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WILKES-BARRE, PA

Stabbing is listed as cause of death

SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011

S U M M E R ’ S U N O F F I C I A L S TA R T

Lot of fun for everyone

Dragons will race at Riverfest

Coroner says Jonathan Balester, 56, died from multiple wounds.

By STEVE MOCARSKY smocarsky@timesleader.com

By MATT HUGHES and JERRY LYNOTT mhughes@timesleader.com jlynott@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE – An autopsy performed Saturday on the body of Jonathan Balester determined the Kingston Township man was stabbed to death in his home. Balester, 56, of North Lehigh Street, died from multiple stab wounds, said Balester Luzerne County Coroner John Corcoran. He and others involved in the investigation released few details about the death that has been ruled a homicide. Luzerne County District Attorney Jackie Musto Carroll said the investigation is ongoing. State police reported Balester’s body was discovered in his home at 10:38 p.m. on Thursday. Investigators were at the house that night and Friday collecting evidence and interviewing neighbors. Friends and neighbors said Balester was active in the Back Mountain Harvest Assembly Church and described him as a caring person who also taught Bible studies at the Luzerne County Correctional Facility. The church’s pastor Dan Miller said Balester often allowed people in need the use of an apartment above a detached

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

Anton Koss, 5, of Sweet Valley, sits behind the wheel of Max Emel’s micro sprint racing car on Saturday at the Sweet Valley Volunteer Fire Company Fair. Coming in for a closer look is Anton’s little brother Evan, 2.

Event roundup includes festivals, concerts By STEVE MOCARSKY smocarsky@timesleader.com

D BUSINESS: Mutuals 6D

Break out your shorts and sandals – and your day trip planner. With Memorial Day weekend upon us and marking the unofficial start of summer, thoughts turn to favorite festivals and popular warm-weather events in Northeastern Pennsylvania that are just around the corner. The most popular regional events this summer as far as attendance will be NASCAR’s Pocono 500 June 10-12 and the Pennsylvania 500 Aug. 5-7 at Pocono Raceway in Long Pond. As raceway vice president Bob Pleban once said, Pocono Raceway becomes the third largest city in the state on race day. If you’re someone who likes your auto racing closer to home, the Giants Despair Hillclimb might be more your speed. The mile-long race is July 9-10 on East Northampton Street in Laurel Run. Drivers encounter

E VIEWS: Editorial 2E Forum 3E

See LOTS, Page 14A

See STABBING, Page 14A

INSIDE A NEWS: Local 3A Nation & World 5A Obituaries 2A, 10A B PEOPLE: Birthdays 5B C SPORTS:Scoreboard 2C Baseball 3C Outdoors 12C

F ETC.: Puzzles 2F Travel 8F G CLASSIFIED

SUMMER FORECASTS Weather: Brian Lovejoy, meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Binghamton, N.Y., said folks in Northeastern Pennsylvania can expect normal temperatures and normal amounts of rainfall this summer. The average low, high and mean temperatures for June are 57 degrees, 78 degrees and 68 degrees. Those for July are 62 degrees, 83 degrees and 72 degrees. Those for

August are 60 degrees, 81 degrees and 70 degrees. On average, there are 12 days in June with precipitation (including days with just trace amounts), 11.4 days in July and 11.1 days in August. Gas prices: Jana Tidwell, public affairs specialist with AAA Mid-Atlantic, said analysts believe gasoline prices will continue to retreat and settle in the $3.25 to $3.75 per gallon range throughout the summer.

CHARLES D. FLACK JR.

MCT PHOTO

A dragon boat breaks up the American flag reflection as it starts to race down the Schuylkill River.

1 9 5 4 - 2 0 11

Remembering a giant friend

Jonah Astolfi Partly sunny, northern shower in the afternoon. High 85. Low 63. Details, Page 14C

Philanthropist, civic leader recalled during memorial service Saturday. By MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

09815 10077

WILKES-BARRE – Every year on the weekend of Wyoming Valley Riverfest, the typically austere riverscape of the Susquehanna is transformed by the appearance of “The ata few traction is hundred colorful kay- the specaks and ca- tacle of it. noes traveling en Anyone masse. can do it. This year, visitors to You do not Riverfront necessarily Park will have to be see something new an athlete cutting to do it.” through the John Maday murky waRiverfront Park ters: the Committee heads of member dragons. While paddlers participating in the Susquehanna Sojourn will again be among the river’s travelers on the weekend of June 17-19, dragon boat racing is a new addition to the Riverfest activities. “The attraction is the spectacle of it,” said John Maday, a Riverfront Park Committee member who organized the See DRAGONS, Page 14A

WEATHER

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$1.50

Friends of Charles Flack wait in line to enter the Church of Christ Uniting in Kingston for his memorial service on Saturday.

KINGSTON – In his lifetime, Charles Flack Jr. touched the lives of countless others. On Saturday, hundreds of his friends, associates and protégés packed a memorial service to celebrate the life of the man known as “Rusty,” who was, in many ways, larger than life. “This place is bursting at the seams, just like Rusty was

bursting at the seams,” former U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum said at the service. “If there’s one way to deFlack scribe Rusty, it’s bursting at the seams with life, energy, zeal, compassion… Rusty was a big man, but the more I learn about Rusty, the more I learn he was bigger.” Flack, 56, passed away at his home Thursday following a 19month battle with cancer. He was chairman of Diamond Consolidated Industries

INSIDE: Times Leader Editor and Publisher Richard L. Connor remembers Rusty Flack, Page 1E

Inc., a West Wyoming perforated metal company he and his brother Harold took over following their father’s death in 1979. Flack was a great philanthropist, a civic leader who served on boards for The Luzerne Foundation, Wyoming Seminary and the Greater WilkesBarre Chamber of Business and Industry, among others, and an influential leader of local ReSee GIANT, Page 8A


K PAGE 2A

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SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011

THE TIMES LEADER

Festival offers fun, baskets and education By JOSEPH DOLINSKY Times Leader Correspondent

CONYNGHAM – In addition to enjoying all the classic perks of summertime church bazaars, picnic-goers at the eighth annual Taming of the Wolf Festival in Conyngham had the opportunity to learn about Lupus and other diseases that affect people on an everyday basis. In between learning, snacking and listening to the entertainment, picnickers were also able to browse the massive collection of gift baskets donated by area companies and individuals alike. These baskets, however, had some extra flair. The festival’s organizer, Cynthia Donlan, cleverly named the nearly 200 baskets with titles such as “Lady Goo Goo Gaa Gaa” - a basket filled with baby items and Thyme Management, a collection of herbs and spices. The festival’s moniker “Taming of the Wolf” is yet another play on words: Lupus being Latin

for wolf, and the typical “butterfly rash” often associated with the disease has been said to resemble the pattern of fur on a wolf’s face. Picnickers may have come for the atmosphere, but they stayed for the healthy living information offered by the many organizations in attendance. “It’s a great event. Picnic food on one end and checkups on the other,” laughed Ray Carroll, a Nanticoke resident who made his way to Conyngham for the second year in a row. Carroll took advantage of a heel scan offered by the Greater Hazleton Health Alliance that tested for osteoporosis. The Luzerne County Lupus Foundation was also on hand to answer questions such as symptoms, definitions and treatment for the disease which often affects the heart, lungs, kidneys, joints and even the nervous system. FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER There was also free blood pressure testing and a chiropractor A Taming of the Wolf Festival was held at St. John Bosco Church, Conyngham, as a benefit for Luwas in attendance. pus. Nearly 200 baskets were part of the fundraiser.

Casey Anthony’s mother and ex-boyfriend testify

where evidence is displayed for ORLANDO, Fla. — The the jury, media and spectators. mother of a Florida woman ac- Anthony eventually interrupted cused of killing her 2-year-old her questioning, asking prosedaughter gave a tour of the fam- cutors to remove the photo. “I can’t look at my grandily home, including a playhouse built for the toddler and the daughter without getting upabove-ground pool the defense set,” she said. Casey Anthony’s former boyteam claims the girl drowned friend, Anthony Lazzaro, also in. Cindy Anthony testified Sat- testified Saturday about the urday at her daughter’s murder hours after the Anthonys reported Caylee’s disaptrial that she and Caylee went swimming Cindy Anthony pearance to authorities. on June 15, 2008 — was not asked He described a text message exchange in the last day she saw which he was trying to her granddaughter. directly SatShe said she removed urday whether get Casey Anthony to reveal where the toddler a ladder used to help she thought Caylee get into the the young girl was. “If they don’t find her pool — something she did every time the drowned. The guess who gets blamed and spends eternity in pool wasn’t being trial will reused. sume Tuesday jail?” the text message read. Casey Anthony, in Orlando. Prosecutors presentwho is charged with ed their strongest witfirst-degree murder in the toddler’s summer 2008 ness Friday after a judge redeath, wiped away tears with a buffed their attempts to allow tissue during her mother’s testi- instant messages to be intromony. Prosecutors contend duced as evidence that they say Casey Anthony suffocated the go toward Anthony’s motive. The manager of a towing girl with duct tape. If convicted, she could be sentenced to yard where the defendant’s car was kept for more than two death. Cindy Anthony was not asked weeks during that summer tesdirectly Saturday whether she tified that he smelled an odor thought the young girl coming from her car consistent drowned. The trial will resume with decomposing bodies he’d smelled in the past. The deTuesday in Orlando. Through most of her testimo- fense argued in its opening ny, a photo of young Caylee re- statement that the smell was acmained on display on television tually from a bag of trash Anmonitors along the courtroom, thony left in her car. The Associated Press

Caroline A. Cunningham May 25, 2011 aroline A. Cunningham, of Hanover Township, passed quietly C into eternal life Wednesday, May 25,

2011, at her home. Born in Wilkes-Barre, she was a lifelong resident of the Wyoming Valley. She was a daughter of the late Joseph Damitski and Laura Baranowski Damitski Harrison. Caroline graduated from G.A.R. Memorial High School and entered the work force where she would eventually meet her future husband. Following the birth of their son, Caroline became a stay-athome mom for many years. Eventually, she re-entered the workforce in both the retail and garment industries. Subsequently, Caroline became a teacher’s aide in the Wilkes-Barre Area School District for 17 years. Following her retirement, she continued to work with children as a Foster Grandparent Aide for 13 years. Throughout her life, Caroline maintained an active social calendar as well as involvement in various volunteer activities. She was active in the Regina’s of King’s College, serving as Financial Secretary, Recording Secretary, Hospitality, and President. She also served as a volunteer for the American Red Cross and as an usher at the Kirby Center for the Performing Arts. Caroline was also active in the Father Nahas Senior Citizens Group in Wilkes-Barre. In addition, Caroline was involved with her church, Saint Leo the Great, Ashley, as an active member of the Altar and Rosary Society, Saint Vincent DePaul Society, a volunteer for the Parish Festival, and, in particular, the Cyrenians More Obituaries, Page 10A

where she served as Secretary for 14 years. In addition to her parents, Caroline was preceded in death by her husband, Bob; as well as a sister, Genevieve Carter; and brother, Michael. Surviving are her son Robert and his fiancée, Dolores Gable, Laflin; granddaughter Amy L. Beggs and her husband, William R. Beggs Jr., Broomall, Pa.; granddaughter Dr. Laura E. Thorp and her husband, Dr. Chris Thorp, Chicago, Ill.; greatgrandson William R. Beggs III; and great-granddaughter Emily Beggs, Broomall; sister, Jane Herron, Wilkes-Barre; as well as nieces and nephews. Throughout her life Caroline carried out many roles. She was a devoted daughter, sister, wife, mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother, as well as a loyal and true friend and dedicated teacher. She touched the lives of so many and leaves our world far better for her presence in it. Caroline is missed beyond words. Funeral services will be at 9 a.m. Tuesday from the Lehman Family Funeral Service Inc., 689 Hazle St., Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call from 2 to 4 and from 7 to 9 p.m. Monday. Interment will be at Saint Mary’s Cemetery, Hanover Township, immediately following a 9:30 a.m. Mass of Christian Burial at Saint Leo the Great Church, 33 Manhattan St., Ashley. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made in her memory to Saint Leo the Great Church, 33 Manhattan St., Ashley. Condolences may be emailed to info@lehmanfuneralhome.com.

Married couples are minority

Census Bureau shows married couples represent 48 percent of all households. By NIGEL DUARA Associated Press

PORTLAND, Ore. — Three mornings a week, when Becky Leung gets ready for work, her boyfriend is just getting home from his overnight job. When her mother drops hints about her twin sister’s marriage, she laughs it off. And when she thinks about getting married herself, she worries first about her career. Leung, 27, cohabits in a Portland, Ore., townhome with her boyfriend but has no plans yet to wed, a reflection of the broader cultural shift in the U.S. away from the traditional definition of what it means to be a household. Data released Thursday by the U.S. Census Bureau shows married couples have found themselves in a new position: They’re no longer the majority. It’s a trend that’s been creeping along for decades, but in the 2010 Census, married couples represent 48 percent of all households. That’s down from 52 percent in the last Census and, for the first time in U.S. history, puts households led by married couples as a plurality.

trend. She’s got a “I see a lot of peo- Fears of not being ple not having the able to hang onto a marketing job in a trendy city, writes a typical 8-to-5 job, or personal blog on livcouples where one job, a widening ing a gluten-free person is employed labor market for lifestyle and has and one isn’t. women and a shift plans to get married There’s other prior- away from having — eventually. ities before mar“I think a lot of riage,” Leung said. kids at a young age people make a misThe flip in the have all proved to take of saying, I’ve 2010 Census hap- be a disincentive got a good job, I’m pened in 32 states. for people in their stable, I’m ready to In another seven take the next step,” states, less than 51 20s and early 30s percent of house- to join the ranks of Leung said. “You never know what holds were helmed the married. happens down the by married couples. road. That’s the The reason, said Portland State University de- whole purpose of dating. “You’re not there to just have mographer Charles Rynerson, is twofold: The fast-growing fun.” The median age for first older population is more likely to be divorced or widowed lat- marriages has climbed steader in life, and 20-somethings ily since the 1960s, when men are putting off their nuptials got married at about 23 years old, and women at 20. Now, for longer stretches. “People in their 20s are post- men are waiting until they’re poning marriage for many rea- 28 and women are holding off sons, including money,” Ry- until 26. “Some of that is people counerson said. “We also have an aging population, so there’s pling but not being married,” Rynerson said. “There are not more people living alone.” Fears of not being able to nearly as many people in their hang onto a job, a widening la- 20s who are married as in prebor market for women and a vious generations.” The data supports that, as shift away from having kids at a young age have all proved to the Census Bureau reported be a disincentive for people in last year that opposite-sex untheir 20s and early 30s to join married couples living together jumped 13 percent from the ranks of the married. Leung is indicative of that 2009 to 7.5 million.

Philly mob took a hit but stages a comeback Federal grand jury report paints a picture of La Cosa Nostra as alive and well.

Reputed boss of the Philadelphia mob Joseph ‘Uncle Joe’ Ligambi, center, along with two unidentified men exit federal court in Philadelphia in July 2001. A federal judge ordered Ligambi held without bail Thursday.

By PATRICK WALTERS Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — Just a few years ago, federal authorities thought they had the Philadelphia-area mob close to sleeping with the fishes: One boss had turned government informant, his successor was convicted of racketeering and the underworld organization seemed in disarray. But a federal grand jury report unsealed Monday, announcing charges against the top two reputed Philadelphia mobsters and 11 others, paints a picture of La Cosa Nostra as alive and well. Its 70 pages detail an operation that has rebounded and is thriving in some of classic staples of organized crime: sports betting, electronic gambling, coded conversations and violent threats. “Despite the clear history over the past 30 years, there are people still willing to be involved in this type of activity,” said Barry Gross, a former assistant U.S. attorney who helped bring down several city crime bosses. “These allegations seem to be in line with what they’ve always done. ... It continues.” The old-school hallmarks of organized crime are detailed in a report that reads like something straight from the big screen, replete with real-life characters who go by “Uncle Joe,” “Mousie,” “Bent Finger Louie” and “Sheep.” The report outlines a structur-

AP FILE PHOTO

ed world of bosses and underbosses, where members are “made” or “straightened out” in a ceremony where a knife and gun are displayed, and the potential member must agree to be willing to use either of them to help “our friends.” The guiding rule of this underworld is “omerta,” the code of silence, the grand jurors wrote, and the penalty for violating that code is death. The indictment alleges that reputed mob leader Joseph “Uncle Joe” Ligambi, reputed underboss Joseph “Mousie” Massimino and 11 others engaged in loan sharking and ran illegal gambling businesses involving video poker machines and sports bookmaking. There are no murder charges, but authorities allege the men used threats to kill or harm people to recoup business debts. In April 2002, for example, two of the defendants went to collect “Uncle Joe’s money” and one of

them told the debtor that he was “capable of cracking” the victim if necessary, the grand jurors allege. In another instance a month later, two defendants allegedly told a victim they had repeatedly assaulted another debtor, once with a bat. The indictment paints a picture of a classic world of coded talk, where illegal gambling machines — placed in coffee shops, restaurants and other places — are spoken of as espresso or coffee machines. Reputed mobsters and associates engage in and secret “walk and talks,” the report alleges, having covert conversations on foot to hinder interception. “Organized crime still exists in the Philadelphia area,” George Venizelos, special agent in charge of the FBI’s Philadelphia field division, said at a news conference announcing the charges. “It has not disappeared.”

www.timesleader.com

Lottery summary Daily Number, Midday Sunday: 8-4-2 Monday: 1-1-9 Tuesday: 9-2-7 Wednesday: 1-9-5 Thursday: 1-5-4 Friday: 5-6-0 Saturday: 8-8-1 Big Four, Midday Sunday: 8-6-0-8 Monday: 6-0-9-7 Tuesday: 9-9-4-2 Wednesday: 5-4-8-0 Thursday: 2-5-5-8 Friday: 8-6-4-7 Saturday: 7-5-1-4 Quinto, Midday Sunday: 4-0-4-1-6 Monday: 7-1-6-0-8 Tuesday: 8-5-2-4-1 Wednesday: 6-4-5-0-5 Thursday: 6-1-8-3-2 Friday: 5-9-8-9-3 Saturday: 7-3-6-8-0 Treasure Hunt Sunday: 01-05-07-13-21 Monday: 01-07-14-23-24 Tuesday: 02-09-12-13-26 Wednesday: 03-08-10-19-24 Thursday: 08-11-14-18-26 Friday: 06-11-13-26-30 Saturday: 05-06-08-14-15 Daily Number, 7 p.m. Sunday: 3-8-4 Monday: 8-7-6 Tuesday: 4-4-7 Wednesday: 0-5-4 Thursday: 1-5-0 Friday: 9-9-4 Saturday: 2-3-2 Big Four, 7 p.m. Sunday: 5-9-8-5 Monday: 1-0-2-5 Tuesday: 8-1-1-4 Wednesday: 8-0-5-6 Thursday: 8-3-6-6 Friday: 4-4-9-9 Saturday: 7-9-8-9 Quinto, 7 p.m. Sunday: 2-7-7-3-7 Monday: 5-1-1-6-7 Tuesday: 2-3-1-6-1 Wednesday: 8-4-3-2-0 Thursday: 7-2-8-5-6 Friday: 9-2-2-8-0 Saturday: 6-2-7-8-8 Cash 5 Sunday: 11-19-32-33-42 Monday: 27-36-38-42-43 Tuesday: 08-10-16-34-41 Wednesday: 05-06-15-20-35 Thursday: 01-10-17-19-43 Friday: 02-04-16-40-42 Saturday: 11-14-20-28-30 Match 6 Lotto Monday: 16-17-23-26-36-38 Thursday: 14-16-19-37-38-45 Powerball Wednesday: 04-23-31-42-50 powerball: 23 powerplay: 02 Saturday: 12-20-43-51-55 powerball: 11 powerplay: 04 Mega Millions Tuesday: 09-12-21-42-43 Megaball: 42 Megaplier: 03 Friday: 05-07-14-28-56 Megaball: 10 Megaplier: 04

OBITUARIES Bedwick, John Berlew, William Sr. Cunningham, Caroline Flynn, Theresa Gamble, Andrew Hess, Dorothy Hughes, Lois Kalinski, Marlene Kolendowicz, Margaret Mikitish, Mary Mitchell, Lynn Pinola, Virginia Shebloski, Beth Ann Simonson, Marvin Stucker, Alyce Tryba, Thomas Sr. Yaple, Norma Page 2A, 10A

BUILDING TRUST The Times Leader strives to correct errors, clarify stories and update them promptly. Corrections will appear in this spot. If you have information to help us correct an inaccuracy or cover an issue more thoroughly, call the newsroom at 829-7242. A QUOTE ABOVE the headline of a Saturday Page 1A story about a new report on priest abuse of minors was incorrectly attributed. The quote came from the report.

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SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011 PAGE 3A

LOCAL

S E R V I C E B E F O R E O R D I N AT I O N

New priest remembers charity By MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

mind may be trained in the classroom, it’s the heart that is formed in service to others,” Loughney said. “My experience at the kitchen taught me Loughney not to judge, but that we need to listen, and we have to understand each person and their story in order to better serve them, to respect their human dignity and to help them to possibly move forward from the situation in which they find themselves.” Loughney, the first priest to be ordained in the Diocese of Scranton under Bishop Joseph Bambera, grew up in Scranton, attending public schools and

SCRANTON – Northeastern Pennsylvania’s newest Roman Catholic priest learned a lesson in charity at the St. Vincent de Paul Kitchen in Wilkes-Barre, and he paid the gift back by inviting volunteers from the charity to attend his ordination Saturday. The Rev. Gregory F. Loughney, of Scranton, became a priest Saturday at a Mass of Ordination at St. Peter’s Cathedral in Scranton. In preparation for his ordination, Loughney volunteered fulltime at the St. Vincent de Paul Kitchen during his spring 2010 semester at St. Pius X Seminary in Dalton.“We spend many years in a classroom, learning from books, but real life experience teaches us lessons that can never be gained from a book and though the See PRIEST, Page 6A

New ad exec

BILL TARUTIS/ FOR THE TIMES LEADER

A group of over 20 volunteers from St. Vincent de Paul Kitchen wait on a chartered bus to depart for St. Peter’s Cathedral in Scranton Saturday morning.

INDIAN WEDDING

named for Wilkes-Barre Publishing Co.

LUZERNE COUNTY

Parades mark holiday Here again is a list of parades that have been planned for Monday: Memorial Day Parade in Dallas, begins at Daddow-Isaacs American Legion Post, 730 Memorial Highway, Dallas, 9 a.m. Memorial Day Parade in Hanover Township, begins at 10 a.m. by Holy Cross Church on Main Road, Buttonwood section of township. Memorial Day Parade in Kingston, begins at 10:30 a.m. at Kingston Corners, Market Street and Wyoming Avenue. Memorial Day Parade in West Pittston and Exeter, begins at 11:30 a.m. at Linden Street and Wyoming Avenue in West Pittston and proceeds to parking lot of St. Cecilia Church, Wyoming Avenue, Exeter. Memorial Day Parade in WilkesBarre Township, begins at 10 a.m. at the former Wilkes-Barre Township High School and proceeds to American Legion Post 815, Chestnut Street, where a memorial service will begin at 11 a.m. Memorial Day Parade in Parsons section of Wilkes-Barre, begins at 10 a.m. on Mill Street, proceeds along George Avenue and concludes at Scott Street Park with memorial service. Memorial Day Parade in Ashley, begins at 9 a.m. on South Main Street and ends with ceremony at Maple Hill Cemetery on St. Mary’s Road.

Agencies closed Monday Monday is Memorial Day and the following will be closed in observance of the national holiday: • Federal agencies • Federal courts • State, county and municipal offices • Banks • Schools • Public libraries There will be no Luzerne County Transportation Authority bus service. There is no delivery by the U.S. Postal Service. The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation will close its driver license and photo centers. Fire and police departments are on duty as well as Luzerne County 911.

By ANDREW M. SEDER aseder@timesleader.com

See SELLERS, Page 6A

B R I E F

LUZERNE COUNTY

Denise Sellers returns to area after working at newspapers in Allentown, Easton.

After spending the past six years in a competitive newspaper market in the Lehigh Valley, Denise Sellers has taken a job in another one here in the Wyoming Valley. Sellers, 48, of Macungie, starts Tuesday as the vice president of advertising for the Wilkes-Barre Publishing Co., parent company of The Times Leader, the Weekender, the Sunday Dispatch, Go Lackawanna, The Abington Journal, The Dallas Post, El Mensajero and numerous web-only media sites. Sellers has spent Sellers the past three years as the retail advertising director at the Express-Times in Easton. Prior to that, she was the automotive classified advertising manager at the Morning Call of Allentown. Having grown up in Kingston Township and graduating from Dallas High School in 1981, Sellers said the chance to move back to the area, live closer to her parents and still work at an awardwinning, well-respected newspaper was too hard to pass up. “I like the newspaper business. I have a lot of experience as far as sales management,” she said, noting that, in addition to her six years at newspapers in the Lehigh Valley, she also worked for 15 years at a cellular phone and paging company. She said that working in a competitive newspaper market has prepared her to come to Luzerne County, where there are three daily newspapers and several weeklies. “I’m used to high pressure and competitive environments,” said Sellers, who earned an associates degree in business from Luzerne County Community College in 1983. Her parents, Donald and Ann Marie Gavigan, are retired and still living in Kingston Township. She said being able to move back to this region and be close to them was an added benefit. Sellers and her husband, Sean, have four children: Alexandra, 17, Brittany, 16, Patrick, 15 and Michael, 13. The family is looking to buy a house in the county. “I’m very excited to work at The Times Leader. I’ve read the newspaper my whole life,” Sellers said. “Denise has a proven track record in building solid relationships with advertisers,” said Prashant Shitut, president of Wilkes-Barre Publishing Co. “She knows how to make advertising work for businesses. Her ability to bring out

I N

NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Benny Anand rides the decorated horse on Pennsylvania Avenue during Saturday’s wedding procession to Genetti’s.

Union of tradition Celebration closed off block in Wilkes-Barre for hour-long procession, fireworks. By JANINE UNGVARSKY Times Leader Correspondent

WILKES-BARRE – Three parties, two ceremonies, one magnificently decked out horse and enough fireworks to supply a small town for the Fourth of July made for a very special wedding day for Sachi Patel and Benny Anand. Hundreds of members of the Patel and Anand families and their friends took over a block of downtown Wilkes-Barre to celebrate the couple’s marriage at Genetti’s, which included an hour-long procession where the groom’s family and friends led him to his bride. Traffic was redirected away from Pennsylvania Avenue and Market Street near Genetti’s so Benny Anand could ride Daniel, a 9-year-old white gelding, amidst a crowd of cheering, dancing family and friends. Daniel and his handlers, Kathy and

NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Groom Benny Anand is lifted in the air by family members and friends to the rhythms of traditional Indian music, on the way to meet his future wife.

Vito Sperduto, traveled from New Jersey for the day. According to Kathy, while Saturday’s events were unusual for this area, she and Daniel take part in three weddings a week almost every week from April until the end of November. She makes all of Daniel’s custom costumes and the matching umbrellas used for the traditional In-

dian weddings. “In many communities, this is common,” Sperduto said, “Daniel is very good at this. Sometimes, the horse gets scared and the I’ve heard of the groom getting bucked off and the horse running off down the street, but See WEDDING, Page 6A

Friends, family remember missing woman Janelle Fox, daughter of Shelva Rafte, holds back tears while her husband Joel Fox stands next to her during Saturday night’s vigil at the Riverfront Park in Pittston.

By JERRY LYNOTT jlynott@timesleader.com

PITTSTON – The past five years have been tough for Joanne Decker and her family. Her baby sister Shelva Conrad Rafte has been missing for that long. On Saturday, Decker and approximately 70 others traveled by bus from her home in Nicholson to Riverfront Park to hold a candlelit vigSee MISSING, Page 6A

NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

ASHLEY

Fire cause investigated Fire late Friday night heavily damaged a trailer home on Donato Drive in Ashley Park . The unidentified owner was not home when the fire was reported around 11 p.m., said Ashley Police Sgt. Joe McGlynn. She had stepped out to go to a convenience store to buy milk and cigarettes, he said. “At this point the fire doesn’t seem suspicious,” said McGlynn, adding that he will ask a state police fire marshal to investigate the cause. McGlynn said the trailer was engulfed in flames when he arrived to investigate a reported porch fire. Firefighters from Ashley and Hanover and Wilkes-Barre townships responded and knocked down the flames in 10 to 15 minutes, he said. FOSTER TWP.

Man accused of assault State police arrested Joshua Michael Tomei, 28, of Grantville, Friday on charges of assault and making threats after he allegedly put a knife to a woman and ordered her to ingest bath salts. State police said Tomei and Lindsey Marie Mellinger, 22, of Grantville were using bath salts together on Crescent Road near the intersection with State Route 940 Friday. At approximately 11:30 a.m., Tomei placed a hunting knife with a 6-inch blade against Mellinger’s side and told her to ingest the rest of the bath salts or he would kill her, state police said. Mellinger jumped away from the knife, began screaming for help and was noticed by a passerby, state police said. Tomei was arraigned Friday before District Judge Gerald Feissner, Freeland, on aggravated assault, simple assault and terroristic threats charges. He is being held at Luzerne County Correctional Facility in lieu of $25,000 straight bail. A preliminary hearing has been set for June 6 at 8 a.m.


CMYK PAGE 4A

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SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011 PAGE 5A

Death toll rises, searches go on

B R I E F

Number of confirmed dead from Joplin twister up to at least 142 people. More than 900 injured. By NOMAAN MERCHANT Associated Press

AP PHOTO

Late surrealist’s work lives on

People walk past a sculpture by British-born Mexican surreal artist Leonora Carrington outside Bellas Artes palace in Mexico City on Saturday. Carrington, considered one of the last of the original surrealists, died late Wednesday. She was 94.

JOPLIN, Mo. — An official in Joplin, Mo., says the death toll from a massive tornado has risen to at least 142 people. Joplin City Manager Mark Rohr released the updated total during a news conference Saturday. The state has been working to pare down the list of people missing and unaccounted for in the wake of the deadliest single U.S. twister in more than six decades. It said Saturday that the original list of 232 missing or unaccounted for residents had dropped to 100. Numbers describing last Sunday’s storm are nothing short of numbing. The tornado — an EF5 monster packing 200 mph winds — was the deadliest

since 1950 and more than 900 people were injured. Friends and family paid tribute to victims of the Joplin tornado on Friday, beginning the grim task of burying the dead. The original list of 232 missing or unaccounted for residents had dropped to 156 by Friday, Missouri Department of Public Safety deputy director Andrea Spillars said, adding that at least 90 people on the initial list had been located alive. But others were identified as among the dead, and some new names had been added to the scroll of the missing. Authorities had cautioned for days that while they believed many on the list were alive and safe, others likely had been killed. City manager Mark Rohr said that there may be “significant overlap” between the confirmed dead and the remainder of the missing list. Still, search and rescue crews were undeterred, with

Tracey Presslor holds up a portrait of her nephew Will Norton during a news conference with family members at Freeman Hospital in Joplin, Mo. on Saturday. Norton’s body was found Friday after he was pulled out of his vehicle on his way home from his high school graduation Sunday. AP PHOTO

600 volunteers and 50 dog teams out again across the city. “We’re going to be in a search and rescue mode until we remove the last piece of debris,” Rohr said. At least 19 bodies have been released

to relatives, Spillars said, a small fraction of the overall count. Identification has been slow because officials have taken extra precautions since a woman misidentified one victim as her son in the chaotic hours after the tornado hit.

Suicide bomber strikes at leaders

LOOKING UP TO VETERANS

WARSAW, POLAND

President completes tour

Barack Obama wrapped up P resident a European tour Saturday that amounted to a roving pep rally for the spread of democracy tempered by debts at home that might make it difficult to pay for much more than talk. His four-country, six-day trek was designed to showcase the appeal of self-government, from a celebration of time-tested freedom in England, to a pledge from the U.S. and its allies to help fledgling democracies in North Africa, to a reassurance that the U.S. stands with Poland and sees its overthrow of Soviet oppression as a beacon to the world.

Taliban claims responsibility for attack month before a drawdown of U.S. troops.

HELENA, MONT.

By JON GAMBRELL and RAHIM FAIEZ Associated Press

Soldiers to help with flood Gov. Brian Schweitzer has deployed Montana National Guard soldiers to the Crow Reservation as residents deal with major flooding. The order to send 50 guardsmen to the reservation Saturday came a day after the governor toured the area and other parts of the state. Crow Tribe officials earlier in the week requested National Guard aid after heavy rainfall put much of the reservation under water and left residents stranded. A spokesman for the Montana National Guard says soldiers will provide unarmed security checkpoints to assist Crow personnel. TEGUCIGALPA, HONDURAS

Former leader returns Former President Manuel Zelaya returned from exile on Saturday, ending a nearly two-year political crisis caused by his ouster in a militarybacked coup that led to Honduras’ international isolation. Zelaya’s flight from neighboring Nicaragua landed at Tegucigalpa’s international airport, where thousands of his supporters had set up a tent camp nearby, dancing and singing to celebrate his arrival. He was accompanied by his wife Xiomara Castro, two of his daughters, several former officials in his government and the foreign ministers of Venezuela and Bolivia. Zelaya’s comeback paves the way for Honduras to re-enter the world community, which near-unanimously rejected the June 2009 coup that saw him whisked out of the Central American country at gunpoint in his pajamas. The Organization of American States is scheduled to meet shortly to formalize Honduras reintegration into the body as a full member. SANAA, YEMEN

Pact to end gunbattles Yemen’s embattled president and the country’s most powerful tribal leader agreed Saturday to end five days of gunbattles that killed 124 people and pushed the country’s political crisis closer to civil war. The fighting between forces loyal to both men made the past week the deadliest since mass street protests for an end to President Ali Abdullah Saleh’s 33-year rule broke out three months ago. Although it could prevent bloodshed, the agreement will do little to solve the wider crisis, with Saleh rejecting efforts to negotiate his exit. The week’s battles began when Saleh’s security forces attacked the home of Sheik Sadeq al-Ahmar, head of the powerful Hasid tribal confederation and an uneasy ally who abandoned the president and joined his opponents.

AP PHOTO

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ub Scouts from Pack 433 receive instructions from Scout leader Dave Anna on the proper way to raise the flag before the boys participated in a flag-raising ceremony in honor of Memorial Day at Knollwood Cemetery in Mayfield Heights, Ohio. After the ceremony, Scouts placed flags on the graves of veterans.

Gay unions face new challenges

Rhode Island ponders proposal to allow civil unions while Minnesota same-sex marriage ban on ballot. By DAVID KLEPPER Associated Press

PROVIDENCE, R.I. — A flurry of activity in efforts to legally recognize gay relationships or ban same-sex marriage is reminding advocates that even though polls indicate growing acceptance, the debate is far from settled. Rhode Island is pondering a proposal to allow civil unions, a compromise that

arose after it became clear there weren’t enough votes to aim for marriage. Minnesota lawmakers voted to put a constitutional marriage ban on the ballot, and the mayor of New York spoke out strongly in favor of same-sex marriage as talks continue in his state. In Rhode Island, gay marriage advocates say they’re unsatisfied with the proposal to offer civil unions, which provide many of the same legal benefits of marriage without calling it that. “There’s a special status when you say ‘my wife,’ and civil unions don’t give that,” said Annie Cronin-Silva, of West Warwick, who married a woman in neigh-

AP PHOTO

Annie Cronin-Silva, left, and Melanie Silva in front of their West Warwick, RI., home.

boring Massachusetts in 2008. “But things are changing. It’s coming. It’s just so hard to wait.”

KABUL, Afghanistan — A suicide bomber wearing a police uniform blew himself up inside a heavily-guarded compound Saturday as top Afghan and international officials left a meeting, killing two senior Afghan police commanders and wounding the German general who commands coalition troops in northern Afghanistan. Two German soldiers and two other Afghans were killed in the blast, the latest in an insurgent spring offensive. The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack, which occurred about a month before a drawdown of U.S. troops begins this summer. The bomber detonated his explosives-laden vest inside the governor’s complex in Takhar province, where high-ranking Afghan officials were meeting with members of the international coalition, said Faiz Mohammad Tawhedi, a spokesman for the governor. “What we know is the guy who carried out the attack had a police uniform on,” Tawhedi said. “How he entered the meeting room and why he was not searched, we don’t know.” Two German troops were killed and two others were wounded in the blast.

Egypt reopens border with Gaza By IBRAHIM BARZAK Associated Press

RAFAH, Gaza Strip — Egypt lifted a 4-year-old blockade of the Gaza Strip on Saturday, greatly easing travel restrictions on the 1.5 million residents of the Palestinian territory in a move that bolstered the Hamas government while dealing a setback to Israel’s attempts to isolate the militant

group. The sense of relief was palpable as buses piled high with luggage crossed the Rafah border terminal and hundreds of people traveled abroad for overdue medical appointments, business dealings and family affairs. In Israel, fears were heightened that militants and weapons will soon pour into the territory. “I was so happy to hear that the Egyptian border is opening

so I can finally travel for treatment,” said Mohammad Zoarob, a 66-year-old suffering from chronic kidney disease. He said he had been waiting for a medical permit from the Palestinian health ministry for five years so he could go to Egypt for treatment. Saturday’s expansion of the Rafah crossAP PHOTO ing was a tangible benefit of the popular unrest sweeping A Palestinian family waits before crossing into Egypt through through the Arab world. the Rafah border crossing, southern Gaza Strip, Saturday.

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MISSING Continued from Page 3A

il for Rafte on the fifth anniversary of her disappearance. “The one thing that I want to say when a family has a missing person, you go through hell,” said Decker to the group. When a loved one dies, there is a funeral, burial and closure, she said. “We don’t have that.” Decker last saw Rafte on

WEDDING Continued from Page 3A BILL TARUTIS/ FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Joan Robinson of Wilkes-Barre boards a chartered bus to witness the ordination of Greg Loughney as a Catholic priest.

PRIEST Continued from Page 3A

graduating from West Scranton High School. He went on to study finance at The University of Scranton. It was during his university studies he felt called to the priesthood. “I came to realize that I was being called to service and that it was going to be in a very particular way,” he said. “The call was to ministerial priesthood in the church.” Loughney began his path of service at St. Pius X in Dalton, and was appointed to continue his preparation for the priesthood as a seminarian at the North American College in Rome, where he earned a degree in sacred theology from the Pontifical Gregorian University. He was appointed Saturday to serve as assistant pastor of St. Mary of the Mount Church in Mount Pocono, where he has served for the past year. Loughney invited volunteers he worked with at the kitchen to attend his Ordination Mass. About 25 of them traveled by charter bus from the kitchen to

the cathedral Friday morning. “I’ve waited a while to see this,” said volunteer Jackie McCabe, of Wilkes-Barre, before getting on the bus. “I couldn’t pass it up.” Volunteers from the kitchen remembered Loughney as a hard worker with a kind-hearted demeanor that made him approachable for the kitchen’s clients. “He would do anything,” said Ann Marie McCawley, director of the kitchen. “He would go in the dish room and wash dishes and do pots and clean up. He never questioned anything; he saw something he needed to do and he did it.” “He wasn’t forward; he wasn’t evangelistic,” she continued. “He was very kind and if anybody had any problems, they felt comfortable talking to him.” “It’s just wonderful when you’re volunteering to be with people who are cheerful,” said volunteer Florence Milazzo Lombardo, of West Pittston. “You like doing your job, but that just makes it all the more wonderful.” “I’ll miss him,” she added, “but maybe he’ll come back with his parishioners to volunteer.”

Daniel has worked in New York and he’s good with loud noises and crowds and traffic.” Daniel performed perfectly, standing calmly with the groom on his back as the procession slowly made its way around the corner from the front of Genetti’s to the Market Street entrance. The procession was led by a white sound system van playing music that had the groom’s family and friends – most wearing traditional Indian dress – literally dancing in the street. Relatives set off Roman candle-type fireworks on the street in front of the procession, a drummer kept a beat with a decorated drum, and the groom beamed and waved as he looked over the crowd. The Sperutos were among several vendors Dr. Bhupendra Patel brought from out of the area to make the day perfect for his daughter, Sachi, and her new husband. “A wedding means a lot in our culture, especially for the parents

SELLERS Continued from Page 3A

the best in people is impressive and we are lucky to have someone of her caliber with roots in this community. She is a fantastic addition to our management

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

May 28, 2006 after her sister left a graduation party at Decker’s house. Rafte, 44, went back to Jenkins Township with her boyfriend and left there after an argument. She was last seen in the area of Market and River streets in the township and was believed to have been walking to her home on Cleveland Street in Pittston, according to police. Decker and Rafte’s daughter Janelle Fox held the vigil with the hope that it might make someone come forward with information about the missing

Rafte, 44, went back to Jenkins Township with her boyfriend and left there after an argument. She was last seen in the area of Market and River streets in the township and was believed to have been walking to her home on Cleveland Street in Pittston, according to police. woman. They also did it out of sense of loyalty to Rafte. “It’s our responsibility to bring her home,” said Fox. Faith Lewis found it hard to believe her good friend would just vanish. There were too many things going on in Rafte’s life for her to disappear, said Lewis of Simpson.

“It’s bothered me for the last five years,” said Lewis. “It’s terrible to have a friend gone.” Decker asked that anyone with information about Rafte’s disappearance contact Pittston Police at 5-654-2424 or the Pennsylvania Crime Stoppers tip line at 1-800-4-PATIPS.

The weekend started with a customary pre-wedding party on Friday night. On Saturday morning, there was the Punjabi wedding, which included a Pallah Ceremony where Patel gave away his daughter by taking one end of the groom’s scarf and handing it to the bride.

of the bride,” said Patel. “It’s important to give a good farewell to the daughter. It’s the biggest thing parents can do.” For Sachi and Benny’s wedding, that meant bringing in an Indian caterer and decorator from New Jersey, and a Punjabi priest from Buffalo. The priest presided at one of the two wedding ceremonies held Saturday. “Sachi and Benny were born and raised here,” said Patel, who immigrated to the United States with his wife in 1980. “But the families are from two different states in India, two different cultures, so we have two different weddings.” The weekend started with a customary pre-wedding party on Friday night. On Saturday morning, there was the Punjabi wedding, which included a Pallah Ceremony where Patel gave away his daughter by taking one end of the groom’s scarf and handing it to the bride. The ceremony also includes the Chaar Lavan, four wedding vows that address the four stages of spirituality the couple must undergo for a blissful union before God. After Benny’s joyous procession, there was a second ceremo-

ny, a traditional Hindu ceremony common in the Dujrat area where the bride’s family originates. This ceremony began after the wedding procession and included ceremonies symbolizing the bride’s family indicated their acceptance of Benny as their daughter’s husband and his promise to take care of their daughter. A white cotton rope draped over the couple’s shoulders represented how the intertwined virtues of the bride and groom will combine for a strong relationship, and a sacred necklace and rings symbolized their newly married state. “It’s a happy moment but a sad one, too, because you’re giving away part of your heart,” said Patel about his daughter’s wedding.

“But you are happy to celebrate your happiness with others, and we are delighted to be able to share our culture with our neighbors in the community.” Many passersby did stop to enjoy the happy procession around Genetti’s, including several who have seen Indian weddings before. “I think it’s awesome,” said John McLaughlin, a Philadelphia resident who was in town for a college graduation. “I was just at one in Bucks County, but it’s different to see it here. It’s cool.” Kim Brown said she’s seen weddings during visits to India, but didn’t expect to see one in downtown Wilkes-Barre. “It’s beautiful,” said the Blakeslee resident. “Look at the saris – they are gorgeous!” Wilkes-Barre resident Matt Feehan used his cell phone to snap pictures of his first Indian wedding. “It’s a very interesting view of a different culture. It’s nice to see Wilkes-Barre opening up their arms a bit and letting something like this happen,” Feehan said. “I’m on my way to work and I had to stop and check it out – especially with this great music!”

team.” Continuing to make sure current advertisers are being treated professionally and growing the customer base to bring new advertisers aboard will be part of Sellers’ responsibilities. With online advertising picking up and many companies still ad-

vertising in the print products, Sellers said it’s a good time to be in the business. “We are so fortunate to have found Denise to lead our advertising department,” said Richard L. Connor, editor and publisher of The Times Leader. “We’ve hit the trifecta. This is

her hometown; she is returning for work and to be with family. She has many local business contacts from her days in the phone company business, and she has media experience at two great newspapers, one in Allentown and the other in Easton.”

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Fracking review ordered ALBANY, N.Y. — Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s administration has ordered an expanded environmental review of proposed “hydrofracking” for natural gas in New York after an accident in Pennsylvania caused a well to gush salty, chemically-tainted water for two days. An internal memo obtained by The Associated Press directs the state Department of Environmental Conservation to review and learn any lessons from the April mishap in Pennsylvania’s Bradford County. The memo dated Friday said the “blowout” raised issues about the controversial technology that need to be evaluated before New York decides whether to allow a major expansion of the potentially lucrative gas-extraction method, which has been assailed by some environmentalists as unsafe. The memo was from Cuomo’s director of state operations, Howard Glaser, to Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Joseph Martens,

The April 19 accident in Pennsylvania briefly caused a handful of families living near the well to flee their homes as thousands of gallons of brine flooded across farm fields. a Cuomo appointee. The April 19 accident in Pennsylvania briefly caused a handful of families living near the well to flee their homes as thousands of gallons of brine flooded across farm fields and entered a stream. Well cappers from Houston had to pump ground-up tires, plastic bits and other rubber material into the well to temporarily seal it. Well operator Chesapeake Energy said the environmental damage from the spill was minimal, but temporarily suspended operations to investigate what went wrong. New York’s review will include an on-site inspection by New York officials. The findings will be part of New York’s environmental eval-

uation of using hydraulic fracturing to release natural gas from the Marcellus Shale deposit through much of New York’s Southern Tier. The final report is due July 1. The gas drilling boom has been an economic engine in Pennsylvania, but it has been delayed in New York for the past three years as environmental groups have assailed hydraulic fracturing as a potential hazard to drinking water. “Fracking” involves shooting huge volumes of water, laced with much smaller amounts of chemicals and sand, thousands of feet underground to release trapped gas. Some of the water then returns to the surface, tainted by substances like barium and salt that it picks up underground. By law, this wastewater must be disposed of deep containment wells or treated before it is released back into the environment. Industry groups say the process is well regulated and safe. The Independent Oil & Gas Association of New York had asked Cuomo to expedite the state’s review of fracking and allow permitting for gas exploration to proceed.

Musician Gil Scott-Heron dies in NYC He is credited for starting rap music by fusing percussion, politics and poetry. By CRISTIAN SALAZAR Associated Press

NEW YORK — Musician Gil Scott-Heron, who helped lay the groundwork for rap by fusing minimalistic percussion, political expression and spoken-word poetry on songs such as “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” but saw his brilliance undermined by a yearslong drug addiction, has died at age 62. A friend, Doris C. Nolan, who answered the telephone listed for his Manhattan recording company, said he died Friday afternoon at St. Luke’s Hospital after becoming sick upon returning from a trip to Europe. “We’re all sort of shattered,” she said. Scott-Heron was known for work that reflected the fury of black America in the post-civil rights era and also spoke to the social and political disparities in the country. His songs often had incendiary titles — “Home is Where the Hatred Is” or “Whitey on the Moon” — and through spoken word and song he tapped the frustration of the masses. Yet much of his life also was defined by his battle with crack cocaine, which led to time in jail. In a 2008 interview with New York magazine, he said he had been living with HIV for years, but he still continued to perform and put out

music; his last album, which came out this year, was a collaboration with artist Jamie xx, “We’re Still Here,” a reworking of Scott-Heron’s acclaimed “I’m New Here,” which was released in 2010. He also was still smoking crack, as detailed in a New Yorker article last year. “Ten to fifteen minutes of this, I don’t have pain,” he said. “I could have had an operation a few years ago, but there was an 8 percent chance of paralysis. I tried the painkillers, but after a couple of weeks I felt like a piece of furniture. It makes you feel like you don’t want to do anything. This I can quit anytime I’m ready.” Scott-Heron’s influence on rap was such that he sometimes was referred to as the Godfather of Rap, a title he rejected. “If there was any individual initiative that I was responsible for it might have been that there was music in certain poems of mine, with complete progression and repeating ‘hooks,’ which made them more like songs than just recitations with percussion,” he wrote in the introduction to his 1990 collection of poems, “Now and Then.” He referred to his signature mix of percussion, politics and performed poetry as bluesology or Third World music. But then he said it was simply “black music or black American music.” “Because black Americans are now a tremendously diverse essence of all the places we’ve come from and the music and rhythms we brought with us,” he wrote. Nevertheless, his influence on generations of rappers has been demonstrated through sampling

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Budget battle is campaign issue

Governor issues memo following Pa. accident

By MICHAEL GORMLEY Associated Press

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AP FILE PHOTO

Musician Gil Scott-Heron poses in 1984. He died Friday.

of his recordings by artists, including Kanye West, who closes out the last track of his latest album with a long excerpt of ScottHeron’s “Who Will Survive in America.” Politically outspoken rapper Michael Franti said in a statement Saturday that Scott-Heron’s talent was his ability to “make us think about the world in a different way, laugh hysterically about the ironies of American culture, anger at the hypocrisy ofourpolitical system, all to a beat that kept us on the dance floor, with a voice and flow that kept you waiting with anticipation for the next phrase.” Scott-Heron recorded the song that would make him famous, “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised,” which critiqued mass media, for the album “125th and Lenox” in Harlem in the1970s. He followed up that recording with more than a dozen albums, initially collaborating with musician Brian Jackson. Throughout his musical career, he took on political issues of his time, including apartheid in South Africa and nuclear arms.

The vote on the bill is a potential gold mine for campaign material in 2012.

know, because I’ve been in numerous competitive elections,” Leach said. “Even votes that I didn’t cast, or policies I didn’t support, were used against me, years after the fact.” By MARK SCOLFORO House Republican leaders Associated Press were able to persuade their HARRSIBURG — The ink members, with only two defecwas still wet last week on the tions, to vote for the $27.3 billion budget bill passed by Republi- plan, with all its pain, without a cans in the state House of Repre- deal in place with the Senate and sentatives when the state Demo- Corbett on the budget’s final form. cratic Party pounced. By next year’s election voters The budget plan, with its cuts to education, health care and a will be able to chew over a much variety of other state programs, broader record, said Rep. Dave is likely to change considerably Reed, R-Indiana, campaign as it grinds through the Repub- chairman of his caucus. “Ultimately, the best thing we lican state Senate in the coming can do, election-wise weeks. Republican for next year, is to Gov. Tom Corbett “We’ve got to correctly this will undoubtedly get our spend- govern year,” Reed said. “If have a lot to say we get the policy about its final form ing under conright, the politics will as well. trol, and there’s take care of itself.” That didn’t stop The House Demothe Democratic a lot of ecoCampaign Party from an- nomic challeng- cratic Committee said the nouncing an immeparty is targeting 25 diate barrage of es the state is districts in 22 counphone calls, emails still facing for ties, including many and online ads to Republicans won in target 25 House Re- next year.” publicans in swing Kevin Harley November as they districts, saying the Corbett spokesman swept back into the majority with a112-91 vote has endanmargin. With two nagered political futures. They vowed to keep re- tionally prominent Democrats at minding voters of higher college the top of the ticket next year, tuition, ballooning nursing President Barack Obama and home costs and fewer kindergar- Sen. Bob Casey, and a Democratten classes, even with the next ic pickup of a congressional seat legislative election still 17 in New York last week, Democrats are feeling more optimistic. months away. “Democrats do struggle to Sen. Daylin Leach, D-Montgomery, called the vote a poten- turn out our voters in nonpresitial gold mine for campaign ma- dential years,” said committee terial. He said candidates should executive director Fiona Conroy, not take much comfort in the noting that Casey won 24 of the thought that most people going 25 targeted districts five years into a voting booth in November ago in beating Republican Sen. 2012 might have difficulty re- Rick Santorum. “We view these membering that their state law- seats as being Casey territory, maker voted in May 2011 to cut and he’s on the ballot again.” Corbett spokesman Kevin state support for local schools or Harley said the governor sees an other programs. “His opponent’s mail and TV opportunity in the current budvendors will remember, as I get debate to create an economic

AP FILE PHOTO

Gov. Tom Corbett delivers his fiscal year 2011-2012 budget address to a joint session of the Pennsylvania House and Senate on March 8.

climate in which businesses will thrive, adding jobs and leading new companies to relocate in Pennsylvania. Will that happen? “It’s hard to say,” Harley said. “Next year may be a very difficult budget year as well. We’ve got to get our spending under control, and there’s a lot of economic challenges the state is still facing for next year.” The window to pass politically sensitive legislation will not be open for very long. If school vouchers or a Marcellus Shale extraction tax don’t pass this year, leaders may be reluctant to take them up in fall 2012. Reed said House Republicans want to make difficult and unpopular decisions while there is time for the policies to yield positive results such as lower unemployment or a budget surplus that could restore education funding. “Folks may look back six months or a year from now and say, ‘Thank goodness folks made those decisions, because we’re better off for it today,”’ Reed said. “I didn’t spend two years helping to run our campaign committee just to win on Nov. 2. I spent that time because I was interested in helping our state by governing responsibly.”

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Seen here is Michael MacDowell, president of Misericordia University, where Flack was awarded honorary doctorate this month.

BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/ FOR THE TIMES LEADER

U.S. Rep. Lou Barletta, left, arrives at the Church of Christ Uniting in Kingston for the memorial service of Charles Flack.

Renita Fennick, press secretary to U.S. Rep. Tom Marino, hugs Luzerne County Republican Party Chairman Terry Casey.

Former state Sen. Charles Lemmond walks with his wife, Barbara, toward the Church of Christ Uniting in Kingston. State Sen. John Yudichak enters the Church of Christ Uniting in Kingston for the memorial service of Charles Flack. Hundreds of friends, associates and protégés packed the memorial service to celebrate the life of the man known as ‘Rusty.’

and he taught us how to lose, he taught us how to live, and finally, he taught us how to die.” Harold Flack, the younger of the two brothers, said there was no greater exemplar of how to live a full life than Rusty. In his final weeks, Harold said, Rusty frequently pondered a quote from the movie “Braveheart,” which declares that “every man dies; not every man

truly lives.” “Rusty, my brother, you’ve truly lived,” he concluded. Flack was interred at Oak Lawn Cemetery, Hanover Township. He was preceded in death by his father, Charles, and infant daughter, Ashley. He is survived by his mother, Joan

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U.S. Rep. Tom Marino leaves the Church of Christ Uniting in Kingston after the memorial service for Charles Flack on Saturday afternoon. The congressman spoke during the service, saying he became acquainted with Flack in 2010, but it didn’t take him long to realize he had made a lifelong friend. Marino said, ‘Rusty is, without a doubt, the kindest, gentlest, most caring person I have ever known.’

Flack Nusbaum, of Naples, Fla.; his wife, Kathi Stine Flack, Dallas; sons, Charles Flack III and Alex, both of Harveys Lake; daughter, Jamie, of Philadelphia; sister, Janet Elizabeth, Kingston; brother, Harold II, Center Moreland; nieces and nephews.

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Former U.S. Senator Rick Santorum was among hundreds who attended the memorial service of Charles Flack on Saturday afternoon.

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publicans. He was also an active member of Grace Episcopal Church, an enthusiastic golfer, an avid guitar player and the life of many parties. The Rev. John F. Hartman of Grace Episcopal Church, Forty Fort, quoted Flack’s wife, Kathi Stine Flack, Saturday when he described Rusty as “the glue who kept so many of his lifelong friends together.” Those friends packed the pews of the Church of Christ Uniting in Kingston for the service and, after the seats filled, they stood in “He taught the aisles, the vestibule and us all how the choir loft. to hope, he All told, the numtaught us crowd bered around to love, he 500. Dr. Bob taught us Clements, of how to win Shavertown, Flack’s friend and he of 41 years, retaught us membered a man who how to loved life, even lose, he as he suffered with cancer. taught us During a how to golfing excursion in Naples, live, and Fla. in March, finally, he Clements said taught us Flack, recovering from chehow to motherapy, die.” “put his arm around me and Stephen ‘ClemAlinikoff said, ents, who’s Former than instructor at luckier Wyoming us?’ I replied Seminary as always: ‘Nobody, Rusty. Nobody.’ “There can be no greater ambition than to be a friend,” Clements continued. “Rusty was all of our friends; who’s luckier than us?” Though other speakers at the service had relationships with Flack that spanned decades, U.S. Rep. Tom Marino said his acquaintance with Flack was much shorter, but nonetheless powerful. The two became acquainted in 2010, Marino said, but it didn’t take him long to realize he had made a lifelong friend. “Rusty is, without a doubt, the kindest, gentlest, most caring person I have ever known,” Marino said. Stephen Alinikoff, a local insurance executive and former instructor at Wyoming Seminary, first met Flack in his classroom in 1968. Alinikoff was then the teacher and Flack the student, but over the years Alinikoff said those roles were reversed. “I’ve learned more from Rusty than I ever taught him… he was my greatest teacher,” Alinikoff said. “He taught us all how to hope, he taught us to love, he taught us how to win


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TAMING OF THE WOLF FESTIVAL

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Front, from left: Betsy DeCosmo, Wyoming, Arlene Sindaco, Wilkes-Barre. Back row, Katie Larsen-Lick, Mountain Top; Lillian Caffrey, Larksville; Patricia McMahon Lacy, Kingston

Aaron Tarver, 16, of Sweet Valley, left, Tyler Bonner, 15, of Sweet Valley, and Josh Bevan, 14, of Lake Silkworth

Kimberly Cunningham and Kyle Volcian

Margaret Paulic of Scranton, left, Frank Kluk of WilkesBarre Township and Rosemary McMahon of Kingston

Katelin Rittenhouse, left, Vincent Lamoreaux and Jeff Deats, all from Sweet Valley

Mike Stritz and Helen O’Donnell

Sandra Sion, left, and Pat Barnes, both of Wilkes-Barre

Morgan Thompson, 12, left, and her mom, Brenda Considine

Carmella, left, and Catherine LaBuz

Gerry DuBoice of Kingston, left, and Karel Zubris of Plains Township

Sam Johnson of Harveys Lake, left, his stepson-in-law John Christiansen and John’s daughter, Haley, 3 months

Yvette Youngcourt and Angel Salas

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ALYCE STUCKER, died Friday, May 27, 2011, at the Birchwood Nursing Home after an illness. Funeral services are pending from the Matthew T. Jacobs Funeral Home, 47 Old River Road, Wilkes-Barre. BETH ANN SHEBLOSKI, 77, of Larksville, passed away Friday, May 27, 2011, at home. Arrangements are pending from Williams-Hagen Funeral Home, 114 W. Main St., Plymouth. LOIS M. HUGHES, formerly of Regent Street, Wilkes-Barre, died Saturday, May 28, 2011, at Wesley Village, Pittston. Funeral arrangements are pending from the Mamary-Durkin Funeral Service, 59 Parrish St., Wilkes-Barre. THERESA ANN FLYNN, 64, of Old Forge, died Friday, May 27, 2011, at home. Born December 5, 1946, in Old Forge, she was a daughter of the late Frank and Theresa Carone Arcaro. She was preceded in death by two sisters, Marie Genell and Angie Blazevige; and two brothers, Anthony and Frank Arcaro. Surviving are son Gerard F. Flynn, Old Forge; daughter Melissa Riefler and husband, Tim, Honesdale, Pa.; grandson Timothy Logan Riefler; and nieces, nephews, and cousins. The funeral will be at 9:30 a.m. Wednesday from the Louis V. Ciuccio Funeral Home, 145 Moosic Road, Old Forge, with a 10 a.m. Mass to be celebrated by the Rev. Joseph Cipriano at the Prince of Peace Parish - St. Mary’s Church, West Grace and Lawrence Streets, Old Forge. Interment will be held in Old Forge Cemetery. Friends may call from 5 to 8 p.m. Tuesday. WILLIAM GILBERT BERLEW SR., 62, of Dallas, died Saturday, May 28, 2011, in the Hospice Community Care Inpatient Unit at Geisinger South Wilkes-Barre. Funeral arrangements are pending from the Harold C. Snowdon Funeral Home Inc., 140 N. Main St., Shavertown. A full obituary will appear in a future edition of The Times Leader. MARLENE “MOLLY” KALINSKI, 71, of Willow Street, WilkesBarre Township, died Friday, May 27, 2011, at Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center, Plains Township. Funeral arrangements are pending from the George A. Strish Inc. Funeral Home, 105 N. Main St., Ashley. MARGARET KOLENDOWICZ, 90, formerly of Grove Street, Edwardsville, died Sunday, May 22, 2011, at Delrosa Nursing Home in San Bernardino, Calif. Funeral arrangements are pending from the Andrew Strish Funeral Home, 11 Wilson St., Larksville.

FUNERALS CRAIG – Jack, memorial Mass 10 a.m. Tuesday in St Jude’s Church, Mountain Top. Friends may call from 9 to 10 a.m. Tuesday at St. Jude’s Church. IRWIN – William, celebration of life 9 a.m. Wednesday from McLaughlin’s, 142 S. Washington St., Wilkes-Barre. Funeral Mass 10 a.m. in the Church of Saint Therese, Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call from 6 to 9 p.m. Tuesday at the funeral home. MCCOSKEY – Jean, celebration of life 8:30 a.m. Tuesday from McLaughlin’s, 142 S. Washington St., Wilkes-Barre. Funeral Mass 9:30 a.m. in the Church of the Holy Family, Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call from 5 to 8 p.m. Monday at the funeral home.

OBITUARY POLICY The Times Leader publishes free obituaries, which have a 27-line limit, and paid obituaries, which can run with a photograph. A funeral home representative can call the obituary desk at (570) 829-7224, send a fax to (570) 829-5537 or e-mail to tlobits@timesleader.com. If you fax or e-mail, please call to confirm. Obituaries must be submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Obituaries must be sent by a funeral home or crematory, or must name who is handling arrangements, with address and phone number. We discourage handwritten notices; they incur a $15 typing fee.

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Marvin ‘Bucca’ Simonson

John Bedwick

May 27, 2011

May 27, 2011

arvin “Bucca” Simonson, 77, of Jenkins Township, passed M away peacefully Friday morning,

May 27, 2011, at Hospice surrounded by his loving family. He was married to the former Imelda Bachman for 34 years. Born July 14, 1933, in Miners Mills, he was a son of the late Joseph and Margaret Howe Simonson. Marvin was educated in Plains Township schools and was employed by Wilkes-Barre Iron & Wire Works and Chase Dallas prison, where he retired as a prison guard. He proudly served our country in the Korean War. He also was in the 109th Field Artillery, where he retired after serving 30 years as a master sergeant. Marvin received numerous medals for sharpshooting, and acts of honor and bravery. He was a member of St. John’s Evangelist Catholic Church, Pittston. He was a member of the Holy Name Society of Saint Mary’s Assumption, Pittston. He was a member of the United Steel Workers Union. Marvin was preceded in death by his daughter Lorraine Catherine Simonson on December 22, 1992. He is survived by daughter Debbie Bell; and son-in-law Mike Bell, Yatesville; grandchildren, Michael, Anthony and Sarah Bell, and also Lindsay Bell Flaherty and husband

ohn Bedwick, a lifelong resident of the Rolling Mill Hill section of JWilkes-Barre, passed away Friday

Sean; and three great-grandchildren, Matthew, Sophia and Lorraine. He is survived by his brothers, John, Jimmy, Ronnie and Jessie; and a sister, Carolyn; as well as numerous nieces and nephews and their families. Funeral services will be at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday in St John the Evangelist, Pittston. Interment with military honors and an honor guard from the state prison in Dallas will take place in St. John the Evangelist Cemetery, Pittston. Friends may call from 6 to 9 p.m. Monday at the Adonizio Funeral Home, 251 William St., Pittston. Memorial contributions may be made to the Veterans of Foreign Wars or St. John the Evangelist Church, 35 William Street, Pittston, PA 18640.

afternoon, May 27, 2011, at the Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. Born on December 3, 1925, John was a son of the late George and Viola (Tabit) Bedwick. Prior to his death, John worked in the family business, Peter Bedwick Foods. He also worked in the furniture business as a salesman. John was a lifelong member of St. George Maronite Church where he was an active participant in various church groups and committees. In addition to his parents, John was also preceded in death by his brother, Joseph and his wife, Agnes; his brother-in-law Joseph Kasmark; his sister, Sadie Ellis and her husband, Leo; his brother, Bill and his wife, Mary; and his brothers, Peter and Paul. John is survived by his sister, Mary Jacobs and her husband, Joe, of Hanover Township; his sister, Ceil Kasmark; his sister, Anna Yablonski, both of Wilkes-Barre; his sisterin-law Anne Bedwick of Hanover Township; and his brother, Raymond of Edwardsville; as well as nu-

merous nieces and nephews. A funeral Mass will be held at 10 a.m. Tuesday at St. George Maronite Church, Loomis Street, WilkesBarre. Interment will be in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Hanover Township. Friends may call from 4 to 7 p.m. Monday at the Mamary-Durkin Funeral Service, Parrish Street, Wilkes-Barre. In lieu of flowers, the family requests memorial contributions can be made to the St. Anthony/St. George Building Fund, 79 Loomis St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702.

Andrew M. Gamble May 26, 2011

Lynn Wheaton Mitchell May 1, 2011 Wheaton Mitchell, of NaL ynn ples, Fla., born January 9, 1925,

in Lewistown, Pa., passed away Sunday, May 1, 2011. He was preceded in death by his parents, Lynn and Myrtle Mitchell of Wilkes-Barre; and by his wife, Dorothy B. Mitchell of Naples, Fla. Lynn graduated from Pennsylvania State University and was a U. S. Navy veteran of World War II, Southwest Pacific Theater. Lynn spent his career in the tire industry with the major tire makers and retired from Uniroyal. In his retirement, he worked for the Naples Daily News. He is survived by his former spouse, Nancy J. Mitchell of Port Charlotte, Fla.; his brother, Robert and Jeanette Mitchell of Seven Lakes, N.C.; his sister, Katherine and Benjamin Lentz of Foxboro, Mass.; his children, Lynn and Rhonda Mitchell of Tempe, Ariz., Col. Charles (USAR) and Diane Mitchell of Fairfax Station, Va., Scott and Linda Mitchell of Allentown, Pa., Craig Mitchell of Port Charlotte, Fla., and James and Doris Mitchell of Port Charlotte, Fla.; stepchildren, Robert Dincesen of Naples, Fla., Stephanie Dincesen of Naples, Fla., and Deirdre Dincesen of New York, N.Y.; his grandchildren, Colin and Christopher Mitchell of Tempe, Ariz., Courtney Mitchell of Arlington, Va., Kelly Mitchell of Roslyn, Va., Kim Silvestri of Allentown, Pa., Tricia and Ray Ferraro of New Tri-

poli, Pa., Jessica and David McPherson of Center Valley, Pa., James Mitchell of Port Charlotte, Fla., and Stephanie Mitchell of Lewisville, Texas; his step-grandchildren, Wesley and Ariane Delande Wobles of Paris, France, and Meghan and Douglas McDowell of Sioux Falls, S.D.; his great-grandchildren, Aidan and Elle Silvestri of Allentown, Pa., and Emmy McPherson of Center Valley, Pa.; as well as his step-great-grandson, Julian Delande Wobles of Paris, France. Funeral arrangements have been made through Hodges Funeral Home, Naples, Fla., and Trexler Funeral Home, Allentown, Pa. Memorial services will be held at the Chapel of the Oak Lawn Cemetery, 1250 S. Main St., Hanover Township, at 11 a.m. Saturday. Donations may be made in his name to the American Cancer Society.

Dorothy Patricia Hess May 25, 2011 Dorothy Patricia “Pat” (Turner) Hess, widow of Al Hess, who died January 31, 2008, passed away Wednesday, May 25, 2011, in the surroundings of dear friends and family. Dorothy Patricia Turner was born February 14, 1937, in Inwood, W.Va., a daughter to parents, Willis and Florence Turner. In May of 1945, the family moved to Scoblick Brothers Orchard in Falls, Wyoming County, Pa., and then to Luzerne County in 1947. She attended schools in Gerrardstown, W.Va., Mill City, Pa., and a one-room school house in Ross Township. She spent three years at Shickshinny High School, and then graduated from Lehman Jackson Ross in 1954. Pat married Albert Bruce Hess, a Jonestown musician with “The Tumbleweed Ramblers,” April 22, 1961. While expecting her daughter, she began singing with their sons as the Al Hess Family Band, and later with local musicians, as “Al and Pat Hess and Friends.” They were a local favorite at many carnivals, festivals, churches and nursing homes. After Al’s passing, she continued to sing with the company of friends. She also enjoyed being outdoors, wildflowers, bird watching, gardening, baking, puzzles and reading. Pat worked as a seamstress at Harvic Sportswear in Sweet Valley, at one time traveling to New York City to picket during the Garment Union Labor Strikes. She also worked for Social Security in Wilkes-Barre. After taking time off to be an at-home mom, she worked

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as an office assistant to various doctors’ within the Bloomsburg Hospital system for 17 years. Having a servant’s heart and love of God, Pat was very active in the Jonestown United Methodist Church. She held many offices including teacher, administrative council chairman, pianist, as well as a lay speaker. She was a Boy Scout leader for 20 years, including one year as Scout Master of Troop 69 (Jonestown, Pa.). She received the Iroquois District Award in 1981 and earned her Woodbadge beads. A brother, Charles Donald Turner, preceded her in death. She is survived by brothers, George Ronald Turner of Knoxville, Tenn., and Ed Turner of Dallas; two sons, Glenn Hess of Jonestown, Pa., and Randy Hess of Nashville, Tenn.; a daughter Brenda Paul of Edmond, Okla.; a grandson Daniel Hess of Berwick, Pa.; as well as many cousins, nieces and nephews. The family will be continuing their Memorial Day tradition by performing at the Sweet Valley Fireman’s Carnival at 11 a.m. Monday. A viewing will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. Tuesday at the McMichael Funeral Home Inc., 4394 Red Rock Road, Route 487, Benton, Pa. Funeral services will be held at the Jonestown United Methodist Church at 10 a.m. Wednesday. Burial will be in the Jonestown Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to the Northern Columbia Community Cultural Center, P.O. Box 305, Benton, PA 17814. For online condolences, please visit www.mcmichaelfuneralhome.com.

G en etti’s

ndrew M. Gamble, 62, of Pennsfield Apartments, Selinsgrove, A Pa., passed away at 12:45 p.m.

Thursday, May 26, 2011, at the SUN Home Hospice Care Center, Sunbury, Pa. He was born September 19, 1948, in Jenkins Township, a son of the late Victor and Julie (Pataki) Gamble. Andrew was a 1967 graduate of the Wyoming Area High School. He was a veteran of the Vietnam War, serving with the U.S. Marine Corps. He was discharged with the rank of lance corporal and was awarded the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal with two stars, the Vietnam Campaign Medal with device, and the Combat Action Ribbon. Andrew retired from the U.S. Postal Service in Scranton as a supervisor. He was a member of St. Pius X Catholic Church, Selinsgrove, Pa., and formerly a member of St. Anthony’s parish in Exeter. He was preceded in death by a son, Eric V. Gamble, in 2002. Andrew is survived by a son and daughter-in-law, Jon G. and Elizabeth Gamble of Shamokin Dam, Pa.; a daughter and son-in-law, Andrea and Phil Haskins of North Hollywood, Calif.; five grandchildren, Alyvia, Ava and Gianna Gamble,

ily. Memorial contributions may be made to the charity of the donor’s choice. Funeral arrangements were entrusted to the Anthony Recupero Funeral Home, West Pittston.

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and Zalia and Zeven Haskins; a brother, John Gamble of Avoca; and a sister, Diane Wilson of South Carolina. Visitors will be received from 1 to 2 p.m. Wednesday at the V.L. Seebold Funeral Home, 601 N. High St., Selinsgrove, Pa., where the funeral will follow at 2 p.m., with the Rev. Ted Keating officiating. Military honors will be accorded by American Legion Victory Post 25 and VFW Post 6631 of Selinsgrove. Contributions in Andrew’s memory may be made to the Disabled American Veterans, 4219 Trindle Road, Camp Hill, PA 17011.

irginia Corrine Pinola, 91, of West Pittston, passed away V Wednesday, May 25, 2011, at High-

Happy Birthday In Heaven

Joseph Melnick. Surviving are three daughters, Mary Ann Galli and her husband, Dennis, Lebanon, Pa., with whom she resided, Lorraine Bezy, Rocky Mount, Va., and Margaret Wasser and her husband, Robert, Madison, Ala.; two sisters, Eleanor Zuba, Plains Township, and Julia Vitek, Pittston; as well as nine grandchildren and 11 greatgrandchildren. The funeral will be at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday from the Paul F. Leonard Funeral Home, 575 N. Main St., Pittston, with Divine Liturgy at 10 a.m. in Saint Michael’s Byzantine Catholic Church, Pittston. Interment will be in the parish cemetery. Friends may call from 7 to 9 p.m. Monday. Parastas will be conducted at 7:30 p.m. Monday.

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May 28, 2011

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orma S. Yaple, of Hughestown, passed away Saturday, May 28, 2011, in Riverstreet Manor, WilkesBarre. She was born in Pittston, on November 15, 1932, a daughter of the late Elmer and Mabel Schmaltz Smith. She was a graduate of Hughestown High School and Wyoming Seminary Dean School of Business. Norma was employed by Miners Bank and First Eastern Bank, Pittston, retiring in 1993 after 17½ years. She was a member of St. Peter’s Evangelical Lutheran Church, where she served as Council Member and Treasurer. Mrs. Yaple was past Secretary of Hughestown Park and Recreation Board and former Borough Auditor for 17 years and also served for many years as Borough Treasurer. Norma was preceded in death by her husband Robert in 1970; and a brother, Merle Smith. Surviving are sons, William Yaple of Hughestown, and Robert Yaple of Frederick, Md.; daughter Barbara Hess and her husband, Cliff, Harding; grandchildren, Joseph, Jeffrey, Jeremy, Marissa and Nicole; and a greatgrandson Gavin Hess. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Wednesday in St. Peter’s Evangelical Lutheran Church, Hughestown. The Rev. Robert Mitchell will officiate. Those attending the funeral are asked to go directly to the church. Private viewing will be held at the convenience of the family. Interment will be held in the Hughestown Cemetery. Memorial donations may be sent to St. Peter’s Lutheran Church or Robert Yaple Memorial Park, c/o Hughestown Borough Council, 42 Center St., Hughestown, PA 18640. Arrangements are by the HowellLussi Funeral Home, West Pittston.

May 26, 2011

May 25, 2011

Mary M. Mikitish, 89, of Lebanon, Pa., died peacefully in her sleep at home Saturday, May 28, 2011. She was the widow of Joseph Mikitish, who died in 2002. Born on March 22, 1922, in Pittston, she was a daughter of the late Michael and Julia Yardchick Melnick. She graduated from Pittston High School and worked as a factory floor manager. She was a member of Saint Michael’s Byzantine Catholic Church, Pittston. She was also preceded in death by a sister, Ann Mapel; and four brothers, John, Michael, Frank and

Norma S. Yaple

Thomas J. Tryba Sr.

Virginia Corrine Pinola

land Manor Nursing Care Center, Exeter. Born in West Pittston October 23, 1919, she was a daughter of the late Joseph and Mary Martinelli Pinola. She was a graduate of West Pittston High School and was employed at Pagnotti Inc., for 35 years. In 1992, Virginia was honored by the West Pittston Cherry Blossom Festival Committee, receiving the Outstanding Citizens Award for her special dedication to the borough of West Pittston. Virginia is survived by cousins, Irene D’Angelo of West Pittston, Lillian Yellalonis of Baltimore, Md., and Helena Flecknoe of Philadelphia, Pa. Funeral and interment were held at the convenience of the fam-

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689 Main Rd. Hanover Twp, PA 18706 (570) 709-5801

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homas J. Tryba Sr., 72, of Hanover Green, passed away at Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center, Plains Township, on Thursday, May 26, 2011. Thomas was born March 22, 1939, a son to the late George and Sophie (Bienias) Tryba. His brother, George Jr., passed away October 16, 1961. A Hanover Township resident his entire life, he graduated from Hanover High School, Penn State University and King’s College. He taught as a high school math teacher and golf coach for over 30 years. He also served as a board member for Hanover Area School District and most recently Hanover golf coach. Thomas was first a caddie and then a longtime member of Wyoming Valley Country Club, where he served as a board member. He was also very involved in the community, volunteering with the Civic Improvement Council, and a lifetime member of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross Church, Hanover Township, where he was a member of the Men’s Club. In acknowledgment of his love and lifetime contributions to high school golf, the Tom Tryba Preseason High School Golf Tournament is held in his honor prior to the start of each golf season. Above all, he was devoted to his family and was a loyal friend. He enjoyed nothing more than spending time with those he loved, whether at home or while traveling. He is survived by his loving wife of 49 years, Lorraine Kraynak Tryba; sons, Thomas Jr., of Hanover Green, and Ted of Orlando, Fla.; daughters, Tammie and her husband, Donald Robbins, of Wyoming, and Teri Lynn and her husband, Jeffrey Braun, of Las Vegas, Nev.; grandchildren, Tiffany, Felicia, Thomas III (TJ), and Tegan; as well as one great-grandchild. Funeral services will be held at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday from the Charles V. Sherbin Funeral Home, Main Road, Hanover Green, with a Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in the Exaltation of the Holy Cross Church, Buttonwood. Interment will be in the parish cemetery, West Nanticoke. Friends may call from 5 to 9 p.m. today and from 6 to 9 p.m. Monday. More Obituaries, Page 2A

In Loving Memory Of

JOSEPH M. FARRELL SR. 1/13/36 - 5/29/2000

God saw you were getting tired, And a cure was not to be, So he put his arms around you And whispered“Come to me.” With tearful eyes we watched, And saw you pass away. Although we loved you dearly, we could not make you stay. A golden heart stopped beating, Hard working hands at rest. God broke our hearts to prove to us, He only takes the best. Sadly missed by Wife, Children, Grandchildren & Great Grandchildren


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

IN MEMORIUM

C D. F J. N ,  - M , 

SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011 PAGE 11A


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Military families still wait

Dozens gather at Vietnam Veterans Memorial to remember loved ones.

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GOP presidential contest is heating up Sarah Palin will make a campaign-style bus tour along the East Coast. By PHILIP ELLIOTT and APRIL CASTRO Associated Press

By JERRY LYNOTT jlynott@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE – To this day, Alice Naylis waits for an ending. The Edwardsville woman remembers the day her younger brother, U.S. Navy pilot Lt. Bernard Rupinski of Edwardsville, was shot down over North Vietnam. It was June 16, 1968. His remains have not been recovered. A cross next to Rupinski’s name on the Luzerne County Vietnam Veterans Memorial indicates he is listed as missing in action. Naylis and a dozen other people gathered at the memorial on the courthouse lawn Saturday afternoon to honor the deceased men and women and MIAs of all wars. Across the country this weekend and on the official holiday Monday, the solemn act will be repeated in private and public gatherings in observance of Memorial Day. “You still have hope that you get something final,” said Naylis, who brought a white candle to light and place on the memorial monument. “You never lose hope and you never stop missing them.” Those who made up the small group have gotten to know one another from attending memorial services and share a common bond as veterans and family of service men and women. U.S. Air Force retired Master Sgt. Neno Sartini knows the group members by name. “We come here for a purpose. That’s to honor our fallen brothers and sisters,” said Sartini, one of the people responsible for building the memorial. Those who wore hats removed them as John Larkin, a U.S. Navy veteran who patrolled Mekong Delta in South Vietnam, offered a short prayer. A member of American Legion Post 395 in Kingston, Larkin

Kingston American Legion Post 395 Commander John Larkin lights red white and blue candles on Vietnam Memorial. Candles burn as they sit on the base of the Vietnam Memorial on the Luzerne County Courthouse lawn. In foreground are the American and POW-MIA flags.

