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The Times Leader timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE, PA

TA X E S

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012

$1.50

Owners of property in 17 Luzerne County municipalities to get hit with tax hikes on two fronts this year

Some face higher county and local rates 37.9%

Source: Luzerne County Assessor’s office

$15 18.6% $10 $107.8%

22.2% 25% $10 $5 4% $3 7.6% $2 3.4%

Mark Guydish/The Times Leader

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See TAXES, Page 14A

Dollar Increase (property value of $100,000) Percent increase (from 2011 to 2012)

$60

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60

Tax increases for 17 municipalities

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80

ship needs that money to buy new $3,000 emergency response radios made obsolete by a government radio bandwidth change, he said. “We buy what we afford, and what we can’t we make do without,” Herring said.

100%

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INSIDE: Chart of tax millage rates by municipality, school district, 14A

oun

Property owners in 17 Luzerne County municipalities will pay higher local taxes this year in addition to the county’s 2 percent tax hike, a review of 2012 millage rates shows. Taxes in the remaining 59 municipalities will stay the same. Slocum Township retains its status as the only county municipality with no local property

taxes. Township officials have forced the municipality to survive on state liquid fuel and wage tax revenue. “It’s the people’s money, not ours,” said township Supervisor Charles Herring. Herring provided an example of this frugality. The township had installed a base for a pavilion in the municipal park with plans to construct the pavilion this year, but the project was postponed because the town-

Fair m

By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES jandes@timesleader.com

OIL SPILL

CLEAN INDOOR AIR ACT

MCT FILE PHOTO

A feather is shown among tar balls that washed ashore in Long Beach in 2010.

BP lawsuit could be mega-case It encompasses 72 million pages of documents, 20,000 exhibits and 303 depositions with 120,00 plaintiffs.

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Dominick Ardo stands in his Plains Pub near a ‘No Smoking’ sign. The Plains Pub is a smoke-free establishment, but Ardo says his competitors should also have to abide by the state’s Clean Indoor Air Act, intended to make public places in Pennsylvania smoke-free.

Excuses up in smoke? Owners and patrons differ on smoke ban

State senator looks to eliminate loopholes that allow smoking to continue in some public places. By ANDREW M. SEDER aseder@timesleader.com

By ANDREW M. SEDER and STEVE MOCARSKY aseder@timesleader.com smocarksy@timesleader.com

Dominick Ardo is a non-smoker, and he appreciates the smoke-free atmosphere inside his Plains Pub on Carey Street. But he wishes all his competitors would play by the same rules and be required to prohibit smoking. More than three years after the state’s Clean Indoor Air Act went into effect, Pennsylvania smokers are still puffing away inside nearly 3,000 bars and social clubs and every one of the state’s 10 operating PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER casinos. A state senator instrumental in Jay Fetor of Wilkes-Barre Twp. smokes a cigarette at Gonda’s Elbow crafting the 2008 Clean Indoor Air Room Bar in Wilkes-Barre on Thursday. Despite the Clean Indoor Air

Elbow Room tavern owner Joe Gonda, a non-smoker, would love to see all bars go smoke-free, including his own. But, he said, the bar business reality is that smoking means more business. To the chagrin of the downtown Wilkes-Barre businessman, the arguments over loopholes in the Clean Indoor Air Act continue more than three years after it became law. Amy Christie, the executive

See SMOKE-FREE, Page 14A

See DIFFER, Page 14A

Act, Pennsylvania has permitted some smaller bars to continue to allow smoking.

By RICHARD FAUSSET Los Angeles Times

NEW ORLEANS — Spill 4.1 million barrels of oil into the ocean, and this is what you get: the lollapalooza, labyrinthine, mega-mother of all lawsuits. "There’s It encompasses 72 million pages of documents, enormous 20,000 exhibits and 303 pressure depositions — the collective effort of hundreds on BP to of lawyers and legal settle.’’ workers. David Uhlmann It involves the Justice Director of the Department and about environmental 120,000 plaintiffs: angry law program at fishermen, restaura- the University of teurs, state governments Michigan and condo owners who say their beach-side property is not worth what it once was. The trial phase, set to begin Feb. 27 in a New Orleans federal courtroom, could go on for nine months. That is, unless it is averted by the megamother of all legal settlements. It goes by the formal title "In Re: Oil Spill by the Oil Rig Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010." And much like the disaster itself, the litigation is startling in its impact and scope, involving billions of dollars of potential fines and damages, arcane matters of maritime law and Space Age details of deep-sea engineering. There are a host of corporate defendSee OIL SPILL, Page 11A

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A NEWS Obituaries 2A, 7A Local 3A Nation & World 5A

Joe Palooka Honoring a local legend ETC, 1F

B PEOPLE Birthdays C SPORTS Outdoors

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D BUSINESS Motley Fool E VIEWS Editorial

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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012

THE TIMES LEADER

Richard J. Joseph

LOTTERY SUMMARY

February 25, 2012 ichard J. Joseph, 60, of HughesR town, passed away Saturday, Feb 25, 2012 at home.

Rick was born in Hanover, Pa., on May 24th, 1951. He was the son of the late Jack and Phyllis Joseph. He graduated from Hanover High School in 1969. Rick was previously employed at Leslie Fay, Whiteman Tower, and recently at American Silk in Plains, PA. He was involved with the Hughestown Little League, Softball League and Pittston Area Football Booster Club. He was a member of the Blessed Sacrament Church in Hughestown and Sacred Heart Church in Dupont. Rick was a devoted husband and loving father. He enjoyed spending time with his children and watching them play sports through the years. Rick’s passion was music, playing the drums and performing with his longtime friends in the band “Tom Slick & The Converted Thunderbolt Greaseslappers’’ for over 38 years. He enjoyed spending vacations in Cape May, N.J., with family and friends for over 20 years. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his goddaughter and niece Michelle Schuler; and father-in-law, Leonard C. Cumbo. He is survived by his wife, Karen, with whom he observed their 36th wedding anniversary on Oct 11, 2011; daughter Stephanie, Hughes-

Daily Number, Midday Sunday: 5-8-4 Monday: 4-5-9 Tuesday: 4-1-2 Wednesday: 2-2-8 Thursday: 3-2-1 Friday: 3-3-0 Saturday: 4-2-1 Big Four, Midday Sunday: 3-9-2-3 Monday: 1-7-6-9 Tuesday: 6-0-7-7 Wednesday: 3-3-8-6 Thursday: 9-1-4-0 Friday: 7-7-2-0 Saturday: 9-4-7-8

town; son, Ricky, West Pittston; sister, Susie Schuler and husband Bob, Macungie; brother, Stanley Joseph and wife Cathy, Sweet Valley; mother-in-law, Florence Cumbo, West Pittston. Funeral services will be at 8:30 a.m. on Tuesday, February 28, 2012 from the Peter J. Adonizio Funeral Home, 251 William St., Pittston, with a Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in Sacred Heart of Jesus Church, 215 Lackawanna Avenue, Dupont. Interment will be in St. Rocco’s Cemetery, Pittston Township. Friends may call Monday, February 27, 2012 from 4 to 8 p.m. at the funeral home. Online condolences may be made at www.peterjadoniziofuneralhome.com.

February 24, 2012 and Jacob Ratowski and Katie Stubblebine; great-grandson, Branden; brother, Joseph Bogdon of Plymouth; sister, Julianne Henninger and her husband, Dana, of Hunlock Creek; several nieces and nephews.’ Private funeral will be held at the convenience of the family from the S.J. Grontkowski Funeral Home, 530 West Main Street, Plymouth. Interment will be in the Lithuanian Independent Cemetery, Wyoming. There will be no calling hours. In lieu of flowers, contributions, if desired, may be made to the Luzerne County S.P.C.A., or the charity of the donor’s choice. Marie’s family would like to thank her doctors and nurses who participated in her care and the staff of the Hospice Community Care for all of their care and compassion given to her. Please visit www.sjgrontkowskifuneralhome.com to submit online condolences to Marie’s family.

Rosalind Chafetz February 9, 2012

R er of Helen Chafetz Frank of osalind Chafetz, beloved moth-

Harveys Lake and Judy Chafetz Good of Syosset, New York, passed away peacefully on Feb 9, 2012, shortly after her 94th birthday. Roz, as everyone who knew her could attest, lived for her family and friends. They are what gave her joy, as was evidenced by her wonderful and perpetual smile. She continued smiling her entire life. Roz was a mom (and grandma) who would do anything for her children and grandchildren. Her daily message to us, whether in a camp letter, birthday card or in person was “all I want is your happiness.” And that was all she ever wanted. Roz was always there to encourage, congratulate and share in each of our triumphs. Her greatest wish was to live to see her great-grandchildren, which was a dream fulfilled. Rosalind, daughter of George and Helen Balterman, was pre-deceased by Benjamin, beloved husband of 60 years.

She is survived by her brothers, Harry (and Sydney) Balterman and Lewis Balterman; daughters and sons-in-law, Helen (and Gary) Frank, Judy (and Larry) Good; grandchildren, Bob (and Faith) Racusin, Ronni (and Russell) Stuart, Adam (and Natalia) Good, Lauren Good, Bryan (and Kristen) Good, and Allison Good; great-grandchildren, Laz and Sari Racusin, Brayden and Avery Stuart, and Julian Good as well as several loving nieces, nephews and cousins. Her funeral was held at Gutterman’s Funeral Home in Woodbury N.Y, on Sunday, February 12, with interment immediately following at Beth Moses Cemetery in Pinelawn, NY. Shiva was observed at the home of Judy and Larry Good, 35 Eagle Chase, Woodbury N.Y. Contributions, if desired, may be made to the Michael J. Fox Parkinson’s Foundation or the charity of your choice.

Eileen Pendergast February 21, 2012

E Village in Hanover Township, ileen K. Pendergast, 89, of Cedar

died Tuesday at Little Flower Manor, where she had been a guest for the past six weeks. Born February 8, 1923 in Harrisburg and raised in Wilkes-Barre, she was a daughter of the late Frank and Nora Reagan Pendergast. Eileen was a graduate of James M. Coughlin High School and Georgetown Nursing School in Washington, D.C. A Registered Nurse, Eileen spent her entire professional career in Washington and returned to make her home in the Wyoming Valley after retiring. Miss Pendergast was a member of the Parish of Saint Andre Bessette and communicant at the

Church of Holy Saviour. She was a member of the Parish of Saint John the Evangelist prior to its closing. Sisters, Nancy Messersmith, Ann Balz and Marguerite Hogan, and brothers, Francis and James Pendergast preceded her in death. She was a diehard Redskins fan, and dedicated nurse, and endured the teasing of her nieces and nephews with grace and good humor. They will miss her. A family celebration of Eileen’s life will be held privately. Interment will be in Saint Mary’s Cemetery in Hanover Township. Permanent messages and memories can be shared with Eileen’s family at www.celebrateherlife.com.

More Obituaries, Page 7A

Quinto, Midday Sunday: 9-5-6-5-0 Monday: 6-5-4-7-2 (7-8-7-1-6, double draw) Tuesday: 6-0-2-3-3 Wednesday: 4-1-3-6-3 Thursday: 9-5-8-0-1 Friday: 7-6-6-5-0 Saturday: 0-9-4-4-4

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

Helen Zukowski, left, and Marjorie Hoffman, both of Rice Township, review art up for auction on Saturday at the St. Jude School in Wright Township. The school hopes to raise $4,000.

St. Jude holds art auction Each class completed a group project based on a specific religious icon.

Marie R. Stubblebine Marie R. Stubblebine, age 67, of Plymouth, passed away on Friday, February 24, 2012. Born December 6, 1944, she was the daughter of the late Joseph and Mildred Bogdon. Marie was a graduate of St. Vincent’s High School, Plymouth, and had been employed by the Wyoming Valley Garment and Food Service Industry. Her family enjoyed her sense of humor. The love that Marie has shown to her family, over the years, can never be measured. Surviving are her daughter and caregiver, Marie (Amy) Ratowski and her husband, Alex, of Hunlock Creek; son, Howard (Dee) Stubblebine and his wife, Melissa, of Larksville; grandchildren, Justin

By STEVEN FONDO Times Leader Correspondent

WRIGHT TWP. – Johnny Mercer’s wonderful classic “Hooray for Hollywood” greeted the audience at St Jude School’s 4th Annual Art Auction on Saturday evening. This year’s benefit was called “You Ought to be in Pictures... A Red Carpet Event” to coincide with this weekend’s Academy Awards in Los Angeles. At the door, guests were greeted by an array of formally attired hostesses and escorted past a velvet rope and down a plush red

POLICE BLOTTER

Two found dead at Split Rock Resort LAKE HARMONY (AP) — Authorities in eastern Pennsylvania are investigating the deaths of two people at a resort in the Pocono mountains and trying to locate their car. State police in Carbon County say officers went to check on the welfare of two residents of Split Rock Resort in Kidder Township at about noon Saturday. Police say the residents were found dead and their sedan was missing. They are calling the deaths suspicious but have not released other details. Police are seeking the 2006 silver Cadillac and asking anyone who sees it to call 911 but not to approach the occupant or occupants. The names of the deceased have not been released. BERWICK – Police arrested three people and seized heroin, cash and loaded sawed-off shotgun in a raid Friday night of a residence at 304 E. Front St. Two of the people taken into custody, a Hispanic male and a black male, did not have identification, police said. Police were attempting to identify them. Brittany Bankes of Berwick was arrested inside the residence on drug and weapon charges and was committed to the Columbia County Prison. Police said they served a search warrant on the residence as part of an investigation into heroin dealing there. Police said 126 packets of heroin, the shotgun, $1,727 in U.S. currency, a video surveillance system, a counterfeit $10 bill, prescription medication and drug paraphernalia were seized. As police entered the residence around 9:30 p.m., the black male climbed out a window onto a second-floor roof and jumped into the backyard

featuring their sucarpet to the auction “The arts board per-imposed photo and room. an individually inspired “We try to come up are so design. with an original theme much a The collaborative stueach year,” said event organizer Nicole Jose- part of the dent pieces were auctioned off along with an fowicz. “It’s a lot of work learning eclectic and colorful seto put an event like this lection of original and retogether; but, in the experiproduction artwork supend, it’s more than ence.” plied by Marlin Fine Art worth it.” Nicole Auctioneers of Deer Students worked Josefowicz Park, N.Y. with artist-in-residence Event organizer “The arts are so much Liz Faist as part of the a part of the learning exNEIU 19 arts program. perience,” said JosefowAccording to organizers, each class completed a group icz, as she surveyed the art disproject based on a specific reli- play. “I’m so proud of what they’ve gious icon, representing their interpretation of their St Jude edu- created.” Josefowicz said the school cational experience. Each student also created a hopes to match last year’s fununique self-expression on poster draising total of $4,000. where he was apprehended, police said. A bag of marijuana and the packets of heroin were found in the area where he was taken into custody, police said. The male also had $771, police said. The Hispanic male also tried to flee but was caught, police said. He had $956, police said. WILKES-BARRE – City police reported the following: • Rite Aid Pharmacy, 33 Public Square, said a white male approximately 5 feet, 9 inches tall and wearing grayish green corduroy pants stole items from the store at 9:44 a.m. Saturday. • Police arrested Angelo Sperlazzo, 27, of Swoyersville, and cited him on harassment and public drunkenness charges at 6:17 a.m. Saturday in the parking lot of Denny’s, 488 Kidder St. According to police, Sperlazzo’s girlfriend, Autumn Evans of Swoyersville, told police Sperlazzo grabbed her by the neck and punched her in the nose during an argument. WILKES-BARRE TWP. – Police said a man robbed Philadelphia Subs, 555 E. Northampton St., at gunpoint Friday night. According to police, the man entered the store, displayed a gun and demanded cash. When he couldn’t open the cash register, he fled, taking the cash register with him. Additional details were unavailable Saturday. HAZLE TWP. – Firefighters responded early Saturday morning to a machinery fire at a plant in the Humboldt Industrial Park North. The fire was reported at approximately 2:30 a.m. Saturday at ADM Cocoa, 400 Stoney Creek Rd. Township Assistant Fire Chief Jason Zoshak said the fire began in a processing machine that linked the second and third floors of the factory. The fire started on the second floor, then spread to the third through ventilation ducts.

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A sprinkler system brought the fire under control on the second floor, and firefighters concentrated on extinguishing flames on the third, bringing the blaze under control within an hour of firefighter arrival, Zoshak said. Crews also disassembled the scorched equipment to ensure the fire did not rekindle. A shift of employees was working when the fire began, and one employee was transported to Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center because of smoke inhalation. No firefighters were injured. Zoshak said the cause of the fire is still under investigation, but that it does not appear to be suspicious. FOSTER TWP. -- State police said they will file charges against Delvy Duran, 34, of Hazleton, alleging he stole $450 worth of prosciutto cheese from the Citterio USA Corporation on Route 940. State police said the company reported the theft, which occurred at 11 p.m. Wednesday, and that management said Duran was seen taking the cheese. During an interview Duran confessed to taking the cheese, police said. HANOVER TWP. – Police arrested Jason Bell, 27, of Edwardsville, at 9:55 p.m. Friday at the Slate Bar & Lounge, 2324 San Souci Parkway, on a bench warrant for failing to appear for a probation hearing. HANOVER TWP. – Mary Fahey of Sively St. reported at 11 p.m. Friday that an unknown male entered her residence and was in the process of taking items when he was seen by a member of Fahey’s family and fled. He was last seen running toward the Marion Terrace Apartment complex. The suspect is described as a black male wearing a black leather jacket, brown hood and white sneakers with blue trim. Anyone with information about the robbery is asked to contact police at 825-1254.

mprazma@timesleader.com

Daily Number, 7 p.m. Sunday: 8-9-3 Monday: 2-7-7 Tuesday: 7-5-0 Wednesday: 4-7-0 Thursday: 6-9-4 Friday: 3-0-9 Saturday: 3-9-2 Big Four, 7 p.m. Sunday: 4-3-0-1 Monday: 3-2-8-4 Tuesday: 3-7-1-9 Wednesday: 8-5-3-3 Thursday: 0-7-9-2 Friday: 3-3-3-9 Saturday: 9-1-2-5 Quinto, 7 p.m. Sunday: 7-8-6-1-3 Monday: 8-1-8-5-6 Tuesday: 7-1-5-9-7 Wednesday: 6-2-9-9-1 Thursday: 4-8-6-6-4 Friday: 6-1-4-2-2 (8-2-6-3-2, double draw) Saturday: 4-2-4-8-6 Cash 5 Sunday: 02-19-28-33-34 Monday: 03-08-16-26-34 Tuesday: 12-25-28-38-41 Wednesday: 04-15-28-42-43 Thursday: 02-11-14-21-23 Friday: 07-08-15-29-33 Saturday: 14-18-21-23-41 Match 6 Lotto Monday: 07-17-25-28-38-44 Thursday: 08-10-26-27-41-47 Powerball Wednesday: 07-16-17-39-51 powerball: 32 Saturday: 06-11-42-53-54 powerball: 07 Mega Millions Tuesday: 09-30-39-42-47 Megaball: 37 Megaplier: 03 Friday: 01-16-18-25-27 Megaball: 03 Megaplier: 04

OBITUARIES Ankudovich, Eleanor Berman, Naomi Cain, Marguerite Chafetz, Rosalind Crockett, Katherine Dobranski, Theresa Fasulka, Helen Graziano, Audrey Husted, Irene Joseph, Richard Karavitch, Vincent Kowalczyk, Dora Legg, Daniel Mulvaney, Susan Mundenar, Virginia Neczesny, Jeanette Pendergast, Eileen Stubblebine, Marie Page 2A, 7A

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LOCAL TOY S H OW

Sugarloaf Volunteer Fire Department offers something for everyone at 18th annual event

Raising funds like child’s play

By RALPH NARDONE Times Leader Correspondent

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Greg Collins, Wells Fargo community banking president, Northeast Pennsylvania, left; Anne Marie McCawley, project director, St. Vincent de Paul Kitchen; Monsignor Joseph Kelly, executive director, St. Vincent de Paul and St. Francis of Assisi kitchens; Kevin Engelman, Wells Fargo district manager, Wilkes-Barre KINGSTON

Food banks receive grants

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 PAGE 3A●

fire company is as busy as it has been lately, he said. Last year, the company answered 599 calls and so far in 2012, more than 100, he added. The company has about 150 members with about 30 actively involved in firefighting and rescue, he said. They currently maintain a fleet that includes fire trucks, a tanker and ambulance. One dozen vendors put out their toy displays for viewing. There were toys for girls and boys, young and old. Many of the toys were still in their original packaging; some were decades old and very rare. There were toy cars, metal trucks, farm tractors, dolls, games, movie and television themed assortments

Michael Grandzol, 4, of Drums, enjoys looking over toys with his father Christian Saturday at the Toy Show at the Sugarloaf Volunteer Fire Department.

SUGARLOAF TWP. – Toy enthusiasts gathered on Saturday morning at the 18th annual Toy Show of the Sugarloaf Volunteer Fire Department. About 200 buyers walked through the fire company to look at toys ranging in value from a few dollars to several hundred dollars. The toy show is one of the fire department’s annual fund raising events, said Fire Chief Duane Hildebrand. He said any fundraising is very important to maintain the fire department functioning. “It’s very expensive to run a fire department,” Hildebrand said. It is especially expensive when the See TOYS, Page 6A

Wells Fargo & Company has given $5,000 grants to five Northeastern Pennsylvania food banks to help them provide for their clients. The grants were awarded to Jewish Family Services of Greater WilkesBarre; St. Vincent de Paul Kitchen, Wilkes-Barre; Seven Loaves Soup Kitchen, Tunkhannock; St. Francis of Assisi Kitchen, Scranton; Oasis of Love, Stroudsburg

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Kids brush up on dental knowledge at free clinics

R E L AY F O R H E AT

WILKES-BARRE

CDBG hearing scheduled

The city will hold a public meeting Monday on the Community Development Block Grant and HOME funds for 2011. The report will include financial summary reports, goals and accomplishments of the federally funded programs. The meeting will be at 3 p.m. Monday in Council Chambers, City Hall. Public comments will be taken.

LCCC involved with two health events for children, at Wyoming Valley Mall and at college. By RALPH NARDONE Times Leader Correspondent

WILKES-BARRE

City eyes Great Cleanup

The City of Wilkes-Barre is participating in the annual Great American Cleanup of PA on April 21, and is seeking help from volunteer groups and individuals. This year the city is emphasizing cleanup of streets, sidewalks, catch basins, and nuisance properties. Leighton The city wants to recruit block captains to organize their neighbors to clean up their street and see that commitment continue beyond the cleanup program. All volunteer groups and individuals will be supplied trash bags, gloves, and other materials, which are provided to the city by PennDOT. To register for the event and volunteer as a block captain, please contact the Department of Public Works at 208-4246. In addition, PennDOT is seeking volunteers for the cleanup, which begins March 1 and runs through May 31. There are several events in Luzerne County planned in March and April All events can be found by going to: www.gacofpa.org/greatpacleanup/ GPCMainSearch.asp and clicking on Luzerne County. Also at that site, interested volunteers can find resources for organizing a cleanup group and other information. HARRISBURG

W-B Bar group recognized

The Pennsylvania Bar Association presented three County Bar Recognition Awards to the Wilkes-Barre Law & Library Association recently. The association was recognized for offering free will service for first responders, for its flood relief efforts and for hosting a business clothing drive for needy clients. In August, the association worked with the Pennsylvania Bar Association to prepare 170 wills for first responders, including police officers and firefighters, and their spouses/significant others, at no cost. Last fall, the association’s Judicorps Committee volunteered labor to help Luzerne County flood victims, and the association’s charitable foundation contributed $5,000 to the United Way for its special flood victims relief fund. The association’s young lawyers also organized a “law suits” drive, collecting business clothing for needy persons without proper attire for court hearings and or the means to purchase such clothing.

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Wilkes University sophomore Mark Attilio of Bethlehem, left, and Paul Konosky of Scott Township run a twomile leg in the Wilkes University Running Club’s 100-mile Relay for Heat along the dike in Kingston.

Footwork for fuel

Running event helps pay energy bills By CAMILLE FIOTI Times Leader Correspondent

KINGSTON – Fresh from a fourmile run in Kirby Park early Saturday morning, Wilkes University biology Professor Dr. William Terzaghi greeted fellow runner and 2010 Wilkes graduate Neil Kocher, 23, at the top of the dike. Braving the biting wind, the two men tried to stay warm as they took part in the eighth annual “Relay for Heat.” Kocher, a second year medical student at Temple University, said he has participated in the race for the past six years. Sponsored by the Wilkes Running Club, the relay helped to raise money

for the Martin Luther King Fuel Fund, administered by the Commission on Economic Opportunity, for people who can’t afford to pay their heating bills. The bitter cold weather seemed appropriate as more than 25 participants took part in the fundraiser, which included members of the Running Club, other Wilkes students, faculty, staff and members of the community. Participants each ran four miles back and forth along the dike throughout the day until they reached a combined total of 100 miles. Terzaghi kicked off the race at 6 a.m. “I’m embarrassed to say that I ran it in 35 minutes,” he said, pointing out that his usual time is 30 minutes.

“My wife (Vivien) and I thought a 100-mile run in the middle of winter would be a good way to raise awareness that a lot of people in Luzerne County need help keeping warm,” said Terzaghi, who is the Running Club’s adviser. Vivien is the office manager for the First Presbyterian Church in WilkesBarre, which partners with the CEO for the MLK Fuel Fund and other charitable programs. More than $2,500 raised from last year’s race helped roughly 80 families stay warm. The fund is tapped out this year, however, said Terzaghi. “Fuel oil is extremely expensive now,” he said. “So anyone who is using fuel oil is really in trouble.”

On Saturday, children’s dental health was the focus of two of the Luzerne County Community College’s outreach programs. One was located at the Wyoming Valley Mall and the other at the college’s dental clinic in Nanticoke. At the mall, college faculty and dental assistant students teamed up with members of the Luzerne County Dental Society for the annual “Dental The program Day” for children included free from ages 3 to 16. Organizer Dr. dental exams, John Evans and free cavity varthree other local nish to strengthdentists perform- en enamel and ed oral screening and the children help prevent met “tooth fair- tooth decay, free ies” who talked to pit and fissure them about propsealants, dental er dental health. The children also X-rays when inplayed games, dicated, free oral won prizes and hygiene instruclearned about how visiting the tion and a free dentist is nothing toothbrush. to fear. Evans, who has been involved in the annual event for 20 years, said the most important message being imparted at the event was for parents to start to pay attention to their children’s teeth early on. “They should take their children to see a dentist as early as age 2 or sooner if they see something not normal with their teeth or gums,” Evans stressed. “Some parents can do a better job of preventive care,” he added. They should help their children start brushing or wiping clean their teeth as See DENTAL, Page 6A

Putting a spin on helping to fund cancer programs By STEVEN FONDO Times Leader Correspondent

FORTY FORT – Two hundred bike riders came out for the 11th Annual Spin 4 Life at Candy’s Place Cancer Wellness Center on Saturday. This year’s event proceeds will benefit the free programs at Candy’s Place and the Brandon J. Case Memorial Scholarship. Brandon’s stepfather, Paul Zbiek pledged to spin for 33 continuous hours to honor what would have been Brandon’s 33rd birthday. Case died in 1999 after a three-year battle with leukemia.

INSIDE: For Click photos, see Page 12A

Zbiek began spinning at 10 a.m. on Friday and ended his personal marathon at 7 p.m. on Saturday. According to center coordinator Nicole Farber, Candy’s Place provides free support services to local cancer patients. The center’s list of services includes various support groups for patients and their families, exercise programs as well as massage and Reiki therapy. See SPIN, Page 6A

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Paul Zbiek, left, leads a group in the annual Spin 4 life at Candy’s Place in Forty Fort Saturday.


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U.S. advisers slain in Afghanistan in wake of Quran burnings

B R I E F

2 American troops killed By DEB RIECHMANN and RAHIM FAIEZ Associated Press

AP PHOTO

Who do you want to pretend to be?

A woman walks out of a mask shop in Tokyo on Saturday. DETROIT

WWII vet attacked, ignored World War II veteran says nobody helped him after he was attacked A and carjacked in daylight at a Detroit

KABUL, Afghanistan — A gunman killed two American military advisers with shots to the back of the head Saturday inside a heavily guarded ministry building, and NATO ordered military workers out of Afghan ministries as protests raged for a fifth day over the burning of copies of the Quran at a U.S. army base. The Taliban claimed responsibility for the Interior Ministry attack, saying it was retaliation for the Quran burnings, after the U.S. ser-

vicemen — a lieutenant colonel and a major — were found dead on the floor of an office that only people who know a numerical combination can get into, Afghan and Western officials said. The top commander of U.S. and NATO forces recalled all international military personnel from the ministries, an unprecedented action in the decade-long war that highlights the growing friction between Afghans and their foreign partners at a critical juncture in the war. The U.S.-led coalition is trying to mentor and strengthen Afghan security forces

A U.S. military convoy enters the Afghan Interior Ministry in Kabul, Afghanistan, Saturday.

AP PHOTO

so they can lead the fight against the Taliban and foreign troops can go home. That mission, however, requires a measure of trust at a time when anti-Western sentiment is at an all-time high. Afghan Defense Minister

Gen. Abdul Rahim Wardak called U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta to apologize for the shooting and offer his condolences, Pentagon press secretary George Little said in a statement released in Washington.

A C A D E M Y AWA R D S

gas station. A roughly four-minute surveillance video obtained by the Detroit Free Press shows 86-year-old Aaron Brantley crawling from a fuel pump to the station’s door as people walk and drive by him. Brantley told the newspaper a man knocked him down, took his keys and drove off in his car Wednesday morning. He says at least four people walked by as he crawled, unable to walk because his leg was broken. Station manager Haissam Jaber says he didn’t see the attack but called 911 after a customer alerted him. A customer drove Brantley home, from where an ambulance took him to the hospital. Police say nobody has been arrested.

