Page 1

CMYK

VALUE PACK OF DOTZ FOR ONLY

20

$

750204

50

$

The Times Leader timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE, PA

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

$1.50

MISCONDUCT

LOCAL DESCENDANTS OF TITANIC SURVIVORS

Living in memory

20 on board headed here

Events mark Titanic’s 100th By LEFTERIS PITARAKIS and JILL LAWLESS Associated Press

By TOM MOONEY Times Leader Correspondent

T

o most Americans, the story of the great ocean liner RMS Titanic is drawn from movies. It’s a love epic, a tale of corporate greed or a panorama of a vanished world of sharp class distinctions, all starring famous actors and actresses. To some Wyoming Valley families, however, the name “Titanic” calls up memories of their own ancestors confronting death in the freezing North Atlantic with courage and steadfastness. That is because nearly 20 of the more than 2,200 people on board AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER were headed for Wilkes-Barre. Mae Thomas with photos of her mother and uncle, who were on Titanic with Today, April 15, is the 100th anniMae’s baby brother, Assid. Uncle Charles did not survive. Charles led the way versary of the disaster. Why so many bound for one small up from the third-class area and found a woman on a boat to take Assid. city? To historian William V. Lewis Jr., who has studied the local contingent, there’s no mystery. It was a case of mostly related people from Hardine, Lebanon, following a standard immigrant pattern of heading for a town where family and friends had preceded them. They

ABOARD MS BALMORAL — In the birthplace of the Titanic, residents gathered for a choral requiem. In the North Atlantic, above the ship’s final resting place, passengers were to pray as a band struck up a hymn and three floral wreaths were cast onto the waves. A century after the great ship went down with the loss of 1,500 lives, events around the globe marked a tragedy that retains a titanic grip on the world’s imagination — an icon of Edwardian luxury that became, in a few dark hours 100 years ago, an enduring emblem of tragedy. Helen Edwards, one of 1,309 See 100TH, Page 10A

See TITANIC, Page 10A

In this April 10, 1912, file photo, the liner Titanic leaves Southampton, England, on its maiden voyage.

Colombia summit scandal widens

Some U.S. military implicated with Secret Service agents in incident involving prostitutes. By JULIE PACE and LIBARDO CARDONA Associated Press

CARTAGENA, Colombia — An embarrassing scandal involving prostitutes and Secret Service agents deepened Saturday as 11 agents were placed on leave, and the agency designed to protect President Barack Obama had to offer regret for the The allegamess over- tions were an shadowing his embarrassdiplomatic mission to La- ment for an tin America. American The contro- president on versy also expanded to the foreign soil U.S. military, and threatwhich an- ened to upend nounced five White House service members staying at efforts to the same hotel keep his trip as the agents focused on in Colombia may have been boosting ecoinvolved in nomic ties misconduct as with fastwell. They growing Latin were confined to their quar- America. ters in Colombia and ordered not to have contact with others. All the alleged activities took place before Obama arrived Friday for meetings with 33 other regional leaders. The allegations were an embarrassment for an American president on foreign soil and threatened to upend White House efforts to keep his trip focused on boosting economic ties with fast-growing Latin America. Obama was holding two days of meetings at the Summit of the Americas with leaders from across the vast region. See SERVICE, Page 12A

PUBLIC HOUSING IN COUNTY

Number of applicants waiting for subsidized unit to be available is more than twice inventory

Demand for shelter keeps growing By STEVE MOCARSKY smocarsky@timesleader.com

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

Danelle Jones is currently staying at Ruth’s Place, a shelter for homeless women in Wilkes-Barre, while looking for affordable housing in Luzerne County.

INSIDE

A NEWS Obituaries Local Click

2A, 8A 3A 9A

Danelle Jones spends at least four hours a day looking for an affordable place for her and her two sons to live. Another four hours are spent looking for a job. “Every day, I’ve been out looking at apartments, but people want way too much, especially when you’re on a fixed income,” said the 30-year-old Jones, who lost her job as a certified nursing assistant. Now staying at Ruth’s Place

IL Baseball

SWB Yanks win home opener Sports, 1C

House of Hope, a shelter for homeless women in WilkesBarre, Jones recently submitted an application to the Sherman Hills subsidized housing complex in the city. She was told there’s an approximately threemonth wait. At least there’s some light at the end of the tunnel now, given that she had been on a waiting list for a three-bedroom unit with the Luzerne County Housing Authority for nearly three years, Jones said.

B PEOPLE Birthdays C SPORTS Outdoors

6B 10C

D BUSINESS Motley Fool E VIEWS Editorial

PUBLIC HOUSING SUPPLY AND DEMAND Data from various housing authorities Eff.: Efficiency apartment BR: Bedrooms

INSIDE: Graphic showing location of public subsidized housing in county, Page 12A

Units in Luzerne County Applicants on waiting list 3,000

Dave Fagula, executive director of the Luzerne County Housing Authority, said a two- to three-year wait is not uncommon. And he expects it to get worse if the federal government continues to make cuts on social safety net programs such as housing assistance.

2,500 2,000 1,500 1,000 500 0

Eff.

1 BR 2 BR 3 BR 4 BR 5 BR Mark Guydish/The Times Leader

See HOUSING, Page 12A

4D 2E

F ETC. Puzzles Books G CLASSIFIED

2F 5F 6

09815 10077


K PAGE 2A

➛ timesleader.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

POLICE BLOTTER WILKES-BARRE -- A Kingston man charged with trying to stab a police officer during a traffic stop was convicted Thursday of four related charges after a jury deliberated for just over an hour. Daniel Miller, 25, was found guilty of charges of aggravated assault, simple assault,

resisting arrest and possessing a small amount of marijuana after a three-day trial. The jury found Miller not guilty of an additional count of aggravated assault. Judge Joseph Sklarosky Jr. said Miller, who was represented by attorney Allyson Kacmarski, will be sentenced on June 8. The case was prosecuted by Assistant District Attorney

Rebecca Reimiller. Police said Miller had a knife with a 3-inch blade in his hand when he was struggling with an officer in a parking lot on Wilkes-Barre Township Boulevard in August 2010. An officer grabbed Miller from behind, initiating another struggle in which the officer lost his ability to radio for more officers.

THE TIMES LEADER

Stash said two bystanders aided in Miller’s apprehension. SCRANTON – The U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Middle District of Pennsylvania charged a Nanticoke woman Tuesday with filing a false federal income tax return. According to U.S. Attorney Peter J. Smith, in March 2008, Deborah Rentko filed a

tax return for calendar year 2007 that “materially and falsely under-represented” her income. If convicted, Rentko could face three years in prison and a $250,000 fine. The investigation was conducted by the Internal Revenue Service, Criminal Investigation Unit. Assistant U.S. Attorney Lorna N. Graham is prosecuting the case.

BAL POLONAISE DEBUTANTES

Ruth Ann Benoska April 13, 2012

day, April 18, 2012 at 10 a.m. with the Rev. Joseph C. Simmons officiating. Pallbearers will be Stephen Benoska, Ronald Owings, Matthew Owings, Joseph Tino, Donald Mayers and Victor DeLuca. In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to Herman and Walter Samuelson Children’s Hospital, c/o Life Bridge Health, Dept. of Development, 2401 W. Belvedere Ave., Baltimore, MD 21215. Memory tributes may be sent to the family at mccomasfuneralhome.com

ea Schools and the Camp Hill Special School in Philadelphia. He worked for many years at the special workshop for United Rehabilitation Services in Wilkes-Barre and Hazleton. He was preceded in death by an uncle, Larry Chan. Surviving, in addition to his parents, are brother, Szu Kay Wong, Philadelphia; many aunts and uncles and numerous cousins. Family and friends are invited to attend a Memorial Celebration of Szu Van Wong’s Life on Tuesday from 3 to 5 p.m. at the Nat & Gawlas Funeral Home, 89 Park Avenue, WilkesBarre. Online condolences may be sent by visiting Szu Van’s obituary at www.natandgawlasfuneralhome.com.

Clair C. Herman April 13, 2012

ger South Wilkes-Barre, surrounded by his loving family. He was born in Allentown, son of Clair P. and Margaret E. Benicoff Herman. Clair was a graduate of Parkland High School, Allentown. He operated a landscaping business in the Allentown area for several years prior to his employment at Kraft Foods, Fogelsville. He retired in 1996. After relocating to the Back Mountain area, he worked in the maintenance department at Gate of Heaven School in Dallas. Clair was a member of Our Lady of Victory Catholic Church, Harveys Lake and its Holy Name Society. He loved gardening and was a faithful fan of the Philadelphia Phillies. He was preceded in death by his parents and several aunts and uncles. Clair is survived by his loving wife of 35 years, Jean Polacky Herman, and children, Christopher and his wife, Courtney Herman of Tuc-

son, Ariz.; Catherine and her husband, Troy Banks, of San Antonio, Texas; Carol and her fiancé, Dan Swartz, of Moscow, Pa.; Jeanne Herman of Bay Harbor Islands, Fla.; Maggie Herman, of Scranton; Kelli and her husband, Carl Ripperger, of Emmaus, Pa.; and Kevin Herman; grandchildren, Jack, Beau and Dane Herman, all of Tucson, Ariz.; Emily, Allison and Natalie Banks, all of San Antonio, Texas; and Steven and Sarah Ripperger, both of Emmaus. Funeral services will be held Tuesday, April 17, 2012 at 10 a.m. from the Richard H. Disque Funeral Home, 2940 Memorial Highway, Dallas, with a Mass of Christian Burial at 10:30 a.m. at Our Lady of Victory Church, Harveys Lake. Interment will be in St. Stephen’s Cemetery, Lehman. Friends may call Monday, April 16, from 7 to 9 p.m. at the funeral home. In lieu of flowers, at the family’s request, donations may be made in Clair’s name to Hospice Community Care, Geisinger South WilkesBarre, Hanover Street, WilkesBarre, PA, 18702 or to The American Cancer Society.

Joseph Casey April 14, 2012 (Poppy) Casey Jr., 68, of Pringle, passed away Saturday JApriloseph 14, 2012, at the South Bay Hos-

pital in Florida. He and his wife were snowbirds and had a winter home in Ruskin, Fla. He was born on October 2, 1943, to Joseph Casey and the late Gertrude Casey. He was a graduate of Kingston High School, and was employed at Wyoming Valley West School District for 28 years. Surviving are his wife of 19 years, MaryBeth (Martin) Casey; his father, Joseph Casey Sr., and stepmother, Evelyn Casey; brother, Thomas Casey, and wife Sylvia; former wife, Frances Casey; and eight grandchildren, Samantha, Justin, Sarah, Todd, Abigayle, Jarrid, Bradley and Adam; sister-in-law, Stella

Martin; nephew Nikki and wife Cristin; many other cousins, nieces and nephews. A granddaughter, Kayla Marie Casey, preceded him in death. He was a member of the Immanuel Baptist Church on Zerby Avenue, Kingston; The Sons of the American Legion, the Moose Lodge. He also loved his time at the LCP Little League fields. He enjoyed cheering for Notre Dame, the Dodgers, and the New York Giants and the Boston Celtics. Memorial donations can be made to the Immanuel Baptist Church on Zerby Avenue, Kingston. The family is following the wishes of Joseph to be cremated in Florida. A memorial service will be held in June or July 2012 in Pennsylvania.

More Obituaries, Page 8A

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

T

he 40th Bal Polonaise was held Saturday night at the Ramada Inn, Wilkes-Barre. Debutantes presented were, from left: Anna Borinski of Cherry Hill, N.J.; Brianna Zawacki of Old Forge; Marissa Durako of Laflin; Sarah Snyder of Dupont; Danielle Gorski of Laflin; and Victoria Zawacki of Old Forge. Along with their escorts, the debutantes performed the Polonaise, a national dance of Poland. The Polish Women’s Alliance of America Council 40 of Luzerne County and Council 44 of Lackawanna County held the formal affair, with the proceeds benefiting the alliance’s scholarship fund.

POLICE BLOTTER

April 12, 2012

lair C. Herman of Dallas passed away Friday, April 13, 2012 at C Hospice Community Care, Geisin-

HANOVER TWP. – Police said six people were cited with underage drinking at a residence on Main Road late Friday night. WILKES-BARRE – Police Police said citations were reported the armed robbery of a Wilkes University student as she issued to: • Ross Lortz, 19, of Eric Trail, walked home from a downtown Sussex, N.J. bar early Saturday morning. • Marc Evoy, 19, South Main Police said the student, who was not identified, was walking Street • Bret Mikulka, 18, High in the area of 109 S. Franklin St. Street, Plymouth around 1:45 a.m. when she was • Jenifer Maciejczak, 18, approached from behind by the Pulaski Street suspect and pushed to the • Patrick O’Donnell, 20, Haground. The suspect had a silver nover Village Apartments handgun and said, “Give me • Paige Rogers, 18, Church everything,” according to police. Street. The student handed over her black-and-gray purse containing HAZLE TWP. -- The front and an iPhone, credit cards and driver’s-side windows were personal items. The suspect, who fled on foot, is described as smashed on a company vehicle parked inside the Can-Do waste a black male, approximately 5 feet, 2 inches tall and wearing a treatment plant in the Humboldt Industrial Park, state hat. police said. The damage occurred beWILKES-BARRE – Police tween 3 p.m. Tuesday and 10 Saturday said they are investia.m. Wednesday. Anyone with gating the sexual assault of a information is asked to contact 16-year-old Kingston girl at the Wilkes-Barre Lodge, 497 Kidder state police in Hazleton at 570 459-3890. St., by three males unknown to her. DORRANCE TWP. – State police said Richard Gallagher, HAZLETON – Police Saturday said a man threatening to 44, of Blakeslee, was charged with failing to yield at a yield harm himself was taken into sign, after a two-vehicle crash custody after he was talked Wednesday morning at the down from a third-floor roof at intersection of Prospect Road his residence at 218 W. Fern St. and Country Club Drive. Ronald Dunn, 22, was taken Gallagher was stopped in his to Hazleton General Hospital Suzuki SX4 on Country Club for evaluation, police said. Police were called to the resi- around 11:25 a.m. and then dence around 2 p.m. for a report proceeded north into the intersection without clearance, of a man threatening to harm striking a Ford Ranger pickup someone for unknown reasons. truck traveling east on Prospect Police located Dunn in the Road, state police said. building and he went onto the Neither Gallagher nor the roof, threatening to harm himdriver of the pickup truck, Leoself. The area was secured off nard Pinkey Jr., 61, of Conyngand while police negotiated with Dunn he yelled profanities ham Township, reported injuries. Both men were wearing and exposed himself, police seatbelts, state police said. said. After nearly an hour, Dunn HAZLE TWP. – State police was talked off the roof and taken reported Louis Falzone, 24, of into custody. The investigation Wyoming, was involved in a into the disturbance is contincrash near the intersection of uing, police said. state Route 309 and Airport Road around 3 p.m. on ThursHAZLETON – Police Satday. urday reported a 20-year-old Falzone was driving a 2012 man was assaulted and robbed Nissan Altima north on state at gunpoint by three or four Route 309, lost control and men around 3:45 a.m. in the area of 17th and Church streets. struck a tree, state police said. He was not wearing a seatbelt The unnamed man said he and suffered a minor injury, was hit in the head with a gun state police said. several times and punched. He said his backpack, cash and a BLACK CREEK TWP. – Sandcell phone were taken in the ra Lee Montanari, 60, of Market robbery. Street, Weston, reported Thurs-

An PRASHANT SHITUT President & CEO (570) 970-7158

pshitut@timesleader.com

Daily Number, Midday Sunday: 3-5-7 Monday: 0-2-0 Tuesday: 1-1-1 Wednesday: 0-6-1 Thursday: 3-9-1 Friday: 4-3-7 Saturday: 7-4-9 Big Four, Midday Sunday: 0-5-5-0 Monday: 3-2-4-2 Tuesday: 0-5-8-0 Wednesday: 9-7-6-7 Thursday: 4-5-5-9 (9-8-7-9, double draw) Friday: 1-6-2-1 Saturday: 7-8-7-3

Treasure Hunt Sunday: 06-08-10-12-20 Monday: 10-11-14-15-16 Tuesday: 06-09-16-22-30 Wednesday: 05-11-14-15-17 Thursday: 11-19-20-22-25 Friday: 01-10-13-14-20 Saturday: 05-16-17-26-27

Szu Van Wong Szu Van Wong, 41, of Laurel Run and a resident of the New Hope House, operated by Step by Step in Tunkhannock, passed away suddenly on Thursday, April 12, 2012 at the Tyler Memorial Hospital in Tunkhannock. He had also formerly resided at the Impact House in Drums for many years. He was born in Wilkes-Barre, on August 15, 1970, a son of Bing K. and Joyce S. Chan Wong of Laurel Run. He attended Wilkes-Barre Ar-

LOTTERY SUMMARY

Quinto, Midday Sunday: 5-7-0-6-4 Monday: 0-4-8-4-2 Tuesday: 5-9-6-0-8 Wednesday: 8-6-8-8-5 Thursday: 9-8-1-7-0 Friday: 0-8-6-6-9 Saturday: 1-4-3-3-6

R

uth Ann Benoska, age 74, of Joppa, Md., passed away on April 13, 2012 at her home. Born in Larksville, she was the daughter of the late Wilfred Evan and Margaret Theresa Bryan Johns and wife, for 50 years, of the late Andrew Stephen Benoska. She was a member of Holy Spirit Catholic Church and the Joppatowne Women’s’ Club. She loved boating, living on the water and playing bridge. She enjoyed spending time with her family and friends. Mrs. Benoska is survived by her children, Patrick T. Benoska of Aberdeen, Md.; Andrew M. Benoska and wife, Linda Ruth, of Delray, Fla.; Deborah A. Owings and husband, Ronald K., of Forest Hill, Md. and Stephen W. Benoska and wife, Tina, of Abingdon, Md.; sister, Claire Anderson of Murrells Inlet, S.C.; and grandchildren, Matthew T. and Katherine A. Owings of Forest Hill, Md. Visitation will be held at McComas Funeral Home, PA. in Abingdon, Md. on Tuesday, April 17, 2012 from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. A Mass will be at Holy Spirit Catholic Church in Joppa, Md. on Wednes-

www.timesleader.com

JOE BUTKIEWICZ VP/Executive Editor (570) 829-7249

jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com

DENISE SELLERS VP/Chief Revenue Officer (570) 970-7203

dsellers@timesleader.com

ALLISON UHRIN VP/Chief Financial Officer (570) 970-7154

auhrin@timesleader.com

day her purse was stolen from her residence around 10:30 a.m. State police said there is a suspect in the case. PLYMOUTH TWP. – State police filed driving under the influence and summary traffic violations against Barry Blazick, 47, of 108 Mark Drive, Hanover Township. According to arrest papers: Blazick stopped his vehicle in front of a marked state police cruiser on state Route 29 around 10:50 p.m. Thursday and backed up. The state trooper turned on his emergency lights and Blazick turned around his vehicle and drove away. He later stopped near the intersection of state Route 29 and Poplar Street. Blazick was taken into custody and transported to WilkesBarre police for a legal breath test. The test indicated his blood alcohol content was 0.24 percent. An adult driver in the state is considered legally intoxicated with a blood alcohol content of 0.08 percent. He was committed to the county prison for lack of $2,000 bail. EXETER TWP. – Police charged Daniel Belcher, 28, of Harding, with simple assault and other charges Friday after he admitted hitting his brother in the head with a wooden 2by-4. Belcher said he consumed approximately one half of a bottle of Jack Daniel’s whiskey before the attack on Jeffrey Anselmi at their residence at 301 Perch Lane the night of April 4, police said. Anselmi suffered a laceration to the left ear from the blow to the head and his right hand had a deep cut from trying to pull the board out of his brother’s grip, police said. Belcher was arraigned on charges of simple assault, harassment and public drunkenness and committed to the Luzerne County Correctional Facility for lack of $2,000 bail. WILKES-BARRE – City police reported the following: • Rafel McCoy reported the theft of a motorcycle from 3 Courtright St. early Saturday. The 2011 Honda CRV 1000 is red and black with RA in silver letters on the front and Maryland license plate D54594. The theft, reported at around 3:20 a.m., occurred between March 25 and Saturday.

mprazma@timesleader.com

Big Four, 7 p.m. Sunday: 6-7-8-9 Monday: 1-0-9-7 Tuesday: 3-9-3-8 Wednesday: 2-7-7-3 Thursday: 2-2-3-2 Friday: 1-7-7-0 Saturday: 6-6-0-5 Quinto, 7 p.m. Sunday: 1-0-6-3-6 Monday: 2-3-2-6-7 Tuesday: 9-0-5-9-6 Wednesday: 1-3-5-2-1 Thursday: 5-2-8-5-4 Friday: 2-1-7-4-0 Saturday: 5-9-8-1-5 Cash 5 Sunday: 04-05-09-25-30 Monday: 03-05-23-37-43 Tuesday: 03-05-14-30-33 Wednesday: 10-14-15-30-43 Thursday: 03-19-32-33-41 Friday: 06-16-19-22-35 Saturday: 08-11-14-23-42 Match 6 Lotto Monday: 06-15-19-24-39-46 Thursday: 06-10-11-15-24-42 Powerball Wednesday: 16-23-42-44-47 powerball: 02 Saturday: 14-15-16-19-24 powerball: 02 Mega Millions Tuesday: 02-06-12-31-48 Megaball: 25 Megaplier: 04 Friday: 09-14-17-36-42 Megaball: 33 Megaplier: 04

OBITUARIES Benoska, Ruth Casey, Joseph Grivner, Richard Harris, Donald Herman, Clair Hughes, Jean Kolodziejczak, Helen Martin, Elizabeth McDowell, Gary Musto, Carrie Pelak, Anna Steinruck, Thelma Wong, Szu Van Yanniello, Ambrose Page 2A, 8A

BUILDING TRUST The Times Leader strives to correct errors, clarify stories and update them promptly. Corrections will appear in this spot. If you have information to help us correct an inaccuracy or cover an issue more thoroughly, call the newsroom at 829-7242.

+(ISSN No. 0896-4084) USPS 499-710

Issue No. 2012-106 Newsroom

829-7242 jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com

Circulation

Jim McCabe – 829-5000 jmccabe@timesleader.com

Published daily by: Impressions Media 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711

company MICHAEL PRAZMA VP/Circulation (570) 970-7202

Daily Number, 7 p.m. Sunday: 4-0-9 Monday: 2-6-9 Tuesday: 3-4-1 Wednesday: 2-9-0 Thursday: 4-4-9 Friday: 9-6-3 Saturday: 5-4-8

Periodicals postage paid at Wilkes-Barre, PA and additional mailing offices

LISA DARIS VP/HR and Administration (570) 829-7113 ldaris@timesleader.com

Postmaster: Send address changes to Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Delivery Monday–Sunday $3.60 per week Mailed Subscriptions Monday–Sunday $4.45 per week in PA $4.85 per week outside PA


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

I N

B R I E F

SCRANTON

Kulick is arrested

Robert Kulick, a one-time associate of a reputed mob boss, was arrested Thursday for failing to appear at a hearing in federal court the same day for allegedly violating the terms of his probation. Kulick was taken into custody at Geisinger Community Medical Center, Scranton, by a member of the U.S. Marshal’s Service and ordered detained by U.S. Magistrate Judge Kulick Malachy Mannion. Kulick, who had been an associate of reputed mob boss William D’Elia, served a prison sentence for a guilty plea to a convicted felon in possession of a firearm. He was on supervised release when he was arrested in February on charges of violating a protection from abuse order obtained against him by his wife, Rose Mattioli-Kulick of Bear Creek Township. She was subpoenaed to appear at the hearing. U.S. District Judge James Munley set a new hearing 10 a.m. Tuesday in U.S. District Court, Scranton.

➛ timesleader.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 3A

LOCAL Shooting suspect still at large State police arrest woman in connection with case involving William Gronosky Jr. By MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

PLYMOUTH TWP. – State police said Saturday they have made an arrest in connection with the search for William Gronosky Jr., the man who allegedly fired at a police during a car chase early Friday morning, but the suspect remains at large. State police said Saturday they arrested Ashley E. Evans, 23, of West Church Street, Nanticoke, on charges of hindering apprehension or prosecution and obstruction of law or other governmental

function in connection with the Gronosky case. State police said the charges stemmed from information obtained at 1:10 Friday morning, around the Gronosky same time Gronosky allegedly fired two shots at a police cruiser that was pursuing the Chevrolet Cruz that Gronosky was driving. Police combed the Parsons section of Wilkes-Barre on Friday morning looking for Gronosky and a woman known to him. State police said the woman is believed to be an exotic dancer at the Cabaret Lounge on Market Street, Kingston. Court records stemming from a May 2011 fight in which Evans was charged

with simple assault and summary offenses indicate Evans was then employed as a dancer at the Cabaret Lounge. State police said Evans was remanded to Luzerne County Correctional Facility in lieu of bail. State police also said Saturday they are continuing the search for the rented gold Chevy Cruz that Gronosky was driving during the incident Friday morning, which may now be displaying a different license plate. State police said they believe vehicle is displaying a Pennsylvania license plate, number DRS-3071, which was stolen from a vehicle in Centre Township, Columbia County. Gronosky and Kevin Williams Jr., 29, were charged last week for their alleged roles in the armed robbery at the Carou-

THEIR FIRST TASTE OF TROUT SEASON

WILKES-BARRE TWP.

Union group sets protest

An association of Pennsylvania unions is planning a tax-day protest of a legal loophole that allows corporations to avoid paying state taxes at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday at Toys R Us, 620 Kidder St. The CLEAR Coalition hopes to urge state lawmakers and Gov. Tom Corbett to close to the Delaware loophole, a gap in state law that allows companies to reduce their Pennsylvania corporate income taxes through royalties and similar payments to holding companies in other states. A bill to close the loophole cleared the state House April 2. CLEAR Coalition says the parent company of Toys R Us uses the loophole to avoid paying state income taxes. ROSS TWP.

Help for veterans set

A claims consultant from the WilkesBarre Veterans of Foreign Wars will be available to provide benefits’ assistance to veterans from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday at the office of state Rep. Karen Boback, R-Harveys Lake, at 5929 Main Road, Sweet Valley. Veterans assistance is available at the office during those hours on the third Tuesday of the month. Appointments are not necessary. Questions about the assistance hours can be directed to Boback’s district offices in Sweet Valley at (570) 4773752 or Tunkhannock at (570) 8364777. Residents also can call toll-free at (800) 278-3930. WILKES-BARRE

YMCA sets free classes

In celebration of its recent makeover, the Wilkes-Barre YMCA will be open to the public free of charge from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Wednesday. Free fitness classes, tours of the facility and light refreshments will also be offered. The YMCA will also mark the completion of renovations with a grand re-opening and ribbon-cutting ceremony at 10 a.m. Wilkes-Barre Mayor Tom Leighton and state Rep. Eddie Day Pashinski, D-WilkesBarre will be present, as will other city and Leighton community leaders and key players in the project. The ribbon-cutting will be followed by cake and refreshments, followed by free tours and use of the facilities. WILKES-BARRE

Weather spotter classes

The National Weather Service will host a free Spring Weather Spotter training class on April 23 at Wilkes University. The class will be held in room 101 of the Stark Learning Center, 150-180 S. River St., from 6:30 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. The class is designed to educate beginners on spring weather events like thunderstorms and tornadoes. Spotters will learn how to report high winds, wind damage, hail, heavy rain, flash flooding and tornadoes to the National Weather Service.

sel Lounge in West Nanticoke. State police said the two men got away with more than $3,500. They are persons-of-interest in a home invasion on Church Street, Hanover Township, on March 26. Both are still at large. State police on Thursday charged Courtney Marie Sadusky, 23, of WilkesBarre, with driving the pair away from the Carousel Lounge robbery, and driving Gronosky to burglarize the trooper’s house in Laflin, according to the criminal complaints. Sadusky told investigators she was coerced into helping Gronosky because her boyfriend owes him money for drugs, the criminal complaints say. Anyone with information about Gronosky and Williams is asked to call state police at Wyoming at 697-2000.

Funding is cut for Pa. pre-school programs

National Institute for Early Education Research report says upward trend has been reversed. By MARK GUYDISH mguydish@timesleader.com

S

him in the Democratic primary on April 24.” While Casey couldn’t make it, a number of state Democratic officials did turn out to support Hold-

After nearly a decade of increases, states have started cutting funding for pre-kindergarten classes nationwide, reducing both the number of students enrolled and the quality of programs, a national study contends. The pattern is apparently playing out in Pennsylvania and Luzerne County. The National Institute for Early Education Research released its “State of Pre-school 2011” report last week, and the emphasis was on a reversal of what had been an upward trend in state funding for pre-kindergarten programs. “Over the past decade, state-funded pre-K has been education’s biggest success story. Enrollment has grown dramatically, and, in a number of states, so has quality.” the executive summary begins, but “our data show that many states’ commitments to their State-level numyoungest citizens bers in the report are now slipping.” State-level num- show this holds bers in the report largely true for show this holds Pennsylvania. largely true for From 2001-02 to Pennsylvania. From 2001-02 to 2010-11, enroll2010-11, enroll- ment for 3-yearment for 3-year- olds rose 6 perolds rose 6 percent, while enrollcent, while enrollment for 4-year- ment for 4-yearolds rose 14 per- olds rose 14 percent. In the last cent. year of that stretch, from 2009-10 to 2010-11, 3-year-old enrollment rose 2 percent, but 4-year-old enrollment dropped 1 percent. The report data also show state spending on pre-k programs dropped by $850 per pupil from 2009-10 to 2010-11. The report warns that such cuts can not only reduce enrollment, but also can reduce quality of programs. Luzerne County Head Start Executive Director Lynn Biga said that has already started to happen here. “We had to eliminate a position out of our budget,” Biga said, adding the job cut involved family support to help parents learn what they need to do for their children to succeed, and to connect them with child care services such as dental exams and medical care. The report looks at the latest available national data, but that means it did not include cuts Gov. Tom Corbett made in his 2011-12 budget. Nor does it consider the potential impact of further cuts he has proposed in the 2012-13 budget. If the proposal is approved, Biga said, “our Pre-K Counts will be reduced by $150 per child. The report and Biga repeated the mantra of early-education proponents:

See ENDORSE, Page 4A

See PRE-SCHOOL, Page 4A

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

aturday was the opening day of trout season in the area and anglers lined the banks of waterways such as Solomon Creek for a Trout Fishing Derby. For more coverage, see Sports, Page 1C.

Since law requires expiration dates, only LCCC’s ID acceptable

Some college IDs get the vote By ANDREW M. SEDER aseder@timesleader.com

Though college ID cards are among the acceptable photo identifications included in the recently enacted Pennsylvania voter ID law, only some local students can use their current college IDs at the polling place. The law requires that identity cards display expiration dates, and as of now, IDs at only one local college -- Luzerne County Community College in Nanticoke -- meet that requirement. Since the requirement won’t be enforced until the November general election, colleges have time to add an expiration date. Two local local schools say they will add the dates, two are studying the change and others are

undecided or will not change. Misericordia University in Dallas Township has student identification cards that include a sticker bearing the academic year, but because the words “expire” or “expiration” do not appear, they would not conform to the new state law. Paul Krzywicki, a Misericordia spokesman, said the college “is examining adding an expiration date to student IDs to meet and comply with the new law.” King’s College will be “gauging how practical” adding expiration stickers or other possible remedies are, spokesman John McAndrew said. McAndrew noted that college IDs are like credit cards since they use a

Student ID card from Luzerne County Community College is OK at polls.

magnetic strip on the back that stores information and can be activated or deactivated so there has been no need to post an expiration date on them. Current student IDs at Keystone See COLLEGE IDS, Page 4A

Holden gets Sen. Casey’s backing in writing Senator couldn’t attend rally for incumbent facing primary challenge.

Former 10th District U.S. Rep. Chris Carney, right, reads a letter of endorsement for Congressman Tim Holden, left, written by U.S. Sen. Robert Casey. Casey, D-Scranton, was unable to attend the event due to a last-minute conflict. Holden is being challenged by area attorney Matt Cartwright.

By MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

SCRANTON – U.S. Sen. Robert Casey delivered an endorsement for Rep. Tim Holden in the 17th District primary, but not in person. Casey, D-Scranton, was scheduled to attend a rally for Holden in downtown Scranton on Saturday, but canceled Friday night because of a last-minute family commitment, Holden said. Casey’s campaign manager confirmed he had a family commitment but did not elaborate. In the senator’s stead,

JASON RIEDMILLER/GO LACKAWANNA

former 10th District Rep. Chris Carney read a statement from Casey. “I am supporting Tim Holden in his campaign for reelection because of his good work for Pennsylvania families,” Casey

wrote. “I’ve work with Tim while I served as a state official and as a member of the PA delegation and I believe he would serve the people of the 17th District with distinction. I will vote for


CMYK PAGE 4A

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

N

E

W

S

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

ENDORSE Continued from Page 3A

en, a 10-term incumbent who is being challenged in the primary by attorney Matt Cartwright of Moosic. Among them were state senators John Yudichak and John Blake and state representatives Mike Carroll and Sid Michaels Kavulich. “We’ve seen a redistricting that has changed the face of Pennsylvania politically, and I actually said on the floor of the Senate, I said notwithstanding what I thought of it… I tell you one thing for sure that we’re glad to have is Tim Holden in the 17th District here in Northeastern Pennsylvania,” Blake said. Carney said Holden’s seniority in the House and on its Agriculture and Transportation and Infrastructure committees is crucial to bringing federal dollars to the area. “(Cartwright) is a good guy, but Matt, if he came in, goes to the back of the line, and seniority is critical,” Carney said. “When we talk about getting transportation bills through, Tim is at the table; when we talk about anything

COLLEGE IDS Continued from Page 3A

College, in La Plume, do not have expiration dates. But that will change in the fall semester, said college spokesman Fran Calpin. “Now that the new voter identification law is officially in effect, Keystone plans to update our student IDs to conform to the new law,” Calpin said. Marywood University in Dunmore is going to add expiration dates to student IDs, though a school spokeswoman said those plans were already being discussed before the voting law was signed. She said it was to ensure only current students had access to campus facilities such as the pool and fitness center. Wilkes University is planning to accommodate students who

PRE-SCHOOL

SPRING Sales Drive With EXCEPTIONAL EPT Inventory, Selection, Price, Quality & SAVINGS

JASON RIEDMILLER/ GO LACKAWANNA

District 17 U.S. Rep. Tim Holden speaks to supporters in Scranton where U.S. Sen. Bob Casey endorsed him in a letter.

in agriculture, Tim is at the table; when we talk about anything for Pennsylvania, it is Tim at the table.” Cartwright, who attended a labor rally on nearby Courthouse Square on Saturday morning, wasn’t fazed by Casey’s endorsement of his opponent. “I have the deepest respect for Sen. Casey and I look forward to serving with him when I’m elected,” Cartwright said. He said he is confident headed into the April 24 primary. “Without getting into specifics, the polling has showed quite clearly that the outrageous attacks on me and my

family are not working on the people of Northeast Pennsylvania,” Cartwright said. “We’re smarter than that around here.” The campaign between the two Democrats has gotten particularly aggressive, with both candidates on the attack in advertisements. Holden said he has campaigned this aggressively in the past, but “not in a primary.” He defended his ads, saying that “Matt Cartwright was killing me in the mail for a month before I went on television; he’s posing for holy pictures on TV and killing me in the mail.”

lack other acceptable Penn State campus- for the Penn State Hazleton campus, forms of ID, said es in Hazleton, located in Sugarloaf Vicki Mayk, a spokesTownship, said syswoman for the Wilkes-Barre and tem officials are Wilkes-Barre school. Dunmore issue IDs aware of the law and “Since a majority of based on the Penn the lack of complistudents have anothState system regu- ance with the IDs er form of identificabut no decision has tion, such as a driv- lations that do not been made to er’s license, Wilkes include expiration change the cards. does not have plans dates, only issue University of to re-issue new cards Scranton spokesto all students, facul- dates. man Stanley Zygty and staff. It would munt said his colbe cost prohibitive. However, we are planning to lege does not conform with the provide a new card with a visible law right now, and “at this time, expiration date to students who we are not planning on changing have no other form of identifica- the ID.” Neither Lackawanna College tion, so that they can participate nor Baptist Bible College has in elections,” Mayk said. Penn State campuses in Ha- plans to change ID formats. All of the colleges said they zleton, Wilkes-Barre and Dunmore issue IDs based on the will be doing outreach to inform Penn State system regulations students of the changes to the that do not include expiration voting law, either through school offices or student-led dates, only issue dates. Susan Bartal, a spokeswoman clubs or organizations.

don’t start school behind their peers, which in turn means they are more likely to succeed, less likely to need special-education Continued from Page 3A services and, in the long run, Studies show assuring that dis- more likely to graduate and live advantaged children are pre- productive lives. Students who pared for first grade means they don’t get the extra education

have higher odds of turning to crime or drugs. “I think states should care about their children and their human capital,” Biga said. “As we dicker about this, the window of opportunity for children disappears. You’re only 3 and 4 once.”

WHY GO

ANYWHERE One of Pennsylvania’s largest inventories of Toyotas

ELSE?

B Brand new environmentally ffriendlyToyota Certified ccollision center

Over 100 certified employees dedicated to serving you

Luxury customer lounge with Wi-Fi and flat screen TVs for your comfort

60,000 square-foot brand-new state-ofthe-art facility

ONLY Dunkin’ Donuts in a Toyota Dealership in the United States

OVER 790 TOYOTAS AVAILABLE! NEW

2012 COROLLA L

Model #1831 Stock# 1831A, Manual, MSRP: $17,395 NO DOWN PAYMENT! LOW PAYMENT!

139 209

$

*

$

per mo. for 36 mos. lease with $0 down

per mo. for 36 mos. lease with $2,999 down

OR

NEW

1

*

.9% APR

117

for up to 60 mos.†

OTHER UNITS OT A AVAILABLE

2012 CAMRY L

Model #2514 Stock# 44601 MSRP: $22,844 NO DOWN PAYMENT! LOW PAYMENT!

169 239

$

*

$

per mo. for 36 mos. lease with $0 down

per mo. for 36 mos. lease with $2,999 down

OR

NEW

2

*

93

.9 % APR for up to 60 mos.†

OTHER UNITS OT A AVAILABLE

2012 RAV4 AWD

Model #4432 Stock# 44451 MSRP: $25,010

NO DOWN PAYMENT!

LOW PAYMENT!

169 239

$

*

$

per mo. for 36 mos. lease with $0 down

per mo. for 36 mos. lease with $2,999 down

OR

NEW

0

*

% APR

146

NOW WITH

500

$

for up to 60 mos.†††

Lease Bonus Cash!

OTHER UNITS O AVAILABLE

2012 HIGHLANDER 4WD

Model #6948 Stock# 44591 MSRP: $34,032

NO DOWN PAYMENT!

LOW PAYMENT!

269 339

$

*

$

per mo. for 36 mos. lease with $0 down

per mo. for 36 mos. lease with $2,999 down

OR

NEW

0

*

53

.9% APR for up to 60 mos.†

OTHER UNITS OT A AVAILABLE

2012 TUNDRA

DOUBLE CAB 4X4

Model #8339 Stock# 44502 (4.6L V8, Automatic) MSRP: $32,030 NO DOWN PAYMENT!

LOW PAYMENT!

279 379

$

*

per mo. for 36 mos. lease with $2,999 down

OR

0

$

% APR for up to 60 mos.†

*

per mo. for 36 mos. lease with $0 down

NOW WITH

1,000

$

65

Bonus Cash!††

O OTHER UNITS A AVAILABLE

For the past three years, Toyota Scion of Scranton was recognized with the prestigious President’s Award for excellence in each of a series of categories, including Customer Sales Satisfaction and Customer Service Satisfaction.

nce! re e f if D e h T e k a M We

3400 34 3 400 N. N. Main M in Ave, Ma Ave ve,, SC SCRANTON CRA RANT NTON NT O ON

570-489-7584 www.ToyotaScionofScranton.com www ToyotaScion nofScranton com

*All offers end close of business April 30, 2012 or while supplies last. Lease offers are for 36 Month with 12,000 annual miles and excludes tax, tags and $128 processing fee, first payment and $650 acquisition fee. Quantities as of 4/09/12. †Finance and lease offers require tier 1 plus credit approval through Toyota Financial Services. All leases are based on 12,000 miles per year. No security deposit required for all leases. Available unit counts include both in-stock and incoming units for all model years and trim levels for series described. **Cash Back offers includes funds from Toyota of Scranton, Toyota Financial Services and Toyota Motor Sales combined. Vehicle must be in-stock units --- Prior sales excluded. Customer must present ad at time of purchase. ***Lease based on 36 month term or 12,000 miles. Includes scheduled maintenance complimentary for 24 months or 25,000 miles. †† Must finance or lease with TFS. See dealer for details. ††† APR offer on Rav4 0% for 60 mos. expires end of business Monday, April 30, 2012. 2012 Impact Advertising 12TSS-NVC-WTL041512


K ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

A

T

I

C E A S E F I R E AT R I S K

B R I E F

O

N

&

W

O

R

L

D

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 5A

Security council vote comes as fighting increases between regime and rebels

U.N. to send monitors to Syria The Associated Press

AP PHOTO

Harleys rumble in Cuban celebration

Bikers acknowledge the crowd Saturday after participating in the competition to place a single straw into bottles that lined their path in Cuba’s first national gathering in honor of the Harley-Davidson motorcycle in Varadero, Cuba. Cuba’s ‘Harlistas’ are just as passionate as their American counterparts, but like the owners of rumbling 1950s Detroit classic cars that still prowl the streets of Havana, vintage Harley fans have had to get creative to keep their bikes roadworthy.

BEIRUT — The U.N. Security Council voted unanimously Saturday to dispatch a first team of monitors to Syria to shore up a brittle cease-fire as escalating fighting between regime and rebel forces threatened the truce at the heart of special envoy Kofi Annan’s peace plan. Syrian troops shelled residential neighborhoods and rebel gunmen fired rocket-propelled grenades in the central city of Homs in the first use of heavy weapons since the cease-fire officially took effect Thursday. Loud booms echoed across the city as smoke rose above badly damaged apartment blocs. In other parts of Syria, both sides described several deadly shootings and ambushes, and reported at least 14 people were killed. Saturday’s resolution gave the 15-

nation Security Council its first united front since the uprising against President Bashar Assad began 13 months ago; it called for immediate deployment of up to 30 monitors, to be followed by a larger contingent of up to 250 once the situation has stabilized. Emphasizing that both sides must halt the violence that has killed more than 9,000, the council called on Syria to pull soldiers and heavy weapons out of towns and cities — a truce provision Assad’s regime has ignored. It also demanded urgent compliance with Annan’s six-point plan intended to lead to talks between the regime and the opposition on Syria’s political future. The plan is widely seen as the only remaining chance for diplomacy, mainly because it has the backing of Syria allies Russia and China, which

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Susan Rice addresses the media at U.N. headquarters Saturday after the U.N. Security Council cast a unanimous vote authorizing the deployment of the first wave of U.N. military observers to monitor a ceasefire in Syria. AP PHOTO

shielded Assad from Security Council condemnation in the past. Annan said in Geneva that he was “very relieved and happy” about the council vote. Western powers and opposition

leaders remain skeptical about Assad’s willingness to ease his tight grip on the country, ruled by his family for four decades. The regime appears to have complied with parts of the Annan plan, while flouting others.

ALL DRESSED UP

Iran nuke talks go to 2nd round in Baghdad

PYONGYANG, North Korea

‘Military first’ is stressed

ours after a failed rocket launch H criticized abroad as a covert test of missile technology, North Korea’s new

leader underlined the country’s “military first” policy with a budget that allocates a sizable chunk of funding to defense spending. North Korea’s legislature also rubberstamped Kim Jong Un’s leadership of the country and promoted a host of relatively younger military officials to the powerful National Defense Commission, state-run media reported Saturday, in a strong indication that will have an overarching role in policy, just as it did under his father, late leader Kim Jong Il. Still, Premier Choe Yong Rim told legislators the nation’s top priority is to build up the economy and improve the people’s standard of living, according to the state-run Korean Central News Agency.

GREENLAND, N.H.

Town honors slain officer Mourners have gathered for a memorial in honor of a New Hampshire police chief who was shot to death days before retiring. Greenland police Chief Michael Maloney was trying to serve a search warrant Thursday night when a suspect opened fire, killing him and wounding four officers. Other community leaders and residents congregated Saturday at a school. KABUL, AFGHANISTAN

Council chief takes over The son of a former Afghan peace council chairman assassinated last fall by a suicide bomber was chosen Saturday as his successor in a renewed push to revitalize efforts to negotiate an end to the decade-long war. The election of Salahuddin Rabbani came on the same day that the government-appointed peace council held talks in Kabul with a delegation from Hizb-i-Islami, one of three major militant factions that are instrumental to crafting a peaceful end to the conflict as U.S. and other foreign troops leave. Part of the U.S.-led coalition’s exit strategy is to gradually transfer security responsibility to Afghan forces by the end of 2014 when most international troops will have left or moved into support roles. LONDON

Bee Gee Robin Gibb ill British media reports say former Bee Gee Robin Gibb is gravely ill with pneumonia in a London hospital. The Sun newspaper reported Saturday that 62-year-old Gibb is in a coma, citing a family friend. Gibb’s publicist, Doug Wright, declined to comment, but Gibb’s son has acknowledged that the 62-year-old musician is seriously ill. Gibb was hospitalized last year for stomach and colon problems and had intestinal surgery last month. He was forced to miss the London premiere of his classical “Titanic Requiem” this week because of illness. The Bee Gees — brothers Robin, Barry and Maurice Gibb — had a string of disco-era hits including “How Deep is Your Love” and “Stayin’ Alive.”

Diplomats sense progress being made in talks on country’s nuclear program. The Associated Press

AP PHOTO

Palestinian Christian girls take part in the Holy Fire procession during Orthodox Easter holiday in the West Bank city of Ramallah, Saturday.

Midwest states hit with storms Large hail, tornados already seen across wide area and worse could be ahead, weather experts say.

The Associated Press

OMAHA, Neb. — Baseball-sized hail was breaking windows and tearing siding off homes in northeast Nebraska, while tornadoes were spotted in Kansas and Oklahoma on Saturday as forecasters warned residents across the nation’s midsection to brace for “life threatening” weather.

Tornado sirens sounded across Oklahoma City before dawn, and at least three possible tornadoes were reported west and north of the city, said Oklahoma Department of Emergency Management official Michelann Ooten. Some homes were damaged, though no injuries were immediately reported. But the most dangerous weather was expected later in the day, and National Weather Service officials issued a stern warning for residents to prepare for overnight storms that could spawn fast-moving tornadoes. “The threat isn’t over with tonight, un-

fortunately. Severe weather is possible again tomorrow from east Texas and Arkansas and up to into the Great Lakes,” said Bill Bunting, chief of operations at the Storm Prediction Center. In Nebraska, Boone County Sheriff David Spiegel said the large hail also damaged vehicles and shattered windows in and around Petersburg. Two possible tornadoes were reported father south in Nebraska near the Kansas border, according to the National Weather Service, which confirmed that at least one rain-wrapped tornado touched down in southwest Kansas and another in Oklahoma.

Law provides Zimmerman additional chances in legal fight Recent laws give lethal-force defendants options other defendants don’t get. By CURT ANDERSON AP Legal Affairs Writer

MIAMI — George Zimmerman persuaded the police not to charge him for killing unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin, but the prosecutor has accused him of murder. Soon, armed with unparalleled legal advantages, Zimmerman will

Zimmerman

get to ask a judge to find the killing was justified, and if that doesn’t work, he’ll get to make the same

case to a jury. The wave of National Rifle Association-backed laws that began seven years ago in Florida and continues to sweep the country has done more than establish citizens’ right

to “stand your ground,” as supporters call the laws. It’s added extra chances for people who use lethal force to keep their freedom that defendants accused of other crimes don’t get. While the states that have passed “stand your ground” laws continue to model them loosely after Florida’s — Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and New Hampshire put expanded laws on the books last year — Florida is unique. One area that sets Florida

apart is the next step Zimmerman faces: With the police and prosecutor having weighed in, a judge will decide whether to dismiss the second-degree murder charge based on “stand your ground.” If Zimmerman wins that stage, prosecutors can appeal. But in another aspect peculiar to Florida, if the appeals court sides with Zimmerman, not only will he be forever immune from facing criminal charges, he could not even be sued for civil damages.

ISTANBUL — Iranian and European officials expressed confidence in the results of Saturday’s negotiations on Tehran’s disputed nuclear program as it was announced that the two sides will meet again in Baghdad on May 23. The very fact that there will be another round adds to a growing sense among diplomats that the two sides were Jalili making notable progress in talks that have grown increasingly tense as the West has tightened sanctions on Iran and Israel has threatened a preemptive military strike on the Islamic republic. But the challenges in the next round could be far more significant. That’s when the six powers will likely seek further commitments from Tehran to reduce concerns that it could use its uranium enrichment program to make the fissile core of nuclear missiles. EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton called Saturday’s talks in Istanbul constructive and said future talks will be guided by the “principle of a step-by-step approach and reciprocity.” That indicates the international community is ready to reward Iran if it moves to alleviate fears that it intends to weaponize its nuclear program — rewards that could include delaying or easing some sanctions. Iran’s chief negotiator, Saeed Jalili said his team “saw a positive approach (from the other side) and we consider it a step forward.” Iran insists its nuclear program is peaceful, and Ashton said Saturday that Tehran has a right to such a peaceful program. At the same time, she added, the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty must be the “key basis” for future talks. Iran asserts that it has not violated the treaty.

Look in THE TIMES LEADER for today’s valuable inserts from these advertisers:

FURNITURE KING

HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS

Some inserts, at the advertisers’ request, only appear in selected neighborhoods. If you would like to receive an insert that you do not currently receive, please call the advertiser.

748780

I N

N


CMYK PAGE 6A

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

THE TIMES LEADER Michael Gruenhill and Brenden Alsaffar check out an Xtra 300 plane on display Saturday at the 7th Annual Aviation Exploration Day at the Wilkes-Barre/ Scranton International Airport in Pittston Township.

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Promoting flight, aiding others

By GERI GIBBONS Times Leader Correspondent

PITTSTON TWP. -- The Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport provided the opportunity Saturday for the Marywood Aviators aviation club to educate and inspire area residents with an airplane flight costing only $20 and benefiting Angel Flight East. The group is a chapter of the Angel Flight America organization, which provides air flights to those whose medical needs can be met only at health care facilities located far from their homes. Volunteer pilots from the airport’s flight school made it possible to introduce area residents to the sky, and Saturday’s fair weather made it an especially pleasant experience. Darrin Long, who heads Marywood’s aviation club, said he is grateful the club is able to assist Angel Flight East. Long also said the event provided the opportunity to teach area residents about the specifics of aviation. He said many area youth were

present at the event and were eagerly absorbing information as they made their way through the hangar. Kristinia Luke, 27, a graduate of Marywood and now an employee of the Angel Flight East chapter in Blue Bell, said she is humbled every day by the commitment of the volunteers pilots who transport patients. She noted one such patient started flying with AFE at 8 weeks old and is now 3 years old and still being served. The first words of the tiny patient when learning to talk were “clear prop,” an aviation term that means to clear the area when the plane is about to take off. Luke said this is an indication of how the pilots not only transport patients, but truly care and become a part of their lives. Harry Morales, himself a pilot, founded the organization in 1992. Committed to public-benefit flying, the Angel Flight East chapter of the organization flew 17 missions in its first year. Today, almost 1,000 missions are completed annually, ensuring

that patients are able to get needed medical attention even if it means traveling a great distance. The hangar was filled with residents young and old who had an appreciation for flight and for the community spirit defined by the event. Cecelia O’Malley, 5, enthusiastically used a flight simulator to learn about flying. “We considered going to another airport,” said O’Malley’s father, Rob, “but we chose this event because it gave us the opportunity to fly and to benefit a worthy organization at the same time.” Marywood also sponsored a raffle and basket drawing to raise money. In addition, the Save-A-Life organization presented information at Saturday’s event about suicide prevention and family support for those in crisis. Long said he anticipated that at least 1,000 people would take advantage of the day to fly in one of two planes, the Piper Warrior and the Piper Archer, made available by the airport.

LAKE TOWNSHIP

Supervisors take steps to stem illegal dumping the property owner is working with DEP to clean it up. “Normally, they give 30 to 45 days for the homeowner to clean up the debris,” Piatt said. Supervisors decided to take advantage of some quotes for material through the state-run COSTARS Program. COSTARS is a joint effort by the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation and the Department of General Services to give municipalities the ability to find competitive prices on necessary items. Supervisors approved a quote from Central Clay Products for $9.99 per 50 pound bag of magnesium chloride. Other bids were from Bradco Supply Co., Towanda, for $11.40 per bag; and John Bonham Road Equipment and Supply, Honesdale, for $11.45 a bag. Supervisors also approved

quotes from Central Clay Products to purchase six pipes at $9.50 a foot and six pipe bands for $12.23 a piece. Other quotes were received from Bradco Supply and John Bonham Road Equipment and Supply but were a few cents more than Central Clay Products, Piatt said. American Asphalt’s quote for blacktop was also approved, but Piatt did not have the cost or the volume of material. In other business, Secretary Carlene Price said $47,285.80 from FEMA was received for damage sustained from storms Lee and Irene in late summer.

• William Dobson, Hanover Township, and Jean Dobson, Hanover Township • Donald Michael Jacobs, Jr., Divorces sought and filed in West Pittston, and Debra D. Jacobs, Pittston the Luzerne County Protho• Milagros Arce, Taylor, and notary’s Office from April 9 Reinaldo Arce Ortiz, San Sebasthrough 13, 2012: • Randall Holdren, Shickshin- tian, Puerto Rico Marriage license applicany, and Linnea Holdren, Freetions filed in the Luzerne land • Alex Hilliard, Harveys Lake, County Register of Wills Office from April 9 through 13, 2012: and Tara Hilliard, Wilkes-Barre • Timothy Lee Vargo, Du• Nicholas Scintilla, Hazleton, pont, and Susan Harper Mikitko, and Diane Scintilla, Drums Lock Haven • Ellen Diluzio, West Hazle• David Eugene O’Kane, ton, and Joseph Diluzio, West Plymouth, and Rose Marie Hazleton Zavrel, West Wyoming • Tulia Terron, unknown • Camile A. Thomas, Wilkesaddress, and Nemesio TlaBarre, and Cynthia Everett, tenchi, Wilkes-Barre Wilkes-Barre • William Dangelo, Berwick, • Michael Anthony Sando, and Jessica Dangelo, ShickshinNanticoke, and Jillian Leigh ny Bush, Nanticoke • Jason Gruver, Hazleton, • Starlin Javier Santana and Robin Gruver, Hazleton Mejia, Hazleton, and Jackeline • Teresa Gill, Swoyersville, Fernandez Gonzalez, Hazleton and John Gill, Jr., Ashley • Barrett Lyndon Jamison, • James Scouton, Kingston, Wilkes-Barre, and Yolanda Rose and Robin Scouton, Pottstown Browning, Wilkes-Barre • David Breese, Hanover • Michael Marriggi, Duryea, Township, and Chandra Breese, and Holly Molenda, Duryea Hanover Township • George Theodore Oberg, III, • Brett Sweeting, Dallas, and Theresa Sweeting, Williamsport Shavertown, and Rachel Lee Holmberg, Shavertown • Corey Pacewicz, Wilkes• Franklyn K. Nunez, HazleBarre, and Kayla Pacewicz, ton, and Anaida Aquino, HazleScranton • Christine West, Drums, and ton • Jeffrey Adam Davison, Kenneth Wilson, Nashville, Plymouth and Candice Leigh Tenn. • Jayne Ann Klenner-Moore, Muench, Plymouth • Michael Carl Kompinski, Shavertown, and Douglas E. Wilkes-Barre, and Melissa FehMoore, Shavertown

linger, Wyoming • Kyle Edward Drake, Pittston, and Rachel Marie Goetze, Pittston • Brian A. Abraham, Exeter, and Jennifer A. Dreabit, Exeter • Duane Joseph Evans, Nanticoke, and Kathy J. Thomas, Nanticoke • Benjamin Michael Pippenger, Dallas, and Ashley Ann Davenport, Dallas • Jason Dominick Dallaverde, Pittston, and Cathryn Noel Warner, Dallas • Eugene Stoodley, Mountain Top, and Sharon D. Davies, Mountain Top • Dominic Musto and Heather Ann Vandervort • Joshua Lee Sorber and Nichole Anne Coulter • Daniel James Cornelius and Tracy Ruth McGeever • Paul T. Fisher and Epefania Marquez Daulong • Jeffrey D. Cundiff and Letha J. Jones • Peter B. Crabb and Tammy Marie Brill • Stephen Joseph Volpe and Kelli Marie Malia • Martin Patrick Kane and Sara Katherine Muth • Francisco I Ibarra, Jr., and Alejandra Gonzalez Hernandez • John Herb and Christina Bolinski • Pedro Norberto Catillo Almonte and Yunill Montes • Robert Joseph Blake and Jennifer Lynn Micklo • Nicholas Angelo Tarullo and Stephanie Nicole Petchel

By EILEEN GODIN Times Leader Correspondent

LAKE TWP. -- On Wednesday, township supervisors took action to prevent further illegal dumping on Sunny Acres Road and approved three bid quotes through the state COSTARS Program. Chairman Lonnie Piatt said material from outside the township was being brought to a property on Sunny Acres Road and dumped. The township’s ordinance restricts and regulates dumping within the township. Supervisors authorized township attorney Mark McNealis as enforcement representative to send a registered letter to the property owner on the violation. Also, the state Department of Environmental Protection was notified and recently met with the property owner. Piatt said

PUBLIC RECORDS

W H AT ’ S N E X T The next supervisors meeting will be at 7 p.m. May 9 in the municipal building.

www.timesleader.com


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

N

E

W

S

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 7A

1962 Pittston Twp. boys of summer celebrate Little Leaguers ended season with record of 12-8, 50 years worth of bragging rights. By STEVEN FONDO Times Leader Correspondent

PITTSTON TWP. -- The members of the 1962 Pittston Township championship Little League baseball team relived a part of their “glory days” Saturday as they entered their “golden years” by celebrating the 50th anniversary of their championship “We’ve all season. The golden remained anniversary in contact was held ay the Pittston over the Township LitLeague years and tle complex as we thought part of openthis would ing day festivbe a great ities. The 12 way to cel- teammates, in their ebrate the now early 60s were 50th anni- part of the Pittston Townversary ship Giants, while we’re which compiled a record all still of 12-8 in 1962 around.” -- good enough Frank to capture the Sciabacucci community ti1962 team’s tle and a half catcher century of bragging rights. “It’s a walk down memory lane,” said a smiling Frank Sciabacucci, the 1962 team’s catcher. “We’ve all remained in contact over the years and we thought this would be a great way to celebrate the 50th anniversary while we’re all still around.” Saturday’s commemorative event started with a group breakfast at Perkins Pancake House and culminated with a formal presentation ceremony

442 RVs & Campers

SUSQUEHANNA RV

TAX RELIEF SALE APRIL 13-21 Save Thousands On All In Stock Campers. Rt 522 Selinsgrove Rt. 11 Bloomsburg

509

Building/ Construction/ Skilled Trades

Rockwater Energy Solutions

is currently hiring for General Laborer Positions for the oil and gas industry. These positions are for Water Transfer operations in the Marcellus (NE PA) area. The ideal candidate will possess previous experience in general labor or construction. Valid Driver’s License and clean driving record required. If offer is extended, employment reference checks, MVR, criminal background check and Drug Test will be administered. Competitive Pay & Benefits. Please contact Ivonne at (724) 249-3358, ibasora@rock waterenergy.com.

944

Commercial Properties KINGSTON COMMERCIAL SPACE

1,250 sf. Excellent for shipping & receiving. Private powder room. Loading dock. Separate over head and entrance doors. Gas Heat. Easy Access. $450 + security & references. 570-706-5628

509

Pittston Township Giants team of 1962. Front row: Danny Mulhern, Aaron Herron, Fred DeSanto, Charlie Dietrich, Earl Stanton and Sam Barletta. Back row: Carl Angello, Matt Amico, Ross Valenti, Frank Sciabacucci, Ray Bernardi, Tony Rostock, Pete Fiume and Anthony Chairge.

AIMEE DILGER PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

Fred DeSanto holds up the winning ball for the 1962 Little League champion Pittston Township Giants. He is the anniversary celebration co-organizer and a member of the 1962 team. Danny Mulhern of the 1962 Giants team shakes hands with Justin Lasota as Tyler Cebula makes his way to the pitcher’s mound.

at Pittston Township’s baseball diamond. “I’ve been involved in local Little League baseball administration for the last 16 years,” said Fred DeSanto, anniversary co-organizer and a member of the 1962 team. “My Little League experience as a child made me want to pass the experience on to future generations.” DeSanto gave a speech recounting the 1962 season along with a brief biography of the 12 players. “It was sort of difficult condensing 50 years into 30 sec-

Building/ Construction/ Skilled Trades

Rockwater Energy Solutions is hiring for all posi-

tions in Flowback operations in the Marcellus (SW PA, NE PA, WV) & Utica (Ohio). Valid Driver’s License, Background and Drug Test required. Competitve Pay & Benefits. Please contact Ivonne at (724) 249-3358, ibasora@rock waterenergy.com or apply online at www.scs-signal.com

538

Janitorial/ Cleaning

Part Time Cleaning Hanover and Pittston Locations

SEVERAL GENERAL CLEANING JOBS ARE NOW AVAILABLE FOR PART TIME EVENINGS. STARTING RATES OF $9.00. HOURS ARE 5PM-8PM – 5PM7:30PM AND HANOVER AREA’S HOURS ARE 8PM-6AM FRIDAY– SATURDAY AND SUNDAY. APPLY ONLINE AT: WWW. SOVEREIGNCS.COM EOE AND DRUG FREE WORKPLACE

30+ DAY

BEING REMODELED

NORTH WILKES-BARRE FIRST FLOOR EFFICIENCY / 1 BEDROOM, BRAND NEW FLOORING, CARPETING, MODERN/APPLIANCES, ELECTRIC/GAS FIREPLACE. APPLICATION/EMPLO YMENT VERIFICATION “being considered” NO PETS/SMOKING 2 YEARS @ $500+ UTILITIES. MANAGED!

America Realty Rentals

288-1422

538

Janitorial/ Cleaning

CLIENT SERVICES MANAGER- FULL TIME

Position available for well established NEPA facility services cleaning company. Person with multi facets of facility cleaning services skill set and managerial duties of facility cleaning-hotel staff helpful. This position is 2nd shift, hours of 3pm-11pm or 4pm-12 midnight with occasional weekends as needed. It is extremely high pace and requires many hours traveling within the day up to 75 miles. Salary is based on skills and years of experience. Must have no less than 5 years current experience in housekeeping, commercial cleaning and supervisor knowledge. Company car after 4 months, car allowance provided in interim with cell phone and laptop. NO phone calls please. Apply online at www.sovereigncs. com. Job description is available online. EOE & Drug Free workplace.

542

Logistics/ Transportation

CDL-A Driver: REGIONAL RUNS KEEP YOU NEAR HOME Benefits after 30 days • Great pay and freight • Great, newer trucks • Start right away! Hiring New CDL Grads, too 888-702-0348 drivewith western.com

953 Houses for Rent

HARDING

Mt. Zion Road 6 rooms and bath, stove provided, washer/dryer hookup, no pets or smoking. $650/ month, plus utilities, & security deposit. Call 570-388-2675 or 570-388-6860

onds,” joked DeSanto. He said he plans to send an account of the anniversary celebration to the world Little League headquarters in Williamsport to encourage other teams to follow suit. The members of the 1962 Pittston Township Giants are: Danny Mulhern, Bob Moscatelli, Aaron Herron, Fred DeSanto, Charlie Dietrich, Earl Stanton, Sam Barletta, Nick Rossi, Ross Valenti, Frank Sciabacucci, Ray Bernardi, Tony Rostock and assistant manager Pete Fiume. Team manager John Angelella is deceased.

548 Medical/Health

573

Warehouse

WAREHOUSE

Home Health Registered Nurse

Looking for a growing, local company where your nursing care is appreciated? CareGivers America is now hiring 3 Full Time RN Case Managers (Clarks Summit, Stroudsburg & Berwick Branch offices) for which we’ll give you the tools (company car/laptop/cell phone) so that you can take care of your patients. Strong assessment skills required. Home Health & OASIS experience preferred. 888-7759099. Resumes to rjacobs@caregivers america.com.

Find Something? Lose Something? Get it back where it belongs with a Lost/Found ad! 570-829-7130

551

Other

Fireworks company looking to hire 12 days in summer. GREAT FUNDRAISING OPPORTUNITY. Debbie 570-619-1025 debivins2000@ yahoo.com

906 Homes for Sale

BACK MOUNTAIN Centermorland

Wednesday (4/18) 1 pm until 3 pm.

We are a National Convenience Store Distribution Company seeking 2nd AND/OR 3rd SHIFT WAREHOUSE WORKERS Full time and part time positions available. Generous benefit package for full time employees, and various bonus programs! Apply @

100 West End Rd. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706 NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE SHOW UP AND BE INTERVIEWED!! All applicants subject to pre-employment drug and background check. EOE

746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets

PLAINS INDOOR YARD SALE

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 133 North Main St. Sat, April 21st 8 am - 2 pm Household items, jewelry, food, and more!

941

529 SR 292 E For sale by owner Move-in ready. Well maintained. 3 - 4 bedrooms. 1 ¾ bath. Appliances included. 2.87 acres with mountain view. For more info & photos go to: ForSaleByOwner.com Search homes in Tunkhannock. $275,000. Negotiable For appointment, call: 570-310-1552

Apartments/ Unfurnished

FORTY FORT

1 BEDROOM APTS Very nice, clean, great neighborhood, hardwood floors, a/c, washer /dryer with newer appliances, storage, 1st/last/security with one year lease. References required. $650$695 + utilities. Water/sewer by owner, no pets, non-smoking. Call 202-997-9185 for appointment

Pittston Township Giants of 1962 member Charlie Dietrich signs a team ball while the rest of the team waits to sign. Saturday’s commemorative event started with a group breakfast at Perkins and culminated with a formal presentation ceremony at Pittston Township’s baseball diamond.


K PAGE 8A

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

AMBROSE R. YANNIELLO, 88, Old Forge, died Saturday in the Regional Hospital of Scranton. His wife is the former Jean Semenza. Born in Old Forge, son of the late John and Mary Panatieri Yanniello, he was a 1941 graduate of Old Forge High School. Ambrose was the owner of Yanniello’s Market in Old Forge. Surviving are son, John; daughter, Ann Goodall, Old Forge; four grandchildren; nieces, nephews. He was preceded in death by brothers, Rex, John “Dusty” and Guy; sisters, Florence Amantea, Velia Angelini, Clara Sebastianelli, and Lillian Capone. The funeral will be Tuesday at 9:15 a.m. from the Victor M. Ferri Funeral Home, 522 Fallon St., Old Forge, with Mass at 10 a.m. in St. Mary’s Church. Interment will be in Old Forge Cemetery. Friends may call Monday from 4 to 8 p.m. To leave an online condolence, visit www.ferrifuneralhome.com. ELIZABETH F. MARTIN, 93, formerly of Wilkes-Barre and Kingston, passed away quietly Friday evening at Highland Manor Skilled Nursing Center, Exeter, along with the care of Hospice Community Care, Kingston. Arrangements are pending from Kniffen O’Malley Funeral Home, Inc.

HELEN R. KOLODZIEJCZAK, 93, of Washington Street, Nanticoke, passed away late Friday night, April 13, 2012, at Hospice Community Care of Geisinger South Wilkes-Barre. Complete obituary will be presented in the Monday, April 16, 2012 newspaper. Arrangements are by Grontkowski Funeral Home P.C., Nanticoke. CARRIE MARRANCA MUSTO, 92, of Pittston Township, passed away peacefully in her sleep at her home, Saturday morning, April 14, 2012. Funeral arrangements are pending from the Peter J. Adonizio Funeral Home, 251 William St., Pittston. GARY L. MCDOWELL, 54, of Howard Street, Larksville, died Friday, April 13, 2012, at Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center, Plains Township. Funeral arrangements are pending from the Andrew Strish Funeral Home, 11 Wilson St., Larksville. CAPT. RICHARD L. GRIVNER, USMC (RET.), 80, of Lawrence Street, Wilkes-Barre, died Saturday, April 14, 2012 at home. Funeral arrangements are pending from the Yeosock Funeral Home, 40 S Main St., Plains Township.

FUNERALS BARRALL – Grant, services 4 p.m. today in the Heller Funeral Home, Nescopeck. Friends may call 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday. FISHER – Joseph, funeral 9:15 a.m. Monday in the Nat & Gawlas Funeral Home, 89 Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in St. Maria Goretti Church, Laflin. Friends may call 2 to 6 p.m. today in the funeral home. GOSS – Lisa, funeral 10 a.m. Monday in the S.J. Grontkowski Funeral Home, 530 W. Main St., Plymouth. Mass of Christian Burial at 10:30 a.m. in All Saints Parish, Plymouth. Friends may call 4 to 7 p.m. today. HUGHES – Jean, funeral services 11 a.m. Wednesday in Church of Christ Uniting, corner of Sprague Avenue and Market Street, Kingston. Friends may call 4 to 7 p.m. Tuesday in the Harold C. Snowdon Home for Funerals, Inc., 420 Wyoming Ave., Kingston. KLEMASH – Alvina, funeral Mass 10 a.m. Monday in St. Robert Bellarmine Parish in St. Aloysius Church, 143 West Division St., Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call 9 to 10 a.m. in the church vestibule. KULIG – Patricia, funeral 9 a.m. Wednesday in the Frank J. Bonin Funeral Home Inc., 592 N. Wyoming St., Hazleton. Mass of Chris-

OBITUARY POLICY The Times Leader publishes free obituaries, which have a 27-line limit, and paid obituaries, which can run with a photograph. A funeral home representative can call the obituary desk at (570) 829-7224, send a fax to (570) 829-5537 or e-mail to tlobits@timesleader.com. If you fax or e-mail, please call to confirm. Obituaries must be submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Obituaries must be sent by a funeral home or crematory, or must name who is handling arrangements, with address and phone number. We discourage handwritten notices; they incur a $15 typing fee.

G en etti’s

A fterFu nera lLu ncheons Sta rting a t$7.95 p erp erson

H otelBerea vem entR a tes

825.6477 Happy 25th Birthday In Heaven

JOHN RICHARD BLANNARD 4/15/87 ~ 12/12/07

Twenty five years ago a perfect little baby was born. That baby grew into a wonderful young man. This world has lost you, but heaven gained a beautiful soul! The pain of losing you will not pass until the day we are reunited. I love and miss you, my sweet Johno! Sadly Missed And Forever Loved! Mom, Dad, Brothers Lee, Adam and Corey, Family And Friends

tian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in the Parish of Ss. Cyril and Methodius at the Church of St. Joseph, Hazleton. Friends may call 6 to 9 p.m. Tuesday. LAKTASIC – Anna, funeral 9:30 a.m. Tuesday in the Betz-Jastremski Funeral Home Inc., 568 Bennett St., Luzerne. Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in Holy Family Parish, Luzerne. Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m. Monday. MACRI – James, funeral 9 a.m. Monday in the John V. MorrisCharles J. Leagus Funeral Home, 281 E. Northampton St., WilkesBarre. Funeral Mass at 9:30 a.m. in the Church of St. Nicholas, 226 S. Washington St., Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call 4 to 7 p.m. today. MILLS – David Sr., Memorial Services 10 a.m. Monday in St. Thomas More Church, 105 Gravity Road, Lake Ariel. PODCZASKI – Joseph, funeral 9:30 a.m. Monday in the Gubbiotti Funeral Home, 1030 Wyoming Ave., Exeter. Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. at Holy Trinity Church, Swoyersville. Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m. today in the funeral home. ROBACHESKI – Anthony, funeral 9:30 a.m. Monday in the Earl W. Lohman Funeral Inc., 14 W. Green St., Nanticoke. Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in Holy Trinity Church, Nanticoke. Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m. today. TEMARANTZ – Joseph, funeral 9 a.m. Monday in the MamaryDurkin Funeral Home, 59 Parrish St., Wilkes-Barre. Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in Exaltation of the Holy Cross Church, Buttonwood Section of Hanover Township. Friends may call 4 to 7 p.m. today at the funeral home.

O

B

I

T

U

A

R

I

E

S

THE TIMES LEADER

Jean Robbins Hughes

Anna Pelak

April 12, 2012

April 13, 2012

Robbins Hughes, 81, died Thursday of complications from Jheartean surgery.

Born in Scranton on August 4, 1930 to the late Elisabeth Shonk Robbins and Walter Scott Robbins, she was a lifelong resident of Wyoming Valley, a1948 graduate of Wyoming Seminary, a 1952 graduate of Wheaton College in Norton, Mass., and a student at the Katherine Gibbs School in New York City. Prior to her marriage to Frank H. Hughes in 1955, Jean worked at her family’s business, the Robbins Door & Sash Company in Wilkes-Barre. She spent more than a decade delivering for the Meals on Wheels program, was a longtime member of the Wilkes-Barre Junior League and its sustainers, and served tirelessly as both volunteer reader and on the Board of the Greater Wilkes-Barre Association for the Blind. She sat on numerous committees at the Church of Christ Uniting in Kingston, where she also taught Sunday School for many years. In 2010 she was honored to receive Wyoming Seminary’s Joseph C. Donchez Distinguished Service Award. Jean was an owner of Wyoming Valley Motors. In her spare time, Jean was an avid supporter of the theater and attended countless performances in both Northeastern Pennsylvania and on Broadway. She was an extraordinary conversationalist, exceptional needlepoint artist, and acted as de facto photographer for many of her friends and family. She loved to travel and was proud and privileged to have visited virtually every corner of the globe. Despite her many journeys, she was never more comfortable than when at home in her beloved Wyoming Valley. Jean was a veritable institution in Kingston’s Butler Street neighborhood, where she lived for more than 55 years, and spent countless summers at Bear Creek Village, where she was one of the last surviving members of its fabled Old Guard. Jean was widely known and celebrated for her indomitable spirit and steadfast and unparalleled loy-

nna Pelak, 84, a resident of WesA ley Village, Jenkins Township, and formerly of Pittston, died peace-

alty and devotion to family and friends. It was typical for Jean to be the first to arrive and last to leave whenever anyone in her circle needed support. She was a lady of incredible grace, dignity, courtesy, and elegance, qualities that she extended and displayed to friends, acquaintances, and strangers alike. Preceding her in death, in addition to her parents, were her husband of 52 years, Frank H. Hughes, and brother, William Shonk Robbins. Surviving are sons, Frank Robbins Hughes, Kingston; William Shonk Hughes, Park City, Utah; daughter, Betsy Hughes Phillips, Summit, N.J.; grandchildren, Andrew and Christina Hughes and Caroline and Leslie Phillips; her companion, Robert Post, Dallas. Funeral services will be held Wednesday, April 18, 2012 at 11 a.m. at Church of Christ Uniting, corner of Sprague Avenue and Market Street, Kingston. Reverend Dr. Carol Ann Fleming will officiate. Interment will be made in Oak Lawn Cemetery, Hanover Township. Friends may call Tuesday, April 17, from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Harold C. Snowdon Home for Funerals, Inc., 420 Wyoming Avenue, Kingston. Memorial contributions may be made to the Kirby Center for the Performing Arts, the Hoyt or Osterhout Libraries, the Wilkes-Barre Historical Society, the Church of Christ Uniting or the Greater Wilkes-Barre Association for the Blind.

Donald E. Harris April 11, 2012 Donald E. trum. Harris, of StanHe loved to travel to tropical iston Street, lands with his childhood sweetheart Wilkes-Barre, and loving wife, the former Debra Osdied Wednes- trum. They would have celebrated day in the Hos- their 30th wedding anniversary June pice Commu- 12, 2012. nity Care Unit In addition to his wife and parents, of Geisinger surviving are daughters, Stephanie South Wilkes- and her husband, Curtis Cibell, Bear Barre after a lengthy and coura- Creek Township; Kimberly Harris, geous battle with cancer. Wilkes-Barre; brother, Walter Harris, Born Oct. 18,1958, in Lakehurst, Wilkes-Barre; sisters, Sharon and her N.J.,. son of Eugene and Elsie See- husband, Raymond Toney, Kingston; ley Harris. He was a graduate of Terry Height, Boca Raton, Fla.; DonMeyers High School and formerly na Leoszewski, Luzerne; several niecworked for Mesko Glass, Carey es and nephews. Avenue, Wilkes-Barre, and King The family would like to thank HosGlass, Swoyersville pice Community Care for their excepA wonderful husband and lov- tional care. ing father, Don loved to camp, hike A memorial service will be held and attend plays and musicals with Monday from 4 to 7 p.m. from Mamhis daughters and also fishing with ary-Durkin Funeral Services, 59 Parhis late father-in-law, Calvin Os- rish St., Wilkes-Barre.

Funeral Lunches starting at $ 7.95 Memorial Highway, Dallas • 675-0804

LAST OPPORTUNITY

NOTICE TO ALL VETERANS and ex-service personnel who have loyally served their country in peace and in war.

If you were honorably discharged and live anywhere in the State of Pennsylvania, you are now entitled to a burial space at no cost in the veteran’s memorial section at

Chapel Lawn Memorial Park RD 5 Box 108, Dallas, PA 18612

This offer is available for a limited time only. Special protection features are available for your spouse and minor children with National Transfer Protection. This limited time offer is also extended to members of the National Guard and Reserve. Space is limited. Conditions - Burial spaces cannot be for investment purposes. You must register for your free burial space.

1-800-578-9547 Ext. 6001

www.timesleader.com

fully on April 13, 2012, surrounded by her loving family at Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center, Plains Township. She was born in Wilkes-Barre, on April 16, 1927, a daughter of the late Alexander and Catherine Kaluzny Dasheski. She was a graduate of Coughlin High School and had been employed for many years at King’s College, Wilkes-Barre. Anna was a devoted member of St. Nicholas Russian Orthodox Church, Seneca Street in WilkesBarre where she was an active member of the church choir for most of her life. She was past president of the church Sisterhood and was a member of the parish Council. Anna, also known lovingly by all as “Nanna Anna,” loved life and was filled with love for all who knew her. She loved to sing and dance whenever she had the opportunity to do so, especially at the nursing home. She was a member of the Pittston Senior Center, the American Legion Post 837 of Brookside and the Anthracite Social. Anna was preceded in death by her husband of 47 years, Stephen Pelak, in 1995; and by her oldest daughter, LaVerne Pelak, in 1994; sister, Anastasia Shanko, 1986, and by a nephew, Nicholas Shanko Jr. Surviving are her daughter; Katherine Dellarte and her son-in-law, Dr. Frank Colella, Harding; son, Stephen Pelak and his wife, Anne, New Rochelle, New York, and by three grandchildren, whom she adored and were her life, Myles Dellarte, Spencer Pelak and Danielle Colella; nephews, Gregory P. Shanko, funer-

al director, Wilkes-Barre, and Basil S. Kaczmarczyk, Plains Township; David S. Shanko, Elizabethtown, Pa.; greatnieces, Lisa Moore, Manheim, and Lori Shanko-Cavanaugh, Mount Laurel, New Jersey; great-great nephew Thomas Henry Moore. Funeral services will be held Tuesday at 10 a.m. in St. Nicholas R.O. Church with the Rev. Fr. Adam R. Sexton as celebrant. Interment will follow in the Orthodox Lawn of Fern Knoll Burial Park, Dallas, PA. Viewing will be held on Monday from 4 to 8 p.m. at the Nat & Gawlas Funeral Home, 89 Park Avenue, Wilkes-Barre, and from 9 to 10 a.m. Tuesday at the church. Parastas will be Monday at 7 p.m. Memorial donations may be made to St. Nicholas Russian Orthodox Church, 58 Seneca Street, WilkesBarre, PA 18702. The family would like to thank the staff of Wesley Village and of the Intensive Care Unit at Geisinger Wyoming Valley for their devoted and excellent care of Anna. Condolences may be sent online by visiting Anna’s obituary at www.natandgawlasfuneralhome.com

Thelma L. Steinruck April 11, 2012 helma L. Steinruck, 90, a resiT dent of Mill Street, Benton, passed away April 11, 2012, in Bon-

ham Nursing Center, Stillwater, Pa. She was born June 21, 1921, in Shickshinny, a daughter of the late Charles H. and Olivia Baer Long. She was a member of the Fairmount Springs United Methodist Church and the church choir and served many years as a secretary to the church and helped with the church dinners. She was a member of the Rohrsburg Grange and a 4-H leader and the Grassmere Garden Club. Thelma loved to sing and yodel. Surviving are a son, Harold Steinruck, and wife Alice, Benton; grandchildren, Kendra Everitt, Benton; Lara Miller, Palmyra; Jana Eshleman, Benton; Heidi Ipher, Benton; great-grandchildren, William and Brianna Everitt; Claire Miller; Duane Eshleman Jr., Alissa Eshleman; Kaden and Kolby Mohr; sisters Helen Masters and Arlene Dennis; brothers, William Long and Ronald Long; son-in-law Claude Ipher. She was preceded in death by her husband, William Steinruck. They were married on Feb. 19, 1938. Also preceding her in death were her daughter, Glenda Ipher, and sisters

Opal Featherman and Belva Titus. Funeral services will be held on Monday at 11 a.m. from the Clarke Piatt Funeral Home Inc., 6 Sunset Lake Road, Hunlock Creek, with Pastor Michael Bodek officiating. Friends may call at the funeral home today from 6 to 8 p.m. Interment will be in Bloomingdale Cemetery, Ross Township, Shickshinny. Memorial contributions may be made to the Fairmount Springs United Methodist Church, c/o Gail Sorber, 218 Old Country Road, Benton, PA 17814.

More Obituaries, Page 2A

In Memory of Joanne Basar Glushefski May we send our heartfelt thanks to all who gave so generously of their kindness, sympathy and prayers following the death of our beloved Joanne. We are very grateful to the many friends who came to offer condolences at the funeral home. Your outpouring of love and support will never be forgotten and was of great comfort to us in our time of sorrow. To all those who shared in the funeral liturgy celebration at Exaltation of the Holy Cross Church, your prayers in word and song made a very difficult day much easier to bear. We give special thanks to Dr. David Greenwald M.D, his nurses, and the office staff at Medical Oncology Associates. You went above and beyond the limits of caring and compassion. Joanne was a wonderful person, and through the memories she gave to each of us, may she forever live on in our hearts.

M .J. JUD G E

M MON UM EN T CO. ON UM EN TS - M ARK ERS - L ETTERIN G

8 2 9 -4 8 8 1

N extto the Big Co w o n Rt. 309

John & Toni Basar John & Scott Glushefski

Card of Thanks from the family of the late Kal Kazimi

The Kazimi family would like to sincerely thank everyone who supported Kal and his family during his sickness and after his passing.This difficult time has been made easier by your outpouring of support and generosity. We would like to thank everyone that attended his memorial service, called or sent cards to our residence, wrote articles or notes in the newspaper, sent flowers or gifts, and those who made memorial contributions to good causes on behalf of Kal. It was wonderful to meet and hear from so many people and to see what an impact Kal had on their lives as well as his community. The Kazimi family would like to once again thank everyone for supporting us in our loss. We are very proud of Kal and the great people who were his friends and acquaintances.


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

IREM CIRCUS AT THE 109TH ARMORY

âž›

C

L

I

C

K

SENIORS HAVE TALENT FUNDRAISER

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 9A

TITANIC EVENT AT HISTORICAL SOCIETY

PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

Al and Barbara Albert, and Wilbur Hayes, all from WilkesBarre

AIMEE DILGER PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

Charles Parsons and Floyd K. Roby PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

Jack Granahan and Margaret Craig

Phil Rodzon and Shannon Brienza of Shavertown Ally, 4, Bea, 6, Terri and Anne, 4, Davis Andy Lane, left, and Dale Wagner

Jodi and Steve Thompson of Bear Creek Miranda Woodburn and Lilli Palchanis Magdaline Griffiths, left, and Rosalie Kolesar

Maddison, 10, Makayla, 2, Amy and Mackenzie, 1, Gregorio Karen and Dr. Richard Blum of Kingston

Wendy Belaski, left, and Julie Esty

Abagail Tobin, 2, and Alexis Bodosky, 9

Sharon Gravenstine, left, Sally Eisenbach and Carol Tredinnick

Annette and Jenna Smith, 10, of Duryea


CMYK PAGE 10A

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

N

E

W

S

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

AT A G L A N C E

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Mae Thomas points out her brother, Assid, who with their mother survived the Titanic sinking. Assid was 3 months old at the time.

TITANIC Continued from Page 1A

known as “steerage.” Survivors that night were picked up by the ship Carpathia, and days later they disembarked in New York City.

Mae Thomas’ family The story of the Titanic has been part and parcel of the life of Mae Thomas, now 87, whose family was on board the ship. She is immensely proud of them and says she has never hesitated to tell their story. “I was 6 years old in school,” she said. “And the teacher brought up the subject of the Titanic. And I raised my hand. I said my mother was a survivor of the A night to remember Titanic. “And, you know what? (the The Titanic’s sinking has become part of the folklore of the teacher) came up here. She said western world. The brand-new ‘Your daughter said you were on ocean liner, hyped as the biggest the Titanic. Is it true?’ My mother and most luxurious ever said ‘My daughter doesn’t lie,’ launched, set sail on its maiden and she started telling the teachvoyage April 10, 1912, from er her experiences.” Her Rolling Mill Hill home Southampton, England, for Chercontains bourg, France, many phowhere it picked up U P N E X T tos of her some more pasmother, sengers, including The Luzerne County Historical Thelma – the group from Le- Society’s 154th annual dinner meeting with be themed, “Stories who died banon. of the Wilkes-Barre Titanic PasJan. 7, 1974 At Queen- sengers” at the Westmoreland -- and brothstown, Ireland, it Club at 59 S. Franklin St., Wilkeser Assid, picked up more Barre. Author Dr. William V. Lewis who surand then headed Jr., Titanic survivor descendant vived the westward across Mae Thomas and TV newsman David DeCosmo will speak. For sinking, as the Atlantic, more information, call 823-6244, well as othscheduled to dock ext. 3. er relatives. in New York City. Her uncle, But late on the evening of April 14, about 375 Charles Thomas, did not survive. Thelma, only a teenager at the miles south of Newfoundland, Canada, the great ship suffered a time, was en route to America gash in its side as it turned in an with her infant son, Assid. They attempt to avoid an iceberg that were being escorted by Charles, to join Thelma’s husband, Alexlookouts detected too late. Historians agree that a delay in ander, who along with Charles making the decision to abandon had emigrated earlier. It was ship, an insufficient number of common in those days for a man lifeboats, poor training of the to travel to a new land first and crew and difficulty of other ships send for his wife and children onin coming to assist combined ly after he had established himwith the collision to produce the self. Charles remains in Mae Thogreatest civilian maritime disasmas’ mind as an example of ter in history. When the ship finally went steadiness in the face of sure down in the darkness of the next death. As she tells the story, in the morning, about 1,500 (figures vary) of the passengers and crew crush of people struggling to get perished – about two-thirds of from the third-class area to the the total on board. The losses few remaining lifeboats, Thelma were especially heavy among became separated from Charles, third-class passengers, who who was carrying Assid. With Thelma safe in a boat, bought the cheapest tickets and occupied crowded conditions Charles begged women getting knew they would be welcome. Lewis’ book, “Stories of the Wilkes-Barre Titanic Passengers,” came out just days ago. “There was a well-established Lebanese community here that was thriving, and that explains it,” he said. “With a few exceptions, it was all about the Lebanese community. Most of the folks on the Titanic were related, if they were Lebanese.”

Statistics Length: 892 ft., 9 in. Gross tonnage: 46,328 Top speed: 23 knots People Total on board: 2,207 passengers and crew Survivors: 712 Construction Built over three years by Harland & Wolff, Belfast, Northern Ireland Launched 1912 Sole voyage The ship left Southampton, England, on April 10, 1912. Proceeded to Cherbourg, France, thence to Queenstown, Ireland, after which it headed into the open North Atlantic. The destination was New York City. Sinking It struck an iceberg approximately 375 miles east of Newfoundland, Canada, late on the evening of April 14, 1912. It sank early the following morning. Discovery The wreck, deep underwater, was discovered by oceanographer Robert D. Ballard in 1985 and was photographed extensively in 1986. Website www.encyclopedia-titanica.org Classic book on Titanic “A Night to Remember,” by Walter Lord (1955) There are innumerable other books, including photos taken by explorer Ballard’s crew. Movies (selection) “Titanic” (1953) “A Night to Remember” (1958) “Titanic” (TV movie, 1996) “Titanic” (1997 – re-released in 3D in 2012)

into the boats to take the baby with them. With the “women and children first” policy of the time, he had little hope of saving himself. Finally he found a woman to take the child to safety. Mae Thomas said that as the lifeboats pulled away Thelma began screaming in Arabic for her baby and had to be restrained from climbing back aboard the Titanic. Lacking safety equipment Why did the Titanic, the most luxurious ship afloat, not have enough lifeboats? Maritime rules of the day did not require lifeboats for all. The prevailing assumption was that a sturdy modern vessel would be able to transfer all passengers and crew to a rescue ship in a series of relays before sinking. The rule makers did not anticipate that a great liner would sink as quickly as did the Titanic or that help in the era of telegraph communication would take so long. Dolores Borek Elias, of Laflin, tells a similar story of rising to a challenge. Her grandmother Amenia Moubarek, 24, and her sons, 4-year-old William and 7year-old George, were on board. So were Amenia’s sister Celiney, 15, who was newly married, and her husband, Antoni Yasbeck, making a return trip to WilkesBarre. “Their cabin was near the boil-

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Mae Thomas has a wall with photos that tell the story of her connection with the Titanic. Thomas – who was born after her family arrived in America -- calls her mother ‘my hero.’

er room, and they felt the bump,” said Elias. “So that’s why they were able to get up to the deck early.” Still, the trip upward from steerage was difficult. Led by Antoni, the family struggled with long passageways and locked gates. When they were finally on deck, he helped them get through the crowd and into the very last lifeboat – a canvas collapsible. “I really credit him with saving their lives because only 25 percent of the people in steerage were saved,” said Dolores Elias. “He really pushed the children and the women into the lifeboat.” Antoni went down with the ship. Not all the people headed for Wilkes-Barre were part of the Lebanese group. Of the total group connected with Wilkes-Barre, including relatives headed elsewhere, nine died in the disaster, according to various sources. Survivors in rough shape When the Carpathia docked in New York days after collecting the lifeboats, the survivors’ ordeal was nowhere near over. They needed medical care for the exposure and stress they’d suffered. It took weeks for some to recover sufficiently to travel. Meanwhile, newspapers throughout America carried daily stories about the Titanic, its victims and its survivors. The New York Times headlined the death of multimillionaire John Jacob Astor IV. The Wilkes-Barre Record interviewed survivors as they arrived in town and offered words of comfort from local clergy, some of whom devoted entire sermons to the disaster. Slowly, the survivors began to get their lives back together. In

LOCAL CONNECTION (“S” indicates survivor) Group 1: Coming from Lebanon Names are taken from “Encyclopedia Titanica.” Spellings may not agree with other sources. All the following were listed as headed for Wilkes-Barre. Some had lived in Wilkes-Barre and had returned to Lebanon to bring relatives over. Thomas, Charles, 31 Thomas, Thelma (Thamine), 16 (S) Thomas, Assad, 5 months (S) Yasbek, Antoni, 27 Yasbek, Selini, 15 (S) Youssif, Gerios, 45 Moubarek, Omine, 24 (S) Moubarek, Gerios, 7 (S)

Moubarek, Halim Gonios, 4 (S) Hannah, Borak, 27 (S) Khalil, Betros, 25 Khalil, Zofia, 20 Moussa, Mantoura, 35 (S) Samaan, Hanna Elias, 40 Samaan, Elias, 17 Samaan, Youssef, 16 Samaan, Betros, 10 Group 2: Returning to WilkesBarre. Names are taken from “Stories of the Wilkes-Barre Titanic Passengers” Frauenthal, Henry William (S) Frauenthal, Clara Heinsheimer (S) Frauenthal, Isaac Gerald (S)

ica - calls her mother “my hero” and credits her with teaching by example the virtues of courage and self-reliance. Dolores Borek remains in awe of the great-uncle whose superhuman effort got his charges into the last lifeboat. That collapsible lifeboat, containing her family, was photographed from the Carpathia – the only Titanic lifeboat Newsman’s enterprise to be photographed during the By chance, local newsman Da- rescue mission. vid DeCosmo heard of a California survivor of the Titanic who Descendants are proud had taken a child into her lifeIn this anniversary year, they boat. He arranged a reunion. have made themselves readily The lives of survivors were not available to tell the stories of free of difficulty afterward. Assid their ancestors and keep their Thomas died young, and Amenia memories alive. Moubarek developed fatal tuberThey are scheduled to be culosis and entered the White guests at the Luzerne County Haven sanitarium. Historical Society’s annual meetNo survivors of the Titanic re- ing Thursday when William V. main alive today. Lewis Jr. speaks on the WilkesBut the descendants of survi- Barre group aboard the doomed vors in the Wilkes-Barre area see ship. themselves marked for a great reIn the tradition of the brave sponsibility. To this day, they people sailing to a new world, of speak with pride of the ancestors the men who selflessly pushed who survived against great odds their families into the lifeboats or faced death with grace on a and of the people who struggled freezing North Atlantic night. to rebuild shattered families, Mae Thomas – who was born they are doing their part to make after her family arrived in Amer- sure sacrifice is not forgotten. St. Vincent’s Hospital in New York, the exhausted Thelma Thomas was reunited with her baby Assid when she recognized the blanket she’d carried him in all the way from Hardine. It would take many years for Thelma to learn the identity of the woman who had taken little Assid into a lifeboat.

100TH

on the route of the doomed voyage, passengers and crew were to hold two ceremonies at the site of the disaster, 400 Continued from Page 1A miles off the coast of Newfoundland — one marking the time passengers on memorial cruise when the ship hit the iceberg, aboard the liner Balmoral who have spent the past week steep- the other the moment it sank below the waves. ed in the Titanic’s history and At 2:20 a.m. ship’s time today symbolism, said Saturday that — 0547 GMT or 12:47 a.m. the story’s continuing appeal was due to its strong mixture of EDT — a minister will lead prayers, floral wreaths will be romance and tragedy, history thrown into the sea and a shipand fate. board band, which has been “(There are) all the factors entertaining guests in the evethat came together for the ship nings during the cruise, will to be right there, then, to hit play “Nearer My God To Thee,” that iceberg. All the stories of the passengers who ended up on the tune the Titanic’s band kept up as the vessel went down. the ship,” said Edwards, a 62“I don’t think there will be a year-old retiree from Silver dry eye,” said Derek Chambers Spring, Maryland. “It’s just a of Belfast, Northern Ireland, microcosm of social history, who is spending his honeymoon personal histories, nautical on the cruise with his wife, histories. Lynn. The great-grandson of a “Romance is an appropriate carpenter who worked on the word right up until the time of the tragedy — the band playing, ship, he has a tatoo of Titanic the clothes. And then there’s the inked on one forearm, the face of ship’s captain Edward Smith tragedy.” on the other. The world’s largest and most Edwards earlier was to hold luxurious ocean liner, Titanic her own private act of rememwas traveling from England to brance. She is carrying the ashNew York, carrying everyone es of family friend Adam Lackey, from plutocrats to penniless a Titanic buff from Montana emigrants, when it struck an iceberg at 11:40 p.m. on April 14, who died last year, and planned to scatter them at the wreck 1912. It sank less than three site. hours later, with the loss of Passengers aboard the cruise, more than 1,500 of the 2,208 which left Southampton, Enpassengers and crew. Aboard the Balmoral, a cruise gland, on April 8, have enjoyed lectures on Titanic history, as ship taking history buffs and well as the usual cruise-ship descendants of Titanic victims

AP PHOTO

In this 1912 photo made available by the Library of Congress, Harold Bride, a Titanic wireless operator, is carried up a ship’s ramp.

grandparents, who married in 1911, were marked by the disaster even though they lived far away in Montana. “They had talked about going back to Sweden to see his parents, and they didn’t because of the Titanic,” she said. Another cruise ship, Journey, left New York on Tuesday and was to join Balmoral at the site. In Belfast, Northern Ireland, AP PHOTO where the Titanic was built — the pride of the Harland & Wolff This image provided by the New York Times shows its April 16, shipyard — thousands attended 1912 front-page coverage of the Titanic disaster. a choral requiem at the Anglican Some of the passengers have a St. Anne’s Cathedral or a nationrecreations of bridge, shuffleally televised concert at the board and lounging in a hot tub. direct link to the ship, through city’s Waterfront Hall on Satan ancestor who was onboard. Many have dressed in period urday. Most feel some sort of conneccostume for elaborate balls and The city spent decades tion to an event whose ripples a formal dinner recreating the scarred by its link to the disashave resonated for a century. last meal served aboard the ter, but has come to take pride Edwards said the lives of her ship.

in the feats of engineering and industry involved in building the Titanic. The memorial concert featured performances by Bryan Ferry and soul singer Joss Stone, as well as 100 drummers beating out a new percussion work, “Titanic Drums.” In film clips, actors including Kenneth Branagh, Simon Callow and Imelda Staunton read from contemporary accounts of those who built the ship and sailed on it. At the cathedral, the performance of composer Philip Hammond’s “The Requiem for the Lost Souls of the Titanic” was being followed by a torch-lit procession to the Titanic Memorial in the grounds of Belfast city hall.


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

N

E

W

S

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 11A

Study charts Pa. Legislature’s greatest laws The study was modeled on similar national studies of Congress’ output. By PETER JACKSON Associated Press

HARRISBURG — Seeking to accentuate the positive in an institution that’s often perceived in a negative light, Temple University student researchers have produced a “greatest achievements” list of the most important laws passed by Pennsylvania’s General Assembly in modern times. To ease the suspense, No. 1 is the personal income tax. The study, part of a larger Temple research project on the

General Assembly, was modeled on similar national studies of Congress’ output and guided by Temple faculty members. Students Shelly Forrester and Van Huynh, political science majors who served as legislative interns in the fall of 2010 as part of Temple’s Capital Semester program, sought to compare the impact of the most significant laws approved between 1968 — the year of Pennsylvania’s last constitutional convention — and 2008. With input from top lawyers for more than 30 state agencies and help from a bipartisan panel of experts, they identified 50 laws or groups of related laws. They were ranked based on their scores in questionnaires

A good year for Pa. incumbents Just four sitting Pa. senators and 28 representatives have an opponent on April 24.