FRED ADAMS PHOTOS/ FOR THE TIMES LEADER

asked those in attendance to remember the men and women who served in the military as well as those still serving. Still on Betty Allabaugh’s mind and in her heart is her older brother, Maj. Wayne Wolfkeil, a U.S. Air Force pilot from WilkesBarre whose aircraft was shot down in Laos on Aug., 6, 1968. The U.S. declared him dead 11 years after he went missing. Dur-

ing that time, he was promoted to the rank of colonel, according to P.O.W. Network. However, he is still listed as MIA on the county memorial. “I know the search team came back with a serial number from something,” said Allabaugh of Hanover Township. Like Naylis, Allabaugh holds on to hope for something that will bring an end to years of waiting.

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WASHINGTON — The still unsettled race for the Republican nomination to challenge President Barack Obama in 2012 is getting more interesting. After months of resisting calls to join the contest, Texas Gov. Rick Perry said Friday he would consider it. That could reshape the GOP field, adding a sitting governor who has never lost an election. Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin also sent a jolt through the party with the announcement of a campaign-style bus tour along theEastCoast,thelatestpossible contender to stand up since Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels announced last weekend that he would not run. And former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani is heading to New Hampshire next week, further stirring speculation that he will jump into the still-gelling field. Perry, the longest serving governor in Texas history, would bring conservative bona fides, a proven fundraising record and a fresh voice. Even as Perry’s closest advisers say he has no intention of getting in the race, he has methodically raised his profile, fanning interest. “I’m going to think about it,” Perry said Friday. “I think about a lot of things.” That was enough to set off speculation he would jump into a campaign that lacks a clear frontrunner. Social conservatives are stillshoppingforacandidate.Tea party activists want one of their own. Establishment Republicans remain divided on a choice. Mitt Romney, the former Massachusetts governor, is the closest to a favorite at this point. Like Giuliani, he ran for the nomination in 2008, losing out to Arizona Sen. John McCain. Romney will formally kick off his campaign in the early primary

whether he would rule state of New Hampshire Mitt Romney, out a run, Perry left the next Thursday, the same the former door open. day that Giuliani is now “I’ve got my focus on scheduled to headline a Massachuwhere it is supposed to fundraiser for the state setts goverbe and that is the legisRepublican Party and nor, is the lative session,” he told have lunch with several closest to a reporters. “Like I’ve GOP activists. said multiple times, Evangelicals who dom- favorite at I’m not going to get disinate the Iowa and South this point. tracted from my work Carolina nominating Like Giuliani, at hand, I’m not going contests are unlikely to he ran for the to get distracted by back Romney or former Utah Gov. Jon Hunts- nomination in that.” The Texas legislaman; some call the two 2008, losing men’s shared Mormon out to Arizona tive session ends Monday. faith a disqualifier. “The candidates that Twice-divorced for- Sen. John are running are not the mer House Speaker McCain. candidates that people Newt Gingrich, too, has want,” said Ryan Heckproblems, although Gingrich is quick to note he has been er of the Houston Tea Party Sowith his third wife for more than a ciety. “They’re looking for someone, almost wistfully.” decade. In recent years, Perry has made Last month, Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour, fresh off a turn as a sport out of bashing Washingthe chairman of the Republican ton. Most often, he assails the Governors Association, said he federal government for failing to wouldn’t make a White House secure the U.S. border with Mexbid; that unlocked many of the ico. In November, he published a book,“FedUp!”Inthebookhededonors for Perry. It also opened the door for a scribes the federal government sought-after Southern candi- as financially reckless and out of control and calls for a resurgence date. While Gingrich is running his of state-based power. Since he was re-elected to a campaign from Georgia, he has lived near Washington for dec- third term, Perry has hopades and is hardly the regional scotched across the country, making several trips to Washingcandidate Perry could be. Mark McKinnon, a veteran po- ton and taking center stage at evlitical consultant who advised ery conservative gathering of President George W. Bush’s cam- high-profile Republicans. From paigns, said of Perry, “The only the Conservative Political Action real question is: Why wouldn’t he Conference to a celebration commemorating what would have run?” Still, Perry has for months in- been Reagan’s 100th birthday, sisted he had no interest in a Perry has constantly brushed elbows with GOP heavyweights. White House bid. Texas Democrats sought to “I don’t want to be the president of the United States,” he paint that travel as a disqualifier. “Governor Perry spends so said flatly in November. With those refusals, he took much time jetting across the the reins of the Republican Gov- country, playing celebrity and igernors Association for a second noring Texas priorities, that he term as chairman earlier this already fits the mold of a typical year, a signal he was serious Washington politician. If Perry fiabout sitting 2012 out; he told fel- nally announces his candidacy, low Republicans he wouldn’t he would fit right into a GOP field split his time between the RGA that’s already well-treaded by aspiring celebrities hawking books and a presidential campaign. Since then, Perry’s refusal and reality TV shows,” Texas seems to have softened, albeit ev- Democratic Party spokeswoman er so slightly. Asked Tuesday Kirsten Gray said.

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MCT PHOTO

Dragon boats compete in the eighth annual Philadelphia Dragon Boat races. The field of 154 teams included aging rockers, doctors, homeless men and college students.

DRAGONS Continued from Page 1A

dragon boat racing exhibition. Dragon boats, about 40 feet long, seat 20 paddlers, twoabreast, plus a drummer seated near the bow and a steersman who stands at the stern. The drummer sets the rhythm to keep the rowing synchronized. “Anyone can do it. You do not necessarily have to be an athlete to do it,” Maday said. When Maday saw a dragon boat racing video a couple years ago, he immediately thought it would be a hit at Riverfest. He tried to arrange an event last year, but only one boat was available and the expense wouldn’t have been worth the results. This year, Calgary-based 22Dragons is supplying two dragon boats that eight teams will take turns using to compete in short races beginning at 10 a.m. on Riverfest Sunday. The boats will be on display on Friday evening and teams will have practice time Saturday afternoon. If there’s enough interest, Maday wants to organize a dragon

boat festival, similar to events in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Providence, R.I., and Burlington, Vt. It’s a great team-building experience, he said. Eight Riverfest sponsors were invited to form teams and compete in the exhibition, including GUARD Insurance Group, Pennsylvania American Water, PNC Bank, the City of WilkesBarre, Luzerne County, Entercomm Communications, The Times Leader and presenting sponsor Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. Elaine Sola, assistant vice president of Regulatory Compliance at GUARD, said she’s looking forward to paddling. “We have a full team ready to go. We talked about getting out on the water and practicing the rowing motion, but we don’t have a big enough boat. We have two people who do this recreationally, so I’m hoping they’ll give us some tips,” Sola said. Sola hopes to see WilkesBarre become a stop on the dragon boating circuit. “I think it would help increase tourism,” she said. Susan Turcmanovich, external affairs manager for Pennsylvania American, said the water company’s team has “a great

I F YO U G O What: Wyoming Valley Riverfest When: 6 to 9:30 p.m. June 17; noon to 9:30 p.m. June 18; 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 19. Where: On the River Common, Wilkes-Barre; and Nesbitt Park, Kingston. Learn more: www.rivercommon.org

mix of employees and family members. They were a little nervous, but they are on board, literally. And we have an advantage – water is our thing,” she joked. Turcmanovich said she expects everyone “to have a great time, win or lose,” and whether on the river or in the park, given the variety of fun activities all weekend long. Vince Cotrone, chairman of the Riverfront Parks Committee, said he hopes many families will spend their Father’s Day weekend at Riverfest, given the numerous children’s activities all weekend, including pony rides, a tree climb and some animals from the Lands at Hillside Farms to name a few. River-related activities and educational kiosks will be a major focus of the event, the purpose of which is to reconnect people with the river, he said.

A dragon boat team is shown in Superior, Wisconsin.

MCT PHOTO

LOTS Continued from Page 1A

challenges such as the “Devil’s Elbow,” a sharply rising hairpin turn that goes off camber at its crest, according to the Pennsylvania Hill Climb Association. Despite the tricky terrain, the skilled drivers rarely crash. But if it’s crunching metal you want, then it’s crunching metal you shall have on June 25, the next-to-last day of the Northeast Fair in Pittston Township. That’s when the Championship Demolition Derby starts at 7 p.m. The country fair, which runs June 21-26, boasts baking and other contests such as Fair Queen, amusement rides and games. Returning favorites include pig racing and a hypnosis/ comedy show. Concerts include a Dakota reunion, an Elvis Presley tribute show, a Billy Joel and Elton John tribute show, Cabinet, Miz and Stanky and His Cadets. Other big-hit fairs in the area this summer include the Kiwanis Wyoming County Fair in Meshoppen Aug. 31-Sept. 5 and the Luzerne County Fair in Lehman Township Sept. 7-11.

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

Aubrey Christiansen, 2, of Warminster, didn’t care for the giant slide at the Sweet Valley Volunteer Fire Company Fair as she and her dad John made their quick descent sitting on a potato sack.

STABBING Continued from Page 1A

garage on his property. Balester also was a businessman, having a minority interest in Balester Optical, a family business in Wilkes-Barre. In addition, he owned ABBA Advertising Products. He was active in the Luzerne County Republican Party, serving as the Club GOP chairman.

Heavy hitter Big acts in Wyoming County include comedian Gallagher and his sledgehammer, Katie Armiger with amRadio and a trio performance from Aaron Tippin, Joe Diffie and Sammy Kershaw. Concerts at the Luzerne County Fair include Alan Jackson, Kenny Rodgers and Elvis Presley tributes, Rick K and the All Nighters, Blues Brotherhood, NOMAD and The Badlees.

For blues lovers, the biggest event in the county will be July 8-9 at the Briggs Farm Blues Festival in Nescopeck Township. Terry “Harmonica” Bean, the main stage opening act on July 8, is among the returning favorites. Chainsaw DuPont and Andrew Jr. Boy Jones are among new faces that will grace the stage. Eddie Shaw, this year’s winner of “Best Instrumentalist – Horn” at the Blues Music Awards in Memphis, and the Wolf Gang will be the headlining act on July 9. Folks who love to spice it up in a farm setting will surely return to the Keystone State Hot and Stinky Garlic & Herb Festival at Zanolini Nursery in Drums on Aug. 27-28. The nagging question of who can stomach the hottest garlic out there will be answered in the annual garlic-eating contest. Tasty outings Other fun, tasty battles can be found at street fairs in the county’s second- and third-largest cities. If ethnic yummies, games, entertainment and a parade tickle your fancy, hit the Pittston Tomato Festival on Aug. 18-21 along with the other 50,000 expected guests. And don’t miss the Tomato Fights that Saturday. The Pierogie Slapshot Contest at Hazleton’s Funfest, which runs Sept. 10-11, is almost as much fun and not nearly as messy. But the Pierogie Eating Contest is much more delicious. That street fair also boasts ethnic food, crafts, games, contests, entertainment and a parade. The Poets are one of the featured entertainers at Funfest, but other acts for that fair and acts at the Tomato Festival haven’t yet

been announced. All that street fair food is great, but The Wine Festival at Sno Cove in Moosic on June 4 and the Pennsylvania Wine & Food Festival at Split Rock Resort in Lake Harmony on June 18-19 are two big draws that might appeal to those with a distinguishing palate. For those who like a little history in the summertime mix, Patch Town Days at Eckley Miners Village in Foster Township are June 18-19. Visitors can celebrate the customs and traditions of the anthracite coal region through music, dancing, food, living history presentations, artisans, crafters and other period activities. Another event to celebrate in June is National Rivers Month. And what better way to celebrate than at Wyoming Valley Riverfest June 17-19 on the River Common and Kirby Park in WilkesBarre? In addition to enjoying live entertainment and festival foods, you can learn to kayak, go fishing, watch your children play games and see this year’s newest attraction, dragon boat racing. Musical guests include George Wesley, Don Shappelle and the Pickups, Post Junction, Miz, Kriki and K8. And what summertime schedule would be complete without a trip to Kirby Park on the Fourth of July? The food vendors, bands and rides are always fun, but nothing beats the tradition of listening to the Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic playing as a backdrop to a sky full of colorful fireworks on the nation’s birthday. Summer is here, unofficially, so let’s get out there and enjoy it!

Mexican authorities detain nearly 50 members of two major drug cartels By GUSTAVO RUIZ Associated Press

MORELIA, Mexico — Mexico’s federal police detained nearly 50 members of two major drug cartels, including suspects in the recent armed attack on a police helicopter, authorities said Saturday. The suspects include 36 members of the La Familia cartel and 10 members of

the Zetas drug gang, the federal police said in a statement. La Familia gang members were detained in connection with the attack on a federal police helicopter Tuesday that wounded two officers and forced the craft to land. The statement said 11 other alleged cartel members were killed during the operation Friday night in the Pacific Coast state of Jalisco.

Authorities added that the 10 Zeta members were detained Friday at a ranch in Cancun, where a kidnapping victim was found and released. Along with the 36 La Familia members, police seized over 70 rifles, 20,000 weapon cartridges, three grenades and 14 handguns in an air and land raid that left two officers injured. Federal Police Commissioner Facun-

do Rosas said the mass detention has delivered a blow to a top leader of La Familia, Jose de Jesus Mendez Vargas, the alleged leader of the detained suspects. “His group has been weakened, which is why we don’t rule out the possibility that (Mendez Vargas) will look to other criminal organizations for support,” Rosas said during a news conference.


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SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011

TOM MOONEY OUT ON A LIMB

Uncover the lives and times of ancestors

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well.” Favorite movie? “The one I enjoyed most recently was ‘The Fighter’.” First car? “A ’69 or ’70 Ford Maverick. It was light blue with a white vinyl top.” What are you reading? “I recently finished ‘Eat, Pray, Love’ by Elizabeth Gilbert. And I enjoyed it, only because it defined how, no matter what your age, you can keep growing.” Favorite quote? “I am third. First comes God, then comes other people, and I am third” - Gale Sayers Defining moment? “Eleven years ago, I was diagnosed with breast cancer. It will always be a part of my life, but I was bound and determined that it wasn’t going to define my life. I really think I grew to appreciate every day, knowing that you never know when it could be taken away from you. It really helped me to grow in many ways, personally and spiritually, and have a new appreciation for everything that I have in my life. The day of the diagnosis and the day I was told was actually the day of my oldest daughter’s high school graduation. I’m sitting there wondering, ‘Well, am I going to see her graduate from college?’ Am I going to see my younger daughter graduate from high school?’ I understand what a gift everything that we’ve been given in life really is.”

ost people this time of year are planning their summer vacations. Genealogists with roots in Wyoming Valley are looking to excursions into the life and times of their ancestors. Let’s see if we can help. Elsa Garey Roden of Endicott, N.Y. is researching the Hadsell and Garey lines in our area. One item is of particular interest to her. “There is a book on the Hadsells I am trying to find,” she writes. So far she’s been unsuccessful in this quest. Ms. Roden, it looks to me as if you’re seeking “For a Thousand Years: The Hadsell-Hodsol Genealogy of Norway, England, and America.” The book is by Willard L. Hadsell and was published in 1956. For many years people researching the Hadsell name have quoted and referred to this book. Unfortunately, according to the bookselling website Amazon.com, the volume has been out of print and unavailable for many years. Still, there are several things you can do. First, if you go online and search for the book by title you will find a list of libraries that have copies. This option, of course, would involve quite a bit of travel. Second, you can go to the Hadsell Family Genealogy Forum and check through the posts to see if anyone does own a copy and is willing to answer questions about its contents for you. At the very least you will connect up with other people researching the Hadsells. Third, several years ago a researcher into the Hadsell line said in a web posting that she was beginning a project to make the book available online. I’d advise you to keep checking the Hadsell Forum for references to that book becoming available. You can also search online for the book by title, and any online presence — if there is one — would certainly come up. Fourth, visit your regional Church of Latter-day Saints Family History Center to see if the book has ever been digitized or if there is any other way to obtain it. The Hadsell name has been a distinguished one in Northeastern Pennsylvania. The first known member of that family here was James Hadsell, a New Englander, who came here in 1762, lived in present-day Forty Fort and operated a 600-acre farm. He was killed in the 1778 Battle of Wyoming, and his descendants qualify for membership in the DAR. For additional information on the Hadsells and Gareys I’d recommend a trip to the Luzerne County Historical Society in Wilkes-Barre. Search the library’s holdings, including the family name file. News Notes: The Northeast Pennsylvania Genealogical Society is continuing its long-term project of copying documents of interest to genealogists. The group extends an invitation to all churches and cemeteries that would like their records placed on microfilm or computer disc. Contact the society at nepgsmail@gmail.com. • The World Genweb continues to expand. More and more countries are now covered by Genweb sites containing history and genealogical information, many with message boards and many in English. To access these sites, search for World Genweb, where you will find a map that will take you to the country you’re interested in. • Check out Linkpendium on the Luzerne County Genweb, a handy entry point to various genealogy-related websites throughout Northeastern Pennsylvania. • Wish you had better computer skills? Watch your Times Leader for news on the computer classes offered at the area’s libraries. The classes, free or at nominal cost, tend to be geared to the needs of older adults.

Alan Stout writes about local people. Reach him at 970-7131.

Tom Mooney is a Times Leader genealogy columnist. Reach him at tmooney2@ptd.net.

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Lissa Bryan-Smith will be awarded the Leadership Wilkes-Barre 2011 Distinguished Leadership Award on June 2.

A dose of encouragement Lissa Bryan-Smith wins Distinguished Leadership Award for motivation, dedication to her community By JANINE UNGVARSKY For the Times Leader

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ots of people attempt to prevent weight gain during the holidays, but few go so far as to try to encourage their whole little corner of the world to stick to healthy habits, too. But it was perfectly in character for Lissa Bryan-Smith to care enough to encourage her co-workers to stay trim during the season. That kind, caring attitude and dedication to the community around her is the reason Bryan-Smith will be awarded the Leadership Wilkes-Barre 2011 Distinguished Leadership Award on June 2. The award is presented annually at a dinner that celebrates the incoming and outgoing Leadership Wilkes-Barre classes. Bryan-Smith is a 2005 graduate of the Leadership Wilkes-Barre Executive Program. “There are so many honors in this Valley that one can have, but it’s hard for me to think of anything that would mean more to me than this,” she said. “I’m bowled over and humbled by it, and so proud to be part of Leadership

ABOUT LISSA BRYAN-SMITH •Age 57 •Originally from Elimsport, currently resides in South Wilkes-Barre with her husband of nearly 29 years, Richard, as well as her mom, two Golden Retrievers and two cats •A registered nurse, was educated at Reading Hospital School of Nursing. Later earned a bachelor’s degree in business from St. Joseph’s College and a master’s degree in health care administration from University of Maryland •Community involvement includes Leadership Wilkes-Barre, where she serves on the executive board, North Branch Land Trust, United Way of Wyoming Valley and Circle 200 •Hobbies include antiques and writing books about antiques •Goals: Bryan-Smith would like to continue to mentor aspiring administrators in her current position, then enjoy a long, healthy retirement where she would sell antiques in downtown Wilkes-Barre and volunteer at a hospice. She plans to co-author a book on area holiday traditions with her husband, and hopes to someday find and own an antique dollhouse made by the Bliss Company.

Wilkes-Barre. I believe so much in the work they do, from the core projects to all the special projects they do to improve this area, it is all just wonderful.” Bryan-Smith began making an impact in the community as soon as she arrived in 2005. Besides serving as the chief administrative officer of Geisinger’s Regional Ambulatory Campus in

downtown Wilkes-Barre, Bryan-Smith epitomizes Leadership Wilkes-Barre’s focus on improving the quality of life in the Greater Wilkes-Barre area. But not all of those improvements take place on a grand community-wide scale. Take her efforts to keep holiday pounds from creeping on. It wasn’t enough for Bryan-Smith, a registered nurse, to seek ways to keep herself healthy; she saw it as a way to help those she works with as well. Last November, she shared her goal of losing weight during the holiday season with the Geisinger community, and invited others to join her. She blogged weekly to share her progress and keep herself honest, and promised to reward all coworkers who matched her goal with a special T-shirt. “Many health care workers like myself are aging and I want them to know they can live a healthier lifestyle,” she said. “I got great feedback from them

South Wilkes-Barre and on the executive board of Leadership Wilkes-Barre, Bryan-Smith was the 2010 campaign chair for the United Way of Wyoming Valley, is a member of the North Branch Land Trust and is proud to be part of Circle 200, an organization for local female leaders. A passionate advocate for this area and especially for See SMITH, Page 9B

MEET TANYA OLAVIANY

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S.JOHN WILKIN/THE TIMES LEADER

anya Olaviany is the program director of Big Brothers Big Sisters of The Bridge, a program of Catholic Social Services. She received a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Mansfield State College and a master’s degree in social work from Marywood University. Olaviany, 55, and her husband, Victor, have two daughters: Amanda, 29, and Caitlin, 19. They live in Larksville.

Why a career in social work? “My senior year in high school, we took a field trip to Allied Services in Scranton. Up until that point I had been considering teaching history, but after visiting Allied Services and meeting with a social worker there, I was sold. I just knew that’s what I wanted to do.” You’ve been with Catholic Social Services since 1978 and with Big Brothers Big Sisters since 1986. What keeps you so inspired? “It’s the diversity of the job. I always knew I wanted to work with children, and being able to do that and being able to work with the volunteers melds together a wonderful combination. I also have the opportunity to work with advisory boards, which puts me with folks from the community that are dedicated to the cause. And there’s fundraising. It’s not a boring job. You just keep going from one thing to another to another. When I walk out of here, I know that my job is never done. There will always be something on that desk tomorrow that needs to be taken care of and needs attention.” How does it feel to find a perfect match for a child with a Big Brother or Big Sister? “Many of

those relationships continue on for a lifetime. And that’s what’s great. These kids really needed that extra support and that friend in their life, and it’s gratifying to know that it continued on for many, many years. It’s wonderful.” What do you do to relax? “My husband and I have really enjoyed raising our children and being involved in their different activities. And we enjoy traveling. We enjoy going on cruises, because we get to see a lot of different parts of the world and different countries on one trip. We’re very familyoriented.” Music? “I love country music. The biggest kick I got was taking my 83-yearold mother to see Alan Jackson at the Mohegan Sun Arena last year. That was great.” Sports fans? “We enjoy Penn State football. And when the arena football was here, we had season tickets to the Pioneers. And we’ll pick up some Penguins hockey games here or there. My kids went to Wyoming Valley West, so we also follow their sports schedule. We like local teams.” Favorite city? “I love New York.” Favorite vacation spot? “Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas. Megan’s Bay is also right in that area. It’s just absolutely beautiful.” Favorite food? “Lobster.” Always in the cupboard? “Popcorn.” Favorite TV show? “I really like ‘Criminal Minds’ and ‘Law & Order SVU’. And I like the ‘Grey’s Anatomy’ type stuff as


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Matz, Troy

Bell, Schmonsees athleen Bell and Kevin Schmonsees, together with their famC ilies, announce their engagement

and upcoming marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of William and Elaine Bell, West Pittston. She is the granddaughter of Rinaldo and Isabel Lucarella, West Pittston; the late William Pahl; and the late Anne Pahl Bell and William Bell, Exeter. Cathleen is a 1999 graduate of Wyoming Area and earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Pennsylvania State University in 2003. She is employed as a communications manager at Cisco Systems in Research Triangle Park, N.C. The prospective groom is the son of John and Carolyn Schmonsees, Greensboro, N.C. He is the grandson of Bob and Ruth Oswald, Charleston, S.C., and the late John and Marguerite Schmonsees, Charleston, S.C. Kevin is a 1995 graduate of Ragsdale High School, Greensboro, N.C. He earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from North Carolina State University in 1999 and a master’s degree in business administration from Strayer University in 2010. He is employed as an engineering services manager at Longent in Raleigh, N.C. Cathleen and Kevin will exchange vows on Sept. 4, 2011, at the Rand-Bryan House in Garner, N.C.

Lavelle, Cibello

Savage, Shatrowskas

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ourtney Ann Savage and Jason Shatrowskas, together with their families, announce their engagement and approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Robert John Savage, Wyoming, and Colette Biernacki Savage, Florida, formerly of Kingston. She is the granddaughter of Robert Savage, Phyllis Savage and Gordon Schaeffer, all of Swoyersville, and Edward Biernacki and the late Dorothy Biernacki, Kingston. The prospective groom is the son of John and Barbara Shatrowskas, Wyoming. He is the grandson of the late Leo and Mary Lulewicz and Stanley and Caroline Yankowski, all of Wyoming. Courtney is a 1997 graduate of Bishop O’Reilly High School. She earned her Bachelor of Science degree in business management and marketing from The Pennsylvania State University in 2001. Jason is a 1995 graduate of Dallas Senior High School and a 2001 graduate from King’s College, where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in finance. The couple will exchange vows on Aug. 27, 2011. The ceremony will take place at The Highlands at Newberry Estates, Dallas. They plan to honeymoon in Hawaii.

ason Scott Lavelle and Karla Leesa Cibello, with their families, announce their engagement and upcoming marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Al and Andrea Cibello, Wilkes-Barre. She is the granddaughter of Felicia Koval; the late Andrew Koval; the late Victor Cibello; and the late Jean Cibello. Karla is a 1998 graduate of G.A.R. Memorial High School. She is attending King’s College for business administration. She is employed by the Luzerne County Election Bureau. The prospective groom is the son of Gene and Kim Lavelle, WilkesBarre. He is the grandson of Hilda Goldberg Ibana; the late Stuart Goldberg; the late MaryJean Lavelle; and the late Eugene Lavelle Jr. Jason is a 1998 graduate of G.A.R. Memorial High School. He earned a bachelor’s degree in business management from East Stroudsburg University in 2004. He is employed by All Seasons Window Cleaning. The couple will exchange vows on July 2, 2011, at St. Mary’s Church, Wilkes-Barre.

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ristie Lynn Matz and Alexander Robert Troy, Nanticoke, Pa., have K announced plans for a wedding on

Crager, Kratz arl and Arlene Kratz of Exeter would like to announce the enC gagement and approaching marriage

of their daughter, Carlene Kratz, of Hattiesburg, Miss., to Mark Crager, also of Hattiesburg, Miss. Carlene is the granddaughter of the late Mercur and Helen Drew, Pittston, and the late Carl and Marie Kratz, Wilkes-Barre. She is a 1997 graduate of Bishop Hoban High School and earned a Bachelor of Science degree from Lock Haven University and a Master of Science degree from Florida State University. She is employed at Enterprise, Hattiesburg, Miss., as a branch manager. Mark is the son of Gary and Sherry Crager, Stateline, Miss. He is the grandson of Ether Dees and the late Clifford Dees and the late Elmer and Elizabeth Crager. He is a 1994 graduate of Fruitdale High School and earned a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Southern Mississippi and a Master of Science degree from Mississippi State University. He is employed at Southern Mississippi University as the associate director of recreational sports. The couple will exchange vows on July 1, 2011, at St. Nicholas Church, Wilkes-Barre, with a reception to follow at Oyster at the Genetti Hotel and Conference Center.

Argo, Supinski Elizabeth Supinski and AnS arah thony Carmen Argo, together

Pelepko-Filak, Schlosser egan Marie Schlosser and Nikolai George Pelepko-Filak, M together with their families, an-

nounce their engagement and approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Albert and Debra Schlosser, Hanover Township. She is the granddaughter of June Chopack and the late James Chopack and the late Albert A. and Mary Schlosser, all of Hanover Township. The prospective groom is the son of George and Kasia PelepkoFilak, Shavertown. He is the grandson of Madelyn Pelepko and the late Michael Pelepko, formerly of Wilkes-Barre, and Irene Filak and the late George Filak, formerly of Jersey City, N.J. Megan is a 2003 graduate of Bishop Hoban High School, Wilkes-Barre. She earned an Associate of Science degree in broadcast communications at Luzerne County Community College, Nanticoke, and a Bachelor of Arts degree in broadcast journalism at American University, Washington, D.C. She is employed as a news producer at WMAR TV, Baltimore, Md. Nikolai is a 2004 graduate of Bishop Hoban High School, Wilkes-Barre, and earned a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing at Misericordia University, Dallas. He is employed as a critical care nurse at Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Md. The couple resides in Baltimore, Md., with their Chihuahua, Anastasia. The couple will exchange vows this summer at St. Robert Bellarmine Parish in Wilkes-Barre.

with their families, announce their engagement and approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of James and Romayne Supinski, Wyoming. She is the granddaughter of Romayne Trolio and the late Joseph Trolio, Pittston, and Elizabeth Supinski and the late Al Supinski, Swoyersville. The prospective groom is the son of Anthony “Butch” and Lorraine Argo, Exeter. He is the grandson of the late Anthony and Martha Argo and the late Stanley and Mary Przekop. Sarah is a 2001 graduate of Wyoming Area High School. She earned a Bachelor of Science degree in accounting from King’s College in 2005 and a Juris Doctor degree from the Pennsylvania State University Dickinson School of Law in 2009. She is employed as an attorney at Cefalo and Associates, West Pittston. Anthony is a 1994 graduate of Wyoming Area High School. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in exercise science from the University of Pittsburgh in 1998 and obtained his health and physical education certificate from East Stroudsburg University in 2003. He is employed as a teacher at Wyoming Area School District. The couple will exchange vows on Oct. 14, 2011, at Caesar’s Palace, Las Vegas, Nev.

Haines, Benscoter

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arrie Anne Benscoter and Joseph Edward Haines, Stewartstown, Pa., had their dream wedding June 12, 2010, on the ocean shoreline in Cape May, N.J. Family and friends all gathered in Cape May to celebrate. Carrie Anne is the daughter of Frank J. Benscoter, Shickshinny, Pa., and the late Theresa M. Benscoter. She is the granddaughter of Weltha Benscoter, Shickshinny; the late Frank Benscoter; and late Thomas and Kathryn Malia. Carrie Anne is a 1999 graduate of King’s College and works for PPL Electric Utilities, Harrisburg, Pa. Joseph is the son of Edward and Gail Haines, Jarrettsville, Md. He is the grandson of Susan Haines, Hunlock Creek, Pa.; the late Edward Haines; and William Riley and the late Mildred Riley, Monkton, Md. The matron of honor was Amy Ferretti, sister of the bride, and the bridesmaid was close friend, Andrea Recene. Groomsmen were David Kloss and Ted Wiley, close friends. Ring bearer was Carter Driscoll, nephew of the groom. Readings were given by John Jesse Benscoter, brother, and Kathryn Intrieri, aunt of the bride. Officiant was Pastor Robert Coscia. The couple had a sunset reception at The Mad Batter, Carrol Villa Hotel, Cape May, N.J., where they had the best time of their lives.

John Handler celebrates 103rd birthday ohn Handler, Mountain Top, celebrated his 103rd birthday JJohn on May 18, 2011. enjoys spending time with his family and friends and

exercising every day. He is also an avid reader. John’s first job was working for Franklin D. Roosevelt before he became President. He resides with his family, Greg and Jill Gower and their children, Katie and Sarah.

Krutz, Gilligan icole Claire Krutz and Brian Christopher Gilligan were united N in marriage on Aug. 21, 2010, at St.

Therese’s Church by Monsignor Thomas Callahan. The bride is the daughter of Nicholas and Claire Krutz, Wilkes-Barre. The groom is the son of Donna Gilligan and the late Bernard Gilligan Jr., Wyoming. The bride, escorted by her father, was attended by Alicia Gazda, maid of honor, and bridesmaids Lauren Krutz, sister of the bride; Kelly Krutz, sister-in-law of the bride; Nora Alu, cousin of the bride; and Cecilia Hebda, friend of the bride. The groom chose his brother, Bernard Gilligan III, as best man. Groomsmen were Kevin Krutz, brother of the bride, and David Walsh, Robert Guerin, Matthew Giambra and Dustin Swales, friends of the groom. Scriptural readings were offered by Lesley Sapak, Danielle Kishbaugh and Megan Landmesser. Offertory gifts were presented by Michelle Gilligan, sister-in-law of the groom, and Maximilian Gilligan, nephew of the groom. The rehearsal dinner was hosted by the parents of the bride and groom at the Krutz residence. An evening cocktail hour, dinner and dancing were held at the Waterfront in Plains Township. Nicole is a 1997 graduate of E.L. Meyers High School and a 2001 graduate of King’s College. She is employed by the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins as the director of marketing. Brian is a 2002 graduate of Seton Catholic High School and a 2007 graduate of King’s College. He is employed by Deluxe Digital Studios as a production manager. The couple honeymooned in the Riviera Maya and reside in Wyoming, Pa.

June 25, 2011, in Berwick, Pa. Kristie is the daughter of Scott and Stephanie Stinnard, Boyertown, Pa. She is a 2008 graduate of Boyertown Area Senior High School and an alumna of the Luzerne County Community College dental hygiene program. Alex is the son of Robert and Laurella Troy, Berwick, Pa. He is a 2004 graduate of Berwick Area High School and an alumnus of Bloomsburg University.

Skoniecki, Crouse tefanie Skoniecki and Jason S Crouse were united in marriage on June 19, 2010, at St. John’s UCC

Church, Farmersville, Easton, Pa. Pastor Peter Unger performed the ceremony. Stefanie is the daughter of Denise Yatko and Thomas Davis, Hanover Township, and Robert Skoniecki, Nanticoke. She is the granddaughter of Irene Yatko, Nanticoke; the late Robert Yatko; and the late Leonard and Ruth Skoniecki. Jason is the son of Dennis Crouse, Riegelsville, and the late Theresa Crouse. He is the grandson of the late Francis and Caroline Roman, Pipersville, and the late Lester and Marian Crouse, Riegelsville. Stefanie selected her college friend, Jennifer Stuhltrager, to be matron of honor. The other bridesmaids were Renee Aulenbach and Lauren Davey, both friends of the bride. The flower girl was Kayleigh Costello, also a friend of the bride. Jason selected his brother, Adam Crouse, to be the best man. The other groomsmen were Jeff Everett and Jeremy Scheetz, both friends of the groom. The ring bearer was Gunner Scheetz, also a friend of the groom. Ushers included friends of the groom, Matt Brown, Ryan Fitz, Fred Magargal and Art Schmell. Friends of the bride, including Raquel Akillas, Kristin Costello and Alizon Uzdella, each presented a reading of special significance to the bride and groom. A bridal shower, hosted by the bride’s mother, grandmother, aunt and bridesmaids, was held at the Candlelight Reception Center, Easton. The father of the groom hosted a rehearsal dinner at the Buckeye Tavern, Macungie. Following the ceremony, the couple celebrated their new marriage, surrounded by friends and family, at a reception at Green Pond County Club, Bethlehem. The bride is a 2000 graduate of Hanover Area Junior-Senior High School. She earned her bachelor’s degree in psychology and English from Elizabethtown College in 2004. She obtained her master’s degree in counseling psychology in 2007 from Kutztown University. She is employed as a counselor at Montgomery County Community College in Blue Bell. The groom is a 1996 graduate of Palisades High School in Kintnersville. He earned his associate’s degree in mechanical design/CAD technology from Lincoln Technical Institute in 1998. He is enrolled at Albright College, pursuing his bachelor’s degree in accounting. He is employed as a design drafter at Victaulic in Nazareth. They honeymooned on the Hawaiian Islands, including the Big Island, Maui and Oahu. The couple resides at their home in Wescosville, Pa.


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Joseph E. Berti to celebrate 91st birthday oseph E. (Jibber) Berti, a life-time Jresident of Swoyers-

Corgan, Kotsur Leonora Corgan and RobK atelyn ert Allen Kotsur were united in

the sacrament of marriage March 26, 2011, in St. Therese’s Church, Shavertown, by the Rev. James Paisley. The bride is the daughter of John and Christine Corgan, Shavertown. She is the granddaughter of Geraldine Wroblewski and John Corgan, both of Nanticoke, and the late Joseph Wroblewski and the late Dorothy Corgan. The groom is the son of Joseph A. and Patricia Kotsur, Reyburn. He is the grandson of Joseph A. Kotsur Sr., Berwick; Robert Allen Garland, Harrisburg; the late Rose Garland; and the late Carol Kotsur. The bride was given away in marriage by her father. She chose her sister, Danielle Corgan, and her close friend, Katie Lynch, as her maids of honor. Bridesmaids were Erin Blain and Tanya Smolinsky, friends of the bride, and Keri Nafus, sister of the groom. The groom chose his close friends, Doug Wagner and Farron Hakanson, as his best men. Groomsmen were Joseph A. Kotsur III, brother of the groom, and David Cruz and Isaac Booth, friends of the groom. Flower girls were Addyson Wroblewski, cousin of the bride; Grace Rushmer, friend of the bride; and Abigail Nafus, niece of the groom. Ring bearers were Ryan and Andrew Trumm, friends of the bride. Readings were given by Cyril Corgan, uncle of the bride; Thomas Ciak, friend of the groom; Theresa Conway, aunt of the bride, and the father of the groom. Gifts were presented by Joann Wroblewski, godmother of the bride; Mark Corgan, godfather of the bride; Robert Garland, grandfather of the groom; and Michelle Wroblewski, cousin of the bride. Ushers were Joseph A. Kotsur III, brother of the groom, and Steven Wroblewski and Joseph Wroblewski, uncles of the bride. A bridal shower was hosted by the mothers of the bride and groom, bridesmaids and flower girls at Coopers Waterfront Restaurant, Pittston. The parents of the groom hosted the rehearsal dinner at Leggio’s, Dallas. The wedding reception was held at Bentley’s, Ashley. The couple resides in North Carolina.

Brynn L. Vosburg baptized rynn Leslie Vosburg, daughB ter of Gary and

Nicole Vosburg, Doylestown, was baptized on May 15, 2011, by Deacon George Corwell at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church, Doylestown. Brynn was born on Dec. 16, 2010. Brynn’s godparents are her aunt and uncle, Megan Ross, Doylestown, and Scott Vosburg, Moosic. Maternal grandparents are the late Leslie Ross and Jan Ross, Seaville, N.J. Paternal grandparents are Julie Vosburg, Moosic, and Gary Vosburg Sr., Avoca. Great-grandparents are Julius and Rose Marie Janesko, Moosic, and Shirley Vosburg, Avoca. A brunch for family and friends was held in Brynn’s honor.

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uzanne Siskovich and Brian Little were united in the sacrament of marriage May 29, 2010, at Sacred Heart of Jesus Church, Wilkes-Barre, by Monsignor John Sempa. The bride is the daughter of Carol and William Siskovich, Plains Township. She is the granddaughter of Agnes Siskovich; the late Theodore Siskovich; and the late Helen and Robert Williams. The groom is the son of Paulette and Malvin Little, Plymouth. He is the grandson of the late Elizabeth and Warren Little and the late Mary Ann and Edward Schwartz. The bride, given in marriage by her father, chose her sister, Sarah Siskovich, as maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Charity Udzella, sister of the groom; Amy Bartosh and Jolene Siskovich, cousins of the bride; and Kate Brown and Tara McCathy, friends of the bride. Jade Udzella, niece of the groom, was flower girl. The groom chose his best friend, Michael Williams, as best man. Groomsmen were Warren Little, brother of the groom; Theodore Siskovich, brother of the bride; Rick Matthews, nephew of the groom; and Jason Williams and Lee Jones, friends of the groom. Scriptural readings were given by Kathy Rembish, godmother and aunt of the bride, and Ronald Brace, cousin of the bride. Presentation of the gifts was given by Kristen Siskovich and Danielle Siskovich, cousins of the bride, and Jason Udzella, nephew of the groom. Music for the ceremony was performed by David Baloga. An evening cocktail hour and reception were held at Appletree Terrace in Dallas. The bride was honored at a bridal shower hosted by her bridal attendants and mothers of the bride and groom at the PAV Hall, Plains Township. A rehearsal dinner was held at the North End Slovak Club. The bride is a graduate of Bishop Hoban High School and earned a Bachelor of Science degree in medical imaging from Misericordia University and a certificate in radiation oncology therapy from Virginia Western Community College. She is employed by Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center as a radiographer. The groom is a graduate of Wyoming Valley West High School. He is employed as a manager for Long John Silver’s restaurants. The couple honeymooned on a cruise to San Juan, St. Thomas, Dominican Republic, and Haiti. They reside in Hanover Township.

Keleigh A. Longfoot baptized

ynthia Gabrielle Charnetski, O.D., married Paul Charles Shiber on April 22, 2011. A weeklong celebration with family and friends in Los Cabos led up to the wedding day. The ceremony and celebration were held at Las Palmas de Cortez overlooking the Sea of Cortez in Los Barriles, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Dr. Charnetski is the daughter of Dr. Carl J. and Susan Charnetski, Harveys Lake. She is the granddaughter of Carl and Irene Charnetski, Kingston; Esther Price, Dallas; and the late Harry W. Price. Mr. Shiber is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Shiber, Dallas. He is the grandson of Mary Shiber, Dallas. Caden, Erik and Ryan Charnetski, nephews of the bride, comprised the wedding party and gave a toast at the celebration. Flowers were by John Mackey from Scranton, friend of the bride. Juanito Medina performed Spanish and salsa music during the ceremony and celebration. An engagement party was given in the fall at the home of the bride’s parents in Harveys Lake. During the wedding week, a dinner was hosted at Tio Pablo’s by the parents of the groom. A beach bonfire was hosted by the parents of the bride at sunset featuring dorado caught by the groom on a fishing excursion in the Sea of Cortez. A Mexican Fiesta, featuring a favorite local guitarist, was given by the bride’s godfather and his wife, Dr. and Mrs. James Harrison at their home in Los Barriles. Dr. Charnetski is a graduate of Wilkes University and the Pennsylvania College of Optometry. She is an optometrist at Northeastern Eye Institute. She is an executive of the alumni board of directors at Wilkes University, a member of the board of directors at Step By Step Inc. and a volunteer for the SPCA of Luzerne County. Mr. Shiber is a graduate of Misericordia University and is employed by Cintas in the fire safety division. He is an avid soccer player and golfer. Cindy and Paul plan to honeymoon in Barcelona and Ibiza this summer. They reside in Kingston with their dogs, Daisy and Chloe.

Sromovski and Matthew J oanne Stitzer were united in marriage

June 12, 2010, at St. John the Baptist Church, Larksville, by the Rev. Gerald Gurka. The bride is the daughter of Paul and Margy Sromovski, Larksville. The groom is the son of Bud and Renie Stitzer, Kingston. Given in marriage by her father, the bride chose her sister, Rachael Sromovski, as her maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Heather Adams, cousin of the bride; Becky Stitzer, sister-in-law of the groom; and Jocelyn Wadzin and Kristen Stevenson, friends of the bride. The flower girl was Robin Stitzer, niece of the groom. The groom chose his brother, Jon Stitzer, as his best man. Groomsmen were Eric Keiper, John Anthony, Michael Stevenson and Lenny Bartone, friends of the groom. The ring bearer was Jacob Stitzer, nephew of the groom. Readings were given by David Sromovski, godfather of the bride, and the mother of the groom. The bride was honored with a bridal shower hosted by the mother of the bride and her bridal party at the Pierce Street Deli, Kingston. A rehearsal dinner was hosted by the parents of the groom at Perugino’s, Luzerne. An evening cocktail hour and reception, hosted by the bride’s parents, were held at the Apple Tree Terrace, Newberry Estates. The bride is a 1999 graduate of Wyoming Valley West High School. She is a 2003 and 2005 graduate of Wilkes University, where she earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in business administration and her Master of Business Administration degree. She is employed as the senior manager of customer service for Lord & Taylor. The groom is a 1997 graduate of Wyoming Valley West High School. He is a 2002 graduate of College Misericordia, where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in sports management. He is also a 2009 graduate of the Lackawanna College Police Academy Program. The couple honeymooned in the Riviera Maya, Mexico. They reside in West Wyoming.

The Skibinskis r. and Mrs. Bernard Skibinski Sr., Wilkes-Barre, will celebrate their M 60th wedding anniversary, June 2, 2011. They were married in SS. Peter and Paul’s Church, Plains Township, by the late Rev. Stanley Stungus. Their attendants were Maryann Purta Dombroski, Pauline Purta Ragukas, Claire Petrosky Lysiak, the late Stanley Skibinski, the late Francis Purta and William Rinken. Mrs. Skibinski is the former Gertrude Purta, daughter of the late Paul and Anna Kobuta Purta. Mr. Skibinski is the son of the late Michael and Frances Kaminski Skibinski. Before retiring, he was employed by United Parcel Service. The Skibinskis have three children: Barbara Ann Sherman, Massachusetts; the late Joan Thiemann, Mountain Top; and Bernard Skibinski Jr., Wilkes-Barre. Their grandchildren are: Jennifer Thiemann Welgosh and her husband, John Welgosh; Jacqueline Thiemann; and Toni Marie Skibinski, who will celebrate her 17th birthday on June 2. The couple also has three step-grandchildren, Karl, Olivia Joan and Shaun Edward. A family dinner will be celebrated for the couple.

NAMES AND FACES

The Skroskys

on and Anna Reino Skrosky will eleigh Adryiene celebrate their 50th anniversary R Longfoot beK with a wedding anniversary Mass on came a member of

the Catholic faith on March 6, 2011, through the waters of baptism. She was born on Feb. 8, 2011, to Michael and Kimmy Longfoot. Keleigh will be welcomed by proud godparents Nancy Geiser and Billy O’Donnell into the Holy Family Parish Church, Luzerne. Included in those celebrating this very special day are her grandparents, David and Maureen Longfoot and Bill and Christine O’Donnell and her brothers, David and Brandon Longfoot.

Sromovski, Stitzer

ville, will celebrate his 91st birthday June 3, 2011. He is the son of the late John and Eugenia Piere Berti, Swoyersville. He was married to the late Tillie Gallagher Berti, Swoyersville. They celebrated their 63rd wedding anniversary on Aug. 4, 2008. He was a plasterman by trade and was employed by local contractors Stanley Susek and Frank Coslett. He retired in 1988 from Tenavision Corporation after 11 years of service. Joe has four children: daughter Marie E. and son-in-law, Jim Kittle, Dallas, Texas; daughter Deborah and son-inlaw, Joe Walsh, Pittston; daughter Corinne and son-in-law, Michael Craig, Cedar Hill, Texas; and son Dale, Plano, Texas. Grandchildren are Joseph and Kyle Walsh, West Pittston; Kelly Walsh Pacelli and husband, Frank, Swoyersville; and Matthew Berti, Plano, Texas. He is an active member of Holy Trinity Parish, Swoyersville, and STAR Fitness, Edwardsville. A party is planned in his honor by his children.

June 5 at St. Peter’s Cathedral in Scranton, Pa. They were married on June 10, 1961, at Sacred Heart Parish, Luzerne, Pa. Anna is the daughter of Tom and Anna Reino. The couple resided in Lodi, N.J., for 40 years and in 2000 they retired to Shavertown, Pa. Their older son, R.J., passed away in 1989. Their younger son, Rick, lives in Indiana with his wife, Suzanne. They are grandparents to R.J.’s two children, Rob and Jena. The couple plans a family gathering at their home on Memorial Day Weekend. In early fall they will take a trip to the Northwest.

Rosemary Shaver, Shavertown, a junior with a double major in history and political science at The University of Scranton, was selected as the winner of the inaugural Weinberg Memorial Library Research Prize. The award recognizes excellence in research projects that show significant knowledge of the methods of research and the information gathering process and use of Shaver library resources, tools and services. Shaver also participates in the university’s honors program. Courtney Fluehr, a senior exercise science major from Bensalem, Benjamin Redan, a senior biochemistry major from Tunkhannock and William Woody, a senior theology/religious studies major from Bryn Mawr received Honorable Mention awards. Award winners were recently honored at a reception at the Weinberg Memorial Library. Laurel Anne Menapace, daughter of Raymond and Deborah Menapace, Harveyville, recently earned her Doctor of Medicine degree from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. Menapace is a 2002 graduate of Northwest Area High School and a 2006 graduate of Pennsylvania State University. She has accepted a resi-

dency in internal medicine at the University of Rochester, Strong Memorial Hospital, Rochester, N.Y. Local residents attending the University of Menapace Scranton were recently included in the 201 1 edition of Who’s Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges. Students were selected as national outstanding leaders based on their academic achievement, service to the community, leadership in extracurricular activities and potential for continued success. The local students are: Christopher Carey, Duryea, a biology major; Mae Lynn Chan, Kingston, a biophysics major; Maria Gubbiotti, Falls, a biochemistry, cell and molecular biology major; Judith Gunshannon, Luzerne, a liberal studies major; Daniel Jackowitz, Moosic, an electrical engineering and computer science major; and Megan Walsh, Laflin, a nursing major. Amanda Reinmiller, Conyngham, recently received the Institute for Physical Therapy Excellence Award at a ceremony honoring graduate students at Widener University, Chester. The award is given annually to students who have excelled in the physical therapy program and earned a 3.8 or higher grade point average. Reinmiller graduated from the university May 14 with a doctorate in physical therapy.

SOCIAL PAGE GUIDELINES The Times Leader allows you to decide how your wedding notice reads, with a few caveats. Wedding announcements run in Sunday’s People section, with black-and-white photos, free of charge. Articles must be limited to 220 words, and we reserve the right to edit announcements that exceed that word count. Announcements

must be typed or submitted via www.timesleader.com. (Click on the "people" tab, then “weddings” and follow the instructions from there.) Submissions must include a daytime contact phone number and must be received within 10 months of the wedding date. We do not run first-year anniversary announcements or announcements of weddings that took place more than a year ago. (Wedding

photographers often can supply you with a black-and-white proof in advance of other album photographs.) All other social announcements must be typed and include a daytime contact phone number. Announcements of births at local hospitals are submitted by hospitals and published on Sundays.

Out-of-town announcements with local connections also are accepted. Photos are only accepted with baptism, dedication or other religious-ceremony announcements but not birth announcements. Engagement announcements must be submitted at least one month before the wedding date to guarantee publication and must include the wedding date. We

cannot publish engagement announcements once the wedding has taken place. Anniversary photographs are published free of charge at the 10th wedding anniversary and subsequent five-year milestones. Other anniversaries will be published, as space allows, without photographs.

Drop off articles at the Times Leader or mail to: The Times Leader People Section 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Questions can be directed to Kathy Sweetra at 829-7250 or e-mailed to people@timesleader.com.


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GNA students attend Career Forum

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Students in the fifth-grade and gifted classes at Greater Nanticoke Area Elementary Center recently attended the first GNA Career Forum. Twelve careers were represented and each student was able to attend two different sessions. The event was coordinated by Jim Gialanella, Northeastern Pennsylvania Tech Prep Consortium; Julie Perhacs, elementary school counselor; and Ryan Kearney, gifted teacher. Some of the participants, from left, first row: Andrew Bartlow, Wilkes University, science careers; Cary Moran, SPCA, animal care careers; Sgt. Chris Keen, Pennsylvania National Guard; Sgt. Andres Colon, U.S. Army. Second row: Elaine Carpenter, Carpenter Dental; Gretchen Eagen, Mercy Hospital, medical careers; Brian Mihneski, Luzerne County Community College, IT careers; Rachel Curtis, Wilkes University, science careers; Perhacs; Frances Egler, FM Kirby Center, performing arts careers; attorney Mark Bufalino, legal careers; Tammy Hoyt, Hoyt Design, fine arts careers. Also participating were: Ed Grant, GNA Elementary Center, education/coaching careers; Ruth Corcoran, Cork Restaurant, culinary careers; Dr. Mark Rutkowski, Luzerne County Community College, engineering careers.

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011 PAGE 5B

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

Madyson B. Daniels Madyson Bethany Daniels, daughter of Jeffrey and Rachelle Daniels, Sweet Valley, celebrated her second birthday May 27. Madyson is a granddaughter of Ronald Daniels, Dallas; Jean Daniels, Trucksville; Alfred and Mary Ann Martin, Zellwood, Fla.; and the late Deatra Martin. She is a great-granddaughter of Betty Kush, Kingston, and Rosetta Tarreto, Luzerne. Madyson has a brother, Cole.

MMI students garner honors at Biology Olympics Ryan J. Reedy Ryan John Reedy, son of Cheryl and John Reedy III, Exeter, is celebrating his ninth birthday today, May 29. Ryan is a grandson of Nancy Sobeski and the late Anthony “Jake” Sobeski, West Pittston, and John Reedy Jr. and the late Carol Reedy, Pittston.

Destiny Warnagiris Ryan R. Smith Ryan Robert Smith, son of Robert Smith and Molly LaverySmith, is celebrating his ninth birthday today, May 29. Ryan is a grandson of Katie Lavery, Wilkes-Barre; Helen Smith, Trucksville; the late Owen Lavery; and the late Clement Smith. He has a brother, Liam, 1 1, and a sister, Lily, 6.

Marywood grads earn academic medals

Destiny Warnagiris, daughter of Candice and George Warnagiris Jr., Plains Township, is celebrating her 16th birthday today, May 29. Destiny is a granddaughter of Ernest Spencer, Debbie and Joe Kotulski and Barb and George Warnagiris Sr., all of Wilkes-Barre. She is a great-granddaughter of Catherine Anderson, Wilkes-Barre, and the late Martha Williams, Inkerman. Destiny has a sister, Arianna, 13.

MMI Preparatory School recently received two first-place awards in the 29th annual Biology Olympics held at Cedar Crest College, Allentown. Seventeen teams of five high school students demonstrated their knowledge of biology during the daylong competition. MMI’s team placed first in the category of Biology Trivia and team member David Polashenski earned a first-place award for his individual assessment in ecology. Some of the team members, from left, are Michael Mele, biology teacher and adviser; Joseph Hornak; Brianna Nocchi; Polashenski; and Trebor Hall. Shital Patel is also a team member.

Several local students recently received Commencement Medals from Marywood University at the 201 1 commencement ceremony. Michael Kuniega, son of David and Catherine Kuniega, Plymouth Township, was awarded the Tama Medal for Excellence in Mathematical Sciences. Sean Hogan, son of Donna Brown and Stephen Hogan, Plymouth, received the Walton Medal for Excellence in Public Administration. Jessica Julia Pawlowski, daughter of Catherine and Gerald Pawlowski, Nanticoke, earned the Nemotko Medal for Distinction in Nursing. Emily McKernan, daughter of Richard and Kathleen McKernan, Mountain Top, was awarded the Jenkins-Colis Gilroy Medal for Excellence in Undergraduate Social Work. Award winners from left, are Hogan, McKernan, Pawlowski and Kuniega.

Wilkes-Barre safety patrol team students awarded Five students from elementary schools in the Wilkes-Barre Area School District were recently honored by AAA Mid-Atlantic, through the Mid-Atlantic Foundation for Safety and Education, for their outstanding service to their school communities serving as members of the safety patrol team. Students were nominated by faculty members or administrators at their schools. A luncheon honoring the students and guests was sponsored by the foundation. Each student received a plaque acknowledging the achievement and $150 in savings bonds provided by the foundation. The foundation also supports the school safety patrol program free of charge. Some of the award recipients, from left, first row: Tina Nguyen, Heights-Murray Elementary; Lauren Owca, Dr. Kistler Elementary; Jenna Rhodes, Dan Flood Elementary and Angelina Davis, Solomon/Plains Memorial Elementary. Second row: Phil Schoener, guest speaker, WBRE sports director, and Josafat Brito, Boyd Dodson Elementary.

W-B Academy students collect donations for SPCA The students at Wilkes-Barre Academy recently conducted a drive for items needed by the Luzerne County SPCA. Mrs. Semcheski’s second-grade class collected the most items and received a dress-down day. Some of the second-grade students, from left, first row, are Anthony Paraventi, Jordyn Ruane and Antonio D’Appolonio. Second row: Destinee Rogers, James Kelly, Maria Pais and Nathaniel May.

Pre-kindergarten classes at Little Stars Nursery School shine at graduation ceremony The pre-kindergarten classes at Little Stars Nursery School, Nanticoke, recently held the 26th annual graduation program at the Luzerne County Community College Conference Center. Following the presentation of diplomas, the graduates presented a program of poems and songs. The students were then presented an album of

photos depicting their activities during the year at the school. Magician Pat Ward also entertained the graduates and their families. Morning class graduates, (above, left) from left, first row, are Lindsay Snook, Ella Kreitzer, Lauren Kijek, Claire Aufiero and Allison Brown. Second row: Niko Butczynski, Mason Czapla, Liam Mullery,

Landon Lore, Chayse Masakowski and Michael Bigos. Third row: Margaret Hopkins, nurse; Kathy Snyder, teacher; Chris John Halchak; Brayden Wanchisen; Ethan Spencer; Alice Biscontini, teacher; and Betty Height, teacher. Afternoon class graduates (above, right), from left, first row, are Amanda Zemetro, Kelsey Clark, McKenna

Golembeski, Brooke Felici, Alivia Graboske and Mariah Minnelli. Second row: Shayne Farrell, Michael Bonk, Sydney Zubritski, Alyssa Evans, Gianna Higdon, Gerry Faulls and Owen Boshek. Third row: Margaret Hopkins, nurse; Alice Biscontini, teacher; Betty Height, teacher; and Kathy Snyder, teacher.

GUIDELINES

Children’s birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge name, age and birthday, parents’, grandparents’ and great-grandparents’ names and their towns of residence, any siblings and their ages. Don’t forget to include a daytime contact phone number.

We cannot return photos submitted for publication in community news, including birthday photos, occasions photos and all publicity photos. Please do not submit precious or original professional photographs that

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require return because such photos can become damaged, or occasionally lost, in the production process. Send to: Times Leader Birthdays, 15 North Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 187110250.

• Sneezing • Post Nasal Drip • Chronic Cough

If your child’s photo and birthday announcement is on this page, it will automatically be entered into the “Happy Birthday Shopping Spree” drawing for a $50 certificate. One winner will be announced on the first of the month on this page.

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SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011

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HONOR ROLL Hanover Area Memorial Elementary School Terry Schnee, principal, Hanover Area District Elementary School, recently announced the Honor Roll for the third quarter.

High school students win 2011 PAI scholarships Three high school students recently received scholarships to attend the 201 1 Performing Arts Institute (PAI) to be held June 26-Aug. 6 at Wyoming Seminary Upper School, Kingston. The students received the scholarships based on their performances at the PAI Gala Scholarship Competition held at the Wyoming Seminary Lower School in Forty Fort. Juliana Pillets, Dallas, won first place and received a full scholarship. Harold Roberts, New York, N.Y., won second place and a $1,000 scholarship, and Noah Sunday-Lefkowitz, Shavertown, took third place and a $500 scholarship. More than 20 students competed in a preliminary round and six finalists took part in the scholarship competition. Judges for the competition included film and television star, David Canary; Jane Ridley, faculty member in the Master of Fine Arts Acting Program at Pennsylvania State University; and Canadian choreographer and musical theater director Janet Venn-Jackson. At the Gala, from left: Juan Huertero, WilkesBarre, finalist; Canary; Sunday-Lefkowitz; Roberts; Venn-Jackson; Pillets; Bill Roudebush, PAI Musical Theater director; Ridley; Anna Smith, Mountain Top, and Alexa Alfonsi, Binghamton, N.Y., finalists.

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Grade 5: High Honors: Cara Albertson, Chakoya Allen, Austin Authier, Joseph Berkant, Madison Birosik, Lauren Blazaskie, Christopher Bleich, Riley Bowers, Matthew Clarke, Angela Croop, Owen Cunningham, Alesha Dennis, Christian Frame, Sabrina Frame, Alexa Graboske, Salvatore Gurnari, Ashley Gushock, Bethany Hannon, Bridget Hannon, Sean Hart, Kaelee Kane, Britney Kornacki, Kamrin Kutlas, Nadia Lamoreux, Nina Lamoreux, Terra Lawson, Darren Martinez, Henry McNair, Andrew Morgan, Hailey Nealon, Evan O’Konski, Briant Pena, Michael Piscotty, David Schwartz, Devin Senk, Kayla Shaffer, Omar Siam, Mary Slusser, Jared Stefanowicz, Brooke Ste-

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vens, Andrew Stremel, Zoe Thompson, Adelia Wallace and Lindsey Williams. Honors: Sevda Adzemovic, Shannon Boyle, Justin Brannigan, Cristian Breton, Carlenton Bryan, Alex Bukoski, Michael Coleman, Justin Comfort, Patrick Connors, Dionisio Cuevas, Jack Davis, Rafeeq Davis, Emily Elick, Jacob Finn, Jared Fulginiti, Jessica Gotay, Duncan Harding, Meghann Hartmann, John Hooper, John Jenkins, Joshua Jopling, Devin Karpovich, James Kilheeny, Ryan Kornacki, Kiara Langan, Kayla Lee, Katherine Lux, Thomas Mercadante, Jon O’Connor, Kayla Palchanis, Troy Pascoe, Tyler Potsko, Empress Prather, Kimberlee Ralston, Haley Rios, Cody Robinson, Michaela Roediger, Crysta Savercool, Hebah Siam, Rhiannon Slater, Kiera Smith, Brett Stevens, Daniel Thompson, Korey Turner, Latarah VanBuren, Kevin Wilcox, Jonathan Wildes, Hope Willis, Halle Yashkus and Corey Zelinka. Grade 6: High Honors: Adam Abuelhawa, Gabrielle Baiamonte, Khabriyah Ballard, Jeffrey Bennett, Karly Bennett, Dakota Bob-

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ita, Brandon Brueckner, Brandon Chafin, Samantha Chavanic, Kaylee Cromer, Paige Davis, Lloyd Deno, Victoria Downey, Stephen Dule, Julie Fischer, Jordan Flaim, Carly Goodman, Nicholas Hannon, Victoria Hoffman, Madison Hummer, Noah Jackson, Paige Jaslar, Shannon Keating, Kevin Kinney, Zachary Koczak, Christina Kratz, Miquela Langan, Candice Mackus, Daniel Marcincavage, Jared Marsellas, Brandon Maximowicz, Samaura McCloe, Rayna McGlynn, Cean Mihalkovitz, John Minor, Richard Mitkowski, Shelby Monk, Victoria O’Boyle, Sara Ortiz, Kailey Orzechowski, Kaylee Politz, Noah Rakowski, Kayla Roushey, Ryan Rudnitskas, Giuseppe Salci, Aubrey Scavone, Noah Segear, Lauren Skupski, Shakai Smith, Jillian Stobodzian, Anthony Vitale, Kenneth Wadzin, Kailey Walski, Chad Wasickanin, Joseph

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HONOR ROLL Dallas Senior High School Jeffrey D. Shaffer, principal, Dallas Senior High School, recently announced the Honor Roll for the third marking period. Grade 12: Honors with Distinction: Robert Adams, Arielle Belskis, Rocco Cabrera, Janelle Cyprich, Katherine Darling, Pierce Donovan, Meghan Gallis, Brandon Harding, Ryan Hogan, Kevin Hunter, Molly Kammen, McKenzie Kelly, Janara Koehler, Dana Krawetz, Anthony LaFratte, Taylor Millington, Desiree Roberts, Lauren Rosen, Danielle Shaver, Ali Snider, Emily Spring, Rebecca Sweetra, Jonathan Wallace, Brian Wise. First Honors: Sabrina Alles, Kristan Baker, Carl Baxter, Anthony Benedetti, Adrienne Box, Shannon Brobst, Michael Brown, Taylor Burak, Gabrielle Byczek, Ashley Carle, Samantha Casto, Christopher Clemson, Jason Crispell, Taylor Culver, Nicholas Gototweski, Allison Hardwick, Joshua Kachurick, Alicia Kaiser, Nadia Kazimi, Jon Laity, Allison Litchkowski, Cameron Lupole, Kelsey Maas, Meghan Macarty, Samantha Martin, Corrine Matusiak, Kelly Mazur, Tyler Morgan, Kathleen Moyer, Andrew Murray, Ali Paris, Jacqueline Pearson, Christian Pyros, Matthew Regan, Timothy Reinert, Thomas Rogers, Robert Schaub, Sarah Simo-

novich, Sara Skammer, Katherine Snyder, Demetra Szatkowski, Peter van Hemert, Nicholas Zabriski. Second Honors: Alexis Arnold, Zachary Berger, Jordan Bloom, Lindsay Danko, Jessica DeMuro, Nicholas Dennis, Christopher Dillon, Alyssa Dolman, Stephanie Dosiak, Cameron Ferdinand, Frank Ferlenda, Kiley Foley, Kelsey Hall, Lindsey Harger, Bethany Harris, Kayla Hennings, Ryan Hertel, Kevin Hine, Chelsi Hunter, William Kaleta Meghan Martin, David Martindale, Caroline Milligan, Rory Moran, Kevin Muldoon, Scott Napkora, Marc Noyalis, Carisa Panzetta, Aaron Perez, Tristan Rinehart, Elizabeth Rybakovsky, Steven Shatrowskas, Rikki Shotwell, Erika Sims, Nicole Sobocinski, Amanda Sotko, Carly Tomko, Patrick Touhey, Ashlyn Van Deutsch, Devin Williams, Timothy Williams, Stephen Zapoticky, Samantha Zimmerman. Grade 1 1: Honors with Distinction: Somiah Almeky, Sarah Bilski, Alyssa Charney, Casey Conway, Kelsey Dissinger, Rachael Gerstein, Angelina Hoidra, Chelsea Martin, Christine McCarthy, David Miller, Alyssa Monaghan, Kelly Monaghan, Deep Patgel, Sarah Pomfret, Emily Prater, Andrew Santora, Kirby Szalkowski. First Honors: Mariya Ackerman, Jess Adams, Rachael Alles, Kasey Bloom, Gavin Carolan, Jessica Congdon, Hilary Crossley, Nicholas Delmar, Morgan Dingle, Nathan Dombek, Christopher Ehret, Dalton Elston,

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Brooke Evans, Matthew Fasulka, Sara Flaherty, Stephanie Force, Sarah Gillette, Megan Grabowski, Ashley Gross, Aubrey Gryskiewicz, Kelly Healey, Elizabeth Hoover, Alex Ivoska, Lindsey Kelly, Timothy Kennedy, Amanda Kotch, Markus Leu, Erika McCabe, Colleen McDonald, Caitlin Meehan, Caitlyn Metz, Kassondra Michno, Tamara Nijmeh, Eric Novroski, Alexandra Owen, Jacob Piskorik, Brandy Popple, Kaylin Russell, Ryan Thomas, Michelle Thompson, Thomas Tidey, Melissa Tucker, Jonathan Weaver, Aaron Weir, Kayla Yaglowski, Kathryn Yanchuk, Laura Zimmerman, Alexander Zubko. Second Honors: Andrew Arnoldi, Donald Behm, Emily Capitano, Gabrielle Caravaggio, Dana Carey, Jacob Chielli, Emily Collins, Francesco Costantino, Victoria Crockett, Taylor Davies, William Dixon, Zachary Downs, Corey Ehret, Chelsea English, Bethany Flanders, Jeremy Geisinger, Taylor Gingell, Segan Hamilton, Alexandra Heltzel, Dana Jolley, Luke Jolley, Amanda Kornak, Samantha Lentz, Kalie Lindbuchler, Aaron Lisses, Jennifer Lloyd, Jenna Lombardo, Carly Manganello, John McCarthy, Jessica Missal, Marilyn Mizenko, Daniel Morgan, Gabriella Oliveri, Madeline Payne, Nova Price, James Roccograndi, Greg Selenski, Joshua Shilanski, Allison Spencer, Jeremy Stair, Adam Stofila, Elaina Tomaselli, Theadora Treslar, Nicholas Vitale, Kassy Wall, Sarah Zerfoss, Haley Zimmer-

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SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011 PAGE 7B Alyssa Horvath, Megan Johnson, Nathan Kish, Luisa Klemm, Briana Konecke, Tess McCarty, Mary Manganello, Katherine Marianacci, Marissa Martindale, Jack Matusiak, Casey McAndrew, James McGovern, Nicholas Michalisin, Madeline Mulhern, John M. Murray, John P. Murray, Helena Nguyen, Andrew Parmelee, Greg Petorak, Cara Pricher, Daniel Saba, Brandon Scott, Courtney Sickel, Joshua Smith, Jonathan Strausser, Tyler Tuck, Nathan Vario, Skyler Velazco, Kyle Williams, Amber Yang, Jennifer Yannuzzi, Eric Zawatski, Kyle Zumchak. Grade 9: Honors with Distinction: Sarah Blamire, Emily Blessner, Lauren Butruce, Dana Capitano, Decklan Cerza, Lauren Charney, Kristi Culp, Magdalena Fannick, Amber Habib, Drew Harding, Sara Hudak, Leonard Javick, Lyubov Kiriakidi, Alexandra Klinges, Amanda Martin, Gurmail Mathon, Erin Muldoon, Emma Niznik, Samuel Reinert, Michelle Thompson, Kayla Wanek, Joshua Weaver, Haley Wilcox, Madison Ziemba. First Honors: Lily Amadio, Giovana Augustine, John Blat, Grace Carolan, Jennifer Cave, Drew Cohen, Kathryn Comitz, Stephanie Cybulski, Logan Darling, Kelsie Davis, Elizabeth Dillon, Bryanna Dissinger, Alyssah Dombek, Brenden Ehret, Catherine Gawlas, Patrick Gelso, Ryan Georgetti, Jared Hoats, Frank Hullihen, Kelly Jacobs, Taylor Kelley,

Sarah Kerdesky, Peter Kuritz, Patrick Madaya, Patrick Maley, Alex Manganella, Connor Martinez, David Matcho, Lauren McDermott, Erin Michael, Christopher Milligan, Samantha Missal, Jaime Moran, Bryan Morgan, Andrew Nardone, Patrick Newhart, Megan Ostrum, Mason Palissery, Blake Pertyl, Michael Pierce, Regan Rome, Peter Shaver, Sarah Smith, Michael Stachnik, Nigel Stearns, Joseph Steve, Jacqueline Sutton, Nora Tidey, Ryan Totten, Cortlyn Van Deutsch, Aaron van Hemert, Taryn Weaver, Stephen Wempa, Krista Zimmerman, Samantha Zimniski. Second Honors: Omar Abualburak, Nell Adams, Allison Amos, Kellyann Anderson, Jacob Arnold, Britnee Atherholt, Stephanie Baines, Casey Barrett, Christopher Behm, Rosario Bevevino, Carmen Cabrera, Jenna Davis, Dominic DeLuca, Bethany Dennis, Curtis Evans, Garrett Geise, Mary Gittens, Zachary Goodwin, Carl Gross, Jonathan Higgins, Alexandra Hood, Alexander Jones, Ashley Kapral, Joseph Kimball, Leah Kleynowski, Amanda Kus, Emily Lofing, Maria Lombard, Mary Martin, Bryce Mattson, Travis Mattson, Margaret Michael, Michael Mihal, Aaron Napkora, Amanda O’Day, Kaitlyn Palmer, Kallysta Panagakos, Vincenzo Parente, David Pomfret, Colton Powell, Joshua Rukstalis, Rocky Rutkoski, Matthew Saba, David Sebolka, Jillian Simon, Eric Woolard.

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SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011

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THE TIMES LEADER

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WSCTC holds honor society induction ceremony Students of the Quarter honored at Dallas High School Dallas High School recently held its Student of the Quarter breakfast to honor the 2010-201 1 Students of the Quarter. State Senator Lisa Baker and Carol Sweeney, legislative outreach specialist to State Representative Karen Boback, presented certificates of recognition to the students. At the breakfast, from left, first row, are Ashlyn Van Deutsch, Janara Koehler, Sara Skammer, Rachel Alles, Erica Sims and Maria Fessler. Second row: Sweeney, Megan Redlich, Ryan Hertel, Joshua Kachurick, Christopher Tamanini, Christopher Clemson, Sam Savoy, Decklan Cerza, Corey Ehert and Baker.

West Side Career and Technology Center recently held its 14th annual National Technical Honor Society induction dinner at the Knights of Columbus, Luzerne. In order to qualify for this society, students must achieve a 3.1 grade point average, or higher, and have excellent behavior and attendance. At the dinner, from left, first row: Sam Edmonds; Hannah Smith; Emily Mansilla; Victoria Apostolov; Steeviemarie Holmes; Dawn Harding, honor society adviser; Emilee Krasson; Desiree Smith; Kassandra Edmonds; Barbara Farley; and Felisha Davenport. Second row: Stanley Sopota; Alton Baggett; Justin Romanoski; Shawn Davis; Elizabeth Ellis, administrative director; Brian Cupp; Ralph Shulde; Marc Denlinger; and Stephen Klebetz.

Truancy training seminar held in county GNA Elementary student designs T-shirt for field trip

Star Students named at Schuyler Avenue Elementary School Schuyler Avenue Elementary School, Wyoming Valley West School District, recently announced its Star Students for the month of April. Awarded students have exemplary behavior and have displayed positive attitudes towards themselves, their school and teachers. Star students, from left, first row, are Lita George, Hunter Rubano, Zoe McNeill, Michael Johnson, and Jude Nichol. Second row: Irelynd Sullivan; Wendy Patton, head teacher; Logan Czyzycki; Katie McDermott; Kerstyn Thomas; Sydney Evans; Sara Napkori, first-grade teacher; Treyvon Garrity; Casey Kavanagh, second-grade teacher; and Jonathan Scarpelli.

Greater Nanticoke Area Elementary Center PTA recently held its annual field trip T-shirt drawing contest for the fifthgrade class. Cassidy Moore, a student in Mr. Grant’s class, was the winner. Every student from kindergarten through fifth grade will wear the shirt on their field trip. Cassidy was also presented with a check from the PTA for $25. With the T-shirt design is Donna Redenski, president, PTA and Moore.

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Luzerne Intermediate Unit, Luzerne County Children and Youth Services and the Education Law Center recently held a training seminar to address the issue of truancy in Luzerne County. More than 100 community professionals attended the seminar hosted by the Luzerne Intermediate Unit. The goal of the training was to bring all systems together to increase communication and develop problem-solving strategies. Participants, from left, first row: Emily Intellicato. Luzerne County Children and Youth; Fred Pieratoni, district judge; Judge Tina Polachek-Gartley; Martin Kane, district judge; Joseph Zola, district judge; and John Kowalski, Luzerne County Children and Youth. Second row: Jennifer Lowman, attorney, Education Law Center; Mary Jo Shisko, Luzerne Intermediate Unit; Hal Bloss, Luzerne Intermediate Unit; Joe DeVizia, Office of Human Services; Tony Grieco, Luzerne Intermediate Unit; Daniel Pillets, attorney, Luzerne County Court System; Frank Castano, Luzerne County Children and Youth; and Maura Mcinerney, attorney, Education Law Center.

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OUT-OF-TOWN GRADUATIONS DeSales University, Center Valley

Caleb M. Ruseskas, Plymouth, Bachelor of Science degree in computer science. Shaina L. Dymond, Shickshinny, Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics, summa cum laude. Nicole M. Frusciante, Swoyersville, Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics, cum laude.

Lebanon Valley College, Annville

Sarah M. Bevans, Beaver Meadows, Doctor of Physical Therapy degree in health science. Krystina M. Sissick, McAdoo, Bachelor of Science degree in accounting, magna cum laude. Tabitha L. Brobst, Tamaqua, Bachelor of Arts degree in English, magna cum laude. Lauren R. Davis, Tamaqua, Bachelor of Science degree in business administration. Paul T. Orsulak II, Tamaqua, Bachelor of Science degree in music education, summa cum laude. Peter A. Moro, Tresckow, Bachelor of Arts degree in history. Jessica M. Ferlenda, Dallas, Bachelor of Science degree in elementary education, magna cum laude. Robert L. Cyphers, Tunkhannock, Bachelor of Science degree in physics, cum laude. Samantha L. Ide, Tunkhannock, Bachelor of Science degree in biology, summa cum laude. Amanda L. Sarkowski, Mountain Top, Bachelor of Science degree

BIRTHS

in health science.

Mesa State College, Grand Junction, Colo.

Stacy Bush, Tunkhannock, Master of Arts degree in education.

Nazareth College, Rochester, N.Y. Mary Dumas, West Pittston, a MSE degree in inclusive education.

Providence College, Providence, R.I.

Jaime Lipski, Dallas, bachelor’s degree in psychology, cum laude. Joscelyn Mahon, Shavertown, bachelor’s degree in health policy and management.

Quinnipiac University, Hamden, Conn.

Kristine M. Watkins, Sweet Valley, Bachelor of Arts degree in sociology.

Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, Vt.

Kyle D. Gallagher, Dallas, Bachelor of Science degree in business administration.

Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, N.Y.

Chelsea Halsor, Dallas, Bachelor of Science degree, magna cum laude.

York College of Pennsylvania, York

Theresa Heintz, Dallas, Bachelor of Arts degree in mass communication, cum laude.

Lobo, Paula and Dario, WilkesBarre, a son, May 18.

Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center Colosi, Taurie and Armando Soba, Tobyhanna, a daughter, May 1 1. Bobbouine, Patricia and Arthur, Pittston, a daughter, May 1 1. Whispell, Christine, Pittston, a daughter, May 12. King, Jill and Jeff, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, May 12. Swingle, Kelsey and Aton, Scranton, a daughter, May 12. Summerton, Jessica and Matthew Farber, Wilkes-Barre, a son, May 13. Comparetta, Sarah and Rob, Wilkes-Barre, a son, May 13. Bush, Michelle and Jermey, Trucksville, a daughter, May 13. Rebollar, Janeth and Carlos Sosa, Wilkes-Barre, a son, May 13. Fedder, Julie and Andrew, Berwick, a daughter, May 13. Knight, Brandy and Shawn Fiorentino, Lawton, a daughter, May 14. Dukes, Lisa and Glen, Hanover Township, a daughter, May 14. Maharaj, Yomatie and Richard Fritz, Scranton, a son, May 15. Wise, Jamie and Michael, Wyoming, a son, May 16. Elko, Victoria and Octavian, Plymouth, a daughter, May 16. Jarmusik, Lacresa and Michael Craig, Ashley, a son, May 16. Prukala, Kelly and Barry Rinehimer, Plymouth, a son, May 16. Barletta, Allison and Jason Antolick, Hazleton, a daughter, May 17. Owens, Danielle, Old Forge, a daughter, May 17. Norieka, Anngenette and Gary Bienkowski, Kingston, a daughter, May 17. Kuzma, Tiffany and Adam, Swoyersville, a son, May 17. Williams, Crystal and Francis, Duryea, a daughter, May 17. Pugh, Allison and Michael, Hanover Township, a son, May 18.

OUT-OF-TOWN BIRTHS Geisinger Medical Center, Danville Serafini, Holly and Anthony, Mifflinville, a son, May 18. Grandparents are Joe and Patti McCullough, Bloomsburg, and Jim and Mary Lou Serafini, Wilkes-Barre.

Moses Taylor Hospital, Scranton Wendolowski, Kelly and Ray, Mountain Top, a son, May 17.

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Combarro, Marsha and Thomas Woodard, Pocono Pines, a daughter, May 18. Roberts, Jacqueline and Thomas Weeks, Mountain Top, a daughter, May 19. Bejeski, Angela and Robert, Duryea, a son, May 19. Morelli, Samantha and Jason Dermody, Pringle, a son, May 19. Walsh, Brigid and Waylon Scott, Pittston, a son, May 19. Cintron, Catherine and Robert Ader, Albrightsville, a son, May 20. Herring, Danielle and Mark Murphy, Pittston, a daughter, May 20. Dalmas, Kelly and Dominic, Nanticoke, a son, May 20. Miller, Jamie and Christopher, Glen Lyon, a daughter, May 20.

