera said he wants to be upfront that he does not believe these steps would be completed before the deadline.

“I don’t think there’s enough time for all the wheels to get that done,” Butera said. Seven candidates competed for four Hazleton Area School Board nominations on each ticket — Thomas Chirico, Jared O’Donnell, Bob Mehalick, James Chapman, Frederick Mariano, Clarence John and Carmella Yenkevich. Hahn received 279 Republican votes in the two other counties. The unofficial Republican vote totals for the seven candidates: Chapman, 2,146; Mehalick, 2,125; John, 1,977; O’Donnell, 1,795; See ELECTION, Page 4A

Solicitor Pedri may represent Griffith

U N I T E D W AY D AY O F C A R I N G

LUZERNE

Luzerne Bank purchase OK’d Penns Woods Bancorp Inc. announced its shareholders approved the company’s pending acquisition of Luzerne Bank at the annual meeting held Wednesday. The shareholders of Luzerne National Corp. also approved the acquisition at their annual shareholders meeting Wednesday. The acquisition is expected to become effective on Saturday, subject to the satisfaction of other customary closing conditions. Penns Woods intends to continue to operate Luzerne Bank as a separate banking subsidiary of Penns Woods under the name “Luzerne Bank.” The existing members of the board of directors of Luzerne Bank will continue to serve as directors after closing, and Richard A. Grafmyre, Penns Woods’ president and chief executive officer, will join the Luzerne Bank board. In addition, at closing the Penns Woods board of directors will be expanded to include three current nonemployee directors from the Luzerne board of directors. Based in Williamsport, Penns Woods is the parent company of Jersey Shore State Bank, which operates 13 branches in Lycoming, Clinton, Centre and Montour counties. Penns Woods will acquire all of the outstanding shares of Luzerne for a total purchase price of $44.5 million. The combined company will have more than $1.1 billion in assets. PLAINS TWP.

Gift of Life fundraiser set The Polish American Veterans are holding a fundraiser/motorcycle ride for the Gift of Life organ donor program on Sunday, June 9. Registration begins at 10 a.m. at the organization’s pavilion at 2 S. Oak St., Hudson. The ride starts at noon. A picnic will follow at 1 p.m. at the pavilion with food, prize drawings and live music by Hat Tryk. Cost is $15 per rider and $15 per passenger. All proceeds go directly to Gift of Life program. FORTY FORT

Forty Fort Pool opens today The Forty Fort Pool will open 3 to 7 p.m. today and Friday. The pool will be open regular hours on Saturdays and Sundays. Beginning Monday and continuing weekdays through the week of June 10, the pool will be open from 3 until 7 p.m. Normal hours will begin on June 17. For more information, call the pool at 714-6261 or the Forty Fort Borough office at 287-8586. DURYEA

Police seek Binghamton man Police said they are searching for Monty Ramey, 22, of Binghamton, N.Y., on charges he interfered with the custody of a child on Monday. Police said New York State Police on Tuesday found the child safe with relatives in New York. Ramey is facing a charge of interference with custody of children that was filed with District Judge Andrew Barilla in Pittston. Anyone with information about the whereabouts of Ramey is asked to call Duryea police at 457-1721 ext. 2

PAGE 3A

Move to save county money could occur if a judge rejects an attempt to dismiss case. By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES jandes@timesleader.com

work in “disruptive innovation” — the idea that changes starting on the fringe of an industry can shake that industry to the core. Think recorded music sales and iTunes. Christensen argued the next big such disruption

Luzerne County Chief Solicitor C. David Pedri said he will start representing county Controller Walter Griffith in a civil suit filed by Judd Shoval if a county judge rejects an attempt to dismiss the case. The issue came up at Tuesday’s county council meeting because some council members have asked Pedri if there’s a conflict of interest with Griffith’s current representation. The firm of Elliott, Green- Griffith leaf & Dean is defending Griffith and the county in the civil suit, which alleges the controller violated the state wiretap Pedri law. Griffith has privately hired one of the firm’s attorneys, Mark Bufalino, to represent him in separate criminal felony wiretapping charges recently filed against him. The county is funding Griffith’s defense in the civil suit, but Griffith must pay for his criminal defense. Pedri told council he won’t provide his personal opinion on the potential conflict. “That’s up to each attorney to make their own determination,” Pedri said. His decision to start representing Griffith stems mainly from the insurance carrier’s decision to deny coverage in the civil matter, Pedri said. The insurance coverage, which requires the use of outside legal counsel, would have funded expenses after a $150,000 deductible. “Where there’s no insurance coverage, I’m going to try to keep as much litigation as I can in-house,” Pedri said, citing the savings. Elliott, Greenleaf & Dean Attorney Jack Dean said Wednesday there is no conflict because the civil litigation is against the controller in his official capacity, which essentially makes it a claim against the county. Dean said the defense in that case focuses on the county’s interest, with no bearing on Griffith’s private interests. Dean said a conflict would

See SELINGO, Page 4A

See GRIFFITH, Page 4A

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

Volunteers from Citizens Bank in Wilkes-Barre fold clothes donated to Ruth’s Place women’s shelter as part of the United Way of Wyoming Valley’s Day of Caring projects on Wednesday.

‘It doesn’t take much to help a lot’ More than 600 volunteers performed 3,700 hours of necessary work at about 34 nonprofit agencies. By BILL O’BOYLE boboyle@timesleader.com

PLAINS TWP. — Malcolm Bradford finished his breakfast and was heading to his one-day, once-a-year job: He was one of 600 volunteers participating in Wednesday’s United Way Day of Caring’s Operation Dream. Bradford, 42, of Wilkes-Barre, an employee at Lord & Taylor, and his team of volunteers were assigned to clean the Back Mountain Trail— one of 34 main-

tenance projects completed Wednesday. “It feels good to volunteer and help out in the community,” Bradford said as he left The Woodlands, where the United Way of Wyoming Valley held its “Operation Dream” breakfast and awards ceremony. “It doesn’t take much to help a lot.” Bill Jones, United Way president/ CEO, said the impact of the annual Day of Caring is significant to the budgets of nonprofit agencies. Jones said 622 volunteers representing 43 businesses performed necessary work at 34 organizations by doing tasks ranging from painting to gardening to cleaning to serving meals to washing

windows to picking up litter to calling bingo at a pizza party for senior citizens. Jones said total volunteer hours exceeded 3,700, providing an estimated $82,000 in value to the groups helped. “Each of you are passionate about our community,” Jones told a sea of orangeclad volunteers at the breakfast. “You are all rolling up your sleeves to help people served by these vital agencies.” Theresa Porter, 33, of Wilkes-Barre, was with a group of volunteers from Benco Dental who were heading to the SPCA of Luzerne County in Plains Township to do yard work. See CARING, Page 7A

Valley West grad has advice for local college-bound Jeff Selingo convinced colleges are about to undergo tectonic changes. By MARK GUYDISH mguydish@timesleader.com

Wyoming Valley West grad Jeff Selingo is coming back to town with a message for all his fellow Spartans — and everyone else poised to leave high school and start college: Higher education is changing, radically. “Every parent thinks the experience their kids will have in college will be the same experience they had 30 years ago,” Selingo, 40, said. “That’s not going to happen.”

A higher ed journalist for 16 years — he’s currently editor-at-large Selingo for The C h ro n i c l e of Higher Education and a senior fellow at the Washington, D.C.-based think tank Education Sector — Selingo will be at Burke Hall in King’s College at 4 p.m. today to talk about his book “College (Un)Bound.” “I try to explain, here’s what’s going on, here’s what’s happening, here’s how you can try to evaluate colleges,” Selingo said. “It’s meant as a primer.”

IF YOU GO

COLLEGE ( UN ) BOUND THE FUTURE OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND WHAT IT MEANS FOR STUDENTS

JEFFREY J. SELINGO Editor at Large, The Chronicle of Higher Education

Selingo became convinced colleges are about to undergo tectonic changes after hearing a lecture by Harvard Professor Clayton Christensen, known for his

What: Discussion of his book “College (Un)Bound” by Plymouth native Jeff Selingo Where: Burke Auditorium in the King’s College McGowan School of Business, West Union and North River streets, Wilkes-Barre When: Today, 4 p.m. Cost: Free and open to the public


C M Y K PAGE 4A

N E W S

Thursday, May 30, 2013

MUNICIPAL BRIEFS DURYEA — The Duryea Borough Sewer Authority will meet Monday at 7 p.m. LUZERNE — John Lohman, tax collector, says the face period for 2013 county/municipal real estate property taxes and municipal per capita taxes ends Saturday. Taxes paid after June 1 will be accepted at penalty value. The entire bill must be sent with payment, especially if a receipt is requested. Enclose a self-addressed, stamped envelope with payment. Office hours are 6 to 7 p.m. Mondays and 1 to 2 p.m. Saturdays. If office hours are inconvenient, payment arrangements can be made by calling John at 570-288-9640. WILKES-BARRE — The Lu-

ELECTION Continued from Page 3A

Yenkevich, 1,747; Mariano, 1,585; and Chirico, 1,515. A combined 273 Democrats picked Hahn in the two counties. The Democratic tallies for the seven contenders: Mehalick, 1,924; Chapman, 1,879; O’Donnell, 1,862; Yenkevich, 1,691; John, 1,611; Mariano, 1,333; and Chirico, 1,265. If these results stand, Chapman, Mehalick and O’Donnell secured nominations to appear on both party ballots in November. John would be the fourth ballot contender on the Republi-

GRIFFITH Continued from Page 3A

exist if the county had filed the criminal charges against Griffith instead of the state. At a preliminary hearing on the civil suit last week, Elliott, Greenleaf & Dean presented legal arguments for dismissing the case. County Senior Judge Charles Brown has not issued a ruling. Pedri said he won’t file notice of the lawyer change until the ruling because Griffith and the county won’t need further representation if the suit does not proceed. Shoval, who serves on the board of the nonprofit CityVest, which owns the Hotel Sterling in downtown Wilkes-Barre, alleges Griffith recorded a March 29 telephone conversation Shoval had with him without Shoval’s knowledge or consent. Shoval seeks damages for viola-

zerne County Treasurer’s Office says the face period for 2013 county real estate collection of tax bills ends Saturday. Because this falls on a day the courthouse is not open for business, the Treasurer’s Office will collect taxes for properties in Wilkes-Barre, Nanticoke and Pittston at the face amount on Monday. The Treasurer’s Office is on the first floor of the courthouse. Hours of operation are 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Payments with a clearly visible postmark of June 3 or earlier will be accepted at face amount. Mail both parts of tax bill with a self-addressed, stamped envelope if a receipt is requested. To make a payment online, visit www.paylocalgov.com/ luzernecounty-pa. A convenience fee of 2.4 percent will be applied to credit card payments

or a $3.95 flat fee to Visa debit cards by the payment processing company.

can side, while Yenkevich would be the fourth Democratic candidate. Election officials in Carbon and Schuylkill counties said they are proceeding with certification of their election results and haven’t received indications any candidates or Luzerne County will challenge the results. Carbon County Elections Director Lisa Dart said she does not know how a special election with the same candidates would be structured. Two county municipalities — Banks Township and Beaver Meadows Borough — fall in the Hazleton Area School District, and roughly 700 voters cast ballots in the two.

“I believe the only people eligible to vote again would be the ones who voted last week,� Dart said. Would these voters be required to appear at polling locations again, or could they vote by absentee ballots because of the unusual situation, she wonders. 2nd challenge possible If the nominees changed as a result of a new election, the candidates who went from winners to losers may then have an opportunity to challenge the new results, Dart said. Butera said the three candidates who secured both party nominations could end up losing a second time around.

tion of the state wiretap law and invasion of privacy. Griffith, who recently won the Republican nomination for a second four-year term as controller, faces three counts of “intercept communications� in the criminal case. Each violation carries a maximum sentence of seven years.

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ASHLEY — Ashley Borough Council announced the second half of the trash and recycling fee for 2013 will be collected in the secretary’s office through June and July, starting June 4. Office hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday and 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday. The mandatory fee is $115 until July 31. After this date, a $10 late fee is assessed. Citations will be issued for non-payment. Stickers may be obtained by sending a check or money order payable to Ashley Borough to 10 N. Main St., Ashley, or by depositing payment in the drop-off box in the vestibule of the Municipal Building. When using this method, add $1.80 for postage and allow sufficient mailing time for delivery of stickers.

Continued from Page 3A

will hit higher education. Selingo did more research and wrote a book designed to help parents and students know what to look for and expect. “My contention is that in the future there are going to be many different pathways to and through college; College in the future will be, as the title says, unbound.� The traditional, four-yearsin-one-place model has already eroded, as colleges increasingly mix Internet-only, classroom-only and hybrid courses. A few colleges have dropped the “120 credits for a degree� mantra completely, testing students when they enter and letting them study what they need as they need it.

At Western University, where such “competencybased� learning has been fully embraced, Selingo noted, the average time to a bachelor’s degree is 2.5 years at an average cost of $18,000. Big changes are necessary because the old system no longer works, Selingo argues. “We talk about how great the American higher education system is.� he said. “But 400,000 students drop out of college every year.� A big reason for that is soaring costs, but it’s also a lack of information when students pick a college. Giving students greater flexibility in how they earn their degree — including cooperation among colleges, real world learning experience worth college credits, and travel abroad — can change that equation. Selingo said his book

is designed to help make better choices in higher education. It can also help keep college grads in smaller communities such as the Wyoming Valley. “I talk about Wilkes-Barre at the end of my book,� he said, noting that the rate of students attending college varied little among lower and higher income cities 30 years ago, but that a gap has grown. “If you come from a family that makes more than $90,000 a year, you have a one in two chance of getting a bachelor’s degree by age 25,� Selingo said. “If you come from a family that makes under $35,000, you have a one in 17 chance. “And even if you graduate here, you tend to gravitate elsewhere, where the jobs are. Until you break that cycle, places like Wilkes-Barre will never keep up with other cities.�

“A lot of crazy things could happen with a new election,� he said. The election board will meet at 5:30 p.m. Monday night — the location has not yet been finalized — to certify the election results and discuss other business. Butera said the board will comply with council’s resolution to investigate primary election problems and report findings to council on June 25. Election Board member John Newman said the election office has been busy tallying hundreds of write-in votes in municipal races and verifying that the winning nominees are eligible to hold office.

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Or Visit ShurSave Supermarkets on Facebook Or Visit Times Leader.com and click on the ShurSave Corner Butcher Ad!! Or type this link into your browser www.timesleader.com/shursavecontest?template=pagenorail Winners will be announced on the Times Leader Front Page News Note on July 15th!

Winners will be drawn from all entries received by Sunday, June 30th, 2013. Winners will be contacted and announced on tlgets.me/shursave after July 15th, 2013. No purchase necessary. Must be 18 years old or older to enter. Prizes have no cash value and are nontransferable. Sponsors, employees and their immediate families are not eligible to enter.

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C M Y K PAGE 4A

N E W S

Thursday, May 30, 2013

MUNICIPAL BRIEFS DURYEA — The Duryea Borough Sewer Authority will meet Monday at 7 p.m. LUZERNE — John Lohman, tax collector, says the face period for 2013 county/municipal real estate property taxes and municipal per capita taxes ends Saturday. Taxes paid after June 1 will be accepted at penalty value. The entire bill must be sent with payment, especially if a receipt is requested. Enclose a self-addressed, stamped envelope with payment. Office hours are 6 to 7 p.m. Mondays and 1 to 2 p.m. Saturdays. If office hours are inconvenient, payment arrangements can be made by calling John at 570-288-9640. WILKES-BARRE — The Lu-

ELECTION Continued from Page 3A

Yenkevich, 1,747; Mariano, 1,585; and Chirico, 1,515. A combined 273 Democrats picked Hahn in the two counties. The Democratic tallies for the seven contenders: Mehalick, 1,924; Chapman, 1,879; O’Donnell, 1,862; Yenkevich, 1,691; John, 1,611; Mariano, 1,333; and Chirico, 1,265. If these results stand, Chapman, Mehalick and O’Donnell secured nominations to appear on both party ballots in November. John would be the fourth ballot contender on the Republi-

GRIFFITH Continued from Page 3A

exist if the county had filed the criminal charges against Griffith instead of the state. At a preliminary hearing on the civil suit last week, Elliott, Greenleaf & Dean presented legal arguments for dismissing the case. County Senior Judge Charles Brown has not issued a ruling. Pedri said he won’t file notice of the lawyer change until the ruling because Griffith and the county won’t need further representation if the suit does not proceed. Shoval, who serves on the board of the nonprofit CityVest, which owns the Hotel Sterling in downtown Wilkes-Barre, alleges Griffith recorded a March 29 telephone conversation Shoval had with him without Shoval’s knowledge or consent. Shoval seeks damages for viola-

zerne County Treasurer’s Office says the face period for 2013 county real estate collection of tax bills ends Saturday. Because this falls on a day the courthouse is not open for business, the Treasurer’s Office will collect taxes for properties in Wilkes-Barre, Nanticoke and Pittston at the face amount on Monday. The Treasurer’s Office is on the first floor of the courthouse. Hours of operation are 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Payments with a clearly visible postmark of June 3 or earlier will be accepted at face amount. Mail both parts of tax bill with a self-addressed, stamped envelope if a receipt is requested. To make a payment online, visit www.paylocalgov.com/ luzernecounty-pa. A convenience fee of 2.4 percent will be applied to credit card payments

or a $3.95 flat fee to Visa debit cards by the payment processing company.

can side, while Yenkevich would be the fourth Democratic candidate. Election officials in Carbon and Schuylkill counties said they are proceeding with certification of their election results and haven’t received indications any candidates or Luzerne County will challenge the results. Carbon County Elections Director Lisa Dart said she does not know how a special election with the same candidates would be structured. Two county municipalities — Banks Township and Beaver Meadows Borough — fall in the Hazleton Area School District, and roughly 700 voters cast ballots in the two.

“I believe the only people eligible to vote again would be the ones who voted last week,� Dart said. Would these voters be required to appear at polling locations again, or could they vote by absentee ballots because of the unusual situation, she wonders. 2nd challenge possible If the nominees changed as a result of a new election, the candidates who went from winners to losers may then have an opportunity to challenge the new results, Dart said. Butera said the three candidates who secured both party nominations could end up losing a second time around.

tion of the state wiretap law and invasion of privacy. Griffith, who recently won the Republican nomination for a second four-year term as controller, faces three counts of “intercept communications� in the criminal case. Each violation carries a maximum sentence of seven years.

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SELINGO

ASHLEY — Ashley Borough Council announced the second half of the trash and recycling fee for 2013 will be collected in the secretary’s office through June and July, starting June 4. Office hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday and 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday. The mandatory fee is $115 until July 31. After this date, a $10 late fee is assessed. Citations will be issued for non-payment. Stickers may be obtained by sending a check or money order payable to Ashley Borough to 10 N. Main St., Ashley, or by depositing payment in the drop-off box in the vestibule of the Municipal Building. When using this method, add $1.80 for postage and allow sufficient mailing time for delivery of stickers.

Continued from Page 3A

will hit higher education. Selingo did more research and wrote a book designed to help parents and students know what to look for and expect. “My contention is that in the future there are going to be many different pathways to and through college; College in the future will be, as the title says, unbound.� The traditional, four-yearsin-one-place model has already eroded, as colleges increasingly mix Internet-only, classroom-only and hybrid courses. A few colleges have dropped the “120 credits for a degree� mantra completely, testing students when they enter and letting them study what they need as they need it.

At Western University, where such “competencybased� learning has been fully embraced, Selingo noted, the average time to a bachelor’s degree is 2.5 years at an average cost of $18,000. Big changes are necessary because the old system no longer works, Selingo argues. “We talk about how great the American higher education system is.� he said. “But 400,000 students drop out of college every year.� A big reason for that is soaring costs, but it’s also a lack of information when students pick a college. Giving students greater flexibility in how they earn their degree — including cooperation among colleges, real world learning experience worth college credits, and travel abroad — can change that equation. Selingo said his book

is designed to help make better choices in higher education. It can also help keep college grads in smaller communities such as the Wyoming Valley. “I talk about Wilkes-Barre at the end of my book,� he said, noting that the rate of students attending college varied little among lower and higher income cities 30 years ago, but that a gap has grown. “If you come from a family that makes more than $90,000 a year, you have a one in two chance of getting a bachelor’s degree by age 25,� Selingo said. “If you come from a family that makes under $35,000, you have a one in 17 chance. “And even if you graduate here, you tend to gravitate elsewhere, where the jobs are. Until you break that cycle, places like Wilkes-Barre will never keep up with other cities.�

“A lot of crazy things could happen with a new election,� he said. The election board will meet at 5:30 p.m. Monday night — the location has not yet been finalized — to certify the election results and discuss other business. Butera said the board will comply with council’s resolution to investigate primary election problems and report findings to council on June 25. Election Board member John Newman said the election office has been busy tallying hundreds of write-in votes in municipal races and verifying that the winning nominees are eligible to hold office.

AFTER 62 YEARS, CHANCES ARE...

We Have Taken Care Of Your Grandfather or Grandmother

Maybe You

Mom or Dad

Or Even Your Children

GENERATIONS OF CARING FOR YOUR FAMILY AND WE ARE SO PROUD OF IT!!! MAY IS BETTER HEARING MONTH. CALL FOR YOUR HEARING TEST TODAY. David A. Wadas, Au.D. Denise Prislupski, Au.D. Doctors of Audiology

Audiology & Hearing CENTERS of NEPA

Carpet Clearance Outlet Wilkes-Barre Blvd. Wilkes-Barre • 826-1806

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

www.audiologyhearing.com

Scranton 343-7710

Peckville 383-0500

Wilkes-Barre 822-6122

REFINANCE YOUR 1ST MORTGAGES ENDS MAY 31ST

Selling Your Home?

CALL US FIRST!

Our team is dedicated to giving you

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Schiel’s Shursave Market Butcher Paul Lucas Tell Us Who Your Favorite ShurSave Corner Butcher Is! Name your favorite ShurSave Corner Butcher and Enter For A Chance To Win A Share $1000 In ShurSave Gift Cards! There will be 20 $50 Gift Card Winners!

ÂŽ

How to Enter Mail Your Entry to:

4.24% 3.74%*

*

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Times Leader Who’s Your ShurSave Corner Butcher 15 North Main Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711

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PENN-LEE FOOTWEAR (THE OLD FASHIONED SHOE STORE) Open Mon. to Fri. 9-8 • Sat 9-5 • Sunday 12-5 163 E. Main St. (Miners-Mills Section) of Wilkes-Barre Phone 825-5346

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Name________________________________________________________________________ Address_____________________________________________________________________ Phone Number_______________________________________________________________ Email________________________________________________________________________ Who’s Your ShurSave Corner Butcher? Butcher Name________________________ShurSave Store________________________ Or Scan this QR Code To Enter.

Or Visit ShurSave Supermarkets on Facebook Or Visit Times Leader.com and click on the ShurSave Corner Butcher Ad!! Or type this link into your browser www.timesleader.com/shursavecontest?template=pagenorail Winners will be announced on the Times Leader Front Page News Note on July 15th!

Winners will be drawn from all entries received by Sunday, June 30th, 2013. Winners will be contacted and announced on tlgets.me/shursave after July 15th, 2013. No purchase necessary. Must be 18 years old or older to enter. Prizes have no cash value and are nontransferable. Sponsors, employees and their immediate families are not eligible to enter.

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Wyoming Valley Motors       570-714-9924     


C MY K N A T I O N

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

&

W O R L D

Thursday, May 30, 2013

PAGE 5A

Health care policies may miss mark

IN BRIEF

Affordable Care Act to prompt cancellation this fall of noncompliant policies. By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Many people who buy their own health insurance could get surprises in the mail this fall: cancellation notices because their current policies aren’t up to the basic standards of President Barack Obama’s health care law. They, and some small businesses, will have to find replacement plans — and that

has some state insurance officials worried about consumer confusion. Rollout of Obama the Affordable Care Act is going full speed ahead, despite repeal efforts by congressional Republicans. New insurance markets called exchanges are to open in every state this fall. Middle-class consumers who don’t get coverage on the job will be able to pick private health plans, while low-income people will

be steered to an expanded version of Medicaid in states that accept it. The goal is to cover most of the nation’s nearly 50 million uninsured, but even Obama says there will be bumps in the road. And discontinued insurance plans could be another bump. Also, it doesn’t seem to square with one of the president’s best known promises about his health care overhaul: “If you like your health care plan, you’ll be able to keep your health care plan.” But supporters of the overhaul are betting that consumers won’t object once they

realize the coverage they will get under the new law is superior to current bare-bones insurance. For example, insurers will no longer be able to turn people down because of medical problems. Other bumps on the road to the new health care law include potentially unaffordable premiums for smokers unless states act to waive them, a new $63-per-head fee that will hit companies already providing coverage to employees and dependents, and a long-term care insurance program that had to be canceled because of the risk it could go belly up The Obama administration

did not respond directly to questions about the potential fallout from cancellation notices. Instead, Health and Human Services spokeswoman Joanne Peters released a prepared statement saying: “Beginning in October, individuals and small businesses will be able to shop for insurance in the marketplace, where we are already seeing that increased competition and transparency are leading to a range of options for quality, affordable plans.” Large employer plans that cover most workers and their families are unlikely to be affected.

AP PHOTO

Into the wild blue yonder

Graduating Air Force cadets throw their caps Wednesday at the completion of the commencement ceremony for the class of 2013 at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado. In the background, a group of World War II warplanes do a flyover.

Railways unsafe? Don’t be so sure

One cool polar bear display

SEATTLE

Plea pending in massacre

T

he Army staff sergeant charged with slaughtering 16 villagers during one of the worst atrocities of the Afghanistan war has agreed to plead guilty in a deal to avoid the death penalty, his attorney told The Associated Press on Wednesday. Staff Sgt. Robert Bales is scheduled to enter guilty pleas to charges of premeditated murder June 5 at Joint Base Lewis-McChord south of Seattle, said lawyer John Henry Browne. A sentencing-phase trial set for September will determine whether he is sentenced to life in prison with or life without the possibility of parole. The judge and commanding general must approve a plea deal.

Statistics show train accidents, fatalities on decline nationally over past decade. By JOSH FUNK AP Business Writer

PROVIDENCE, R.I.

Chafee plans party switch

Independent Rhode Island Gov. Lincoln Chafee is joining the Democratic Party ahead of his 2014 bid for a second term, his spokeswoman said Wednesday, confirming a move that Chafee has been talking about for months as a way to better position himself for re-election. Chafee would not immediately address his party switch when asked about it Wednesday after he exited a ferry from Block Island to the mainland, saying only that he would be announce his decision at his local board of canvassers this morning. The governor, a former Republican senator, became a political independent in 2007, the year after he lost re-election to the U.S. Senate.

CHICAGO

Study: Stop infections via ICU

Infections in U.S. hospitals kill tens of thousands of people each year, and many institutions fight back by screening new patients to see if they carry a dangerous germ, and isolating those who do. But a big study suggests a far more effective approach: Decontaminating every patient in intensive care. Washing everyone with antiseptic wipes and giving them antibiotic nose ointment reduced bloodstream infections dramatically in the study at more than 40 U.S. hospitals. The practice could prove controversial, because it would involve even uninfected patients and because experts say it could lead to germs becoming more resistant to antibiotics. But it worked better than screening methods, now required in nine states.

BEIRUT

Assad eyeing 2014 election

Syria’s foreign minister laid out a hard line Wednesday, insisting that Bashar Assad will remain Syria’s president at least until elections in 2014 and might run for another term, conditions that will make it difficult for Syria’s opposition to agree to U.N.-sponsored talks on ending Syria’s civil war. Any deal reached in such talks would have to be put to a referendum, Walid al-Moallem said in a TV interview, introducing a new condition that could complicate efforts by the U.S. and Russia to bring the two sides together at an international conference in Geneva, possibly next month. The comments by al-Moallem, a regime stalwart with decades in top positions, reflected a new confidence by Assad’s government. , which had seemed near collapse during a rebel offensive last summer but has scored a number of battlefield successes in recent weeks.

AP PHOTO

I

nuka, the first polar bear born in the tropics, swims in his new enclosure at the Singapore Zoo on Wednesday. Modeled closely after the arctic habitat, the enclosure helps replicate the climate of the arctic by including an ice cave and a large pool filled with giant ice blocks.

Rep. Bachmann: I’m not returning The tea party favorite is not seeking re-election to fifth term. The Associated Press

ST. PAUL, Minn. — Michele Bachmann, the Minnesota congresswoman whose sharply conservative views on social and fiscal issues elevated her to a leader of the tea party movement, announced Wednesday she will not seek a fifth term but insisted the decision was unrelated to ethics inquiries or her near-loss last fall. It was a sudden turn for the fostermom-turned-politician. She left the door open to other, unspecified political options. Bachmann was traveling in Russia as part of a congressional delegation and

was not available for interviews. In a lengthy video message to supporters, she said her decision “was not influenced by any concerns about my being re-elected.” Ron Carey, a former chief of staff to Bachmann, said he suspects she was anticipating a tough battle ahead and seemed to be stuck in place in Congress. “This is a great chance to exit stage right rather than have a knockdown, drag-out re-election fight,” said Carey, also a former state GOP chairman. “The reality also set in that she is not a favorite of Republican leadership, so she is not going to be rising up to a committee chair or rising up in leadership.” Her departure next year is part of a larger shift involving the leading per-

AP PHOTO

Rep. Michele Bachmann, R- Minn., will not run for re-election in 2014.

sonalities of the tea party. Stalwarts like former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, former Rep. Allen West of Florida and former South Carolina Sen. Jim DeMint have left elected office to move into conservative organizations and commentary roles.

Weather Service is upgrading computers Forecasters: $25 million project needed to better protect public from storms. By TAMARA LUSH Associated Press

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — When forecasters from the National Weather Service track a hurricane, they use models from several different supercomputers located around the world to create their predictions. Some of those models are more accurate than others. During Hurricane Sandy last October, for instance, the model from the European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasting in the United Kingdom predicted eight days before landfall that the large storm would

hit the East Coast, while the American supercomputer model showed Sandy drifting out to sea. The American model eventually predicted Sandy’s landfall four days before the storm hit — plenty of time for preparation — but revealed a potential weakness in the American computer compared to the European system. It left some meteorologists fuming. “Let me be blunt: The state of operational U.S. numerical weather prediction is an embarrassment to the nation and it does not have to be this way,” wrote Cliff Maas, a professor of atmospheric sciences at the University of Washington on his weather blog. Meteorologists agree that the two American supercom-

AP PHOTO

National Hurricane Center Director Rick Knabb talks about the pending 2013 Atlantic hurricane season.

puters that provide storm models are underpowered — which is why the National Weather Service plans on upgrading those computers in the next two years. The two main forecasting com-

puters — one in Orlando, Fla. and the other in Reston, Va., — will receive $25 million in upgrades as part of the Hurricane Sandy supplemental bill that was recently approved by Congress.

OMAHA, Neb. — The nation’s railroads are safer than ever, despite recent high-profile accidents such as this week’s fiery derailment in Maryland. Derailments and crossing accidents have steadily declined nationwide even as businesses have come to increasingly rely on trains to move their raw materials and products. The number of train accidents fell 43 percent to 1,712 between 2003 and last year, while the number of incidents at rail crossings dropped 34 percent to 1,960. And the total number of deaths declined 19 percent to 705 over the decade. Railroads have been investing in their equipment and track, their employee training and in technological tools to help detect problems before they can derail a train. Fewer derailments means fewer delayed deliveries and less need for railroads to reroute traffic for hours or even days. That all helps the industry’s bottom line. “There’s a strong incentive in the industry to maintain and invest in infrastructure,” said Allan Zarembski, an industry veteran who now leads the railroad engineering and safety program at the University of Delaware. “Last year was the safest year on record for the railroad industry,” said Federal Railroad Administration spokesman Warren Flatau. That might surprise anyone who saw the video of a smoldering CSX train after a chemicalfueled explosion near Baltimore Tuesday. Early indications are that the train struck a truck at a private crossing before the derailment. The Maryland accident comes on the heels of the derailment of a commuter train in Bridgeport, Conn., earlier this month. More than 70 people were injured when a second train struck the one that derailed. And last weekend, a freight train crash in Rockview, Mo., injured seven people and destroyed a highway overpass, which could take a year to repair. A trust fund should be established to ensure the upkeep and safety of the nation’s rail system, U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut said Wednesday, labeling the recent incidents a call to action. “Lack of public trust and confidence in safety and reliability threaten to undermine the entire rail system,” Blumenthal said.


C MY K N E W S

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Josephine Pavlico May 28, 2013

J

osephine Pavlico, 93, of Pittston, peacefully entered into the arms of the Lord, her savior, on Tuesday evening, May 28, 2013, surrounded by her daughter, Joann, and granddaughter, Melissa, at the Partridge-Tippett Nursing Facility in the Wesley Village Campus, Jenkins Township, where she had been a guest for the past year. She was the widow of Joseph Pavlico, who passed away on June 6, 1985. Born and raised in Pittston, she was a daughter of the late John and Stephanie Wrezneski Goretski. She was educated in area schools. Prior to retirement, she was employed by the Pittston Hospital, Pittston Apparel and WilkesBarre General Hospital. She was a member of St. John the Evangelist Church, Pittston. Josephine was unconditionally dedicated to those closest to her. A woman of devout faith and the heart of her family, she shared her unwavering spirituality through her tireless Catholic example of good works and kindness to all. She imparted her wisdom and joy upon others and gave selflessly of herself to those she loved. She faced life’s obstacles with great resilience and enduring strength. Josephine was happiest when she was able to assist others and offer compassion, support and encouragement. Her greatest passions included gardening, quilting, reading, playing bingo, attending Mass and cooking. She was a true servant at heart and faithfully cared for family and friends through delicious cooking and baking from scratch. She is most well-known for her homemade, delicious, one-of-akind cannolis, a recipe that she created. There simply was not a person who tasted her cannolis and did not find them to be the best around. Josephine was truly an angel on earth to so many and will continue to be an angel in heaven, protecting and watching over those she loved. She was the longest-living member of her family. In addition to her parents and husband, she was preceded in death by her sisters, Lottie Ostrowski, Peggy Rikuta and Stella Waseleski; brothers, Eddie, Anthony, Bernie, Joseph and Johnny; her beloved dogs, Buttons and Fluffy. She is survived by her loving and faithful daughter, Joann Sulima, and her husband, Jerry, Jenkins Township; devoted and dearest granddaughter, attorney Melissa Sulima, Jenkins Town-

PAGE

CARING Continued from Page 3A

ship; dear daughter, Elizabeth Masters, and her husband, Garry, Hunlock Creek; grandchildren, Steven Kazmierski, Wilkes-Barre, and April Weaver and her husband, Zac, Brookville; dear son, James Pavlico, and his wife, Karen, Luzerne; grandchildren, Tracy and Joseph, at home; three greatgrandchildren, Haley Kazmierski, Ella and Hank Weaver; sister-inlaw, Agnes Neff, and her husband, William, Pittston; numerous nieces and nephews. Her daughter Joann and granddaughter Melissa thank the nurses and staff of Wesley Village, Partridge-Tippet Nursing Facility, South Unit for the loving and outstanding care and endless compassion they gave Josephine. Their presence in her life throughout the past year filled all her days with happiness, laughter and smiles. Her passing is not marked by sadness for her but by peace, for she has been reunited with the Lord. Her life is celebrated through the remembrance of and gratitude for the innumerable wonderful memories that exist. Her spirit will continue to shine light and provide guidance and immeasurable love for those closest to her. The funeral will be held at 8:45 a.m. Saturday from Baloga Funeral Home Inc., 1201 Main St., Pittston (Port Griffith), with a Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in St. John the Evangelist Church, William Street, Pittston. Interment will be in Mount Olivet Cemetery, Carverton. Relatives and friends may pay their respects 5 to 8 p.m. Friday at the funeral home. In lieu of flowers, contributions in Josephine’s memory may be made to the Greater Pittston Food Pantry, 37 William St., Pittston, PA 18640. For directions or to send an online condolence, please visit www. balogafuneralhome.com.