“Most people, at best, they know their state representative or their state senator,” said Thomas Baldino,apoliticalscienceprofessoratWilkesUniversityinWilkesBarre. “They don’t follow HarrisBy MARK SCOLFORO burg politics and they are not Associated Press clued in to the issues that conHARRISBURG — A safe pre- front their district.” If they were, the primary could diction about the upcoming primary for seats in the Pennsylvania be a referendum on public school Legislature: April 24 will be a and university funding, social services spending, the recently engood day for incumbents. Ten senators and 85 representa- acted Marcellus Shale revenue tives face no opposition whatso- and regulation law, a proposal to ever this year, and the other 133 shrink the size of the Legislature, districts will in most cases be con- gun rights and gun control, property taxes, school tested only in NoBoth chambers are vouchers, business vember. taxes, liquor store Just four sitting now firmly under the senators and 28 incontrol of the Repub- system privatization, welfare rules and the cumbent represenneed to rebuild the tatives have an op- licans, 112-91 in the state’s roads and ponent in the pri- House and 30-20 in bridges. mary, which mat- the Senate. The Republican ters because so campaign theme, many districts are either overwhelmingly Republi- said Sen. Joe Scarnati, R-Jefferson, will be “jobs, jobs, jobs.” can or widely Democratic. “We’re going to look forward to Both chambers are now firmly under the control of the Republi- our vision for Pennsylvania,” cans, 112-91 in the House and 30- Scarnati said. “Not ‘What have you done for me lately,’ but ‘What 20 in the Senate. “There’s a lack of political com- are you going to do for me?’ ” Gov. Tom Corbett’s weak poll petition at the state level that really is problematic for democracy,” numbers may present a challenge said Joseph DiSarro, who chairs for Republican lawmakers, but the political science department that could turn around this sumat Washington & Jefferson Col- mer after the state budget passes, lege, southwest of Pittsburgh. “In said Rep. Dave Reed, R-Indiana, the end, what you get is a lack of his caucus’ leading campaign political initiatives in the Legisla- strategist. “There’s a lot of time between ture to deal with policy problems now and the fall to determine the commonwealth is facing.” Voter turnout is generally low what the governor’s popularity for legislative primaries, and this will be,” said Reed. year the Democrats do not have a contested presidential nomination race and the Republican battle has lost much of its steam. The top-of-the-ticket interest is not what it could be, at least not for the primary.

CURRYS DONUTS

®

BUY 1 DOZEN DONUTS

GET 6 FREE 750126

99¢

746058

16 oz. COFFEE at participating locations with this coupon. 1 coupon per customer

Expires 5/30/12

$AVE $AVE $AVE IInground d PPooll LLiners i • PPooll O Openings i Above ground pool packages from $995

• Pools • Spas • Liners • Chemicals • Accessories Specializing in Ab & Inground I d Above Pools!

29 North Memorial Hwy., Sh Shavertown • 69 696-9700 2 9N th hM i lH h t 6 96 9 97 700 70

completed by 148 legislators, exlawmakers, governors’ aides, reporters and academics. “This is not really hard social science ... but they followed a very systematic regimen,” said Joseph McLaughlin, director of the university’s Institute for Public Affairs. Of the 10 laws judged to have the most impact, two involved health care, two involved collective bargaining rights for public employees and two involved gambling. The personal income tax was enacted in 1971 after more than a decade of unsuccessful efforts by governors from both parties to enact one. Pennsylvania was the 43rd state to do so. The flat 3.07 percent levy is now the

largest source of state tax revenue, generating more than $10 billion a year. Also making the list: 2: The Public Employee Relations Act, approved in 1970, giving public employees in Pennsylvania to organize and bargain collectively with employers, as well as a limited right to strike. 3: The Children’s Health Insurance Program. Enacted in 1992, CHIP provides free or low-cost health coverage for nearly 200,000 uninsured children and teenagers not enrolled in the Medical Assistance program. 4: The PACE and PACENET programs. These related programs, approved separately more than a decade apart, pro-

vide low-cost prescription drugs for low-income senior citizens and are funded largely by state lottery revenue. 5: Laws creating the Department of Environmental Resources in the early 1970s. It has since been renamed the Department of Environmental Protection. 6: The 1971 law creating the Pennsylvania Lottery. 7: The Public Safety Emergency Telephone Act, approved in 1990, that provided a toll-free 911 number to request emergency aid. 8: The Sunshine Act, approved in 1986, establishing citizens’ right to attend meetings of public bodies at which decisions are discussed and made.

9: The Police and Firefighter Collective Bargaining Law, approved in 1968, giving police and firefighters the right to collective bargaining and binding arbitration. 10: The 2004 law that legalized slot-machine gambling in Pennsylvania and the 2006 law that set up a system for distributing the portion of slots revenue dedicated to local property-tax relief. On Friday, Gov. Tom Corbett certified that nearly $783 million will be available this year. McLaughlin said the students spent several months finishing the project after their Harrisburg semester was over and that both women got As. “People like lists,” he said.

Cheney well after heart transplant

Former vice president makes first public appearance three weeks after surgery. By MEAD GRUVER Associated Press

CHEYENNE, Wyo. — Former Vice President Dick Cheney walked onstage without any assistance and spoke for an hour and 15 minutes without seeming to tire in his first public engagement since he underwent a heart transplant three weeks ago. He sat in a plush chair throughout the long chat with daughter Liz Cheney but looked better, even, than during recent appearances where he has been gaunt and used a cane. Cheney even threw in a couple of political plugs amid much reminiscing at the Wyoming Republican Party state convention in Cheyenne on Saturday. He said presumptive Republican presidential nominee Mitt

AP PHOTO

Former Vice President Dick Cheney speaks Saturday at the Wyoming Republican state convention in Cheyenne, Wyo.

Romney is going to do a “whale of a job.” He said it’s never been more important than now to defeat a sitting president and the Republican Party should unite behind Romney. “He has been an unmitigated disaster to the country,” Cheney said of President Barack Obama.

Cheney’s heart transplant in Virginia on March 24 initially canceled his trip to the state party convention but he got lastminute medical clearance to go. “I’m not running any foot races yet but it won’t be long,” he said. He owed a “huge debt” to the unknown donor of his new

heart, he said, and to medical technology. He did not take the opportunity to weigh in on health care politics. He didn’t stumble in his words and his voice was clear “I was amazed he was able to say so much over the whole course of an hour,” said one delegate to the convention, Helen Bishop, of Moran in Jackson Hole. “I thought it would be a really brief, ‘hi.’ ” Cheney neither arrived early nor stuck around to shake hands: It was fly-in, fly-out. Bishop speculated he might soon return to Jackson Hole, where he has a home in the exclusive Teton Pines neighborhood. He is an avid fly fisherman. Nearly all of the talk traced the more than 40 years of Cheney’s political career, including the controversial waterboarding and other interrogation practices the Bush administration employed to extract information from terrorist suspects.


CMYK PAGE 12A

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

N

E

W

S

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

PUBLIC HOUSING IN LUZERNE COUNTY PITTSTON HOUSING AUTHORITY

5 authorities, 42 housing complexes, 3,218 units

Locations are approximate

WA SH ING TON ST. N.

ST.

SCOTT ST.

6

MA IN

AVE .

N.

WA SH INGT ON N.

N.

S.

AVE.

ST.

5 2

KLIN FRAN S.

ST.

IN MA

ST.

S.

ON INGT SH WA

ST.

IA AN SYLV PENN

Public Square

3

. BLVD RRE ES-BA WILK ER ST. KIDD

KIDDER ST.

ST. SCOTT

1

309 Coal Street Park

E. AV

. VD E BL RR ES-BA WILK E. AV RK PA

CO AL

ST.

ST.

BLAC KM AN

. E ST PIR EM

. N ST TO MP HA RT E. NO

HIG H ST.

HO RTON

ER RIV

S. AC AD EM Y ST .

ST.

DR.

AVE. CAREY

Hanover Twp.

WILKES-BARRE

ER A RIV NN HA UE SQ SU

ST.

4

309

ST.

ET RK S. MA

RIVERS IDE

ER RIV

TLER BU

Nesbitt Park

Kirby Park

11

ST. STAN TON ST.

HAZ LE ST.

Newport Twp. (Glen Lyon)

GEO RGE

ST. RTH NO

The Secret Service did not disclose the nature of the misconduct. The White House said Obama had been briefed about the incidents but would not comment on his reaction. “The president does have full confidence in the United States Secret Service,” presidential spokesman Jay Carney said. Carney insisted the matter was more a distraction for the media than Obama. But Secret Service assistant director Paul Morrissey said in a statement: “We regret any distraction from the Summit of the Americas this situation has caused.” Rep. Peter King, chairman of the House Homeland Security

Plains Twp.

Kingston Plymouth

4 5

WILKES-BARRE HOUSING AUTHORITY

7

. N ST TO MP RTHA NO

Continued from Page 1A

12 13

15 16 17 6

18

1

Swoyersville

W.

SERVICE

8 9 10 2

Edwardsville

HOUSING

2 5

Luzerne

14

3

21 20 19

Danelle Jones, who lost her job as a certified nursing assistant, says she spends at least four hours a day seeking housing.

Committee, said after he was briefed on Saturday that “close to” all 11 of the agents involved had brought women back to their rooms at a hotel separate from where Obama is now staying. The New York Republican said the women were “presumed to be prostitutes” but investigators were interviewing the agents. King said he was told that anyone visiting the hotel overnight was required to leave identification at the front desk and leave the hotel by 7 a.m. When a woman failed to do so, it raised questions among hotel staff and police, who investigated. They found the woman with the agent in the hotel room and a dispute arose over whether the agent should have paid her. King said he was told that the agent did eventually pay the woman.

Exeter

Kingston Twp. (Trucksville)

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

Dave Ritter, director of housing for the Commission on Economic Opportunity in WilkesBarre, said CEO has seen a continual increase in requests for Continued from Page 1A housing assistance over the last Fagula says the considerable several years. stock of public and subsidized “We see a lot of families comhousing units in Luzerne Coun- peting for a limited number of ty is just not enough to meet the safe, affordable units. A lot of demand in today’s economy. times, housing authorities will have long waiting lists. We have Thousands on waiting lists hundreds of families looking for A Times Leader survey of the housing,” Ritter said. five housing authorities in LuCEO refers clients to apply at zerne County, which include the housing authorities and privately county authority and city au- owned subsidized housing develthorities in Hazleton, Nanti- opments, as well as to the few coke, Pittston and Wilkes-Barre, transitional housing agencies, found there are 20 high-rises Ritter said. and 21 family developments ofTransitional housing, run by fering public subsinonprofit agendized housing. Tax credits are availcies, is designed Those complexes able for developers of to be a short-term contain nearly 3,300 solution for apartments or low-income housing, homeless families homes ranging from but developers would and individuals efficiencies to five- rather build in places until affordable bedroom units. But such as Philadelphia housing becomes the number of appliavailable. cants waiting for and Lancaster, where The waiting one of those units to fair market rents are lists for transibecome available is substantially higher tional housing are more than double large as well. and they can derive the inventory – Kristen Topol6,716 as of March more rental income to ski, director of 30. pay off their construc- Ruth’s Place, said The figures do not tion loans, said Liz the shelter houses include the 25 pri18 to 20 women vate developments Hersh, executive direc- per night. Last in Luzerne County tor of the Housing year, Ruth’s Place under contract with Alliance of Pennsylvasheltered 256 the U.S. Depart- nia. homeless women. ment of Housing “A lot has to do and Urban Developwith the job marment to provide subsidized ket. And there are landlords who housing to low-income individ- can no longer afford their mortuals and families. Waiting lists gages, so their tenants become for those units also are quite displaced. I’ve been in housing 15 long, officials have said. years now and certainly there’s a Generally, a low-income resi- trend – a need for more safe, affordent will pay 30 percent of dable housing,” Topolski said. household income toward rent and the difference is subsidized HUD formula seen as with funding from HUD, Fagula problem said. Several factors are contributHUD sets fair market rents, ing to the affordable housing criwhich differ according to metro- sis, not only in Luzerne County, politan areas, and gives housing but nationally. authorities annual allocations Locally, housing directors say to make up the difference be- HUD’s formula for fair market tween what the low-income rents presents a major obstacle. renters pay and the market rent. Fagula, of the county housing HUD also funds the Housing authority, said the fair market Choice Voucher Program, com- rent set by HUD for the Wilkesmonly referred to as Section 8 Barre/Scranton metropolitan arand administered by local hous- ea is unrealistically low – it was ing authorities. reduced 7.5 percent – so landUnder that program, an appli- lords are less willing to accept cant who meets income guide- Housing Choice vouchers. lines receives a voucher to preAnd, HUD bases next year’s sent to a landlord. The voucher funding partly on how much guarantees that HUD will pay funding was used this year. If apthe landlord the difference be- plicants who hold vouchers can’t tween 30 percent of the individ- find landlords willing to take ual’s income and the fair market them this year, funding for Secrent in the area. tion 8 will be cut next year, he There were nearly 1,200 indi- said. viduals or families on waiting And, Fagula said, HUD has lists for Housing Choice vouch- been underfunding housing auers in Luzerne County as of thorities for several years, in conMarch 30. flict with what HUD’s own formulas determine authorities should Continual rise in requests

1

Duryea

ST.

$1,752,257 $2,468,936 $1,689,670 $9,866,267 $15,000,000 $30,777,130

GO RD ON

Hazleton Nanticoke Pittston Wilkes-Barre Luzerne County Total

4 3

2012 projected budget

CA RE Y AV E.

Authority

6

1

3

Fairview Twp.

2

Shickshinny 4

5

NANTICOKE HOUSING AUTHORITY

OTHER SUBSIDIZED HOUSING

Section 8 vouchers

HAZLETON HOUSING AUTHORITY 4

2 3

1

Hazleton Housing Authority 328 Nanticoke Housing Authority 51 Pittston Housing Authority 132 Wilkes-Barre Housing Authority 657 Luzerne County Housing Authority 1,115 Total 2,283 Other subsidized housing

Authority-owned, non-public units Privately-owned, non-public units

Authority/facility

Location

Luzerne County Housing Authority 1 Frank Crossin Towers Brown St. 2 Edwardsville Scattered Sites Various 3 Exeter Apts. Schooley Ave. 4 Glen Lyon Apts. Rock St. 5 Glen Lyon Scattered Sites Various 6 Dundee Apts. Middle Road 7 Kingston Manor First Ave. 8 Luzerne Apts. Ann Court 9 Luzerne Apts. Main & Walnut 10 Luzerne Towers Bennett St. 11 Fairview Apts. Fairview Drive 12 Plains Family Second St. 13 Plains Manor N. Main St. 14 Plymouth Family New St. 15 Dan Flood Buildings E. Main St. 16 Kingston Gardens E. Main St. 17 Lee Park Towers E. Main St. 18 Shickshinny Apts. W. Vine St. 19 Roosevelt Manor Tripp St. 20 Swoyersville Elderly Hemlock St. 21 Meadowcrest Meadowcrest Drive Hazleton Housing Authority 1 Mine Street Building Mine St. 2 Hazleton Twins Juniper St. 3 Hazleton Twins Juniper St. 4 Birch Street Family Birch St. Nanticoke Housing Authority 1 Nanticoke Towers Nanticoke Ave. 2 Park Towers E. Green St. 3 Oplinger Towers E. Main St. 4 Nanticoke Terrace S. Gemini & Enterprise 5 Nanticoke Terrace South St. & Lincoln Ave. 6 Apollo Circle Apollo Circle Pittston Housing Authority 1 Appollo Apartments S. Main St. 2 Infantino Towers Kennedy Blvd. 3 Panama Street Family Panama St. 4 Riverview Manor Riverview 5 Winter Street Family Winter St.. Wilkes-Barre Housing Authority 1 Lincoln Towers Lincoln Plaza 2 Boulevard Town Homes Wilkes-Barre Blvd. 3 East End Towers Scott St. 4 South View Manor Monroe St. 5 Valley View Terrace Hill St. 6 Mineral Springs Village East View Drive

Municipality

Efficiency

One Two Three bedrm bedrm bedrm

Four bedrm

Five bedrm

Type

Year built

Duryea Edwardsville Exeter Glen Lyon Glen Lyon Hanover Twp. Kingston Luzenre Luzerne Luzerne Mountaintop Plains Twp. Plains Twp. Plymouth Plymouth Plymouth Plymouth Shickshinny Swoyersville Swoyersville Trucksville

0 0 0 0 0 0 40 0 0 56 0 0 0 0 60 60 94 30 0 18 0

100 0 20 4 2 6 0 5 2 16 26 15 50 0 36 36 49 20 8 11 21

0 10 50 20 2 20 0 5 4 8 54 19 0 20 3 0 6 0 20 0 54

0 14 44 20 7 20 0 5 4 0 20 20 0 25 0 0 0 0 20 0 25

0 0 10 0 0 4 0 3 2 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

High-rise Family Family Family Family Family High-rise Family Family High-rise Family Family High-rise Family High-rise High-rise High-rise High-rise Family High-rise Family

1987 1981* 1976 1981 1981* 1977 1977 1979 1979 1978 1980 1981 1993 1981 1974 1981 1974 1978 1979 1987 1980

Hazleton Hazleton Hazleton Hazleton

60 32 32 0

37 17 17 12

2 1 1 30

0 0 0 50

0 0 0 8

0 0 0 0

High-rise High-rise High-rise Family

1970 1969 1969 1968

Nanticoke Nanticoke Nanticoke Nanticoke Nanticoke Nanticoke

24 38 26 0 0 0

22 36 112 8 4 0

4 2 6 12 12 35

0 0 0 24 8 32

0 0 0 6 0 8

0 0 0 0 0 0

High-rise High-rise Family Family Family Family

1965 1968 1972 1965 1968 1972

Pittston Pittston Pittston Pittston Pittston

32 0 0 0 0

20 60 8 0 6

0 0 14 42 17

0 0 22 40 22

0 0 6 8 5

0 0 0 0 0

High-rise High-rise Family Family Family

1970 1973 1967 1973

Wilkes-Barre Wilkes-Barre Wilkes-Barre Wilkes-Barre Wilkes-Barre Wilkes-Barre

100 0 63 34 42 0

100 20 33 52 135 0

0 60 4 4 4 24

0 100 0 0 0 35

0 20 0 0 0 25

Source: Housing Authorities

receive based on their needs. “Last year, we only received 78 percent of the fees we earned. This year, we only expect to receive 80 percent,” Fagula said. Liz Hersh, executive director of the Housing Alliance of Pennsylvania, said the fair market rent HUD set for Wilkes-Barre/ Scranton discourages private developers from building more affordable housing here.

Tax credits are available for developers of low-income housing, but developers would rather build in places such as Philadelphia and Lancaster, where fair market rents are substantially higher and they can derive more rental income to pay off their construction loans, Hersh said. Adding to the housing problem are natural gas industry

workers in Pennsylvania’s northern counties. They can afford higher rents, so landlords there are raising rents and forcing out lower-income tenants, who are moving south to find cheaper housing, Hersh said. Hersh and Fagula agree that HUD needs to re-examine its fair market rent formulas and state and federal legislators should allocate more funding

237 3,473

0 High-rise 1968 0 Family 1971 0 High-rise 1972 0 High-rise 1972 0 High-rise 1975 5 Family 1975 *Denotes year acquisition of units began Mark Guydish/The Times Leader

for housing assistance, or more Americans are going to become homeless. “I think sometimes folks in Harrisburg believe (HUD funding represents) a bunch of bureaucrats grabbing at dollar bills. But it’s people with mental and physical disabilities, senior citizens, people who have fallen on hard times, and it’s a helping hand for them,” Hersh said.

The incident was reported to the U.S. embassy, prompting further investigation, King said The 11 employees in question were special agents and Uniformed Division Officers. None were assigned to directly protect Obama. All were sent home and replaced, Morrissey said, given “the nature of the allegations” and a zero tolerance policy on personal misconduct. The Secret Service says the incidents have had no bearing on its ability to provide security for Obama’s stay in Colombia. Another jolt came Saturday when the U.S. Southern Command said five service members assigned to support the Secret Service violated their curfew and may have been involved in inappropriate conduct. Carney AP PHOTO said it was part of the same incident involving the Secret Ser- President Barack Obama sits in front of a large video screen displaying an image of a U.S. national vice. flag at the CEO Summit of the Americas, in Cartagena, Colombia, Saturday.


CMYK

PEOPLE

SECTION

timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

At left, Elaine Saunders shows off the hat she wore when President Obama visited Zion Baptist Church in Washington D.C. Right, Saunders enjoys wearing hats, a tradition that is fading among the younger generation of African American women.

B

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

TOM MOONEY REMEMBER WHEN

Northampton was a street of busy-ness

L

By LISA FRAZIER PAGE The Washington Post

E

laine Saunders stepped into Bachrach’s Millinery in northwest Washington one late winter day in 1953, and there it was, calling her name: a pale fuchsia straw hat with an upturned brim and matching rosebuds circling the crown. • “It’s a Mr. John,” Saunders, now 77, recalls without explanation, certain the designer’s name alone says this was no ordinary hat.

She paid $5 to put it on layaway and made regular installments until she’d covered the $35 cost. When she finally clutched the gold braided handle of the pink floral hat box and strutted out of the shop, she knew that this final touch to her pale pink Easter suit would place her among the best-dressed young ladies at Zion Baptist Church. And that would be no small feat, since every proper church lady back then wore hats - their finest, of course, on Easter.

For generations, church sanctuaries across the nation on Sunday mornings, especially in black churches and especially on Easter, transformed into a collage of hats: straw ones, felt ones, velvet ones, every shape, size and color, with bows, jewels and feathers, reaching for the heavens. But anyone walking into today’s services expecting to see a nonstop parade of women making fashion statements on their heads will be See HATS, Page 2B

LINDA DAVIDSON PHOTOS/THE WASHINGTON POST

Elaine Saunders’ pink straw hat dates back 59 years. It is one of the most cherised in her collection.

MEET KAREN HATALSKI CLARK VAN ORDEN/ THE TIMES LEADER

K

aren Hatalski is the owner of the Form You 3 Weight Loss Center in Wilkes-Barre. She attended Hanover Area High School and received a degree in Psychology from Bloomsburg University. We asked her age; she declined. She resides in Hanover Township. How did you get interested in the business and how did you come to own Form You 3? “I have always had an interest in health and nutrition. I knew the woman that owned the center previously. I took a part time position as a telemarketer in 1987. I eventually became a weight loss counselor and that led to becoming a manager. In 1996, I bought the business and this year we celebrated 30 years of existence dating back to 1982.” So what exactly is the weight loss program you offer at Form You 3 and what fuels your passion for running the business? “It is a common sense approach to healthy eating and maintaining a positive attitude while modifying one’s habits or behaviors. The

experience the people and their culture there. Locally I like to take advantage of all the opportunities that the Wyoming Valley has to offer.” What is your favorite food and drink? “I love chocolate and white zinfandel wine.” What movies or television shows do you like? “I really enjoyed ’The Help’ with Emma Stone. I also enjoy watching Penn State football and Steelers games.” Do you have a favorite quote or saying? “If you believe it, you can achieve it.” What was your very first automobile? “A red Toyota Corolla that my dad refurbished. It’s funny. I remember the car had a starter button to make it work.” What have been some of the proudest moments in your life? “I would say the day I bought this business was very prideful in regards to my professional life. However, taking care of my parents when they were ill, that was a very special time that I will never forget.”

idea of changing someone’s life with health and wellness is the underlying theme behind my passion for the business. I love to see the smile on a person’s face when you can tell their life is changing for the better both physically and personally.” What jobs did you have growing up? “I have always considered myself to be a people person. I used that quality in fast food restaurants during high school and then as a telemarketer during college.” When you are not at work what do you like to do? Where do you like to go? “I love spending time with family and friends. Summer weather and sunshine usually leads to the beach and Ocean City, Md. John Gordon writes about area people for Some day I would love to travel to Italy and the Meet feature. Reach him at 970-7229.

ower East Northampton Street in Wilkes-Barre isn’t what it used to be. It’s neat and tidy with really nice buildings. Uggghhh! For much of the 20th century it served as the city’s wholesale district. Companies that supplied the hundreds upon hundreds of small neighborhood stores throughout the area with everything from a case of Hershey with almonds to a card full of little packets of bobby pins made their headquarters and kept their stock there. If you went down there in those years you found a phantasmagoria of sight, aroma and sound — a veritable bazaar for youthful senses. Years ago my parents operated a small variety store on East Market Street, just a block over and halfway up Brewery Hill. Once a week a salesman from each of our preferred wholesalers would stop by, chew the fat with my dad for a while and leave — a page in his order book filled with notations about shoe polish, cartons of Tareytons, packets of aspirin, balsa wood planes with wind-up propellers or whatever else his house specialized in. But sometimes on a Saturday dad and I would have to hop in the station wagon and trek down to East Northampton because, business being only imperfectly predictable, we had run out of twisty Italian cigars or boxes of home permanent wave. The first thing that struck you about the three blocks between South Main Street and the railroad tracks was the busy-ness. It was all noise, horns blaring, people rushing about on mysterious errands. There was always at least one truck, double-parked, unloading crate after crate of something or other fresh from the docks of New York City or the wilds of Asia while harried men waved their arms and shouted at other harried men to get those boxes inside faster. While my dad placed his orders and clerks rushed to fill them, I explored these great emporiums of commerce. We bought a lot of stuff from Rubin Specialty and Grosco Products. But for sheer sybaritic indulgence, my favorite places were Klein Candy Co., Key Stores and Sperling Tobacco. Even if your name’s Willie Wonka you don’t know candy until you’ve inhaled a wild atmospheric soup of chocolate, peppermint, caramel, peanut butter and licorice all at once. Of course I didn’t smoke (still don’t), but on wings of exotic tobaccos I enjoyed imaginary travel to desert oases and suggestions of adult pleasure in hazy parlors as my dad and his buddy behind the counter agreed on how all the world’s problems could be solved if the politicians would only … Well, that whole part of town is no more. The very concept of a wholesale district became history when people stopped buying at neighborhood stores and took their business to malls and shopping centers, whose stores dealt directly with manufacturers and importers. The coup de grace fell on an alreadyreeling lower East Northampton in June of 1972 when a fire consumed many of the remaining buildings, burning them right down to the water line of the Tropical Storm Agnes flood one terrible day. I drive through that area today frequently. It’s clean and quiet from the 14-screen movie theatre through Heritage House and the B’nai B’rith Apartments all the way past a fast-food eatery, a pharmacy and a car wash. For a modern urban landscape you probably can’t ask anything more. Except maybe a crate of Sky Bars and 200 tins of itching powder and a whole bunch of people trying to get their trucks unloaded. Tom Mooney is a Times Leader columnist. Reach him at tmooney2@ptd.net.


CMYK PAGE 2B

âž›

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

P

E

O

P

L

E

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

NAMES AND FACES Rhonda Zikowski, a nursing student at Wilkes University received The Bergman Foundation Scholarship at the annual scholarship luncheon on March 29. The scholarship, donated by Harry and Bev Hiscox, provides Zikowski support for any undergraduate or graduate student enrolled in the creative writing program at the university. Zikowski, Kingston, was able to meet the donor of the scholarship at the luncheon.

King’s students join international honor society in education

Rachel Mattaucchi, a nursing student at Wilkes University, received The Nicholas L. Alesandro ‘63 Scholarship at the annual scholarship luncheon on March 29. The scholarship, donated by Nicholas L. and Jeanne Alesandro, Mattaucchi Albany, N.Y., is awarded to a student with financial need and good academic standing who is enrolled in the nursing program at the university. Mattaucchi, Pittston, was able to meet the donor of the scholarship at the luncheon.

Thirty King’s College students were recently inducted to the college’s Tau Pi Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi, an international honor society in education. Selected students must have a minimum 3.4 grade point average, a commitment to education as a career and a professional attitude which assures the member’s steady growth in the field of education. Inductees, from left, first row, are Jayme Doyle, Kayla Strach, Michel Hughes, Nicole Rogers, Renee Voith, Samantha Orr, Francesca Klinger, Amanda Carey and Teila McNulty. Second row: Kelsey Jones, Sarah Bolton, Jeannette Bartlow, Emily Snyder, Samantha Kishbach, Richard Schofield, Kevin Barry, Robert Moulton, Lindsay Atchison, Kevin Taylor, Nicole D’Auria, Lauren Suchecki, Ashley Varga, Amanda Avery, Jason Herman, Eric Grego, Margaret Troxell, Sarah Beyer, Christopher Thompson, Morin McDade, Maryann Marselles and Dr. Laurie Ayre, professor of education and moderator of Kappa Delta Pi.

HATE Continued from Page 1B

sorely disappointed. Many daughters and granddaughters of the women who made bold and flashy hats synonymous with the black church have not carried on the tradition. Anita Saunders, 42, Elaine’s youngest daughter, who lives in Indianapolis, grew up watching her mother’s generation flaunt their hats in church. “And I always loved it,� she says. “It was part of Sunday, the experience of the hats. We looked forward to seeing what hat sister so-and-so was going to wear. My friends, we all grew up in the same church with mothers who wore hats, but we don’t. And so, yes, it seems it’s fading out.� The National Museum of African American History and Culture, under construction on the

National Mall, will immortalize one source of this tradition when it re-creates the hat shop of Mae Reeves, a 99-year-old milliner who was one of the first black female business owners in downtown Philadelphia. In the 1940s and ’50s, Mae’s Millinery made one-of-a-kind creations for the stars, including Ella Fitzgerald, Lena Horne, Eartha Kitt and Marian Anderson, as well as some of the city’s most prominent socialites, who sometimes rolled up in a limousine. But it was the regular church ladies, black and white, who made up about half of the shop’s business and helped keep the place open for 50 years, buying “showstoppers� for Sunday morning, said Reeves’ daughter, Donna Limerick, a documentary producer for a Maryland-based company who went to work in her mother’s shop when she was 15. Like Reeves, who lives in a

LANDSCAPING AND EXCAVATING

COMPLETE LANDSCAPING NEW LAWNS - YARD PROJECTS TOP SOIL, FILL & GRAVEL SPREAD PAVERS, FIELD STONE, FLAGSTONE AND CONCRETE SHRUBS & BUSHES REMOVED

Professional Work That Is Guaranteed! Licensed and Insured - Ask for References

205014

760-4797

LOTS CLEARED RED - TREES REMOVED DRAINAGE PROBLEMS SOLVED WALLS, WALKS & DRIVEWAYS DEMOLISHED SPECIALIZING IN - INGROUND POOL FILL - IN

suburban Philadelphia nursing home, many of the most celebrated African American milliners are well past retirement age. In Washington, D.C., Vanilla Beane, maker of the famed creations worn by late civil rights and women’s activist Dorothy Height, is 92. Though Beane is still making hats, few younger business owners have taken up the art. By 1987, Mae Reeves was 75 years old, and most of her customers were fellow seniors. “Even though business was declining, Mae kept the shop running by taking orders from her special clients, up until 1997, when she was 85 years old,� Limerick says. By then, Limerick had found her way back to hats, and she now wears them all the time. As

she crisscrosses the Washington region these days to speak at luncheons and teas about her mother’s career, she uses volunteer models to show off selections from the vintage Reeves collection. Many women tell her, “I have hats from my mother and other relatives, but I don’t wear them,� or “Hats don’t look good on me,� Limerick says. But many of the women get inspired by the show to give hats a try. “I promptly remind them that Mae always tells women to have at least one special hat that you can put on, strut out the door, and say, ‘Here I am, world. I feel good, and I know I look good.’ � As Saunders sees it, “there will be a set of women who will wear hats forever.�

August 3rd - 11th

Matthew Glicini, Dallas, was a member of the Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE) team from Susquehanna University who claimed a league championship at the SIFE USA Regional Competition in Baltimore on April 4. SIFE members use business concepts to develop community outreach projects that improve the quality of life and standard of living for people in need. Glicini is majoring in business administration with an emphasis in finance. He is a 2008 graduate of Dallas High School and the son of Robert and Paula Glicini. Jeremy L. Thorne, Sugarloaf, joined students from Pennsylvania College of Technology’s School of Natural Resources Management in attending the Professional Landscape Network’s Student Career Days competition in Manhattan, Kan. Thorne finished third in compact excavator operation and tenth in tractor loader backhoe operation. He and his classmate, Samuel W. Hanmer, Harrisburg, also combined to place seventh in the team truck and trailer operation competition.

The Municipality of Kingston is conducting a public hearing on Monday, April 16, 2012 at 7pm in Council Chambers to discuss closing Sprague Avenue between West Hoyt Street and West Market Street and eliminating one-way trafďŹ c on West Hoyt Street between Wyoming Avenue and North Maple Avenue. TrafďŹ c pattern changes are also being considered for Chestnut Avenue, Maple Avenue, Pringle Street, and Sprague Avenue.

Walls, Pavers & Firepits

Stamped and Colored Concrete, Pavers, Flagstone, All Types of Retaining Walls, Excavation, Drainage, Custom Landscaping Designs

#1

“Tired Of Contractors Not Showing Up?â€? LICENSED & INSURED • ALL WORK GUARANTEED

287-4144

WATER PROBLEMS DRAINAGE References and Photos Upon Request IS OUR SPECIALTY www.wvlandscaping.com

Glacier Bay, Juneau, Sitka, Ketchikan, Victoria Overnight and Sightseeing in Seattle $2,095 pp Includes: Bus, Nonstop ights, Hotel in Seattle, 7 Night Cruise with all meals and entertainment, tax

Nicole Gillen, Wilkes-Barre, will be participating in St. Luke’s Half Marathon on April 29 in Allentown. Gillen is taking on the physical challenge to honor her mother, Victoria Gillen, who lost her life to cancer two years ago. This will be Gillen’s first event with Team In Training (TNT), The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s (LLS) sports endurance training program.

New TrafďŹ c Pattern Sprague Avenue and West Hoyt Street

WYOMING VALLEY LANDSCAPING & MASONRY

IN CUSTOMER SATISFACTION

ALASKAN EXPLORER, MS WESTERDAM

Jessica Rafalko and Sarah Scinto, students at King’s College, were recently recognized for their writing by the annual Delta Epsilon Sigma National Writing Contest. Rafalko received first place for her short fiction piece, “The Dog Sitter,� and Scinto received an honorable mention for her poem, “Advice.� Rafalko is an English literature major with a minor in professional writing and works

in the college’s Writing Center. Scinto is a professional writing major with a mass communications minor. She is an editorin-chief of “The SCOP;� program director of WRKC, the college radio station; treasurer of the Campion Society; president of Eyes on Africa, the college’s Invisible Children Club; a member of the Questions and Answers Club; a member of Delta Epsilon Sigma and Sigma Tau Delta honor societies; and a Dean’s List student.

All Estimates Given in 2 Days PA. 066987

OASIS OF THE SEAS, ROYAL CARIBBEAN September 15th - 22nd

Western Caribbean: Labadee, Falmouth, Cozumel From - $1,399pp Includes: Bus, Air, Cruise and Tax THE SCOTTISH DREAM September 15th - 23rd

Glasgow, Loch Lommond Cruise, Isle of Skye, Culloden BattleďŹ eld, Edinburgh Castle, Speyside Distillery. $2,895pp Includes: Bus, Nonstop Flights, Full Breakfast, 6 Dinners, First Class Hotels, Sightseeing, Tax

Kevin M. Barno, MPT • K. Bridget Barno, PT Sharon Marranca, MPT • Hal Glatz, MPT Maria Hall, PTA • William Montross, MPT

COLUMBUS DAY WEEKEND IN WASHINGTON D.C. October 6th - 8th

We’ve Expanded! We Now Have A Location In Pittston

$379 Adult $189 Child - Includes: Motor coach, 2 Nights Embassy Suites, Full Breakfast, Sightseeing Tour

Pinnacle Rehabilitation Associates welcomes William Montross, MPT to our new Pittston location.

601 Market St., Kingston, PA 288-9311

With over seventeen years experience, William can assist you with... Comprehensive Outpatient Physical Therapy Featuring:

• Hands-on one on one manual therapy by a skilled Physical Therapist • Supervised exercise program appropriate for your condition William Montross, MPT

Most Insurances Do Not Require A Referral. All Major Insurances Accepted.

Treatment for:

• All post-surgical orthopedic conditions including rehab for total joint replacement, rotator cuff repairs and arthroscopic surgery • Arthritis • Work Injury • Neck/Back Pain • Disc Injuries • Auto Accidents • Foot/Ankle Injury • TMJ Dysfunction Program • Fall Prevention Program

201 South Main Street 520 Third Avenue 2 Convenient NEW Pittston • 602-1933 Kingston • 714-6460 Locations To LOCATION www.pinnaclerehabilitation.net Serve You!





747616

746604

 "#$" &' $ ''$ " # "#  " " "'"$ $

 " '' "     "   

"     &"   "#$" &' $ ""#"$& $""$ "$&  "# #"" "!##"

                                     


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

N

E

W

S

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 3B

Local music teachers presenting recitals

Fazzini named Outstanding Student at Crestwood

Dallas Eastern Star holding flea market

Christopher Fazzini, Drums, was selected as the Outstanding Student for the Third Quarter at Crestwood High School. Fazzini, son of Sharon and Kevin Fazzini, enjoys history and Spanish classes. He is a member of the boys’ varsity basketball team, the National Honor Society and the Spanish National Honor Society. Fazzini plans on attending college. He is not sure of his major but hopes to continue his basketball career in college. Outside of school, Fazzini enjoys swimming, hiking, cooking and playing sports. He has two brothers, Adam and John. At the award presentation, from left, first row, are Mark Jarolen, history teacher, and Chris Fazzini. Second row: Sharon and Kevin Fazzini.

Dallas Eastern Star Building Association is holding a craft and flea market 9 a.m.-3 p.m. April 28 at 15 Foster St., Dallas, behind the CVS drugstore. The event will be held indoors and outside. Members of the Eastern Star will be serving lunch and selling their famous Welsh cookies. For vendor information call Dianne Corby at 6754893. Making cookies, from left, are Beverly Todd, Sharon Jones and Hope Beisel.

My Mommy Creates Beautiful Smiles! No matter what your age... Dr.. Joseph offers comprehensive dental care for the entire he en enti tire re ffamily. amil am ily y. Dr. Joseph offers all aspects of generall eir dentistry. She and her staff focus on their hem he m patients comfort, as well as educating them on their dental needs and treatments. Dr. Joseph accepts most insurances.. Interest free financing available. We accept Medical Access.

The Northeast Pennsylvania Music Teachers Association (NEPMTA) will present ‘88 Keys & 24 Songs,’ a series of four recitals including piano, voice and violin students who auditioned and qualified for a performance spot. The event will be 11 a.m., 1 p.m., 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. on April 29 at the F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts, Wilkes-Barre. Ticket prices are $15 for adults and $8 for students and tickets are good for all four recitals. Tickets may be purchased through Ticketmaster, the Kirby Box Office and at Bogusko Music Company. For more information on the recitals, contact Boguskomusic@hotmail.com. NEPMTA members, from left, are Dan DeMelfi; Maureen Salley; Joelle Witner; Ninarose Lewko; Andrea Bogusko, cochairperson; Diane Shuleski, and Michele Millington, co-chairperson. Other participating members include Yvonne Alling, Laura Anderson; Stefani Austin, Michael Borthwick, Heather Clendenning, Judith Fedor, Valerie Grabiec, Donna Kane, Judy Katra, Denise Knox, Christine Leandri, Maureen MacDonald-Scotti, Irina Manasyan and Pat Paciotti.

free consultation* e 1987 since

y mericle dr. penny dr. samantha tha abod

no interest payments most insurance accepted united concordia, blue chip, delta… no referral needed

Comprehensive, Family & Cosmetic Dentistry 337 Third Ave., Kingston • 714-1800

NEED BRACES?

190 welles street • forty fort 287-8700 braceplaceorthodontics.com *Valid through 6-30-12

Serving The Mountain Top, Wilkes-Barre, Kingston and Surrounding Areas 747996

Elizabeth A. Joseph, DMD, PC

156,434

*

PATIENTS

CAN’T BE WRONG. We Carry A Complete Line Of

ManorCare – Kingston 570.288.9315 | Hampton House 570.825.8725

First Communion and d Confirmation C Jewelry

259 Wyoming Ave.• Wyoming • 693-5910

749356

Tues. Wed. Thurs. - 9am - 5:30pm • Fri. - 9am - 6pm • Sat. - 10am - 3pm

742629

*Number of patients admitted for post-acute care nationwide in the last 12 months.


CMYK PAGE 4B

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

Sclafani, Simko

Halbing, Pugliese

O

C

C

A

S

I

O

N

S

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Leslie, Bennick

Zavislak, Novak

rica Elizabeth Leslie and Matauren Marie Simko and John thew Michael Bennick, together icole Pugliese and Joshua HalbE Matthew Sclafani, together with L ing, together with their families, with their families, announce their their families, announce their engageN are pleased to announce their engagement and upcoming marriage. engagement and approaching marThe bride-to-be is the daughter of Frank and Leslie Simko, Swoyersville, Pa. She is the granddaughter of Robert Solomon and the late Joanne Solomon, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., and Jennie Simko, Swoyersville, Pa. The prospective groom is the son of John and Mary Sclafani, Brooklyn, N.Y. He is the grandson of Rocco and Grace Imbriale and Benedetta Sclafani and the late Alphonse Sclafani, all of Brooklyn, N.Y. Lauren is a 2004 graduate of Wyoming Valley West High School and a 2008 graduate of Wilkes University, where she earned her Bachelor of Science degree in nursing. She is a graduate student at the University of Scranton, studying to become a Family Nurse Practitioner. She is employed by Lehigh Valley Hospital as a cardiology nurse and Wilkes University as a clinical nursing instructor. John is a 2002 graduate of Xaverian High School, Brooklyn, N.Y. He is also a Wilkes University graduate of the Class of 2006, earning his bachelor’s degree in accounting. He is a district manager at ADP in Dumbo, N.Y. The couple will be happily united in marriage in November 2012, at St. Athanasius Church in Brooklyn, N.Y. Reception will follow at The Grove in Cedar Grove, N.J.

Becker, Dougherty

T

homas and Catherine Becker, Sweet Valley, are proud to announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their daughter, Emily, to James P. Dougherty Jr., son of James and Susan Dougherty, Mechanicsburg. The bride-to-be is the granddaughter of Margaret Becker, Berwick; the late Benjamin Becker; and the late Edward and Sadie Powell, Plymouth. The prospective groom is the grandson of Joseph and Rebecca Dougherty, Warrington; Carole McCoy, Warwick; and the late James McCoy. Emily is a 2004 graduate of LakeLehman High School and a 2008 graduate of Kutztown University with a Bachelor of Science degree in education and library science. She is employed as a teacher with Hildebrandt Learning Centers, Harrisburg. Jim is a 2004 graduate of Trinity High School, Camp Hill, and a 2008 graduate of Penn State University with Bachelor of Arts degrees in political science and history. He is pursuing a master’s degree in public administration from Penn State Harrisburg. He is employed as a research analyst with the Pennsylvania House of Representatives. The couple plans to exchange vows on Sept. 1, 2012, at The Woodlands Inn and Resort.

Riley Mastantuono baptized

R

iley Mastantuono, son of Christy and Joseph Mastantuono, was baptized on Jan. 22, 2012, at Gate of Heaven Church, Dallas. He has a big sister, Kayla, and brother, Joey. Among the guests attending were his grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins and friends. Riley’s godparents are Debra Vinnacombe and Michael Mastantuono. A reception was held at his home in celebration of Riley’s baptism.

ment and upcoming marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Joseph P. Pugliese, Dallas, Pa., and Mary V. LaBella, Wayside, N.J., formerly from Shavertown, Pa. She is the granddaughter of Dr. Joseph F. Pugliese and the late Margaret Pugliese, Wyoming, Pa., and John Dooling III and the late Jacqualine Dooling, Long Island, N.Y. The prospective groom is the son of John Halbing III, Harveys Lake, Pa., and Susan Halbing, Kingston, Pa. He is the grandson of Paul and Grace Ealer, Bethlehem, Pa., and David and Elsa Smith, Easton, Pa. Nicole is a 2001 graduate of Dallas Senior High School. She is a 2003 graduate of Luzerne County Community College, where she earned her associate’s degree in journalism communications, and a 2006 graduate of Temple University, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism. She is employed with Wyoming Valley West Middle School. Joshua is a 2003 graduate from Bishop O’Reilly High School. He attended Pennsylvania State University for business management. He is an automotive technician. The couple will exchange vows on June 16, 2012, in front of their family and friends in their hometown.

Fay, Turnbaugh illiam and Jo Ann Turnbaugh, Sugarloaf, announce the engageW ment of their daughter, Brittany

Turnbaugh, to Eric Fay, son of Todd and Marlajean Fay, Jamison. The couple met at their alma mater, King’s College, in Wilkes-Barre, Pa. The bride-to-be is the granddaughter of Mary Novotnak and the late Clarence “Archie” Novotnak and the late William and Mary Turnbaugh. Brittany is a graduate of Hazleton Area High School. She is also a 2009 summa cum laude graduate of King’s College, where she earned degrees in finance, Spanish and business administration on a full-tuition scholarship. She is employed as a financial analyst at GSI Commerce, a division of eBay, King of Prussia, Pa. The prospective groom is the grandson of the late Albert and Mary Twilley and the late Thomas and Marion Fay. Eric is a graduate of Central Bucks East High School. He is also a 2010 magna cum laude graduate of King’s College, where he earned degrees in finance and business administration. He is employed as a financial analyst at CSL Behring, King of Prussia, Pa. The couple will exchange vows in August.

Peter J. Cicacci baptized eter Jacob Cicacci, son of Peter P Cicacci and Mi-

chelle Shock, Flagler Beach, Fla., was baptized March 8, 2012, at Santa Maria Del Mar on Flagler Beach, Fla. Peter Jacob is the grandson of Christopher Hoyt and Jill Cicacci, Palm Coast, Fla., and Ralph and Pauline Shock, Wapwallopen, Pa. Peter’s godmother is his aunt, Sabrina Cicacci-Hoyt, Palm Coast, Fla., and his godfather is his cousin, Cody Gobbler, Wilkes-Barre, Pa.

riage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Edward and Sharon Leslie, WilkesBarre. She is the granddaughter of Andrew and Ruth Gobla and Alice Leslie and the late Edward Leslie, all of Wilkes-Barre. She has a brother, Edward, and a sister, Madisen. The prospective groom is the son of Benjamin and Dorothy Bennick, Plains Township. He is the grandson of the late Bennie and Sophie Bennick, Wilkes-Barre, and the late Leo and Veronica Stachowski, Hudson. The bride-to-be is a 2003 graduate of James M. Coughlin High School. She is employed at Blue Cross of Northeastern Pennsylvania. The prospective groom is a 1998 graduate of James M. Coughlin High School and a 2000 graduate of Luzerne County Community College, with an Associate in Applied Science degree in electronics engineering technology. He is employed at AWI. Matthew is also a well-known, local guitar player. He has his own band and teaches guitar. The couple will exchange vows on Oct. 6, 2012 at East End Primitive Methodist Church in Wilkes-Barre.

Spece, Mitchell olly Mitchell and Jason Spece, together with their families, H announce their engagement and

approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of the late Christopher Mitchell and the late Rose Mitchell Jones. She is the granddaughter of William and Barbara Mitchell, Hanover Township; Robert Franco, Wyalusing; and the late Helen Franco. The prospective groom is the son of Michael J. and Sarah Spece, Plymouth. He is the grandson of James Spece, Montana; Diane Chapman, Florida; and the late Michael and Gertrude Washney, Wilkes-Barre. Holly is a student at Luzerne County Community College and will graduate in May 2012. She is employed by K-Mart. Jason is a 2001 graduate of GAR Memorial High School and is enrolled in the Smith and Solomon Commercial Driver Training Program. He is employed in the construction industry. The couple will exchange vows June 9, 2012, at Immanuel Baptist Church, Edwardsville.

Clare R. Sheils baptized

lare Regina Sheils, daughter C of Robert P. Sheils

III and Sheila Flanagan-Sheils, Clarks Summit, was baptized on March 24 at The Church of Saint Gregory by her grandfather, Deacon Robert P. Sheils Jr., who was assisted by Monsignor Philip A. Gray. Clare is the granddaughter of Joseph and Regina Flanagan, Laflin, and Bob and Connie Sheils, Clarks Summit. Godparents are Michael Flanagan, Laflin, and Maureen Flanagan, Duryea. Clare was honored at a luncheon with family and friends at The Waverly Club following the baptism.

anina Novak and Michael Zavislak were united in the sacrament Jof marriage Sept. 3, 2011, in St.

Phillips, Rushton ennifer Lynn Rushton and John Edward Phillips were Junited in marriage on Nov. 12,

2011, at the Luzerne County Courthouse Rotunda in WilkesBarre by the Rev. Michael Hauser. The bride is the daughter of Randall and Sherry Rushton, Nanticoke. She is the granddaughter of the late James and Shirley Catnes, Sheatown; Anita and Edward Josefowicz, Nanticoke; and James Rushton, Wilkes-Barre. The groom is the son of Joanne Phillips, Scranton, and Majid Entezam, Charlottesville, Va. He is the grandson to Mary Isobel Steppe, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, and the late John Edward Phillips, Scranton. The bride, escorted by her father, was joined by maid of honor Tatum Neiderhiser and bridesmaids Hoai Nguyen, Christine Gavlick, Renee Stavish and Amy Cohen. The groom chose Aaron Zona as best man. Groomsmen were Giuseppe Saltalamacchia, Nicholas Brogna, Frank Hershberger and Michael Dudley. Ushers were Jeffrey Rushton, James Phillips, Cyrus Entezam and John Lahr. A reading was given by Lynn Catnes, aunt and godmother of the bride. Musical talent for the ceremony was performed by Tom Graham. After the ceremony, an evening cocktail hour and reception were held at The Highlands at Newberry Estates in Dallas. Music and dancing were highlights of the evening, including a special performance by UUU during the reception. A bridal shower was held in late August by the mother of the bride and bridesmaids. A rehearsal dinner was hosted by the bride’s parents at their home in Nanticoke. Jennifer is a 2000 graduate of Wilma Boyd School in Pittsburgh. She is employed as the catering director for the Westmoreland Club in Wilkes-Barre. Jennifer is also the co-owner of MCR Productions with her husband. John is a 2003 graduate of Lackawanna College in Scranton. He is the owner of MCR Productions in Kingston. John is also the keyboard player for the award-winning cover band, UUU. The couple resides in Kingston.

Ignatius Church, Kingston, by the Rev. John Polednak. The bride is the daughter of Janice C. Novak, Kingston, and the late Robert J. Novak, Plains Township. She is the granddaughter of the late Benjamin and Emily Margavage, Kingston, and the late George and Tessie Novak, Plains Township. The groom is the son of Maureen Solomon, Nanticoke, and Michael and Margaret Zavislak, St. Augustine, Fla. He is the grandson of the late George and Lottie Solomon, Ashley, and Elizabeth Zavislak and the late Louis Zavislak, both of Hanover Township. The bride was given away in marriage by her mother. She chose her friend, Katie Richardson, as her matron of honor. Bridesmaids were Tracy Tomasura, friend of the bride; Melissa Vitale, cousin of the bride; and Stacey Fetterman and Michelle Zavislak, sisters of the groom. The groom chose his brother, Mark Zavislak, as his best man. Groomsmen were Robert Novak, brother of the bride, and Wayne Foux, Jason Josefowicz and Mike Rodriguez, friends of the groom. Flower girl was Halley Richardson, friend of the bride. Ring bearer was Nick Biniek, nephew of the groom. Readings were given by Jenn Rodriguez, Trina Mushala and John Hemsley. A bridal shower was hosted by the mothers of the bride and groom at Andy’s Diner, Plains Township. The parents of the groom hosted the rehearsal dinner at Andy’s Diner, Plains Township. The bride is a 1997 graduate of Wyoming Valley West High school and earned a bachelor’s degree in human development and family studies from Penn State University in 2001. She is employed by Evergreen Behavioral Intervention for Children, Luzerne. The groom is a 1998 graduate of Greater Nanticoke Area High school and attended Penn State University. He is owner and operator of the family business, Valley Pools and Spas, Hanover Township. The couple resides in Hanover Township.

Bryant, Cassidy

The DeMelliers

hannon Lynn Bryant and James William Cassidy III, S together with their families, an-

r. and Mrs. Thomas DeMellier celebrated their 50th wedding M anniversary on April 6. They were

nounce their engagement and upcoming marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of F. Barry Bryant and Earlene A. Bryant, Hanover Township, Pa. Shannon is the granddaughter of the late David and Ruth A. Jones and the late Frederick and Frances Bryant, all of Plymouth, Pa. The prospective groom is the son of James W. Cassidy II, Scranton, Pa., and Mary Cassidy, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. James is the grandson of the late James W. Cassidy I and Ruth Cassidy and the late John and Elizabeth Coleman, all of Scranton, Pa. Shannon is employed as a computer operator at the Social Security Administration, WilkesBarre Data Operations Center. James is employed as a security guard for the Whitestone Group at the Wilkes-Barre Data Operations Center. A fall wedding is planned.

married in Phillisburg, N.J., and also had a Catholic wedding at St. Leo’s Church in Ashley. Best man was the late Joseph Fisher and maid of honor was Carol Riley. Mrs. DeMellier is the former Judy Radici, daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Marchello Radici. Mr. DeMellier is the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. George DeMellier. Mrs. DeMellier is retired. She worked in private duty nursing and was a bartender at the Lake Carey Inn. Mr. DeMellier is a retired teamster road driver from Roadway Express. They are the proud parents of four children, Thomas, Lake Carey; Michelle, Stockbridge, Mass.; Brian, Wilkes-Barre; and Daniel, Plains Township. They are the proud grandparents of Julia DeMellier, Caden DeMellier and Brian DeMellier and the step-grandparents of Sadie Smith. They will celebrate their day with their children and grandchildren.


K ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

O

C

C

A

S

I

O

N

S

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 5B

Family Service Association planning fundraising gala Shedlock, Brominski

DeLucia, Nemic

A. Shedlock and Donald R ebecca A. Brominski were united in

icole DeLucia and John Nemic III were united in marriage on Sept. N 10, 2011, at St. John the Evangelist

marriage on March 3, 2012, at the Westmoreland Club, Wilkes-Barre. The double-ring, candlelight ceremony was performed by the Honorable Diana Malast, friend of the bride. Rebecca is the daughter of James and Carol Shedlock, Plains Township. She is the granddaughter of the late Joseph and Elizabeth Shedlock and the late John and Irene Marcikonis. Donald is the son of Donald and Ann Marie Brominski, Moosic. He is the grandson of Anne Yanklunas and the late Anthony Yanklunas and the late Louis and Bina Brominski. Rebecca chose Stacey Sanchez, friend of the bride, as maid of honor and Don chose Anthony Brominski, son of the groom, as best man. The couple chose their family as attendants. They included Jim, Jenn and Jaden Shedlock; Jason, Meg and Josie Shedlock; Kim Brominski and Danny Tolan; John, Shelley, Jack, Matt and Holly Rodgers. An evening cocktail and dinner reception, hosted by the bride and groom, was held at the Westmoreland Club, Wilkes-Barre. Ceremony and reception music was provided by the Fuzzy Park Band. Prior to the wedding, the family gathered for a rehearsal and dinner held at Vino Dolce, Hanover Township. Rebecca is a graduate of Luzerne County Community College and Wilkes University with a bachelor’s degree in English and education and a master’s degree in educational development. Rebecca is the director of conference services and community outreach initiatives for the Educational Conference Center at Luzerne County Community College. Donald is a graduate of Lehigh University with a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering and is the director of business development for UGI Utilities, Inc. The couple honeymooned at the RIU Paradise Island Resort, Nassau, Bahamas. They reside in Dallas.

Church, Pittston. Monsignor John Bendik performed the double-ring ceremony. A reception followed at Colarusso’s La Palazzo in Moosic. The bride is the daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth DeLucia, Harding. She is the granddaughter of the late Joseph and Philomena DeLucia and the late Michael and Regina Jurovsky, all of Pittston. The groom is the son of John and Margaret Nemic, West Wyoming. He is the grandson of the late John Nemic and Rose Walker, West Wyoming, and the late Clarence and Marguerite Hite, Pittston. Given in marriage by her father, the bride chose her sister, Deanne Tomaszewski, as her matron of honor. Bridesmaids were Nadia Nemic, sister of the groom; Mary DeLucia, sister-in-law of the bride; Marissa Giorgio and Alicia Kelley, friends of the bride and groom; and Morgan Tomaszewski, niece of the bride. The flower girl was Nina Callahan, cousin of the groom. The groom selected his brother, Justin Nemic, as his best man. Groomsmen were Daniel DeLucia Jr., brother of the bride; Eric Lewis, Brian Pikas and Dave Hergan, friends of the bride and groom; and Mitchell Tomaszewski, nephew of the bride. Readings were given by Joel Tomaszewski and Krista and Sarah Walker. Gifts were presented by George Walker and Robert and Barbara Kitchen. A blessing was provided at the reception by George Walker Jr. The bride is a 2002 graduate of Wyoming Area High School. She earned a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing from Misericordia University in 2006. She is employed as a registered nurse and case manager for Geisinger Health Plan. The groom is a 1999 graduate of Wyoming Area High School. He is a 2006 graduate of Wilkes-Barre General Hospital School of Radiology. John is employed as a radiologic technologist for Community Health Systems. The couple honeymooned in St. Lucia. They reside in Plains Township.

Final arrangements are being made by Family Service Association of Wyoming Valley (FSAWV) for its 10th Annual Gala and Auction to be held 6-11 p.m. Saturday at the Westmoreland Club in Wilkes-Barre. This year’s benefit, which is open to the public, will feature both a live and silent auction and musical entertainment by Group DuJour. The theme is ‘From Our Family to Yours’ and is mission-based with all proceeds from the event benefitting the many programs and services that FSAWV provides. Included in this year’s auctions are trips, sporting events, sports memorabilia, jewelry and many retail store and restaurant gift certificates. There will also be a Diamond Hunt for a $1,000 gift certificate sponsored by Bartikowsky Jewelers of Wilkes-Barre. Cost is $110 per person which includes hors d’oeuvres, a full dinner and valet parking. Co-Chairing this year’s event are Mary Agnes Kratz; John Barancho, Floral Designs; and Carol Douds, Golden Business Machines. For more information, or to make a reservation, contact Ruth Kemmerer at FSAWV at 823-5144. Members of the Gala Auction Committee, from left: Alice Baran, FSA Board of Directors; Tony Orlando, co-chair, Logistics Committee; Kratz; Douds; Sandy Feldman, FSA Friends Committee; Mike Zimmerman, executive director, FSA; Rose Brostoski, Auction Committee; and Lita Insalaco, chair, Auction Committee.

UGI sponsors reading program at State Street Elementary School The Reading is Fundamental (RIF) program, sponsored by UGI, distributed books to the first-grade students at the Wyoming Valley West State Street Elementary School. At least three times a year UGI provides all first graders the opportunity to select a free book to take home. This year’s fourth-grade students read books to the first graders. In addition, volunteers from UGI visited with the children and spent time discussing their book selection. Some of the participants, from left, first row, are Caitlyn Suda, David Hilenski, Cody Anderscavage, Saige Magana, Nicole Carpio and Claudia Sigfreid. Second row: Emanuel Tresilus, Colin Muskus, Cheyenne Sipple, Madison Chacko, Shawn Evans and Aidan Slatky. Third row: teacher Denise Ash, Cody Fink, Alyssa Wolfe, Madison Lord, Siranda Kenndy, Joshua Wesolowski and Donovan Meyers. Fourth row: Joan Ruscavage, reading specialist; Cindy Serafin, UGI volunteer; Mollie Gizenski, teacher; Melissa Zupko, teacher; Dianne Janoski, reading specialist; and Valerie Packer, teacher. Nancy Margavage, UGI volunteer, and principal Amy Pettit also participated.

Juvenile Justice in-service held at Crestwood The Luzerne County Juvenile Justice School Sub Committee recently held an in-service at the Crestwood School District. Presentations outlined the current juvenile justice system and how it interfaces with Luzerne County’s educational system. Participants, from left, first row: Brian Waite, Crestwood; Al Flora Jr., chief public defender; Romilda Crocamo, master of Juvenile Delinquency and Dependency Court; Judge Tina Polachek-Gartley; Mary Jo Shisko, LIU; and Cheryl Sobeski-Reedy, assistant public defender. Second row: Christopher Gegaris, Crestwood; Peg Foster, Crestwood; Kevin Seyer, Crestwood; Brian Baddick, Crestwood; Matthew Muckler, assistant district attorney; Theresa Kline, juvenile probation; Michael Zimmerman, Family Service Association of Wyoming Valley; and Bonnie Gregory, Crestwood.

Night at the Races benefiting Breathe Deep NEPA planned

A Night at the Races to benefit Breathe Deep NEPA/LUNGevity Foundation will be held 6 p.m. Friday at the Swoyersville American Legion, 259 Shoemaker St., Swoyersville. Admission is $20 and includes a horse and all you can eat and drink. To purchase tickets contact Pauline at 690-6111 or nepa@lungevity.org. Committee members, from left, first row, are Sam Greenberg, Barbara Greenberg and Linda Giordano. Second row: Sabine Thomas; Pauline Makowski, event coordinator; Jerry Weinstock; and Ed Evans.

W-B General will honor volunteers at luncheon As part of its National Volunteer Week observances, Wilkes-Barre General Hospital will recognize and thank its dedicated volunteers at its annual Volunteer Luncheon on Monday at the Thomas P. Saxton Medical Pavilion, Edwardsville. This year’s theme is ‘Volunteers are Super!’ The hospital’s volunteers fulfill several important functions ranging from customer service, admissions, flower and mail delivery and hospitality cart duties. For more information about volunteering contact Daria Kochanievich, volunteer coordinator, at 552-1199. Some of the volunteers, from left: Maureen Carey, Wyoming; Joanne Corbett, Kingston; and Barbara Wideman, Luzerne.

SOCIAL PAGE GUIDELINES The Times Leader allows you to decide how your wedding notice reads, with a few caveats. Wedding announcements run in Sunday’s People section, with color photos, free of charge. Articles must be limited to 220 words, and we reserve the right to edit announcements that exceed that word count. Announcements must be typed or submitted via

www.timesleader.com. (Click on the "people" tab, then “weddings” and follow the instructions from there.) Submissions must include a daytime contact phone number and must be received within 10 months of the wedding date. We do not run first-year anniversary announcements or announcements of weddings that took place more than a year ago. (Wedding

photographers often can supply you with a color proof in advance of other album photographs.) All other social announcements must be typed and include a daytime contact phone number. Announcements of births at local hospitals are submitted by hospitals and published on Sundays. Out-of-town announcements

with local connections also are accepted. Photos are only accepted with baptism, dedication or other religious-ceremony announcements but not birth announcements. Engagement announcements must be submitted at least one month before the wedding date to guarantee publication and must include the wedding date. We

cannot publish engagement announcements once the wedding has taken place. Anniversary photographs are published free of charge at the 10th wedding anniversary and subsequent five-year milestones. Other anniversaries will be published, as space allows, without photographs.

Drop off articles at the Times Leader or mail to: The Times Leader People Section 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Questions can be directed to Kathy Sweetra at 829-7250 or e-mailed to people@timesleader.com.


CMYK PAGE 6B

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

N

E

W

S

THE TIMES LEADER

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

Olivia R. Dudeck

Oscar Paddock Avila

Olivia R. Dudeck, daughter of Matt and Linda Dudeck, McAdoo, is celebrating her fifth birthday today, April 15. Olivia is a granddaughter of Linda Slovik, Peggy Dudeck and the late Norb Dudeck. She is a great-granddaughter of Rose Bottley, Joe Bottley, Adolph Slovik and the late Helen Slovik and Margaret Damiano and the late Joseph Damiano.

Oscar Paddock Avila, son of Karen Paddock and Javier Avila, Bethlehem, is celebrating his second birthday today, April 15. Oscar is a grandson of Joseph and Nancy Paddock, Hanover Township; and Josefina Morales and the late Alfonso Avila, Bayamon, Puerto Rico. He is a greatgrandson of Bernadine Stack, Wilkes-Barre.

www.timesleader.com

Preschoolers learn about pretzels at Auntie Anne’s

The preschool class from Miss Ellie’s Education Center in WilkesBarre recently visited Auntie Anne’s pretzels at the Wyoming Valley Mall. The children heard a story about the history of pretzels and were able to make one of their own to enjoy. They also visited the Easter Bunny. Some of the participants, from left, first row, are Tristin Rushnock, Aiden Nealon, Abby Tredinnick, Keira Thompson, Ava Fosko, Christopher Schlude, Colton Tomczak and Robbie Miller. Second row: Linda Campenalla, shift manager, Auntie Anne’s; Nicholas Nuss; Bobby Ashford; Christopher Rilk; Shawn Rubin; Mackenzie Kearney; Alivia Evans; and Jude Free.

LCCC raises more than $9,000 for United Way of Wyoming Valley

United Way of Wyoming Valley recently participated in the first donor luncheon thanking Luzerne County Community College and its staff for supporting the 2011-2012 United Way Community Campaign. Led by Rebecca Brominski, employee campaign manager, Luzerne County Community College employees raised more than $9,000. At the luncheon, from left: Thomas Leary, president, LCCC; Paula Bowman, Career Services and campaign volunteer, LCCC; Brominski, director, Conference Services and Outreach Initiatives, LCCC; Cathy Beretski, senior director, resource development, United Way; Bryne Lewis, campaign manager, United Way; and Bill Jones, president and chief executive officer, United Way.

Justin N. Mercado Justin Noel Mercado, son of Noel and Jennifer Mercado, Shamong, N.J., celebrated his fourth birthday April 1 1. Justin is a grandson of Tony and Kathy Weiss, WilkesBarre, and Noel and Reina Mercado, Vineland, N.J. He is a greatgrandson of the late Michael and Helen Simons and the late Tony and Doris Weiss, Wilkes-Barre. Justin has a sister, Nina, 1.

Northwest second-graders learn about pioneers Students in Mrs. Hasay’s second-grade class at the Northwest Area Primary School recently studied about the life of early pioneers. Students had the opportunity to dress as pioneers and make an entire pioneer supper with roast beef, mashed potatoes, carrots and apple pie. At the dinner, from left, are Aidan Killian, Abby Strange and Alex Kopco.

Nursery school students have a magical day

Eighth-graders named Holy Redeemer scholars

Ronald McDonald recently performed his magic act for the 3- and 4-year-old students at Forty Fort United Methodist Church Nursery School as part of the school’s annual Ronald McDonald Day program. Some of the participating staff, from left: Elizabeth Ginoccetti, teacher’s aide; Ronald McDonald; Mary Ermel, school coordinator; Caroline Novrocki, teacher, 4-year-old class; and Deanna Lyons, teacher, 3year-old class.

Eighth-grade students at Wyoming Area Catholic School, Exeter, who achieved a high standard on the placement exam at Holy Redeemer High School were recently named Holy Redeemer Scholars. From left, first row, are Noah Heck and Isabella Romani. Second row: Christopher Tigue, principal; James Orr; and Ann Marie Walsh, eighth-grade teacher.

GUIDELINES

Children’s birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge Photographs and information must be received two full weeks before your child’s birthday. To ensure accurate publication, your information must

be typed or computer-generated. Include your child’s name, age and birthday, parents’, grandparents’ and great-grandparents’ names and their towns

of residence, any siblings and their ages. Don’t forget to include a daytime contact phone number. We cannot return photos

submitted for publication in community news, including birthday photos, occasions photos and all publicity photos. Please do not submit precious

or original professional photographs that require return because such photos can become damaged, or occasionally lost, in the production process.

Send to: Times Leader Birthdays, 15 North Main St., WilkesBarre, PA 18711-0250.

We L ve Flip Fl ps!

1-800-49-SHOES

Hours: Mon. & Sat. 10-5:30pm • Tues.-Thurs. 10am-8:30pm • Sun. 12-4pm

744496

158 MEMORIAL HWY. • SHAVERTOWN •


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

BIRTHS Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center Davis, Tiffany and James Weidner, Tunkhannock, a daughter, March 16. Harris, Nicole and Jeremy, Shavertown, a son, March 16. Schweizer, Laura and Paul, Falls, a daughter, March 18. Armstrong, Sara and Jeffrey, Tunkhannock, a son, March 18. Broscious, Johanna and Jonathan, Hunlock Creek, a daughter, March 18. Charnick, Erin and Raymond, Hazleton, a son, March 19. Coburn, Krystal and Paul Shinko, Kingston, a son, March 19. Stallone, Desirae and Eric Kuklinski, Weatherly, a son, March 19.

C

O

M

M

U

N

Porter, Jennifer and Dan Wise, Blakeslee, a daughter, March 20.

Johnson, Robin and Seth, Monroe Township, a daughter, March 25.

Sweeney, Ashley, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, March 21.

Dobbs, Brittany and Ronald Kearns Jr., White Haven, a daughter, March 25.

Herbert, Walta and William Shotwell, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, March 21. Humphrey, Kimberly and Chauncey, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, March 21.

I

Fisher, Amber and Josh Giannott, Wilkes-Barre, a son, March 26. McDonald, Jessica, Meshoppen, a son, March 26.

T

Y

N

E

W

ter, March 30. Kellum, Kristen and Damon Heck, Wilkes-Barre, a son, March 30. Tingley, Rebecca and James Resseguie, Harford, a daughter, March 30. Messinger, Amber and Matthew Stuart, Hughestown, a son, March 30. Iris, Blanca and Gabriel Rodriguez Sr., Hazleton, a daughter, March 30.

Dessoye, Lauren, Pittston, a son, March 21.

Kochanski, Victoria and A.J., Mountain Top, a daughter, March 27.

Bufogle, Erin and Jonathan, Pittston, a daughter, March 22.

Webb, Iasia, Wilkes-Barre, a son, March 27.

Finan, Meghan and Allen, Meshoppen, a daughter, March 22.

Cantone, Tonya and Charles Jones, Laceyville, a daughter, March 31.

Drouse, Erica, Pittston, a son, March 28.

Millirons, Krystal and Eric Rivera, Kingston, a daughter, March 23.

Green, Kaila and Allen Jr., Berwick, a daughter, March 31.

Marcy, Lindena and Matthew David, Nicholson, a son, March 28.

Jiminez, Diane and Phillip Tyson Jones, Pocono Summit, a son, March 23. Guth, Jamie and Edward Mazza, Wilkes-Barre, a son, March 23.

Strish, Amanda and Eric, Mountain Top, a son, March 20.

Hemple, Jessica and William, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, March 24.

Alu, Cheryl and John, Avoca, a daughter, March 20.

Bozek, Deana and Randy Hules, Kingston, a son, March 24.

Minet, Cynthia and Andy Chopka, Plains Township, a daughter, March 29. Williams, Megan and Shaun Gunshore, Tunkhannock, a daugh-

Novartis

MS Education Link Hear Gary Clauser, MD

ALL JUNK CARS & TRUCKS WANTED

Highest Prices Paid In Cash. Free Pickup. Call Anytime.

VITO & GINO 288-8995 •

Forty Fort

Your Power Equipment Headquarters CubCadet • Stihl • Ariens Troybilt • Gravely Lawntractors • Mowers • Trimmers Blowers and more

570-675-3003 0 6 3003

687 Memorial Hwy., Dallas

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 7B

MEETINGS

and third Tuesday of each month. All are welcome. For more information call Rick at 417-7036, visit toastmasters.org or email toastmasterswb@gmail.com.

Tuesday WILKES-BARRE: Toastmasters International, a public speaking, leadership, self-improvement club, 5:15 p.m. in the Presentation Room at Sundance Vacations, 264 Highland Park Blvd., across from the Mohegan Sun Arena. The club meets the first

April 29 PLAINS TWP.: The Annual Italian Independent Cemetery, 6 p.m. at the Fox Hill Fire House, Senior Citizens Center, 50 Second Street. All members are invited.

Senior Homecare By Angels Up to 24 Hour care Meal Preparation Errands/Shopping Hygiene Assistance Light Housekeeping Medication Reminders Companionship

LUCAS FARMS Open 7 Days a Week • 9am-5pm

10lb. BAG POTATOES

199

WOW!

59¢ 1LB. BAG VINE RIPENED 89¢LB. TOMATOES KIRBY “PICKLING” 79¢LB. CUCUMBERS CELERY 79¢ BUNCH COOKING ONIONS 69¢ 2LB. BAG CARROTS

FREE In Home Consultation Call 570-270-6700 or visit visitingangels.com Licensed, Bonded and Insured

99¢

3/

KIWI MACINTOSH APPLES CABBAGE

EQUIPMENT

S

69¢ LB. 39¢ LB.

610 Nanticoke Street, Hanover Twp. 825-9720

discuss information about multiple sclerosis (MS) and a prescription treatment option. April 18, 2012 • 6:30 pm The Café 1120 Highway 315 Wilkes-Barre, PA 18705 Please RSVP by April 17, 2012 by calling 800-973-0362. Light food and beverage served.

Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation ©2011 Novartis 9/11 T-XMG-109961

FREE SUNGLASSES WITH COMPLETE PURCHASE

A hearing aid system built for two! Hear the sound directly from those who matter... ...even if they are not right in front of you

Some restrictions apply, see store for details. Expires May 4, 2012

WE ACCEPT THE FOLLOWING INSURANCE CARRIERS: • Blue Cross Blue Shield • Geisinger • Medicare • Davis Vision • VSP • VBA • NVA • Eyemed • Aetna • Health America • United Healthcare • Chip

The newest accessory for Alera

Dr. Nicole Schwartz

• Lab On Premises • Accepting New Patients 35 Gateway Shopping Center, Edwardsville • 714-3937

Hear sound directly from those who matter, even if they are not right in front of you. Clip on clothing, or plug into an iPod*, to hear sound streamed directly to your hearing aids... no strings attached ReSound Alera, paired with ReSound Unite® easily connects to your TV, stereo, computer and cell phone. Using 2.4 GHz technology, a clear wireless signal streams audio directly to your hearing instruments, without wearing anything extra around your neck. *iPod is a registered trademark of Apple, Inc.

• Free hearing evaluation and consultation • Free demonstration of our most advanced hearing aid technology • Trial-period and financing options available NEW LOCATION

Park Office Bldg. 400 Third Ave. • Suite 109 Kingston, PA

(570) 714-2656

Family

Hearing Center

Zeigler - Asby Audiology www.afamilyhearingcenter.com

1132 Twin Stacks Drive Twin Stacks Center Dallas, PA

(570) 675-8113


CMYK PAGE 8B

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

N

E

W

S

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Lake-Lehman High School earns Outstanding School Award at History Day Contest For the 13th consecutive year, Lake-Lehman High School won the Outstanding School Award, Senior Division, at the Regional History Day Contest recently held at Penn State Wilkes-Barre. The award is presented to the high school that achieves the most winning entries. Lake-Lehman won five first-place awards, five second-place awards and three third-place awards. A record number of 13 projects and 22 students from the school qualified to compete in the state competition May 4-5 at Cumberland Valley High School, Mechanicsburg. Students researched topics related to the annual theme, Revolution, Reaction, Reform in History, and produced media documentaries, tabletop exhibits, drama performances or research papers. Award-winning students, from left, first row: Lindsay Williams, first place, individual exhibit; Courtney McMonagle, first place, individual performance; Lauren Macmullen, second place, individual documentary; Michael Novrocki, History Day coordinator, Lake-Lehman; Brian Gorski, associated History Day coordinator, Lake-Lehman; Jason Patterson, first place, individual documentary; Sara Tronsue, second place, group performance; Jenna Mortenson, second place, group performance; Jasmine Moku, second place group performance. Second row: Kristen Boyle, third place, individual historical paper; Hannah Cross, second place, group exhibit; Shauna Leahy, second place, group exhibit; Sela Fine, second place, group exhibit; Nicholas Egan, third place, group documentary; Christopher Herrick, third place, group documentary; Alexander Hoyt, third place, group documentary; Brittany Faux, second place, group documentary; Anna James, second place, group documentary; Shelby Foster, second place, individual historical paper; Rachael Hohol, third place, individual documentary; Sarah Bedford, first place, group exhibit; Ashley Jackson, first place, group documentary; Megan Davis, first place, group documentary; Thomas Boyle, first place, group exhibit. Ryan Lindbuchler, chair of the Social Studies Department, was also an associate History Day coordinator.

E.O.E.

240353

T h e M eado w s M an o r M ead ow s C om plex • 200 L ak e Street • D allas • 675-9336

See the signs of Summer Save Now...Learn How

Cub Scout Pack 155, Trucksville, recently held its annual Blue and Gold Dinner at the Trucksville United Methodist Church Memorial Hall. This year’s theme was ‘Around the World.’ Food and decorations were featured from Italy, Poland and Mexico. The scouts also enjoyed a slide show featuring pictures from last summer’s events and were able to participate in the breaking of piñatas supplied by the Lion, Tiger and Wolf Dens. The dinner also included a Parent and Pal Cake Bake. Sixteen Cub Scouts and their partners baked and decorated cakes that were judged by the scout families attending the dinner. All bakers received a certificate of participation and their cakes were later served for dessert. Winners of the Parent and Pal Cake Bake, from left: Doug Newbinging and his mother, Renee, first place; Brendon Austin and his mother, Amy, second place; Vince Vespico and his mother, Kelly, third place; and Rick Ostroski, cubmaster.

Smiles get a little Bigger and Brighter every Spring! Make your smile the Biggest and Brightest this Spring! Now Accepting New Patients

Trained Professionals Crawl Spaces - Basements - Attics - Behind Walls Commercial & Residential 1 Room or Entire House • Testing through air quality & physical inspection • Basement waterproofing & dehumidification • Prevention with mold retardants & dehumidification Emergency Services - Free Estimates www.seitzbrothers.com • info@seitzbrothers.com Call Us Toll Free ~ 888.467.1008

Carpenter Dental 1086 Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort

570-331-0909

www.carpenterdental.com

$1,000 LASIK Savings

NOW OPEN SUNDAYS 10AM - 3PM

ATTEND A FREE EDUCATIONAL SEMINAR & SAVE

Tuesday, April 17th

Meet Dr. Bucci At Our Wilkes-Barre Office

BucciVision.com • 1-877-DR-BUCCI

746752

Seating Is Limited - Pre-register @

746419 7 7464 19

O fferi n g Q u al i ty I n Perso n al C are

Scouts attend ‘Around the World’ Blue and Gold Dinner


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

âž›

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

N

E

W

S

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 9B

Pringle children enjoy egg hunt Members from the Pringle Borough Crime Watch and students from the Law Enforcement/Police Science Program at West Side Career and Technology Center recently conducted an Easter egg hunt for the children of Pringle Borough on the school grounds. The event was attended by several hundred children from the community who also had their fingerprints and photographs taken by the law enforcement students. Celebrities in attendance were the Easter Bunny, Tux, McGruff and the Kingston Police Department K-9 Unit. Some of the students, from left, first row, are Cassie Hivish, Mark Davis, Rebecca Green, Heather Kennedy, Allisah Fuches, Dave Eland, Ceara Letteer, Dan Pierce, Emily Mansilla and Robert Arnold. Second row: members of the Crime Watch, Pete Kelly, Karen Leonardi, Cathy Brojakowski, Judith Tovey, Mary Lou Orlrtk, Joyce Evans, Connie Kostelac, Dorthy Peters and Lois Sporinsky.

Swoyersville Fire Department receives support grant from Pennsylvania American Water

Pennsylvania American Water recently provided a $500 firefighting support grant to the Swoyersville Fire Department for the purchase of a Task Force Tip Blitzfire portable monitor to replace an older model. The new model provides added fire suppression features and can also be used for exposure protection. At the presentation, from left: John Konopka, deputy chief, Swoyersville Fire Department; Frank Gates, supervisor, Pennsylvania American Water; and Matt Bonawits, assistant chief, Swoyersville Fire Department.

BEL L ES

C O N S TR U C TIO N C O . PA012959

THE BES T RO O FIN G S ID IN G W IN D O W S & C ARPEN TRY

824- 7220

We design rooms for the way you live!

sq. ft.

sq. ft.

12mm

Laminate Floors

by Formica S/A

2

$ 99

1230 Wyoming Ave | Forty Fort 570-714-2900 ray.hamad@gmail.com

sq. ft.

749244

59 2

¢ $ 99

Custom Window Shades and Draperies Available Now

747451

Ceramic Tile Hardwood S/A S/A


CMYK PAGE 10B

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Spring is here!

GetreadyforsummerwithaKubotafromC.H.WaltzSons,Inc.

C.H. Waltz Sons, Inc.

W WALTZ www.chwaltz.com BX2660

Physical Therapy ~ Occupational Therapy ~ Speech Therapy

   .)- $ , & ("$(  0# & +$/  1+),--$ -+(,'$,,$)(

Relationships Built On Trust For Over Twenty Years Receive One on One Therapy in a private setting at our newest location: 575 E. Main St., Plains Twp. Near Coccia Ford and Mohegan Sun.

C.H. Waltz Sons, Inc   -- ).-  &&,     

 000#0&-2)' Scan for directions to &-2 )(, $( &&, 

B3200

 )0 + ,- +$("    .)- $ , & ("$(

Visit www.riversiderehab.com For the location near you. Grand L3240 HSTC

   )0 ()$, ( /$+-$)( & / &  0# & +$/

WIN TICKETS!

ZD 323

   .)- $ , & ("$(   +)! ,,$)(& ')0$("  %

Vicki Lawrence and Mama

A Two Woman Show

Financing AsLowAs

May 4th at 8:00 p.m.

RTV1140

 )'!)+-&1 , -, .&-,  1+.&$ .'* )(/ +-$&  

0%

APR

Kubota RTV 1100

 0# & +$/  .)- $ , & ("$(    0$-# # - ( $+

SVL 75     +-$& &$! )'*- -+% loader   )+  /$&& A Two-Woman Show Return this completed entry by April 25th at 5:00 p.m. to: The Times Leader Vicki Lawrence and Mama 15 N. Main Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711

ÂŽ

Enter for your chance to be one of the lucky winners to receive tickets to this special performance on Friday, May 4 at 8:00 p.m. All winners will be notiďŹ ed by phone and can retrieve their tickets at the FM Kirby Center’s will-call window with proper ID.

KX 121-3

   .)- $ , & ("$(  ), (,$(" #1+.&$ ,1,- '  & ( +.(($(" .)- ("$(

Name: _________________________________________________________ Address: _______________________________________________________ City: ________________________________ State: ____ Zip: _____________ E-mail: ________________________________________________________ Phone: _________________________

Winners must pick up tickets at The Times Leader office. No purchase necessary. Prizes have no cash value and are nontransferable. Winners agree to having their name and photo used for publicity. Copies may be examined at our 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre office. The winners will be determined through random drawing from all entries received by April 25th, 2012 at 5:00 p.m. This newspaper cannot answer or respond to telephone calls or letters regarding the contest. Sponsors’ employees and their immediate families are not eligible to enter.

timesleader.com 748793

Vicki Lawrence and Mama


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

IN BRIEF

Alumnae Foundation. The Russell E. Markert Award for Excellence in Choreography and Outstanding Stage ProEDWARDSVILLE: Seven duction will also be presented dance students from the to Rockette choreographer Northeastern Pennsylvania Linda Haberman. Academy of Dancing in EdFor ticket information conwardsville will perform at the Rockette Alumnae Foundation tact Sue Bono Moore, 16413 Fitzhugh Road, Dripping Award luncheon April 29 at Springs, Texas 78620 or 512The Out Hotel, 42nd Street, New York, N.Y. Artistic direc- 775-5668. tor of the school is Barbara HANOVER TWP.: Members Anzalone, a former Rockette. The dancers, ages 14-27, are of the Catholic War Veteran Association are requested to Brittney Eramo, Lindsey attend the Chapter 13 meetShaw Hartzell, Alyssa Horing 1 p.m. today at 175 Old vath, Jessica Kozich, Katelyn Laskowski, Chelsea Margallis Ashley Road. The CWV Post 274, Old and Kristi Shaw. The students Ashley Road, will conduct its will be performing original monthly meeting at 7 p.m. choreography by Anzalone. Thursday. A Catholic service This event is a fundraiser member or member of the for the Rockette Alumnae National Guard may apply for Foundation, an organization that donates money to several membership at this meeting. nonprofit groups. Tickets for the event are $125, with all proceeds benefit the Rockette

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

MUHLENBERG: Muhlenburg Christian Academy, an independent Christian school in the Muhlenburg/Hunlock Creek area, is accepting applications for enrollment for the 2012-2013 school year. The academy uses the Accelerated Christian Education curriculum. Classes are offered from kindergarten to grade 12. Kindergarten is a half day, 9 a.m.-noon, and grades 1-12 are all day, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. For more information, or to schedule an interview, contact the school office at 256-3378. WILKES-BARRE: Fifteen local residents and King’s College students are participating as volunteers in the Learning Works Program. Learning Works is a new after-school program designed by Volunteers of America and

T

Y

N

E

W

S

funded by a state grant that is helping more than 100 WilkesBarre Area School District students from low-income families. The program is designed to teach skills that help families prepare their children for high school and beyond. Student volunteers tutor students in grades 5-8 at Dodson Elementary, Kistler Elementary and Meyers Junior/Senior High School who visit the King’s campus after school. Student participants are: Joseph Antosh, Harding; Cali Berryman and John Blaski, Kingston; Natalia Chinikaylo, West Wyoming; Carmen Flores, Jenn Harnischfeger, Henry Peñafiel and Yessica Robles, Wilkes-Barre; Jeffrey Hanadel, Swoyersville; Michel Hughes, Duryea; Francesca Klinger, Nanticoke; Madalynn Matosky, Wyoming; Liberato

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 11B cashier. The school cross trained employees for flexibility and introduced regular, ongoing training sessions. The online WILKES-BARRE: Wilkes University is one of 16 colleg- systems were simplified, makes and universities nationwide ing it easier for students to navigate, which increased recognized by University online enrollment and reBusiness magazine’s Models duced traffic at the Student of Efficiency program, which is sponsored by Higher One, a Center. Eighty-five percent of stutechnology and payment services company serving higher dents now register online. Phone wait times have been education. The Models of Efficiency program recognizes curtailed and with the new online system, students can innovative approaches for streamlining higher education check important documents from their dorm. The unioperations through technolversity has cut printing and ogy or business process impostage expenses and reduced provements. operating costs. Wilkes was recognized for Models of Efficiency is an streamlining its registration and student admissions offic- ongoing recognition program. es. The college created a one- Schools can participate in upcoming rounds by visiting stop shop housing the offices www.universitybusiness.com/ of registrar, financial aid, moe. admissions processing and

Sperrazza, West Pittston; and Michael Zurek, Mountain Top.

MOUNTAIN TOP: Mary Katherine Evans, daughter of Dr. Greg and Karen Evans, Mountain Top, will present a vocal recital 7 p.m. Friday at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, Route 309. The solo vocal program will feature works from “Wicked,” Evans “Funny Girl,” “Hairspray,” “Beauty and the Beast” and others. Piano accompanist will be Andrea Bogusko. There is no admission charge and refreshments will follow the recital. The public is invited. Evans has studied voice for the past seven years with Laura Anderson, Mountain Top, and 13 years of piano under Andrea Bogusko, Mountain Top and Wilkes-Barre. A senior honors student at Holy Redeemer High School, Evans has participated in her school’s musicals for the past four years and has had lead roles in two productions. She was the narrator for “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat,” and played Sarah Brown in “Guys and Dolls.” She has also performed with Limelight Players. Over the past 10 years, Evans has been awarded four Gold Cup trophies in piano, three in musical theater vocals, and two in art song vocals, by the National Federation of Music Clubs. She also earned the prestigious Paderewskj Gold Medal from the National Guild of Piano Teachers and was selected to sing at Carnegie Hall in New York City on April 7 in an honors recital sponsored by the Northeast Pennsylvania Music Teachers Association. With the assistance of Laura Anderson and Andrea Bogusko, Evans was part of a group who recorded for the Massachusetts Public Radio production of “Spoon River Anthology,” traditional American music adapted and arranged by Charles Aidman and Naomi Caryl Hirshhorn. Evans has a twin brother, Zachary.

OUT-OF-TOWN DEAN’S LIST Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Va.

Kyle Giumento, Dunmore, and Aaron Keich, Tunkhannock.

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

Bu ying Gold Jew elry D ia m onds,Pla tinu m , Pu re S ilver,S terling, Indu stria l & Coin S ilver

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

A ntiqu e Jewelry (Brok en OK) Dental Gold,Gold Filled Eyeglasses,Etc.

K IN G T U T ’S 824-4150

322 N. PENN A VE. W -B

744479

G O L D R E PA IR H U T

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

745883

Area vocalist holding recital Friday evening


CMYK PAGE 12B

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

GINO’S SHOE STORE IS YOUR CHILDREN’S SANDAL HEADQUARTERS!

Large Selection of KEENS Available!

...Just Ju Arrived!

GINO’S SHOE STORE Route 309, Dallas, PA – Call 675-2029 Sun. 12-4, Mon. thru Fri. 9:30-8, Sat. 9:30-6

DEBIT

Dry, Red Eyes? Dr. Michele Domiano Dry Eye Syndrome Covered By Most Insurances

The Greater Pittston Chamber of Commerce presents

A Benefit Concert to Support the Hometown Heroes Memorial

Saturday, May 12th • 7pm to 11pm at The Open Space Center 71 South Main Street, Pittston

Captain T.J. Hromisin

Army Specialist Dale Kridlo

Critically wounded in the Iraq conflict

Police Officer Rodney F. Pocceschi

Lieutenant Colonel Richard Berrettini

1st Lieutenant Jeffrey DePrimo

PA State Trooper Joshua Miller

BENEFIT CONCERT REGISTRATION FORM

I will be attending the benefit concert at $30 per person to support the Hometown Heroes Memorial. THANK YOU FOR I will need ______ reservation(s). My total amount enclosed is $_______. SUPPORTING YOUR HOMETOWN ❏ No, I will be unable to attend. Please accept my donation of $_______. HEROES! Attendees:

❏ YES!

___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ Contact number: ( ______ ) _______–_________

GREATER PITTSTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 570.655.1424 info@pittstonchamber.org.

FEATURING

Bill Gelb

and the

Banana Hammocks Band Beer, soft drinks and a light fare menu will be served. TO RSVP, PLEASE MAIL THIS FORM WITH YOUR PAYMENT BY MAY 7TH, 2012

750177

To attend, please return this form with your payment to The Greater Pittston Chamber of Commerce at P.O. Box 704, Pittston, PA 18640. Please make checks payable to: GPCC Hometown Heroes Memorial. Reservation deadline is May 7th, 2012.


CMYK

SPORTS

SECTION

timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

C

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

I N T E R N AT I O N A L L E A G U E

Yanks top Syracuse at ‘home’

T R O U T S E A S O N – O P E N I N G D AY

They’re hooked

By PAUL SOKOLOSKI psokoloski@timesleader.com

W

6 3

See YANKEES, Page 5C INSIDE: Area fans make the trip, 6C

N H L P L AYO F F S

Neil’s OT goal gives Sens split

By IRA PODELL AP Sports Writer

NEWYORK—ChrisNeilscored1:17into overtime, and the Ottawa Senators rallied for a wild 3-2 victory over the New York Rangers in Game 2 to even the first-round Eastern Conference series Saturday night. Neil got to a loose puck in front off a rebound and backhanded SENATORS the puck past goalie Henrik Lundqvist. The top-seeded Rangers seemed poised to RANGERS grab a 2-0 series lead when Brian Boyle scored in the third period, but Nick Foligno tied it with 4:37 left in regulation. Erik Karlsson also scored for the Senators, who exacted some revenge on Boyle for some shots he took at Karlsson during Game 1. A brawl

3

2

See SENS, Page 5C

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Jaden McEvoy, 5, shows off his trout caught in Soloman Creek on Saturday.

Kids enjoy the fishing experience WHERE THE FISH ARE

By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

PLYMOUTH TWP. – Ten-year-old Gary Cooper admitted he had trouble sleeping on Friday night. He woke up at midnight and again at 5 a.m. before finally deciding to stay awake. The reason for Cooper’s insomnia could be found in the basket staked to the shoreline of Moon Lake park on Saturday morning. Inside were five brook trout that Cooper reeled in during the first two hours of the opening AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER day of trout season on Saturday. Jeremy, Aiden and Nick Artemik try to catch a See TROUT, Page 11C

trout Saturday in Ashley at the Soloman Creek fishing derby.

The following Luzerne County waterways will be stocked during trout season: Wapwallopen Creek April 19, May 16 Frances Slocum Lake April 16 Francis E. Walter Dam - April 21, May 8 Harveys Creek - April 21, May 15 Lake Frances - April 18, May 17 Lake Irena - April 21, May 8 Lake Jean - April 16 Lake Took-A-While April 16 Lehigh River - April 17, April 25 Lily Lake - May 19 Moon Lake - April 28, May 5 Nescopeck Creek April 19, May 2, May 15 Pine Creek - May 15

HOCKEY

‘The Hammer’ comes to Wilkes-Barre Philadelphia Flyers legend Dave Schultz spoke at Hockey 101 day before Saturday’s Penguins game. By JOHN MEDEIROS jmedeiros@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE TWP. — While the Pittsburgh Penguins and Philadelphia Flyers are playing a gripping playoff series, a man who played in the NHL for both organizations graced Northeastern Pennsylvania with his presence Saturday. Dave Schultz, who to some put the

“bully” in the Broad Street Bullies, was the featured speaker for the WilkesBarre/Scranton Penguins’ Hockey 101 day at Mohegan Sun Arena. “There’s a lot of people here who grew up going to games in Philadelphia,” Schultz said. “There’s a lot of passionate fans of both teams.” Fans got a look at every facet of the arena and the game, from ice level to the skyboxes, starting five hours before the puck drop Saturday night against the Bridgeport Sound Tigers. The day included time to talk with Schultz, known as “The Hammer” during his eight seasons in the NHL.

“It really wasn’t anything specific,” Schultz said of his talk with area fans. “Let me tell you, though, there was this one kid who was a major Penguins fan. He totally didn’t think it was funny that his dad wanted a picture with me in a Flyers jersey.” Schultz, now in commercial energy sales, was once the most feared enforcer in the NHL. He set the league record for penalty minutes with 472 in 1974-75 with the Flyers, and finished his pro career with more than 4,100 minutes. He led the NHL in penalty See SCHULTZ, Page 5C

ANOTHER SEASON HAS SPRUNG

A

OPINION

No milestone can change up A-Rod’s image

Scranton/Wilkes-Barre shakes off strange circumstances to win.

SYRACUSE, N.Y. — Before they took the field as the home team this season, the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees received a reminder from their manager Dave Miley. “Miley told us make sure we wear the right pants,” Scranton/ Wilkes-Barre outfielder DeWayne Wise said. “Because we’re all over the place.” Forgive the Triple-A Yankees if they someYANKEES times seem a bit confused. But a whole season playing on the road has CHIEFS way of playing tricks on a team. The Yankees certainly won’t forget Saturday afternoon, when Wise drilled a homer as one of his two RBI hits and Scranton/Wilkes-Barre captured its first home game away from home by besting the Syracuse Chiefs 6-3 at Alliance Bank Stadium. That’s the place Syracuse normally calls home.

PAUL SOKOLOSKI

AIMEE DILGER PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

bove, members of the Phillies team in the Pittston Township Little League listen at the opening ceremonies Saturday. At right, the Pittston Township Astros’ Danica Berry readies her glove while teammates Brady Baldrica and Noah Matta look on. The Astros played in the opening T-Ball game. Two players comment on opening day. More on Page 6C.

ith one mighty clout, Alex Rodriguez became the talk of the town again. Which is the way he has always wanted it. In a lot of ways, he is a perfect representative of the New York Yankees. He is selfish and arrogant. He is rich and famous. He is talented and tainted. He is what the Yankees have been all about since the late George Steinbrenner began running them four decades ago. But you can’t buy the kind of passion A-Rod evokes. Like his pinstriped team, people either love him or they hate him, maybe more for who he is than what he does. What he did Friday was make himself noticed. His first home run of the season, an impressive shot to dead center field in the home opener at Yankee Stadium, signaled a renewed interest in A-Rod. Because that shot was his 630th career home run, tying his former Seattle teammate, Ken Griffey Jr., for fifth place on baseball’s all-time list. “Obviously, Griff is special to me,” Rodriguez said. The names directly ahead of him now hold a sacred place in baseball history, starting with Willie Mays and his 660 homers. Sitting just 30 homers away, A-Rod should pass him this year. “It’s something people will follow,” Yankees manager Joe Girardi said. “I will definitely pay attention. I knew he tied Ken Griffey Jr. (Friday). “I think it’s something to follow.” Two sides to a star After that, A-Rod will try to pound his way into the 700 club, which includes three names: Babe Ruth, Hank Aaron and Barry Bonds. Bonds leads the list with 762 career homers, but that bloated number was enhanced by his suspected use of steroids. His run to the top of baseball’s most prestigious record became so tainted, baseball officials once considered putting an asterisk next to his name in the record books. It’s likely the book on A-Rod’s career will read the same way, since he admitted using performance-enhancing drugs during his short stay with the Texas Rangers. He swore he hasn’t used them before or since. But who knows which version of the truth A-Rod’s telling? “You never dream of world championships or reaching milestones,” Rodriguez said. If that’s true, why did he negotiate his own trade to Yankees in 2004, saying they gave him the best chance to win a World Series? “My focus comes back to the team, and helping the team win,” Rodriguez said. If he was really such a team player, A-Rod would have stuck it out in Seattle with Griffey instead of following the big money to Texas while the Mariners were building toward a championship. “I love the game of baseball, there’s no secret there,” A-Rod said. “I don’t allow myself to be a fan of what I’m trying to do.” Yet, he loves the limelight and seems to crave attention, so much that he created a stir by re-signing with the Yankees in the middle of the 2007 World Series. When the Los Angeles Angels came to New York with Albert Pujols, baseball’s newest $100 million man, it has to drive A-Rod crazy. He wasn’t going to be upstaged on his home turf in the home opener. “I’m kind of laying in the weeds, letting other players get this much attention,” A-Rod said. Almost like a snake in the grass. Paul Sokoloski is a Times Leader sports columnist. You may reach him at 970-7109 or email him at psokoloski@timesleader.com.


K PAGE 2C

AMERICA’S LINE By ROXY ROXBOROUGH BASEBALL Favorite

Odds

Underdog

American League BLUE JAYS

9.5

Orioles

Rays

9.5

RED SOX

WHITE SOX

8.5

Tigers

ROYALS

8.5

Indians

Rangers

8.5

TWINS

MARINERS

7.0

A’s

YANKEES

10.0

Angels

National League MARLINS

7.5

PHILLIES

7.0

Mets

NATIONALS

8.0

Reds

Astros

Brewers

BRAVES

8.5

CARDS

8.5

Cubs

ROCKIES

9.5

D’backs

GIANTS

7.0

Pirates

6.5

Padres

DODGERS

NBA Favorite

Points

Heat

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

Underdog

2.5

KNICKS

LAKERS

4

Mavericks

HAWKS

9

Raptors

Bulls

8

Magic

5.5

CAVALIERS

PISTONS

Celtics

8.5

BOBCATS

KINGS

2.5

Blazers

Grizzlies

5

HORNETS

NUGGETS

4

Rockets

NHL Favorite

Odds

Underdog

RED WINGS

-155/ +135

Predators

Penguins

-120/even

FLYERS

Devils

-110/-110

PANTHERS

KINGS

-110/-110

Canucks

Home teams in capital letters.

