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The Times Leader timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE, PA

SPORTS SHOWCASE

By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER tmorgan@timesleader.com

I’ll Have Another

overtook Bodemeister down the stretch to win the Preakness and keep alive his hopes of winning the Triple Crown. In a race that was a virtual repeat of the Kentucky Derby, I’ll Have Another raced from behind Saturday to beat pace-setter Bodemeister, who also finished second in the Derby. 1C

six years, four current and former council members racked up $15,204 in meal charges on taxpayer-funded trips, but none ever produced a single receipt to show how the money was spent. They didn’t have to, thanks to an unwritten policy that reimburses council for meals based on a flat rate calculated by Runzheimer International, a firm that estimates food and lodging costs for cities throughout the nation.

WILKES-BARRE – For years, city council members who traveled to conferences were reimbursed for three meals each day, even when some meals were included in the registration fee, a review of city records shows. Each council member was given a generous allowance – in some cases as high as $92.95 per day – to pay for their meals. But if See LUNCHES, Page 14A

WILKES-BARRE CITY COUNCIL TRAVEL EXPENDITURES Annual totals paid for council travel, broken down by charges to credit card held by City Clerk Jim Ryan and reimbursements paid to council members. Includes meals, airfare, mileage and taxi.

Credit card Reimbursements 2005 $7,820 $5,930 2006 $7,969 $4,205 2007 $11,694 $8,971 2008 $6,460 $4,924 2009 $8,007 $3,713 $3,566 2010 $11,606 2011 $6,214 $3,429 $0

Total $13,750 $12,174 $20,665 $11,384 $11,720 $15,172 $9,643

$5,000 $10,000 $15,000 $20,000

Source:Cityrecords

MarkGuydish/TheTimesLeader

Review: Meal allowances for W-B council generous

paid to several council members who attended conferences in the nation’s capital since at WILKES-BARRE – According to the federal government, least 2005. It’s based on an a person traveling to Washing- estimate published by Runzheimer International, a priton, D.C., this year should vate firm that calculates averexpect to pay a total of $71 for age meal costs in cities breakfast, lunch and dinner. If you are a Wilkes-Barre City throughout the United States. Council members are paid Council member, however, you the set daily rate, regardless of will get $92.95 for the three meals, no questions asked. That’s the rate that has been See MEALS, Page 14A By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER tmorgan@timesleader.com

HERE’S A BIG ONE THAT DIDN’T GET AWAY

RANGERS 3, DEVILS 0 Henrik Lundqvist

stopped all 36 shots to lead the New York Rangers to a 3-0 win over the New Jersey Devils in Game 3 of the Eastern Conference Finals on Saturday. 7C

By BEN FELLER and JIM KUHNHENN Associated Press

SPURS 96 CLIPPERS 86 MLB

REDS 6 YANKEES 5 FRED ADAMS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

BLUE JAYS 2 METS 0

J

acob Shinal, 7, above, has a big smile as he displays a 21-inch trout he caught Saturday at Wilkes-Barre Township’s annual Mayor’s Children’s Fishing Derby, hosted by Wilkes-Barre Township Mayor Carl Kuren. The event To see was held at the Wilkes-Barre additional Township Settlement Camp. In photos, visit photo at left, Naythan Woods, www.times leader.com 4, watches his sister, Makayla, 6, fish at the derby. More than 130 registered young anglers, with their parents and guardians, took part. They tried to catch the 1,400 stocked trout at the derby, which included a 27-inch trout.

INSIDE A NEWS: Local 3A Nation & World 5A Obituaries 10A B PEOPLE: 1B Birthdays 6B C SPORTS: 1C Outdoors 12C D BUSINESS: 1D E VIEWS: 1E Editorials 3E

G CLASSIFIED: 1G

WEATHER Hailey Russ Partly sunny. High 85, low 53. Details, Page 14C

Dirty Girl Run raises charity race questions Charities face higher demands for services from cash-strapped clients. By BILL O’BOYLE boboyle@timesleader.com

6

09815 10077

Leaders want to fix the economy

Consensus of Group of Eight summit is that governments must cut debt.

NBA PLAYOFFS

F ETC: 1F Puzzles 2F Books 5F

$1.50

Study: Free lunches do exist W-B council members paid for you want to know where they meals included in conference dined, who was with them or what they ate, you’re out of luck. registration fees, review finds. Records show that in the past

“I’ll HAVE ANOTHER,” DOES

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

WILKES-BARRE – Does the Dirty Girl Run muddy the fundraising waters? The national event has held eight races to date, including the Dirty Girl Mud Run two weeks ago in Lackawanna County. And in Northeastern Pennsylvania, the event took in $560,000 and donated $14,500 to the charity. The organization clearly states on its website and registration forms that it will donate 2.5 percent of registration fees to the

Barber

Jones

National Breast Cancer Foundation for research. Some have raised questions about the 2.5 percent donation, including: • Is that enough? • In today’s world of declining donor dollars and rising demand for charitable services, is any donation better than no donation? • Is the practice of for-profit See CHARITY, Page 14A

TIMES LEADER FILE PHOTO

A participant in the Dirty Girl Mud Run in Lackawanna County two weeks ago.

CAMP DAVID, Md. — Confronting an economic crisis that threatens them all, President Barack Obama and leaders of other world powers on Saturday declared that their governments must both spark growth and cut the debt that has crippled the European continent and put investors worldwide on Obama edge. “There’s now an emerging consensus that more must be done to promote growth and job creation right now,” Obama proclaimed after hosting unprecedented economic talks at Camp David, his secluded and highly secure mountaintop retreat. Seeking a second term amid hard economic times, Obama hailed a debate heading in the direction he likes, with nations now talking of ways to spark their economies instead of just slashing spending. Yet there were no bold prescriptions at hand. Instead, leaders seemed intent on trying to inspire confidence by agreeing on a broad strategy no matter their differences. With all of them facing their own difficult political realities, they built some sovereign wiggle room into their pledge to take all necessary steps, saying “the right measures are not the same for each of us.” Obama played international host as Europe’s debt crisis threatens to drag down the U.S. recovery and his own political future, underscoring the stakes for him in getting allies abroad to rally around some answers. Much of the new emphasis on government-led growth seemed See SUMMIT, Page 7A INSIDE: 3 charged in alleged plot, 8A


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➛ timesleader.com

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

4 douse flames on back porch Neighbors noticed fire, used pool water to keep flames from spreading. By MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

HANOVER TWP. – Four quick-thinking neighbors kept a porch fire from engulfing a home Saturday afternoon by dousing the flames with pool water. The responding neighbors said they noticed smoke rising from the back of 250 Phillips St. in the Bresleau section of Hanover Township at approximately 2 p.m. Saturday afternoon. “We were coming back from my son’s baseball game and I saw the smoke coming out of the top of the guy’s house,” said Dave Turner, who lives across the street at 251 Phillips St. “It didn’t look right. It wasn’t somebody burning wood or something.” Turner ran around the back of the house, where he was joined by Sean Leachey, who saw the fire from his mother’s house around the corner and came running. The pair dumped the contents of a recycling barrel and began using it to douse the flames rising waist high and beginning to climb the walls of the house with water from the above ground pool behind the home. “Put it out,” Leachey said. “That was the first thing that came to my mind; find water and put it out.” Meanwhile, neighbor Bob Leskosky and a Phillips Street resident the others knew only as Jose ran in the front door to alert the home’s residents. Jose left the area shortly thereafter, neighbors said. The house is owned by Jim and Michelle Bohlin, who live there with two sons. Michelle Bohlin was home at the time of the fire but escaped unharmed, though she was treated by paramedics on scene for anxiety, township fire Capt. Bill McDaniels said. McDaniels said the cause of the fire remained undetermined Saturday afternoon and that a state police fire marshal would investigate. Neighbors said the fire appeared to have originated in a pile of garbage bags on the porch. McDaniels said the fire started on back porch and worked its way up the back side of the house to the roof. The bungalow-style home suffered fire damage to its exterior and some smoke damage to the kitchen on the other side of the wall, he added. Township firefighter Gabe Metric was in the first fire truck to arrive on scene. He said the fire department saw the fire from the nearby Bresleau station and responded before 911 had been called, but the neighbors had the fire largely under control before they even arrived. “Alert neighbors saved it from getting worse than what it was,” Metric said. Homeowner Jim Bohlin said he was overwhelmed by his neighbors’ actions. “Words can’t even explain it,” Bohlin said. “With all the bad stuff that people do this is one of the shining moments. How can you beat that; your neighbors come and save your house for you.”

Bid in for Market Street train car Redevelopment Authority receives $5,000 bid at auction, but deal not sealed. By MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE – Going once, going twice … still going. The Luzerne County Redevelopment Authority received a high bid of $5,000 for the train car at the Market Street Square complex during an auction Saturday morning. But the deal hasn’t been sealed yet. Under the To see additional terms of the aucphotos, visit tion, the county www.times and redevelopleader.com ment authority have 48 hours from the time of auction to accept or decline the offer. The winning bid was made by Jim Williams Jr. and his father Jim Williams Sr., owners of a metal recycling business in Blakely, Lackawanna County. The two others who bid on the car were also scrap yard owners and their proxies. Redevelopment Authority Director Andy Reilly said that decision will be made by County Manager Robert Lawton in consultation with Reilly and County Engineer Joe Gibbons. Their decision could hinge on their appraisal of Williams’ plan to disassemble the train car on site. Auction organizers initially said they wanted the car removed in one piece because they were worried about the consequences if hazardous materials, such as asbestos, were discovered during disassembly. But at roughly 90 feet long, removing the train cars whole could cost thousands of dollars in road permits. On the advice of auctioneer Leo A. Glodzik Sr., Reilly and county Property and Supply Director Frank Pugliese agreed immediately before the auction to accept bids from buyers who wish to break down the car on site, noting the county would take the buyer’s plans for the car into consideration when reviewing the winning bid. Since they are only interested in the car’s scrap value, the Williams’ said they will only agree to the deal if they can cut the car apart on-site. “They can keep it; It’s too heavy, too big, too high,” Williams Junior said. “Nobody can take that out of here.” “You can’t put that on the rail and you can’t move it (because) you need police permits that cost thousands,” his father added.

pshitut@timesleader.com

PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

James Williams III, 12, sits in the dining car that was sold at Saturday’s auction at Market Street Square. James’ dad, James Jr., bought the dining car for scrap.

Williams wouldn’t say what he thought the car was worth in raw metal value because the deal hasn’t been finalized. Pugliese said the county estimates it’s worth $3,500 to $5,000 in scrap. If the sale is approved, the Williams’ will have 30 days to remove the train car from the site. County officials expressed mixed feelings about the offer. “We were hoping of course that we would be able to sell it to a collector, but obviously that didn’t happen,” Pugliese said. The county advertised the auction to collectors, museums and amusement parks locally and around the country, but found little interest. Glodzik said the Steamtown National Historic Site in Scranton and the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania in Strasburg, Lancaster County would accept the car as a donation but did not wish to bid on it. “It’s what the market will bear,” Reilly said of the sale. “I think there’s only a limited market for this because if you’re interested in restoring it that could be a very expensive proposition. The idea is, the site needs to be cleaned up, and this is a big part of that.” Though its painted stripes have faded and its stainless steel sides are pocked with rust, inside the car is in remarkably good shape. The tables from the old Joe Palooka Diner the car was once part of are gone, but white and maroon tiled walls, white vinyl booths, mirror backed bar, server’s station and even a table top jukebox – flipped open to Michael Jackson, Aerosmith and Blood, Sweat and Tears – remain. Apart from some graffiti left by vandals the car could have been boarded up yesterday. If Williams’ bid is approved, it

through the area and might have information about any of the vehicles is asked to contact HAZLETON – City police are state police in Dunmore at 570 963-3156. investigating a crash involving Chief Frank DeAndrea Friday HAZLETON – City police morning near the intersection reported the following: of Broad and Laurel streets. • Maria Rivera, 67, reported His police sport utility vehia man stole her purse around cle and a motorcycle collided 7:35 a.m. Saturday while she around 9:50 a.m. DeAndrea was walking in the area of suffered non-life threatening Hemlock and Laurel streets. injuries. She described the suspect as The operator of the motorcycle, Walter Bloss of Drums, was a clean-shaven, dark-skinned man, approximately 6 feet tall, flown by helicopter to Geiswearing a black hooded sweatinger Medical Center in Danshirt, dark pants and running ville. He was listed in critical shoes. She was treated for condition on Saturday night. minor injuries at Hazleton General Hospital. DUNMORE – State police are • An Air Force backpack asking for assistance in the containing recruiting materials investigation of the May 13 was reported stolen Friday crash on Interstate 81 that morning from a vehicle parked killed a Scranton woman. outside the U.S. Air Force Jeri Todd was thrown from recruiting station on West the vehicle she was riding in Broad Street. A large stone and landed on the roadway used to break a passenger winnear mile marker 200.3 in Scott dow was found on the front Township around 3 a.m. An seat. eyewitness reported Todd might have been struck by HAZLE TWP. – State police several vehicles traveling north- reported a fence at the Verizon bound. The eyewitness reportsubstation on Airport Road was ed seeing a bus, a tractor-trailer cut between 4 p.m. Tuesday and several passenger vehicles. and 1 p.m. Friday. It is unAnyone who was traveling known if anything was stolen.

jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com

DETAILS WEEKLY LOTTERY SUMMARY

Big Four, Midday Sunday: 7-1-9-5 Monday: 7-6-8-6 Tuesday: 0-8-7-9 Wednesday: 0-2-6-7 Thursday: 2-9-7-1 (7-2-9-0, double draw) Friday: 4-0-1-0 Saturday: 4-2-4-0

POLICE BLOTTER

JOE BUTKIEWICZ VP/Executive Editor (570) 829-7249

www.timesleader.com

Daily Number, Midday Sunday: 6-1-0 Monday: 6-6-0 Tuesday: 5-4-1 Wednesday: 5-9-8 Thursday: 7-0-0 Friday: 1-6-7 Saturday: 1-7-2

DENISE SELLERS VP/Chief Revenue Officer (570) 970-7203

dsellers@timesleader.com

Quinto, Midday Sunday: 5-3-0-5-0 Monday: 1-5-8-9-4 Tuesday: 9-6-8-0-2 Wednesday: 0-7-4-3-8 Thursday: 9-5-4-5-8 Friday: 7-0-3-1-6 Saturday: 4-3-5-4-7 Treasure Hunt Sunday: 02-09-10-16-17 Monday: 05-16-22-23-28 Tuesday: 08-12-19-22-30 Wednesday: 15-16-22-29-30 Thursday: 04-06-08-19-26 Friday: 02-03-13-14-28 Saturday: 08-11-14-21-30 Daily Number, 7 p.m. Sunday: 0-5-3 Monday: 8-8-7 Tuesday: 4-0-2 Wednesday: 7-0-4 Thursday: 0-8-1 Friday: 4-9-5 Saturday: 3-4-9

The dining train car at Market Street Square in Wilkes-Barre

will bring an end to the car’s thirty years of history in WilkesBarre. County officials couldn’t say exactly when the car, a dining car from a long-distance train, was made, but Glodzik determined from serial numbers and other markings that it was manufactured in Philadelphia by the The Edward G. Budd Manufacturing Company. The Budd Company, which was made famous by its Zephyr line of passenger trains, manufactured lightweight railroad cars from the 1930s into the 1980s, but produced fewer longdistance passenger cars after the 1950s due to a decline in demand, according to the Philadelphia Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society. The car and a Vulcan locomotive engine were donated to the Luzerne County Redevelopment Authority when it purchased the Market Street Square Complex from businessman Thom Greco for $5.8 million in 2007. WILKES-BARRE – City police reported the following: • Jamie Molina of Loomis Street reported Friday a rock was thrown through a secondfloor window of her residence. • Hang Lin of Brookhollow Road, Mountain Top, reported Thursday the left front fender and doors on the driver’s side of his vehicle were scratched with a key while parked at the Home Depot store on Spring Street. • Brandon Negron of Maffett Street reported Thursday his 49cc motorcycle was stolen from the front porch of his residence. • Doris Branch of South Sherman Street reported her laptop computer was stolen Tuesday on Empire Street. She arranged to sell the computer to two women. They left the Trading Post bar and the two women stole her computer and ran. Branch described the suspects as: a white woman with brown hair in her 20s, 5 feet, 6 inches tall, 180 pounds, wearing a gray hooded top and blue jeans; and a white woman in her 20s, 5 feet, 6 inches tall, 120 pounds, wearing a white top and blue jeans.

An PRASHANT SHITUT President & CEO (570) 970-7158

THE TIMES LEADER

ALLISON UHRIN VP/Chief Financial Officer (570) 970-7154

auhrin@timesleader.com

It was first brought to Market Street Square in 1982 by Marvin Roth, who in the late 1970s built and operated a hotel in the former train station and about 60 attached Pullman passenger cars and wanted to open a diner where guests could eat, according to Greco. Greco, who owned the land where the diner sat and later held a 50 percent stake in the business, said Roth moved an existing classic diner to the site, restored it and attached the rail car as an additional seating area. “He was kind of ahead of his time, because the diner is a big thing now,” Greco said. When the restaurant, known for most of its history as the Joe Palooka Diner, closed permanently in 1999, a buyer purchased the main diner building and had it moved to the Mt. Airy section of Philadelphia, where it still operates as the Trolley Car Diner on Germantown Avenue, Greco said.

Climber falls, dies on Mt. McKinley

Big Four, 7 p.m. Sunday: 7-1-3-1 Monday: 0-6-4-8 Tuesday: 4-8-4-2 Wednesday: 2-9-9-1 Thursday: 8-7-7-2 Friday: 8-7-0-8 Saturday: 6-9-8-4 Quinto, 7 p.m. Sunday: 9-4-7-8-2 Monday: 4-6-6-8-5 Tuesday: 4-2-6-0-3 Wednesday: 1-0-3-2-0 Thursday: 4-3-4-4-5 Friday: 9-4-0-6-1 Saturday: 1-3-5-6-6 Cash 5 Sunday: 06-24-28-32-41 Monday: 09-17-26-32-41 Tuesday: 13-17-21-25-41 Wednesday: 33-34-35-40-43 Thursday: 08-14-23-27-35 Friday: 17-25-26-29-32 Saturday: 02-07-08-14-31 Match 6 Lotto Monday: 02-05-18-31-37-39 Thursday: 06-29-33-39-41-48 Powerball Wednesday: 03-07-21-28-43 powerball: 02 Saturday: 08-13-35-46-51 powerball: 30 Mega Millions Tuesday: 10-11-12-14-24 Megaball: 06 Megaplier: 04 Friday: 03-11-22-34-49 Megaball: 01 Megaplier: 04

The Associated Press

DENALI NATIONAL PARK and PRESERVE, Alaska — National Park officials say a climber has died of injuries after falling during a climb of Alaska’s Mount McKinley. A park release Saturday says the climber fell about 1,100-feet Friday, while following the West Buttress route to the summit. Witnesses say the climber fell at about 16,200-feet. He was trying to recover a backpack that had started to slide downhill. A park service mountaineering patrol was behind the climber’s three-person team and called for a helicopter. The victim’s body was flown to Talkeetna, Alaska, after rangers confirmed that the climber had died of injuries. The victim’s identity has not been released pending notification of family members overseas. Mount McKinley is North America’s highest mountain. Friday’s fatal fall is the first serious incident on McKinley during the 2012 mountaineering season.

mprazma@timesleader.com

Acevedo, Jean German, Jeffrey Hudelson, James Kozak, Diane McGill, John Palencar, Genevieve Romanosky, Dorothy Savage, Mary Sell, Michael Swirbel, Mary Page 10A

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CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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IN

BRIEF

WILKES-BARRE

JCC open house today

he Jewish Community Center is hosting an open house today T from noon to 3 p.m.

The JCC is at 60 S. River St. and the community is invited. There will be free snacks, and tours of the JCC will be offered. The pool will be open from noon to 3 p.m. and the bowling lanes will be open from 2 to 3 p.m. Activities will be offered, including family zumba, senior yoga, whirling gig for kids. For more information, contact Sara Pisarz at 824-4646.

PLYMOUTH

Historical open house set

The Plymouth Historical Society will hold an Open House from 2 to 4 p.m. today at the Plymouth Historical Society, formerly the Welsh Presbyterian Church, 115 Gaylord Ave., Plymouth. The event is free and open to the public. Donations are welcome. The afternoon will kick off with comments from Georgetta Potoski, Plymouth Historical Society president, and Mayor Dorothy Petrosky. Then folklorist Fiona Siobhan Powell will present the story of “Polly Jenkins From Wales to America,” which follows the life of a young Welsh girl named Angharad and her journey from South Wales to America, the transition into married life, and then losing her husband in a mine accident. Also, 12 authors with local ties will receive certificates in honor of their work. A meet and greet will follow where attendees can socialize with the authors.

➛ timesleader.com

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 PAGE 3A

LOCAL County looks at merging services concept, but has concerns about the real- said the committee will consider all opCivil and criminal court records, deeds in 90 days. Committee Chairman Dominick De- ism of cross-training expectations. tions. and wills all in same division under Polo, interim county treasurer, said conWorkers in each office must know de“We’re trying to put our heads togethhome rule, but offices are scattered. solidation makes sense for public conve- tailed information about procedures and er. There’s so much to talk about,” he By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES jandes@timesleader.com

Luzerne County’s home rule charter puts deeds, wills, civil and criminal court records under the same judicial services and records division, and county Manager Robert Lawton wants to find a way to get them in the same room. Lawton asked the heads of those departments and other members of the county’s record improvement committee to try to come up with a merger plan

nience and more efficient use of staff. The civil and criminal court records offices are in separate rooms in the county courthouse in Wilkes-Barre. The deeds office is in the courthouse annex across the street, and wills are in the county’s Penn Place building a few blocks away. Committee members plan to visit another home rule county with a similar one-room setup for reference, DePolo said. County Prothonotary Carolee Medico Olenginski, who oversees civil court records and filings, said she supports the

document types, and developing an understanding of the same information for all four offices may be difficult, she said. “The information in my office alone is so technical, and if you make a mistake, the county could be subject to litigation,” she said. Interim Recorder of Deeds Joan Hoggarth said unions must be involved when a plan is formulated because two different bargaining units cover employees in the impacted offices. Finding a location to fit all four departments will be another hurdle, she said. Interim Clerk of Courts Tom Pizano

said. Register of Wills Dorothy Stankovic said the administration also must decide if records will be stored in the merged office or in a separate building because that will determine the amount of required space. County officials are exploring options for records storage because experts concluded the current leased space in the Thomas C. Thomas building in downtown Wilkes-Barre has temperature extremes, lack of security, leaks and fire hazards.

PLENTY TO DO AT FINE ARTS FIESTA

Flood-damaged Skovish Brothers Pools and Spas rebuilds and expands. By RALPH NARDONE Times Leader Correspondent

SHAVERTOWN

Climate discussion on tap

Citizens for Pennsylvania’s Future and The Lands at Hillside Farms will host an evening of fine food and drink from 6 to 8 p.m. May 24 at Hillside’s historic Coach Barn, 65 Hillside Road. Speakers will lead a discussion on the impact of climate change on food supply in Pennsylvania and what local citizens can do. Guests will enjoy locally produced hors d’oeuvres, ciders, wines and beers as well as informational displays. Speakers include Jeff Moyer, farm director of Rodale Institute; George Jugovic Jr., PennFuture’s president and CEO; and, Douglas J. Ayers, founder and board chair, The Lands at Hillside Farms. Admission is free for PennFuture members and $10 for others. Reservations can be made at www.pennfuture.org/events or by calling 2081757.

PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

TUNKHANNOCK

All-night party for grads

The Tunkhannock Area School District is planning its fourth annual all-night party to be held June 15, the night of graduation for seniors. Seniors who have been registered by their parents will report to the high school between 10 and 11 p.m. Friday night. Students will be locked in the building until 6 a.m. the following morning. The school district is holding this lock-in in an attempt to reduce potential tragedies that often result from students’ poor choices during the celebration of graduation. Last year, approximately 82 percent of the graduating class took part in events and activities that included an inflatable obstacle course, a mechanical bull, open swimming, card tournaments, a hypnotist, and peddle cart racing. If interested in making a donation, contact the high school office at (570) 836-8241. BETHLEHEM

Test shows fox has rabies

Health authorities in eastern Pennsylvania say a fox that bit a man who was visiting Bethlehem has tested positive for rabies. Officials say the man bitten Wednesday and another man who reported a fox bite not far away on the same day are being treated. Health officials say they aren’t sure whether both victims encountered the same animal. On May 8, a woman walking a dog in east Allentown was bitten by a rabid fox. She was started on a series of rabies shots.

Shickshinny sees Skovish store reopen

B

rooke Piscotty, 7, of Hanover Township, meets Miss Northeastern Pennsylvania Lindsey Reichard, at top, during an autograph session of local beauty pageant contestants at Saturday’s Fine Arts Fiesta on Public Square in Wilkes-Barre. Above, accordion player Bill Kuklewicz of Wilkes-Barre Township, serenades Mary Johns, 7, of Kingston and her mom Maureen. This is the 35th year Kuklewicz has been playing the accordion at the fiesta. At left, Fine Arts Fiesta vendor Bob Wiggins of Unicoi, Tenn., makes brooms in his booth.

Hanover Police celebrate 100th anniversary By STEVEN FONDO Times Leader Correspondent

HANOVER TWP. – The Hanover Township Police Department celebrated its 100th anniversary on Saturday with an open house and meet-andgreet for local residents. The afternoon event featured fun and games for the kids with face-painting and prize handouts, as well as children’s identification kits and a special K9 demonstration by township officers. “There are two primary reasons we’re celebrating today,” said Police Chief Albert Walker. “To honor 100 years of professional service with honor and integrity and to allow the

residents of the township to come out and meet their police officers in a more relaxed environment.” Walker, who is celebrating 25 years with the department, said he welcomes the opportunity to meet many of the township’s residents as they tour the department’s facilities, vehicles and grounds. “This is a special day for this community,” said one elderly citizen who came out to enjoy the festivities. “I was born and raised here and my children all graduated from Hanover Area. One FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER hundred years is a long time and it’s definitely something to Hanover K9 Officer Mark Stefanowicz and Otto his police dog put on a demonstration at the open house. be proud of.”

SHICKSHINNY – The flood in September of last year devastated many business properties in the borough of Shickshinny, causing some to close down forever. One business, however, will not. After six months of cleanup and repairs, Skovish Brothers Pools and Spas on Union Street held their “Grand Re-opening” on Saturday. Hundreds showed up to take advantage of deals, have some fun and thank the company for not only remaining in Shickshinny, but actually expanding. In three decades of business, the company saw its share of floods, however, this last one was the worst, said Holly Reynolds, the store manager for the last nine years. The owners were considering closing down. But the company rebuilt and expanded into the pet supplies business with its new Paws Plus Pet Supplies store in the same building. “We decided to rebuild for the community and our customers,” Reynolds said. “We serve a large area, including Nanticoke, Bloomsburg, Mountain Top and Hazleton,” she said. “They had to gut the entire first floor right down to the studs,” Reynolds said. New mildew resistant materials were installed and now the “place looks amazing,” she said. More than 500 tons of gravel were dumped into the basement, a new support beam was constructed and a concrete floor was poured to improve building safety, she said. During the massive project, completed in mid-April, Reynolds said, the company was still focused on helping customers dealing with flood damage. “We wanted to take care of our customers first,” she said. When the project neared completion, she suggested to the owners they hold a reopening. Now customers entering the store comment on how well the improvements went, she said. Plus they can take advantage of an assortment of pet supplies not previously available in Shickshinny, she said. Owner Marty Skovish Jr. said the company wanted to “go all out for the community” on Saturday. “We wanted to make our customer base see we are back,” he said. Skovish said borough officials were closely watching the remodeling progress over the last few weeks. Several council members commented how glad they were to see the company stay. At the reopening, visitors enjoyed complimentary food and drinks, live music, games for the children and the knowledge one local business is definitely sticking it out there.


CMYK PAGE 4A

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

THE TIMES LEADER

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SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 PAGE 5A●

Chinese activist lands in U.S.

B R I E F

York City, where he will be stayHis arrival ends nearly a ing. monthlong diplomatic tussle Dressed in a white shirt and between China and U.S. khaki pants and using crutches, By KAREN MATTHEWS Associated Press

AP PHOTO

Don’t fear the reapers

Reapers go to the competitions during the World Scythe Cup 2012 in Salbitz, eastern Germany, Saturday. Two hundred thirty-one participants from seven countries took part at the event. TAMPA, FLA.

20 years for warning shot

ritics of mandatory-minimum sentencing laws are upset over a 20C year prison term imposed on a Florida

woman for firing a warning shot to try to scare off her threatening husband. Civil rights groups and other advocates say the sentencing of 31-yearold Marissa Alexander last week shows how stripping judges of discretion can result in unfair sentences. About twothirds of the states have mandatoryminimum sentencing laws, usually for drug crimes. Alexander tried unsuccessfully to invoke Florida’s “stand your ground” law and rejected a plea deal for a lesser sentence after she was charged in a dispute with her husband. No one was hurt. A jury convicted her of aggravated battery with a firearm. Florida’s “10-20-life” law that targets gun crimes required the judge sentence her to 20 years.

SANAA, YEMEN

Clashes kill 24 militants

Yemeni officials say fresh clashes with al-Qaida fighters in the south have left at least 34 people dead, while a suspected U.S. drone strike has killed two militants. The officials say the drone attack took place in the central province of Bayda, killing a Somali and a Yemeni militants. Al-Qaida briefly ovverran parts of Bayda earlier this year. Further south in Abyan province, fighting between Yemeni troops and al-Qaida fighters killed 12 soldiers and 22 al-Qaida militants. ROME

Bomb fatal for student

A bomb exploded on Saturday outside an Italian high school named after the wife of an assassinated anti-Mafia prosecutor, killing one student and wounding at least seven others, officials said. There was no immediate claim of responsibility, and police were trying to determine who had planted the bomb. But an anti-Mafia prosecutor said it didn’t appear to be the kind of attack that organized crime has carried out in Italy. The bombing also followed a spate of attacks against Italian officials and buildings by a group of anarchists. The device went off a few minutes before 8 a.m. in the Adriatic port town of Brindisi in the country’s south just as students milled outside, chatting and getting ready for class at the mainly all-girls Francesca Laura Morvillo Falcone vocational institute. Saturday is a school day in much of Italy. The school — which prepares students for jobs in fashion, tourism and social services — is named in honor of Morvillo, a judge who died along with her husband, anti-Mafia prosecutor Giovanni Falcone, in a 1992 highway bombing in Sicily by the Cosa Nostra. BOISE, IDAHO

Robber makes it brief

Police in southwest Idaho say a man chose briefs over boxers to wear on his head as he held up a coffee shop and stole a safe. Coffee shop owner Jason Wilson tells the Idaho Statesman says he believes the man was likely not prepared when he entered Big Star Coffee in Fruitland with an accomplice on Tuesday morning. Wilson asked: “Who robs something with underwear on their head?” Investigators say the two burglars made off with about $500 in cash that was inside the safe. Their actions were captured on surveillance cameras inside and outside the shop.

NEW YORK — A blind Chinese legal activist who was suddenly allowed to leave the country arrived in the United States on Saturday, ending a nearly monthlong diplomatic tussle that had tested U.S.-China relations. Chen Guangcheng had been hurriedly taken from a hospital hours earlier and put on a plane for the U.S. after Chinese authorities suddenly told him to pack and prepare to leave. He arrived Saturday evening at Newark Liberty International Airport and was whisked to New

his right leg in a cast, Chen was greeted with cheers when he arrived at the apartment in Manhattan’s Greenwich Village where he will live with his family. The complex houses faculty and graduate students of New York University, where Chen is expected to attend law school. “For the past seven years, I have never had a day’s rest,” he said through a translator, “so I have come here for a bit of recuperation for body and in spirit.” Chen urged the crowd to fight against injustice, and thanked the U.S. and Chinese governments, along with the embassies of Switzerland, Canada and France. “After much turbulence, I

AP PHOTO

Chinese activist Chen Guangcheng is helped to head to a commercial flight Saturday at Beijing International Airport.

have come out of Shandong,” he said, referring to the Chinese province where he was under house arrest. The U.S. has granted him partial citizenship

rights, he said. Chen gave a short statement, which was greeted by cheers in Mandarin and English, but did not take questions from report-

ers. The departure of Chen, his wife and two children to the United States marked the conclusion of nearly a month of uncertainty and years of mistreatment by local authorities for the self-taught activist. After seven years of prison and house arrest, Chen made a daring escape from his rural village in April and was given sanctuary inside the U.S. Embassy, triggering a diplomatic standoff over his fate. With Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton in Beijing for annual high-level discussions, officials struck a deal that let Chen walk free, only to see him have second thoughts. That forced new negotiations that led to an agreement to send him to the U.S. to study law, a goal of his, at New York University.

Dems: GOP Deadliest twister also costliest is hurting economy Most of $2.8 billion in Joplin damage covered by insurance

By DAVID A. LIEB Associated Press

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — The cost of 30 manhole covers that got sucked away: $5,800. A new concession stand at the destroyed high school: $228,600. Shelter and care for more than 1,300 homeless pets: $372,000. The tornado that tore through Joplin a year ago already ranks as the deadliest twister in six decades. Now it carries another distinction — the costliest since at least 1950. Insurance policies are expected to cover most of the $2.8 billion in damage. But taxpayers could supply about $500 million in the form of federal and state disaster aid, low-interest loans and local bonds backed by higher taxes, according to records obtained by The Associated Press and interviews with federal, state and local officials. Almost one-fifth of that money was paid to contractors who hauled off debris. Tens of millions more dollars went to individuals for temporary housing and other living expenses in the immediate aftermath of the storm. Additional money could help subsidize construction of a new hospital to replace one that was irreparably damaged. All told, about two dozen school districts, emergency agencies, public housing authorities, religious groups and other nonprofits could receive taxpayer money through a program run by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The outpouring of assistance is nowhere near the scale of Hurricane Katrina, which swamped New Orleans and damaged property along a wide swath of the Gulf Coast in 2005. Yet the Joplin tornado raises questions anew about the government’s role in disasters. For Joplin families still on the long road to recovery, the taxpayer aid generally is appreciated. The twister killed Danielle Robertson’s mother and destroyed the duplex she shared with her teenage daughter and two dogs. After several months of tempo-

Some top Dem lawmakers say GOP intentionally delaying economic recovery to hurt Obama in election. By CHARLES BABINGTON Associated Press

AP FILE PHOTO

Shirley Waits sits outside her mother’s home and waits for an insurance adjuster to arrive, in Joplin, Mo., after a massive tornado in May 2011.

rary living arrangements, Robertson eventually got one of the FEMA trailers for tornado survivors. No rent or utility payments were required. “There are just thousands of people who would not have recovered at all had that aid not been there. I mean there’s no way,” said Robertson, who finally moved into a rebuilt rental home about three weeks ago. “I like to consider my-

self a survivalist, but there was nothing to survive with.” The Joplin tornado, which killed 161 people, was one of 99 major disasters declared by President Barack Obama in 2011. Other included blizzards, wildfires and hurricanes. Congress responded in December by authorizing an extra $8.6 billion in disaster aid. Missouri has a rainy day fund with about $500 mil-

lion that was created for costly emergencies. But the fund hasn’t been tapped for Joplin because Gov. Jay Nixon and some lawmakers are reluctant to trigger a constitutional mandate that the borrowed money be replenished within three years. Some critics of federal disaster aid point to Missouri’s rainy day fund as a prime example of how states pass the buck to the federal government for local tragedies.

WASHINGTON — Are Republican lawmakers deliberately stalling the economic recovery to hurt President Barack Obama’s re-election chances? Some top Democrats say yes, pointing to GOP stances on the debt limit and other issues they claim are causing unnecessary economic anxiety and retarding growth. The latest Democratic complaint came after House Speaker John Boehner said Tuesday that when Congress raises the nation’s borrowing cap in early 2013, he will again insist on big spending cuts to offset “The last the increase. Boehner, R-Ohio, continues to re- thing the ject higher tax rates, country which Democrats demand from the wealthy. needs is a That led Sen. Chuck rerun of Schumer, D-N.Y., to say last sumBoehner is virtually assuring another debt- mer’s deceiling crisis as bad or bacle that worse than the one that shook financial markets nearly nine months ago. brought “The last thing the country needs is a rerun down our of last summer’s deba- economy.” cle that nearly brought Sen. Chuck down our economy,” Schumer, Schumer said in a stateD-N.Y. ment. Boehner responded in a statement: “Republicans have passed nearly 30 bills that would help small businesses create jobs and we are waiting on Senate Democrats to vote on these commonsense measures. The failure to act on these jobs bills, as well as our crushing debt burden, is undermining economic growth and job creation.” Democrats say Republicans loaded their jobs bills with provisions certain to doom them in the Senate, such as restrictions on unions and on regulatory agencies such as the Environmental Protection Agency. Regardless of whether Schumer’s suspicions are right, there’s evidence that unceasing partisan gridlock and the prospect ofbigtaxincreasesandspendingcutsinJanuaryarecausingsomecompaniestopostpone expansions. Even small economic slowdowns are bad news for Obama, who is seeking re-election amid high unemployment.

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SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

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Launch of SpaceX is aborted

Engine trouble leads to last-second stopping of historic rocket flight.

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By MARCIA DUNN AP Aerospace Writer

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — A new private supply ship for the International Space Station remained stuck on the ground Saturday after rocket engine trouble led to a last-second abort of the historic flight. All nine engines for the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket roared to life Saturday morning. But with a mere half-second remaining before liftoff, the onboard computers automatically shut everything down. So instead of blasting off on a delivery mission to the space station, the rocket stayed on its launch pad amid a plume of engine exhaust. Even NASA’s most seasoned launch commentator was taken off-guard. “Three, two, one, zero and liftoff,” announced commentator George Diller, his voice trailing as the rocket failed to budge. “We’ve had a cutoff. Liftoff did not occur.” SpaceX president Gwynne Shotwell said that high combustion chamber pressure in engine No. 5 was to blame. During an inspection later in the day, engineers discovered a faulty valve and worked into the evening to replace it. Tuesday is the earliest that SpaceX can try again to send its cargo-laden Dragon capsule to the space station. The Californiabased company — formally known as Space Exploration Technologies Corp. — is targeting every few days for a launch attempt to save fuel in case of rendezvous problems at the space station. Wednesday also could be a launch option. This was the first launch attempt by the several private U.S. companies hoping to take over the job of delivering cargo and eventually astronauts to the space station for NASA. Only governments have accomplished

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Workers, bottom, check out the engines on the Falcon 9 SpaceX rocket on space launch complex 40 at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Cape Canaveral, Fla., early Saturday.

that to date: the United States, Russia, Europe and Japan. NASA is looking to the private sector, in this post-shuttle era, to get American astronauts launching again from U.S. soil. SpaceX officials said that could happen in as few as three years, possibly four. Several other companies are in the running. An estimated 1,000 SpaceX and NASA guests poured into the launching area in the wee hours of Saturday, hoping to see firsthand the start of this new commercial era. They left disappointed. The abort was especially disheartening given the perfect weather and the absence of any earlier countdown problems. Shotwell was asked by a reporter whether she considered Saturday’s abort a failure. “This is not a failure,” she said. “We aborted with purpose. It would be a failure if we were to have lifted off with an engine trending in this direction.” She added: “The software did

what it was supposed to do” with the engine shutdown. Everyone around town, at least, is rooting for a successful flight. “Go SpaceX,” read the sign outside Cape Canaveral City Hall. Until NASA’s space shuttles retired last summer, the sign had urged on the launches of Discovery, Endeavour and, finally, Atlantis. Those ships are now relegated to museums. Late last month, SpaceX conducted a test firing of the nine first-stage rocket engines at the pad. Each engine — including No. 5 — was “rock solid,” Shotwell said. The first flight of the Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral, in June 2010, encountered similar last-second engine trouble, but there was enough time to fix the problem and fly the same day. SpaceX has just a single second each day to launch this time around because of the space station rendezvous.

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 PAGE 7A

AP PHOTO

President Barack Obama, center, and world leaders wave during a photo opportunity at the G-8 Summit Saturday at Camp David, Md.

aimed at German Chancellor Angela Merkel, who came to the summit as the European leader who had demanded austerity as the most important step toward easing the eurozone’s debt crisis. But the election of Socialist Francois Hollande as president of France, and Greek elections that created political chaos in the country were clear rejections of the belt-tightening Merkel represented. Hollande, a new voice at the table in just his first week on the job, offered Obama a reminder of his own responsibilities to work to expand the economy, “even if he’s in an electoral period and who has a Congress that’s not necessarily easy to deal with.” Coping with shaky oil markets, the leaders set the stage for a united release of world oil reserves to balance any disruption in world markets when tough new sanctions are imposed on Iran’s exports because of its disputed nuclear program. The leaders said they were ready to take “appropriate action” to meet any shortages. The mere preparation to release oil reserves could help calm markets and ensure that oil prices, which have been dropping, don’t climb again and anger consumers as U.S. elections approach. The Group of Eight summit includes leaders of the United States, Japan, Britain, Germany, France, Italy, Canada and Russia. A joint summit statement reflected how urgently the countries must contain a financial crisis that could spread from the eurozone to the United States and infect the rest of the global economy. They declared unanimity in ensuring that Greece, which is crippled in debt and politically gridlocked, remains as part of the 17-member euro currency union. “The leaders here understand the stakes,” Obama said in summing up a packed, unusually intimate day of world talks. “They know the magnitude of the choices they have to make and the enormous political and economic and social costs if they don’t.” Merkel said growth and deficit-cutting reinforced each other and that everyone around the table agreed. “That is great progress,” she said. As for promoting growth, she said investments under consideration include research and development, Internet networks and infrastructure. But she said “this doesn’t mean stimulus in the usual sense.” U.S. officials agreed, saying growth measures that the Europeans might pursue don’t all require outright public spending, and could be in the form of public-private partnerships or in initiatives designed to loosen credit. And the leaders stayed away entirely from the world “stimulus,” which has taken on an unpopular political connotation, including in the United States. “The global economic recovery shows signs of promise, but significant headwinds persist,” said G-8 leaders said. The tension between austerity and growth — whether to slash debt by cutting budgets or use

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It all came before Obama was to lead a much larger NATO summit in Chicago on Sunday and Monday that will be heavily focused on the Afghanistan war. The drag of a eurozone crisis comes as joblessness and doubts about a life of better opportunities are already the chief concerns for American voters.

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public money and other means to help spur economic growth — was the backdrop as Obama welcomed an emerging push for a balance between the two. He seized the opportunity to cast the debate in terms favorable to his own re-election, closing the summit with the steps he took to right the U.S. economy and his economic vision for a second term. He said he was confident Europe could get on a path to recovery as has the United States. “We know it is possible in part based on our own experience here,” he said. “In my earliest days in office, we took decisive steps to confront our own financial crisis.” Obama chose Camp David in part to encourage a freewheeling discussion out of sight of most media and potential protests, allowing the leaders to sit around a cabin table to negotiate terms, or stroll through the leafy paths for chats that seemed a world away from the typical summit convention-hall setting.

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SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

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THE TIMES LEADER

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Prosecutors: Trio planned to attack Obama HQ The men were arrested when police raided an apartment in Chicago before NATO summit. By MICHAEL TARM and TAMMY WEBBER Associated Press

CHICAGO — Three men accused of making Molotov cocktails had been planning to attack President Barack Obama’s campaign headquarters, Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s home and other targets during this weekend’s NATO summit, prosecutors said Saturday. The three were arrested Wednesday when police raided an apartment on the city’s South Side ahead of the two-day meeting. Defense attorneys alleged that the arrests were an effort to scare the thousands of people expected to protest at the gathering of world leaders. They told a judge that undercover police were the

ones who brought the Molotov cocktails. “This is just propaganda to create a climate of fear,” defense attorney Michael Duetsch said. Later, outside the courtroom, Duetsch said two undercover police officers or informants who called themselves “Mo” and “Gloves” were also arrested during the Wednesday raid, and defense attorneys said they later lost track of the two. “We believe this is all a setup and entrapment to the highest degree,” Duetsch said. The trio was charged with providing material support for terrorism, conspiracy to commit terrorism and possession of explosives. The suspects were each being held on $1.5 million bond. They apparently came to Chicago late last month to take part in May Day protests. Six others arrested Wednesday in the raid were released Friday without being charged.

Chicago police Lt. Kenneth Stoppa declined to elaborate on the case beyond confirming the charges against the three who were still in custody. Police identified the suspects as Brian Church, 20, of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.; Jared Chase, 24, of Keene, N.H.; and Brent Vincent Betterly, 24. A police spokesman gave Betterly’s hometown as Oakland Park, Mass., but no such town exists. There is an Oakland Park, Fla., that is near Fort Lauderdale. Activist Bill Vassilakis, who said he let the men stay in his apartment, described Betterly as an industrial electrician who had volunteered to help with wiring at The Plant, a former meatpacking facility that has been turned into a food incubator with the

city’s backing. Vassilakis said he thought the charges were unwarranted. “All I can say about that is, if you knew Brent, you would find that to be the most ridiculous thing you’ve ever heard. He was the most stand-up guy that was staying with me. He and the other guys had done nothing but volunteer their time and energy,” he said. Betterly appears to have a history of minor run-ins with law enforcement. He was cited for disorderly intoxication in February in MiamiDade County, Fla., earlier this year , but the case has been dismissed, according to online court records. Authorities in Oakland Park, Fla., said Betterly and two other

N.H. She said she was stunned to learn of the charges against her nephew. Jared Chase’s father, Steve Chase, died about five weeks ago after a long struggle with a disease that left him disabled, Barbara Chase said. The arrests came as authorities tightened security throughout the city in preparation for the summit, where delegations from about 60 countries will discuss the war in Afghanistan and European missile defense. Downtown streets were largely empty Saturday, though that is not unusual for a weekend.

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WILKES UNIVERSITY COMMENCEMENT

A major feat for one graduate with 3 of them By MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

the graduating class. Two students tied for the female honor, Rachel A. Talpash of Larksville and Michelle Wakeley of Endicott, N.Y. Matthew Ruch of Dallas earned the male award. The university also paid posthumous tribute to graduate student Jennifer Diskin of Scranton during the ceremony, awarding her degree to her parents Edmund and Anita Diskin. Diskin, 38, completed the coursework for her Master of Fine Arts degree but died in December following a long battle with Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

WILKES-BARRE TWP. – No one can accuse Brad Kuzawinski of failing to make the most of his college education. Kuzawinski, one of 779 Wilkes University students who received their degrees at the university’s commencement ceremony Saturday, is graduating from the college’s engineering program in four years with three List of graduates of Arts majors and three minors, a feat Bachelor Marwa Aldaraweish, Wilkes-Barre, English; that, as far as the university’s re- Justin Balint, Drums, Spanish; Katie Blose, Criminology; Heather Brown, cords indicate, has never been Wilkes-Barre, Sugarloaf, Psychology; Nicole Clarke, WilkesBarre, Elementary Education; Kelly Clisham, achieved before. Nanticoke, English; Colleen Conway, Mountain “What he did is literally impos- Top, Sociology; David Cook, Wilkes-Barre, sible,” said Rodney Ridley, direc- English; Sara Crolick, Kingston, English; Lindsey Davenport, Dallas, Elementary Education; Paul tor of Wilkes’ Division of Engi- DeAngelo, Hazleton, International Studies; PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER neering and Physics. “He’s the Justin DeSanto, Pittston, Psychology; Alana Donnelly, Wilkes-Barre, Middle School Education; one in a million student who can Marrissa Fedor, Hanover Township, English; Sean Wilkes University graduates take their places inside the Mohegan Sun Arena on Saturday during spring commencement exercises. Wilkes-Barre, Psychology; Jeffrey pull it off. I’ll never say ‘never’ Flecknoe, Ford, Nanticoke, English; Kerri Frail, Wilkesagain because of him.” Barre, Integrative Media; Courtney Gans, Hazle Avoca, Psychology; Krista Tabone, Duryea, Sarah Monsuer, Swoyersville, Business Adminisronmental Engineering; Stephen Martin, Duryea, Township, Psychology; Jonathan Gonsky, Kuzawinski, 22, of Maine, N.Y., Kingston, Sociology; Rachael Talpash, Larksville, Psycholotration; De Nguyen, Wilkes-Barre, Business Biology; Erica Naperkowski, Ashley, Biology; Sociology; Leonard Gryskewicz, White Anthony Thomas, Wilkes-Barre, English; Administration; Steven Olshefski, Wilkes-Barre, Kireesa Pramik, Wilkes-Barre, Electrical Engimajored in mechanical engineer- Haven, Political Science; Bethany Guarilia, Forty gy; Lacey Willis, Plains, Theatre Arts; Bethany Business Administration; Rachael Rovinski, neering; Tylor Ricker, Wilkes-Barre, Biology; Biology; Stephanie Harkins, Larksville, Yamrick, Dallas, Communications; Adam Hanover Township, Business Administration; Gerbeys Roa, Hazleton, Nursing; Kyle Rountree, ing, electrical engineering and Fort, Psychology; Bridget Hine, Plains, Psychology; Zambotti, Drums, Criminology Zachary Stash, Dallas, Business Administration Wilkes-Barre, Accounting; Matthew Ruch, Dallas, applied engineering science, Jeromy Hrabovecky, Wilkes-Barre, Psychology; Bachelor of Business Administration Bachelor of Science Accounting; Jared Sabol, Mountaintop, AccountMiles Humenansky, Edwardsville, Political Wadha Alqahtani, Wilkes-Barre, Business Krysten Alba, Forty Fort, Nursing; Devin Aling; Jeffrey Samselski, Nanticoke, Electrical with minors in physics, math and Science; Angelia Karsko, Wyoming, Sociology; Administration; Christopher Barna, Dallas, brecht, Shavertown, Mechanical Engineering; Engineering; Jessica Shaw, Wilkes-Barre, statistics. He graduated with 182 John Keiser, Wilkes-Barre, Political Science; Business Administration; Hani Barradah, James Barcheski, Hanover Township, AccountNursing; Rebecca Stanton, Edwardsville, Biology; Melissa Kirwan, Larksville, Elementary EducaWilkes-Barre, Business Administration; Gary ing; Joseph Brown, Nanticoke, Computer Suzanne Szewczyk, Dallas, Chemistry; Melanie credits, more than 50 more than tion; Michael Klimek, Kingston, Integrative Buczynski, Mountain Top, Business AdminisScience; Brian Burden, Lauren Run, EnviWard, Yatesville, Accounting; Carl Wilcox, are required for matriculation. Media; Julia Kolaski, Courtdale, Psychology; Lea tration; Joseph Chrismer, Mountain Top, ronmental Engineering; Albert Clocker, SwoyersWilkes-Barre, Mathematics; Danielle Wysokinski, Kunkle, West Pittston, Elementary Education; Business Administration; Raina Connor, ville, Accounting; Christopher Fadule, Hazle Dupont, Nursing; Danielle Yaros, Hanover After easing into his first semes- Jared Lacefield, Wilkes-Barre, History; Alicia Swoyersville, Business Administration; Cory Township, Accounting; Jocelyn Forte, Sugarloaf, Township, Biology; John Yavorski, Wilkes-Barre Conrad, Wilkes-Barre, Entreprenuership; Alyssa Twp, Computer Information Systems; Edward Nursing; Justin Gabel, Nanticoke, Computer ter, he averaged six or seven Lewis, Wilkes-Barre, English; Matthew Manganiello, West Pittston, Psychology; Justin Marino, Davis, White Haven, Business Administration; Zulkoski, Mountain Top, Mathematics Science; Todd Garey, Courtdale, Accounting; courses each semester. Wilkes-Barre, Psychology; Kayla Mattioli, West Jaclyn Gadomski, Plymouth, Entreprenuership; Doctor of Education Stephanie Gerhat, Wilkes-Barre, Nursing; Donald Barbara Conway, Hazleton, Educational AdminisAnthony Griseto, Forty Fort, Entreprenuership; Gosart, Swoyersville, Biology; Jeffrey Hughes, Earning his degree required Pittston, Communications; Christian Medek, Drums, Integrative Media; Jason Neare, Dallas, tration; Kelley Moran, Harveys Lake, Higher Sam Ground, Wilkes-Barre, Entreprenuership; Mountain Top, Mechanical Engineering; Corey sacrifice, Kuzawinski said. It English; Joseph Polashenski, Hazleton, History; Osama Hameed, Wilkes-Barre, Business Admin- Katsak, Plains, Electrical Engineering; Melanie Education Administration; Christy Savakinas, Breanne Ralston, Mountain Top, CommuniBear Creek Township, Educational Technology Timothy Husty, Wilkes-Barre, Business Koslosky, Swoyersville, Nursing; Cody Kustrin, meant giving up his ambitions of cations; Allison Romanski, Jenkins Twp, Psychol- istration; Doctor of Pharmacy Administration; Bernard Kasteleba, Plains, Lehman, Accounting; Richard Lashock, Hazlejoining the college basketball ogy; Daniel Sekera, Luzerne, Integrative Media; Business Administration; Gina Manganiello, Ali Alsheheri, Wilkes-Barre, Pharmacy; Kristin ton, Computer Science; Christopher Lehman, Mark Senchak, Larksville, History; Mary Siejak, Andres, Wyoming, Pharmacy; Justin Balint, Exeter, Business Administration; Courtney Mountain Top, Biology; Jordan Lynch, Nanticoke, team – though he did play intram- Ashley, Elementary Education; Nina Sparacino, Drums, Pharmacy; Alex Brittain, Mountaintop, Matus, Harveys Lake, Business Administration; Nursing; Allison Malloy, Hazle Township, Enviural ball – as well as most of his weekends in his junior and senior years. “There were nights when I’d be in the computer lab – you know, Friday, Saturday nights when everyone’s out partying – from about 8 p.m. Friday night to 8 a.m. Saturday morning. I’d go back, get some rest and be back Saturday around noon, until about 8 a.m. Sunday morning.” “There were times where it got real tough,” he added. “It got to the point where you see everyone else out partying and you wish you could be there too, but you know it will benefit you in the long run.” To push through the grueling schedule, Kuzawinski said he and a study partner would bring their bikes with them and break up the monotony by taking quick rides around Wilkes-Barre every two hours or so. Going to college in a time of recession, Kuzawinski said he was motivated by a realization of how difficult finding work has become. He thinks his sacrifice was worth it. “We’re obviously in a recession right now and jobs are tough to come by,” he said. “That was one of the things I wanted, was to not have to worry about a job; to be able to rise to the top… To be able to walk into an office and say, I graduated in four years, I took all of this and here’s what I can do for you.” After graduation he’s entering a two-year management development program with Precision Castparts Corp., with the longterm goal of becoming an operations manager. Kuzawinski wasn’t the only talented graduate to cross the stage at the Mohegan Sun Arena at Casey Plaza during Wilkes’ commencement Saturday. The university honored Cortny Sasserson, of Westfield, Tioga County, with its Alumni Award for Leadership. Sasserson earned her Bachelor of Business Administration degree with a minor in accounting and served for two years as commuter council president, and was an E-Mentor, alternative spring break coordinator, treasurer of the ultimate Frisbee team, Students in Free Enterprise representative and the university’s representative to Leadership Wilkes-Barre. She will join the Executive Team Leader Program at Target in the Boston area this summer. Three students were recognized with the Wandell Award, presented to the male and female undergraduate students with the highest grade-point average in

Pharmacy; Michelle Davis, Plains, Pharmacy; Kerry Denicola, Pittston, Pharmacy; Laura Eckman, Shavertown, Pharmacy; Elefteria Galiatsatos, White Haven, Pharmacy; Arthur Jankowski, Mountain Top, Pharmacy; Philip Loscombe, Plains, Pharmacy; George Morgan, Exeter, Pharmacy; Paran Mukhija, Wilkes-Barre, Pharmacy; Thao Nguyen Nguyen, Wilkes-Barre, Pharmacy; Theresa Romaldini, Pittston, Pharmacy; Joseph Shipula, Wilkes-Barre, Pharmacy; Trisha Sikora, Shickshinny, Pharmacy; Karan Sluhocki, Plains, Pharmacy Master of Arts Jaclyn Fowler, Drifton, Creative Writing; Erin Miele, Dupont, Creative Writing Master of Business Administration Mohammed Aburiyaleh, Wilkes-Barre, Business Administration; Kimberly Broskoske, Nanticoke, Business Administration; Christopher Brzenchek, Wilkes-Barre, Business Administration; John Cybulski, Kingston, Business Administration; Brittany DeBalko, Drums, Business Administration; Ronald Fitser, Forty Fort, Business Administration; Ann Marie Galli, Wilkes-Barre, Business Administration; Christopher Generose, Mountain Top, Business Administration; Tara Holland, Freeland, Business Administration; Jonathan Hrichison, Plains, Business Administration; John Matteo, Drums, Business Administration; Lauren Noreika, Dallas, Business Administration; Hatim Ouladelhadjahmed, Harveys Lake, Business Administration; Wendy Reshetar, Drums, Business Administration; Thomas Smith, Mountain Top, Business Administration; Kristen Yurkavage, Wilkes-Barre, Business Administration Master of Fine Arts Rachael Goetzke, Sugar Notch, Creative Writing Master of Science Ammar Aldubaikhi, Wilkes-Barre, Engineering Management; Diana Alichnie, Mountain Top, Education; Karen Atiyeh, Wilkes-Barre, Education; Jolie Bach, Tunkhannock, Education; Dara Belak, Hazleton, Education; Linda Benesky, Kingston, Nursing; Karen Carbaugh, Wyoming, Nursing; John Carey, Wilkes-Barre, Electrical Engineering; Svetlana Chinikaylo, Dallas, Nursing; Linda Corbett, Wilkes-Barre, Nursing; Courtney Delazio, West Hazleton, Education; Todd DeSando, Dallas, Education; Monica Falatko, Drums, Education; Michele Garrison, Wilkes-Barre, Education; Edward Grant, Mocanaqua, Education; Neil Grimes, Wilkes-Barre, Education; Megan Howey, Hazleton, Education; Kathryn Kaufman, White Haven, Education; Theresa Long, Drums, Nursing; Megan McAndrew, Forty Fort, Education; Alison Petiak, Wapwallopen, Education; Jennifer Pokrinchak, Swoyersville, Education; Brenda Rehrig, Berwick, Nursing; Mark Robbins, Mountain Top, Education; Tamara Rogowski, Dallas, Education; Mary Roman, Shavertown, Education; Joseph Ruane, Wilkes-Barre, Engineering Management; Keith Schifano, Duryea, Education; Nikolaus Schultz, Sugar Notch, Electrical Engineering; Jennifer Siff, Kingston, Education; Robert Thomas, Forty Fort, Education; Serkan Varol, Wilkes-Barre, Engineering Management; Andrea Vomero, West Wyoming, Nursing; Mike Ward, Wilkes-Barre, Education; Amanda Wark, Wapwallopen, Education; Jarett Wolfe, Nanticoke, Engineering Management

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Brad Kuzawinski, one of 779 graduates, had three majors and three minors.


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SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

JEFFREY ADAM GERMAN, 27, passed away in Byhalia, Mississippi, on Monday. He was the son of Sheldon German, Wilkes-Barre, and Janice Ginn, Collierville, Tenn. He was preceded in death by paternal grandfather, Leonard German, maternal grandfather and grandmother, Miriam and Reuben Katuna, and his niece, Kayleigh. Surviving are father, Sheldon German; mother, Janice Ginn; grandmother, Elaine German; brothers, David German and Daniel German; stepmother, Linda German; stepfather, Bob Ginn; aunts, uncles and cousins. Funeral services will be at The Rosenberg Funeral Chapel Inc., 348 S. River Street, Wilkes-Barre, today at 1 p.m. Interment is in Anshe Ahavas Achim Cemetery, West Pittston. Shiva will be observed at 445 North Gates Avenue, Apt. 1, Kingston, today, 7 to 9 p.m. and Monday through Thursday, 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. JAMES N. HUDELSON, a resident of Lakeland, Florida, formerly of West Pittston, died Thursday, May 17, 2012, in Lakeland, Florida Regional Medical Center. Funeral arrangements have been entrusted to and will be announced by the H. Merritt Hughes Funeral Home Inc., a Golden Rule Funeral Home, 211 Luzerne Avenue, West Pittston.

Jean Acevedo March 30, 2012

Acevedo, 71, of West BabyJ ean lon, N.Y., passed away on Fri-

day, March 30, 2012. Born in Pittston, she was a daughter of the late Frank Argona and Rose Benfante Argona Gerena. Jean was a loving wife, mother, grandmother and sister. She was preceded in death by her parents and a sister, Michaeline Gerena, Pittston. Surviving are her husband, Richard; a son, Frank, and his wife, Diana; a granddaughter, Ellea, Farmingdale, N.Y; a brother, Charles Gerena, Pompano Beach, Fla.; and numerous relatives from the Pittston area. The family requests that memorial donations, if desired, may be made to the Lust-Garten Foundation, 1111 Stewart Ave., Bethpage, NY 11714. A memorial Mass will be held on Monday, May 21, 2012 at 10 a.m. at St. Joseph Morello Parish at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church, William Street, Pittston. Interment was held on Wednesday, May 16, 2012, at St. John the Evangelist Cemetery, Market Street, Pittston. Arrangements have been entrusted to the Gubbiotti Funeral Home, 1030 Wyoming Ave., Exeter.

FUNERALS BENNIE – Mary, Mass of Christian Burial 10 a.m. Monday in Queen of the Apostles Parish, 715 Hawthorne St., Avoca. BEZDZIECKI – Albert, funeral 9 a.m. Monday in the Mark V. Yanaitis Funeral Home, 55 Stark St., Plains Township. Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in Ss. Peter and Paul Church, Plains Township. GERMAN – Jeffrey, funeral services 1 p.m. today in The Rosenberg Funeral Chapel Inc., 348 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre. GNATT – Aldona, funeral 10 a.m. Monday in the Kopicki Funeral Home, 263 Zerbey Ave., Kingston. Mass of Christian Burial at 10:30 a.m. in St. John the Baptist Church, Larksville. SCHULTZ – Norman, funeral services 9:45 a.m. Monday in the George A. Strish Inc. Funeral Home, 105 N. Main St., Ashley. Mass of Christian Burial at 10:30 a.m. in St. Frances Cabrini Parish, Wyoming. TURNER – George, memorial service 1:30 p.m. today in the Davis-Dinelli Funeral Home, 170 E. Broad St., Nanticoke. WALTERS – Mildred, memorial services 4 p.m. today in the Assembly of God Church, 618 Exeter Ave., West Pittston.

OBITUARY POLICY The Times Leader publishes free obituaries, which have a 27-line limit, and paid obituaries, which can run with a photograph. A funeral home representative can call the obituary desk at (570) 829-7224, send a fax to (570) 829-5537 or e-mail to tlobits@timesleader.com. If you fax or e-mail, please call to confirm. Obituaries must be submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Obituaries must be sent by a funeral home or crematory, or must name who is handling arrangements, with address and phone number. We discourage handwritten notices; they incur a $15 typing fee.

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Dorothy Polisky Romanosky

Genevieve Kaminski Palencar

May 19, 2012

May 17, 2012

Polisky Romanosky, 87, D orothy a resident of Kingston, left us

peacefully on Saturday morning, May 19, 2012, in Celtic Healthcare Hospice at Geisinger South WilkesBarre. Her beloved husband was the late Albert W. Romanosky, who passed away on December 10, 1991. Dorothy and Albert were married on May 19, 1941 and they were rejoined in heaven on the 71st anniversary of their marriage. Born on September 28, 1924 at her parents’ home in Kingston, Dorothy was the daughter of the late Charles and Catherine (Moran) Polisky. Prior to her retirement, Dorothy was employed for over 25 years as a seamstress at Leslie Fay, formerly of Plains Township. Dorothy was a faithful member of the former Saint Mary of the Annunciation Roman Catholic Church, Kingston. Following her retirement, Dorothy enjoyed spending time with her family, sewing, baking and volunteering at the Senior Center in Kingston. Dorothy will be forever missed and remembered as the heart and soul of her family, who lovingly put her heart into everything she did. In addition to her husband, Albert, Dorothy was preceded in death by her brothers, Charles, Raymond and Edward Polisky. Dorothy is survived by her brother, Fred Polisky, of Edwardsville; her sister-in-law, Jennie Romanosky, of Kingston; her son, Albert Romanosky and his wife, Kaye Dean Romanosky, of Centerville, Maryland; her daughter, Catherine Terwilliger, of Kingston; her son-in-law, Raymond

Kaminski Palencar, G enevieve 82, of Bear Creek Township,

Terwilliger, of Mountain Top; her grandchildren, Kristin Pitarra and her husband, Peter, and their daughter, Caroline; Laura Klepaski and her husband, Mark, and their children, Kaya and Corey; Raymond Terwilliger and his wife, Danielle, and their children, Raymond and Keira; numerous nieces and nephews. Relatives and friends are invited to attend Dorothy’s viewing, which will be held on Monday, May 21, 2012 from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Wroblewski Funeral Home Inc., 1442 Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort. A private family funeral will be held on Tuesday, May 22, 2012 with a Mass of Christian Burial to be celebrated in Holy Name/Saint Mary’s Church, 283 Shoemaker Street, Swoyersville. Interment with the Rite of Committal will follow in Saint Mary of the Annunciation Cemetery, Pringle. For additional information or to send the family of Mrs. Dorothy Romanosky an online message of condolence, you may visit the funeral home website, www.wroblewskifuneralhome.com.

Michael Joseph Sell February 9, 2012 Michael Joseph Sell, 78, of Hunt, Texas, passed into eternal life Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 at his home. Born in Yatesville, on February 19, 1933, he was the son of the late Loretta Sell Gawronski of Yatesville. After graduating, he proudly served and retired as a Colonel from the U.S. Army. He relocated and lived his charismatic life surrounded by his children and grandchildren, whom he loved and adored. His life was celebrated in a service on Feb. 18, 2012 at the Basilica of Mesilla officiated by the Bishop. He was then laid to rest in the New

Mexico mountains in a cowboy burial and cemetery not far from where he had spent many joyful days hunting and spending time with his family. The service was attended by his many friends, family, children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. He is survived by his daughters, Susan Roberts, and future son-in-law, Kevin Tegmeyer, New Mexico; Arlene Thomas and husband, Bill, New Mexico, and Theresa Sell, Texas; sons, Michael Sell, Texas, and Dillon Sissney and wife, Holly. He is also survived by his grandchildren, Gentry, Brooks and Cameron Roberts, Suelena Thomas and Katie Tegmeyer. There will be a memorial service held for family and friends of his hometown on Saturday, May 26, 2012 at 10 a.m. at St Joseph Marello, Mount Carmel Parish, William Street, Pittston.

Mary Savage May 18, 2012

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ary Savage, 86, of Park Towers, East Green Street, Nanticoke, and formerly East Washington Street, was embraced by her Lord late Friday evening, May 18, 2012 at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. She had been seriously ill since March. Born on August 8, 1925, in Nanticoke, she was a daughter of the late John and Anna Krucovski Baran. She attended the Nanticoke schools. Prior to retiring, she had been employed by A. Rifkin Company, Hanover Township, for 20 years. Mary was a very devoted wife and mother and was a member of St. Peter’s Lutheran Church, WilkesBarre. She also enjoyed cooking and baking. In addition to her parents, Mary was preceded in death by her husband of 50 years, Edmund P. Savage, on June 18, 1997; and a brother,

John, in infancy. She will be greatly missed by her daughter, Roxanne Kellow, and her husband, Ray, Slocum Township; sisters, Anna Krzyznieski and Irene Michalski, both of Nanticoke, a brother, George Baron, Maine, and her many nieces and nephews who will cherish memories of her forever. Services will begin Tuesday at 10 a.m. with a brief prayer service from Davis-Dinelli Funeral Home, 170 E. Broad St., Nanticoke, followed by the funeral service at 11 a.m. in St. Peter’s Lutheran Church, 1000 South Main Street, WilkesBarre. The Rev. Michael Erickson, her pastor, will officiate. Interment will be in Oak Lawn Cemetery, Hanover Township. Visitation will be Monday from 7 to 9 p.m. at the funeral home.

Diane Marie Kozak May 19, 2012 Marie Kozak, 42, of Avoca, D iane passed away Saturday at her

home under the care of Hospice Community Care, surrounded by her loving family. Born in Scranton, she was the daughter of Joseph and Ellen Willard Kozak of Avoca. She was a graduate of Pittston Area High School. She was employed by Dr. Lilik’s Office, Scranton. She was a member of Queen of the Apostles Parish, Avoca. She was a loving mother, daughter, fiancée, sister and aunt. She was a loving person who always went out of her way to help anyone who needed it. She was a member of the Polish Falcons Nest 128, Duryea. In addition to her parents, she is survived by daughter, Carrie Anne Kozak, at home; fiancé, Wayne Hoover, Avoca; brother, Edward Kozak and his wife, Diana, of Dupont and their son Braden; brother, Stephen Kozak of Duryea and his son,

Stephen. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held Tuesday at 9:30 a.m. in Queen of the Apostles Parish, 715 Hawthorne St., Avoca, with the Rev. Philip J. Sladicka officiating. Interment will be in St. John’s Cemetery, Duryea. Friends may call Monday from 5 to 8 p.m. at the Bernard J. Piontek Funeral Home Inc., 204 Main St., Duryea. Family and friends are asked to go directly to the church the morning of the funeral. Diane’s family would like to thank their family, friends and Hospice Community Care for the excellent care that was given to Diane throughout her illness.

died Thursday, May 17, at Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center. She was the daughter of the late Felix and Mary Telech Kaminski. Genevieve graduated from Coughlin High School, Class of 1948, and College Misericordia in 1975, and worked as an administrative assistant for AT&T. She was active with Children International Charities and was a member of St. Elizabeth of Hungary Church, Bear Creek. She was preceded in death by her husband, Andrew, in 1994. Surviving are daughters, Andrea and Valerie of Bear Creek and Carolyn Palencar Herrera of Los Angeles, California. Funeral will be held on Monday

from the Yeosock Funeral Home, 40 S. Main St., Plains Township, with a Mass of Christian Burial at noon in St. Elizabeth of Hungary Church. Friends may call today, 6 to 7 p.m., and Monday, 10 a.m. until time of service.

May 17, 2012

inger Wyoming Valley Medical Center, Plains Township. Born in Hazleton, she was a daughter of the late Thomas and Dana (Sarl) DeFazio. Mary worked for the Diocesan Guild Studios for over 40 years. She will also be remembered as an ardent supporter of Pro Life. Mary was a member of St. Jude Church, Mountain Top. Preceding Mary in death, in addition to her parents, were her husband John, and her brothers, Frank, Thomas and Mauro DeFazio.

Mary is survived by her sons, Thomas Swirbel and his wife, Lara, and their daughter, Ashley Grace, Davie, Fla., and John Swirbel and his wife, JoAnn, Mountain Top. The funeral will be held on Monday, May 21, at 10 a.m. from McCune Funeral Home, 80 S. Mountain Blvd., Mountain Top, followed by a Mass of Christian Burial at 10:30 a.m. at St. Jude Church, Mountain Top. Interment will immediately follow in Calvary Cemetery, Drums. Relatives and friends are invited to call on Monday from 9 to 10 a.m. at the funeral home. View obituaries online at mccunefuneralserviceinc.com.

John P. McGill May 18, 2012 P. McGill, of Poplar Street, J ohn Wilkes-Barre, passed away Fri-

day in Hospice Community Care Unit, Geisinger South Wilkes-Barre. Born Nov. 28, 1955, in WilkesBarre, he was a son of the late Frank and Mary Murphy McGill. He was a graduate of Meyers High School, Class of 1973. He was formerly employed by Zayre Department Store, Ames Department Store, both of Wilkes-Barre, and Lord and Taylor, Wilkes-Barre Township. He was a member of St. Andrew’s Parish, Wilkes-Barre. John is survived by brothers,

Illinois man trapped in cave in Iowa Rescue crews had to chisel away rocks to get the man out after 20 hours.

Mary D. Swirbel ary D. Swirbel, 89, of Mountain Top, entered into eternal rest M on Thursday, May 17, 2012, at Geis-

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James and his wife, June McGill; Joseph and his wife, Dolores McGill, both of Exeter; niece and godchild Marianna McGill, Arlington, Va. Funeral will be Monday at 9 a.m. from the Mamary-Durkin Funeral Service, 59 Parrish St., WilkesBarre, with Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in St. Andrew’s Church, Parrish Street, Wilkes-Barre. Interment will be in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Hanover Township. Friends may call today from 5 to 8 p.m. Those who desire may give memorial contributions to the charity of their choice.

By TIMBERLY ROSS Associated Press

An Illinois man was trapped for more than 20 hours in a cave at an Iowa state park before being rescued Saturday. Iowa Department of Natural Resources spokesman Kevin Baskins said Logan Eliasen, 20, of Port Byron, Ill., was dislodged from a narrow part of Wye Cave at Maquoketa Caves State Park about 3:30 p.m. Saturday. He’d been stuck there since 6:45 p.m. Friday. Baskins said Eliasen was given oxygen and an IV to prevent dehydration as crews chiseled away rock to widen the path. He was taken from the scene to a Maquoketa hospital. A spokeswoman there said she couldn’t release his condition. Park Ranger Scot Dykstra said visitors discovered two people lodged in the cave about 8 p.m. Friday and alerted park staff. Dykstra said they became stuck while crawling through a narrow part of the cave. Rescue crews from Maquoketa and Quad Cities were able to free the woman, identified as 20-yearold Emma Thomson of Port Byron, Ill., about 11:40 p.m. Friday. She was treated at the scene for minor injuries, Baskins said. The 323-acre state park is northwest of Maquoketa, about halfway between Des Moines and Chicago. It features more than a dozen caves visitors can explore on their own, either by walking or crawling, based on their own ability and comfort level. Baskins said he’s not sure whether the man was experienced in cave exploration.

South Asia a force in meth trade Drug cartels are thriving off the weak governments in Iran and Pakistan. By SEBASTIAN ABBOT Associated Press

ISLAMABAD — Iran, Pakistan and other South Asian countries are a fast-rising force in the global methamphetamine market, with drug cartels thriving off the weak governance and law enforcement that have long fueled the region’s heroin trade. This environment has allowed criminals to tap into the countries’ relatively advanced pharmaceutical industries to get their hands on meth’s two main ingredients: ephedrine and pseudoephedrine. The drug is more valuable than heroin, and some say, more addictive. Highlighting this scourge are U.N. figures showing that the number of meth labs uncovered in Iran rose from two to 166 in three years, while the supply of precursor chemicals in Pakistan has more than tripled over roughly the same period. A Supreme Court case in Pakistan involving the prime minister’s son has drawn more attention to the problem. The case revolves around two Pakistani pharmaceutical companies that allegedly used political connections to obtain huge amounts of ephedrine and are suspected of diverting it to people in the drug trade who could have used it to make meth worth billions of dollars. The companies have denied any wrongdoing. Ephedrine and pseudoephedrine are used to make common cold medicine, but either can also be used to manufacture meth easily at home or, in places like Mexico where the trade is most advanced, in huge labs indistin-

ST.M A RY’S

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guishable from those of large pharmaceutical companies. The greater South Asia region has a long history of drug manufacturing, but most of it has involved opium and heroin made from the vast quantities of poppy grown in Afghanistan and smuggled out through Pakistan and Iran. As governments elsewhere clamp down on the availability of the precursor chemicals, this region is attracting more dealers, said Matt Nice of the Viennabased International Narcotics Control Board, which enforces U.N. conventions regulating the manufacture and distribution of ephedrine and pseudoephedrine. They look for a country with weak security and regulation “where you can obtain the chemicals because no one is paying attention, or it has never been a problem before,” he said. Iranian police dismantled 166 meth labs in 2010, up from just two in 2008, according to the U.N. Labs have also been dismantled in Sri Lanka and India, one of the world’s largest manufacturers of precursor chemicals. Worldwide, nearly 10,200 meth labs were seized in 2009, the most recent aggregate data available, according to the U.N. Most were small labs dismantled in the U.S. But the number of labs outside the U.S. has increased significantly in recent years. Much of the meth produced in Iran is smuggled to East and Southeast Asia, which have some of the highest street prices and are facing an epidemic of addiction. “Over the past five years, Iran went from a non-issue in the global synthetic drug trade to top10 in the world in terms of sei-

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zures,” said Jeremy Douglas, head of the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime in Pakistan. “They are also arresting Iranian meth couriers and traffickers throughout East Asia.” There are up to 21 million amphetamine users in East and Southeast Asia, out of a total high-end estimate of 56 million worldwide, according to the U.N. Nearly half of all people seeking drug treatment in East and Southeast Asia in 2009 were methamphetamine users. There are signs Pakistan could be vulnerable to the synthetic drug trade and headed in the same direction as Iran. Pakistani authorities arrested a Malaysian man last year at the airport in Karachi with a suitcase containing hidden compartments of meth that he admitted was made in the city, said Douglas. Thai officials have also arrested several Pakistanis carrying meth at the airport in Bangkok who flew there from Pakistan, he said. “There are indications meth is being produced in Pakistan,” said Douglas. “It makes sense because the supply of the precursors is high, readily available and cheap.” The chemicals are also being smuggled out of Pakistan to neighboring Iran and other countries. Iran reported significant seizures of ephedrine originating from Pakistan and Syria — 648 pounds in 2010 and 827 pounds in 2011, the U.N said. Pakistan also seized 584 pounds of ephedrine in provinces bordering Iran in 2010.

In Remembrance of “Howdy” May 20, 2009


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SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 PAGE 11A

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SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

NAACP backs gay marriage

The Associated Press

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MIAMI — The NAACP passed a resolution Saturday endorsing same-sex marriage as a civil right and opposing any efforts “to codify discrimination or hatred into the law.” The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People’s board voted at a leadership retreat in Miami to back a resolution supporting marriage equality, calling the position consistent with the equal protection provision of the U.S. Constitution. “The mission of the NAACP has always been to ensure political, social and economic equality of all people,” Board Chairwoman Roslyn M. Brock said in a statement. “We have and will oppose efforts to codify discrimination into law.” Same-sex marriage is legal in six states and the District of Columbia, but 31 states have passed amendments to ban it. The NAACP vote came about two weeks after President Barack Obama announced his support for gay marriage, setting off a flurry of political activity in a number of states. Obama’s announcement followed Vice President Joe Biden’s declaration in a television interview that he was “absolutely comfortable” with gay couples marrying. “Civil marriage is a civil right and a matter of civil law. The NAACP’s support for marriage equality is deeply rooted in the Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution and equal protection of all people” said NAACP President Benjamin Todd Jealous, a strong backer of gay rights. Gay marriage has divided the black community, with many religious leaders opposing it. In California, exit polls showed about 70 percent of blacks opposed samesex marriage in 2008. In Maryland, black religious leaders helped derail a gay marriage bill last year. But state lawmakers passed a gay marriage bill this year. Pew Research Center polls have found that African Americans have become more supportive of same-sex marriage in recent years, but remain less supportive than other groups. The Human Rights Campaign, gay rights advocacy group, applauded the step by the Baltimorebased civil rights organization.

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Marjorie Douglas, Mountain Top James Doyle, Zion Grove Marilynn Drumtra, Hazleton Len Dugan, Monroeton David H. Dulebohn, Sweet Valley Donna Dzugan, Nanticoke Joan Ellard, Old Forge Frances A. Ellis, Wilkes-Barre Henry Elmy, Sugar Notch Shirley Emswiler, Swiftwater Barry Erick, Dallas Robert Ernestine, Dallas Elizabeth Estrada, Scranton Edith Evans, Wilkes-Barre Norma E. Evans, Mountain Top Beverly Fedder, Berwick Gayle Fenton, White Haven Margaret Filbert, Wapwallopen Elsie Floray, Zion Grove Louis Foster, Dallas Elizabeth Frantz, Stillwater Eunice Frederick, Sugarloaf Mary Frederick, Drifton Juergen Friedrich, Conyngham Melissa Futch, West Wyoming Theodore Gabriel Sr., Trucksville JoAnne Gagliardi, Hanover Twp. James Galdieri, Clarks Green Janet Gammaitoni, Plains Leo Gammaitoni, Plains Raymond Ganska, Hawley Ronald Garbett, Nanticoke Maude Geary, Harvey’s Lake Barbara George, Avoca Michael George, Avoca Kathleen Geraghty, Shavertown William Geurin, Shickshinny Angelo Giannone, Pittston Barbara Gilbert, Clarks Summit Dolores Gillow, Old Forge Donna Ginthner, Plymouth Edward Golanoski, Mountain Top Elaine Golaszewski, Wilkes-Barre Edward Golden, Wilkes-Barre Charles Gordon, Dallas Robert Gordon, Benton Paul Gottleib, Plains Twp. Laraine Grande, East Stroudsburg Carol Grant, Effort James Gravatt, Pocono Pines Mary Jean Greco, Drums Arthur Gregoire, Hazleton Clair Gregory, Lakeville Carmella Gress, S. Abington Twp. Charlene E. Griffith, Luzerne Jeanette Grutrkowski, Hunlock Creek Lewis Gubrud, Lords Valley Carolyn Gwozdziewycz, Honesdale Charlene Hardik, Luzerne Harry Harmon, Berwick Betty J. Harkleroad, Dalton Kay Harmon, Berwick Ralph Harris, Saylorsburg Joseph Healy, Hazleton Mary Hendricks, Scranton Paul Herstek, Harvey’s Lake Connie Hildebrand, Wapwallopen Dwayne Hilton, Berwick Joyce Hocko, Mountain Top Jennie Hodick, Hanover Twp. Roy Hoffman, Pocono Lake Elizabeth Hogar, Shenandoah Joan Hopper, Dingmans Ferry Joan Hudak, Forty Fort Rosalie Hughes, White Haven James Humenick, Beaver Meadows Agnes Hummel, Wilkes-Barre Marianne Infantino, Wilkes-Barre Barbara Jarrow, Blakely Gertrude Johnson, Berwick John Johnson, Nanticoke Irene Joseph, Wilkes-Barre Simona Juzwiak, Plains Lynette Kabula, Pocono Pines Carol Ann Kasper, Kingston David Kaufman, Waverly Maryann Kaufman, Waverly Sylvia Keber, Nanticoke Stephanie Keffer, Berwick Shirley Keenan, Moscow James Kennedy, Hazleton Renee Kennedy, Hazleton Beth Kerr, Harvey’s Lake Sharon Kingsbury, Wyoming Joann Kishbaugh, Berwick Emily Klem, Plains Eugene Klimash, Shavertown John Klimczak, Lake Ariel Ann Marie Kmieciak, Harvey’s Lake Joyce Kocis, Plymouth Lisa Koehler, Weatherly

Cecilia Kondrchek, Bloomsburg John Kondrchek, Bloomsburg John Koscelnick, Mountain Top Paula Koscelnick, Mountain Top Eileen Kovatch, Bloomsburg James Kozokas, Swoyersville Dennis Kravitz, Mechanicsburg Anita Kretchic, Hawley Edward Krubitzer, Dallas Joan Kryzanowski, Peckville “Debbie” Kukorlo, Bloomsburg Joseph Kuloszewski, Forty Fort William Kurtinitis, Pittston Kevin Kwiatek, Glen Lyon Marcella Kwiatkowski, W. Hazleton Joan Lally, Forty Fort Molly Landmesser, Wilkes-Barre Jerry Laudeman, Ringtown Bonnie Lavin, Bartinsville Betty Lawrence, Clarks Summit Toby Lovinger, Clarks Summit Lucille Loyack, Exeter Lorraine Lecce, Montoursville Kenneth Legg, Exeter Joseph Lehman, White Haven Patricia Lewis, Danville Roseann Libus, Nanticoke Joseph Ligotski, Askam Colleen Lindsay, Moosic Janice Link, Bethlehem Eugene Lippi, Wyoming Joseph Litchman, Kingston Josaphine Loomis, Carbondale Lottie Lowe, Exeter William Lowe, Exeter Al Manganello, Bloomsburg Jane Malinowski, Mountain Top Ayn Lynn Malkin, Lansford Robert Marsh, Dupont Darlene Marin, Lightstreet Ronald Martin, Honesdale Robert Marvin, East Stroudsburg Delphine Mattei, Dupont Julie Matteo, Hazel Twp. Ronald May, Zion Grove Marian A. Mazza, Carbondale Marian Mazza, Scranton Karen McCloud, Shavertown Georgia McDonald, Lake Ariel Georgiana McDonald, Lake Ariel Mary Ellen McDonough, Scranton Patricia McElhattan, Bloomsburg Pat McGill, Keyaryes Jeanette McNamara, Scranton Mary Anne Medalis, Kelayres Helene Megargel, Lake Ariel Marie L. Melvin, West Pittston Grace Merlino, Hudson Richard Merrick, Hazleton Nancy Mesh, Wilkes-Barre Walt Michaels, Shickshinny Patricia Miles, Avoca David Minnier, Mountain Top Dena Mitchell, Dupont Mary Sue Mitke, Mountain Top Marie Montecalvo, Berwick Paul Montgomery, Nicholson Deborah Moran, Wilkes-Barre Judi Morgan, Femington, NJ Ruby Ann Morgan, Albrightsville Joan Moss, West Pittston George Mullen, Avoca Anthony Mulvey, Wilkes-Barre Lorraine Mursch, Scranton Mary O’Hara, Scranton Judith O’Melia, Lake Harmony Al Olhanoski, Hazleton Leonard Orehek, Swiftwater Rose M. Orehek, Vandling Colette Orlando, Pittston Mary Ann Pachick, Cape Coral, FL Helen M. Parker, Dallas Robert E. Parker, Dallas Lucille Parrell, Macadoo Mary Payne, Wilkes-Barre Robert Pealer, Forty Fort Dorothy Pembleton, Bloomsburg Florence Peoples, Hawley Eleanor Petrucci, Scranton Marcella Petuch, Beaver Meadows Mary Jo Piazza, Swoyersville Emidio Piccioni, Pottsville Alex Podsadlik, Pittston Sylvia Poltrock, Freeland Jean Porter, East Stroudsburg Brenda Post, Berwick Karen Potter, Bradford Karen Potter, Wyalusing Joyce Preston, Myrtle Beach, SC James Price, Bushkill Falls Mary Priddy, Honesdale

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MISERICORDIA UNIVERSITY COMMENCEMENT

One graduate discovers that it’s never too late Undergraduate and graduate degrees awarded to 392 members of class of 2012. By CAMILLE FIOTI Times Leader Correspondent

pooled and compared notes.’’ Our family is very supportive of each other,” Kreitzer said, adding he couldn’t have done it without the support of his wife, Gail. “She sacrificed a lot,” he said. The couple’s other daughter, Lisa Perfetto, 32, of Larksville, also inspired Kreitzer to finish what he started. Perfetto graduated at the top of her class from Geisinger’s phlebotomy program last year. “We all shared in each other’s successes,” he said. Kreitzer, who works in the Quality Assurance Department at the American Red Cross in Hanover Township, said the program helped him build a foundation for the future. “You’re always learning new concepts and ideas,” he said. “I think education is so important that if something presents itself, you’ll have that background and it will support you down the road.”