Albert M. Draina May 28, 2013 Albert M. Draina, 84, formerly of Hanover Township, passed away peacefully Tuesday in Celtic Care, Geisinger South Wilkes-Barre, surrounded by his family. He was born in Hanover Township on June 8, 1928, a son of the late Andrew and Helen Kotalick. Albert graduated from Hanover Memorial High School, class of 1945, and served in the U.S. Army during World War II. He was employed as a coordination contractor for Wickes Lumber. He was a member and former director of the Catholic War Veterans, Post 274. He was a member of St. Leo’s/Holy Rosary Church, Ashley, and was a former committee member of the Republican Party in Hanover Township.

Thursday, May 30,

He was preceded in death by his wife of 28 years, the former Ruth Tomczyk; sisters Irene Walton, Rita Draina and Mary Tate; brothers Aloysius, Andrew and Robert. Surviving are a daughter, Gail, West Wyoming; son Gregory and his wife, Mary; son Allen and his wife, Donna; grandchildren, Jill, Gregg and Alex; great-grandchildren, David, Maria, Kyle, Megan and Addison; sisters Em Myzick, Maryland, and Betsy Flores, Virginia; brothers Richard, Texas, and William, Florida; numerous nieces and nephews. Funeral will be at 10:30 a.m. Saturday from the Charles V. Sherbin Funeral Home, 630 Main Road, Hanover Township, followed by a Mass of Christian Burial in St. Leo’s/Holy Rosary Church, Ashley. Interment will be in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Hanover Township. Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m. Friday at the funeral home.

MORE OBITUARIES, Page 6A

“This is my third year with the Day of Caring,” she said. “And it makes me feel better each year. If everyone gave eight hours of their time to volunteer, it would make a big difference in the community.” Parks get helping hand At the River Common Park along River Street, volunteers from Sallie Mae, Mondelez International and Pennsylvania American Water Co. were busy picking up litter and pulling weeds. Bill Konsavage, Tarynne Wolfe and Brian Stubbs agreed that their efforts and that of the other volunteers really made a difference in the community. “I was surprised when I heard how many people were volunteering,” Konsavage said. Wolfe, who has participated in the event for nine years, said she felt good “to be part of something that has so much meaning.” Elizabeth Shafer of Pennsylvania American Water is a 17year veteran of Day of Caring. She and 34 co-workers were enjoying the sunshine and the satisfaction of helping others.

FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

United Way President and CEO William Jones addresses the volunteers gathered at a breakfast held Wednesday at the Woodlands Inn and Resort in Plains Township.

“It’s important to give back to the community,” she said. John Maday, of the Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Commerce and a member of the Riverfront Parks Committee, said the cleanup efforts on both sides of the Susquehanna River were needed as RiverFest 2013 approaches. The event is scheduled for June 21-23. Michael Zimmerman, execu-

Corporate Award (more than 100 employees): Blue Cross of NEPA; United Way Corporate Award (fewer than 100 employees): The Citizens’ Voice; Rose Brader Community Service Award: Gary H. Williams; United Way Sam Bianco Labor Award: UFCW Local 1776; Sarah & Anthony F. Kane Jr. Achievement Award: Kevin Sickle.

Parents of hit-and-run victim file civil suit against Letteers Suspect and his father sued in death of Kevin Miller, the 5-year-old struck and killed by a vehicle on Dec. 21, 2012. By STEVE MOCARSKY smocarsky@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE — The parents of Kevin Miller, the 5-year-old struck and killed by a vehicle Dec. 21, 2012, have filed a civil lawsuit against the man charged in the hit-and-run case and the man’s father. Stephen and Caroline Miller, of Orchard Lane, Dallas, filed the suit against Thomas W. Letteer Jr. and his father, Thomas W. Letteer Sr., both of Mack Street, Plains Township, on Wednesday in Luzerne County Court of Common Pleas. As administer of her son’s estate, Caroline Miller is demanding compensatory and punitive damages in excess of $50,000 and all other relief the court finds just and proper in each count of the seven-count lawsuit. Letteer was arrested on April 11 and charged with one count of accidents involving death. He is free on $200,000 bail. The lawsuit alleges that Letteer Jr., while recklessly driving his father’s 1999 Pontiac Grand Am east on North Street in Wilkes-Barre at about 10:50 p.m. on Dec. 21 in the area of 47 W. North St., struck and killed Kevin Miller while he was lawfully and properly crossing North Street at an intersection with his father.

police blotter SCRANTON — A man wanted in a 2012 homicide in Florida was captured in Dickson City on Tuesday, U.S. Marshal Martin J. Pane said in a news release. Arthur Spencer, 20, was apprehended by the U.S. Marshals Service in the 900 block of West Lackawanna Avenue. He was turned over to the Dickson City Police Department for processing and to await extradition to Florida. An arrest warrant was issued

The lawsuit states the impact propelled Miller onto the hood/front bumper of the Grand Am and caused him to be thrown, pushed and/or dragged a substantial distance. “Letteer Jr. struck Kevin Francis Miller with such force that Kevin Miller was pulled from his father’s grasp and knocked … out of his shoes,” the lawsuit states. The suit goes on to allege that Letteer Jr. failed to stop and “knowingly fled the scene of a collision.” The lawsuit also alleges Letteer Jr. operated the vehicle with the express and/ or implied consent of his father, and his father, prior to Dec. 21, had knowledge or reason to know that Letteer Jr. “drove dangerously, recklessly, unreasonably, upon public roadways and further drove after consuming alcoholic beverages to the point of intoxication.” The lawsuit goes on to allege that Letteer Jr. was intoxicated when the Grand Am struck Kevin Miller and that Letteer Sr. granted his son his express and/or implied permission to drive the car knowing or having reason to know his son drove the car after consuming alcohol to the point of intoxication and/or knowing or having reason to know that his son lacked the capacity to drive safely. The seven counts include: • Survival action, seeking compensation for Kevin Miller’s pain and suffering, his emotional distress and his financial

for Spencer on May 24 charging him with homicide in Lake County, Fla. Spencer and four co-defendants allegedly invaded a home in Clemont, Fla., and shot a man multiple times on May 22, 2012, according to the news release. Pane said the Lake County Sheriff’s Office requested assistance from the U.S. Marshals Service Regional Fugitive Task Force in Florida. Information was developed on the possible whereabouts of Spencer in Lackawanna County. U.S. Marshals in Florida

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tive director at Family Service Association of Wyoming Valley, said the work being done by volunteers may not be possible if it had to come out of his budget. “This event helps so many agencies that help many people. It may seem like a little thing, but it all adds up to a lot,” he said. At the breakfast, five awards were presented: United Way

| www.bcnepa.com

losses. • Wrongful death, seeking compensation for funeral expenses, expenses of administration, plaintiffs’ deprivation and injury as a result of the loss of support, society, consortium, companionship, comfort, aid, association, care and services of Kevin Miller, value of loss of services and household contributions. • Negligent infliction of emotional distress on Stephen and Caroline Miller, who witnessed their son being struck. • Negligent infliction of emotional distress on Stephen and Christopher Miller, who witnessed their brother being struck. The parents and their surviving children also suffered conditions requiring professional treatment with physicians, psychiatrists, psychologists, professionals and counselors, the lawsuit states. • Negligent entrustment, alleging that Letteer Sr. negligently entrusted his vehicle to his son without ensuring his son was capable of safely driving it. • Intentional spoilation of evidence, in that Letteer Jr. allegedly fled the scene, depriving investigators the opportunity to conduct a thorough forensic investigation of the vehicle. The count asks for the assessment of punitive damages based on spoilation of evidence. • Loss of filial consortium, allowing for compensatory damages. Each count seeks punitive damages as well.

contacted the Middle District of Pennsylvania Fugitive Task Force, which located Spencer in Dickson City. HAZLETON — City police reported the following: • Property was stolen during a burglary of an apartment in the 400 block of East Broad Street on Tuesday. • Police said a vehicle fire is under investigation in the area of West Fourth and North Sherman Court early Wednesday morning. • Police said they are search-

ing for a white Pomeranian dog that bit a 12-year-old girl in the area of 70 S. Locust St. at about 12:55 a.m. Tuesday. The girl was bitten on her lower lip and treated at Hazleton General Hospital. • Joel Santiago and Miguel Nieves reported Tuesday that an unknown person burglarized their apartment in the 200 block of West Fern Street. • PPL Electric Utilities reported Tuesday that an unknown person damaged a transmission line in the area of South Poplar Street that caused a power outage to 12 homes.


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Thursday, May 30, 2013

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Holy Redeemer grads celebrate Holy Redeemer Class of 2013 Valedictorian: Cassandra Gill Salutatorian: Cody James Januszko Graduates: Vito Thomas Aiello Sara Emily Altemose Vincent James Amarando Nicholas Joseph Ambrulavage Danielle Elizabeth Angle Mathijs Arts Jeremy Jacob Astolfi Emily Jeanne Becker Fallyn Marie Boich James R. Bond Amy Nicole Boris Krzysztof Michael Bozentka Abigail Ann Bruno Meghan Ann Burns Taylor Lynne Christina Burwell Nadine Marie Carlo John Cecere Bethany Veronica Chmil Cornelia Catherine Chmil Rachael Catherine Coassolo Matthew Timothy Collins Thomas Shea Cosgrove Matthew Robert Michael Crofchick Kelsey Lynn Crossin Melissa R. Cruz Elizabeth Erin DeMichele Kaitlyn Nichole Donnelly Tyler Edward Daniel Dougherty Marissa Ann Durako Elizabeth Marie Eaton Tyler Michael Elias Callie Evans George Patrick Evans Michael Joseph Faux Shane Thomas Flannery Mitchell W. Ford Joshua Allen Foust Brianne Elizabeth Frascella Kyle Patrick Gainard Eric Thomas Gdovin Sophīa Leanore Geiser Alexandra Adriana Gentilesco Erica Marie Gernhart Cassandra Gill Clarissa Gingell Danielle Nicole Gorski Margaret Mary Guarnieri Daniel J.C. Gushanas Tricia Jacqueline Harenza Jeremy M. Heiser Krista Ann Heller Autumn Rose Henrie Richard Joshua Hoggarth Dakota Leigh Hollock-Sinclair Matthew Jason DelBalso Isely John Joseph Jablowski III Louis Alexander Jablowski Cody James Januszko Robert William Jones John Joseph Jurta Anna Christine Kachmarski Tyler Michael Kastendieck Geetika Khanna Eamon David Theodore Klinges Mary Kathryn Kolojejchick Maria Sara Kopczynski Kellie Marie Ann Kopko

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

H

oly Redeemer graduate Sarah Warnagiris of Hunlock Creek gets a kiss from her dad, Bob, outside the F.M. Kirby Center in Wilkes-Barre after commencement on Wednesday night. It was the school’s sixth commencement since the Wilkes-Barre Catholic high school was renamed. The Class of 2013 includes 157 members.

Michael Kosik Ann Olivia Kotch Sydney Leah Kotch Matthew Bernard Kotulak Nicholas Bernard Kotulak Jacob Walter Kozak John Edward Kozak Marnie Kusakavitch Katelyn Ann Laskowski Amanda Catherine Latoski Brendan Matthias Leahigh Ashley Marie Leighton Patrick Hoban Loftus Michael Charles LoGrande Thomas Daniel Madigan Julie Ann Mahle Alexandria Marie Malacari Selina Elizabeth Malacari Gerald Maloney Morgan Leigh Mancini Ennio Mancuso Tyler Joseph Margalski Andrew Alexander Mark Brandon Joseph Marx Violeta M. Mattei Nicholas Reilly McCarroll Stephanie Lorraine McCole Patrick Walsh McHale Derek Thomas McManus Maria Sophia Elizabeth Mengak Timothy Menta

Edmund Francis Meszczynski Kasey Lynn Miller Jason Michael Mitchell Jessica Marie Mitchell Michael Mocion Michael Morrison Louis Albert Murray Jeremy Edward Myslowski Angeli Nause Jenna Victoria Nitowski Nadia Attar Novak Devon Alexandra Nowicky Patrick F. O’Boyle, Jr. Noah Orlandini-Sapack Daniel Thomas Ostrowski Michael Charles Pahler Megan Lynn Phillips Samantha Mae Pierce Lauren Marie Pikul Brittany Ann Pilch Cameron J. Pinto Victoria L. Reggie Kayla Marie Rhiel Thérèse Anne Roughsedge Joseph E. Ruiz Grace Elizabeth Rychwalski Scott Calvin Safka Morgan Joseph Manuel Mark Santayana Daniel James Seasock Alexis Morgan Shemanski

Joshua Stephen Siecko Andrea Rose Siejna Grace M. Sipler Matthew Slavoski Cody Jay Smith Eva Marie Geneviève Smith Sydney Anne Burke Smith Joanna Marie Sobeck Rachel Mary Sowinski Christina Marie Springer Alexander David Stashik Shawn William Stefanski Kristen Leah Stepanski Alexander James Stevens Kaitlyn Marie Stochla Jacob Stone Frazee Cole Sutphen III Joseph Francis Szczechowicz III Leanne Theresa Tabit Ryan Joseph Tabit Teresa Ann Toomey Adam Tyler Turosky Aaron James Urbanski Sarah Nicole Warnagiris Christopher Robert Welgosh David Allan Wert Kelsey Williams Sarah Kathryn Williams Carleena Elizabeth Wozniak

2013 Scripps National Spelling Bee becomes family affair Multiple contestants in this L O O S E E L I M I N A T E D A F T E R E A R LY S U C C E S S year’s Scripps event following Grant Loose, a middle school 218 and corstudent at Wyoming Valley rectly spelled in a sibling’s footsteps. By JOSEPH WHITE AP Sports Writer

OXON HILL, Md. — She looks like her sister. She spells like her sister, tracing the letters on her palm as she calls out the letters. Her goal is become the back half of the first set of sibling champions in National Spelling Bee history. Eleven-year-old Vanya Shivashankar of Olathe, Kan., qualified Wednesday for the semifinals of the 86th Scripps National Spelling Bee. She handled “intaglio” and “horologium” with no problem. “My sister’s more like a bubbly person,” said Vanya’s sister, 2009 champion Kavya Shivashankar. “You can see that onstage, that she’s really excited to be there. I think I felt the same way, but it just showed dif-

West who won the regional bee sponsored by The Times Leader, was not listed among the 42 spellers who advanced through the Scripps National Spelling Bee preliminaries round on Wednesday. According to the spelling bee’s Twitter feed, Loose was Speller

“chauvinism” and “hegemonic” on Wednesday. But that alone wasn’t enough to earn him a place in today’s semifinals.

ferently.” Forty-two of the 281 spellers advanced, having tallied the most points in a formula that combined Wednesday’s onstage rounds with a computer test that included a section on vocabulary for the first time. Officials originally announced 41 semifinalists, but added one more after a review of the written test. The semifinals are this afternoon, with the finals set for tonight. The winner gets $30,000 in cash and prizes and

a huge trophy. Making the cut are several returning favorites, including a speller with a sibling story similar to the Shivashankars. Thirteen-year-old Arvind Mahankali of New York, who finished third each of the last two years, is getting eager support from 9-yearold brother Srinath. Two years ago, Arvind hilariously mispronounced “Jugendstil” as “You could steal” and saluted the crowd after he misspelled the word. Now he’s more

bit more low-key and appears unfazed by anything, while Srinath talks up a storm and playfully bragged he will need only one year to win the title once he makes the national bee. Eighteen spellers at this year’s bee have at least one relative who has competed previously. Vanya, who tied for 10th last year, isn’t the only one with a chance to make sibling history this year: 13-year-old Ashwin Veeramani of North Royalton, Ohio, is the brother of 2010 winner Anamika Veeramani. A win by Vanya, Arvind or Ashwin would continue the recent tradition of Indian-American winners. There have been five in a row and 10 of 14, a run that started in 1999 when Nupur Lala captured the title in 1999 and was later featured in the documentary “Spellbound.”

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Five sets of twins graduating from Holy Redeemer High School pose for a photo at the F.M. Kirby Center before commencement. Pairwise, from left: Comelia and Bethany Chmil, Louis and John Jablowski, John and Jacob Kozak, Ryan and Leanne Tabit, and Nick and Matt Kotulak.

TWINS Continued from Page 1A

157 grads — about 6 percent of the class. Not astronomical, but enough to make one (twin Louis Jablowski) muse “There must have been something in the water that year.” The second obvious question: How many of you used your twinship to play tricks on teachers. “I did,” Matt Kotulak said with a mischievous grin. Really, what was it? “No, I was just kidding, we never did that stuff.” C’mon. There are five sets of twins and 12 years of education — that’s 120 studentyears. What are the odds no one pulled a prank? “Well, there was the one time a teacher was going to give me detention, and when he asked my name I said John Jablowski,” Louis said with a chuckle. Did it work? “No, John was in his class, so the teacher knew him,” Louis added. Turns out the teacher wasn’t really going to send him to detention, either … until after the lie. OK, Cornelia and Bethany Chmil fessed up, “sometimes we would tell teachers we were the other one.” The joke wasn’t that teachers couldn’t tell them apart — they are fraternal twins who look a lot alike but are distinguishable. The joke was in confusing teachers about which name belonged to which face. One more obvious question: Five sets of twins at the nexus

between forced unity by dint of family and the free choice of adulthood; are you planning to go your separate ways and prove your independence, or do you find yourselves pursuing similar majors at the same college? “I’m going to Wilkes University,” Bethany Chmil said, “for pharmacy.” Sister Cornelia is headed to Misericordia University for speech pathology. Score one for “separate ways” then? “University of Pittsburgh for occupational therapy,” Leanne Tabit said, while brother Ryan is off to Drexel for bio-medical engineering. Rival cities in the same state, different segments of the medical profession … a psychologist could fill a treatise dissecting that one. “King’s College, undeclared,” Nick Kotulak said. Ditto brother Matt chimed. Hmmm … does that count as two for “same pursuit?” “King’s, for history,” Jacob Kozak said. “King’s, for computer science,” brother John offered, creating a decidedly split decision — unless Jacob focuses on computer history. And our last set of twins? “I’m going to Penn State University, main campus, to study music,” Louis Jablowski said. “Harvard,” brother John (to be precise, it’s John III) offered with a straight face, before cracking a smile. “No. I’m kidding. I’m going to LCCC, general studies.” He may be joking, but Harvard LCCC sounds like a great new hybrid school. Or maybe they are twins who went their separate ways …


C MY K SERVING THE PUBLIC TRUST SINCE 1881

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

THURSDAY, MAY 30, 2013 Page 9A

E DITORIAL

OUR OPINION: A LIFE MESSAGE

Advice of the aged to our fresh grads

A

CROSS LUZERNE County and the country for that matter, another class is graduating high school to the next chapter of life. We offer some simple advice gathered through hard-learned lessons of time. In other words, this is a parent talking at you. 1. And on that note, consider the advice of those parents and elders. We wished we had listened to ours. They were right more often than wrong. That advice isn’t foolproof or a guarantee against failure. Everyone makes mistakes. But in general we’d prefer you not repeat ours and make your own mistakes. 2 Don’t be foolish. Don’t break laws; the consequences are large and lasting. When you’re of age and you can drink alcohol, don’t drive. Any time at all, don’t text and drive. Don’t consume illegal drugs. If you’re going to have sex, make sure it’s safe and by mutual consent and that you understand the consequences. 3. Don’t be afraid. You’ve made it this far. Heck, you survived high school in the 21st century. So jump into life. Better to try and fail than sit and watch. Take chances; not risks. And when the challenges seems too big, break it down. Inch by inch, life is a cinch. Yard by yard, life is hard. 4. If you don’t know the difference between “chance” and “risk,” figure it out. Use a computer. Open a dictionary. Look it up. 5. Ask questions. Even with that diploma, be it from high school or college, you do not know it all, even if you think you

do. Curiosity shows you care and it will take you to new places. Never stop learning. 6. Words have power so be careful how you use them. Particularly in text messaging and emails. When you find you’ve written an angry email or text, delete it. If you really are angry, you can write it a second time. 7. Have conversations. Facebook isn’t face time. Nothing replaces the significance, nuance and satisfaction of human interaction. And remember to treat other people as you would like to be treated. There are many reasons they call it a Golden Rule. 8. Be concerned. Plan for the future, anticipate what’s next, show empathy for others. 9. Don’t worry. We worry about too many things that will never happen. 10. Make lists. It will help you accomplish the things that must be accomplished and give you more time to do the things you want to do. 11. Try new things. New food. New routines. New places. New ideas. 12. Drink water. Get enough sleep. Exercise. Read books. Always. Life is long. You will forever be chasing the next thing. So remember to take time from the chase. Put your phone in a drawer. Breathe. At the same time, life is short. Before you know it you will be your parents, or something like them. That doesn’t seem possible now or palatable ever but it will happen. So start now. It’s your life. Do something.

quote of the day

“My future is full, it is limitless, and my passions for America will remain.”

Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann A conservative sensation and briefly a Republican presidential front-runner, announced Wednesday that she won’t seek re-election to her congressional seat in 2014.

OTHER OPINION: MOTORCYCLISTS

Helmet law needs to be reversed

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ennsylvania lawmakers should reverse their mind-boggling 2003 decision allowing motorcyclists to ride without a helmet. In 2003, Gov. Ed Rendell legalized the measure, allowing motorcyclists to ride helmet-free if they are 21 or older and have two years of experience, or pass a safety program. Since then, the number of deaths in motorcycle crashes has increased 30 percent, according to a Pittsburgh Tribune-Review analysis. Last year, 210 people died in motorcycle crashes, and only 100 of them were wearing helmets. Sen. John Wozniak, D-Johnstown, who introduced the 2003 legislation, maintains — against all logic — the law was the right thing to do. “It was a 15-year battle to let those that ride decide,” he told the newspaper. “It would be just as agonizing to reverse it.” That’s a poor excuse to justify dangerous behavior. Opponents of the state law, who are calling for its reversal, rightly stress that this isn’t an

MALLARD FILLMORE

issue of personal liberty. When motorcyclists forgo helmets, it affects all of us financially: • Insurance premiums for Pennsylvania drivers are higher. • Taxpayer dollars go toward emergency responses inolving serious injuries which may have been less serious had motorcyclists used helmets. • Taxpayer dollars go toward investigation of such accidents. The law’s spirit is rooted in personal liberty. But extend that logic a little farther, and you can use it to justify pretty much anything: Let’s allow texting while driving; let’s allow people to forgo seat belts. Hell, let’s allow those strung out on heroin to get behind the wheel. Personal liberty above all, right? Helmets save lives. It’s that simple. Regulations exist not only for those operating a motor vehicle, but for those who have to share the road with them. More motorcyclists are dying now than before this law went into effect. This law has failed all Pennsylvanians. The Sentinel (Carlisle, Pa.)

MAIL BAG | LETTERS FROM READERS

US immigration policy a long-term disaster T

here is no doubt that the United States is heading in a downward spiral and it has been steadily heading in that direction since the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965. The downward spiral was further hastened by the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. Currently, there are traitorous Senators in Washington trying to pass an amnesty bill for the more than 11 million illegal immigrants living in this country. Some Republicans say we need to pass this amnesty so that the GOP can win over the ever-increasing Hispanic vote. They are basically saying that we must abandon our principles, and essentially let the United States turn into a Third World country with the false hope that the majority of Hispanics will vote Republican. It’s a shame that these politicians care more about votes than the future of their country. Securing the borders and deporting illegal immigrants should be the top priority of any true pro-American politician. If we solve this problem, other problems in this country will be easier to solve. The failing economy and violent crime will be less of a burden when we successfully stop the invasion. Steve Smith Pittston

Candidate gratified voters heard message I

would like to thank the Democratic voters of Wright Township who voted for me in the recent May 21 primary election. While I did not obtain a majority vote, their endorsement means my message was received and given thoughtful consideration. Good government depends on critical interaction between citizens and elected officials. And so I urge all voting residents of Wright Township to continue their interest and awareness in the township’s government.

Michael M. Stair Chairman, Wright Township Recreation Board

Hilly streets of Nanticoke are becoming a hazard H ow many accidents will have to occur on Kosciuszko Street in Nanticoke before someone tries to control the speed of the cars? The cars race over the hill from the direction of East Main Street and are almost airborne leaving no room for exiting from Lexington Village. People pay no attention to the directional lines on the street allowing residents to enter Lexington Village. I am not sure that a sign warning of the driveway will help and I am not sure we can blame all of this on the students as has been

SEND US YOUR OPINION Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification. Letters should be no more than 250 words. . • Email: mailbag@timesleader.com • Fax: 570-829-5537 • Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711

done before. Would it be facetious of me to suggest a blinking light at the hill or maybe more police presence? Ellen Trent Nanticoke

Positive developments in the city of Pittston T

here are many examples of positive factors that tell the story of the quality of life of the Pocono-Northeast, but perhaps no better example is that of Pittston and the Pittston Memorial Library. The downtown revitalization of Main Street which is the commercial corridor of the City of Pittston has changed dramatically over the last few years, and many other development opportunities are opening up through the highly committed leaders of this community that represents one of the seven cities found across the Northeastern Pennsylvania region. In fact, what has transpired in the city is a wonderful example that can serve as a model for other communities of its size, not only in this region, but the entire commonwealth. Along side this fantastic voyage is the role that is being played by the Pittston Memorial Library. The downturning of the national economy caused many questions to be asked about the future of libraries, and together with the electronic boom that has occurred throughout the nation, there was much speculation about what that would do to the traditional role of libraries. So it was that the Board of Trustees of the Pittston Library and the many people associated with protecting the library’s capacity went through the heart of the national recessions and the years following, seeking to diversity the many activities that a library serves and reinventing a role that has shown spectacular growth in recent years. Libraries such as Pittston’s are far more than a collection of books. They have diversified to add many strengths and assets that assist youngsters and adults alike. Some examples include for youngsters after school snacks and dinners, story time, furry tails reading program, made scientist club, craftastic kids club, Lego club, pageturners book club, and a summer reading program. For adults, examples include baked goods book club, internet and email computer classes, e-reader classes, crochet club, an intergenerational family program and taking on the responsibility of the NEPA Intergenerational Coalition grandparents raising grandchildren program, Friends of the Library, adult

DOONESBURY

summer reading, and much more. In 2012 alone, there were more than 80,000 visits to the Library and more than 9000 searches on the library’s computer system for jobs, a role that will substantially increase in coming months and years. The library has become a true community center for the greater Pittston area, serving eight municipalities surrounding the City. This monumental statistical advancement is now allied with a new infrastructure project that will add 5175 square feet to the Library that will include a new children’s wing (John P. Cosgrove Annex), and a community conference meeting room that will hold 125 people. A Capital Campaign is underway to raise at least $1.3 million, of which over $500,000 currently has been raised. Native Pittston son John P. Cosgrove had donated his book and material collection to the Library, is 94 years old, lives in Washington, D.C., and has visited the Library to lend his support and interest to maintaining his donated collection with a commitment of $50,000 that has resulted in one room being set aside in the main Library to house his collection. Many community citizens and businesses have either already contributed to the Capital Campaign or are being approached to encourage their support. Co-chair of the campaign are two Pittston area leaders — Pat Solano and Tom Tigue. They are well known in Luzerne County and across the PoconoNortheast. They are backed up by a 27 person Campaign Committee who meet monthly to continue to develop ideas and thoughts regarding ways to raise funds and reach the Campaign goal. It is expected that construction of the addition will be initiated prior to the end of the calendar year. Those interested in learning more about the role the Library plays and the campaign can contact the undersigned at any time at the Library and learn more of the significant services and factors that represent the essence of community service that the Pittston Memorial Library plays.

Howard J. Grossman Fundraising director

Gun control opposition recalls Bunker Hill spirit I

n April the U.S. Senate turned down the gun control measure and President Obama called those senators a bunch of cowards. The brave men in Congress who voted down the gun control bill did it for the memory and in the spirit of those men who took a stand against King George and his “red coats.” Millions of Americans believe in the First and Second amendments, the NRA and others who defend our freedoms. If you don’t like it here, pack your bags, buy a one-way ticket and leave. We will play “Yankee Doodle Dandy” as you disappear over the horizon. Fred F. Murray Shavertown


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Thursday, May 30, 2013

N E W S

ROADS Continued from Page 1A

Mobility,” finds that throughout Pennsylvania: • Thirty seven percent of major roads and highways provide motorists with a rough ride. • About 42 percent of state bridges show significant deterioration or do not meet current design standards. • The state’s major urban roads are becoming increasingly congested, with drivers wasting increasing amounts of time and fuel. • Pennsylvania’s rural noninterstate traffic fatality rate is significantly higher than the fatality rate on all other roads in the state. The study was commissioned and released by TRIP, which is a national transportation research group based in Washington, D.C., and sponsored by highway construction interests and insurance companies. “As the General Assembly looks at a transportation funding measure, there’s a lot of discussion about the cost,” said Jason Wagner, managing director of the Pennsylvania Highway Information Association. “The TRIP report quantifies the cost of not addressing this problem, and that cost is almost three times greater than the $3.5 billion annual transportation funding gap. Of even greater concern is the safety threat

DRIVER Continued from Page 1A

in front of her house. The driver of the vehicle left the scene, according to police. Court papers identify John Kuniskas, 36, of 1072 Westminster Road, as the driver of a 2005 Ford F350 that allegedly struck Darsky. Kuniskas could not be reached for comment Wednesday, and it was unclear Wednesday if he had retained legal counsel. Kuniskas’ home is eighttenths of a mile from the Darsky home. Westminster Road runs from state Route 315 to Jumper

SALLIE Continued from Page 1A

pany’s existing businesses into two, separate, publicly traded entities — an education loan management business and a consumer banking business — to “unlock value and enhance long-term growth potential.” “By separating our current operations into two businesses, we will facilitate focus on Sallie Mae’s growing consumer banking business and management of its education loan portfolios,” Remondi said.

Shareholders’ stake

The strategic plan will create two companies, each initially owned by Sallie Mae’s existing

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

Construction crews resurface the east-bound lanes of the Veterans Memorial Bridge on Wednesday.

that a deficient transportation system represents, especially in Pennsylvania’s rural areas.” The TRIP report calculated the cost to motorists of insufficient roads in the state’s largest urban areas. Data show that at $1,320 per driver, this region actually had the lowest additional operating costs, with Philadelphia, at $1,798, reporting the highest.

Report highlights

Other highlights of the 20page study include data that show more people are using state roadways and those that Road, about a three-mile stretch. The attorneys filed a notice that a lawsuit will be filed in the case, listing Kuniskas, and his business, Evolving Water Systems, as defendants, as well as a man who allegedly sold Kuniskas the truck. The two families did not know each other, but knowing who caused the accident is the first step “on a long road” for Mark Darsky in terms of the grieving process, Ciarimboli said. “There is some comfort knowing who the individual is, but there are still a lot of unanswered questions,” he said. Ciarimboli said as an attorney representing Darsky it is his responsibility to protect each

shareholders. Sallie Mae would form an education loan management business composed of the company’s portfolios of federally guaranteed (FFELP) and private education loans, as well as most related servicing and collection activities. Remondi will continue as its CEO. Sallie Mae’s private education loan origination and servicing businesses, including Sallie Mae Bank, the Sallie Mae Upromise Rewards program and the private education loans it currently holds, will operate separately under the Sallie Mae brand. This will be a consumer education lending franchise with expertise in helping families save, plan and pay for college. Joseph DePaulo, executive vice president, banking and finance, will lead this business as its CEO.

are using them spend more time behind the wheel and put more miles on their vehicles. Findings include: * Vehicle miles of travel in the state increased 16 percent from 1990 to 2011 and are expected to increase another 15 percent by 2030. * Traffic congestion in the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre area is worsening, causing 20 annual hours of delay for the average motorist. The average Scranton/Wilkes-Barre driver wastes an average of nine gallons of fuel each year due to

aspect of the case and gather all possible information. Jean Darsky was retrieving a political flier from her mailbox when she was struck by a vehicle driven by Kuniskas, according to Boylan and Ciarimboli’s filing. The attorneys say Kuniskas’ vehicle is at the state police barracks in Wyoming. No charges have been filed in the case. The Luzerne County District Attorney’s Office last week turned over the criminal case to the state Attorney General’s Office, citing District Attorney Stefanie Salavantis “has a close personal relationship with one of the witnesses who came forward in the case.” The Darsky family attorneys

The company release indicated that if completed, the separation would be effected via a tax-free distribution of common stock to Sallie Mae’s shareholders. The details of the planned separation, including the precise allocation of assets between the two companies, remain under consideration at this time. Based on current plans and Sallie Mae’s March 31 financial information: • The education loan management business’ principal assets are likely to consist of about $118.1 billion in FFELP loans, $31.6 billion in private education loans, $7.9 billion of other interest-earning assets and a leading education loan servicing platform that services loans for about 10 million federal education loan customers,

congestion. Both of those totals were the lowest of the five metro regions included in the study. Most of the findings are not news to state motorists but something that each driver knows and experiences firsthand. “Our roads are a mess,” said Donna Palermo, the head of the Greater Hazleton Chamber of Commerce.

Traffic and commerce

The report makes it clear that “commuting and commerce in Pennsylvania are requested that the Ford truck be left untouched so that testing can be conducted, and that the attorneys be permitted to photograph, measure and inspect the truck. The attorneys also asked to conduct a search for evidence in the case before filing an actual complaint because information remains unknown. Ciarimboli said Stephen Doty of Clarks Summit recently contacted him regarding the vehicle, which was allegedly sold to Kuniskas in April. Though records still list Doty as the owner, Ciarimboli said, it is a possibility the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation is behind on updating records.

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com constrained by growing traffic congestion, which will increase in the future unless additional highway and transit capacity is provided.” Tom Lawson, a partner of the area engineering firm Borton-Lawson and president of the Pennsylvania Highway Information Association, has been an outspoken advocate for additional funding for not only infrastructure upgrades and repairs but also annual maintenance to keep future costs in check. At a recent forum on the region’s economy, Lawson said some businesses want to locate in Northeastern Pennsylvania but are hampered by the infrastructure. Site Selection magazine’s 2010 survey of corporate real estate executives found that transportation infrastructure was the third most important selection factor in site location decisions, behind only work force skills and state and local taxes. The cost estimate to add a third lane on Interstate 81 over the 30-mile stretch between Scranton and Hazleton would be about $1.5 billion to $2 billion, Lawson said. Funding, or lack thereof, he said, needs to be addressed and action needs to be taken now, not when costs will be even greater. He also added that “the amount of freight traffic over the next 20 years is expected to explode” and as more product is brought to ports in northeastern cities that’s only going to clog Interstates 80, 81 and 380 even more.

Darsky’s attorneys say the claims in the yet-to-be-filed complaint exceed a seven-figure monetary amount, and that Kuniskas can “currently … sell his properties and assets, transfer and/or withdraw funds from his personal and business accounts … with knowledge that (Darsky) has a substantial claim against the businesses and himself,” court papers state. Because of that possibility in regards to Kuniskas and Doty, the attorneys asked that both men be prohibited from selling assets or any other property. A hearing has been scheduled for July 8 before a county judge to consider the attorneys’ requests.