L O C A L C A L E N D A R TODAY'S EVENTS MEN'S COLLEGE GOLF King’s at Glenmaura Tournament COLLEGE TENNIS Cabrini at King’s, 1 p.m. Wilkes at New York, 1 p.m.

MONDAY, APR. 16 H.S. BASEBALL Coughlin at Tunkhannock, 4:15 p.m. Crestwood at Wyoming Area, 4:15 p.m. Hazleton Area at Dallas, 4:15 p.m. Holy Redeemer at Berwick, 4:15 p.m. Pittston Area at Wyoming Valley West, 4:15 p.m. H.S. GIRLS SOCCER Berwick at Nanticoke, 4:15 p.m. Coughlin at Delaware Valley, 4:15 p.m. Dallas at Hazleton Area, 4:15 p.m. Holy Redeemer at Wyoming Valley West, 5 p.m. H.S. SOFTBALL Crestwood at Wyoming Area, 4:15 p.m. Coughlin at Tunkhannock, 4:15 p.m. Hazleton Area at Dallas, 4:15 p.m. Holy Redeemer at Berwick, 4:15 p.m. Pittston Area at Wyoming Valley West, 4:15 p.m. H.S. BOYS TENNIS Berwick at Coughlin, 4 p.m. MMI Prep at Holy Redeemer, 4 p.m. Pittston Area at Hazleton Area, 4 p.m. Wyoming Area at Meyers, 4 p.m. Wyoming Seminary at Dallas, 4 p.m. Wyoming Valley West at Crestwood, 4 p.m. H.S. BOYS VOLLEYBALL Lake-Lehman at Holy Redeemer COLLEGE GOLF Wilkes at Misericordia Invite, noon King’s at Glenmaura Tournament COLLEGE SOFTBALL Lycoming at Wilkes, 3 p.m. Keystone at King’s, 3 p.m.

TUESDAY, APR. 17 H.S. BASEBALL Hanover Area at MMI Prep, 4:15 p.m. Lake-Lehman at GAR, 4:15 p.m. Northwest at Meyers, 4:15 p.m. H.S. GIRLS SOCCER GAR at Honesdale, 4:15 p.m. Meyers at North Pocono, 4:15 p.m. MMI Prep at Wyoming Seminary, 4:15 p.m. Tunkhannock at Pittston Area, 4:15 p.m. Wyoming Area at Hanover Area, 4:15 p.m. H.S. SOFTBALL Hanover Area at MMI Prep, 4:15 p.m. Lake-Lehman at GAR, 4:15 p.m. Northwest at Meyers, 4:15 p.m. H.S. BOYS TENNIS MMI Prep at Notre Dame-East Stroudsburg, 4:30 p.m. H.S TRACK AND FIELD Pittston Area at Coughlin, 4:15 p.m. H.S. BOYS VOLLEYBALL Dallas at Hanover Area Hazleton Area at Coughlin H.S. BOYS LACROSSE Tunkhannock at Dallas 4:30 p.m. H.S. GIRLS LACROSSE Dallas at Lewisburg, 5:30 p.m. COLLEGE BASEBALL King’s at Scranton, 4 p.m. MEN'S COLLEGE GOLF Scranton at Wilkes, 1 p.m. MEN'S COLLEGE LACROSSE DeSales at Misericordia, 7 p.m. WOMEN'S COLLEGE LACROSSE Lycoming at King’s, 4 p.m. Misericordia at Wilkes, 4:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, APR. 18 H.S. BASEBALL Berwick at Pittston Area, 4:15 p.m. Dallas at Crestwood, 4:15 p.m. Tunkhannock at Nanticoke, 4:15 p.m. Wyoming Area at Holy Redeemer, 4:15 p.m. Wyoming Valley West at Coughlin, 4:15 p.m. H.S. GIRLS SOCCER Delaware Valley at Holy Redeemer, 4:15 p.m. Hazleton Area at Berwick, 4:15 p.m. Lake-Lehman at Dallas, 4:15 p.m. Nanticoke at Coughlin, 4:15 p.m. Wyoming Valley West at Crestwood, 7 p.m. H.S. SOFTBALL Holy Redeemer at Berwick, 4:15 p.m. H.S. BOYS TENNIS Coughlin at Wyomign Area, 4 p.m. Crestwood at Tunkhannock, 4 p.m. Dallas at Pittston Area, 4 p.m. Hazleton Area at Berwick, 4 p.m. Meyers at MMI Prep, 4 p.m. Wyoming Valley West at Wyoming Seminary, 4 p.m. H.S TRACK AND FIELD Holy Redeemer at Hanover Area, 4:15 p.m. Lake-Lehman at GAR, 4:15 p.m. Meyers at Northwest Area, 4:15 p.m. Nanticoke at Wyoming Area, 4:15 p.m. H.S. BOYS VOLLEYBALL Holy Redeemer at Crestwood, 4:30 p.m. H.S. GIRLS LACROSSE Dallas at Wyoming Seminary, 4:15 p.m. COLLEGE BASEBALL Keystone at Misericordia, 3:30 p.m. COLLEGE SOFTBALL Albright at Misericordia, 3 p.m. COLLEGE TENNIS Wilkes at Muhlenberg, 3:30 p.m. Baptist Bible at Misericordia

THURSDAY, APR. 19 H.S. BASEBALL MMI Prep at Lake-Lehman, 4:15 p.m.

◆ BUILDING TRUST The Times Leader strives to correct errors, clarify stories and update them promptly. Sports corrections will appear in this spot. If you have information to help us correct an inaccuracy or cover an issue more thoroughly, call the sports department at 829-7143.

Northwest at Hanover Area, 4:15 p.m. Wyoming Seminary at Meyers, 4:15 p.m. H.S. GIRLS SOCCER Hanover Area at Tunkhannock, 4:15 p.m. Honesdale at Wyoming Area, 4:15 p.m. North Pocono at GAR, 4:15 p.m. Pittston Area at MMI Prep, 4:15 p.m. Wyoming Seminary at Meyers, 4:15 p.m. H.S. SOFTBALL Berwick at Pittston Area, 4:15 p.m. Dallas at Crestwood, 4:15 p.m. Tunkhannock at Nanticoke, 4:15 p.m. Wyoming Area at Holy Redeemer, 4:15 p.m. Wyoming Valley West at Coughlin, 4:15 p.m. H.S. TRACK AND FIELD Crestwood at Wyoming Valley West, 4:15 p.m. Dallas at Berwick, 4:15 p.m. Tunkhannock at Hazleton Area, 4:15 p.m. H.S. BOYS VOLLEYBALL Berwick at Delaware Valley Coughlin at Dallas Hanover Area at Nanticoke North Pocono at Hazleton Area H.S. BOYS LACROSSE Dallas at Crestwood, 4:30 p.m. MEN'S COLLEGE GOLF King’s at Susquehanna, 1 p.m. WOMEN'S COLLEGE LACROSSE King’s at Gwynedd-Mercy, 4 p.m. COLLEGE SOFTBALL Ithaca College at King’s, 3 p.m. Penn State Hazleton at Wilkes, 3 p.m. COLLEGE TENNIS Moravian at Wilkes, 3:30 p.m.

FRIDAY, APR. 20 H.S. BASEBALL Coughlin at Berwick, 4:15 p.m. Hazleton Area at Tunkhannock, 4:15 p.m. Holy Redeemer at Dallas, 4:15 p.m. Nanticoke at Wyoming Valley West, 4:15 p.m. Pittston Area at Wyoming Area, 4:15 p.m. H.S. GIRLS SOCCER Berwick at Lake-Lehman, 4:15 p.m. Crestwood at Delaware Valley, 4:15 p.m. Holy Redeemer at Nanticoke, 4:15 p.m. MMI Prep at Tunkhannock, 4:15 p.m. H.S. SOFTBALL MMI Prep at Lake-Lehman, 4:15 p.m. Northwest at Hanover Area, 4:15 p.m. Wyoming Seminary at Meyers, 4:15 p.m. H.S. BOYS TENNIS Berwick at Wyoming Area, 4 p.m. Hazleton Area at Dallas, 4 p.m. Holy Redeemer at Crestwood, 4 p.m. MMI Prep at Coughlin, 4 p.m. Pittston Area at Wyoming Valley West, 4 p.m. Tunkhannock at Wyoming Seminary, 4 p.m. COLLEGE BASEBALL Misericordia at King’s, 3:30 p.m. Wilkes at DeSales, 3:30 p.m. COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD Misericordia at Princeton

SATURDAY, APR. 21 H.S. BASEBALL Hazleton Area at Bethlehem Liberty, noon H.S. SOFTBALL Northwest at Berwick, 11 a.m. Allentown Central Catholic at Hazleton Area, noon H.S. BOYS TENNIS State College at Hazleton Area, 2 p.m. H.S. BOYS LACROSSE Mifflinburg vs. Dallas, at Crestwood, 11 a.m. Lewisburg vs. Dallas, at Crestwood, 1 p.m. H.S. GIRLS LACROSSE Midd-West at Dallas, 2 p.m. COLLEGE BASEBALL King’s at Misericordia, noon DeSales at Wilkes, 1 p.m. PSU Wilkes-Barre at Penn College (DH), 1 p.m. COLLEGE GOLF Misericordia at DeSales, noon MEN'S COLLEGE LACROSSE King’s at DeSales, 1 p.m. FDU-Florham at Misericordia, 4 p.m. WOMEN'S COLLEGE LACROSSE Eastern at Misericordia, 1 p.m. FDU-Florham at Wilkes, 1 p.m. Manhattanville at King’s, 1 p.m. COLLEGE SOFTBALL Wilkes at DeSales, 1 p.m. Misericordia at King’s, 3 p.m. COLLEGE TENNIS Misericordia at King’s, 1 p.m. Wilkes at Manhattanville, 1 p.m. COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD Misericordia at East Stroudsburg, TBA

W H A T ’ S

O N

T V

AUTO RACING 1 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Truck Series, Good Sam Roadside Assistance 200, at Rockingham N.C. 3:30 p.m. NBCSN — IRL, IndyCar, Grand Prix of Long Beach, at Long Beach, Calif. 7 p.m. ESPN2 — NHRA, 4-Wide Nationals, at Concord, N.C. (same-day tape)

BOWLING

1 p.m. ESPN — PBA, Tournament of Champions, at Las Vegas

COLLEGE BASEBALL

1 p.m. ESPN2 — Alabama at LSU

COLLEGE SOFTBALL

4 p.m. ESPN — LSU at Tennessee

GOLF

9 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Malaysian Open, final round, at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (same-day tape) 1 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, The Heritage, final round, at Hilton Head Island, S.C. 3 p.m. CBS — PGA Tour, The Heritage, final round, at Hilton Head Island, S.C. 7 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, Pro-Am of Tampa Bay, final round, at Lutz, Fla. (same-day tape)

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

1:30 p.m. TBS — Tampa Bay at Boston SNY, WQMY -- N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia 2 p.m. WGN — Detroit at Chicago White Sox 4 p.m. ROOT -- Pittsburgh at San Francisco 8 p.m. ESPN — L.A. Angels at N.Y. Yankees

MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

1:30 p.m. SE2, WYLN -- Rochester at Lehigh Valley

NBA BASKETBALL

1 p.m. ABC — Miami at New York 3:30 p.m. ABC — Dallas at L.A. Lakers

NHL HOCKEY

Noon NBC — Playoffs, conference quarterfinals, game 3, Nashville at Detroit 3 p.m. NBC — Playoffs, conference quarterfinals, game 3, Pittsburgh at Philadelphia 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — Playoffs, conference quarterfinals, game 2, New Jersey at Florida 10:30 p.m. NBCSN — Playoffs, conference quarterfinals, game 3, Vancouver at Los Angeles

T R A N S A C T I O N S BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX—Placed OF Jacoby Ellsbury on the 15-day DL. Recalled OF Che-Hsuan Lin from Pawtucket (IL). DETROIT TIGERS—Activated INF Brandon Inge from the 15-day DL. Recalled LHP Adam Wilk from Toledo (IL). Optioned INF Danny Worth and RHP Brayan Villarreal to Toledo. LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Designated RHP Rich Thompson for assignment. Recalled LHP Brad Mills from Salt Lake (PCL). MINNESOTA TWINS—Claimed OF Clete Thomas off waivers from Detroit. Optioned OF Ben Revere to Rochester (IL). TEXAS RANGERS—Reinstated RHP Yoshinori Tateyama from the 15-day DL and optioned him to Round Rock (PCL). National League COLORADO ROCKIES—Reinstated OF Charlie Blackmon from the 15-day DL and optioned him to Colorado Springs (PCL). LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Reinstated LHP Ted Lilly from the 15-day DL. Placed RHP Todd Coffey on the 15-day DL. SAN DIEGO PADRES—Placed INF-OF Kyle Blanks on the 15-day DL. Selected RHP Joe Wieland from Tucson (PCL). WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Reinstated OF Rick Ankiel from the 15-Day DL. Designated OF Brett Carroll for assignment.

BASKETBALL National Basketball Association CLEVELAND CAVALIERS—Recalled F Luke Harangody from Canton (NBADL).

S

C

O

R

E

S O F T B A L L

Game One: Wyoming Valley Vipers 17, Stonerville Flames 0 Meg Armstrong struck out six over three innings to earn the win in the circle and Kristen Coffee scored four times and picked up four hits as Wyoming Valley rolled. Game Two: Wyoming Valley Vipers 16, The Storm 1 Miranda Bohn allowed one hit over three innings and Jordan Olenginski and Jaden Belles each totaled two hits at Wyoming Valley defeated The Storm Game Three: Wyoming Valley Vipers 13, D.B. Inferno 0 Leandra Ramos struck out eight in three innings in Wyoming Valley’s win over D.B. Inferno. Audi Welles notched three hits and Cassie Novakowski added two more for the offense.

B A S E B A L L International League

Lehigh Valley (Phillies).............. Pawtucket (Red Sox) ................. Rochester (Twins)...................... Yankees ...................................... Buffalo (Mets) ............................. Syracuse (Nationals) ................. South Division Gwinnett (Braves) ...................... Durham (Rays) ........................... Charlotte (White Sox) ................ Norfolk (Orioles) ......................... West Division

W 8 6 5 4 4 2

L 2 4 5 5 6 7

Pct. GB .800 — .600 2 .500 3 1 .444 3 ⁄2 .400 4 .222 51⁄2

W 7 5 4 4

L 3 5 6 6

Pct. GB .700 — .500 2 .400 3 .400 3

W L Pct. GB Columbus (Indians).................... 7 3 .700 — Indianapolis (Pirates) ................. 4 4 .500 2 Toledo (Tigers) ........................... 4 4 .500 2 Louisville (Reds)......................... 3 7 .300 4 Saturday's Games Pawtucket 9, Buffalo 6 Yankees 6, Syracuse 3 Columbus 9, Louisville 4 Lehigh Valley 5, Rochester 2 Gwinnett 5, Durham 0 Toledo at Indianapolis, ppd., rain Charlotte 5, Norfolk 2 Today's Games Toledo at Indianapolis, 12:35 p.m., 1st game Pawtucket at Buffalo, 1:05 p.m. Charlotte at Norfolk, 1:15 p.m. Rochester at Lehigh Valley, 1:35 p.m. Syracuse vs. Yankees at Syracuse, 2 p.m. Durham at Gwinnett, 2:05 p.m. Columbus at Louisville, 2:15 p.m. Toledo at Indianapolis, 3:05 p.m., 2nd game

Eastern League At A Glance All Times EDT Eastern Division W L Pct. GB New Britain (Twins).................... 7 3 .700 — Reading (Phillies)....................... 7 3 .700 — Binghamton (Mets)..................... 3 5 .375 3 New Hampshire (Blue Jays) ..... 3 6 .333 31⁄2 Trenton (Yankees) ..................... 3 6 .333 31⁄2 Portland (Red Sox)..................... 3 7 .300 4 Western Division W L Pct. GB Akron (Indians) ........................... 6 2 .750 — Harrisburg (Nationals) ............... 7 3 .700 — Richmond (Giants) ..................... 5 5 .500 2 Altoona (Pirates)......................... 4 4 .500 2 Erie (Tigers) ................................ 4 4 .500 2 Bowie (Orioles)........................... 3 7 .300 4 Saturday's Games Portland 5, Binghamton 3 Akron 8, Trenton 5 Erie 11, Bowie 10, 10 innings New Britain 7, New Hampshire 6 Richmond 1, Altoona 0 Harrisburg 4, Reading 3 Today's Games Binghamton at Portland, 1 p.m. Trenton at Akron, 1:05 p.m. Bowie at Erie, 1:35 p.m. New Britain at New Hampshire, 1:35 p.m. Reading at Harrisburg, 2 p.m. Altoona at Richmond, 2:05 p.m.

B A S K E T B A L L NBA At A Glance All Times EDT EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct Boston........................... 35 25 .583 New York ...................... 31 28 .525 Philadelphia ................. 31 28 .525 New Jersey .................. 22 39 .361 Toronto ......................... 21 39 .350 Southeast Division W L Pct x-Miami........................... 41 17 .707 Atlanta............................. 35 24 .593 Orlando........................... 34 25 .576 Washington.................... 14 46 .233 Charlotte ........................ 7 51 .121 Central Division W L Pct y-Chicago ..................... 45 14 .763 x-Indiana ....................... 37 22 .627 Milwaukee..................... 29 30 .492 Detroit ........................... 22 37 .373 Cleveland...................... 20 38 .345 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct x-San Antonio ................ 41 16 .719 Memphis ........................ 35 24 .593 Dallas.............................. 34 26 .567 Houston.......................... 32 27 .542 New Orleans .................. 17 42 .288 Northwest Division W L Pct y-Oklahoma City.......... 44 16 .733 Denver .......................... 32 27 .542 Utah............................... 31 30 .508 Portland......................... 28 32 .467 Minnesota..................... 25 36 .410 Pacific Division W L Pct x-L.A. Lakers................ 38 22 .633 L.A. Clippers................. 37 23 .617 Phoenix......................... 31 28 .525 Golden State ................ 22 37 .373 Sacramento.................. 19 41 .317 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division Saturday's Games L.A. Clippers 112, Golden State 104 Cleveland 98, Washington 89 Boston 94, New Jersey 82 Oklahoma City 115, Minnesota 110 Memphis 103, Utah 98 Indiana at Milwaukee, late Phoenix at San Antonio, late Today's Games Miami at New York, 1 p.m. Dallas at L.A. Lakers, 3:30 p.m. Portland at Sacramento, 6 p.m. Toronto at Atlanta, 6 p.m. Orlando at Cleveland, 6 p.m. Boston at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Chicago at Detroit, 6 p.m. Memphis at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Houston at Denver, 8 p.m. Leaders Through April 13th Scoring G FG FT PTS Bryant, LAL ............... 56 558 372 1572 Durant, OKC ............. 59 572 368 1626 James, MIA............... 57 568 345 1530 Love, MIN.................. 55 474 379 1432 Westbrook, OKC...... 59 531 304 1424 Wade, MIA ................ 46 399 223 1036 Anthony, NYK........... 49 377 258 1067 Aldridge, POR .......... 55 483 223 1191 Nowitzki, DAL........... 56 421 278 1188 D. Williams, NJN ...... 54 388 251 1142 Griffin, LAC ............... 59 498 219 1217 Howard, ORL............ 54 416 281 1113 Ellis, MIL.................... 53 414 203 1089 Lee, GOL .................. 57 464 219 1147 Jefferson, UTA ......... 55 468 130 1067 Paul, LAC .................. 54 376 220 1042 Pierce, BOS.............. 56 359 261 1072 Smith, ATL ................ 59 452 181 1112 J. Johnson, ATL ....... 53 374 141 996 Jennings, MIL........... 59 417 158 1106 FG Percentage FG FGA Chandler, NYK............................ 219 326 Howard, ORL.............................. 416 726 Gortat, PHX................................. 395 692 Bynum, LAL ................................ 405 718 Griffin, LAC ................................. 498 917 McGee, DEN .............................. 270 498 Nash, PHX .................................. 272 506 Boozer, CHI ................................ 408 764 James, MIA ................................. 568 1072 Blair, SAN.................................... 231 436 Rebounds G OFF DEF TOT Howard, ORL.......... 54 200 585 785 Love, MIN................ 55 226 508 734 Bynum, LAL ............ 55 183 484 667 Cousins, SAC ......... 58 242 400 642 Humphries, NJN..... 57 216 413 629 Griffin, LAC ............. 59 190 456 646 Gasol, LAL .............. 60 172 456 628 Chandler, NYK........ 57 196 381 577 Gortat, PHX ............. 59 158 425 583 Monroe, DET .......... 59 216 354 570

O

A

R

D

Assists

12U Warm-Up Tournament Reading, PA

At A Glance All Times EDT North Division

B

GB — 31⁄2 31⁄2 131⁄2 14 GB — 61⁄2 71⁄2 28 34 GB — 8 16 23 241⁄2 GB — 7 81⁄2 10 25 GB — 111⁄2 131⁄2 16 191⁄2 GB — 1 61⁄2 151⁄2 19

Rondo, BOS .................................. Nash, PHX..................................... Paul, LAC ....................................... Calderon, TOR.............................. D. Williams, NJN ........................... Rubio, MIN..................................... Wall, WAS...................................... Parker, SAN................................... Lowry, HOU ................................... Conley, MEM.................................

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

G AST AVG 49 561 11.4 55 608 11.1 54 481 8.9 53 468 8.8 54 467 8.6 41 336 8.2 59 454 7.7 53 407 7.7 42 295 7.0 54 366 6.8

H O C K E Y NHL Playoff Glance All Times EDT FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE N.Y. Rangers 1, Ottawa 1 Thursday, April 12: NY Rangers 4, Ottawa 2 Saturday, April 14: Ottawa 3, NY Rangers 2, OT Monday, April 16: NY Rangers at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 18: NY Rangers at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 21: Ottawa at NY Rangers, 7 p.m. x-Monday, April 23: NY Rangers at Ottawa, TBD x-Thursday, April 26: Ottawa at NY Rangers, TBD Boston 1, Washington 1 Thursday, April 12: Boston 1, Washington 0, OT Saturday, April 14: Washington 2, Boston 1, 2OT Monday, April 16: Boston at Washington, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 19: Boston at Washington, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 21: Washington at Boston, 3 p.m. x-Sunday, April 22: Boston at Washington, TBD x-Wednesday, April 25: Washington at Boston, TBD New Jersey 1, Florida 0 Friday, April 13: New Jersey 3, Florida 2 Sunday, April 15: New Jersey at Florida, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 17: Florida at New Jersey, 7 p.m. Thursday, April 19: Florida at New Jersey, 7 p.m. x-Saturday, April 21: New Jersey at Florida, 6:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 24: Florida at New Jersey, TBD x-Thursday, April 26: New Jersey at Florida, TBD Philadelphia 2, Pittsburgh 0 Wednesday, April 11: Philadelphia 4, Pittsburgh 3, OT Friday, April 13: Philadelphia 8, Pittsburgh 5 Sunday, April 15: Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 3 p.m. Wednesday, April 18: Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m. x-Friday, April 20: Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m. x-Sunday, April 22: Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, TBD x-Tuesday, April 24: Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, TBD WESTERN CONFERENCE Los Angeles 2, Vancouver 0 Wednesday, April 11: Los Angeles 4, Vancouver 2 Friday, April 13: Los Angeles 4, Vancouver 2 Sunday, April 15: Vancouver at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 18: Vancouver at Los Angeles, 10 p.m. x-Sunday, April 22: Los Angeles at Vancouver, TBD x-Tuesday, April 24: Vancouver at Los Angeles, TBD x-Thursday, April 26: Los Angeles at Vancouver, TBD San Jose 1, St. Louis 1 Thursday, April 12: San Jose 3, St. Louis 2, 2OT Saturday, April 14: St. Louis 3, San Jose 0 Monday, April 16: St. Louis at San Jose, 10 p.m. Thursday, April 19: St. Louis at San Jose, 10:30 p.m. Saturday, April 21: San Jose at St. Louis, 7:30 p.m. x-Monday, April 23: St. Louis at San Jose, TBD x-Wednesday, April 25: San Jose at St. Louis, TBD Phoenix 1, Chicago 0 Thursday, April 12: Phoenix 3, Chicago 2, OT Saturday, April 14: Chicago at Phoenix, late Tuesday, April 17: Phoenix at Chicago, 9 p.m. Thursday, April 19: Phoenix at Chicago, 8 p.m. x-Saturday, April 21: Chicago at Phoenix, 10 p.m. x-Monday, April 23: Phoenix at Chicago, TBD x-Wednesday, April 25: Chicago at Phoenix, TBD Nashville 1, Detroit 1 Wednesday, April 11: Nashville 3, Detroit 2 Friday, April 13: Detroit 3, Nashville 2 Sunday, April 15: Nashville at Detroit, Noon Tuesday, April 17: Nashville at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 20: Detroit at Nashville, 8 p.m. x-Sunday, April 22: Nashville at Detroit, TBD x-Tuesday, April 24: Detroit at Nashville, TBD

AHL At A Glance All Times EDT EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA y-St. John’s ........... 75 43 24 5 3 94 238 212 Manchester ........... 75 38 32 2 3 81 203 206 Portland ................. 75 36 30 4 5 81 221 251 Providence............ 75 34 34 3 4 75 190 212 Worcester.............. 75 30 33 4 8 72 196 216 East Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA y-Norfolk ............... 75 54 18 1 2 111 269 178 x-Penguins .......... 75 44 24 2 5 95 233 212 x-Hershey ............. 75 38 25 4 8 88 242 222 Syracuse............... 74 35 29 5 5 80 234 232 Binghamton .......... 76 29 40 5 2 65 201 243 Northeast Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA y-Bridgeport .......... 75 40 26 3 6 89 230 217 x-Connecticut ....... 75 36 26 7 6 85 209 206 Adirondack............ 75 37 34 2 2 78 202 213 Springfield ............. 76 36 34 3 3 78 217 231 Albany .................... 75 31 33 6 5 73 189 224 WESTERN CONFERENCE Midwest Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA y-Chicago.............. 74 41 27 3 3 88 208 189 Milwaukee ............. 74 38 29 2 5 83 202 188 Charlotte................ 74 37 28 3 6 83 204 205 Peoria .................... 75 39 32 2 2 82 215 203 Rockford................ 75 35 32 2 6 78 204 224 North Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA y-Toronto............... 75 44 24 4 3 95 213 170 Rochester.............. 76 36 26 10 4 86 224 221 Lake Erie ............... 76 37 29 3 7 84 189 210 Grand Rapids........ 75 33 31 7 4 77 243 246 Hamilton ................ 75 33 35 2 5 73 182 224 West Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA y-Oklahoma City .. 74 44 21 4 5 97 208 173 x-Abbotsford ......... 75 41 26 3 5 90 195 197 San Antonio .......... 74 40 29 3 2 85 193 199 Houston ................. 74 33 25 5 11 82 195 202 Texas ..................... 74 31 38 3 2 67 221 244 x-Clinched Playoff Berth y-Clinched Divisional Title NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point for an overtime or shootout loss. Saturday's Games Manchester 5, Hershey 1 Albany 4, Providence 2 Hamilton 5, Grand Rapids 2 Springfield 3, St. John’s 1 Adirondack 3, Worcester 2 Penguins 3, Bridgeport 2 Norfolk 3, Binghamton 2, OT Rochester 2, Lake Erie 1 Connecticut at Syracuse, late Milwaukee at Chicago, late Oklahoma City at Texas, late Charlotte at Rockford, late San Antonio at Houston, late Today's Games Hershey at Worcester, 3 p.m. Penguins at Bridgeport, 3 p.m. St. John’s at Manchester, 3 p.m. Grand Rapids at Hamilton, 3 p.m. Toronto at Abbotsford, 4 p.m. Charlotte at Milwaukee, 4 p.m. Syracuse at Albany, 4 p.m. Portland at Providence, 4:05 p.m. Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 4:30 p.m. Norfolk at Adirondack, 5 p.m. Peoria at Chicago, 5 p.m. Texas at Houston, 6:05 p.m.

N A S C A R AVG 28.1 27.6 26.8 26.0 24.1 22.5 21.8 21.7 21.2 21.1 20.6 20.6 20.5 20.1 19.4 19.3 19.1 18.8 18.8 18.7 PCT .672 .573 .571 .564 .543 .542 .538 .534 .530 .530 AVG 14.5 13.3 12.1 11.1 11.0 10.9 10.5 10.1 9.9 9.7

Camping World Truck Good Sam Roadside Assistance 200 Lineup After Saturday qualifying; race Sunday At Rockingham Speedway Rockingham, N.C. Lap length: 1 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (30) Nelson Piquet Jr., Chevrolet, 144.387. 2. (5) Paulie Harraka, Ford, 144.381. 3. (17) Timothy Peters, Toyota, 143.937. 4. (18) Jason Leffler, Toyota, 143.73. 5. (4) Brad Sweet, Chevrolet, 143.392. 6. (29) Parker Kligerman, Ram, 143.147. 7. (11) Todd Bodine, Toyota, 143.033. 8. (88) Matt Crafton, Toyota, 142.976. 9. (60) Grant Enfinger, Chevrolet, 142.885. 10. (13) Johnny Sauter, Toyota, 142.693. 11. (98) Dakoda Armstrong, Toyota, 142.642. 12. (3) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 142.535. 13. (33) Cale Gale, Chevrolet, 142.349. 14. (08) Ross Chastain, Toyota, 142.298. 15. (24) Max Gresham, Chevrolet, 142.259. 16. (31) James Buescher, Chevrolet, 142.158. 17. (22) Joey Coulter, Chevrolet, 142.034. 18. (92) Chad McCumbee, Chevrolet, 141.989. 19. (6) Justin Lofton, Chevrolet, 141.766. 20. (09) John Wes Townley, Toyota, 141.682. 21. (81) David Starr, Toyota, 141.06. 22. (9) Ron Hornaday Jr., Chevrolet, 140.658. 23. (32) Miguel Paludo, Chevrolet, 140.488. 24. (75) Caleb Holman, Chevrolet, 140.455. 25. (7) John King, Toyota, 140.384. 26. (02) Tyler Young, Chevrolet, 140.362. 27. (27) Jeb Burton, Chevrolet, 140.203. 28. (23) Jason White, Ford, 139.969. 29. (2) Tim George Jr., Chevrolet, 139.654. 30. (14) Brennan Newberry, Chevrolet, 139.373. 31. (99) Bryan Silas, Ford, 138.648. 32. (39) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, 138.206. 33. (93) Chris Cockrum, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 34. (07) Johnny Chapman, Toyota, Owner Points. 35. (57) Norm Benning, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 36. (70) Jeff Agnew, Chevrolet, 139.346. Failed to Qualify 37. (68) Clay Greenfield, Ram, 139.27. 38. (10) Jennifer Jo Cobb, Ram, 137.657. 39. (84) Chris Fontaine, Chevrolet, 137.274. 40. (28) Wes Burton, Chevrolet, 136.333. 41. (74) Brian Weber, Chevrolet, 128.723.

H A R N E S S R A C I N G Pocono Downs Saturday's Results First - $12,000 Pace 1:52.0 3-Tylers Rendevous (Jo Pavia Jr) 7.80 3.00 2.60 2-General Montgomery (Ge Napolitano Jr) 5.40 4.20 9-One Chaser (Er Carlson) 18.00 EXACTA (3-2) $36.80 TRIFECTA (3-2-9) $788.00 SUPERFECTA (3-2-9-1) $5,844.00 10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $292.20 Scratched: Love To Rock Second - $8,500 Pace 1:51.2 6-The Real Dan (Ge Napolitano Jr) 3.40 2.60 2.10 9-Twinscape (Ma Kakaley) 16.20 7.40 4-Wesley Snip (Er Carlson) 3.60 EXACTA (6-9) $40.60 TRIFECTA (6-9-4) $179.00 SUPERFECTA (6-9-4-3) $426.40 10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $21.32 DAILY DOUBLE (3-6) $16.40 Third - $6,000 Pace 1:54.1 1-Poor House (Ge Napolitano Jr) 3.40 2.20 2.10 3-Roseann Ken Win (Ja Morrill Jr) 2.80 2.20 2-Upncoming Prospect (Br Clarke) 3.60 EXACTA (1-3) $10.00 TRIFECTA (1-3-2) $30.80 SUPERFECTA (1-3-2-4) $87.00 10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $4.35 Fourth - $8,500 Pace 1:52.4 3-Rader Detector (An McCarthy) 4.60 2.20 2.10 5-Thunder Seelster (Ge Napolitano Jr) 3.00 2.60 1-Four Starzzz King (Ty Buter) 8.40 EXACTA (3-5) $13.20 TRIFECTA (3-5-1) $140.40 SUPERFECTA (3-5-1-2) $458.60 10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $22.93 Fifth - $25,000 Trot 1:54.0 2-Sand Top Gun (Ja Morrill Jr) 4.00 2.40 2.10 6-Cassis (Jo Pavia Jr) 3.40 2.80 1-Keystone Thomas (Da Bier) 2.80 EXACTA (2-6) $13.60 TRIFECTA (2-6-1) $29.20 SUPERFECTA (2-6-1-4) $105.00 10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $5.25 PICK 3 (1-3-2) $24.00 Sixth - $18,000 Pace 1:50.1 3-J J Gladiator (Ge Napolitano Jr) 5.40 3.00 2.20 8-Touch The Rock (Br Simpson) 4.20 3.80 6-Whogoesfirst (An Napolitano) 6.40 EXACTA (3-8) $19.00 TRIFECTA (3-8-6) $347.80 SUPERFECTA (3-8-6-2) $2,789.00 10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $139.45 Seventh - $16,000 Trot 1:54.4 6-Jabez (Ge Napolitano Jr) 3.60 2.60 2.10 2-Alternat Thursdays (Ma Kakaley) 4.20 2.60 3-Hogue’s Rockie (Br Simpson) 4.80 EXACTA (6-2) $13.40 TRIFECTA (6-2-3) $72.20 SUPERFECTA (6-2-3-7) $2,507.80 10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $125.39 Eighth - $14,000 Pace 1:51.1 5-Float Blue Chip (Ge Napolitano Jr) 5.20 3.00 2.10 1-I Scoot For Cash (Ty Buter) 5.40 4.20 6-Ab’s Attack (An Napolitano) 3.60 EXACTA (5-1) $36.20 TRIFECTA (5-1-6) $222.40 SUPERFECTA (5-1-6-9) $1,724.40 10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $86.22 Ninth - $10,000 Pace 1:52.0 3-Frankthebank (Ja Morrill Jr) 2.60 2.40 2.10 2-Night Train Shane (An Napolitano) 6.40 4.20 5-Milliondollar Art (Mi Simons) 5.00 EXACTA (3-2) $11.80 TRIFECTA (3-2-5) $54.00 SUPERFECTA (3-2-5-7) $164.20 10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $8.21 PICK 4 (3-6-5-(1,3) (4 Out of 4)) $121.40 Scratched: Mr Vitti Tenth - $25,000 Pace 1:50.0 4-Drop Red (Ja Morrill Jr) 6.20 3.20 2.60 7-Fred And Ginger (Ma Kakaley) 4.40 3.40 6-Sand Summerfield (Jo Pavia Jr) 11.20 EXACTA (4-7) $18.40 TRIFECTA (4-7-6) $373.00 SUPERFECTA (4-7-6-3) $2,717.20 10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $135.86 Eleventh - $18,000 Pace 1:50.3 2-Bet The Town (An Napolitano) 7.60 4.60 4.40 5-All Star Dragon (Ma Kakaley) 10.60 9.40 8-Bestnotlie Hanover (Jo Pavia Jr) 12.00 EXACTA (2-5) $47.80 TRIFECTA (2-5-8) $763.80 SUPERFECTA (2-5-8-4) $36,605.00 10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $1,830.25 Twelfth - $21,000 Pace 1:51.0 8-Foreclosure N (Ja Morrill Jr) 8.80 7.20 5.00 2-Transcending (Ma Kakaley) 10.20 6.40 6-Custard The Dragon (Mo Teague) 3.80 EXACTA (8-2) $75.60 TRIFECTA (8-2-6) $459.40 SUPERFECTA (8-2-6-7) $4,643.80 10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $232.19 PICK 3 (4-2-8) $116.20 Thirteenth - $14,000 Pace 1:51.2 8-Great Soul (Br Simpson) 103.80 44.60 22.80 3-Artie Bacardi (Ja Morrill Jr) 4.20 3.00 6-Oil Magnet (An McCarthy) 8.20 EXACTA (8-3) $457.60 TRIFECTA (8-3-6) $1,529.00 SUPERFECTA (8-3-6-ALL) $1,250.00 10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $62.50 Fourteenth - $17,000 Pace 1:51.3 2-My Drag Queen (Ge Napolitano Jr) 4.80 2.80 2.10 1-Blackjack Princess (Ja Morrill Jr) 2.20 2.10 5-Love You Always (Ma Kakaley) 2.40 EXACTA (2-1) $9.20 TRIFECTA (2-1-5) $33.40 SUPERFECTA (2-1-5-4) $149.20 10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $7.46 LATE DOUBLE (8-2) $369.80 Scratched: Franciegirl Total Handle-$297,281

G O L F PGA Tour RBC Heritage Scores Saturday At Harbour Town Golf Links Hilton Head, S.C. Purse: $5.7 million Yardage: 7,101;Par: 71 Third Round Carl Pettersson .................................70-65-66—201 Colt Knost ..........................................67-66-69—202 Zach Johnson....................................71-68-66—205 Boo Weekley .....................................70-66-70—206 Brandt Snedeker ...............................71-67-69—207 Kevin Na.............................................70-68-69—207 Robert Garrigus ................................71-66-70—207 Tommy Gainey..................................70-70-68—208 Brian Davis.........................................72-68-68—208 Billy Mayfair........................................72-70-67—209 Michael Bradley ................................74-64-71—209 Chad Campbell .................................67-70-72—209 Harris English ....................................68-68-73—209 Cameron Beckman ...........................73-71-66—210 Jim Furyk ...........................................68-75-67—210 Kevin Stadler .....................................72-71-67—210 Rory Sabbatini ...................................70-72-68—210 Matt Bettencourt ................................73-69-68—210 Jason Bohn........................................70-71-69—210 Matt Kuchar........................................72-69-69—210 Vaughn Taylor ...................................67-73-70—210 Chez Reavie ......................................69-71-70—210 Charley Hoffman ...............................74-65-71—210 Stephen Ames ...................................71-74-66—211 Jason Dufner .....................................78-66-67—211 Michael Thompson ...........................71-70-70—211 Hunter Haas ......................................71-74-67—212 John Daly ...........................................70-74-68—212 Heath Slocum ....................................71-71-70—212 Marc Leishman..................................71-71-70—212 Kevin Streelman................................74-68-70—212 John Rollins .......................................70-72-70—212 Tim Clark............................................73-67-72—212 Fredrik Jacobson ..............................71-67-74—212 Mark Wilson.......................................73-72-68—213 Mark Anderson..................................73-71-69—213 D.A. Points.........................................74-68-71—213 Brendon de Jonge ............................72-70-71—213 Stuart Appleby...................................73-69-71—213 Trevor Immelman..............................71-71-71—213 Jerry Kelly ..........................................72-69-72—213 Greg Chalmers..................................71-69-73—213 Matt Every ..........................................68-72-73—213 Bud Cauley ........................................71-68-74—213 Bob Estes...........................................71-67-75—213 Jeff Maggert.......................................74-71-69—214 Briny Baird..........................................74-69-71—214 J.J. Henry...........................................72-70-72—214 Charlie Wi ..........................................68-73-73—214 Lee Janzen ........................................71-70-73—214 John Mallinger...................................69-72-73—214 Webb Simpson..................................71-74-70—215 Luke Donald ......................................75-69-71—215 Will Claxton ........................................70-72-73—215 Graham DeLaet.................................74-68-73—215 Kevin Chappell ..................................70-72-73—215 Brian Harman.....................................71-70-74—215 Geoff Ogilvy.......................................74-67-74—215 Tom Gillis ...........................................70-71-74—215 Gary Christian....................................71-68-76—215 Spencer Levin ...................................73-72-71—216 Ken Duke ...........................................72-72-73—217 Charles Howell III..............................72-68-77—217 Rocco Mediate...................................73-71-74—218 Lucas Glover .....................................72-72-74—218 Kyle Stanley.......................................71-72-75—218 Joe Durant .........................................70-71-77—218 James Driscoll ...................................72-72-75—219 Shaun Micheel...................................72-73-76—221 Nick O’Hern .......................................74-69-78—221 Sean O’Hair .......................................73-69-79—221

BULLETIN BOARD MEETINGS Hanover Area Cheerleading Booster Club will hold a mandatory meeting April 16 at 7 p.m. in the high school cafeteria. REGISTRATION/TRYOUTS Back Mountain American Legion Baseball will conduct tryouts for the 2012 season on Sunday, April 22, and Sunday, April 29. This will be for both Senior Legion (ages 16-19) and Youth Legion (ages 14-15) and Prep Legion (age 13); is for players who live within the Dallas and Lake-Lehman school districts. Tryouts will be held at the Back Mountain Little League upper field from 5:00 to 7:00 each of the days, rain or shine. Questions, call 696-3979. Back Mountain Youth Soccer Association will hold registrations for the Fall Intramural Season on April 28 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Dallas Middle School cafeteria for age groups U6 through U18. Elegible players must be at least five years old by July 31st, 2012. New players must show proof of age. All players must register online available now at bmysa.org. If you do not have internet access, computers will be available at registration. Bear Creek Youth Soccer Registration will be held on Wednesday, April 18, from 6-8:30 p.m., and Sunday, April 29, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Bear Creek Community Charter School. Registration is open to anyone born between Aug. 1, 1994 and July 31, 2008. For more information, contact Billie Jo at bmondulick@gmail.com or John at jjkozerski@gmail.com. Forty Fort Soccer Club, registrations for the fall season on the following dates in the basement of the Forty Fort Borough Building: Today from 3-5 p.m.; April 22 from 5-7 p.m.; and April 29 from 1-3 p.m. Forms and more information can be found at www.fortyfortpioneers.org. Greater Pittston Stoners Youth Soccer fall registrations will be held April 19, 24, 26 and May 1, 3 and 8 from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Exeter Scout Home, located in the rear of the Exeter Borough Bldg. on the corner of Wyoming Ave. and Lincoln St. in Exeter. Cost is $48 if you do NOT need a uniform and $63 if you DO need a uniform. There will be no additional signup dates. For more information, visit www.stonersoccer.org. Nanticoke American Legion Baseball will be holding try-outs for players of Nanticoke, Hanover and Northwest; 13-year-old, Junior and Senior levels, at the home field in Honey Pot on April 21st at 6 p.m. and April 22nd at 5 p.m. Registrations will also be accepted at this time. Call Joe at 814-1430 with any questions. WB Girls Softball League will hold registration today from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. for the Senior League (born 7-1-94 to 12-31-98) only at the field complex (Simpson and Willow Sts).The league begins May 30th and there is no residency requirement. For info call 822-3991 or log onto www.wbgsl.com. Wyoming Valley Babe Ruth Teeners League, sign-ups 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. today at Christian Field in South Wilkes-Barre. Cost is $85 per player. Eligible players are ages 13-18. Ages 13-15 contact Rob at 592-4236. Ages 16-18 contact Jim at 983-9877. Any child from the Heights contact John at 817-3555. Also, full teams in 13 to 15 age bracket needed. UPCOMING EVENTS Dallas High School Softball Clinic, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Today for girls ages 7-13 at the Back Mountain Little League Field. In case of rain, the clinic will be held at the Dallas Middle School. For information, call Bill at 498-5991 or email dallashighsoftball@gmail.com. Jenkins Twp Little League is sponsoring a bus trip to the Penn State Blue/White Game on Saturday, April 21st. Buses leave at 8:00 AM from the Jenkins Twp Little League Fields and will return at approximately 9:00 PM. Cost is $30 per person. All proceeds benefit the Jenkins Twp Little League. For more information, please go to www.jenkinstwplittleleague.com. The K-Club will host its annual golf tournament on Saturday, April 21st at Sand Springs Country Club. The tournament will begin with a 1 p.m. shotgun start. Cost is $60 per person and includes greens fees, cart fees, driving, lunch and an Italian all-you-can-eat buffet dinner. Prizes and awards will be given out. For more information contact Jody at 570-592-4748. The Kingston Lodge #395 will be holding its annual golf tournament at the Sand Springs Country Club on Saturday, May 19th. The tournament will be a captain and crew format with a 1 p.m. shotgun start. Cost is $75 per person and includes greens fees, cart and a buffet dinner. Door prizes, gifts and awards will also be given out. Reservation deadline is April 30th. For more information contact Walt Kolander at 570-436-6767. WB Girls Softball League will hold field clean up today from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. All coaches should attend. For info call 8223991 or log onto www.wbgsl.com. Bulletin Board items will not be accepted over the telephone. Items may be faxed to 831-7319, emailed to tlsports@timesleader.com or dropped off at the Times Leader or mailed to Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250.


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 3C

➛ WWW.TIMESLEADER.COM/SPORTS

PENGUINS SUNDAY LAST FIVE GAMES

April 3 at Norfolk L, 2-1

April 6 Hershey W, 4-2

April 7 Connecticut W, 3-0

NEXT FIVE GAMES

Friday Binghamton L, 3-1

Saturday Bridgeport W, 3-2

Today at Bridg’port 3 p.m.

April 20 Hershey 7:05 p.m.

“(A playoff run) galvanizes a team big time. You go through the highs and lows together, and you come through it together.”

April 21 Hershey 7:05 p.m.

April 25 at Hershey 7 p.m.

April 27 at Hershey 7 p.m.

AHL

That time of year

BREAKING THE ICE

By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

For years, Bill Guerin couldn’t watch the NHL playoffs. He wanted nothing to do with them. The way Guerin saw it, if his team was eliminated in the first round or failed to make the playoffs, he just couldn’t bring himself to watch those players whose seasons had yet to end. “It hurt me too much,” Guerin said. “I went through a stretch of about 10 years before I really started watching playoff hockey after my season was done.” It’s all part of the emotional roller coaster that hockey players endure during the postseason, and Guerin experienced the highs and lows during his 18year NHL career, which includes two Stanley Cups. Now a player development coach for Pittsburgh, Guerin spent last week in Wilkes-Barre working with the Penguins both on the ice during practice and away from it, sharing his postseason experiences with the team’s younger players. His message: “Don’t be in a rush to get through it. It’s gone in a flash,” Guerin said. “You have to go through the process and enjoy it.” That’s one of the quick lessons Guerin received in 1992 as a rookie fresh out of Boston College. He played in five regular season games with the New Jersey Devils that year before being thrust into his first NHL playoffs. Guerin scored three goals in six games before the Devils were eliminated by New York Rangers in a seven-game first round series. It was a time when Guerin learned the importance of keeping one’s emotions in check. After the Devils lost the first game of the series in Madison Square Garden, Guerin went back to his hotel and sat down with teammate Claude Lemieux, general manager Lou Lamoriello and a few other players. He was shocked at what he saw. “The guys were having a couple of beers and they were upbeat and positive,” Guerin said. “I couldn’t believe they weren’t kicking trash cans and flipping tables. “But they just put that game behind them, moved on and were looking ahead to the next game. That’s when I learned you control your emotions and prepare as a professional.” Two years later, Guerin experienced his first run deep into the postseason when the Devils made it to the conference finals before losing to the Rangers in seven games. Guerin experienced the physical grind of a lengthy playoff run and the mental toll of coming up just short. “It’s hard and, at the time, you’re not happy and it hurts,” he said. “That one little step, and we missed. But most teams learn from it, and we did.” The biggest lesson, Guerin said, was learning what it takes to win. The next season, Guerin and the Devils did just that when they swept the Detroit Red Wings in the Stanley Cup Final. “Nobody comes into this knowing what it takes to win. Unless you actually experience it, it’s going to be a mystery,” he

The Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins have three players who will be experiencing a playoff series for the first time. Forwards Brian Gibbons and Matt Rust, along with defenseman Cody Wild all played college hockey before turning pro. Since the college postseason doesn’t match up teams for a playoff series, all three players will be experiencing the grind of a series for the first time. Forward Brandon DeFazio and defenseman Phil Samuelsson have also yet to experience an AHL playoff series, but they have played in the ECHL postseason. Bill Guerin, who played with Boston College before turning pro, knows what it’s like to experience a playoff series for the first time. “It’s an adjustment and you learn a lot of lessons very quickly,” he said. “You go from college to the AHL to the AHL playoffs, and it’s a different emotional level, a different level of play and a different level of responsibility. You really have to prepare for it.” Guerin said he will talk to the Penguins about that adjustment before the playoffs start, and he will likely find many eager listeners. “You always hear about how a series is like a war, and I’m sure it will be a big adjustment,” Gibbons said. “Bill Guerin knows what it takes to play at the next level, and I’m sure not too many teams have a guy like him at their practices giving us one-on-one time. “When he has anything to say, you listen. You have to listen to guys like that.”

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

Penguins player development coach Bill Guerin talks with rookie Brian Gibbons during a recent Wilkes-Barre/Scranton practice.

G U E R I N ’ S N H L P L AYO F F S TAT S (Games, goals-assists-points) 1992 Devils - 6, 3-0-3; Lost in Rd. 1 1993 Devils – 5, 1-1-2; Lost in Rd. 1 1994 Devils – 17, 2-1-3; Lost in Rd. 3 1995 Devils – 20, 3-8-11; Won Stanley Cup 1997 Devils – 8, 2-1-3; Lost in Rd. 2 1998 Oilers – 12, 7-1-8; Lost in Rd. 2 1999 Oilers – 3, 0-2-2; Lost in Rd. 1 2000 Oilers – 5, 3-2-5; Lost in Rd. 1 2002 Bruins – 6, 4-2-6; Lost in Rd. 1 2003 Stars – 4, 0-0-0; Lost in Rd. 2

2004 Stars – 5, 0-1-1; Lost in Rd. 1 2006 Stars – 5, 3-1-4; Lost in Rd. 1 2007 Sharks – 9, 0-2-2; Lost in Rd. 2 2009 Penguins – 24, 7-8-15; Won Stanley Cup 2010 Penguins – 11, 4-5-9; Lost in Rd. 2 Totals – 140 games, 39-35-74, 162 penalty minutes

said. “After losing the year before, we knew the process we had to go through, the work we had to put in and the highs and lows we would face. We were prepared.” Guerin missed the NHL playoffs only three times in his 18 seasons, and despite being in the postseason so often, he always cherished each opportunity. And even if his team didn’t reach the final, Guerin didn’t always feel that the postseason was a failure. In fact, depending on the circumstances, he appreciated it even more. In the late 1990s as a member of the Edmonton Oilers, Guerin remembers the postseason battles against league powerhouses such as the Colorado Avalanche and the Dallas Stars. They were the classic example of small market team versus the upper echelon. “(Colorado) would trade for

(Ray) Bourque and (Dave) Andreychuk, and I think we would make a call-up,” Guerin said. In 1998, the Oilers pulled a surprising first round upset when they eliminated the Avalanche in seven games. Exhausted by their emotional upset, the Oilers lost to Dallas in the next round but Gue-

rin views that postseason as a success. “Beating Colorado in seven games, that was pretty big,” he said. “You always wish you went further, but that was pretty special and we didn’t take it for granted.” While Stanley Cup wins and first round upsets are obvious highs, Guerin did endure several lows during his postseason career. Eight times Guerin’s team was eliminated in the first round, and three seasons his team failed to make the postseason at all. “It was a miserable feeling. It stinks,” Guerin said. “Even getting knocked out in the first round was tough. You’re basically on break for five months and there’s still six weeks of hockey left.” Perhaps the most enjoyable feeling the Guerin recalls from his playoff days doesn’t necessarily revolve around wins, but rather how the postseason brings a team together. He compares it how a hardship brings a family together, and it’s something he hopes this year’s WilkesBarre/Scranton Penguins appreciate it as they embark on the postseason. “It galvanizes a team big time,” Guerin said. “You go through the highs and lows together, and you come through it together. “There’s still guys from the 1995 Devils team that I’m close with, and I still have a bond with the guys from in Pittsburgh. It’s unbreakable. It’s a bond that only playoffs can create.”

Bill Guerin won his second Stanley Cup as a member of the Pittsburgh Penguins in 2009.

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Penguins enforcer Steve MacIntyre (left) celebrates after scoring his first goal in his last 125 pro games on Saturday.

Scoring slumps snapped in win nomenal,” Hynes said. “It’s nice Tough guy MacIntyre and to see him get rewarded for that scorer McDonald both end work.” droughts to beat Bridgeport. The pair of goals, both of By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE TWP. — During Saturday’s game against Bridgeport, Colin McDonald scored his first goal in 14 games and Steve MacIntyre recorded his first tally in 125 games, including his time in the NHL. Both were equally relieved. The pair of goals, combined with a third period tally from Jason Williams, guided WilkesBarre/Scranton to a 3-2 win over Bridgeport in a game that saw several regulars from both teams sit out to get some rest. The Penguins travel to Bridgeport to wrap up the regular season today. Saturday’s game gave coach John Hynes a chance to see his team work in a number of situations, including a two-man advantage and holding onto a one-goal lead. “It was a good, clean competitive game by both teams,” Hynes said. “That helps both teams get ready for the playoffs because we were both put in some situations you can use going into the playoffs.” MacIntyre opened the scoring for the Penguins when he muscled into the crease after a loose puck and forced it by goaltender Kenny Reiter. It was MacIntyre’s first AHL goal since Dec. 12, 2007, a span of 97 games. MacIntyre’s last goal came on April 10, 2009 with Edmonton against Calgary and goaltender Miikka Kiprusoff. “The very last goal I scored was on the second to last game of the season, against Calgary. It’s been three years pretty near to the day,” MacIntyre said. “It feels nice.” McDonald’s goal, his 14th of the season and first since March 10, came when Paul Thompson backhanded a pass through his legs from behind the Bridgeport net. McDonald slid into the slot and slammed the pass home. “It feels good to get that in one of the last games before the playoffs start,” McDonald said. “It is going to help my confidence a lot.” “His work ethic has been phe-

which came in the first period, gave the Penguins a 2-1 lead going into the third. Williams then scored one minute into the third to make it 3-1. The goal would prove to be the difference maker as Bridgeport got a second puck past Brad Thiessen. Late in the period, Thiessen stopped a quick shot from Sean Backman in close and, with less than a minute left, thwarted a Bridgeport power play by stopping three straight shots and preserve the one-goal lead. “He held the fort and came up with some big saves as the game wore on,” Hynes said. “That’s a good sign.” NOTES • With one game left, Hynes said Scott Munroe will start today and a decision on who will start in net for the playoffs won’t be made until next week. “I’m going to put it off as long as possible,” Hynes said. • Prior to the game the Penguins announced their team awards: Media Award – Colin McDonald; Community Service – Paul Thompson; Rookie of the Year – Simon Despres; Most Valuable Defenseman – Brian Strait; Most Improved Player – Alex Grant; Herb Brooks Award – Ryan Craig; Fan Favorite – Zach Sill; Penguin Award – Brandon DeFazio; Leading Scorer – Ben Street; Star Award – Ben Street; MVP – Ben Street/ Bryan Lerg Bridgeport ............................................... 1 0 1 — 2 Penguins ................................................. 2 0 1 — 3 First Period: Scoring – 1. BRI, Mark Halmo 1 (Backman, Oleksy) :22. 2. WBS, Steve MacIntyre 1 (Payerl, Picard) 2:53. 3. WBS, Colin McDonald 14 (Thompson, O’Reilly) power play 16:52. Penalties – BRI, Oleksy (interference) 15:13. Second Period: Scoring – Scoring – None. Penalties – WBS, Petersen (slashing) :43; BRI, Marcinko (tripping) 3:06; BRI, Riley (elbowing) 16:36; BRI, Oleksy (slashing) 17:15 Third Period: Scoring – Scoring – 4. WBS, Jason Williams 13 unassisted 1:06. 5. BRI, Tyler McNeely 8 (Donovan, Romano) 6:03. Penalties – WBS, Samuelsson (cross-checking) 1:51; WBS, Payerl (hooking) 11:32; WBS, Williams (interference) 17:24. Shots on goal – Bridgeport – 7-5-12-24; Penguins – 11-12-6-29 Power-play Opportunities — Bridgeport – 0 of 4; Penguins – 1 of 4 Goaltenders — Bridgeport – Kenny Reiter 01-0 (26 saves - 29 shots); Penguins – Brad Thiessen – 23-15-2 (22-24) Starters — Bridgeport – G Kenny Reiter, D Steve Oleksy, Matt Donovan, LW Mark Halmo, C Kael Mouillierat, RW Sean Backman; Penguins – G Brad Thiessen, D Alexandre Picard, D Simon Despres, LW Paul Thompson, C Cal O’Reilly, RW Nick Petersen Three Stars — 1. WBS, Steve MacIntyre (goal) 2. WBS, Colin McDonald (goal) 3. WBS, Jason Williams (goal) Referee — Terry Koharski. Linesmen – Scott Pomento, Jud Ritter Attendance – 8,213


CMYK PAGE 4C

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Imagine a building big enough to cover an entire football field. Now, imagine 274 more buildings of the same size. That’s almost 16 million square feet and that’s how much commercial real estate Mericle has developed in Northeastern Pennsylvania. Whether you need industrial, office, flex, or medical space, from 1,000 square feet to more than 1 million square feet, call Mericle. We’ll have a property that works for you. SCAN to learn more about Mericle’s Ready to Go Sites!

Call Mericle at 570.823.1100.



INDUSTRIAL





FLEX



400-450 CenterPoint Boulevard CenterPoint Commerce & Trade Park East, Jenkins Township

1110 Hanover Street Hanover Industrial Estates, Sugar Notch Borough

320-330 Stewart Road Hanover Industrial Estates, Hanover Township

240-258 Armstrong Road CenterPoint Commerce & Trade Park East, Jenkins Township

61 Green Mountain Road Humboldt Industrial Park, East Union Township



OFFICE

345 Enterprise Way (Parcel 7A) CenterPoint Commerce & Trade Park West, Pittston Township



 READY TO GO SITES 

400 Stewart Road Hanover Industrial Estates, Hanover Township

250 Enterprise Way (Parcel 13) CenterPoint Commerce & Trade Park West, Pittston Township

660 Baltimore Drive Corporate Center at East Mountain, Plains Township

177-193 Research Drive CenterPoint Commerce & Trade Park East, East Jenkins Twp.

For more information on the above properties, call Bob Besecker, Jim Hilsher, Bill Jones, or Dan Walsh.

B R O K E R AG E D I V I S I O N

N EW

!

5 Pethick Drive, Plains Township

For Lease ... Ron Koslosky

152 Horton Street, Wilkes-Barre

For Sale/Lease ... Steve Barrouk

570.823.1100

www.mericle.com/brokerage

57 New Frederick St, Wilkes-Barre

For Lease ... John Rokosz

2989 Columbia Blvd, Bloomsburg

For Sale ... Bob Frodsham

28 Campground Rd, Exeter Twp.

For Sale ... Dave Daris

Visit our Web site to see hundreds of buildings and sites from

1,000 SF to 1,000,000 SF

Developing Pennsylvania’s I-81 Corridor for 26 Years.


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

S

P

O

R

T

S

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 5C

NBA ROUNDUP

HIGH SCHOOL ROUNDUP

Celtics continue surge, beat Nets

Dallas sweeps lacrosse matches

The Associated Press

NEWARK, N.J. — Avery Bradley hit three straight 3-pointers and scored 11 of his 18 points in a game-deciding third quarter as the surging Boston Celtics defeated the New Jersey Nets 94-82 Saturday night. Kevin Garnett had 21 points and 12 rebounds to lead the Celtics, who have won 10 of 13, and 20 of 28 to take over first place in the Atlantic Division. Rajon Rondo added 15 assists, Brandon Bass had 18 points and Paul Pierce 17 for Boston, which limited New Jersey to 34 secondhalf points in beating the Nets for the third time in three games this season. Cavaliers 98, Wizards 89 WASHINGTON — Luke Harangody had 16 points and 10 rebounds, Anthony Parker scored 15 points and Tristan Thompson added 14 to lead the Cleveland Cavaliers in a 98-89 win over the Washington Wizards on Saturday night. Donald Sloan had a careerhigh 13 points to help the Cava-

SENS

liers win a game featuring teams that had combined to lose 23 of their 28 coming in. Clippers 112, Warriors 104 LOS ANGELES — Chris Paul had 28 points and 13 assists, and the Los Angeles Clippers beat the Golden State Warriors 112104 on Saturday to close within a game of the Lakers for the Pacific Division lead. Blake Griffin added 20 points, DeAndre Jordan 18 and Mo Williams 14 in the Clippers’ third straight win and 11th in their last 13 games. Grizzlies 103, Jazz 98 MEMPHIS, Tenn. — O.J. Mayo scored 17 of his 20 points in the fourth quarter to rally the Memphis Grizzlies to a 103-98 victory over the Utah Jazz on Saturday night. The Jazz held a 4-point lead early in the final period, but Mayo scored 10-straight points for Memphis to erase the advantage. Thunder 115, Timberwolves 110

By The Times Leader Staff

MIFFLINBURG – The Dallas girls lacrosse team posted a pair of victories Saturday, defeating Mifflinburg 10-5 and edging Selinsgrove 12-11. Emily Capitano had three goals in the win over Mifflinburg. Madeline Mulhern, Sarah Stewart and Melissa Tucker all contributed two goals. Capitano had six goals and Cara Pricher added three against Selinsgrove. Dana Jolley made 15 saves. Lake-Lehman wins two games

AP PHOTO

Boston’s Paul Pierce (34) dribbles past New Jersey’s Gerald Green (14) during Saturday’s game in Newark, N.J.

MINNEAPOLIS — Kevin Durant scored 43 points and Russell Westbrook had 35 and eight assists to keep the Oklahoma City Thunder atop the Western Conference with a 115-110 victory over the Minnesota Timberwolves on Saturday night.

Pacers 105, Bucks 99 MILWAUKEE — Roy Hibbert had 23 points and 14 rebounds, including six free throws in the final 74 seconds, to lead the Indiana Pacers to a 105-99 victory over the Milwaukee Bucks on Saturday night.

Alysa Adams had nine goals and Mallory Wilson netted six as Lake-Lehman defeated Bellefonte 18-8. In a 14-8 victory over Danville, Amelia Jenkins scored six times and Adams scored four times. Wilson had two goals and five assists.

H.S. BOYS LACROSSE Dallas 9, Danville 7

Aaron Kliamovich’s four goals paced Dallas in a win over Danville at home. Morgan Cohen contributed two goals and two assists for the Mountaineers,

YANKEES

S TA N L E Y C U P P L AYO F F R O U N D U P

Continued from Page 1C

Continued from Page 1C

led to the ejections of Ottawa defenseman Matt Carkner and New York forward Brandon Dubinsky just 2:15 in. Anton Stralman had the other goal for the Rangers. Game 3 of the best-of-seven series is Monday night in Ottawa, followed by Game 4 on Wednesday night. The series will return to New York for Game 5 next Saturday. Foligno helped ensure that the Senators would still be alive then when he got to a loose puck off a shot by Zenon Konopka that got past Rangers defenseman Marc Staal and slammed it up and over the sprawling Lundqvist from the edge of the crease to tie it. Boyle appeared to be in line to be the star of the game when he fired in a shot from the slot, as he was being knocked sideways by a hit from Jesse Winchester. That gave the Rangers their second lead of the night, 2-1 at 2:41 of the third. Boyle was already the prime focus on a night in which he was targeted early and often by the Senators. He was jumped by Carkner along the side boards and absorbed numerous punches while he was up on his skates and after he fell to the ice and tried to cover up. Dubinsky also was kicked out for being the third man in when he came to Boyle’s defense. Craig Anderson made 27 saves, all in regulation, to earn the win for the eighth-seeded Senators. Lundqvist stopped 29 shots. The Rangers’ much-maligned power play finally came through after falling during the 5-minute advantage New York received for Carkner’s fighting penalty. With defenseman Sergei Gonchar off for tripping, Stralman took a cross-zone pass from defense partner Dan Girardi and fired a shot from the top edge of the right circle that pinballed off Anderson and squeezed between his pads at 10:16.

But since Scranton/WilkesBarre’s home field of PNC Field is scheduled to undergo renovation this summer, the minor-league Yankees will use six different other venues as their home site. Starting with Saturday’s “home” opener. “The only thing that felt like a home game,” Miley said, “was we were wearing white pants and batted last.” That didn’t stop Syracuse from running its standard promotion for home games, where a player on the opposing team is selected to reward fans with a free taco from Taco Bell if he strikes out during the game. “Real weird,” Wise said. “We were the home team and we had guys that were the K-man of the game. At the same time, this is what it’s going to be like during the whole season. Nobody’s complaining. Coming into the season, we knew this is what it was going to be like.” Not even the honor of drawing the first start on the home portion of Scranton/Wilkes-Barre’s schedule was enough to make Yankees Adam Warren feel extra special. “To me, it felt like just another start,” Warren said. “I’ve already pitched here once before. I still felt like it was a road game. At the same time, we were trying to embrace it a little bit.” That was last week, when Warren took the loss at Alliance Bank Stadium as a visitor. But he was much better on the same mound as the home starter, limiting Syracuse to two runs over 62⁄3 effective innings. “I was throwing more strikes, had more command of my pitches,” Warren said. The only runs he allowed came in the third inning, when Carlos Rivera singled home Mark Teahen and later scored on a double-play ground out. “I thought the key for him was he minimized that one inning,” Miley said of Warren. “He got us deep into the game.” Then former big leaguer Wise went deep himself, launching a solo homer over the right field wall

SCHULTZ Continued from Page 1C

minutes four times. Yet when his schedule allows, he meets fans like he did Saturday and makes appearances of all kinds. He does motivational speaking, “some stand-up” and reaches out to youngsters to educate on the dangers of bullying. “I actually did one up here in Tunkhannock. There were about 900 kids,” said Schultz of his program, “Put Bullying on Ice.” “People find it hard to believe that I was bullied. I was on the wimpy side growing up. I wasn’t hung upside down on a fence or anything. But growing up in a small farm town, I faced it. I

AP PHOTO

Washington center Nicklas Backstrom (19) celebrates his Game 2-winning goal against the Bruins during the second overtime of Saturday’s Eastern Conference quarterfinal in Boston.

Caps even series in two OTs The Associated Press

BOSTON — Nicklas Backstrom scored 2:56 into the second overtime Saturday to give the Washington Capitals a 2-1 victory over the Boston Bruins and tie the first-round playoff series at a game apiece. Braden Holtby stopped 43 shots for Washington in his second career postseason game. Tim Thomas made 37 saves for the defending Stanley Cup champions. Troy Brouwer opened the scoring for the Capitals in the second period, and Benoit Pouliot tied it with 7:47 left in regulation. Early in the second overtime, Washington won a faceoff in the Boston zone and Marcus Johansson got the puck from behind the net. He passed it to Backstrom at the left faceoff circle and he wristed it past Thomas on his stick side. Thomas barely moved as the puck sailed by his blocker. As soon as it hit the back of the net, he quickly headed for the didn’t start fighting until I reached the Flyers.” The Waldheim, Sask., native still exudes a passion for the game, and why not? A potent scorer during his junior playing days, he took up an enforcer’s role to realize his dreams and reach the NHL. Once there, he helped the Flyers to two Stanley Cups with his fists, and his hockey prowess. He scored 20 goals during the first Cup year (1973-74) and was fourth in the NHL in shooting percentage – his 21.1 percent left him behind only Hall of Famers Johnny Bucyk, Rod Gilbert and Yvan Cournoyer. The following season, the Flyers repeated as champions and Schultz again led the league in penalty minutes. His record

locker room while the Capitals congratulated each other in the same corner of the rink where Boston celebrated its singleovertime Game 1 victory. Game 3 is Monday night in Washington. The first game remained scoreless into overtime, when Chris Kelly scored after 1:18 to give the Bruins the edge in the best-of-seven series. The defenses dominated again Saturday, though each team did manage to break through once in regulation. The Capitals took their first lead of the series when Brouwer poked a puck out of the crease and under Thomas, who was blocked by Bruins defenseman Greg Zanon.

Blues 3, Sharks 0 ST. LOUIS — Brian Elliott and Jaroslav Halak combined for a shutout, the San Jose Sharks put themselves in an early hole when Marc-Edouard Vlasic tapped the puck into his own net and the St. Louis Blues 472 were nearly 200 more than any other player. And his two championship rings made him a Philadelphia legend. He sported a Stanley Cup ring Saturday night, as well as a smile familiar to fans who went to the Spectrum to see him play. “Yeah, it’s pretty neat after all these years,” Schultz said of seeing fans still wearing his Orange and Black No. 8 jersey. “The big thing for me, of course besides the two Stanley Cup teams, was being inducted into the Flyers Hall of Fame in 2009. My name is hanging up there with the other Flyers greats. “They loved all of us. We played together and were a great team. And we won those championships at a time when Philadelphia really needed something

evened the first-round series at a game apiece with a 3-0 victory Saturday night. Vladimir Sobotka was credited with a goal on the first shot of the game after Vlasic’s gaffe. David Backes and David Perron also scored, and T.J. Oshie had two assists in the Blues’ first playoff victory since 2004. Halak and Elliott combined for 15 shutouts in the regular season, tying a modern NHL record, and won the Jennings Trophy for the fewest goals allowed. Elliott was quite the luxury as a backup after setting a modern NHL record with a 1.56 goals-against average and nine of the shutouts. Antti Niemi made 29 saves for the seventh-seeded Sharks, who were shut out in both regular-season meetings in St. Louis, with Halak and Elliott getting one apiece. The game turned feisty at the finish, with Blues defenseman Roman Polak and Sharks defenseman Justin Braun tangling after the final horn.

while J.T. Carey (two goals) and Anthony Chielli (one goal) rounded out the scoring. Casey McAndrew garnered eight gound balls and George Pfeiffer had 20 saves in goal for the victors. Danville was led by Nick Treon’s three goals.

H.S. SOFTBALL

Hazleton Area 6, Wallenpaupack 5, 8 inn.

Shannon Salvaterra’s RBI-triple in the bottom of the eighth inning tied the game at 5 and Becky Demko singled home Salvaterra for a 6-5 win over Wallenpaupack. Demko also picked up the win in the circle for the Cougars, coming on in relief late in the game to strike out three of the five batters she faced. Katie Marro, who gave Wallenpaupack its first lead with an RBI-groundout in the eighth, collected four hits for the Buckhorns. Kennedy Thomas added three hits and an RBI.

Wallenpaupack ......................... 000 111 11 — 5 Hazleton Area ........................... 400 000 02 — 6 WP -- Demko, 1 2/3IP, 2H, 1R, 0ER, 2BB, 3K; LP – Nikki Mann, 2 IP, 2H, 2R, 2ER, 1BB, 3K; 3B— HAZ Salvaterra. Top hitters – WP: Marro 4-for-5, Thomas 3-for-4; HAZ: Salvaterra 2-for-4, Maria Trivelpiece 2-for-3.

to give Scranton/Wilkes-Barre a 5-2 cushion in the fifth inning. “He’s a player, man,” Miley said. “I’ve known him from way back. That’s what he does every day. He’s swinging it well. He runs balls out hard, just does things that make him stand out.” Wise also helped the SWB Yanks get out in front quickly, following Jack Cust’s RBI double in the first inning with one of his own to stamp Scranton/Wilkes-Barre to a two-run lead. That grew to 3-0 in the second inning, when Colin Curtis doubled and scored on Kevin Russo’s hard single to right field. After Syracuse closed within a run by scoring twice in the third, Curtis tripled and scored on Doug Bernier’s single in the fourth. The teams exchanged runs in the eighth inning, when Washington Nationals prospect Bryce Harper rocketed a double and scored on Jhonatan Solano’s double in the top half of the frame for Syracuse and Russo responded with a sacrifice fly for Scranton/Wilkes-Barre in the bottom of the inning. That got the SWB Yankees off to a good “home” start away from home. “Guys sit around the clubhouse and joke about it,” said Wise, who helped Scranton/Wilkes-Barre improve to 4-5. “I said we’ve got to start winning some games, or it’s going to be a long year. It’s going to be tough. But we have a good group of guys in here. I’m going to tell you, one thing that’s going to be tough, we’re going to play at a Rookie ball stadium (Batavia). SYRACUSE

SWB YANKEES ab r h bi Russo lf 4 0 2 2 Cervelli c 5 0 0 0 Pearce 1b 2 1 0 0 Cust dh 4 1 2 1 Kruml dh 0 0 0 0 Wise cf 3 1 2 2 Laird 3b 4 0 1 0 Curtis rf 4 2 2 0 Pena ss 2 1 0 0 Bernier 2b 3 0 3 1 Totals 34 3 9 2 Totals 31 6 12 6 Syracuse ................................. 002 000 010 — 3 SWB Yankees........................ 210 110 01x — 6 DP – Syracuse 3, SWB Yankees 1. LOB – Syracuse 7, SWB Yankees 8. 2B – Teahen (2), McConnell (2), Rivero (2), Harper (2), Solano (1), Cust (2), Wise (5), Curtis (3), Bernier (2). 3B – Curtis (1). HR – Wise (3). SAC – Bernier. SF – Russo. IP H R ER BB SO Syracuse Duke (L, 1-1) .............. 5.0 9 5 5 2 4 Pena ............................. 2.0 2 0 0 1 1 Wilkie ............................ 1.0 1 1 1 1 1 SWB Yankees Warren (W, 1-1)......... 6.2 7 2 2 2 1 Cedeno (H, 1) ............ 1.1 2 1 1 1 1 Eppley (S, 1)............... 1.0 0 0 0 0 2 WP – Pena, Warren. Balk – Pena. HBP – Pena (by Duke). Umpires – HP: Alan Porter. 1B: Adam Hamari. 2B: Seth Buckminster. 3B: Toby Basner. T – 2:41.Att – 3,928. Brown rf Bynum 2b Michaels dh Moore 1b Harper cf Solano c Teahen lf Rivero 3b McConnell ss

ab 3 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4

r 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0

h bi 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 2 1 2 0

like that.” Schultz still follows the game that made him famous, and has been impressed with what he’s seen in the battle between the instate rivals, especially from the Flyers, who lead the series 2-0 heading into Game 3 today. “I don’t think there are too many people who expected the Flyers to do what they did. I’m not quite sure why,” Schultz said of sweeping two games in Pittsburgh. “What’s crazy is they keep going down early. They’ve been doing it the last couple of months. And they’re still 7-4-1 when they go down by two goals. They let a couple of goals against DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER and then (coach Peter) Laviolette uses his timeout. Then they Former NHL player Dave Schultz signs a puck for Jeremy Chmiel start their comeback. It’s incred- and Amy Milewski on Saturday before the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins game with Bridgeport. ible.”


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

S

P

O

R

T

S

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 7C

GOLF

AT PLAY

AP PHOTO

Carl Pettersson watches his shot on the 10th tee during the third round of the RBC Heritage tournament on Saturday.

St. Jude kindergarten hoops

Kindergarten hoops teams play at St. Jude’s on Saturday mornings. Some of the kindergarten participants include, Row 1: Abe Hagenbuch, Natalie Hunsinger, Hannah Hickey, Colton Moran, Jack Novelli, and Donato Strish. Row 2: Austin Campbell, Alex Martin, Ryan Grieves, Chase Rasmus, Kayden Ayre, Olivia Bilbow. Row 3: Coach Jon Grieves, Emerson Zito, Brendon Brobst, Margaret Mary Ganter, coach James Ganter, coach Walter Novelli.

Crestwood holds breakfast fundraiser

The Crestwood girls basketball booster club sponsored an Applebee’s breakfast fundraiser at the Wilkes-Barre Township restaurant recently. Members of the team pictured, front row: Kayla Gegaris, Dallas Kendra, Maury Cronauer, Carina Mazzoni, Sarah Andrews, Taryn Wojnar. Back row: Rachael Ritz, Deidra Ciavarella, Carly Hislop, Heather Muse, Rebecca Rutkowski, Krista O’Brien, Sydney Myers, Gaby Lutz, Amy Jesikiewicz.

Newport wins tourney

The Newport biddy fourth grade all-star team won a basketball tournament in Lebanon, winning all four of its games, inclduing the final, 36-34. First row, from left: Jake Krupinski, Jared Piontkowski, Connor Olenginski, Colby Butczynski. Second row: Head coach Jim McDermott, A.J. Murphy, Devland Heffron, Brandon Steirer, Luke Myers, Collin Brown, Walker Yaple, assistant coach Aaron Yaple.

Local karate champions

The Downtown Dojo Karate Academy of Wilkes-Barre competed recently at the Mifflin County Classics Karate Tournament. All the competing students and instructors placed in their divisions and were awarded trophies for first through fourth places in fighting, weapons and forms. Shawn O’Neil was adult underbelt grand champion for forms. From left: Daisy Perea-Sosa, sensei Josh Reilly, Shawn O’Neil, sensei Pat Reilly, Angela McKeown.

Kingston company honored

A. Pickett Construction, Inc., Kingston, was presented with a plaque from all the children of Saint Jude’s Children’s Hospital as a thank you for its charitable efforts. Pictured, from left: Michael Gill, business development representative; attorney John P. Moses, representing Saint Jude’s; James Solano, vice president; Kim Gill, chairman of the A. Pickett Construction Golf Tournament.

Dallas wins girls title

The Dallas girls basketball seventh grade travel team won the championship game in the Wyoming Valley basketball league. The team defeated Nanticoke in the title game. Front row: Talia Kosierowski, Sara Lojewski, Maria Bednar. Back row: Coach Len Kelley, Breezy Coolbaugh, Maddie Kelley, Paige Evans, Courtney Devens, coach Chad Lojewski. Absent: Emma Lehman, Rachael Maniskas

St. Jude’s completes season

St Jude’s’ NOMADS teams of fifth to eighth graders completed theirbasketball season. First row, from left: Bryce Zapusek, Patrick Ganter, Sean Murphy. Second row: Rachel Rinehimer, Adam Abad, Nick Ganter, Sean Wills, Joshua Zapusek, Randi Kuhar, Corey Chalk. Third row: Coach Lee Kempinski , Kayla Hons, Ben Koshinski, coach Norm Zapusek, coach Tom Gilroy.

Nanticoke freshmen win crown

Nanticoke’s freshman girls basketball teamwon the conference title with a 19-1 record and was undefeated in division play. First row, from left: Chaquana Zendarski, Abbey Zaykoski, Kassie Schinski, Amber Grohowski, Rachel Roccograndi, Giana Roberts. Second row:Keri Lukashefski, Lovelia Pacuzzo, Riley Klepadlo, Jordan Bavitz, Alexis Pyzia, Janaan Trotter. Third row: Coaches Goodman and Grandson, coach Gerard Rentko.

Strong front nine lifts Pettersson into first

Five birdies early on led to a one-shot lead after three rounds of the RBC Heritage. By PETE IACOBELLI AP Sports Writer

HILTON HEAD ISLAND, S.C. — Carl Pettersson had a run of five straight birdies on the front nine and finished with a birdie on the 18th hole for a 66 and a onestroke lead over Colt Knost after the third round of the RBC Heritage on Saturday. Pettersson held a three-stroke lead through 10 holes, yet was tied with Knost after the 15th. Pettersson moved in front with the round’s final putt, an 8-foot birdie on Harbour Town Golf Links signature closing hole. Knost’s roller coaster of a round included an eagle on No. 2 and several missed fairways on the tight holes of Harbour Town Golf Links. Still, he kept close enough with a 69. He’ll be paired with Pettersson again today looking for his first PGA Tour win. Zach Johnson, the 2007 Masters winner, shot a 66 to move to third at 8 under, three behind the leaders. Two-time RBC Heritage champion Boo Weekley had a 70 and was in fourth another shot behind. Defending champ Brandt Snedeker (69), Kevin Na (70) and Robert Garrigus (70) were next at 6 under. World No. 1 Luke Donald failed to make a move toward keeping the top spot, his even-par 71 leaving him at 2 over and tied for 52nd. Donald needs to finish eighth or better to fend off No. 2 Rory McIlroy, who like Masters champion Bubba Watson and most other top golfers, was taking the week off. Pettersson threatened to turn the tournament into a runaway with his early birdie streak. Knost would not let that happen, over-

coming some unsteady play to keep close to his playing partner. It sure wasn’t easy for Knost. He came to the first tee with a two-stroke lead, then knocked his opening tee shot into some pine straw right of the fairway and took bogey. He followed that by rolling in a 48-foot eagle putt from the left fringe on No. 2 and flashed a wide smile that even had Pettersson grinning. Knost’s up-and-down ride continued through the front nine. There was the lipout on No. 3 for bogey, the layup and chip to 10 feet on the par-5 fifth for birdie, and solid par saves from the bunker on No. 7 and from some more pine straw on No. 8. Then on the ninth after another wayward drive, Knost punched it to 10 feet and made the birdie to stay one behind Pettersson. Things swung Pettersson’s way once more on the 10th, his lead growing to three shots after he made birdie and Knost was short on his approach and missed an 8-foot attempt at par. Still, Knost kept grinding. A birdie on the 13th hole drew Knost with a stroke and the pair was tied at the top at 11 under when Pettersson took bogey on the par-5 15th hole. The two matched pars until the windswept 18th when Pettersson struck a stunning approach that slid by the cup and settled 8 feet past. He rolled in the putt with a smile on his face. Johnson put together his second straight sub-70 round to move into third. He has largely struggled at Harbour Town, his best showing a tie for sixth the week after he slipped on the green jacket five years ago. Johnson’s round took flight with an eagle on No. 5. He closed with birdies on the 16th and 18th as he looks for his first victory since 2010.

NASCAR

Biffle continues Roush dominance in Texas By STEPHEN HAWKINS AP Sports Writer

FORT WORTH, Texas — Greg Biffle regained the lead when he charged under Jimmie Johnson with 30 laps left Saturday night, then pulled away to end his 49race winless streak while giving owner Jack Roush another NASCAR Sprint Cup victory in Texas. Johnson led 156 of the 334 laps while going for owner Rick Hendrick’s 200th career victory. But he never recovered, even scraping hard into the wall trying to catch up after Biffle drove under him in Turn 3 and completed the pass before the start-finish line. Biffle, the season points leader, went on to win the fastest Cup race at the 11⁄2-mile, high-banked Texas track. His average speed of 160.577 mph put his Ford 3.2 seconds ahead of the Chevrolet driven by Johnson. It was Roush’s ninth win in 23 Cup races at Texas, and completed a Lone Star State weekend sweep. Ricky Stenhouse Jr. won the Nationwide race on Friday night for Roush’s fourth Texas victory in a row and ninth overall in the second-tier series. Biffle got his 17th career victory. It was his first since an Octo-

ber 2010 race in Kansas, where the series goes next week. After starting third, Biffle was among the lead pack the entire race, leading 91 laps on a fastpaced and windy night. There were only two cautions for 10 slowed-down laps, both for debris, and the race finished with a record 234 consecutive laps of green-flag racing. Mark Martin finished third in a Michael Waltrip-owned Toyota, followed by Jeff Gordon and Roush driver Matt Kenseth. Polesitter Martin Truex Jr., another Waltrip car, finished sixth after leading 68 laps. Biffle got his eighth consecutive top-10 finish at Texas, where he had a victory in 2005 even before that stretch. For Hendrick Motorsports, it was the second race in a row that Rick Hendrick was close to getting his 200th victory. Johnson, Gordon and teammate Dale Earnhardt Jr. were running in the top three at Martinsville two weeks ago before a late restart in the last race before the Easter weekend break. But Clint Bowyer’s aggressive inside move took out Johnson and Gordon, and Earnhardt ended up third.


CMYK PAGE 8C

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

M

A

AMERICAN LEAGUE ROUNDUP

Newest Angels take down Yanks The Associated Press

NEW YORK — C.J. Wilson beat the Yankees for the first time in his career, Albert Pujols and his teammates teed off and the Los Angeles Angels romped past New York 7-1 Saturday. Howie Kendrick, Chris Iannetta and Vernon Wells homered as the Angels ended their three-game skid and stopped New York’s winning streak at four. Pujols got in the swing, too, after a quiet start with his new club. He singled sharply his first time up, then hit an RBI double that one-hopped the center-field wall. He later lined out twice and flied out to the fence in left. Wilson (2-0) effectively pitched inside and worked out of frequent trouble, allowing only one run in six innings. He gave up back-to-back singles to start the game and stranded runners at second and third in each of his last three innings. Red Sox 13, Rays 5

BOSTON — David Ortiz drove in five runs and hit one of Boston’s five home runs as the Red Sox pounded the Tampa Bay Rays for the second straight day. The game was tied 5-all until Mike Aviles hit a go-ahead homer after replacing the injured Jacoby Ellsbury as the leadoff hitter, starting a threerun seventh inning. The Red Sox added five runs in the eighth one day after scoring eight in that inning. Orioles 6, Blue Jays 4

TORONTO — Nolan Reimold hit a tiebreaking, two-run homer in the ninth inning and the Baltimore Orioles beat the Toronto Blue Jays. Wilson Betemit tied it with a home run in the eighth and

Chris Davis also went deep for the Orioles, who won their second straight game at Rogers Centre. Coming into the series, Baltimore was 5-29 in Toronto dating to 2008. White Sox 5, Tigers 1

CHICAGO — Gavin Floyd overcame control problem to pitch six scoreless innings and Alexei Ramirez homered as the Chicago White Sox beat the Detroit Tigers. Tigers left-hander Adam Wilk, making first big league start, was hit in his pitching shoulder by teammate Prince Fielder’s foul ball while sitting in the dugout in the sixth inning. Wilk (0-1) left with a bruised shoulder but is expected to make his next start. He allowed two runs on three hits in five innings Saturday. He struck out four and walked one. Rangers 6, Twins 2

MINNEAPOLIS — Yu Darvish kept wriggling out of trouble in five-plus innings, Josh Hamilton homered among his three hits and the Texas Rangers beat the Minnesota Twins. Adrian Beltre drove in two runs and put Texas ahead with a single in the seventh that scored Brandon Snyder, who had a career-high three hits. The Rangers won their third straight and for the sixth time in seven games. Indians 11, Royals 9, 10 innings

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — ShinSoo Choo hit a two-run double with two outs in the 10th inning, and the Cleveland Indians beat the Kansas City Royals 11-9 on Saturday night in a testy affair with three ejections and a pair of bench-clearings.

N AT I O N A L L E A G U E R O U N D U P

Mets find the Wright stuff to beat Phillies The Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — Jonathon Niese and two relievers combined on a six-hitter, David Wright homered despite a broken finger and the New York Mets beat the Philadelphia Phillies 5-0 on Saturday. Niese (2-0) allowed five hits and struck out five in 62⁄3 innings. Bobby Parnell got four outs and Jon Rauch pitched the ninth. Wright was 3 for 5, including a long homer on the first pitch he saw after missing three games with a broken right pinkie. Lucas Duda also connected for the Mets, who are off to a surprising 6-2 start. The five-time defending NL East champion Phillies are 3-5 and struggling offensively without All-Stars Chase Utley and Ryan Howard in the middle of their lineup. They’ve scored two runs or less in five of their eight games. Nationals 4, Reds 1

WASHINGTON — Edwin Jackson threw a two-hitter for his fifth career complete game and Adam LaRoche added to his unusually strong start with a tiebreaking two-run double, helping the Washington Nationals win their fifth game in a row, 4-1 over the Cincinnati Reds. Other than a rocky second inning, Jackson (1-0) was as efficient and effective as can be, striking out nine. He retired 16 consecutive batters in one stretch, until walking Chris Heisey leading off the eighth. After a visit from pitching coach Steve McCatty, Jackson got back in gear, striking out the side. And he finished with

the flourish of a 1-2-3 ninth. As if all of that weren’t enough, Jackson even singled off Reds starter Homer Bailey (0-2). Cardinals 5, Cubs 1

ST. LOUIS — ST. LOUIS — Lance Lynn pitched effectively into the sixth inning and Yadier Molina had two hits and two RBIs, leading the St. Louis Cardinals to a win over the Chicago Cubs. The Cardinals snapped a two-game skid with their fourth win in six games. Chicago, which lost five of its first six, had won two in a row. Braves 2, Brewers 1

ATLANTA — Mike Minor pitched two-hit ball into the eighth inning to give Atlanta’s rotation a lift and the Braves survived a ninth-inning scare to beat Shaun Marcum and the Milwaukee Brewers for their fourth straight victory. Craig Kimbrel pitched out of a bases-loaded jam in the ninth, striking out pinch-hitter George Kottaras and Mat Gamel for his fourth save. Astros 5, Marlins 4

MIAMI — Carlos Lee drove in the tying run with a two-out single in the ninth inning, and an error by left fielder Logan Morrison allowed the go-ahead run to score as the Houston Astros rallied to beat closer Heath Bell and the Miami Marlins. Bell, one of the Marlins’ All-Star acquisitions this offseason, took the mound with a 4-1 lead to start the ninth but had a shaky performance for the third time in as many outings this season.

J

O

R

L

E

A

G

U

E

B

A

S

E

B

A

L

L

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

STANDINGS/STATS S TA N D I N G S Baltimore........................................... New York.......................................... Tampa Bay ....................................... Toronto ............................................. Boston...............................................

W 5 4 4 4 3

Chicago ............................................ Detroit ............................................... Cleveland.......................................... Kansas City ...................................... Minnesota.........................................

W 5 5 3 3 2

Texas ................................................ Oakland ............................................ Seattle ............................................... Los Angeles .....................................

W 7 4 4 3

Washington ...................................... New York.......................................... Atlanta............................................... Philadelphia ..................................... Miami.................................................

W 7 6 4 3 3

St. Louis............................................ Houston ............................................ Milwaukee ........................................ Chicago ............................................ Cincinnati .......................................... Pittsburgh .........................................

W 6 4 4 3 3 2

Los Angeles ..................................... Arizona ............................................. Colorado........................................... San Francisco .................................. San Diego.........................................

W 7 5 3 3 2

AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division L Pct GB WCGB 3 .625 — — 4 .500 1 1 4 .500 1 1 4 .500 1 1 5 .375 2 2 Central Division L Pct GB WCGB 2 .714 — — 1 3 .625 ⁄2 — 4 .429 2 11⁄2 5 .375 21⁄2 2 6 .250 31⁄2 3 West Division L Pct GB WCGB 2 .778 — — 4 .500 21⁄2 1 5 .444 3 11⁄2 5 .375 31⁄2 2 NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division L Pct GB WCGB 2 .778 — — 1 2 .750 ⁄2 — 4 .500 21⁄2 2 5 .375 31⁄2 3 6 .333 4 31⁄2 Central Division L Pct GB WCGB 3 .667 — — 4 .500 11⁄2 2 5 .444 2 21⁄2 6 .333 3 31⁄2 6 .333 3 31⁄2 5 .286 3 31⁄2 West Division L Pct GB WCGB 1 .875 — — 1 2 .714 11⁄2 ⁄2 4 .429 31⁄2 21⁄2 4 .429 31⁄2 21⁄2 6 .250 5 4

L10 5-3 4-4 4-4 4-4 3-5

Str W-2 L-1 L-3 L-2 W-2

Home 3-3 1-1 3-0 2-3 2-0

Away 2-0 3-3 1-4 2-1 1-5

L10 5-2 5-3 3-4 3-5 2-6

Str W-4 L-2 W-2 L-3 L-2

Home 2-0 5-1 1-4 0-2 2-3

Away 3-2 0-2 2-0 3-3 0-3

L10 7-2 4-4 4-5 3-5

Str W-3 W-2 L-2 W-1

Home 5-2 3-4 0-1 1-2

Away 2-0 1-0 4-4 2-3

L10 7-2 6-2 4-4 3-5 3-6

Str W-5 W-2 W-4 L-2 L-1

Home 3-0 4-2 2-0 2-3 1-2

Away 4-2 2-0 2-4 1-2 2-4

L10 6-3 4-4 4-5 3-6 3-6 2-5

Str W-1 W-1 L-3 L-1 L-3 L-4

Home 1-1 3-3 1-2 2-5 3-3 2-1

Away 5-2 1-1 3-3 1-1 0-3 0-4

L10 7-1 5-2 3-4 3-4 2-6

Str W-4 L-1 W-1 W-2 L-2

Home 4-0 3-0 2-2 1-0 2-5

Away 3-1 2-2 1-2 2-4 0-1

AMERICAN LEAGUE Friday's Games N.Y. Yankees 5, L.A. Angels 0 Boston 12, Tampa Bay 2 Chicago White Sox 5, Detroit 2 Cleveland 8, Kansas City 3 Baltimore 7, Toronto 5 Texas 4, Minnesota 1 Oakland 4, Seattle 0 Saturday's Games L.A. Angels 7, N.Y. Yankees 1 Texas 6, Minnesota 2 Boston 13, Tampa Bay 5 Baltimore 6, Toronto 4 Chicago White Sox 5, Detroit 1 Cleveland 11, Kansas City 9, 10 innings Oakland at Seattle, 9:10 p.m. Sunday's Games Baltimore (Matusz 0-1) at Toronto (Drabek 1-0), 1:07 p.m. Tampa Bay (Moore 0-0) at Boston (Doubront 0-0), 1:35 p.m. Cleveland (Jimenez 0-0) at Kansas City (Mendoza 0-1), 2:10 p.m. Detroit (Porcello 0-0) at Chicago White Sox (Sale 1-0), 2:10 p.m. Texas (Feliz 1-0) at Minnesota (Hendriks 0-0), 2:10 p.m. Oakland (Godfrey 0-1) at Seattle (Beavan 0-1), 4:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (Williams 0-0) at N.Y. Yankees (Nova 1-0), 8:05 p.m. Monday's Games Tampa Bay at Boston, 11:05 a.m. Minnesota at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. Baltimore at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Detroit at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Oakland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE Friday's Games

Chicago Cubs 9, St. Louis 5 San Francisco 5, Pittsburgh 0 Washington 2, Cincinnati 1, 13 innings N.Y. Mets 5, Philadelphia 2 Miami 5, Houston 4, 11 innings Atlanta 10, Milwaukee 8 Colorado 7, Arizona 6 L.A. Dodgers 9, San Diego 8 Saturday's Games St. Louis 5, Chicago Cubs 1 Washington 4, Cincinnati 1 N.Y. Mets 5, Philadelphia 0 Houston 5, Miami 4 Atlanta 2, Milwaukee 1 Arizona at Colorado, 8:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at San Francisco, 9:05 p.m. San Diego at L.A. Dodgers, 9:10 p.m. Sunday's Games Houston (Happ 1-0) at Miami (A.Sanchez 1-0), 1:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Leake 0-1) at Washington (Detwiler 1-0), 1:35 p.m. Milwaukee (Narveson 1-0) at Atlanta (Beachy 0-1), 1:35 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 0-0) at Philadelphia (Hamels 0-1), 1:35 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Maholm 0-1) at St. Louis (Westbrook 1-0), 2:15 p.m. Arizona (Cahill 0-0) at Colorado (Pomeranz 0-0), 3:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Correia 0-0) at San Francisco (Vogelsong 0-0), 4:05 p.m. San Diego (Volquez 0-1) at L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 0-0), 4:10 p.m. Monday's Games Houston at Washington, 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. San Diego at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Pittsburgh at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. Philadelphia at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.

A M E R I C A N L E A G U E

IP H R ER BB SO Baltimore Hammel.................... 5 6 2 2 1 3 Lindstrom BS,1-1.... 1 2 2 0 1 1 O’Day........................ 1 0 0 0 0 0 Ayala W,1-0 ............. 1 1 0 0 0 1 Ji.Johnson S,4-4 ..... 1 1 0 0 0 0 Toronto H.Alvarez ................. 7 6 3 3 1 2 Janssen BS,1-1....... 1 1 1 1 0 0 Cordero L,0-1 .......... 1 2 2 2 0 2 HBP—by H.Alvarez (Ad.Jones, Hardy). Umpires—Home, Derryl Cousins;First, Bob Davidson;Second, Ron Kulpa;Third, Jim Wolf. T—2:57. A—28,355 (49,260).

Angels 7, Yankees 1 Los Angeles

ab 5 5 5 5 3 3 4 2 4

r 1 2 0 0 0 0 2 2 0

h bi 1 0 3 3 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 2 0 0

New York

ab r h bi Jeter ss 5 0 2 0 Swisher rf 5 0 1 0 Cano 2b 4 0 1 1 ARdrgz dh 4 0 0 0 Teixeir 1b 4 0 1 0 Grndrs cf 3 0 0 0 AnJons lf 4 0 0 0 Martin c 2 0 0 0 ENunez 3b 3 1 1 0 ErChvz ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 36 7 9 7 Totals 35 1 6 1 Los Angeles....................... 021 310 000 — 7 New York ........................... 000 010 000 — 1 E—C.Wilson (1), Aybar (1). LOB—Los Angeles 6, New York 10. 2B—Pujols (3). HR—H.Kendrick (1), V.Wells (2), Iannetta (1). IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles C.Wilson W,2-0 ....... 6 6 1 1 2 2 Jepsen...................... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Hawkins.................... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Walden ..................... 1 0 0 0 0 2 New York P.Hughes L,0-2 ....... 31⁄3 8 6 6 2 6 Phelps ...................... 51⁄3 1 1 1 2 4 Rapada..................... 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 HBP—by C.Wilson (Martin). WP—Phelps. Umpires—Home, James Hoye;First, Jim Joyce;Second, Jim Reynolds;Third, Mike DiMuro. T—3:07. A—46,829 (50,291). Aybar ss HKndrc 2b Pujols 1b KMorls dh TrHntr rf Callasp 3b V.Wells lf Iannett c Bourjos cf

Rangers 6, Twins 2 Texas

Minnesota ab r h bi Span cf 5 0 3 1 JCarrll ss 3 0 0 0 Brrghs ph 1 0 0 0 Plouffe ss 0 0 0 0 Mauer c 4 0 1 0 Mornea dh 4 0 1 0 Wlngh lf 3 0 2 0 Doumit rf 5 0 1 0 Valenci 3b 5 2 2 0 Parmel 1b 5 0 1 0 ACasill 2b 4 0 2 0 Totals 40 613 5 Totals 39 213 1 Texas.................................. 011 000 202 — 6 Minnesota .......................... 010 001 000 — 2 E—M.Young (1), Plouffe (1). DP—Texas 1. LOB— Texas 10, Minnesota 15. 2B—Hamilton 2 (3), Beltre 2 (3), N.Cruz 2 (2), Span 2 (4), Willingham (2). HR— Hamilton (3). SB—A.Casilla (1). SF—Napoli. IP H R ER BB SO Texas Darvish ..................... 52⁄3 9 2 1 4 4 R.Ross W,1-0.......... 2⁄3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Ogando H,4 ............. 2⁄3 Adams H,4 ............... 1 1 0 0 0 0 Nathan ...................... 1 2 0 0 0 2 Minnesota Blackburn................. 51⁄3 7 2 2 1 3 Duensing L,0-1........ 11⁄3 1 2 2 1 1 2 0 0 0 2 Gray .......................... 11⁄3 Perkins ..................... 2⁄3 2 2 1 0 0 Al.Burnett ................. 1⁄3 1 0 0 0 0 HBP—by Darvish (J.Carroll). WP—Darvish. Umpires—Home, Ed Rapuano;First, Cory Blaser;Second, Jerry Layne;Third, Ed Hickox. T—3:27. A—35,854 (39,500). Kinsler 2b Andrus ss Hamltn cf-lf Beltre dh MYong 3b N.Cruz rf DvMrp lf Gentry cf Napoli c BSnydr 1b

ab 5 4 5 4 5 5 4 1 3 4

r 0 0 3 1 0 1 0 0 0 1

h bi 0 0 0 0 3 1 3 2 1 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 0

Red Sox 13, Rays 5 Tampa Bay

Boston ab r h bi ab r h bi Jnnngs cf 3 1 0 0 Aviles ss 5 2 3 1 C.Pena 1b 4 1 1 1 Pedroia 2b 5 2 2 1 Longori 3b 4 0 0 0 AdGnzl 1b 4 1 1 0 Joyce lf 2 1 1 0 Youkils 3b 3 3 1 0 EJhnsn ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Ortiz dh 5 2 4 5 Zobrist rf 3 1 0 0 C.Ross cf 5 1 2 4 Scott dh 4 1 2 4 Lin cf 0 0 0 0 Kppngr 2b 4 0 0 0 Sweeny rf 4 1 1 0 JMolin c 4 0 1 0 Sltlmch c 4 1 1 2 SRdrgz ss 3 0 1 0 DMcDn lf 2 0 0 0 Totals 32 5 6 5 Totals 37131513 Tampa Bay....................... 401 000 000 — 5 Boston.............................. 021 020 35x — 13 DP—Tampa Bay 1. LOB—Tampa Bay 4, Boston 6. 2B—C.Pena (3), Scott (2), Aviles (2), Ad.Gonzalez (2), Ortiz (4), C.Ross (2), Sweeney (3). HR—Scott (1), Aviles (1), Pedroia (2), Ortiz (1), C.Ross (1), Saltalamacchia (1). S—S.Rodriguez. IP H R ER BB SO Tampa Bay Hellickson ................ 5 7 5 5 3 1 Badenhop L,0-1....... 11⁄3 1 1 1 0 2 Howell....................... 2⁄3 3 2 2 1 1 D.De La Rosa.......... 1 4 5 5 2 0 Boston Buchholz W,1-0 ...... 7 6 5 5 3 5 F.Morales H,1.......... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Aceves ..................... 1 0 0 0 0 2 Balk—Buchholz. Umpires—Home, Todd Tichenor;First, Brian Gorman;Second, Larry Vanover;Third, Tony Randazzo. T—3:18. A—38,024 (37,067).