ABBOTTABAD, PAKISTAN

Osama house coming down

Under powerful floodlights and surrounded by rings of soldiers and police, heavy machines began Saturday night to demolish the three-story compound in northwestern Pakistan where Osama bin Laden lived for years and was killed by U.S. commandos last May. Pakistan was outraged by the covert American raid in Abbottabad because it was not told about it beforehand — a decision the U.S. explained was driven by concerns that someone in the government might tip off bin Laden. Many Pakistanis were angry the U.S. violated its territory and that Pakistani troops were powerless to stop American soldiers from attacking a compound located next to the country’s military academy. Just as U.S. Navy SEALs waited for the cover of darkness to descend on bin Laden’s compound by helicopter from Afghanistan, Pakistani authorities held off on tearing it down Saturday until the sun had set, said local residents. DAMASCUS, SYRIA

Syria rips Saudi Arabia

Syria lashed out at Saudi Arabia on Saturday, a day after the kingdom’s foreign minister backed the idea of arming the rebels fighting President Bashar Assad’s regime, accusing Saudi Arabia of becoming “a partner” in the bloodshed in Syria. The sharp reply from Damascus, which was published in a state-run newspaper, came as activists said at least 77 people were killed across the country and regime forces pounded rebel-held neighborhoods in the central city of Homs. The International Committee of the Red Cross said it had failed Saturday to gain access to the besieged neighborhood of Baba Amr in the city of Homs for a second day to evacuate wounded civilians. WASHINGTON

Hinckley seeks more liberty

The man who tried to kill President Ronald Reagan over 30 years ago said he would like to be known as something other than a would-be assassin. John Hinckley made the statement to a doctor who interviewed him in the past year at a Washington mental hospital. That and other pieces of information about Hinckley’s life are part of hundreds of pages of documents prepared for hearings in Hinckley’s case. Hinckley, who shot and wounded Reagan in 1981, is seeking more freedom from the hospital. He has been allowed to visit his mother’s home in Williamsburg, Va., for up to 10 days at a time. Government attorneys believe his trips should remain at 10 days. A jury found Hinckley to be insane when he shot Reagan. He has spent most of the past three decades at St. Elizabeths Hospital in Washington. In recent years, doctors have said his mental illness has been in remission.

AP PHOTO

A Oscar statue is seen Saturday on the red carpet. The 84th Academy Awards will be held tonight in Los Angeles. Actor Billy Crystal, a veteran Academy Awards host, returns to the role after an absence of eight years.

Crystal to the rescue Actor Tom Hanks rehearses Saturday for tonight’s 84th Academy Awards in Los Angeles. He will be just one in a myriad of stars at the ceremony, including Halle Berry, Tom Cruise, Natalie Portman, Penelope Cruz and Angelina Jolie.

By LYNN ELBER AP Television Writer

LOS ANGELES — The Oscar ceremony has much to prove tonight, including whether a blockbuster-free field can draw a TV audience and if Billy Crystal’s host routine remains a crowdpleaser. Brian Grazer and Don Mischer, the show’s producers, are laughing off the challenges: “Comedy is the direction we’re going in this year,” said Mischer. For Crystal, who reCrystal turns to the ceremony (8:30 p.m. EST, ABC) after an absence of eight years, that means jokes and patter that were being rehearsed at the last minute to avoid punch line leaks. The actor also is bringing back two of his trademark Oscar bits: A film sequence in which he appears via CGI in clips from the nine best-picture contenders, and a musical number that pays tribute to the ceremony and nominees. “It’s everything everybody is going to

want to see from Billy Crystal,” Grazer said. “Billy was born for this job. He loves being the host and he does it with complete zest and enthusiasm. He makes it fun for everybody.” Crystal has help. Presenting team Will Ferrell and Zach Galifianakis have a “great gag,” Grazer promised, with more light moments planned courtesy of co-presenters Tina Fey and Bradley Cooper and, in a group effort, the cast of “Bridesmaids.” Presenters will be framed by a stage set evoking a classic movie theater and the evening’s theme: the enduring nature of the moviegoing experience.

The night’s starring role goes to Crystal, 63, who acknowledged in an Oscar.com video that “there’s so much expected” of his return. He should have the audience’s goodwill in his ninth Oscar gig since, in the best Hollywood tradition, he came to the rescue after Eddie Murphy dropped out as host. Murphy’s exit followed that of ceremony producer Brett Ratner, who had drawn fire for using a pejorative word for gay men at a screening of “Tower Heist,” directed by Ratner and starring Murphy. Oscar-winning movie producer Grazer (”A Beautiful Mind”) jumped in to work with awards veteran Mischer.

U.S. could be facing new war

An Israeli pre-emptive attack on Iran could pull America into another confrontation. By ROBERT BURNS AP National Security Writer

WASHINGTON — An Israeli pre-emptive attack on Iran’s nuclear sites could draw the U.S. into a new Mideast conflict, a prospect dreaded by a war-weary Pentagon wary of new entanglements. That could mean pressing into service the top tier of American firepower — warplanes, warships, special operations forces and possibly airborne infantry — with unpredictable outcomes in one of the world’s most volatile regions. “Israel can commence a war with Iran, but it may well take U.S. involvement to conclude it,” says Karim Sadjadpour, a Middle East specialist at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. An armed clash with Iran is far from certain. Diplomacy Diplomacy backed by in- backed by creasingly tough econom- increasingly ic penalties is tough ecostill seen by the nomic penalUnited States ties is still and much of the rest of the world seen by the as worth pursu- United States ing for now, not and much of least because the rest of the other options — going the world as to war or simply worth pursudoing nothing ing for now. — are considered more risky. Israel, however, worries that Iran soon could enter a “zone of immunity” in which enough of its nuclear materials are beyond the reach of Israeli air power so that Iran could not be stopped, or perhaps could be stopped only by superior American firepower. If Israel’s American-made strike planes managed to penetrate Iranian air space and bomb Iran’s main nuclear facilities, some of which are underground, then Iran would be expected to retaliate in any number of ways. Iran could fire Shahab-3 ballistic missiles at Israeli targets. Iran might take a less direct approach, relying on its Hezbollah allies in Lebanon or Hamas militants in Gaza to hit Israel with missiles from closer range. Iran also might block the Strait of Hormuz, a key transit route for the world’s oil tankers. It could attack nearby Bahrain, home to the U.S. Navy’s 5th Fleet. In either of these scenarios, the U.S. military almost certainly would hit back. Uncertainty about Iranian retaliation, as well as the cascade of potential consequences if the U.S. got drawn into the conflict, is at the core of U.S. officials’ rationale for publicly casting doubt on the wisdom of Israeli military action now.

Nobel peace laureate Mandela in hospital with ill stomach By DONNA BRYSON Associated Press

JOHANNESBURG — Former South African President Nelson Mandela was hospitalized Saturday for a test to determine what is behind an undisclosed stomach ailment, and the country’s current leader said the much beloved 93year-old icon was in no danger. Mandela, a Nobel peace laureate who

spent 27 years in prison for fighting racist white rule, has officially retired and last appeared in public in July 2010. He became South Africa’s first black president in 1994 and served one five-year term. Mandela “has had a long-standing abdominal complaint and doctors feel it needs proper specialist medical attention,” President Jacob Zuma said in a

statement Saturday morning, asking that Mandela’s privacy be respected. Later, Zuma added that Mandela had undergone a planned, undisclosed “diagnostic procedure.” Mandela “is fine and fully conscious and the doctors are satisfied with his AP FILE PHOTO condition, which they say is consistent with his age,” Zuma said. “We are happy Nelson Mandela after a 2007 meeting with Germany’s Angela Merkel. that he is not in any danger.”

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‘Artist’ wins 4 honors, including best picture at Spirit Awards SANTA MONICA, Calif. — “The Artist” won best picture and three other prizes Saturday at the Spirit Awards honoring independent film, a possible prelude to a big night at the Academy Awards for the black-and-white silent movie. The film also won for best di-

TOYS Continued from Page 3A

and other items. Visitors voted for their favorite of eight different toy displays crafted by local youth. They included miniature snow covered towns, tiny job sites and automotive displays. Peter Hildebrand, 9, took pride in his “construction site.” The top three winners took home plaques provided by the fire company, Hildebrand added. Hldebrand said playing with the toys and working on the displays was a whole lot of fun. Herb and Kathy Reader, toy dealers from Elysburg, attended almost all of the fire company’s toy show fundraisers. They work at up to 10 shows per year, in-

rector for Michel Hazanavicius and lead actor for Jean Dujardin as a silent-era star whose career crumbles as talking pictures take over in the 1920s. It earned the cinematography prize for Guillaume Schiffman, too. “The Artist” is the best-picture favorite at tonight’s Oscars. Michelle Williams won best actress as Marilyn Monroe in the

filmmaking tale “My Week with Marilyn.” Supporting-acting honors went to Christopher Plummer as an elderly widower who comes out as gay in “Beginners” and Shailene Woodley as a troublesome Hawaiian teenager in “The Descendants.” “The Artist” producer Thomas Langmann said the awards atten-

tion for the film was especially gratifying given how difficult it was to line up financing for a silent film, a form that went out of vogue more than 80 years ago. “Everybody told us this is so much against conventional wisdom,” Langmann said. At Sunday’s Oscars, Dujardin is in a two-man race for best actor against “The Descendants” star

cluding the Bloomsburg Fair, specializing in die-cast metal fire and construction oriented toys. Herb Reader said the Sugarloaf show is a good place to gather with friends and help the fire department. The people there understand the value of toys not only for fun but as an investment. “One person spent $300 on a toy and was able to sell it on the Internet for $1,700,” he said. Kathy Reader pointed out toy shows are the best place to purchase toys because buyers can get a fair price and are able to see and touch what they are buying. She warned that purchasing toys on the Internet can result in acquiring something damaged that DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER then loses a lot of its value. The Internet has in some ways ruined Peter Hildebrand, 9, of Drums checks out some heavy equipment the toy selling trade, she said. in toy form at the fire company’s 18th annual Toy Show.

DENTAL

“We want to make dental young people. The program included free health fun and appealing to childental exams, free cavity var- dren,” Farrell said. “We don’t nish to strengthen enamel and want them to be scared to go to Continued from Page 3A help prevent tooth decay, free the dentist.” Both events were scheduled toddlers after meals. This pit and fissure sealants, dental avoids bigger problems in the X-rays when indicated, free oral to be part of February’s National Dental Health hygiene instruction and a free Children’s future, he said. Month, she said. John Wittcopp from Larksville toothbrush. brought his two sons, Liam, 4, and Colin, 2, to have the oral screening done. Wittcopp was happy to see everything looked “pretty good.” CITY OF WILKES-BARRE He added the dental day gave COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM his children a chance to see what dentists visits are like. The City of Wilkes-Barre will hold a public meeting “It’s their first exposure,” he February 27, 2012 in City Council Chambers of Wilkes-Barre City said. “They can get comfortable Hall at 3:00 p.m. with it.” “Parents should take their The purpose of the meeting is to present information on the children to the dentist as soon proposed Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report as the first tooth appears,” said which details the activities related to the expenditures of the LCCC dental program instrucCommunity Development Block Grant, Emergency Services Grant tor Jeanne Farrell. and HOME funds during fiscal year ending December 31, 2011. Farrell added parents can do Included in this report are financial summary reports and goals things daily such as monitoring and accomplishments of the above Federally financed programs. their children’s sugar intake, All interested persons and agencies are invited to attend and which contributes to early tooth present their views and comments. problems. When they eat too much candy or drink a lot of Data concerning the proposed report is available for soda, iced tea, juice and other inspection by the public at the Wilkes-Barre Office of Economic & sugary drinks, they could be setCommunity Development, Wilkes-Barre City Hall, and 40 East ting themselves up for problems Market Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 beginning Febraury 27, down the road, she said. 2012. At the LCCC dental clinic in downtown Nanticoke, LCCC’s Citizen comments regarding this report will be accepted Dental Department and the beginning February 27, 2012 and ending March 28, 2012. Northeast Pennsylvania Dental Hygiene Association held a The finalized report will be submitted to the United States Kids’ Cavity Prevention Day, Department of Housing and Urban Development no later than driving home the same message March 31, 2012. about proper dental hygiene for

SPIN Continued from Page 3A

"We also offer a ‘Look Good, Feel Better’ program that ministers to many of the psychological and aesthetic issues related to cancer," said Farber. "We have a boutique that offers wigs, turbans and accessories at no cost." Brandon’s Farber said stepfather, the center is Paul Zbiek, run wholly on pledged to donations and is not affiliatspin for 33 ed with the continuous government hours to hon- or any area or what would hospital group. have been "We’re totalBrandon’s ly dependent 33rd birthday. on donation," continued Farber. "Events like today’s are so important to us." Candy’s Place will hold “A Night at the Races” fundraiser on Saturday from 6 to 10:30 p.m. at Kingston’s Independent Fire Hall. Advanced registration is required. Farber said Candy’s Place wanted to thank all the volunteers and everyone who participated in Saturday’s event. She said special thanks goes to Dave Kaplan of Sickler’s Bike Shop for his generous support in sponsoring the event.

independent filmmakers and recalling her first time at the ceremony a decade ago. Plummer is the supporting-actor favorite at the Oscars, at 82 potentially becoming the oldest ever. “The Descendants” also won the screenplay award for director Alexander Payne and his co-writers, Nat Faxon and Jim Rash.

An Invitation Cook & Cook Antiques and Home Furnishings Would like to invite you to join us for our

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Prizes, refreshments and entertainment Come meet and greet our vendors. Be serenaded by “Sounds Abound” barbershop quartet Hourly prizes Multi dealer shop featuring antiques to retro furniture, lighting, advertising, military, glassware, porcelain, artwork, jewelry, pottery and more. 29 East Carey Street, Plains, Pa. 18705 570-270-3107 cookandcookantiques.com

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Wilkes-Barre City Hall is a facility which is accessible to persons with disabilities. Non-English speaking and/or disabled persons who require special accommodations should notify Ms. Melissa Popson at (570) 208-4194 or TSD (570) 821-1111

George Clooney. Williams is nominated for best actress at the Oscars, though Viola Davis of “The Help” and Meryl Streep of “The Iron Lady” are considered the favorites. Williams gave the best performance among the Spirit Awards winners with a touching acceptance speech acknowledging her kinship with low-budget

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By DAVID GERMAIN AP Movie Writer


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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com AUDREY GRAZIANO, age 84, of West Scranton, passed away Friday evening, February 24, 2012, under NEPA Hospice Care at Regional Hospital of Scranton. She is survived by her children, her son, Scranton City Police Capt. Carl Graziano and wife Donna of Scranton, and three daughters, Janet Bastek of Scranton, Beverly Smith and husband James of Mechanicsburg and Brenda Graziano of Dupont; nine grandchildren; 11 greatgrandchildren; two great-great grandchildren; many nieces and nephews; and her dear friend, Debbie Reynolds of Scranton. Funeral services are scheduled for Wednesday to begin at 9 a.m. from the Thomas P. Kearney Funeral Home, Inc., 517 North Main Street, Old Forge, with a 10 a.m. Mass of Christian Burial at St. Patrick’s Church, 1403 Jackson Street in West Scranton. Relatives and friends may pay their respects on Tuesday from 5 to 7 p.m. IRENE HUSTED, 81, formerly of Larksville and a guest at Tiffany Court, Kingston, died Thursday, February 23, 2012. Born in the Breslau section of Hanover Township, she was the daughter of Jacob and Mary (Peck) Dugan. She was a 1948 graduate of Plymouth High School and a 1954 graduate of the Hoyt School of Nursing. Irene was an avid homemaker who delighted in taking care of many family members. Irene was preceded in death by husband, Robert, in 2001; brothers Thomas, Nicholas, and Russell; sisters, Sofia Holtz and Jule Kelly. Surviving are her brother, Sylvester Dugan, Mountain Top; many nieces and nephews. Funeral will be held at 10:30 a.m. on Monday from Yeosock Funeral Home, 40 S. Main St., Plains Township, with Requiem Service at 11 a.m. in Holy Resurrection RO Cathedral. Friends may call from 3 to 5 p.m. today. DANIEL T. LEGG, 60, formerly of Avoca and Dupont, passed away Friday afternoon, February 24, 2012, at Riverside Rehab and Nursing Center, Taylor. Born on February 23, 1952 in Taylor, he was a son of the late John and Dorothy (Matheson) Legg. Danny was a 1970 graduate of Pittston Area High School. Danny served six years in the 109th Reserve Unit, Keystone Division, Scranton. Prior to retiring, he worked at Preferred Meals, Moosic. Surviving are his companion, Beth Ann Eipper; two sisters, Dorothy Ann Slater and Beverly Webb; two brothers, John and Joseph, several nieces and nephews. Private services will be held at the convenience of the family. Kniffen O’Malley Funeral Home, Inc. 728 Main Street, Avoca, is in charge of arrangements. Online condolences at www.BestLifeTributes.com. HELEN H. FASULKA, 84, of East Brunswick, N.J., and formerly of Wilkes-Barre, passed away Thursday evening, February 23, 2012. Born in Wilkes-Barre, she was the daughter of the late Joseph and Ann Janczewski. She was a member of Immaculate Conception Church, Spotswood, N.J. She was preceded in death by her brother and two sisters. Surviving are her husband, Robert; son, Mark, Old Bridge, N.J.; daughter, Roberta Gildea, Kingwood, N.J.; sister, Theresa Kindred, Philipsburg, N.J.; four grandchildren. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated Monday at 10 a.m. in the Chapel of St. Mary’s Maternity Cemetery, West Wyoming. Arrangements are entrusted to Bednarski & Thomas Funeral Home, 27 Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre. ELEANOR L. ANKUDOVICH, 66, of Park Avenue, Wilkes-Barre, died Friday, February 24, 2012 at home. Funeral arrangements are pending from the Yeosock Funeral Home, 40 S. Main Street, Plains Township.

Katherine M. Crockett February 23, 2012 Katherine M. (Kate) Crockett, age 81, of Broadway, died at 5 a.m. on February 23, 2012, at Berwick Hospital, where she had been a patient for two months. Born in Benton, on September 18, 1930, she was one of three daughters born to Alva and Delihla Ash. Kate was a homemaker and enjoyed helping others and was active in her church. She especially liked picture puzzles. She was preceded in death by her sister Helena Rood. Surviving are her husband, James, whom she was married to for 54 years; two sons, Ralph and wife, Barbara, of Albuquerque, N.M., and Renald and wife, Maria, of Shickshinny; three grandchildren, Matthew and Adam of Albuquerque, N.M. and Danielle of Shickshinny; one surviving sister, Shirley Whitenight and husband, Blair, of Hershey. Interment services will be at the Broadway Cemetery at a later date. Funeral arrangements are by the Clarke Piatt Funeral Home Inc., 6 Sunset Lake Road, Hunlock Creek.

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Dora Kowalczyk

Virginia Marmo Mundenar

February 24, 2012

February 24, 2012

wife, Eva. Plains Township; beloved grand nephew and niece, Mark and Jeanette Kaczorowski. Graveside funeral service will be held Monday, February 27, 2012, at noon in Ohav Zedek Cemetery, Church and Chestnut streets, Hanover Township, with Rabbi Raphael Nemetsky officiating. Memorial contributions, if desired, may be made to the American Cancer Society. Condolences may be emailed by visiting Dora’s obituary at www.rosenbergfuneralchapel.com.

Marguerite M. Cain February 20, 2012 M. Cain ‘Maggie,’ 82, M arguerite of Dallas, passed away peace-

fully in her sleep early on the morning of February 20, 2012 at The Meadows Nursing and Rehabilitation Facility in Dallas. Maggie was born in New York City, on December 14, 1929. She grew up in the Kingston area and graduated from Kingston High School in 1947. Maggie spent many happy childhood summers on Harveys Lake at her Aunt Bea’s cabin as well as a couple summers during her high school years working at the Chatterbox Restaurant in Ocean City, N.J. Prior to starting her family, Maggie spent several years as a stewardess for American Airlines. Maggie was a faithful and devout Catholic. In her last years, she drew great strength and solace from her faith in God. She gave much of her time after retirement to prayer and contemplation for the salvation of all whom she came into contact with. She made a profound impact on many people who she ministered to over her last years. She was a dedicated mom and found great joy in her children and grandchildren. Maggie’s infectious laugh, her endearing charm and her super human stubbornness live on in her children and grandchildren and will not soon be forgotten. She was preceded in death by her mother, Mary, and her brothers,

a niece, Virginia Pezzuti, and her son Robert, wife Dana, and their son, Robert Carmen; a nephew, Joseph Marmo and his children, Alisha and Andrew Marmo, Robert and Paul Marmo, Bucky Cardoni, Marcie Petrucelli, Marguerite Latinski, Dr. Michael and Joseph Mundenar, Michael and Carl Viola. The funeral will be held Tuesday at 9:30 a.m. from the Louis V. Ciuccio Funeral Home, 145 Moosic Road, Old Forge, followed by a 10 a.m. Mass at the Prince of Peace Parish - St. Mary’s Church, West Grace and Lawrence streets, Old Forge. Interment will be in Memorial Shrine Cemetery, West Wyoming. Friends may call Monday from 5 to 7 p.m.

February 24, 2012

Jim, Jack and Bill. She is survived by her children, Wilson Fieldhouse Jr. and his wife Kim of Guangzhou, China; Sara Boylan and her husband Bruce of Louisville, Colo. and four grandchildren, Katie Fieldhouse, Gabriel Boylan, Samantha Boylan and Maggie Boylan. The funeral will be held Thursday at 9 a.m. from Maher-Collins Funeral Home, 360 N. Maple Avenue, Kingston, with a Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola, Kingston. Interment will be in the parish cemetery, Pringle. Friends may call Wednesday from 5 to 8 p.m. In lieu of flowers, Maggie would almost certainly ask that all of her friends and family pray the Rosary. Condolences can be sent to the family at: www.maher-collins.com.

February 23, 2012 Berman, 93, passed away N aomi Thursday February 23, 2012

husband, Morris. She is survived by her daughter Sandra Kam (Jeff) of Baltimore, Md.; daughter Joan Berman of Tucson, Ariz.; son Scott Berman, M.D. (Christi) of Tucson, Ariz. and granddaughters, Samantha Kam of Baltimore, Md. and Alex Berman of Tucson, Ariz. A graveside service will be held today at 11 a.m. at East Lawn Palms Cemetery in Tucson, Ariz.

Vincent Michael Karavitch February 21, 2012 r. Vincent Michael Karavitch, M age 74, of Caldwell Road, Blairsville, Ga., passed away Tues-

day, February 21, 2012 in Erlanger Medical Center in Chattanooga. He was born February 19, 1938 in Wilkes-Barre to the late William and Julia Yankowski Karavitch. He moved to Blairsville 11½ years ago from Marietta. He loved gardening, his animals and traveling. Mr. Karavitch was a loving husband and father. He was a U.S. Navy veteran, and was of the Catholic Faith. Survivors include his wife Hendrikien Karavitch of Blairsville; sons, Case and Ellen Bergman of Marietta and Eelco and Carol Bergman of Sunny Vale, Calif.; sister, Anastia and Mickey Stucko of Long Island, N.Y.; brother, Steven and Laverne Karavitch of Hilldale, Pa.; grandchildren, Taylor “T.J.” Bergman, Brianne “Brie” Bergman, Jesse Bergman and Hayley Bergman.

irginia Marmo Mundenar, 94, of Old Forge, died Friday at Moses Taylor Hospital. She was the widow of Samuel Mundenar, who died in 2001. Born in Old Forge, she was the daughter of the late Giovanni and Rose Tedesco Marmo. She was a graduate of Old Forge High School Class of 1936 and a graduate of the Lackawanna Business College. Prior to her retirement, she was employed at the former Sullivan Trail. She was a member of the Prince of Peace Parish - St. Mary’s Church, Old Forge. Virginia was a devoted and loving wife who spent a great portion of her life residing in Old Bridge, N.J., with her husband, Sam. The two enjoyed traveling with friends and trips into the city to see the opera. They would make frequent trips back to Old Forge to visit family before her relocation back to the area in 2001.Virginia was affectionately known to her many nieces and nephews as Aunt DeDe. She was preceded in death by two brothers, John and Robert Marmo; four sisters, Helen Manganiello, Jennie Cardoni, Margaret Gelli, Angela Marmo; a godson, John Marmo III. Surviving are two sisters-in-law, Paula and Sarah Marmo, Old Forge;

Theresa Wysowski Dobranski

Naomi Berman

with her family at her side in Tucson, Arizona. Naomi was born July 29, 1918 in Baltimore, Maryland. She worked for the Social Security Administration in Baltimore before starting her family. She returned to Social Security in Wilkes-Barre after settling there and retired in the early 1980s. She was best known for her devotion to her family and her faith. She was active in Hadassah and community activities in Wilkes-Barre, and in Lake Worth, Fla. She loved to bowl and play card games of all varieties. She was distinguished by her tenacity for the pursuit of rights and opportunities for the mentally disabled. Most recently, she enjoyed living in Southern Arizona with her family and particularly took pleasure in the activities at her community at Santa Catalina Villas. She was preceded in death by her

February 24, 2012

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ora Kowalczyk, a Holocaust survivor, 93, of Plains Township, formerly of Brooklyn, died Friday morning at the home of her nephew, Dr. Eugene Kaczorowski. She was born the daughter of parents who perished in the Holocaust. Dora was taken in by the loving, generous Kaczorowski family and was hidden in the floor boards of their kitchen for two years. If Dora was found, everyone in the home, including children, would have been shot on the spot. Dora’s life was saved by Adam and his family. Adam later became her husband. Since they had no children, Dr. Kaczorowski and his children became her family. She was educated in Poland and immigrated to the United States. While living in New York City, she was a seamstress and was a member of many civic and religious organizations. She was preceded by parents and husband, Adam Kowalczyk (Kaczorowski). Dora is survived by her nephew, Dr. Eugene Kaczorowski and his

Memorial services will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers, make memorials to the American Heart Association. Mountain View Funeral Home of Blairsville is in charge of the arrangements. You may sign the family guest book and send condolences to the family online at www.mountainviewfuneralhome.com.

Theresa Dobranski, 63, formerly of Nanticoke, passed away Friday in Kingston Commons. She was born June 21, 1948 in Nanticoke and was the daughter of the late Felix S. Wysowski. She was a graduate of Nanticoke High School, class of1966. She was formerly employed by Blue Cross /Blue Shield, The Villa Nursing Home and Gerrity’s. She was a member of St Faustina Church, Nanticoke.

She is survived by her mother Eleanore Wysowski, Nanticoke; daughter Ann Marie Thomas, Kingston; brothers, Phillip Wysowski, Portland, Maine; Vincent and wife Audrey Wysowski, Plymouth; sister Patricia Cooper and husband Richard, Nanticoke; Elizabeth Elick and husband John, Swoyersville; granddaughter Abigail Thomas, Kingston; numerous nephews and cousins. Arrangements are by WilliamsHagen Funeral Home Inc., 114 W. Main St., Plymouth. A Memorial Mass will be held Monday at 10 a.m. in St. Faustina Church, Nanticoke.

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Susan (Shaulis) Mulvaney, 63, of Dallas, passed away on Friday, February 24, 2012 in Hospice Community Care at Geisinger South Wilkes-Barre, after a courageous six year battle with cancer. She was born in North Attleboro, Massachusetts, on February 3, 1949, a daughter of Alice Brant Mutter of Wilkes-Barre and the late John Mutter. Susan was a graduate of Meyers High School, class of 1967. She was formerly employed by the Flagship Bank in Bradenton, Florida. Susan was a member of Gate of Heaven Church, Machell Avenue, Dallas. Surviving, in addition to her mother, are daughters, Kelly Shaulis Bednar and her husband, Christopher, Mountain Top; Megan Shaulis Sevenski and her husband, Ben, Dallas; Alison Shaulis Park and her husband, Randy, Christiana, Del.; grandchildren, Marlena Bednar; Ben and Matthew Sevenski; Pierson, Josette and Julianna Park; brothers, Edward Mutter and his wife, Sharon, WilkesBarre; John J. Mutter Jr., Hampton, Georgia; Mark Mutter, St. Petersburg, Fla.; sisters, Robin Hammond and her husband, Larry, Hawley; Janelle Wierbowski and her husband, Jerry, Hawley; nieces and nephews. A memorial Mass will be held on Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. in Gate of Heaven Church, 40 Machell Avenue, Dallas, with the Rev. Daniel A. Toomey officiating. Interment will be in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Hanover Township. In keeping with Susan’s wishes, there will be no viewing. Family and friends are respectfully asked to meet at the church on Wednesday morning for the service. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to Candy’s Place, 190 Welles Street, Suite 120, Forty Fort, PA 18704. Funeral arrangements are by the Nat & Gawlas Funeral Home, 89 Park Avenue, Wilkes-Barre. Online condolences may be sent by visiting Susan’s obituary at www.natandgawlasfuneralhome.com.