BILL TARUTIS/ TIMES LEADER FILE PHOTO

Sallie Mae’s loan servicing center in the Hanover Industrial Estates has about about 100 open positions.

including 4.8 million customer accounts serviced under the company’s contract with the

U.S. Department of Education. In aggregate, this company will own approximately 95 percent

PATERNO Continued from Page 1A

tions and agreement between school and the NCAA to be deemed unlawful and the penalties overturned, he said. The suit would also ask for unspecified damages and court costs, Sollers said, though the family would donate any net proceeds to charity. “The broader goal is to get the truth out,” Sollers said. “This narrative that’s in public that was perpetuated by the NCAA’s adoption of the deeply flawed Freeh report … cannot stand.” Freeh accused Paterno and three former university officials of concealing allegations against Sandusky, a retired defensive coordinator. Sandusky was sentenced to at least 30 years in prison after being convicted last year of dozens of criminal counts of abuse, including allegations on and off campus. Paterno died in January 2012. His family and the former school officials have vehemently denied they took part in a cover-up. The suit is designed “to redress the NCAA’s 100 percent adoption of the Freeh Report. … The reality is that consent decree was imposed through coercion and threats behind the scenes and there was no ability for anyone to get redress,” Sollers told Costas. “There was no board approval, there was no transparency, and there was no consideration of this consent decree.” The NCAA said Wednesday it had not received any such lawsuit and could not comment. “Despite our request, the Paterno family has not shared any information about its planned legal action,” chief legal officer Donald Remy said in a statement. “We remain committed to working with Penn State toward the continued successful completion of our voluntary agreement with the university and to working” with the NCAA’s independent monitor, former U.S. Sen. George Mitchell. Penn State spokesman Dave La Torre said the school itself was not a party to any litigation that might be filed by the Paterno family and remained committed to “full compliance” to the sanctions.

of Sallie Mae’s existing assets and remain obligated for the company’s senior indebtedness. • The consumer banking business’ assets are likely to include about $9.9 billion of total assets composed primarily of private education loans and related origination and servicing platforms, cash and other investments, and the Sallie Mae Upromise Rewards program. The two separate companies initially will be owned by Sallie Mae stockholders, but the separation of the businesses does not require a shareholder vote. The company, which just celebrated its 40th anniversary, is still looking to fill close to 100 positions at its Hanover Township loan servicing center, Lavoie said.


C MY K

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timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

THURSDAY, MAY 30, 2013

HIGH SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL

Royals graduate to another level Seniors Leahigh, Myslowski and Morrison spark Redeemer’s opening-round state victory.

By PAUL SOKOLOSKI psokoloski@timesleader.com

DALLAS - After raising his arm high above the net and smashing the final point to the gym floor in one final statement of triumph, Jeremy Myslowski charged over to join his celebrating teammates. He quickly found fellow seniors Brendan Leahigh, Mike Morrison and Vito Aiello, who banded

3 REDEEMER

together for one more inspiring battlecry. “Graduation!” they yelled. SCHUYLKILL Obviously, the VALLEY Royals had more on their minds Wednesday than playing a state-opening volleyball match. But since graduation day for

H.S. SOFTBALL

Demko helps lift Cougars

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Holy Redeemer began with the start of the PIAA Class 2A boys volleyball playoffs, Leahigh made 12 kills, Morrison had nine kills and five blocks and Myslowski made 22 assists as the Royals rolled past Schuylkill Valley, 2725, 25-14, 25-17 at Dallas High School. “And they practiced this (Wednesday) morning for gradu-

SYRACUSE CRUNCH

See VOLLEYBALL, Page 5B

WBS PENGUINS

AIMEE DILGER /THE TIMES LEADER

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PENS ICED

Becky Demko’s pitching, sacrifice fly carry Hazleton Area past Williamsport.

Seminary seniors get special win By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

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EDWARDSVILLE —For three straight years Wyoming Seminary’s girls lacrosse team advanced to the PIAA Championships only to fall in the first round the previous two. The six seniors, who graduated just last weekend, finally got the win they were looking for on SEMINARY Wednesday at Wilkes University’s Schmidt Stadium. The Blue LEWISBURG Knights scored twice in the game’s first six minutes and never looked back defeating Lewisburg 13-3. “I think it’s actually really special because most of us (seniors) have been together since our freshman year and we’ve all just graduated together this past weekend,” senior Kristen Mericle said. “So it’s really special that we get to stay together past graduation because a lot of them are boarders so we get to stay together and keep playing. And all of our hard work is paying off.” Seminary (13-6) advances to Saturday’s quarterfinal round where it will face either District 1 No. 4 seed Boyertown or District 3 champion Manheim Township at a site and time to be determined. That first-round game was held Wednesday night and the result was not available at press time. Mericle tallied three goals and two assists to pace the Blue Knights’ attack. Both assists and two of her goals came in the first half as her team opened up an 8-0 lead at halftime. The Blue Knights got to the big lead by winning nearly every draw in the first 25 minutes of play as Mericle was a big part of that.

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See SOFTBALL, Page 4B

Wyoming Seminary’s Tali Dressler looks to pass the ball during PIAA girls lacrosse first round game against Lewisburg at Ralston field Wednesday.

Blue Knights score first victory in PIAA playoffs, defeating Lewisburg.

By JOHN ERZAR jerzar@timesleader.com

EDWARDSVILLE — The pitching duel that was expected Wednesday — Hazleton Area’s Becky Demko vs. Williamsport’s Alexis Bower — took an odd turn in the seventh inning. HAZLETON It became AREA batter vs. pitcher, and WILLIAMSPORT Demko won. D e m ko scored Mikaela Browdy with a sacrifice fly for the game’s only run as Hazleton Area edged Williamsport 1-0 in the District 2-4 Class 4A softball championship game at Wilkes University. Hazleton Area (16-1) moves to the state tournament, playing on Monday at a District 2 site. The Cougars will play the District 3 runner-up, either Central Dauphin (17-6) or Daniel Boone (186). Those teams play today. Williamsport ended its season at 18-3. The Cougars were well aware of who they were facing in Bower, a St. Francis recruit who was the state’s Class 4A Player of the Year in 2012. They cranked up the pitching machine to 70 mph in practice to simulate Bower, owner of four no-hitters this season. The strategy, said Hazleton Area coach Vince Trivelpiece, was to get someone on base and

H.S. LACROSSE

ation,” Holy Redeemer coach Jack Kablick said, noting that his senior players headed for the 7 p.m. graduation ceremonies at Redeemer right after completing a state volleyball match that began at 3:30 p.m. “The spacing was fair. We had 3 1/2 hours between the the match (and graduation).

C A L D E R C U P P L AY O F F S E A S T E R N C O N F E R E N C E P L AY O F F S

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AIMEE DILGER /THE TIMES LEADER

Phillip Sammuelsson goes down to block a shot against the Syracuse Crunch Wednesday night at Mohegan Sun Arena in Wilkes-Barre Township.

Power outage dooms Pengiuns Syracuse shuts down WBS power play en route to a 2-1 series lead.

as they beat the Penguins 2-0 to take a 2-1 series lead. For the Penguins, who were 0-for-5 on the power play, the lack of production with the man-advantage was By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com the difference. WILKES-BARRE TWP. – Coming in, the Penguins During Wednesday’s Game had converted at least once on the power play 3 of the Eastern in the last six Conference finals, UP NEXT games and failed GAME 4 the Wilkes-Barre/ to score with the Syracuse Crunch Scranton Penat WBS Penguins man advantage guins and Syra7:05 p.m. Friday in only one out of cuse Crunch were the last 12 posta combined 0-for-9 season contests. on the power play. “The power play didn’t go Not surprisingly, both in,” said head coach John teams combined for only two goals – both by the Crunch, See OUTAGE, Page 5B

Maatta comfortable in big role By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

like an odd place for an 18-year-old. But for Maatta, who just played 21 postseason games in the OHL playoffs, the chance to tie was bittersweet. “I tried to get it on net, thought I had him at first but it was a nice save,” he said. “Sometimes it goes in, sometimes it doesn’t.” Maatta arrived in WilkesBarre on Tuesday and played big minutes in Wednesday’s Game 3. The highly-touted prospect didn’t look out of

WILKES-BARRE TWP. — Fresh into his first AHL game with the game on the line, 2012 first round pick Olli Maatta whipped a wrist shot on net with hopes of erasing the Syracuse’s Crunch 1-0 lead late in the third period. At the last second, Crunch goaltender Cedrick Desjardins snared the shot with his glove to keep the Penguins, and Maatta, off the scoreboard. Being on the ice late in a 1-0 AHL playoff game seems See MAATA, Page 5B

See LACROSSE, Page 5B

AUTO RACING

Danica Patrick talks with reporters after a NASCAR testing at Pocono Raceway on Wednesday.

Patrick doesn’t mind being who she is By JOHN ERZAR jerzar@timesleader.com

LONG POND — Danica Patrick doesn’t mind being one of the guys. She’s also fine with being the only female driver in a sport dominated by men throughout its history. “I don’t think I’ve ever said specifically I want to be judged as a driver and not a girl driver,” Patrick said Wednesday morn-

FREE 10 A MERICAN G OLD $ B UYING, Inc. $

ing during a break in NASCAR Sprint Cup testing at Pocono Raceway. “People have asked me how I want people to think about me or remember me when I’m done. I’ve said I want to be remembered as a very good driver and not a good girl driver. Although that could be part of it.” The paradox fits in nicely with her StewSee PATRICK, Page 4B

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AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Hazleton Area’s Mikela Browdy makes the catch for the out against Williamsport Wednesday afternoon.

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C MY K S C O R E B O A R D

PAGE 2B THURSDAY, MAY 30, 2013

w hat ’ s o n t v COLLEGE SOFTBALL

Noon ESPN2 — World Series, game 1, Nebraska vs. Washington, at Oklahoma City 2 p.m. ESPN — World Series, game 2, Tennessee vs. Florida, at Oklahoma City 7 p.m. ESPN2 — World Series, game 3, Arizona St. vs. Texas, at Oklahoma City 9 p.m. ESPN2 — World Series, game 4, Michigan vs. Oklahoma, at Oklahoma City

GOLF 9 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Nordea Masters, first round, at Stockholm 2:30 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, the Memorial Tournament, first round, at Dublin, Ohio

MLB 2:10 p.m. WGN — Chicago White Sox at Chicago Cubs 7 p.m. CSN — Boston at Philadelphia ROOT — Detroit at Pittsburgh WPIX, YES — N.Y. Mets at N.Y. Yankees

NBA 8:30 p.m. TNT — Playoffs, conference finals, game 5, Indiana at Miami

NHL 8 p.m. NBCSN — Playoffs, conference finals, game 1, Boston at Pittsburgh

TENNIS 5 a.m. ESPN2 — French Open, second round, at Paris

tra n sa c ti o n s BASEBALL

American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Optioned INF Yamaico Navarro to Norfolk (IL). Recalled 2B Ryan Flaherty from Norfolk. BOSTON RED SOX — Optioned RHP Alex Wilson to Pawtucket (IL). Recalled OF Jackie Bradley Jr. from Pawtucket. CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Agreed to terms with OF Alex Llanos on a minor league contract. CLEVELAND INDIANS — Sent C Lou Marson to Akron (EL) for a rehab assignment. HOUSTON ASTROS — Optioned OF Robbie Grossman to Oklahoma City (PCL). Recalled RHP Brad Peacock from Oklahoma City. Sent RHP Josh Fields to Oklahoma City for a rehab assignment. LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Assigned RHP Billy Buckner outright to Salt Lake (PCL). Placed LHP Sean Burnett on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Monday. Reinstated RHP Tommy Hanson from the restricted list. MINNESOTA TWINS — Optioned OF Chris Colabello to Rochester (IL). Reinstated INF Trevor Plouffe from the seven-day DL. NEW YORK YANKEES — Sent 1B Mark Teixeira and 3B Kevin Youkilis to Trenton (EL) for rehab assignments. OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Sent OF Josh Reddick to Sacramento (PCL) for a rehab assignment. SEATTLE MARINERS — Optioned RHP Brandon Maurer to Tacoma (PCL). Recalled INF Alex Liddi from Tacoma. TAMPA BAY RAYS — Optioned RHP Jake Odorizzi to Durham (IL). Recalled RHP Alex Colome from Durham. TEXAS RANGERS — Optioned LHP Martin Perez to Round Rock (PCL). TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Designated RHP Ramon Ortiz and 1B Clint Robinson for assignment. Optioned RHP Thad Weber to Buffalo (IL). Placed 3B Brett Lawrie on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Tuesday. Recalled RHP Todd Redmond from Buffalo. Selected the contracts of RHP Neil Wagner and LHP Juan Perez from Buffalo. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Optioned LHP Tyler Skaggs to Reno (PCL). ATLANTA BRAVES — Optioned RHP Cory Rasmus to Gwinnett (IL). Reinstated RHP Jordan Walden from the 15-day DL. Sent RHP Brandon Beachy to Rome (SAL) for a rehab assignment. LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Sent RHP Stephen Fife to Rancho Cucamonga (Cal) for a rehab assignment. MIAMI MARLINS — Designated 2B Nick Green for assignment. Selected the contract of 3B Ed Lucas from New Orleans (PCL). PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Placed 3B Michael Young on the bereavement list. Recalled INF Cesar Hernandez from Lehigh Valley (IL). SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Optioned RHP Sandy Rosario to Fresno (PCL). Selected the contract of LHP Mike Kickham from Fresno. Transferred LHP Eric Surkamp to the 60-day DL. WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Optioned LHP Xavier Cedeno to Syracuse (IL). Recalled RHP Nate Karns from Harrisburg (EL). Sent OF Jayson Werth to Potomac (Carolina) for a rehab assignment. International League DURHAM BULLS_Added RHP Juan Sandoval from Montgomery (SL). Carolina League CAROLINA MUDCATS_Transferred INF Yhoxian Medina to Lake County (MW). American Association AMARILLO SOX — Released INF Jermel Lomack. FARGO-MOORHEAD REDHAWKS — Released OF Nick Akins. Can-Am League NEWARK BEARS — Released LHP Leandro Mella and RHP Brian Chandler. ROCKLAND BOULDERS — Signed OF Jaren Matthews. Frontier League EVANSVILLE OTTERS — Signed RHP Alex Sunderland. RIVER CITY RASCALS — Signed RHP Andrew Virgili. WINDY CITY THUNDERBOLTS — Signed RHP Dan Cropper and OF Blake Helm. Released LHP Rich Hawkins. Traded OF Lyndon Estill to Copper State (Freedom).

BASKETBALL National Basketball Association CHARLOTTE BOBCATS — Named Steve Clifford coach.

FOOTBALL National Football League ATLANTA FALCONS — Waived FB Deon Goggins. CLEVELAND BROWNS — Named Jim Brown special advisor. DALLAS COWBOYS — Released LS Charley Hughlett and WR Carlton Mitchell. Signed LS Jackson Anderson and OT J.B. Shugarts. DETROIT LIONS — Claimed QB Thaddeus Lewis off waivers from Cleveland. Released QB Alex Carder. MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Signed LB Stanford Keglar. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — Released WR Matt Austin. Signed WR Greg Herd. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Announced the retirement of WR Steve Smith. TENNESSEE TITANS — Agreed to terms with C Brian Schwenke, DE Lavar Edwards, CB Khalid Wooten and S Daimion Stafford. WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Named Larry Coyer advance scout and Aubrey Pleasant offensive assistant. Canadian Football League EDMONTON ESKIMOS — Signed DB Aaron Grymes and WRs Owen Spencer and Terrance Lewis. OTTAWA — Named Brock Sunderland assistant general manager.

HOCKEY National Hockey League NEW YORK RANGERS — Fired coach John Tortorella. PHOENIX COYOTES — Signed D James Melindy to a three-year, entry-level contract. American Hockey League SPRINGFIELD FALCONS — Signed RW Alex Aleardi to a one-year contract.

LACROSSE Major League Lacrosse HAMILTON NATIONALS — Traded M Jake Bernhardt to Ohio for a 2015 third-round draft pick.

COLLEGE ALABAMA — Named Kelly Curry, Terry Nooner and Shereka Wright women’s assistant basketball coaches and Grant Fausset director of women’s basketball operations. COLGATE — Named Jena Caccitore assistant field hockey coach. DETROIT — Named Ernie Ziegler men’s assistant basketball coach and Robert C. Vowels director of athletics. GEORGIA — Suspended S Josh Harvey-Clemons one game. ILLINOIS — Approved a contract extension for men’s basketball coach John Groce through April 2018. TCU — Announced women’s basketball G Alexia Standish is transferring from Texas A&M.

BASEBALL

www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER

latest li n e

International League

bulleti n b o ard

Major League Baseball

North Division W L Pct. Pawtucket (Red Sox) 32 21 .604 Buffalo (Blue Jays) 28 22 .560 Lehigh Valley (Phillies) 24 28 .462 RailRiders 23 28 .451 Rochester (Twins) 23 30 .434 Syracuse (Nationals) 22 29 .431

GB — 2½ 7½ 8 9 9

South Division Norfolk (Orioles) Durham (Rays) Gwinnett (Braves) Charlotte (White Sox)

W L Pct. 33 20 .623 32 20 .615 23 30 .434 21 32 .396

GB — ½ 10 12

West Division Indianapolis (Pirates) Columbus (Indians) Louisville (Reds) Toledo (Tigers)

W L Pct. GB 35 19 .648 — 29 24 .547 5½ 26 27 .491 8½ 16 37 .302 18½

Wednesday’s Games Louisville 10, Columbus 7 Pawtucket 8, Indianapolis 2 Rochester 8, Lehigh Valley 7, comp. of susp. game Norfolk 5, RailRiders 2 Gwinnett 10, Syracuse 1 Rochester 8, Lehigh Valley 7, 7 innings Durham 10, Buffalo 2 Toledo 12, Charlotte 4 Today’s Games Lehigh Valley at Rochester, 11:05 a.m. RailRiders at Norfolk, 6:05 p.m. Columbus at Louisville, 6:35 p.m. Gwinnett at Syracuse, 7 p.m. Buffalo at Durham, 7:05 p.m. Pawtucket at Indianapolis, 7:05 p.m. Toledo at Charlotte, 7:15 p.m.

FAVORITE

LINE

Texas

-130/+120

San Diego

- 110/+100

Detroit

-125/+115

UNDERDOG Arizona

Chicago (AL) -110/+100 Chicago (NL) Seattle

San Francisco -115/+105 Boston

-150/+140

at Baltimore -120/+110

Oakland

Cleveland

Tampa Bay

-170/+160

Miami

-150/+140

Toronto

WESTERN CONFERENCE Los Angeles vs. Chicago Saturday, June 1: Los Angeles at Chicago, 5 p.m. Sunday, June 2: Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m. Tuesday, June 4: Chicago at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. Thursday, June 6: Chicago at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. x-Saturday, June 8: Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m. x-Monday, June 10: Chicago at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 12: Los Angeles at Chicago, TBD

AHL Playoffs CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS BEST OF 7

Friday’s Games Syracuse at Pawtucket, 6:15 p.m. Louisville at Toledo, 7 p.m. RailRiders at Durham, 7:05 p.m. Gwinnett at Lehigh Valley, 7:05 p.m. Buffalo at Norfolk, 7:05 p.m. Rochester at Charlotte, 7:15 p.m. Indianapolis at Columbus, 7:15 p.m.

Eastern League

Eastern Division W L Pct. Binghamton (Mets) 30 22 .577 Portland (Red Sox) 29 22 .569 Trenton (Yankees) 29 24 .547 Hampshire (Blue Jays) 26 28 .481 New Britain (Twins) 24 29 .453 Reading (Phillies) 19 30 .388

GB — ½ 1½ 5 6½ 9½

Western Division W L Pct. Erie (Tigers) 31 20 .608 Richmond (Giants) 28 23 .549 Harrisburg (Nationals) 27 26 .509 Bowie (Orioles) 24 25 .490 Akron (Indians) 23 30 .434 Altoona (Pirates) 20 31 .392

GB — 3 5 6 9 11

Wednesday’s Games Trenton 3, Erie 1 Portland 9, New Hampshire 1 Richmond 10, New Britain 5 Altoona 8, Binghamton 4 Akron 6, Harrisburg 3 Reading 6, Bowie 5 Today’s Games Richmond at New Britain, 10:35 a.m. Altoona at Binghamton, 10:35 a.m. New Hampshire at Portland, 6 p.m. Reading at Bowie, 7:05 p.m. Harrisburg at Akron, 7:05 p.m. Erie at Trenton, 7:05 p.m. Friday’s Games Altoona at Portland, 6 p.m. Bowie at New Britain, 6:35 p.m. Trenton at Harrisburg, 7 p.m. Erie at Richmond, 7:05 p.m. Akron at Reading, 7:05 p.m. Binghamton at New Hampshire, 7:05 p.m.

BASKETBALL NBA Playoffs

CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-7) EASTERN CONFERENCE Miami 4, Chicago 1 Monday, May 6: Chicago 93, Miami 86 Wednesday, May 8: Miami 115, Chicago 78 Friday, May 10: Miami 104, Chicago 94 Monday, May 13: Miami 88, Chicago 65 Wednesday, May 15: Miami 94, Chicago 91 Indiana 4, New York 2 Sunday, May 5: Indiana 102, New York 95 Tuesday, May 7: New York 105, Indiana 79 Saturday, May 11: Indiana 82, New York 71 Tuesday, May 14: Indiana 93, New York 82 Thursday, May 16: New York 85, Indiana 75 Saturday, May 18: Indiana 106, New York 99 WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 4, Golden State 2 Monday, May 6: San Antonio 129, Golden State 127, 2OT Wednesday, May 8: Golden St. 100, San Antonio 91 Friday, May 10: San Antonio 102, Golden State 92 Sunday, May 12: Golden State 97, San Antonio 87, OT Tuesday, May 14: San Antonio 109, Golden State 91 Thursday, May 16: San Antonio 94, Golden State 82 Memphis 4, Oklahoma City 1 Sunday, May 5: Oklahoma City 93, Memphis 91 Tuesday, May 7: Memphis 99, Oklahoma City 93 Saturday, May 11: Memphis 87, Oklahoma City 81 Monday, May 13: Memphis 103, Oklahoma City 97, OT Wednesday, May 15: Memphis 88, Oklahoma City 84 CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Miami 2, Indiana 2 Wednesday, May 22: Miami 103, Indiana 102, OT Friday, May 24: Indiana 97, Miami 93 Sunday, May 26: Miami 114, Indiana 96 Tuesday, May 28: Indiana 99, Miami 92 Thursday, May 30: Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m. Saturday, June 1: Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m. x-Monday, June 3: Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 4, Memphis 0 Sunday, May 19: San Antonio 105, Memphis 83 Tuesday, May 21: San Antonio 93, Memphis 89, OT Saturday, May 25: San Antonio 104, Memphis 93, OT Monday, May 27: San Antonio 93, Memphis 86

h o c key

NHL Playoffs CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Pittsburgh 4, Ottawa 1 Tuesday, May 14: Pittsburgh 4, Ottawa 1 Friday, May 17: Pittsburgh 4, Ottawa 3 Sunday, May 19: Ottawa 2, Pittsburgh 1, 2OT Wednesday, May 22: Pittsburgh 7, Ottawa 3 Friday, May 24: Pittsburgh 6, Ottawa 2 Boston 4, N.Y. Rangers 1 Thursday, May 16: Boston 3, N.Y. Rangers 2, OT Sunday, May 19: Boston 5, N.Y. Rangers 2 Tuesday, May 21: Boston 2, N.Y. Rangers 1 Thursday, May 23: N.Y. Rangers 4, Boston 3, OT Saturday, May 25: Boston 3, N.Y. Rangers 1 WESTERN CONFERENCE Detroit 3, Chicago 3 Wednesday, May 15: Chicago 4, Detroit 1 Saturday, May 18: Detroit 4, Chicago 1 Monday, May 20: Detroit 3, Chicago 1 Thursday, May 23: Detroit 2, Chicago 0 Saturday, May 25: Chicago 4, Detroit 1 Monday, May 27: Chicago 4, Detroit 3 Wednesday, May 29: Chicago 2, Detroit 1, OT Los Angeles 4, San Jose 3 Tuesday, May 14: Los Angeles 2, San Jose 0 Thursday, May 16: Los Angeles 4, San Jose 3 Saturday, May 18: San Jose 2, Los Angeles 1, OT Tuesday, May 21: San Jose 2, Los Angeles 1 Thursday, May 23: Los Angeles 3, San Jose 0 Sunday, May 26: San Jose 2, Los Angeles 1 Tuesday, May 28: Los Angeles 2, San Jose 1 CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Saturday, June 1: Boston at Pittsburgh, 8 p.m. Monday, June 3: Boston at Pittsburgh, 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 5: Pittsburgh at Boston, 8 p.m. Friday, June 7: Pittsburgh at Boston, 8 p.m. x-Sunday, June 9: Boston at Pittsburgh, 8 p.m. x-Tuesday, June 11: Pittsburgh at Boston x-Wednesday, June 12: Boston at Pittsburgh, TBD

EASTERN CONFERENCE Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 4, Providence 3 Friday, May 10: Providence 8, Wilkes-Barre/ Scranton 5 Saturday, May 11: Providence 4, Wilkes-Barre/ Scranton 2 Wednesday, May 15: Providence 2, WilkesBarre/Scranton 1, OT Friday, May 17: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 3, Providence 1 Saturday, May 18: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 4, Providence 0 Monday, May 20: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 2, Providence 1, OT Wednesday, May 22: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 5, Providence 0 Syracuse 4, Springfield 0 Friday, May 10: Syracuse 5, Springfield 2 Saturday, May 11: Syracuse 5, Springfield 3 Wednesday, May 15: Syracuse 3, Springfield 0 Friday, May 17: Syracuse 5, Springfield 2 WESTERN CONFERENCE Grand Rapids 4, Toronto 2 Friday, May 10: Grand Rapids 7, Toronto 0 Saturday, May 11: Toronto 4, Grand Rapids 2 Wednesday, May 15: Grand Rapids 5, Toronto 4 Friday, May 17: Grand Rapids 4, Toronto 1 Saturday, May 18: Toronto 4, Grand Rapids 1 Tuesday, May 21: Grand Rapids 4, Toronto 3 Oklahoma City 4, Texas 1 Thursday, May 9: Oklahoma City 2, Texas 1, OT Saturday, May 11: Texas 2, Oklahoma City 1 Monday, May 13: Oklahoma City 4, Texas 0 Wednesday, May 15: Oklahoma City 7, Texas 3 Thursday, May 16: Oklahoma City 5, Texas 1 CONFERENCE FINALS BEST OF 7 EASTERN CONFERENCE Syracuse 2, Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 1 Saturday, May 25: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 4, Syracuse 2 Sunday, May 26: Syracuse 3, Wilkes-Barre/ Scranton 2 Wednesday, May 29: Syracuse 2, Wilkes-Barre/ Scranton 0 Friday, May 31: Syracuse at Wilkes-Barre/ Scranton, 7:05 p.m. Saturday, June 1: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton at Syracuse, 7 p.m. x-Monday, June 3: Syracuse at Wilkes-Barre/ Scranton, 7:05 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 5: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton at Syracuse, 7 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Grand Rapids 1, Oklahoma City 1 Friday, May 24: Grand Rapids 2, Oklahoma City 1 Saturday, May 25: Oklahoma City 4, Grand Rapids 2 Wednesday, May 29: Grand Rapids at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Friday, May 31: Grand Rapids at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Saturday, June 1: Grand Rapids at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. x-Tuesday, June 4: Oklahoma City at Grand Rapids, 7 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 5: Oklahoma City at Grand Rapids, 7 p.m.

T e n n is

French Open Results At Stade Roland Garros Paris Purse: $28.4 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Men First Round Benoit Paire (24), France, def. Marcos Baghdatis, Cyprus, 3-6, 7-6 (1), 6-4, 6-4. Janko Tipsarevic (8), Serbia, def. Nicolas Mahut, France, 6-2, 7-6 (4), 6-1. Lukasz Kubot, Poland, def. Maxime Teixeira, France, 6-4, 5-7, 7-6 (7), 6-2. Horacio Zeballos, Argentina, def. Vasek Pospisil, Canada, 7-6 (9), 6-4, 6-7 (4), 2-6, 8-6. Second Round David Ferrer (4), Spain, def. Albert Montanes, Spain, 6-2, 6-1, 6-3. Marin Cilic (10), Croatia, def. Nick Kyrgios, Australia, 6-4, 6-2, 6-2. Viktor Troicki, Serbia, def. Daniel Gimeno-Traver, Spain, 4-6, 7-6 (4), 6-0, 6-7 (7), 6-4. Feliciano Lopez, Spain, def. Joao Sousa, Portugal, 3-6, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (6), France, def. Jarkko Nieminen, Finland, 7-6 (6), 6-4, 6-3. Kevin Anderson (23), South Africa, def. Evgeny Donskoy, Russia, 6-7 (8), 6-1, 7-5, 6-2. Jeremy Chardy (25), France, def. Roberto Bautista Agut, Spain, 6-1, 7-5, 6-4. Tommy Robredo (32), Spain, def. Igor Sijsling, Netherlands, 6-7 (2), 4-6, 6-3, 6-1, 6-1. Andreas Seppi (20), Italy, def. Blaz Kavcic, Slovenia, 6-0, 7-6 (3), 6-7 (2), 4-6, 6-3. Milos Raonic (14), Canada, def. Michael Llodra, France, 7-5, 3-6, 7-6 (3), 6-2. Gilles Simon (15), France, def. Pablo Cuevas, Uruguay, 6-7 (2), 6-1, 6-1, 6-1. Nicolas Almagro (11), Spain, def. Edouard Roger-Vasselin, France, 6-2, 6-4, 6-3. Gael Monfils, France, def. Ernests Gulbis, Latvia, 6-7 (5), 6-4, 7-6 (4), 6-2. Julien Benneteau (30), France, def. Tobias Kamke, Germany, 7-6 (9), 7-5, 5-7, 0-6, 6-4. Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def. Somdev Devvarman, India, 6-2, 6-1, 6-1. Sam Querrey (18), United States, def. Jan Hajek, Czech Republic, 6-4, 7-5, 6-4. Women First Round Victoria Azarenka (3), Belarus, def. Elena Vesnina, Russia, 6-1, 6-4. Petra Kvitova (7), Czech Republic, def. Aravane Rezai, France, 6-3, 4-6, 6-2. Anna Karolina Schmiedlova, Slovakia, def. Yanina Wickmayer, Belgium, 7-6 (5), 2-6, 6-2. Annika Beck, Germany, def. Sandra Zahlavova, Czech Republic, 6-2, 6-1. Peng Shuai, China, def. Camila Giorgi, Italy, 6-4, 6-2. Stefanie Voegele, Switzerland, def. Heather Watson, Britain, 6-4, 2-6, 6-4. Jamie Hampton, United States, def. Lucie Safarova (25), Czech Republic, 7-6 (5), 3-6, 9-7. Ashleigh Barty, Australia, def. Lucie Hradecka, Czech Republic, 7-5, 2-6, 6-1. Kaia Kanepi, Estonia, def. Klara Zakopalova (23), Czech Republic, 7-6 (3), 6-2. Maria Kirilenko (12), Russia, def. Nina Bratchikova, Portugal, 6-0, 6-1. Second Round Agnieszka Radwanska (4), Poland, def. Mallory Burdette, United States, 6-3, 6-2. Angelique Kerber (8), Germany, def. Jana Cepelova, Slovakia, 6-2, 6-2. Varvara Lepchenko (29), United States, def. Elina Svitolina, Ukraine, 7-6 (5), 6-1. Dinah Pfizenmaier, Germany, def. Urszula Radwanska, Poland, 6-3, 6-3. Svetlana Kuznetsova, Russia, def. Magdalena Rybarikova, Slovakia, 1-6, 6-2, 6-2. Carla Suarez Navarro (20), Spain, def. Shelby Rogers, United States, 3-6, 6-4, 6-4. Sorana Cirstea (26), Romania, def. Johanna Larsson, Sweden, 6-1, 6-4. Bojana Jovanovski, Serbia, def. Caroline Wozniacki (10), Denmark, 7-6 (2), 6-3. Sabine Lisicki (32), Germany, def. Maria-Teresa Torro-Flor, Spain, 6-4, 6-0. Roberta Vinci (15), Italy, def. Galina Voskoboeva, Kazakhstan, 6-4, 4-6, 6-2. Petra Cetkovska, Czech Republic, def. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (19), Russia, 7-5, 2-6, 6-4. Serena Williams (1), United States, def. Caroline Garcia, France, 6-1, 6-2. Virginie Razzano, France, def. Zuzana Kucova, Slovakia, 4-6, 6-2, 6-0.