Orioles 6, Blue Jays 4 Baltimore

Toronto ab r h bi ab r h bi Reimld lf 5 1 2 2 YEscor ss 4 0 0 0 EnChvz lf 0 0 0 0 KJhnsn 2b 4 1 1 1 Hardy ss 4 1 1 0 Bautist rf 4 0 1 0 Markks rf 4 0 0 0 Lind 1b 4 1 1 0 AdJons cf 3 0 1 0 Encrnc dh 4 1 1 0 Wieters c 4 0 0 1 Thams lf 2 1 1 1 Betemt 3b 4 1 1 1 RDavis lf 1 0 0 0 MrRynl dh 4 1 1 0 Lawrie 3b 3 0 2 0 C.Davis 1b 4 1 3 2 Rasms cf 4 0 3 2 Flahrty pr-1b 0 1 0 0 Arencii c 4 0 0 0 Andino 2b 4 0 0 0 Totals 36 6 9 6 Totals 34 410 4 Baltimore ............................ 100 200 012 — 6 Toronto............................... 110 002 000 — 4 E—Betemit (1). DP—Baltimore 1. LOB—Baltimore 6, Toronto 6. 2B—Reimold (3), Lind (3), Thames (1). HR—Reimold (2), Betemit (1), C.Davis (1), K.Johnson (3). SB—Rasmus (1). CS—Lawrie 2 (2). SF—Thames.

White Sox 5, Tigers 1 Detroit

Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi AJcksn cf 4 0 3 0 De Aza cf 4 0 1 1 Boesch rf 4 1 1 1 Morel 3b 3 1 1 0 MiCarr 3b 4 0 0 0 A.Dunn dh 4 0 1 1 Fielder 1b 3 0 1 0 Konerk 1b 4 1 1 1 DYong lf 1 0 0 0 Rios rf 4 0 1 0 Avila c 3 0 0 0 AlRmrz ss 4 1 1 1 Laird ph 1 0 0 0 Viciedo lf 3 0 1 0 JhPerlt ss 3 0 0 0 Lillirdg lf 1 0 0 0 Dirks dh 2 0 0 0 Flowrs c 2 2 1 1 Inge ph 1 0 0 0 Bckhm 2b 2 0 0 0 Raburn 2b 3 0 0 0 Totals 29 1 5 1 Totals 31 5 8 5 Detroit................................. 000 000 010 — 1 Chicago.............................. 010 011 11x — 5 DP—Detroit 1, Chicago 3. LOB—Detroit 7, Chicago 5. 2B—A.Jackson (3), Morel (1), A.Dunn (1). 3B—De Aza (2). HR—Boesch (1), Konerko (1), Al.Ramirez (1), Flowers (1). SB—Flowers (1). CS— Boesch (1). IP H R ER BB SO Detroit Wilk L,0-1 ................. 5 3 2 2 1 4 Balester .................... 12⁄3 2 2 2 0 1 3 1 1 1 2 Schlereth.................. 11⁄3 Chicago Floyd W,1-1 ............. 6 3 0 0 3 6 Crain H,1.................. 2 2 1 1 0 2 Thornton................... 1 0 0 0 0 0 HBP—by Balester (Flowers), by Floyd (D.Young, Dirks, D.Young). WP—Balester 2. Umpires—Home, Gary Cederstrom;First, Lance Barksdale;Second, Fieldin Culbreth;Third, Adrian Johnson. T—2:44. A—33,025 (40,615).

Indians 11, Royals 9, 10 innings, Cleveland

Kansas City ab r h bi ab r h bi Brantly cf 6 2 1 0 Dyson cf 3 1 1 1 ACarer ss 6 2 3 1 Francr rf 5 1 1 0 Choo rf 5 1 1 2 Hosmer 1b 5 1 1 1 CSantn c 4 1 2 2 Butler dh 5 1 2 2 Duncan lf 3 1 1 0 AGordn lf 5 0 0 0 Cnghm lf 2 0 0 0 YBtncr 2b 4 2 2 1 JoLopz dh 5 0 1 2 Getz 2b 1 0 0 0 Ktchm 1b 3 1 1 1 Mostks 3b 3 2 2 2 Donald 2b-3b 4 1 2 1 Quinter c 4 0 1 0 Hannhn 3b 1 0 0 0 AEscor ss 4 1 1 1 Kipnis 2b 3 2 2 2 Totals 42111411 Totals 39 911 8 Cleveland ................... 005 130 000 2 — 11 Kansas City................ 002 022 210 0 — 9 E—Hannahan (3), Donald (1). DP—Cleveland 2. LOB—Cleveland 9, Kansas City 3. 2B—A.Cabrera (3), Choo (1), C.Santana (1), Jo.Lopez (1), Dyson (1), Hosmer (1), Butler (5), Moustakas 2 (4). 3B—Brantley (1), A.Escobar (1). HR—Kotchman (1), Kipnis (2), Y.Betancourt (1). SB—Kotchman (1). CS—A.Cabrera (1), Dyson (1). SF—Donald, Dyson. IP H R ER BB SO Cleveland J.Gomez................... 2 0 1 1 0 0 Tomlin....................... 32⁄3 6 5 4 0 0 R.Perez .................... 0 1 0 0 0 0 J.Smith H,2 .............. 1 1 1 1 0 0 Sipp H,2 ................... 1⁄3 2 1 1 0 0 Pestano BS,1-1 ....... 1 1 1 1 0 1 Asencio W,1-1......... 1 0 0 0 1 2 C.Perez S,2-3.......... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Kansas City J.Sanchez ................ 22⁄3 6 5 5 4 1 Collins....................... 21⁄3 5 4 4 0 3 K.Herrera ................. 1 0 0 0 0 1 Mijares...................... 1 0 0 0 1 0 Crow ......................... 1 0 0 0 0 0 Broxton..................... 1 0 0 0 0 0 G.Holland L,0-1 ....... 1 3 2 2 1 1 J.Gomez pitched to 1 batter in the 3rd. R.Perez pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. HBP—by J.Gomez (Moustakas), by J.Sanchez (Choo). WP—Tomlin. Umpires—Home, Gary Darling;First, Jerry Meals;Second, Lance Barrett;Third, Paul Emmel. T—3:44. A—21,788 (37,903). NATIONAL LEAGUE

Mets 5, Phillies 0

New York

Philadelphia ab r h bi ab r h bi Tejada ss 5 0 2 1 Victorn cf 4 0 1 0 DnMrp 2b 2 1 0 0 Polanc 3b 4 0 1 0 Rauch p 0 0 0 0 Rollins ss 4 0 1 0 DWrght 3b 5 2 3 1 Pence rf 4 0 0 0 I.Davis 1b 5 0 1 0 Mayrry lf 4 0 0 0 Bay lf 4 0 1 0 Wggntn 1b 2 0 1 0 Duda rf 4 1 2 2 Galvis 2b 3 0 1 0 Niwnhs cf 4 0 1 0 Schndr c 2 0 0 0 Thole c 2 0 0 0 Ruiz ph-c 1 0 0 0 Niese p 3 0 0 0 Worley p 2 0 0 0 Parnell p 0 0 0 0 Herndn p 0 0 0 0 Baxter ph 0 1 0 0 Bastrd p 0 0 0 0 Cedeno 2b 0 0 0 0 Pierre ph 1 0 1 0 Stutes p 0 0 0 0 Totals 34 510 4 Totals 31 0 6 0 New York ........................... 100 300 001 — 5 Philadelphia....................... 000 000 000 — 0 DP—New York 2, Philadelphia 2. LOB—New York 8, Philadelphia 5. 2B—Duda (1). HR—D.Wright (2), Duda (3). SB—Baxter (1). CS—Bay (1). IP H R ER BB SO New York Niese W,2-0............. 62⁄3 5 0 0 1 5 Parnell ...................... 11⁄3 1 0 0 0 0 Rauch ....................... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Philadelphia Worley L,0-1 ............ 6 8 4 4 4 5 Herndon ................... 11⁄3 1 0 0 0 1

AP PHOTO

The Angels’ Howie Kendrick scores on a double by Albert Pujols during the third inning of Saturday’s game against the Yankees. 0 0 0 0 2 Bastardo ................... 2⁄3 Stutes ....................... 1 1 1 1 2 1 Umpires—Home, Alfonso Marquez;First, Tom Hallion;Second, D.J. Reyburn;Third, Brian O’Nora. T—2:41. A—45,750 (43,651).

Cardinals 5, Cubs 1 Chicago

ab 3 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 2 1 0

r 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

h bi 1 0 0 0 2 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

St. Louis

ab r h bi Furcal ss 4 0 0 0 Jay cf 4 1 1 1 Hollidy lf 4 1 0 0 Beltran rf 4 0 0 0 MCrpnt 1b 4 1 1 0 YMolin c 4 1 2 2 Descals 3b 3 1 1 1 Greene 2b 3 0 1 1 Lynn p 2 0 1 0 JRomr p 0 0 0 0 Boggs p 0 0 0 0 Komats ph 1 0 0 0 Salas p 0 0 0 0 Rzpczy p 0 0 0 0 Motte p 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 1 6 1 Totals 33 5 7 5 Chicago.............................. 000 001 000 — 1 St. Louis ............................. 000 400 10x — 5 E—S.Castro 2 (4). LOB—Chicago 7, St. Louis 4. 2B—S.Castro (3), M.Carpenter (2). 3B—Descalso (1). HR—Jay (2). SB—Jay (1), Y.Molina (1). IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Volstad L,0-1 ........... 6 6 4 3 0 4 Camp ........................ 2 1 1 1 0 1 St. Louis Lynn W,2-0 .............. 51⁄3 4 1 1 2 5 0 0 0 0 2 J.Romero H,1 .......... 2⁄3 Boggs H,2 ................ 1 0 0 0 0 0 Salas......................... 2⁄3 2 0 0 0 2 Rzepczynski H,2 ..... 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 Motte......................... 1 0 0 0 0 0 Umpires—Home, Phil Cuzzi;First, Vic Carapazza;Second, Gerry Davis;Third, Greg Gibson. T—2:47. A—46,792 (43,975). DeJess rf Barney 2b SCastro ss ASorin lf IStewrt 3b LaHair 1b Soto c Byrd cf Volstad p DeWitt ph Camp p

Nationals 4, Reds 1 Cincinnati

Washington ab r h bi ab r h bi Harris 2b 4 0 0 0 Dsmnd ss 5 0 0 0 Cozart ss 4 0 0 0 Espinos 2b 4 2 1 0 Votto 1b 4 0 0 0 Zmrmn 3b 4 1 1 0 Bruce rf 3 0 0 0 LaRoch 1b 3 0 2 2 Cairo 3b 1 1 1 0 Werth rf 3 1 2 1 Valdez 3b 2 0 0 0 Nady lf 3 0 0 0 LeCure p 0 0 0 0 Ankiel cf 4 0 0 0 Heisey lf 1 0 0 0 Flores c 3 0 3 1 Stubbs cf 3 0 1 1 EJcksn p 4 0 1 0 Mesorc c 3 0 0 0 HBaily p 2 0 0 0 Rolen 3b 1 0 0 0 Totals 28 1 2 1 Totals 33 410 4 Cincinnati ........................... 010 000 000 — 1 Washington ....................... 012 000 10x — 4 DP—Cincinnati 1, Washington 1. LOB—Cincinnati 2, Washington 10. 2B—Cairo (1), LaRoche (2), Werth (2). IP H R ER BB SO Cincinnati H.Bailey L,0-2 .......... 6 7 3 3 4 3 LeCure ..................... 2 3 1 1 1 2 Washington E.Jackson W,1-0 .... 9 2 1 1 1 9 HBP—by E.Jackson (Heisey). Umpires—Home, Tim Welke;First, Laz Diaz;Second, Mike Everitt;Third, Paul Schrieber. T—2:33. A—35,489 (41,487).

Braves 2, Brewers 1 Milwaukee

ab 3 4 3 4 2 3 1 4 3 2 1 0

r 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

h bi 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

Atlanta

ab r h bi RWeks 2b Bourn cf 4 0 1 0 CGomz cf Prado lf 4 0 0 0 Braun lf Fremn 1b 4 0 0 0 ArRmr 3b McCnn c 2 1 0 0 Hart rf Uggla 2b 3 0 0 0 Lucroy c Heywrd rf 3 1 1 0 Kottars ph JFrncs 3b 2 0 1 1 Gamel 1b Pstrnck ss 3 0 0 0 CIzturs ss JWilson ss 0 0 0 0 Marcm p Minor p 2 0 0 0 Aoki ph Venters p 0 0 0 0 Veras p Hinske ph 0 0 0 0 Kimrel p 0 0 0 0 Totals 30 1 5 0 Totals 27 2 3 1 Milwaukee.......................... 000 000 010 — 1 Atlanta ................................ 020 000 00x — 2 E—Braun (1), Uggla (2). DP—Atlanta 2. LOB—Milwaukee 6, Atlanta 4. 2B—Lucroy (1), J.Francisco (1). IP H R ER BB SO Milwaukee Marcum L,1-1 .......... 7 3 2 2 2 6 Veras ........................ 1 0 0 0 1 1 Atlanta Minor W,1-1 ............. 71⁄3 2 1 0 1 4 2 0 0 0 1 Venters H,3.............. 2⁄3 Kimbrel S,4-4 .......... 1 1 0 0 2 2 HBP—by Minor (Hart). WP—Veras. Balk—Marcum. Umpires—Home, Chris Guccione;First, Tim Tschida;Second, Jeff Nelson;Third, Bill Welke. T—2:44. A—37,408 (49,586).

Astros 5, Marlins 4 Houston

ab 1 5 3 0 0 5 3 5 4 4 1 1 0 1

r 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1

h bi 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1

Miami

ab r h bi Reyes ss 4 1 1 0 Bonifac cf 3 2 1 0 HRmrz 3b 4 1 3 1 Morrsn lf 3 0 1 2 Gaudin p 0 0 0 0 GSnchz 1b 4 0 1 1 Coghln rf 4 0 0 0 DMrph 2b 2 0 0 0 Stanton ph 1 0 0 0 Hayes c 3 0 0 0 Zamrn p 2 0 0 0 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 Dobbs ph 1 0 1 0 Mujica p 0 0 0 0 Bell p 0 0 0 0 Choate p 0 0 0 0 Kearns lf 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 5 8 4 Totals 31 4 8 4 Houston.............................. 100 000 004 — 5 Miami .................................. 103 000 000 — 4 E—Bonifacio (1), Hayes (1), Morrison (2). DP— Houston 2. LOB—Houston 10, Miami 3. 2B—Ca.Lee (2), Altuve (1), Reyes (3). SB—Bonifacio (5), H.Ramirez (2). CS—H.Ramirez (1). S—Norris, Bonifacio. SF—Morrison. IP H R ER BB SO Houston Norris ........................ 6 6 4 4 1 2 R.Cruz W,1-0 .......... 2 2 0 0 0 2 Myers S,2-2 ............. 1 0 0 0 0 2 Miami Zambrano................. 6 4 1 1 6 4 Cishek H,3 ............... 1 0 0 0 0 2 Mujica H,3................ 1 0 0 0 1 0 Bell L,0-2 BS,2-2..... 2⁄3 4 4 2 0 0 Choate ...................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 Gaudin ...................... 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 Choate pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Umpires—Home, Dana DeMuth;First, Kerwin Danley;Second, Doug Eddings;Third, Paul Nauert. T—2:48. A—31,659 (37,442). Schafer cf Lowrie ss JMrtnz lf Maxwll pr Myers p Ca.Lee 1b Bogsvc rf CJhnsn 3b CSnydr c Altuve 2b Norris p MGnzlz ph R.Cruz p T.Buck ph-lf

MAJOR LEAGUE LEADERS

NATIONAL LEAGUE

BATTING—Kemp, Los Angeles, .419; MeCabrera, San Francisco, .414; Freese, St. Louis, .406; JMartinez, Houston, .379; SCastro, Chicago, .371; Infante, Miami, .367; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, .360. RUNS—Kemp, Los Angeles, 10; MEllis, Los Angeles, 9; MeCabrera, San Francisco, 8; DeJesus, Chicago, 8; Infante, Miami, 8; Schafer, Houston, 8; Zimmerman, Washington, 8. RBI—Ethier, Los Angeles, 13; Freese, St. Louis, 11; Kemp, Los Angeles, 11; LaRoche, Washington, 10; CaLee, Houston, 9; JMartinez, Houston, 9; Headley, San Diego, 8. HOME RUNS—Hart, Milwaukee, 4; Beltran, St. Louis, 3; Bruce, Cincinnati, 3; Duda, New York, 3; Freese, St. Louis, 3; Infante, Miami, 3; Kemp, Los Angeles, 3; Kottaras, Milwaukee, 3; JMartinez, Houston, 3; CYoung, Arizona, 3. STOLEN BASES—SCastro, Chicago, 6; Bonifacio, Miami, 5; DGordon, Los Angeles, 5; Schafer, Houston, 5; Victorino, Philadelphia, 4; Maybin, San Diego, 3; Reyes, Miami, 3. STRIKEOUTS—Harang, Los Angeles, 19; MCain, San Francisco, 15; Volquez, San Diego, 15; Billingsley, Los Angeles, 15; Dempster, Chicago, 15; EJackson, Washington, 15; Strasburg, Washington, 14; Garza, Chicago, 14. SAVES—Guerra, Los Angeles, 5; Putz, Arizona, 4; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 4; FFrancisco, New York, 3; Myers, Houston, 2; Papelbon, Philadelphia, 2; Motte, St. Louis, 2; RBetancourt, Colorado, 2.

F R I D AY ’ S L A T E B O X E S Rockies 7, Diamondbacks 6 Arizona

ab 5 5 4 4 0 3 5 3 3 1 1 0 1 0

r 0 0 2 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

h bi 0 0 1 0 2 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

Colorado

ab r h bi Scutaro 2b 5 0 1 0 Fowler cf 5 1 1 1 CGnzlz lf 5 2 2 0 Tlwtzk ss 4 2 3 0 Helton 1b 5 0 3 3 Cuddyr rf 4 1 1 0 RHrndz c 4 1 2 3 Nelson 3b 3 0 1 0 Nicasio p 0 0 0 0 Rogers p 1 0 0 0 EYong ph 1 0 0 0 Belisle p 0 0 0 0 Pachec ph 0 0 0 0 Brothrs p 0 0 0 0 RBtncr p 0 0 0 0 Totals 35 6 9 6 Totals 37 714 7 Arizona ............................... 204 000 000 — 6 Colorado ............................ 112 200 01x — 7 E—Goldschmidt (1), Cuddyer (1). DP—Arizona 1. LOB—Arizona 9, Colorado 11. 2B—J.Upton (2), R.Roberts (2), Tulowitzki (2), Helton (3), R.Hernandez (2). HR—M.Montero (1), Fowler (1), R.Hernandez (1). SF—Blum. IP H R ER BB SO Arizona D.Hudson................. 32⁄3 10 6 6 3 3 Ziegler ...................... 11⁄3 1 0 0 0 1 Breslow .................... 2 1 0 0 2 1 Shaw L,0-1............... 1 2 1 0 0 2 Colorado Nicasio ..................... 22⁄3 5 6 6 5 3 Rogers...................... 21⁄3 2 0 0 0 3 Belisle....................... 2 0 0 0 0 1 Brothers W,1-1........ 1 1 0 0 1 0 R.Betancourt S,2-2 . 1 1 0 0 0 0 WP—D.Hudson, Nicasio. Umpires—Home, Mark Wegner;First, Brian Knight;Second, Mike Winters;Third, Wally Bell. T—3:39. A—30,642 (50,398). Blmqst ss Kubel lf J.Upton rf MMntr c GParra pr CYoung cf Gldsch 1b Blum 3b RRorts 2b DHdsn p Ziegler p Breslw p A.Hill ph Shaw p

Dodgers 9, Padres 8 San Diego

Los Angeles ab r h bi ab r h bi Maybin cf 3 0 1 0 GwynJ lf 5 1 1 1 Parrino ph-2b 1 0 0 0 M.Ellis 2b 4 2 1 2 Venale lf 3 1 1 1 Kemp cf 2 2 1 2 Guzmn ph 0 0 0 1 JRiver 1b 3 0 0 0 Brach p 0 0 0 0 Loney 1b 0 0 0 0 Blanks ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Ethier rf 3 0 1 3 Headly 3b 3 2 1 3 Uribe 3b 4 0 0 0 Alonso 1b 5 1 2 1 Sellers ss 2 2 1 0 Hermid rf 4 0 1 0 A.Ellis c 4 2 1 1 OHudsn 2b 5 0 0 1 Harang p 2 0 0 0 Cashnr p 0 0 0 0 Coffey p 0 0 0 0 Thtchr p 0 0 0 0 Elbert p 0 0 0 0 JoBakr c 3 1 1 0 Lindlm p 0 0 0 0 Bartlett ss 4 1 1 0 Jansen p 0 0 0 0 Richrd p 2 0 0 0 DGordn ph 1 0 0 0 Denorfi ph-lf-cf 1 2 1 1 Totals 35 8 9 8 Totals 30 9 6 9 San Diego .......................... 000 300 302 — 8 Los Angeles....................... 004 400 001 — 9 Two outs when winning run scored. E—Bartlett (3). DP—San Diego 1. LOB—San Diego 7, Los Angeles 6. 2B—Alonso 2 (2), Hermida (1), Jo.Baker (1), Denorfia (1), Sellers (1), A.Ellis (1). HR—Venable (1), Headley (2), Kemp (3). SB— Maybin (3), M.Ellis (1). CS—Kemp (2). S—Harang. SF—Headley. IP H R ER BB SO San Diego Richard..................... 6 6 8 4 4 4 Brach ........................ 2 0 0 0 2 1 Cashner L,0-1 ......... 2⁄3 0 1 1 3 1 Thatcher ................... 0 0 0 0 1 0 Los Angeles Harang...................... 61⁄3 4 4 4 2 13 Coffey ....................... 0 2 2 2 0 0 Elbert H,2................. 2⁄3 1 0 0 1 1 Lindblom H,2 ........... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Jansen W,2-0 BS,1-1 ...................... 1 2 2 2 2 3 Coffey pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. Elbert pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Thatcher pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. HBP—by Coffey (Maybin). Umpires—Home, Angel Campos;First, CB Bucknor;Second, Dale Scott;Third, Bill Miller. T—3:14. A—31,601 (56,000).

Athletics 4, Mariners 0 Oakland

Seattle ab r h bi ab r h bi JWeeks 2b 4 1 1 1 Figgins lf 4 0 0 0 Crisp lf 4 0 1 1 Ackley 2b 4 0 1 0 Reddck rf 4 1 1 0 ISuzuki rf 4 0 1 0 Cespds cf 4 0 0 0 Smoak 1b 3 0 0 0 S.Smith dh 3 0 1 0 Seager 3b 4 0 0 0 KSuzuk c 3 0 1 1 JMontr dh 3 0 1 0 Barton 1b 3 1 1 0 MSndrs cf 3 0 0 0 Dnldsn 3b 4 0 1 0 Olivo c 2 0 0 0 Pnngtn ss 4 1 2 1 Ryan ss 2 0 0 0 Totals 33 4 9 4 Totals 29 0 3 0 Oakland.............................. 002 000 011 — 4 Seattle ................................ 000 000 000 — 0 DP—Oakland 1, Seattle 2. LOB—Oakland 7, Seattle 5. 2B—K.Suzuki (3), Pennington (3). HR— J.Weeks (2). SB—Reddick (1). SF—K.Suzuki. IP H R ER BB SO Oakland Colon W,2-1 ............ 7 3 0 0 1 5 Cook H,1 .................. 1 0 0 0 2 0 Balfour ...................... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Seattle F.Hernandez L,1-1.. 7 7 2 2 3 6 Luetge ...................... 0 1 1 0 0 0 Wilhelmsen .............. 1 0 0 0 1 1 Furbush .................... 1 1 1 1 0 0 Luetge pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. PB—Olivo. Umpires—Home, Tim Timmons;First, Jeff Kellogg;Second, Eric Cooper;Third, Marty Foster. T—3:02. A—46,026 (47,860).


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

➛ WWW.TIMESLEADER.COM/SPORTS

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 9C

AT PLAY

Six swimmers qualify for districts

SUBMITTED PHOTO

The Wilkes-Barre Family YMCA Swim Team had six swimmers qualify for the Pa. Eastern District Championships. Front row: Madison Weiss, 10, of Mountain Top; Colin Wroebeleski, 11, of Mountain Top; Christopher Cabonilas, 9, of Nanticoke. Back row: Margaret Walting, 9, of West Nanticoke; Corinne Smith, 12, of Mountain Top; coach Suzanne Youngblood; Adam Mahler, 11, of Mountain Top.

Moran to play field hockey at West Chester

Crestwood’s Alexa Moran has accepted an invitation to attend West Chester University and compete on its field hockey team. Seated, from left: Shell Moran, mother; Alexa Moran; Joe Moran, Father. Standing: Tony Mozeleski, athletic director; Bonnie Gregory, assistant principal; Elevetta Gemski, head coach; Patsy Moratori, assistant coach

GAR freshmen claim division basketball championship

The GAR freshman boys basketball team won the Wyoming Valley Conference Division III championship. First row, from left: Dajon Rush, Tino Altavilla, Chris Campbell, Garry Kroll, Antwone Easter, Lizander Torres, Saul Wilkins. Second row: Coach Lenny Martin, Justin Crosby, Raheem Twyman, Greg Skrepanak, Damon Lawrence, Toby Tighe, Oscar Barrientos, Tyler Winstead, Elisha McAllister, coach Jerry Altavilla.

Bogart taking game to East Stroudsburg

Hanover Area’s Austin Bogart, the school’s all-time leadering scorer and first all-state honoreee, will continue his soccer and academic career at Division II East Stroudsburg University. First row, from left: Caitlyn Bogart, sister; Kim Bogart, mother; Austin Bogart; Paul Bogart, father. Second row: Russ Davis, athletic director; Anthony Podczasy, superintendent; Daniel Malloy, assistant principal; John Nealon, head coach.

Local pair leads Summit Christian

Undefeated in the regular season, co-captains Tim Piatt, left, Lehman, and Robbie Hoffman, right, Shavertown, are shown with fellow senior Mike Butts, Scott Township. They led Summit Christian (Clarks Sumit) to a second-place finish in the NyPenn Christian League Tournament.

Crestwood soccer player Hannah Coffin will attend the University of Alabama-Birmingham on scholarship. Seated, from left: Megan Coffin, sister; Diane Coffin, mother; Hannah Coffin; Dan Coffin, father; Noah Coffin, brother. Standing: Bonnie Gregory, assistant principal; Tony Mozeleski, athletic director.

Dallas wins WVBL 7th grade title

The Dallas Middle School seventh grade girls basketball team captured the championship in the Wyoming Valley Basketball League. The team was 11-0, and defeated Wyoming Valley West in the final. Front: Lauren Dotter, Breezy Coolbaugh, Maria Bednar, Talia Kosierowki, Carley Perloff, Jackie Dotter, Samantha Delamater, Maddie Kelley. Back: Courtney Devens, Sara Lojewski, coach Schickram, coach Bove, league director John Leighton, Danielle Walsh, Miranda Roche, Paige Evans, Catherine Dillon. Absent from photo: Kaitlyn Pelcher.

Hampsey to play softball at Scranton

Tunkhannock High School’s Jamie Hampsey expressed her intentions to play Division III softball for the University of Scranton next year. Flanking Hampsey in the front row are parents Gabrielle and Ron Hampsey, and sister Molly. In the back row are assistant coaches Dan Inman and Bob Hegedty, head coach John Keefe, athletic director Kenny Janiszewski and assistant principal Todd Bosscher.

Nanticoke wins WVBL 6th grade crown

Coffin to play soccer at Alabama-Birmingham

Nanticoke’s sixth grade girls recently won the Wyoming Valley Basketball League championship, going 12-0 and defeating Dallas 35-17 in the title game. Members of the team, first row, from left: Miranda Bohn, Leah Mullery, Lauren Mullery. Second row: Coach Jay Bohn, Katie Butczynski, Codi Hornlein, Kendra Ryan, Kasey Radginski, Morgan Bienkowski, coach Jerry Mullery.

Seaberg to play football at King’s

Tunkhannock High School’s Luke Seaberg expressed his intentions to play Division III football for King’s College next fall. Pictured in the front row are sisters Kate and Emily, Luke and mom Stacey Seaberg. Standing: Head coach Rod Azar, grandparents Mary and Rich Seaberg, dad and assistant coach Rich Seaberg, athletic director Kenny Janiszewski and assistant principal Todd Bosscher.

Zdancewicz honored for 1,000th career point

Wyoming Valley West senior standout Tara Zdancewicz scored her 1,000th point against Dallas in a January win. Zdancewicz is pictured with her parents, Laura and Ron, coach Curt Lloyd, and her teammates after her historic basket.


CMYK PAGE 10C

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

➛ WWW.TIMESLEADER.COM/SPORTS

OUTDOORS The Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission is capturing spawning walleye in Lake Wallenpaupack as part of a fertilizing and hatching program.

TOM VENESKY OUTDOORS

Artifical baits worming way into fishing

I

RICK KOVAL/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission employees check a net for captured walleye on Lake Wallenpaupack on Wednesday.

Producing net results By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

Hatchery has grasp on species

PALMYRA TWP. – Bill Smoyer climbed to the front of his boat and peered into the net that had just been pulled from the cold Lake Wallenpaupack water. Inside were a myriad of fish species, including channel catfish, perch, rock bass and more than a dozen walleye, which Smoyer was hoping to see. Smoyer, who is a fish culturist with the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission, deposited the walleye into a tank on his boat where they would later be loaded into a truck. When the fish were removed, the net was re-tied and deposited back onto the bottom of the lake. “That’s why this job doesn’t get old,” Smoyer said. “You never know what you’re going to find when you pull a net up.” The PFBC is currently capturing spawning walleye in the lake and taking them back to the Pleasant Mount hatchery, where the eggs are fertilized and hatched. As of Wednesday, Smoyer had already captured 600 walleye – and the goal is to collect 20 million eggs each year. A large female walleye may contain 180,000 eggs, Smoyer said. The agency uses the eggs to restock lakes in the eastern half of the state. Lake Wallenpaupack receives an annual walleye stocking of five million fry and 100,000 fingerlings, which Smoyer said is much higher than what would reproduce naturally in the lake. To capture the walleye, Smoyer uses a Pennsylvania trap net, which is basically RICK KOVAL/FOR THE TIMES LEADER a funnel system of nets 100 feet long. Spawning walleye patrolling the shoreEggs are removed from a female walleye into a container where they will be

PLEASANT MOUNT – The concrete tanks and outdoor raceways that cover the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission’s hatchery in Pleasant Mount contain something of critical importance. It’s home to the future fishery of many lakes and ponds in the eastern half of Pennsylvania. The hatchery was built in 1903 and is one of the few owned by the PFBC that doesn’t raise brook, rainbow or brown trout for stocking. Instead, Pleasant Mount is used to raise a variety of cool and warmwater species used to augment fish populations in lakes and ponds, or re-establish numbers in places where populations are low. “The future for a lot of lakes starts right here,” said hatchery manager Tom Pekarski, who has been at Pleasant Mount since 1995. “This year, we’re raising chain pickerel and bluegills for Leeser and Possum lakes, both of which were drained down for dam work.” That future includes Tiger musky, chain pickerel, walleye, crappie, lake trout and channel catfish, all of which are raised at the hatchery. The beginning of the busy season at the hatchery begins in April with the

See NET, Page 11C

See HATCHERY, Page 11C

fertilized and moved to an incubator to hatch.

By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

OUTDOORS NOTES The Red Rock Chapter of the National Wild Turkey Federation will hold its annual JAKES event on Sunday, April 22, at the Wilkes Barre Twp. Settlement Camp in Thornhurst. The event runs from 8 a.m. until approximately 4 p.m. If you are looking for a fun day for kids to attend and learn about the many things there are to enjoy in the outdoors, this event is for them. For $15, a child gets a one-year membership and magazine delivered to their house, lunch and a t-shirt. For more information, call Chastity King at 472-1190. This event is limited to 150 children ages 5-17. Some of the classses offered may include archery, shotguns (12-17 yr. olds) .22s (5-11) turkey calling, trapping and fishing to name a few. The Stanley Cooper Sr. Chapter of Trout Unlimited will host the Wyoming Valley Fly Tyers on Tuesday at the VFW Anthracite Post 283 in Kingston. The board meeting will be held on May 1 at the post, and the monthly meeting will be held May 8. Featured speaker will be Jim “Coz” Costolnick, who will discuss the current

conditions of the Delaware River. Also, the guest speaker will be Joe Humphreys for the 25th Anniversary Meeting on May 8. This year’s adult fly fishing camp will be held May 20 at A&G Outfiiters in Dickson City. Cost is $25 for non-TU members and free to members. Call Jay Downs at 8146998 for more information. The youth fly fishing camp will be held June 9. Call Joe Ackourey at 574-5956. Stan Cooper Jr. will host a fly tying demonstration Saturday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the Fishin’ Musician Fly and Tackle Shop located inside the Merchants’ Village at 1201 Oak Street in Pittston. For more information, call 451-0248. Beltzville State Park will host a basic boating course instructed by the Pennsylvania Fish & Boat Commission on May 14 and 16. The course will be held from 6-10 p.m. each night. There is no charge for the course. All participants must pre-register and must attend both sessions. Call Beltzville State Park at 610-377-0045 to register. The basic boating course is designed to supply boaters with practical information

so they can make better informed decisions on the water. Instructors will provide students with information via a classroom setting to help them reduce the risk of injury and conflict on the water. Students who successfully complete the course may apply for a Boating Safety Education Certificate for a $10 fee. The certificate is required of all operators of personal watercraft (PWCs) or anyone born on or after January 1, 1982, who operate a motorboat of more than 25 horsepower. More information about this course or boating safety can be found by visiting the Commission’s website at www.fishandboat.com. Those clubs interested in hosting a junior pheasant hunt are encouraged to use the 26-page planning guide prepared by the Pennsylvania Game Commission and the Pennsylvania State Chapter of Pheasants Forever. The booklet offers a step-by-step guide on how to develop an organized junior pheasant hunt. The guide book includes: a sample timeline; suggested committees and assignments;

general event planning considerations; and several sample forms and news releases. It also includes event evaluation guides so clubs and organizations may consider changes for future junior pheasant hunts. To view the guide, go to the Game Commission’s website, put your cursor over “HUNT/TRAP” in the menu bar at the top of the page, click on “Hunting” in the drop-down menu listing, select the “Pheasant” in the “Small Game” listing, and choose “Junior Pheasant Hunt Planning Guide” in the Junior Pheasant Hunt section. Once a club schedules a junior hunt, it can submit the information for posting on the Game Commission’s on-line “Special Hunts” calendar, which enables those looking to participate in special hunts to locate and register on-line for an opportunity near them. Clubs that want to have their junior hunt advertised in the “Special Hunts” calendar should contact Samantha Pedder, Game Commission outreach coordinator, atsapedder@pa.gov, or at 717-787-4250 (ext. 3327).

t’s about time the worms got a little credit. Worms as in nightcrawlers, redworms, waxworms and mealworms. All have long been the go-to bait when it comes to trout fishing, and they all are fading away in popularity. Dan Cochran, owner of Grubco, a bait company in Ohio, said last week that his business for fishing has decreased to the point where zoos and the pet industry are now his biggest buyers of worms and grubs. Why? Because of artificial baits, like Power Bait. More anglers are grabbing a jar of the synthetic stuff rather than picking up the real deal. It’s a shame. I’m not advocating a ban on PowerBait, or even lures for that matter. But there’s just something about using grubs, minnows or worms that seems to fit with trout season. Especially when pursuing wild trout in a secluded mountain stream. My favorite bait for those small, wary trout is anything I find under a rock in the woods surrounding the stream. These trout weren’t raised in a hatchery and they never ate a pellet. Their diet consists of the insects that hatch in the stream and the worms and grubs that wash into the water. That’s all they eat, and that’s all I use. Nature is the best bait It’s an effective, easy way to fish when it comes to targeting wild trout. The places they inhabit can be tough to get to, and it’s much easier to maneuver through the woods carrying only an ultra-light rod. The tackle box is left at home and the bait is anything that I find under a rock or log. Casting a small redworm or grub into a wild trout stream just seems more fitting than lobbing a bright orange chunk of PowerBait into the water. Bait such as worms and mealworms are part of the tradition of trout fishing. Casting a hook baited with a redworm is what gives fishing its simplicity. After all, isn’t that a big reason why we fish – to get away from the complexities in life? A few bait shops in the area also reported that sales of worms and grubs have dropped significantly ever since Power Bait hit the market years ago. Apparently the scientifically engineered baits, infused with scent and flavor enhancers, are more appealing to anglers than the actual stuff that it is supposed to replicate. But why use a Power Bait Minnow, Leech or Grub when you can just use the real thing with real flavor enhancers built in? I’m not saying that the use of artificial bait is wrong, and I am fond of rubber worms for bass. I also saw many anglers using PowerBait on Saturday’s trout opener with amazing results. That’s fine. After all, anything that keeps people, especially kids, interested in fishing is a plus. Even if it’s a chunk of PowerBait. Still, it’s sad to see that it’s displacing a live bait industry that has long been the backbone of fishing. No matter how lifelike or flavor enhanced the artificial stuff is, and no matter how many fish one can catch with it, I’ll opt for the real thing when it comes to trout fishing. That means leaving the jars of synthetic bait on the shelf and buying the stuff that comes in a plastic cup full of sawdust, or, better yet, the things that are found in the dirt in your backyard.


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

S

P

O

R

T

S

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 11C

DEER ASSOCIATION MAKES DONATION

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Pitt gaining ground with rushing offense

he North Mountain, T Huckleberry Mountain, and Susquehanna Branches

of the Quality Deer Management Association (QDMA) recently donated whitetail deer educational materials to the Pennsylvania Game Commission Northeast Region Office in Dallas. The items will be used by Northeast Region Wildlife Conservation Officers as part of deer biology and deer management educational programs. Kneeling, from left: Robert Wagner, Buster Coolbaugh, Chris Denmon. Standing: Jack Sorber, William Williams, Josh Miller.

Strong showing in Blue-Gold game could mean more running under new coach. The Associated Press

SUBMITTED PHOTO

HATCHERY

SPECIES RAISED List of species raised at the Pleasant Mount hatchery in 2012 (Either fry, fingerling or adult): Black crappie – 53,800 Bluegill – 33,000 Brown bullhead – 5,800 Chain pickerel – 1,200 Channel catfish – 77,450 Fathead minnow – 23,000 Golden shiners – 23,700 Golden shiners (adult) – 170,900 Lake trout – 53,000 Largemouth bass – 50,150 Muskellunge – 62,930 Pumpkin seed – 18,500 Striped bass (fry and fingerling) – 7 million Striped hybrid bass – 20,400 Tiger musky – 36,050 Walleye – 638,080 White crappie – 15,800 Yellow perch (fry and fingerling) – 525,800

Continued from Page 10C

walleye spawn. Soon after, muskie eggs will come in to be incubated, and throughout the year the hatchery will hatch, raise and release 15 fish species. The hatchery has an average annual production of almost 26 million fry, fingerling and yearling fish. So how do they obtain enough feed to satisfy the appetites of so many fish? Well, at Pleasant Mount, they raise that as well. “We deal with so many species and it’s always changing. That’s the fun of it,” Pekarski said. “The easiest way to feed them is to raise minnows. But with some species, we use a prepared diet because we simply can’t raise enough minnows to feed the 30,000 muskies we have here.” Pekarski has seen the benefits that his hatchery provides to area lakes firsthand. Lake Wallenpaupack, for example, really didn’t have a population of channel cat-

NET Continued from Page 10C

line encounter the net and are guided down the funnel into a box at the end. Smoyer checks the nets daily and generally captures between 30 and 60 walleye each day. The agency has been collecting spawning walleye from Lake Wallenpaupack since the 1980s. Tom Pekarski, manager of the Pleasant Mount State Fish Hatchery, said the program has boosted walleye populations in the lake. “Most of the females we were spawning in the 1980s were 15 to 25 years old,” he said. “Since we began stocking, most are now 5 to 6 years old. The age distribution has improved dramatically since we started this in the 1980s, and without it there would probably be very little walleye in the lake.” It takes Smoyer about three hours to check a half dozen net traps. Once the fish are brought

Bill Smoyer determines the sex of a walleye at the Pleasant Mount hatchery in Wayne County.

fish until the hatchery began stocking them in 1982. “Through stocking, there’s a real nice population in the lake to-

day,” Pekarski said. “I wouldn’t be surprised to see the state record come out of there one day, especially with all the prey available.”

back to the hatchery, employees get to work determining the sex of the walleye and sorting them into tanks. Females are also separated between those that are “green,” meaning they have eggs that aren’t ready to be released, and “ripe,” those that are ready to release their eggs. The ripe females are placed in a tub with an anesthetic mixed into the water that knocks them out. They are then rinsed off and the eggs are then discharged into a pan, along with sperm from male walleyes. The contents of the pan are then slowly stirred with a turkey feather to make sure the sperm fertilizes the eggs. Pekarski said a turkey feather is used because it won’t damage the eggs. It takes about two minutes to fertilize the eggs, he said. Before the fertilized eggs are placed in incubation jars, they are mixed in a solution of water and Fuller’s earth to remove the natural adhesive on the eggs.

“The walleye is a broadcast spawner and they spread their eggs along the bottom where they stick to vegetation,” Pekarski said. “We need to remove that adhesive; otherwise they’ll just lump into one big cluster and die.” The eggs are then placed in incubation jars, where they will hatch in 21 days. The fry exit the jars through a screen on the top, and a trough gently guides them into a water-filled tank below. “In the wild it could take 35-40 days for the eggs to hatch,” Pekarski said. “In the hatchery, 70-75 percent of the eggs hatch. In the wild, it could be zero or 90 percent. There are so many variables that can affect the hatch in the lake, such as insects, wave action and water temperature.” Pekarski said the fry start swimming immediately after they hatch, and it’s critical to move them into larger tanks or to a holding pond outside within three to five days. “That’s when they want to eat,

Many local lakes and rivers will receive fish from Pleasant Mount this year: Frances Slocum – musky, walleye Harris Pond – golden shiners Lehigh River – musky North Branch of the Susquehanna River – musky Sylvan Lake - walleye

and they’re very cannibalistic,” Pekarski said. “If we don’t get them out, they’ll eat each other.” The fry in the tanks are released into lakes, such as Wallenpaupack, while those transported to a holding pond are allowed to reach the fingerling stage, which is about an inch in length. That takes 35 days, Pekarski said, and then they’re stocked as well. The adult male and female walleyes that were used for spawning are released back into Lake Wallenpaupack the next day. Those that didn’t release eggs are held for up to two weeks. If they still don’t produce eggs, Pekarski said, it’s assumed that they already spawned and they are released back into the lake. “I’ve been involved with spawning these fish for 30 years and I really do believe its improving walleye populations in our lakes,” Pekarski said. “We want this fishery to survive, and the stocking efforts are really proving to be a benefit.”

PRO SOCCER

Italian midfielder suffers cardiac arrest and dies during game MILAN — Livorno midfielder Piermario Morosini died Saturday after suffering cardiac arrest and collapsing during a Serie B match at Pescara. He was 25. Edoardo De Blasio, a cardiologist at Pescara’s Santo Spirito hospital, confirmed the death.

“Unfortunately he was already dead when he arrived at hospital,” De Blasio said. “He didn’t regain consciousness.” Morosini, who was on loan from Udinese, fell to the ground in the 31st minute of the match and tried unsuccessfully to get up before receiving medical attention on the field. A defibrilla-

2 0 12 P L ATIN U M $ 70 OFF $ GOLD 60 OFF S ILVER $ 50 OFF

C O L L EC T I O N

(Includes any vest and tie, pants, shirt, shoes, studs and cuff links)

CO L L ECTIO N

(Includes any vest and tie, pants, shirt, shoes, studs and cuff links)

A n y D e s ig n e r Tu xe d o s

Starting at$89.95,W ith Discount

C O L L EC TIO N

ON LY $59 98 TU X ED O JU N CTION ON L IN E B R O N ZE

C O L L EC TIO N

.COM

B a s ic - B la c k

56 W estEnd Road ( N ear Carey Ave.Bri dge) H anover Tw p. ,PA • 570-829-4999 Not valid with any other offer

“I just wanted to catch some fish and this is worth losing sleep over,” Cooper said as he watched his pole with his uncle, Alan Harvey. Despite warm, sunny weather, a lighter than usual crowd dotted the shoreline of Moon Lake for Saturday’s trout opener. Many anglers said the low turnout was due to the recent talk of closing the park. “I really think that hurt it this year,” said Dan Brzozowski of Plymouth. “I called just to make sure they were still stocking the lake.” The Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission stocked Moon Lake on April 5, and those anglers that did come out were reeling in a fish at a steady rate throughout the morning. Brzozowski’s daughter Emily, 11, caught her limit by 9:20 a.m. and his son Calvin, 8, had three. “The kids are having a blast,” Brzozowski said. “We got here at 6 a.m. and they’ve been excited ever since.” Earlier in the morning at Lily Lake, Hanover Township resident Glen Hulsizer stood on the shoreline with his two sons, Isiah, 7, and Glen, 9. They arrived at the lake at 7 a.m. and Hulsizer watched his sons’ excitement grow as the 8 a.m. start time approached. “I don’t mind the wait because it really builds the excitement,” he said. “The kids were really excited about their first opening day, and they were up and ready at 5 a.m.” The first hour of the season at Lily Lake was relatively slow, with only a handful of trout caught among the 35 boats that floated around the launch area. Waterways Conservation Officer John Cummings, who patrols parts of Luzerne and Columbia counties, said angler turnout was higher this season

27 Unique Holes One Breathtaking Course

LADIES GOLF LEAGUE

Fu b u , C a lvin K le in , Jo s e p h A b o u d

M on .- Thu rs . 12 - 8 • Fri. 11- 7 • S a t. 10 - 5 • S u n 12 - 4

weekend were canceled after his death was announced. Italian media reports said a car belonging to traffic police blocked the ambulance’s way into the stadium Saturday and a window had to be broken so the car could be moved. The match was abandoned with Livorno leading 2-0.

BLUE RIDGE TRAIL GOLF CLUB

P ro m Tu xe d o R e n ta l (Includes any backless vest and bow tie, pants, shirt, shoes, studs and cuff links) DesignerTuxedosStarting at$79.95,w ith Discount

( In c lu d e s FR EE ve s t & b o w tie )

tor was used on the player, and he was conscious when he was taken off on a stretcher. “He looked at me in the eyes when he was taken into the ambulance,” Pescara’s general manager, Danilo Iannascoli, told Sky Italia. “We are living through a drama.” All Italian matches for the

Weekday Special Tuesday thru Friday Play & Ride for Just

than last, but the trout weren’t hitting as well as expected. Cummings attriTo see additional buted the slow photos, visit start to the nice www.times weather. While leader.com clear, sunny skies may be good for anglers, he said, it’s not so great for fishing. “A front is supposed to move in later in the day and hopefully with that cloud cover the trout will relax and start feeding,” Cummings said. Still, Cummings wasn’t complaining about the nice weather, especially considering what anglers had to endure on last year’s opening day. “Last year we had sideways sleet. This year I’m in short sleeves,” he said. The clear skies and recent dry weather impacted angler success on many streams. Joe Wadzin, of Hunlock Creek, spent the morning fishing Harveys Creek along Route 29. By 9:30 a.m. he still had yet to get a hit. “The stream is the lowest I’ve ever seen it,” Wadzin said. “I’m not even seeing trout in the pools. “There were a lot of anglers here in the morning and they disappeared quick. I think a lot of it has to do with the stream conditions.” Cummings said because streams are low and clear, anglers have to change their tactics. On a typical opening day the streams are higher, he said, and anglers don’t have to worry as much about presentation and line weights. That wasn’t the case on Saturday. “I’m telling anglers to go to four-pound test fluorocarbon line,” he said. “If you use the heavier line in this low, clear water, the trout will see it.”

BOAT

UPHOLSTERY

$33.00

The Blue Chips Ladies Golf League at BLUE RIDGE TRAIL GOLF CLUB in Mountaintop will begin their Tuesday morning 18 hole golf league on Tuesday April 24 with opening day meeting and golf. The Blue Chips play every Tuesday morning from May to October. New lady members are welcome. For details call Janet Kresge 262-5283 or Sue Pohutski 474-0673

Must Present Coupon. One coupon per foursome. Cannot be used in tournaments or with any other promotion. ST

Monday Special $32 Senior Day Mon-Thurs $28 Ladies Day Thursday $28 Weekends After 1 p.m. $36 GPS CART INCLUDED 868-GOLF

260 Country Club Drive, Mountaintop 748840

The Associated Press

TROUT Continued from Page 1C

T H E B E N E FA C T O R S RICK KOVAL/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

PITTSBURGH — It looks like a strong running game followed new Pittsburgh football coach Paul Chryst from Wisconsin. Sophomore Isaac Bennett rushed for 121 yards on 23 carries Saturday during the Panthers’ Blue-Gold game, their final scrimmage of the spring season. It was a spring where the Panthers players had to acclimate to their fourth head coach in three seasons. After Dave Wannstedt left two seasons ago, Pitt hired Miami (Ohio) coach Mike Haywood, then fired him less than a month later following his arrest on a domestic battery charge. Pitt then hired Todd Graham from Tulsa and he stayed just one season before bolting to Arizona State. Chryst, who came to Pitt after seven seasons as Wisconsin’s offensive coordinator, said the players and new coaching staff worked well together this spring. “For the players, some of the anxiety that change presents, I

think that’s behind us now,” he said. “It’s about what we do as a group going forward.” An effective running game, a staple for the Badgers’ offense under Chryst, should help that growth. Three Pitt running backs — Bennett, redshirt junior E.J. Banks and sophomore Corey Davis — all averaged more than five yards a carry Saturday. The Panthers also expect leading rusher Ray Graham — out since October with a knee injury — back for the fall and will welcome incoming freshman Rushel Shell, Pennsylvania’s all-time leading high school rusher. There could be enough carries to go around. In 2010, Wisconsin had two running backs, John Clay and James White, who each rushed for more than 1,000 yards and a third, 2011 Heisman finalist Montee Ball, who rushed for 996 yards. Bennett said he’s excited about the offense’s potential. “It’s a lot of fun, because when you get tired, someone can come in and take over where you left off,” Bennett said. “It’s a lot of fun knowing that everyone is going to be really good.”

www.blueridgetrail.com

FREE PICKUP AND DELIVERY

PRE-SEASON SALE

SAVE 10% PONTOON BOAT SPECIAL • Navy Tops • Helm Seats • Side Curtains • Winter Covers • Stern Curtains • Boat Cushions • Cleaning, Waxing & Detailing

570-288-6459 Wyoming Ave., Kingston www.raycoeuro.com


CMYK PAGE 12C

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

W

E

A

T

H

E

R

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

NATIONAL FORECAST Mostly cloudy, showers

WEDNESDAY Sunny

73° 52°

85° 56°

THURSDAY Partly sunny, showers

65° 40°

TUESDAY Partly sunny, a.m. rain

MONDAY Partly sunny, p.m. rain

FRIDAY Partly sunny, rain

70° 37°

65° 40°

REGIONAL FORECAST Syracuse 74/58

Today’s high/ Tonight’s low

Poughkeepsie 78/55

New York City 76/65 Reading 79/59

Atlantic City 75/60

12 264 4605 5835 5767

*Index of fuel consumption, how far the day’s mean temperature was below 65 degrees.

Yesterday Month to date Normal month to date Year to date Normal year to date

Sun and Moon

Sunrise 6:23a 6:22a Moonrise Today 3:23a Tomorrow 3:52a

0.00” 0.32” 1.54” 5.70” 8.49”

47/34

Sunset 7:44p 7:45p Moonset 2:34p 3:36p

Today Tomorrow

New

First

Brandywine Valley

Delmarva/Ocean City

Highs: 65-81. Lows: 57-62. Isolated thunderstorms early; otherwise, partly cloudy.

April 21 April 29

Full

Last

May 5

May 12

We Are A Member Of

NECOAlliance

We Have Over 1 Billion Dollars in Buying Power with all Major Appliances & Consumer Electronics Brands, stocked in Over 1 Million Sq. Ft. of Warehouse Space...giving YOU

Unlimited Selections & Super Savings!

Forecasts, graphs and data ©2012

Weather Central, LP For more weather information go to:

www.timesleader.com National Weather Service

607-729-1597

City

Yesterday

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Buffalo Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Las Vegas Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis

47/29/.00 74/50/.00 75/38/.00 70/49/.00 65/37/.00 74/44/.00 67/54/.00 57/45/.05 80/72/.00 61/37/.00 63/46/.07 83/67/.00 83/75/.00 61/53/.65 58/44/.01 59/45/.00 80/69/2.05 68/48/.00 72/45/.00

City

Yesterday

Amsterdam Baghdad Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Dublin Frankfurt Hong Kong Jerusalem London

52/36/.00 86/55/.00 86/46/.00 55/30/.00 79/61/.00 48/32/.00 59/34/.00 84/77/.00 84/68/.00 54/41/.00

Today Tomorrow 47/34/sh 78/59/pc 81/67/pc 74/60/c 66/57/t 80/59/pc 81/58/t 73/58/t 77/53/t 51/35/rs 75/59/t 84/71/s 84/67/t 80/62/w 70/55/pc 65/52/s 80/72/pc 73/50/t 64/35/t

DDR5011

179

52/37/pc 91/70/pc 75/51/pc 55/41/pc 76/62/s 48/36/pc 58/34/pc 81/73/pc 85/52/t 50/31/c

42995

55” LED TV

• Internet ready - full 1080P • 3D ready • LED Backlit yields images with vibrant colors • Sony’s advanced processing system delivers astounding picture quality • Advanced motion control

KDL55HX729

$

189995

72/46/.00 79/52/.00 84/66/.00 77/44/.00 75/63/.00 65/44/1.18 76/65/.00 68/50/.01 63/38/.03 61/41/.00 79/53/1.36 53/39/.06 82/73/.00 59/53/.02 59/48/.00 58/38/.00 83/65/.00 62/44/.12 74/46/.00

47/35/pc 94/65/s 63/41/s 52/32/c 80/60/s 49/40/sh 50/31/pc 83/73/c 69/51/s 51/40/pc

City

Yesterday

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Paris Rio de Janeiro Riyadh Rome San Juan Tokyo Warsaw

77/50/.05 61/41/.00 55/32/.00 57/43/.00 88/77/.00 82/61/.00 57/52/.00 81/74/.65 55/48/.00 59/41/.08

HBF05EABB

599

$

95

affinity

3.26 cu. ft. Front Load Washer

• Advanced vibration control keeps even oversized loads balanced • TimeWise® technology ensures wash time equals dry time • Easily select options and cycles with the touch of a button • Designed for quiet operation • Stay-Fresh™ Door Seal • ENERGY STAR® Qualified

Shown on Optional Pedestal

Today Tomorrow 77/63/pc 83/64/s 83/71/pc 81/62/pc 75/48/t 69/41/sh 83/65/pc 75/51/s 80/62/pc 65/48/c 78/57/t 57/41/pc 83/59/t 65/54/s 62/49/pc 64/45/pc 86/63/pc 70/47/s 79/64/pc

78/64/s 77/51/t 82/67/t 85/62/s 73/49/pc 58/40/pc 85/64/pc 83/57/s 81/54/sh 60/47/sh 68/46/pc 62/47/pc 79/58/t 69/57/s 62/50/pc 57/49/sh 85/64/pc 78/51/s 85/63/pc

Today Tomorrow 77/50/pc 68/56/pc 58/42/c 53/34/c 89/73/sh 88/71/pc 63/51/sh 79/72/pc 65/50/s 57/46/sh

77/51/pc 76/56/sh 51/45/c 50/35/pc 79/69/t 92/70/pc 62/48/sh 79/73/pc 64/49/pc 55/37/sh

-Michelle Rotella

timesleaderautos.com m

• Comes complete with tap system, CO2 tank and regulator and cleaning kit • Dispenses, mini, 1/4 or 1/2 kegs • Can be converted to a beverage center

95

$

Yesterday

Myrtle Beach Nashville New Orleans Norfolk Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Ore. St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, DC

WORLD CITIES

Beer Dispenser

• HydroWave™ wash system - Longer, slower travel through water improves cleaning performance and is gentler on your clothes • PreciseFill with 5 water level selections - Washer will automatically measure the load size and add just the right amount of water, or choose from 5 pre-set water levels • 5 wash/spin speed combinations - Washer alternates speeds for great clothes care • 3-speed motor - Multiple speed options are designed to handle different types of wash loads • 6 wash/rinse temperatures

GTWN4250M

City

GET GRILLIN! See Voitek For A Great Selection Of Famous Weber Grills

Professional Installation Available Portable, Casement or Multi Room, We Got The Right Unit For You!

General Electric Energy Star® 3.6 cu. ft. Capacity Washer with Stainless Steel Drum

FREE DELIVERY

51/34/sh 77/60/pc 83/63/pc 86/61/s 66/42/sh 81/60/pc 62/42/pc 68/47/t 74/53/pc 59/38/pc 69/42/pc 84/71/s 78/63/t 69/46/sh 76/57/pc 69/53/s 81/71/pc 53/36/c 42/32/c

Today Tomorrow

PRE-SEASON SAVINGS p Name Air Conditioners Top

• Auto-Sensing Humidity Control • Removable Air Filter • Quiet Operation • Covers Approximately 3,000 Sq. Ft. • Direct Drain Option For Continuous Operation

$

80/72

Break out those shorts and Tshirts if you haven’t already! This week is going to be warm, with high temperatures in the 80s! A rumble of thunder is possible this morning as rain showers continue with mostly cloudy skies throughout the day. Highs will be in the mid-70s. Monday will start off partly cloudy. Rain will return toward the later afternoon, but we will have a high of 85! We could hear thunder again Tuesday morning as showers clear out. Wednesday will be beautiful with sunny skies and highs in the mid-60s. Rain returns Thursday and sticks around through the weekend with on-and-off showers.

Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snow flurries, i-ice.

50 Pint Dehumidifier with Auto De-Icer

TOP RATED!

84/67

84/71

Find the car you want from home. Our Buying Power Sa Saves You $$

78/59

53/36

The Finger Lakes

Susquehanna Stage Chg. Fld. Stg Wilkes-Barre 1.93 -0.06 22.0 Towanda 1.34 -0.01 21.0 Lehigh Bethlehem 3.07 0.75 16.0 Delaware Port Jervis 2.64 -0.04 18.0

79/64

77/53

66/43

Highs: 66-76. Lows: 53-58. Scattered thunderstorms will be possible during the morning hours.

River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.

76/65

65/52

ALMANAC Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Int’l Airport

Precipitation

75/59

72/46

51/35

Highs: 78-79. Lows: 61-64. Scattered thunderstorms will be possible during the morning hours.

Philadelphia 79/67

Heating Degree Days*

64/50

Highs: 77-80. Lows: 56-59. Scattered thunderstorms will be possible during the morning hours.

Wilkes-Barre 78/59

Harrisburg 79/58

Yesterday Month to date Year to date Last year to date Normal year to date

81/58

60° 40°

Highs: 65-78. Lows: 55-60. Scattered thunderstorms will be possible during the morning hours.

Pottsville 74/56

69/36 59/38 84 in 1968 22 in 1950

64/35

The Jersey Shore

Scranton 79/58

Yesterday Average Record High Record Low

51/31

The Poconos

Albany 75/55

Towanda 76/57

Temperatures

64/45

TODAY’S SUMMARY

Binghamton 76/56

State College 75/55

SATURDAY Clouds and rain

FAFW3801LW

52995

$

Get Weber Quality Starting At

$

4411001LP

39995

2 20.7 cu. ft. Frost Free Refrigerator • Adjustable Glass Shelves • 2 Humidity Controlled Crispers • Glass Crisper Cover • On Rollers for Easy Movement

FREE DELIVERY

RRTG21PABW

49995

$

Gas or Electric Range 5 5.0 Cu. Ft. Gas Range FFFGF3023LW • 4 Sealed Burners • Quick Boil Burners • Ready Select Controls 5.3 5 Cu. Ft. Electric Range FFEF3018LW F • 4 Radiant Elements • Even Bake Technology • Store-More Storage Drawer

after $40 Mail-In rebate

$

54995

18 Months No Interest Sony Bravia HDTVs On purchases of $999 or more on select Sony BRAVIA® HDTVs, Internet TVs and other home entertainment product purchases. Offer ends 10/31/12

TV AND APPLIANCES 639 Wyoming Avenue, Kingston • 287-9631 1313 Wyoming Avenue, Exeter • 655-8801 Visit us on the web at www.voitektv.com

196600

73° 53°

TODAY

NATIONAL FORECAST: An outbreak of strong to severe thunderstorms will be possible today along a powerful cold front extending from the Upper Midwest and Mid-Mississippi Valley to the southern Plains. Large hail, damaging winds and tornadoes will all be possible with these storms, especially across the Upper Midwest. Rain and snow will be possible across much of the Rockies.


CMYK

BUSINESS timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

Winds of change bear down on Harley plants By RICK BARRETT Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

YORK — For a look at what’s to come for Harley-Davidson Inc., the best place to start is the company’s largest motorcycle factory, where change has been described as “leaning into a hurricane.” Where 41 buildings once stood on 232 acres, there’s now an enormous vacant lot. Gone are about half of the 2,300 jobs that, for decades, supported families in this blue-collar town. The old buildings, some of them dating back to World War II, were demolished as Harley-Davidson wiped the slate clean and developed a new manufacturing system that’s the template for

several hundred jobs but will lower costs and make the plants more responsive to changes in the motorcycle marketplace. The York transformation is the most tangible manifestation so far of Chief Executive Officer Keith Wandell’s strategy for putting Milwaukee-based Harley-Davidson on a path to sustained MCT PHOTO profitability. Hired from Johnson ConChanges will be coming to Harleytrols Inc. in 2009, Wandell has said that Davidson plants in Wisconsin and over time Harley management gave Kansas City, Mo. away the keys to the company, leading to runaway costs and York’s patchwork ley wants to replicate at all of its facto- 41-building campus. The “New Factory York” is now about ries, including Menomonee Falls, Wis., and Tomahawk, Wis., where the new manufacturing system will eliminate See HARLEY, Page 2D

changes coming to Harley plants in Wisconsin and Kansas City, Mo. “It’s like Cortez burning the ships when he reached the New World. There’s no going back to what this factory used to represent,” said York General Manager Ed Magee, who once managed the now-closed Capitol Drive plant in Milwaukee. York’s new factory, housed in one building, is much smaller than the old sprawling campus patched together over decades. But this year it will assemble more bikes than were built in the old system two years ago. One motorcycle rolls off the assembly line here every 89 seconds. York is a model of efficiency that Har-

U.S. labor force faces slowdown

By PETER WHORISKEY The Washington Post

If demography is destiny, the U.S. economy may be in the midst of a decades-long slowdown. The U.S. labor force is growing at about half the rate it was 20 years ago. According to recent projections by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it will continue to expand at a slightly lower pace through 2020. Slower growth in the number of workers tends to hold back gross domestic product and employment, economists say. And that makes it less likely that the economy will pick up steam at the rate it did in previous recessions. These changes in the labor force “imply that future recessions will be deeper, and will have slower recoveries, than historically has been the case,” according to a paper issued last month by James H. Stock of Harvard University and Mark W. Watson of Princeton University. Their research shows that as much as half of the relative slowness of the recent recovery may be attributable to the fact that the growth of the U.S. labor force has declined. “The demographics turn out to be a very important factor,” Stock said in an interview. The slower growth in the labor force arises from two factors, according to the BLS. First, the U.S. population is growing more slowly. Second, the percentage of Americans working or seeking work will continue to decline as the population ages. What exactly stalled the recovery from the recent recession and what might still be holding it back continue to be a matter of debate among economists and politicians. The doddering nature of the recovery has been blamed on a variety of factors: the financial nature of the crisis, the fact that millions of homeowners are struggling with mortgage debt, the size of the government stimulus, as well as spiking gas prices, the Japanese earthquake and the European banking troubles. The role of demographics has been relatively unexplored, and in contrast to those other causes, the decline in the labor force will probably be a perSee LABOR, Page 2D

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

For 30 years, Marilyn Stanks, owner of Avenue Travel, Kingston, has been booking travel destinations for her customers.

RETURN TRIP

Local travel agents see boost in business By JOE DOLINSKY

T

Times Leader intern

ravelers booking getaways through Avenue Travel owner Marilyn Stanks know they can have peace of mind when enlisting the aid of the 30-year trip planning veteran. • They simply tell her where they want to go and for how much, and leave it up to

Stanks to get them there. • Stanks started her travel agency in Kingston nearly 30 years ago

and in that time has coordinated honeymoons, anniversary trips, spring breaks and weekend getaways for thousands of eager travelers. Planning travel for that long, she’s also seen just as many trends sent off into the sunset. One recent departure has been from do-it-yourself online trip planning. Weary of point-and-click discount travel websites such as Hotwire and Orbitz, many vacationers have been gradually returning to traditional travel agents. “The Internet is a great source of information,” Stanks said. “But a mis-

conception is that you need it to get the best deals when it comes to travel and that’s just not the case.” According to a February 2011 report from the American Society of Travel Agents, 44 percent of agencies surveyed in 2010 saw an increase in clients from the previous year, with 94 percent of agents polled expecting to make profits in 2012. Beth Savage, owner of Dallasbased Vacation Station Tours and Travel, has seen a recent spike in cli-

entele and believes internet shoppers are beginning to realize the pitfalls of booking through a website. “I just don’t think people have the time to waste,” Savage said. She added that a personal touch is what’s most comforting to her customers. “People prefer that real, personalized service,” she said. Discount travel websites boast low See TRAVEL, Page 2D

Your next visit to Steamtown National Park is on the house THE WEATHER IS warming and outdoor adventure could be in store. National Parks throughout the nation are waiving most fees beginning Saturday through April 29 to celebrate National Park Week. Steamtown National Historic site in Scranton is among those participating in the promotion. The fee waiver includes entrance fees, commercial tour fees and transportation fees. For a complete list of participating parks, go to www.nps.gov/findapark/feefreeparksbystate.htm If shopping is more your type of leisure activity, head to the Poconos and visit The Crossings premium Outlets in Tannersville. Today is the

ANDREW M. SEDER

shared/images/32212254732/ 32212254732_20120410192972.jpg • Arby’s is offering free curly fries STEALS & DEALS on Tuesday to celebrate (help you cope with) Tax Day. You will need to visit Arby’s Facebook page — last day of their VIP Shopper Club www.facebook.com/arbys — to print Exclusive Event weekend. Members a coupon. Valid at participating Arof the VIP Shopper Club will enjoy exclusive savings, free gifts at partici- by’s locations only so check the local ones to make sure the coupon will pating stores and can enter to win a work. $250 outlets gift card. If you’ve never tasted a LARABAR, The club is free and easy to join. you’re missing out. The healthy New members can register online at www.premiumoutlets.com/vip. Exist- snack bars are tasty and usually priced between $1 and $1.50. There’s ing members can log into The VIP a sweepstakes this month where you Lounge to download the VIP event could win free bars, coupons for free savings sheet and entry form. Hungry, here are two deals for local bars and more. Go to www.larabar.com/sweepeateries: stakes/larabar-very-large-sweepstakes •Head to Smokey Bones with this $5 off a $15 order coupon that’s good and enter for a chance to win one of today only: smokeybones.fbmta.com/ 590 prizes. This sweepstake ends

April 30. Many Steals & Deals readers have asked me to keep them in the loop whenever another week of Walgreens Register Rewards program multiple rebate offers were back. They’re back. Among the products that you will buy and get the full purchase price back via a coupon printed on your receipt are: Nasal Ease Allergy Relief, Similasan Nasal Allergy Relief spray, iCool +D Menopause Relief Tablets and Pepsi Next. See the store circular for complete details and sizes that are part of the deal. Andrew M. Seder, a Times Leader staff writer, may be reached at 570-829-7269. If you know of any local steals or deals, send them to aseder@timesleader.com. And follow him on Twitter @TLAndrewSeder

SECTION

D

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

PERSONAL FINANCE EILEEN AMBROSE

Young workers err by skipping IRA investment GIVE ANYONE AGE 40 and older a time machine and they would likely go back to their early 20s — to open an IRA. That’s because by 40, many of us have learned the miracle of compound earnings over time. We kick ourselves for not socking away even tiny sums in a tax-sheltered individual retirement account when we were younger. Consider the math: A 22-year-old who invests $100 a month in an IRA for 10 years and then stops will end up with more money at age 65 then a 32-year-old who saves $100 a month in an IRA for 33 years. Baltimore’s T. Rowe Price says the first investor, assuming a 7 percent annual return, would accumulate $174,217; the other winds up with $155,307. That’s why Price’s recent survey of young investors is disappointing. The investment firm polled 860 adults age 21 to 50 who have at least one investment account, so these are folks already engaged in investing. According to Price, just 45 percent of these Gen X and Gen Y investors say they would contribute to an IRA for the 2011 tax year, down from 71 percent who invested in an IRA the year before. And if these investors had a spare $5,000 — the maximum amount those under 50 can contribute yearly to an IRA — only 16 percent say they would put the money into the account. More than half would pay off debt or put it in a rainy day fund. Not bad choices, but again, young investors need to take advantage of their most valuable asset — time. And that’s where an IRA can help. You can open an IRA with an investment firm, and you’ll have a greater choice of investments than the typical 401(k). This money is meant for your retirement, so you’ll generally have to pay a penalty if you cash out early, similar to the 401(k). There are two kinds of IRAs. Depending on your income, your contributions to a traditional IRA could be tax-deductible. And when you pull money out in retirement, it will be taxed as regular income. With a Roth — available to those within certain income limits — you don’t get an upfront deduction. But withdrawals, which include all the money you earned over the years, won’t be taxed in retirement. A Roth is the preferred IRA for younger investors, who are likely to be in a higher tax bracket when they retire. The Roth is considered so beneficial for young investors that many financial bloggers last month participated in the Roth IRA Movement, a day in which they wrote about the account to raise its profile. Of course, there is no time machine that will allow today’s twentysomethings a do-over in the future. If you have extra dollars after participating in a 401(k) or you don’t have a retirement plan at work, contribute to an IRA. You have until the tax deadline — April 17 this year — to make a contribution for the 2011 tax year. I’m not the only one nagging young investors to stash money in an IRA. Jeff Rose is a 34-year-old financial planner in Illinois and the creator of the Roth IRA Movement. Rose says he came up with the idea after speaking to 50 or so college seniors at his alma mater last month. He asked how many had ever heard of a Roth. “Not a single one of them raised their hand,” Rose says. He says that depressed him, figuring that by the time they learned about a Roth they could be well into their 30s and have lost valuable investing years. Rose, who blogs on personal finance, reached out to fellow bloggers to suggest they raise awareness by writing about the benefits of the Roth on the same day, March 27. More than 140 bloggers and media outlets did so last week, Rose said, and he hopes to make this an annual event. Young investors should try to make investing in an IRA an annual event, too. Eileen Ambrose is a personal finance columnist at the Baltimore Sun.


CMYK PAGE 2D

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

B

U

S

CONVENIENCE CORNER EXPANDS

I

N

E

S

S

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

CORPORATE LADDER JACOBI CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LLC

Convenience Corner, at 395 S. Main Plaza, Wilkes-Barre, recently held a ribbon-cutting to celebrate the expansion into a hoagie and lunch market. Mbathio Holloway owns the business that carries snacks, beverages and baked goods.The store is open every day; call 208-4774. From left: Ed Kowalczyk, Wilkes University SBDC; Eliza Njie, family member; Sheik Njie, family member; Jainaba Fye; owner Mbathio Holloway; Yorro K. Sanyang, chairman of the African community, and Bruce Krell, representing Cong. Lou Barletta’s office.

OFFICE COACH

Try to ignore co-worker’s moodiness

By MARIE G. MCINTYRE McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Q: Ever since I came to work here a year ago, I have gotten nothing but attitude from the woman in the next cubicle. I keep trying to be nice to “Mandy,” but she refuses to develop any kind of relationship with me. Sometimes she doesn’t speak to me at all. Mandy seems to resent the fact that I have a more responsible job than she does. After my position was upgraded, she didn’t talk to me for several days. Whenever I tell her that she has made a mistake, she completely ignores me. I am constantly cleaning up her errors, which takes time away from my own work. Our supervisor told us that we needed to work on our communication problem, but that didn’t help at all. I believe he’s getting tired of Mandy’s behavior, although he doesn’t seem to be doing anything about it. I have considered transferring to another department, but I don’t see why I should be the one to leave. This situation has me ready to explode, but I know that getting

BUSINESS AGENDA BACK MOUNTAIN BUSINESS & COMMUNITY EXPO: Wednesday, 4-7 p.m., Insalaco Hall, Misericordia University, Dallas. Local businesses and organizations will have tables and booths; door prizes, refreshments provided by Gerrity’s Supermarkets and Fire and Ice restaurant. Free to the business community and general public. For more information, call 675-9380 or log on to www.BackMountainChamber.org. HAZLETON CHAMBER NETWORKING MIXER: Wednesday, 5-7:30 p.m., Mountain Valley Golf Course, 1021 Brockton Road, Barnesville. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres, beer and wine. Door prizes including a corpo-

HARLEY Continued from Page 1D

two years ahead of the Wisconsin plants in implementing Harley’s new manufacturing system. Changes are coming to Wisconsin this spring with labor contracts that went into effect April 1, giving the company more flexibility with the workforce. The Milwaukee contracts — similar to York’s — include higher health care contributions from workers and a seven-year wage freeze, although there is the possibility of pay raises. They also call for the use of seasonal, or “casual,” employees who are not entitled to medical or retirement benefits and receive less pay for the same work done by regular employees. Casual employees in Milwaukee, while still unionized, are paid about $16.80 to $26 per hour, depending on their job description. Pay for full-time work-

angry will only make me look bad. What should I do? A: Since this unpleasant woman obviously doesn’t want a relationship with you, I think you should just go about your work and leave her alone to sulk in silence. When you allow yourself to get bent out of shape over Mandy’s frosty demeanor, you are giving her way too much power to affect your life. Unless monitoring Mandy is part of your job, you should also stop pointing out her mistakes. By acting like her supervisor, you are overstepping your boundaries and increasing her resentment. More importantly, if you continue to fix her errors, management will never learn about her shortcomings. While your boss may indeed be growing tired of Mandy’s moodiness, you would be wise to note that he has attributed this “communication problem” to both of you. If you are unable to get a grip on your emotional reactions, he may soon tire of your attitude as well. Q: I have been told that if my

rate golf membership at Mountain Valley and custom designed websites. Reservation required; call 455-1509 or email jferry@hazletonchamber.org. PREVENTING EMPLOYEE THEFT: April 24, 9 a.m.-noon, Greater Hazleton Chamber of Commerce, 20 W. Broad St., Hazleton. Tabitha McCormick, C.P.A. and Certified Fraud Examiner will discuss how and why employees commit fraud on a business, the indicators that fraud is taking place and simple steps to prevent fraud. $25 members for Greater Hazleon Chamber members; non-members $30, includes materials and Continental breakfast. Reservations required; call 455-1509 or email jferry@hazletonchamber.org.

performance does not improve, I will be fired. This company is not a good fit for me, so I want to start looking for another job while I’m still employed. However, I don’t know what to say when interviewers ask why I want to leave my present position. What should I tell them? A: Because there can be many different honest answers to the same question, you need to prepare a truthful response that does not raise any red flags. Instead of describing your disappointing experience with your current company, explain why you are attracted to the organization where you are interviewing. This means, of course, that you must do your homework, research potential employers, and determine what interests you about each one. Managers are always impressed with applicants who appear genuinely excited about coming to work for them. Marie G. McIntyre is a workplace coach and the author of “Secrets to Winning at Office Politics.” Send in questions and get free coaching tips at http://www.yourofficecoach.com.

Drive, Drums. State Sen. John Yudichak will be the featured speaker. $20 members for Greater Hazleon Chamber members; non-members $25. Reservations required; call 455-1509 or email jferry@hazletonchamber.org. EMPLOYMENT EXPO 2012: April 26, 1 1 a.m.-4 p.m., Mohegan Sun Arena at Casey Plaza, Highland Park Blvd., Wilkes-Barre Twp. Sponsored by the Wilkes-Barre, Hazleton, Pittston, Scranton, Carbondale and Wayne County Chambers of Commerce and the Lackawanna and Luzerne/ Schuylkill County Workforce Investment Boards. For information, call 342-771 1, ext. 130.

RED CARPET BREAKFAST: April 25, 7:45-9 a.m., Keystone Job Corps Center, 235 W. Foothills

GREATER W-B CHAMBER NETWORKING MIXER: April 26, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Woodlands Inn & Resort, Plains Township. For information, call 763-9887.

ers ranges from about $30.50 to $38 per hour; workers recalled from layoff sometimes come back at a second-tier, lower wage. Currently, all union employees are paid at or above their wage scale, according to Harley, which says the jobs are among the best-paying positions in manufacturing in York and Milwaukee. The York factory now has about 270 casual employees supplementing the reduced fulltime workforce. “We get to be the poster child for change,” Magee said. “I didn’t want my resume to say I impacted 1,000 families. That is tough to go home with. But this factory now has a future, along with the rest of its suppliers, and it didn’t have that before.” The changes are especially evident because of the demolished buildings where Harley once made motorcycle parts that now are outsourced to other companies. But they’re also dra-

matic inside the newer 650,000square-foot factory that was formerly used just to assemble Harley’s Softail motorcycles. Where partially assembled bikes once crawled along a conveyor belt with overhead hooks, and parts were stacked to the ceiling, there’s now a production line with more than 100 robotic smart carts traveling on five rows of thin magnetic tape. The factory’s 62 job classifications have been slashed to five, and the number of salaried positions has been cut in half to 150 people. Blue-collar employees now work in teams of six to 14 people and have more responsibility for making their own decisions. One team, led by an hourly wage worker, implemented 124 changes that saved the company $100,000 a year and made the work area safer. “All of those ideas were there before. We just did not have a mechanism to capture and implement them,” Magee said.

April Piccotti, Wilkes-Barre, has been named chief operating officer. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Dickinson College. Rodman C. Azar, Clarks Summit, has joined the firm as a maPiccotti naging director. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Columbia University. Guthrie “Mitch” Mitchell Jr., Dallas, has Azar joined as a client services associate. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Lehigh University and is on track to earn his MBA from Wilkes Mitchell University in May 2012. Jeffrey P. Clemente, Dallas, joined as a client services analyst. Clemente earned his bachelor’s Clemente degree in finance with a minor in economics from St. Joseph’s University. Meredith Alexis, Hanover Township, has been hired as an adminisAlexis trative assistant. She earned her bachelor’s degree in business administration from James Madison University.

TMG HEALTH Christopher J. Haran has been promoted to senior vice president and chief information officer. Haran holds a master’s degree in management science and a bachelor’s degree in Haran biology with a minor in education from Stony Brook University, New York. He also attended managing information systems resources at Harvard University.

SUPREME COURT OF PENNSYLVANIA David E. Schwager has been appointed by the Disciplinary Board to serve for a three-year term. Schwager received his J.D. from The Dickinson School of Law of Pennsylvania State University and his A.B. from Lafayette Schwager College. He is admitted to practice law in the United States District Courts for the Middle and Eastern Districts of Pennsylvania, the United States Court of Appeals for the third circuit, and the United States Supreme Court.

HONORS & AWARDS Patrick Sandone, founder and president of Net Driven, Scranton, will be honored by the Ben Franklin Technology Partners of Northeastern Pennsylvania as the company that has best demonstrated successful Ben Franklin business incubation. Kenneth Volet, chief executive officer, and Elisa Grandizio, chief administrative officer for RantNetwok, Inc., Bloomsburg, will be honored by the Ben Franklin Technology Partners of Northeastern Pennsylvania as the company that best demonstrates the commercialization of a unique, innovative product that creatively and effectively meets a market need. Submit announcements of business honors and awards to Business Awards by email to tlbusiness@timesleader.com; by mail to 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250; or by fax to (570) 829-5537. Photos in jpg format may be attached to email.

AMANDA HRYCYNA/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Avenue Travel owner Marilyn Stanks talks with a customer about booking a vacation.

TRAVEL Continued from Page 1D

prices on airfare, hotels, car rentals and vacation packages by selling unsold travel inventory at cut-rate prices. “What most customers don’t realize is that those unsold inventories are probably unsold for a reason,” Stanks said. Additionally, most online bookings are final and cannot be cancelled, refunded, changed, exchanged or transferred. A client’s account will be charged for the total price shown, regardless of whether the reservation is used. Low-cost insurance programs are available for those wishing to protect themselves against medical emergencies, strikes, natural disasters and weather emergencies -- for an extra fee. Agents like Stanks and Savage have the ability to act as a go-between, protecting the best interests of their clients against the unpredictability of chance. “If you’re planning an anniversary or destination wedding, you want it to go off without a hitch,” Savage said. If a sudden snowstorm creeps in hours before a client’s flight, most agents have the connections at airlines to bypass customer service queues and talk directly to someone who can confirm departure times. If a client arrives at a destination to pouring rain and decides a convertible-top rental car might not be the best way to go, with a quick phone call an agent can have the new set of keys waiting at the front desk when their customer arrives. Most agents can also offer something else: multiple choices for the same destination. “There are literally tons of op-

LABOR Continued from Page 1D

sistent feature of the U.S. economy for the foreseeable future. In the mid-1980s, the labor force — defined as the number of people working or seeking work — was growing at about 1.7 percent per year, according to Stock and Watson’s calculations. By the mid-2000s, the growth was just about half that, or 0.9 percent. The growth, moreover, is anticipated to slow even more in the years to come. In labor force estimates published by the BLS, annual growth of the labor force shrinks to less than 0.6 percent by the end of the decade. One of the primary causes for the decline of labor force growth is the retirement of the giant baby-boom generation. Last year, the first baby boomers, born in 1946, reached 65, the traditional age of retirement. Second, through the 1990s, a rapid rise in the percentage of women working led to a surge in the size of the labor force. But once the percentage of women in the labor force reached about 60 percent, it stopped climbing, and economists see little immediate sign that it is likely to rise again. The labor-force participation of women “is as high as it has ever been,” said Claudia Goldin, a Harvard economics professor who has studied the issue. And “it has not gone higher in the last 20 years.” But the high numbers of women attaining bachelor’s degrees suggest to some that there is a large group of women

“I don’t feel I’m selling travel. I’m sharing my own experiences to help someone make a good decision.” Marilyn Stanks Avenue Travel owner

tions,” Stanks said. “I might be able to pricematch. I might be able to give families three or four different deals for the same package,” she said. “I might get 120 emails about deals and special packages for one location,” she said. And if Stanks, an avid traveler, hasn’t been to a location herself – she has a Rolodex full of contacts that have. “I don’t feel I’m selling travel,” Stanks said. “I’m sharing my own experiences to help someone make a good decision.” Stanks said the Internet doesn’t compare when it comes to having experienced years of sending clients to a destination. “Travel agents educate people. That’s a big difference,” she said. Sometimes it’s the littlest things an agent can offer that make the biggest difference. Stanks recalls when she wanted to do something special for a client she sent to the Hawaiian island of Maui for a birthday getaway. As her client was en route, Stanks called ahead and had a tray of cupcakes delivered to her room. Call it a sweet gesture or a gesture of sweets. Either way, it’s something a website can’t offer. “I want the experiences of my clients to be memorable ones, and anything I can do to make that happen is my job,” Stanks said.

Slower growth in the number of workers tends to hold back gross domestic product and employment, economists say. who could be enticed into joining the workforce. In 2010, 36 percent of women ages 25 to 29 had bachelor’s degrees, compared with 28 percent of men of the same age group. The labor force participation rate among men 25 and older, meanwhile, has been in a decline, and stands at 73 percent. Assuming that the growth of the labor force continues to decline as expected, there are important ramifications for the economy. For starters, when the labor force grows more slowly, the growth in the number of jobs and the growth of GDP is unlikely to be as robust as it otherwise would be, economists said. “In the end, what an economy depends upon is how many bodies you have,” said Anthony Carnevale, an economist and director of the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce. Carnevale added that if the diagnosis for what ails the economy is the size and quality of the workforce, that may be good news, at least compared with the theory that the biggest problem is foreign competition. “To the extent this is a domestic demographic problem, it’s more in our control,” he said. “We can’t blame the Chinese for the quality and quantity of our domestic labor force.”


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

B

U

S

I

N

E

S

S

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 3D

MarketPulse THE LONG RUN Consider yourself a long-term investor? You may want to focus on pharmaceutical stocks and steer clear of banks. Researchers from Harvard Business School combed through more than 150,000 transcripts of earnings conference calls. They wanted to see whether CEOs used phrases that emphasize long- or short-term planning. They found that the vocabulary of pharmaceutical and apparel CEOs tended to be more long-term oriented, while electronic equipment companies and banks were more short term. The researchers also found that short-term oriented companies had more volatile stocks.

TRASHED The business of trash The economic recovery may be 1Q growth over last year, percent underway, but it’s not yet showing trash hauled price increase itself at the dump. Haulers dumped 0.3 percent less stuff in U.S. landNortheast fills in the first quarter than a year ago, according to Wedbush analyst Al Kaschalk. One of the main South culprits is the still-weak housing market. In February, crews started construction on only about 30 perMidwest cent of the number of homes that they did during 2006. That means less construction and demolition West waste. One bright spot for Republic Services (RSG) and other publicly traded waste companies is National average that prices are rising to haul trash: -2% -1 0 1 2 They were up 1.8 percent last quarter, Wedbush says. Source: Wedbush

IT ALL MATTERS Bond investors took notice when Standard & Poor’s upgraded Macy’s credit rating on Tuesday: It meant S&P believes Macy’s bondholders are more likely to get their money back. But stockholders should also care. The upgrade means Macy’s can borrow more cheaply, and can use the cash which would have gone to interest, on stock buybacks instead. Citi analyst Deborah Weinswig expects Macy’s to buy $1.3 billion of its stock in 2012, up from an estimate of $1 billion. A bigger buyback means shareholders will get a larger proportion of the company’s earnings.

Phrases that imply a short-term view: ew: •Weeks •Short run •Latter half of the year Phrases that imply a long-term view: •Years •Long run •Trend Source: “Short-termism, Investors Clientele, and Firm Risk” by Francois Brochet, Maria Loumioti and George Serafeim

AP

Big Big opportnities opportunities InsiderQ&A

Eric Marshall Who he is: Co-manager of Hodges Small Cap fund (HDPSX) His track record: The small-cap fund has returned an annualized 34 percent over the last three years; better than 98 percent of similar funds What he suggests: Look to smaller stocks for growth

Small stocks have lagged behind the rest of the market in 2012, but Eric Marshall still sees big opportunities for them. Fewer financial analysts follow small-cap companies, which means there are more chances to find overlooked winners. Aren’t small-caps more volatile historically than large stocks? Small-cap stocks tend to be in the areas of the market that are growing the most. They tend to involve companies that are more cyclical and maybe have a little more leverage to what’s going on in the economy. That can be good in good times and bad in bad times. But because they carry a higher risk, they carry a higher reward over the long run. If you’re a long-term investor with a four- or five-year time horizon, it makes sense to have a portion of your portfolio exposed to small-caps, because it’s where you find the opportunity for growth. Can you give an example? During the recession, everyone thought you didn’t want to be in retail stocks. But there were pockets, like at A.T. Cross (ATX). They own the Cross pen business and a sunglass brand called Costa that grew double digits during the recession. They have a unique lens technology and sell for over $200 per pair. We’re in an environment where the economy is improving, but it’s improving at a very slow pace. In this environment, small-caps can represent pockets of growth, either in a niche sector or through a company that’s gaining market share. Like Tempur-Pedic (TPX). Here’s a company that just went through the worst housing crisis, and furniture companies are very tied to the housing market. Also, who’s going to go out and buy a $2,000 mattress when the unemployment rate is 10 percent? But somehow TempurPedic was able to see decent growth, because they had only 2 percent of the global market share. If you can go from 2 percent to 3 or 4 percent, you can offset whatever slow economic growth is out there. Isn’t a drawback of small-cap stocks that they generally don’t pay dividends? There are some out there. Cinemark (CNK) has a 3.7 percent yield. The funny thing about the movie business is if people don’t go for a long time, they quit going. But it only takes one or two movies to get people back in the habit of going to the movies. I see you own Heelys (HLYS), the company that makes a shoe with a wheel in it. Isn’t that fad over? The stock is down to about $2 from $30 in 2006. Heelys is now sitting on about $2.20 per share in cash. We paid right at or below that price for it. We bought the cash on the balance sheet and got the company for free. They don’t have any debt. There’s a new management team in there. We think maybe they could be break even, modestly profitable, by the end of this year. Answers edited for content and clarity. AP

Mortgage rates fall again

No treasure in these funds

Treasury bond mutual funds haven’t offered much safety this year. Even though Treasury prices have rebounded this month, long-term government bond mutual funds remain in the red. They’ve lost 3.4 percent this year. That’s the worst performance among the 14 bond fund categories that Morningstar tracks. At the top of the list? Emerging market bond funds, which are up 6.3 percent. Treasury prices began falling in February after fears about the European debt crisis waned and the U.S. unemployment rate fell to 8.3 percent, its lowest level since 2009. As a result of those improvements, investors sold Treasurys and shifted money into riskier, higheryielding investments. Also, the Federal Reserve said it doesn’t foresee buying more bonds to pump money into the economy. Investors are hungry for bond yields to rise.

The 10-year Treasury note yields about 2 percent, down from its average of 6.5 percent over the last 30 years. Worries about the strength of an economic recovery have worked to keep interest rates low. Just last Friday a weaker-than-expected jobs report caused Treasury prices to rise, and the yield on the 10-year note to fall to 2.06 percent from 2.18 percent. What’s more, economic problems in Europe remain unresolved. Such uncertainty is why a diversified bond fund is often the best option. For instance, the T. Rowe Price Short-Term Bond fund (PRWBX), which Morningstar recommends, has 49 percent of its assets in corporate bonds, 4 percent in Treasurys and the rest in mortgage-backed securities and other investments. It has returned 2.2 percent over the last 12 months.

InterestRates

Money market mutual funds

PRIME FED Taxable—national avg RATE FUNDS Selected Daily Govt Fund/Cl D FRIDAY 3.25 .13 Tax-exempt—national avg 6 MO AGO 3.25 .13 BofA CT Muni Reserves/Investor 1 YR AGO 3.25 .13

Longterm

Investment grade Shortterm

Intermediateterm

Shortterm

0.4%

Intermediateterm

Longterm

2.0%

3.4%

1.4%

0.8%

High-yield

-0.14 -0.08 -0.08 -0.04 0.14 -0.13

FRIDAY YIELD

1WK

0.08 0.19 0.12 0.27 0.85

0.01 -0.04 -0.01 -0.07 -0.16

s t t t t

s 0.02 s -0.05 s 0.00 s -0.47 s -1.35

0.12 0.26 0.15 0.80 2.29

0.07 0.01 0.16 0.71

10-year T-Note 1.99 30-year T-Bond 3.13 Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.

-0.19 -0.20

t t

s -1.49 s -1.41

3.56 4.63

1.72 2.72

3-month T-Bill 1-year T-Bill 6-month T-Bill 2-year T-Note 5-year T-Note

6.3%

4.8%

0.01 0.09 $ 2,500 min (800) 345-6611

2.13 3.99 3.37 4.56 7.39 1.08

Broad market Lehman Triple-A corporate Moody’s Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman Municipal Bond Buyer U.S. high yield Barclays Treasury Barclays

Emerging market

0.01 0.22 $ 10,000 min (800) 243-1575

1WK

TREASURYS

Investors willing to take on more risk can earn significantly greater returns.

MIN INVEST PHONE

YIELD

FRIDAY YIELD

U.S. BOND INDEXES

2012 bond mutual fund returns U.S. Government

The average rate on the 15-year fixed mortgage fell to a record low of 3.11 percent last week, down from 3.21 percent a week earlier. The average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage fell to 3.88 percent from 3.98 percent. Mortgage rates tend to follow Treasury yields, and the yield on the 10-year Treasury note has been falling since March on worries about a slowing global economy.

CHANGE 1MO 3MO 1YR t t t t s t

t s t t t s

52-WK HIGH LOW

-0.94 -1.17 -0.63 -1.11 0.51 -1.23

3.17 5.23 4.10 5.71 10.15 2.39

CHANGE 1MO 3MO 1YR

2.05 3.72 3.27 4.54 6.61 0.93

52-WK HIGH LOW

-3.4% Source: Morningstar Data through April 11

MutualFunds

Stan Choe; J. Paschke • AP

LocalStocks COMPANY

TICKER

52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN RANK %RTN LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD +.62

Air Products

APD

72.26 7

98.01

88.26

-2.55

-2.8

t

t

3.6

Amer Water Works

AWK

25.39 9

34.67

33.05

-0.76

-2.2

t

s

3.7 +20.55

Amerigas Part LP

APU

36.76 2

48.34

38.10

-2.07

-5.2

t

t -17.0—10.79 3

9.3

21

8.0

Aqua America Inc

WTR

19.28 6

23.28

21.52

-0.71

-3.2

t

s

2

1.2

21

3.1

Arch Dan Mid

ADM

23.69 6

37.28

30.75

-0.57

-1.8

t

s

7.5—10.59 3

-2.4

14

2.3

AutoZone Inc

AZO

266.25 0 386.00 380.97

-2.83

-0.7

s

s 17.2 +36.18

1 23.9

19

...

Bank of America

BAC

Bk of NY Mellon

BK

Bon Ton Store

BONT

CVS Caremark Corp

CVS

-2.4 +1.42

2

5.8

15

2.9

1 26.3a

18

2.8

4.92 5

13.64

8.68

-0.55

-6.0

t

s 56.1—34.29 4 -23.9

...

0.5

17.10 5

30.77

23.11

-0.71

-3.0

t

s 16.1—20.25 4

-8.4

11

2.3

2.23 5

14.58

7.19

-0.77

-9.7

t

s 113.4—44.23 5 -31.4

...

2.8

31.30 9

45.88

43.43

-1.19

-2.7

t

s

17

1.5

6.5 +23.43

1

5.2

Cigna Corp

CI

38.79 7

52.95

48.31

-0.68

-1.4

s

s 15.0 +9.27

2

-0.5

10

0.1

CocaCola

KO

63.34 8

74.39

71.94

-1.53

-2.1

s

s

2 10.0

19

2.8

Comcast Corp A

CMCSA 19.19 0

30.41

29.50

-0.06

-0.2

r

s 24.4 +23.97

1

2.0

19

2.2

Community Bk Sys

CBU

21.67 8

29.47

27.69

-0.85

-3.0

t

t

1

9.7

14

3.8

Community Hlth Sys

CYH

14.61 4

37.79

21.82

-0.68

-3.0

t

s 25.0—33.54 4

-9.5

9

...

Entercom Comm

ETM

4.61 2

11.01

5.80

-0.56

-8.8

t

t

-5.7—44.18 5 -23.3

6

...

Fairchild Semicond

FCS

10.25 4

21.02

14.02

0.03

0.2

t

s 16.4—26.90 4

12

...

Frontier Comm

FTR

Genpact Ltd

G

Harte Hanks Inc

HHS

7.00 3

11.94

8.26

-0.48

-5.5

t

Heinz

HNZ

48.17 7

55.00

52.65

-0.61

-1.1

t

Hershey Company

HSY

53.77 0

62.38

61.69

1.03

1.7

s

Kraft Foods

KFT

31.69 8

39.06

37.35

-0.69

-1.8

Lowes Cos

LOW

18.07 0

31.63

31.69

0.34

1.1

2.8 +9.78 -0.4 +19.77

-3.9

3.81 1

8.97

4.12

-0.19

-4.4

t

t -20.0—40.81 5 -10.9

24

9.7

13.37 6

18.16

15.92

-0.21

-1.3

t

s

2 20.0a

21

1.1

t

-9.1—26.81 4 -18.5

12

4.1

t

-2.6 +10.15

2

5.3

17

3.6

s

-0.1 +11.65

2

4.2

23

2.5

t

t

0.0 +18.86

1

5.6

19

3.1

s

s 24.9 +19.73

1

1.5

22

1.8

6.5 +1.47

M&T Bank

MTB

66.40 8

90.76

84.43

-2.45

-2.8

t

s 10.6 +1.50

2

-1.5

13

3.3

McDonalds Corp

MCD

75.83 9 102.22

96.97

-1.65

-1.7

t

t

1 17.7

18

2.9

NBT Bncp

NBTB

17.05 6

24.10

20.81

-0.83

-3.8

t

t

-6.0 —1.91

3

1.9

12

3.8

Nexstar Bdcstg Grp

NXST

5.53 5

10.28

7.45

-0.18

-2.4

t

t

-5.0 +5.67

2

-7.0

...