DALLAS – Forty-six-year-old Joseph Kreitzer of Plymouth proved it’s never too late to achieve your dreams, as he accepted his diploma at Misericordia University’s 86th Commencement Saturday. He was one of the school’s 392 members of the class of 2012 who were awarded undergraduate and graduate degrees. Had it not been for the support of family, Kreitzer may have never achieved his goal of earning a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration. He had always wanted to continue his education after earning an associate degree at Luzerne County GRADUATE LIST Community College in 1992, but The following are Misericordia University who applied and were eligible to the demands of work and family students participate in the spring commencement ceremolife left little time to pursue his ny on Saturday: Eric Aeppli, Wyalusing, PA, Business Adminisgoal. tration, BS; Ebony Amora-Garrison, Brooklyn, NY, Having gone through the pro- Business Administration, BS; Megan Anderson, Fair Lawn, NJ, Education, MS; Kristen Andrews, gram school’s Expressway Accel- Scranton, PA, History, BA; Michelle Anzalone, PA, English, BA; Krista Artim, West erated Degree Program a few Pittston, Wyoming, PA, Elementary Education, BS & Special years earlier, Kreitzer’s daughter, Education, BS; Jessica Aungst, Selinsgrove, PA, Language Pathology, MS; Dawna Barna, Missy Kapsick of Shavertown, Speech Wapwallopen, PA, Nursing, BS; Jacqueline Barna, Tunkhannock, PA, Elementary Education, BS & encouraged him to enroll. Special Education, BS; Aaron Barnhart, Apalachin, “She was the catalyst to get me NY, Biology, BS; Charelle Bassett, Harveys Lake , Nursing, BS; Stephanie Bellino, Kingston, PA, to go back,” he said of Missy, 36, PA, Elementary Education, BS & Special Education, who received a bachelor’s degree BS; Marisa Betz, Mount Carmel, PA, Medical Imaging, BS; Katherine Blanchard, Shavertown, in nursing through the Express- PA, Elementary Education, BS & Special EducaBS; Amanda Blank, Nanticoke, PA, Orgaway Program in 2009. “She said, tion, nizational Management, MS; William Boice Jr., ‘Joe, you should really think Benton, PA, Business Administration, BS; Lisa Ann Gabel Bolton, Dallas, PA, Nursing, BS; Abigail about going back to school.’” Bomboy, Dallas, PA, Speech Language Pathology, With Kapsick’s encourage- MS; Kelly Booth, Red Bank, NJ, Elementary Education, BS & Special Education, BS; Sara ment, Kreitzer attended an open Borbacs, Allentown, PA, Business Administration, BS; Lauren Brague, West Wyoming, PA, Psycholohouse at Misercordia, where he gy, BS; Christine Brandon, Freeland , PA, Occupadiscussed his options with advis- tional Therapy, MS; Marcy Bronsburg, WilkesPA, Professional Studies, BS; Amanda er Maki McCann of the school’s Barre, Brown, New Columbia, PA, Speech Language Pathology, MS; Alicia Bryk, Dupont, PA, OccupaAdult and Continuing Education tional Therapy, MS; Krystal DeEtte Burford, Department. Conklin, NY, Nursing, BS; Kaitlin Burgio, Greenfield Twp., PA, Speech Language Pathology, MS; “We talked about time con- Stephen Burnett, Tobyhanna, PA, Health Care straints and she said, ‘It’s never Management, BS; Justine Burrell, Forest City, PA, Physical Therapy, DPT; Courtney Butler, Mount the right time; you just have to Cobb, PA, Nursing, BS; Albert Caban, Dickson City, PA, Business Administration, MBA; Jeanne start,’” he said. Cadman, Clarks Summit, PA, Nursing, MS; James In the fall of 2008, Kreitzer Carpenter, Mountaintop, PA, Nursing, BS; Brandon Carr, Wyalusing, PA, Business Administration, BS; took the first big step and began Amelia Caruso, Kingston, PA, Organizational Management, MS; Lisa Caruthers, West Pittston, taking classes. Kapsick, who was PA, Professional Studies, BS; Casandra Casselbustill enrolled in the program, was ry, Tunkhannock, PA, Nursing, BS; Jillian Castaldi, PA, Nursing, BS; Caitlin Cavanaugh, in Kreitzer’s first class. In 2009, Scranton, Toms River, NJ, Occupational Therapy, MS; Rebecca Charnitski, Swoyersville, PA, Nursing, BS; the two were classmates once Peter Chesney, Hanover Twp. , PA, Information again in Kapsick’s last class. “It Technology, BS; Kimberly Chopyak, Shavertown, PA, Education, MS; Nicole Chromey, Exeter, PA, was nice,” he said of their shared Social Work, BS; Patrick Clark, Brookhaven, PA, academic experience. “We car- Business Administration, BS; Tanya Clark,

Davenport, NY, Occupational Therapy, OTD; Mason Coldwater, Clarks Summit, PA, Sport Management, BS; Megan Conklin, Bloomingdale , NJ, Elementary Education, BS & Special Education, BS; Meaghan Connolly-Ubaldini, Trucksville , PA, Nursing, BS; Paula Considine-Perugino, Dallas, PA, Nursing, BS; Margaret Constable, Lewisburg, PA, Speech Language Pathology, MS; Misty Cook, Dallas, PA, Nursing, BS; Colleen Coolbaugh, Inkerman, PA, Psychology, BS; Marisa Cooper, Frackville, PA, Occupational Therapy, MS; Samuel Corey, Union Dale, PA, Computer Science, BS; Laura Crilley, Mountaintop, PA, Nursing, BS; Angela Croop, Kingston, PA, Speech Language Pathology, MS; Julianne Curry, Glassboro, NJ, Speech Language Pathology, MS; Amanda Davis, Taylor, PA, Occupational Therapy, MS; Kelsey Davis, Clarks Summit, PA, Speech Language Pathology, MS; Sarah Dempsey, Clarks Green, PA, Education, MS; Janette Depew, Scranton, PA, Psychology, BS; Mark DeStefano, Chesapeake Beach, MD, Business Administration, BS; Lane Dickey, Bangor, PA, Sport Management, BS; Aimee DiLucido, Collingdale, PA, English, BA; Nichole Donnelly, Wapwallopen, PA, Business Administration, BS; Christina Dorward, Muncy, PA, Occupational Therapy, OTD; Michele Drago, Larksville, PA, Communications, BA; April Dulsky, Dallas, PA, English, BA & Communications, BA; Matthew Erney, Jim Thorpe, PA, Sport Management, BS; Amanda Evans, Wapwallopen, PA, Organizational Management, MS; Erin Evans, Kingston, PA, Biology, BS; Ryan Felsman, Waymart, PA, Business Administration, BS; Christopher Fisher, Mifflinburg , PA, Physical Therapy, MS; Nicole Flaherty, Hanover Twp., PA, Elementary Education, BS & Special Education, BS; Kaitlyn Flannery, Mountaintop, PA, Nursing, BS; Emily Foley, Hunlock Creek, PA, Business Administration, BS; Kristie Force, Wyalusing, PA, Nursing, BS; Janice Frank, Wilkes-Barre, PA, Nursing, MS; Meghan Franz, Pocono Lake, PA, Occupational Therapy, MS; Kimberly Frey, Swoyersville, PA, Nursing, BS; Alex Fuchylo, Peckville, PA, Communications, BA; Jennifer Gallagher, Bethlehem, PA, Medical Imaging, BS; Michelle Galli, Wilkes-Barre, PA, Physical Therapy, MS; Caitlin Gardner, Brick , NJ, Physical Therapy, MS; Gabrielle Gattuso, Mountaintop, PA , English, BA; Vladislav Gladkikh, Nanticoke, PA, Medical Imaging, BS; Matthew Godlewski, Mountaintop , PA, Information Technology, BS; Holly Goncheroski, Wilkes-Barre, PA, Nursing, BS; Andres Gonzalez, Centereach, NY, Computer Science, BS & Mathematics, BS; Rebecca Gouldthread, Salisbury, MD, Physical Therapy, MS; Cassandra Graeff, Pottsville, PA, Biology, BS; Alicia Grandinetti, Jessup, PA, Physical Therapy, MS; Jessica Grant, Walden, NY, Health Care Management, BS; Matthew Grant, Allentown, PA, Communications, BA; Tedi Greenley, Tunkhannock, PA, Nursing, BS; Wendy Woodside Griggs, Muncy, PA, Speech Language Pathology, MS; Amber Gulla, Plains, PA, English, BA; Julia Guzman, Springfield , NJ, Occupational Therapy, OTD; Caitlin Hails, Lopez, PA, English, BA; Bradley Hankey, Swoyersville, PA, Information Technology, BS; Catherine Harding, Hanover Twp., PA, Nursing, MS; Bridget Harrison, Leesport, PA, Nursing, BS; Allen Heintz, Ardsley, PA, Sport Management, BS; Abby Heintzelman, Hellertown , PA, Business Administration, BS; Melanie Hill, Shickshinny, PA, Occupational Therapy, MS; Lisa Homa, Minersville , PA, Nursing, BS; Kelly Hooper, West Pittston, PA, Social Work, BS; Kera Hope, Northampton, PA, Speech Language Pathology, MS; Kaytlin Houseknecht, Shickshinny, PA, Psychology, BS; Amanda Howatt, Coopersburg, PA, Nursing, BS; Kailee Hummel, Dover, DE, Physical Therapy, MS; Nicole Iaconetti, Wharton, NJ, Occupational Therapy, MS; Natasha Jankowsky, Trucksville, PA, Physical Therapy, MS; Michelle Jeffries, Tunkhannock, PA, English, BA; Mark Johndrow, Duryea, PA, Organizational Management, MS; Amy Johnson, Hurleyville, NY, Physical Therapy, DPT; Robert Johnson, Jackson, PA, Physical Therapy, MS; Gina Jorgensen, Owego, NY, Physical Therapy, MS; Melanie Kalinowski, Sugarloaf, PA, Organizational Management, MS; Rebecca Kania, Meriden, CT, Physical Therapy, DPT; Jennifer Kates, Dallas, PA, Biology, BS; Nicole Kazmerick, Exeter, PA, Speech Language Pathology, MS; Christina Kelljcheain, Kunkletown, PA, Elementary Education, BS; Jeffrey Kelly, Dallas, PA, Professional Studies, BS; Denise Kennedy, Nesquehoning, PA, Business Administration, BS; Peter Kerrick, Beaver Meadows, PA, Government, Law, National Security, BA; Samantha Kilgour, South Berwick, ME, Organizational Management, MS; Laura Kingston, Tunkhannock, PA, English, BA; Jenna Kinzinger, Honesdale , PA, Occupational Therapy, MS; Jessica Klimas, Tunkhannock, PA, Physical Therapy, DPT; Tonya Klinger, Frackville , PA, Nursing, BS; Courtney Knipe, Cogan Station, PA, Social Work, BS; Phyllis

NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Misericordia University graduate Joe Kreitzer poses with his daughter Melissa Kapsick before Saturday’s commencement. Knorr, Danville, PA, Nursing, BS; Kristina Kogoy, Wilkes-Barre, PA, Physical Therapy, DPT; Devin Koslap, Bethlehem, PA, Occupational Therapy, MS; Shannon Kowalski, Glen Lyon, PA, Interdisciplinary Studies, BA; Joseph Kreitzer, Plymouth, PA, Business Administration, BS; Colleen Kuchar, Blakely, PA, Physical Therapy, MS; Jeremy Kushner, Archbald, PA, Physical Therapy, MS; Danielle Lachall, Brookhaven, PA, Mathematics, BS; Marisa Lagana, Lattimer Mines, PA, Elementary Education, BS & Special Education, BS; Lauren LaSala, Denville, NJ, Speech Language Pathology, MS; Nicholas Lauri, Larksville , PA, Business Administration, BS; Brianne Lavelle, Ridgefield, NJ, Speech Language Pathology, MS; Katie Lawlor, Hillsdale , NJ, Speech Language Pathology, MS; Richard Lazarsky, Drums, PA, Information Technology, BS; Gregory Lenhart, Temple, PA, Physical Therapy, DPT; Wendy Leonhart, Factoryville, PA, Management, BS; Candace Levanavage, Pittston, PA, Psychology, BS; Edward Lino, Bethpage, NY, History, BA; Alexandria Litchkofski, Hunlock Creek, PA, Occupational Therapy, MS; Lauren Lomando, Hazleton, PA, Nursing, BS; Leigh Loughran, Kingston, PA, Psychology, BS; Jennifer Lozier, Jessup, MD, Speech Language Pathology, MS; David Luksh, Dallas, PA, Business Administration, BS; Christine Mariano, Hazleton, PA, Biology, BS; Ashley Marinock, Hazleton, PA, Nursing, BS; Christine Marks, Milford, PA, Psychology, BS; Jordan Marzani, Jefferson Twp., PA, Medical Imaging, BS; Jessica Massimino, Clearfield, PA, Physical Therapy, MS; Kristen Matsen, Norwood, PA, Psychology, BS; Chelsea Matukaitis, Kulpmont, PA, Physical Therapy, MS; Stephanie May, Scranton, PA, Occupational Therapy, MS; Aubre Mayorowski, Old Forge, PA, English, BA; Mark Mazur, Hanover Twp. , PA, Information Technology, BS; Brianna Mc Laughlin, Dallas, PA, Speech Language Pathology, MS; James McDonagh, Rockville Centre, NY, Medical Imaging, BS; Brittany McKeown, Kingston, PA, Speech Language Pathology, MS; Angela Mele, Perkasie, PA, Physical Therapy, MS; Tammy Merrifield, Mountaintop, PA, Nursing, BS; Mary Michael, Sugarloaf, PA, Business Administration, BS; Brittany Michalik, Girardville, PA, Occupational Therapy, MS; Lily Mieczkowski, Shickshinny, PA, Physical Therapy, MS; Ashley Mihal, Wyoming, PA, Physical Therapy, MS; Caitlin Mileski, Archbald , PA, Health Care Management, BS; Chelsea Mixon, Bethlehem, PA, Social Work, BS; Kimberly Monahan DeSanto, Scranton, PA, Professional Studies, BS; Larissa Motko, Pocono Lake, PA, Business Administration, BS; Mark Mott, Edwardsville, PA, Business Administration, MBA; Hannah Muller, York, PA , Occupational Therapy, MS; Megan Murphy, Scranton, PA, Physical Therapy, MS; Morgan Myers, Orwigsburg, PA, Organizational Management, MS; Kristina Naylon, Sugarloaf, PA, Mathematics, BS; Ann Neary, Springfield, PA, Health Care Management, BS; Kimberly Neary, Huntington Mills, PA, Health Care Management, BS; Danielle Nebzydoski, Pleasant Mount, PA, Nursing, BS; Robert L. Nelson III, Ballston Spa, NY, Physical Therapy, MS; Maura Nerbecki, Laflin, PA, Nursing, BS; Denise Nerozzi, Dallas, PA, Elementary

Education, BS & Special Education, BS; Andrea Nichols, Kunkletown, PA, Occupational Therapy, MS; Amanda Nodes, Middlesex, NJ, Speech Language Pathology, MS; Krystle Novak, Olyphant, PA, Elementary Education, BS & Special Education, BS; Jamie Novitski, Shavertown, PA, Nursing, BS; Suzanne Nowalk, Hop Bottom, PA, Nursing, BS; Alisha Nudo, Tunkhannock, PA, Elementary Education, BS & Special Education, BS; Frank E. Nutt III, Montgomery, NY, Speech Language Pathology, MS; Kevin Odell, Dupont, PA, Sport Management, BS; Matthew Ontko, Swoyersville, PA, Business Administration, MBA; Alma Ortega, Hazleton, PA, Professional Studies, BS; Lawrence Paddock, Millerton, PA, Biology, BS; Candice Pagnotti, Clarks Summit , PA, Physical Therapy, DPT; Jillian Palamar, Pottsville, PA, Speech Language Pathology, MS; Laura PalmiterCastellani, Peckville, PA, Business Administration, BS; Susan Panaway, Hanover Twp., PA, Psychology, BS; Andrea Pandya, Hanover Twp., PA, Speech Language Pathology, MS; Kelley Parkison, Tunkhannock, PA, Elementary Education, BS & Special Education, BS; Debra-Ann Passarella, Pittston, PA, Psychology, BS; Marissa Patton, Beaumont, PA, Elementary Education, BS; Jennifer Paull, Hanover Twp., PA, Biology, BS; Jessica Pavlikowski, Old Forge, PA, Biology, BS; Kelsey Pazanski, Forest City, PA, Professional Studies, BS; Bryan Peden, Rehoboth Beach, DE, Physical Therapy, MS; Charlea Pedro, Tunkhannock, PA, Nursing, MS; Elena Pellegrini, Exeter, PA, Education, MS; Amanda Pernot, Dupont, PA, Elementary Education, BS & Special Education, BS; Sara Petersen, Beachwood, NJ, Speech Language Pathology, MS; Barbara Petrilla, Hazleton, PA, Business Administration, MBA; Tozia Pierre, Moscow, PA, Business Administration, BS; Paul Pierson, Glen Lyon, PA, Business Administration, BS; Shelena Piland, Bloomsburg, PA, Elementary Education, BS & Special Education, BS; Ashley Piontek, Plains, PA, Nursing, BS; Jenna Rose Rakowsky, Frackville, PA, Occupational Therapy, MS; Ashleigh Ramsey, Athens, PA, Occupational Therapy, MS; Christine Reesey, New Foundland, PA, Nursing, BS; Christopher Remus, Clarks Summit , PA, Nursing, BS; Colleen Ries, Tunkhannock, PA, Nursing, BS; Kristina Corcoran Rinde, Pennsylvania Furnace, PA, Physical Therapy, DPT; Kayla Rinehimer, Mountaintop, PA, Nursing, BS; Laura Rinehimer, Hanover Twp., PA, Elementary Education, BS & Special Education, BS; Andrew Roccograndi, Kingston, PA, Biology, BS; Tia Rodriguez, Edwardsville, PA, Social Work, BS; Christie Rogo, Pittston, PA, Business Administration, BS; Rachel Rolison, Dimock, PA, Nursing, BS; Erin Rother, Forty Fort, PA, History, BA; Karen Rubino, Roaring Brook Twp., PA, Accounting, BS; Kelly Rygielski, Plains Twp. , PA, Organizational Management, MS; Jeffrey Salvatore, South Harrison, NJ, Nursing, BS; Erik Sandstrom, Harveys Lake, PA, Business Administration, BS; Vincent Savinelli, III, Larksville, PA, Sport Management, BS; Ashley Scaffido, Swoyersville , PA, Medical Imaging, BS; Samantha Scalpone, Ogdensburg, NJ, Occupational Therapy, MS; Mary Scarpa, Tunkhannock, PA, Communications, BA; Heather Schlingman, Hanover Twp., PA, Business

Administration, BS; Megan Schnaufer, Beaver Meadows, PA, Physical Therapy, MS; Erin Schneck, Pottsville , PA, Physical Therapy, MS; Eric Schollmeyer, Salt Point, NY, History, BA; Rachel Schultes, Maryland, NY, Sport Management, BS; Kara Schuster, Kresgeville, PA, History, BA; Luke Schweitzer, Gurnee, IL, Organizational Management, MS; David Schweitzer, Jr., Fleetville, PA, Organizational Management, MS; Evan Scott, Shavertown, PA, Information Technology, BS; Rose Scott, Harveys Lake, PA, Accounting, BS; Courtney Sennett, Williamsport, PA, Occupational Therapy, MS; Leslie Serino, Shavertown , PA, History, BA; Brandin Shaffern, Kingston, PA, Professional Studies, BS; Lisa Sheckler, West Nanticoke, PA, Professional Studies, BS; Tiara Shipe, New Columbia, PA, Physical Therapy, DPT; Breanna Shoemaker, Scranton, PA, Nursing, BS; Kristin Shores, Ulster, PA, Physical Therapy, MS; Emilie Shultz, Dushore, PA, Medical Imaging, BS; Karen Sickler, Tunkhannock , PA, Sport Management, BS; Stacy Siglin, Tunkhannock, PA, Business Administration, MBA; Suzanne Sikora, Sweet Valley, PA, Elementary Education, BS & Special Education, BS; Karen Simeone, Northumberland, PA, Nursing, MS; Danielle Simko, Laflin , PA, Physical Therapy, DPT; James Sipple, Jr., Warrior Run, PA, Nursing, BS; Kristen Siskovich, Plains, PA, Nursing, BS; Christi Skiro, Hanover Twp. , PA, Management, BS; Jeffrey Slanovec, Easton, PA, Accounting, BS; Lauren Smith, Cassville, PA, Nursing, BS; Gregory Sofia, Walden , NY, Biology, BS; Sara Solomon, Wilkes-Barre, PA, Nursing, BS; Morgan Sorber, Shickshinny, PA, Social Work, BS; Samantha Sorokas, Plains, PA, Psychology, BS; Sydney Stamatis, Tunkhannock, PA, History, BA; Catherine Stanski, Dallas, PA, Speech Language Pathology, MS; Erin Stellar, Kulpmont, PA, Nursing, BS; Nicholas Sulzer, Lehighton, PA, Biology, BS; Kyle Suponcic, Shavertown, PA, Sport Management, BS; Joan Surfus, Long Beach, CA, Occupational Therapy, OTD; Carol Sweetra, Luzerne, PA, Professional Studies, BS; Richard Sypniewski, Hanover Twp., PA, Biology, BS; Jessica Szumski, Dupont, PA, Psychology, BS; Lindsey Tarutis, Hanover Twp., PA, Medical Imaging, BS; Melissa Templeton, Lancaster, PA, Occupational Therapy, MS; Sarah Terry, Orrtanna, PA, Occupational Therapy, MS; Courtney Thomas, Dallas , PA, Elementary Education, BS & Special Education, BS; Eric Thomas, Schuylkill Haven, PA, Nursing, BS; Chase Thomson, Wysox, PA, Sport Management, BS; Rachel Tomkins, Slatedale, PA, Management, BS; Linda Tomlinson, Windsor, NY, Nursing, BS; Nicholas Troutman, Ashland, PA, Nursing, BS; Julia Truax, Millville, PA, Psychology, BS & Communications, BA; Michael Truscott, Tunkhannock, PA, Computer Science, BS; Brian Tupper, Wilkes-Barre, PA, Business Administration, BS; Stephanie Turner, Dallas, PA, Nursing, BS; Ann Turse, Drums, PA, Professional Studies, BS; Amanda Undersinger, Florida, NY, Speech Language Pathology, MS; Christopher P.J. Undersinger, Florida, NY, Sport Management, BS; Christine Van Tassel, Starrucca, PA, Psychology, BS; Lauren Verret, Walnutport, PA, Elementary Education, BS & Special Education, BS; Brittany Vetrini, Hunlock Creek, PA, Business Administration, BS; Nicole Vitack, Kingston, PA, Nursing, BS; Angela Vnuk, Plymouth, PA, Nursing, MS; Christopher Wadas, Courtdale, PA, Education, MS; Penny Wagner, Vandling, PA, Nursing, MS; Martin Wahle, Loveland, CO, Education, MS; Phyllis Walter, Dallas, PA, Business Administration, MBA; Daniel Warakomski, Nanticoke, PA, Business Administration, BS; Patricia Warkevicz, Trucksville, PA, Business Administration, BS; Philip Wascavage, Mountaintop, PA, Nursing, BS; Kelly Wasylkewicz, Hunlock Creek, PA, Professional Studies, BS; Audra Wehner, Bloomsburg, PA, Communications, BA; Shana Weinstock, Dallas, PA, Communications, BA; Max Weintraub, Southampton, PA, Business Administration, BS; Jonathan Weiss, Minersville, PA, Biology, BS; Mark Werger, Oakland, NJ, Social Work, BS; Anthony White, Drums, PA, Business Administration, BS; Tyler White, Allentown, PA, Business Administration, BS; Matthew Wiater, South Amboy, NJ, Business Administration, BS; Carl Wiedlich, Mountaintop, PA, Physical Therapy, DPT; Ramah Williams, Harveys Lake, PA, Medical Imaging, BS; Rebekah Williams, Harveys Lake , PA, Nursing, BS; Jessica Williamson, Media, PA, Organizational Management, MS; Chelsea Wilson, Kingston, PA, Nursing, BS; Jennifer Windt, Wapwallopen, PA, Diagnostic Medical Sonography, BS; Charles Yavorski, Dallas, PA, Professional Studies, BS; Lauren Young, Easton, PA, Medical Imaging, BS; Margaret Young, Pittstown, NJ, Communications, BA; Chelsea Youtz, Clarks Summit, PA, Mathematics, BS; Jonathon Zaremba, Weatherly , PA, Sport Management, BS; Frank Ziegler, Trucksville, PA, Accounting, BS; Kenneth Zipovsky, Hazleton, PA, Government, Law, National Security, BA;

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CMYK PAGE 14A

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

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LUNCHES Continued from Page 1A

Council members are paid that rate, without any consideration Barrett Kane McCarthy Mengeringhausen given to the actual cost of their meals, or proof that they even ate FEEDING WILKES-BARRE CITY COUNCIL at all. Amount spent on meals for Wilkes-Barre City Council members Kathy Kane, Tony Thomas, A Times Leader review of hunJim McCarthy and Bill Barrett during trips from 2005 through 2011. dreds of pages of credit card statements and requests for reim$5,781 Kane bursement shows that from 2005 to 2011, the city spent $94,508 to Thomas $4,372 send council members to conferences, including $34,738 that Barrett $2,747 was paid directly to the members to reimburse them for meals, McCarthy $2,304 mileage, airfare and taxi fees. It’s what the records don’t $0 $1,000 $2,000 $3,000 $4,000 $5,000 $6,000 show that has riled several tax2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 payer advocates. Frequent travelers Councilman Bill Barrett and former council members Tony Thomas and Kathy Kane, who is now city controller, were the most frequent travelers. The trio made yearly trips to the National League of Cities annual conference, traveling to numerous cites nationwide, including San Antonio; Reno, Nev.; New Orleans; Denver; Orlando, Fla., and Phoenix. Council allots $10,000 for travel, plus $4,000 more for training each year. The records show it has overspent that budget in several years, including 2007, when it spent a total of $20,665. Karen Ceppa Hirko, a taxpayer advocate who closely monitors the city’s finances, has questioned whether the excursions are worth the cost. The public is largely unaware the money is being spent because council does not publicly vote to approve the trips, Ceppa Hirko said. The lack of documentation for meals is another example of the lack of accountability in many areas of the city’s budget, she said. “No one ever comes back and explains how the trip benefited the city or taxpayers. They just go,” Ceppa Hirko said. “There’s absolutely no accountability. None.” Luzerne County Controller Walter Griffith, who lived in WilkesBarre until about a year ago, also questioned the flat rate meal policy. The county requires all employees to provide receipts and caps the amount they are reimbursed for each meal, he said. “The issue is accountability for taxpayers’ money,” Griffith said. “If you are not producing a receipt, how do we know you are not putting the money in your pocket? If you get $60 for a meal, you should document you used the money for the meal. It shouldn’t be walkingaround money.”

Kane $897 Thomas $538 Barrett McCarthy $817 Yearly Totals $2,252

$682 $429 $310 $682 $2,103

$805 $805 $433 $805 $2,848

$968 $894 $537

$1,027 $573 $596

$810 $749 $452

$592 $384 $419

$2,399

$2,196

$2,011

$1,395

Source: City records acquired through Right To Know request

Mark Guydish/The Times Leader

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Ryan said there also is nothing that prevents council members from seeking reimbursement for a given Thomas meal, even if that particular meal was included in the conference registration fee. “Council members have the option of having the meal that is offered or purchasing their own meals,” Ryan said. “I don’t know why that’s the way it is, but they’ve always been given that option.” Former city controller Bernie Mengeringhausen, who was responsible for reviewing the bills, said at some point – he couldn’t recall when – he began to monitor the conferences to more closely police what meals were offered. That led him to alter the policy on payment, he said. “It was changed to indicate that if anything was included, they did not get reimbursed for it,” Mengeringhausen said. “I would take the agenda (from the conference). If a meal was provided, it wasn’t paid for.” Mengeringhausen, who frequently attended conferences with council members, served as controller from 2000 until he retired last year. He said he believed he made the change years ago. But records indicate it was not made until 2011. Reimbursement requests that year specifically note the number of breakfasts, lunches and dinners for which the council member was reimbursed the Runzheimer rate. For instance, Barrett sought a meal per diem for his attendance at the four-day Pennsylvania League of Cities convention in Erie in June. He was paid for two breakfasts, one lunch and four dinners.

vealed numerous instances from 2005 to 2010 in which council members were reimbursed for breakfast, lunch and dinner for each day of a multi-day conference, even though breakfast and/ or lunch were provided on some of the days. For instance, one or two council members have attended the Pennsylvania League of Cities Convention held each June in various parts of the state, including Erie and Bethlehem. Breakfast and lunch are typically provided on at least two days of the four-day conference, but council members received a meal allowance for all three meals each of the four days. Kingston Administrator Paul Keating said that very issue is the reason why Kingston requires employees and council members to provide receipts. “There are a lot of conferences that come with a continental breakfast and buffet lunches, so you can get into paying someone for meals they are not necessarily spending money on,” Keating said. Ceppa Hirko said there’s also a question of whether the spouses of council members, who frequently accompanied them to out-of-state conventions, benefited from the per diems. Records reviewed by The Times Leader show council members provided receipts to document the city was not charged for their spouse’s airfare or conference registration. But there’s no documentation regarding meals since they were paid the flat rate. “I honestly believe they took the per diem to pay for their Meals at conferences spouse’s meals,” Ceppa Hirko The newspaper’s review re- said.

Barrett insisted he has never used per diem money to pay for his wife’s meals. He said he believes that, overall, the per diem meal rate he received fairly represented their actual costs. “When I submitted travel requests, I was not looking to make money. If I got reimbursed for legitimate expenses, that’s all I wanted,” he said. “I don’t think anyone set out to use it as a way to make money.” He acknowledged lunch was often provided at conferences he attended, but there were many occasions he could not make the scheduled meal due to conflicts in sessions. “Lunch was provided at most, but it was very hit or miss,” he said. “I haven’t always had the best experience with those. There would be certain things out on the floor, but when you get Benefit of conferences there, there’s nothing there.” Barrett is a staunch defender of Policy’s origin unknown allowing council to attend conferIt’s not clear exactly when, or ences, insisting that he’s brought why, Wilkes-Barre instituted the back information and ideas that have significantly benefited the flat rate policy. City Clerk Jim Ryan said he be- city. He said he understands conlieves the policy, which is not in writing, started around the time cerns about a flat rate, and agrees the late Tom McLaughlin was it may be time to revisit the issue mayor in the 1980s and never to see if it should be altered to require receipts. changed. “I would support a switch to reRyan said he doesn’t know why the city opted for a flat rate, ver- ceipts. I think that’s the fairest sus reimbursing for actual ex- way to go. That way what you penses. He believes it was to en- spend is what you are reimbursed sure that everyone was paid the for,” he said. If the council is going to adsame. “I believe the reason was it was dress the issue, it needs to act a sense of fairness, that everyone soon. The next Pennsylvania League follow the same standard and had the same amount of per diem. of Cities conference will be held That way somebody was not get- from June 19-22 in Pittsburgh. ting more than someone else by Councilman Tony George has alhaving a higher-cost meal,” he ready indicated he plans to attend the conference. said.

MEALS

zheimer. “There is a big difference. We look at the restaurants a corporate traveler would go to. That’s not the government’s methodology,” Uecker said. Joseph Wielgosz, a taxpayer advocate and frequent critic of council, said residents should be “appalled” by the meal policy. Wielgosz has repeatedly questioned whether the trips are worthwhile at all. If council is going to go, they should provide receipts at the very least, he said. “You can’t just take a trip, buy something off the dollar menu and pocket the rest of the money,” Wielgosz said. “There needs to be checks and balances to make sure this doesn’t happen.” Neither City Clerk Jim Ryan nor former controller Bernie Mengeringhausen, who approved the payments, could explain why the city has chosen to utilize the Runzheimer rate over the GSA rate. They also could not explain why the top rate was paid. “That was the practice the city had,” Mengeringhausen said. “It

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whether they spend more, or less, on their meals. They’re not required to provide receipts. If they eat inexpensively, they can keep the difference. And the rate they are paid is quite generous compared to standards set by the General Services Administration, the accounting arm of the federal government. Disparity in rates The Times Leader reviewed hundreds of documents, including requests for reimbursement sought by council members, for travel-related expenses from 2005 to 2011. The review revealed differences – some of which were significant – between the average costs of meals calculated by Runzheimer versus the GSA in cities to which council members have traveled, with the GSA rate always being lower. For example, in addition to

Washington, D.C., council members have routinely traveled to Bethlehem, Erie and Hershey to attend various conferences held by the Pennsylvania League of Cities and other organizations. For trips to Erie, council members have been reimbursed $72.75 per day under the Runzheimer rate. The GSA rate was $46. The disparities are similar for Bethlehem and Hershey. Council members received $76.30 for trips to Bethlehem and $59.15 for trips to Hershey. The GSA meal rate for each of those two cities was $51. Runzheimer calculates an average meal cost, as well as a high and low range. The city always paid the top rate, rather than the average or low, the records show. Why is there such a large disparity between the Runzheimer and GSA rates? Runzheimer is a fee-based, subscription service utilized by businesses. Its costs are estimated based on what a corporate traveler would experience, said Genevieve Uecker, a spokeswoman for Run-

was done before I got there and it was a practice that was continued.” Merritt: Changes coming All this was news to council member Mike Merritt, who became board president this year. Merritt, now in his fifth year on council, said he has never traveled on a taxpayer-funded trip, so he was unaware of how council members were reimbursed for meals. He said he supports sending council members to conferences but believes some changes are in order relating to reimbursements for meals. “I think they should have receipts,” he said. “That takes away any question the public may have … If you spend $75, you get reimbursed $75 and have the receipts to prove it.” Merritt said he will also discuss with council the possibility of capping the meal reimbursements at the GSA rate, as opposed to the Runzheimer rate. “Wilkes-Barre does not have a lot of money, so that would help.”

Tropical storm watch issued for parts of S.C. coast due to Alberto By TOM FOREMAN Jr. Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. — Forecasters late Saturday issued a tropical storm watch for parts of the South Carolina coast after the first tropical storm of the 2012 hurricane season formed in the Atlantic. The National Hurricane Center in Miami issued the watch after Tropical Storm Alberto

formed Saturday. The official start to hurricane season is June 1, but tropical storms occasionally occur before then. The advisory covers the South Carolina coast from the Savannah River to the South Santee River for at least the next 24 hours. Tropical storm and dangerous surf conditions are possible. Late Saturday, the storm was

110 miles southeast of Charleston, S.C. with maximum sustained winds of 50 mph. It was moving southwest at 6 mph. Forecasters advised coastal interests from Georgia to North Carolina’s Outer Banks to track the storm. The hurricane center said a decrease in speed was expected through Sunday, with the storm

turning toward the west-northwest — and then moving northnortheast by Monday. Tropical storm-force winds extend outward up to 45 miles. National Weather Service meteorologist Sandy LaCorte in Wilmington, N.C. said early Saturday evening that there is a high risk of rip currents along North Carolina’s Outer Banks.

THE TIMES LEADER

CHARITY Continued from Page 1A

companies taking in big money and donating only 2.5 percent of the gross to the charity an acceptable practice? • Are charities being exploited? Is the public being misled? The controversy with the May 5 event at Toyota Pavilion at Montage Mountain points to a larger issue: charities face higher demands for services from cash-strapped clients and dwindling donor dollars and diminishing government funds.

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W H AT T O WAT C H F O R ❏ Don’t donate a thing without checking up on the charity ❏ Do some research on the organizations that will benefit from your generosity ❏ Evaluate charities based on fiscal health and efficiency operating efficiency (includes evaluation of overhead and amounts given to intended recipients) Source: website wepay.com:

“But total revenue is flat or decreasing for lots of agencies,” he said. Barber and Jones said there are no hard rules that say what percentage of money raised at a charitable event should go to Partnerships needed the charity. They said events Because nonprofits have been raise money, but they also profinancially challenged, the orga- vide fun, such as golfing or nizations have resorted to a va- dancing at a gala, for the donors. riety of partnerships to bring in income and raise their profiles Dirty Girl Mud Run At the Dirty Girl Mud Run in the community. They work harder on special earlier this month, thousands of events, they trim their budgets spectators and participants had and they do everything they can fun. From the perspective of Dirty to get their names out there where prospective donors can Girl Founder Robin Gohsman, charity also benenotice. fited. In addition That’s why a “In essence, it to the 2.5 percent charity will eagerdonation of the ly accept a dona- (government aid) another tion from a compa- has been eliminat- gate, “substantial” dony that uses their nation was given name and logo, ed..” raises hundreds of Charles Barber to the National Luzerne Foundation Breast Cancer thousands of dolFoundation, he lars and donates a said. fraction to the Gohsman wouldn’t say how charity. “In essence, it (government much constituted “substantial,” aid) has been eliminated,” said but he said the foundation is veCharles Barber, executive direc- ry happy with the amount and tor at the Luzerne Foundation. has no complaints about the “Everybody’s wish is it gets re- event. Amy Power, president and stored, but nobody’s holding chief executive officer of Power their breath.” But, Barber said, the generos- Public Relations LLC, issued a ity of the people of the region statement on behalf of the National Breast Cancer Foundahas been “a godsend.” Barber says every charity has tion: “We are proud to partner a mission and purpose and with with the Dirty Girl Mud Run. that comes a responsibility to Through their fundraising efcommunicate to the communi- forts in 2011, we received ty. Part of the challenge is to $50,000 and this year we expect identify businesses and individ- to receive over $200,000. These uals who identify with the par- donations allow us to fulfill our ticular needs of the specific mission of providing education, mammograms and breast charity. “The economy has presented health services to women in challenges for everybody,” Bar- need.” ber said. “That’s why you have seen an increase in special Opposing viewpoint But area businessman Scott events as a way to raise money.” Even though more events are Sanfilippo of Moosic has a difbeing held, the amounts raised ferent opinion. Sanfilippo quesrepresent only a portion of the tioned the 2.5 percent donation money needed to run the char- publicly on his blog. Many people commented – ity. But events have benefits be- some said they were aware of yond raising funds. Special the 2.5 percent and others were events also increases aware- offended even to the point that they would not participate ness. “Fundraisers are also friend- again. Here’s what Sanfilippo “8,000 women raisers,” Barber said. “They get blogged: new people involved and aware plopped down $70 to register of the mission of an organiza- for the event resulting in a tion and that translates to reve- $560,000.00 take. Remove the costs to promote and put on the nue.” Barber said donors have be- event and that’s a nice chunk of come more selective when change for breast cancer rechoosing where to give. He said search, right? “Wrong.” the more information that can The blog notes that the Dirty be put out in the public transGirl organizers include the fact lates to more donations. “You have to give prospective that 2.5 percent of the registradonors the best possible under- tion fee goes to the National standing of what a charity Breast Cancer Foundation. Sanfilippo said the 8,000 does,” Barber said. “Let them know what you do and why you women “gathered in a spirit of have to do it; tell them who you community to run in the mud either as a cancer survivor, a famhelp and why.” Bill Jones, executive director ily member of someone who at the United Way of Wyoming died of cancer or a friend. They Valley, said special events – all had a great bonding experiwhether conducted by in-house ence and from what I’ve seen, staff or by outside groups – are a would do it again. “But when you wrap yourself critical part of any fundraising around a cause and use that as plan. “Not only do they bring in your primary motivator to get dollars, they bring awareness people to fork over their money, and visibility to an organiza- I would expect much stronger tion,” Jones said. “Having said financial support than 2.5 perthat, they are a very expensive cent,” he blogged. Many comments were posted proposition and they imply on Sanfilippo’s website. Most of risk.” Jones said an organization them felt the event was “awecan plan an event and have it not some” and they didn’t mind that be well attended and could lose only $1.75 of their $70 entrance money. He said if an event fee went to the charity. doesn’t raise at least $10,000, Check out beforehand it’s not worth doing. Jones, of United Way who alJones said donor dollars are still out there. He said contribu- so ran Volunteers of America, tions are down a bit overall. He said patrons of charitable said the competition has in- events should inquire beforecreased, making charities work hand where the money goes. “Before participating, people that much harder to encourage should know the charity and the donors to give. “Donors are becoming more event and then ask was it worth selective, more sophisticated,” it,” Jones said. “The million dollar question Jones said. “Donors want their is, ‘Is it good enough to contindollars to mean something.” Jones said most charities are ue the relationship with the worthy – they have good mis- event organizers?’ You have to sions, they operate efficiently measure the take and the expoand they make a positive impact sure and determine if it was enough,” he added. on the community.


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“Peter has really fluid ankles. He’s near perfect in the way you’re supposed to turn your feet ... and he can lay down some groundfire. The international circuit loves this kid.” Mark Howar Founder and artistic director of Trinity Academy of Irish Dance

TOM MOONEY OUT ON A LIMB

Turn your life into an infinite, living memoir

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Peter Dziak, 14, left, who has been dancing since he was 4, takes a break from teaching Irish dance to Ryan DeMotte, 9, on a wooden practice floor in Dziak’s Villa Park, Ill., backyard.

THE ‘IRISH’ BIEBER

Peter Dziak taps up the global rankings

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By VIKKI ORTIZ HEALY

Chicago Tribune

HICAGO — Peter Dziak camouflages himself well as a typical14-yearold kid in the suburbs. He rides his bike to friends’ houses. He has a paper route. He plays center field for his hometown Villa Park Vipers. • But watch closely during a down moment, when he’s waiting for fly balls in the outfield, and Peter’s fancy footwork might give away the eighth-grader’s international secret identity. • He’s the Justin Bieber of the Irish dancing world. “Sometimes, you know, just randomly when I’m getting bored, I’ll just randomly start dancing,” said Peter, who last month brought home the World Irish Dancing Championship title from Dublin for the second straight year. The accomplishment — comparable to back-to-back Super Bowl wins — required Peter to beat 54 top dancers his age from Ireland, New Zealand, Australia, Germany, England, Iceland, Brazil, China, Japan and Russia. It inspired a crowd of Irish-dance fans to greet him at O’Hare International Airport when he returned home with the giant silver trophy, and has prompted girls to rush the stage for his pic-

ture or autograph at recent dance performances. Howard and other teachers at the 30-year-old dance school note that the last Chicago student to win the title for the school was Michael Flatley, aka “Lord of the Dance,” in 1976. Still, on most days, in a metropolitan area with a rich Irish history and long-standing appreciation for Irish dance at parades, taverns and downtown theater shows, the freckle-faced Boy Scout’s global renown remains under the radar. See IRISH, Page 11B

Dziak performs an Irish dance on a wooden practice floor.

MEET BOB AND BEVERLY ASTOLFI

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ob and Beverly Astolfi have been married for 48 years. They graduated from Plains High School and own The Children’s Bootery in Kingston. Bob, 71, and Beverly, 69, live in Forty Fort. They have five children: Michelle, Dean, Cynthia, Nicole and Danette.

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

You and your wife are approaching your 50th wedding anniversary. That is very admirable. I understand that you are also celebrating the 35th Anniversary of Children’s Bootery this year. What does the future hold? Bob: “We are set to close the store this year and retire. It has been a wonderful experience to share through the years with our family and other families and friends.” What has been special about the experience? Bob: “It’s still all about the family. Some of the kids that we fitted years ago now bring their children in to be fitted for shoes. When people bring in their infant for the first time to be fitted it is a special feeling. They feel like part of the family and you get to watch the kids grow up over the years. Friendships are made. The families go back as far as three generations.” What are some of the other pleasant memories here at the store through the years? Beverly: “There used to be sidewalk sales all the time. There were kids all over the place. There were ice cream carts and many vendors. The whole town

seemed to come out for the events.” Has the store always been called Children’s Bootery? Bob: “It was actually called Dr. David’s before we bought the business in 1977.” How did the business purchase come about? Bob: “After I finished my stint in the military as a military policeman, a friend encouraged me to get into the shoe business. I worked as an employee of the Brown Shoe Company at Isaac Long Department Store. I was promoted and transferred to other stores after the flood of ’72. The Isaac Long store did not reopen and I found my niche as a general manager and regional coordinator at various locations including Elmira, N.Y., Lexington, Ky., and Hershey, Pa. In 1974 I was general manager for B. Levy Shoes until 1976. I left that job to do mission work for a year. I finally settled back in and my wife and I bought Dr. David’s and The Children’s Bootery was born.” Has traveling been part of your family adventures throughout the years? Beverly: “When the See MEET, Page 11B

emoirs can make fascinating reading — especially so for genealogists. If your ancestors wrote down their personal stories, you are fortunate indeed. You have not only facts about them, but also insight into their character, their daily lives and their most personal thoughts and motivations. So why not write your own? Your family — especially the genealogists — will love you for it. What are your memoirs? Unlike an autobiography, memoirs (meaning “recollections”) do not have to cover every little detail in your life. Instead, your memoirs focus on whatever areas you want. So you’re not a professional writer? Look at it this way. Did not being a professional ever stop you from going fishing, cooking lasagna, changing a tire or making a quilt? You did those things because you wanted to, and you did them well. You can do the same with your recollections. Follow these simple guidelines. Start by taking a notepad or opening up the first of several blank documents on your computer. Devote one sheet to each of the major areas of your life (such as “childhood”). Then, fill in everything you can think of under each heading. The first of those headings could be all the information you have about your parents and grandparents and any earlier ancestors you know about. When and where were they born? When did they come to America? Where did they live and what work did they do? Who was in their families? What churches did they attend, and what military service did they have. Under the second heading, talk about your early life, beginning with your birth and your earliest recollections of your home, parents and siblings. Tell about your neighborhood and school. You can include sports, amusement parks and little jobs, like babysitting. If you talk about breaking Mrs. Murphy’s window, don’t worry: the statute of limitations has expired. Your third heading should be all about your growing up and becoming a young adult. This is where you write about dating, making the basketball team, graduation, college or tech school, military service, that first job, your marriage, your first car, your first house, your first child. Start more pages. You can break up your adult life into as many headings as you like, each one to a sheet of paper. Perhaps your next heading will take you up to the time your children finally left home. If your work took you to another part of the country, that could call for a new heading — and a new sheet of paper. Don’t forget to tell about your parents as they grew older, and perhaps passed away. Write about your children getting jobs and starting their own families. Are you retired? Begin yet another heading. This is the place to talk about the lessons you’ve learned in life, the values you’ve tried to teach, loved ones you’ve lost, the people who most inspired or helped you. Of course when you read it over you’ll find revisions are necessary. Put in the name of that first boss, whom you just remembered. Correct the date for the purchase of your home. Fix up your sentences and make sure they all say what you want them to say. Spell check words you’re not sure of. Finally, make several copies of the memoir, and keep them in different places. The work can also be scanned into a computer and/or put on disc. You can never be too careful. And don’t forget to tell every genealogist in your family that you’ve done it. That’s the whole idea.

Tom Mooney is a Times Leader genealogy columnist. Reach him at tmooney2@ptd.net.


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Academic team member honored by senator King’s College students spend time in the classroom

Barbershop Society makes donation to WVCA The Wilkes-Barre Barbershop Harmony Society recently donated $500 to Wyoming Valley Children’s Association as part of the chapter’s community service project, Singing Valentines. At the check presentation, from left, first row, are Serina Florencio, Morgan Drauschak, Caleb Hoffman and Charles Seiger. Second row: Phillip Brown, program vice president and project chairman, Shavertown; Lou Volpetti, president, Pittston; Jill Hertel, development and grant writing coordinator, Wyoming Valley Children’s Association.

Eight students from King’s College in Wilkes-Barre recently volunteered their time and skills to teach the Junior Achievement (JA) curriculum to local classrooms. The students met with their JA classes once a week for 45 minutes per week for five weeks. They taught local students the value of hard work, the need to stay in school and the importance of being financially literate through activity-based learning. Anyone interested in becoming a JA in-classroom volunteer, can contact Rianna Carlisle at 602-3600 or email rcarlisle@janepa.org . Some of the participating students, from left, are Corey Koons, Alyssa Dolman, Emily Heimbecker, Laura Ortiz and Sarah Beyer. Rosalind Bingman, Aimee Bono and Jenn Cook also participated.

Luzerne County Community College student and 2012 Pennsylvania Academic Team member Emily Lynch of Forty Fort was recently presented with a certificate from Senator Lisa Baker for her academic achievements in the classroom and for volunteerism in her community. On April 2, Pennsylvania’s 14 community colleges, together with Phi Theta Kappa, the national two-year college honor society, met in Harrisburg to name community college students from across the commonwealth to the 2012 All-Pennsylvania Academic Team. In order to be named to the All-Pennsylvania Academic Team, students must maintain a 3.5 GPA or higher. In Harrisburg, from left: Lynch, Baker and Katie Smith, Bloomsburg, LCCC student.

Students of the Month named at Smith Elementary

Rose Brader scholarships awarded to seniors

Allied Services Heinz Rehab Hospital recently hosted a luncheon for its volunteers and auxiliary in honor of National Volunteer Month. Heinz volunteers raise money all year in their gift shop in the hospital lobby and with many special sales and raffles. The funds are used for the benefit of patients and visitors and for the beautification of the hospital. At the luncheon, from left: the Rev. John Terry; Carl Puscavage, volunteer; Mary Yuknavich, director of Heinz Rehab volunteers and auxiliary; and Bill Conaboy, president and chief executive officer, Allied Services Integrated Health System.

Allied Services Heinz Rehab Auxiliary recently awarded its annual Rose Brader scholarships in the amount of $500 each to three local high school seniors who plan to earn degrees in occupational therapy, physical therapy or speech therapy. Funds for the scholarship are raised by the auxiliary and the scholarship is named in memory of Rose Brader, who was one of the Heinz Rehab Hospital’s first volunteers and an outstanding community leader. Recipients, from left: Falon Cooper, Freeland, will attend College Misericordia for occupational therapy; Cody Tsevdos, Wanamie, will attend Arcadia University for physical therapy; and Samantha Kirschner, Wilkes-Barre, will attend University of Sciences for occupational therapy.

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Heinz Rehab volunteers, auxiliary honored

K.M. Smith Elementary School, Nanticoke, recently announced the Students of the Month for March. These students excelled in acting safely, being responsible and caring about others. One student from each class was selected for the honor. John Pashinski was chosen as the school-wide Student of the Month. His teacher is Karen Oltra. Honored students, from left, first row, are Alycia Knorr, Kaitlyn Darby, Olivia Wasco and Makenzie Cheslaw. Second row: Brooke Felici, Walker Yale, Frederick DiCrecio, Abdul Garder, Grace Reed, Noah Divers, Pashinski and Oltra. Hannah Dravage, Stephen Armstrong and Megan Lamoreaux were also Students of the Month.


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K PAGE 4B

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

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Stry, Jackson

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obert Stry and Amber Jackson, together with their families, announce their engagement and approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Valerie and Gifford Cappellini, Hanover. She is the granddaughter of the late James Micheal and Peggy Cathcart, Delaware. She is a 2006 graduate of Hanover Area High School and 2010 graduate of Fortis Medical Institution. She is a technician at FMC Dialysis Center. The prospective groom is the son of Helen and Sheldon Stry. He is the grandson of the late Stella Buchkowski. He is a 1990 graduate Greater Nanticoke Area High School. He is the owner and creator of Landmark Landscaping. The wedding is Aug. 31, 2012.

Kinney, Evanoski hara Kinney and Andrew Evanoski Jr., both of Ashley, announce their S engagement.

Shara is the daughter of Sheldon and Sandra Kinney, McAlisterville. She is a 1997 graduate of East Juniata High School and a 2001 graduate of Bloomsburg University. Shara is employed as a teacher at Central Columbia School District, Bloomsburg. Andrew is the son of Debra Evanoski, Wilkes-Barre, and the late Andrew Evanoski Sr. He is a 1998 graduate of GAR Memorial High School and attended Luzerne County Community College. Andrew is employed as an industrial painter at Necon/Steward Industrial in Berwick. The couple will exchange vows on June 16, 2012, in Jamaica.

Lautz, Moranski ictoria Ann Weiss and Charles Casimer Szostak III, together V with their families, announce their

engagement and approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick and Anita Weiss, Beaumont, Pa. She is the granddaughter of the late Frederick and Agnes Weiss, Beaumont, and the late Otto and Pauline Kistner, Beaumont, originally from Oberelsebach, Germany. The prospective groom is the son of Connie and Charles Szostak Jr., Kings Mountain, N.C., originally from Hudson Falls, N.Y. He is the grandson of Victoria Szostak and the late Charles Szostak, South Glens Falls, N.Y., and the late William and Emerentienne Miner, Hudson Falls, N.Y. Victoria is a 1997 graduate of Tunkhannock Area High School and earned a Bachelor of Science degree in early childhood and elementary education from Misericordia University in 2001 and is pursuing a master’s degree in educational development and strategies from Wilkes University. She is employed as a substitute teacher and works at Twigs Café in Tunkhannock, Pa. Charles is a 1997 graduate of Tunkhannock Area High School. He has completed various courses earning his Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certificate and a title of master technician in the automotive industry. He is employed as a lead technician at George’s Garage, Scranton, Pa. A July 21, 2012, wedding is planned at Stone Hedge Country Club, Factoryville, Pa., where Victoria and Charles will exchange their wedding vows.

r. and Mrs. Gary Mathern, Jeffersonville, N.Y., are M pleased to announce the engage-

arissa Lee Doyle and Thomas Stephen Weldon, together with M their families, announce their engagement and upcoming marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of John and Maria Doyle, Pittston. She is the granddaughter of the late Minnie and Michael Orlando Sr., Pittston, and John Doyle and the late Ruth Doyle, Oakmont, Pa. Marissa is a 2003 graduate of Wyoming Seminary. She graduated from Columbia University in 2007 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in American studies and is a recent graduate of The Ohio State University, Moritz College of Law, with a certificate in children’s studies. She is employed by The Children’s Defense Fund of Ohio. The prospective groom is the son of Victoria and Stephen Weldon, Columbus, Ohio. He is the grandson of the late Elizabeth and Joseph Thomas, Belle Valley, Ohio, and the late Helen and Patrick Weldon, Columbus, Ohio. Thomas is a 2004 graduate of New Albany High School. He graduated from Columbia University in 2008 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in economics. He is employed as a director of operations for Payliance in Columbus, Ohio. A Sept. 1, 2012, wedding is planned.

r. Kara Nicole Moranski and Dr. Andrew John Lautz (and faithful D companion “Victor”), together with

Szostak, Weiss

Vencak, Mathern

Doyle, Weldon

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ment of their daughter, Ms. Lisa Ellen Mathern, to Mr. Kenneth Edward Vencak, son of Julia and Michael Vencak Jr., Dorrance, Pa. The bride-to-be is the granddaughter of Anna Mathern, West Palm Beach, Fla., and the late Harry P. Mathern and the late Sidney and Edith Peters, Callicoon, N.Y. The prospective groom is the grandson of Margaret Lukashewski and the late Edward Lukashewski, Dorrance, Pa., and Victoria Vencak and the late Michael Vencak, Hobbie, Pa. The bride-to-be is a 1996 graduate of Jeffersonville-Youngsville Central School and earned her bachelor’s degree at Elmira College in 2000, where she majored in elementary and middle school education. She earned a master’s degree in instructional technology in 2002 from the New York Institute of Technology. The bride-to-be is employed as a student support supervisor at Delaware Valley Job Corps and is an adjunct math instructor at Sullivan County Community College. The prospective groom is a 1994 graduate of Crestwood High School and is employed by Popple Construction as a prep crew foreman. The happy couple will exchange vows in September 2012.

Sadowsky, Currie

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mily Anne Currie and Michael Patrick Sadowsky were united in marriage on Sept. 10, 2011. Due to the flooding caused by Tropical Storm Lee and the evacuation of Wilkes-Barre, the ceremony was moved from St. Stephen’s Church, Wilkes-Barre, to St. Martin In the Fields, Mountain Top. The Rev. Daniel FitzSimmons officiated the 6 p.m. ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Sally Shoaff Currie and the late Bruce Robert Currie, Mountain Top. She is the granddaughter of Jeanne Currie and the late James A. Currie, Brandon, Fla., and the late Almon LeRoy and Lucy Shoaff, Fort Lauderdale, Fla. The groom is the son of Maurice and Kathleen Sadowsky, Overland Park, Kan. He is the grandson of Betty Sadowsky and the late Maurice Sadowsky Jr. and Cornelius and Diane Murphy, Bradford, Pa. The bride chose her sister, Corinne Currie-Racicky, as her matron of honor. Bridesmaids were Jamie Keeler, sister of the bride; Sarah Sadowsky, sister of the groom; and Christen Jeckell, Liddy Racicka and Samantha DiTieri, friends of the bride. Flower girls were Lucie Racicky, niece of the bride, and Harlee Shoaff, cousin of the bride. Bell ringers were Cecilia Keeler, niece of the bride, and Elizabeth Naylor, cousin of the bride. The groom chose his friend, Jason Gordon, as the best man. Groomsmen were Daniel Sadowsky, brother of the groom; Christopher Ward, Nicholas Ward and Mathew Bryden, friends of the groom; and Lukas Racicky, brother-in-law of the bride. Ring bearers were Luke Racicky, nephew of the bride, and Graham Naylor, cousin of the bride. Scripture readings were given by Ann Jameson, godmother of the bride, and Debra Johnson, godmother of the groom. Offertory gifts were presented by Jane Currie and Patricia Becker, aunts of the bride. Prayers were read by Holly Naylor, cousin of the bride. Soloists were Karma Wood, friend of the bride, and Clarissa Sadowsky, cousin of the groom. Following the wedding ceremony, an evening cocktail hour and reception were held at Valley Country Club, Sugarloaf. The original reception was planned for the Westmoreland Club, Wilkes-Barre, but was moved following the evacuation. The bride was honored with a bridal shower given by her bridesmaids at Valley Country Club. A rehearsal dinner was hosted by the parents of the groom at Genetti’s, Hazleton. The dinner was moved to Genetti’s from Oyster, WilkesBarre. The bride is a 2001 graduate of Crestwood High School. She graduated from West Virginia University with a bachelor’s degree in environmental protection with a minor in geology in 2006. Emily is employed as an environmental scientist with Malcolm Pirnie, Wilmington, Del. The groom is a 1999 graduate of Brandywine High School, Wilmington, Del. He earned a bachelor’s degree in computer engineering in 2003 and a master’s degree in computer science in 2005 from the University of Delaware. He is employed as a software engineer for Hologic, Newark, Del. The couple honeymooned in St. Lucia. They reside in their new home in Newark, Del.

Wanyo, Maiolatesi indsey Wanyo and Tino Maiolatesi were united in marriage L on June 18, 2011, at Our Lady of

the Snows Church in Clarks Summit, Pa. Monsignor James McGarry officiated the ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Edward and Diane Wanyo, Forty Fort. She is the granddaughter of the late James and Lucy Shedlarski, Forty Fort, and the late Stephen and Mary Wanyo, Plymouth. The groom is the son of Roland and Cynthia Maiolatesi, Montdale. He is the grandson of the late Mr. and Mrs. Roland Maiolatesi, Jessup, and the late Mr. and Mrs. Armond Garofoli, Jessup. The bride was escorted down the aisle by her father. She chose her close friend, Amy Rodano Crossin, as her maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Maria Godfrey, Jill Shultz, Mitzi Giacometti, Alissa Mattei, friends of the bride; Jessica Lewis, cousin of the bride; and Tia Maiolatesi Welsh, sister of the groom. Flower girl was Julia Godfrey. The groom chose his two close friends, Drew Mallick and Nathan Hosie, as best men. Groomsmen were Ronald Metcho, Stephen Druck, Pat Nash, Jason Wolfe, Chris Davis, Larry Piccini, friends of the groom; Gino Bianconi, cousin of the groom; Todd Welsh, brother-in-law of the groom; and Eric Wanyo, brother of the bride. Ring bearer was Carter Wanyo, nephew of the bride. Readings were given by Michael Lavelle, Don Sadue and Dominica Bianconi. Following the ceremony, a cocktail hour and reception were held at the Montdale Country Club, Montdale, Pa. The bride was honored at a bridal shower hosted by the mothers of the bride and groom and bridesmaids at the Montdale Country Club. Parents of the groom hosted a rehearsal dinner at the Montdale Country Club. The bride is a 1998 graduate of Wyoming Valley West High School and a 2002 graduate of Bloomsburg University with a Bachelor of Science degree in marketing. She is employed by WBRE-TV as an advertising consultant. The groom is a 1998 graduate of Scranton Preparatory High School and a 2003 graduate of Pennsylvania State University with a Bachelor of Science degree in criminal justice. He is employed as a correctional officer by the Federal Bureau of Prisons. The couple honeymooned to the Hawaiian islands of Maui and Kauai. They reside in Greenfield Township, Pa.

their families, announce their engagement and approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Nickolas M. and Beverly Jean Moranski, Kingston Township, Pa. She is the granddaughter of the late Frank and Helen Moranski. The prospective groom is the son of Stephen and Maureen Lautz, Munster, Ind. He is the grandson of John Burns and the late Anita Burns and Hal and Jean Lautz. The bride-to-be earned a bachelor’s degree in Hispanic languages and literature and global studies from the University of Pittsburgh. She earned a Ph.D. in Hispanic linguistics from Temple University. She is employed as an assistant professor at DeSales University. The prospective groom earned a Bachelor of Science degree in biology from Purdue University. He earned his Doctorate of Medicine from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. He is employed as a pediatric resident physician at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. The couple will exchange vows in spring 2012 in Philadelphia, Pa.

Wheeler, Day aryann Day and William C. M Wheeler Jr., together with their families, announce their

engagement and upcoming marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Gabriel and Marylou Day, Plains Township. She is the granddaughter of the late Carmen and Stella Barletta and the late Michael and Victoria Day. The prospective groom is the son of William and Maryann Wheeler, Hudson. He is the grandson of Francis Andrejko and the late Michael Andrejko and the late Donald and Doris Wheeler. The bride-to-be is a 1985 graduate of Coughlin High School. Maryann is employed by The Bungalo, Swoyersville. The prospective groom is a 1981 graduate of Bishop Hoban High School. Billy is employed by Slusser Brothers. The couple will exchange vows Sept. 29, 2012.

SOCIAL PAGE GUIDELINES The Times Leader allows you to decide how your wedding notice reads, with a few caveats. Wedding announcements run in Sunday’s People section, with color photos, free of charge. Articles must be limited to 220 words, and we reserve the right to edit announcements that exceed that word count. Announcements must be typed or submitted via www.timesleader.com. (Click on the "people" tab, then “weddings” and follow the instructions from there.) Submissions must include a daytime contact phone number and must be received within 10 months of the wedding date. We do not run first-year anniversary announcements or announcements of weddings that took place more than a year ago. (Wedding photographers often can supply you with a color proof in advance of other album photographs.) All other social announcements must be typed and include a daytime contact phone number. Announcements of births at local hospitals are submitted by hospitals and published on Sundays.

Out-of-town announcements with local connections also are accepted. Photos are only accepted with baptism, dedication or other religious-ceremony announcements but not birth announcements. Engagement announcements must be submitted at least one month before the wedding date to guarantee publication and must include the wedding date. We cannot publish engagement announcements once the wedding has taken place. Anniversary photographs are published free of charge at the 10th wedding anniversary and subsequent five-year milestones. Other anniversaries will be published, as space allows, without photographs. Drop off articles at the Times Leader or mail to: The Times Leader People Section 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Questions can be directed to Kathy Sweetra at 829-7250 or e-mailed to people@timesleader.com.


CMYK ➛

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BIRTHS Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center Lapinski, Lara and David, Benton, a daughter, April 19.

Nesbitt Women’s and Children’s Center at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital Rought, Beth and Donald, WilkesBarre, twin son and daughter, April 26.

Nikoden, Mullin elissa Mullin and Thomas John Nikoden were united in marriage M March 30, 2012, at The Appletree

Terrace, Dallas. The ceremony was officiated by Robert Boyer, Mayor of Wyoming. The bride is the daughter of Carol Meyers, Nanticoke, and Patrick and Cynthia Mullin, Sugar Notch. She is the granddaughter of the late Richard and Doris Meyers, Nanticoke, and the late Joseph and Patricia Mullin, Sugar Notch. The groom is the son of Thomas Nikoden, Dallas, and Donna Selner, Wilkes-Barre. He is the grandson of Catherine Prednis and John and Margaret Nikoden, all of WilkesBarre. The bride was escorted down the aisle and given in marriage by her father. She chose her sister, Briann Broksy, as her maid of honor. Her bridesmaids were Jennifer Mullin, sister of the bride; Renee Kozlowski, cousin of the bride; and Karen Grabowski, friend of the bride. The bride’s goddaughter, Adyson Yeager, served as flower girl. The groom chose his friend, Rick Deno, as his best man. His groomsmen were Patrick Mullin Jr., brother of the bride, and Jeff Altavilla and Gerard DeMarco, friends of the groom. The bride’s cousins, Aidan Geisinger and Braden Meyers, served as ring bearers. Following the ceremony, an evening cocktail hour and reception were hosted by the bridal couple at The Appletree Terrace, Dallas. The bride was honored with a bridal shower given by the aunts of the bride and her bridal party at Alden Manor, Nanticoke. The rehearsal dinner was hosted by the father and step-mother of the bride and was held at Lum’s Fernbrook Inn, Dallas. The bride is a graduate of Greater Nanticoke Area High School and The Fortis Institute. She is a pharmacy operations supervisor for CVS Caremark, Hanover Township. The groom is a graduate of Bishop O’Reilly High School and earned associate’s degrees in specialized technology and criminal justice from ITT Technical Institute. He is a security supervisor for Allied Barton Security Services, Mountain Top. The couple honeymooned in Puerto Rico, St. Thomas and Grand Turks.

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Grullon, Denise, and Denzel Walker, Wilkes-Barre, a son, April 28. Silva, Jennifer and Ed, Mountain Top, a son, April 28. Lawson, Amanda, Ashley, a daughter, April 29. Harris, Kristen Marie and Robert Karl, Plains Township, a daughter, April 30.

Good Shepherd Academy students take part in forensics competition Thirty-two students from Good Shepherd Academy in Kingston recently competed in the Spring Regional Forensics Competition held by the Holy Redeemer System of the Diocese of Scranton. Student teams presented dramatic interpretations of selected plays. The competition was hosted by Wyoming Area Catholic School, Exeter. The winning teams progressed to the Diocesan Final Competition at St. Clare/St. Paul School, Main Campus, in Scranton. Junior Varsity and Varsity members of the Forensics Club, from left, first row, are Cole Dewees, Francesca Kalie, Bianca Cantando, Gianna Centrella, Sara Kuderka, Isabel Maria, Alexandra McHale and Korren Hicks. Second row: Michele O’Brien, moderator; Peter Maria; Joseph Brennan; Molly McHale; Logan Korus; Vivian Novitski; Emily Easton; Emily Blaum; Morgan Luksic; Lynn Prociak, moderator; Madison Guido; Maddie Lewis; Kit Neville; Jude Height; and Jimmy Reilly. Third row: Madelyn Charney, Gracyn Giampietro, Alexandra Nockley, Mackenzie Byers, Julia Adonizio, Lauren Slavoski, Alexis Bigus, Mesa Ashton, Anthony Khoudary and Chester Brennan. Abigail Stucker is also a team member.

Ceremony held to honor Oakwood Terrace volunteers Oakwood Terrace memory care community in Moosic recently honored its dedicated volunteers. At the ceremony, from left, first row, are Moosic Alliance Church volunteers Sandra Slack, Betty Talerico, Gladys Webb, Nettie Gaughan and Sharon Woodmancy and Judy Jones, pianist. Second row: Janet Zaleski, recreation director; volunteers Darlene Lulo, Doris Harshman, Darleen Poelman, Margie Ely, Hope McCracken, Linda Howey, Ann Webb, Ellen Webb, Lorraine Goeringer, Ina Pearage, Lorraine Collins, Eva Masher and Robin Trager; Claire Wagner, recreation assistant; and Walter Deliman, volunteer from Serving Seniors Inc. Also acknowledged were volunteers Pastor Doug and Mrs. Jensen, Evie and Neeka Miller, Barbara Sito, Dan Howey and Jillian Zaleski.

Morton, Sierra and Cade Hawkins, Bear Creek Village, a daughter, May 4. Stoss, Jean M., Exeter, a son, May 4. Corsey, Sheri and Richard Hartnett, Wilkes-Barre, a son, May 5. Fowler, Brittany and Joseph, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, May 7.

Johnson, Diana and Ricardo James, Wilkes-Barre, a son, May 8.

Jones, Brittany and Andrew Aleski, Dallas, a daughter, April 28.

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Dziak, Jacqueline and Todd, Dallas, a daughter, May 4.

Caines, Jessica and Michael Booth, Hanover Township, a daughter, April 27.

The Bartuskas

r. and Mrs. David Krolikowski, Pittston, celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary on May 2, 2012. They were married on May 2, 1987, at St. Rocco’s Church, Pittston, by the late Rev. Mario Buttini. Their attendants were Michelle Lamark Stark, Bonnie Thomas, Carmella DeFiore Pahler, Brad Mrugal, Charles Brunn and Brian Tobin. Mr. Krolikowski is the son of Jean Krolikowski, Plymouth, and Walter Krolikowski, WilkesBarre. Mrs. Krolikowski is the former Connie Marie Cipolla, daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Gabriel Cipolla, Pittston. Mr. Krolikowski is employed at Diamond Manufacturing, Wyoming, and as a real estate agent for Crossin Real Estate, Pringle. Mrs. Krolikowski is employed at Kmart, Pittston. The couple has one son, Christopher, 19, who is attending Luzerne County Community College, Nanticoke, where he is completing his associate’s degree in office information technology. A summer trip is planned to celebrate the occasion.

Welkey, Nicole and David, Duryea, a son, May 3.

Chopka, Tara, Hanover Township, and Lawrence VanBuren, Philadelphia, a daughter, May 8.

Morgan, Angela and Don, Kingston, a son, April 27.

The Krolikowskis

Smith, Rachele and Andrew, Exeter, a daughter, May 3.

Marte, Yudelky and Emilio Ramon Genao, Edwardsville, a daughter, April 26.

Kolesar, Tiffany and Tyler Pace, Plymouth, a daughter, April 27.

r. and Mrs. Peter Bartuska are celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary on May 26, 2012. Peter and Barbara were married at St. Pius X Roman Catholic Church, Broomall, Pa., by the Rev. Joseph Lyons. Mrs. Bartuska is the former Barbara Kramer of Hamilton, Ohio, and Broomall, Pa., and the daughter of the late Harold and Loretta Kramer. Mr. Bartuska is the son of the late Anna and Peter Bartuska Sr., Nanticoke. Peter and Barbara met 52 years ago at Split Rock Lodge in the Poconos. Before retiring in 1994, Peter ran Bartuska’s Furniture in Nanticoke, which was started by his father back in the 1930’s. Barbara was a nurse at Good Samaritan Hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio, and Fitzgerald Mercy Hospital in Upper Darby, Pa., prior to her marriage. They discovered a deeper love and appreciation for their marriage when they completed their Marriage Encounter Weekend in 1975. The Bartuskas have been blessed with six children: Ken, Nanticoke; Denis and his wife, Becky, Hunlock Creek; Jim, Nanticoke; Nancy, Wilmington, Del.; Gary and his wife, Karrie, Pittsburgh; and Ellen, Wilmington, Del. They are the proud grandparents of six grandchildren, Kevin, Sam, Katie, Beth, Rachel and Abby. A special anniversary blessing will be bestowed on them during the 4 p.m. Mass on May 26 at the alternate site of St. Faustina Parish (formerly St. Mary’s Church), Hanover Street, Nanticoke. A family dinner in their honor is being celebrated on May 27.

Kline, Tiffany, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, May 3.

Greig, Tara and Arlen, Harveys Lake, a son, April 30. Lombardi, Dana and Scott Paull, Hanover Township, a daughter, April 30. Gonzalez, Cynthia and Gerardo Rivera, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, May 1. Rother, Amanda and Sean Andrukaitis, Bear Creek, a daughter, May 1. Morris, Ashley and Nicholas Stern, Plymouth, a son, May 2. Nichols, Yvette and Joseph, Plains Township, a daughter, May 2. Maldonado, Amanda and James Rushton, Kingston, a daughter, May 2.

NAMES AND FACES Rebecca Lynn Colwell, 16, West Pittston, recently earned the title of Miss Keystone’s Outstanding Teen 2012 at the Eastern Regional Scholarship Pageant held in Allentown. She will be competing for the Miss Pennsylvania Outstanding Teen Title in the Miss Pennsylvania Outstanding Teen Pageant in Pittsburgh. Colwell is the daughter of Saundra Colwell and Colwell a sophomore at Wyoming Area Secondary Center. She is a member of the award-winning Wyoming Area Indoor Percussion Unit and Marching Band and a Senior Girl Scout. Colwell’s platform is “Helping Families Deal with Pancreatic Cancer.” She has been a student at David Blight School of Dance, Wilkes-Barre, since the age of five and is under the direction of Candice Miscavage and Chrissy Howe. Amanda L. Sivco was chosen as the Student of the Month for May at Northwest Area Senior High and Middle School. Sivco is the daughter of Thomas Sivco, Pottstown, and Elaina and David Elmore, Shickshinny. Amanda has been a member of the marching band since fourth grade and plays the alto saxophone. She served as section Sivco leader and treasurer of the marching band and is this year’s president. She is also president of the school’s yearbook. Sivco has been an integral part of the drama productions since seventh grade, serving on stage, backstage and as stage manager. She also works at Camp Lavigne in the summer as a part of the Venturing Crew, where she instructs scouts in climbing and rappelling. Sivco plans to attend Mansfield University in the fall to major in chemistry with a forensic science concentration. She plans to continue her musical involvement with Mansfield’s marching band and is traveling to London this summer to play during the 2012 Olympic Games. Julia Adonizio, daughter of Patrick and Judy Adonizio, Harveys Lake, received the Bishops Youth Award for 2012. She was nominated by Good Shepherd Academy, where she is an eighth-grade student. The recipients of the award were honored at a Mass officiated by Bishop Joseph C. Adonizio Bambara at St. Peter’s Cathedral in Scranton. Adonizio plans to attend Holy Redeemer High School in the fall. Brandon Kuhar, a senior business admin-

Ford, Lindsey, Edwardsville, a daughter, May 8. Kosek, Mary and Christopher Walsh, Shavertown, a daughter, May 8. Cave-Mattie, Kelly and Jeff Mattie, Harveys Lake, a son, May 9. Perry, Shaquanda and Trevor Holman, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, May 9. Slaven, Heather and Ed Tomcho, Kingston, a daughter, May 9. Mill, Audrey and Michael, Larksville, a daughter, May 10. Davenport, Sarah and Daniel Wilcox, Edwardsville, a daughter, May 10. Latona, Melissa and Matthew, Hughestown, a daughter, May 10. Radil, Katrina and David Jones, Kingston, a daughter, May 1 1. Norris, Danielle and Craig Sanders, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, May 1 1. Williamson, Gracelynn and Paul, Scranton, a son, May 1 1. Fedak, Shauna and Josue Rodriguez, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, May 12. O’Brien, Amanda and Keith Perschau, Pittston, a son, May 12. Burry, Billie Jeanne and Dr. Robert, Luzerne, a daughter, May 12. Fabian, Naomi and Alexander, WilkesBarre, a daughter, May 14. Martinez, Yesenia and Stephen Franklin, Edwardsville, a daughter, May 14.

istration major at Wilkes University, placed fourth in the 10th Annual Great Valley Business Plan Competition. Kuhar and his partner, Joe Carlin from Keystone Kuhar College, developed a mobile application concept that allows iPhone users to request and share contact information in a simpler, more organized fashion. Kuhar is from Moscow, Pa., and is the son of Lawrence and Debbie Kuhar. The Great Valley Business Plan Competition is a regional competition in Northeastern Pennsylvania designed to stimulate innovative thinking to influence a technology-driven economy while retaining the region’s talent. Jonathan Michael Doblix, a 2008 graduate of Wyoming Seminary College Preparatory School and son of Edward and Judith Doblix, Hanover Township, was recently inducted into the University of Mary Washington’s chapter of the Phi Alpha Theta, a honor society dedicated to the promotion of the study of history and to the aims of strong research, teaching and intellectual exchange in the profession. Doblix was also named to the 2012 edition of Who’s Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges. Students are selected for this honor based on academic achievement, community service and extracurricular activity leadership. Doblix is majoring in history, English, and secondary education. He has been named to the dean’s list and is a member of Kappa Delta Phi National Educational Honor Society, Lambda Iota Tau National English Honor Society, Alpha Phi Sigma National Honor Society and National Society of College Scholars. Doblix, an Eagle Scout and Fourth Degree member of the Knights of Columbus Council 4034, has also participated in the Renaissance and Civil War Re-enactors Clubs. Local University of Scranton students were recently inducted into Alpha Sigma Nu, the national honor society for students in Jesuit colleges and universities. New inductees are Geralyn Cross, Plains Township; Elise Gower, White Haven; Elena Habersky, Dallas; William McGuiness, Forty Fort; Brian Musto, Pittston; and Jonathan Schall, Wyoming. Local residents were among the 175 University of Scranton students inducted into Alpha Lambda Delta, the national honor society of freshmen. Inductees are full-time students who maintain a 3.5 or above grade point average and rank in the top 20 percent of their class. New inductees are Sara Aijaz, Mountain Top; Joshua Bayzick, Sugarloaf; Dayton Beasley III, Moosic; Julia Frakes, Kingston; April Francia, Albrightsville; Stephen Gadomski, Plains Township; Anthony Guariglia, Pittston; Kyla Hennigan, Shickshinny; Lauren Krasucki, Wilkes-Barre; Shital Patel, Drums; Natalie Radle, Avoca; Samantha Scott, Falls; and Christine Valente, Hazleton.


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OUT-OF-TOWN DEANS’ LISTS

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

Penn State University, Altoona Campus Rachel May, Swoyersville.

IN BRIEF Katherine Potter

Sydney M. Cantwell

Katherine Potter, daughter of Chuck and Bridget Potter, West Wyoming, is celebrating her sixth birthday today, May 20. Katherine is a granddaughter of Jerry and Shirley Potter, West Wyoming, and Ray and Pat Lenahan, Forty Fort. She is a great-granddaughter of Rosemary Potter, Josephine Morio and Catherine O’Brien, all of WilkesBarre. Katherine has a sister, Julianne, 3.

Sydney Michelle Cantwell, daughter of James and Michelle Cantwell, Mountain Top, is celebrating her 12th birthday today, May 20. Sydney is a granddaughter of Roy and Wanda Cantwell, Kingwood, Texas; Tim and Pauline Craig, Saranac, N.Y.; and the late Armand Frenyea, Morrisonville, N.Y. She has a sister, Samantha, 18.

Senior art students to exhibit work at Sue Hand’s Imagery Fifteen graduating seniors from Sue Hand’s Imagery, representing nine area high schools, will hold their senior art exhibit Monday and Tuesday at Sue Hand’s Imagery, 35 Main Street, Dallas. Senior students are Kristen Boyle, Shavertown; Kathryn Cohen, Shavertown; Anna Fiske, Kingston; Monique Kenia, Falls; Kaitlyn Kishbaugh, Forty Fort; Rachel Madeira, Dallas; Chelsea Martin, Dallas; Christine McCarthy, Dallas; Joseph Miele, Dupont; Alyssa Miller, Dallas; Danielle Patterson, Larksville; Sarah Pomfret, Dallas; Kristin Smith, Berwick; Tyrel Wilson, Tunkhannock; and Kevin Yozviak, Swoyersville. Each student will exhibit up to 20 pieces of artwork, a retrospective of their artistic endeavors throughout their years at Sue Hand’s Imagery. All 15 students have received numerous art awards in many varied art contests and exhibits. The graduates will be pursuing careers in various branches of art and other fields. The public is invited to view the exhibit 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday and 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesday. A meet-the-artist reception and graduation ceremony will take place 6-8 p.m. on Monday. For information, contact Heather Hand Madeira at 675-5094. Some of the participating students, from left, first row, are McCarthy, Pomfret, Yozviak, Patterson and Cohen. Second row: Fiske, Smith, Martin, Madeira, Kenia and Boyle.

WILKES-BARRE: The Big Band Society of Northeastern Pennsylvania will hold its next dinner dance on June 1 at the Genetti Hotel and Conference Center, Wilkes-Barre. The event is open to the public. The cost is $30 for nonmembers. Doors will open at 5:45 p.m. with dinner at 6:30 p.m. Music will be provided by King Henry and The Showmen. For reservations call Glen at 586-5359 or Herman at 654-6454.

OUT-OF-TOWN BIRTHS Bloomsburg Hospital Baxter, Pearl and Randy Brink, Berwick, a son, May 1 1. Grandparents are Danny and Nancy Williams, Berwick; Darrell Sharp, Minden, W.Va.; and Jean Sharp, Oak Hill, W.Va.

Madison E. Brdaric Brandon M. Richie Brandon Michael Richie, son of John and Joanie Richie, Kingston, is celebrating his 10th birthday today, May 20. Brandon is a grandson of James and Joan Richie, Shavertown, and the late Michael and Nancy Kaczmar. He has a sister, Lauren, 7.

Madison Elizabeth Brdaric, daughter of Shaun and Therese Brdaric, Jackson Township, is celebrating her ninth birthday today, May 20. Madison is a granddaughter of Philip and Sharon Mathers, Donna Brdaric and Stephen and Sharon Brdaric. She is a great-granddaughter of Dorothy Shutlock. Madison has two sisters, Marissa, 7, and Macey, 4.

HONOR ROLL Fairview Elementary School Margaret S. Foster, principal, Fairview Elementary School, recently announced the sixth-grade students who attained Principal’s List and High Honors for the third quarter of the 2011-2012 school year.

King’s students attend Impact Forum

Crestwood names Students of the Month Brian Baddick, principal, Crestwood Middle School, recently announced the Students of the Month for February. Award-winning students, from left, first row, are Michelle Loveless, Alexandra Olszyk, Zachary Anderson and Harley Langford. Second row: Noah Kulp, Sadie McNulty, Lauren Rowski and Kyle Sanders.

Nine King’s College students and eight mentors recently participated in the second annual Impact Forum, an outreach program designed to enrich the lives of the college’s male minority students, at the Westmoreland Club, Wilkes-Barre. The forum, made possible by a grant from the McGowan Small Family Fund, was the culmination of a semester of skill-building workshops for the participating students. The forum included a dinner featuring an address by Roger Jackson, chief executive officer and president of R. Jackson & Associates Educational Consulting. At the event, from left, first row: the Rev. John Ryan, president, King’s; student participants James Tribie, Tyler Tynes, Adam McGahee II, Henry Penafiel and Charles McIntosh; Jackson; and Nathan Ward, director, King’s Office of College Diversity. Second row: Robert McGonigle, associate vice president for student affairs; student participants Jorge Brito, Antoine Basquiat, Exaud Hugho and Wilton Curiel; and Bret Stemrich, mentor. Third row: Harold Etheart, Greg Johnson, Georgetta Kerny, Karlynn Kerney, William Kerney and Adam McGahee Sr. Fourth row: Brother George Schmitz, director of community outreach, King’s; Freddie Pettit, vice president for institutional advancement, King’s; and Janet Mercincavage, vice president for student affairs, King’s.

Principal’s List: Ameen Bader, Gianna Brogna, Brandon Brozena, Samantha Brumagin, Brett Caladie, Katherine Coslett, Andrew Dean, Luke Evans, Julia Fey, Dylan Gesford, Alexandria Gierszal, Abigail Glynn, Paige Gould, Lauren LaMarca, Laura Miller, Kurtis Orrson, Abby Post, Jeffrey Schmude, Michael Schwab, Lauren Shiplett, Andrea Shipton, Jeffrey Siegfried, Taylor Tomalinas, Nicholas Toronzi, Megan Wood and Matthew Zwiebel. High Honors: Christopher Argenziano,Vanessa Atie, Austin Belles, Amanda Craine, Christopher Danishefski, Carina D’Sousa, Maggie Fraley, Von Gushka, Brian Hernandez, Hannah Hilpp, Kiera Hinkle, Amber Hughes, Madison Krawontka, Gabrielle Leri, Michael Macri, Liam Martinchek, Audralaine Mentrikoski, Shane O’Rourke, Genevieve Osterhout, Shiv Patel, Sean Phelan, Corinne Smith, Victoria Smolenak and Elizabeth Sulkowski.

GUIDELINES

Children’s birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge relationship to the child (parent, grandparent or legal guardians only, please), your child’s name, age and birthday, parents’, grandparents’ and great-grandparents’ names and their towns

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SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 PAGE 7B

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1961 Coughlin class plans 70th birthday party

ka, Ian Valles, Darius Washington, Shawn Washington, SeanPaul Williamson, Tydus Winstead. Honors: Alexander Boback, Paige Elmy, Joshua Flynn, Katlin Kofchak, Kati Mendoza, Derric Raspa, Matthew Stanislowski, Larissa Stucker, Anthony Tlatenchi, Ayanna Warren.

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Grade 8: Highest Honors: Tristino Altavilla, Banessa Flores, Robert Petrovich, Isell Reyes-Martinez, Erin Scafella. High Honors: Randy Duval, Jeremy Erhardt, Shaquan Everett, Dylon Faller, Myuanna Fitzgerald, Dylan Frame, Avery Harris, Giselle Huertero, Laura Kolarik, Diance McCloe-Hall, Hayden Moody, McKenzie Nichol, Rofiat Oseni, Tatiana Reed, Angel Reese, Skye Reese, Tyi Rookwood, Mohamed Toure, Kayla Unvarsky, Jessica Valencia. Honors: Mabel Awuah, David Bubblo III, Brian Cruz, Shamika Dates, Paige Gartin,

THE TIMES LEADER Renee Khamis-Muse, Shawn Mulligan, Jayleen Peralta, Lindsey Quinn, Josmarlyn Rivas Adon Jr., Briee Shovlin, Giovanny Vivar. Grade 7: Highest Honors: Josafat Brito, Guadelupe Canongo, Cody Dzurisin, Luan Hoang, Roselyn Kosich, Tina Nguyen, Nataliya Scarantino, Ashlee Shaver, Jackie Tang. High Honors: Gregory Askew, Miranda Brazinski, Fernando De La Cruz, Francisco Espinoza-Juarez, Breonna Hanahan, De Andre Hollis, Malik Johnson, Timothy Lavelle, Chris-

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topher Malys, Samaura McCloe, Sierra Quinn, Justin Remphrey, Jaeline Reyes, Bridget Seabrook, Rachael Stucker. Honors: Dhamiere Adams, Donny Camacho, Iyanna Chalmers, Patricia Dapas, Jay Deininger, Jeanette Evans, Joshua Goodwin, Mitchell Hall, Katlyn Heck, Christopher Kolativa, Eric Krzywicki, Justin Lecadre, Paul Leco, Erika Merth, Angelo Najera, Zoe Phillips, Robert Reimiller III, Tabitha Schneider, Jonathan Seabrook, Anna Shaver, Michael Suquilanda, Genesis Velez-Guerrero, Asher Wielgopolski.

The Coughlin High School Class of 1961 birthday party committee will meet 6 p.m. May 31 at the Checkerboard Inn, 385 Carverton Road, Trucksville, to plan its 70th birthday party celebration. All classmates are invited to attend this meeting. Contact Louiseat 610518-0484 or PZGluv@aol.com with questions. Committee members, from left, first row, are Joe Baloga; Louise Terrusa, chair; and Chuck Rutt. Second row: Carolyn Tippett Burke, Regina Stepanski Catina, Jeanne Fraley Youngman, Lois Krahel Edwards and Carole Godlewski MacPhee.

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MEET

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kids were younger we use to travel to North Carolina. We love Nags Head, Jockey Ridge State Park and Holden Beach. We would also frequent the local amusement parks with the kids. Knoebel’s and Angela Park were just a couple of the places we went to. We would hit all the amusement parks.” What are some of the improvements you would like to see occur in Northeastern Pennsylvania as you have witnessed many changes over the years? Bob: “The infrastructure needs to be better. There has to be a better effort to make more employment available. The young people are tending to leave the city for jobs.” Beverly: “I would like to see people be more neighborly like it used to be when everyone knew everyone in a pleasant manner.” Is there any moment in particular that stands out to either of you, professionally or personally? Bob: “For some reason, Father’s Day three years ago stands out. All five of my kids showed up and we shared a pew at church. They came from all different directions to make the trip here. It was very special to me.” Beverly: “I would have to second the family notion. I am proud of the kids’ accomplishments and the family that has come from this special marriage.” The Children’s Bootery will be closing soon. What would you like to say to the friends, families and customers that have visited your store through the years? Bob: “In regards to the store we set out to offer quality shoes and a fitting service in an honest and patient manner. I hope we fulfilled that mission. We will miss everyone dearly.”

“He’s a pretty good friend to have,” says Andrew Deardurff, a 13-year-old from Elmhurst who can count on Peter to ride his bike over at least twice a week to shoot air guns in Andrew’s yard. Peter’s parents, Joan and Dick Dziak — who are both mostly Irish, with a bit of Polish on Dick’s side — began enrolling their seven children in Irish dance more than a decade ago after feeling morally at odds with some of the suggestive moves their elder daughters learned in mainstream ballet, tap and jazz. The Dziaks (pronounced De Jacques) liked that Irish dance allowed the family an activity they could all drive to together. They danced at the Downers Grove and Elmhurst studios. Trinity, which has 1,100 students across Chicago, is designed to teach children discipline, but also that it’s OK to fail. “We feel they are not going to remember what they won, but they’ll remember how this organization made them feel — the family atmosphere,” Howard said. At Trinity, every child can participate at his or her own pace, Joan Dziak said. In Peter’s case, that pace was to begin winning competitions almost immediately. He won a regional title his first year in

John Gordon writes about area people for the Meet feature. Reach him at 9707229.

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Peter Dziak, 14, who has been dancing since he was 4, secures his shoes before doing an Irish jig on a wooden practice floor in his Villa Park, Ill.

2006, and then again in 2007, 2009, 2010 and 2011, and also a national title in 2011. All the Dziak children have competed, and two of Peter’s siblings — older brother Randy, 17, and older sister Ann, 19 — have also earned national and international rankings. Joan Dziak still marvels that her children have excelled so much at the activity for which she buys secondhand costumes and helps raise funds for travel expenses. “Last year, when Peter won, I thought maybe it was a fluke.

But then when he got it twice, I was like, ‘Wow, he’s really good,’” she joked. “Some of these steps he can do, they’re really complicated. And he can remember them, but he can’t remember to take the garbage out?” To that end, Joan, who teaches water aerobics, and Dick, who owns a landscaping company, make efforts to keep all their children down-to-earth and wellrounded. Each of the children is home-schooled, which evolves into part-time attendance at the public high school so they can

participate in team sports. For extra cash, Peter and his 11-year-old sister, Mary Ellen, share a paper route. He and Randy have a summer landscaping business called Randy’s Lawn Service — and Peter doesn’t mind the omission of his name. Dick helped his sons build a stage in their backyard for Irish-dance practice. In between travels to Canada, Scotland and Ireland for dance competitions, and the three days each week set aside for dance practice, Peter is also an altar

boy at his family’s church, a goalie for a youth soccer team, an avid swimmer and a paintball lover. He shares a Chicago Cubs-themed bedroom with Randy and sleeps on the top bunk. “With home schooling, I also think kids at a young age need to be exposed to a lot of things,” said Joan Dziak. A visitor who meets the Dziak children can see how the approach seems to have worked marvelously. They are quick to take a younger sibling in their lap or get lunch started when the others are hungry. Rosanne Deardurff, Andrew’s mother, said Peter’s dance victories haven’t gone to his head. “For all he has performed and his great successes and the notoriety around the world, he’s a very modest boy,” she said. “He’s very humble about all his specialness.” With the second world title under his belt, Peter will perform several times this summer, including a show in Belgium. The young performer loves dancing and would consider a professional career in it. But he would also like to become a pilot, police officer or journalist. For now, he’s just enjoying a little bit of everything. “When I first came back after I won, my friends from baseball were saying, ‘Dance for us. Dance!’ and I’m like, ‘Nooo,’” Peter said. “If we win the World Series, I will.”

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CMYK PAGE 12B

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

THE TIMES LEADER

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CMYK

SPORTS timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

P I A A B OYS T E N N I S

Seminary handed first loss in finals

SECTION

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

1 3 7 T H P R E A K N E S S S TA K E S

HE HAS ANOTHER

Derby winner outduels Bodemeister

Blue Knights swept singles play during their morning state semifinal vs. Harriton.

See FINALS, Page 9C

H.S. SOFTBALL

Throwing the plan off course

Nanticoke’s Rubasky takes no-hitter into the seventh inning as Trojanettes prevail. By JOHN MEDEIROS jmedeiros@timesleader.com

PAUL SOKOLOSKI OPINION

The fight was still there, even after the finish

I

By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

HERSHEY – Losing just once in a season is a major accomplishment. Dropping just one outcome in consecutive seasons shows just how dominant Wyoming Seminary’s boys tennis has been in the last two years. Unfortunately for the Blue Knights, their only losses in that span came in their last match of the season. That includes Saturday’s 4-1 setback to Wyomissing in the finals of the PIAA Class 2A Team Championships at the Hershey Racquet Club. After an excruciating semifinal win earlier in the day, the Blue Knights couldn’t carry the momentum to the finals against the Spartans (22-0), who claimed their third state title in four years and kept Seminary from its first gold medal since 2001. The gratifying aspect for the Blue Knights (17-1) is that their only two losses the last two seasons have come to eventual state champions. In 2011, they lost to Holy Ghost Prep in the state semis for an indication of just how talented the team has been over the span. “It was my last team match in high school tennis and it was exciting to do better than last year and get to the state finals,” senior George Parkhurst said. “It’s the biggest match of the year that you could possibly have. It’s ex-

C

ASSOCIATED PRESS

I’ll Have Another, left, ridden by Mario Gutierrez, beats Bodemeister, ridden by Mike Smith, to the finish line to win the 137th Preakness Stakes at Pimlico Race Course on Saturday in Baltimore.

Triple Crown try will come on June 9

By RICHARD ROSENBLATT AP Sports Writer

BALTIMORE — I’ll Have Another did just that, winning another Triple Crown race with even more flash and dash than he did in the Kentucky Derby. By bolting past Bodemeister — again — this time in Saturday’s Preakness, all that stands in the way of racing glory is the Belmont Stakes in three weeks. Win that and the smooth-striding 3-year-old will find himself in the company of Secretariat, Seattle Slew and Affirmed, the last to win thoroughbred racing’s most coveted prize in 1978. That’s heady company for a colt who has yet to be favored in any of his seven races. That should change in the Belmont. “We’re thinking Triple Crown, baby,” elated winning trainer Doug O’Neill said. “He’s a special horse. We’ll see how he comes out of it, and if he comes out of it in good shape, we’re heading

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jockey Mario Gutierrez, center, holds up a trophy in the winner’s circle Saturday in Baltimore.

to New York, baby.” I’ll Have Another won by 11⁄2 lengths in the Derby and by a neck in the Preakness — the same margins Affirmed posted in wins over rival Alydar in those two races 34 years ago. But there’s one big storyline difference this time: Bodemeister is skipping the Belmont. “He’s getting off the bus here,” trainer Bob Baffert said. The 1 3-16-mile Preakness unfolded the same way as the 11⁄4-mile Derby, with the speedy Bodemeister moving to the lead under Mike Smith and I’ll Have Another hanging back in fourth in the 11-horse field. The early fractions were slower than the Derby, but when it came time for Bodemeister to dig in, it was I’ll Have Another who found another gear under young jockey Mario Gutierrez and surged past the tiring pacesetter in the shadow of the wire. Since Affirmed became the 11th Tri-

WRIGHT TWP. – Hannah Rubasky wasn’t going to pitch much Saturday against Crestwood. Nanticoke coach Gary Williams said the plan was for the senior to share the circle against the Comets. NANTICOKE Rubasky scuttled those plans, however, by CRESTWOOD pitching an absolute gem, carrying a no-hitter into the seventh inning of Nanticoke’s 4-0 win Saturday. “I didn’t know, actually,” Rubasky said of facing the pressure of completing a no-hitter. “There were so many great plays by our outfield. And Kaylee (Schinski) at second base had a great catch. The team behind me played great defense today.” “The plan was to split it (with pitcher Brooke Chapin),” Williams said. “Unbelievably, we didn’t realize she had a no-hitter. We were talking about a pitching change when one of the assistants noticed.” Rubasky retired 12 in a row between the second and sixth innings, thanks to her impressive

WILKES-BARRE — It took three extra days, 12 total innings and some help from the rest of the league, but Hazleton Area still managed to pull it off. A long shot at the start of the week, the Cougars nevertheless claimed the WVC Division I East title on Saturday after a full afternoon of baseball at Hollenback Park. Completing a game that had been suspended because of darkness on Wednesday, the Cougars outlasted Holy Redeemer 8-7 in 12 innings to win the crown outright. The championship came courtesy of a big assist from that same Royals BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER squad, which knocked off Pittston Area 3-2 just a few hours earlier on Saturday at Pittston Area pinch runner John Faggotti, left, gets tagged out by Holy Redeem-

See COURSE, Page 9C

See COUGARS, Page 6C

See PREAKNESS, Page 9C

HIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL

4

Twelve-inning triumph delivers crown to Cougars

0

Hazleton Area goes from a game behind first place three days prior to an outright win of Division I East. By DEREK LEVARSE dlevarse@timesleader.com

er third baseman Ryan English in WVC baseball action at Hollenback Park in Wilkes-Barre on Saturday afternoon.

n the middle of his second set, on his way to his first loss this season, George Parkhurst offered his own assessment of his play loud enough for everyone at the Hershey Racquet Club to hear. “Embarrassing,” Parkhurst shouted. Maybe the PIAA Class 2A title match felt that way to Parkhurst and his Wyoming Seminary Blue Knights. But what they accomplished Saturday in Hershey won’t be forgotten anytime soon. The Blue Knights somehow found a way to win all three singles matches Saturday morning, when the opportunity to compete for a state championship was riding on each of those matches. In the end, the Blue Knights didn’t have enough left to win a state title later Saturday afternoon against a fresher and more experienced Wyomissing team that played in its fourth straight PIAA championship and won three of them, including a 4-1 victory over Sem. “We’ve been here before,” Wyomissing’s top singles player, Ricardo Saad, said. “We have some big players ready to play some big matches. I don’t know how many times Seminary’s been to the championship round.” Try two. The Blue Knights won the PIAA title in 2001, the first year Pennsylvania began holding a high school tennis championship for teams. And they didn’t go back to the finals until Saturday. Nobody from the Wyoming Valley Conference does. So Sem had nothing to be upset about, even if the Blue Knights seemed a little red-faced over dropping their first team match of the season in the state championship round. “We had a good day,” Parkhurst said afterward. “It’s exciting. Our team put in a lot of hard work. We grinded out a bunch of close ones. We know we deserve to be here.” They were there at the end of it all receiving silver medals, only because the Blue Knights didn’t know when, or how, to quit Long after the title match had been decided, with Wyomissing already assured state gold while holding a 4-0 lead, George’s brother Harry Parkhurst was still down on the court playing his heart out at No. 2 singles. And showing the kind of heart that brought Sem to the state title match in the first place, by going the distance to capture an amazing 7-6, 6-7, 14-12 victory in tangle with Ridrigo Saad that lasted more than two hours. You got the feeling Harry Parkhurst would have went at it all night. “Harry can hang in there with anybody,” senior George Parkhurst, the District 2 singles champion, said while admiring his twin brother. “I don’t think he’s lost a team singles match, including states, his entire high school career.” George Parkhurst lost for the first time this year, dropping a 6-3, 6-1 decision to the wicked serves and sheer power of Ricardo Saad. But not before George Parkhurst, who played three straight three-set state matches before the finals, took the first game and had the first set tied 2-2 before fatigue kept sending his returns and serves into the net. And not before he impressed his supremely talented opponent. “I think George is really good,” Ricardo Saad said. “I think he was pretty tired from his match this morning. Could have made a difference.” The last match they played turned out to be a lot different than the Blue Knights envisioned. But an embarrassment? Hardly. Paul Sokoloski is a Times Leader sports columnist. You may reach him at 970-7109 or email him at psokoloski@timesleader.com.


K PAGE 2C

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

AMERICA’S LINE BY ROXY ROXBOROUGH BOXING REPORT: In the WBO welterweight title fight on June 9 in Las Vegas, Nevada, Manny Pacquiao is -$400 vs. Timothy Bradley at +$300. Follow Eckstein on Twitter at www.twitter.com/ vegasvigorish.

Syracuse at Toledo, 7 p.m. Charlotte at Durham, 7:05 p.m. Yankees at Columbus, 7:05 p.m. Indianapolis at Buffalo, 7:05 p.m. Gwinnett at Rochester, 7:05 p.m. Pawtucket at Norfolk, 7:15 p.m. Today's Games Indianapolis at Buffalo, 1:05 p.m. Yankees at Columbus, 1:05 p.m. Gwinnett at Rochester, 1:05 p.m. Pawtucket at Norfolk, 1:15 p.m. Louisville at Lehigh Valley, 1:35 p.m. Syracuse at Toledo, 2 p.m. Charlotte at Durham, 5:05 p.m. Monday's Games Syracuse at Toledo, 10:30 a.m. Yankees at Columbus, 6:35 p.m. Louisville at Lehigh Valley, 7:05 p.m. Indianapolis at Buffalo, 7:05 p.m. Charlotte at Durham, 7:05 p.m. Gwinnett at Rochester, 7:05 p.m. Pawtucket at Norfolk, 7:15 p.m.

BASEBALL Favorite

Odds

Underdog

Interleague BLUE JAYS

8.5

Mets

YANKEES

8.0

Reds

INDIANS

7.5

Marlins

TIGERS

8.5

Pirates

PHILLIES

7.0

Red Sox

NATIONALS

6.5

Orioles

RAYS

7.0

Braves

Rangers

9.0

ASTROS

BREWERS

8.5

Twins

D’backs

9.0

ROYALS

White Sox

NL

CUBS

ROCKIES

10

Mariners

GIANTS

7.0

A’s

Angels

6.5

PADRES

7.0

Cards

National League DODGERS

NOTE: There will be no over/under run total (which would be the overnight total) for all the Chicago Cubs home games due to the constantly changing weather reports at Wrigley Field. Please check with www.americasline.com for the latest Cubs run total on the day of the game. NBA Favorite Heat

Points

Underdog

2

PACERS

Monday CELTICS

5.5

76ers

NHL Favorite

Odds

Underdog

KINGS

-$225/ +$185

Coyotes

L O C A L C A L E N D A R TODAY'S EVENTS H.S. BASEBALL GAR at Meyers, noon H.S. SOFTBALL Nanticoke vs. Hazleton Area, 6 p.m. at Coal Street Park

W H A T ’ S

O N

T V

AUTO RACING Noon NBCSN — IRL, IndyCar, Indianapolis 500 Bump Day 2 p.m. ESPN — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Pioneer HiBred 250, at Newton, Iowa 5 p.m. SPEED — ARCA, Menards 200, at Toledo, Ohio (same-day tape) 7 p.m. ESPN2 — NHRA, Summernationals, at Topeka, Kan. (same-day tape)

COLLEGE SOFTBALL

1 p.m. ESPN2 — NCAA Division I playoffs, regionals, game 6, teams TBD 3:30 p.m. ESPN2 — NCAA Division I playoffs, regionals, game 7 teams TBD (if necessary)

CYCLING

1 p.m. NBC — Tour of California, final stage, Beverly Hills, Calif. to Los Angeles 6:30 p.m. NBCSN — Tour of California, final stage, Beverly Hills, Calif. to Los Angeles

GOLF

6 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Volvo World Match Play, semifinal and championship matches, at Malaga, Spain 2 p.m. TGC — Nationwide Tour, BMW Charity Pro-Am, final round, at Greer, S.C. 3 p.m. CBS — PGA Tour, Byron Nelson Championship, final round, at Irving, Texas 4 p.m. TGC — LPGA, Sybase Match Play Championship, semifinal and championship matches, at Gladstone, N.J.

HOCKEY

9 p.m. NBCSN — IIHF World Championships, Gold Medal game, Russia vs. Slovakia, at Helsinki (same-day tape)

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

1 p.m. ROOT — Pittsburgh at Detroit WPIX – N.Y. Mets at Toronto YES – Cincinnati at N.Y. Yankees 1:30 p.m. WQMY — Boston at Philadelphia

MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

1:30 p.m. SE2, WYLN — Boston at Philadelphia

T R A N S A C T I O N S BASEBALL National League CHICAGO CUBS—Acquired C Koyie Hill from Cincinnati Reds for cash considerations. MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Selected the contract of LHP Juan Perez from Nashville (PCL). Designated RHP Vinnie Chulk for assignment.

B A S E B A L L Minor League Baseball International League North Division W L Pawtucket (Red Sox) .............. 27 16 Lehigh Valley (Phillies) ........... 25 16 Buffalo (Mets)........................... 25 17 Yankees ................................... 21 19 Syracuse (Nationals)............... 19 23 Rochester (Twins) ................... 17 24 South Division W L Gwinnett (Braves) ................... 25 17 Charlotte (White Sox) ............. 22 20 Norfolk (Orioles) ...................... 17 24 Durham (Rays)......................... 17 26 West Division W L Indianapolis (Pirates)............... 22 19 Toledo (Tigers) ........................ 22 20 Columbus (Indians) ................. 20 21 Louisville (Reds) ...................... 13 30 Saturday's Games Louisville at Lehigh Valley, 6:35 p.m.

Pct. GB .628 — .610 1 .595 11⁄2 .525 41⁄2 .452 71⁄2 .415 9 Pct. GB .595 — .524 3 .415 71⁄2 .395 81⁄2 Pct. GB .537 — 1 .524 ⁄2 .488 2 .302 10

◆ BUILDING TRUST The Times Leader strives to correct errors, clarify stories and update them promptly. If you have information to help us correct an inaccuracy or cover an issue more thoroughly, call the sports department at 8297143.

H O C K E Y National Hockey League Playoff Glance (x-if necessary) FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) Wednesday, April 11 Philadelphia 4, Pittsburgh 3, OT Nashville 3, Detroit 2 Los Angeles 4, Vancouver 2 Thursday, April 12 NY Rangers 4, Ottawa 2 San Jose 3, St. Louis 2, 2OT Boston 1, Washington 0, OT Phoenix 3, Chicago 2, OT Friday, April 13 New Jersey 3, Florida 2 Philadelphia 8, Pittsburgh 5 Detroit 3, Nashville 2 Los Angeles 4, Vancouver 2 Saturday, April 14 Washington 2, Boston 1, 2OT Ottawa 3, NY Rangers 2, OT St. Louis 3, San Jose 0 Chicago 4, Phoenix 3, OT Sunday, April 15 Nashville 3, Detroit 2 Philadelphia 8, Pittsburgh 4 Florida 4, New Jersey 2 Los Angeles 1, Vancouver 0 Monday, April 16 NY Rangers 1, Ottawa 0 Boston 4, Washington 3 St. Louis 4, San Jose 3 Tuesday, April 17 Florida 4, New Jersey 3 Nashville 3, Detroit 1 Phoenix 3, Chicago 2, OT Wednesday, April 18 Ottawa 3, NY Rangers 2, OT Pittsburgh 10, Philadelphia 3 Vancouver 3, Los Angeles 1 Thursday, April 19 New Jersey 4, Florida 0 Washington 2, Boston 1 Phoenix 3, Chicago 2, OT St. Louis 2, San Jose 1 Friday, April 20 Pittsburgh 3, Philadelphia 2 Nashville 2, Detroit 1, Nashville wins series 4-1 Saturday, April 21 Washington 4, Boston 3 Florida 3, New Jersey 0 Ottawa 2, NY Rangers 0 St. Louis 3, San Jose 1, St. Louis wins series 4-1 Chicago 2, Phoenix 1, OT Sunday, April 22 Philadelphia 5, Pittsburgh 1, Philadelphia wins series 4-2 Boston 4, Washington 3, OT Los Angeles 2, Vancouver 1, OT, Los Angeles wins series 4-1 Monday, April 23 NY Rangers 3, Ottawa 2 Phoenix 4, Chicago 0, Phoenix wins series 4-2 Tuesday, April 24 New Jersey 3, Florida 2, OT Wednesday, April 25 Washington 2, Boston 1, OT, Washington wins series 4-3 Thursday, April 26 NY Rangers 2, Ottawa 1, NY Rangers wins series 4-3 New Jersey 3, Florida 2, 2OT, New Jersey wins series 4-3 CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS Friday, April 27 Phoenix 4, Nashville 3, OT Saturday, April 28 NY Rangers 3, Washington 1 Los Angeles 3, St. Louis 1 Sunday, April 29 Philadelphia 4, New Jersey 3, OT Phoenix 5, Nashville 3 Monday, April 30 Washington 3, NY Rangers 2 Los Angeles 5, St. Louis 2 Tuesday, May 1 New Jersey 4, Philadelphia 1 Wednesday, May 2 NY Rangers 2, Washington 1, 3OT Nashville 2, Phoenix 0 Thursday, May 3 New Jersey 4, Philadelphia 3, OT Los Angeles 4, St. Louis 2 Friday, May 4 Phoenix 1, Nashville 0 Saturday, May 5 Washington 3, NY Rangers 2 Sunday, May 6 Los Angeles 3, St. Louis 1, Los Angeles wins series 4-0 New Jersey 4, Philadelphia 2 Monday, May 7 NY Rangers 3, Washington 2, OT Phoenix 2, Nashville 1, Phoenix wins series 4-1 Tuesday, May 8 New Jersey 3, Philadelphia 1, New Jersey wins series 4-1 Wednesday, May 9 Washington 2, NY Rangers 1 Saturday, May 12 NY Rangers 2, Washington 1, NY Rangers wins series 4-3 CONFERENCE FINALS Sunday, May 13 Los Angeles 4, Phoenix 2 Monday, May 14 NY Rangers 3, New Jersey 0 Tuesday, May 15 Los Angeles 4, Phoenix 0 Wednesday, May 16 New Jersey 3, NY Rangers 2 Thursday, May 17 Los Angeles 2, Phoenix 1, Los Angeles leads series 3-0 Saturday, May 19 NY Rangers 3, New Jersey 0, NY Rangers leads series 2-1 Today's Games Phoenix at Los Angeles, 3 p.m. Monday, May 21 NY Rangers at New Jersey, 8 p.m. Tuesday, May 22 x-Los Angeles at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Wednesday, May 23 New Jersey at NY Rangers, 8 p.m. Thursday, May 24 x-Phoenix at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. Friday, May 25 x-NY Rangers at New Jersey, 8 p.m. Saturday, May 26 x-Los Angeles at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Sunday, May 27 x-New Jersey at NY Rangers, 8 p.m.