Jeanette B. (Petrushak) Neczesny February 24, 2012

FUNERALS BARLIK – Anthony, funeral 9 a.m. Monday in the Bernard J. Piontek Funeral Home Inc., 204 Main St., Duryea. Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in Holy Rosary Church, Duryea. Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m. today. BIXBY – Kathleen, memorial service 7 p.m. Monday in the Emmanuel Assembly Of God Church, 239 Church Road, Harveys Lake. CIOLEK – Walter, Mass of Christian Burial 9:30 a.m. Tuesday in Ss. Peter & Paul Church, Plains Township. Friends may call 5 to 7 p.m. Monday at the Corcoran Funeral Home Inc., 20 South Main Street, Plains Township. Friends are invited to go directly to church Tuesday morning. CONKLIN – Ruth, funeral service 11 a.m. Monday in the McCune Funeral Home, 80 S. Mountain Blvd., Mountain Top. Friends may call 2 to 6 p.m. today at the funeral home. DENNIS – Joseph Sr., funeral 10:30 a.m. Monday in the Howell-Lussi Funeral Home, 509 Wyoming Avenue, West Pittston. Services at 11 a.m. in St. John’s Lutheran Church. Pittston. American Legion Post 477, Pittston, will conduct services today at the funeral home and Monday at Marcy Cemetery. Friends may call at the funeral home 5 to 8 p.m. today. GAUGHAN – Grace, funeral services 9 a.m. Monday in the Metcalfe and Shaver Funeral Home Inc., 504 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming. Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in St. Cecilia’s Church of St. Barbara Parish, Exeter. Friends may call 8:30 to 9 a.m. in the funeral home. KACILLAS – Justin, visitation 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Monday in the Davis-Dinelli Funeral Home, 170 E. Broad St., Nanticoke. The Rev. James Nash will conduct a prayer service at 6 p.m. KOSCHELLA – Joseph, funeral 9:30 a.m. Monday in the Wroblewski Funeral Home Inc., 1442 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort. Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in Holy Trinity Church, Swoyersville. Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m. today at the funeral home. KRAYNAK – Helen, funeral 9:30 a.m. Monday in the Kopicki Funeral Home, 263 Zerbey Ave., Kingston. Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in St. John the Baptist Church, Larksville. Friends may call 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. today. MANARSKI – Henry, funeral 9 a.m. Monday in the Mark V. Yanaitis Funeral Home, 55 Stark Street, Plains Township. Mass of Chris-

Susan Mulvaney

tian Burial in Ss. Peter and Paul Church, Plains Township. Friends may call 3 to 6 p.m. today. OLSHEFSKI – Martha, funeral services 9:30 a.m. Monday in the Stanley S. Stegura Funeral Home Inc., 614 S. Hanover St., Nanticoke. Divine Liturgy at 10 a.m. in Holy Resurrection Orthodox Church, Alden. Friends may call 4 to 8 p.m. today. Parastas services will be at 4:30 p.m. REILLY – Rose, funeral 9:30 a.m. Monday in the E. Blake Collins Funeral Home, 159 George Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in St. Benedict’s Church, Parsons. Friends may call 9 a.m. until the time of the service. SHURITES – Raymond, military funeral services 9:30 a.m. Monday in the Andrew Strish Funeral Home, 11 Wilson St., Larksville. Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in St. Therese Church, Shavertown. Friends may call 4 to 7 p.m. today and 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. Monday. VACULA – Michael, military funeral honors 9 a.m. Monday in the Gubbiotti Funeral Home, 1030 Wyoming Ave., Exeter, with the Am Vets Honor Guard. Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in St. Anthony of Padua Church, St. Barbara Parish, Exeter. Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m. today at the funeral home.

OBITUARY POLICY The Times Leader publishes free obituaries, which have a 27-line limit, and paid obituaries, which can run with a photograph. A funeral home representative can call the obituary desk at (570) 829-7224, send a fax to (570) 829-5537 or e-mail to tlobits@timesleader.com. If you fax or e-mail, please call to confirm. Obituaries must be submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Obituaries must be sent by a funeral home or crematory, or must name who is handling arrangements, with address and phone number. We discourage handwritten notices; they incur a $15 typing fee.

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eanette B. (Petrushak) Neczesny, 83, of Roselle Park, N.J., passed away on Friday, February 24, 2012, at Overlook Hospital, Summit, on what would have been her 50th wedding anniversary. Born in Glen Lyon, Mrs. Neczesny subsequently lived in Jersey City and moved to Roselle Park in 1962. She was a lifelong nurse, beginning at Mercy Hospital in Wilkes-Barre, Margaret Hague Maternity Hospital in Jersey City, where she became director of obstetrics nursing education, and the Union Township, N.J. school district, including many years at Battle Hill Elementary School, retiring in 1996. Mrs. Neczesny received her nursing degree at Mercy Hospital School of Nursing, attended the University of Pennsylvania, and earned a B.S. degree in nursing education from Teachers College, Columbia University and a second degree in education from Seton Hall University. She was a communicant of St. Vladimir Ukrainian Catholic Church in Elizabeth, N.J., where she was a member of the Sodality society, Apostleship of Prayer, and Senior Citizens club. She was also a member of the UCREA, NJEA, NEA, and Alpha Delta Kappa sorority. Mrs. Neczesny was predeceased by her beloved husband of 48 years, John Neczesny, and was the devoted mother of John A. Neczesny of Manhattan, Peter Neczesny and wife, Melissa, of Fair Haven, N.J., and Kathryn Ford and husband, Richard, of Jackson, N.J.; loving sister of the late John Petrushak, and cherished grandmother of Jonathan and Nicolas Ford and Sarah Neczesny. Relatives and friends are kindly invited to attend the funeral on Tuesday, February 28, 2012, at 9:15 a.m. from the Krowicki McCracken Funeral Home, 2124 E. St. Georges Ave., Linden, N.J., (908) 352-9190. Funeral Mass is in St. Vladimir Ukrainian Catholic Church, Elizabeth, at 10 a.m. Interment is in Graceland Memorial Park, Kenilworth. Viewing is on Monday, February 27, from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Parastas is at 3 p.m. Send online condolences to www.krowickifuneralhome.com In lieu of flowers, donations in her memory to The Seeing Eye Inc., 10 Washington Valley Road, Morristown, NJ 07963 would be appreciated. More Obituaries, Page 2A

In Loving Memory Of

Daniel Sabol

Who passed away 12 years ago February 19, 2000

Dad, If tears could build a stairway And memories a lane I’d walk right up to heaven And bring you back again. Sadly missed by family: wife Barbara, children Audrey, Dan and John


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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com


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Hoping pope’s Cuba visit will bring change Pope’s trip to mark 400th anniversary of appearance of Cuba’s patron saint.

Many agree. “Our presence is the best testimonial,” says Margarita Cuervo, a parishioner at Epiphany Catholic Church and a professor emeritus at Miami Dade College. “I’m going to exBy ANA VECIANA-SUAREZ press my solidarity and share my McClatchy Newspapers faith and hope with the long-sufMIAMI — For the business- fering people in Cuba.” And from Miami attorney John man who has changed his politics, the Miami priest who tends de Leon, who calls his first trip to to an exile flock, the retired col- his parents’ homeland in 1992 life lege math professor who has changing: “The pope is sending searched her conscience for guid- an incredibly important message ance and the lawyer who has long to the world, and it’s a message advocated reconciliation, the pil- that the Vatican is willing to keep grimage to Cuba next month rep- engaging Cuba, that the world resents more than an opportunity needs to open to Cuba and Cuba to see Pope Benedict XVI cele- to the world.” The Archdiocese of Miami is brate Mass. sponsoring the trip The trip signals to Cuba during the hope. Hope that “The pope is pope’s visit, March the island will 26-28, led by Archopen itself up to sending an inbishop Thomas Wenfreedom. Hope credibly imporski. Hundreds have that Miami’s Cutant message to applied for the trip. ban-American Most pilgrims are community has the world, and from Miami, but matured enough to it’s a message faithful are coming consider other apfrom all over the proaches. Hope that the Vatican country, including that the pilgrims’ is willing to keep New York, Los Anpresence, and that geles, Boston, Tamof their religious engaging Cuba, pa and St. Augustine. leader, will show that the world It’s not yet clear how the world that many other pilgrims, change is possible. needs to open to The pope’s Cuba and Cuba to both Cuban and nonCuban, will visit the three-day-trip, communist island on which will com- the world.” memorate the John de Leon flights through inde400th anniversary Miami attorney pendent charters. One thing appears of the appearance certain, though. The of Our Lady of Charity, Cuba’s patron saint, is opposition that bedeviled Pope bringing together faithful from John Paul II’s historic visit to Cuall walks of life who share one be- ba in January 1998 is not as large lief: Benedict’s visit to the com- or as vocal. Back then, the Archmunist island, the second by a diocese was forced to cancel a pontiff in 14 years, marks one cruise ship charter that was more step in the long journey of scheduled to take thousands of bringing the Cuban people to- the faithful to the island. Now, 14 years later, “we as a community gether. “This,” says Cuban-born Rev. have matured,” says Andy GoFernando Heria, pastor of St. mez, a senior fellow for the InstiBrendan’s Catholic Church, “is an tute for Cuban and Cuban Ameropportunity to break myths on ican studies at the University of both sides. This is a pilgrimage of Miami. “I think we’re more realistic.” love.”

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In this picture made available by the Vatican newspaper Osservatore Romano, Pope Benedict XVI greets the faithful of the Pontifical Academy for Life during an audience at the Vatican, Saturday.

Much has changed, too, on the other side of the Florida Straits. Fidel Castro is no longer in power, having ceded the reins to his more pragmatic brother Raul. And the Catholic church has become a social force in the island’s society, brokering the release of political prisoners and lobbying to halt the harassment of some dissidents. “Democracy is not going to happen overnight,” says Gomez, who will be in Cuba for the pope’s visit. “But the church also realizes it can play an important role in the changes that are going to come.” In Miami, Gomez, adds, some of the entrenched hard-liners have either died or evolved in their stance. A growing number of Cuban-Americans are questioning a 53-year-old failed policy of isolation. What’s more, the sight of enthusiastic throngs greeting Pope John Paul 14 years ago proved to be an eye-opening experience for some exiles — those who were there to witness

it and those who refused to go but watched from Miami. Businessman Carlos Saladrigas was one of them. He spearheaded the opposition to the church-sponsored cruise in 1998. But “after I saw the images on television and I heard what was being said, it was clear to me that I had made a mistake. I realized I wanted to be there,” he says. Those powerful images got him thinking — and talking. He spoke at length with Father Jose Conrado Rodriguez, an outspoken priest from a parish in Santiago de Cuba. Father Rodriguez is best known for the 2009 open letter he sent Raul Castro condemning the restrictions on freedoms and the harassment of his parishioners. “He convinced me it was necessary to seek a neutral process,” Saladrigas said — a process the Catholic church could facilitate. Saladrigas and wife, Olga, practicing Catholics who met as teenagers teaching catechism classes

in Miami, will be in Cuba for Benedict’s visit. He defends the church’s position against those who claim that a religious institution should not play into Castro’s hands. “The church is doing what it always does,” he adds. “It provides moral guidance. It spreads the gospel. This is about evangelization, about hope.” Saladrigas echoes the words of other pilgrims, who say the gradual opening of a totalitarian government bodes well. De Leon, president of the Greater Miami Chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union, says Benedict’s trip — the second by a pope to the small Caribbean nation in less than 15 years — signals an opportunity to engage the Cubans on the island. De Leon also went to Cuba for Pope John Paul’s 1998 visit., a trip, he says, that made an impact on the island. “The pope is serving as a force for reconciliation,” says de Leon, who will be representing la Asociacion Cubana de la Orden de

Malta, a charitable Catholic group. “I’m very much a believer that when you open up doors to faith and religion, miracles happen.” That’s also the message Cubanborn Felipe Estevez, bishop of the Diocese of St. Augustine, is spreading to the dozen faithful who will accompany him to the island in March. He calls the visit a viaje de re-encuentro, a trip of reunion. “It’s time to heal the separation between families, between Cubans,” says Estevez, who has been back to Cuba as a priest several times. “Cuba is more than a political party. It’s a people, a society.” Estevez says he understands why some exiles have vowed to never return to the island as long as the Castros are in power. “There’s been a lot of oppression, a lot of hurt. But at the same time, the island doesn’t belong to the party or to one man. It belongs to the people.” For some pilgrims, the trip back is expected to be very emotional. Cuervo, for instance, hopes to visit a cousin, whose son is now a priest. She also hopes to stop in on the nuns from Religiosas del Apostolado, the religious order who taught her in Cuba. “This is a religious pilgrimage,” she says. “It’s an opportunity to find out how we can be of help and to be blessed in a special way by Our Lady of Charity and our Pope.” In 1998, she debated whether she wanted to return to the island. Wenski, at the time not yet a bishop, gave her this piece of advice: “Let the spirit guide you.” She did and applied to go on a one-day charter flight, but a visa mix-up kept her stranded in Miami. When she finally went several months later — the first time she had returned to her homeland in more than 35 years — she distributed rosaries and prayer cards. “There was such a spiritual hunger,” she recalls, tears welling. She expects to see the same in March.

Possibility seen for male ‘Pill’

Team at University of Kansas School of Medicine working to put new product on market.

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HARLEY DAVIDSON

By ALAN BAVLEY McClatchy Newspapers

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Women may say, "It’s about time." Guys may have the same reaction. After many overly optimistic predictions, a male version of The Pill may truly be in sight. And a team at the University of Kansas School of Medicine, a nationally recognizedcenterofresearchinto male contraceptives, is working to be among the first to put a new generation of products on the market. Joseph Tash, a reproductive biologist at KU, Tash’s work is has spent a decade tinkering part of a with a chemical promising compound array of new called H2-gabirth control mendazole that keeps sperm methods for from developmen that are ing in the testes. Men taking a under develgamendazole opment in "pill" would eslaboratories sentially be or already shooting blanks. being tested The expectaon volunteers. tion is that men on the KU pill would experience no change in their libido and, if they stopped taking it, would regain full fertility within a few weeks. Tash’s work is part of a promising array of new birth control methods for men that are under development in laboratories or already being tested on volunteers. These contraceptives are arriving more than 50 years after the female birth control pill revolutionized relations between the sexes and gave women greater control over their lives. Outdated attitudes that birth control was women’s work, along with the technical challenges —

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Standing from left, Dr. Ajay Nangia, Dr. Gustavo Blanco, Dr. Leslie Heckert stood with Dr. Joseph Tash as he sits near a microscope with before-and-after images of testes treated with contraceptives at the University of Kansas Medical Center on Feb. 1, in Kansas City, Kan.

women release just one egg per month, but men produce 1,000 sperm per second — have slowed development of new male contraceptives. But recent investments in research appear to be paying off. Men already are testing contraceptives based on hormones that are analogous to the contraceptive pills women take. Meanwhile, researchers such as Tash are working on compounds that target sperm production or activity directly without affecting men’s hormones. Tash is confident enough about gamendazole that he’s getting ready to ask the Food and Drug Administration what additional studies he’ll need to do before he can start trying it on human subjects. "We have enough data now toactuallygototheFDA,"hesaid. He will have to meet a high standard of safety for a drug that healthy men would be taking regularly for a long time; FDA approval, if it goes that far, is perhaps a decade away. So far, though, the compound’s safety has checked out in rabbits, mice, rats and monkeys. Mating tests on rats showed no

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CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com ter Act civil penalties levied against MOEX Offshore 2007, a minority investor in the well, which came as part of an overall $90 million settlement with the Continued from Page 1A Justice Department. "There’s enormous pressure ants — chief among them oil giant BP, which was in charge of on BP to settle," said David Uhlthe drilling project, and Swiss mann, director of the environcompany Transocean Ltd., the mental law program at the Uniowner of the doomed rig — versity of Michigan. "No matter which have been fighting in how confident BP is about the court over who should shoulder gross negligence question, that’s how much of the blame for the just an extraordinary amount of risk for any trial." disaster that killed BP Chief Execu11 rig workers and A key issue, if the caused the largest case goes to trial, is tive Robert Dudley said this month that offshore oil spill in the degree to which the company was U.S. history. preparing for the Charles F. Herd fault should be allocourt date, but ready Jr., a veteran Hous- cated among the to settle "if we can do ton maritime attor- corporate defendso on fair and reasonney, calls it an "unable terms." heralded" event in ants, which also Experts will also the history of include Houstonbe watching whether American jurispru- based Halliburton, the Justice Departdence because of which performed the ment will include a its size and comcement job on the non-prosecution plexity. agreement with the The biggest ques- well, and Cameron companies as part of tion is whether the International Corp., any potential civil Justice Department, which is designer of the failed settlement, closing a door on future crimiseeking civil penal- blowout preventer. nal charges. ties under the A Justice spokesClean Water Act, will reach a settlement with BP man declined to comment. The lawsuits loom despite or other companies involved in BP’s agreement to set up a $20 the spill. The Clean Water Act penalties billion fund to compensate spill for BP alone could be as high as victims. That fund has paid $6.5 $17 billion if it is found to have billion to thousands of claiexhibited "gross negligence" — mants, most of whom signed a a failure to take reasonable steps waiver agreeing not to file suit. to avert the disaster — during Two families of the 11 rig workthe nonjury trial before U.S. Dis- ers killed in a fiery explosion are trict Court Judge Carl Barbier. still negotiating wrongful-death Such a decision could increase cases against BP; the others the fine from $1,100 per barrel to have settled. In addition, a separate classa maximum of $4,300 per barrel, roughly a $13 billion difference. action suit is unfolding in HousThat potential fine dwarfs the ton on behalf of thousands of inrecord $70 million in Clean Wa- vestors accusing BP of securities

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OIL SPILL

All School Shoes & Boots NOW OFF

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Sale Ends 3/3/12

MCT FILE PHOTO

Oil-tar patties from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill cover the beach in Waveland in 2010.

fraud. That suit alleges that BP made false or misleading statements about its safety programs in the gulf and about its ability to respond to a big spill. A trial date in that case has not been set, according to Richard Mith-

off, a co-lead attorney for the plaintiffs. The disaster that slimed the coastline of four states and closed gulf fisheries for months also triggered hundreds of other individual and class-action

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cases, which were filed in courthouses around the country. In August 2010, a federal legal panel lumped those cases together into one suit so that Barbier could address the common questions at the heart of the matter. A key issue, if the case goes to trial, is the degree to which fault should be allocated among the corporate defendants, which also include Houston-based Halliburton, which performed the cement job on the well, and Cameron International Corp., designer of the failed blowout preventer. Once the degree of fault is established, the court determines the amount the companies must pay in compensatory damages — that is, the cost of replacing what has been lost. The court will also establish whether the defendants must pay punitive damages, meant to punish and deter bad conduct. The issue of gross negligence is also significant here because only companies whose actions are deemed grossly negligent

must pay punitive damages. Attorneys for the plaintiffs will argue that BP, the main company in their cross hairs, exhibited gross negligence by not only mismanaging the disaster, but also encouraging a culture that valued profit more than safety — a claim that BP has denied. Rig owner Transocean is hoping to take a pass on much of this, citing an 1851 federal statute that limits a ship owner’s legal exposure when a vessel goes down. Transocean argues that its exposure should be about $27 million, the current value of the sunken rig. Despite all the legal complexity, the matter couldn’t be simpler for plaintiffs like Acy Cooper Jr. Cooper said the spill seriously affected his ability to fish in 2010. More recently, he was forced to close down his family’s Venice, La., seafood restaurant. "If they didn’t do things right," Cooper said of the defendants, "they need to be held accountable."

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CMYK PAGE 12A

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012

SPIN 4 LIFE EVENT AT CANDY’S PLACE

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GAS DRILLING COALITION BENEFIT CONCERT

THE TIMES LEADER

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ETHNIC FOOD FESTIVAL AT LCCC IN NANTICOKE

BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

DON CAREY PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

Jennie Hampton, left, and Amanda Daczka

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BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Lindsey, left, Chris, and Riley Oremus, all of Dallas

LCCC NAACP Chapter President Shanice Thomas of Wilkes-Barre, left, and Susan Gilroy-King of Ashley

Susan and Tony Rutchauskas, both of Shavertown

Ursula Tracy of Scranton, left, and Mary Sullivan of Swoyersville

Jeanne Kapral of Trucksville, left, Holly Ratowski of Wilkes-Barre Township, and Suzanne Vitanovec of Forty Fort

Machelle Smith of Ashley, left, and Julie Schechter of Exeter

Liz Martin of Dallas, left, and Maureen Oremus of Frankin Township

Jeilys Nieves of Hazleton, left, and Catiana Aristide of Glen Lyon

Beth Miner, left, and Joan Murphy

Jen Sipe, left, and Eve Wile

Angela Mushinsky, left, and Donna Zbiek

Nicole Farber, left, and Debra Ganz

Sisters Jenn Robinson, left, and Tracey Richards, both of Dallas

Luzerne County Community College President Thomas Leary and Christine Delaplace of Moscow

Ticket fiasco fires up ‘Burning Man’ fest By SCOTT SONNER and CRISTINA SILVA Associated Press

RENO, Nev. — The biggest prior threats to Burning Man’s annual regeneration in the Black Rock Desert were U.S. land use laws, undercover cops and the media-perpetuated perception that the largest outdoor arts festival in North America is really just an excuse to get naked and do drugs.

But that was before the teethgnashing “ticket fiasco.” Two decades after the free spirits moved their party from San Francisco’s Baker Beach to a dried up ancient lake bed 120 miles north of Reno, the annual pilgrimage with its drum circles, decorated art cars, guerilla theatrics and colorful theme camps has become too popular for its own good. “The hard truth is that there are a lot of you who want to come

to Black Rock City to celebrate your participation in the Burning Man culture this year, but not everyone will be aable to attend,” organizers said in an apologetic email — this after a lottery ticket sale intended to keep attendance below the federally permitted cap blew up in their faces. The counter-culture celebration open to all under the principal of “radical inclusion” sold out for the first time last year with a crowd in excess of 53,000, forcing

organizers to make plans to sell the bulk of the 2012 tickets through random drawings. But it wasn’t until recently that many regulars got word they may not get in to this year’s psychedelic adventure combining wilderness camping with avant-garde performance. Whether opportunistic ticket scalpers are to blame or naïve organizers were caught off guard is a topic raging among Burners.

Many lament it will never be the same. “The ticket fiasco means Burning Man has to make decisions now about who to let in and who to keep out,” said Mark Van Proyen, chairman of the painting department at the San Francisco Art Institute who has attended the last 16 years in a row. “For AP FILE PHOTO that reason, it no longer can really truly be a radically inclusive The Burning Man is ignited in event.” 1998 to signal festival’s end.


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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GOP eyes Pa. tax provisions after blocking Dems Month-old bill would attempt to close the so-called ‘Delaware loophole.’

Under the proposal, retailers that get to keep 1 percent of the sales tax money they collect would now be allowed to keep no more than $250 per month, which would bring another $41 By MARC LEVY million to the state in the fiscal Associated Press year that begins July 1. During Tuesday’s Senate ApHARRISBURG — After blocking similar efforts by Democrats in recent years, Republicans in Harrisburg now want to chip away at a couple of state tax provisions that benefit businesses. Business advocacy groups are not necessarily supporting the ideas now just because Republicans are getting behind them, and it’s not clear that GOP lawmakers will be able to agree with each other to get them passed, particularly during an election year when no one wants to alienate potential supporters. A month-old bill backed by the leaders of the House Republican majority would attempt to close the so-called “Delaware loophole.” It would give the state Department of Revenue the power to stop firms — usually large, multistate companies — from using an accounting sleight of hand to move profits out of Pennsylvania to a lower-tax jurisdiction in order to avoid paying the state’s 9.99 percent corporate net income tax. To make it easier for business advocates to swallow, the bill would also take major steps long sought by the business community to lower business taxes, including gradually reducing the corporate net income tax rate to 6.99 percent in 2019. At the same time, the Corbett administration wants to scale back part of an approximately $73 million incentive for retailers that collect the sales tax and send it to the state in a timely fashion. Neither seems to be embracing the other just yet, and the turf gets tricky for Corbett, a Republican who campaigned on a vow not to increase taxes and who counts business owners and executives among his strongest supporters. A spokesman for the House Republicans, Steve Miskin, said Friday that the group had not yet taken a position on the governor’s proposal, which was included in the budget plan Corbett unveiled Feb. 7.

propriations Committee hearing, Sen. Jim Ferlo, D-Allegheny, asked whether that change is a tax increase. Revenue Secretary Dan Meuser responded that it is a “modernization.” Asked about the House bill to close the “Delaware loophole,” on Thursday, Corbett said he

hadn’t seen it, hadn’t talked to House leaders about it and couldn’t say whether he would support it. The bill’s chief Republican sponsor, Rep. David Reed of Indiana County, said he has spoken to the governor’s office and the Department of Revenue’s secre-

tary about it, and they seem to be open to it. “Depending on who you talk to, it depends on how open, but they certainly want to continue the conversation,” Reed said Friday. Meuser fielded questions from members of the House and Sen-

ate Appropriations committees on Tuesday and didn’t exactly endorse the bill. At one point he called it “a very smartly planned idea,” but at another point he suggested that calls to close the Delaware loophole may be long on politics and short on substance.

7 property owners in decimated town lose court appeal HARRISBURG — Residents of a central Pennsylvania coal town decimated by a half-century-old mine fire have lost a state court appeal to try to prevent condemnation of their land, but the long-running case will continue in federal court. The Commonwealth Court rejected arguments by seven Centralia property owners who say condemnation is no longer needed because the underground fire has moved and air quality in the borough has improved. Most homes in Centralia were demolished in the 1980s after the slow-burning fire that began in 1962 at the town dump spread to the underground network of coal mines, threatening residents with poisoning gases and dangerous sinkholes. The court upheld a 2010 ruling in county court that set fair market value for the properties that the commonwealth began condemning in 1993. The state court ruled Thursday that nothing would authorize a request by the property owners to stop the condemnation on the grounds that the public purpose for it no longer exists. The property owners, however, have also lodged a civil rights complaint in federal court against the state and other defendants, alleging a conspiracy to steal the mineral rights to billions of dollars’ worth of anthracite coal. The suit names the state Department of Community and Economic Development, a law firm, a coal company and the county redevelopment authority. A similar petition in state court was dismissed on jurisdictional and procedural grounds.

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SMOKE-FREE Continued from Page 1A

Act banning smoking in a majority of public places is trying to close loopholes and make all public places in Pennsylvania smoke-free. The law went into effect on Sept. 11, 2008. Sen. Stewart Greenleaf, a Republican from Montgomery County, said the time has come to make the law more restrictive. According to the state Department of Health, more than 2,800 establishments have been granted exemptions from the law. Of that total, 195 are in Luzerne County, more than double the 79 the county had the first year the law was in effect. Ardo’s pub – one of the hundreds of businesses not granted AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER exemptions because food sales account for about 40 percent of Dominick Ardo stands outside of his Plains Pub with some of his smoking customers. His bar is his business – has fared well non-smoking so customers have to step outdoors to light up. under the new law. sino currently has 55 percent of said in a press release issued by Greenleaf supporters Smoke-free appeal the American Lung Association Deb Brown, a spokeswoman the gaming floor designated as Ardo said that while business in Pennsylvania. with the American Lung Associ- non-smoking. At one point it The senator said that not on- ation in Pennsylvania, said was a 50/50 split. trailed off right after the law He said eliminating smoking was passed, he’s seen twice as ly are business factors at play, Greenleaf is hoping to get the many new patrons come in be- health factors are as well. spotlight placed back on his totally would mean the loss “of tens of millions, maybe hun“Secondhand smoke does not proposal this year. cause of the smoke-free environplay favorites, it impacts everyment. His bill would remove all of dreds of millions for the state’s But he said perhaps he could one. We know that secondhand the exemptions that were in- coffers.” He said the present stasee even more business if bars smoke is a leading cause of pre- cluded in the 2008 legislation. tus seems to work well. “Anydown the street weren’t able to ventable death. It causes cancer, Overall, there are a dozen ex- body that wants to enjoy gamheart disease, lung disease and emptions, including those for ing in a non-smoking environpermit smoking. “I think it’s an unfair law. other respiratory illness, includ- social and private clubs; for bars ment has that opportunity,” Make it fair. Have no gray area,” ing worsening of asthma. How that get less than 20 percent of Soper said. The exemptions were cited as can we ignore this?” Ardo said. their business from the sale of Senate Bill 35, which Green- food; and casinos, which were reasons why Pennsylvania reGreenleaf agrees. “We know the (law) has leaf introduced, and House Bill permitted to allow smoking on ceived poor grades in the annual American Lung Associgreatly impacted most of our 824, which was introduced by up to half the gaming floor. public places and establish- Rep. Mario Scavello, R-Mount Bobby Soper, president of ation’s State of Tobacco Control ments. Now we must go further Pocono, were referred to com- Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs 2012 report card, an annual acand finish the task. We must mittees, where they’ve re- in Plains Township, said his ca- counting that tracks key tobacco control policies at the state end the exemptions,” Greenleaf mained since early last year.

TAXES Continued from Page 1A

RESEARCH ASSESSMENTS The Times Leader’s free online property assessment database has been updated with the latest assessments as of Feb. 9. The database may be accessed at www.timesleader.com (click on the property tax house icon on the main page). To figure out your tax bill, multiply your assessed value by the millage rate and divide by 1,000. For example, the combined (school, county and local) millage rate in Ashley is 24.6483. Taxes on a $100,000 property would be $2,464.83.