Houston

NBA Playoffs

FAVORITE

Saturday

-120/+110

-200/+185

Los Angeles (AL) -150/+140Los Angeles

Washington

New York (AL) -165/+155 N ew York (NL)

Minnesota

-145/+135 Kansas City

Colorado

at Miami

Philadelphia

-120/+110

St. Louis

Pittsburgh

Cincinnati at Atlanta

Milwaukee

FAVORITE

LINE O/U UNDERDOG 7½ 185

NHL Playoffs L INE

at Pittsburgh

- 170/+150

Pittsburgh

-185/+165

Indiana

UNDERDOG

Odds to Win Series

Boston

Boston

Sara Errani (5), Italy, def. Yulia Putintseva, Kazakhstan, 6-1, 6-1. Ana Ivanovic (14), Serbia, def. Mathilde Johansson, France, 6-2, 6-2. Monica Puig, Puerto Rico, def. Madison Keys, United States, 6-4, 7-6 (2). Doubles Men First Round Paolo Lorenzi and Potito Starace, Italy, def. Sanchai and Sonchat Ratiwatana, Thailand, 6-4, 6-1. Marcel Granollers and Marc Lopez (2), Spain, def. Jaroslav Levinsky, Czech Republic, and Yenhsun Lu, Taiwan, 4-2, retired. Eric Butorac and Jack Sock, United States, def. Martin Klizan and Igor Zelenay, Slovakia, 6-4, 6-4. Robert Lindstedt, Sweden, and Daniel Nestor (3), Canada, def. Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine, and Mikhail Youzhny, Russia, 7-6 (8), 7-6 (4). Ivan Dodig, Croatia, and Marcelo Melo (12), Brazil, def. Victor Hanescu, Romania, and Gilles Muller, Luxembourg, 6-7 (4), 6-4, 6-1. Mikhail Elgin, Russia, and Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, def. Santiago Gonzalez, Mexico, and Scott Lipsky (11), United States, 1-6, 6-3, 6-4. Andre Begemann and Martin Emmrich, Germany, def. Guillermo Garcia-Lopez and Albert Ramos, Spain, 6-3, 4-6, 6-3. Jonathan Dasnieres de Veigy and Florent Serra, France, def. Marinko Matosevic and JohnPatrick Smith, Australia, 7-6 (4), 7-6 (6). Max Mirnyi, Belarus, and Horia Tecau (5), Romania, def. Adrian Mannarino and Benoit Paire, France, 6-0, 7-6 (3). David Marrero and Fernando Verdasco (8), Spain, def. Johan Brunstrom, Sweden, and Raven Klaasen, South Africa, 6-3, 6-2. Jamie Murray, Britain, and John Peers, Australia, def. Julian Knowle, Austria, and Filip Polasek (15), Slovakia, 7-6 (5), 7-6 (5). Women First Round Zhang Shuai and Zheng Jie (13), China, def. Timea Babos, Hungary, and Mandy Minella, Luxembourg, 6-7 (5), 6-4, 6-3. Olga Govortsova, Belarus, and Anna Tatishvili, Georgia, def. Stephanie Foretz Gacon and Irena Pavlovic, France, 6-3, 6-4. Francesca Schiavone, Italy, and Sam Stosur, Australia, def. Liezel Huber, United States, and Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez (5), Spain, 6-1, 6-3. Misaki Doi, Japan, and Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan, def. Shuko Aoyama, Japan, and Chang Kai-chen, Taiwan, 6-1, 6-1. Julie Coin and Pauline Parmentier, France, def. Jill Craybas, United States, and Romina Oprandi, Switzerland, 7-5, 6-4. Severine Beltrame and Laura Thorpe, France, def. Petra Martic, Croatia, and Chanelle Scheepers, South Africa, 3-6, 6-4, 6-4. Jelena Jankovic, Serbia, and Mirjana Lucic-Baroni, Croatia, def. Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, and Anabel Medina Garrigues (16), Spain, 6-4, 3-6, 6-2. Anna-Lena Groenefeld, Germany, and Kveta Peschke (9), Czech Republic, def. Kiki Bertens, Netherlands, and Tatjana Maria, Germany, 6-4, 6-4. Ekaterina Makarova and Elena Vesnina (4), Russia, def. Mallory Burdette and Sloane Stephens, United States, 6-1, 6-3. Nadia Petrova, Russia, and Katarina Srebotnik (3), Slovenia, def. Natalie Grandin, South Africa, and Vladimira Uhlirova, Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-0. Vania King, United States, and Monica Niculescu, Romania. def. Eva Birnerova, Czech Republic, and Stefanie Voegele, Switzerland, 2-6, 7-5, 6-2. Kimiko Date-Krumm, Japan, and Arantxa Parra Santonja, Spain, def. Christina McHale, United States, and Tamira Paszek, Austria, 6-4, 6-3.

s o c c er MLS

EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF GA New York 7 4 4 25 22 17 Montreal 7 2 2 23 20 14 Kansas City 6 4 4 22 17 11 Houston 6 4 3 21 18 13 Philadelphia 5 5 3 18 18 23 Columbus 4 4 4 16 15 12 New England 4 4 4 16 10 9 Chicago 2 7 2 8 7 17 Toronto FC 1 7 4 7 11 18 D.C. 1 9 2 5 6 22 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF GA FC Dallas 8 2 3 27 21 15 Portland 5 1 7 22 22 14 Real Salt Lake 6 5 3 21 18 15 Los Angeles 6 4 2 20 21 10 Colorado 5 4 4 19 13 10 Seattle 4 4 3 15 14 13 San Jose 3 5 6 15 13 20 Vancouver 3 4 4 13 14 16 Chivas USA 3 7 2 11 13 24 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. Saturday’s Games Philadelphia at Toronto FC, 6 p.m. Vancouver at New York, 7 p.m. Houston at Columbus, 7:30 p.m. Montreal at Sporting Kansas City, 8:30 p.m. FC Dallas at Colorado, 9 p.m. San Jose at Real Salt Lake, 9:30 p.m. Seattle FC at Chivas USA, 10:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Los Angeles at New England, 4:30 p.m. D.C. United at Chicago, 5 p.m

boxing Fight Schedule June 1 At The BB&T Center, Sunrise, Fla. (FOXSN), Braulio Santos vs. Derrick Wilson, 10, featherweights; Daquan Arnett vs. Irving Garcia, 10, welterweights. June 7 At Turning Stone Resort & Casino, Verona, N.Y. (SHO), Jorge Melendez vs. Luis Grajeda, 10, junior middleweights. At Little Creek Casino and Resort, Shelton, Wash. (ESPN), John Molina Jr. vs. Andrey Klimov, 10, lightweights; Farrah Ennis vs. Anthony Hanshaw, 10, super middleweights. June 8 At The Bell Centre, Montreal (HBO), Chad Dawson vs. Adonis Stevenson, 12, for Dawson’s WBC light heavyweight title; Yuriorkis Gamboa vs. Darley Perez, 12, lightweights; Eleider Alvarez vs. Allan Green, 10, light heavyweights. At Home Depot Center, Carson, Calif. (SHO), Marcos Maidana vs. Josesito Lopez, 12, for Maidana’s WBA Inter-Continental welterweight title; Erislandy Lara vs. Alfredo Angula, 12, light middleweights; Demetrius Hopkins vs. Jermell Charlo, 12, for Hopkins’ USBA light middleweight title; Yoshihiro Kamegai vs. Johan Perez, 10, welterweights. At Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Las Vegas, Juan Carlos Sanchez Jr. vs. Roberto Sosa, 12, for Sanchez’s IBF super flyweight title. June 14 At Sands Casino Resort, Bethlehem, Pa. (NBCSN), Sergey Kovalev vs. Cornelius White, 12, light heavyweights; Bryant Jennings vs. Franklin Lawrence, 10, heavyweights; Ronald Cruz vs. Jaime Herrera, 10, welterweights. At West Orange, N.J. (ESPN2), Arash Usmanee vs. Art Hovhannisyan, 10, super featherweights; Luis Ortiz vs. Travis Kaufmann, 10, heavyweights. June 15 Valley Forge (Pa.) Casino and Resort, Harry Joe Yorgey vs. Julius Kennedy, 10, junior middleweights. June 21 At Moscow, Krzysztof Wlodarczyk vs. Rakhim Chakhkiev, 12, for Wlodarczyk’s WBC cruiserweight title. At the Minneapolis Convention Center (ESPN2) Rances Barthelemy vs. Fahsai Sakkreerin, Thailand, 12, IBF super featherweight title eliminator; Caleb Truax vs. Don George, 10, middleweights. June 22 At Barclays Center, Brooklyn, N.Y. (SHO), Paul Malignaggi vs. Adrien Broner, 12, for Malignaggi’s WBA World welterweight title; Johnathon Banks vs. Seth Mitchell, 12, for Banks NABO and WBC international heavyweight titles; Sakio Bika vs. Marco Antonio Periban, 12, for the vacant WBC super middleweight title.

CAMPS/CLINICS Stan Waleski Basketball Camp is currently accepting registrations and will be held at the Greater Pittston YMCA from July 8 to August 9 for boys and girls in grade K through 8. The camp stresses skills, fundamentals, competitions, team play and fun with all players receiving a camp t shirt and certificate. The camp also features an early registration discount for players enrolling prior to June 1 and discounts for multiple family members attending. For camp information call Coach Waleski at 457 - 1206 or Coach LoBrutto at 654 - 8030. Interested players can also e mail stanwaleski@yahoo. com. Complete camp scheduling and registration information is also available on the camp web site at stanwaleski.com. LEAGUES Jim Atherton Men’s Open Basketball League applications are still being accepted, which will be played Monday and Tuesday nights beginning Monday, June 3. Monday and Tuesday leagues will be separate leagues. To sign up, call John Leighton at 430-8437. The deadline to enter is Friday, May 31. All games will be played at Miner Park. There will be a 12 team maximum for each league. MEETINGS Dupont High School Softball Summer League will have a kickoff meeting today, at 7 p.m. at the Dupont Field House. The meeting is open to any and all high school teams. For more information, call Bob at 881-8744. Heights Packers Football and Cheerleading Youth Organization will be having a Booster Club Meeting on June 4 at 7 p.m. at Stanton Lanes. Everyone is encouraged and welcome to attend. Please come to discuss or listen to all the new changes and exciting events for the upcoming 2013 season. Any questions please email heightspackers68@yahoo.com. Nanticoke Area Little League will have its monthly meeting June 5 at 7:30 p.m. at the high school cafe. South Wilkes-Barre Little League will have its all-star meeting/draft Sunday, June 2, at 6 p.m. at the Riverside Cafe on Old River Road in Wilkes-Barre. All minor and major league coaches and board members must attend. Wyoming Valley West Softball Booster Club will have a meeting today at 7 p.m. at the WVW Middle School. Parents of all players are encouraged to attend. REGISTRATIONS/TRYOUTS Ed-Lark Hurricanes Football and Cheer signups are on the following dates: Monday, June 3, 5-7 p.m.; Saturday, June 15, from noon to 4 p.m.; Thursday, June 20, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Signups will be at the Larksville Borough building. The cost is $40 for the first child and $5 for each additional child. Greater Pittston Stoners Youth Soccer will be holding two Fall season registration dates: Tuesday June 4 from 6:30-8:00 p.m. and Thursday June 6 from 6:30-8:00 p.m. at the Exeter Scout Home on the corner of Wyoming Ave & Lincoln Str. New players must show birth certificate. For further info visit www.stonersoccer.org. Heights Packers Football and Cheerleading Registrations for boys and girls between the ages of 6-12 will be held at Coal Street Pavillion on June 2, June 16, and June 30 between 2-4 p.m. Must be 6 years old by August 1 and provide a copy of birth certificate for each child and a physical form completed by first practice. If you have any questions please email us at heightspackers68@yahoo. com . Cost for registration are as follows: $35 for one child, $50 for two children and $65 per family. All information may also be found on our website at http://www.heightspackers.webs.com/ WA Ice Hockey Association will hold their registration for incoming students in grades 7-12 residing within the Wyoming Area School District. JV and Varsity Registration will be held Monday June 3, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the West Wyoming Boro. Building. A $100 deposit will be required at the time of registration. For more information contact Dawn Thomas at mejane134@aol.com WA Ice Hockey Association will hold their registration for incoming students in grades 5-7 residing on Monday June 3, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the West Wyoming Boro. Building. A $100 deposit will be required at the time of registration. For more information contact Dawn Thomas at mejane134@aol. com UPCOMING EVENTS/OTHER Association for the Blind will hold its Chip in for Sight golf tournament on Monday, June 3, at Fox Hill Country Club. Registration

begins at 11 a.m. with the shotgun start at noon. Cost includes lunch, greens fee and cart, and gourmet food station dinner. For golf & dinner reservations, sponsorships or donations, call the Association for the Blind at 693-3555. Children’s Service Center will hold its 12th annual golf tournament June 3, at Huntsville Golf Club in Dallas. The tournament is presented by Howell Benefit Services, and benefits programs for children, adolescents, and families dealing with emotional and behavioral problems. Format is captain and crew, and the shotgun start is at 9 a.m. Breakfast and registration begin at 8 a.m. Contact Liz Hibbard at 825-6425 or lhibbard@e-csc.org for more information. Crestwood Boys Basketball Booster Club will have a “May Social” on Friday, May 31, from 7-9 p.m. at Cavanaugh’s Grille. Crestwood Football will have its annual Iron Man Competition Friday, May 31, at 6 p.m. at the football stadium. Parents and community members are invited. Lake Harmony Fire Company annual golf tournament is Sunday, June 2, at Split Rock Golf Course in Lake Harmony. Lunch and registration is from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. There will be a 1 p.m. shotgun start. An awards banquet will follow the tournament. Registration is $100, which includes green fees, cart rental, lunch and banquet. There are prizes, including a flat-screen TV, and chances to win this year. For more information, call Colin at 722-9571 or Marv at 956-9944. Daddow-Isaacs Dallas American Legion Post 672 will hold their annual golf tournament June 8 at Stone Hedge Golf Course in Tunkhannock. Cost is $80 per player and includes a steak dinner. Hole sponsors are available for $50. Monies raised will support the post scholarship fund. For more information, call Jim Baloga at 690-0756 or Clarence J. Michael at 675-0488. Grace Episcopal Church of Kingston will hold a charity golf tournament at Sand Springs Country Club on Saturday, June 8. The tournament begins at 8 a.m. with a shotgun start and a captain-and-crew format. The cost is $85 per golfer and includes lunch. A portion of the proceeds will benefit our local community outreach organization, the Women with Children program at Misericordia, and the Grace Episcopal Church. For more information, call Nancy Pleskatch at 287-8440 or visit gracechurchkingston.org. Greater Pittston Legion Baseball is seeking sponsors for its two senior American Legion squads. Donations to the program also welcome. Contact coach Musto at 814-9106 for more information. Kirby Park Tennis Courts are open. Hours of operation will be daily from 8:30 a.m. until dark. The facility will be closed during inclement weather and hours of operation are subject to change. Season memberships are now on sale at the Kirby Park Tennis Office and there is a fee for all non-season members. For more information call the tennis office at 714-9697 or visit www.kirbyparktennis.net. Kiwanis Club of Mountain Top will hold its 31st annual Score One For Kids Golf Tournament on Friday, June 14 at Sand Springs Country Club. Sponsorships are available and start at the price of $25. Make checks payable to Kiwanis Club of Mountain Top Charitable Foundation and mail them to David Barry, 49 Fieldstone Way, Mountain Top. Lake Harmony Fire Company annual golf tournament is Sunday, June 2, at Split Rock Golf Course in Lake Harmony. Lunch and registration is from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. There will be a 1 p.m. shotgun start. An awards banquet will follow the tournament. Registration is $100, which includes green fees, cart rental, lunch and banquet. There are prizes, including a flat-screen TV, and chances to win this year. For more information, call Colin at 722-9571 or Marv at 956-9944. Swoyersville Little League is hosting a craft fair and flea market on June 1 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Hemlock Street in Swoyersville. It is looking for vendors, at $15, for the fair. For more information, call Dave at 889-3750 or Lori at 7099698. West Pittston Parks and Recreation will have its 36th annual 4-mile Anthracite run Saturday, June 1, at 9 a.m. The start and finish will be at the West Pittston Borough building, 555 Exeter Ave. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. A long sleeve T-shirt will go to the first 150 applicants. There will be an awards ceremony for the top-three men and women in age groups with 5-year increments. The run benefits the two parks in West Pittston. For more information, call Don Shearer at 357-9144.


C MY K S P O R T S

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

MAJOR LEAGUE ROUNDUP

S TA N D I N G S • S TAT S Boston New York Baltimore Tampa Bay Toronto Detroit Cleveland Chicago Minnesota Kansas City Texas Oakland Los Angeles Seattle Houston AP PHOTO

Philadelphia Phillies starting pitcher Kyle Kendrick delivers a pitch to the plate against the Boston Red Sox on Wednesday in Philadelphia.

Brown homers twice, slugs Phils over Sox The Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — Domonic Brown hit a pair of homers, Erik Kratz and Ryan Howard also had solo shots to back Kyle Kendrick and the Philadelphia Phillies beat the Boston Red Sox 4-3 Wednesday night. Kendrick (5-3) allowed two runs and four hits in six innings, helping the Phillies win their second straight against the Red Sox to get within one game of .500. Antonio Bastardo pitched the seventh, Mike Adams struck out two in a perfect eighth and Jonathan Papelbon finished for his 11th save in 11 tries, including second in two nights against his old team. Papelbon allowed an RBI single to Jacoby Ellsbury, snapping his scoreless string at 19 1-3 innings. But with runners on second and third, he retired Daniel Nava on a grounder to first to end it.

Mets 9, Yankees 4

NEW YORK — Challenged by fed-up manager Terry Collins, slumping infielders Ike Davis and Ruben Tejada sparked a five-run first inning that kept the New York Mets sailing along in this surprising Subway Series with a victory over the Yankees. Tejada hit a leadoff single, Davis drove in two runs and the Mets won with Jeremy Hefner (1-5) on the mound for the first time all season. They’ve taken three in a row from their crosstown rivals for their first four-game winning streak of the year and will go for a Big Apple whitewash in the series finale at Yankee Stadium on Thursday night.

Cubs 9, White Sox 3

CHICAGO — Dioner Navarro hit three home runs in a game for the first time in his career, connecting from both sides of the plate at Wrigley Field and leading the Chicago Cubs over the White Sox. Navarro had never homered more than once in a game, but he sure had his swing going while driving in a career-high six runs and scoring four times. He became the first Cubs player to hit three homers in a game since Aramis Ramirez against Houston on July 20, 2010, at Wrigley and their first catcher to do it since George Mitterwald on April 17, 1974, against Pittsburgh.

Rays 3, Marlins 1

MIAMI — Roberto Hernandez bounced back from two rough outings and pitched 8 2-3 innings, leading the Tampa Bay Rays over Miami and sending the Marlins to their seasonworst eighth straight loss. Kelly Johnson and Yunel Escobar each drove in a run as the Rays won their fourth in row.

Pirates 4, Tigers 3

PITTSBURGH — Pedro Alvarez’s two-run double sparked a seventh-inning rally and the Pittsburgh Pirates beat the Detroit Tigers. Travis Snider added an RBI double and Jordy Mercer laid down a perfect suicide squeeze as the Pirates erupted late against Anibal Sanchez (5-5) and scored four times. Miguel Cabrera hit his 15th homer of the season for Detroit and Andy Dirks had an

RBI double, but that couldn’t prevent the Tigers from falling to Pittsburgh for the second straight night. Bryan Morris (2-2) picked up the win in relief of A.J. Burnett. Jason Grilli pitched the ninth for his major league-leading 22nd save. Sanchez cruised through the first six innings, surrendering only a solo home run to Neil Walker. Things unraveled in the seventh as the Pirates batted around.

Indians 5, Reds 2

CLEVELAND — Justin Masterson pitched six solid innings, Jason Giambi and Mark Reynolds homered, and the Cleveland Indians broke a fivegame losing streak with a win over the Cincinnati Reds. Masterson (8-3) worked out of a bases-loaded jam with nobody out in the sixth to preserve a 2-1 lead. Cincinnati’s only run off the right-hander came on Joey Votto’s two-out homer in the first.

Orioles 9, Nationals 6

BALTIMORE — Chris Davis went 4 for 4 with two home runs, and the Baltimore Orioles overcame three homers by Ryan Zimmerman to beat the Washington Nationals. In a wild game before 39,129 fans, each team slugged four home runs and the Orioles rallied from a four-run deficit against one of the best pitchers in the game. Zimmerman hit solo homers in the first and fourth innings before adding a two-run drive in the fifth, all off Chris Tillman. With a chance to tie the major-league record of four homers in a game, Zimmerman came to the plate in the seventh against Steve Johnson and looked at a third strike.

Blue Jays 3, Braves 0

ATLANTA — Melky Cabrera had three hits, including a tworun single, and four Toronto pitchers combined on a fourhitter to lead the Blue Jays past the Atlanta Braves. Last-place Toronto went with a pitcher-by-committee approach to fill a hole in the rotation. Esmil Rogers lasted 3 1-3 innings in his first start since 2011, and two pitchers just up from the minors shut down the Braves. Juan Perez (1-0) went 2 2-3 innings and Neil Wagner got through the seventh and eighth before Casey Janssen earned his 11th save.

Twins 4, Brewers 1

MINNEAPOLIS — Aaron Hicks homered again and made another run-saving catch for Minnesota, helping Samuel Deduno and the Twins beat the Milwaukee Brewers. Deduno (1-1) pitched into the eighth inning, the longest start for a Twins pitcher in more than a month, and gave up four hits and one run. He beat Marco Estrada (4-3), who was done in by a three-run first as the Brewers lost their fifth straight game.

Cardinals 5, Royals 3

ST. LOUIS — Pinch hitter Daniel Descalso hit a two-run single with the bases loaded to snap an eighth-inning tie and the St. Louis Cardinals rallied past the Kansas City Royals with a victory.

Atlanta Washington Philadelphia New York Miami St. Louis Cincinnati Pittsburgh Chicago Milwaukee Arizona Colorado San Francisco San Diego Los Angeles

AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away 32 22 .593 — — 5-5 L-2 17-12 15-10 30 22 .577 1 — 4-6 L-4 15-10 15-12 29 24 .547 2½ 1 6-4 W-1 12-12 17-12 28 24 .538 3 1½ 6-4 W-4 17-10 11-14 23 30 .434 8½ 7 6-4 W-1 14-16 9-14 Central Division W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away 29 22 .569 — — 6-4 L-2 17-9 12-13 28 24 .538 1½ 1½ 3-7 W-1 16-10 12-14 24 26 .480 4½ 4½ 5-5 L-2 13-11 11-15 22 28 .440 6½ 6½ 4-6 W-3 10-13 12-15 21 29 .420 7½ 7½ 1-9 L-8 10-14 11-15 West Division W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away 32 20 .615 — — 5-5 L-3 15-7 17-13 30 23 .566 2½ — 9-1 W-5 15-10 15-13 23 29 .442 9 6½ 8-2 L-2 12-13 11-16 22 30 .423 10 7½ 2-8 L-1 13-12 9-18 15 37 .288 17 14½ 4-6 L-1 9-21 6-16 NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away 31 21 .596 — — 7-3 L-1 15-6 16-15 27 26 .509 4½ 6 4-6 L-1 15-11 12-15 26 27 .491 5½ 7 6-4 W-2 12-12 14-15 21 29 .420 9 10½ 5-5 W-4 12-17 9-12 13 40 .245 18½ 20 2-8 L-8 7-19 6-21 Central Division W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away 35 17 .673 — — 8-2 W-4 15-8 20-9 33 20 .623 2½ — 7-3 L-1 20-7 13-13 33 20 .623 2½ — 8-2 W-2 19-9 14-11 21 30 .412 13½ 11 4-6 W-3 11-14 10-16 19 32 .373 15½ 13 2-8 L-5 12-17 7-15 West Division W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away 30 22 .577 — — 6-4 W-3 16-12 14-10 28 24 .538 2 4½ 6-4 W-1 16-9 12-15 28 24 .538 2 4½ 4-6 L-2 19-9 9-15 23 28 .451 6½ 9 5-5 W-1 13-12 10-16 22 28 .440 7 9½ 5-5 W-2 14-15 8-13

Intraleague Play Tuesday’s Games Atlanta 7, Toronto 6, 10 innings Colorado 2, Houston 1 Washington 9, Baltimore 3 Pittsburgh 1, Detroit 0, 11 innings Cincinnati 8, Cleveland 2 Tampa Bay 7, Miami 6 N.Y. Mets 2, N.Y. Yankees 1 Philadelphia 3, Boston 1 Minnesota 6, Milwaukee 5, 14 innings St. Louis 4, Kansas City 1 Chicago Cubs at Chicago, ppd., rain Oakland 6, San Francisco 3 L.A. Dodgers 3, L.A. Angels 0 San Diego 6, Seattle 1 Wednesday’s Games Chicago Cubs 9, Chicago White Sox 3 Philadelphia 4, Boston 3 Cleveland 5, Cincinnati 2 Pittsburgh 5, Detroit 3 N.Y. Mets 9, N.Y. Yankees 4 Baltimore 9, Washington 6 Tampa Bay 3, Miami 1 Toronto 3, Atlanta 0 Arizona at Texas, ppd., rain Minnesota 4, Milwaukee 1 St. Louis 5, Kansas City 3 Houston at Colorado, (n) L.A. Dodgers at L.A. Angels, (n) Seattle at San Diego, (n) Oakland at San Francisco, (n)

Thursday’s Games Arizona (Miley 3-4) at Texas (D.Holland 4-2), 2:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Peavy 6-2) at Chicago Cubs (Wood 4-3), 2:20 p.m. Seattle (F.Hernandez 5-4) at San Diego (Cashner 4-2), 3:40 p.m. Oakland (Griffin 5-3) at San Francisco (Zito 3-3), 3:45 p.m. Boston (Morales 0-0) at Philadelphia (Pettibone 3-0), 7:05 p.m. Cincinnati (H.Bailey 3-3) at Cleveland (Kazmir 2-2), 7:05 p.m. Detroit (Fister 5-2) at Pittsburgh (Locke 5-1), 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Gee 2-6) at N.Y. Yankees (Nuno 1-1), 7:05 p.m. Washington (Haren 4-5) at Baltimore (F.Garcia 1-2), 7:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (M.Moore 8-0) at Miami (Nolasco 3-5), 7:10 p.m. Toronto (Dickey 4-6) at Atlanta (Minor 6-2), 7:10 p.m. Milwaukee (Lohse 1-5) at Minnesota (Walters 1-0), 8:10 p.m. Kansas City (Guthrie 5-3) at St. Louis (Wacha 0-0), 8:15 p.m. Houston (Harrell 3-6) at Colorado (Nicasio 4-1), 8:40 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Lilly 0-1) at L.A. Angels (Vargas 4-3), 10:05 p.m.

American League Friday’s Games Boston at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. Detroit at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. Kansas City at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Seattle at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Oakland, 10:05 p.m. Houston at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Toronto at San Diego, 10:10 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE Friday’s Games Arizona at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Miami, 7:10 p.m. Washington at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. San Francisco at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Toronto at San Diego, 10:10 p.m.

Cubs 9, White Sox 3 Chicago (A) Chicago (N) ab r h bi ab r h bi De Aza cf-lf 3 0 0 1 DeJess cf 5 1 2 0 AlRmrz ss 4 1 2 0 SCastro ss 5 0 1 0 Rios rf 4 0 0 0 Rizzo 1b 4 1 1 1 A.Dunn 1b 3 0 0 1 ASorin lf 3 1 0 0 Viciedo lf 3 0 0 0 Marml p 0 0 0 0 Lndstr p 0 0 0 0 AlBrntt p 0 0 0 0 Omgrss p 0 0 0 0 Hairstn rf-lf 4 2 2 0 Gimenz ph 1 0 0 0 DNavrr c 3 4 3 6 NJones p 0 0 0 0 Valuen 3b 2 0 0 0 Gillaspi 3b 4 1 1 0 Barney 2b 4 0 1 0 Kppngr 2b 4 0 3 0 Feldmn p 2 0 0 0 Flowrs c 4 1 2 1 Sweeny ph 1 0 1 1 JhDnks p 0 0 0 0 Villanv p 0 0 0 0 C.Wells ph 1 0 1 0 Schrhlt rf 1 0 0 0 HSantg p 0 0 0 0 Wise cf 2 0 0 0 Totals 33 3 9 3 Totals 34 9 11 8 Chicago (A) 010 010 010 —3 Chicago (N) 110 202 30x —9 E-Viciedo (2). DP-Chicago (A) 1. LOB-Chicago (A) 6, Chicago (N) 5. 2B-Al.Ramirez (11), Flowers (6), Barney (10). HR-D.Navarro 3 (6). SB-Al. Ramirez 2 (10). S-Joh.Danks, Valbuena. SF-De Aza, A.Dunn. IP H R ER BB SO Chicago (A) Joh.Danks L,0-1 4 5 4 3 1 2 H.Santiago 1 1-3 2 2 2 1 1 Lindstrom 2-3 2 0 0 0 0 Omogrosso 1 2 3 3 0 3 N.Jones 1 0 0 0 0 1 Chicago (N) Feldman W,5-4 6 6 2 2 0 7 Villanueva 1 1 0 0 0 2 Marmol 1 1 1 0 0 2 Al.Burnett 1 1 0 0 0 0 HBP-by Omogrosso (A.Soriano). WP-Lindstrom. PB-D.Navarro. Umpires-Home, Tim Welke; First, Clint Fagan; Second, Mike Everitt; Third, Scott Barry. T-3:09. A-31,279 (41,019).

Rays 3, Marlins 1 Tampa Bay Miami ab r h bi ab r h bi Zobrist 2b 4 1 1 0 Coghln lf 4 1 1 0 Joyce rf 4 1 1 0 Polanc 3b 4 0 1 0 KJhnsn lf 4 0 1 1 Dietrch 2b 4 0 0 0 Fuld lf 0 0 0 0 Ozuna rf 3 0 1 0 Longori 3b 4 0 0 0 Ruggin cf 3 0 0 0 Loney 1b 4 1 1 0 Dobbs 1b 3 0 0 0 DJnngs cf 2 0 2 0 Hchvrr ss 3 0 0 0 YEscor ss 2 0 0 1 Brantly c 3 0 0 0 JMolin c 3 0 1 0 Koehler p 2 0 0 0 RHrndz p 3 0 0 0 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 Rodney p 0 0 0 0 Pierre ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 30 3 7 2 Totals 30 1 3 0 Tampa Bay 200 000 100 —3 Miami 100 000 000 —1 E-Joyce (1). DP-Miami 1. LOB-Tampa Bay 2, Miami 2. 2B-Joyce (8), Loney (14), Coghlan (7). SBOzuna (3). CS-De.Jennings (5). SF-Y.Escobar. IP H R ER BB SO Tampa Bay Ro.Hernandez W,3-5 8 2-3 3 1 0 0 5 Rodney S,10-15 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 Miami Koehler L,0-3 8 7 3 3 1 4 Cishek 1 0 0 0 0 0 Umpires-Home, Alan Porter; First, Jerry Layne; Second, Greg Gibson; Third, Hunter Wendelstedt. T-2:13. A-16,671 (37,442).

Pirates 5, Tigers 3 Detroit Pittsburgh ab r h bi ab r h bi Dirks lf-rf 5 1 1 1 SMarte lf 4 0 1 0 TrHntr rf 3 0 1 0 Walker 2b 4 1 2 1 AGarci cf 1 0 0 0 McCtch cf 4 0 1 0 MiCarr 3b 5 1 1 2 GJones 1b 3 1 1 0 Fielder 1b 4 0 1 0 Watson p 0 0 0 0 JhPerlt ss 4 0 1 0 Inge ph 1 0 0 0 Avila c 2 0 0 0 Grilli p 0 0 0 0 B.Pena ph-c 1 0 1 0 RMartn c 3 1 0 0 Infante 2b 4 0 0 0 PAlvrz 3b 3 1 1 2 D.Kelly cf 0 1 0 0 Snider rf 3 1 1 1 Tuiassp ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Mercer ss 3 0 1 1 AnSnch p 1 0 0 0 AJBrnt p 1 0 0 0 Smyly p 0 0 0 0 JHrrsn ph 1 0 0 0 VMrtnz ph 1 0 1 0 Morris p 0 0 0 0 GSnchz ph-1b 1 0 0 0 Totals 32 3 7 3 Totals 31 5 8 5 Detroit 000 030 000 —3 Pittsburgh 000 100 40x —5 E-G.Jones (3), P.Alvarez (8). DP-Detroit 1, Pittsburgh 1. LOB-Detroit 9, Pittsburgh 3. 2B-Dirks (4), P.Alvarez (3), Snider (10). HR-Mi.Cabrera (15), Walker (4). SB-S.Marte (14), Mercer (2). CS-McCutchen (3). S-Ani.Sanchez 2. IP H R ER BB SO Detroit Ani.Sanchez L,5-5 6 2-3 7 5 5 1 9 Smyly 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 2 Pittsburgh A.J.Burnett 6 5 3 3 4 4 Morris W,2-2 1 0 0 0 0 0 Watson H,9 1 1 0 0 0 1 Grilli S,22-22 1 1 0 0 0 1 HBP-by Morris (Tor.Hunter). WP-Ani.Sanchez, A.J.Burnett. Umpires-Home, Wally Bell; First, Manny Gonzalez; Second, Tony Randazzo; Third, Larry Vanover. T-2:41. A-19,980 (38,362). Orioles 9, Nationals 6 Washington Baltimore ab r h bi ab r h bi Span cf 4 1 1 1 McLoth lf 5 1 2 0 Berndn rf 4 1 1 1 Machd 3b 5 1 1 1 Zmrmn 3b 4 3 3 4 Markks rf 4 2 2 2 LaRoch 1b 3 0 1 0 A.Jones cf 4 0 0 0 Dsmnd ss 3 0 1 0 C.Davis 1b 4 3 4 3 TMoore lf 4 0 0 0 Wieters c 4 0 1 0 Tracy dh 4 0 0 0 Hardy ss 4 0 0 0 KSuzuk c 4 0 0 0 Flahrty 2b 4 1 2 1 Espinos 2b 4 1 1 0 Pearce dh 3 1 1 2 Totals 34 6 8 6 Totals 37 9 13 9 Washington 100 230 000 —6 Baltimore 010 101 60x —9 E-Hardy (5). DP-Baltimore 1. LOB-Washington 3, Baltimore 5. 2B-Span (10), Machado (24), Flaherty (4). HR-Bernadina (2), Zimmerman 3 (6), Markakis (6), C.Davis 2 (19), Pearce (3). SBMcLouth (17). IP H R ER BB SO Washington Zimmermann L,8-3 6 10 7 7 1 3 Clippard 1 2 2 2 0 2 H.Rodriguez 1 1 0 0 0 0 Baltimore Tillman 4 2-3 8 6 6 1 4 S.Johnson W,1-1 2 1-3 0 0 0 1 2 Tom.Hunter H,3 1 0 0 0 0 2 Ji.Johnson S,16-20 1 0 0 0 0 2 Zimmermann pitched to 4 batters in the 7th. Umpires-Home, Ron Kulpa; First, Mike Estabrook; Second, Phil Cuzzi; Third, Tom Hallion. T-2:47. A-39,129 (45,971).