...

PNC Financial

PNC

42.70 9

64.85

61.28

-1.85

-2.9

t

t

+.86

2

-1.3

11

2.6

PPL Corp

PPL

25.00 4

30.27

26.77

-0.86

-3.1

t

t

-9.0 +5.19

2

-4.6

10

5.4

Penna REIT

PEI

6.50 8

17.34

14.61

-0.25

-1.7

t

s 39.9 +10.30

2 -15.1

...

4.1

PepsiCo

PEP

58.50 5

71.89

65.06

-1.09

-1.6

s

s

-1.9 +1.01

2

2.8

16

3.2

Philip Morris Intl

PM

60.45 0

90.10

87.84

-0.80

-0.9

s

s

11.9 +37.33

1 37.1a

18

3.5

Procter & Gamble

PG

57.56 8

67.95

65.81

-1.50

-2.2

t

r

-1.3 +7.81

2

3.3

17

3.4

Prudential Fncl

PRU

42.45 8

65.30

59.91

-2.61

-4.2

t

s 19.5

2

-6.7

8

2.4

SLM Corp

SLM

10.91 7

17.11

14.85

-0.41

-2.7

t

s 10.8 +3.77

2 -20.1

12

3.4

SLM Corp flt pfB

SLMBP 39.00 5

60.00

47.75

-0.50

-1.0

t

s 22.4

...

0.0

...

9.7

TJX Cos

TJX

24.60 0

40.62

39.82

-0.47

-1.2

s

s 23.4 +57.22

1 24.2

21

1.2

UGI Corp

UGI

24.07 3

33.53

26.60

-1.01

-3.7

t

t

-9.5—12.25 3

2.9

15

3.9

Verizon Comm

VZ

32.28 7

40.48

37.26

-0.40

-1.1

t

t

-7.1 +4.13

2

5.8

44

5.4

WalMart Strs

WMT

48.31 9

62.63

59.77

-0.90

-1.5

t

s

0.0 +14.23

1

6.7

13

2.7

Weis Mkts

WMK

36.52 8

44.85

43.00

0.03

0.1

t

s

7.7 +14.32

1

2.7

15

2.8

-3.3 +29.52

6.3

+.92

Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quarters. Rank classifies a stock’s performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).

Hunting for takeover targets

Companies are rolling in cash: Those in the S&P 500 have more than $1 trillion collectively, a record. One way for them to use that cash is to buy other companies. The economy is slowly growing again, and one quick way for CEOs to boost growth is to buy another company. For investors of the acquired company, it can be a quick and lucrative payday. This screen shows companies that Goldman Sachs analysts say have a high probability of being involved in a merger or acquisition. One example is Ariba, whose software helps businesses manage their * 1 = buy; 2 = hold; 3 = sell

cash. It’s part of the cloud-computing industry, which delivers software to customers over the Internet. The industry has also been a locus of takeover activity in recent months. German giant SAP said in December that it would buy SuccessFactors, which makes cloud-based human resources applications, for about $3.4 billion. SAP paid $40 in cash for each SuccessFactors share, 52 percent more than its closing price a day before the deal was announced. That followed Oracle’s October announcement in that it would buy RightNow Technologies, another cloud company, for about $1.5 billion.

Data through April 12;

Source: FactSet

TICKER

FRIDAY NAV

WK CHG

4WK

American Funds BalA m ABALX American Funds BondA m ABNDX American Funds CapIncBuA m CAIBX American Funds CpWldGrIA m CWGIX American Funds EurPacGrA m AEPGX American Funds FnInvA m ANCFX American Funds GrthAmA m AGTHX American Funds IncAmerA m AMECX American Funds InvCoAmA m AIVSX American Funds NewPerspA m ANWPX American Funds WAMutInvA m AWSHX BlackRock GlobAlcA m MDLOX BlackRock GlobAlcI MALOX Dodge & Cox Income DODIX Dodge & Cox IntlStk DODFX Dodge & Cox Stock DODGX Fidelity Contra FCNTX Fidelity GrowCo FDGRX Fidelity LowPriStk d FLPSX Fidelity Spartan 500IdxAdvtg FUSVX FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m FKINX FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m FCISX FrankTemp-Mutual Euro Z MEURX FrankTemp-Templeton GlBond A mTPINX FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAdv TGBAX Harbor IntlInstl d HAINX Oakmark EqIncI OAKBX PIMCO AllAssetI PAAIX PIMCO LowDrIs PTLDX PIMCO TotRetA m PTTAX PIMCO TotRetAdm b PTRAX PIMCO TotRetIs PTTRX PIMCO TotRetrnD b PTTDX Permanent Portfolio PRPFX T Rowe Price EqtyInc PRFDX T Rowe Price GrowStk PRGFX T Rowe Price HiYield d PRHYX T Rowe Price MidCpGr RPMGX T Rowe Price NewIncome PRCIX Vanguard 500Adml VFIAX Vanguard 500Inv VFINX Vanguard GNMAAdml VFIJX Vanguard InstIdxI VINIX Vanguard InstPlus VIIIX Vanguard InstTStPl VITPX Vanguard MuIntAdml VWIUX Vanguard STGradeAd VFSUX Vanguard Tgtet2025 VTTVX Vanguard TotBdAdml VBTLX Vanguard TotBdInst VBTIX Vanguard TotIntl d VGTSX Vanguard TotStIAdm VTSAX Vanguard TotStIIns VITSX Vanguard TotStIdx VTSMX Vanguard WellsIAdm VWIAX Vanguard Welltn VWELX Vanguard WelltnAdm VWENX Vanguard WndsIIAdm VWNAX Vanguard WndsrII VWNFX Wells Fargo AstAlllcA f EAAFX

19.32 12.71 50.56 34.43 38.31 38.32 32.09 17.18 29.14 29.02 29.70 19.21 19.31 13.61 31.13 110.24 76.51 95.89 39.64 48.60 2.13 2.15 19.66 13.06 13.03 57.74 28.52 12.10 10.45 11.19 11.19 11.19 11.19 48.10 24.69 37.55 6.70 58.18 9.75 126.37 126.36 11.06 125.55 125.56 30.99 14.16 10.75 13.12 11.02 11.02 14.06 34.24 34.24 34.23 56.92 32.84 56.72 49.72 28.01 12.42

-.24 +.07 -.36 -.57 -.56 -.65 -.57 -.18 -.56 -.44 -.54 -.19 -.18 +.05 -.88 -2.26 -1.26 -2.05 -.55 -.97 -.02 -.02 -.42 -.07 -.06 -.70 -.40 +.01 +.04 +.09 +.09 +.09 +.09 -.02 -.52 -.55 -.03 -1.18 +.05 -2.54 -2.55 +.04 -2.52 -2.52 -.63 +.06 +.01 -.15 +.07 +.07 -.19 -.69 -.70 -.70 -.05 -.34 -.59 -1.06 -.60 -.11

-1.4 +.6 -1.5 -3.3 -3.7 -2.2 -1.7 -1.7 -2.4 -1.8 -2.2 -2.3 -2.3 +.5 -5.5 -3.3 +.2 -.2 -2.2 -1.7 -1.8 -1.8 -5.3 -1.4 -1.3 -4.9 -2.1 -.9 +.6 +1.0 +1.0 +1.0 +1.0 -1.9 -2.7 +1.0 -.3 -2.5 +.6 -1.7 -1.7 +.8 -1.7 -1.7 -2.0 +.2 +.3 -1.8 +.8 +.8 -4.7 -2.0 -2.0 -2.0 -.2 -1.6 -1.6 -2.3 -2.3 -1.9

GROUP, FUND

RETURN/RANK 1YR 5YR +6.5/A +7.6/B +2.5/A -5.0/C -10.2/B +.7/D +1.8/D +3.9/B +2.3/D -1.8/B +6.8/A -1.7/C -1.4/C +6.4/D -13.6/D -.9/D +8.7/B +10.8/A +3.9/A +6.5/A +1.1/E +.6/E -9.0/A +.5/E +.7/E -7.6/A +1.7/D +4.2/A +2.6/B +5.9/D +6.1/D +6.4/D +6.1/D +2.5/D +1.7/C +12.0/A +4.0/C +1.3/C +7.2/C +6.5/A +6.4/A +8.0/B +6.5/A +6.5/A +5.5/B +11.0/B +2.8/B +2.6/A +8.3/A +8.4/A -11.7/C +5.4/B +5.4/B +5.3/B +10.2/A +5.3/A +5.4/A +5.4/A +5.3/A +2.2/B

+3.3/A +3.7/E +.7/D -.6/B -.9/A +1.1/B +.8/D +1.7/D +.1/C +1.7/A +.5/B +3.9/B +4.2/B +6.8/B -3.8/A -3.4/E +4.4/B +6.8/A +3.1/A +1.0/B +2.5/D +2.0/E -1.8/A +9.7/A +10.0/A -.3/A +4.4/A +6.3/A +5.4/A +8.2/A +8.4/A +8.7/A +8.4/A +8.3/A -.2/B +3.8/B +6.9/B +6.1/A +6.7/B +1.0/B +.9/B +6.9/A +1.0/B +1.1/B +1.5/A +5.3/B +4.4/B +1.9/A +6.5/B +6.5/B -3.5/B +1.5/A +1.5/A +1.4/B +6.3/A +4.0/A +4.1/A -.4/B -.5/B +2.6/C

Rank: Fund’s letter grade compared with others in the same performance group; an A indicates fund performed in the top 20 percent; an E, in the bottom 20 percent.

StockScreener 52-WEEK LOW HIGH

COMPANY

TICKER

CLOSE

MAKO Surgical

MAKO

$41.56

$21.40

$45.15

Wellcare Health Plans

WCG

67.85

33.29

Cepheid

CPHD

38.82

Onyx Pharmaceuticals

ONXX

Ariba

1-YR AVG. STOCK BROKER CHANGE RATING*

62.7%

1.5

74.41

62.4

1.7

28.33

45.00

34.1

1.4

40.73

27.17

46.07

21.5

1.6

ARBA

34.56

21.90

37.14

12.9

1.4

Medicis Pharmaceutical

MRX

38.14

29.76

40.51

10.7

1.6

Volcano

VOLC

26.97

21.38

33.90

7.1

1.3

Computer Prog. & Sys.

CPSI

55.99

41.80

79.06

-6.8

1.2

AeroVironment

AVAV

26.13

24.01

36.49

-8.4

1.6

Aeroflex Holding

ARX

11.05

7.19

19.64

-38.0

1.9

q q q q

Dow industrials

-1.6% WEEKLY

Nasdaq

-2.3% WEEKLY

LARGE-CAP

S&P 500

-2.0% WEEKLY

SMALL-CAP

Russell 2000

-2.7% WEEKLY

q p q p q p q p

-2.9%

MO +5.2%

YTD -1.4%

MO +15.6%

YTD -2.4%

MO +9.0%

YTD

-4.1%

MO +7.5%

YTD


CMYK PAGE 4D

âž›

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

8jb k_\ =ffc

Q A

The Strike Price

What’s a stock option’s “strike priceâ€?? — C.G., Springfield, Ill. It’s the price at which it can be exercised. Imagine you work for Holy Karaoke Inc. TICKER (9-.3  9OURE ISSUED 1,000 employee stock options with a strike price of $10 each. A few years later, the company goes public, issuing shares of stock for the first time via an initial public offering (IPO). The shares are priced at $25 each, but a year later they’re trading at $40. At this point, you decide to “exerciseâ€? your options. Since your options carry a strike price of $10, you’re entitled to buy up to 1,000 shares at $10 each — not the $40 that they’re going for on the open market. If you exercise all of them, you’ll fork over $10,000 to your company for 1,000 shares worth $40,000. You can hang on to them as long as you like, or quickly cash out for a $30,000 profit. As you might suspect, it’s not exactly quite this simple. There are many tax issues to consider, and your option plan might have some special features. Read the plan carefully. You might also read “Consider Your Optionsâ€? by Kaye Thomas (Fairmark Press, $24). *** To buy a company’s stock, do I have to work for it? — K.F., Hickory, N.C. Not at all. (Although some companies do offer employees stock options, stock grants or the ability to buy shares of company stock at a discount.) All you generally need is a brokerage account. You can learn how to pick a good brokerage at broker.fool.com. -OST MAJOR COMPANIES AND many smaller ones, are pubLICLY TRADED %XAMPLES 'ENERAL %LECTRIC -ERCK "OEING +EL LOGG 4I6O #ROCS 'ARMIN AND Harley-Davidson.

Q A

Got a question for the Fool? Send it in — see Write to Us

B

U

S

I

N

E

S

S

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

The Motley Fool

ÂŽ

=ffcËj JZ_ffc

-AKE A 0LAN ˆ Perhaps With a Pro Don’t leave your financial future to chance, as many are doing. According to the 2011 Retirement Confidence Survey, only 42 percent of workers have tried to estimate, in detail, their financial needs for retirement. The other 58 percent are not likely to meet their ultimate goals. That doesn’t have to be you, THOUGH 9OU JUST NEED A SOLID PLAN

and you don’t have to construct it on your own. An experienced financial adviser can help you get your fiscal house in order. They’re NOT JUST FOR RICH PEOPLE YOU KNOW A financial adviser can guide you through retirement planning, investing strategies, tax issues, dealing with employee stock options and more. This is valuable throughout your life, but especially when you’re dealing with or preparing FOR MAJOR LIFE EVENTS SUCH AS PAY ing for college, retiring, buying a house, getting married, having a baby or (yikes) being laid off. &OR EXAMPLE WHEN CHANGING JOBS

To Educate, Amuse & Enrich

you have to decide how to deal with your retirement accounts. All of us should evaluate whether we have adequate disability insurance. Longterm care insurance also makes sense for many of us. Financial advisers can help you determine whether you should refinance your mortgage, how to avoid estate taxes, how to maximize your ability to care for elderly parents and so on. You can learn a lot about these topics on your own. You’ll find a lot of guidance at fool.com/investing/ basics/index.aspx and elsewhere. But it can still be smart to consult a pro about your specific situation. There are good and not-so-good financial advisers. Watch out for those who will put their financial self-interest before yours, perhaps trying to sell you products you don’t need, or skimming a percent off your assets without helping to increase your wealth. We favor feeonly advisers, as opposed to those who collect commissions for putting you in various investments. Visit napfa.org to locate an adviser near you. And check out any before hiring them, at sec.gov/ investor/brokers.htm.

Name That Company 9Xj\[ `e @cc`ef`j# @Ă&#x2039;d eXd\[ X]k\i Xe /$p\Xi$fc[ ^`ic# Xj nXj dp ]`ijk Z_\\j\ZXb\% Kf[Xp @Ă&#x2039;d X ]ff[ Xe[ Y\m\iX^\ ^`Xek# ^\e\iXk`e^ e\Xicp 0 Y`cc`fe `e i\m\el\ XeelXccp% Dp YiXe[j `eZcl[\ 9Xcc GXib# ;fln\ <^Y\ikj# ?`ccj_`i\ =Xid# JleY\Xd# BX_eĂ&#x2039;j# A`ddp ;\Xe Xe[ J\ej\f% K_\ ;lkZ_ ;fln\ <^Y\ikj eXd\ `j dfi\ k_Xe ),' p\Xij fc[% @e k_\ gXjk @Ă&#x2039;m\ fne\[ G`^^cp N`^^cp jlg\i$ dXib\kj# ?Xe\j# :fXZ_# GcXpk\o 8ggXi\c Xe[ :_fZb =lcc fĂ&#x2039;Elkj% @ jgle f]] ?Xe\jYiXe[j `e )''-# Xe[ gcXe kf jg`e f]] dp Zf]]\\ Xe[ k\X Ylj`e\jj jffe# `ekf X e\n ZfdgXep ZXcc\[ ;%<% DXjk\i 9c\e[\ij (.,*% N_f Xd @6 Know the answer? Send it to us with Foolish Trivia on the top and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be entered into a drawing for a nifty prize!

Dp ;ldY\jk @em\jkd\ek

K_\ Dfkc\p =ffc KXb\

3IZE $OESNT -ATTER

3 Best Buys in the Dow

Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d read a book on Warren Buffett in the mid-1980s and thought he was a smart guy. I read articles on him occasionally, noticing his big investments in Coke, etc. Then, in the late 1980s, I thought about buying some shares of his company, Berkshire Hathaway. They were about $4,000 each. I had that much cash in my IRA and thought, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why not?â&#x20AC;? But then I decided that it was dumb to spend $4,000 for a single share and didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t buy it. I could sure use that extra $118,000 of profit about now. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Pete, Alexandria, Va. The Fool Responds: Yes, those shares are now worth about $120,000 each, though Berkshire Hathaway also sports class-B shares, trading around $80. Berkshireâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s class-A shares have trailing earnings per share (EPS) of $6,215, giving them a price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio of about 20. By contrast, AT&T recently traded near $31 per share, with EPS of $0.67, giving it a P/E of 47 and a steeper valuation. Focus on the big PICTURE NOT ON JUST PRICE 4HE -OT ley Fool owns shares of Berkshire Hathaway, and its newsletter services have recommended it.) Do you have an embarrassing lesson learned the hard way? Boil it down to 100 words (or less) and send it to The Motley Fool c/o My Dumbest Investment. Got one that worked? Submit to My Smartest Investment. If we print yours, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll win a Foolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cap!

The 30 companies in the Dow Jones Industrial Average are established, well-run, dividend-paying large-caps. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not all bargains, but here are some to consider: s -ACHINERY TITAN #ATERPILLAR (NYSE: CAT) is poised to profit from the industrialization of emerging markets. It has a strong track record of returning capital to its shareholders. Over the past five years, Catâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grown its dividend payouts at an average rate of 10 percent annually, and recently yielded 1.8 percent. -ARKET LEADING COMPANIES WITH strong fundamentals can turbocharge your portfolio. s 3EMICONDUCTOR POWERHOUSE )NTEL (Nasdaq: INTC), yielding 3 percent, owns the semi space like no one else. According to the latest figures out of IHS iSuppli, Intel widened its lead in the semiconductor market to a 10-year high in 2011, with an overall market share of 15.6 percent. s 'ENERAL %LECTRIC .93% '%

recently yielding 3.4 percent, has LARGELY RIGHTED THE SHIP WITH ITS '% Capital unit that generated the lionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s share of its problems during the FINANCIAL CRISIS )N FACT '% #APITAL should begin paying a dividend to the parent company as soon as this YEAR '% HAS ALSO DONE A GREAT JOB shifting its strategy to more forwardlooking growth markets â&#x20AC;&#x201D; namely, energy and infrastructure. These companies offer long-term investors a solid upside and limited DOWNSIDE 4HE -OTLEY &OOL OWNS shares of Intel, and its newsletter services have recommended it.)

C8JK N<<BĂ&#x2039;J KI@M@8 8EJN<I @ kiXZ\ dp iffkj YXZb kf X (0+' [i`m\$`e i\jkXliXek n`k_ ZXi$_fg j\im`Z\% =i\eZ_ ]i`\j i\gcXZ\[ gfkXkf Z_`gj fe dp d\el `e (0+0# k_\ jXd\ p\Xi k_Xk Ki`gc\ K_`Zb D`cbj_Xb\j [\Ylk\[% Kf[Xp @Ă&#x2039;d k_\ nfic[Ă&#x2039;j c\X[`e^ i\jkXliXek i\kX`c\i# n`k_ dfi\ k_Xe **#''' cfZXk`fej% @ j\im\ e\Xicp -/ d`cc`fe g\fgc\ `e ((0 Zfleki`\j \XZ_ [Xp% @] pflĂ&#x2039;[ jg\ek )#),' fe ('' j_Xi\j f] dp jkfZb n_\e @ n\ek glYc`Z `e (0-,# pflĂ&#x2039;[ _Xm\ .+#*-' j_Xi\j kf[Xp [l\ kf () jkfZb jgc`kj # nfik_ dfi\ k_Xe . d`cc`fe% @ Xcjf _\cg dfi\ k_Xe + d`cc`fe ]Xd`c`\j n`k_ j`Zb Z_`c[i\e XeelXccp% N_f Xd @6 8ejn\i1 DZ;feXc[Ă&#x2039;j WritetotoUs! us! Send questions Dumbest (or (or Smartest) Write questionsfor forAsk AskthetheFool, Fool, Dumbest Investments (up to 100 words) triviaand entries Fool@fool.com Smartest) Investments (up to and 100your words), yourtoTrivia entries or via regular mail to Motley Fool, Foolish 2000 Duke St., to Fool@fool.com orThe via regular mail c/o this Trivia, newspaper, attn: The Alexandria, VASorry, 22314. we Sorry, we provide canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t provide individual financial advice. -OTLEY &OOL canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t individual financial advice.

Š 2012 THE MOTLEY FOOL/DIST. BY UNIVERSAL UCLICK (FOR RELEASE 4/12/2012)


CMYK

VIEWS timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

SECTION

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

COMMENTARY

COMMENTARY

LEONARD PITTS JR.

KATHLEEN PARKER

A courageous moment amid complicit silence

Information losing integrity to idiocracy

BARACK OBAMA himself has never had the guts to say it. Indeed, while it is famously difficult to prove a negative, it seems apparent that few people in all of politics and media have had the guts to say it. Did John McCain ever say it? Did Rick Santorum or Bill O’Reilly? So let us plant a little flag for, mark with a yellow highlighter, the thing U.S. Rep. Raul Labrador said last Sunday on “Meet the Press”: that “it wouldn’t matter” if President Obama were a Muslim. And if it seems rather much to be handing out medals for such a modest statement of principle, well ... the principle has been under fire for so long that even a modest statement feels momentous. In recent years, public figures have made news for refuting (like McCain) or failing to refute the canard that Obama is a follower of Islam. But outside of Colin Powell, who did so a few years back on “Meet the Press,” it is difficult to think of many — or any — who have dared to confront the notion implicit in the lie. Namely, that being a Muslim is incompatible with being an American. This is taken by some as self-evident truth even as Muslim soldiers risk their lives on our battlefields, Muslim cops risk their lives on our streets, Muslim teachers teach our children, Muslim reporters report our news, Muslim politicians help to make our laws, and Muslim-Americans struggle against those who believe our sacred ideals cover other people, but not them. Thus, a fleeting statement that should have been obvious to the point of mundanity feels instead like a water station in the Mojave. Labrador is no fan of the president’s. His comment about Islam was made en route to a contention that Obama’s policies have “weakened” the nation. Labrador is a Republican and a conservative from a very Republican and conservative state, Idaho. It is his political and ideological kin who are most responsible for pushing — and believing — the Obama-as-Muslim narrative. All of which imbues his remark with a welcome patina of political courage and moral clarity. Perhaps he would agree that what has historically weakened this nation at least as much as any policy the president has ever pursued is the tiresome notion that some of us are more American than the rest of us, that the “all” in “all men are created equal” refers only to those of the right gender, genus, sexual or political orientation, or faith. It is an idea abhorrent to the aforementioned sacred ideals, yet one embraced eagerly in recent years by those who apparently feel bereft without someone to fear. It is a shameful truth of American history that there has never been a shortage of someones to fear, nor of those who were willing to maximize and exploit that fear. It is an equally shameful truth that Americans, in thrall to that fear, have committed grievous sins against both human rights and those sacred ideals. And always, it begins with some false, implicit truth, some lie that gains such a foothold in the popular imagination, that becomes so pervasive and persuasive, no one even questions it anymore. Some, because they don’t think to; others, because they don’t dare to. So someone says the German-Americans are traitors and let’s string that one up — and no one says a thing. Someone says the Japanese-Americans are spies and let’s imprison them all behind barbed wire — and no one raises a cry. And someone says all the Muslims are terrorists and we must rid our nation of them by any means necessary — and one hears only the arias of the crickets. It is in those complicit silences that we lose ourselves, that we betray our ideals and that mobs are born. So there is nothing modest about even a modest statement of principle. And one cannot help but be glad Labrador, being what he is, said what he said. It’s about time someone did. Leonard Pitts Jr., winner of the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for commentary, is a columnist for the Miami Herald, 1 Herald Plaza, Miami, FL 33132. Readers may write to him via email at lpitts@miamiherald.com.

LEGENDARY JOURNALIST TO SPEAK ABOUT THE

‘HISTORY OF OUR TIME’ By ANDREW M. SEDER aseder@timesleader.com

T

hings are a lot different today than they were in 1972 when investigative reporting by intrepid young Washington Post journalists Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward led to the demise and resignation of President Richard M. Nixon. Bernstein, now 68 and living in New York, said the media, politicians and the courts all did their jobs and the system worked to right a wrong. “I’m not sure that kind of thing would happen today in this hyper-partisan atmosphere,” said Bernstein, who will be at Misericordia University in Dallas Township Tuesday night speaking as part of the inaugural Dr. Midori Yamanouchi Lecture Series. See BERNSTEIN, Page 2E

AN EVENING WITH CARL BERNSTEIN Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Carl Bernstein will be the featured lecturer Tuesday night at the inaugural Dr. Midori Yamanouchi Lecture Series at Misericordia University. The lecture takes place at 7 in the Lemmond Theater in Walsh Hall. Bernstein is presenting the public lecture, “His Holiness, John Paul II,’’ in which he will discuss the Pope’s role in bringing down the former Soviet Union. Tickets for the evening event are free, but seating is limited. Tickets can be reserved by calling the Misericordia University Cultural Events Box Office at 674-6719. The remaining available tickets can be picked up at the lobby box office up to 10 minutes prior to the show. A question-and-answer session follows immediately after his presentation. Bernstein will also participate in a book signing and autograph session following the event. MCT PHOTO

Richard Nixon gazes out of an Oval Office window in 1971. Carl Bernstein, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who helped uncover the Watergate scandal, will speak at Misericordia University.

E

ALL IT takes is one little twit. Or a tweet, as the case might be — not that the two are mutually exclusive. In fact, very likely the person who recently started a rumor about South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley was trying to create that idiot’s delight — “buzz” — for his blog. Or whatever little virtual temple he had erected to himself. So it goes in the ridiculous political arena in which we now find ourselves. The rumor — that Haley was about to be indicted for tax fraud — was so delicious that other bloggers, tweeters and even some mainstream media outlets felt compelled to repeat it. Except that it wasn’t true. Not even a little bit. Some twit thought it would be fun to start a rumor and see what happened next. We all know what happens: Indictments spread like wildfire; corrections couldn’t roast a marshmallow. The damage took only a couple of hours. And Haley, a rising star in the Republican Party and a possible vice presidential pick for Mitt Romney, is all too aware of the potential cost to her reputation. She’s been through this before. While she was running in the Republican primary for governor, two men stepped forward to claim sexual dalliances with the married mother of two. Obviously, South Carolinians either didn’t buy it or didn’t care. The attack was so vile and, frankly, not so credible that voters reacted by checking the box by Haley’s name. Her popularity as governor ebbs and flows as these things go, but her appeal as a national figure does not seem affected by local attacks. She’s going to be around for a long time. Meanwhile, what Haley experienced as a target of the rumor mill should be of more general concern to everyone. The New York Times tracked the path of the Haley/tax rumor to show how quickly it traveled from a small spark in the fevered brain of a political enemy into a bonfire of inanity. It began with a blog item, then was tweeted by The Hill, a Washington political newspaper, and reported in a short article by The Daily Beast. All of this happened between12:52 p.m., when the blog post went online, and1:12 p.m., when a reporter for USA Today actually decided to call Haley’s office and find out if the story was true. Give that reporter a raise! But the rumor was retweeted at1:14 by a Washington Post reporter and later picked up by online outlets Daily Kos and The Daily Caller. By 3:29, The Drudge Report linked to the Daily Caller article featuring the headline: “Report: DOJ may indict SC Gov. Nikki Haley for tax fraud.” The next morning, The State newspaper, South Carolina’s largest, had a front-page story. All in a day’s whisper. What is abominably clear is that this sort of thing can happen to anyone at any time. And much worse things can be said that can’t easily be disproved. Haley extinguished this fire by releasing a letter from the Internal Revenue Service stating that there was no investigation. But what if, instead, the rumor were that a candidate was once suspected of child abuse? “Neighbors, who remembered Candidate A as quiet and polite, nonetheless say they always suspected ...” Most disappointing during this particular cycle was the failure of legitimate news organizations to turn the rumor over and examine its underbelly before repeating it. What happened to a minimum of two corroborating sources before a story is posted? Even laymen unfamiliar with traditional journalism’s standards and procedures learned that rule from “All the President’s Men,” the movie based on Woodward and Bernstein’s historic Watergate investigation. That was then. Now editors faced with dwindling subscriptions and advertising must compete with the twits who make it up as they go. But the danger of trying to keep up with twits and tweeters is that eventually you might get good at it — and no better. Integrity of information is the one thing newspapers can promise readers that other new media can’t deliver with the same consistency. It isn’t only a matter of pride or even of survival of newspapers, in which I obviously have a personal interest. Ultimately, it is a matter of helping protect freedoms that will become diminished as a less-informed citizenry surrenders responsibility to titillation — and slouches inevitably toward idiocracy. Kathleen Parker’s email address is kathleenparker@washpost.com.


CMYK PAGE 2E

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

V

I

E

W

S

THE TIMES LEADER

INVESTIGATITIVE JOURNALISTS’ ROUNDTABLE

BERNSTEIN Continued from Page 1E

Though he’s used to being asked about his role in the Watergate scandal and “All the President’s Men,” the book he coauthored with Woodward that was made into a Robert Redford/Dustin Hoffman movie, he’ll be at Misericordia to speak about a 1996 book he wrote with Marco Politi titled “His Holiness: John Paul II & the History of Our Time.” Bernstein will discuss the Pope’s role in bringing down the former Soviet Union. During a recent phone interview with The Times Leader, Bernstein said he was proud to be associated with Watergate and enjoys being asked about that role because it means people care. “The more people want to know about what happened in our history, the better,” said Bernstein, who has penned six books, including those on Nixon, Pope John Paul II and Hillary Clinton. Whether something such as Watergate could happen today and whether the reporting that took place at the time could be repeated were raised during the interview. Could it happen today? Bernstein said he’d “be very surprised if a president of the United States were to be willing to engage in the type of illegal and unconstitutional, not just activities but sensibilities.” He also said he thought that members of Congress from the same political party as the president might not be so willing to go along with investigations and possible impeachment proceedings like Republicans did in the case of Nixon. He said partisanship has so gripped Washington today that he can’t be so sure the way Congress came together to protect the integrity of the office and the constitution in the Watergate era would be repeated today.

www.timesleader.com

AP FILE PHOTO

Washington Post writers Carl Bernstein, left, and Robert Woodward, who pressed the Watergate investigation, are photographed in Washington, D.C., May 7, 1973. It was announced that The Post won the Pulitzer Prize for public service for its stories about the Watergate scandal. Bernstein will speak at Misericordia University’s inaugural Dr. Midori Yamanouchi Lecture Series Tuesday at 7 in the Lemmond Theater in Walsh Hall.

As for the reporting, “we could do (it),” Bernstein said. “There’s still a number of great journalistic institutions that will support this kind of reporting. My concern would be more how the reporting would be received.” He added, “We live in a different age.” Social media, 24-hour news cycles, cable news networks, media conglomerates, and citizen journalists have changed the way news is reported and received but, Bernstein noted, true quality journalism can still be found and produced. “Social media is an obviously important means of communication,” Bernstein said, and “the Web is a great reporting medium and subject to great abuse.” His advice to young journalists or students looking to enter the field is “to be a good listener.” He said far too often there’s “a tendency to jump on the telephone or go see

The Misericordia University Department of Communications is hosting a panel discussion about investigative journalism with noted journalists from the region Monday night at 7 in Room 219 of Insalaco Hall. Investigative journalists Terrie Morgan-Besecker of the Times Leader; Joe Holden of WBRE-TV 28, Dave Bohman of WNEP-TV 16, Borys Krawczeniuk of the Scranton Times-Tribune and Dave Janoski of The Citizens’ Voice will provide some perspective and insight into how investigative journalism works and how they research their stories. The panelists will field questions from the public and students. Immediately following the presentation, the university is also sponsoring the free screening of the 1976 movie, “All the President’s Men,” starring Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman, which recounts Bob Woodward’s and Carl Bernstein’s work and how they uncovered the details of the Watergate scandal.

people for very brief periods of time with a preconceived notion or seeking to manufacture controversy rather than seeking what truly happened.” “Use common sense, seek out people and let them tell their story. Don’t substitute your ideas for theirs,” Bernstein said. Bernstein noted that while he believes there are some very good and some very bad journalists working today, that is something that has not changed. He said that has been the case for quite some time. What has changed, especially over the past 20 years, is the audience. “You have equal problems of fewer readers and viewers in reading or watching hard, complex factual information and more interested in reading and viewing information that satisfies their ideologies,” said Bernstein, adding that “it’s cultural, it’s political.”

111 N. Pennsylvania Blvd. , Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701 570-822-1158 ext. 3539 • 800-252-1512 ext. 3539 AgingLW.org

744061

AREA AGENCY on AGING: LUZERNE & WYOMING COUNTIES


K ➛ S E R V I N G T H E P U B L I C T R U S T S I N C E 18 81

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Editorial

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 3E

OUR OPINION: RULES OF DEBATE

Ban on recording sends bad message

A

T THE RISK of sounding like the ingrate who shows up late for a wedding reception, then loudly complains that his chicken cordon bleu is cold, we have to say this: The League of Women Voters got it wrong. The area league’s decision to ban the public from recording last week’s congressional debate in Kingston set a bad precedent and wrongly suggested that carefully controlling information can somehow breed better democracy. Not so. The league’s event organizers, no doubt, had the best of intentions. By limiting any recording to “professional” newsgathering outfits, they probably hoped to prevent unscrupulous sorts from gathering material to use in gotchatype campaign ads and web postings. Campaign agents toting recording devices have been known in recent years to trail certain candidates, hoping to catch slips of the tongue, apparent flip-flopping on the issues and other embarrassing moments. It’s a bit devious, but sometimes enlightening. The league, a highly respected and nonpartisan group, should not adopt the role of policing political speech or protecting candidates from the free flow of information – even if that information could, in the hands of some people, be manipulated, mistranslated or

twisted. Allow the voting public to use its judgment on the authenticity and accuracy of statements. Encourage the use of technology to transmit these public discussions on important civic issues to the widest possible audience; trust that certain attendees have only the best of intentions: for instance, streaming an entire debate to viewers in an unadulterated fashion. By drawing up differing rules for what a journalist and a non-journalist can record, league officers only create confusion as to the rights of citizens. Journalists, after all, are merely stand-ins for residents who can’t attend a particular government meeting or campaign event. (By the way, the news media typically are selective, though hopefully not partisan, in what they report to audiences). At future debates in Luzerne County, the league should drop its no-recording rules. Let camcorders and cell phones capture, then convey, the conversation. Freedom of speech, with all its pitfalls, must prevail. In the meantime, we remain ardent fans of the League of Women Voters and its volunteers who further the cause of good government. We benefit from their efforts and believe in their mission. But, on this matter, we had to speak up.

QUOTE OF THE DAY “Honestly it was terrifying … to look back and see nothing but flames and to look in front of you and see nothing but blackness.” Cory Booker The 42-year-old mayor of Newark, N.J., a former collegiate football player, described the scene last week as he rescued a woman from a burning home in his neighborhood. Booker, who said the experience gave him an even greater appreciation of firefighters’ work, is slated to speak April 22 at Wilkes University in Wilkes-Barre. His lecture is titled “How to Change the World with Your Bare Hands.”

OTHER OPINION: FRACKING LAW

Gas industry gags physicians

W

HAT ARE THEY afraid of? That’s the obvious question that arises from yet another move by the natural gas industry, and their BFFs in Pennsylvania government, to keep secret (“proprietary,” if you will) the toxic chemicals that they are injecting into the earth. Act 13, the hydraulic fracturing law passed in February, already qualified as a major corporate giveaway, giving companies the right to overturn local zoning laws and pretty much drill anywhere. But buried in the law, which went into effect Saturday, is a gag order on doctors. If physicians want to learn the exact chemicals being used in fracking, they must sign a nondisclosure agreement that prevents them from sharing what they know with their patients or other doctors. At least that’s how many health professionals and environmentalists read it. Pennsylvania doctors already were flying blind when it came to answering their patients’ anxious questions about the health

effects of fracturing. In an essay in the Harrisburg Patriot-News in February, Dr. Marilyn Heine, president of the Pennsylvania Medical Society, reported that some of her colleagues were being asked if symptoms such as rashes might be tied to fracking chemicals, or whether they should have their well-water tested. She said that medical expertise is being “handcuffed by a lack of research.” Act 13 adds a muzzle to the handcuffs. Sponsors of the bill say that the confidentiality agreement is necessary because the exact cocktail of carcinogens – and 650 of 750 of the chemicals used in fracking are known to cause cancer – are “trade secrets,” and that doctors might spread them to competitors in the oil and gas industries. Puh-lease. Isn’t it far more likely that they know that if people knew about the massive amounts of benzine and other toxins to which they and their kids have been exposed, they would ask more questions – and ask them louder?

An

Philadelphia Daily News

company

Editorial Board PRASHANT SHITUT President and CEO/Impressions Media MARK E. JONES JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ Vice President/Executive Editor Editorial Page Editor

The wonderful addicting world of ‘Words with Friends’ DON’T TEMPT me. Put it away. I have resisted “Pong,” “Space Invaders,” “Pac-Man” and “Super Mario Bros.” I have scoffed at “Asteroids,” “Donkey Kong” and entire generations of Game Boy. Put it away. Shut it off. I’m serious. Don’t tempt me. ... I have ignored “Gran Turismo” and “Grand Theft Auto.” I showed no interest in “Myst,” “Doom” or anything with wizards. I have never worked a joystick. My phone is just a phone. Don’t tempt me. Turn that screen off. I’m warning you. ... I am talking about “Words with Friends,” a terribly addicting app that is basically Scrabble played long distance. It involves nothing more than two players making words out of the letters they are given, and trying to score points by doing so. My sister-in-law, Trisha, showed it to me a few weeks ago. She handed me her iPad. “You’re a writer,” she said. “Help me.” That was a mistake. The first time I tried it, I was on for an hour. That is an hour longer than my lifetime total on video games. I’m the guy who rolled his eyes at “Halo.” I’m the guy who never owned a PlayStation or an Xbox. I’m the guy who asked, “Why would anybody play ‘The Sims’? Isn’t the real world good enough?” Get that screen away from me.

COMMENTARY MITCH ALBOM Do not tell me the letters! ... I am embarrassed by my attraction to “Words with Friends.” It’s a time vampire. But what’s a writer to do? They say there is a match for everyone on the planet, and though they are talking about love, maybe it applies to video games, too. All I know is I spent stupid time on Trisha’s screen, trying to come up with a word that used two D’s, two U’s, two L’s and a C. Go ahead. You try. It ain’t easy. In addition, you want to put your word over a triple-word square, or combine it with another word so you get double the points, or lay it down so it doesn’t create opportunities for your opponent ... Wait. The opponents. That’s the best part. They don’t need to be with you. They don’t need to be in this country! You play your word, send it in, and it’s the opponent’s turn, whenever he or she gets around to it. Now. Tomorrow. Next week. You can have up to 20 games going simultaneously. It’s like those guys in the park who play multiple chessboards. Only “Words with Friends” you can do in bed, in your underwear. Not that I’m revealing anything here. “Words with Friends” is now huge. Of course, like everything that is big news today, it happened in the last five minutes.

OK. Maybe a little longer. “Words with Friends” was started by a couple of game developers in 2009. The legend is it wasn’t very popular, until singer John Mayer sent out one tweet to a few million of his fans. It’s been skyrocketing ever since. More than 8 million people play every day, and actor Alec Baldwin was so intensely involved, he refused to stop and got kicked off an American Airlines flight. That’s truly embarrassing. But so is this. I like it. I confess. And I have never liked a video game in my life. I ignored my “Call of Duty.” I refused to enter the “World of Warcraft.” And the only correct spelling of we, in my book, is “we” or “whee” – not “Wii.” How could a game that was nerdy 40 years ago suddenly be so hip now? And so addicting. I don’t know. Ask Baldwin. Meanwhile, put it away. Do not tell me what seven letters you have. Do not stick the phone near my nose and reveal a triple-word square just sitting there, next to a Q, and you have a U and an I and – oh, dear God! – a Z. Move. Out of my way. I will not give away one more precious minute of life, even if my entire working career has prepared me for this app like a Jedi Knight wielding a magic vocabulary. Not interested. Go away. OK. Gimme that phone. Just this once ... Mitch Albom is a columnist for the Detroit Free Press. Readers may write to him at: Detroit Free Press, 600 West Fort St., Detroit, MI 48226, or via email at malbom@freepress.com.

Holden should give voters the debate they deserve DAN QUAYLE and Lloyd Bentsen, Kennedy-Nixon, Ford and Carter, ReaganMondale, Bush-Clinton, McCain and Obama; before the vote, they debated. Since 1960, with the unfortunate exceptions of 1964 and more significantly 1968 and ’72, Americans have insisted that their candidates meet in civilized forums to discuss the major issues of the day. While you have been treated this presidential election cycle to a record number of Republican presidential primary debates (20), we have not seen the last of these intense, high-stakes, all-or-nothing, oratorical jousts. Three additional presidential debates for 2012 already have been scheduled. They will feature candidates who demonstrate broad nationwide support, averaging at minimum 15 percent in four national polls, and who are on the ballot in states with an aggregate number of electoral votes equal to the 270 required for victory. Slated for the University of Denver on Oct. 3, Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., on Oct. 16 and Lynn University in Boca Raton, Fla., on the 22nd – with one vice presidential debate on Oct. 11 at Centre College in Danville, Ky. – America will vote once the candidates debate. A candidate no-show? It is inconceivable. Can you imagine Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, or Joe Biden and (I’ll tell you later), refusing to meet in televised debate to discuss the issues while declaring their intentions and defending their positions for our careful consideration? Rest assured they will be on stage and in place at the appointed hour.

KEVIN BLAUM IN THE ARENA An engaged electorate insists on candidate debates, and the voters in Northeastern Pennsylvania are no different. Here in the 17th Congressional District the League of Women Voters is sponsoring a debate in what is arguably Pennsylvania’s marquee congressional primary of 2012 between Democrats Tim Holden of Schuylkill County and Matt Cartwright of Moosic. The event is scheduled for 7 p.m. April 18 on the campus of the University of Scranton. Cartwright has accepted the league’s invitation; Holden has not. The league and the university wait as the primary looms large on Tuesday, April 24. Cartwright has challenged Holden to a series of televised debates throughout the gerrymandered 17th District that now includes large swaths of Luzerne and Lackawanna counties. Holden has refused. Lafayette College Democrats invited the two candidates to debate the issues on April 19 inside Lafayette’s magnificent Kirby Hall. Cartwright accepted the invitation; Holden has not. Is Holden holding out until it’s too late to have the necessary cameras and print reporters in place for proper coverage and questioning, or is the incumbent simply “Holden out?” Either way, running from debates is bad form, shoddy manners and a politics reminiscent of the days when Holden was a Schuylkill County sheriff. Voters in Northeastern Pennsylvania

The voters in Northeastern Pennsylvania expect the free exchange of ideas that debates bring to the decision-making process. If Holden expects to come up here and represent this region and its people, congressional debates are a virtual prerequisite. expect the free exchange of ideas that debates bring to the decision-making process. If Holden expects to come up here and represent this region and its people, congressional debates are a virtual prerequisite. Instead he appears to rely on party insiders and the party organization in Luzerne and Lackawanna counties to pull him through. Good luck with that one. Cartwright’s grassroots campaign for the Democratic nomination is clearly gaining momentum. According to an article in Roll Call, “the newspaper of Capitol Hill since 1955,” a new poll released by the Cartwright campaign shows Cartwright now inching ahead. Last week Holden told The Times Leader’s Andrew Seder that he doesn’t have the time to debate. Holden’s campaign advisers must’ve winced when they heard that reply. Too busy for voters? Doesn’t have the time? Really? Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas found time for seven debates. Dan Quayle two. Surely, Holden has time for one. Kevin Blaum’s column on government, life and politics appears every Sunday. Contact him at kblaum@timesleader.com.


CMYK

MAIL BAG

V

I

E

W

S

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

LETTERS FROM READERS

Holden missing VA center issues

I

f Congressman Tim Holden is concerned for the wellbeing of the veterans at the VA Medical Center in Plains Township, why doesn’t he hear their grievances rather than being satisfied with a cook’s tour by the center director to see what the administration chooses him to see? The physicians and nurses with their bloated salaries and benefits have no need for additional incentives, while the disabled vets scrape along without increased payments in order to keep up with the ever-increasing cost of living. There exists a critical need for an open-door policy on the 11th floor and a thorough review of practices by staff. He might begin with dental clinic treatment, or lack thereof, and attitudes toward patients requiring complicated procedures. These matters require prompt remedial action. Lip service and photo-ops won’t do, Mr. Congressman. A. LeRal Wilkes-Barre

Barletta failing to serve voters

C

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

ongressman Lou Barletta’s recent commentary (“Health care reform law won’t fix insurance problems,” March 27) concerning President Obama’s health care law is an embarrassment to the constituents of his district as well as to the office he holds. He expresses pride in the fact that he voted against the bill – a bill that, if looked at carefully, contains solid benefits for Americans such as coverage despite pre-existing conditions, available coverage for the 40 million who cannot afford coverage and extended coverage for children who are out of school but not yet on their own. He offers nothing to replace

SEND US YOUR OPINION Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification. Letters should be no more than 250 words. We reserve the right to edit and limit writers to one published letter every 30 days. • E-mail: mailbag@timesleader.com • Fax: 570-829-5537 • Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., WilkesBarre, PA 1871 1

the loss of these benefits and nothing to address the overall problems with our health care system other than steps to reduce the cost of malpractice insurance and the ability to purchase health insurance across state lines. Well, the first benefits doctors, and the second measure benefits insurance companies. Is there something for the average citizen? He further asserts that European countries are running away from their own government-sponsored health care systems at race car speed, having learned the lesson that government-sponsored health care doesn’t work. Nonsense. Germany and the Scandinavian countries have had government-run health care since the 19th century. Germany’s universal health care system was established in 1869; it has endured 143 years and two world wars, neither of which had particularly favorable outcomes for Germany. It also should be noted that Germany has only 2 percent unemployment at present and 1½ million unfilled skilled job openings. Other European countries are having economic problems, and they are adjusting the social programs accordingly. But to assert that they are even toying with the abandonment of government-sponsored health care is ridiculous. What would they want as an alternative: our system? Europeans have superior health care to Americans and are statistically much healthier than we are. The care that they receive is not inferior. Congressman Barletta offers stern warnings about the dangers of government health

care systems, but becomes protective and concerned on the subject of Medicare. Medicare is government-run health care. Medicare is socialized medicine. Is there a Medicare recipient who wants to scrap Medicare? Is there an elected member of the government who openly demands an end to Medicare on the grounds that it is a government plan that cannot possibly work? There are only 537 elected positions in the federal government. What is needed is Medicare for everyone, even Mr. Barletta. What is not needed is another term for Mr. Barletta. Chris Shaw Kingston

Murphy backed for state AG

T

he upcoming election for Pennsylvania attorney general will decide the future of our state. Will our next attorney general continue protecting the interests of politicians and corporate executives, or will that person fight for justice on behalf of all Pennsylvania families? We deserve an attorney general who will stand up to Republicans in Harrisburg and who will protect Pennsylvania families against Gov. Tom Corbett’s extreme ideological agenda. We deserve an attorney general who will prosecute criminals wherever they exist. We deserve Patrick Murphy. Whether halfway around the world in Iraq or here at home, Patrick Murphy has dedicated his life to protecting

Pennsylvania families. He is running for attorney general because he believes that the office can be more than a law-and-order position. Patrick knows that the office can do more to protect our rights and be a strong voice in the debate over issues that affect all Pennsylvanians. I want an attorney general who will use his elected position to check Gov. Corbett and his extreme right-wing agenda. I want an attorney general who will engage in legal challenges that affect my everyday life. I want an attorney general who will protect my family. I know I can trust Patrick Murphy, and that’s why he has my vote. Nik Capitano Shavertown

Fundraiser scores bucks for MDA

I

want to extend our heartfelt sincerity and appreciation to everyone who helped to make our annual charity basketball game a success at Solomon/Plains Educational Complex in Plains Township. We raised more than $1,000 for the Muscular Dystrophy Association, and a great time was had by all. I need to recognize WBRETV staff, and in particular Phil Schoener, Colin Riccobon, Rich Charnetski, Dave Kuharchik and Monica Madeja, for their tireless efforts in helping us promote the event. Appreciation also goes to our principals, Mr. John Woloski and Mr. Sean Flynn, the Wilkes-Barre School District staff, and in particular Superintendent Jeff Namey, and the school board for allowing us to use the facilities. Thanks also to the committee of Marie Correll, John Duda and Lisa Giovannini, and everyone who contributed monetary and product resources. Area restaurants and businesses provided refreshments and supplies; we could not have done it without their generosity.

To everyone, thank you from the bottoms of our hearts. Brian Fischer Activities director Solomon/Plains Junior High School

TL staffer lauded for commentaries

I

must commend The Times Leader on its excellent journalist, Mark Guydish. He is witty, down-to-earth, remarkably talented and certainly possesses a special gift from almighty God. My husband and I always enjoy his commentary. I especially loved the April 2 opinion piece in which he mentioned his mother. Mark’s commentaries always are straight from his heart and honest. Mark, continue your writing, and God be with you and yours always. Alma Berlot Nanticoke

Writer: Repeal civil rights laws

T

oo many elected officials are too afraid to speak the truth. The people who brought crime to this area are Hispanic migrants from Central and Latin America. The only way to get rid of crime is to get rid of them. Democracy allows us the use of peaceful means to repeal the civil rights acts so that we can do just that. Instead of talking about it quietly, please sign an application for a petition for initiative to have the revocation of civil rights laws put on the Luzerne County agenda and eventually on a statewide referendum. There is no doubt that the courts initially will kick back an overt county and state law that intentionally takes civil rights away from Hispanics; but getting the revocation of

civil rights on a statewide referendum will send a necessary and powerful message to both Harrisburg and Washington. To get started under the new Luzerne County home rule form of government, 100 people need to sign an application for a petition. Their signatures, names and addresses must be on a letter that contains the language of the issue that will appear on the petition. A petition is then issued by the county clerk and, once there are enough signatures, the county council must vote on the matter. The population of Hazleton and the Hispanic population cannot meld into one population. I am tired of hearing politicians and loudmouth business leaders say such garbage. Sean M. Donahue Hazleton

Barack Obama: Who is he really?

I

s our president in the real world? Does he think we are all stupid with no memories? He bet on the three worst car companies, green investments that went nowhere, and to bail himself out of his created debt he sold guns all over the place. But the kicker is this health care albatross. His idea of change was to tear apart and destroy the American ideal. Who is he really? Go to Patriot Update and then to ConservativeVideos.com and see for yourself that he is a Muslim. View all his comments for the last 15 or so years. This president is the worst I’ve seen in my lifetime for leadership skills; I might have been too naïve at the time of Carter. Just what was he talking about to that Russian? Are we in for more lies from this guy? Bob Boyd East Stroudsburg

Joseph Paz, D.O. AND Avner R. Griver, M.D. formerly of Advanced Pain Management

Have opened their own practice. To continue your care with these physicians call us. Now accepting new patients. Call today!

TOLL FREE 1-855-558-2050 Comprehensive Pain Management Specialists, LLC

PLAINS • KINGSTON • DUNMORE www.comprehensivepaindocs.com

NEW THERAPY FOR LOW BACK PAIN If You Suffer From Any Of These Conditions, This Therapy May Be The Answer For Your Pain! • Degenerative Disc Disease • Herniated/Bulging Discs • Sciatica • Spinal Stenosis

FREE BACK PAIN CONSULTATION

NEUROPATHY NEUROPATHY CENTER CENTER www.nervetreatmentcenter.com

For More Information: www.protecspine.com

250 Pierce St., Suite 108, Kingston • (570) 287-5560 Michele Holincheck CRNP • Dane Kozlevcar MSPT

749187

PAGE 4E


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Years required to pay for Obama free lunch HERE WE go again. At the beginning of his presidency, Barack Obama argued that the country’s spiraling debt was largely the result of exploding health care costs. That was true. He then said the cure for these exploding costs would be his health care reform. That was not true. It was obvious at the time that it could never be true. If government gives health insurance to 33 million uninsured, that costs. Costs a lot. There’s no free lunch. Now we know. The Congressional Budget Office’s latest estimate is that “Obamacare” will add $1.76 trillion in federal expenditures through 2022. And, as one of the Medicare trustees has just made clear, if you don’t double count the $575 billion set aside for the Medicare trust fund, “Obamacare” adds to the already crushing national debt. Three years later, we are back to smoke and mirrors. This time it’s not health care but the Buffett Rule, which would impose a minimum 30 percent effective tax rate on millionaires. Here is how Obama introduced it last September: “Warren Buffett’s secretary shouldn’t pay a (higher) tax rate than Warren Buffett. ... And that basic principle of fairness, if applied to our tax code, could raise enough money” to “stabilize our debt and deficits for the next decade. ... This is not politics; this is math.” OK. Let’s do the math. The Joint Committee on Taxation estimates this new tax would yield between $4 billion and $5 billion a year. If we collect the Buffett tax for the next 250 years – a span longer than the life of this republic – it would not cover the Obama deficit for 2011 alone. As an approach to our mountain of debt, the Buffett Rule is a farce. And yet Obama repeated the ridiculous claim again last week. “It will help us close our deficit.” Does he really think we’re that stupid? Hence the fallback: The Buffett Rule is a first step in tax reform. On the contrary. It’s a substitute for tax reform, an evasion of tax reform. In three years, Obama hasn’t touched tax (or, for that matter, entitlement) reform, and clearly has no intention to. The Buffett Rule is nothing but a form of redistributionism that has vanishingly little to do with debt reduction and everything to do with re-election. As such, it’s clever. It deftly channels the sentiment underlying Occupy Wall Street (original version, before its slovenly,

V

I

E

W

S

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 5E

ANOTHER VIEW

A photograph by Don Carey and words by Mark E. Jones

COMMENTARY CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER whiny, aggressive weirdness made it politically toxic). It perfectly pits the 99 percent against the 1 percent. Indeed, it is OWS translated into legislation, something the actual occupiers never had the wit to come up with. Clever politics, but in terms of economics, it’s worse than useless. It’s counterproductive. The reason Buffett and Mitt Romney pay roughly 15 percent in taxes is that their income is principally capital gains. The Buffett Rule is, in fact, a disguised tax hike on capital gains. But Obama prefers to present it as just an alternative minimum tax because 50 years of economic history show that raising the capital gains tax backfires: It reduces federal revenues, while lowering the tax raises revenues. No matter. Obama had famously said in 2008 that even if that’s the case, he’d still raise the capital gains tax – for the sake of fairness. For Obama, fairness is the supreme social value. And fairness is what he is running on – although he is not prepared to come clean on its price. Or even acknowledge that there is a price. Instead, Obama throws in a free economic lunch for all. “This is not just about fairness,” he insisted on Wednesday. “This is also about growth.” Growth? The United States has the highest corporate tax rate in the industrialized world. Now, in the middle of a historically weak recovery, Obama wants to raise our capital gains tax to the fourth highest. No better way to discourage investment – and the jobs and growth that come with it. Three years ago, Obama promised universal health care that saves money. Today, he offers a capital gains tax hike that spurs economic growth. This is free-lunch egalitarianism. The Buffett Rule redistributes deck chairs on the Titanic, ostensibly to make more available for those in steerage. Nice idea, but the iceberg cometh. The enterprise is an exercise in misdirection – a distraction not only from Obama’s dismal record on growth and unemployment but, more important, from his dereliction of duty in failing to this day to address the utterly predictable and devastating debt crisis ahead. Charles Krauthammer’s email address is letters@charleskrauthammer.com.

hat is it about a banner than can make a heart beat bolder? How does unfurling a flag inspire such reverent feelings – emotions shared equally W by those who first rallied behind its colors and those who simply re-enact the moments?

Susquehanna at risk from the regressive right THE Susquehanna River is a part of my life. As a boy I played on its banks, as an adult I wrote about its incredible power and the criminal pollution of its waters. Rising as the outlet of Otsego Lake in Cooperstown, N.Y., and winding through Pennsylvania and Maryland into the Chesapeake Bay, the Susquehanna is an important global artery, the 16th largest river in America and second only to the Amazon River in the Western Hemisphere in the number of indigenous plant species. It serves as an environmental barometer and a living symbol of the ravaging effects of unregulated polluters. Its power is enormous, last year coming once again within inches of mass destruction and causing millions of dollars in damage to one of its original settlements of West Pittston. Those of us who remember the 1972 Agnes flood will never forget the full measure of its muscle. In 1959, the Knox Mine disaster took 12 lives when the river burst into the mines, hastening the end of deep coal mining in the Wyoming Valley. In a futile

close to our interstate highway system. The range of toxins being dumped, including cyanide, was frightening. COMMENTARY Cancer rates in neighborhoods from Pittston to Plymouth, even effort to plug the void where the when adjusted for an aging population, were higher than nationriver crashed into the mines, a huge whirlpool gobbled railroad al levels. The Wyoming Valley had become an industrial wastecars like rubber duckies. When I was a boy in the 1960s land. But in the early 1970s, a Rein the Pittston “Junction,” where publican president approved the the Lackawanna River joins the Environmental Protection AgenSusquehanna, pollution had reached historic levels, the result cy, the hated “EPA” of the modern Republican Party. And law of a century of coal mining and enforcement finally cracked the industrial dumping. Like a bad connection between corporadream, I can still picture the tions and organized crime that multicolored industrial waste, was profiting from the illegal the orange and purple slicks of dumping of liquid death. chemicals, sitting like a poisonRemarkably, the Susquehanna ous soup around dead trees in began to cleanse itself. Projects the lifeless, backwater “flats” of on the polluted Lackawanna the Susquehanna. worked, and the Susquehanna In my late teens, I took a cafrom Pittston southward began noe from Binghamton, N.Y., to to come to life again. Pittston, still the best weeklong In the 1980s, I would spend trip of my life. But when I arrived at Pittston, after a beautiful my Mondays fishing on the river, flow through the Endless Moun- once catching a 36-inch shiny, tains, the odor of contamination light gray “channel cat” that looked like a shark with whiskwas sickening. I was home. In the 1970s, it was learned by ers, and a 50-inch “muskie” that looked like something from the a chance testing of the Butler Jurassic. The dead river of my Mine Tunnel in Pittston that youth began jumping with smallchemical companies from New mouth bass and walleye. York and New Jersey were ille“Tree huggers” like me began gally dumping toxic waste into dreaming of a day when the the vast catacombs of the aban“shad run” would return, a jourdoned mines through illegal “bore holes” drilled conveniently ney of long forgotten fish that

JOHN WATSON

would swim upstream from the Atlantic Ocean to upstate New York to spawn. The “shad run” was described by native Americans, the last people to see it, as a “white wave” coming up the river, providing nourishment for hundreds of species. In 1988 I bought a fishing boat and won a statewide writing award for a column detailing the farcical misadventure of launching it with my 10-year-old daughter into a deep, fast current in Harding. Luckily, she is still alive and the reason I reside today in Seattle, where she has made me into a grandpa. The Susquehanna, dating back to the Mesozoic era 250 million years ago, is one of the world’s most amazing rivers. When it comes to protecting it, we should never listen to conservative cavemen who would turn back the clock. With natural gas “fracking” fast becoming a major industry, regulations should be strictly enforced, not removed. The regressive right that denies science would do away with the EPA and all regulation, once again leaving the health of the Susquehanna River to those who would poison it for profit, a history we can not afford to repeat. John Watson is the former editor of the Sunday Dispatch in Pittston. He lives in Seattle.

Affordable Care Act is last chance to avoid health insurance ‘death spiral’ AS WE wait for the Supreme Court to render its verdict on health reform in June, there is an important question to ponder: Does American exceptionalism extend to health care? Are we different than other advanced democracies? The country was jolted by the vigor of the conservative justices’ attack on the Affordable Care Act, “Obamacare.” It is now entirely possible that the five-man conservative majority will hold the centerpiece of the law, the individual mandate, unconstitutional, along with the requirement that insurers cover high-risk customers for the same price as healthy ones. Indeed, the court might overturn the whole act. Democrats are dismayed; Republicans are encouraged. But let’s consider the larger picture. The ACA is America’s best shot at providing universal health care through the private insurance market. The rest of the developed world has abandoned private health insurance in favor of systems closer to single payer, where everyone receives comprehensive benefits paid for by taxes or tightly regulated prices. So far, these systems have achieved better health outcomes for a fraction of what we pay. There is a reason private health insurance, which served us well for

complications: people with diabetes sometimes develop kidney failure, cancer might recur. So, much disease is now common, CAROLINE POPLIN predictable and expensive. The core competence of insurers is risk management: It is up to them to many years, is failing in America now. evaluate risks, and charge enough to In the last half-century, medicine has cover anticipated losses, with somebeen completely transformed. thing left over for themselves. Insurance works best where there is Insurers compete vigorously for a large group of people at low risk for healthy customers by offering low the covered event, which is rare, limited in time and cost, unpredictable as to premiums. Too many sick patients in the pool can ruin an insurer’s day, and individuals but actuarially predictable force it to raise premiums. Higher for the group. Think automobile accipremiums can drive the healthy cusdents. Illness and injury were once like that: tomers into the arms of a competitor. you never knew who would break a leg, Insurers call this the “death spiral.” Modern medicine allows insurers to get pneumonia or have a heart attack. identify high-risk, high-cost customers The stricken individual would get early, and avoid them. That is why, surgery, or the few medicines we had, and recover or die. What happened last unless it is tightly regulated, insurance year had no bearing on what happened is often unavailable to those who need it most, and insurers drop sick patients next year. at the first opportunity. Modern medicine has changed all The individual mandate in the ACA that. As we learn more, and can do addresses this problem by forcing the more, diseases that used to be acute healthy in with the sick, which means and rapidly fatal – cancer, heart athealthy customers’ premiums would tacks, even HIV – have become chronic. With appropriate treatment patients likely go up. Supporters of the ACA also expect can live with their illnesses for decinsurers to use the market to drive ades. Moreover, chronically ill people down health care costs, by bargaining are at risk for predictable, expensive

COMMENTARY

with providers. To date, insurers have had limited success: It is hard to force prices down at the only hospital in town, or the best. On the price front, Medicare has done much better. Moreover, insurers have no control over the real cost drivers in American health care: ever more expensive technology and drugs (which might be little better than what is already on the market), physicians who flock to profitable specialties. Medicare does not control these things either, but it could. So maybe other Western countries had good reason to go with a public insurance model, where everyone is really in the same pool, pays the same, gets comprehensive benefits with limited co-pays, and the government regulates provider prices. A system where insurance companies can design products, set prices and choose customers, where customers are likewise free to pick and choose, will give us just what we have: insured citizens facing rising premiums for reduced coverage, growing numbers lacking coverage and care. The ACA is the last, best chance for Americans to receive health care through a private insurance market. Personally, I doubt it will work. But if

AP PHOTO

Can Americans come to grip with the health care we expect and can afford?

the Supreme Court throws out the individual mandate, we will have to decide whether, when the chips are down, we are all in this together, or one’s freedom to choose to participate is even more important. This decision will test the American character. Caroline Poplin, a physician and lawyer, is a consultant to Social Security Administration and law firms. Readers may send her email at: poplin@aya.yale.edu.


CMYK PAGE 6E

MAIL BAG

V

I

E

W

S

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

LETTERS FROM READERS

TL hits mark with Watson column

A

n exuberant thank-you to The Times Leader for adding John Watson’s commentary to the newspaper. He writes with clarity and a sense of reason that is uncommon anymore. While it is a struggle for me to get past the second paragraph of most columnists’ pieces, a second reading of Watson’s opinion is not unusual. His column of April 8, regarding the Nation Rifle Association, was of particular interest because I worked for the NRA when I was starting my career. Even though I was quite young, the internal memos (no email back then) coming across my desk were starting to make me think that this wasn’t the marksman/guncollector organization it was pretending to be. Fear is an easy sell, and the NRA has been pushing it a long time. John, keep it coming. And may your voice reach farther and farther. Jim Kearney Exeter

Honoring Jackie beyond color line

T

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

he annual observance of Jackie Robinson Day throughout Major League Baseball occurs today. On April 15, every Major League player wears the number 42 in honor of Robinson and his tremendous contribu-

SEND US YOUR OPINION

Colorss S Spring p

Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification. Letters should be no more than 250 words. We reserve the right to edit and limit writers to one published letter every 30 days. • Email: mailbag@timesleader.com • Fax: 570-829-5537 • Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 1871 1

tions not only to baseball, but also to our society, civil rights and diversity. Robinson’s uniform number 42 has been retired by every team in the major leagues, and the last active player to wear this number throughout the season is New York Yankee closer Mariano Rivera. Robinson, of course, will forever be known as the man who broke baseball’s color barrier. As we remember Robinson and his rightful place in history, though, I also call your attention to some players not as well known: Welday Walker, Moses Fleetwood Walker and William Edward White. Welday Walker played in five games for the Toledo Blue Stockings in 1884, getting four hits and batting .222. His brother, Moses Fleetwood Walker, appeared in 42 games, hitting .261 and scoring 23 runs. It wasn’t the Walker brothers’ statistics that were important, though; it was the color of their skin. More than 60 years before Robinson played for the Brooklyn Dodgers, Moses Fleetwood Walker was known as the first African American to play major league ball. That designation was challenged by The Society for Baseball Research, with the finding that William

Edward White might have been Major League Baseball’s first black player. White appeared in one game for the Providence Grays in 1879; however, he was considered to be of mixed race. In fact, White was listed as Caucasian in the 1880 census, although he might have been masquerading as a white man to avoid the racism of that time. Racism led to their dismissals from baseball, and it affected Moses Fleetwood Walker in an even greater way. Defending himself from an attack by some white men in 1891, he stabbed and killed one of his attackers. Walker was arrested and charged with seconddegree murder; however, he claimed self-defense and was acquitted of the charges. Sadly, he came to believe that whites and blacks would never coexist peacefully. While there is still much work to be done regarding diversity in our society, Jackie Robinson, the Walker brothers and William White all certainly played a role in helping to move it forward. Everyone should remember that throughout the year, not only on Jackie Robinson Day.

SALE

Financing Available Up To 24 Months or More O.A.C.

SOLID

MULTI-COLOR

SALE!

1

$ 39 sq. ft.

S.A.

David A. Jolley Larksville

TRUSTED.

SALE!

1

$ 65

S.A.

IN STOCK Proudly Made in the U.S.A.

sq. ft.

HEAVY PLUSH SALE!

1

$ 99

S.A.

sq. ft.

BERBER SCOTCHGUARD

EXTRA HEAVY THICK VINYL FLOORING

1

$ 99

Fantastic for high traffic areas In Stock Colors S.A.

99¢

S.A.

sq. ft.

sq. ft.

Veteran Owned Business

A Dentist that treats you like family.

The Place For Price, Service, Selection!

For over 30 years, families have trusted in us for their dental care. Isn’t it time for your family to receive the quality care that you deserve.

431 Market Street, Kingston

Dr. Gary Nataupsky

Riverside Commons, 575 Pierce St. • Suite 201 • Kingston • 331-8100 • www.dr.gmn.com We Accept CareCredit

Store Hours: Mon., Wed. 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Tues, Fri. 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Thur. 9 a.m. - 8 p.m. ; Sat. 10 a.m. -5 p.m.

570-287-4354


CMYK

etc.

Entertainment

Travel

Culture

SECTION F

timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

ON THE SCENE

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Chacko’s bowling alley in WilkesBarre is just one venue local musician K8 plays. The versatile performer has made a name for herself on the local music scene during the past decade.

K8 still one hot number By SARA POKORNY spokorny@timesleader.com

AP PHOTOS

Artist Thomas Kinkade unveils his painting, ’Prayer For Peace,’ at the opening of the exhibit ’From Abraham to Jesus’ in 2006.

S

By SUDHIN THANAWALA

Associated Press

AN FRANCISCO — To fans and the countless collectors who helped build painter Thomas Kinkade’s commercial-art empire, his idealized vision of the world usually served as a simple, soothing addition to the living-room wall: a soft depiction of a churning seascape or a colorful garden or a cottage brimming with warm light. • Kinkade’s vision, and the artworks he prolifically created from it, paid off handsomely for the self-described “painter of light,” whose business grew into franchised galleries, reproduced artwork and spin-off products said to fetch at their peak some $100 million annually and adorn roughly 10 million homes.

See KINKADE, Page 4F

Just call Schilling ‘The Lucky One’ By AMY LONGSDORF For The Times Leader

Taylor Schilling doesn’t just star in “The Lucky One.” She exemplifies the title. Best known for her turn on the shortlived TV show “Mercy,” the 27-year-old Boston native is about to receive a major career boost thanks to a starring role opposite Hollywood heartthrob Zac Efron. And that’s just the beginning of her bigscreen run. She’ll also pop up as Ben Affleck’s wife in “Argo,” a political thriller due in theaters on Sept. 14. And next year, she’ll partner with Bradley Cooper in the Upper Darby-shot “The Silver Linings Playbook,” a black comedy about a former high-school teacher who attempts to win back his ex-wife. “Sometimes I have to pinch myself, I

“She has an extraordinary immediacy about her as an actress. You just believe what she’s saying. It sounds silly, but that’s in essence what acting should do; you accept that person in that situation. I thought she was wonderful.” Director Scott Hicks

certainly do,” she says. “And the best part is being able to just wake up in the morning and go off and do what I love.” After the untimely cancellation of “Mercy,” Schilling looked like she might go the way of other talented TV stars who are never heard from again. But instead, she nabbed the starring role once earmarked for Angelina Jolie in the big-screen adaptation of Ayn Rand’s “Atlas Shrugged.” While the movie received savage re-

views, Schilling was mostly spared any brick bats. Not long afterward, she went up against dozens of other actresses trying out for the high-profile role of Efron’s sweetie in “The Lucky One.” Even though director Scott Hicks (“Shine”) auditioned Schilling early on and was knocked out by her reading, he continued to conduct screen tests with See SCHILLING, Page 5F

AP PHOTO

Taylor Schilling stars alongside Zac Efron in ’The Lucky One.’

You’ve heard her pounding away on her guitar on Public Square, in the bar down the street and even at the local bowling alley. She comes in many incarnations, from a one-woman acoustic show to a duo with Dustin Drevitch of Lemongelli to part of the group Flaxy Morgan. K8, a 33-year-old Wilkes-Barre rocker and Hazleton native – pronounce her name Kate – has been a part of the local music scene for more than a decade now. Her sound is unmistakable, and it brings with it an ever-growing fan base. “I have done so much in my time as a musician. I love it,” she said. “I’m thankful for everyone who’s supported me over the years.” Her heartfelt lyrics, though sometimes dark, are offset by upbeat instrumentation. She laces her stories through sounds based in acoustic rock and folk with traces of pop. K8 started early, writing her first song when she was 6 years old, she says. “It was silly, a song for my mom’s birthday, but it had lyrics, a melody, and a little piano part that went to it,” she said. “I was very proud of it.” She took piano lessons and eventually picked up a guitar and never put down. When she was 21 she recorded a multisong demo with Tommy Bruno from Kartune. “It was very basic and stripped down, just me with an acoustic guitar or me and a piano,” she said. “Some people might consider that my first recording. That recording was titled “Because,” a sort of answer to the name of the main track: “Why?” In 2004 K8 put out what she considers her first major release, “Something Out of Nothing.” She is close to finishing a follow-up to “Something” and hopes to have it out this year. K8’s music, though well-known locally, also has gone out on national airwaves. From 2004 to 2008 her vocals were part of a Days Inn commercial that used the tune “Keep on the Sunny Side.” K8 has a full-time job in addition to the shows she plays throughout the week and weekends. It’s a taxing but necessary schedule, she says. “There are highs and lows in this business, and once something good happens to you it can be hard to keep that wave going,” she said. “You’ve got to get involved in a lot of things to keep that high in motion.” No matter the high or the low, K8’s love for music runs deep. “On one hand it’s selfish because it’s something you do, at least in my case, to have a release, kind of how people might work out when they’re upset. “At the same time, if you’re done performing a song you wrote, and someone comes up to you and says, ‘I broke up with my boyfriend, and that was the song that helped me through it,’ that means the world to you. It may be my personal release, but it also touched someone else’s life and affected them in a positive way.”


CMYK PAGE 2F

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

O

C

C

A

S

I

O

N

S

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

HOROSCOPE

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE

4/15/12

BONUS PUZZLE The Sunday Crossword

K-2

Don Gagliardo and C.C. Burnikel

KENKEN

1. Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1 through 4. 2. The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called cages, must combine using the given operation (in any order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners. 3. Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the top-left corner.

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis

JUMBLE

ARIES (March 21-April 19). Do the ends justify the means? Ethical matters will arise. Everyone has a different idea about where the line is and who has crossed it. You don’t have to draw a conclusion on the matter just yet. Think it over. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). The Golden Rule only works well if what you want “done unto you” is the same thing the “other” in question would prefer. Better to find out what that person really wants first. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). When you spend time with your friend, what happens is more than conversation. There’s a connection occurring that goes much deeper than words. You rely on your loved ones, and they rely on you. CANCER (June 22-July 22). The simplest way to get what you want is to ask for it. Just because it’s simple doesn’t mean it’s easy. In order to ask, you have to risk rejection. But if you don’t ask, you risk more than that. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). You will be keenly aware of your need for relationships with substance, and you’ll be drawn to deep thinkers. It won’t take much to start up an open and meaningful dialogue. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). You’ll be in a funny kind of mood. You may joke in a borderline appropriate way or issue a dare. You’ll use the element of surprise. Your humor works because it’s unexpected — and also because you’re hilarious. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). You usually like to consider every choice available to you. However, you’ll currently be in an uncharacteristically decisive mood, and once you make a decision, you’re not likely to back down, reverse it or change it. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Life will bring you superfluous ingredients. With so many choices available to you, it may be challenging to stick to the recipe. But if you do, you’ll love what you accomplish with simply a plan and the patience to follow each step. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). You’ll be looking for opinions to guide your next move. You’re not likely to trust advertisers or critics unless you know them personally. Friends will give you your best leads. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). You’ll finally get the chance to relax and release blocked emotions. As your sign mate Henry Miller wrote: “Our own physical body possesses a wisdom which we who inhabit the body lack.” AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You’re powerful, and you’ll walk a fine line between being influential and being manipulative. Manipulation is when you trick someone into wanting what you’d like them to want and make them believe it was their idea all along. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). Before you invent new methods to attain your goals, make sure you’ve given the old ones a try. The action that will be most effective may also be so obvious that it’s easy to miss. TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (April 15). The attitude of hope and optimism you developed as a child will color your world this year. Try to soar beyond the level of optimism you were taught, because what you believe will come true. May and June bring financial wins. You’ll love the special attention you get in June. You’ll present your works in a public forum in July. Aries and Virgo people adore you. Your lucky numbers are: 30, 29, 1, 38 and 13.

Puzzle Answers on 3F


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

UNIVERSAL SUDOKU

O

C

C

A

S

I

O

N

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 3F

WONDERWORD

By David Ouellet

PREVIOUS DAY’S SOLUTION

For information about WonderWord volumes and Treasuries, call Universal Press Syndicate at 1-800-255-6734.

UNIVERSAL SUDOKU KIDS

WITH OMAR SHARIF & TANNAH HIRSCH

GOREN BRIDGE

©1995 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

ADVICE

Thoughtful gifts convey thanks for hospitality Dear Abby: I’m confused about the protocol in thanking or repaying someone after staying several nights at their home. My feeling is, if you’re staying with people, the nicest way to thank them for their hospitality is to pay for most, if not all, the lunches and dinners you share with them when you dine out. That way, you lessen the monetary burden of your visit, and it gives you a chance to say “thank you” for the use of their home. Some visitors seem to think that when they come to your home, you should not only put them up, but also pay for all their activities while you show them your town. What is correct? Or is it a matter of preference? — Visiting From Phoenix

PREVIOUS SUNDAY’S SOLUTION

LAST WEEK’S PUZZLE ANSWERS KenKen Diagramless

Bonus Puzzle Bonus Puzzle

ON THE WEB For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com

MINUTE MAZE

DEAR ABBY

4/15

Cryptograms

4/15

New York Times

4/15

New York Times

Dear Visiting: According to Emily Post, when a guest stays overnight, a nice bottle of wine would be a proper gift if you know your hosts drink and their preference. If there are children in the household, a game they can all enjoy or candy might be nice. If you will be staying longer, she suggests a picture frame with a photo taken during your visit sent afterward, a houseplant in a decorative pot, hand towels or beach towels. And I agree with you that treating your host(s) to a nice dinner during your visit would be gracious and thoughtful. Dear Abby: One of my best supervisors is in a samesex relationship. She and her partner are raising three wonderful children from previous marriages. I have introduced them to my husband at the office as well as work-related social events. He says he “hates” them because he believes their relationship broke up their marriages and it’s wrong

HOW TO CONTACT:

to raise their children this way. When he encounters them he refuses to acknowledge them and will snarl when near them. Neither of them have done anything to deserve this treatment, and it makes me embarrassed and ashamed of him. I’ve tried to reason with him — nothing works. I told him flat out he can have his opinions, but I expect him to treat them with respect. I’m to the point where I have to attend work-related functions alone and not allow him to come to my office. That’s one solution, but I’m still upset about his attitude in general. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. — Upset in Texas Dear Upset: I suspect that your husband’s reason for “hating” your supervisor has less to do with the fact that she and her partner ended their marriages, and more to do with knee-jerk homophobia. Children who are raised in happy homes do better than those who are raised in a household filled with unresolved tension. I can’t change your husband’s attitude, and neither can you. Only he can do that, but enlightenment isn’t likely to be achieved until he recognizes a need for it. P.S. His manners are atrocious, and you’re right to keep him apart from your work environment. Dear Abby: Due to a health problem that caused some of my hair to break and fall out, I have recently begun wearing a wig. At a social function a woman who was not a friend of mine approached me and asked if I was wearing a hairpiece. How could I respond to such a rude question without admitting that I am wearing a wig? — Stumped in Pennsylvania Dear Stumped: Try this: “I’ll forgive you for asking that question if you’ll forgive me for not answering.”

To receive a collection of Abby’s most memorable — and most frequently requested — poems and essays, send a businesssized, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $3.95 ($4.50 in Canada) to: Dear Abby’s “Keepers,” P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included.)

Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 4/15


CMYK ➛

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

E

T

C

.

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

KINKADE Continued from Page 1F

AP PHOTOS

Thomas Kinkade’s ’Indy Excitement, 100 Years of Racing at Indianapolis Motor Speedway.’ The artist, whose brushwork paintings of idyllic landscapes, cottages and churches have been big sellers for dealers across the United States, died April 6.

tions, yet the public is coming in and just buying art off the wall,” said Ester Wells, gallery director at the Thomas Kinkade Signature Gallery in Pismo Beach, Calif. “Right now, people are just coming in and buying everything in our inventory.” Many customers bought art as a tribute while others said it was a smart investment: They feel his work will now be worth more down the road, Wells said. Others stopped by just to say how sorry they were to hear of his death. “We’re going to lose a great artist to the world but we’ll never forget him,” Wells said, adding that she thinks Kinkade will be remembered as another Norman Rockwell Kinkade regarded Rockwell as his earliest hero. His mom had a big collection of copies of Saturday Evening Post magazines, he said in a biography on his website.

“The scenes were nostalgic and brought back very happy memories for people,” said Marty Brown, who owns four galleries in Southern California that sell Kinkade paintings. Brown’s galleries had already had a record sales day by noon the day after the artist’s death, he said. The customers ranged from curious people who’d seen news of the death to longtime collectors purchasing a few more pieces. “Some people are coming and buying a couple or buying their first piece, or just buying something. But they all feel pretty bad, to tell you the truth,” he said.

’Christmas in New York’ by Thomas Kinkade.

Kinkade had a fan base that was unprecedented, and he made collectors out of the many people who brought his art into their homes. “That’s market penetration that we’ve never seen in art, for sure,” Brown said. Yet some of the qualities that made Kinkade’s art popular and accessible to everyday consumers also led to its criticism from art experts. “I think the reason you probably aren’t going to find his work in many museums, if any, is that there really wasn’t anything very innovative about what he was doing,” said Michael Darling, chief curator of Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art. “I really think that he didn’t bring anything new

DOMBROSKI BUILDERS, LLC

• Custom Homes • Additions • Remodeling • Roofing • Siding • Interior Damage • Fire, Water and Storm Restoraton We Will Work With Your Insurance Company!

Prompt – Reliable – Professional Over 26 Years Experience

570-406-5128 / 570-406-9682 PA#088686 • Fully Insured

THINKING OF SELLING REAL ESTATE...

Pat Busch

• • • • •

Experienced Knowledgeable Working for You Full Service Office Great Exposure

Jerry Busch, Jr.

749957

GERALD L. BUSCH REAL ESTATE, INC.

Each Office is Independently Owned And Operated.

(570) 288-2514 • Business (570) 709-7798 • Cell JerryBuschJr@aol.com

Thank You For Your Continued Support. We Are Open For Business, Stop By! John Campas - Owner

“We Meet by Accident”

ESTABLISHED 1979

QUALITY BODY WORK & PAINTING CARS – TRUCKS – HEAVY EQUIPMENT INSURANCE CLAIMS & UNIBODY REPAIR Monday through Saturday 8am - 6pm 40 Nottingham St | Plymouth

779-4144 • 332-3347 (Cell)

BEL L ES

Northeast Pennsylvania Music Teachers’ Association

EN ERG Y S AVIN G S W IN DO W S AL E

“88 Keys & 24 Songs”

C O N S TR U C TIO N C O .

FREE Trip le Pa ne Up gra d e o n a ll Plygem L ifestyle W ind o w s

TaxCreditApproved M axim um Efficiency& Sound Control

S id ing Exp erts To o ! PA012959

Don’t just watch a movie, experience it! All Stadium Seating and Dolby Surround Sound ALL FEATURES NOW PRESENTED IN DIGITAL FORMAT

TITANIC (2012) TITANIC (2012) (XD) (PG-13) 11:45AM, 3:45PM, 7:55PM (DOES NOT PLAY

ON THURS. 4/19)

21 JUMP STREET (DIGITAL) (R) 11:50AM, 2:25PM, 5:00PM, 7:45PM, 10:20PM AMERICAN REUNION (DIGITAL) (R) 12:45PM, 2:10PM, 3:25PM, 4:50PM, 6:10PM, 7:30PM, 8:50PM, 10:15PM (DOES NOT PLAY 6:10PM & 8:50PM ON THURS. 4/19) CABIN IN THE WOODS, THE (DIGITAL) (R) 11:40AM, 12:50PM, 2:00PM, 3:10PM, 4:20PM, 5:30PM, 6:40PM, 7:50PM, 9:00PM, 10:10PM DR. SEUSS’ THE LORAX (3D) (PG) 1:00PM, 3:15PM, 5:35PM, 8:00PM, 10:25PM DR. SEUSS’ THE LORAX (DIGITAL) (PG) (1:35PM, 4:00PM DOES NOT PLAY ON SAT. 4/14) HUNGER GAMES, THE (DIGITAL) (PG-13) 12:40PM, 1:30PM, 2:15PM, 3:55PM, 4:45PM, 5:40PM, 6:30PM, 7:20PM, 8:15PM, 9:05PM, 9:45PM, 10:40PM LOCKOUT (DIGITAL) (PG-13) 12:35PM, 2:55PM, 5:15PM, 7:35PM, 9:55PM MIRROR MIRROR (DIGITAL) (PG) 1:25PM, 4:35PM, 7:15PM, 10:00PM OCTOBER BABY (2012) (DIGITAL) (PG-13) 11:55AM, 2:25PM, 4:55PM, 7:25PM, 9:55PM RAID: REDEMPTION, THE (DIGITAL) (R) 12:25PM, 2:50PM, 5:15PM, 7:40PM, 10:05PM SALMON FISHING IN THE YEMEN (DIGITAL) (PG-13) 12:10PM, 3:20PM THREE STOOGES, THE (DIGITAL) (PG) 12:00PM, 1:10PM, 2:20PM, 3:30PM, 4:40PM, 5:55PM, 7:00PM, 8:10PM, 9:20PM, 10:30PM, TITANIC (2012) (3D) (PG-13) 1:40PM, 5:50PM, 9:50PM WRATH OF THE TITANS (3D) (PG-13) 2:35PM, 5:05PM, 7:35PM, 10:05PM WRATH OF THE TITANS (DIGITAL) (PG-13) 6:45PM, 9:15PM NO PASSES

You must be 17 with ID or accompanied by a parent to attend R rated features. Children under 6 may not attend R rated features after 6pm

Cabin in the Woods in DBox Motion Seating - R - 105 min (2:15), (4:30), 7:20, 9:40 *Cabin in the Woods - R - 105 min (2:15), (4:30), 7:20, 9:40 *The Three Stooges - PG - 100 min (1:40), (3:50), 7:00, 9:15 *Lockout - PG13 - 105 min (1:50), (4:10), 7:30, 9:50 American Reunion - R - 120 min (1:15), (2:10), (3:45), (4:40), 7:15, 7:45, 9:45, 10:15 **Titanic 3D - PG13 - 200 min (1:00), (2:00), 7:00, 8:00 Mirror Mirror - PG - 115 min (1:25), (3:50), 7:10, 9:20 ***Wrath of the Titans - PG13 110 min (4:15), 9:45 Wrath of the Titans - PG13 - 110 min (1:55), 7:25 The Hunger Games - PG13 - 150 min (1:00), (2:00), (4:00), (5:00), 7:00, 8:00, 10:00 21 Jump Street - R - 120 min (1:30), (2:15), (4:00), (4:45), 7:00, 7:45, 9:30, 10:15 (No 1:30 or 4:00 on Sat 4/14. No 7:00 or 9:30 on Sun 4/15 or Thurs 4/19)

The Lorax - PG - 105 min (2:20), (4:40), 7:30, 9:45

SPECIAL EVENTS The Metropolitan Opera: La Traviata Saturday, April 14 at 12:55pm only

Grateful Dead Meet Up 2012 Thursday, April 19th at 7:00pm All Showtimes Include Pre-Feature Content

(Parenthesis Denotes Bargain Matinees)

Avoid the lines: Advance tickets available from Fandango.com Rating Policy Parents and/or Guardians (Age 21 and older) must accompany all children under 17 to an R Rated feature *No passes accepted to these features. **No restricted discount tickets or passes accepted to these features. ***3D features are the regular admission price plus a surcharge of $2.50 D-Box Motion Seats are the admission price plus an $8.00 surcharge First Matinee $5.25 for all features (plus surcharge for 3D features).

825.4444 • rctheatres.com

• 3 Hrs. Free Parking At Participating Park & Locks with Theatre Validation •Free Parking at Midtown Lot Leaving After 8pm and All Day Saturday & Sunday.

THE MUSIC BOX DINNER PLAYHOUSE

196 HUGHES ST, SWOYERSVILLE, PA Presents

APRIL 13th to 29th

Musical inspired by and featuring the songs of Elvis Presley

Present this ad and receive $4 OFF the regular $39 tickets for Dinner & Show! CALL 283-2195 TO MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS TODAY!

Call: 283-2195 or 800-698-PLAY

Piano ~ Voice ~ Violin

RECITALS at the

F. M. Kirby Center, Wilkes-Barre, PA Sunday, April 29, 2012

15th Annual

Saturday, May 12th ~ 10am

11 a.m. ~ 1 p.m. ~ 3 p.m. ~ 5 p.m. “Buy 1 ticket ~ Enjoy 4 recitals”

C AL L

824- 7220

In June 2010, he was arrested outside Carmel, Calif., on suspicion of driving under the influence. That same year, one of his companies also filed for Chapter 11bankruptcy. The bankruptcy filing came as the company had started making payments on an almost $3 million court award against it in a lawsuit filed by a Virginia couple, Karen Hazlewood and Jeff Spinello. The Virginia gallery owners sued Kinkade and his company in 2003, arguing that he’d fraudulently persuaded them to invest in a licensed Kinkade gallery, according to the Los Angeles Times. The couple alleged that they were being undercut by discount sellers whose prices they were barred from matching, and they had merchandise they couldn’t sell. The court eventually sided with the couple. Kinkade faced similar lawsuits from other owners as a number of Kinkade galleries failed from 1997 to 2005. Brown said he hopes people remember Kinkade not only as a commercially successful artist but one who raised millions for charity by auctioning his works. “We’ve got a lot of people out there today that are a little sadder today because Thomas Kinkade passed away,” he said, adding: “I just hope that he’s in a better place.”

747966

Kinkade, who died on April 6 of what appeared to be natural causes in Los Gatos, Calif., embraced his popularity even as he drew less than appreciative attention from those within the art establishment who derided him, at least in part, for appealing so brazenly to the widest possible audience. “In their minds, he represented the lowest type of art,” said Jeffrey Vallance, an artist who hosted a show of Kinkade’s artwork in Santa Ana, Calif., in 2004. “He was different from other artists. You kind of felt like he was giving people what they wanted.” Kinkade’s art empire included reproductions of his numerous paintings in hand-signed lithographs, canvas prints, books and posters, calendars, magazine covers, cards, collector plates and figurines. As his art drew wider and wider attention, Kinkade didn’t shy away. “It is clear that everyday people need an art they can enjoy, believe in and understand,” he wrote in a catalog to the 2004 show. For Kinkade, such art meant light-infused renderings of tranquil landscape scenes, homes and churches that evoked an idealized past, some of which included religious iconography. As word of Kinkade’s untimely death at age 54 spread Saturday, fans flocked to some galleries to buy his work. “It’s crazy beautiful. We’re struggling with our own emo-

to art.” Kinkade also was criticized for selling reproductions of his works, not the originals. “That was something that drove the art world crazy,” Vallance said. “You were never really buying the real thing, you were buying something made by a machine.” In the 2004 catalog to his California show, Kinkade offered an answer to his critics, saying he didn’t look down upon any type of art. “As to the myriads of products that have been developed from my paintings, I can only state that I have always had the attitude that art in whatever format it is accessible to people is good,” he wrote. “All forms of art reproduction have meaning to some body of people.” But Alexis Boylan, who edited a 2011 book of essays, “Thomas Kinkade: The Artist in the Mall,” said Kinkade presented his art as value-driven and contrasted it with rap music and other forms of art that he was less fond of. “He saw his art as antagonistic towards other forms of artistic expression,” she said. “He was very antagonistic towards modern and contemporary art.” Amid the success, though, Kinkade had run into personal difficulties in recent years.

Open to the Public

15 Adult • $8 Student (18 and younger)

$

Tickets available at: ticketmaster.com, Kirby Box Office, Andrea Bogusko Music Co. or at the Door

749547

PAGE 4F


CMYK ➛ timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 5F

BOOKS Teen endures one dark journey

◆ BEST SELLERS HARDCOVER FICTION 1. The Lost Years. Mary Higgins Clark. Simon & Schuster, $26.99 2. Guilty Wives. James Patterson & David Ellis. Little, Brown, $27.99 3. Sacre Bleu. Christopher Moore. Morrow, $26.99 4. The Limpopo Academy of Private Detection. Alexander McCall Smith. Pantheon, $24.95 5. Betrayal. Danielle Steel. Delacorte, $28 6. The Shoemaker’s Wife. Adriana Trigiani. Harper, $26.99 7. The Beginner’s Goodbye. Anne Tyler. Knopf, $24.95 8. Stay Close. Harlan Coben. Dutton, $27.95 9. Lover Reborn. J.R. Ward. NAL, $27.95 10. Gypped. Carol Higgins Clark. Scribner, $25 HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. Drift. Rachel Maddow. Crown, $25 2. Weeknights with Giada. Giada De Laurentiis. Clarkson Potter, $35 3. The Big Miss. Hank Haney. Crown, $26 4. Trickle Down Tyranny. Michael Savage. Morrow, $26.99 5. The Pioneer Woman Cooks: Food from My Frontier. Ree Drummond. Morrow, $29.99 6. Imagine. Jonah Lehrer. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, $26 7. Mrs. Kennedy and Me. Clint Hill with Lisa McCubbin. Gallery, $26 8. Wild. Cheryl Strayed. Knopf, $25.95 9. All In. Paula Broadwell with Vernon Loeb. Penguin Press, $29.95 10. The Blood Sugar Solution. Mark Hyman, M.D. Little, Brown, $27.99 MASS MARKET 1. The Lucky One. Nicholas Sparks. Vision, $7.99 2. A Game of Thrones. George R.R. Martin. Bantam, $8.99 3. The Affair. Lee Child. Dell, $9.99 4. A Clash of Kings. George R.R. Martin. Bantam, $8.99 5. Chasing Fire. Nora Roberts. Jove, $7.99 6. I’ll Walk Alone. Mary Higgins Clark. Pocket, $7.99 7. The Postcard Killers. James Patterson & Liza Marklund. Vision, $9.99 8. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest. Stieg Larsson. Vintage, $9.99 9. Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter. Seth Grahame-Smith. Grand Central, $7.99 10. A Turn in the Road. Debbie Macomber. Mira, $7.99 TRADE 1. Fifty Shades of Grey. E.L. James. Vintage, $15.95 2. The Magic. Rhonda Byrne. Atria, $12.99 3. The Lucky One. Nicholas Sparks. Grand Central, $14.99 4. Heaven Is for Real. Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent. Thomas Nelson, $16.99 5. Bossypants. Tina Fey. Back Bay/Reagan Arthur, $15.95 6. What Do You Want to Do Before You Die? Jonnie Penn, Dave Lingwood, Duncan Penn, & Ben Nemtin. Artisan, $19.95 7. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. Rebecca Skloot. Broadway, $16 8. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest. Stieg Larsson. Vintage, $15.95 9. Zero Day. David Baldacci. Grand Central, $14.99 10. The Help. Kathryn Stockett. Berkley, $16

SCHILLING Continued from Page 1F

scores of other actresses. In the back of his mind, though, Schilling was the one. “Taylor Schilling was just a revelation to me,” Hicks told movieweb.com. “She was the very first person that (I read) and … I just kept gravitating back to (her). She has an extraordinary immediacy about her as an actress. You just believe what she’s saying. It sounds silly, but that’s in essence what acting should do; you accept that person in that situation. I thought she was wonderful.” “The Lucky One,” due in theaters Friday, stars Efron as a U.S. Marine stationed in Iraq who one day notices a discarded photograph of a young woman buried in the sand. When he gets up to retrieve the picture, he escapes a bombing that kills several members of his platoon. The photo becomes his lucky charm. Returning home after his third

By M.L. JOHNSON Associated Press

“Hand Me Down” (Dutton), by Melanie Thorne:

By JEFF AYERS For The Associated Press

“Heroes for My Daughter” (Harper), by Brad Meltzer:

B

rad Meltzer’s followup to his amazing “Heroes for My Son” features more talented individuals who prove one person truly can change the world. From the introduction of “Heroes for My Daughter,” where Meltzer delivers a personal message to his young daughter, the reader immediately understands how deeply personal this book is for the author.

tour of duty, Efron sets out to discover the identity of the girl in the picture. Thanks to a distinctive lighthouse in the background of the snapshot, he tracks her down to a small town on the coast of New Orleans where she’s living with her grandmother (Blythe Danner) and running a dog kennel. Initially, Schilling wants nothing to do with the stranger who can’t quite bring himself to tell her how he acquired her photograph. But when Danner gives Efron a job at the kennel, the stage is set for a smoldering love affair. The movie is the seventh adaptation of a Nicholas Sparks novel to reach the screen. The others are “Message in a Bottle,” “A Walk to Remember,” “The Notebook,” Nights in Rodanthe,” “Dear John” and “The Last Song.” Schilling thinks she knows why audiences can’t get enough of Sparks’ lush love matches. “I think all of the Nicholas Sparks (movies) make the case that not only is true love possible but it’s out there waiting for us. It doesn’t matter

He wants his daughter to understand that anything is possible. What better way to demonstrate that belief than by using stories of people who have defied the odds or spoken up when they were told to be quiet? The subjects are diverse, from Helen Keller and Rosa Parks to Carol Burnett and Bart Simpson’s sister, Lisa. After reading the text accompanying the hero, it makes perfect sense. One of the best stories tells of Mallory Holtman and Liz Wallace, players on the woman’s softball team of Central Washington University. During an important game, Western Oregon University senior Sara Tucholsky hit her very first home run. While running around the bases, she missed first base. She turned back to touch the base and tore a ligament in her leg. She crawled back to first and couldn’t move.

what you’re experiencing right now, there’s hope for all of us. I think that’s incredibly romantic.” Schilling was attracted to the role for the chance to play a woman who’s more complicated than she first appears. While Efron is top-billed, Schilling has the meatier role. Her character, Beth, starts out as a bitter, grief-stricken single mom who allows herself to be bullied by her ex-husband but who winds up stronger, happier and more in control of her own destiny. “Beth is such a dynamic character,” Schilling says. “ I really connected to her the first time I read the script. I was thrilled to be able to explore so many facets of this woman. “In a lot of ways, Beth has put her own life on the back burner in service to her son. … She has a lot of walls up. She’s very guarded. She’s almost resigned to not falling in love ever again. But after meeting the right guy, we see her open herself up again and believe in love. She becomes vulnerable around another human being. And I think that’s so beautiful.”

A pinch runner would negate the run, and if her teammates helped her, she would be called out. Holtman and Wallace checked with the umpires to make sure it was OK if they carried Tucholsky around the bases so she could have her home run. That run cost Central Washington University the game and a playoff spot. But the team gained something more valuable, and provided a lesson for us all. “Heroes for My Daughter” is the perfect book to read aloud to your children. The discussions generated from talking about these individuals will spark creativity and provide concrete examples that prove a hero doesn’t have to be wealthy or pretty. It’s all about standing up for what’s right against all odds. Meltzer sums it up best to his daughter: “Always remember: The truth is what people say behind your back.”

The role was not without the occasional physical challenge. For a sequence in which Beth is seen jogging with five or six dogs, Schilling had to hone her balance skills. Every week, she’d go out running, adding additional dogs one by one. Schilling didn’t need any preparation for her love scenes with Efron. She recently told MTV that smooching the “High School Musical” star was “not a bad way to make a paycheck.” When the quote is read back to her, she says, “I don’t remember saying that, but I second that today. I felt pretty blessed to go to work every morning with Zac. He made my job so easy. He’s a hard worker, a talented actor, and I felt so safe and comfortable around him. He’s a really down-to-earth guy.” Schilling, daughter of former prosecutor Robert Schilling and Tish Schilling, an MIT administrator, has wanted to perform “for as long as she can remember,” she notes. “It’s the only thing in my life that I’ve always been clear about.”