The municipalities with 2012 tax hikes: Nanticoke, Hazleton, Laflin, Edwardsville, Hughestown, Kingston, Penn Lake Park and 10 townships – Franklin, Huntington, Hunlock, Jenkins, Butler, Pittston, Dennison, Newport, Fairmount and Kingston. Pittston Township has the highest percentage increase because its municipal taxes are doubling from 0.25 to 0.5 mills. The increase, which equates to come and local services taxes $25 on a $100,000 property, will were also increased so the engenerate an additional $80,000 tire burden wouldn’t be on in tax revenue earmarked solely property owners, she said. The property tax hike will for the purchase of a new fire truck and ambulance, said generate an additional $177,740, township manager and financial she said. She believes the tax rate is fair because municipal administrator John Bonita. The new emergency vehicles services directly benefit all will cost an estimated $525,000. township residents. “We aren’t even charging a Township officials want to try to pay off the vehicles in future mill. Residents are getting their years without the increase, Bon- roads paved and plowed and receiving police protection and ita said. “If we don’t need it the sec- other services,” she said. Nanticoke’s 10.2 percent tax ond year, we will take the inhike will cost a $100,000 propercrease off,” he said. ty owner an additionFairmount Townal $38 this year. ship’s 88.5 percent “We had so City Finance Directax increase will cost tor Pam Heard said township residents much road the increase stems in more out of pocket – damage, and large part from in$60 on a $100,000 property – because now fuel costs creased costs in the city’s transition to a its millage rate is are rising. We new home rule govhigher than Pittston don’t get a ernment, including Township’s. The inpublic advertising, lecrease bumps up the break.” gal expenses and millage rate from David Keller 0.6768 to 1.2757. Fairmount Township consulting services. The increase will The tax increase Supervisor generate $126,000 was largely needed more for the general to fund extensive road repairs and other damage fund operating budget, which disasters in September, said receives about $1 million from township Supervisor David Kell- property tax revenue, Heard said. er. Nanticoke’s new millage – The federal government has not provided any disaster recov- 4.0594 – is among the highest ery funding to date, Keller said. of the 76 municipalities. Pittston city is at the top, “We had so much road damage, and now fuel costs are ris- with 6.85 mills, followed by Plying. We don’t get a break,” Kell- mouth borough, 5.7, and Haer said. “Once we get caught nover Township, 5.5. Wilkesup, we may cut the tax rates Barre’s local millage rate is back, but as of now, we can’t technically the highest at 96.63 mills, but it can’t be fairly comguarantee anything.” Kingston Township’s 82.4 per- pared to the others because the cent hike raises its millage from city continues to use its own 0.4112 to 0.75. Municipal taxes assessments for city taxes, inwill increase $34 on a $100,000 stead of the values stemming from the countywide reassessproperty, from $41.12 to $75. Township Manager Kathleen ment that took effect in 2009. Sebastian said revenue wasn’t County taxes increased from keeping pace with rising costs 5.215 mills to 5.32 mills, which for utilities, vehicle repairs, amounts to $10 more on a $100,000 property. equipment and supplies. School boards have not yet “We cut back as much as we finalized their new property tax possibly could,” she said. The municipality’s earned in- rates for the 2012-13 fiscal year.

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as smoking. and federal levels. But casinos that could docuPennsylvania earned two “C” grades and two “Fs.” The C ment a significant difference in grades were for “smokefree air” revenues between games in and “cigarette tax” categories. smoking and non-smoking areas The Fs were given for the over the first 90 days the new state’s “tobacco prevention and law was in effect could apply to control spending” and “cessa- raise the smoking area percenttion coverage.” They were the age to 50 percent. To do so, the casino’s average same grades the state received gross slot take per day needed in the 2011 report. The association took Harris- to be at least 25 percent higher burg to task for inaction on sev- per machine in the smoking eral key tobacco measures, in- section than in the non-smoking cluding Greenleaf’s bill, last section. Every casino easily exyear to remove all the exemp- ceeded that threshold. tions from the 2008 law. “The Lung Association will ‘Downward on smoking’ Soper said continue to work on that even with cleaning up the cur- T H E E X E M P T the law in place, rent law to protect To see the list of Luzerne Mohegan Sun all workers in Penn- County establishments sylvania from sec- granted exemptions under has “seen it ondhand smoke,” the state’s Clean Indoor Air trending downthe report stated. Act, go to: tlgets.me/smok- ward on the smoking.” “It’s at the top of the ingexemptions “Smoking list because it imunits still outpacts the health of millions of people in the com- perform non-smoking units,” Soper said, but not by as great a monwealth.” In 2006, the U.S. Surgeon percentage as in the past. He General released a report stat- did not have precise figures, ing there is no safe level of ex- showing the disparity readily available, but said it’s “still douposure to secondhand smoke. A study done by Repace Asso- ble digits.” Soper pointed out that in adciates showed that six months after the 2008 law was imple- dition to more than half of the mented, indoor air pollution gaming floor, with one excepdropped 87 percent in the state. tion all of the casino’s eateries Prior to the law being passed, and bars are smoke-free and so casinos could designate as is the poker room. Twenty-eight states, Washingmuch or as little of their gaming floors as they wished as ton D.C., and Puerto Rico have smoking. After the law, casinos enacted comprehensive clean were knocked down to a maxi- indoor air laws with no exempmum of 25 percent of floor area tions.

LUZERNE COUNTY TAX MILLAGE RATES BY MUNICIPALITY AND SCHOOL DISTRICT Municipal 2011 Municipal 2012 School 2011-12* Total 2012 Municpality millage millage millage millage** Ashley 2.85 2.85 16.4783 24.6483 Avoca 1.5 1.5 13.1228 19.9428 Black Creek Twp. 0.5473 0.5473 9.0446 14.9119 Bear Creek Twp. 0.4412 0.4412 15.3684 21.1296 Bear Creek Village 0.549 0.549 15.3684 21.2374 Buck Twp. 0.1212 0.1212 15.3684 20.8096 Butler Twp. 0.80505 0.95505 9.0446 15.31965 Courtdale 2 2 13.5 20.82 Conyngham 2.83 2.83 9.0446 17.1946 Conyngham Twp. 0.877 0.877 9.9295 16.1265 Dallas Twp. 0.52 0.52 11.5624 17.4024 Dallas 1.28 1.28 11.5624 18.1624 Dorrance Twp. 0.64 0.64 9.16 15.12 Dennison Twp. 0.435 0.6 9.16 15.08 Duryea 1.1 1.1 13.1228 19.5428 Dupont 1.2235 1.2235 13.1228 19.6663 Exeter 1.4233 1.4233 13.0799 19.8232 Exeter Twp. 0.969 0.969 13.0799 19.3689 Edwardsville 3.3486 3.5561 13.5 22.3761 Fairmount Twp. 0.6768 1.2757 9.1986 15.7943 Fairview Twp. 0.85 0.85 9.16 15.33 Forty Fort 2.91 2.91 13.5 21.73 Freeland 1.8 1.8 9.0446 16.1646 Foster Twp. 0.556 0.556 9.0446 14.9206 Franklin Twp. 0.58 0.6 11.5624 17.4824 Hanover Twp. 5.5 5.5 16.4783 27.2983 Harveys Lake 0.704 0.704 8.8531 14.8771 Hazle Twp. 0.75 0.75 9.0446 15.1146 Hollenback Twp. 0.23 0.23 11 16.55 Hughestown 1.4326 1.6326 13.1228 20.0754 Hunlock Twp. 0.45 0.55 9.1986 15.0686 Huntington Twp. 0.433 0.466 9.1986 14.9846 Jackson Twp. 1.32 1.32 8.8531 15.4931 Jeddo 0.336 0.336 9.0446 14.7006 Jenkins Twp. 1.275 1.375 13.1228 19.8178 Kingston 1.264 1.315 13.5 20.135 Kingston Twp. 0.4112 0.75 11.5624 17.6324 Laflin 1.5642 1.8476 15.3684 22.536 Lake Twp. 0.322 0.322 8.8531 14.4951 Larksville 2.9 2.9 13.5 21.72 Laurel Run 1.4683 1.4683 15.3684 22.1567 Lehman Twp. 1.25 1.25 8.8531 15.4231 Luzerne 1.4524 1.4524 13.5 20.2724 Nanticoke 3.6844 4.0594 9.9295 19.3089 Nescopeck 1.377 1.137 11 17.497 Nescopeck Twp. 1.23 1.23 11 17.55 New Columbus 0.37 0.37 9.1986 14.8886 Newport Twp. 1.95 2.2 9.9295 17.4495 Nuangola 0.444 0.444 9.16 14.924 Penn Lake Park 0.4 0.5 9.16 14.98 Plymouth 5.7 5.7 13.5 24.52 Plymouth Twp. 1.386 1.386 9.9295 16.6355 Plains Twp. 1.77 1.77 15.3684 22.4584 Pittston Twp. 0.25 0.5 13.1228 18.9428 Pringle 0.45 0.45 13.5 19.27 Rice Twp. 0.26 0.26 9.16 14.74 Ross Twp. 0.23 0.23 8.8531 14.4031 Salem Twp. 0.224 0.224 11 16.544 Shickshinny 1.1329 1.1329 9.1986 15.6515 Slocum Twp. 0 0 9.16 14.48 Sugarloaf Twp. 0.825 0.825 9.0446 15.1896 Swoyersville 1.45 1.45 13.5 20.27 Sugar Notch 2.5 2.5 16.4783 24.2983 Union Twp. 0.23 0.23 9.1986 14.7486 Warrior Run 1.9 1.9 16.4783 23.6983 West Hazleton 2.631 2.631 9.0446 16.9956 Wright Twp. 0.7516 0.7516 9.16 15.2316 West Pittston 1.4762 1.4762 13.0799 19.8761 West Wyoming 1.5 1.5 13.0799 19.8999 Wyoming 1.7905 1.7905 13.0799 20.1904 White Haven 1.9 1.9 9.16 16.38 Wilkes-Barre Twp. 1.2507 1.2507 15.3684 21.9391 Yatesville 0.612 0.612 13.1228 19.0548 Hazleton 2.83 3.11 9.0446 17.4746 Pittston 6.85 6.85 13.1228 25.2928 Wilkes-Barre*** 96.63 96.63 15.3684 117.3184 * Districts have not set tax rates for the 2012-13 fiscal year. ** Includes 5.32 mills for Luzerne County taxes in 2012, a 2 percent increase from 2011. ***Uses own assessment system for city taxation Source: Luzerne Conty Assessor’s offie and municipal offices

Mark Guydish/The Times Leader

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

Bob Stabryla of Shavertown smokes a cigarette at Gonda’s Elbow Room Bar in Wilkes-Barre on Thursday.

New York when she was a U.S. senator. Stabryla said a sizeable amount of cigarette taxes go to fund health programs. “If Continued from Page 1A everybody quit smoking, who director of the Pennsylvania would pay these taxes? … If Tavern Association, said half they don’t want you to smoke, of that organization’s members they shouldn’t be selling (cigasupport the law while an rettes),” he said, adding that equal amount opposes it. he doubts a full ban would “Some businesses it has become law because Pennhelped, some businesses it has sylvania has such a high rate hurt,” Christie said. of smoking. She said there have been Among the states, Pennsome taverns that have closed sylvania is tied for 15th place because of the loss of busiin the percentage of people ness, but others have reported who smoke, according to the gains in customers after Centers for Disease Control they’ve gone smoke-free. and Prevention. When the law was first Seated a few barstools away, debated, the association arRobin Steidinger, 22, of gued that government should Wilkes-Barre, said she doesn’t not be involved in legislating smoke, but she is not deterred this type of proposal. Once the from patronizing a bar in law was enacted, the associwhich smoking is allowed. ation has done what it can to “It doesn’t really matter to support and educate members. me. If it’s a good bar with Gonda, who said a clear good music, a good bartender majority of his North Main and friendly people, it doesn’t Street patrons smoke, agreed matter if smoking is allowed,” the law isn’t perfect. But he she said. said with the law written the Jay Fetor, 33, of Wilkesway it is, permitting exempBarre Township, said he only tions for businesses where patronizes bars that allow food accounts for less than 20 smoking. percent of sales, he’ll continue “I understand it’s hazardous to apply for an exemption to to your health … but it’s my allow smoking. right to choose if I want to smoke or not, as long as it’s Patrons weigh in not affecting anyone else. And Some of his smoking pathey can always go someplace trons, however, think the curelse that doesn’t allow smokrent law is overreaching and a ing,” Fetor said. total ban on smoking in public Let business decide places would be unconstitutional. Kyle Andres, a bartender at Bob Stabryla, 52, of Shaver- Gonda’s and a former smoker, town, said supporters of a said he thinks the current total ban “can stick it in their smoking law is unfair and a a--.” Currently, whether a bar total ban would be even more allows smoking determines so. whether he’ll patronize it. “I think it should be up to If a total ban went into the restaurant or bar owner effect as proposed by State whether or not to allow it. Sen. Stewart Greenleaf, RThey’re nitpicking. EveryMontgomery County, Stabryla thing’s unhealthy. Alcohol’s said he would be less likely to not healthy for you either,” he patronize bars. said. “Who does he think he is, Andres, 24, said a majority Hillary Clinton?” Stabryla said of the people he serves are of Greenleaf. smokers and he’s certain he Clinton, now the U.S. secre- would lose tips and his boss tary of state, was a vocal prowould lose business if patrons ponent of a smoking ban in couldn’t smoke in the bar.

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Pennsylvania retiree works to help Eritrean refugees TOM MOONEY OUT ON A LIMB

Go online now to prepare for census release

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John Stauffer, of Wallingford, Pa., co-founded the America Team for Displaced Eritreans. He served in the Peace Corps years ago.

LENDING A HAND By MICHAEL MATZA

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HILADELPHIA — Wallingford, Pa.’s lush hills are a world apart from the arid Horn of Africa. But a trim stone Tudor in the Philadelphia suburb is a humming hub of help for refugees

from one of the world’s most repressive regimes. Since the birth of Eritrea as a nation in1993, more than 200,000 of its people have fled the dictatorship of President Isaias Afewerki. Under his government, Human Rights Watch monitors say, “arbitrary arrests, torture, and forced labor are rampant.” Something had to be done to make this stop, John Stauffer resolved. So, in 2010, he cofounded the America Team for Displaced Eritreans, an all-volunteer effort that he runs from a spare bedroom in his 75-year-old Wallingford home. With a board of eight Eritrean immigrants and two Americans, and $35,000 in private donations annually, the group has provided cash assistance, clothing, household goods, and advocacy for hundreds of Eritreans in America. Since 1994, an estimated 12,575 Eriteans have moved to the United States, with from 50 to 60 currently in the Philadelphia area. The group’s network of supporters in seven mostly East Coast states supplies translators and expert testimony in asylum cases. Its website, www.EritreanRefugees.org, is a news clearinghouse.

Stauffer’s team devised a picture dictionary to help Eritreans once they reach America.

Slightly larger than Pennsylvania, the country of nearly 6 million people is bordered by Ethiopia, Sudan, Djibouti, and the Red Sea. But Eritrea was a province of Ethiopia 46 years ago when Stauffer, freshly graduated from Juniata College, served there with the Peace Corps. He fell in love with the place. In 1968, he returned to the United States to work at Rohm & Haas, marketing chemicals used to manufacture paint. He retired in 2006 and incorporated the nonprofit America Team four years later. On a typical day, Stauffer, 68, posts news about Eritrea and works the phones, sharing information with aid groups and government agencies. He recently highlighted the 2012

Reporters Without Borders index ranking Eritrea dead last among 179 countries in press freedom. In December, he posted news about economic sanctions the United Nations imposed on Eritrea for allegedly arming Somalian warlords. Among Stauffer’s ongoing concerns is fallout from the Arab Spring — specifically, the plight of Eritreans fleeing to Israel via the Sinai, where Bedouin bandits have held them up. Israel’s Interior Ministry reports that 20,000 Africans, mostly Eritreans and Sudanese, enter Israel annually seeking jobs and safety. Israel says it does not deport them beSee REFUGEES, Page 10B

MEET EMILE ZAFRANY

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mile Zafrany is the owner of Simon & Company Jewelers in Kingston. Zafrany, 52, attended schools in Casablanca, Morocco and studied architecture. Emile and his wife, Mindy, have three children, Gael, Rachelle and Simon. They live

CLARK VAN ORDEN / THE TIMES LEADER

in the Wilkes-Barre area. You studied architecture, so how did the career in the jewelry field develop? “I came to America in 1979 to be an architect, but the metric system was different here and that posed problems. I had always helped with my father’s company overseas, so I used my eye for architecture and made the transition into our family jewelry business.” Simon & Company has been a family business for years. When did it start? “My father, Simon, established the com-

temporary artists that America has to offer. It is similar to how a museum curator goes to the archives to find the finest pieces to display. I am able to hand-pick the best and bring them back to Northeastern Pennsylvania. We currently have approximately 40 American designers in our line.” You seem very passionate about the local people in the area. “The local people in the area are great. They support us so we support them in return. Simon & Company donates jewelry to local foundations and auctions and the proceeds go towards particular charities.” What are some of your favorite things to do away from work? “I like to swim and exercise. I have a passion for gardening, but the wife and I love to travel.” Where would you like to travel? “Mindy and I are very fond of Bruges, Belgium. It is so quaint, we love it. Someday we want to travel to Tibet. It

pany in Casablanca, Morocco in 1940. The company has since spread to America, France and Israel. I have four brothers and four sisters and most all of them are involved in the business throughout the world.” How does the international presence affect your business? “My siblings and I attend all the major international jewelry shows and this enables us to exchange new lines and various artists with one another. The exposure to the most exciting and new designers gives us an unparalleled insight into the industry or avantgarde. We also attend all the major American gift shows several times a year to see the freshest and most con- See MEET, Page 10B

ith the release date for the U.S. Census of 1940 just a little more than a month away, the National Archives, Archives.com and the U.S. Census Bureau have partnered in an unprecedented effort to prepare genealogists to access the census and get the most out of it. The release is set for 9 a.m. eastern time, on Monday, April 2. The web address to access the census is already available. It’s www.1940census.archives.gov, and of course you can bookmark the address to save time when you return to it in April and afterward. You can download the census for free. The site offers a three-minute video introducing the census and explaining how to find the enumeration districts for your ancestors within communities. Online maps are provided to help the genealogist find those districts, and archives show how to use them. Other points of interest are addressed as well, including whether a person worked in one of the many federal programs, such as the Civilian Conservation Corps, launched during the Great Depression of the 1930s. New in 1940 were additional questions on employment and marriages. The archives will also use social media to keep the public informed as the release date nears. “Be sure to follow us on Twitter (using hashtag #1940Census), Facebook, Tumblr, Flickr, YouTube, and subscribe to our blogs: NARAtions and Prologue: Pieces of History,” says the archives in a recent release. Genealogy Conference: Reserve April 21 on your schedule for the Family History Seminar, co-sponsored by the Northeast Pennsylvania Genealogical Society and the Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania. It will be held at the Educational Conference Center of Luzerne County Community College, Nanticoke, 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Speakers will address the 1940 U.S. Census, resources at the Pennsylvania State Archives, military records at the National Archives and naturalization records in Luzerne County. During the noon break I’ll be giving an informal talk on how knowledge of local history can help the genealogist. For registration information and details about speakers and times, go to www.nepgs.org. Genealogy Class: I’ll offer my twohour “Getting Started in Genealogy” presentation 2-4 p.m. on April 12 at the Osterhout Free Library, South Franklin Street, Wilkes-Barre. The program is free. I’ll go over basic genealogical research, explore local resources and look at ways to find information from afar. To register, call the library at 823-0156. News Notes: The West Pittston Library is back in operation at its 200 Exeter Ave. location. The library was badly damaged in the September flooding that inundated much of the town. Congratulations are in order for Head Librarian Anne Bramblett Barr, her staff, the volunteers who helped clean and refurbish the building, the Insalaco family for providing temporary quarters for several months and the many people who contributed to the library’s recovery fund. An open house is scheduled for 5-8 p.m. on March 9. The Northeast Pennsylvania Genealogical Society will offer “Get Acquainted” nights on March 27 and April 24, 4-8 p.m. at its research library, in the office building at the Hanover Green Cemetery, Main Road, Hanover Township. The society still needs a copy of Vol. 4 of the old “Historical Record” to complete its digitization of the series.

Tom Mooney is a Times Leader genealogy columnist. Reach him at tmooney2@ptd.net.


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Solomon students support Crayon Can project The students of Solomon-Plains Elementary School recently collected 31 pounds of unwanted crayons for The Crayon Can, a project created by Hannah Gaydos, a fourth-grade student from Forty Fort. Gaydos collects broken and unwanted crayons; melts them into molds; and creates shaped crayons which she distributes to children’s hospitals and at local events. She has made and distributed more than 6,000 crayon molds to date. Some of the participants, from left, first row, are Allison Chocallo, Suzi Hannigan, Sean Chalker, Sarah Supinski and Ryan Chalker. Second row: Hannah Chocallo; J.R. Hannigan; Jake Supinski; Gaydos; and Mike Grebeck, assistant principal.

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LCCC Nursing Forum elects officers The Luzerne County Community College Nursing Forum recently elected officers for the 2011-12 academic year. The nursing students participate in several community service projects and educational programs throughout the school year. New officers, from left: Angelica Granahan, Scranton, secretary; Theresa Kloeker, Mountain Top, vice president; Peggy Sosnak, Wilkes-Barre, adviser and associate professor, nursing; Allison Bailey, Forty Fort, president; and Anne Larson, Pittston Township, treasurer.

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Students of the Month named at WVW Wyoming Valley West High School recently honored the January Students of the Month at a luncheon held at the school. Faculty members choose students each month based on their academic achievements and contributions to the school. Honored students, from left, first row: Adam Dibuo, son of Richard and Lynne Dibuo, Luzerne; Tara Zdancewicz, daughter of Ron and Laura Zdancewicz, Larksville; Malissa Lucas, daughter of Jon and Mary Jo Lucas, Kingston; and Michael Kilheeney, son of Michael and Kim Kilheeney, Swoyersville. Second row: Erin Keating, principal, and David Robbins and Christopher Lazor, assistant principals.

St. Jude volleyball game part of Catholic Schools Week activities

Dana Elementary students learn about magic of reading Joseph Keppel of Keppel’s Magical Reading Programs recently visited Dana Elementary Center in the Wyoming Valley West School District. Keppel used magic to promote his message ‘Turn off the TV and Read’ to the entire student body. Some of the participants, from left, first row, are Michael Koval and Emma Adamchak. Second row: Damian Cavuto, Andrew Novrocki, Julie Schwartz and David White. Third row: Ann Sorrick, ESEA reading; Keppel; Maylan Nicholson, guidance counselor; and David Novrocki, principal.

St. Jude School, Mountain Top, celebrated Catholic Schools Week with its annual volleyball game between the eighth-grade students and faculty. The entire student body attended and cheered on the teachers and students. Each team won two games. Participants, from left, first row, are Kayla Hons, Sarah Thomas, Jordyn Pavelitz, Amanda Bohn, Erica Stuccio, Rachel Rinehimer and Lauren Higgs. Second row: Tom Williams, Patrick Ganter, John Gentilesco, Joseph Kaskel, Derek Hamelin, Jean-Sebastien Taillefer and Neal Sowers. Third row: Vincent Gentilesco, Charles Nudo, Chris Nudo, Ann Levandoski and Brenda Kolojejchick. Fourth row: Marilyn Baran, Eileen Kempinski, Lester Kempinski, Mary Ann Crofchick, Yvette Koshinski and Mary Jean Stephens.

Redeemer bake sale benefits Cancer Society

First Catholic Slovak Ladies give donation to King’s King’s College recently received an $8,000 grant from the First Catholic Slovak Ladies Association (FCSLA) that will be used to expand the college’s faculty-led, study-abroad program offerings to Central and Eastern European countries; develop a Slavic Cultures course that will become part of the curriculum; and to conduct public presentations on Slavic cultures. The grant will also provide scholarships for students to participate in a multi-week academic program to Slovakia, the Czech Republic and Poland in the summer of 2013. The college will use institutional funds to send two faculty members to the destination countries this summer in order to conduct research and prepare the itinerary for the summer 2013 travel abroad experience. Participating students and faculty members will share their experiences through public presentations upon their return. At the check presentation, from left, first row: Beth Admiraal, associate professor of political science, director of the Public Policy and Social Research Institute and co-leader of the study abroad experience; the Rev. John Ryan, president, King’s; Magdalen Iskra, president, the local district of FCSLA; and Regina Molitoris, vice president, the local district of FCSLA. Second row: Freddie Pettit, vice president for institutional advancement; Renata Evan, faculty member, foreign languages department and co-leader of the study abroad experience; Ann Dougher, district auditor, FCSLA; and Martha Iskra, district trustee, FCSLA.

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Students honored at Crestwood Middle School Brian Baddick, principal, Crestwood Middle School, recently announced the Students of the Month for December. Honored students, from left, first row, are Taryn Pecile, Mady Heller, Maria Ellis and Patrick Brennan. Second row: Ryan Toporcer, Rachel Speck, Julie Murphy and Troy Simko.

Students at Holy Redeemer High School helped support Coaches vs. Cancer through a bake sale held as part of the Suits and Sneakers basketball weekend. The sale was coordinated by the basketball team’s Towel Lady Delores Shurshen, who baked many of the items herself and sold them to students, faculty and staff during lunch periods. Proceeds benefit the American Cancer Society. During one of the sales, from left: Shurshen; Thomas Cosgrove, White Haven; Meghan Burns, Wilkes-Barre; Kaitlyn Donnelly, Plains Township; and Mary Kolojejchick, Plains Township.

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HONOR ROLL Hanover Area Memorial Elementary School Dr. Terry Schnee, district elementary principal, Hanover Area School District recently announced the second quarter Honor roll ofr Memorial Elementary School. Grade 5: High Honors: Emina Adzemovic, Tanisha Atherton, Matthew Beecham, Emilee Bobos, Kyle Bohlin, Tessa Bresnahan, Madalyn Brink, Christian Buckley, Ashleigh Carbohn, Nicolas Chekan, Jessica Chieffo,

Taylor Coleman, Nadia Costigan, Lexie Dubois, Sarah Dule, Tiffany Eustice, Adam Gatusky, Taylor Gavlick, Shaun Gurnari, Gina Hemsley, Julian Homa, Aaron Hummer, Miles Hunter, Matthew Judge, Georgia Karpovich, April Kashmer, Jenna Kurent, McKenzie Kus, Zachary Lewis, James McCabe, Max Mendrzycki, Abigail Mendygral, Miranda Mislivets, Sharon Monahan, Samantha Nay, Marissa O’Brien, Alekzander Otero, Ana Pac, Connor Quaglia, Eric Ryan, Isabella Salci, Gabriel Stefanec, Cody Thomas, Gregory Wallace, Andy Xu and Abigale Yakavonis. Honors: Jared Banesh, Aaron Bennett, Kelsey Brunn, Trinadee Coleman, Gary Cooper, Alexis Cotier, Owen

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Yedloski, Kevin Zeske. Grade 6: High Honors: Sevda Adzemovic, Cara Albertson, Chakoya Allen, Austin Authier, Joseph Berkant, Madison Birosik, Lauren Blazaskie, Shannon Boyle, Matthew Clarke, Angela Croop, Dionisio Cuevas, Owen Cunningham, Jack Davis, Rafeeq Davis, Alesha Dennis, Jacob Finn, Christian Frame, Sabrina Frame, Alexa Graboske, Salvatore Gurnari, Ashley Gushock, Bethany Hannon, Sean Hart, Meghann Hartmann, John Hooper, Kaelee Kane, Britney Kornacki, Kamrin Kutlus, Nadia Lamoreux, Nina Lamoreux, Kiara Langan, Terra Lawson, Donnell

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HONOR ROLL Northwest Area Senior High and Middle School Ryan Miner, principal, and Joseph Rasmus, assistant secondary principal, Northwest Area Senior High and Middle School recently announced the second quarter Honor Roll students. Grade 7: High Honors: Forrest Callahan, Emily Demko, Shayla DiPasquale, Samuel Edwards, Adam Grisham, Brian Hardiman, Emma Herbert, Morgan Kline, Amanda Learn, Justis Miller, Katherine Noss, Luke Pavill, Skylar Peters, Michael Samulevich, Sarah Zultevich. Honors: Kaelee Albertson, Brittany Bitto, Victoria Buziak, Kiersten Eddinger, Brittani Jo George, Julia Grattan, Joseph Groff, Dannielle Grose, Tara Herman, Morgan Lancenese, Benjamin Macierowski, Mitchell Mazonkey, Noah McGovern, Karleigh Poeth, Carlie

Pszeniczny, Shelby Spencer, Jesse Tarnowski, Cole Ungvarsky, Cheyenne Wildoner, Ania Williams, Dylan Womelsdorf, Devone Zagata, Alijah Zielecki. Grade 8: High Honors: Ashley Brubaker, Rachel Connolly, Alan Diltz, Catherine George, Elizabeth Gurzynski, Katie Jones, Tanner Kennedy, Kaylee Kishbaugh, Sarah Kozlowski, Benjamin Krouse, Tanner MacDougall, Vincent Pavill IV, Terasa Pierontoni, Garrett Reese, Alex Schechterly, Brooke Stavitzski, Jeremy Walsh. Honors: Neno Agnello, Andrew Boberick, Douglas Campbell, Carlee Capece, Erin Cerase, Tyde Chamberlain, Emily Clarke, Kelsey Cook, Luke Dadey, Kira Dempsey, Maggie Dow, Angel Engle, Eric Evans, Hannah Everett, Haily Gee, Reese Godfrey, Joseph Hall III, Brianna Hardiman, Bryce Harrison, Cheyenne Huffman, Alexis Kennedy, Jillian Kondrosky, Anya Leitem, Joshua Marr, Brooke Mendegro, Abaigael Noss, Brandon Reno, Garrett Roche, Ariana Saxe, Zachary Schwartz, Auston

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SS. Peter & Paul Womens Society celebrates Christmas The Womens Society of SS. Peter & Paul Church, Plains Township, celebrated the Christmas season on Jan. 8. Members and guests were treated to dinner and entertainment, which was provided by the Royal Singers of Holy Redeemer High School. Celebrating the season on the Feast of the Epiphany has become a tradition for the group. Seated: the Rev. John Albosta, senior priest. Standing, from left: Joanne Nixxon, Marty Yanaitis, Joanne Milman and Joan Pisack, committee members. The Rev. Joseph Greskiewicz is pastor.