Nesbitt Women’s and Children’s Center at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital Volch, Laura and James Deveiga, Swoyersville, a daughter, May 17. Briggs, Kendra and Dexter Daniels, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, May 17. Reynolds, Kate and Brian, West Pittston, a daughter, May 17. Donavan, Alysha and Jeremy Harvey, Falls, a son, May 17. Wrubel, Pamela and Jonathan, Bear Creek Township, a daughter, May 18. Glomb, Michelle and Tyler Kopiak, Wyoming, a son, May 18. Ashman, Shana Marie and Nathan Warrick Sr., Pittston, May 18. Neiderhiser, Caitlin C. and Ryan T. Siley, Wilkes-Barre, a son, May 19. Hudock, Brittany, Kingston, a daughter, May 19. Slusser, Theresa and Michael, Wilkes-Barre, a son, May 20.

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OUT-OF-TOWN DEANS’ LISTS Albion College, Albion, Mich. Paige Narins, Kingston.

Alfred University, Alfred, N.Y.

Jessica K. Detweiler, Lake Harmony.

Elmira College, Elmira, N.Y.

Ashley Culpepper, Drums; Kelly Bronson, Hunlock Creek; Callin Karnopp, Tunkhannock.

Penn State – University Park Joshua Aciukewicz, Trucksville.

Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Va.

Nicole Herbst, Wyoming, honor roll status.

York College of Pennsylvania, York

Megan Phillips, Shamokin; Christopher Mhley, Hazleton; John O’Connor, Gouldsboro; Katrina Heintz, Dallas; Theresa Heintz, Dallas; Amy McNelis, Larksville; Michael Brennan, Nuangola; Ryan O’Donnell, Mountain Top.

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about how it was helping and they just constantly inspired me, so it was a perfect circle.” The effort was a success for Bryan-Smith and many Geisinger employees, and it’s just one example of how she has spent her life trying to helping people and her community. In fact, she has made a career out of it. Catch Bryan-Smith bustling about the office suite on the second floor of Geisinger’s South Wilkes-Barre campus and you’ll see a woman dressed in a business suit juggling the usual day full of meetings, interviews, appointments and

SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011 PAGE 9B phone calls t hat come with a senior administrative position. But you can’t miss one thing about Bryan-Smith that you don’t see on many executives: just below her employee identification badge is another white badge bearing a simple twoletter title — RN. Nursing was her first career, and though it wasn’t her first career choice, Bryan-Smith said she has never once regretted being a nurse. “I didn’t grow up wanting to be a nurse,” she said. “I wanted to be a teacher or a librarian because I love books.” She started pursuing a degree that would have led to a career as a librarian, but found it wasn’t for her. “I didn’t like it. I found out you had to be quiet, and

that’s not in my skill set,” Bryan-Smith said with a laugh. She left school and took a summer job at a hospital for mentally ill patients where she got a firsthand look at the life of a registered nurse. “I watched them and I knew that they were making a difference,” Bryan-Smith said. “I went to nursing school at 21 years of age and I fell in love with hospital nursing. I could see every day that I made a difference for a patient or their family, and that was critical to me.” Her career path led from hospital nursing to working a front-line office position for a team of allergists, then to stints as an office manager and vice president before she assumed her current poSee SMITH, Page 10B


CMYK PAGE 10B

SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011

SMITH Continued from Page 9B

sition as chief administrative officer at Geisinger’s South Wilkes-Barre campus. “I’ve been very, very blessed,” Bryan-Smith said of her journey. “But even now, if I have a trying day, I can walk into a clinical area and go out and talk to a patient or a nurse and be reenergized by trying to make their day better in some way.” Though she passed on a career as a librarian or teacher, Bryan-Smith remains passionate about continuing to share knowledge, whether it’s encouraging people to maintain healthy lifestyles that will allow them to avoid problems like the heart disease that plagued her family, or supporting smoking cessation efforts to help others beat the habit she herself kicked years ago. “When I went to nursing school, all the nurses smoked, and ironically, that’s where I learned to smoke,” she said. “Stopping was the first thing I had to do to live a healthy life style and that’s what I continue to try to do and to encourage others to do.” One thing that supports Bryan-Smith’s healthy habits is the downtown Wilkes-Barre home she shares with her husband, her mom, two Golden Retrievers and two cats. The home, which was built in 1873, has been filled with period touches, courtesy of Bryan-Smith and her husband, and is central to a lifestyle that includes walks around the neighborhood and long chats with neighbors, including

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THE TIMES LEADER the students from nearby Wilkes University. “It’s so great to be living in a university neighborhood where you can walk to Boscov’s, Barnes & Noble, stores like the Beehive and all the great restaurants we have,” she said. And while she’d love to see the downtown continue to grow and flourish into the kind of university town many other areas enjoy, Bryan-Smith said she thoroughly enjoys all the improvements this area has already seen. “I love Movies 14. I like that when dinner is over, I can just take a short walk and enjoy a movie. It’s a wonderful benefit to being downtown and one I hope people appreciate,” she said. Bryan-Smith has become such an impassioned fan of this area that she’s planning on combining that with another interest to write a book. As long time antique enthusiasts and former antique dealers, she and her husband have written two books on antiques and been featured in Martha Stewart Living, on HGTV and other national media venues. Drawing on her experience growing up in a Williamsport area farmhouse filled with antiques brimming with family history, Bryan-Smith has developed a special love of antiques children’s toys and antiques related to the holidays. She’d like to combine her interest in holidays of the past with her love for her new hometown and write a third book with Richard, this one focusing on holiday traditions of the Greater WilkesBarre area. Bryan-Smith seeks the help of local residents willing to share their memories of special holiday traditions and especially

photos that capture these traditions and local holiday landmarks of the past, like the decorations once displayed over the main door to the Pomeroy’s store on Public Square and the giant candy-dispensing Easter Bunny in the old Lazarus department store. She’s set up a special email address for people to share those stories or contact her regarding photos: wbholiday@frontier.com. Bryan-Smith said it’s important to save these memories, and equally important for people to realize how lucky they are to live in this area. “I hope that people who live here don’t take for granted what an amazing community this is,” she said. “People still care about people here … and so much good work gets done here every day, so many people here who volunteer, not looking for any recognition.” While some long-time residents continue to compare Wilkes-Barre, especially the downtown area, with what it was like before the 1972 Agnes flood, Bryan-Smith likes to share her perspective as someone who doesn’t see WilkesBarre for what it was, but for what it is becoming. “This area is a gem,” she said. “I hope people can rediscover it for what it is now and what it can be. And there’s no reason for people to not be involved in making that happen. If you live here and you’re not involved, it’s because you don’t want to be because there are plenty of opportunities. “This is the most friendly place I’ve ever lived, and people are so lucky to live here,” she said. “This is my forever home.”

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CMYK

SPORTS

SECTION

timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

C

SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011

I.L. BASEBALL

Yankees’ winning streak ends at 4

PIAA TRACK AND FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS

PAUL SOKOLOSKI OPINION

Women’s game ends up being quite a show

Dorn’s two-run HR in the eighth off Sanit is the difference for Louisville.

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By STEVE BITTENBENDER For The Times Leader

LOUISVILLE, Ky. – Danny Dorn’s two-run home run with two out in the eighth lifted the Louisville Bats past the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees 4-3 Saturday night at Louisville Slugger Field. The blast to left-center was just out of the reach of Austin Krum and was enough to snap SWB’s four-game winning streak. Amauri Sanit (2-1) started the inning by getting Juan Francisco to ground out and Todd BATS Frazier to fly out. But Jeremy Hermida extended the inYANKEES ning by singling, setting the stage for Dorn to break a 2-2 tie. Sunit continued to struggled, allowing another walk and a single. He made two pitches to Kristopher Negron before needing to be lifted because of an apparent injury. But Kaneoka Texeria, in his first SWB appearance, got Kristopher Negron to ground out to end the inning. SWB mounted a rally in the ninth. Justin Maxwell led off the ninth with a long homer, his 15th, off David Johnson (2-0) to cut the Bats’ lead to one. The Yankees would load the bases with only one out in the ninth, but Krum’s bid for a possible go-ahead hit up the middle was stopped by the shortstop Negron, who turned it into a game-ending double play. Former SWB Yankee reliever Steven Jackson got the double play to earn his first save for Louisville. The Yankees got off to a strong start off Edinson Volquez, the opening-day starter for the Cincinnati Reds. Krum tripled to left field and scored on Ramiro Pena’s single. The start mirrored Volquez’s problems in Cincinnati, where he had an 18.00 ERA in the first inning of his Reds starts. But the right-hander settled down after that, only allowing two walks and a hit batsman over the next six innings. He was in

4 3

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Shelley Black of Coughlin wins her heat in the 3A 100 hurdles at the PIAA Track and Field Meet. In the final meet of her high school career, Black finished first in the 100 hurdles, second in the 300 hurdles and fourth in the long jump.

Black is golden

Coughlin hurdler wins 100. Silver in 300 gives her 8 career state medals By TOM ROBINSON For the Times Leader

SHIPPENSBURG – Shelley Black’s illustrious high school track career came to an end Saturday afternoon. While the Coughlin senior was adding a gold and silver medal to her collection, junior teammate Dannah Hayward and GAR freshman Quieterra Gross were sending a clear message that the Wyoming Valley Conference can be expected to continue to make an impact on the girls hurdles events at the PIAA Track and Field Championships in the years ahead. Hayward finished sixth in the 300 hurdles, combining with Black to help the Lady Crusaders place fourth in the Class 3A team standings. Gross took second in the Class 2A 100 hurdles. Black finishes her high school career with three titles among her See BLACK , Page 5C

DON CAREY//THE TIMES LEADER

A.J. Limongelli of Holy Redeemer competes in the Class 2A 3,200-meter run at the state track and field meet Saturday at Shippensburg University. Limongelli placed fifth, in 9:35.44.

S H E L L E Y B L A C K ’ S C A R E E R S TAT E M E D A L S 2008: 300 hurdles -- sixth, 45.09 2009: 300 hurdles -- fifth, 44.17

2010: 100 hurdles -- first, 13.79 300 hurdles -- first, 43.23 triple jump -- seventh, 37-6 1/2

2011: 100 hurdles -- first, 13.83 300 hurdles -- second, 42.51 long jump -- fourth, 18-0 1/4

See YANKEES , Page 5C

FRENCH OPEN

AUTO RACING

Djokovic, Nadal, Sharapova win Centennial race could By HOWARD FENDRICH AP Tennis Writer

PARIS — What was shaping up as a struggle for Novak Djokovic at the French Open suddenly turned into something of a stroll. Tied at a set apiece with big-hitting 2009 U.S. Open champion Juan Martin del Potro when play was suspended because of darkness a night earlier, Djokovic quickly faced two break points Saturday. He saved those, then broke del Potro in the next game, and that was pretty much that. “If he serves well, he can beat anybody, really,” Djokovic said. “I went (into) the match a bit more nervous than usual.” If that’s so, it didn’t really show. Djokovic completed a 6-3, 3-6, 6-3, 6-2 victory in the third AP PHOTO round, pushing his 2011 record to 40-0 and stretching his winning streak to 42 matches over- Rafael Nadal serves the ball to Croatia’s AntoSee OPEN, Page 5C

nio Veic during their third-round match of the French Open. Nadal won in straight sets.

be start of better times

With new leadership, Indy 500 may just be ready to rebound.

INDY 500 TV: Noon, ABC, WNEP-16 DISTANCE: 500 miles; 200 laps around the asphalt-on-brick Indianapolis Motor Speedway track, a 2.5-mile rectangular oval. POLE POSITION: Alex Tagliani, the first Canadian to win the pole after averaging 227.472 mph in 4-lap qualifications.

By PAUL NEWBERRY AP National Writer

INDIANAPOLIS — When Alex Tagliani leads the 33-car field into the first turn of the Indianapolis 500, he’ll be tugging along a century’s worth of triumphs, thrills and tragedy. But in this, the 100th anniversary of America’s most famous race, the focus is clearly on the future. The IndyCar series is showing signs of emerging from 15 years of irrelevance, a period of darkness that began with an open-wheel war between two feuding series and ended with a peace agreement hardly anyone noticed. The See INDY, Page 11C

ven from way up on the concourse, it was easy for everyone to see. There is just something captivatingly different about the style of play in the WNBA. “It’s like 3D, but better,” raved Justine Seely, a sophomore center who plays just down the road at Benton High School. Too bad more people didn’t get to appreciate a basketball night from an alternate dimension. Only 2,139 fans showed up Friday when the WNBA brought a preseason game to Mohegan Sun Arena. “For a preseason game, that’s a respectable crowd,” said Bobby Soper, the president of Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs whose parent company owns the WNBA’s Connecticut Sun. For a Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees game, that’s a packed house. But for a historic event, the interest wasn’t exactly overflowing. It wasn’t quite the New Jersey Nets playing the New York Knicks. “The men are a lot more physical,” said Samantha Martin, a senior at Dallas who just finished up her high school basketball career before she heads to Albright. “They get up and down the court quicker.” But what people got when they showed up to watch the WNBA at Mohegan Sun Arena was quite a show.

Plenty of players on hand The passing was precise Friday, the defense was determined and the effort was excellent as the Connecticut Sun staved off the San Antonio Silver Stars 75-73 in the first WNBA game played in Northeastern Pennsylvania. Connecticut’s Tina Charles, out of that women’s college basketball factory known as the University of Connecticut, dominated the inside with 17 points and 11 rebounds. Fan favorite Kelly Mazzante, the Big Ten all-time Big Ten scoring leader when she played at Penn State, delighted the crowd by burying four of her five 3-point shots for the Stars. “I got a lot of sarcasm from my teammates – ‘Where is Wilkes-Barre, Pa.?” said Mazzante, who starred down the road at Montoursville High. “But it was good for people to see a professional game.” Watching other former college stars including Kara Lawson from Tennessee and Alysha Clark from Texas A&M work live proved treats for the crowd. “The competition is more than I expected,” said Dave Zasada from Swoyersville, who brought his 9-year-old basketball-loving son Matt to watch the game. “It’s hard to judge, because it’s the first live (women’s) game I ever saw. But I’m glad to see some professionals play.” It was clear some of the younger basketball-playing fans were fascinated by it all. “It’s really cool to see something like this happen here,” Martin said. “The ballhandling, the fast break, the transitions are a lot quicker … it’s just a totally different style of play.” Call it a clinic for aspiring basketball stars. “We both could see what to do in our positions,” said Seely, who attended the game with her Benton teammate and point guard Casey Gavin. Could such a night send local players on their way to the WNBA someday? “I don’t know if they aspire to play in it,” King’s College women’s coach Brian Donahue said, “but they can appreciate it. I think it was great that it was here. You had some of the biggest names in the WNBA here. You had a lot of local high school players here (to watch), college players, high school coaches, youth kids.” They all got their money’s worth. But really, the value of the night was worth so much more. Paul Sokoloski is a Times Leader sports columnist. You may reach him at 970-7109 or email him at psokoloski@timesleader.com.


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SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011

L O C A L C A L E N D A R Tuesday, May 31 H.S. BASEBALL District 2 Semifinals Abington Heights at Tunkhannock, 4:30 p.m. Hanover Area at Lake-Lehman, 4:30 p.m. Dunmore at Holy Redeemer, 4:30 p.m. H.S. SOFTBALL District 2 Semifinals Berwick at Valley View, 4:30 p.m. Coughlin at Dallas, 4:30 p.m. Riverside at Nanticoke, 4:30 p.m. H.S. BOYS VOLLEYBALL PIAA First Round Coughlin vs. Bethlehem Catholic, 5 p.m., Dieruff H.S. (Allentown) Holy Redeemer vs. Masterman, 3:30 p.m., LakeLehman H.S.

Wednesday, June 1

H.S. GIRLS LACROSSE PIAA First Round Wyoming Seminary vs. Cocalico, 5 p.m., Nazareth H.S.

W H AT ’ S

O N

T V

AUTO RACING 7:30 a.m. SPEED — Formula One, Monaco Grand Prix Noon ABC — IRL, IndyCar, Indianapolis 500 5:30 p.m. FOX — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Coca-Cola 600, at Concord, N.C.

COLLEGE BASEBALL

2 p.m. ESPN2 — Southeastern Conference, championship game, teams TBD, at Hoover, Ala. FSN — Big 12 Conference, championship game, teams TBD, at Oklahoma City

COLLEGE SOFTBALL

1 p.m. ESPN — Regional coverage, NCAA Division I playoffs, super regionals, game 2, California at Kentucky 3:30 p.m. ESPN — Regional coverage, NCAA Division I playoffs, super regionals, game 3, California at Kentucky (if necessary) 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Regional coverage, NCAA Division I playoffs, super regionals, game 2, Washington at Missouri 9:30 p.m. ESPN2 — Regional coverage, NCAA Division I playoffs, super regionals, game 3, Washington at Missouri (if necessary)

GOLF

9:30 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, BMW PGA Championship, final round, at Surrey, England 3 p.m. CBS — PGA Tour, Byron Nelson Championship, final round, at Irving, Texas NBC — PGA of America, Senior PGA Championship, final round, at Louisville, Ky.

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

1 p.m. TBS — Boston at Detroit WQMY/SNY — Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets 2:10 p.m. ROOT — Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs 4 p.m. YES — N.Y. Yankees at Seattle 8 p.m. ESPN — Cincinnati at Atlanta

MOTORSPORTS

12 Mid. SPEED — AMA Pro Racing, at Salt Lake City (same-day tape)

TENNIS

Noon NBC — French Open, round of 16, at Paris (sameday tape)

T R A N S A C T I O N S

International League North Division W L Pct. Lehigh Valley (Phillies) ........... 30 18 .625 Yankees ................................... 25 21 .543 Pawtucket (Red Sox) .............. 24 24 .500 Syracuse (Nationals)............... 22 24 .478 Buffalo (Mets)........................... 21 28 .429 Rochester (Twins) ................... 18 28 .391 South Division W L Pct. Durham (Rays) ....................... 26 21 .553 Gwinnett (Braves) .................. 25 22 .532 Charlotte (White Sox)............ 21 26 .447 Norfolk (Orioles)..................... 16 32 .333 West Division W L Pct. Columbus (Indians)................ 34 14 .708 Louisville (Reds) .................... 27 22 .551 Indianapolis (Pirates) ............. 23 27 .460 Toledo (Tigers)....................... 22 27 .449 Saturday's Games Gwinnett 6, Buffalo 1, 1st game Buffalo 3, Gwinnett 1, 2nd game Indianapolis 9, Pawtucket 7 Louisville 4, Yankees 3 Lehigh Valley 4, Rochester 3 Syracuse 8, Charlotte 7 Syracuse 8, Charlotte 3 Durham at Toledo, ppd., rain Columbus at Norfolk, 8 p.m. Today's Games Gwinnett at Buffalo, 1:05 p.m., 1st game Columbus at Norfolk, 1:15 p.m. Rochester at Lehigh Valley, 1:35 p.m. Gwinnett at Buffalo, 3:35 p.m., 2nd game Durham at Toledo, 5 p.m., 1st game Indianapolis at Pawtucket, 6:05 p.m. Yankees at Louisville, 6:05 p.m. Charlotte at Syracuse, 6:30 p.m. Durham at Toledo, 7:30 p.m., 2nd game Monday's Games Norfolk at Pawtucket, 4:05 p.m. Syracuse at Louisville, 4:05 p.m. Toledo at Rochester, 5:05 p.m. Yankees at Indianapolis, 6:05 p.m. Columbus at Durham, 7:05 p.m. Lehigh Valley at Gwinnett, 7:05 p.m. Buffalo at Charlotte, 7:15 p.m.

GB — 4 6 7 91⁄2 11 GB — 1 5 101⁄2 GB — 71⁄2 12 121⁄2

Super Regionals Glance (Best-of-3) Host school is home team for Game 1; visiting school is home team for Game 2; coin flip determines home team for Game 3: At Athens, Ga. Saturday, May 28: Baylor (43-12) at Georgia (50-12), 7:30 p.m. Sunday, May 29: Baylor vs. Georgia, 3:30 p.m. x-Sunday, May 29: Baylor vs. Georgia, 6 p.m. At Gainesville, Fla. Friday, May 27: Florida 9, Oregon 1 Saturday, May 28: Florida 7, Oregon 0, Florida advances At Lexington, Ky. Saturday, May 28: California 1, Kentucky 0, Cal leads series 1-0 Sunday, May 29: California (43-10) vs. Kentucky (39-15), 1 p.m. x-Sunday, May 29: California vs. Kentucky, 3:30 p.m. At Tuscaloosa, Ala. Thursday, May 26: Stanford 5, Alabama 2 Friday, May 27: Alabama 10, Stanford 0, 5 innings Friday, May 27: Alabama 1, Stanford 0, Alabama advances At Columbia, Mo. Saturday, May 28: Washington (37-14) at Missouri, 9 p.m. Sunday, May 29: Washington vs. Missouri, 7 p.m. x-Sunday, May 29: Washington vs. Missouri, 9:30 p.m. At Stillwater, Okla. Friday, May 27: Oklahoma State 3, Houston 0 Saturday, May 28: Houston 1, Oklahoma State 0 Saturday, May 28: Oklahoma State 6, Houston 5, Oklahoma State advances At Tempe, Ariz. Thursday, May 26: Arizona State 3, Texas A&M 2 Friday, May 27: Arizona State 4, Texas A&M 2, Arizona State advances At Tucson, Ariz. Friday, May 27: Oklahoma 6, Arizona 0 Saturday, May 28: Oklahoma 5, Arizona 2, Oklahoma advances

EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF GA Philadelphia ................... 6 3 2 20 14 9 New York........................ 4 2 6 18 18 11 Houston .......................... 3 4 5 14 15 13 Columbus ....................... 3 3 5 14 11 13 New England.................. 3 4 4 13 10 14 D.C. ................................. 3 4 3 12 13 18 Toronto FC..................... 2 5 6 12 13 23 Chicago .......................... 1 4 5 8 13 17 Sporting Kansas City .... 1 6 1 4 11 18 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF GA Los Angeles ................... 7 2 5 26 19 12 FC Dallas........................ 6 3 3 21 14 10 Seattle ............................. 4 4 5 17 14 12 Portland .......................... 5 3 2 17 13 14 Real Salt Lake ............... 5 1 2 17 9 2 Colorado......................... 4 3 5 17 14 12 Chivas USA.................... 3 4 4 13 14 13 San Jose......................... 3 4 3 12 12 12 Vancouver ...................... 1 5 6 9 13 17 Saturday's Games Philadelphia 6, Toronto FC 2 Vancouver 1, New York 1, tie Columbus 3, Chivas USA 3, tie Los Angeles at New England, late FC Dallas at Houston, late

S

THE TIMES LEADER

BASEBALL Odds

Underdog

American League Red Sox

-$118

TIGERS

BLUE JAYS

-$160

White Sox

RAYS

-$135

Indians

Angels

-$140

TWINS

RANGERS

-$220

Royals

A’S

-$112

Orioles

Yankees

-$150

MARINERS

CUBS

-$142

ROCKIES

-$118

GB — 21⁄2 3 61⁄2 151⁄2 161⁄2 GB — 11⁄2 2 21⁄2 31⁄2 31⁄2

T E N N I S

L A C R O S S E NCAA Division I Lacrosse First Round Saturday, May 14 Johns Hopkins 12, Hofstra 5 Notre Dame 13, Penn 6 Duke 15, Delaware 14 Cornell 12, Hartford 5 Sunday, May 15 Maryland 13, North Carolina 6 Virginia 13, Bucknell 12, OT Denver 13, Villanova 10 Syracuse 10, Siena 4 Quarterfinals Saturday, May 21 At James Shuart Stadium Hempstead, N.Y. Virginia 13, Cornell 9 Denver 14, Johns Hopkins 9 Sunday, May 22 At Gillette Stadium Foxborough, Mass. Maryland 6, Syracuse 5, OT Duke 7, Notre Dame 5 Semifinals Saturday, May 28 At M&T Bank Stadium Baltimore Virginia 14, Denver 8 Maryland 9, Duke 4 Championship Monday, May 30 At M&T Bank Stadium Baltimore Virginia (12-5) vs. Maryland (13-4), 3:30 p.m.

B O X I N G Fight Schedule May 27 At Reno Events Center, Reno., Nev. (ESPN2), Chris Arreola vs. Kendrick Releford, 10, heavyweights; Tony Thompson vs. Maurice Harris, 12, IBF heavyweight eliminator. May 28 At the Mazatlan (Mexico) International Center, Pedro Guevara vs. Mario Rodriguez, 12, WBC Silver light flyweight title; Jorge Linares vs. Francisco Cordero, 10, for the WBA International lightweight title; Sergio Lopez vs. Omar Estrella, 10, featherweights. June 3 At Tampa, Fla. (ESPN2), Yudel Johnson vs. Miguel Torres, 10, welterweights. June 4 At Parken Stadium, Copenhagen, Denmark (SHO), Mikkel Kessler vs. Mehdi Bouadla, 12, super middleweights. At Boardwalk Hall, Atlantic City, N.J. (SHO), Carl Froch vs. Glen Johnson, 12, for Froch’s WBC super middleweight title; Zsolt Erdei vs. Dawid Kostecki, 10, light heavyweights. At Staples Center, Los Angeles (HBO), Sebastian Zbik vs. Julio Cesar Chavez Jr., 12, for Zbik’s WBC middleweight title; Vanes Martirosyan vs. Saul Roman, 12, WBC junior middleweight eliminator; Mi-

Pirates Cards

DODGERS

-$132

Marlins

BRAVES

-$145

Reds

NBA Favorite

Points

Underdog

Tuesday NBA Finals HEAT

4.5

Mavericks

NHL Favorite

Odds

Underdog

Wednesday

Phillies

-$120

METS

NATIONALS

-$115

Padres

D’backs

-$128

ASTROS

BREWERS

-$135

Giants

NBA

Eastern League

Eastern Division W L Pct. New Hampshire (Blue Jays) . 31 16 .660 Trenton (Yankees) ................. 29 19 .604 New Britain (Twins) ............... 27 18 .600 Reading (Phillies)................... 24 22 .522 Binghamton (Mets) ................ 14 30 .318 Portland (Red Sox) ................ 14 32 .304 Western Division W L Pct. Harrisburg (Nationals)............. 24 20 .545 Altoona (Pirates) ...................... 24 23 .511 Bowie (Orioles) ........................ 24 24 .500 Richmond (Giants) .................. 23 24 .489 Akron (Indians)......................... 23 26 .469 Erie (Tigers) ............................. 21 24 .467 Saturday's Games Trenton 8, Portland 7, 1st game Portland 7, Trenton 5, 2nd game Reading at Erie, 6:35 p.m. Bowie at Harrisburg, 7 p.m. Altoona 8, Binghamton 6 New Britain at New Hampshire, 7:05 p.m. Richmond at Akron, 7:05 p.m. Altoona at Binghamton, 7:05 p.m. Sunday's Games Trenton at Portland, 1 p.m. Richmond at Akron, 1:05 p.m. Reading at Erie, 1:05 p.m. New Britain at New Hampshire, 1:35 p.m. Bowie at Harrisburg, 5 p.m., 1st game Altoona at Binghamton, 6:35 p.m. Bowie at Harrisburg, 7:30 p.m., 2nd game Monday's Games Trenton at Portland, 1 p.m. Reading at Erie, 1:05 p.m. Altoona at Binghamton, 1:05 p.m. Richmond at Akron, 1:05 p.m. New Britain at New Hampshire, 1:35 p.m.

NOTE: There will be no over/under run total (which would be the overnight total) for all the Chicago Cubs home games due to the constantly changing weather reports at Wrigley Field. Favorite

FIRST ROUND Thursday, April 21 Chicago 88, Indiana 84 Miami 100, Philadelphia 94 Portland 97, Dallas 92 Friday, April 22 Boston 113, New York 96 Atlanta 88, Orlando 84 L.A. Lakers 100, New Orleans 86 Saturday, April 23 Indiana 89, Chicago 84 Portland 84, Dallas 82 Memphis 91, San Antonio 88 Oklahoma City 97, Denver 94 Sunday, April 24 Philadelphia 86, Miami 82 Boston 101, New York 89, Boston wins series 4-0 Atlanta 88, Orlando 85 New Orleans 93, L.A. Lakers 88 Monday, April 25 Memphis 104, San Antonio 86 Dallas 93, Portland 82 Denver 104, Oklahoma City 101 Tuesday, April 26 Orlando 101, Atlanta 76 Chicago 116, Indiana 89, Chicago wins series 4-1 L.A. Lakers 106, New Orleans 90 Wednesday, April 27 Miami 97, Philadelphia 91, Miami wins series 4-1 San Antonio 110, Memphis 103, OT Oklahoma City 100, Denver 97, Oklahoma City wins series 4-1 Thursday, April 28 Atlanta 84, Orlando 81, Atlanta wins series 4-2 L.A. Lakers 98, New Orleans 80, L.A. Lakers wins series 4-2 Dallas 103, Portland 96, Dallas wins series 4-2 Friday, April 29 Memphis 99, San Antonio 91, Memphis wins series 4-2 CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-7) Sunday, May 1 Memphis 114, Oklahoma City 101 Miami 99, Boston 90 Monday, May 2 Atlanta 103, Chicago 95 Dallas 96, L.A. Lakers 94 Tuesday, May 3 Miami 102, Boston 91 Oklahoma City 111, Memphis 102 Wednesday, May 4 Chicago 86, Atlanta 73 Dallas 93, L.A. Lakers 81 Friday, May 6 Chicago 99, Atlanta 82 Dallas 98, L.A. Lakers 92 Saturday, May 7 Memphis 101, Oklahoma City 93, OT Boston 97, Miami 81 Sunday, May 8 Dallas 122, L.A. Lakers 86, Dallas wins series 4-0 Atlanta 100, Chicago 88 Monday, May 9 Miami 98, Boston 90, OT Oklahoma City 133, Memphis 123, 3OT Tuesday, May 10 Chicago 95, Atlanta 83 Wednesday, May 11 Miami 97, Boston 87, Miami wins series 4-1 Oklahoma City 99, Memphis 72 Thursday, May 12 Chicago 93, Atlanta 73, Chicago wins series 4-2 Friday, May 13 Memphis 95, Oklahoma City 83 Sunday, May 15 Oklahoma City 105, Memphis 90, Oklahoma City wins series 4-3 CONFERENCE FINALS Sunday, May 15 Chicago 103, Miami 82 Tuesday, May 17 Dallas 121, Oklahoma City 112 Wednesday, May 18 Miami 85, Chicago 75 Thursday, May 19 Oklahoma City 106, Dallas 100 Saturday, May 21 Dallas 93, Oklahoma City 87 Sunday, May 22 Miami 96, Chicago 85 Monday, May 23 Dallas 112, Oklahoma City 105, OT Tuesday, May 24 Miami 101, Chicago 93, OT Wednesday, May 25 Dallas 100, Oklahoma City 96, Dallas wins series 4-1 Thursday, May 26 Miami 83, Chicago 80, Miami wins series 4-1 FINALS Tuesday, May 31: Dallas at Miami, 9 p.m. Thursday, June 2: Dallas at Miami, 9 p.m. Sunday, June 5: Miami at Dallas, 8 p.m. Tuesday, June 7: Miami at Dallas, 9 p.m. x-Thursday, June 9: Miami at Dallas, 9 p.m. x-Sunday, June 12: Dallas at Miami, 8 p.m. x-Tuesday, June 14: Dallas at Miami, 9 p.m.

H O C K E Y National Hockey League FIRST ROUND EASTERN CONFERENCE Washington 4, New York Rangers 1 Wednesday, April 13: Washington 2, N.Y. Rangers 1, OT Friday, April 15: Washington 2, N.Y. Rangers 0 Sunday, April 17: N.Y. Rangers 3, Washington 2 Wednesday, April 20: Washington 4, N.Y. Rangers 3, 2OT Saturday, April 23: Washington 3, N.Y. Rangers 1 Philadelphia 4, Buffalo 3 Thursday, April 14: Buffalo 1, Philadelphia 0 Saturday, April 16: Philadelphia 5, Buffalo 4 Monday, April 18: Philadelphia 4, Buffalo 2 Wednesday, April 20: Buffalo 1, Philadelphia 0 Friday, April 22: Buffalo 4, Philadelphia 3, OT Sunday, April 24: Philadelphia 5, Buffalo 4, OT Tuesday, April 26: Philadelphia 5, Buffalo 2 Boston 4, Montreal 3 Thursday, April 14: Montreal 2, Boston 0 Saturday, April 16: Montreal 3, Boston 1 Monday, April 18: Boston 4, Montreal 2 Thursday, April 21: Boston 5, Montreal 4, OT Saturday, April 23: Boston 2, Montreal 1, 2OT Tuesday, April 26: Montreal 2, Boston 1 Wednesday, April 27: Boston 4, Montreal 3, OT Tampa Bay 4, Pittsburgh 3 Wednesday, April 13: Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 0 Friday, April 15: Tampa Bay 5, Pittsburgh 1 Monday, April 18: Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 2 Wednesday, April 20: Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 2, 2OT Saturday, April 23: Tampa Bay 8, Pittsburgh 2 Monday, April 25: Tampa Bay 4, Pittsburgh 2 Wednesday, April 27: Tampa Bay 1, Pittsburgh 0 WESTERN CONFERENCE Vancouver 4, Chicago 3 Wednesday, April 13: Vancouver 2, Chicago 0 Friday, April 15: Vancouver 4, Chicago 3 Sunday, April 17: Vancouver 3, Chicago 2 Tuesday, April 19: Chicago 7, Vancouver 2 Thursday, April 21: Chicago 5, Vancouver 0 Sunday, April 24: Chicago 4, Vancouver 3, OT Tuesday, April 26: Vancouver 2, Chicago 1, OT San Jose 4, Los Angeles 2 Thursday, April 14: San Jose 3, Los Angeles 2, OT Saturday, April 16: Los Angeles 4, San Jose 0 Tuesday, April 19: San Jose 6, Los Angeles 5, OT Thursday, April 21: San Jose 6, Los Angeles 3 Saturday, April 23: Los Angeles 3, San Jose 1 Monday, April 25: San Jose 4, Los Angeles 3, OT Detroit 4, Phoenix 0 Wednesday, April 13: Detroit 4, Phoenix 2 Saturday, April 16: Detroit 4, Phoenix 3 Monday, April 18: Detroit 4, Phoenix 2 Wednesday, April 20: Detroit 6, Phoenix 3 Nashville 4, Anaheim 2 Wednesday, April 13: Nashville 4, Anaheim 1 Friday, April 15: Anaheim 5, Nashville 3 Sunday, April 17: Nashville 4, Anaheim 3 Wednesday, April 20: Anaheim 6, Nashville 3 Friday, April 22: Nashville 4, Anaheim 3, OT Sunday, April 24: Nashville 4, Anaheim 2 CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE

CANUCKS

T R A C K

PIAA BOYS CHAMPIONSHIPS

By Roxy Roxborough

B A S K E T B A L L

S O C C E R Major League Soccer

T

National League

French Open

NCAA Division I Softball

R

AMERICA’S LINE

International League

At Stade Roland Garros Paris Men Third Round Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Antonio Veic, Croatia, 6-1, 6-3, 6-0. Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, def. Juan Martin del Potro (25), Argentina, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3, 6-2. Andy Murray (4), Britain, def. Michael Berrer, Germany, 6-2, 6-3, 6-2. Robin Soderling (5), Sweden, def. Leonardo Mayer, Argentina, 6-1, 6-4, 6-3. Mardy Fish (10), United States, lost to Gilles Simon (18), France, 6-3, 6-4, 6-2. Viktor Troicki (15), Serbia, def. Alexandr Dolgopolov (21), Ukraine, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3, 6-4. Fernando Verdasco (16), Spain, lost to Ivan Ljubicic, Croatia, 6-3, 7-6 (6), 6-4. Gilles Simon (18), France, def. Mardy Fish (10), United States, 6-3, 6-4, 6-2. Alexandr Dolgopolov (21), Ukraine, lost to Viktor Troicki (15), Serbia, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3, 6-4. Juan Martin del Potro (25), Argentina, lost to Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3, 6-2. Women Third Round Victoria Azarenka (4), Belarus, def. Roberta Vinci (30), Italy, 6-3, 6-2. Li Na (6), China, def. Sorana Cirstea, Romania, 6-2, 6-2. Maria Sharapova (7), Russia, def. Chan Yung-jan, Taiwan, 6-2, 6-3. Petra Kvitova (9), Czech Republic, def. Vania King, United States, 6-4, 6-2. Agnieszka Radwanska (12), Poland, def. Yanina Wickmayer (21), Belgium, 6-4, 6-4. Andrea Petkovic (15), Germany, def. Jarmila Gajdosova (24), Australia, 6-2, 4-6, 6-3. Kaia Kanepi (16), Estonia, lost to Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, 6-4, 7-5. Yanina Wickmayer (21), Belgium, lost to Agnieszka Radwanska (12), Poland, 6-4, 6-4. Jarmila Gajdosova (24), Australia, lost to Andrea Petkovic (15), Germany, 6-2, 4-6, 6-3. Maria Kirilenko (25), Russia, def. Arantxa Rus, Netherlands, 6-1, 6-1. Roberta Vinci (30), Italy, lost to Victoria Azarenka (4), Belarus, 6-3, 6-2.

S O F T B A L L

O

H . S .

BASEBALL

BASKETBALL

P

B A S E B A L L

American League DETROIT TIGERS — Optioned LHP Adam Wilk to Toledo (IL). MINNESOTA TWINS — Placed RHP Joe Nathan on the 15-day DL. National League CHICAGO CUBS — Activated RHP Randy Wells from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Casey Coleman to Iowa (PCL). CINCINNATI REDS — Called up LHP Jeremy Horst from Louisville (IL). Optioned RHP Daryl Thompson to Carolina (SL). COLORADO ROCKIES — Recalled RHP Juan Nicasio from Tulsa (TL). Optioned RHP Bruce Billings to Colorado Springs (PCL). HOUSTON ASTROS — Placed LHP Wandy Rodriguez on the 15-day DL. Called up RHP Jordan Lyles from Oklahoma City (IL). PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Agreed to terms with LHP Les Walrond and assigned him to Reading (EL). PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Placed LHP Joe Beimel on the 15-day DL Recalled LHP Daniel Moskos from Indianapolis (IL). SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Activated RHP Santiago Casilla from the 15-day DL. Optioned LHP Dan Runzler to Fresno (PCL). WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Recalled RHP Collin Balester from Syracuse (IL). Placed LHP Tom Gorzelanny on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 24. Women's National Basketball Association WASHINGTON MYSTICS — Waived C Chasity Melvin and F Angel Robinson.

S

-$195/ +$175

Bruins

Tampa Bay 4, Washington 0 Friday, April 29: Tampa Bay 4, Washington 2 Sunday, May 1: Tampa Bay 3, Washington 2, OT Tuesday, May 3: Tampa Bay 4, Washington 3 Wednesday, May 4: Tampa Bay 5, Washington 3 Boston 4, Philadelphia 0 Saturday, April 30: Boston 7, Philadelphia 3 Monday, May 2: Boston 3, Philadelphia 2, OT Wednesday, May 4: Boston 5, Philadelphia 1 Friday, May 6: Boston 5, Philadelphia 1 WESTERN CONFERENCE Vancouver 4, Nashville 2 Thursday, April 28: Vancouver 1, Nashville 0 Saturday, April 30: Nashville 2, Vancouver 1, 2OT Tuesday, May 3: Vancouver 3, Nashville 2, OT Thursday, May 5: Vancouver 4, Nashville 2 Saturday, May 7: Nashville 4, Vancouver 3 Monday, May 9: Vancouver 2, Nashville 1 San Jose 4, Detroit 3 Friday, April 29: San Jose 2, Detroit 1, OT Sunday, May 1: San Jose 2, Detroit 1 Wednesday, May 4: San Jose 4, Detroit 3, OT Friday, May 6: Detroit 4, San Jose 3 Sunday, May 8: Detroit 4, San Jose 3 Tuesday, May 10: Detroit 3, San Jose 1 Thursday, May 12: San Jose 3, Detroit 2 CONFERENCE FINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE Boston 4, Tampa Bay 3 Saturday, May 14: Tampa Bay 5, Boston 2 Tuesday, May 17: Boston 6, Tampa Bay 5 Thursday, May 19: Boston 2, Tampa Bay 0 Saturday, May 21: Tampa Bay 5, Boston 3 Monday, May 23: Boston 3, Tampa Bay 1 Wednesday, May 25: Tampa Bay 5, Boston 4 Friday, May 27: Boston 1, Tampa Bay 0 WESTERN CONFERENCE Vancouver 4, San Jose 1 Sunday, May 15: Vancouver 3, San Jose 2 Wednesday, May 18: Vancouver 7, San Jose 3 Friday, May 20: San Jose 4, Vancouver 3 Sunday, May 22: Vancouver 4, San Jose 2 Tuesday, May 24: Vancouver 3, San Jose 2, 2OT STANLEY CUP FINALS Boston vs. Vancouver Wednesday, June 1: Boston at Vancouver, 8 p.m. Saturday, June 4: Boston at Vancouver, 8 p.m. Monday, June 6: Vancouver at Boston, 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 8: Vancouver at Boston, 8 p.m. x-Friday, June 10: Boston at Vancouver, 8 p.m. x-Monday, June 13: Vancouver at Boston, 8 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 15: Boston at Vancouver, 8 p.m.

AHL

FIRST ROUND EASTERN CONFERENCE Portland 4, Connecticut 2 Thursday, April 14: Portland 3, Connecticut 2 Saturday, April 16: Portland 3, Connecticut 2, OT Sunday, April 17: Connecticut 3, Portland 1 Tuesday, April 19: Connecticut 3, Portland 1 Thursday, April 21: Portland 5, Connecticut 4 Saturday, April 23: Portland 6, Connecticut 4 Binghamton 4, Manchester 3 Thursday, April 14: Manchester 2, Binghamton 1 Friday, April 15: Binghamton 4, Manchester 3, OT Sunday, April 17: Manchester 5, Binghamton 4, OT Tuesday, April 19: Manchester 6, Binghamton 3 Wednesday, April 20: Binghamton 5, Manchester 4, OT Friday, April 22: Binghamton 2, Manchester 1, 2OT Saturday, April 23: Binghamton 6, Manchester 5, OT Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 4, Norfolk 2 Friday, April 15: Norfolk 2, Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 1 Saturday, April16: Norfolk 2, Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 0 Tuesday, April 19: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 2, Norfolk 1 Wednesday, April 20: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 4, Norfolk 2 Friday, April 22: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 2, Norfolk 1 Saturday, April 23: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 6, Norfolk 3 Charlotte 4, Hershey 2 Thursday, April 14: Charlotte 5, Hershey 4 Sunday, April 17: Hershey 4, Charlotte 2 Tuesday, April 19: Hershey 3, Charlotte 2 Wednesday, April 20: Charlotte 3, Hershey 2 Friday, April 22: Charlotte 5, Hershey 3 Sunday, April 24: Charlotte 2, Hershey 1, OT WESTERN CONFERENCE Manitoba 4, Lake Erie 3 Saturday, April 16: Lake Erie 6, Manitoba 4 Sunday, April 17: Manitoba 3, Lake Erie 2, OT Tuesday, April 19: Lake Erie 2, Manitoba 1 Thursday, April 21: Lake Erie 6, Manitoba 3 Friday, April 22: Manitoba 2, Lake Erie 0 Sunday, April 24: Manitoba 3, Lake Erie 1 Tuesday, April 26: Manitoba 4, Lake Erie 1 Hamilton 4, Oklahoma City 2 Thursday, April 14: Hamilton 5, Oklahoma City 2 Saturday, April 16: Hamilton 2, Oklahoma City 1 Tuesday, April 19: Oklahoma City 2, Hamilton 0 Wednesday, April 20: Oklahoma City 5, Hamilton 2 Friday, April 22: Hamilton 2, Oklahoma City 0 Sunday, April 24: Hamilton 4, Oklahoma City 1 Houston 4, Peoria 0 Wednesday, April 13: Houston 4, Peoria 1 Friday, April 15: Houston 3, Peoria 2, OT Monday, April 18: Houston 5, Peoria 3 Tuesday, April 19: Houston 2, Peoria 1 Milwaukee 4, Texas 2 Thursday, April 14: Milwaukee 5, Texas 2 Saturday, April 16: Texas 3, Milwaukee 1 Tuesday, April 19: Texas 3, Milwaukee 2, OT Wednesday, April 20: Milwaukee 3, Texas 2 Friday, April 22: Milwaukee 2, Texas 1, OT Monday, April 25: Milwaukee 3, Texas 2, 2OT DIVISION FINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE Binghamton 4, Portland 2 Wednesday, April 27: Binghamton 3, Portland 2 Thursday, April 28: Binghamton 5, Portland 3 Saturday, April 30: Portland 3, Binghamton 2 Monday, May 2: Binghamton 6, Portland 1 Tuesday, May 3: Portland 6, Binghamton 2 Friday, May 6: Binghamton 3, Portland 0 Charlotte 4, Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 2 Thursday, April 28: Charlotte 3, Wilkes-Barre/ Scranton 2 Saturday, April 30: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 3, Charlotte 0 Monday, May 2: Charlotte 2, Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 1, OT Wednesday, May 4: Charlotte 1, Wilkes-Barre/ Scranton 0 Friday, May 6: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 1, Charlotte 0 Saturday, May 7: Charlotte 4, Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 3 WESTERN CONFERENCE Hamilton 4, Manitoba 3 Thursday, April 28: Hamilton 4, Manitoba 1 Sunday, May 1: Hamilton 4, Manitoba 2 Tuesday, May 3: Manitoba 5, Hamilton 4 Wednesday, May 4: Manitoba 2, Hamilton 1, 2OT Friday, May 6: Hamilton 5, Manitoba 1 Sunday, May 8: Manitoba 1, Hamilton 0 Monday, May 9: Hamilton 2, Manitoba 1, 3OT Houston 4, Milwaukee 3 Friday, April 29: Milwaukee 3, Houston 1 Sunday, May 1: Houston 2, Milwaukee 0 Tuesday, May 3: Milwaukee 5, Houston 3 Thursday, May 5: Houston 3, Milwaukee 2, OT Friday, May 6: Houston 3, Milwaukee 2, OT Sunday, May 8: Milwaukee 5, Houston 4, OT Tuesday, May 10: Houston 4, Milwaukee 2 CONFERENCE FINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE Binghamton 4, Charlotte 0 Thursday, May 12: Binghamton 7, Charlotte 4 Friday, May 13: Binghamton 3, Charlotte 0 Tuesday, May 17: Binghamton 7, Charlotte 1 Wednesday, May 18: Binghamton 4, Charlotte 3, OT WESTERN CONFERENCE Houston 4, Hamilton 3 Friday, May 13: Houston 2, Hamilton 1 Sunday, May 15: Houston 3, Hamilton 2 Tuesday, May 17: Houston 3, Hamilton 2 Wednesday, May 18: Hamilton 8, Houston 1 Friday, May 20: Hamilton 4, Houston 2 Sunday, May 22: Hamilton 5, Houston 4, 2OT Tuesday, May 24: Houston 4, Hamilton 3 CALDER CUP FINALS Houston 1, Binghamton 0 Friday, May 27: Houston 3, Binghamton 1 Saturday, May 28: Binghamton at Houston, 8:35 p.m. Wednesday, June 1: Houston at Binghamton, 7:05 p.m. Friday, June 3: Houston at Binghamton, 7:05 p.m. x-Saturday, June 4: Houston at Binghamton, 7:05 p.m. x-Tuesday, June 7: Binghamton at Houston, 8:05

CLASS 2A 100: 1, Trenton Coles, Clairton, 11.15; 2, Kalil Slaughter, Sheffield, 11.19; 3, Christian Jackson, Hickory, 11.25; 4, Joe Sobucki, Girard, 11.29; 5, Jarred Gambrell, Athens, 11.30; 6, Clay Allen, West Middlesex, 11.32; 7, Tariq Lovelace, Delaware Valley, 11.49; 8, Matt Silva, Trinity (District 3), 11.54 200: 1, Trenton Coles, Clairton, 22.33; 2, Nicholas Patton, Tyrone, 22.38; 3, Chidi Okezie, New Media, 22.40; 4, Clay Allen, West Middlesex, 22.44; 5, Joe Sobucki, Girard, 22.83; 6, Christian Beard, Delaware Valley Christian, 23.75; 7, Kaylan Kenney, Aliquippa, 24.15; 8, Kalil Slaughter, Sheffield, 25.96. 400: 1, Chidi Okezie, New Media, 48.12; 2, Bryce Staffin, Clarion, 48.82; 3, Troy Sczwaczkowski, Deer Lakes, 49.31; 4, Alex Foulke, Salisbury Twp., 49.62; 5, Kyle Shinn, General McLane, 50.08; 6, Mike Wright, Danville, 50.11; 7, Sean Carney, Elk Lake, 50.56; 8, Ben Mason, Annville-Cleona, 50.57. 800: 1, L.J. Westwood, Quaker Valley, 1:55.55; 2, Scott Whitaker, Trinity Christian (District 7), 1:56.14; 3, Harold Lamour, Carver Engineering & Science, 1:56.33; 4, Derek Pawlush, Trinity (District 3), 1:56.61; 5, Matt Oldroyd, Troy, 1:57.01; 6, Morgan Huegel, Cranberry, 1:57.26; 7, Michael Bedell, Elk Lake, 1:57.57; 8, Dan Alexander, Lower Moreland, 1:57.85. 1600: 1, Tom Gruschow, Trinity (District 3), 4:17.90; 2, Ryan Smathers, North East, 4:18.48; 3, Jordan Jackson, Wellsboro, 4:23.61; 4, John Trueman, Springfield Twp., 4:26.25; 5, Andrew Hess, Central Columbia, 4:26.56; 6, Andrew Morgan, Northern Potter, 4:27.00; 7, Nathan Noll, Kutztown, 4:27.69; 8, Brendan Shearn, North Schuylkill, 4:28.35. 3200: 1, John Trueman, Springfield Twp., 9:31.66; 2, Brendan Shearn, North Schuylkill, 9:32.43; 3, Barrett Kemp, Oswayo Valley, 9:33.78; 4, Sam Williams, Northeast Bradford, 9:34.56; 5, AJ Limongelli, Holy Redeemer, 9:35.44; 6, Joel Christian, Towanda, 9:36.84; 7, Alex Woodrow, Marion Center, 9:40.59; 8, Luke Jones, Elk Lake, 9:43.94. 110 hurdles: 1, Cyniel Hinton, Summit Academy, 14.99; 2, Josh Nesmith, Bible Baptist, 15.00; 3, Todd Townsend, West Catholic, 15.18; 4, Dan Hoover, Martinsburg, 15.27; 5, Zane Zeigler, Freedom Area, 15.28; 6, Tyler Horton, Bethlehem Catholic, 15.40; 7, Kyle Pane, Athens, 15.42; 8, Darrell Crawford, GAR Memorial, 15.69. 300 hurdles: 1, Todd Townsend, West Catholic, 39.15; 2, Matt Moore, Southern Columbia, 39.49; 3, Jordan Jones, Annville-Cleona, 39.74; 4, Kyle Fronk, Greenwood, 39.96; 5, Matt Dull, Chestnut Ridge, 39.99; 6, Austin Schied, North East, 40.36; 7, Jared Schaut, Elk County Catholic, 41.14; 8, Dustin Fuller, Washington, 45.91. 4x100 relay: 1, Hickory (Markus Schumacher, Michael Palumbo, Marlon Pegues, Christian Jackson) 42.45; 2, Trinity (District 3) 42.70; 3, Aliquippa 42.87; 4, Holy Redeemer 43.28; 5, West Middlesex 43.35; 6, Tyrone 43.40; 7, Delaware Valley Charter, 44.33; 8, Catasauqua 44.85. 4x400 relay: 1, Trinity, District 3 (Mike Giordano, Derek Pawlush, Brett Seymore, Tommy Gruschow) 3:24.90; 2, Lewisburg 3:25.26; 3, Harrisburg Bishop McDevitt (District 3) 3:25.29; 4, West Catholic 3:25.41; 5, Washington 3:26.12; 6, Youngsville 3:26.38; 7, Bellwood-Antis 3:27.86; 8, Delaware Valley Charter 3:33.40. 4x800 relay: 1, Lewisburg (Noah Bernahu, Ryan Lopes, Greg Oleginski, Luk Oleginski) 7:50.66; 2, Trinity (District 3) 7:51.46; 3, Quaker Valley 7:54.15; 4, Elk Lake 7:57.99; 5, Lower Moreland 8:00.28; 6, Trinity Christian (District 7) 8:01.57; 7, Lancaster Mennonite 8:01.72; 8, Bethlehem Catholic 8:04.31 High jump: 1, Luke Gallaher, Forest Hills, 6-7; 2, Jaisen Irwin, Monessen, 6-6; 3, Jeremy Posey, Huntingdon, 6-6; 4, Josh Beach, Williamson, 6-5; 5, Zach Pressel, Northern Bedford, 6-5; 6, Josh Wise, Washington, 6-4; 7, Kent Commodore, Ford City, 6-4; 8, Hiree Peoples, Girard College, 6-4. Long jump: 1, Derek Gaul, Schuylkill Valley, 23-1 1 ⁄4; 2, Jarred Gambrell, Athens, 23-0; 3, Trey Blanding, Annville-Cleona, 22-2 1⁄2; 4, Josh Page, Clairton, 22-0 3⁄4; 5, Luke Gallaher, Forest Hills, 21-9; 6, Carrington Motley, Sewickley Academy, 21-8; 7, Brian Leap, Bellwod-Antis, 21-6; 8, Joshua Santiago, Bok, 21-3 1⁄4. Discus: 1, De’mond Davis-White, Sharon, 172-2; 2, Mike Recla, Bloomsburg, 168-7; 3, Lucas Banks, McConnellsburg, 160-4; 4, John Yohman, Wilmington, 160-0; 5, Trevor Stutzman, Kutztown, 159-0; 6, Brice Beals, Bald Eagle Area, 157-2; 7, Martin Steve, Hanover Area (District 2), 153-6; 8, Bobby Hozick, Ellwood City, 152-1. Team standings (top 5): 1, Trinity (District 3) 42; 2, Clairton 25; 3, Athens and Hickory 24; 5, Bloomsburg 23. CLASS 3A 100: 1, Tyler Smith, Norristown, 10.87; 2, Brandon Mercer, Lansdale North Penn, 10.95; 3, Ronnie Gillespie, Upper Perkiomen, 11.05; 4, Paulus Gipla, Harry S. Truman, 11.10; 5, Gavin Colley, Tunkhannock, 11.11; 6, Alex Yoder, Greencastle-Antrim, 11.19; 7, Ricky Bruno, Exeter, 11.20; 8, Shakeil Carter, Bethel Park, 11.25. 200: 1, Ronnie Gillespie, Upper Perkiomen, 22.09; 2, Matt Gilmore, Cheltenham, 22.31; 3, Alex Yoder, Greencastle-Antrim, 22.49; 4, Trey Washington, Central Dauphin East, 22.60; 5, Ricky Bruno, Exeter, 22.63; 6, Josh Mindlin, Council Rock North, 22.79; 7, Lionel Wilson, Honesdale, 22.80; 8, Gavin Colley, Tunkhannock, 22.95. 400: 1, Matt Gilmore, Cheltenham, 47.81; 2, Tyler Gallen, Cardinal O’Hara, 48.03; 3, Colin Dempster, Hatboro-Horsham, 48.06; 4, Terrance Taylor, Conestoga Valley, 48.54; 5, Lionel Wilson, Honesdale, 48.77; 6, Brian Hamilton, Cardinal O’Hara, 49.15; 7, Hunter Williams, Seneca Valley, 49.61; 8, Damien Boham, Spring-Ford, 49.63. 800: 1, Hong Cho, Wissahickon, 1:52.49; 2, Andy Flynn, Cumberland Valley, 1:53.36; 3, Wade Endress, Altoona, 1:53.76; 4, Mato Bekelja, Hershey, 1:54.36; 5, Brandon Krszal, West Allegheny, 1:54.36; 6, Luke Lefebure, Henderson, 1:54.38; 7, Brad Rivera, Bensalem, 1:55.28; 8, Eric Witmer, J.P. McCaskey, 1:55.48. 1600: 1, Drew Mahaga, Upper Moreland, 4:07.32. PIAA record. Old: 4:09.33, Craig Miller, Manheim Twp., 2004. 2, Nate McClafferty, Conrad Weiser, 4:11.37; 3, Ned Willig, Great Valley, 4:11.99; 4, Wade Endress, Altoona, 4:13.77; 5, Alex Moran, Mount Lebanon, 4:15.46; 6, Ed Schrom, Central Dauphin, 4:16.63; 7, Matthew Groff, Landisville Hempfield, 4:17.35; 8, Chris Campbell, Council Rock North, 4:18.08. 3200: 1, Glen Burkhardt, Unionville, 9:07.53; 2, Zach Hebda, North Hills, 9:07.93; 3, Jacob Kildoo, Grove City, 9:11.53; 4, Tom Trainer, La Salle College, 9:18.67; 5, Joe Kush, North Hills, 9:20.03; 6, Juris Silenieks, North Hills, 9:21.49; 7, Sam Hibbs, Hatboro-Horsham, 9:22.40; 8, Matt Kacyon, Whitehall, 9:22.49. 110 hurdles: 1, Chris Williams, Strath Haven, 14.18; 2, Kowan Scott, Wilson Area (District 11), 14.29; 3, Kevin Day, Glen Mills, 14.41; 4, Christian Lupica, Holy Ghost Prep, 14.50; 5, Khalid Guiden, Exeter, 14.58; 6, Aaron Willett, Coatesville, 14.71; 7, Deandre Black, Schenley, 14.84; 8, Wellington Zaza, Upper Darby, 15.90. 300 hurdles: 1, Eric Futch, Penn Wood, 36.43. PIAA record. Old: 36.94, Jason Kremus, Northampton, 1989. 2, Kowan Scott, Wilson Area (District 11), 37.68; 3, Byrum Luoco, North Allegheny, 38.65; 4, Maxmilian Hairston, Wissahickon, 38.76; 5, Sheldon Hannibal-Nixon, West Lawn Wilson (District 3), 38.76; 6, Jeff Elam, Greater Latrobe, 39.05; 7, Ryan Hynes, Central Bucks South, 39.22; 8, Derek Newsome, Hatboro-Horsham, 39.30. 4x100 relay: 1, Susquehanna Twp. (Leroy McClain, Patrick Olal-Ogwal, Rodney Watkins, Colby Grant) 41.74; 2, Strath Haven 41.81; 3, Central Bucks West 41.97; 4, Norristown 42.09; 5, Council Rock North 42.16; 6, West Lawn Wilson (District 3) 42.37; 7, Central Dauphin East 42.38; 8, Pottstown 42.86. 4x400 relay: 1, Cardinal O’Hara (Brian Hamilton, Ken McAndress, Christian Canavarro, Tyler Gallen) 3:17.61; 2, Abington 3:17.96; 3, Seneca Valley 3:18.36; 4, Lansdale North Penn 3:19.29; 5, Cedar Crest 3:19.70; 6, Wissahickon 3:19.71; 7, North Allegheny 3:25.23; 8, West Lawn Wilson (District 3) 3:26.16. 4x800 relay: 1, Central Bucks West (Nico Metzler, matt McGarvey, Matt Bee, Connor Manley) 7:41.51; 2, Abington 7:41.57; 3, La Salle College 7:47.93; 4, Hershey 7:49.60; 5, Easton 7:51.84; 6, Central Bucks South 7:52.02; 7, Penn Hills 7:52.19; 8, Strath Haven 7:52.58. High jump: 1, Ryan Brumfield, Owen J. Roberts, 6-10; 2, Robert Cardina, Conestoga Valley, 6-6; 3, Clarence Ball, Glen Mills, 6-6; 4, Jay Jabat, Pennsbury, 6-6; 5, Derek Hart, Manheim Central, 6-5; 6, Misohn Coppock, Pottstown, 6-5; 7, John Dahlstran, McDowell, 6-5; 8, Max Mahan, Garden Spot, 6-5. Pole vault: 1, Eric Hunter, Northampton, 15-0; 2, Chris Williams, Strath Haven, 15-0; 3, Dylan Bilka, Seneca Valley, 14-6; 4, Shawn Mayer, Palmyra, 14-6; 5, Brandon Teribery, Bradford, 14-6; 6, Sean Burns, Delaware Valley; Jared Allison, Dallastown; Troy Makous, Radnor; Jacon Hensh, Laurel Highlands, 14-0 (tie for 6th) Long jump: 1, Matt Green, Belle Vernon, 23-5 3⁄4; 2, Austin Rizzo, Williamsport, 22-6 1⁄2; 3, Joe Oduho, Cathedral Prep, 22-4 1⁄2; 4, Ryan Brumfield, Owen J. Roberts, 22-3; 5, Richard Rouse, Penn Hills, 22-1 1 ⁄2; 6, Jean-Luc Twyman, Coatesville, 22-1; 7, Brent Charlton, Downingtown West, 22-0 3⁄4; 8, De’vion Tate, McDowell, 21-7 1⁄2. Shot: 1, Kyle Long, Landisville Hempfield, 58-3 3⁄4; 2, Darrell Hill, Penn Wood, 56-5 3⁄4; 3, Luke Monta, Greensburg Salem, 55-6 3⁄4; 4, Brendan Lamy, West Lawn Wilson (District 3), 54-6 1⁄2; 5, Tyler Kerstetter, Selinsgrove, 54-4; 6, David Reinhardt, Bradford, 53-1; 7, Pete Calderone, North Pocono, 52-3; 8, Blailin Baker, Muhlenberg, 51-6 /14. Javelin: 1, Tom Lang, Pope John Paul II, 211-4; 2, Billy Stanley, South Park, 205-10; 3, Stephen Feister, Landisville Hempfield (District 3), 196-11; 4, Jamie Colon, Donegal, 186-8; 5, Bobby Smutsky, Northern York, 186-1; 6, Jon Strauss, Lehighton, 186-1; 7, Perry Hopkins, Unionville, 184-1; 8, Kyle Hefkin, State College, 184-0. Team standings (top 5): 1, Landisville Hempfield (District 3) 28; 2, Strath Haven 27; 3, Cardinal O’Hara 21; 4, Penn Wood 20; 5, Wissahickon and Cheltenham 18.

PIAA GIRLS CHAMPIONSHIPS

CLASS 2A 100: 1, Cierra White, Carver Engineering & Science, 12.05; 2, Jada Steward, West Catholic, 12.44; 3, Erikka Williams, Rochester, 12.66; 4, Lanae Newsome, Brookville, 12.70; 5, Lauren Ellsworth, Lackawanna Trail, 12.74; 6, Jeannette Youngblood, East Allegheny, 12.83; 7, Karli Balmer, Christopher Dock Mennonite, 12.83; 8, Alyssa Wise, Washington, 12.94. 200: 1, Cierra White, Carver Engineering & Science, 24.92; 2, Michelle Davis, West Catholic, 25.39; 3, Jada Steward, West Catholic, 25.33; 4, Imani Harris-Quillen, Swenson, 26.00; 5, Lanae Newsome, Brookville, 26.00; 6, Yaneshia Gaston, Bishop McDevitt, 26.03; 7, Kim Watterson, Springdale, 26.16; 8, Alyssa Wise, Washington, 26.31. 400: 1, Michelle Davis, West Catholic, 55.26; 2, Lauren Ellsworth, Lackawanna Trail, 56.16; 3, Imani Harris-Quillen, Swenson, 56.78; 4, Caela Williams,

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West Catholic, 57.09; 5, Kim Watterson, Springdale, 57.62; 6, Cassie Vanetten, Elk Lake, 58.22; 7, Mia Hicks, West Catholic, 58.68; 8, Marina Wareham, Kennedy Catholic, 58.96. 800: 1, Lille Brown, Boiling Springs, 2:13.78; 2, Kennedy Weisner, Elk County Catholic, 2:14.95; 3, Janine Powis, Christopher Dock Mennonite, 2:16.54; 4, Allison Hall, Blue Ridge, 2:16.56; 5, Peyton Hampson, Waynesburg Central, 2:17.84; 6, McKenna Spence, Cranberry, 2:18.18; 7, Rebecca Askins-Gast, Moravian Academy, 2:18.69; 8, Casey Gallaher, Forest Hills, 2:20.64. 1600: 1, Angel Picirillo, Homer-Center, 4:53,42; 2, Kennedy Weisner, Elk County Catholic, 4:59.29; 3, Caitlin Bungo, Sewickley Academy, 5:02, 94; 4, Rachel Hilliard, South Side Beaver, 5:04.97; 5, Morgan Richards, Hickory, 5:07.33; 6, Shannon Wright, Lewisburg, 5:10.30; 7, Karlie Heistand, Hamburg, 5:11.30; 8, Nicole Hilton, South Fayette, 5:14.22. 3200: 1, Nicole Hilton, South Fayette, 10:55.43; 2, Maria Snyder, Northern Bedford County, 10:56.86; 3, Morgan Richards, Hickory, 11:04.81; 4, Elizabeth McDonald, Scared Heart (District 1), 11:07.45; 5, Megan McGarrity, St. Basil Academy, 11:08.06; 6, Adair Gennocro, St. Marys, 11:12.08; 7, Marissa Durako, Holy Redeemer, 11:12.56; 8, Kendall Seymour, Central Cambria, 11:12.78. 100 hurdles: 1, Torrey Hollis, Hughesville, 15.10; 2, Quieterra Gross, GAR Memorial, 15.43; 3, Emily Lelis, Springdale, 15.45; 4, Shalaya Sidney, Paul Robeson, 15.55; 6, Paige Lumley, Richland, 15.98; 7, Teri Stoner, Montoursville, 16.03; 8, Moira Nester, Milton, 19.36. 300 hurdles: 1, Brodie Ercole, Lewisburg, 44.17; 2, Aisha Newsome, Brookville, 44.22; 3, Christina Gulliver, Bloomsburg, 45.08; 4, Shalil Muhammad, Paul Robeson, 45.61; 5, Emily Lelis, Springdale, 46.13; 6, Amy Kester, Notre Dame-Green Pond, 46.76; 7, Kaitlyn McSurdy, North Schuylkill, 48.76; 8, Shalaya Sidney, Paul Robeson, 1:04.04. 4x100 relay: 1, West Catholic (Jada Steward, Mia Hicks, Caela Williams, Michelle Davis) 48.08; 2, Carver Engineering & Science 48.37; 3, Lewisburg 48.66; 4, Bloomsburg 49.11; 5, Brookville 49.17; 6, St. Basil Academy 49.23; 7, Swenson 49.59; 8, Paul Robeson 49.99. 4x400 relay: 1, West Catholic (Jada Steward, Mia Hicks, Caela Williams, Michelle Davis) 3:54.03; 2, Lewisburg 4:00.03; 3, St. Basil Academy 4:00.06; 4, Paul Robeson 4:01.50; 5, Wellsboro 4:03.05; 6, Villa Joseph Marie 4:03.67; 7, Carver Engineering & Science 4:04.41; 8, Forest Hills 4:06.14. 4x800 relay: 1, Montoursville (Lana Spitler, Taylor Eshbach, Alexis Weisser, Briana Spitler) 9:25.50; 2, Christopher Dock Mennonite 9:32.37; 3, St. Basil Academy 9:32.41; 4, Villa Joseph Marie 9:38.47; 5, Boiling Springs 9:40.62; 6, St, Marys 9:45.51; 7, Millersburg 9:46.74; 8, Bethlehem Catholic 9:49.11. Triple jump: 1, Lanae Newsome, Brookville, 338-3 1 ⁄2; 2, Paige Lumley, Richland, 37-4; 3, Lauren Ball, Bloomsburg, 37-0; 4, Mariah Burns, Wilmington, 36-9; 5, Britni Phillips, Bloomsburg, 36-1 1⁄4; 6, Olivia Jendrezjewski, Hanover Area (District 2), 3510; 7, Sarah Hunt, Fairfield, 35-8 1⁄4; 8, Brooke Smay, Forest Hills, 34-10 1⁄2. Shot: 1, Megan Dornish, Elk County Catholic, 44-8; 2, Aubree Ray, Middletown, 40-1 1⁄4; 3, Jennifer Neider, Hickory, 39-11; 4, Taylor Woods, Hickory, 38-2 1⁄2; 5, Mary Newell, Villa Joseph Marie, 37-10; 6, Kalene Anderson, Pine Grove, 37-3 1⁄2; 7, Hayden Kimbrough, Rochester, 36-7 1⁄4; 8, Jessica Shotts, Southmoreland, 35-10. Javelin: 1, Christine Streisel, Tamaqua, 143-11; 2, Jessie Merckle, Fort Cherry, 141-0; 3, Jessica Delic, Penn Cambria, 138-3; 4, Emily Hughes, Holy Cross, 135-0; 5, Kelsey Hay, Palmerton, 129-10; 6, Kiesha Dornish, Johnsonburg, 129-7; 7, Lauren Lubarski, Hickory, 128-10; 8, Katie Strapple, Windber, 128-5. Team standings (top 5): 1, West Catholic 59; 2, Hickory 41; 3, Elk County Catholic 36; 4, Brookville 31; 5, Carver Engineering & Science 30. CLASS 3A 100: 1, Iman Wilkerson, Penn Hills, 12.04; 2, Lydia Ali, Radnor, 12.18; 3, Jody Evans, Quakertown, 12.29; 4, Jessica Whitmore, Chambersburg, 12.35; 5, Deme’shia Davis, Central Dauphin East, 12.45; 6, Danielle Smith, Whitehall, 12.59; 7, Courtney Mitchell, Central Dauphin East, 12.60; 8, Taylor Williams, Hatboro-Horsham, 12.63. 200: 1, Iman Wilkerson, Penn Hills, 24.76; 2, Lydia Ali, Radnor, 24.98; 3, Deme’shia Davis, Central Dauphin East, 25.29; 4, Alicia Evans, Quakertown, 25.55; 5, Alicia Minella, Unionville, 25.57; 6, Nicole Grasty, Abington, 25.63; 7, Danielle Smith, Whitehall, 25.96; 8, Taylor Williams, Hatboro-Horsham, 26.13. 400: 1, Alicia Evans, Quakertown, 55.02; 2, Kenya Woodall, Coatesville, 55.35; 3, Abby O’Connell, North Hills, 55.88; 4, Jordan Matthews, Abington, 56.05; 5, Ce’aira Brown, Overbrook, 56.91; 6, Megan Lundy, Central York, 56.98; 7, Alyssa Lombardo, Saucon Valley, 57.24; 8, Krista Kuss, Baldwin, 57.29. 800: 1, Emma Keenan, Gwynedd Mercy, 2:13.06; 2, Chloe Schmidt, State College, 2:14.41; 3, Morgan Sheaffer, West Perry, 2:14.66; 4, Taylor Carcella, Downingtown East, 2:15.22; 5, Marissa Long, Indian Valley, 2:15.38; 6, Heather Selheimer, Lansdale North Penn, 2:16.09; 7, Sophia Meehan, Haverford, 2:17.08; 8, Val Wilson, Strath Haven, 2;17.41. 1600: 1, Margo Malone, North Hills, 4;55.72; 2, Chloe Schmidt, State College, 4:59.87; 3, Sarah Holl, Upper Dublin, 5:03.47; 4, Hannah Grossman, Strath Haven, 5:04.07; 5, Angelica Peck, Blackhawk, 5:04.47; 6, Summer Hill, Honesdale, 5:05.05; 7, Katie Rodden, Archbishop Carroll, 5:05.09; 8, Anja Weiler, Downingtown East, 5:06.06. 3200: 1, Tori Gerlach, Pennridge, 10:36.00; 2, Sara Sargent, Pennsbury, 10:36.72; 3, Meghan McGovern, Lansdale North Penn, 10:41.37; 4, Amy Darlington, Bethlehem Liberty, 10:47.61; 5, Lauren Mills, Unionville, 10:53.27; 6, Regan Rome, Dallas, 10:53.31; 7, Shannon Malone, North Hills, 10:53.65; 8, Maggie Lawrence, West Lawn Wilson (District 3), 10:54.11. 100 hurdles: 1, Shelley Black, Coughlin, 13.83; 2, Emerald Walden, Plymouth-Whitemarsh, 14.50; 3, Eliana Yankelev, Lower Merion, 14.84; 4, Alicia Minella, Unionville, 15.00; 5, Georgia Mason, Upper Darby, 15.07; 6, Kayla Charles, Lansdale North Penn, 15.14; 7, Rachel Clarke, Strath Haven, 15.19; 8, Paige Fry, State College, 15.29. 300 hurdles: 1, Leah Nugent, Abington, 41.10. PIAA record. Old: 41.46, Ryann Krais, Methacton, 2006, and Nugent, 2009); 2, Shelley Black, Coughlin, 42.51; 3, Paige McDowell, Council Rock South, 44.60; 4, Emily Cable, Malvern Villa Maria (District 1), 44.82; 5, Anna Simone, Mount Lebanon, 44.98; 6, Dannah Hayward, Coughlin, 45.04; 7, Kim McDonagh, Greater Latrobe, 46.11; 8, Elizabeth Rose, Schenley, 47.86. 4x100 relay: 1, Norristown (Rowanna Watson, Alexis Ball, Ciara Heatin, Zayna Milligan) 47.13; 2, Central Dauphin East 47.61; 3, Gwynedd Mercy 48.60; 4, Milton Hershey 48.61; 5, State College 48.88; 6, Octorara 48.95; 7, Quakertown 49.12. Did not finish, Penn Hills. 4x400 relay: 1, Abington (Jordan Matthews, Rachel Strother, Nicole Grasty, Leah Nugent) 3:46.20. PIAA record. Old: 3:46.31, Penn Hills, 2010. 2, Central Bucks West 3:50.83; 3, Upper Darby 3:53.99; 4, Penn Hills 3:55.22; 5, Coatesville 3:57.30; 6, Unionville 3:58.62; 7, Milton Hershey 3:59.26; 8, State College 3:59.59. 4x800 relay: 1, Henderson (Janie Augustyn, Michelle Tracy, Suzanne Sanders, Natalie Deacon) 8:55.43. PIAA record. Old: 8:58.43, Upper Dublin, 1982. 2, Strath Haven 9:02.36; 3, Central Bucks West 9:06.25; 4, Downingtown East 9:06.83; 5, North Allegheny 9:09.99; 6, Cardinal O’Hara 9:15.57; 7, Central Bucks South 9:18.60; 8, Lansdale North Penn 9:19.91. Pole vault: 1, Kasey Kemp, Norwin, 12-0; 2, Olivia Loy, Cedar Cliff; Kathleen McPhillips, Carlisle; Larisa Debich, Greensburg Hempfield Area (District 7), 11-6 (tie); 5, Lexi Masterson, Greensburg Hempfield Area (District 7), 11-6; 6, Amanda Benninghofff, Council Rock South, 11-6; 7, Franki DiSalvo, McDowell, 11-0; 8, Caitlin Eberly, Mechanicsburg, 11-0. Triple jump: 1, Jasmine Hays, West Mifflin, 39-2 3⁄4; 2, Ada Maduka, Central Dauphin, 37-5 1⁄4; 3, Jamilla Janneh, New Oxford, 36-11 3⁄4; 4, Shannon Daniels, State College, 36-8; 5, Ramonia Benitez, Pocono Mountain West, 36-7 3⁄4; 6, Syndee Jacques, Lansdale North Penn, 36-6; 7, Mariah Powell, Bayard Rustin, 36-1 1⁄2; 8, Alisa Fornwald, Girls High School, 36-1 1⁄2. Discus: 1, Rachel Serafin, Greensburg Hempfield Area (District 7), 134-0; 2, Mercedes Vaughn, Academy Park, 130-10; 3, Rachel Fatherly, Williamsport, 126-10; 4, Sarah Fairbanks, Elizabethtown, 125-10; 5, Jenn Slagus, North Pocono, 122-1; 6, Anna McCloskey, Cardinal O’Hara, 121-2; 7, Taylor Seiber, West Perry, 120-11; 8, Sarah Connor, Penn Manor, 120-4. Team standings (top 5): 1, State College 37; 2, Abington 36; 3, Greensburg Hempfield Area (District 7) 28 1/3; 4, Coughlin 26; 5, Penn Hills 25.

G O L F Byron Nelson Championship At The Four Seasons Resort and Club Irving, Texas Purse: $5.5 million Yardage: 7,116; Par: 70 Third Round Ryan Palmer ...............................65-67-73—205 Sergio Garcia..............................66-66-74—206 Arjun Atwal..................................68-72-67—207 Ryuji Imada .................................69-68-70—207 Gary Woodland ..........................69-71-68—208 Matt Kuchar .................................69-71-68—208 Joe Ogilvie ..................................66-70-72—208 Rod Pampling .............................70-68-71—209 John Rollins ................................68-70-71—209 Jeff Overton ................................64-74-71—209 Jordan Spieth..............................69-68-72—209 Keegan Bradley..........................66-71-72—209 Nick Watney ................................68-68-73—209 Tim Petrovic................................69-66-74—209 Scott Piercy.................................66-69-74—209 Dustin Johnson ..........................66-75-69—210 Vijay Singh ..................................68-73-69—210 Vaughn Taylor.............................67-73-70—210 Steve Flesch ...............................70-69-71—210 Brett Wetterich............................69-69-72—210 Chris Riley...................................66-71-73—210 Hunter Haas................................70-72-69—211 Brandt Jobe.................................67-72-72—211 Chad Collins ...............................67-69-75—211 Jason Day ...................................72-71-69—212 Brian Gay.....................................71-72-69—212 Jason Dufner ..............................70-70-72—212 Fran Quinn ..................................69-70-73—212 Chris DiMarco.............................70-67-75—212 Fredrik Jacobson .......................70-73-70—213 Scott Gordon ..............................70-71-72—213 Jeff Quinney................................66-75-72—213 J.J. Henry ....................................69-72-72—213 Charles Howell III.......................71-70-72—213 Kyle Stanley ................................70-70-73—213 Jerry Kelly ...................................67-71-75—213 Josh Teater .................................66-71-76—213 Chad Campbell ..........................69-74-71—214 D.A. Points ..................................68-75-71—214 Harrison Frazar ..........................71-72-71—214

-5 -4 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 E E E E E E +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011 PAGE 3C●

YANKEESSUNDAY

YA N K E E S P R O S P E C T S

Hurlers look sharp vs. Double-A hitters Editor’s Note: The Scranton/WilkesBarre Yankees have taken a page from their parent club by winning championships. SWB has racked up four consecutive International League North Division titles and more could be on the way because the minor league system is stacked with top prospects that are close to contributing at the Triple-A or Major League level, according to Baseball America. By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

Dellin Betances: The No. 3 overall prospect for the Yankees and the top pitching prospect, had his worst outing of the year on Wednesday for Double-A Trenton, but it still wasn’t a bad effort. The 23-year-old, right-hander allowed two runs and four hits in six innings and whiffed 10 against Reading. In the no-decision, his ERA rose slightly to 1.30. Overall this season in seven starts, he’s 3-1 with 39 strikeouts in 34 2⁄3 innings. Manny Banuelos: The No. 2 pitching prospect in the organization and the No. 4 overall prospect for the Yankees, continues to lower his ERA start-bystart. The 5-foot-11, 155-pound lefty pitched twice during the last week, earning a win and a nodecision. The 20-year-old’s ERA dropped from 2.25 to 2.16 in his last two starts. He has fanned 38 in 41 1⁄3 innings for the Double-A Thunder. Austin Romine: Another catcher and the No. 6 overall prospect for the Yankees, the 22-year-old is having a solid season at Double-A Trenton. He has been consistent this season for the Thunder, hitting .284 with four home runs and 26 RBI in 155 at-bats before Saturday’s action. Over the last seven days, he went 8-for-21 with five RBI. Slade Heathcott: The 20-yearold outfielder playing for Single-A Charleston raised his average to .301 this season by going 7-for-28 in his last six games. After Friday’s action, he has three home runs, 14 RBI and six stolen bases in 40 games for the RiverDogs. He has also been reaching base at a good clip with 17 extra-base hits and 15 walks this season. Notable: Tampa third baseman Robert Lyerly leads all Yankee minor leaguers in batting average, hitting .337 in 190 at-bats.