Indians 5, Reds 2 Cincinnati Cleveland ab r h bi ab r h bi Choo cf 4 0 1 0 Bourn cf 4 0 1 0 Cozart ss 4 0 1 0 Kipnis 2b 3 0 0 0 Votto 1b 4 1 1 1 ACarer ss 4 2 2 0 Phillips 2b 4 0 2 0 Swisher 1b 4 1 2 1 Bruce rf 3 0 0 0 Giambi dh 4 1 2 3 Frazier 3b 2 0 0 0 CSantn c 3 0 1 0 Paul lf 4 1 1 1 MrRynl 3b 4 1 1 1 Hanign c 3 0 0 0 Brantly lf 3 0 0 0 Hannhn dh 4 0 0 0 Stubbs rf 2 0 0 0 Totals 32 2 6 2 Totals 31 5 9 5 Cincinnati 100 000 001 —2 Cleveland 001 103 00x —5 E-Votto (4), Swisher (2). DP-Cleveland 2. LOBCincinnati 8, Cleveland 5. 2B-A.Cabrera (17), Swisher (14), Giambi (4). HR-Votto (10), Paul (3), Giambi (4), Mar.Reynolds (13). CS-Giambi (1). IP H R ER BB SO Cincinnati Arroyo L,5-5 5 2-3 8 5 5 1 3 Ondrusek 1 1-3 1 0 0 2 1 Hoover 1 0 0 0 0 1 Cleveland Masterson W,8-3 6 4 1 1 4 7 Allen 1 0 0 0 0 2 J.Smith 1 1 0 0 0 1 Pestano S,1-3 1 1 1 1 0 1 HBP-by Masterson (Frazier). Umpires-Home, Jeff Kellogg; First, Eric Cooper; Second, Paul Schrieber; Third, Chad Fairchild. T-2:49. A-18,004 (42,241). Mets 9, Yankees 4 New York (N) New York (A) ab r h bi ab r h bi RTejad ss 5 1 1 0 Gardnr cf 5 1 1 0 Turner ss 0 0 0 0 Cano 2b 5 0 2 1 DnMrp 2b 5 2 2 1 Hafner dh 5 1 1 0 DWrght 3b 4 2 1 0 Overay 1b 4 1 1 0 Duda dh 5 0 1 2 Boesch rf 4 1 3 2 Buck c 5 1 2 1 ISuzuki lf 4 0 2 0 Ankiel cf 4 1 1 1 J.Nix 3b 4 0 2 1 Byrd rf 5 1 2 2 Brignc ss 4 0 0 0 I.Davis 1b 5 0 2 2 CStwrt c 3 0 0 0 Baxter lf 2 1 0 0 DAdms ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 40 9 12 9 Totals 39 4 12 4 New York (N) 501 200 001 —9 New York (A) 000 102 001 —4 E-Byrd (2), J.Nix (4). LOB-New York (N) 8, New York (A) 8. 2B-Dan.Murphy (17), Duda (10), Overbay (12). HR-Byrd (5), Boesch (3). IP H R ER BB SO New York (N) Hefner W,1-5 6 9 3 3 0 5 Rice 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 3 Hawkins 1 1-3 2 1 1 0 1 New York (A) D.Phelps L,3-3 1-3 4 5 4 2 1 Claiborne 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 Warren 2 3 3 3 0 3 Nova 5 5 1 1 1 6 HBP-by Warren (Baxter). Umpires-Home, Bill Welke; First, Adrian Johnson; Second, Fieldin Culbreth; Third, Brian O’Nora. T-3:11. A-43,681 (50,291). Blue Jays 3, Braves 0 Toronto Atlanta ab r h bi ab r h bi MeCarr lf 3 1 3 2 Smmns ss 4 0 1 0 Wagner p 0 0 0 0 Heywrd rf 3 0 0 0 Lind ph 1 0 0 0 J.Upton lf 4 0 0 0 Janssn p 0 0 0 0 FFrmn 1b 4 0 2 0 Bautist rf 4 0 0 0 McCnn c 3 0 0 0 Encrnc 1b 4 0 3 0 Uggla 2b 2 0 0 0 Arencii c 5 0 0 1 JFrncs 3b 3 0 0 0 ClRsms cf 3 0 0 0 BUpton cf 3 0 0 0 MIzturs 3b 4 0 0 0 Medlen p 0 0 0 0 Bonifac 2b 4 1 2 0 DCrpnt p 1 0 0 0 Kawsk ss 2 1 0 0 RJhnsn ph 1 0 0 0 ERogrs p 0 0 0 0 Varvar p 0 0 0 0 J.Perez p 0 0 0 0 Walden p 0 0 0 0 Gose ph-lf 1 0 0 0 JSchafr ph 1 0 1 0 Gearrin p 0 0 0 0 Totals 31 3 8 3 Totals 29 0 4 0 Toronto 120 000 000 —3 Atlanta 000 000 000 —0 E-Uggla (8), F.Freeman (4). DP-Toronto 2, Atlanta

THURSDAY, MAY 30, 2013 Page 3B 2. LOB-Toronto 10, Atlanta 5. 3B-F.Freeman (1). SB-Bonifacio (5). CS-Bonifacio (2). S-E.Rogers 2. IP H R ER BB SO Toronto E.Rogers 3 1-3 3 0 0 2 4 J.Perez W,1-0 2 2-3 0 0 0 0 4 Wagner H,1 2 1 0 0 0 2 Janssen S,11-11 1 0 0 0 0 1 Atlanta Medlen L,1-6 2 4 3 3 1 1 D.Carpenter 3 1 0 0 4 1 Varvaro 2 2 0 0 0 2 Walden 1 0 0 0 0 2 Gearrin 1 1 0 0 2 0 HBP-by E.Rogers (Uggla). Umpires-Home, Jim Reynolds; First, Paul Nauert; Second, James Hoye; Third, John Tumpane. T-2:55. A-22,489 (49,586). Phillies 4, Red Sox 3 Boston Philadelphia ab r h bi ab r h bi Ellsury cf 5 1 2 1 Revere cf 4 0 1 0 Nava rf 4 1 1 1 Frndsn 2b 3 0 1 0 Pedroia 2b 3 0 1 1 MAdms p 0 0 0 0 Napoli 1b 3 0 1 0 Papeln p 0 0 0 0 Sltlmch c 4 0 0 0 Rollins ss 2 0 0 0 Carp lf 3 0 0 0 Howard 1b 4 1 1 1 AMiller p 0 0 0 0 DYong rf 2 0 1 0 Uehara p 0 0 0 0 Mayrry pr-rf 1 0 0 0 BrdlyJr ph 1 0 0 0 DBrwn lf 4 2 2 2 Drew ss 2 1 0 0 Kratz c 3 1 1 1 Iglesias 3b 3 0 1 0 Galvis 3b 4 0 0 0 D.Ortiz ph 1 0 0 0 Kndrck p 2 0 1 0 Lackey p 1 0 0 0 Bastrd p 0 0 0 0 JGoms ph-lf 1 0 1 0 CHrndz ph-2b 2 0 0 0 Totals 31 3 7 3 Totals 31 4 8 4 Boston 100 001 001 —3 Philadelphia 010 200 01x —4 E-Howard (1). DP-Boston 1, Philadelphia 1. LOBBoston 8, Philadelphia 8. 2B-Ellsbury (11), Iglesias (4). 3B-Ellsbury (5). HR-Nava (7), Howard (7), D.Brown 2 (13), Kratz (6). SB-Revere (10), Frandsen (1), Mayberry (3), D.Brown (3). CS-Pedroia (2). S-Lackey. SF-Pedroia. IP H R ER BB SO Boston Lackey L,3-5 6 6 3 3 3 5 A.Miller 2-3 1 0 0 2 1 Uehara 1 1-3 1 1 1 0 1 Philadelphia K.Kendrick W,5-3 6 4 2 2 3 3 Bastardo H,7 1 1 0 0 0 2 Mi.Adams H,5 1 0 0 0 0 2 Papelbon S,11-11 1 2 1 1 1 1 HBP-by Bastardo (J.Gomes). Umpires-Home, Dale Scott; First, Bill Miller; Second, CB Bucknor; Third, Todd Tichenor. T-3:08. A-38,831 (43,651). Twins 4, Brewers 1 Milwaukee Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi Aoki rf 3 0 0 0 EEscor 3b 4 1 1 0 Segura ss 3 0 0 0 Dozier 2b 4 1 1 0 Braun lf 2 0 0 0 Mauer dh 3 0 1 0 ArRmr dh 4 0 1 0 Wlngh lf 4 0 1 0 CGomz cf 4 1 2 0 Doumit rf 3 1 1 2 Lucroy c 4 0 1 0 Parmel 1b 4 0 1 0 YBtncr 1b 4 0 0 1 CHrmn c 3 0 1 1 Weeks 2b 3 0 1 0 Hicks cf 3 1 1 1 Bianchi 3b 4 0 0 0 Flormn ss 3 0 0 0 Totals 31 1 5 1 Totals 31 4 8 4 Milwaukee 010 000 000 —1 Minnesota 300 100 00x —4 E-Estrada (1). DP-Milwaukee 1, Minnesota 1. LOB-Milwaukee 8, Minnesota 5. 2B-Ar.Ramirez (8), C.Gomez (14), Willingham (10), Doumit (10). HR-Hicks (6). IP H R ER BB SO Milwaukee Estrada L,4-3 7 7 4 4 0 5 Gorzelanny 1 1 0 0 2 2 Minnesota Deduno W,1-1 7 4 1 1 2 2 Fien H,5 1 0 0 0 0 0 Perkins S,11-13 1 1 0 0 0 2 Deduno pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. HBP-by Deduno (Aoki, Weeks, Segura). BalkDeduno. Umpires-Home, Angel Hernandez; First, Jordan Baker; Second, Dana DeMuth; Third, Doug Eddings. T-2:32. A-31,359 (39,021). Cardinals 5, Royals 3 Kansas City St. Louis ab r h bi ab r h bi AGordn lf 5 1 3 0 MCrpnt 2b-3b 5 0 1 0 AEscor ss 5 0 2 0 Beltran rf 4 1 1 1 L.Cain cf 3 0 0 1 Hollidy lf 4 1 1 1 Butler 1b 4 0 0 0 Craig 1b 4 1 3 0 Crow p 0 0 0 0 YMolin c 4 1 3 0 Hochvr p 0 0 0 0 Freese 3b 2 1 1 1 Mostks 3b 4 1 2 0 Mujica p 0 0 0 0 Lough rf 3 1 2 0 Jay cf 3 0 0 0 Kottars c 4 0 0 1 Kozma ss 4 0 0 0 Getz 2b 3 0 0 0 Lynn p 1 0 0 0 JGutrrz p 0 0 0 0 MAdms ph 1 0 1 0 Hosmer ph-1b 1 0 0 0 SRonsn pr 0 0 0 0 Mendoz p 2 0 1 1 Maness p 0 0 0 0 Collins p 0 0 0 0 Choate p 0 0 0 0 EJhnsn ph-2b 2 0 0 0 Descals ph-2b 1 0 1 2 Totals 36 3 10 3 Totals 33 5 12 5 Kansas City 000 110 010 —3 St. Louis 000 001 04x —5 DP-Kansas City 2. LOB-Kansas City 8, St. Louis 8. 2B-A.Gordon (12), A.Escobar (8), Craig (15). 3B-Lough (2). HR-Beltran (12), Holliday (8). SF-L. Cain. IP H R ER BB SO Kansas City Mendoza 5 2-3 6 1 1 3 5 Collins H,5 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 J.Gutierrez H,2 1 1 0 0 0 0 Crow L,0-1 BS,1-2 2-3 5 4 4 1 2 Hochevar 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 St. Louis Lynn 7 8 2 2 1 4 Maness 2-3 2 1 1 0 1 Choate W,1-0 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 Mujica S,17-17 1 0 0 0 0 1 Umpires-Home, David Rackley; First, Andy Fletcher; Second, Rob Drake; Third, Joe West. T-2:50. A-43,477 (43,975).

This date in baseball

May 30 1894 — Boston’s Robert Lowe became the first player in Major League history to hit four home runs in a game, leading the Beaneaters to a 2011 win over Cincinnati. After hitting four straight homers, all line drives far over the fence, Lowe added a single to set a major league record with 17 total bases. 1922 — Between the morning and afternoon games of a Memorial Day twin bill, Max Flack of the Chicago Cubs was traded to the St. Louis Cardinals for Cliff Heathcote. They played one game for each team. 1927 — In the fourth inning of a game against the Pittsburgh Pirates, shortstop Jim Cooney of the Chicago Cubs caught Paul Waner’s liner, stepped on second to double Lloyd Waner and then tagged Clyde Barnhart coming from first for an unassisted triple play. 1935 — Babe Ruth made his last major league appearance. He played one inning for the Boston Braves against the Philadelphia Phillies. Jim Bivin retired Babe Ruth on an infield grounder in the Babe’s final major league at-bat. 1940 — Carl Hubbell of the New York Giants threw 87 pitches in a 7-0 one-hitter against the Brooklyn Dodgers. He faced the minimum 27 batters. Johnny Hudson, who singled, was caught stealing. 1956 - Mickey Mantle hit a home run which came within a foot-and-a-half of leaving Yankee Stadium. It hit the face of the upper deck in right field, 370 feet from home plate and 117 feet in the air. Mantle became the first player to hit 20 home runs by the end of May as the Yankees beat the Washington Senators 4-3. 1961 — Mickey Mantle, Roger Maris and Bill Skowron each hit two homers to lead the New York Yankees to a 12-3 rout of the Boston Red Sox. Yogi Berra also added a homer. 1962 — Pedro Ramos of the Cleveland Indians tossed a three-hitter and hit two home runs, including a grand slam, for a 7-0 victory over the Baltimore Orioles. 1977 — Cleveland’s Dennis Eckersley pitched a 1-0 no-hitter against the California Angels. 1982 — Baltimore’s Cal Ripken Jr. began his record consecutive games streak by starting at third base against the Toronto Blue Jays. 1987 — Eric Davis hit a grand slam in the third inning, breaking two National League records and leading the Cincinnati Reds to a 6-2 victory over the Pittsburgh Pirates. Davis became the first NL player to hit three grand slams in a month and his major league leading 19 homers broke the NL record for most homers in April and May. 1992 — Scott Sanderson became the ninth pitcher to beat all 26 major league teams as New York defeated Milwaukee 8-1. Sanderson joined Nolan Ryan, Tommy John, Don Sutton, Mike Torrez, Rick Wise, Gaylord Perry, Doyle Alexander and Rich Gossage as those who have defeated every club. 2001 — Barry Bonds hit two home runs, moving past Willie McCovey and Ted Williams into 11th place on the career list with 522. Bonds with 17 home runs in May, surpassed the mark set by Mark McGwire in 1998 and Mickey Mantle in 1956. 2003 — Ken Griffey Jr. hit a game-tying home run in the ninth and a go-ahead homer in the top of the 11th to lead Cincinnati over Florida 4-3. 2009 — Travis Tucker hit an RBI single with one out in the top of the 25th inning, leading Texas to a 3-2 victory over Boston College in the longest game in NCAA history. The game eclipsed the previous record of 23 innings, set in 1971 when Louisiana-Lafayette defeated McNeese State 6-5. 2010 — Albert Pujols hit three long home runs to lead the St. Louis Cardinals to a 9-1 win over the Chicago Cubs. Pujols homered in the first, fifth and ninth innings for his fourth career three-homer game. 2011 — Jo-Jo Reyes won for the first time in 29 starts by throwing his first career complete game to lead Toronto to an 11-1 rout of Cleveland. Reyes avoided becoming the first pitcher to go winless in 29 starts. Oakland’s Matt Keough went 28 starts between wins in 1978 and 1979, matching the dubious mark first set by Boston’s Cliff Curtis in 1910 and 1911.

TUESDAY’S LATE BOXES

Padres 6, Mariners 1 San Diego Seattle ab r h bi ab r h bi EvCarr ss 3 0 0 0 EnChvz lf-rf 4 0 0 0 Amarst cf 3 1 1 1 Seager 3b 4 0 1 0 Denorfi ph-rf 2 0 0 0 Ibanez dh 3 0 0 0 Headly 3b 5 0 1 0 KMorls 1b 4 0 1 0 Quentin dh 4 1 2 0 Morse rf 1 1 1 0 Alonso 1b 4 1 1 0 Bay lf 2 0 0 0 Grandl c 4 1 1 0 MSndrs cf 1 0 1 0 Gyorko 2b 3 2 1 2 Frnkln 2b 4 0 0 0 Kotsay lf 4 0 1 2 Sucre c 3 0 0 1 Blanks lf 0 0 0 0 Ryan ss 3 0 0 0 Venale rf-cf 4 0 1 0 Totals 36 6 9 5 Totals 29 1 4 1 San Diego 000 213 000 —6 Seattle 010 000 000 —1 E-Franklin (1). LOB-San Diego 6, Seattle 7. 2BHeadley (9), M.Saunders (5). HR-Amarista (4), Gyorko (6). S-Ev.Cabrera. SF-Sucre. IP H R ER BB SO San Diego Volquez W,4-5 7 2-3 4 1 1 3 5 Thatcher 0 0 0 0 1 0 Thayer 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 Seattle Maurer L,2-7 5 2-3 9 6 5 1 2 Furbush 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 Farquhar 2 0 0 0 0 4 Thatcher pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. WP-Maurer 2. Dodgers 3, Angels 0 Los Angeles (A) Los Angeles (N) ab r h bi ab r h bi Aybar ss 4 0 0 0 Crwfrd lf 4 0 0 0 Trout cf 4 0 0 0 M.Ellis 2b 3 0 1 0 Pujols 1b 3 0 0 0 AdGnzl 1b 4 0 0 0 Trumo rf 3 0 0 0 Ethier rf 4 0 1 0 HKndrc 2b 3 0 1 0 Kemp cf 2 1 1 0 Callasp 3b 3 0 0 0 Schmkr cf 0 0 0 0 Iannett c 3 0 1 0 A.Ellis c 3 0 1 1 Shuck lf 3 0 0 0 Uribe 3b 3 1 1 0 Blanton p 2 0 0 0 L.Cruz ss 3 1 1 2 DDLRs p 0 0 0 0 Ryu p 3 0 1 0 BHarrs ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 29 0 2 0 Totals 29 3 7 3 Los Angeles (A) 000 000 000 —0 Los Angeles (N) 000 021 00x —3 DP-Los Angeles (A) 1. LOB-Los Angeles (A) 2, Los Angeles (N) 4. 2B-Iannetta (5), Ethier (8), Kemp (10), Ryu (2). HR-L.Cruz (1). IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles (A) Blanton L,1-8 7 7 3 3 0 5 D.De La Rosa 1 0 0 0 1 0 Los Angeles (N) Ryu W,6-2 9 2 0 0 0 7 HBP-by Blanton (Kemp). Athletics 6, Giants 3 San Francisco Oakland ab r h bi ab r h bi GBlanc cf 4 0 0 0 Crisp cf 5 0 1 0 Scutaro dh 4 2 2 0 CYoung rf 4 1 0 0 Sandovl 3b 3 0 0 0 Cespds lf 5 1 1 0 Posey c 4 0 0 1 Dnldsn 3b 3 1 2 0 Pence rf 4 1 2 2 Lowrie 2b 3 1 2 1 Belt 1b 4 0 1 0 Freimn 1b 2 0 1 1 AnTrrs lf 4 0 0 0 Moss ph-1b 2 0 0 0 BCrwfr ss 3 0 1 0 DNorrs c 3 1 1 2 Noonan 2b 3 0 0 0 Montz dh 0 0 0 0 S.Smith ph-dh 2 0 0 1 Rosales ss 4 1 1 1 Totals 33 3 6 3 Totals 33 6 9 6 San Francisco 100 001 001 —3 Oakland 022 010 01x —6

E-C.Young (2). DP-Oakland 1. LOB-San Francisco 4, Oakland 9. 2B-Scutaro (12), Belt (10), Cespedes (7), Donaldson (18). HR-Pence (8), D.Norris (2), Rosales (3). IP H R ER BB SO San Francisco Kickham L,0-1 2 1-3 4 4 4 4 3 Kontos 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 J.Lopez 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 Gaudin 3 2 1 1 2 2 Mijares 2 3 1 1 0 1 Oakland Parker W,3-6 7 5 2 2 1 4 Cook H,7 1 0 0 0 0 0 Balfour 1 1 1 1 0 2

Cubs 7, White Sox 0 Chicago (N) Chicago (A) ab r h bi ab r h bi Borbon cf 5 2 2 2 De Aza cf 4 0 0 0 SCastro ss 4 2 2 0 AlRmrz ss 4 0 1 0 Rizzo 1b 5 2 2 2 Rios rf 4 0 0 0 ASorin lf 4 0 3 2 A.Dunn dh 3 0 0 0 Hairstn dh 3 0 0 1 Konerk 1b 2 0 0 0 Castillo c 3 0 0 0 Viciedo lf 3 0 0 0 Ransm 3b 4 0 0 0 Gillaspi 3b 3 0 1 0 Sweeny rf 3 1 0 0 Kppngr 2b 3 0 0 0 Barney 2b 4 0 0 0 Flowrs c 2 0 0 0 Totals 35 7 9 7 Totals 28 0 2 0 Chicago (N) 100 021 300 —7 Chicago (A) 000 000 000 —0 E-Flowers (3). DP-Chicago (N) 1. LOB-Chicago (N) 5, Chicago (A) 3. 2B-S.Castro (12), Rizzo (16). 3B-Rizzo (1). HR-Borbon (1). SB-S.Castro (3), A.Soriano (6). SF-Hairston. IP H R ER BB SO Chicago (N) Samardzija W,3-6 9 2 0 0 2 8 Chicago (A) Quintana L,3-2 6 4 4 4 3 5 N.Jones 1 4 3 3 0 1 Omogrosso 2 1 0 0 0 2

Mets 2, Yankees 1 New York (A) New York (N) ab r h bi ab r h bi Gardnr cf 4 1 2 0 RTejad ss 4 0 0 0 Cano 2b 4 0 1 0 DnMrp 2b 4 1 2 0 V.Wells lf 4 0 1 0 DWrght 3b 4 1 2 1 Overay 1b 4 0 1 1 Duda lf 4 0 2 1 DAdms 3b 4 0 0 0 Byrd rf 3 0 0 0 ISuzuki rf 4 0 1 0 Ankiel cf 3 0 1 0 Brignc ss 4 0 1 0 Buck c 3 0 0 0 CStwrt c 3 0 0 0 I.Davis 1b 3 0 0 0 Kuroda p 2 0 0 0 Harvey p 2 0 0 0 Hafner ph 1 0 0 0 Vldspn ph 1 0 0 0 DRrtsn p 0 0 0 0 Rice p 0 0 0 0 Rivera p 0 0 0 0 Totals 34 1 7 1 Totals 31 2 7 2 New York (A) 000 001 000 —1 New York (N) 000 000 002 —2 No outs when winning run scored. E-Cano (2), Gardner (1), Byrd (1), R.Tejada (8). LOB-New York (A) 6, New York (N) 5. 2B-Dan. Murphy (16). CS-I.Suzuki (2). IP H R ER BB SO New York (A) Kuroda 7 4 0 0 0 7 D.Robertson H,10 1 0 0 0 0 1 Rivera L,0-1 BS,1-19 0 3 2 1 0 0 New York (N) Harvey 8 6 1 1 0 10 Rice W,3-3 1 1 0 0 0 1 Rivera pitched to 3 batters in the 9th. PB-C.Stewart.

Pirates 1, Tigers 0 Pittsburgh Detroit ab r h bi ab r h bi SMarte lf 5 0 0 0 Dirks lf 5 0 0 0 Walker 2b 5 1 3 1 TrHntr rf 5 0 1 0 McCtch cf 5 0 1 0 MiCarr 3b 5 0 1 0 GJones dh 5 0 0 0 Fielder 1b 5 0 1 0 RMartn c 4 0 1 0 VMrtnz dh 4 0 0 0 PAlvrz 3b 3 0 1 0 JhPerlt ss 4 0 1 0 JHrrsn pr-3b 0 0 0 0 Avila c 1 0 1 0 Inge 3b 0 0 0 0 AGarci ph-cf 2 0 0 0 GSnchz 1b 4 0 0 0 Infante 2b 3 0 0 0 Snider rf 2 0 0 0 D.Kelly cf 2 0 0 0 Barmes ss 3 0 0 0 B.Pena ph-c 2 0 0 0 Mercer ph-ss 1 0 0 0 Totals 37 1 6 1 Totals 38 0 5 0 Pittsburgh 000 000 000 01 —1 Detroit 000 000 000 00 —0 E-Barmes (6), B.Pena (1). DP-Pittsburgh 1, Detroit 1. LOB-Pittsburgh 6, Detroit 7. HR-Walker (3). SB-Walker (1). S-J.Harrison. IP H R ER BB SO Pittsburgh J.Gomez 7 3 0 0 1 2 Ju.Wilson 2 1 0 0 0 2 Melancon W,1-0 1 1 0 0 1 1 Grilli S,21-21 1 0 0 0 0 3 Detroit Porcello 8 3 0 0 1 11 Benoit 1 1 0 0 0 2 Ortega L,0-2 2 2 1 1 1 1

Nationals 9, Orioles 3 Baltimore Washington ab r h bi ab r h bi McLoth lf 3 0 1 0 Span cf 4 0 1 1 Machd 3b 3 0 1 0 Lmrdzz 2b 4 1 1 0 Markks rf 4 0 0 0 Zmrmn 3b 4 1 2 0 A.Jones cf 4 0 0 0 LaRoch 1b 3 3 2 4 C.Davis 1b 4 2 2 1 Dsmnd ss 4 1 1 0 Wieters c 4 0 1 1 TMoore lf 4 1 1 2 Hardy ss 4 1 3 1 Berndn rf 4 1 2 2 YNavrr 2b 3 0 0 0 KSuzuk c 4 1 3 0 Patton p 0 0 0 0 Karns p 1 0 0 0 Valenci ph 1 0 0 0 Duke p 0 0 0 0 Gasmn p 1 0 0 0 Koerns ph 1 0 0 0 Pearce ph 1 0 0 0 Storen p 0 0 0 0 McFrln p 0 0 0 0 Clipprd p 0 0 0 0 ACasill ph-2b 1 0 0 0 JSolano ph 1 0 0 0 Abad p 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 3 8 3 Totals 34 9 13 9 Baltimore 010 200 000 —3 Washington 300 400 02x —9 DP-Baltimore 2, Washington 2. LOB-Baltimore 5, Washington 3. 2B-Wieters (13), Span (9), Desmond (15). HR-C.Davis (17), Hardy (10), LaRoche 2 (10), T.Moore (2), Bernadina (1). SB-McLouth (16). S-Karns. IP H R ER BB SO Baltimore Gausman L,0-2 4 8 7 7 1 0 McFarland 2 1 0 0 0 0 Patton 2 4 2 2 0 1 Washington Karns 4 1-3 5 3 3 2 3 Duke W,1-1 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 Storen 1 1 0 0 0 1 Clippard 1 2 0 0 0 0 Abad 1 0 0 0 0 1 Umpires-Home, Tom Hallion; First, Ron Kulpa; Second, Mike Estabrook; Third, Phil Cuzzi. T-2:44 (Rain delay: 1:21). A-35,664 (41,418).


C MY K S P O R T S

PAGE 4B THURSDAY, MAY 30, 2013

T R I P L E-A BAS E BA L L

HIGH SCHOOL SOFTBALL

PATRICK

RailRiders silenced by Arrieta

Continued from Page 1B

The Times Leader staff

NORFOLK, Va. —A night after piling up double-digit hits and reaching eight runs for the second straight game, the RailRiders only managed three hits and two runs on Wednesday night at Harbor Park falling to Norfolk, 5-2. Kelvin Perez got the start and Scranton/Wilkes-Barre was in an early hole as the Tides put up one in the first and two more in the second to open a 3-0 lead. Buck Britton started TIDES the scoring with a single to plate the first RAILRIDERS run in the top of the first inning. Trayvon Robinson and Jason Pridie each tallied an RBI-double in the second. The RailRiders, meanwhile couldn’t get anything going against Tides pitcher Jake Arrieta, who only allowed a two-out single to Corban Joseph in the third. Arrieta also walked two — both to Dan Johnson — in five innings of work to improve to 3-2. After Zelous Wheeler scored on a passed ball in the sixth to put Norfolk ahead 4-0, the RailRiders got something going in the top of the eighth off Tides pitcher — and former SWB Yankee Manny Delcarmen — with two outs. Joseph singled and Thomas Neal and Zoilo Almonte followed with walks to load the bases. Ronnier Mustelier singled to score Joseph and Neal to trim the deficit to 4-2. The threat came to an end when Johnson flied out. Perez lasted just 4 2/3 innings allowing three runs on eight hits. Dellin Betances made his third relief appearance since moving to the bullpen for the RailRiders. He lasted 2 1/3 innings fanning three, but didn’t walk any. But he did give up one run on two hits and uncorked a wild pitch.

5

2

RailRiders ab r h bi Tides ab r h bi Joseph 2b 4 1 2 0 Pridie dh 4 1 2 1 Neal rf 2 1 0 0 Wood ss 4 0 2 0 Almonte cf 3 0 0 0 Britton 2b 4 0 1 1 Mustelier lf 3 0 0 0 Canzler 1b 4 0 1 0 Johnson 1b 3 0 1 2 Hoes rf 4 1 0 0 Bell dh 4 0 0 0 Exposito c 3 0 1 1 Murton dh 4 0 0 0 Avery cf 4 0 0 0 Wilson c 4 0 0 0 Gonzalez ss 3 0 0 0 Totals 28 2 3 2 Totals 34 5 11 4 E – Gonzalez (1). LOB—SWB 6, NOR 7. TEAM RISP – SWB 1-for-4, NOR 4-for-16. 2B—Pridle 2 (16), Robinson (5), Expositio (9) RailRiders 000 000 020 — 2 Norfolk 120 001 01x — 5 RailRiders IP H R ER BB SO Perez (L, 0-3) 4.2 8 3 3 1 1 Betances 2.1 2 1 1 0 3 Miller 1 1 0 0 2 Norfolk IP H R ER BB SO Arrieta (W, 3-2) 5 1 0 0 2 2 Jones (H,2) 2.2 1 1 1 3 2 Delcarmen 0.1 1 1 1 2 0 Ascensio (S, 12) 1 0 0 0 0 2 WP – Perez K, Betances. Umpires—HP: David Soucy; 1B: Max Guyll; 3B: Will Little T—2:37. A—3,428

NFL

Source: Gronkowski to have disk surgery The Associated Press

New England tight end Rob Gronkowski will have back surgery on a disk in mid-June. A person familiar with the decision told The Associated Press on Wednesday that Gronkowski will undergo the surgery next month, which means he will miss the rest of offseason training activities with the Patriots. He could return for training camp at the end of July. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the Patriots do not reveal injury details publicly. Gronkowski missed the 2009 season at the University of Arizona after back surgery. Earlier this month, he underwent a fourth procedure on his left forearm, which he broke last season, to treat an infection. He broke the forearm Nov. 18 while blocking for an extra point against the Indianapolis Colts. He broke it again early in the Patriots’ first playoff game, a win over Houston, ending a rough season for the star tight end.

www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER

JASON REIDMILLER/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Berwick’s Taylor Kern hits a single in the second inning against Valley View Wednesday afternoon.

Valley View stymies Berwick By TOM FOX For The Times Leader

DUNMORE – Anna McElroy watched Courtney Hummel drift back toward the fence in left field and snag a ball in her glove right at the base. McElroy, Valley View’s senior catcher, just shook her head and trotted back to the dugout in the fourth frame. Three innings prior, the result was much different. The senior jumped all over a Margaret Bridge change-up, and crushed a two-out, game-winning home run in the bottom of the first, and the Lady Cougars rode Gina Chieffallo’s four-hitter en route to a 2-0 victory over Berwick at Marywood University. The victory is Valley View’s fourth straight District 2 Class 3A softball championship. The Lady Cougars, which reached the PIAA Class 3A state championship last season, have outscored its three district opponents by a margin of 16-1. “We work really hard all year round, and I’m so happy for our seniors,” Valley View head coach E.J. Weston said. “Two of them have been with me since they were freshmen. It’s a great honor for them. They deserve it. Honestly, I didn’t know what to expect coming into this one. Bridge pitched extremely well. Both teams had to fight through the heat. Gina pitched well, and as usual, Anna came through with the big hit, the two-run dinger.” One swing. That was the difference between the title and a season-

ender. Both Bridge and Chieffallo were sensational in the circle, tossing complete-game four-hitters. Chieffallo punched out 10, while Bridge sent five back to the dugout. One pitch. “That pitch was on me, actually,” Berwick head coach Brian Bridge said. “I called that pitch, and it was the wrong one to call. Unfortunately, it was a changeup across the plate, and she hit it. She’s a good hitter, and that’s why we called that pitch. We wanted to try to get her off-balance a little bit, and it got up in the zone and she did what you are supposed to do with it.” McElroy didn’t think about it. Didn’t waste time contemplating the scenario. With Blayse Cholish standing on first, thanks to a full-count, inning-opening single to left, McElroy drilled the first-pitch offering well beyond the left-field fence and into a bullpen-type facility. Just like that, the defending district champs had a 2-0 lead. “That was such a big hit. It was a great feeling,” McElroy said. “Honestly, I was not thinking one thing when I walked in the batter’s box. It was kind of like a change-up, an off-speed pitch, and I put my weight back and hit it. I was hoping for the best.” Berwick (14-4) never let the heads drop. The Lady Bulldogs just couldn’t find the timely baseknock to drag a run across the dish.

Brian Bridge’s squad stranded a runner on base in each of the first three innings, and left one Lady Bulldog standing on first in the top of the seventh. “We had opportunities, but we just couldn’t string them backto-back,” the head coach said. “I know the hits were pretty close between us. If we could have put them together a little better, maybe it could have been different, but that’s the way the ball bounces sometimes. I thought we played tough, and we never got down. That’s just the way it goes.” Valley View had a chance to extend the lead in the fourth, but left runners on the corners. The Lady Cougars also got a twoout triple by first baseman Alex Wiltz in the sixth, but couldn’t push her home, either. “Bridge is a terrific pitcher, and we knew that we were in for a battle with her,” Weston said. “I didn’t know what to expect because I only seen them one time. But that’s a quality team. I have a lot of respect for them and their coaching staff. You saw a game where both pitchers kept their teams in the game. It was the difference of one swing.” Taylor Kern had two hits for Berwick, while Moriah Lynn and Kylene Welsh added singles.

art-Haas teammates — Tony Stewart and Ryan Newman. Stewart has a sarcastic side to him. Newman possesses a dry wit. The trio played off each others comments Wednesday like a comedy team. “You just have to come to one of our debriefs and you’ll definitely have the answer to your question,” Stewart said. “I can tell you I don’t embarrass easy. And these two talking and some of the conversations they have, I’m like ‘Oh, God, I have to go get a Coke.’ I can promise you she’s just another person out there and fits in just fine.” Patrick has always had a way of blending in with the opposite sex. It started at an early age and continued through her racing career that took off with a fourth-place finish in the 2005 Indianapolis 500. “I’ve always been able to fit in with the guys really well,” Patrick said. “Since I was 10 years old, I spent more time with guys than girls. Gosh, I can remember being in grade school and having all the girls being mad at me because I got along with all the guys so well. I understand them, I understand the way they joke around. I don’t take anything too seriously. It’s very easy, just like if I spent all my time with girls.” The next step for Patrick is to go from a NASCAR curiosity to a steady performer. Although a rookie, her 22 Cup starts are

second most in series history by a female. Only Janet Guthrie, whose last race was in 1980, has more with 33. The results thus far haven’t been good. After a career-high eighth at the season-opening Daytona 500, Patrick hasn’t finished in the top 10. She is 30th in the standings, but Stewart has been impressed. “I think people underestimate how good she is right out of the box at tracks and how good she is about figuring out race tracks,” Stewart said. “Honestly, the 10 races she ran last year and the races she’s run this year, we haven’t had to do a lot of coaching with her.” Patrick’s hand-timed laps were about a second slower than laps by Newman and Paul Menard, who was also at Pocono with Richard Childress Racing teammates Jeff Burton and Kevin Harvick for two days of testing in preparation for the Party in the Poconos 400 Presented by Walmart on June 9. “We made five laps, so I really don’t know a whole lot yet,” Patrick said. “It seems like a neat place, definitely a unique track. I have a long way to go to get up to speed and get comfortable around here and start working on the car.” At least she has Stewart and Newman — past winners at Pocono Raceway — to help her … maybe. “I didn’t tell her anything. Make her learn like everybody else,” Stewart deadpanned. “Honestly, I haven’t told her anything yet because I haven’t been that good here lately.”

VALLEY VIEW 2, BERWICK 0 Berwick 000 000 0 – 0 4 1 Valley View 200 000 x – 2 4 1 B: Margaret Bridge and Sara Berlin. V: Gina Chieffallo and Anna McElroy. WP – Chieffallo (7 IP, 0R, 4H, 10K, 0BB). LP – Bridge (6IP, 2R, 4H, 5K, 1BB). HR: VV, McElroy. 3B: VV, Alex Wiltz. MH: B, Taylor Kern.

SOFTBALL

AP PHOTO

Danica Patrick gives Tony Stewart a kick as they walk from their garage area to do interviews after testing at Pocono Raceway on Wednesday afternoon.

Continued from Page 1B

then do everything possible to score, whether that meant pinch runners, sacrifice bunts, whatever. “We said we’re going to throw the kitchen sink (at them) first opportunity,” Trivelpiece said. The plan fell short several times until the top of the seventh. Browdy led off with a single to left. MacKenzie Yori bunted Browdy to second and a wild pitch sent her to third. Demko then lifted a flyball to right field and Browdy scored easily. “I was just thinking hit whatever, just score the run,” Demko said. Demko retired Williamsport in order in the bottom of the seventh, but the sixth inning was stressful. A single, double and intentional walk loaded the bases with one out. Demko then uncorked a wild pitch, but catcher Justine Rossi rifled the ball to her at home plate and she tagged out Kiatlyn Caringi trying to score. “That was really close. I don’t know,” said Demko, whose expression indicated she might have been a tad surprised by the umpire’s call. “That was a rise (pitch) and it rose. But it worked and got her out.” Demko was on the mark, though. She struck out nine and retired 14 of 15 at one point. She surrendered just four hits. “We have Becky and they don’t,” Trivelpiece said. “But what they have is pretty damn good.”