Liz Reid’s 12-year-old sister delivers the bad news: “Terrence is getting out next month.” The sex offender their mother has married is being released from prison and moving in with them. Liz’s sister, Jaime, immediately flees to live with their alcoholic father and conniving stepmother. But Liz, having seen their father beat their mother innumerable times and survived a drunken driving crash with him at the wheel, balks. She’ll try to make it work. And so she ignores it when Terrence touches her, obeys his petty demands regarding pizza toppings and TV show selections, and tries to block out the sounds of sex coming from her mother’s bedroom. She doesn’t complain when her mother buys Terrence a new set of weights instead of getting her children shoes. And when her mother tells her she must move out, Liz cries. A lousy home is better than no home, and Liz’s sense of security is tied to her mother. For years, her mother took the blows from her father to protect the girls. But now she has a new life, and she has chosen: Terrence will stay, Liz will go. Liz and her sister soon find themselves shuttled among relatives: Terrence’s brother, their father, one aunt and then another. Yet no matter where they go, Liz cannot escape Terrence. He visits, he calls, he writes. Melanie Thorne’s debut novel is raw with emotion as she describes Liz’s often futile efforts to protect her sister and herself from the predator their mother has invited into their lives. It is often hard to remember that this is, in fact, a novel and not a memoir. In a letter tucked in the front of the book, Thorne outlines the similarities between her life and her character’s. “My mom ... married a convicted sex offender,” she writes. “Like Liz, I was ‘asked’ to leave my home. And, like Liz, I was separated from my little sister at a time when we needed one another the most. Fifteen years later I still wonder what would have been different if my mom had forced her husband to leave instead of her daughters.” It’s a good question. Thorne’s novel is an eye-opener. It’s unlikely that anyone would disagree with a policy preventing sex offenders from living with young girls, but there’s almost no public discussion of what that means in practical terms. I suspect most of us believe that any good mother, any rational woman would choose her daughters over someone who has been convicted of sexual assault. But every year, hundreds, if not thousands, of women prove that’s not the case. Liz eventually finds a safe home with her mother’s sister, but Thorne makes it clear her path still won’t be easy, and she leaves the reader haunted by a nagging question: What happens to the children who are not so lucky?

When she was11, she decided to try out for a role in “Fiddler On The Roof.” She remembers her initial reluctance to audition until her father reminded her that anyone who showed up would land a part. “I remember walking into the audition room and feeling bizarrely comfortable,” she says. “I had a really good time. I was standing on the table dancing around. It just fit me. And since then, I’ve never had a Plan B.” Schilling was still in graduate school at New York University when she landed the starring role of Iraq war veteran Nurse Veronica Callahan on the 2009’s NBC drama “Mercy.” “I had to drop out of grad school after two years when the pilot was picked up,” the actress says. “I loved Veronica. She was such a strong lady. For my first job, it was such a tremendous opportunity.” For her next role in “Atlas Shrugged,” Schilling played the tough-as-nails business exec Dagny Taggart. “It was a great role to sink my teeth into, and I’m grateful for the experience,” says the ac-

tress, who notes she’s not signed up for any potential sequels in the proposed trilogy. In September, Schilling will be seen in the fact-based “Argo,” which was inspired by Joshuah Bearman’s Wired magazine article “How the CIA Used a Fake Sci-Fi Flick to Rescue Americans from Tehran.” The film will center on a team of CIA operatives who manage to smuggle American diplomats out of Iran by pretending they’re a Hollywood movie crew. Affleck not only stars in the movie as Tony Mendez, the leader of the operation, but he directed the film as well. “Ben moved seamlessly from acting to directing,” Schilling notes. “He wore both hats beautifully.” After seeing the Affleck-directed movies “The Town” and “Gone Baby Gone,” Schilling says she longed to toil alongside her fellow Boston native. “Honestly, Ben was on my dream list of people I’ve always wanted to work for,” she says. “And he was quite magnificent.”


CMYK PAGE 6F

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

T

R

A

V

E

L

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

Derby’s not just about the horses L By BRUCE SCHREINER Associated Press

A display of Kentucky Derby winners’ silks at the Kentucky Derby Museum.

AP FILE PHOTOS

John Velazquez rides Animal Kingdom to victory during the 137th Kentucky Derby horse race at Churchill Downs in Louisville, Ky. Although Louisville is best-known for the Derby, visitors in town for the May 5 race will find plenty of other things to do and see around town, from museums to historic hotels to trendy restaurants.

IF YOU GO LOUISVILLE CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU: One Riverfront Plaza, 401 W. Main St., Suite 2300, Louisville, Ky.; www.gotolouisville.com or 800-626-5646. Louisville Visitors Center, 301 S. Fourth St., 502-379-6109. MUHAMMAD ALI CENTER: 144 N. Sixth St., Louisville; alicenter.org/site/ or 502-584-9254. Tuesday-Saturday, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday, noon-5 p.m. Adults, $9; children 6-12, $4.

LOUISVILLE SLUGGER MUSEUM & FACTORY: 800 W. Main St., Louisville; www.sluggermuseum.org/ or 877-775-8443. Monday-Saturday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Adults, $11; children 6-12, $6. KENTUCKY DERBY MUSEUM: 704 Central Ave., Louisville; www.derbymuseum.org or 502637-7097. Adults, $14; children 5-12, $6 and 13-18, $11. MondaySaturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday, 11

a.m.-5 p.m. Closed Derby and Oaks race days, open 8 a.m. Sunday after Derby. HOTELS/ATTRACTIONS: • Brown Hotel, 335 W. Broadway, www.brownhotel.com/ • Seelbach Hilton, 500 S. Fourth St., www.seelbachhilton.com/ • 21C Museum, 700 W. Main St., www.21cmuseumhotels.com/louisville/ • Lynn’s Paradise Cafe: 984 Barret Ave., www.lynnsparadisecafe.com/

that also features athletic events, music and food. At the Brown Hotel, one of the city’s landmark places to stay, visitors can dig into a Hot Brown. The local favorite, an open-faced turkey and bacon sandwich covered with Mornay sauce (a creamy cheese sauce), was first served at the hotel decades ago. At the Seelbach Hilton, another renowned Louisville hotel

where Al Capone played blackjack, there’s an extensive bourbon collection, including ultrapremium single-barrel bourbons, served in a bar restored to an early 1900s feel. The cocktails are made from scratch, with Kentucky limestone water dispensed from old-fashioned seltzer bottles. The Oakroom at the hotel is one of the city’s premier dining spots.

Tradition gives way to avant garde at 21c Museum Hotel. The boutique hotel features contemporary art seemingly everywhere. The hotel includes the popular Proof on Main restaurant and bar. But Louisville’s most enduring landmark is Churchill Downs, situated south of downtown. The

3 ROOMS $589 PLUSH CARPET Based On 40 Sq. Yds.

• INSTALLED WITH PAD • FREE ESTIMATES

MARKET ST., NANTICOKE

Call (570) 436-1500

ELLISON CARPET

Tamara Sorrell, of Austin, Tx., wears her Derby hat before the 137th Kentucky Derby horse race.

historic track underwent a facelift several years ago that refurbished the six-level clubhouse, added luxury suites and spruced up the home of the Kentucky Derby. The spring racing meet begins April 28, a week before the Run for the Roses. Churchill’s Dawn at the Downs offer runs from Tuesday to Thursday of Derby week, May 1-3 this year, and includes a sumptuous Kentucky-style breakfast buffet from 7 to 8:30 a.m. in a dining space overlooking the finish line. Next door, the world’s most famous horse race is a daily attraction at the Kentucky Derby Museum. Situated just off Gate 1 at Churchill, the museum is filled with Derby memorabilia. Interactive displays let visitors pretend they’re in the middle of a thoroughbred race. They can take a

crack at calling a horse race as track announcer. The museum also offers tours of Churchill. Visitors can get a behind-the-scenes glimpse of millionaires’ row, the jockeys’ quarters, the press box and other areas of the track’s clubhouse. A barn and backside tour lets visitors soak in the life of thoroughbreds between races. Carolyn Hayden of Louisville brought her extended family from California to visit the museum and tour the track. “On a pretty day it’s great to be outside at the track,” she said.

ALL JUNK CARS & TRUCKS WANTED

BROADWAY SHOW BUS TRIPS

Bland McCall of Bennettsville, S.C., in front of the iconic Louisville Slugger bat at the Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory in Louisville, Ky.

Highest Prices Paid In Cash. Free Pickup. Call Anytime.

LION KING Wed. June 13th $175 (Orchestra)

VITO & GINO

JERSEY BOYS Wed. July 18th $150 (Front Mezz)

288-8995 •

Forty Fort

PHANTOM OF THE OPERA Wed. July 18th $135 (Orchestra)

Call Roseann @655-4247

AUTO-BUS

• NYC (Times Sq.) $30 • NYC Canal St. Shops $35 • Ocean City, NJ $40 • Rehoboth Beach, DE $55 • Wildwood, NJ $45 • Pt. Pleasant Beach, NJ $35 • IKEA Shopping $30 • Cape May, NJ $45 • King of Prussia Shopping $30 • Knoebles $25 • Baltimore Harbor $45 • Wine Fest, Watkins Glen $40 • NJ Meadowlands Flea Mkt. $25 • NYC San Gennaro Fest $35 • NYC South Street Seaport $35 • Sands Casino $20 incl. $30 slot, $5 food • Atlantic City Resorts Casino $35 incl. $30 slot

12 MONTHS SAME AS CASH

Group Bus Rental • To & From Florida You & Your Car

Call For a 2012 Brochure www.auto-bus.com

744991 732959

570-474-6771 ext. 4

JO JO’S TRAVELERS

JO JO’S TRAVELERS ** New York City **

Wednesday & Saturday

** Mt Airy Casino ** 5/14, 6/18, 7/23, 8/20, 9/17

743203

** Hollywood Casino ** 5/6, 6/10, 7/15, 8/12, 9/9

** One Day Tours **

Peddler’s Village (Strawberry Fest) 5/6

Ellis/Liberty Islands/Seaport 5/12, 6/16, 7/14, 8/11 Baltimore Harbor 5/27, 6/24, 7/21

Seneca Lake Wine Tour 6/16

NYC 3-hr Sightseeing Cruise 6/17

Hershey Gardens/Riverboat Cruise 6/23

Finger Lakes Wine Fest 7/14

Catskills Luncheon Train Ride 7/15

Bronx Zoo 7/22 Little Odessa & Coney Island 7/28 Philadelphia Land & Sea Tour 8/4 Seneca Lake Wine Tour (Includes Lunch) 9/8, 10/6 Woodbury Common Outlets 9/30 Catskills Luncheon Train Ride 10/7 Spirit of NY Fall Foliage Tour 10/20

** Multi-Day Tours ** Long Island Hampton’s 6/17-18 Wildwood 6/25-28 Cape Cod - Dunes, Harbors, Whales & Martha’s Vineyard 7/8-12

Washington, DC 7/13-15 Myrtle Beach 9/9-15 Cape May 9/16-17 Lake George 10/5-7

Hudson Valley Wine Tour 10/13-14 749534

www.JoJosTravelers.com

749688

OUISVILLE, Ky. — Shadowbox with a silhouetted Muhammad Ali. Grab a bat and take a few swings in a batting cage at the Louisville Slugger Museum. Dig into a Hot Brown at the place where the savory sandwich was created. Sip Kentucky bourbons at a hotel where Al Capone played blackjack. Louisville is home to plenty of originals that liven up a visit to Kentucky’s largest city, best known for a 2-minute sporting event. It’s the iconic horse track that overshadows everything in town on the first Saturday in May. That’s when the Kentucky Derby is run at Churchill Downs — where mint juleps flow, women sport flowery hats and sleek thoroughbreds race for immortality. Visitors don’t have to be horse racing buffs to enjoy the charms of this city along the Ohio River. Usually, the city is adorned in red, pink and white blossoms as springtime thoughts turn from following NCAA basketball brackets to handicapping the Derby. But this year’s unseasonably warm weather resulted in a showy but early bloom. But the spring greenery is always dazzling in the Bluegrass state. While in Louisville, visitors can stroll along Waterfront Park — the city’s 85-acre front yard. The expansive playground near downtown offers panoramic views of downtown and the Ohio River. “This time of year, Louisvillians get so happy,” said local restaurateur Lynn Winter. “It’s like everyone comes out.” A short walk away, visitors can see workers crafting bats used by big leaguers. The Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory is a treasure trove of memorabilia that features bats used by Babe Ruth, Hank Aaron, Ted Williams and other Hall of Famers. Visitors can pick a bat, wood or aluminum, and take a crack in the batting cages. Leading up to the Derby, the city celebrates with a giant fireworks show, a parade, a steamboat race and a balloon race — among the highlights of a festival

Call: (570) 655-5050


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 1G

MARKETPLACE

CALL TO PLACE 24/7

570.829.7130 800.273.7130 SEARCH: TIMESLEADER.COM/CLASSIFIED EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@TIMESLEADER.COM

135

It’s time to get the kids together for a new photo with Mom. Take part in a special Mother’s Day tradition as we feature area Moms in FULL COLOR in our People section on May 13. All photos must arrive by May 1st at noon.

Mom getesr... a flow ALL featured Moms will receive a FREE BEGONIA from Kettler Florist and Greenhouses, 1205 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre. 412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

M SRP $40,340

2012 CadillacCTS AW D

2012 CadillacCTS CPE

$25

OR

$35

Drop off or return this completed form with your photo and payment to: The Times Leader, Mother's Day Photos, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711. Include a self-addressed, stamped envelope to have your photo returned or pick it up at our office after May 15th. On the back of the photo, please print mother's name and the names of everyone in the photo as they appear from left to right and your mailing address. All entries must include phone number. Name ________________________________________________Phone ______________________________ Address ______________________________________________________________________________ City _________________________________________________State ______ Zip ________________ ❏ YES! I want the $25 photo ❏ YES! I want the $35 photo I’ve enclosed my check for: $______ Or, charge to credit card #_________________________________ Expiration date___________ Sec. Code________

Subscribe to The Times Leader . Call 570-829-5000.

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

LEASE FO R O N LY

412 Autos for Sale

Mother’s Day Photo Deadline May 1, 2012 at noon

timesleader.com

412 Autos for Sale

LEASE FO R O N LY

259 369

$

$

24 m onths $ 0 Security Deposit

29 CTS IN STO CK M SRP $41,490

Extra-large photo

Basic photo

Mail photo with payment and form below. Credit card payments have the option of calling 829-7189 or 970-7371 or by emailing classifieds@timesleader.com.

LEASE FO R O N LY

24 m onths $ 0 Security Deposit LEASE FO R O N LY

329 319

$

24 m onths $ 0 Security Deposit

$

24 m onths $ 0 Security Deposit

412 Autos for Sale

Legals/ Public Notices

135

Legals/ Public Notices

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Pittston, at a meeting to be held on Wednesday, April 18, 2012 at 7:00 P.M. in Council Chambers, City Hall, 35 Broad Street, Pittston, Pennsylvania will consider the following Ordinance (of which this is only a summary) on second and final reading. “AN ORDINANCE” File of Council No. 5 {2012} “AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF PITTSTON, LUZERNE COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA, RESTRICTING PARKING ON KENNEDY BOULEVARD.” The full text of File of Council No. 5 {2012} is available for public inspection at the Office of the City Clerk, City Hall, 35 Broad Street, Pittston, Pennsylvania, during regular office hours of 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M., Monday thru Friday except holidays. Any person with a disability requiring special accommodation to attend this meeting should notify the City Clerk’s office at 570-654-0513, as early as possible, but not later than 3 to 5 working days prior to this meeting. Joseph Moskovitz, City Clerk City of Pittston

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

M SRP $40,890

2012 CadillacSRX Luxury Edition M SRP $36,710

22 SRX’s IN STO CK

2012 CadillacSRX


PAGE 2G

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 110

ALL JUNK VEHICLES WANTED!!

100 ANNOUNCEMENTS 110

Lost

LOST CAT: Tan, grey, white & black Tiger/Tortoiseshell mix, female cat. Declawed. Shaved area on back, needs medication. Last seen Vulcan St., Wilkes-Barre on 4/4/12. Reward. Call Dawn/Jim 570-991-2330

135

Legals/ Public Notices

Lost

ŠCALL ANYTIME ŠHONEST PRICES ŠFREE REMOVAL

CA$H PAID ON THE SPOT 570.301.3602 135

Legals/ Public Notices

LEGAL NOTICE Public Notification of Change of Date and Location of Public Meeting and Hearing to Solicit Comments on Laser Northeast Gathering Company, LLC’s; Plan Approval Application Nos: 58-399-016, 58399-017, 58-399-018, and 58-399-019 Notice is hereby given under 25 Pa. Code § 127.48, that the Department of Environmental Protection (Department) is changing the date and location of the public meeting and hearing to solicit comments on the proposed Air Quality Plan Approvals, Nos. 58-399-016, 58-399-017, 58-399-018, and 58-399-019, for Laser Northeast Gathering Company, LLC (the Permittee), 333 Clay Street, Suite 4500, Houston, TX 77022, to construct the proposed Compressor Stations, which are to be located in Liberty Twp., Middletown Twp., and Forest Lake Twp., Susquehanna County, as described in the Permittee's June 24, 2011 Plan Approval Applications and any other subsequent supplemental submissions. The stations each will consist of two CAT G3606LE engines and two dehydrators with reboilers. The VOC emissions from each facility will not equal or exceed 50 TPY, based on a 12-month rolling sum. The NOx emissions from each facility will not equal or exceed 100 TPY, based on a 12month rolling sum. Total PM, SOx, and CO emissions from each facility will not equal or exceed 100 TPY, based on a 12-month rolling sum. The HAPs from each facility must never equal or exceed 10 TPY of any single HAP and must never equal or exceed 25 TPY of all aggregated HAPs, based on a 12-month rolling sum. The Plan approval and Operating Permit will include testing, monitoring, record keeping and reporting requirements designed to keep the sources operating within all applicable air quality requirements. The facilities are subject to MACT 40 CFR Part 63 Subparts ZZZZ and HH, NSPS Subpart JJJJ and 25 Pa. Code § 127.12(a)(5) Best Available Technology (BAT) requirements. The visible emission opacity shall not be equal to or greater than 20% at any time. The company shall be subject to and comply with 25 Pa. Code § 123.31 for malodorous emissions. Emissions from the engines will meet MACT Subpart ZZZZ, MACT Subpart HH, BAT & NSPS Subpart JJJJ requirements. The Plan Approvals and Operating permits will contain additional recordkeeping and operating restrictions designed to keep the facilities operating within all applicable air quality requirements. A public meeting will be held for the purpose of receiving comments on the proposed air quality plan approvals. The meeting will be held on April 26, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. at the Elk Lake High School located at 2380 Elk Lake School Road, Springville, PA 18844-0100. Persons interested in commenting are invited to appear. Staff from DEP's Air Quality Program will explain the application review process and applicable regulations. This presentation will be followed by a question and answer session with citizens. The public meeting will be followed by a DEP public hearing beginning at 7:30 p.m. during which time citizens will have an opportunity to present oral testimony regarding the proposed Air Quality Plan Approval applications. Anyone who wishes to present oral testimony during the public hearing may register that evening prior to the hearing. Citizens will have a maximum of five minutes each to present testimony. Written testimony of any length also will be accepted. The testimony will be recorded by a court reporter and transcribed into a written document. DEP will respond in writing to all relevant testimony provided during the public hearing. Copies of the applications, the Department's technical reviews and other supporting documents are available for public inspection between the hours of 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. at the Department's Wilkes-Barre Regional Office, 2 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701-1915. Appointments for scheduling a review may be made by calling (570) 826-2511. The general procedures for the hearing are as follows: To develop an agenda for the hearing, the Department requests that individuals wishing to testify at the hearing submit a written notice of their intent. The notice should be sent to Mark Wejkszner, Air Quality Program Manager, Department of Environmental Protection, Air Quality Program, Wilkes-Barre Regional Office, 2 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre, PA 187011915. The Department will accept notices up to the day of the public hearing. This written notice should include the person's name, address, telephone number and a brief description as to the nature of the testimony. Individuals who submit a notice of intent to testify will be given priority on the agenda. If time permits, the Department will allow individuals who have not submitted a notice of intent to testify to present their comments. Each individual will have up to 5 minutes to present testimony. The Department requests that individuals present written copies of their testimony in addition to their oral presentations. To insure that all speakers have a fair and equal opportunity to present their testimony, relinquishing of time will be prohibited. Further details relating to the procedures to be followed at the hearing will be outlined at the beginning of the hearing. Persons unable to attend the hearing can submit written testimony to the Department through May 7, 2012. The Department will address comments from the public before any final actions are taken on the proposals. A summary report addressing the concerns raised by the public will be released should the Department decide to issue the Plan Approval. Send written comments to Mark Wejkszner, Air Quality Program Manager, Department of Environmental Protection, Air Quality Program, Wilkes-Barre Regional Office, 2 Public Square, WilkesBarre, PA 18701-1915. Persons with a disability who wish to comment and require an auxiliary aid, service or other accommodations should contact the Department at the address shown above, or the Pennsylvania AT&T relay service at (800) 654-5984 (TDD) to discuss how the Department may address their needs. For additional information regarding the above, contact Mark Wejkszner at (570)826-2511 or write to the Department at the Wilkes-Barre address given previously.

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

110

Lost

WANTED ALL JUNK CARS & TRUCKS HEAVY EQUIPMENT DUMPTRUCKS BULLDOZERS BACKHOES

Highest Prices Paid!!!

FREE REMOVAL Call Vito & Ginos Anytime 288-8995

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

120

Found

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted Highest Prices Paid In CA$H FREE PICKUP

570-574-1275

135

Legals/ Public Notices

LEGAL NOTICE DEADLINES Saturday 12:30 on Friday Sunday 4:00 pm on Friday Monday 4:30 pm on Friday Tuesday 4:00 pm on Monday Wednesday 4:00 pm on Tuesday Thursday 4:00 pm on Wednesday Friday 4:00 pm on Thursday Holidays call for deadlines

135

PUBLIC NOTICE HANOVER TOWNSHIP CONTRACTORS LICENSE EXPIRING APRIL 30, 2012 The Township of Hanover is serving notice that all Contractors licenses will expire April 30, 2012. The Township is happy to announce that there will be no increase in license fees. The licenses can be renewed at the Hanover Township Code Enforcement Office located at 1267 Sans Souci Parkway, Hanover Township, PA. 18706 between the Hours of 8:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. Monday thru Friday. Any questions please call 570-825-1247. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, at the Regular December Meeting of Courtdale Borough on Tuesday, April 17, 2012, at the Courtdale Municipal Building, 5 Blackman St., Courtdale, Luzerne County, PA at 7:00 PM, Council intends to act on an Ordinance restricting the parking of non-motorized vehicles and also of commercial vehicles in excess of 10,000 pounds gross vehicle weight on the roadways of the Borough of Courtdale between 6:00 PM and 6:00 AM, authorizing enforcement, providing penalties and repealing prior inconsistent Ordinances. Council will also act on an Ordinance joining with other municipalities per the Intergovernmental Cooperation Act (ICA) by becoming a settler of the PA Local Government Investment Trust and entering the Declaration of Trust to pool funds for investment purposes. The Ordinance further authorizes Courtdale to purchase and redeem shares in the Trust; designates Trustees with official custody of funds which are invested by the purchase of shares in the trust and makes determination and empowerments required by the ICA. The public is invited to attend. A complete copy of the Ordinances are available for review at the Courtdale Municipal Building, Mon. through Fri., 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM prevailing time.

or fax to 570-831-7312 or mail to The Times Leader 15 N. Main Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 For additional information or questions regarding legal notices you may call Marti Peznowski at 570-970-7371 or 570-829-7130

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

360

Instruction & Training

150 Special Notices

BABY SITTER

Part Time Sitter needed in my Forty Fort home from 5am to 8:20am, 3 to 4 (maximum) days per week. Child sleeps until 7:30 am, then needs to eat breakfast, get dressed and be at the bus stop for 8:20. $50/week. 570-231-9106

150 Special Notices ADOPT Adoring couple longs to adopt your newborn. Promising to give a secure life of unconditional and endless love. Linda & Sal 1-800-595-4919 Expenses Paid

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

PT/SEASONAL NATURALISTS www.bearcreek-

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted Highest Prices Paid In CA$H FREE PICKUP

PAYING $500

150 Special Notices

150 Special Notices

Octagon Family Restaurant

375 W Main St, Plymouth, PA 18651

570-779-2288

W eekend S pecial $13.95 for a Large Plain Pie & a Dozen Wings

Dine in only. Valid Saturday & Sunday. One coupon per party/table. Present coupon upon ordering.

Home of the Original ‘O-Bar’ Pizza

*Unemployment Hearing? *Sued by Credit Card Company? *Charged with DUI? *Sued for Custody or Child Support? Call the Law office of Michael P. Kelly 570-417-5561

Child Care

DAYCARE In my Kingston

home. Licensed. Ages 15 months to 6 years. 570-283-0336

360

Instruction & Training

EARN COLLEGE DEGREE ONLINE. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV Certified. Call 888-2203984. www.CenturaOnline.com

380

Travel

ALSO PAYING TOP $$$

BROADWAY SHOW BUS TRIPS

for heavy equipment, backhoes, dump trucks, bull dozers HAPPY TRAILS TRUCK SALES 570-760-2035 542-2277 6am to 8pm

240

THE LION KING

Wed., June 13 $175. Orchestra JERSEY BOYS Wed., July 18 $150. “Front Mezz”

200 AUCTIONS Farm & Stock Auction

CAMEO HOUSE BUS TOURS

PHANTOM OF THE OPERA

Wed., July 18 $135. Orchestra

Call Roseann @ 655-4247

New York City Saturday May 19th

Kips Bay Decorator ShowHouse & ....more! Considered by most to be the Premier Showcase of interior design

For more info 570-655-3420 anne.cameo @verizon.net 250 General Auction

COIN AUCTION

Reduced Rates from $839. per person

2012 GROUP CRUISES

New Jersey to Bermuda Explorer of the Seas 09/09/12 New York to the Caribbean Carnival Miracle 10/13/2012 New York to the Caribbean NCL’s Gem 11/16/2012 Includes Transportation to Piers Book Early, limited availability! Call for details 300 Market St., Kingston, Pa 18704 570-288-TRIP (288-8747)

406 This Sunday, April 15th 10 am viewing, 11 am start. 1925 Wyoming Ave., Exeter, next to Sabatini’s Pizza. www.auction zip.com Terms: Cash

ATVs/Dune Buggies

HONDA`09 REKON

TRX 250CC/Electric shift. Like New. REDUCED $3,650. (570) 814-2554

YAMAHA `07 RHINO 450. , 6 ft. snow

GREEN plow, winch, mud bottom mounts, moose utility push tube, windshield, hard top, gauges, side mirrors, doors, 80 hours run time. Like new. $6,999. 570-477-2342

310

Attorney Services

BANKRUPTCY

FREE CONSULT

Guaranteed Low Fees Payment Plan! Colleen Metroka 570-592-4796

BANKRUPTCY

DUI-ARD SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENEFITS WORKERS’ COMP Free Consultation 25+ Years Exp.

Joseph M. Blazosek 570-655-4410 570-822-9556 blazoseklaw.com DIVORCE No Fault $295 divorce295.com Atty. Kurlancheek 800-324-9748 W-B Free Bankruptcy Consultation Payment plans. Carol Baltimore 570-822-1959

Autos under $5000

409

Autos under $5000

BUICK ‘03 LESABRE

4 door, V6, 78k, loaded, white, gray cloth interior, very good condition!!! $4999 warranty available call. 570-388-6008

CADILLAC `94 DEVILLE SEDAN

94,000 miles, automatic, front wheel drive, 4 door, air conditioning, air bags, all power, cruise control, leather interior, $3,300. 570-394-9004

SATURN `97 L

Driven less than 2,500 miles a year! 35,000 miles, good on gas. $2,995. 717-873-1887

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

‘00 DTS E AUTO SALES CADILLAC Tan, satellite CHEVROLET `01 ACM343-1959 radio, leather, moon roof, loaded IMPALA excellent High mileage. Runs GOOD CREDIT, BAD 1009 Penn Ave Scranton 18509 Across from Scranton Prep

like a dream. If you can name it, it has probably been replaced. $2,999 (570)690-8588

CHEVROLET `90 CELEBRITY STATION WAGON

3.1 liter V6, auto, A/C. excellent interior, new tires. 66K $3,250. 570-288-7249

To place your ad call...829-7130 3.8V6 A1 condition. Auto, cruise, tilt. All power accessories. Traction control. 3 remotes. Like new tires & brakes. Mechanic is welcome to inspect this vehicle. Reduced to $2,950. 570313-8099/457-5640

FORD ‘83 MUSTANG 5.0 GT. 70,000

original miles. California car, 5 speed, T-tops, Posi rear end, traction bars, power windows, rear defroster, cruise. New carburetor and Flow Master. Great Car! $5000 OR equal trade. 468-2609

LEO’S AUTO SALES 92 Butler St Wilkes-Barre, PA 570-825-8253

Travel

Full size 4 wheel drive trucks

409

FORD `97 WINDSTAR GL. 71K miles.

MINIMUM DRIVEN IN

www.FortisInstitute.edu

FORTIS Institute – Forty Fort 166 Slocum St Forty Fort, PA 18704 (Greater WilkesBarre Area) Financial aid available for those who qualify. For consumer information, visit www.Fortis.edu

SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY Free Consultation. Contact Atty. Sherry Dalessandro 570-823-9006

To place your ad Call Toll Free 1-800-427-8649

Instruction & Training

Day and evening classes available! CALL NOW! 1-888-788-2890

Attorney Services

570-574-1275

camp.org 570-472-3741

360

310

330 Wow, another wonderful Oyster Wedding! Jacque and Michael couldn’t be happier. Have a great honeymoon Mr. & Mrs. Sullivan!! bridezella.net

Jill Dietrick Secretary Borough of Courtdale

You may email your notices to mpeznowski@ timesleader.com

Legals/ Public Notices

PONTIAC ‘99 GRAND AM 4 door 4 cylinder

automatic. Good condition. $2,150

CHEVY ‘04 MALIBU CLASSIC door, 4 cylinder,

4 auto, good condition. 120k. $2,850.

FORD ‘01 F150 XLT Pickup Triton V8,

auto, 4x4 Super Cab, all power, cruise control, sliding rear window $4,250 Current Inspection On All Vehicles DEALER

PONTIAC `99 BONNEVILLE

112,000 miles. Alloys, new battery, newer engine (76K) $2,600. 570-825-9657

412 Autos for Sale

AUDI ‘03 TT ROADSTER CONVERTIBLE BEAUTIFUL AUTO1.8. 4 cylinder

Loaded, silver, black leather. 66,500 miles. Bose premium sound. 6 CD changer. New tires, inspection, timing belt. Garaged, no snow. $10,200 OBO. 570-592-2458

BMW `00 528I

Premium sound package, very clean, recently tuned, seat memory, silver. 26 mpg on trips, Low mileage for the age of the car 122,500 $5,875. 570-704-7286

BMW `06 650 CI

Black convertible, beige leather, auto transmission, all power. $35,750. 570-283-5090 or 570-779-3534

BMW ‘98 740 IL

White with beige leather interior. New tires, sunroof, heated seats. 5 cd player 106,000 miles. Excellent condition. $5,300. OBO 570-451-3259 570-604-0053

CREDIT, NO CREDIT Call Our Auto Credit Hot Line to get Pre-approved for a Car Loan!

800-825-1609

11

www.acmecarsales.net

AUDI S5 CONV.

Sprint blue, black / brown leather int., navigation, 7 spd auto turbo, AWD 09 CADILLAC DTS PERFORMANCE PLATINUM silver, black leather, 42,000 miles 09 CHRYSLER SEBRING 4 door, alloys, seafoam blue. 08 CHEVY AVEO red, auto, 4 cyl 07 CHRYSLER PT Cruiser black, auto, 4 cyl 07 BUICK LUCERNE CXL, silver, grey leather 06 MERCURY MILAN PREMIER, mint green, V6, alloys 05 VW NEW JETTA gray, auto, 4 cyl 04 NISSAN MAXIMA LS silver, auto, sunroof 03 CHRYSLER SEBRING LXT red, grey leather, sunroof 03 AUDI S8 QUATTRO, mid blue/light grey leather, navigation, AWD 01 VOLVO V70 STATION WAGON, blue/grey, leather, AWD 99 CHEVY CONCORDE Gold

SUVS, VANS, TRUCKS, 4 X4’s

09

DODGE JOURNEY

07

CADILLAC

SXT white, V6, AWD SRX silver, 3rd seat, navigation, AWD 06 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD blue, grey leather 4x4 06 NISSAN TITAN KING CAB SE white, auto 50,000 miles 4x4 truck 06 CHEVY TRAILBLZAER LS, SILVER, 4X4 06 PONTIAC TORRENT black/black leather, sunroof, AWD 05 FORD ESCAPE LTD green, tan leather, V6, 4x4 05 FORD ESCAPE XLT V6, sandstone 4x4 05 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB CAB SPORT, blue, auto, 4x4 truck 04 SUBARU FORESTER X Purple, auto, AWD 04 FORD F150 XF4 Super Cab truck, black, 4x4 04 CHEVY AVALANCHE Z71, green, 4 door, 4x4 truck 04 MERCURY MOUNTAINEER V6, silver, 3rd seat AWD 04 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB SLT SILVER, 4 door, 4x4 truck 04 FORD FREESTAR, blue, 4 door, 7 passenger mini van 04 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE OVERLAND graphite grey, 2 tone leather, sunroof, 4x4 03 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER black, V6, 4x4 03 SATURN VUE orange, auto, 4 cyl, awd 03 DODGE DURANGO RT red, 2 tone black, leather int, 3rd seat, 4x4 03 FORD EXPLORER SPORT TRAC XLT, 4 door, green, tan, leather, 4x4 02 NISSAN PATHFINDER SE, Sage, sun roof, autop, 4x4 01 FORD F150 XLT Blue/tan, 4 door, 4x4 truck 01 CHEVY BLAZER green, 4 door, 4x4 01 FORD EXPLORER sport silver, grey leather, 3x4 sunroof 00 CHEVY SILVERADO XCAB, 2WD truck, burgundy 00 CHEVY BLAZER LT black & brown, brown leather 4x4 99 FORD RANGER XLT gold Flairside X-Cab truck, V6 4x4 99 ISUZI VEHIACROSS black, auto, 2 door AWD 89 CHEVY 1500, 4X4 TRUCK

condition. 136k miles. $4,995.

570-814-2809

CADILLAC ‘09 DTS 33,000 MILES. Extra Clean $24,999. WARRANTY MAFFEI AUTO SALES 570-288-6227

CHEVY ‘95 ASTRO

MARK III CONVERSION VAN. Hightop. 93K. 7 passenger. TV/VCP/Stereo. Loaded. Great condition. $3,495 (570) 574-2199

CHRYSLER `04 SEBRING LXI CONVERTIBLE

Low miles - 54,000. V6. FWD. Leather interior. Great shape. A/C. CD. All power. $6,900. Negotiable New inspection & tires. (570) 760-1005

CHRYSLER ‘04 SEBRING CONVERTIBLE

Silver, 2nd owner clean title. Very clean inside & outside. Auto, Power mirrors, windows. CD player, cruise, central console heated power mirrors. 69,000 miles. $4900. 570-991-5558

CHRYSLER ‘07 SEBRING

Low miles, heated seats, moonroof, 1 owner. $11,220 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

DODGE `00 DURANGO SPORT

4.7 V8, 4WD, 3rd row seat, runs good, needs body work $1900. 570-902-5623

FORD `93 MUSTANG

Convertible. 5.0. 5 speed. New top. Professional paint job. Show car. $6,500. Call 570-283-8235

FORD `94 MUSTANG GT Convertible, 5.0 auto, very nice car, (R Title). $4,600. 570-283-8235

FORD ‘02 MUSTANG

GT CONVERTIBLE

Red with black top. 6,500 miles. One Owner. Excellent Condition. $17,500 570-760-5833

FREE CONSULT

Guaranteed Low Fees Payment Plan! Colleen Metroka 570-592-4796

BDA UN KI R- AU PRT DC Y

SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENEFITS WORKERS’ COMP Free Consultation 25+ Years Exp.

Joseph M. Blazosek 570-655-4410 570-822-9556 blazoseklaw.com DIVORCE No Fault $295 divorce295.com Atty. Kurlancheek 800-324-9748 W-B

‘11 DODGE DAKOTA CREW 4x4, Bighorn 6 cyl. 14k, Factory Warranty. $21,799 ‘11 Ford Escape XLT, 4x4, 26k, Factory Warranty, 6 Cylinder $20,899 ‘11 Nissan Rogue AWD, 17k, Factory Warranty. $19,899 ‘10 Dodge Nitro 21k alloys, tint, Factory Warranty $18,599 ‘08 Chrysler Sebring Conv. Touring 6 cyl. 32k $12,899 ‘08 SUBARU Special Edition 42K. 5 speed, Factory warranty. $12,299 ‘05 HONDA CRV EX 4x4 65k, a title. $12,799 ‘06 FORD FREESTAR 62k, Rear air A/C $7999 ‘01 LINCOLN TOWN CAR Executive 74K $5,399 TITLE TAGS FULL NOTARY SERVICE 6 M ONTH WARRANTY

HONDA `01 ACCORD

V6, Automatic, 4 door, Power everything, Moon Roof, Leather Interior, 6 CD changer & cassette. 112,000 miles. Good Condition $5,200. 814-0717

HONDA ‘02 CIVIC EX

Auto, moonroof, 1 owner. $8,888 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

HONDA ‘04 ACCORD

LX SEDAN. 162,000 miles, new battery, excellent condition. Auto, single owner, runs great. Upgraded stereo system. 4 snow tires and rims & after market rims. Air, standard power features. Kelly Blue Book $7800. Asking $7200 570-466-5821

HONDA ‘05 CIVIC COUPE 4 cylinder, auto

Gas $aver! $8,995 WARRANTY MAFFEI AUTO SALES 570-288-6227

HONDA 07 FIT Auto. 4 door. Keyless entry. Hatchback. $10,999

HONDA ‘08 ACCORD 4 door, 4 cylinder, auto $16,995 WARRANTY MAFFEI AUTO SALES 570-288-6227

KELLY

875 W. Market St. Kingston, PA. 570-287-2243

AUTO SERVICE DIRECTORY

460 AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE DIRECTORY 468

Auto Parts

Call 829-7130 To Place Your Ad BANKRUPTCY

570-825-7988

700 Sans Souci Highway WE SELL FOR LESS!!

310

Auto Parts

570-301-3602

Don’t Keep Your Practice a Secret!

Attorney Services

CROSSROAD MOTORS

468

LAW DIRECTORY

310

412 Autos for Sale

SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY Free Consultation. Contact Atty. Sherry Dalessandro 570-823-9006 *Unemployment Hearing? *Sued by Credit Card Company? *Charged with DUI? *Sued for Custody or Child Support? Call the Law office of Michael P. Kelly 570-417-5561

Sell your own home! Place an ad HERE 570-829-7130

BEST PRICES IN THE AREA CA$H ON THE $POT, Free Anytime Pickup 570-301-3602

472

Attorney Services

Free Bankruptcy Consultation Payment plans. Carol Baltimore 570-822-1959

CALL US! TO JUNK YOUR CAR

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted Highest Prices Paid In CA$H

FREE PICKUP

570-574-1275

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

Auto Services

$ WANTED JUNK $ VEHICLES LISPI TOWING We pick up 822-0995

EMISSIONS & SAFETY INSPECTION SPECIAL

$39.95 with this coupon Call V&G Anytime 574-1275

Expires 6/30/12 WANTED

Cars & Full Size Trucks. For prices... Lamoreaux Auto Parts 477-2562


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N

M A S S I V E

B$

$

O F

S AVI AV IN G S !

TH E O NL Y TH ING DRO PPING ARE TH E PRIC ES !

S E R V I $ C E

$$

$ $ $$ $

IN STO C K O NLY

2012 N IS S A N ROGUE SA VE O VER S FW D $3000 O FF M SR P

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $$

O FF M SR P

25 @ TH IS P R IC E

4 Cyl, CVT , AC, AM /F M /CD, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s

B U Y FO R

18 ,9 6 0

*

OR

W / $15 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $75 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H

$

L EAS E FOR *

18 9

PP luERs TaM x.O.

$

*$189 PerM o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $12,459.20; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1,999 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery $2,202.50. $1330 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed .

2012 N IS S A N S E N TRA 2.0S R S P E CIA L E DITION STK#N 21795 H U R R Y O NLY M O D EL# 12212 6 A VA ILA B LE M SR P $20,530 @ TH IS P R IC E V IN # 705857

4 Cyl, CVT , A/C, M o o n ro o f, Na viga tio n , Allo ys , S p o iler, F lo o r M a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s

B U Y FOR

$

IN STO C K O NLY

*

$

OR

W / $10 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H

LEAS E FOR

*

169

PER MO. P lu s Ta x.

*$169 Perm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $16,913; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2,202.50. In clu d es $725 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te.

2012 N IS S A N M URA N O S AW D SA VE $5000 O R M O R E O N A L L 2012 M U R A NO ’S

IN STO C K O NLY

V-6, CVT , A/C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts 6 A VA ILA B LE @ TH IS P R IC E & S p la s h Gu a rd s !

B U Y FOR

27,495

$ $ $ $ $$ $ $ $$ $

*

$

OR

W / $150 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H

LEAS E FOR

299

*

PER MO. P lu s Ta x.

*$299 Perm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $16,913; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2,202.50. In clu d es $725 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te.

$

$

$

$

$ $ $ $

$

$

B U Y FO R

19 ,9 9 9

W / $5 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE AN D $5 0 0 N IS S AN CAP TIVE CAS H

T u rb o 4 Cyl, CVT , L ea ther, M o o n ro o f, Na viga tio n , Allo ys , Pu re Drive, Blu eto o th, M u ch, M u ch M o re!

B U Y FOR

25,495

$

$

$

*Price is p lu s ta x a n d ta gs .

2011 N IS S A N M URA N O CROS S -CA BRIOL E T A W D EXEC U TIVE DEM O !

$ $ $ $ $ $$ $$ $ $

V6, CVT , Na viga tio n , Po w erT o p , L ea ther, Hea ted S ea ts , Bo s e S o u n d M u s ic Bo x, M u ch, M u ch M o re!

SA VE $10,000 O FF M SR P O NLY O NE!

P R IC E & TO P DR O P !

$

$

$

OR

L EAS E FOR *

199

P ER M O. P lu s Ta x.

B U Y FO R

3 7,5 2 0

*

W / $3 0 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE *Price is p lu s ta x a n d ta gs .

2012 N IS S A N FRON TIE R S V K C 4X4

$

$

*

W / $5 0 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H

STK#N 20877 M O D EL# 27011 M SR P $47,520

*

*$199 Perm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $12,216.50; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1,999 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2,202.50. $1000 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed .

6 A VA ILA B LE @ TH IS P R IC E

$

IN STO C K O NLY

30 @ TH IS P R IC E

4 Cyl, CVT , AC, AM /F M /CD, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s

$ $ $ $ $$ $ $ $$ $

STK#N 21665 M O D EL# 20612 M SR P $27,240 V IN # 115052

$ $ $ $ $$ $ $ $$ $

STK#N 21536 M O D EL# 22112 M SR P $23,050 V IN # 273561

2012 N IS S A N JUK E IN STO C K SL AW D O NLY

$$

$ $ $ $ $$ $ $ $$ $

17,695

$

‘‘SS

$ $ $$ $ $ $ $$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $$ $ $

STK#N 21404 M O D EL# 13112 M SR P $23,960 V IN # 196876

STK#N 21472 M O D EL# 23212 M SR P $32,525 V IN #211509

L$

R IS H O W ER I ER G

AP

2012 N IS S A N A L TIM A 2.5S SA VE $5000 O N $ $ $ $ $$

$

G R E A T

TH E NUM BER 1 NISSAN DEAL ER IN TH E NE AND C ENTRAL PA REGIO N**

I N V E N T O R Y

$

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 3G

$

$ $

STK#N 21686 M O D EL# 31412 M SR P $28,500 V IN # 432945

SA VE $4500 O R M O R E O N M O ST NEW 2012 FR O NTIER !

$ $ $ $ $$ $ $ $$ $

IN STO C K O NLY

2 A VA ILA B LE @ TH IS P R IC E V6, Au to , A/ C, S p o rtPkg, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T Ilt, F lo o rM a ts & M u ch M o re!

$

B U Y FOR

23,995 OR $ *

W / $250 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE

LEAS E FOR *

229

P ER M O. P lu s Ta x.

*$229 Perm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $16,530; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $2,699 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2,891.50.

2012 N IS S A N M A XIM A 3.5S V S E DA N W H A T A LEA SE! STK#N 21297 M O D EL# 16212 M SR P $36,925 V IN # 815839

IN STO C K O NLY

$ $ $ $ $$ $ $ $$ $

V6, CVT , Co ld W ea ther Pa cka ge, M o n ito rPkg, L ea ther, M o o n ro o f, Bo s e S o u n d , F lo o r M a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s

SA VE $5000 O FF M SR P O N A LL SV M A XIM A S

6 A VA ILA B LE @ TH IS P R IC E

$

B U Y FOR

31,925

*

W / $150 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H

OR

$

L EAS E FOR

299

*

P ER M O. P lu s Ta x.

*$299 Perm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $19,939.50; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $1,999 Ca s h D o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2,202.50. $1700 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed .

*Ta x a nd Ta g a d d itio na l. Prio rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib le fo rTypo gra phic a l Erro rs . All reb a tes & inc entives a pplied . **0 % APR in lieu o f reb a tes . As k fo rd eta ils . **As perN is s a n M o nthly Sa les V o lu m e R epo rta s o f O c t2 0 11. All Pric es b a s ed o n im m ed ia te d elivery in s to c k vehic le o nly. All o ffers ex pire 4 /3 0 /12 .

Th e

#1 N

K E N

N

is s a n

De a le rin

P O L L O CK

IS

S

A

N

N

.E. PA

1- 8 66- 70 4- 0 672

229 M U N DY S TRE E T W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .

w w w .ke n polloc kn is s a n .c om

®


PAGE 4G

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

NEW 2012 FORD ESCAPE XLS FWD NEW 2012 FORD ESCAPE XLT FWD Automatic, 16” Steel Wheels, PL, PW, Keyless Entry with Remote, Safety Canopy, Side Air Bags, Air

APR

M O S.

PLUS

XLT, Safety Canopy, Side Impact Safety Pkg., Pwr. Seat, Auto., PL, PW, CD, Air, Fog Lamps, Privacy Glass, Roof Rack, 16” Alum. Wheels, Sirius Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry, Rear Cargo Convenience Pkg.,

24 Mos.

*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/12.

NEW 2012 FORD ESCAPE XLT AWD

NEW 2012 FORD ESCAPE LMTD AWD

, XLT, Safety Canopy, CD, Side Impact Safety Pkg., Pwr. Seat, Auto., PDL, PW, Air, Fog Lamps, Privacy Glass, Roof Rack, Rear Cargo Convenience Pkg., 16” Alum. Wheels, Sirius Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry,

APR

M O S.

PLUS

, Safety Canopy, Side Impact Safety Pkg., CD, Sirius Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry, Rear Cargo Convenience Pkg.,

24 Mos.

24 Mos.

*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/12.

*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/12.

NEW 2012 FORD FOCUS SE

NEW 2012 FORD FUSION SE

Auto., CD, Anti-Theft Sys., Side Curtain Air Bags, 16” Alloy Wheels, Tilt Wheel, AC, Instrument Cluster, Message Center, Fog Lamps, MyKey, Convenience Pkg., Cruise Control, Perimeter Alarm, MyFord, SYNC, Sirius Satellite Radio,

Auto., CD, Alum. Wheels, Tilt, PL, PW, Pwr. Seat, Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry, Message Center,

24 Mos.

*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/12.

NEW 2012 FORD EDGE EcoBoost Engine, Pwr. Windows, PDL, Air, Advance Trac with Roll Stability Control, Remote Keyless Entry, CD, MyFord

24 Mos.

APR

PLUS

M O S.

*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/12.

24 Mos.

APR

PLUS

*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/12.

APR

NEW 2012 FORD FUSION SEL AWD CD, Alum Wheels, Tilt, PW, PDL, Pwr. Seat, Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry with Keypad, Message Center,

24 Mos.

M O S.

PLUS

M O S.

*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/12.

CALL NOW 823-8888 1-800-817-FORD Overlooking Mohegan Sun 577 East Main St., Plains

Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B *Tax and tags extra. Security Deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. See salesperson for details. All payments subject to credit approval by the primary lending source, Tier 0 rate. Special APR financing cannot be combined with Ford cash rebate. “BUY FOR” prices are based on 72 month at $18.30 per month per $1000 financed with $2,500 down (cash or trade). Photos of vehicles are for illustration purposes only. Coccia Ford is not responsible for any typographical errors. No Security Deposit Necessary. See dealer for details. Sale ends APRIL 30, 2012.


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 5G


PAGE 6G

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

0.9% for24 to 36 m on ths a n d 1.9% for37 to 60 m on ths on n e w 2012 A c c ord , Civic , Cros s tour, Od ys s e y, P ilot, a n d Rid ge lin e m od e ls . $0 DO W N PAYM EN T

HO N DA W ILL M AKE 1S T PAYM EN T *M u stfin a n ce o rlea se AHFC.

G AS M ILEAG E 23 C ITY/ 34 H W Y

HO N DA W ILL M AKE 1S T PAYM EN T *M u stfin a n ce o rlea se AHFC.

$0 DO W N PAYM EN T

G AS M ILEAG E 28 CITY/39 HW Y

2012 Hon d a

CIV IC L X

• M odel#FB2F5C EW • 140-hp 16-V alve SO H C i-V TEC ® • 5-Speed A utom atic Transm ission • A ir C onditioning w ith A ir-Filtration System • Pow er W indow s/ Locks/M irrors • C ruise C ontrol• R em ote Entry • 160-W att A M /FM /C D A udio System w ith 4 Speakers • A BS • D ual-Stage,M ultiple-Threshold Front A irbags (SR S) • Front Side A irbags w ith Passenger-Side O ccupant Position D etection System (O PD S) • Side C urtain A irbags

$

***LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS THROUG H AHFC . $0 DOW N. 1S T PAY M ENT PAID BY HONDA. TAG S DUE AT DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $12,043 .50

199/ 199/M OO.***.***

G AS M ILEAG E 17 CITY/24 HW Y

$0 DO W N PAYM EN T

2012 H on d a

P IL O T L X

• 250-hp 24-V alv e SO H C i-V TEC ® • 5-Speed A utom atic Trans m is s ion • 8 Pas s enger Seating • V ariable Torque M anagem ent® 4-W heelD riv e Sy s tem (V TM -4® ) • V ehic le Stability A s s is tTM (V SA ® ) w ith Trac tion C ontrol• Pow er W Indow s /Loc k s / M irrors • Front and R ear A ir C onditioning w ith A ir-Filtration Sy s tem • 229-W att A M /FM /C D A udio Sy s tem w ith 7 Speak ers inc luding Subw oofer • R em ote Entry • A BS • D ual-Stage, M ultiple-Thres hold Front A irbags (SR S) • Front Side A irbags w ith Pas s enger-Side O c c upant Pos ition D etec tion Sy s tem (O PD S)

$

2012 H on d a

A CCO RD L X

• M odel#C P2f3C EW • 177-hp 16-V alve D O H C i-V TEC ® Engine • 5-Speed A utom atic Transm ission • Pow er W indow s/Locks/M irrors • R em ote Entry • C ruise C ontrol• A ir C onditioning w ith A ir-Filtration System • 160-W att A M / FM /C D A udio System w ith 6 Speakers • V ehicle Stability A ssistTM (V SA ® ) w ith Traction C ontrol• A BS • Sual-Stage,M ultiple-Threshold Front A irbags (SR S) • D ual-C ham ber Front Side A irbags w ith Passenger-Side O ccupant Position D etection System (O PD S) • Side C urtain A irbags

$

2219/ 19/M OO.**.**

**LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS THROUG H AHFC . $0 DOW N. 1S T PAY M ENT PAID BY HONDA. TAG S DUE AT DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $13 ,081.50

G AS M ILEAG E 22 C ITY/ 30 H W Y

O . **** 319/ 319/M O.****

2012 Hon d a

CR-V E X

• M odelR M 4H 5C JW • 185-hp • 2.4-Liter,16-V alve SO H C i-V TEC ® 4-C ylinder Engine • R ealTim e A W D w ith Intelligent C ontrolSystem ™ • V ehicle Stability A ssist™ (V SA ® ) w ith Traction C ontrol • A utom atic Transm ission • C ruise C ontrol• A /C • O ne-Touch Pow er M oonroof w ith Tilt Feature • R em ote Entry System • Bluetooth® H andsFreeLink ® • M ulti-angle rearview cam era w ith guidelines • 160-W att A M /FM /C D A udio System w ith 6 Speakers • Bluetooth® Stream ing A udio • Pandora® Internet R adio com patibility • SM S Text M essage Function • U SB A udio Interface • A nti-Lock Braking System (A BS) • D ual-Stage,M ultiple-Threshold Front A irbags (SR S) • Front Side A irbags w ith Passenger-Side O ccupant Position D etection System (O PD S) • Side C urtain A irbags w ith R ollover Sensor

****LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS THROUG H AHFC . $0 DOW N PAY M ENT. 1S T PAY M ENT AND TAG S DUE AT DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $17,601.60

IN S TO CK!

*BAS E D ON 2008-2009 E PA M IL E AGE E S T IM AT E S , RE F L E CT ING NE W E PA F UE L E CONOM Y M E T HODS BE GINNING W IT H 2008-2009 M ODE L S . US E F OR COM PARIS ON PURPOS E S ONL Y . DO NOT COM PARE T O M ODE L S BE F ORE 2008. Y OUR ACT UAL M IL E AGE W IL L VARY DE PE NDING ON HOW Y OU DRIVE AND M AINT AIN Y OUR VE HICL E . AL L OF F E RS E XPIRE 4/ 30/ 2012.

M AT AT T B U R N E H O N D A 1110 WYOMING AVE. • SCRANTON • 1-800-NEXT-HONDA w w w. M a t t B u r n e H o n d a . c o m

M A AT TT T B U UR RN N EE

H O ON N DD A A PR R EE - O W W N N EE DD

C EE N NT T EE R R

A CCO R D S .9% .9%

DDue ueTo To TThh eeSuccess SuccessOO ff OO ur urNNew ew CCaarrGGaara rage geSa Sale,W le,W eeHHaave veLot Lotss OO ff Fresh Fresh NNew ew Tra Tradd es es SH SH OO PP AT AT WW WW WW ..MM ATTB ATTBUURRNNEE HH OONNDD AA. .CCOOMM

Tan,93K M iles

S ilver,97K M iles

N ow

$6,950

08 TO Y O TA Y A RIS SDN

S ilver,60K M iles

$11,500

N ow

N ow

$7,950

06 KIA SPO RTA G E 4W D

CRV 4W D 08 07 07 07 07 07 07 09 09

C RV C RV C RV C RV C RV C RV C RV C RV C RV

LX Lt B lue,63K...........................................N O W LX N avy,47K.............................................N O W EX Lt B lue,47K...........................................N O W EX Lt B lue,63K...........................................N O W EX S ilver,53K.............................................N O W EX S ilver,50K.............................................N O W EX G reen,46K............................................N O W LX G reen,36K............................................N O W EX B lack,48K.............................................N O W

$15,750 $15,950 $16,350 $16,950 $17,950 $17,950 $17,950 $18,500 $18,950

08 08 08 07 08 09 09 10

C RV C RV C RV C RV C RV C RV C RV C RV

2

60 M O S.

C CAL AL LL :1-800-N :1-800-NEE X XTH TH O ON NDD A A

LX B eige,17K.............................................N O W EXL R ed,65K............................................N O W EX N avy,43K.............................................N O W EXL B lue,39K...........................................N O W EXL N A V I W hite,53K...........................N O W EX W hite,19K............................................N O W EXL Lt.B lue,28K.......................................N O W EXL Lt B lue,23K.......................................N O W

C HEV Y C O BA LT SDN $18,950 $18,950 $18,950 $19,350 $20,950 $20,950 $22,500 $23,750

S ilver,69K M iles

N ow

36 M O S.

H O N D A ’S

98 TO Y O TA SIENNA

04 HY UNDA I XG 350 SDN

1

05 “LS ”,W hite,76K 09 “LT”S ilver,36K

$8,950 $13,500

05 HO NDA C IV IC SE SEDA N B lack,58K M iles

$11,950

N ow

$12,500

07 HY UNDA I SO NA TA SE SDN B eige,89K M iles

$9,950

N ow

HO NDA A C C O RD SDN 05 EX,G ray,56K 06 EXL V 6,B ronze,33K

$12,500 $14,950

CROS S TOUR 4W D

11 C RO SSTO UR EXL G reen,19K..................NO W $31,500 05 JEEP G RA ND C HERO KEE 4W D

Laredo,Khaki,68K M iles N ow

$12,500

06 HO NDA C RV LX 4W D M oss,82K S ilver,35K

$12,750 $15,950

07 FIT

HY UNDA I SA NTA FE 4W D 07 Ltd,W hite,71K 07 Ltd,C herry,60K

W hite,21K

$16,950

G ray,47K.......................................................NO

07 M A ZDA C X-7 G RA ND TO URING A /N

$14,950

04 C HEV Y SILV ERA DO 1500 XC A B 4X4 Z71,W hite,70K

N ow

$16,950

09 C IV IC 09 C IV IC 09 C IV IC 10 C IV IC 09 C IV IC 09 C IV IC 11 C IV IC 09 C IV IC 11 C IV IC 10 C IV IC 09 C IV IC 10 C IV IC

B lack,29K M iles

N ow

$20,950

08 C A DILLA C STS A W D SDN D iam ond,43K,N avi

N ow

$22,500

Y O UR NIC E TRA DE HERE

08 ELEM 08 ELEM 08 ELEM 10 ELEM

EL EM EN T 4W D

ENT LX S ilver,56K...............................NO W ENT EX B lack,43K...............................NO W ENT EX S ilver,33K...............................NO W ENT EX Om inP earl,24K........................NO W

N ow

$15,750 $17,500 $18,950 $20,950

RD RD RD RD RD RD RD RD RD RD RD

S and,43K M iles

N ow

$13,950

$15,950

10 HY UNDA I ELA NTRA G LS SDN Khaki,3K M iles

N ow

W hite,52K M iles

$17,750

$15,950

10 TO Y O TA RA V 4 4W D

06 C A DILLA C SRX A W D N ow

G reen,30K M iles N ow

$19,950

60 m os

PIL OT 4W D 07 A C C O 09 A C C O 10 A C C O 09 A C C O 09 A C C O 09 A C C O 09 A C C O 09 A C C O 09 A C C O 09 A C C O 09 A C C O

$13,500 $16,500

07 NISSA N A LTIM A “S” SDN

2.9%

10 V W RO UTA N V A N

$20,950

06 EX,B lack,71K

R ed,41K M iles

$15,500 $16,250 $16,250 $16,750 $16,750 $16,950 $16,950 $16,950 $16,950 $17,250 $17,950 $18,750

D V D ,N avi,R ed,33K M iles N ow

04 EXL,N avi,B lack,75K

08 JEEP LIBERTY SPO RT 4X4

ACCORDS

36 m os

HO NDA PILO T 4W D

$11,950

W

LX SD N S ilver,36K...............................N O W LX SD N G ray,18K................................N O W LX-S SD N S ilver,15K.........................N O W LX SD N Lt B lue,30K.............................N O W EX SD N B lue,23K................................N O W EX SD N W hite,36K..............................N O W LX C PE B lue,19K.................................N O W LX-S Titanium ,9K...................................N O W LX C PE W hite,19K...............................N O W LX-S SD N S ilver,16K.........................N O W H Y BR ID SD N B lack,36K.................N O W EX SD N B lack,31K...............................N O W

1.9% 08 HY UNDA I V ERA C RUZ A W D

10 O DY SSEY TO URING DV D/NA V I S ilver,29K....NO W $32,500 10 O DY SSEY EXL G ray,24K...............................NO W $28,950

CI V I C

B lack,58K

$14,950 $15,950

10 TO Y O TA C O RO LLA S SDN

FIT

O DYS S EY

EX C arbon B ronze,49K................................NO W LX SDN R ed,40K..................................NO W EXL SDN S ilver,53K.............................NO W EX C PE R ed,34K....................................NO W EX C PE B lue,33K...................................NO W EX SDN G rey,22K..................................NO W EXL SDN G old,21K..............................NO W EXL SDN G reen,37K............................NO W EXL 6 SPD C PE B lue,47K.............NO W EXL V 6 SDN S ilver,37K....................NO W EXL SDN B lack,11K.............................NO W

$14,950 $16,500 $18,500 $18,500 $18,950 $18,950 $19,500 $19,500 $19,950 $20,950 $21,500

09 PILO T EXL R DV D B urgandy,62K.............NO W 09 PILO T EX S ilver,33K........................................NO W 09 PILO T EX S ilver,34K........................................NO W 09 PILO T EX B lack,42K........................................NO W 09 PILO T EXL-DV D N avy,33K........................NO W 10 PILO T EX N avy,16K.........................................NO W 09 PILO T EXL M ocha,17K...................................NO W

$23,950 $25,950 $25,950 $26,950 $27,950 $28,500 $29,500

D isclosure:1.9% - 36 m os,2.9% - 60 m os thru A .H .F.C .W -A -C on C ertified A ccords.C ertified H onda’s have 1yr - 12k B asic W arranty.B alance of 7yr - 100K P ow ertrain W arranty from in-service date.

08 HO NDA RIDG ELINE RTL 4W D G ray,82K M iles

N ow

$20,950

10 V O LV O XC -90 A W D

Taupe,47K M iles N ow

$27,950

08 C HRY SLER A SPEN LTD 4W D B lack,42K M iles

N ow

$22,500

Y O UR NIC E TRA DE HERE

( (5 57 70 0) )3 34 411 -11 4 40 00 0 • • 11 -8 80 00 0-8 82 22 2-2 211 11 0 0

1 1 1 0 W Y O M M

I N G A V E . • S C R A N T O N , PA

1 8509

w w w .m a ttb u rn e h o n d a .co m

on d a y - T

h u rs d a y 9 -8 :0 : 0 0 • F rid i d a y 9 -5 &

S a tu rd a y 9 -3 :3 :3 0


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 7G

24 For

Get

Just

Rounds of Golf

$35

Join The Most Exclusive Club In Northeastern Pennsylvania,

The Times Leader Golf Club! Play at these courses*: Arnold’s Golf Course

490B. West Third St., Nescopeck, PA (570) 752-7022

Blue Ridge Trail Golf Club

18 Golf Course Road, Sugarloaf, PA (570) 384-4097

Briarwood “East” & “West” Golf Clubs

Towanda Country Club

Emanon Country Club

Traditions at the Glen

4301 Watson Blvd., Johnson City, NY (607) 797-2381

Fernwood Hotel Resort

Twin Oaks Golf Course

Hollenback Golf Course

Villas Crossing Golf Course

1050 N. Washington St., Wilkes Barre, PA (570) 821-1169

Lakeland Golf Club

Route 107, Fleetville, PA (570) 945-9983

Mill Race Golf Course

4584 Red Rock Road, Benton, PA (570) 925-2040

❏ Yes!

Box 6180, Towanda, PA (570) 265-6939

Old State Road, RR#1 Box 78, Falls, PA (570) 388-6112

Route 209, Bushkill, PA (888) 337-6966

*Your membership covers the greens fees at most of the participating golf courses.

Sugarloaf Golf Course

260 Country Club Dr., Mountain Top, PA (570) 868-4653

4775 West Market Street, York, PA (717) 792-9776

Phone orders call 829-7101 or order online at timesleader.com by clicking on “Contact Us > Subscribe” at the top right of our home page.

Stone Hedge Golf Course

49 Bridge St., Tunkhannock, PA (570) 836-5108

Mountain Laurel Golf Course HC1, Box 9A1, White Haven (570) 443-7424

Mountain Valley Golf Course

1021 Brockton Mountain Dr., Barnesville, PA (570) 467-2242

Sand Springs Country Club 1 Sand Springs Drive, Drums, PA (570) 788-5845

Shadowbrook Inn and Resort Route 6E, East Tunkhannock, PA (800) 955-0295

Shawnee Inn & Golf Resort

RR3 Box 283, Dallas, PA (570) 333-4360

521 Golf Road, Tamaqua, PA (570) 386-4515

White Birch Golf Course

660 Tuscarora Park Rd., Barnesville, PA (570) 467-2525

White Deer Golf Club

352 Allenwood Camp Ln., Montgomery, PA (570) 547-2186

Woodloch Springs

Woodloch Drive, Hawley, PA (570) 685-8102

Driving Ranges & Instruction Academy of Golf Center

1333 N. River St., Plains, PA (570) 824-5813

International Golf School

Multiple course locations. Call (570) 752-7281 for information.

1 River Rd., Shawnee On The Delaware, PA (800) 742-9633

I want to join The Times Leader Golf Club. Cards are now available.

______ paid in full at $35 per membership (includes Pa. sales tax). Pickup at The Times Leader. ______ membership(s) paid in full at $35 each (includes Pa. sales tax & shipping). ______ TOTAL ENCLOSED Name___________________________________________________ Address_________________________________________________

timesleader.com

Phone__________________________ City______________________________ State___ ZIP____________ Check one: ❒ MasterCard ❒ Visa ❒ Discover ❒ American Express Charge to my credit card # ____________________________________ Exp. date_______ Security Code_____ Signature_____________________________________ Return form to: The Times Leader Golf Club, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711

Join the Club Today!


PAGE 8G

H O M E

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

A TOP 10 IN THE NATION SUZUKI SALES VOLUME DEALER 2 YEARS RUNNING**

Join the...

I Love My Suzuki Car Club!

H O M E

R U N

R U N

P R I C I N G

P R I C I N G

$ S A V E $

ONLY AT 2012 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA 4WD

NEW

Stk# S1976

Stk#S1987

24,284* 22,499*

$ 4 Wheel Drive, Voice MSRP Activated Navigation w/ Blue $ Tooth, Automatic Transmission, Ken Pollock Sale Price Power Windows, Power Locks, Manufacturer Rebate - $ 1,000* Power Mirrors, $ Owner Loyalty Rebate - 1,000* Electronic Stability Control

$

BUY NOW FOR:

20,499*

NEW Stk# S2045

2012 SUZUKI SX4 CROSSOVER AWD

NEW

2012 SUZUKI KIZASHI SLS AWD

30,118* 27,999* $

3-Mode Intelligent All-Wheel Drive, 8 Standard Airbags, Power Windows, Power Locks, Power Manufacturer Rebate Owner Loyalty Rebate Mirrors, 6 Spd Transmission

$

$

MSRP w/ Accessories $ Ken Pollock Sale Price

- 1,000* - 1,000* - 500*

Manufacturer Rebate $ Owner Loyalty Rebate $ Tax Relief Bonus Customer Cash

BUY NOW FOR:

25,499*

1,000* - $ 500*

2012 SUZUKI KIZASHI S AWD

NEW

MSRP

$

23,669* 21,999*

$ Advanced Intelligent All-Wheel Ken Pollock Sale Price Drive, 8 Standard Airbags, Dual Zone $ Manufacturer Rebate Digital Climate Control, Automatic CVT Transmission, TouchFree Smart Owner Loyalty Rebate $ Key, Power Windows, Power Locks, $ Tax Relief Bonus Customer Cash Molded Mud Flap Package

- 1,000* - 1,000* - 500*

$

BUY NOW FOR:

19,499*

16,570* 15,299* $

$

MSRP $ Ken Pollock Sale Price

- 1,000* - $ 500*

Manufacturer Rebate Owner Loyalty Rebate

BUY NOW FOR:

13,799*

$ S A V 24,999* E % 0 $

Stk#S2005

Stk#S2050

2012 SUZUKI SX4 SEDAN

LE Popular Package, 8 Standard Airbags, 6 Speed Transmission, Power Windows, Power Locks, Power Mirrors, Alloy Wheels

$

14,899*

NEW

Stk#S2081

BUY NOW FOR:

$

Power Sunroof, Heated Leather Power Seats, Blue Tooth, Rockford Fosgate Stereo, 8 Standard Airbags, Alloy Wheels, Electronic Stability Control, Power Windows, Power Locks, Power Mirrors, Fog Lamps, Automatic

18,019* 16,399* $

$

MSRP $ Ken Pollock Sale Price

NEW

2012 SUZUKI EQUATOR CREW CAB SPORT 4X4

4.0L V6 w/ Automatic Transmission, $ MSRP w/ Accessories Dual Stage Airbags, 17” Aluminum $ Wheels, 4-Wheel Anti-Lock Ken Pollock Sale Price Braking System, Six Standard $ Manufacturer Rebate - 2,000* Airbags, Power Windows, $ Owner Loyalty Rebate - 500* Power Locks

29,789* 27,499*

$

BUY NOW FOR:

*Tax and tags additional. Buy now for sale price includes Suzuki Manufacturer rebates of $1,000 on 2012 Suzuki SX4 AWD, Grand Vitara 4x4, Sportback, SX4 Sedan, and Kizashi. Buy now sale price includes Suzuki Manufacturer rebate of $2,000 on Suzuki Equator. $500 Suzuki Owner Loyalty on 2012 Suzuki SX4 Sedan, Equator, SX4 Crossover, and SX4 Sportback. $1,000 Suzuki Owner Loyalty on 2012 Suzuki Kizashi and Grand Vitara. $500 Tax Relief Bonus Customer Cash is only applicable on 2012 Suzuki Kizashi models for retail purchase, not applicable on lease. All Ken Pollock Suzuki discounts applied. Artwork for illustration purposes only. Not responsible for typographical errors. 0% financing in lieu of Suzuki Manufacturers rebates, Owner Loyalty is applicable. Buy now for sale prices valid on IN STOCK vehicles only.

EXIT 175

81 INTERSTATE

ROUTE 315 ROUTE 315

KEN POLLOCK SUZUKI

CLOSE TO EVERYWHERE! WE’RE EASY TO FIND!

JUST OFF EXIT 175 RTE I-81 • PITTSTON

APR

FINANCING AVAILABLE TO QUALIFIED BUYERS*


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 9G 412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

VULLO MOTORS, INC.

OVER

412 Autos for Sale

YEARS

HONDA ‘10 CIVIC

HONDA ‘06 RIDGELINE RTS

4 door, 4 cylinder, auto. Low Miles! $15,495 WARRANTY MAFFEI AUTO SALES 570-288-6227

Sprin g Specia l

RATES STARTING @ 2.19%

65

412 Autos for Sale

S A V E 10% P a in tle s s De n t Re m ova l

(570)-344-1600

100% GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVAL

R ev olutionary Proc es s to R em ov e Sm allD ents - D ings Ev en H ailD am age.

288-6459

VVisit isit UUss @ vullomotors.com

A uthoriz e d Bos c h S e rvic e De a le r

new condition. Brilliant blue exterior with beige hides. Car is fully equipped with navigation system, V-8, automatic, climate control AC, alarm system, AM/FM 6 disc CD, garage door opener. 42,000 original miles. $9,000 Call (570) 288-6009

Boat? Car? Truck? Motorcycle? Airplane? Whatever it is, sell it with a Classified ad. 570-829-7130

412 Autos for Sale

S

412 Autos for Sale

AVE

TH OUS AN D S CL E AN R E L I ABL E L OW M I L E CAR S

SP EC IA L O F TH E W EEK

2007 H O NDA A C C O R D

P E TTILIL L O M OOTOR TO R S • 5570-457-5441 7 0 -4 5 7 -5 4 4 1

• Bankruptcy ......... “WE HAVE A BANK FOR THAT” • Divorce ............. “WE HAVE A BANK FOR THAT” • Fixed Income ...... “WE HAVE A BANK FOR THAT” • First Time Buyer... “WE HAVE A BANK FOR THAT” • Repo ................ “WE HAVE A BANK FOR THAT” • Foreclosure ........ “WE HAVE A BANK FOR THAT” • Unemployment .... “WE HAVE A BANK FOR THAT”

JAGUAR `00 S TYPE 4 door sedan. Like

Automatic, 4WD, power seats. $16,995 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

P E TTILIL L O M OOTOR TO R S • 5570-457-5441 7 0 -4 5 7 -5 4 4 1

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

V -Te c h 4 C y l,5-S pe e d, Tinte d W indow s,S unroof, C le an,1 O w ne r,6 m o. U nlim ite d W arranty

$

11,495

V IEW M O R E A T P ETIL L O M O TO R S.C O M G O O D C R ED IT G ETS L O W IN TER EST R A TES!

412 Autos for Sale

VITO’S & GINO’S

Wanted:

ALL JUNK CARS & TRUCKS Highest Prices Paid!! FREE PICKUP

288-8995

HYUNDAI ‘07

SANTE FE AWD, auto, alloys $14,880

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

JEEP LIBERTY ‘06

MERCURY `05 SABLE LS PREMIUM

TOYOTA `04 COROLLA 100,000 miles, auto-

One owner, 4WD, Alloys.

$14,880 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

LEXUS `10 RX 350

Excellent condition, garage kept, navigation, keyless entry & start, heated seats, CD changer, ipod hookup, rear camera, light blue, 64K, new tires, balance of 100,000 mile warranty. $31,000. 570-881-6426

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

WANTED!

ALL JUNK CARS! CA$H PAID

570-301-3602 MAZDA 3 ‘05

4 door hatchback sport, 5 speed manual, grey exterior, black/red cloth interior. Clean, one owner, excellent condition. 17K. $12,000 570-586-6055

49,500 miles Moon roof, alloys, all power, 24 valve V6. Original owner, perfectly maintained, needs nothing. Trade-in’s welcome. Financing available. $8,995 570-474-6205

OLDSMOBILE `97 CUTLASS SUPREME Museum kept, never

driven, last Cutlass off the GM line. Crimson red with black leather interior. Every available option including sunroof. Perfect condition. 300 original miles. $21,900 or best offer. Call 570-650-0278

SUBARU `07 LEGACY 2.5I LTD All wheel drive,

loaded including rear DVD player. 103,000 miles. Very good condition. Asking $10,200 (570)675-5286

Line up a place to live in classified!

SUBARU FORESTER’S

W E ’ RE S TIL L O P E N M O N DA Y TH RU S A TU RDA Y W H IL E W E RE N O V A TE TO A N E V E N BE TTE R FA CIL ITY TO S E RV E YO U !

OP E N

V A L L E Y CH E V RO L E T IS K

FO R BU S IN E S S !

EN

W

A L L A CE’S

V A L L EY CH

601 KIDDER STREET, W ILKES-BA RRE, PA

M

821- 2772 • 1- 800- 444- 7172

O N D AYTH U R SD AY 8 : 3 0 8 : 0 0 pm ; FR ID AY 8 : 3 0 7: 0 0 PM

E X I T 170B 170B O FF FF I -81 - 81 TO TO E X I T 1 1.. B E A R R I G H T O N

; SATU R D AY 8 : 3 0 5 : 0 0 pm

BU S IN E S S

R O U TE TE

Y ou’lls ee s om e dus t during our renov ation, but it’s tem porary w hile w e m ak e y our dealers hip ex perienc e ev en better. Stop in, w e hav e s om e great offers !

le EV R O L ET youFinwda nthettoveb uyhic from w w w.v alleyc hev ro let.c o m yourm ob ile d e vic e !

309 309 TO T O S I X TH T H L I G H T. T. JU JU S T B E L O W

W

YO M IN G V A L L E Y M A L L .

S CA N HE RE >

TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT

112K miles. Blue, 5 speed. Air, power windows/locks, CD/cassette, Keyless entry, sunroof, new battery. Car drives and has current PA inspection. Slight rust on corner of passenger door. Clutch slips on hard acceleration. This is why its thousands less than Blue Book value. $6,500 OBO. Make an offer! Call 570-592-1629

TOYOTA 09 COROLLA LE

Keyless entry, well equipped including alloy wheels $12,999

KELLY

875 W. Market St. Kingston, PA. 570-287-2243

TOYOTA YARIS ‘10

6

to choose From

starting at $11,450 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

SUBARU

IMPREZA’S

MAZDA 3 ‘08

Extra clean. 5 speed. 41K miles $13,999

matic, 4 cylinder, power everything, moonroof, 4 door, Excellent condition! $7,200. 814-0717

4

to choose From

875 W. Market St. Kingston, PA. 570-287-2243

KELLY

starting at $12,400 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

Great Gas Saver $11,990

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

VOLVO 850 ‘95 WAGON Runs good, air, automatic, fair shape. $1,400. 347-693-4156

VW `87 GOLF

Excellent runner with constant servicing & necessary preventative maintenance. Repair invoices available. Approx 98,131 miles. Good condition, new inspection. $2,300. Call 570-282-2579

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

CADILLAC `77 COUPE

70,000 original miles. Leather interior. Excellent condition. $2,500. Call 570-282-4272 or 570-877-2385

CHEVROLET `’57 BEL AIR 2 door, hardtop, im-

maculate, full restoration, white with red interior $48,500 570-237-0968

Chrysler ‘68 New Yorker

Sedan. 440 Engine. Power Steering & brakes. 34,500 original miles. Always garaged. Reduced to $5995 Firm. 883-4443

MAZDA `88 RX-7 CONVERTIBLE

1 owner, garage kept, 65k original miles, black with grey leather interior, all original & never seen snow. $7,995. Call 570-237-5119

MERCEDES 1975

Good interior & exterior. Runs great! New tires. Many new parts. Moving, Must Sell. $1,300 or best offer 570-362-3626 Ask for Lee

MERCEDES-BENZ `73 450SL with Convertible

removable hard top, power windows, AM /FM radio with cassette player, CD player, automatic, 4 new tires. Champagne exterior; Italian red leather interior inside. Garage kept, excellent condition. Reduced price to $26,000. Call 570-825-6272

MERCURY `79 ZEPHYR

6 cylinder automatic. 52k original miles. Florida car. $1500. 570-899-1896

Need a Roommate? Place an ad and find one here! 570-829-7130


PAGE 10G

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s there when you wake up.

Get convenient home delivery. Call 829-5000.


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

468

We Need Your Help!

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 11G

Auto Parts

468

Auto Parts

412 Autos for Sale

DRIVE IN PRICES

Call for Details (570) 459-9901 Vehicles must be COMPLETE!! PLUS ENTER TO WIN $500 CASH!! DRAWING TO BE HELD LAST DAY OF EACH MONTH

Luzerne County Sheriff’s Office

412 Autos for Sale

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

412 Autos for Sale

OLDSMOBILE `68 DELMONT

Cars in Color

AS ALWAYS ***HIGHEST PRICES*** PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED VEHICLES!!!

Anonymous Tip Line 1-888-796-5519

412 Autos for Sale

www.wegotused.com

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

SANTO VOLVO APRIL CONQUEST EVENT 5

570.822.8870 steve@yourcarbank.com www.wyomingvalleyautomart.com

412 Autos for Sale

1.9%

2.5 Litre Turbo, Dynamic Stability, Traction Control, City Safety

2.9%

Gaughan Auto Store

List Price $32,175 Santo Discount -$1,576 Conquest Savings or Volvo Owner Loyalty -$1,000

JUST

We’re Making Lots Of Friends

299

20yrs SERVICING NEPA*

PER MONTH $ 36 MONTH

LEASE FOR 999 DOWN Your New 2012 VOLVO XC60 AWD

List Price $37,465 Santo Discount -$1,866 Conquest Savings or Volvo Owner Loyalty -$1,000

JUST

LEASE FOR

399

08 DODGE NITRO

08 FORD FOCUS SE

04 BUICK LESABRE

05 JEEP LIBERTY

#7844 Moonroof, Black, 4x4

4X4, 1-Owner

#7868 Automatic, Power Options, Electric Blue

#7998 One of a Kind, 1 Owner, 31K

Power Options, 5 To Choose From

188* $9,988*

A MONTH

188* $9,988*

$

A MONTH

04 SAAB 9-3

Power Option, 1-Owner

#7994 Moonroof, 4 Door, Autmatic, Like New!

188* $9,988*

A MONTH

1999 DOWN

4DOOR

07 SATURN VUE

$

PER MONTH $ 36 MONTH

188* $9,988*

$

A MONTH

188* $9,988*

A MONTH

188* $9,988*

$

A MONTH

04 HONDA PILOT

ARC

$

CUSTOM

4DOOR

188* $9,988*

A MONTH

ALL PRICED @

A MONTH

06 HYUNDAI SONATA

05 HYUNDAI TUCSON

4DOOR

#7817 3rd Row Seating, Extra, Extra, Nice

$

188* $9,988*

$

ALL WHEEL DRIVE

Automatic, Moonroof, 2 To Choose From

188* $9,988*

$

A MONTH

Go Anywhere!

188* $9,988*

$

A MONTH

*Tax & Tags extra. Based on 4.99% for 60 months w/ your good credit.

Payments based on 36 month closed end lease. Tax and fees not included with $999 down (S60) and $1,999 Down (XC60) or equal trade in value. First pmt and bank acquisition fee ($695). Due on delivery. No security deposit required. 30,000 miles allowed. Balance due S60 $1,993. Balance due XC60 $3093 + tax and tags. Special APR available with approved credit. Offer ends 4-30-2012.

Welcome Our New Sales Professionals from Wilkes-Barre!

gaughanautostore.com 114 South Main Ave, Taylor, PA 18517 570-562-3088 Shannon Sosnak

VIEW OUR INVENTORY 24/7 AT WWW.SANTOCARS.COM

207-8149

Montage Auto Mile, 3514 Birney Ave., Moosic

A MONTH

07 FORD ESCAPE

$

$34,599

$

3.2 Litre All Wheel Drive, Heated Seats, City Safety

00

#1 in Selection Over 100 Vehicles Ready to Go! 4DOOR

APR to 72 Months

188

DON’T OVERPAY $

$29,599

$

Call Chuck at 570-466-2819

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

415 Kidder Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702

Your New 2012 VOLVO S60 T5

APR to 72 Months

Johnson, Bow mounted trolling motor, 2 fish finders, live well, bilge, lights, swivel seats and trailer. Garage kept. $5,900.

Will sell for $6,000 Serious inquires only 570690-0727

W Y O M I N G VA L L E Y

Joe O’Neil

All prices plus tax and tags.

Boats & Marinas

MIRRORCRAFT ‘01 FISHING BOAT LOADED. 30 hp

45,000 miles • 350 Rocket engine • Fender skirts • Always garaged

YEAR ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE

YOU ARE ELIGIBLE FOR $1000 OFF THE PURCHASE OR LEASE OF A NEW S60 OR XC60

421

• All original

(See sales representative for details)

Attention: Current owners or lesees of Acura, Audi, BMW, Infiniti, Lexus, Mercedes, SAAB, Honda, Nissan, Toyota or Volkswagen Cars or SUVs,

YOUR DONATE DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK OR BOAT TO HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. 888-6435496

Must Sell! Appraised for $9,200

FREE GAS when you finance a vehicle up to 36 months

412 Autos for Sale

Auto Miscellaneous

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

Use your tax refund to buy. 412 Autos for Sale

418

SILVERCRAFT

Heavy duty 14’ aluminum boat with trailer, great shape. $1,500. 570-822-8704 or cell 570-498-5327 ABANDONED 12 foot lowe rowboat. PA fishboat# 584 3AW. 570-871-5652

427

Commercial Trucks & Equipment

GMC ‘98 SIERRA 3500 4WD Stake Side, 350 V8, Auto. 75,000 miles on current engine. 12' wood bed, body, tires, interior good. Excellent running condition. New generator, starter, battery. Just tuned and inspected. $6,900. Call 570-656-1080

439

Motorcycles

HARLEY ‘10 DAVIDSON SPORTSTER CUSTOM Loud pipes. Near Mint 174 miles - yes, One hundred and seventy four miles on the clock, original owner. $8000. 570-876-2816

HARLEY 2011 HERITAGE SOFTTAIL Black. 1,800 miles. ABS brakes. Security System Package. $15,000 firm. SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY 570-704-6023

412 Autos for Sale

YOUR ULTIMATE PRE-OWNED STORE RATES AS LOW AS

1.99%** The Best Vehicle At The Absolute Lowest Prices.

Value Vehicle Outlet 2002 FORD EXPLORER 4X4

Stk# S2052A, XLT Package, 3rd Row Seating, PW, PL

NOW

6,899*

$

2006 MITSUBISHI GALANT GTS SEDAN

Stk# P14624, Leather, Sunroof, Alloy Wheels, Automatic

NOW

2003 HYUNDAI SANTA FE AWD

Stk# S2040A, Sunroof, Automatic, CD, Power Windows & Locks

7,599

$

2005 FORD ESCAPE 4X4

*

NOW

8,699*

$

Stk# S2003A, XLT Package, Sunroof, Leather, Auto

NOW

9,599*

$

Stk# P14641, Heated Leather, Sunroof, 18” Alloys, Auto, Rare “Pearl White” Color

2005 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 4X4 $

2010 HONDA CIVIC LX SEDAN

11,599*

Stk# S1728A, Laredo Pkg, Chrome Wheels, Automatic, PW, PL

2008 HYUNDAI TIBURON GT COUPE

$

2005 MAZDA RX-8 COUPE

$

Stk# P14621, Leather, Automatic, PW, PL

Stk# P14631, Sunroof, Leather, Power Windows & Locks, Only 48K Miles!

2004 DODGE RAM REG CAB 4X4

Stk# P14604, SLT Sport Package, 5.7L V8 Hemi, Automatic, A Must See!

2011 SUZUKI KIZASHI GTS AWD

13,499*

2012 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4

13,499*

2008 NISSAN PATHFINDER SE 4X4 $

13,799

2008 GMC ACADIA AWD

Stk# S1997B, 3rd Row, Power Windows/Locks, CD, Automatic, Alloys

13,999*

Stk# S1807A, Navigation, Sunroof, Leather, Rear Park Assist

2010 SUZUKI SX4 CROSSOVER AWD $ 2008 CHEVROLET IMPALA LT $ Stk# S1954A, Only 19K Miles! Alloy Wheels, Power Windows & Locks

*

2011 SUZUKI SX4 CROSSOVER AWD $

Stk# S1803A, Tech Pkg, Fog Lights, Navigation, 6 Speed, PW, PL

Stk# S2017A, Automatic, CD, Power Windows & Locks, Alloy Wheels

Stk# S2059A, Leather, Sunroof, Alloy Wheels, PW, PL

NOW

NOW

9,899*

$

16,699 $ 19,999*

12,799*

Stk# S1939A, Tech Package w/ Navigation, Auto, PW, PL

Stk# P14634, Auto, Power Windows & Locks, Gas Saver w/ Only 30K Miles!

14,999*

12,499

$

2006 SUBARU TRIBECA AWD

$

Stk# P14636, Power Windows & Locks, Automatic, Rear Spoiler

2012 SUZUKI SX4 CROSSOVER AWD $

*

2007 SUBARU IMPREZA SEDAN AWD

2006 PONTIAC G6 SEDAN

9,899*

$

NOW

CERTIFIED VEHICLES $ 2009 CHEVY MALIBU LTZ GRAND VITARA LIMITED 4X4 $21,499* 14,999* Stk#2011S1854A,SUZUKI Sunroof, Heated Seats, 18” Alloys, Navigation w/ Blue Tooth!

GOLD CHECK 2008 CHEVROLET HHR LT $ 10,899* Stk# P14620A, Chrome Wheel Package, Power Windows & Locks, CD, 1-Owner

• 3 Day or 150 Mile Money Back Guarantee** • 30 Day/1000 Mile Limited Warranty** • All Value Vehicle Outlet Cars Pass PA State Inspection**

Stk# S1993A, Only 442 Miles! Automatic, Alloy Wheels, PW, PL

*

Stk# S1808A, Sunroof, Power Memory Seat, Auto, PW, PL, Only 10K Miles, Save Big!

Stk# P14637, DVD, Leather, Sunroof, 3rd Row, V6

2009 HYUNDAI GENESIS SEDAN

20,899*

$

Stk# P14638, Automatic, Alloy Wheels, Tinted Windows, PW, PL

20,999*

20,999

$

*

21,799*

$

9,999*

$

2008 FORD FOCUS COUPE

Stk# P14628, SE Package, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks

NOW

9,999*

$

JUST TRADED AS TRADED! 1995 SUZUKI SIDEKICK 4X4 $ *

1,999 2001 SUBARU LEGACY WAGON AWD $ 1,999* 2011 MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER SE 4WD $21,699* 2001 VOLKSWAGEN PASSAT SEDAN $ 2,599* $ 2011 SUZUKI KIZASHI SLS AWD 21,999* 2002 SATURN SL1 SEDAN $ 2,999* 2012 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA LIMITED 4X4 $ 21,999* 1999 FORD F150 SUPER CAB 4X4 $2,999* $ * 1997 FORD F350 REG CAB 4X4 $ 2011 TOYOTA VENZA 2,999* Stk# S1912B, Automatic, 4 Cylinder, Low Miles! Power Windows/Locks, 1-Owner 23,999 1991 FORD BRONCO 4X4 $ 3,899* 2011 SUZUKI EQUATOR CREW CAB RMZ-4 4X4 $ * 24,499 Stk# S1996A, Navigation, Alloy Wheels, Automatic, Off Road Pkg 2000 CHEVY BLAZER 4DR 4X4 $ * 3,999 $ 2009 NISSAN ARMADA LE 4X4 29,999* 2001 FORD F150 SUPER CREW 4X4 $3,999* Stk# S2043A, Automatic, Hard to Find!

Stk# S1895A, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks, CD

Stk# S1995A, Power Windows & Locks, Auto, CD, Only 11K Miles!

Stk# P14643A, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks

Stk# S1625B, Leather, Sunroof, All Wheel Drive, Power Seats, Blue Tooth, Auto, Only 9K Miles!

Stk# S1736A, Automatic, A/C, Great On Gas!

Stk# S1951A, Sunroof, Heated Leather, 18” Alloys, Navigation w/ Bluetooth!

Stk# S2071A, Long Bed w/ Cap, Automatic

Stk# P14453C, Plow! Dual Rear Wheels, Automatic

Stk# S2090A, Anniversary Edition! Nice Nice Truck!

Stk# S1991A, LT Package w/ Leather, Auto, PW, PL

Stk# P14614A, Navigation w/ Rear Camera, DVD Player, 3rd Row, Leather, Sunroof

Stk# S1936A, XLT Pkg, Power Windows & Locks

*All Prices Plus Tax, Tags, & Fees. Artwork for illustration purposes only. Dealer not responsible for typographical errors. All Value Vehicle Outlet Cars pass PA State Inspection. See sales person for complete details. **1.99% on bank approved credit for 60 month term. Just Traded As Traded Vehicles are sold as is where is with no warranty.

KEN POLLOCK AT Ken Pollock

1-800-223-1111

SUPER CENTER

339 HWY 315, PITTSTON, PA www.kenpollocksuzuki.com

Hours M-F 9-8pm Sat 9-5pm

CLOSE TO EVERYWHERE WE’RE EASY TO FIND JUST OFF EXIT 175 RTE I-81 • PITTSTON

SCAN HERE FOR MORE INFO

750151 750151

PRE-OWNED


PAGE 12G 439

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

Motorcycles

HARLEY ‘07 SCREAMING EAGLE DYNA Assembled by

Custom Vehicle Operations. Very Unique, Fast Bike. 1800cc. 10,000 miles. Performance Rinehart pipes, comfortable Mustang seat with back rest and detachable rack , Kuryakyn pegs and grips, color matched frame, SE heavy breather air filter comes with HD dust cover and gold CVO owners key. Excellent condition. Silver Rush/ Midnight Black. Asking $13,500 Call Ron @ 570- 868-3330

HARLEY DAVIDSON `07

Road King Classic FLHRC. Burgundy / Cream. 6 speed. Cruise control. Back rests, grips, battery tender, cover. Willie G accessories. 19,000 miles. $13,250. Williamsport, PA 262-993-4228

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 Electra Glide, Ultra Classic, many chrome accessories, 13k miles, Metallic Emerald Green. Garage kept, like new condition. Includes Harley cover. $12,900 570-718-6769 570-709-4937

439

Motorcycles

KAWASAKI ‘09 KLR

650. 940 original miles. Kept indoors, very clean, water cooled, new tires. Blue and black. 2.5 liter, street/trail. Paid $5500 Asking $3800. 570-760-8527

SUZUKI ‘01 VS 800 GL INTRUDER Garage kept, no rust, lots of chrome, black with teal green flake. Includes storage jack & 2 helmets. $3600 570-410-1026

YAMAHA ‘09 250 V STAR 143 original miles,

new engine guard just added. $2,499 570-690-8588

YAMAHA ‘96 VIRAGO 750 24,000 miles. Must see and ride to believe! $2,499. 570-690-8588

YAMAHA ‘97 ROYALSTAR 1300

12,000 miles. With windshield. Runs excellent. Many extras including gunfighter seat, leather bags, extra pipes. New tires & battery. Asking $4,000 firm. (570) 814-1548

442 RVs & Campers

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘05 V-ROD VRSCA

Blue pearl, excellent condition, 3,100 miles, factory alarm with extras. $10,500. or best offer. Tony 570-237-1631

HONDA ‘84 XL200R 8,000 original miles,

442 RVs & Campers

FLAGSTAFF `08 CLASSIC NOW BACK IN PA.

Super Lite Fifth Wheel. LCD/DVD flat screen TV, fireplace, heated mattress, ceiling fan, Hide-a-Bed sofa, outside speakers & grill, 2 sliders, aluminum wheels, , awning, microwave oven, tinted safety glass windows, fridge & many accessories & options. Excellent condition, $22,500. 570-868-6986

FLEETWOOD ‘06 PROWLER

30’ model #300FQS 1 slide out, living /dining area, Queen bed, sofa/double bed, large bath, AM/ FM CD player, micro wave, large refrigerator. Upgrades include scissor leveling jacks, ducted heat & air, glass shower door, skylight in bath. Water filter system, spare tire & cover + extras. Trailer is at campground. Site fee paid 05/1/12 through 09/30/12 or can be moved. Asking $15,500. Call 570-233-8652 570-443-9260

WILDWOOD ‘99 27’ bunk house

model, A/C, sleeps 8, 30 lb. gas tank, new battery & tires, garage kept. Very good condition for age. $6,500. 570-814-5012

451

SUSQUEHANNA RV

TAX RELIEF SALE

excellent condition. $1,000. 570-379-3713

APRIL 13-21 Save Thousands On All In Stock Campers. Rt 522 Selinsgrove Rt. 11 Bloomsburg

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

CHEVROLET `02 AVALANCHE 4 x 4, black, V8,

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

BUICK ‘04

Rendezvous Heritage Edition, leather, sunroof, 3rd seat 1 Owner, local trade $6,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

CHEVY `99 SILVERADO

Auto. V6 Vortec. Standard cab. 8’ bed with liner. Dark Blue. 99K miles. $4,400 or best offer 570-823-8196

CHEVY ‘03 IMPALA

One owner, only 42k miles. $9,885

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

CHEVY ‘04 MONTE CARLO Silver with Black

Leather, Sunroof, Very Sharp! $5,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

DODGE ‘05 CARAVAN

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

CHRYSLER 02 TOWN & COUNTRY V6. Like new!

$4,495 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

FORD `06 F150 XLT 124,000 miles, automatic, A/C, air bags, all power. Silver, excellent condition. $10,000 (570) 840-3971

FORD `10 F150 BLACK KING RANCH

4X4 LARIAT 145” WB STYLESIDE

5.4L V8 engine Electronic 6 speed automatic. Brown leather “King Ranch” interior. Heat/cool front seats. Power moonroof, rear view camera, 18” aluminum wheels, tow package, navigation system. 23,000 miles. Asking $33,000 Call Jeff @ 570-829-7172

FORD ‘02 EXPLORER Red, XLT, Original

non-smoking owner, garaged, synthetic oil since new, excellent in and out. New tires and battery. 90,000 miles. $7,500 (570) 403-3016

auto, heated leather seats, dual exhaust, moon roof, absolutely loaded. 98,000 miles, $12,000, OBO 570-262-2204 or 570-288-2722

SXT Special Edition. Stow and go, beautiful van. Leather heated seats with sunroof, tinted windows, luggage rack. Brandy color, 85K miles. $13,500 negotiable 570-301-4929

JEEP `08 LIBERTY SPORT 45,000 miles, good

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

condition, automatic. $13,500 570-675-2620

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD 02 F150 Extra Cab. 6

Cylinder, 5 speed. Air. 2WD. $4,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD2V6. ‘04Clean, EXPLORER

Clean SUV! $5995 WD. Extra cab. Call For Details! 570-696-4377

FORD 04 F150

4x2. Nice Truck! $11,999 1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

KELLY 875 W. Market St. Kingston, PA. 570-287-2243

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD ‘04 RANGER

Super Cab One Owner, 4x4, 5 Speed, Highway miles. Sharp Truck! $5,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

FORD ‘08 ESCAPE XLT

Leather, alloys & moonroof $16,995

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

AWD. 1 owner. $15,900

all power, new tires, recent inspection, 121,000 miles, R title, nice shape. $4,500. 570-735-9989 or 570-262-1046

JEEP `90 CHEROKEE LTD Red, black leather

interior, ABS, 4 wheel drive, 6 cylinder, 4.0 liter, auto, 92K miles, all power options, moon roof, A/C, AM/FM stereo, cassette, alloy wheels, inspected until 4/13. $2,495 570-674-5655

JEEP 03 WRANGLER X 6 cylinder. Auto. 4x4. $10,999

KELLY

875 W. Market St. Kingston, PA. 570-287-2243 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

HYANDAI ‘11 SANTA FE 1 owner, only 7k miles. $23,386 560 Pierce St.

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

JEEP `00 CHEROKEE NISSAN ‘97 PICKUP XE 4WD, alloys, 5 speed. $7,550 CLASSIC 4.0 6 cylinder, auto

HONDA ‘09 CRV LX

FORD ‘06 ESCAPE XLT

4x4. Sunroof. Like new. $6,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

451

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

SUZUKI4x4. `03 XL-7 85K. Auto.

Nice, clean interior. Runs good. New battery & brakes. All power. CD. $6,000. 570-762-8034 570-696-5444

SUZUKI `07 XL-7 56,000 miles,

automatic, all-wheel drive, 4 door, air conditioning, all power, CD player, leather interior, tinted windows, custom wheels, $13,000 Call 570-829-8753 Before 5:00 p.m.