LOCALS IN MINORS

WVC grads hitting .300-plus for teams By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

Russ Canzler: After slumping slightly earlier this week going just 1-for-11, the Hazleton Area graduate went 6-for-10 during a twogame period on Thursday and Friday for the Durham Bulls. Playing for the Triple-A club of the Tampa Bay Rays, Canzler hit his fourth home run of the year on Friday against Toledo. Through Friday, he’s hitting .311, with 23 RBI, in 43 games for Durham. He also has three stolen three bases and an on-base percentage of .432. Chris Sedon, a Coughlin graduate, played in six games last week for the Gateway Grizzlies, an independent team in Sauget, Ill. He’s seeing at-bats as designated hitter for the team and went 5-for-19 in those contests. Overall for the Grizzlies, Sedon is hitting .304 with three doubles before Saturday.

At UNC and as pro, Warren has individual, team success

Mounds of triumph I

By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

t appears that Adam Warren and the Yankees organization are a good fit. The New York Yankees are a team that has the most World Series titles with 27. Warren, a right-handed pitcher, also has a resume filled with success. The victorious attitude for the 23-yearold was at an all-time high while he was in college at the University of North Carolina and has continued throughout his minor league career. Before the Yankees’ No. 12 overall prospect – according to Baseball America – got to Chapel Hill, the Tar Heels never advanced to the 12-team College World Series tournament. While he was playing at UNC, the team reached the World Series all four years when he played from 2006-09. After graduating and getting drafted in the fourth round, he joined the Staten Island Yankees and went 4-2 with a 1.43 ERA in 12 starts to help the short-season Class A team win the New York-Penn League title. He followed that with a combined 11-7 record and 2.59 ERA in 25 starts with Class A Tampa and Double-A Trenton in 2010. He also helped the Double-A Thunder advance to the finals of the Eastern League playoffs. It was his collegiate career and playing in the ACC that helped him succeed at the professional level. “I felt like the ACC was one of the stronger conferences in baseball, so I knew I could pitch there, and coming to the next level I could go after hitters and still have that confidence,” said Warren, from New Bern, N.C. “I think that’s helped me learn how to pitch and build that confidence.” The Tar Heels reached the national championship three-game series in 2006 and 2007 when they fell to Oregon State both times and settled for runner-up status. In 2008, UNC advanced to the national semifinals before being eliminated by that year’s runner-up, Fresno State. The final year of the run only lasted three games in the double-elimination tournament when the Tar Heels went 1-2. Warren was a big contributor for the Tar Heels in 2007, his sophomore year, when he put together his best collegiate season. For UNC that year he went 12-0 in 15 appearances (12 starts). In 70 1/3 innings, he only gave up 17 earned runs for a 2.17 ERA as the Tar Heels also won their only ACC championship in the four-year run. Warren left UNC with a career record of 22-2 and a 3.49 ERA in 48 appearances (33 starts). “It was exciting. We had a lot of good players come through the team while I was there and there were some games that I didn’t pitch well and still got the win because we put up a bunch of runs,” Warren said. “For me it was the four best years of my life. Just being able to play with those guys every day and see the talent come through there.” Several of his Tar Heels teammates also were drafted by Major League teams. Dustin Ackley (infielder, Mariners), Alex

FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Right-hander Adam Warren had his best start for Scranton/Wilkes-Barre on Tuesday. He gave up one run and three hits in eight innings as the Yanks beat Indianapolis, 5-1.

“The Carolina tradition is a winning tradition and every sport expects to win. That’s kind of what sold me on the school ... ”

Warren added. The baseball team wasn’t the only program flourishing at the time Warren was attending North Carolina. The Tar Heels men’s basketball team won a national title in 2009 after reaching Adam Warren the Final Four in 2008. Scranton/Wilkes-Barre starting pitcher The football program won 20 games in four years, but started becoming a contender in the ACC, snapping a four-year bowl drought in 2008. White (pitcher, Indians) and Andrew “The Carolina tradition is a winning Miller (pitcher, Red Sox) are considered tradition and every sport expects to win,” top prospects in their organizations. Ackley is the No. 1 overall prospect and Warren said. “That’s kind of what sold me on the school was not just the baseball is currently still in the minors, while program but the whole kind of athletic White has reached the majors and is on the disabled list. Miller was projected as a program and just to have that winning traditions.” future pitching star when he was drafted One of the professional highlights for by the Tigers, but is now playing for his Warren was setting a franchise record with third organization. Warren and Miller pitched against each 15 strikeouts for Trenton, in a seven-inother May 7; that game against Pawtucket ning win against Bowie last year. His best performance for Scranton/ was Warren’s only loss of the season of a Wilkes-Barre was Tuesday when he only 3-1 record. allowed three hits and one run in eight “I’ve been trying to keep up with these guys and encourage them because a lot of innings and picked up the win against Indianapolis. them are having a lot of success so far,”

P H I L L I E S O N T H E FA R M

Single-A Clearwater plays on and on, and ends up with a record 23-inning loss Editor’s Note: The Philadelphia Phillies minor league system has lost some highly regarded prospects during the last few years with many trades being made to help the parent club. But that doesn’t mean the cupboard is bare. The Phillies have produced more young talent and might have more pieces to deal if they need to make a midseason trade this season. Here are how some of the top prospects in the Philadelphia organization are faring this spring:

By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

Clearwater, the Single-A club for the Phillies, played a historic game this past week. The Threshers participated in a 23-inning marathon on Monday against the Jupiter Hammerheads and lost 2-1. The contest, which was the longest in Clearwater history and lasted 5 hours, 27 minutes, finished with just 31 combined hits. Threshers first baseman Joe Savery, who is a former pitcher in the organization, pitched two

scoreless innings. It was his first appearance on the mound since Sept. 3, 2010 when he pitched for Lehigh Valley. At the plate, Savery is hitting .331 with 17 RBI and has a .381 on-base percentage. He has 11 extra-base hits and 17 RBI in 154 at-bats for the Threshers. Double-A Reading’s Matt Rizzotti had an off-week and was passed by Savery for the organizational lead in batting average. Rizzotti, a designated hitter for the R-Phils, is hitting .325.Brody Colvin: The team’s top pitching prospect, according to Baseball

America, returned to the mound for Single-A Clearwater after being shut down with a back injury. He started the 23-inning contest for the Threshers and pitched six innings of onerun ball. In 16 1⁄3 innings this season, he is 0-1 with a 4.96 ERA and 11 strikeouts and five walks. Jesse Biddle: The Phillies’ No. 1 pick from 2010 allowed three runs over five innings in a no-decision last week for the Low-A Lakewood Blue Claws. For the season, the 19-yearold lefty is 2-5 with a 4.78 ERA in nine starts for Lakewood. He’s fanned 43 in 43 1⁄3 innings.

I.L. NOTEBOOK

IronPigs plan visit to Hall of Fame By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

Ryne Sandberg was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2005 for his exceptional career as second baseman for the Chicago Cubs. The manager of the Lehigh Valley IronPigs is now getting his whole team into the establishment in Cooperstown, N.Y. The ’Pigs and their manager will take a trip to Cooperstown on June 15 on their way to Pawtucket. That date is an open date for the team and comes after an eightgame homestand and before a four-game stint with the PawSox. The contingent from Lehigh Valley, the Triple-A franchise of the Phillies, will tour the museum a month before former Phillies general manager Pat Gillick will be inducted into the Hall on July 24. While playing for the Cubs – after being traded from Philadelphia – Sandberg was a 10-time All-Star during his 16-year career. In his career, he batted .285, with 282 home runs, 1,061 RBI and 344 stolen bases in 2,164 games. BULL, BRAVE LAUDED Durham infielder Felipe Lopez and Gwinett pitcher Todd Redmond were selected the International League Batter and Pitcher of the Week, respectively, for the week of May 16-22. Redmond picked up the honor for the third time in his career with the previous times coming from June 28-July 4 and Aug. 23-29 of last season. Redmond threw a three-hit shutout last week, throwing 111 pitches in a complete-game win over Rochester. Although he’s won the award three times, he oddly didn’t claim the achievement last season after throwing a no-hitter on May 28, 2010 against Louisville. Lopez put together a stellar .591 batting average (13-for-22) in five games last week. A major leaguer with the Blue Jays, Reds, Nationals, Cardinals, Diamondbacks, Brewers, Red Sox and Rays, Lopez posted a multiple-hit effort in all five games he played. He also ended the week with eight RBI and seven runs scored. TODAY IN I.L. HISTORY Indians prospect Cory Snyder was known as a fiery player. On May 29, 1986, while playing for Maine in a game against Rochester, his passion showed. After popping out in one at-bat, he threw the bat in disgust and accidentally injured two female fans. While playing defense later in the inning, the infielder applied a tag at second base on a hard slide and a bench-clearing brawl ensued. When he came up to bat later in the game, he was hit by a pitch and didn’t charge the mound. But the benches cleared again and a brawl between the teams couldn’t be stopped. Snyder was ejected from the game and also faced criminal charges for the bat-throwing incident.

On This Date On May 31, 1998, the Red Barons erupted for 26 runs in a road win against the Toledo Mud Hens. The Red Barons set several still-standing franchise records in runs, home runs (7), extra-base hits (14), RBI (26) and largest margin of victory in the 26-4 rout. Bobby Estalella homered and went 5-for-6 in the game. Other Barons to go deep in the contest were Wendell Magee Jr., Marlon Anderson, David Doster, Jose Flores and Tony Barron with two.

UPCOMING SCHEDULE

Today at Louisville 6:05 p.m.

Monday at Louisville 6:05 p.m.

Tuesday at Indianapolis 7:05 p.m.

Wednesday at Indianapolis 1:05 p.m.

Thursday at Indianapolis 7:05 p.m.

Friday Toledo 7:05 p.m.

Saturday Toledo 7:05 p.m.

Sunday Toledo 1:05 p.m.


CMYK PAGE 4C

SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011

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Seth Houston of Lansdale re-energizes himself with some post-race liquids.

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THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

Junior riders listen to instructions before the start of the Junior 15-16 race.

A hot time on two wheels From kids to pros, it’s a good time for cycling

By MATTHEW SHUTT For The Times Leader

HANOVER TWP. – On a lazy Saturday afternoon there was still plenty of traffic to be found along Lasley Avenue in the Hanover Industrial Estates – but of the two-wheeled variety. The looping road served as the course for The Mohegan Sun Scorcher and The Jack Williams Tire Youth Challenge, an afternoonlong bicycle race for all levels of riders, from children as young as 6 and 7 years old to the seasoned professionals. As different categories of riders from both in and out of the area took their turns winding along the looping course, David Novak, 18, of Tunkhannock, certainly found a way to stand out among the crowd. Novak, currently a Level 2 rider training to make the jump to professional status, won the Junior 17-18 year old race and competed in the Pro 123 race, the final of the day. “Hopefully I’ll be a Level 1 by the end of the year,” said Novak. “It’s just a lot of fun to keep going, to win some races. If I can get into a top-three finish at nationals this year, hopefully I can get to that professional level.” With only a handful of riders in Novak’s age group ranked in the same level, he could soon find himself pulling away from the pack with a few races soon coming up on his schedule. Lake Carey, in Tunkhannock, will be the host of an event held today, while upcoming races will be held in Nicholson, Luzerne and Nanticoke, all before the end of June. All the events are sanctioned by the USA Bicycling Federation, which keeps track of results and rankings that determine which racers make the national team and eventually given a crack at the Olympics. Wilkes-Barre will be host a race held late in August, something organizer Phil Cable is looking forward to. “It’s on Aug. 27 and I’m really excited about some of the ideas I have for it,” said Cable, currently of Huntington. “I’m going to be talking with some of the local restaurants about bringing some of their tables outside to watch the riders go by and, also, with some of the local businesses about sponsoring a team of employees that would donate its winnings to a charity of their choice.”

NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Marcus Kuliska of Houston prepares his wheel after a flat tire during the cycling Saturday morning. Kuliska was visiting the area with his wife, Melissa Gavlick, to celebrate her parents’ 50th wedding anniversary and renewing of their vows.

Sandra Lakey of Wilmington, Del., takes video of the races.

While the notion of dinner in a bistro setting on Public Square as flocks of bicyclists speed by will undoubtedly seem unconventional to some, there were a few fans in attendance that were in favor of such an event. “I think it would be, to say the least, an interesting way to spend an evening,” said James Mikluscak, 23, of Larksville. “If Wilkes-Barre’s trying to bring new attractions to the area, it could be something fun to go and do. The downtown area has become a nice play to spend a night and I’d want to go and see something like Cyclists make their way up a hill during the Cat 4/5 race that.” Saturday morning at Hanover Industrial Estates.

Dave Novak, of Tunkhannock, in red, goes head to head with Luke Lukas of Courtdale in the Junior 17-18 year old race Saturday morning at Hanover Industrial Estates.


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all, including two Davis Cup matches in December. “He was much better than me,” said the 25th-seeded del Potro, a semifinalist in Paris two years ago. “He has everything; everything perfect. He has very good movement. He’s very fast. He’s improved his serve. He’s beating all the players very, very easy, and I’m one more victim of his game.” Djokovic’s 42-match run is tied for the third-longest by a man in the Open era, which began in 1968; Guillermo Vilas won 46 in a row in1977. And Djokovic is off to the second-best start to a season, trailing only John McEnroe’s 42-0 in 1984. As it happens, the 24-year-old Serb ran into McEnroe at Roland Garros on Saturday, and they chatted. Asked whether McEnroe was one of his favorite players, Djokovic replied with a smile: “Nothing against his age, but it’s just that I was still quite young when he stopped playing.” McEnroe said recently he finds Djokovic’s streak more impressive than his own, because of the current depth in men’s tennis, and because it includes a Grand Slam title — at January’s Australian Open, which was played at season’s end in 1984. Djokovic, who will be in action for a third straight day today when he faces No.13 Richard Gasquet of France, said a third major championship — and first at the French Open — takes priority over any other possible goal at the moment. If he gets to the final, he’ll take over the No. 1 ranking from Rafael Nadal. Djokovic is 4-0 this year against Nadal, including wins in two claycourt tournament finals this month, and some have speculated those results chipped away at the Spaniard’s self-belief. Nadal felt much better about himself and his game after reaching the fourth round by beating Croatian qualifier Antonio Veic 6-1, 6-3, 6-0. “Solutions don’t come from heaven. I mean, you can’t change everything in one day. And you know what? I had not forgotten how to play tennis for a week, but I played better today,” said Nadal, who was pushed to five sets in the first round. He’s 41-1 in his French Open career and bidding to tie Bjorn Borg’s mark of six titles at the clay-court Grand Slam tournament. The man Nadal beat for trophy No. 5 in last year’s final, Robin Soderling, also reached the fourth round, as did three-time Grand Slam runner-up Andy Murray, No. 15 Viktor Troicki, No. 18 Gilles Simon, and unseeded Ivan Ljubicic, who eliminated No. 16 Fernando Verdasco 6-3, 7-6 (6), 6-4 and meets Nadal on Monday. “There is no question that his confidence is shaken,” Ljubicic said about Nadal. “You see him in the locker room. He’s saying it. He’s not hiding it.” No. 4 Murray got past Michael Berrer of Germany 6-2, 6-3, 6-2 despite badly twisting his right ankle while chasing a drop shot in the second set, then said he wasn’t sure if he could play his next match. Berrer chastised himself for not taking advantage. “I should have hurt him when he’s down, but that’s difficult for me. So I was feeling sorry for him,” Berrer said. “I need to be tougher. Like, in Germany, we have a saying that ’an injured deer has to fall.’ So that was what I should have done today.” France’s Simon beat No. 10 Mardy Fish 6-3, 6-4, 6-2. That result, plus Vania King’s 6-4, 6-2 loss to No. 9 Petra Kvitova of the Czech Republic, mean there are zero U.S. men or women left in the singles draws as the tournament enters Week 2. Only one other time in the Open era were there no Americans in the round of 16 at a Grand Slam tournament — the 1973 Australian Open, when no one from the United States entered the field. Twenty-eight of the 32 players still around in both fields are from Europe. That includes three Russian women who won Saturday: No. 7 Maria Sharapova, No. 25 Maria Kirilenko and unseeded Ekaterina Makarova. Also advancing: No. 4 Victoria Azarenka of Belarus, No. 6 Li Na of China, No. 12 Agnieszka Radwanska of Poland, and No. 15 Andrea Petkovic of Germany.

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PGA TOUR

PIAA TRACK AND FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS

Training key for Colley’s showing es, including a strength and conTigers sprinter credits a ditioning coach.” change in preparation as key Colley, who plans to run at to winning two state medals. Widener University next year, By TOM ROBINSON For the Times Leader

SHIPPENSBURG – Gavin Colley ate better and trained smarter, preparing himself for what turned into a demanding final day of the PIAA Track and Field Championships at Shippensburg University. Running a series of sprints while fighting heat, wind and fatigue, Colley was the only Wyoming Valley Conference boy to claim two medals during Saturday’s competition. Coughlin’s Shelley Black matched Tunkhannock’s Colley in producing two Class 3A medals on Saturday. GAR’s Darrell Crawford and Hanover Area’s Olivia Jendrezjewski each added a second Class 2A medal Saturday after winning their first Friday. “In the past, especially in my sophomore year, I didn’t even have a chance down here,” Colley said after taking fifth in the 100 with a time of 11.11 seconds and eighth in the 200 in 22.95. “Last year, if I ran my absolute best race, I could have made the semifinals or maybe the finals. “This year, I could run my best race almost all the time.” Colley said he reached his potential with better training. “I was training like a miler, not a sprinter,” Colley said. “I was always tired and I felt weak. “To prepare for this year, I talked to a bunch of different coach-

said instead of working out on the track six days a week, he was more inclined to lift weights three days and run hard twice in a week. Crawford made it through semifinal qualifying with the fifth-best time out of 16 entries and went on to take eighth in the Class 2A110-meter high hurdles. The GAR junior added the medal to the two fourth-place medals he earned in the triple jump last season and Friday. Jendrezjewski, a sophomore, took sixth in two events. After earning her first medal in the high jump Friday, she went 35-10 in the triple jump Saturday. WVC athletes added five other medals Saturday. Holy Redeemer’s team of David Gawlas, Austin Carr, Jeff Capaci and Seth Tarselli placed fourth in the Class 2A 400-meter relay in 43.28 seconds. A.J. Limongelli gave the Royals a fifth-place finish in the 3,200, the day’s first event, in 9:35.44. The 3,200 was the only track event that did not have a qualifying step on Friday. It included three medalists from the WVC. Dallas freshman Regan Rome ran with the lead three runners until deep into the seventh lap of the eight-lap race before falling off and settling for sixth in Class 3A in 10:53.31. Holy Redeemer’s Marissa Durako started the day with a seventh-place finish in the 3,200 in 11:12.56.

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Marissa Durako of Holy Redeemer competes in the 3,200. She placed seventh in the Class 2A race.

Hanover Area’s Martin Steve finished seventh in the Class 2A discus with a throw of 153-6. Gawlas just missed an individual medal. He had the eighthbest time (11.49) in the 100-meter semifinals, but was not one of the eight finalists. The top three from each heat are guaranteed of advancing and Gawlas had a better time than the third-place finisher in the other heat. Lackawanna Trail’s Lauren Ellsworth led Lackawanna League performers with a second-place finish in the Class 2A 400 dash and a fifth-place in the 100. Note: In Friday’s results, the school that high jumper Amanda Jimcosky competes for was incorrect. Jimcosky is on the Northwest Area team.

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Darrell Crawford of GAR competes in the 110 hurdles at the state track meet in Shippensburg. Crawford earned a Class 2A medal by finishing in eighth place.

BLACK Continued from Page 1C

eight state medals and a series of memorable performances. “I wouldn’t be able to pick between the two years,” Black said. “I know a lot of people were expecting me to win two gold medals again, but to get a first, second and fourth in the same year is a big deal, too.” Black repeated her 100-meter championship and finished second in the 300 behind the staterecord performance of Leah Nugent of Abington, who had won the state title in 2009. The Penn State recruit was untouched all weekend in the 100. Black had the best time of 29 entries with 13.87 seconds in Friday’s qualifying, led 16 semifinalists Saturday morning in 14.21 and won in 13.83 seconds Saturday afternoon. “I don’t really think I was ever behind, but there were girls right with me going over the first and second hurdles,” Black said of the final. “Then, I started pulling away. “That’s how a lot of my races seem to go.” Black went from 42.98 in Friday’s qualifying to 42.51 in Saturday’s 300 final, but it was not enough to keep pace with Nugent.

After beating the District 1 champion head-to-head in last year’s final, Black finished second to Nugent’s record time of 41.10. Nugent began pulling away after the second hurdle, then maintained her lead. Black was more than two seconds ahead of everyone else in the field. “She qualified (Friday) with a time completely better than anything I had ever done,” Black said. “Just because of that, it didn’t mean I couldn’t win. I still thought I had a chance. “She ran a state-record time. She ran a great race and deserved to win.” Hayward was sixth in 45.04. After finishing second to Black in both races in last week’s District 2 championships, Hayward said her teammate has inspired her to believe she can move up toward the top steps of the state medal stand next season as a senior. Gross actually gave District 2 its first hurdles medal of the day. A hurdler since fourth grade while running on the GT Races summer track team that her father, Richard Gross, coaches, Gross said she made great strides in the last year because of Black’s success. “It took years of work,” she said. “I used to come in first in my age group, but my form was

horrible. “My Dad said, ‘let’s watch Shelley Black.’ I’ve been working on the way I bend my lead leg and moving my trail leg in a circle, not having it flat out.” PIAA TRACK AND FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS (Results of Wyoming Valley Conference athletes) CLASS 3A BOYS Saturday's Medalist Gavin Colley, Tunk., 100, 5th of 8, 11.11 Gavin Colley, Tunk., 200, 8th of 8, 22.95 Other Final Result Connor Flaherty, Co., high jump, T18th of 24, 6-0 Saturday's Semifinals Gavin Colley, Tunk, 100, 4th of 16, 11.10 Gavin Colley, Tunk, 200, 5th of 16, 22.33 Seth Tarselli, HR, 200, 11th of 16, 22.86 CLASS 2A BOYS Saturday's Medalists Holy Redeemer, 400 relay, 4th of 8, 43.28 A.J. Limongelli, HR, 3200, 5th of 24, 9:35.44 Martin Steve, HanA, Discus, 7th of 23, 153-6 Darrell Crawford, GAR, 110 high hurdles, 8th of 8, 15.69 Saturday's Semifinals David Gawlas, HR, 100, 9th of 16, 11.49 Seth Tarselli, HR, 100, 15th of 16, 11.69 Darrell Crawford, GAR, long jump, 18th of 27, 20-1 ¼ Darrell Crawford, GAR, 110 hurdles, 5th of 16, 15.39 Holy Redeemer, 3,200 relay, 11th of 12, 8:21.57 CLASS 3A GIRLS Saturday's Medalists Shelley Black, Co., 100 hurdles, 1st of 8, 13.83 Shelley Black, Co., 300 hurdles, 2nd of 8, 42.51 Dannah Hayward, Co., 300 hurdles, 6th of 8, 45.04 Regan Rome, Dal., 3,200, 6th of 25, 10:53.31 Other Final Result Destiny Distasio, Tunk, pole vault, T22nd of 24, 9-0 Saturday's Semifinals Shelley Black, Co., 100 hurdles, 1st of 16, 14.21 CLASS 2A GIRLS Saturday's Medalists Quieterra Gross, GAR, 100 hurdles, 2nd of 8, 15.43 Olivia Jendrezjewski, HanA, triple jump, 6th of 25, 35-10 Marissa Durako, HR, 3,200, 7th of 25, 11:12.56 Other Final Result Fallyn Boich, HR, javelin, 21st of 26, 108-5 Saturday's Semifinals Quieterra Gross, GAR, 100 hurdles, 6th of 16, 15.94 Nicole Snyder, L-L, 100 hurdles, 9th of 16, 16.18 Marnie Kusakevitch, HR, 100, 13th of 16, 13.15

AP PHOTO

Ryan Palmer watches his tee shot fly into the gallery on the 18th hole during the third round of the Byron Nelson Championship.

Surviving third round, Palmer leads by shot Texas native holds onto Byron Nelson lead despite two bogeys the last three holes. By STEPHEN HAWKINS AP Sports Writer

IRVING, Texas — Ryan Palmer sat down after finishing his third round and put his head down on the table. He was exhausted — and still leading — after a 3-over 73 on a gusty day at the Byron Nelson Championship. The Texas native who made the cut only once in his first seven appearances at Lord Byron’s tournament, took a one-stroke lead over Sergio Garcia into the final round after surviving a sunsoaked but brutal day for scoring Saturday at TPC Four Seasons. “We chalked it up as a hard day of golf,” Palmer said. “If you had told me Thursday I was going to have a one-shot lead, I would have called you a liar and said whatever. But my bad round is out of the way, I think, and I still lead by one.” Even with two bogeys the last three holes, Palmer finished a stroke ahead of playing partner Garcia after the two started the day tied. Garcia shot a 74 while also making bogeys at the 16th and 18th holes, where he missed makable putts. “It was definitely hard. At the same time I have to say I got nothing out of my round,” Garcia said. “I could not shoot one shot higher than I did. So if you look at it that way, and I’m only one shot behind Ryan, and I have tomor-

YANKEES Continued from Page 1C

line for the victory until he surrendered a solo home run to Pena with two-out in the eighth. Volquez pitched 7-2/3 innings, his longest outing since last Sept. 21, in his first start with the Bats this spring. Volquez’s counterpart, Andrew Brackman, could not match Volquez’s effectiveness. The righthander continued his recent stretch of wildness. Though he struck out a season-high eight, he also allowed a season-high six walks in 4-1/3 innings. It’s the fourth time in his last six starts that he’s allowed at least five walks, and he has not won during that stretch. Brackman’s wildness cost him most in the third. He started the inning by hitting Corky Miller, then issued walks to Brent Clevlen and Negron to load the bases. After a strikeout, Yonder Alonso – who had only one hit in his last 21at- bats – ripped a single to give the Bats a 2-1 lead. HOW THEY SCORED YANKEES FIRST: Austin Krum tripled. Ramiro Pena sin-

row, I think it’s pretty positive.” The last three holes at TPC Four Seasons played into the wind, sustained all day at 25 mph with gusts near 40. “Obviously the scores show how hard it was,” Palmer said. “Bad, hard day, that is for sure. I hit it pretty good I felt, but it’s hard to hit some of these tee balls... Just a hard round of golf.” Conditions are expected to be similar for the final round Sunday. Only eight of 74 players shot under par Saturday, and there were no bogey-free rounds. The best round was a 67 by Argon Atwal that tied him with Ryuji Imada (70) for third place at 3 under. “Par’s really good on every hole, and I’m just lucky to shoot 67,” Atwal said after his round with six birdies and three bogeys. “You catch the wrong gust and you could be in serious trouble.” Garcia missed a 5-foot par putt on the 535-yard 16th hole, where Palmer also bogeyed after missing the fairway with his tee shot. Palmer, who is letting caddie James Edmondson call the shots this week, missed the fairway again at No. 18 and two-putted from 27 feet once he got on the green. Garcia hit his drive way right and still had a chance to covert an 81⁄2-foot par-saver that would have put him back in a share for the lead. Garcia began the week with an infected fingernail on his left ring finger that forced him to withdraw from a British Open qualifier after just five holes. He didn’t have any practice rounds at TPC Four Seasons before opening with consecutive 66s. gled, scoring Krum. Jesus Montero grounded into a double play, Pena out at second. Jorge Vazquez struck out, but reached on a wild pitch. Justin Maxwell grounded into a fielder’s choice, Vazquez out at second. YANKEES 1, BATS 0. BATS THIRD: Corky Miller hit by pitch. Brent Clevlen walked, Miller to second. Kristopher Negron walked to load bases. Chris Valaika struck out. Yonder Alonso singled, scoring Miller and Clevlen. Juan Francisco struck out. Todd Frazier walked to load bases. Jeremy Hermida struck out. BATS 2, YANKEES 1. YANKEES EIGHTH: Luis Nunez flied out. Krum grounded out. Pena homered. Montero hit an infield single. Vazquez grounded out. BATS 2, YANKEES 2. BATS EIGHTH: Francisco grounded out. Frazier flied out. Hermida singled. Danny Dorn homered, scoring Hermida. BATS 4, YANKEES 2 YANKEES NINTH: Maxwell homered. Laird singled. Russo struck out. Brewer singled. Laird and Brewer advanced on a wild pitch. Nunez walked. Krum grounded into a double play, Nunez out at second. BATS 4, YANKEES 3.


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SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011

N AT I O N A L L E A G U E R O U N D U P

Howard mows down Mets in 8th The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Ryan Howard hit a tiebreaking double in the eighth inning and Cole Hamels finally beat a familiar nemesis, pitching the Philadelphia Phillies past the slumping New York Mets 5-2 on Saturday night. Hamels (7-2) struck out a season-high 10 and walked none over seven innings to win his third straight outing and improve to 3-9 in 15 career games against the Mets. The left-hander had lost five consecutive starts against them. This time, he recovered from a shaky start to retire his final 11 batters — five by strikeout — without allowing a ball out of the infield. Jose Contreras worked a perfect eighth and Ryan Madson got three quick outs for his 11th save in as many tries. Philadelphia pitchers set down the last 17 Mets after Ronny Paulino’s fourth-inning single.

baseball’s weakest-hitting teams. Stauffer (1-3) limited the Nationals to four hits and a run — a seventh-inning homer by Laynce Nix — to win for the first time in 11 starts. He struck out four and walked four. Brewers 3, Giants 2

MILWAUKEE — Pinchhitter Jonathan Lucroy’s basesloaded suicide squeeze scored Ryan Braun with one out in the ninth, lifting the Milwaukee Brewers to a 3-2 victory over the San Francisco Giants on Saturday. Lucroy’s well-executed bunt was out of the reach of pitcher Guillermo Mota. Braun easily scored and Lucroy began pumping his fists halfway down the line. Rockies 15, Cardinals 4

DENVER — Chris Iannetta homered twice and drove in a career-high six runs and Juan Nicasio pitched seven solid Pirates 10, Cubs 0 innings in his major league CHICAGO — Paul Maholm debut as the scuffling Colorado Rockies routed the St. pitched a three-hitter for his first victory in a month, Ronny Louis Cardinals 15-4 on Saturday night. Cedeno, Lyle Overbay, Chris The hard-throwing Nicasio Snyder and Andrew McCutch(1-0) surrendered just six hits en each homered Saturday and one unearned run after and the Pittsburgh Pirates routed the Chicago Cubs 10-0. being recalled from Double-A Tulsa to make a spot start. Maholm (2-7) got his third career shutout in a place he’s Diamondbacks 11, Astros 3 always pitched well. Maholm is 8-2 in 15 career starts HOUSTON — Zach Duke against the Cubs, including allowed three hits over seven 6-2 in 11 starts at Wrigley innings and hit a three-run Field. homer in his first game of the season, leading the Arizona Padres 2, Nationals 1 Diamondbacks to an 11-3 victory over the Houston Astros WASHINGTON — Tim Stauffer pitched seven innings on Saturday night. Duke’s first home run in for his first win of the season, Blake Tekotte had the first two seven major league seasons hits of his major league career came in the Diamondbacks’ and the San Diego Padres beat four-run fourth inning, a shot over the left field fence off the Washington Nationals 2-1 Bud Norris (2-4). on Saturday in a matchup of

AMERICAN LEAGUE ROUNDUP

Shelley Duncan pinches in for Tribe The Associated Press

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Shelley Duncan and Orlando Cabrera each had two RBIs, Carlos Carrasco pitched six solid innings and the Cleveland Indians beat the Tampa Bay Rays 7-3 on Saturday. Duncan, who was pinchhitting, and Cabrera both had two-run singles during the eighth to put Cleveland ahead 7-2. Duncan had a bases-loaded drive off J.P. Howell that hit high off the left-field wall, but he was held to a single because it looked like outfielder Sam Fuld might be able to catch the ball. Carrasco (4-2) gave up two runs and seven hits, helping the AL Central-leading Indians end a three-game losing streak. Cleveland had been outscored 23-4 during the short skid. Blue Jays 9, White Sox 8, 14 innings

TORONTO — Corey Patterson hit a game-ending homer in the 14th inning, Jose Bautista connected for his major league-leading 20th home run and the Toronto Blue Jays beat the Chicago White Sox 9-8 on Saturday. Patterson, who tied a career high with five hits, led off the 14th with a drive to right off Gavin Floyd (5-5) for his third of the season. It was the fourth game-winning homer of his career. Rangers 10, Royals 1

ARLINGTON, Texas — Mitch Moreland, Mike Napoli and Endy Chavez hit consecutive homers to match a club record and back Matt Harri-

son’s five-hit shutout pitching over six innings as the Texas Rangers beat the Kansas City Royals 10-1 on Saturday night. Three straight Rangers homered for the fifth time in club history. It hadn’t happened since April 25, 2004, when Laynce Nix, Rod Barajas and Adrian Gonzalez went deep against Seattle. Twins 1, Angels 0, 10 innings

MINNEAPOLIS — Danny Valencia hit a bases-loaded single in the bottom of the 10th inning, lifting the Minnesota Twins to a 1-0 victory over Los Angeles on Saturday night after spot starter Anthony Swarzak held the Angels hitless into the eighth. Swarzak, a late fill-in on the mound for Francisco Liriano, gave up a one-out double in the eighth to Peter Bourjos for the Angels’ first hit. Liriano, who pitched a no-hitter May 3, was scratched the day before because of shoulder soreness. Red Sox-Tigers game postponed

DETROIT — The game between the Boston Red Sox and Detroit Tigers has been postponed because of rain. The third game of the series didn’t start on Saturday night. It was postponed after a delay of 1 hour, 25 minutes. Light rain began to fall about 10 minutes after the scheduled start and it quickly got heavier without much relief in sight on radar maps. The game will be made up in a day-night double-header Sunday. The first game will begin at 1:05 p.m. and the second at 7:05 p.m.

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STANDINGS/STATS S TA N D I N G S Boston ............................................ New York ....................................... Tampa Bay..................................... Toronto........................................... Baltimore........................................ Cleveland ..................................... Detroit ........................................... Kansas City.................................. Chicago ........................................ Minnesota .................................... Texas ............................................. Los Angeles .................................. Seattle ............................................ Oakland..........................................

W 29 27 27 26 24 W 31 25 23 24 17 W 27 27 25 25

Philadelphia ................................. Florida........................................... Atlanta........................................... New York...................................... Washington..................................

W 33 29 28 23 22

St. Louis ....................................... Milwaukee .................................... Cincinnati...................................... Pittsburgh..................................... Chicago ........................................ Houston ........................................

W 31 28 27 24 22 19

San Francisco ............................... Arizona........................................... Colorado ........................................ Los Angeles .................................. San Diego ......................................

W 28 28 25 23 21

AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division L Pct GB WCGB 22 .569 — — 22 .551 1 — 24 .529 2 1 1 21⁄2 26 .500 3 ⁄2 25 .490 4 3 Central Division L Pct GB WCGB 18 .633 — — 25 .500 61⁄2 21⁄2 28 .451 9 5 30 .444 91⁄2 51⁄2 101⁄2 33 .340 141⁄2 West Division L Pct GB WCGB 25 .519 — — 27 .500 1 21⁄2 25 .500 1 21⁄2 27 .481 2 31⁄2 NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division L Pct GB WCGB 19 .635 — — 20 .592 21⁄2 — 24 .538 5 21⁄2 28 .451 91⁄2 7 29 .431 101⁄2 8 Central Division L Pct GB WCGB 22 .585 — — 24 .538 21⁄2 21⁄2 25 .519 31⁄2 31⁄2 26 .480 51⁄2 51⁄2 28 .440 71⁄2 71⁄2 111⁄2 33 .365 111⁄2 West Division L Pct GB WCGB 23 .549 — — 1 24 .538 ⁄2 21⁄2 26 .490 3 5 29 .442 51⁄2 71⁄2 31 .404 71⁄2 91⁄2

L10 8-2 7-3 3-7 5-5 5-5

Str W-4 L-1 L-1 W-2 L-1

Home 16-10 17-13 12-14 13-12 15-14

Away 13-12 10-9 15-10 13-14 9-11

L10 5-5 3-7 3-7 5-5 4-6

Str W-1 L-2 L-1 L-2 W-1

Home 19-6 13-10 17-13 10-13 6-14

Away 12-12 12-15 6-15 14-17 11-19

L10 5-5 5-5 8-2 3-7

Str W-1 L-1 W-2 W-2

Home 18-11 13-13 12-12 12-12

Away 9-14 14-14 13-13 13-15

L10 7-3 6-4 5-5 4-6 2-8

Str W-4 L-1 L-1 L-3 L-1

Home 19-10 14-12 14-11 10-14 12-10

Away 14-9 15-8 14-13 13-14 10-19

L10 7-3 8-2 2-8 6-4 5-5 4-6

Str L-1 W-1 W-1 W-2 L-2 L-2

Home 14-9 20-7 15-11 9-14 11-16 11-16

Away 17-13 8-17 12-14 15-12 11-12 8-17

L10 6-4 9-1 3-7 4-6 3-7

Str L-1 W-5 W-1 W-1 W-1

Home 13-8 16-10 13-14 12-14 9-20

Away 15-15 12-14 12-12 11-15 12-11

AMERICAN LEAGUE Friday's Games Boston 6, Detroit 3 Toronto 4, Chicago White Sox 2 Tampa Bay 5, Cleveland 0 Kansas City 12, Texas 7, 14 innings L.A. Angels 6, Minnesota 5 Oakland 6, Baltimore 2 Seattle 4, N.Y. Yankees 3 Saturday's Games Toronto 9, Chicago White Sox 8, 14 innings Cleveland 7, Tampa Bay 3 Texas 10, Kansas City 1 Minnesota 1, L.A. Angels 0, 10 innings Boston at Detroit, ppd., rain Baltimore at Oakland, 10:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. Sunday's Games Boston (Beckett 4-1) at Detroit (Verlander 4-3), 1:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Danks 0-7) at Toronto (R.Romero 4-4), 1:07 p.m. Cleveland (Masterson 5-2) at Tampa Bay (Hellickson 5-3), 1:40 p.m. L.A. Angels (Haren 4-3) at Minnesota (Pavano 2-4), 2:10 p.m. Kansas City (Duffy 0-0) at Texas (Ogando 5-0), 3:05 p.m. Baltimore (Britton 5-2) at Oakland (Moscoso 1-0), 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 5-3) at Seattle (Vargas 3-2), 4:10 p.m. Monday's Games Minnesota at Detroit, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. Baltimore at Seattle, 4:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Kansas City, 4:10 p.m. Texas at Tampa Bay, 6:40 p.m. Cleveland at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Boston, 7:10 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE Friday's Games Pittsburgh 4, Chicago Cubs 2

Washington 2, San Diego 1 Philadelphia 6, N.Y. Mets 4 Cincinnati 5, Atlanta 1 Arizona 7, Houston 6 San Francisco 5, Milwaukee 4 St. Louis 10, Colorado 3 L.A. Dodgers 3, Florida 2 Saturday's Games Pittsburgh 10, Chicago Cubs 0 San Diego 2, Washington 1 Milwaukee 3, San Francisco 2 Arizona 11, Houston 3 Philadelphia 5, N.Y. Mets 2 Colorado 15, St. Louis 4 Cincinnati at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. Florida at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Sunday's Games Philadelphia (Worley 2-0) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 3-5), 1:10 p.m. San Diego (Moseley 1-6) at Washington (Maya 0-0), 1:35 p.m. Arizona (Collmenter 3-1) at Houston (Happ 3-6), 2:05 p.m. San Francisco (Cain 3-3) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 6-2), 2:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Karstens 3-3) at Chicago Cubs (Dempster 3-4), 2:20 p.m. St. Louis (Lohse 6-2) at Colorado (Chacin 5-3), 3:10 p.m. Florida (Nolasco 4-0) at L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 5-3), 4:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Cueto 2-1) at Atlanta (Jurrjens 6-1), 8:05 p.m. Monday's Games Philadelphia at Washington, 1:05 p.m. San Diego at Atlanta, 1:05 p.m. Houston at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m. San Francisco at St. Louis, 4:15 p.m. Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 8:10 p.m. Florida at Arizona, 8:10 p.m.

N A T I O N A L L E A G U E

Huff 1b 3 0 1 0 Nieves c 3 0 1 0 MTejad 3b 4 0 0 0 Lucroy ph 1 0 1 1 Burriss ss 4 0 1 0 Morgan rf 3 0 0 0 Mota p 0 0 0 0 Wolf p 2 0 0 0 Whitsd c 3 0 0 0 Loe p 0 0 0 0 JSnchz p 2 0 0 0 Counsll ph 1 0 0 0 Torres ph-cf 0 1 0 0 Axford p 0 0 0 0 Totals 32 2 5 1 Totals 28 3 5 3 San Francisco.................... 000 000 020 — 2 Milwaukee.......................... 100 100 001 — 3 One out when winning run scored. E—Whiteside (1), McGehee (7). DP—San Francisco 1, Milwaukee 1. LOB—San Francisco 6, Milwaukee 6. 2B—F.Sanchez (13). HR—C.Gomez (3). SB—Burriss (3), Braun (12). SF—McGehee. IP H R ER BB SO San Francisco J.Sanchez ................ 7 2 2 2 4 8 Romo ........................ 1 0 0 0 0 2 Mota L,2-2................ 1⁄3 3 1 1 1 0 Milwaukee Wolf........................... 71⁄3 3 2 1 2 5 Loe BS,2-3............... 2⁄3 1 0 0 0 0 Axford W,1-1 ........... 1 1 0 0 0 0 HBP—by Wolf (Huff). WP—Wolf. Umpires—Home, Mark Wegner;First, Mike Winters;Second, Mike Everitt;Third, Mike Muchlinski. T—2:54 (Rain delay: 0:12). A—42,512 (41,900).

Phillies 5, Mets 2 Philadelphia

ab 5 3 3 4 4 3 4 4 1 1 0 1 0

r 1 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

h bi 1 0 2 1 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0

New York

ab r h bi JosRys ss 4 2 2 0 Turner 3b 4 0 1 1 Beltran rf 4 0 0 0 Bay lf 4 0 1 1 Evans 1b 3 0 0 0 DnMrp ph 1 0 0 0 Pagan cf 4 0 1 0 RPauln c 3 0 1 0 RTejad 2b 3 0 1 0 Pelfrey p 3 0 0 0 OConnr p 0 0 0 0 Isrnghs p 0 0 0 0 Byrdak p 0 0 0 0 Thayer p 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 5 8 5 Totals 33 2 7 2 Philadelphia....................... 000 100 031 — 5 New York ........................... 101 000 000 — 2 E—R.Paulino (3). DP—New York 1. LOB—Philadelphia 5, New York 4. 2B—Utley (1), Howard (13), Ibanez (10), Brown (3), B.Francisco (4), Jos.Reyes (17). SB—Rollins (10), Utley (1), Jos.Reyes 2 (19), Turner (2), Bay (3), Pagan (6). CS—Pagan (1). S— Hamels. IP H R ER BB SO Philadelphia Hamels W,7-2.......... 7 7 2 2 0 10 Contreras H,1.......... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Madson S,11-11 ..... 1 0 0 0 0 0 New York Pelfrey ...................... 72⁄3 4 2 2 2 6 O’Connor L,0-1 BS,1-1 ...................... 0 1 1 1 0 0 Isringhausen ............ 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 Byrdak ...................... 1⁄3 Thayer ...................... 1 2 1 1 0 0 O’Connor pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Isringhausen pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Balk—Pelfrey. Umpires—Home, Scott Barry;First, John Hirschbeck;Second, Wally Bell;Third, Laz Diaz. T—2:46. A—29,337 (41,800). Rollins ss Utley 2b Polanc 3b Howard 1b Ibanez lf Ruiz c Brown rf Mayrry cf Hamels p Gload ph Contrrs p BFrncs ph Madson p

Pirates 10, Cubs 0 Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi Tabata lf 4 2 1 0 Campn cf 4 0 0 0 GJones rf 4 0 1 1 Barney 2b 4 0 1 0 AMcCt cf 5 2 2 2 SCastro ss 4 0 0 0 Walker 2b 5 1 2 0 ArRmr 3b 3 0 0 0 Overay 1b 3 1 1 1 ASorin lf 3 0 1 0 Pearce 3b 2 1 1 2 Montnz rf 3 0 1 0 BrWod 3b 2 0 0 0 C.Pena 1b 3 0 0 0 CSnydr c 3 2 1 1 K.Hill c 3 0 0 0 Cedeno ss 4 1 1 3 R.Wells p 1 0 0 0 Mahlm p 4 0 0 0 JRussll p 0 0 0 0 Fukdm ph 1 0 0 0 Maine p 0 0 0 0 Grabow p 0 0 0 0 JeBakr ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 36101010 Totals 30 0 3 0 Pittsburgh ........................ 000 502 201 — 10 Chicago............................ 000 000 000 — 0 LOB—Pittsburgh 4, Chicago 3. 2B—Tabata (9), G.Jones (6), Walker (12), A.Soriano (9). HR— A.McCutchen (9), Overbay (5), C.Snyder (2), Cedeno (2). CS—G.Jones (1). IP H R ER BB SO Pittsburgh Maholm W,2-7......... 9 3 0 0 0 4 Chicago R.Wells L,1-1........... 4 5 5 5 3 7 J.Russell .................. 2 2 2 2 0 1 Maine........................ 2 1 2 2 2 1 Grabow..................... 1 2 1 1 0 1 Umpires—Home, Gary Cederstrom;First, Lance Barksdale;Second, Adrian Johnson;Third, Fieldin Culbreth. T—2:28. A—38,413 (41,159). Pittsburgh

Padres 2, Nationals 1 San Diego

ab 3 1 4 3 4 4 3 4 0 4 2 0 0

r 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

h bi 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Washington

ab r h bi Ankiel cf 4 0 0 0 Dsmnd ss 2 0 0 0 Werth rf 3 0 0 0 L.Nix lf 3 1 1 1 Berndn pr 0 0 0 0 Morse 1b 4 0 1 0 Espinos 2b 3 0 0 0 IRdrgz c 3 0 1 0 HrstnJr 3b 3 0 2 0 Zmrmn p 2 0 0 0 SBurntt p 0 0 0 0 Coffey p 0 0 0 0 Stairs ph 1 0 0 0 HRdrgz p 0 0 0 0 Totals 32 2 7 2 Totals 28 1 5 1 San Diego .......................... 000 200 000 — 2 Washington ....................... 000 000 100 — 1 E—I.Rodriguez (2). DP—San Diego 3. LOB—San Diego 6, Washington 4. 2B—Tekotte (1), Hairston Jr. (7). 3B—Tekotte (1). HR—L.Nix (7). SB—E.Patterson (6). CS—Desmond (2), Morse (3). IP H R ER BB SO San Diego Stauffer W,1-3 ......... 7 4 1 1 4 4 M.Adams H,9........... 1 1 0 0 0 2 H.Bell S,11-12 ......... 1 0 0 0 0 2 Washington Zimmermann L,2-6 . 6 5 2 2 1 4 S.Burnett .................. 1 0 0 0 0 2 Coffey ....................... 1 0 0 0 0 1 H.Rodriguez ............ 1 2 0 0 1 1 WP—H.Bell. Umpires—Home, Ed Rapuano;First, Brian O’Nora;Second, Alfonso Marquez;Third, Ed Hickox. T—2:32. A—19,159 (41,506). EPtrsn rf Denorfi ph-rf Bartlett ss Ludwck lf Hawpe 1b Headly 3b Tekotte cf KPhlps c RJhnsn c Forsyth 2b Stauffr p MAdms p H.Bell p

Brewers 3, Giants 2 San Francisco ab Rownd cf-lf 4 FSnchz 2b 4 Burrell lf 4 Romo p 0 BCrwfr ss 0 C.Ross rf 4

r 1 0 0 0 0 0

h bi 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

Milwaukee Weeks 2b CGomz cf Braun lf Fielder 1b McGeh 3b YBtncr ss

ab 4 4 1 3 3 3

r 0 1 2 0 0 0

h bi 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0

Diamondbacks 11, Astros 3 Arizona

ab 5 5 5 5 4 5 3 2 3 1 0

r 0 1 1 2 1 3 0 2 1 0 0

h bi 1 0 1 0 1 0 4 1 1 1 3 2 0 0 1 3 1 3 0 0 0 0

Houston

ab r h bi Bourn cf 4 0 0 0 Barmes ss 4 1 2 0 Pence rf 4 1 1 0 Ca.Lee lf 4 1 2 1 CJhnsn 3b 4 0 1 1 Wallac 1b 4 0 1 1 Hall 2b 2 0 0 0 FRdrgz p 0 0 0 0 Michals ph 1 0 0 0 JValdz p 0 0 0 0 AngSnc ph 1 0 0 0 Towles c 4 0 0 0 Norris p 1 0 0 0 MDwns 2b 1 0 0 0 Totals 38111310 Totals 34 3 7 3 Arizona............................. 020 400 032 — 11 Houston ........................... 000 000 003 — 3 E—Hall (4). DP—Houston 1. LOB—Arizona 4, Houston 5. 2B—R.Roberts (7), C.Young (16), Montero (12), Ca.Lee (10). HR—G.Parra (3), Duke (1). CS—S.Drew (3). SF—C.Young, G.Parra. IP H R ER BB SO Arizona Duke W,1-0.............. 7 3 0 0 1 4 Kroenke.................... 2 4 3 3 0 1 Houston Norris L,2-4.............. 5 7 6 2 2 4 Fe.Rodriguez........... 2 1 0 0 0 2 J.Valdez ................... 2 5 5 5 0 2 WP—J.Valdez. Balk—Norris. Umpires—Home, Brian Runge;First, D.J. Reyburn;Second, Marvin Hudson;Third, Ted Barrett. T—2:53. A—31,405 (40,963). Blmqst lf KJhnsn 2b RRorts 3b S.Drew ss CYoung cf Monter c Mirand 1b GParra rf Duke p Brrghs ph Kroenk p

Rockies 15, Cardinals 4 St. Louis

Colorado h bi ab r h bi 2 1 EYong 2b-lf 6 1 3 1 0 0 Fowler cf 5 2 2 0 3 0 CGnzlz lf 4 2 2 1 JMorls Pujols 1b 2 0 0 0 ph-2b 1 0 0 0 Greene rf 2 1 1 1 Tlwtzk ss 4 2 2 1 Brkmn rf 2 0 1 0 Amezg 3b 0 0 0 1 Craig rf-1b 2 0 1 2 Helton 1b 3 2 1 0 Rasms cf 3 0 0 0 JHerrr ss 1 0 0 0 Wggntn Schmkr 2b 4 0 0 0 3b-1b 4 2 1 0 YMolin c 2 0 0 0 Splrghs rf 4 2 3 4 Frnkln p 1 0 0 0 Iannett c 5 2 4 6 Miller p 0 0 0 0 Nicasio p 4 0 0 0 Hollidy ph 1 0 0 0 GRynld p 1 0 0 0 Tallet p 0 0 0 0 Street p 0 0 0 0 Descals 3b 4 0 1 0 JGarci p 1 0 0 0 T.Cruz c 3 1 2 0 Totals 36 411 4 Totals 42151814 St. Louis........................... 000 010 030 — 4 Colorado .......................... 610 500 12x — 15 E—J.Garcia (2). DP—Colorado 2. LOB—St. Louis 8, Colorado 9. 2B—Greene (4), T.Cruz (2), Fowler (13), C.Gonzalez (8). 3B—Fowler (5), Spilborghs (1). HR—Iannetta 2 (7). SB—E.Young (1). SF— Amezaga. IP H R ER BB SO St. Louis J.Garcia L,5-1.......... 31⁄3 11 12 11 4 6 Franklin..................... 22⁄3 2 0 0 0 3 Miller ......................... 1 1 1 1 1 0 Tallet......................... 1 4 2 2 0 2 Colorado Nicasio W,1-0.......... 7 6 1 0 2 2 G.Reynolds.............. 1 3 3 3 1 0 Street ........................ 1 2 0 0 0 1 PB—Iannetta. Umpires—Home, Kerwin Danley;First, Vic Carapazza;Second, Paul Nauert;Third, Doug Eddings. T—3:02. A—38,149 (50,490). Theriot ss Kozma ss Jay lf

ab 3 1 5

r 0 1 1

A M E R I C A N L E A G U E Blue Jays 9, White Sox 8, 14 innings, Chicago

Toronto ab r h bi Pierre lf 6 1 0 0 YEscor ss AlRmrz ss 6 1 3 1 CPttrsn dh A.Dunn dh 7 1 1 1 Bautist rf Konerk 1b 3 1 2 1 JRiver 1b McPhrs pr-1b 0 0 0 0 A.Hill 2b Quentin ph-rf 2 0 0 0 RDavis cf Przyns c 7 0 2 2 EThms lf Rios cf 7 1 2 0 JMolin c Vizquel 2b-1b 6 0 0 0 J.Nix 3b Lillirdg rf-2b 5 2 2 2 Encrnc ph Morel 3b 6 1 2 0 McCoy 3b Totals 55 814 7 Totals Chicago ............ 030 030 011 000 Toronto ............. 302 000 300 000

ab 6 7 4 6 6 6 5 6 2 1 3 52 00 01

r h bi 1 1 0 4 5 1 3 3 3 0 2 3 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 914 9 — 8 — 9

AP PHOTO

T

he Phillies’ Ryan Howard smacks a two-run double in the eighth inning of Saturday’s game against the New York Mets as New York Mets, at Citi Field in New York. Howard, who was batting .186 with 25 strikeouts in 70 at-bats against lefties this year, lined a 2-0 pitch off of left-hander Tim Byrdak into the right-field corner to put Philadelphia up 4-2. The Phils added another run in the ninth for a 5-2 win.

No outs when winning run scored. E—Al.Ramirez (10), A.Hill (2). DP—Chicago 2, Toronto 1. LOB—Chicago 10, Toronto 8. 2B—Al.Ramirez 2 (14), Konerko 2 (7), Pierzynski (6), Rios (9), Morel (6), Bautista (8), J.Rivera (7), A.Hill (11). 3B—Lillibridge (1). HR—Lillibridge (5), C.Patterson (3), Bautista (20). S—Pierre. IP H R ER BB SO Chicago E.Jackson ................ 62⁄3 9 6 6 1 7 Thornton................... 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 Crain BS,1-1............ 1⁄3 Sale........................... 3 2 0 0 1 3 S.Santos................... 2 0 0 0 1 1 Floyd L,5-5............... 1 1 1 1 0 0 Toronto Villanueva ................ 5 8 6 5 1 4 Camp ........................ 1 0 0 0 0 0 Rzepczynski ............ 1 0 0 0 1 0 Dotel H,2 .................. 1 1 1 0 0 1 F.Francisco BS,3-8. 2⁄3 2 1 1 0 1 Frasor ....................... 12⁄3 1 0 0 1 1 L.Perez W,1-0 ......... 32⁄3 2 0 0 0 0 Thornton pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Floyd pitched to 1 batter in the 14th. HBP—by Camp (Lillibridge). WP—Villanueva, L.Perez. PB—J.Molina. Umpires—Home, Rob Drake;First, David Rackley;Second, Bruce Dreckman;Third, Paul Emmel. T—4:17. A—22,659 (49,260).

Indians 7, Rays 3 Cleveland

Tampa Bay ab r h bi ab r h bi Brantly cf 5 2 2 0 Longori 3b 4 1 2 1 ACarer ss 4 1 1 1 Damon dh 5 0 1 0 Choo rf 3 2 1 0 Zobrist 2b 4 0 1 0 T.Buck lf 2 0 1 0 Joyce rf 4 1 1 0 Duncan ph 1 1 1 2 BUpton cf 4 0 0 0 Kearns lf 0 0 0 0 Ktchm 1b 4 1 2 0 CSantn c 3 0 1 1 SRdrgz ss 4 0 2 1 GSizmr dh 4 0 0 0 Fuld lf 3 0 0 0 OCarer 2b 4 0 1 2 Shppch c 2 0 0 0 LaPort 1b 3 1 2 1 Jaso ph-c 2 0 0 0 Hannhn 3b 4 0 0 0 Totals 33 710 7 Totals 36 3 9 2 Cleveland ........................... 210 000 040 — 7 Tampa Bay......................... 001 100 001 — 3 E—LaPorta (5), Zobrist (4). DP—Tampa Bay 3. LOB—Cleveland 4, Tampa Bay 8. 2B—Damon (7), Kotchman (6). 3B—A.Cabrera (3). HR—LaPorta (6), Longoria (3). SF—C.Santana. IP H R ER BB SO Cleveland C.Carrasco W,4-2... 6 7 2 2 0 4 Pestano H,6 ............. 2⁄3 0 0 0 1 1 Sipp H,11 ................. 11⁄3 0 0 0 0 2 2 1 0 1 0 R.Perez .................... 2⁄3 C.Perez S,14-15 ..... 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 Tampa Bay Shields L,5-3 ........... 7 7 3 3 3 8 Howell....................... 0 2 4 1 0 0 Farnsworth............... 1 1 0 0 0 0 J.Cruz ....................... 1 0 0 0 0 2 Howell pitched to 4 batters in the 8th. HBP—by Howell (Choo). Umpires—Home, Brian Gorman;First, Tony Randazzo;Second, Dan Bellino;Third, Larry Vanover. T—3:05. A—24,717 (34,078).

York Giants to a 12-5 win over Brooklyn at Ebbets Field. Terry became the first player in major league history to include a grand slam as part of the cycle. 1942 — New York’s Lefty Gomez, self-described as the worst-hitting pitcher in baseball, banged out four hits while pitching a 16-1 four-hitter against Washington. 1946 — In a reverse integration role, Edward Klep became the first white to play in the Negro leagues in a game played in Grand Rapids, Mich. Klep pitched seven innings for the Cleveland Buckeyes against the American Giants in his debut with the Negro American League team. 1956 — Dale Long went hitless for the Pirates, ending his major league record streak of home runs in eight consecutive games. The Brooklyn Dodgers beat Pittsburgh, 10-1. 1965 — Philadelphia’s Richie Allen hit a 529-foot home run over the roof of Connie Mack Stadium off Chicago’s Larry Jackson in the Phillies’ 4-2 victory. 1976 — Houston’s Joe Niekro was the winning pitcher and hit a home run off his brother, Phil Niekro. The Astros beat the Atlanta Braves 4-1. It was the only home run hit by Joe in his 22-year major league career.

F R I D AY ’ S L A T E B O X E S Mariners 4, Yankees 3 New York

Seattle ab r h bi ab r h bi Jeter ss 5 0 1 0 ISuzuki rf 4 1 1 1 Grndrs cf 2 1 0 0 LRdrgz 3b 2 0 0 1 Teixeir 1b 4 2 2 1 Smoak 1b 3 0 0 1 AlRdrg 3b 3 0 1 1 Cust dh 3 0 1 0 Cano 2b 4 0 0 0 FGtrrz cf 4 0 0 0 Martin c 3 0 0 0 AKndy 2b 4 1 2 0 Posada dh 3 0 0 0 Olivo c 3 1 1 0 ENunez pr-dh 0 0 0 0 Peguer lf 3 0 0 0 Swisher rf 3 0 1 0 MSndrs lf 0 0 0 0 Gardnr lf 4 0 0 0 Ryan ss 3 1 1 1 Totals 31 3 5 2 Totals 29 4 6 4 New York ........................... 100 020 000 — 3 Seattle ................................ 000 022 00x — 4 LOB—New York 7, Seattle 8. 2B—I.Suzuki (9). HR—Teixeira (14). SB—Granderson (7), Martin (5), E.Nunez (6), Olivo (2). IP H R ER BB SO New York A.J.Burnett............... 5 4 2 2 5 6 Logan........................ 0 1 1 1 0 0 Ayala L,1-1 BS,1-1 . 2 1 1 1 1 2 Robertson ................ 1 0 0 0 0 2 Seattle Pineda ...................... 5 3 3 3 5 5 Pauley W,3-0 ........... 2 2 0 0 0 1 J.Wright H,10 .......... 1 0 0 0 1 0 League S,13-16 ...... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Logan pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. HBP—by Ayala (L.Rodriguez). WP—Ayala, Pineda. Umpires—Home, Todd Tichenor;First, Sam Holbrook;Second, Gerry Davis;Third, Greg Gibson. T—3:04. A—33,715 (47,878).

Rangers 10, Royals 1 Kansas City

ab 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3

r 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

h bi 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0

Texas

ab r h bi Gordon lf Kinsler 2b 4 1 1 0 MeCarr cf Andrus ss 4 1 1 0 Hosmer 1b ABlanc ss 1 0 0 0 Francr rf JHmltn lf 5 1 2 1 Butler dh MiYong dh 4 1 0 0 Betemt 3b ABeltre 3b 4 1 2 3 Aviles 2b N.Cruz rf 4 2 3 2 Treanr c Morlnd 1b 4 1 3 1 AEscor ss Napoli c 2 1 1 2 EnChvz cf 4 1 2 1 Totals 33 1 7 1 Totals 36101510 Kansas City ..................... 000 000 100 — 1 Texas ............................... 231 013 00x — 10 E—A.Beltre (5). DP—Kansas City 2, Texas 2. LOB—Kansas City 6, Texas 6. 2B—J.Hamilton 2 (7), A.Beltre (12), N.Cruz (4). HR—A.Beltre (11), N.Cruz (9), Moreland (6), Napoli (7), En.Chavez (1). SF—Napoli. IP H R ER BB SO Kansas City O’Sullivan L,2-4....... 52⁄3 15 10 10 2 1 Collins....................... 21⁄3 0 0 0 1 2 Texas Harrison W,5-4........ 6 5 0 0 1 1 Tateyama S,1-1....... 3 2 1 0 0 1 Umpires—Home, Bill Welke;First, Mike Estabrook;Second, Jeff Nelson;Third, Marty Foster. T—2:30. A—40,240 (49,170). Twins 1, Angels 0, 10 innings, Los Angeles Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi MIzturs 2b 4 0 0 0 Span cf 4 0 1 0 Aybar ss 4 0 0 0 ACasill 2b 4 0 0 0 Abreu dh 4 0 0 0 Kubel dh 4 0 0 0 TrHntr rf 4 0 0 0 Mornea 1b 4 0 1 0 Callasp 3b 3 0 0 0 Repko pr 0 1 0 0 Branyn 1b 3 0 0 0 Cuddyr rf 4 0 1 0 Trumo 1b 1 0 0 0 DYong lf 4 0 2 0 Bourjos cf 3 0 1 0 Valenci 3b 4 0 1 1 Mathis c 2 0 0 0 RRiver c 1 0 0 0 Conger ph-c 1 0 0 0 Thome ph 1 0 0 0 Willits lf 1 0 0 0 Butera c 0 0 0 0 Amarst ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Plouffe ss 2 0 0 0 Totals 31 0 1 0 Totals 32 1 6 1 Los Angeles ................. 000 000 000 0 — 0 Minnesota .................... 000 000 000 1 — 1 One out when winning run scored. E—Weaver (1). DP—Los Angeles 1. LOB—Los Angeles 3, Minnesota 5. 2B—Bourjos (8). IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles Weaver..................... 9 2 0 0 2 7 Takahashi L,1-1 ...... 1⁄3 1 1 1 0 1 Jepsen...................... 0 3 0 0 0 0 Minnesota Swarzak ................... 8 1 0 0 2 4 Capps ....................... 1 0 0 0 0 0 Al.Burnett W,1-3 ..... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Jepsen pitched to 3 batters in the 10th. Umpires—Home, Jim Reynolds;First, Tim Welke;Second, Andy Fletcher;Third, Mike DiMuro. T—2:43. A—39,284 (39,500).

T H I S D A T E I N B A S E B A L L May 29 1916 — Christy Mathewson defeated the Boston Braves 3-0 for the New York Giants’ 17th consecutive road win. 1928 — Bill Terry hit for the cycle to lead the New

Athletics 6, Orioles 2 Baltimore

Oakland ab r h bi ab r h bi Andino 2b 4 0 1 0 DeJess rf 3 1 1 1 AdJons cf 4 0 0 0 Barton 1b 5 0 1 0 Markks rf 3 0 1 0 Sweeny cf 5 2 2 1 Guerrr dh 3 1 1 0 Wlngh lf 3 1 2 2 Wieters c 4 0 2 0 Matsui dh 3 0 1 1 Reimld lf 3 0 0 0 KSuzuk c 5 0 2 1 MrRynl 3b 2 0 0 1 M.Ellis 2b 4 1 1 0 Hardy ss 4 0 1 0 AnLRc 3b 4 1 1 0 Fox 1b 2 1 0 0 Pnngtn ss 4 0 1 0 Totals 29 2 6 1 Totals 36 612 6 Baltimore ............................ 010 010 000 — 2 Oakland.............................. 110 003 01x — 6 E—Ad.Jones (4), Mar.Reynolds (9), Pennington (5). DP—Baltimore 1, Oakland 4. LOB—Baltimore 6, Oakland 15. 2B—Sweeney (5), Willingham (7), K.Suzuki (9). HR—Willingham (8). SB—M.Ellis (7). IP H R ER BB SO Baltimore Tillman ...................... 41⁄3 6 2 1 3 2 Simon L,1-1 ............. 2 4 3 3 2 4 M.Gonzalez ............. 12⁄3 2 1 1 2 1 Oakland G.Gonzalez ............. 5 5 2 1 5 7 Ziegler W,1-0........... 2 1 0 0 0 1 Devine H,1 ............... 1 0 0 0 0 0 Wuertz ...................... 1 0 0 0 0 1 G.Gonzalez pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. HBP—by M.Gonzalez (An.LaRoche), by Tillman (M.Ellis), by G.Gonzalez (Guerrero). WP—M.Gonzalez. Umpires—Home, Angel Campos;First, Chad Fairchild;Second, Joe West;Third, Angel Hernandez. T—3:09. A—12,110 (35,067).

Dodgers 3, Marlins 2 Florida

Los Angeles ab r h bi ab r h bi Coghln cf 4 0 0 0 Furcal ss 4 0 0 0 HRmrz ss 1 2 0 0 Blake 3b 4 1 1 0 Morrsn lf 3 0 2 0 Ethier rf 3 1 2 1 GSnchz 1b 4 0 1 0 Kemp cf 3 0 0 0 Dobbs 3b 4 0 3 2 Gions lf 2 0 0 0 Stanton rf 3 0 0 0 JuCastr ph 1 0 0 0 J.Buck c 4 0 0 0 RDLRs p 0 0 0 0 Infante 2b 4 0 0 0 Navarr ph 1 0 1 1 Vazquz p 2 0 0 0 Loney 1b 3 1 1 1 Cousins ph 1 0 1 0 Barajs c 3 0 1 0 Choate p 0 0 0 0 Carroll 2b 3 0 0 0 R.Webb p 0 0 0 0 Garlnd p 2 0 0 0 Bonifac ph 1 0 0 0 Elbert p 0 0 0 0 Hensly p 0 0 0 0 GwynJ lf 1 0 0 0 Totals 31 2 7 2 Totals 30 3 6 3 Florida ................................ 000 001 010 — 2 Los Angeles....................... 010 001 001 — 3 No outs when winning run scored. E—Stanton (2), Furcal (3). DP—Los Angeles 4. LOB—Florida 7, Los Angeles 5. HR—Ethier (5), Loney (2). SB—H.Ramirez (11). IP H R ER BB SO Florida Vazquez ................... 6 3 2 2 1 3 Choate ...................... 2⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 R.Webb .................... 11⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 Hensley L,0-1 .......... 0 3 1 1 1 0 Los Angeles Garland..................... 61⁄3 5 1 1 4 2 Elbert H,2................. 2⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 R.De La Rosa W,1-0 BS,1-1........... 2 2 1 1 1 1 Hensley pitched to 4 batters in the 9th. Umpires—Home, Derryl Cousins;First, Jim Joyce;Second, Ron Kulpa;Third, Jim Wolf. T—2:37. A—34,407 (56,000).


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

➛ WWW.TIMESLEADER.COM/SPORTS

SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011 PAGE 7C

AT PLAY

Comets athlete Millersville-bound Invited to play football at ESU

Comet is Susquehanna-bound

Crestwood’s Alexandra Hoops has accepted an invitation to attend Millersville University, an NCAA Division II school, and compete on the softball team. Pictured are, seated from left: John Hoops (brother), Susan Hoops (mother), Alexandra Hoops and William Hoops (father). Standing: Tony Mozeleski (Director of Athletics), Bonnie Gregory (Assistant High School Principal), Bob Bertoni (Head Softball Coach), Bob Tarnowski (Assistant Softball Coach) and Chris Gegaris (High School Principal).

Crestwood’s Zachary Fogleman has accepted an invitation to attend Susquehanna University, an NCAA Division III school in Selinsgrove, and compete on the football team. Seated: Michelle Glynn (mother), Zachary Fogleman, Gregory Fogleman (father) and Sarah Fogleman (sister). Standing: Tony Mozeleski (Athletics Director), Greg Myers (Football Coach) and Bonnie Gregory (Assistant Principal).

Crestwood’s Nico DiSabatino has accepted an invitation to attend East Stroudsburg University, an NCAA Division II school, and compete on the football team. Pictured, seated from left, are: Dominick DiSabatino (brother), Debbie DiSabatino (mother), Nico DiSabatino, Joe DiSabatino (father), Jenna DiSabatino (sister) and Cassie DiSabatino (sister). Standing: Tony Mozeleski (Director of Athletics), Greg Myers (Head Football Coach) and Bonnie Gregory (Assistant High School Principal).

Comet’s next stop: Stevenson U WVW Wrestling Hall inductee

Crestwood’s Jeff Michaels has accepted an invitation to attend Stevenson University, an NCAA Division III school in Owings Mills, Md., and compete on the football team. Seated, from left: Leroy Michaels (father), Jeff Michaels and Rhonda Morrison (mother). Standing: Tony Mozeleski (Director of Athletics), Greg Myers (Head Football Coach) and Bonnie Gregory (Assistant High School Principal).

Rock Solid girls reign in N.J.

Standout wrestler Trevin Cowman was honored recently by the Wyoming Valley West Wrestling Booster Club as the 2011 inductee to the WVW Wrestling Hall of Fame. Trevin was the 2006 PIAA champion heavyweight and went on to earn All-American status when he beat the country’s topranked heavyweight wrestler at the Dapper Dan Wrestling Classic. Cowman graduated from Cornell University in 2010 and is pursuing an application into the U.S. Marine Corps Officer Candidates School. Pictured above at the induction ceremony are, from left: Trevin’s junior high coach and current WVW varsity head coach Steve Barber; Cowman; Trevin’s varsity coach Don Morgan; and former WVW heavyweight, 2008 Hall of Fame inductee and current varsity assistant coach Drew Feldman.

Comets’ Martin King’s-bound

Crestwood’s Casey Martin has accepted an invitation to attend King’s College, an NCAA Division III school in the MAC, and compete on the football team. Seated, from left: Casey R. Martin and Ellen Yarborough (mother) Standing: Tony Mozeleski (Director of Athletics), Ryan Arcangelli (Assistant Football Coach), Greg Myers (Head Football Coach) and Bonnie Gregory (Assistant High School Principal).

Step By Step golf set for June 24

Sem trio on national title team

Rock Solid sixth-grade girls AAU team recently finished first in a basketball tournament in New Jersey. The team went 4-0 and outscored its opponents 152-58 in tournament games. Pictured, first row, is: Alexis Pyzia, Talia Kosierowski, Sara Lojewski and Kirsten Durling;. Second row: Assistant Coach Mark Lacey, Courtney Devens, Paige Evans, Sarah Sabaluski and Head Coach Chad Lojewski. Absent from picture: Maddie Kelley, Katie Wolfgang, Breezy Coolbaugh, Emma Lehman and Sam Delamater.

Scranton’s sportsmanship lauded

Craig Skudalski (Kingston Township), Hunter Obeid (Wilkes-Barre) and Bobby Polachek (Kingston), pictured from left, recently became 16U AA Tier II National Ice Hockey Champions. The boys play for the Mid-State Mustangs, of Altoona. The team first won the MID–AM District/Pa. State Championship played in March in Pittsburgh. They then advanced to the National Tournament held in Reston, Va. The Mustangs went 6-0 for the tournament, beating the Alaska Wolves in the quarterfinals, the Metro (Md.) Maple Leafs in the semifinals and the Florida Junior Panthers in the championship game. During the regular ice hockey season, all three boys are members of the Wyoming Seminary varsity ice hockey team.

Step By Step Vocational Services holds an annual golf tournament to increase community awareness to the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities. This year’s tournament will be held June 24 at Sand Springs Country Club in Drums. For promotional opportunities or to register to golf, contact Fran Granahan at 829-3477, ext 181. Pictured, seated, is Robert Rudinski, honorary golf chairperson Standing, from left: Michael Bernatovich, Fran Granahan, Patricia Mentis, James Bobeck, Marbee Sulitka and David Searfoss.

Comets aid the Relay for Life

AT P L AY P O L I C Y

University of Scranton has won the Schoenfeld Sportsmanship Award, which is given out annually by the CBOA (Collegiate Basketball Officials Association)—Lehigh/Scranton chapter. This marks the second straight year for Scranton to win the award and third time in the last eight years. Scranton also won it in 2005. Pictured is John Leighton, area representative of the Lehigh-Scranton chapter; and Carl Danzig, men’s basketball coach, accepting the award.

The Times Leader will accept photos, standings and stories from readers about youth and adult recreation activities. We’re also encouraging anyone in a league – darts, pool, Frisbee, etc. – to submit standings and results to us. E-mailed photos should be sent in a jpeg format. Those that are not in a jpeg format might not be published. All submitted items should have contact information as well to ensure publication. Items will not be accepted over the telephone. They may be e-mailed to tlsports@timesleader.com with “At Play” in the subject, faxed to 831-7319, dropped off at the Times Leader or mailed to Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250.

Crestwood track and field athletes, from both the varsity and juniior high teams, contributed toward a team donation for the Relay for Life held May 21-22 at Crestwood High School in Wright Township. In addition to their donations, Crestwood athletes got together May 21 to run laps in honor or memory of someone stricken with cancer. Pictured, from left, are team members Matt Sandroski, senior captain; Paul Chiaramonte, senior captain; Kyle Broshl, junior; and Billy Li, sophomore.


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SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011

Jets’ DeVito using lockout to give faith a workout

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

By DENNIS WASZAK Jr. AP Sports Writer

RANDOLPH, N.J. — Mike DeVito cleared his throat a few times, took a couple of steps from behind the lectern and looked out at the dozens of people seated in front of him. This was no locker room speech or game huddle for the New York Jets defensive lineman. DeVito was giving his first sermon at a church filled with congregants looking for spiritual guidance from their special guest. “I was nervous, brother,” DeVito acknowledged a few moments after his passionate presentation last Sunday. “But I think it turned out OK.” No doubt about it. Just as he has for Rex Ryan’s defense the past few seasons, DeVito got the job done. “He seemed very comfortable engaging the crowd,” said Jets left tackle D’Brickashaw Ferguson, who was there to support his teammate. “It seemed like he had done this before. To see him doing God’s work and be so excited, it’s just great.” A devout Christian who is considering a post-football career as perhaps a youth minister or pastor, the 26-year-old DeVito was part-teacher and part-preacher as he spoke about the meaning of faith for about 20 minutes at RCC — a Relevant Christian Church — complete with a PowerPoint presentation. He also threw in a few jokes that drew a roomful of chuckles, and several of his points were met with an approving “Amen!” or “You’re right!” “I’m so proud of him,” DeVito’s wife, Jessie, said with a huge smile as several people hugged and thanked her husband a few feet away. While so much focus during the NFL’s strange offseason has been on the contentious lockout and how players are staying in shape while they wait to go back to work, DeVito has been using some of that extra time to strengthen his faith. “He delivered a great message,” said church member Jay Trevorrow of Flanders, N.J. “I think God has great plans for him.” DeVito has been working closely with Morning Star New York associate pastor Adam Burt, a former NHL defenseman who has served as the Jets’ chaplain for three years. DeVito regularly studies the Bible and pretty much anything else he can get his hands on that helps him learn more about living and teaching

AP P HOTO

New York Jets defensive lineman Mike DeVito gives his first sermon at a church service in Randolph, N.J. DeVito, a devout Christian, is considering a post-football career as a youth minister or pastor. The 26-year-old DeVito spoke for 20 minutes about the meaning of faith.

as a Christian. “When I saw Michael’s heart, he has a real passion in it,” said Burt, also the itinerant pastor at RCC. “As much of a mountain of a man as he is, he loves people deeply. I had no idea that his heart would be like, ’Hey, someday I might like to do this,’ but the closer I get to him, I can definitely see the call of God being on his life and that’s exciting.” Burt also recently had DeVito speak to athletes at West Point and Columbia University about making religion a major part of their lives. And, DeVito said, this is only the beginning. “I feel that with this platform God has given me, it has allowed me to meet people, reach out to kids and be in situations where football facilitates it, but it allows me to talk about God,” DeVito said. “I love talking to the youth and trying to set the right example because if you can set a good foundation right from the start, it’s going to help them avoid so many problems down the line.” DeVito is a friendly guy with the media, a quiet and easygoing presence in a Jets locker room filled with players who speak their minds, just like their coach. “But when it comes to his faith in God, if you come and talk to him about that, he’s a totally different person,” said Jets tight end Matthew Mulligan, who has been best friends with DeVito since their days together at the University of Maine. “In college, he would never be able to get up and talk in front of people like Sunday. It’s just been a big transformation that I’ve been able to see.” It all started a few years ago for DeVito, who grew up in a nonreligious Italian home in Massachusetts. He was hanging out in his

apartment during his junior year at Maine when two Mormon missionaries showed up at his door. “When I first saw them coming, I really don’t like to be mean to anybody, so when they asked to come in, I was like, ’All right,”’ he recalled. “Not because I wanted to hear about God, but it was more like I didn’t want to just turn these guys away.” Well, DeVito kept listening and that visit turned into several more. For the first time, he realized he had to make changes: no more drinking and partying; no more living with his then-girlfriend; no more scoffing at religion. “They had a good idea of who Jesus is, and that’s what I needed at the time,” he said. “I’m not a Mormon, but they knew Jesus and they gave me that foundation.” It was also during this time in 2006 when DeVito’s friend, Mark Stetson, was slain. DeVito called it “my eye-opening experience.” “When I got up to that coffin and saw a 23-year-old man dead,” DeVito recalled, “it was like, ’Whoa. Man, this isn’t guaranteed. I can’t think I can take care of this on my own time. It’s not about my time. It’s God’s time.’ “There was no turning back.” The defensive lineman confided in Mulligan, who was raised as a Christian, and the two moved in together and helped each other with their faith. When DeVito signed with the Jets as an undrafted free agent in 2007, teammates Kenyon Coleman and James Dearth served as spiritual mentors. DeVito and his best friend were reunited as teammates two years later when the Jets signed Mulligan as a free agent.