SOCCER

Belgium rocks US in Cleveland friendly By TOM WITHERS AP Sports Writer

AIMEE DILGER /THE TIMES LEADER

Bechy Demko pitches for Hazleton Area against Williamsport at Wilkes.

Williamsport also had the bases loaded in the first inning with one out and didn’t score. But like all season, Bower’s pitching kept the Millionaires in the game. The young bats, though, faltered. “We got a lot out of a senior pitcher and a bunch of underclassmen this year,” Williamsport coach Quint Bower said. “I pulled Alexis aside this week and told her one player can’t win or lose ballgames. We need players to step up. We talked last night a little bit about it. One player isn’t going to win or lose a ballgame.”

Hazleton Area AB R H BI 2B 3B HR MacKenzie Yori 3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 Becky Demko p 3 0 1 1 0 0 0

Maria Trivelpiece 2b 4 0 3 0 0 0 0 Lexi Wolk cf 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 Samantha Varela 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 Abby Sachse rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 Celine Podlesney dp 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 Jolene Browdy 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Justin Rossi c 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 Mikaela Browdy ss 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 Renee Taylor pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Hailey Kendall lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 Totals 25 1 7 1 0 0 0 Williamsport AB R H BI 2B 3B HR Taylor Brooks rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kaitlyn Caringi 3b 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 Alexis Bower p 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 Mikayla Bower ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 Samantha Fischer 1b 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kaliyah Moore dp 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 McKenzie Tebbs c 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 Chloe Jennings cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 Tiana McCormick 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 Shataya Buxton lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Totals 24 0 4 0 0 0 0 Hazleton Area 000 000 1 — 1 Williamsport 000 000 0 — 0 E — Hazleton Area 1, Williamsport 1. LOB — Hazleton Area 8, Williamsport 7. SF — Demko. SAC — Yori 2. SB — Trivelpiece, Kendall. CS — Podlesney. Hazleton Area IP H R ER BB SO Demko (W) 7 4 0 0 2 9 Williamsport IP H R ER BB SO A. Bower (L) 7 7 1 1 1 6

CLEVELAND — Christian Benteke scored two goals in the second half and Marouane Fellaini had another, leading Belgium to a 4-2 thrashing of the United States on Wednesday night in an international friendly the Americans hoped would get them ready for upcoming World Cup qualifiers. Boasting a strong roster with 10 players from the English Premier League, Belgium broke a 1-1 tie with three goals in the second half. It overpowered a U.S. team that has some work to do on defense before it can even think about making the field for next summer’s World Cup in Brazil. Benteke, who plays for Aston Villa, scored in the 56th and 71st minutes for Belgium, ranked 15th in the world and considered a rising European power. Geoff Cameron scored in the 22nd minute and Clint Dempsey pounded in a penalty kick in the 80th minute for the U.S. U.S. coach Jurgen Klinsmann figured Belgium would provide a stiff challenge for his evolving team, and while the Americans

had some nice moments, the Belgians controlled the game from the outset. Belgium took advantage of poor defense to score three of its goals. With the score 1-1 in the 56th minute, a turnover by American midfielder Brad Davis was compounded by defender Omar Gonzalez’s failure to clear the ball in front of the net. Gonzalez could have easily booted it over the touch or end line, but instead left the ball for Belgium’s Kevin De Bruyne. He centered it to Benteke for an easy tap-in past goalkeeper Brad Guzan, who replaced Tim Howard in the second half. Guzan came up with a nice save in the 64th minute, but seconds later he was fishing the ball from his net again. Fellaini, known as much for his puffy hairdo as his skills, headed his goal into the left corner off a beautiful cross by De Bruyne to make it 3-1. In the 71st minute, Benteke streaked behind defenders DaMarcus Beasley and Matt Besler and chipped in a pass from Steven Defour.


C MY K S P O R T S

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

a lot tighter. “Decent coverage, broken plays, blocking shots. We have to pass it around and find ways to get pucks to the net.”

OUTAGE Continued from Page 1B

Hynes. “We can say the power play cost us not scoring a goal, but we did hit the pipe on the power play and had a point blank chance by (Brian) Gibbons. We had some Grade A chances on the power play, they didn’t go in.” Riley Holzapfel hit the crossbar on one of the Penguins’ power play opportunities, and they had several chances in the first period alone, including 59 seconds of a two-man advantage in the final two minutes but were unable to get anything past Crunch goaltender Cedrick Desjardins. “That can be a turning point in the game,” Holzapfel said. “It’s a key point in the game anytime you can get a five-on-three in the playoffs. The momentum kind of swung their way.” After a scoreless first period, the Crunch got on the board midway through the second when Vladislav Namestnikov capitalized on an Alex Grant turnover and scored on a slapshot from the high slot to make it 1-0. The Penguins’ penalty kill did generate momentum late in the period. With Holzapfel off for a high-sticking double minor, the Penguins prevented the Crunch from extending their lead, led by several saves from Brad Thiessen to keep it 1-0 heading into the third. “It was a big kill for us,” Hynes said. “We didn’t have a huge response after that. It wasn’t like we took the game over.” Syracuse’s defense clamped down in the third and prevented the Penguins from pulling

THURSDAY, MAY 30, 2013 Page 5B

NOTES

• D Olli Maata, one of Pittsburgh’s two first round picks in 2012, played in his first game for the Penguins on Wednesday. • G Scott Darling, D Dylan Reese (injury), D Cody Wild, D Reid McNeill, C Chris Barton, C Jayson Megna (injury), LW Bobby Farnham, LW Anton Zlobin, LW Steve MacIntyre, D Harrison Ruopp, D Scott Harrington, and RW Matia Marcantuoni were scratched for the Penguins. • The last time the Penguins were shutout in the playoffs was May 4, 2011, 1-0 to Charlotte. • Game 4 is this Friday, 7:05 p.m. at the Mohegan Sun Arena. For tickets call 208-PENS.

Thiessen for the extra attacker for most of the final minute. The best chance the Penguins had came with four minutes remaining when Olli Maatta – playing in his first AHL game, whizzed a wrist shot from the high slot that Desjardins just snared with his glove. The Crunch put the game out of reach when J.T. Brown scored

into an empty net with five seconds left for the 2-0 win. Still, it was the lack of power play success coupled with a stout Syracuse defense that was responsible for the Penguins first shutout loss this postseason. “We got a little desperate,” said center Trevor Smith, who admitted Syracuse’s defense was

Syracuse 2 Penguins 0 Syracuse 0 1 1 — 2 Penguins 0 0 0 —0 First Period Scoring – None. Penalties – SYR, Paradis (roughing) 7:12; WBS, Gibbons (roughing) 7:12; WBS, Thompson (roughing) 7:12; SYR, Gudas (tripping) 9:33; SYR, Gudas (roughing) 13:57; WBS, Thompson (roughing) 13:57; WBS, Grant (boarding) 15:08; SYR, Paradis (cross-checking) 18:29; SYR, Gudas (roughing) 18:58; WBS, Gibbons (diving) 18:58; SYR, Cote (cross-checking) 19:29. Second Period Scoring – 1. SYR, Vladislav Namestnikov 1 (Palat) 7:29. Penalties – SYR, Cote (elbowing) 8:39; SYR, Barberio (high-sticking) 12:45; WBS, Holzapfel (high-sticking, double minor) 14:19. Third Period Scoring – 2. SYR, J.T. Brown 3 (Angelidis) empty net 19:55. Penalties – None. Shots on goal Syracuse – 6-9-7-22 Penguins – 10-7-5-22 Power-play Opportunities Syracuse – 0 of 4 Penguins – 0 of 5 Goaltenders Syracuse – Cedrick Desjardins 9-1 (22 saves – 22 shots) Penguins – Brad Thiessen 6-3 (20-21) Starters Syracuse – G Cedrick Desjardins, D JeanPhilippe Cote, D Mark Barberio, LW J.T. Wyman, C Mike Angelidis, RW J.T. Brown Penguins – G Brad Thiessen, D Philip Samuelsson, D Brian Dumoulin, LW Riley Holzapfel, C Warren Peters, RW Adam Payerl Three Stars 1. SYR, Cedrick Desjardins (22 saves, shutout) 2. SYR, Vladislav Namestnikov (game-wining goal) 3. WBS, Brad Thiessen (21 saves) Referee – Jean Hebert, Dave Lewis. Linesmen – Kiel Murchison, Jud Ritter Attendance – 4,012

“I’m still in shape and it doesn’t change much,” Maatta said. “It’s still the playoffs and everyone’s giving their best on the ice.” Still, Maatta admitted he was a little nervous before his first AHL game. But as the minutes ticked away, so did the nerves and he grew more comfortable on the Penguins’ blueline.

Head coach John Hynes rewarded the rookie with big minutes late in the game as the Penguins tried to erase the Crunch’s one-goal lead. And he almost came through, until Desjardins’ glove stopped the puck at the last second. “He did a nice job,” Hynes said. “He came in and didn’t know what to expect. His con-

fidence got better as the game went on and he earned the extra ice time.” Maatta took that as a vote of confidence - something that likely earned him another start in Game 4 on Friday. “It was big and I really enjoyed it (playing in the third period). I felt good that they trust me,” Maatta said.

FOR THE TIMES LEADER/CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK

Holy Redeemer’s Mike Conlin puts one over the net against Schuylkill Valley during Wednesday’s PIAA first-round match at

VOLLEYBALL Continued from Page 1B

S TA N L E Y C U P P L AY O F F S

Some of the seniors said, ‘Let’s get out of here in three (games) and it won’t be a problem.” It wasn’t. When Myslowski put down the final point, Redeemer wrapped up the match - and a spot in the state quarterfinals Saturday against either Manheim Central or Western Wayne - in just under 90 minutes. That left the Royals two hours to pull on their caps and gowns and pick up their diplomas. “It feels so great to have that game-winning kill,” said Myslowski, who made six of those kills, served 11 points including two aces and picked up four digs to complement his 22 assists. “Being it’s graduation night for us makes it all the more sweet.” Hard-hitting junior Mike Prociak made Redeemer’s strategy look even sweeter. The 6-foot-7 middle hitter pounded home a match-high 15 kills, including two straight to give the Royals breathing room with a four-point lead early in the final game. He then slammed home three consecutive points to put Redeemer up, and on the brink of the state-opening victory, 25-14. “At that point, we felt like we had the game sealed,” Prociak said. “We were completely in rhythm. We were just really in sync today. I think it’s a sense of knowing it’s playoff time. We

Seabrook’s OT goal lifts Blackhawks past Red Wings

Lacrosse

MAATA Continued from Page 1B

place - a fact he attributed to his long run with London in the OHL playoffs. Playoffs, no matter what the league, is all about intensity, he said.

AIMEE DILGER /THE TIMES LEADER

Linesmen Kiel Murchinson tries to break up a fight between the Penguins’ Joey Mormina and the Crunch’s Tyler Johnson during Wednesday night’s game at Mohegan Sun Arena in Wilkes-Barre Township.

The Associated Press

CHICAGO — Brent Seabrook sent a wrist shot past goalie Jimmy Howard’s glove 3:35 into overtime to give the Chicago Blackhawks a 2-1 victory over the Detroit Red Wings in Game 7 of their second-round playoff series on Wednesday night. The Blackhawks, who had the best record in the NHL regular season, rallied from a 3-1 series deficit to reach the Western Conference finals against the defending Stanley Cup champion Los Angeles Kings. For just the second time in NHL history, the final four teams remaining in the playoffs are the four most recent Stanley Cup winners. Chicago captured the Cup in 2010. Seabrook picked up a loose puck and skated in on Howard through the middle of the ice, with Detroit defenseman Niklas Kronwall in front of him. His shot hit Kronwall’s leg before it sailed into the left side of the net for the defenseman’s first goal of the postseason. “I was just trying to step up,” Seabrook said. “The coaches have been on me all year to get up and jump into the play.”

The sellout crowd of 22,103 roared as Seabrook skated over to the boards and was mobbed by his delirious teammates. Howard put his arm around Kronwall, who was down on one knee, and tried to console him while the Blackhawks celebrated. It was quite a change from the end of the third period, when the Blackhawks thought they had scored the go-ahead goal. But it was waved off with less than 2 minutes remaining by referee Stephen Walkom, who called a pair of penalties behind the play. Henrik Zetterberg scored the tying goal in the third period for Detroit, which beat second-seeded Anaheim in seven games in the first round. Howard finished with 33 saves. Pavel Datsyuk was held without a point, closing out an ineffective series for the Russian star. Chicago made it to the conference finals for the first time since it won the title in 2010 and will host Los Angeles in Game 1 on Saturday night. The Kings advanced with a 2-1 victory over San Jose in Game 7

on Tuesday night. Pittsburgh will host Boston in the opener of the East finals on Saturday. Chicago was one of the favorites to win the Stanley Cup when the playoffs began, storming to the Presidents’ Trophy during the lockout-shortened season. The Blackhawks then boosted their credentials with a five-game win over Minnesota in the first round and a convincing 4-1 victory against the Red Wings in the series opener. But Howard and Detroit responded with three straight victories, pushing Chicago to the edge of elimination. The frustrated Blackhawks held a team meeting the day after Game 4, where the seeds were planted for their improbable comeback. They felt one win would turn it around, and they were right. Three victories later — in which the Blackhawks outscored the Red Wings 10-5 after managing just two goals in Games 2-4 — made them the 25th team to win a series after trailing 3-1. It was the first time in franchise history they have made such a comeback.

After second-round loss, Rangers fire coach Tortorella By IRA PODELL AP Sports Writer

NEW YORK — The Rangers fired combative coach John Tortorella on Wednesday, four days after New York was eliminated from the Stanley Cup playoffs. Tortorella was unexpectedly dismissed with one year left on his contract. He led the Rangers to the Eastern Conference finals last year and into the second round this year before New York was eliminated in five games by the Boston Bruins. The fiery Tortorella, who was hired to replace Tom Renney in February 2009, achieved some success with the Rangers but couldn’t match the Stanley Cup title he earned in 2004 with the Tampa Bay Lightning. Rangers general manager Glen Sather met with the media via a conference call Wednesday afternoon. He did not a name an immediate replacement, but

hopes to have one in place by the June 30 NHL draft in Newark, N.J. “I felt this was a decision Tortorella that had to be made going forward,” Sather said. “I think he was shocked, but he is a gentleman and he took it very well.” Last season, Tortorella led the Rangers to 51 wins — the second-most in franchise history — and 109 points before they were beaten in six games by New Jersey in the conference finals. He finished his Rangers tenure in fourth place on the team’s career coaching wins list. The 54-year-old Tortorella got the Rangers back into the playoffs in this lockout-shortened season, and New York outlasted Washington in seven games in

the first round of the playoffs before being knocked out by Boston. Tortorella made curious comments on Monday when the Rangers packed up for the season, which could have led to his ouster. In his final meeting with reporters, Tortorella said his club wasn’t emotionally ready to take on Boston after getting past Washington with back-toback shutout wins when it faced elimination. “One of the things, and it falls on my shoulders, is our team’s mindset going into another round,” Tortorella said. “I don’t think our mindset was ready to play another series and to the level you need to be at. It didn’t have a playoff atmosphere. “That’s what I struggle with right now. I didn’t do a good enough job in correcting and getting their mindset back to not only play at the level of a

Game 7 in the first round but get ready for round 2, which is always going to be tougher.” Even though the Rangers were knocked out of the playoffs one round earlier this year than last, Tortorella was defiant in expressing that he didn’t believe the team regressed in its progression. “I know the surrounding feeling here is that it was a negative season, a disappointing season. I don’t buy it and I won’t,” Tortorella said. “There are some good things that happened. I don’t think we took a step backward. I think this is a sideways step in our lineup and how things worked out. “We played really well our last couple of months to get in, found a way to win a big series against Washington, and against Boston I thought we competed right to the end.”

Continued from Page 1B

“That has been the key for us all season, winning draws and being able to go in on attack,” Blue Knights coach Catie Kersey said. “I think the difference in our game today was our attack playing defense. So if there was a turnover in our attack end we quickly got on the ball and were able to create another turnover and try again.” Mericle’s fellow seniors Emily Granger and Amanda Schwartz combined for seven more goals, including the game’s first two which came just 14 seconds apart. Schwartz opened the game’s scoring giving the Blue Knights a 1-0 lead with the clock reading 18:38. It didn’t take much time for the second tally of the contest. Once the draw was won, Granger and Mericle used their speed to open the lead to 2-0. Mericle won the draw sprinted down field then quickly passed

just know that every point matters that much more. If you lose once, you go home. We don’t want that to happen. We really think we can go far in states.” Redeemer’s offense ran smoothly thanks in large part to 6-7 hitter Morrison. The strategy was simple. The Royals matched up Morrison on junior killing machine Mitch Strobel - “He’s they’re goto man,” Kablick said - and neutralized Schuylkill Valley’s greatest weapon. That left Prociak pounding shots over much smaller Schuylkill Valley players, none taller than 6-4. “We had a great matchup with him,” Kablick said. “Morrison did a great job. That puts Prociak against their second line of defense, and he just feasted on it.” Noticing that, the Royals kept feeding Prociak. “When there’s good ability on both sides, matchups are important,” Myslowski said. “When you have a 6-7 (player) on one side and a guy a bunch of inches shorter on the other side, it’s good to use your matchups.” Ultimately, it meant Redeemer reserved a trip to the second round of states, and in plenty of time to get to a graduation. “I don’t think we were distracted,” Myslowski said. “We had to focus on one thing at a time. Both things were really important to us.”

Schuylkill Valley 25 14 17 Holy Redeemer 27 25 25 Holy Redeemer: Mike Prociak 15 kills, Brendan Leahigh 12 kills, Jeremy Myslowski 22 assists, 11 service points, Mike Morrison 9 kills, five blocks, Vito Aiello 8 service points, Mike Conlon 12 assists, 7 service points.

to Granger who broke through the Lewisburg defense for another goal at the 18:24 mark. Outrunning Lewisburg is something the Blue Knights did the entire 50 minutes of the contest to open a huge lead. “We had a really good transition in the backfield with passing and speed that just helped us get down to our goal, numbers up and give us a better opportunity to score,” Mericle added. Sophomore Alexis Quick contributed two goals for Seminary, while junior Rebecca Schulman also found the back of the net for the Blue Knights, who led 9-0 before Lewisburg finally got on the scoreboard four minutes into the second half.

PIAA Girls Lacrosse First Round Wyoming Seminary 13, Lewisburg 3 Lewisburg 0 3 3 Wyoming Seminary 8 5 13 First half: 1. WS, Amanda Schwartz 18:38; 2. WS, Emily Granger (Kristen Mericle) 18:24; 3. WS, Granger 12:42; 4. WS, Alexis Quick (Marra Wagner) 7:27; 5. WS, Schwartz 6:09; 6. WS, Mericle 4:01; 7. WS, Rebecca Schulman (Mericle) 2:04; 8. WS, Mericle :01 Second half: 1. WS, Mericle (Granger) 23:07; 2. LEW, Hannah Gotoff 21:56; 3. WS, Schwartz (Quick) 21:03; 4. WS, Schwartz 13:59; 5. LEW, Ashley Bilger 12:33; 6. WS, Quick 7:45; 7. WS, Granger 5:21; 8. LEW, Bilger (Sarah Talabisto) 3:45 Saves: WS, Kelley Gavin 7; LEW, Claire Paulsen 13

C O L L EGE F O O T B A L L

Playoff architects won’t be allowed to select teams IRVING, Texas (AP) — The conference commissioners who put together the College Football Playoff will not be allowed to serve on the committee that selects the teams that will play in it. The commissioners are still working on the structure of the selection committee for the new postseason system that starts in 2014. But they have eliminated themselves from consideration. Big 12 Commissioner Bob Bowlsby, who once served on the basketball selection committee, said Wednesday he thought commissioners recusing themselves was the right way to go. “I really believe there are some people with a high level of exper-

tise that would be helpful to the process, a high level of experience that would be helpful to the process,” Bowlsby said at Big 12 meetings in the Dallas area. “But we felt like it was just going to be too disruptive and too subject to suspicion and therefore decided that we wouldn’t be in the room.” BCS Executive Director Bill Hancock told reporters at the Southeastern Conference spring meetings in Destin, Fla., that the commissioners are not eliminating the possibility that active athletic directors could serve on the committee, but the focus has been on using former administrators, coaches, and even media members to make up the panel.


C MY K S P O R T S

PAGE 6B THURSDAY, MAY 30, 2013

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Things could get more interesting for Federer

Injured LB Spence says he will play this season

By HOWARD FENDRICH AP Tennis Writer

PARIS — Now things could get a little more interesting for Roger Federer. After a pair of straightforward and straight-set victories at the French Open against qualifiers ranked outside the top 150, the 17-time major champion will face a seeded player, France’s Julien Benneteau, who not only already beat Federer once this year but also came within two points of upsetting him at Wimbledon, of all places, in 2012. “I think I’m playing OK,” Federer said in something of an understatement, considering he’s dropped 11 games through six sets so far. “Definitely think the next match is going to be sort of the big test for me, to see exactly where I stand.” There wasn’t much trouble for Federer in the second round Wednesday, when he beat twotime NCAA singles champion Somdev Devvarman 6-2, 6-1, 6-1 in less than 1½ hours. It really was something of a laugher, especially with Federer serving at 4-0 in the final set. He hit a first serve well out, and both players waited for the linesman to make a call — which he finally did, albeit after a long delay. Federer and Devvarman chuckled, looked at each other, and chuckled some more. As Federer prepared to hit his second serve, he needed to pause because he couldn’t regain his composure. Otherwise, little bothered Federer. “You obviously know he’s capable of doing certain things, and you try and make life as tough for him as possible,” said Devvarman, who played college

The Associated Press

PITTSBURGH — Sean Spence’s coaches appear split over whether the linebacker’s mangled left knee will be ready to play for the Pittsburgh Steelers in 2013. Spence, however, has no such concerns. “The goal is for me to play this season,” Spence said Wednesday during organized team activities. “That’s the way I’m preparing.” Though he declined to mark a specific return date, Spence insists he can see the finish line for his recovery from a gruesome injury that cut short his rookie year before it even began. Spence was blitzing late in the third quarter of the team’s final preseason game against Carolina when his knee gave out and bent awkwardly. The third-round pick out of Miami (Fla.) needed to be taken off the field on a stretcher after tearing all three major ligaments and sustaining extensive nerve damage in the knee. “I knew right away that something wasn’t right,” Spence said. “The knee went back. It didn’t hurt as much as I thought it should have hurt, but I think I was in shock more than anything.” So were the Steelers, who were hoping Spence could become the eventual successor to James Farrior at inside linebacker. Instead he spent all of Pittsburgh’s disappointing 8-8 season wearing a brace and wondering if his career was in jeopardy. That doesn’t appear to be an issue anymore. At least, not to Spence. “I know a lot of people have not been able to come back after damage like that, but I’m going to see if I can be one of the only ones,” he said. “Actually, I know that I’m going to beat the odds. I’m not really worried about that.” Spence’s coaches can’t seem to agree. Coach Mike Tomlin said before last month’s draft that Spence was progressing as planned but linebackers coach Keith Butler appeared to be more cautious, indicating there would be little chance of Spence playing this season, if at all. The Steelers re-signed veteran Larry Foote in the offseason and grabbed Florida State’s Vince Williams in the sixth round of the draft. Williams is considered a project while Foote turns 33 next month. Spence remains very much a part of Pittsburgh’s long-term plans. He would just prefer to be a part of the shortterm one as well. Though Spence says he can run and “do everything,” he will not be on the field during OTAs or minicamp. His goal is to be ready when training camp opens in July but that seems a bit ambitious. Spence allows that might be too soon, but he doesn’t see himself sitting out the year again. “You do want to play it safe, in a situation like this, but at the same time if I’m good enough to go, I’m gonna go,” he said. “I probably will take things slow, but I have trust myself in doing what I know I can do. And if I think I can go, I’ll go.” Spence was a tackling machine for the Hurricanes, making 317 stops in four seasons, including 10.5 sacks. His speed makes him an asset in coverage and when he was drafted, the Steelers saw an opportunity to pair him with veteran Lawrence Timmons in the middle of Pittsburgh’s 3-4 scheme.

AP PHOTO

Jack Nicklaus answers questions during a news conference before the the Memorial on Wednesday in Dublin, Ohio.

Nicklaus: Woods-Garcia feud ‘stupid’ The Associated Press

DUBLIN, Ohio — Jack Nicklaus only has to look at some of the clashes on the PGA Tour in recent months to see how far golf has come since he was in his prime. That’s not necessarily a good thing. “We were trying to figure out how to get somebody to write about anything when we played,” Nicklaus said Wednesday on the eve of the Memorial. “I think today you have to figure out how you keep somebody from writing about anything. It’s a big difference.” Vijay Singh is suing the PGA Tour over its anti-doping policy. A small group of players has retained a lawyer over the new rule involving long putters. And the dispute getting all the attention is Tiger Woods and Sergio Garcia, who didn’t hide their dislike for each other until it reached a point last week that Garcia made a comment with racial overtures about Woods. “The Sergio-Tiger thing, I mean, it’s stupid,” Nicklaus said. “Do guys have an issue one with another? They usually resolve it themselves. You guys want to resolve it in the newspapers today. Nobody needs that. And I think they both finally said, ‘It’s enough. Forget it, guys. Let’s move on.’ In our days, I suppose there were times when you had an issue with somebody and it came about. You never read about it.” The Woods-Garcia spat turned ugly last week when Garcia was jokingly asked at a European Tour dinner outside London if he would have Woods over for dinner during the U.S.

Open. Trying to go along with the sarcasm, the Spaniard said he would serve fried Woods chicken. G a rc i a apologized that night in a statement and the next day in a news conference, though he Garcia said he had been unable to reach Woods over the phone. Woods was asked Wednesday if he considered getting in touch with Garcia to hear the apology so he wouldn’t have to deal with it during a busy, important week at the U.S. Open. What followed were his first public comments, though they were sparse. “Was I supposed to go to Wentworth?” Woods said jokingly. Asked if he would allow Garcia to reach him on the phone to be done with the matter before getting to Merion, Woods said, “That’s already done with.” Did that mean Garcia apologized to him? “Not in person, no,” he said. When asked if Woods considered Garcia’s news conference an apology, Woods said, “Move on.” On one matter there is no dispute — Woods is playing some pretty good golf. When all the discord was mentioned, followed by the question of whether it was healthy for golf, Woods replied, “Well, I’ve won four times.”

No one else has more than one win this year, which explains why Woods has opened another large lead at No. 1 in the world ranking, and why he is the favorite going into the next major championship. The first stop is Muirfield Village, were Woods is a five-time winner. A year ago, Woods completed a Sunday rally with a chip from behind the 16th green that even Nicklaus, the tournament host, called one of the best shots he ever saw under the circumstances. The flop shot behind the green had to be executed to perfection — anything too soft would turn away to the left down a ridge and leave some 30 feet for par, while anything too firm might run beyond the hole and off the green into the water. Woods holed it for a birdie. The Memorial has the top six players in the world ranking and the strongest field in golf among regular tour events. Rory McIlroy, Scott, Justin Rose, Lee Westwood and Brandt Snedeker are all playing. Given his history — and this golf course — it only seems as though it’s Woods against everyone else. What is it about the course Jack built and the guy who seems to own it? “Most golf courses set up well for Tiger Woods,” McIlroy said. “He’s won The Players this year, and that was a golf course that everyone said didn’t quite suit him. … The guy is good wherever he goes and plays. It’s not like he goes to the same course and wins. He can win anywhere.”

tennis at Virginia. “In my case today, I didn’t execute. And sometimes even when I did, I feel like he came up with the better shot.” Federer accumulated a 5412 edge in winners, in part by moving forward to the net on 30 points. “I’m happy that I was playing offensive and aggressive tennis in the first two matches, because I had the opportunity, but I didn’t back off and start to play passive tennis and wait for mistakes. So I took it to my opponent,” said Federer, the 2009 French Open champion. “But really, I think I’ll only know more after the Benneteau match, to be quite honest.” Then again, Benneteau might not quite be the same guy who took the first two sets against Federer before losing in five on the grass of the All England Club nearly a year ago. Or the one who has beaten Federer twice in six meetings, including 6-3, 7-5 in February on an indoor hard court at Rotterdam, Netherlands. The 30th-seeded Benneteau dealt with pain in his thigh Wednesday during a topsy-turvy 7-6 (9), 7-5, 5-7, 0-6, 6-4 win against Tobias Kamke of Germany. Ahead by two sets and at 5-all in the third, Benneteau dropped 10 games in a row before righting himself. Even putting that aside, Benneteau explained, “Obviously it’s all pretty tricky, (playing) Federer. He breezed through the first two rounds. He plays very well. … You know you’re going to have to really ramp up a gear.” Same must be said when facing another past French Open champion, Serena Williams, who has been challenged about as much as Federer has.

AP PHOTO

Roger Federer greets spectators after defeating India’s Somdev Devvarman in their second round match of the French Open at Roland Garros stadium in Paris on Wednesday. Federer won in three sets 6-2, 6-1, 6-1.

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AP PHOTO

The Miami Heat’s LeBron James reacts after he was called for a technical foul against the Indiana Pacers in Game 4 of the NBA basketball Eastern Conference finals on Tuesday in Indianapolis.

By TIM REYNOLDS AP Basketball Writer

MIAMI — Several times around the start of these playoffs, Miami coach Erik Spoelstra insisted that the postseason path his team would wind up navigating had the potential to be more challenging than the route they took to the NBA championship a year ago. He’s apparently correct, probably to his own chagrin. The defending NBA champion Heat are in a bit of trouble. They can’t get enough rebounds, can’t get Dwyane Wade on track, can’t get consistency out of Chris Bosh — and will likely see all those story lines either grow exponentially or basically disappear tonight, when they host to the Indiana Pacers in Game 5 of a super-competitive Eastern Conference finals that’s now knotted at two games apiece. “We have a great locker room of Alpha competitors,” Spoelstra said Wednesday. “And so they take this very seriously. We’re playing against a worthy opponent and if we don’t play well, they beat us. If they don’t play well and we impose our identity, we beat them. That’s what this is all about. So let’s lace ‘em up and let’s get ready for Game 5.” Game 6 will be in Indiana on Saturday night, while the Western Conference champion San Antonio Spurs keep waiting to see who they’ll face in the NBA Finals starting on June 6. History says the Game 5 winner when a series is tied at 2-2 has a colossal upper hand, though that’s an axiom that the Heat both proved and disproved last season. When the Heat and Pacers split the first four games of their secondround series last year, Miami rolled to a 115-83 home win in Game 5 and captured the series in six games. One round later, Miami lost a home Game

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5 of the East finals to Boston, then went on the road for Game 6 and got a virtuoso 45-point night from LeBron James to stave off elimination before coming home and winning a nailbiter of a Game 7 to advance. Given all that, it’s no wonder why Spoelstra said the Heat aren’t looking back at any series as a blueprint for how the final acts of this one should go. “We don’t need confidence to go into any game,” James said. “We’re a confident bunch. We’re excited to get the opportunity to go back to our home and play Game 5.” Confidence is not exactly in short supply around the Pacers right now, either. Indiana came into the series saying — and believing — that it could find a way to oust the team that was virtually preordained as a champion entering these playoffs. That hasn’t changed. “We’ve got to be at our best,” Pacers coach Frank Vogel said Wednesday. “Our intensity, our determination, our focus, we’ve got to keep getting better if we’re going to beat this team.” The statistical trends probably aren’t surprising. The Heat have scored 402 points, the Pacers 394. The Heat have shot 47 percent from the field, the Pacers 46 percent. The Pacers have shot 37 percent from 3-point range, the Heat 34 percent. Miami is better at forcing turnovers, the Pacers are better at rebounding. Miami has forced Indiana into 14 more turnovers in the series, but the Pacers are outrebounding the Heat by 10 boards per game. Pacers center Roy Hibbert is averaging 12 rebounds; Bosh has grabbed 13 rebounds — total — in the series, or as many as Miami guard Ray Allen has despite being half a foot shorter and playing 32 fewer minutes. GAME 5 Indianapols Pacers at Miami Heat 8:30 p.m. today TNT

O LY M P I C S

Wrestling, baseball/softball, squash make IOC short list By LUKE MEREDITH AP Sports Writer

ST. PETERSBURG, Russia — And now for the gold-medal match. Three months after wrestling got kicked out of the 2020 Olympics, the ancient sport is back in the frame and will compete against baseball-softball and squash for a spot in the games. “We had the opportunity to have a second chance to compete,” international wrestling federation head Nenad Lalovic said Wednesday after the three sports made the IOC short list. “We took the opportunity. We won the first match but there is another one to fight.” Of eight sports competing for a place on the 2020 program, five were eliminated — karate, roller sports, sport climbing, wakeboarding and the Chinese martial art of wushu. The IOC executive board decided to recommend wrestling, squash and baseball-softball to the full IOC assembly for a final decision on Sept. 8 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Only one will get through. “We are competitors. We had seven and now we have two,” said Lalovic, a Serb who has revamped FILA and led the campaign for reinstatement. “Be careful, we are good fighters.” Despite a tradition dating to the Olympics of ancient Greece, wrestling was cut from the list of core sports by the IOC board in February. The deci-

sion caused an international uproar and prompted the United States, Russia, Iran and other countries to join forces in an unlikely political alliance to save the sport. Wrestling has gone through a major upheaval since the rejection. Raphael Martinetti resigned as FILA president within days of the decision and was replaced by Lalovic, who won election as full-time leader 10 days ago. FILA has brought women and athletes into decision-making roles and enacted rule changes to make the competition more compelling. Matches will now consist of two three-minute sessions instead of three two-minute periods, and scoring will be cumulative instead of the previous best-ofthree system. “Everybody understood what we have done,” said Lalovic, wiping away sweat from his forehand after the decision was announced in a packed conference room. “They probably trust us that we can do more and this is the result. “But we have to do much more, and to prepare ourselves for Buenos Aires with additional arguments. These will not be sufficient in Buenos Aires.” Asked whether the result showed the IOC’s earlier decision was a mistake, Lalovic said: “I can’t say that. Simply, I don’t judge them. They are in the position to judge us.”

PLAINS

WEST PITTSTON

35 Westminster Drive Orchard View Terrace Fri & Sat, 9-3. Lighting fixture, household items, many home decor items, collectibles, antique piano stool with glass feet & much more!

DALLAS

8 Reservoir Road (Off Overbrook Rd) Sat., June 1st, 8-3 Country decor, Tupperware, books, lamps, tools, girl’s bedding & decor, Longaberger, kitchen, storage, seasonal items & much more!

DALLAS

233 Phillips Street Sat., June 1, 8 to 2 Kitchen and household items, kids toys, clothing and MORE!

HANOVER TWP.

2 Cobblestone Lane Saturday June 1st 8am-2pm A variety of items. MOUNTAINTOP

105 Amesbury St. Saturday June 1st 7am until 1pm Entire contents of home, including bedroom, dining room and family room furniture. Tools Lawn mower, coffin freezer, washer dryer and much much more.

Church 105 Irem Road Fri., May 31, 9-3 Sat. June 1, 9-Noon Sat. is $2 bag day!