NHL Leaders Through games of Friday, May 18, 2012 Goal Scoring Name Team .....................................................GP G Danny Briere Philadelphia............................. 11 8 Claude Giroux Philadelphia .......................... 10 8 Dustin Brown Los Angeles ............................ 12 7 Ilya Kovalchuk New Jersey ........................... 13 6 Brad Richards NY Rangers........................... 16 6 Jordan Staal Pittsburgh ................................. 6 6 Dwight King Los Angeles .............................. 12 5 Anze Kopitar Los Angeles............................. 12 5 Andy McDonald St Louis ............................... 9 5 Alex Ovechkin Washington ........................... 14 5 Antoine Vermette Phoenix ............................ 14 5 Travis Zajac New Jersey ............................... 14 5 Mikkel Boedker Phoenix................................ 14 4 Jeff Carter Los Angeles ................................. 12 4 Jason Chimera Washington.......................... 14 4 Marian Gaborik NY Rangers ......................... 16 4 Chris Kreider NY Rangers............................. 14 4 Zach Parise New Jersey ............................... 14 4 Max Talbot Philadelphia ................................ 11 4 Artem Anisimov NY Rangers ........................ 16 3 Sean Bergenheim Florida.............................. 7 3 Patrik Berglund St Louis ................................ 9 3 Gabriel Bourque Nashville ............................ 10 3 Brian Boyle NY Rangers ................................ 13 3 Ryan Callahan NY Rangers .......................... 16 3 David Clarkson New Jersey.......................... 14 3 Sean Couturier Philadelphia ......................... 11 3 Sidney Crosby Pittsburgh.............................. 6 3 Shane Doan Phoenix ..................................... 14 3 Patrik Elias New Jersey ................................. 14 3 Martin Hanzal Phoenix................................... 10 3 Scott Hartnell Philadelphia............................ 11 3 Tyler Kennedy Pittsburgh.............................. 6 3 Andrei Kostitsyn Nashville ............................ 8 3 David Legwand Nashville .............................. 10 3 Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh............................... 6 3 Rich Peverley Boston .................................... 7 3 Taylor Pyatt Phoenix ...................................... 14 3 Matt Read Philadelphia.................................. 11 3 Mike Richards Los Angeles .......................... 12 3 Brayden Schenn Philadelphia ...................... 11 3 Alexander Semin Washington ...................... 14 3 Jason Spezza Ottawa .................................... 7 3 Marc Staal NY Rangers ................................. 16 3 Anton Stralman NY Rangers......................... 16 3 Kris Versteeg Florida ..................................... 7 3 Stephen Weiss Florida .................................. 7 3 Dainius Zubrus New Jersey .......................... 14 3

S

P

O

B A S K E T B A L L National Basketball Association Playoff Glance (x-if necessary) FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) Saturday, April 28 Chicago 103, Philadelphia 91 Miami 100, New York 67 Orlando 81, Indiana 77 Oklahoma City 99, Dallas 98 Sunday, April 29 San Antonio 106, Utah 91 L.A. Lakers 103, Denver 88 Atlanta 83, Boston 74 L.A. Clippers 99, Memphis 98 Monday, April 30 Miami 104, New York 94 Indiana 93, Orlando 78 Oklahoma City 102, Dallas 99 Tuesday, May 1 Boston 87, Atlanta 80 Philadelphia 109, Chicago 92 L.A. Lakers 104, Denver 100 Wednesday, May 2 San Antonio 114, Utah 83 Indiana 97, Orlando 74 Memphis 105, L.A. Clippers 98 Thursday, May 3 Miami 87, New York 70 Oklahoma City 95, Dallas 79 Friday, May 4 Boston 90, Atlanta 84, OT Philadelphia 79, Chicago 74 Denver 99, L.A. Lakers 84 Saturday, May 5 Indiana 101, Orlando 99, OT L.A. Clippers 87, Memphis 86 Oklahoma City 103, Dallas 97, Oklahoma City wins series 4-0 San Antonio 102, Utah 90 Sunday, May 6 Philadelphia 89, Chicago 82 New York 89, Miami 87 Boston 101, Atlanta 79 L.A. Lakers 92, Denver 88 Monday, May 7 San Antonio 87, Utah 81, San Antonio wins series 4-0 L.A. Clippers 101, Memphis 97, OT Tuesday, May 8 Indiana 105, Orlando 87, Indiana wins series 4-1 Atlanta 87, Boston 86 Chicago 77, Philadelphia 69 Denver 102, L.A. Lakers 99 Wednesday, May 9 Miami 106, New York 94, Miami wins series 4-1 Memphis 92, L.A. Clippers 80 Thursday, May 10 Philadelphia 79, Chicago 78, Philadelphia wins series 4-2 Boston 83, Atlanta 80, Boston wins series 4-2 Denver 113, L.A. Lakers 96 Friday, May 11 Memphis 90, L.A. Clippers 88 Saturday, May 12 L.A. Lakers 96, Denver 87, L.A. Lakers wins series 4-3 Sunday, May 13 L.A. Clippers 82, Memphis 72, L.A. Clippers wins series 4-3 CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS Saturday, May 12 Boston 92, Philadelphia 91 Sunday, May 13 Miami 95, Indiana 86 Monday, May 14 Philadelphia 82, Boston 81 Oklahoma City 119, L.A. Lakers 90 Tuesday, May 15 Indiana 78, Miami 75 San Antonio 108, L.A. Clippers 92 Wednesday, May 16 Boston 107, Philadelphia 91 Oklahoma City 77, L.A. Lakers 75 Thursday, May 17 Indiana 94, Miami 75, Indiana leads series 2-1 San Antonio 105, L.A. Clippers 88 Friday, May 18 Philadelphia 92, Boston 83, series tied 2-2 L.A. Lakers 99, Oklahoma City 96, Oklahoma City leads series 2-1 Saturday, May 19 San Antonio 96, L.A. Clippers 86, San Antonio leads series 3-0 Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, late Today's Games Miami at Indiana, 3:30 p.m. San Antonio at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Monday, May 21 Philadelphia at Boston, 7 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Oklahoma City, 9:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 22 Indiana at Miami, 7 or 8 p.m. x-L.A. Clippers at San Antonio, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 23 Boston at Philadelphia, TBD x-Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, TBD Thursday, May 24 x-Miami at Indiana, TBD Friday, May 25 San Antonio at L.A. Clippers, TBD Saturday, May 26 x-Philadelphia at Boston, TBD x-Indiana at Miami, TBD Sunday, May 27 x-L.A. Lakers at Oklahoma City, TBD x-L.A. Clippers at San Antonio, TBD NBA LEADERS PLAYOFFS / THROUGH MAY 18 Scoring G FG FT PTS Bryant, LAL .................. 10 102 60 280 Anthony, NYK.............. 5 52 31 139 James, MIA.................. 8 75 63 221 Nowitzki, DAL.............. 4 34 38 107 Durant, OKC ................ 7 64 43 184 Westbrook, OKC......... 7 56 34 152 Wade, MIA ................... 8 61 39 163 Pierce, BOS................. 10 61 59 196 Garnett, BOS............... 10 79 33 192 Lawson, DEN............... 7 56 12 133 Gay, MEM .................... 7 48 33 133 Davis, ORL .................. 5 39 17 95 Parker, SAN................. 6 39 34 113 Jefferson, UTA ............ 4 36 1 73 Griffin, LAC .................. 9 62 37 161 Granger, IND ............... 8 52 20 142 Harden, OKC............... 7 31 53 124 Paul, LAC ..................... 9 56 36 159 Bynum, LAL................. 10 60 52 172 J. Johnson, ATL.......... 6 38 18 103 FG Percentage FG FGA Stoudemire, NYK......................... 20 36 Ibaka, OKC ................................... 31 57 Faried, DEN.................................. 32 60 Duncan, SAN................................ 44 83 Jefferson, UTA............................. 36 68 Garnett, BOS................................ 79 150 Gasol, MEM.................................. 36 69 Hibbert, IND ................................. 40 77 Bosh, MIA ..................................... 31 60 Lawson, DEN ............................... 56 109 Rebounds G OFF DEF TOT Smith, ATL .............. 5 10 58 68 Bynum, LAL ............ 10 41 79 120 Hibbert, IND ............ 8 36 58 94 Millsap, UTA ........... 4 17 27 44 Garnett, BOS .......... 10 12 98 110

AVG 28.0 27.8 27.6 26.8 26.3 21.7 20.4 19.6 19.2 19.0 19.0 19.0 18.8 18.3 17.9 17.8 17.7 17.7 17.2 17.2 PCT .556 .544 .533 .530 .529 .527 .522 .519 .517 .514 AVG 13.6 12.0 11.8 11.0 11.0

R

T

S

THE TIMES LEADER

Faried, DEN ............ West, IND................ Randolph, MEM...... Boozer, CHI ............ McGee, DEN...........

7 25 8 17 7 27 6 10 7 23 Assists

Rondo, BOS.................................... Paul, LAC ........................................ Conley, MEM .................................. Parker, SAN .................................... Nelson, ORL ................................... Miller, DEN...................................... Kidd, DAL ........................................ Lawson, DEN .................................. Watson, CHI.................................... James, MIA .....................................

45 62 42 49 44

70 10.0 79 9.9 69 9.9 59 9.8 67 9.6

G AST AVG 9 118 13.1 9 65 7.2 7 50 7.1 6 42 7.0 5 33 6.6 7 42 6.0 4 24 6.0 7 42 6.0 6 33 5.5 8 41 5.1

Women's National Basketball Association All Times EDT EASTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct Connecticut .................... 1 0 1.000 Atlanta ............................. 0 0 .000 Chicago........................... 0 0 .000 Indiana ............................ 0 0 .000 Washington .................... 0 0 .000 New York ........................ 0 1 .000 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct Los Angeles ................... 1 0 1.000 Minnesota....................... 0 0 .000 Phoenix........................... 0 0 .000 San Antonio.................... 0 0 .000 Tulsa ............................... 0 0 .000 Seattle ............................. 0 1 .000 Friday's Games Los Angeles 72, Seattle 66 Saturday's Games Connecticut 78, New York 73 Indiana 92, Atlanta 84 Chicago 69, Washington 57 San Antonio at Tulsa, late Today's Games Phoenix at Minnesota, 12:30 p.m. New York at Connecticut, 5 p.m.

GB — 1 ⁄2 1 ⁄2 1 ⁄2 1 ⁄2 1 GB — 1 ⁄2 1 ⁄2 1 ⁄2 1 ⁄2 1

S O C C E R Major League Soccer EASTERN CONFERENCE .......................................................................W New York...................................................... 7 Sporting Kansas City .................................. 7 D.C. ............................................................... 6 Chicago ........................................................ 4 New England................................................ 4 Houston ........................................................ 3 Montreal ....................................................... 3 Columbus ..................................................... 3 Philadelphia ................................................. 2 Toronto FC................................................... 0 WESTERN CONFERENCE .......................................................................W Real Salt Lake ............................................. 8 San Jose....................................................... 7 Seattle ........................................................... 7 Vancouver .................................................... 5 Colorado....................................................... 5 FC Dallas...................................................... 3 Los Angeles ................................................. 3 Chivas USA ................................................. 3 Portland ........................................................ 2 Tuesday's Games Houston 0, Portland 0, tie Wednesday's Games D.C. United 2, Colorado 0 Saturday's Games Vancouver 2, Seattle FC 2, tie D.C. United 3, Toronto FC 1 New York 2, Montreal 1 Houston 2, New England 2, tie Philadelphia at FC Dallas, late Sporting Kansas City at Colorado, late Columbus at San Jose, late Los Angeles at Chivas USA, late Today's Games Chicago at Portland, 7 p.m.

L T 3 1 3 0 4 3 2 3 6 0 3 3 5 3 4 2 6 1 8 0 L T 3 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 6 0 6 3 5 2 6 1 5 3

F O O T B A L L Arena Football League NATIONAL CONFERENCE Central Division ...........................................................W L San Antonio...................................... 6 3 Chicago ............................................ 6 3 Iowa................................................... 4 5 Kansas City ...................................... 0 8 West Division ...........................................................W L San Jose........................................... 7 2 Arizona.............................................. 6 3 Utah................................................... 6 3 Spokane............................................ 5 4 AMERICAN CONFERENCE South Division ...........................................................W L Georgia ............................................. 6 4 Tampa Bay........................................ 5 4 New Orleans .................................... 4 5 Jacksonville...................................... 3 5 Orlando ............................................. 1 8 Eastern Division ...........................................................W L Philadelphia ..................................... 7 3 Cleveland.......................................... 5 3 Milwaukee......................................... 3 6 Pittsburgh ......................................... 2 7 Friday's Games Georgia 58, Milwaukee 55 New Orleans 68, Orlando 61 Spokane 65, Philadelphia 47 Saturday's Games Iowa at Jacksonville, late Kansas City at Pittsburgh, late Tampa Bay at Cleveland, late San Jose at San Antonio, late Arizona at Utah, late Friday, May 25 Jacksonville at Orlando, 8 p.m. Spokane at Iowa, 8:05 p.m. Saturday, May 26 Milwaukee at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m. Arizona at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Georgia at Kansas City, 8 p.m. San Antonio at Utah, 9 p.m. Chicago at San Jose, 10:30 p.m. Sunday, May 27 Philadelphia at Cleveland, 4 p.m.

3. (19) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 40, 105.7, 0. 4. (2) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 40, 112.2, 0. 5. (7) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 40, 104.7, 0. 6. (13) Joey Logano, Toyota, 40, 84.5, 0. 7. (5) Aric Almirola, Ford, 40, 89, 0. 8. (4) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 40, 92.3, 0. 9. (6) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 40, 79.9, 0. 10. (9) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 40, 71.1, 0. 11. (11) Casey Mears, Ford, 40, 70.5, 0. 12. (8) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 40, 62.7, 0. 13. (21) Josh Wise, Ford, 40, 51, 0. 14. (15) Scott Speed, Ford, 40, 50.2, 0. 15. (16) David Gilliland, Ford, 40, 49.4, 0. 16. (17) Mike Bliss, Toyota, ignition, 28, 35.9, 0. 17. (20) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, vibration, 26, 35.8, 0. 18. (10) David Stremme, Toyota, overheating, 22, 39.6, 0. 19. (12) David Reutimann, Chevrolet, vibration, 20, 52.4, 0. 20. (22) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, electrical, 20, 26.9, 0. 21. (14) Stephen Leicht, Chevrolet, brakes, 7, 35.1, 0. 22. (18) J.J. Yeley, Toyota, accident, 3, 28.6, 0. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 125.581 mph. Time of Race: 0 hours, 28 minutes, 40 seconds. Margin of Victory: 2.384 seconds. Caution Flags: 1 for 0 laps. Lead Changes: 1 among 1 driver. Lap Leaders: D.Earnhardt Jr. 1-40. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): D.Earnhardt Jr., 1 time for 40 laps. Top 12 in Points: 1. G.Biffle, 411;2. M.Kenseth, 409;3. D.Earnhardt Jr., 397;4. D.Hamlin, 394;5. J.Johnson, 372;6. M.Truex Jr., 372;7. T.Stewart, 369;8. K.Harvick, 361;9. Ky.Busch, 349;10. C.Edwards, 337;11. C.Bowyer, 335;12. B.Keselowski, 328. NASCAR Driver Rating Formula A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a race. The formula combines the following categories: Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Running Position While on Lead Lap, Average Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most Laps, Lead-Lap Finish. IndyCar-Indy 500-Qualifying Indianapolis 500 Qualifying Pole Day (Qualifying continues Sunday; race May 27) At Indianapolis Motor Speedway Indianapolis With rank, car number in parentheses, driver, chassis-engine, time and speed in parentheses: 1. (2) Ryan Briscoe, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:38.9514 (226.484 mph) 2. (27) James Hinchcliffe, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:38.9537 ( 226.481) 3. (28) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:39.1233 ( 226.240) 4. (26) Marco Andretti, Dallara- Chevrolet, 2:40.6766 ( 225.456) 5. (12) Will Power, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:39.7004 (225.422) 6. (3) Helio Castroneves, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:39.8780 (225.172) 7. (67) Josef Newgarden, Dallara-Honda, 2:40.6879 (224.037) 8. (11) Tony Kanaan, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:40.1775 (224.751) 9. (5) EJ Viso, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:40.4119 ( 224.422) 10. (8) Rubens Barrichello, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:40.5253 ( 224.264) 11. (98) Alex Tagliani, Dallara-Honda, 2:40.7144 ( 224.000) 12. (38) Graham Rahal, Dallara-Honda, 2:40.7437 ( 223.959) 13. (25) Ana Beatriz, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:40.7720 ( 223.920) 14. (83) Charlie Kimball, Dallara-Honda, 2:40.8093 ( 223.868) 15. (9) Scott Dixon, Dallara-Honda, 2:40.9413 ( 223.684) 16. (50) Dario Franchitti, Dallara-Honda, 2:41.0144 ( 223.582) 17. (19) James Jakes, Dallara-Honda, 2:41.0866 ( 223.482) 18. (4) JR Hildebrand, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:41.1299 ( 223.422) 19. (15) Takuma Sato, Dallara-Honda, 2:41.1517 ( 223.392) 20. (99) Townsend Bell, Dallara-Honda, 2:41.3377 ( 223.134) 21. (18) Justin Wilson, Dallara-Honda, 2:41.4865 ( 222.929) 22. (30) Michel Jourdain, Dallara-Honda, 2:41.5124 ( 222.893) 23. (77) Simon Pagenaud, Dallara-Honda, 2:41.5138 ( 222.891) 24. (17) Sebastian Saavedra, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:41.5720 ( 222.811)

G O L F

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .667 .667 .444 .000

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .778 .667 .667 .556

T Pct 0 .600 0 .556 0 .444 0 .375 0 .111 T Pct 0 .700 0 .625 0 .333 0 .222

A U T O R A C I N G NASCAR Sprint Cup-Sprint Showdown Results Saturday At Charlotte Motor Speedway Concord, N.C. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (3) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 40 laps, 150 rating, 0 points. 2. (1) A J Allmendinger, Dodge, 40, 92.8, 0.

Byron Nelson Championship Scores Saturday At TPC Four Seasons Resort Irving, Texas Purse: $6.5 million Yardage: 7,166; Par 70 Third Round Jason Dufner .....................................67-66-69—202 J.J. Henry...........................................68-68-67—203 Jason Day ..........................................68-68-67—203 Dicky Pride.........................................66-68-69—203 Vijay Singh .........................................68-70-66—204 Jonas Blixt .........................................68-70-67—205 Marc Leishman..................................65-69-71—205 Rich Beem .........................................68-70-68—206 Bob Estes...........................................73-68-65—206 Joe Durant .........................................70-71-65—206 Scott Piercy .......................................66-70-70—206 Keegan Bradley.................................67-68-71—206 Matt Kuchar........................................66-68-72—206 Pat Perez............................................67-67-72—206 Ryan Palmer ......................................64-70-72—206 Jason Bohn........................................70-70-67—207 Jimmy Walker....................................70-68-69—207 Andres Gonzales ..............................66-72-69—207 Padraig Harrington ...........................68-69-70—207 Chad Campbell .................................68-66-73—207 Phil Mickelson ...................................70-69-69—208 Shane Bertsch...................................70-70-68—208 Graham DeLaet.................................71-68-69—208 James Driscoll ...................................67-71-70—208 Greg Owen ........................................67-71-70—208 Billy Mayfair........................................69-68-71—208 Ken Duke ...........................................69-67-72—208 Ernie Els.............................................70-69-70—209 Nathan Green ....................................68-71-70—209 John Mallinger...................................70-70-69—209 Andres Romero.................................72-67-70—209 David Mathis ......................................68-71-70—209 Robert Garrigus ................................71-70-68—209 Roberto Castro..................................74-67-68—209 Charles Howell III..............................68-73-68—209 John Rollins .......................................71-67-71—209 D.A. Points.........................................68-69-72—209 Charley Hoffman ...............................66-69-74—209 Tim Herron.........................................70-72-67—209 Brandt Jobe .......................................70-69-71—210 Derek Lamely ....................................69-70-71—210 Bill Lunde ...........................................66-75-69—210 Boo Weekley .....................................69-68-73—210 John Merrick ......................................71-70-69—210 Danny Lee..........................................71-71-68—210 D.J. Trahan ........................................72-68-71—211 Todd Hamilton ...................................70-70-71—211 Gavin Coles .......................................71-69-71—211 Brian Davis.........................................73-65-73—211 Greg Chalmers..................................70-71-70—211 Hunter Haas ......................................69-73-69—211 Duffy Waldorf.....................................72-70-69—211 Scott Brown .......................................70-69-73—212 Ricky Barnes......................................67-71-74—212 Kevin Kisner ......................................67-74-71—212 Gary Woodland .................................68-70-74—212 Nick O’Hern .......................................70-71-71—212

Blackhawks claim NEPASHL championship

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Erik Compton.....................................70-71-71—212 Blake Adams .....................................66-71-75—212 Seung-Yul Noh..................................73-69-70—212 Mathew Goggin .................................69-71-73—213 Chris Couch.......................................68-70-75—213 Brian Gay............................................71-71-71—213 Kyle Reifers .......................................70-72-71—213 Richard H. Lee ..................................68-72-74—214 Arjun Atwal.........................................72-69-73—214 Chris Riley .........................................67-74-73—214 Jhonattan Vegas ...............................67-74-73—214 Alex Cejka..........................................65-73-76—214 J.J. Killeen .........................................70-72-72—214 Ryuji Imada........................................67-68-79—214 Made cut did not finish Harrison Frazar .................................68-70-77—215 Robert Gamez...................................74-68-73—215 Bobby Gates ......................................71-70-75—216 Alexandre Rocha ..............................69-72-75—216 Tim Petrovic.......................................67-74-76—217 Rocco Mediate...................................70-71-76—217 Jerry Kelly ..........................................68-71-79—218 Stephen Gangluff ..............................71-71-78—220

LPGA Sybase Match Play Results Saturday At Hamilton Farm Golf Club Gladstone, N.J. Purse: $1.5 million Yardage: 6,553 yards; Par: 72 Patty Berg Bracket Candie Kung, Taiwan, def. Yani Tseng, Taiwan, 3 and 2 Julieta Granada, Paraguay, def. Karine Icher, France, 1 up. Kathy Whitworth Bracket Ryu So Yeon, South Korea, def. Katherine Hull, Australia, 5 and 4. Vicky Hurst, United States, def. Angela Stanford, United States, 2 and 1. Mickey Wright Bracket Morgan Pressel, United States, def. Na Yeon Choi, South Korea, 5-4, 19 holes. Anna Nordqvist, Sweden, def. Amy Yang, South Korea, 3 and 1. Annika Sorenstam Bracket Azahara Munoz, Spain, def. Jodi Ewart, Britain, 2 and 1 Stacy Lewis, United States, def. Sun Young Yoo, South Korea, 1 up. Quarterfinals Patty Berg Bracket Candie Kung, Taiwan, def. Julieta Granada, Paraguay, 2 and 1. Kathy Whitworth Bracket Vicky Hurst, United States, def. Ryu So Yeon, South Korea, 2 up. Mickey Wright Bracket Morgan Pressel, United States, def. Anna Nordqvist, Sweden, 5 and 4. Annika Sorenstam Bracket Azahara Munoz, Spain, def. Stacy Lewis, United States, 5 and 4.

B O X I N G Fight Schedule May 24 At Boston House of Blues, Danny O’Connor vs. Daniel Sostre, 10, junior welterweights. May 25 At the Horseshoe Casino, Hammond, Ind., Fres Oquendo vs. Joey Abell, 10, for the WBA Fedelatin heavyweight title. At St. Charles, Mo. (ESPN2), Ji-Hoon vs. Alisher Rahimov, 10, lightweights; Efrain Esquivias vs. Roberto Castaneda, 10, super bantamweights. May 26 At Nottinghamshire, England, Lucian Bute vs. Carl Froch, 12, for Bute’s IBF super middleweight title. June 1 At Sands Casino Resort, Bethlehem, Pa. (NBCSN), Gabriel Rosado vs. Sechew Powell, 12, junior middleweights; Prenice Brewer vs. Ronald Cruz, 12, for the vacant WBC Continental Americas welterweight title. June 2 At Home Depot Center, Carson, Calif. (SHO), Antonio Tarver vs. Lateef Kayode, 12, for Tarver’s WBO cruiserweight title; Austin Trout vs. Delvin Rodriguez, 12, for Trout’s WBA World light middleweight title; Vusi Malinga vs. Leo Santa Cruz, 12, for the vacant IBF bantamweight title; Ronald Wright vs. Peter Quillin, 10, middleweights; Winky Wright vs. Peter Quillin, 10, middleweights. At the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas, Beibut Shumenov vs. Enrique Ornelas, 12, for Shumenov’s WBA World and IBO light heavyweight titles. At Aviator Sports Complex, Brooklyn, N.Y., Sadam Ali vs. Franklin Gonzalez, 10, welterweights. June 8 At Las Vegas (ESPN2), Kelly Pavlik vs. Scott Sigmon, 10, super middleweights. June 9 At the MGM Grand Garden Arena, Las Vegas (PPV), Manny Pacquiao vs. Timothy Bradley, Jr. 12, for Pacquiao’s WBO welterweight championship; Mike Jones vs. Randall Bailey, 12, for the vacant IBF welterweight title; Jorge Arce vs. Jesus M. Rojas, 10, bantamweights; Guillermo Rigondeaux vs. Teon Kennedy, for Rigondeaux’s WBA World super bantamweight title. June 16 At Manchester, England, Scott Quigg vs. Rendall Munroe, 12, for the interim WBA World junior featherweight title. At Newark, N.J. (NBCSN), Tomasz Adamek vs. Eddie Chambers, 10, heavyweights. At El Paso, Texas (HBO), Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. vs. Andy Lee, 12, for Chavez’s WBC middleweight title.

BULLETIN BOARD MEETINGS Wyoming Valley West Softball Booster Club will have a meeting on Wednesday, May 23rd at 7:00 p.m. at the WVW Middle School. Parents of all players are encouraged to attend. REGISTRATION/TRYOUTS King’s College/Kirby Park Tennis is accepting registrations for three summer sessions of the annual Junior Tennis Camps. Session 1 will run June 11- June 22, session 2 will be July 9 though July 20, and session 3 will go form July 30 – August 10. Camps run daily from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. daily Monday – Thursday will Friday as a make up day. Students may register for one session or all sessions. Cost is $135 per session and you may deduct $15 if no racket is required. To register, call Kirby Park Tennis offices at 714-9697, visit the website at www.kirbyparktennis.net, the King’s College tennis website. Registrations will be accepted on the firs day of each camp. Kingston Huskies Football and Cheerleading will have sign ups at the Black Diamond VFW Post 395 near Kost Tire on May 23 from 6-7:30 p.m. downstairs. First time participants must bring a small photo of each child (that will be kept), a copy of the child’s birth certificate, and copies of two proofs of residence. They will be sizing the boys for equipment during sign ups. Board meeting will follow after sign ups. UPCOMING EVENTS

The Back Mountain Blackhawks finished the NEPASHL varsity ice hockey season in second place with a 10-2-2 record and won the championship in the playoffs, defeating Crestwood in the title game. Team members are Hunter Hackling, Tyler Steve, Alex Hoyt, Eric Gotoweski, Dominic Hockenbury, Eric Anderson, Lewis Hackling, Eric Anderson, Corey McAndrew, Sean Jenkins, Dylan Pilger, Jimmy Loeffland, David Payne, Erix Smith, Paul Ciaccia, Logan Obes, Kenny Burkhardt, Patrick Newhart, Casey McAndrew, Eric Yenchack, Tom Brady and John Enchack. The Blackhawks were coach by Paul Ciaccia, and assistants Jerry Martindale and George Hockenbury.

Dallas football reunion for former players of Ted Jackson will be held from 4-8 p.m. on Sunday, May 27, at Irem Country Club in Dallas. Cost of $45 per person includes open bar and buffet dinner. Tickets for those under age 21 are $20 per person. Children age 4 and under will be admitted free. For more information or to make a reservation, contact Ted Jackson Jr. at 574-0409 or Sandy Jackson at 574-0412. Bulletin Board items will not be accepted over the telephone. Items may be faxed to 831-7319, emailed to tlsports@timesleader.com or dropped off at the Times Leader or mailed to Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250.


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 PAGE 3C

MINOR LEAGUES S W B YA N K E E S U P C O M I N G S C H E D U L E

YA N K E E S P R O S P E C T S

PHILLIES PROSPECTS

Marshall is part of pitching logjam By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

The Yankees system is stocked with top pitching prospects, so there might not be any room on the top prospects list for 22-year-old Brett Marshall. But the right-hander is making a push for notice. For Trenton this season, he’s been very consistent, only allowing three or more runs once in eight starts. He’s used that to race to a 4-1 record with a 2.79 ERA. He doesn’t strike out many batters (26), but he doesn’t walk many either with just 13. And, he hasn’t allowed a run since May 4. Here are the New York Yankees Top 10 prospects according to MLB.com. 1. Manny Banuelos, LHP, Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (TripleA): The left-hander pitched Friday night and was roughed up by Toledo, giving up five runs, four hits and three walks in just four innings of a nodecision. In six starts for Yankees, he’s 0-2 with a 4.50 ERA and 22 Ks in 24 innings. 2. Dellin Betances, RHP, Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (TripleA): The 6-foot-8, 260-pound righty has struggled with command at times this season, including a loss last week to Toledo where he walked six in just 3 2 ⁄3 innings. On the season, he’s 2-3 with a 5.40 ERA, 35 strikeouts and 35 walks in 40 innings. 3. Gary Sanchez, catcher, Charleston (A): The 19-year-old is still having a solid campaign for the RiverDogs, hitting .315 in 33 games. Last week, he knocked in a career-high six when he also hit his second home run of the season. He also has stolen eight bases so far this season. He had a 10-game hitting streak snapped last week. 4. Mason Williams, outfielder, Charleston (A): The fourthround selection in 2010 is hitting a respectable .311 for the RiverDogs this season with three home runs and 15 RBI. The 20-year-old is also a speedster with three triples, eight doubles and 12 stolen bases. 5. Jose Campos, RHP, Charleston (A): A 19-year-old acquired in the Michael PinedaJesus Montero trade in the offseason was off to a good start before getting roughed up in an outing. Then he was placed on the disabled list last week with elbow inflammation. He’s currently 3-0 with a 4.01 ERA and 26 strikeouts in 24 2⁄3 innings. 6. Slade Heathcott, outfielder, TBA: The 2009 first-round draft pick is currently in extended spring training rehabbing a shoulder injury that sidelined him for the end of the 2011 season. He’s expected to play his first game of 2012 on June 5 with High-A Tampa. 7. Austin Romine, catcher, TBA: A 23-year-old who was expected to be with Scranton/ Wilkes-Barre this season, he is currently on the disabled list with a lower back strain. He was switched to the 60-day DL last week to open a spot on New York’s 40-man roster. When he’s healthy, he should join the SWB Yankees. 8. Dante Bichette Jr., third base, Charleston (A): The Yankees first pick in 2011 (51st overall) is batting just .239 for the RiverDogs with four extrabase hits and 14 RBI. He’s starting to get things together, reaching base in eight of his last nine games while going 12for-33 in that span. 9. Cito Culver, shortstop, Charleston (A): A first-round pick in 2010 (32 overall), the 19-year-old is having a season of streaks. After slumping to begin the season, he stepped up his game over a seven-game span in which he hit .300. Now, he’s in another rut, going just eight for his last 40 to see his average drop down to .214. 10. Adam Warren, RHP, Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (TripleA): He had his best start of the season last week, but took a loss to Durham. He only gave up one run in seven innings, but still has his record fall to 2-2. For the season, he has a 4.58 ERA with 25 strikeouts in 37 1⁄3 innings.

Smooth season for prospect Ruf Today at Columbus 1:05 p.m.

Monday at Columbus 6:35 p.m.

Tuesday at Columbus 10:35 a.m.

Wednesday Off

Thursday Buffalo 7:05 p.m. at Buffalo

Friday Buffalo 7:05 p.m. at Buffalo

Saturday Buffalo 1:05 p.m. at Buffalo

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

SWB catcher Gustavo Molina is congratulated by Austin Krum after hitting a home run in a game played June 6 last year.

Molina catches on despite the odds By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

Gustavo Molina isn’t part of the famous brothers who catch in the major leagues. But he is a catcher in the New York Yankees organization. Playing mainly as a backup for Triple-A Scranton/WilkesBarre, Molina started the season at Double-A Trenton after spending 2011 playing in Moosic and New York. Time after time, the 30-yearold has come through when called upon. Last year for SWB, he had several big hits to help his team win a ball game as he smashed four home runs and drove in 21 in 47 games. After being called up to Triple-A, he’s continuing to get

huge hits for Scranton/WilkesBarre. He laced a go-ahead two-run single in the top of the sixth of a 3-1 win over Toledo last week. A week before that hit, he won a game in the bottom of the 10th for the Yankees against Columbus with a runscoring single. “It feels good when you step to the plate with the game on the line,” Molina said to the SWB Yankees’ Above the Plate Blog. “All you want to do is put the ball in play. It feels pretty good when you get a hit to win the game. There’s nothing like feeling like that.” Even though Molina didn’t spend anytime below Triple-A in 2011, an excess of catchers in Spring Training with the Yankees made him expendable. He had a great spring for the Yan-

kees, hitting .389 (7-for-16) with a home run and two RBI, but there was no room for the veteran minor leaguer on the major league roster. Then when the Yankees traded for Chris Stewart and Francisco Cervelli was sent to Triple-A, there was no room for Molina there either. So he took his assignment to Trenton and excelled before getting hurt and missing time. He batted .304 with two home runs and six RBI for the Thunder in just six games to prove he should be at a higher level. “Every time you get to spring training, you want to make a good impression,” Molina said. “Wherever they decide to send you, Double-A or Triple-A and just keep working. Baseball’s like that. It’s a

long season you never know what can happen.”

GOLSON IN CHARLOTTE Former Scranton/WilkesBarre Yankees can be found all over the International League. One of the most notable faces is outfielder Greg Golson, who has latched on with Charlotte, the Chicago White Sox Triple-A squad. And Golson is performing well for the Knights. He entered Friday tied for the league lead in hits with 46, fourth in runs (27) and 12th in batting average (.301). He also has one home run, 13 RBI and six stolen bases. Last year for Scranton/ Wilkes-Barre, he batted .263 with eight home runs and 15 stolen bases.

DISTRICT 2’S PRESENCE IN PROFESSIONAL BASEBALL

Russ Canzler, Hazleton Area, Columbus (Cleveland, Triple-A): The Hazleton native must have been glad to see a team other than the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees. After playing four against SWB earlier this month and getting just one hit, the 26-year-old has been on fire. He’s hitting 10-for-31 (.323) with three home runs in eight games since ending a series against his hometown team. He faces the Yankees again this week, this time in Columbus. The series started Saturday and continues through Tuesday. To date for the Clippers, after a slow start, he’s now hitting .265 with three home runs, 12 RBI and a .310 on base percentage. Originally drafted by the Cubs in the 30th round in 2004, he was signed as a minor league free agent by Tampa Bay last year and then traded to Cleveland in this offseason. After having a decent spring for the Indians, he was sent down to Columbus.

Cory Spangenberg, Abington Heights, Lake Elsinore (San Diego, Class A advanced): The No. 10 overall pick last June by the Padres is currently on a roll for the Storm. After beginning the season slowly, the No. 6 overall prospect in the Padres system according to MLB.com was hitting in a .479 stretch to raise his average over .300 for the season. But an 0-for-8 streak last week dropped his average back under .300 to .285 for the season. To date, he also has 15 stolen bases in 18 attempts to go along with three triples and eight doubles.

Ray Black, Coughlin, San Francisco (extended Spring Training): Drafted in the seventh round (237th overall) out of Pittsburgh last June, the right-handed pitcher hasn’t made his professional debut, continuing to work in extended Spring Training. The 21-yearold is currently in Scottsdale, Ariz., for the Giants. Extended spring training is just like regular spring training and consists of workouts and games to keep players fresh in the case he is needed to fill in for an injury. A number of players also stay in EST until June when the shortseason teams open the season. Black is ranked the No. 24 overall prospect in the organization, according to Baseball America and has been known to reach in the high 90s with his fastball. He is also listed as an “Under the Radar” player for the organization, according to MLB.com.

Rich Thompson, Montrose, Lehigh Valley (Philadelphia, Triple-A): The 33-year-old is finally getting a shot in the Major Leagues. He was traded last week from the Phillies to Tampa Bay and was immediately called up to the big leagues. On the day of his call-up, he also saw action as a pinch-runner, but was stranded on third. Before the trade, he was hitting .307 for Lehigh Valley with seven stolen bases and an on base percentage of .390. Originally drafted in the sixth round by the Blue Jays in 2000 out of James Madison, he is now playing for his seventh organization. So far for Tampa, the outfielder picked up his first Major League hit and RBI in a game against the Red Sox on Thursday night. His last taste of the majors came in 2004 for the Royals where he received his only big league at-bat prior to last week. .

By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

Kyle McMyne, Old Forge, Dayton (Cincinnati, Class A): Taken by the Reds in the fourth round (145 overall) of last year’s draft out of Villanova, the righthanded reliever has gotten off to a good start for the Midwest League’s Dragons. After allowing a run on May 3, he has pitched 9 2⁄3 scoreless innings. On the season, in 22 1⁄3 innings the 22-year-old has allowed 17 hits, three earned runs and just three walks. He’s averaging just under a strikeout per inning with 21 so far this season to go with a 3-2 record in 15 games. He is holding opponents to a .202 batting average and has only given up one home run.

By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

Being drafted just three years ago out of Creighton, Darin Ruf is just starting to get in a groove in the Phillies organization. The first baseman isn’t listed as a top prospect for the organization, but he is starting to make experts take notice. Playing for Double-A Reading, the 25-year-old is second in the Eastern League in batting average (.359) to go along with six home runs and a leagueleading 28 RBI in 39 games. In 2011playing for Clearwater, Ruf hit .308 with17 home runs and 82 RBI. In his first two seasons combined after being drafted, he only hit12 home runs. The 6foot-3, 220-pound right-handed hitter and thrower has also swiped two stolen bases this season. Here are Philadelphia’s top10 prospects according to MLB.com and how they are faring in 2012. 1. Trevor May, RHP, Reading (Double-A): May earned a nodecision last week allowing three runs in five innings. In that outing, he also struck out a season-low three, but he still leads the Eastern League with 48 Ks. He has a 5-2 record with a 2.91ERA in 46 1⁄3 innings. 2. Jesse Biddle, LHP, Clearwater (A-Advanced): The 20-yearold top draft pick for the Phillies in 2010 is in a groove after a slow start. He’s won two of his last three starts and only allowed three runs in18 2⁄3 innings in that span. For the season, he’s 2-2 with 40 strikeouts in 36 1⁄3 innings. 3. Brody Colvin, RHP, Clearwater (A-Advanced): The 21-yearold has been struggling of late for the Threshers, allowing11runs in 10 1⁄3 innings over his last two starts to see his ERA balloon to 5.31with a 2-3 record. 4. Larry Greene, first base, TBA: The first-round pick from last June has yet to play in a professional game. The19-year-old is currently in extended spring training. 5. Phillippe Aumont, RHP, Lehigh Valley (Triple-A): The 6-foot-7, 260-pound 23-year-old reliever hasn’t pitched since May 2 and is considered day-to-day due to tightness in his upper back. He’s expected to throw a side session and be re-evaluated. 6. Sebastian Valle, catcher, Reading (Double-A): Struggles continue for the 21-year-old, who is hitting just .175 in his last10 games. His batting average was well-over .300 last month and now it has plummeted to .223. 7. Justin De Fratus, RHP, TBA: He was on a rehab assignment and was shut down after experiencing soreness in his right elbow. He’s expected to begin working out again next month. 8. Freddy Galvis, infielder, Philadelphia: He found a starting spot at second base for the Phillies early, but lately is starting to split time with Pete Orr. He is hitting .233 with one home run and16 RBI in 39 games. 9. Maikel Franco, third base, Lakewood (Class A): Only19, he could end up being one of the next top hitters in the organization. Signed as a non-drafted free agent in 2010 from the Dominican Republic, he’s batting .230 with four home runs and17 RBI in 38 games. 10. Jonathan Pettibone, RHP, Reading (Double-A): Another starting pitcher with promise for Philadelphia, he’s been consistent in Double-A, going 2-4 with a 3.78 ERA in eight starts.

On This Date Brian Sanches is a right-handed reliever who was called up to the Phillies earlier this month. He also has a spot in the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre record book. On May 21, 2006, he established a franchise record by retiring his 30th consecutive batter. The streak dated back to 12 previous days. He eclipsed the previous mark of 24, set by Robert Gaddy in 1994. Gaddy still holds the record for most consecutive batters retired in a single game.


CMYK PAGE 4C

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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The Cincinnati Reds’ Drew Stubbs (6) is greeted at home plate by Todd Frazier after Stubbs scored on Brandon Phillips’ single off of New York Yankees starting pitcher Ivan Nova in the first inning of a game on Saturday at Yankee Stadium in New York.

Votto hits 3-run HR; Reds hold off Yanks

Niemann, who is on the 60-day disabled list with an injured right leg. Mariners 10, Rockies 3

DENVER — Jason Vargas threw seven strong innings, Kyle Seager homered and drove in three runs, and the Seattle Mariners beat the freefalling Colorado Rockies. Twins 5, Brewers 4

MILWAUKEE — Trevor Plouffe hit a solo home run in the top of the 11th inning to lift the Minnesota Twins to a victory over the Milwaukee Brewers. Plouffe’s fourth homer of the season came off Manny Parra (0-1) with two outs. Parra had retired the first two batters before Plouffe connected on a 2-0 pitch that landed in the Brewers’ bullpen.

Blue Jays 2, Mets 0

Red Sox 7, Phillies 5

TORONTO — Brandon Morrow pitched his second shutout in four starts, blanking the Mets on three hits and leading the Toronto Blue Jays over New York. Morrow (5-2) struck out nine and walked one to win for the fifth time in six outings. He has three career shutouts, including a victory over the Los Angeles Angels on May 3. Toronto won its fourth in a row overall.

PHILADELPHIA — David Ortiz homered, singled and drove in two runs to lead the Boston Red Sox to a win over Philadelphia, snapping the Phillies’ six-game winning streak. Mike Aviles, Will Middlebrooks and Jarrod Saltalamacchia also homered for Boston, which won for the seventh time in nine games. Saltalamacchia went 3 for 4, needing a triple for the cycle. Jon Lester (3-3) improved to 3-0 in four career starts against the Phillies despite matching a season high for hits allowed with eight and giving up four runs in six innings. Freddy Galvis homered, and John Mayberry Jr., Hector Luna and Shane Victorino each had three hits for the Phillies as the teams combined for 26 hits. Joe Blanton (4-4) pitched a season-low 4 1/3 innings while surrendering seven runs — six earned — on nine hits. Alfredo Aceves got four outs for his ninth save in 11 chances.

Indians 2, Marlins 0

CLEVELAND — Jeanmar Gomez pitched three-hit ball into the seventh inning and Asdrubal Cabrera homered to lead the Cleveland Indians past the Miami Marlins. Gomez (3-2) allowed two Marlins to reach base in an inning only once, striking out four over 6 1-3. Cabrera connected off Anibal Sanchez (2-2) to put Cleveland ahead in the fourth inning. Pirates 4, Tigers 3

DETROIT — Andrew McCutchen hit a pair of tworun homers and A.J. Burnett pitched six solid innings to lead the Pittsburgh Pirates to a win over the Detroit Tigers. A day after Detroit’s Justin Verlander took a no-hitter into the ninth while shutting out the Pirates, McCutchen went deep twice off Tigers rookie Drew Smyly (1-1). It was McCutchen’s sixth career multihomer game and second in three days. He has seven home runs on the season. Giants 4, Athletics 0

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SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 PAGE 5C

Mariners 10, Rockies 3

S TA N D I N G S

NEW YORK — Joey Votto hit a three-run homer, Jose Arredondo worked out of a ninth-inning jam for his first major league save and the Cincinnati Reds held off the New York Yankees 6-5 Saturday. New York scored twice off Sean Marshall in the ninth, but Reds manager Dusty Baker pulled his regular closer in favor of Arredondo and he got the job done. The right-hander entered with runners at first and second and one out, and Derek Jeter grounded his first pitch to third. Cincinnati nearly turned a game-ending double play, but Jeter just beat the relay. Curtis Granderson then fouled off a 3-0 pitch before topping a slow roller to Votto for the final out.

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Orioles 6, Nationals 5

WASHINGTON — Adam Jones and Nick Markakis hit two-run homers and the Baltimore Orioles matched a season high with their fifth straight win. Jones had three hits as the AL East leaders improved to 15-5 on the road. Washington lost its third in a row. White Sox 7, Cubs 4

CHICAGO — John Danks pitched shutout ball into the seventh for his first win in nearly a month and Dayan Viciedo, A.J. Pierzynski and Adam Dunn homered as the Chicago White Sox beat the Cubs.

SAN FRANCISCO — Ryan Vogelsong allowed one hit in seven scoreless innings and played a key role in San Francisco’s go-ahead rally as the Giants beat the Oakland Athlet- Astros 6, Rangers 5 ics for the 11th straight time at HOUSTON — Justin Maxhome. well hit one of Houston’s season-high three homers to put Rays 5, Braves 2 his team on top in the fifth inning and the Astros held on ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Alex Cobb won his first start of for a win over the Texas Rangers. the season, Matt Joyce hit a grand slam and the Tampa Bay Royals 7, Diamondbacks 3 Rays beat the Atlanta Braves. Cobb (1-0) allowed two runs KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Billy and six hits in seven innings Butler and Mike Moustakas and retired his last 10 batters. homered, Bruce Chen won his Cobb was recalled from third straight start and the Triple-A Durham on Friday Kansas City Royals beat the night to take the place of Jeff Arizona Diamondbacks.

Baltimore........................................ Tampa Bay..................................... Toronto........................................... New York ....................................... Boston ............................................

W 27 25 23 21 19

Cleveland....................................... Chicago.......................................... Detroit............................................. Kansas City ................................... Minnesota ......................................

W 23 20 19 16 14

Texas ............................................. Oakland.......................................... Los Angeles .................................. Seattle ............................................

W 25 20 18 18 W 25 23 21 21 21

Atlanta.............................................. Washington..................................... Miami ............................................... New York......................................... Philadelphia .................................... St. Louis ......................................... Cincinnati ....................................... Pittsburgh ...................................... Houston ......................................... Milwaukee...................................... Chicago.......................................... Los Angeles ................................. San Francisco .............................. Arizona ......................................... Colorado....................................... San Diego.....................................

W 22 20 19 18 16 15 W 26 21 18 15 14

All Times EDT AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division L Pct GB WCGB 14 .659 — — 16 .610 2 — 18 .561 4 — 11⁄2 19 .525 51⁄2 21 .475 71⁄2 31⁄2 Central Division L Pct GB WCGB 17 .575 — — 21 .488 31⁄2 3 21 .475 4 31⁄2 6 23 .410 61⁄2 26 .350 9 81⁄2 West Division L Pct GB WCGB 16 .610 — — 21 .488 5 3 22 .450 61⁄2 41⁄2 24 .429 71⁄2 51⁄2 NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division L Pct GB WCGB 16 .610 — — — 17 .575 11⁄2 19 .525 31⁄2 — 19 .525 31⁄2 — 1 20 .512 4 ⁄2 Central Division L Pct GB WCGB 17 .564 — — 1 19 .513 2 ⁄2 21 .475 31⁄2 2 3 22 .450 41⁄2 24 .400 61⁄2 5 25 .375 71⁄2 6 West Division L Pct GB WCGB 13 .667 — — 19 .525 51⁄2 — 23 .439 9 31⁄2 24 .385 11 51⁄2 26 .350 121⁄2 7

AMERICAN LEAGUE Friday's Games Chicago White Sox 3, Chicago Cubs 2 Baltimore 2, Washington 1, 11 innings Philadelphia 6, Boston 4 N.Y. Yankees 4, Cincinnati 0 Miami 3, Cleveland 2 Detroit 6, Pittsburgh 0 Toronto 14, N.Y. Mets 5 Atlanta 5, Tampa Bay 3 Texas 4, Houston 1 Arizona 6, Kansas City 4 Minnesota 11, Milwaukee 3 Seattle 4, Colorado 0 L.A. Angels 7, San Diego 2 San Francisco 8, Oakland 6 Saturday's Games Cincinnati 6, N.Y. Yankees 5 Toronto 2, N.Y. Mets 0 Cleveland 2, Miami 0 San Francisco 4, Oakland 0 Pittsburgh 4, Detroit 3 Tampa Bay 5, Atlanta 2 Minnesota 5, Milwaukee 4, 11 innings Seattle 10, Colorado 3 Kansas City 7, Arizona 3 Baltimore 6, Washington 5 Boston 7, Philadelphia 5 Chicago White Sox 7, Chicago Cubs 4 Houston 6, Texas 5 L.A. Angels at San Diego, (n) Sunday's Games Cincinnati (Cueto 4-1) at N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 5-1), 1:05 p.m. Miami (Jo.Johnson 1-3) at Cleveland (D.Lowe 6-1), 1:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (Correia 1-4) at Detroit (Scherzer 2-3), 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Gee 2-3) at Toronto (H.Alvarez 3-3), 1:07 p.m. Baltimore (W.Chen 4-0) at Washington (Strasburg 3-1), 1:35 p.m. Boston (Beckett 3-4) at Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 0-1), 1:35 p.m. Atlanta (T.Hudson 2-1) at Tampa Bay (Price 6-2), 1:40 p.m. Texas (Lewis 3-3) at Houston (Lyles 0-0), 2:05 p.m. Arizona (Miley 4-1) at Kansas City (Adcock 0-1), 2:10 p.m. Minnesota (Marquis 2-3) at Milwaukee (Greinke 4-1), 2:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Peavy 4-1) at Chicago Cubs (Maholm 4-2), 2:20 p.m. Seattle (Beavan 1-4) at Colorado (Guthrie 2-1), 3:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (E.Santana 2-6) at San Diego (Bass 2-4), 4:05 p.m. Oakland (Colon 3-4) at San Francisco (Lincecum 2-3), 4:05 p.m. Monday's Games Boston at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Kansas City at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. Toronto at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Oakland, 10:05 p.m. Texas at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.

A M E R I C A N L E A G U E Reds 6, Yankees 5 Cincinnati

ab 5 3 3 4 3 4 0 3 3 4

r 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1

h bi 2 1 0 0 1 3 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0

New York

ab r h bi Jeter ss 5 0 1 0 Grndrs cf 4 0 0 0 Cano dh 4 1 0 0 AlRdrg 3b 4 0 0 0 Ibanez rf-lf 4 1 2 1 Swisher 1b 4 1 2 1 Martin c 4 1 1 1 Wise lf 2 0 0 0 ErChvz ph 1 0 1 0 AnJons pr-rf 1 0 1 0 J.Nix 2b 4 1 3 2 Totals 32 6 8 6 Totals 37 511 5 Cincinnati ........................... 110 030 010 — 6 New York ........................... 001 110 002 — 5 E—Phelps (2). DP—New York 1. LOB—Cincinnati 5, New York 6. 2B—Heisey (6), Mesoraco (2), Ibanez 2 (7). HR—Votto (7), Martin (4), J.Nix (2). SB— Stubbs (7), Jeter (3). CS—J.Nix (1). SF—Costanzo. IP H R ER BB SO Cincinnati H.Bailey W,2-3 ........ 61⁄3 7 3 3 1 7 0 0 0 0 0 Ondrusek H,4 .......... 2⁄3 Chapman H,6 .......... 1 0 0 0 0 2 4 2 2 0 1 Marshall H,2 ............ 1⁄3 Arredondo S,1-1 ..... 2⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 New York Nova L,4-2 ............... 6 7 5 5 2 12 Eppley ...................... 1⁄3 0 0 0 1 0 Rapada..................... 2⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 Phelps ...................... 2 1 1 0 1 3 HBP—by Nova (Mesoraco). Umpires—Home, Brian Gorman;First, Tony Randazzo;Second, Alan Porter;Third, Larry Vanover. T—3:15. A—45,302 (50,291). Heisey lf Stubbs cf Votto 1b BPhllps 2b Bruce rf Frazier 3b Cozart ss Costanz dh Mesorc c Valdez ss-3b

Blue Jays 2, Mets 0 New York

Toronto ab r h bi ab r h bi ATorrs cf 4 0 0 0 KJhnsn 2b 4 1 2 1 Baxter dh 4 0 1 0 YEscor ss 4 0 2 1 DnMrp 2b 4 0 0 0 Bautist rf 4 0 0 0 Duda rf 3 0 1 0 Encrnc 1b 3 0 1 0 I.Davis 1b 3 0 0 0 Arencii dh 4 0 0 0 Turner 3b 3 0 0 0 Thams lf 2 0 0 0 Niwnhs lf 3 0 0 0 RDavis cf 3 0 0 0 Cedeno ss 3 0 1 0 YGoms 3b 3 0 0 0 Nickes c 2 0 0 0 Vizquel 3b 0 0 0 0 Hairstn ph 0 0 0 0 Mathis c 3 1 1 0 Totals 29 0 3 0 Totals 30 2 6 2 New York ........................... 000 000 000 — 0 Toronto............................... 000 020 00x — 2 E—A.Torres (2). LOB—New York 3, Toronto 6. 2B—Duda (5), K.Johnson (2), Y.Escobar (6), Encarnacion (10). IP H R ER BB SO New York Batista ....................... 2 1 0 0 1 2 Hefner L,0-1 ............ 5 4 2 2 0 5 Byrdak ...................... 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 Rauch ....................... 2⁄3 1 0 0 1 1 Toronto Morrow W,5-2.......... 9 3 0 0 1 8 Umpires—Home, Mike Muchlinski;First, Wally Bell;Second, Brian Knight;Third, Mark Wegner. T—2:12. A—34,962 (49,260).

ab 4 3 4 4 2 2 3 3 3

r 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

h bi 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

Cleveland

ab r h bi Reyes ss Choo rf 4 0 2 0 Infante 2b Kipnis 2b 3 0 0 1 HRmrz 3b ACarer ss 3 1 1 1 Dobbs rf Hafner dh 2 0 0 0 Stanton dh CSantn c 4 0 1 0 Morrsn lf Brantly cf 3 0 0 0 GSnchz 1b JoLopz 3b 3 0 1 0 Petersn cf Ktchm 1b 3 0 1 0 J.Buck c Duncan lf 3 1 1 0 Cnghm lf 0 0 0 0 Totals 28 0 3 0 Totals 28 2 7 2 Miami .................................. 000 000 000 — 0 Cleveland ........................... 000 110 00x — 2 DP—Miami 2, Cleveland 2. LOB—Miami 4, Cleveland 6. HR—A.Cabrera (5). SF—Kipnis. IP H R ER BB SO Miami A.Sanchez L,2-2 ..... 7 7 2 2 2 4 Mujica ....................... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Cleveland J.Gomez W,3-2 ....... 61⁄3 3 0 0 2 4 J.Smith H,6 .............. 2⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 Pestano H,10........... 1 0 0 0 0 1 C.Perez S,13-14 ..... 1 0 0 0 0 3 HBP—by A.Sanchez (Hafner), by J.Gomez (Infante). Umpires—Home, Angel Hernandez;First, Chris Conroy;Second, Mark Carlson;Third, Ed Hickox. T—2:26. A—29,799 (43,429).

L10 7-3 5-5 6-4 5-5 7-3

Str W-5 W-1 W-4 L-1 W-1

Home 12-9 15-5 12-9 12-9 9-11

Away 15-5 10-11 11-9 9-10 10-10

L10 6-4 6-4 4-6 6-4 6-4

Str W-1 W-3 L-1 W-1 W-4

Home 11-11 7-12 10-12 5-16 6-14

Away 12-6 13-9 9-9 11-7 8-12

L10 5-5 4-6 5-5 4-6

Str L-1 L-2 W-1 W-2

Home 11-9 9-10 11-10 7-8

Away 14-7 11-11 7-12 11-16

Str L-1 L-3 L-1 L-2 L-1

Home 10-7 14-8 9-7 12-8 10-10

Away 15-9 9-9 12-12 9-11 11-10

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Home 9-8 9-8 10-8 13-9 9-11 9-14

Away 13-9 11-11 9-13 5-13 7-13 6-11

L10 6-4 5-5 6-4 4-6 7-3 L10 4-6 5-5 5-5 4-6 3-7 3-7 L10 7-3 6-4 4-6 3-7 4-6

Str W-2 W-3 L-1 L-3 L-2

Home 17-4 12-9 7-12 9-13 10-16

Away 9-9 9-10 11-11 6-11 4-10

NATIONAL LEAGUE Friday's Games Chicago White Sox 3, Chicago Cubs 2 Baltimore 2, Washington 1, 11 innings Philadelphia 6, Boston 4 N.Y. Yankees 4, Cincinnati 0 Miami 3, Cleveland 2 Detroit 6, Pittsburgh 0 Toronto 14, N.Y. Mets 5 Atlanta 5, Tampa Bay 3 Texas 4, Houston 1 Arizona 6, Kansas City 4 Minnesota 11, Milwaukee 3 Seattle 4, Colorado 0 L.A. Angels 7, San Diego 2 L.A. Dodgers 6, St. Louis 5 San Francisco 8, Oakland 6 Saturday's Games Cincinnati 6, N.Y. Yankees 5 Toronto 2, N.Y. Mets 0 Cleveland 2, Miami 0 San Francisco 4, Oakland 0 Pittsburgh 4, Detroit 3 Tampa Bay 5, Atlanta 2 Minnesota 5, Milwaukee 4, 11 innings Seattle 10, Colorado 3 Kansas City 7, Arizona 3 Baltimore 6, Washington 5 Boston 7, Philadelphia 5 Chicago White Sox 7, Chicago Cubs 4 Houston 6, Texas 5 L.A. Angels at San Diego, (n) St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, (n) Sunday's Games Cincinnati (Cueto 4-1) at N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 5-1), 1:05 p.m. Miami (Jo.Johnson 1-3) at Cleveland (D.Lowe 6-1), 1:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (Correia 1-4) at Detroit (Scherzer 2-3), 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Gee 2-3) at Toronto (H.Alvarez 3-3), 1:07 p.m. Baltimore (W.Chen 4-0) at Washington (Strasburg 3-1), 1:35 p.m. Boston (Beckett 3-4) at Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 0-1), 1:35 p.m. Atlanta (T.Hudson 2-1) at Tampa Bay (Price 6-2), 1:40 p.m. Texas (Lewis 3-3) at Houston (Lyles 0-0), 2:05 p.m. Arizona (Miley 4-1) at Kansas City (Adcock 0-1), 2:10 p.m. Minnesota (Marquis 2-3) at Milwaukee (Greinke 4-1), 2:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Peavy 4-1) at Chicago Cubs (Maholm 4-2), 2:20 p.m. Seattle (Beavan 1-4) at Colorado (Guthrie 2-1), 3:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (E.Santana 2-6) at San Diego (Bass 2-4), 4:05 p.m. Oakland (Colon 3-4) at San Francisco (Lincecum 2-3), 4:05 p.m. St. Louis (Lohse 5-1) at L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 2-3), 8:05 p.m. Monday's Games N.Y. Mets at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Atlanta at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. Colorado at Miami, 7:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Houston, 8:05 p.m. San Francisco at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. San Diego at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.

Giants 4, Athletics 0 Oakland

San Francisco ab r h bi ab r h bi JWeeks 2b 4 0 0 0 GBlanc rf 2 1 1 0 Pnngtn ss 3 0 0 0 BCrwfr ss 4 0 2 0 Reddck cf-rf 3 0 0 0 MeCarr lf 3 0 2 1 JGoms lf 3 0 0 0 Posey c 3 1 1 1 Blackly p 0 0 0 0 Pagan cf 4 0 2 2 S.Smith rf-lf 3 0 1 0 Belt 1b 3 0 0 0 Dnldsn 3b 3 0 0 0 Arias 3b 4 0 1 0 Barton 1b 2 0 0 0 Burriss 2b 4 1 1 0 KSuzuk c 2 0 0 0 Vglsng p 1 1 0 0 T.Ross p 2 0 0 0 JaLopz p 0 0 0 0 Balfour p 0 0 0 0 Pill ph 1 0 0 0 Cowgill cf 0 0 0 0 Hensly p 0 0 0 0 Kaaihu ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 26 0 1 0 Totals 29 410 4 Oakland.............................. 000 000 000 — 0 San Francisco.................... 000 000 40x — 4 DP—Oakland 4, San Francisco 2. LOB—Oakland 1, San Francisco 8. 2B—Posey (7). SF—Me.Cabrera. IP H R ER BB SO Oakland T.Ross L,2-4............ 6 7 2 2 4 4 Balfour ...................... 2⁄3 2 2 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 Blackley.................... 11⁄3 San Francisco Vogelsong W,2-2 .... 7 1 0 0 1 5 Ja.Lopez .................. 1 0 0 0 0 2 Hensley .................... 1 0 0 0 1 0 T.Ross pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. HBP—by T.Ross (Vogelsong). Umpires—Home, James Hoye;First, Jim Joyce;Second, Jim Reynolds;Third, Mike Estabrook. T—2:49. A—41,411 (41,915).

Pirates 4, Tigers 3 Pittsburgh

Detroit ab r h bi ab r h bi Tabata rf 5 0 1 0 Kelly cf 4 0 0 0 JHrrsn 2b 3 2 1 0 Dirks lf 5 1 1 0 AMcCt cf 4 2 2 4 MiCarr 3b 4 1 2 0 PAlvrz 3b 3 0 0 0 Fielder 1b 5 1 2 2 Walker dh 4 0 2 0 DYong dh 4 0 2 0 Barajs c 4 0 1 0 Avila c 4 0 0 0 McGeh 1b 4 0 1 0 Boesch rf 4 0 2 0 Navarr lf 3 0 1 0 JhPerlt ss 3 0 0 0 McLoth lf 1 0 0 0 RSantg 2b 3 0 1 0 Barmes ss 4 0 0 0 Totals 35 4 9 4 Totals 36 310 2 Pittsburgh .......................... 200 020 000 — 4 Detroit................................. 002 000 100 — 3 DP—Pittsburgh 1. LOB—Pittsburgh 7, Detroit 10. 2B—Dirks (6), D.Young (9). HR—A.McCutchen 2 (7), Fielder (7). SB—Kelly (1). CS—Navarro (2). IP H R ER BB SO Pittsburgh A.J.Burnett W,2-2 ... 6 7 2 2 3 2 Grilli H,10 ................. 1 2 1 0 0 1 J.Cruz H,7................ 1 1 0 0 0 1 Hanrahan S,9-10..... 1 0 0 0 1 2 Detroit Smyly L,1-1.............. 42⁄3 7 4 4 2 6 Villarreal ................... 21⁄3 0 0 0 0 3 Coke ......................... 1 2 0 0 0 2 Benoit ....................... 1 0 0 0 0 1 HBP—by Smyly (J.Harrison). WP—A.J.Burnett. PB—Barajas. Umpires—Home, Bill Miller;First, Dan Iassogna;Second, Dale Scott;Third, CB Bucknor. T—3:06. A—42,953 (41,255).

Rays 5, Braves 2

Indians 2, Marlins 0 Miami

Seattle

Atlanta

Tampa Bay ab r h bi ab r h bi Bourn cf 4 0 1 0 Zobrist rf 4 0 0 0 Prado lf 3 0 0 0 BUpton cf 3 1 2 0 Fremn 1b 4 0 0 0 Joyce lf 3 1 1 4 Uggla 2b 4 0 1 0 C.Pena 1b 2 0 0 0 McCnn c 4 1 1 0 Scott dh 3 0 0 0 Heywrd rf 4 1 1 0 SRdrgz 3b 3 1 1 1 JFrncs 3b 4 0 1 1 Rhyms 2b 3 0 0 0 Hinske dh 1 0 0 1 EJhnsn ss 2 1 1 0 Pstrnck ss 3 0 1 0 Gimenz c 2 1 1 0 Totals 31 2 6 2 Totals 25 5 6 5 Atlanta ................................ 020 000 000 — 2 Tampa Bay......................... 004 001 00x — 5 E—Rhymes (3). DP—Atlanta 2, Tampa Bay 2. LOB—Atlanta 5, Tampa Bay 5. 2B—Uggla (9). HR—Joyce (8), S.Rodriguez (4). SB—Bourn (13), B.Upton 2 (9). CS—B.Upton (1), Rhymes (1). S— S.Rodriguez. SF—Hinske. IP H R ER BB SO Atlanta Delgado L,2-4.......... 4 3 4 4 5 2 C.Martinez ............... 21⁄3 3 1 1 1 1 O’Flaherty ................ 1 0 0 0 1 0 Durbin....................... 2⁄3 0 0 0 1 0 Tampa Bay Cobb W,1-0 ............. 7 6 2 2 2 6 Jo.Peralta H,10 ....... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Rodney S,13-13...... 1 0 0 0 0 0 Umpires—Home, Lance Barksdale;First, Fieldin Culbreth;Second, Adrian Johnson;Third, Gary Cederstrom.

Ackley 2b C.Wells lf ISuzuki rf JMontr c Seager 3b Liddi 1b

ab 5 4 5 4 4 5

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h bi 1 2 2 2 1 0 3 1 3 3 0 0

Colorado

ab 4 4 2 2 1 1

Orioles 6, Nationals 5 r 0 0 0 0 0 1

h bi 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

Scutaro 2b Colvin rf-lf CGnzlz lf JHerrr ss Tlwtzk ss Giambi 1b Cuddyr MSndrs cf 4 1 1 0 1b-rf 4 0 0 0 Ryan ss 5 2 2 0 Pachec 3b 4 1 1 1 Vargas p 3 1 1 1 WRosr c 3 1 1 2 Kelley p 0 0 0 0 Fowler cf 2 0 0 0 Figgins ph 1 0 0 0 Rogers p 0 0 0 0 Delaar p 0 0 0 0 RHrndz ph 1 0 0 0 Brothrs p 0 0 0 0 Outmn p 0 0 0 0 Fridrch p 1 0 0 0 EYong cf 2 0 1 0 Totals 401014 9 Totals 31 3 5 3 Seattle .............................. 022 104 010 — 10 Colorado .......................... 000 000 300 — 3 DP—Seattle 1, Colorado 1. LOB—Seattle 8, Colorado 3. 2B—Ackley (8), M.Saunders (11), Giambi (2). 3B—Ryan (1). HR—Seager (5), W.Rosario (6). IP H R ER BB SO Seattle Vargas W,5-3 .......... 7 5 3 3 1 1 Kelley........................ 1 0 0 0 0 1 Delabar..................... 1 0 0 0 1 1 Colorado Friedrich L,1-1 ......... 5 9 8 8 4 3 Rogers...................... 2 3 1 1 0 3 Brothers ................... 1 2 1 0 1 1 Outman..................... 1 0 0 0 0 2 Friedrich pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. WP—Delabar, Friedrich, Rogers. PB—W.Rosario. Umpires—Home, Paul Schrieber;First, D.J. Reyburn;Second, Laz Diaz;Third, Mike Everitt. T—2:42. A—30,784 (50,398).

Twins 5, Brewers 4 Minnesota

ab 5 4 4 3 3 5 0 0 5 4

r 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0

h bi 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 1

Milwaukee

ab r h bi Hart rf 5 0 2 0 Morgan cf 5 3 3 0 Braun lf 5 0 2 1 ArRmr 3b 5 1 1 2 Lucroy c 4 0 1 1 RWeks 2b 5 0 0 0 Green 1b 2 0 0 0 Aoki ph 1 0 0 0 FrRdrg p 0 0 0 0 Axford p 0 0 0 0 CIzturs Pavano p 2 0 0 0 ph-ss 2 0 0 0 Doumit ph 0 0 0 0 Maysnt ss 4 0 0 0 Komats pr 0 0 0 0 MParr p 0 0 0 0 Dunsng p 0 0 0 0 Gallard p 2 0 0 0 Mauer ph 1 0 0 0 Loe p 0 0 0 0 Burton p 0 0 0 0 J.Perez p 0 0 0 0 Perkins p 0 0 0 0 Veras p 0 0 0 0 Conrad Plouffe 3b 1 1 1 1 ph-1b 1 0 0 0 Kottars ph-1b 1 0 0 0 Totals 37 5 8 5 Totals 42 4 9 4 Minnesota .................. 000 101 110 01 — 5 Milwaukee .................. 000 101 020 00 — 4 E—Hart (2), R.Weeks (5). DP—Milwaukee 2. LOB—Minnesota 8, Milwaukee 6. 2B—Revere 2 (3), Butera (3), Hart (13). HR—Plouffe (4), Ar.Ramirez (3). SB—Revere (2), Morgan 2 (5), Lucroy (2). S—J.Carroll. SF—Dozier 2. IP H R ER BB SO Minnesota Pavano ..................... 6 5 2 2 1 6 Duensing H,5 .......... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Burton BS,1-1.......... 1 2 2 2 0 2 Perkins ..................... 1 0 0 0 0 2 Gray W,3-0 .............. 1 2 0 0 0 2 Capps S,9-9 ............ 1 0 0 0 0 1 Milwaukee Gallardo ................... 6 3 2 1 3 3 Loe ............................ 1⁄3 1 1 1 1 0 J.Perez ..................... 0 0 0 0 1 0 Veras ........................ 2⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 Fr.Rodriguez ........... 1 3 1 1 0 0 Axford ....................... 1 0 0 0 0 1 M.Parra L,0-1 .......... 2 1 1 1 0 0 J.Perez pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. HBP—by J.Perez (Revere). Umpires—Home, Bob Davidson;First, Hunter Wendelstedt;Second, Dan Bellino;Third, Jerry Layne. T—3:45. A—42,398 (41,900). Span cf Revere rf Wlngh lf Mornea 1b Dozier ss ACasill 2b Gray p Capps p Butera c JCarrll 3b-2b

Red Sox 7, Phillies 5 Boston

Philadelphia ab r h bi Rollins ss 5 0 1 1 Mayrry lf 4 1 3 0 Victorn cf 5 0 3 1 Pence rf 4 0 1 0 Ruiz c 4 1 0 0 Wggntn 3b 5 1 2 0 Luna 1b 5 1 3 1 Galvis 2b 4 1 2 2 Blanton p 2 0 0 0 Valdes p 0 0 0 0 Polanc ph 1 0 0 0 Savery p 0 0 0 0 Pierre ph 1 0 0 0 Contrrs p 0 0 0 0 Totals 37 711 6 Totals 40 515 5 Boston ................................ 120 220 000 — 7 Philadelphia....................... 001 300 010 — 5 E—Lester (1), Blanton 2 (3). DP—Boston 3, Philadelphia 1. LOB—Boston 5, Philadelphia 11. 2B—Saltalamacchia (10), Sweeney (14), Victorino (6). HR—Aviles (7), Ortiz (9), Middlebrooks (5), Saltalamacchia (6), Galvis (3). SB—Rollins (9). S— Sweeney, Lester. IP H R ER BB SO Boston Lester W,3-3............ 6 8 4 4 1 3 Padilla H,7 ............... 11⁄3 4 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 R.Hill H,2.................. 1⁄3 Aceves S,9-11......... 11⁄3 3 0 0 1 1 Philadelphia Blanton L,4-4 ........... 41⁄3 9 7 6 0 4 1 0 0 0 2 Valdes ...................... 12⁄3 Savery ...................... 2 1 0 0 0 1 Contreras ................. 1 0 0 0 0 1 HBP—by Lester (Ruiz). Umpires—Home, Gary Darling;First, Paul Emmel;Second, Scott Barry;Third, Jerry Meals. T—3:11. A—45,656 (43,651). Aviles ss Pedroia 2b Ortiz 1b Byrd cf AdGnzl rf-1b Mdlrks 3b Sltlmch c Sweeny cf-rf Nava lf Lester p Padilla p R.Hill p Aceves p

ab 5 5 5 0 4 4 4 3 4 2 1 0 0

r 1 1 1 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0

h bi 1 1 1 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 3 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Astros 6, Rangers 5 Texas

Houston ab r h bi Schafer cf 1 0 0 0 Bogsvc rf 3 0 0 0 Altuve 2b 4 1 1 0 Maxwll rf-cf 2 2 1 2 Ca.Lee 1b 4 1 1 2 Lowrie ss 4 0 1 0 MDwns 3b 4 0 0 0 Myers p 0 0 0 0 JDMrtn lf 3 1 1 0 CSnydr c 3 1 1 1 Harrell p 2 0 0 0 Abad p 0 0 0 0 T.Buck ph 1 0 1 1 WLopez p 0 0 0 0 Wrght p 0 0 0 0 Lyon p 0 0 0 0 MGnzlz 3b 0 0 0 0 Totals 35 5 9 5 Totals 31 6 7 6 Texas.................................. 004 000 100 — 5 Houston.............................. 001 221 00x — 6 E—Napoli (3), D.Holland (2), Lowrie (4). DP— Houston 1. LOB—Texas 7, Houston 5. 2B—J.D.Martinez (5), T.Buck (5). 3B—Andrus (2). HR—Dav.Murphy (4), Maxwell (2), Ca.Lee (4), C.Snyder (2). SB—Hamilton (4), Maxwell (1). SF— Hamilton. IP H R ER BB SO Texas D.Holland L,3-3 ....... 5 5 5 5 2 6 Ogando..................... 2 2 1 1 2 2 M.Lowe..................... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Houston Harrell W,3-3 ........... 52⁄3 5 4 1 3 6 Abad H,1 .................. 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 W.Lopez H,4............ 1 2 1 1 0 2 W.Wright .................. 0 1 0 0 0 0 Lyon H,1................... 1 0 0 0 0 0 Myers S,10-11......... 1 1 0 0 0 1 W.Lopez pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. W.Wright pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Umpires—Home, Tim McClelland;First, Brian Runge;Second, Ted Barrett;Third, Marvin Hudson. T—2:58. A—42,673 (40,981). Kinsler 2b Andrus ss Hamltn cf-rf Beltre 3b MYong 1b DvMrp lf BSnydr ph-lf N.Cruz rf MLowe p Napoli c DHllnd p Morlnd ph Ogando p Gentry ph-cf

ab 5 4 3 4 4 3 1 4 0 3 2 1 0 1

r 0 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

h bi 0 0 2 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 1 3 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

White Sox 7, Cubs 4 Chicago (A)

ab 4 0 0 5 1 5 5 3 4 4 3 0 1

r 1 0 0 0 2 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0

h bi 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 2 3 2 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Chicago (N)

ab r h bi RJhnsn cf 4 0 1 0 Barney 2b 4 1 1 0 SCastro ss 4 0 0 0 LaHair 1b 4 0 0 0 ASorin lf 4 1 3 2 JeBakr rf 4 1 1 0 Mather 3b 3 1 1 2 K.Hill c 4 0 1 0 Dmpstr p 1 0 0 0 Campn ph 1 0 1 0 Camp p 0 0 0 0 Russell p 0 0 0 0 BParkr p 0 0 0 0 Bowden p 0 0 0 0 Cardns ph 1 0 0 0 CColmn p 0 0 0 0 Totals 35 710 7 Totals 34 4 9 4 Chicago (A)........................ 103 000 030 — 7 Chicago (N) ....................... 000 000 004 — 4 E—Mather (1). DP—Chicago (A) 2, Chicago (N) 2. LOB—Chicago (A) 7, Chicago (N) 4. 2B—Pierzynski (5), A.Soriano (8). HR—A.Dunn (13), Viciedo (7), Pierzynski (6), A.Soriano (3), Mather (3). SB—De Aza (8). CS—De Aza (4). IP H R ER BB SO Chicago (A) Danks W,3-4............ 61⁄3 3 0 0 1 4 1 0 0 0 0 N.Jones .................... 2⁄3 H.Santiago ............... 1 1 0 0 0 0 Z.Stewart ................. 1 4 4 4 0 1 Chicago (N) Dempster L,0-2 ....... 6 7 4 4 3 3 Camp ........................ 1 0 0 0 0 2 Russell ..................... 1⁄3 3 3 2 1 0 B.Parker ................... 1⁄3 0 0 0 1 1 Bowden .................... 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 C.Coleman............... 1 0 0 0 1 1 Umpires—Home, Jeff Kellogg;First, Eric Cooper;Second, Marty Foster;Third, Tim Timmons. T—2:51. A—40,228 (41,009).

De Aza cf HSantg p ZStewrt p Bckhm 2b A.Dunn 1b Viciedo lf Przyns c Rios rf AlRmrz ss EEscor 3b Danks p NJones p Lillirdg ph-cf

Baltimore

ab 5 4 4 4 4 4 3 0 3 2 0 0 0 1 0

r 1 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

h bi 2 2 2 0 1 2 3 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Washington

ab r h bi Lmrdzz 2b 5 0 2 1 Harper rf-cf 5 0 0 0 Zmrmn 3b 5 2 3 1 LaRoch 1b 4 1 0 0 Dsmnd ss 4 0 1 0 Ankiel cf 3 1 1 1 Nady ph-rf 1 0 0 0 Maldnd c 3 0 0 1 Berndn lf 3 1 2 1 Detwilr p 0 0 0 0 TMoore ph 1 0 1 0 Stmmn p 0 0 0 0 Tracy ph 1 0 0 0 Perry p 0 0 0 0 Espinos ph 1 0 0 0 HRdrgz p 0 0 0 0 Totals 34 610 6 Totals 36 510 5 Baltimore ............................ 022 020 000 — 6 Washington ....................... 000 013 001 — 5 LOB—Baltimore 4, Washington 8. 2B—Andino (5), Avery (3), Zimmerman (6), Desmond (12), Ankiel (7). 3B—Hardy (1). HR—Markakis (8), Ad.Jones (14), Zimmerman (2). S—Tolleson, Hammel, Detwiler. IP H R ER BB SO Baltimore Hammel W,5-1 ........ 51⁄3 6 4 4 2 5 Ayala H,5.................. 12⁄3 3 0 0 0 2 Patton H,3 ................ 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 Strop H,7.................. 2⁄3 0 0 0 1 0 Ji.Johnson S,15-15 1 1 1 1 0 1 Washington Detwiler L,3-3 .......... 5 9 6 6 1 3 Stammen.................. 1 1 0 0 0 3 Perry ......................... 2 0 0 0 0 1 H.Rodriguez ............ 1 0 0 0 0 1 Ayala pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Andino 2b Hardy ss Markks rf AdJons cf Wieters c Betemt 1b Tollesn 3b Flahrty 3b Avery lf Hamml p Ayala p Patton p Strop p NJhnsn ph JiJhnsn p

Royals 7, Diamondbacks 3 Arizona

Kansas City ab r h bi ab r h bi Blmqst ss 5 0 2 1 Dyson cf 3 1 1 1 A.Hill 2b 5 0 1 0 Hosmer 1b 4 0 1 1 J.Upton rf 3 1 1 0 Butler dh 3 1 1 3 MMntr c 2 0 0 0 AGordn lf 3 0 0 0 CYoung cf 4 0 1 0 Francr rf 4 0 0 0 Kubel lf 3 0 2 1 Mostks 3b 4 3 2 1 Gldsch 1b 4 1 3 0 B.Pena c 4 0 3 0 Ransm dh 3 0 0 0 Getz 2b 4 0 1 1 Overay ph-dh 1 0 0 0 AEscor ss 3 2 2 0 RRorts 3b 4 1 1 1 Totals 34 311 3 Totals 32 711 7 Arizona ............................... 000 000 210 — 3 Kansas City ....................... 012 121 00x — 7 DP—Kansas City 3. LOB—Arizona 8, Kansas City 5. 2B—Kubel (11), Goldschmidt (8), R.Roberts (5). HR—Butler (8), Moustakas (6). SB—J.Upton (7). SF—Kubel, Dyson, Butler. IP H R ER BB SO Arizona I.Kennedy L,3-4 ...... 41⁄3 8 6 6 1 3 Zagurski ................... 12⁄3 2 1 1 1 2 Collmenter ............... 2 1 0 0 0 1 Kansas City B.Chen W,3-4.......... 61⁄3 8 2 2 2 4 Crow ......................... 2⁄3 2 1 1 0 0 Mijares...................... 1⁄3 1 0 0 1 0 G.Holland H,2.......... 2⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 Broxton..................... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Crow pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.

FRIDAY'S LATE BOXES Twins 11, Brewers 3 Minnesota

ab 5 0 1 0 6 5 5 4 5 4 4 3 0 2

r 3 0 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1

h bi 4 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 3 3 2 2 2 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0

Milwaukee

ab r h bi Hart rf 5 2 2 0 Aoki cf 4 0 2 1 Braun lf 4 1 3 2 ArRmr 3b 4 0 0 0 Lucroy c 3 0 1 0 RWeks 2b 3 0 1 0 Ishikaw 1b 4 0 1 0 CIzturs ss 4 0 1 0 Estrad p 1 0 0 0 Conrad ph 1 0 0 0 MParr p 0 0 0 0 Dillard p 0 0 0 0 Veras p 0 0 0 0 Morgan ph 1 0 0 0 Chulk p 0 0 0 0 Axford p 0 0 0 0 Maysnt ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 44111611 Totals 35 311 3 Minnesota........................ 200 022 140 — 11 Milwaukee........................ 101 001 000 — 3 E—C.Izturis (1), Ishikawa (2), Braun (3), Lucroy (3). DP—Minnesota 2, Milwaukee 1. LOB—Minnesota 9, Milwaukee 7. 2B—Span (8), Mauer 2 (10), Hart (12), Aoki (3), Lucroy (7). 3B—Revere (1). HR—Willingham (8), Braun (11). SB—A.Casilla (6), Braun (8), Lucroy (1). CS—Braun (3). SF—Morneau. IP H R ER BB SO Minnesota Diamond W,3-0 ....... 51⁄3 8 3 3 1 3 Swarzak H,1 ............ 12⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 Al.Burnett ................. 1 1 0 0 0 0 Liriano....................... 1 2 0 0 1 1 Milwaukee Estrada L,0-3........... 5 6 4 4 1 5 M.Parra .................... 2⁄3 1 2 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 Dillard ....................... 1⁄3 Veras ........................ 1 3 1 1 0 0 Chulk ........................ 1 5 4 4 0 2 Axford ....................... 1 1 0 0 0 0 Span cf AlBrntt p Komats ph Liriano p Dozier ss Mauer c Wlngh lf Mornea 1b Plouffe rf ACasill 2b JCarrll 3b Dimnd p Swarzk p Revere ph-cf

Angels 7, Padres 2

Los Angeles

San Diego ab r h bi Venale rf 4 1 1 1 Maybin cf 4 0 1 0 Headly 3b 3 0 0 0 Alonso 1b 4 0 1 0 Guzmn lf 3 1 0 0 JoBakr c 2 0 0 0 ECarer ss 4 0 0 0 Amarst 2b 3 0 0 1 Suppan p 1 0 0 0 Parrino ph 1 0 0 0 Mikolas p 0 0 0 0 Denorfi ph 1 0 0 0 Grgrsn p 0 0 0 0 Brach p 0 0 0 0 Totals 37 711 6 Totals 30 2 3 2 Los Angeles....................... 010 030 003 — 7 San Diego .......................... 000 001 100 — 2 E—Maybin (4). DP—San Diego 1. LOB—Los Angeles 10, San Diego 5. 2B—Trumbo (10), Aybar (5). 3B—Trout (1). HR—Venable (2). SB—Trout (4), Maybin (12). IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles Weaver W,6-1 ......... 7 3 2 2 3 4 S.Downs H,7 ........... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Frieri ......................... 1 0 0 0 1 2 San Diego Suppan L,2-2 ........... 5 6 4 4 5 0 Mikolas ..................... 2 2 0 0 1 3 Gregerson................ 1 0 0 0 0 1 Brach ........................ 1 3 3 3 1 2 Trout cf-rf MIzturs 3b Pujols 1b Trumo rf Frieri p HKndrc 2b V.Wells lf Aybar ss BoWlsn c Weaver p KMorls ph SDowns p Bourjos cf

ab 4 3 4 4 0 4 5 5 5 2 1 0 0

r 1 1 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0

h bi 3 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 2 1 2 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Giants 8, Athletics 6

Oakland

San Francisco ab r h bi ab r h bi JWeeks 2b 5 1 1 0 GBlanc rf 4 1 1 0 Pnngtn ss 4 1 1 1 BCrwfr ss 5 1 1 1 Reddck rf-cf 4 0 0 0 MeCarr lf 4 2 2 0 JGoms lf 3 0 0 0 Pagan cf 2 3 1 0 KSuzuk c 4 1 1 0 Belt 1b 2 1 1 3 Barton 1b 4 2 2 0 HSnchz c 3 0 2 2 Dnldsn 3b 4 1 3 5 Arias 3b 3 0 0 1 Cowgill cf 3 0 0 0 Burriss 2b 3 0 0 0 Norerto p 0 0 0 0 Zito p 1 0 0 1 Blackly p 0 0 0 0 Edlefsn p 0 0 0 0 Kaaihu ph 1 0 0 0 Hensly p 0 0 0 0 JParkr p 1 0 0 0 Affeldt p 0 0 0 0 Blevins p 0 0 0 0 Pill ph 1 0 0 0 Rosales ph 1 0 0 0 Romo p 0 0 0 0 Figuero p 0 0 0 0 SCasill p 0 0 0 0 S.Smith rf 2 0 1 0 Totals 36 6 9 6 Totals 28 8 8 8 Oakland.............................. 001 014 000 — 6 San Francisco.................... 024 200 00x — 8 E—Burriss (3). DP—Oakland 1, San Francisco 1. LOB—Oakland 4, San Francisco 8. 2B—Donaldson 2 (3), B.Crawford (10), Pagan (7), H.Sanchez (3). 3B—J.Weeks (2). HR—Donaldson (1). SB—Me.Cabrera (6), Pagan (8). IP H R ER BB SO Oakland J.Parker L,1-2.......... 2 4 6 6 4 0 Blevins...................... 2 3 2 2 2 3 Figueroa................... 1 1 0 0 3 0 Norberto................... 2 0 0 0 0 1 Blackley.................... 1 0 0 0 0 0 San Francisco Zito W,3-1 ................ 51⁄3 5 4 4 1 5 Edlefsen ................... 1⁄3 3 2 2 0 0 Hensley H,4 ............. 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 Affeldt H,4 ................ 1 0 0 0 0 2 Romo H,7................. 1 0 0 0 0 2 S.Casilla S,10-11.... 1 1 0 0 0 1

Dodgers 6, Cardinals 5

St. Louis

Los Angeles ab r h bi ab r h bi Furcal ss 3 0 0 1 DGordn ss 5 0 0 0 MCrpnt 1b-rf 3 1 1 1 M.Ellis 2b 4 1 1 0 Hollidy lf 4 1 1 2 Lindlm p 0 0 0 0 Beltran rf 4 0 2 0 VnSlyk ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Chamrs pr-rf-cf 0 0 0 0 Abreu lf 3 0 1 0 Freese 3b 4 0 0 0 Jansen p 0 0 0 0 YMolin c 4 0 0 0 EHerrr ph 0 1 0 0 Greene 2b 4 1 1 0 Ethier rf 4 1 0 0 Roinsn cf 3 1 0 0 AKndy 3b 4 1 4 1 Brkmn ph-1b 1 1 1 1 Loney 1b 4 1 3 2 Lynn p 1 0 0 0 A.Ellis c 4 1 1 2 Schmkr ph 1 0 0 0 GwynJ cf 4 0 2 1 Rzpczy p 0 0 0 0 Lilly p 2 0 0 0 VMarte p 0 0 0 0 Sellers 2b 1 0 1 0 Descals ph 1 0 0 0 Salas p 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 5 6 5 Totals 36 613 6 St. Louis ............................. 004 000 001 — 5 Los Angeles....................... 031 000 101 — 6 One out when winning run scored. E—Furcal (4), A.Kennedy (1), A.Ellis (3). DP—St. Louis 1. LOB—St. Louis 4, Los Angeles 12. 2B—A.Kennedy (3), Loney (10), Sellers (3). 3B—Gwynn Jr. (2). HR—Holliday (9), Berkman (1). S—Lynn, Lilly. SF—Furcal. IP H R ER BB SO St. Louis Lynn .......................... 6 9 4 4 2 5 Rzepczynski ............ 1 2 1 1 1 0 V.Marte..................... 1 1 0 0 0 2 Salas L,0-2 .............. 1⁄3 1 1 1 3 1 Los Angeles Lilly............................ 7 4 4 0 0 6 Lindblom H,9 ........... 1 1 0 0 1 3 Jansen W,3-0 BS,2-6 ...................... 1 1 1 1 0 3


CMYK PAGE 6C

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

S

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THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

MIXED MARTIAL ARTS

H.S. SOFTBALL

Gratalo remains undefeated

Redeemer handles Patriots

Former Pittston Area wrestler goes to 3-0. Hazleton’s Wells wins middleweight title.

By TOM ROBINSON For the Times Leader

DICKSON CITY – Former Pittston Area wrestler Kris Gratalo improved to 3-0 and Hazleton’s Jeremiah Wells won a title fight Saturday night to highlight the amateur portion of PA Cage Fight 12, a Mixed Martial Arts card. Northeast MMA sponsored the card at Genetti Manor. There were two professional bouts and nine amateur bouts. Gratalo and Wells won the last two amateur bouts. Gratalo defeated Scranton’s Paul McDonough 30-27 on all three cards. The 21-year-old, a former NCAA Division I wrestler at Lock

COUGARS Continued from Page 1C

Hollenback. Hazleton Area (9-6), which trailed Pittston Area and Coughlin by a game as late as Wednesday afternoon, won two games this week while the Patriots and Crusaders both lost twice to finish 8-7. “Never thought we’d be here,” Cougars coach Gino Cara said after the celebration. “This was important to me. It was very important to me on a personal level. These kids have been with me since they were 9 or 10 years old. To come back like this…” It was an impressive feat. Fittingly, it was decided on a tense day on the diamond as Henderson Concepcion brought home Kyle Klein with a sacrifice fly to right in the top of the 12th, breaking a 7-7 tie that had stood since Wednesday. Erik Johnson set the Royals down in order in the home half to pick up the win and finish off seven innings of relief. The teams had originally played nine full innings thanks to a tying two-run homer by Redeemer’s Eric Ringsdorf with two outs in the bottom of the seventh on Wednesday. The game resumed Saturday in the top of the 10th. “We’re probably the best sixloss team to ever win the division,” joked Cara. “I think that says a lot about our conference. There aren’t many six-loss teams that win divisions, but this whole conference was outstanding this year, top to bottom.” The Royals, the lone Class 2A team out of 11 in Division I, proved that earlier in the day by stunning Pittston Area. Ringsdorf delivered a two-run double in the first for an early lead. Pat Condo made it 3-1 in the fourth with an RBI single and Redeemer held off a late rally in the seventh, stranding the tying run at third base. Will Cavanaugh pitched five innings of four-hit ball and Jim Strickland escaped a pair of jams for a two-inning save. The Royals finished the regular season 5-10 and will once again be a threat in the 2A tournament, looking for a third straight appearance in the district title game. “Obviously we’re out here to win (it all),” Redeemer coach Chris Ritsick said. “We’re getting prepped and ready for a run at the districts. … I think we still need to clean things up, but I think we’re headed in the right direction.” Pittston Area coach Paul Zaffuto had a different assessment of his squad after a second straight loss to teams trailing in the standings. “The last two games, we didn’t even come to play,” Zaffuto said. “We had championship on the mind, and guys just figure because we’re Pittston and we’ve been successful in the past that teams are just going to hand it over to us. They don’t understand that they come after us twice as hard. “Redeemer’s sitting at the bottom of the pack, and here they are playing their hearts out. Our guys are cheering (on the bench), but they’re not showing anything on the field. They didn’t give me an effort that I thought we should’ve got for a championship

Haven, controlled most of the middleweight bout, but had to fight off four submission attempts on his left elbow. “I’m very flexible,” Gratalo said. “He was close toward the end, but I held on.” Gratalo said the danger in MMA is submission holds that can end a bout in a matter of seconds. “I knew from my teammates that he had good Jiu Jitsu and he would go for that,” Gratalo said. Wells (5-1) stopped Dennis Maldonado at the end of the first round on a technical knockout for the PA Cage Fight Amateur middleweight title. Mike Bannon improved to 7-0 as a professional by stopping Jay Haas in 1:47 of the first round by getting a tap out with a knee bar. James Cianci, a Clarks Summit resident who trains in Swoyersville, met Joel Roberts in the 135-

S TA N D I N G S WVC Division I East Team W L x-Hazleton Area ............... 9 6 Pittston Area ..................... 8 7 Coughlin ............................ 8 7 Nanticoke .......................... 5 10 Holy Redeemer ................ 5 10 Crestwood......................... 4 11 Division I West Team W L x-Wyoming Valley West.. 13 1 Berwick.............................. 10 4 Wyoming Area.................. 9 5 Tunkhannock .................... 7 7 Dallas................................. 2 12 Division II Team W L x-Hanover Area ................ 12 0 Lake-Lehman.................... 8 4 Meyers............................... 6 5 Northwest.......................... 6 6 Wyoming Seminary ......... 5 7 MMI Prep........................... 4 8 GAR ................................... 0 11 x-clinched division title SCHEDULE Today's game GAR at Meyers, 1 p.m. End regular season

GB — 1.0 1.0 4.0 4.0 5.0

RS 70 98 76 60 65 58

RA 55 101 54 88 88 103

GB — 3.0 4.0 6.0 11.0

RS 78 61 70 46 53

RA 23 37 56 43 87

GB — 4.0 5.5 6.0 7.0 8.0 11.5

RS 97 96 81 93 67 46 16

RA 19 45 55 77 83 75 142

DISTRICT 2 STANDINGS Class 4A (District 2-4) Team W L Pct. x-Wyoming Valley West ............ 13 1 .929 x-Hazleton Area ......................... 9 6 .600 Scranton ...................................... 11 3 .786 Delaware Valley.......................... 9 5 .643 *Williamsport............................... 11 8 .579 Wallenpaupack........................... 2 12 .143 *-Williamsport is 2-4 for seeding purposes Class 3A Team W L Pct. x-North Pocono .......................... 13 1 .929 x-Valley View .............................. 12 2 .857 Berwick ........................................ 10 4 .714 Wyoming Area............................ 9 5 .643 Pittston Area ............................... 8 7 .533 Coughlin ...................................... 8 7 .533 Tunkhannock .............................. 7 7 .500 Scranton Prep............................. 7 7 .500 Abington Heights........................ 7 7 .500 Nanticoke .................................... 5 10 .333 Western Wayne.......................... 4 10 .286 Honesdale................................... 4 10 .286 Crestwood................................... 4 11 .267 West Scranton ............................ 3 11 .214 Dallas........................................... 2 12 .143 Class 2A Team W L Pct. x-Montrose .................................. 14 0 1.00 x-Hanover Area .......................... 12 0 1.00 Lake-Lehman.............................. 8 4 .667 Mid Valley.................................... 9 5 .643 Holy Cross .................................. 8 6 .571 Mountain View............................ 8 6 .571 Meyers......................................... 6 5 .545 Lakeland ...................................... 7 7 .500 Northwest .................................... 6 6 .500 Dunmore ..................................... 6 8 .429 Elk Lake....................................... 6 8 .429 Holy Redeemer .......................... 5 10 .333 Riverside ..................................... 2 12 .143 Carbondale ................................. 2 12 .143 GAR ............................................. 0 11 .000 Class A Team W L Pct. Lackawanna Trail ....................... 11 3 .786 Old Forge .................................... 10 4 .714 Blue Ridge .................................. 6 8 .429 Wyoming Seminary ................... 5 7 .417 MMI Prep..................................... 4 8 .333 0-Susquehanna .......................... 4 10 .286 0-Forest City ............................... 3 11 .214 x-division champ; 0-opted out of D2 tournament POSTSEASON SCHEDULE Brackets released today Tuesday District 2 Class 3A first round District 2 Class 2A first round Wednesday District 2-4 Class 4A quarterfinals District 2 Class A quarterfinal Thursday District 2 Class 3A quarterfinals District 2 Class 2A quarterfinals Friday District 2-4 Class 4A semifinals District 2 Class A semifinals May 29 District 2 Class 3A semifinals District 2 Class 2A semifinals May 30 District 2-4 Class 4A championship District 2 Class A championship May 31 District 2 Class 3A championship District 2 Class 2A championship

game.” The Patriots had several chances to rally against the Royals and force a playoff for the division title. Anthony Schwab and Tyler Loftus both hit RBI singles, but the Patriots stranded 10 runners on the day, including three in the sixth and two in the seventh. Earlier in the game, miscues led to two runners being thrown out at third. That opened the door for the Cougars, who captured their second division title in four seasons under Cara. “This one,” Cara said, “is better than the last one. Every next one is better than the last one.” Holy Redeemer 3, Pittston Area 2 Pittston Area Holy Redeemer ab r h bi ab r h bi Houseman cf 4 0 0 0 Kosik cf 1 0 0 0 MSchwab p 4 0 1 0 Tsevdos rf 3 1 1 0 Razvillas 1b 1 2 0 0 Policare 2b 3 1 1 0 ASchwab 3b 3 0 2 1 Cavangh p 0 0 0 0 Loftus c 4 0 1 1 Strickland p 0 0 0 0 Kielbasa lf 3 0 1 0 Ringsdrf dh 3 0 1 2 Rowan cf 0 0 0 0 Choman 1b 2 0 1 0 BDelaney dh 1 0 1 0 English 3b 3 0 0 0 Hahn 2b 1 0 0 0 Trimblett lf 1 0 0 0 McGinty ss 3 0 0 0 Ell pr-lf 1 1 0 0 Peterlin c 2 0 1 0 Leighton c 1 0 0 0 Condo ss 1 0 1 1 Totals 24 2 6 2 Totals 21 3 6 3 Pittston Area............................ 001 000 1 — 2 Holy Redeemer....................... 200 100 x — 3 2B – MSchwab, BDelaney, Ringsdorf IP H R ER BB SO Pittston Area MSchwab (L, 2-2).... 6.0 6 3 2 1 4 Holy Redeemer Cavangh (W, 2-1) .... 5.0 4 1 1 4 2 Strickland (S)............ 2.0 2 1 1 4 0 Hazleton Area 8, Holy Redeemer 7 (12 inn.) (Game resumed from Wednesday, top 10th) Hazleton Area Holy Redeemer

pound main event. Roberts stopped Cianci on a rear naked choke hold 4:15 into the five-minute first round of an action-filled fight for the PA Cage Fight Featherweight title. Hazleton fighters Mike Zola and Keman Jackson won consecutive bouts early in the card. Zola overcame a penalty point for an illegal strike with his elbow in the first round and posted a majority decision over Billy Magliane in a bantamweight bout. Jackson won the first two rounds to take a unanimous decision from Derek Smith in a meeting of middleweights who were making their debuts. Other amateur winners were Maiguel Machado, Adam Atiyeh, Tyler Marinucci, Brad Turi and Sean Oliveri. Northeast MMA plans Cage Fight 10 for August at the Woodlands Inn and Resort. ab r h bi Peterlin c 5 1 1 0 Policare 2b 6 1 2 0 Chomn p-1b 6 1 0 0 Kerr pr 0 0 0 0 Ringsdrf 1b 3 1 1 3 Trimblett lf 1 0 0 0 Cosgrove lf 1 0 0 0 Tsevds lf-rf 6 2 3 3 Cavangh 3b 2 0 1 0 English 3b 3 0 2 0 Condo ss 5 1 1 0 Ell rf-p 0 0 0 0 Amarndo dh 2 0 1 0 Stricklnd dh 3 0 0 0 Kosik rf 4 0 0 0 Totals 41 810 7 Totals 47 712 6 Hazleton Area .......... 200 221 000 001 — 8 Holy Redeemer........ 300 101 200 000 — 7 2B – Barletta, Cavanaugh, English, Condo; HR – Ringsdorf, Tsevdos 2 IP H R ER BB SO Hazleton Area Hernandez ................ 5+ 7 5 4 1 1 Johnson (W, 2-3)..... 7.0 5 2 2 4 5 Holy Redeemer Choman (L, 0-4)....... 7.0 6 5 4 4 5 Ell ............................... 5.0 4 3 3 3 3 Rubasky c Klein 2b Cara ss Hernandez p Johnson p Craig dh Concepcn dh Barletta rf Wolfe cf Vigna 1b Greco lf Biasi 3b

ab 5 5 5 0 0 3 1 6 4 4 3 5

r 0 2 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1

h bi 0 0 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 2

Lake-Lehman 5, MMI Prep 0 Tyler McGovern pitched a three-hit shutout and struck out a career-high 14 batters as the Black Knights finished league play at 8-4. Curt Barbacci and Jeff Carter both finished with two hits and two RBI. John Van Scoy added two hits. Charlie Karchner doubled for the Preppers (4-8). Lake-Lehman

MMI Prep ab r h bi ab r h bi VanScoy c 2 2 2 0 Kollar cf 3 0 0 0 CuBarbcci 3b 4 1 2 0 Dashr 2b-ss 3 0 1 0 McGovern p 4 0 0 0 Krchnr ss-p 2 0 1 0 Shurites cf 3 1 1 2 Harman c 2 0 0 0 Borum 1b 3 0 0 0 Yamulla p-rf 3 0 0 0 Carter ss 4 0 2 2 Andes 1b 3 0 1 0 Bean rf 2 0 0 0 Merench 3b 2 0 0 0 Carey 2b 0 0 0 0 JDriscoll lf 3 0 0 0 Paraschak dh 2 0 0 0 PDriscoll rf 1 0 0 0 Balloun ph 1 0 0 0 Hall 2b 1 0 0 0 Partington lf 3 1 0 0 Totals 28 5 7 4 Totals 23 0 3 0 Lake-Lehman .......................... 201 200 0 — 5 MMI Prep ................................. 000 000 0 — 0 2B – Karchner IP H R ER BB SO Lake-Lehman McGovern (W, 1-1) . 7.0 3 0 0 2 14 MMI Prep Yamulla (L, 0-4) ....... 3.0 5 3 3 3 1 Karchner ................... 4.0 2 2 0 1 2

Northwest 4, Meyers 2 Kyle Stempien went the distance for Northwest, striking out eight to help the Rangers (6-6) finish league play at .500. Matt Korea led the offense, going 2-for-3 with a double and an RBI. In the first game of their twotown doubleheader, the Mohawks got a double from Matt DeMarco and an RBI from Corey Dubil, who pitched a complete game. Meyers Northwest ab r h bi ab r h bi MDeMrco 3b 3 0 1 0 DiPasqle 3b 2 2 1 1 Zionce cf 3 1 1 0 Mazonky 1b 2 0 0 0 Owen c 4 0 0 0 Korea c 3 0 2 1 Dubil p 3 0 1 1 Volkel rf 3 0 1 1 Conrad 1b 3 0 0 0 Stempien p 3 0 0 0 Szafran ss 3 0 0 0 Gurznski cf 3 1 0 0 Kendra rf 0 0 0 0 White ss 3 0 0 0 CDeMrco dh 2 1 1 0 Long 2b 0 0 0 0 Morrash 2b 3 0 1 0 Samlvch dh 2 1 1 0 Reilly cf 2 0 0 0 Feno lf 3 0 1 0 Totals 26 2 5 1 Totals 24 4 6 3 Meyers...................................... 100 000 1 — 2 Northwest................................. 100 300 x — 4 2B – MDeMarco, Korea IP H R ER BB SO Meyers Dubil (L, 2-2) ............. 6.0 6 4 3 2 4 Northwest Stempien (W, 3-0) ... 7.0 5 2 1 3 8

Meyers 10, Seminary 8 The Mohawks (6-5) capped their doubleheader with a win, taking advantage of 11 walks issued by the Blue Knights. Tony Morrash doubled and drove in a run, while C.J. Szafran finished with two RBI. Robert Reilly earned a complete-game victory. Bobby Polachek (triple, RBI), Riku Kaizaki (three RBI) and Asa Saidman (double, two RBI) had three hits apiece for Seminary (5-7). Meyers

Wyoming Seminary ab r h bi ab r h bi MDeMrco 3b 4 1 0 0 Power cf 5 1 1 0 Zionce cf 5 1 1 0 Gilmore rf 3 0 1 0 Kendra rf 1 0 0 0 Sugiyma pr 0 1 0 0 Dubil dh 4 2 1 1 Polachek p 4 2 3 1 Conrad 1b 2 1 0 0 Gagliardi 3b 2 2 0 0 CDeMrco 1b 2 1 0 0 Kaizaki ss 4 2 3 3 Morrash 2b 2 2 1 1 Saidman 1b 4 0 3 2 Szafran ss 2 1 0 2 Sherwood c 3 0 0 0 Owen c 0 1 0 1 Chiba 2b 3 0 0 1 Reilly p 2 0 0 1 Chang rf 1 0 0 0 Lisman lf 4 0 0 0 Bath dh 2 0 0 0 Totals 2810 3 6 Totals 31 811 7 Meyers ................................... 521 101 0 — 10 Wyoming Seminary ............. 500 000 3 — 8 2B – Morrash, Saidman; 3B – Polachek IP H R ER BB SO Meyers Reilly (W, 1-0) .......... 7.0 11 8 8 4 5 Wyo. Seminary Polachek (L, 2-3) ..... 4.0 3 9 4 9 2 Saidman .................... 3.0 0 1 0 2 1

The Times Leader staff

HUGHESTOWN – Stacey Warga was 4-for-4 with two doubles as Holy Redeemer downed Pittston Area 15-1 Saturday in Wyoming Valley Conference softball. Sydney Kotch also doubled for Redeemer. Abby Staskiel struck out six batters through five innings to pick up the win.