TOYOTA 04 TACOMA 4X2. 4 cylinder Auto. $6,999

JEEP 04 WRANGLER

6 cylinder. 5 speed 4x4 $9,999

KELLY

KELLY

875 W. Market St. Kingston, PA. 570-287-2243

TOYOTA ‘08 4 RUNNER

875 W. Market St. Kingston, PA. 570-287-2243

KIA ‘07 SPORTAGE EX

4WD, Leather, Moonroof $12,724

610

Landscaper Dry Cleaner Home Health Care Car Wash 570-407-2716 LIQUOR LICENSE FOR SALE. Luzerne County. $20,000. 570-574-7363

TURN KEY OPERATION

Located at Wyoming Valley Mall must sell. $125,000 negotiable. Ask for Rob 570-693-3323

630 Money To Loan “We can erase your bad credit 100% GUARANTEED.” Attorneys for the Federal Trade Commission say they’ve never seen a legitimate credit repair operation. No one can legally remove accurate and timely information from your credit report. It’s a process that starts with you and involves time and a conscious effort to pay your debts. Learn about managing credit and debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC. GOVERNMENT INSURED LOANS! Residential remodeling. Many programs require no equity, bad credit often O.K. Consolidate, extra $ in your pocket. www.TRISTATECREATIONS.C OM 1-888-9908886

700 MERCHANDISE 708

GMC `01 JIMMY

Less than 5,000 miles on engine. 4WD. Power accessories. Inspected. Runs great. $4,500 or best offer. Call 570-696-9518 or 570-690-3709

Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

KIA ‘08 SPORTAGE EX 4WD, Low Miles. $14,800

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

KIA ‘11 OPTIMA SX

1 Owner, moonroof & alloys. $22,500 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

LEXUS `05 RX 330

All wheel drive, Savannah metallic, navigation, backup camera, lift gate, ivory leather with memory, auto, 3.3 liter V6, regular gas, garaged, nonsmoker, exceptional condition, all service records. 6 disc CD. Private seller with transferable one year warranty, 96K. $16,900 570-563-5056

LEXUS 08 RX350

Navigation. Back up camera. 45K miles. 4 WD.

Antiques & Collectibles

ANTIQUE TOYS WANTED Larry - Mt. Top 474-9202

457 Wanted to Buy Auto

VITO’S & GINO’S

Wanted:

ALL JUNK CARS & TRUCKS Highest Prices Paid!! FREE PICKUP

1 Owner, leather, Panoramic moonroof & navigation. $28,880 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

Business Opportunities

288-8995

$ ANTIQUES BUYING $

Old Toys, model kits, Bikes, dolls, guns, Mining Items, trains & Musical Instruments, Hess. 474-9544 MOVE POSTERS authentic $15. each. 5 drawer file, side to side $300. 570-380-2472

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

710

600 FINANCIAL 610

Business Opportunities

CHILDREN’S SHOESTORE

For Sale.Established 50+ years, owner retiring, looking for the right person as successor. Call 570-288-9323

COFFEE SHOP

Turn key operation in a wonderful area. A must see! Deli & ice cream. Will train, excellent opportunity. $25,000. 570-262-1497

Appliances

Why Spend Hundreds on New or Used Appliances? Most problems with your appliances are usually simple and inexpensive to fix! Save your hard earned money, Let us take a look at it first! 30 years in the business. East Main Appliances 570-735-8271 Nanticoke

APPLIANCE PA RT S E T C .

Used appliances. Parts for all brands. 223 George Ave. Wilkes-Barre 570-820-8162

DISHWASHER 24”

white, 2 years old $150. obo.

RANGE HOOD 30”

KELLY

875 W. Market St. Kingston, PA. 570-287-2243

MERCURY `03 MOUNTAINEER

AWD. Third row seating. Economical 6 cylinder automatic. Fully loaded with all available options. 93k pampered miles. Garage kept. Safety / emissions inspected and ready to go. Sale priced at $7595. Trade-ins accepted. Tag & title processing available with purchase. Call Fran for an appointment to see this outstanding SUV. 570-466-2771 Scranton

MITSUBISHI `11

OUTLANDER SPORT SE

AWD, Black interior/exterior, start/ stop engine with keyless entry, heated seats, 18” alloy wheels, many extra features. Only Low Miles. 10 year, 100,000 mile warranty. $22,500. Willing to negotiate. Serious inquires only - must sell, going to law school. (570) 793-6844

FIRE YOUR BOSS!!!! “WORK FOR YOURSELF” INVEST IN YOURSELF WITH JAN – PRO

*Guaranteed Clients * Steady Income *Insurance & Bonding * Training & Ongoing Support * Low Start Up Costs *Veterans Financing Program * Accounts available through 0ut Wilkes-Barre & Scranton

Broan, white $50. obo. 570-574-3899 FREEZER refrigeration uniT complete system for walk in freezer includes Copeland compressor, Larkin air blower, power control & temperature switch & timer etc. Almost new $550. 570-333-4827 RANGE: Kenmore countertop electric, stainless steel, 4 burner with center grill. Good condition. $125.570-675-0248 WASHER & electric dryer. As is $75. 570-451-2789

Janpro.com

WASHER Kenmore apartment size $75 All excellent condition. 570-472-3334

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

570-824-5774

HDI METALS

39 S. Prospect St. Nanticoke PA • 570-735-1487 GOLD - SILVER COINS - JEWELRY Buying Daily 11AM - 6PM No nonsense guarantee We will beat any competitors advertised price by up to 20%


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 710

Appliances

744

Furniture & Accessories

HUTCH oak corner hutch $100. (2) end tables & coffee table $25 each. All excellent condition 570-472-3334

GENE’S RECONDITIONED APPLIANCES 60 Day Warranty Monday-Friday 8:00PM-5:00PM Saturday 8:00AM-11:00AM Gateway Shopping Center Kingston, PA

(570) 819-1966

726

Clothing

CLOTHING men’s size L & XL, camouflaged coat plus 15 other items, sweatshirts, sweatpants & shirts $20. WOMEN’S size L 10 tops, 1 skirt $20. Size medium 8 tops $10. 570-474-6028

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

COAT

KENNETH COLE Beige, size 6, hardly worn. $75. 570-855-5385 DRESS ladies pullover sweater dress, blue sequins size 10 $25. Men’s orange hunting coat, XL, like new $35. Men’s heavy knot wool sweater, 3 colors, Xl, like new $25. Ladies fur coat size 10-12 $100. 570-574-9518 DRESSES: teen party / prom Evan Picone size 4 burgundy dress, back of dress has 4 rose buds, flowing down back of dress is 2 panels that just lay over the dress $35. Size 4 champagne color strapless, side zipper, beautiful crossover in back $35. Rampage size 4 white dress, pearls on front, side zipper, dress off shoulder, 2 side slits $35. Jessica McClintock size 5 2 piece lavender dress, open back ties around neck, rhinestones on top of dress $20. Urban Girl Nites size 5/6 red dress has back cut out with crisscross straps, comes with small matching red purse $20. Jessica McClintock strapless embroided floral burgundy dress size 5 back zipper has (1) side slit $20. Jump size 5/6 black sparkle dress, rhinestone straps, slit up back $20. 570-288-8689 PROM GOWN pink strapless jeweled ballgown. Pickups on skirt, corset style back lacing, size 3/4. Originally $420 asking $100. 570-474-6936 PURSES variety, new condition $11. each. 570-602-1075

730

DESKTOPS & TOWERS refurbished, off lease $25-$175. IBM/HP/ACER + more. xp pro, windows 7, keyboard & mouse included, all have office 10, AV + more. Refurbished OFF-LEASE laptops $150-$225. DELL/ HP/COMPAQ. windows 7, wifi, office, + more. laptop bag included. Warranty included!! call 8622236 for details

WILKES-BARRE

220 Bradford St Saturday & Sunday April 14 & 15 8am - 5pm Many indoor and outdoor items, priced to sell!

WYOMING Mattress Queen P-Top Set New in Plastic Can Deliver $150 570-280-9628

MATTRESS SALE

We Beat All Competitors Prices!

Mattress Guy

Twin sets: $139 Full sets: $159 Queen sets: $199 All New American Made 570-288-1898 PATIO FURNITURE: One 6’ redwood picnic table with 2 benches One 40” round fiberglass/ aluminum table plus 4r chairs with cushions. All very good condition, $100 for both OBO. 570675-1278 9am -5pm ROCKER, wood/tapestry, $75. RECLINER, Burgundy velour cloth, $125. SOFA, chair, ottoman, 3 tables, great for den. Wood and cloth, all in excellent condition. $450. Call after 6 PM 570-675-5046 SOFA & matching chair. Excellent condition. $130. 570-824-6770 WING CHAIR, small antique upholstered, with channel back & claw feet, gold color, $75. Antique mahogany two tier end table, $40. 3 stack tables, walnut, excellent $30. Brass table lamp with shade $10. Crockery jardineer floor vase with floral embellishments $65. 570-655-1217

746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets

DALLAS

1981 RANSOM RD 4/14 & 4/15 8AM-2PM Must sell! Tools, Household items, furniture, and Much much More.

81-83 Fifth Street (Sale in yard, bordering Monument Avenue) Saturday, 9am-4pm Young Boy’s items, knick knacks and much more!

750

Jewelry

JACK IS PAYING TOP DOLLAR !!!!! for gold and silver, diamonds, platinum, watches. Also buying scrap jewelry. Cash on the spot!!!!! We make house calls. 328-3428, 855-7197 or visit us 134 Route 11 Larksville, Pa

Furniture & Accessories

BED Queen, White metal, excellent condition, paid $500. asking $100. Is 5 years old. 570-371-3148 DESK & CHAIR with detachable hutch with light. Excellent condition asking $50. 570-822-7813 DINING ROOM TABLE & CHAIR SET. Solid oak, laminate top, medium oak color. 4 chairs, 2 10” leaf extensions. Asking $600, OBO. 570-639-2671 ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Sauder with 27” Zenith TV & 5 disc player $75. 570-287-0023 ENTERTAINMENT CENTER, 68hx50w, white with glass doors on top only, tv opening $50. 570-675-2879

FURNISH FOR LESS

* NELSON * * FURNITURE * * WAREHOUSE * Recliners from $299 Lift Chairs from $699 New and Used Living Room Dinettes, Bedroom 210 Division St Kingston Call 570-288-3607

758 Miscellaneous

758 Miscellaneous

776 Sporting Goods

786 Toys & Games

FREE AD POLICY

LADDER 24’ aluminum Werner $100. Burner propane grill with wheels never used $285. Wood stove never used new $200. Magic Chef small fridge used 1 day $75. Dewalt cordless drill 18v $75. Makita cordless drill 12v $40. 3” solid pvc pipe & 7’113/4” $9. 16’ $20. 3’9 3/4 $3.85 3’x 25’ fence with gate top rail fence poles $50.: 570-735-2236

TIRES/Like New 2 225/60r/16 $115. 2225/45r/17 $145. 2205/50r/17 $145. 2245/45r17 $160. 22-35/12.50/15LT $200. 2-275/55r/20 $135. 2-225/75r/15 $80. 570-969-1481

FLY ROD Martin matched set 8’ 3 piece & reel - Tuffy #63 with line, excellent condition $30. 570-735-6638

PLAYHOUSE heavy duty plastic outdoor approximately 6’ tall with front door, back door, & double side doors, window seat with toy chest underneath, flower boxes for the windows, used, sell for $500. paid $1200, Must disassemble, & pickup. 570-379-2625

The Times Leader will accept ads for used private party merchandise only for items totaling $1,000 or less. All items must be priced and state how many of each item. Your name address, email and phone number must be included. No ads for ticket sales accepted. Pet ads accepted if FREE ad must state FREE. One Submission per month per household. You may place your ad online at timesleader.com, or email to classifieds@ timesleader.com or fax to 570-831-7312 or mail to Classified Free Ads: 15 N. Main Street, WilkesBarre, PA. Sorry no phone calls.

LAWN STATUES,

CONCRETE For Sale. Fishing Boys, Mexican & Donkey, Deer, Elf, & Others. 570-262-2204 or 570-288-2722

MOWER Simplicity Cornet, 13 HP riding mower with 30” deck, front weight, & twin bagger. Excellent condition. $550.570-675-4777 TILLER Cub Cadet model FT24 front tine tiller. Honda 160cc OHV engine. Adjustable 13”/22” / 24” tilling width. Like brand new. Paid over $350 asking $250. 905-0657

754

Machinery & Equipment

SAWMILLS from only $3997-MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmillCut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD: www.Nor woodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N

756

Medical Equipment

TIRES studded snows 2, Trailtron King plus 10 ply 245-75-16 M&S, lightly used $149. Additional set nonstudded $89. 570-333-4827

PLAINS

(Hudson Section) R. 74 Skidmore St. Saturday & Sunday April 14 and 15 8am - 1pm Leather furniture, lawn equipment, TV’s, kitchen items, household furniture, children’s items, exercise equipment Something for everyone!!!!

PLAINS INDOOR YARD SALE UNITED

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 133 North Main St. Sat, April 21st 8 am - 2 pm Household items, jewelry, food, and more!

SHEATOWN

Highest Prices Paid In CA$H

SEWING MACHONE Singer in cabinet, 18 discs for various stitches plus buttonholer $50. 570-474-6028

1000 SERVICE DIRECTORY 1006

A/C & Refrigeration Services

STRISH A/C

Ductless / Central Air Conditioning Free Estimates Licensed & Insured 570-332-0715

1024

Building & Remodeling

1st. Quality Construction Co.

Roofing, siding, gutters, insulation, decks, additions, windows, doors, masonry & concrete. Insured & Bonded.

Senior Citizens Discount! State Lic. # PA057320

570-606-8438 ALL OLDER HOMES SPECIALIST 825-4268. Remodel / repair, Windows & Doors

For All of Your Remodeling Needs. Will Beat Any Price! BATHROOMS, KITCHENS, ROOFING, SIDING, DECKS, WINDOWS, etc. 25 Yrs. Experience References. Insured Free Estimates. (570) 332-7023

NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION

Chimney Service

CHIMNEY REPAIRS Parging. Stucco.

Stainless Liners. Cleanings. Custom Sheet Metal Shop. 570-383-0644 1-800-943-1515 Call Now!

COZY HEARTH CHIMNEY

ALL CHIMNEY REPAIR Chimney Cleaning, Rebuilding, Repair, Stainless Steel Lining, Parging, Stucco, Caps, Etc. Free Estimates Licensed & Insured 1-888-680-7990 570-840-0873

1042

Cleaning & Maintainence

HOUSE CLEANING

We would love to clean your home. We clean around your schedule. We clean weekly, bi-weekly, and monthly. We also do one time cleaning. Call Eddie 570-677-0344 or online at www. empresacleaning. com

1054

Concrete & Masonry

B.P. Home Repairs 570-825-4268 Brick, Block, Concrete, Sidewalks, Chimneys, Stucco. New Installation & Repairs COVERT & SONS CONCRETE CO. All types of concrete & foundation work. Specials & discounts for Veterans & Sr . Citizens. Give us a call we will beat any written estimate by 10% or more. 570-696-3488 or 570-239-2780

FREE PICKUP

All Types Of Work New or Remodeling Licensed & Insured Free Estimates 570-406-6044

BAY WINDOW Outdoor Gazebo - Black metal with brown canopy and mosquito netting. Will email picture. $100 OBO Call 570-883-9868

NORTHEAST CONTRACTING GROUP Decks, Sunrooms, Additions, Windows, Kitchens & Baths. Concrete Driveways, Walkways & Patios 570-338-2269

All phases of masonry & concrete. Small jobs welcome. Senior discount. Free estimates. Licensed & Insured 288-1701/655-3505

Shedlarski Construction

Masonry - Concrete Brick-Stonework. Chimneys-Stucco” “NO JOB TOO SMALL” “Damage repair specialist” 570-466-2916

570-574-1275

BEDDING beige floral full bedspread reversibile both sides different pattern $10. Full size reversible quilt white background with pink flowers, comes with a matching dust ruffle $12. Floral lined drapery 52”W x 72” L each panel, matching Valance 106”L x 14” D & floral quilted full matching bedspread $35. 570-288-8689 COOKIE JAR Antique House Cottage, Good condition. $50. 570-675-0248 GOLF CLUBS: Nice set of Wilson fat shaft, deep red irons. $40. 570-655-3512 Home made scented candles & new flea market items. Bulk quantity. Call for info 570-864-3532

570-301-3602

CALL US! TO JUNK YOUR CAR

12 SIMON STREET Behind Marty’s Blue Room Sun., April 15th, 9-2 Rain Date Sun. 4/22 Cabbage Patch Dolls, housewares, toddler boy clothes, decorations, bedding, & much more!

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

1039

570-819-0681

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted

SEWING MACHINE Singer Overlock factory machine, attachments, fabric, buttons etc. $550. OBO. 570-472-3378

BEST PRICES IN THE AREA

CA$H

ON THE

$POT,

Free Anytime Pickup 570-301-3602

SEWING MACHINE Brother 27 functions, new in box $125. 570-602-1075

WHEELS Volvo 940/ 740 series factory cast aluminum wheels with new Nokia is 195/65/R15 tires (4). Tires new, wheels include centers, excellent condition. May also fit 240 series. Asking $500.570.675.8832

772

Pools & Spas

POOL Infinity A Frame, adjustable ladder 48”-52”-54”, new still in box $125. 28” round solar cover new $30. 570-474-6926

776 Sporting Goods BIKE girl’s 20”, great condition, Rallye Sweetie. $45. 570-822-6258

780

Televisions/ Accessories

TV 31” inch Proton color LCD TV. Excellent condition. Flat screen panel with TV cabinet stand. $160.00 for both with remote. 570-266-2682.

784

Tools

BANDSAW Grizzly 14” model g 1019 asking $100. 570-574-1468 WELDER Lincoln arc welder very good condition. Asking $200.570-540-3163

786 Toys & Games BIKE Mongoose racer boys 16”, excellent condition $25. 570-735-6638

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE IN CLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmore space? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way to cleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

VITO’S & GINO’S

Wanted:

ALL JUNK CARS & TRUCKS Highest Prices Paid!! FREE PICKUP

288-8995 LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

91

%

of Times Leader readers read the Classified section. *2008 Pulse Research

What Do You Have To Sell Today? Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONLY ONL NL ONE NLY N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

Professional Services Directory

DAVE JOHNSON Expert Bathroom & Room Remodeling, Carpentry & Whole House Renovations. Licensed &Insured 121 Sandwedge Dr Blue Ridge Golf Course Saturday & Sunday 10am-2pm Plumbing supplies, electrical & bathroom fixtures, doors, tile, Lawnmowers, snowblowers, housewares, and much more! 2 garages, everything must go! No earlybirds. Rain or Shine

PICTURES & paintings of old Pittston town scenes. Various sizes. $5 & $10 prices. Call Jim at 570-655-9474

UTILITY TRAILER ‘04, with spare & crank up, plywood all around $419. 570-829-1541

GOLF CLUBS 3 sizes, like new $20 each. 570-574-9518

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

CALL AN EXPERT

752 Landscaping & Gardening

MOUNTAINTOP

Furnaces & Heaters

OIL FURNACE 100,000 BTU. approximately 4 years old, works very well. $350. 570-675-4923

758 Miscellaneous

NECKLACE 16” pearl with 67 5-5.5 white pearls & 14kt gold clasp. Never worn. Paid $1,895 asking $1,000 OBO. 570-301-8749

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got 758 Miscellaneous the directions!

COAL 3 ton of buck coal & 12 ash cans for $300. 655-0429

744

746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets

Computer Equipment & Software

COMPUTER - DELL $25. 570-287-0023

742

MATTRESS & BOX SPRING, full set brand new in bag. $325.570-602-1075

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 13G

HOME IMPROVEMENT SPECIALIST Licensed, insured & PA registered. Kitchens, baths, vinyl siding & railings, replacement windows & doors, additions, garages, all phases of home renovations. Free Estimates 570-287-4067

SPRING BUILDING/ REMODELING?

Call the Building Industry Association for a list of qualified members

call 287-3331 or go to

www.bianepa.com

Land for sale? Place an ad and SELL 570-829-7130

D. Pugh Concrete

Williams & Franks Inc

WYOMING VALLEY MASONRY Concrete, stucco, foundations,pavers, retaining wall systems, dryvit, flagstone, brick work. Senior Citizen Discount.570-287-4144 or 570-760-0551

1057Construction & Building

GARAGE DOOR

Sales, service, installation & repair. FULLY INSURED HIC# 065008 CALL JOE 570-735-8551 Cell 606-7489

1078

Dry Wall

MIRRA DRYWALL

Hanging & Finishing Textured Ceilings Licensed & Insured Free Estimates

570-675-3378

1084

Electrical

GRULA ELECTRIC LLC

Licensed, Insured, No job too small.

570-829-4077

SLEBODA ELECTRIC Master electrician Licensed & Insured Service Changes & Replacements. Generator Installs. 868-4469

1093

WYOMING VALLEY PROPERTY MGT. Mini-Excavating /Hauling Stone, mulch, topsoil, etc. Lawn care. Reasonable rates. 570-466-4176

Fencing & Decks

ACTION FENCE SPRING SALE: Discounts on wood, vinyl, chain link, aluminum and more! Call today for a FREE ESTIMATE! 1-888-FENCE-80

1105 Floor Covering Installation

ETERNITY FLOORING

*Hardwood *Laminate *Ceramic *Porcelain Installations 570-820-0233 Free Estimates PA 089377

1129 Gutter Repair & Cleaning

GUTTER CLEANING

Window Cleaning Pressure washing Insured 570-288-6794

1132

Handyman Services

All Your Home Repair Needs No Job Too Small Licensed & Insured Free Estimates Russell’s Property Maintenance 570-406-3339

DO IT ALL HANDYMAN

Painting, drywall, plumbing & all types of interior & exterior home repairs. 570-829-5318

Mark’s Handyman Service

Give us a call

We do it all! Licensed &Insured

570-578-8599 NEPA HANDYMAN 30 Years Experience Remodeling Homes Pittston & Surrounding Areas Dave 570-479-8076

1135

Hauling & Trucking

A.S.A.P Hauling Estate Cleanouts, Attics, Cellars, Garages, we’re cheaper than dumpsters!. Free Estimates, Same Day! 570-822-4582

Excavating

All Types Of Excavating, Demolition & Concrete Work. Large & Small Jobs FREE ESTIMATES (570) 760-1497

1099

1135

Hauling & Trucking

AA CLEANING

A1 Always hauling, cleaning attics, cellar, garage, one piece or whole Estate, also available 10 & 20 yard dumpsters.655-0695 592-1813or287-8302 AAA CLEANING A1 GENERAL HAULING Cleaning attics, cellars, garages. Demolitions, Roofing & Tree Removal. Free Est. 779-0918 or 542-5821; 814-8299

AFFORDABLE Junk removal cleanups, cleanouts, Large or small jobs. Fast free estimates. (570) 814-4631

ALL KINDS OF HAULING & JUNK REMOVAL SPRING CLEAN UP!

TREE/SHRUB REMOVAL REMOVAL DEMOLITION Estate Cleanout Free Estimates 24 HOUR SERVICE SMALL AND LARGE JOBS! 570-823-1811 570-239-0484 ALWAYS READY HAULING Moving, Deliveries, Property & Estate Cleanups, Attics, Cellars, Yards, Garages, Construction Sites, Flood Damage & More. CHEAPER THAN A DUMPSTER!! SAME DAY SERVICE Free Estimates 570-301-3754

CASTAWAY HAULING JUNK REMOVAL

823-3788 / 817-0395

Mike’s $5-Up

Removal of Wood, Trash and Debris. Same Day Service.

1162 Landscaping/ Garden ARE YOU TIRED OF BEING RAKED? Specializing In Trimming and Shaping of Bushes, Shrubs, Trees. Also, Bed Cleanup, Edging, Mulch and Stone. Call Joe. 570-823-8465 Meticulous and Affordable. F ree E stimates BITTO LANDSCAPING & LAWN SERVICE 26 years experience, landscape designs, retaining walls, pavers, patios, decks, walkways, ponds, lighting, seeding, mulch, etc Free Estimates. 570-288-5177

Brizzy’s

Arbor Care & Landscaping Tree trimming, pruning & removal. Stump grinding, Cabling. Shrub and hedge sculpting and trimming. Spring cleanup, retaining walls and repair. Free Estimates Fully Insured 570-542-7265

CO$T U LE$$ LANDSCAPING

Specializing in Grass Cutting, Trimming of Shrubs & Hedges, & Mulching Call for estimates 570-239-4011

GARDEN TILLING

call Stan at 570-574-3050

JAY’S LAWN SERVICE

Spring clean-ups, mowing, mulching and more! Free Estimates 570-574-3406 PATRICK & DEB’S LANDSCAPING Landscaping, basic handy man, house cleaning,painting, moving & free salvage pick up. AVAILABLE FOR SPRING CLEAN UPS! Call 570-793-4773

RESIDENTIAL LAWN SERVICE

826-1883 793-8057

Grass cutting, trimming, leaf clean-up. Free Est. 574-5800

1156

TOUGH BRUSH, mowing, edging, mulching, trimming shrubs, hedges, trees, lawn care, leaf removal, Spring clean up. Accepting new customers & applications this season. Weekly & bi-weekly lawn care. Fully Insured. Free Estimates 570-829-3261

Insurance

NEPA LONG TERM CARE AGENCY Long Term/Short Term Care Products Life Insurance Tax Deferred Annuities Medicare Supplement Plans Dental/Vision Estate Planning Ideas 570-580-0797 FREE CONSULT

www nepalong termcare.com LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

TREE REMOVAL Stump grinding, Hazard tree removal, Grading, Drainage, Lot clearing, Stone/ Soil delivery. Insured. Reasonable Rates 570-574-1862

1165

Lawn Care

B & R LAWN SERVICE Grass & Shrub Cutting Reasonable Rates Senior Discount Free Estimates Call Butch at 570-954-6009 or Ron at 570-640-3458

Country Gentleman Total Yard Care Lawns - Shrubs Tilling - Mulch Senior Discount Westside Specials Family Owned 570-287-3852

1165

Lawn Care

DC LAWNCARE

Cleanups, mowing, mulching, shrub & tree trimming. Residential & Commercial Accounts Wanted Call Doug at 570-574-4367

GRASS CUTTING

Affordable, reliable, meticulous. Rates as low as $20. Emerald Green 570-825-4963

LOW COST LAWN CARE SERVICE

Specializing in grass cutting rates start at $20 Free Estimates 570-706-5035 PORTANOVA’S LAWN CARE Weekly & BiWeekly Lawn Cutting, Landscaping. Reasonable rates. Now accepting new customers. Email DanPortanova@ gmail.com or call 570-650-3985 RAINERI’S LAWN CARE & SHRUBS Lawns Trimmed & Edged, Hedges Cut, Mulch & More Free Estimates 570-825-2779 570-954-2302 YARD CLEAN UP Attics & Basements Complete clean ups Garden tilling Call for quotes 570-954-7699 or 570-926-9029

1183

Masonry

CONCRET E & MASONRY Brick, block, walks, drives, stucco, stone, chimneys and repairs.

570-283-5254

H O S CONSTRUCTION

Licensed - Insured Certified - Masonry Concrete - Roofing Quality Craftsmanship Guaranteed. Unbeatable Prices Senior Citizen Discounts Free Estimates 570-574-4618 or 570-709-3577

1189 Miscellaneous Service

1204

Painting & Wallpaper

AMERICA PAINTING

Interior/Exterior. 20 years experience. Insured. Senior Discount 570-855-0387

M. PARALIS PAINTING

Int/ Ext. painting, Power washing. Professional work at affordable rates. Free estimates. 570-288-0733

Serra Painting Book Now For Spring & Save. All Work Guaranteed Satisfaction. 30 Yrs. Experience Powerwash & Paint Vinyl, Wood, Stucco Aluminum. Free Estimates You Can’t Lose! 570-822-3943

1213

Paving & Excavating

DRIVEWAYS PARKING LOTS ROADWAYS HOT TAR & CHIPS SEALCOATING Licensed and Insured. Call Today For Your Free Estimate

570-474-6329 Lic.# PA021520 Mountain Top

PAVING & SEAL COATING Patching, Sealing, Residential/Comm Licensed & Insured PA013253 570-868-8375

1252

Roofing & Siding

EVERHART CONSTRUCTION Roofing, siding, gutters, chimney repairs & more. Free Estimates, Lowest Prices 570-855-5738

J.R.V. ROOFING

570-824-6381 Roof Repairs & New Roofs. Shingle, Slate, Hot Built Up, Rubber, Gutters & Chimney Repairs. Year Round. Licensed/Insured ŠFREE EstimatesŠ *24 Hour Emergency Calls*

Jim Harden

VITO’S & GINO’S

Wanted:

ALL JUNK CARS & TRUCKS Highest Prices Paid!! FREE PICKUP

288-8995 1195

Movers

BestDarnMovers Moving Helpers Call for Free Quote. We make moving easy. BestDarnMovers.com 570-852-9243

Motorcycle for sale? Let them see it here in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

570-288-6709

New Roofs & Repairs, Shingles, Rubber, Slate, Gutters, Chimney Repairs. Credit Cards accepted FREE ESTIMATES! Licensed-Insured EMERGENCIES

WINTER ROOFING Special $1.29 s/f Licensed, insured, fast service 570-735-0846

1297

Tree Care

GASHI AND SONS TREE SERVICE AND STUMP REMOVAL. Fully Insured. 570-693-1875

Find Your Ideal Employee! Place an ad and end the search! 570-829-7130 ask for an employment specialist


PAGE 14G

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

V isitus 24/ 7 a twww.v a lleyc hev ro let.c o m

R EN OVA TION SA LE

SSTOP STTOOPP BBY BYY TTODA YY!! TOODDAA Y!

A LL P RE-O W N ED VEHICLES

PRICES SLA SHED 2001 CHEVY ASTRO CARG O V AN

WILKESBARREGOLD

(570)48GOLD8 (570)484-6538

ONE O W N ER

O N LY 43K M ILES

#Z2656,V6 4 Speed A utom atic w /O verdrive,D eep Tinted G lass,H igh Back BucketSeats,FrontA uxillary Seat $ *

#12581A ,V6 A utom atic,A ir,PW ,PD L,D eep Tinted G lass,A M /FM /C D ,C ruise,Tilt,Low M iles

2007 CHEVRO LET IM PALA LS

2003 CHEVY S10 PICKUP XCAB EXTREM E EDITIO N

10 799

WANTED JEWELRY

2006 CHRYSLER TO W N & CO UNTRY 7 PA SSEN G ER

ONE O W N ER

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

$

,

10 999 ,

*

Highest Cash PayOuts Guaranteed

Find that new job. The Times Leader Classified section.

Mon-Sat 10am -6pm Closed Sundays

1092 Highway 315 Blvd (Plaza 315) 315N .3 miles after Motorworld

WE’LL HELP YOU

MOVE THAT STUFF

We Pay At Least 80% of the London Fix Market Price for All Gold Jewelry #12552B, V6 A utom atic, A ir C onditioning, PW , PD L, Tilt, Pow er M irrors, A M /FM /C D , FrontBucketSeats, O nly 55K M iles

$

10 999 ,

*

#Z 2583, 4.3L V6, 5 Sp eed, PS, PB, A / C , PW , P.Locks, Tilt, C ruise

$

11 999 ,

*

2008 KIA SPO RTAG E LX

2007 CHEVY CO BALT 4Dr

London PM Gold Price

April 13th: $1,666.50 Visit us at WilkesBarreGold.com Or email us at wilkesbarregold@ yahoo.com

O N LY 32K M ILES

ONE O W N ER

#Z2391, 4 C yl, A T, PS, PB, A /C , A M /FM /Stereo, D river Info C enter

$

12 487*

#12579A , 4 C yl., A utom atic, A ir, A lloy W heels, Pow er W indow s & D oor Locks, C ruise C ontrol

$

,

12 999* ,

800 PETS & ANIMALS 810

Cats

O N LY 39K M ILES

timesleader.com

CATS & KITTENS

12 weeks & up. All shots, neutered, tested,microchipped

#Z2436,3.5LV6 A utom atic,A /C ,PW ,PD L,Pow er Seat w /Lum bar A djustm ent,Steering W heelC ontrols,1 O w ner

#Z 2682, 6 C yl, A T, PS, PB, A /C , PW , PL, Tilt, C ruise, A lum .W heels

13 999*

$

,

2006 PO NTIAC TO RRENT

14 995* ,

VALLEY CAT RESCUE

824-4172, 9-9 only

815

ONE O W N ER

PAWS

O N LY O N 46K E OW N MER ILES

#12131A ,V6 A utom atic,A /C ,PW ,PD L,Pow er Seat, RoofRack,A lloy W heels,A M /FM C D

14 999 ,

Dogs

2011 CHEVY H H R LT

AW D

$

#Z2663, 2.2LA uto., A /C , PW , PD L, O nStar, Traction C ontrol, C D , Luggage RoofRails

$

*

2011 CHEVY AVEO LT

14 999 ,

*

2007 SUZUKI XL7 AW D

#Z2573, 4 C yl, A T, PS, PB, A /C , Leather, Sunroof, 16K, A lum .W heels, Spoiler

ENHANCE YOUR PET CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE

15 389* ,

2008 SATURN V UE XE AW D

Place your pet ad and provide us your email address

#12004A , V6 A utom atic, A /C , PW , PD L, Tilt, C ruise, A lloy W heels

$

15 555* ,

2007 CHEVY EXPRESS

“Regency Conversion” Van

ONE O W N ER

#11640A ,V6 A utom atic,A /C ,PW ,PD L,Pow er H eated M irrors,C ruise C ontrol,FrontH eated Seats,Low M iles

$

#Z2661,4.3LV6 A utom atic,A /C ,FullFloor C overing, PW ,PD L,C loth Seats,O nStar,C ruise,O nly 49K M iles

16 999*

$

,

17 900* ,

AW D

3RD RO W SEAT

ONE O W N ER

$

#11735A , V6, A utom atic, A ir, Leather, A M /FM /C D , C hrom e W heels

$

17 999* ,

21 999* ,

2009 CHEVY TRAVERSE LS FW D

2011 D O DG E D AKO TA BIG HO RN CREW CAB 4W D ONE O W N ER

O N LY 14K M ILES

$

21 999 ,

*

2008 H UM M ER H3

#Z 2609A , 8 Pass., 3.6L A T, A / C , 3rd Row , C ruise, Traction C ontrol, O nstar, Rem ote Keyless Entry, Pow er O p tions

$

22 900 ,

*

2009 CHEVY AVALANCHE LT 4W D

GOLDEN DOODLE PUPS

F1B. Health guarantee, non shedding. References available. $800 males, $900 Females. 570-765-1846

MALTI-POO PUPS Health guaranteed,

23 999* ,

2010 CHEVRO LET SUBURBAN LT 4W D

#12467A , 5.3L V8 A uto., A ir, PW , PD L, Running Boards, Keyless Start, O nStar, X M Satellite, Tilt, C ruise

$

24 950* ,

2010 CHEVY CO RVETTE

CO NVERTIBLE G RAN SPO RT

ONE O W N ER

O N LY 7K M ILES

#12343A ,V8 A uto.,Front/Rear A /C & H eat,Leather,Bose Stereo,H D Trailering Pkg,Rem ote Start,3rd Row ,Pow er O ptions,O nstar,A lum inum W heels,Bluetooth & M uch M ore!

$

31 999 ,

*

#12519A A ,D ualM ode ExhaustC hrom e W heels, A utom atic,Z51 Package,Sold N ew Here,1 O w ner

$

53 999 ,

*P r ices p lu s ta x & ta g s . P r io r u s e d a ily r en ta l o n s electvehicles . Selectp ictu r es f o r illu s tr a tio n p u r p o s es o n ly. XM a n d On Sta r f ees a p p lica b le. Lo w AP R to w ell q u a lif ied b u yer s .N o tr es p o n s ib le f o r typ o g r a p hica l er r o r s .

KEN W A LLA CE’S

ONLY ONL NLY NL L ONE N LE LLEADER. LEA E DER D . timesleader.com

Over 47,000

people cite the The Times Leader as their primary source for shopping information. *2008 Pulse Research

What Do You HaveTo Sell Today?

821-2772•1-800-444-7172 VA LLEY 601 Kid d er Street, W ilkes-Ba rre, PA CHEVROLET

*

Sca n From M ob ile D evice For M ore Sp ecia ls

M o n .- Thu rs .8:30- 8:00p m ; Frid a y 8:30- 7:00p m ; Sa tu rd a y 8:30- 5:00p m

EXIT 1 70B O FF I- 81 TO EXIT 1 . BEAR RIGH T O N BU SIN ESS RO U TE 309 TO SIXTH L IGH T. JU ST BEL O W W YO M IN G V AL L EY M AL L .

PLACE YOUR

GARAGE SALE AD TODAY Your Package includes: • Garage Sales Kit • Garage Sale Signs, • FREE Unsold Merchandise ad • Your sale location mapped FREE online and on our mobile app • PLUS a FREE BREAKFAST from McDonald’s.

1, 2, OR 3 DAYS

8 LINES

STARTING AT

$15

POMERANIAN

PUPPIES/FREE Bejoun poodle mix with Jack Russell. Call 570-235-9178

SHIH-TZU PUPPIES

$

Call 829-7130 to place your ad.

AKC, 8 weeks, female. Shots & wormed. Vet checked. Home Raised. $500. 570-864-2643

Pure Bred & Mixes $400 570-250-9690

LO W M ILES

#Z2680A , 3.7LVortec I5 A utom atic, A ir, Pow er O ptions, C hrom e A lum inum W heels, H eated Leather Seats, 6 D isc C D M onsoon Stereo, O nStar, XM Satellite

The Classified section at timesleader.com

health records, non shedding, socialized. $400 each. 570-765-0936

O N LY 14K M ILES

#11908B,3.7LV6 A utom atic,A /C ,PW ,PD L,FrontBucket Seats,A M /FM /C D ,Fog Lam ps,A lloy W heels

You can then use your account to enhance your online ad. Post up to 6 captioned photos of your pet Expand your text to include more information, include your contact information such as e-mail, address phone number and or website. Sweet, affectionate, loving puppies. 5 1/2 months old. Second shots & papers. $300/each. 570-466-2252 570-954-1231

O N LY 26K M ILES

#Z2515,V6 A utom atic,A /C ,PW ,PD L,O nstar,D eep Tinted G lass,C ruise,Fog Lam ps,O nly 47K M iles,H eated M irrors

This will create a seller account online and login information will be emailed to you from gadzoo.com “The World of Pets Unleashed”

CHOW PUPPIES

2009 FO RD EDG E SEL

2006 G M C ENVO Y XL 4W D

Find the perfect friend.

TO CONSIDER....

Call 829-7130 O N LY 37K M ILES

$

ONLY ONL NLY ONE N LE LEA LEADER. E DER.

2005 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER 4DR LS 4X4

2007 SATURN AURA XE

$

Call 829-7130 to place an employment ad.

Poms, Yorkies, Maltese, Husky, Rotties, Golden, Dachshund, Poodle, Chihuahua, Labs & Shitzus. 570-453-6900 570-389-7877

468

Auto Parts

Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONLY ONL NLY L ONE N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

468

timesleader.com

Auto Parts

BUYING JUNK VEHICLES $300 AND UP

$125 EXTRA IF DRIVEN, DRAGGED OR PUSHED IN!

NOBODY Pays More 570-760-2035

Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm • Happy Trails!

CALL 800-273-7130 OR VISIT TIMESLEADER.COM

24/7 TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD


TIMES LEADER LEADER www.timesleader.com www.timesleader.com TIMES

SUNDAY, SUNDAY, SUNDAY, FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL 15, 19, 4, 2012 PAGE PAGE 15G 15G

SUNDAY REAL ESTATE

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

THE TIMES LEADER

SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER. Smith Hourigan Group

Visit Our Website

Century21SHGroup.com

Striking décor highlights renovated Mountain Top ranch Story and Photos by Marianne Tucker Puhalla Advertising Projects Writer Over the past three years, the owners of this four-bedroom ranch have renovated every nook and cranny and the result is a totally updated home that could easily appear in a home decorator’s magazine. Treat yourself to a tour of 43 Walden Dr., a raised ranch in the Walden Park development of Mountain Top. Totally coordinated with a neutral color palette throughout, the home has a warm and welcoming energy that will make you feel right at home as soon as you step inside. Starting the renovation with a new roof and gutters, they also opened up the lower level family room adding sliding doors to a new rear patio. Listed by Linda Gavio of Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate for $198,500, this 2,330-square-foot home offers four

OPEN HOUSE TODAY, 1:30-3:30PM

bedrooms and three baths, all set on a .46acre lot. There is plenty of new landscaping to go with the surrounding trees. There will be an Open House today from 1:30-3:30 p.m. as part of a Spring Open House promotion offering tours at many of the Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate listings in the county. The red brick exterior has tan trim and black shutters. The raised porch leads into a large foyer with wood laminate flooring and a leaded glass front door with sidelight. To the left, the 11’-by-15’ living room features a white brick fireplace with a slate tile hearth and wooden mantle. The cool and crisp décor includes pale green/gray walls accented by white crown molding and cream carpeting. A large bow window front brings in plenty of natural light. The color palette is the same in the nearby 10’-by-12’ dining room where there

is a striking chandelier and bow window rear. To the left, the 11’-by-12’ kitchen offers a wood laminate floor chosen to accent hardwood cabinets in a light finish topped by newly installed black and tan speckled laminate countertops. Appliances include a stove with exhaust hood, a stainless side-by-side refrigerator, and a stainless dishwasher. There is a triple bow window facing rear. A separate eat-in area offers additional space. A nearby laundry room provides washer and dryer hook-ups and a door to the side yard. Next door, a powder room has a white vanity with red accents set against a gray tile floor. To the right of the dining room, you pass a linen closet on the way to the master

Continued

Lewith & Freeman Real Estate, Inc.

WE WILL SELL YOUR HOUSE OR ERA WILL BUY IT!*

iin n Du Duryea, uryea, PA Open House Today • 1-3PM

Ready for a New Home? Call the experts. We can help.

ATTENTION SMARTPHONE USERS: Try our new QR Code

Discover LF Homefinder at www.lewith-freeman.com

Atlas Realty, Inc.

Community Building Gym ~ Swimming Pool

TWINS AT WOODBERRY MANOR

829-6200 • www.atlasrealtyinc.com

Brand new luxury Townhomes

VISIT OUR OPEN HOUSES TODAY

Starting at $179,900

12-1:30 10 Norman St. Pittston Twp. ................................$159,900 12-1:30 48 Lewis St. Pittston .............................................$147,500 12-1:30 63 Clarks Lane, Plains ..........................................$144,900 12-2 238 S. Main St., Pittston .............................................$129,900 12-2 517 S. Main St. Jenkins Twp. ....................................$129,000 12-1:30 15 Green St, Pittston..............................................$124,900 12-1:30 29 Valley View Dr., Mountaintop..........................$174,900 12-1:30 2032 Route 92, Harding ..........................................$78,900 2-4 550 Johnson St., West Wyoming ................................. $249,900 2-4 1167 Shoemaker Ave., West Wyoming.........................$159,900 2:30-4 38 Johnson St., Pittston ...........................................$139,900 1215 South Street, Avoca ............................................ Sale Pending Charles A. Adonizio, III 2:30-4 621 Donnelly St., Duryea..........................................$34,900 For more information and photos visit www.atlasrealtyinc.com Broker, GRI, SRES

Directions: 81S take exit 178B toward Avoca. Turn slight right onto PA 315S Make first right onto Main Street. Make a left onto McAlpine. Make a left onto Foote ave. Forest Heights is on the right

ERA1.com

ONE Mountaintop Office SOURCE 12 N Mountain Blvd. REALTY (570) 403-3000

Prices Start at $219,900

Call Lisa Joseph at 715-9335 or Virginia Rose at 714-9253 for more information.

We Sell Happiness!

Spring-g-g Into Summer... by moving into your own home! ! Pittston-Stately Home!

Open House! 1

0pm -2:3 0 0 :

29 BOHAC ST, SWOYERSVILLE 10-4758 Double lot, well maintained and ready to move in! Priced to sell! Don’t miss out on this 3 bedroom home with covered CALL FLO 371-2881

patio, garage and private drive! $110,000 DIR: Route 11 to Dennison St. Right on Bohac. Property on right.

Open House! 12:0

:00p 0- 2

m

5 WASHINGTON TERRACE, HUGHESTOWN 12-854 Charming 3 bedroom home that has been lovingly redone. Delightful features include fireplace, hardwood floors, updated kitchen, modern bath, and large yard with off alley parking. Located in great neighborhood! CALL KIM 466-3338 $97,000 DIR: From Main St, Pittston right on Mill St, left on Searle St, right on Division St, left on Washington Terr, home on left.

Harveys Lake-Lake Front!

Trucksville-Great Price!

837 Wyoming Ave., Kingston

288-1401

Harveys Lake-Point Breeze!

W NE Stately turn of the century home. Modern colors and decor compliment the original wood work and architecture. Well maintained 3+ bedrooms, 2 baths, lots of space and many upgrades, custom counter tops. A must see home! Robert Bartorillo 283-9100 12-1256 $135,000

Welcome home! Relax and enjoy the stunning lake views from either of the 2 balconies in this 6000SF lake front treasure. Spacious master, elevator from lower level, 2 fireplaces, 2 boat slips, custom oak built-ins, mature landscaping DJ Wojciechowski 283-9100 12-1207 $749,900

Park like setting in rear with stream on .8 acre lot and house. Large room sizes, first and lower level family rooms, 3 bedrooms, first floor laundry, updated roof, new deck, above ground pool. 1-car detached garage. Bar and exercise room in lower level. Maribeth Jones 696-6565 12-1263 $139,900

Every amenity you could ask for in this lake front home on Point Breeze! Granite, hardwood, vaulted ceilings, open 1st floor layout leading to the front deck & covered porches. Master with fireplace, lower level home theater, the list goes on & on! Jill 696-6550/Bob 696-6555 12-1249 $749,000

Two Of ces To Serve You Better: 1149 Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort 570.283.9100 28 Carverton Road, Shavertown 570.696.2600 Visit our website: www.poggi-jones.com © 2012 BRER Af liates Inc. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Af liates Inc. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other af liation with Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity.

E IC PR

LOWER DEMUNDS RD., DALLAS Like new! This 2,500 sq.ft. home features new kitchen; 2 1/2 new baths; new hardwood flooring; new heating system; new plumbing; newly finished lower level. MLS#11-4504 JOE MOORE $199,000

138 ORCHARD EAST, DALLAS 2 bedroom - 2 bath condo in very nice condition. Tiled baths. 2 balconies. Nearby 1-car garage. New vinyl exterior... Assessment paid by seller/owner. New roof 2005. New electrical system. MLS#11-4031 JOE MOORE $109,000

info@mksre.com

NANTICOKE

ED

SALESPERSONS WANTED!

THORNHURST Low maintanence, single story ranch home located in Join a GROWING FIRM servicing the Greater Wyoming Valley with offices strategically located in SHAVERTOWN & W-B. a private golf course community in the Poconos for weekEnjoy a challenging career with EXCELLENT INCOME end or year round enjoyment. Modern kit w/ breakfast bar, POTENTIAL for intelligent, industrious, motivated individuals. formal living room and din- We have professional office space available and WILL TRAIN ning room. Family room QUALIFIED PEOPLE. If you have a license or have always w/gas FP. Walk-up master wanted to obtain one call for a confidential interview. Learn bedroom w/bonus room ideal for an office. New front and rear decks in a how you can become a part of our private setting within 30 minutes to W-B or Scranton. $115,000 EXCELLENT ORGANIZATION!

RE

263490

Darren G. Snyder Broker/President

WILKES-BARRE Totally Remodeled 3 Bedroom ED Move right into this 3 home on large lot on a wellUC bedroom, 1 1/2 bath kept street in move-in condiD tion! Home Includes 1 1/2 in very good condition RE Modern Baths w/ stone counwith modern kitchen tertops, tile floors, spacious and bathrooms and a 3 kitchen with all new appliseason sunroom off of ances & plenty of countertop the kitchen. Central air space! New carpet throughout! throughout. An Amazing Price- This home can be yours with very little out-of-pocket $59,900 money. Call Darren Snyder 570-825-2468. $49,900

C DU

Se Habla ~ Espanol

Happy Easter!

Wilkes-Barre 570-825-2468 • Shavertown 570-696-2010

2297 W. 8TH ST., FRANKLIN TWP. 18612 2 or 3 bedroom cape cod farmhouse located in the Village of Orange. 1st floor bedroom, living room with hardwood flooring, eat-in kitchen. 1st floor laundry. garage & shed with loft. Rear deck overlooking cleared lot. New furnace, new kitchen floor (October, 2011) MLS#11-3255 JOE MOORE $119,900

GERALD L. BUSCH REAL ESTATE, INC. Pat Is Ready 288-2514 To Work For “You!”

Open House-Double Block! 33-35 OAK ST, WILKESBARRE 11-3031 0pm 3:0 Well maintained huge 0 3 : double block. 1 3 bedrooms each side, newer roof, and replacement windows. Owner side features new bathroom and laundry room with bath. Tenant side occupied with occupants paying all utilities. Finished room in attic on owner’s side could be used as a 4th bedroom. A conspicuously nice, large, well built property in a nice residential neighborhood. CALL RON 817-1362 $89,900 DIR: South on Carey Ave. Right onto Oak St. Property on right.

Spectacular 3br 2 1/2 bath twin on great lot offers beautiful hardwood floors on 1st flr and stunning kitchen with granite counter tops and stainless steel appl. Large master suite with wonderful bath & closet. All modern amenities, stately entry and staircase, composite deck, central air, gas heat, 1 car garage. Dir: Rt 309S to Mountain Top, R at triangle to R onto Nuangola Rd. R into Woodland Estates to enter Woodberry Manor. R onto Woodberry Dr, R onto Twins Lane.

744678

is Luzerne County’s ONLY Gated Community

Jerry Busch, Jr. Is Ready Each Office is Independently Owned And Operated. To Work For “You!” Call Jerry Today 709-7798 EMAIL: JERRYBUSCHJR@AOL.COM

OPEN HOUSE TODAY 1-3PM

761 North Street, Luzerne Beautiful 3 bedroom , 1 1/2 bath home, lving room with bright windows and pretty wood floors, dining room, modern eat-in kitchen, family room, laundry,deck, fenced yard above ground pool, comfortable gas heat and central air. Call Jerry Busch Jr Today! MLS#12-948 $129,900. DIR: Wyoming Ave to Bennett St. left on Kelly St. to right on North St. Home will be on the right.

NEW LISTING - DALLAS!

Move right in to your own home without doing a thing ! 3 bedroom with gorgeous cherry kitchen with appliances, hardwood floors, new roof, newer windows, front & rear porches, comfortable gas heat and off street parking. Call Pat Busch Today! 885-4165 MLS#12-1082 $137,900

Call Pat Today 885-4165

NEW LISTING LUZERNE!

LUZERNE HIGH TRAFFIC BUSINESS LOCATION

Here’s The STARTER Home For You! This home needs some TLC but has fantastic location and a great yard. Call Pat Busch Today ! MLS#12-1137 $44,900

Luzerne long established business location, presently used as food business, good for car lot or retail location, paved parking, rental income. Located across from high traffic shopping center. Realtor owned. Call Jerry Busch Jr. $169,900

FOR PROMPT REAL ESTATE APPRAISALS, CALL GERALD L. BUSCH APPRAISAL SERVICE 288-2514

National Open House Weekend APRIL 28TH & 29TH

Open Houses Publishing April 27th, 28th and 29th in The Times Leader AND View online at WWW.TIMESLEADER.COM – Click on “Homes”


PAGE 16G

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Mountain Top

Continued from front page

bedroom. Measuring 15’-by-12’, this striking bedroom has a double closet with mirrored sliding doors and cream carpeting to accent pale gray walls. Double windows front and side each have white and gray marble windowsills. The attached master bath has a cherry vanity and a tiled floor in a gray slate pattern. There are double windows front and a tiled tub and shower surround. A second full bath has cream wainscoting, a cream tiled floor, its own cherry vanity and a tiled tub and shower surround. Bedrooms two and three are 10’-by-10’, respectively, each with pale green walls, at least one double window, and a double closet. The fourth bedroom is larger, measuring 13’-by-9’ with a similar décor and double window front. An 11’-by-15’ office on the home’s lower level could be also used as a fifth bedroom. It has tan Berber carpeting, pale green walls and its own closet. A large storage closet is nearby in the hall. A family room on this level is sure to please. It measures 11’-by-25’ and has new tan Berber carpeting, and was recently renovated with sliding doors that open rear to a new concrete patio. A nearby door opens to the attached two-car garage where you find lots of extra room for storage or a workbench. This home has electric baseboard heat, central air conditioning and public water and sewer systems. To get to today’s Open House from Wilkes-Barre, take Route 309 south into Mountain Top. Go past the intersection with Church Rd. The entrance to Walden Park is ahead on the right. Turn right onto Walden Dr. For more information or to make an appointment to see this extraordinary house, call Linda Gavio at Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate, at (570) 474-2231, ext. 19; email Linda.Gavio@ coldwellbanker.com. SPECIFICATIONS: Raised ranch 2,330 square feet BEDROOMS: 4 BATHS: 3 PRICE: $198,500 LOCATION: 43 Walden Dr., Mountain Top AGENT: Linda Gavio REALTOR: Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate, (570) 474-2231, ext. 19; Linda.Gavio@coldwellbanker.com OPEN HOUSE: Today, 1:30-3:30 p.m.

906 Homes for Sale ASHLEY

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

ASHLEY Exclusive Listing $32,900

AVOCA

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

BACK MOUNTAIN

BACK MOUNTAIN

CENTERMORELAND Wyoming County Home with 30 Acres

DALLAS

850 Homestead Dr. Bank owned end unit townhome in beautiful condition. Finished walk-out lower level. Private setting. Not your typical foreclosure! $297,000 MLS #12-851 Call Tracy Zarola 570-696-0723

Dakota Woods Enjoy maintenance free living at Dakota Woods Development in the Back Mountain. This 3+ bedroom condo features an open floor plan, first floor master suite, hardwood floors, stunning granite kitchen, gas fireplace & 2 car garages. Large loft area provides multiuse space. MLS# 11-3212 $299,000 Call Rhea 570-696-6677

900 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 906 Homes for Sale Having trouble paying your mortgage? Falling behind on your payments? You may get mail from people who promise to forestall your foreclosure for a fee in advance. Report them to the Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency. Call 1-877FTC-HELP or click on ftc.gov. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

WEBUY HOMES! Any Situation 570-956-2385 Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

3 bedroom, 1 bath 2 story in good location. Fenced yard with 2 car detached garage. Large attic for storage. Gas heat. $79,900 Call Ruth Smith 570-696-1195 or 570-696-5411

SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP

91

%

of Times Leader readers read the Classified section. *2008 Pulse Research

What Do You Have To Sell Today? Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONLY ONL NL ONE NLY N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER D .

127 DONATO DRIVE Large mobile home in excellent condition on a double lot, located in Ashley Park. Carport, above ground pool with deck, two sheds, fenced in yard, modern kitchen, dining room, family room with wood burning fireplace, two bedrooms, master bedroom has whirlpool tub, laundry room with appliances, foyer, large enclosed heated porch. New hardwood floors thruout, vinyl siding, central air, skylights, private driveway, appli ances. Listed exclusively by Capitol Real Estate Shown by appointment Qualified buyers only! Call John Today 570-823-4290 570-735-1810

214 Gedding St. Cozy Cape Cod home with 2 bedrooms, 1st floor laundry, nice yard with deck. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-668 $59,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

AVOCA

901 Main St. Stately 4 bedroom home with beautiful woodwork, extra large rooms with gas heat and nice yard. MLS 12-884 $79,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

CAPITOL REAL ESTATE

www.capitol-realestate.com Doyouneedmorespace? for additional A yard or garage sale photos in classified ASHLEY is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

BACK MOUNTAIN Centermorland

529 SR 292 E For sale by owner Move-in ready. Well maintained. 3 - 4 bedrooms. 1 ¾ bath. Appliances included. 2.87 acres with mountain view. For more info & photos go to: ForSaleByOwner.com Search homes in Tunkhannock. $275,000. Negotiable For appointment, call: 570-310-1552

BACK MOUNTAIN

AVOCA

timesleader.com

Remodeled 2 or 3 bedroom home. Large yard. Nice porch. Low traffic. Not in flood area. Asking $82,000. Deremer Realty 570-477-1149

45 +- acres/pasture/woods 2 producing horizontal gas well units 8-room log home with newer roof, full basement 2-story barn & detached 2-car garage Also, commercial building on 8.5 +- acres

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

AVOCA

1215 South St. Spacious 4 bedroom home with in law suite with separate entrance. Large lot, large room sizes. Split system A/C in family room. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-963 $89,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

The Attorney To Call When Buying A Home • Complete Real Estate Legal Services • Title Insurance • Rapid Title Search & Closing

Renovated 3 bedroom, 2 story on corner lot. New roof & windows. New kitchen, carpeting & paint. Hardwood floors, gas fireplace & garage. All appliances included. A MUST SEE. $119,000. 570-457-1538 Leave Message BACK MOUNTAIN

133 Frangorma Dr Bright & open floor plan. 6 year old 2 story. 9' ceiling 1st floor. Custom kitchen with stainless steel appliances. Family Room with 14' ceiling & fireplace. Convenient Back Mt. location. MLS# 12-127 $344,000 Call Geri 570-696-0888

• Evening & Weekend Appointments

Angelo C. Terrana Jr. Suite 117 Park Building, 400 Third Avenue, Kingston, PA (570) 283-9500

742259

ATTORNEY AT LAW

Shopping for a Shopping for a new apartment? new apartment? Classified lets Classified lets you compare costs you compare costs without hassle without hassle or worry! or worry! Get moving Get moving with classified! with classified!

Immaculate 4 bedroom 3 bath brick front home in Northwoods. Many amenities include hardwood floors in the living room & dining room, cherry kitchen with breakfast area that opens to deck overlooking a large yard and gazebo. Family room with gas fireplace, moldings, gas heat, central air & attached 2 car garage. MLS#111193 $369,000 Call Rhea 570-696-6677

Back Mountain

Newberry Estate Three story freshly painted unit at Hillside. 2 bedrooms & loft, 3 bath, modern kitchen, fireplace in living room, central air & gas heat. Convenience of living at Newberry Enjoy golf, tennis & swimming. MLS#11-4435 $132,900 Call Rhea 570-696-6677

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

This country estate features 30 acres of prime land with a pretty home, ultra modern kitchen, 2 full modern baths, bright family room, den, living room & 3 good sized bedrooms. Property has open fields & wooded land, stream, several fieldstone walls & lots of road frontage. Equipment and rights included. $489,000 Coldwell Banker Gerald L. Busch Real Estate 570-288-2514

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

143 Nevel Hollow Road Great country living in this 3 bedroom, 2 & 1/2 bath home with 1 car attached garage, large entertainment room lower level. Plus a 30'x30' detached garage with open 2nd floor ready to finish & mechanics pit in one stall. MLS 11-4124 $195,000 570-675-4400

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

DALLAS

$214,900 Motivated Seller. Very spacious home with great floor plan features hardwood floors & pocket doors on main level. 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, rear screened patio, attached garage, as well as a 2-car detached garage, all located on a 1 acre country size lot with beautiful views. Please Call Deb Roccograndi at 570-696-6671 MLS#12-691.

DALLAS HUGE REDUCTION

248 Overbrook Rd. Lovely 4 bedroom cape cod situated in a private setting on a large lot. Vaulted ceiling in dining room, large walk in closet in 1 bedroom on 2nd floor. Some replacement windows. Call Today! MLS 11-2733 $114,900 Jay A. Crossin Extension 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770 DALLAS

Four bedroom Colonial with hardwood floors in formal dining and living room. Modern eat in kitchen, finished basement with 24” x 30” recreation room. Deck, hot tub and ceiling fans. MLS#11-4504 $229,900 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

Purebred Animals? Sell them here with a classified ad! 570-829-7130

906 Homes for Sale DALLAS

NEWBERRY ESTATE ORCHARD EAST Two bedroom condo, 2nd floor. Living/dining room combination. 1,200 square feet of easy living. Two balconies, one car garage nearby. Security system, cedar closet, use of in ground pool. $109,000 MLS#11-4031 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

Looking to buy a home? Place an ad here and let the sellers know! 570-829-7130 DALLAS OAK HILL

DALLAS

BEAR CREEK

6650 Bear Creek Blvd Well maintained custom built 2 story nestled on 2 private acres with circular driveway - Large kitchen with center island, master bedroom with 2 walk-in closets, family room with fireplace, custom built wine cellar. A MUST SEE! MLS#11-4136 $299,900 Call Geri 570-696-0888

906 Homes for Sale

Just minutes from 309 this Bi-level is ideally located near shopping, schools and major highways. Complete with an oak kitchen with dining area leading to deck, 3 bedrooms and bath on the main level plus L shaped family room, 4th bedroom, power room & storage/ laundry area it awaits its new owners. It offers a spacious rear yard, an enclosed patio and has dual access from 2 streets. $ 121,900. Ann Marie Chopick 570-760-6769

570-288-6654

3 bedroom ranch. Remodeled kitchen. Added family room. Master bedroom with 1/2 bath. Beautiful oak floor. 3 season room. Deck & shed. Garage. 114476. 100x150 lot. $154,900. Call Besecker Realty 570-675-3611

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

Real Estate Briefs –– Prepared by The Times Leader Advertising Department

Mary Anne Orsini Joins MGE Mortgage

Mary Anne Orsini joins MGE Mortgage Wilkes-Barre Office Virginia Rose, President of Lewith & Freeman Real Estate is pleased to announce Mary Anne Orsini recently joined MGE Mortgage. Mary Anne has extensive experience as a Mortgage Banking consultant. Most recently Mary Anne held the position of Renovation Mortgage Consultant at Wells Fargo. “Mary Anne’s expansive knowledge in conventional, FHA, VA and renovation loans makes her uniquely qualified to consult home buyers with their mortgage needs. Mary Anne maintains a high standard of service and makes the process easy,” stated Virginia Rose. Mary Ann graduated from State University of New York with a degree in Mathematics and minors in Computer Science and Chemistry. Mary Anne is a member of the Mortgage Bankers Association and the Greater Wilkes-Barre Association of Realtors, Associate Member. Mary Anne is involved in community volunteering including the United Way. Mary Ann stated “My goal is to provide the best possible service and solutions to my clients so that they are able to purchase their dream home.” Mary Anne’s experience and dedication undoubtedly make her a perfect fit with MGE Mortgage.

Contact Mary Anne at (570) 970-1124 or mgemortgage12@frontier.com


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 17G

Eric McCabe

Lisa Perta

• First Time Buyer Programs

SOLD

• PHFA Experts - Super Low Fixed Rates & Low Down Payment Options Available Susan Hines

• FHA & VA Loan Experts • Refinance - Low Fixed Rates for Home Improvements, Consolidate Debt or Cash Out!

Danielle McCoy

• FHA 203(k) Streamline - Purchase and Remodel All In One Loan • Construction Loans - Low Fixed Rates & Low Down Payment Options Available

Len Mudlock

• Rural Housing Loans - Low Fixed Rates with No Money Down and No PMI • Fast, Free Pre-approval - Online, By Phone or In Person

Northeast PA’s

#1

• Evening/Weekend Appointments • Friendly, Local Processing/Closing Staff! Darren Lowell

570-714-4200

Mortgage Connection

www.mccabemortgagegroup.com 400 Third Avenue, Suite 100 • Kingston, PA 18704

Find A New Friend

EILEEN R. MELONE Real Estate 821-7022

EILEEN MELONE, Broker 821-7022

In The Times Leader Classified

Visit us on the web at: www.NEPAHOMESETC.com OR www.realtor.com/wilkes-barre

COUNTRYWOOD ESTATES

To place an ad call 829-7130

Level Building Lots .40 – 1.50 Acres All Underground / Public Utilities Gas, Sewer, Water, Phone, Electric, Cable, Street Lighting, Sidewalks Rental / Lease Options Available Convenient Location / Hanover Township / Close to Hanover Industrial Park

BANK ORDERED AUCTION

Saturday, April 28th 11:00 AM

NEPA’S #1 Real Estate Website!

NEPA’s Leader in Energy Efficient Construction Alternative Energy Solutions Additional Warranty and Maintenance Services available

OVER 880 SALES IN 2011* Top 500 Largest Brokers in the U.S.

570-718-4959

Steve Farrell Owner/Broker

KINGSTON OFFICE (570) 718-4959 OR (570) 675-6700

Open House • 1:00-3:00

Open House • 1:00-3:00

New Listing

69 Girard Avenue Plymouth, PA 18651

Convenient 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Single Family Home with Living Room, Dining Room, Kitchen, Covered Front Porch, Rear Deck. Living Area 1,800 SF+/12:00 PM

267 Gardner Street Plymouth, PA 18651

Comfortable 2 Bedroom, Single Family Home with Living Room, Dining Area, Kitchen, Freshly Painted Interior, Newer Carpet, Covered Front Porch, Complete with Garage.

Surprising 4 Bedroom, Single Family Home with Living Room, Dining Room, Spacious Kitchen, Bay Window, Covered Front Porch and Exceptional Backyard.

EVERY NEW HOME CONTRACT INCLUDES HEATING AND COOLING BILLS FOR

10 YEARS

LOT PRICES STARTING AT $40,000 $40 000 LOTS READY FOR IMMEDIATE CONSTRUCTION For Specifics Call Connie Yanoshak 829-0184

MOUNTAINTOP

WILKES-BARRE

3BR/2.2BA, Beautiful Lakefront Property!! MLS#12-40 DIR: 81 S to Nuangola Exit 159, R past gas station, R onto Aspen, R onto Laurel, L onto Lakeview, L onto Oakmont to Coplay straight ahead

36-38 Brogan Street - Miners Mills Nice Double Block w/separate utilities & osp. MLS#12-180 DIR: North on Washington St past Hollenback Golf Course to end, R on E Main St, L on Brogan St

Classy 2BR Two Story - all modern w/ preserved CHARACTER! Garage, new roof, furnace, wiring & gas fp MLS#12-1248

Hosted By: Carol Shedlock 570-407-2314

Hosted by: Steve Shemo 570-793-9449

Call Whitney 570-338-7537

New Listing

Spring Training Classes Begin Soon!

Reduced

25 Coplay Place - Laurel Lakes

$309,900

$74,900

WILKES-BARRE

$82,500

Designed specifically for agents that are fresh out of Real Estate School.

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

455 WARREN AVENUE, KINGSTON 2 Story unique home on a beautiful tree lined street. Huge foyer with window bench, formal dining rm w/ French doors/chair rail. Fireplace, perfect triangle work space in kitchen w/ S.S. appliances, finished basement w/2nd kitchen & bath. (MLS #11-5161)

Space is limited. Our 11th year of New Agent Training Classes! Classes taught by: Whitney Lopuhovsky Certified Corporate Trainer Multi-Million $ Club

HANOVER TWP.

Really nice 3BR/2.5BA Three Story w/ family room addition, fenced yard & many upgrades. MLS#12-1163

$118,000

WILKES-BARRE

Contact Whitney today for a confidential interview:

Call Whitney 570-338-7537

570-338-7537 or wlopuhovsky@classicproperties.com

Nice cash flow! 3-unit w/storefront, 3 BR apt & 2 BR home. Close to W-B General Hospital. MLS#12-406

$159,900

HOSTED BY: MIKE SANDHERR Directions: Wyoming Ave. to Pierce Street, L onto Rutter, R on Butler. House located on corner of Warren & Butler.

$89,500

Call Steve S 570-793-9449

*CLOSED SALES BASED ON COMPANY WIDE SALES FOR NORTHEASTERN PA FROM 1/1/2011 to 12/31/2011 *Ranking as of Jan. 2012

KINGSTON

CLARKS SUMMIT

NORTH POCONO

SAVE $$$ 800-262-3050

TUNKHANNOCK

POCONO MOUNTAINS

STYLE

New Residential Construction

www.auctionworldusa.com

Luxury Townhomes 1,340-2,300 sq. ft. Three with First-Floor Master Suite!

Auction World USA, Inc. PA License # AY-59-L

Custom Remodeling Kitchen and Baths Land Development

SIGNATURE PROPERTIES Kimberly J. Reilly, MBA REALTOR® 230 Ferguson Avenue Shavertown, PA Office: 570.675.5100 Cell: 570.466.3338 kimberly.reilly@century21.com www.c21signature.com Each office is Independently Owned and Operated

Office: 570-655-2374 Direct: 570-237-1444

rank F arey C Construction, Inc.

www.staufferpointe.com

Join us for our Friends and Family Event Today at 4PM!

Where High Quality Is The Standard

w w w. f r a n k c a r e y c o n s t r u c t i o n . c o m

Find all properties for sale by scanning this QR code

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 1:00 - 3:00 PM

Classes Offered: FLEX/MLS Computer Training Contract Negotiations Building Your Business Social Media Internet Marketing

1:30 PM

68 Graham Avenue Hanover Twp., PA 18706

740207

Licensed by the Pennsylvania Department of Banking. NMLS #139699 Co. NMLS #2611

VALUE

Starting at $219,000.

LOCATION

EXCLUSIVE, RESIDENTIAL LOCATION - Minutes to NE EXT. and I-81 OFF SR-315

CALL: 877-442-8439 Susan Parrick Dir., Sales/Marketing

Stauffer Pointe is a Planned Condominium Community

Like us on Facebook!


PAGE 18G

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

BUY OR LEASE Lease Starting at $1,800/mo.

3 Bedroom, 2.5 Bath Units with Bonus Room, Loft & Garage 2-3 Bedroom, 2 bath Condos Also Available Virtually Maintenance Free with Affordable Fees Pool, Clubhouse, Fitness Room, Basketball, Fishing Pond on site and more! Tennis coming soon!

(570) 881-3946 or (570) 690-6632 yalickfarms.com Located on Memorial Highway at the Intersection of Routes 415 & 118, Dallas Township 906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

DALLAS 148 E Center Hill Rd

DRUMS

DURYEA

906 Homes for Sale

DURYEA

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

DURYEA REDUCED

DURYEA

ELEGANT HOMES, LLC. 51 Sterling Avenue, Dallas PA 18612

(570) 675 • 9880

www.eleganthomesinc.net

Conveniently located, roomy and comfortable 2 story awaits your family. 3 bedrooms 1.5 bath, hardwood floors, new deck and pool, new windows. MLS#11-3815 New price $144,900 Call Tracy Zarola 570-696-0723

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

DALLAS Newberry Estates

Condos with architect designed interior on 3 floors. Large, well equipped tiled kitchen with separate breakfast room, den with fireplace-brick & granite hearth. Open floor plan in living/dining area. 3 or 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths. Lower level has den or 4th bedroom with family room & bath. Recently sided; attached 2-car garage, walk-out lower level, decks on 1st & 2nd floor; pets accepted (must be approved by condo association). Country Club amenities included & private pool for Meadows residents. MLS 12-203 $269,000 Maribeth Jones 570-696-6565

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

61 Acer Lane Great value, great location on a fabulous lot. From your hot tub you can enjoy the view of the almost full acre lot. Year round sun room, plus you have a Lower Level that adds more space to this great home. Don’t miss out on this incredible buy!! Schedule your showing today. MLS 12-808 $139,900 Call Tony Wasco 570-855-2424 Trademark Realtor Group 570-613-9090

DUPONT

140 Bear Creek Boulevard Beautiful family home on over 1/2 acre with 3 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms and finished lower level. For more info and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 12-918 $159,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

S O L D

$159,900 Good visibility commercial location. Room for up to 3 businesses! Also has 2 apartments., off-street parking for 8 w/ possibility. of much more in rear. Great for Beauty/Nail Salon, Fitness Studio, Shop, and Garage type businesses. Call CHRISTINE KUTZ for more information. 570-332-8232

DURYEA

125 McAlpine St Ideal starter is this appealing two bedroom 2 story with large lot and 1.5 car garage. Plenty of off street parking, in solid neighborhood. MLS 11-4313 PRICE REDUCED $79,000 Call Arlene Warunek 570-650-4169

ComeUpToQuailHill. com

New Homes From $275,000$595,000 570-474-5574

Looking for the right deal Do you need more space? A yard or garage sale on an automobile? in classified Turn to classified. is the best way It’s a showroom in print! to clean out your closets! Classified’s got You’re in bussiness the directions! with classified!

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

548 Green St. Are you renting?? The monthly mortgage on this house could be under $500 for qualified buyers. 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, 1st floor laundry. Off street parking, deep lot, low taxes. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3983 $64,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

REDUCED 619 Foote Ave. Fabulous Ranch home with 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, ultra modern kitchen with granite counters, heated tile floor and stainless appliances. Dining room has Brazilian cherry floors, huge yard, garage and large yard. Partially finished lower level. If you’re looking for a Ranch, don’t miss this one. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 11-4079 $154,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

Open House Sundays • 1:00-3:00PM

Luxurious Twins in Kingston

$198,900

New Construction!

* Approx 2100 Sq. Ft. * 2 Car Garage with Storage Area * 2 Story Great Room * Cherry Kitchen with Granite * Fenced in Yard with Patio * Gas Heat/AC Directions: From Wyoming Ave. take Pringle St. to the End, take left on Grove St. Twins on left 267 Grove St. Kingston

Find A New Friend In The Times Leader Classified

To place an ad call 829-7130 Heritage He eritage H Homes omes P Promise: romise:

Competitive Pricing Hidden Costs Hidden Upgrades titiv ivee Pr Pric icin ic in ng • No No H idd id den Co den de C ost sts ts • No No H id idde dde d n Up

Smith Hourigan Group (570) 696-1195

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified LINE UP is the best way A GREAT DEAL... tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness IN CLASSIFIED! with classified! Looking for the right deal

on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

97 Chittenden St. Flood damaged home with new furnace, electric box, water heater, outlets and switches. 1st floor gutted but already insulated and ready for sheetrock. 2nd floor has 4 bedrooms and bath with double sinks. Large yard. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 12-1225 $69,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

DURYEA

621 Donnelly St. Great starter home, already furnished, newer roof and vinyl windows. Move right into this 2 bedroom, 1/2 double home. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc. com MLS 12-1042 $34,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

New Model!

2898 Scranton/Carbondale Highway Blakely, PA 18447 570-383-2981 • www.heritagehomesltd.com HERITAGE HOMES INCLUDE: • Gas Warm Air Heat • Site Work Package • Central Air Conditioning • Concrete Front Porch • Andersen Windows • 1st Floor Laundry • Master Bath Whirlpool • Two Story Foyer • 2 1/2 Tile Baths • Front Stone Accent •˙Hardwood, Kitchen, Foyer • Poured Concrete Foundation Featuring:

The Arlington - 2,820 sq. ft. You’ve Got Dreams. We’ve Got Plans. MODEL HOURS Weekdays 12-7 Sat & Sun 12-5 Closed Fridays

Scan Code and Visit Our Website:


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 19G

NEPA’s #1 Real Estate Website!*

C Classic Properties.com

Carol Shedlock

Associate Broker Regional Sales Manager Office: 570-718-4959 Direct: 570-718-4959 Cell: 570-407-2314 cshedlock@classicproperties.com

Tour This Beautiful Lakefront Property Today!

Open House • 1:00-3:00PM 25 Coplay Place, Mountaintop

$309,900

Enter this lovely two story property... Relax in the large LR w/hardwood floors & gas FP... Enjoy your evenings on the screened in summer room overlooking the calm lake front of Laurel Lakes. Entertain on the tiered deck... cook in the newly remodeled kitchen w/tiled floors... first floor also sports a 1/2 bath w/laundry area, large pantry & formal dining room w/HW floors. Second floor: Large master bedroom w/beautiful French doors, master bath, large walk in closet, two additional bedrooms and full bath Lower level: Oversized family room w/French doors for access to a beautiful yard, lake and dock! What a great way to relax and enjoy! P.S. Two car garage... DIR: 81S to Nuangola Exit 159, R past gas station, R on Aspen, R on Laurel, L onto Lakeview, L onto Oakmont to Coplay straight ahead.

Call Carol (570) 407-2314

Find your next vehicle online. Why llilive W Wh i iin a ttown h house or condo, d when h you can llilive i iin one off these “River Shores” style TWIN Ranch homes. These homes come with an outstanding view of the valley and river island. Included is a stainless kitchen, hardwood floors, tile baths, sunken tub, tiled master bath, two car garage, tankless hot water, the best materials, the best finishes and a covered porch overlooking the beautiful views. All for $299,000. High on a ridge in Jenkins Township, Eagle View offers outstanding custom built single family homes as well as these great Twins. Limited number of lots available, Call now 881-2144 Brokers Welcome

741943

timesleaderautos.com


PAGE 20G

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

906 Homes for Sale

DURYEA REDUCED!

38 Huckleberry Ln Blueberry Hills 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, family room with fireplace, 2 car garage, large yard. Master bath with separate jetted tub, kitchen with stainless steel appliances and island, lighted deck. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 11-3071 $309,860 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified! EXETER

530 Cherry Drive Spacious 2 bedroom townhome with hardwood floor, gas heat, central air, end unit with one garage. All appliances, move in condition. For more info and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 12-712 $169,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! 906 Homes for Sale

EXETER

908 Primrose Court Move right into this newer 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath Townhome with many upgrades including hardwood floors throughout and tiled bathrooms. Lovely oak cabinets in the kitchen, central air, fenced in yard, nice quiet neighborhood. MLS 11-2446 $117,900 Call Don Crossin 570-288-0770 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-287-0770 EXETER

Nice size 4 bedroom home with some hardwood floors, large eat in kitchen with breakfast bar. 2 car garage & partially fenced yard. Close to everything! $89,000 Call Christine Kutz 570-332-8832

Do you need more space? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way to clean out your closets! You’re in bussiness with classified! EXETER

OPEN HOUSE Sunday 12pm-5pm

362 Susquehanna Ave Completely remodeled, spectacular, 2 story Victorian home, with 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, new rear deck, full front porch, tiled baths and kitchen, granite countertops, all Cherry hardwood floors throughout, all new stainless steel appliances and lighting, new oil furnace, washer dryer in first floor bath. Great neighborhood, nice yard. $174,900 (30 year loan, $8,750 down, $887/month, 30 years @ 4.5%) 100% OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE Call Bob at 570-654-1490

906 Homes for Sale

EXETER REDUCED

128 JEAN ST. Nice bi-level home on quiet street. Updated exterior. Large family room, extra deep lot. 2 car garage, enclosed rear porch and covered patio. For more information and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.co m MLS 11-2850 $179,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

P E N D I N G

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

906 Homes for Sale HANOVER TWP 1 Grandview Ave

OPEN HOUSE

Sunday 1-2:30 Price Reduced $95,500 Directions from San Souci Parkway to St. Mary’s Rd., make 1st right then left onto Grandview

Hanover Twp. Discover the values in this welcoming 3 bedroom home. Some of the delights of this very special home are hardwood floors, deck, fully fenced yard & screened porch. A captivating charmer that handles all your needs! $95,500 MLS 11-3625 Michael Slacktish 570-760-4961

Signature Properties HANOVER TWP

EXETER REDUCED

908 Primrose Court Move right into this newer 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath Townhome with many upgrades including hardwood floors throughout and tiled bathrooms. Lovely oak cabinets in the kitchen, central air, fenced in yard, nice quiet neighborhood. MLS 11-2446 $119,900 Call Don Crossin 570-288-0770 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-287-0770 EXETER TWP.

NEW PRICE $699,000 311 Lockville Rd Stately brick 2 story, with in-ground pool, covered patio, finished basement, fireplace, wood stove, 3 car attached garage, 5 car detached garage with apartment above. MLS#11-1242 Call Joe or Donna, 613-9080

FREELAND

Spacious 4 bedroom, 1 3/4 bath home. Gas Heat. Deck. Fenced yard. One car garage. MLS 12-832 $71,900 Ann Marie Chopick 570-760-6769

570-288-6654 GLEN LYON

P INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY E Double side by side. New roof, N replacement windows, D many updates, detachedI 3 car garage. Priced to N sell!! $72,000 MLS# 12-685 G Call Geri 570-696-0888

HANOVER TOWNSHIP

3 bedrooms, 2 baths, finished basement, screened patio, new paint & carpet. Move in condition. $139,900. Call 570-301-9590

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

Lovely home with many upgrades, new roof, windows, flooring and plumbing. Above ground pool with fenced yard, home features gas, hot water, baseboard heating, modern kitchen, living room, dining room, family room, large foyer, master bedroom with walk in closet, 2 car detached garage with private driveway. MLS# 12-467 $100,000 Call Lynda at 570-262-1196

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

HANOVER TWP.

HANOVER TWP. REDUCED

95 Pulaski St. Large home on nice sized lot. Newer windows, walk up attic. 3 bedrooms, nice room sizes, walk out basement. Great price you could move right in. For more info and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 11-4554 $39,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

P E N D I N G

5 Raymond Drive Practically new 8 year old Bi-level with 4 bedrooms, 1 and 3/4 baths, garage, fenced yard, private dead end street. For more info and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 11-3422 $175,000 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

HANOVER TWP

Over 47,000

people cite the The Times Leader as their primary source for shopping information. *2008 Pulse Research

What Do You Have To Sell Today?

HANOVER TWP. UNDER CONTRACT

285 Lyndwood Ave. Brick 3 bedroom Ranch with full finished basement. Home features large modern kitchen, 3 nice size bedrooms, all with closets, hall coat closet, w/w, modern bath, ceiling fans, fenced yard. Private driveway, newer furnace. Assessed value and taxes recently reduced! MLS 12-222 $86,000 Patricia Lunski 570-814-6671 Antonik & Associates, Inc. 570-735-7494

HARDING

Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONLY ONL NL N L LY ONE N L LEA LE LEADER. E DER D .

906 Homes for Sale

HANOVER TWP.

19 Lee Park Ave. Well kept 3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath single with eat in kitchen, 1st floor laundry area, w/w, ceiling fans, full concrete basement. Gas heat. Home sits on large lot with 2 car detached garage and off street parking. MLS 12-541 $79,900 ANTONIK & ASSOCIATES, INC. 570-735-7494 Ext 304 Patricia Lunski 570-814-6671

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified! 906 Homes for Sale HANOVER TWP.

20 Dexter St., Nice starter home with shed M OVE -I N R EADY ! 3 bedroom. Fenced yard. Security system. Roof 2006. Hanover Area Schools. This home would be eligible for the LUZERNE COUNTY GROWING HOMEOWNERS INITIATIVE. Seller will help with closing cost expenses. MONTHLY PAYMENT $191 ON A 30 YEAR MORTGAGE- HOW CAN YOU BEAT THAT? MLS #11-3023 Reduced $35,000 Call Tracy Zarola 570-696-0723

Dallas School District. Wooded and private Bi-Level. This home features 1 car garage, 3 bedrooms, 1 3/4 bath & nice updates. plenty of room on your private 2 acre lot. Call for details. $166,000 Call Cindy King 570-690-2689 www.cindykingre.com

HUDSON

Archaic 2 floor, 5.5 room homestead, new washer, dryer, sump pump, roof 3.5 years old. Lot over 4,000 sq. ft. 50 East Stanton St. $50,000. Call 9am7pm 570-239-5672 or 570-822-1940

HUGHESTOWN REDUCED

189 Rock St. Spacious home with 4 bedrooms and large rooms. Nice old woodwork, staircase, etc. Extra lot for parking off Kenley St. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3404 $89,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

JENKINS TWP

timesleader.com

Very well maintained 2-story home with 6 rooms, 3 bedrooms, large eat-in kitchen and 1.5 baths. This home also has a first floor laundry room, ductless air conditioner, gas steam heat and a fenced in yard with a shed. This home is in move-in condition just waiting for you to move into. Make an appointment today! #11-4433 $79,900 Karen Altavilla 283-9100 x28

HARVEYS LAKE

570-675-4400

(570) 696-1195

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

906 Homes for Sale

HANOVER TWP.

2032 ROUTE 92 Great Ranch home surrounded by nature with view of the river and extra lot on the river. Large living room and kitchen remodeled and ready to move in. Full unfinished basement, off street parking. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-79 $78,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

HARDING

Extraordinary Quality Built 4000+ Square Foot Home – the rear yard with stone patio backs up to the 8th Fairway of the Wyoming Valley Country Club! There’s a custom cherry eat-in kitchen with island, formal living and dining rooms with hardwood floors, 1st Floor Family Room with Vermont Stone fireplace and wet bar, 1st floor Master Suite with His & Her Dressing and Powder Rooms opening to a tiled master bath with jetted tub and separate tiled shower; Second floor has 3 additional Bedrooms with walk in closets, 2 full baths and large attic for storage; Gigantic Lower Level Family Room has a stone fireplace, seated bar area with sink & mirrored backsplash, workout area, & powder room. Stunning landscaping surrounds this beautiful home with an indoor and outdoor speaker system, oversized 2 car garage & underground sprinkler system. MLS #11-994 $385,000. Call Pat today @

Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 570-287-1196

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

Find the perfect friend. The Classified section at timesleader.com

Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONLY ONL NLY NL L ONE N LE L LEA LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

1252 Main St.

3 Bedrooms 1 Bath Finished Walk-Out Basement Corner Lot Single Car Garage

$58,900

Call Vince 570-332-8792

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified! JENKINS TWP.

OPEN HOUSE 723 Jean Street SUNDAY, APRIL 15 12pm to 1:30pm Charming home in very good condition. Nice woodworking, replacement windows, new vaulted ceiling bedroom overlooking amazing view of the river. Vinyl siding, one car garage, private setting on a dead end street, but not flood zone. $95,000 MLS 12-990 Call Nancy Answini, Gilroy Real Estate 570-288-1444

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified! HARVEY’S LAKE

906 Homes for Sale

JENKINS TWP.

4 Widener Drive A must see home! You absolutely must see the interior of this home. Start by looking at the photos on line. Fantastic kitchen with hickory cabinets, granite counters, stainless steel appliances and tile floor. Fabulous master bathroom with champagne tub and glass shower, walk in closet. 4 car garage, upper garage is partially finished. The list goes on and on. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 12-210 $389,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

JENKINS TWP.

7 years old, 4 bedroom plus den, 3 full bath rooms plus one unfinished one, large kitchen, dining room. $155,000 (570)704-6194

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified! JENKINS TWP.

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE IN CLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

JENKINS TWP.

4 Orchard St. 3 bedroom starter home with 1 bath on quiet street. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-254 $69,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

906 Homes for Sale

KINGSTON MOTIVATED SELLER REDUCED!

76 N. Dawes Ave. Use your income tax rebate for a downpayment on this great home with modern kitchen with granite counters, 2 large bedrooms, attached garage, full basement could be finished, sun porch overlooks great semi private yard. A great house in a great location! Come see it! . For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-41 $115,000 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

KINGSTON TWP

431 Chestnut Ave. Charming 2 story single family home with upgrades, including new kitchen cabinets, furnace, hot water heater, 200 amp electric, 2 car detached garage. Walk up attic for additional storage space. MLS 11-4106 $129,900 Jay A. Crossin EXT 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770 KINGSTON 58 S. Welles Ave

Highland Hills 8 Patrick Road Magnificent custom built tudor home with quality throughout. Spacious 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, 2 story living room with fireplace and library loft. Dining room, family room and 3 season sunroom which overlooks professionally landscaped grounds with gazebo and tennis/basketball court. Lower level includes recreation room, exercise room and 3/4 bath. Enjoy this serene acre in a beautiful setting in Highland Hills Development. Too many amenities to mention. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-723 $399,900 Call Terry 570-885-3041 Angie 570-885-4896

So close to so much, traditionally appointed 3 bedroom, 3 bath townhome with warm tones & wall to wall cleanliness. Modern kitchen with lots of cabinets & plenty of closet space thruout, enjoy the privacy of deck & patio with fenced yard. MLS 11-2841 $123,000 Call Arlene Warunek 570-650-4169

KINGSTON

297 Susquehannock Drive Traditional 4 bedroom home with 2.5 baths, 2 car garage, private yard with above ground pool. Large deck with retractable awning. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 12-945 $254,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

38 W. Walnut St. Charming 4/5 bedroom with 1.5 baths. Beautifully appointed kitchen w/granite counter tops, cherry cabinets and hardwood floors. Gas fireplace in living room, leaded glass windows in living room and dining room. Nice back deck, 2 car garage and 4 season front porch. MLS 11-4103 $179,900 Jay A. Crossin EXT. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

JENKINS TWP. 41 Chestnut Street

Smith Hourigan Group (570) 696-1195

1626 Halowich Rd. Country living at its finest! This 3 bedroom, 2 and 3/4 bath home features a spacious floor plan. Great room features a fireplace enclosed in PA Cultured Blue Stone w/waterfall on side. Red oak flooring and beams & a panoramic view of the mountainside. Kitchen has granite countertops and hickory cabinets, Satillio terra cotta flooring and sky windows. Much more. MLS 12-471 $270,000 Call Jay Crossin Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

KINGSTON

906 Homes for Sale LARKSVILLE

9 Morgan Terrace OPEN HOUSE Sunday, April 15 2:00 to 3:30 Charming & unique remodeled home with 5 bedrooms and spectacular views of Carey Ave Bridge and the river. New kitchen, roof and deck. Three bedrooms on first floor and two baths, 2 bedrooms on second floor. Three season porch, first floor laundry and office/den area. Must see. Out of flood zone. $119,000 Call Nancy Answini Gilroy Real Estate 570-288-1444 LUZERNE

KINGSTON

KINGSTON 171 Third Ave 2 W. Sunrise Drive PRICED TO SELL! This 4 bedroom has 2 car garage with extra driveway, central air, veranda over garage, recreation room with fireplace and wet bar. Sunroom For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-296 $199,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

906 Homes for Sale

29 Landon Ave N Star Quality at a Great Value!! Large Livingroom with energy saving Gas Fireplace. 3 Bedroom with ample closet space. Beautifully remodeled main bath with built in granite vanity. Enjoy the expansive back yard from the covered stone patio with a built in gas grill! 570-696-5418 570-472-1395 MLS#11-3075 PRICE REDUCED $139,900 Call Mary Price 570-696-5418 570-472-1395

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

573 Carverton Rd Privacy & serenity! This 40 acre estate features living room with fireplace & hardwood floor; family room with vaulted ceiling & fireplace; 1st floor master bedroom & bath with jetted tub & stall shower; panelled den; dining room with stone floor & skylight; 3 additional bedrooms & 2 baths. Central Air, 3 outbuildings.

459 Bennett St. Very nice 5 bedroom, 2 story home in nice area of Luzerne. Off street parking for 4 cars. 1st floor master bedroom & laundry. Replacement windows on 2nd floor. 5 year young full bath. Modern kitchen w/breakfast bar, oak cabinets. Basement always DRY! All measurements approximate MLS11-3745 $122,900 Debbie McGuire 570-332-4413 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770 LUZERNE

REDUCED $695,000

MLS 11-4056 Call Nancy Judd Joe Moore 570-288-1401 Large charmer had been extensively renovated in the last few years. Tons of closets, walk-up attic & a lower level bonus recreation room. Great location, just a short walk to Kirby Park. MLS 11-3386 $129,000 Call Betty at Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 570-287-1196 ext 3559 or 570-714-6127 KINGSTON

Condo with architect designed interior on three floors. Large well equipped kitchen with breakfast room, den with fireplace with brick and granite hearth. Open floor plan in living room/dining room. Attached 2 car garage, walkout basement with family room, den & bath, could be 4th bedroom. Pets accepted, must be approved by Meadows Association. Gas heat, abundant closet space. $269,000 MLS-12-1203 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

KINGSTON

Freshly painted Cozy Cape Cod in the heart of Kingston. Walking distance to parks, schools & shopping. Features 2 full baths, formal dining room, 3-4 bedrooms and an oversized garage. Plenty of room for all. $179,900. MLS# 11-4162 Please Call Deb Roccograndi at 570-696-6671

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE IN CLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmore space? Ayard orgaragesale in classified is thebestway to cleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

KINGSTON ATHERTON AVE

Wonderful starter home in a convenient neighborhood. Home features many updates including new windows, roof, kitchen & carpets. Offstreet parking with large yard. Located near schools and shopping. Low taxes & priced to sell! MLS#12-515 $109,900 Everett Davis 696-2600 417-8733

LAFLIN 24 Fordham Road

Lovely cedar shingle sided home on large corner lot in a great development. 4 bedroom, 2 1/2 baths, 1st floor family room, finished lower level. Hardwood floors throughout, huge living room & family room. 1st floor laundry room & office, gas heat, nice deck, above ground pool, 2 car garage. 11-3497 $295,000 Call Nancy Answini 570-237-5999 JOSEPH P. GILROY REAL ESTATE 570-288-1444

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

LAFLIN

4 Fordham Road Lovely brick ranch home in great development. 2 bedrooms, 2.5 baths. All hardwood floors, brand new roof. 2 family rooms suitable for mini apartment. 1st floor laundry, sunroom, central air, alarm system, 1 car garage. Very good condition. 11-2437 $200,000 Call Nancy Answini 570-237-5999 JOSEPH P. GILROY REAL ESTATE 570-288-1444

Find homes for your kittens! Place an ad here! 570-829-7130

Large, spacious home, ultra modern kitchen, new windows, carpet & bath. Off-street parking, gas heat & hardwood floors. Large open floor plan. Must See! MLS #12-958 $105,000 Call Lynda Rowinski

Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-5418 MOUNTAIN TOP

803 Aspen Drive Brand new carpet in lower level family room! Hardwood on 1st floor dining room, living room, bedrooms & hall! Large rear deck. Master bedroom opens to deck! Private rear yard! Basement door opens to garage. MLS #11-2282 NEW PRICE $174,900 Jim Graham at 570-715-9323

MOUNTAIN TOP

Beautiful 4 bedroom, 2.5 baths, brick & vinyl bi-level. Professionally landscaped private 1/2 acre tree lined lot with paved driveway. Hardwood floors on 2nd floor; Italian tile on 1st floor. 2-car attached garage, gas heat, deck, stone patio, storage shed, detached office. Photos @ www. postlets.com/repb/ 6548110. $195,000. 570-474-9827 MOUNTAIN TOP

Nestled on just under an acre just minutes from 81S this colonial offers 2194 sq. ft. of living area plus a finished basement. Enjoy your summer evenings on the wrap around porch or take a quick dip in the above ground pool with tier deck. The covered pavilion is ideal for picnics or gatherings And when the winter winds blow cuddle in front of the gas fireplace and enjoy a quiet night. MLS 11-2260 Priced to Sell, $179,900 Ann Marie Chopick 570-760-6769

(570) 288-6654

Find homes for your kittens! Place an ad here! 570-829-7130


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 21G

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

MOUNTAIN TOP

NANTICOKE 23 W. Grand Street

NORTH LAKE

PITTSTON REDUCED

PLAINS

PLYMOUTH 22-24 BRADLEY ST

SHICKSHINNY

SWEET VALLEY REDUCED!

SWOYERSVILLE

WEST NANTICOKE

OPEN HOUSE 215 PATRIOT CIRCLE SUNDAY, APRIL 15 1PM TO 3PMVery Townhouse.

good condition. 3 bedroom, 1 ½ bath, living room with gas fireplace and hardwood floors. Kitchen offers new stainless steel appliances, tile floor, laundry area, dining room with built in corner cabinets. MLS 12-238 $119,500 James Banos Realtor Associate COLDWELL BANKER RUNDLE REAL ESTATE 570-991-1883

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

MOUNTAINTOP

Totally Remodeled 3 Bedroom home on large lot on a wellkept street in movein condition! Home Includes 1 1/2 Modern Baths w/ stone countertops, tile floors, spacious kitchen with all new appliances & plenty of countertop space! New carpet throughout! MLS 11-3473 $57,900 Call Darren Snyder Marilyn K Snyder Real Estate 570-825-2468

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

Inviting home with 90 feet of lake front & wonderful enclosed dock. The huge great room features a vaulted ceiling, hard wood floors, handsome stone fireplace, built-in cabinets & long window seat with offering lake view. Modern kitchen with large pantry for entertaining, Master suite opens to 3 season room, also lakefront. 2nd floor guest rooms are oversized. MLS# 11-2954 $328,500 Call Rhea 570-696-6677

MOUNTAINTOP

Move right into this beautiful 4 bedroom home in desirable Rockledge development. Many upgrades & features including modern kitchen with granite countertops, 22x20 great room, 2 fireplaces, new paint, carpet, gorgeous 2 tier deck & much more. $245,000. For more information or to schedule a viewing please Call 570-242-5381 MOUNTAINTOP

VACANT LAND 333 OAKMONT LANE 1.15 acre, level lot, #254, on cul-de-sac, in Laurel Lakes. Underground electric, phone & cable. Ready for your new home in 2012! MLS# 11-4465 $35,500 Call Christina Kane 570-714-9235

NANITCOKE

3 bedroom, 1 bath. Nice opportunity for a starter home or investment property. Needs work, but columns, moldings, and leaded glass windows are intact. $42,000 CALL CHRISTINE KUTZ 570-332-8832

Beautiful woodwork highlights the Victorian influenced 3 bedroom home featuring hardwood floors, pocket & transoms doors, shuttered windows, crown molding & large bay window. Plus a 2+ bedroom unit with newer kitchen to help pay mortgage. MLS 12-674 $89,000 Call Arlene Warunek 570-650-4169

8 rooms, 4 bedrooms & bath, eat-in kitchen, formal dining room, new windows, gas heat. MLS # 11-4369 $74,500 Call Donna 570-613-9080

NANTICOKE

Adorable home with charm & character. 4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, eat-in kitchen, formal dining room, family room with gas fireplace. 3 season room, fenced in yard with rear deck & shed. $119,000 MLS#12-498 Michael Nocera 570-357-4300

Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-5412 NANTICOKE

31 Tedrick St. Very nice 3 bedroom with 1 bath. This house was loved and you can tell. Come see for yourself, super clean home with nice curb appeal. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3544 Reduced to $76,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

PITTSTON

175 Oak Street NEW FURNANCE 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, 1st floor laundry room, 3 season porch, fenced yard and off street parking. MLS#12-721 $89,000 Call Patti 570-328-1752 Liberty Realty & Appraisal Services LLC

Smith Hourigan Group (570) 696-1195

PITTSTON REDUCED

PITTSON

NANTICOKE 294-296 EAST STATE ST

29 Valley View Dr. MOTIVATED SELLER Raised ranch on corner lot. Spacious two car garage. Modern kitchen & bath, tile floors. Energy efficient Ceramic Heat. MLS#11-2500 $174,900 Call Julio Caprari: 570-592-3966

238 S. Main St. Ten room home with 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car garage, great driveway, central air, large yard. A must see home! For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-477 $129,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

PITTSTON

Johnson St. Great home, move in ready, with 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, large yard with lots of outdoor living space. Hardwood floors, gas fireplace, modern eat in kitchen. New gas furnace, roof and windows. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 12-328 $139,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

PITTSTON REDUCED!