G O L F N O T E S • The Wyoming Valley Country Club Women’s Golf Association recently held a “Better Ball of Partners” tournament. Karen Kempinski and Sally Price were the first gross winners, while Connie Rado and Kathy Heltzel took first net. Dorothy Simon and Marie Mihalos won second gross. Linda Shypulefski and Maureen Umphred won second net. Mary Zabresky and Donna Long won third gross, while Carol Lippincott and Jane Olszewski won third net. Cassie Obeid and Julie Chmielowski took fourth gross. Michelle Hazelton and Karen Hazelton won fourth net. Heltzel had a chip-in on hole No. 10. Debbie Gwiandowski had a closest to the pin on hole 13. • George Aldrich and Bob

Stone Meadows Golf Course 18 Holes

Ames won first place in the 2011 men’s member-member tournament held at the Glenmaura National Golf Club. Patrick Mitchell and Brian Lonergan finished second. Dan Mcormick and Rich Kalinowski took third. Bob Galdieri and Bernie Povanda placed fourth. • Joanne Bittner won the “Grandmother’s Prize” tournament held at the Irem Country Club Women’s Golf Association. Mary Ann Stelma recorded a chip in on the second hole and received the putting prize for having made 31 putts. • Luke Pisarcik shot a holein-one at the Glenmaura National Golf Club. Pisarcik aced the 161-yard ninth hole. George Aldrich, Paul Falzett and Paul Pisarcik witnessed the shot. • The Irem Country Club recently held its opening day

tournament. Lou Belgio and Jeff Hodorowski won the first flight. Jack Serafin and Dr. Bill Krywicki took the second flight. The third flight went to Dennis Wengrzkynek and Henry Simoncavage. Jim Finn and Charlie Preece were the fourth flight winners. Closest to the pin shots were made by Dave Straley and Steve Osterhout on hole No. 7. • Jim Hoover and Bill Gaylord won the championship flight of the Spring Classic Golf Tournament held at the Irem Country Club. Jim Breck and Tim Holland were the runner-ups. Semifinalists included Dave Janus, Jason Miller, Tom Stitzer and Bob Bogensberger. The medalists were Scott Francis and Ryan Holthaus. Ed Hennigan and Ron Pokrinchak won closest-to-the-pin honors.

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CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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SOCCER

Barcelona captures Champions League crown Lionel Messi has big day as his team claims its third crown in six years. STUART CONDIE AP Sports Writer

WEMBLEY, England — Lionel Messi scored one goal and created another Saturday, leading Barcelona to a 3-1 victory over Manchester United and a third Champions League title in six years. Barcelona dominated play at Wembley with trademark onetouch passing, but the Spanish champions needed the Argentine striker to conjure a 54th-minute solo strike from the edge of the penalty area to take the lead for the second time.

There seemed to be no space as Messi was tracked by fullback Patrice Evra. But the two-time world player of the year spotted a gap between the central defenders and hit a shot down the middle, beating goalkeeper Edwin van der Sar. Messi followed his 53rd goal of a remarkable season with a fake and run that led to David Villa taking possession on the edge of the area. From there, the Spain striker curled a shot into the top corner of the net. With Pedro Rodriguez scoring the opening goal midway through the first half from an imaginative through ball from Xavi Hernandez, the win was as comprehensive as Barcelona’s 2-0 victory over United in the final two years ago.

Wayne Rooney’s goal in the 34th minute for United left the score 1-1 at halftime. Rooney carried the ball to the edge of the area, slipping it to Ryan Giggs. Giggs knocked it back, giving Rooney the perfect opportunity to curl a shot past goalkeeper Victor Valdes at the far post. It was said before the game that Barcelona, which already had won a third straight Spanish league title, would be ranked among soccer’s truly great teams with a victory over United. Now, with four European titles, only Liverpool, AC Milan and Barcelona’s fierce rival Real Madrid have won more. The performance was so comfortable that Barcelona coach Pep Guardiola was able to bring on

umph. But in a gesture symbolizing Barcelona’s team ethic, Puyol handed the armband over to Eric Abidal. His place on the team had been in doubt after he had surgery this season to remove a liver tumor — and the France defender lifted the famous trophy. After a shaky opening, Barcelona simply outclassed the English champions. Xavi, standing in as captain for Puyol, orchestrated play from in front of Sergio Busquets, while Andres Iniesta and Messi tormented United with pinAP PHOTO point passing. United did improve on its perBarcelona’s Lionel Messi celebrates after winning the Champions formance in Rome two years ago. League final match against Manchester United on Saturday. But it could do little to disrupt regular captain Carles Puyol for injury-hit defender the chance to Barcelona, the prevailing force of the last few moments, giving the play a part in a memorable tri- European soccer.

S TA N L E Y C U P F I N A L S

NBA FINALS

Bruins have eyes set on Cup win

Players refuse to touch Prince of Wales trophy after winning Eastern Conference finals. JIMMY GOLEN AP Sports Writer

Title would cap Wade’s wild year From lawsuits to divorce, Miami star has been through a lot in last 52 weeks.

TIM REYNOLDS AP Sports Writer

MIAMI — Only a year ago, everything in Dwyane Wade’s life was uncertain. Former business partners had brought a combination of civil lawsuits, seeking somewhere around $100 million in what they said was the earnings potential of some failed deals. His yearslong divorce battle was still unsettled. Another courtroom fight was looming for custody of his two sons. And the free-agent period was fast-approaching. “Very long year,” Wade said Saturday. “Very, very long year.” Alas, it comes with a very, very sweet opportunity to close this chapter. Wade is heading back to the NBA finals for the second time. When his Miami Heat open the series at home against the Dallas Mavericks — the franchise they beatin2006aswell—onTuesday night, it’ll be exactly 52 weeks after the four civil suits were settled in what was an overwhelming victory for his side. With that, everything started falling into place. Wadegothisdivorce.Hestayed in Miami. He got LeBron James andChrisBoshtojoinhim.Hegot Udonis Haslem to stay with him. He got custody of his kids. The Heat won 58 games, endured some major bumps along the way, needed only 10 games to get past Chicago and Boston on the way to the Eastern Conference title, and now stand four wins from the ring. “This would be the capper,” said Tragil Wade, the Heat star’s sister. “My mom has been saying this since his 29th birthday in January: ’This will be the year and he will be rewarded. It’ll be in his favor. It will end in his favor.’ So even now, it’s all about belief. We’ve always had belief. When

NBA FINALS Miami vs. Dallas May 31: Dallas at Miami, 9 p.m. June 2: Dallas at Miami, 9 p.m. June 5: Miami at Dallas, 8 p.m. June 7: Miami at Dallas, 9 p.m. x-June 9: Miami at Dallas, 9 p.m. x-June 12: Dallas at Miami, 8 p.m. x-June 14: Dallas at Miami, 9 p.m. TV: All games on ABC, WNEP-16 X – If Necessary

things are good, when things are bad, we always have to have belief.” The first championship was great, sure. After the last 12 months, for Wade, a second title would be monumentally more enjoyable. “I know him better than anybody and I saw the toll that it kind of took on him,” Haslem said of the past year for one of his closest friends. “Through all that, he stayed professional. I think he’s used basketball as an outlet, as many of us do, and when it was all over and he was fortunate enough to get custody of his kids, I saw a light just shining around him.” That light hasn’t always been there, of course. Wade’s story is well-known, starting with an incredibly rough upbringing in Chicago, leaning on his sister as the maternal influence for many years when his mother — Jolinda, now a minister who turned her own life around — wasn’t there for her children for an array of reasons. Basketball was the escape, taking him away from the problems in Chicago to Marquette, then from Marquette to Miami. It has given him wealth and fame, and now — after a season unlike any other, where the Heat were as scrutinized as perhaps any team in NBA history — it has brought him to the cusp of a second championship.

AP PHOTO

NHL deputy commissioner Bill Daly, center, presents the Prince of Wales Trophy to the Eastern Conference finals champion Boston Bruins Friday in Boston.

feeling that today. That’s a great feeling.” Although four of the first six games of the conference finals were high-scoring affairs that left both goaltenders struggling for answers — and left Tampa Bay’s Dwayne Roloson on the bench — the finale was defensive duel with no penalties at all. Lightning coach Guy Boucher said the entire game felt like sudden-death overtime, and it might as well have been. Horton’s goal allowed the Boston fans to celebrate, but it wasn’t until the final seconds ticked off the clock that the players streamed over the boards and fans began showering the ice with souvenir towels. The Bruins surrounded Tim Thomas to congratulate him on his second shut-

out of the series, and no one seemed happier than backup goalie Tuukka Rask, who has not played in the postseason. “Tuukka was like mugging about 10 guys,” Chiarelli said. “He was moving around the most and jumping on guys. So that was just kind of funny.” NHL deputy commissioner Bill Daly brought out the conference trophy — Boston’s first since 1990 — but Chara was only mildly interested in the shiny bauble. “I thought it would be great to have all the guys with it,” he said. “It’s a team thing. It’s something I decided to do and everybody liked it.”

NHL FINALS June 1: Boston at Vancouver 8 p.m., NBC, WBRE-28 June 4: Boston at Vancouver 8 p.m., NBC, WBRE-28 June 6: Vancouver at Boston 8 p.m., VERSUS June 8: Vancouver at Boston 8 p.m., VERSUS x-June 10: Boston at Vancouver 8 p.m., NBC, WBRE-28 x-June 13: Vancouver at Boston 8 p.m., NBC, WBRE-28 x-June 15: Boston at Vancouver 8 p.m., NBC, WBRE-28

COLLEGE LACROSSE

It’s Virginia vs. Maryland for NCAA title The Associated Press

BALTIMORE — Steele Stanwick had three goals and two assists, leading seventh-seeded Virginia to a 14-8 victory over No. 6 seed Denver in the NCAA Division I men’s lacrosse semifinals Saturday. The Cavaliers (12-5) will meet unseeded Maryland (13-4) in Monday’s finals. The Terps, who received 13 saves from keeper Niko Amato to anchor a stingy defense, defeated fifth-seeded Duke, 9-4, in the other semifinal. The four-time champion Cavaliers seized control early in their 22nd appearance in the final four. Denver (15-3) was making its first appearance in the semifinals. Amato, a redshirt freshman, made seven saves in the first half to help the Terps to a 5-2 lead. He got great support from his defenders — Max Schmidt, Brett Schmidt and Ryder Bohlander — who held Duke (14-6) scoreless for stretches of more than 18 minutes in the first half and 22 minutes in the second half.

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AP PHOTO

Miami Heat guard Dwyane Wade jokes around during a practice session Saturday in Miami.

BOSTON — The Prince of Wales trophy sat untouched on a table in the middle of the ice. It’s not the one that Zdeno Chara is hoping to take for a skate. Instead, the Boston Bruins captain waved his teammates over to pose for a picture. “I liked the touch that Zee had, bringing the group around the trophy. I haven’t seen that before,” general manager Peter Chiarelli said Saturday, a day after the Bruins beat Tampa Bay 1-0 in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference finals to earn a chance to play for the Stanley Cup. “You know, it was just a good time. It was a good moment, just for the organization, and it was a feelgood moment. So I was able to enjoy that for a little bit.” Tim Thomas stopped 24 shots for his third career playoff shutout — his second of the conference finals — and Nathan Horton deflected a pass from David Krejci into the net with 7:33 left for the only goal. With that, the Bruins earned the right to play the Vancouver Canucks for their first Stanley Cup since 1972. “It was a special feeling,” Chiarelli said. “You look over and see the ice, see these guys and watch how they celebrate, how they, how emotional they are. You felt good for them, you really felt good for them. ... Then immediately after that feeling passed, I realized that we have a chance to win the Stanley Cup. And I’m still


CMYK ➛

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NASCAR

INDY

Penske’s 2-car team is an enigma MIKE CRANSTON AP Sports Writer

JENNA FRYER AP Auto Racing Writer

CONCORD, N.C. — To hear Kurt Busch talk, his race team is struggling mightily and maybe some behind-the-scenes changes will save the season. Then there’s Brad Keselowski, excited about three weeks of progress that have him enjoying his best stretch yet in NASCAR’s elite Sprint Cup Series. That’s the enigma that is Penske Racing right now. Keselowski will start the Coca-Cola 600 from the pole, while defending race winner Busch will go off 26th in today’s race. Keselowski doesn’t sugarcoat things, and readily admits the NASCAR side of Penske’s motorsports operation has areas that need improvement. But he does it thoughtfully and with an eagerness that good things are coming. Busch is quite the opposite. He’s beyond being hopeful, and his assessments and outlook both seem dreary. He’s also angry with the media for harping on his in-race radio communications, which have gone from maniacal rants to near despondency over the last month. It’s created the good cop-bad cop perception, even though both drivers want the same thing. “He definitely has a different approach,” Keselowski said. “To be honest, if he didn’t have that approach, I probably would adopt it because you keep trying different things until you get what you want. I spent all last year being quiet and not saying, ’Hey, this car is really, really bad’ to the media. But they were really, really bad. “At the same time, Kurt was running well and I didn’t have a leg to stand on with that. This year, obviously my cars have gotten better. Kurt has had his strug-

AP PHOTO

Kurt Busch waits in his car before practice for today’s NASCAR Sprint Cup series Coca-Cola 600 in Concord, N.C.

gles. But it’s somewhat refreshing to have someone that can speak up have a voice, have the credibility of being a past champion and past winner and those around him perhaps listen more intently.” Busch apparently does make things happen behind the scenes. His radio tirade at Richmond earlier this month was epic, and the fallout led to some serious organizational meetings that Busch believed would spur some changes. Less than two weeks later, technical director Tom German left the organization in what the team said was a long-planned opportunity to attend an elite graduate program at MIT. “There were people that had good things to say about him and people that had bad things to say about him,” Keselowski said of German. “Either way, the change there has opened doors that would have never opened before. The jury is still out whether that’s good or bad.” It’s such a far cry from Roger Penske’s esteemed IndyCar operation, which will attempt to win its 16th Indianapolis 500 today. Will Power, who will start from the second row, has two wins this

season and leads the points standings. Teammates Helio Castroneves and Ryan Briscoe have struggled at times this season and this month at Indy, and Briscoe will race in a backup. Back in NASCAR, the two Penske teams have been all over the map. Busch opened the season as the driver to beat at Daytona, winning two exhibition races leading into the season-opener. Top-10 finishes in the first four races made him the points leader for two weeks, but he hasn’t had a top-10 since and has dropped to eighth in the standings. Despite the drop-off, which has left Busch clearly frustrated, he begins each weekend with optimism only to learn shortly after the green flag that his car is not capable of contending for a win. “I feel like we have to go into each race optimistic and positive so that you can find good results,” Busch said. “At the end of the day, Roger Penske and I agree that as long as you put yourself in position to do well, no matter what the outcome is, those are good days. But when you’re running 15th just clawing to hang onto the

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100 ANNOUNCEMENTS

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sport that produced such giants as A.J. Foyt, Mario Andretti and Rick Mears found itself relegated to niche status. Heck, there were even empty seats at the Brickyard, a sight no one could have envisioned a couple of decades ago. “There was almost a lost generation,” Andretti moaned. “There were those 15 years where things were precarious, at best.” Now, there’s a semblance of hope. Two new manufacturers will enter the series in 2012, powering a futuristic new machine. The field for this year’s 500 is undoubtedly deeper and more talented than it has been since the glory days. Sponsorships are up, attendance is improving and an energetic new leader seems willing to try anything that might bring more attention to the sport. In a sense, today’s race can be seen as a jumping-off point to a new era (and, no, we’re not talking about the giant orange ramp set up on the infield for a Hot Wheels promotional stunt before the green flag waves). “I’m proud of the series for what we’ve done, for all the hard work we’ve put in,” said Danica Patrick, who has just one win in her career but remains the only driver widely known outside of IndyCar circles. Of course, the fact that everyone is wondering whether Patrick will bolt to a more profitable gig in NASCAR next year shows the checkered flag remains in the distance. No matter what happens, there’s still plenty of work to be done. A third of the field is composed of part-time drivers, most of whom are doing Indy-only deals and hope it leads to something bigger Look at Dan Wheldon, a former race winner who should be in the prime of his career. He was squeezed out of his last job, and this is the only sure thing on his schedule in 2011. Look at Townsend Bell, who has finished as high as fifth at Indy and will start

Kenseth first in Nationwide

Keselowski happy with team’s recent success. Kurt Busch’s struggles continue.

150 Special Notices

Continued from Page 1C

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CONCORD, N.C. — Matt Kenseth passed Roush Fenway Racing teammate Carl Edwards with two laps to go and hung on to win Saturday’s Nationwide Series race at Charlotte Motor Speedway. Kenseth and Edwards exchanged the lead with five laps left in the 300-mile race, but Edwards couldn’t counter Kenseth’s final pass on the inside. Kenseth was filling in for Trevor Bayne, who has been sidelined with an inflammatory condition, in the No. 16 Ford and was making his only Nationwide start of the season. Bayne is expected to return to competition next week. Edwards, who was running low on fuel, hung on to finish second in what’s been an impressive week for his race team. Edwards won last week’s AllStar race on the same track. Fellow Sprint Cup regular Kyle Busch was third, failing to tie Mark Martin (49) for the most wins in the Nationwide Series. A week after becoming the first non-Sprint Cup driver to win a Nationwide race this season and a day before he makes his Sprint Cup debut, Ricky Stenhouse Jr. finished fourth after captured the pole in the morning qualifying.

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from the inside of the second row. Asked what’s on his schedule for the rest of the year, he replied, “Well, there’s Christmas. And New Year’s, I guess.” Good line, but not good for IndyCar. “I stopped many years ago trying to rationalize or problemsolve the racing industry,” Bell said. “I’m resigned to the fact that if I just go out and win the damn race, everything else will probably take care of itself.” Randy Bernard, who was brought in from the Professional Bull Riders series to bring some pizazz to IndyCar, has certainly shown he’s willing to shake thing up. One of his changes — double-file restarts, which are used in NASCAR — has drawn the ire of the drivers. They see them as impractical with the high-speed, open-wheel machines, which can’t go banging into each other like the good ol’ boys. Tagliani, the surprising polewinner, was one of the most outspoken critics. He fears that today’s race could turn into a gruesome crashfest. He even went so far as to raise the possibility of debris flying into the stands and injuring someone in the massive crowd of more than 200,000. “I don’t want to be responsible for that,” the Canadian said. “If our wheels touch while we’re racing side-by-side, all of a sudden cars are going to be flipping.” IndyCar officials have promised extra sweeping in the corners during caution periods to provide a wider racing groove, but they appear unwilling to back off from the double-file concept. If nothing else, it has given people something to talk about, which might have been the main purpose all along. “It’s brought a lot of new controversy and attention to the sport, in a good and positive way,” Bernard said. Patrick could be making her final start at the 500 if, as most people expect, she moves full time to stock cars in 2012. While coy about her future, she denied a report that a tentative NASCAR deal was already in place and insisted she has not made a final decision. “We’re very far from the finish line on any of that,” she said.

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CMYK PAGE 12C

SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011

OUTDOORS

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

3,600-plus on protected list; 86 waters in county

TOM VENESKY OUTDOORS CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

Reyburn Creek in the Shickshinny area was the latest Luzerne County stream to be added to the wild trout stream list.

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Tobys Creek in the Back Mountain is among the county waters that has a naturally reproducing population of wild trout.

S. JOHN WILKIN/THE TIMES LEADER

Trees bordering Bow Creek in Mountain Top provide adequate shade to keep the water cool enough to sustain a population of wild trout.

Litter bugs, stay away from this jewel of a lake

T

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

Brothers Edward and Joseph Leyshon of Falls fishing Harveys Creek in West Nanticoke recently. While portions of Harveys Creek are stocked with trout, others aren’t because they hold reproducing populations of wild trout.

Discovering wild trout By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

Bow Creek is a deceiving stream. Flowing through numerous housing developments and a large industrial park in Wright Township, Bow Creek isn’t in the perfect location to provide a home to a naturally reproducing wild trout population. But it is. And so are 85 others in Luzerne County. For the last year, the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission has been assessing streams throughout the state to determine if they hold populations of wild trout. Dubbed the Unassessed Waters Initiative, the PFBC utilizes the manpower of local colleges, including King’s College, and conservation groups in assessing the nearly 45,000 waterways in the state that have never been studied for wild trout. So far, naturally reproducing wild trout have been found in 3,650 waterways statewide, and 86 are in Luzerne County. “I think it’s a great number for a county with a large urban area,” said Larry Bundy, regional supervisor for the PFBC’s Northeast Region. The designation has regulatory significance because wetlands that are located in or along the floodplain of the reach of a wild trout stream are considered “exceptional value” by the state Department of Environmental Protection and are entitled to the highest level of pro-

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Nescopeck Creek in Nescopeck State Park is home to a naturally reproducing wild trout population.

Norm Gavlick of the PFBC surveys Mill Creek, one of 86 county streams classified as a wild trout water.

F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N :

who represents the northeast region, expects more streams to be added in the near future. The volunteers also reassess streams and in some cases waterways are removed from the list if they don’t meet the criteria for a naturally reproducing trout population. “We haven’t undertaken anything of this magnitude before because we didn’t have the money or the manpower,” Gavlick said. “There’s no way we could do this without the help of other agencies and schools.” As far as angling opportunities go, just because a stream is added to the wild trout list doesn’t mean it is open to public fishing. Bundy said many of the waterways are on privately owned property and anglers should ask permission.

To see the statewide list of wild trout waters, visit http://www.fishandboat.com/ trout_repro.pdf.

tection by DEP. The list is also the primary tool that the PFBC has to protect wild trout populations because the list must be consulted by agencies such as the DEP and the Susquehanna River Basin Commission when reviewing permit applications to do work in the area. Last week the PFBC board voted unanimously to add 99 additional waters to the wild trout list. One – Reyburn Creek in Jonestown – was in Luzerne County. Because the assessment is still ongoing, PFBC commissioner Norm Gavlick,

See STREAMS , Page 13C

State anglers cashing in on tagged fish; 11 prize-winners caught Pennsylvania anglers have landed nearly a dozen prize-winning fish as part of Cabela’s “Wanna Go Fishing for Millions?’’ national contest, including one fish that might carry a $9,000 prize. As a partner in the contest, the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission tagged fish in eight waterways across the state. OnFriday,Cabela’sconfirmedthat11tags have been submitted as part of the contest. The participants and the fish they caught are currently being verified, including one fish with a potential $9,000 award. Tagged fish have been caught in Raystown Lake, Penns Creek, Lake Nockamixon, Lake Wallenpaupack and Foster Joseph Sayers Lake. The PFBC is reminding the public that the contest coincides with the first of the agency’s Fish-For-Free Days, scheduled for

Memorial Day, Monday, May 30. On this “fishing holiday,’’ the public can fish for free anywhereinthestate.Nolicenseisrequired. In conjunction with the Cabela’s contest, the PFBC will hold Fish-for-Free events on Memorial Day at six of the waters containingtaggedfish.Theeventswillbeheldfrom 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at: NE Region: Lake Wallenpaupack (Pike and Wayne counties) — PFBC Access (Access #750 on PFBC maps). The tagged fish include walleye and smallmouth bass. SE Region: Lake Nockamixon in Nockamixon State Park (Bucks County) — Tohickon Access (Access #981on PFBC maps). Tagged fish include largemouth bass. NC Region: Foster Joseph Sayers Lake in Bald Eagle State Park (Centre County) — Pavilion7attheday-usearea.Taggedfishin-

clude largemouth and smallmouth bass. SC Region: Raystown Lake (Huntingdon County) — Visitor center at Seven Points Marina. Tagged fish include largemouth bass and walleye. NWRegion:PresqueIsleBay(ErieCounty) — Perry Monument. Tagged fish include largemouth bass. SW Region: Emsworth Pool, Three Rivers, Pittsburgh — Braddock public ramp (Access #328 on PFBC maps). Tagged fish include smallmouth bass. “Fish-for-Free days are a convenient way to introduce friends and family to the sport of fishing,” said PFBC Executive Director John Arway. “Many families spend the day at lakes and parks throughout the state. Now they can try fishing at no cost. We know that once people try it, particularly

kids,theywillseethatfishingisagreatrecreational activity and they will want to do it more.” In addition to providing free fishing tips, PFBCoutreachandeducationstaffwillhave exhibits, free publications and more at the six selected sites. The second Fish-for-Free Day is Labor Day, Sept. 5. TheremainingtwowatersintheCabela’s contest include: Penns Creek (Centre County) — Tagged fish include rainbow trout. Lake Arthur in Moraine State Park (Butler County) — Tagged fish include largemouth bass and walleye. For information about Fish-for-Free Days andCabela’scontest,visitthePFBCwebsite at www.fishandboat.com/fishformillions.htm.

he lake at Frances Slocum State Park is a dump. Let me explain. Last week I walked around the entire lake searching for signs of a mysterious creature that was seen by several anglers (more on that in the coming weeks). The lake and the mix of swamp and forest that border it is actually a beautiful place. Until one looks down at the ground. There is a small path that meanders around the edge of the lake, and along it are several small clearings that anglers frequent. In some of these areas, and along the path, litter is strewn on the shore and in the shallow edges of the lake. It’s the bad stuff, too. Not that any litter is good, but what has accumulated around the lake isn’t the stuff – like paper for example – that will decompose. It’s Styrofoam bait containers, plastic water bottles, aluminum cans and, worst of all, fishing line. Massive tangles of it. The discarded line snakes out of the water along the ground and through tree branches like a spider web. But there is no pattern to the monofilament web and it is far more deadly. And it’s everywhere. On the back end of the lake near Carverton Road, I spied a male mallard duck floating lazily along the edge of the shore. It was a beautiful sight as the bright sun illuminated the duck’s green head and reflected its image of the calm lake surface. But for as picture-perfect as the scene was, it also had an underlying tone of danger. Risk, if you will. By simply swimming along the shore, the mallard could easily get tangled in the strands of fishing line that were left by those too careless to pick it up. Sure, a large mallard is a powerful swimmer, but it is no match if it gets wrapped up in a ball of 8-pound test. On the way back I stuffed by pockets full of fishing line – some of it still had hooks and sinkers attached – and grabbed as many cans and containers as I could hold. Though I was packed full with litter, it didn’t put a dent in what is around the lake. It would take trash bags to do that. To shorten the trip back to my car I turned away from the lake and walked a mountain bike path toward the parking lot. And even there the litter was present. This time it mainly consisted of foil wrappers from protein bars and aluminum cans that once held energy drinks. There’s no doubt that the bulk of the litter around the 165-acre lake was left behind by anglers and mountain bikers. The evidence, unfortunately, is everywhere. Still, I know plenty of mountain bikers and I’m an angler myself, so it isn’t fair to say that all those who pedal or cast are litterbugs. It’s a small segment of each group that is responsible. Unfortunately, when it comes to littering, it only takes a minority to make a big impact. While litter might be a problem around the lake, the staff at Frances Slocum does a great job keeping many areas of the park clean and picturesque. Because of their work, the park is truly a beautiful place. But it’s unreasonable to think that the park staff should also be able to keep the woods and swamps around the lake clean as well. What is reasonable is for the users of such areas to pick up after themselves and make Frances Slocum Lake the natural jewel that it is, and not a dump. Tom Venesky covers the outdoors for The Times Leader. Reach him at tvenesky@timesleader.com


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011 PAGE 13C

OUTDOORS ALBUM Angler: Alexis Bigus Age: 12 Hometown: Dallas What she got: A gobbler that weighed 21 lbs. and sported a double-beard, one side measured eight inches and the other was 10-3/4 inches. Where: Colley Twp., Sullivan County When: May 12 The story: This is gobbler number two for Alexis. She shot her first bird during last year’s youth season. She was hunting with her father, Russ, when she got each bird and is following in her father’s footsteps when it comes to the outdoors.

If you know of a child who recently had a good day hunting, fishing or just spending time in the outdoors, send us a photo. Include the child’s name, age, hometown, information about the fish or game in the photo and a few details to go with it. Photos with information can be emailed to tvenesky@timesleader.com

STREAMS Continued from Page 12C

Also, the wild trout waters are under the same regulations as approved trout waters from April 16 to Sept. 5, but between those dates the wild trout streams are catchand-release only, according to Bundy. Wild trout streams aren’t stocked, Bundy said, in order to protect the wild populations. “What we found is the competition from the stocked trout was tough on the wild populations and actually pushed them out,” Bundy said. “Stocking ends up doing more harm than good.” While it’s likely that many more streams will be added to the list as more assessments are completed, Gavlick wonders about those where wild trout populations were lost simply because no one knew they existed.

“It’s very possible had we been able to get more streams assessed and listed over the last 15 years, that perhaps some of those streams out there that had wild trout that are now gone may have still had those populations today,” he said. “These protections really do benefit wild trout, and I’m sure there’s a lot of trout swimming in our mountain streams that we don’t know about yet.” And it’s the mountain streams in particular that are the reason why Luzerne County has 86 waterways on the list, according to PFBC NE regional outreach and education coordinator Walt Dietz. “A lot of people think of Wilkes-Barre when they think of Luzerne County, but a lot of it is actually rural and mountainous,” Dietz said. “There’s a lot of places here with streams tucked back into forested areas where the water is cool and the quality is good enough to support wild trout.”

Angler: JJ Delaney Age: 3 1/2 Hometown: Wilkes-Barre What he got: Brook trout Where: At the North Branch Trout Derby in Lovelton, Wyoming County When: May 21 The story: JJ caught his first trout at the derby, along with several more later in the morning. The derby attracted more than 125 kids along with their families, and there were plenty of fish to catch for all.

SUBMITTED PHOTOS

Angler: Adam Gegaris (pictured with his father, Andy) Age: 10 Hometown: White Haven What he got: 12-inch brown trout Where: Wapwallopen Creek in Mountain Top When: May 18 The story: Gegaris caught the trout by himself using salted minnows. It was the first trout of what is sure to be a long fishing career for Gegaris.

Sportsmen form alliance in Marcellus Shale region As Marcellus Shale gas development increases at a rapid pace and scale across northern Appalachia, sportsmen and women in the region have joined forces and created an alliance to urge state and federal agencies and the energy industry to protect longheld hunting, fishing and trapping traditions. The Sportsmen Alliance for Marcellus Conservation (Sportsmen Alliance) is an affiliation of sportsmen and women working together to identify and mitigate the impacts of Marcellus Shale gas drilling on hunting, fishing, trapping and other outdoor sporting activities. “While there have been many concerns expressed about Marcellus Shale gas development, the voices of sportsmen and women are beginning to emerge in the public dialogue,” said Katy Dunlap, Eastern Water Project Director for Trout Unlimited (TU). “A number of key organiza-

tions have joined forces to give sportsmen and women an opportunity to be heard—so that together we can advocate for common sense policies and practices to ensure that Marcellus Shale gas development does not negatively impact sportsmen’s interests.” Members of the Sportsmen Alliance include TU and its Pennsylvania, New York, West Virginia, Mid-Atlantic and New Jersey state councils, Theodore Gordon Flyfishers, Izaak Walton League of America and its New York and Pennsylvania state divisions, New York State Trappers Association, Quality Deer Management Association, Pennsylvania Forest Coalition and The Wildlife Society. Collectively, the Sportsmen Alliance members represent 60,000 sportsmen and women in the Marcellus Shale states. The Sportsmen Alliance is not opposed to gas drilling and recognizes its potential economic

and social benefits. Rather, it is concerned that the current state and local policies governing gas drilling and hydraulic fracturing in the Marcellus Shale do not adequately protect valuable and irreplaceable natural resources, including clean water and critical habitat for fish and wildlife. The Sportsmen Alliance has developed a set of recommendations for improving policies and practices for Marcellus Shale development, including: • Gas drilling industry exemptions under the federal Safe Drinking Water Act and Clean Water Act should be repealed; • Each state in the Marcellus Shale region should adopt a comprehensive statewide water withdrawal law; • Drilling operations should not be permitted in watersheds with special state-designated conservation status without additional regulatory requirements, review and inspection;

• High fencing and/or netting should be required around wastewater storage impoundments and well pads to reduce the possibility that wildlife will enter well pad sites and consume wastewater or other toxic chemicals. On Saturday, the Sportsmen Alliance will host the Sportsmen Marcellus Shale Summit at the University of Pittsburgh, Johnstown campus, to provide sportsmen and women with an opportunity to learn about potential impacts and discuss ways in which their interests can be protected. Communities in the Marcellus Shale region have a rich heritage of hunting, fishing, trapping and other outdoor traditions on public and private lands—the very places targeted for Marcellus Shale gas drilling. In the Marcellus states, there are more than 13 million sportsmen and women whose interests are at stake.

M E M O RIA L DA Y S A L E S E V E N T

0.9% A P R FOR UP TO 60 M ON THS N OW THROUGH M A Y 31S T ON N E W 2011 HON DA A CCORD, CR-V , CR-Z, E L E M E N T, FIT, IN S IGHT, ODYS S E Y, P IL OT, A N D RIDGE L IN E M ODE L S . 0.9% A P R FOR UP TO 60 M ON THS A L S O A V A IL A BL E ON THE A L L N E W 2012 HON DA CIV IC THROUGH M A Y 31S T. $0 DO W N G AS M ILEAG E 23 CITY/34 HW Y

G AS M ILEAG E 28 CITY/39 HW Y

2012 Hon d a

CIV IC E X

• M odel#FB2F8C J W • 140-hp,SO H C i-V TEC ® 4-c y linder engine • 5-s peed autom atic trans m is s ion • Bluetooth® † H ands FreeLink ® • Intelligent M ulti-Inform ation D is play (i-M ID ) • 160-w att A M /FM /C D audio s y s tem • U SB A udio Interfac e • O ne-Touc h Pow er M oonroof w ith Tilt Feature • R em ote Entry • Pow er W indow s /Loc k s /M irrors • M P3/ W indow s M edio® II A udio (W M A ) play bac k c apability • Ec o A s s is tTM s y s tem • A nti-loc k brak ing s y s tem (A BS) • D ual-s tage,m ultiplethres hold front airbags (SR S) • Front s ide airbags w ith pas s enger-s ide O c c upant Pos ition D etec tion Sy s tem (O PSD ) • Side c urtain airbags

G AS M ILEAG E 16 CITY/22 HW Y

2011 H on d a

IINN S TTOCK O CK !

A CCO RD L X

$0 DO W N

2011 H on d a

P IL O T L X

$

• M odel#Y F4H 2BEW • 250-hp, 3.5-Liter, 24-V alv e SO H C i-V TEC ® • V -6 Engine V ariable Torque M anagem ent® • 4 W heelD riv e Sy s tem (V TM -4® ) • A nti-Loc k Brak ing Sy s tem (A BS) • V ehic le Stability A s s is tTM (V SA ® ) w ith Trac tion C ontrol• Front and R ear A ir C onditioning • A M /FM /C D A udio Sy s tem w ith 7 Speak ers Inc luding Subw oofer 60/40 Split • Flat-Folding, Sliding and R ec lining 2nd-R ow Benc h Seat • 60/40 Split Flat-Folding 3rd-R ow Benc h Seat • D ual-Stage M ultiple-Thres hold Front A irbags (SR S) • Front Side A irbags w ith Pas s enger-Side O c c upant Pos ition D etec tion Sy s tem (O PD S), Three-R ow Side C urtain A irbags w ith R ollov er Sens or • Pow er W indow s /Loc k s /M irrors • R em ote Entry Sy s tem

3329/ 29/M OO.****.****

****LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS , 3 6K THROUG H AHFC . $0 DOW N. 1S T PAY M ENT AND TAG S DUE AT DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $17,646.50

• M odel#C P2F3BEW • A uto • A ir • A M /FM /C D • 6 A ir Bags • PW • PL • C ruise

IINN S TTOCK O CK !

G AS M ILEAG E 18 C ITY/ 27 H W Y

2011 Hon d a

ODYS S E Y L X

• M odel#RL5H2BEW • 248-hp,3.5-liter,SO HC i-V TEC ® V -6 Engine • 5-Speed A utom atic Transm ission • Front and Rear A ir C onditioning • Pow er W indow s/ Locks/M irrors • C D Player • V ehicle Stability A ssistTM (V SA ® ) w ith Traction C ontrol • A BS • Dual-stage,m ultiple-threshold Front A irbags (SRS) • Front side A irbags w ith Passenger-Side O ccupant Position Detection System (O PDS)

$0 DO W N

$

309/ 309/M OO.*.*

*LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS , 3 6K THROUG H AHFC . $0 DOW N. 1S T PAY M ENT AND TAG S DUE AT DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $18,005.40

*BAS E D ON 2008-2009 E PA M IL E AGE E S T IM AT E S , RE F L E CT ING NE W E PA F UE L E CONOM Y M E T HODS BE GINNING W IT H 2008-2009 M ODE L S . US E F OR COM PARIS ON PURPOS E S ONL Y . DO NOT COM PARE T O M ODE L S BE F ORE 2008. Y OUR ACT UAL M IL E AGE W IL L VARY DE PE NDING ON HOW Y OU DRIVE AND M AINT AIN Y OUR VE HICL E . AL L OF F E RS E XPIRE 5/ 31/ 11.

TT BU R N E H O N D A M A AT 1110 WYOMING AVE. • SCRANTON • 1-800-NEXT-HONDA w w w. M a t t B u r n e H o n d a . c o m


CMYK PAGE 14C

SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011

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THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

NATIONAL FORECAST Partly sunny, northern showers in the afternoon WEDNESDAY

85° 63°

MONDAY

89° 67°

92° 66°

90° 65° FRIDAY

THURSDAY

Partly sunny, T-storm

Partly sunny, hot

Partly sunny, hot

SATURDAY

Mostly sunny

Sunny

75° 58°

75° 51°

Wilkes-Barre 86/64

Pottsville 84/63

New York City 84/70 Reading 86/66

Harrisburg 87/66

Atlantic City 78/66

Cooling Degree Days*

Yesterday Month to date Year to date Last year to date Normal year to date

80/61 74/52 91 in 1908 36 in 1994 6 32 44 74 36

*Index of fuel consumption, how far the day’s mean temperature was above 65 degrees.

Yesterday Month to date Normal month to date Year to date Normal year to date

Sun and Moon

Sunrise 5:35a 5:34a Moonrise Today 3:20a Tomorrow 3:51a Today Tomorrow

Delmarva/Ocean City

Highs: 76-86. Lows: 67-69. Partly cloudy and warm.

94/78

trace 4.23” 3.31” 21.18” 13.82” Sunset 8:28p 8:28p Moonset 5:38p 6:39p

Susquehanna Wilkes-Barre Towanda Lehigh Bethlehem Delaware Port Jervis

Stage 9.94 8.76

2.86

Chg. Fld. Stg 2.71 22.0 2.68 21.0 0.54

16.0

4.96 -0.02

18.0

New

First

Full

Last

June 1

June 8 June 15 June 23

Forecasts, graphs and data ©2011

Weather Central, LP For more weather information go to:

www.timesleader.com National Weather Service

607-729-1597

87/77

89/74 65/44

City

Yesterday

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Buffalo Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Las Vegas Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis

56/48/.00 86/64/.00 83/64/.00 71/60/.00 69/52/.00 84/66/.00 62/51/.07 76/54/.00 96/75/.00 66/46/.00 70/54/.00 83/76/.00 94/78/.00 72/55/.00 85/69/.00 66/58/.00 91/75/.00 65/47/.00 69/50/.16

City

Yesterday

Amsterdam Baghdad Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Dublin Frankfurt Hong Kong Jerusalem London

61/48/.00 104/82/.00 91/64/.00 64/46/.00 61/43/.00 59/50/.00 68/54/.00 88/75/.00 90/61/.01 61/48/.00

Today Tomorrow 62/44/c 91/69/pc 87/71/pc 82/66/c 74/66/t 88/66/pc 73/66/t 84/72/t 95/74/pc 68/48/c 81/66/t 89/74/s 94/78/pc 88/71/pc 68/57/c 69/55/s 87/77/t 66/54/t 69/58/sh

ALMANAC Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Int’l Airport River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.

91/69

95/74

101/70

65/50/pc 91/68/pc 94/75/t 86/66/t 82/67/t 92/67/pc 94/78/pc 87/69/pc 93/74/pc 73/49/pc 86/68/pc 89/75/s 92/76/pc 90/70/s 77/66/s 69/56/s 87/76/t 82/67/pc 86/64/pc

City

Yesterday

Myrtle Beach Nashville New Orleans Norfolk Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Ore. St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, DC

82/75/.00 86/52/.00 91/73/.00 85/68/.00 91/70/.00 73/57/.07 91/69/.00 99/77/.00 78/60/.00 56/45/.01 75/60/.00 60/48/.00 99/75/.00 67/63/.00 63/53/.00 58/45/.01 90/74/.00 98/66/.00 84/66/.00

WORLD CITIES

Today Tomorrow 64/50/c 108/80/s 89/70/c 73/52/pc 65/48/c 59/45/pc 77/52/pc 88/77/s 81/58/s 66/54/pc

75/54/pc 107/78/s 90/67/s 82/59/pc 63/49/pc 57/39/sh 82/56/s 84/75/s 82/59/s 68/43/sh

City

Yesterday

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Paris Rio de Janeiro Riyadh Rome San Juan Tokyo Warsaw

90/63/.00 66/50/.00 77/41/.00 72/43/.00 72/66/.02 102/77/.00 75/64/.00 87/77/.00 68/64/.00 61/54/.11

Today Tomorrow 82/67/s 92/70/s 88/72/s 83/69/pc 93/72/w 74/67/t 91/71/pc 91/62/pc 88/65/t 62/50/c 92/73/pc 53/41/sh 97/78/pc 64/55/s 63/48/pc 63/49/sh 91/70/t 93/60/s 88/70/pc

80/67/s 92/69/s 90/74/pc 90/70/t 90/73/pc 85/66/w 90/71/t 87/67/s 92/65/pc 64/51/c 92/74/s 57/48/sh 95/76/pc 71/55/s 62/48/s 60/49/c 91/71/t 86/65/s 95/75/t

Today Tomorrow 85/59/t 74/61/sh 79/61/t 77/53/pc 72/67/s 106/81/s 84/61/s 87/77/t 68/64/r 72/55/c

82/58/t 77/61/pc 77/52/pc 79/52/c 73/65/pc 108/79/s 81/59/pc 85/76/t 69/63/sh 79/61/pc

The temperatures are heating up this Memorial Day weekend. We've been waiting all spring for an area of low pressure to develop across the southeastern Atlantic coast, and with it finally in place, a surge of warm air is on tap. Temperatures will climb through the 80s this afternoon, to near 90 for Memorial Day, and maybe even beyond for the start of the shortened work week. Still, our forecast isn't completely in the clear. A frontal system across upstate New York may spark a few showers later this evening, and those may drift south toward our northern areas, but most will stay dry. As for tomorrow, skies should remain rain-free, but it will be muggy. The old saying of “hazy, hot and humid” will be tossed around for the first time this year, and the heat won't let up until late Wednesday. - Ryan Coyle

Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snow flurries, i-ice.

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Yesterday Average Record High Record Low

Precipitation

Brandywine Valley

Highs: 84-86. Lows: 65-70. Partly to mostly cloudy skies.

Philadelphia 87/71

Temperatures

The Finger Lakes

Highs: 74-87. Lows: 63-67. Cloudy, scattered showers and thunderstorms possible.

88/70

69/55

The Jersey Shore

Poughkeepsie 85/65

84/70

88/73

62/44

Highs: 74-82. Lows: 65-67. Partly cloudy, becoming breezy in the afternoon.

81/66

61/50

Highs: 80-86. Lows: 63-65. Partly to mostly cloudy, chance of isolated thunderstorms.

Albany 83/65

Towanda 85/65

69/58

68/48

80° 50° The Poconos

Binghamton 86/65

State College 84/65

54/44

Sunny

TODAY’S SUMMARY

Syracuse 87/67

Scranton 84/65

63/49

73/66

REGIONAL FORECAST Today’s high/ Tonight’s low

NATIONAL FORECAST: A frontal boundary extending from the Southwest, across the central Plains and into the Midwest will be responsible for widespread showers and thunderstorms today. Thunderstorms associated with this system will be possible for the central Plains, portions of the Midwest and Great Lakes, and the Northeast.

196600 279045

TODAY

TUESDAY


CMYK

BUSINESS timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

SECTION

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SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011

GAIL MARKSJARVIS PERSONAL FINANCE

Bond-bound investors at greater risk

MotorWorld employee Gina Colleran points out the Prius Hybrid on the sales lot.

AIMEE DILGER / THE TIMES LEADER

On a slow course Hybrid vehicle sales not revving up

A

By ANDREW M. SEDER

aseder@timesleader.com

s gas prices raced toward $4 a gallon this spring, local residents did not race to area automobile dealers in search of hybrid vehicles.

While they’ve sold briskly in many markets across the

country the past few months, sales are non-existent or very low at many local lots. “I would be hard pressed to tell you the last one we sold,” said Blake Gagliardi, sales manager at Valley Chevrolet in Wilkes-Barre Township. “We just don’t sell them.” When gas prices hovered at or above the $4 mark three years ago, sales of compact cars skyrocketed. Some thought the same would happen with hybrid sales during the recent flirtation with $4 but it never happened — at least here. “In this market, hybrids aren’t as big a deal,” said Steve Ubaldini, the general manager at Wyoming Valley Motors in Larksville. He said the rough terrain, hilly landscape and lots of interstate driving are not the ideal situation for hybrids. “They’re generally not a practical

solution around here,” Ubaldini said. “Hybrids are good for city driving but on the highways they’re less efficient.” Jeff Berger, whose family owns the Berger Family Dealership in Hazle Township, said his dealership sells very few and rarely stocks them because of poor sales. He said the area loves SUVs and pickup trucks and the weather is not conducive to smaller vehicles. Even when his dealership stocked larger hybrid models like the Cadillac Escalade or the GMC Yukon, they “were very difficult to sell.” Berger said customers “don’t even ask” about hybrid models at See HYBRID, Page 3D

Driven to a different fuel source By ANDREW M. SEDER aseder@timesleader.com

Local hotelier Gus Genetti said that fueling America’s vehicles with natural gas is an idea whose time has come. And he’s putting his money where his heart is. Genetti has spent more than $12,000 for billboards in the Williamsport, Wilkes-Barre and Scranton areas urging Congress to take a serious look at the alternative fuel and “reduce our dependency on foreign oil.” “It’s a matter of philosophy,” said Genetti, 72. “Not sending money to the Arab countries so they cannot finance terrorism.” He said finding an alternative to foreign oil “is the smart, proud and patriotic thing to do.” Genetti wanted to send a message that he practices what he preaches and went looking for natural gas fueled vehicles two years ago. What he found was that they exist, but not locally. And even if he were to buy one, fueling them would be an issue. So he purchased a used 2009 Cadillac Escalade that runs on gasoline. “It’s the chicken and egg,” Genet-

S.JOHN WILKIN / THE TIMES LEADER

Local hotelier Gus Genetti is pushing for natural gas as an alternative fuel source.

ti said during an interview in Natural gas his office at vehicles hot Genetti Hotel & in California. Convention See story, Center on East PAGE 3 Market Street in Wilkes-Barre. “If you don’t have fuel, you can’t have the vehicles … but why would you build natural gas stations if you don’t have the vehicles?” While he predicts an increased production of natural gas-run vehi-

INSIDE

See GENETTI, Page 3D

Westside Mall businesses have deals, giveaways in store for you WHEN THE Blockbuster Video in the Westside Mall in Edwardsville closed last month, it sent ripples throughout the shopping center. Jerry Rigner, manager at the RadioShack in the shopping center, said when the video rental giant shut its doors it meant foot traffic at the center dropped dramatically. The remaining stores decided to band together to remind shoppers that although Blockbuster is no longer there, the rest of the tenants are open for business. The solution takes place Wednesday as the center holds a sidewalk sale and offers sales and giveaways from noon to 7 p.m. “We’re coming together,” Rogner

ANDREW M. SEDER

that have good deals. • Head over to Toys R Us or Babies R Us where all filtered above STEALS & DEALS ground pools, outdoor swing sets, sandboxes, trampolines, bouncers, gym sets and playhouses are 20 persaid. “We’re raising awareness and cent off. The sale is good today and trying to drum up business.” Monday. While at either store, grab a In addition to RadioShack, other participating businesses include Fam- healthy snack for your toddler. Revolution Foods, known for fruit Mashily Dollar, Rent-a-Center and Little ups, has just expanded into veggie Ceasers. and fruit combinations. I can honestStephanie Roman, an assistant ly say, through personal experience, manager at RadioShack said the they’re kid tested and parent apevent includes outside table sales, tents featuring Sprint, T-Mobile, and proved. • Victoria’s Secret is offering your AT&T products, and freebies inchoice of 10 Secret Garden scented cluding pizza. body care products for $40 this week, I urge you to take a drive over and but it’s limited to in-store stock. support the center’s remaining busi• New York & Co. has a fantastic nesses — and grab a few pizza pizzas. Memorial Day sale today and tomorWhile you’re on the road, take a detour to a few other area merchants row. All tanks, tees, shorts and crops

are buy one, get one 75 percent off. This sale is in stores or online. • There’s a Fashion Bug circular in today’s Times Leader with a coupon on the back page for $10 off a $20 purchase. There is some fine print about clearance items, items of the week and doorbuster exclusions. Still a nice coupon. • Bass Shoes, at the Crossings Premium Outlets in Tannersville, has a buy one, get two for free footwear sale through Monday. Use this coupon to get an additional 30 percent off the already sweet deal: http:// f.chtah.com/i/35/2070763300/ 20110522_BO_Memorial_Coupon.jpg. Andrew M. Seder, a Times Leader staff writer, may be reached at 570-829-7269. If you know of any local steals or deals, send them to aseder@timesleader.com.

INVESTORS TRYING to duck a blow from the stock market by moving to bonds may be positioning themselves to take a left jab that they didn’t see coming. As the economy has weakened lately, investors pulled about $3 billion from stock funds and poured more than $8 billion into bond funds — presumably for safekeeping. It’s a continuation of a trend that began during the stock market crash, when nervous investors yanked about $200 billion from stock funds and added $340 billion to bond funds. Yet, while investors may be trying to protect their money, they have been pouring cash into high-yield bonds, which are the riskiest and the most likely to plunge along with stocks if the economy takes a turn for the worse. In addition, even some of the supposedly mild-mannered, diversified bond funds that investors buy for wellrounded, core exposure to bonds, may not be the carefree choices people envision. With safe U.S. Treasury bonds paying little interest, some fund managers have become more daring and added more high-yield and emerging-market bonds than usual to spice up returns for income-starved investors. “This is part of the engineering of the Fed,” said James Swanson, chief investment strategist for MFS Investments, who recently cut exposure to high-yield bonds as the economy’s growth rate appeared to slow. “They are forcing people to take on more risk through preferred stock, junkier companies and foreign bonds. If there is a contraction in the economy, defaults could rise.” During the past two years, the average fund that invests in intermediateterm government bonds has provided investors just 4.17 percent a year, while the average high-yield bond fund has paid about 23 percent, according to Lipper. Those extraordinary gains have given investors a sense of security as they’ve sought solace from the painful stock losses of 2008 and early 2009. But those gains have the potential to cut the other way in a downturn — leaving losses people wouldn’t expect from a faithful fund. High-yield bonds come from companies with shaky finances, and amid economic weakness those firms can have trouble paying investors back. Besides high-yield risk, funds are investing more in foreign bonds and making bets on currencies that could turn out to either help or hurt investors. Gyrations in the value of the dollar and currencies are difficult to predict. Until recently, few diversified bond funds would have made these bets, said bond analyst Eric Jacobson, of Morningstar. Pimco led the way and has expertise, but Jacobson said investors should make sure their funds have the “depth and breadth” to handle the complexity. Losses in diversified bond funds, which hold an array of tame and risky bonds, are not common, but they do happen — especially when fund managers have taken on extra risks prior to a downturn in the economy. Morningstar fund analyst Miriam Sjoblom has raised similar concerns. She recently noted that public filings show funds such as Janus Flexible Bond, Delaware Diversified Income and Loomis Sayles Core Plus Bond devoting close to 20 percent of their assets to high-yield corporate bonds in early 2011. Meanwhile, she said, T. Rowe Price High Yield and Western Asset High Yield have trimmed their fund’s exposure to some of the riskiest bonds, rated CCC. If inflation and interest rates rise and investors can get higher yields in safe U.S. Treasury bonds they may sell high-yield bonds and pick Treasurys instead, undermining the value of the riskier bonds. Gail MarksJarvis is a personal finance columnist for the Chicago Tribune and author of “Saving for Retirement Without Living Like a Pauper or Winning the Lottery.” Readers may send her email at gmarksjarvis@tribune.com.


CMYK PAGE 2D

SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011

BUSINESS AGENDA MetroAction Business Seminar/Webinar: Three Steps to Business Success

MetroAction, a nonprofit community development organization that provides small business loans and business development assistance throughout Northeastern Pennsylvania, will hold a training program on how to operate a successful small business from 9-1 1 a.m. on Tuesday, June 7 at the Innovation Center at Wilkes-Barre, 7-13 Main St., Wilkes-Barre. The seminar is also available at the same time as a webinar. Cost is $10 per person. The program, presented in partnership with the Greater WilkesBarre Chamber of Business and Industry, will address how to plan for success; effective ways to market a business; financing and finding grants; and available community resources. To register, visit www.MetroAction.org or call 341-0270.

Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber: Human Resources Forum

The Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber will hold a Human Resources

BUSINESS AWARDS The Weekender, Wilkes-Barre Publishing Company’s arts and entertainment weekly, recently won two awards in the 201 1 Spotlight Contest held by the Keystone State Professional Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. The paper won first place for Headline Writing for a Non-Daily publication. The winning entry was “Franks for the memories,” the cover headline for the Wednesday, March 31, 2010 issue about the histories of Abe’s and Coney Island hot dog restaurants. The Weekender also came in third place for Best Overall Non-Daily Newspaper, behind the Jewish Exponent and Pittsburgh Business Times. The Spotlight Contest is broken into two categories: Daily and Non-Daily. “That means if you win a category, you’ve beaten

Forum at 8:30 a.m. on Friday, June 10 in the chamber conference room, 2 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre. The forum is suggested for all businesses, particularly human resource professionals, managers, supervisors and communicators. Topic of discussion will be a legal update by Jim Valentine from Rosenn, Jenkins and Greenwald. To reserve, contact Karen Gallia at 823-2101 ext. 133 or by email at Karen@wilkes-barre.org.

MetroAction Business Seminar/Webinar: Financing Your Business

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Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber/Greater Pittston Chamber Networking Mixer

The Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber and the Greater Pittston Chamber will hold a networking mixer from 5-7 p.m. on Thursday, June 16 at Junior Achievement, 1 122 Oak St., Pittston. Attendance is free for chamber members. The mixer will feature tours of Junior Achievement’s Center for Enterprise Education and a special presentation on Chamber Choice benefits. Reservations are required. To register, contact Jean Kile at 823-2101 ext. 1 13 or by email at jeankile@wilkes-barre.org.

MetroAction will hold a training program on how to finance a small business from 9:30-1 1:30 a.m. on Tuesday, June 14 at the Pocono Chamber, 556 Main St., Stroudsburg. The seminar is also available at the same time as a webinar. Cost is $10 per person. The program, presented in partnership with the Greater Pocono Chamber of Commerce, will cover the following topics: borrowing basics, types of financing available, understanding credit, what lenders look for, finding grants, and community resources. To register, visit www.MetroAction.org or call 341-0270.

The Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Commerce will hold a Member Appreciation Day from 1 1 a.m.-5 p.m. on Friday, June 17 at Sno Cove Water Park, 1000 Montage Mountain Road, Moosic. Cost is $10 for two tickets and includes wild water rides, batting cages, miniature golf, bumper boats and more. Pre-registration is required. To register, call 823-2101 ext. 1 13 or visit www.wilkes-barre.org.

every other paper in that category in the state, regardless of size,” Contest Coordinator Susan Schwartz said in a press release. “Being recognized by our chapter of the SPJ is a great honor for us,” said Weekender Editor Nikki M. Mascali. The Weekender was founded in 1993 and has more than 170,000 readers. For more information, visit www.theweekender.com. Quandel Enterprises, Inc., a local construction firm, was recently ranked number 291 in Engineering News-Record’s Top 400 Contractors edition. The national construction publication publishes the list annually. Last year, Quandel was ranked at No. 351. MetroAction, a regional nonprofit community development organization that provides small business loans and training, has been awarded a $1,500 PPL Blue Ribbon Marketing Partnership grant to create a small business marketing brochure that high-

lights the available financing, training, and counseling services. The development of this brochure will complement MetroAction’s comprehensive marketing program and will provide details on valuable programs for small businesses in one location. Cross Valley Federal Credit Union recently honored 10 employees with awards for their devotion and longevity to the credit union. Ann Marie Maday was recognized for 25 years of service. Those honored for 20 years of service include: Midge Serafin, MSR, Sandy Cann, branch manager, Sandy Reed, ATM/ share draft coordinator, and Phyllis Holmgren, MSR. Honored for 10 years of service were Valerie Swaditch, MSR/head teller, Joanne Verastro, MSR, and Jennifer Viadock, teller. Five-year honorees included Jill Houseknecht, marketing/community relations coordinator, and Deb Volpi, MSR.

Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber: Member Appreciation Day

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

CORPORATE LADDER QUAD THREE GROUP INC.

The local architectural engineering design firm recently announced four promotions. John C. Cowder, Dunmore, was promoted to principal and senior architect. He is responsible for the overall management, team coordination and commitment of resources Cowder to projects. He directs and monitors a project’s design from initial programming through final design and oversees the development of project building systems for technical integrity and consistency with the design objectives. Cowder has 39 years of experience in design, project management and construction administration for numerous commercial, educational, institutional and industrial projects. He is also skilled in interior architecture, building renovations, facilities management and master planning. Cowder holds a master’s degree in architecture from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a bachelor’s degree in architecture from Penn State University. He is a registered architect in both Pennsylvania and New Jersey and is a member of the American Institute of Architects (AIA). He also serves on the Board of Directors for the northeast Pennsylvania chapter of the AIA. Richard B. Kresge, Jr., Bear Creek Township, was promoted to principal and director of Land Planning and Utilities. He over-

sees the study, planning, regulatory compliance, and design of various land development Kresge and water/ wastewater projects. Kresge has 18 years of professional experience and holds a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from Penn State University. He is a registered engineer in both Pennsylvania and Maine and is a certified Pennsylvania sewage enforcement officer. He has served as state director of the Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers (PSPE) and state director for PSPE in Luzerne County. He is past president of the Luzerne County Chapter of the National Society of Professional Engineers and is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers and the Society of American Military Engineers. Samuel S. Scarantino, Pittston, was promoted to principal and director of operations for Architecture and Building Systems. He is responsible for the overall management and scheduling of the Architectural Scarantino and Building Engineering Group, allocating resources, developing project budgets and maintaining interdisciplinary coordination. In addition, he is the firm’s educational project team leader and oversees educational projects from the initial interview thru occupancy. Scarantino, who has extensive experience in the design and management of commercial, educational and governmental facilities, holds

an associate’s degree in architectural engineering technology from Luzerne County Community College. He is a registered architect in New York, a member of the American Institute of Architects, the Pennsylvania Society of Architects, the Council of Educational Facility Planners - International, the Pennsylvania Association of School Board Officials, the Pennsylvania School Board Association, the Pennsylvania Association of School Administrators, and the Pennsylvania Association of Rural and Small Schools.

FELLERMAN & CIARIMBOLI

Attorney Martin J. Meyer recently joined the law firm as Attorney of Counsel after a distinguished career and a multitude of leadership positions in the legal community. He will be based in the Meyer firm’s Kingston office. Meyer has been actively engaged in the general practice of law with emphasis on civil litigation and family law since 1960. He has participated in a variety of plaintiff’s litigation before all levels of the state and federal trial courts, including numerous administrative agencies, and appeared before all state and federal appellate courts in Pennsylvania. Meyer holds a law degree from Temple University School of Law. Submit announcements of business promotions, hirings and other events to Corporate Ladder by email to tlbusiness@timesleader.com; by mail to 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250; or by fax to (570) 829-5537. Photos in jpg format may be attached to e-mail.

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Prices at pump build demand for natural gas cars

GENETTI Continued from Page 1D

cles in less than three years, he said the logical first step should be for the federal government to offer incentives for trucking firms to make the switch. “Trucks are the biggest payback. They’re the low-hanging fruit,” Genetti said. “If I were a fleet owner, I’d do it immediately.” He said the price for the natural gas equivalent of one gallon of gas ranges from $1.30 to $2.70. He said trucks operating on diesel could see a huge savings immediately. And that means less foreign oil would be purchased, but plenty of domestic natural gas would be, meaning profits stay at home and it’s cleaner burning, which is good for the environment. “Natural gas is the cat’s meow. It just makes sense,” Genetti said. He said while gas prices were quickly marching toward $4 a gallon, he was keeping his fingers crossed they’d go even higher. “I was hoping for $5 a gallon

HYBRID Continued from Page 1D

his dealership. “It’s not taking off (here) like it is in other parts of the country,” Berger said. One spokesman for a local dealer told a different story when it came to hybrid sales, but it also helps that some of the most popular hybrid models — including the Toyota Prius — are on his lots. John Quinn, marketing director for Motor World, said sales have been strong locally. “As quick as they’re building them, we’re selling them,” said Quinn. Motor World sells 14 different brands of vehicles, including Honda, which has the Civic hybrid, Toyota, which has the Camry and Prius, and Lexus, which has the CT 200h. He said sales, which number more than 100 annually, are ris-

By JERRY HIRSCH Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — With the future of gasoline prices uncertain, cars and trucks that run on compressed natural gas — fuel that’s about half the cost of gasoline — are getting another look. Los Angeles commercial real estate broker Ted Simpson recently snapped up a Honda that runs on CNG, which in the U.S. has been better known for powering public transit buses and delivery trucks. “I did not want to be hostage to what I believe will be rapidly escalating oil and gasoline prices,” said Simpson, who drives hundreds of miles a week, covering a territory that ranges from San Diego in the south to Santa Barbara in the north. He’s been able to fill up his vehicle for the equivalent of about $2.25 a gallon. CNG costs about $2.10 to $2.70 at Southern California filling stations. For the moment, Honda is the only major automaker selling natural gas passenger cars in the U.S. Honda, which makes the CNG-powered Civic GX in Indiana, has sold a record number so far this year. Although the volume was small — 643 — it was almost triple the number sold during the same period a year earlier, and the company expects to run out of the cars this summer as it gets ready to sell a larger, redesigned version this fall. The current version gets the equivalent of 24 miles per gallon in city driving and 36 mpg on the highway. The nextgeneration vehicle is expected to have better fuel economy. Honda wants to double annual production to at least 2,000 and maybe more, depending on parts availability from earthquake-stricken Japan. The cars list for $25,490

SUBMITTED PHOTO

This billboard, paid for by Gus Genetti, is along I-81 near the Dunmore exit in Lackawanna County. Genetti has spent more than $12,000 over the past year on billboards in the Williamsport, WilkesBarre and Scranton areas promoting natural gas vehicles.

for gas,” Genetti said, noting he’s sure he’ll take grief from people, especially his colleagues in the travel business. “Short term pain, long term gain.” He said unfortunately in America, breaking points must be passed for major changes to happen. He said if gas prices skyrocketed, the uproar would lead to something, like pushing Congress to seek alternative fuels and incentivize their use. Genetti had harsh words for elected officials who have continued to watch Americans pay for gas, which in turn gives money to unfriendly nations. He said natural gas technology exists and Congress is aware of

it, but has done little to push it. “The reason it hasn’t developed is because of political will, or lack,” Genetti said. He said if Congress would push for natural gas vehicles and fueling stations, and back it up with incentives for people and companies to buy them, it would work. He pointed to hybrids and electric cars, both of which have had tax credits and incentives encouraging people to buy them. While Genetti readily admits natural gas conversion would be costly, he said the price is worth it. “Sending money over there is not good for this country,” Ge-

netti said. He also said natural gas is not “going to be the end game. But we need a transition, and that’s what this is.” “Natural gas could be now. All we need to do is develop our infrastructure. That can be done overnight if we have the will to do it.” He said getting companies to install natural gas fueling stations at strategic locations along the nation’s interstates, while at the same time letting vehicle manufacturers and trucking firms know that they’re on the horizon would spur action. “I think it’s an idea whose time has come. Many people who are enlightened in America understand it makes sense.”

ing each year. “Interest is growing locally,” he said. And gas prices aren’t the only reason. He said often when a new technology hits the market, people are apprehensive to spend more money on an unknown entity. “People at first weren’t so sure how long a battery life would last,” Quinn said. But a few years into the hybrid revolution and with technology improving, people are buying into the hybrid movement. True Electric Cars The next step in that evolution, Gagliardi said, will hit the market in July. The Chevy Volt, a vehicle Gagliardi called “a true hybrid,” arrives at Valley Chevrolet and other General Motors dealers in the region in about six to eight weeks. Unlike the hybrids on the market now, Gagliardi said the Volts are worth the extra money. Also unlike the hybrids on the

market now, Gagliardi said there is a definite interest in the Volt locally. “We have a lot of people coming in, asking questions. So far, the dealer has preordered three Volts. “People are going to buy every one that we get,” he said matterof-factly. Ubaldini, at Wyoming Valley Motors, said that with most hybrids, “you probably never get your money back for what you spend.” The gas savings just aren’t significant enough to warrant the extra cost of the vehicle. Gagliardi said unlike other hybrids, the Volts are true electric cars that can travel up to 40 miles on a single charge, no gas required. Even with a price tag of $40,000, he said they will sell with ease. The gas savings, unlike those realized with other “hybrids,” are tangible and real with the Volt, he said. “Electric is definitely coming,”

said Ubaldini. He said manufactures are telling dealers that by 2020, “a big percent of sales will be electric.” But for that to happen, Ubaldini said batteries need to be able to go 300 miles per charge “for people to really consider it.” The Diesel Option While hybrid sales are hot and cold, and electric car sales are a great unknown, sales of another type of engine are strong Ubaldini said passenger vehicles with diesel engines are “red hot.” He said he is selling “as many as I can get. They don’t sit around.” While hybrids have a reputation as being fuel efficient and environmentally friendly, he said it’s the new diesel vehicles that fit that bill. “They’re much, much more fuel efficient than a hybrid,” he said, noting that Wyoming Valley Motors has sold more than 100 this year already.

MCT PHOTO

Ted Simpson and his new natural gas powered Honda Civic GX at CNG filling station in April.

and are sold at 139 dealers in 33 states. Honda plans to certify more dealers to service and sell the cars this year, pushing it into more regions where there are natural gas filling stations, Honda spokesman Eric Rosenberg said. Simpson said there are enough freeway-close natural gas filling stations to make driving the vehicles in Southern California practical. “The interest in this car has grown significantly,” Rosenberg said, which is why the automaker plans to pack it with more options, such as a navigation system and rear stereo speakers and aluminum wheels. Many consumers also install home filling stations in their garages, connecting a natural gas pump to their existing gas piping. That slices the cost of the fuel to the equivalent of about $1.43 a gallon. But the pump is expensive — about $6,000 for the device and installation, minus a $1,000 federal tax credit for the purchase of a natural gas vehicle home refueling system. Ford Motor Co. Chief Executive Alan Mulally said natural gas technology hasn’t caught on domestically because automakers find it too difficult to make a cost-competitive passenger car with the type of trunk space and interior that consumers expect.

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Graduates fight to upgrade from first job By PATRICIA KITCHEN Newsday

MELVILLE, N.Y. — Katie Hennes’ dream had been to become a Spanish teacher after college, not take the job she did as a receptionist/translator in a county food stamps office. But like many in what’s being called Generation R, Hennes, a 2010 graduate of St. Joseph’s College, took on a survival job. Generation R, for Generation Recession, refers to those who graduated into the recession’s dismal job market. “I worked at the front window. I was the first person people saw and yelled at,” said Hennes, 23, of Lake Grove, N.Y., who later left that job for a fill-in high school Spanish teacher position, which lasted only a few months. As the economy and entry-level job market picks up, hiring experts say these underemployed professionals have special issues to address when looking to upgrade, one being to put a positive spin on that detour job, be it cashiering, stocking shelves, waiting tables, answering phones. They need to see that “R” as standing for resilience, said Kathy Kane, senior vice president of talent management at Melville-based Adecco Group

MCT PHOTO

Caitlyn Pace, a University of Scranton graduate, just signed on for a 5 1/2- month administrative assignment with a financial services firm. Up until March, Pace, had been babysitting and doing part-time administrative work.

North America, whose U.S. division commissioned research on how 2006-2010 grads fared careerwise. Employers want to hear how young professionals made the most of an adverse situation and what learning they took away from it, she said. Last month’s telephone survey of 503 graduates nation-

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OFFICE COACH

wide, ages 22 to 26, found: • 57 percent working fulltime; • 43 percent of full-timers in jobs not requiring a college degree; • 18 percent of full-timers in fields outside their majors. Close to 30 percent said that within six months of graduating they had taken part-time jobs, and 19 percent took temporary assignments. Caitlyn Pace, a 2010 finance graduate of the University of Scranton, has done both, having just signed on for a 5 1/2- month administrative assignment with a financial services firm in Edgewood, N.Y., where she says she’s “learning what it is to be in the corporate world, how people interact.” Up until March, Pace, 23, had been baby-sitting and doing part-time administrative work. Hennes, who is doing substitute teaching and job hunting, said she’s grateful for that receptionist job, because it taught her how to deal with people who are frustrated, a skill she can carry over into the classroom. She said she learned to respond to patrons by letting them vent and reminding them, “Sir, I’m here to help you.”

Conflicting personalities can work together By MARIE G. MCINTYRE McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Q.: A colleague and I recently started a business venture as equal partners. “Dave” is a local radio host, and I’m a computer geek. I have read that partnerships often don’t work out, and I’m afraid that may be true for us. Whenever Dave wants something, he insists on getting his own way and refuses to discuss other options. For example, if we have a technical problem, he immediately wants to buy new equipment instead of trying to find a less costly solution. If I disagree with him, he becomes very moody. Now Dave would like to bring one of his radio buddies into the business, which I think would be a huge mistake. I have suggested alternate ways that we might work with this guy, but Dave won’t even consider other possibilities. These arguments with Dave are wearing me out, so I’m tempted to just disengage and start my own company. Is there any way to make this partnership work? A.: Partnerships are a lot like marriages. You have people with

equal power entering into a close, interdependent relationship where they frequently have to make joint decisions. Unfortunately, the parties often leap into this arrangement without any prior discussion of their goals, values and temperaments. Given the combination of radio host and computer geek, disagreements are not surprising, because these occupations typically attract very different personality types. On the positive side, however, your differences also provide complementary skills and abilities, which can be of great benefit to your business. To rescue this partnership, you and Dave must first stop arguing about current events and remember why you started this company in the first place. Revisit your original hopes and dreams, then see if you can agree on some specific goals for the future. Next, try to objectively review what you have learned about the differences in your work styles. Start by recognizing each other’s strengths, then try to formulate an effective strategy for calmly working through your inevitable conflicts. If both of you can take a ma-

ture, adult approach to this collaborative effort, then your joint venture may have a bright future. But if the relationship continues to deteriorate, you might be better off flying solo. Q: After months of searching, I finally have an appointment to interview for an engineering position. I understand that “business casual” is the normal dress in this company, so I’m trying to decide whether I should wear a suit or a jacket and tie to the interview. When I asked the recruiter, he recommended the latter, but I would like another opinion. A: The general guideline for applicants is to dress “one level up” from typical workday attire for the position, so either of your choices could be appropriate for this interview. If your recruiter is familiar with the company’s culture, however, you can probably assume that he’s giving you good advice. Marie G. McIntyre is a workplace coach and the author of “Secrets to Winning at Office Politics.” Send in questions and get free coaching tips at http://www.yourofficecoach.com, or follow her on Twitter officecoach.

New regulations offer big cash awards to whistleblowers reporting fraud WASHINGTON — Whistleblowers who report corporate fraud or other misconduct to the government could receive sizable cash awards under new rules adopted Wednesday by federal regulators. Tipsters would be eligible if they give the Securities and Exchange Commission information that leads to an enforcement action resulting in more than $1 million in penalties. The SEC would pay up to 30 percent of the money it recovers from a company or person. A divided SEC voted 3-2 to

adopt the whistleblower program. The two Republican commissioners objected. The new rules will take effect in about 60 days. Whistleblowers who provided information starting in July 2010, when the overhaul law was enacted, also would be eligible to receive awards. The whistleblower program was mandated by the financial overhaul law enacted last year. It was contested by big U.S. companies, like AT&T Inc., Best Buy Co., FedEx Corp., Google Inc., Target Corp. and Verizon Communications Inc., in addition to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. They argued that whistleblow-

ers should first have to tell their companies of misconduct and give them a chance to correct problems before informing the SEC. Otherwise, the corporations contend, it will take longer to address wrongdoing. On the other side, advocates and lawyers for whistleblowers say they would be discouraged from reporting wrongdoing if required to inform company officials first. The new rules would seek to discourage employees from bypassing their companies’ compliance programs. Once employees report potential wrongdoing to their company, the SEC would

officially designate them as whistleblowers, potentially eligible for awards — provided they give the SEC the same information within 120 days. In addition, the SEC will credit whistleblowers whose companies pass their information to the agency, even if the whistleblowers themselves do not. That way, whistleblowers could receive awards by reporting wrongdoing internally to their companies. The new rules represent the first time that whistleblowers will be given a financial incentive to report misconduct to company authorities, SEC Chairman Mary Schapiro said before the

vote. Companies’ internal compliance programs play “an extremely valuable role” in preventing fraud, Schapiro said. She said the new rules strike a balance between encouraging whistleblowers to pursue internal compliance when appropriate and giving them the option to go directly to the SEC. “It is the whistleblower who is

in the best position to know which route is best to pursue,” she said. Advocates of the new program say whistleblowers can be an effective line of defense against corporate wrongdoing. The SEC was embarrassed by its failure to halt Bernard Madoff’s multibillion-dollar fraud over nearly two decades, despite red flags raised by whistleblowers.

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CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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MarketPulse SIZING UP BANK STOCKS Are banks stocks cheap or dangerous? Analysts can’t agree. Financial stocks in the S&P 500 have fallen 4 percent this year even as the broader market has risen 6 percent. Some mutual fund managers say banks should be avoided since they’re facing increased scrutiny from government regulators. Oppenheimer analyst Chris Kotowski takes the counter argument. He believes banks are cheap and worth buying. His recommendations: Citigroup, Goldman Sachs, J.P. Morgan Chase and Wells Fargo, among others.

A WET CORN RALLY Forget oil: corn is becoming this year’s hot commodity. Prices for corn have risen 21 percent this year. Oil, by comparison, is up 10 percent, while gold is up 8 percent. Corn has gone up recently because of poor weather conditions. Drenching rains in the Midwest have made it difficult for farmers to plant their crops. That’s raised concerns about supplies. Demand for corn remains high from food makers, ethanol producers and consumers around the globe. Corn is also used to feed livestock. Jack Scoville, vice president of the Price Futures Group, says prices could fall next week, though, if there’s drier weather.

BARGAIN BANKS?

(C) closing price: $40.97 Average target price: $56.02

(GS) closing price: $138.66 Average target price: $199.48

(JPM) closing price: $42.79 Average target price: $55.58

(WFC) closing price: $28.14 Average target price: $36.81 Source: FactSet

GOOD TIMES AND BAD Don’t get complacent if your stock is doing well. That’s when companies are more likely to try for governance changes that aren’t friendly to shareholders. So say researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Yale University. They found that companies are more likely to call special meetings after they report surprisingly good earnings. CEOs then ask shareholders to approve plans that deter hostile takeover attempts. Investors might want a takeover — especially if they get a good price for their stock.

Corn climbs

The price of a bush-el of corn has more than doubled over the past 12 months. $8 7 6

Price per bushel of corn

$7.59

5 4

’10 ’11 3 MJ J A S ON D J F M A M

Source: FactSet

C. Cutter, S. Choe, K. Girard • AP

Trawling where others don’t

Small-cap stocks are more expensive than Exxon Mobil, Microsoft and other well-known, big-cap stocks, based on their earnings. That has some analysts saying it’s time for large stocks to do better than small ones. But Ford Draper Jr. says he still sees opportunities in small caps. He is president and chief investment officer of Kalmar Investments, which invests $4.6 billion mostly for endowments, charities and wealthy families. It also has a mutual fund for retail investors, Kalmar Growthwith-Value Small Cap Fund (KGSCX).

InsiderQ&A

You’ve been investing for 43 years. Does this market remind you of any previous ones? I would say it’s very different. We haven’t in recent times had to recover from a Draper major international financial calamity, like we’re having to recover from now. While we don’t forecast the economy per se, we think the likelihood is that the aftermath will be slow economic growth. That’s what we’re seeing now - a temporary period of waning economic strength in what we think is nevertheless a sustainable growing economy.

Hedge funds’ favorite stocks

Smurfit-Stone Container may not be a household name, but the maker of pizza boxes and other packaging is a favorite of professional investors. Goldman Sachs reviewed the holdings of 574 hedge funds and found that 28 had Smurfit-Stone among their 10 biggest holdings at the end of the first quarter. That makes it the eighth most popular stock among hedge funds. Goldman’s study listed the 50 stocks that were most often found among hedge funds’ top 10 holdings. No. 1 was Apple. Smurfit-Stone stock may not be available for long. The company agreed in January to be bought by a rival, Rock-Tenn. But investors may find more opportunities with other hedge fund favorites. The list includes stocks that have done well

COMPANY

TICKER

NO. OF FUNDS WITH STOCK AS TOP 10 HOLDING

Apple

AAPL

6 3 63

CLOSE

$335.00

52-WK LOW

52-WK HIGH

$235.56

$364.90

YTD STOCK CHANGE

DIVIDEND YIELD

AVG. BROKER RATING*

3.9%

0.0%

1.1

Microsoft

MSFT

54

24.67

22.73

29.46

-11.6

2.6

1.4

JPMorgan Chase

JPM

49

42.45

35.16

48.36

0.1

2.4

1.2

Google

GOOG

48

518.13

433.63

642.96

-12.8

0.0

1.2

Citigroup

C

43

40.22

36.20

51.50

-15.0

0.1

1.6

Qualcomm

QCOM

31

57.17

31.63

59.84

15.5

1.5

1.3

LyondellBasell

LYB

30

41.76

14.86

48.12

21.4

0.0

1.1

Smurfit-Stone

SSCC

28

41.03

15.91

41.10

60.3

0.0

2.0

Pfizer

PFE

27

20.90

14.00

21.28

19.4

3.8

1.3

CIT Group

CIT

23

42.41

32.78

49.57

-10.0

0.0

1.7

Economic data has certainly been disappointing, and stocks have dropped in May. We went through a period like this in April (2010) that ended around when Uncle Ben (Bernanke, the Federal Reserve chairman, hinted at a bond-buying program to help the economy at the end of August). I wouldn’t be surprised if in a month or so from now we find ourselves looking at better economic numbers, and people are feeling better. It was only a few months ago that everyone was giddy. That’s not abnormal. Bull markets have sharp corrections and pullbacks. That volatility creates opportunities for people investing over several years.

SOURCES: FactSet Goldman Sachs

You like small-cap stocks because few analysts are covering them? That’s the main reason. There are 3,000, 4,000 (smaller) companies that one can forage in, and if you’ve got genuine research skills, you ought to be able to find exciting things.

Community Bk Sys

CBU

21.33 5

28.95

24.65

0.30

1.2

Community Hlth Sys

CYH

22.33 4

42.50

28.65

0.42

1.5

Entercom Comm

ETM

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13.63

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0.14

1.5

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Fairchild Semicond

FCS

7.71 8

21.02

17.97

-0.97

-5.1

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Frontier Comm

FTR

3

Genpact Ltd

G

Harte Hanks Inc

Even though few small caps look cheap now after the group’s big run? We’ve found good valuations (more difficult) to find. But that would be much more of a handicap if we were focusing only on 200 or 300 large companies. We’re focusing on several thousand companies. We think the game is far from over. You’ve got several stocks that are dependent on consumer spending like Ulta Salon, Elizabeth Arden and Ruby Tuesday. Is it safe to trust consumers will spend? Depending on the company, it’s safe. That’s the key. Ulta is a category killer in women’s cosmetics retailing. (Customers) are moving away from department stores, where they used to buy cosmetics. When times are tough, they can move down the price range but still stay in an Ulta store. When times are more flush, they can move up the price range (and still shop at) the same store. You could see that a model like that would attract the shopper when she’s a bit more pressed, but it also gives her an opportunity to spread her wings when times are better. You bought Robbins & Myers, an equipment maker, recently. It certainly doesn’t look cheap, trading at 29 times its earnings over the past 12 months. We are forward, forward, forward oriented. Robbins & Myers wouldn���t be considered high quality on backward-looking (measures), including price to earnings. This has been a pretty sleepy, undermanaged company that was over-diversified. In the last several years, it has been, with new management, slimming down to a set of businesses where it’s got the No. 1 or 2 position and become much more competitive. It’s what Robbins & Myers offers us in the next several years that we’re keyed to, not its mediocre past results.