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Tunkhannock’s David Novak wears the medals he won in his first season with the Lindsey Wilson College cycling team.

Tunkhannock’s Novak pedals to the medals David Novak knew he was headed for a different type of cycling when he headed to Lindsey Wilson College last

fall. Novak, an experienced racer already by the time he reached the school’s Columbia, Ky., campus, would be racing for more than just himself. “Cycling in college is different,” Novak said last week while driving back to Northeastern Pennsylvania with his parents. “There is a lot more team practice. You are really racing for points, so you just want someone (from your team) to do well. So you use lots of team tactics.” Team tactics or not, the 19-year-old from Tunkhannock found plenty of individual glory in his first season with the Blue Raiders. Novak finished second earlier this month in the USA Cycling Collegiate Road Nationals road race held in Ogden, Utah. That came just a week after he finished second in the road race and fifth in the criterium at the Midwest Collegiate Cycling Conference. And, oh yeah, in between he won a race at the Historic Roswell Criterium in Marietta, Ga. “I’m really happy,” Novak said. “(The season) couldn’t have gone any better. “I expected to do well, but I wasn’t sure of how well I would do. I didn’t really expect to do this well.” Oddly enough, Novak wasn’t even counting on a high finish in the road race in Ogden. “I really thought I would do better in the criterium,” said Novak, who finished 71st in that race which was held the day before the road race. “I wasn’t even feeling that well when I got to the (road) race, so I was really questioning whether I was going to even finish the race.” Finish the race he did as he added a nice cap to his first collegiate season. Lindsey Wilson coach Dave Grigsby was impressed with Novak even before his finish in Ogden. “David has emerged as one of the hardest working, fearless riders on the team,” Grigsby told The Times Leader earlier in the year. “He is a relentless attacker in any bike race, any discipline, and his fearlessness is definitely one of his strengths. “David feels he can win any race he enters and that is something that is impossible to teach.” Novak will now move on to his summer racing schedule with the Integrated Sports Medicine cycling team. He’s not sure exactly which races he will be in yet, but he is sure there will be plenty of them. One he is looking forward to doing is the Tour of America’s Dairyland, an 11-day stage race

JOE SOPRANO CYCLING SCENE through Wisconsin starting June 11. Then it’s back to Lindsey Wilson in the fall with an eye on improving on his finish at nationals. “That’s what my goal is,” Novak said. “The only way to improve on second is to win.” Passport Program worth a look Do you enjoy being outdoors? Since you are reading Cycling Scene, I’m going to have to guess yes. Do you like free stuff and winning prizes? Well who doesn’t? You will want to checkout the Keystone Active Zone Passport program this spring and summer. Basically, you go to www.kazpassport.org and download a passport. Then you visit various passport stops around Luzerne County and answer scavenger hunt questions, return to the website and log your answers. The more places you visit the more chances you have for awards and prizes. For instance, visit just five places – parks, trails, etc. – and you receive a pair of ice skating passes for the Ice Rink at Coal Street Park. Skate rental included! It’s all geared to get people outside and active. So since you are probably riding already, you may as well download the passport, stuff it in your jersey pocket and visit a few of the sites. Race shortened According to a report on Philly.com, the Philadelphia International Cycling Championships, set for June 3, will be shortened due to budget concerns. Traditionally, professional cyclists would do 14 laps around the 14.7-mile course in Philadelphia, which includes the famed “Manayunk Wall.” This year, the race will be cut down to seven laps. But there is some good news. Organizers have added a morning rider for amateurs who will get to complete three circuits of the course. Be forewarned, however, that is a 17 percent grade in Manayunk. And some riders might consider the price just a steep for the privilege of suffering up the Wall. Through June 1 the registration fee is $95. Day of the event registration is $100. There is a fundraising option that reduces the registration fee to $25, provided the cyclist raise $250 in fundraising efforts. More information is available at www.echelongranfondo.org/ bicyclingopen. Joe Soprano writes about cycling for The Times Leader. Reach him at jsoprano@timesleader.com

Holy Redeemer ......................... 171 06 — 15 Pittston Area .............................. 001 00 — 1 WP – Staskiel (No stats available); LP – Dragon (No stats available) 2B – HR, Warga (2), Kotch. Top hitters – HR, Warga 4-for-4, Kotch 2-for-3; PA, Lieback 1-for-2, George 1-for-1

Lake-Lehman 7, MMI Prep 3 Kori Wandel struck out nine as the Black Knights defeated the Preppers. Wandel also went 3-for-4 at the plate with two doubles and an RBI.

Lake-Lehman .......................... 200 120 2 — 7 MMI Prep ................................. 200 001 0 — 3 WP – Wandel, 7 IP, 3H, 3R, 3ER, 3BB, 9K; LP – Karchner, 7 IP, 10H, 7R, 4ER, 3BB, 3K; 2B— LL, Wandel (2), Caldwater, Meeker, Pyskoty; Top hitters – LL, Stacy 2-for-3 RBI, Wandel 3-for-4 1RBI; MMI, Carrato 1-for-4, Purcell 1-for-2

Hanover Area 8, Meyers 5 Danielle Tuzinski struck out seven batters through four innings to lead the Hawkeyes to a win over the Mohawks. Aimee Peelak was 1-for-2 with two RBI. Amy Kowalczyk was 2-for-4 with a double for Meyers.

Hanover Area .......................... 104 030 0 — 8 Meyers...................................... 000 030 2 — 5 WP -- Tuzinski, 4 IP, 2H, 0R, 0ER, 2BB, 7K; LP -Kowalczyk, 7 IP, 9H, 8R, 5ER, 6BB, 3K; 3B— HAN, McNair; MEY, Kowalczyk Top hitters – HA, Rinehimer 2-for-3, A. Peelak 1-for-2 2 RBI, Trevethan 2-for-4; MEY, Kowalczyk 2-for-4, Merrick 1-for-4.

S W B YA N K E E S

Yankees rally past Clippers The Times Leader staff

COLUMBUS, Ohio – The Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees rallied for three runs in the top of the ninth to defeat Columbus 8-6 Saturday night in International League baseball. Jack Cust YANKEES started the comeback by opening the inning with a sinCLIPPERS gle. Eduardo Nunez ran for Cust and moved to third when Ronnier Mustelier singled to center. Brandon Laird then reached on an error that scored Nunez. Musteller moved to third and Laird to second on the miscue. Francisco Cervelli then delivered a two-run single for the 8-6 advantage. Manny Delcarmen pitched the final inning to earn his second save of the season. Chase Whitley picked up the victory by pitching the eighth inning. He improved to 5-2. Hazleton Area graduate Russ Canzler was 2-for-3 with a triple and two runs scored for Columbus.

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Yankees 8, Columbus 6 Yankees

Columbus h bi ab r h bi 2 0 Donald ss 5 1 1 1 0 0 Carrera cf 5 0 0 0 1 0 LaPorta 1b 5 1 1 1 Chisenhall Cust dh 4 1 2 1 3b 3 0 2 1 Nunez pr 0 1 0 0 Goedert lf 4 0 0 0 Mustelier 3b 5 3 3 0 Phelps 2b 4 1 1 0 Laird rf 5 2 1 2 Canzler dh 3 2 2 1 Cervelli c 5 1 2 2 Huffman rf 4 1 2 1 Curtis cf 2 0 1 1 Pagnozzi c 4 0 1 0 Pena 2b 1 0 0 0 Garner lf-cf 3 0 2 1 Totals 38 814 7 Totals 37 610 5 Yankees............................... 011 002 013 — 8 Columbus ............................ 120 110 010 — 6 E – SWB, Mustelier (2); COL, Goedert (1), LaPorta (2), Donald (4). SB – SWB, Garner (1). 2B – SWB, Mustelier 2 (4), Russo (10), Laird (9); COL, Phelps (14), Huffman (10), Donald (1), Chisenhall (10). 3B – COL, Canzler (2). HR – SWB, Cust (4); COL, LaPorta (13), Huffman (4). IP H R ER BB SO Yankees Warren....................... 6.0 8 5 5 1 7 Cedeno...................... 1.0 1 0 0 0 1 Whitley (W, 5-2) ....... 1.0 1 1 1 0 1 Delcarmen (S, 2) ..... 1.0 0 0 0 0 1 Columbus Berger 5.0 6 2 2 1 4 Herrmann 1.0 2 2 2 1 1 Wheeler 0.1 1 0 0 1 0 Allen ........................... 1.2 2 1 1 1 0 Ray (L, 0-3)............... 1.0 3 3 2 1 1 Russo 2b-lf Antonelli ss Pearce 1b

ab 5 4 4

r 0 0 0


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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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N H L P L AYO F F S

King Henrik, Rangers blank New Jersey By DAN GELSTON AP Sports Writer

NEWARK, N.J. — Henrik Lundqvist stopped all 36 shots, and Dan Girardi, Chris Kreider and Ryan Callahan scored thirdperiod goals to lead the New York Rangers to a 3-0 win over the New Jersey Devils in Game 3 of the Eastern Conference Finals on Saturday. The Rangers scored two goals only 1 minute, 57 seconds apart early in the third to help them take a 2-1 series lead. Lundqvist was busy from the opening faceoff en route to his second shutout of the series and third in the postseason. Callahan iced it with an empty-netter late in third. Game 4 is Monday in New Jersey. Not even playing on home ice,

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where they had won four straight, was enough to help New Jersey. The Rangers have won every Game 1, lost each Game 2, and rebounded to win Game 3 in every round this postseason. Each preceding series, of course, saw them win the all-important last one: Game 7. Kreider, a rookie called up during Round 1 vs. Ottawa, has scored in every game of this series. Lundqvist was fantastic as he

showed again why he led the Rangers to an Eastern Conference-high 109 points. He stoned Adam Henrique on a nice backhander late in the second period to keep it scoreless entering the third, setting the stage for New York’s late magic. He also toyed with Ilya Kovalchuk all game and stopped him on a nice breakaway in the second. Kovalchuk, who scored in Game 2, couldn’t get untracked and neither could the rest of the Devils. Especially not with the way Lundqvist shined in net. The Rangers opened the third ready to go against Martin Brodeur and found a way to give Lundqvist a needed cushion. With Devils defenseman Bryce Salvador in the penalty box, Girardi pushed a slow wrist shot

past Brodeur’s glove side, off a faceoff win by center Brad Richards. Brodeur could have easily stopped the point-blank shot, especially with no traffic in front of the net. The Rangers could have squeezed in a pair of John Tortorella press conferences before their next goal. Rangers defenseman Ryan McDonagh wristed a shot along the ice toward Brodeur that got through to the crease, eventually being deflected by Kreider and around a prone Brodeur. Devils defenseman Marek Zidlicky was out of position at the faceoff circle, when Kreider sneaked in behind him and poked it in. ASSOCIATED PRESS The Devils kept up the pressure the rest of the way, but got New York Rangers’ Dan Girardi (5) is congratulated by teammates nowhere with an ineffective pow- after scoring the first goal of the game during the third period Saturday against the New Jersey Devils in Newark, N.J. er play.

N B A P L AYO F F S

AUTO RACING

Briscoe puts Penske back on Indy pole

Shuffling leaders at Nelson

By MICHAEL MAROT AP Sports Writer

The Associated Press

IRVING, Texas — Jason Dufner shot a 1-under 69 on Saturday, enough to keep a onestroke lead heading into the final round of the Byron Nelson Championship. On a day when nine players had or shared the lead, Dufner Dufner was the one on top alone for the second day in a row when play was done. He was at 8-under 202. Jason Day shot a 67, with his only bogey coming after missing a short putt on the 18th hole. He was a stroke back along with J.J. Henry and Dicky Pride. Henry also had a 67, and Pride shot a 69. Vijay Singh had a 66 and was two strokes back. Matt Kuchar, who won The Players Championship last weekend, was four shots back after a 72 with an up-and-down back nine. Kuchar still has a chance to become the first PGA Tour player since Tiger Woods in 2009 to win in consecutive weeks. Dufner got his first PGA Tour victory three weeks ago at New Orleans, then took a week off to get married before returning to play at The Players Championship last week. Sybase Match Play GLADSTONE, N.J. — Morgan Pressel inched closer to her first LPGA Tour title since 2008, posting two very different victories to reach the semifinals of the Sybase Match Play Championship. Pressel rallied from 2-down with three holes to play to stun No. 2 ranked Na Yeon Choi in 19 holes in the morning and rolled over Anna Nordqvist of Sweden 5 and 4 in the afternoon quarterfinal in the surprised-filled event at the Hamilton Farm Golf Club. Pressel will face former NCAA champ Azahara Munoz — a 5-and-4 winner over American Stacy Lewis — in the semifinals, while Vicky Hurst and Candie Kung will square off in the other match. Volvo World Match Play CASARES, Spain — Northern Ireland’s Graeme McDowell advanced to the World Match Play semifinals when Sergio Garcia missed a shot par putt on the first extra hole. McDowell will face Rafael Cabrera-Bello, a 3-and-1 winner over Spanish compatriot Alvaro Quiros. Belgium’s Nicolas Colsaerts will play Scotland’s Paul Lawrie in the other semifinal at Finca Cortesin. Colsaerts beat American Brandt Snedeker 4 and 3, and Paul Lawrie routed South Africa’s Retief Goosen 6 and 5.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Los Angeles Clippers’ Blake Griffin, left, and forward Reggie Evans, right, chat as San Antonio Spurs center Tim Duncan listens in during the second Saturday in Los Angeles.

Spurs go up 3-0 on Clippers

By BETH HARRIS AP Sports Writer

LOS ANGELES — Nothing was going to rattle the calm, cool and collected Spurs. Not even a 24-point deficit. Tim Duncan scored 19 points, helping engineer a defining 24-0 run in the third quarter, and San Antonio defeated the Los Angeles Clippers 96-86 on Saturday to take a commanding 3-0 lead in their second-round playoff series. “We didn’t plan on being down that much,” said Duncan, who at 36 is hungry to win the team’s fifth NBA championship and first since 2006-07. “We stuck with it.” Led by Tony Parker’s 23 points and his defense on an ailing Chris Paul, the Spurs kept running their plays even as Blake Griffin’s early offensive assault buried them in a huge hole. Griffin missed three shots in the first half, when he scored 20 points and carried his team to a 24-point lead despite a left hip injury and a sprained right knee. “They came out like we ex-

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pected, very strong. Blake was making crazy shots,” Parker said. “We just took our time. It’s a long game, a very long game. At halftime, we were very calm.” Griffin had 28 points and 16 rebounds, and reserve Mo Williams added 19 points for the Clippers, who face some daunting NBA history heading into Game 4 on Sunday at Staples Center. No team has rallied from a 3-0 deficit to win a series. “If we don’t play with that sense of urgency, it’s not going to be pretty,” Griffin said. The Clippers played a mustwin Game 7 in the opening round on the road at Memphis and succeeded. “We have to keep fighting,”

Paul said. Rookie Kawhi Leonard added 14 points and Manu Ginobili 13 to help the top-seeded Spurs win their 17th in a row and improve to 7-0 in the playoffs. “We all struggled in the first quarter. We didn’t feel right out there,” said Duncan, who like his teammates, looked to Parker to pick the team up. “We follow his lead. He stuck with it, made some big shots down the stretch and continued to attack,” Duncan said. “He was playing defense really hard and got up into Chris.” Besides Parker, the Spurs threw two other defenders at Paul. He finished with 12 points and 11 assists after two previous sub-par efforts in the series. “Tony really ran the show well,” Spurs coach Gregg Popovich said. “I’d say, ‘Let’s do this’ and he said, ‘No, let’s do this,’ and we’d do it.” After a quiet first half in which he scored eight points, Duncan helped the Spurs control the third quarter when they outscored Los Angeles 26-8.

INDIANAPOLIS — Roger Penske’s strategy beat Michael Andretti by inches Saturday — 9.168 inches to be exact. In the closest pole duel in Indianapolis 500 history, Team Penske sent points leader Will Power onto the track with two minutes left in the Pole Day shootout — a shrewd move that prevented three Andretti drivers from taking one last shot at the pole and preserving it for his own guy, Ryan Briscoe It was a remarkable finish to a wild afternoon. Briscoe was the surprise winner of his first Indy pole with a four-lap average of 226.484 mph. He completed the 10-mile qualification run .0023 seconds quicker than James Hinchcliffe. The previous record was set in1970 when Al Unser defeated Johnny Rutherford by .01 seconds over the four-lap qualifying run. “My name will go down forever for something that I won here at the Indy 500,” Briscoe said. It will go straight into the record book. How close was the battle? Everybody seemed to have an explanation. When Hinchcliffe left the postrace news conference, Briscoe held his fingers about an inch apart and explained it was that close. Hinchcliffe already knew better. “It’s a gust of wind, it’s a shadow over a part of the track,” Hinchcliffe said, before holding up his name card and explaining that was the distance. "I’m going to lose a little bit of sleep at how small the margin was to Ryan.” Eventually a series spokesman came in and blurted out the actual distance to the the thousandth of an inch. Nobody knows how to play this game better than Penske and he proved it again Saturday.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

IndyCar driver Ryan Briscoe celebrates after winning the pole on the first day of qualifications for the Indianapolis 500 at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway on Saturday.

The iconic racing owner has now won five of the last seven poles at Indy and extended his own Indy record to 17 poles. Briscoe is the 11th driver to win a pole for The Captain, and it comes one week before Penske celebrates the 40th anniversary of his first career Indy win 1972. As usual, he didn’t rely on conventional wisdom. Penske’s three drivers — Briscoe, three-time Indy winner Helio Castroneves and Power, the points leader — spent most of this week just trying to crack the top 10 of the speed charts. Some around Gasoline Alley thought the only IndyCar team to win a pole or a race this season was sandbagging. Maybe they were. When Castroneves arrived at the track Saturday morning, it didn’t take him long to top 227 mph in the early morning practice, and once qualifying began, it quickly became apparent this would be a twoteam race between Penske’s drivers and the resurgent Andretti team.

EDITOR’S NOTE At press time, Saturday night’s NASCAR all-star race was still in progress.

CYC L I N G

Robert Gesink takes Tour of California lead The Associated Press

MOUNT BALDY, Calif. — Dutchman Robert Gesink won the difficult seventh stage of the Tour of California on Saturday to take a 46-second lead in the overall standings into the largely ceremonial final leg. Gesink, the Rabobank rider who broke his right leg in a training accident last fall, pulled away from Colombia’s Jhon Atapuma in the final-half mile to win the 78.3-mile leg from Ontario to Mount Baldy in 3 hours, 37 minutes, 8 seconds. Gesink was fifth in the 2010 Tour de France.

“This is amazing,” Gesink said. “At the end of last season I crashed and broke my leg. In January, I still had to learn how to walk. Now I’m back.” Atapuma, riding for Colombia-Coldeportes, was second in the same time. Colombia teammate Fabio Duarte was third, 14 seconds back in the stage. Dave Zabriskie, the GarminBarracuda rider from Salt Lake City, was second in the overall standings entering the final 46.2-mile stage from Beverly Hills to Los Angeles. Tom Danielson of Garmin-

Barracuda and Lyme, Conn., was third overall, 54 seconds behind. “I’ve been working really, really hard in the last few months,” said Gesink, who won his first Tour of California stage in 2008. Amador wins stage of Giro CERVINIA, Italy — Andrey Amador won the 14th stage of the Giro d’Italia and Ryder Hesjedal took back the overall lead from Joaquin Rodriguez as the race took to the Alps on Saturday. On the first big summit finish

of the race, Amador crossed in 5 hours, 33 minutes, 36 seconds, edging out Jan Barta and Alessandro De Marchi on the 128-mile trek from Cherasco to Cervinia. Hesjedal takes back the pink jersey from Rodriguez, who wore it for four successive days. The 15th stage Sunday is similar to the 14th. The 105mile leg from Busto Arsizio to Lecco and Pian dei Resinelli starts off relatively flat before four categorized climbs. Monday is a rest day. The Giro ends on May 27 in Milan.

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Costa Rica’s Andrey Amador celebrates at finish line after winning the 14th stage of the Giro d’Italia on Saturday.


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AT PLAY

Roadhouse Blues wins sixth state title

Pocono Snow claims showcase crown

The Roadhouse Blues senior softball team recently won the men’s 55-and-older Pennsylvania State Championship in Linfield. The team played seven games in one day to win its sixth state title. First row, from left: Mike Papagene; Butch Frati; Phil Tumminello; Rich Colonese; Sulley Gelet, District 15 commissioner; Pete Lynch. Back row: Bernie White; Gary Domitrovitz; Terry Martin; Rick Barlow; John Mattes; Duane Impeciati; Ed Wanyo; Bruce Cavallotti; coach Bill Jaynes; Earl Soloski; Jack Andrejko.

Pocono Snow Juniors soccer club U18 boys recently won the Spring MSSL College Showcase Tournament in Fort Dix, N.J. Pictured are team members Tyler Peterson (Honesdale), Jay Dawsey (Lake-Lehman), Brandon Jackson (Valley View), John Loboda (Abington Heights), Brian Mattern (Abington Heights), David Miller (Dallas), Joshua Huggard (Scranton Prep), Aaron Mattis (Holy Cross), Dean Johnson (Delaware Valley), Christopher Pawlenok (Holy Redeemer), Brendan Leahigh (Holy Redeemer), Michael Gaudette (Pocono Mountain West), Kody Grlica (Pocono Mountain West), Jacob Pompey (Scranton Prep), John Harrison (Valley View), Michael Burney (Scranton Prep), Ben Kalmanowicz (Abington Heights), Mitchell Hubert (Honesdale) and Mark Monacelli ( Scranton Prep). The team is led by Pocono Snow head coach Winga Siwale and John McNicol, assistant men’s soccer coach at King’s College. The team manager is Gwen Pompey.

Winstead Memorial champions

WVSC takes Del. Tourney title

Nanticoke sixth grade girls won the championship of the Tyler T. Winstead Memorial 3-on-3 Tournament at the Wilkes-Barre CYC. Team members, first row, from left: Leah Mullery, fourth grader Lauren Mullery. Second row: Miranda Bohn, Katie Butczynski

The Wyoming Valley Soccer Club 99 Boys won the U12 Division championship at the 21st annual Hockessin Soccer Club Spring Classic Tournament in Hockessin, Del. The team went undefeated. Front row, from left: Johnny Torres, Modou Lamin, Jeffrey Mondulick, Shane Syms, Moises Tlatenchi, Zach Kalna, Angel Tlatenchi. Back row: Jake Gurtis, Jonathan Tambasco, Cameron Corcoran, Alex Kresge, Nick Bazadona, Josh Kalna, Chris Williams. Absent from photo: Coach Javier Rodriguez.

Jr. Pens claim Canadian Cup

Big season for future Warriors

The Wilkes-Barre Junior Penguins Bantam AA team took first place in the Canadian Cup Tournament held in Montreal at the Les 4 Glaces Ice Rink. The Junior Pens defeated the New Jersey Colonials, (Vermont) Black Ice and the Eastern Ontario Cobras. The Junior Pens defeated the Cobras in the championship 4-3. Pictured: Alex Rowan, Jerry Scatena, Robbie Piccoletti, Dan Blazejewski, Thomas Brady, Chris McGrath, tourney MVP Carter Kusakavitch, Frankie Castellana, Sal Aiello, Eric Yenchak, Matthew Madry, Josh Gartley, Tino Alunni, Tyler Uravage, Robert Viteritti, J.P. Natishan, Damian Farrell. Absent from photo: Jarrod Elko, head coach John Yenchak, assistant coach Jerry Scatena, manager Linda Viteritti, team dad Bill Brady.

AT P L AY P O L I C Y The Times Leader will accept photos, standings and stories from readers about youth and adult recreation activities. We’re also encouraging anyone in a league – darts, pool, Frisbee, etc. – to submit standings and results to us. E-mailed photos should be sent in a jpeg format. Those that are not in a jpeg format might not be published. All submitted items should have contact information as well to ensure publication. Items will not be accepted over the telephone. They may be e-mailed to tlsports@timesleader.com with “At Play” in the subject, faxed to 831-7319, dropped off at the Times Leader or mailed to Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250.

Wyoming Area sixth graders finished the season with a record of 28-4 and won the St. Joseph’s Oblates Eastside Basketball League championship, the Back Mountain Shootout and the Newport Boys Tournament. First row, from left: Aaron Zezza, Jake Hogan, Kyre Zielinski, Dylan Melberger, Jon Angelella. Second row: Marc Minichello, Matt Wright, Matt Silinskie, Sam Greenfield, P.J. Angeli. Coaches were Ron Silinskie and Mick Melberger.

Trio earns black belts

The Hapkido Taekwondo Institute of Kingston held promotion testing. Promoted to junior black belt in the North American Hapkdio Taekwondo Federation were Chance D’Agostino, Matthew Jesse and Amelia Lawrence. First row, from left; Jesse, D’Agostino, Lawrence. Second row: Master Vince Sperduto, Dino Cussatt, Nick Jula, Brian Kaschak, master Pete Canavan.

Successful season at St. Jude

St. Jude School has hosted intramural basketball teams for kindergarten through third grades in games coordinated through the school’s sports association. Shown are some members of the program. First row, from left: Lauren Urosevich, Matthew Banford, Tea Amerise. Second row: Caden Sparich, Connor Spencer, Michael McLaughlin, Chris Papciak. Third row: Coach Sal Sparich, Julianna Powis, Ethan Stoltz, Sarah Stettler, coach Chris Spencer.

Wyoming Valley CC preps for Classic week Wyoming Valley Country Club will open its tournament season with the Wyoming Valley Country Club Classic, scheduled for June 1-3. The Classic will be a member/ member or member/guest tournament. The Classic week will kick off Tuesday, May 29, with the Ladies Classic. Delbaso Ford will donate a Ford Focus for the first hole-in-one made on the club’s No. 13 during the Classic. Pictured, from left: Vince Tassitano, president of Wyoming Valley CC; Jennifer Mang, general manager; Dan Delbaso, Delbaso Ford; Paul Eyerman, co-chair of the Classic; Pat Delbaso, Delbaso Ford; Marty Behm, co-chair of the Classic; Floyd Bowen, classic committee; Adam Slamas, assistant golf professional; Pete Korba, head golf professional.


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SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 PAGE 9C

Parsnik to play at Bloomsburg

Coughlin’s Joe Parsnik has announced that he will continue his football and academic careers at Bloomsburg University. First row, from left: Joseph Parsnick Sr., father; Joe Parsnick; Cathy Parsnick, mother. Second row: Ciro Cinti, head football coach; Ken White, assistant football coach; James Geiger, dean of students; Cliff Jones, athletic director; Patrick Patte, principal.

The Kirby Park Men’s 4.0 tennis team won the Eastern Pennsylvania District USTA championship. Team members, from left: Wes Woo, Jeff Sirota, Fred Hockenbury, Marc Smulowitz, Eric Fritzges, Tony Vevevino, Doug Fawbush, Jim Landon, Jim Hayes, Steve Brand, Blake Bonser, Matt Berger, Bill Eydler. Absent from photo: Jon A. Hand, Brad Kurlancheek, Sal Sarantini, Tyler Ryman.

Students shine at championship

Spartans raise funds with meal

Karazia to play at Lackawanna

The Wyoming Valley West girls field hockey booster club recently sponsored a Applebee’s breakfast fundraiser at the Wilkes-Barre Township restaurant. Team members, first row, from left: Sara Menn, Casey Dolan, Sauni Davenport, Alex Gonda, Kady Gurtis. Second row: Abby Baur, Nicole Sott, Haley Gayoski, Erika Stefanides, Danielle Grega, Morgan Fulton, Katie Lipski.

Sitara’s Karate School of Pittston participated in the Action Martial Arts Championship at the Tropicana Hotel and Resort in Atlantic City, N.J. The students competed in selfdefense, weapons and point sparring. From left: Erin NewCoughlin’s John Karazia will continue his academic and football careers at Lackawanna College. First row, from left: man, yellow belt, first place self-defense, second place weapons, second place point sparring; master Sheridan, John Karazia Sr., father; John Karazia; Bonnie Karazia, owner of Sitara’s Karate School; Maggie Stuccio, orange mother; Rhiannon Barrett, sister. Second row: Ciro Cinti, belt, first place weapons, first place point sparring; Olivia head football coach; Ken White, assistant coach; James Molnar, white belt, first place point sparring, third place Geiger, dean of students; Cliff Jones, athletic director; Paweapons. trick Patte, principal.

FINALS Continued from Page 1C

citing whether we won or lost.” Harry Parkhurst was the only Blue Knight to win a set against the buzzsaw Spartans, who dropped just two individual matches the entire state tournament. Harry Parkhurst defeated Rodrigo Saad 7-6, 6-7 (3), 14-12 in a marathon match that lasted more than two-and-a-half hours. The other players were all defeated in straight sets, including George Parkhurst’s first loss of the season at No. 1 singles. “I just couldn’t give him enough. He was really fresh, but as a team we played great today,” George Parkhurst noted. The whole day wasn’t a loss for the silver medalist Knights as they had a dramatic, comefrom-behind win in the semifinals. They were trailing Harriton

COURSE Continued from Page 1C

pitching and a stellar defense behind her. The plays in the field by Nanticoke were worthy of a highlight reel. “We pride ourselves on our defense,” Williams said. “We’ve been solid. We’ve got a lot of 3-4 year starters out there.” First baseman Lindsay Roberts fielded a bunt and got a tag on the batter in the first inning. Left fielder Kate Kowalski made a running catch in foul territiory in the second inning. Catcher Katie Wolfe made a lunging catch on a popped-up bunt in the third inning, and two batters later, Schinski snagged a soft liner over her shoulder while running into right field – taking away a sure hit. “About halfway through the game I knew we had this one,” Rubasky said. “We’re not used to losing. It (the Trojanettes dropped consecutive games to Berwick and Hazleton Area) humbled us a little bit. But we’re hungry to win the division again. We want to do well in the playoffs.” The big plays continued as

2-0 after the two doubles matches ended quickly in straight sets. Seminary was also losing two of the three singles matches after dropping the first sets at No. 1 and No. 3 singles. But they didn’t give up and pulled out an exceptional victory. No. 1 singles player George Parkhurst, a Siena recruit, came back after losing his first set 4-6 to win the next two, 7-5, 6-1 over Max Blumenthal to trim the Rams’ lead to 2-1. His victory was sparked by an exceptional shot with his back facing his opponent and the ball going between his legs to net a point in the second set. “We keep talking about never giving up. Well that’s intellectually easy, but when you’re in the heat of battle to stay calm, not to look ahead or behind and to stay in the present, these three guys in singles demonstrated that the last three matches,” Seminary coach Mike Balutanski said.

TIebreaker tonight Nanticoke’s victory created a tie for the WVC Division I East championship with Hazleton Area, as both teams finished their league schedule with 13-2 records. The teams will break that tie today at 6 p.m. in a showdown at Coal Street Park in Wilkes-Barre. The teams split the season series, with Nanticoke winning 5-0 on April 4 and Hazleton Area taking a 7-0 decision May 10. Hazleton Area has won its last 13 WVC games since the loss to Nanticoke. The Cougars only other loss during league play came April 2 at Crestwood, a 4-3 Comets victory. Nanticoke, winner of the last three Division I East titles, has won its last four league games. The Trojanettes opened the season with a nine-game winning streak that was snapped April 30 by Berwick, 4-3.

Shortly after George Parkhurst’s win, his twin brother Harry ended his match with a 6-3, 3-6, 6-3 win over Sam Borowsky to even the match score at 2-all. That set up one of the most dramatic finishes the Knights program has ever been a part of with No. 3 singles player Henry Cornell. The junior was in the third set, trailing 5-3 and down 30-40 in the ninth game. Being just one point from team elimination, he didn’t hold anything back. He rebounded to win that game, and then win the final three games to pull out a 7-5 win and send his team to the finals.

PIAA Class 2A Team Tennis Championships Semifinals: Wyoming Seminary 3, Harriton 2 Singles: 1. George Parkhurst (WS) d. Max Blumenthal 4-6, 7-5, 6-1; 2. Harry Parkhurst (WS) d. Sam Borowsky 6-3, 3-6, 6-3; 3. Henry Cornell (WS) d. Zak Kivitz 4-6, 7-5, 7-5 Doubles: 1. Matt Benstock/Griffin Kivitz (Har) d. Christopher Kim/Willie Lu 6-0, 6-0; 2. Jake Ohlbaum/Aaron Lazar (Har) d. Evan Botwin/Matt Cartwright 6-1, 6-1 Finals: Wyomissing 4, Wyoming Seminary 1 Singles: 1. Ricardo Saad (Wyomis) d. George Parkhurst 6-3, 6-1; 2. Harry Parkhurst (WS) d. Rodrigo Saad 7-6, 6-7 (3), 14-12; 3. Andre Fick (Wyomis) d. Henry Cornell 6-1, 6-1Doubles: 1. Alex Altman/Jack Davis (Wyomis) d. Christopher Kim/Willie Lu 6-1, 6-1; 2. Mike Pottieger/Tommy Heck (Wyomis) d. Evan Botwin/Matt Cartwright 6-4, 6-2

foul territory for a pop-up, pulling down a line drive, going deep into the hole for a groundball (twice) and twice turning slow rollers into outs. “Sammy Gow is just a phenomenal player,” Crestwood coach Bob Bertoni said. “She made some incredible plays out there.” Lost in Crestwood’s second straight tough offensive day was Alyssa Davies’ impressive performance. The Comets pitcher allowed just four hits and one earned run. “How about Alyssa Davies?” Bertoni said. “She had a 101 fever, pitched sick as a dog today. She was great today against a very good team.” Nanticoke 4, Crestwood 0

right fielder Kayla Benjamin tracked down a shot in right-center in the fourth inning, and center fielder Ange Hillan turned a base hit in the seventh inning into a fielder’s choice with a strong throw to second base for a force out. Between those two plays, shortstop Sammy Gow put on a clinic. She was involved in six of eight outs between the fourth and sixth innings, ranging into

Nanticoke

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ab r h bi Ritz cf 3 0 0 0 Perry 3b 3 0 0 0 Snyder ss 2 0 0 0 Casem 2b 3 0 1 0 Davies p 2 0 0 0 Wothrspn lf 2 0 0 0 Coulter c 3 0 0 0 DeSpirto 1b 2 0 0 0 Borum ph 1 0 0 0 Gavin dp 2 0 0 0 Gallagher rf 0 0 0 0 Totals 25 4 4 2 Totals 23 0 1 0 Nanticoke ............................... 010 003 0 — 4 Crestwood ............................. 000 000 0 — 0 IP H R ER BB SO Nanticoke Rubasky (W)............ 7.0 1 0 0 3 1 Crestwood Davies (L)................. 7.0 4 4 1 1 4

Gow ss Hillan cf Kowalski lf Roberts 1b Gola 3b Benjamin rf Wolfe c Rubasky P Horoschck ph Schinski 2b

PREAKNESS Continued from Page 1C

137TH PREAKNESS STAKES

I’ll Have Another takes the second jewel Kentucky Derby winner I’ll Have Another edged out Bodemeister to take the Preakness Stakes and is now in position to become the first horse to sweep the Triple Crown since Affirmed in 1978.

ple Crown winner, 11 horses have won the first two legs only to come up short in the 11⁄2-mile Belmont, the longest of the races also known as the “Test of the Champion.” The most recent try came in 2008, when Big Brown was pulled up around the turn for home and did not finish. Before that, Smarty Jones was run down in the final 70 yards by Birdstone in the 2004 HORSE WIN PLACE SHOW Belmont. I’ll Have Another With the colorful and contro$8.40 3.80 2.80 versial O’Neill squarely in the Bodemeister 3.20 2.80 limelight, scrutiny is sure to Z intensify about his violations for Creative Cause 3.60 allegedly giving his horses improper drugs. He was fined AP $1,000 and suspended 15 days in one incident. He is contesting another. thought his colt — named for “We know we play by the his 7-year-old son, Bode — rules,” O’Neill said. “It’s all would outlast I’ll Have Another. about the horse, and we’re just “I felt really good about where going to focus on the horse.” he was,” Baffert said. “I really I’ll Have Another has made a thought he was going to do it. habit of close calls. Before the The winner is a good horse. He Triple Crown began, the chestshould get the respect now that nut colt won the Santa Anita he deserves.” Derby by a nose over Creative The victory was worth Cause. As usual, owner Paul $600,000, boosting his earning Reddam wasn’t sure his colt to $2,693,600. Not a bad return would come through this time. for Reddam, who bought the “I didn’t feel confident we colt for $35,000 on the advice of were going to get there until 10 O’Neill’s brother, Dennis. yards from the wire,” Reddam “He showed he’s the real deal. said. “I wasn’t sure that we He’s a real race horse. He gutted would get there, but I knew that it out,” Reddam said. “The our horse had a lot of heart and other horse was not stopping. a lot of fight.” He ran a bang-up race, to come With a record crowd of and catch him, how can you 121,309 watching, I’ll Have Ancriticize that? For those who other was sent off as the second have followed the horse and bet choice at 3-1, with Bodemeister on him, that’s been pretty rethe 8-5 favorite. The winning warding. I don’t know if that time was 1:55.94. will be the case next time, I’ll Have Another paid $8.40, though.” $3.80 and $2.80. Bodemeister I’ll Have Another could have returned $3.20 and $2.80, and plenty of company for the BelCreative Cause paid $3.60 to mont, including some familiar show. foes from the Derby: third-place Zetterholm was fourth, folfinisher Dullahan; seventh-place lowed by Teeth of the Dog, finisher Union Rags; eight-place Optimizer, Cozzetti, Tiger Walk, finisher Rousing Sermon and Daddy Nose Best, Went the Day 12th-place finisher Alpha. Other Well and Pretension. possibles include Paynter — Baffert, a Hall of Famer and trained by Baffert — and Peter Pan winner Mark Valeski. five-time Preakness winner,

Triple Crown dreams dashed at Belmont Since Affirmed last won horse racing’s Triple Crown in 1978, 11 3-year-olds have won both the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness — but fallen short in the Belmont Stakes. A look at how those thoroughbreds ran at Belmont: 2008: Big Brown finishes last to Da’ Tara, the longest shot on the board. Big Brown fails to respond when jockey Kent Desormeaux asks for more speed in the last turn. At that point, Desormeaux eases him up. 2004: Smarty Jones extends his lead approaching the quarter pole and maintains a clear lead inside the furlong marker. Fights gamely into the deep stretch then yields grudgingly to finish second, a length behind Birdstone. 2003: Funny Cide leads to the far turn, relinquishes the lead to Empire Maker at the three-sixteenths pole, battles along the inside to the top of the stretch then weakens, finishing third, five lengths back. 2002: War Emblem stumbles badly out of the gate then bumps Magic Weisner at the start in an 11-horse field. Takes brief lead nearing the half-mile pole. Remains a factor to the turn but gives way, finishing eighth, 191⁄2 lengths back. 1999: Charismatic takes the lead briefly at the turn but Lemon Drop Kid and Vision and Verse fly by him on the outside and he finishes third, 11⁄2 lengths back. 1998: Four lengths ahead with an eighth-mile remaining, Real Quiet is nipped by a nose at the wire by Victory Gallop in a nine-horse field. 1997: Silver Charm fails to hold off Touch Gold in the final eighth-mile and finishes second, three-quarters of a length back, in a seven-horse field. 1989: Sunday Silence can’t match Easy Goer in the final quarter-mile and finishes second, eight lengths back in a 10-horse field. 1987: Checked sharply on the final turn, Alysheba finishes fourth, 14 lengths behind winner Bet Twice in a 10-horse field. 1981: Pleasant Colony, never better than third, finishes a little more than 11⁄2 lengths behind Summing, with Highland Blade second in an 11-horse field. 1979: The 1-5 favorite, Spectacular Bid leads with a quarter-mile left, but weakens to finish third in an eight-horse field, 31⁄4 lengths behind Coastal and another head behind Golden Act. - The Associated Press


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OUTDOOR NEWS PGC commissioner nominated Governor Tom Corbett has nominated Brian H. Hoover, of Glenolden, Delaware County, to serve as a member of the Pennsylvania Game Commission. Following confirmation by the Pennsylvania Senate, Hoover will represent the Game Commission board’s District 8. Hoover serves as the manager of the Borough of Glenolden and is responsible for the borough government’s day-to-day operations. He previously owned and operated South East Archery and Sports, which was one of the leading outdoor sales facilities in the Philadelphia region. Hoover has 27 years of experience as a hunter education instructor. He holds degrees from Penn State University and Delaware County Community College. He is a member of the Delaware County Field and Stream Association, the National Wild Turkey Federation and is a life member of the National Rifle Association. Workshops for educators The Pennsylvania Game Commission announced a series of upcoming professional development opportunities offered as part of the agency’s Project WILD program. Classroom teachers, early childhood teachers, informal educators, home-school leaders and Scout and youth group leaders are welcome to participate in these

SOCCER

Chelsea beats Bayern Munich in shootout

MUNICH (AP) — Didier Drogba scored the decisive penalty in the shootout as Chelsea beat Bayern Munich to win the Champions League final after a dramatic1-1draw on Saturday. Drogba sent goalkeeper Manuel Neuer the wrong way in front of massed Bayern fans in their home Allianz Arena. Bayern’s Bastian Schweinsteiger missed the previous penalty. The shootout was needed after Chelsea goalkeeper Petr Cech saved Arjen Robben’s spotkick early in extra time. It was awarded for a foul by Chelsea’s talismanic forward Drogba, whose 88th-minute header earned an unlikely reprieve.

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workshops. Workshop offerings range from Pennsylvania Biodiversity, a hands-on conservation education program that examines genetic, species and community diversity to WILD about Waterfowl, a session designed to explore the conservation, management and on-going banding of ducks and geese. New to the summer series is Flying WILD, a hands-on conservation education program that examines bird biology and conservation. “We are also offering workshops at two new locations this summer,” said Theresa Alberici, who coordinates the programs through the Game Commission’s Bureau of Information and Education. “Project WILD will be held at the Tuscarora Wildlife Education Project in Mercersburg, Franklin County, and PA Songbirds will be held at Black Rock Retreat in Quarryville, Lancaster County.” For a complete list of courses being offered, go to the agency’s website (www.pgc.state.pa.us) and click on the “2012 Teacher Workshops” icon in the center of the homepage. The listing includes a two-page summary of the courses being offered from June through August in various parts of the state, followed by information on how to register for each of the courses. Project WILD is an awardwinning, international, handson conservation education program. It focuses on wildlife and the environment and how humans interrelate with both. WILD provides educators, primarily kindergarten through 12th grade, with interdisciplinary activities that help address state and national education standards and help educators comply with mandates of the No Child Left Behind Act. WILD’s materials are scientifically sound and use educational practices proven to be effective.

WILD’s mission is to provide wildlife-based conservation education that fosters responsible action. WILD’s goal is to develop the awareness, skills, knowledge and commitment that are necessary for people to make informed decisions and act constructively and responsibly toward wildlife and the environment. “Educators leave Project WILD workshops with a renewed appreciation of wildlife and are excited about how they’re going to share what they’ve learned with their students,” Alberici said. “This year, wildlife agencies nationwide celebrated one million educators ‘Gone WILD.’ More than one million educators have been trained in the program since Project WILD originated in 1983. “Project WILD isn’t about teaching kids what to think about wildlife; it’s about teaching kids how to think about wildlife and giving them the skills they need to become responsibly active citizens who recognize the importance of wildlife and the environment. The milestone of training one million educators means that, through Project WILD, more than 53 million people worldwide have experience in thinking responsibly about natural resources. Last year alone, state wildlife agencies ordered more than 65,000 guides for distribution to educators across the country, reaching 1.8 million students with information on wildlife conservation.” Alberici works closely with Game Commission Southeast Region Wildlife Education Specialist Dan Lynch and Southwest Region Wildlife Education Supervisor Joe Stefko, as well as the Pennsylvania Department of Education and prominent conservation and environmental education organizations throughout the state and the country.

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CHRYSLER `05 300 LIMITED EDITION All wheel drive. Loaded with all power options. Black metallic with grey leather interior. Heated front seats, sunroof, 6 disc CD changer, satellite radio, cruise control, keyless/ alarm. Too many options to list. 79,400 miles. Sharp car, good condition. $10,500. Call 814-9574

442 RVs & Campers

533

FORKLIFT MECHANIC

Action Lift, Inc., located in Pittston, PA, is the exclusive dealership for Crown and TCM forklifts for NEPA. We are seeking a full time forklift mechanic to troubleshoot, repair and diagnose Crown & other makes of lift trucks. Good written & verbal communication skills, as well as customer care skills are necessary. A valid driver’s license & the ability to safely operate lift trucks are required. Previous forklift mechanical experience or technical school graduate will be considered. We offer an excellent wage and benefits package, as well as 401K Retirement Savings Plan, paid holidays, paid vacation & much more. For an interview, please call Mike Phelan at 570-655-2100 x115.

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Drivers: $2,500 Sign-On Bonus Home Nightly Hazleton, PA Dedicated Run. CDL-A, 1 year experience required. Estenson Logistics. Apply: www.goelc.com 1-866-336-9642

YARD JOCKEY ~ Class A 506 Administrative/ Clerical

ADMINISTRATIVE PROFESSIONAL

Full time position in manufacturing office environment to assist with preparing and maintaining documents and files, answering phones, taking meeting minutes, general office duties. Proficient with Microsoft Office. Other responsibilities will include helping in other departments on special projects as needed. Good organizational and communication skills are required. Interested candidates should reply to: AMERICAN SILK MILLS 75 STARK STREET PLAINS, PA 18705

524

Engineering

PLANT ENGINEERING AND MAINTENANCE SUPERVISOR

High Steel Structures Inc., a leading Structural Steel Fabrication firm, is seeking a Plant Engineering and Maintenance Supervisor for its Lancaster, PA facility. The responsibilities of this position will include assisting in the direction and leadership of maintenance personnel and meeting maintenance requirements for buildings and equipment. This includes: Preplanned and scheduled Total Productive Maintenance (TPM), emergency maintenance, Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE), equipment upgrades and new equipment installations. Qualified individuals will have a minimum of an Associate Degree in Electrical/Electronics. A BS Mechanical or Electrical Engineering Degree is preferred. A valid driver’s license is required. This position requires extensive maintenance experience, project supervision, troubleshooting experience and supervisory/ leadership skills. Interested applicants are encouraged to apply online at www.high.net. EOE M/F/D/V

530

Human Resources

PAYROLL, AP AND HR

Lakeside Health and Rehabilitation Center is looking for someone with Payroll, AP and HR ex-perience. Candidate should possess strong computer and customer service skills and at least 1 year of experience in a skilled nursing center preferred. 245 OLD LAKE RD. DALLAS, PA 18612, 570-639-1885. E.O.E.

2nd & 3rd Shifts available. $15 per hour. Overtime after 40 hours. Average 10-12 days. Medical, Dental, Vision & 401K. Must have 6 months recent verifiable driving experience. Interested & qualified candidates, please call 570-474-3190 Or stop in and visit us at 545 Oakhill Rd Mountain Top, PA 18707 WWW.DRIVEJTC.COM

545

Marketing/ Product

548 Medical/Health

TRADITIONAL HOME HEALTH & HOSPICE 941 HOME HEALTH RN’S Full time positions for home visits. Mon-Fri schedule with 1 weekend/ month. Mileage reimbursement. OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS & PHYSICAL THERAPISTS Full time and per diem positions for home therapy visits. All positions offer competitive salary and benefit package. Call 570-207-9286 to schedule an interview. EOE

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548 Medical/Health

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CONCERN – a private non-profit child & family welfare agency is seeking a Clinical Therapist for its CRR “Host Home” program in Luzerne County. This is currently a supplemental position requiring a Master Degree in Human Service or related field. Submit resume by 5/31 to: REGIONAL DIRECTOR CONCERN 829 SCRANTONCARBONDALE HIGHWAY; EYNON, PA 18403 OR FAX 570.876.5726 www.concern4kids. org. E.O.E

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PHARMACIST

Part time, 10 hours a week for a small, but busy independent pharmacy that prides itself in delivering friendly, hometown service. Candidate must have a PA license and excellent customer service skills. We offer competitive pay and an excellent work environment. Resume to:

Spotanski’s Pharmacy

243 S. Prospect St. Nanticoke, PA 18634, or e-mail josephedmundo wicz@gmail.com Fax: 570-258-2036

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1 bedroom, offstreet parking, no pets. $450/month. Heat paid. 1 month security. Call 570-655-2306

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2 bedrooms, living room, kitchen, bath. gas heat. $450 month + utilities. 1 year lease & $450 security. Off street parking. 570-899-0295

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Pools & Spas

SWIMMING POOL PUMP, motor, & sand filter for 4x18 pool, still hooked to pull $50. Deck ladder 4’ pool $25. 570-262-9273

10 weeks old, 2 males $175. Very playful 371-3441

for people to represent our product at local events. Have fun attending music festivals, flea markets & craft fairs around the area! Must be outgoing, friendly, professional & energetic! Experience a plus but not required. Transportation, cell phone & weekends a must! Call Marcie 570-762-4872 On Monday after 9am.

Apartments/ Unfurnished

900 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 906 Homes for Sale

KINGSTON

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Available June 1st Single home, 4 bedrooms, 2 baths. Stove, washer/ dryer hookup, offstreet parking, nice back yard. $800/month, plus utilities & security. 570-690-8669

Find that new job. The Times Leader Classified section.

New on the market. All brick 2 story home with finished basement 5 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, on beautiful Butler St. Large eat-in kitchen, in ground pool, central air, new hardwood floors, den/office. 2 car detached garage. Sale by owner! $279,900 To view pictures go to Facebook Butler St., Kingston, PA 570-852-0130

LAFLIN

Lovely 3 bedroom 2 bath updated ranch home in a great neighborhood. Minutes from I-81 and PA turnpike. Featuring Formal Living room & Dining room, Family room, Modern Kitchen with all Stainless appliances & ample storage. Gorgeous Brazilian Cherry hardwood floors. Central air. 1st floor laundry, large cedar closet, full basement and attached 2 car garage. Beautiful 3 season sunroom, large private backyard with nice view and mature landscapes. Also, an extra-large shed that can be used as workshop / studio. Close to Mohegan Sun, Center Point and Geisinger Wyoming Valley. Only 1% local income tax! Priced to sell at $198,500. Call 570-814-8800

Call 829-7130 to place an employment ad. ONL NLYONE N LE LEA E DER. ONLYONE LEADER. timesleader.com


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 PAGE 11C●

HOCKEY

Malkin powers Russia to final The Associated Press

HELSINKI — Russia and Slovakia will meet in the world hockey championship final Sunday for the first time since the Slovaks won their only title a decade ago against the Russians. After Evgeni Malkin scored a hat trick to lead Russia to a 6-2 rout of host Finland, Slovak forward Miroslav Satan scored twice to help beat the Czech Republic 3-1 in the second semifinal on Saturday. Malkin, the NHL regularseason scoring king for the Pittsburgh Penguins this season, scored twice in the first period against defending champ Finland and completed the hat trick in the second period. The crowd threw red hats on the ice to celebrate the three goals. “I have never experienced such things,” Malkin said. “It was fantastic to see.” Satan scored his first goal at 15:52 in the first period. He broke away when Slovakia was a man short, earning his second goal at 0:56 in the third period. Forward Jiri Hudacek added another at 4:56. Michael Frolik scored for the Czechs at 10:45, tying the game at 1-1. Finland opened the scoring when defender Janne Niskalas deflected a blue line shot at 7:28, but Malkin evened the

score at 15:33 shooting through a crowd, and he connected from the slot at 19:06 on a power play. Aleksander Ovechkin made it 3-1, and Malkin’s hard slapshot found the far corner at 17:46 in the second period In the third period, Denis Kokarev, and Sergei Shirokov increased the lead to 6-1. Mikael Granlund scored Finland’s second goal with four minutes left. Before Malkin’s third goal, he lost his balance and

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smashed into the board charged by Finnish defender Joonas Jarvinen. The Finn went out for tripping, but Malkin went down after slipping. The Russian star disappeared for treatment, but came back after some six minutes, losing four or five shifts in the process. “I was lucky, I was going at high speed and could not evade the contact,” Malkin said. “But our doctor gave my hand some freezing treatment, and I could continue.”

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The Pittsburgh Penguins star netted a hat trick against Finland in the semifinals.


CMYK PAGE 12C

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

S

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OUTDOORS

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

Official says black marks shouldn’t be of great concern to anglers

TOM VENESKY OUTDOORS

Lights, camera and an action that’s repulsive

T

PENNSYLVANIA FISH AND BOAT COMMISSION

The black spots on this smallmouth bass are the result of a condition called hyperpigmented melanosis. It occurs through an accumulation of melanin-producing cells in the upper two layers of the skin.

Spotting an odd condition on bass Blotchy bass condition in Pa.

By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

Joe Lesko was surprised at the appearance of the smallmouth bass he had just reeled in from the Susquehanna River. The Tunkhannock resident was fishing the river near Meshoppen in late April, and the bass he caught was mottled with black spots on the tail and a smaller one on its lip. “I fish the river quite a bit and I hadn’t seen anything like it before,” Lesko said. “It was a concern.” The condition has been documented on smallmouth bass in the lower portion of the river, but has been seen elsewhere across the state, according to Geoff Smith, a Susquehanna River biologist with the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission. The PFBC started hearing from anglers late last year concerning the black spots, whicharemostoftenfoundonthehead,lips,tailorfins. It appears to affect only fish larger than12 inches and typically occurs in a localized area and not uniformly in a lake or throughout a river system. Some bass have had one or two spots while others have had a dozen or more, according to the PFBC. Smith said the black spots shouldn’t be of great concern because it’s unlikely to be fatal to the fish and the markings may be temporary. Still, the condition has raised questions. “No one’s quite sure what’s causing it,” Smith said. “It’s more widespread than areas of the river and it’s been documented dating back to the 1980s. They’ve seen it from Maine to Florida and west to the Rockies.” While the cause may be unknown, Smith does have a good idea what the black spots are and aren’t. Fish have been sent to a lab for analysis to determine if the black spots are a cancerous melanoma. Smith said that’s highly unlikely. Instead, the spots are the result of a condition called hyperpigmented melanosis, which Smith said is the accumulation of melanin-producing cells in the upper

OUTDOORS NOTES THE WESTERN POCONO CHAPTER OF TROUT UNLIMITED will hold its Memorial Day picnic on Monday, May 28, at the White Haven Sportsmen’s Club along the Lehigh River. The picnic will run from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and food and drinks will be available. A casting demonstration will be conducted by George Daniel – a certified FFF Fly Casting instructor who has also appeared on ESPN and OLN. Daniel was the head coach of Team USA in the 2011 World Fly Fishing Championship in Italy and earned a gold medal at the 2008 U.S. National Fly Fishing Championship in Colorado. Autographed copies of his book, “Dynamic Nymphing” will be available for purchase. Fishing will be permitted after the demonstration. Tickets are $18 for adults, $12 for teens 13-17 and children under 12 are free. For more information, call chapter president Paul Raubertas at 768-8409 or email praubert@ptd.net. THE FSC CLAY BUSTERS, the youth shooting team from the Factoryville Sportsmen’s Club, will hold its annual benefit shoot on Sunday, June 3, on the club grounds. The event raises funds to sponsor the shooters at events held throughout the state. The team asks for your support by attending this special

PFBC biologists have documented the blotchy bass condition previously in Pennsylvania in the Susquehanna River (2011, 2006); Cowanesque Lake, Tioga County (2003); the Allegheny River (1999); and in the 1980s in Conneaut Lake (Crawford County), Presque Isle Bay (Erie County), Raystown Lake and several other waters. It also was observed in New York’s Hudson River during the 1980s, which resulted in a N.Y. fisheries biologist surveying other states about the condition. The survey showed that the condition was present in largemouth and smallmouth bass in 12 states in the East, South and along the Gulf Coast.

Who to contact

Anglers who observe sick fish or other unusual conditions can report it to the PFBC through the websitewww.fishandboat.com/bassproblems.htm.

two layers of the skin. It typically occurs during coldwater periods, such as the spring, and appears to be a relatively natural condition, Smith added. “We’re not sure if it’s a viral infection or genetic,” Smith said. “All of the fish we handled with the black spots have been healthy and actively feeding, and all the studies in the past haven’t been able to definitively link it to water quality.” Bass with black spots are safe to eat, Smith said, because are limited to the first two layers of skin and don’t go into the tissue. Still, plenty of questions remain. “We know more work is needed and we’re looking at it, as well as departments in other states. We don’t know if it’s occurring more or just being observed more,” Smith said. “It’s hard to say if we’ll be able to find a cause.” Black spots are just one concern that anglers have regarding smallmouth bass in the Susquehanna River. Bacterial infections and poor recruitment of young bass, particular in the middle and lower stretches of the

shoot. Price is $30 for 100 targets on the sporting clays course, or $15 for 50 targets. The trap range and 5-stand course will also be open, as well as the kitchen. Shooting starts at 9 a.m. with the last squad out by 1:00. For directions and more information please visit the club website at www.fscweb.org. THE GREATER WYOMING VALLEY AUDUBON SOCIETY is offering partial scholarships for area students to attend nature camp during the summer of 2012. Partial scholarships will be available at several sites this year. Applicants may choose to attend camp at the Bear Creek Camp Nature Center, Nescopeck State Park, or the Endless Mountains Nature Center. Applications are available by contacting 570-403-2006 or nescopecksp@state.pa.us Application deadline is May 31. Scholarship recipients will be notified by June 8. A limited number of scholarships will be awarded to each age level. Recipients will be responsible for their own transportation to and from camp, and for paying the remainder of the camp fee not covered by the scholarship. For more information call 403-2006. THE STATE DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION AND NATURAL RESOURCES, PENN STATE COOPERATIVE EXTENSION AND PENNSYLVANIA ENVIRONMENTAL COUNCIL

will host an Invasive Plants and Pests Workshop on Saturday, June 2, at the Musto EE Center in Nescopeck State Park. The workshop runs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and costs $15. The workshop will help homeowners and forest landowners identify invasive plants and insects and develop strategies for controlling and removing them from their property. Participants will learn if mechanical removal will work or if herbicidal applications are required to control the invasives. A short field trip will illustrate how the park and its community partners are working to control invasives at Nescopeck State Park. The registration fee includes informational resources and lunch. Please dress for weather and plan to be outside for part of the workshop. For more information contact Nescopeck State Park at 403-2006 or the Luzerne County Cooperative Extension at 825-1701. COLUMBIA COUNTY BASSMASTERS, in partnership with the Columbia County Commissioners, Borough of Berwick and Columbia-Montour Visitors Bureau, is hosting its third annual Bassmasters Fishing Tournament at the Berwick Test Track Park Boat Launch the weekend of June 23-24.There will be cash prizes in the amount of $12,500 for the tournament, with the first place team winning $5,000; and paying 10 places. In addition, each day a $500 lunker

river, have some worried that the future of the fishery may be in peril. On the positive side, bass in the north branch of the river haven’t experienced the same problems as those down below. Smith said the north branch has always been the least-affected area when it comes to bass diseases and recruitment. “We don’t know why,” he said. “I’ve spoken with officials in New York and they’re seeing the same thing up there – it’s not impacted as much.” Smith did say the north branch of the river behaves differently than other stretches, particularly with bass recruitment. Low water periods in May, June and July result in better recruitment of young bass into the population, he said. High water events result in poor recruitment. With the north branch, those conditions haven’t impacted bass reproduction as it has in other stretches, Smith said. “It hasn’t been as severe on the north branch and we don’t know why,” he said. Still, there is hope that the smallmouth bass fishery may be able to withstand the problems it currently faces throughout the river. Smallmouth bass populations can withstand a few years of poor recruitment and a single exceptional year class can drive the population for quite some time, according to Smith. All it could take is a couple of successful spawning nests to populate a particular stretch of river. “We’re optimistic,” Smith said. “We just need to get those young fish to survive through their first summer.” That’s good news for anglers such as Lesko, who fishes the river frequently. “I enjoy fishing the river for smallmouths and would hate to see them disappear,” he said. “I don’t see a decrease in the population in this area and I just hope the black spot condition isn’t widespread.”

will be awarded, with the first day “lunker” winner automatically advancing to the second day. A $100 gift certificate will be awarded each day to the second place lunker. And for all you junior fishermen out there (16 and under), a $100 award will be given on Sunday for the overall junior lunker. There is a strict 100 boat limit, with 2 fishermen per boat. Cost is $140 per boat and breakfast and a free t-shirt are provided. The boundaries on the Susquehanna River extend from the Danville/Riverside bridge to the Nanticoke bridge. Applications, including all tournament rules, can be downloaded from the Columbia-Montour Visitors Bureaus website, www.iTourColumbiaMontour.com/Bassmasters, or the Columbia County Bassmasters website, www.ColumbiaCountyBassmasters.com. For more information, call Mike “Chuck” Monico at 752-3223. LAKE WALLENPAUPACK is included in this year’s waterways participating in Cabela’s “Wanna Fish for a Millions?” contest. For a second year, the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC) is partnering in this contest by tagging fish and selecting Pennsylvania waters where participants can be big winners. Most people have heard the phrase “you have to play to win.” Well, in addition to knowing the contest waters, Pennsylvania anglers need to have a fishing

license to play. Your license will be your ticket to fish some of the Commonwealth’s best waters in the hopes of cashing-in on big winnings. While purchasing a fishing license guarantees you a gateway into the contest, PFBC underscores that regardless of the contest, a Pennsylvania fishing license is always a winner. In fact, it affords anglers the opportunity to unlock a year’s worth of fishing opportunities in all the Commonwealth’s fishing waters. Cabela’s started accepting registrations on its website on April 19. The contest began on May 5 and ends July 8. The premise is simple: catch specially tagged fish and win prizes ranging from Cabela’s gift cards to boats to $2 million. All rules and requirements, as well as contest details and registration information, can be found at Cabela’s contest website, www.cabelas.com/fishformillions. In addition, PFBC will maintain its own contest web page at www.fishandboat.com/ fishformillions.htm. Here, Pennsylvania anglers will be able to see the listing of contest waters along with photos of tagged fish. Outdoors notes items will not be accepted over the telephone. Items may be faxed to 831-7319, dropped off at the Times Leader or mailed to Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 187110250.

hey’ve gone too far. Hunting videos and television shows in general have become more about the kill and less about teaching techniques or simply just sharing an appreciation for the hunt itself. Some have gotten to the point where they are just idiotic. A video clip that was emailed to me this week is a perfect example. It was filmed a group that call themselves the Turkey Reapers. The name alone should give you a good idea of what their priority is. In the video, an individual crawls through a field toward a gobbler holding a fanned turkey tail in one hand and a shotgun in the other. The gobbler sees the fanned tail, considers it a threat and charges. When the bird is a few feet away, the individual drops the tail, raises his shotgun and blasts the bird. He then stands over the gobbler and raises his arms in victory. Nice touch. Apparently the turkey tail stalk is catching on as a gobbler hunting technique in other states. The reality is it’s not a hunting technique at all. It’s unethical and dangerous. Gobblers are meant to be called in, not stalked. It’s illegal to stalk gobblers during the spring season in Pennsylvania. There’s no fair chase involved with the technique, and even worse, it’s extremely dangerous. I asked a local Wildlife Conservation Officer what he thought about the video. His response echoed my sentiments. “It’s a complete and total disregard for safety. Someone’s going to get shot,” he said. “It’s over the edge.” And that’s the problem with many of today’s hunting videos and shows. They push the limit and then some. There’s a sure-fire way to tell if a video or show is truly about the hunt or all about the slaughter. If they make it a point to advertise how many “kills” are in each episode, then it’s the latter. I don’t watch many hunting shows, but those that I have seen didn’t appeal to me. With flashy graphics rock music blaring in the background to provide an extra touch of action and adrenaline, every one I’ve seen has the same plot: a hunter shoots a big buck, the kill is replayed in slow motion, and the show concludes with a few minutes of bragging. Videos and shows such as these are hurting the sport that true, ethical hunters appreciate. And while there are plenty examples of the bad ones out there, some are actually pretty good. All Outdoors with Alan Probst produces some excellent trapping videos that demonstrate techniques and are truly educational. Videos such as these help viewers become better hunters and trappers. There’s a purpose behind them. But apparently the trend today is to highlight the kills and nevermind the technique or the simple appreciation of the hunt. The kills are where the money is, and that’s what has driven some well-known hunters to break the law while filming their videos. A true hunting video doesn’t need flashy graphics and loud background music to make it exciting. And they don’t encourage people to crawl through a field during gobbler season with a tail in front of their face. And, most important, they don’t preach that hunting is only about killing. It’s not, and to portray it that way is doing a disservice to those who hunt, fish and trap safely and ethically. Tom Venesky covers the outdoors for the Times Leader. Reach him at tvenesky@timesleader.com.


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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CMYK PAGE 14C

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www.timesleader.com

NATIONAL FORECAST

WEDNESDAY Partly sunny, a shower

MONDAY Partly sunny, p.m. rain

TUESDAY Mostly cloudy, rain

FRIDAY

SATURDAY Partly sunny, p.m. rain

THURSDAY Partly sunny

80° 55°

Partly sunny

83° 54°

85° 60°

REGIONAL FORECAST Syracuse 88/58

Today’s high/ Tonight’s low

Wilkes-Barre 86/55 New York City 80/59 Reading 83/57

Yesterday Average Record High Record Low

83/48 71/48 92 in 1962 30 in 2009

Cooling Degree Days*

Yesterday Month to date Year to date Last year to date Normal year to date

1 11 16 15 12

*Index of fuel consumption, how far the day’s mean temperature was above 65 degrees.

Yesterday Month to date Normal month to date Year to date Normal year to date

Sun and Moon

Sunrise 5:40a 5:39a Moonrise Today 5:20a Tomorrow 6:01a

Today Tomorrow

Brandywine Valley

Highs: 80-84. Lows: 56-60. Sunny to partly cloudy skies will be the rule today, then expect showers late tonight. Atlantic City 73/61

Precipitation

The Finger Lakes

Highs: 82-88. Lows: 51-58. Mostly sunny skies are in store today. Expect increasing clouds overnight.

Delmarva/Ocean City

Highs: 71-75. Lows: 60-65. Chance of showers and t-storms late today. Showers will be likely tonight.

0.00” 4.50” 2.07” 12.41” 12.35” Sunset 8:20p 8:21p Moonset 8:17p 9:10p

Susquehanna Stage Wilkes-Barre 6.41 Towanda 3.35 Lehigh Bethlehem 3.07 Delaware Port Jervis 4.73 New

First

Chg. Fld. Stg -1.69 22.0 -0.79 21.0 0.75

16.0

-0.93

18.0

Full

May 20 May 28 June 4

Last

Forecasts, graphs and data ©2012

Weather Central, LP For more weather information go to:

www.timesleader.com National Weather Service

607-729-1597

80/60

77/52 69/59 85/60

93/73

85/66 87/68

57/42

84/74

87/72 58/43

City

Yesterday

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Buffalo Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Las Vegas Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis

52/43/.00 82/62/.00 82/49/.00 66/51/.00 81/52/.00 76/54/.00 91/59/.00 84/50/.00 88/69/.00 57/46/.19 83/51/.00 83/72/.00 87/62/.00 86/61/.00 88/68/.00 68/60/.00 84/74/.02 84/54/.00 87/67/.00

City

Yesterday

Amsterdam Baghdad Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Dublin Frankfurt Hong Kong Jerusalem London

64/52/.00 106/81/.00 86/68/.00 75/46/.00 61/54/.00 52/43/.00 73/55/.00 88/79/.00 74/57/.00 63/50/.00

Today Tomorrow 57/42/c 85/60/pc 80/60/pc 75/55/s 82/57/s 82/59/pc 89/61/t 83/64/pc 85/66/pc 77/49/t 84/62/pc 87/72/s 87/68/s 87/64/pc 97/74/s 69/59/pc 84/74/t 78/56/t 68/49/t

ALMANAC Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Int’l Airport River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.

80/59

77/49

The Jersey Shore

Philadelphia 81/59

Temperatures

89/61 65/51

Highs: 80-86. Lows: 50-55. Skies will be sunny today. Showers will be possible late tonight.

Poughkeepsie 85/53

84/62

68/49

85° 60°

Highs: 71-76. Lows: 58-62. Look for increasing clouds today. Tonight will be breezy with showers developing.

Pottsville 84/54

Harrisburg 83/59

77/51

The Poconos

Albany 88/56

Towanda 84/52

State College 83/55

63/51

TODAY’S SUMMARY

Binghamton 86/54

Scranton 85/54

75° 58°

75° 56°

June 11

Find the car you want from home.

60/44/pc 86/62/t 72/62/sh 66/56/sh 71/59/pc 80/60/pc 65/54/pc 78/61/t 87/66/pc 86/52/pc 78/59/t 86/72/s 87/69/pc 79/59/t 101/75/s 66/58/pc 86/76/pc 63/51/pc 72/51/pc

City

Yesterday

Myrtle Beach Nashville New Orleans Norfolk Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Ore. St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, DC

72/55/.01 87/62/.00 89/68/.00 71/58/.00 85/68/.00 86/71/.00 86/70/.00 96/70/.00 81/49/.00 69/45/.00 89/66/.00 70/45/.00 88/70/.00 69/61/.00 67/49/.00 63/45/.00 88/71/.00 92/63/.00 82/56/.00

WORLD CITIES

Today Tomorrow 74/48/t 103/76/s 88/65/pc 75/56/pc 73/62/sh 54/41/c 79/58/t 90/78/t 77/55/s 70/52/r

72/56/t 100/72/pc 86/58/c 83/65/t 65/54/sh 62/52/pc 82/58/t 87/78/pc 73/54/s 65/48/c

City

Yesterday

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Paris Rio de Janeiro Riyadh Rome San Juan Tokyo Warsaw

79/52/.00 79/54/.00 68/55/.00 66/48/.00 79/64/.00 109/81/.00 73/50/.00 89/77/.00 75/57/.00 68/43/.00

Today Tomorrow 78/65/pc 89/64/pc 88/70/s 72/63/t 81/62/t 73/50/pc 88/67/s 104/73/s 86/56/s 70/53/sh 89/62/t 80/62/s 88/65/pc 69/59/pc 68/51/pc 63/51/sh 88/67/pc 100/69/s 80/60/pc

80/65/pc 86/61/t 89/71/pc 73/63/sh 81/59/t 76/54/pc 89/69/s 107/74/s 80/59/t 65/53/r 75/58/pc 89/59/s 90/67/pc 68/59/pc 66/51/pc 60/47/r 88/70/s 103/70/s 73/62/sh

Today Tomorrow 76/46/s 86/64/s 78/57/s 72/50/sh 76/60/pc 110/87/s 70/59/sh 86/77/t 72/55/c 79/58/pc

Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snow flurries, i-ice.

74/48/s 86/60/sh 78/58/pc 66/53/sh 76/60/s 109/84/s 66/54/sh 87/78/pc 75/56/c 80/63/pc

Temperatures this week are going to be very nice, even though we will have a few days with showers. This morning will start off cool with temperatures in the 50s, but warm up to the mid-80s. Monday will start off partly cloudy, then turn cloudy in the afternoon as showers and possibly a thunderstorm move through. Tuesday will be mostly cloudy with the chance for showers throughout the day. The sun will return on Wednesday, but we still have the chance for a stray shower. Thursday and Friday will be very warm with partly cloudy skies. We could see rain late in the day on Saturday with the chance for a thunderstorm. -Michelle Rotella

m timesleaderautos.com

196600

Partly sunny

85° 53°

756788

TODAY

NATIONAL FORECAST: Newly formed Tropical Storm Alberto will be located just off the coast of South Carolina today, with rain and windy conditions possible along the Carolina coast. Meanwhile, showers and thunderstorms will accompany a storm system crossing the Plains and Midwest, and a few severe thunderstorms will be possible this afternoon and evening.


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SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

REX HUPPKE SUGARLOAF TOWNSHIP NATIVE HITS ALL THE RIGHT NOTES WITH HIS HAND-MADE DRUMS AP PHOTO/TOBY TALBOT

The wind turbine owned by Bryan Davis stands on the hilltop in Derby Line, Vt.

Ill winds blow over the border By WILSON RING Associated Press

STANSTEAD, Quebec — The winds blowing through Canada’s broad St. Lawrence Valley and across Vermont’s hilltops are stirring up an international tempest over which country’s laws should govern how those breezes are harnessed for electricity. Some residents of the Quebec town of Stanstead are upset about plansinVermonttoerectjustsouth of the border two industrial-size wind turbines — one of which would be about 1,000 feet from a few Canadian and Vermonthomes. Quebec requires wind turbines tobeatleast1,640feetfromhomes, and the Canadian homeowners are demanding those rules be followed. But in Vermont, the allowable distance is determined by the sound of the spinning blades, and the project’s developer says the turbines would meet those requirements. The plan has yet to win approval from Vermont regulators. But the dispute has gotten so rancorous that the mayor of Stanstead threatened to cut off water to some homes on the American side. The issue has even come up on the floor of Canada’s Parliament. “You know, there really is no precedent to follow here,” said Chad Farrell of Encore Redevelopment, the Burlington, Vt., company working with two dairy farmers to build the 425-foot windmills, each of which would be capable of producing enough electricity for about 900 homes. Stanstead’s Lynda Hartley lives on a horse farm about 3,700 feet from the turbine site, well beyond the Quebec setback distance, but is leading the opposition in the community. She said her 8-year-old autistic son is hypersensitive to noise. “This is going to be stopped,” she said. “I am not going to allow this to happen. This is crazy.” The Vermont farmers are counting on the money they would be paid for hosting the towers as a steady source of income in an era of up-and-down milk prices. Oneofthem,BryanDavis,saidhis neighbors in Derby Line who live

PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

Neil Longo of Sugarloaf Township checks to see if a drum is ready to be set free from a press in his drum making workshop. Top of Page: C-clamps hold the shape of the drum shell in place at Neil Longo’s workshop.

A world-wide beat STEVE MOCARSKY smocarsky@timesleader.com

S

UGARLOAF TWP. — Take a drive along a winding countryroadthroughatinytownshipfilledwithfarmland in southern Luzerne County and you might pass by the home of Neil Longo. Chances are it would never occur to you that the modest,two-storyhouseandthegaragebesideitarethebaseof operations for a worldwide exporter of hand-crafted musical instruments.

The drummer for Teddy Young and the Aces, an area blues band, Longo, 58, began making snare drums on a whim 20 years ago. “I always wanted to make a drum. So one day, I got a piece of wood—apieceofwalnut,putitin the shower with a rag on it, I let it get soaked, kept the rag on it, did that for a couple of days. It bent, I put it together and it sounded reallygoodfromthefirsthit,”Longo said during a recent interview in his living room. He actually surprised himself with his first attempt at drum making. “I was, like, ‘Wow, this sounds good.’ So I made about 10 more,” he said. At the time, Longo was taking a

A world map hangs in Neil Longo’s drum workshop with push pins indicating where he has sold his drums.

hiatus from playing with Jay Black and the Americans. He lent one of the drums to his friend, who was playing with the band in his place, and sound engineers told him they loved the sound. “I gave a snare drum to Vinnie Colaiuta back in the ‘90s. He’s worked with Sting and Herbie Hancock and Jeff Beck and everybody. He’s the top drummer in the world. … I get a letter from a guy who knows him, he says ‘Vinnie’s been using your snare drum on like 250 recordings. I want one of your snare drums.’ So I was

“I gave a snare drum to Vinnie Colaiuta back in the ‘90s ... He’s the top drummer in the world. … I get a letter from a guy who knows him, he says ‘Vinnie’s been using your snare drum on like 250 recordings. I want one of your snare drums.’ So I was like, well, I guess I’m doing something right.”

See DRUMS, Page 2D

Neil Longo, Drum maker

See WINDS, Page 2D

Memorial Day travel deals are only a car ride away WHEN YOU HIT the road this coming weekend for Memorial Day travel, perhaps a meal at a TravelCenters of America or Petro Stopping Centers is in order, especially if you have kids age 10 or younger. Through Sept. 3, sit down restaurants located inside those travel centers, such as Iron Skillet and Buckhorn, will give children, age 10 and under, a free meal from the kid’s menu, with the purchase of an adult entrée. Free kids meals are available at breakfast, lunch or dinner. And, each free meal includes a small beverage. In addition to these savings, TA and Petro offer AAA members the opportunity to show their card and save an additional 10 percent off. This discount may be combined with the free kid’s

candy bar when you buy another Hershey’s chocolate bar. The other is for a 12-ounce McDonald’s McCafe Cherry Berry Chiller coupon found inside the STEALS & DEALS Parade magazine inserted in today’s meal special for even bigger savings. Times Leader. The free meal and AAA discount are Take either the $1 off two Irish good for eat in only. Spring body washes or $1 off one Irish There are local Petro and TA centers Spring deodorant coupon to CVS with in Dupont and Bloomsburg. Go to your Extra Care Card. The items are www.tatravelcenters.com or www.peon sale two for $7 plus you’ll get $4 in trotruckstops.com/locaExtrabucks printed out on your retion_search.sstg for a listing of all ceipt. So you’ll pay $6 and get $4 back. centers nationwide. And smell clean as a whistle for weeks Recently I told you the bad news to come. about Price Chopper’s change to its gas While at CVS, get a Salonpas-Hot rewards program. This week, more bad capsicum patch for $1.87 and get that news. McDonald’s has removed French same amount back in Extra Bucks. fries from its $1 menu. They’re now No coupon needed for the deal Redn$1.19 for a small fries. Not a major er’s is offering this week: Buy one punch to the gut, but it still hurts. package of Thomas’ English Muffins, Don’t miss two freebie coupons get two free. That’s a lot of nooks and tucked into today’s Times Leader. One crannies for less than $4. is for a free Hershey’s Air Delight In the mood for a movie, score a

ANDREW M. SEDER

discount code when you text DEALS to 727272 each day through Wednesday. You’ll get a code you can use at the Redbox kiosk good for anywhere between a dime and a dollar. The code must be used the same day it’s given and standard text messaging rates apply. Summer is so close I can taste it, and you can, too. Stock up on picnic and BBQ items this week at Weis. Corn is 28 cents an ear; whole seedless watermelons are $3.99; Ball Park meat or Nathan’s beef franks are buy-one, get-one free; and bigger deal packs of boneless and skinless chicken breasts are too. And Johnsonville fresh or smoked brats are 30 percent off. Andrew M. Seder can be reached at 570829-7269. Email him local steals and deals at aseder@timesleader.com and follow him on Twitter @TLAndrewSeder

JOB MARKET

How to find a good job that suits your needs IT’S THE TIME of year when spirited young women and men graduate from the joyous, beer-soaked, afternoon-nappingallowed world of college and enter the soul-crushing, coffee-soaked, afternoonnapping-frowned-upon world of work. I kid, of course — graduates, you’ll love the real world! (No, you won’t. ... Return to school immediately. ... I haven’t had fun in 20 years. PLEASE TAKE ME WITH YOU!!) As most of you know, the first postgraduation step is to get the throw-up off the shoes you rented for your graduation ceremony. The next is to get a job, which is unfortunate because there aren’t quite as many of those as there used to be. I consulted with job search experts and business owners to come up with some pragmatic tips for young job seekers — not the “add some zazz to your resume!” or “make sure to wear a power tie” type of advice. Concrete, sensible stuff that fits the modern business world. Tom Walter is head of a company called Tasty Catering and co-author of the coming book “It’s My Company Too!” He said the vast majority of companies that are hiring are smaller ones with fewer than 500 employees. Yet many college graduates are still being taught job search and interview approaches tailored for large, monolithic corporations. Smaller businesses, Walter said, tend to look for employees they believe will fit into the company’s culture — they’re “hiring for attitude.” “If you’re looking for a job, you don’t want to just take something that comes along,” he said. “You need to find a place that matches your core values. That’s a place where you’ll be recognized, and that’s a place where you’ll have a better chance of getting hired.” This requires research. Simply applying for every job you hear about isn’t going to get it done. You need to take some time, reflect on what inspires you, talk to people in the field about what they do and then start finding companies that match your desires. “What they should do is investigate the company and deeply dive into it and figure out if their personal skills and values line up,” Walter said. “Ask about the culture, ask about core values, ask about how they measure your performance. “We had this young man come in here once for an interview, and he knew about our culture and he said what was important to him was that he be respected from the day he starts working. That was clearly a differentiator. That stood out.” The young man got the job. So the lesson here is that before you find work, you’ve got to do work. And if it goes right, you’ll wind up in a job that’s a good fit, which is a rare feat for a person just out of college. Given the competitive nature of the job market, you might have to settle for part-time opportunities or contract work at first. But remember, anything you do, whether it’s paid or volunteer, provides critical experience and opens more networking doors. Once you land an interview with a target company, be prepared to ask questions that show you care not just about the job but also about the company’s character. “If you come in just like every other person and talk the applicant talk, the stuff many 45-year-old people are telling college students to do, that’s not going to work,” Walter said. “You need to ask questions like: What are your core values and what does your company stand for? How do you make your culture work? As an employee, what would your organization judge me on most?” Don’t ask questions like this just to suck up to the interviewer. You should be asking them earnestly, because if your beliefs and desires line up with the company’s, you’ll be a far better and happier worker. Fresh out of college, this is the right time to figure out what you need to feel fulfilled at work. It gets harder to do that later in life. Rex Huppke writes for the Chicago Tribune. Send him questions by email to rhuppke@tribune.com or on Twitter @RexWorksHere.


CMYK PAGE 2D

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

CEO ROUNDTABLE: Thursday, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., the Northeast Pennsylvania Manufacturers and Employers Association will hold a CEO Roundtable, regarding an update on the agenda in Harrisburg at the Top of the 80’s in Sugarloaf Township with presenter David N. Taylor, executive director of the Pennsylvania Manufacturers Association. The cost to register, which includes lunch, is $36 for members and $72 for non-members. To register, please email Darlene J. Robbins at drobbins@maea.biz, or call 622-0992. HUMAN RESOURCES ROUNDTABLE: Friday, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., the Northeast Pennsylvania Manufacturers and Employers Association will hold a Human Resources Roundtable discussing new unemployment compensation programs at the Top of the 80’s restaurant in Sugarloaf Township. Rebecca Yoskoski, site administrator for the Office of UC Service Centers, PA Department of Labor & Industry, will be on hand to present. Topics on the agenda include the SharedWork Program, severance pay deduction changes, “Active Search for Employment” eligibility requirements, and the recall requirement for temporary layoffs. This program is approved for 1 PHR/SPHR/GPHR (General) Recertification Credit. The cost to register, which includes lunch, is $36 for members and $72 for non-members. To register, please email Gina Whalen at gwhalen@maea.biz, or call the 6220992. WOMEN’S NETWORKING: Tuesday, May 29, 12-1 p.m., The Greater Hazleton Chamber of Commerce will host a women’s networking luncheon at Lobitz Catering Service, 1090 State Route 940, Hazle Township. The event is open to all women from the Greater Hazleton region. The guest speaker is Sandy Visintainer of Visintainer Nursery and Penn State Extension Master Gardeners who will present on container gardening with flowers, herbs, vegetables and perennials. Learn how to choose plants, how to plant and maintain a container, planting tips and demonstrations. Reservations are required by registering online, or call the chamber at 455-1509 or email jferry@hazletonchamber.org. Cancellations must be made three days prior to the event for a full refund. Otherwise you are responsible for payment. There will be a 50/50 raffle and a door-prize drawing including two opportunities to introduce yourself and your business at the event and a free lunch for the next program. Cost for the event is $16 for chamber members and $21 for non-members. Proceeds will benefit the Women’s Empowerment Grant Fund. ESTATE PLANNING: Wednesday, June 6, 1:30-2:30 p.m., learn how to effectively manage your personal tax situation and estate planning, at the Irem Clubhouse, 64 Ridgway Drive in Dallas. Attorney Alvin Blitz will discuss the critical decisions that you need to make when preparing your will, power of attorney and living will. He will also discuss when you should consider a living trust, and how to title your property and complete beneficiary forms to make sure your plan runs smoothly. He also will review the tax implications based on how your estate plan is set up. This review will include a discussion of what plan works best whether you are a widow or widower, married, have children or do not have children. The community is invited to the program, sponsored by the Masonic Village at Dallas, free of charge. Call 675-1866 to reserve a spot by Tuesday, June 5. Send announcements of upcoming events by email to tlbusiness@timesleader.com; by mail to Business Agenda, Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 or by fax to 829-5537. Include a contact phone number and email address. The submission deadline is Wednesday for publication on Sunday.

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BUSINESS AGENDA BUSINESS CARD EXCHANGE: Tuesday, 5-7 p.m., the Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce announces a Spring Business Card Exchange hosted by Northwestern Mutual/Eastern Pennsylvania Group, 52 Glenmaura Corporate Center, Moosic. Chamber members and guests will mingle and network at the newest Northwestern Mutual/Eastern Pennsylvania Group location in northeastern Pennsylvania. This event is free, and all members and guests in attendance will enjoy complimentary beverages and hors d’oeuvres and will have the opportunity to win door prizes. Bring your business cards. Palmiter Financial Group will be giving away a 22-inch Vizio Razor Flat Screen TV but you must be present to win. Go to www.scrantonchamber.com/ events/eventdetail.aspx?EventID=30 to register.

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OFFICE COACH

ROTARY CLUB OF WILKES-BARRE Beth Langston, assistant vice president/branch manager of Citizens Bank, Wilkes-Barre; and Ryan Wagner, mortician, H. Merritt Hughes Funeral Home, Inc., have been welcomed into the rotary as new members.

FIRST LIBERTY BANK AND TRUST Peter Albano has been hired as vice president and financial consultant of wealth management. Albano graduated from Delaware Valley College with a degree in business administration.

PENNSYLVANIA INSTITUTE OF CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS Marc T. Decowski, was elected president of the Northeastern Chapter for the 2012-2013 fiscal year. Decowski is a senior manager in audit and assurance services at ParenteBeard LLC in Wilkes-Barre. Decowski, a certified public accountant, graduated from King’s College. Other 2012-2013 officers elected: Mar-

Albano

Calvert

garet Manley, Plymouth, CPA, president-elect, a certified public accountant with Snyder & Clemente, Kingston. Manley received her bachelor’s degree from Wilkes University. Desiree M. Anderson, Hazle Township, secretary, a certified public accountant at Jones Kohanski & Company, PC in Sugarloaf. Anderson received her bachelor’s degree from Bloomsburg University. Michael W. Yencha, treasurer, a certified public accountant and tax manager at Kronick Kalada Berdy & Company PC in Kingston. Yencha received his bachelor’s degree from Wilkes University.

IMPRESSIONS MEDIA Erica Calvert, of Plains Township, has been promoted to director of digital and local retail sales for the parent company of The Times Leader, Go Lackawanna,

Langston

Wagner

The Dallas Post, and other local media publications and websites. Calvert has been with the company for more than seven years in advertising and sales and most recently held the position of retail print and digital sales manager. Her new duties include developing cutting-edge digital strategies, growing digital revenue in all departments, overseeing the retail print and digital teams, growing local retail print and digital revenue. The Times Leader publishes announcements of business promotions, hirings and other noteworthy events on Sundays. Photographs may be included as space allows. Submit an announcement by e-mail to tlbusiness@timesleader.com, by mail to 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711; or by fax to 829-5537. Photos in jpeg format may be attached to e-mails.

OPEN FOR BUSINESS HARTMAN BEAUTY SUPPLY

Hartman Beauty Supply, owned by Carleen Hartman, will open on Friday at 514 S. Main St., Wilkes-

Barre. There will be a ribbon cutting ceremony that morning at 10:30. The business will sell wigs, perm solutions, nail pol-

ish, assorted make-up, shampoo, and other beauty related supplies. Call 208-1085 for more information.

How to deal with a non-stop chatterbox By MARIE G. MCINTYRE McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Q: My manager has an annoying habit of talking non-stop about her family. She goes into great detail about her daughter’s clothes, her son’s sports activities, or her mother’s latest trip. Although I try to listen courteously, I have absolutely no interest in their activities. I obviously don’t want to alienate my boss or hurt her feelings, but this is really getting on my nerves. What should I do? A: Most people who get trapped by compulsive talkers are simply being too polite. Because they see no way to escape without being rude, they suffer in silence while the speaker drones on and on. Sadly, this only serves to reward the very behavior they would like to discourage. To extract yourself from your manager’s monologues, you must find a way to disengage without being offensive. Fortunately, at work, the need to be productive always provides a valid excuse. For example, if your boss is extolling her son’s soccer prowess, just wait for an appropriate moment, then say, “That’s impressive. Ryan must be quite an athlete. Well, I suppose I’d better start making those customer calls.” On occasions when you find yourself cornered in her office, the “gradual exit” maneuver may come in handy. Start by sitting up straight and leaning forward in your chair. Then, while you continue chatting, slowly stand up and begin working your way toward the door. By the time you have one hand on the doorknob, the conversation should be winding down. Another trick is to take control of the discussion by telling a story of your own. When you fin-

HONORS & AWARDS PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

Drum maker Neil Longo of Sugarloaf Township has been making drums for about 20 years in his workshop.