Cub Scouts receive Catholic religious awards Several Scouts from Cub Scout Pack 193 of Swoyersville recently received their Catholic religious award. They received their awards during Mass at Holy Trinity Church in Swoyersville in celebration of Scouting Sunday. From left, first row, are: Johnathan Brokenshire and Riley Dieffenbach, who received the Parvuli Dei award along with Zeb Moses who received the Light of Christ award. Second row: Tyler Gillespie, Colin Matello, Nate Remsky and Charles Heckman who also received the Parvuli Dei award. In back: The Rev. Joseph J. Pisaneschi who presented the awards.

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The Wilkes-Barre Verizon Telecom Pioneers 7, in partnership with the Horseshoe Curve Club of Altoona, recently purchased folding tables for Holy Rosary School, Duryea. The school received major flood damage in September. Grant money from Verizon was used for the purchase. At the presentation, from left: Kathleen Gilmartin, principal, Holy Rosary School; Trevor Tigue and Eddie Sankus, students; Nancy Karpovich, president, WilkesBarre Telecom Pioneers; Judy Betti, community service chair, Telecom Pioneers; and Josh Mesaris, Emily Mazur and Michael Pope, students.

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Zaykoski, Morgan Sabecky, Cheatley Matreselva, Miles

Sapak, Pepperling

icole C. Miles and Paul M. Matrer. and Mrs. Robert Sapak, selva, together with their famN M Wilkes-Barre, announce the ilies, announce their engagement and upcoming marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Janet Miles, New York, and Brian Miles, West Pittston. She is the granddaughter of Constance J. Varhely and the late Edward J. Varhely, Hanover Township; Patricia Salcedo, Exeter; and the late Thomas Miles, Wilkes-Barre. The prospective groom is the son of Paul and Catherine Matreselva, Swoyersville. He is the grandson of Amy George and the late Michael George, Wilkes-Barre, and the late Angeline and Joseph Matreselva, Wyoming. Nicole attended Hanover Area Jr./Sr. High School and Luzerne County Community College. She is employed at TelerX in Hanover Township. Paul attended Wyoming Valley West High School and Luzerne County Community College. He is the general manager of Pierce Street Motors in Kingston. The couple recently purchased a home together in Swoyersville, where they reside with the bride-to-be’s four-year-old son, Tyler. They will exchange vows on June 24, 2012, at The Waterfront in WilkesBarre. They will celebrate their marriage with a honeymoon in Cancun, Mexico.

BIRTHS Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center Clauson-Alt, Megan and Brian Alt, Lake Ariel, a son, Feb. 3. Blom, Teresa and Richard Harvey, Tunkhannock, a daughter, Feb. 3. Roberts, Tiffany, Wilkes-Barre, a son, Feb. 3. Smallcomb, Jillian and Jason A. Walski, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, Feb. 3. Rezykowski, Amanda and Anthony, Meshoppen, a daughter, Feb. 3. Yanchulis, Jenna and Edward, Dupont, a daughter, Feb. 4. Paulino, Jazmine and Carolos Matos, Hazleton, a daughter, Feb. 5. Close, Quanise, Wilkes-Barre, a son, Feb. 5. Yost, Stacy and Evan, Drums, a son, Feb. 6. Shultz, Brittany and Lester E. Sites Jr., Dallas, a son, Feb. 6. Evans, Danielle and Joshua, Shavertown, twin son and daughter, Feb. 7. Jones, Nancy and Christopher, Harveys Lake, a son, Feb. 7. Smith, Cassandra and Michael Whitmier, Nanticoke, a daughter, Feb. 7. Ruggeri, Rachael and Michael, Mountain Top, a daughter, Feb. 7. Nun, Crissey and Eric, Weatherly, a son, Feb. 8. Brown, Janee and Dwight Woods, Exeter, a daughter, Feb. 8. Moran, Danielle and William, Wyoming, a son, Feb. 9. George, Jessica and James Pitts Jr., Avoca, a daughter, Feb. 9. Adzema, Christina and Erik, Swoyersville, a son, Feb. 9. Sieminski, Jennifer and David, Forty Fort, a son, Feb. 9. Lispi, Sarah and Lee, Swoyersville, a daughter, Feb. 10. Otway, Desiree and Omar Kellom, WilkesBarre, a son, Feb. 10. Rutkoski, Kelly and Joseph, Sugar Notch, a son, Feb. 10. Kaur, Baljeet and Jasuar Singh, Hanover Township, a son, Feb. 1 1. Cragle, Marissa and Joshua, Dallas, a son, Feb. 1 1. Papciak, Lori and Erick Siegfried, Throop, a son, Feb. 12. Martinez, Rosa and Jose Pena, WilkesBarre, a daughter, Feb. 13. Brojakowski, Tanya and Jared Cross, Nanticoke, a daughter, Feb. 13. Zongaro, Kelly and David, a son, Feb. 14. Wiss, Maria and Paul, Moscow, a daughter, Feb. 14 White, Jessica and Wayne, Plains Township, a daughter, Feb. 14.

engagement and approaching marriage of their daughter, Jamie Lee, to Kenneth Pepperling, son of Renita Fennick, Wilkes-Barre Township, and Thomas Pepperling, Kingston. Ms. Sapak is the granddaughter of Pauline (Shirley) Mancini, Ashley; the late Albert (George) Mancini; and the late Regina and William A. Sapak Sr. Mr. Pepperling is the grandson of the late Adolph and Theresa Fennick and the late Elmer and Ruth Pepperling. The bride-to-be is a graduate of Elmer L. Meyers High School and will graduate in May from Portland State University with a Bachelor of Science degree in criminology and criminal justice with a certification in criminal behavior. She is employed by Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center. Mr. Pepperling is a graduate of Elmer L. Meyers High School and King’s College, where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in business administration. He is employed by the Olive Garden, Wilkes-Barre. The couple will exchange vows on June 22, 2012, in Our Lady of Hope Church, Wilkes-Barre.

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arah Cheatley and Jeffrey Sabecky, together with their families, announce their engagement and approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Steven Cheatley and the late Elizabeth Cheatley, Plymouth. She is the granddaughter of the late Dorothy Cheatley. The prospective groom is the son of Edward and Patricia Sabecky, Hanover Township. He is the grandson of the late Amelia and Charles Pugh, Hanover Township, and Edward and Irene Sabecky, Sugar Notch. The bride-to-be is a 2005 graduate of Wyoming Valley West High School. She earned an associate’s degree in general studies from Luzerne County Community College in 2010. She is employed at CVS Caremark as a pharmacy tech. The prospective groom is a 2001 graduate of Hanover Area High School. He is employed at Cardinal Glass and is a member of the Hanover Township Fire Department. The couple will exchange vows on Oct.13, 2012, at All St. Parish Church, Plymouth.

hilip Morgan and Leigh ZayP koski are excited to announce their engagement and approach-

ing marriage. The prospective groom is the son of Giles Morgan, Dickson City, and Marina Morgan, Albuquerque, N.M., and the stepson of Jean Morgan, Dickson City. He is the grandson of the late Willard and Marie Morgan and the late Henry and Helen Jacukowicz. Morgan is employed by CVS Caremark, Hanover Township. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Anthony and Susan Zaykoski, Bear Creek Township. She is the granddaughter of the late Anthony and Florence Zaykoski and the late William and Eldora Crawford. Zaykoski is the owner of Word of Mouse Communications, a copywriting and marketing consulting firm, and a regular contributor to “Northeast Nursing News” magazine. The couple will exchange vows on May 26, 2012, at Messiah Primitive Methodist Church, Bear Creek Township. The Rev. Reginald Thomas will preside over the ceremony.

Scott, Rashaine, Wilkes-Barre, a son, Feb. 15.

Pape, Porcello

Nesbitt Women’s and Children’s Center at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital

ogether with their families, Doctors Eric John Pape and T Danielle Marie Porcello are

Schinse, Gabrielle, Wilkes-Barre, a son, Feb. 7. Dileo, Breanne, Courtdale, a son, Feb. 7. Sokolowski, Erin and Raymond Williamson, Glen Lyon, a daughter, Feb. 7. Millner, MaryAnna and Randy, Kingston, a son, Feb. 8. Andrews, Amber and Randy Groner, Kingston, a daughter, Feb. 8. Freeman, Brianne and Andrew Jackson, Edwardsville, a daughter, Feb. 9. China, Patti and DeShawn, Forty Fort, a daughter, Feb. 9. Stahlnecker, Jessica and Erik, Mountain Top, a son, Feb. 9. Wychock, Kathleen Ann and David Thomas Jr., Mountain Top, a daughter, Feb. 9. Radley, Sirena and Tim Nichol, Dallas, a daughter, Feb. 9. Kapitula, Tamara and Robert Janosky, Kingston, a son, Feb. 10. Kropa, Lisa and Mark J., Greentown, a son, Feb. 10. Kazimi, Suzie and Mohammed Ziadeh, Kingston, a son, Feb. 10. Gajeski, Kerri and Keith, Thornhurst, a daughter, Feb. 10. Bissol, Tracy and Joseph P., Beaver Meadows, a daughter, Feb. 12. Brady, Laura and Gene, Wyoming, a son, Feb. 13. Zielinski, Stephanie and Brandon Jones, West Pittston, a son, Feb. 14. Vega, Maribel and Johnathan Torres, Wilkes-Barre, a son, Feb. 14. Nafus, Keri and Josh, Shickshinny, a daughter, Feb. 14. Dean, Crystal Gordan and Jeremy, Edwardsville, a son, Feb. 14 Jackson, Alicia and Robert Smith, Pittston, a son, Feb. 15. Dupcavitch, Stevei and Jamie Martin, Exeter, a daughter, Feb. 15. Rinehart, Kayla and Justin Whitebread, Mountain Top, a son, Feb. 16. Goble, Genevieve and Brian Thorek Jr., Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, Feb. 17. Decowski, Andrea and Marc, Mountain Top, a daughter, Feb. 17. Wagner, Katie and Mirnes Babic, Moosic, a daughter, Feb. 17. Frederick, Ashley Marie, Pittston, a son, Feb. 18. Falchetti, Kiersten and Shawn, Dallas, a daughter, Feb. 20. Applegate, Courtney and Joshua Kleedorfer, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, Feb. 20.

r. and Mrs. Michael Spurlin, Bucks County, Pa., proudly anM nounce the engagement of their

daughter, Lauren Spurlin, to James Petersen, son of James and Kathleen Petersen, Hillsborough, N.J. Miss Spurlin attended cosmetology school at the Vidal Sassoon Academy in Santa Monica, Calif., and is employed as a hairstylist in North Wales, Pa. Mr. Petersen is a graduate of Arizona State University and is employed as a chef in King of Prussia, Pa. Miss Spurlin is the granddaughter of Dolores Goble and Mr. and Mrs. Bill Spurlin, Dallas, Pa. The wedding is planned for February 2013 at the Historic Hotel Bethlehem, Bethlehem, Pa.

Gannon, Roberts

Gagliardi, Corinna and Michael Dixon, Exeter, a daughter, Feb. 15.

Reid, Julie E. and Herbert F. Beere III, Plymouth Township, a daughter, Feb. 6.

Spurlin, Petersen

pleased to announce their upcoming marriage. Eric is the son of John and Patricia Pape, Larksville. He is the grandson of Mary Shymansky, the late Robert Shymansky and the late John and Ann Pape. He is a 2004 graduate of Wilkes University, where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in biology. Eric completed his Doctor of Optometry degree in 2008 at SUNY College of Optometry in New York City. Danielle is the daughter of Ralph and Diane Porcello, Dix Hills, N.Y. She is the granddaughter of Ralph and Jean Porcello, Middle Island, N.Y.; Frances Haug, Glen Cove, N.Y.; and the late Charles Haug. She is a 2004 graduate of Villanova University. She also completed her Doctor of Optometry degree in 2008 at SUNY College of Optometry. The couple will be united in marriage on April 28, 2012, at St. Elizabeth’s Roman Catholic Church, Long Island, N.Y.

Four generations of Zwarycz family gather our generations of the Zwarycz family recently gathered F to celebrate the 90th birthday of

John Zwarycz, Pittston. John is a former bus driver for Yatesville/Parrish Bus Company. He has five children, Rosemary Massara, Jim, Ron, the late Robert and the late Evelyn Shaw. Four generations at the party, from left, first row, are John Zwarycz and his daughter, Rosemary Massara, Pittston. Second row: grandson Tony Massara, Shippensburg, and greatgrandchildren Anna, 5, Peter, 8, and Joey, 10; and granddaughter Maria Sypniewski, Wyoming, and great-grandchildren, Nina, 1 1, and Zachary, 15.

evi Gannon and Kristin RoL berts, along with their parents, announce their engagement and

upcoming marriage. The bride-to-be is a 1999 graduate of Lake-Lehman High School and a 2003 graduate of Wilkes University, where she earned her bachelor’s degree in elementary education and English. She is employed as a fifth-grade teacher by the Lake-Lehman School District. The prospective groom is a 2000 graduate of Tunkhannock Area High School and a 2004 graduate of The Pennsylvania State University, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering. He is employed as a patent examiner by the United States Patent and Trademark Office. The couple will exchange vows on June 30, 2012.

IN BRIEF PITTSTON: The Pittston Memorial Library, 47 Broad St., is hosting “A Blind Date with a Book” event from now until April 10. Books wrapped in newspaper will be available for take out. There will be various types of books, including fiction, non-fiction, comedies, informational and romances. The books will be checked out without un-wrapping the paper. A “Rate Your Date” slip will be provided for reviews of the book. Each slip returned to the library will be entered into a raffle for a Barnes and Noble gift certificate. Deadline to enter is April 10. The library will also have six Simple Touch Nooks available for check out beginning March 1. The Nooks will come preloaded with best sellers and classics for adults and young adults, thanks to the generosity of the Friends of the Pittston Library. Some requirements apply. Simple Touch Nooks can be reserved at the library or by calling 654-9565.

Literacy Night set at K.M. Smith Elementary School K.M. Smith Elementary School, Nanticoke, is holding its annual Literacy Night for students and parents of the school 5-6:30 p.m. March 6. Dr. Seuss is the theme for this year’s event. The Greater Nanticoke Area Family Center will present information and include activities for non-school-age children and Joan Solano, reading coach, will be available with information on early literacy development. The staff will be demonstrating different reading activities from blending words to showcasing the new Apple IPODS that are used in one of the kindergarten classes. Members of the planning committee, from left, first row, are Mrs. Mendrzycki, Ms. Mullen, Mrs. Solano and Mrs. Coleman. Second row: Ms. Paganucci, Ms. DeCinti, Mrs. Wojciechowski, Mrs. Thomas and Ms. Mash.


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arly M. Drahus, D.O. , daughter of ary Gertrude Kurlandski and Joseph and Tina Drahus, West C Albert William Adomitis M Wyoming, and Christopher P. Snyder, were united in holy matrimony son of Philip and Patricia Snyder, Audubon, N.J., were married on Feb. 26, 2011, in St. Peter’s Roman Catholic Church, Merchantville, N.J. The Rev. Allain Capras celebrated the nuptial mass. Readings were performed by Mary Manion and Craig Adair, friends of the groom. The gifts were presented by Antoinette Drahus-Paone and Tanya Drahus-Greeley, cousins of the bride. The bride chose her friends Sara Nardone as her maid of honor and Erin Barnard as her matron of honor. Bridesmaids were Ann Wisloski and Laura Wisloski, cousins of the bride; Kim Snyder, sister of the groom; and Megan Marshall, Nina Vecchione, Candace Robb-Rarey and Moha Kulkarni, friends of the bride. The groom chose his friend Mark Hebert as his best man. Groomsmen were Pete Knast, cousin of the groom; Joseph Drahus and David Drahus, brothers of the bride; and Tom Maioriello, Paul Santangelo, Dan LeFebvre, Christopher Miller and the late Dusty Spreng, friends of the groom. The bride chose Kaylee Dawson, niece of the groom, as her flower girl and the groom chose Philip Gristina, cousin of the bride, as his ring bearer. The bride carried a bouquet of white calla lilies and roses which were a symbol of her beloved grandmothers, Rose Maira and Lillian Drahus. On her bouquet were crystal picture charms of her late grandparents, Rose and Joseph Maira and Lillian Drahus, and of the groom’s late grandparents, Marylou Knast and Neri and Margaret Snyder. An evening cocktail hour and reception were held at The Merion, Cinnaminson, N.J. The bride is a 2000 graduate of Wyoming Area Secondary Center, Exeter, Pa. She is a 2004 cum laude graduate from Dickinson College, where she earned a Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry. In 2008, she earned the degree of Doctor of Osteopathy from Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine. She is a fourth-year resident at Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pa., in the Emergency Medicine Residency Program, class of 2012. Upon graduation from residency, she has accepted a position with J.H. Gatewood Emergency Services, P.A., as an Emergency Medicine Physician at Northside Hospital and Heart Institute, St. Petersburg, Fla. The groom is a 1999 graduate of Audubon High School. He graduated from Camden County Community College in 2002 with a degree in criminal justice. He is a 2007 graduate of the Camden County Police Academy, serving as platoon leader. He served as a police officer for the Camden City Police Department in the Special Operations Unit. He is pursuing his Bachelor of Arts/Master of Business Administration degrees at the University of South Florida. The couple honeymooned in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic.

MEETINGS March 6 WILKES-BARRE: Toastmasters International, 5:15 p.m. at Sundance Vacations, Presentation Room, 264 Highland Park Blvd. All are welcome. The public speaking, leadership and self-improvement club meets the first and third Tuesdays of each month. For more information contact Rick at 417-7036; visit the website toastmasters.org; or email toastmasterswb@gmail.com.

on Sept. 23, 2011, at St. Jude’s Parish, Mountain Top by the Rev. Gerald Shantillo. The bride is the daughter of John and Mary Kurlandski, Swoyersville. She is the granddaughter of the late Frank and Mary Sorick, Pittston, and the late John and Helen Kurlandski, Plains Township. The groom is the son of Marion Adomitis and the late Albert Adomitis, Wilkes-Barre. He is the grandson of Helen Lutkoski and the late William Lutkoski, Wilkes-Barre, and the late Joe and Anna Adomitis, WilkesBarre. The bride was escorted down the aisle by her father and chose her sister Susan as her maid of honor. Flower girls were her sister Christina Kurlandski and Anna Holstine, niece of the groom. Albert chose John Bilski as his best man. Groomsmen were Mark, John Jr. and Frank Kurlandski, brothers of the bride. Scripture readings were given by Joy Kurlandski, sister of the bride, and Alyssa Bonomo, niece of the groom. Offertory gifts were presented by the groom’s sisters, Susan Holstine and Judy Bonomo. An evening cocktail hour and wedding reception were held at The Ice House in Mountain Top. Mary is a 1992 graduate of Bishop O’Reilly High School. She earned a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing and a major in psychology in from Wilkes University in 1996. She is employed as a registered nurse in the Critical Care Unit of Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. Albert is a 1988 graduate of GAR Memorial High School. He was in the Armed Services 109th Field Artillery for six years. He earned an EMS paramedic degree in 1992 and an associate’s degree in nursing from Luzerne County Community College in 1994. He earned his Bachelor of Science degree in nursing from the University of Delaware in 1999 and his master’s degree in anesthesia from the University of Scranton in 2005. Albert is employed as a certified registered nurse anesthetist at Hazleton General Hospital. The couple honeymooned in Guanacaste, Costa Rica. They reside in Mountain Top.

Emerson L. Bomber baptized Louise Bomber, daughter of Lee and Brittany Balchune E merson Bomber, formerly of

Duryea, was baptized on Jan. 22 at Holy Rosary Church, Duryea. A celebration was held at Memorable Occasions in her

honor. Emerson’s parents chose Jeremy Ambrosavage and Bridgette Balchune as godparents. Maternal grandparents are William and Charlotte Balchune, Duryea. Paternal grandmother is Deborah Bomber, Duryea. The family resides in Henryville.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 PAGE 7B

Blandina, Weinschenk

arya Morris and John Nackley, r. and Mrs. James M. Blanditogether with their parents, na, Wyoming, are proud to M M announce their engagement and announce the engagement and

The Kovaleskis r. and Mrs. Joseph S. Kovaleski celebrated their 50th wedding M anniversary on Feb. 24, 2012. The

couple was married in 1962 at St. Mary’s Church, Swoyersville, by the Rev. E.J. Zawodniak. Mrs. Kovaleski is the former Geraldine Grace. She is the daughter of the late John and Stella Grace. Mr. Kovaleski is the son of the late Stanley and Victoria Kovaleski. The couple has three children: son Joseph S. Kovaleski Jr. and his wife, Maria, Swoyersville; daughter Debbie A. (Kovaleski) Ulitchney and her husband, Ronald, Trucksville; son David C. Kovaleski and his wife, Irene, Plains Township. They have four grandchildren, Christopher and Bryanna Kovaleski, Stephanie Grace Ulitchney, and David Edmund Kovaleski. Prior to retirement, Joseph Kovaleski was a guard at the State Correctional Institution at Dallas. Gerrie Kovaleski retired from Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. To mark the occasion, the couple renewed their vows in Holy Name/ St. Mary’s Church, Swoyersville. A dinner, in the couple’s honor, was given by their children at Costello’s Restaurant in Edwardsville.

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aren Hannington and Benjamin Zehner, together with their families, announce their engagement and approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of the late Sherrin Hannington, Exeter. The groom is the son of Jeffrey Zehner, Scranton, and Tonya Zehner, Dunmore. The bride-to-be is a 1992 graduate of Wyoming Area High School, Exeter, and a 2007 graduate of King’s College, Wilkes-Barre, where she earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology. Karen is pursuing her Master of Science degree in organizational leadership. She is employed by National University, Henderson, Nev., as an admissions adviser. The prospective groom is a 1998 graduate of Dunmore High School and a 2003 graduate of Pennsylvania State University, State College, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration and finance. Ben is employed by Harrah’s Entertainment, Las Vegas, Nev. The couple will exchange vows on June 17, 2012.

approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Daniel and Maureen Morris, Kingston. She is the granddaughter of the late Daniel and Helen Morris, Edwardsville, and the late Harry and Florence Kocylowski, Plymouth. The prospective groom is the son of John Nackley, Harveys Lake and Dena Nackley, Dallas. He is the grandson of the late George and Sara Nackley, Wilkes-Barre, and Ralph and Ann Capristo, Wilkes-Barre. Marya is a 2001 graduate of Wyoming Valley West High School. She earned her Bachelor of Science degree in elementary education and a minor in psychology from The Pennsylvania State University. She earned a master’s degree in education from Wilkes University. Marya will complete her reading specialist certification from King’s College this fall. She is employed as a first-grade teacher at Wyoming Valley West School District. John Nackley is a 2001 graduate of Dallas High School. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in business administration and a Master of Business Administration degree from Saint Joseph’s University, Philadelphia. He is director of marketing for Maslow Lumia Bartorillo Advertising, Wilkes-Barre. The couple will exchange vows July 21, 2012, at The Terraview Chapel in the Poconos.

Freeman, Ferdinand ancy and Paul R. Ferdinand, Drifton, are happy to announce N the engagement of their daughter,

Nicole, to Brett Freeman, son of Joan and Bob Freeman, Drums. The bride-to-be graduated from MMI Preparatory School in 2004; Indiana University of Pennsylvania (Robert E. Cook Honors College) in 2008 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology; and Indiana University of Pennsylvania in 2009 with a Master of Education degree in educational psychology. She is attending Kutztown University, where she will graduate with her Master of Education degree in secondary school counseling on May 12, 2012. The prospective groom graduated from Mahwah High School in 2003; Penn State University in 2007 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in crime, law and justice; and Indiana University (Maurer School of Law) in 2010 with his Doctorate of Jurisprudence. He is an associate at Sabatini Law Firm, Dunmore. A July 2012 wedding is planned.

upcoming marriage of their daughter, Jaime, to Jay Weinschenk, son of Attorney and Mrs. Alfred Weinschenk, Clarks Green. The bride-to-be is the granddaughter of Helen C. Adonizio, Pittston; the late Charles A. Adonizio Jr.; and Mr. and Mrs. Michael Blandina, Wyoming. The prospective groom is the grandson of the late Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Weinschenk, Dunmore, and Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Houllihan, Clarks Summit. Ms. Blandina is a graduate of Scranton Preparatory High School and the University of Delaware, where she earned a Bachelor of Science degree in business administration with a minor in international marketing. She is employed with Geisinger Health System as an operations manager in community practice in the Scranton Department. Mr. Weinschenk is a graduate of Scranton Preparatory High School and Catholic University, Washington, D.C., where he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in financial management. Mr. Weinschenk also earned a Masters of Business Administration degree from the University of Scranton. He is employed with Net Driven as a client relations executive. The couple plans to exchange vows on May 26, 2012.

Bria, Donovan lyssa Bria and Daniel Donovan, together with their families, are A pleased to announce their engage-

ment and upcoming marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Frank Bria, Wilkes-Barre, and the late Regina Bria. The prospective groom is the son of Joseph and Anne Donovan, Marlton, N.J. Alyssa is a 2006 graduate of James M. Coughlin High School. She earned a Bachelor of Science degree in accounting from King’s College in 2010. She is employed by Kraft Foods. Daniel is a 2006 graduate of Holy Cross High School, Delran, N.J. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in finance from King’s College in 2010 and is pursuing his Master of Business Administration degree from Rowan University. He is employed by Curtis Circulation Company. The couple will exchange vows on Sept. 29, 2012, at St. Mary’s of the Immaculate Conception Church, Wilkes-Barre. A reception will follow at the Genetti Hotel and Conference Center, Wilkes-Barre.

SOCIAL PAGE GUIDELINES The Times Leader allows you to decide how your wedding notice reads, with a few caveats. Wedding announcements run in Sunday’s People section, with black-and-white photos, free of charge. Articles must be limited to 220 words, and we reserve the right to edit announcements that exceed that word count. Announcements

must be typed or submitted via www.timesleader.com. (Click on the "people" tab, then “weddings” and follow the instructions from there.) Submissions must include a daytime contact phone number and must be received within 10 months of the wedding date. We do not run first-year anniversary announcements or announcements of weddings that took place more than a year ago. (Wedding

photographers often can supply you with a black-and-white proof in advance of other album photographs.) All other social announcements must be typed and include a daytime contact phone number. Announcements of births at local hospitals are submitted by hospitals and published on Sundays.

Out-of-town announcements with local connections also are accepted. Photos are only accepted with baptism, dedication or other religious-ceremony announcements but not birth announcements. Engagement announcements must be submitted at least one month before the wedding date to guarantee publication and must include the wedding date. We

cannot publish engagement announcements once the wedding has taken place. Anniversary photographs are published free of charge at the 10th wedding anniversary and subsequent five-year milestones. Other anniversaries will be published, as space allows, without photographs.

Drop off articles at the Times Leader or mail to: The Times Leader People Section 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Questions can be directed to Kathy Sweetra at 829-7250 or e-mailed to people@timesleader.com.


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Wyoming Valley Poetry Society seeks student contest entrants

WILKES-BARRE: The Wyoming Valley Poetry Society is accepting entries for its annual student poetry contest held in conjunction with the Fine Arts Fiesta in Wilkes-Barre. The contest is open to students in grades 1 through 12 from throughout northeastern Pennsylvania. Poems may be rhymed or free verse and are not to exceed 32 lines. They must be original, unpublished works created by the student. Entries should be submitted on 8-by-11-inch, white paper and typed or neatly written in blue or black ink. Lined paper is allowed. No odd-sized paper, light-colored ink, penciled entries or artwork. The poetry will be judged in the following age groups: Primary, grades 1-3; Intermediate, grades 4-6; Junior, grades 7-9; and Young Adult, grades 10-12.

HONOR ROLL West Side Career and Technology Center Nancy P. Tkatch, administrative director, and Jerry Ogurkis, acting principal, West Side Career and Technology Center announced the names of students who were placed on the Honor Roll for the second marking period. Grade 9: Highest Honors: Emily A. Brown. High Honors: Alexis Padavan, Garvin D. Paisley, Troy J. Vankevich. Honors: Carl Lee Koprowski, Michael T. Kusma, Rachel Langan, Lila V. Szabo, D’Mitri Yakushin. Grade 10: Highest Honors: Ashleigh Kristina Gillis. High Honors: Jory D. Brezinski, Matthew A. Church, Nichole L. Hill, Paul T. Holena, Anthony J. Katchko, Amber D. Lewis, Alexandria E. McManus, Paige E. Siani, Danielle J. Simon, Jestina L. Vasicak, Shannon Yavorchak. Honors: Kenneth C. Askew, Laura Baut, Laura E. Brown, Jessica A. Byam, Christopher David Cragle, Dorothy Rose Derby, Eric W. Flaherty, Brittany E. O’Connell, Brandon W. Orlowski, Kendra Sarai Poaches, Allison Sands, Dylan M. Sherrill, Tyler Ray Smith, Jamie Marie Zimmerman.