COMPANY

TICKER

Data through May 26

10-year Treasury yield drops to 2011 low

recently, like chemical maker LyondellBasell, which rose 15 percent in the first quarter. It also contains some duds: Microsoft was a top 10 holding for 54 hedge funds at the end of the quarter. It fell 9 percent over the three months. Individual investors may want to consider these stocks. As a group, they have led the overall S&P 500’s quarterly performance 65 percent of the time, going back 10 years. Several energy companies were new entries in last quarter’s list. They included BP, Marathon Oil and Chevron. Priceline.com and Valeant Pharmaceuticals also joined. Hedge funds invest money for pension funds, wealthy individuals and endowments. They’re generally lightly regulated, but they have to give updates on what they own each quarter.

*1=buy; 2=hold; 3=sell

InterestRates

Money market mutual funds

PRIME FED Taxable—national avg RATE FUNDS Dreyfus MM Instr/MM Series FRIDAY 3.25 .13 Tax-exempt—national avg 6 MO AGO 3.25 .13 Alpine Municipal MMF/Investor 1 YR AGO 3.25 .13

0.01 0.16 $ 2,500 min (888) 785-5578

2.75 4.92 3.68 5.36 6.85 1.91

-0.09 -0.04 -0.06 -0.01 0.15 -0.10

FRIDAY YIELD

1WK

0.03 0.20 0.09 0.47 1.71

-0.01 0.01 0.01 -0.03 -0.08

r t r t t

t t t t t

-0.13 -0.22 -0.13 -0.39 -0.47

0.17 0.42 0.22 0.86 2.39

0.17 0.05 0.31 1.02

10-year T-Note 3.07 30-year T-Bond 4.23 Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.

-0.08 -0.07

t t

t -0.26 t -0.01

3.72 4.77

2.38 3.53

TREASURYS 3-month T-Bill 1-year T-Bill 6-month T-Bill 2-year T-Note 5-year T-Note

CHANGE 1MO 3MO 1YR t t t t s t

t t t t t t

-0.41 0.03 -0.73 0.30 -2.56 -0.22

TICKER

3.29 5.31 4.58 5.95 9.53 2.46

CHANGE 1MO 3MO 1YR

Exchange-Traded Funds NAME

52-WK HIGH LOW 2.35 4.24 3.47 4.86 6.61 1.35

52-WK HIGH LOW

FRIDAY CLOSE

CHG WK

%CHG 1WK

%CHG 1MO

%RTN 1YR

ProShs Ultra Silver

AGQ

201.00

29.06

16.9

-44.0

224.6

PwShs Silver Fund

DBS

66.53

5.25

8.6

-21.2

103.4

iPath Beta Cotton

CTNN

49.37

3.87

8.5

-1.1

...

ETFS Silver Trust

SIVR

37.74

2.88

8.3

-21.0

106.0 105.8

Air Products

APD

64.13 0

96.00

93.96

2.69

2.9

t

s

9.4

18

2.5

iShares Silver Trust

SLV

37.03

2.85

8.3

-21.0

Amer Water Works

AWK

19.41 0

30.70

29.82

0.42

1.4

s

s 17.9 +51.38

1 14.8a

18

3.0

PwSh Base Met DLong

BDD

18.36

1.38

8.1

-2.2

50.7

Amerigas Part LP

APU

36.85 6

51.50

45.19

-0.62

-1.4

t

t

-7.4 +21.51

3 15.4

29

6.6

E-Tracs silver

USV

53.65

4.00

8.1

-21.2

100.1

Aqua America Inc

WTR

16.54 9

23.79

22.36

-0.25

-1.1

t

s

-0.5 +32.09

2

1.7

23

2.8

Dir Dly Gold Bull2x

NUGT

33.59

2.37

7.6

-14.1

...

Arch Dan Mid

ADM

24.22 6

38.02

32.21

0.95

3.0

t

t

7.1 +29.10

2

-4.0

10

2.0

Direx LatAm Bull 3x

LBJ

34.60

2.34

7.3

-12.0

76.5

8.8 +54.54

180.02 0 298.47 296.71 20.11

2

0.01 0.11 $ 50,000 min (800) 782-6620

1WK

Broad market Lehman Triple-A corporate Moody’s Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman Municipal Bond Buyer U.S. high yield Barclays Treasury Barclays

52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN RANK %RTN LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD 3.3 +35.84

MIN INVEST PHONE

YIELD

FRIDAY YIELD

U.S. BOND INDEXES

S Choe K Girard • AP

LocalStocks

The 10-year Treasury’s yield fell during the week to its low for 2011, dragging down borrowing and savings rates for consumers. Yields sank after nervous investors bought Treasurys. A bond’s yield falls when its price rises. Worries about Europe’s debt crisis and a slowing U.S. economic recovery drove the buying. The average 30-year fixed mortgage rate fell to 4.6 percent from 4.61 percent a week ago.

AutoZone Inc

AZO

7.3

s

s

1 27.3

17

...

DB Cmdty Long

DPU

19.56

1.33

7.3

-6.1

34.3

Bank of America

BAC

10.91 2

16.20

11.69

0.11

0.9

t

t -12.4—27.50 5 -18.2

21

0.3

ProShs Ult Brazil

UBR

33.05

2.15

7.0

-8.2

51.2

Bk of NY Mellon

BK

23.78 5

32.50

27.72

-0.47

-1.7

t

t

-1.3

13

1.9

Global X Uranium ETF

URA

14.04

0.86

6.5

-1.8

...

Bon Ton Store

BONT

6.08 4

17.49

10.64

0.40

3.9

t

t -16.0—18.89 4 -15.0

82

1.9

CIGNA Corp

CI

29.12 0

49.90

49.47

0.33

0.7

s

s 34.9 +47.00

1 10.0

Direxion EngyBull 3x

ERX

76.85

4.35

6.0

-16.8

175.2

CVS Caremark Corp

CVS

26.84 0

38.71

38.80

0.40

1.0

s

s

11.6 +13.40

3

CocaCola

KO

49.47 9

68.77

66.51

-1.79

-2.6

t

s

1.1 +33.32

Comcast Corp A

CMCSA 16.30 8

27.16

24.89

-0.23

-0.9

t

t 13.8 +37.95

t

t -11.2 +9.96

t

-8.2

+.32

4

9

0.1

7.1

16

1.3

2 10.8

13

2.8

2

3.8

18

1.8

3

8.2

13

3.9

t -23.3—28.36 5

-4.9

9

...

8

...

13

...

6.96 7

9.84

8.81

0.00

0.0

s

s

-9.5 +22.11

1.3

63

8.5

13.09 6

18.71

15.93

-0.70

-4.2

t

s

4.8 —6.02

4 1.9a

25

1.1

HHS

8.08 1

13.91

8.43

-0.01

-0.1

t

t -34.0—36.90 5 -18.2

11

3.8

Heinz

HNZ

42.88 0

54.21

54.68

0.79

1.5

s

s 10.6 +26.07

2

7.9

18

3.5

Hershey Company

HSY

45.31 8

58.20

55.02

-0.77

-1.4

t

s 16.7 +19.16

3

1.4

24

2.5

Kraft Foods

KFT

27.59 0

35.44

34.75

-0.48

-1.4

s

s 10.3 +23.57

3

4.1

20

3.3

Lowes Cos

LOW

19.35 7

27.45

24.25

-0.21

-0.9

t

t

-3.3 -1.71

4

-3.5

17

2.3

M&T Bank

MTB

72.03 7

96.15

87.62

0.28

0.3

t

t

0.7 +10.97

3

-2.6

14

3.2

McDonalds Corp

MCD

65.31 0

83.08

81.62

-0.10

-0.1

s

s

6.3 +25.00

3 22.6

17

3.0

NBT Bncp

NBTB

19.27 5

24.98

21.58

0.13

0.6

t

t -10.6

-.27

4

2.5

13

3.7

Nexstar Bdcstg Grp

NXST

3.64 7

9.26

7.09

-0.06

-0.8

t

s 18.4 +2.16

4

6.6

...

...

PNC Financial

PNC

49.43 9

65.19

62.54

0.87

1.4

s

s

3.0 -1.99

4

0.5

9

2.2

PPL Corp

PPL

24.00 9

28.38

27.86

-0.42

-1.5

s

s

5.9 +14.61

3

2.6

12

5.0

Penn Millers Hldg

PMIC

11.98 0

17.72

17.20

-0.20

-1.1

s

s 30.0 +19.28

3

...

...

...

Penna REIT

PEI

10.03 0

16.57

17.03

1.47

9.4

s

s 17.2 +26.65

2

-8.5

...

3.5

PepsiCo

PEP

60.32 9

71.89

70.40

-0.90

-1.3

s

s

3

5.3

19

2.9

Philip Morris Intl

PM

42.94 0

70.77

70.52

0.33

0.5

s

s 20.5 +63.36

1 14.4a

17

3.6

Procter & Gamble

PG

58.92 9

67.72

66.20

-1.16

-1.7

s

s

2.9 +11.85

3

6.2

17

3.2

Prudential Fncl

PRU

48.56 8

67.52

63.17

-0.44

-0.7

t

t

7.6 +8.76

3

-2.2

9

1.8

SLM Corp

SLM

9.89 0

16.86

16.84

0.50

3.1

s

s 33.8 +46.43

1 -20.1

9

2.4

SLM Corp flt pfB

SLMpB 32.41 0

60.00

58.50

0.58

1.0

s

s 33.5

0.0

...

7.9

Southn Union Co

SUG

20.00 0

30.38

30.07

0.50

1.7

s

s 24.9 +39.60

2

7.0

15

2.0

TJX Cos

TJX

39.56 0

54.94

53.46

0.84

1.6

t

s 20.4 +17.58

3 18.8

17

1.4

UGI Corp

UGI

24.30 9

33.53

32.29

-0.19

-0.6

t

s

2.2 +29.68

2

9.4

14

3.2

Verizon Comm

VZ

25.79 9

38.95

36.67

-0.48

-1.3

t

s

2.5 +49.73

1

9.8

22

5.3

WalMart Strs

WMT

47.77 7

57.90

54.70

-0.59

-1.1

t

s

1.4 +10.52

3

3.8

13

2.7

Weis Mkts

WMK

32.56 9

41.82

40.62

0.00

0.0

t

s

0.7 +21.84

3

1.7

16

2.9

7.8 +14.98

...

Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quarters. Rank classifies a stock’s performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).

Stock Screener

ETFS White Metals

WITE

61.74

3.26

5.6

-15.4

...

Global X 30 Canada

TSXV

14.78

0.74

5.3

-10.6

...

RBS Gold Trendpilot

TBAR

28.50

1.42

5.2

1.8

...

Barc iPath Alum

JJU

34.42

1.69

5.2

-4.4

21.4

GlobalX SilverMiners

SIL

25.38

1.23

5.1

-10.7

79.7

ProShs Ult Mexico

UMX

41.05

1.94

5.0

-6.6

70.0

DB Agr DoubLong

DAG

14.93

0.70

4.9

4.0

116.6

Direxion REst Bull3x

DRN

77.21

3.62

4.9

-1.4

100.0

ProSh UltraBasicMat

UYM

53.31

2.47

4.9

-9.6

88.1

US Nat Gas Fund

UNG

11.48

0.52

4.8

-4.8

55.9

Barc iPath DJ NatGas

GAZ

7.83

0.35

4.7

-11.3

-21.3

Barc iPath DJ Engy

JJE

23.39

1.05

4.7

-11.2

10.6

iPath ShtEnh EAFE

MFSA

74.80

3.18

4.4

19.5

...

CS Elem GlobWarm

GWO

9.39

0.40

4.4

-5.2

51.5 27.9

E-Tracs Energy

UBN

17.27

0.73

4.4

-7.5

ETFS Phys Prec Metal

GLTR

99.29

4.11

4.3

-11.1

...

PowShs Global Gold

PSAU

47.14

1.88

4.2

-7.4

23.4 26.5

E-Tracs IndMet

UBM

24.50

0.98

4.2

-2.6

Barc iPath Lead

LD

65.53

2.63

4.2

5.4

47.0

PwShs Base Metals Fd

DBB

23.85

0.94

4.1

-1.0

24.7

E-Tracs Gold

UBG

41.32

1.59

4.0

-1.4

24.6

ProSh Ultra O&G

DIG

56.30

2.16

4.0

-10.7

104.1

Direxion EmMktBull3x

EDC

38.17

1.45

3.9

-14.8

83.7

Mkt Vect Gold Miners

GDX

57.92

2.16

3.9

-6.9

17.4 ...

Fact TBBull S&PBear

FSA

26.05

0.97

3.9

9.7

CS VS InvVix STerm

XIV

182.79

6.61

3.8

4.5

...

DB Cmdty DblLg

DYY

11.81

0.43

3.8

-13.0

81.6

iShs MSCI Russia

ERUS

28.43

1.05

3.8

-8.6

...

Direx 30YTrBull 3x

TMF

37.90

1.35

3.7

9.7

-3.7

PwShs Oil Svcs

PXJ

24.67

0.85

3.6

-6.6

62.9

Mkt Vect JrGoldMin

GDXJ

37.44

1.29

3.6

-10.1

48.5

SPDR S&P O&G EqSv

XES

41.63

1.45

3.6

-5.6

57.9

PowSh SP SmCap Engy

PSCE

38.63

1.34

3.6

-6.8

72.5

Global X PureGoldMin

GGGG

15.20

0.51

3.5

-8.0

...

iShares MSCI Peru

EPU

45.24

1.55

3.5

8.1

43.4

iShares Brazil

EWZ

74.34

2.41

3.4

-4.3

26.8

iShs DJ Oil Eq

IEZ

63.47

2.07

3.4

-5.3

61.8

Looking for values? Try technology companies q

Big tech stocks are starting to look like big bargains. Microsoft, Intel, Dell and Hewlett-Packard all have price-to-earnings ratios below the S&P 500, which has a P/E of about 15. That’s drawn the attention of fund managers. Tom Forester, portfolio manager of the Forester Value fund (FVALX), has Microsoft in his fund. The company has a P/E of 11. “It’s a dirt cheap stock,” he says. A big tech company stock like Apple has done better because investors believe that long-term, it will rise more than Microsoft or Dell. Apple has shown investors that it’s more innovative than other tech giants. But Forester and other analysts say the big companies still have potential for higher earnings as the economy improves and companies spend more on computers and servers. This screen, powered by FactSet, identifies technology stocks that have the lowest P/E ratios in the S&P 500. Micron Technology tops the list. The company, which makes computer memory chips, has a P/E of about 6. Micron’s stock is up 22 percent this year. Still, the company is selling chips

COMPANY

TICKER

Micron Technology Lexmark International Computer Sciences Western Digital VeriSign SanDisk Corning Teradyne Hewlett Packard Harris Microsoft

MU LXK CSC WDC VRSN SNDK GLW TER HPQ HRS MSFT

SOURCE: FactSet

Data through midday May 27

PRICE/ EARNINGS

5.5 5.5 6.9 7.2 7.7 7.8 8.4 8.8 9.2 9.9 10.0 10 .5 10.5

YTD

DIV. YIELD

MARKET VALUE

22.1% -15.6 -22.6 5.2 11.2 -8.4 2.1 10.0 -13.2 7.4 -11.6

0.0% 0.0 2.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 0.0 0.9 2.1 2.6

$9.8b 2.3 5.9 8.3 6.1 10.9 31.0 2.9 79.1 6.2 208.0

at lower prices due to competition in the industry. That sent its net income down 80 percent in its fiscal second quarter.

q q p

Dow industrials

-0.6%

WEEKLY

Nasdaq

-0.2% WEEKLY

LARGE-CAP

S&P 500

-0.2%

WEEKLY

SMALL-CAP

Russell 2000

+0.9%

WEEKLY

q p q p q p q p

-2.9%

MO +7.5%

YTD -2.7%

MO +5.4%

YTD -2.4%

MO +5.8%

YTD

-3.4%

MO +6.7%

YTD


CMYK ➛

SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011

Mutual Fund Categories SPECIALTY FUNDS

YTD

PERCENT RETURN 1YR 3YR*

5YR*

Conservative Allocation (CA) 4.18 Moderate Allocation (MA) 4.95 Health (SH) 15.91 Natural Resources (SN) 3.43 Real Estate (SR) 11.56 Technology (ST) 6.11

13.36 17.48 29.83 32.50 26.45 28.65

4.02 2.77 8.98 -3.84 1.79 6.74

4.42 3.96 6.77 6.82 2.83 7.24

BALANCED Target-Date 2000-2010 (TA) Target-Date 2011-2015 (TD) Target-Date 2016-2020 (TE)

4.12 4.76 4.72

14.52 17.24 17.80

2.49 1.66 1.58

4.14 3.78 3.57

INTERNATIONAL Divers. Emerging Mkt. (EM) Europe Stock (ES) Foreign Small/Mid Val (FA) Foreign Large Blend (FB) Foreign Large Growth (FG) Foreign Small/Mid Gr. (FR) Foreign Large Value (FV) World Allocation (IH) World Stock (WS)

-0.44 6.71 3.89 4.26 4.15 3.90 5.28 4.22 5.39

26.06 32.00 32.01 27.65 30.01 35.86 26.58 20.06 26.05

-0.95 -4.78 0.34 -4.31 -2.76 0.04 -4.57 1.42 -0.71

8.76 2.03 3.58 1.32 2.93 3.51 0.85 4.65 2.95

YTD 5-YR FUND %RTN %RTN AMF ARM b +.7 -1.1 Acadian EmgMkts d +1.5 +8.8 AdvisorOne AmerigoN +5.4 +3.9 Alger Group CapApInsI +7.9 +9.2 CapApprA m +7.8 +9.1 MdCpGInsI +9.6 +3.6 SmCpGrthO +10.7 +6.6 SmCpInstI +10.6 +6.1 Allegiant UltShtBdI +.3 +3.4 Alliance Bernstein BalShrA m +7.9 +3.1 BalShrB m +7.5 +2.4 BalWlthStrA m +4.5 +3.6 BalWlthStrC m +4.2 +2.8 CoreOppA m +10.3 +3.9 GlTmtcGA m +1.4 +6.1 GlblBondA m +2.6 +8.1 GlblBondC m +2.1 +7.3 GrowA m +7.4 +2.1 GrowIncA m +10.0 +1.4 HighIncA m +5.2 +11.9 HighIncC m +5.0 +11.1 IntGrA m +1.5 +1.7 IntlValA m +1.8 -4.3 IntlValAdv +1.9 -4.0 LgCapGrA m +7.7 +6.2 LgCapGrAd +7.8 +6.5 MuInCAA m +3.9 +3.9 MuInNYA m +3.7 +4.1 MuInNatlA m +3.9 +3.9 SMCpGrA m +13.4 +5.9 SmMidValA m +4.6 +6.1 TxMgdWlApStAd +4.4 +.1 WlthApprStr +5.0 +1.2 WlthApprStrA m +4.8 +.9 Allianz NFJDivVlA m +7.9 +.9 NFJDivVlC m +7.6 +.2 NFJEqIncD b +7.9 +.9 NFJIntVlA m +5.4 +6.2 NFJSmCVlA m +7.7 +7.5 NFJSmCVlC m +7.4 +6.7 Alpine DynDiv x +5.7 -1.7 InRelEstY d +2.5 -1.6 UlShTxAdv d +.7 +3.1 Amana Growth m +4.4 +6.7 Income m +6.4 +7.2 American Beacon BalAMR +4.4 +4.0 IntlEqAMR d +8.0 +2.2 IntlEqInv +7.7 +1.7 LgCpVlAMR +5.5 +1.9 LgCpVlInv +5.2 +1.4 SmCapAMR +6.0 +4.6 SmCpVlInv +5.7 +4.0 American Cent BalInv +5.4 +4.4 CAInTFBdIv +4.2 +4.3 DivBdInv +2.8 +6.9 EmgMktInv d +1.0 +7.6 EqGrowInv +7.3 +2.0 EqIncA m +5.3 +4.1 EqIncC m +5.0 +3.3 EqIncInv +5.4 +4.4 Gift +7.6 +8.2 GinMaeInv +2.8 +6.6 GlGold d -7.0 +11.0 GovBdInv +2.4 +6.5 GrowthAdv m +5.9 +6.0 GrowthInv +6.0 +6.2 HeritA m +7.9 +9.8 HeritInv +8.0 +10.1 InTTxFBInv +3.6 +4.6 IncGrInv +7.0 +1.3 IncGroA m +6.9 +1.1 InfAdjAdv m +4.6 +6.3 InfAdjI +4.7 +6.6 IntlBd +5.8 +5.7 IntlDisIv d +3.6 +2.4 IntlGrInv d +6.0 +3.4 LS2025Inv +5.0 +5.0 LgCoVlInv +6.0 +.1 MdCpValIv +5.5 +6.5 NTEqGrIns +7.1 +2.2 NTGrthIns +6.0 +6.5 NTLgCmVlI +5.9 +.1 OneChAgg +5.6 +4.9 OneChCon +4.7 +5.2 OneChMod +5.2 +5.0 RealEstIv +12.9 +2.0 SelectInv +7.8 +4.9 ShTmGovIv +.8 +3.9 SmCpValAdv m +2.9 +6.3 SmCpValIv +3.0 +6.6 StrAlAgIv +5.5 +4.9 StrAlMd +5.0 +5.1 StrAlMd m +5.0 +4.8 UltraInv +7.2 +4.0 ValueInv +5.4 +2.4 VistaInv +6.7 +3.0 American Funds AMCAPA m +6.4 +4.1 AMCAPB m +6.1 +3.3 BalA m +5.4 +4.4 BalB m +5.1 +3.6 BondA m +3.1 +3.9 BondAmerB m +2.8 +3.2 CapIncBuA m +6.0 +4.2 CapIncBuB m +5.7 +3.4 CapWldBdA m +4.3 +6.8 CpWldGrIA m +5.9 +4.5 CpWldGrIB m +5.6 +3.7 EurPacGrA m +4.3 +4.9 EurPacGrB m +3.9 +4.1 FnInvA m +6.7 +4.0 FnInvB m +6.4 +3.2 GrthAmA m +5.2 +3.0 GrthAmB m +4.9 +2.2 HiIncA m +5.4 +7.4 HiIncMuA m +2.9 +2.2 IncAmerA m +6.8 +4.5 IncAmerB m +6.6 +3.7 IntBdAmA m +1.9 +4.0 IntlGrInA m +6.2 NA InvCoAmA m +4.5 +2.4 InvCoAmB m +4.2 +1.6 LtdTmTxEA m +2.9 +4.1 MutualA m +6.5 +3.9 NewEconA m +6.4 +5.1 NewPerspA m +4.6 +5.6 NewPerspB m +4.2 +4.8 NwWrldA m +1.8 +9.3 NwWrldB m +1.5 +8.5 STBdFdofAmA m +.7 NA SmCpWldA m +3.2 +5.6 SmCpWldB m +2.9 +4.8 TDR2010A m +4.6 NA TDR2015A m +4.7 NA TDR2020A m +5.0 NA TDR2025A m +5.2 NA TDR2030A m +5.3 NA TaxEBdAmA m +3.6 +3.6 TaxECAA m +3.6 +3.4 USGovSecA m +2.2 +5.7 WAMutInvA m +7.5 +2.5 WAMutInvB m +7.2 +1.8 Aquila HITaxFA m +2.8 +3.8 Arbitrage ArbtrageR m +1.1 +4.2 Ariel Apprec b +8.4 +6.5 Ariel b +7.2 +3.3 Artio Global GlobHiYldA x +6.1 +9.2 IntlEqA b +1.3 +.7 IntlEqIIA b +1.3 +1.5 Artisan IntSmCpIv d +4.4 +6.1 Intl d +6.1 +2.6 IntlVal d +5.3 +6.0 MdCpVal +11.5 +7.7 MidCap +9.7 +9.4 SmCapVal +7.8 +7.2 Aston Funds MidCapN b +4.2 +9.4 MtgClGrN b +4.8 +5.3 TAMROSmCN b +7.6 +6.7 BBH BrdMktFxI x +.9 +4.5 IntlEqN d +6.2 +2.6 TaxEffEq d +8.8 +7.9 BNY Mellon BalFd +4.6 +5.3 BondFd +2.8 +6.6 -.8 +9.4 EmgMkts

52-WEEK HI LOW 7.51

7.35

WK NAV CHG 7.42

...

21.65 14.99 20.51 +.17 14.44 10.72 14.06 +.05 23.01 16.12 16.21 36.82 31.94

22.34 15.62 15.56 35.49 30.80

+.01 -.01 +.08 +.21 +.18

10.05 10.00 10.01

...

15.98 14.97 12.55 12.49 12.84 81.41 8.58 8.61 40.02 3.67 9.31 9.41 16.42 14.78 15.06 27.62 28.91 11.09 10.12 10.12 7.11 19.24 13.16 13.09 13.07

16.35 11.44 10.83 24.61 21.29

12.87 12.08 10.22 10.19 9.10 58.26 8.16 8.18 29.24 2.69 8.32 8.41 12.08 11.10 11.32 19.67 20.58 10.14 9.39 9.33 4.25 13.41 9.94 9.65 9.63

15.89 14.88 12.31 12.25 12.70 78.26 8.46 8.48 39.28 3.63 9.26 9.37 15.60 13.91 14.18 26.68 27.94 10.64 9.80 9.76 6.86 18.48 12.76 12.65 12.63

+.01 +.01 +.06 +.05 +.05 +.89 +.03 +.02 +.19 ... -.04 -.03 +.08 +.11 +.10 +.17 +.17 -.01 ... -.01 +.04 +.04 +.05 +.06 +.06

12.40 9.37 12.18 -.04 12.44 9.41 12.21 -.04 12.42 9.39 12.20 -.04 22.38 16.72 21.75 +.13 31.65 23.14 30.74 +.12 30.29 22.14 29.41 +.11 5.14 3.90 4.87 -.04 27.18 18.54 26.58 +.28 10.06 10.03 10.05 ... 26.22 20.05 25.80 +.05 34.50 26.30 33.81 +.05 13.01 18.52 18.33 20.86 20.02 21.83 21.35

11.17 13.44 13.18 15.91 15.29 15.09 14.82

12.83 17.78 17.59 20.33 19.50 21.00 20.52

+.01 +.13 +.12 -.02 -.03 +.04 +.03

16.37 11.56 11.16 9.64 22.85 7.66 7.66 7.66 30.85 11.10 27.26 11.50 27.57 28.00 22.51 23.14 11.39 26.22 26.19 12.40 12.45 15.24 11.78 12.19 12.39 5.95 13.49 10.48 12.87 9.09 13.01 11.58 12.34 20.80 41.39 9.89 9.59 9.63 8.17 6.95 6.94 24.63 6.14 18.30

13.65 10.73 10.61 6.53 17.04 6.21 6.21 6.21 21.19 10.72 18.70 10.96 20.11 20.43 14.84 15.23 10.63 19.69 19.67 11.52 11.56 13.03 7.62 8.39 10.23 4.56 10.43 7.84 9.40 6.96 10.06 9.99 10.03 14.57 29.72 9.71 6.99 7.02 6.30 5.63 5.62 17.78 4.77 12.38

16.22 11.21 10.91 9.07 22.35 7.57 7.56 7.57 30.24 11.03 24.26 11.28 26.95 27.38 22.03 22.66 11.06 25.59 25.56 12.31 12.36 14.60 11.10 11.63 12.23 5.83 13.25 10.25 12.58 8.91 12.74 11.49 12.15 20.71 40.74 9.80 9.24 9.28 7.99 6.84 6.83 24.28 6.02 17.83

+.03 ... +.02 ... +.01 -.04 -.05 -.04 +.17 +.02 +.86 +.03 -.01 -.01 +.10 +.10 ... -.03 -.02 +.09 +.09 +.20 -.02 +.07 +.02 -.02 -.07 ... -.01 -.02 +.03 +.03 +.02 +.34 +.23 +.02 +.02 +.02 +.01 +.01 +.01 +.06 -.02 +.09

20.44 19.49 19.07 18.99 12.56 12.56 53.07 53.07 21.53 38.88 38.66 45.12 44.65 40.16 40.03 32.93 31.89 11.61 14.26 17.74 17.60 13.74 34.29 30.12 29.99 16.04 27.24 27.48 31.04 30.55 57.43 56.42 10.18 41.61 39.45 9.61 9.70 9.67 9.84 10.11 12.54 16.63 14.79 29.67 29.46

15.28 14.67 15.49 15.44 12.02 12.02 43.95 43.91 19.51 29.35 29.16 33.17 32.78 29.89 29.81 25.00 24.17 10.55 13.10 14.61 14.51 13.30 25.76 23.39 23.30 15.29 21.52 20.50 23.12 22.72 43.32 42.55 10.03 30.53 28.95 8.44 8.33 8.08 7.89 7.94 11.53 15.19 13.66 22.58 22.43

20.04 19.10 18.79 18.71 12.40 12.40 52.44 52.41 21.11 37.68 37.44 43.14 42.66 39.05 38.91 32.01 30.98 11.55 13.60 17.51 17.37 13.55 33.01 29.30 29.15 15.73 26.81 26.95 29.93 29.44 55.57 54.57 10.10 40.11 38.01 9.53 9.58 9.52 9.64 9.88 12.04 15.88 14.10 29.10 28.88

-.04 -.04 ... ... +.03 +.03 +.01 -.01 +.10 +.07 +.06 +.24 +.22 +.09 +.09 +.01 +.01 -.04 +.01 -.04 -.04 +.03 +.11 -.07 -.07 ... -.15 -.04 +.03 +.02 +.22 +.21 +.01 +.17 +.16 ... +.01 ... ... ... ... -.01 +.04 -.12 -.12

11.60 11.04 11.35

...

12.93 12.32 12.74 +.01 46.84 32.10 45.94 53.61 35.47 52.08

-.09 -.03

11.15 10.27 10.97 -.10 31.51 23.84 29.78 +.24 13.28 10.01 12.55 +.13 21.58 24.23 29.31 22.79 37.48 18.61

14.85 17.10 21.18 16.84 24.84 13.37

20.77 -.18 23.03 +.07 28.55 +.13 22.39 -.19 36.88 +.05 18.17 -.02

34.58 24.75 33.27 -.09 25.71 20.23 25.31 -.10 23.56 15.56 22.77 +.14 10.47 10.27 10.43 -.01 14.21 10.78 13.87 +.15 15.69 12.05 15.59 +.04 11.69 9.59 11.49 +.03 13.47 12.94 13.31 +.04 12.40 8.85 11.75 +.05

YTD 5-YR FUND %RTN %RTN IntlM +5.6 -.2 IntmBdM +2.1 +5.9 LgCpStkM +6.7 +3.1 MidCpStM +9.1 +5.7 NtlIntM +3.6 +4.7 NtlShTM +1.1 +3.1 PAIntMu +3.3 +4.0 SmCpStkM +7.2 +2.1 Baird AggrInst +3.8 +6.2 CrPlBInst +4.2 +7.9 IntBdInst +3.5 +6.5 IntMunIns +3.8 +5.4 ShTmBdIns +1.7 +4.4 Barclays Global Inv LP2020R m +5.0 +3.5 Baron Asset b +7.5 +3.9 Growth b +9.0 +4.7 Partners b +8.2 +3.7 SmCap b +11.4 +5.6 Bernstein CAMuni +2.9 +4.2 DiversMui +2.9 +4.3 EmgMkts ... +8.0 IntDur +3.6 +6.9 IntlPort +1.3 -3.5 NYMuni +2.8 +4.3 ShDurDivr +1.1 +2.8 ShDurPlu +.9 +2.8 TxMIntl +1.4 -3.6 Berwyn Income d +3.7 +8.8 BlackRock BalCapA m +9.2 +3.6 BasicValA m +6.1 +2.7 BasicValC m +5.8 +1.9 Engy&ResA m +6.8 +6.0 EqDivA m +7.2 +4.4 EqDivR b +7.0 +4.0 EquitDivC m +6.9 +3.6 GlbDynEqA m +3.8 +5.4 GlobAlcA m +3.4 +6.8 GlobAlcB m +3.1 +6.0 GlobAlcC m +3.1 +6.0 GlobAlcR m +3.2 +6.5 GovtInIvA m +2.0 +5.0 HiIncA m +6.1 +7.8 HiYldInvA m +5.6 +8.6 HthScOpA m +12.8 +10.3 InflPrBndA m +3.9 +6.7 InflPrBndC m +3.6 +5.9 IntlOppA m +3.2 +4.2 LCCrInvA m +13.1 +1.5 LCCrInvC m +12.7 +.7 LatinAmA m -5.0 +15.9 LgCapValA m +11.2 +.7 LowDurSvc b +1.9 +3.6 MidCpValEqA m +8.3 +5.0 NatMuniA m +3.7 +3.8 NatResD m +5.5 +7.1 S&P500A b +6.5 +2.4 TotRtrnA m +2.6 NA USOppInvC m +6.3 +7.4 USOppsIvA m +6.7 +8.2 ValOpptyA m +8.2 +1.3 Brandywine BlueFd +3.3 -.3 Brandywin +8.7 +.4 Bridgeway UltSmCoMk d +4.3 -.6 Brown Cap Mgmt SmCo Is d +13.0 +12.5 Buffalo MidCap d +5.6 +6.4 SmallCap d +5.8 +5.3 CG Capital Markets CrFixIn +3.0 +7.4 EmgMktEq +.3 +8.7 IntlEqInv +4.8 +1.6 LgCapGro +5.8 +4.4 LgCapVal +7.6 +.9 CGM Focus -8.5 +2.0 Mutual -6.2 +4.1 Realty +10.8 +9.7 Calamos ConvC m +4.1 +5.2 ConvertA m +4.5 +6.0 GlbGrIncA m +4.4 +5.5 GrIncA m +5.9 +5.5 GrIncC m +5.5 +4.7 GrowA m +6.5 +3.8 GrowB m +6.2 +3.1 GrowC m +6.2 +3.1 MktNuInA m +2.5 +3.3 Calvert BalancedA m +4.8 +2.6 BondA m +2.8 +5.1 EquityA m +8.8 +5.5 IncomeA m +3.7 +4.5 ShDurIncA m +1.9 +5.1 Cambiar OppInv +8.3 +3.4 Champlain Investment ChSmlComp b +9.8 +8.7 Clipper Clipper +8.2 -.4 Cohen & Steers Realty +12.7 +4.7 RealtyIns +12.8 +5.0 Colorado BondShares COBdShrs f +1.8 +4.3 Columbia AcornA m +7.1 +5.7 AcornC m +6.8 +4.9 AcornIntA m +3.3 +6.6 AcornIntZ +3.4 +7.0 AcornSelA m -.4 +4.7 AcornSelZ -.2 +5.1 AcornUSAZ +9.7 +4.8 AcornZ +7.3 +6.1 BondZ +2.9 +6.2 CntrnCoreA m +6.1 +6.5 ComInfoA m +5.1 +9.8 ComInfoC m +4.7 +8.9 DivBondA m +3.2 +5.9 DivBondI +3.4 +6.3 DivIncA m +6.5 +4.7 DivIncZ +6.6 +5.0 DivOppA m +9.9 +5.4 DivrEqInA m +5.9 +2.0 EmMktOppA m -.9 +9.6 EnrNatRsZ +4.3 +6.3 EqValueA m +6.1 +2.2 FlRateA m +3.1 +3.6 GlblTechA m +3.0 +8.2 HYMuniZ +3.1 +1.9 HiYldBdA m +5.5 +8.0 IncBldA m +5.3 +6.2 IncOppA m +5.4 +8.1 IncomeZ +4.5 +6.9 IntlOpZ +.1 +1.2 IntlVaZ +5.7 +1.0 IntmBdZ +3.3 +6.6 ItmMunBdZ +3.9 +4.3 LarCaCorZ +5.9 +3.4 LgCpGrowA m +7.5 +4.7 LgCpGrowZ +7.6 +5.0 LgCrQuantA m +7.8 +1.7 LtdDurCrdA m +2.6 +5.2 MAIntlEqA m +2.7 0.0 MAIntlEqZ +2.8 +.3 Mar21CA m +3.9 +2.6 Mar21CC m +3.6 +1.8 Mar21CZ +4.0 +2.8 MarFocEqA m +2.8 +3.2 MarFocEqZ +2.9 +3.5 MarGrIA m +5.3 +2.8 MarGrIZ +5.4 +3.1 MdCapGthZ +12.0 +8.2 MdCapIdxZ +9.5 +6.7 MdCpValOppA m +8.3 +4.1 MdCpValOppR4 +8.2 +4.3 MdCpValZ +8.3 +4.1 MdCpVlA m +8.1 +3.9 MidGrOppA m +6.6 +7.1 PBAggA m +6.0 +3.8 PBModA m +5.2 +5.3 PBModAggA m +5.5 +4.6 PBModConA m +4.7 +5.4 PBTtlEqA m +6.5 +3.0 SIIncZ +1.5 +4.6 SelSmCapZ +1.1 +3.0 ShTmMuZ +1.1 +3.4 SmCaVaIIA m +8.8 +4.1 SmCaVaIIZ +9.0 +4.4 SmCapCrZ +6.3 +5.7 SmCapIdxZ +7.7 +4.4 SmCpGthIZ +12.7 +8.0 SmCpValIA m +3.5 +4.1 SmCpValIZ +3.6 +4.4 StLgCpGrA m +10.9 NA

SMALL-CAP MID-CAP LARGE-CAP

PAGE 6D

VALUE LV 7.9 24.4 -1.7 0.6

YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR

BLEND LB 6.5 20.7 1.8 4.0

MV

8.7 22.9 5.7 3.8 6.3 22.1 9.1 5.5

M

10.1 31.8 5.4 6.0 8.9 27.2 7.0 5.1

SV

U

T

U

GROWTH LG 4.2 22.9 0.7 3.7

MB

SB

11.9 35.6 3.6 6.3

MG

10.4 37.4 7.5 5.7

SG

A

L

S

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Fund Focus FundFocus This stock-and-bond fund reopened to new investors on May 16. Managers have previously kept a tight lid on the fund’s size, so don’t be surprised if it closes again. It now holds $1.2 billion. Leuthold CoreInv d

LCORX

BOND FUNDS Interm-Term Bond (CI) Interm. Government (GI) High Yield Muni (HM) High Yield Bond (HY) Muni National Interm (MI) Muni National Long (ML) Muni Short (MS)

3.27 2.51 2.78 5.30 3.32 3.69 1.62

7.57 4.61 1.57 17.39 2.99 1.96 2.02

6.44 5.50 1.51 8.78 4.16 3.38 2.77

5.98 5.72 1.07 7.12 4.00 3.16 3.10

NAV 11.37 13.05 9.23 13.36 13.24 12.93 12.56 12.56

WK CHG +.06 +.03 ... +.10 -.01 ... ... +.06

10.91 10.88 11.31 11.79 9.81

10.73 10.75 11.09 11.61 9.75

-.01 -.02 ... -.02 -.01

10.42 10.40 10.80 11.21 9.62

16.01 13.29 15.85 +.07 61.10 57.22 22.80 26.93

44.23 40.23 15.39 18.53

59.43 55.86 22.25 26.48

+.23 +.56 +.10 +.25

14.96 14.84 35.25 14.27 16.62 14.61 12.72 11.96 16.74

14.09 14.14 25.01 13.54 12.58 13.94 12.53 11.80 12.66

14.43 14.48 33.29 14.00 15.83 14.27 12.64 11.94 15.95

-.01 -.01 +.39 +.04 +.07 +.01 -.01 +.01 +.07

13.68 12.76 13.65 +.04 23.51 27.93 26.17 44.83 19.12 19.21 18.74 13.50 20.75 20.22 19.34 20.08 11.23 4.97 7.95 32.53 11.60 11.58 36.24 12.52 11.57 77.62 16.58 9.75 12.57 10.47 72.62 16.72 11.47 38.87 42.71 21.41

18.95 20.96 19.64 26.49 14.48 14.55 14.19 10.22 16.99 16.56 15.85 16.45 10.60 4.41 7.10 25.80 10.54 10.53 26.06 8.95 8.28 53.88 11.95 9.55 9.18 9.48 47.67 12.57 10.83 27.63 30.23 14.24

23.29 27.15 25.42 41.99 18.71 18.79 18.32 12.98 20.20 19.67 18.82 19.54 10.93 4.94 7.89 31.98 11.01 11.00 34.56 12.30 11.37 71.25 16.25 9.73 12.39 10.04 67.79 16.35 11.24 38.06 41.85 20.66

+.04 -.09 -.09 +1.37 ... ... ... +.08 +.11 +.11 +.11 +.11 +.02 -.02 -.03 -.31 +.04 +.04 +.26 +.01 +.02 +2.09 ... ... +.02 ... +1.41 -.02 ... +.13 +.15 +.20

FUND

YTD 5-YR %RTN %RTN

StLgCpGrZ +11.0 StrInvZ +5.3 StratAllocA m +5.6 StratIncA m +4.6 StratIncZ +4.8 TaxEA m +4.5 TaxEBdA m +3.9 TaxEZ +4.5 USGovMorA m +5.3 ValRestrZ +4.3 ValueA m +4.6 ValueZ +4.7 Commerce Bond +3.6 Constellation SndsSelGrII +6.0 DFA 1YrFixInI +.6 2YrGlbFII +.6 5YearGovI +1.6 5YrGlbFII +2.8 EMktsSoCo -.5 EmMkCrEqI -.3 EmMktValI -1.5 EmMtSmCpI -1.3 EmgMktI +.8 GlEqInst +6.0 Glob6040I +4.9 InfPrtScI +5.3 IntGovFII +2.7 IntRlEstI +9.6 IntSmCapI +4.8 IntlValu3 +4.6 LgCapIntI +5.0 RelEstScI +12.5 STMuniBdI +1.4 TMIntlVal +4.4 TMMkWVal +8.7 TMMkWVal2 +8.7 TMUSEq +7.0 TMUSTarVal +5.9 TMUSmCp +7.2 USCorEq1I +7.5 USCorEq2I +7.4 USLgCo +6.7 USLgVal3 +9.5 USLgValI +9.4 USMicroI +5.9 USSmValI +5.2 USSmallI +7.6 USTgtValI +6.0 USVecEqI +7.2 DWS-Investments

+8.4 +4.6 +2.8 +7.3 +7.6 +4.0 +3.7 +4.2 +6.8 +3.1 +.8 +1.1

52-WEEK HI LOW 14.15 20.96 10.04 6.28 6.21 13.79 3.89 13.79 5.46 54.18 12.23 12.25

9.43 14.82 8.17 5.81 5.75 12.35 3.51 12.35 5.15 37.85 9.27 9.28

WK NAV CHG 14.00 20.16 9.92 6.15 6.08 13.07 3.71 13.07 5.46 52.61 12.02 12.05

-.03 +.04 +.02 -.03 -.03 ... ... ... +.01 +.55 +.03 +.03

+7.8 20.44 19.61 20.25 +.05 +7.0 10.83 +3.2 +3.3 +4.8 +4.9 NA +13.0 +13.4 +14.6 +11.9 +3.6 +4.8 NA +7.1 NA +3.4 +2.5 +2.1 +3.3 +3.0 +2.7 +1.9 +2.0 +3.1 +1.5 +2.4 +3.8 +3.5 +3.0 +2.1 +1.9 +2.8 +2.4 +4.9 +3.6 +3.0

10.38 10.30 11.17 11.75 15.50 23.21 38.10 25.24 32.37 14.76 13.69 11.90 12.91 5.59 18.94 18.91 21.80 24.43 10.41 16.56 16.73 16.11 14.81 23.61 25.49 12.09 12.07 10.76 17.21 22.48 15.13 28.21 23.76 18.31 12.00

7.46 10.61 +.06 10.31 10.13 10.69 10.78 11.41 16.37 27.82 17.79 22.98 10.65 11.08 11.09 12.09 3.67 13.30 13.45 15.92 17.26 10.21 11.75 11.84 11.39 10.91 16.00 17.19 8.71 8.62 8.07 12.26 16.02 10.30 18.50 15.89 12.42 8.39

10.36 10.21 10.93 11.18 14.69 22.10 35.61 23.74 30.90 14.27 13.43 11.84 12.55 5.50 18.03 17.93 20.85 24.25 10.32 15.67 16.31 15.70 14.48 22.74 24.59 11.80 11.76 10.53 16.82 21.96 14.58 26.90 22.96 17.62 11.64

+.01 +.01 +.04 +.05 +.08 +.13 +.14 -.06 +.25 +.05 +.05 +.09 +.06 +.05 +.07 +.09 +.13 +.40 ... +.06 +.06 +.05 +.01 +.17 +.22 +.02 +.03 -.01 +.05 +.06 +.14 +.24 +.19 +.12 +.05

FUND

YTD 5-YR %RTN %RTN

BstSMCpGI +11.3 BstSmCpVl +4.7 CAAMTBdZ +4.0 DiscStkR b +6.8 Dreyfus +7.0 EmergMarI d -2.5 EmgLead +4.2 EmgMkts m -2.5 GNMA Z b +3.1 GrowInc +6.5 GrtChinaA m -5.8 HiYldI +6.0 IntBndA f +4.9 IntIncA f +3.9 IntMuBd +4.0 IntlStkI +4.9 IntlStkIx +4.7 MidCapIdx +9.5 MuniBd +3.4 NJMuniA f +3.2 NYTaxEBd +3.6 OppMdCpVaA f +10.6 SIMuBdD b +1.8 SP500Idx +6.5 SmCapIdx +7.7 SmCoVal +4.6 StratValA f +6.4 TechGrA f +5.6 WldwdeGrA f +10.4 Driehaus ActiveInc +2.3 EmMktGr d +2.5 Dupree KYTxFInc +4.1 Eagle CapApprA m +4.7 MidCpStA m +3.8 Eaton Vance DivBldrA m +4.7 Floating-Rate A m +2.9 FltRateC m +2.5 FltRtAdv b +2.9 GovOblA m +1.5 GtrIndiaA m -12.7 HiIncOppA m +5.9 HiIncOppB m +5.6 IncBosA m +5.4 LrgCpValA m +3.5 LrgCpValC m +3.2 NatlMuniA m +3.6 NatlMuniB m +3.3 NatlMuniC m +3.3 PAMuniA m +4.3

+7.2 +3.2 +3.6 +3.6 +3.7 +9.2 -2.0 +9.0 +6.2 +3.5 +17.2 +7.9 +10.7 +6.5 +4.3 NA +.9 +6.4 +3.3 +3.5 +4.1 +9.1 +3.7 +2.5 +4.3 +12.0 +3.3 +7.8 +5.5

52-WEEK HI LOW 15.90 25.11 14.90 33.52 9.80 13.95 22.39 13.87 15.86 15.40 55.00 6.84 17.20 13.43 13.89 14.75 16.44 31.27 11.58 13.10 15.22 38.37 13.33 37.66 22.56 32.83 30.96 34.86 44.68

10.86 18.32 13.35 24.46 7.21 10.31 15.03 10.23 15.25 11.14 37.10 6.17 16.53 12.82 13.00 11.01 11.91 21.87 10.53 11.86 13.92 25.47 13.02 28.92 15.98 21.96 22.81 23.69 33.26

WK NAV CHG 15.62 24.12 14.13 32.65 9.60 13.21 13.13 15.85 15.04 47.28 6.80 16.88 13.40 13.53 14.37 15.62 30.53 11.01 12.42 14.57 37.79 13.19 36.83 22.00 31.54 30.31 34.31 43.86

+.16 +.14 ... +.02 +.02 +.04 ... +.05 +.04 ... -1.62 -.03 +.17 +.02 ... +.11 +.07 +.12 ... ... -.01 +.10 ... -.04 +.16 +.06 +.12 +.07 +.14

+6.4 11.35 10.71 11.24 -.01 +11.1 34.42 23.49 33.00 +.27 +4.7 7.92

7.33

7.66

-.01

+3.3 29.72 22.76 29.22 +.05 +4.5 29.41 21.40 28.61 +.04 +3.7 +3.8 +3.0 +3.8 +5.8 +5.9 +6.7 +6.0 +7.6 +1.6 +.8 +.5 -.3 -.3 +2.2

10.68 8.45 10.37 -.04 9.41 8.91 9.39 -.01 9.09 8.60 9.06 -.02 9.10 8.61 9.08 -.01 7.65 7.39 7.48 ... 29.97 21.43 24.58 -.08 4.52 4.07 4.50 -.01 4.52 4.08 4.51 -.01 6.00 5.47 5.97 -.02 19.26 15.13 18.81 +.03 19.25 15.14 18.79 +.03 10.03 8.44 9.02 -.02 10.03 8.44 9.02 -.02 10.03 8.44 9.02 -.02 9.25 8.22 8.75 -.03

27.37 19.61 26.48 +.11 30.08 19.53 28.86 +.35 16.00 11.20 15.41 +.24 49.87 32.88 49.41 +.12 18.21 13.25 17.86 +.02 28.58 20.78 27.72 -.13 8.88 8.27 8.52 +.03 18.12 13.09 17.34 +.21 11.61 8.22 11.08 +.06 16.09 11.42 15.61 -.02 9.64 7.28 9.44 ... 36.39 24.44 31.85 -.22 30.21 22.53 27.63 -.16 29.83 19.95 29.63 +.45 20.92 21.03 11.56 34.35 34.45 58.70 58.21 53.27 12.33

17.92 17.99 9.20 26.77 26.92 41.56 41.47 37.95 11.18

20.33 20.45 11.23 33.26 33.34 56.84 56.34 51.56 12.25

-.02 -.01 -.01 +.01 +.01 +.19 +.18 +.16 +.01

28.83 16.05 39.20 16.27 16.71

24.05 15.37 28.43 15.64 16.36

28.52 ... 15.78 +.02 38.93 +.22 16.27 +.05 16.56 -.02

20.38 13.98 19.88 +.12

NORTH AMERICAN Exit 1 off Rt. 380 1000 DUNHAM DR. DUNMORE, PA www.nawarhorse.com (570) 346-2453

WARHORSE

16.46 11.28 16.01 +.05 67.75 51.94 67.06

-.34

65.86 46.42 65.64 +.97 42.81 30.13 42.67 +.62 9.20

8.95

9.05

...

32.30 29.58 43.72 43.82 29.34 30.20 32.21 33.38 9.62 15.44 48.80 40.48 5.12 5.13 14.06 14.07 8.58 10.96 10.33 26.05 11.35 9.11 22.24 10.11 2.88 10.95 10.16 9.92 12.67 15.39 9.25 10.72 14.17 25.60 26.18 5.95 10.11 12.97 13.15 14.61 13.61 14.94 24.39 24.94 22.06 22.47 30.40 12.93 8.63 8.68 14.81 14.79 12.42 11.00 11.22 11.11 10.99 10.85 10.03 18.98 10.60 15.40 15.51 17.49 19.08 36.99 47.76 50.13 14.04

22.85 21.11 31.37 31.44 21.15 21.72 21.26 23.54 9.14 11.18 35.02 29.19 4.91 4.92 10.95 10.95 6.29 7.97 7.47 16.96 8.21 8.44 16.79 9.18 2.58 9.81 9.28 9.35 9.17 12.11 8.91 10.02 10.58 18.39 18.81 4.39 9.75 9.44 9.56 10.63 9.95 10.85 17.36 17.74 15.54 15.80 19.75 8.96 5.98 6.02 10.46 10.45 8.51 8.38 9.30 8.82 9.50 7.89 9.89 12.85 10.46 10.17 10.25 11.92 13.35 23.42 34.92 36.63 9.38

31.33 28.68 42.21 42.31 27.84 28.66 31.34 32.38 9.39 15.14 46.97 38.88 5.10 5.11 13.83 13.84 8.49 10.66 9.80 24.16 11.02 9.06 21.49 9.53 2.86 10.90 9.80 9.91 11.99 14.92 9.20 10.43 13.90 24.95 25.52 5.83 10.08 12.35 12.51 14.12 13.13 14.44 23.35 23.88 21.42 21.81 29.82 12.62 8.52 8.56 14.56 14.54 12.07 10.77 11.09 10.92 10.91 10.56 9.97 17.95 10.52 14.89 15.00 16.90 18.61 35.61 46.33 48.64 13.89

+.21 +.19 +.39 +.39 +.09 +.09 +.38 +.22 +.01 +.01 -.03 -.03 ... ... -.02 -.02 -.03 +.01 +.11 +.73 +.02 -.02 -.08 ... -.01 -.01 -.04 +.01 +.06 +.09 +.01 -.01 +.01 +.10 +.10 -.01 +.01 +.10 +.09 +.05 +.05 +.05 +.18 +.19 +.15 +.15 +.19 +.04 ... ... ... ... +.04 +.04 +.03 +.03 +.03 +.04 ... +.13 -.01 +.07 +.07 +.03 +.14 +.27 +.23 +.24 -.03

DrSmCpVlA m +3.9 +4.9 39.85 LgCapValA m +7.1 +3.4 18.76 LgCapValS +7.2 +3.7 18.77 DWS-Scudder BalA m +4.0 +2.9 9.59 CATFIncA m +3.9 +3.9 7.47 CapGrA m +4.1 +4.3 58.29 CapGrS +4.3 +4.6 58.70 EnhEMFIS d ... +6.0 11.53 Eq500S +6.6 +2.8 153.28 GNMAS +3.7 +6.8 15.65 GlbTS d +4.9 +1.9 25.90 GrIncS +8.4 +3.0 18.10 GvtSc m +3.4 +6.5 9.00 HiIncA m +5.1 +7.0 4.96 HlthCareS d +15.3 +7.2 28.50 IntTFrS +3.8 +4.6 11.76 IntlS d +2.1 -1.3 49.01 LAEqS d -5.9 +9.8 53.68 MgdMuniA m +3.7 +4.4 9.25 MgdMuniS +3.8 +4.7 9.26 SPInxS +6.5 +2.6 18.13 ShDurPS +2.0 +4.3 9.64 StrHiYldTxFA m +3.1 +3.5 12.52 StrHiYldTxFS +3.2 +3.7 12.53 StrValA m +5.5 -2.2 35.44 TechA m +4.2 +5.2 14.76 Davis FinclA m +2.6 +.1 33.73 NYVentA m +5.0 +1.8 36.90 NYVentB m +4.5 +.9 35.33 NYVentC m +4.6 +1.0 35.60 Delaware Invest CorpBdIs +5.0 +9.1 6.35 DiverIncA m +3.7 +8.9 9.84 EmgMktA m +.7 +12.0 17.03 GrowOppA m +16.3 +9.1 25.30 LgValA m +10.2 +2.1 16.67 LtdDvIncA m +2.1 +6.1 9.05 OpFixIncI +3.7 +8.0 9.87 OptLgCpIs +6.2 +3.5 13.16 OptLgValI +8.6 +2.9 11.42 TaxFIntA m +3.0 +4.1 12.12 TaxFMNA m +3.9 +4.1 12.74 TaxFPAA m +3.1 +4.1 8.13 TaxFUSAA m +3.4 +3.9 11.64 Diamond Hill LngShortA m +3.7 +1.0 17.32 LngShortI +3.9 +1.4 17.52 LrgCapI +6.8 +3.5 16.12 SmCapA m +5.2 +4.2 27.74 Dimensional Investme IntCorEqI +4.7 +2.7 12.33 IntlSCoI +4.6 +4.1 18.73 IntlValuI +4.5 +2.3 20.21 Direxion DynHYBdI b +3.9 +1.2 14.95 Dodge & Cox Bal +6.8 +2.5 75.65 GlbStock +5.5 NA 9.72 Income +3.5 +7.2 13.55 IntlStk +3.7 +3.2 38.80 Stock +7.7 +.2 118.20 Domini Social Invmts SocEqInv m +8.2 +3.3 32.81 Dreyfus Apprecia +8.0 +4.2 42.06 AtvMdCpA f +8.6 0.0 36.88 BasSP500 +6.6 +2.8 27.98 BondIdxIn b +2.7 +6.0 10.85

28.99 38.22 +.05 14.73 18.63 -.03 14.73 18.63 -.03 7.98 6.70 43.03 43.36 10.28 114.86 15.04 19.11 13.35 8.62 4.51 21.24 10.91 37.27 40.00 8.39 8.40 13.58 9.49 11.18 11.19 26.65 10.37

9.42 7.10 56.72 57.13 10.74 149.91 15.53 25.02 17.65 8.91 4.90 28.07 11.41 46.25 50.00 8.82 8.83 17.74 9.55 11.78 11.79 34.45 14.06

+.01 ... +.17 +.18 -.08 -.17 -.03 +.07 -.07 -.04 -.05 -.20 ... +.17 +1.50 ... ... -.02 -.03 -.01 -.01 +.18 -.03

26.45 28.46 27.23 27.44

32.59 -.14 36.04 +.01 34.47 ... 34.75 +.01

5.76 9.14 11.99 16.72 12.15 8.83 9.26 9.44 8.49 11.26 11.67 7.36 10.62

6.02 9.38 16.13 24.83 16.45 9.00 9.77 12.80 11.29 11.66 12.24 7.72 11.12

14.67 14.79 12.40 21.10

16.86 -.01 17.06 ... 15.83 +.01 27.15 +.12

+.01 +.02 +.10 +.02 -.06 +.02 +.04 +.03 +.01 ... +.01 ... ...

8.79 11.76 +.05 13.00 17.96 +.09 14.38 19.15 +.08 14.09 14.78

-.04

59.93 7.14 13.15 27.90 87.05

74.64 9.39 13.55 37.02 115.67

+.17 +.01 +.02 +.07 +.23

24.27 32.05

-.09

31.31 26.58 20.96 10.38

41.24 +.07 35.68 -.12 27.25 -.03 10.69 +.03

CATEGORY MORNINGSTAR RATING™ ASSETS EXP RATIO MANAGER SINCE RETURNS 3-MO YTD 1-YR 3-YR ANNL 5-YR-ANNL

Aggressive Allocation ★★★★★ $822 million 1.26% Matthew Paschke 2011-01-31 +2.9 +6.6 +15.8 -0.1 +5.4

TOP 5 HOLDINGS Fidelity Instl MM Fds Government I Gold (Physical) Brazil Federative Rep 12.5% iShares Russell 2000 Index iShares iBoxx $ Invest Grade Corp Bond

*– Annualized 52-WEEK HI LOW 11.86 8.78 13.24 12.81 9.48 6.90 13.68 8.96 13.75 12.73 13.01 12.85 12.96 12.13 12.97 8.70

FUND

PaTxMgEMI d +.9 StrIncA m +2.4 StratIncC m +2.1 TMG1.0 +5.4 TMG1.1A m +5.2 TMGlbDivIncA m +7.0 TMGlbDivIncC m +6.6 TaxMgdVlA m +3.6 WldwHealA m +13.0 FAM Value +7.3 FBR FBRFocus m +1.3 FMI CommStk +7.8 Focus +9.3 LgCap +7.5 FPA Capital m +11.6 Cres d +5.6 NewInc m +1.6 Fairholme Funds Fairhome d -8.2 Federated CapAprA m +1.7 ClvrValA m +7.9 HiIncBdA m +5.0 InterConA m +4.5 KaufmanA m +4.4 KaufmanB m +4.0 KaufmanC m +4.0 KaufmanR m +4.2 KaufmnSCA m +6.1 MuniSecsA f +4.0 MuniUltA m +.7 PrdntBr m -8.5 StrValA x +9.3 StratIncA f +3.9 TotRetBdA m +2.8 USGovSecA f +2.2 Fidelity AstMgr20 +3.0 AstMgr50 +4.3 AstMgr85 +5.2 Bal +5.2 BlChGrow +7.2 BlChVal +6.7 CAMuInc d +3.9 CASITxFre d +2.1 CTMuInc d +4.0 Canada d +4.1 CapApr +5.6 CapInc d +6.3 ChinaReg d +.8 Contra +5.0 ConvSec +8.1 DiscEq +7.2 DivGrow +5.7 DivStk +6.4 DivrIntl d +3.4 EmergAsia d +3.2 EmgMkt d +.2 EqInc +6.1 EqInc II +6.2 EuCapApr d +5.3 Europe d +5.3 ExpMulNat d +5.2 FF2015 +4.6 FF2035 +5.4 FF2040 +5.5

+12.1 53.81 +7.3 8.26 +6.5 7.80 +2.5 574.45 +2.1 25.66 +2.0 10.51 +1.2 10.49 +1.0 17.94 +7.4 10.57

39.18 8.10 7.64 435.73 19.51 8.44 8.43 14.12 8.15

51.56 8.24 7.77 561.41 25.07 10.21 10.19 17.51 10.57

+.27 -.01 -.02 -1.91 -.09 +.01 +.01 +.02 +.09

+3.0 48.92 38.16 48.67 +.06 +5.8 51.90 38.90 50.49 +.45 +8.7 27.49 20.91 27.03 +8.8 33.81 23.07 33.16 +5.6 17.00 13.23 16.78

-.06 -.02 -.06

+7.2 47.08 30.86 45.97 +.30 +6.5 28.71 23.99 28.30 -.04 +4.2 11.07 10.82 10.91 +.01 +6.4 36.53 28.24 32.68

-.08

+3.1 +2.5 +8.3 +3.9 +4.4 +3.8 +3.8 +4.4 +4.3 +2.9 +2.2 -1.5 +2.4 +8.2 +6.4 +5.4

20.00 15.75 7.77 55.09 5.89 5.56 5.56 5.89 28.37 10.34 10.05 5.65 4.80 9.45 11.48 7.93

15.48 11.60 7.11 37.18 4.37 4.13 4.13 4.38 19.09 9.34 10.01 4.26 3.75 8.54 11.01 7.66

19.35 15.51 7.73 52.14 5.73 5.41 5.41 5.73 27.80 9.85 10.04 4.33 4.73 9.26 11.29 7.84

+.09 +.10 -.01 +.32 +.01 ... +.01 +.01 +.03 ... ... ... -.04 +.01 +.01 +.01

+4.9 +4.9 +4.2 +4.3 +6.4 -.9 +3.9 +4.3 +4.6 +7.9 +2.8 +10.5 +13.3 +5.1 +6.9 +.8 +4.5 +3.0 +1.1 +10.2 +7.1 +1.1 +.7 +1.1 +2.1 +2.4 +4.4 +3.3 +3.1

13.17 16.27 14.51 19.40 49.64 11.88 12.37 10.81 11.84 63.77 27.33 9.95 34.07 72.91 27.62 24.96 31.04 16.30 32.85 32.86 27.86 48.11 19.84 21.27 35.01 23.65 12.05 12.45 8.71

12.01 13.52 10.85 15.94 34.78 9.04 11.33 10.49 11.01 46.30 20.41 8.47 24.82 54.99 21.07 19.05 21.79 12.06 23.93 22.93 19.80 35.94 14.86 14.36 23.88 17.70 10.07 9.53 6.64

13.11 16.04 14.10 19.12 48.63 11.53 11.87 10.66 11.50 60.51 26.76 9.83 32.76 71.01 27.34 24.15 30.05 15.91 31.17 31.61 26.40 46.85 19.34 20.04 32.99 22.94 11.82 12.04 8.42

+.03 +.05 +.06 +.03 +.10 +.02 -.01 ... ... +.54 +.01 -.01 -.18 +.18 +.23 +.10 +.11 +.01 +.18 -.12 +.14 +.04 +.03 +.15 +.25 +.08 +.05 +.05 +.04

FUND

YTD 5-YR %RTN %RTN

Fidelity +7.5 Fifty +7.5 FltRtHiIn d +1.9 FocStk +10.0 FocuHiInc d +4.6 FourInOne +5.9 Fr2045 +5.4 Fr2050 +5.5 Free2000 +3.2 Free2005 +4.0 Free2010 +4.4 Free2020 +4.9 Free2025 +5.1 Free2030 +5.2 FreeInc +3.1 GNMA +3.3 GlbCmtyStk d +2.2 GlobBal d +5.3 GovtInc +2.4 GrDiscov +8.6 GrStr d +7.1 GrowCo +10.3 GrowInc +5.8 HiInc d +5.2 Indepndnc +6.8 InfProtBd +4.7 IntBond +3.2 IntGovt +2.1 IntMuniInc d +3.0 IntSmOpp d +4.7 IntlCptlAppr d +3.6 IntlDisc d +2.7 IntlSmCp d +4.2 InvGrdBd +3.6 Japan d -8.4 LargeCap +6.0 LatinAm d -.9 LevCoSt d +8.9 LgCpVal +7.3 LowPriStk d +8.5 MAMuInc d +3.7 MIMuInc d +3.3 MNMuInc d +3.6 Magellan +4.3 MdCpVal d +8.3 MeCpSto +5.4 MidCap d +8.3 MtgSec +3.0 MuniInc d +3.8 NJMuInc d +2.8 NYMuInc d +3.5 NewMille +8.3 NewMktIn d +3.3 Nordic d +7.0 OHMuInc d +3.7 OTC +10.1 Overseas d +3.7 PacBasin d -.4 Puritan +5.6 RealInv d +12.0 RelEstInc d +5.8 Series100Index +5.1 ShIntMu d +1.9 ShTmBond +1.4 SmCapRetr d +8.5 SmCapStk d +8.1 SmCpGr d +10.0 SmCpOpp +8.9 SmCpVal d +3.8 StkSelec +6.3 StrDivInc +10.0 StratInc +4.7 StratRRet d +4.5 StratRRnI d +4.5 TaxFrB d +3.9 Tel&Util +9.8 TotalBd +3.6 Trend +9.5 USBdIdxInv +2.9 Value +7.4 ValueDis +7.0 Worldwid d +6.4 Fidelity Advisor AstMgr70 +4.9 BalT m +5.0 CapDevO +8.3 DivIntlA m +3.7 DivIntlC m +3.4 DivIntlIs d +3.9 DivIntlT m +3.6 EmMktIncI d +3.3 EqGrowA m +8.4 EqGrowI +8.5 EqGrowT m +8.3 EqIncA m +7.3 EqIncI +7.4 EqIncT m +7.2 FltRateA m +1.8 FltRateC m +1.5 FltRateI d +1.8 Fr2010A m +4.2 Fr2015A m +4.3 Fr2020A m +4.7 Fr2020T m +4.5 Fr2025A m +4.9 Fr2030A m +4.9 Fr2035A m +5.1 Fr2040A m +5.1 GrowIncI +5.9 GrowOppT m +10.7 HiIncAdvA m +7.0 HiIncAdvI d +7.1 HiIncAdvT m +7.0 IntrDiscA m +2.5 LeverA m +9.0 LeverC m +8.7 LeverI +9.1 LeverT m +8.9 LrgCapI +6.0 Mid-CpIIA m +3.2 Mid-CpIII +3.3 MidCapA m +5.9 MidCapT m +5.9 MidCpIIT m +3.1 NewInsA m +4.6 NewInsB m +4.3 NewInsC m +4.3 NewInsI +4.7 NewInsT m +4.5 OverseaI d +4.6 ShFixInI +1.5 SmCapA m +9.9 SmCapC m +9.5 SmCapI +10.0 SmCapT m +9.8 StSlctSmCp d +9.3 StratIncA m +4.7 StratIncC m +4.4 StratIncI +4.7 StratIncT m +4.7 TechA m +4.9 TotBondA m +3.5 TotBondI +3.6 ValStratT m +8.1 Fidelity Select Banking d -3.6 Biotech d +19.8 BrokInv d -3.6 Chemical d +11.8 CommEq d +8.5 Computer d +5.9 ConsStpl d +8.3 DefAero d +9.8 Electron d +10.6 Energy d +12.5 EnergySvc d +10.8 FinSvc d -2.4 Gold d -4.0 HealtCar d +15.4 IndustEq d +6.5 Industr d +7.0 Materials d +5.2 MedDeliv d +20.3 MedEqSys d +14.6 NatGas d +6.7 NatRes d +9.8 Pharm d +14.9 SelctUtil d +8.7 SoftwCom d +6.5 Tech d +5.1 Fidelity Spartan 500IdxInv +6.7 ExtMktIdI d +8.5 FdSpIntIv +3.6 IntlIdxIn d +5.1 TotMktIdI d +7.1 First American RealA m +12.2 First Eagle FndofAmY b +9.2 GlbA m +4.4 Gold m -1.1 OverseasA m +2.8 USValueA m +6.6 First Investors

52-WEEK HI LOW

PCT 5.46 4.48 4.22 2.17 2.01 WK NAV CHG

+3.8 +1.4 +4.8 +6.5 +6.8 +3.6 NA NA +4.4 +4.2 +4.6 +4.0 +4.0 +3.3 +4.5 +7.2 NA +6.3 +6.4 +5.5 +4.3 +7.6 -4.3 +8.7 +5.6 +5.8 +5.8 +5.8 +4.5 -2.4 +1.2 +2.1 +3.3 +5.6 -6.4 +4.4 +12.4 +4.9 -1.0 +5.7 +4.4 +4.4 +4.4 +.6 +4.2 +2.8 +4.2 +5.1 +4.3 +4.2 +4.5 +5.5 +9.4 +4.9 +4.5 +10.3 -.1 +5.0 +4.8 +3.0 +5.3 NA +4.0 +2.7 +9.8 +6.7 +6.2 NA +5.9 +3.2 +2.7 +8.5 +4.5 +4.4 +4.5 +4.8 +6.9 +6.6 +6.0 +2.6 +1.8 +4.8

35.76 19.26 9.91 15.26 9.57 29.24 10.33 10.23 12.37 11.38 14.42 14.75 12.40 14.86 11.65 11.94 18.55 24.07 10.97 15.24 22.26 93.53 19.75 9.24 26.75 12.21 10.86 11.21 10.48 11.28 14.03 35.83 23.10 7.56 11.87 19.10 60.50 31.59 11.52 42.57 12.32 12.24 11.79 77.46 17.57 10.79 31.78 11.03 12.97 11.94 13.36 32.26 16.63 38.84 11.97 62.30 35.56 27.12 19.18 28.93 10.95 9.45 10.82 8.53 22.78 21.72 17.84 12.24 16.78 28.16 11.61 11.67 10.11 10.09 11.19 17.63 11.16 75.18 11.71 75.87 16.04 20.56

25.78 13.85 9.37 10.30 8.79 22.66 7.83 7.66 11.34 9.77 12.11 11.96 9.81 11.61 10.74 11.30 12.22 18.76 10.26 10.46 15.60 64.17 14.60 8.31 18.16 11.39 10.38 10.58 9.89 7.87 9.92 25.96 15.98 7.23 9.65 13.84 43.72 21.30 8.87 30.93 11.38 11.45 11.08 58.10 12.44 8.05 22.04 10.69 11.94 11.03 12.28 23.28 14.84 24.46 11.11 41.75 25.84 19.64 15.52 20.33 9.60 7.23 10.54 8.39 15.40 14.68 11.86 7.90 12.35 20.13 9.11 10.72 8.48 8.46 10.27 13.39 10.64 51.59 11.16 53.86 11.82 14.47

34.56 18.95 9.87 15.01 9.42 28.58 9.97 9.86 12.28 11.20 14.14 14.41 12.06 14.43 11.58 11.69 17.52 23.48 10.59 14.85 21.90 91.74 19.31 9.18 26.00 12.08 10.75 10.87 10.17 10.88 13.35 33.92 22.16 7.56 10.24 18.66 58.48 30.96 11.29 41.65 11.87 11.84 11.48 74.68 17.28 10.53 31.24 11.01 12.52 11.43 12.84 31.54 15.81 36.73 11.61 60.48 33.69 25.97 18.85 28.76 10.95 9.19 10.70 8.53 22.20 21.18 17.26 11.82 16.20 27.37 11.55 11.36 9.97 9.95 10.76 17.46 10.95 73.76 11.52 73.80 15.67 19.85

+.05 +.16 -.01 +.14 -.02 +.07 +.04 +.04 +.03 +.04 +.05 +.06 +.05 +.06 +.03 +.02 +.44 +.18 +.04 +.07 +.28 +.35 -.03 -.03 +.19 +.09 +.03 +.04 ... +.08 +.13 +.21 +.19 +.02 +.11 +.01 +1.58 +.28 +.02 +.06 ... ... -.01 +.15 +.07 -.01 +.24 +.02 ... ... ... +.15 -.09 -.09 ... +.24 +.21 -.24 +.06 +.46 +.04 -.01 ... +.01 -.01 ... +.15 +.10 -.04 +.07 +.01 +.01 +.08 +.08 ... -.15 +.03 +.37 +.04 +.16 +.07 +.14

+4.3 +3.6 +4.0 -.7 -1.4 -.4 -.9 +9.4 +3.8 +4.1 +3.6 +.8 +1.1 +.6 +4.5 +3.7 +4.8 +4.4 +4.2 +3.7 +3.4 +3.6 +2.9 +2.9 +2.7 +2.2 +3.7 +7.9 +8.1 +7.9 +1.9 +5.2 +4.4 +5.5 +5.0 +4.4 +5.4 +5.7 +2.2 +2.0 +5.2 +4.6 +3.7 +3.8 +4.9 +4.3 +2.1 +3.1 +7.3 +6.5 +7.7 +7.1 +3.7 +8.4 +7.5 +8.6 +8.4 +8.4 +6.5 +6.8 +4.0

17.52 15.99 12.00 17.47 16.74 17.75 17.31 13.89 60.10 64.02 59.82 25.01 25.77 25.37 9.92 9.92 9.90 12.21 12.17 12.80 12.79 12.46 13.11 12.51 13.38 18.69 38.91 10.50 9.98 10.55 35.58 38.29 36.42 38.73 37.60 20.29 19.17 19.42 21.62 21.81 19.03 21.40 20.30 20.39 21.62 21.15 20.39 9.29 27.83 24.75 29.15 26.86 20.94 13.09 13.06 13.22 13.08 27.46 11.17 11.15 28.43

13.68 13.11 8.35 12.66 12.15 12.86 12.55 12.40 41.10 43.77 40.93 18.61 19.16 18.87 9.38 9.38 9.36 10.22 10.14 10.34 10.33 9.81 10.19 9.51 10.14 13.76 26.08 8.99 8.57 9.03 25.77 25.91 24.75 26.22 25.46 14.73 14.07 14.22 15.48 15.64 14.00 16.21 15.44 15.50 16.37 16.04 14.13 9.14 20.76 18.70 21.65 20.11 13.43 12.02 12.00 12.14 12.01 18.34 10.64 10.62 19.76

17.13 15.75 11.58 16.64 15.94 16.91 16.49 13.24 58.49 62.32 58.22 24.50 25.24 24.85 9.88 9.88 9.86 11.99 11.95 12.52 12.51 12.13 12.75 12.12 12.95 18.28 38.10 10.44 9.91 10.48 33.67 37.50 35.66 37.95 36.83 19.83 18.47 18.71 21.22 21.41 18.34 20.84 19.76 19.85 21.06 20.60 19.37 9.29 27.09 24.09 28.39 26.15 20.24 12.69 12.67 12.83 12.69 26.24 10.95 10.93 28.00

+.06 +.02 +.06 +.10 +.10 +.10 +.10 -.07 +.26 +.28 +.26 ... -.01 ... -.01 -.01 -.02 +.04 +.05 +.05 +.04 +.05 +.05 +.05 +.05 -.02 +.25 ... ... ... +.20 +.34 +.33 +.35 +.34 +.02 -.23 -.23 +.16 +.17 -.22 +.05 +.05 +.05 +.06 +.06 +.14 +.01 +.06 +.05 +.07 +.06 +.17 +.01 +.01 +.01 +.01 -.12 +.03 +.02 +.34

-8.0 19.65 +7.6 87.42 -1.4 55.95 +13.8 111.04 +6.8 30.20 +10.8 62.42 +10.0 73.92 +5.4 82.73 +4.8 54.98 +6.0 62.56 +4.6 88.76 -8.7 65.17 +13.6 55.28 +8.0 145.90 +6.2 37.56 +7.2 26.12 +11.2 74.58 +7.9 61.69 +10.9 31.96 +2.1 37.23 +8.6 40.76 +9.3 13.97 +4.8 53.22 +12.1 89.73 +10.0 105.02

14.67 58.55 42.21 63.99 19.74 42.57 57.47 59.81 34.61 37.16 46.90 51.47 40.11 100.51 24.62 17.59 47.18 39.12 21.95 25.57 24.65 10.20 41.59 63.21 70.10

17.85 87.42 50.54 106.72 28.77 59.77 73.37 80.28 53.50 58.74 82.42 60.09 49.06 143.82 35.96 24.89 71.43 59.75 31.42 35.41 38.16 13.89 52.49 87.23 100.46

+.05 +.45 -.09 +2.69 -.15 +.26 -.27 -.48 +.69 +1.51 +2.55 +.32 +1.60 -1.02 -.19 -.05 +1.50 -1.22 -.29 +.38 +1.03 +.08 -.67 -.48 -.43

36.36 29.12 10.41 28.13 29.40

47.26 40.88 10.91 36.85 38.90

-.05 +.31 +.08 +.21 +.03

+2.9 +6.2 +7.5 +1.4 +3.6

48.31 41.87 11.39 38.58 39.77

+5.8 20.19 14.20 20.08 +.32 +7.7 +7.6 +14.7 +6.7 +6.2

28.62 49.61 35.84 24.05 17.64

20.85 38.82 25.58 18.88 14.38

28.27 +.02 48.38 -.02 33.56 +.79 23.29 ... 17.41 -.04

YTD 5-YR %RTN %RTN

BlChipA m +6.3 +1.6 GrowIncA m +8.5 +2.8 IncomeA m +4.9 +4.6 InvGradeA m +4.2 +6.0 OpportA m +9.9 +4.9 TaxEA m +3.8 +4.1 TotalRetA m +6.2 +4.8 FrankTemp-Franklin AZ TF A m +3.5 +3.8 AdjUSA m +.7 +3.6 AdjUSC m +.5 +3.2 BalInv m +3.6 +.4 CA TF A m +3.3 +3.6 CA TF C m +3.1 +3.0 CAHY A m +3.0 +2.7 CAInTF A m +4.2 +3.3 CAInt A m +3.1 +3.8 CO TF A m +4.5 +3.7 CaTxFrAdv +3.4 +3.7 China A m +3.0 +15.4 ChinaAdv +3.2 +15.7 CvtSc A m +7.2 +6.4 DynaTechA m +8.0 +7.8 EqIn A m +4.7 +1.3 FL TF A m +3.6 +3.9 FLRtDAAdv +2.4 +3.4 Fed TF A m +4.6 +4.1 Fed TF C m +4.4 +3.5 FedIntA m +3.9 +4.5 FedLmtT/FIncA m +1.8 +3.8 FedTxFrIA +4.7 +4.1 FlRtDAC m +2.1 +2.7 FlRtDAccA m +2.3 +3.1 FlxCpGr A m +6.0 +5.2 FlxCpGrAd +6.1 +5.5 GoldPrAdv -8.7 +17.4 GoldPrM A m -8.8 +17.1 GoldPrM C m -9.0 +16.2 GrowAdv +5.9 +5.2 GrowB m +5.5 +4.2 GrowC m +5.5 +4.2 Growth A m +5.8 +5.0 HY TF A m +4.4 +3.7 HY TF C m +4.3 +3.1 HighIncA m +5.6 +8.1 HighIncC m +5.3 +7.6 InSCGrAd +2.9 +6.6 Income A m +6.9 +6.1 Income C m +6.6 +5.6 IncomeAdv +7.0 +6.3 IncomeB m +6.5 +5.2 IncomeR b +6.3 +5.8 InsTF A m +4.4 +3.6 LoDurTReA m +2.1 +5.3 MATFA m +4.8 +3.6 MD TF A m +2.9 +3.5 MITFA m +4.1 +3.8 MNTFA m +4.7 +4.4 MO TF A m +3.9 +3.8 NC TF A m +4.1 +4.0 NJ TF A m +3.1 +4.0 NY TF A m +3.8 +4.1 NY TF C m +3.5 +3.5 NYIntTFA m +3.9 +4.3 NatResA m +6.8 +9.8 OHTFA m +4.4 +3.9 OR TF A m +4.3 +4.3 PA TF A m +4.1 +4.1 PR TF A m +2.8 +3.8 RealRetA m +3.3 +5.7 RisDv A m +7.5 +3.1 RisDv C m +7.2 +2.3 SmCpGI C m +7.4 +5.3 SmCpValA m +3.1 +3.6 SmCpVlAd +3.3 +3.9 SmMCpGAdv +7.8 +6.3 SmMdCpGrA m +7.7 +6.1 StrInc A m +4.4 +7.7 StrIncAdv +4.4 +7.9 Strinc C m +4.2 +7.3 TotRetAdv +4.3 +6.9 TotalRetA m +4.2 +6.6 US Gov A m +2.7 +6.3 US Gov C m +2.5 +5.7 USGovtAdv +2.8 +6.4 Utils A m +9.4 +6.8 Utils C m +9.1 +6.3 VA TF A m +4.2 +3.9 FrankTemp-Mutual Beacon A m +6.6 +.9 Beacon C m +6.3 +.2 Beacon Z +6.8 +1.3 Discov A m +5.8 +5.6 Discov C m +5.5 +4.9 Discov Z +5.9 +5.9 DiscovR b +5.7 +5.4 Euro A m +5.7 +5.1 Euro Z +5.8 +5.4 QuestA m +5.9 +4.7 QuestC m +5.6 +4.0 QuestZ +6.0 +5.1 Shares A m +6.9 +1.6 Shares C m +6.7 +.9 Shares Z +7.1 +1.9 FrankTemp-Templeton BricA m -2.1 NA DvMk A m -.4 +7.0 EmgMktIs -.7 +7.5 Fgn A m +9.0 +4.6 Frgn Adv +9.1 +4.9 Frgn C m +8.8 +3.8 GlBond A m +4.4 +11.8 GlBond C m +4.1 +11.4 GlBondAdv +4.4 +12.1 GlOp A m +7.7 +3.6 GlSmCo A m +2.6 +4.5 Growth A m +9.3 +.2 Growth Ad +9.4 +.5 Growth C m +9.0 -.5 IncomeA m +5.4 +7.0 IncomeC m +5.3 +6.6 World A m +7.3 +2.7 Franklin Templeton ConAllcC m +3.2 +5.0 ConAllctA m +3.5 +5.8 CoreAll A m +7.0 +2.9 FndAllA m +7.6 +2.5 FndAllC m +7.4 +1.7 GrAllcA m +4.8 +5.5 HYldTFInA +4.6 +3.8 TemHdCurA m +4.7 +5.8 TemMdTaC m +3.7 +5.3 TemMdTarA m +4.1 +6.1 GE ElfunTr +7.6 +4.2 ElfunTxE +3.7 +4.6 S&SInc +3.8 +5.7 S&SProg +5.4 +3.8 GMO DomBdVI +1.9 +6.0 EmgDbtIII +5.2 +10.2 EmgDbtIV +5.2 +10.2 EmgMktII +2.5 +8.8 EmgMktIII +2.6 +8.8 EmgMktIV +2.5 +8.8 EmgMktV +2.6 +8.9 EmgMktsVI +2.6 +8.9 ForIII +5.2 +.4 ForIV +5.2 +.4 ForSmCaS +5.7 +6.1 InCorEqIV +6.5 +1.2 IntCEqIII +6.5 +1.1 IntCEqVI +6.6 +1.2 IntGEqIII +6.1 +3.6 IntGEqIV +6.1 NA IntIVlIII +6.3 +.3 IntItVlIV +6.4 +.4 IntlSmIII +6.7 +4.1 QuIII +7.7 +4.3 QuIV +7.7 +4.4 QuVI +7.7 NA StFxInVI +4.5 NA TxMdIEIII +6.8 +1.8 USCorEqVI +7.6 +2.1 Gabelli AssetAAA m +7.7 +6.4 EqIncomeAAA m +7.9 +5.3 GoldAAA m -6.1 +13.1 GrowthAAA m +2.3 +2.1 SmCpGrAAA m +5.5 +7.3 UtilA m +7.6 +6.9 UtilAAA m +7.7 +6.9 UtilC m +7.4 +6.2 Value m +9.7 +5.3 Gartmore LrgCapA m +6.7 +3.1 Gateway GatewayA m +3.2 +2.6 Goldman Sachs BalStrA m +3.9 +3.7 CapGrA m +5.1 +3.0 CorFixIA m +3.0 +4.8 G&IStrA m +4.9 +2.4 GovtIncA m +2.0 +5.5 GrIncA m +5.0 +.9 GrOppA m +7.0 +8.5 GrStrA m +5.7 +1.1 HiYieldA m +5.0 +7.0 LgCapValA m +5.4 +1.6 MidCapVaA m +7.3 +5.2 ShDuGovA m +.5 +4.7 SmCpValA m +7.3 +5.4 StrIntEqA m +4.2 +.3 Greenspring Greensprretl d +2.7 +5.2 GuideStone Funds AggAllGS4 +6.0 +2.0 BlcAlloGS4 +4.7 +4.9 GrAlloGS4 +5.4 +3.6 GrEqGS4 +5.0 +3.2 IntEqGS4 +4.5 +2.0 LowDurGS4 +1.4 +4.6 MedDurGS4 +3.3 +7.1 SmCapGS4 +11.2 +3.6 ValEqGS4 +7.6 +.9 Harbor Bond +3.2 +8.2 CapApInst +7.6 +5.2 CapAprAdm b +7.5 +4.9 CapAprInv b +7.5 +4.8 HiYBdInst d +4.5 +7.7 IntlAdm m +6.3 +5.8 IntlGr d ... +1.7 IntlInstl d +6.4 +6.1 IntlInv m +6.3 +5.7 MidCpGr +12.2 +6.6 SmCpGr +8.6 +6.6 SmCpVal +9.3 +2.4 Harding Loevner EmgMkts d -2.8 +8.5 Hartford AdvHLSFIB b +4.8 +3.8 AdvHLSIA +5.0 +4.0 +4.8 +3.6 AdviserA m

52-WEEK HI LOW

WK NAV CHG

22.89 15.79 2.58 9.92 30.52 10.11 15.95

17.70 11.56 2.34 9.26 20.56 9.18 13.18

22.44 15.54 2.56 9.74 29.90 9.62 15.83

-.11 +.02 -.01 +.03 +.20 -.01 +.03

11.11 8.94 8.93 50.62 7.25 7.24 9.73 12.40 11.81 12.01 7.22 42.33 42.61 16.51 33.26 17.94 11.69 9.26 12.16 12.16 12.08 10.49 12.16 9.25 9.25 52.42 53.26 53.67 51.50 49.28 48.18 46.05 45.56 48.13 10.39 10.53 2.06 2.08 17.81 2.30 2.32 2.29 2.29 2.27 12.19 10.48 11.95 11.73 12.22 12.55 12.33 12.51 12.36 12.01 11.99 11.57 45.14 12.78 12.22 10.57 12.16 11.53 35.75 35.26 37.10 48.15 49.53 42.73 41.47 10.71 10.72 10.70 10.42 10.40 6.88 6.84 6.90 12.72 12.66 11.93

9.93 8.84 8.84 36.40 6.48 6.47 8.68 11.08 10.93 10.65 6.47 30.39 30.58 12.86 23.50 13.78 10.75 8.88 10.93 10.93 11.19 10.25 10.94 8.87 8.87 37.91 38.44 35.35 33.97 32.63 36.66 35.11 34.74 36.62 9.31 9.44 1.87 1.88 13.07 1.97 1.99 1.96 1.97 1.95 10.93 10.16 10.64 10.58 11.12 11.47 11.14 11.29 11.13 10.72 10.71 10.72 27.63 11.50 11.08 9.49 10.77 10.62 27.54 27.18 25.18 33.28 34.23 28.77 27.98 9.93 9.94 9.92 9.80 9.79 6.63 6.59 6.65 10.12 10.09 10.77

10.53 8.85 8.84 48.94 6.82 6.81 9.07 11.77 11.31 11.41 6.81 41.05 41.33 16.28 32.56 17.49 11.30 9.21 11.67 11.66 11.66 10.42 11.68 9.20 9.20 51.11 51.94 48.61 46.60 44.42 47.28 45.16 44.68 47.23 9.85 9.99 2.05 2.07 17.28 2.27 2.29 2.26 2.26 2.24 11.66 10.46 11.37 11.10 11.72 12.16 11.79 12.00 11.74 11.45 11.43 11.18 42.43 12.24 11.74 10.11 11.37 11.42 35.33 34.83 35.93 46.00 47.33 41.42 40.19 10.69 10.70 10.69 10.35 10.33 6.83 6.79 6.85 12.58 12.52 11.47

... +.01 ... +.16 +.01 +.01 ... ... -.01 ... +.01 -.13 -.13 +.09 +.05 -.05 ... -.01 +.01 ... ... ... +.01 -.02 -.02 +.01 +.01 +1.26 +1.21 +1.14 -.08 -.08 -.08 -.08 +.01 +.01 -.01 ... ... -.01 -.01 ... -.01 -.01 ... +.01 ... ... ... ... -.01 ... +.02 +.01 ... -.01 +1.07 ... +.01 ... +.01 +.06 -.17 -.18 +.07 +.19 +.20 +.09 +.08 -.01 -.01 ... +.03 +.02 +.01 +.01 +.01 -.14 -.14 ...