Ledgewood Estates Somerset Dr. (take Middle Rd to McGovern Hill Rd) Sat June 1st 8AM -12PM (No Early Birds) Lots of great items!

16 Karin Drive Sat., June 1, 8 to 2 Quality household items, yard maintenance equipment, gas grill, tools. Too many to List. Priced to sell, All items must go!

57 Woodcrest Court Sat., June 1, 9 to 2 Jazzy power chair, computer speakers, household items and more!

MOUNTAINTOP

KINGSTON

112 Sharpe Street Sat. June 1, 9-1 Dining room table, kitchen appliances, children’s clothes, (school uniform approved), coats, toys & much more! KINGSTON

119 John Street, Sat., June 1, 8:30-2 kids items, household, and something for everyone!

S.WILKES-BARRE

995 First Avenue, Last house on First Ave., off of Blytheburn Rd. Fri. and Sat., May 31 and June 1, 8 to 3. Small cabinets, power tools and tools, adult and children’s clothing, household, games, and 2 small TV’s.

MOUNTAINTOP

NEIGHBORHOOD SALE FOX MEADOWS ANNUAL

15+ HOMES, Sat., June 1st, 8-1. Household, luggage, a quad, DVD’s & much, much more! Wyoming Ave, left to Schooley, right on Shoemaker & follow signs.

Selling Your Furniture? Do it here in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

FORTY FORT

599 Westmoreland Ave., Sat., June 1, 8 to ?. Final Sale of the contents of home! KINGSTON 104 Meadow Crest Dr., Sat., June 1,9-2 Baby items, girls clothing, sizes baby-4 years & Something for Everyone! 656 Warren Ave. Sat., June 1, 8 to 2 Something for Everyone! Air hockey table, electronics, collectibles, housewares, teen clothes, sporting goods, toys, etc.. Many years of accumulation, priced to sell!

Garage/Basement 170 West Grand St. Sat., June 1, Early Birds Welcome! Tools, jewelry and much more! Something for Everyone! NANTICOKE

The Learning Station Contents of School Sale!

133 Alden Road Sat., June 1, 8 to 1. Furniture, toys, games, instructional materials, decorations, and miscellaneous Items. 565 Rutter Avenue Sat., June 1st, 9-2 Women’s, juniors & men’s clothing, shoes, purses, housewares, odds & ends.

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

NANTICOKE YARD SALE 48 W. Green St

Fri. & Sat. May 31 & June 1, 7 - ? MECHANICS TOOLS, HOUSEHOLD & OTHER.

815

Dogs

1313 Shoemaker Ave. (The Back Road) Sat., June 1, 9 to ? Antiques and collectibles, beatles 45’s, furniture, elliptical machine, leaf blower, 16” Craftsman Scroll Saw, Outdoor Lounge Cushions, and a Whole Lot More! Check Craig’s List for Pictures.

SHAVERTOWN

114 Idetown Rd. Sat., June 1; 8-3 Oak Hill (Rte 415 to Rte 118, turn right, 1 mile to Idetown Rd.)

PLAINS

283 Chase Road Sat., June 1st, 8-2 Women’s & baby boy clothing, toys, Graco changing table, household items & much more

536 Carey Avenue Sat., June 1st, 7-12 Baby clothes, household, computer desk, books & much more!

WILKES-BARRE

1027 Main ST. Sat., June 1 9 to 1 No Early Birds

SWOYERSVILLE

461 Slocum St Saturday 6-2 The one you’ve been waiting for! Snowblower, collectibles, jewelry, and roll top desk!

623 BLACKMAN ST. Sat., June 1st 8:00-4:00 DIRECTIONS: BUSINESS 309-R ONTO BLACKMAN Entire Contents Of Home Including furniture, bedroom sets, lots of Asian design items, new in box household, lamps, glassware, kitchenware, craft & hobby supplies, prints & wallhangings, books, hand tools & much more. This house is loaded! CREDIT CARD ACCEPTED! SALE BY COOK & COOK ESTATE LIQUIDATORS WWW.COOKANDCOOKESTATELIQUIDATORS.COM

Apartments/ Unfurnished

WILKES-BARRE

For lease, available immediately, 1 large bedroom, 1 bathroom, refrigerator and stove, washer/ dryer provided. $550/month plus utilities, references and security. 570-735-4074 Leave message

LINE UP A SUCCESSFUL SALE IN CLASSIFIED! Do you need more space? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way to clean out your closets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

Half Doubles

PLYMOUTH

Half Double 2 bedrooms, New flooring, water included. Other utilities by tenant, No Pets. $465/month+ security deposit. 570-779-4240

WILKES-BARRE

Find that new job. The Times Leader Classified section.

8TH ANNUAL SOUTH WILKES-BARRE

TRUCKSVILLE Old River Road Sat., June 1st, 8-2 Look for signs on Old River Road.

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

WILKES-BARRE

Indoor/Outdoor Yard Sale 151 Stanton Street Thurs., Fri., & Sat. 8:30 to 3

WEST NANTICOKE WYOMING

47 Stark Street Sat., June 1, 8 to 1 Tools, snowblower, bar items, homemade towels & dishcloths, teenage girl’s & men’s clothes, & various household items, and More!

PLAINS

Town House A great home, 2 bedrooms, 2.5 bath, laundry room, newly remodeled kitchen, one car garage, quiet neighborhood. Well maintained. $194,900 570-855-8498

SWOYERSVILLE

MOUNTAIN TOP FOREST POINTE NEIGHBORHOOD YARD SALE SAT. JUNE 1ST 7 AM - NOON RT. 309 to KESTREL ROAD Toys, Furniture, Household, Electronics, Collectibles, Clothes and more!

Females, red and rust. Ears cropped. READY NOW! Cooper’s Dobermans 570-542-5158

950

7 Eileen Road Sunrise Estates Sat., 6-1, 8:30am Clothes, furniture household items, and more! 222 Mill Street Sat., June 1, 8 to 3 Records, 45’s and LP’s, trains, models, stereos,Kayaks, electronics, household, tupperware, plus Free Stuff!

DOBERMAN PUPPIES AKC. Males and

941 126 Hanover St. Friday & Saturday. May 31-June 1, 8:00a.m.-3:00p.m. Contents of lovely older home. Sofa, tables, lamps, corner cupboard, stereo, TV, shelves, Blue leather recliner, loads of kitchen items, Yorktowne dishes, hutch, glassware, collectibles, Bedroom suites, linens, bedding, carpets, ladies’ clothing, purses, Holiday, filing cabinet, smalls galore! Too much to list, all priced to sell!

PITTSTON

LEHMAN TWP.

15 FAMILIES!

1670 Murray Street SAT., JUNE 1st 9 TO 1 Furniture, housewares, tools, glassware, jewelry, etc.

WEST WYOMING

WILKES-BARRE WALDEN PARK 13 Yard Sales Get your yard sale map at 12 Walden Dr. Saturday, 8-1

KINGSTON ANNUAL

EXETER

371 Susquehanna Ave. Fri. & Sat., May 31 & June 1, 9 to 3 Furniture, tools, household goods and More!

906 Homes for Sale 701 Montgomery Ave. Fri., 8-1 & Sat, 8-12 Adult & children’s clothing, toys, books, furniture, kitchen wares, lots of other household items.

KINGSTON

DALLAS

Saturday June 1st. 8-12. Luzerne Ave., Lackwanna Ave, Monroe Ave., and Susquehanna Ave. Various items. No early birds.

30+ Family Sale Saturday, June 1st 8 am to 3 pm Trinity Church 220 Montgomery Avenue. More Vendors Welcome. $10 Space. Must RSVP 570-654-3261

WEST PITTSTON

NANTICOKE

DALLAS GIGANTIC RUMMAGE SALE Trinity Presbyterian

WYOMING

PLAINS

NANTICOKE

Elmcrest Dr. & White Birch Lane ELMCREST HOMEOWNER’S ASSOCIATION Sat, June 8th, 8-3 Furniture, baby gear, household, books, exercise rower, kid toys, clothes & books. No Early Birds!

569 Security/ Protective Services

WOMEN’S CLUB OF MOUNTAIN TOP

DALLAS

Heat’s back to the wall? Crucial Game 5 looms tonight as Miami struggles to right ship.

569 Security/ Protective Services

MOUNTAIN TOP

Harveys Lake Borough is currently accepting applications for Must be Act 120 Certified and hold current CPR, First Aid and Firearms Credentials. Applications may be picked up at the Harveys Lake Borough Office, 4875 Memorial Highway, HL, PA 18618, Monday – Friday, 7:00 am until 3:30 pm. Call 570-639-3300 for more information.

569 Security/ Protective Services

Call 829-7130 to place an employment ad.

& MOVING SALE

24-26 Tilbury Ave. Sat. & Sun., June 1 & 2, 9-12. Furniture, household items, king size bed, bistro set, knick-knacks, etc.

21 East 6th Street Sat, June 1st , 9-2 Furniture, children’s toys, odds & ends

ONLY ONL NLY ONE N LE LEA LEADER. E DER. timesleader.com


C MY K

BUSINESS

8B

timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

IN BRIEF Funeral homes combining

Service Corp. International plans to buy Stewart Enterprises Inc. in a cash deal valued at about $1.13 billion that combines the two largest funeral home and cemetery operators in the United States. Houston-based Service Corp. said Wednesday it will pay $13.25 for each share of Stewart, which is based in Jefferson, La. That’s a 36 percent premium over Stewart’s closing price on Tuesday. Service Corp. said the combined company will operate 1,653 funeral homes and 515 cemeteries in the United States, Canada and Puerto Rico. Service Corp. currently runs 1,437 funeral homes and 374 cemeteries. Spokeswoman Lisa Marshall said that amounts to about a 13 percent market share in a highly fragmented industry.

Exxon Mobil CEO defends oil

The CEO of Exxon Mobil Corp. says there’s no quick replacement for oil, and sharply cutting oil’s use to reduce greenhouse gas emissions would make it harder to lift 2 billion people out of poverty. “What good is it to save the planet if humanity suffers?” CEO Rex Tillerson said at the oil giant’s annual meeting Wednesday. Tillerson jousted with environmental activists who proposed that the company set goals to reduce emissions from its products and operations. Shareholders sided with the company and voted nearly 3-to-1 to reject the proposal. By a 4-to-1 ratio, shareholders also defeated a resolution to explicitly ban discrimination against gays. The Exxon board had argued that the company already banned discrimination of any type and didn’t need to add language regarding gays.

THURSDAY, MAY 30, 2013

Local unemployment drops three-tenths of a percent By ANDREW M. SEDER aseder@timesleader.com

Jobless rates

As the temperatures climb in Northeastern Pennsylvania, the local unemployment rate has continued to dip. Coming off a March that saw the local rate drop two-tenths of a percentage point, April was even better, dropping another threetenths of a percent to settle at 9.4 percent. For the 37th consecutive month, the rate was still the highest of the state’s 14 metropolitan statistical areas (MSA). The report, released Wednesday by the state Department of Labor and Industry, showed there were actually 100 fewer people working in the tri-county region that

Monthly rates, seasonally adjusted: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Pennsylvania U.S.

10% 9.5%

9.4%

9.0% 8.5%

7.6%

8.0% 7.5% 7.0%

7.5% A M J J A S O N D J F MA 2012

2013

Local rate includes Luzerne, Lackawanna and Wyoming counties SOURCE: Pa. Dept. of Labor and Industry Mark Guydish/The Times Leader

makes up the MSA in April than in March; however, the number of people listed as unemployed but searching for jobs had dropped by 700.

Scranton/Wilkes-Barre was one of four MSAs to register a drop in the number of employees from month-to-month, joining Erie, Johnstown and State College. The MSA incorporates Lackawanna, Luzerne and Wyoming counties. Most over-the-month changes were modest. Mining, logging and construction, and professional and business services all experienced seasonal increases. Leisure and hospitality experienced the largest gain adding 1,100 to payrolls. Health care and social assistance saw the largest decline over the month, down 600 employees. Over the year, transportation, warehousing and utili-

ties, as well as professional and business services, performed well. Durable goods manufacturing, educational services, and healthcare and social assistance saw the largest declines. Anthony Liuzzo, director of the master of business administration program at Wilkes University, classified the report as “slightly positive” though “humdrum” but added that overall it continues the “slow but steady trend” toward getting better. “Stability is good,” Liuzzo said, saying that the ultimate goal should be to get back into the 5 to 6 percent unemployment rate range that the region had pre-recession. Though those days, he noted, “aren’t

US banks report record earnings of $40.3B for Q1 By MARCY GORDON AP Business Writer

WASHINGTON — U.S. banks earned more from January through March than during any quarter on record, buoyed by greater income from fees and fewer losses from bad loans. The banking industry earned $40.3 billion in the first quarter, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. said Wednesday. That’s the highest ever for a single quarter and up 15.8 percent from the first quarter of 2012, when the industry’s profits were $34.8 billion. Record profits show banks have come a long way from the 2008 financial crisis. But the report offered a reminder that the industry is still struggling to help the broader economy recover from the Great Recession. Only about half of U.S. banks reported improved earnings from a year earlier, the lowest proportion since 2009. That shows the industry’s growth is being driven by a narrower group of the nation’s largest banks. Those banks include Bank of America Corp., Citigroup Inc., JPMorgan Chase & Co. and Wells Fargo & Co. Most of them have recovered with help from federal bailout money and record-low borrowing rates. Bank lending declined from the October-December quarter, although that followed several quarters of increases. And bank profits from interest charged fell 2.2 percent to $104 billion. The industry’s average interest income as a percentage of total loans on its books fell from 3.35 percent to 3.27 percent. That’s the lowest portion of total loans in nearly seven years. That has forced banks to see more revenue from fees, despite complaints from customers and consumer advocates.

Joblessness down in US cities

Unemployment rates fell in almost all large U.S. cities in April, helped by stronger hiring. The gains show the job market is improving throughout the country. The Labor Department said Wednesday that unemployment rates declined in 344 of the 372 largest metro areas. Rates rose in only 17 cities and were unchanged in 11. The U.S. unemployment rate dropped in April to a four-year low of 7.5 percent, down from 7.6 percent in March. Employers have added an average of 208,000 jobs each month in the past six months. That’s up from just 138,000 in the previous six. Yuma, Ariz. had the nation’s highest rate, at 30.3 percent, followed by El Centro, Calif., with 24 percent. Both cities have long had the highest rates in the country. They are adjacent and have heavy populations of migrant farm workers. GAS PRICES Average price of a gallon of regular unleaded gasoline: YESTERDAY MONTH AGO YEAR AGO

$3.47

$3.40

$3.52

RECORD

$4.06 07/17/08

Source: AAA report for the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre/Hazleton area

S&P 500 1,648.36

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+4.7 +4.1 +0.7 +0.4 +1.4

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+2.5 +9.4 +16.6 +14.3 +8.9 +12.8 +6.2 +8.2 +16.1 -7.6 +16.0 +15.2 +9.3 +9.0

q Name

AP PHOTO

Chinese meat processor Shuanghui International Holdings Ltd. agreed Wednesday to buy Smithfield Foods Inc. for approximately $4.72 billion in a deal that will take the world’s biggest pork producer private.

China’s Shuanghui in $4.7B deal for Smithfield By MICHAEL FELBERBAUM AP Business Writer

RICHMOND, Va. — Shuanghui International Holdings Ltd. has agreed to buy Smithfield Foods Inc. for approximately $4.72 billion, the largest acquisition of a U.S. company by a Chinese company. Hong Kong-based Shuanghui owns a variety of global businesses that include food, logistics and flavoring products and is the majority shareholder in China’s largest meat processing enterprise. Smithfield, the world’s biggest pork producer, owns brands such as Armour, Farmland and its namesake. Shareholders of Smithfield will receive $34 per share under terms of the deal announced Wednesday — a 31 percent premium to the Smithfield, Va., company’s closing stock price of $25.97 on Tuesday.

-21.37

DOW 15,302.80

METALS Copper Gold Platinum Silver Palladium

PVS. +.0058 -.0028 +.0058 -.93 +.0944

CLOSE PVS. 3.29 3.31 1391.30 1379.10 1453.00 1461.80 22.45 22.18 747.75 756.80

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-106.59

Mutual Funds YTD NAV Chg %Rtn

TotalBd 10.83 +.01 -0.1 Value 90.37 -.58 +18.4 Fidelity Advisor NewInsI 26.32 -.24 +14.3 ValStratT m 33.69 -.23 +14.5 Fidelity Select Gold d 23.01 +.93 -37.8 Pharm d 17.73 -.27 +19.9 Fidelity Spartan 500IdxAdvtg 58.58 -.40 +16.6 500IdxInstl 58.58 -.40 +16.6 500IdxInv 58.57 -.40 +16.5 TotMktIdAg d 47.98 -.35 +16.7 First Eagle GlbA m 52.16 +.02 +7.3 FrankTemp-Franklin CA TF A m 7.47 -.03 +0.8 Income C m 2.38 -.01 +7.7 IncomeA m 2.36 -.01 +7.9 FrankTemp-Mutual Discov Z 32.62 -.19 +13.9 Euro Z 23.23 -.25 +9.9 Shares Z 25.88 -.14 +15.1 FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondA m 13.41 -.10 +1.7 GlBondAdv 13.36 -.10 +1.7 GrowthA m 22.04 -.18 +13.4 Harbor CapApInst 47.67 -.41 +12.1 IntlInstl 66.03 -.50 +6.3 INVESCO ConstellB m 23.74 -.20 +11.9 GlobQuantvCoreA m13.04-.05+14.6 PacGrowB m 21.50 -.11 +6.0 JPMorgan CoreBondSelect11.91 ... -0.4

Foreign Exchange & Metals CURRENCY CLOSE USD per British Pound 1.5124 Canadian Dollar 1.0357 USD per Euro 1.2934 Japanese Yen 101.15 Mexican Peso 12.6842

going to be here for a while.” The region’s rate drop mirrored Pennsylvania’s rate decrease of three-tenths of a point. The state’s unemployment rate in April was 7.6 percent, while the United States’ rate was at 7.5 percent, down one-tenth of a point over the month. Over the past year, the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre rate increased two-tenths of a point, Pennsylvania’s rate decreased two-tenths, and the U.S. rate was down six-tenths of a point. On the county level, the unemployment rate rose to 8.8 percent in Lackawanna County, stayed at 9.4 percent in Wyoming County and dipped to 9.5 percent in Luzerne County.

6MO. 1YR. %CH. AGO AGO +.38% 1.6038 1.5634 -.27% .9923 1.0242 +.45% 1.2972 1.2487 -.92% 82.15 79.51 +.74% 12.9392 13.9204 6MO. 1YR. %CH. AGO AGO -0.62 -8.29 -2.82 +0.88 -19.45 -11.01 -0.60 -10.28 +3.70 +1.19 -34.65 -19.73 -1.20 +9.13 +23.66

Name

YTD NAV Chg %Rtn

John Hancock LifBa1 b 14.56 -.07 +7.8 LifGr1 b 14.86 -.09 +10.3 RegBankA m 16.59 -.07 +16.7 SovInvA m 17.98 -.12 +12.5 TaxFBdA m 10.33 -.03 +0.1 Lazard EmgMkEqtI d 19.35 -.29 -1.0 Loomis Sayles BdInstl 15.47 -.02 +4.3 Lord Abbett ShDurIncA m 4.62 -.01 +0.8 MFS MAInvA m 24.80 -.18 +15.5 MAInvC m 23.89 -.18 +15.1 Merger Merger b 15.96 -.01 +0.8 Metropolitan West TotRetBdI 10.87 -.01 +1.2 TotRtBd b 10.87 -.01 +1.0 Mutual Series Beacon Z 15.44 -.08 +15.6 Neuberger Berman SmCpGrInv 22.33 -.11 +16.2 Oakmark EqIncI 31.15 -.13 +9.3 Intl I 24.08 -.19 +15.1 Oppenheimer CapApB m 47.37 -.35 +11.9 DevMktA m 36.06 -.41 +2.2 DevMktY 35.68 -.41 +2.3 PIMCO AllAssetI 12.62 -.05 +1.2 AllAuthIn 10.82 -.03 -1.6 ComRlRStI 6.15 -.04 -6.9 HiYldIs 9.73 -.05 +3.4 LowDrIs 10.42 ... 0.0 TotRetA m 11.11 +.01 -0.2 TotRetAdm b 11.11 +.01 -0.2 TotRetC m 11.11 +.01 -0.5 TotRetIs 11.11 +.01 -0.1 TotRetrnD b 11.11 +.01 -0.2 TotlRetnP 11.11 +.01 -0.1 Permanent Portfolio 47.31 +.05 -2.7 Principal SAMConGrB m15.96 -.12 +10.8 Prudential JenMCGrA m 34.82 -.32 +11.5 Prudential Investmen 2020FocA m 17.50 -.11 +13.0 BlendA m 21.03 -.13 +14.0 EqOppA m 18.27 -.16 +15.2 HiYieldA m 5.79 -.03 +4.1 IntlEqtyA m 6.81 -.03 +8.4 IntlValA m 21.27 -.09 +6.8 JennGrA m 23.39 -.20 +12.0 NaturResA m 46.22 +.03 +2.5 SmallCoA m 25.68 -.23 +14.5 UtilityA m 13.37 -.20 +12.5

Name

Both companies’ boards have unanimously approved the transaction, which still needs approval from Smithfield’s shareholders. The transaction may also be subject to review by the U.S.’s Committee on Foreign Investment, which evaluates the potential national security effects of transactions. The process typically includes a 30-day initial review, followed by a 45-day investigation before making a recommendation to the president. Chinese investment in the U.S. is still comparatively low but has risen sharply in recent years. China has accused the U.S. of discriminating against its companies, although analysts say American firms face bigger obstructions investing in China. The companies put the deal’s total value at about $7.1 billion, including debt. Smithfield Foods has about

RUSSELL 2000 986.96 YTD NAV Chg %Rtn

ValueA m 18.33 -.05 Putnam GrowIncB m 17.30 ... IncomeA m 7.27 ... Royce LowStkSer m 14.20 +.01 OpportInv d 14.19 -.09 ValPlSvc m 15.63 -.11 Schwab S&P500Sel d 25.86 -.18 Scout Interntl d 35.25 -.32 T Rowe Price BlChpGr 52.32 -.43 CapApprec 24.78 -.13 DivGrow 30.33 -.23 DivrSmCap d 20.45 -.20 EmMktStk d 33.46 -.47 EqIndex d 44.54 -.31 EqtyInc 30.69 -.19 FinSer 17.96 -.03 GrowStk 42.87 -.41 HealthSci 50.54 -.44 HiYield d 7.21 -.03 IntlDisc d 50.32 -.08 IntlStk d 15.14 -.11 IntlStkAd m 15.07 -.11 LatinAm d 36.14 -1.00 MediaTele 59.98 -.75 MidCpGr 65.60 -.42 NewAmGro 40.23 -.33 NewAsia d 16.89 -.11 NewEra 44.76 -.15 NewHoriz 39.58 -.24 NewIncome 9.71 +.01 Rtmt2020 19.38 -.11 Rtmt2030 20.86 -.15 ShTmBond 4.82 ... SmCpVal d 44.43 -.45 TaxFHiYld d 11.92 -.03 Value 31.59 -.20 ValueAd b 31.25 -.19 Thornburg IntlValI d 29.73 -.27 Tweedy, Browne GlobVal d 25.83 -.26 Vanguard 500Adml 152.43 -1.06 500Inv 152.41 -1.05 CapOp 41.70 -.30 CapVal 13.56 -.02 Convrt 13.99 -.06 DevMktIdx 10.55 -.07 DivGr 19.53 -.18 EnergyInv 64.63 -.04 EurIdxAdm 64.86 -.40 Explr 94.28 -.66 GNMA 10.64 +.01 GNMAAdml 10.64 +.01 GlbEq 21.09 -.12 GrowthEq 13.91 -.10

+17.4 +18.6 +1.3 +2.6 +18.7 +13.0 +16.5 +5.7 +14.7 +11.4 +15.5 +17.3 -1.8 +16.5 +16.5 +20.2 +13.5 +22.6 +5.9 +9.2 +5.1 +5.0 -5.0 +12.5 +16.2 +12.0 +0.5 +6.8 +19.3 -0.4 +8.4 +10.3 0.0 +13.4 +1.7 +19.7 +19.6 +6.2 +11.1 +16.6 +16.5 +24.0 +22.3 +11.0 +8.2 +17.4 +9.4 +7.6 +18.6 -1.5 -1.5 +13.0 +13.3

Name

q

-10.39

6-MO T-BILLS .09%

YTD NAV Chg %Rtn

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

HYCor 6.13 -.03 HYCorAdml 6.13 -.03 HltCrAdml 71.40 -.75 HlthCare 169.23 -1.76 ITGradeAd 10.09 +.01 InfPrtAdm 27.47 -.01 InfPrtI 11.19 -.01 InflaPro 13.98 -.01 InstIdxI 151.46 -1.05 InstPlus 151.47 -1.05 InstTStPl 37.50 -.28 IntlExpIn 16.32 +.01 IntlStkIdxAdm 26.26 -.17 IntlStkIdxIPls 105.03 -.70 LTInvGr 10.47 +.07 MidCapGr 23.57 -.18 MidCp 26.43 -.22 MidCpAdml 119.97 -1.00 MidCpIst 26.50 -.22 MuIntAdml 14.23 -.04 MuLtdAdml 11.11 -.01 PrecMtls 11.91 +.15 Prmcp 83.92 -.56 PrmcpAdml 87.07 -.58 PrmcpCorI 17.86 -.13 REITIdx 24.05 -.52 REITIdxAd 102.65 -2.20 STCor 10.78 ... STGradeAd 10.78 ... SelValu 24.78 -.13 SmGthIdx 29.21 -.32 SmGthIst 29.27 -.32 StSmCpEq 25.57 -.26 Star 22.56 -.06 StratgcEq 25.55 -.25 TgtRe2015 14.25 -.05 TgtRe2020 25.69 -.11 TgtRe2030 25.70 -.14 TgtRe2035 15.63 -.10 TgtRe2040 25.86 -.17 TgtRe2045 16.23 -.11 Tgtet2025 14.80 -.06 TotBdAdml 10.89 +.02 TotBdInst 10.89 +.02 TotBdMkInv 10.89 +.02 TotBdMkSig 10.89 +.02 TotIntl 15.70 -.10 TotStIAdm 41.38 -.31 TotStIIns 41.39 -.31 TotStIdx 41.36 -.31 TxMIntlAdm 12.15 -.09 TxMSCAdm 36.35 -.42 USGro 24.15 -.15 USValue 14.11 -.10 WellsI 25.32 -.07 WellsIAdm 61.35 -.16 Welltn 37.37 -.12 WelltnAdm 64.54 -.21 WndsIIAdm 61.13 -.29 WndsrII 34.43 -.17 Wells Fargo DvrCpBldA f 7.96 -.10

+2.7 +2.8 +21.1 +21.1 -0.1 -3.4 -3.4 -3.4 +16.6 +16.6 +16.7 +10.9 +5.1 +5.1 -1.3 +15.7 +17.6 +17.7 +17.7 +0.2 +0.4 -25.3 +20.8 +20.8 +19.6 +10.9 +10.9 +0.4 +0.5 +18.1 +16.7 +16.8 +17.8 +8.5 +19.1 +6.5 +7.8 +9.9 +10.9 +11.6 +11.5 +8.9 -0.7 -0.7 -0.7 -0.7 +5.1 +16.6 +16.6 +16.5 +8.4 +16.7 +13.6 +19.0 +5.7 +5.8 +11.1 +11.1 +17.3 +17.2 +14.0

96.16 76.11 43.09 32.75 47.82 37.00 33.28 22.85 35.04 24.38 435.36 341.98 13.73 6.85 30.64 19.30 22.68 4.00 60.70 43.30 69.56 39.01 43.43 35.58 43.74 28.34 30.17 25.38 48.59 20.72 59.41 40.06 60.08 43.59 62.50 34.00 10.00 4.74 15.75 11.14 5.15 3.30 19.72 13.06 9.81 5.14 72.70 52.29 91.99 65.43

p

138.8 million outstanding shares, according to FactSet. Smithfield’s stock will no longer be publicly traded once the deal closes. Its shares surged $6.50, or 25 percent, to $32.47 in midday trading Wednesday. Shuanghui has 13 facilities that produce more than 2.7 million tons of meat per year. Under the agreement, there will be no closures at Smithfield’s facilities and locations, including its Smithfield, Va., headquarters in the historic southeastern Virginia town of about 8,100 where it was founded in 1936, the companies said. Smithfield’s existing management team will remain in place and Shuanghui also will honor the collective bargaining agreements with Smithfield workers. The company has about 46,000 employees.

+.01

10-YR T-NOTE 2.12%

q

-.05

q

CRUDE OIL $93.13

NATURAL GAS $4.15

-1.88

Stocks of Local Interest

NAME

AirProd AmWtrWks Amerigas AquaAm ArchDan AutoZone BkofAm BkNYMel BonTon CVS Care Cigna CocaCola s Comcast CmtyBkSy CmtyHlt CoreMark EmersonEl EngyTEq Entercom FairchldS FrontierCm Genpact HarteHnk Heinz Hershey

TKR

APD AWK APU WTR ADM AZO BAC BK BONT CVS CI KO CMCSA CBU CYH CORE EMR ETE ETM FCS FTR G HHS HNZ HSY

DIV

2.84 1.12 3.36 .76 .76 ... .04 .60 .20 .90 .04 1.12 .78 1.08 .25 .76 1.64 2.58 ... ... .40 .18 .34 2.06 1.68

LAST

94.63 40.93 46.81 31.81 33.43 416.75 13.48 30.09 21.29 59.24 68.85 41.40 40.79 29.39 44.35 59.19 57.27 59.23 9.52 14.12 4.25 19.50 9.08 72.43 89.58

CHG

-.08 -.67 -.59 -.64 -.71 -2.20 +.13 ... -.10 -.97 -.22 -1.15 -1.03 -.46 +.07 -.01 -.39 -.77 -.23 +.02 -.05 -.17 -.04 -.02 -.54

YTD %CHG

+12.6 +10.2 +20.8 +25.1 +22.1 +17.6 +16.1 +17.1 +75.1 +22.5 +28.8 +14.2 +9.2 +7.4 +44.3 +25.0 +8.1 +30.2 +36.4 -1.9 -.7 +25.8 +53.9 +25.6 +24.0

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

43.84 107.41 103.70 32.10 22.89 29.99 73.13 33.55 22.54 84.78 96.73 82.54 69.38 3.04 23.14 64.48 51.84 42.11 54.31 79.96 45.96 41.10

24.76 76.92 83.31 24.27 18.92 6.00 53.36 27.10 11.81 66.66 81.10 59.07 44.47 .95 13.65 42.35 40.08 27.78 40.51 65.13 37.65 29.80

NAME

Lowes M&T Bk McDnlds Mondelez NBT Bcp NexstarB PNC PPL Corp PennaRE PepsiCo PhilipMor ProctGam Prudentl RiteAid SLM Cp SLM pfB TJX UGI Corp VerizonCm WalMart WeisMk WellsFargo

TKR

LOW MTB MCD MDLZ NBTB NXST PNC PPL PEI PEP PM PG PRU RAD SLM SLMBP TJX UGI VZ WMT WMK WFC

DIV

.64 2.80 3.08 .52 .80 .48 1.76 1.47 .72 2.27 3.40 2.41 1.60 ... .60 2.07 .58 1.13 2.06 1.88 1.20 1.20

LAST

43.09 105.99 99.05 30.28 20.18 27.24 71.80 30.04 20.04 81.12 92.25 78.90 69.22 2.97 23.48 61.89 49.99 38.45 49.57 76.23 42.14 40.75

q CHG

+.23 -.09 -2.19 -1.00 -.29 -.58 +.77 -.02 -.88 -1.31 -1.11 -1.96 +1.35 +.02 +.50 -1.61 -.70 -1.15 -1.25 -1.09 -.55 +.23

-.02 YTD %CHG

+21.3 +7.6 +12.3 +19.0 -.4 +157.2 +23.1 +4.9 +13.6 +18.5 +10.3 +16.2 +29.8 +118.4 +37.1 +16.8 +17.8 +17.5 +14.6 +11.7 +7.6 +19.2

Combined Stocks Name

Last Chg %YTD

AFLAC 55.69 AT&T Inc 35.91 AbtLab s 37.72 AMD 3.98 AlaskaAir 55.95 Alcoa 8.58 Allstate 48.55 Altria 36.44 AEP 46.19 AmExp 75.83 AmIntlGrp 45.52 Amgen 104.39 Anadarko 90.50 Annaly 13.99 Apple Inc 444.95 AutoData 69.77 AveryD 43.77 Avnet 33.68 Avon 23.44 BP PLC 43.65 BakrHu 47.41 BallardPw 2.02 BarnesNob 21.81 Baxter 71.34 Beam Inc 66.64 BerkH B 113.03 BigLots 38.38 BlockHR 29.59 Boeing 99.09 BrMySq 46.71 Brunswick 33.14 Buckeye 67.69 CBS B 50.45 CMS Eng 27.09 CSX 25.19

+.58 +4.8 -.27 +6.5 -.84 +20.4 -.07 +65.8 -.24 +29.8 -.01 -1.2 -.02 +20.9 -.63 +15.9 -.37 +8.2 -.33 +32.4 +.35 +29.0 -1.81 +21.1 -.96 +21.8 +.07 -.4 +3.51 -16.4 -.72 +22.6 -.60 +25.3 +.11 +10.0 -.24 +63.2 +.05 +4.8 -.24 +16.1 +.19+230.6 -.50 +44.5 -.97 +7.0 -.66 +9.1 +.75 +26.0 +.33 +34.9 -.09 +59.3 -1.02 +31.5 -.97 +44.9 -.35 +13.9 -1.77 +49.1 -.85 +32.6 -.43 +11.1 +.04 +27.7

Name

Last Chg %YTD

CampSp 44.66 Carnival 33.10 Caterpillar 86.49 CenterPnt 23.04 CntryLink 36.17 Chevron 125.49 Cisco 24.12 Citigroup 52.28 Clorox 84.84 ColgPalm s 59.58 ConAgra 34.38 ConocoPhil 62.78 ConEd 57.74 Corning 15.59 CrownHold 42.78 Cummins 117.72 DTE 66.26 Deere 87.35 Diebold 32.08 Disney 66.26 DomRescs 57.07 Dover 77.95 DowChm 34.94 DryShips 1.89 DuPont 56.02 DukeEn rs 67.15 EMC Cp 23.66 Eaton 67.24 EdisonInt 46.21 EmersonEl 57.27 EnbrdgEPt 30.13 Energen 56.40 Entergy 68.59 EntPrPt 61.43 Ericsson 12.02

-1.19 +.10 +.30 -.39 -.90 -.94 +.23 +.49 -2.26 -2.05 -.60 -.06 -.82 -.07 -.40 +.45 -1.43 +1.01 -.02 -.43 -.66 -.89 -.10 -.05 +.13 -.60 -.21 -1.43 -1.21 -.39 -.77 +.22 -.91 -1.04 +.12

+28.0 -10.0 -3.5 +19.7 -7.5 +16.0 +22.8 +32.2 +15.9 +14.0 +16.5 +8.3 +4.0 +23.5 +16.2 +8.6 +10.3 +1.1 +4.8 +33.1 +10.2 +18.6 +8.1 +18.1 +24.5 +5.3 -6.5 +24.1 +2.3 +8.1 +8.0 +25.1 +7.6 +22.7 +19.0