DRUMS Continued from Page 1D

like, well, I guess I’m doing something right,” Longo said. At that point, Longo decided to try expanding his business. “I started making them and then we started calling drum shops all over the country and they’re like, ‘Oh yeah, we heard of you.’ I was like, how did you hear of me? And it was just from that one thing,” Longo said. That one thing was news of Colaiuta’s use of Longo’s drum spreadingbywordofmouthinthe music world. Longo enlisted the help of his sons,Matt,DaveandJames,inmarketingandsellingthedrumsaswell as helping him in the workshop. He also made his own tools for crafting the drums, from a steamer consisting of a hot water tank, heating element, piping and box to hold the wood he bends into a circular shape, to a clamp device that holds the drum shell together once it has been shaped and glue has been applied. Dozens of the solid-shell drums fill a room and office in his house and dozens more drum shells fill his garage/workshop. Pushpins in a map on the work-

WINDS Continued from Page 1D

close by are not complaining. The opposition, he said, is “scaring people with these tactics.” It is the other proposed turbine in Derby Line that has generated most of the opposition. Seven homes in Quebec would be less than 1,640 feet from it. The owners of the farm on which it would be erected did not return calls for comment. Julie Fauteux lives with her husband and two young children in Quebec, about 1,500 feet from where that second turbine

shop wall indicate the states and countries in which he has sold his drums. “We have shops in Germany and Japan, we sold drums in Israel, Sweden, Switzerland,” Longo said. Longo has an album full of photos of famous drummers he’s met at the National Association of Musical Merchants trade shows he’s attended in Anaheim, Calif. Many of them use his drums. “Sean Paddock, he’s Kenny Chesney’s drummer, he has a couple of my drums; Russ McKinnon, he’s Barry Manilow’s drummer; WillDentoniswithLeAnnRimes; Todd Sucherman is with Styx; all of the big-name guys, they want that sound because it’s really sensitive, like a light touch, you can hear everything,” Longo said. Longo’s drums made from domestic woods such as walnut, maple and cherry, sell for about $900; theexoticcustomdrumsaremore expensive, with those made of bubinga costing about $3,000. He recently began making lower-end plywood drums to satisfy a store in New Hampshire; they sell for about $500. But it’s the quality of the wood and the work he puts into each drum that sets Longo apart from other custom crafters, he said. “It seems like (almost) all of the custom guys, they buy drum would be. In front of her house is a sign in French that translates as “health and quality of life,” with an image of a turbine inside a circle with a slash through it. “There is not going to be any quality of life with the sound of this,” Fauteux said. She added: “They don’t consider the closeness of our house. In the United States there’s no law about how closeyoucanputone,butinCanada there is.” The farming villages of Stanstead, population 3,000, and its American twin, Derby Line, a section of the broader town of Derby, which has about 4,600 people, are practically one community, even though many people in Stanstead

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shells and buy hardware and they just assemble the drum. I make it from cutting the tree down to taking it to the saw mill to planing it down and doing all of that. Then I steam-bend the shells and glue them by hand. All the machinery I use is hand-made,” he said. Longo said drum makers say thereisnosecrettomakingagood drum. “I have one, but it’s kind of not evenasecret.It’slike,youputyour heart and soul into it. It’s no matter what you do — your mind, heart, soul, your gut feeling and your brain. I’ve worked with wood my whole life and I play drums, so I know what wood will do and I know what drummers want to hear,” he said. Longo worked construction for hisfather,Michael,formanyyears before going into music and drum making full-time. His father and mother, Genie, supported his musical interests since he started taking lessons at age 11. Longo said people have asked him why he and his wife, Lucia, don’t move to a nicer locale, given his growing success. “Why should I move somewhere else? I’m selling drums all over the world from here. Why would I want to move? Why torture yourself? Unless taxes go up through the roof,” he said with a laugh. speak French as their first language and the international boundary cuts through yards and even houses. It was only after security was tightened following 9/11 that residents had to start reporting at border stations before visiting friends or relatives on the other side. Supporters say the turbines would produce green energy, create jobs during construction and provide income to the farmers. Opponents say wind power harms the environment, wouldn’t be practical without huge government subsidies, and is an eyesore. The giant spinning blades in Derby Line would be visible for miles on both sides of the border.

Anthony P. Ferzola, associate professor of mathematics, has been named Case Professor of the Year by The University of Scranton, in recognition of his outstanding performance as a member of the faculty. Dr. FerFerzola zola earned his bachelor’s degree in mathematics from the City University of New York Queen’s College. He earned his master’s degree and Ph.D. in mathematics from New York University. Quandel Enterprises, Inc., a local construction firm, was recently named in Engineering NewsRecord’s current edition of The Top 400 Contractors. ENR is a national construction industry publication which rated Quandel in comparison to construction firms nationwide Quandel’s ranking at No. 245, moving up 46 spots from last year’s No. 291. Brandon Kuhar, a senior business administration major at Wilkes University, placed fourth in the 10th Annual Great Valley Business Plan Competition. Kuhar and his partner, Joe Carlin from Keystone College, developed a Kuhar mobile application concept that allows iPhone users to request and share contact information in a simpler, more organized fashion. Attorney Marion Munley was recently inducted into the International Society of Barristers as a fellow of the society. The organization is dedicated to preserving trial by jury, the adMunley versary system and an independent judiciary. Christopher M. Stock, ParenteBeard Wealth Management, has been awarded the Accredited Investment Fiduciary designation from the Center for Fiduciary Studies. The center is the standards-setting body for fi360, a training and research facility for fiduciaries, and conducts training programs at

ish this anecdote, quickly excuse yourself and return to work. Ending a conversation is much easier if you’re the one doing the talking. Of course, these strategies only work if they are executed with a friendly attitude and a smile. But if you can pull it off, you may be able to shorten the family saga without insulting your boss.

Q: I work in the marketing department of a community bank. My new manager was given the title of marketing director, even though her entire background is in accounting. She seems to realize that she has a lot to learn, but I still have trouble communicating with her. Having worked in marketing for many years, I’m not sure how to relate to a manager who has no professional qualifications. A: Being more experienced than your boss puts you in the tough position of having to lead and follow at the same time. To manage this balancing act, try to view this as a partnership in which the two of you share the goal of helping the bank succeed. You contribute your marketing know-how, while your boss contributes managerial skills and the greater influence of her position. If your manager is reasonably mature, she will value your expertise and use it strategically. And if you are reasonably mature, you will be careful not to flaunt your knowledge or embarrass her in front of others. Remember that making your boss look good is usually a wise career move. Marie G. McIntyre is a workplace coach and the author of “Secrets to Winning at Office Politics.” Send in questions and get free coaching tips at http://www.yourofficecoach.com, or follow her on Twitter @officecoach.

universities throughout the United States and abroad. Wilkes-Barre General Hospital, The Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) recently announced that the Center for Advanced Rehabilitation has been accredited for a period of three years. This is the first accreditation that CARF has awarded to Wilkes-Barre General Hospital, which opened the 20-bed unit in July 2011. King’s College, The Early Learning Center, managed by Hildebrandt Learning Center, located on the King’s College campus, has earned accreditation from the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) – the nation’s leading organization of early childhood professionals. The program received accreditation after meeting each of the ten program standards. Lisa Gennaro, a resident of Luzerne County, was one of 10 Pennsylvanians to receive the Governor’s Achievement Award during the 28th Annual Pennsylvania Partners Employment, Training & Education Conference. Representatives of state workforce development agencies recognized the individuals for their accomplishments. Cross Valley Federal Credit Union honored employeeservice milestones for 2012. Those honored included: Chris George, loan officer, 5 years; John Makowski, maintenance, 5 years; Kim Thomas, head teller, 5 years; Lisa Walker, head teller, 5 years; Amy Major, IT help desk, 10 years; Michelle Motel, MSR, 10 years; Ann Gustinucci, ACH coordinator, 15 years; Darlene Culp, MSR, 15 years; Christina Davis, MEMBERS financial services, 15 years; and John Monico, V.P. of operations, 20 years. Jeffrey H. McKinnon has been designated by Wells Fargo Advisors as a member of the firm’s Premier Advisors Program. The Bloomsburg resident serves as first vice president for investments at the company’s Edwardsville office. To qualify for the program, financial advisors must demonstrate a high level of production and a commitment to professional service. McKinnon has been a financial advisor with Wells Fargo Advisors for 6 years and has 15 years experience in the brokerage industry. He has a BA in economics from Penn State University. Submit announcements of business honors and awards to Business Awards by email to tlbusiness@timesleader.com; by mail to 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250; or by fax to (570) 829-5537. Photos in jpg format may be attached to email.


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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MarketPulse GOLD AND THE BEAR Gold investors growled when its price thudded to $1,536.60 per ounce at Wednesday’s close. That’s 19 percent below its record closing level of $1,891.90 reached on Aug. 22. When an investment drops 20 percent in price, traders say that it has graduated from a mere “correction” into a fullblown bear market. The main culprit has been a strengthening dollar, says Jon Nadler, senior metals analyst at Kitco Metals. Gold prices tend to go in the opposite direction of the dollar’s value, and the dollar has been rising as investors search for safer currencies.

OUT IN THE COLD Most companies offered investors pleasant surprises this past earnings season: More than two out of three companies in the S&P 500 reported stronger profits than financial analysts expected. But utilities were the exception. It was the only industry where less than half of the companies beat expectations. A warm winter meant that fewer customers were using heaters, which reduced demand. Consider Duke Energy, which earned 22 cents per share last quarter. Warmer temperatures knocked 4 cents per share off its earnings.

Gold

price per ounce $1900

1800

Percentage of compaines

that beat 1Q earnings expectations Materials producers Consumer discretionary Industrials Consumer staples Technology Health care Financials Energy Telecom Utilities 0%

1700

1600

1500

’11 ’12 A S

O

N

D

J

F

M

A

M

Source: FactSet

10

20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Source: FactSet; data though May 16

FEAR FACTOR Mutual fund investors continued to adopt a cautious approach to U.S. stocks in April, but they weren’t so riskaverse when it came to foreign stocks. Industry consultant Strategic Insight reports that a net $5.7 billion was withdrawn from U.S. stock funds. But funds investing in foreign stocks attracted $10.4 billion in new cash. International stock funds also attracted cash in each of the first three months of this year. That came as investors became less worried that the European debt crisis might spin out of control. But new fears emerged after voters in France and Greece backed parties that want to roll back or slow down spending cuts.

AP

The long view InsiderQ&A

Mortgage rates hit record low, again

Heard in the Suite

“Earnings season,” the roughly four-week stretch each quarter in which many companies report their results for the previous quarter, is only partly about the bottom line. During a conference call with financial analysts and journalists, top executives also talk broadly about their businesses. Comments gleaned over the last few weeks, for example, show that slowing economies in China and Europe are denting sales. But one big question remains unanswered, says Goldman Sachs strategist David Kostin: Whether companies can maintain their profit margins. Executives are split on whether they can keep raising prices.

Robert McIver Who he is: Head of portfolio portfolio manager at Jensen Investment Management His track record: Jensen Quality Growth fund (JENSX) has Morningstar’s top gold rating What he suggests: Keep focus on companies’ long-term performance

Robert McIver won’t consider buying a stock for the Jensen Quality Growth fund unless it’s been profitable for a long time: 10 straight years. Not only that, it must have had a return on equity, or ROE, of at least 15 percent each of those years. ROE measures how profitable a company is relative to its shareholders’ investment, and the S&P 500’s ROE dipped to 8 percent during 2009. The logic: Companies that have been strongly profitable a long time tends to stay so. McIver’s firm also launched a mutual fund focused on value stocks in 2010, the Jensen Quality Value fund (JNVSX). Even companies with a long history of profits are dropping now on worries about Europe’s debt crisis. It can be really frustrating. Last year, in the quality growth strategy, the return from the fund was slightly negative. Yet, to our mind, there’s a real disconnect between the stock price and the very solid business performance that quality growth companies had. On average, they increased their earnings by 11 percent last year. They increased their dividends, on average, by 18 percent. The companies are operating at a very profitable level, with strong balance sheets, huge cash flow, and they dominate their markets. Profit margins are at nearly record levels. Aren’t you worried that they will fall sharply? For the market, I believe that’s the case. For our companies, because of the fundamental strengths they have, they have been able to demonstrate in good times and bad the ability to keep their margins high. They’re not immune from short-term pressures, particularly with oil prices in recent years, but the companies are able to by and large pass those pricing pressures onto their customers, albeit there’s a bit of a lag. Over the longer term, we’re not concerned with margins. What’s the downside of having such a long timeframe when looking for stocks? We recognize on the downside that there are some younger companies that don’t have the track record, that we miss the opportunity, like Apple (which had an ROE below 15 percent early last decade). But on the other hand, we’ve also missed some real horrors of companies that blow up for some reason or another. The secret to success over the longer term is to make money in the good times but not blow up in the bad times. Microsoft is in both your growth and value funds. Microsoft’s ROE at the end of last year was 44 percent: It’s staggeringly profitable. The use of cash flow is what we like to see, in terms of dividends, share buybacks, growing organically and buying other companies. It’s a fantastically strong company. It gets dinged because people compare and contrast it with a company like Google or Apple. It’s a fair comparison, but it doesn’t detract from the fundamental strengths of Microsoft’s core competencies. Answers edited for content and clarity. AP

On Europe:

On China: “I think that the market is going to recover in China. I think by the end of the year, we will see sort of a recovery take place. But the first quarter was very weak.”

—Ingersoll Rand CEO Michael Lamach

“While we agree that there has been some moderate slowdown in China, we also believe that this is a natural progression and that it is a positive for the long-term sustainable growth of the country.”

—Coca-Cola CEO Muhtar Kent

InterestRates

Money market mutual funds

PRIME FED Taxable—national avg RATE FUNDS Selected Daily Govt Fund/Cl D FRIDAY 3.25 .13 Tax-exempt—national avg 6 MO AGO 3.25 .13 Vanguard OH Tax-Exempt MMF 1 YR AGO 3.25 .13

On pricing power:

“The impact of austerity measures is weighing on both our top (revenue) and bottom (net income) lines.”

—McDonald’s CFO Peter Bensen

“We’ve seen the reduced sales in the EU where economic conditions reduced demand for our higher-end vegetables and have limited customers’ access to credit.”

—Monsanto CFO Pierre Courduroux

“Pricing continues to be the most important single driver of our profitability, … We increased prices, notably in Argentina, Germany, Indonesia, Italy, Korea, Mexico, the Philippines and Russia.”

72.26 3

98.01

77.81

-5.36

-6.4

t

t

AWK

25.39 9

34.89

33.01

-1.32

-3.8

t

t

Amerigas Part LP

APU

36.76 2

46.47

38.23

-1.05

-2.7

t

Aqua America Inc

WTR

19.28 9

23.00

22.26

-0.45

-2.0

s

Arch Dan Mid

ADM

23.69 8

33.98

31.82

-0.85

-2.6

s

s

AZO BAC

Bk of NY Mellon

BK

Bon Ton Store

BONT

CVS Caremark Corp

2.2

14

3.3

1 27.5a

18

3.0

t -16.7 —9.91

3

7.0

35

8.4

s

1.0 +2.09

2

2.5

21

3.0

11.3 +2.35

2

-1.2

15

2.2

3.6 +17.32

-3.9

t

s 14.6 +31.84

1 22.6

18

...

12.11

7.02

-0.53

-7.0

t

t 26.3—40.12 4 -26.2

...

0.6

17.10 3

28.91

20.24

-1.85

2.6

2.23 2

11.56

3.70

CVS

31.30 9

46.22

44.43

Cigna Corp

CI

38.79 3

52.95

42.91

-2.20

-4.9

t

CocaCola

KO

63.34 8

77.82

74.05

-3.42

-4.4

t

Comcast Corp A

CMCSA 19.19 8

30.88

28.28

-1.11

-3.8

t

t 19.3 +13.42

1

1.6

17

2.3

Community Bk Sys

CBU

21.67 7

29.47

26.40

-0.98

-3.6

t

t

1

8.8

13

3.9

Community Hlth Sys

CYH

14.61 5

29.55

20.98

-1.97

-8.6

t

s 20.2—26.62 4 -10.7

Energy Transfer Eqty

ETE

30.78 4

47.34

36.45

-3.90

-9.7

t

t -10.2 -3.49

Entercom Comm

ETM

4.61 1

9.55

4.99

-0.37

-6.9

t

t -18.9—45.70 5 -24.3

Fairchild Semicond

FCS

10.25 3

19.98

12.90

-0.51

-3.8

t

t

FTR

Genpact Ltd

G

Harte Hanks Inc

-8.4

t

t

1.7—27.72 4 -10.4

10

-1.17 -24.0

t

t

9.8—65.02 5 -39.0

...

5.4

-0.89

s

s

9.0 +16.74

17

1.5

-2.0

1

3.8

t

2.2—13.49 3

-4.9

9

0.1

s

5.8 +11.23

9.4

20

2.8

-5.0 +11.83

1

2

7.1—33.23 4

3.2 -7.1

9

...

21

6.9

6

...

15

...

3.06 1

8.97

3.22

-0.25

-7.2

t

t -37.5—55.82 5 -13.2

19 12.4

13.37 7

18.16

16.36

-0.11

-0.7

s

s

9.4 —3.42

2 17.0a

21

1.1

HHS

7.00 5

10.24

8.57

0.10

1.2

s

t

-5.7 +3.95

2 -17.3

13

4.0

Heinz

HNZ

48.17 9

55.48

54.10

-0.72

-1.3

s

t

0.1 +4.91

2

6.2

18

3.5

Hershey Company

HSY

53.77 9

69.46

67.41

-1.05

-1.5

s

s

9.1 +24.05

1

7.3

23

2.3

Kraft Foods

KFT

31.88 9

39.99

38.49

-0.55

-1.4

t

s

3.0 +13.68

1

5.9

19

3.0

Lowes Cos

LOW

18.07 8

32.29

28.48

-1.14

-3.8

t

s 12.2 +15.93

1

-1.4

20

2.0

M&T Bank

MTB

66.40 7

90.00

80.71

-4.09

-4.8

t

t

3

-3.4

13

3.5

McDonalds Corp

MCD

80.00 5 102.22

89.85

-2.05

-2.2

t

t -10.4 +13.46

1 14.0

17

3.1

NBT Bncp

NBTB

17.05 5

24.10

20.03

-0.39

-1.9

t

t

2

1.1

12

4.0

Nexstar Bdcstg Grp

NXST

5.53 3

10.28

6.66

-0.24

-3.5

t

t -15.1 —7.76

3 -13.3

...

...

PNC Financial

PNC

42.70 8

67.89

61.33

-4.15

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t

s

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2

-1.8

11

2.6

PPL Corp

PPL

25.00 5

30.27

27.19

-0.33

-1.2

s

t

-7.6 +1.60

2

-5.9

10

5.3

Penna REIT

PEI

6.50 6

17.34

12.35

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t

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...

5.2

PepsiCo

PEP

58.50 8

71.89

68.12

1.32

2.0

s

s

2.1

17

3.2

Philip Morris Intl

PM

60.45 8

91.05

84.30

-1.85

-2.1

t

s

7.4 +25.94

1 29.2a

17

3.7

Procter & Gamble

PG

57.56 6

67.95

63.52

-0.16

-0.3

t

t

-4.8 —2.56

2

16

3.5

Prudential Fncl

PRU

42.45 2

65.30

46.10

-5.41 -10.5

t

t

-8.0—25.69 4 -13.1

6

3.1

SLM Corp

SLM

10.91 4

17.11

12.89

-0.81

-5.9

t

t

-3.8—18.36 3 -24.8

12

3.9

SLM Corp flt pfB

SLMBP 39.00 3

60.00

45.25

-0.76

-1.7

t

t 16.0

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0.0

TJX Cos

TJX

24.60 9

42.81

40.06

-1.19

-2.9

t

s 24.1 +54.03

1 24.0

19

UGI Corp

UGI

24.07 6

33.12

28.60

-0.70

-2.4

s

s

-2.7 —8.12

3

2.6

17

3.8

Verizon Comm

VZ

32.28 0

41.47

41.53

0.37

0.9

s

s

3.5 +17.33

1

5.0

45

4.8

WalMart Strs

WMT

48.31 0

62.63

62.43

3.01

5.1

r

t

4.5 +15.90

1

7.7

13

2.5

Weis Mkts

WMK

36.52 9

45.90

44.63

-0.36

-0.8

s

s

11.7 +13.83

1

4.6

16

2.7

5.7 —6.57 -9.5 —5.15 6.3

2.7 —1.53

2

2.7

... 10.2 1.1

Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quarters. Rank classifies a stock’s performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).

European stocks with greenback support Europe’s debt problems have pummeled the continent’s economies, stock markets and currency. But some European stocks are better shielded than others from the crisis. EADS, for example, trades on the French exchange, but it gets 75 percent of its revenue in the form of dollars, not euros. That’s because it’s the company behind the Airbus airplane. American Airlines ordered 260 Airbus jets last year. As the dollar climbs against the euro, the sales that Airbus makes in dollars become worth that much Data through May 16

more in euros after they’re translated. One dollar is worth about 0.79 euro, up from 0.70 a year ago. Better yet: Only 28 percent of EADS’ expenses are in dollars, according to Credit Suisse. That means that the benefit of the falling euro on EADS’ revenue outweighs the increase in costs caused by the change in currency values. This screen from Credit Suisse shows European companies that get much of their revenue in dollars but have limited costs in the U.S. currency.

Sources: Credit Suisse; FactSet

1WK

0.07 0.22 0.13 0.30 0.75

-0.01 0.03 -0.01 0.04 0.00

s s s s t

t 0.03 s 0.04 s 0.04 s -0.21 t -1.07

0.12 0.25 0.15 0.54 1.83

0.07 0.01 0.16 0.71

10-year T-Note 1.72 30-year T-Bond 2.81 Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.

-0.12 -0.20

t t

t -1.45 t -1.49

3.19 4.40

1.70 2.72

COMPANY

PERCENT OF REVENUE FROM U.S. DOLLARS

PERCENT OF COSTS FROM U.S. DOLLARS

EADS

75%

28%

LVMH

50

37

Siemens

40

t t t t s t

35

52-WK HIGH LOW

-0.84 -1.29 -0.43 -1.00 0.78 -1.05

2.88 5.16 4.03 5.40 10.15 2.04

CHANGE 1MO 3MO 1YR

FRIDAY NAV

WK CHG

American Funds BalA m ABALX American Funds BondA m ABNDX American Funds CapIncBuA m CAIBX American Funds CpWldGrIA m CWGIX American Funds EurPacGrA m AEPGX American Funds FnInvA m ANCFX American Funds GrthAmA m AGTHX American Funds IncAmerA m AMECX American Funds InvCoAmA m AIVSX American Funds NewPerspA m ANWPX American Funds WAMutInvA m AWSHX BlackRock GlobAlcA m MDLOX BlackRock GlobAlcI MALOX Dodge & Cox Income DODIX Dodge & Cox IntlStk DODFX Dodge & Cox Stock DODGX Fidelity Contra FCNTX Fidelity GrowCo FDGRX Fidelity LowPriStk d FLPSX Fidelity Spartan 500IdxAdvtg FUSVX FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m FKINX FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m FCISX FrankTemp-Mutual Euro Z MEURX FrankTemp-Templeton GlBond A mTPINX FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAdv TGBAX Harbor IntlInstl d HAINX Oakmark EqIncI OAKBX PIMCO AllAssetI PAAIX PIMCO LowDrIs PTLDX PIMCO TotRetA m PTTAX PIMCO TotRetAdm b PTRAX PIMCO TotRetIs PTTRX PIMCO TotRetrnD b PTTDX Permanent Portfolio PRPFX T Rowe Price EqtyInc PRFDX T Rowe Price GrowStk PRGFX T Rowe Price HiYield d PRHYX T Rowe Price MidCpGr RPMGX T Rowe Price NewIncome PRCIX Vanguard 500Adml VFIAX Vanguard 500Inv VFINX Vanguard GNMAAdml VFIJX Vanguard InstIdxI VINIX Vanguard InstPlus VIIIX Vanguard InstTStPl VITPX Vanguard MuIntAdml VWIUX Vanguard STGradeAd VFSUX Vanguard Tgtet2025 VTTVX Vanguard TotBdAdml VBTLX Vanguard TotBdInst VBTIX Vanguard TotIntl d VGTSX Vanguard TotStIAdm VTSAX Vanguard TotStIIns VITSX Vanguard TotStIdx VTSMX Vanguard WellsIAdm VWIAX Vanguard Welltn VWELX Vanguard WelltnAdm VWENX Vanguard WndsIIAdm VWNAX Vanguard WndsrII VWNFX Wells Fargo AstAlllcA f EAAFX

18.65 12.75 49.57 32.51 35.39 36.03 30.09 16.79 27.75 27.21 28.64 18.26 18.35 13.64 28.70 103.83 71.63 87.20 36.83 46.04 2.08 2.10 18.77 12.47 12.44 53.54 27.39 11.81 10.46 11.24 11.24 11.24 11.24 46.25 23.47 34.55 6.64 54.44 9.78 119.72 119.70 11.06 118.94 118.95 29.27 14.28 10.73 12.54 11.09 11.09 12.83 32.34 32.35 32.33 56.53 32.00 55.27 47.18 26.58 11.95

-.62 -.01 -1.41 -1.72 -2.18 -1.82 -1.55 -.48 -1.23 -1.41 -1.14 -.59 -.60 -.06 -1.77 -5.44 -3.36 -4.88 -2.00 -2.03 -.06 -.06 -.90 -.41 -.40 -3.23 -1.10 -.26 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.01 -1.01 -1.11 -1.88 -.13 -3.39 -.01 -5.28 -5.28 +.01 -5.25 -5.25 -1.40 -.01 -.04 -.46 +.02 +.02 -.82 -1.55 -1.54 -1.55 -.73 -.85 -1.46 -2.22 -1.25 -.32

4WK

2.01 3.63 3.25 4.37 6.61 0.93

52-WK HIGH LOW

RETURN/RANK 1YR 5YR

-4.4 +.5 -2.9 -6.7 -9.0 -7.0 -7.1 -3.3 -5.9 -7.5 -4.9 -5.3 -5.4 +.1 -9.5 -7.1 -7.0 -9.6 -7.8 -6.3 -2.3 -2.3 -5.7 -3.7 -3.6 -9.1 -4.7 -2.5 +.3 +.7 +.7 +.7 +.7 -4.1 -5.9 -8.4 -.5 -7.5 +.5 -6.3 -6.3 +.3 -6.3 -6.3 -6.5 +1.0 -5.2 +.9 +.9 -9.9 -6.5 -6.5 -6.5 -1.2 -3.4 -3.4 -6.0 -6.0 -4.1

+.9/A +6.5/B -1.3/A -11.3/C -16.5/B -6.4/D -5.6/D -.5/B -3.9/C -8.3/B +.1/A -6.7/C -6.4/C +5.2/D -20.7/D -9.1/D +1.1/A -1.2/B -5.4/A -1.3/A -2.5/E -3.0/E -14.0/A -3.8/E -3.5/E -14.1/A -3.7/D +.8/A +2.4/B +5.6/D +5.7/C +6.0/C +5.7/D -2.2/E -4.5/B +1.9/A +2.4/C -6.6/B +6.1/C -1.3/A -1.4/A +6.1/C -1.3/A -1.2/A -2.5/B +9.0/B +2.3/B -3.4/B +7.4/A +7.4/A -18.8/D -2.5/B -2.5/B -2.7/B +6.4/A +.9/A +1.0/A -2.3/A -2.4/A -2.2/

+1.8/B +3.7/E -.3/C -2.5/B -3.1/A -1.2/B -1.2/D +.6/C -1.8/C -.3/A -1.3/A +2.3/B +2.6/B +6.7/B -5.7/A -5.1/D +2.3/A +4.0/A +1.0/A -1.1/B +1.5/D +1.0/E -3.3/A +8.4/A +8.7/A -2.5/A +3.0/A +5.5/A +5.5/A +8.4/A +8.6/A +8.9/A +8.5/A +7.5/A -2.3/B +1.1/B +6.5/B +3.5/A +6.8/B -1.0/B -1.1/B +6.9/A -1.0/B -1.0/B -.5/A +5.5/B +4.4/B +.3/A +6.6/B +6.6/B -5.7/B -.5/A -.5/A -.6/A +5.7/A +2.6/A +2.7/A -2.6/B -2.7/B +1.5/

Rank: Fund’s letter grade compared with others in the same performance group; an A indicates fund performed in the top 20 percent; an E, in the bottom 20 percent.

q

StockScreener YTD STOCK CHANGE*

1-YR STOCK CHANGE*

DIVIDEND YIELD

16.6%

17.1%

1.6%

-7.5

2.1

9.5 -12.7

-35.8

4.6

BMW

39

23

18.7

-7.0

3.7

SAP

36

30

13.9

-2.2

1.6

Porsche

35

0

-3.1

-21.8

1.9

* Stock change data is in U.S. dollars

t t s t s t

TICKER

GROUP, FUND

4.92 3

Frontier Comm

266.25 8 399.10 372.45 -15.05

-8.7—12.27 3

CHANGE 1MO 3MO 1YR

MutualFunds

52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN RANK %RTN LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD

APD

Bank of America

FRIDAY YIELD

3-month T-Bill 1-year T-Bill 6-month T-Bill 2-year T-Note 5-year T-Note

Stan Choe; J. Paschke • AP

Amer Water Works

AutoZone Inc

-0.05 -0.26 0.04 -0.09 0.44 -0.02

—Quest Diagnostics CFO Robert Hagemann

Air Products

0.01 0.10 $ 3,000 min (800) 662-7447

2.01 3.63 3.32 4.37 7.46 0.99

TREASURYS

LocalStocks TICKER

0.01 0.20 $ 10,000 min (800) 243-1575

1WK

Broad market Lehman Triple-A corporate Moody’s Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman Municipal Bond Buyer U.S. high yield Barclays Treasury Barclays

“It’s a very difficult pricing environment today. I don’t expect that to abate. And in fact, as I’ve listened to other health care providers, I’m consistently hearing the same thing.”

MIN INVEST PHONE

YIELD

FRIDAY YIELD

U.S. BOND INDEXES

—Philip Morris International CFO Hermann Waldemer

Sources: FactSet; S&P Indices

COMPANY

Another week, another record low for mortgage rates. The average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage fell to 3.79 percent last week from 3.83 percent. It’s the third week in a row that the rate has hit a record. A year ago, the average rate was 4.61 percent. Mortgage rates tend to follow Treasury yields, and the yield on the 10-year note neared its own all-time low last week.

q q q

Dow industrials

-3.5% WEEKLY

Nasdaq

-5.3% WEEKLY

LARGE-CAP

S&P 500

-4.3% WEEKLY

SMALL-CAP

Russell 2000

-5.4% WEEKLY

q p q p q p q p

-5.1%

MO +1.2%

YTD -7.4%

MO +6.7%

YTD -6.0%

MO +3.0%

YTD

-7.1%

MO +0.9%

YTD


CMYK PAGE 4D

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timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

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SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

COMMENTARY

COMMENTARY

LEONARD PITTS JR.

KATHLEEN PARKER

Only one party has messed up nation’s politics

Likability’s the buzz word in campaign

AND ANOTHER one bites the dust. But Indiana Sen. Richard Lugar did not go quietly. After this month’s defeat in the Republican primary, the veteran legislator issued a remarkable statement warning of the dangers of continued partisanship. Lugar, a conservative who embraces “the Republican principles of small government, low taxes, a strong national defense, free enterprise, and trade expansion,” was nevertheless targeted for defeat by conservatives who felt he had strayed from ideological orthodoxy. This, because he compromised with the other party on a few matters — the auto industry bailout, TARP, the confirmation of two Supreme Court justices — that were, he thought, “the right votes for the country.” “Partisans at both ends of the political spectrum,” said Lugar, “are dominating the political debate in our country … They have worked to make it as difficult as possible for a legislator of either party to hold independent views or engage in constructive compromise. If that attitude prevails in American politics, our government will remain mired in the dysfunction we have witnessed during the last several years.” The senator is in the ballpark. But he misstates the problem in two ways. In the first place, the issue is not partisanship, but hyper-partisanship, a mindset that prioritizes party above country. In the second place, Lugar’s sop to moral equivalence notwithstanding, this is not a problem caused by partisans “at both ends of the political spectrum.” It was not Democrats who held the economy hostage in a manufactured debt ceiling crisis that caused the nation’s credit rating to be lowered for the first time in history. It was not Democrats who voted down their own deficit reduction resolution, apparently because they didn’t want the president to share credit. It was not a Democratic leader who declared defeating the president his top legislative priority. No, it was Republicans who did all that. And it is not Democrats who have seen a steady trickle of condemnation and defection by their own appalled members. That trickle includes Nathan Fletcher, a San Diego mayoral candidate who left the GOP because, “I don’t believe we have to treat people we disagree with as an enemy.” And former Sen. Chuck Hagel, who said he was “disgusted” by the “irresponsible actions” of the GOP during the debt ceiling crisis. And congressional staffer Mike Lofgren, who likened his party to an “apocalyptic cult.” And former California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, who said too many in the GOP regard it as “an exclusive club where your ideological card is checked at the door.” In their new book, “It’s Even Worse Than It Looks,” Thomas E. Mann and Norman J. Ornstein argue that the GOP has “become an insurgent outlier — ideologically extreme; contemptuous of the inherited social and economic policy regime; scornful of compromise; unpersuaded by conventional understanding of facts, evidence and science; and dismissive of the legitimacy of its political opposition.” It is, they note, awkward for mainstream news media to report this because it might be seen as violating their ethos of non-bias or interpreted as blindness to the sins of Democrats. But it needs reporting, regardless. One cannot fix a problem one will not face. And the new cultishness of the Republican Party is certainly a problem. It should concern anyone who thinks democracy is best served when political parties offer coherent alternatives and hash them out in the marketplace of ideas — something the GOP no longer does. Or, as Lugar’s opponent, Richard Mourdock, said in response to Lugar’s statement: “I have a mindset that says bipartisanship ought to consist of Democrats coming to the Republican point of view.”

A PRESIDENTIAL race recently focused on high school has come to resemble a popularity contest of the same vintage. Hence, we read that women like Barack best (except when they don’t). Last week, a New York Times/CBS News poll shows women tilting toward Mitt and voters overall favoring him by 46 percent to 43 percent. But you know how girls are. A month ago, according to a CNN/ORC poll, women loved Obama 55 percent to 39 percent. Next week, check your Eight Ball. The concept of likability isn’t new, but this election provides fresh criteria. The old standard of judging candidates by which one you’d rather join for a beer doesn’t apply because Mormons don’t drink. No beer summits in a Romney administration. You can’t even figure with whom you’d rather share a cup of coffee. So we focus instead on which guy we like based on instincts that were honed in — you got it — high school. Almost daily, we hear that Romney isn’t (or wasn’t always) such a sweet guy. Most recent to the roster of his offenses is an event nearly 50 years ago when he and his prep school classmates tackled a longhaired boy (who later identified himself as gay) and lopped his locks. This report followed by a single day the president’s declaration of support for same-sex marriage. The comparison was grim for Romney, even if his bad behavior occurred five decades ago and despite his having no apparent animus toward the gay community. Under no fair debate can support for traditional marriage necessarily be construed as bigotry toward gays. The fact that Romney claims not to remember the hair-cutting incident is a curiosity to many, but not all. These differences of opinion will continue mostly as a Rorschach based on one’s own experiences as a high school student. For now, we leave such discussions to our inner voices in order to save a little space for the point of this column, which is that the Obama campaign seems dedicated to advancing the notion that Obama is the nicer guy and therefore should be re-elected. Polling supports this premise for now — with Obama twice as likable as Romney. The question is whether likability is enough when polling also shows that four in 10 voters think Obama’s policies will make their financial situations worse if he is re-elected. A case can be made that a campaign that focuses on likability is a campaign that doesn’t want to run on its record. A case also can be made that voters can be swayed by feel-good fare given the complexity of our problems. Thus, Obama has taken pains to demonstrate just how wonderful he really is — one demographic at a time. Here he is surrounded by adoring Barnard College graduates following a pro-woman commencement address, while a campaign ad asserts that Romney has thrown women under the bus. (See “Republican War on Women.”) Who you gonna like? The juxtaposition is reminiscent of Obama standing before a delirious mob in Berlin (Germany) while John McCain held forth before a half-dozen admirers at “Schmidt’s Restaurant und Sausage Haus” in German Village in Columbus, Ohio. In politics, it’s all about optics. Here’s Obama on the cover of Newsweek being promoted as the first gay president. This might help him with his base, but polls show that the broader voting audience isn’t strongly swayed one way or the other. Twothirds (67 percent) of those polled said Obama’s support for same-sex marriage was politically motivated, while 57 percent said it would have no effect on their vote. Finally, here’s an Obama ad characterizing Romney as a “vampire” who, while head of Bain Capital, sometimes profited from failed businesses that also sometimes resulted in job losses. This is otherwise known as

Leonard Pitts Jr., winner of the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for commentary, is a columnist for the Miami Herald, 1 Herald Plaza, Miami, FL 33132. Readers may write to him via email at lpitts@miamiherald.com.

MCT ILLUSTRATION

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By NANCY BENAC

Associated Press

ASHINGTON — The early border skirmishes of Campaign 2012 are reviving questions about one candidate’s former pastor and shining a spotlight on the other’s high school hijinks. Can a fresh round of questions about

President Barack Obama’s birth certificate be far behind? In a campaign year when voters have declared the economy their top concern, Obama and Mitt Romney are on notice that there’s no statute of limitations on the issues or conduct that might be used against them. And there’s sure to be somebody with money or other means to insert even low-threshold matters into the political dialogue. “It’s open season,” says Eric Dezenhall, an expert on crisis management. “This is going to be very rough.” Thursday’s disclosure that a Republican-leaning super PAC was considering a $10 million ad campaign highlighting Obama’s past links to inflammatory preacher Jeremiah Wright was just the latest evidence that if there ever were limits on what was fair game in a campaign, they’re largely history. That’s thanks to a flood of new money into politics, the ease of spreading political attacks via the Internet and changing attitudes about what’s an appropriate topic for discussion. Long gone are the days when candidates’ extramarital escapades were off-limits, photographers avoided taking pictures of Franklin D. Roosevelt in a wheelchair and a few newspapers and TV stations acted as gatekeepers. The New York Times quoted backers of this year’s Wright ad proposal as aiming to “do exactly what John McCain would not let us do” in the 2008 campaign. Romney repudiated the Wright plan, as did the super PAC financier weighing it. Nonetheless, Obama’s campaign accused Romney of refusing to “stand up to the most extreme voices in the Republican Party” and the president’s supporters were happy to associate Romney with what campaign strategist David Axelrod called the “purveyors of slime.” McCain, the 2008 GOP nomi-

AP PHOTOS

The early border skirmishes of Campaign 2012 are reviving questions about one candidate’s former pastor and shining a spotlight on the other’s high school hijinks. Can a fresh round of questions about President Barack Obama’s birth certificate be far behind?

nee, spoke out forcefully during the campaign four years ago against efforts to use Wright’s provocative speeches against Obama, and the issue largely subsided. But since then, a series of court cases has cleared the way for an onslaught of campaign ads from outside groups seeking to influence elections. Such so-called super PACs can be a megaphone for matters that would have gotten less attention in the past, and still allow candidates to deny they’re involved. But outside messengers who do the dirty work in campaigns are nothing new in presidential politics. Democrat Michael Dukakis in 1988 was the target of an infamous outside ad about a furloughed rapist named Willie Horton. Democrat John Kerry in 2004 saw his record as a Vietnam War hero mischaracterized and used against him by the outside group Swift Boat Veterans for Truth.

Political historian Evan Cornog, author of “The Power and the Story,” said the staying power of a particular issue or charge usually depends on whether it jibes with the public’s understanding of a candidate. “We are addicted to narratives, and if something fits with the story, it’s going to get some traction,” says Cornog. “A good political operative will have a fairly good sense of what will work and what will not work.” Both sides are experiencing this in real time: • Questions about Romney’s bad behavior toward classmates during his high school years, revealed in a recent Washington Post article, are being used to reinforce the profile that Romney’s critics have tried to create of the GOP candidate as a corporate bully. The Democratic National Committee circulated the Post See SPATS, Page 2E

See LIKABILITY, Page 2E


CMYK ➛

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

SPATS Continued from Page 1E

article and highlighted just one sentence about Romney’s behavior: “It was vicious.” • Questions about Obama’s ties to his former preacher’s incendiary rhetoric about America and about whether the president was truly born in Hawaii and is a Christian fit with broader efforts to paint Obama as radically different from most Americans. Romney earlier this year told an interviewer, “I’m not sure which is worse, him listening to Reverend Wright or him saying that we must be a less Christian nation.” That was a reference to remarks in which Obama actually did not promote a less Christian nation but observed growing religious diversity in the U.S. When something nicely fits with the profile that one side or the other is trying to build, it may endure long after a question has been duly asked and answered. • Questions about the validity of Obama’s Hawaii birth certifi-

“It’s open season. This is going to be very rough.” Eric Dezenhall An expert on crisis management

cate, for example, have been widely discredited, but they keep popping up. Donald Trump and Texas Gov. Rick Perry both toyed with it during the presidential primaries. A poll last May, after Obama had released his detailed Hawaii birth certificate, found that a third of Americans still thought he might have been born elsewhere or said they didn’t know. Cornog points to plenty of positive aspects to the free-wheeling exchange of ideas and information allowed by a broad variety of news sources and the Internet but also has a warning: “If you enter an age in which you have elective belief systems independent of fact, you have a problem for your political world.” AP News Survey Specialist Dennis Junius in Washington contributed this report.

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LIKABILITY Continued from Page 1E

capitalism, but never mind. For likability, see auto bailout. This last example is at least of a more substantive nature, suggesting a real debate about different approaches to the marketplace. But what’s clear for now is that Obama is hoping he can hold on to the affections of a coalition of admirers who will overlook his flaws simply because they like him. The larger truth of Romney’s adult life, including far more business successes than failures — not to mention a résumé of service to others — could tilt the likability meter in time, though one hopes for deeper soul-searching. Likability, like popularity contests, is so high school. Kathleen Parker’s email address is kathleenparker@washpost.com.

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Editorial

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 PAGE 3E

OUR OPINION: NOW WHAT?

Real-world advice for college grads

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REAT JOB, graduate. Well-wishes go to you and all the region’s recent college diploma recipients, including this weekend’s newly minted alumni of King’s College, Misericordia University and Wilkes University. As you probably realized during your four or more years on campus, life’s most important lessons often get conveyed outside of classrooms – sometimes prophetically, all too often painfully. With that in mind, we offer these unsolicited nuggets of wisdom intended partly to inspire (or amuse) and partly to guide you safely past common pitfalls of early adulthood. •••

• If you already haven’t, learn to cook. By that, we mean cook something other than a Stouffer’s microwave dinner. • Moving back home to live with your parents, particularly in this callous economy, should not shatter your self-esteem (or theirs). It’s all about the attitude with which you approach the situation. • In every situation, it’s all about the attitude. Adopt a healthy one. • Do your own laundry. This is especially true if you just moved back home. • When the bartender says it’s time to go, leave. Don’t make a scene. Just go. • Pursuing success is not the

same as pursuing fame. Don’t confuse the two; neither the rewards, nor the results, are going to be the same. • As soon as your monthly income exceeds your monthly expenses for necessities such as groceries, follow this progression: Buy first-rate insurance (auto and property) … then build an ample rainy day fund … then begin to invest. • A new Porsche 911 Carrera S is not a necessity. For that matter, if you plan on driving it every day, it’s not an investment. • Don’t fear love. Don’t chase love. Just give it. • Being a “good citizen” means more than voting; it means staying engaged in current events (global and local), speaking up, volunteering and voting. Be a good citizen. • Exercise. • Don’t put much stock in conventional wisdom; for example, this week, don’t put much stock in Facebook. • There are many ways to measure one’s wealth; calculating your net worth is probably the least revealing of them. • When faced with an ethical dilemma, choose the option that you won’t regret if the whole world reads about it later on Wikipedia. • Continue learning, because much of what you believe to be true today – including what you read here – might one day change.

QUOTE OF THE DAY “We have different political views on how to achieve what is best for the future of America …” Laura Ricketts The prominent lesbian activist and volunteer fundraiser for President Obama again this week noted the stark philosophical contrast with her father, J. Joseph Ricketts, 70, a politically conservative Nebraskan. He recently was linked to a plan, ultimately rejected, for a $1 0 million campaign that would have targeted Obama’s relationship with the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, the Chicago pastor known for racially incendiary sermons.

OTHER OPINION: PA. TURNPIKE

Put brakes on speed hike plan

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IKE OTHER legislators from Western Pennsylvania, state Rep. Joe Preston, a Democrat from East Liberty, spends a great deal of time driving the Pennsylvania Turnpike – 30 times a year by his reckoning. But the road to Harrisburg leaves plenty of time for thinking, and a lawmaker with time to spare can dream up trouble for the rest of us. Preston’s invitation to trouble comes in House Bill 2119, which would allow the turnpike commission to raise the maximum speed on the highway from 65 mph to 70 mph. The Legislature cannot order such a change, merely permit the turnpike to raise the speed limit if it so chooses – and this decision could not be made without a study to see if it safely can be done. The trouble with raising the speed limit to 70 mph is that, for most drivers, it immediately becomes more than 75 mph. They know that the state police cannot give tickets unless a driver is 6 mph or more over the posted

limit. Turnpike officials don’t need to do a study to find out if this change would be conducive to safety. They need only look at the experience of neighboring Ohio. As the Post-Gazette reported, the Ohio Turnpike raised its speed limit from 65 to 70 mph in April 2001 and experienced a 5.6 increase in crashes and a 17 percent rise in injuries through March this year. Although fatalities did not increase, they have risen in other states after speed limits went up. The old adage that speed kills has not changed, and driving faster is not only more dangerous, but also reduces fuel economy. Weren’t we all just complaining about the price of gasoline? HB 2119 recently passed the House Transportation Committee by a bipartisan 18-4 vote, but the full House needs to pull this one over. As for Preston, his long drives will soon end because voters in his district pulled him over in the primary. Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

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Editorial Board PRASHANT SHITUT President and CEO/Impressions Media MARK E. JONES JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ Vice President/Executive Editor Editorial Page Editor

Nursing mother just what the hype doctor ordered WHEN I first saw the new Time magazine cover of a nearly 4-year-old boy nursing on his mother’s exposed breast, I must admit it made me nostalgic. For a time when they wrapped magazines in brown paper. I’m no mothering expert, but I do believe, as a general rule, that if you are standing up and wearing long pants, your breast-feeding days are over. But what do I know? Using the headline “Are You Mom Enough?” Time has gotten tons of attention for its cover shot of 26-yearold Jamie Lynne Grumet yanking down one side of her tank top for her son Aram, who breast-feeds while standing on a stool and wearing – I’m not kidding here – sneakers and camouflage pants. Grumet is a devotee of attachment parenting – the subject of the cover story – and, I admit, she and her boy do look attached. Very attached. Although I wonder how hungry that poor kid must have been. I’ve been to photo shoots. They can take hours. Then again, why would the boy want to move? In their famous “2000 Year Old Man” routines, Mel Brooks tells Carl Reiner that the key to his long life was doing things slowly: “I breast-fed for 200 years.” He quickly adds, “I look back at that as the happiest part of my life.” But Brooks was making a comedy album. Time is trying to make a statement. Well, I take that back. First, Time was trying to make a splash. Then make money. Then make a statement.

enting techniques? Not long ago, it was the Tiger Mom. Even more recently was prechewing your child’s food. Every five minutes, there seems to be a new, better way to bring MITCH ALBOM up your kids. You wonder how adults ever managed for millions of years before Time needed to sell a copy. Why else do this cover? It’s 10 percent subAnd, as with other lifestyle magazine stostance and 90 percent shock value. Yes, Gruries, you wonder how many people are really met actually breast-feeds her son (and I feel living the trend, and how many are just gaping sorry for that kid when he hits school, now at the cover. Sears’ book has sold in excess of that the whole world has downloaded that image). But I doubt Grumet earned the cover a million copies over the last 20 years, but in a nation of more than 300 million people, that’s with her story. not big penetration. According to Dr. Lori Would the magazine have used her if she Feldman-Winter of the American Academy of were 50 pounds overweight and had a funny Pediatrics, “only 12 percent of American mothnose and frizzy hair? The fact that she is aters exclusively breast-feed even for the first six tractive and stands pitched in a slightly sexy months.” The number goes down after that. pose – wearing skinny jeans, with her shoulBreast-feeding has many benefits, and it ders bare and a hand on her hip – should tell should be celebrated, but ask yourself: Really, you what Time most wants from this whole how many people do you know who still are thing: buzz. nursing their 4-year-olds? Is this really a naAnd yes, we are helping the magazine achieve that by writing about it. But the image tional issue, or, like that famous picture of a is too omnipresent to ignore. And it has, for a naked, pregnant Demi Moore on the cover of few days (which is as long as anything lasts in Vanity Fair, just a great way to boost newsstand sales? America now), sparked another discussion The truth is, as enlightened as we think we over what makes a good parent. are, many Americans still get worked up over Attachment parenting was started by Dr. Bill Sears 20 years ago with a best seller called seeing an attractive woman’s naked breast on a magazine cover. To us, it’s a big story; to a “The Baby Book.” Sears suggests long-term breast-feeding, sleeping in the same bed as the baby, it’s breakfast. Makes you wonder: Who’s the mature one child and wearing the little one in a sling here? against your body. Personally, had I been raised in such a system, I would never have learned to walk. Why Mitch Albom is a columnist for the Detroit Free Press. Readers may write to him at: Detroit Free bother? I’m riding shotgun and sleeping next Press, 600 W. Fort St., Detroit, MI 48226, or via to my food source. email at malbom@freepress.com. Anyhow, why are we so fascinated by par-

COMMENTARY

A destructive Congress has placed U.S. in jeopardy “JEOPARDY!” WAS first broadcast on March 30, 1964 and has been an enduring franchise of American television for 40 years, airing uninterrupted since 1984. Winner of 29 Emmys, the popular game show will receive its first Peabody Award for “encouraging, celebrating and rewarding knowledge” at the 71st annual George Foster Peabody Awards ceremony Monday afternoon at the Waldorf Astoria in New York City. Businessman, philanthropist and social activist George F. Peabody worked to promote education and humanitarian causes. Though he held no high government position, refusing several invitations, Peabody was active in national politics and a close confidant to many public officials, including presidents Grover Cleveland, Woodrow Wilson and Franklin Roosevelt. It was Peabody who invited Roosevelt to his estate in Warm Springs, Ga., after FDR had been diagnosed with polio. Roosevelt subsequently purchased the warm springs property for his own use and the rehabilitation of others. It was a time when people of substance got things done. Peabody and Roosevelt would not recognize the current deplorable state of American governance, our deteriorating infrastructure and the destructive U.S. Congress that places our nation, its people and economy in serious, if not final, jeopardy. Let’s play. “The Destructive U.S. Congress for $200.” The Answer Is: U.S. Sen. Richard Lugar, RInd.

“The Destructive U.S. Congress for $600.” The Answer Is: Sarah Palin’s Senate candidate fav. Who is Debra Fischer of Nebraska? IN THE ARENA Fischer won the Nebraska U.S. Senate Republican primary on Tuesday. The littleknown state legislator surged past Attorney Whose defeat is a perfect manifestation of General Jon Bruning in the final days of the how utterly destructive the U.S. House and campaign, following an endorsement by Palin Senate have become? (not kidding) and a silo of money spent On May 8 Indiana’s most respected public official and longtime senator Richard Lugar, a attacking Bruning courtesy of Chicago Cubs owner and creator of TD Ameritrade, Joseph Rhodes Scholar, Navy veteran and the Senate’s authority on foreign affairs, was crushed Ricketts …. and the 2010 decision of America’s Supreme Court. in the state’s Republican primary by perenThese and elections to come occur against nial right-wing candidate and state Treasurer the backdrop of Tuesday’s comments by Richard Mourdock. Speaker of the House John Boehner suggestiMourdock’s fringe campaign based on ng congressional Republicans are prepared disdain for compromise, cooperation and once again to take our nation toward ecoproblem-solving was supported by conservanomic Armageddon over the necessity of tive super-PACs now able to raise and spend raising America’s debt ceiling. unlimited amounts of cash from anonymous “The Destructive U.S. Congress for $800.” sources capable of hijacking an unlimited The answer is: Bob Kerrey and Joseph number of elections – all because of a 2010 Donnelly. decision by the U.S. Supreme Court. Ask Who are the Democratic nominees for Newt and Rick about it. A loyal conservative and honored member Senate in Nebraska and Indiana? Will enough registered Republicans and of the GOP, Lugar was subjected to a relentindependents in these reddest of states reject less assault of negative ads perpetrated by obstructionism and vote for a couple of Demextreme members of his own party. They ocrats: Kerrey, the popular former governor, operate the strings from above and exercise former U.S. senator and Medal of Honor their democracy-stunting power in low-turnwinner from Nebraska, and Donnelly, the out Republican primaries. moderate-fighting Irishman and congressman Lugar received 257,687 primary votes to 391,689 for Mourdock. Yet Mourdock’s num- from South Bend? “Destructive U.S. Congress for $1,000.” ber represents only 14 percent of the HooThe Answer Is: Angus King siers who will vote in November’s general Who is … election. However, preventing Mourdock from filling another do-nothing, obstructionist chair Kevin Blaum’s column on government, life and on the floor of the U.S. Senate will not be politics appears every Sunday. Contact him at kblaum@timesleader.com. easy.

KEVIN BLAUM


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Keep art, music alive in schools

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SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

icture, if you will, holidays without decorations: bare walls in homes, restaurants and schools. Refrigerators are bare for lack of children’s artwork; everything looks dark and drab. No color, no excitement, no individual expression. Picture parades without marching bands, no background music on television and in movies, no theme songs with which to hum along. How about quiet sporting events? No iPods, no radio stations, no catchy tunes to let you know you have a cellphone call. Picture quiet graduation ceremonies, weddings, birthdays, even amusement parks. Now think of our children or grandchildren with no school plays, programs or concerts in which to perform. Picture a world in which there is no outlet for children to be able to express themselves and live well-rounded lives. Every night on the news and every day in the newspaper we see another school district cutting art and music programs, or choosing not to replace retiring art and music teachers, which is a future death for those programs. We know the number of art and music teachers in any given district is a very small percentage of the full faculty, but this is what we cut? We also know that things are tough; people understand that, but if anyone thinks their taxes will not be raised because of these cuts, they are fooling themselves. Taxes will forever be raised to the max whether we can afford it or not, but the students will pay the biggest price of all. These are our children, our future; it has to be more than only dollars and cents. Please, someone, find the solution. I would like all school board members and administrators to spend one week without music and art of any kind. See

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if it is even possible. See if you want to be part of a future without new expressions in these areas. Yes, I understand you have tough decisions to make. But shame on any of you who vote to diminish or eliminate art and music in our schools. Marlene Chamberlain Pittston

Reader addresses school spending

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t the April meeting of the Crestwood School Board, I asked the board members what the state constitution says about paying for education and sports. No board member answered, so the superintendent did. He told me there is nothing in the constitution about paying for sports or extracurricular activities, only the cost of education. In 1960 I graduated from Nanticoke High, where boys played baseball, basketball and football. Most kids played sports in alleyways, where telephone poles had hoops or baskets, or played baseball and football on empty fields. Today, we have both boys and girls in sports such as field hockey, softball and probably a dozen others. This is great, and I am all for it. But, pay for it in the proper way; don’t force taxpayers to pay for sports. Go by the constitution. The $5,000 spent for a softball coach would be better spent on things such as school supplies. Hopefully, someone with legal knowledge will look into this injustice to taxpayers. They also should see what could be done about the cost

of some teachers being more than $100 per hour. Three months of summer pay should stop, as well as sabbatical pay, personal holidays, life insurance, health insurance and much more. If teachers agree to a reasonable cost for their work, they won’t have to lay off other teachers. Have common sense: Eighty-five percent of the budget goes to salaries, which means no school supplies and layoffs for teachers. I do know the teachers teaching my grandkids do a superb job. Hopefully, they will all see what is right for everyone, not only themselves. Ed Tomko Sr. Dorrance Township

It’s boom/bust in gas industry

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isericordia University President Michael MacDowell wrote a commentary earlier this year titled “Shale exploration holds promise for Pennsylvania and the country” that asserted this state will enjoy an economic boom, as natural gas extraction will supply a clean-burning and abundant source of energy that will make our country less dependent on foreign oil. Recent articles from national news outlets disagree. A Wall Street Journal article (“Natural-gas windfall wanes,” March 13) describes how the 2008 discovery of the Haynesville Shale in DeSoto Parish, La., was a windfall for tax revenue and businesses catering to the drilling industry, but is now feeling an economic backlash. “In recent

months, the hotels and RV parks that were built to accommodate energy workers have sat half-empty,” the article states. “Restaurants have seen their sales collapse. Local landowners have seen their royalty checks from drilling companies fall by half in some cases.” The same article identifies a similar trend playing out in parts of Texas, Arkansas and Pennsylvania as companies move to hunt for oil in (other) parts of Texas, Oklahoma and Ohio. It is well-documented that extraction industries can lead to a “boom and bust” economy – something that we in Northeastern Pennsylvania know well because of the “King Coal” era. While gas drilling might produce limited, short-term economic gains, it might be devastating to communities in the intermediate to long term. It is likely to cause declines in our important existing industries such as agriculture, tourism, hunting, fishing and river recreation. Anticipate huge costs to the region, including maintenance and repair of over-used infrastructure, environmental degradation, human health costs and increased demands on social services and first responders. Homeowners can expect trouble refinancing and insuring properties on or near gas drilling, with the possibility of reduced property values and tax revenues. MacDowell’s commentary stated that natural gas has one-third the carbon footprint of coal and half that of oil. While it is true that natural gas is one of the cleanest burning fossil fuels, recent scientific studies and reviews – including those from Cornell University, the University of Colorado Boulder, NASA Climate Scientist Drew Shindell, Climate Progress and Post Carbon – conclude that the energy-intensive process of extracting gas from shale puts full-cycle greenhouse gas emissions as equal to or worse than coal over a 20-year time-

frame. This includes the production and transportation of methane, which is 105 times more powerful than carbon dioxide as a global warming contributor. The commentary also noted that there is an estimated 50-year supply of natural gas. Actually, there is realistically only about a four-year supply of natural gas in the Marcellus. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, there are about 84 trillion cubic feet of technically recoverable natural gas in the Marcellus, while the U.S. Energy Information Administration reports that in 2011 the United States consumed 24.37 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. The industry has spent millions of dollars on ads that equate natural gas extraction with freedom from foreign energy sources. Dr. MacDowell asserted that natural gas can provide domestic security for Americans. Why, then, is the industry selling off its interests to foreign corporations and developing plans to liquefy the gas for transportation overseas? Dr. MacDowell wrote: “How do we ensure that our region will be minimally exposed to risk from the growth of natural gas extraction and its various spin-offs? That is the $64,000 question.” In our opinion, this question should have been answered long before drilling ever began. After studying this industry for more than two years, it is the opinion of the Gas Drilling Awareness Coalition that the economic benefits to Northeastern Pennsylvania have been greatly exaggerated and the environmental costs have been gravely underestimated. Dr. MacDowell said, “Perhaps greater assurances are needed.” With that, we are in agreement. Dr. Tom Jiunta Spokesman Gas Drilling Awareness Coalition Lehman Township

Writer contradicts Watson column

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n columnist John Watson’s commentary on May 6, “The time for government intervention is now,” he claims additional government stimulus is necessary to boost our economy. He also states that economist Paul Krugman, who is widely known for his controversial Keynesian theory that massive government spending during World War II ended the Depression, has been making the same recommendation. While Mr. Krugman’s demand-side theory might appear sound, historical records show that many economically friendly supply-side factors appeared during World War II and shortly afterwards, which conversely also could have ended the Depression. These supply-side factors include: lowering taxes, repealing import tariffs, Franklin Delano Roosevelt stopping his war on business because he needed corporations to produce war equipment and munitions, FDR ending his experimental economic programs that caused market fluctuations and therefore made long-term planning and investment impossible, FDR ending his meddlesome New Deal and lawmakers rejecting FDR’s proposed New Deal Revival that included governmentsponsored health care. Mr. Watson also claims government fear of spending caused the Depression. His hypothesis contradicts historical records that show President Hoover’s spending created a deficit that was heretofore the largest in U.S. history, and FDR’s spending increased the deficit by 83 percent. The widely accepted causes of the Depression are increased wages, increased taxes and import tariffs. Bill Ostrowski Exeter

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Same-sex marriage: Empathy or right? THERE ARE two ways to defend gay marriage. Argument A is empathy: One is influenced by gay friends in committed relationships yearning for the fulfillment and acceptance that marriage conveys upon heterosexuals. That’s essentially the case President Obama made when he first announced his change of views. No talk about rights, just human fellow feeling. Such an argument is attractive because it can be compelling without being compulsory. Many people, feeling the weight of this longing among their gay friends, are willing to redefine marriage for the sake of simple human sympathy. At the same time, however, one can sympathize with others who feel great trepidation at the radical transformation of the most fundamental of social institutions, one that, until yesterday, was heterosexual in all societies in all places at all times. The empathy argument both encourages mutual respect in the debate and lends itself to a political program of gradualism. State by state, let community norms and moral sensibilities prevail. Indeed, that is Obama’s stated position. Such pluralism allows for the kind of “stable settlement of the issue” that Ruth Bader Ginsburg once lamented had been “halted” by Roe v. Wade regarding abortion, an issue as morally charged and politically unbridgeable as gay marriage. Argument B is more uncompromising: You have the right to marry anyone, regardless of gender. The right to “marriage equality” is today’s civil rights, voting rights and women’s rights – and just as inviolable. Argument B has extremely powerful implications. First, if same-sex marriage is a right, then there is no possible justification for letting states decide for themselves. How can you countenance even one state outlawing a fundamental right? Indeed, half a century ago, states’ rights was the cry of those committed to continued segregation and discrimination. Second, if marriage equality is a civil right, then denying it on the basis of (innately felt) sexual orientation is, like discrimination on the basis of skin color, simple bigotry. California’s Proposition 8 was overturned by a 9th Circuit panel on the grounds that the referendum, reaffirming marriage as between a man and woman, was nothing but an

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ANOTHER VIEW

A photograph by Pete G. Wilcox and words by Mark E. Jones

COMMENTARY CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER expression of bias – “serves no purpose ... other than to lessen the status and human dignity of gays and lesbians.” Pretty strong stuff. Which is why it was so surprising that Obama, after first advancing Argument A, went on five days later to adopt Argument B, calling gay marriage a great example of “expand(ing) rights” and today’s successor to civil rights, voting rights, women’s rights and workers’ rights. Problem is: It’s a howling contradiction to leave up to the states an issue Obama now says is a right. And beyond being intellectually untenable, Obama’s embrace of the more hard-line “rights” argument compels him logically to see believers in traditional marriage as purveyors of bigotry. Not a good place for a president to be in an evenly divided national debate that requires both sides to offer each other a modicum of respect. No wonder that Obama has been trying to get away from the issue as quickly as possible. It’s not just the New York Times poll showing his new position to be a net loser. It’s that he is too intelligent not to realize he’s embraced a logical contradiction. Moreover, there is the problem of the obvious cynicism of his conversion. Two-thirds of Americans see his “evolution” as a matter not of principle but of politics. In fact, the change is not at all an evolution – a teleological term cleverly chosen to suggest movement toward a higher state of being – given that Obama came out for gay marriage 16 years ago. And then flip-flopped. He was pro when running for the Illinois Legislature from ultra-liberal Hyde Park. He became anti when running eight years later for U.S. senator and had to appeal to a decidedly more conservative statewide constituency. And now he’s pro again. Notwithstanding a comically fawning press, Obama knows he has boxed himself in. His “rights” argument compels him to nationalize same-sex marriage and sharpen hostility to proponents of traditional marriage – a place he is loath to go. True, he was rushed into it by his loquacious vice president. But surely he could have thought this through. Charles Krauthammer’s email address is letters@charleskrauthammer.com.

might be a wonderful, ‘wireless’ world, but don’t kid yourself. You still kicked that oversized appetite for power. I thaven’t

Preserve area’s priceless watershed at all costs THERE IS a woman out here in Seattle whom I revere. She’s a real peach. An economics graduate from Catholic University in Washington, D.C., her opinion on a wide range of issues is smart, informed and kind. “The Northwest is the future for one simple reason: Water,” she said to me recently. Bingo. She is right again. She is a committed treehugger and liberal, which makes her a socialist. But she is also the West Coast representative for a Washington, D.C., mutual fund company, which makes her a capitalist. Her analysis is supported by research and fact. In Seattle, she points out, the quality of the public water system is of utmost importance and they watch over it like a little child. The Seattle area has one of the best managed and cleanest watershed areas in the world. Very few regions of the country have sustainable public water systems. Luckily, Northeastern Pennsylvania is one of them. In the 1970s, my baptism in

system is, as the Mittster would say, marvelous. The entire system, from the Scranton area right through JOHN WATSON Wilkes-Barre, is gravity fed. There’s hardly a pump in the whole system. public life was when my faThis watershed is essential ther joined an effort to prefor future generations of serve that watershed area. Scranton/Wilkes-Barre resiAt the time, Pennsylvania Gas and Water Co. laughably dents and future economic proposed to build a filtration development. Protect it at all costs. Compromise when it plant on the Susquehanna makes sense, but don’t let River in order to open the watershed area to real estate anyone or any company steal your watershed for real esdevelopment. tate speculation. Don’t throw My father joined activists such as Mary Allen of Moosic the baby out with the bathwater, so to speak. and Ed Zygmund of Dupont The future belongs to those (and many others) in a fight to protect the watershed. The places that have plentiful, clean water because much of only regional political figure to back our cause was former the rest of the country will face serious water shortages. state Sen. Ray Musto. “Have you seen the Rio In the end, a compromise Grande?” says my Seattle was reached. Some watershed land was used for the oracle. “It is anything but recreation, business and resi- grand today. It’s a trickle.” “By the time the Colorado dential development of the River reaches the Southwest, Montage Mountain, but the priceless watershed area was it is bone dry,” she adds. “They literally use all the preserved. water generated by the westDon’t you love it when ern Rockies.” people work together? My Seattle sage is my 35Northeastern Pennsylvania year-old daughter, a Scranton is blessed with many manPreppie who, in 2008, used made reservoirs built during her vacation time to go back the Great Depression to get to Pittston to knock on doors people back to work. The for Barack Obama. Next engineering of the water

COMMENTARY

This watershed is essential for future generations of Scranton/Wilkes-Barre residents and future economic development. Protect it at all costs. Compromise when it makes sense, but don’t let anyone or any company steal your watershed for real estate speculation. month, she will be giving birth to my second grandson. Of course, as with any father-daughter relationship, we don’t agree on everything. She still has confidence in “responsible corporate governance,” for example. In a new book, “Lizz Free Or Die” – “The Daily Show” co-creator Lizz Winstead tells a story about her father that reminds me of our situation. “I raised you to have an opinion,” her father said. “I just forgot to tell you it was my opinion.” A belated Happy Mother’s Day to my muse and collaborator, Pamela Watson Rivers. She’s a peach. John Watson is the former editor of the Sunday Dispatch in Pittston. He lives in Seattle.

The ‘Great Books’ of Western civilization are still worth studying SOMETHING WE haven’t heard many university commencement speakers discuss this year is our Western heritage – or the related topics of “Western civilization,” “Great Books” or “the classics.” The hostility to such topics is not new; it goes back at least four decades. It reached its apex in 1988, when Jesse Jackson led a demonstration at Stanford University, chanting “Hey hey, ho ho, Western Civ has got to go” – referring to a Stanford course that featured such authors as Homer and Voltaire. Stanford did, of course, drop the course, and since that time most schools that even bother to teach “Western Civ” have tended to apologize for doing so. Many academics, politicians and self-professed intellectuals dismiss 2,000 years of Western writing and thinking as the offspring of an imperialistic, sexist and despotic European culture, whose last remnant is found in the United States. They view the Great Books of our heritage as antiquated and illegitimate, unworthy of a contemporary education.

COMMENTARY JANE S. SHAW To the contrary, if we delegitimize “Western civilization,” we delegitimize humankind’s long march from drudgery to comparative luxury. As Nathan Rosenberg and L.E. Birdzell Jr. wrote in their book, “How the West Grew Rich,” “If we take the long view of human history and judge the economic lives of our ancestors by modern standards, it is a story of almost unrelieved wretchedness.” What made this transition from “unrelieved wretchedness” possible? While experts offer many opinions, there is widespread agreement among serious scholars that the economic forces of the Industrial Revolution largely were responsible – and that these forces were closely intertwined with the development of ideas about liberty. Liberty was a necessary precursor to the Industrial Revolution because it made possible the freedom to own property, the freedom of scientific inquiry and the freedom to explore new ideas.

But how did we get those freedoms? The idea that people have an inalienable right to be free (however much they are enslaved in practice) must have come from somewhere. The study of Western civilization explains the origins. Some people (I am one) argue that the transformation of the West started with new concepts introduced as far back as early Judaism and Christianity, such as the separation of divine and earthly sovereignty. Others credit the Middle Ages, thanks to competition caused by fragmented power (popes, kings, nobility and cities vying with one another) and the development of property rights out of feudalism. Others believe the phenomenon came much later, reflecting the science of Francis Bacon, the support of free speech by John Milton, the property theories of John Locke and the classical liberalism of Adam Smith. To argue for the study of Western civilization is not to argue against the study of Eastern civilization or African or native American civilizations. At the very least, however, the intellectual history of Europe – with its foundations in the cultures of Greece and Rome and in the religions of the Middle East, including Islam – chron-

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Amid the pomp and circumstance, is there no room on campus for Plato?

icles the gradual, fitful and often violent progress of humans toward freedom. While the writings of “dead white males,” such as Bacon and Locke, might not have caused the transformation of the world into its modern condition, in which liberty is considered inalienable, those writings accompanied that development and shed light on it. Not all “Great Books,” of course, are inherently great in terms of their insights, beauty of language or precision of logic – though many are.

They are worth reading and studying, however, because they chronicle human progress and the monumental changes that enabled vast numbers of people to move out of desperate poverty to a decent life. Commencement speakers who focus only on the here and now do us a great disservice. Jane S. Shaw is president of the John W. Pope Center for Higher Education Policy, 333 E. Six Forks Road, Raleigh, N.C. 27609; website: www.popecenter.org.


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Upward Bound grads lauded

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am a 1995 graduate of the Wilkes University Upward Bound Program and serve as the secretary of its alumni association. I am writing with great pleasure to congratulate the 45th graduating class of the university’s Upward Bound program. Best of luck wherever your roads might lead you. The goal of Upward Bound is to increase the rate at which participants complete secondary education and enroll in and graduate from institutions of postsecondary education. Having this successful program in our community for 45 years is a great accomplishment. Having 45 years of graduates is a tremendous feat for the alumni association, which, together with current and past students, fights for this program time and time again. It also is with great pleasure that I am able to participate in preparations for the 45th anniversary celebration of Upward Bound. We are planning a spectacular family get-together on July 22 on the Wilkes University campus. If you want information, or if you would like to let the alumni association know where you are today, please contact me at kelleyconner220@yahoo.com. Kelley Ceppa Conner Swoyersville

Tebow considered perfect role model

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ike a breath of fresh air for our country, and in particular for sports, we have Tim Tebow. This young hero is setting the right example. In reading Tim’s book, a bestseller, one can learn about his family-oriented young life in the Philippines. His mother and father were missionaries there. We see how the Christian faith was the main consideration; there was love and obedience in their home. Tim

always did his best in everything he did. I have tears in my eyes when I see him praying on the football field and elsewhere. There is no materialism and consumerism in him. I look forward to seeing him play for the New York Jets. Frank Mrufchinski Nanticoke

Working together, they aided shelter

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fter reading a recent article that expressed the need for a roof over the dog kennel at the Blue Chip Farms Animal Refuge located in Franklin Township, I was inspired by the Lord to fill the need. I was moved by the work done by Marge Bart and Tanya Stankus, who run the shelter. No animal they care for is euthanized. In fact, they provide food, shelter, love, grooming and veterinarian care. More than 200 animals are adopted out to loving homes annually. My faith in the Lord opened the door to get this project done. My wife Janice was very supportive and came up with the idea of having 10 area businesses each donate $100, and we would incur any additional costs and supply the labor. I enlisted the help of my nephew Tim Sarnak and my niece’s husband Scott Martin, who are both in the construction business. The moment I told them what needed to be done, these outstanding men agreed and provided the skills and labor necessary. We raised more than $1,900, as many individuals and business wanted to help the cause. It was enough for the project

and more, which Blue Chip will put to great use. I want to acknowledge the generosity of these businesses and individuals: Fino’s Pharmacy, Valentines Jewelry, Back Mountain Professional Insurance, Rainbow Jewelry, Compassionate Care Hospice, Pizza Perfect, McCarthy Tire and Auto Center, Hoof and Paw, Pauline and Santo Sperazza, Kost Tire, Elements of Style, T&F Tire, Age of Innocence, Wegmans grocery, Vantage Trust Federal Credit Union, Jack Williams Tire and Auto, Leggio’s Restaurant, My Sisters Closet, Penn Star Bank, Delta Paper and the staff of HCC/Celtic Care Home Health. More information on the animal refuge is available on the web or by calling (570) 333-5265. Bill Sarnak Harding

W-B Twp. section being neglected

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hen is the Stanton Hill section of Wilkes-Barre Township finally going to get help? Where are the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the Environmental Protection Agency and the area news media concerning property at the end of Augusta Street and behind the playground on Anderson Street? Health and safety issues have to be addressed. I have contacted all parties concerned, because residents have asked for my help. Soil testing has to be implemented because of the potential for oil, gas and stagnant water to go into the soil. Children can get hurt. Where is the ordinance that

Obama, not GOP, will help country

was passed three years ago to make sure a full fence was put up? Explain and address the issue, Mayor Carl Kuren. Where are council members? Show community involvement. People, now you know: John “Red” O’Brien for mayor was the real solution – the only solution.

I

have trouble with double standards the Republicans have when it comes to a lot of things, but especially when it comes to Obama using his accomplishments and they call it “politicizing.” What is it when all you see in the newspaper is Congressmen Lou Barletta and Tom Marino holding meetings right before election time? Where were they before? The people are waking up and seeing that we had a donothing Congress. Who in their right mind as a politician would sign a pledge to not raise taxes when we are in a recession? Now you see who is going to pay for that pledge. Your taxes won’t stop going up, but the top 1 percent doesn’t have to worry. When it comes to jobs, the states with Republican governors such as ours are laying off teachers and government workers. Obama is trying to make jobs, and the Republicans are getting rid of them. Now how do you fix the jobs problem when you are up against that kind of opposition? It’s all about keeping the unemployment numbers high so Obama looks bad come November. With all the big money against Obama coming from Citizens United, the only thing that Obama has is the

Joseph Naperkowski Wilkes-Barre

Resident defends W-B Twp. mayor

I

find Joe Naperkowski’s letters attacking the mayor not credible. It seems Mr. Naperkowski is unaware that Wilkes-Barre Township has two meetings every month, and all bills are presented and made public. The mayor summarizes these reports and the state of affairs. It seems, Mr. Naperkowski, that your “henchmen” at the locations you fancy (i.e. the garage at which you hang out) are misinforming you. You are not a resident of Wilkes-Barre Township and do not pay taxes to the township. This suggests your unwarranted, abusive attacks on the mayor are personal and transparent as glass. And you do know what they say about those who live in glass houses, don’t you? Alex Milanes Wilkes-Barre Township

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was driving north on Interstate 81 the other day; traffic was down to one lane because of road work. I was a couple of car lengths away from a pickup truck from Virginia. It had a bumper sticker: “O__ B__ A__ M__ A__” “One Bad A** Mistake, America” I agree. I keep hearing from those currently in charge of our government and their surrogates: “The (Republicans) want us to go back to the failed policies of the past.” I got to thinking: When did the economy go bad? What new laws were added from the time it was doing “good,” (the Clinton administration), to when the economy went bad? It’s only been a couple of years. Even ABC’s “World News Tonight” must have that in its archives. What new laws were added from the time it was doing good to when the economy went bad? Remove them! Andy Wydra Dorrance Township

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SECTION F SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

Funny or Die all grown-up, thriving at 5 By CHRISTOPHER BORRELLI Chicago Tribune

Despite injury, painter inspired by faith, nature By MARY THERESE BIEBEL

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GETTING TO KNOW HENRY RODRIGUEZ • Born in Castillo San Francisco de Macoris, Dominican Republic, in 1977 • Graduated from Osvaldo Garcia of the Concha High School • Studied privately with Guillo Perez, one of the Dominican Republic’s famous painters • Recently opened Art & Framing gallery, 673 Hazle St., Wilkes-Barre • Leads Spanish-language services at First Assembly of God Church, Stanton Street, Wilkes-Barre.

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waterfall tumbles in the mountains. A flamboyán tree blazes brilliant red. A stone-lined street leads

through Santo Domingo’s historic “old city.” Wilkes-Barre artist Henry Rodriguez has painted all

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

these and more – the curving brook, the colorful cabins,

AT TOP: The scenes artist Henry Rodriguez paints can represent reality or imagination. AT LEFT: This painting depicts a street in Santo Domingo, where Rodriguez grew up. BELOW: Rodriguez in his art and framing shop.

the water birds looking for fish – sometimes from memory or a photograph, sometimes from pure imagination. What inspires him? “La luz. The light,” he says. Helping as translator during an interview, Rodriguez’s friend Eddy Cortes explains Rodriguez is very happy to have recently opened his Art & Framing shop in the 600 block of Hazle Street in Wilkes-Barre. Ever since the artist moved to Northeastern Pennsylvania, it has been his goal to open a gallery similar to the one in which he showcased his work in the Dominican Republic. But the road has not been easy. Soon after his arrival in 2005 he found a job in a local factory, and that December, a horrifying accident with a piece of sharp ma-

chinery cost him all four fingers on his left hand. There was terrible pain, he remembers, followed by a helicopter flight to Philadelphia, during which he lost consciousness. At first, doctors hoped they could save some of his fingers. But it was not to be. “It turned black,” Rodriguez said. “The doctor had to cut, cut, cut.” He is thankful his dominant right hand was spared, but, without his left hand, it is more difficult to hold a palette or clean brushes, the artist said through See ARTIST, Page 4F

New album is natural evolution By CHRIS BARTON Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Mention that Norah Jones has a new record and most likely an aural picture emerges. Maybe it’s a hazard of success or having such a recognizable, lightly sanded voice, but after she took home five Grammys for the nearly inescapable “Come Away With Me” in 2003, Norah Jones’ particular brand of song craft became synonymous with an understated, ballad-friendly sound that was always tasteful but sometimes a bit unobtrusive. “If there was no Adele or Norah, what would they play in coffee shops and hotels?” one prominent jazz musician playfully

AP PHOTO

“I don’t think I’ve made the same record over and over. I think I’ve made a pretty natural evolution to this point.” Norah Jones

asked on Twitter recently, pairing two runaway Grammy winners of the past 10 years. Yet this perception overlooks that Norah Jones has been steadily moving away from the sultry, nocturnal atmosphere of her previous records. The daughter of sitar great Ravi Shankar, Jones exploded out of the New York City jazz scene in the early ’00s and built a steady career

on albums that elegantly nodded toward jazz, country and pop in a manner that merged well with public spaces seeking a hip (but not too hip) backdrop. But a shift began coming into focus in 2009 with “The Fall,” which took Jones into a more shuffling, rock-oriented direction with guest turns from indie heroes Ryan Adams and Okkervil River’s Will Sheff. Her new album, “Little Broken Hearts,” goes a significant step further with the help of uber-producer Danger Mouse (a.k.a. Brian Burton), whose eclectic, funk-dusted touch has been heard with Gnarls Barkley, Broken Bells and the Black Keys. Though layered with curious sounds and effects, Jones emphaSee NORAH, Page 4F

CHICAGO — Five years ago the influential comedy website Funny or Die took a few baby steps and uploaded its first video, a rough, hastily assembled sketch that starred, appropriately enough, a baby. Pearl McKay was 2 years old at the time, the daughter of parents deeply rooted in Chicago — her mother, Shira Piven, grew up in Evanston, Ill., the sister of actor Jeremy Piven. Pearl’s father, Adam McKay, got his start in the Chicago comedy scene in the early ’90s, then left in 1995 to become a writer at “Saturday Night Live.” The video was called “The Landlord” and featured Pearl screaming at McKay’s comedy partner, Will Ferrell. Back then, expectations for Funny or Die, which seemed like just another mingling of originally produced comedy videos and user-uploaded material, fell somewhere in line with scores of other, similar Hollywood-Internet hybrid misfires — remember Dot Comedy (NBC), Pop (Steven Spiel- “The Landberg) and SuperDe- lord,” the luxe (TBS)? Five years later, most-watched Funny or Die, which video in FoD McKay, Ferrell and history, has “Entourage” execu- been viewed tive producer Chris Henchy founded on a more than 80 whim (and with the million times friendly urging of a venture capital firm), is way beyond baby steps. You might say, to keep the metaphor going, it already has graduated and become a media mogul: This fall there will be four Funny or Die-branded TV shows, two Web series and a movie in production, said CEO Dick Glover. It recently launched an iPad magazine, announced a deal to provide some of the in-flight entertainment for Virgin Airlines and started a commercial division. It’s become the place where stars and corporations alike go to seem a little subversive. “The Landlord,” the most-watched video in FoD history, has been viewed more than 80 million times, and the site gets 17 million visitors a month. Glover, who said Funny or Die became profitable in late 2010, has not ruled out the possibility (“someday, just not right now”) of an initial public offering for Funny or Die stock. McKay, currently prepping “Anchorman 2” (set in the late ’70s, during the transition from traditional newscasts to the 24-7 cable universe, he teased), took time out recently to talk by phone about the site’s evolution since 2007. The following is an edited version of a longer conversation. Q: When you first started in comedy, moving from Philadelphia to Chicago in 1990, going through Second City and iO and co-founding the Upright Citizens Brigade, were you making short videos back then? A: Yes! And there was no place to put them. There was no outlet. We made them anyway. It was like an animal instinct. A group of us stuck together, Matt Besser, Horatio Sanz, Ian Roberts. It was as if everyone’s collective (subconscious) knew the Internet was coming. We would show them in the lobby before (UCB) shows. The first video was about a bunch of us coming back from a party. We were in a car, which speaks to how little we knew what we were doing — shooting in cars is the worst. One of us kept doing a Jack Nicholson impression, then kept doing it, until we’re like, “Hey, really, stop it.” That turns into a fight. Q: Later, at “Saturday Night Live,” you brought short films back in the 1990s, which had been this marginal thing at “SNL,” though the tradition went back to the first season. Sounds like you really wanted to direct. A: Actually, it went exactly like that! I was going to quit the show. I had been head writer for a couple of years, and there was all this stuff I wanted to try, but ultimately it’s (Lorne Michaels’) show and I should politely move on. My manager said, “If you’re going to quit, make an unreasonable demand. What would you want in your dream world?” I didn’t want to go to production meetSee FUNNY, Page 5F


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NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE

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KENKEN

1. Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1 through 4. 2. The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called cages, must combine using the given operation (in any order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners. 3. Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the top-left corner.

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Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis

JUMBLE

ARIES (March 21-April 19). Some days it’s best to let yourself go soft, and other days you benefit from tapping into something stronger inside you. That’s what will work for you now. If you indulge sad feelings, they will just keep coming. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Look at the routine tasks in your life. For each one, ask yourself: Is this necessary or just habitual? Consider whether your time would be better spent on a different activity. Delegate where you can. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). You might spend a good portion of your day doing someone a favor. It’s not wasted time. You’ll enjoy yourself and learn something new, and you’ll build up karma points to cash in at a later date. CANCER (June 22-July 22). Do you understand how you make a difference in this world? There are multiple ways in which you contribute to the lives of others. A friend helps you see how great you are. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). You’ll operate in a group of people who are committed to meeting one common goal. You may not technically be the team leader, but it will fall to you to keep the team motivated to achieve that goal. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). You’re spread a bit thin. Starting too many projects at one time is disempowering because you never get to feel like you’re winning at any of them. Narrow your task list so you can see — and celebrate — its completion. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). You might have to miss out on a spur-of-themoment opportunity, and rightly so. Stick to your plan. You can always ask for more notice and a second chance. You’ll find a way to work it into your schedule at a later date. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). There are things you couldn’t possibly know about that you nonetheless get right on the first try. The guesses you make will turn out to be both intelligent and intuitive. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). You genuinely want to help people and make them happy. But you can’t say yes to everyone. You’ll think of ways to say no that are so brilliant, they come across like you’re saying yes. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). No one has to tell you about perseverance. You know that if you don’t give up, you can’t fail. It’s as simple as that. Try and try again, using different methods to achieve the result you are looking for. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). What comes around goes around — and rather quickly today. This is a fact that favors you because you’ve gone out of your way to make sure your contributions are helpful, supportive and loving. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). Make the interesting choice instead of the one with a predictable outcome. If you’re unsure, your brain will kick into a heightened mode, and you’ll play a better game. TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (May 20). You know yourself well, and you’ll apply yourself to the endeavors that best fit your strengths and preferences. Because of this, in the next two weeks, you sail past the obstacles that once stopped you. July brings the return of an old theme. This could come in the form of a special relationship. Family makes you proud in September. Aries and Libra people adore you. Your lucky numbers are: 40, 1, 22, 39 and 18.

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DEAR ABBY ADVICE

Fueling car as engine runs is very dangerous Dear Abby: My father absolutely refuses to turn off the ignition when fueling his car, despite the warnings at the pump. How can I convince him to stop endangering himself and my mother? — Worried Down South Dear Worried: Motorists are instructed to “Stop Motor” while refueling for good reason. Gasoline is highly flammable. However, it is not actually the liquid that burns. Even at temperatures as low as 45 degrees, gasoline gives off vapor. It is the VAPORS that ignite. Gasoline vapor is heavier than air, so when it ignites, it does so at ground level. All it takes to create a violent explosion is fuel vapors, enough oxygen and a source of ignition. A spark from a cigarette, a hot exhaust pipe, faulty wiring, static electricity or the vapor reaching an open flame — all can cause gasoline vapors to explode. Please show this item to your father. Perhaps it will convince him to be more safety conscious.

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Dear Abby: My husband loves to cook and he’s very good at it. Every night when I get home from work, he greets me with a huge meal. Problem is, I feel obligated to eat it even when I’m not the least bit hungry. Every morning, he asks me what I want for dinner. I prefer my main meal at noon and a very light meal — or none at all — at the end of the day. How can I get him to stop cooking for me without hurting his feelings? I know he does it because he loves me, but I feel I am being forced to eat food I don’t want. — Stuffed in San Antonio Dear Stuffed: I presume you’re a new bride, because otherwise you would have already learned how to communicate openly with your husband while still being tactful. Try this:

HOW TO CONTACT:

“Honey, you’re killing me with kindness. If I keep eating like this, I’ll have to invest in an entire new wardrobe. My metabolism works better if I have my main meal at noon and very little in the evening, so please help me by not making these large dinners because they’re too tempting to resist.” P.S. If cooking is his creative outlet, why not suggest he go all out once a week and invite another couple? Dear Abby: My daughter recently became engaged to a wonderful young man. I have looked forward to planning her wedding for years. She always said she wanted to be married in our hometown, but now she says they want to get married near where he lives, which is four hours from where I live. I feel she has been persuaded to do this. I’m paying for the wedding and work full time, and I’m really stressing about planning the dream wedding she wants from far away. Weddings are usually in the bride’s hometown, but I’m concerned her mind was changed by his family for their convenience. What do I do? — Just the Bride’s Mom Dear Just: Have a frank talk with your daughter and ask why she changed her mind. Tell her that you have dreamed of planning her wedding for years, but the change of venue is causing stress for you. Then ask if she would prefer you just give her a check for the amount you can afford, and whether it would be more practical for her to do the planning herself. What teens need to know about sex, drugs, AIDS and getting along with peers and parents is in “What Every Teen Should Know.” Send your name and mailing address, plus check or money order for $7 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby, Teen Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Shipping and handling are included in the price.)

To receive a collection of Abby’s most memorable — and most frequently requested — poems and essays, send a businesssized, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $3.95 ($4.50 in Canada) to: Dear Abby’s “Keepers,” P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included.)

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his translator. Still, he is not bitter. “He believes God has a purpose for everything. He does not question the Lord,” said Cortes, who added Rodriguez is his pastor at the First Assembly of God Church on Stanton Street, where he leads the Spanish-language services. Further evidence of the artist’s faith can be found in his gallery, on a floral painting emblazoned with the sentiment: “Dios bendiga al que entra y sale de este hogar.” “It means, ‘God bless all who enter and leave this place,” Cortes translated. Rodriguez has great hopes to sell his lush, colorful paintings from his gallery – where passersby are sure to notice he’s painted a waterfall on the front door. He is also available to frame pictures, which he manages despite his injury. He lives with his wife and

sizes the recording’s acoustic roots, so this effort is far from a dance or electronic record. It is, however, her most intriguing listen. With Burton credited as cowriter, “Little Broken Hearts” feels like a welcome left turn, right down to its seductive, Russ Meyer-evoking cover art. But Jones doesn’t see it that way. “I always try to do something different,” Jones said, speaking by phone from New York City. “I don’t think I’ve made the same record over and over. I think I’ve made a pretty natural evolution to this point. “So for me, this doesn’t seem so crazy,” she added with a laugh. Jones first joined Burton on his lush 2011 album, “Rome,” an imaginary soundtrack teamed with composer Daniele Luppi steeped in the Ennio Morriconescored spaghetti westerns of the ’60s and ’70s. Though Burton was said to be in the studio and unavailable for interviews, he’s previously described Jones as his first choice for the icily detached female vocal counterpoint to that record’s other high-profile guest, Jack White. Inspired by the experience, Jones asked if they could work together again on her next album. “(Burton) said it would be fun to go in with nothing and just kind of write from scratch and play a bunch of instruments our-

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

Henry Rodriguez uses a variety of lush colors when he paints.

three young children in WilkesBarre, and has been looking forward to taking his citizenship test this month. Rodriquez expects to have regular daily hours at the gallery starting in June. For now, you can make an appointment to see his work by calling 417-7986 or 824-7964.

•••

Further evidence of the artist’s faith can be found in his gallery, on a floral painting emblazoned with the sentiment: “Dios bendiga al que entra y sale de este hogar.” “It means, ‘God bless all who enter and leave this place.”

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Norah Jones has been steadily moving away from the sultry, nocturnal atmosphere of her previous records. selves,” Jones explained, adding this was his method while recording with the Shins’ James Mercer on Broken Bells, whose electropop flourishes share a sonic lineage with “Little Broken Hearts.” Though Jones said one of the most freeing aspects of the album was going into its sessions with no expectations, Burton had a direction in mind. “In the beginning Brian asked me if I was into making a dark album, and I think I was kind of surprised by that,” Jones said. “But I also wasn’t closed to anything. ... He loves that mood, so you put him in a room with me who likes ballads and quiet music — I think the combination works.” The result is certainly dark, with many of the lyrics chronicling the shattered aftermath of a breakup, something Jones recently went through herself with the end of her relationship with musician Lee Alexander, who worked with Jones on her first three albums. (The two still work together on Jones’ country-tilted side project the Little Willies, which also released an album in January.) With Burton’s spacey burbles and echoes shadowing her every move, Jones can sound achingly heartsick for much of “Little Broken Hearts,” as on “She’s 22,”

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where a lonely guitar shuffles behind her plaintive refrain of “Does she make you happy?” But there’s also room for upbeat, R&B-leaning sass with the irresistible “Say Goodbye” and debut single “Happy Pills,” which features a spectral echo of voices along its heavy-footed rhythm. In maybe the record’s biggest departure, Jones delivers a spare murder ballad on “Miriam,” which finds her stalking an unfaithful

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lover and making the line “I’m gonna smile when I take your life” sound sinister yet weirdly sweet. When asked if she was worried about perhaps letting too much of her private life show in a breakup album that quickly starts sounding personal, Jones waved off such concerns. “People will read into what you say no matter what, so it doesn’t matter to me. I know what’s real, what’s encrypted in there and what’s not,” she said.

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MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (DIGITAL) (PG-13) 11:45AM, 3:05PM, 6:15PM, 8:05PM, 9:45PM

PIRATES! BAND OF MISFITS (DIGITAL) (PG) 11:40AM, 1:50PM, 4:20PM

RAVEN, THE (DIGITAL) (R)

7:35PM, 10:15PM (7:35PM, 10:15PM DO NOT PLAY ON MON, 5/21)

May 18 — 6 PM May 19 — 1 & 5 PM May 20 — 1 PM

FRIDAY MAY 25th, 2012

Call for Tickets – 823-6242, 905-6485 or 817-4867

C

THINK LIKE A MAN (DIGITAL) (PG-13) 7:10PM, 10:00PM

THREE STOOGES, THE (DIGITAL) (PG)

11:50AM, 2:20PM, 4:35PM (11:50AM, 2:20PM, 4:35PM DO NOT PLAY ON SAT, 5/19)

WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU’RE EXPECTING (DIGITAL) (PG-13)

All Showtimes Include Pre-Feature Content

(Parenthesis Denotes Bargain Matinees)

Avoid the lines: Advance tickets available from Fandango.com

11:30AM, 12:50PM, 2:10PM, 3:30PM, 4:50PM, 6:05PM, 7:30PM, 8:50PM, 10:10PM NO PASSES

*Battleship in DBOX - PG13 130 min (1:00), (4:00), 7:00, 10:00 *Battleship - PG13 - 130 min (1:00), (1:45), (4:00), (4:40), 7:00, 7:25, 10:00, 10:15 *The Dictator - R - 95 min (2:00), (4:10), 7:40, 9:45 *What to Expect When You’re Expecting - PG13 - 110 min (2:00), (4:50), 7:25, 9:55 Dark Shadows - PG13 - 120 min (1:00), (1:45), (3:30), (4:15), 7:10, 7:45, 9:40, 10:15 Marvel’s The Avengers - PG13 150 min (1:05), (1:20), (2:15), (4:05), (4:20), (5:15), 7:05, 7:20, 8:20, 10:00, 10:20 (The 10:20 plays Friday, Saturday & Sunday Only) ***Marvel’s The Avengers 3D - PG13 - 150 min (12:45), (3:45), 7:40 The Raven - R - 120 min (1:45), (4:20), 7:30, 10:10 The Lucky One - PG13 - 110 min. (1:30), (4:10), 7:40, 10:10 Think Like A Man - PG13 130 min. (1:50), 4:30, 7:15, 10:00 The Hunger Games - PG13 - 150 min. (1:00), (4:00), 7:00, 10:00

You must be 17 with ID or accompanied by a parent to attend R rated features. Children under 6 may not attend R rated features after 6pm

Rating Policy Parents and/or Guardians (Age 21 and older) must accompany all children under 17 to an R Rated feature *No passes accepted to these features. **No restricted discount tickets or passes accepted to these features. ***3D features are the regular admission price plus a surcharge of $2.50 D-Box Motion Seats are the admission price plus an $8.00 surcharge First Matinee $5.25 for all features (plus surcharge for 3D features).

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CMYK ➛ timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 PAGE 5F

BOOKS No need to refuse this prequel

BEST SELLERS HARDCOVER FICTION 1. 11th Hour. James Patterson & Maxine Paetro. Little, Brown, $27.99 2. Bring Up the Bodies. Hilary Mantel. Holt, $28 3. Deadlocked. Charlaine Harris. Ace, $27.95 4. In One Person. John Irving. Simon & Schuster, $28 5. The Road to Grace. Richard Paul Evans. Simon & Schuster, $19.99 6. The Innocent. David Baldacci. Grand Central, $27.99 7. Calico Joe. John Grisham. Doubleday, $24.95 8. Home. Toni Morrison. Knopf, $24 9. The Wind Through the Keyhole. Stephen King. Scribner, $27. 10. The Sins of the Father. Jeffrey Archer. St. Martin’s, $27.99 HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. The Passage of Power. Robert Caro. Knopf, $35 2. I Am a Pole (And So Can You!). Stephen Colbert. Grand Central, 15.99 3. Lots of Candles, Plenty of Cake. Anna Quindlen. Random House, $26 4. Most Talkative. Andy Cohen. Holt, $25 5. Screwed! Dick Morris & Eileen McGann. Broadside, $27.99 6. Bombshell. Suzanne Somers. Crown, $26 7. The Pioneer Woman Cooks: Food from My Frontier. Ree Drummond. Morrow, $29.99 8. This Is How. Augusten Burroughs. St. Martin’s, $24.99 9. Prague Winter. Madeleine Albright. Harper, $29.99 10. Killing Lincoln. Bill O’Reilly & Martin Dugard. Holt, $28 MASS MARKET 1. The Lucky One. Nicholas Sparks. Vision, $7.99 2. The Fifth Witness. Michael Connelly. Vision, $9.99 3. A Game of Thrones. George R.R. Martin. Bantam, $8.99 4. A Clash of Kings. George R.R. Martin. Bantam, $8.99 5. A Storm of Swords. George R.R. Martin. Bantam, $8.99 6. Buried Prey. John Sandford. Berkley, $9.99 7. Vision in White. Nora Roberts. Jove, $7.99 8. Mystery. Jonathan Kellerman. Ballantine, $9.99 9. The Affair. Lee Child. Dell, $9.99 10. Sunrise Point. Robyn Carr. Mira, $7.99 TRADE 1. Fifty Shades of Grey. E.L. James. Vintage, $15.95 2. Fifty Shades Darker. E.L. James. Vintage, $15.95 3. Fifty Shades Freed. E.L. James. Vintage, $15.95 4. The Last Boyfriend. Nora Roberts. Berkley, $16 5. In the Garden of Beasts. Erik Larson. Broadway, $16 6. State of Wonder. Ann Patchett. Perennial, $15.99 7. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. Rebecca Skloot. Broadway, $16 8. The Lucky One. Nicholas Sparks. Grand Central, $14.99 9. The Art of Fielding. Chad Harbach. Back Bay, $14.99 10. Heaven Is for Real. Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent. Thomas Nelson, $16.99

By ED SIEGEL Newsday

Food for thought Author examines the ‘Taste of Tomorrow’ “The Taste of Tomorrow: Dispatches From the Future of Food” (Harper), by Josh Schonwald:

By JESSICA GRESKO

W

hat will we be eating in 2035? That’s the question reporter Josh Schonwald sets out to answer in “The Taste of Tomorrow.”

The food odyssey that follows takes him from his neighborhood farmers market in Illinois

all the way to the Netherlands, where he visits a lab making the world’s first serious effort to grow meat in a test tube. Other stops include a California farmer who grows produce for renowned chef Alice Waters, the world’s largest indoor fish farm in Martinsville, Va., and an Army food lab west of Boston. Along the way, Schonwald eats his way through a buffet of possible foods of tomorrow including stinging nettles, a fish called cobia, “Stay Alert” caffeine gum and an African dish called fufu that he says tastes like raw sourdough. At the headquarters of a California food research and development company he even tries a balsamic-infused

pickle in the prototype stage. Luckily for readers, all this food exploration is divided into manageable and palate-pleasing bites. Different sections explore the future of salad, meat and fish. Schonwald also asks what will be the next big ethnic food, the next pad thai. And a final section explores the idea that we might be able to get all

of our needed nutrients without even chewing, by taking a “food pill.” Readers who expect to come away knowing exactly what will be on the dinner table in 2035, however, will be disappointed. After thousands of miles of travel and a whole lot of eating, Schonwald confesses he still doesn’t have a definitive answer.

•••

The food odyssey that follows takes him from his neighborhood farmers market in Illinois all the way to the Netherlands.