136 East Ridge St. A great home features 3 bedrooms, plenty of closet space, modern eat in kitchen with great appliances, living room with wood pellet stove, large family room, 1 1/2 modern bathrooms, washer/ dryer hook-up, second floor has all new replacement windows, exterior has aluminum siding, stain glass window on new front porch, new above ground pool, fenced in level yard, Plenty of off street parking, A+ today. Never worry about parking, its always there. Great location, best price home in today's market, Shown by appointment only, to qualified buyers. Call John Vacendak CAPITOL REAL ESTATE 570-735-1810 www.capitolrealestate.com for additional photos

PLAINS

63 Clarks Lane 3 story Townhome with 2 bedrooms, 3 baths, plenty of storage with 2 car built in garage. Modern kitchen and baths, large room sizes and deck. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 11-4567 $144,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

Sell your own home! Place an ad HERE 570-829-7130 95 William St. 1/2 double home with more square footage than most single family homes. 4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, ultra modern kitchen and remodeled baths. Super clean. For more information and photos visit www.atlas realtyinc. com MLS 11-2120 $54,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

PITTSTON TWP. REDUCED

PLAINS

86 St. Mary’s Road Nice 3 bedroom 1 bath Single in Plains with large modern kitchen, master bedroom with double closets, beautiful woodwork, w/w, ceiling fans, attic, porches, shed, gas heat. MLS 10-3939 $68,000 ANTONIK & ASSOCIATES, INC. 570-735-7494 Ext. 304 Patricia Lunski 570-814-6671

PLAINS Birchwood hills, 4

bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2 story family room with fireplace, finished basement, built in pool, $399,900 (570)824-2471

PLAINS OPEN HOUSE

Get ready for your outdoor entertaining!! Fenced & beautifully landscaped lot with huge rear Trex decks and newer above ground pool. Plenty of off-street parking & detached 2-car oversized garage. 2 Story has 3 bedrooms, formal dining room & modern kitchen with corian counters & oak cabinets. MLS# 12-457 $117,900 Call Deb Roccograndi at 570-696-6671

LivingInQuailHill.com

New Homes From $275,000$595,000 570-474-5574

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

10 Norman St. Brick 2 story home with 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, large family room with fireplace. Lower level rec room, large driveway for plenty of parking. Just off the by-pass with easy access to all major highways. For more info and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com. MLS 11-2887 $159,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

PITTSTON REDUCED

NANTICOKE $49,900

1610 Westminster Road. DRASTIC PRICE REDUCTION Paradise found! Your own personal retreat, small pond in front of yard, private setting only minutes from everything. Log cabin chalet with 3 bedrooms, loft, stone fireplace, hardwood floors. Detached garage with bonus room. Lots to see. Watch the snow fall in your own “cabin in the woods.” For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 11-319 $279,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

PITTSTON TWP. REDUCED

NEWPORT TWP.

Five bedroom Contemporary has a vaulted ceiling in living room with fireplace. Hardwood floors in dining & living rooms. 1st floor master bedroom with walk in closet. Lower level family room. Deck, garage, separate laundry. $257,500 MLS#12-170 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

P E N D I N G

168 Mill St. Large 3 bedroom home with 2 full baths. 7 rooms on nice lot with above ground pool. 1 car garage. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3894 $79,000 Tom Salvaggio 570-262-7716

38 Frothingham St. Four square home with loads of potential and needs updating but is priced to reflect its condition. Nice neighborhood. Check it out. For more info and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 11-3403 $54,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

We Need Your Help!

4/15/12 1pm-3pm 5 West Bergh St. FOR SALE BY OWNER MUST SEE! 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, 6 car garage, eat-in kitchen, dining room, large living room, utility room, gas fireplace, oil/steam heat, finished basement, fully fenced, screened deck. $144,900. 570-606-6850 PLAINS

A steal at this price! 4 year young 3 bedroom, (1st floor master bedroom and bath), 3 baths, 1-car garage townhome in Rivermist Development. New carpeting and freshly painted. Rear 10 x 12 deck. Ready to move into. Call for your appointment today! #12-611 $174,900 Karen Altavilla 283-9100 x28

Well maintained aluminum sided double block, gas heat, & an additional lot. Tenant pays all utilities. $92,900 MLS 12-347 Call Florence 570-715-7737

Smith Hourigan Group 570-474-6307

Anonymous Tip Line 1-888-796-5519 Luzerne County Sheriff’s Office

570-288-6654

SHICKSHINNY

4 Oliver Road Located in the back part of Oliver Road in a very private part of North Lake in Sweet Valley. Yearning to be restored, lake front cape cod in a very tranquil setting was formerly used as a summer home. MLS 11-2113 $93,500 Jay Crossin CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770 ext. 23 SWEET VALLEY

REDUCED!!! 78 Maltby Ave. Wonderful family home in a great neighborhood. A large master suite and family room addition make this home a must see! There is an inground pool and attached in-law suite. MLS 11-4572 $210,000 Call Kelly Connolly-Cuba EXT. 37 Crossin Real Estate 570-288-0770 SWOYERSVILLE

NEW LISTING! Great price! 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, only 3 years old. Located in Sand Springs Golf community. Master bath & second floor laundry. Kitchen has granite counter tops and stainless steel appliances. Basement can be easily finished with walkout sliding doors. Why pay new construction prices? Save thousands! Home is cleaned & ready for occupancy! MLS#12-775 $218,500 Paul Pukatch 696-6559

SHAVERTOWN

1195 Sutton Road Attractive, wellmaintained saltbox on 2 private acres boasts fireplaces in living room, family room & master bedroom. Formal dining room. Large Florida room with skylights & wet bar. Oak kitchen opens to family room. 4 bedrooms & 3 1/2 baths. Finished lower level. Carriage barn PRICE REDUCED $425,000 MLS# 10-3394 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

SHAVERTOWN

408 Cragle Hill Rd. This is a very well kept Ranch home on 6 acres, central air, rear patio and 1 car garage. This is a 3 parcel listing. MLS 11-4273 $157,900 Jackie Roman 570-288-0770 Ext. 39 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770 SHICKSHINNY

Great new construction on 2 acres with 1 year builders warranty! 2 story home, 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, master with whirlpool tub, living room with gas fireplace, dining room with tray ceiling, kitchen, breakfast room & laundry room. 2 car attached garage, open porch & rear deck. $275,000 MLS 11-2453 Five Mountains Realty 570-542-2141 SHICKSHINNY

Very nice Ranch home with 4 bedrooms, 2 full baths, kitchen, dining room & living room. Plus propane fireplace in living room, french doors in dining room and large deck with a view. $159,900 MLS 12-287 Five Mountains Realty 570-542-2141 SWEET VALLEY

Totally remodeled 3 bedroom, 2 bath home on 1 acre with large family room on lower level. property has small pond and joins state game lands. $141,900 MLS 11-4085 Five Mountains Realty 570-542-2141

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

TILBURY TERRACE Tilbury Avenue Superb 3 bedroom single. Hardwood floors, fireplace, garage. Well maintained. Great Neighborhood. Affordable at $209,500. Towne & Country Real Estate Co. 570-735-8932 570-542-5708

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

906 Homes for Sale

WEST PITTSTON

Spacious 4 bedroom colonial on 40 x 150 lot with private drive, gas heat, modern kitchen and 1.5 baths. French doors between living room and formal dining room plus an entrance foyer with wood stair case and Hardwood floors. MLS 12-1304 $44,270 Ann Marie Chopick 570-760-6769

225-227 Boston Ave Double block. Wyoming Area schools. Out of flood zone. 1 side rented to long term tenant at $525 /month. Other side remodeled - move in or rent at $650/month. 3 bedrooms each side, gas furnaces, sunrooms, large yard. $149,000. Call 570-357-0042

WEST PITTSTON

SWOYERSVILLE 570-288-6654 TAYLOR

313 Race St. This home needs someone to rebuild the former finished basement and 1st floor. Being sold as is. 2nd floor is move in ready. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-255 $39,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

S

O

129 Townsend St. Wonderful home in great neighborhood. Relax in the pool after a hard day of work. Property offers the opportunity to have your own Beauty Shop (equipment negotiable), or expand your living space. Buyer responsible for confirming zoning for business. All measurements approximate. MLS# 12-833 $219,000 Jolyn Bartoli

570-696-5425 SWOYERSVILLE

L

Featured on WNEP’s Home & Backyard. Move right into this 3 bedroom, 2 bath immaculate home with custom maple eat in kitchen, stainless steel appliances, hardwood floors, Jacuzzi tub, 2 fireplaces, abundance of storage leading outside to a private sanctuary with deck/pergola & Koi pond. Off street parking. MUST SEE. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-733 $189,900 Call Keri 570-885-5082

D

WEST PITTSTON

REDUCED

18 Atlantic Ave. Large 2 story home with 2 baths, attached garage. Being sold as-is. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-4475 $49,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

S

O

TRUCKSVILLE

Wonderful home in convenient location features spacious formal rooms, beautiful hardwood floors, & grand stone fireplaces. Kitchen opens to bright sunroom/ breakfast area. 4 large bedrooms, office & 2 baths on 2nd floor. Charming wrap around porch offers views of large property with mature oak and pines. MLS#11-528 $499,000 Call Rhea 570-696-6677

5411 Main Road Commercial zoned property on busy corner. Country Colonial home with detached 2 car garage, with additional office space and entrance door. Perfect property for home based business. Eat in kitchen with brick gas fireplace, large dining room and living room with coal stove. Finished basement with 2 rooms & 1/2 bath. Old fashioned root cellar off the kitchen. Large paved parking area. MLS 11-2554 $188,000 570-675-4400

SHAVERTOWN

OPEN HOUSE

SWEET VALLEY

Sunday April 15 From 1-3 pm 122 Manor

Move right in to this comfortable, well maintained home. Newer roof and beautiful wood floor. Make this home yours in the New Year! MLS# 11-4538 $165,000 Jolyn Bartoli

If you crave privacy, consider this stunning, 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2 story traditional cradled on a 2 acre lot. Ultra modern kitchen with breakfast area, great room with cathedral ceiling & fireplace, formal dining room & bonus room over 2 car garage. Only $299,000. MLS# 12-679 Call Barbara Metcalf 570-696-0883 LEWITH & FREEMAN 570-696-3801

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130 SHAVERTOWN

Spacious 1791 sq. ft. 1/2 double with wrap around porch, shed & garage. Semi modern kitchen & bath. 3 bedrooms with gas heat and plenty of storage. $24,900. Possible rent to own Ann Marie Chopick 570-760-6769

To place your ad call...829-7130

SAND SPRINGS

Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-5425 PLYMOUTH

3 bedroom, 2.5 bath log sided Ranch on almost 2 acres. Lower level is 3/4 finished. $210,000 MLS-11-4038 Five Mountains Realty 570-542-2141

Well maintained raised ranch in Midway Manor. Good size level yard with shed. Large sunroom / laundry addition. Lower level family room with wood stove. $155,000 Call Christine Kutz 570-332-8832

SWEET VALLEY

Nice country bi-level on 40 acres with 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, kitchen, living room, family room, office & laundry room, plus attached oversized 2 car garage with workshop, rear deck & 3 sheds. Bordering state game lands. $319,900. MLS-11-1094 Five Mountains Realty 570-542-2141

53 Noyes Ave. Single family, 3 bedroom, 1 bath home situated on a double lot with finished family room in basement./ MLS 12-641 $119,900 Jay A. Crossin Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770 SWOYERSVILLE

“New Listing”! 3 bedrooms, 1 bath home on double lot. One car garage, two 3 season porches, security system & attic just insulated. $90,000. Call Christine Kutz 570-332-8832

SWOYERSVILLE

OPEN HOUSE Sunday 12pm-5pm

52 Barber Street Beautifully remodeled 3 bedroom, 1 bath home in the heart of the town. With new carpets, paint, windows, doors and a modern kitchen and bath. Sale includes all appliances: refrigerator, stove, dishwasher, washer and dryer. Nice yard and superb neighborhood. Priced to sell at $89,900 or $433.00 per month (bank rate; 30 years, 4.25%, 20% down). Owner also willing to finance 100% of transaction with a qualified cosigner. Call Bob at 570-654-1490

L

D

Well maintained 3 bedroom, 2 bath double wide in nice neighborhood. Many updates. Landscaped & fenced yard with pool, large deck & koi pond! $89,900. Call Christine Kutz 570-332-8832

W. PITTSTON

New Listing. Opportunity knocking. Stately 2 story, river front home located on Susquehanna Ave. New heat, new electrical, 1st floor studded, 2nd floor good condition. $149,900 Call Donna Mantione 570-613-9080

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130! WAPWALLOPEN

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! WEST PITTSTON

Wonderful, cozy home on a corner lot with in-ground pool, yard and carport. Home is across from Fox hill Country Club. $120,000 MLS# 12-755 Jolyn Bartoli

Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-5425 WEST WYOMING

438 Tripp St

OPEN HOUSE Sunday 12pm-5pm

Vinyl resided, new shingles in 2008, quiet location with level, open ground. Replacement windows, new well pump. MLS #12-760 $64,900 Call Dale 570-256-3343 Five Mountain Realty

Purebred Animals? Purebred Animals? Sell them here with a Sell them here with a classified ad! classified ad! 570-829-7130 570-829-7130

Completely remodeled home with everything new. New kitchen, baths, bedrooms, tile floors, hardwoods, granite countertops, all new stainless steel appliances, refrigerator, stove, microwave, dishwasher, free standing shower, tub for two, huge deck, large yard, excellent neighborhood $154,900 (30 year loan @ 4.5% with 5% down; $7,750 down, $785/month) 100% OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE Call Bob at 570-654-1490


T

PAGE 22G SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

SWEET VALLEY

WILKES-BARRE

OPEN HOUSEDALLAS TODAY • 1:00-2:30 PM

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 1:00-3:00 PM Lot 1 Woodberry Dr., Mountaintop

I

WILKES-BARRE Private serene setting! Two ranches! Main house w/pool & gazebo, 60x40 pole barn, storage for cars, boats. Located near Geisinger! MLS# 11-2259 TERRY D. 715-9317 $329,000

DALLAS

SWEET VALLEY

DALLAS New HW floors, freshly painted. Great views! 2BRs plus den, vinyl siding, 2 car garage, lower level part finished. MLS# 11-3797 SALLY 714-9233 $349,000

SWEET VALLEY If you crave privacy, consider this stunning 3BR, 2.5 bath, 2 story Traditional on a 2acre lot. Ultra modern kitchen, great room w/FP & cathedral ceiling, formal DR & bonus room over 2 car garage. MLS# 12-679 BARBARA M. 696-0883 $299,000

Preview this 4BR, 3bath 2 story model w/ lots of HW & tile. Granite counters in kit, MSTR Suite w/2 walk-in closets & tiled bath w/ dbl vanities, shower & whirlpool. Home/lot packages available. TERRY D. 715-9317 Dir: 309S. to Right on S Main, Right on Nuangola, RIght on Fairwood Blvd. to end. Straight into Woodberry Manor. Right on Woodberry Dr.

E

S

L

E

A

D

E

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 1:00-2:30 PM

10 DAKOTA DRIVE

W NE

SWEET VALLEY Plenty of TLC is reflected in this 3BR, 1.5 bath, 2 story cradled on 1acre. Sun-filled Florida room off modern kitchen w/breakfast room. Offers formal LR & DR, 1 car garage & detached 24 x 24 heated workshop. MLS# 12-1190 BARBARA M. 696-0883 $134,900

M

G TIN LIS

R

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 23G

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 1:00-2:30 PM

4 NOBLE LANE

W NE

G TIN LIS

1 WORTHINGTON RD

DALLAS DAKOTA WOODS - Carefree Condo -Bright & spacious w/3 BR’s, 1st flr master, study/library, kit w/granite & upscale app’ls, 2 car gar. MLS#11-3208 RHEA 696-6677 $379,000 DIR: Rt 309N to R into Dakota Woods

DALLAS Enjoy carefree living in the villas at Masonic Village. Located at Irem Temple Country Club, this entrance fee community offers interior & exterior home maintenance. Call for details on this unique community. MLS# 12-880. RHEA 696-6677 $256,000 DIR: 309N to L on Country Club Road - L onto Wedgewood Way. Follow into Masonic Village.

NORTH LAKE GREAT HOUSE w/ 90ft of lakefront! 3BR, 2.5 bath Cape Cod w/ Open fl plan has extensive views, 1 fl Master opens to screened porch & large deck. MLS# 11-2958 RHEA 570-696-6677 $328,500 DIR: Rt.118W L @ Sheldon’s Diner - Go 2.5 miles - Turn R @ Davis Trophy - At stop sign turn R on Lakeview - Property on L.

SHAVERTOWN Sprawling 3BR Ranch in excellent condition features beautiful Brazilian cherry floors, stunning new baths, walls of windows, lovely deck & stone patio. MLS# 12-429 MARGY 696-0891 $375,000 DIR: Rt 309N - L on Sutton - Home on corner of Worthington & Sutton Road.

MOUNTAINTOP

COURTDALE

DALLAS

FORTY FORT

MOUNTAINTOP Beautiful Victorian home renovated w/open flr plan, 6BRs, 4.5 elegant baths & stunning Kit - HW flrs, spacious rms, handsome FP’s, front & back staircases, delightful Gazebo & huge wrap around porch. Glen Summit Community 7miles from W-B. MLS# 10-2874 MARGY 696-0891 or RHEA 696-6677 $650,000

COURTDALE Peacefully secluded custom built Contemporary on 6.4acs w/4-5BRs, 3.5 bths, ingrnd pool, 3 car gar, LR w/flr to ceiling windows, marble entry w/spiral staircase. LL rec rm w/wet bar, granite tops & gas FP. Sweeping views from 61x9 deck. Country living in town! MLS# 12-1189 DEB R. 714-5802 $438,000

MOUNTAINTOP

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 1:00-2:30 PM

4145 LAKEVIEW

KINGSTON TWP. “FANTASTIC HOME” overlooking Francis Slocum State Park w/ 5BR’s, Ultra modern master bath, “Out of this World” Florida Room w/built-in bar, multiple garage stalls & more! All on over 6 acres of pure privacy! MLS# 12-475 DEB ROCCOGRANDI 696-6671 $599,000

FORTY FORT Excellent location - 5BRs, 4 baths, large lot spacious home, HW floors, 8 person hottub, 2FPs, garage. MLS# 11-3790 SUSAN K. 696-0872 $319,900

MOUNTAINTOP Hallmark Homes - Formal LR & DR opens to great room w/gas FP, breakfast room off deck, pool & backyard. Kitchen w/ granite counters, stainless steel appliances, Master Suite w/2 large walk-in closets, master bath w/whirlpool & steam shower! Much more! MLS# 12-1241 TERRY D. 715-9317 $409,000

OPEN HOUSES - SUNDAY, APRIL 15TH, 2012 BACK MOUNTAIN & SURROUNDS 93 Saddle Ridge Dr. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 25 Marina Dr. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 122 Manor Dr. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 4 Noble Lane 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman 267 Overbrook Rd. 12-2PM Lewith & Freeman 1 Worthington Rd. 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman 4145 Lakeview Dr. 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman 104 Orchard East 2-3:30PM Lewith & Freeman 10 Dakota Dr. 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman 103 Root Hollow Lane1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman Lot #12 Windy Dr. 12-2PM Lewith & Freeman 16 Zarychta Rd. 1-2PM Lewith & Freeman 125 Frangorma Dr. 12-1:30PM Lewith & Freeman 829 Homestead Dr. 2-3:30PM Lewith & Freeman 11 Idlewood Dr. 12-1:30PM Prudential Poggi & Jones 30 Maple St. 11AM-1PMColdwell Banker Rundle Real Estate WILKES-BARRE & SURROUNDS Plains 63 Clarks Lane 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty Bear Creek 81 Sandspring Rd. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group Wilkes-Barre 42 Elizabeth St. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group Bear Creek 1000 Laurel Run Rd. 1-3PM Lewith & Freeman Bear Creek Village 30 Cove Rd. 1-3PM Lewith & Freeman Bear Creek 101 Maple Rd. 2:30-4PM Lewith & Freeman Wilkes-Barre 191-193 E. Main St. 2-3:30PM Lewith & Freeman Dallas Harveys Lake Shavertown Dallas Dallas Shavertown North Lake Dallas Dallas Tunkhannock Shavertown Tunkhannock Trucksville Dallas Dallas Dallas Twp.

WWW.LEWITH-FREEMAN.COM

SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER.

(570) 696-1195

Century21SHGroup.com

1124 Woodlawn Ave.

$$185,000 185,,000 185,000

Scranton n

54 Church Road, Tunkhannock

199 Clearview Ave., Trucksville

Wilkes-Barre Wilkes-Barre Wilkes-Barre Bear Creek Wilkes-Barre Wilkes-Barre Wilkes-Barre Wilkes-Barre Wilkes-Barre Wilkes-Barre

335 E. South St. 1:30-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman 33-35 Oak St. 1:30-3PM Century 21 Signature Properties 36-38 Brogan St. 1-3PM Classic Properties 210 Parkway Rd. 1-3PM Prudential Poggi & Jones 362-364 Dana St. 11AM-1PMJJ Mantione Appraisal & Realty Group 15 Haldeman St. 12-2PMRealty World Rubbico Real Estate 822 Scott St. 12-2PMRealty World Rubbico Real Estate 316 New Grant St. 12-2PMRealty World Rubbico Real Estate 590-592 N. Main St. 2-4PM Rothstein Realtors Route 315 1-4PM Hanover Homes PITTSTON/NORTH & SURROUNDS Pittston Twp. 10 Norman St. 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty Pittston 48 Lewis St. 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty Pittston 238 S. Main St. 12-2PM Atlas Realty Jenkins Twp. 517 S. Main St. 12-2PM Atlas Realty Pittston 15 Green St. 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty Harding 2032 Route 92 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty West Wyoming550 Johnson St. 2-4PM Atlas Realty Pittston 38 Johnson St. 2:30-4PM Atlas Realty Avoca 1215 South St. 2-4PM Atlas Realty Duryea 621 Donnelly St. 2:30-4PM Atlas Realty Scranton 1124 Woodlawn St. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group Wyoming 17 E. Seventh St. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group Avoca 800 Grove St. 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman Moosic 36 Kipling Dr. 2-4PM Lewith & Freeman

$123,500

Open House Today ~ 12:00-1:30

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 11AM1PM

Like-new 3BR, 3.5 bath 2 story on 4.17acres. LR & DR, Eat-in kitchen w/Island & appliances; 1st floor FR w/FP; MBR Suite; A/C; 2 garages; Tunkhannock Schools! Dir: Rt 92N, L on Rt 292 (near Emannon Golf Course) R at Keelersburg Road sign, go 3 miles approx, L on Zarychta, home on L.

PM 00 -0 2: 1:0

(570) 474-9801

(570) 696-0894

MOUNTAINTOP

New construction in Crestwood school district. Home features wood flooring, Anderson Windows, Douglas Fir timber, 2 zone forced air hvac, island kitchen w/ granite tops.

$299,000 MLS#12-163

MOUNTAINTOP

Lovely home located in Alberdeen Acres near the 7th hole of Blue Ridge Golf Course . 4BR, 3BA, fireplace with many amenities. Private setting on 1.8acres located. New Roof!

$269,000 MLS#11-3813

SUGARLOAF

Petite Farmette, split-level, new roof, family room, 1.5 car attached garage, detached 3 car garage w/workshop, large pole barn w/stall, storage & wood shed.

$239,900 MLS#11-3966

DURYEA

Renovated 4BR features central AC, newer roof, SS appliances, new heating and electric systems, master suite with balcony and a gorgeous wrap around front porch.

$205,000 MLS#12-762

DUPONT

4BR Brick home with wood floors, fireplace, finished LL with new kitchen, nice outdoor entertaining area centered with an in-ground pool $175,900 MLS#11-4082

$249,500

125 Frangorma Drive, Trucksville Beautiful 3 bedroom, 3 bath, home, sweet home on quietest Back Mt. street, steps from 309. Directions: Follow Carverton Rd to W Hillside to R on Frangorma.

$258,500

Highland Woods Ranch on a corner lot. 4BRs, Eat-in kitchen, hardwood floors, fully finished LL. In-ground pool and nice yard.

$149,900 MLS#12-389

DURYEA

Investment property! This Multi-Family property has been completely gutted and renovated. Beautifully updated with new roof, windows, porch, & vinyl siding.

$104,900 MLS#11-4228

DRUMS

Practically Brand New! Totally redone from top to bottom with original integrity, this 4BR, 2BA Cape Cod on ½ acre lot

$99,900 MLS#11-4335

829 Homestead Drive, Dallas

Smashing contemporary condo combines luxury and comfort. 3 or 4 bedrooms plus loft over looking vaulted living/dining room. Rear view of horse farm, too! Garage and drive parks 3 cars. Directions: Follow 415 to blinking light @ Yalick Farms - Go straight to Homestead Drive - Make R.

Remember: Market Analysis is always free! Call for appointment.

288-1444

HANOVER

Easy living is within reach at this “priced to sell” 2BR, 2BA, 1,500 SF townhome. The unit offers large rooms, modern kitchen, garage and additional parking.

$93,000 MLS#12-967

WILKESBARRE

2-story home , modern kitchen, 2BR, modern bath, first floor laundry/ bath. Large paved driveway leads back to a 28 x 37 oversized garage.

$74,900 MLS#11-4555

EDWARDSVILLE

HOME WARRANTY! 3BR home offers formal dining room with bay window, eat-in kitchen, arches throughout, many updates completed. Move right in!

$59,900 MLS#12-706

Two-story Townhomes

New 4br, 2story/mbr on 1st. floor! Granite kit/ss appl. dr/ hdwd. lg.fr/fire place. public sewer, all on 2.8acre corner lot. MLS#12-1233 $319,900

Jim Graham Associate Broker

Pure Indulgence... Luxury Condominums nestled in a quiet corner of Northeast Pennsylvania

Watch this Community come to life by becoming a Bell Weather Resident. There has never been a better time to join us…

Prices Starting in the $140s

Find us in our convenient Location: Wyoming Avenue to Union Street. Turn onto Mill Hollow in Luzerne

MOUNTAINTOP

DUPLEX Terrific duplex; extensivley remodeled; over 1400SF each unit; separate utilities; 2 car garages; new roof; low taxes. Must be seen!

Pretty 4BR, 3 bath Bi-Level on semi-wooded lot. Screened deck, hardwood floors, finished LL/new carpeting, Fireplace, large wet bar, all with cedar walls! Also large storage/bonus room. MLS#11-2282 PRICE REDUCED MOTIVATED SELLER! $182,500

If you are buying or selling anywhere in the county, I can help you! Only if you call! Direct Line - Jim (570) 715-9323

Lewith & Freeman Real Estate

(570) 696-3801 • (570) 696-0883 Direct metcalf@epix.net Barbara B bara F. Metcalf Bar Metc t alf A ociate Brokerr Ass Associate

69 N. MEMORIAL HIGHWAY, SHAVERTOWN, PA 18708

Dallas

Smith Hourigan Group (570) 696-1195

DALLAS TOWNSHIP Spectacular wooded and rolling topography provides backdrop for one of the Back Mountains most successful new neighborhoods. Created by Halbing-Amato Developers, you can work with Summit Pointe Builders to design your dream home or choose your own builder. Offers public, water, sewer, gas, electric, phone and cable.

Priced from $52,900 to $89,900.

Call Kevin Smith (570) 696-5420 Kevin.Smith@Century21.com

Directions: From Kingston. Route 309 to a right on Center Street. Left at the “T” onto Ondish Road. Follow 3/4 mile to Saddle Ridge Entrance on the Right.

Sweet Valley

3138 Memorial Hwy., Dallas Across From Agway

www.gordonlong.com Sunita Arora Heather D’Adamo Barbara Beggs 570.510.5840 570.977.9969 570.239.7644

Ilona Bruns 570.239.7644

Donna Clarke Jennifer Davidson Victoria Dwyer Cindy Eckrote Robert Hourigan Annemarie Janus Jennifer Winn 570.262.0608 570.793.1032 570.704.6323 570.690.1621 570.417.2320 570.899.6836 570.760.1622

Mountaintop (570) 403-3000

CALL NANCY ANSWINI 288-1444

$119,900

(570) 675-4400

OPEN HOUSE SUN. 4/15 • 2:00-3:30PM

9 MORGAN TERRACE, LARKSVILLE Charming and unique remodeled home with 5 bedrooms and spectacular views of Carey Ave Bridge and the river. New kitchen, roof and deck. Three bedrooms on first floor and two baths, 2 bedrooms on second floor. Three season porch, first floor laundry and office/den area. Must see. Not flood zone. MLS#12-986 $119,000 Directions: South on Wyoming Ave towards Plymouth, turn right on Chestnut(before the Carey Ave Bridge) and first left on Morgan Terrace.

Well built 3BR, eat-in kit. w/all appls., oversized 2 car garage, LL ready to be finished, 2 bath, MBR Suite.

See our spec home and lots today!

email: gilroyre@yahoo.com

723 JEAN ST., HARDING Charming home in very good condition. Nice woodworking, replacement windows, new vaulted ceiling bedroom overlooking amazing view of the river. Vinyl siding, one car garage, private setting on a dead end street, but not flood zone. MLS#12-990 $95,000 Directions: From Exeter Avenue, West Pittston, take Rt. 29 approximately 1.5 miles and make left on Oberdorfer Road, then first left on Jean St.

2420 S. Main Street, Hanover Twp. (Grandview Acres)

…………Is Developing Nicely!

230 Wyoming Ave., Suite 5 Kingston, PA 18704 OPEN HOUSE SUN. 4/15 • 12:00-1:30PM

$149,900

With Rae, Service = Sales

Open House Today 1:00-3:00

• 1st floor master • Formal Dining Room • Eat-in Kitchen • Loft • Valuted Ceilings • Front Porch • Garage • Garden Area

Lovely 3BR, 1.1 bath 2 story. LR & DR; modern eat-in kitchen w/all appliances, gas heat & A/C; garage, screened porch, LL + attic ready to be finished. Dir: Wyoming Avenue to Hoyt St, R on N. Loveland, home on R.

$118,000

MULTIFAMILY

MOUNTAINTOP

95-97 Third Avenue, Kingston

Updated ranch, 4BR, sized deck. Finished LL level with a sauna & fireplace. $149,500 MLS#11-3557 tAnne Marie Janus 570.899.6836

Deanna Farrell

PM 00 -0 4: 3:0

NEW PRICES

61 MARKET ST., LAFLIN

Ranch with 3BR, finished LL +2BR and 2nd kitchen, laundry room, family room $124,900 MLS#12-1328 scr Dir: From Scranton 81S, to exit 164PA29 Nanticoke exit, then exit 3. L at light on Sans Souci Pkwy to E Main St to L on S Hanover St, to R on W Ridge Silvana Benavides 570.840.8707

72 N. Loveland Ave., Kingston

$259,900

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 24PM

126 W RIDGE ST., NANTICOKE CITY

3BR, 2BA, 2,200 SF, bi-level in convenient Luzerne County location $189,900 MLS#12-1051 Dir: From Kossack Ave, Main St (known as the back road), Home on L. see sign Jennifer Winn 570.760.1622

rae@lewith-freeman.com OPEN HOUSES TODAY

DRUMS 225 KOSSACK ST., SWOYERSVILLE

Open House Today ~ 2:00-3:30

Rae Dziak 714-9234

16 Zarychta Road, Tunkhannock

On average our Gold Star Properties spend 80% less time on the market 150 agents serving 12 counties from 8 offices put the talent of ERA One Source Realty to work for you.

48 Marjorie Ave., Wilkes-Barre

696-3801

White Haven Penn Lake

EARN A GOLD STAR!

Lovely 3BR 1 3/4BA Greenridge home one block from Marywood College. Gorgeous Oak HW floors, db French doors and trim. Directions: Corner of N Washington and Woodlawn Ave.

$154,000

REAL ESTATE

Mountaintop Mountaintop Mountaintop Mountaintop Mountaintop Mountaintop Mountaintop Mountaintop Mountaintop Mountaintop Mountaintop Mountaintop Wapwallopen Mountaintop

87 N. Atherton Ave. 12-2PM Prudential Poggi & Jones 109 Poplar St. 12-1:30PM Prudential Poggi & Jones 1455 Wyoming Ave. 2-3:30PM Prudential Poggi & Jones 9 Morgan Terrace 2-3:30PM Gilroy Real Estate 168 Lathrop St. 1:30-3:30PMColdwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 267 Grove St. 1-3PM Elegant Homess MOUNTAINTOP & SURROUNDS 29 Valley View Dr. 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty 428 Ice Harvest Dr. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 76 Loop Rd. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 123 Spruce St. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 59 Spruce St. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 21 Forest Rd. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group Lot 1 Woodberry Dr. 1-3PM Lewith & Freeman 25 Coplay Place 1-3PM Classic Properties 215 Patriot Circle 1-3PMColdwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 43 Walden Dr. 1:30-3:30PMColdwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 67 Spruce St. 1:30-3:30PMColdwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 138 Kestrel Rd. 1:30-3:30PMColdwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 215 Stoney Creek Ln 1:30-3:30PMColdwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 59 Yorktown Rd. 12-2PM TradeMark Realty Group HAZLETON & SURROUNDS 15 Walnut St. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 1327 Lakeview Dr. 1:30-3PM TradeMark Realty Group (570) 288-9371

I’m Sue Barre and I sell houses, and I can SELL YOURS! (570) 696-5417

Shavertown

Kingston Kingston Forty Fort Larksville Kingston Kingston

Smith Hourigan Group

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 12:30PM

$224,500

Old Forge 148 Harrison St. 12-2PM Realty Network Group Dunmore 112 Barton St. 12-1:30PM Realty Network Group Hughesville 5 Washington Terrace 12-2PM Century 21 Signature Properties Harding 723 Jean St. 12-1:30PM Gilroy Real Estate Pittston 168 Elizabeth St. 2-4PMJJ Mantione Appraisal & Realty Group Laflin 61 Market St. 2-4PM ERA One Source Realty HANOVER/ASHLEY/NANTICOKE & SURROUNDS Hanover Twp. 68 Lyndwood Ave. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group Hanover Twp. 30 Oxford St. 12-1:30PM Lewith & Freeman Nanticoke 38 W. Field St. 1-3PMColdwell Banker Rundle Real Estate Nanticoke 126 W. Ridge St. 11AM-1PM ERA One Source Realty KINGSTON/WEST SIDE & SURROUNDS Forty Fort 27 Rose St. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group Kingston 66 N. Goodwin Ave. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group Luzerne 51 Ryman St. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group Kingston 621 Gibson Ave. 2-3:30PM Lewith & Freeman Plymouth 181 VanLoon St. 12:30-2PM Lewith & Freeman Swoyersville 387 Slocum St. 12-1PM Lewith & Freeman Kingston 61 W. Walnut St. 12-2PM Lewith & Freeman Kingston 72 N. Loveland Ave. 3-4PM Lewith & Freeman Swoyersville 29 Bohac St. 1-2:30PM Century 21 Signature Properties Luzerne 761 North St. 1-3PM Coldwell Banker Gerald Busch Real Estate Swoyersville 225 Kossack St. 1-2:30PM ERA One Source Realty Luzerne Waypoint Townhomes 1-3PM ERA One Source Realty Kingston 455 Warren Ave. 1-3PM Century 21 Sherlock Homes

ONE SOURCE REALTY

Clarks Summit Peckville Moscow Lake Ariel

ERA1.com Toll Free 877-587-SELL

(570) 587-9999 (570) 489-8080 (570) 842-2300 (570) 698-0700

Mt Top Scranton Stroudsburg Lehighton

(570) 403-3000 (570) 343-9999 (570) 424-0404 (610) 377-6066

Accredited Buyer Representative Certified Residential Broker, E-Pro Graduate Realtors Institute Seniors Real Estate Specialist

If you’ve reached the top, live there in this stunning 3,900 sq. ft., 4BR, 4 bath executive home in a great neighborhood. Offers formal LR, DR, 2 family rms, Florida rm and kitchen any true chef would adore. Picture perfect condition. COMES W/HOME WARRANTY. MLS# 11-1005 11 1005 $$349,900

Sweet Valley

Kingston

If you crave privacy, consider this stunning 3BR, 2.5 bath 2 story traditional cradled on a 2 acre lot. Ultra modern kitchen w/breakfast area, great room w/cathedral ceiling & FP, formal DR & bonus room over 2 car garage. MLS#12-679 Only $299,000

This 6 BR, 2 BTH 3 story traditional makes a perfect family home. It’s the home you’ve been waiting for at a price you can afford. Great location, close to schools and shopping. Seller providing home warranty. MLS#11-3760 Only $130,000

Sunita Arora Broker/Owner

*Conditions and limitations apply; including but not limited to: seller and house must meet specific qualifications, and purchase price will be determined solely by ERA Franchise Systems LLC, C b based ased d upo upon a d discount isc of the home’s appraised value value. Additionally, a second home must be purchased through a broker designated by ERA Franchise Systems LLC. ©2008 ERA Franchise Systems LLC. All Rights Reserved. ERA® and Always There For You® are registered trademarks licensed to ERA Franchise Systems LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.

Plenty of TLC is reflected in this attractive 3 BR, 1 & 1/2 BTH 2-story home cradled on 1 acre. Sun-filled Florida room off modern kitchen w/breakfast room. Offers formal living room & dining room, one-car garage + detached 24’ x 24’ heated workshop. MLS#12-1190 $134,900

EW G N TIN S LI

10 FA AC RM RE

BLOOMINGDALE ROSS TOWNSHIP 10 Acre Farm field with Country Views from this Immaculate Ranch Home, Ultra Modern Kitchen, Oversized Garage Listing #12-1067 All for $274,900 Call Cherub for details 570-762-4641


PAGE 24G

SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

WEST WYOMING

WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE

YATESVILLE PRICE REDUCED

909

Income & Commercial Properties

FORTY FORT

REDUCED 550 Johnson St. Nicely landscaped corner lot surrounds this brick front Colonial in desirable neighborhood. This home features a spacious eat in kitchen, 4 bedrooms, 4 baths including Master bedroom with master bath. 1st floor laundry and finished lower level. Enjoy entertaining under the covered patio with hot tub, rear deck for BBQ’s and an above ground pool. Economical gas heat only $1224 per yr. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-157 $249,900 Call Michele Reap 570-905-2336

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified! WILKES-BARRE

Nice home, great price. 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, wood floors, off street parking, Approx 1312sq ft. Currently rented out for $550 monthly, no lease. Keep it as an investment or make this your new home. MLS 11-3207 $46,000 Call/text for Details. Donna Cain 570-947-3824

WILKES-BARRE

Great Investment. Quiet street close to everything. Nice size rooms. Both sides currently rented. Off street parking in back with a 1 car garage. $89,900. MLS 114207. Call Donna for more information or to schedule a showing. 570-947-3824

39 W. Chestnut St. Lots of room in this single with 3 floors of living space. 3 bedrooms, 1 bath with hardwood floors throughout, natural woodwork, all windows have been replaced, laundry/pantry off of kitchen. 4x10 entry foyer, space for 2 additional bedrooms on the 3rd floor. Roof is new. MLS 11-325 $69,900 Jay A. Crossin 570-288-0770 Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

77 Schuler St. Newly renovated with new windows, door flooring, etc. “Goose Island” gem. Large home with 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, screened in porch overlooking fenced in yard, driveway, laminate floors throughout. Fresh paint, move in condition. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-845 $99,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

WILKES-BARRE WILKES-BARRE

44 Hillard St. Lovely 3 bedroom in move in condition. Beautiful hardwood floors throughout, crown molding and lots of character and charm. Large closets and lots of storage space. New vinyl fence around back yard. New front porch. One stall garage has a new roof and is accessed via alley behind property. Water heater is new. MLS 12-510 $74,000 Shelby Watchilla 570-762-6969 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

Beautifully maintained double block on large landscaped lot. Newer roof and windows, hardwood under carpet, ceiling fans, plaster walls and ample off street parking. Live in one side and let rent from other side help pay your mortgage. Must see! $108,000 Call CHRISTINE KUTZ for details 570-332-8832

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified! WILKES-BARRE

Handyman Special Extra large duplex with 7 bedrooms, 2 baths, fireplace, screened porch, full basement and 2 car garage on double lot in Wilkes-Barre City. $58,000. ERA BRADY ASSOCIATES 570-836-3848 WILKES-BARRE

115 Noble Lane 3 bedroom, 2 bath end unit townhome with finished lower level. Natural gas fireplace, 3 tiered deck, newer roof, cul de sac. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-1006 $68,000 Call Tom 570-262-7716

WILKES-BARRE

2 Story, 3 bedrooms, 1 & 1/2 bath single family. Large eat-in kitchen, 1st floor laundry, hardwood floors, newer furnace & water heater, 1 car garage. Off street parking. Quiet one way street. $49,900 MLS 11-4171 Call Jim Banos Coldwell Banker Rundle 570-991-1883 WILKES-BARRE

285 Blackman St Great property. Priced to sell quickly and in move-in condition! Easy access to Interstate 81 & shopping! 11-3215 $36,500 570-675-4400

WILKES-BARRE 3 bedrooms,

Heights Section, side yard, fully fenced, gas heat, close to schools, good condition $51,900 Call 570-823-2726 Leave message if no answer.

WILKES-BARRE 54 PENN ST.

SALE BY OWNER

EAST END BEAUTY

All lookers say the house is gorgeous, but too small. 1500 SF, but one of the 3 bedrooms is a pass thru. Great for a den or office. Eat in kitchen and large oak floor dining room. Ceramic tile master bath with walk in linen. Laundry and powder room on first floor. Large master bedroom. Lots of closet space. Gas heat, concrete floor basement. Private side yard, wrap porch. Safe neighborhood out of the flood zone. New concrete driveway. Minutes to the mall and other shopping. Nice view. Motivated seller, as I need a smaller house. Will consider trading for a ranch style house of equal value. New price: $85,700. Call 570-970-8065 or email aleta59@msn.com

Sell your own home! Place an ad HERE 570-829-7130

909

Income & Commercial Properties

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

WILKES-BARRE To Settle Estate $56,900 REDUCED! Offer Needed!

314 Horton Street Wonderful home, 6 rooms. 3 bedrooms, 1 1/2 baths, twostory, living room with built-in bookcase, formal dining room with entrance to delightful porch. Eat-in kitchen. Private lot, detached garage. A must see home. MLS 11-2721 New Price $56,900 GO TO THE TOP... CALL

JANE KOPP REAL ESTATE

570-288-7481 WILKES-BARRE

Lot 39 Mayock St. 9' ceilings throughout 1st floor, granite countertops in kitchen. Very bright. 1st floor master bedroom & bath. Not yet assessed. End unit. Modular construction. MLS #10-3180 $179,500 Jim Graham at 570-715-9323

Well maintained 2 story home with a finished lower level and a gas fireplace. New carpets and a walk-up attic, great for storage. $65,000 MLS# 11-4529 Call Michael Nocera

SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP 570-696-5412

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified! WILKES-BARRE

WYOMING

DOUBLE BLOCK Easily converts to

single home. New roof, electric, windows & 2 car garage. Remodeled. 66 x 100 feet, fenced lot, $130,000. 570-693-2408

25 St. Mary’s St. 3,443 sq. ft. masonry commercial building with warehouse/office and 2 apartments with separate electric and heat. Perfect for contractors or anyone with storage needs. For more information and photos log onto www.atlas realtyinc.com. Reduced to $89,000 MLS #10-3872 Call Charlie 570-829-6200 VM 101

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

WILKES-BARRE NOW REDUCED!

191 Andover St. Lovely single family 3 bedroom home with lots of space. Finished 3rd floor, balcony porch off of 2nd floor bedroom, gas hot air heat, central air and much more. Must see! MLS 11-59 $66,000 Jay A. Crossin 570-288-0770 Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE IN CLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

Fall in love with this gorgeous brick home just a few minutes from town. spacious rooms, a view of the countryside, a fenced inground pool, gazebo with electric, spacious recreation room with wet bar, curved oak staircase, beautiful French doors and a fireplace in the kitchen are just some of the features that make this home easy to love. MLS# 12-443 $600,000 Jolyn Bartoli

Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-5425 WYOMING

Move in condition. 3 bedrooms, 1 bath. Corner lot. $132,900 MLS 12-428 Call Stephen 570-613-9080

Wanna make your car go fast? Place an ad in Classified! 570-829-7130.

KINGSTON

366 Pierce Street (corner lot). 1,300 sq. ft. concrete block commercial building on a 90 x 145 lot. Central air conditioning. Paved parking for 25 cars. Presently a pizza business, but land can be used for multiple uses (bank building, offices, etc.). MLS 12-1279. $350,000 Bob Kopec HUMFORD REALTY 570-822-5126 KINGSTON 7 Hoyt St

HUGHESTOWN

115 New St. Office building with over 2600 sq. ft. can be divided for up to 3 tenants with own central air and utilities and entrances. New roof. 20-25 parking spots in excellent condition. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-607 $249,900 Call Tom

P E N D I N G

Nice duplex zoned commercial, can be used for offices as well as residential. All separate utilities. Keep apt. space or convert to commercial office space. Adjacent lot for sale by same owner. MLS 11-2176 $79,900 Jay A. Crossin CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770 ext. 23

DUPONT

100 Lincoln St. MULTI FAMILY 3 bedroom home with attached apartment and beauty shop. Apartment is rented. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-941 $82,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

EDWARDSVILLE

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130! KINGSTON

155 Sharpe St. Nice duplex with separate electric and water. Off street parking in rear. Also listed as residential. See list #12-609 for additional photos. MLS 12-605 $79,900 Jay A. Crossin Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

341 Wyoming Ave. 3 story Victorian located in a high exposure area. Has all the lovely signature woodwork of a grand Victorian of yesteryear! Can be restored for use as a residential home or a landlord investment. Currently subdivided into multiple office spaces and 2 apartments. MLS 12-617 $190,000 Jay A. Crossin Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

941

33 Market St. Commercial/residential property featuring Ranch home with 3 bedrooms, newly remodeled bathroom, in good condition. Commercial opportunity for office in attached building. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3450 Reduced $149,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

LEASE SPACE

Kingston Wellness Center / professional offices. -Modern Decor and Loft Style Offices -Four Lane Street Frontage -100+ Parking -Established Professional & Wellness Businesses On-Site -Custom Leases Available -Triple Net Spaces Available: 600SF, 1400SF, 2610SF, and 4300SF. 4300SF Warehouse Space available Built to Suit. Call Cindy 570-690-2689 www.cindykingre.com

INCOME/ COMMERCIAL PROPERTY NANTICOKE

Unique investment opportunity. Vacant storefront which can be used for office, retail, etc. with a 3-room, 1 bedroom apartment above. Other side of the building is a 6room, 3 bedroom home. Perfect for owner occupied business with additional rental income from apartment. Newer roof & furnace, hardwood floors, off-street parking, corner lot. MLS#12-780 $44,900 Karen Ryan 283-9100 x14

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

PITTSTON

909

Income & Commercial Properties

570-675-4400

Purebred Animals? Sell them here with a classified ad! 570-829-7130

155 E Walnut St. Good investment property knocking on your door. Don't miss out, come and see for yourself. Also included in the sale of the property is the lot behind the home. Lot size is 25X75, known as 147 Cherry St. $82,000 MLS# 10-2666 Call Karen Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 570-474-2340

822-4444

O L

D

134 Ann St. Nice duplex in a great neighborhood. Low maintenance. Investors: Money maker right from the start. Unit 2 is owner occupied, rent is projected. MLS 12-575 $119,000 David Krolikowski 570-288-0770 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

Many possibilities for this building. 40 + parking spaces, 5 offices, 3 baths and warehouse. $249,000 with option to lease Maria Huggler Classic Properties 570-587-7000

WILKES-BARRE

Duplex. Aluminum siding, oil heat, semi - modern kitchens, long term tenant. On a spacious 50’ x 150’ lot. Motivated Seller. REDUCED. $37,900 Anne Marie Chopick 570-760-6769

• 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.

288-6300

www.GatewayManorApt.com

39 Wedgewood Dr. Laurelbrook Estates Lot featuring 3.22 acres with great privacy on cul-desac. Has been perc tested and has underground utilities. 4 miles to PA Turnpike entrance. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-114 $64,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

DALLAS

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

PITTSTON

BEAR CREEK

WEST PITTSTON

269 S. Washington Zoned C-1. 3 floors with 10 units; 8 apartments and 2 office spaces. Huge potential for student housing, offices or social group. MLS 12-615 $175,000 John Shelley 570-702-4162 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770 WILKES-BARRE

570-288-6654

PITTSTON

$129,900 SPECTACULAR WATER VIEW! 2 acres overlooking Huntsville Reservoir. Building site cleared but much of woodlands preserved. Perc & site prep done. Call Christine Kutz 570-332-8832

DALLAS AREA

3 lots. 70 x 125. City water and sewer, gas available. $36,500 per lot. 570-675-5873

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! Earth Conservancy Land For Sale 61 +/- Acres Nuangola - $99,000 46 +/- Acres Hanover Twp. $79,000 Highway Commercial KOZ Hanover Twp. 3+/- Acres 11 +/- Acres Wilkes-Barre Twp. 32 +/- Acres Zoned R-3 See additional land for sale at: www.earth conservancy.org 570-823-3445

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! 941

Rear 49 James St. Two 2 bedroom apartments, fully rented with separate utilities on a quiet street. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-219 $39,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

S

O L

57 Carey Ave. Good investment property. 4 apartments needing a little TLC. Two 1 bedroom apartments. One 2 bedroom and one 3 bedroom. Separate water and electric. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-1026 $79,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

WYOMING PRICE REDUCED!

PLAINS

Apartments Unfurnishe

EAST MOUNTAIN APARTMENTS

www.EastMountainApt.com

166 Vine St. Nice PPthree family home in good location, fully occupied. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-220 $49,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

912 Lots & Acreage

PLYMOUTH

WEST WYOMING 331 Holden St 10-847

D

Apartments 941 Unfurnishe

• 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.

Motorcycle for sale? Let them see it here in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

Income & Commercial Properties

S

The good life... Regions Best close at hand Address

263 Lawrence St Pride of ownership shows in this nicely updated & well maintained home with possible in-law suite/apt. Enjoy off street parking, spacious yard & large deck with beautiful views of the valley. 1st floor has large separate eat-in kitcher, living room, bedroom & bath. 2nd floor has large eat-in kitchen, living/ dining combo, 3 bedrooms, 1 bath & 2nd floor laundry. Many possibilities to fit your needs! Must see! MLS #12-518 Reduced to $89,900 Call Christina @ (570) 714-9235

909

LAFLIN

KINGSTON 1255 Laurel Run Rd. Bear Creek Twp., large commercial garage/warehouse on 1.214 acres with additional 2 acre parcel. 2 water wells. 2 newer underground fuel tanks. May require zoning approval. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-208 $179,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

WYOMING

Nice 3 bedroom, 1 bath home, with 3 season porch and detached 1 car garage. Good starter home in well established neighborhood. Family owned for many years. $65,000 CALL CHRISTINE KUTZ 570-332-8832

1012 Wyoming Ave. SUPER LOCATION Needs work. Priced to sell. Great for your small business or offices. Very high traffic count. Property is being sold IN AS IS CONDITION. Inspections for buyers information only. Property needs rehab. MLS 11-4267 $84,900 Roger Nenni 570-288-0770 Ext. 32 Crossin Real Estate 570-288-0770

Income & Commercial Properties

AVOCA

BEAR CREEK

WILKES-BARRE 527 S. Franklin St. If you’re looking for a large home with Victorian charm, come and see this 4 bedroom with many great features. Cedar closet in Master bedroom, enclosed 2nd floor sun porch, full bath and bedroom on 3rd floor. Beautiful woodwork, newer appliances and water heater. Additional fenced side yard offers may possibilities. MLS 11-2495 $125,000 Call Connie for a look EILEEN R. MELONE REAL ESTATE 570-821-7022

12 Reid st. Spacious Bi-level home in semi-private location with private back yard. 3 season room. Gas fireplace in lower level family room. 4 bedrooms, garage. For more informtion and photos visit wwww.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 10-4740 $149,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200 VM 101

Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 570-287-1196

WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE 495-497 S. Grant St

Nice double block in good condition with 2 bedrooms on each side. New vinyl siding. Bathrooms recently remodeled. Roof is 2 years old. Fully rented. Tenants pay all utilities. MLS11-580.$53,500 Call Darren Snyder Marilyn K Snyder Real Estate 570-825-2468

OPEN HOUSE Sunday, April 15 1-3 pm ONLY $89,900 Old World Charm abounds in this Move In Ready updated 6 Bedroom Victorian with new plumbing, new furnace, new water heater; original hardwood floors, stunning restored lighting fixtures, wonderful window treatments, new berber carpet on stairs & second floor bedrooms; one Bedroom on the 2nd floor could be a grand office with built in desk & bookcases, 3rd floor rooms need a little TLC - super-sized L shaped lot, one car garage – priced under market for a quick sale….. MLS #12-744 Call Pat today @

909

Apartments Unfurnishe

Wilkeswood Apartments 1 & 2 BR Apts

2 & 3 BR Townhomes

570-822-2711

www.liveatwilkeswood.com KINGSTON

SDK GREEN ACRES HOMES 11 Holiday Drive

Kingston “A Place To Call Home” Spacious 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts 3 Bedroom Townhomes Gas heat included

FREE

107-109 E. Carey St. High traffic, high potential location with enough space for 2 second floor apartments. A stones throw away from the casino. Large front windows for showroom display. Basement & sub - basement for additional storage or workspace. PRICE REDUCED $99,500 MLS# 10-1919 Call Stanley (570) 817-0111 COLDWELL BANKER RUNDLE REAL ESTATE 570-474-2340

941

285 Wyoming Ave. First floor currently used as a shop, could be offices, etc. Prime location, corner lot, full basement. 2nd floor is 3 bedroom apartment plus 3 car garage and parking for 6 cars. For more information and photos go to www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS #10-4339 $169,900 Call Charlie VM 101

Apartments 941 Unfurnishe

Apartments Unfurnishe

IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE

Immediate Occupancy!!

Efficiencies available @30% of income

MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS

61 E. Northampton St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701 • Affordable Senior Apartments • Income Eligibility Required • Utilities Included! • Low cable rates; • New appliances; • Laundry on site; • Activities! •Curbside Public Transportation

24hr on-site Gym Community Room Swimming Pool Maintenance FREE Controlled Access Patio/Balcony and much more... Call Today for Move In Specials. 570-288-9019

Spring into your own space

We offer a panoramic view of the Valley Now accepting applicants for a limited number of available Apartments. Featuring: Private entrances! New kitchens! 24-hour emergency maintenance! On-site laundry! Close to shopping, schools and public transportation! Visit us today 517 Roosevelt St. Edwardsville, PA 18704 570-287-8886

Please call 570-825-8594 D/TTY 800-654-5984

EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 PAGE 25G

SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER.

SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP

Visit These Open Houses Today! 0 3:0 0 1:0

81 SANDSPRING RD

12-792 LAURELBROOK $460000 Impeccable class! Wonderful 1st floor master bedroom. Loft area overlooks great room. 3 acres. ARLENE 696-1195 5 BR Dir: Rt. 115 past dam to L into Laurelbrook Estates to stop sign. Home on L.

0 3:0 0 1:0

93 SADDLE RIDGE DR

10-1293 DALLAS $305000 Fine Line presents the “Baywood” w/modern cherry kitchen open to FR. HW in foyer & kitchen. KEVIN 696-1195 4 BR Dir: Rt. 309 north to R on Center St. L on Ondish, R into Saddle Ridge. L on Saddle Ridge Dr.

:00 3 00 : 1

27 ROSE ST

12-270 FORTY FORT $176000 Move right in! 2 story w/mod kit w/granite & SS appl. Formal LR & DR w/parquet floors. IG pool. RUTHIE 287-1196 3 BR Dir: Wyoming Ave. to Rose St. Home on R.

:00 3 00 : 1

122 MANOR DR

11-3377 MTP-ICE LAKES $399900 Picture perfect! Attractive Cape w/2 sty FR, nice kit, 1st flr MBR, unfin bonus room over gar. DAVE 474-6307 3 BR Dir: Turn onto Ice Harvest Dr. from Nuangola Rd. Proceed 3 blocks to house on R. 123 SPRUCE ST

12-835 MERRYWOOD HILLS $299500 Always admired! Spacious ranch w/cut stone exterior. Lg rooms, 2 FPs, double lot & more! CALL DAVE 474-6307 3 BR Dir: Turn onto Spruce St. from Kirby Ave. Proceed 3 blocks to house on L.

0 3:0 0 1:0

15 WALNUT ST

76 LOOP RD

0 3:0 0 1:0

11-4344 MTP-GLEN SUMMIT $329900 Spacious ranch w/great views. Impressive entry, fab kit, oversize deck, 2 FPs, 3.5 baths & more! DAVE 474-6307 3 BR Dir: Rt. 437/Woodlawn Ave. to Glen Summit. Take Lake Rd. past tennis courts. R onto Loop Rd. House on L @ top of hill. 25 MARINA DR

12-898 HARVEYS LAKE $220000 Inviting townhouse w/open kitchen, LR & DR areas. Outside deck & patio. DONNA KLUG 696-1195 3 BR Dir: Rt. 415 to Harveys Lake. Turn L before Grotto Pizza. Home on L.

THERE ARE ONLY TWO WAYS TO LOOK FOR A HOUSE... Attend Our Open Houses And See For Yourself or

11-4538 SHAVERTOWN $165000 Come see what this home has to offer! Cozy but spacious w/nice size yard, deck & FR. JOLYN 696-1195 3 BR Dir: Carverton Rd. to L on Manor. Home will be on the L.

:00 3 00 : 1

0 3:0 0 1:0

428 ICE HARVEST DR

0 3:0 0 1:0

Visit Our Website to Find the Details and Photos of All the Homes on the Market www.CENTURY21SHGroup.com

0 3:0 0 1:0

1124 WOODLAWN ST

11-4032 SCRANTON $185000 Lovely Greenridge home w/gorgeous HW flrs, french doors, formal DR, office & fin LL. 1 car garage. SUE 696-1195 3 BR Dir: Electric St. to N. Washington (near Marywood). House on L corner of N. Washington & Woodlawn Ave.

:00 3 00 : 1

59 SPRUCE ST

12-794 MTP-FAIRVIEW HGTS $169900 Pretty 2 sty w/stone front in very good condition. LR w/FP, FR, HW floors, 2 baths & 2 car garage. DAVE 474-6307 3 BR Dir: From South Mountain Blvd. turn onto Spruce St. opposite PNC Bank. Three blocks to house on R.

:00 3 00 : 1

21 FOREST RD

12-899 MTP-FAIRVIEW HGTS $164900 Cheerful, bright ranch w/character. Brk FP, HW flrs, patio, porch, workshop, WI cedar closet. MARY ANN 474-6307 3 BR Dir: Rt. 309 to Kirby Ave. (by Burger King). 1st R on Main, L on Pine, L on Forest. Home on R.

:00 3 00 : 1

17 EAST SEVENTH ST

or from Your Smart Phone Scan Here 12-1002 WHITE HAVEN $164900 Remodeled ranch on lvel lot w/view. Full walk up attic with 4th BR. Finished bsmt, 2 FPs, HW flrs. TONY 474-6307 4 BR Dir: Rt. 437 to L on Berwick St., L on Towanda, 1 mile to L on Second St. L on Walnut. Home on L.

0 3:0 0 1:0

66 NORTH GOODWIN AVE

SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER. 0 3:0 0 1:0

51 RYMAN ST

0 3:0 0 1:0

NEW LISTING 11-2676 KINGSTON BORO $127000 Spacious 2 story home on nice tree lined street. Newer windows, furnace & fresh paint. CALL CATHY T 696-1195 3 BR Dir: Market St. toward WB. L on Goodwin. Home on L.

12-958 LUZERNE $105000 Newly renovated, spacious 3 BR home w/ultramodern kit, lg open rooms, new windows, carpet. LYNDA 696-1195 3 BR Dir: Rt. 11 to Bennett St. R on Ryman. Home on L.

68 LYNDWOOD AVE

REDUCED 12-467 HANOVER TWP. $100000 Spacious 2 story w/room to grow. Many upgrades to roof, windows, etc. Fenced yard. 2 car garage. LYNDA 696-1195 3 BR Dir: From WB to Carey Ave. R onto Lyndwood Ave. Home on R.

SHAVERTOWN 570.696.1195 KINGSTON 570.287.1196 MOUNTAINTOP 570.474.6307 • 570.788.1047

12-226 WYOMING $139900 Well maintíd 1600 sf home on nice street w/LR, DR, kitchen w/granite countertops, LL FR, & OSP. KEVIN 696-1195 2 BR Dir: Rt. 11 North to R on 7th St. Home on R.

0 3:0 0 1:0

42 ELIZABETH ST

12-744 WILKES-BARRE GEM! $89900 Stunning move inr eady Victorian w/new plumbing/ furnace/restored lighting/huge lot/garage. CALL PAT 287-1196 6 BR Dir: South Franklin St. to Elizabeth St. House on L.

Visit us on the web at: century21SHGroup.com


PAGE 26G

SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012

Fire damaged former restaurant tavern w/apt, garage & parking lot. MLS#11-4410 JULIO ACOSTA 239-6408

Former Tavern w/2 apts. No liquor license. Needs work. Add’l lot for OSP. MLS#12-421 JULIO 714-9252 or ANDY 714-9225

Multi-Purpose Bldg Unique bldg currently used Convenient location on State St - Adjacent lot as single residence. May be converted to available. MLS#10-4590 suit your needs (w/zoning approval). MARGY 696-0891 or MIKE J 970-1100 MLS#12-844 DAVID 970-1117

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

900 SF Commercial space on Great business opportunity. 1st flr has 2 BR, Apt. Freshly painted exterior. Zoned 1st flr. 900 SF 2 BR apt on 2nd flr. Billboard also available to rent on bldg. Community Business. MLS#11-4416 MLS#10-4309 MATT 714-9229 TINA 714-9251

Nicely maintained offices & garage. 2400 SF w/overhead door. Great for many uses. Near highways. MLS#114561 JUDY RICE 714-9230

Large 8000 SF building looking for a new lease on life! Zoned Commercial. MLS#11-4058 SANDY 970-1110 or DAVID 970-1117

Great corner property. Auto repair & body Ranch style home includes 2990SF shop w/state certified paint booth. Commercial space. MLS#11-459 2nd flr storage. MLS#11-2842 LISA 715-9335 ANDY 714-9225

Excellent opportunityEstablished Restaurant for sale in busy shop ctr. Business only. MLS#11-2782 PAT G 788-7514

6000+ SF former furniture store, plus apt. & lots more space. High traffic area. Combined w/12 Davenport. MLS#11-3865 RAE DZIAK 714-9234

Currently business on 1st flr, 3 BR apt. on 2nd flr. Lg garage in rear w/storage. Owner financing or lease purchase available. MLS#11-4015 ANDY 714-9225

Prime commercial storefront + 3 spacious Apts. Parking lot in rear. MLS#12-687 DONNA S 788-7504

High traffic Route 11 w/6000 SF Showroom/Garage, & Apt above. MLS#11-2106 ANITA REBER 788-7501

Great location for professional 3 BR, Ranch w/gar+ Great location on busy Rte Prime location Established turn-key office. Private drive in rear. Zoned C-3. attached bldg. Zoned HWY COMM. Ideal ZONED HWY COMMERCIAL- 4 BR Cape 309! Office Bldg w/1500 SF of space restaurant w/2 apts. Business & Property being sold "as is". MLS#10-4362 for office or sm business. MLS#10-4367 Cod on 100x556 lot. MLS#11-229 & 2270 SF warehouse. MLS#11-2094 building priced to sell! MLS#11-130 TINA 714-9251 RAE 714-9234 ANITA REBER 788-7501 RAE 714-9234 ANDY 714-9225

Wonderful opportunity for commercial bldg w/ice cream stand, storefront & apt. Also storage bldg. MLS#12-370 CORINE 715-9321

4 Sty brick office bldg, more than half rented. High traffic area. 2 lots included for pkg. MLS#11-1045 ANDY 714-9225 or MARGY 696-0891

Established restaurant/bar. Former landmark restaurant. Equip & liquor license included + 3 Apts. offers 3500 SF on the 1st level plus basement. Parking for 40 cars. MLS#12-89 MLS#11-3896 MIKE 970-1100 or BETTY 970-1119 GERALD PALERMO 788-7509

Well built 2 story - 8000 SF bldg. Prime location/high traffic area. Add’l pkg available. 1st flr office/commercial space & 2 apts on 2nd flr. MLS#11-508 RHEA SIMMS 696-6677

5700 SF in Prime downtown location. Suitable for office/residence. Full basement, private parking, Zoned C3. MLS#11-345 MARGY 696-0891

High traffic location. 2900 SF professional office space w/basement storage. Pkg for at least 12 cars. MLS#12416 RHEA SIMMS 696-6677

Retail, Office, Medical Whatever your need - This 4000 SF Bldg can accommadate it! Parking for 10. MLS#12276 JUDY RICE 714-9230

Outstanding brick bldg! Parking for 7-10 cars. MLS#08-2790 PEG 714-9247

Lg Commercial warehouse & office space w/over 3.5 acres. Owner financing or lease purchase available. MLS#11-4014 ANDY 714-9225

Commercial - Vacant Land Perfect downtown corner location near Coal Street Exit. Ideal for many uses. MLS#12181 MIKE JOHNSON 970-1100

3.895 Acres on W-B Blvd700 front feet provides excellent exposure. Utilities, access road, possible KOZ opportunity. MLS#11-1346 VIRGINIA ROSE 288-9371

Commercial opportunity awaits your business.1st flr 10,000 SF w/offices. 2nd flr storage. Plenty of pkg on 4.62 acres. MLS#10-1110 JUDY 714-9230

Prime location - former Convention Hall. Wonderful opportunity for professional offices. Pkg for 100+ cars. Zoned Hwy Business. MLS#11-3654 MARGY SIMMS 696-0891

Turnkey restaurant/bar. Liquor license & inventory included + 3 Apts. MLS#11-3895 MIKE 970-1100 or BETTY 970-1119

Rental space - office & 32,000SF, 30+ parking, including trailer spaces warehouse, 500SF to 15000SF. MLS#092115 MLS#08-1305 MATT 714-9229 VIRGINIA ROSE 288-9371

Executive Offices from 600-1000 SF or Retail store front. Ample pkg. Fiber optics, all inclusive rates start @ $7.50/SF MLS#114141 JUDY RICE 714-9230

From $199,900!

Attractive office space Prime Location Prime location on in excellent condition. Good visibility. 1900SF - 12 pkg spaces. MLS#09- Memorial Hwy. Unique space-many For "rent" only. MLS#10-4503 3085 possibilities. Zoning B-2. MLS#11-669 BARBARA M 696-0883 MARGY 696-0891 MARK 696-0724

NEWN! PL A

th

1i0versary!

Ann

Single Story “No Steps”

• 3 BR • 2 Bath • 2 Car Garage • Granite Counters • Spa Style Bath • Hardwood Floors

Sand Springs Active Adult Community

• 1 Story Single Family Patio Homes • Live a maintenance free livestyle • Golf Course; Clubhouse activities! Open Daily 12 to 5 Fri. & Sat. 11 to 5

Relocating? Home Sold?

READY NOW!

HEMLOCK - 3BR, 2.5 Bath $244,900 SAUCON - 4BR, 2.5 Bath $264,900 BRECKENRIDGE - 4BR, 2.5 Bath, Over 3,000 Sq. Ft $339,900

Call 570.708.3042

SandSpringsGolf.com

Sand Springs Real Estate Corp. 570.708.3042


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 912 Lots & Acreage

912 Lots & Acreage

938

HARDING

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012 PAGE 27G Apartments/ Furnished

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

FORTY FORT

LivingInQuailHill.com

Almost an acre of cleared level land with well, septic and utilities. Property currently has a mobile home in need of some TLC but not on permanent foundation. A beautiful country location only minutes from town. 12-1178 $39,900 Karen Ryan 283-9100 x14

HARDING Mt. Zion Road One acre lot just before Oberdorfer Road. Great place to build your dream home MLS 11-3521 $29,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

New Homes From $275,000$595,000 570-474-5574

PITTSTON TWP. Beautiful lot in

Pocono Ridge Estate. 1.14 acres with a view! MLS 12-1313 $48,500 Call Kevin Sobilo 570-817-0706

RIVERFRONT FARM LAND!

7 acres - was $79,900, NOW $59,900. Woods, meadows, over 400’ waterfront1 Canoe, Fish, Swim! Terms available! 3 to choose from! 888-793-7762 Hurry! SHICKSHINNY

HARVEYS LAKE 2 ACRES

$35,000 WOODED LAND. Call Cindy 570-690-2689

Level *7.5 acres* building lot with a mountain view. Great for horses or organic farming. MLS 12-306 $59,000 570-675-4400

www.cindykingre.com

570-675-4400

HUGHESTOWN

Cleared lot in Stauffer Heights. Ready for your dream home just in time for Spring! MLS 12-549 $32,500 Call Kevin Sobilo 570-817-0706

JACKSON TWP 1 acre with well, septic and driveway in place. Asking $39,900. Make reasonable offer. DEREMER REALTY 570-477-1149

MOOSIC

BUILDING LOT Corner of Drake St. & Catherine, Moosic. 80x111 building lot with sewer & water available, in great area with newer homes. Corner lot. For more details visit www.atlasrealtyinc.com. MLS #12-1148. Call Charlie

MOUNTAIN TOP Beautiful 2.66 Acre building lot/lake view. Public sewer & natural gas. Use any builder! Call Jim for private showing. $126,500.00 570-715-9323.

MOUNTAIN TOP Beautiful 2.66 Acre building lot/lake view. Public sewer & natural gas. Use any builder! Call Jim for private showing. $126,500.00 570-715-9323.

MOUNTAIN TOP Crestwood Schools! 126 Acres for Sale! Mostly wooded with approx. 970 ft on Rt. 437 in Dennison Twp. $459,000 Call Jim Graham at 570-715-9323

MOUNTAIN TOP Several building lots ready to build on! ALL public utilities! Priced from $32,000 to $48,000! Use your own Builder! Call Jim Graham at 570-715-9323

SUSQUEHANNA COUNTY/MONTROSE

10.66 ACRES Mostly wooded. $100,000. Well & electric, no running water. Small bunk bed cabin with baseboard heat. No septic. 610-760-1308

WYOMING

FIRST ST. 4 building lots each measuring 68x102 with public utilities. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-439 $39,900 EACH Call Charlie 570-829-6200

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

915 Manufactured Homes

EAST MOUNTAIN RIDGE (Formerly Pocono

Park) and San Souci Park. Like new, several to choose from, Financing &Warranty, MobileOneSales.net Call (570)250-2890

MOUNTAIN TOP

Valley Stream Park 24 x 48. 3 Bedroom 2 bath double wide Skyline 2001. $20,000. Serious Inquiries only Please, do not waste my time. 570-406-7318

927

Vacation Locations

Virginia Seaside Lots: Absolute buy of a lifetime! Fully improved 3 acre lots, exclusive development on the seaside (the mainland) overlooking Chincoteague Bay and islands. Gated entrance, paved roads, caretaker, community dock, pool and club house including owners guest suites. Build the house of your dreams! Unique bank foreclosure situation makes these lots available at 1/3 of original cost. Great climate, low taxes and National Seashore beaches nearby. Only $49,000 each or pond lots $65,000. Tel. (757) 824-5284 website: http://ViewWebPage.com/5EUO or email:oceanland trust@yahoo.com

MOUNTAINTOP LAND Level building lot.

1/2 acre, 100 ft frontage, all utilities including gas. $42,900 Call 570-417-4177 Ready for construction.

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

NEWPORT TOWNSHIP 1 mile south of L.C.C.C. 2 lots available. 100’ frontage x 228’ deep. Modular home with basement accepted. Each lot $17,500. Call 570-714-1296

938

Apartments/ Furnished

NANTICOKE Nice, clean, 1 bed-

room, water, sewer, garbage fee included.Washer/dryer, refrigerator & stove availability. Security, $465/month. 570-542-5610

NANTICOKE

Very clean, nice, 2 bedroom. Water, sewer, stove, fridge, Garbage collection fee included. Washer/dryer availability. Large rooms. Security, $565/mo. 570-542-5610

PLYMOUTH FURNISHED APARTMENT Available immedi-

ately, refrigerator and stove provided, off-street parking, no pets, utilities all paid, Call (570) 881-0636

WILKES-BARRE 1

FULLY FURNISHED BEDROOM APARTMENT

ŠShort or long term ŠExcellent Neighborhood ŠPrivate Tenant Parking Š$600 includes all utilities. No pets. 570-822-9697

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

BEAR CREEK New 3 room apart-

ment. All utilities included except electric. No smoking & no pets. $650 + security and references. Furnished or unfurnished. Call 570-954-1200 Dallas, Pa. MEADOWS APARTMENTS 220 Lake St. Housing for the elderly & mobility impaired; all utilities included. Federally subsidized program. Extremely low income persons encouraged to apply. Income less than $12,400. 570-675-6936, 8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE DUPONT Completely remodeled, modern 2 bedroom townhouse style apartment. Lots of closet space, with new carpets and completely repainted. Includes stove, refrigerator, washer, dryer hook up. Nice yard & neighborhood, no pets. $595 + security. Call 570-479-6722

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

DURYEA/PITTSTON 2 bedrooms, gas

heat, washer & dryer hookup, tile kitchen & bath. Large yard. $545 + utilities, security & references. Call 570-840-4534

EXETER

1 BEDROOM. $450. Newly remodeled, off street parking. 570-602-0758 EXETER 850 SQ. FT. 2nd Story apartment for rent. 1086 Wyoming Ave Apt A 1 Bedroom/1Bath/ Living room/full Kitchen. New exterior doors with locks. Cleaned before showing. Private off street parking space included. Right on Wyoming Ave in the middle of town. Great Area. $475 a month. Water and Sewer included. you just pay electrical and your garbage sticker. Call Charlie at 570-760-7504 for showings and details.

EXETER First floor,

1 bedroom. Freshly painted, washer/dryer hook-up. $395/ month + utilities. Security required. NO PETS. 570-477-6018 leave message.

FORTY FORT

1 BEDROOM APTS Very nice, clean, great neighborhood, hardwood floors, a/c, washer /dryer with newer appliances, storage, 1st/last/security with one year lease. References required. $650$695 + utilities. Water/sewer by owner, no pets, non-smoking. Call 202-997-9185 for appointment

FORTY FORT

149 River Street. Modern 2 bedroom. 1 bathroom, 1st floor, off street parking, laundry, $650 per month + security. Utilities included. Available now. NO PETS Call 570-472-1414

FORTY FORT

Lovely 2 bedroom, 2nd floor on River St. Living room, dining room, kitchen and bath. W/d hookup in basement. Garage. $550/mo + utilities No Pets 570-288-0770

30 DAY MAKEOVER

America Realty Rentals

First Floor, Renovated, Compact, 1 Bedrooms, Gas Fireplaces, new wall to wall, Appliances, Decks. EMPLOYMENT VERIFICATION/ APPLICATION, 2 YEAR SAME RENTS STARTING AT $500 + Utilities. NO PETS OR SMOKING

288-1422

GLEN LYON 1/2 DOUBLE 2 bedroom, washer,

dryer, stove & refrigerator included. $350 per month. Sewage & Trash included. No pets. Muench Clifford@yahoo.com 570-735-2207

HANOVER TOWNSHIP 2 bedroom, 2nd

floor. Stove & refrigerator, washer/dryer hook up. No pets. $475 + security & utilities Call 570-822-7657

HANOVER TWP. Beautiful 2 bed-

room second floor apartment with modern kitchen, refinished hardwood floors throughout, gas heat, $575/month + security. All utilities by tenant. Call Lynda 570-262-1196

HANOVER TWP.

Beautiful 2 bedroom second floor apartment with modern kitchen, refinished hardwood floors throughout, gas heat, 1 car garage. $575/month + security. All utilities by tenant. Call Lynda 570-262-1196

HARDING Renovated 1st floor,

2 bedroom apartment. New carpeting and paint. Fridge & stove. Water Included. $600 + security & utilities. Call 570-240-6620 or 570-388-6503

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

KINGSTON

2nd Floor. 2 bedrooms, renovated bathroom, balcony off newly renovated kitchen with refrigerator & stove, Pergo floors, central air, newly painted, offstreet parking, no pets. $600 per month plus utilities, & 1 month security deposit. 570-239-1010

KINGSTON 399 -401 Elm Ave.

Newly remodeled apartments. 1st floor, 3 bedroom, $850 + utilities. 2nd floor, (2) 2 bedroom $600 + utilities. NO PETS, No section 8 housing. References and security required. 570-301-2785

KINGSTON E. W alnut St.

Located in quiet neighborhood. Kitchen, living room, dining room, sun room, bathroom. 2 large and 1 small bedroom, lots of closets, built in linen, built in hutch, hardwood floors, fireplace, storage room, yard. New washer/ dryer, stove & fridge. Heat and hot water included. 1 year lease + security. $950 570-406-1411

KINGSTON

Beautiful 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, modern kitchen with appliances, large dining & living rooms, central air, decks, ample parking. No pets. $595 per month.

570-696-1866

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

KINGSTON Two 1 bedroom & two 2 bedroom apartments available in a renovated building with OSP. Great location within walking distance to shopping & restaurants. 1 year lease, 1st month rent, credit check & security required. No pets. Utilities by tenant. 1 bedroom $550/month, 2 bedroom $650/month. Call Nicole 570-474-6307 or 570-715-7757

SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP

LUZERNE 1 bedroom, wall to wall, off-street parking, coin laundry, water, sewer & garbage included. $495/ month + security & lease. HUD accepted. Call 570-687-6216 or 570-954-0727

LUZERNE Ultra clean, safe and

private. 1.5 bedrooms, 2nd floor. All appliances. Wall to wall. No pets. Non smoking. $465 + utilities, lease & security. Call 570-288-9735

Sell your own home! Place an ad HERE 570-829-7130 Midtowne Apartments 100 E. 6th Street, Wyoming PA 18644

Housing for

Extremely Low & Very Low Income

Elderly, Handicapped & Disabled. 570-693-4256 ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED Rents based on income. Managed by EEI

MOUNTAIN TOP 1 Bedroom apart-

ments for elderly, disabled. Rents based on 30% of ADJ gross income. Handicap Accessible. Equal Housing Opportunity. TTY711 or 570-474-5010 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer.

NANTICOKE

1st floor. 1 bedroom. ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED! Off street parking. Fresh paint. NO PETS $525 + security 570-477-6018 leave message

NANTICOKE

Great 1st floor 1 bedroom apartment, heat included, with a detached garage in a great location. Hardwood floors & appliances included. Shared washer / dryer. Large yard. $750 + electric, security & references. Call 570-371-3271

NANTICOKE

Honeypot Section 2nd floor, 3 room apartment. Nice neighborhood. $400 + utilities & security. No pets. Call 570-885-6878

NANTICOKE

LARGE EFFICIENCY. New carpeting, clean. Garbage Included. $350 + utilities, security & references. Call 570-815-2265

NANTICOKE Nice 2 bedroom

Eat-in kitchen, living room, full bath, stove/fridge, washer/dryer, $475 + utilities. No Pets. Call 570-760-3637 or 570-477-3839

NANTICOKE

Spacious 1 bedroom 1st floor. New carpeting, gas range and fridge included. Garage parking, no dogs. References and security required. $450/mo. Water, sewer, garbage fee incl. Tenant pays gas and electric 570-696-3596

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

KINGSTON

KINGSTON Modern 2 bedroom 1 bath. Second floor. $600 + utilities. Call Darren 570-825-2468

Need a Roommate? Place an ad and find one here! 570-829-7130

30+ DAY

BEING REMODELED

NORTH WILKES-BARRE FIRST FLOOR EFFICIENCY / 1 BEDROOM, BRAND NEW FLOORING, CARPETING, MODERN/APPLIANCES, ELECTRIC/GAS FIREPLACE. APPLICATION/EMPLO YMENT VERIFICATION “being considered” NO PETS/SMOKING 2 YEARS @ $500+ UTILITIES. MANAGED!

America Realty Rentals

288-1422

Apartments/ Unfurnished

WILKES-BARRE

PARSONS SECTION 46 Govier St. 2nd floor, 2 bedroom, W/D hookup, fridge & stove. Off street parking water included. freshly painted $525/mo + utilities, lease & security No pets. 570-328-1875

PITTSTON

1st floor, 2 bedrooms. All appliances included. All utilities paid; electricity by tenant. Everything brand new. Off street parking. $750 + security & references. Call 570-969-9268

PITTSTON 2 bedrooms, 1st

Mayflower Crossing Apartments 570.822.3968 2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms - Light & bright open floor plans - All major appliances included - Pets welcome* - Close to everything - 24 hour emergency maintenance - Short term leases available

Call TODAY For AVAILABILITY!! www.mayflower crossing.com

floor. Stove, fridge, w/d hookup provided. $550/mo., includes sewer & refuse. Utilities by tenant. NO PETS Call Charlie 570-829-1578

Certain Restrictions Apply*

PITTSTON 2 or 3 bedroom, 1st

WILKES-BARRE

floor, full kitchen. Heat included, no pets. $650 + 1 month security. Call 570-451-1038

PITTSTON

3 bedroom. Living room, kitchen, 1 bath. Off street parking, on site laundry, enclosed porch, fenced yard. $695/mo + utilities. Security required. Call (570) 881-1747

PITTSTON

SINGLE DELUXE APARTMENT 2 large bedrooms over two car heated garage. Wall to wall carpet, large kitchen & living room, 1.5 baths. Master bath has shower & whirlpool tub, custom vanities & tile. Gas heat, central vacuum & air, all appliances. Sundeck off kitchen. $950/month, plus utilities, & security. No pets. 570-654-1621 or 570-654-6720 PLAINS

MODERN 1ST FLOOR 2 bedroom. Kitchen

with appliances. All new carpet. Convenient location. Washer/dryer hookup. No smoking. No pets. $550 + utilities. 570-714-9234

PLAINS

Newly remodeled, 2 bedroom. Living room, dining room, eat in kitchen, stove w/d hookup. Heat, water, sewer included. No smoking or pets. $625/month, security and references. 570-905-0186

PLYMOUTH

Cozy 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath, $525/ month + utilities & security. No pets. 570-417-3427

WEST PITTSTON

- Boston Ave. Spacious, private 2 bedroom apartment on 2nd floor. Refrigerator, stove, dishwasher, washer, dryer, off street parking, air conditioning & gas heat + storage space. Water & Sewer included in rent. No pets, no smoking. $525/month + security. 570-417-2775 or 570-954-1746

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified! West Pittston, Pa. GARDEN VILLAGE APARTMENTS 221 Fremont St. Housing for the elderly & mobility impaired; all utilities included. Federally subsidized program. Extremely low income persons encouraged to apply. Income less than $12,400. 570-655-6555, 8 am-4 pm, Monday-Friday. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

WEST WYOMING

Beautiful, oversized executive style apartment in large historic home. Two bedrooms, one bath, granite kitchen, hardwood floors, dining room, living room, basement storage, beautiful front porch, washer/ dryer. $1,200 monthly plus utilities. No pets. No smoking. Call 570-472-1110

941

1st floor, 1 bedroom, $450 per month + utilities. No pets, no smoking. Call 570-693-1000

WEST WYOMING 425 West 8th Street

New 1st floor, 2 bedroom with off street parking, washer/dryer hook up, stove. No pets. $550/mo + security. Sewer & garbage included, other utilities by tenant. 570-760-0458

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

1-ROOM STUDIO

in historic building at 281 S. Franklin St. with kitchenette & bath. Heat, water, garbage removal, and parking included in $425 month rent. Call 570-333-5471 with references

WILKES-BARRE

155 W. River St. 1 bedroom, some appliances included, all utilities included except electric, hardwood floors, Pet friendly. $600. 570-969-9268

WILKES-BARRE

3 Apartments available. $400-800 per month plus security. 2 bedrooms, offstreet parking, no pets, newly renovated. No Section 8. Call 917-971-5991 or 917-373-1828

WILKES-BARRE

3 bedroom, 2nd floor apartment, off street parking, washer & dryer hookup, no pets. $550 + security & utilities. Call 570-822-7657

WILKES-BARRE

Duplex first and second floor for rent. Kitchen, bedroom, living room and bath in each apartment. Included is refrigerator and stove in each apartment. First floor tenant has use of washer and dryer. Off-street parking. Heat, water and sewer included in rent. Tenant responsible for electric only. Applicant to provide proof on income and responsible for cost of credit check. First floor rent is $600 per month, second floor rent is $575 per month. Louise Laine 283-9100 x20

WILKES-BARRE HUGE, modern effi-

ciency, includes all new appliances & all utilities. $725/month + security. Call 570-574-3065 WILKES-BARRE

LAFAYETTE GARDENS ! S

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

WILKES-BARRE S W S . OUTH

ELLES

T

Available Now. 2 bedrooms, 1st floor. New paint & carpet, heat, hot water, sewer & garbage included. $635 + security. Pets OK with approval. Section 8 Welcome. 570-589-9767

WILKES-BARRE

Wilkes-University Campus Studio, 1, 2, 3 & 4 bedroom. Starting at $425. All utilities included. Call 570-826-1934

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

WYOMING

1 bedroom 2nd floor at $625/month. Off street parking. Non smoking. No pets. Bonus walk up attic with tons of storage. Heat, water, garbage, sewer included. 1 month security, credit check & references. 1 year lease. Please call Donna 570-613-9080

WYOMING AVAILABLE MAY 1

2nd floor. Bright & cheery. One bedroom. Quiet building & neighborhood. Includes stove, refrigerator, heat, water, sewer & trash. No smoking. No pets. Security, references & credit check. $585/month Call (570) 609-5133

WYOMING

Updated 1 bedroom. New wall to wall carpet. Appliances furnished. Coin op laundry. $550. Heat, water & sewer included. Call 570-687-6216 or 570-954-0727

944

Commercial Properties

Commercial Lease Courtdale location Ideal for: Veterinarian Office Manufacturing / Industrial Space Storage Space

WILKES-BARRE LODGE Formerly The Travel Lodge 497 Kidder St., Wilkes-Barre Rooms Starting at: Daily $44.99 + tax Weekly $189.99 + tax Microwave, Refrigerator, WiFi, HBO 570-823-8881 www.Wilkes BarreLodge.com

WILKES-BARRE

Mayflower Section 1 bedroom apartment available. Nice Area. Stove, fridge, heat & hot water included. Storage. No pets. Call 570-823-7587

WILKES-BARRE

Newly renovated 2 bedroom. New kitchen, appliances, floor coverings & washer/dryer. $650 + utilities. Nice neighborhood. References, credit & background check. Smoke free 570-881-0320

WILKES-BARRE SOUTH

1 bedroom, 1st floor. Modern kitchen & bath. Wall to wall carpet, Stove, Fridge, Washer, Dryer. Heat included. $535 + security. 570-718-0331

WILKES-BARRE SOUTH SECURE BUILDINGS 1 & 2 bedroom

apartments. Starting at $440 and up. References required. Section 8 ok. 570-332-5723

Commercial Properties

PITTSTON

OFFICE SPACE

Attractive modern office space. 2 suites available. Suite A-4 offices, plus restroom and storage includes utilities, 700 sq. ft. $650/month Suite B-2, large offices, 2 average size offices, plus restroom and storage plus utilities, 1,160 sq. ft. $1000/month Call Charlie 570-829-6200

RETAIL BUILDING

WILKES-BARRE TWP 12,000 sf. Route 309. Exit 165 off I81. 570-823-1719

315 PLAZA 1,750 SQ. FT. & 3,400 SQ.FT OFFICE/RETAIL 570-829-1206

950

Half Doubles

PLAINS

NEW LUXURY DUPLEX This beautiful, completely renovated 2 bedroom luxury apartment could be yours! All new high end amenities include: hardwood floors, gorgeous maple kitchen cabinets with granite countertops & stainless steel appliances. Spacious great room with gas fireplace. Stacked washer/dryer. All new tile bath. Large screened-in porch. Many large, convenient closets. Central A/C. New gas heating system. Huge attic for storage. “Must See!” $850 + utilities, lease & security. NO PETS. Call for appointment. 570-793-6294

WILKES-BARRE

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

3 bedroom 1/2 double. Nice neighborhood. Wall/wall carpet. Washer/dryer hookup. Fenced Yard. No Pets. $600 + utilities. Security & references. After 5, call 570-822-8657

WILKES-BARRE

Nice 3 bedroom with eat in kitchen & walk up attic. Walking distance to school & parks. $700/month + utilities & 1 month security. (570) 793-9449

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! 1,500 sq. ft. Multiuse for $295/ month. Easy access to I-81. 570-829-0897 or 570-822-1139

WILKES-BARRE GREAT LOCATION!

Close to all Major Highways Commercial space for lease. 21,600 sq. ft. Distribution/ Warehouse/Retail /Offices, etc + large 80,000 sq. ft. parking lot fenced in with automatic dusk to dawn lighting system. Will divide. 570-822-2021. Ask for Betty or Dave

947

Garages

WEST PITTSTON

1 locking garage/ storage unit for rent. 13’x15’. $55/month. No electric. Call 570-357-1138

950

Half Doubles

WILKES-BARRE/SOUTH

953 Houses for Rent

ALDEN

Large single family home. 4 bedrooms, 1.5 bath, huge family room & fenced yard, off street parking, pets OK on approval. $1000 + security. Tenant pays utilities. Call

570-592-7918 DALLAS FOR SALE

OR RENT Single home in gated retirement village. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage. Granite countertops, hardwood floors, gas fireplace, appliances included. Quiet 55 plus community. No Pets. One year lease. $1675/mo + utilities & security. Monthly maintenance fee included. 570-592-3023 DALLAS

HANOVER TOWNSHIP

1000 SF - 5000 SF Space Available. 5000 SF Warehouse Space with loading docks, office, heat, and plumbing. $3.60 - $12 sf/yr + NNN, lease negotiable. Call Cindy King 570-690-2689 www.cindykingre.com

570-675-4400

DOLPHIN PLAZA

Rte. 315 1,000 & 3,800 Sq. Ft. WILL DIVIDE OFFICE / RETAIL Call 570-829-1206

AVE MONEY THIS YEAR

113 Edison St. Quiet neighborhood. 2 bedroom apartments available for immediate occupancy. Heat & hot water included. $625 Call Aileen at 570-822-7944

944

RETAIL SHOPPES 30-60 day availability FORTY FORT WYOMING AVE

“America Realty” Rentals Lease one or more “divided/ small shoppes”. Starting @ $550 2 years, 500/600 approximate sq. ft. Inquiries apply:

570-288-1422

1 Regina St 3 bedrooms, 1.5 bath. All appliances included. New carpet. Large kitchen & living room. $875 + utilities. Security deposit + background check. Call 570-765-4474

HANOVER TWP.

3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, gas heat, refurbished, $600 per month plus 1 month security, utilities not included. references & credit check. 1 year lease. 570-825-4302 Leave message

HANOVER TWP.

$650/month, 2 bedroom, 1 bath, living dining room & eat in kitchen. Appliances, washer/dryer hook up. Off street parking. Water, sewer & recyclables included. Security, references & credit check. No pets. 570-824-3223

KINGSTON

Sprague Ave. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, 1st floor duplex, New w/w carpeting & hardwood floors. Convenient to Wyoming Ave. Washer/dryer hookup, basement storage. Reduced! $540/month + utilities, security, lease & NO PETS. 570-793-6294

GREENBRIAR Well maintained ranch style condo features living room with cathedral ceiling, oak kitchen, dining room with vaulted ceiling, 2 bedrooms and 2 3/4 baths, master bedroom with walk in closet. HOA fees included. $1,000 per month + utilities. MLS#11-4063. Call Kevin Smith 570-696-5422

SMITH HOURIGAN 570-696-1195

EDWARDSVILLE

150 Green St. Newly remodeled ranch, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths. Handicap accessible. Corner lot with nice yard. $1100. monthly plus own utilities (570) 283-0587 HANOVER TWP Modern 3 bedroom. 1 1/2 bath. Driveway. Gas heat. Lease. No pets. No smoking. $725 + utilities. Call Ann Marie Chopick 570-760-6769

LUZERNE

KINGSTON COMMERCIAL SPACE

1,250 sf. Excellent for shipping & receiving. Private powder room. Loading dock. Separate over head and entrance doors. Gas Heat. Easy Access. $450 + security & references. 570-706-5628

OFFICE/RETAIL

BLOOMSBURG

150 East 9th Street, 3891 square feet. Newly remodeled. Offices, conference area, large open area, energy efficient & parking. Call 570-387-3300

PITTSTON COOPERS CO-OP

Lease Space Available, Light manufacturing, warehouse, office, includes all utilities with free parking. I will save you money!

2 bedrooms, off street parking, stove & refrigerator, washer / dryer. No pets. Non smoking. $450 + utilities, security & references. Call Mark 570-262-2896 NANTICOKE Large 1/2 Double, 3 bedrooms, large kitchen, fenced in yard. $550 per month + utilities. Garbage & maintenance fees included. No Pets, 1 month security deposit. References. Available May 1st. 477-1415

PITTSTON 3 bedroom, 1 bath,

living & dining room. Kitchen with stove, refrigerator & dishwasher. Gas heat & off street parking. $675/month + utilities, security & references. Call (570) 822-8671

PITTSTON TWP

MAINTENANCE FREE!

2 Large Bedrooms. Off-Street Parking No Smoking. $600+utilities, security, last month. 570-885-4206

Motorcycle for sale? Let them see it here in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

(570) 288-6654

HARDING

Mt. Zion Road 6 rooms and bath, stove provided, washer/dryer hookup, no pets or smoking. $650/ month, plus utilities, & security deposit. Call 570-388-2675 or 570-388-6860

Find Something? Lose Something? Get it back where it belongs with a Lost/Found ad! 570-829-7130

HARVEYS LAKE

2 small bedrooms, All appliances. New wall to wall. Security & first month’s rent. NO PETS. 570-762-6792

NANTICOKE Desirable

Lexington Village Nanticoke, PA Many ranch style homes. 2 bedrooms $900 + electric only

SQUARE FOOT RE MANAGEMENT 866-873-0478


PAGE 28G

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

     

   Property Available - Pierce Street - Kingston

FOR SALE 1300 SF Commercial Building Pierce Street - Kingston

1300 Sq Ft concrete block commercial building on a 90â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x145â&#x20AC;&#x2122; corner lot. Located at 366 Pierce St., Kingston. Central air conditioning, Paved parking for 25 cars. Presently a pizza business, but land can be used for multiuple uses (bank building, offices, etc.).

$350,000

MLS 12-1279

H U M F O R D 953 Houses for Rent

NANTICOKE

Single Cape Cod 6 room, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, carpeting, washer provided, off-street parking, no pets, $650/month, plus utilities + security deposit. Call 570-788-6265

PITTSTON

Newly remodeled single family Ranch home. Excellent condition with 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths. Hardwood floors, granite counter tops, central air, garage, driveway, full basement. No pets or smoking. Garbage & maintenance included. Utilities not included. $1000/mo. Contact Pat 570-237-0425

PLYMOUTH bedroom,

3 1.5 baths. Gas heat. Carpeted. Off street parking. $800 + utilities & security. Call 570-430-7901

PLYMOUTH

3 bedrooms, 1 bath, dishwasher, washer /dryer hookup, off-street parking, $675/month, plus utilities, & security deposit. Section 8 Welcome Call 570-885-5539

Line up a place to live in classified! SWOYERSVILLE Completely remodeled Large 2 story, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, single family home including refrigerator, stove, dishwasher & disposal. Gas heat, nice yard, good neighborhood,. Off street parking. Shed. No pets. $995 / month. 570-479-6722

WILKES-BARRE

3 bedrooms, 1 bath. Full kitchen, washer/dryer hookup, off-street parking, no pets. $675/ month, plus utilities & security. Call 570-760-8116

WILKES-BARRE ELEGANT

VICTORIAN 5 bedroom. 1.5 baths. www.aptilike.com Ad #547

WILKES-BARRE Safe

Neighborhood One 3 bedroom $700 One 3 Bedroom $625 One 2 bedroom $585 Plus all utilities References & security. No pets. 570-766-1881

WILKES-BARRE

Single family, 3 bedroom, washer/dryer on premises. $875/month, + utilities & security. 570-814-7562

959 Mobile Homes

HARVEYS LAKE

Available May 1 2 bedroom mobile home. Newly remodeled. All new carpet, flooring & appliances, including washer & dryer. $575 + utilities & security deposit. Call 484-571-8356

962

Rooms

KINGSTON HOUSE Nice, clean furnished room, starting at $340. Efficiency at $450 month furnished with all utilities included. Off street parking. 570-718-0331

WILKES-BARRE

Furnished room for rent. Close to downtown. $90/week + security. Everything included. Call 570-704-8288

965

Roommate Wanted

Female roommate wanted. 2nd floor of house, 1.5 rooms, all utilities included. $400/month. Call 570-212-2594

LUZERNE MILLER ST.

Need Roommate to share furnished 1/2 double. $350 per month all utilities included. 570-338-2207

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in bussiness with classified!

MOUNTAIN TOP

Male homeowner looking for responsible male roommate to share house. Minutes away from Industrial Park. Off street parking. Plenty of storage. Furnished room. Large basement with billiards and air hockey. All utilities included. $425. Call Doug 570-817-2990 ROOMMATE WANTED - Wilkes-Barre. $275 + 1/2 utilities. 570-262-5202

www.humford.com â&#x20AC;˘ Broker Protected

971 Vacation & Resort Properties ADIRONDACK LAKE, NY: Off market since 1947, former Scout Camp. 2 lake cabins 147â&#x20AC;&#x2122; lakefront $119,900. 5 acre cabin on Portaferry Lake $149,900. www. LandFirstNY.com 1888-683-2626.

WE NEED YOUR HELP!

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in bussiness with classified!

Anonymous Tip Line

1-888-796-5519

HARVEYS LAKE Furnished Summer

Luzerne County SheriffĘźs OfďŹ ce

Home. Weekly and/ or Monthly. Starting June to end of August. Washer & dryer. Free boat slips. Call for more details. 570-639-5041 OCEAN CITY . MARYLAND. Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/ partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800638-2102. Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com VACATION RENTAL Brant Beach - LBI, NJ 4 bedrooms; 2 baths, sleeps 10. 1 block to the beach, ½ block to the bay. Front porch, rear deck, all the conveniences of home. Many weeks still available. $1000$1950. Call Darren 570-825-2468

974 Wanted to Rent Real Estate

WILKES-BARRE

& Surrounding Areas Seeking a Ranch Home. 3+ bedrooms. 1 1/2 baths or more. Call Jean 570-829-3477 ext. 152

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a showroom in print! Classifiedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got the directions!

timesleaderautos.com

953 Houses for Rent

Contact Bob Kopec, CLS â&#x20AC;˘ 570.822.5126

R E A L T Y

Over 2,000 vehicles available online.

Over 47,000

OFFICENTERS - Pierce St., Kingston

people cite the The Times Leader as their primary source for shopping information. *2008 Pulse Research

What Do You Have To Sell Today?

Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONLY ONL NL N L LY ONE N L LEA LE LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

Professional OfďŹ ce Rentals

Full Service Leases â&#x20AC;˘ Custom Design â&#x20AC;˘ Renovations â&#x20AC;˘ Various Size Suites Available Medical, Legal, Commercial â&#x20AC;˘ Utilities â&#x20AC;˘ Parking â&#x20AC;˘ Janitorial Full Time Maintenance Staff Available

For Rental Information Call:

1-570-287-1161