First-place, second-place, thirdplace and honorable mention awards will be given. All winners will receive a certificate suitable for framing and will be invited to read their poem on the main stage at 11 a.m. May 20 at the Fine Arts Fiesta. They will also have their pictures published in the newspaper. All entries should include, on the reverse side of the poem, the following information: student’s name, grade, school, home town, phone number and teacher’s name. Poems should be mailed to W.V.P.S. Student Poetry Contest, c/o Jim Spock, P.O. Box 173, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703. All entries must be postmarked by March 31. Winners will be notified on or around May 10. Call 570-823-0786 with any questions. Barbara L. Farley, Richelle Marcella Fountain, Alexis Hamlett, Nikki J. Higgins, Alexis Regina Johnson, Rebecca Kemp, Emilee A. Krasson, Kristina R. Leitem, Emily C. Mansilla, Mark Aaron Mesaris, Kyle Joseph Novitski, Kelsey Lynn Pritchard, Haliee E. Rhodes, Justin Romanoski, Ralph F. Shulde, Michael Stash, Sareina M. Wootton, Bailey Wright. Grade 12: Highest Honors: Chenay R. Champluvier, Felisha Lynn Davenport, Hannah Lee Smith. High Honors: Nathan T. Brodosky, Nicole Rae Davenport, Audre M. Edwards, Mark J. Macosky, Kassie Rodriguez. Honors: David A. Allen, Bethany M. Bielut, Brian C. Bonnerwith, Gage Lee Buchanan, Shyann N. Church, Ariel H. Courter, Llyod A. Crawford, Samantha Jayne Edmonds, Derrick J. Eyerman, Emily A. Farver, George Fink, Kisem Freeman, Michael J. Garrity, Justin C. Grocki, Amanda R. Hamilton, Kelly A. Jones, Jacqueline Joseph, Elias F. Kocher, Shane Michael Kocher, Derek R. Lewis, Robert E. Lewis, Vera E. Lewis, Samantha Lynn MacMillan, Jesse J. Nace, Shawn Ryan O’Malley, Michael E. Price, Terrell J. Sasser, Ryan J. Searles, Stanley Sopata, Robert F. Strachan.

Pittston Area Leo’s Club co-sponsoring shoe/clothing drive The Pittston Area Leo’s Club and Fibers of the Earth, a recycling company, have joined forces to help the environment by holding a clothing and shoe drive fundraiser. The collection will start on March 1 and continue through March 16. Drop-off locations are Pittston Area High School, 5 Stout St., Yatesville, or the Dupont Municipal Office, 600 Chestnut St. Dupont. Fibers of the Earth will pay per pound to the Leo’s Club and funds will be used for the club’s tree-planting projects. Contact Claire Ellen Hopple at 654-2415 ext. 2101 with any questions about the drive. For more information on Fibers of the Earth, call 570-586-5242; email fibersoftheearth@gmail.com; or visit fibersoftheearth.com. Members of the Leo’s Club, from left, first row: Ellen Renfer, president; Antoinette Antonacci; Irene Magdon, vice president; Leonardo, club mascot; Jessica Baker, secretary; Christine D’Agostino; and Megan Dougherty, treasurer. Second row: Dominique DelPriore, Katie Johnson, Nicole Lazevnick, Rachael Lazevnick, Christine Briggs and Haleigh Zurek. Third row: Jessika Timinski, Jamie Baker, Britanny Hypolite, Lea Garibaldi, Marie Terese Fox, Marie Cary, Samantha Piazza and Josh Zurek.

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HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

Church, community note Vietnamese New Year

Scarlet J. Hoskins

Elyse L. Kunec

Scarlet J. Hoskins, daughter of Rachel and Jason Hoskins, Larksville, is celebrating her second birthday today, Feb. 26. Scarlet is a granddaughter of Linda Grayson, Panama City Beach, Fla., and the late David and Nancy Morgan. She has a brother, Anthony, and two sisters, Courtney and Sara.

Elyse Leigh Kunec, daughter of William and Amy Kunec, Hanover Township, is celebrating her third birthday today, Feb. 26. Elyse is a granddaughter of Sandra Beggs, Nanticoke, and William and Barbara Kunec, Lee Park. She is a great-granddaughter of Irene Beggs, Nanticoke. Elyse has a brother, Ian, 6.

St. Frances Cabrini Parish along with the Vietnamese Community recently celebrated Vietnamese New Year, the Year of the Dragon, with a Mass at the Franklin Township Fire Hall. The Mass was followed by a gathering which included traditional Vietnamese food and New Year festivities. More than 200 Vietnamese parishioners attended the event. The Rev. Vincent Dang, shown, celebrates a monthly Vietnamese Mass at 2 p.m. on the third Sunday of each month at St. Frances Cabrini Church. For more information, call 696-3737.

Heights Saint David’s Day Banquet planned at First Welsh Presbyterian Church The 76th annual Heights Saint David’s Day Banquet honoring the patron saint of Wales will be held 6:30 p.m. Friday at the First Welsh Presbyterian Church, East Northampton and Meade streets, WilkesBarre, for the men and sons of the church and community. Tickets are $15 and are available from any of the committee members. The speaker will be David Williams, a society member, who earned his master’s degree in education from Wilkes University. Williams, a teacher in the Scranton Area School District, will talk about his many trips to Wales to study genealogy. Organist and song leader will be Glenn Ryman. Invocation will be given by Pastor Chester Dudick from the Meade Street Baptist Church and the benediction will be given by the Rev. George Kropp from the Laurel Run Primitive Methodist Church. H. Merritt Hughes will be the master of ceremonies. Catering will be provided by Dukey’s Café. Committee members, from left, are Ryan Anthony, Jeff Borosky, Jim Anthony, Jonathan Comitz, Bob Anthony, Dr. William Lewis Jr. and Jack Owens.

NAMES AND FACES

Amiah E. Wade

Blakely A. Ball

Amiah Elizabeth Wade, daughter of Joni Wade, Wilkes-Barre, celebrated her fourth birthday Feb. 6. Amiah is a granddaughter of Jo Ann Wade, Wilkes-Barre, and the late Robert Stancik, Zion Grove. She is a great-granddaughter of Joan Herbert and the late William Herbert, WilkesBarre.

Blakely Anan Ball, daughter of Brad and Tammy Ball, is celebrating her fourth birthday today, Feb. 26. Blakely is a granddaughter of Mayor Norm and Peg Ball, Tunkhannock, and Joe and Debbie Boyle, Jim Thorpe. She has a brother, Blaize Norman, 2.

Students participate in Race for Education Good Shepherd Academy students recently competed in a Race for Education Program to raise money for future class trips. The top four students that collected the most money received a $50 savings bond from Luzerne National Bank. Other awards were given to students who ran the most laps and raised the most money for their class. Savings bond winners, from left: Brady Eggleston, first grade; Brennan Eggleston, third grade; Samantha Sokolowsky, seventh grade; Emily Stefanik, fifth grade; and James Jones, principal.

Sara C. Cawley, a recent Gettysburg College graduate and a 2003 graduate of Tunkhannock High School, was awarded a Fulbright U.S. Student Program Scholarship. Cawley is Cawley studying in Denmark at the University of Copenhagen’s Danish Centre for Forest, Landscape and Planning. Her focus is on collaboration’s role in the formation of the Danish National Park System. The Fulbright Scholarship is a prestigious grant from the U.S. Department of State’s Fulbright Program to learn, teach and conduct research around the world. Recipients of Fulbright grants are selected on the basis of academic or professional achievement and demonstrated leadership potential in their fields. Ralph Shuldi and Emilee Krasson were recently named Students of the Month at the West Side Career and Technology Center. Shuldi, a senior in the auto mechanics program, was named Shuldi Student of the Month for January. He plans on attending college and mastering in auto mechanical technology. He is the son Krasson of Ralph Shuldi Sr. and Arlene Pesavento, Wyoming. Krasson, a junior in the health related technology program, was named Student of the Month for February. Her future goals include college and work in the medical profession. She is the daughter of Joseph and Rebecca Krasson, Plymouth.

Seminary MATHCOUNTS team earns first place at competition The MATHCOUNTS team at Wyoming Seminary Lower School recently took first place in the Keystone Northeast Chapter MATHCOUNTS Competition held at the Luzerne County Community College. The team advances to the state competition in Harrisburg in March. Four students placed in the top ten spots in the individual competition rounds: Dominic Wright, Dallas, placed sixth; Alexandra Zaloga, Moosic, finished fifth; Andrew Alday, Mountain Top, finished fourth; and Connor McGowan, Pittston, finished first. In the countdown round, McGowan finished first and Alday finished second, advancing to the state competition. Middle-school mathematics teacher Renee McGowan coached this year’s team. Members of the 2012 MATHCOUNTS team, from left: Daniel Paglia, Shavertown; Robert Austin, Dallas; Alday; Zaloga; Katie Paglia, Shavertown; Alexandra Cuddy, Shavertown; Connor McGowan; Wright; Renee McGowan; Reeya Lele, Pittston; and Satyasaran Sreeharikesan, Wilkes-Barre.

Schuyler Avenue Elementary School recognized for test achievements The Pennsylvania Department of Education recognized Wyoming Valley West’s Schuyler Avenue Elementary School for continuing to achieve Adequate Yearly Progress on the PSSA assessments for the 2010-2011 school year. Schuyler Avenue Elementary has achieved AYP consecutively since the start of the PSSA Assessments in the 2002-2003 school year. Faculty members, from left, first row, are Sara Pape, Connie Bookwalter, Danielle Griffin, Kristy Blizzard, Nicole Rossick, Jackie Dziak and Gwen Blaker. Second row: Jill Widman; Lindsey Keating; Casey Kavanagh; Lenora Minetola; Alison Hoover; Samantha Bovolick; Maylan Nicholson, guidance counselor; Raymond Whalen, principal; and Wendy Patton, head teacher.

GUIDELINES

Children’s birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge Photographs and information must be received two full weeks before your child’s birthday. To ensure accurate publication, your information must

be typed or computer-generated. Include your child’s name, age and birthday, parents’, grandparents’ and great-grandparents’ names and their towns

of residence, any siblings and their ages. Don’t forget to include a daytime contact phone number. Without one, we may be unable to publish a birthday

announcement on time. We cannot return photos submitted for publication in community news, including birthday photos, occasions

photos and all publicity photos. Please do not submit precious or original professional photographs that require return because such photos can be-

come damaged, or occasionally lost, in the production process. Send to: Times Leader Birthdays, 15 North Main St., WilkesBarre, PA 18711-0250.

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cause the human rights records of Eritrea and Sudan are so abominable. In concert with the Hebrew aid group HIAS and Council Migration Service of Philadelphia, Stauffer tracks the movement of Eritreans held hostage in the desert. “When Eritreans are going through difficult times, in Libya, Egypt, or anywhere, (Stauffer) is always the first to come out and say, ‘Please, please try to help,’” said Eskinder Negash, who was born in Ethiopia to Eritrean parents and whom President Obama appointed director of the federal Office of Refugee Resettlement in 2009. Stauffer re-immersed himself in the struggles of the small African nation in 2003, when he helped bring to America an Eritrean he knew from his Peace Corps days teaching English, science, and art to Eritrean teens. Prompted to reconnect with the man after hearing about him from an immigrant friend they had in common, Stauffer reached out by e-mail and telephone. He arranged for the man to get a visa to the United States, and personally paid for his plane ticket. He supported his successful application for asylum. Today, the man, his wife, and two daughters live in Florida. He is business manager for the America Team. Eritrea has a “diaspora tax,” under which Eritreans living abroad pay 2 percent of their income to its government. Those in the United States often speak of being followed or visited by people they suspect are Afewerki

agents, Ramic said. “They don’t know who to trust.” Stauffer said he recently “exchanged e-mails on (intimidation) with the State Department.” Eritrea’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs called the accusations against its government “malicious distortions” and “outright lies.” Interviewed Friday, Dawit Haile, a spokesman for the Eritrean Embassy in Washington, cited numerous satellite dishes and Internet cafes in his country as proof that free expression is valued. The United States and United Nations demonize Eritrea with “propaganda,” he said. The United Nations awarded Eritrea, a former Italian colony, to Ethiopia in 1952 in a postWorld War II realignment of Africa. A decade later, Ethiopia annexed Eritrea, triggering a 30year war for independence that ended after rebels defeated government forces and Eritrea became a nation. Along with civil strife, Eritrea is plagued by frequent droughts and locust swarms. National service — including military duty with no time limit — also drives young people to leave, adding to the refugee crisis. More than 42 percent of the population is younger than 14. U.N. monitors have found evidence that high-level Eritrean officials facilitate escapes for cash, charging about $3,000 per person to leave a country where the average annual income is $710. In a cable published two years ago by WikiLeaks, the U.S. ambassador to Eritrea described Afewerki, a former hero of the country’s independence, as “cruel ... defiant” and “unhinged.”

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are.” What was your first car? “It was a 1978 red Austin Mini that had a white top and windows that folded. I used to drive it on the beach with my friends and it would get stuck in the sand. Those were good times.” What would be some of your proudest moments either personally or professionally? “I would have to say, professionally, when I moved here from a different country at the age of 20 and successfully set up a business and established my family here. In regards to my family, it has been seeing my kids grow up and be successful themselves. If you work hard in America, good things truly happen.”

has an appeal because it is remote and rich with spirituality and culture.” Where do you like to go in Northeastern Pennsylvania? “Historical locations are most appealing, such as Jim Thorpe. The wife and I have a real appreciation for preserved things and places.” Do you have any particular tastes in food or drinks? “I like Mediterranean and Thai food accompanied by Absolut, perhaps.” Do you have any favorite books? “I like anything that involves politics or world John Gordon writes about area people for the Meet feature. Reach events.” Do you have a favorite him at 970-7229. quote? “Tell me what you want, I will tell you who you

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At The Pro Life Center, we are here to help you where help is needed most with an untimely pregnancy. And remember that we have professionals ready to talk to you about your situation and you decide what is best for you and your baby. Single Parenting Single parenting is a real challenge and a very difficult one. Maturity, responsibility and financial stability play an important role in considering the choice in being a single parent. Being able to look to the future and plan for a secure future for yourself and the baby is extremely important in making this decision. A home life for the baby with a mother and father is the most stable condition. Marriage Well meaning people may try to push you into marriage. But marriage is intended to be forever, especially when it involves children. Getting married because you are

pregnant is a poor basis for building a loving family. Marriage failures are high for those who marry under such pressures. You should be the one to decide what is right for your life and for the life of the child. Marriage is a serious step to a committed relationship. Adoption Considering adoption means that you are concerned about the being a good mother- wise enough to realize that you might not be ready to raise a child at this time in your life. You may be concerned with what your family and friends will think of your decision, but the important thing is what you think. An adoption decision can be made any time during pregnancy or even after the baby is born. Adoption agencies have long lists of qualified couples who are unable to have children and are ready to love and raise a child. You can help choose the adoptive parents for your child, as adoption plans can be developed that allow you to

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be as involved as you would like to be, both before and after your child’s birth. Through the counseling services that are available to you, they will enable you to begin to explore your personal needs, concerns and issues surrounding your pregnancy. Whatever you decide, we believe it is important that you make an informed decision and that you feel comfortable and confident with your decision. We are here to support you through the many emotions you may experience through this difficult time. The Pro Life Center can also provide you with information regarding adoption. Pro-Life Center Services Include: • Information on pregnancy and abortion • Referrals for all pregnancy related concerns, • Education on fetal development, • Post abortion healing, • Maternity clothes, baby clothes and supplies • Counseling and education on crisis pregnancy • Prenatal care education. You have major decisions to make. You need to learn about all of your options. There are simply no easy answers. And no one should have to be alone. Please let our professionals at Pro Life Center help you during this time. Life is the center of our concern for you and your baby. There are no fees and you are not obligated to do anything. You are not alone. We truly care. Call Pro Life Center at (570) 826-1819. Open Monday through Friday from 10:00 AM until 3:00 PM and other times by appointment.

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HONOR ROLL Rice Elementary Kevin Seyer, principal, Rice Elementary School recently announced the second quarter Honor Roll:

Preschoolers celebrate ‘Pajama Day’ at Miss Ellie’s Miss Ellie’s Education Center’s five-day and two-day preschool classes recently celebrated Pajama Day. The students enjoyed breakfast foods for lunch which included French toast, pancakes, cereal, fresh fruit, eggs, juice and milk. The children brought in their favorite stuffed animals and watched the movie ‘Bedtime Stories’ and listened to the story ‘Pajama Day.’ Participants, from left, first row, are Christian Padden, Nicholas Havard, Preston Zadzura, Alexys Hazeltine, Alivia Evans, Aiden Nealon and Christopher Schlude. Second row: Nicholas Nuss, Jude Free, Branden Biller, Allison Drust, Tristin Rushnock and Mackenzie Kearney.

Principal’s Honors: Shane Angle, Jacob Antosh, Kailee Barboza, Alyssa Bennett, Kaitlyn Bobeck, Matthew Brunetti, Nicholas Brunetti, Patrick Colo, Grant Cormier, Justin Darden, Ryan Deem, Brian Dwyer, Jade Fallbright, Makena Gormley, Ronnie Grevera, Owen Grigas, Sara Hopkins, Manav Javia, Holly Jones, Sarah Kalada, Connor Kaminski, Kathryn Karpinski, Matthew Kelly, Aaron Kleger, Kevin Klusewitz, Evan Knapp, Natasha Koslop, Anthony Kovalchik, Kayla Kulp, Hanna Lines, Sarah Macko, Wesley Mahler, Julia Makowski, Jared McCune, Ifrah Mehran, Joseph Parsons, Spencer Riccio, Jordan Rinehimer, Kaitlyn Roberts, Thomas Roberts, Caden Rozitski, Sebastian Rucco, Anthony Ruggeri, Joshua Rusinko, Sydney Sobelewski, Wyatt Steltz, Joseph Taylor, Kiara Tereska, Ethan Van Gorden, Brandon Whitman, Eric Witner, Abigail Zaleppa, Braden Zlockie. Honors: Tyler Albert, Zarqua Ansari, Paul Ashton, James Aton, Ryan Black, Lyndsey Blackwell, Brianna Booths, Robert Briggs, Jennifer Brown, Robert Bueg, Kimberly Conrad, Cassandra Cooper, Emily Dreyfus, Julia Dreyfus, Alyssa Dulski, Julia Filchak, Natasha Geisler, Michael Golden, Elizabeth Harding, Michelle Heller, Brian Hilenski, Michael Jarmiolowski, Joey Judge, Shea Kilbourn, Wyatt Kindler, Kyleigh Kline, Chloe Lacoste, Alexis Legg, Elizabeth Martz, Molly Maley, Alexis McLean, Timothy Mikolaichik, Paul Mikolajczyk, Mahad Muhammad, John O’Boyle, Prit Patel, Thomas Perillo, David Perrins, Christopher Ribar, Zabria Ross, Kevin Smith, Kiara Smith, Tyler Snipas, Jacob Spaide, David Steadle, Jacob Swartwood, Samantha Swartwood, Matthew Tirpak, Kayla Van Kirk, Nicholas Vital, David Wint, Michael Wyda, Kaitlyn Zimmerman.

Our Lady of the Eucharist celebrates first reconciliation Our Lady of the Eucharist Parish, Pittston, recently celebrated first reconciliation. Having completed a two-year preparation program, 15 children celebrated their First Reconciliation at 2 p.m. Feb. 5. Maurita Bartnikowski is the coordinator of religious education and Katryna Reilly serves as catechist for the second grade. The Rev. Thomas J. Maloney is pastor. From left, first row: Abby Lazecki, Isabella Latona, Paige Washko, Richard Bowen, Matthew Mayers, Samantha Quinn, Avalon Starrie, and Shelby Klush. Second row: Ben Frederick, Stephen Schott, Madion Decker, Avery McNulty, Kalyssa Reilly, Madison Hector, and Ethan Ghannam. Third row: Bartnikowski, Rev. Maloney and Reilly.

OUT-OF-TOWN GRADUATES Clarion University

Scouts earn God and Church awards Five local scouts recently earned the United Methodist God and Church award after a nine-week course of study under the guidance of the Rev. M. Lynn Snyder at Shavertown United Methodist Church. The scouts were required to learn more about their faith and the history of their denomination in addition to creating a scrapbook of their study. From left, first row, are: Alex McCarthy, Emma Oley, a member of Girl Scout Cadet Troop 33903 in Swoyersville; and James Hughes. Second row: Hunter Hughes, Rev. Snyder, David Oley. All of the Boy Scouts are members of Boy Scout Troop 281 in Dallas.

Plains Lions Club donates $500 to pantry The Plains Lions Club recently presented a $500 donation to the food pantry of SS. Peter and Paul Church. Money for the donation was made possible through the Lions’ fundraisers such as the OutBack Steak Dinner and golf tournament, which is scheduled for July 15. From left: Lion John Woloski, chairman health and welfare; Lion John Corcoran , first vice president; Lorraine Talmon, director, SS. Peter and Paul Food Pantry; the Rev. John Albosta, senior priest, SS. Peter and Paul.

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St. Frances Church celebrates sacrament of reconciliation Ten children from St. Frances Cabrini Church, Mount Olivet Road, Wyoming, received the sacrament of reconciliation on Jan. 28. They are preparing for their First Holy Communion which will be celebrated on May 5. From left, first row: Olivia Kochan, Olivia Jorda, John Paul Clerico, Abigail Lushefski, and Michael Ford. Second row: Jessica Kozemko, class instructor; Jordon Wagner, Nathaniel Spare, Aidan Mateos, James Lehane, Richard Chihorek, Flo Mociun, director of religious education; and the Rev. Vincent Dang, pastor.

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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012

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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012

PAUL SOKOLOSKI

H.S. WRESTLING

Champs go back to the future

OPINION

FREEDOM CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS

HAPPY MISERI

Old school uniforms inspire Crestwood duo of Hankinson and Hammerstone to wins. By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

HAZLETON—Earlier in the week, Crestwood’s Kyle Hankinson and Matt Hammerstone were rummaging through the school’s wrestling room and pulled out old singlets from the 1990s. The duo decided to wear the throwback uniforms in their finals matches in the District 2 Class 3A Championships on Saturday night at Hazleton Area. They may want to don MORE INSIDE those school outfits for •Class 2A wrestling the rest of results. the season. Hankinson, a 145-pounder, and Hammerstone, 152, won their finals matches to extend Crestwood’s run of individual championships to a classification-high 11th consecutive year. “They look good don’t they?” said Hammerstone, a junior, after defeating Abington Heights’ Michael Carr11-6 for his first district gold medal. Hammerstone’s win immediately followed his workout partner’s 8-3 decision over Pittston Area’s Angelo Lussi as Hankinson pulled out his second straight district title and extended his team’s run. The Comets placed fourth in the team standings with 118 points Saturday night at Hazleton Area. The Comets – who followed Delaware Valley (239 points), Wyoming Valley West (132) and Pittston Area (128) in the team race – were one of just two WVC teams to claim multiple champions joining Hazleton Area. Hankinson, who picked up win No. 93 for his career and was the No. 3 seed in his bracket, missed a portion of the season with an injury but is at full strength at the right time. “It kind of sucked in the beginning because I was out with an ankle injury and that kind of explained the bad seeding,” Hankinson said. “But I feel good and I’m hoping to make a run at states.” Pittston Area’s Jamie Scarantino earned a feat of his own. The 103-pounder picked up his

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Misericordia’s Christine Marks cuts down the net after defeating King’s College in the women’s Freedom Conference tournament championship game in Wilkes-Barre on Saturday afternoon.

Women’s team wins first Freedom crown By DEREK LEVARSE dlevarse@timesleader.com

Conference power on Saturday, winning the women’s league title with a 6454 victory over top-seeded King’s. Misericordia has made it to the conference tournament in each of its first four seasons in the league, reaching the finals in the past two. After losing on the road in last year’s championship, the Cougars made their second chance

WILKES-BARRE — With two minutes to play, the Misericordia bench rose to its feet for the final time. The anticipation had been building the entire second half. The wait had been longer. For the first time in program history, the Cougars are going to the NCAA tournament. The Cougars established themselves as a Freedom See WOMEN, Page 9C

H I G H S C H O O L B OYS BAS K E T BA L L

Men cut down Wilkes for conference title By DEREK LEVARSE dlevarse@timesleader.com

Sean Bieski and Cael Evans. Players and staff alike. Finally, it was the coach’s turn. Trevor Woodruff climbed the ladder and took some time to savor his alma mater’s first men’s basketball conference title. The Cougars boss gave the rim a firm two-handed shake before cutting down the net to finalize Misericordia’s 69-42 win over Wilkes in Saturday’s

DALLAS — One last string remained. The Misericordia roster had already done a number on the net, snipping away in celebration as the players each got a turn with the scissors. Ethan Eichhorst, the league’s player of the year. Steve Artzerounian, the tournament MVP. Fellow starters Matt Greene, Jeff Slanovec and Chris Undersinger. Nanticoke grads See MEN, Page 8C

HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS BASKETBALL

Mohawks ‘run, run, run’ Schinski’s late shot saves season into district semifinals Junior Ryan Krawczeniuk scores a game-high 24 points as Meyers moves on. By JOHN GORDON jgordon@timesleader.com

The plan was executed to near •For complete coverage of perfection boys and girls by the Moplayoff action, hawks see 8C, 9C (21-2) as they were able to fast break their way to a dominating 68-39 win over the Bucks (19-8) and advance to the semifinals Wednesday against Lakeland. Lakeland defeated Hanover Area 72-58 on Saturday. Meyers connected on three treys in the opening four minutes to get early lead. Co-captains Ryan Krawczeniuk and Rasheed Moore did the damage from deep as Krawczeniuk’s second three-pointer brought the

MORE INSIDE

EXETER—Meyers head coach Pat Toole had a simple plan of attack for Saturday’s District 2 Class 2A boys basketball quarterfiMEYERS nal against Dunmore at Wyoming Area. DUNMORE “Three words: Run, run, run,” Toole said. “We wanted to push the ball up the floor as much as possible in order to avoid Dunmore’s half court game.” See MOHAWKS, Page 8C

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The junior sank a three-point shot at the end of OT to extend Nanticoke’s season. By JOHN MEDEIROS jmedeiros@timesleader.com

YATESVILLE – Nanticoke’s Kayley Schinski had made 33 three-pointers this season as overtime began Saturday against Valley NANTICOKE View. As the buzzer sounded to VALLEY VIEW end overtime, her 34th trey was rippling the net, giving the Trojanettes a 43-42 overtime victory in a District 2 Class 3A girls basketball quarterfinal at Pittston Area. Then Schinski got a victory lap on the shoulders of her teammates.

43

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DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Schoolmates and teammates raise Kayley Schinski up on thier shoulders to celebrate after she hit a three-point shot in overtime at the buzzer to defeat Valley View on Saturday.

“That was such a rush,” said never done that before. That Schinski, who finished with a was the first time.” game-high 13 points, of being carried by her teammates. “I’ve See SHOT, Page 9C

Cougars’ AD gets his ticket

AFTER ALL THIS excitement is over, Dave Martin will walk away from a Misericordia University basketball locker room again and go back to being an administrator. For now, he is going to the NCAA Tournament. He finally got there, with a group of young women – not men this time – who believed he could magically make their dreams come true. But Martin always seems to inspire that kind of faith as a basketball coach, no matter what group of kids he happens to be working with. “He’s been energizing,” Misericordia star scorer Christine Marks said. “He’s been awesome,” Cougars guard Lauren Smicherko said. He’s been away too long. Before he became the school’s athletic director, Martin made Misericordia men’s basketball matter during his 14 seasons at the helm. He was always fighting an uphill battle back in the 1990s on a stage that included Middle Atlantic Conference powers Wilkes and Scranton and a King’s College program that was emerging at the time. But Martin’s teams never stopped swinging. His Cougars always fought to the finish and never allowed themselves to feel like secondbest, even when they runners-up for conference titles and NCAA Division III playoff berths in their old league, the Pennsylvania Athletic Conference. Then Martin got the chance to run Misericordia’s whole athletic program eight years ago, and bolted for it quicker than one of his teams on a fast break. Even if it meant leaving behind the game he loves. “At the Division III level,” Martin said, “there’s a big pay discrepancy between basketball coach and AD. I have a young family. My priority was to take care of them. “It wasn’t a difficult decision.” The hard part was staying away. All he wanted to do Oh, Martin stayed involved with his children’s teams here and there. The two grade school teams he coaches both won championships this week. And often advises his kid sister, Tina Martin, who coaches the 25-1 University of Delaware women. “I still serve as her independent counselor,” Dave Martin laughed. “We talk a lot of basketball.” It is not the same as coaching it on the college level with the constant interaction Martin’s longed for. “I’d be lying if I said I didn’t,” he relented. “All I ever wanted to do was coach kids.” He got that chance a month ago, when women’s coach Tom Griffith suddenly and mysteriously resigned. So the big boss came out of the AD’s office and headed straight back into a basketball office. “Everybody was nervous our first practice,” Smicherko said. It turns out the rest of the Freedom Conference, where Misericordia now plays, should have been most worried. Martin not only took a team barely above .500 when he came aboard all the way to the Freedom Conference playoffs, he marched it straight to the Freedom title and into the NCAAs.

See TICKET, Page 8C


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012

L O C A L C A L E N D A R

T R A N S A C T I O N S

TODAY'S EVENTS

National League HOUSTON ASTROS — Agreed to terms with RHP Rhiner Cruz, RHP Aneury Rodriguez and RHP Kyle Weiland on one-year contracts. Frontier League EVANSVILLE OTTERS — Signed RHP Eric Massingham to a contract extension. FLORENCE FREEDOM — Signed C David Carrillo and OF David Harris. Released OF Jon Smith. North American League MCALLEN THUNDER — Re-signed LHP Frank James and P Bryan Smith.

COLLEGE WRESTLING Metropolitan Tournament at Elizabethtown, 10 a.m.