FUNNY Continued from Page 1F

ings. I didn’t want to be in the room for the actual show any more, which is actually no fun. I wanted a raise. I wanted a budget for short films. And I wanted to name my own screen credit. Lorne said yes. So for the last two years I was there, I was “coordinator of falconry.” That was my actual screen credit. Wow, some people were (ticked off)! I’m like, “Relax, this is a comedy show.” Q: Still, you didn’t want to do Funny or Die at first, right? A: I didn’t. Ferrell and I still had the dot-com collapse in our heads. The hype around it had gotten so dumb. But the guy who brought the idea to us, Mark Kvamme (of the venture-capital firm Sequoia Capital), he had already

Associated Press

In the wildly popular video ‘The Landlord’ then-2-year-old Pearl McKay rides Will Ferrell hard over the rent.

adjusted. He knew you didn’t launch a site like this the way you might have in 1998. It boiled down to, what do we have to lose? None of us, me or Will or Chris, put our money into it. Worstcase scenario, we have an outlet for the stuff we did on “SNL” and it gets 50,000 hits a month. If it was a failure, it wouldn’t be a hyped failure. Which is

what resonated. It was clearly for the fun of it, and people liked the spontaneity of it. Q: So “The Landlord” was as roughly made as it looks? A: Completely. My daughter was going through that phase where she repeated anything you said. My wife would speak French to her, and she would repeat it. I would say “postlapsarian epistemological” and she would repeat it. I said, “You know, Ferrell, Pearl can say anything.” So we showed up at his house. My buddy, Drew Antzis, who shot it, was a masseuse at the time. I know him from Chicago, from iO. He said, “I have a couple of massages scheduled. Between them, let’s do it.” Pearl couldn’t focus, but with “Uncle Will,” she calmed down. It took about 40 minutes. We didn’t think much of it, beyond it being funny. We threw it on the site with no announcement, no press release. Will and I forwarded it to

friends. That was about it. Within days, Ellen DeGeneres wanted Pearl on her show. It blew up faster than anything we’d ever done. Q: Early on, within months of launch, the site also began making corporatesponsored comedy videos. Weren’t you leery of that, that it might change this scrappy, spontaneous thing into something deliberate? A: We were worried. We talked about that at great length. We decided we would just separate those from the rest, the way Second City had done when it started a business unit. With a firewall, it should be fine. The rule is, never do a video unless there’s a chance to do something interesting. When this arrangement works best, it’s close to TV, working with advertisers behind you. The best example is Zach Galifianakis’ “Between Two Ferns” series. There’s corporate money behind it. That hasn’t affected the drive of it at

Luca Brasi sleeps with the fishes, and the Corleones, while not resting in a watery grave, are gone as well — Sonny, the Don and his wife, even Michael and his daughter. But you can’t keep a good Godfather down, any more than you can kill off Sherlock Holmes or Dracula. The Corleones still haunt our imaginations, and the beleaguered publishing industry knows it’s easier selling a name brand than an unknown. So welcome back, Fredo and Tom, Clemenza and Barzini, and particularly you, Luca Brasi, with your 15 minutes of fame as one of the central characters in”The Family Corleone." Billed as "The Family Corle- a prequel to Mario one" by Ed Falco, Puzo’s”The Godfabased on a screen- ther," the novel takes play by Mario place before most of Puzo; Grand Centhe events of the tral Publishing original book. The (436 pages, $27.99) writer is Ed Falco, here novelizing a Puzo screenplay that was originally conceived as half of”The Godfather Part III." (The book prompted a nasty legal battle between Paramount and the Puzo estate over copyright and trademark concerns.) Sonny is 17, Michael 13 and Vito 41 as the book opens in 1933. Tom Hagen is a student at New York University who tempts fate by sleeping with Brasi’s mistress. And as the Italian families prepare to square off against one another, they face another threat — the Irish, who want control of their own mean streets. Which does not stop Sonny from befriending one young Irish fellow and having an even closer, clandestine friendship with his sister. Most of this fits with Puzo’s original novel and director Francis Ford Coppola’s first two films. A couple of major incidents in the new book don’t quite square with Puzo’s screenplay, but that’s nothing to be concerned about. It’s an entertaining back story to the main event, including how Brasi came to talk so haltingly, and Falco does justice to each of the characters. The author — uncle to actress Edie Falco — is a better writer than Mark Winegardner, who also wrote a couple of books based on the”Godfather" characters. Falco honors Puzo’s straightforward writing style without becoming as boring and unrhythmic as Winegardner. The difference between”The Godfather" and”The Family Corleone," though, is the difference between art and commerce. Puzo and Coppola were channeling something poetic in the book and the two films, focusing on the Don’s own quasi-religious belief in making the best of the world God gave us and Michael’s more capitalistic, button-down approach to making one’s way. In Shakespearean terms, the Don is Henry IV, Michael Henry V and Sonny Hotspur. Falco has no such artistic ambitions, and how could he, given the perfection of the book and first two films, which make everything else superfluous, including”The Godfather Part III"? That said, Falco spins a good yarn, even if the violence is more grotesque than in Puzo.”The Family Corleone" is not a gourmet meal, but sometimes spaghetti and meatballs can be pretty tasty. all. Q: But co-opting can be subtle. A: It can, and we live in a corporate society. Depending on your belief system, that’s a positive, a negative or somewhere in between. I’m somewhere in between. Friends give me a hard time about the pants I’m wearing, which are made in China. Well, how do you find the right clothes? Or the right movie studio? The right people giving you checks? Good luck doing the right thing all the time. Will and I discussed this early on: What if Exxon wants an ad? Or Wal-Mart? You have to cater a little. Wal-Mart is the biggest distributor of DVDs out there, but personally, I think their manufacturing policies have destroyed our economy and they don’t pay their employees enough. I have massive problems with them. At the end of the day, the answer might be that as long as you don’t feel a sick feeling in your stomach, you’re clean.


CMYK PAGE 6F

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

T

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A

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THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

Houston: 5 free things for visitors to do By MICHAEL GRACZYK

Associated Press

H

OUSTON — Summer is nearly year-round in Southeast Texas so it should be no surprise that the free stuff to see and do in the sprawling metropolitan area of the nation’s fourth-biggest city focuses on the outdoors. But that doesn’t mean you have to surrender to the area’s infamous heat and humidity, particularly brutal in August, to enjoy attractions that will only cost the time and gasoline to get there.

1. THE MENIL COLLECTION: Banker John de Menil and his wife, Dominique, heiress to the Schlumberger oilfield company fortune, over decades amassed a collection of nearly 16,000 art objects that since 1987 have been on display at the Houston museum that bears their name. The collection features pieces by European and American masters plus ancient and modern works from around the world. The museum’s companion Rothko Chapel provides visitors with a tranquil meditative environment that welcomes 60,000 visitors a year. 2. MILLER THEATRE: The Houston Symphony, Houston Grand Opera and Houston Ballet headline an extensive performing arts lineup that’s been using the Miller Theatre stage since the 1920s and now draws nearly a half-million spectators annually to the 7.5-acre site in Hermann Park, just east of the world famous Texas Medical Center. Tickets for the recently renovated covered seating area are available early in the day for that evening’s performance and concert-goers also can bring a blanket and sit on the grass hill immediately behind the seats. 3. THE WATER WALL: A couple blocks south of the Galleria, Houston’s largest shopping experience, and in the shadow of the 902-foot Williams Tower, the city’s most visible skyscraper outside down-

town, this 64-foot-high semicircular fountain arguably is Houston most photographed site. Visitors can stand inside the wall that recirculates 11,000 gallons of water each minute. Besides providing cooling mist, the visual effect is surreal. A night visit inside the lit fountain gives it an entirely different look and experience. 4. GALVESTON: Houston’s getaway to the Gulf of Mexico. OK, it’s not the glistening white Gulf beaches of the Florida Panhandle but it’s only an hour’s drive south on Interstate 45. Park on the Galveston Seawall and you’re there. And as a bonus, one of the best free trips in all of Texas is just off the east end of the seawall, where the Bolivar Ferry 24 hours a day carries vehicles and passengers the couple of miles back and forth across Galveston Bay. Watch for dolphins and feed the sea gulls. 5. PORT OF HOUSTON BOAT TOUR: Since 1958, the 95-foot-long Motor Vessel Sam Houston has been taking visitors on a 90-minute cruise of the Houston Ship Channel, home to one of the world’s busiest ports and among the world’s largest petrochemical complexes. The boat holds up to 100 people who can sit in its air-conditioned seating area or stand on the deck to take full advantage of the port’s sounds and smells. There’s no charge but reservations are required.

1 AP PHOTOS

The exterior of the Menil Collection, an anthology of nearly 16,000 art objects from ancient works to modern masterpieces. The museum is one of Houston’s best free attractions.

4

A seagull snags a piece of bread out of a passenger’s hand aboard a ferry boat as it crosses Galveston Bay in Galveston, Texas. Galveston, an hour south of Houston on I-45, is Houston’s gateway to the Gulf of Mexico and the ferry is free.

2 With free performances March through October, the Miller Outdoor Theatre is one of Houston’s best free attractions.

5 Sightseers aboard the Sam Houston, a boat that offers a 90-minute cruise of the Houston Ship Channel. Reservations are required, but the cruise is free, one of a number of free attractions in Houston.

3 The Water Wall, a 64-foot curved, black obsidian wall that recirculates 11,000 gallons of water each minute. It’s one of Houston’s most photographed sites and one of the city’s best free attractions.

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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 PAGE 1G

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

Mert’s

412 Autos for Sale

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the price is always right for over 20 years.

412 Autos for Sale

YOMING VALLEY

100 ANNOUNCEMENTS

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197 West End Road, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706

BLOWOUT SALE!

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WE’RE CLEARING THE LOT!

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110

Lost

ALL JUNK VEHICLES WANTED!!

WE BEAT ANYBODY’S DEALS

Cars

00 NEON Stick.................... $2,595 00 FORD WINDSTAR .. $2,695 97 KIA SPORTAGE 4X4 $2,795 97 NISSAN PATHFINDER . $2,995 97 CADILLAC SEVILLE . $3,495 02 SATURN L100 .............. $3,995 01 TOYOTA COROLLA ..... $4,195 04 PONTIAC MONTANA .. $4,395 02 CHRYSLER VAN ............ $4,255 01 DODGE CARGO VAN .. $4,795 01 FORD TAURUS 69K .. $4,795 03 HYUNDAI TIBURON ... $4,995 00 HONDA CRV ............. $5,395 01 SUBARU LEGACY .. $5,495 04 CHEVY CAVALIER ... $5,495 00 GMC SIERRA ............. $5,995 03 SUBARU FORESTER.... $5,995 03 LINCOLN LS ............... $6,495 03 MITSUBISHI MONTERO SPORT... $7,495 06 PONTIAC G6 .................. $7,995 03 CHEVY STATE BODY ... $8,995

CALL TODAY!

412 Autos for Sale

06 Kia Spectra 54K ...................$7,675 02 Volvo C70 Convertible .......$7,450 02 Honda Accord ......................$6,850 02 Ford Mustang Conv ......$6,495 06 Chevy Cobalt Moonroof .$5,995 04 Ford Focus Wagon..........$5,995 04 Hyundai Elantra 85K ....$5,575 05 Pontiac Sunfire...................$4,950 01 Mitsubishi Galant ............$4,695 00 Mitsubishi Eclipse ..........$4,495 03 Ford Focus...............................$4,250 99 Nissan Sentra 83K...........$4,250 02 Saturn SL2 ............................... $4,10 0 97 Chevy Malibu 78K..............$3,750 99 Kia Sephia 64K .....................$3,625 98 Plymouth Breeze ..................$3,450 01 Chevy Malibu ........................$3,495 97 Pontiac Sunfire Conv ..$3,250

ŠCALL ANYTIME ŠHONEST PRICES ŠFREE REMOVAL

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LOST DOG Female Yellow Lab. 4 months old. Lost 5/18 REWARD 570-655-2697

00 Ford Ranger 4x4 77K....$6,995

04 Mercury Monterey 65K .$6,575 04 Chevy Venture......................$5,650

02 Ford Windstar 88K ..........$4,950 MANY MORE TO CHOOSE FROM

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USED CARS

2011 FORD FUSION SE

2011 CHEVY IMPALA LT

2007 CHEVY HEVY SILVERADO 1500 PICKUP CKUP

Preferred Equipment Pkg., Tons Of Warranty

V6, One Owner

17,995

$

$

2010 NISSAN ALTIMA Just Arrived, One Owner

9,850

$

$

Inferno Red Beauty, Power Pkg.

18,900

$

14,995

2010 CHRYSLER SEBRING TOURING

2010 DODGE AVENGER SXT

2011 CHEVY TRAVERSE LT

Black Beauty, g Leather Seating

Preferred Equipment Pkg.

Power Equipped, Local Trade

“All Wheel Drive”, 8-Passenger Seating, Tons Of Warranty

16,995

$

All New Body Style, White Beauty

15,900

White Beauty, ty, h Loaded With Luxury

2010 DODGE CALIBER SXT

2010 VW W BEETLE COUPE

$

2011 CHRYSLER HRYSLER 200 LX

4x2, W/T Pkg..

2011 CHEVY HEVY MALIBU LTZ

15,995

$

14,995

2012 CHEVY IMPALA LTZ

2011 HYUNDAI ACCENT’S

Just 13K Miles, Not Even Broken In Yet

Choose From 6, Balance Of Warranty

15,995

$

$

23,995

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$

14,995

2012 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4 All The Toys, Just 12K Miles

12,995

$

$

26,995

$

2011 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4 Preferred Equipment Pkg.

21,995

19,995

$

2011 CHEVY AVEO LT’S

2011 CHEVY HHR WGN’S

2011 MAZDA CX-7

2011 V.W. JETTA SE

2011 HYUNDAI SANTE FE

Choose From 5, Balance of Warranty

Choose From 3, LT Pkg.

All Wheel Drive, Just 17K Miles, Black Beauty

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“All Wheel Drive”, 4 Cyl., Only 16K Miles

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12,995

$

2010 HYUNDAI TUSCON Front Wheel Drive, Local One Owner, Only 18K Miles

$

12,995

2010 DODGE CHARGER SXT Silver Beauty, Tons of Warranty

17,995

$

FROM

$

16,995

$

23,995

2011 NISSAN ROGUE

$

2011 DODGE CHALLENGER SE 6 Cyl., Power Galore, Factory Warranty

All Wheel Drive, Silver Beauty, Only 12K Miles

19,995

$

23,995

16,995

$

$

20,995

2011 BUICK ENCLAVE CXL

2011 GMC TERRAIN

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33,995

$

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PAGE 2G

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

110

Lost

570-301-3602

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120

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LOST BIBLE

somewhere along Wyoming Avenue near Forty Fort or Wyoming. Please call 570-693-1918 LOST DOG: Family pet. White Maltese 3 lbs. Answers to Teacup. REWARD. 570-417-0227

120

Found

Black and white male, adult cat. Found 2 weeks ago in Wilkes Barre Twp. Please call 570280-9110

250 General Auction

Found

FOUND, Set of keys on the corner of Scott and Laird Streets. Call 570-704-9403 leave message Found- about 4 & a half month old male kitten. All black, yellow/gold eyes, found in Plymouth area, was taken to the SPCA, please call the SPCA in Wilkes Barre.

135

Legals/ Public Notices

ESTATE NOTICE Estate of Michael A. Ramey, late of Pittston, Pennsylvania, died on September 19, 2011. All persons having claims against the Estate shall present same to Administratrix Jung Lee Ramey, c/o Donald W. Jensen, Esquire, 538 Spruce Street, Suite 730, Scranton, Pennsylvania 18503

250 General Auction

FINE! BAKERY, RESTAURANT, KITCHEN & DELI EQUIPMENT Tuesday, May 29th @ 9:30 A.M. Relocated to: “Metal Building” 2091 Seaman’s Rd., Factoryville, Pa 18419 Details: www.sitarauctions.com

Col. Steve Sitar & Co.

(570) 586-1397 Pa.Lic.AU2124-L www.sitarauctions.com.

150 Special Notices

Octagon Family Restaurant

375 W Main St, Plymouth, PA 18651

570-779-2288

W eekend S pecial $13.95 for a Large Plain Pie & a Dozen Wings

Dine in only. Valid Saturday & Sunday. One coupon per party/table. Cannot be combined with any other offers.

Home of the Original ‘O-Bar’ Pizza Legals/ Public Notices

Saturday 12:30 on Friday

135

Legals/ Public Notices

LEGAL NOTICE COUNTY OF LUZERNE REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Luzerne County is soliciting proposals from qualified professional consultants for the provision of professional services, advice and technical assistance in carrying out various duties related to: RFP#1: Professional engineering design services for complex and emergency projects. RFP #2: The acquisition of Right-of-Way for public works projects. RFP #3: Professional roof design, inspection and consulting services for Countyowned facilities. RFP #1 solicits proposals from experienced, diverse engineering design firms to assist Luzerne County with technical and/or emergency public infrastructure, building, recreation and other projects. RFP #2 solicits proposals from experienced right-of-way acquisition firms to assist Luzerne County with procuring necessary right-of-way for public works projects. RFP #3 solicits proposals from experienced roof consultant firms to assist Luzerne County with design, inspection and consulting services for County-owned buildings. The above noted RFP’s are issued by the Luzerne County Purchasing Department. Firms should contact the Luzerne County Engineer’s Office for information or questions concerning this RFP. Please contact Joseph J. Gibbons, P.E., Luzerne County Engineer, at (570) 825-1600 or email at joe.gibbons@luzernecounty.org. The respective RFP contains instructions and specifications to prospective responders detailing the proposed scope of services. Proposals must be submitted to the primary issuing office no later than June 1, 2012 at 10:00 A.M. to the Luzerne County Purchasing Department, Attention: Mr. Frank A. Pugliese, Jr., Penn Place Office Building, 20 North Pennsylvania Avenue, Wilkes- Barre, PA 18702. All respondents are required to submit an original and three copies of their proposal in a plain envelope with the project title clearly marked on the outside of the envelope. The County reserves the right to accept or reject any and all proposals submitted and to waive any informality in the process. The respective RFP scope of work, requirements and conditions may be obtained by calling the Luzerne County Purchasing Department at 570-820-6337 or electronically on the Luzerne County website at www.luzernecounty.org. LUZERNE COUNTY IS AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION, EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER. Robert C. Lawton Luzerne County Manager

150 Special Notices

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted Highest Prices Paid In CA$H

Sunday 4:00 pm on Friday Monday 4:30 pm on Friday Tuesday 4:00 pm on Monday

570-574-1275 FOUND Is your cat missing? Injured but recouping cat found in the 700 Block of Main St., Avoca. please call 570-4572066 to describe your cat.

Legals/ Public Notices

LEGAL NOTICE DEADLINES

PICKUP

AUCTION

135

135

FREE

Directed By The Secured Parties!

150 Special Notices

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Wednesday 4:00 pm on Tuesday Thursday 4:00 pm on Wednesday Friday 4:00 pm on Thursday Holidays call for deadlines You may email your notices to mpeznowski@ timesleader.com or fax to 570-831-7312 or mail to The Times Leader 15 N. Main Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 For additional information or questions regarding legal notices you may call Marti Peznowski at 570-970-7371 or 570-829-7130 LEGAL NOTICe E&M Realty dba Flat Rate Storage 213 East Luzerne Ave. Larksville, PA hereby gives notice of it's intent to sell at auction on June 2, 2012, at 10:00am, as per Sec. 1905 and Sec. 1907 of the PA Self Storage Assoc., the contents of the following units unless payment is received in full before June 1, 2012. #116 #125 #128 #229 PUBLIC NOTICE

FREE PICKUP

570-574-1275

PAYING $500 MINIMUM DRIVEN IN

Full size 4 wheel drive trucks

ALSO PAYING TOP $$$

for heavy equipment, backhoes, dump trucks, bull dozers HAPPY TRAILS TRUCK SALES 570-760-2035 542-2277 6am to 8pm

330

ADOPT

To place your ad call...829-7130 ADOPT: Loving, secure, accomplished married couple to adopt newborn. Expenses paid. Please call Ben & Jim 888-690-9890

Ambulatory Internal Medicine Clinic announcing we're accepting new Adult Internal Medicine and Primary care patients in WilkesBarre. Phone# 570-270-7200.

DAYCARE

In my Kingston home. Licensed. Ages 15 months to 6 years. 570-283-0336

Wed., July 18 $135. Orchestra

Call Roseann @ 655-4247

CERTIFIED NURSES AID

Caring & Dependable nurse available for private duty in your home. Feed, bath, dress, shop, clean, cook & more. 357-1951 after 6

Instruction & Training

Need a math tutor? Get ready for college math! one on one summer instruction. Affordable rate. experienced instructor. Topics: algebra 1, 2 & 3, plain geometry, trigonometry, pre calculus, & calculus. Call the professor at 570-288-5683

Lookingfortherightdeal onanautomobile? Turn to classified. It’s ashowroomin print! Classified’s got thedirections!

DON’T MISS OUT!

All inclusive packages For Travel

First Come, First Serviced! Limited Availability, Passports Required Call NOW! 300 Market St., Kingston, Pa 18704 570-288-TRIP (288-8747)

380

Travel

ATLANTIC CITY RESORTS 5/27/12 ROUND TRIP $30/PP REBATE $25 + SNACKS 570-740-7020

Come relax & enjoy great fishing & tranquility at it’s finest. Housekeeping cottages on the water with all the amenities of home.

NEED A VACATION?

Call Now!

(315) 375-8962 daveroll@black lakemarine.com www.blacklake4fish.com

Autos under $5000

412 Autos for Sale

ATVs/Dune Buggies

HAWK 2011 UTILITY ATV

NEW!! Full size adult ATV. Strong 4 stroke motor. CVT fully automatic transmission with reverse. Electric start. Front & rear luggage racks. Long travel suspension. Disc brakes. Dual stage head lights. Perfect for hunters & trail riders alike. BRAND NEW & READY TO RIDE. $1,995 takes it away. 570-817-2952 Wilkes-Barre

TOMAHAWK`11

70,000 original miles. Black with black leather interior. California car, 5 speed, T-tops, Posi rear end, traction bars, power windows, rear defroster, cruise, tilt wheel, all factory. New carburetor and Flow Master. Great Car! $4,700 or equal trade 570-468-2609

LEO’S AUTO SALES 92 Butler St Wilkes-Barre, PA 570-825-8253

CHEVY ‘04 MALIBU CLASSIC door, 4 cylinder,

FORD ‘01 F150 XLT Pickup Triton V8,

auto, 4x4 Super Cab, all power, cruise control, sliding rear window $3,850

PONTIAC ‘99 GRAND AM door, 6 cylinder,

4 auto, good condition 75k. $2,150.

HYUNDAI ‘01 ACCENT door, 6 cylinder,

4 auto, excellent gas mileage. good condition. $2,350. Current Inspection On All Vehicles DEALER

GRAND MARQUIS ‘99 GS Well maintained, Smooth riding, 4.6L, V8, RWD, Auto, Power windows, power locks, New Inspection, Serviced, Silver over blue. Good tires $3,750 Call 823-4008

LINCOLN ‘98 CONTINENTAL

Beige, V8 engine, 74,600 miles. $3,500. AWD Loaded. 570-693-2371

OLDS ‘96 ACHIVEA

2 door, 4 cyl. 5 speed. 81,000 miles. 4 new tires, Inspected until 3/1/13. $2595 negotiable. 570-417-4731

412 Autos for Sale

ACURA `03 3.2 TL-S 4 door, sport sedan,

auto, full power, exceptional condition. Asking $6375. negotiable. Call 570-674-4713 ATV, 110 CC. Brand New Tomahawk Kids Quad. Only $695 takes it away! 570-817-2952 Wilkes-Barre

409

Autos under $5000

CADILLAC `94 DEVILLE SEDAN

94,000 miles, automatic, front wheel drive, 4 door, air conditioning, air bags, all power, cruise control, leather interior, $3,300. 570-394-9004

Audi `01 A6 Quattro 123,000 miles, 4.2 liter V8, 300hp, silver with black leather,heated steering wheel, new run flat tires, 17” rims, 22 mpg, German mechanic owned. Reduced $4995. 570-822-6785

AUDI `03 CS

5 speed, all the extras, immaculate interior with Pioneer Sound System. $2,500. (570)455-5770 or leave message

BMW `06 650 CI

Black convertible, beige leather, auto transmission, all power. $35,750. 570-283-5090 or 570-779-3534

BUICK `04 CENTURY

auto 107K miles. 4 new tires runs great. $2,900 570-575-0192

Presidential Edition with Cabriolet roof. Power. V6. 4 door. Silver with grey velour. No accidents. Garaged. Fully serviced. 39K miles. $7,200. Leave Message. 570-823-5386

BUICK ‘09 ENCLAVE

To place your ad Call Toll Free 1-800-427-8649

DODGE `93 CARAVAN

SE. Inspection good till 12/12. AM/FM/CD. A/C. All new brakes, muffler, gas tank, radiator, struts. 163k miles. Body & tires good, paint fair. Has had noisy engine for 4 years. $800 or best offer. Call 570-283-9452

FORD `97 EXPLORER XLT 4.0 V6 Automatic

with air, Full power, 6 disk CD changer, sunroof, 155,000 miles. Runs great! asking $2,500 Call 570-823-2360 after 5pm or call 570-417-5780.

412 Autos for Sale

FORD ‘83 MUSTANG 5.0 GT. FAST!

ACME AUTO SALES 343-1959

1009 Penn Ave Scranton 18509 Across from Scranton Prep

GOOD CREDIT, BAD CREDIT, NO CREDIT Call Our Auto Credit Hot Line to get Pre-approved for a Car Loan!

800-825-1609

11

www.acmecarsales.net

AUDI S5 CONV.

Sprint blue, black / brown leather int., navigation, 7 spd auto turbo, AWD 09 CADILLAC DTS PERFORMANCE PLATINUM silver, black leather, 42,000 miles 09 CHRYSLER SEBRING 4 door, alloys, seafoam blue. 08 CHEVY AVEO red, auto, 4 cyl 07 BUICK LACROSSE CXL, black, V6 07 CHRYSLER PT Cruiser, white, auto, 4 cyl., 68k miles 07 CHRYSLER PT Cruiser black, auto, 4 cyl 07 BUICK LUCERNE CXL, silver, grey leather 06 LINCOLN ZEPHYR grey, tan leather, sun roof 06 MERCURY MILAN PREMIER, mint green, V6, alloys 05 VW NEW JETTA gray, auto, 4 cyl 04 NISSAN MAXIMA LS silver, auto, sunroof 03 AUDI S8 QUATTRO, mid blue/light grey leather, navigation, AWD 01 VOLVO V70 STATION WAGON, blue/grey, leather, AWD 73 PORSCHE 914 green & black, 5 speed, 62k miles, $12,500

SUVS, VANS, TRUCKS, 4 X4’s

CHEVY ‘00 MALIBU 4 doors, 6cylinder,

Travel

409

4 auto, good condition. 120k. $2,450.

Elderly Care

Black Lake, NY

For that Hallmark Moment…..Start planning your Oyster Wedding today and make your special day “ Nothing But The Best”! bridezella.net

PHANTOM OF THE OPERA

Child Care

EARN COLLEGE DEGREE ONLINE. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV Certified. Call 888-2203984. www.CenturaOnline.com

A caring, married couple promises a secure future, unconditional love, and a happy home near beaches and great schools. Expenses paid. Allison & Joe 877-253-8699

JERSEY BOYS Wed., July 18 $150. “Front Mezz”

406

MRS. DEBORAH A. RACHILLA, BOARD SECRETARY C/O SCHOOL DIRECTOR APPLICANT PITTSTON AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT 5 STOUT STREET YATESVILLE, PA 18640

150 Special Notices

Wed., June 13 $175. Orchestra

WORK WANTED

experienced in home care. I will work in your home taking care of your loved one. Personal care, meal preparation and light housekeeping provided. References, background check also provided. Salary negotiable. 570-836-9726 or 570-594-4165 (m)

360

THANK YOU GOD Prayer to God. Say nine Hail Marys for nine days. Ask for three wishes. First for business, second and third for the impossible. Publish this article on the ninth day. Your wishes will come true, even though you may not believe it. THANK YOU GOD. MAY

THE LION KING

May and early June

SEND RESUME AND STATEMENT TO:

Prayers

BROADWAY SHOW BUS TRIPS

New! Special Incredible Last Minute Deals to Cancun and Punta Cana

350

145

Travel

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

THE PITTSTON AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT IS SEEKING APPLICANTS INTERESTED IN BEING APPOINTED AS A SCHOOL DIRECTOR DUE TO A VACANCY ON THE BOARD. INTERESTED CANDIDATES MUST SUBMIT A RESUME AND A WRITTEN STATEMENT AS TO WHY THEY WISH TO SERVE ON THE PITTSTON AREA SCHOOL BOARD.

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS IS TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012 @ 2:00 P.M.

380

07 CADILLAC SRX silver, 3rd seat, navigation, AWD 06 CHRYSLER PACIFICA TOURING, red, 3rd seat (AWD) 06 FORD EXPLORER XLT, black, 3rd seat, 4x4 06 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD blue, grey leather 4x4 06 NISSAN TITAN KING CAB SE white, auto 50k miles 4x4 truck 06 CHEVY TRAILBLZAER LS, SILVER, 4X4 06 PONTIAC TORRENT black/black leather sunroof, AWD 05 FORD ESCAPE LTD green, tan leather, V6, 4x4 05 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB CAB SPORT, blue, auto, 4x4 truck 04 DODGE DURANGO LTD, gray, gray leather, 3rd seat, 4x4 04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE GLS, silver (AWD) 04 CHEVY AVALANCHE Z71, green, 4 door, 4x4 truck 04 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB SLT SILVER, 4 door, 4x4 truck 04 FORD FREESTAR, blue, 4 door, 7 passenger mini van 04 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE OVERLAND graphite grey, 2 tone leather, sunroof, 4x4 03 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER LTZ, blue, two tone leather, V6, 4x4 03 FORD EXPEDITION XLT, silver, 3rd seat, 4x4 03 FORD EXPLORER SPORT TRAC XLT, 4 door, green, tan, leather, 4x4 02 GMC ENVOY SLE, brown, V6, 4x4 02 NISSAN PATHFINDER SE, Sage, sun roof, autop, 4x4 01 FORD F150 XLT Blue/tan, 4 door, 4x4 truck 01 CHEVY BLAZER green, 4 door, 4x4 01 FORD EXPLORER sport silver, grey leather, 3x4 sunroof 00 CHEVY SILVERADO XCAB, 2WD truck, burgundy 89 CHEVY 1500, 4X4 TRUCK

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

CADILLAC `05 SRX

AWD, V-6, gold with tan interior, loaded, 91,000 miles. Asking $11,900. Please call 570-760-7550

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

BUICK ‘98 CENTURY CUSTOM V6, BARGAIN

PRICE! $2,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

CADILLAC ‘00 DTS Tan, satellite

radio, leather, moon roof, loaded excellent condition. 136k miles. $4,995.

570-814-2809

CADILLAC ‘11 STS 13,000 Miles, Showroom condition. $37,900 MAFFEI AUTO SALES 570-288-6227

CHEVROLET `00 MALIBU Bucket Seats &

console, A/C, inspected. Good condition $1,750 (570)299-0772

CHEVY ‘01 CAVALIER

4 door, 4 cylinder, automatic, 85k, looks & runs well $3,495 DEALER 570-868-3914

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

CROSSROAD MOTORS

HONDA ‘08 ACCORD 4 door, 4 cylinder,

570-825-7988

700 Sans Souci Highway WE SELL FOR LESS!! ‘11 DODGE DAKOTA CREW 4x4, Bighorn 6 cyl. 14k, Factory Warranty. $21,199 ‘11 Ford Escape XLT, 4x4, 26k, Factory Warranty, 6 Cylinder $20,299 ‘11 Nissan Rogue AWD, 17k, Factory Warranty. $19,199 ‘10 Subaru Forester Prem. 4WD 30k Factory warranty, power sunroof. $18,899 ‘08 Chrysler Sebring Conv. Touring 6 cyl. 32k $12,899 ‘08 SUBARU Special Edition 42K. 5 speed, Factory warranty. $11,699 ‘05 HONDA CRV EX 4x4 65k, a title. $12,799 ‘06 FORD FREESTAR 62k, Rear air A/C $7999 ‘01 LINCOLN TOWN CAR Executive 74K $5,199 ‘11 Toyota Rav 4 4x4 AT only 8,000 miles, new condition $22,899 TITLE TAGS FULL NOTARY SERVICE 6 M ONTH WARRANTY

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

CHEVY ‘04 MONTE CARLO Silver with Black

Leather, Sunroof, Very Sharp! $4,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD ‘02 TAURUS SES LIKE NEW!

$3,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

Low miles - 54,000. V6. FWD. Leather interior. Great shape. A/C. CD. All power. $6,900. Negotiable New inspection & tires. (570) 760-1005

leather moonroof, 1 owner $21,880

CHRYSLER `05 300 LIMITED EDITION

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

All wheel drive. Loaded with all power options. Black metallic with grey leather interior. Heated front seats, sunroof, 6 disc CD changer, satellite radio, cruise control, keyless/ alarm. Too many options to list. 79,400 miles. Sharp car, good condition. $10,500.

miles. New battery, excellent condition. Auto, single owner, runs great. Upgraded stereo system. 4 snow tires and rims & after market rims. Air, standard power features. Kelly Blue Book $7800. Asking $6800 570-466-5821

Call 814-9574

DODGE ‘08 AVENGER

R/T AWD 1 owner, only 15k miles, leather, alloys

$17,575 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

SATURN `02 SL1

Sedan,auto, all power, low miles. $4,999 (570)702-6023

BANKRUPTCY

FREE CONSULT

VITO’S & GINO’S

Wanted:

ALL JUNK CARS & TRUCKS Highest Prices Paid!! FREE PICKUP

288-8995

HYUNDAI ‘08 AZZURA

Leather moonroof & much more

$14,990 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

HYUNDAI ‘08 ELANTRA GLS

only 25,000 miles,

One owner, $14,880 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

HYUNDAI ‘08 SANTE FE

1 owner, Alloy, CD player $19,944

HONDA ‘04 ACCORD LX SEDAN. 162k

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

INFINITI ‘03 G35

Sedan. Silver with dark charcoal interior. 105,000 miles. All available options. Looks and runs like new. $8999 Call Rick 762-8165

MERCURY ‘10 MARINER

HONDA ‘04 CRV

All wheel drive, cruise, CD player, low miles. $11,575

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

1 owner, Low miles, AWD $19,840 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

apple red. Tan interior & top. 5.0, 5 speed. Totally original, low original miles. $6,800 570-283-8235

HONDA `07 CR-V EXL

Glacier blue, grey leather interior, 42,000 miles. 4 cylinder, auto. Excellent Condition! $19,500. 570-954-1435

472

460 AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE DIRECTORY 468

Call 829-7130 To Place Your Ad Attorney Services

navigation system. 4 cyl, silver w/ black interior. Satellite radio, 6CD changer, heated leather seats, high, highway miles. Well maintained. Monthly service record available. Call Bob. 570-479-0195

FORD `94 MUSTANG GT Convertible, candy

LAW DIRECTORY

310

HONDA ‘08 ACCORD 4 door, EXL with

CHRYSLER `04 SEBRING FORD ‘09 ESCAPE LTD Only 14k miles, LXI CONVERTIBLE

Auto Parts

310

Attorney Services

SHOTTO LAW, P.C. Affordable Family

Guaranteed Low Fees Payment Plan! Colleen Metroka 570-592-4796

Law Services. PFA, Divorce & Custody. Mike@Shottolaw.com 570.510.0577 Major Credit Cards Accepted

Free Bankruptcy Consultation Payment plans. Carol Baltimore 570-822-1959

SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY Free Consultation. Contact Atty. Sherry Dalessandro 570-823-9006

Auto Services

$ WANTED JUNK $ VEHICLES LISPI TOWING We pick up 822-0995

EMISSIONS & SAFETY INSPECTION SPECIAL

$39.95 with this coupon

Don’t Keep Your Practice a Secret! CXL top of the line. AWD, 50K original miles. 1 owner. Cocoa brown metallic. Dual sunroofs, power memory cooled and heated seats. 3rd row seating. DVD rear screen, navigation system, balance of factory warranty. Bought new over $50,000. Asking $25,900. Trade ins welcome 570-466-2771

auto $16,995 WARRANTY MAFFEI AUTO SALES 570-288-6227

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted Highest Prices Paid In CA$H

FREE PICKUP

570-574-1275

Also, Like New, Used Tires & Batteries for $20 & up!

Vito’s & Gino’s 949 Wyoming Avenue Forty Fort, PA

574-1275

Expires 6/30/12 WANTED

Cars & Full Size Trucks. For prices... Lamoreaux Auto Parts 477-2562


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 PAGE 3G

K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N

TH E NUM BER 1 NISSAN DEAL ER IN TH E S TATE O F PA IN NEW VEH IC L E S AL ES VO L UM E AND C US TO M ER S ATIS FAC TIO N FO R APRIL 2012**

A ND ND TH TH E P R ICIC ES ES A R E... E...

TH TH E TENT TEN T IS IS U PP... ...

SIM ILA R SA VING S O N A LL NEW NISSA N SENTR A S A ND LEA SES STA R TING A T $189/M O .

2012 N IS S A N A L TIM A 2.5S S E DA N $6000SA VEO FF M SR P !

STK#N 22026 M O D EL# 13112 M SR P $24,255

4 Cyl, CVT , A/C, AM /F M /CD, T ilt, Cru is e, F lo o rM a ts , M u ch M o re

$

B U Y FO R

18 ,2 5 5

*

+ T/T

W / $ 15 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE, $ 75 0 N M AC C A P TIV E C A S H & $ 5 0 0 M EM O R IA L D AY B O N U S C A S H *S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs

2011 N IS S A N CUBE 1.8S L SA$1500 VE O VER O FF M SR P !

STK#N 21437 M O D EL# 21211 M SR P $19,525

4 Cyl, CVT , S L Pkg, In t. Des ign Pkg, S p la s h Gu a rd s , M u ch M o re!

$

B U Y FO R

17,9 9 5

*

+ T/T

*S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs

2012 N IS S A N S E N TRA 2.0S R SA$2700 VE O VER O FF M SR P !

STK#N 21847 M O D EL# 12212 M SR P $19,230

4 Cyl, CVT , A/C, PW , PDL , Allo ys , S p o ilers , AM /F M /CD, M u ch M o re

$

B U Y FO R

16 ,4 9 5

*

+ T/T

W / $10 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H *S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs

2012 N IS S A N JUK E S L A W D SA$2600 VE O VER O FF M SR P !

STK#N 21677 M O D EL# 20612 M SR P $27,630

4 Cyl T u rb o , AW D, L ea ther, Blu eto o th, M o o n ro o f, Pu re Drive, A/C, Bo s e S o u n d , M u ch, M u ch M o re

$

D O W N

2012 N IS S A N ROGUE S V A W D SAM SRVEP OOVERN A LL$40002012O SVFF STK#N 21528 M O D EL# 22412 M SR P $26,870

4 Cyl, CVT , A/C, T in ted Gla s s , F lo o r M a ts , Allo ys , M u ch M o re!

$

2 4 ,9 9 5

B U Y FO R

2 2 ,8 70

*

+ T/T

W / $ 5 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE, $ 5 0 0 N M AC C A P TIV E C A S H & $ 5 0 0 M EM O R IA L D AY B O N U S C A S H *S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs

2012 N IS S A N V E RS A 1.8S H/B SA$2000 VE O VER O FF STK#N 21708 M O D EL# 11462 M SR P $15,430

M SR P !

4 Cyl, 6 S p eed , A/C, AM /F M , F lo o r M a ts , M u ch M o re!

$

B U Y FO R

13 ,3 9 5

*

+ T/T

W / $50 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC CAS H & $50 0 M EM OR IAL D AY B ON U S CAS H *S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs

2012 N IS S A N A L TIM A 2.5S COUP E $5000SA VEO FF STK#N 21885 M O D EL# 15112 M SR P $25,620

4 Cyl, CVT , A/C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts & M u ch M o re!

$

M SR P !

B U Y FO R

2 0 ,6 2 0

*

+ T/T

W / $ 10 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE, $ 5 0 0 N M AC C A P TIV E C A S H & $ 5 0 0 M EM O R IA L D AY B O N U S C A S H *S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs

2012 N IS S A N M A XIM A SA VE O VER 3.5S S E DA N $5500 O FF M SR P !

STK#N 21319 M O D EL# 16112 M SR P $32,945

V6, CVT , M o o n ro o f, Pw rS ea t, A/C, Orga n izer, F lo o r M a ts & M o re!

B U Y FO R

& SL R O G U ES

$

*

+ T/T

B U Y FO R

2 7,4 4 5

*

+ T/T

W / $ 15 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE, $ 5 0 0 N M AC C A P TIV E C A S H & $ 5 0 0 M EM O R IA L D AY B O N U S C A S H

W / $ 5 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE & $ 5 0 0 M EM O R IA L D AY B O N U S C A S H

*S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs

*S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs

*Ta x a nd Ta g a d d itio na l. Prio rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib le fo rTypo gra phic a l Erro rs . All reb a tes & inc entives a pplied . **0 % APR in lieu o f reb a tes . As k fo rd eta ils . **As perN is s a n M o nthly Sa les V o lu m e R epo rta s o f M a rc h 2 0 12 . All Pric es b a s ed o n im m ed ia te d elivery in s to c k vehic le o nly. All o ffers ex pire 5 /3 1/12 .

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PAGE 4G

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

FORD - LINCOLN

%

Auto., CD, Alum Wheels, Tilt, PW, PDL, Pwr. Seat, Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, Message Center, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Keyless Entry, Sirius Satellite Radio,

APR

M O S.

PLUS

Auto., CD, Alum Wheels, Tilt, PW, PDL, Pwr. Seat, Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry w/Keypad, Message Center

M O S.

PLUS

CD, Alum Wheels, Tilt, PW, PDL, Pwr. Seat, Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry w/Keypad, Message Center,

PLUS NO PAYMENTS FOR 90 DAYS*

PLUS NO PAYMENTS FOR 90 DAYS*

APR

M O S.

PLUS PLUS NO PAYMENTS FOR 90 DAYS*

24 Mos.

24 Mos. *Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/12.

APR

*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/12.

24 Mos. *Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/12.

APR

APR

M O S.

Automatic, 16” Steel Wheels, Pwr. Windows, Pwr. Door Locks, Air, Keyless Entry with Remote, Safety Canopy, Side Air Bags

PLUS PLUS NO PAYMENTS FOR 90 DAYS*

M O S.

XLT, Safety Canopy, Side Impact Safety Pkg., Pwr. Driver’s Seat, Auto., PDL, PW, Air, Fog Lamps, Privacy Glass, Roof Rack, 16” Alum. Wheels, Sirius Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry, Rear Cargo Convenience Pkg.,CD,

PLUS PLUS NO PAYMENTS FOR 90 DAYS*

24 Mos. *Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/12.

*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/12.

APR

APR

M O S.

M O S.

XLT, Safety Canopy, Side Impact Safety Pkg., Pwr. Driver’s Seat, Air, Auto., PDL, Fog Lamps, Privacy Glass, Roof Rack, 16” Alum. Wheels, Sirius Satellite Radio, Rear Cargo Convenience Pkg., Keyless Entry, CD, PW,

PLUS PLUS NO PAYMENTS FOR 90 DAYS*

, V6, Limited, CD, Pwr. Leather Heated Seats, Safety Canopy, Side Impact Safety Pkg., 17” Chrome Wheels, Sirius S atellite Radio, Keyless Entry, Rear Cargo Convenience Pkg.,

PLUS PLUS NO PAYMENTS FOR 90 DAYS*

24 Mos.

24 Mos.

*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/12.

*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/12.

CALL NOW 823-8888 1-800-817-FORD Overlooking Mohegan Sun 577 East Main St., Plains

Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B *Tax and tags extra. Security Deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. See salesperson for details. All payments subject to credit approval by the primary lending source, Tier 0 rate. Special APR financing cannot be combined with Ford cash rebate. “BUY FOR” prices are based on 72 month at $18.30 per month per $1000 financed with $2,500 down (cash or trade). *On retail purchases financed through Ford Motor Credit Company. Photos of vehicles are for illustration purposes only. Coccia Ford is not responsible for any typographical errors. No Security Deposit Necessary. See dealer for details. Sale ends MAY 31, 2012.


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 PAGE 5G

w w w. M a t t B u r n e H o n d a . c o m

2012 HONDA ACCORD LX

MPG 23 City 34 HWY

$0 DOWN PAYMENT

4 dr, Auto Trans, AC, PW, PL, Cruise, ABS, 6 Air Bags, Tilt, Keyless Entry, AM/FM/CD, Model #CP2F3CEW

219

$

*

$219 Lease Per Mo. For 36 Months through AHFC. $0 Down Payment. 1st Payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $13,149.90.

Thank You To Our Customers

0

APR FINANCING .9% NOW AVAILABLE!

2012 HONDA CIVIC LX SEDAN

$0 DOWN PAYMENT

*On select models to qualified buyers for limited term.

2012 HONDA PILOT LX MPG 17 City 24 HWY

MPG 28 City 39 HWY • Model #FB2F5CEW • 140-hp 16-Valve SOHC i-VTEC® • 5-Speed Automatic Transmission • Air Conditioning with Air-Filtration System • Power Windows/Locks/Mirrors • Cruise Control • Remote Entry • 160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System with 4 Speakers • ABS • Dual-Stage, Multiple-Threshold Front Airbags (SRS) • Front Side Airbags with Passenger-Side Occupant Position Detection System (OPDS) • Side Curtain Airbags ***Lease ease 36 Months through ahfc ahfc. $0 Down Payment Payment.

199

$

* ** Per Mo. L ease Lease

1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $11,952.95

300

• 250-hp 24-Valve SOHC i-VTEC® • 5-Speed Automatic Transmission • 8 Passenger Seating • Variable Torque Management® 4-Wheel Drive System (VTM-4®) • Vehicle Stability AssistTM (VSA®) with Traction Control • Power WIndows/Locks/Mirrors • Front and Rear Air Conditioning with Air-Filtration System • 229-Watt AM/ FM/CD Audio System with 7 Speakers including Subwoofer • Remote Entry • ABS • Dual-Stage, Multiple-Threshold Front Airbags (SRS) • Front Side Airbags with Passenger-Side Occupant Position Detection ****Lease Lease 36 Months through ahfc ahfc. $0 Down Payment Payment. System (OPDS) 1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $17,388.00

329

$

08 HONDA CRV LX

$15,250

$18,950

Red, 8K

Mocha, 17K Miles

$28,500 50 TO CHOOSE FROM

$15,950 $16,950

TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR TRADE!

CRV 4WD’s

2009 HONDA PILOT EX 4WD

08 HONDA ACCORD LXP SDN

09 HONDA CIVIC EX SDN

IN STOCK!

$14,950

$18,950

08 HONDA ACCORD EXL SDN Silver, 22K

L ease Lease

• Model RM4H5CJW • 185-hp • 2.4-Liter, 16-Valve SOHC i-VTEC® 4-Cylinder Engine • Real Time AWD with Intelligent Control System™ • Vehicle Stability Assist™ (VSA®) with Traction Control • Automatic Transmission • Cruise Control • A/C • One-Touch Power Moonroof with Tilt Feature • Remote Entry System • Bluetooth® HandsFreeLink® • Multi-angle rearview camera with guidelines • 160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System with 6 Speakers • Bluetooth® Streaming Audio • Pandora® Internet Radio compatibility • SMS Text Message Function • USB Audio Interface • Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS) • Dual-Stage, Multiple-Threshold Front Airbags (SRS) • Front Side Airbags with Passenger-Side Occupant Position Detection System (OPDS) • Side Curtain Airbags with Rollover Sensor

STARTING FROM

09 HONDA ACCORD EX CPE Gray, 33K

* Per ***Mo.

(15) 07-10

TO

Blue, 33K

MPG 22 City 30 HWY

LEASES BASED ON APPROVED CREDIT TIER 1 THRU AHFC. MILEAGE BASED ON 2012 EPA MILEAGE ESTIMATES. USE FOR COMPARISON PURPOSES ONLY. DO NOT COMPARE TO MODELS BEFORE 2008. YOUR ACUTAL MILEAGE WILL VARY DEPENDING ON HOW YOU DRIVE AND MAINTAIN YOUR VEHICLE.

A HOND S LE C I ! H M O E R F V CHOOSE

Lt Blue, 63K

2012 HONDA CR-V EX

$0 DOWN PAYMENT

Used Cars

7-Year/100,000-Mile Powertrain Warranty 12 month/12,000-Mile Non Powertrain Warranty 150-Point Mechanical & Appearance Inspection Vehicle History Report

*From the original date of first use when said as a new vehicle *Prior sales excluded. Tax & tags Extra. Expires 05-31-12

Open Monday - Thursday 9-9 Friday & Saturday 9-5

09 HONDA CIVIC HYBRID SEDAN Black, 37K

$17,950

11 HONDA CROSSTOUR EXL 4WD Green, 18K

$29,950

11 HONDA CRZ EX White, 6K

$19,500

09 HONDA PILOT EX Silver, 33K

$23,750

09 HONDA ACCORD EXL-V6 Silver, 26K

$20,950

1110 Wyoming Ave, Scranton, PA 1-800-NEXT-HONDA 570-341-1400


PAGE 6G

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

A TOP 10 IN THE NATION SUZUKI SALES VOLUME DEALER 2 YEARS RUNNING***

JUST ANNOUNCED

0

%

72

FOR UP TO

** MO.

APR AVAILABLE ON ALL NEW 2012 SUZUKI MODELS! (In Lieu Of Rebates)

NOW WHAT’S STOPPING YOU?

NEW Stk# S2199

I Love My TODAY! T HESE i k u z Su PEOPLE Car Club! DID!

Charles and Holly from Tunkhannock

Margaret from Mountaintop

Rita from Miners Mills

Join The

Mark from Mountaintop

The “S” Family from Scranton

2012 SUZUKI KIZASHI S AWD

2012 SUZUKI SX4 CROSSOVER AWD

NEW

0

%

Stk#S1987

APR

0

AVAILABLE UP TO

72

23,669* 21,499*

BUY NOW FOR:

19,499*

NEW

2012 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA 4WD

Stk#S2132

0%

72

3-Mode Intelligent All-Wheel Drive, 8 Standard Airbags, Power Windows, Power Locks, Power Manufacturer Rebate Owner Loyalty Rebate Mirrors, 6 Speed Transmission

$

BUY NOW FOR:

19,999*

APR

APR

18,019* 15,999* $

$

1,000* - $ 500*

BUY NOW FOR:

AVAILABLE UP TO

72 LE Popular Package, 8 Standard Airbags, 6 Speed Transmission, Power Windows, Power Locks, Power Mirrors, Alloy Wheels

2012 SUZUKI KIZASHI S FWD

NEW

NEW Stk#S2100

0%

$

BUY NOW FOR:

Stk#S2005

2012 SUZUKI EQUATOR CREW CAB SPORT 4X4

0% APR

AVAILABLE UP TO

72

MOS.**

20,463* 18,199* $

$

MSRP w/ Accessories $ Ken Pollock Sale Price

- 1,500* - $ 500*

Manufacturer Rebate Owner Loyalty Rebate

BUY NOW FOR:

16,199* EXIT 175

81 ROUTE 315 ROUTE 315

KEN POLLOCK SUZUKI

MOS.**

4.0L V6 w/ Automatic Transmission, $ MSRP w/ Accessories Dual Stage Airbags, 17” Aluminum $ Wheels, 4-Wheel Anti-Lock Ken Pollock Sale Price Braking System, Six Standard $ Manufacturer Rebate - 2,000* Airbags, Power Windows, $ Owner Loyalty Rebate - 500* Power Locks

29,789* 26,999*

$

BUY NOW FOR:

24,499*

*Tax and tags additional. Buy now for sale price includes Suzuki Manufacturer rebates of $1,000 on 2012 Suzuki SX4 AWD, SX4 Sedan; $1,500 Suzuki Manufacturer Rebates on Suzuki Grand Vitara and Kizashi; $2,000 Manufacturer Rebates on Suzuki Equator. Buy now for sale price includes $500 Suzuki Owner Loyalty on 2012 Suzuki SX4 Sedan, Equator, SX4 Crossover, Kizashi and Grand Vitara. All Ken Pollock Suzuki discounts applied. Artwork for illustration purposes only. Dealer not responsible for typographical errors. 0% financing in lieu of Suzuki Manufacturers rebates, Owner Loyalty is applicable. Buy now for sale prices valid on IN STOCK vehicles only. PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED. **O% APR in lieu of Rebates (for “S” tier approvals). $13.89 for every $1000 Financed for 72 Months. Offer is with No Money Down. Offer Ends May 31, 2012. See salesperson for details.***Based on 2010 and 2011 President’s Club Standings.

INTERSTATE

- 1,000* - $ 500*

Manufacturer Rebate Owner Loyalty Rebate

AVAILABLE UP TO

8 Standard Airbags, Dual Digital Climate Control, Power Windows, Power Locks, Power Mirrors, AM/FM/CD

16,570* 14,799* $

$

MSRP $ Ken Pollock Sale Price

APR

72

MOS.**

13,299*

14,499*

$

MOS.**

24,284* 21,999*

0%

%

$

AVAILABLE UP TO

$ MSRP w/ Accessories 4 Wheel Drive, Voice Activated $ Navigation w/ Blue Tooth, Ken Pollock Sale Price Automatic Transmission, Power $ Windows, Power Locks, Power Manufacturer Rebate - 1,500* $ Mirros, Electronic Stability Control Owner Loyalty Rebate - 500*

Stk#S2081

2012 SUZUKI SX4 SEDAN

MOS.**

MSRP $ Ken Pollock Sale Price

APR

72

NEW

Amanda from Noxen

AVAILABLE UP TO

MOS.**

Advanced Intelligent All-Wheel $ Drive, 8 Standard Airbags, Dual MSRP Zone Digital Climate Control, $ Automatic CVT Transmission, Ken Pollock Sale Price $ TouchFree Smart Key, Power Manufacturer Rebate - 1,500* Windows, Power Locks, Molded $ Owner Loyalty Rebate - 500* Mud flap package

$

Jerome & Anita from Pittston

Becky from Wilkes-Barre

CLOSE TO EVERYWHERE! WE’RE EASY TO FIND!

JUST OFF EXIT 175 RTE I-81 • PITTSTON

0

%

APR

FINANCING AVAILABLE TO QUALIFIED BUYERS*


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 412 Autos for Sale

WANTED!

ALL JUNK CARS! CA$H PAID

570-301-3602

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

NISSAN 09 MORANO SL

SUBARU FORESTER’S

1 owner, AWD, Alloys, $22,345 560 Pierce St.

NISSAN 09 ROGUE S 1 owner, AWD $17,950 560 Pierce St.

8

NISSAN `99 SENTRA

Selling your Camper? Place an ad and find a new owner. 570-829-7130

NISSAN ‘09 ALTIMA SL

Leather moonroof, smartkey, 1 owner

to choose From

427

PONTIAC ‘01 SUNFIRE GT 2 door, 4 cylinder, automatic, 84k, sunroof, looks & runs well. $3,595 DEALER 570-868-3914

PONTIAC ‘06 G6 GTP door, red with

2 black interior, V6, sunroof, remote start, R-Title, 52,000 miles. Priced to sell at $7200 firm. (570) 283-1756

SATURN ‘03 VUE

Low miles, leather & alloys. $8,800

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

SUBARU ‘11 IMPREZA PREMIUM. AWD,

All original $12,000

MERCEDES ‘76 450 SL

Kit Car $9,000 (570) 655-4884 hell-of-adeal.com

SUBARU

Chrysler ‘68 New Yorker

4 OLDSMOBILE `97 CUTLASS SUPREME Museum kept, never

driven, last Cutlass off the GM line. Crimson red with black leather interior. Every available option including sunroof. Perfect condition. 300 original miles. $21,900 or best offer. Call 570-650-0278

FORD ‘76 THUNDERBIRD

starting at $11,450 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

$24,000

MERCEDES ‘29

Sedan. 440 Engine. Power Steering & brakes. 34,500 original miles. Always garaged. Reduced to $5995 Firm. 883-4443

Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

FORD ‘65 GALAXIE

to choose From

starting at $12,400 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

TOYOTA `05 SCION TC Manual, AM/FM

stereo, MP3 multi disc, rear spoiler, moon roof, alloys, gound effects, 90,100 miles, A/C. $9,000, negotiable. 570-760-0765 570-474-2182

TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT

112K miles. Blue, 5 speed. Air, power windows/locks, CD/cassette, Keyless entry, sunroof, new battery. Car drives and has current PA inspection. Slight rust on corner of passenger door. Clutch slips on hard acceleration. This is why its thousands less than Blue Book value. $6,500 OBO. Make an offer! Call 570-592-1629

TOYOTA ‘09 CAMRY 18,000 Miles,

1 owner, 4 cylinder. $16,900 MAFFEI AUTO SALES 570-288-6227

Convertible, white with red leather interior. 64,000 original miles. Beautiful car. Asking. $10,500 570-371-2151

MAZDA `88 RX-7

CONVERTIBLE 1 owner, garage kept, 65k original miles, black with grey leather interior, all original & never seen snow. $7,995. Call 570-237-5119

MERCURY `79 ZEPHYR

6 cylinder automatic. 52k original miles. Florida car. $1500. 570-899-1896

OLDSMOBILE `68 DELMONT

Commercial Trucks & Equipment

CHEVY ‘08 3500 HD DUMP TRUCK 2WD, automatic.

Only 12,000 miles. Vehicle in like new condition. $19,000. 570-288-4322

439

Motorcycles

BMW 2010 K1300S

Only 460 miles! Has all bells & whistles. Heated grips, 12 volt outlet, traction control, ride adjustment on the fly. Black with lite gray and red trim. comes with BMW cover, battery tender, black blue tooth helmet with FM stereo and black leather riding gloves (like new). paid $20,500. Sell for

$15,000 FIRM.

Call 570-262-0914 Leave message.

HARLEY ‘10 DAVIDSON SPORTSTER CUSTOM Loud pipes. Near Mint 174 miles - yes, One hundred and seventy four miles on the clock, original owner. $8000. 570-876-2816

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘03 DYNA WIDE GLIDE

Golden Anniversary. Silver/Black. New Tires. Extras. Excellent Condition. 19,000 miles $10,000. 570-639-2539

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘05 V-ROD VRSCA

Blue pearl, excellent condition, 3,100 miles, factory alarm with extras. $9,700. or best offer. Tony 570-237-1631

Must Sell! Appraised for $9,200

Line up a place to live in classified!

• All original

KAWASAKI ‘03

45,000 miles • 350 Rocket engine • Fender skirts • Always garaged

KLR 650.Green w/cargo bag. Excellent condition. $3,000 Rick 570-216-0867

POLARIS ‘00 VICTORY CRUISER 14,000 miles,

$19,995 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

3,000 miles. Like new, metallic silver, satellite radio, 4 door, 170 hp. $17,500 OBO 570-696-3447 570-574-2799

VOLKSWAGEN ‘00 BEETLE 2.0 automatic, air

Will sell for $6,000 Serious inquires only 570690-0727

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

67k miles $6400. 570-466-0999

Boats & Marinas

BOAT 14 foot fishing boat with oars & electric motor good condition $425 570-824-0950

$49,000

IMPREZA’S

9999999

XE. Runs excellent, great gas mileage. Moving - must sell. Asking $2,800, negotiable. Call 570-852-7323

CHEVROLET `65 CORVAIR 4 speed, 4 door,

421

CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

9999999

570-955-5792

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

$2,500. 570-851-4416

MARZAK MOTORS 601 Green Ridge St, Scranton

BUICK ‘91 ROADMASTER Station Wagon, white with woodgrain exterior, gold leather interior, 3rd seat. Runs great, high mileage. $1800 MERCURY ‘99 GRAND MARQUIS Gold, 4 door, tan interior, runs great, 116,000 miles, new inspection $4500 LINCOLN ‘02 TOWNCAR Signature series, Silver, grey leather interior, 99,000 miles, runs great $5295 AUDI ‘95 A6 2.8 QUATRO Black, 4 door, grey leather interior, loaded $3500 CHEVY ‘05 AVEO Silver, 4 door, grey cloth interior, A/C, re-built transmission with warranty, 4 cyl. 79,000 miles $5200 MERCURY ‘96 GRAND MARQUIS 4 door, gold with tan cloth interior, only 50k miles. Loaded. Must See! $4200 Warranties Available

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 PAGE 7G 439

Motorcycles

HSoft ARLEY DAVIDSON ‘80 riding FLH. King of the Highway! Mint original antique show winner. Factory spot lights, wide white tires, biggest Harley built. Only 28,000 original miles! Never needs inspection, permanent registration. $7,995 OBO 570-905-9348

SUZUKI ‘01 VS 800 GL INTRUDER Garage kept, no rust, lots of chrome, black with teal green flake. Includes storage jack & 2 helmets. $3600 570-410-1026

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130! SUZUKI 2006 BOULEVARD 4,000 miles, garage kept, excellent condition. $3,000 570-970-3962

YAMAHA ‘97 ROYALSTAR 1300

12,000 miles. With windshield. Runs excellent. Many extras including gunfighter seat, leather bags, extra pipes. New tires & battery. Asking $4,000 firm. (570) 814-1548

442 RVs & Campers

FLAGSTAFF `08 CLASSIC NOW BACK IN PA.

Super Lite Fifth Wheel. LCD/DVD flat screen TV, fireplace, heated mattress, ceiling fan, Hide-a-Bed sofa, outside speakers & grill, 2 sliders, aluminum wheels, , awning, microwave oven, tinted safety glass windows, fridge & many accessories & options. Excellent condition, $22,500. 570-868-6986

SPORTSMAN CAMPER ‘00 30’, 10’ slide.

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

CHEVROLET `00 LS 4 X 4 EXTENDED CAB

4.8 liter, all power, auto. Newer tires, looks & runs great. 82K. $8,600. 570-693-9339

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

CHEVY ‘03 IMPALA

One owner, only 42k miles. $8,550

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

CHEVY ‘99 BLAZER

Sport utility, 4 door, four wheel drive, ABS, new inspection. $4200. 570-709-1467

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

CHEVY ‘05 SILVERADO X CAB

2 WHEEL DRIVE $5,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

CHRYSLER `02 TOWN & COUNTRY

Luxury people mover! 87,300 well maintained miles. This like-new van has third row seating, power side & rear doors. Economical V6 drivetrain and all available options. Priced for quick sale $5,495. Generous trade-in allowances will be given on this top-of-the-line vehicle. Call Fran 570-466-2771 Scranton

CHRYSLER ‘01 TOWN AND COUNTRY VAN V6, automatic, 44k

92 V-twin, 1507 cc, extras $6000. 570-883-9047

Queen bed, A/C. 16’ canopy. Sleeps six. $7,500, OBO. Near Lake Winola 570-239-6848

miles, 7 passenger $4,995 DEALER 570-868-3914

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

FORD ‘01 RANGER 4X4

Extended cab, V6 automatic, 51k, looks and runs well $6,995 DEALER 570-868-3914

FORD ‘02 EXPLORER

Red, XLT, Original non-smoking owner, garaged, synthetic oil since new, excellent in and out. New tires and battery. 90,000 miles. $7,500 (570) 403-3016

FORD ‘04 RANGER

All wheel drive, Champagne tan, navigation, backup camera, lift gate, ivory leather with memory, auto, 3.3 liter V6, regular gas, garaged, nonsmoker, brand new condition, all service records. 6 disc CD. Private seller with transferable 2 year warranty, 96K. $15,995 570-563-5065

GMC `07 SIERRA 1500

OUTLANDER SPORT SE AWD, Black interi-

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

Super Cab One Owner, 4x4, 5 Speed, Highway miles. Sharp Truck! $5,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

Regular Cab 37,000 miles, 6 cylinder auto, 4 x 4. Black Excellent condition. $16,500 570-954-1435

GMC ‘05 ENVOY SLE moonroof, many extras. $10,850 560 Pierce St.

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD ‘02 F150 Extra Cab. 6

Cylinder, 5 speed. Air. 2WD. $4,495 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD ‘06 ESCAPE XLT

4x4. Sunroof. Like new. $5,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD ‘00 EXPLORER XLT

eXTRA cLEAN! 4X4. $3,995. 570-696-4377

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORDV6.‘04Clean, EXPLORER

Clean SUV! 4WD $4,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

412 Autos for Sale

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

LEXUS `05 RX 330

DODGE ‘05 CARAVAN

SXT Special Edition. Stow and go, beautiful van. Leather heated seats with sunroof, tinted windows, luggage rack. Brandy color, 85K miles. $11,875 negotiable 570-301-4929

451

MITSUBISHI `11

or/exterior, start/ stop engine with keyless entry, heated seats, 18” alloy wheels, many extra features. Only Low Miles. 10 year, 100,000 mile warranty. $22,500. Willing to negotiate. Serious inquires only - must sell, going to law school. (570) 793-6844

NISSAN ‘97 PICKUP XE 4WD, alloys, 5 speed. $6,880

Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

HONDA `02 PILOT

90,432 miles, automatic, all-wheel drive, new new brakes, newly inspected. $7,000 (570)823-7176

HYANDAI ‘11 SANTA FE

1 owner, only 7k miles. $22,900 560 Pierce Street

Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

JEEP `96 GRAND CHEROKEE V8 Automatic, four

wheel drive, air conditioning, new tires, brakes & transmission. $3,300. 570-972-9685

JEEP 02 GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO 6 cylinder 4 WD, air

conditioning power windows, door locks, cruise, dual air bags, tilt wheel, AM/FM/CD. keyless remote. 130k miles. $5400. 570-954-3390

412 Autos for Sale

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

457 Wanted to Buy Auto

VITO’S & GINO’S

Wanted:

ALL JUNK CARS & TRUCKS Highest Prices Paid!! FREE PICKUP

288-8995 412 Autos for Sale

1.866.356.9383 MOTORWORLDGROUP.COM MOTORWORLD DRIVE JUST OFF INTERSTATE 81 WILKES-BARRE, PA SALES HOURS MON – FRI: 9AM-8PM SAT: 9AM-5PM SUN: OPEN FOR OUTDOOR BROWSING NOON-5PM

North Eastern Pennsylvania’s #1 Luxury Vehicle Destination MOTORWORLD CADILLAC

SPRING EVENT 2012

2012

CADILLAC CTS COUPE AWD PERFORMANCE

CADILLAC CTS SEDAN AWD

LEASE FOR

STK# C3587

$

419

LEASE FOR

STK# C3528

$

TAX/TAGS FOR 39 MONTHS* PLUS TAX *LEASE BASED ON 39 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH , DUE AT SIGNING WITH APPROVED CREDIT THRU ALLY FINANCIAL. $2,995 LEASE INCLUDES $2,000 CONQUEST REBATE. MUST CURRENTLY BE IN A NON-GM LEASE TO QUALIFY.

*LEASE BASED ON 39 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $1,995 DUE AT SIGNING WITH APPROVED CREDIT THRU ALLY FINANCIAL. LEASE INCLUDES $2,000 CONQUEST REBATE. MUST CURRENTLY BE IN A NON-GM LEASE TO QUALIFY.

2012

2012

CADILLAC ESCALADE AWD ESV PREM PREMIUM

LEASE FOR

STK# C3592

$

439

PLUS TAX TAX/TAGS FOR 39 MONTHS* *LEASE WITH 39 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $1,995 DUE AT SIGNING. LEASE INCLUDES $2,000 CONQUEST REBATE. MUST CURRENTLY BE IN A NON-GM LEASE TO QUALIFY. MUST QUALIFY FOR LEASE THROUGH ALLY FINANCIAL.

LEASE FOR

STK#C3554

$

799

PLUS TAX/TAGS TAX FOR 48 MONTHS* *LEASE BASED ON 48 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $4,995 DUE AT SIGNING WITH APPROVED CREDIT THRU ALLY FINANCIAL. LEASE INCLUDES $2,000 CONQUEST REBATE. MUST CURRENTLY BE IN A NON-GM LEASE TO QUALIFY.

*PRICES & PAYMENTSARE PLUSTAX,TAGS &TITLE.PHOTOSARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY.DEALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FORTYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS.ALL PRICES INCLUDEAPPLICABLE REBATESAND/OR INCENTIVES.SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS.PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED.ALL OFFERS SUBJECTTO MANUFACTURES PROGRAM CHANGES.PRICESAVAILABLE ON ADVERTISEDVEHICLES ONLY.MILEAGE CHARGE OF $.25/MILE OVER 30K MILES.LESSEE PAYS FOR EXCESSWEAR.NOTAVAILABLEWITH SOME OTHER OFFERS.SECURITY DEPOSIT IS NOT REQUIREDATTIME OF DELIVERY.FINANCING ON SELECT MODELSTHRUALLY FINANCIAL,MUST QUALIFY.SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS.ALL OFFERS EXPIRE 5/31/12.

754174

CADILLAC SRX LUXURY AWD

299

PLUS TAX/TAGS FOR 39 MONTHS* TAX


PAGE 8G

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

VEHICLES FOR EVERY BUDGET! Value Vehicle Outlet

2002 FORD EXPLORER 4X4

Stk# S2027A, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks

Stk# S2052A, XLT Package, 3rd Row Seating, PW, PL

NOW

5,750*

$

2006 CHEVY COBALT SEDAN

2005 SUZUKI AERIO WAGON

NOW

5,950*

$

NOW

7,750*

$

10,750*

2006 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA 4X4 $ Stk# P14654, Alloy Wheels, Power Windows & Locks, CD, Auto

14,450*

$

14,550*

2008 CHEVROLET MALIBU LTZ $ Stk# P14641, Heated Leather, Sunroof, 18” Allys, Auto, Rare “Pearl White” Color

Stk# P14652, Leather, Sunroof, Auto, Power Windows & Locks

14,950*

$

2009 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA 4X4

Stk# S1792A, Sunroof, Alloy Wheels, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks

Stk# PA4673, Sunroof, Alloy Wheels, Auto, Power Windows & Locks

15,950

2012 SUZUKI SX4 CROSSOVER AWD $ Stk# S1933A, Only 422 Miles! Automatic, Alloy Wheels, PW, PL

Stk#S1831A, Leather, Sunroof, Auto, Alloy Wheels, PW, PL

*

17,950

2008 HONDA ACCORD EX-L SEDAN $

12,450 $ 2006 CHEVY IMPALA LTZ 12,950* $ 2005 SAAB 9-3 AERO CONV 13,950* 2012 SUZUKI SX4 CROSSOVER AWD $13,950* *

Stk#S2063A, Alloy Wheels, Automatic, CD, Power Windows & Locks

NOW

Stk#S2111A, Leather, Sunroof, V6, Automatic, Pw, PL

*

18,950

2011 MITSUBISHI ENDEAVOR AWD $ Stk#P14647, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks, Alloy Wheels

Stk#P14671, Leather, Alloy Wheels, Automatic, CD, PW, PL

*

19,350*

2011 SUZUKI KIZASHI SLS AWD $ Stk# P14608, Navigation, Sunroof, Leather, Power Seats, And More!

Stk#P14670, Leather, Alloy Wheels, Automatic, PW, PL

19,750*

2012 MITSUBISHI LANCER RALLIART AWD $ Stk# P14662, Special Edition, Twin Clutch Automatic, All Wheel Drive

Stk# S2006A, 6 Speed, Power Windows & Locks, CD1-Owner

8,450*

$

NOW

8,850*

$

2006 CHEVY EXPRESS 2500 CARGO VAN

Stk# P14668, Bin Pkg, Ladder Rack Pkg, V8

Stk# S2064A, Automatic, A/C, Tonneau Cover

NOW

8,950*

$

CERTIFIED VEHICLES Stk# S2098A, Sunroof, Low Miles, Automatic, 4 Cylinder, PW, PL

$

2005 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO 4X4 $

7,750*

$

2006 HYUNDAI TUCSON AWD

10,850* $ 2006 FORD FUSION 10,950* 2008 NISSAN ALTIMA SE SEDAN $ 11,850* 2008 CHEVY COBALT LT COUPE $ 11,950* 2007 DODGE NITRO 4X4

NOW

The Best Vehicle At The Absolute Lowest Prices.

2005 CHEVY SILVERADO REG CAB 2WD

Stk# P14661, Alloy Wheels, Automatic, PW, PL, All Wheel Drive

Stk# S1625C, Automatic, Power Windows, Power Locks, CD

1.99%**

• 3 Day or 150 Mile Money Back Guarantee** • 30 Day/1000 Mile Limited Warranty** • All Value Vehicle Outlet Cars Pass PA State Inspection**

2005 CHEVROLET EQUINOX LT AWD

2007 PONTIAC G5 COUPE

Stk# S2040A, Sunroof, Automatic, CD, Power Windows & Locks

Stk# S1988A, Alloy Wheels, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks

GOLD CHECK

Stk# S2086A, Alloy Wheels, Power Windows & Locks, CD, Auto

2003 HYUNDAI SANTA FE AWD

RATES AS LOW AS

NOW

9,950*

$

JUST TRADED AS TRADED!

1,750* 1995 CADILLAC DEVILLE $ 2008 NISSAN PATHFINDER SE 4X4 $ 1,950* 20,450* 2003 ISUZU RODEO 4X4 $ 1,950* 2011 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA LIMITED 4X4 $21,250* 1991 FORD BRONCO 4X4 $ * 2,999 $ * 2011 KIA SORENTO 4WD 21,950 2002 SATURN L300 SEDAN $ * 3,450 2012 SUZUKI KIZASHI GTS AWD $ 22,750* 2002 CHEVROLET TRACKER 4X4 $ 3,550* 2011 SUZUKI EQUATOR CREW CAB RMZ-4 4X4 $23,750* 2000 CHEVROLET BLAZER 4DR 4X4 $ 3,550* 2012 FORD MUSTANG CONVERTIBLE $25,350* 2004 JEEP LIBERTY 4X4 $ 3,750* $ 2011 HONDA PILOT 4X4 27,950* 2005 HYUNDAI SANTA FE AWD $5,750* 2009 TOYOTA RAV 4 4WD

Stk# P14645, Alloy Wheels, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks

19,750*

$

2002 FORD TAURUS SEDAN

Stk# S2058A, Leather, Power Windows & Locks, Auto

$

Stk# S2079B, Power Windows & Locks, Sunroof, Leather

Stk# P14637, DVD, Leather, Sunroof, 3rd Row, V6

Stk# P14669, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks

Stk# S1854, Sunroof, Heated Leather, 18” Alloys, Navigation w/Bluetooth!

Stk# S2090A, Anniversary Edition!! Nice Nice Truck!

Stk# S2099A, Rear View Camera, Remote Start, 4 Cylinder, Heated Seats

Stk#S2105A, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks, Alloy Wheels

Stk# S1806A, Only 3K Miles, Sunroof, 18” Wheels, All Wheel Drive

Stk# S2020A, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks

Stk# S1996A, Navigation, Alloy Wheels, Automatic, Off Road Pkg.

Stk# S1991A, LT Package w/ Leather, Auto, PW, PL

Stk# P14659, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks, CD, Alloy Wheels

Stk# S1971A, Columbia Edition, Automatic, PW, PL

Stk# P14635, EX Package, 3rd Row Seating, Alloy Wheels, CD, Low Miles!

Stk# S2097A, GLS Pkg, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks

*All Prices Plus Tax, Tags, & Fees. Artwork for illustration purposes only. Dealer not responsible for typographical errors. All Value Vehicle Outlet Cars pass PA State Inspection. See sales person for complete details. **1.99% on bank approved credit for 60 month term. Just Traded As Traded Vehicles are sold as is where is with no warranty.

1-800-223-1111

339 HWY 315, PITTSTON, PA www.kenpollocksuzuki.com

AT Ken Pollock

Hours M-F 9-8pm Sat 9-5pm

SCAN HERE FOR MORE INFO

755589

KEN POLLOCK

CLOSE TO EVERYWHERE WE’RE EASY TO FIND JUST OFF EXIT 175 RTE I-81 • PITTSTON

of Scranton - NEPA

2012 Cadillac SRX 2012 Cadillac CTS All Wheel Drive

Luxury Edition

MSRP $43,085

2012 Cadillac SRX Front Wheel Drive

MSRP $40,360

MSRP $36,075

39 MONTHS LEASE IT! 39 MONTHS LEASE IT! 39 MONTHS LEASE IT! 24 $ SECURITY $ SECURITY $ SECURITY 0 0 0 DEPOSIT DEPOSIT DEPOSIT $ $ $

429

$

279

$

Per Month + Tax*

Lease price based on a 2012 SRX AWD Luxury Edition $43,085 MSRP. $429 per month plus 9% PA sales tax total $467 per month. 39 Month lease 10,000 miles per year. 39 Monthly payments total $18,213 $.25/mile penalty over 32,500 miles. $2000 down payment plus $429 first payment plus tax and tags due at delivery. Total due at delivery $2650 plus tag fees. MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER NON-GM LEASE. Leasee responsible for excessive wear and tear. Must take delivery by 5/31/2012. Requires ALLY Bank Tier S credit approval. Please see sales person for complete details. Example payment per thousand 16.67 per month. Example down payment 29%.

Per Month + Tax*

Lease price based on a 2012 CTS Sdn with All Wheel Drive $40,360 MSRP. $279 per month plus 9% PA sales tax total $306 per month. 39 Month lease 10,000 miles per year. 39 Monthly payments total $11,934 $.25/mile penalty over 32,500 miles. $2000 down payment plus $279 first payment plus tax and tags due at delivery. Total due at delivery $2539 plus tag fees. MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER NON-GM LEASE. Leasee responsible for excessive wear and tear. Must take delivery by 5/31/2012. Requires ALLY Bank Tier S credit approval. Please see sales person for complete details. Example payment per thousand 16.67 per month. Example down payment 29%.

329

$

Per Month + Tax*

Lease price based on a 2012 SRX FWD Luxury Edition $36,075 MSRP. $329 per month plus 9% PA sales tax total $358 per month. 24 Month lease 10,000 miles per year. 24 Monthly payments total $8,616 $.25/mile penalty over 20,000 miles. $2000 down payment plus $329 first payment plus tax and tags due at delivery. Total due at delivery $2550 plus tag fees. MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER NON-GM LEASE. Leasee responsible for excessive wear and tear. Must take delivery by 5/31/2012. Requires ALLY Bank Tier S credit approval. Please see sales person for complete details. Example payment per thousand 16.67 per month. Example down payment 29%.

Premium Select Pre-Owned Cars Sunroof, All Wheel Drive, 5,952 Miles

CTS AWD

by Cadillac #12496, Crystal Red/ Titanium, Sunroof, Heated & Memory Seats, Only 13,850 Miles

31,991 $34,991

$

2008 Cadillac

2011 Cadillac

DTS Premium SRX AWD White Diamond/cashmere leather, Navigation, Heated/Cooled Seats, 18” Performance Wheels, Sunroof

28,998

$

Ultra View Sunroof, All Wheel Drive, Heated & Memory Seats

2006 Cadillac DTS Memory & Heated Leather, Only 26,990 Miles

36,991 $18,996

$

2010 Cadillac

Escalade

2008 Cadillac

STS AWD

#12533, Black/Black Leather, #8992A, Blue/Leather, Sunroof, Heated Navigation, 22” Chromes, Sunroof, Rear & Memory Seats, Low Mileage, Entertainment, Only 22,506 Miles One Owner

51,990

$

R.J. BURNE 1205-1209 Wyoming Avenue, Scranton

(570) 342-0107 • 1-888-880-6537 www.rjburne.com Mon-Thurs 9-8 • Sat 9-4

$

18,997

1205 Wyoming Ave. RJ Brune Cadillac

WYOMING AVE.

From Wilkes-Barre to Scranton Expressway 8 Blocks on Wyoming Avenue *TAX & TAGS EXTRA NC + Non-Certified

81

CTS AWD

2011

EXPWAY

2011 Cadillac


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 PAGE 9G


PAGE 10G

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 708

600 FINANCIAL 610

Business Opportunities

HOME HEALTH CARE AGENCY - 5 County Area -

Cash flow $125,000 570-407-2716

JAN-PRO COMMERCIAL CLEANING OF NORTHEASTERN PA Concerned about your future?

BE YOUR OWN BOSS Work Full or Part time Accounts available NOW throughout Luzerne & Lackawanna, Counties We guarantee $5,000.to $200,000 in annual billing. Investment Required We’re ready –Are you? For more info call

570-824-5774

Jan-Pro.com

NIGHTCLUB FOR SALE

Seven years old. Luzerne County, Wilkes-Barre area. 1,800 square feet bar & 1,800 square feet banquet hall. No kitchen. Off street parking for 20 cars. Partner considered. $327,000, firm. P.O. 2827 Wilkes-Barre PA 18702

TURN KEY OPERATION

Located at Wyoming Valley Mall must sell. $125,000 negotiable. Ask for Rob 570-693-3323

Antiques & Collectibles

LONGABERGER BASKET SALE

Private Longaberger pottery, basket, fabric & wrought iron collection All in remarkable condition. Pricing Negotiable Visit our Open House on Saturday May 19 8am - 12pm 134 Independence Boulevard Liberty Hills Hanover Twp or Call 570-823-9467 after 5pm for a private showing, ask for Kathy.

710

Appliances

Why Spend Hundreds on New or Used Appliances? Most problems with your appliances are usually simple and inexpensive to fix! Save your hard earned money, Let us take a look at it first! 30 years in the business. East Main Appliances 570-735-8271 Nanticoke

APPLIANCE PA RT S E T C .

Used appliances. Parts for all brands. 223 George Ave. Wilkes-Barre 570-820-8162

702

Air Conditioners

AIR CONDITIONER portable 14,000 BTU dual hose system 2 year extended warranty policy - like new - cools up to 525 sq ft. $365 obo. 570-392-9006 AIR CONDITIONERS. (1) Frigidaire window. 5,000 BTU $75. (1) Portable RoomAir, 11,000 BTU. $295. 570-636-3151

706

Arts/Crafts/ Hobbies

Counted cross stitch, books, $1-$5 each. Aida cloth, $1$3. Hoops, 10¢-50¢. Frames, $1- $5, kits, $1-$5 . Towels, $1$3. Moving Sale. 570-288-5555

708

Antiques & Collectibles

ANTIQUE TOYS WANTED Larry - Mt. Top 474-9202

AVON 25 good condition empty bottles with boxes including Ben Franklin, Betsy Ross, Little Miss Muffet & American Eagle pipe $1. each. 570-639-1653

Find Something? Lose Something? Get it back where it belongs with a Lost/Found ad! 570-829-7130 COLLECTIBLES 2 steins Arrow Schapps Oktoberfest 1981 limited edition #3329 & 3337, handcrafted $50. each. 1 1883 Tribute To The Wild Wild West #15223 $50. 1976 # 160105n large stein with metal lid $50. #169962 small stein no lid $25. Bavaria Collection II $14735 authentic, pretzel handle $50. 1992 edition Budwiser Oktobofest Anheiser Busch #32032 $50. 570-430-2311 Floor Safe, antique, National Safe And Lock, inside drawers & locking compartment, measures 2’ 6.5 across $400. 570-592-7247 Football mini helmet autographed LaVar Arrington w/coa former Penn State player $40. Penn State Playerson professional teams, 200 count. $15. Cards, Philadelphia Eagles from 19781988, 30 count. $10. Phillies cards. 114 assorted 1978-1987 $10. 313-5214 or 313-3859 POLORID CAMERA Kodak $45. 570-740-1392 SIGN one of a kind...the end of an era..Vic-Mar’s seafood restaurant outside building sign $250. 612 Main St., Edwardsville 570-831-5728

Clothing

DRESS. Mother of the Bride. Grey/silver, size 8, strapless top with flowers, beading & silver threading with sheer bolero jacket. Original price $1,200 asking $400 for all. 570-262-9483 DRESS. Mother of the Bride. Grey/silver, size 8, strapless top with flowers, beading & silver threading with sheer bolero jacket. Original price $1,200 asking $400 for all. 570-262-9483

Lamb coat, ladies, black persian, with white fur collar, size large, hardly worn. $50. 313-5214 or 313-3859 TUXEDOS: 9 very good condition sizes 38 to 60; modern & classic styles. $40 each. 655-2180.

730

Computer Equipment & Software

COMPUTER, Dell Windows XP Pentium 4 processor 160 GB hard drive, fast $100. 570-824-7354

732

Exercise Equipment

AB CIRCLE PRO new with DVD $150. 570-430-2311 EXERCISE BIKE Stationary $25. 570-283-1911 GYM Home Weider 8525 $125. 570-829-2599

GENE’S RECONDITIONED APPLIANCES 60 Day Warranty Monday-Friday 8:00PM-5:00PM Saturday 8:00AM-11:00AM Gateway Shopping Center Kingston, PA

(570) 819-1966

700 MERCHANDISE

726

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

DISHWASHER Countertop. Danby, White, does 4 place settings & silverware. Variety of settings. $60 or best offer. 570-871-3360 FREEZER Commercial Kelvinator “Flash /Blast Reachin freezer. great working condition! 7’ tall, 52”w, 3” deep. Comes complete with shelving. 220v, on legs. 2 outside doors, 4 inside doors. $695. obo. 570-831-5728 REFRIGERATOR GE Energy Star, black, top freezer, bottom refrigerator 18.1 cu. ft. 4 months old. $375. 570-430-2311 REFRIGERATORAmana 17.9 cu. ft., bisque, very good condition. $90. Pick up after 6/13/12. 570-639-5066 WASHER/DRYER COMBO UNIT: Whirpool Washer/ electric dryer 24” combo unit. White, excellent condition $800. Call 570-814-7207

712

Baby Items

BABY CLOTHES boys, very gently used. Sizes range from 0-3 months to 9 months. Some with tags still on. 100 pieces for $50. 407-276-6011 or duff3089@ yahoo. com BABY SWING Graco cover seat, music $35. 570-740-1392

To place your ad call...829-7130 CRIB MATTRESS Sealy baby soft premium crib mattress $30. 674-5138.

716

Building Materials

BATHROOM matching sink set. Gerber white porcelain with mirror & medicine cabinet $80. 570-331-8183 DOOR 36”x80” solid wood, 6panel exterior/interior, natural oak finish, right or left with hardware $200. Handmade solid wrought iron mail box stand with fancy scroll $100. 570-735-8730 570-332-8094 LIGHT FIXTURES classic hanging, 6 lights & 12 lights, all porcelain, beautiful painted flowers, other parts are made in 24k gold both lights for $300. 570-868-6095 SINK, bathroom includes new faucet 18”x24” $15. 570-696-1030 SINK, bathroom, blue with hardware. $25. 570-825-2599

720

Cemetery Plots/Lots

MEMORIAL SHRINE PARK One Gravesite $400.00 570-675-0102

726

Clothing

COAT

KENNETH COLE Beige, size 6, hardly worn. $75. 570-855-5385

TREADMILL Precor brand model 9.21. Purchased 1997, regular maintenance & great working condition. $100. 570-477-2087 WEIGHT BENCH complete workout weight bench, curl bars, dumbells & 800 lbs of old style free weights ( not olympic style) $295. call 570-606-4353 or 570-299-0487

742

Furnaces & Heaters

HEATERS (1) Portable 9,000 BTU Kerosene, with manual, $75. (1) Electric wall, mountable or free stand. New in box. $49 570-636-3151

744

Furniture & Accessories

BEDROOM SET Beautiful birch queen suite. Unique modern design has integrated cabinets & electric. Dresser & mirror. Asking $550. 814-4835 BEDROOM SET twin, mahogany, double dresser with mirror, chest, nigh table complete. $625.570-822-3581

744

Furniture & Accessories

FURNITURE Sofa with pull-out couch, $75; Coffee table & two end tables, $20 for set; white formica desk, $75; dresser & cabinet with drawers, white formica with pink drawer fronts, $100 for set; platform bed & headboard with drawers, white formica with pink drawer fronts, $150; Thomasville dining room table set & china cabinet, $200 for set; Baldwin classic theater organ, needs some repairs, $100; all prices negotiable. 570-801-0428 KITCHEN TABLE oak round handcrafted built in leaf, seats 4-6, 2 chairs $125. 570-430-2311 KITCHEN TABLE oak, 4 chairs with padded seats $65. Solid maple dining room table, 2 leaves, 4 chairs $150. 570-379-3107 LOVE SEAT blue double recliner loveseat, blue recliner/rocker chair both for $150. Antique RCA Victor dark mahogany, double door console $50. Philco table top antique $150. 570574-8297/696-3567

Mattress Queen Pillow Top Set New in Plastic Must Sell ASAP Can Deliver. $150 Call Steve @ 570-280-9628

MATTRESS SALE

We Beat All Competitors Prices!

Mattress Guy

Twin sets: $139 Full sets: $159 Queen sets: $199 All New American Made 570-288-1898 PORCH GLIDER & Rocker $75. 570-824-8810 RECLINER double recliner love seat.. blue & a blue recliner chair / rocker. Both for $150. Also, antique RCA victor dark mahogany, double door console. $450. Philco TV table top, antique, 150. 570574 8297 or 570696 3567. ROCKER, wood/tapestry, $75. RECLINER, Burgundy velour cloth, $125. SOFA, CHAIR, OTTOMAN, 3 TABLES, great for den. Wood and cloth, all in excellent condition. $450. Call after 6 PM 570-675-5046

746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets

746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets

DALLAS STORAGE UNIT SALE Route 309 at

SHAVERTOWN

Dallas Self Storage Sat. & Sun. May 19 & 20, 8-1 Small furniture, household items, costume jewelry, books and lots of other treasures.

DURYEA

WARRIOR RUN R. 108 Chittenden May 18, 19, & 20 8-3. Jewelry, clothes, furniture, tools,

EXETER

1950 Wyoming Ave Sundays 8am-4pm

VENDORS WANTED!

Indoor spaces, Outdoor spaces, & Storefronts available. Call Chris at 570-709-1639 after 3:30pm.

EXETER

JENKINS TOWNSHIP

348 Heather Highlands Saturday & Sunday 9am - 3pm Rain or Shine No Early Birds Jewelry, furniture, dolls, household items & much more!

KINGSTON Sofa & Oversized chair for sale. Excellent condition. $300 or best offer. Must go! Call 570-696-4813

BUNK BED Loft bunk bed with desk, dresser, storage and trundle bed $75.00 Oriental furniture, black lacquer with mother of pearl & ornate soapstone designs; coffee table $150, 4 nesting tables $75, 2 linen cabinets $125 each, 4 panel 6’ tall screen $300. 5’ x 4’ room divider $125. 570-991-1016

TABLE 45” drop leaf oak table $25. 2 cane oak chairs $5. each. 22” round oak lamp table $5. Oak plant table $8. 9 table lamps $5 each. 570-639-1653

174 E. Bennett Sun., May 20th, 9-1 Glassware, bedding, bicycle, old pottery, mirror, books, toys, etc.

TABLE, Magazine, maple with marble top 21” x 6’ $300. 570-735-8730/ 570-332-8094

LAFLIN

746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets

AVOCA

BUNK BEDS. Very good condition. $80 570-262-2410 CHAIR. Queen Anne wing back chenille, gold, wood leg trim. Excellent condition. $50. 570-639-5066 END TABLES (2) $45. Computer desk with hutch $20. White pedestal sink with base $20. 32” Sylvania tv $25. 570-709-6664 Entertainment center with glass stereo cabinet. Very good condition. Asking $75. 570-239-6011 ENTERTAINMENT CENTER. New $200, Sell $75. Includes 27” Zenith TV, 5 Disc CD player. All VGC 570-287-0023 FRENCH PROVINCIAL couch setantique gold, beige with light blue & mauve flowers. Wilkes-Barre area, pick up only $500. 570-817-1174 570690-4248.

FURNISH FOR LESS

* NELSON * * FURNITURE * * WAREHOUSE * Recliners from $299 Lift Chairs from $699 New and Used Living Room Dinettes, Bedroom 210 Division St Kingston Call 570-288-3607 GRANDFATHER CLOCK runs perfect $350. Fireplace, oak with log heater $150. 570-740-7446

1 Oakwood Drive Sat., May 19th,8-5 Sun., May 20th, 8-3 Household items, furniture, construction/yard tools & equipment, women’s & junior’s clothing, shoes, accessories & more GREAT STUFF!

LUZERNE 625 Packer Street Sunday May 20th 8am-2pm Rain or Shine Furniture, glassware, clothing, knick-knacks, Christmas items, & odds and ends!

DALLAS

177 Main St. Friday,Saturday & Sunday May 18th,19th&20th Friday- 9am-5pm Saturday- 9-4pm Sunday- 10-4pm Furniture, knick knacks, china, & much, much more!

MOUNTAIN TOP

187 Machell Ave Saturday&Sunday 9-2pm. Antiques, furniture, sports, hunt and fish, glass, mens, women's & girls name brand clothing, and new items!

DALLAS

2715 Nuangola Rd May 22 & 23 9am - 5pm Tools - hand, bench & power. Stanley, Craftsman & Dunlap. Screwdrivers, planes, chisels & other tools. Garden equipment, pieces of slate, bricks, stained glass along with tools. Carpet tools. Wood post 6” x 6” x 5’. Propane tank. Motor oil. DIY books & much more!

PITTSTON Huntsville United Methodist Church Sat. May 19, 9-3 Living room furniture, brass lamps, Longaberger baskets, Tasha Tudor books, some toys, and much more!

WILKES-BARRE Huge Multi-Family

38 Johnson Street Sun, May 20, 8-3 Household items, crafts & more. Everything Must go!

Highest Prices Paid In CA$H

FREE PICKUP

BOOKS paperback books (200) hardcover books (25) must take all for $200. Romance, mysteries. Silver serving tea/coffee set, never been use in original box. $100. call 570-606-6679

Line up a place to live in classified! BOOKS Selling my collection of US War books. Civil War, WWII, Vietnam, Book of Medal of Honor Winners. ETC. All for $40. Call Jim 655 9474

Car Rims. Honda, 4 pair 15” will fit any model Accord, Civic, and Del-Sol cars. Brand new. asking $175 570-239-6011. 57-59 Pearl Street (Between Scott & Kidder St’s.) Saturday & Sunday 5/19 & 5/20 8:00AM - 4:00PM Tons of Stuff. Household. Something for everyone.

CLEAN FILL WANTED for Shavertown residence. Please Call 570-237-6375. DOLLS Barbie Anniversary plus Ken and Jenny $35. Elvis and me book plus program musical $30. VHS tapes $25. Book - Bonshi $15. 570-825-2494 DOWNRIGGERS 2 Cannon Uni Troll Manual Downriggers. Like new. Bases & 8Lb weights included. $275. 570-262-0716

22 Clarke Street Sat., May 19th, 10-3 Sun. May 20th, 11-2 Furniture, appliances, tools, women’s clothing, jewelry, storage totes, holiday decor, crafts, office, patio furniture, grill, Pfaltzgraff, books, bakeware, housewares, games, electronics, gas & electric heaters & vacuums. See Craig's list for full list & pics.

750

Jewelry

CAROL IS BUYING

PAYING TOP DOLLAR for your gold, silver, co ins, scrap jewelry, rings, diamonds, necklaces,bracelets, old antique costume jewelry. Guaranteed to be paid top dollar. WE MAKE HOUSE CALLS! 570-855 7197 570-328-3428 NECKLACE 16” pearl with 67 5-5.5 white pearls & 14kt gold clasp.From Wisnosky jewelers. Paid $1,600 asking $900 OBO. 570-301-8749

ENGINE Honda GC160 engine from pressure washer. Like new $125. 570-407-0874 FILE 5 drawer side to side $300. 5 drawer file bearing type $60. Authentic movie posters $15. each. 280-2472

FREE AD POLICY

The Times Leader will accept ads for used private party merchandise only for items totaling $1,000 or less. All items must be priced and state how many of each item. Your name address, email and phone number must be included. No ads for ticket sales accepted. Pet ads accepted if FREE ad must state FREE. You may place your ad online at timesleader.com, or email to classifieds@ timesleader.com or fax to 570-831-7312 or mail to Classified Free Ads: 15 N. Main Street, WilkesBarre, PA. Sorry no phone calls.

ENGINE 3 HP Briggs & Stratton engine in good condition mounted on a 2 wheel sprayer with hose & nozzle that needs work. $50. OBO 570-693-1918

GARAGE SALE LEFTOVER ITEMS: Microwave Carousel Sharp $10. Brok-onic TV-VCR combo $10. Admiral 23 automatic dehumidifier $40. Brand new ceiling fan model CH-42 $10. 1 box boys Huggies pullups $10. 2 boxes girl’s training pants for overnight $10 each. V-tech phone answering machine $5. Assorted Bob the Builder videos $2. each. Vintage suitcase with keys $20. Assorted boys clothes size 14-16 $2. each. Assorted single bed sheets $3. each. set. 570-445-9207

SAWMILLS: From only $3,997.00MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill-Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N

GARAGE SALE LEFTOVERS white double bowl cast iron sink 33”w x8”deep with Moen accessories, excellent condition $60. Grey metal office computer desk 30” x48”, 2 drawers, key & tray $45. 570-678-3532

756

GEBNERATOR Sears Craftsman 3600 Watts. Purchased new & used only once. Asking $500 Beermeister $400. Fooseball Table $40. 570-573-4696

752 Landscaping & Gardening

TABLES 3 matching oak tables, 1 coffee, 2 end tables $125. 570-814-0633 WALL UNIT, pecan finish $150. 570-825-2599

FIRE COMPANY 316 Academy St. Fri., Sat., Sun. May 18, 19 & 20, 8-3 all days. Kerosene & electric heaters, sweeper, computer monitor, children’s clothing, household items, good stuff cheap. something for everyone. Rain or shine! New items daily.

WYOMING Rte. 11 Opening in June, Prime Location, Every Saturday & Sunday Vendors Wanted The Avenue Flea Market Call 570-817-0153

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted

570-574-1275

The Discount Warehouse Vendor Market.

BEDROOM SET with dresser. Kitchen table with chairs, Sofa, loveseat, coffee table and more. FREE. 814-0843

BUNK BED, loft style, $75. Oriental furniture, black lacquer with mother of pearl & ornate soapstone designs. Four panel, 6’ room screen, $300. Coffee table, $175. 4 nesting tables, $75. Room divider, $125. 2 linen chests, $125 each. 570-991-1016

91 WILLIAMS ST. (go to the top of West Mt Airy Rd. off Pioneer Ave. SAT. & SUN. MAY 19TH & 20TH FROM 9AM-2PM Miscellaneous household items. Too many to list.