13.15 13.03 13.25 31.31 31.00 31.71 31.01 22.76 23.22 18.76 18.53 18.92 22.28 22.03 22.47

10.67 10.53 10.78 25.55 25.28 25.88 25.31 18.75 19.12 15.15 15.06 15.24 18.05 17.83 18.20

13.05 +.02 12.92 +.01 13.15 +.02 30.88 -.10 30.56 -.10 31.28 -.10 30.58 -.10 22.26 -.07 22.72 -.07 18.60 -.04 18.37 -.03 18.76 -.04 22.07 -.02 21.81 -.03 22.26 -.02

15.97 26.96 17.50 7.89 7.80 7.71 14.08 14.10 14.04 19.77 7.91 20.04 20.05 19.54 3.01 3.01 16.39

11.34 18.79 12.28 5.52 5.47 5.40 12.62 12.64 13.28 14.76 5.62 14.70 14.71 14.31 2.41 2.41 12.25

14.87 25.44 16.59 7.61 7.54 7.44 13.93 13.95 13.89 19.09 7.63 19.45 19.46 18.95 2.95 2.95 15.93

+.34 +.32 +.22 +.03 +.04 +.04 ... -.01 ... +.03 +.01 +.03 +.03 +.03 ... ... +.04

14.04 14.27 13.55 11.43 11.25 16.21 10.42 10.40 14.58 14.90

12.35 12.54 10.22 9.05 8.94 12.91 9.34 8.25 12.37 12.63

13.91 14.15 13.28 11.26 11.08 15.91 9.88 10.23 14.39 14.72

+.01 +.02 ... ... ... +.03 +.01 +.07 +.01 +.02

45.57 12.06 11.52 43.40

35.00 11.02 10.96 33.17

44.54 -.09 11.53 ... 11.52 +.02 42.42 -.01

4.63 9.60 9.59 15.87 15.91 15.81 15.79 15.82 13.43 13.76 15.11 32.18 32.20 32.15 25.36 25.37 24.29 24.28 9.00 21.78 21.80 21.79 15.81 16.22 12.51

4.24 7.87 7.86 10.88 10.91 10.84 10.83 10.85 9.87 10.10 10.14 22.83 22.84 22.81 17.75 17.76 17.38 17.37 6.04 17.16 17.17 17.17 14.93 11.52 9.63

4.24 9.57 9.56 15.03 15.07 14.97 14.96 14.98 12.79 13.10 14.48 30.93 30.94 30.90 24.58 24.60 23.23 23.22 8.73 21.55 21.56 21.55 15.80 15.55 12.33

... -.03 -.03 +.13 +.13 +.13 +.13 +.12 +.08 +.08 +.08 +.19 +.19 +.19 +.17 +.18 +.12 +.12 +.06 -.04 -.04 -.04 +.07 +.09 -.06

53.83 22.30 36.71 33.47 36.89 6.71 6.66 6.00 17.32

38.79 16.60 26.36 24.66 25.80 5.86 5.83 5.34 12.68

52.70 21.92 33.55 32.12 35.80 6.55 6.51 5.86 17.11

+.21 -.02 +1.08 +.15 +.26 -.07 -.07 -.07 +.11

16.07 12.35 15.77

...

26.98 24.00 26.78

-.05

10.76 22.67 10.07 11.30 15.90 22.50 25.09 11.72 7.47 12.67 39.04 10.50 43.38 11.22

10.59 22.28 10.01 11.03 15.21 22.06 24.56 11.36 7.42 12.43 38.53 10.28 42.37 10.66

+.05 +.04 +.03 +.05 +.03 -.01 -.01 +.06 -.04 +.01 +.13 ... +.31 +.07

25.20 22.58 24.84

-.05

12.87 12.83 13.20 20.26 14.65 13.49 14.48 16.54 15.59

9.50 10.93 10.51 14.50 10.65 13.20 13.51 10.87 11.41

12.50 12.69 12.94 19.85 14.03 13.38 14.02 16.08 15.20

+.05 +.04 +.04 +.08 +.11 +.01 +.04 +.15 -.02

12.45 40.02 39.82 39.56 11.33 66.94 13.07 67.42 66.74 9.88 14.38 22.00

11.74 29.37 29.22 29.06 10.46 46.33 9.49 46.64 46.17 6.63 9.86 15.62

12.39 39.52 39.31 39.06 11.23 63.96 12.37 64.44 63.76 9.65 13.98 21.42

+.02 +.14 +.14 +.14 -.03 +.60 +.05 +.62 +.60 +.05 +.07 +.06

9.32 17.33 9.63 9.23 14.78 17.40 18.37 9.09 6.80 9.68 27.65 10.21 30.34 8.19

52.86 39.03 50.36 +.39 20.77 16.86 20.50 +.06 20.55 16.69 20.28 +.06 15.65 12.65 15.44 +.05


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW BalAlA m +5.1 +4.4 12.07 9.82 CapAppIIA m +6.0 +5.4 15.27 10.84 CapApr C m +1.4 +1.7 32.29 24.42 CapAprA m +1.7 +2.4 36.47 27.43 CapAprB m +1.4 +1.6 32.09 24.29 CapAprI +1.8 NA 36.51 27.39 ChksBalsA m +3.8 NA 10.04 8.27 CpApHLSIA +4.5 +4.4 45.67 33.13 CpApHLSIB b +4.4 +4.1 45.25 32.82 DivGrowA m +6.3 +4.2 20.65 15.66 DivGrowI +6.5 NA 20.59 15.61 DsEqHLSIA +8.6 +3.0 13.02 9.59 DvGrHLSIA +6.7 +4.6 21.31 16.18 DvGrHLSIB b +6.5 +4.3 21.25 16.13 EqIncA m +7.7 +4.6 13.87 10.54 FloatRtA m +2.8 +3.5 9.01 8.48 FloatRtC m +2.4 +2.7 9.00 8.47 FloatRtI +2.7 NA 9.01 8.49 GlbGrthIA +5.0 +.8 17.09 12.01 GrAlA m +5.5 +4.0 12.45 9.54 GrOpHLSIA +9.7 +4.9 28.94 20.00 GrOppA m +9.4 +4.5 29.88 20.77 GrOppL m +9.4 +4.8 30.70 21.32 HiYdHLSIA +6.3 +9.0 9.74 8.10 InOpHLSIA +2.7 +5.4 13.31 9.62 IndHLSIA +6.6 +2.7 28.54 21.47 InflPlC m +4.2 +5.8 12.20 10.95 InflPlusA m +4.6 +6.6 12.32 11.08 MCVlHLSIA +6.9 +5.1 11.26 7.92 MdCpHLSIA +8.0 +6.7 28.80 20.62 MidCapA m +7.7 +6.0 24.30 17.48 MidCapC m +7.4 +5.3 21.25 15.36 Sm-CpGrHLSIA +13.9 +6.4 24.81 15.28 SmCoHLSIA +14.1 +5.3 20.65 13.32 StkHLSIA +5.8 +2.9 44.46 32.79 TRBdHLSIA +3.2 +5.4 11.54 10.81 TRBdHLSIA b +3.2 +5.1 11.46 10.76 TotRetBdA m +2.9 +5.0 10.76 10.36 USHLSIA +1.7 +3.3 11.17 10.36 ValHLSIA +5.8 +4.3 11.68 8.77 Heartland SelectVal m +5.6 +6.0 31.69 23.25 Value m +6.4 +3.7 48.48 33.76 ValuePlus m +4.3 +9.9 32.39 22.65 Henderson IntlOppA m +7.4 +4.2 23.63 17.57 IntlOppC m +7.1 +3.4 22.36 16.63 Homestead Value d +9.5 +2.6 34.22 25.45 Hotchkis & Wiley LgCapValA m +3.9 -2.5 17.55 13.12 Hussman StrTotRet d +1.7 +7.3 12.86 12.04 StratGrth d +.1 -.7 13.53 11.84 ICON Energy +8.7 +7.2 23.11 14.53 ING CorpLeadB +11.5 +6.3 23.25 16.10 GNMAIncA m +3.3 +6.4 8.99 8.71 GlREstA m +7.0 +2.6 17.50 13.21 IntlVal A m +4.9 +.2 12.72 9.85 RussiaA m +1.7 +7.5 46.06 28.36 TRPGrEqI +5.5 +4.5 58.73 42.62 INVESCO AmerValA m +9.2 +5.8 30.05 21.92 AsPacGrA m +4.2 +13.4 32.41 22.94 CapDevA m +9.5 +2.9 18.51 12.71 CharterA m +7.6 +5.4 17.60 13.78 ComstockA m +6.5 +2.2 17.20 12.78 ComstockB m +6.5 +1.9 17.20 12.78 ComstockC m +6.1 +1.4 17.20 12.78 ConstellA m +5.4 -.3 24.89 18.32 ConstellB m +5.1 -1.0 22.32 16.53 CorpBondA m +4.2 +6.7 6.95 6.50 DevMkt A m +1.3 +11.7 34.78 25.75 DivDivA m +6.7 +4.5 13.18 10.32 DivDivInv b +6.7 +4.6 13.18 10.32 DynInv b +11.9 +4.7 25.36 16.86 EnergyA m +8.5 +8.4 47.82 29.13 EnergyInv b +8.5 +8.4 47.65 29.02 EqIncomeA m +5.1 +4.4 9.17 7.32 EqIncomeB m +5.1 +4.2 9.00 7.18 EqIncomeC m +4.7 +3.6 9.04 7.21 EqWSP500A m +8.8 +4.9 33.96 24.54 EuroGrA m +10.2 +4.1 34.74 24.00 FloatRtA m +2.9 +3.1 7.88 7.34 GlHlthCrA m +16.4 +5.7 31.40 23.28 GlHlthCrI m +16.4 +5.7 31.41 23.28 GlS&MGrA m +6.7 +4.8 21.01 15.20 GlobEqA m +7.9 +.3 11.88 8.65 GovtSecsA m +2.0 +3.5 9.87 9.44 GrowIncA m +5.5 +2.8 20.86 15.61 HiYldA m +4.6 +8.4 4.35 3.96 HiYldMuA m +2.9 +2.1 9.67 8.64 HiYldMuC m +2.6 +1.3 9.65 8.63 InsTaxFA m +3.6 +1.7 16.79 15.24 IntlGrA m +6.2 +4.8 30.19 21.92 MidCapGrA m +8.2 +7.9 33.16 22.79 MidCpCrA m +7.4 +6.2 25.34 19.97 MuniIncA m +3.4 +2.5 13.56 12.23 PacGrowB m -1.3 +3.9 22.83 17.66 RealEstA m +11.2 +3.5 23.95 17.40 SP500IdxA m +6.5 +2.5 14.74 11.04 SmCapEqA m +10.9 +5.3 13.91 9.20 SmCapGrA m +12.8 +6.7 32.98 21.79 SmCapValA m +5.7 +7.8 19.72 14.03 SmCpGrA m +11.6 +5.4 12.67 8.61 Summit b +6.4 +2.2 12.76 9.42 TaxESecY +3.7 +3.5 11.21 10.05 TechInv b +9.0 +5.8 36.18 24.41 TxFrInmA3 m +3.5 +4.8 11.59 10.92 USMortA m +3.0 +4.7 13.22 12.84 Ivy AssetSTrB m +6.3 +8.4 26.09 19.53 AssetStrA m +6.6 +9.3 27.05 20.13 AssetStrC m +6.3 +8.5 26.22 19.62 AssetStrY m +6.6 +9.3 27.10 20.17 GlNatResA m +6.3 +4.9 24.76 15.21 GlNatResC m +6.0 +4.2 21.47 13.26 GlNatResI d +6.4 NA 25.26 15.47 GlbNatrlY m +6.4 +5.1 25.06 15.38 HiIncA m +5.4 +9.5 8.69 8.11 HiIncC m +5.1 +8.6 8.69 8.11 IntlValA m +3.6 +5.8 17.98 12.71 LgCpGrA m +5.6 +4.4 14.05 10.40 LtdTmBdA m +1.6 +5.5 11.37 11.00 MdCpGrA m +8.4 +9.0 18.85 12.90 PacOppA m +2.8 +10.6 17.89 12.97 ScTechA m +9.7 +10.3 35.64 26.06 ScTechY m +9.8 +10.5 37.12 27.12 JPMorgan CoreBondA m +2.7 +6.9 11.75 11.33 CoreBondC m +2.5 +6.2 11.81 11.38 DiversMidCapGrA m+9.0 +6.3 23.81 16.11 EqIdxA m +6.5 +2.5 30.96 23.22 GovtBdA m +3.2 +6.5 11.32 10.65 HighStatA m +1.7 +.7 15.50 14.95 HighYldA m +5.1 +8.7 8.39 7.61 InvBalA m +4.1 +5.2 12.83 10.95 InvBalC m +3.9 +4.7 12.68 10.83 InvConGrA m +3.4 +5.3 11.53 10.44 InvConGrC m +3.1 +4.8 11.50 10.41 InvGrInA m +4.7 +4.5 13.60 10.99 InvGrowA m +5.3 +3.8 14.55 11.14 MidCapVal m +8.3 +5.0 25.35 18.63 SmCapEqA m +10.1 +8.4 37.65 27.07 SmCapEqR5 +10.3 +9.0 41.02 29.41 USEquityA m +4.7 +5.1 10.99 8.23 James Advantage GoldRainA b +3.6 +6.5 20.86 18.22 Janus BalC m +5.6 NA 26.68 22.89 BalJ +6.0 +7.5 26.72 23.33 BalS b +5.8 NA 26.72 22.91 ContrJ -1.0 +2.1 15.36 12.32 EntrprsJ +7.4 +8.1 65.02 44.79 FlxBdJ +3.7 +8.2 11.06 10.34 FortyA m +2.2 +5.7 35.77 28.15 FortyS b +2.1 +5.5 35.28 27.80 Gr&IncJ +8.0 +1.3 33.60 25.62 HiYldJ d +5.1 +8.5 9.35 8.31 J +4.1 +3.7 31.19 23.93 OrionJ d +1.7 +7.0 12.81 9.24 OverseasJ d -5.0 +8.7 53.66 39.77 PerkinsMCVJ +6.6 +6.7 24.66 18.87 PerkinsSCVJ +5.0 +8.0 25.96 20.61 RsrchJ +5.8 +6.8 31.84 22.92 ShTmBdJ +1.6 +5.2 3.14 3.07 TwentyJ +1.2 +6.6 68.99 54.09 WorldwideJ d +2.7 +2.4 49.99 37.48 Janus Aspen Bal Is +6.2 +7.9 30.37 25.49 FortyIs +2.2 +6.3 37.85 29.55 IntlGrIs -6.1 +10.0 59.90 43.34 JanusI +4.2 +4.3 26.02 19.97 MidCpIs +7.6 +8.3 42.69 29.34 WldWGrIs +2.8 +2.8 32.36 24.26 Jensen J b +6.7 +5.3 29.42 22.57 John Hancock BalA m +3.4 +7.2 16.07 13.44 BondA m +4.3 +8.0 15.88 14.93 ClsscValA m +5.6 -3.1 18.18 13.47 HiYldA m +4.3 +5.0 4.08 3.51 LgCpEqA m +3.7 +8.1 27.84 21.04 LgCpEqC m +3.4 +7.3 25.76 19.46 LifAg1 b +5.7 +2.9 13.36 9.89 LifBa1 b +5.2 +4.9 13.73 11.31 LifCo1 b +4.3 +6.3 13.22 12.16 LifGr1 b +5.4 +4.1 13.85 10.84 LifMo1 b +4.8 +5.6 13.24 11.53 RegBankA m -1.0 -4.7 15.50 12.04 SmCapEqA m +10.5 +4.4 27.78 17.16 SovInvA m +5.9 +2.8 17.12 13.24 StrIncA m +4.5 +8.5 6.88 6.27 StrIncC m +4.2 +7.7 6.88 6.26 TaxFBdA m +3.6 +3.8 10.19 9.28 Keeley SmCapVal m +6.8 +2.0 27.77 18.33 Kinetics Paradigm d +4.2 +2.2 25.22 18.31 LKCM SmCpEqI d +13.9 +4.8 24.94 15.68 Laudus GrInvUSLCGr d +7.9 +8.4 13.87 9.84 InMktMstS d +4.4 +5.4 20.78 14.57 IntlFxInc d +4.7 NA 12.37 10.66 IntlMstrI d +4.3 +5.3 20.78 14.56 Lazard EmgMktEqO m -1.2 +11.3 22.82 16.90 Legg Mason/Western AggGrowA m +10.2 +2.3 124.09 82.78 AggGrowB m +9.8 +1.5 106.37 71.52 AggrsvGrC m +10.0 +1.7 108.34 72.65 ApprecA m +6.1 +4.1 14.82 11.52 CAMncpA m +4.3 +3.9 16.41 14.85 EqIncBldA m +6.6 +2.1 13.71 10.94 EquityO +4.9 +2.8 13.34 10.17 FdmACValA m +3.8 +1.6 14.87 10.75 GovtSecsA m +4.0 +6.5 10.63 10.12 LSAllc70A m +5.5 +3.4 13.61 10.70 LSAllc85A m +6.0 +2.2 14.05 10.59 LgCpGrA m +4.5 +3.0 25.94 19.52 MdCpCoA m +9.4 +5.9 23.56 16.28

NAV 11.89 14.80 31.17 35.22 30.97 35.26 9.87 44.27 43.85 20.15 20.10 12.81 20.80 20.73 13.70 8.94 8.93 8.94 16.41 12.18 28.38 29.28 30.09 9.73 12.80 27.92 11.51 11.65 11.03 28.10 23.70 20.71 24.33 20.15 43.38 11.25 11.19 10.65 10.63 11.40

WK CHG +.04 +.03 -.15 -.17 -.15 -.17 -.01 -.05 -.05 ... +.01 +.01 +.01 ... -.01 -.01 -.02 -.02 +.07 +.05 +.13 +.13 +.14 -.01 +.10 -.03 +.06 +.07 -.01 +.05 +.05 +.04 +.24 +.13 +.11 +.01 +.01 ... +.02 -.01

30.82 -.07 46.64 +.29 31.10 +.35 22.66 +.04 21.43 +.03 33.62 +.05 16.90

-.06

12.32 +.07 12.30 -.06 21.79 +.29 22.62 8.99 17.31 12.20 41.40 57.47

+.07 +.02 +.15 +.09 +1.27 +.17

29.66 31.38 17.96 17.40 16.69 16.69 16.68 24.55 21.99 6.89 33.54 13.03 13.03 24.90 44.92 44.76 8.99 8.82 8.85 33.45 33.84 7.82 31.10 31.11 20.30 11.59 9.68 20.23 4.32 9.01 8.99 15.96 29.27 32.19 24.89 12.78 22.04 23.77 14.42 13.57 32.24 19.04 12.38 12.58 10.57 35.33 11.34 13.19

+.06 -.08 +.15 -.02 -.07 -.07 -.07 +.06 +.05 +.01 +.25 -.06 -.05 +.21 +1.29 +1.28 -.02 -.02 -.03 -.04 +.15 -.01 -.19 -.18 +.10 +.04 +.03 -.09 -.03 ... ... ... +.16 +.28 +.01 ... +.10 +.36 -.01 +.14 +.31 -.11 +.12 +.03 ... ... ... +.02

25.09 26.03 25.22 26.07 22.98 19.91 23.45 23.27 8.48 8.48 17.18 13.72 11.17 18.46 17.18 34.59 36.02

+.17 +.19 +.18 +.18 +.42 +.36 +.42 +.43 -.03 -.03 +.07 +.10 +.02 +.02 -.08 ... -.01

11.64 11.69 23.42 30.28 11.08 15.28 8.35 12.66 12.51 11.46 11.42 13.34 14.17 25.05 37.19 40.54 10.69

+.04 +.04 +.04 -.03 +.06 +.01 -.02 +.02 +.02 +.02 +.02 +.02 +.02 -.03 +.18 +.21 -.01

20.73 +.07 26.38 26.44 26.43 14.48 63.46 10.64 34.47 33.99 32.92 9.29 30.33 12.07 48.13 24.06 25.16 31.13 3.10 66.54 47.81

+.12 +.12 +.11 -.10 -.19 +.02 -.32 -.33 +.19 -.05 -.05 +.14 -.67 -.08 -.10 -.04 ... -.45 +.02

30.05 +.15 36.54 -.32 53.61 -.86 25.29 -.04 41.65 -.13 30.97 +.01 28.82

-.34

15.81 15.86 17.60 3.97 26.96 24.93 12.98 13.52 13.20 13.53 13.14 14.50 27.26 16.59 6.84 6.84 9.71

+.07 ... -.04 -.06 +.17 +.16 +.04 +.03 +.02 +.03 +.02 +.02 +.28 +.03 -.01 -.01 +.01

26.66 +.26 24.28 +.04 24.48 +.36 13.57 20.08 12.30 20.08

+.02 +.13 +.15 +.13

21.92 +.29 122.21 104.69 106.66 14.54 15.80 13.50 13.00 14.21 10.63 13.35 13.71 25.36 23.30

+.14 +.09 +.11 -.01 +.02 -.03 +.04 +.02 +.04 +.01 +.02 -.17 +.11

YTD 5-YR FUND %RTN %RTN MgdMuniA m +4.4 +4.7 MgdMuniC m +4.1 +4.1 MuBdLtdA m +3.8 +4.1 MuBdLtdC b +3.7 +3.4 MuBdNYA m +4.0 +4.6 MuHiIncA m +2.7 +3.3 OpportntC m -3.8 -5.2 SmCpGrA m +8.7 +5.6 SpecInvC m +5.2 +1.2 ValueC m +3.1 -6.4 Leuthold AssetAl m +5.1 +3.6 CoreInv d +6.6 +5.4 Longleaf Partners Intl +1.6 +1.9 LongPart +10.4 +1.6 SmCap +14.2 +7.1 Loomis Sayles BondR b +6.8 +8.4 GlbBdR b +5.1 +7.3 SmCpVaR b +7.5 +5.3 Lord Abbett AffiliatA m +4.5 +.5 AffiliatC m +4.2 -.2 AlphaA m +6.9 +6.7 BalA x +5.2 +4.9 BondDebA m +6.1 +7.8 BondDebB m +5.9 +7.1 BondDebC m +5.8 +7.1 ClsscStckA m +1.9 +3.8 CptStrcA m +5.9 +4.5 DevGrowA m +11.1 +10.1 FdmtlEqtyA m +6.7 +5.3 FdmtlEqtyC m +6.4 +4.6 FltRateF b +2.4 NA GrOpportA m +9.2 +8.5 HYMuniBdA m +1.5 -1.1 HiYldA m +5.9 +8.8 IncmA m +5.0 +8.6 IntlCorEqA m +6.3 +2.3 MidCpValA m +8.9 +3.2 NatlTaxFA m +3.6 +2.7 ShDurIncA m +2.2 +6.5 ShDurIncC m +1.9 +5.8 SmCpBlnA m +11.0 +2.7 SmCpValA m +6.5 +6.6 TotRetA m +3.5 +7.0 MFS AggGrAlA m +6.3 +4.0 BondA m +4.5 +8.0 ConAlocA m +4.4 +6.3 CoreEqA m +6.4 +4.6 CoreGrA m +5.2 +3.2 GlTotRtA m +6.1 +5.4 GovtSecA m +2.2 +6.2 GrAllocA m +5.9 +5.0 GrAllocB m +5.5 +4.2 GrAllocC m +5.5 +4.3 GrowA m +5.2 +6.4 HiYLDOpA m +5.9 +6.7 HighIncA m +5.5 +6.8 HighIncI +5.3 +7.1 IntDivA m +5.2 +4.1 IntlNDisA m +5.6 +5.8 IntlNDisI +5.7 +6.1 IntlValA m +6.6 +3.5 LtdMatA m +1.4 +3.8 MAInvA m +6.3 +4.6 MAInvC m +6.0 +3.9 MAInvGrA m +6.2 +5.2 MdCpValI +8.9 +4.8 MidCapGrI +6.6 +1.6 ModAllocA m +5.3 +5.8 ModAllocC m +5.0 +5.1 MuHiIncA f +2.7 +2.8 MuIncA m +2.9 +4.0 MuLtdMtA m +2.2 +4.0 NewDiscA m +11.8 +10.2 NewDiscI +12.0 +10.5 ResBdA m +3.5 +6.7 ResBondI +3.7 +6.9 ResIntlA m +6.3 +2.6 ResIntlI +6.5 +2.9 ResearchA m +5.9 +4.7 ResearchI +6.0 +5.0 TotRetA m +5.1 +3.9 TotRetB m +4.7 +3.3 TotRetC m +4.7 +3.2 UtilA m +11.3 +10.7 UtilC m +10.9 +9.9 ValueA m +6.7 +3.3 ValueC m +6.4 +2.5 ValueI +6.8 +3.6 MainStay ConvertA m +6.1 +7.4 FltgRateA m +1.9 +3.9 HiYldCorA m +4.6 +7.0 HiYldCorC m +4.4 +6.2 LgCapGrA m +7.8 +6.5 Mairs & Power GrthInv +5.9 +3.9 Managers AMGFQGlAA m +3.8 +2.0 Bond +5.8 +8.1 MgrsPIMCOBd +3.5 +8.1 Manning & Napier PBConTrmS +3.9 +6.3 PBExtTrmS +5.9 +5.7 PBMaxTrmS +5.6 +4.8 PBModTrmS +5.1 +5.6 WrldOppA +8.4 +5.8 Marshall SmCpGrInv d +6.9 +8.6 Marsico 21stCent m +3.9 +2.3 FlexCap m +4.6 NA Focus m +2.6 +2.9 Grow m +5.7 +2.7 MassMutual PremIntlEqtyS +7.5 +5.3 SelFundmtlValS +6.0 +4.0 SelGlAlcS +3.9 NA SelIndxEqS +6.5 +2.5 SelIndxEqZ +6.6 +2.8 SelMdCpGrEqIIA m+8.5 +7.2 SelMdCpGrEqIIL +8.5 +7.5 SelMdCpGrEqIIS +8.7 +7.8 SlSmGrEqS +10.8 +5.4 MassMutual Inst PremCoreBndS +3.5 +6.9 Masters’ Select IntlIntl d +6.0 +4.9 Matthews Asian China d +1.4 +20.4 GrInc d +1.3 +10.0 India d -8.7 +13.2 PacEqInc d +.5 NA PacTiger d +.9 +13.5 Merger Merger m +3.0 +4.3 Meridian MeridnGr d +7.1 +8.9 Value d +3.8 +3.9 Merk HrdCurInv b +5.1 +7.1 Metropolitan West Hi-YldBdM b +5.3 +9.7 LowDurBd b +2.0 +3.4 TotRtBd b +3.5 +8.6 Morgan Stanley FocGrA m +7.8 +7.5 StrategiA m +4.7 +4.3 USGovSecB m +3.1 +3.5 Muhlenkamp Muhlenkmp +5.0 -3.6 Munder Funds InternetA m +6.0 +7.8 MdCpCrGrA m +9.1 +5.3 Nations LgCpIxZ +6.7 +2.8 Nationwide DesModSvc b +4.8 +3.9 FundD m +7.1 +1.2 IDAggSrv b +6.1 +2.7 IDModAgSv b +5.7 +3.4 IntlIdxA m +4.7 +.8 S&P500Svc m +6.4 +2.3 Natixis CGMTgtEqA m -2.7 +4.0 InvBndA m +5.2 +8.8 InvBndC m +4.9 +8.0 StratIncA m +7.3 +8.6 StratIncC m +7.0 +7.8 Neuberger Berman FocusInv +6.3 -.1 GenesAdv b +9.3 +7.1 GenesisInv +9.5 +7.4 GenesisTr +9.4 +7.4 GuardnInv +8.4 +4.2 PartnerTr b +5.6 +1.8 PartnrAdv b +5.5 +1.7 PartnrInv +5.7 +2.0 SmCpGrInv +10.3 +4.3 SocRespInv +8.2 +4.7 SocRespTr b +8.1 +4.5 New Covenant Growth +6.3 +1.8 Income +2.5 +3.0 Nicholas Nichol +9.0 +5.7 Northeast Investors Northeast +4.2 +3.9 Northern BdIndx +2.7 NA FixedIn +3.2 +5.9 GlbREIdx d +5.6 NA HYFixInc d +5.9 +7.1 HiYMuni +3.3 +.6 IntTaxE +3.9 +4.2 IntlIndex d +3.9 +.8 MMIntlEq d +2.4 NA MMMidCap +9.0 NA MMSmCp +6.8 NA MdCapIndx +9.6 +6.5 ShIntUSGv +1.1 +4.4 SmCapIdx +7.0 +3.8 SmCapVal +4.2 +3.2 StkIdx +6.6 +2.7 TaxE +4.7 +4.3 Nuveen HiYldMunA m +3.3 -1.9 HiYldMunC m +3.1 -2.4 IntlValA m +.3 +2.9 LtdTmMuA m +2.7 +4.1 LtdTmMuC m +2.5 +3.7 NWQVlOppA m +3.2 +10.1 NWQVlOppC m +2.9 +9.3 Oakmark EqIncI +5.7 +7.0 GlSelI d +8.1 NA Global I d +2.9 +4.6 Intl I d +4.7 +4.8

52-WEEK HI LOW 16.13 14.47 16.14 14.48 6.55 6.00 6.56 6.01 13.87 12.49 14.24 12.82 11.81 8.51 19.16 12.91 34.33 25.20 42.42 31.94

NAV 15.45 15.46 6.29 6.30 13.32 13.35 10.60 18.66 33.34 40.07

WK CHG +.02 +.02 ... +.01 ... +.01 -.08 -.05 -.20 -.32

11.35 9.13 11.02 +.03 18.39 14.75 17.99 +.04 16.21 12.35 15.59 +.03 31.42 23.47 31.20 +.16 30.28 21.32 30.28 +.37 14.93 13.34 14.88 -.03 17.25 15.22 17.06 +.07 29.10 19.73 28.36 +.22 12.45 12.44 26.82 11.31 8.12 8.15 8.14 31.31 12.63 24.70 14.05 13.34 9.44 25.24 11.88 8.04 2.92 13.57 18.20 10.89 4.68 4.71 17.50 34.93 11.45

9.21 9.21 18.28 9.20 7.25 7.27 7.27 23.51 9.92 15.15 10.18 9.69 9.30 16.65 10.64 7.27 2.73 9.59 12.60 9.71 4.57 4.60 11.71 23.99 10.58

12.08 12.06 25.80 11.08 8.09 8.12 8.11 30.14 12.39 23.67 13.78 13.08 9.36 24.72 10.90 8.00 2.92 12.98 17.91 10.23 4.62 4.65 16.84 33.47 10.89

+.04 +.03 +.19 ... -.01 -.01 -.01 +.09 +.03 +.19 +.06 +.05 -.02 +.24 -.02 -.02 ... +.07 +.10 -.01 -.01 ... +.15 +.14 +.02

15.49 13.76 13.18 19.19 18.85 14.26 10.46 14.99 14.80 14.76 44.89 6.60 3.56 3.56 14.66 23.72 24.37 26.76 6.27 20.83 20.11 16.47 14.70 10.23 14.23 14.06 7.78 8.59 8.10 27.05 28.39 10.68 10.69 16.73 17.27 26.84 27.35 14.85 14.85 14.92 18.25 18.19 24.78 24.55 24.89

11.44 12.82 11.58 14.18 14.14 11.77 9.99 11.63 11.48 11.45 32.94 5.89 3.20 3.20 10.56 16.64 17.09 20.11 6.17 15.86 15.32 12.17 10.35 7.15 11.74 11.58 7.03 7.79 7.84 17.64 18.48 10.21 10.21 11.86 12.24 19.94 20.31 12.61 12.61 12.66 13.49 13.45 19.03 18.86 19.11

15.16 13.69 13.12 18.86 18.51 14.06 10.26 14.74 14.55 14.51 44.05 6.57 3.55 3.54 14.22 23.10 23.73 26.22 6.20 20.43 19.71 16.21 14.52 10.02 14.09 13.91 7.28 8.11 7.99 26.67 28.00 10.64 10.65 16.18 16.71 26.43 26.93 14.71 14.71 14.77 18.13 18.06 24.28 24.04 24.39

+.06 ... +.03 -.03 -.02 +.05 +.02 +.04 +.04 +.04 ... -.03 -.01 -.02 +.10 +.16 +.17 +.17 ... +.01 ... -.05 ... +.02 +.04 +.04 ... ... ... +.11 +.12 +.01 +.02 +.14 +.15 +.01 +.02 ... ... -.01 -.03 -.03 -.08 -.08 -.08

17.35 13.31 16.99 +.05 9.55 9.14 9.51 -.01 6.04 5.61 6.02 -.02 6.01 5.59 6.00 -.01 7.79 5.45 7.60 +.02 78.14 61.08 76.44

-.40

10.84 9.58 9.94 +.04 26.58 24.82 26.57 ... 10.76 10.15 10.64 +.02 13.55 16.56 17.76 13.57 9.62

12.41 13.45 13.34 11.72 7.00

13.37 16.43 17.41 13.51 9.33

+.03 +.01 -.01 +.01 +.08

21.58 13.55 20.32 +.10 15.35 14.70 19.41 21.11

11.14 10.15 13.80 14.86

14.81 +.05 14.25 ... 18.56 +.14 20.47 +.10

16.02 11.36 11.51 12.75 12.75 16.64 17.11 17.56 19.91

11.24 8.58 9.41 9.59 9.59 11.55 11.85 12.14 13.39

15.51 11.12 11.21 12.47 12.47 16.23 16.68 17.13 19.11

+.10 +.01 +.06 -.02 -.01 +.03 +.03 +.03 +.12

11.35 10.61 11.34 +.03 16.61 11.32 15.96 +.15 31.71 18.68 23.02 14.60 24.40

23.14 15.25 16.54 11.85 17.70

29.77 -.26 18.28 -.03 19.61 +.05 14.30 +.01 23.64 -.05

16.27 15.35 16.26

...

48.43 33.72 47.77 +.10 30.70 22.54 30.01 -.01 13.17 10.84 12.82 +.12 11.02 10.07 10.91 -.04 8.68 8.29 8.66 ... 10.79 10.26 10.56 +.01 39.73 26.34 38.48 -.05 17.31 13.74 16.89 +.08 9.58 8.43 8.72 +.03 58.49 46.64 56.48

-.40

30.66 21.62 29.54 -.05 30.86 21.78 30.43 +.16 26.48 19.85 25.91

-.02

9.98 8.27 9.82 14.84 11.06 14.49 9.35 6.96 9.08 9.86 7.69 9.63 8.11 5.92 7.75 11.38 8.55 11.13

+.02 ... +.02 +.03 +.04 -.01

11.46 12.76 12.68 15.57 15.66

8.53 11.86 11.78 13.81 13.89

10.82 -.02 12.55 +.04 12.46 +.04 15.52 -.03 15.61 -.02

21.34 31.08 37.44 53.67 16.40 22.96 19.80 29.93 20.28 28.13 19.27

16.07 21.93 26.35 37.80 11.95 16.51 14.26 21.51 13.49 20.55 14.10

20.85 30.17 36.36 52.11 16.07 22.34 19.26 29.13 19.73 27.55 18.87

+.05 +.14 +.17 +.24 -.07 +.03 +.02 +.05 +.17 -.05 -.03

33.62 24.97 32.91 +.04 23.20 22.35 22.95 +.06 49.52 37.40 49.20 +.05 6.42

5.79

10.88 10.72 8.90 7.55 8.46 10.74 11.58 10.60 12.98 11.40 13.43 10.73 9.52 16.45 16.89 10.95

10.35 10.02 6.57 6.77 7.64 9.76 10.10 7.94 9.06 7.76 12.32 10.24 6.50 11.64 12.66 9.68

10.67 10.33 8.77 7.51 8.01 10.24 11.06 10.18 12.70 10.99 13.11 10.43 9.21 15.96 16.52 10.31

6.25 +.04 +.03 +.02 +.09 -.03 ... ... +.07 +.07 +.07 +.04 +.05 +.02 +.08 +.10 -.02 ...

16.07 16.06 27.27 11.09 11.05 36.81 35.93

13.77 13.76 21.58 10.68 10.64 29.40 28.70

14.58 14.57 26.15 10.95 10.91 36.20 35.31

+.01 +.01 +.20 ... ... +.29 +.27

29.68 24.50 29.31 +.04 12.39 9.18 11.97 -.03 23.93 18.07 23.14 -.12 21.01 15.47 20.32 +.06

YTD 5-YR FUND %RTN %RTN IntlSmCpI d +.7 +4.1 Oakmark I d +7.2 +5.1 Select I d +9.6 +2.7 Old Mutual Advisor F FocusedZ d +5.4 +4.6 Old Westbury FixedInc +2.2 +6.5 GlbSmMdCp +6.9 +9.3 LgCapEq +4.1 +1.1 MuniBd +2.4 +4.6 NonUSLgCp +3.6 +1.4 RealRet +4.4 +5.3 Olstein AllCpVlC m +4.4 +.2 Oppenheimer AMTFrMunA m +4.6 -3.5 ActAllocA m +5.0 +1.0 ActAllocC m +4.6 +.2 AmtFrNYA m +2.0 +1.8 BalA m +5.6 -1.4 CAMuniA m +3.6 -1.8 CapApA m +5.4 +1.7 CapApB m +5.0 +.9 CapApC m +5.0 +1.0 CapApprY +5.6 +2.2 CapIncA m +6.1 -.4 ChampIncA m +6.3 -19.8 CmdtStTRA m +6.6 -9.1 CmdtStTRY +6.5 -8.7 CoreBondY +4.3 -2.3 DevMktA m -1.6 +13.5 DevMktN m -1.8 +13.0 DevMktY -1.5 +13.8 DevMktsC m -1.9 +12.7 DiscoverA m +15.6 +7.4 EqIncA m +7.1 +5.8 EquityA m +6.6 +2.2 GlobA m +7.9 +3.8 GlobC m +7.6 +3.1 GlobOpprA m +6.4 +5.1 GlobOpprC m +6.1 +4.3 GlobY +8.0 +4.2 GoldMinA m -5.9 +18.5 GoldMinC m -6.2 +17.6 IntlBondA m +3.6 +8.9 IntlBondC m +3.3 +8.1 IntlBondY +3.7 +9.2 IntlDivA m +2.7 +5.6 IntlDivC m +2.4 +4.8 IntlGrY +7.5 +6.2 IntlGrowA m +7.3 +5.7 IntlSmCoA m -3.9 +6.7 IntlSmCoY -3.7 +7.1 LmtTmMunA m +2.5 +2.9 LmtTmMunC m +2.1 +2.1 LtdTmGovA m +1.2 +3.4 LtdTmGovY +1.3 +3.6 LtdTmNY m +1.9 +3.6 LtdTmNY m +1.6 +2.9 MainSSMCA m +7.7 +3.1 MainSSMCC m +7.4 +2.3 MainSSMCY +7.9 +3.5 MainStSelA m +.5 +1.7 MainStrA m +3.4 +1.8 MainStrC m +3.1 +1.1 ModInvA m +4.9 0.0 PAMuniA m +3.3 +1.8 QuBalA m +3.9 +2.5 QuOpportA m +4.8 +5.1 RisDivA m +7.3 +4.3 RisDivY +7.5 +4.6 RocMuniA m +2.0 +2.1 RocMuniC m +1.6 +1.2 RochNtlMC m +4.1 -5.3 RochNtlMu m +4.4 -4.6 SmMidValA m +8.7 +2.8 SrFltRatA m +3.4 +4.5 SrFltRatC m +3.2 +4.0 StrIncA m +5.1 +7.7 StrIncY +5.2 +7.9 StratIncC m +4.8 +6.9 USGovtA m +2.7 +5.4 ValueA m +7.8 +2.5 ValueY +8.0 +2.9 Osterweis OsterStrInc d +3.3 +7.9 Osterweis d +6.1 +5.0 PIMCO AllAssetA m +5.1 +6.8 AllAssetC m +4.8 +6.0 AllAssetsD b +5.2 +6.9 AllAuthA m +4.8 +7.6 AllAuthC m +4.4 +6.8 CmRlRtStA m +6.3 +3.6 CmRlRtStC m +5.9 +2.8 CmRlRtStD b +6.2 +3.5 EmgMktA m +3.3 +8.4 ForUnhgD b +5.1 +8.6 GNMA A m +3.3 +7.4 Hi-YldD b +5.0 +7.6 HiYldA m +5.0 +7.6 HiYldC m +4.7 +6.8 LowDrA m +2.1 +5.5 LowDrC m +1.9 +5.0 LowDurD b +2.1 +5.6 RealRetD b +4.5 +6.9 RealRtnA m +4.5 +6.9 RealRtnC m +4.3 +6.4 ShtTermA m +.9 +3.3 ShtTermD b +.9 +3.3 TotRetA m +3.1 +8.3 TotRetB m +2.7 +7.5 TotRetC m +2.7 +7.5 TotRetrnD b +3.1 +8.5 PRIMECAP Odyssey AggGr d +11.4 +9.0 Growth d +9.6 +6.2 Stock d +7.6 +4.6 Pacific PortOptCA m +4.9 +4.9 Parnassus EqIncInv +6.2 +7.5 Parnassus +5.4 +7.0 Pax World Bal b +6.5 +3.3 Payden CoreBd x +2.8 +5.7 EmMktBd x +3.7 +9.1 GNMA +3.2 +7.1 HighInc x +4.8 +6.2 ShortBd +1.5 +4.3 Permanent Portfolio +6.3 +10.2 Perritt MicroCap d +2.2 +2.7 Pioneer Bond A m +3.9 +7.3 CulValA m +4.7 +1.7 CulValC m +4.4 +.9 EqInc A m +9.5 +3.2 GlobHiYA m +5.5 +7.7 GlobHiYC m +5.2 +6.9 GrOppA m +11.3 +4.1 HiYldA m +6.9 +8.1 HiYldC m +6.5 +7.3 IndependA m +7.4 +1.3 MidCpValA m +7.2 +4.0 MuniA m +3.8 +3.5 PioneerA m +5.0 +2.8 SmCapEq m +10.5 +7.1 StratIncA m +4.0 +8.4 StratIncC m +3.6 +7.6 ValueA m +3.9 -2.2 Principal BdMtgInst +4.4 +5.3 CaptApprtnA m +5.4 +4.0 DivIntI +4.0 +1.0 EqIncA m +7.3 +2.7 HiYldA m +5.5 +9.1 HiYldC m +5.2 +8.3 HiYldII +5.6 +10.1 InfProI +4.2 +1.2 IntIInst +4.3 +1.1 IntlGrthI +4.7 -.9 L/T2010I +5.5 +3.4 L/T2020I +5.9 +3.6 L/T2020J m +5.8 +3.1 L/T2030I +6.2 +3.5 L/T2030J m +6.1 +3.0 L/T2040I +6.3 +3.2 L/T2050I +6.5 +3.0 L/TSIInst +4.3 +3.1 LCBIIInst +5.7 +3.2 LCGIIInst +6.0 +5.2 LCGrIInst +7.0 +6.6 LCIIIInst +6.7 -1.3 LCVlIInst +6.4 +.1 LgCGrInst +3.1 +3.4 LgCSP500I +6.6 +2.8 LgCValI +8.6 +1.1 MCVlIInst +7.7 +5.7 MGIIIInst +11.1 +5.9 MidCapBleA m +13.0 +8.0 PrSecInst +6.6 +7.1 ReEstSecI +13.0 +4.5 SAMBalA m +5.1 +4.9 SAMBalC m +4.8 +4.2 SAMConGrA m +5.7 +3.8 SAMConGrB m +5.4 +3.0 SAMConGrC m +5.4 +3.0 SAMFleIncA m +4.3 +5.9 SAMStrGrA m +6.1 +3.1 SCGrIInst +11.9 +7.0 SCValIII +5.7 +2.2 Prudential Investmen 2020FocA m +7.0 +5.9 2020FocC m +6.8 +5.1 2020FocZ +7.2 +6.2 BlendA m +7.3 +4.6 EqIncC m +7.5 +7.1 EqOppA m +8.0 +4.2 GovtIncA m +2.4 +6.0 HiYieldA m +5.0 +8.6 HlthSciA m +19.0 +10.9 IntlEqtyA m +6.0 -1.3 IntlValA m +5.7 +2.0 JenMidCapGrA m+10.4 +7.5 JenMidCapGrZ +10.6 +7.8 JennGrA m +7.4 +4.8 JennGrZ +7.5 +5.0 NatlMuniA m +3.7 +3.5 NaturResA m +1.3 +10.0 ShTmCoBdA m +2.3 +6.1 SmallCoA m +9.8 +6.0 SmallCoZ +9.9 +6.2 StkIndexI +6.8 +2.9 UtilityA m +9.5 +3.6 ValueA m +7.4 +2.3 ValueZ +7.5 +2.6 Purisima TotReturn b +4.2 +2.1 Putnam AmGovtInA m +3.4 +8.0 AstAlBalA m +5.2 +3.8 AstAlConA m +4.2 +4.4

M

U

T

U

52-WEEK WK HI LOW NAV CHG 15.20 10.99 14.47 -.10 45.29 34.67 44.28 -.43 30.73 23.12 30.08 -.32 22.80 17.52 22.22

-.15

12.00 16.95 13.05 12.43 11.63 11.60

11.75 16.54 12.68 11.87 11.00 11.38

+.05 ... +.07 ... +.04 +.17

13.43 10.16 13.12

-.13

6.64 10.29 10.08 12.06 10.69 8.31 46.92 41.33 41.05 49.10 8.99 2.02 4.25 4.26 6.62 37.42 36.17 37.05 35.91 67.85 26.53 9.59 67.42 63.28 32.57 30.08 67.57 51.45 48.74 7.04 7.01 7.04 13.03 12.75 30.92 31.05 24.84 24.68 14.70 14.64 9.47 9.46 3.34 3.32 22.56 20.39 23.71 13.18 34.21 33.00 9.27 11.37 16.43 28.00 16.89 17.28 16.91 16.88 7.36 7.37 35.48 8.42 8.43 4.45 4.44 4.44 9.65 24.01 24.49

11.47 12.18 10.01 11.56 7.99 8.74

5.63 8.06 7.89 10.25 8.76 7.11 35.13 31.16 30.93 36.63 7.90 1.79 2.90 2.91 6.27 26.44 25.62 26.17 25.51 41.54 19.30 7.08 48.55 45.61 24.99 23.08 48.68 33.00 31.47 6.06 6.04 6.06 9.60 9.41 21.63 21.73 15.75 15.60 13.88 13.82 9.35 9.34 3.14 3.13 15.89 14.44 16.70 10.25 25.88 24.99 7.66 9.89 13.29 23.73 12.81 13.10 14.49 14.47 6.25 6.27 24.73 8.05 7.97 3.99 3.99 3.98 9.23 17.37 17.73

6.05 10.07 9.85 10.71 10.62 7.53 45.93 40.43 40.15 48.07 8.98 2.00 3.90 3.91 6.59 35.89 34.68 35.54 34.42 65.19 26.15 9.41 65.15 61.12 31.64 29.21 65.31 46.90 44.39 6.69 6.67 6.69 12.60 12.33 29.98 30.10 23.70 23.58 14.26 14.20 9.41 9.40 3.22 3.21 22.01 19.88 23.14 12.83 33.49 32.29 9.13 10.42 16.06 27.66 16.60 16.99 15.15 15.12 6.70 6.72 34.84 8.40 8.41 4.40 4.39 4.39 9.47 23.54 24.02

... +.03 +.02 ... -.02 ... +.17 +.14 +.14 +.18 +.01 -.01 +.06 +.05 ... +.18 +.17 +.18 +.16 +.61 +.02 ... -.11 -.12 +.10 +.09 -.11 +1.81 +1.72 +.04 +.04 +.04 +.04 +.04 +.19 +.18 +.30 +.30 ... ... ... -.01 ... ... +.08 +.08 +.09 +.10 +.04 +.03 +.02 ... +.09 -.16 +.05 +.05 +.02 +.02 +.01 +.01 +.13 -.02 -.02 ... ... ... +.02 -.08 -.08

11.92 11.32 11.90 29.59 23.18 28.76

-.01 -.12

12.77 12.63 12.79 11.28 11.19 10.04 9.84 10.07 11.66 11.62 11.71 9.54 9.54 9.54 10.77 10.77 10.77 11.91 11.91 11.91 9.95 9.95 11.77 11.77 11.77 11.77

+.04 +.05 +.05 +.03 +.03 +.22 +.20 +.21 -.04 +.14 +.03 -.04 -.04 -.04 ... ... ... +.04 +.04 +.04 -.01 -.01 +.01 +.01 +.01 +.01

11.67 11.55 11.69 10.43 10.34 7.15 7.03 7.17 10.36 9.72 11.25 8.68 8.68 8.68 10.27 10.27 10.27 11.02 11.02 11.02 9.85 9.85 10.69 10.69 10.69 10.69

12.53 12.39 12.56 10.95 10.84 9.48 9.28 9.50 11.23 11.00 11.71 9.50 9.50 9.50 10.52 10.52 10.52 11.68 11.68 11.68 9.91 9.91 11.05 11.05 11.05 11.05

18.79 13.54 18.35 +.20 17.24 12.44 16.88 +.07 15.48 11.83 15.24 +.02 12.21 10.04 12.03 +.02 28.61 22.33 27.88 +.01 45.09 31.93 42.68 +.09 24.21 18.74 23.81 +.11 10.75 15.02 10.60 7.43 10.25

10.31 13.40 10.14 6.80 10.04

10.59 -.02 14.48 -.12 10.48 +.03 7.36 -.07 10.18 +.01

49.73 39.10 48.71 +.72 29.58 21.04 28.02 +.20 9.74 19.73 19.53 28.03 10.95 10.91 31.08 10.82 11.00 12.41 23.06 13.69 43.93 33.07 11.17 10.93 12.26

9.34 15.23 15.05 20.80 9.61 9.58 21.40 8.86 9.00 8.74 17.02 12.07 32.45 21.94 10.45 10.22 9.50

9.74 19.01 18.80 27.66 10.82 10.78 30.36 10.66 10.83 12.06 22.66 12.78 42.92 32.01 11.15 10.91 11.83

+.01 -.06 -.06 +.02 -.05 -.05 +.12 -.01 -.01 +.03 -.06 -.01 -.05 +.16 -.01 -.01 +.03

10.66 41.71 11.00 18.88 8.24 8.30 11.77 8.28 12.63 9.76 11.92 12.56 12.51 12.53 12.51 12.79 12.31 11.09 10.36 8.97 10.11 11.15 11.53 8.70 9.58 10.37 14.30 11.99 15.07 10.32 18.20 13.54 13.40 14.65 14.12 13.93 11.70 16.18 12.54 10.63

9.98 32.20 7.75 14.67 7.62 7.67 10.33 7.77 8.92 6.98 9.90 10.02 9.97 9.72 9.69 9.70 9.21 9.98 7.79 6.74 7.21 8.41 8.77 6.42 7.18 7.59 10.22 7.92 11.31 8.99 12.98 11.10 11.00 11.40 10.97 10.84 10.59 12.13 7.74 7.25

10.65 40.65 10.52 18.58 8.17 8.22 11.32 8.15 12.04 9.40 11.78 12.35 12.30 12.29 12.27 12.51 12.02 11.05 10.12 8.78 9.92 10.88 11.29 8.44 9.37 10.12 14.06 11.81 14.98 10.32 18.19 13.35 13.21 14.35 13.83 13.63 11.68 15.78 12.09 10.21

+.01 -.05 +.08 -.06 -.02 -.02 -.04 +.03 +.10 +.10 +.04 +.04 +.04 +.04 +.05 +.04 +.04 +.03 +.01 -.01 +.01 ... -.02 ... -.01 +.02 +.03 +.07 +.10 +.01 +.29 +.02 +.02 +.03 +.03 +.02 +.02 +.04 +.06 +.08

17.34 15.56 17.95 18.87 13.79 15.19 9.83 5.65 27.85 6.85 22.79 30.53 31.67 19.65 20.41 15.05 62.22 11.72 22.83 23.86 30.18 11.30 16.32 16.34

12.68 11.44 13.09 13.74 10.50 11.12 9.44 5.14 18.60 4.92 16.48 22.15 22.91 14.42 14.94 13.73 40.05 11.38 15.67 16.37 22.68 8.45 12.03 12.05

17.01 15.26 17.61 18.47 13.55 14.99 9.72 5.62 27.71 6.56 21.78 30.24 31.37 19.39 20.14 14.42 57.83 11.55 22.28 23.29 29.52 11.15 15.82 15.84

+.10 +.09 +.11 +.13 +.01 +.08 +.03 -.02 +.28 +.04 +.12 +.11 +.12 +.07 +.07 ... +1.74 +.01 +.19 +.20 -.03 +.05 +.11 +.11

21.99 15.64 21.12 +.20 9.88 11.69 9.57

9.44 9.67 +.03 9.63 11.45 +.01 8.67 9.49 +.02

A

L

S

YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW AstAlGrA m +5.4 +3.3 13.36 10.47 AstAlcCoY +4.3 +4.7 9.59 8.69 CATxEIncA m +2.7 +3.2 8.12 7.22 ConvInGrA m +5.9 +6.3 21.47 17.05 DivIncTrC m +4.0 +4.6 8.17 7.76 DivrInA m +4.3 +5.4 8.28 7.86 EqIncomeA m +8.6 +4.7 16.67 12.17 EqIncomeY +8.7 +4.9 16.67 12.16 GeoPutA m +5.8 -.4 12.69 10.54 GlbEqA m +10.7 +1.3 9.94 7.07 GlbHltCrA m +14.7 +4.9 51.66 38.52 GlobNatA m +6.7 +4.5 25.20 15.70 GrowIncA m +5.3 -.1 14.68 10.83 GrowIncB m +5.0 -.9 14.41 10.64 HiYldA m +5.4 +8.1 8.00 7.16 HiYldAdvA m +5.2 +8.4 6.16 5.57 IncomeA m +5.0 +7.8 6.97 6.68 IntlCpOpA m +2.5 +4.4 38.57 26.65 IntlEqA m +3.8 -.3 21.83 15.39 InvestorA m +6.7 +.1 13.95 10.30 MidCapVal m +5.2 +2.7 13.49 9.47 MultiCapGrA m +6.9 +3.2 55.41 38.86 NYTxEIncA m +3.1 +3.9 8.74 7.98 TaxEIncA m +3.3 +3.7 8.73 7.29 TaxFHYldA m +2.2 +2.7 12.07 10.96 USGovtInA m +3.6 +8.3 14.44 13.94 VoyagerA m +.7 +7.3 25.49 18.17 VoyagerY +.8 +7.5 26.54 18.93 RS GlNatResA m +6.0 +6.0 41.60 28.30 PartnersA m +6.0 +3.4 36.00 25.15 SmCpGrthA m +14.8 +6.8 48.62 31.25 ValueA m +3.3 +3.5 27.62 20.34 RS Funds CoreEqA m +2.9 +6.6 45.58 35.06 EmgMktsA m -3.3 +10.9 27.44 20.41 Rainier CoreEq b +5.4 +2.3 27.05 19.62 SmMidCap b +9.6 +3.1 36.86 24.52 RidgeWorth CapAprI +7.4 +5.1 11.89 8.30 HiIncI +6.8 +10.4 7.41 6.42 HighYI +6.2 +7.5 10.19 9.05 IntlEIxI +5.8 0.0 14.44 10.43 IntmBndI +2.6 +6.7 11.03 10.27 InvGrBdI +3.4 +5.3 12.56 11.51 LgCpVaEqI +5.3 +4.2 13.79 10.31 MdCpVlEqI +7.5 +9.4 13.15 9.20 SmCapEqI +6.7 +6.3 14.96 10.74 SmCapGrI +12.3 +3.0 17.87 11.41 TtlRetBndI +3.2 +7.2 11.17 10.28 USGovBndI +.9 +4.0 10.11 10.05 RiverNorth CoreOpp m +5.4 NA 12.99 11.85 RiverSource ShDurUSA m +.9 +3.4 4.81 4.74 TxExHiIncA m +3.6 +3.6 4.39 3.96 Royce LowStkSer m +4.8 +8.1 19.92 13.10 MicrCapIv d +4.0 +7.6 19.30 13.18 OpportInv d +3.6 +4.7 13.10 8.66 PAMutCnslt m +7.4 +4.3 11.80 8.20 PAMutInv d +7.9 +5.3 13.00 9.00 PremierInv d +9.3 +8.9 22.95 15.59 SpecEqInv d +3.5 +7.5 22.54 16.60 TotRetInv d +6.0 +4.6 14.28 10.49 ValPlSvc m +6.5 +3.3 14.72 10.56 ValueSvc m +9.1 +7.8 14.21 9.58 Russell EmgMktsS +.1 +10.7 21.93 15.76 GlRelEstS +6.6 +2.3 38.66 29.56 GlbEqtyS +5.4 NA 9.68 7.05 InvGrdBdS +3.1 NA 22.89 21.41 ItlDvMktS +4.2 NA 34.64 25.14 ShDurBdS +1.6 +4.7 19.51 19.02 StratBdS +3.6 NA 11.32 10.68 TaxExBdS +2.8 +4.4 22.80 21.61 TxMgdLgCS +6.4 +2.9 21.38 15.52 USCoreEqS +5.3 NA 30.16 22.31 USQntvEqS +9.9 NA 31.96 23.47 USSmMdCpS +7.4 NA 25.30 17.14 Russell LifePoints BalStrA m +4.8 +4.2 11.09 9.21 BalStrC b +4.5 +3.4 11.00 9.14 BalStrE +4.6 +4.1 11.12 9.23 BalStrS +4.8 +4.4 11.18 9.29 BlStrR3 b +4.7 +3.9 11.12 9.23 EqGrStrC b +5.0 +1.0 9.39 7.07 GrStrA m +5.1 +3.1 10.69 8.39 GrStrC b +4.8 +2.3 10.55 8.30 GrStrR3 b +5.1 +2.9 10.73 8.42 Rydex Nsdq100Iv +5.3 +7.3 15.71 11.31 Rydex/SGI MCapValA m +5.3 +5.9 35.77 26.44 MgFtrStrH b +.9 NA 26.76 23.75 SEI DlyShDurA +1.2 +4.7 10.72 10.53 SSGA EmgMkts b +.9 +8.6 23.98 17.07 EmgMktsSel b +1.0 +8.8 24.06 17.13 IntlStkSl b +5.3 +.3 11.17 8.10 S&P500Idx b +6.6 +2.8 22.42 16.82 Schwab 1000Inv d +6.9 +3.2 40.64 30.66 CoreEqInv d +7.7 +2.7 18.63 13.72 DivEqSel d +8.0 +3.0 14.09 10.70 FUSLgCInl d +6.6 NA 10.51 7.80 FUSSMCIns d +6.1 NA 11.78 7.99 GNMA +3.2 +6.6 10.45 10.04 HlthCFoc d +15.4 +6.4 18.52 13.49 IntlIndex d +6.0 +1.6 19.10 13.92 MktTrAlEq d +6.6 +2.9 13.06 9.58 MktTrBal d +5.0 +3.6 16.16 13.43 PremInc d +2.5 NA 10.54 10.16 S&P500Sel d +6.6 +3.0 21.33 16.07 SmCapIdx d +8.2 +5.7 23.44 16.02 TaxFreeBd +3.8 +4.8 11.72 10.95 TotBdMkt +2.7 +3.7 9.45 9.05 TotStkMSl d +7.2 +3.7 24.91 18.46 Scout Interntl d +4.4 +5.5 35.42 25.58 Selected AmerShS b +5.0 +2.0 44.52 34.31 American D +5.1 +2.3 44.53 34.33 Seligman MuniNatA m +3.9 +4.2 8.05 7.20 Sentinel CmnStkA m +7.1 +4.4 34.23 25.50 GovtSecA m +2.4 +6.8 11.24 10.34 ShMatGovA m +1.3 +4.6 9.38 9.17 SmallCoA m +12.4 +6.7 8.91 6.12 Sequoia Sequoia +11.6 +5.2 147.36 112.47 Sit LrgCapGr d +5.2 +3.9 45.42 34.58 USGovSec +1.8 +6.1 11.36 11.12 Sound Shore SoundShor +5.6 +2.3 34.47 25.73 Spectra Spectra A m +8.2 +11.5 13.59 9.47 Stadion MgdPortA m -3.5 NA 11.00 9.41 State Farm Balanced +4.4 +5.2 57.34 48.83 Growth +5.5 +4.1 57.76 44.03 MuniBond +4.2 +5.2 8.91 8.35 Stratton SmCapVal d +9.3 +3.3 55.63 38.32 T Rowe Price Balanced +5.5 +5.2 20.55 16.65 BlChpGAdv b +6.1 +4.4 41.32 29.78 BlChpGr +6.2 +4.6 41.37 29.79 CapApprec +6.4 +6.3 21.79 17.72 CorpInc +4.4 +6.8 10.11 9.39 DivGrow +7.4 +4.1 24.86 18.76 DivrSmCap d +12.5 +7.8 18.27 11.50 EmEurMed d -3.0 +2.9 24.84 16.30 EmMktBd d +3.9 +9.0 13.86 12.37 EmMktStk d -.3 +8.8 36.99 26.50 EqIndex d +6.6 +2.7 36.77 27.55 EqtyInc +5.6 +2.7 25.53 19.42 EqtyIncAd b +5.5 +2.5 25.49 19.39 EurStock d +10.7 +4.8 17.41 11.42 ExtMktIdx d +8.6 +5.8 18.09 12.31 FinSer -.1 -2.9 15.40 11.94 GNMA +2.6 +6.4 10.10 9.76 GlbTech +11.0 +11.3 10.79 7.10 GloStk d +2.8 +1.6 19.20 14.47 GrStkAdv b +5.5 +4.5 34.38 24.96 GrStkR b +5.4 +4.3 33.98 24.72 GrowInc +7.0 +3.6 21.84 16.40 GrowStk +5.6 +4.8 34.67 25.15 HealthSci +19.7 +11.6 36.50 24.60 HiYield d +5.6 +8.4 7.00 6.33 HiYldAdv m +5.5 +8.2 6.99 6.32 IntlBnd d +5.3 +6.7 10.66 9.07 IntlBndAd m +5.3 +6.4 10.65 9.06 IntlDisc d +4.2 +5.1 47.45 33.49 IntlEqIdx d +5.6 +1.8 13.08 9.40 IntlGrInc d +7.0 +1.8 14.86 10.56 IntlStk d +4.1 +3.7 15.35 11.12 IntlStkAd m +4.1 +3.5 15.29 11.10 LatinAm d -4.6 +15.3 57.59 41.11 MDTaxFBd +3.0 +4.1 10.77 9.89 MdCpVlAdv b +6.9 +6.3 25.58 19.51 MediaTele +9.8 +12.7 58.18 39.43 MidCapVa +7.0 +6.6 25.71 19.62 MidCpGr +9.0 +8.4 65.35 46.81 MidCpGrAd b +8.9 +8.2 64.12 46.05 NewAmGro +6.7 +7.6 35.86 25.64 NewAsia d +1.3 +15.0 20.17 14.91 NewEra +3.9 +6.4 58.14 37.45 NewHoriz +11.8 +7.6 38.26 25.10 NewIncome +2.7 +7.0 9.81 9.36 OrseaStk d +6.6 NA 9.24 6.61 PerStrBal +5.5 +5.6 20.30 16.30 PerStrGr +6.2 +4.5 24.84 18.93 PerStrInc +4.6 +6.1 16.86 14.34 R2015 +5.3 +5.2 12.72 10.30 R2025 +5.7 +4.7 12.99 10.06 R2035 +6.1 +4.4 13.28 9.97 Real d +12.5 +3.3 19.59 13.79 Ret2020R b +5.3 +4.4 17.43 13.78 Ret2050 +6.1 NA 10.58 7.94 RetInc +4.3 +5.4 13.71 11.91 Retir2005 +4.8 +5.5 12.00 10.28 Rtmt2010 +5.0 +5.3 16.31 13.60 Rtmt2020 +5.5 +4.9 17.67 13.96 Rtmt2030 +6.0 +4.6 18.71 14.24 Rtmt2040 +6.0 +4.5 18.92 14.18 Rtmt2045 +6.0 +4.5 12.60 9.45 SciTecAdv b +9.7 +8.8 29.88 20.31 SciTech +9.8 +8.9 30.02 20.37 ShTmBond +1.3 +4.7 4.91 4.83 SmCpStk +9.5 +6.7 38.67 26.31 SmCpVal d +5.5 +4.7 39.53 28.50 SmCpValAd m +5.4 +4.5 39.27 28.31 SpecGrow +6.1 +4.3 19.27 14.14 SpecInc +4.2 +7.1 12.70 11.74 SpecIntl d +5.3 +4.2 11.78 8.43 SumMuInc +3.4 +4.2 11.40 10.39 SumMuInt +3.8 +4.8 11.64 10.91

SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011 PAGE 7D

NAV 12.96 9.51 7.54 21.32 8.07 8.18 16.29 16.29 12.52 9.66 51.37 23.60 14.23 13.96 7.93 6.10 6.93 36.56 20.81 13.61 13.07 54.12 8.34 8.34 11.32 14.34 23.88 24.88

WK CHG +.02 +.02 ... +.07 -.03 -.03 -.08 -.08 -.05 +.05 -.04 +.47 -.01 -.02 -.06 -.02 +.02 -.03 +.16 +.01 +.04 +.22 ... ... +.01 +.03 +.06 +.05

39.83 +.91 35.06 +.40 47.83 +.54 26.77 -.07 43.76 -.27 25.86 +.33 26.33 +.10 35.80 +.42 11.64 7.36 10.14 13.58 10.54 11.97 13.47 12.72 14.62 17.28 10.60 10.11

+.06 -.02 -.04 +.06 +.04 ... +.01 -.04 +.05 +.16 +.03 +.01

12.84 +.02 4.79 4.17

... ...

19.14 18.28 12.51 11.40 12.57 22.25 21.60 13.93 14.29 13.80

+.24 +.18 +.07 +.06 +.07 +.17 -.04 +.04 +.18 +.16

20.86 38.18 9.36 22.11 33.01 19.40 11.04 22.20 20.87 29.38 31.45 24.54

+.14 +.29 +.03 +.05 +.15 +.01 +.03 +.01 ... -.04 +.03 +.11

10.89 10.79 10.91 10.98 10.92 9.09 10.41 10.26 10.44

+.04 +.03 +.03 +.04 +.04 +.03 +.04 +.03 +.04

15.23

-.10

34.09 -.02 26.01 +.22 10.67

...

22.78 +.18 22.86 +.18 10.62 +.04 21.93 -.03 39.75 18.13 13.82 10.28 11.39 10.41 18.31 18.26 12.67 15.95 10.39 20.87 22.84 11.38 9.33 24.38

-.01 +.02 -.02 -.02 +.09 +.03 -.06 +.12 +.04 +.05 +.02 -.03 +.20 ... +.03 +.02

33.79 +.11 43.50 43.53

-.01 -.01

7.63

...

33.54 -.04 10.63 -.01 9.27 ... 8.71 +.06 144.32 +1.06 44.45 +.07 11.35 ... 33.60

-.06

13.18 +.02 9.93

-.02

56.47 +.24 55.96 +.22 8.68 ... 54.21 +.27 20.28 40.41 40.48 21.61 9.86 24.51 17.79 22.72 13.42 35.16 35.96 24.93 24.88 16.61 17.63 14.15 10.04 10.46 18.57 33.64 33.23 21.56 33.94 36.24 6.96 6.95 10.37 10.36 45.75 12.47 14.24 14.81 14.76 54.09 10.28 25.23 56.79 25.36 63.78 62.56 35.21 19.43 54.20 37.43 9.61 8.89 20.01 24.33 16.72 12.52 12.73 12.97 19.59 17.11 10.33 13.55 11.88 16.11 17.35 18.31 18.47 12.31 29.32 29.45 4.87 37.70 38.13 37.87 18.78 12.67 11.32 10.87 11.35

+.05 +.05 +.05 -.01 +.02 -.02 +.14 +.45 -.05 +.41 -.04 -.05 -.05 +.13 +.13 ... +.01 +.02 +.18 +.11 +.10 +.02 +.11 -.02 -.03 -.03 +.12 +.12 +.20 +.07 +.10 +.14 +.14 +1.77 -.01 -.01 -.02 -.01 +.09 +.08 +.02 -.07 +1.12 +.10 +.01 +.07 +.04 +.06 +.04 +.03 +.04 +.04 +.32 +.04 +.04 +.02 +.03 +.04 +.05 +.06 +.07 +.05 +.05 +.05 ... +.27 +.20 +.20 +.04 +.01 +.09 ... ...

YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW TaxFHiYld +3.2 +2.8 11.09 10.04 TaxFInc +3.5 +4.2 10.17 9.29 TaxFShInt +2.2 +4.2 5.66 5.51 TotMktIdx d +6.8 +3.4 15.50 11.46 TrRt2010Ad b +4.9 +5.0 16.23 13.54 TrRt2010R b +4.7 +4.7 16.14 13.46 TrRt2020Ad b +5.4 +4.7 17.56 13.88 TrRt2030Ad b +5.8 +4.3 18.59 14.15 TrRt2030R b +5.7 +4.0 18.49 14.07 TrRt2040Ad b +6.0 +4.2 18.79 14.08 TrRt2040R b +5.8 +4.0 18.70 14.02 TxFIncAdv b +3.2 +3.8 10.18 9.29 USBdEnIdx d +2.8 +6.6 11.43 10.95 USTrInt +3.2 +7.3 6.26 5.74 VATaxFBd +4.2 +4.3 11.91 10.87 Value +7.2 +3.1 25.63 19.05 ValueAd b +7.1 +2.9 25.36 18.88 TCW DivFocN b +7.7 +1.7 11.63 8.27 EmgIncI +5.5 +12.3 8.99 7.81 RltvVlLCI +7.0 +1.2 14.92 10.64 SelEqI +7.0 +4.9 18.90 13.43 SmCapGrI +8.1 +10.6 33.27 22.23 TotRetBdI +3.3 +9.2 10.44 9.87 TotRetBdN b +3.2 +8.9 10.79 10.21 TFS MktNeut d +5.0 +8.9 15.63 13.63 TIAA-CREF EqIxRtl b +7.0 +3.2 10.62 7.85 Gr&IncRmt +8.1 +6.0 10.11 7.40 Gr&IncRtl b +8.1 +6.1 12.11 8.86 IntEqIdxRet d +5.1 +1.2 18.45 13.36 IntlEqRmt d +2.3 +2.2 11.12 7.45 Life2010 b +4.6 +4.5 11.66 9.92 Life2015 b +5.0 +4.3 11.75 9.76 Life2020 b +5.2 +3.8 11.71 9.50 Life2025 b +5.5 +3.4 11.64 9.22 Life2030 b +5.8 +3.0 11.55 8.93 Life2035 b +6.1 +3.0 11.68 8.82 Life2040 b +5.9 +3.2 11.91 8.98 LrgeCapVal +5.7 +1.9 14.16 10.43 MdgAllRtl b +5.2 +4.3 10.47 8.61 MidCapGrwthRe +10.2 +6.4 21.40 14.24 MidValRmt +8.7 +5.1 18.75 13.30 SPIndxRmt +6.5 +2.6 15.30 11.55 ScChEqR +6.1 +3.5 11.77 8.89 SmCapEqRe d +8.3 +3.3 15.95 10.66 SmCpBlIdxRet d +7.0 +3.9 15.30 10.47 Target SmCapVal +7.5 +5.8 22.86 16.32 Templeton InFEqSeS +6.4 +4.3 22.33 16.36 Thomas White ThmsWIntl d +3.4 +3.5 18.61 13.62 Thompson Plumb Bond +3.5 +8.6 11.67 11.26 Thornburg IncBldA m +6.0 +7.7 20.23 16.76 IncBldC m +5.7 +7.0 20.23 16.76 IntlValA m +5.9 +5.9 30.95 22.32 IntlValC m +5.6 +5.2 29.10 21.05 LtdTMuA m +2.9 +4.5 14.34 13.83 LtdTMuC m +2.7 +4.2 14.37 13.85 LtdTmIncA m +3.5 +6.3 13.51 13.02 Value A m +6.7 +3.9 37.64 27.99 Thrivent HiYieldA m +5.3 +7.9 4.97 4.47 LgCapStkA m +5.0 +1.4 23.91 18.12 MidCapA m +7.6 +4.8 16.67 11.32 MuniBdA m +3.9 +4.2 11.53 10.57 Tocqueville Gold m -1.2 +18.2 91.56 61.13 Tocquevil m +5.3 +3.2 24.34 18.49 Touchstone MdCpGrA m +9.5 +5.7 25.74 17.45 Transamerica AssAllCvA m +4.4 +4.9 11.79 10.30 AssAllCvC m +4.2 +4.3 11.71 10.25 AssAllGrA m +5.8 +2.3 13.00 9.68 AssAllGrC m +5.5 +1.7 12.71 9.47 AstAlMdGrA m +5.0 +3.6 12.77 10.16 AstAlMdGrC m +4.8 +2.9 12.72 10.11 AstAlModA m +4.9 +4.5 12.40 10.38 AstAlModC m +4.6 +3.9 12.35 10.33 TransEqA m +5.1 +1.2 10.36 7.47 Transamerica Partner CoreBd b +3.0 +6.4 11.17 10.68 CrBond b +2.9 +6.0 13.19 12.69 StockIdx b +6.5 +2.7 9.12 6.84 Trust for Credit Un TCUShDur +.8 +3.9 9.79 9.69 TCUUltrShGov +.3 +3.2 9.62 9.59 Turner MidGrInv +10.8 +6.2 39.73 25.89 Tweedy Browne GlobVal d +4.0 +4.1 25.26 20.15 Tweedy, Browne Value +4.1 +4.2 20.15 16.20 UBS GlobAllA m +3.2 +2.7 10.59 8.65 UBS PACE AltStrP d +1.9 +.6 9.91 9.03 GlFxIP d +4.8 +6.6 12.43 10.54 GvtSecP d +2.8 +6.9 13.84 12.94 IntlEqP 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CALTAdml +3.9 +3.5 11.48 10.40 CapOp d +6.1 +5.6 36.17 26.50 CapOpAdml d +6.1 +5.7 83.55 61.22 CapVal +7.1 +4.4 12.21 8.32 Convrt d +5.6 +7.9 14.20 11.18 DevMktIdx d +4.8 +1.3 11.03 8.04 DivAppInv +7.2 +4.3 22.97 17.53 DivEqInv +7.4 +2.9 22.43 16.31 DivGr +7.9 +5.9 15.67 12.11 EmMktIAdm d +.5 NA 42.03 30.20 EmerMktId d +.4 +10.2 31.97 22.95 EnergyAdm d +11.0 +7.3 141.63 96.08 EnergyInv d +10.9 +7.2 75.42 51.16 EqInc +9.3 +3.8 22.40 16.93 EqIncAdml +9.3 +3.9 46.95 35.49 EurIdxAdm d +9.4 +2.3 70.05 49.10 EuropeIdx d +9.3 +2.2 30.06 20.92 ExMktIdSig +8.8 NA 39.55 26.97 ExplAdml +10.6 +4.7 76.59 51.04 Explr +10.5 +4.6 82.27 54.82 ExtdIdAdm +8.8 +5.8 46.03 31.39 ExtndIdx +8.7 +5.7 45.99 31.37 FAWeUSInv d +3.7 NA 20.32 14.76 FLLTAdml +4.1 +4.4 11.74 10.74 GNMA +3.3 +6.9 11.16 10.57 GNMAAdml +3.3 +7.0 11.16 10.57 GlbEq +5.9 +1.9 19.58 14.38 GrIncAdml +6.6 +1.3 47.06 35.26 GroInc +6.5 +1.2 28.82 21.60 GrowthEq +6.7 +2.3 11.73 8.66 GrowthIdx +6.3 +5.0 34.10 24.93 GrthIdAdm +6.4 +5.2 34.11 24.93 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NAV 10.50 9.73 5.61 15.14 16.03 15.93 17.24 18.18 18.08 18.34 18.25 9.73 11.27 5.98 11.45 25.02 24.75

WK CHG +.02 ... ... ... +.04 +.04 +.05 +.06 +.06 +.06 +.06 ... +.03 +.04 ... ... -.01

11.38 -.02 8.92 -.03 14.46 ... 18.52 +.04 31.73 -.08 10.02 +.02 10.36 +.02 15.45

-.01

10.38 9.90 11.86 17.63 10.46 11.53 11.59 11.52 11.41 11.29 11.38 11.59 13.78 10.32 20.83 18.46 14.96 11.53 15.46 14.80

... +.03 +.03 +.10 -.01 +.03 +.04 +.03 +.03 +.03 +.03 +.03 +.04 +.03 +.10 +.03 -.02 -.02 +.14 +.13

22.14 +.06 21.33

...

17.81 +.14 11.67 +.03 19.78 19.78 29.67 27.88 14.20 14.22 13.38 36.13

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4.94 -.02 23.34 +.04 16.14 ... 11.06 ... 85.45 +2.18 23.76 -.02 25.17

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11.68 11.60 12.68 12.39 12.50 12.44 12.23 12.16 10.03

+.02 +.02 +.03 +.02 +.03 +.03 +.03 +.02 -.01

11.00 +.03 13.04 +.03 8.92 -.01 9.76 9.61

... ...

39.03 +.35 24.78

-.22

19.71

-.10

10.30 +.03 9.60 12.20 13.28 13.62 17.75 19.20 12.09 17.75 18.60 14.40

+.03 +.11 ... +.12 -.01 +.04 +.01 +.10 +.15 +.02

10.94 +.30 11.94 +.23 19.85 +.53 35.19 14.18 9.71 7.04 23.87 21.20 13.68 10.29 15.52 15.91 8.74 12.97 12.99 10.63 25.87 40.31 19.98 9.21 14.65 12.86 12.59 10.70 11.96 11.59 10.82 14.53 20.14

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14.70 +.02 10.01 12.06 11.72 6.73 11.83 12.19 22.48 17.37 15.37 26.43

+.06 +.02 ... +.06 +.08 +.08 +.08 -.03 +.13 -.03

14.04 +.12 17.84 +.02 14.43 +.14 11.91 -.02 11.45 ... 54.26 +1.54 23.32 +.67 123.01 122.98 25.96 58.30 22.42 22.43 10.95 10.95 10.94 10.94 35.26 81.46 11.80 14.06 10.54 22.47 21.90 15.52 40.07 30.47 134.22 71.47 22.13 46.40 66.75 28.63 38.57 75.04 80.60 44.90 44.86 19.41 11.31 10.95 10.95 18.92 45.80 28.04 11.51 33.51 33.52 31.04 5.85 5.85 10.26 58.83 139.39 11.43 11.43 10.04 10.04 11.56 11.56 26.52 13.50 17.18 20.20

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YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW IntlGrAdm d +4.5 +4.6 67.38 47.27 IntlStkIdxAdm d +3.6 NA 28.57 25.19 IntlStkIdxISgn d +3.6 NA 34.29 30.22 IntlVal d +2.6 +1.9 34.50 25.74 ItBdIdxSl +4.0 NA 11.87 10.98 LTBond +4.6 +8.0 13.22 11.53 LTGradeAd +5.2 +7.9 10.04 8.99 LTInvGr +5.1 +7.8 10.04 8.99 LTTsry +3.7 +7.3 12.80 10.46 LTsryAdml +3.7 +7.4 12.80 10.46 LgCpIdxAdm +7.0 +3.5 31.62 23.51 LgCpIdxSg +7.0 NA 27.58 20.51 LifeCon +4.1 +4.8 17.10 14.93 LifeGro +5.6 +3.6 23.83 18.44 LifeInc +3.4 +5.2 14.47 13.42 LifeMod +5.0 +4.4 20.85 17.11 MATxEx +4.1 +4.4 10.56 9.72 MdGrIxInv +10.3 NA 27.29 18.26 MdPDisInv +5.7 NA 17.34 14.59 MdVlIxInv +9.0 NA 23.09 16.99 MidCapGr +9.8 +6.7 21.27 14.43 MidCp +9.7 +5.2 22.57 15.82 MidCpAdml +9.7 +5.3 102.47 71.79 MidCpIst +9.7 +5.4 22.64 15.87 MidCpSgl +9.7 NA 32.34 22.66 Morg +6.8 +4.0 19.74 14.17 MorgAdml +6.8 +4.2 61.21 43.95 MuHYAdml +3.5 +4.0 10.76 9.82 MuInt +3.7 +4.6 13.99 13.04 MuIntAdml +3.7 +4.6 13.99 13.04 MuLTAdml +3.7 +4.2 11.37 10.39 MuLong +3.7 +4.1 11.37 10.39 MuLtd +1.7 +3.8 11.20 10.95 MuLtdAdml +1.7 +3.9 11.20 10.95 MuSht +.8 +3.0 15.98 15.84 MuShtAdml +.9 +3.1 15.98 15.84 NJLTAdml +2.9 +4.1 12.03 11.05 NYLT +3.5 +4.1 11.43 10.52 NYLTAdml +3.5 +4.2 11.43 10.52 OHLTte +3.4 +4.4 12.34 11.27 PALT +3.6 +4.1 11.38 10.48 PALTAdml +3.7 +4.1 11.38 10.48 PacIdxAdm d -3.1 -.3 73.70 57.99 PacificId d -3.2 -.4 11.35 8.86 PrecMtls d ... +8.8 28.35 18.20 Prmcp d +6.8 +5.6 71.63 53.02 PrmcpAdml d +6.9 +5.7 74.34 55.03 PrmcpCorI d +7.3 +6.0 15.02 11.11 REITIdx d +12.3 +4.1 20.65 14.75 REITIdxAd d +12.3 +4.2 88.12 62.93 STBond +1.6 +5.2 10.77 10.48 STBondAdm +1.7 +5.3 10.77 10.48 STBondSgl +1.7 NA 10.77 10.48 STCor +1.8 +5.0 10.91 10.66 STFed +1.2 +5.0 11.03 10.69 STFedAdml +1.2 +5.1 11.03 10.69 STGradeAd +1.9 +5.2 10.91 10.66 STTsry +1.0 +4.5 10.95 10.62 STsryAdml +1.1 +4.6 10.95 10.62 SelValu d +8.6 +5.8 20.68 15.39 SmCapIdx +8.4 +5.6 38.92 26.38 SmCpIdAdm +8.5 +5.7 38.97 26.40 SmCpIndxSgnl +8.5 NA 35.11 23.80 SmGthIdx +11.0 +7.1 25.10 16.13 SmGthIst +11.0 +7.3 25.15 16.16 SmValIdx +5.8 +3.8 17.52 12.54 Star +5.3 +5.0 20.35 16.71 StratgcEq +11.9 +2.0 20.96 14.34 TgtRe2005 +4.2 +5.4 12.27 11.00 TgtRe2010 +4.6 NA 23.54 20.24 TgtRe2015 +4.8 +5.0 13.18 11.03 TgtRe2020 +5.0 NA 23.57 19.27 TgtRe2030 +5.5 NA 23.37 18.26 TgtRe2035 +5.7 +4.0 14.18 10.88 TgtRe2040 +5.8 NA 23.31 17.83 TgtRe2045 +5.8 +4.1 14.64 11.25 TgtRe2050 +5.7 NA 23.21 17.88 TgtRetInc +4.0 +5.9 11.71 10.56 Tgtet2025 +5.2 +4.5 13.53 10.82 TotBdAdml +2.8 +6.5 10.94 10.43 TotBdMkInv +2.7 +6.4 10.94 10.43 TotBdMkSig +2.8 NA 10.94 10.43 TotIntl d +3.6 +3.0 17.08 12.34 TotStIAdm +7.1 +3.7 34.44 25.37 TotStISig +7.1 NA 33.24 24.48 TotStIdx +7.1 +3.6 34.43 25.36 TxMBalAdm +5.5 +4.8 21.02 18.15 TxMIntlAdm d +4.8 +1.5 12.70 9.22 TxMSCAdm +7.9 +4.5 30.03 20.91 USGro +7.2 +3.1 20.00 14.60 USGroAdml +7.2 +3.3 51.79 37.83 USValue +9.2 +.7 11.27 8.37 ValIdxAdm +7.6 +1.7 22.78 17.23 ValIdxSig +7.6 NA 23.70 17.93 ValueIdx +7.5 +1.6 22.78 17.23 VdHiDivIx +8.3 NA 18.28 13.87 WellsI +5.7 +7.1 22.79 20.27 WellsIAdm +5.8 +7.2 55.21 49.10 Welltn +5.6 +5.9 33.11 27.37 WelltnAdm +5.7 +6.0 57.18 47.28 WndsIIAdm +7.9 +2.1 50.09 37.70 Wndsr +6.1 +1.1 14.68 10.78 WndsrAdml +6.1 +1.2 49.54 36.35 WndsrII +7.8 +2.0 28.22 21.24 Vantagepoint AggrOpp +7.1 +5.2 12.34 9.12 AllEqGr +6.7 +3.3 21.64 16.04 BrMktIx +6.7 +3.4 11.21 8.32 ConsGro +4.1 +4.6 24.77 21.73 CorBdIxI +2.8 +6.1 10.40 9.95 EqInc +8.8 +3.4 9.53 7.19 GrInc +6.6 +3.3 10.50 7.87 Growth +3.8 +1.2 9.36 7.02 InfltnPrt +4.1 +6.5 11.64 10.75 Intl +6.7 +1.4 10.32 7.53 LgTmGro +5.7 +4.2 23.01 18.31 LoDurBd +1.4 +4.4 10.18 9.98 TradGro +4.9 +4.3 23.56 19.53 Victory DivrStkA f +3.0 +2.7 16.59 12.43 SpecValA f +6.0 +3.7 17.70 12.70 Virtus BalA m +5.3 +4.6 14.27 11.30 ForOppA m +6.8 +3.6 24.23 18.56 MulSStA m +3.6 +6.6 4.91 4.60 MulSStC b +3.6 +6.4 4.96 4.64 MulSStT m +3.4 +5.8 4.95 4.63 RealEstA m +12.9 +3.9 31.45 22.20 Waddell & Reed DivOppsA m +5.3 +2.7 16.11 11.48 Waddell & Reed Adv AccumA m +5.7 +3.4 8.09 5.90 AssetStrA m +6.6 +9.7 10.34 7.79 BondA m +2.5 +5.1 6.46 6.13 ContIncA m +6.3 +6.6 8.81 6.83 CoreInv A m +8.1 +5.2 6.54 4.68 GlbBondA m +2.2 +6.3 4.08 3.93 HiIncA m +5.8 +8.0 7.31 6.58 IntlGrowA m +6.5 +5.0 10.62 7.34 MuniBondA m +3.0 +4.8 7.45 6.88 MuniHiInA m +2.3 +3.6 4.89 4.50 NewCncptA m +8.5 +9.9 12.47 8.71 SciTechA m +8.9 +9.3 11.67 8.54 SmCapA m +11.2 +8.3 17.80 11.65 ValueA m +5.6 +3.5 12.96 9.69 VanguardA m +5.8 +3.8 8.75 6.47 Wasatch CoreGr d +10.0 +4.0 38.36 26.83 LgCpVal d +5.7 +4.6 15.12 11.33 Lng/Sht d +6.8 +6.6 13.76 10.81 SmCapGr d +7.4 +6.5 43.05 29.34 Weitz PartVal +7.2 +3.3 22.43 16.73 PrtIIIOpp +8.4 +6.3 12.84 9.34 ShtIntmInc +1.9 +5.9 12.54 12.33 Value +6.4 0.0 30.87 23.68 Wells Fargo AstAlcA f +5.5 +3.0 20.05 15.98 AstAlllcA f +4.1 +4.5 12.76 10.67 AstAlllcB m +3.8 +3.7 12.63 10.55 AstAlllcC m +3.8 +3.7 12.36 10.33 CATxFA f +3.1 +3.5 11.02 10.11 CmnStkInv +7.7 +8.0 22.56 16.57 CrEqA f +7.6 +5.8 29.35 20.99 DiscovInv +10.8 +8.9 27.37 17.75 DvrCpBldA f +7.8 +3.0 7.43 5.40 EmgMktEqA f +.5 +13.2 23.83 16.94 GovSecInv +2.3 +6.0 11.20 10.72 GrowInv +13.3 +10.4 37.58 24.51 MidGrA f +5.1 +6.1 6.66 4.68 OmgGrA f +7.4 +9.5 41.19 28.05 OpportInv +7.9 +5.3 42.61 30.42 PrecMetA f -4.3 +15.4 93.72 68.16 PrecMetC m -4.6 +14.5 85.79 62.64 PrmLrgCoGrA f +7.4 +7.9 10.15 7.26 SCpValInv +1.2 +5.7 34.38 26.00 STMuBdInv +1.6 +3.9 9.98 9.84 SmCapValA f +1.2 +5.6 33.83 25.59 SpMdCpValIv +8.7 +4.6 23.31 16.74 SpSmCpValA f +3.2 +2.5 23.46 16.91 UlSTMInA f +.8 +3.3 4.82 4.80 UlSTMInIv +.7 +3.2 4.83 4.80 UltSTInIv +.7 +2.3 8.58 8.48 WBGrBl m +4.4 +2.4 12.02 9.17 WlthConAl m +2.7 +4.4 11.05 9.97 WlthModBl m +3.4 +3.6 11.60 9.72 WlthTactEq m +5.0 +1.2 14.14 10.23 Westcore PlusBd d +3.5 +6.0 11.03 10.61 Select d +9.8 +11.1 23.81 15.68 Westwood MtyMteAAA m +1.8 +9.1 18.39 14.02 William Blair IntlGrN m +1.2 +2.0 22.99 16.87 Yacktman Focused d +8.6 +11.5 19.37 15.30 Yacktman d +9.0 +10.5 18.21 14.49

NAV 64.28 27.30 32.76 33.01 11.43 12.35 9.60 9.60 11.31 11.31 30.98 27.02 16.96 23.29 14.47 20.54 10.20 26.98 17.01 22.72 20.86 22.27 101.11 22.34 31.91 19.25 59.71 10.26 13.55 13.55 10.88 10.88 11.08 11.08 15.91 15.91 11.44 11.01 11.01 11.81 10.96 10.96 68.35 10.52 26.69 70.30 72.96 14.77 20.49 87.45 10.63 10.63 10.63 10.80 10.84 10.84 10.80 10.76 10.76 20.38 37.68 37.73 33.99 24.33 24.38 16.94 20.09 20.50 12.22 23.33 13.02 23.21 22.88 13.84 22.74 14.28 22.63 11.67 13.28 10.75 10.75 10.75 16.32 33.68 32.51 33.67 20.93 12.13 29.32 19.56 50.65 11.03 22.24 23.14 22.23 17.99 22.74 55.10 32.64 56.39 49.14 14.33 48.37 27.68

WK CHG +.40 +.17 +.20 +.22 +.06 +.07 +.03 +.03 +.08 +.08 -.01 -.01 +.03 +.05 +.04 +.04 -.01 +.17 +.09 ... +.10 +.08 +.33 +.08 +.11 +.02 +.06 ... -.01 -.01 ... ... -.01 -.01 ... ... ... -.01 -.01 +.01 -.01 -.01 +.25 +.04 +.55 -.14 -.15 -.01 +.34 +1.46 +.02 +.02 +.02 +.01 +.01 +.01 +.01 +.01 +.01 -.10 +.26 +.26 +.23 +.25 +.24 +.06 +.05 +.08 +.04 +.07 +.04 +.06 +.06 +.03 +.06 +.03 +.05 +.04 +.03 +.03 +.03 +.03 +.10 +.02 +.02 +.02 +.01 +.07 +.22 -.03 -.09 ... -.03 -.03 -.03 -.10 +.01 +.02 +.05 +.10 +.01 ... -.01 ...

12.14 21.14 10.96 24.58 10.26 9.40 10.31 9.11 11.32 9.97 22.63 10.11 23.26

+.01 +.05 ... +.04 +.04 ... +.01 ... +.07 +.07 +.05 ... +.05

16.06 17.25

... ...

14.06 +.04 23.82 +.13 4.89 ... 4.94 ... 4.93 ... 31.36 +.52 15.58 +.15 7.92 9.95 6.30 8.70 6.44 4.06 7.27 10.27 7.14 4.60 12.18 11.31 17.21 12.70 8.54

+.04 +.08 +.02 +.02 +.04 ... -.03 +.06 ... ... +.01 ... +.13 +.05 +.06

37.85 +.25 14.65 ... 13.49 +.11 42.42 +.48 22.07 +.09 12.62 +.02 12.54 +.02 30.28 -.12 19.72 12.50 12.36 12.10 10.49 22.27 28.89 26.47 7.34 22.98 11.01 36.31 6.40 39.78 41.89 84.25 77.06 9.93 32.96 9.94 32.43 22.86 22.50 4.82 4.82 8.57 11.72 10.97 11.43 13.75

+.02 -.03 -.03 -.03 -.01 +.03 -.09 +.07 +.06 +.20 +.02 +.20 +.01 +.15 -.06 +2.63 +2.39 +.02 +.21 ... +.20 -.11 +.07 ... ... -.01 +.04 +.02 +.03 +.05

10.90 ... 23.14 +.11 17.66 +.14 22.12 +.08 19.20 18.03

-.04 -.06


CMYK PAGE 8D

SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011

8jb k_\ =ffc

 -ILLION $ONUTS

1

) READ THAT $UNKIN $ONUTS IS PLANNING A  MILLION INITIAL PUBLIC OFFERING )0/  7ITH CLOSE TO   LOCATIONS WORLD WIDE SHOULDNT THE COMPANY BE WORTH MORE THAN THAT 3TARBUCKS HAS A MARKET CAP OF MORE THAN  BILLION ˆ M.R., Denver 7HEN A COMPANY FIRST ISSUES SHARES TO THE PUBLIC IT OFTEN SELLS OFF JUST A PORTION OF ITSELF

IN ORDER TO RAISE MONEY )F $UNKIN $ONUTS WERE SELLING ALL OF ITSELF

THAT WOULD INDEED REFLECT A TOTAL VALUE OF  MILLION "UT IF ITS SELLING JUST  PERCENT THEN THE IMPLIED VALUE IS  BILLION /NCE THE SHARES DEBUT AND ARE TRADING IN THE MARKET THEIR PRICE WILL REFLECT HOW INVESTORS ARE VALUING the company. *** 7HICH BROKERAGES CHARGE VERY LOW COMMISSIONS TO BUY OR SELL STOCK ˆ N.C., Watertown, Wis. 4RADING COMMISSIONS ARE AS LOW AS  TO  PER TRADE AT % 42!$% &IDELITY #HARLES 3CHWAB AND 4$ !MERITRADE )TS  AT 3COTTRADE AND &IRSTRADE AND YOU CAN FIND EVEN LOWER RATES ELSEWHERE ,OOK AT MORE THAN COMMISSIONS

THOUGH !FTER ALL IF YOU BUY OR SELL STOCKS ONLY A FEW TIMES A YEAR

FINDING THE LOWEST COMMISSION RATE WONT SAVE YOU ALL THAT MUCH AND OTHER BROKERAGE FEATURES MIGHT BE MORE VALUABLE TO YOU -EAN WHILE SOME BROKERAGES HAVE BEEN CHARGING QUARTERLY ACCOUNT FEES JUST FOR HAVING AN ACCOUNT WITH THEM 4HESE ARE OFTEN WAIVED IF YOUR ACCOUNT IS LARGE ENOUGH 7HEN SHOPPING FOR A BROKER AGE LOOK AT ALL THE FEES IT CHARGES AND CONSIDER ITS CONVENIENCES SUCH AS LOCAL BRANCHES A WIDE VARIETY OF MUTUAL FUNDS OR CHECK WRITING SERVICES AND HOW WELL IT MEETS YOUR NEEDS &OR COMPARISON DATA ON BROKER AGES VISIT www.broker.Fool.com

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VIEWS timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

KEVIN BLAUM

MARINERS OF OLD relied upon an early warning beacon from a dependable lighthouse when searching for that one particular harbor on a dark and moonless night. Avoiding invisible shoals and rocky coastlines was often the most hazardous leg of a voyage as skipper and crew attempted to navigate their vessel safely into port A lighthouse used a combination of lamps, lenses and height to propel its beam far out amongst the waves. Captains who knew their math and the height of various lighthouses could determine a ship’s distance from danger and give it a wide berth. They used a simple formula of multiplying the square root of the light’s height above sea level by 1.17 and adding it to the square root of the captain’s eye above sea level, times 1.17. If the eye of a sailor on deck was 9 feet above the water and he knew the lighthouse was 100 feet above sea level, those aboard were confident the way home would become visible 15.21 nautical miles from shore. They ignored such warnings at their peril. Miners once used canaries in coal mines as an early warning system against carbon monoxide and methane gas poisoning. Canaries have no tolerance for them and have trouble breathing and chirping in the presence of either. Miners knew then to quickly evacuate the mine. They ignored such warnings at their peril. Unfortunately, congressional Republicans are not as discerning. For months, Republicans refused to listen and ignored repeated warnings from the American people to keep their GOP hands off Medicare. Mindlessly, House Republicans marched in unison to undo Medicare America’s health care system for the elderly. They adopted their budget scheme in mid April 2011. Medicare was signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson on July 30, 1965 in Independence, Mo., where he enrolled former President Harry Truman as Medicare’s first recipient. From that day forward Americans 65 and older have had health care coverage upon which they could rely. Today’s Republican plan eliminates the Medicare guarantee and replaces it with a coupon forcing seniors to go hat in hand and attempt to buy some private health insurance. It is taxpayer money transferred directly to the insurance industry lobby. And the coupon provided will not purchase the care seniors require. House Republicans, with Lou Barletta (R-11) and Tom Marino (R-10) falling dutifully in line, insult all Americans when they say their plan will not affect anyone over the age of 55. As if those of us older than 55 care more about our own coverage at 65 than we do that of our under-55 spouses, children and siblings. Are House Republicans so callous to think they can win our votes by tossing us a health care lifeline while abandoning those we love? Do Barletta and Marino not understand that the over-55 crowd cares less about themselves and more about their children’s health care and that of their grandchildren when they too will reach the twilight of their years? Perhaps now they do. On Tuesday night the Republican barge ran aground on the jagged, electoral rocks in upstate New York. In an overwhelmingly Republican district, covering the well-to-do suburbs between Buffalo and Rochester, a Democrat was elected to Congress on the issue of protecting Medicare. For the first time in a generation, and only the fourth time since 1857, voters in that district came together to defeat the Republican candidate. That Republican supported the coupon plan approved by Barletta and Marino. The warnings to Congress were everywhere. “Keep your GOP hands off Medicare.” Barletta and Marino ignored them. Kevin Blaum’s column on government, life and politics appears every Sunday. Contact him at kblaum@timesleader.com.

A life lived greatly

RICHARD L. CONNOR OPINION

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weet as he was, Rusty Flack was not a “sweet evening breeze,” a nickname we used for one of our friends over 30 years ago when we first met. Rusty was a rock-and-rolling thunderstorm of laughter, love and generosity. A friendly tsunami who swept through life leaving all he touched awash with a glow, he knew neither nuance nor subtlety. Other than welcoming the night as a good time to throw a party, there was no evening, no end of the day for him. He was always the bright, hopeful, shining morning for so many of us who were touched by his love and indomitable spirit. He was all-night radio, Wolfman Jack, Mr. ’70s and ’80s, Jimmy Buffett, the Beatles, the Corvettes, and James Dean, in a nose tackle’s body. He was a young hippie with a mind for conservative politics and just somewhat of a human Rubik’s Cube, except in his heart, for which there was no mystery to ponder or unlock. It shone clearly like a beacon in the night. He joined the Love Generation and never left it. He was a pirate who turned 40. I met him at The Westmoreland Club, me running The Times Leader at 31 and Rusty, at 24, in charge of Diamond Manufacturing. Turns out we had recently covered in our paper a municipal meeting where his company had come under some criticism. “You the new guy running the paper?” he asked. Proudly, I said I was. He quickly put me in check. “When you going to start printing the truth and getting things right?” he asked. It turned out we had missed a few points here and there in the story. They were important to the context of the issues. As often happens in the case of this newspaper business, we had been incorrect. We argued a bit, neither of us giving ground. Then we laughed, toasted, and became friends for life. Simple as that. Along the way that night, Rusty sneered and said newspapers never got things right. All you print is trash, he said. Newspapers. Ugh! About 30 years later, he helped me buy one and preserve an independent local voice for our community. It is today’s Times Leader. Before that, he invested in every one I have started or bought. That one night, finding ourselves playfully pitted against one another, was the beginning. We proceeded to race headlong into the 1980s and along the way I formed bonds with many of Rusty’s friends, who became my friends. Many of us had feet to the floorboards as we sped through our young years of building businesses, careers and families. For a long time, we held onto a playful sense of immaturity and recklessness. We never expected to say goodbye. We never expected to die or watch our friends die. Many of us had nicknames bestowed by our friend the late John McCole — he was “the sweet evening breeze” — and we loved those nicknames in the laughter of our youthful cockiness. Tongue in cheek and self-deprecating, the nicknames also held in them a future hope of accomplishment that we kept hidden. In that milieu, Rusty was “The Great Industrialist,” and I was “Pulitzer.” We had a an irascible, irreverent and everything else “ir” friend we called “Zoomer.” That nickname grew from a bunch of Christians trying to understand Yiddish at a Hebrew service at Temple. Or something like that. Another friend, “Dead Tree,” was in the lawn and nursery business. Rusty was always the trunk of our tree of friendship. He still is, despite what you might

have read. The papers say he died at 56 early Thursday morning, after essentially defying the savagery of colon cancer for two years. He will never die. A spirit that big, a presence that large, of physique and of heart, touches so many and touches them so deeply that he comes into a life and stays forever. Visible footsteps from Rusty Flack’s life are imprinted in the sand of this community forever. He took over a family business while almost still a boy, rescued it financially, built trust and efficiency among a unionized work force, became a brilliant businessman, served as chairman of a hospital and then the Wyoming Seminary Board of Trustees, helped create the Luzerne Foundation, and on and on. Look at the life of Rusty Flack and you see a giant of a man walking through the community of the Wyoming Valley. He left many traces that he was here. He was an inspirational father to four children, caring husband to his wife, dutiful son to his mother, keeper of his father’s dreams, foundation of strength for a brother and sister. They carry his legacy. The rest of us carry the gift of having been touched by him personally in so many ways, large and small. Those are private recollections that would embarrass him in public recitation. So, we keep them to ourselves and he will live within us as an example of who we should be, how we should live. If a person who knew him well could tell you one thing about Rusty that would encapsulate how much he was admired and trusted it would be this: Several of his friends, not relatives, appointed him as guardian of their children if both parents died prematurely. Throughout his life he knitted the patchwork of a quilt of friendship that was as inclusive as it was broad and diverse. He literally brought hundreds of people together and bonded them with his embrace. Except for a few Democrats, enduring but never abandoning his quirky friends who matched his perfection with their imperfections, he loved everyone and laughed with them all. His wry sense of humor, delivered in quick, penetrating one-liners, could lighten the darkest corner of a day or night. Rusty was comical in his acquisition of boats,

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SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011

RUSTY FLACK 1954-2011

IN THE ARENA

GOP should keep hands off our Medicare

SECTION

cars, homes, and rock ‘n’ roll memorabilia. There was nothing funny about his incredible gift for building personal coalitions, linking his friends to other friends until everyone in his aura suddenly shared friendshps. No one did it better. Despite a large and heavy frame, he could glide around a dance floor like a swan before he’d take the stage at a wedding or party and knock the lights out with his cover of “Born to be Wild.” Unlike the musical misfits who would often join him on stage, he could actually sing, actually carry a tune. He created a songbook of memories of a life lived well — no, lived greatly. William Faulkner wrote that “man will not merely endure, he will prevail.” That was Rusty Flack, who, also borrowing from a Faulkner speech, took it upon himself to make it “his privilege to help man endure by lifting his heart, by reminding him of the courage and honor and hope and pride and compassion and pity and sacrifice which have been the glory of his past.” “He taught us to live,” said one of his closest friends, “and then he taught us how to die.” Fighting and fighting and fighting for the last two years against the long-shot odds of beating colon cancer, his spirit was bountiful, his hope eternal, his optimism undiminished. If he knew pain, he never winced, never flinched. And then, when he had done his best, when he had given it his all, he knew his time was up. A graceful giant of a robust, life-loving man, he drifted into the sweet evening breeze surrounded by his loved ones. He will always drift above us and among us. Richard L. Connor is editor and publisher of The Times Leader. Reach him at rconnor@timesleader.com.

Rusty was a rock-and-rolling thunderstorm of laughter, love, and generosity. A friendly tsunami who swept through life leaving all he touched awash with a glow, he knew neither nuance nor subtlety.


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➛ S E R V I N G T H E P U B L I C T R U S T S I N C E 18 81

SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011

Editorial

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

OUR OPINION: SCHOOL BUDGETS

Speak out before you lose a chance

S

CHOOL MAY BE almost over for students, but crunch time is just starting for taxpayers. For months we’ve heard speculation and hypothetical proposals for dealing with the meat cleaver education cuts proposed by Gov. Tom Corbett. Parents fretted while school boards and administrators mulled the elimination of everything from full-day kindergarten to music, arts and summer school. This past week, the theoretical impact of those cuts solidified into cold, hard reality, as local school boards voted on preliminary budgets in order to meet state deadlines. Those budgets go on public display for the next several weeks before the boards give them final approval, which – by state law – must happen no later than June 30. Some are posted on district websites. Which means now is the time to see if you agree with the cuts and changes. If you wait until classes start in three months and realize you hate what has happened in your school, it will be far too late. Wilkes-Barre Area plans to drop two pre-kindergarten

classes and merge seventh and eighth grade sports into the high school programs. Pittston Area won’t replace a middle school music teacher. Dallas intends to eliminate before- and after-school tutoring programs. Crestwood put fullday kindergarten and middle school sports on the chopping block. Hanover Area is set to close an elementary building. Retiring teachers won’t be replaced. Class sizes will grow while student options shrink. Spending on supplies and textbooks will wither. Talk of fourday school weeks has begun. All of this comes with the state education budget still unsettled. The Legislature is proposing restoring some lost education money. State income is much higher this year than expected, though talk of using that money to curb the cuts has been muted. Which gives taxpayers a narrow window of opportunity. Look at your school district’s proposed budget, decide what you like and don’t like, and take a stand – both locally and at the state level – for or against the real-world impact of these cuts. Because come June 30, you’re cut out of the decision.

QUOTE OF THE DAY “It wasn’t just pie out of the sky.” A.J. Munchak The Lackawanna County commissioner defended the $14.6 million sale price of the Triple-A baseball franchise to the New York Yankees. An expert hired by Luzerne County says the franchise is worth $18 million, meaning the county should see an extra $1.7 million from its share of the sale.

STATE OPINION: LEGISLATURE

Budget drama takes nasty turn

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VERY TIME the state budget rolls around, we can count on Harrisburg to provide a few months of theater, as the governor makes his priorities clear, and the Legislature pushes back with its own priorities. The drama surrounding the Corbett budget is different. The budget proposed first by Gov. Corbett and recently amended by House Republicans could barely get worse. Both feature steep cuts to higher ed, basic education and the Department of Public Welfare, holding the line at state spending to $27.3 billion -which is $700 million less than this year’s budget. The House did restore some of the Corbett cuts to higher education. But it does get worse for every taxpayer in the state, and not because spending is being cut. What’s also being cut is a fuller discussion of both sides of the ledger -- spending and revenues. The state budget must deal with a large deficit. But the factors mitigating that crisis are barely mentioned. They include the $500 million surplus that the budget crafters are leaving untouched. It also conveniently ignores the higher revenues that the state has collected. According to a recent report from the Rockefeller Institute,

revenues from personal income tax rose 7.5 percent; sales taxes generated 4.2 percent more than anticipated and corporate income tax saw a rise of 3.9 percent during the first quarter of 2011 in the state. (The state’s gain in corporate-income-tax revenues are among the lowest of most of the states reporting.) There’s little mention of these bright spots, mainly because they don’t conform to the accepted talking points that would characterize previous administrations’ reckless spending. This is the time for taxpayers to speak up to their elected officials about their priorities. Is the strategy of cutting higher and basic education right for the state’s future? Should we really be increasing spending on corrections? And why are we giving big tax breaks to the Marcellus Shale drilling industry when revenue from taxes or fees could help the state budget and ease the burden on local communities dealing with the environmental impact? On Monday evening, when you’re facing the prospect of going back to work after the Memorial Day holiday, think about this: Legislators are taking the entire week off to celebrate and won’t be back in session until June 6. Philadelphia Daily News

Entitlements make poor dependent on politicians THOSE WHO REGARD government “entitlement” programs as sacrosanct, and regard those who want to cut them back as calloused or cruel, picture a world very different from the world of reality. To listen to some of the defenders of entitlement programs, which are at the heart of the present financial crisis, you might think that anything the government fails to provide is something that people will be deprived of. In other words, if you cut spending on school lunches, children will go hungry. If you fail to subsidize housing, people will be homeless. If you fail to subsidize prescription drugs, old people will have to eat dog food in order to be able to afford their meds. This is the vision promoted by many politicians and much of the media. But, in the world of reality, it is not even true for most people who are living below the official poverty line. Most Americans living below the official poverty line own a car or truck -- and government entitlement programs seldom provide cars and trucks. Most people living below the official poverty line also have air conditioning, color television and a microwave oven -- and these too are not usually

COMMENTARY THOMAS SOWELL handed out by government entitlement programs. Cell phones and other electronic devices are by no means unheard of in low-income neighborhoods, where children would supposedly go hungry if there were no school lunch programs. In reality, low-income people are overweight even more often than other Americans. As for housing and homelessness, housing prices are higher and homelessness a bigger problem in places where there has been massive government intervention, such as liberal bastions like New York City and San Francisco. As for the elderly, 80 percent are homeowners whose monthly housing costs are less than $400, including property taxes, utilities, and maintenance. The desperately poor elderly conjured up in political and media rhetoric are -- in the world of reality -- the wealthiest segment of the American population. The average wealth of older households is nearly three times the wealth of households headed by people in the 35 to 44-year-old bracket, and more than 15 times the wealth of house-

holds headed by someone under 35 years of age. If the wealthiest segment of the population cannot pay their own medical bills, who can? The country as a whole is not any richer because the government pays our medical bills -- with money that it takes from us. What about the truly poor, in whatever age brackets? First of all, even in low-income and high-crime neighborhoods, people are not stealing bread to feed their children. The fraction of the people in such neighborhoods who commit most of the crimes are far more likely to steal luxury products that they can either use or sell to get money to support their parasitic lifestyle. We don’t need to send the country into bankruptcy, in the name of the poor, by spending trillions of dollars on people who are not poor, and who could take care of themselves. We have all heard the old saying about how giving a man a fish feeds him for a day, while teaching him to fish feeds him for a lifetime. Independence makes for a healthier society, but dependency is what gets votes for politicians. Thomas Sowell is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305. His website is www.tsowell.com.

Getting into college: To be or not to be (yourself) JASON LAMOREAUX will graduate June 14 from Upper Merion High School. Last year at this time, he was navigating the collegeapplication process, which includes the writing of a personal statement and this dilemma: Do I tell them what I think, or what I think they want to hear? Lamoreaux took what some might view as a risk. Instead of addressing world hunger or carbon emissions, he offered an honest insight into his personality. Andrew Ferguson applauded the approach when I told him about Lamoreaux. Ferguson recently documented the charade that the college-application process has become. His best seller, “Crazy U: One Dad’s Crash Course in Getting His Kid Into College,” is a testament to kids’ adopting alternative personas that they think will please admissions officers. Ferguson’s book highlights the application essay as a particular source of student and parental angst. Ferguson laments that the essays seem ill-suited for 17-year-olds — an unrealistic, touchy-feely search for a high schooler’s most intimate thoughts. Jason Lamoreaux’s academic record at Upper Merion has included both A’s and B’s — with more of the latter than the former. He’s carried a couple of honors-level courses. His honors physics teacher emailed his mom earlier this year, saying: “Jason is definitely

COMMENTARY MICHAEL SMERCONISH an asset in the class; I’m glad he’s here. Honors classes can be a little ‘stuffy’ sometimes. He breaks the mold.” Lamoreaux was a co-captain of the swimming and water polo teams this year, and likes classic rock, comedy and summer lifeguarding. Last year, he applied to several schools but refused to end nuclear proliferation in his essay. Instead, he discussed watching a lacrosse championship against rival Upper Dublin. “As a swimmer and one who had to compete regularly against Upper Dublin, they had always been a powerhouse filled with pompous jerks who thought they were better than everyone else,” he wrote. “ ... It was a Thursday night at Upper Dublin and the league championship was on the line. As a swimmer and water polo player, I know how it feels to not get too much support from fans except for the occasional friends who come to watch me.” “Before the game, I had put on my Spanish National water polo team flame-decorated Speedo. ... I pulled my shorts off, and ran up and down the stands with my chest painted blue (one of my high school colors) in my flame-decorated Speedo.

“Our fans erupted. It was louder than it had been all game.” To my surprise, it also won accolades from Leonard Krivy, who for decades has been a prominent educational consultant in Cherry Hill, N.J. “The home field advantage is relevant to many aspects of our lives,” he told me. “This is a very interesting and well told perspective on home field advantage — and one with which most of us can identify. “Jason shows accomplishments that invite the colleges’ attention. He has taken wellthought risks and has confidence in his ideas and ability to follow through, and he has become part of the school’s history and has made a difference,” Krivy continued. “You can write a modern-day version of the Gettysburg Address. However, unless you meet the school’s objective criteria, you probably won’t be admitted and the essay may not be read.” Jason Lamoreaux applied to nine schools. He was rejected at one, wait-listed at another, and accepted at the remaining seven. The head of admissions at St. Mary’s College in Maryland wrote a note on his acceptance saying “how glad he was that he was wearing his Speedo.” Lamoreaux will enter Gettysburg College in the fall. And he will go places. Michael Smerconish writes a weekly column for The Philadelphia Inquirer. Readers may contact him via www.smerconish.com.

Editorial Board RICHARD L. CONNOR Editor and Publisher JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ Vice President/Executive Editor

MARK E. JONES Editorial Page Editor PRASHANT SHITUT President/ Wilkes-Barre Publishing Co.

RICHARD L. CONNOR Editor and Publisher PRASHANT SHITUT President

JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ Vice President/Executive Editor RICHARD DEHAVEN Vice President/Circulation

DENISE SELLERS Vice President/Advertising ALLISON UHRIN Vice President/Chief Financial Officer


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Obama undermines Mideast peace process EVERY ARAB-Israeli negotiation contains a fundamental asymmetry: Israel gives up land, which is tangible; the Arabs make promises, which are ephemeral. The long-standing American solution has been to nonetheless urge Israel to take risks for peace while America balances things by giving assurances of U.S. support for Israel’s security and diplomatic needs. It’s on the basis of such assurances that Israel undertook, for example, the Gaza withdrawal. In order to mitigate this risk, President George W. Bush gave a written commitment that America supported Israel absorbing major settlement blocs in any peace agreement, opposed any return to the 1967 lines and stood firm against the so-called Palestinian right of return to Israel. For two and a half years, the Obama administration has refused to recognize and reaffirm these assurances. Then last week in his State Department speech, President Obama definitively trashed them. He declared that the Arab-Israeli conflict should be resolved along “the 1967 lines with mutually agreed swaps.” Nothing new, said Obama three days later. “By definition, it means that the parties themselves – Israelis and Palestinians – will negotiate a border that is different” from 1967. It means nothing of the sort. “Mutually” means both parties have to agree. And if one side doesn’t? Then, by definition, you’re back to the 1967 lines. Nor is this merely a theoretical proposition. Three times the Palestinians have been offered exactly that formula, 1967 plus swaps – at Camp David 2000, Taba 2001, and the 2008 Olmert-Abbas negotiations. Every time, the Palestinians said no and walked away. And that remains their position today: Indeed, in September the Palestinians are going to the U.N. to get the world to ratify precisely that – a Palestinian state on the ’67 lines. No swaps. Note how Obama has undermined Israel’s negotiating position. He is demanding that Israel go into peace talks having already forfeited its claim to the territory won in the ’67 war – its only bargaining chip. That ’67 line runs right through Jerusalem. Thus the starting point of negotiations would be that the Western Wall and even Jerusalem’s Jewish Quarter are Palestinian – alien territory for which Israel must now bargain.

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A photograph by Aimee Dilger and words by Mark Guydish

COMMENTARY CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER Obama also moved the goal posts on the so-called right of return. Flooding Israel with millions of Arabs would destroy the world’s only Jewish state while creating a 23rd Arab state and a second Palestinian state -- not exactly what we mean when we speak of a “two-state solution.” That’s why it has been the policy of the U.S. to adamantly oppose this “right.” Yet in his State Department speech, Obama refused to simply restate this position. Instead, he told Israel it must negotiate the right of return with the Palestinians after having given every inch of territory. Bargaining with what, pray tell? No matter. “The status quo is unsustainable,” declared Obama, “and Israel too must act boldly to advance a lasting peace.” Israel too? Exactly what bold steps for peace have the Palestinians taken? Israel made three radically conciliatory offers to establish a Palestinian state, withdrew from Gaza and has been trying to renew negotiations for more than two years. Meanwhile, the Gaza Palestinians have been firing rockets at Israeli towns and villages. And on the West Bank, Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas turns down the Olmert offer, walks out of negotiations with Binyamin Netanyahu and now defies the United States by seeking not peace talks but instant statehood – without peace, without recognizing Israel – at the U.N. And to make unmistakable this spurning of any peace process, Abbas agrees to join the openly genocidal Hamas in a unity government, which even Obama acknowledges makes negotiations impossible. Obama’s response to this relentless Palestinian intransigence? To reward it – by abandoning the Bush assurances, legitimizing the ’67 borders and refusing to reaffirm America’s rejection of the right of return. The only remaining question is whether this perverse and ultimately self-defeating policy is born of genuine antipathy toward Israel or of the arrogance of a blundering amateur who refuses to see that he is undermining not just peace but the very possibility of negotiations. Charles Krauthammer’s e-mail address is letters@charleskrauthammer.com.

here is nothing timeless about technology; there is nothing technological T about timeless values. Capturing memories via microchip belongs to this generation, but the smile those memories evoke remains ageless.

In a galaxy far, far away lies the Apple Store sweetly and said, “You pathetic imbecile.” She didn’t say those words. That’s just how I felt. Actually, MITCH ALBOM once I told her what the problem was, she nodded pleasPlanet Apple Store, prepared to antly, gave a brief explanation do what was expected, namely, of several possibilities and told me, “Don’t worry.” I felt like a drop to my knees and beg for Store. man whose doctor looks at a mercy. On this planet, no one has a The mall in which this Planet troublesome X ray and says, job or anyplace to go. They “It’s nothing.” Apple Store was located was simply drift all day in an endI wanted to kiss her sneakvirtually deserted. It was midless swirl of new products, ers. week and midday and as I apmost of them white. You need Then came the questions. no food, no water. You can stay proached the big white apple Genius: “Do you back up sign, I had reason to be optithere for years with your your data?” mistic, because if you shot a mouth hanging open. Me: “Sure.” cannon down the corridor Some have gone and never Genius: “Do you have a Time returned, forgetting they have a you’d hit nothing but a Rosetta Machine?” family, a house or other clothes Stone kiosk. Me: “Who doesn’t?” Wrong. Planet Apple Store to wear. They spend the rest of Genius: “You may need to was still as jammed as a Tokyo their lives lifting a MacBook Air and yelling, “Feel how light street crossing. At least half the bring it in.” Me: “Sure, no problem.” people wore blue shirts with an this is!” I did not realize a Time Maapple on the front. These were I am quite intimidated by chine was a device Apple sold the employees whom Apple Planet Apple Store. But I was for data storage. I just figured calls “Geniuses,” which, when forced to go there last week the Geniuses had mastered compared with you and me, is when my Mac stopped worktime travel and assumed the an understatement. ing. I started it up, the little rest of us dummies dropped by One such Genius signed me apple appeared, the little doohfrom the 17th century. ickey spun around, but then the in (on a handheld device, “After we reload the Time which I’m sure took my vital screen went blue and froze. Machine, we can add RAM, signs and spat out my SAT Naturally, I was embarscores) and another summoned upgrade the graphics card, rassed. I believed that Apple increase the memory, maybe me to the Genius Bar, where products never broke — and if they did, it was your fault. You the Geniuses presumably pour click in a terabyte,” she said. “Good, good, yeah, yeah,” I each other blue drinks like were an idiot who did somesaid, nodding as if I had the those “Star Wars” creatures, thing mean to the nice white and where a redheaded female slightest clue what she was machine, you big clumsy oaf! Genius with the tattoo of some- talking about. A friend remindWhat on Earth is wrong with ed me to be grateful because at thing crawling up her arm you? least she lived in this country looked me in the eye, smiled So I carried my Mac into THEY SAY there are nine planets in the solar system. But that is not true. There is a 10th. The Apple

COMMENTARY

Wrong. Planet Apple Store was still as jammed as a Tokyo street crossing. At least half the people wore blue shirts with an apple on the front. These were the employees whom Apple calls “Geniuses,” which, when compared with you and me, is an understatement. and wasn’t talking to me over the phone. She then wrote me a prescription, told me to drink lots of fluids and had me make an appointment with the nurse on the way out. As I write this, I still don’t have my Mac working. But that may be my own fault for not driving a time machine. On my way out of Planet Apple Store, the Geniuses stared with pity. So I grabbed a MacBook Air, held it high and said, “Feel how light this is!” Too late. It was already out of style. Mitch Albom is a columnist for the Detroit Free Press. Readers may write to him at: Detroit Free Press, 600 W. Fort St., Detroit, MI 48226, or via email at malbom@freepress.com.

LETTERS FROM READERS

Mayoral candidate glad for support

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ow that the primary is over I want to say thank you to the residents for coming out and supporting me. I hope I can count on your support again in November. I’d also like to thank all the candidates I’ve met in the last month. Thank you everyone for your kind words and encouragement. Lisa Cope Wilkes-Barre

Juvenile mischief curbed by police

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hanks to Plymouth police for a job well done. A sincere thank-you to our responsive, courteous, and very professional police officers for responding to my call for help regarding juveniles who were trespassing on and damaging my property and the properties of others. The high degree of seriousness

MOUNTAIN LAURELS Mountain Laurels is a regular series of letters from readers conveying thanks to individuals or groups for their support, help or kindness.

that officers displayed in investigating these offenses is most commendable. There is, I’m sure, always the possibility of dismissing such calls as a “just kids playing,” but our police have seen the serious damage juveniles can do, and treat it accordingly. If it were not for this fine police work, the situation would surely be out of hand. Keeping it contained is a great contribution to our community. A. Chadwick Plymouth

Raup commends campaign workers

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would like to take this opportunity to thank all of my campaign supporters who not only voted for me, but worked tirelessly as volunteers which ultimately brought me close to winning

the election. I would also like to give special thanks to those who actually invested in a brighter future for Wilkes- Barre by donating funds that enabled us to buy the necessary tools that one needs in a campaign. I received support for choosing to run and for choosing to stand up for my beliefs. I remain convinced that more must be done in the neighborhoods to fight gangs, drugs and urban decay. I will continue to work with the residents through our Neighborhood Crime Watch groups to improve the quality of life in our city. If anyone is interested in joining us in our efforts to improve the quality of life in Wilkes-Barre, please contact us at 570-208-8900. Charlotte Raup Wilkes-Barre

Council candidate thanks backers

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send a heartfelt thank-you to all the voters. Anyone who assisted with my campaign in the smallest way ensured my success in the May Primary Election process. Those who signed my petitions gave me encouragement. I deeply thank all who believe in me. I commend and respect all who took time and made the effort to become a candidate. I hope the voters realize moving Luzerne County government in the right direction will also require more work. I seek to run as a team player for the taxpayers of Luzerne County. I believe it will be a continuous process to observe and learn how each candidate responds to questions in regard to Luzerne County issues. I have stated previously: I will continue the work of Luzerne County Controller Walter Griffith. His efforts to

seek accountability for expenditures is are commendable. I enjoy having conversations with all constituents. I welcome discussion with the other Luzerne County Council candidates. It is imperative that the newly elected council is not bought or owned by any particular group to gain endorsements. I hope each candidate will focus on the county issues and not distract voters. We must eliminate cronyism and nepotism. I believe special interest groups are not representing the interests of the taxpayer. The high elderly population in Luzerne County cannot afford to keep their homes and pay higher taxes to meet the demands of these groups. I plan to continue my campaign with a basic effort which promotes a plan to maintain accountability for expenditures, to eliminate waste and provide necessary county services. I encourage all Luzerne Council candidates to attend Luzerne County Transition Team meetings to understand

the process. The newly elected council will need to work together in 2012. The campaign process will reveal those candidates who have taxpayers’ interests at heart. Place aside political affiliations and work together to improve our county. I was very concerned when I saw a large slate of candidates endorsed with printed signs telling voters the best candidates for Luzerne County Council. This is not a new direction for Luzerne County government. This was the same old political guard at work. I encourage all residents to register to vote. Please make an effort to stay current with the work of the Luzerne County Home Rule Transition team and read all candidate responses from media interviews. I will run independently and hope to establish a positive communication with the other candidates. Let’s change this county and have a better future. Kathy Dobash Hazleton


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Keep funding for human services

s our community mourns yet more domestic violence-related deaths, our state legislators are considering a Republican House amended budget that includes 9.1 percent cuts for both domestic violence services and rape crisis services. House Appropriations Chairman Bill Adolph has framed cuts to the Department of Public Welfare programs as a way to find money to restore funding to education programs. This is being justified based on contested estimates of the rate of “waste, fraud and abuse” within “welfare” programs. In the hierarchy of human needs, safety comes first. Basic human needs (food, shelter and safety) must be met before more “advanced” needs can be realized. Witnessing or experiencing rape, battery and other abuse destroys safety. Children and young adults who live with these realities day after day cannot benefit fully from an education. While I find cuts to education funding proposed by Gov. Tom Corbett appalling, and laud legislators for looking at ways to restore that funding, it should not be at the expense of the safety of domestic violence and rape victims. Education cannot be a priority over victim services, and it is bad public policy. Rape crisis centers across Pennsylvania assisted more than 31,000 victims of sexual assault in fiscal 2010. Approximately one-third of those clients were children. Domestic violence programs served 92,000 victims, including 7,410 children during that same year. The proposed cut is likely to result in a complete lack of services for nearly 4,000 sexual assault victims. It is important to note that for nine years rape crisis and

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domestic violence services received no state increases, and in fact have sustained cuts. Neither the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Domestic Violence nor the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape, which fund local centers, has been the subject or rumor of “waste, fraud or abuse” of DPW dollars, In fact, both organization are known as models for responsible administrative oversight and positive service outcomes. I have contacted state Rep. Gerald Mullery, D-Newport Twp., about my concerns over these proposed cuts and he has assured me he will fight to have the funding restored. I encourage everyone to contact their state legislators and let them know the proposed cuts to vital services are not acceptable.

neighborhoods. Before my dad passed away, we spent a lot of time talking about the way things had changed in the Democratic Party. The change was not good. It moved into being more and more progressive/socialist and no longer stood for individual liberty and freedom. Under today’s norms, John F. Kennedy would be classified as a conservative. My dad believed deeply that we should all work hard, get the best wage that we can, and be able to keep what we earn. As a brewery worker, my dad thought much like other hard laborers in Northeastern Pennsylvania, and that included the miners. The miners, the brewery workers, the coal men and other factory workers were rugged individualists. They all loved freedom and liberty; they worked hard to enjoy the small breaks in the action. Their love of freedom and family helped them get up every day to put in that long day’s work. And, yes, often the tavern awaited them for a quick 15 minutes on the way home in the dark. Work is good for the heart. Unions helped them even the score with management so that their wages were higher than mere subsistence. I did benefit from my dad’s notion of work. As a very young boy, he picked coal along the railroad tracks to heat the home.When I was 5 years old, my first job was as an entrepreneur. I used either an old pint-sized Radio Flyer Wagon, an old wheel barrow, or a twin-sized baby carriage to collect papers and rags from my “customers” every Sat-

Patrick Rushton Fairview Township

Reader laments Democrat changes

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ouldn’t the hardworking parents of the baby boomers be surprised? Something happened to the Democratic Party since I first joined at the age of 23. I spent my first two years as a voter registered as an Independent and then my father helped me understand that in Pennsylvania, being Independent meant I could not vote in the primaries. So, I changed to Democrat, like my dad. We were very close and talked a lot about how things were in America and in the

JOHN M. WILDES,

urday. I would take the stash to a junkyard. I made about a quarter to thirty-five cents a week. It gave me an understanding of what it takes to work and it put something in my pocket. It was a great life lesson. I later moved on to shoveling sidewalks, cutting grass, working in a 5 & 10, and then I spent time spotting pins in a bowling alley. When I was 12, I inherited my older brother’s paper route, which I turned over to my younger brother when I graduated from Meyers High School. I finished my high school manual labor career working on a soda truck. That was how things were for the families of working men and women. If you didn’t find some ways to make a few bucks, you would have nothing to spend. We did not get to keep all our income as family needs came first. It’s just the way it was. Things have really changed and today, I do not think my father would call the new Democratic Party the party of the working man. Democratic leaders across the country seem to believe the purpose of the Democratic Party is to make people dependent on government. One of the big differentiations between the Democratic Party leaders and myself is that I believe if you work hard, you should keep what you earn. You should not be obligated to pay the freight of someone whose only problemis that they do not want to work. In our democracy, those who are able to amass a huge bounty and those who are able to earn even a meager living do have obligations to the poor and the sick and those struggling with life. However, that should be done through trustworthy sources such as Churches and charities. Income re-distribution by government is not the way to create a set of rugged individuals like our parents and grandparents that will help keep America strong.

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

I am nowhere close to being rich but today’s America permits me to get there. Those who really make it and become rich do so honestly and should not be denied their day in the sun. They work for it. I am very happy that there are more and more rich people every day. It is called the American Dream. I do not want the government taking what they have earned and giving it to somebody else so that some politician someplace can get re-elected. Your money and your resources are yours and mine are mine. Yes, I am for helpless people but I am not for making people helpless. Brian Kelly Wilkes-Barre

Voter worries about candidates

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just watched the intro of Michele Bachmann’s interview by Mike Huckabee. Beginning with the usual first question response of “That’s a great question...” blah blah blah, I immediately turned it off. Though I believe her more qualified than our current White House occupant who has displayed more than his share of foibles, I’m disgusted with the cookie-cutter pandering we now have. None show character worthy to even carry the coat of the likes of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson or Abraham Lincoln. Our country is in dire times with worse ahead. We desperately require an unbiased leader of fortitude and conviction. Are there no survivors for our country to draw from following the aftermath of the “Tune in, turn on and drop out” drug-infested generation? Is no humanity retained after the “If it feels good, do it” and “I, me, mine” generations? And for a country founded on Christian/Judeo principles, we see the imposed banishment of any form and/or reference to God by loud lobbyists.

It is time for Americans to take a stand, but will we ever see a leader to stand with? Edward Frankavitz Dallas

Taking aim at pigeon shoot

In the late 1980s/early ’90s, I had the “privilege” of attending several pigeon shoots in Hegins, Pa. My friends and I witnessed the depravity and callousness of participants and their families (including small children), in a carnival atmosphere deserving comparison to spectacles offered in Roman times to bored and degenerate crowds craving blood and gore. Participants took shots at pigeons that were released from small, dark traps; they were blinded by daylight, disoriented, hungry, thirsty from days without food and water. Of the injured pigeons (very few were actually killed!), some were able to fly away, taking refuge on rooftops and trees, only to die later, while others fell, flapping and writhing on the ground. Teenage boys approached them nonchalantly, grabbed them by their necks, swung them around, hoping to break their necks, or tore off their heads; one laughing “nice young man” even threw a headless pigeon at me. Thankfully, that particular pigeon shoot in Hegins is no more. Let’s hope that decent human beings will object to this bloody spectacle once and for all by calling their legislators, urging them to please support SB 626 – to stop a cruel “sport” that uses thousands of live pigeons for mere target practice. Has anyone heard of skeet shooting? It’s certainly a lot more sportsmanlike than taking shots at small, helpless and disadvantaged birds! Natalie Jarnstedt Greenwich, Conn.

Northeastern Pennsylvania Council Boy Scouts of America

WE SALUTE YOU.

28th Annual “Distinguished Citizens Award” Dinner

JOHN M. WILDES

Purposes: To honor leading citizens and role models in our community. Raise the necessary funds to provide a quality Scouting Program for over 4,500 youth.

June 1, 2011

BRANCH: Army

Genetti’s Hotel and Convention Center Wilkes-Barre, PA

RANK:

Dinner Reception & Gathering at 6:00 p.m.• Dinner served promptly at 6:45 p.m.

E8

YEARS SERVED: 26

WAR FOUGHT: Iraq

HOMETOWN:

“Iron” Mike Ditka Featured Speaker Football Legend

Hanover

Charles E. Parente Honoree

Thomas G. (Tim) Speicher Honoree

Matthew Cartwright Dinner Co-Chair & Master of Ceremonies

Greg Collins Dinner Co-Chair

Sponsor Packages (Ticket and Table Reservations due by May 25, 2011)

NUMBER

❏ Eagle $15,000 ❏ Life $10,000 ❏ Star $5,000 ❏ First Class $2,500 ❏ Table 1,500 ❏ Individual Reservations ____ x $150 per person - $____ ❏ Contribution only $____

ONE

❏ We will be attending Dinner. ❏ Not Attending: Please donate our seats to Scouting.

AUD AUDITED

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Advertising Packages (Your artwork for the Program Book is due by 5-23-11)

LUZERN UZERN COUNTY IN N LUZERNE

❏ Full Page - $1,000 ❏ Half Page - $500 ❏ Quarter Page - $250

_____________________________________________________________________ Contact Person

Organization (if applicable)

_____________________________________________________________________ Address

City

State

Zip

_____________________________________________________________________ Phone

Fax

Email

❏ Check enclosed for $_____ (Payable to NEPA BSA) ❏ Please send me an invoice ❏ Charge to: ❏ Visa ❏ Disc. ❏ MC Account #_________________________________ Expiration date: __________ Authorized Signature: ____________________________ 266352

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SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2011

Mail to: Northeastern Pennsylvania Council - BSA, 1 Bob Mellow Drive, Moosic, PA 18507-1776 Contact: Becky Mozeleski: rmozeleski@nepabsa.org 570-207-1227 Fax: 570-207-1232

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Allocate more funds to students attending colleges with higher graduation rates WITH SIGNIFICANT fanfare, Vice President Joe Biden recently issued a call to action to boost college graduation rates in the United States. His March announcement followed on the heels of a talk by President Barack Obama himself, where he reiterated his long-held belief that college graduates fuel the engine of economic growth that this country needs to compete in a global economy. The president and vice president are right in calling America’s attention to the issue. The United States ranks ninth in the world in the percentage of adults ages 25 to 34 who have a college education. America trails Korea, Canada, Russia, Japan, New Zealand, Norway, Ireland and Denmark in this allimportant category. In order to meet the goal of having the highest proportion of college graduates by the year 2020, our country will need to increase the number of college graduates by 50 percent — turning out about 8 million additional graduates from the 16 mil-

demic support systems, and have large class sizes. Students often find the classes they need to graduate are closed because they quickly reach their full capacity. Smaller, mostly private colleges and universities, do a better job of graduating students efficiently. For instance, the four-year graduation rate at Misericordia University for 2009-10 was 66 percent. Few colleges exceed this rate. The graduation rate for all Pennsylvania public higher education institutions was only 30 percent. Why should tax dollars be used to subsidize such inefficiencies? The way to stimulate growth in the number of college graduates is to allocate funds to students who attend colleges with higher graduation rates and do well in other performance measures. Such a system will present an optimal distribution of taxpayer dollars to the students who deserve them and ensure that the president’s goal of increasing the number of college graduates is met. Michael A. MacDowell is president of Misericordia University in Dallas, Pa.

LETTERS FROM READERS

Returning vets deserve support

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determine how to allocate federal dollars for financial aid is to examine the U.S. Department of Education College Completion Tool Kit. That set of policy recommendations suggest, among other things, that the federal and state governments “embrace performancebased funding,” including the graduation rates of colleges and universities. Among students attending four-year institutions of higher education, only 27 percent graduate in four years. Fiftythree percent graduate in five years and 57 percent complete their education in six years. The fact that Pell Grants are paid on an annual basis means that for every extra year in college, American citizens are paying millions of dollars more in Pell Grant aid. And the longer it takes a student to graduate, the more elusive the president’s goal becomes. Why are students in four-year colleges taking so long to graduate? Numerous reasons are given. Many students must work and hence, cannot attend school full time. While this is an important issue, more so is the fact that large, mostly public institutions offer little advising, have precious few aca-

s I look back over the 13 years since my father passed away, I think about the many influences he had on me and my family -- behaviorally, attitudinally and, of course, genetically. I am far more like him than I would ever admit when I was a defiant, oppositional teenager. I guess he was much the same when he was a teen. In fact, I’m reminded of one of his stories from his youthful days. He was but 19 years old, serving in the Army within the signal corps as a teletype operator. One winter day, his Commanding Officer asked him to do something – I don’t recall what it was – that he felt

SEND US YOUR OPINION Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification. Letters should be no more than 250 words. We reserve the right to edit and limit writers to one published letter every 30 days. • E-mail: mailbag@timesleader.com • Fax: 570-829-5537 • Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., WilkesBarre, PA 1871 1

he need not do. He advised his CO of his defiance, and within a few months found himself standing on Utah Beach, Normandy, in June, 1944, with a rifle replacing his typewriter and European soil replacing his office chair. My own teen defiance never brought such grave circumstances. I realize that it is this time of year, between mid-May and mid-June, that I miss him most, not so much for the many times we shared

throughout his life and the gifts he left me, but because it is a time when we publically honor our veterans. My father was a veteran, and he was proud of it. It is hard for me to imagine what passed through his mind upon his first step on the beach of southern France, June 1944, and I hope that at some point no young man or woman will be asked to make such sacrifice. But, for now, they are. I can only hope that

they return unscathed, much as my father did. But, not all do. Recently, the Family Service Association joined with numerous other organizations to form the Tri-Vets Community Action Team to facilitate better services to support our veterans and military families. As a community, we are obligated to honor and to help those who serve our country through the armed forces in their transition back to civilian life. Through assisting with employment, education and health care, we are obligated to provide more opportunitiesfor those who have put their lives on the line so we can live peacefully with the freedoms and blessings we enjoy. As Memorial Day approaches, remember those who gave

the ultimate sacrifice to ensure our freedoms. Remember, too, their families who so often struggle in ways we can hardly imagine. The Family Service Association is committed to helping our military families. For more information, contact us at 823-5144 or through our Help Line at 1-888-829-1341 Michael Zimmerman Executive director Family Service Association of Wyoming Valley Wilkes-Barre

Resident glad Haggerty lost bid

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ince 1979, I have been active in Republican politics in Northeastern Pennsylvania. But never before

have I been so proud and encouraged by Luzerne County Republicans and Democrats alike than on Primary Election Day 2011, when the smart voters rejected Jim Haggerty’s bid for a seat on the Luzerne County Court of Common Pleas. To be a judge requires more than technical qualifications. It requires a personal commitment to “putting aside politics.” I could not see Haggerty as an objective administrator of the law in view of his longterm policy of “Covering Up Crime Statistics” as Mayor of Kingston. Transparency is the key to keeping things straight and honest. Special thanks to my family, friends and supporters in Pittston for leading the way. John C. Cordora Kingston

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full-time college students up to $5,500 to help cover tuition payments. Although few students receive the maximum Pell Grants, the grants are based MICHAEL MACDOWELL solely on need and are inversely related lion the country now produces annual- to the income of the student’s family. The lower the family income, the grealy. ter the Pell Grant. We’ve seen developed countries in In the proposed 2011-2012 federal Asia and Europe borrow a strategy from America’s past successes in gener- budget, the maximum Pell Grant is supposed to be cut by $845 per student ating college graduates. Following and the total amount any student can World War II, the United States fosobtain is between $4,705 and $5,550. tered college attendance and graduaThose not receiving the maximum Pell tion as a strategy to ensure economic growth. Instead of letting returning GIs Grant would also receive a smaller grant. Pell Grants are clearly the most join unemployment and soup kitchen lines as they had done during the Great often-used resource by students to help pay for college. Supplemental EducaDepression of the 1930s, the GI Bill tional Opportunity Grants (SEOGs), enabled tens of thousands of veterans another source to help pay for a college to attend college and start new lives and new families. This, in turn, helped education, are also to be cut. Reducing Pell Grants and SEOG support sends a create the American dream and grow mixed signal to those working hard to the middle class. support the president’s goal of increasWhile the post-911 GI Bill is still helping veterans, Pell Grants are by far ing college graduation rates by 50 the largest investment the government percent. Of course in these tough times all is making today in helping to create a college-educated generation. These are federal expenditures need to be examined carefully. An excellent way to means-tested grants, which award


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U.S. Sen. Barbara Mikulski hits the trail for women Women in Congress After the 2010 election, the number of women in the House and Senate fell for the first time in more than 30 years.

54 57

63 65

65 73

74

88 90 88

31 32 20 17 23 24 25 25 ’77 ’79 ’81 ’83 ’85 ’87 ’89 ’91 ’93 ’95 ’97 ’99 ’01 ’03 ’05 ’07 ’09 ’11 Source: Center for American Women and Politics Graphic: The Baltimore Sun

MCT PHOTO

U.S. Sen. Barbara Mikulski (D-MD) is the longest-serving female in the history of the Senate.

capture lost ground. Mikulski’s reaction: no problem. “I’m going to organize the women into a SWAT team,” said Mikulski, who won her own re-election last year to a fifth term representing Maryland in the Senate with 62 percent of the vote. “We’re going to be like NATO: An attack on one will be an attack on all.” Mikulski traveled to Seattle in

February to speak at a $1,000-aplate fundraiser for Sen. Maria Cantwell, a two-term Democrat from Washington who is up for reelection next year. In June, she will head to Michigan for Democratic Sen. Debbie Stabenow. Earlier this month she was the keynote speaker at an event organized by EMILY’s List, a liberal Washingtonbased group that raises money for

female candidates. Because she has positioned herself as a leader on women’s issues in Congress — and because she will not be on the ballot in Maryland again until 2016 —analysts say Mikulski could play a significant role in several states, including Missouri, Michigan and Washington, as candidates look to court women voters. “She confers some degree of credibility to these candidates, but she can also tell a very real story,” said Jennifer Lawless, who heads the Women and Politics Institute at American University. “Barbara Mikulski is in a position to help out this election because she doesn’t have to worry about her own race.” Seventeen women, 12 Democrats and five Republicans, serve in

© 2011 MCT

the Senate. Seven of them, six Democrats and one Republican, are up for election next year. The incumbents include Sen. Claire McCaskill of Missouri, among the most vulnerable Democrats in Congress, and Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, who was appointed and won a special election to serve out the last three years of Hillary Clinton’s Senate term after Clinton became secretary of state in 2009. Decades of growth in the number of women in Congress came to a halt after last year’s election. In the Senate, the number of women remained constant at17. But in the House of Representatives, the See MIKULSKI, Page 8E

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WASHINGTON — Like other Democrats in Congress, Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski is battling Republican budget cuts and working to bring home federal money for her state. But as the 2012 election nears, Maryland’s senior senator is also playing a role in national politics: helping to elect more women to Congress. Asthelongest-servingwomanin the chamber’s history, the selfstyled Dean of the Senate Women is poised to become a powerful messenger and fundraiser for female Democratic senators running for re-election across the country next year. Eighteen months before voters head to the polls, Mikulski is already in high demand. Her efforts come at a challenging time for the Democratic Party, which will be forced to defend twice as many Senate seats as the GOP next year, just two years after losing control of the House of Representatives. The number of women in Congress, meanwhile, fell this year for the first time in more than three decades — leaving advocates for women in politics anxious to re-

number of female lawmakers fell by two to 88, or about 20 percent of the chamber. The number of Republican women in the House increased by eight to 29, while the number of Democrats dropped by 10 to 59. Because Democratic women in Congress still outnumber their Republican counterparts by more than 2-to-1, part of the decrease is simply a byproduct of the historic gains the GOP made in the 2010 election. Riding a wave of anger over the economy and Democratic policies, the GOP picked up 63 new seats in the House to recapture the majority. Of 13 new senators elected last year only one, Republican Kelly Ayotte of New Hampshire, is a woman. Mikulski, 74, has gained national prominence by focusing on women’s issues. The former social worker left her mark on the Democratic health care overhaul, adding language to require insurance companies to offer mammograms and other health services to wom-

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As face of health care law, HHS’ Sebelius soldiers on By DAVID GOLDSTEIN McClatchy Newspapers

WASHINGTON — A global flu pandemic loomed the very day in 2009 that Kathleen Sebelius took command of Washington’s massive health care bureaucracy. She had to marshal a response quickly. A year later, when a drilling rig exploded in the Gulf of Mexico, she had to deal with the medical fallout from the worst oil spill in U.S. history. But throughout her two years as the secretary of health and human services, her toughest challenge has been to shoulder the defense — and weather the political blows — of the biggest expansion of America’s health care system in half a century. “I cannot overstate the pressure she was under during the health care debate, yet she handled it with aplomb and the facts,” said Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif. “She doesn’t engage in hyperbole. She’s calm. She reflects the no-drama-Obama kind of approach.” A year after the 10-year, $1.1 trillion overhaul passed without a single Republican vote, it remains a deep and divisive fault line in American politics. Bridging it seems out of the question. Opposition to “Obamacare” is the price of admission to being taken seriously in Republican circles. Sebelius’ critics remain implacable. “I’m not pleased, frankly, with her performance,” said Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, who opposed her nomination. “I think the law is unaffordable, and costs will explode far beyond the preliminary estimates.” The secretary is just as pointed when she talks about the plan by Republicans in the

MCT PHOTO

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius holds a news conference to release updated guidance for schools during the upcoming influenza season, at the Health and Human Services Department in Washington, D.C.

House of Representatives to replace Medicare’s guaranteed benefit with set payments to individuals, adjusted for inflation, for them to purchase private insurance. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office has said that the plan, offered by Republican Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin and passed by the House, would shift more health care costs onto seniors. By 2030, they could be on the hook for as much as 70 percent. Supporters of the Ryan plan counter that competition for seniors’ health care dollars would reduce the cost of private insurance, thus lowering theirs as well. At a news conference last week, Sebelius said the GOP plan “would destroy this com-

“She has been an incredibly good soldier. She’s someone who bears all the criticism and answers all those difficult questions, most of which are being posed not because of substance but because of the politics and trying to score political points.” Jeffrey Levi Executive Director of the Trust for America’s Health

mitment made 46 years ago to the seniors of this country that they won’t go bankrupt based on health care costs. ... The federal government pays 70 percent of the costs of health care for the very members of Congress who voted to flip that on seniors. It’s a commitment that they haven’t taken on themselves, but they’re willing to put on the seniors of this country.” The fight over health care rages on, in the conservativemedia sphere, on Capitol Hill and in the courts. More than two dozen states

have challenged the health care law. They contend that the individual mandate, which requires people to purchase insurance or pay a fine, is unconstitutional. Lower court rulings have been mixed so far, and the case is likely to end up before the U.S. Supreme Court. Congressional Republicans and the party’s evolving cast of 2012 presidential hopefuls want to repeal the law. “The rules and regulations are going to be imposed outside of legislative channels, where you hold people ac-

countable,” said Robert Moffit, a senior fellow at the Heritage Foundation, a conservative Washington research center, who served at Sebelius’ agency during the Ronald Reagan administration. “Americans correctly believe that they have lost a huge amount of freedom.” Convincing doubters that the Democrats’ medicine will be good for them has been difficult. But at 63 and a runner for three decades, Sebelius knows something about endurance. The former Democratic governor of Kansas, who campaigned around the country for Barack Obama in 2008, is the front-line defender of what could be his most enduring achievement, or his undoing. Perhaps her own, as well. “It fulfills an incredibly important legacy to finally have an opportunity to have health care available and affordable for most Americans and all the children and family services I’ve believed in and worked on all my life,” she said during a recent interview. “I can’t imagine at this point being anyplace else.” There are times she probably wishes she were. Her exasperation with the attacks and misinformation — who could ever forget “death panels” — can be abundantly clear. During a recent hearing before the House Education and the Workforce Committee, Rep. Todd Rokita, a Republican freshman from Indiana, kept pressing Sebelius on when she’d get back to him about a mine safety rule on coal dust. Another Indiana Republican had asked her the same question minutes earli-

er. “I can’t give you a date certain until I know what it is that we’re looking for,” Sebelius said. “But I can guarantee you: All of us heard the question four or five times.” “She has been an incredibly good soldier,” said Jeffrey Levi, the executive director of the Trust for America’s Health, a nonpartisan publichealth advocacy group. “She’s someone who bears all the criticism and answers all those difficult questions, most of which are being posed not because of substance but because of the politics and trying to score political points.” But Sebelius isn’t above playing politics herself. She was asked at the hearing what the Ryan Medicare plan would mean for a cancer patient. “People will run out of money very quickly, and if you run out of the government voucher and then you run out of your own money, you’re really left to scrape together charity care, go without care, die sooner,” Sebelius said. Critics said she’d inflamed the debate. Sebelius was mildly contrite: “I certainly didn’t mean to suggest that passing the budget made people die sooner. I do think that shifting costs — which is, no doubt, what the plan would do — onto seniors may well leave some people in very difficult situations where they go without care that they may need.” Sebelius wants to see health care restructuring through. That depends, of course, on whether Obama is re-elected, and if so, keeps her on.

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