TUESDAY, FEB. 28 DISTRICT 2 BOYS BASKETBALL CLASS 3A Semifinals Crestwood/Pittston Area winner vs. Tunkhannock/ Abington Heights winner, TBA Holy Redeemer/Scranton Prep winner vs. Dallas/ North Pocono winner, TBA CLASS A Semifinals Susquehanna vs. MMI Prep, TBA Forest City vs. Old Forge, TBA DISTRICT 2 GIRLS BASKETBALL CLASS 4A Semifinals Abington Heights vs. Hazleton Area/Williamsport winner, TBA Wallenpaupack/Scranton winner vs. Delaware Valley/Wyoming Valley West winner, TBA CLASS 2A Semifinals Montrose/Holy Cross winner vs. Riverside/Meyers winner, TBA Dunmore/Wyoming Seminary winner vs. Mid Valley/Lake-Lehman winner, TBA

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 29 DISTRICT 2 BOYS BASKETBALL CLASS 4A Semifinals Friday’s winner vs. Scranton, TBA Saturday’s winner vs. Hazleton Area, TBA CLASS 2A Semifinals Montrose/Holy Cross winner vs. Riverside/GAR winner, TBA Lakeland/Hanover Area winner vs. Dunmore/ Meyers winner, TBA DISTRICT 2 GIRLS BASKETBALL CLASS 3A Semifinals Holy Redeemer/Dallas winner vs. Crestwood/Honesdale winner, TBA Nanticoke/Valley View winner vs. Pittston Area/ Scranton Prep winner, TBA CLASS A Semifinals Forest City vs. MMI Prep/Blue Ridge winner, TBA Northwest vs. Old Forge, TBA MEN'S COLLEGE LACROSSE Drew at King’s, 4 p.m.

FRIDAY, MAR. 2 DISTRICT 2 BOYS BASKETBALL CLASS 3A Final Semifinal winners, TBA CLASS A Final Semifinals winners, TBA DISTRICT 2 GIRLS BASKETBALL CLASS 4A Final Semifinals winners, TBA CLASS 2A Final Semifinals winners, TBA Third-place game Semifinals losers, TBA HS WRESTLING Northeast Regional Championships: Class 2A at Williamsport H.S.; Class 3A at Freedom H.S., Bethlehem WOMEN'S COLLEGE SOFTBALL York College at Wilkes (in Virginia Beach), Noon John Jay College of Criminal Justice at Wilkes (in Virginia Beach), 2 p.m. COLLEGE TENNIS King’s at Kissimmee, FL., TBA COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD ECAC Indoor Championships, TBA

SATURDAY, MAR. 3 DISTRICT 2 BOYS BASKETBALL CLASS 4A Final Semifinals winners, TBA CLASS 2A Final Semifinals winners, TBA Third-place game Semifinals losers, TBA DISTRICT 2 GIRLS BASKETBALL CLASS 3A Final Semifinals winners, TBA CLASS A Final Semifinal winners, TBA HS WRESTLING Northeast Regional Championships: Class 2A at Williamsport H.S.; Class 3A at Freedom H.S., Bethlehem WOMEN'S COLLEGE SOFTBALL Franklin and Marshall College at Wilkes (in Virginia Beach), 10 a.m. North Carolina Wesleyan College at Wilkes (in Virginia Beach), Noon MEN'S COLLEGE BASEBALL Manchester at Wilkes (in Myrtle Beach), Noon Danville Area Community College at King’s (in Myrtle Beach), 3 p.m. Manchester College at King’s (in Myrtle Beach), 6 p.m. Johnson & Wales University at King’s (in Myrtle Beach), 6 p.m. WOMEN'S COLLEGE LACROSSE Wilkes at Sweet Briar College, 4 p.m. MEN'S COLLEGE LACROSSE King’s at Susquehanna, 1 p.m. COLLEGE TENNIS King’s at Kissimmee, FL., TBA

W H AT ’ S

O N

T V

AUTO RACING Noon FOX — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Daytona 500, at Daytona Beach, Fla.

BOWLING 3 p.m. ESPN — PBA, U.S. Open, at North Brunswick, N.J.

GOLF 9 a.m. TGC — PGA Tour-WGC, Accenture Match Play Championship, semifinal matches, at Marana, Ariz. 2 p.m. NBC — PGA Tour-WGC, Accenture Match Play Championship, championship match, at Marana, Ariz. TGC — LPGA, Women’s Champions, final round, at Singapore (same-day tape) 7 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Mayakoba Classic, final round, at Playa del Carmen, Mexico (same-day tape)

MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL Noon WQMY — Cincinnati at South Florida 1 p.m. ESPN — Indiana at Minnesota 2 p.m. CBS — Pittsburgh at Louisville 4 p.m. CBS — Wisconsin at Ohio St. 5:30 p.m. FSN, MSG, ROOT — California at Colorado 6 p.m. BTN — Iowa at Illinois 7:30 p.m. FSN, CSN, MSG, ROOT — Oregon at Oregon St.

MOTORSPORTS 2:30 p.m. SPEED — FIM World Superbike, at Phillip Island, Australia (same-day tape)

NBA 7:30 p.m. TNT — All-Star Game, at Orlando, Fla.

NHL 1 p.m. PLUS — Tampa Bay at New Jersey ROOT — Columbus at Pittsburgh 5 p.m. PLUS — N.Y. Islanders at Ottawa 7 p.m. NBCSN — Chicago at Anaheim

WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL Noon BTN — Indiana at Purdue 1 p.m. FSN, CSN — UCF at Houston 2 p.m. BTN — Minnesota at Penn State 3 p.m. ESPN2 — Duke at North Carolina FSN, CSN — Washington St. at Washington 4 p.m. BTN — Ohio State at Nebraska 5 p.m. ESPN2 — LSU at Georgia

BASEBALL

HOCKEY National Hockey League COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS — Assigned D David Savard to Springfield (AHL). Claimed C Darryl Boyce off waivers from Toronto. FLORIDA PANTHERS — Reassigned RW Michal Repik and Jonathan Matsumoto to San Antonio (AHL). NEW JERSEY DEVILS — Waived LW Eric Boulton. Assigned D Peter Harrold to Albany (AHL). NEW YORK RANGERS — Reassigned D Blake Parlett from Connecticut (AHL) to Greenville (ECHL). Traded F Wojtek Wolski to Florida for D Michael Vernace and a 2013 third-round draft pick. American Hockey League SAN ANTONIO RAMPAGE — Reassigned RW Anthony Luciani to Cincinnati (ECHL).

H O C K E Y National Hockey League EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA N.Y. Rangers............... 60 39 15 6 84 167 124 Pittsburgh .................... 61 35 21 5 75 194 161 New Jersey ................. 60 35 21 4 74 169 164 Philadelphia ................ 60 33 20 7 73 198 183 N.Y. Islanders.............. 61 26 27 8 60 144 179 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston.......................... 60 37 20 3 77 200 139 Ottawa .......................... 63 32 23 8 72 193 190 Toronto ........................ 62 29 26 7 65 184 190 Buffalo.......................... 62 27 27 8 62 154 180 Montreal....................... 62 24 28 10 58 161 171 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Florida .......................... 60 28 20 12 68 149 167 Winnipeg...................... 64 30 26 8 68 163 181 Washington ................. 62 31 26 5 67 169 176 Tampa Bay................... 61 27 28 6 60 170 209 Carolina ....................... 62 23 26 13 59 162 187 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit .......................... 63 41 19 3 85 197 149 St. Louis....................... 62 38 17 7 83 158 125 Nashville ...................... 61 35 19 7 77 170 158 Chicago........................ 62 33 22 7 73 192 182 Columbus .................... 61 18 36 7 43 142 203 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver ................... 62 40 16 6 86 201 151 Colorado ...................... 63 32 27 4 68 164 172 Calgary ........................ 61 28 23 10 66 146 165 Minnesota.................... 61 27 25 9 63 135 160 Edmonton .................... 61 24 31 6 54 162 181 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Phoenix........................ 62 32 21 9 73 164 155 San Jose ...................... 59 32 20 7 71 172 149 Dallas ........................... 62 32 26 4 68 162 169 Los Angeles ................ 61 27 22 12 66 129 135 Anaheim ...................... 61 26 25 10 62 157 173 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Friday's Games N.Y. Islanders 4, N.Y. Rangers 3, SO Buffalo 2, Boston 1, SO Vancouver 2, New Jersey 1 Washington 4, Montreal 1 Colorado 5, Columbus 0 Dallas 4, Minnesota 1 Saturday's Games St. Louis 3, Winnipeg 2, SO Florida 3, Carolina 2, SO Pittsburgh 8, Tampa Bay 1 Phoenix 3, Edmonton 1 Washington 4, Toronto 2 Boston 5, Ottawa 3 N.Y. Rangers 3, Buffalo 2, OT Colorado 4, Detroit 3 Chicago at Los Angeles, late San Jose at Nashville, late Philadelphia at Calgary, late Today's Games Tampa Bay at New Jersey, 1 p.m. Columbus at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. Vancouver at Dallas, 3 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Ottawa, 5 p.m. Montreal at Florida, 5 p.m. San Jose at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Chicago at Anaheim, 7 p.m. Monday's Games New Jersey at N.Y. Rangers, 7:30 p.m. Los Angeles at Nashville, 8 p.m. Edmonton at Winnipeg, 8:30 p.m. Anaheim at Colorado, 9 p.m. St. Louis at Calgary, 9 p.m.

American Hockey League EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA St. John’s .............. 53 33 13 5 2 73 176 150 Manchester ........... 58 28 27 0 3 59 149 168 Providence............ 56 26 24 3 3 58 139 156 Worcester.............. 53 24 20 4 5 57 140 144 Portland ................. 55 25 24 3 3 56 155 182 East Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Norfolk ................... 56 35 18 1 2 73 199 153 Penguins.............. 56 32 17 2 5 71 181 169 Hershey ................. 56 29 18 4 5 67 190 169 Syracuse ............... 54 22 24 4 4 52 169 176 Binghamton........... 55 21 30 2 2 46 148 178 Northeast Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Bridgeport ............. 53 29 18 3 3 64 161 146 Connecticut........... 55 27 18 5 5 64 165 154 Albany .................... 54 26 20 5 3 60 140 155 Springfield ............. 55 26 25 2 2 56 156 167 Adirondack............ 54 25 26 2 1 53 146 156 WESTERN CONFERENCE Midwest Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Charlotte................ 56 31 19 2 4 68 160 150 Chicago ................. 53 30 19 1 3 64 155 135 Peoria .................... 55 29 23 2 1 61 165 153 Milwaukee ............. 52 27 22 2 1 57 148 139 Rockford................ 54 22 26 2 4 50 154 181 North Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Toronto .................. 55 30 19 4 2 66 161 135 Rochester.............. 55 25 21 6 3 59 160 165 Lake Erie ............... 56 27 25 2 2 58 138 159 Grand Rapids........ 53 23 21 5 4 55 171 170 Hamilton ................ 54 25 24 1 4 55 140 162 West Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Oklahoma City...... 55 35 15 2 3 75 161 121 Houston ................. 54 25 17 3 9 62 145 147 San Antonio .......... 54 29 22 2 1 61 139 149 Abbotsford ............ 53 28 21 3 1 60 126 135 Texas ..................... 54 24 26 2 2 52 161 174 NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point for an overtime or shootout loss. Saturday's Games Grand Rapids 2, Toronto 1 Oklahoma City 3, Charlotte 2, SO Portland 5, Worcester 1 Bridgeport 5, Providence 4 Norfolk 4, Hershey 3 Albany 3, Manchester 1 Springfield 2, Connecticut 0 Adirondack 2, Binghamton 1, SO Syracuse 2, Penguins 1 Lake Erie at Rochester, late Abbotsford at Chicago, late Houston at Texas, late Milwaukee at Rockford, late San Antonio at Peoria, late Today's Games Syracuse at Adirondack, 3 p.m. Providence at Manchester, 3 p.m. Albany at Bridgeport, 3 p.m. Norfolk at Penguins, 3:05 p.m. San Antonio at Milwaukee, 4 p.m. Springfield at Portland, 4 p.m. Hamilton at Toronto, 5 p.m. Abbotsford at Peoria, 6 p.m. Chicago at Rockford, 6:05 p.m. Monday's Games No games scheduled Tuesday's Games Worcester at Connecticut, 11 a.m. St. John’s at Binghamton, 7:05 p.m. Syracuse 2, Penguins 1 Syracuse ................................................... 0 2 0 — 2 Penguins.................................................. 0 1 0 — 1 First Period Scoring – None. Penalties – SYR, Smaby (roughing) 2:07; WBS, Sill (hooking) 10:10. Second Period Scoring – 1. SYR, Dan Sexton 7 (Smaby, Carle) power play 10:34. 2. WBS, Ryan Craig 7 (Walker, Mormina) power play 14:15. 3. SYR, Patrick Maroon 25 (Palmieri) 19:52. Penalties – SYR, Gordon (interference) 5:03; WBS, Grant (roughing) 8:40; SYR, Guenin (elbowing) 12:55; WBS, benchserved by Walker (too many men) 15:41. Third Period Scoring – None. Penalties – WBS, O’Reilly (hooking) 11:39; SYR, Smaby (tripping, misconduct) 18:34. Shots on goal Syracuse – 7-6-6-19 Penguins – 11-11-14-36 Power-play Opportunities Syracuse – 1 of 4 Penguins – 1 of 4 Goaltenders Syracuse – Antero Niittymaki 4-6-0 (35 saves – 36 shots) Penguins – Scott Munroe (8-8); Patrick Killeen – 3:33 of the second period 0-1-0 (9-11) Starters Syracuse – G Antero Niittymaki, D Sean Zimmerman, D Mark Fraser, LW J-F Jacques, C Riley Holzapfel, RW Andrew Gordon Penguins – G Scott Munroe, D Brian Strait, D Robert Bortuzzo, LW Bryan Lerg, C Ben Street, RW Jason Williams

S

C

O

R

E

B

O

A

R

D

THE TIMES LEADER

BULLETIN BOARD

AMERICA’S LINE

MEETINGS

By ROXY ROXBOROUGH BOXING REPORT: In the WBA super welterweight title fight on May 5 in Las Vegas, Nevada, Floyd Mayweather Jr. is -$650 vs. Miguel Cotto at +$450; in the WBA/IBF welterweight title fight on May 19 in Las Vegas, Nevada, Amir Khan is -$450 vs. Lamont Peterson at +$350; in the WBO welterweight title fight on June 9 in Las Vegas, Nevada, Manny Pacquiao is -$400 vs. Timothy Bradley at +$300. NBA Favorite

Points

Underdog

3

West

College Basketball Favorite S FLORIDA

Points

Underdog

1

Cincinnati

C MICHIGAN

10.5

No Illinois

LOUISVILLE

9

Pittsburgh

DENVER

9.5

N Texas

California

2.5

COLORADO

ILLINOIS

7.5

Iowa

MIAMI-FLORIDA

1.5

Florida St

OREGON ST

3

Oregon

OHIO ST

9

Wisconsin

MINNESOTA

PK

Indiana

OHIO U

3.5

Akron

MARIST

2

Niagara

10.5

Canisius

SIENA

22.5

Fairfield

3.5

MANHATTAN

NBA All-Star Game EAST

IONA

Three Stars 1. SYR, Antero Niittymaki (35 saves) 2. WBS, Ryan Craig (power play goal) 3. SYR, Dan Sexton (goal) Referee – Ryan Fraser. Linesmen – Jud Ritter, Chris Allman. Attendance – 8,216

B A S K E T B A L L National Basketball Association EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct Philadelphia ................. 20 14 .588 New York ...................... 17 18 .486 Boston........................... 15 17 .469 Toronto ......................... 10 23 .303 New Jersey .................. 10 25 .286 Southeast Division W L Pct Miami............................. 27 7 .794 Orlando ......................... 22 13 .629 Atlanta ........................... 20 14 .588 Washington .................. 7 26 .212 Charlotte ....................... 4 28 .125 Central Division W L Pct Chicago .......................... 27 8 .771 Indiana............................ 21 12 .636 Cleveland ....................... 13 18 .419 Milwaukee ...................... 13 20 .394 Detroit ............................. 11 24 .314 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct San Antonio.................. 24 10 .706 Dallas ............................ 21 13 .618 Houston ........................ 20 14 .588 Memphis ....................... 19 15 .559 New Orleans ................ 8 25 .242 Northwest Division W L Pct Oklahoma City............... 27 7 .794 Portland .......................... 18 16 .529 Denver............................ 18 17 .514 Minnesota ...................... 17 17 .500 Utah ................................ 15 17 .469 Pacific Division W L Pct L.A. Clippers .................. 20 11 .645 L.A. Lakers..................... 20 14 .588 Golden State .................. 13 17 .433 Phoenix .......................... 14 20 .412 Sacramento ................... 11 22 .333 Friday's Games No games scheduled Saturday's Games No games scheduled

GB — 31⁄2 4 91⁄2 101⁄2 GB — 51⁄2 7 191⁄2 22 GB — 5 12 13 16 GB — 3 4 5 151⁄2 GB — 9 91⁄2 10 11 GB — 11⁄2 61⁄2 71⁄2 10

NCAA MEN Top 25 Fared Saturday 1. Kentucky (28-1) beat Vanderbilt 83-74. Next: vs. Georgia, Thursday. 2. Syracuse (28-1) at UConn. Next: vs. No. 17 Louisville, Saturday. 3. Missouri (25-4) lost to No. 4 Kansas 87-86, OT. Next: vs. Iowa State, Wednesday. 4. Kansas (24-5) beat No. 3 Missouri 87-86, OT. Next: at Oklahoma State, Monday. 5. Duke (25-4) beat Virginia Tech 70-65, OT. Next: at Wake Forest, Tuesday. 6. Michigan State (24-5) beat Nebraska 62-34. Next: at No. 23 Indiana, Tuesday. 7. North Carolina (25-4) beat No. 25 Virginia 54-51. Next: vs. Maryland, Wednesday. 8. Ohio State (23-5) did not play. Next: vs. No. 16 Wisconsin, Sunday. 9. Georgetown (21-6) beat Villanova 67-46. Next: vs. No. 20 Notre Dame, Monday. 10. Marquette (24-5) did not play. Next: at Cincinnati, Wednesday. 11. Michigan (21-8) lost to Purdue 75-61. Next: at Illinois, Thursday. 12. Florida (22-7) lost to Georgia 76-62. Next: at Vanderbilt, Tuesday. 13. Baylor (24-5) beat Oklahoma 70-60. Next: vs. Texas Tech, Monday. 14. Murray State (27-1) at Tennessee Tech. Next: OVC semifinals, Friday. 15. Florida State (19-8) did not play. Next: at Miami, Sunday. 16. Wisconsin (20-8) did not play. Next: at No. 8 Ohio State, Sunday. 17. Louisville (21-7) did not play. Next: vs. Pittsburgh, Sunday. 18. New Mexico (22-6) lost to TCU 83-64. Next: vs. Air Force, Wednesday. 19. Wichita State (26-4) beat Drake 81-58. Next: MVC quarterfinals, Friday. 20. Notre Dame (20-9) lost to St. John’s 61-58. Next: at No. 9 Georgetown, Monday. 21. UNLV (24-6) beat Air Force 68-58. Next: at Colorado State, Wednesday. 22. Temple (22-6) lost to Saint Joseph’s 82-72. Next: vs. UMass, Wednesday. 23. Indiana (21-7) did not play. Next: at Minnesota, Sunday. 24. San Diego State (21-6) vs. Colorado State. Next: at Boise State, Wednesday. 25. Virginia (21-7) lost to No. 7 North Carolina 54-51. Next: vs. No. 15 Florida State, Thursday. Saturday's College Basketball Major Scores EAST American U. 76, Lafayette 69 Boston U. 64, Hartford 55 Brown 94, Columbia 78 Bucknell 64, Navy 55 Buffalo 84, Miami (Ohio) 74 CCSU 78, Wagner 61 Delaware 82, Northeastern 72 Fairleigh Dickinson 45, St. Francis (NY) 44 Fordham 67, La Salle 62 George Washington 56, Duquesne 51 Georgetown 67, Villanova 46 Hofstra 93, UNC Wilmington 64 Holy Cross 65, Colgate 58 Lehigh 74, Army 72, OT Monmouth (NJ) 106, LIU 78 Mount St. Mary’s 71, Bryant 62 NJIT 94, Longwood 51 Penn 55, Harvard 54 Princeton 85, Dartmouth 61 Quinnipiac 73, Robert Morris 69 Rhode Island 64, Saint Louis 62 Rutgers 77, Seton Hall 72, OT Sacred Heart 72, St. Francis (Pa.) 57 Saint Joseph’s 82, Temple 72 St. John’s 61, Notre Dame 58 Vermont 80, UMBC 49 Yale 71, Cornell 40 SOUTH Alabama 67, Mississippi St. 50 Alcorn St. 60, Southern U. 40 Ark.-Pine Bluff 46, Jackson St. 44 Arkansas 77, Auburn 71 Belmont 62, Mercer 61 Charleston Southern 65, Radford 59 Chattanooga 86, Samford 78 Clemson 72, NC State 69, OT Coastal Carolina 81, VMI 64 Coll. of Charleston 55, The Citadel 47 Davidson 71, Georgia Southern 54 Delaware St. 63, Howard 46 Drexel 73, Old Dominion 72 Duke 70, Virginia Tech 65, OT E. Kentucky 86, E. Illinois 74 ETSU 84, Florida Gulf Coast 71 Elon 93, UNC Greensboro 79 Georgia 76, Florida 62 Georgia St. 64, William & Mary 60 Georgia Tech 63, Maryland 61 Hampton 74, Florida A&M 59 James Madison 65, Towson 59 Kentucky 83, Vanderbilt 74 Liberty 49, Campbell 41 Lipscomb 74, Kennesaw St. 71 Louisiana Tech 84, Hawaii 67 MVSU 79, Grambling St. 60 Md.-Eastern Shore 58, Morgan St. 57 Memphis 87, Marshall 67 Mississippi 72, LSU 48 Morehead St. 76, SIU-Edwardsville 61 NC A&T 79, SC State 75 Nicholls St. 78, McNeese St. 75 Norfolk St. 75, Bethune-Cookman 72

5

St. Peter’s RIDER Loyola-MD

NHL Favorite

Odds

Underdog

DEVILS

-$225/ +$185

Lightning

PENGUINS

-$300/ +$240

Blue Jackets

Canucks

-$140/ +$120

STARS

PANTHERS

-$120/ even

Canadiens

SENATORS

-$155/ +$135

Islanders

Sharks

-$150/ +$130

WILD

DUCKS

-$120/ even

Blackhawks

Home Teams in Capital Letters

North Carolina 54, Virginia 51 Presbyterian 68, Gardner-Webb 62 SC-Upstate 90, Stetson 72 Savannah St. 60, NC Central 47 St. Bonaventure 72, Charlotte 56 Troy 83, FAU 82 UAB 61, East Carolina 57 UCF 63, UTEP 45 UNC Asheville 67, Winthrop 55 VCU 89, George Mason 77 W. Carolina 83, Appalachian St. 75 W. Kentucky 73, Middle Tennessee 67 Wake Forest 85, Boston College 56 Wofford 67, Furman 52 MIDWEST Bowling Green 74, Kent St. 58 Cleveland St. 77, Wright St. 55 Creighton 61, Indiana St. 60 Dayton 76, UMass 43 Detroit 76, Youngstown St. 74 E. Michigan 61, Ball St. 50 Evansville 75, Missouri St. 70, OT Green Bay 71, Ill.-Chicago 63 Illinois St. 54, Bradley 53 Iowa St. 65, Kansas St. 61 Kansas 87, Missouri 86, OT Michigan St. 62, Nebraska 34 Milwaukee 78, Loyola of Chicago 69 N. Iowa 65, S. Illinois 61 North Dakota 66, Houston Baptist 62 Providence 73, DePaul 71 Purdue 75, Michigan 61 Toledo 83, W. Michigan 74 Urbana 59, Chicago St. 55 Wichita St. 81, Drake 58 SOUTHWEST Baylor 70, Oklahoma 60 Cent. Arkansas 64, SE Louisiana 63 Lamar 72, Sam Houston St. 49 Oklahoma St. 60, Texas A&M 42 Prairie View 60, Alabama A&M 52 Stephen F. Austin 74, Texas A&M-CC 41 TCU 83, New Mexico 64 Texas 71, Texas Tech 67, OT Texas Southern 67, Alabama St. 59 Texas St. 66, UTSA 52 FAR WEST Arizona 65, UCLA 63 Arizona St. 56, Southern Cal 52 BYU 76, Portland 66 Gonzaga 65, San Diego 57 Long Beach St. 64, UC Riverside 40 UNLV 68, Air Force 58 Wyoming 64, Boise St. 54

NCAA WOMEN Women's Top 25 Fared Saturday 1. Baylor (29-0) did not play. Next: at No. 14 Texas A&M, Monday. 2. Stanford (26-1) beat Utah 69-42. Next: vs. Seattle, Wednesday. 3. Notre Dame (27-2) beat South Florida 80-68. Next: at No. 4 UConn, Monday. 4. UConn (26-3) beat Marquette 85-45. Next: vs. No. 3 Notre Dame, Monday. 5. Miami (24-4) did not play. Next: vs. Boston College, Sunday. 6. Maryland (24-4) did not play. Next: at N.C. State, Sunday. 7. Duke (23-4) did not play. Next: at North Carolina, Sunday. 8. Ohio State (24-4) did not play. Next: at No. 23 Nebraska, Sunday. 9. Delaware (25-1) did not play. Next: vs. Northeastern, Sunday. 10. Tennessee (20-8) did not play. Next: vs. Florida, Sunday. 11. Penn State (22-5) did not play. Next: vs. Minnesota, Sunday. 12. Green Bay (25-1) beat Butler 78-53. Next: at Loyola of Chicago, Wednesday. 13. Kentucky (23-5) did not play. Next: at Mississippi State, Sunday. 14. Texas A&M (20-7) beat Texas Tech 79-51. Next: vs. No. 1 Baylor, Monday. 15. Georgetown (22-6) beat Syracuse 65-62. Next: vs. No. 20 St. John’s, Monday. 16. Louisville (20-8) beat No. 21 DePaul 75-62. Next: at Seton Hall, Monday. 17. Georgia Tech (21-7) did not play. Next: vs. Clemson, Sunday. 18. Georgia (21-7) did not play. Next: vs. LSU, Sunday. 19. St. Bonaventure (27-2) beat Rhode Island 58-32. Next: Atlantic 10 tournament, Saturday. 20. St. John’s (20-8) beat Villanova 69-49. Next: at No. 15 Georgetown, Monday. 21. DePaul (20-9) lost to No. 16 Louisville 75-62. Next: vs. Cincinnati, Monday. 22. Purdue (20-8) did not play. Next: vs. Indiana, Sunday. 23. Nebraska (20-7) did not play. Next: vs. No. 8 Ohio State, Sunday. 24. Rutgers (20-8) beat Providence 68-47. Next: vs. Marquette, Monday. 25. Gonzaga (25-4) beat BYU 77-60. Next: WCC tournament, Friday or Saturday.

G O L F PGA Tour Mayakoba Classic Par Scores Third Round Daniel Summerhays....................69-65-67—201-12 Chris Stroud.................................69-66-68—203-10 Michael Allen ...............................68-71-66—205 -8 Will Claxton ..................................66-68-71—205 -8 Marc Turnesa ..............................67-72-67—206 -7 Robert Allenby.............................69-67-70—206 -7 Brian Harman...............................71-71-65—207 -6 Colt Knost.....................................69-71-67—207 -6 Briny Baird....................................71-69-67—207 -6 Charles Howell III........................67-71-69—207 -6 Matt Every ....................................67-71-69—207 -6 Greg Owen...................................67-67-73—207 -6 Dicky Pride...................................68-72-68—208 -5 Alejandro Canizares....................67-72-69—208 -5 Billy Mayfair..................................70-68-70—208 -5 John Huh ......................................67-70-71—208 -5 Richard S. Johnson ....................70-66-72—208 -5 Kevin Stadler ...............................68-68-72—208 -5 J.J. Henry .....................................72-69-68—209 -4 Russell Knox................................74-67-68—209 -4 Stephen Ames .............................69-70-70—209 -4 Tim Petrovic.................................72-72-66—210 -3 Nathan Green...............................73-69-68—210 -3 Rich Beem ...................................70-71-69—210 -3 Craig Barlow.................................71-68-71—210 -3 Edward Loar ................................69-74-68—211 -2 Garrett Willis ................................70-72-69—211 -2 Billy Horschel...............................69-72-70—211 -2 Seung-Yul Noh ............................68-70-73—211 -2 Tom Lehman................................70-72-70—212 -1 Chad Campbell ...........................70-71-71—212 -1 Esteban Toledo ...........................72-69-71—212 -1 Vaughn Taylor..............................71-69-72—212 -1 Mark D. Anderson .......................67-72-73—212 -1 John Merrick ................................71-67-74—212 -1 Troy Kelly .....................................72-73-68—213 E Heath Slocum ..............................73-71-69—213 E Sunghoon Kang...........................68-76-69—213 E Billy Hurley III...............................73-71-69—213 E Kirk Triplett...................................73-71-69—213 E Spencer Levin .............................73-71-69—213 E Skip Kendall.................................71-72-70—213 E Jarrod Lyle ...................................73-69-71—213 E Matt Bettencourt ..........................69-72-72—213 E Will MacKenzie............................72-73-69—214 +1 Jose de Jesus Rodriguez ..........71-73-70—214 +1 Tim Herron ...................................70-74-70—214 +1 Cameron Beckman .....................72-71-71—214 +1 Patrick Sheehan ..........................70-73-71—214 +1 Josh Teater ..................................68-75-71—214 +1 Johnson Wagner.........................73-70-71—214 +1 Hunter Haas.................................68-75-71—214 +1 William McGirt .............................69-72-73—214 +1 Brian Gay......................................72-68-74—214 +1 Steve Wheatcroft.........................75-70-70—215 +2 Chris Riley....................................73-72-70—215 +2 Michael Thompson .....................72-72-71—215 +2 Stephen Gangluff ........................70-75-71—216 +3 Robert Damron............................73-72-71—216 +3 Jerry Kelly ....................................73-71-72—216 +3 Fred Funk.....................................73-71-72—216 +3 Brandt Jobe..................................74-70-72—216 +3 Gary Christian..............................73-70-73—216 +3 Brett Wetterich.............................71-72-73—216 +3 Paul Stankowski ..........................72-70-74—216 +3 Erik Compton...............................71-69-76—216 +3

Wyoming Valley West Baseball Booster Club will meet Monday at 7 p.m. at Murphy’s Pub, Swoyersville. Parents of players are encouraged to attend. Wyoming Chapter of ASA Umpires will meet Monday at 7 p.m. at Konefal’s Restaurant. Tipsy Turtle Over 50 Softball Team will meet TODAY at 6 p.m. at the Jenkins Township Turtle. The Wyoming Chapter of ASA Umpires will meet Monday at 7 p.m. at Konefal’s Restaurant. The new umpire test will be given from 6-7 p.m. Dues for the upcoming season will also be accepted at this meeting. REGISTRATION/TRYOUTS Greater Pittston Stoners Youth Soccer will hold registrations for spring soccer on Wednesday from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Exeter Scout Home, located in the rear of the Exeter Borough Building on the corner of Wyoming Ave. and Lincoln St. Cost is $25 if you do not need a uniform and $40 with a uniform. For more information, go to http://stonersoccer.org. Dupont Softball/Teeball will hold signups Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday from 6-9 p.m. at Dupont field house on 200 Elm St., Dupont. Open to all, no boundary restrictions. T-ball for boys and girls ages 4-7; softball for girls ages 7-17. Call Bob at 881-8744 for info or visit http://dupontsoftball.clubspaces.com. Nanticoke Area Little League will be having final registration TODAY from 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. at the GNA Elementary Center cafeteria. Three proofs of residency are required for all players. If there are questions, please call Wade at 735-0189 or visit www.nanticokelittleleague.com. Hughestown Softball League will hold an open registration at the second floor of the Hughestown Borough Building on the following dates: Feb. 29, March 7, March 14, March 21 and March 28. Each registration will be held from 6:30-7:30 p.m. Registration is for girls ages 7-14. The league is slow pitch and no traveling is required. All games will be played on Mondays-Thursdays. For more information, call Dave at 709-5727, Joanne at 313-0321 or Lori at 262-1226. West Side Little League will host signups for its Jr./Sr. divisions on Saturday, March 3 from Noon – 2 p.m. at the Courtdale Borough Building. This signup also includes residents of Plymouth. Junior division includes ages 13-14. Senior divisions includes players 15-16. Another signup will take place Saturday, March 10 from 10 a.m. – Noon at West Side Tech High School in Pringle during Little League tryouts. For more information, call Mike Jeschke at 332-7253. Rampage Travel Girls Basketball Team is holding a tryout for 4th and 5th grade girls TODAY at 12:30 p.m. at the Butler Community Center in Drums. Any girl interested can contact Chris at 233-4855. The program is designed for athletes that want to compete in AFBE, AAU and School Tournaments starting in March. Jenkins Twp. Little League will hold its final scheduled registration on Sunday, March 4 at 12:30 p.m.