758 Miscellaneous

LAWN MOWER push reel lawn mower, very good condition, $50. call 570-696-1030

754

Machinery & Equipment

Medical Equipment

JAZZY Victoria Model Pride, electric wheelchair, excellent condition $700. 654-0507 WHEEL CHAIR. Manual with foot pedals, like new. $75. 2 pair aluminum crutches. $120 for all. 570-592-7247

758 Miscellaneous AIR PURIFIER. Oreck XL Professional with user manual. Floor tower model. Half Price, asking $150. Good clean condition. 570-636-3151

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130 ANTIQUE MODEL CARS: Seven available. $100 each, negotiable. Weight bench $75 includes curl bar, weight bar & weights. 570-824-3869 570-235-4457

GRANDFATHER CLOCK, Howard & Miller, oak, $795. 570-472-4744 HAULING TRAILER made from the bottom of a pop up. No guts or top, used for landscaping, have title. $152. 570-693-1046 HUMIDIFIER, Honeywell, Digital sunset, almost new. $40. 570-675-4383

570-301-3602

CALL US! TO JUNK YOUR CAR BEST PRICES IN THE AREA

CA$H

ON THE

$POT,

Free Anytime Pickup 570-301-3602

758 Miscellaneous

780

LAWN CHAIRS set of 2, like new, brown $40 each. Outdoor gas grill, never used paid $200 sell $100. 570-574-9518

TV 32” Sony $50. 570-829-2599

LAWNMOWER Craftsman self propelled with bag, 22” cut runs good $150. 570- 655-3197 LEFTOVER GARAGE SALE ITEMS Flooring, wood, 250 sq. ft, $400; 32” TV, $20; 13” TV both with remotes. Lamp, floor $5. 570-474-5704

Wanna make a speedy sale? Place your ad today 570829-7130. LONGABERGER BASKETS: Mothers day basket, maple leaf basket, sweet pea basket, darning basket, large peg basket. Each has protective plastic liner and some have ceramic tie on tag. Never used. $18 each. Call 570-826-0830 PATIO UMBRELLA large, grey, tilts. Very good condition $25. 570-609-5012 REVEREWARE, clean, shiny & very good condition, 8 pieces $3-$6 each. Corelle Spring Blossom Crazy daisy 60 pieces @.30 each. Flatware 26 piece Everbrite stainless deluxe in case $8. Vintage style 12 piece pumpkin tea set $10. 639-1653 RIMS 4Maxxim SE10 size 16x7.0 Offset +40mm bolt pattern 10x100. Graphite color. Were on a 2002 Mazda Protege for less than 2 months. Asking $240. 2005 KTM 50 cc Adventure Senior motorcycle. 2 cycle, monoshock, well maintained, runs excellent. Youth out grew, asking $750. 570-823-0466 RV COVER for 35’ to 38’ 5th wheel $45. RV air conditioner cover $10. 570-379-3107 Sewing machine, Singer. Heavy duty head with formica table. $100. 570-740-7446 SHOP VAC wet/dry, 16 gallon, filters & attachments included, very good condition, $20. 570-696-1030. TRAILER black 4’X 6’ 1 year old asking $400 (trailer only) or with (2) kayak attachments $550. Miller golf bag, tapestry golf motiff. $50. 570-262-7318 TV 27” RCA color $40. 20” RCA color tv $25. Industrial sewing machine with stand $75. 570-288-4966

772

Pools & Spas

POOL STEPS with double hand rails, white, $200. 570-779-3274 SWIMMING POOL Intex easy set up 18 x48, used 1 season, $75. 570-606-9776 SWIMMING POOL PUMP, motor, & sand filter for 4x18 pool, still hooked to pull $50. Deck ladder 4’ pool $25. 570-262-9273

Televisions/ Accessories

TV 32” Panasonic gray trim, tube television, remote, works great. $70. Call 570-871-3360

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! TV Sony 19 portable, converter, HD antenna $40. 570-825-8256

782

Tickets

MEET PRESIDENT JIMMY CARTER &“Plains ROSALYNNHelping CARTER Plains” Bus Trip to Plains, Georgia June 7-10, 2012 Trip arranged by Larry & Diane Cook Transportation by Stucker Tours Profits benefit the Plains, Georgia Better Hometown Program. Call Larry or Diane, 570-270-9239 for further details or reservations!

TONY BENNETT June 2, 2012, 8 p.m. Kirby Center, Orchestra seat, row E. Face Value $124. 570-384-0381

784

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

$ ANTIQUES BUYING $

Old Toys, model kits, Bikes, dolls, guns, Mining Items, trains & Musical Instruments, Hess. 474-9544

RIDING LAWN MOWER

Must be in good working condition. Have large lawn. $200 Maximum. 570-574-1243

VITO’S & GINO’S

Wanted:

ALL JUNK CARS & TRUCKS Highest Prices Paid!! FREE PICKUP

288-8995

WANTED JEWELRY

Tools

AIR BLOWER 18 v, new, 18v cordless hedge trimmer new. 18v gas trimmer/ edger, like new. (2) 18v batteries with charger $175. Trimmer/edger, electric TORO 100’ extension cord, $45. Wheel Barrow, $25 570-823-2893 COMPRESSOR 33 gallon, upright, used twice with tool kit $225. 362-4143

WILKESBARREGOLD

(570)48GOLD8 (570)484-6538

OUTDOOR POWER EQUIPMENT Echo bent shaft trimmer gt-225, professional results, lots of power ez load trimmer head $95. Homelite bent shaft trimmer around 28cc, lots of power, great for taller grass, ez start, bump feed head $60. Homelite power broom blower, around 21cc, great for blowing grass off drivEway and light leaf coverage.$60.00 Echo pb500h back pack blower, very powerful great for heavy leaf & larger properties, 50.8cc brand new!!! $200. 570-675-0212

Visit us at WilkesBarreGold.com Or email us at wilkesbarregold@ yahoo.com

POWER WASHER 2550 PSI, like new, extra connections $125. Aluminum ladder 24’ $100. 570-740-7446

WE PAY MORE FOR YOUR

SUPER WINCH S9000 good condition, needs remote $325. 16” aluminum wheels set of 4 off 2011 Kia Forte, mint condition $400. Dehumidifier GE 30 pint runs good $75. 570-655-3197

Highest Cash PayOuts Guaranteed Mon-Sat 10am -6pm C l o s e d S u n d a ys

1092 Highway 315 Blvd (Plaza 315) 315N .3 miles after Motorworld

We Pay At Least 80% of the London Fix Market Price for All Gold Jewelry

London PM Gold Price

May 18th: $1,589.50

GOLD, SILVER JEWELRY, COINS SCRAP JEWELRY, Bring it on down for a great price. Anything old in good condition, trains, toys etc. 570-328-3428 570-855-7197

DINETTE SET beautiful cascade set, light oak, made in USA $875. 570-740-1392

WELDER Lincoln electric 220 ac/dc arc welder, single phase, 60 hertz, 230 volts, 50 amps, 225 amps hc or 125 amps dc at 25 volts, 79 volts max on wheels code# 8811702 $400. 570-7358730/ 332-8094

800 PETS & ANIMALS

776 Sporting Goods

786 Toys & Games

810

BASKETBALL HOOP with backboard, rim, pole & base. $60 OBO. 570-332-2812 or Email- Burkhardt 93 @aol.com

BICYCLE Girl’s 16” bike with training wheels (Barbie) $40. Little Tikes picnic table $35. 570-696-4020

BICYCLE, Raleigh Sport, Vintage, 3 speed, excellent condition $200. 570-829-2599

LITTLE TYKES BASKETBALL SET almost new $18. Toddler’s bicycle $10. Toddler’s pool $5. 570-287-4181

774

Restaurant Equipment

BICYCLES. Mongoose $30, Schwinn $30, Golf Bag, black Nike. Very good condition, $20. 570-690-3840 after 1:00 pm. BOW: Hunt Ready! Hoyt highlander compound bow with hardcase. New string & cables drop a way rest & lighted sights. Excellent condition. Must sell. $300. 336-2944 GOLF BALLS lot of 60 new balls in new never opened boxes, Wilson, Nike & Spalding all for $35.570-735-6638 GOLF CLUBS (6) never used $40 for all. Golf nag Callaway, like new $200. Biker 26” boys 570-574-9518 HUNTING CLOTHES. Early season scentlok coveralls size L $50. Cabelas fleece windshear hoodie size L pants size M $50. each also Cabelas gortex scentlok boots size 8 $30. Lacross 800 gms boots size 8 $30. All items are in great shape. 570-336-3625 REFRIGERATOR, IGLOO Handy Kool for a motor vehicle. Plug in cigarette lighter $40. 570-823-2893 WEIGHTS 2-50lb plates. Standard Size. $50 OBO. 570-690-4327

LITTLE TYKES PLAYHOUSE & CASTLE. Good condition. $90. 570-779-1342 SLIDING BOARD, used Safety First, plastic toddler’s sliding board. $45 OBO. 570-332-2812 or email Burkhardt 93@aol.com BUTTERSCOTCH THE HORSE, a Furreal Friend. Comes with saddle. Excellent condition. $125.570-855-8966

788

Stereo/TV/ Electronics

STEREO SYSTEM Sharp 5-CD changer stereo, 2 blue cloth covered speak -ers, subwoofer, remote. Barley used , sounds excellent. $120 OBO. 570332-2812 or Email Burkhardt 93@aol.com

794

Video Game Systems/Games

GAMES 3 Nintendo DS games, all gently used with cases & instruction manuals. Dora Saves the Mermaids, Barbie Horse Adventures Riding Camp, and Disney Princess Magical Jewels. $5. each 905-5539 PLAYSTATION 3 with 6 games and many accessories. $400 for all, negotiable. Call 570-824-3869 or 570-235-4457

Cats

CATS & KITTENS 12 weeks & up.

All shots, neutered, tested,microchipped

VALLEY CAT RESCUE

824-4172, 9-9 only KITTENS, free, 3 male & 2 female, black, gray & mixed. Mother also free to a good home. She is very clean and hose broken. 570-457-3983 KITTENS: free to good home. Ready in 2 weeks. Call 570-779-3705

815

Dogs

BEAGLE TERRIER PUPPY FREE to good home. 15 week old female, brown, white & 2 patches around eyes. Good with kids & other animals. Love to cuddle and her name is Patches 472-4104

CAVALIER KING CHARLES SPANIEL PUPPIES . $700 to $1,500 HAVANESE PUPPIES $700 to $1,300

www.willowspring cavaliers.com 215-538-2179

CHIHUAHUA FOX TERRIER

10 weeks old, 2 males $175. Very playful 371-3441


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 PAGE 11G


PAGE 12G

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 815

Dogs

815

Dogs

815

Dogs

GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPPIES AKC Registered.

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

Will have 2nd shots before they leave. Puppies are 80% housebroken. Parents on premises. $600. NO CHECKS. 570-328-4966

PET CREMATION Country Pets

SIMMONS-ROCKWELL 2012 FORD ESCAPE XLT

4X4

MOONROOF

FACTORY AIR, AUTO, 2.5 i4, POWER SEAT-WINDOWS-LOCKS-MIRRORS, CRUISE, SYNC, MOONROOF, 17” CHROME WHEELS, FOG LAMPS, SIRIUS RADIO, PRIVACY GLASS, ROOF SIDE RAILS,

23,499

ONEY NO M N DOW

BUY $ FOR

43 IN STOCK, AT THIS PRICE!

$

259/

E MONTH LEAS FOR 24 MOS. FOR WITH ONLY TAXES/DMV DUE AT SIGNING

Taxes & DMV fees extra. Ford Trade Assist to those trading in a ‘95 or newer vehicle. Lease with approved credit for 24 months, allowed 21,000 total miles; 15¢/mile in excess. Customer responsible for maintenance and repair. Prices expire 5/31/12.

www.simmons-rockwell.com

HALLSTEAD, PA

BATH, NY

HORNELL, NY

Exit 230 OFF 1-81

Exit 38 OFF I-86. Follow 54N.

Exit 34S OFF I-86

570-879-5000

Poms, Yorkies, Maltese, Husky, Rotties, Golden, Dachshund, Poodle, Chihuahua, Labs & Shitzus. 570-453-6900 570-389-7877

Spring Schedule April, May & June Puppy Level I, II, Rally-0, Tricks $60/4 weeks Discount for 2 consecutive sessions.

570-829-8430 WBDogTraining.com

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED!

Champion line. Call 570-788-2963

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

AKC DOBERMAN PUP Male.Ready May 20.

607-776-7100

39 S. Prospect St. Nanticoke PA • 570-735-1487 GOLD - SILVER COINS - JEWELRY Buying Daily 11AM - 6PM No nonsense guarantee We will beat any competitors advertised price by up to 20%

468

Auto Parts

607-324-4444

PAWS TO CONSIDER.... ENHANCE YOUR PET CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE Call 829-7130

HDI METALS

43 AT THIS PRICE

MSRP ........................................................... $28,935 FORD REBATE............................................... -2,750 SIM-ROC DISCOUNT ..................................... -1,936 FORD TRADE ASSIST ...................................... -750 BUY FOR $23,499

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

468

Auto Parts

BUYING JUNK VEHICLES $300 AND UP

Place your pet ad and provide us your email address This will create a seller account online and login information will be emailed to you from gadzoo.com “The World of Pets Unleashed” You can then use your account to enhance your online ad. Post up to 6 captioned photos of your pet Expand your text to include more information, include your contact information such as e-mail, address phone number and or website.

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

Collect Cash. Not Dust. Sell it in The Times Leader Classified section.

$125 EXTRA IF DRIVEN, DRAGGED OR PUSHED IN!

NOBODY Pays More 570-760-2035

Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm • Happy Trails!

412 Autos for Sale

S

412 Autos for Sale

AVE

TH OUS AN D S CL E AN R E L I ABL E L OW M I L E CAR S

SP EC IA L O F TH E W EEK

2010 C H EVR O LET C O B A LT 50K M iles, 1 O w ner, N ew Tires, S irius R adio

V IEW M O R E A T P ETIL L O M O TO R S.C O M G O O D C R ED IT G ETS L O W IN TER EST R A TES!

P E TTILIL L O M OOTOR TO R S • 570-457-5441 5 7 0 -4 5 7 -5 4 4 1

P E TIL TIL L O M OTOR O TO R S • 570-457-5441 5 7 0 -4 5 7 -5 4 4 1

BRAND NEW!

Local, caring service. Pick up & delivery available. Call 570-256-3847

WILKES-BARRE DOG TRAINING CLUB

Call 829-7130 to place an ad. ONLY ONL NL LY ONE N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER. timesleader.com

Find that new job. The Times Leader Classified section.

468

Auto Parts

468

Auto Parts

AS ALWAYS ***HIGHEST PRICES*** PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED VEHICLES!!!

DRIVE IN PRICES

Call for Details (570) 459-9901 Vehicles must be COMPLETE!! PLUS ENTER TO WIN $500 CASH!! DRAWING TO BE HELD LAST DAY OF EACH MONTH

www.wegotused.com

Call 829-7130 to place an employment ad. ONLY ONL NLY ONE N LE LEA LEADER. E DER. timesleader.com


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets

746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets

EXETER

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 PAGE 13G

Need a great website

The solution has never been easier!

that will

grow your business?

1950 Wyoming Ave Sundays 8am - 4pm

weekender

VENDORS & CUSTOMERS WANTED!

570-970-7307 • localmantra.com • contact@localmantra.com

The Discount Warehouse Vendor Market.

CALL AN EXPERT

Indoor, Outdoor & Storefront Spaces Available

Contact Chris at 570-709-1639 after 3:30pm

Professional Services Directory

WE’LL HELP YOU

MOVE THAT STUFF

1039

1000 SERVICE DIRECTORY 1006

A/C & Refrigeration Services

DUCTLESS A/C $84.00 per

STRISH A/C

CHIMNEY REPAIRS Parging. Stucco.

Building & Remodeling

1st. Quality Construction Co.

Roofing, siding, gutters, insulation, decks, additions, windows, doors, masonry & concrete. Insured & Bonded.

Senior Citizens Discount! State Lic. # PA057320

570-606-8438 ALL OLDER HOMES SPECIALIST 825-4268. Remodel / repair, Interior remodel & additions DAVE JOHNSON Expert Bathroom & Room Remodeling, Carpentry & Whole House Renovations. Licensed &Insured

570-819-0681

Your Package includes: • Garage Sales Kit • Garage Sale Signs, • FREE Unsold Merchandise ad • Your sale location mapped FREE online and on our mobile app • PLUS a FREE BREAKFAST from McDonald’s.

1, 2, OR 3 DAYS

8 LINES

STARTING AT

$15 timesleader.com

DRIVEWAYS, SIDEWALKS, STONE WORK

All Top Masonry. Quality Work. Call Bahram 570-855-8405

OR VISIT TIMESLEADER.COM

24/7 TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD

Stainless Liners. Cleanings. Custom Sheet Metal Shop. 570-383-0644 1-800-943-1515 Call Now!

COZY HEARTH CHIMNEY

ALL CHIMNEY REPAIR Chimney Cleaning, Rebuilding, Repair, Stainless Steel Lining, Parging, Stucco, Caps, Etc. Free Estimates Licensed & Insured 1-888-680-7990 570-840-0873

1042

Cleaning & Maintainence

HOUSE CLEANING

We would love to clean your home. We clean around your schedule. We clean weekly, bi-weekly, and monthly. We also do one time cleaning. Call Eddie 570-677-0344 or online at www. empresacleaning. com

HOUSEKEEPING Dependable &

professional. Flexible rates and hours. Supplies provided. References Available 357-1951, after 6pm

1054

HUGHES Construction

NEED A NEW KITCHEN OR BATH???? Seasonal Rooms

Roofing, Home Renovating. Garages, Kitchens, Baths, Siding and More! Licensed and Insured. FREE ESTIMATES!! 570-388-0149 PA040387

NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION

All Types Of Work New or Remodeling Licensed & Insured Free Estimates 570-406-6044 ROOFING & SIDING. Kitchens & Baths. Painting. All types of construction. Free Estimates. 35 years experience. 570-831-5510

ROOFING, SIDING, DECKS, WINDOWS

For All of Your Remodeling Needs. Will Beat Any Price 25 Yrs. Experience Ref. Ins. Free Est. 570-332-7023 Or 570-855-2506

SPRING BUILDING/ REMODELING?

Call the Building Industry Association for a list of qualified members

CALL 800-273-7130

CAVUTO CHIMNEY SERVICE

& Gutter Cleaning Free Estimates Insured 570-709-2479

1024

GARAGE SALE AD TODAY

A-1 1 ABLE CHIMNEY Rebuild & Repair Chimneys. All types of Masonry. Liners Installed, Brick & Block, Roofs & Gutters. Licensed & Insured 570-735-2257

month Call 570-736HVAC (4822)

Ductless / Central Air Conditioning Free Estimates Licensed & Insured 570-332-0715

PLACE YOUR

Chimney Service

call 287-3331 or go to

www.bianepa.com

Motorcycle for sale? Let them see it here in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

Concrete & Masonry

DEMPSKI MASONRY & CONCRETE

All Phases Licensed & Insured No job too small. Free Estimates.

570-824-0130

DempskiMasonry.com

B.P. Home Repairs 570-825-4268 Brick, Block, Concrete, Sidewalks, Chimneys, Stucco. New Installation & Repairs

C&C MASONRY & CONCRETE Absolutely free

estimates. Masonry & concrete work. Specializing in foundations, repairs and rebuilding. Footers floors, driveways. 570-766-1114 570-346-4103 PA084504 COVERT & SONS CONCRETE CO. Give us a call, we’ll beat them all! 570-696-3488 or 570-239-2780

D. Pugh Concrete

All phases of masonry & concrete. Small jobs welcome. Senior discount. Free estimates. Licensed & Insured 288-1701/655-3505

Williams & Franks Inc

Masonry - Concrete Brick-Stonework. Chimneys-Stucco” “NO JOB TOO SMALL” “Damage repair specialist” 570-466-2916 WYOMING VALLEY MASONRY Concrete, stucco, foundations,pavers, retaining wall systems, dryvit, flagstone, brick work. Senior Citizen Discount.570-287-4144 or 570-760-0551

1057Construction & Building ALR CONSTRUCTION INC. Additions, siding, windows, kitchens, bathrooms, new homes & more! A name you can trust. Guaranteed quality you can depend on! 570-606-3462 PA087364 FATHER & SON CONSTRUCTION Interior & Exterior Remodeling Jobs of All Sizes 570-814-4578 570-709-8826

FS CONSTRUCTION

Specializing in all types of home improvements, complete remodeling from start to finish, additions, roofing, siding, electrical and plumbing, all types of excavation & demolition, sidewalks and concrete work, new home construction, with new model on display. Free estimates, licensed, insured. Call Frank at 570-479-1203

GARAGE DOOR

Sales, service, installation & repair. FULLY INSURED HIC# 065008 CALL JOE 570-735-8551 Cell 606-7489

H-D Contracting Flooring, siding, decks & more. Any size job. Call Salvatore 570-881-2191 Russ Keener Construction Windows, doors, siding, porches, decks, kitchen, baths, garages, & more. All home maintenance. Free estimates, Fully Insured PA079549 570-336-6958

1078

Dry Wall

MIRRA DRYWALL

Hanging & Finishing Textured Ceilings Licensed & Insured Free Estimates

570-675-3378

1084

Electrical

GRULA ELECTRIC LLC

Licensed, Insured, No job too small.

570-829-4077

SLEBODA ELECTRIC Master electrician Licensed & Insured Service Changes & Replacements. Generator Installs. 868-4469

1093

Excavating

EXCAVATING/MODULAR HOMES

Custom excavating, foundations, land clearing, driveways, storm drainage, blacktop repair, etc. 570-332-0077 Skidster/Backhoe With Operator I can help make your spring projects a little easier. Fully Insured. Reasonably Priced. Free Estimates. Stan 570-328-4110

1099

Fencing & Decks

ACTION FENCE SPRING SALE: Discounts on wood, vinyl, chain link, aluminum and more! Call today for a FREE ESTIMATE! 1-888-FENCE-80

1105 Floor Covering Installation

ETERNITY FLOORING

*Hardwood *Laminate *Ceramic *Porcelain Installations 570-820-0233 Free Estimates PA 089377

1129 Gutter Repair & Cleaning

GUTTER CLEANING Window Cleaning

Pressure washing Insured 570-288-6794

1132

Handyman Services

Find homes for your kittens! Place an ad here! 570-829-7130

Hauling & Trucking

ALWAYS READY HAULING Moving, Deliveries, Property & Estate Cleanups, Attics, Cellars, Yards, Garages, Construction Sites, Flood Damage & More. CHEAPER THAN A DUMPSTER!! SAME DAY SERVICE Free Estimates 570-301-3754

CASTAWAY HAULING JUNK REMOVAL

823-3788 / 817-0395

Mike’s $5-Up

Removal of Wood, Trash and Debris. Same Day Service.

826-1883 793-8057 S & S HAULING & GARBAGE REMOVAL

#1 FOR ALL YOUR CONSTRUCTION NEEDS Interior & exterior painting. All types of remodeling. Front and back porches repaired & replaced Call 570-991-5301

DOPainting, IT ALL HANDYMAN drywall,

plumbing & all types of interior & exterior home repairs. 570-829-5318

Mark’s Handyman Service

Give us a call

We do it all! Licensed &Insured

570-578-8599

The Handier Man

We fix everything! Plumbing, Electrical & Carpentry. Retired Mr. Fix It. Emergencies 23/7

299-9142

1135

Hauling & Trucking

AA CLEANING

A1 Always hauling, cleaning attics, cellar, garage, one piece or whole Estate, also available 10 & 20 yard dumpsters.655-0695 592-1813or287-8302 AAA CLEANING A1 GENERAL HAULING Cleaning attics, cellars, garages. Demolitions, Roofing & Tree Removal. Free Est. 779-0918 or 542-5821; 814-8299 A.S.A.P Hauling Estate Cleanouts, Attics, Cellars, Garages, we’re cheaper than dumpsters!. Free Estimates, Same Day! 570-822-4582

Free estimates. Clean out attics, basements, estates & more. 570-472-2392

1156

Insurance

NEPA LONG TERM CARE AGENCY Long Term/Short Term Care Products Life Insurance Tax Deferred Annuities Medicare Supplement Plans Dental/Vision Estate Planning Ideas 570-580-0797 FREE CONSULT

www nepalong termcare.com 1162 Landscaping/ Garden Š 1st Call

JOHN’S Š Landscaping/Hauling Excavating:Bobcat Shrub / Tree Trimming Installation & Removal Edging, Mulch, Stone Lawns, Tilling & more! Handyman/Masonry Reasonable / Reliable ŠŠ 735-1883 ŠŠ BITTO LANDSCAPING & LAWN SERVICE 26 years experience, landscape designs, retaining walls, pavers, patios, decks, walkways, ponds, lighting, seeding, mulch, etc Free Estimates. 570-288-5177

JAY’S LAWN SERVICE Spring clean-ups,

mowing, mulching and more! Free Estimates 570-574-3406 O’NEIL’S Landscaping, Lawn Maintenance,Cleanups, shrub trimming, 20 years experience. Fully Insured 570-885-1918

AFFORDABLE Junk removal cleanups, cleanouts, Large or small jobs. Fast free estimates. (570) 814-4631

ALL KINDS OF HAULING & JUNK REMOVAL SPRING CLEAN UP!

DECK BUILDERS Of Northeast

Contracting Group. we build any type, size and design, staining & powerwashing. If the deck of your choice is not completed within 5 days, your deck is free! 570-338-2269

1135

TREE REMOVAL Stump grinding, Hazard tree removal, Grading, Drainage, Lot clearing, Stone/ Soil delivery. Insured. Reasonable Rates 570-574-1862

1165

Lawn Care

Masonry

H O S CONSTRUCTION

Licensed - Insured Certified - Masonry Concrete - Roofing Quality Craftsmanship Guaranteed Unbeatable Prices Senior Citizen Discounts Free Estimates 570-574-4618 or 570-709-3577

OLD Voted TIME MASONRY #1

MasonryContractor Let A Real Mason Bid Your Project! Brick, Block, Concrete, Stone, Chimney & Stucco Repair, Retaining Walls, Patio & Pavers, Stamped & Colored Concrete, etc. Fully Insured. 570-466-0879

oldtimemasonry.com

1189 Miscellaneous Service

YARD CLEAN UP Attics & Basements Complete clean ups Garden tilling Call for quotes 570-954-7699 or 570-926-9029

1213

Paving & Excavating

AAA SEAL COATING

Residential & Commercial. Professional, reliable service. Free Estimates. 570-822-6785

DRIVEWAYS PARKING LOTS ROADWAYS HOT TAR & CHIP SEALCOATING Licensed and Insured. Call Today For Your Free Estimate

570-474-6329 Lic.# PA021520

Keystone Paving & Seal Coating Services Free Quotes. Residential / Commercial. Parking lots / driveways•drainage •landscaping •hot tar • asphalt paving • seal coating. 10% off for spring! 570-906-5239

Mountain Top

VITO’S & GINO’S

Wanted:

ALL JUNK CARS & TRUCKS Highest Prices Paid!! FREE PICKUP

288-8995 1195

Movers

BestDarnMovers Moving Helpers Call for Free Quote. We make moving easy. BestDarnMovers.com 570-852-9243

1204

Painting & Wallpaper

A.B.C. Professional Painting 36 Yrs Experience We Specialize In New Construction Residential Repaints Comm./Industrial All Insurance Claims Apartments Interior/Exterior Spray,Brush, Rolls WallpaperRemoval Cabinet Refinishing Drywall/Finishing Power Washing Deck Specialist Handy Man FREE ESTIMATES Larry Neer 570-606-9638

DEVALI’S PAINTING Residential &

Commercial, Internal / Exterior Quality, dependable, affordable service. 1-888-374-3082 JACOBOSKY PAINTING Interior, & Exterior Painting, $50.00 off with this ad. Call 570-328-5083

M. PARALIS PAINTING

Int/ Ext. painting, Power washing. Professional work at affordable rates. Free estimates. 570-288-0733

GRASS CUTTING

Affordable, reliable, meticulous. Rates as low as $20. Emerald Green 570-825-4963 Lawn & Garden Service Lawn cutting, Garden maintenance, mulching, trimming, Call 570-675-3517 or 570-855-2409

TREE/SHRUB REMOVAL REMOVAL DEMOLITION Estate Cleanout Free Estimates 24 HOUR SERVICE SMALL AND LARGE JOBS! 570-823-1811 570-239-0484

1183

Serra Painting Book Now For Spring & Save. All Work Guaranteed Satisfaction. 30 Yrs. Experience Powerwash & Paint Vinyl, Wood, Stucco Aluminum. Free Estimates You Can’t Lose! 570-822-3943

WITKOSKY PAINTING Interior

Exterior, Free estimates, 30 yrs experience 570-826-1719, 570-288-4311 & 570-704-8530

PAVING & SEAL COATING Patching, Sealing, Residential/Comm Licensed & Insured PA013253 570-868-8375

1228

Plumbing & Heating

CARL KRASAVAGE & SON Heating, Plumbing, & Air Conditioning. No job too big or small. Let our experience & knowledge work for you. Free Estimates. Call 570-288-8149 D.M. PLUMBING & HEATING Specializing in boilers, furnaces & water heaters. 10% senior discount. Licensed,Insured &24 hour service 570-793-1930

1252

Roofing & Siding

ABSOLUTELY FREE ESTIMATES E-STERN CO. 30 year architec tural shingles. Do Rip off & over the top. Fully Insured PA014370 570-760-7725 or 570-341-7411 EVERHART CONSTRUCTION Roofing, siding, gutters, chimney repairs & more. Free Estimates, Lowest Prices 570-855-5738

J.R.V. ROOFING

570-824-6381 Roof Repairs & New Roofs. Shingle, Slate, Hot Built Up, Rubber, Gutters & Chimney Repairs. Year Round. Licensed/Insured ŠFREE EstimatesŠ *24 Hour Emergency Calls*

Jim Harden

570-288-6709

New Roofs & Repairs, Shingles, Rubber, Slate, Gutters, Chimney Repairs. Credit Cards accepted FREE ESTIMATES! Licensed-Insured EMERGENCIES

SPRING ROOFING McManus

Construction Licensed, Insured. Everyday Low Prices. 3,000 satisfied customers. 570-735-0846

1297

Tree Care

GASHI AND SONS TREE SERVICE AND STUMP REMOVAL. Fully Insured. 570-693-1875

J BIRD TREE CARE

Tree trimming & tree removal, shrub maintenance and mulch, free estimates and fully insured. Please call 570-362-3215

Motorcycle for sale? Let them see it here in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130


PAGE 14G

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Find your next vehicle online.

timesleaderautos.com 412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

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Attention: Current owners or lesees of Acura, Audi, BMW, Infiniti, Lexus, Mercedes, SAAB, Honda, Nissan, Subaru, Toyota or Volkswagen Cars or SUVs,

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Payments based on 36 month closed end lease plus tax and fees not included with $1,990 Cash down or equal trade allowance. First Payment and Bank acquisition fee ($695) due on delivery. No security deposit required. 30,000 miles allowed. Balance Due A-$2,959 B-$3,089 Expires 5-31-12

VIEW OUR INVENTORY 24/7 AT WWW.SANTOCARS.COM Montage Auto Mile, 3514 Birney Ave., Moosic

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ONLYONE ONL NLYONE N LE LEA LEADER. E DER. timesleader.com

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

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Ken

P O L L O CK Innovation That W orks For A ll.

TH E A LL NEW 2012

N V

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W E’VE GO T EM ! AND W E’RE SELLIN EM !

M em oria l D a y B onus C a s h

2012 NV 2500 V-6 S

2012 NV 2500 V-8 S

M SR P $27,320

St# N20765, Standard Roof

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** *

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2012 NISSA N NV 2500 V-6 SV LO C KSM ITH P A C KA G E TR U C K

27,292

$

C O M P A NY DEM O

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M SR P $33,178

** Inc lude s allR e bate s and D is c ounts . N is s an * F le e t doe s not apply. D oe s not qualify for

$700 additionalc as h re bate or graphic s pac k age .

Automatic, PW, PDL, Tilt, Cruise D on’t M iss This!

2012 NV 1500 V-6 SV 2012 NV 2500 V-8 SV 2012 NV 2500 V8 S St# N20743, Standard Roof, St# N21444, Highroof, M SR P $28,015

Power Locks, Windows, Mirrors

M SR P $32,560

$24,861 -500 B onus C ash

24,361

$

** *

Power Locks, Windows, Mirrors

$29,140 -500 B onus C ash

28,640

$

** *

M SR P $31,520

St# N21729, w/Power Pkg, Highroof

$28,122 -500 B onus C ash ** *

NV C argo M anagem ent P kg or $700 A dditionalC ash R ebate

Direct:570-760-8518

**Tax and tags additional. N ot re s pons ible for ty pographic ale rrors . P hotos for illus tration only.A lls ale pric e s inc lude $500 c us tom e r c as h in lie u ofs pe c ialA P R rate s and $500 M e m orialD ay B onus C as h. S e e de ale r for fullde tails . O ffe r e nds 5/31/12

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®

S A L E S

Red, 27K Miles ..................... $15,495 40th Anniversary Ed, 38K...... $13,995

27,622

$

A U T O

11 NISSAN SENTRA

502 Auto Sales

w w w.ke n polloc kn is s a n .c om

07 CHRYSLER SEBRING

Touring, 57K Miles ................... $9,995

101 Lonesome Rd. Old Forge, PA 18518

“Give Us a Try Before You Buy.” Discount Prices Only Everyday

Call C ll T Today! d !

04 MUSTANG GT

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JOE NOCERA OLD FORGE, PA

(570) 457-0825 003 MAZDA TRIBUTE

$8,600 $

VVery Clean, 6 Mo. Warranty, 69,000 Miles Ve

Find the perfect friend. The Classified section at timesleader.com

10 VW BEETLE

Leather, 34K Miles, Green...... $14,995

03 JAGUAR X-TYPE 2.5

AWD, 38K Miles, Silver............ $9,995

06 CHEVY UPLANDER

3 Seats, V6, Auto, Dual Air, P-Side Doors, Loaded, 6 Mo. Warranty, 89,000 Miles

10 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5S

Push Button Start, 35K Miles ... $15,995

05 KIA SEDONA

10 FORD ESCAPE XLT

AWD, 4 Cyl, 48K Miles, Red . $17,995

08 FORD EDGE AWD

61K Miles............................. $17,995

10 KIA FORTE EX

33K Miles, White.................. $15,995

11 CHEVY HHR

32K Miles, Silver................... $14,495

$5,990

AWD, 40K Miles, Leather, 3rd Seat

V6, Auto, Air, Loaded, 104,000 Miles, 6 Mo. Warranty

$6,990

05 CHRYSLER PACIFICA 2WD

$12,995

570-457-7278

3 Seats, V6, Auto, Dual Air, DVD, Loaded, 6 Mo. Warranty, 99,000 Miles

07 FORD TAURUS

05 MERCURY MOUNTAINEER 12 Lonesome Road Old Forge, PA 18518

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Call 829-7130 to place your ad.

$6,990

V6, Auto, Air, Loaded, 6 Mo. Warranty, 122,000 Miles

ONLY ONL NLY ONE N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com


TIMES LEADER LEADER www.timesleader.com www.timesleader.com TIMES

SUNDAY, SUNDAY, SUNDAY, FEBRUARY MARCH MAY 20, 19, 4, 2012 PAGE PAGE 15G 15G

SUNDAY REAL ESTATE

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

THE TIMES LEADER

SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER. Smith Hourigan Group

Visit Our Website

Century21SHGroup.com

Dramatic layout highlights elegant Glenmaura two-story Story by Marianne Tucker Puhalla Advertising Projects Writer Stately and elegant are the first words that come to mind at this well designed and well decorated home in the Glenmaura section of Moosic. Listed by Nell Donnelly O’Boyle of Realty Network Group for $424,900, this home lives up to the reputation of its neighborhood, a picture-perfect home is a desirable location, overlooking Glenmaura National Golf Club and near to Sno Mountain ski resort and PNC Field, home to minor league baseball. This circa 1995 construction has numerous upgrades, including a stunning open living room and dining room space that shares a 15-foot ceiling. Plantation shutters are found on many of the home’s large windows, and the granite kitchen is sure to be a favorite. Just shy of a half acre in size, the lot has extensive landscaping and a paved driveway

that leads to an attached two-car garage. The red brick exterior has white trim. The front door is flanked by sidelights and leads into a hardwood foyer with a staircase straight ahead. A right takes you into the open living and dining room space that has dramatic columns that divide the two. The living room area feels even bigger than its 15-by-14 measurement thanks to the 15-foot ceiling that it shares with the dining area. This room has a triple window front with rounded accent windows, covered by plantation shutters for privacy. Butterscotch paint on the walls provides a sharp contrast to white trim and white crown molding. The dramatic pillars lead to the dining room, which measures 14-by-12. This room has a leaded glass window to the side and a matching set of triple windows facing rear. The adjacent kitchen is a comfortable 20-by-13 and has black speckled granite countertops over striking white cabinets. A large angled island hosts two sinks and a breakfast bar. The cooktop is set on an

angle in the corner, as is the microwave. A breakfast room extends out into the rear yard, offering three large windows that overlook the yard and patio. The kitchen opens to the left to the 18-by13 family room where you find sage green walls and French doors that open to the rear yard. All eyes here are sure to be drawn to the red brick fireplace with carved white mantle and raised brick hearth that graces the end wall. There is a nearby mud room/laundry that offers access to the garage which features linoleum flooring and a pedestrian door to the rear yard. A first floor office is located just off the foyer, with French doors, burgundy walls, white wainscoting and a double window front with shutters. A nearby powder room offers a cherry vanity with black and green speckled granite countertop and a stained glass front window.

Continued

Lewith & Freeman Real Estate, Inc.

WE WILL SELL YOUR HOUSE OR ERA WILL BUY IT!*

Visit Our Open House Every Sunday 1:00-3:00

Waypoint In Luzerne

Connecting buyers with sellers. ATTENTION SMARTPHONE USERS: Try our new QR Code

Watch this Community come to life by becoming a Bell Weather Resident. There has never been a better time to join us…

Prices Starting in the $140’s

Find us in our convenient Location: Wyoming Avenue to Union Street. Turn onto Mill Hollow in Luzerne.

Contact one of our Luzerne County Real Estate Professionals at 570.403.3000

Two-story New Construction Townhomes

• 1st floor master • Formal Dining Room • Eat-in Kitchen • Loft • Valuted Ceilings • Front Porch • Garage • Garden Area

Shavertown: 696.3801 Mountain Top: 474.9801

Atlas Realty, Inc. :00

ERA1.com

1

11-

Dallas-Private Setting!

Pittston-Updated Ranch!

Hanover Twp.-Town House!

OPEN HOUSES TODAY!

:00

-2 :00

12

46 BRADFORD ST., WILKESBARRE $69,900

0

1:3

12-

0

1:3

12-

Very nice ranch home with 3 Beautiful split-level home on a Manageable updated ranch bedrooms and 1.5 baths. Hard- large lot in a private setting. home with 3 bedrooms and 2 wood floors, finished basement 4 bedrooms and 2.5 baths, modern baths, semi-modern with a separate workshop, 2-car living room with fireplace and eat-in kitchen, recreation room in attached garage, fenced-in yard. finished lower level, replacement vaulted ceiling, hardwood Bring your Buyers now & they’ll floors, modern kitchen with windows and the price is right be enjoying the summer in the Corian counter tops. 20x40 too! beautiful in-ground pool! Sylvan in-ground pool. Mary Ellen Belchick 696-6566 Maribeth Jones 696-6565 DJ Wojciechowski 283-9100 #12-1821 $139,900 #12-1609 $259,000 #12-1531 $114,500

77 SCHULER ST. WILKESBARRE $99,900

115 NOBLE LANE

WILKESBARRE $59,900 Great home with 3 BRs, 2 1/2 baths, Three bedroom, two bath, end unit townhouse screened in porch overlooking fenced in yard. Pride of ownership everywhere! Ready with finished lower level, gas fireplace, 3 All laminate floors throughout. Remodeled to move in. 3 BRs, alarm system. MLS tiered deck, newer roof.MLS #12-1006. Call and ready to move into. MLS #12-845. Call Tom, 262-7716. Colleen, 237-0415. #12-1508. Call Kevin, 817-0706 3380 LAUREL RUN ROAD, WILKESBARRE 263 WEST AVE., BEAR CREEK Dir: South on S. Sherman, right on Metcalf Dir: South Main just past Blackman to left Dir: Blackman St., to right on Brown, right Ranch home on 2.5 acres; large garage, great Mountain lake community, cape cod home, triple to right on Noble Lane. on E. Division, left on Vine, right on Schuler. on Bradford. Home on right. Home on right. location. MLS#09-1918 lot. MLS#09-4715 $189,900

We Sell Happiness!

Completely remodeled interior shines on this ranch townhouse. Containing 6 rooms, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, laundry room on 1st floor, very modern kitchen & a beautifully finished basement. Central A/C and a 1-car attached garage. Ted Poggi 283-9100 x25 #12-1300 $162,500

Two Of ces To Serve You Better: 1149 Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort 570.283.9100 28 Carverton Road, Shavertown 570.696.2600 Visit our website: www.poggi-jones.com

$127,500

© 2012 BRER Af liates Inc. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Af liates Inc. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other af liation with Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity.

837 Wyoming Ave., Kingston

288-1401

Open House! :30 0-1 0 : 12

167 ABBY RD, FALLS 11-4310 Beautiful 3 bedroom, 3 bath home in serene setting. Beautiful foyer, 2 car garage, Florida Room, wood burning stove, and central air are just a few of the amenities this move-in ready home has to offer.Home is also extremely cost efficient. Passive solar thermal envelope design $229,000 CALL SUSAN 417-9904 DIR: NE on Wyoming Ave/US 11 toward E. Hoyt St. Turn right onto Main St, Main becomes Shoemaker. Shoemaker becomes Slocum. Turn left onto PA-92 Exeter Ave. until left turn on Abby Rd.

Open House! 29 BOHAC ST, SWOYERSVILLE 10-4758 Double lot, well maintained and ready to move in! Priced to sell! Don’t miss out on this 3 bedroom home with covered CALL FLO 371-2881

patio, garage and private drive! $110,000 DIR: Route 11 to Dennison St. Right on Bohac. Property on right.

M :30P

7 MANOR DRIVE SHAVERTOWN 12-1184 Well maintained, quaint 3 bedroom Cape Cod located in the beautiful Back Mountain. Home features first floor master bedroom, extra large bedroom on 2nd floor, hardwood floors, shed and covered deck. Conveniently located..close to Cross Valley and 8th Street. CALL KIM 466-3338 $149,900 DIR: Cross Valley (Route 309) to Carverton Road. Turn on to Manor Drive from Carverton Road. Home is on the right.

263490

Se Habla ~ Espanol

Wilkes-Barre 570-825-2468 • Shavertown 570-696-2010 info@mksre.com

For Instant Pricing More FOR INSTANT PRICING & MORE&INFO TEXTInfo ML31 TEXT: TO 88000 ML31 TO: 88000

1195 SUTTON ROAD, SHAVERTOWN Attractive, well-maintained saltbox on 2 private acres boasts fireplaces in the living room, family room and master bedroom. Formal dining room. Large Florida room w/skylights and wet bar. Oak kitchen opens to family room. 4 bedrooms and 3 1/2 baths, Finished lower level. Carriage barn. JOE MOORE $424,900 MLS#10-3394

For Instant Pricing & More Info TEXT: ML32 TO: 88000

573 CARVERTON ROAD KINGSTON TWP. Privacy & serenity! This 40 acre estate features LR w/FP & hardwood floor, FR w/vaulted ceiling & FP; 1st floor master BR & bath w/jetted tub & stall shower, panelled den, DR w/ stone floor & skylight, 3 add’l BRs and 2 baths. Central A/C, 3 outbuildings. JOE MOORE & NANCY JUDD $695,000 MLS#11-4056

baths. Off street parking for 6 cars. Call Darren Snyder 570-825-2468

D CE DU E R

PRIME WOODED RESIDENTIAL BUILDING LOT ON 2.86 ACRES IN WOODRIDGE II

Glently sloping for a walk-out basement. Plenty of privacy. All public utilities. MLS #11-1601 $125,000

WILKES-BARRE Landmark home / office located on a corner lot in a high visibility location in Wilkes-Barre’s Historic District. With over 4,800 sq ft this property offers many options for your home or professional office space. 2 full baths, 2 half $325,000

Darren G. Snyder Broker/President

WILKES-BARRE

3 Story 6 bedroom, 1 1/2 baths with 2430 sq ft in move in condition. Fresh paint and newer carpeting throughout. Modern kitchen with laundry room. Large lot and 1 car garage.

$67,375 Call Darren Snyder 570-825-2468

SALESPERSONS WANTED!

THORNHURST Low maintanence, single story ranch home located in Join a GROWING FIRM servicing the Greater Wyoming Valley a private golf course commu- with offices strategically located in SHAVERTOWN & W-B. nity in the Poconos for weekEnjoy a challenging career with EXCELLENT INCOME end or year round enjoyment. Modern kit w/ breakfast bar, POTENTIAL for intelligent, industrious, motivated individuals. formal living room and din- We have professional office space available and WILL TRAIN ning room. Family room QUALIFIED PEOPLE. If you have a license or have always w/gas FP. Walk-up master wanted to obtain one call for a confidential interview. Learn bedroom w/bonus room ideal for an office. New front and rear decks in a how you can become a part of our private setting within 30 minutes to W-B or Scranton. $105,000 EXCELLENT ORGANIZATION!

GERALD L. BUSCH REAL ESTATE, INC. 288-2514

Open House 0-1 12:0

Get Set For Summer.....In Your NEW HOME! Call us! !

-2 829-6200 :00 • www.atlasrealtyinc.com 12

www.lewith-freeman.com

Hanover Twp.-Enjoy Summer!

2-4

ONE Mountaintop Office SOURCE 12 N Mountain Blvd. REALTY (570) 403-3000

pm :30 0-2 1:0

Wilkes-Barre: 822.1160 Clarks Summit: 585.0600

744678

Pure Indulgence... Luxury Condominiums nestled in a quiet corner of Northeast Pennsylvania

Kingston: 288.9371 Hazleton: 788.1999

Jerry Busch, Jr. Is Ready Each Office is Independently Owned And Operated. To Work For “You!” Call Jerry Today 709-7798 EMAIL: JERRYBUSCHJR@AOL.COM

OPEN HOUSE TODAY 12-2PM

OPEN HOUSE TODAY 2:15-4PM

View Our Listings on Realtor.com

HUNTINGTON TWP. - FIELDS, FLOWERS & SUNSHINE!

Pat Is Ready To Work For “You!” Call Pat Today 885-4165

NEW LISTING BACK MOUNTAIN!

ONLY 6 LOTS LEFT Custom Homes by Romanowski Homes

Spec Home offered at $525,000 Or Have Romanowski Homes build your Dream Home on any of these 6 remaining lots 93 New Street, Plains Come Relax in the Gardens! 9 spacious rooms, 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, finished basement, generous room sizes, garage and beautiful lot. MLS#12-307 Call Pat Busch 885-4165 $149,900 DIR: River Street to Carey Street continue straight on to Hudson Road to Garden Drive right on New Street.

7 Helen Street, Plains Excellent condition, 8 rooms, 3 Bedrooms, 1 1/2 baths, 3 season porch, comfortable gas heat and lots of closet space. MLS#11-4448 Call Pat Busch $79,900 DIR: River Street to Helen Street.

Plant your garden here while you enjoy the comfort of this quality built home nestled on one acre, 5 minutes from RT11 Shickshinny, 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, super kitchen, living room, dining room, den. Hardwood floors, large basement ready to finish, two car garage. Call Jerry Busch Jr. MLS#11-1680 $249,000

Call Geri for details Your Spirits Will Soar! This raised ranch home features a modern kitchen, 4 good size bedrooms, 2 baths, sunroom, huge finished basement, deck and central air. All situated on 2 acres. Don’t Wait! Call Jerry Busch Jr Today! $169,900

FOR PROMPT REAL ESTATE APPRAISALS, CALL GERALD L. BUSCH APPRAISAL SERVICE 288-2514

View Open Houses and Featured Properties Online at

timesleader.com

www.timesleader.com Click on “Homes”

Scan to View Listings


PAGE 16G

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Glenmaura

Continued from front page

Throughout the first floor are beautiful hardwood floors. Upstairs, dramatic double doors open to the 16-by-13 master bedroom, where you find plush tan carpeting, blue walls and shutters on a triple window rear. There is a large walk-in closet. The adjoining master bath has two white pedestal sinks that stand out thanks to coffee-colored walls and a tan ceramic tile floor. A jetted tub is set into a bay of rear-facing windows with more of the shutters for privacy. There is a separate walk-in shower and a linen closet. Bedrooms two and three measure 15-by-11 and 11-by-11, respectively, and have large closets and more of the goodsized windows. A full bath nearby has a tan tile floor, white vanity with black granite countertop, and striking lime green walls with aqua accessories. There is a white one-piece tub and shower surround. A pull-down staircase to attic storage is nearby in the hall. The fourth bedroom measures 16-by-14 and has navy walls with white wainscoting, its own cedar closet plus a walk-in closet, and a door that leads to a separate storage room with plenty of under-eave storage. The full, mostly finished basement offers as much as 1,500 square feet of additional living space. A second family room here measures 35-by-15 and offers forest green carpeting accented by butterscotch walls with beautiful built-in bookcases and room for an entertainment center. A separate area has a hanging stained glass light just right for a pool table. A separate utility room/gym offers an open area with linoleum flooring for exercise equipment and a built-in workshop with storage cabinets. There is plenty of additional closet storage. A nearly Bilko doors leads to the rear yard. This home has gas forced air heat and public sewer and water connections. For additional information, or to make an appointment, contact Nell Donnelly-O’Boyle, Realty Network Group, at (570) 585-6880;ndonnelly@realtynetwork.net. SPECIFICATIONS: Two-story 2,800 square feet BEDROOMS: 4 BATHS: 2 full, 1 half PRICE: $424,900 LOCATION: 24 Joyce Dr., Moosic AGENT: Nell Donnelly-O’Boyle REALTOR: Realty Network Group, (570) 585-6880

906 Homes for Sale

AVOCA

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

Back Mountain

DALLAS

DALLAS

DRUMS

DUPONT

Newberry Estate Three story freshly painted unit at Hillside. 2 bedrooms & loft, 3 bath, modern kitchen, fireplace in living room, central air & gas heat. Convenience of living at Newberry Enjoy golf, tennis & swimming. MLS#11-4435 $132,900 Call Rhea 570-696-6677

2 Story Immaculate Home located in a desirable neighborhood! Charming wrap around porch welcomes you & your friends to a beautiful inviting home. MLS# 12-1630 $430,000 Call Donna Klug 570-690-2579

NEWBERRY ESTATE ORCHARD EAST Two bedroom condo, 2nd floor. Living/dining room combination. 1,200 square feet of easy living. Tiled bath, new vinyl exterior, Two balconies,new roof, 2005. New electrical system. one car garage nearby. Security system, cedar closet, use of in-ground pool. $109,000 MLS#11-4031 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

Bright & spacious raised ranch on level lot in cul-desac. Tiled foyer. Living room with fireplace. Lovely oak kitchen opens to dining area with 4 skylights & beamed ceiling. French doors to deck. Large family room plus craft room. Huge garage w/plenty of space for workshop. MLS#12-606 $179,000 Call Mary Ann Desiderio 570-715-7733 Smith Hourigan Group Mountain Top

Two story with four bedrooms, remodeled oak kitchen with pantry, first floor laundry, off street parking, newer roof & windows. MLS #11-5344

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

DURYEA

DURYEA REDUCED!

97 Chittenden St. Flood damaged home with new furnace, electric box, water heater, outlets and switches. 1st floor gutted but already insulated and ready for sheetrock. 2nd floor has 4 bedrooms and bath with double sinks. Large yard. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 12-1225 $69,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

38 Huckleberry Ln Blueberry Hills 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, family room with fireplace, 2 car garage, large yard. Master bath with separate jetted tub, kitchen with stainless steel appliances and island, lighted deck. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 11-3071 $309,860 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

906 Homes for Sale EXETER

900 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE Having trouble paying your mortgage? Falling behind on your payments? You may get mail from people who promise to forestall your foreclosure for a fee in advance. Report them to the Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency. Call 1-877FTC-HELP or click on ftc.gov. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

P E N D I N G

1215 South St. SpaPcious 4 bedroom home with in law suite with separate entrance. Large lot, large room sizes. Split system A/C in family room. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-963 $89,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-5406 BACK MOUNTAIN

DUPONT

DALLAS

AVOCA

Why rent? Two story features newer roof, replacement windows, two bedrooms, enclosed porch, 40’ x 175’ lot with off street parking, great commuting location. $55,000. MLS#12-1238

214 Gedding St. Cozy Cape Cod home with 2 bedrooms, 1st floor laundry, nice yard with deck. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-668 $59,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

Call 570-348-1761 ALDEN

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Large home on a huge lot. Needs some care so come put your personal touch into this great value. Off street parking, 2 car detached garage and a large fenced in yard. Did we mentioned 4 bedrooms. MLS 12-1589 $64,900 Call/text Donna 570-947-3824 or Tony 570-855-2424

ASHLEY

Own your own home-start investing in your new home, remodeled kitchen, Living room, Dining room, 3 beds, 1 bath, front & rear porches, detached 2 car garage, nice yard. MLS#12-1074. Call Susan Pall 696-0876

ASHLEY

Remodeled 2 or 3 bedroom home. Large yard. Nice porch. Low traffic. Not in flood area. Asking $79,900. Deremer Realty 570-477-1149

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

AVOCA

BACK MOUNTAIN

Meticulous townhouse, almost new granite countertops, tile in baths, hardwood floors, dock slip available to homeowner. MLS# 11-2984 $209,900 Call Susan Pall @ (570) 696-0876

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

EDWARDSVILLE

DALLAS OAK HILL

Dakota Woods Enjoy maintenance free living at Dakota Woods Development in the Back Mountain. This 3+ bedroom condo features an open floor plan, first floor master suite, hardwood floors, stunning granite kitchen, gas fireplace & 2 car garages. Large loft area provides multiuse space. MLS# 11-3212 $299,000 Call Rhea 570-696-6677

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! BEECH MOUNTAIN LAKES

901 Main St. Stately 4 bedroom home with beautiful woodwork, extra large rooms with gas heat and nice yard. MLS 12-884 $79,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

Call (570)348-1761

LAKE VIEW custom built Chalet with 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths & 2,600 sq. ft. Features hardwood floors thruout 1st & 2nd floors & bamboo flooring in the finished lower level. 2 fireplaces & central air. Motivated Seller. Take a virtual tour at www.PaHouseHunt ers.com or TEXT 2308 to 85377 for additional info & pictures. MLS #12-564 $249,900 Cindy Perlick

Smith Hourigan Group Mountain Top 570-715-7753

4 bedroom Colonial with hardwood floors in formal dining & living room. Modern eat in kitchen, finished basement with 24” x 30” recreation room. Deck, hot tub and ceiling fans. MLS#11-4504 $199,000 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

DRUMS 3 bedroom ranch. Remodeled kitchen. Added family room. Master bedroom with 1/2 bath. Beautiful oak floor. 3 season room. Deck & shed. Garage. 114476. 100x150 lot. $154,900. Call Besecker Realty 570-675-3611

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale Shopping for a in classified new apartment? is the best way Classified lets you compare costs - tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness without hassle with classified! or worry! DALLAS Get moving with classified! DALLAS

New Homes From $275,000$595,000 570-474-5574 DURYEA

PRICE REDUCED! Comfortable, affordable 3 bedroom ranch on just over an acre. 2 fireplaces. One in living room and one in backyard pavilion. 1st floor laundry and built in one car garage. $82,000 MLS #12-1101 Call Mary Ann Desiderio 570-715-7733 Smith Hourigan Group MountainTop

Great Dallas Location. Close to town & library. 4 bedroom ranch with lower level family room, replacement windows, 16x32 deck, garage, 100 x 150 lot. 12-1528 $180,000 Besecker Realty 570-675-3611

DALLAS

Private & beautiful lovely brick chalet on 11.85 acres. Custom brick work, tongue & groove interior & oversized 3 car garage. Features whirlpool tub, heated sunroom, kitchen island & hickory cabinets, laundry room. Basement is plumbed & ready to finish. MLS# 12-817 $315,000 Call Ken Williams Five Mountain Realty 570-542-8800 DALLAS

Looking for a ranch in the Back Mountain? Come and preview this remodeled two or three bedroom, one bath home. New Pergo flooring, updated kitchen with stainless steel appliances, off street parking. MLS #121213 $112,000 Call Kathy Murray 570-696-6403

INCLASSIFIED!

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

The Greens at Newberry Estates. Condo with special view of golf course & ponds. 3 bedrooms. Family room. 5 1/2 baths on 2 floors. 4,000 sq. ft. living area. 12-1480 $449,900 Besecker Realty 570-675-3611

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE IN CLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified! MOUNTAIN TOP

OPEN HOUSE 61 Acer Lane Sunday, May 20 2:00 to 3:30 Great value, great location on a fabulous lot. From your hot tub you can enjoy the view of the almost full acre lot. Year round sun room, plus you have a Lower Level that adds more space to this great home. Don't miss out on this incredible buy! 12-808. $139,900 For more information or to schedule a showing call or text Donna 570-947-3824 or Tony 570-855-2424

Need a Roommate? Place an ad and find one here! 570-829-7130

P E N D I N G

EXETER

ComeUpToQuailHill. com

1107 Spring Street Superb two story with 3 bedrooms & 1 ½ baths. Hardwood floors, gas heat, vinyl siding, large yard with garage. Call Jim for details. Offered at $169,500 Towne & Country Real Estate Co. 570-735-8932 or 570-542-5708 DURYEA

LINEUP LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

DURYEA NEW PRICE!!!!!

530 Cherry Drive Spacious 2 bedroom townhome with hardwood floor, gas heat, central air, end unit with one garage. All appliances, move in condition. For more info and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 12-712 $169,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

621 Donnelly St. Great starter home, already furnished, newer roof and vinyl windows. Move right into this 2 bedroom, 1/2 double home. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc. com MLS 12-1042 $29,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! DURYEA

125 McAlpine St Ideal starter is this appealing two bedroom 2 story with large lot and 1.5 car garage. Plenty of off street parking, in solid neighborhood. MLS 11-4313 PRICE REDUCED $79,000 Call Arlene Warunek 570-650-4169

Smith Hourigan Group (570) 696-1195

DURYEA

90 Main St. Recently remolded 4 bedroom, 1.5 single. Modern kitchen with new appliances, open floor plan, wood burning fireplace, gas heat. 2 car detached garage. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 12-895 $109,900 Call Lu-Ann 570-602-9280

263 Lawrence St Pride of ownership shows in this nicely updated & well maintained home with possible in-law suite/apartment. Enjoy off street parking, spacious yard & large deck with beautiful views of the valley. 1st floor has large separate eat-in kitchen, living room, bedroom & bath. 2nd floor has large eatin kitchen, living/dining combo, 3 bedrooms, 1 bath & 2nd floor laundry. Many possibilities to fit your needs! Must see! MLS#11-4434 Reduced to $88,900 Call Christina @ (570) 714-9235

EXETER

OPEN HOUSE Sunday 12pm-5pm

Need to rent that Vacation property? Place an ad and get started! 570-829-7130 EDWARDSVILLE REDUCED

REDUCED 619 Foote Ave. Fabulous Ranch home with 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, ultra modern kitchen with granite counters, heated tile floor and stainless appliances. Dining room has Brazilian cherry floors, huge yard, garage and large yard. Partially finished lower level. Built for handicap accessibility with exterior ramp, interior hallways and doorways. If you’re looking for a Ranch, don’t miss this one. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 11-4079 $149,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

Nice size 4 bedroom home with some hardwood floors, large eat in kitchen with breakfast bar. 2 car garage & partially fenced yard. Close to everything! $89,000 Call Christine Kutz 570-332-8832

274 Hillside Ave. PRICED TO SELL. THIS HOME IS A MUST SEE. Great starter home in move in condition. Newer 1/2 bath off kitchen & replacement windows installed. MLS11-560. $49,500 Roger Nenni EXT. 32 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

362 Susquehanna Ave Completely remodeled, spectacular, 2 story Victorian home, with 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, new rear deck, full front porch, tiled baths and kitchen, granite countertops, all Cherry hardwood floors throughout, all new stainless steel appliances and lighting, new oil furnace, washer dryer in first floor bath. Great neighborhood, nice yard. $174,900 (30 year loan, $8,750 down, $887/month, 30 years @ 4.5%) 100% OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE Call Bob at 570-654-1490

The Attorney To Call When Buying A Home • Complete Real Estate Legal Services • Title Insurance

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

• Rapid Title Search & Closing • Evening & Weekend Appointments

Angelo C. Terrana Jr. ATTORNEY AT LAW Suite 117 Park Building, 400 Third Avenue, Kingston, PA (570) 283-9500

754272

906 Homes for Sale


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

OPEN HOUSE • SUN, 5/20 1:00-2:30PM

220 HILLSIDE, DALLAS

DALLAS Newberry Estates - 3 story Condo w/2BRs & loft, 3 baths, FP in LR, C/A, gas heat, modern kitchen. Enjoy golf, tennis & swimming! MLS# 11-4435 RHEA 696-6677 $132,900 Dir: Rt.309 to L on Pioneer into Newberry Estate. Hillside on R.

OPEN HOUSE • SUN, 5/20 2-3:30PM

981 LAUREL RUN ROAD, BEAR CREEK

BEAR CREEK REDUCED Custom Designed New Construction -2 Story w/open flr plan. 4 BR’s, 3.5 baths, ultra kit, formal DR, LR w/FP, oversized laundry. Hardwood on 1st floor. Many amenities! MLS# 12-353 CLYDETTE 696-0897 $449,000

Dir: Rt.309 to L on Pioneer into Newberry Estate. Hillside on R.

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 PAGE 17G

OPEN HOUSE • SUN, 5/20 11-1PM

OPEN HOUSE • SUN, 5/20 1:00-2:30PM

Cape boasts 3BR, 1.5 baths, LR, DR, PLUS eat-in kitchen, lower level private drive on quiet street. MLS# 12-1119 $117,000 CLYDETTE 696-0897 Dir: From Wyoming Ave. in Kingston to L onto Crisman - Property on L.

305 UNION STREET, TAYLOR TAYLOR NEW CONSTRUCTION at an amazing price! Features 4BR’s, 2.5 baths on large lot. FR on LL. Plenty of room to grow! MLS#12-1506 CHRISTINA 714-9231 $179,900 Dir: Main Street, Taylor, to Union St, house on L.

SHAVERTOWN Bulford Farms custom built brick 2sty, 5BR, 4 full & 2 1/2 baths home on 4acres w/open flr plan. Quality thru-out includes mod kitchen w/island & granite open to FR w/FP & bar. Walls of windows overlook grounds, 2stry fyr, sunken LR w/FP, 1st flr office. Finished LL w/2nd kitchen, rec rm & wine cellar. Amazing storage, 4 car garage, tennis court & large patio. MLS# 09-4567 TINA 714-9277 or VIRGINIA 714-9253 $750,000

GLEN SUMMIT Glen Summit Community - Beautiful Victorian home renovated w/new open floor plan, 6BRs, 4.5 elegant baths & stunning new kitchen HW flrs, spacious rms, handsome FP’s, front & back staircases, delightful Gazebo & huge wrap around porch. MLS# 10-2874. MARGY 696-0891 or RHEA 696-6677 $650,000

MOUNTAINTOP Gracious home with granite kitchen tops & custom cabinetry, upgraded millwork throughout, incl. beautifully finished lower level with 9 ft. ceilings. Hardwood floors on 1st floor & 2nd floor hall. Gathering room features cathedral ceiling & stunning floor to ceiling fireplace. Inground heated pool, hot tub, great patio & deck areas. MLS# 12-1557 PAT SCIANDRA DIRECT : (570) 715-9337 $629,900

MOOSIC Custom-built Craftsman-style 3000SF home. LR w/vaulted ceiling & 2 story FP; Spacious cherry kitchen w/Island & all appliances; DR open to deck; 1st floor MBR Suite; Beautiful HW floors; Large FR open to patio; A/C; 3 garages; Exercise pool; This home must be seen! MLS# 12-950 RAE (570) 714-9234 $625,000

56 CRISMAN STREET, FORTY FORT

FORTY FORT Attractive move-in condition

BACK MOUNTAIN Enjoy maintenance free living in this outstanding 3 bedroom condo- Wonderful open floor plan with custom paint & built-ins featured throughout. Spacious living and dining room opens to bright kitchen with large island and great view- Main floor Master suite has lovely office and stunning bath. Walk out lower level has large family room , office, 2 bedrooms, bath and extensive ,organized storage. MLS# 12-1680 Rhea Simms (570) 696-6677 $495,000

MOUNTAINTOP NEW LISTING Stunning 4BR, 2.5 bath home. Large eat-in kitchen w/granite Island, C/A, DR w/HW, FR w/ FP, 40’ deck, private rear yard. MLS# 121813 JIM 715-9323 $314,900

KINGSTON REDUCED! A must see! Steel & concrete construction put together this exceptional 4BR, 5 bath home. Along w/the great location & fenced yard, this property features maple HW flrs - cherry kitchen cabinets - unique bronze staircase – tile baths & SO MUCH MORE! MLS# 12-531 Julio Acosta (570) 239-6408 $299,500

DALLAS This almost new 2 story w/open floor plan boasts eat-in kitchen, FR w/ gas FP, spacious 4BRs, double lot & more! MLS# 12-1344 TERRY NELSON 714-9248 or JUDY 714-9230 $289,900

DALLAS Maintenance free living in this stunning Condo at Newberry Estate. Many recent upgrades including granite countertops in kitchen & gas heat. 2nd floor laundry. Enjoy golf, tennis & swimming! MLS#12-324 Terry Nelson (570) 714-9248 $269,900

BACK MOUNTAIN Beautifully maintained 4 bedroom 2 1/2 bath home on a fenced corner lot. Modern kitchen and baths, hardwood floors, large room sizes. Must see! MLS#12-749 Jill Hiscox (570) 696-0875 $259,900

DALLAS Century home w/charm & functionality! 2 Story w/3 BR’s, 2 baths, FR & garage. Hdwd floors, fireplace & more! MLS# 12-1406 JUDY 714-9230 $164,900

MOUNTAINTOP REDUCED! Very nice offering, level lot, large cedar walled sunroom with skylight, newly remodeled kitchen, good sized bedrooms. MLS# 12-1065 Pat Sciandra (570) 715-9337 $229,000

KINGSTON REDUCED! Old World Charm at its best! Beautiful 5BR, 2.5 bath w/mod kit. HW flrs, 2 mantels & 1 wood burning FP, 2.5 car gar, library w/built-ins & FP, DR w/beam ceiling & stain glass windows. Great landscaping! Could make wonderful bed & breakfast! Agent owned. MLS# 11-2878 MATT 714-9229 $229,900

LARKSVILLE REDUCED! Larkmount Manor Development. Updated 4 Bedroom Bilevel w/2 newly remodeled baths. Newly finished lower level with laminate floors, large fenced yard, 2 car detached garage. Solarium in back. One year Home Warranty. All measurements approximate. MLS# 12-1105 Nancy Palumbo (570) 714-9240 $179,500

KINGSTON Lovely 4BR, 1.5 bath 2 story in convenient location. Sunporch, 1 car garage, carport & fenced yard. MLS# 12-1122 SALLY 714-9233 $109,900

FORTY FORT Two story w/garage & great yard! This 3BR, 1.5 bath w/enclosed front porch awaits your arrival. New roof, freshly painteed, new laminate flooring. Move right in! MLS# 12-748 JUDY 714-9230 $89,900

PLYMOUTH Very nice kitchen w/Island is the focal point for this 2BR Cape Cod. Move right in! Potential for 3rd BR. MLS# 12-117 JUDY 714-9230 $89,900

WILKES-BARRE This home features over 3000SF of everything. Lg FR w/FP, fin. LL w/ wet bar, fenced yard w/in-grnd pool & pool hs, C/A, sec sys & lots of room to grow, Most of all it’s affordable! Includes Hometrust Warranty. MLS# 12-411 JULIO 239-6408 or DEB 714-5802 $179,900

WILKES-BARRE Convenient city living on almost one acre lot. Beautiful views, large room sizes. Finished lower level. MLS# 12-1651 JILL 696-0875 $117,000

EXETER TWP. Stunning views! Lot is cleared & ready to build your dream home! Lot is perked w/ approved sewage design. Wyoming Area School District. MLS# 12-1223 MARY D. 696-0729 72,900

BEAR CREEK VILLAGE Fall in love w ‘’Whispering Pines’’ in scenic Historic Bear Creek Village set on a knoll w/lake glimpses. Spacious, comfortable traditional features 3FP’s, HW flrs, mod kit, GE appls. Come for a visit & stay for the lifestyle! MLS# 12-186 Ann Lewis 714-9245 $269,500

WILKES-BARRE Beautifully maintained 5 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath home in mint condition on double lot. Large room sizes, modern kitchens & baths, wood burning fireplace. In-ground pool. Must see property. MLS#1729 Jill Hiscox (570) 696-0875 $239,900


PAGE 18G

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

One Floor Ranch, Two Story Four Bedroom, 3600 Sq. Ft. River Shores Spec Home—TAKE YOUR PICK All with outstanding architechture, outstanding finishes and great locations.

All priced between 299,900 and $399,000, Total Finished Price! Open House Sunday between 11 and 2 at the River Shores Spec Home. 15 River Shores Court, West Pittston (at the corner of Erie St. and Susquehanna Ave).

906 Homes for Sale

EXETER REDUCED

128 JEAN ST. Nice bi-level home on quiet street. Updated exterior. Large family room, extra deep lot. 2 car garage, enclosed rear porch and covered patio. For more information and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.co m MLS 11-2850 $179,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

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906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

FREELAND

HANOVER TWP 1 Grandview Ave

Spacious 4 bedroom, 1 3/4 bath home. Gas Heat. Deck. Fenced yard. One car garage. MLS 12-832 $71,900 Ann Marie Chopick 570-760-6769

Hanover Twp. Discover the values in this welcoming 3 bedroom home. Some of the delights of this very special home are hardwood floors, deck, fully fenced yard & screened porch. A captivating charmer that handles all your needs! $97,500 MLS 11-3625 Michael Slacktish 570-760-4961

570-288-6654 GLEN LYON

Signature Properties HANOVER TWP.

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

Fully rented 5 unit apt building, new siding, new roof and nice updates inside, off street parking & near the college. Call or text Donna 570-947-3824 or Tony 570-855-2424 for more information or to schedule your showing. $117,000

EXETER REDUCED HANOVER GREEN

908 Primrose Court Move right into this newer 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath Townhome with many upgrades including hardwood floors throughout and tiled bathrooms. Lovely oak cabinets in the kitchen, central air, fenced in yard, nice quiet neighborhood. MLS 11-2446 $119,900 Call Don Crossin 570-288-0770 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-287-0770 EXETER REDUCED

908 Primrose Court Move right into this newer 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath Townhome with many upgrades including hardwood floors throughout and tiled bathrooms. Lovely oak cabinets in the kitchen, central air, fenced in yard, nice quiet neighborhood. MLS 11-2446 $114,900 Call Don Crossin 570-288-0770 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-287-0770

2 Zack Street 3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath bi-level hardwood floors on upper & lower level. 65’x100’ lot. New Corian kitchen including new appliances, central air, gas heat, 3 bedrooms, living room & dining room, new carpeting, heated 1 car garage. 2 large sheds, 16’x32’ in ground pool. Covered upper deck & lower covered patio. Walking distance to schools. On bus route. Much More! Reduced to $172,900. Kwiatkowski Real Estate 570-825-7988

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

HANOVER TOWNSHIP

HANOVER TWP.

577 Nanticoke St. Well maintained 3 bedroom, 2 story home in quiet neighborhood. This home features an enclosed patio with hot tub, enclosed front porch, walk up floored attic with electric. 2 coal stoves and much more. All measurements approximate. MLS 10-4645. $80,900 Debbie McGuire 570-332-4413 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-287-0770

To place your ad call...829-7130

HANOVER TWP.

95 Pulaski St. Large home on nice sized lot. Newer windows, walk up attic. 3 bedrooms, nice room sizes, walk out basement. Great price you could move right in. For more info and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 11-4554 $39,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

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3 bedrooms, 2 baths, finished basement, screened patio, new paint & carpet. Move in condition. $139,900. Call 570-301-9590

2808 Scranton/Carbondale Highway Blakely, PA 18447 570-383-2981 • www.heritagehomesltd.com HERITAGE HOMES INCLUDE: • Gas Warm Air Heat • Site Work Package • Central Air Conditioning • Concrete Front Porch • Andersen Windows • 1st Floor Laundry • Master Bedroom 1st Floor • Two Story Great Room • 2 1/2 Tile Baths • Front Vinyl Shares •˙Hardwood, Kitchen, Foyer • Poured Concrete Foundation

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906 Homes for Sale HANOVER TWP.

At this price with today’s interest rates, now is the time to buy! This 3 bedroom ranch offers a spacious kitchen/dining area, lower level makes a great recreation room, an exercise room or office. Large fenced yard will be great for your summer picnics. Call today for your appointment. MLS# 11-1793 $109,500 Jill Jones 696-6550 Office696-2600

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

HANOVER TWP. NEW LISTING

3 Dexter St. Why pay rent when you can own your own home! Recently renovated 3 bedroom home with 1 car garage & fenced in yard. New carpet, flooring & counter tops. Roof & windows just 2 years old. Call Michele for your private showing. For more info and photos visit: www.Atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 12-1354 $59,900 Call Michele 570-905-2336

Patrick Deats Contractor Back Mountain Lots Now Available! Integrity • Quality • Value

Custom Home Builder with over 25 years experience in Luzerne and Lackawanna Counties

570-696-1041

www.patrickdeats.com

Lot/Home Packages or Custom Homes on Your Lot

The Somerville - 2,210 sq. ft. You’ve Got Dreams. We’ve Got Plans. MODEL HOURS Weekdays 12-7 Sat & Sun 12-5 Closed Fridays

Featuring: 2 Betsy Ross Drive Warmly inviting 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath Tudor. Striking highlights in this beautiful home include custom blinds, manicured lawn, deck, patio and 3-season porch. Entertain in the finished walkout basement with wet bar or relax by the pool! Outstanding quality! Call Pat Guesto 570-793-4055 CENTURY 21 SIGNATURE PROPERTIES 570-675-5100

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FORTY FORT

11 Cayuga Place BY OWNER $84,900 2 or 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, 2 car heated garage 570-970-0650 jtdproperties.com Call (570)970-0650

Heritage He eritage H Homes omes P Promise: romise:

Competitive Pricing Hidden Costs Hidden Upgrades titiv ivee Pr Pric iccin ng • No No H idd id den Co den de C Cost ost sts ts • No N H id idde dde d n Up

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LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED!

754024

WE’LL BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME ON YOUR DREAM LOT CALL ANYTIME – 881-2144

Scan Code and Visit Our Website:

906 Homes for Sale

HANOVER TWP. REDUCED

5 Raymond Drive Practically new 8 year old Bi-level with 4 bedrooms, 1 and 3/4 baths, garage, fenced yard, private dead end street. For more info and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 11-3422 $175,000 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

HARDING

105 Circle Drive

Well maintained Bi-Level on nicely landscaped corner lot. Finished lower level with gas fireplace & sliding doors to private patio. Totally fenced yard, 1 car garage. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths. $127,900 MLS# 11-1271 Call Cathy (570) 696-5422

Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-1195

HARDING

2032 ROUTE 92 Great Ranch home surrounded by nature with view of the river and extra lot on the river. Large living room and kitchen remodeled and ready to move in. Full unfinished basement, off street parking. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-79 $78,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

Find A New Friend In The Times Leader Classified

To place an ad call 829-7130

Find the perfect friend. The Classified section at timesleader.com

ELEGANT HOMES, LLC. 51 Sterling Avenue, Dallas PA 18612

(570) 675 • 9880

www.eleganthomesinc.net

Open House Cancelled For Today

Luxurious Twins in Kingston

Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONLY ONL NLY NL L ONE N LE LLEADER. LEA E DER D . timesleader.com

$198,900

New Construction!

* Approx 2100 Sq. Ft. * 2 Car Garage with Storage Area * 2 Story Great Room * Cherry Kitchen with Granite * Fenced in Yard with Patio * Gas Heat/AC Directions: From Wyoming Ave. take Pringle St. to the End, take left on Grove St. Twins on left 267 Grove St. Kingston


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 PAGE 19G

SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER.

SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP

Visit These Open Houses Today! 119 BLUE ELDER DR

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12-1100 MTP-BOW CREEK $369900 Exceptional contemporary! Dramatic foyer & LR, great master suite, FR w/home theater, IG pool. DAVE 474-6307 4 BR Dir: From elementary school - Shady Tree to 1st L onto Cedar Manor. 2nd R onto Blue Elder. House

12-1359 MOUNTAINTOP $298900 Lovely 10 room vinyl & stone front ranch w/cent air, gas heat, deck, FR w/FP, fin LL, 2 c gar. FLORENCE 474-6307 3 BR Dir: Rt. 309, Mountaintop, to Kirby Ave. R on Farmhouse. Home on the L.

24 MEADOW LANE

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12-1598 HUNLOCK CREEK $ $2 $289900 899 89 8 year old Colonial on 2.5 acres. Mod oak kit, formal DR, 1st flr laundry. Huge flat back yard. SUE 696-1195 3 BR Dir: 415 Dallas to 118. Bear L towards Sweet Valley, approx 5 miles to R on Grassy Pond Rd. L on Meadow Lane.

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12-478 DALLAS $189900 Well appointed 1300 sf condo LR w/cathedral ceiling, gas FP, mod oak kit w/all appls. MBR w/ bath. KEVIN 696-1195 2 BR Dir: From Dallas Center, Rt. 415 towards Harvey’s Lake to L into Green Briar, 1st R then 1st L to Willow. Property on L.

17 EAST SEVENTH ST

12-226 WYOMING $139900 Well maintíd 1600 sf home on nice street w/LR, DR, kitchen w/granite countertops, LL FR, & OSP. KEVIN 696-1195 2 BR Dir: Rt. 11 North to R on 7th St. Home on R.

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12-1172 HUNLOCK CREEK $250000 Own your “very own” getaway! Spacious home w/many updates, fenced yard, hot tub & IG pool. LYNDA 696-1195 3 BR Dir: Rt. 11 to Rt. 29. R onto Summit St. just before Lake Silkworth. 3rd home on the L.

12-240 DALLAS $284000 Beautiful end unit condo in Dakota Woods. Open floor plan w/3 BRs & 3 baths. Gas heat/cent air. CATHY T 696-1195 3 BR Dir: Rt. 309 north, pass Country Club shopping center. Turn R into Dakota Woods (across from Frontier

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12-196 HANOVER TWP. $123500 Spacious townhouse in great area. Mod kit & baths, carpeted, freshly painted. 1 c gar. Full bsmt. CARL 696-1195 2 BR Dir: South Main toward Nanticoke. Countrywood Dr. is on the R across from St. Mary’s cemetery.

THERE ARE ONLY TWO WAYS TO LOOK FOR A HOUSE... Attend Our Open Houses And See For Yourself or Visit Our Website to Find the Details and Photos of All the Homes on the Market

www.CENTURY21SHGroup.com Our Listings Are Posted With Full Photo Tours on Every Major Real Estate Website... We Showcase Our Homes to Potential Buyers Throughout the World!

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12-270 FORTY FORT $176000 Immaculate 2 story w/recently redone kit w/granite. New windows, furnace, roof. LR, DR, IG pool. RUTHIE 287-1196 3 BR Dir: Wyoming Ave. to Rose St. Home on R.

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12-1502 HANOVER TWP. $89 $8 $89900 99 Recently redone! Lg rooms, mod kitchen & baths, 2 car gar, AG pool & deck. 1st floor laundry. JEANNETTE 287-1196 3 BR Dir: South Main to Vine to Rear Boland.

CENTURY 21 Is The Most Recognized Name in Real Estate Most Recognized Name in Real Estate: As in previous years, consumers in 2011 continued to identify CENTURY 21as the most recognized name in Real Estate

CENTURY 21: 37% RE/MAX: 30% Coldwell Banker: 18% Prudential: 13% Keller Williams: 12% Realty Executives: 12% ERA: 8% Weichert Realtors: 7%

Thirty-seven percent of adults surveyed singled out CENTURY 21 as the most well known brand, with the nearest competitor (RE/MAX) trailing by a substantial 7 percentage points

Q:

“Which of these agencies, if any, is the most recognized name in real estate?” (multiple choice question); Base -Aware of Brand. Results significant at a 90% Confidence level

*Source: 2011 Ad Tracking Study, Millward Brown.

SHAVERTOWN 570.696.1195 KINGSTON 570.287.1196 MOUNTAINTOP 570.474.6307 • 570.788.1047

Visit us on the web at: century21SHGroup.com


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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 PAGE 20G

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PAGE 21G

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

906 Homes for Sale

HARDING

3 bedroom, 1.5 bath raised Ranch on 1 acre. Home boasts a gas fireplace in living room. Central A/C, 2.5 car garage, covered deck, finished basement, lots of storage, out of flood zone. $179,900. Call 570-299-5940 570-388-4244 HARDING

Charming home in very good condition. Nice woodworking, replacement windows, new vaulted ceiling bedroom overlooking amazing view of the river. Vinyl siding, one car garage, private setting on a dead end street, but not flood zone.Reduced! $89,900 MLS 12-990 Call Nancy Answini, Gilroy Real Estate 570-288-1444

906 Homes for Sale HUNLOCK CREEK

Beautifully maintained cape cod features 3 bedrooms and one and a half baths. Hardwood floors in living room, dining room, foyer and first floor bedroom. Newly remodeled kitchen and bathroom. Lots of storage. New roof installed in 2010. Breakfast nook with built-in table and benches. Enclosed porch, above ground pool and deck. 11-2706. $155,000 Call Brenda Suder 570-332-8924 McDermott Realty 570-696-2468

JENKINS TWP.

4 Orchard St. 3 bedroom starter home with 1 bath on quiet street. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-254 $69,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

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LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! JENKINS TWP

HARVEYS LAKE

1252 Main St.

Dallas School District. Wooded and private Bi-Level. This home features 1 car garage, 3 bedrooms, 1 3/4 bath & nice updates. plenty of room on your private 2 acre lot. Call for details. $166,000 Call Cindy King 570-690-2689

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

906 Homes for Sale

3 Bedrooms 1 Bath Finished Walk-Out Basement Corner Lot Single Car Garage

$57,900

Call Vince 570-332-8792

570-675-4400

Richard Lane 2 story, 3 bedroom, 1 bath home at rear of Lake Side Drive between Pole #’s 125 and 126 on Richard Lane. Lake view, including front wrap around porch and 2 of the 3 upstairs bedrooms. and rear yard. Home in need of updating and repairs and is being sold as is. 13,809 sq. ft. lot. MLS 12-1607 $59,900 Michelle T. Boice 570-639-5393 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

HARVEYS LAKE Ridge Ave

Modern 2 story home on 1+ acre. Duplex. Excellent starter home, retirement home, or investment property public sewer,deep well. asking $109,900 570-287-5775 or 570-332-1048

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

HUGHESTOWN REDUCED

189 Rock St. Spacious home with 4 bedrooms and large rooms. Nice old woodwork, staircase, etc. Extra lot for parking off Kenley St. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3404 $89,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

P E N D I N G

KINGSTON

Large, double block in Kingston with 3 bedrooms on one side and 2 bedrooms (possibly 3) on the other side. Both have 2nd floor baths rooms, gas hot water baseboard heat, separate utilities, fencedin yard with offstreet parking from rear alley. Each unit is deeded separately. Let your tenant pay your mortgage! #12-387 $84,500 Karen Altavilla 570-283-9100 x28

570-283-9100 KINGSTON 4 Widener Drive A must see home! You absolutely must see the interior of this home. Start by looking at the photos on line. Fantastic kitchen with hickory cabinets, granite counters, stainless steel appliances and tile floor. Fabulous master bathroom with champagne tub and glass shower, walk in closet. 4 car garage, upper garage is partially finished. The list goes on and on. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 12-210 $389,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

906 Homes for Sale

KINGSTON

New on the market. All brick 2 story home with finished basement 5 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, on beautiful Butler St. Large eat-in kitchen, in ground pool, central air, new hardwood floors, den/office. 2 car detached garage. Sale by owner! $279,900 To view pictures go to Facebook Butler St., Kingston, PA 570-852-0130

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130! KINGSTON TWP

Located within 1 block of elementary school & neighborhood park this spacious 4 bedrooms offers 1450 sq. ft of living space with 1.75 baths, walk up attic, and partially finished basement. Extras include gas fireplace, an inground pool with fenced yard, new gas furnace & more. 11-823

Reduced $99,900

Ann Marie Chopick 570-760-6769

573 Carverton Rd Privacy & serenity! This 40 acre estate features living room with fireplace & hardwood floor; family room with vaulted ceiling & fireplace; 1st floor master bedroom & bath with jetted tub & stall shower; panelled den; dining room with stone floor & skylight; 3 additional bedrooms & 2 baths. Central Air, 3 outbuildings. REDUCED $695,000 MLS 11-4056 Call Nancy Judd Joe Moore 570-288-1401

570-288-6654

JENKINS TWP.

2 W. Sunrise Drive PRICED TO SELL! This 4 bedroom has 2 car garage with extra driveway, central air, veranda over garage, recreation room with fireplace and wet bar. Sunroom For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-296 $199,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

P E N D I N G

JENKINS TWP.

297 Susquehannock Drive Traditional 4 bedroom home with 2.5 baths, 2 car garage, private yard with above ground pool. Large deck with retractable awning. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 12-945 $254,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE IN CLASSIFIED!

Doyouneedmore space? A yard or garage sale in classified Motorcycle for sale? Let them see it here is the best way in the Classifieds! to cleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness 570-829-7130 with classified!

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

LAFLIN

LARKSVILLE Come put your personal finishings into this great value. Out of flood zone and a huge yard! Lots of potential in this 3 bedroom home. Call today for a private showing. Could be your first home or your first investment, don’t miss out. MLS 12-1583 $49,900 Call/text Donna 570-947-3824 or Tony 570-855-2424

MOUNTAIN TOP

MOUNTAIN TOP

NANTICOKE

Greystone Manor. Ten year old home with attached apartment. 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths. Kitchen, living room, dining room & den. Apartment has 1 bedroom, bath, living room, dining room, private entrance. 3 car garage, front porch, large decks. Total 2,840 square feet. On cul-de-sac. Call BOB RUNDLE for appointment.

OPEN HOUSE 139 Sandwedge Drive Sunday, May 20 1:30 to 3:00 LOCATION LOCATION LOCATION! Beautiful home in Alberdeen Acres, hole 7 of Blue Ridge Golf Course. 1.84 acres of serenity. Large 4 bedroom home with great deck to relax on and enjoy your surroundings. Come make this your private retreat today. $259,900. MLS 121627. For more information or to schedule a showing call or text Donna 570-947-3824 or Tony 570-855-2424

418 Front St. Check out this large 4 bedroom, 1.5 bath home with a formal dining room, living room and family room. This home is located across the street from a beautiful park and recreation area. Great for people who like the outdoors and have kids. MLS 12-1466 $50,000 Call John Polifka 570-704-6846 FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY 570-542-2141

NEW LISTING! Convenient Laflin location just minutes from I-81, Rt. 315 & PA Turnpike. 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, living room open to the modern kitchen, dining room and first floor with beautiful hardwood floors. H a n d i c a p p e d accessible with oversized doors and hallways. New carpet & extra basement ceiling height make this a great family home. Landscaped yard with Koi pond & custom deck that sits in a quiet, private location on a dead-end street. Move-in ready! mls 12-1197 $199,900 Chris Jones 696-6558

Highland Hills 8 Patrick Road Magnificent custom built tudor home with quality throughout. Spacious 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, 2 story living room with fireplace and library loft. Dining room, family room and 3 season sunroom which overlooks professionally landscaped grounds with gazebo and tennis/basketball court. Lower level includes recreation room, exercise room and 3/4 bath. Enjoy this serene acre in a beautiful setting in Highland Hills Development. Too many amenities to mention. Taxes appealed and lowered considerably for year 2013. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-723 $399,900 Call Terry 570-885-3041 Angie 570-885-4896

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified! KINGSTON

A must see. Steel & concrete construction put together this exceptional 4 bedroom 5 bath home. Great location & fenced yard, property features maple hardwood floors, tile baths, cherry kitchen cabinets, unique bronze staircase, & much more. MLS#12-531 $299,500 Call Julio 570-239-6408 or Rhea 570-696-6677

KINGSTON MOTIVATED SELLER REDUCED!

KINGSTON

241 Pringle Street 4 Bedroom 1 3/4 baths with a modern kitchen, generous room sizes and ample closet space located in Kingston. Natural woodwork throughout. Finished attic could make a possible 5th bedroom. MLS 12-211 $59,900 Call Darren Snyder Marilyn K Snyder Real Estate 570-825-2468

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified! KINGSTON

Beautiful, updated and well-maintained 3 level townhome in very desirable Kingston location. Many upgrades include a spacious, custom bathroom with large closets, custom window treatments, built-in wall microwave in kitchen, new roof, and new garage door. Convenient location with plenty of storage, and a possible 3rd bedroom on 1st level. 12-175 $142,900 Call Mary Danelo 570-704-8000 Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 570-474-2340

Find homes for your kittens! Place an ad here! 570-829-7130

76 N. Dawes Ave. Don’t miss this great home with updated kitchen and granite counter. Private yard with enclosed sun room, garage and off street parking. 2 large bedrooms. PRICED TO SELL!! . For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-41 $109,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

KINGSTON MOTIVATED SELLER REDUCED!

76 N. Dawes Ave. Don’t miss this great home with updated kitchen and granite counters, private yard with enclosed sun room. Garage and off street parking. 2 large bedrooms. PRICED TO SELL! For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-41 $109,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

KINGSTON

LEHMAN TWP. /DALLAS

Very comfortable 2 bedroom home in move in condition. Great sun room, large yard, 1 car garage. Deeded lake access. $119,000 MLS # 11-2899

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

COLDWELL BANKER RUNDLE REAL ESTATE 570-474-2340, Ext. 11

MOUNTAIN TOP

1233 Market Street BY OWNER $134,900 3 bedrooms, 1 3/4 baths includes adjacent 50’ x 150’ lot 970-0650 jtdproperties.com 570-970-0650 MESHOPPEN Novak Road

(570) 288-6654 JENKINS TWP.

1182 Main St. Modern 3 bedroom, 2 full bath, single on a double lot. Huge family room, modern kitchen, 1st floor laundry room, additional room on 1st floor could be used as 4th bedroom. Landscaped yard, shed, off street parking For more info and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 12-1269 $129,900 Call Lu-Ann 570-602-9280

906 Homes for Sale

LAKE NUANGOLA 28 Lance Street

JENKINS TWP.

www.cindykingre.com

HARVEYS LAKE

906 Homes for Sale

Lovely, nearly completed, renovated Victorian farmhouse sits high on 7.81 acres featuring panoramic pastoral views, high ceilings, original woodwork, gutted, rewired, insulated & sheetrocked, newer roof, vinyl siding, kitchen and baths. Gas rights negotiable. Lots of potential with TLC. Elk Lake $119,900 MLS# 11-525. Call 570-696-2468

MOUNTAIN TOP Nestled on just under an acre just minutes from 81S this colonial offers 2194 sq. ft. of living area plus a finished basement. Enjoy summer your evenings on the wrap around porch or take a quick dip in the above ground pool with tier deck. The covered pavilion is ideal for picnics or gatherings And when the winter winds blow cuddle in front of the gas fireplace and enjoy a quiet night. MLS 11-2260 Priced to Sell, $179,900 Ann Marie Chopick 570-760-6769

(570) 288-6654 MOUNTAIN TOP NANITCOKE

LARKSVILLE

OPEN HOUSE Saturday, May 19 Sunday, May 20 2pm to 3pm 162 Dawes Ave Great Location, Huge rooms, Amazing kitchen with granite countertops, relax in the sunroom or the partial finished lower level, Hardwood under carpets, off street parking, plus a 1 year home warranty. Call or text Donna 570-947-3824 or Tony 570-855-2424 for more information or to schedule your showing. $169,999

LAFLIN 24 Fordham Road

Lovely cedar shingle sided home on large corner lot in a great development. 4 bedroom, 2 1/2 baths, 1st floor family room, finished lower level. Hardwood floors throughout, huge living room & family room. 1st floor laundry room & office, gas heat, nice deck, above ground pool, 2 car garage. 11-3497 $295,000 Call Nancy Answini 570-237-5999 JOSEPH P. GILROY REAL ESTATE 570-288-1444

LAFLIN

Lovely 3 bedroom 2 bath updated ranch home in a great neighborhood. Minutes from I-81 and PA turnpike. Featuring Formal Living room & Dining room, Family room, Modern Kitchen with all Stainless appliances & ample storage. Gorgeous Brazilian Cherry hardwood floors. Central air. 1st floor laundry, large cedar closet, full basement and attached 2 car garage. Beautiful 3 season sunroom, large private backyard with nice view and mature landscapes. Also, an extra-large shed that can be used as workshop / studio. Close to Mohegan Sun, Center Point and Geisinger Wyoming Valley. Only 1% local income tax! Priced to sell at $198,500. Call 570-814-8800

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

Charming & unique remodeled home with 5 bedrooms and spectacular views of Carey Ave Bridge and the river. New kitchen, roof and deck. Three bedrooms on first floor and two baths, 2 bedrooms on second floor. Three season porch, first floor laundry and office/den area. Must see. Out of flood zone. Reduced! $109,000 Call Nancy Answini Gilroy Real Estate 570-288-1444 LARKSVILLE

Looking to buy a home? Place an ad here and let the sellers know! 570-829-7130 MOUNTAIN TOP

215 Patriot Circle Townhouse. Very good condition. 3 bedroom, 1 ½ bath, living room with gas fireplace and hardwood floors. Kitchen offers new stainless steel appliances, tile floor, laundry area, dining room with built in corner cabinets. MLS 12-238 $119,500 James Banos Realtor Associate COLDWELL BANKER RUNDLE REAL ESTATE 570-991-1883 MOUNTAIN TOP

PRICE REDUCED! The price has now come down for your 4th of July view of the fireworks…and of course you can live in the house too…Architecturally built split level with beamed ceilings, living room with view, wood-burning fireplace and hardwood floors, dining room with view and hardwood floors, galley oak kitchen, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, family room, hobby room and green house. Twocar detached garage, one ace lot with raised gardens, grape vines, perennials, fruit trees, fenced! gardener’s paradise or we can provide the gardener at your expense…. 11-1079 $199,000 Maribeth Jones 696-6565 Prudential: 696-2600

LARKSVILLE

REDUCED 10 E. Second St. Property in nice neighborhood. Includes 4 room apartment over garage. MLS 12-253 $65,000 Charles J. Prohaska EXT 35 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-287-0770

Need a Roommate? Place an ad and find one here! 570-829-7130

130 CHURCH ROAD The feel of a true colonial home with double entry doors off the foyer into the living room and dining room. Spacious kitchen breakfast area, family room leading to a fenced rear yard. 3-season room with cathedral ceiling. Hardwood floors, fireplace, recently remodeled 2.5 bath and 2-car garage. Located on 3.77 acres, all the privacy of country living yet conveniently located. MLS#12-165 $183,900 Jill Jones 696-6550 Prudential: 696-2600

Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 3/4 bath, with hardwood floors under carpet & 2nd kitchen in lower level for entertaining. screened porch, landscaped yard, heated workshop & much more! $179,900 Call Christine Kutz 570-332-8832

Spacious 3 bedroom, 1 3/4 bath split level on a beautifully landscaped 1 acre lot. Large sunroom & recreation room with fireplace and wet bar. $205,000 Call Christine Kutz 570-332-8832

MOUNTAINTOP

29 Valley View Dr. INSTANT EQUITYModern kitchen and baths. Tile floors. Corner lot with deck overlooking spacious yard. Desirable neighborhood. Conveniently located. Turn-key, just back up the moving truck and start your new life. Easy to show. Call for your private tour today MLS#11-2500 Great Price $164,900 Julio Caprari: 570-592-3966

MOUNTAIN TOP

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

NANTICOKE

9 Anne Street Modern bi-level, 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath, tile kitchen and bath floor. New appliances, new gas hot water furnace and architectural roof. Family room, 3-season room and deck. 2 car garage, large yard. Move-in condition. Convenient location. Reduced to $189,000 OBO 570-823-4282 or 570-823-7540

MOUNTAINTOP

Move right into this beautiful 4 bedroom home in desirable Rockledge development. Many upgrades & features including modern kitchen with granite countertops, 22x20 great room, 2 fireplaces, new paint, carpet, gorgeous 2 tier deck & much more. $245,000. For more information or to schedule a viewing please Call 570-242-5381

5 bedroom Contemporary has a vaulted ceiling in living room with fireplace. Hardwood floors in dining & living rooms. 1st floor master bedroom with walk in closet. Lower level family room. Deck, garage, separate laundry. $257,500 MLS#12-170 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

NUANGOLA

Nuangola LAKEFRONT. Intriguing older home with hardwood floors, natural woodwork, newer roof (2005) & mostly newer windows. Private 3/4 acre setting. Beautiful lake frontage. $189,00 MLS #12-887 Call Mary Ann Desiderio 570-851-2999

Smith Hourigan Group Mountain Top 570-474-6307

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

PITTSTON

1/2 DOUBLE Great starter home in nice area. Close to schools and recreation. Large 3 season porch with cabinetry, great for entertaining. New plumbing, lots of light & huge walk up attic for storage or rec room. $35,000 Call CHRISTINE KUTZ 570-332-8832

NANTICOKE 23 W. Grand Street

Land for sale? Place an ad and SELL 570-829-7130

MOUNTAINTOP

Cheerful, bright, surprisingly roomy ranch in a great neighborhood. Hardwood floors, brick fireplace with gas insert. 1st floor laundry, porch, patio, & workshop in basement. Many updates. Huge floored attic with walk in cedar closet. $164,900 MLS#12-899 Call Mary Ann Desiderio 570-715-7733 Smith Hourigan Group Mountain Top

3 bedroom, 1 bath. Nice opportunity for a starter home or investment property. Original columns, moldings, and leaded glass windows are intact. Reduced $40,000 CALL CHRISTINE KUTZ 570-332-8832

NEWPORT TWP.