Name

Last Chg %YTD

Exelon 31.65 ExxonMbl 92.08 FMC Corp 63.80 Fastenal 51.91 FedExCp 96.55 Fifth&Pac 21.71 FirstEngy 39.22 Fonar 6.63 FootLockr 34.02 FordM 15.63 Gannett 21.56 Gap 39.37 GenCorp 13.83 GenDynam 77.53 GenElec 23.64 GenMills 48.18 GileadSci s 55.63 GlaxoSKln 52.01 Hallibrtn 43.57 HarleyD 55.47 HarrisCorp 51.16 HartfdFn 30.81 HawaiiEl 26.29 HeclaM 3.80 Heico 50.51 Hess 68.57 HewlettP 25.24 HomeDp 79.49 HonwllIntl 78.80 Hormel 40.83 Humana 81.22 INTL FCSt 17.52 ITT Corp 30.08 ITW 70.17 IngerRd 57.23

-.39 -.30 -.68 -.19 +.02 -.38 -.64 -.10 -.08 +.35 ... -1.15 -.02 -.34 +.04 -.93 -.55 -1.58 +.20 -.88 +.30 +.18 -.49 +.37 -.95 +.05 +.59 -.33 -.97 -.85 +.67 -.02 -.50 -.29 -.48

+6.4 +6.4 +9.0 +11.3 +5.3 +74.4 -6.1 +53.1 +5.9 +20.7 +19.7 +26.8 +51.1 +11.9 +12.6 +19.2 +51.5 +19.6 +25.6 +13.6 +4.5 +37.3 +4.6 -34.8 +12.8 +29.5 +77.1 +28.5 +24.2 +30.8 +18.3 +.6 +28.2 +15.4 +19.3

Name

Last Chg %YTD

IBM 207.92 IntPap 46.86 JPMorgCh 54.67 JacobsEng 56.06 JohnJn 85.65 JohnsnCtl 38.02 Kellogg 63.61 Keycorp 10.72 KimbClk 99.49 KindME 86.24 Kroger 34.42 Kulicke 12.30 L Brands 48.89 LancastrC 83.26 LillyEli 53.75 LincNat 35.53 LockhdM 107.31 Loews 46.18 LaPac 18.33 MDU Res 25.91 MarathnO 35.46 MarIntA 42.33 Masco 21.33 McDrmInt 9.12 McGrwH 54.09 McKesson 114.37 Merck 46.87 MetLife 43.93 Microsoft 34.88 MorgStan 24.98 NCR Corp 31.88 NatFuGas 62.04 NatGrid 60.38 NY Times 10.70 NewellRub 27.03

+.14 -.98 +.07 -.38 -1.96 -.04 -1.11 -.02 -5.04 -1.57 -.12 +.16 -.95 -.97 -.79 +.29 -.44 -.02 -.64 -.16 -.02 -.90 -.75 -.05 -.31 -1.94 -.75 +.69 -.14 +.25 +.06 -.13 -2.36 +.10 -.38

+8.5 +17.6 +25.2 +31.7 +22.2 +24.0 +13.9 +27.3 +17.8 +8.1 +32.3 +2.6 +3.9 +20.3 +9.0 +37.2 +16.3 +13.3 -5.1 +22.0 +15.7 +13.6 +28.6 -17.2 -1.1 +18.0 +14.5 +33.4 +30.6 +30.6 +25.1 +22.4 +5.1 +25.4 +21.4

Name

Last Chg %YTD

NewmtM 33.10 NextEraEn 75.72 NiSource 28.50 NikeB s 62.93 NorflkSo 76.89 NoestUt 41.73 NorthropG 81.87 Nucor 45.73 NustarEn 47.69 NvMAd 14.11 OGE Engy 68.11 OcciPet 94.55 OfficeMax 12.78 ONEOK s 45.85 PG&E Cp 44.82 PPL Corp 30.04 PVR Ptrs 26.37 Pfizer 28.28 PinWst 55.96 PitnyBw 15.01 Praxair 115.53 PSEG 33.30 PulteGrp 22.05 Questar 24.02 RadioShk 3.70 RLauren 177.33 Raytheon 67.10 ReynAmer 48.68 RockwlAut 87.94 Rowan 34.41 RoyDShllB 70.06 RoyDShllA 67.67 Safeway 23.56 Schlmbrg 74.98 Sherwin 189.99

+1.05 -1.30 -.37 -.35 -.72 -.42 -.23 -.42 -.94 -.25 -1.18 +1.90 -.21 -1.29 -1.24 -.02 -.33 -.73 -1.45 -.07 -.69 -.72 -.74 -.35 -.18 -1.14 -.65 -.89 -.60 -.27 +.27 +.17 +.17 -.42 -1.91

-28.7 +9.4 +14.5 +22.0 +24.3 +6.8 +21.1 +6.0 +12.3 -7.2 +21.0 +23.4 +30.9 +7.3 +11.5 +4.9 +1.5 +12.8 +9.8 +41.1 +5.6 +8.8 +21.4 +21.6 +74.5 +18.3 +16.6 +17.5 +4.7 +10.0 -1.2 -1.9 +30.2 +8.2 +23.5

Name

Last Chg %YTD

SilvWhtn g 23.40 SiriusXM 3.56 SonyCp 20.10 SouthnCo 44.26 SwstAirl 14.13 SpectraEn 30.80 SprintNex 7.28 Sysco 34.10 TECO 17.40 Target 69.42 TenetHlt rs 45.75 Tenneco 44.11 Tesoro 61.24 Textron 26.94 3M Co 111.13 TimeWarn 59.20 Timken 56.79 UnilevNV 41.62 UnionPac 156.13 Unisys 19.80 UPS B 86.34 USSteel 18.05 UtdTech 95.12 VarianMed 68.01 VectorGp 16.15 ViacomB 68.43 WestarEn 31.46 Weyerhsr 30.53 Whrlpl 127.77 WmsCos 35.88 Windstrm 8.25 Wynn 138.48 XcelEngy 28.65 Xerox 8.98 YumBrnds 69.54

+.89 -.04 -.57 -.63 -.14 -.33 +.01 -.88 -.35 -.09 -.89 -.04 -.72 -.86 -.46 -.80 +.16 -.53 -.92 +.48 -.41 -.42 -.85 -.07 -.10 -.93 -.79 -1.27 -1.84 -.52 -.22 -2.10 -.72 -.03 -.49

-35.1 +23.0 +79.5 +3.4 +38.0 +12.5 +28.4 +8.7 +3.8 +17.3 +40.9 +25.6 +39.0 +8.7 +19.7 +23.8 +18.7 +8.7 +24.2 +14.5 +17.1 -24.3 +16.0 -3.2 +8.6 +29.7 +9.9 +9.7 +25.6 +9.6 -.4 +23.1 +7.3 +31.7 +4.7


C MY K WHAT ARE YOU WATCHING? Love it or not, the Bluths are back After a much-hyped social-media buzz, the Bluth family returned to television screens on May 26 thanks to a season four revival of ‘Arrested Development’ courtesy of Netflix. Readers asked about the series are split on whether or not a return was

worth it. A jumpy first episode turned a few heads but not in a good way. Factoryville resident Samantha Watkins said, “I liked the old format better, as these were a bit hard to follow.” Scranton native Stephanie Monahan agreed, adding, “The perk of focusing

L ife

on each character is that we get some well-deserved character development.” Jennifer Graham Edsell, also of Scranton, said, “I was devastated when Fox canceled it and only caught episode one of Season Four so far, but I’m loving it!” “The callbacks to old characters

SECTION C

timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

(including a ton of favorites, no spoilers here) were well executed,” noted former Scranton resident Christopher Glenn Barrows. “It’s good to see what the Bluth family has been up to. Here’s hoping they never leave us again.” - Chris Hughes

thursday, may 30, 2013

ap photos

A bold bikini top by Athleta.

ap photo

A full-coverage bikini top by Athleta.

A floral-print Athleta tankini top.

mix MATCH

-ANDAND

is this year’s hot swimwear solution By SAMANTHA CRITCHELL / The Associated Press

N

EW YORK — For some women, it’s just this way and probably always will be: The size of their swimwear tops and bottoms don’t match. So, why not have some fun with it? There’s no better place than the beach or the pool to show off the whimsical and creative sides of a woman’s personality, says Josh Saterman, Macy’s fashion director. The customer can let down her hair when she’s there and break a few rules. Stripes with polka dots or a hot-pink string top and orange boy shorts: Why not? “We are definitely seeing our customer steer away from matchy-matchy,” says Nancy Taylor, Athleta’s director of design. Swim separates, including bikini and tankini tops, and brief, bikini and short-style bottoms, were introduced into wide distribution several years ago. They were intended to solve a practical problem when consumers needed a bigger top or bigger bottom, but women have since started using them to make a style statement. See SWIMWEAR, Page 5C

An Athleta short-style bottom.

A multicolored swim bottom by Athleta.

Athleta offers many full-coverage bikini bottoms.

Al Quinones, who manages Playground 52, is interviewed at the venue in The Bronx borough of New York. A company that offered tourist treks to the Bronx ‘ghetto’ has shut down under scathing criticism from offended neighborhood leaders.

‘Ghetto tours’ cease and desist amid public outcry By VERENA DOBNIK Associated Press

NEW YORK — A company that promised sightseer tours to the Bronx that included a New York City “ghetto” has stopped the bus rides under protest from an outraged neighborhood. Real Bronx Tours, which took mostly European tourists from Manhattan to see life in the South Bronx “from a safe distance,” issued a statement saying it would immediately cease all tours there. Three times a week, the $45 ride took visitors past food-pantry lines, a housing project and a park a guide described as a pickpocket hangout. Tourists were told they’d get a look at the Bronx that reflects one of the darkest chapters of the city’s history, the 1970s and ’80s, when the tour website said “this borough was notorious for drugs, gangs, crime and murders.” The Bronx lost hundreds of buildings to fires intentionally set by landlords to collect insurance money, hence the phrase, “the Bronx is burning.” But residents say the tours are a misrepresentation of the area where former Secretary of State Colin Powell and U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor lived as children. “Those days are over, the Bronx is being rebuilt, it’s rising again,” said Bronx resident and Grammy-nominated musician Bobby Sanabria. Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. and City Councilwoman Melissa Mark-Viverito sent an open letter to the company owner, Michael Myers, saying they were “sickened by the despicable way” the borough was being portrayed to outsiders. “We strongly urge you to stop profiting off of a tour that misrepresents the Bronx as a haven for poverty and crime, while mocking everything from our landmarks to the less fortunate members of our community who are availing themselves of food assistance programs.” The tour company did not respond to calls and emails requesting comment. It was not clear whether they would resume any of their tours. The website of the company is no longer accessible. Other companies in the city still offer regular guided trips to the Bronx. Three weeks ago, NYC & Company, the city’s tourism bureau, launched a promotion of the South See ghetto, Page 5C


817532

C MY K


C MY K TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

Paige L. Bittmann Paige Lauren Bittmann, daughter of Frank and Donna Bittmann, Pittston Township, is celebrating her fifth birthday today, May 30. Paige is a granddaughter of Ann Braccini, Pittston Township; the late Louis Braccini; and Kurt and Gerda Bittmann, Lake Grove, N.Y. She has a brother, Andrew, 7.

Sara A. Solo Sara A. Solo, daughter of Bobby and Linda Solo, Pittston, is celebrating her fourth birthday today May 30. Sara is a granddaughter of Michael and Loretta Kirkpatrick, Pittston.

Kaydence B. Presto Kaydence Bella Presto, daughter of Ashley Presto, Edwardsville, and Chris Lewis, Kingston, is celebrating her fourth birthday today, May 30. Kaydence is a granddaughter of Loretta Presto and Scott Perkins, Ross Township; Tyrone Presto and Kim Brenner, Plymouth; and Carrie Lewis, Kingston. She has a brother, Gaige Presto, 1.

MEETINGS Today KINGSTON: The Black Diamond Post 395 Kingston Son’s of the American Legion, 7 p.m., at the post home. All officers and members are urged to attend. Nomination of officers for 20132014 will be held. Commander Tom Walsh will preside.

C O M M U N I T Y

N E W S

THURSDAY, MAY 30, 2013 Page 3C

NAMES AND FACES Mitch Pointon, Courtdale, was named the Student of the Month for May at West Side Career and Technology Center. Pointon Pointon is a junior in the heating, ventilation and air-conditioning program. He plans on continuing his education in the HVAC field after graduation. Pointon hopes to start his own business someday. He is the son of Ed and Ann Marie Pointon. Josh Villarosa was the winner of WilkesBarre Academy’s ScriptsHoward school-wide spelling bee. VilVillarosa larosa advanced to the regional competition, where he finished in the sixth round. Adam Rinehimer Rinehimer was the secondplace winner at Wilkes-Barre Academy.

Dental hygienists visit day care students Preschool and pre-kindergarten students from Small Wonders/Back Mountain Day Care School were recently visited by dental hygienists Mary and Jennifer from the dental office of Dr. William Watkins and Dr. Lawrence Medura. They instructed the children on dental hygiene and proper tooth-brushing techniques. Members of the pre-kindergarten class, from left, first row, are Taylor Gashi, Lyla Wydra, Kaylee Kumenansky, Megan Kuzma, Julie Navestad, Alexa Thompson, Carissa Davis and Ayla Balent. Second row: Emily Grochal. Third row: Noah Love, Garrett Voitek, Peyton VanValkenburgh, Liam Naperkowski, Cole Sarday, Theo Barr, Aiden Romanoski and Violet Gontkowski. Fourth row: Lynn Jumper, teacher, and Brenda Davis, teacher.

IN BRIEF HOBBIE: The Dorrance Township, Wright Township and Hobbie fire departments are sponsoring a Kids Safety Day from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday at the Hobbie bazaar grounds. The event will feature search and rescue dogs, a fire safety house, fire trucks, ambulances and Life Flight. There will be representatives from the Department of Health, Hanover Water Rescue, Geisinger Trauma Department, Community Outreach and more. There will also be appearances by McGruff the Crime Dog and Smokey Bear. The event is free and open to the public. Refreshments and prizes will also be available. For more details, or directions, call 479-7033.

King’s College completes Annual Fund campaign The 2012-13 King’s College Annual Fund campaign recently culminated with an on-campus victory luncheon and volunteer recognition event. Contributions and pledges to the Annual Fund totaled more than $1.31 million. Funds raised during the campaign will help King’s College students with scholarship support, provide funds for faculty development and enhance campus improvements. At the event, from left, first row: Rose Marie Panzitta, team captain; Jim Gorman, team captain; the Rev. John J. Ryan, president, King’s; Eileen R. Melone, chair, Community Campaign; Tom Semanek Jr., team captain; and Kimberly K. Cardone, staff, King’s Institutional Advancement. Second row: Cheryl Nardone, staff, King’s Institutional Advancement; Freddie Pettit, vice president, Institutional Advancement; Karen Collins, team captain; Cathy Beretski, team captain; Rose Gryskevicz, King’s Institutional Advancement; Patrice Persico, King’s Institutional Advancement; Todd Serafin, team captain; and Brian Vinsko, team captain. Also participating were Monsignor Joseph Rauscher, chair, Clergy Campaign, and Kevin and Sue Lange, co-chairs, Parents’ Campaign.

REUNIONS Editor’s Note: To have your announcement published in this column please submit the information to Reunions, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., WilkesBarre, PA 18711. Email submissions must be sent to people@ timesleader.com. Please type “Reunion News” in the subject line. The deadline is each Monday

for all copy. EXETER HIGH SCHOOL All 50-plus graduates are invited to the next reunion planning committee meeting from 2-4 p.m. today at the Avenue Diner. Representatives from all classes are encouraged to attend. For more information call Barbara Russo at 654-8670.

KINGSTON HIGH SCHOOL Class of 1948 is holding its 65th anniversary reunion at 1 p.m. on June 15 at Costello’s Restaurant, Gateway Shopping Center, Edwardsville. All classmates and guests are welcome. No reservations required. MEYERS HIGH SCHOOL Classes 1960-1971 are plan-

ning a combined reunion. The next meeting will be held at 7 p.m. on June 6 at Rodano’s, Public Square, Wilkes-Barre. Invitations have been mailed. Class of 1966 is holding a meeting at 7 p.m. on June 13 at Cris Nics Irish Pub (the old Barney Inn) to discuss plans for a class 65th birthday party to be

held in September. ST. JOHN’S HIGH SCHOOL Class of 1973 is having a reunion meeting 6:30 p.m. on June 10 at Cooper’s, Pittston. Plans for a 40th anniversary reunion celebration will be discussed. The date of this meeting, June 10, is significant because it marks the 40th anniversary of graduation.

GUIDELINES

Children’s birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge Photographs and information must be received two full weeks before your child’s birthday. Your information must be typed or computer-generated. Include your name and your relationship

to the child (parent, grandparent or legal guardians only, please), your child’s name, age and birthday, parents’, grandparents’ and great-grandparents’ names and their towns of residence, any sib-

lings and their ages. Don’t forget to include a daytime contact phone number. Without one, we may be unable to publish a birthday announcement on time.

We cannot guarantee return of birthday or occasions photos and do not return community-news or publicity photos. Please do not submit precious or original professional photographs

that require return because such photos can become damaged, or occasionally lost, in the production process. Email your birthday announcement to people@timesleader.com

or send it to: Times Leader Birthdays, 15 North Main St., WilkesBarre, PA 18711-0250. You also may use the form under the People tab on www.timesleader.com.

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PAGE 4C THURSDAY, MAY 30, 2013

honor roll Holy Redeemer High School Anita M. Sirak, principal, Holy Redeemer High School, Wilkes-Barre, recently announced the following students have attained High Honors or Honors for the third quarter of the 2012-2013 school year: Grade 12: High Honors: Vito Aiello, Nicholas Ambrulavage, Jeremy Astolfi, Emily Becker, Fallyn Boich, Bethany Chmil, Cornelia Chmil, Matthew Collins, Thomas Cosgrove, Tyler Dougherty, Marissa Durako, Brianne Frascella, Kyle Gainard, Cassandra Gill, Danielle Gorski, Tricia Harenza, Cody Januszko, Anna Kachmarski, Mary Kolojejchick, Maria Sara Kopczynski, Kellie Kopko, Michael Kosik, Ann Kotch, Sydney Kotch, Jacob Kozak, John Kozak, Brendan Leahigh, Patrick Loftus, Thomas Madigan, Morgan Mancini, Ennio Mancuso, Nicholas McCarroll, Stephanie McCole, Michael Mocion, Jeremy Myslowski, Angeli Nause, Jenna Nitowski, Megan Phillips, Victoria Reggie, Joseph Ruiz, Grace Rychwalski, Matthew Slavoski, Rachel Sowinski, Christina Springer, Kaitlyn Stochla, Joseph Szczechowicz, Ryan Tabit, Teresa Toomey, David Wert and Sarah Williams. Honors: Vincent Amarando, James Bond, Krzysztof Bozentka, Nadine Carlo, Rachael Coassolo, Kelsey Crossin, Elizabeth Eaton, Callie Evans, George Evans, Shane Flannery, Mitchell Ford, Joshua Foust, Eric Gdovin, Sophia Geiser, Margaret Guarnieri, Jeremy Heiser, Louis Jablowski, Robert Jones, Geetika Khanna, Katelyn Laskowski, Amanda Latoski, Alexandria Malacari, Gerald Maloney, Andrew Mark, Patrick McHale, Derek McManus, Kasey Miller, Michael Morrison, Louis Murray, Devon Nowicky, Lauren Pikul, Kayla Rhiel, Joshua Siecko, Andrea Siejna, Grace Sipler, Joanna Sobeck, Kristen Stepanski, Frazee Sutphen,

Leanne Tabit, Adam Turosky, Sarah Warnagiris, Kelsey Williams and Carleena Wozniak. Grade 11: High Honors: Brian Banas, Caitlin Barat, Michael Boland, Michael Boris, Michael Boutanos, Rachel Callahan, Casey Carty, Megan Devaney, Elizabeth DiGiovine, Rachel Finnegan, Michele Fromel, Carl Gross, Amanda Halchak, Samantha Hilenski, Caroline Jones, John Kane, Kellan Katra, Lucas Klimuszka, Bailey Klocko, Jeffrey Kloeker, Julie Kosik, Tyler Kukosky, Melanie Kusakavitch, Tram Le, Gary Loughney, Emily Makar, Rachel Makar, Alisson Meluskey, Frank Mrozowski, Connor Mulvey, Vinay Murthy, Hailey Noss, Nina Paoloni, Christopher Pawlenok, Alyssa Platko, Michael Prociak, Dominick Rendina, Anneliese Romani, Samantha Scalzo, Nikki Scarantino, Christine Scavone, Nicole Slavoski, Kelsey Stasko, Donald Stephens, Ana Turosky, Krista Williams, Allison Zablocky and Audrey Zavada. Honors: Nathaniel Anderson, Elizabeth Arensmeyer, Michael Berbano, Justine Bielecki, James Blewitt, Brandon Bojanowski, Thomas Caffrey, Devon Claherty, Erik J. Cudo, Joseph Devers, Michael Dubinski, Taylor Engel, Alexia Evans, Dominique Falzone, Jessica (Ting) Fu, Tyler Guilford, Shawna Hannon, Jason Hauze, Kenny Ho, Hyunju Jeon, Emily Kabalka, Margarete Kukosky, Kaila Kurash, Jacqueline Kurovsky, Mallory Kusakavitch, Anna Layaou, Eric Ligotski, Chase Makowski, Elizabeth Masi, Mariano Medico, Sara Mirra, Victoria Nealon, Bryce Partlow, Taylor Pavlick, Matthew Pawlowski, Yardley Phillips, Stefani Povalac, Lucille Reilly, Miranda Robasky, Sydney Roth, Emily Savidge, Patrick Serino, Sarah Snyder, Anastasia Stevens, Nicholas Strellish, David Tomaszewski, Vincent Villani, Lloyd Wagner and Taylor Wheeler. Grade 10: High Honors: Kathryn Aldrich, Derek Belsky, Robert Ber-

tram, Mary Pat Blaskiewicz, Renee Brown, Elena Bruning-Martin, Gaetano Buonsante, Erin Byorick, Jamie Carty, Michael Conlon, Ann Cosgrove, Caitlin Croke, Ryan Crossin, Matthew Dacey, Arielle Djokoto, Robert Dougherty, Greta Ell, Bailey Endler, Eric Flower, Cameron Ford, Michael Gatusky, Katarina Gereda, Cameron Gill, Michael Gorski, Olivia Gregorio, Hannah Griffiths, Vanessa Hannagan, Megan Harding, Jillian Hayden, Taylor Kane, Maria Khoudary, Alex Kotch, Johanna Kultys, Matthew Lyons, Danielle Marchese, Conlan McAndrew, Marlee Mierzwa, Madison Mishanski, Arvind Murali, Connor Murray, Lindsay Musial, Rachel Platko, Kenneth Rexer, John Rey, Jennifer Ringsdorf, Emily Schramm, Briana Scorey, Tyler Scott, Gabriella Soroka, Abigail Truschel, Matthew Wert, Timothy White, Alana Wilson, Abigail Wolfgang, Alexis Wylam and Adam Zipko. Honors: Jerry Busch, Nicole Calomino, Thomas Calpin, Natalie Coffee, Ryan Doyle, Victoria Fulton, Joshua Gallagher, Breanna Gorski, Kaitlyn Gushka, Justin Higgs, Taylor Isaacs, Danielle Jensen, Alexis Lewis, Mark Liskowicz, Lauren Manganello, Lucas Mark, Jacob Martin, Danielle McCole, Gabrielle Mohutsky, Benjamin Nause, Brandon Povilitus, Justin Prenga, Justin Renfer, Phoebe Ritsick, Scott Roper, Theodosia Seasock, Andrew Semanek, James Slavinski, Kaya Swanek, Hannah Thornton and Patrick Villani. Grade 9: High Honors: Ivy Ap-

N E W S

pleyard, Caroline Banas, Amanda Benzkofer, Anah Bozentka, Juliana Buonsante, Kaitlyn Ceppa, Alyssa Christian, Matthew Clemow, Colin Craven, Alexis Davison, Thomas Day, Michelle Devaney, Andrea Dogal, Catherine Falzone, Madeline Grant, Olivia Greer, Noah Heck, Nicholas James, Kathryn Jeffries, Emily Johnson, Courtney Kijek, Carrie Kinney, Macy Klocko, Emily Kolojejchick, Lydia Lawson, Jennifer Loughney, Angela Malinovitch, Alyson Manley, Alexia Mazzarella, Meghan McGraw, Olivia Mennig, Marley Mullery, Abby Muth, Randy Nguyen, Alexis Ornoski, James Orr, Jordyn Pavelitz, Rebecca Prociak, Marissa Rogers, Isabella Romani, Hope Sipler, Lauren Slavoski, Abigail Spencer, Brianna Stilp, Abigail Stucker, Connor Thole, Gabby Tomasura, Michela Torbik, Isabelle Updike, Leeann Wasiakowski, Michael Waugh, Thomas Williams, Amanda Wozinski and John Wychock. Honors: Julia Adonizio, Matthew Barat, Abigail Bradigan, Cameron Brennan, Abigail Burge, John Carr, Casey Chandler, Christian Coassolo, Meghan Corridoni, Kyle Davis, Maria DiBuo, Liam Frederick, Jarrett Gabriel, Lauren Higgs, Kayla Hons, Matthew Howard, Bailey Janowski, Jaclyn Leighton, Aidan Lynn, Jack Patterson, Jason Poor, Rose Randazza, Emily Romanowski, James Rushton, Courtney Scovish, Katarina Solovey, Connor Stone, Erica Stuccio, Sarah Thomas, Liam Vender, Alex Wampole, Riley Williams and Carissa Wozinski.

www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER

Nanticoke-Newport Class of ‘53 planning reunion

T

he Nanticoke-Newport High School Class of 1953 is holding its 60th anniversary reunion on Aug. 16 at the East Mountain Inn. Information on classmates can be sent to any planning committee member. Reunion committee, from left, first row, are Carol Sukowaski, Harriet Seward, Marian Horn and Alice Pawlowski. Second row: Joanne Madey, Josephine Cybulski, Stanley Makowski and Frank Wempa. Also on the committee are Arlene Gritsko and Jake Marcinkowski.

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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

thursday, may 30, 2013 Page 5C AP PHOTOS

GHETTO

Manicured homes line a street in the Longwood Historic District in The Bronx borough of New York. A company that offered tourist treks to the Bronx ‘ghetto’ has shut down under scathing criticism from neighborhood leaders offended by the tours that took mostly European and Australian tourists past foodpantry lines and ‘pickpocket’ park. But other New York companies continue to show visitors, many of them foreigners who know of the Bronx only from movies, the grittiest part of the city’s poorest borough.

Continued from Page 1C

Bronx as “one of our safest, most exciting boroughs,� with highlights including Art Deco architecture and the Yankees. Real Bronx Tours has been booted from the bureau’s membership list as a result of the language they’ve been using, NYC & Company spokeswoman Kimberly Spell said. Elena Martinez, an anthropologist and Bronx resident, offers visitors walks through the same neighborhood that was on Real Bronx Tours’ itinerary. The human struggles on these still gritty streets have produced urban styles and sounds copied around the world, from hip-hop music and outdoor murals to clothing. “Many young Europeans come here as a pilgrimage,� Martinez said. “This was the incubator for hip-hop, salsa, jazz, Afro-Cuban music, R&B.� She points to theaters, lavish dance halls and clubs where salsa came alive, along with some of the biggest names in music. Sanabria, a famed drummer, says he comes from a borough “that has an incredible, majestic music culture.� And though many of the buildings now house stores and offices, or were demolished or burned down, new ones mingle with restored historic ones “and people are helping to bring the neighborhood back,� Martinez said. “We’ve had enough of the gawkers who come to ghettoize us,� says Al Quinones, caretaker of a community park that features a garden with fruit trees and a stone outdoor amphitheater. “Their timing was bad. The Bronx is not burning, not now! Now it’s resurgence.� On the door to his shack on the grounds is a sign that reads: “Don’t dump on the Bronx.� Sanabria, Martinez and other Bronx residents are meeting Friday to kickstart a counter-campaign to what they call the Bronx’s “negative image.� They’ve calling their action “Bronx Rising.�

SWIMWEAR Continued from Page 1C

Mixing pieces, sometimes in different silhouettes or from different brands, builds a swim wardrobe that suits different occasions — a strapless bandeau for a party and an athletic racer-back for a day with the kids, perhaps? — while a woman can remain comfortable and confident in the bottom she feels best fits her figure. (Loyalty runs deeper for bottoms, experts say.) Celebrities were photographed in mismatched tops and bottoms, and young women soon followed, says designer Shoshanna Lonstein Gruss, who launched her brand with swimwear. It was only a matter of time until more fans of two-piece bathing suits caught on to it, she says. Fans of the one-piece can accomplish a

ABOVE: The former Samuel B. White mansion, in the 1850s’ Greek Revival style, survives in the Longwood Historic District in The Bronx borough of New York. AT LEFT: A young man runs under an elevated section of subway tracks in The Bronx borough of New York.

Mixing pieces, sometimes in different silhouettes or from different brands, builds a swim wardrobe that suits different occasions — a strapless bandeau for a party and an athletic racer-back for a day with the kids, perhaps? similar look by adding a pair of swim shorts or a skirt. “Mix-and-match is definitely a trend this season,� agrees Jennifer Foyle, design director for Aerie. That has made designers more conscious of using complementary colors and prints. Taylor of Athleta plans for all sorts of combinations as she plots the collection. Right now, shoppers seem to favor printed tops with solid bottoms as they’re still adjusting their eye, she says. It’s a way for customers to dip a toe into separates. Dark bottoms, especially black and dark blue, do tend

to be more flattering, Foyle advises. She adds: “It’s almost like dressing for ready to wear. Women are using her swimsuit top as her summer statement piece. She wants it to be fun, but she wants it to look good.� Taylor doesn’t want to put any rules to it — rule-breaking is the best part, she says — but still, she’d encourage color families, pairing cool beach blues and greens. Neons also work together, and so do warm tropical hues. It’s the same idea with prints: Nautical stripes and cheerful polka dots marry

well, as do ethnic and animal prints, and ikats. But a dot and an ikat would look more like they were just two pieces pulled haphazardly from the drawer. Small-scale geometric patterns also work with florals or paisleys, but because florals and paisleys are both typically bold, Taylor would keep those separate. Keep in mind the vibe and the overall look even if you’re not sweating full-on coordination, she suggests. There’s also the opportunity to use different solid separates to tap into the colorblocking trend that remains popular this season. This summer, Gruss says she’ll be mixing gold pieces with corals and turquoise blue. A bonus? You get more mileage out of your swim “outfits,� Gruss adds. “Three suits become six.�

AP PHOTOS

TOP: A smallerscale bikini top by Athleta might mix well with a fuller-coverage bottom in a different pattern. BOTTOM: A bold, full-coverage bikini bottom by Athleta.

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Friend keeping confidences for married couple feels ready to crack Dear Abby: I am friendly with a married couple. The husband, “Grant,” is my best friend and we talk about everything. His wife, “Sharon,” and I are equally close. Their wedding date was last summer. I have known for a while that Grant didn’t want to get married. He did it to please everyone around him. Sharon, however, was elated. He hoped that after the wedding his feelings would change. Now they have been married for nine months Grant tells me he can’t continue on, that he is unhappy and no longer wants to be married. I have begged and pleaded with

DEAR ABBY ADVICE him to level with Sharon. He keeps making excuses about why he hasn’t told her yet. He says he’ll do it — but each day he moves the discussion further and further back. When I talk with her, she tells me she has the feeling he doesn’t want to be married anymore. Please help. This is stressing me out. I want to let Grant tell her, but I feel I should say something because he hasn’t. At the same time, I don’t want to have anyone mad at me. What should I do? — Caught in the Middle

UNIVERSAL SUDOKU

Dear Caught: Step back and keep your mouth shut. You are in a no-win situation. It is Grant’s job to find the courage to tell his wife he made a mistake by marrying her. While it may be painful for her to hear, it probably won’t come as a shock, from what she’s telling you. You help neither of them by letting them discuss their marital problems with you instead of with each other. So do them both a favor and remove yourself from the middle. Dear Abby: When I was 15, I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, severe anxiety and social phobia. I am now 20 and have been on countless medications and tried different forms of therapy. I wish for nothing more than

CRYPTOQUOTE

to be a fully functioning adult, but I am exhausted from trying my hardest to feel better internally only to find myself where I started. What’s your best advice for young adults dealing with crippling mental illness? How can we live our lives without fear of being rejected or shunned for our illness? — Frustrated in Washington Dear Frustrated: There is still ignorance, stigma and fear about mental illness mostly because it is misunderstood. However, 50 percent of adults will have a diagnosable mental illness at some time in their lives — including the ones you have. I discussed your letter with Dr. David Baron, psychiatrist in chief at the University of Southern California

hospital. He suggested that I stress to you the importance of finding a mental health professional you can trust and confide in, and have another thorough evaluation done. In recent years newer drugs and therapies are being used which may help you, so you shouldn’t give up. In a case like yours, a combination of medication and talk therapy can be helpful.

To receive a collection of Abby’s most memorable — and most frequently requested — poems and essays, send a business-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $3.95 ($4.50 in Canada) to: Dear Abby’s “Keepers,” P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included.)

HOROSCOPE BY HOLIDAY MATHIS

GOREN BRIDGE WITH OMAR SHARIF & TANNAH HIRSCH PREVIOUS DAY’S SOLUTION

ARIES (March 21-April 19). Cats don’t really get tongues, and the pants of liars rarely catch on fire. But you believe in the influence of phrases, and you’re careful to use the most empowering words you can think of. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You’ll note the odd out-of-place things here and there and decide it’s time to clean up your life a bit. Regarding your list of next steps: Are they doable? GEMINI (May 21-June 21). People will tell you that they want a job done fast, but if it’s not also done well, all that speed will be for nothing. It’s better to slow down and take pride in your work. CANCER (June 22-July 22). You may look around and assess that you can’t do anything about the situation at hand. If all you can change is your own attitude, do that. It will be enough to flip the situation around. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Someone stole something from you in the past — an intangible item, like your wide-eyed pure affection. Now you’ll be paid a small penance for this thievery. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). You have to admire a person who is doing the right thing and getting rewarded for it — that is, after you finish being envious that it’s not you. It will be soon. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Destiny is not a scriptwriter assigned to the task of creating your epic love story. You’re the best one for that job, although you might have better luck making it an adventure story with romantic undertones.

CROSSWORD

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SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). You have a special relationship with silence. You use it effectively, and it empowers you. You sense when the silence is in danger, and you protect it. You also know when to interrupt the silence. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). If you know what another person should be doing and you fail to tell him or her, does that make you negligent? Unless you’re the other person’s boss or parent, no. It’s smart to mind your own business. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). You’ll enjoy the state of things inside your own head. There’s more optimism, hope and playfulness there than before. It’s like you’re learning a new way to think. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You are competitive, so you will be tempted to compare yourself to others, which is not a good idea, especially if you’re comparing your weaknesses to their strengths. Stay focused on what you’re doing well. Keep doing it. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). When you show people who you are, they will first wonder whether what you’re showing is really you. Your consistency will convince them. What you display is who you really are inside. TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (May 30). Relationships change, and the new way suits your lifestyle and goals beautifully. In June, you move forward in less than perfect conditions, and you make something great out of the circumstances. July brings a professional shift. Your lucky numbers are: 40, 2, 11, 24 and 18.

Times Leader 05-30-2013  

The Times Leader

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