Totally Remodeled 3 Bedroom home on large lot on a wellkept street in movein condition! Home Includes 1 1/2 Modern Baths w/ stone countertops, tile floors, spacious kitchen with all new appliances & plenty of countertop space! New carpet throughout! MLS 11-3473 $57,900 Call Darren Snyder Marilyn K Snyder Real Estate 570-825-2468 NANTICOKE

15 Green St. Move right into this newly upgraded 2 story, 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath home with granite counter tops, stainless steel appliances and slate tile floors. Rest easy with a new roof overhead as well as new energy efficient furnace, private lot. Take a tour of this home before it is gone! For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. Priced to sell at $119,900 MLS 12-916 Call Lu-Ann 570-620-9280

PITTSTON

175 Oak Street New furnace, 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, 1st floor laundry room, 3 season porch, fenced yard and off street parking. MLS#12-721 $84,900 Call Patti 570-328-1752 Liberty Realty & Appraisal Services LLC

PITTSTON 415 Jones Street Adorable home with charm & character. 4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, eat-in kitchen, formal dining room, family room with gas fireplace. 3 season room, fenced in yard with rear deck & shed. $119,000 MLS#12-498 Michael Nocera 570-357-4300

Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-5412

38 Johnson St. Looking for a home with 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, modern kitchen, hardwood floors? Also features gas fireplace, new gas furnace, newer windows and roof, deck, fenced in yard. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-328 $129,900 Call Lu-Ann 570-602-9280 ATLAS REALTY, INC. 570-829-6200


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KINGSTON

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 1:00-3:00 PM

BEAR CREEK

Lot 1 Woodberry Dr., Mountaintop

BEAR CREEK Spacious Cape Cod with large rooms on almost 4 acres. Newer roof, gutters and deck. MLS# 11-4042 DAVE 585-0615 or KIM 585-0606 $199,900

KINGSTON

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MOUNTAINTOP Older home in very nice condition/very nice & private rear yard! Garage is 2 car tandem. MLS# 12-1754 JAMES 715-9323 $129,900

Dir: 309S. to Right on S Main, Right on Nuangola, RIght on Fairwood Blvd. to end. Straight into Woodberry Manor. Right on Woodberry Dr.

10 Dakota Drive

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OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 1:30-2:30PM 30 -2: 0 3 1:

SHAVERTOWN

HARVEYS LAKE

DALLAS Enjoy carefree living in the villas at Masonic Village. Located at Irem Temple Country Club, this entrance fee community offers interior & exterior home maintenance. Call for details on this unique community. MLS# 12-880 RHEA 696-6677 $256,000 Dir: 309N to L on Country Club Road - L onto Wedgewood Way. Follow into Masonic Village.

SHAVERTOWN This inviting 5 bedroom, 5 bath Farm home has been completely renovated with great new open floor plan and stunning modern kitchen and baths. Beautiful wide plank floors, stone fireplaces and charming built-ins remain. The new large deck and pool are a wonderful addition to the serene 39+ acre setting, capturing beautiful mountain and field views. Just minutes from Hillside Farm & Golf Community. MLS #12-279 RHEA 696-6677 $650,000

HARVEY’S LAKE 105’ Lakefront w/4acre lot. Modern, 3BR brick ranch all HW; A/C; great lake views; 2+ heated garage; gas heat; boathouse & dock. MLS# 12-915 RAE 714-9234 $595,000

BEAR CREEK TWP.

TUNKHANNOCK

DALLAS

JENKINS TWP.

BEAR CREEK TWP. Custom built 10 year old nestled on 2 private acres. Circular drive, large kitchen, office, custom built wine cellar. MLS #12-1751 GERI 696-0888 $299,900

MOUNTAIN TOP

4 Noble Lane

PM

DALLAS DAKOTA WOODS - Carefree Condo -Bright & spacious w/3 BR’s, 1st flr master, study/library, kit w/granite & upscale app’ls, 2 car gar. MLS#11-3208 RHEA 696-6677 $379,000 Dir: Rt 309N to R into Dakota Woods

Preview this 4BR, 3bath 2 story model w/ lots of HW & tile. Granite counters in kit, MSTR Suite w/2 walk-in closets & tiled bath w/ dbl vanities, shower & whirlpool. Home/lot packages available. TERRY D. 715-9317

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KINGSTON A must see! Steel & concrete construction put together this exceptional 4BR, 5 bath home. Along w/the great location & fenced yard, this property features maple HW flrs - cherry kitchen cabinets unique bronze staircase – tile baths & SO MUCH MORE! MLS# 12-531 JULIO 239-6408 $299,500

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 1-2:30PM

I

TUNKHANNOCK Exquisite home with spacious grand room, charming features, crown molding, Brazilian cherry hardwood flooring throughout main level, custom built-ins include cast iron railing, 2fireplaces, BlueStone mantel, marble foyer, granite wet bar with inlaid Travertine stone, bright sunroom, convenient location in desirable sub-division, huge yard, keyless entry, new whole house water purification system. MLS #12-1448 RENEE 585-0600 $329,900

DALLAS 1Stunning craftsman-style home cradled on 11+ acres complete w/pond, stream & rolling meadows in pristine condition. Great room w/stone FP & warm wood walls is one of the focal points of this home. Offers modern kitchen, formal DR & FR. Wraparound porch overlooks property, recently built 3-car garage w/ guest quarters above, invisible dog fence, and HOME WARRANTY on property. MLS# 11-1741 BARBARA 696-0883 $499,000

JENKINS TWP. Absolute Masterpiece! This dream home graciously combines great living & excellent entertaining. A circular drive greets you to a spectacular entrance suited with high ceilings & marble floors. Enjoy entertaining in the dining room, piano room or grand living. A 1st floor master suit, exercise room, office, and kitchen are all luxurious but perfectly suited for everyday life. MLS# 12-448 CHRISTIAN 947-3292 $770,000

MOUNTAIN TOP Spectacular 7 BR, 5 bath home on 40 acres w/tennis courts, inground pool, barn, pond & trails galore! Very private - right in the middle of Mountaintop. Heat is combination gas & radiant w/7 zones. (2nd & 4th baths on 1st floor) MLS# 12-448 SHARON 970-1106 $1,299,000

OPEN HOUSES SUNDAY, MAY 20

SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER. Century21SHGroup.com

(570) 696-1195

Hanover Twp. Hunlock Creek Hunlock Creek Hanover Twp. Hanover Twp. Nanticoke Hanover Twp. Ashley

May 20th HANOVER/ASHLEY/NANTICOKE & SURROUNDS Sunday 3 Dexter St./CANCELLED 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty 24 Meadow Lane 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 15 Summit St. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 57 Countrywood Dr. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group Rear 225 Boland Ave. 2-3:30PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 25 Shea St. 1-3PM Jane Kopp 35 Somerset Dr. 12:30-2PM Prudential Poggi & Jones 10 Frederick St. 1:30-3:30PM Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate

Wilkes-Barre Plains Wilkes-Barre Wilkes-Barre Wilkes-Barre Bear Creek Wilkes-Barre Wilkes-Barre Plains Wilkes-Barre Twp. Wilkes-Barre Wilkes-Barre Wilkes-Barre Plains Plains

WILKES-BARRE & SURROUNDS Sunday 46 Bradford St. 11AM-1PM Atlas Realty 63 Clarks Lane 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty 77 Schuler St. 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty 115 Noble Lane 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty 134 W. River St. 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman 1000 Laurel Run Rd. 2-3:30PM Lewith & Freeman 40 Wyndwood Dr. 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman 590-592 N. Main St. 2-4PM Rothstein Realtors 29 Jay Dr. 11AM-12:30PM Prudential Poggi & Jones 14 Anastasia Court 1-3PM Prudential Poggi & Jones 48 Jones St. 12-4PM Prudential Poggi & Jones 237 Matson Ave. 12-2PM Realty World Rubbico Real Estate 246 High St. 1-3PM TradeMark Realty Group 93 New St. 12-2PM Coldwell Banker Gerald L. Busch 7 Helen St. 2:15-4PM Coldwell Banker Gerald L. Busch

West Wyoming Duryea

PITTSTON/NORTH & SURROUNDS Sunday 1167 Shoemaker Ave. 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty 619 Foote Ave. 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty

Hunlock Creek $289,900 I’m Sue Barre and I sell houses, and I can SELL YOURS! (570) 696-5417

Atlas Realty Atlas Realty Lewith & Freeman Lewith & Freeman Lewith & Freeman Lewith & Freeman Lewith & Freeman Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group Classic Properties Classic Properties Prudential Poggi & Jones Prudential Poggi & Jones Century 21 Signature Properties Century 21 Signature Properties Realty World Rubbico Real Estate TradeMark Realty Group Stauffer Pointe Dev. Corp.

Forty Fort Kingston Edwardsville Forty Fort Edwardsville Swoyersville Kingston Kingston Luzerne

KINGSTON/WEST SIDE & SURROUNDS Sunday 56 Crisman St. 11AM-1PM Lewith & Freeman 72 N. Loveland Ave. 1-2PM Lewith & Freeman 76 Zerby Ave. 12-1:30PM Lewith & Freeman 27 Rose St. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group Russell St. 1-3PM Gilroy Real Estate 29 Bohac St. 1-2:30PM Century 21 Signature Properties 168 Lathrop St. 1:30-3:30PM Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 162 Dawes Ave. 2-3PM TradeMark Realty Group Waypoint Townhomes 1-3PM ERA One Source Realty

Mountaintop Mountaintop

MOUNTAINTOP & SURROUNDS Sunday 830 Lakeview Dr. 1:30-3PM Lewith & Freeman Lot 1 Woodberry Dr. 1-3PM Lewith & Freeman

Mountaintop Mountaintop Mountaintop Mountaintop Mountaintop Mountaintop

119 Blue Elder Dr. 46 Farmhouse Rd. 453 S. Mountain Blvd. 613 Laurel Dr. 43 Walden Dr. 139 Sandwedge Dr.

Dallas Dallas Dallas Tunkhannock Shavertown Dallas Dallas Shavertown Dallas Dallas Dallas Dallas Shavertown Harveys Lake Dallas

BACK MOUNTAIN & SURROUNDS Sunday 4 Noble Lane 1:30-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman 36 Marina Dr. 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman 220 Hillside 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman 16 Zarychta Rd. 4-5PM Lewith & Freeman 158 E. Center St. 12-1PM Lewith & Freeman 1341 Mountain View 2-4PM Lewith & Freeman 211 Hillside 12-1:30PM Lewith & Freeman Lot #12 Windy Dr. 2-3:30PM Lewith & Freeman 10 Dakota Dr. 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman 9 Dakota Dr. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 31 Willow Way 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 2430 Lower Demunds Rd. 1-4PM Classic Properties 7 Manor Dr. 12-1:30PM Century 21 Signature Properties 3145 Pole 283, Lakeside Dr. 12-2PM JJ Mantione Appraisal & Realty Group 23 Norton Ave. 1-3PM Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate

White Haven Drums Lattimer

1066 Woodhaven Dr. 61 Acer Lane 208 Columbus Ave.

STYLE

WWW.LEWITH-FREEMAN.COM

HAZLETON & SURROUNDS Sunday 1-3PM Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 2-3:30PM TradeMark Realty Group 1-3PM TradeMark Realty Group

VALUE

$149,900 OPEN HOUSES TODAY

72 N. Loveland Ave., Kingston

(570) 474-9801 OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 13PM

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 13PM

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NE

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 12:30PM

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NE

10 Seminary Place

14 General Pulaski St.

4BR Cape Cod, wood floors, central A/C, nice yard, garage, 200 amp electric

New Construction! upgraded materials; Anderson Windows, Douglas Fir timber, so much more!

DIR: South on Rte 315, Dupont to L on Bear Creek Rd to L on Commerce Rd(Grimms Ind Park), to R on Freeport Rd (becomes Langan Rd) House on L

DIR: Wyoming Ave to Seminary Place. Next to Wyoming Seminary school.

George Pugh 570.906.7446

Jennifer Winn 570.760.1622

DIR: Rte 309S to R on S. Main Rd to R on Nuangola Rd. Follow .5 miles to R on Aleksander into Polonia Estates then R on General Pulaski

FORTY FORT

Sprawling ranch on 12 acres, modern interior, huge pool, barn

$589,000 MLS#12-1765

$99,900 MLS#12-1618

MOUNTAINTOP

Welcome Amie Sheikh

Sunita Arora, Owner/Broker of ERA One Source Realty, is proud to welcome Amie Sheikh to her Mountain Top office. Amie is originally from Drums. She became a licensed REALTOR in 2005. where she worked as an agent in the fast paced Fairfax, VA market until 2011. She has vast experience with distressed properties and earned CDPE (Certified Distressed Property Expert), SFR (Short Sale and Foreclosure Resource), ABR (Accredited Buyers rep) designations to competently represent her clients. She also welcomes traditional transactions with buyers and sellers. Amie will be working from our Mountain Top office and will also have access to the other 7 ERA One Source Realty offices throughout the NEPA region. To contact her call 703-593-8206 or visit ERA1. com / Company Roster

MOUNTAIN TOP $299,000 MLS#12-163

Robert Hourigan 570.417.2320

4BR, 2 story on 24 acres w/granite kitchen, large FR, DR, large LR, C/A, large barn, 2 decks & security system. Very nice! MLS#12-1483 $459,000

$319,900 MLS#11-3974

SUGARLOAF

EILEEN R. MELONE

$239,900 MLS#11-3966

MOUNTAINTOP

Ranch on corner lot, eat-in kitchen, hardwood floors, in-ground pool, finished LL

$149,900 MLS#12-389

LAFLIN

Updated ranch, 4BR, French doors to large deck, finished LL with a Sauna & fireplace

$149,500 MLS#11-3557

EVERY NEW HOME CONTRACT INCLUDES HEATING AND COOLING BILLS FOR

10 YEARS

LOT PRICES STARTING AT $40,000 $40 000 LOTS READY FOR IMMEDIATE CONSTRUCTION For Specifics Call Connie Yanoshak 829-0184

If you are buying or selling anywhere in the county, I can help you! Only if you call! Direct Line - Jim (570) 715-9323

DRUMS

Remodeled 4BR Cape Cod on ½ acre, master bath, fireplace, 1st floor master

$99,900 MLS#11-4335

PLAINS

Double block, 3 BR and 2BR units, garage, large eat-in kitchen, nice sized back yard.

$94,000 MLS#11-2398

Mountaintop (570) 403-3000

ONE SOURCE REALTY

Clarks Summit Peckville Moscow Lake Ariel

DURYEA

Adorable, affordable remodeled ranch. Finished LL, new paint in and out. Move right in!

$83,900 MLS#11-1457

ERA1.com Toll Free 877-587-SELL

(570) 587-9999 (570) 489-8080 (570) 842-2300 (570) 698-0700

Mt Top Scranton Stroudsburg Lehighton

EDWARDSVILLE

3BR doll house in nice section of town. Wood floors, formal dining room, eat-in kitchen

$59,900 MLS#12-706

(570) 403-3000 (570) 343-9999 (570) 424-0404 (610) 377-6066

WILKESBARRE

6BR, modern baths & eat-in kitchen, finished attic, large yard, extra lot

$59,000 MLS#12-247

Sunita Arora Broker/Owner

*Conditions and limitations apply; including but not limited to: seller and house must meet specific qualifications, and purchase price will be determined solely by ERA Franchise Systems LLC, C b based ased d upo upon a d discount isc of the home’s appraised value value. Additionally, a second home must be purchased through a broker designated by ERA Franchise Systems LLC. ©2008 ERA Franchise Systems LLC. All Rights Reserved. ERA® and Always There For You® are registered trademarks licensed to ERA Franchise Systems LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.

$109,900

Dir: Carverton Rd. to R on Holly, L on Staub, R on Elm Terrace, home on L

$259,900

Dir: Rt 92N, L on 292 (near Emanon Golf Course), R at Keelersburg Road sign,go 3 miles approx. L on Zarychta, home on L

Convenient to Wilkes-Barre with spectacular views and 1 to 4.5 acre parcels. 16 - Estate sized sites on a private rolling hillside between Hillside Road and Huntsville Reservoir, Shavertown. Public Sewer - Natural Gas Another Quality Halbing – Amato Development

a

Expert Construction with attention to every detail by Summit Pointe Builders – Your plan or ours!

Lewith & Freeman Real Estate

Contact: Kevin Smith (570) 696-1195 Kevin.Smith@ Kevin.Smith@Century21.com

Ready for custom build by Summit Pointe Builders

Smith Hourigan Group

Across From Agway

(570) 675-4400

www.gordonlong.com

If you like lik privacy i you’ll ’ll relish li h thi this attractive 3br, 1.5 bth, 2,200 sq. ft. split level home just 15 minutes from downtown. Enjoy spacious rms, ample closets & country sized kitchen. MLS#12-1846 Offered @ $169,000

Have you always dreamed of owning a lakefront home? Don’t miss the opportunity to own this stunning 3,000 sq.ft. 3 bedroom 3 bath home w/100’ lakefront w/dock. Offers attractive Florida room w/ vaulted ceiling overlooking the lake, plus formal LR w/FP, DR, FR w/FP, den & 2-car garage. Power boat for waterskiing & jetskiing permitted. MLS#12-959 $349,900

Homesites From $155,900

3138 Memorial Hwy., Dallas

Shickshinny h kh Lake k Sweet Valley

Accredited Buyer Representative Certified Residential Broker, E-Pro Graduate Realtors Institute Seniors Real Estate Specialist

garage & electric fence, new porch, roof.

Like new 3 BR, 3.5 bath, 2 story on 4.17 acres, LR & DR, eat-in kitchen w/island & appliances, 1st floor FR w/FP, MBR suite, AC, 2 garages, Tunkhannock Schools!

We’re W ’ moving i t and this l i d development llots d thi hi exclusive l t will sell out soon to a fortunate few!

Franklin Twp

ESTATES

DR & kit. w/all appliances, rec. room, sunroom, deck,

Exclusive Jackson Township Location Just Off Hillside Road

New Listing

COUNTRYWOOD

0

4:

With Rae, Service = Sales

A ociate Brokerr Ass Associate

EILEEN MELONE, Broker 821-7022

NEPA’s Leader in Energy Efficient Construction Alternative Energy Solutions Additional Warranty and Maintenance Services available

OPEN HOUSE CANCELLED

69 N. MEMORIAL HIGHWAY, SHAVERTOWN, PA 18708

Visit us on the web at: www.NEPAHOMESETC.com OR www.realtor.com/wilkes-barre

Rental / Lease Options Available Convenient Location / Hanover Township / Close to Hanover Industrial Park

Pretty 4 BR bi-level! LR, DR, 3 BRs, HW, finished lower level. FR w/FP, 3 full baths, 2 car garage. 2120 SF. MLS#11-2282 $174,900

(570) 696-3801 • (570) 696-0883 Direct metcalf@epix.net Barbara B bara F. Metcalf Bar Metc t alf

Real Estate 821-7022

Level Building Lots .40 – 1.50 Acres All Underground / Public Utilities Gas, Sewer, Water, Phone, Electric, Cable, Street Lighting, Sidewalks

Jim Graham Associate Broker

PLYMOUTH

MULTIFAMILY

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1:

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5 0-

New 4BR 2-Story w/MBR on 1st floor! Granite kit w/ss appliances, DR w/hdwd, lg FR w/FP, public sewer, all on 2.8 acre lot! MLS#12-1233 $319,900

3BR, 2BA completely renovated eat-in kitchen, new appliances, new master suite, OSP

$120,000 MLS#12-1282

0

PENDING

DRUMS

Susan Parrick Dir., Sales/Marketing

Petite Farmette, 3BR split-level, wood stove, new roof, attached garage + 3 car w/ workshop

16 Zarychta Road, Tunkhannock

:0

2 0-

porch, LL+attic ready to be finished. $149,900 Dir: Wyoming Ave to Hoyt St. R on N Loveland, Home on R

CALL: 877-442-8439 DURYEA

240 Elm Terrace, Trucksville

Lovely 3 BR, 1.1 bath, 2 story, L& DR, modern eat-in Modern 3 BR Cape, 1st floor BR & bath, lovely HW, LR, kitchen w/all appliances, gas heat & AC, garage, screened

LOCATION

Blueberry Hills! Granite kitchen, master suite, family room with gas fireplace, views

rae@lewith-freeman.com NEW LISTING

Motivated Seller! Terrific property! 2 homes!!! Modern 3BR, 1.1 bath w/new kitchen; 20x19 3rd floor BR w/skylights; Many, many upgrades; nice yard, parking PLUS: 1BR, 1 bath guesthouse (or rental) 1 deck + carport. Beach membership! Don’t miss this one!!

EXCLUSIVE, RESIDENTIAL LOCATION - Minutes to NE EXT. and I-81 OFF SR-315

Directions: From Williams St., Pittston turn onto Fulton St. at 4-way cross Butler St. and go straight to Grandview Dr.

Rae Dziak 714-9234

HARVEYS LAKE 5 BAIRD STREET

Starting at $219,000.

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Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group Prudential Poggi & Jones Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate TradeMark Realty Group

Discover What 150 Agents Already Have... Contact Sunita for a Confidential Interview

542 Langan Rd.

Luxury Townhomes 1,340-2,300 sq. ft. Three with First-Floor Master Suite!

Stauffer Pointe is a Planned Condominium Community

1-3PM 1-3PM 12-1:30PM 1:30-3:30PM 1:30-3:30PM 1:30-3PM

(570) 288-9371

PITTSTON

OPEN HOUSE TODAY 1-3PM

2:30-4PM 12-1:30PM 12-1:30PM 2-3:30PM 2-3:30PM 2-4PM 1-2:30PM 1-3PM 12-2PM 3-5PM 1-2:30PM 1-3PM 12-1:30PM 12-1:30PM 1-3PM 1:30-3PM 1-3PM

We Will Hand YOU the Keys to a Rewarding Real Estate Career

There’s room to breathe on your 2.5 acres in this small 7 house development in the country! 8 years young 3BR, 2.5 Bath Colonial. Family room could be a 1st first floor master (currently used as office space). Modern oak Kit., formal DR, and 1st Floor Laundry. 3BRs upstairs with Master BA and WIC. Long winding driveway, huge flat backyard and inviting front porch. Directions: 415 Dallas to 118. Bear L towards Sweet Valley (formerly Sheldon’s Diner) travel approx. 5 miles, then R on Grassy Pond Road. L into Meadow Lane. House at end of Cul de Sac.

www.staufferpointe.com

238 S. Main St. 413 Liberty St. 74 Cranberry Terrace 57 Dewitt St. 4 Donny Dr. 36 Kipling Dr. 305 Union St. 17 E. Seventh St. 11 W. Sunrise Dr. 35 Center St. 106 E. Oak St. 127 Howard St. 167 Abby Rd. 405 Sutton Creek Rd. 100 Maple Lane 608 Wyoming Ave. Stauffer Pointe Townhomes

Smith Hourigan Group

Open House Today • 1:00-3:00PM

24 Meadow Lane

Pittston Dupont Duryea Pittston Old Forge Moosic Taylor Wyoming Pittston Hughestown Pittston Old Forge Falls Exeter Twp. Pittston Wyoming Pittston Twp.

Plenty of TLC is reflected in this attractive 3 BR, 1 & 1/2 BTH 2-story home cradled on 1 acre. Sun-filled Florida room off modern kitchen w/breakfast room. Offers formal living room & dining room, one-car garage + detached 24’ x 24’ heated workshop. MLS#12-1190 $134,900

EW G N TIN S LI

10 FA AC RM RE

BLOOMINGDALE ROSS TOWNSHIP 10 Acre Farm field with Country Views from this Immaculate Ranch Home, Ultra Modern Kitchen, Oversized Garage Listing #12-1067 All for $274,900 Call Cherub for details 570-762-4641


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 906 Homes for Sale

PITTSTON

38 Johnson St. Looking for a home with 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, modern kitchen, hardwood floors? Also features gas fireplace, new gas furnace, newer windows and roof, deck, fenced in yard. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-328 $129,900 Call Lu-Ann 570-602-9280

LivingInQuailHill.com

New Homes From $275,000$595,000 570-474-5574

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 PAGE 24G

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

PITTSTON REDUCED!

PLAINS

95 William St. 1/2 double home with more square footage than most single family homes. 4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, ultra modern kitchen and remodeled baths. Super clean. For more information and photos visit www.atlas realtyinc. com MLS 11-2120 $54,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

P E N D I N G

PITTSTON TWP. REDUCED

1610 Westminster Road. DRASTIC PRICE REDUCTION Paradise found! Your own personal retreat, small pond in front of yard, private setting only minutes from everything. Log cabin chalet with 3 bedrooms, loft, stone fireplace, hardwood floors. Detached garage with bonus room. Lots to see. Watch the snow fall in your own “cabin in the woods.” For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 11-319 $279,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

PLAINS

PITTSTON

Prime Location This three bedroom, 2.5 bath has many upgrades, including new hardwood floors in living & dining rooms, a big Trex deck, new fencing in back yard & an oversized driveway leading to a 2 car garage. MLS# 11-3931 $319,000

RUBBICO REAL ESTATE 570-826-1600

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

PITTSTON REDUCED

P E N D I N G

168 Mill St. Large 3 bedroom home with 2 full baths. 7 rooms on nice lot with above ground pool. 1 car garage. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3894 $79,000 Tom Salvaggio 570-262-7716

PITTSTON REDUCED

238 S. Main St. Ten room home with 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car garage, great driveway, central air, large yard. A must see home! For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-477 $129,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

PITTSTON REDUCED

P E N D I N G

31 Tedrick St. Very nice 3 bedroom with 1 bath. This house was loved and you can tell. Come see for yourself, super clean home with nice curb appeal. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3544 Reduced to $76,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

Purebred Animals? Sell them here with a classified ad! 570-829-7130

10 Norman St. Brick 2 story home with 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, large family room with fireplace. Lower level rec room, large driveway for plenty of parking. Just off the by-pass with easy access to all major highways. For more info and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com. MLS 11-2887 $154,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

PITTSTON TWP. REDUCED

38 Frothingham St. Four square home with loads of potential and needs updating but is priced to reflect its condition. Nice neighborhood. Check it out. For more info and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.co m MLS 11-3403 $54,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

P E N D I N G

PITTSTON

70 Warner Street 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, freshly painted and ready to move in, nice deck and yard, with alley access in rear. Low taxes. Great starter home! Asking $72,000. Call 570-822-5508 or 570-822-8708

PLAINS

Plenty of space for everyone in this 4/5 bedroom 2 story. Heated 4 season sunroom; enjoy all year! Large family room opens to the sunroom, spacious u-shaped kitchen offers roomy breakfast area. Formal living and dining room. Second floor has 4 bedrooms and 2 full baths. 2car garage. Above ground pool/deck. Unfinished basement offers more room for expansion. Large mostly level private yard. MLS# 12-1664 $274,500 Call Linda (570) 956-0584

Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 570-474-2340

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

PLAINS REDUCED

Great Investment just waiting for a new owner. Many updates In both units. Building has extra unused space in attic and basement that be be finished with many options. Out of flood zone, huge lot and off street parking. MLS 12-1586 $124,900 Call/text Donna 570-947-3824 or Tony 570-855-2424

PITTSTON

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

PLAINS TWP

SHAVERTOWN

OAKWOOD PARK Lovely 3 bedroom town home with great access to major highway & business districts. Entertain in the finished basement. MLS 11-4571 $104,999 Call Pat Guesto 570-793-4055 CENTURY 21 SIGNATURE PROPERTIES 570-675-5100

Wonderful home in convenient location features spacious formal rooms, beautiful hardwood floors, & grand stone fireplaces. Kitchen opens to bright sunroom/ breakfast area. 4 large bedrooms, office & 2 baths on 2nd floor. Charming wrap around porch offers views of large property with mature oak and pines. MLS#11-528 $499,000 Call Rhea 570-696-6677

PLYMOUTH

Spacious 1791 sq. ft. 1/2 double with wrap around porch, shed & garage. Semi modern kitchen & bath. 3 bedrooms with gas heat and plenty of storage. $24,900. Possible rent to own Ann Marie Chopick 570-760-6769

570-288-6654

PRINGLE

2 story, 3 bedrooms home. New bath, new furnace and new central air, all appliances included. Hardwood floors downstairs, carpet upstairs. Great yard. Out of the flood zone. Nice neighborhood, By appointment only. Call (570)287-1029

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified! SHAVERTOWN

Well maintained raised ranch in Midway Manor. Good size level yard with shed. Large sunroom / laundry addition. Lower level family room with wood stove. $149,900 Call Christine Kutz 570-332-8832

SHICKSHINNY

119 West Union Street Out of flood zone! Large, 2 story frame with 2, three bedroom apartments. Off street parking, Large, dry basement, oil heat, large front porch and yard, also 4 room “rented” cottage, with garage in the rear of the same property. $85,000. Great home and/or rental. Call 570-542-4489

Own for less than you rent. Quaint, 2 bedroom home, nestled in private area. 1 full bath with jacuzzi bathtub, eatin kitchen, living room, dining room, front & side covered porches. Fenced in yard with patio area, and private driveway. A must see! Asking $64,900 Call 570-371-1196 Or 570-335-6081

SHAVERTOWN

63 Clarks Lane 3 story Townhome with 2 bedrooms, 3 baths, plenty of storage with 2 car built in garage. Modern kitchen and baths, large room sizes and deck. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 11-4567 $139,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

SHAVERTOWN 122 Manor

187 Shoemaker St. Adorable 3 bedroom, 1 bath, Cape Cod. Completely remodeled inside and out. Hardwood floors throughout, duct work in place for central air installation. Back yard deck for summer cook outs and much, much more. Not a drive by! MLS 12-1595 $142,500 Jay A. Crossin EXT. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

4 Oliver Road Located in the back part of Oliver Road in a very private part of North Lake in Sweet Valley. Yearning to be restored, lake front cape cod in a very tranquil setting was formerly used as a summer home. MLS 11-2113 $93,500 Jay Crossin CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770 ext. 23

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130! SWOYERSVILLE

PLAINS TWP

PLAINS

20 NITTANY LANE Vinyl sided 3 level townhouse with central air & vacuum, 4 baths, 3 bedrooms, 2 car garage. Deck & patio. A Must See! $189,900 century21shgroup. com MLS 12-927 Call Florence 570-715-7737

Move right in to this comfortable, well maintained home. Newer roof and beautiful wood floor. Make this home yours in the New Year! MLS# 11-4538 $165,000 Jolyn Bartoli

Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-5425

Smith Hourigan Group 570-474-6307 137 Hollywood Ave. Beautiful 2 bedroom Townhouse in the River Ridge neighborhood. Modern kitchen/dining area with tile flooring, laundry area on main floor. Living room with gas fireplace and French doors leading to back deck. MLS 12-1109 $164,900 Jay A. Crossin Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

Purebred Animals? Sell them here with a classified ad! 570-829-7130

Wanna make your car go fast? Place an ad in Classified! 570-829-7130.

129 Townsend St. Wonderful home in great neighborhood. Relax in the pool after a hard day of work. Property offers the opportunity to have your own Beauty Shop (equipment negotiable), or expand your living space. Buyer responsible for confirming zoning for business. All measurements approximate. MLS# 12-833 $200,000 Jolyn Bartoli

570-696-5425

52 Barber Street Beautifully remodeled 3 bedroom, 1 bath home in the heart of the town. With new carpets, paint, windows, doors and a modern kitchen and bath. Sale includes all appliances: refrigerator, stove, dishwasher, washer and dryer. Nice yard and superb neighborhood. Priced to sell at $89,900 or $433.00 per month (bank rate; 30 years, 4.25%, 20% down). Owner also willing to finance 100% of transaction with a qualified cosigner. Call Bob at 570-654-1490

SWOYERSVILLE

REDUCED!!! 78 Maltby Ave. Wonderful family home in a great neighborhood. A large master suite and family room addition make this home a must see! There is an inground pool and attached in-law suite. MLS 11-4572 $210,000 Call Kelly Connolly-Cuba EXT. 37 Crossin Real Estate 570-288-0770 TAYLOR

Featured on WNEP’s Home & Backyard. Move right into this 3 bedroom, 2 bath immaculate home with custom maple eat in kitchen, stainless steel appliances, hardwood floors, Jacuzzi tub, 2 fireplaces, abundance of storage leading outside to a private sanctuary with deck/pergola & Koi pond. Off street parking. MUST SEE. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-733 $189,900 Call Keri 570-885-5082

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

To place an ad call 829-7130

THORNHURST

WILKES-BARRE TOWNSHIP

Live on the Lehigh. Totally remodeled home with a river view from every room. Sit in your recliner & watch Nature stroll by. Located just a few miles from all outdoor activities that make the Poconos great, close to I-81 & Turnpike. Easy care finishes , neutral decor & immaculate condition make this house the perfect choice for anyone. MLS# 12-1372 $169,900

TRUCKSVILLE 130 Harris Hill Rd

For Sale or Lease Remodeled doublewide mobile home on solid foundation. Featuring 3 bedrooms, new kitchen, new carpet, fresh paint & nice yard with deck. Only $49,000. Call 570-466-6334

Looking to buy a home? Place an ad here and let the sellers know! 570-829-7130

5 room, 3 bedroom, 3 bath, 1-year young town home. 1st floor master bedroom with master bath and walk-in closet. 2 more very large (approx. 18 x 12) bedrooms on the 2nd floor with walkin closets. Kitchen has KraftMaid Cabinets, stainless steel stove, microwave and dishwasher, eat-in area, tile floor and a deck off of the kitchen. The large living room, 20x14 has hardwood floors, baths and 1st floor laundry room has tile floors, There is a 18” sound and fire protection separating each unit. The front of the town home is Hardi Plank siding and stone, the 1st floor is ground level and the lower level is easily finishable with patio doors leading to a concrete patio. 12-1410 $215,000 Karen Altavilla 283-9100 x28 Prudential: 696-2600

W. NANTICOKE

TRUCKSVILLE

221 Maple St. Beautiful 4 bedroom Back Mtn. home with natural woodwork, pocketdoors, ceiling fans & great light. Sit on 1 or 2 screened rear porches and enjoy awesome views or sit on your front porch in this great neighborhood! Don’t forget the above ground pool with deck. MLS 12-1699 $154,900 John Shelley 570-702-4162 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770 TRUCKSVILLE

NEW LISTING! Dallas School District. Park like setting with stream on this .8 acre lot and house. Large room sizes, first and lower level family rooms, three bedrooms, first floor laundry, updated roof, new deck, above-ground pool. 1-car detached garage, Bar in lower level with exercise room. MLS# 12-1263 $137,500 Maribeth Jones 696-6565 Prudential: 696-2600

TUNKHANNOCK

2000+ sq ft of living space on gorgeous 1acre lot. 4 bedrooms, family room, covered deck, aboveground pool, pond, fruit trees and more. $185,000. Shari Philmeck ERA Brady Associates 570-836-3848 TUNKHANNOCK

71 George Ave. Nice house with lots of potential. Priced right. Great for handy young couple. Close to just about everything. Out of flood zone. MLS 12-195 $76,000 Call Roger Nenni EXT 32 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770 W. PITTSTON

Opportunity knocking. Stately 2 story, river front home located on Susquehanna Ave. New heat, new electrical, 1st floor studded, 2nd floor good condition. $149,900 Call Donna Mantione 570-613-9080

G IN D N E P

WEST NANTICOKE

TILBURY TERRACE Tilbury Avenue Superb 3 bedroom single. Hardwood floors, fireplace, garage. Well maintained. Great Neighborhood. Affordable at $209,500. Towne & Country Real Estate Co. 570-735-8932 570-542-5708

WEST PITTSTON

225-227 Boston Ave Double block. Wyoming Area schools. Out of flood zone. 1 side rented to long term tenant at $525 /month. Other side remodeled - move in or rent at $650/month. 3 bedrooms each side, gas furnaces, sunrooms, large yard. $149,000. Call 570-357-0042

Motorcycle for sale? Let them see it here in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130 944

1061 Fairway Lane Low maintenance, single story ranch home located in a private golf course community in the Poconos for weekend or year round enjoyment. Modern kit with breakfast bar, formal living room and dinning room. Family room with gas Fireplace. Walk-up master bedroom with bonus room ideal for an office. New front and rear decks in a private setting within 30 minutes to W-B or Scranton. MLS 12-453 $105,000 Call Darren Snyder Marilyn K Snyder Real Estate 570-825-2468

Find A New Friend In The Times Leader Classified

906 Homes for Sale

RUBBICO REAL ESTATE Call (570)8261600

THORNHURST Nice 3 bedroom unit in back and a nice studio apt up front. Great investment opportunity. Large yard and off street parking plus out of the flood zone. MLS 12-1587 $89,900 Call/text Donna 570-947-3824 or Tony 570-855-2424

906 Homes for Sale

SWOYERSVILLE

OPEN HOUSE Sunday 12pm-5pm

SWEET VALLEY REDUCED!

12 Windy Drive OPEN HOUSE MAY 20TH 2-3:30PM New construction in the exclusive Slocum Estates. Stucco exterior. All the finest appointments: office or 5th bedroom, hardwood floors, crown moldings, 9' ceilings 1st & 2nd floor. Buy now select cabinetry & flooring. MLS #11-1987 $525,000 Call Geri 570-696-0888

SWOYERSVILLE

SHAVERTOWN

SUGAR NOTCH 1195 Sutton Road Attractive, wellmaintained saltbox on 2 private acres boasts fireplaces in living room, family room & master bedroom. Formal dining room. Large Florida room with skylights & wet bar. Oak kitchen opens to family room. 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths. Finished lower level. Carriage barn. PRICE REDUCED $425,000 MLS# 10-3394 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

906 Homes for Sale

Historic Tunkhannock Borough. Affordable 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath family home with detached garage. All appliances and many furnishings included. $149,000. Shari Philmeck ERA Brady Associates 570-836-3848

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

906 Homes for Sale WEST PITTSTON

510 Fourth St. A nice 2 story, 3 bedroom home in the Wyoming Area school district. Corner lot. Out of the flood zone. MLS 12-1616 $79,000 Jackie Roman EXT 39 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

WEST PITTSTON

A bargain at $68,900 A f f o r d a b l e , Updated & Move in Ready 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath home - entry foyer with closet, large fully applianced eat-in kitchen with Corian countertops & tile floor, 1st floor laundry complete with washer & dryer; hardwood floors in some rooms, under carpet in others, large bedroom closets, quiet dead end street. MLS #12-361 Call Pat today @

Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 570-287-1196 WEST WYOMING

438 Tripp St

OPEN HOUSE Sunday 12pm-5pm

Completely remodeled home with everything new. New kitchen, baths, bedrooms, tile floors, hardwoods, granite countertops, all new stainless steel appliances, refrigerator, stove, microwave, dishwasher, free standing shower, tub for two, huge deck, large yard, excellent neighborhood $154,900 (30 year loan @ 4.5% with 5% down; $7,750 down, $785/month) 100% OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE Call Bob at 570-654-1490

Find a newcar online at

timesleader.com

906 Homes for Sale WEST WYOMING

REDUCED 550 Johnson St. Nicely landscaped corner lot surrounds this brick front Colonial in desirable neighborhood. This home features a spacious eat in kitchen, 4 bedrooms, 4 baths including Master bedroom with master bath. 1st floor laundry and finished lower level. Enjoy entertaining under the covered patio with hot tub, rear deck for BBQ’s and an above ground pool. Economical gas heat only $1224 per yr. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-157 $249,900 Call Michele Reap 570-905-2336

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! WEST PITTSTON

Nice double block, not in the flood area! 3 vehicle detached garage, off-street parking for 4 vehicles, front & rear porches, patio, fenced yard, nice & private. Home also has central air, #410 is updated & in very good condition, modern kitchen & bath. Kitchen has oak cabinets, stainless steel refrigerator, center aisle, half bath on 1st floor & 4th bedroom on 3rd floor. Both sides have hardwood floors on 2nd floor. MLS#12-737 $175,000 Louise Laine 283-9100 x20

570-283-9100 WHITE HAVEN

Priced to sell in Woodhaven Estates! This well maintained home located in the Crestwood School District offers features such as, covered deck and lower deck leading to the pool, ductless A/C, zoned heating system, oversized heated 2car garage in addition to the built-in garage. Finished lower level with recreation room, workshop and ½ bath laundry area. The list goes on, come and take a look! Owners are ready to move, are you? MLS#12-872 $199,900 Jill Jones direct: 696-6550 Office 696-2600

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! ONLY ONL NLY L ONE N LE LLEA LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

Commercia 944 Propertie

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Commercia 944 Propertie

Commercia Propertie

FOR LEASE! NARROWS SHOPPING CENTER 72 South Wyoming Ave., Edwardsville

ONLY

6 SF

$ 00

2000 SF FULLY CARPETED - FRESH PAINT THROUGHOUT - RECEPTION, FOUR OFFICES & KITCHENETTE IDEAL FOR SALES - SERVICE - TELEMARKETING JUST NEEDS DESKS & CHAIRS - AMPLE PARKING FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT: DAVE DARIS AT (570)823-1100 EXT. 246 or ddaris@mericle.com


PAGE 25G

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE

Wilkes-Barre

YATESVILLE PRICE REDUCED

909

Income & Commercial Properties

909

JENKINS TWP.

BACK MOUNTAIN/ HARVEYS LAKE

Great Investment. Quiet street close to everything. Nice size rooms. Both sides currently rented. Off street parking in back with a 1 car garage. $79,900. MLS 114207. Call Donna for more information or to schedule a showing. 570-947-3824

38 E. Thomas St. Former St. Francis Church. Sale includes Church, Rectory and 2 paved lots. $130,000 MLS# 12-877 Jeff Cook Realty World Bank Capital 570-235-1183 WILKES-BARRE

SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP 570-696-5412

WILKES-BARRE

18 Prospect Street BY OWNER $54,900 3 bedroom,1 bath possible 100% owner financing 570-970-0650 jtdproperties.com

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE 44 Hillard St. Lovely 3 bedroom in move in condition. Beautiful hardwood floors throughout, crown molding and lots of character and charm. Large closets and lots of storage space. New vinyl fence around back yard. New front porch. One stall garage has a new roof and is accessed via alley behind property. Water heater is new. MLS 12-510 $74,000 Shelby Watchilla 570-762-6969 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

45 Marlborough Avenue Nice brick front Ranch on corner lot. 3 bedrooms, 1 full and (2) 1/2 baths. Finished basement, breezeway to 2 car garage. Fenced yard and central air. MLS 12-1612 $125,000 Mark R. Mason 570-331-0982 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE

240 Sheridan St. Cute home just waiting for your personal touch. Looking to downsize? Well this is the one for you. 2nd floor could be finished, along with the basement. If you are a handyman you have to see this home. MLS 12-1481 $42,000 Roger Nenni EXT 32 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770 WILKES-BARRE

5 bedrooms, 2.5 bath, hardwood floors, large kitchen, Driveway. Asking $85,000 Call 570-905-2769 WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE

3 bedrooms, back bedroom has small balcony. 1.5 baths, eat-in kitchen, dining & living rooms, gas heat. Small fenced in back yard. $33,500. Call 570-851-4416

WILKES-BARRE

Cozy 2 story, 2 bedrooms, new bathroom, tile living room, dining room, new Energy Star windows. Kitchen is unfinished. All measurements are approximate. 12-344 $19,900 Call Brenda Suder 570-332-8924 McDermott Realty 570-696-2468 WILKES-BARRE

Four bedrooms, 4 square. Eat in kitchen, spacious rooms, replacement windows. Hardwood floors, French doors, stained glass, wood work, walk up attic & oversized 2 car garage. MLS# 11-2054 $104,900

RUBBICO REAL ESTATE 570-826-1600

WILKES-BARRE 62 Schuler St 3 bedroom 1 3/4 baths with hardwood floors throughout. Updated kitchen and baths. All natural woodwork. Large yard on double lot with Off street parking. MLS 12-135 $64,900 Call Darren Snyder Marilyn K Snyder Real Estate 570-825-2468 WILKES-BARRE

254 Sheridan St Nice Bright Traditional with modern ceramic eat-in kitchen & tiled bath, most windows replaced, built-in garage and deep yard. Very convenient to schools, shopping and highways. MLS 12-1512. $79,900. CLASSIC PROPERTIES 570-793-9449 Call Steve Shemo 570-718-4959

Beautifully maintained 3 story home, features hardwood floors, built-in cabinet, five plus bedrooms, office, 3 bathrooms and stained glass windows. All measurements are approximate. 12-1081 $99,900 Call Brenda Suder 570-332-8924 McDermott Realty 570-696-2468

Find Something? Lose Something? Get it back where it belongs with a Lost/Found ad! 570-829-7130 WILKES-BARRE

216 Franklin St Elegant tudor with 4800 sq ft in Downtown Wilkes-Barre's Historic District. The 1st floor office has 1860 sq ft with central air and 2 restrooms. The residence upstairs includes 5 bedrooms, 2 baths, custom kitchen with an island & sunny breakfast room, formal dinning room. The formal living room has a tray ceiling, picture windows and wet bar. Also, a cozy den. Private drive, Off street parking for 5 cars. MLS 12-1525 $325,000 Call Darren Snyder Marilyn K Snyder Real Estate 570-825-2468

89 Conwell Street Well maintained 2 story home with a finished lower level and a gas fireplace. New carpets and a walk-up attic, great for storage. $60,000 MLS# 11-4529 Call Michael Nocera

68-70 W. South St. 5 Unit property for sale on the campus of Wilkes University with a Cap Rate of 8.67%. Annual Net Operating Income of $34,238. 100% occupancy over the last 5 years. 12-1522 $395,000 Call Darren Snyder Marilyn K Snyder Real Estate 570-825-2468 WILKES-BARRE

Lovely home with many upgrades, new roof, windows, flooring & plumbing. Pool & fenced yard. Home features gas hot water heat. Modern kitchen, Living, dining and family rooms. large foyer, Master Bedroom with walk-in-closet. 2 car detached garage with private driveway. MLS#12-467 $100,000 Call Lynda Rowinski

Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-1195

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

WILKES-BARRE

35 Hillard St. Hardwood floors, fenced in yard, large deck. Off street parking. 3 bedroom home with 1st floor laundry. Move in condition. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-1655 $76,500 Colleen Turant 570-237-0415

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

Need a Roommate? Place an ad and find one here! 570-829-7130

RUBBICO REAL ESTATE 570-826-1600

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

NEW LISTING All brick ranch. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths. Large lower level family room. 2 car garage. Fenced yard. Gas heat and central a/c. Great South Wilkes-Barre location. 12-1045 $125,000 BESECKER REALTY 570-675-3611

Lookingfortherightdeal onanautomobile? Turntoclassified. It’s ashowroomin print! Classified’s got thedirections!

Terrific family home with lots to offer. Large kitchen/dining area. Family room, rec room, enclosed porch with knotty pine & hot tub. Separate screened porch. All appliances stay. Lovely yard with many perennial plantings, a covered patio & 2 sheds. $117,900 MLS # 11-4234 Cal570-715-7733 Mary Ann Desiderio 570-715-7733 Smith Hourigan Group Mountain Top

12 Reid st. Spacious Bi-level home in semi-private location with private back yard. 3 season room. Gas fireplace in lower level family room. 4 bedrooms, garage. For more informtion and photos visit wwww.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 10-4740 $149,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200 VM 101

909 WYOMING

Income & Commercial Properties ASHLEY

WILKES-BARRE

Nice 3 bedroom, 1 bath home, with 3 season porch and detached 1 car garage. Good starter home in well established neighborhood. Family owned for many years. $65,000 CALL CHRISTINE KUTZ 570-332-8832

573 Coon Road This 100+ year old Victorian comes with a lot of amenities inside and out on 6 acres of Country living. Indoor pool, wine cellar, patio, 4 car garage and much more. Property is being sold “as is”. MLS 12-1676 $399,000 Shelby Watchilla 570-762-6969 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

WYOMING

100 Ashley St. Well maintained 3 unit building with extra $50 per month from garage with electric. Off street parking for 4 cars and fenced in yard. Back porches on both levels. Fully rented. Let rental income pay for this property. Must see! MLS 12-1746 $109,000 Debbie McGuire 570-332-4413 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770 ASHLEY

WILKES-BARRE

Nicely remodeled fully rented Duplex, near schools, hospital, parks & bus route. Separate utilities and off street parking. MLS 12599 $96,500. CLASSIC PROPERTIES 570-793-9449 Call Steve Shemo 570-718-4959

WILKES-BARRE OPEN HOUSE SUN. 11AM - 1PM

46 Bradford St. Pride of ownership everywhere. 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, large yard, off street parking. Ready to go! MLS 12-1508 $69,900 Kevin Sobilo 570-817-0706

WILKES-BARRE PRICE REDUCED

608 Wyoming Ave OPEN HOUSE SATURDAY & SUNDAY 1:30 TO 3:00 Location, Location, location! Either you are looking to raise your family or just work from home this amazing brick ranch style property has it all. Zoned commercial, 3 very large bedrooms and 3 1/2 baths, full finished basement, library room, oversized living room, formal dining room and so much more. You have to see it to appreciate. Call today for a private tour of the property. 1 year Home Warranty. MLS 11-1870 PRICE REDUCTION!!! OWNER WANTS OFFERS $275,000 Call Tony Wasco 570-855-2424 Trademark Realtor Group 570-613-9090

Let the Community Know! Place your Classified Ad TODAY! 570-829-7130

WYOMING

DOUBLE BLOCK

Easily converts to single home. New roof, electric, windows & 2 car garage. Remodeled. 66 x 100 feet, fenced lot, $120,000. 570-693-2408

115 Noble Lane 3 bedroom, 2 bath end unit townhome with finished lower level. Natural gas fireplace, 3 tiered deck, newer roof, cul de sac. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-1006 $59,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

WILKES-BARRE REDUCED

60 Kulp St. 3-4 bedroom, 2 story home with well kept hardwood floors throughout. Private driveway with parking for 2 cards and nearly all replacement windows. MLS 11-2897 $59,900 Jay A. Crossin Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE IN CLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

Fall in love with this gorgeous brick home just a few minutes from town. spacious rooms, a view of the countryside, a fenced inground pool, gazebo with electric, spacious recreation room with wet bar, curved oak staircase, beautiful French doors and a fireplace in the kitchen are just some of the features that make this home easy to love. MLS# 12-443 $600,000 Jolyn Bartoli

110 Ashley St. Very nice duplex with off street parking and nice yard. Enclosed porch on 1st floor and 2 exits on 2nd. Fully rented. Great return on your investment. Rent pays your mortgage. Don’t miss out MLS 12-1745 $89,000 Debbie McGuire 570-332-4413 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

ASHLEY

TO SETTLE ESTATE 92/94 CAREY STREET Live on one side, and rent the other, call for details. Call 570-735-8763

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

AVOCA

25 St. Mary’s St. 3,443 sq. ft. masonry commercial building with warehouse/office and 2 apartments with separate electric and heat. Perfect for contractors or anyone with storage needs. For more information and photos log onto www.atlas realtyinc.com. Reduced to $89,000 MLS #10-3872 Call Charlie 570-829-6200 VM 101

10 Calvert St. Pristine Bi-level, 3/4 bedrooms, modern kitchen & 1 3/4 modern baths. Heated sunroom, hardwood floors, 1 car garage, central air, landscaped yard. For additional info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 12-1804 $183,500 Call Lu-Ann 570-602-9280

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

BEAR CREEK

100 Lincoln St. MULTI FAMILY 3 bedroom home with attached apartment and beauty shop. Apartment is rented. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-941 $82,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

263 Lawrence St Pride of ownership shows in this nicely updated & well maintained home with possible in-law suite/apt. Enjoy off street parking, spacious yard & large deck with beautiful views of the valley. 1st floor has large separate eat-in kitcher, living room, bedroom & bath. 2nd floor has large eat-in kitchen, living/ dining combo, 3 bedrooms, 1 bath & 2nd floor laundry. Many possibilities to fit your needs! Must see! MLS #12-518 Reduced to $88,900 Call Christina @ (570) 714-9235

HANOVER TOWNSHIP Crossroads area. commercial building lot for sale, in high traffic area. 325x80 foot corner lot bordering Carey Avenue. Owner financing available. Please Call 1-800-696-3050

Do you need more space? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way to clean out your closets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

909

Income & Commercial Properties

Wanna make your car go fast? Place an ad in Classified! 570-829-7130.

140 Wyoming Ave. Location, Location, Location! Great space in high traffic area. Was used for professional business with a gun shop occupying a small portion of the building. Only the gun shop is occupied. OSP for approximately 11 cars. MLS 12-1735 $350,000 Shelby Watchilla 570-762-6969 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 5770-288-0770

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

155 Sharpe St. Nice duplex with separate electric and water. Off street parking in rear. Also listed as residential. See list #12-609 for additional photos. MLS 12-605 $79,900 Jay A. Crossin Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

O L

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

Income & Commercial Properties

KINGSTON REDUCED

388 Schuyler Ave. Well cared for Duplex in great location. 1st floor has new bathroom and large kitchen, 2nd floor has all new carpeting and long term tenant. Large lot and off street parking for 2 cars. Separate furnaces and electricity, Make an offer! MLS 12-1125 $109,000 Call Shelby Watchilla 570-762-6969 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

LAFLIN

33 Market St. Commercial/residential property featuring Ranch home with 3 bedrooms, newly remodeled bathroom, in good condition. Commercial opportunity for office in attached building. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3450 Reduced $149,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

LEASE SPACE

909

Income & Commercial Properties

PITTSTON

Duplex. Aluminum siding, oil heat, semi - modern kitchens, long term tenant. On a spacious 50’ x 150’ lot. Motivated Seller. REDUCED. $33,260 Ann Marie Chopick 570-760-6769

570-288-6654

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

PLYMOUTH

155 E Walnut St. Good investment property knocking on your door. Don't miss out, come and see for yourself. Also included in the sale of the property is the lot behind the home. Lot size is 25X75, known as 147 Cherry St. $82,000 MLS# 10-2666 Call Karen Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 570-474-2340 WEST PITTSTON

Kingston Wellness Center / professional offices. -Modern Decor and Loft Style Offices -Four Lane Street Frontage -100+ Parking -Established Professional & Wellness Businesses On-Site -Custom Leases Available -Triple Net Spaces Available: 600SF, 1400SF, 2610SF, and 4300SF. 4300SF Warehouse Space available Built to Suit. Call Cindy 570-690-2689 www.cindykingre.com

134 Ann St. Nice duplex in a great neighborhood. Low maintenance. Investors: Money maker right from the start. Unit 2 is owner occupied, rent is projected. MLS 12-575 $119,000 David Krolikowski 570-288-0770 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

909

Income & Commercial Properties

WILKES-BARRE

KINGSTON

570-675-4400

295 Grove St. Nice Duplex. Both units have 2 bedrooms, kitchen and bath. Full basement, off street parking for 4 cars. MLS 12-1750 $59,000 Donald Crossin 570-288-0770 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130 909

Income & Commercial Properties

KINGSTON 7 Hoyt St

Job Seekers are looking here! Where's your ad? 570-829-7130 and ask for an employment specialist LUZERNE Over 10,000SF of storage space in two buildings. Room to build another building, professional, car wash, restaurant, salon. Minutes from Cross Valley Expressway Exit 6. Survey, storm water/drainage control plan and soil and erosion sedimentation control plan completed if you choose to build a building on the property. Also a portion is available for rent. MLS#10-320 REDUCED TO $199,000 Maribeth Jones 570-696-6565 Prudential: 696-2600

MOUNTAINTOP 110 North

HUGHESTOWN

115 New St. Offie building with over 2600 sq. ft. can be divided for up to 3 tenants with own central air and utilities and entrances. New roof. 20-25 parking spots in excellent condition. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-607 $249,900 Call Tom

909

KINGSTON

KINGSTON

D

1255 Laurel Run Rd. Bear Creek Twp., large commercial garage/warehouse on 1.214 acres with additional 2 acre parcel. 2 water wells. 2 newer underground fuel tanks. May require zoning approval. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-208 $179,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

55 1/2 Main St. Newer side by side double built in 1989 with 2 bedrooms and 1.5 baths each side. All separate utilities, very well insulated and easy to heat. Will qualify for FHA financing with low down payment. Is owner occupied. If you’re just starting out or looking to downsize, you should consider this property. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-1851 $159,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

DUPONT

S

Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-5425

YATESVILLE

Restaurant/Bar for sale. 8,525sf. Turnkey with seating for 125, bar area seats 24, includes all equipment, fixtures, two walk-in coolers, furnishings, kitchen equipment, & liquor license. Two apartments with long term tenants, gas heat, handicap accessible, high traffic area. MLS#11-4332 $499,000 Maribeth Jones 570-696-6565

EDWARDSVILLE

WYOMING

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! WILKES-BARRE

77 Schuler St. Newly renovated with new windows, door flooring, etc. “Goose Island” gem. Large home with 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, screened in porch overlooking fenced in yard, driveway, laminate floors throughout. Fresh paint, move in condition. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-845 $99,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

Nice 2 story, 3 bedroom on a quiet street. 2 full baths, new appliances, vinyl siding, replacement windows, newer furnace & roof. New laminate floors, off street parking, large yard & shed. MLS# 12-1330 $79,000

Income & Commercial Properties

Nice duplex zoned commercial, can be used for offices as well as residential. All separate utilities. Keep apt. space or convert to commercial office space. Adjacent lot for sale by same owner. MLS 11-2176 $79,900 Jay A. Crossin CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770 ext. 23

Mountain Blvd. OFFICE OR RETAIL SPACE Great Location! Total 3,000 square feet on two levels. High visibility, plenty of parking, garage in rear. $295,000. 570-474-2993 NANTICOKE

KINGSTON REDUCED

341 Wyoming Ave. 3 story Victorian located in a high exposure area. Has all the lovely signature woodwork of a grand Victorian of yesteryear! Can be restored for use as a residential home or a landlord investment. Currently subdivided into multiple office spaces and 2 apartments. MLS 12-617 $179,900 Jay A. Crossin Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

REDUCED 414 Front St. Move right into this modern office building featuring 4 offices, receptionist office, large conference room, modern kitchen, storage room, full basement, central air, handicap access. 2 car garage and 5 additional off street parking spaces. This property is also available for lease. Lease price is $675/mo + $675 security deposit. Tenant pays all utilities. Sells for $85,900 Call John Polifka 570-704-6846 5 Mountains Realty 42 N. Main St. Shickshinny, PA 570-542-2141

150 Dana St. Completely remodeled! Modern 5 unit property with hardwood flooring and ceramic tile in kitchens and baths. New furnace in 2009. Secure building. Fully rented. Large concrete basement for Owner’s storage, part of which could be used as an efficiency. All services separate. Utilities included in rent for #5 only. Great money maker MLS 12-1740 $319,000 Debbie McGuire 570-332-4413 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! WILKES-BARRE

57 Carey Ave. Good investment property. 4 apartments needing a little TLC. Two 1 bedroom apartments. One 2 bedroom and one 3 bedroom. Separate water and electric. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-1026 $79,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Income & Commercial Properties

WILKES-BARRE

62 Hutson St. Duplex in good condition Fenced in yard and back screened porch. Fully rented. Property pays for itself with $$$ left over. Take a look NOW! MLS 12-1747 $59,000 Debbie McGuire 570-332-4413 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

912 Lots & Acreage HARDING Mt. Zion Road One acre lot just before Oberdorfer Road. Great place to build your dream home MLS 11-3521 $29,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

WYOMING PRICE REDUCED!

285 Wyoming Ave. First floor currently used as a shop, could be offices, etc. Prime location, corner lot, full basement. 2nd floor is 3 bedroom apartment plus 3 car garage and parking for 6 cars. For more information and photos go to www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS #10-4339 $159,900 Call Charlie VM 101

Looking to buy a home? Place an ad here and let the sellers know! 570-829-7130

KEELERSBURG River front lot with a deck overlooking water. Well, septic & electric on site. New price. $32,000. Besecker Realty 570-675-3611 LAND FOR SALE: Upstate NY Land Sale “Sportsman Bargain” 3 acres w/ cozy cabin, Close access to Oneida Lake -$17,995. “Large River” -over 900 ft. 18 acres along fishing/swimming river -$49,995. “Timberland Investment” -90 acres deer sanctuary, beautiful timber studs, small creek $99,995. Over 100 new properties. Call 800-229-7843 Or visit landandcamps.com LEHMAN 9 Acres on Lehman Outlet Road. 470’ front, over 1,000’ deep. Wooded. $150,000. Call Besecker Realty 570-675-3611

MOOSIC

BUILDING LOT Corner of Drake St. & Catherine, Moosic. 80x111 building lot with sewer & water available, in great area with newer homes. Corner lot. For more details visit www.atlasrealtyinc.com. MLS #12-1148. Call Charlie

Newport Township

LOTS - LOTS - LOTS 1 mile south of L.C.C.C.

210’ frontage x 158’ deep. All underground utilities, natural gas. GREAT VIEW!! $37,500 2 LOTS AVAILABLE 100’ frontage x 228’ deep. Modular home with basement accepted. Each lot $17,500. Call 570-714-1296

DURYEA 196 Foote Avenue

Corner lot, bordering Foote Ave and McAlpine St. Commercial zoning. $10,000 or best offer. Please Call 610-675-9132 Earth Conservancy Land For Sale 61 +/- Acres Nuangola - $99,000 46 +/- Acres Hanover Twp. $79,000 Highway Commercial KOZ Hanover Twp. 3+/- Acres 11 +/- Acres Wilkes-Barre Twp. 32 +/- Acres Zoned R-3 See additional land for sale at: www.earth conservancy.org 570-823-3445 Sell your own home! Place an ad HERE 570-829-7130

927

Vacation Locations

VIRGINIA SEASIDE LOTS: Virginia Seaside Lots: Spectacular 3+ acre estate lots in exclusive development on the seaside (the mainland) overlooking Chincoteague Bay, islands and ocean beyond. Gated entrance, caretaker, private paved roads, community pier, pool and club house which includes 2-bedroom guest suites for property owners. Great climate, fishing, clamming and National Seashore beaches nearby. Just 30 miles south of Ocean City, Md. Absolute buy of a lifetime, recent bank sale makes these lots available at 1/3 original price! Priced at only $49,000 to $65,000. For info call (757)824-5284 Email: oceanlandtrust@yahoo.co m, pictures on website: www.corbinhall.com

930 Wanted to Buy Real Estate

HOME & FARMLAND for Christmas

Tree Farm. Dallas, Lehman & Wyoming Area School Districts. Immediate Sale! 570-760-7253

New Homes From $275,000$595,000 570-474-5574

PITTSTON TWP.

Beautiful lot in Pocono Ridge Estate. 1.14 acres with a view! MLS 12-1313 $48,500 Call Kevin Sobilo 570-817-0706

Apartments/ Furnished

WILKES-BARRE Furnished 1 bed-

room executive apartment. All brand new. Spacious eat in kitchen. 2 TV’s provided, leather sofas. Too many amenities to list. $700. No pets. 570-899-3123

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

stove, washer/dryer included. No pets. Security, lease, application fee. $525/month plus utilities. 570-472-9494

AVOCA Modern & spacious

1st floor, wall to wall carpet. Appliances, washer & dryer hookup. Off street parking. Security, no pets. $450 month. 570-655-1606

PITTSTON TWP.

SHAVERTOWN LAND Harford Ave. 4 buildable residential lots for sale individually or take all 4! Buyer to confirm water and sewer with zoning officer. Directions: R. on E. Franklin, R. on Lawn to L. on Harford. $22,500 per lot Mark Mason 570-331-0982 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

TUNKHANNOCK

Approximately 4 acres. Perk Tested & Surveyed. Well above flood level. Mountain View. Clear land. $45,000. Bill 570-665-9054

Apartments/ Unfurnished

Dallas, Pa. MEADOWS APARTMENTS 220 Lake St. Housing for the elderly & mobility impaired; all utilities included. Federally subsidized program. Extremely low income persons encouraged to apply. Income less than $12,400. 570-675-6936, 8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

DUPONT

1 bedroom, offstreet parking, no pets. $450/month. Heat paid. 1 month security. Call 570-655-2306 DUPONT Completely remodeled, modern 2 bedroom townhouse style apartment. Lots of closet space, with new carpets and completely repainted. Includes stove, refrigerator, washer, dryer hook up. Nice yard & neighborhood, no pets. $595 + security. Call 570-479-6722

DURYEA

2nd Floor, 2 bedroom, kitchen, living room, refrigerator and stove provided, washer/dryer hookup, 3 rooms, wall to wall carpeting, sewer included. Quiet neighborhood, No pets. $485 per month, lease, 1st, and security deposit, and references required. Call 570498-0949

EDWARDSVILLE 21 Pugh Street.

Quiet, one way street, half double, cleaned and freshly painted, 2.5 bedrooms, living room, dining room, kitchen, with washer/dryer hookup. Gas heat. Small yard, small pets considered with additional rent. $530.00 per month + security & last months rent. Call 570-793-6566

3 bedrooms, 1st floor, large closets. Hardwood floors. New gas furnace. Garage. No dogs, no smoking. $1200/month, plus utilities & security, includes yard maintenance, water & garbage. Call 570-407-3600

FORTY FORT

1 BEDROOM APT Very nice, quiet, clean, great neighborhood, hardwood floors, a/c, washer /dryer with newer appliances, storage, 1st/last/security with one year lease. References required. $650 + utilities. Water/sewer by owner, no pets, non-smoking. Call 202-997-9185 for appointment

FORTY FORT bedroom nice

2 & clean. Great neighborhood. Air, all appliances. Storage. Security with 1 year lease. $595 month + electric. No pets. Non smoking (570) 466-0005 FORTY FORT Lovely 2 bedroom, 2nd floor on River St. Living room, dining room, kitchen and bath. New carpeting throughout. Off street parking. $600/mo + utilities No Pets No Smoking 570-288-0770

FORTY FORT

AVOCA

Beautiful lot in Pocono Ridge Estate. 1.14 acres with a view! MLS 12-1313 $48,500 Call Kevin Sobilo 570-817-0706

941

EXETER

ASHLEY

LivingInQuailHill.com

City water and sewer, gas available. $36,500 per lot. 570-675-5873

Park) and San Souci Park. Like new, several to choose from, Financing &Warranty, MobileOneSales.net Call (570)250-2890

Doyouneedmorespace? 941 Apartments/ A yard or garage sale Unfurnished in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! 74 W. Hartford St 1 bedroom + comYou’re in bussiness puter room. 2nd with classified! floor. Water,fridge,

DALLAS

DALLAS AREA 3 lots. 70 x 125.

EAST MOUNTAIN RIDGE (Formerly Pocono

938

BEAR CREEK

$129,900 SPECTACULAR WATER VIEW! 2 acres overlooking Huntsville Reservoir. Building site cleared but much of woodlands preserved. Perc & site prep done. Call Christine Kutz 570-332-8832

915 Manufactured Homes

MOUNTAIN TOP Several building lots ready to build on! ALL public utilities! Priced from $32,000 to $48,000! Use your own Builder! Call Jim Graham at 570-715-9323

912 Lots & Acreage

39 Wedgewood Dr. Laurelbrook Estates Lot featuring 3.22 acres with great privacy on cul-desac. Has been perc tested and has underground utilities. 4 miles to PA Turnpike entrance. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-114 $64,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

WYOMING

FIRST ST. 4 building lots each measuring 68x102 with public utilities. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-439 $39,900 EACH Call Charlie 570-829-6200

HUGHESTOWN

Cleared lot in Stauffer Heights. Ready for your dream home just in time for Spring! MLS 12-549 $32,500 Call Kevin Sobilo 570-817-0706

WILKES-BARRE

70-72 Sullivan St. Well maintained 4 unit property with enclosed back porches and off street parking for 4 cars. Fully rented. New roof in 2008. Great investment. Make an appointment now! MLS 12-1748 $179,000 Debbie McGuire 570-332-4413 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

912 Lots & Acreage

Modern 1 bedroom, off-street parking, washer/dryer hook up, appliances, dishwasher, built-in bookcases, $435/ month +utilities. Call (908)362-8670

DALLAS

1 bedroom, 1st floor 1 bedroom. $650/month all inclusive. W/w carpeting. Security, No Pets. 570-690-1591

DALLAS

2 bedrooms, no pets. $650/mo + utilities & security. Trash & sewer included. Off street parking Call 570-674-7898

DALLAS

2nd floor, 2 bedroom, refrigerator & stove, washer/ dryer. No smoking. $625/month + security. Sewer & trash included. Application & background check. No Section 8 570-675-8627

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

Nice, quiet neighborhood. First floor, spacious living room with working fireplace, bedroom with 2 closets. New kitchen with stove, fridge & lazy Susan. Laundry room off kitchen with washer / dryer, bath / shower. Off street, lighted parking. Lease, security, references. Gas heat & all utilities by tenant. Absolutely no pets. $600. Call 570-714-5588

FORTY FORT

Ransom Street, 1st floor, 1 bedroom, dining room, oak hardwood floors, central air, range & fridge included. Off street parking. $585/month utilities by tenant. Security, references, lease, pets maybe? Handicapped accessible 570-287-5775 or 570-332-1048.

KINGSTON

1st Floor, recently renovated, 2 bedrooms, with washer & dryer hook-up, $650 per month, plus utilities, water and sewer included. Off street parking. 570-443-0770

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

KINGSTON

2nd floor, 3 1/2 rooms, all appliances included. Off street parking. Sewer & water included. New carpet. $575/mo + utilities and security. NO PETS Call 570-331-7412 KINGSTON

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

MOUNTAIN TOP

1 Bedroom apartments for elderly, disabled. Rents based on 30% of ADJ gross income. Handicap Accessible. Equal Housing Opportunity. TTY711 or 570-474-5010 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer.

MOUNTAIN TOP WOODBRYN 1 & 2 Bedroom.

3 bedroom 1 bath. $700/month. Separate utilities, laundry hookups, stove and refrigerator included. Small pets negotiable. Call Scott Zoepke Trademark Realty 570-814-0875

KINGSTON 399 -401 Elm Ave.

Newly remodeled apartments. 1st floor, 3 bedroom, $850 + utilities. 2nd floor, (2) 2 bedroom $600 + utilities. NO PETS, No section 8 housing. References and security required. 570-301-2785

KINGSTON Beautiful 2 bed-

rooms, 1 bath, modern kitchen with appliances, large dining & living rooms, central air, decks, ample parking. No pets. $595 per month.

570-696-1866

KINGSTON

Beautiful, oversized executive style apartment in large historic home. Two bedrooms, one bath, granite kitchen, hardwood floors, dining room, living room, basement storage, beautiful front porch, washer/ dryer. $1,100 monthly plus utilities. No smoking. Call 570-472-1110 KINGSTON Modern 2 bedroom 1 bath. Second floor. $600 + utilities. Call Darren 570-825-2468

KINGSTON

Nice area. Modern, clean, 1 bedroom, 2nd floor. Recently painted. Refrigerator & stove, washer/dryer hook up, off-street parking, no dogs. $550/ month & security, includes heat, water & sewer. 570-545-6057

KINGSTON

Recently renovated 2 bedroom. Living room & dining room. Convenient off street parking. All new appliances. Gas. Water & sewer included. $550 + utilities, security & references. No pets, no smoking. Call 570-239-7770

KINGSTON/PRINGLE

Totally remodeled, clean, 1 ½ bedroom half double (apartment size). All new stainless appliances. Backyard, large driveway. No pets. $625 + utilities & security. Call Fadwa, 570-574-1818

LARKSVILLE

2 bedrooms, living room, kitchen, bath. gas heat. $450 month + utilities. 1 year lease & $450 security. Off street parking. 570-899-0295

LUZERNE

1 bedroom, wall to wall, off-street parking, coin laundry, water, sewer & garbage included. $495/ month + security & lease. HUD accepted. Call 570-687-6216 or 570-954-0727

LUZERNE

Modern 2 bedroom, all appliances, offstreet parking, no pets. No smokers. $600/month, plus utilities, 1st month & security. Call 570-696-5417

941

No pets. Rents based on income start at $405 & $440. Handicap Accessible. Equal Housing Opportunity. 570-474-5010 TTY711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Immediate Openings!

NANTICOKE

1 bedroom, 2nd floor, off street parking, coin-op washer/dryer on premises, heat and water included, no pets. $475. Call 570-417-4311 or 570-696-3936

NANTICOKE 1st floor. 1 bed-

room. ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED! Off street parking. Fresh paint. NO PETS $525 + security 570-477-6018 leave message

NANTICOKE 314 Prospect St.

Convenient 1st floor, 1 bedroom, nonsmoker, large closets. Freshly painted & new carpeting. New ceiling fans, new modern kitchen & tile bath. New windows. Heat & hot water included. Washer/dryer hook up, stove & refrigerator provided. No pets. $595. 570-287-4700

NANTICOKE

Spacious 1 bedroom 1st floor. New carpeting, gas range and fridge included. Garage parking, no dogs. References and security required. $450/mo. Water, sewer, garbage fee incl. Tenant pays gas and electric 570-696-3596

NANTICOKE

Spacious 2 bedroom, full kitchen, No pets, no smoking. $475 + electric. Call 570-262-5399

JULY MOVEIN

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

PITTSTON

2 bedrooms, 1st floor. Stove, fridge, w/d hookup provided. $550/mo., includes sewer & refuse. Utilities by tenant. NO PETS Call Charlie 570-829-1578

PITTSTON

2 bedrooms, refrigerator & stove , washer/dryer hookup, off-street parking, pets ok. $650/month, plus utilities & security. (570)814-2752

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

PITTSTON

2nd floor, 2 bedrooms, all appliances, washer/dryer hookup, no pets. $400/month + utilities, & security. Call 570-6546737 570-212-2908 570-362-4019

PITTSTON

2nd floor, 2 bedrooms, living room, eat in kitchen. Stove, garbage disposal, fridge, washer & dryer included. Carpeted & newly painted, A/C. Trash & sewer paid. Off street parking for 1 car. No smoking. No pets. $575 + utilities, security & 1st month. 570-696-1485 Leave Message

PLYMOUTH

3 bedrooms,1 bath, $650/per month, Call 570-760-0511

PLYMOUTH

Real nice 1 bedroom, 2nd floor. New stove & refrigerator, wall to wall carpeting, total electric, off street parking $350 + security. No pets.

570-779-3006

SWOYERSVILLE

Newly remodeled 1 bedroom studio apartment with large living room, kitchen & bath. Wall to wall carpet. Off street parking. All utilities paid except electric. $595 + security. Call 570-287-3646

THANOVER TWP.

3 bedrooms, 1.5 bath, no pets. $725 + utilities, 1st months security deposit. Call 570-417-3427

WEST PITTSTON 1 F ,5 ST

LOOR

ROOMS

NORTH WILKES-BARRE NEAR GENERAL HOSPITAL NEWLY DONE, 1ST FLOORS, NEW KITCHEN, NEW BUILT-INS, LAUNDRY, NEW CARPETING, ASTHETIC FIREPLACES. 1 BEDROOMS. $625 + UTILITIES. EMPLOYMENT VERIFICATION, 2 YEAR LEASES. NO PETS/ NO SMOKING, APPLY NOW... MANAGED

Recently renovated. All appliances, washer/dryer hookup. Wall to wall carpeting & window dressings. Off street parking. $600 per month + utilities, security & references. No smoking. No pets. Call 570-574-1143

288-1422

West Pittston, Pa. GARDEN VILLAGE APARTMENTS 221 Fremont St. Housing for the elderly & mobility impaired; all utilities included. Federally subsidized program. Extremely low income persons encouraged to apply. Income less than $12,400. 570-655-6555, 8 am-4 pm, Monday-Friday. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

America Realty

PARSONS 2nd floor, 2 bed-

rooms, washer, dryer, fridge, stove & heat included. $685/month + security & references, no pets. Call 570-332-9355

PITTSTON

1 or 2 bedroom, wall to wall carpeting. Off street parking. Stove, fridge, porch, sewer, garbage. $450/ month. No Pets (570) 947-5113

Need to rent that Vacation property? Place an ad and get started! 570-829-7130

PITTSTON

2 bedroom, 1 bath. Nice neighborhood. Off street parking Own basement. $500/month + utilities + 1 mo. security 347-668-6568

Apartments 941 Unfurnishe

WEST PITTSTON

Large 2 bedroom, 2nd floor . Hardwood floors, balcony, heat & hot water included. $775/month + security. No smoking. 570-947-9340

WEST WYOMING

Large, modern 2nd floor 1 bedroom. Quiet neighborhood, eat in kitchen, stove, refrigerator, washer/dryer hook up. Living & dining room combo, large bedroom, deck, heat, water, sewer & garbage included. No pets. $650 + security. 570-693-9339

Apartments 941 Unfurnishe

Apartments Unfurnishe

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

WILKES-BARRE

Mayflower Crossing Apartments 570.822.3968 2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms - Light & bright open floor plans - All major appliances included - Pets welcome* - Close to everything - 24 hour emergency maintenance - Short term leases available

Call TODAY For AVAILABILITY!! www.mayflower crossing.com Certain Restrictions Apply*

WILKES-BARRE & Surrounding Areas

AVAILABLE RENTALS: WILKES-BARRE: 4 bedroom 1/2 double. Yard, Off street parking. $725. + utilities WILKES-BARRE: 2 bedroom apartment, Off street parking, yard $460. + utilities PLAINS: New carpeting. 1 bedroom. $425. + utilities PLAINS: 3 bedroom, yard, Off street parking $525. + utilities Appliances are included in all rental units. Lease, credit check, references required. Tina Randazzo 570-899-3407

WILKES-BARRE / KINGSTON Efficiency 1 & 2

bedrooms. Includes all utilities, parking, laundry. No pets. From $390 to $675. Lease, security & references. 570-970-0847

WILKES-BARRE

1 bedroom, and also a 3 bedroom apartment for rent, newly remodeled, with stove, fridge, washer & dryer hookup. $425 and $625 plus utilities and security. Call 570-301-8200

941

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

WILKES-BARRE

1 bedroom, refrigerator & stove, offstreet parking, no pets.$370/per month, security, references & lease. 570-825-5945 before 9:00 p.m.

WILKES-BARRE

155 W. River St. 1 bedroom, some appliances included, all utilities included except electric, hardwood floors, Pet friendly. $600. 570-969-9268

WILKES-BARRE

19 Catlin Ave 2 bedroom. Heat & hot water. New stove & fridge. Tenant pays electric 646-391-4638 or 570-825-3360

WILKES-BARRE

2 bedrooms, 1 bath, big kitchen,6x8 porch, available June 1st, landlord pays heat and water. No hookups, no pets. $625 per month, 1st month and security required. Call Manny 718-946-8738 or 917-295-6254

WILKES-BARRE APARTMENTS FOR RENT!

425 S. FRANKLIN ST. For lease. Available immediately, washer/dryer on premises, no pets. We have studio & 1 bedroom apartments. On site parking. Fridge & stove provided. 24/7 security camera presence and all doors electronically locked. Studio - $450. 1 bedroom - $550. Water & sewer paid. One month security deposit. Call 570-793-6377 after 9:00 a.m. to schedule an appointment. Or email shlomo_voola @yahoo.com wilkesliving.com WILKES-BARRE

LAFAYETTE GARDENS ! S AVE MONEY THIS YEAR

113 Edison St. Quiet neighborhood. 2 bedroom apartments available for immediate occupancy. Heat & hot water included. $625 Call Aileen at 570-822-7944

WILKES-BARRE

1 bedroom apartment, 2nd floor. Stove, fridge, heat & hot water included. Attic Storage. Carpeted. No pets. Nice, safe area. Call 570-823-7587

Apartments 941 Unfurnishe

Apartments Unfurnishe

EAST MOUNTAIN APARTMENTS The good life... Regions Best close at hand Address • 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.

822-4444

www.EastMountainApt.com

• 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.

288-6300

www.GatewayManorApt.com

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

WILKES-BARRE Nice, 3 bedroom, 1st floor apartment. Close to Wilkes-University and downtown Wilkes-Barre. Modern eat in kitchen, basement laundry + large storage area. $725 + gas and electric. Call 570-793-9449

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

WILKES-BARRE

Parsons Section 2nd floor 1 bedroom, wall to wall, stove & fridge. Heat, hot water, sewer & trash included. $475. No pets. Non smoking. References & security. 570-823-0864 or 570-817-1855

WILKES-BARRE SOUTH

Nice neighborhood. 1st floor, 2 bedroom. Wall to wall carpet. Off street parking. Washer/dryer. $575 + 1 month security, references & credit check. No pets. (570) 574-2249

WILKES-BARRE SOUTH SECURE BUILDINGS 1 & 2 bedroom

apartments. Starting at $440 and up. References required. Section 8 OK 570-357-0712

WILKES-BARRE

Wilkes-University Campus Studio, 1 & 2 bedroom. Starting at $400. All utilities included. No pets. 570-826-1934

WILKES-BARRE

VICTORIAN CHARM 34 W. Ross St. 1 bedroom, 2nd floor. Most utilities included. Historic building is non smoking/no pets. Base rent $700/mo. Security, references required. View at houpthouse.com. 570-762-1453 WILKES-BARRE Š1 bedroom water included Š2 bedroom water included Š2 bedroom single family Š5 bedroom large Š2 bedroom, heat & water included Š 2 bedroom, totally remodeled Š 3 bedroom, half double, immaculate condition NANTICOKE Š2 bedroom large, water included PITTSTON ŠLarge 1 bedroom water included McDermott & McDermott Real Estate Inc. Property Management 570-821-1650 (direct line) Mon-Fri. 8-7pm Sat. 8-noon

IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE

1 BEDROOM APARTMENTS AVAILABLE

MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS 61 E. Northampton St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701

• Affordable Senior Apartments • Income Eligibility Required • Utilities Included! • Low cable rates; • New appliances; • Laundry on site; • Activities! •Curbside Public Transportation

Please call 570-825-8594 D/TTY 800-654-5984

WYOMING

1 bedroom 2nd floor at $595/month. Off street parking. Non smoking. No pets. Bonus walk up attic with tons of storage. Heat, water, garbage, sewer included. 1 month security, credit check & references. 1 year lease. Please call Donna 570-613-9080

SAINT JOHN Apartments 419 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre

One bedroom apt available with beautiful stained glass windows for only $516 per month including all utilities.

941

1 & 2 BR Apts

2 & 3 BR Townhomes

570-970-6694

Equal Housing Opportunity

570-822-2711

NEWPORT TWP. PRIME APARTMENTS STILL AVAILABLE!

www.liveatwilkeswood.com

ST. STANISLAUS APARTMENTS 143-145 Old Newport Rd., Newport Twp.

Affordable, Accessible 1 Bedroom Apartments Income Eligibility* Required. Rents: $455 plus electric

• High Efficiency Heat/Air Conditioning • Newer Appliances • Laundry Rooms • Community Room • Private Parking • Rent Includes Water, Sewer & Refuse For more info or to apply, please call: 570-733-2010 TDD: 800-654-5984

Apply Today!

KINGSTON

SDK GREEN ACRES HOMES 11 Holiday Drive

Kingston “A Place To Call Home” Spacious 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts 3 Bedroom Townhomes Gas heat included

(*Maximum Incomes vary according to household size)

Great, Convenient Location!

Apartments Unfurnishe

Wilkeswood Apartments

• Secured Senior Building for age 62 & older. • YOU regulate heat & air conditioning • Laundry Room Access • Community Room/Fully equipped kitchen for special events • 24 Hour Emergency Maintenance • Garage & off street parking • Curbside public transportation

FREE

757390

909

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 PAGE 26G

24hr on-site Gym Community Room Swimming Pool Maintenance FREE Controlled Access Patio/Balcony and much more... Call Today for Move In Specials. 570-288-9019


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 PAGE 27G


PAGE 28G

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

2-Story masonry bldg on Former automotive/gas station (tanks removed). 1500 SF bldg w/2 bay 96x180 lot w/pkg for 36 cars. Ideal for apts garage & pkg for 30 cars. MLS#12-1713 or small mfg business. MLS#12-1758 MIKE 970-1100 or MARGY 696-0891 CLYDETTE 696-0897

1600 SF building - ideal for professional offices. Includes office furniture. Zoned Commercial. MLS#121422 MIKE JOHNSON 970-1100

Great location for multi-use Opportunity to own your own commercial business. Ample pkg, office & restaurant/pizza business. Includes equipment & liquor license. MLS#12-1658 workspace. MLS#12-685 PAT G 788-7514 or BEN T 788-7516 JUDY RICE 714-9230

Former Tavern w/2 apts. No liquor license. Needs work. Add’l lot for OSP. MLS#12-421 JULIO 714-9252 or ANDY 714-9225

900 SF Commercial space on Great business opportunity. 1st flr has 2 BR, Apt. Freshly painted exterior. Zoned 1st flr. 900 SF 2 BR apt on 2nd flr. Billboard also available to rent on bldg. Community Business. MLS#11-4416 MLS#10-4309 MATT 714-9229 TINA 714-9251

Nicely maintained offices & garage. 2400 SF w/overhead door. Great for many uses. Near highways. MLS#114561 JUDY RICE 714-9230

Prime commercial storefront + 3 spacious Apts. Parking lot in rear. MLS#12-687 DONNA S 788-7504

6000+ SF former furniture store, plus apt. & lots more space. High traffic area. Combined w/12 Davenport. MLS#11-3865 RAE DZIAK 714-9234

Unique bldg currently used 2 bldgs zoned commercial. as single residence. May be converted to 1 consists of retail space & apts, the suit your needs (w/zoning approval). other is a 2-story home. MLS#10-4056 MLS#12-844 MIKE JOHNSON

Established turn-key Auto repair & body restaurant w/2 apts. Business & shop w/state certified paint booth. building priced to sell! MLS#11-130 2nd flr storage. MLS#11-2842 ANDY 714-9225 ANDY 714-9225

Currently business on 1st flr, 3 BR apt. on 2nd flr. Lg garage in rear w/storage. Owner financing or lease purchase available. MLS#11-4015 ANDY 714-9225

High traffic Route 11 w/6000 SF Showroom/Garage, & Apt above. MLS#11-2106 ANITA REBER 788-7501

Brick & block prime office bldg. Great location on busy Rte Includes professional office space + 309! Office Bldg w/1500 SF of space restaurant. MLS#12-366 & 2270 SF warehouse. MLS#11-2094 GERALD PALERMO 788-7509 ANITA REBER 788-7501

Wonderful opportunity for commercial bldg w/ice cream stand, storefront & apt. Also storage bldg. MLS#12-370 CORINE 715-9321

4 Sty brick office bldg, more Former landmark restaurant. 3235 SF Warehouse. than half rented. High traffic area. 2 lots Perfect for landscaper, contractor, etc. offers 3500 SF on the 1st level plus basement. Parking for 40 cars. MLS#12-89 included for pkg. MLS#11-1045 Zoned Industrial. MLS#12-1376 ANDY 714-9225 or MARGY 696-0891 GERALD PALERMO 788-7509 ANDY CISNEY 714-9225

Well built 2 story - 8000 SF bldg. Prime location/high traffic area. Add’l pkg available. 1st flr office/commercial space & 2 apts on 2nd flr. MLS#11-508 RHEA SIMMS 696-6677

Retail, Office, Medical Whatever your need - This 4000 SF Bldg can accommadate it! Parking for 10. MLS#12276 JUDY RICE 714-9230

Lg Commercial warehouse & office space w/over 3.5 acres. Owner financing or lease purchase available. MLS#11-4014 ANDY 714-9225

Prime location - former Convention Hall. Wonderful opportunity for professional offices. Pkg for 100+ cars. Zoned Hwy Business. MLS#11-3654 MARGY SIMMS 696-0891

Large 8000 SF building looking for a new lease on life! Zoned Commercial. MLS#11-4058 SANDY 970-1110 or DAVID 970-1117

High traffic location. 2900 SF professional office space w/basement storage. Pkg for at least 12 cars. MLS#12416 RHEA SIMMS 696-6677

Ideal bldg for retail sales or prof offices. High traffic location on Route 309S. Zoned Commercial. MLS#121534 MIKE JOHNSON 970-1100

DAVID 970-1117

Great location for professional 3 BR, Ranch w/gar+ Prime location office. Private drive in rear. Zoned C-3. attached bldg. Zoned HWY COMM. Ideal ZONED HWY COMMERCIAL- 4 BR Cape Property being sold "as is". MLS#10-4362 for office or sm business. MLS#10-4367 Cod on 100x556 lot. MLS#11-229 TINA 714-9251 RAE 714-9234 RAE 714-9234

Commercial - Vacant Land Perfect downtown corner location near Coal Street Exit. Ideal for many uses. MLS#12181 MIKE JOHNSON 970-1100

Commercial opportunity awaits your business.1st flr 10,000 SF w/offices. 2nd flr storage. Plenty of pkg on 4.62 acres. MLS#10-1110 JUDY 714-9230

6700 SF building on the San Highly visible commercial Attractive office space 32,000SF, Prime Location Prime location on 30+ parking, including trailer spaces Souci Parkway. Modern office space available. in excellent condition. Good visibility. 1900SF - 12 pkg spaces. MLS#09- space on busy blvd, across from Wegman’s & Memorial Hwy. Unique space-many Parking for 30+ cars. MLS#12-1342 Price Chopper. Plenty of pkg. MLS#12-1709 For "rent" only. MLS#10-4503 MLS#08-1305 3085 possibilities. Zoning B-2. MLS#11-669 MATT HODOROWSKI 714-9229 TERRY ECKERT 696-0843 BARBARA M 696-0883 VIRGINIA ROSE 288-9371 MARGY 696-0891 MARK 696-0724

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

944

Commercial Properties

WYOMING DOLPHIN PLAZA 1 bedroom 2nd floor Rte. 315 at $595/month. Off street parking. Non smoking. No pets. Bonus walk up attic with tons of storage. Heat, water, garbage, sewer included. 1 month security, credit check & references. 1 year lease. Please call Donna 570-613-9080

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WYOMING

Updated 1 bedroom. New wall to wall carpet. Appliances furnished. Coin op laundry. $550. Heat, water & sewer included. Call 570-687-6216 or 570-954-0727

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944

Commercial Properties

Commercial Lease Courtdale location Ideal for: Veterinarian Office Manufacturing / Industrial Space Storage Space

1000 SF - 5000 SF Space Available. 5000 SF Warehouse Space with loading docks, office, heat, and plumbing. $3.60 - $12 sf/yr + NNN, lease negotiable. Call Cindy King 570-690-2689 www.cindykingre.com

570-675-4400

1,000 & 3,800 Sq. Ft. WILL DIVIDE OFFICE / RETAIL Call 570-829-1206

OFFICE SPACE PLAINS

Total space 30,000 sf. Build to suit. Perfect for Doctors suite, day care, etc. High visibility. Lots of parking. Rent starting $10/sf. MLS 11-4200 Call Nancy or Holly JOSEPH P. GILROY REAL ESTATE 570-288-1444

To place your ad Call Toll Free 1-800-427-8649

PITTSTON COOPERS CO-OP

Lease Space Available, Light manufacturing, warehouse, office, includes all utilities with free parking. I will save you money!

PITTSTON

OFFICE SPACE

Attractive modern office space. 2 suites available. Suite A-4 offices, plus restroom and storage includes utilities, 700 sq. ft. $650/month Suite B-2, large offices, 2 average size offices, plus restroom and storage plus utilities, 1,160 sq. ft. $1000/month Call Charlie 570-829-6200

315 PLAZA 1,750 SQ. FT. & 3,400 SQ.FT OFFICE/RETAIL 570-829-1206

WEST PITTSTON

OFFICE SPACE

Containing Six separate offices, 1 large meeting room. Segregated bathrooms. Kitchenette. Total recent renovation. Great location. Lot parking in rear. $3,500 monthly. 570-299-5471

944

Commercial Properties

WILKES BARRE TWP

Blackman St. & I-81 3,000 to 30,000 sq. ft Ideal for distribution & manufacturing HE lighting, heat sprinklers with drive in & 4 dock doors J B Post Co. 570-270-9255

Do you need more space? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way to clean out your closets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

950

Half Doubles

HANOVER TWP.

221 Boland Ave. 1 bedroom. $325+ utilities Call Mark at (570) 899-2835 (917) 345-9060

KINGSTON $695/month. New

bath, kitchen, living room, dining, 2 1/2 bedrooms. Water, sewer & recycling included. Gas fireplace. New flooring, ceiling fans. Washer/dryer hook up. Lease & security. Call after 6 pm. 570-479-0131

950

Half Doubles

PLYMOUTH

3 bedrooms, 2 baths, washer/dryer hookup, off-street parking, no pets, $700/month, plus utilities & security. Call (570)592-5030

953 Houses for Rent

DALLAS

FOR SALE OR RENT Single home in gated retirement village. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage. Granite countertops, hardwood floors, gas fireplace, appliances included. Quiet 55 plus community. No Pets. One year lease. $1675/mo + utilities & security. Monthly maintenance fee included. 570-592-3023

HANOVER TWP Modern 3 bedroom. 1 1/2 bath. Driveway. Gas heat. Lease. No pets. No smoking. $725 + utilities. Call Ann Marie Chopick 570-760-6769

Kingston, 3 BEDROOM, 1 bath in Kingston; $500/month; gas heat; being shown Saturday, 5/12 from 10am to 2pm; applications available at that time; bring credit report, current pay stub; security deposit $500; ready for occupancy after 5/13; 949-3227780 for further info; small pets considered.

PITTSTON 3 bedrooms, 2

baths, refrigerator, stove, washer/ dryer included. No pets. New gas furnace and gas hot water heater. $600/month, plus utilities & security. Call 570-655-4691 PLAINS 72 Cleveland Street 2 bedroom home, large Living room and kitchen. Washer /dryer hookups, with yard, electric heat $575 + utilities. Call Louise Gresh 570-233-8252 CENTURY 21 SELECT GROUP 570-455-8521

SHAVERTOWN

3 bedrooms, off-street parking, fenced yard, dishwasher. $760/month, + utilities. Section 8 Accepted 570-328-8643

SHAVERTOWN

Immaculate 2 bedroom Cape Cod with eat in kitchen, hardwood floors, gas heat, detached garage. $950/mo. + utilities and security deposit. Call now! 570-675-3178

SWOYERSVILLE

2 bedrooms, 1 bath, eat-in kitchen, small yard $575/month + utilities. Call 570-472-7145 SWOYERSVILLE Completely remodeled Large 2 story, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, single family home including refrigerator, stove, dishwasher & disposal. Gas heat, nice yard, good neighborhood,. Off street parking. Shed. No pets. $995 / month. 570-479-6722

WEST PITTSTON

KINGSTON Newly renovated, 3

bedrooms, 1 bath, kitchen, dining room & living room. Private drive, No pets & no smoking. $725 +utilities, references & credit check. No section 8. Call 570-288-3274

953 Houses for Rent

(570) 288-6654

HANOVER TWP.

Available June 1st Single home, 4 bedrooms, 2 baths. Stove, washer/ dryer hookup, offstreet parking, nice back yard. $800/month, plus utilities & security. 570-690-8669

LARKSVILLE Conveniently locat-

ed. Spacious 4 bedroom single. Gas heat. Off street parking. Lease, no pets. $650 + utilities & Security. Call Ann Marie Chopick 570-760-6769

570-288-6654

NANTICOKE Desirable

Lexington Village Nanticoke, PA Many ranch style homes. 2 bedrooms $900 + electric only

SQUARE FOOT RE MANAGEMENT 866-873-0478

Charming 1/2 double, newly renovated downstairs, 3 bedrooms, living & dining & breakfast rooms, kitchen. 1.5 baths, hardwood floors downstairs. beautiful woodwork & pocket doors. Dish washer, washer/dryer hook up. Front & back porches, fenced yard, garage, full attic & basement, gas heat. $800 + heat & utilities. 1st, last, security & references required. 570-675-0150

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WILKES-BARRE Safe

Neighborhood One 3 Bedroom $625 One 2 bedroom $585 Plus all utilities, references & security. No pets. 570-766-1881

959 Mobile Homes

DALLAS TWP. Newly remodeled 3

bedroom, 1 bath. Large kitchen with stove, water, sewer & garbage included. $545 + 1st & last. 570-332-8922

962

Rooms

KINGSTON HOUSE Nice, clean furnished room, starting at $340. Efficiency at $450 month furnished with all utilities included. Off street parking. 570-718-0331

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KINGSTON HOUSE Nice, clean furnished room, starting at $340. Efficiency at $450 month furnished with all utilities included. Off street parking. 570-718-0331

WILKES-BARRE

Furnished room for rent. Close to downtown. $90/week + security. Everything included. Call 570-704-8381

965

Roommate Wanted

LUZERNE MILLER ST.

971 Vacation & Resort Properties BRANT BEACH, LBI, NEW JERSEY 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, sleeps 10. 1 block to the beach 1/2 block to the bay. Front porch, rear deck, all the conveniences of home. Many weeks still available. $1,000 to $1,950. Call Darren Snyder 570-696-2010

Marilyn K. Snyder Real Estate, Inc. 570-696-2010

HARVEYS LAKE

Furnished Summer Home. Weekly and/ or Monthly. Starting June to end of August. Washer & dryer. Free boat slips. Wireless internet. 570-639-5041 OCEAN CITY . MARYLAND. Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/ partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800638-2102. Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com

SPRINGVILLE, PA

Male property owner seeking Male roommate to share furnished 1/2 double. $350 per month all utilities included. 570-338-2207

Lake Front Cottage “Simplicity” on Schooley Pond Fishing, Boating, Swimming & Relaxing. Boats included. $700/week. Call 570-965-9048

MOUNTAIN TOP

VACATION RENTAL Brant Beach - LBI, NJ 4 bedrooms; 2 baths, sleeps 10. 1 block to the beach, ½ block to the bay. Front porch, rear deck, all the conveniences of home. Many weeks still available. $1000$1950. Call Darren 570-825-2468

Male homeowner looking for responsible male roommate to share house. Minutes away from Industrial Park. Off street parking. Plenty of storage. Furnished room. Large basement with billiards and air hockey. All utilities included. $425. Call Doug 570-817-2990

968

Storage

WILKES-BARRE TWP. Casey Avenue

Large storage spaces. Available 800 to 3000 sq. ft. Ideal for business location Heat & electric optional Short or long term Sprinkler & CAM included J.B Post Company 570-270-9255

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timesleaderautos.com

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KINGSTON OFFICENTERS New Bridge Center 480 Pierce Street

Officenter–250 250 Pierce Street

Officenter–270 270 Pierce Street

Park Office Building 400 Third Ave.

WILDWOOD CREST Ocean Front, on

the beach. 1 bedroom condo, pool. 5/04/12 - 6/22/12 $1,250/week 6/22/12 - 9/7/12 $1,550/week 570-693-3525

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Officenter–220 220 Pierce Street

Call 829-7130 to place an employment ad. ONLY ONL NLY ONE N LE LEA LEADER. E DER. timesleader.com

Professional Office Rentals Full Service Leases • Custom Design • Renovations • Various Size Suites Available Medical, Legal, Commercial • Utilities • Parking • Janitorial Full Time Maintenance Staff Available

For Rental Information Call:

1-570-287-1161 www.lippiproperties.com

Times Leader 05-20-2012  

The Wilkes-Barre Times Leader 05-20

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