Charley Hoffman .........................75-70-72—217 John Peterson .............................73-72-72—217 Martin Flores................................77-67-73—217 Jose Maria Olazabal...................72-72-74—218 Gavin Coles .................................71-71-76—218 David Hearn.................................68-73-77—218 Charlie Beljan ..............................73-67-79—219 Boo Weekley ...............................75-69-76—220 Garth Mulroy ................................71-74-76—221

+4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +5 +6 +7 +8

World Golf Championships Accenture Match Play Championship Results Quarterfinals Seeds in parentheses Mark Wilson (40), United States, def. Peter Hanson (33), Sweden, 4 and 3. Hunter Mahan (21), United States, def. Matt Kuchar (13), United States, 6 and 5. Rory McIlroy (2), Northern Ireland, def. Bae Sangmoon (42), South Korea 3 and 2. Lee Westwood (3), England, def. Martin Laird (38), Scotland, 3 and 2.

LGPA Tour HSBC Champions Par Scores Third Round a-amateur Katie Futcher ..................................69-67-71—207-9 Jenny Shin .....................................69-67-71—207-9 Angela Stanford.............................66-70-71—207-9 Shanshan Feng..............................69-71-69—209-7 Yani Tseng .....................................71-72-67—210-6 Jiyai Shin ........................................70-70-70—210-6 Na Yeon Choi ................................68-71-71—210-6 I.K. Kim ...........................................68-72-71—211-5 So Yeon Ryu..................................68-73-71—212-4 Ai Miyazato .....................................69-70-73—212-4 Hee Young Park ............................71-68-73—212-4 Vicky Hurst .....................................69-73-71—213-3 Mika Miyazato ................................72-70-71—213-3 Ji-Hee Lee ......................................71-69-73—213-3 Sun Young Yoo .............................70-70-73—213-3 Stacy Lewis ....................................71-75-68—214-2 Sandra Gal .....................................72-71-71—214-2 Anna Nordqvist ..............................71-72-71—214-2 Inbee Park......................................70-72-72—214-2

B O X I N G Fight Schedule March 2 At Chonburi, Thailand, Pongsaklek Wonjongkam vs. Sonny Boy Jaro, 12, for Wonjongkam’s WBC flyweight title. At Hollywood, Fla. (ESPN2), Joan Guzman vs. Jesus Pabon, 10, junior welterweights; Ed Paredes vs. Cosme Rivera, 10, welterweights. March 3 At Duesseldorf, Germany, Wladimir Klitschko vs. Jean-Marc Mormeck, 12, for Klitschko’s WBA Super World-IBF-WBO-IBO heavyweight titles. At the Woodland (Calif.) Community Center, Vicente Escobedo vs. Lonnie Smith, 10, for the vacant NABO Junior Lightweight Title. March 7 At Hobart, Australia, Daniel Geale vs. Osumanu Adama, 12, for Geale’s IBF middleweight title; Billy Dib vs. Eduardo Escobedo, 12, for Dib’s IBF featherweight title; Kali Meehan vs. Travis Walker, 12, heavyweights. March 10 At Coliseo Roberto Clemente, San Juan, Puerto Rico (SHO), Orlando Salido vs. Juan Manuel Lopez, 12, for Salido’s WBO featherweight title; Miguel Angel Garcia vs. Bernabe Concepcion, 12, featherweights. March 16 At Morongo Casino Resort & Spa, Cabazon, Calif. (ESPN2), Kendall Holt vs. Tim Coleman, 10, welterweights. At Fantasy Springs Resort Casino, Indio, Calif., Omar Figueroa Jr. vs. Ramon Ayala, 10, for Figueroa’s WBO Intercontinental Youth lightweight title.

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upstairs at Jenkins Twp. Fieldhouse at the Little League Field Complex. Fees due at signup are $65 for Major/Minor Baseball/ Softball, $55 for Coach Pitch, $50 for T-Ball and $75 for Teeners. Additional child cost is $30 with no rebate for Teeners. Please bring a copy of child’s birth certificate and three proofs of residency. Forms and information can be found at www.jenkinstwplittleleague.com. If you can not sign up by this registration date, please advise so other arrangements can be made. CLINCS Electronic City Baseball & Softball Academy will hold a Hitter’s Video Clinic for boys and girls ages 8-18 at their new facility at 738 Davis St., Scranton on April 14 and 15. Hitters receive instruction, drills and video analysis. Cost is $75 for both days; $65 is post-marked by March 15. For more information, call 955-0471 or visit www.electriccitybaseball.com. UPCOMING EVENTS King’s College Specialty Baseball Camps will be held TODAY in the King’s College Scandlon Gymnasium. The program is designed for players in K-12th grade. For additional information, go to www.kingscollegeathletics.com or contact Coach Greeley at baseball@kings.edu or call 592-7797. Athletes for Better Education (AFBE) will be hosting a regional basketball tournament in the Hazleton area March 24-25. There will be seven age groups for both boys and girls: U10, U12, U13, U14, U15, U16 and U18. Each team will be guaranteed four games. There are a limited number of spots available in each division, so a quick response is advised. The deadline is March 18. For more information or to register, visit www.afbe.org or contact Jason Bieber at 866-9062323 or e-mail jbieber@afbe.org. The 9th Annual Sportsman’s “Beast Feast”, sponsored by the Men’s Ministry of the Christian and Missionary Alliance, will be held on Saturday, March 24 at 6 p.m. at the Christian and Missionary Alliance Church, 317 Luzerne Ave., West Pittston. This annual event features a buffet of wild game cuisine as well as some domestic offerings. The speaker for the event will be sportsman Steve Diehl, from Harrisburg, who will share adventures in hunting across the nation. Diehl, a veteran hunter for over 25 years will share stories hunters will readily relate to. This event is open to the general public free of charge. Reservations are required and can be made by calling the church office at 6542500 by Monday, March 19. Wyoming Valley West Spartan Baseball Booster Club baseball clinic for students of the Wyoming Valley West School District ages 8-12 will be held Sunday, March 4, at the high school and training facility. Cost is $20 per child and $10 for second child in the same family. Each participant will receive a t-shirt. To register call 287-1978 by Feb. 27. Bulletin Board items will not be accepted over the telephone. Items may be faxed to 831-7319, emailed to tlsports@timesleader.com or dropped off at the Times Leader or mailed to Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250.

A U T O

R A C I N G

NASCAR Nationwide Series DRIVE4COPD 300 Results (Start position in parentheses) 1. (15) James Buescher, Chevrolet, 120 laps, 94 rating 2. (9) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 120, 109.5 3. (3) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 120, 105.7 4. (8) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 120, 81.6 5. (5) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 120, 88.7 6. (25) Tayler Malsam, Toyota, 120, 58.4 7. (29) Timmy Hill, Ford, 120, 63.9 8. (7) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 120, 115.6 9. (11) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 120, 110.7 10. (14) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 120, 124.9 11. (2) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 120, 87.7 12. (33) Benny Gordon, Toyota, 120, 59.1 13. (41) Danny Efland, Chevrolet, 120, 49.1 14. (37) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 120, 64.7 15. (4) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 120, 110.5 16. (22) Joey Logano, Toyota, 120, 97.9 17. (31) Blake Koch, Ford, 120, 50.4 18. (24) Kyle Busch, Toyota, accident, 119, 73.7 19. (10) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, accident, 119, 82.4 20. (6) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 119, 94.9 21. (21) Johanna Long, Chevrolet, 119, 47.9 22. (20) Eric McClure, Toyota, 118, 64.2 23. (27) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, accident, 116, 88.6 24. (39) T.J. Bell, Chevrolet, accident, 115, 37.5 25. (36) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 115, 61.4 26. (23) David Ragan, Ford, accident, 113, 50.6 27. (16) Michael Annett, Ford, accident, 113, 77 28. (28) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 112, 84.7 29. (35) Joey Gase, Ford, 108, 38.9 30. (26) Kenny Wallace, Toyota, accident, 104, 71.8 31. (18) Ryan Truex, Chevrolet, accident, 104, 58.8 32. (17) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, accident, 103, 77.8 33. (12) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, accident, 103, 55.3 34. (42) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, accident, 103, 48.2. 35. (34) Robert Richardson Jr., Chevrolet, accident, 103, 57.2 36. (32) Casey Roderick, Ford, accident, 103, 45.8 37. (19) Brian Scott, Toyota, 96, 58.5 38. (1) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 72, 69.5 39. (13) Mike Bliss, Toyota, accident, 59, 67 40. (38) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, engine, 43, 27 41. (40) Jason Bowles, Dodge, engine, 28, 35.4 42. (30) Johnny Sauter, Toyota, electrical, 14, 26.9 43. (43) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 3, 25.8 Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 129.636 mph. Time of Race: 2 hours, 18 minutes, 51 seconds. Margin of Victory: Under Caution. Caution Flags: 8 for 35 laps. Lead Changes: 38 among 16 drivers. Lap Leaders: D.Patrick 1-2; T.Bayne 3; E.Sadler 4; T.Stewart 5-8; K.Kahne 9-12; D.Hamlin 13; T.Bayne 14-15; S.Hornish Jr. 16-20; M.Bliss 21-25; D.Earnhardt Jr. 26; M.Bliss 27; Ku.Busch 28-29; D.Earnhardt Jr. 30-32; Ku.Busch 33-36; T.Stewart 37-43; Ku.Busch 44-48; D.Earnhardt Jr. 49-50; D.Hamlin 51-53; Ku.Busch 54-64; E.Sadler 65-66; D.Earnhardt Jr. 67; E.Sadler 68-72; Ky.Busch 73; Ku.Busch 74-76; R.Richardson Jr. 77; J.Nemechek 78-79; S.Hornish Jr. 80-81; Ku.Busch 82; T.Stewart 83-88; Ky.Busch 89; D.Hamlin 90; D.Earnhardt Jr. 91; T.Stewart 92-94; T.Hill 95-98; K.Wallace 99; D.Hamlin 100-101; T.Stewart 102-103; Ku.Busch 104-119; J.Buescher 120. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): Ku.Busch, 7 times for 42 laps; T.Stewart, 5 times for 22 laps; E.Sadler, 3 times for 8 laps; D.Earnhardt Jr., 5 times for 8 laps; S.Hornish Jr., 2 times for 7 laps; D.Hamlin, 4 times for 7 laps; M.Bliss, 2 times for 6 laps; T.Hill, 1 time for 4 laps; K.Kahne, 1 time for 4 laps; T.Bayne, 2 times for 3 laps; Ky.Busch, 2 times for 2 laps; J.Nemechek, 1 time for 2 laps; D.Patrick, 1 time for 2 laps; J.Buescher, 1 time for 1 lap; K.Wallace, 1 time for 1 lap; R.Richardson Jr., 1 time for 1 lap. Top 10 in Points: 1. E.Sadler, 42; 2. C.Whitt, 40; 3. A.Dillon, 39; 4. T.Malsam, 38; 5. T.Bayne, 34; 6. B.Gordon, 32; 7. D.Efland, 31; 8. B.Koch, 27; 9. R.Stenhouse Jr., 25; 10. S.Hornish Jr., 25.


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 PAGE 3C

➛ WWW.TIMESLEADER.COM/SPORTS

PENGUINS SUNDAY LAST FIVE GAMES

Feb. 17 at Bingham’n W, 6-1

Feb. 18 at Albany L, 3-0

Feb. 20 at Portland W, 5-3

Thursday Manchester W, 7-6

NEXT FIVE GAMES

Saturday Syracuse 7:05 p.m.

Today Norfolk 3:05 p.m.

March 4 at Adirond’ck 3 p.m.

March 6 St. John’s 7:05 p.m.

March 9 at Provid’nce 7:05 p.m.

March 10 at Bridgep’t 7 p.m.

Fantasy GM “YOU FIND YOURSELF going into the corner with a chance to lay a guy out whom, just a couple days ago, you were having dinner with.” -- Jason Williams Pens’ center on being traded

Dealing with deals Players wait as the trade deadline approaches

PAUL THOMPSON Penguins winger

When Paul Thompson was going to school at University of New Hampshire, the Boston Bruins were the team of choice in the area. So it’s understandable that Thompson chose three Bruins – two current and one retired, to be on his Fantasy GM team. But Thompson didn’t limit his choices to players in Beantown. He threw in a couple Penguins and Red Wings, a New York goaltender who surprisingly has yet to be chosen by anyone, and a current member of the Connecticut Whale.

By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

Jason Williams was driving to the airport with his Detroit Red Wings teammates for a flight to Chicago to play the Blackhawks the next night. That’s when he got the call from Detroit GM Ken Holland, informing him that he wouldn’t be playing against the Blackhawks, but for them. It was the trade deadline day in 2007 when Williams was moved for the first time in his NHL career. Up until then, Williams had spent all six years of his pro career with the Detroit organization. To say that Williams’ first NHL trade was earth-shattering is an understatement. “It was a shock,” he said. “I went from a first place team to one that wasn’t going to make the playoffs. That was tough.” Making matters even tougher was Williams had to face his former Detroit teammates the day after the trade. “I was now playing against guys I used to go to war with every night, guys who became good friends and won a Stanley Cup with,” Williams said. “You find yourself going into the corner with a chance to lay a guy out whom, just a couple days ago, you were having dinner with.” It’s situations like that that make the trade deadline day an unsettling one. As this year’s deadline of Feb. 27 hits tomorrow, many of the Wilkes-Barre/ Scranton Penguins are wondering who, if any, will soon be a former teammate. But it’s really not something to worry about, Williams said, because it’s part of the business. Williams has been traded twice while in the NHL – the second move coming in 2009 when he was traded by Atlanta to Columbus. “When you’re traded, you’re going somewhere where someone wants you,” he said. “Some players can benefit from going to a new team and a different situation. “It’s not the end of the world.” That point rang true to Alex Grant, who was traded during his final season in juniors. Grant began his career as a 16-year-old playing with the Saint John Sea Dogs during their first season as an expansion team in the QMJHL. He spent the next three-and-a-half seasons with Saint John, growing accustomed to the hockey life and living away from home. It wasn’t until midway through the 2008-09 season that the rumors began to swirl. Grant had a hunch a trade was

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

Jason Williams has been traded twice during his NHL career. He said getting moved is tough, but it’s a part of the game and one that a player has to get over.

coming. “It was tougher than I expected, dealing with the rumors,” he said. “I was with this team as one of its original players since Day 1, and it was pretty emotional knowing I would probably soon be done with that organization.” Sure enough, Grant was traded to the Shawinigan Cataractes, a team that was in contention to win the President’s Cup. Grant admits that made the trade a bit easier to handle. “The fact that the organization had enough respect for me to trade me to a team making a run for the cup meant a lot,” he said. Williams’ advice to his teammates as this season’s trade deadline approaches is don’t think you’re untouchable and, if a trade happens, don’t view it as a negative. “Wayne Gretzky was even traded a few times, and if he can be moved then anyone can,” Williams said. “It doesn’t matter who you are. If an organization feels it can make the team better by dealing you or one of your good friends, they’re going to do

FORWARD – Evgeni Malkin (Pittsburgh), “He’s having such a good year and producing every game. He’s probably the best forward in the league.” DEFENSEMAN – Nicklas Lidstrom (Detroit), “One of the best players in the league and one of the best defensemen ever.” GOALTENDER – Henrik Lundqvist (N.Y. Rangers), “The Rangers are in first and he’s one of the main reasons why. He’s having a huge statistical year.” POWER PLAY SPECIALIST – Pavel Datsyuk (Detroit), “He’s such a good playmaker and he sees the ice so well. He’s part of a Detroit power play that is usually one of the best in the league.” PENALTY KILL SPECIALIST – Craig Adams (Pittsburgh), “One of the better killers in the league. Being in this organization, he’s talked about a good amount.” SHOOTOUT SPECIALIST – Evgeni Malkin (Pittsburgh), “He’s got a few nice moves to use and he’s doing pretty well in the shootout this year.” ENFORCER – Shaun Thornton (Boston), “He’s a really tough guy, and he’s not just an enforcer. He plays the other parts of the game pretty well, too.” AGITATOR/PEST – Sean Avery (Connecticut-AHL), “That’s his main role whatever team he’s with. That’s his goal out there and he’s made a living off it.” HEAD COACH – Dan Bylsma (Pittsburgh), “Just seeing him in camp and talking to him, he’s a great guy and a great coach. He runs things similar to how it’s run here.” ALL-TIME GREAT – Cam Neely (Vancouver, Boston), “I grew up as a Bruins fan, watched them a lot and I admired the way he played. He did everything and his career was too short.”

W H E E L I N G WAT C H CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

Alex Grant was traded during his final season of junior hockey from a team out of playoff contention to one with a chance to win it all. The prospect of a championship, he said, made the trade easier to accept.

it. It’s tough to go through, but as a player you have to get used to it.” It didn’t take long for Williams to get used to playing for a team other than Detroit after he was traded.

Three days after the trade, Chicago faced Detroit for what would be Williams’ second game against his old team. Detroit won 6-2, but Williams scored both of Chicago’s goals.

Nailers sitting in fifth in East; Torquato out The Wheeling Nailers have won six of their last 10 contests and sit in fifth place in the Eastern Conference. The Nailers lost their second-leading scorer, Zack Torquato, after the middle finger on his right hand was severed at the top knuckle Tuesday. According to the Wheeling NewsRegister, the injury occurred when Torquato was stepped on by Elmira defenseman Mario Larocque.


CMYK PAGE 4C

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 PAGE 5C

NCAA MEN’S BASKETBALL

CLASS 3A DIVING

Kansas edges Missouri in OT

Decades-old record finally takes a dive

The Associated Press

LAWRENCE, Kan. — Kansas and Missouri kept their storied rivalry alive just a little bit longer. Tyshawn Taylor and Thomas Robinson made it a memorable ending for Kansas. Robinson kept the game going with a three-point play in the closing seconds of regulation, and Taylor’s two free throws with 8.3 seconds left in overtime gave the fourth-ranked Jayhawks an 87-86 victory over No. 3 Missouri on Saturday in their final scheduled regular-season matchup.

Wyoming Valley West’s Collin Vest and Ibrahim Ismail top 37-year-old points mark. By JAY MONAHAN For The Times Leader

No. 1 Kentucky 83, Vanderbilt 74 LEXINGTON, Ky. — Freshman Anthony Davis scored a career-high 28 points on 10-of-11 shooting, and No. 1 Kentucky beat Vanderbilt 83-74 on Saturday to win the Southeastern Conference regular season title for the 45th time. The Wildcats (28-1, 14-0) have won 51 straight at home and are on a 20-game winning streak overall. But Kentucky trailed at halftime and needed a late surge to put away the scrappy Commodores. No. 5 Duke 70, Virginia Tech 65 OT DURHAM, N.C. — Austin Rivers scored 23 points, Seth Curry added 19 and No. 5 Duke held off Virginia Tech 70-65 in overtime Saturday. Miles Plumlee added 15 rebounds and two free throws with 9.6 seconds left for the Blue Devils (25-4, 12-2), who made 6 of 8 foul shots in the final minute of OT to win their sixth straight and remain atop the Atlantic Coast Conference standings. No. 6 Michigan State 62, Nebraska 34 EAST LANSING, Mich. — Draymond Green had 20 points and 10 rebounds to help No. 6 Michigan State beat Nebraska 62-34 on Saturday night for its seventh straight victory. Undefeated at home this season, the Spartans (24-5, 13-3 Big Ten) lead No. 8 Ohio State by 11⁄2 games and No. 11 Michigan by two games in the conference race with three games left in the regular season. The Buckeyes, who close the regular season at Michigan State, can pull back within a game by beating Wisconsin at home Sunday. No. 7 North Carolina 54, No. 25 Virginia 51 CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — Tyler Zeller scored 20 points, including a critical dunk with 13.3 seconds left and the shot clock winding down, and No. 7 North Carolina beat No. 25 Virginia 54-51 on Saturday to

AP PHOTO

Missouri guard Michael Dixon tries to shoot while covered by Kansas forward Thomas Robinson during the second half of Saturday’s game in Lawrence, Kan.

sweep the season series. John Henson added 15 points, including 11 in the second half, as the Tar Heels (25-4, 12-2) kept pace with No. 5 Duke for first place in the Atlantic Coast Conference. The Blue Devils beat Virginia Tech 70-65 in overtime Saturday. No. 9 Georgetown 67, Villanova 46 WASHINGTON — Freshman Otto Porter had 15 points and six rebounds in his second start of the season, Jason Clark had 15 points and six rebounds, and No. 9 Georgetown took a big lead early and never trailed in a 67-46 win over Villanova on Saturday. The victory moves the Hoyas (21-6, 11-5) into sole possession of fourth place in the Big East, one-half game ahead of Cincinnati and South Florida, who play Sunday. Purdue 75, No. 11 Michigan 61 ANN ARBOR, Mich. — Terone Johnson scored a careerhigh 22 points and Robbie Hummel added 17 to help Purdue upset No. 11 Michigan 75-61 on Saturday night, handing the Wolverines their first home loss of the season.

Georgia 76, No. 12 Florida 62 ATHENS, Ga. — Freshman Kentavious Caldwell-Pope scored 18 points, Gerald Robinson added 15 and Georgia snapped No. 12 Florida’s threegame winning streak with a 76-62 victory Saturday. No. 13 Baylor 70, Oklahoma 60 WACO, Texas — Pierre Jackson scored 18 points, including the tiebreaking 3-pointer that started Baylor’s game-deciding spurt, and the 13th-ranked Bears beat Oklahoma 70-60 on Saturday. TCU 83, No. 18 New Mexico 64 FORT WORTH, Texas — Amric Fields scored eight consecutive points for TCU in a 48-second span in their tiebreaking run and the Horned Frogs upset another ranked team at home, beating No. 18 and Mountain West leader New Mexico 83-64 on Saturday night. No. 19 Wichita State 81, Drake 58 WICHITA, Kan. — Ben Smith scored 18 points to lead a balanced offense and help No. 19 Wichita State beat Drake 81-58

on Saturday. St. John’s 61, No. 20 Notre Dame 58 NEW YORK — Moe Harkless had 22 points and nine rebounds to lead St. John’s to a 61-58 victory over No. 20 Notre Dame on Saturday, the Red Storm’s first win over a ranked team in 11 games this season. 21 UNLV 68, Air Force 58 LAS VEGAS — Chace Stanback scored 21 points to lead No. 21 UNLV to a 68-58 victory over Air Force on Saturday and passed Runnin’ Rebels great Reggie Theus on the school’s all-time scoring list. Saint Joseph’s 82, No. 22 Temple 72 PHILADELPHIA — Langston Galloway scored 22 points while Carl Jones and Ronald Roberts each added 18 to lead Saint Joseph’s to an 82-72 victory over No. 22 Temple on Saturday.

CLASS 2A DIVING

Rutgers 77, Seton Hall 72 NEWARK, N.J. — Freshman Jerome Seagears hit a 3-pointer with 13.1 seconds to play in overtime and Rutgers snapped a six-game losing streak with a 77-72 victory over New Jerseyrival Seton Hall on Saturday.

By JAY MONAHAN For The Times Leader

NCAA WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Irish fight off South Florida’s upset attempt The Associated Press

SOUTH BEND, Ind. — Natalie Novosel scored a career-high 32 points, Devereaux Peters added 17 points and a careerhigh 18 rebounds, and No. 3 Notre Dame withstood an upset bid by South Florida to beat the Bulls 80-68 on Saturday and clinch a tie for the Big East regular-season title. Skylar Diggins had 18 points for the Irish (27-2, 14-1), who set a school regular-season mark with their 27th victory. But this one was not easy against the scrappy Bulls (15-14, 7-8), who got 18 points apiece from Inga Orekhova and Jasmine Wynne..

fifth on the all-time coaching list with 852 wins. No. 4 Connecticut 85, Marquette 45 MILWAUKEE — Kaleena Mosqueda-Lewis scored a career-high 27 points to lead fourth-ranked Connecticut to an easy 85-45 victory over Marquette on Saturday. The Huskies (26-3, 13-2 Big East) have won all seven meetings against Marquette and will face No. 3 Notre Dame on Monday night to try and earn a share of the conference regular season title.

No. 12 Green Bay 78, Butler 53 No. 2 Stanford 69, Utah 42 GREEN BAY, Wis. — Julie STANFORD, Calif. — Chiney Wojta had a double-double with Ogwumike scored 16 points and 27 points and 13 rebounds as 12th-ranked Green Bay earned had 12 rebounds, older sister Nnemkadi Ogwumike added 15 its 14th straight Horizon points and five blocks and No. 2 League title with a 78-53 victory over Butler. Stanford beat Utah 69-42 on Saturday, giving coach Tara No. 15 Georgetown 65, Vanderveer her 700th career Syracuse 62 victory with the Cardinal. SYRACUSE, N.Y. — Sugar The Hall of Fame coach is

WILKES-BARRE – Bishop Hoban’s Mike McGinley held on to the District 2 Class 3A diving record for 37 years. Ibrahim Ismail had it in his name for less than five minutes. Unfortunately for the Wyoming Valley West senior diver, his teammate Collin Vest was four spaces behind him in the diving order – waiting to scratch his own name into the record books. Vest and Ismail shattered the 1975 record of 476 points as the Spartans took the top two spots in boys diving Saturday at the District 2-4 Class 3A regional championships at the Wyoming Valley Catholic Youth Center. Delaware Valley’s Kristiana Brush won the girls title with a fivepoint win over Wyoming Valley West’s Karina Zabresky. Vest posted a score of 534.4, eclipsing Ismail’s newly established record of 506.25. It marked his third consecutive district title. “Ibrahim raced back and told us, ‘Sure, Collin might have the record. But I held it first,’” joked Wyoming Valley West coach Rob Jacobs. Vest and Brush claim automatic bids to the PIAA diving championships March 14-15 in Lewisburg. The Spartan pair traded leads throughout the 11-round meet. Ismail took the lead in the ninth round when he nailed a forward three somersaults to take a 1.65point lead over Vest. Vest’s degree of difficulty proved to be the deciding factor in the final two rounds. Ismail’s near-perfect inward dive in the 10th secured him four 8.5s and a 9; however, Vest’s dive carried a 3.2 degree of difficulty and gave him a 14.5-point lead. “They were all going back and forth,” Jacobs said. “Ibrahim was out there, and he was focused. It just came down to degree of difficulty. Collin had the triple pike that nailed him to get back into first place.”

Rodgers scored 21 points, including a three-point play in the game’s last minute, as No. 15 Georgetown used a 5-0 run in the final 39 seconds to sink Syracuse 65-62 on Saturday.

Eugeneia McPherson scored 11 of her 13 points in the first half for the Red Storm (20-8, 12-3), who shot 51.9 percent (14 of 27) to take a 36-26 lead at the break.

\No. 16 Louisville 75, No. 21 DePaul 62 LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Becky Burke scored 20 points and No. 16 Louisville defeated No. 21 DePaul 75-62 on Saturday to earn a split in the season series. Louisville used a 12-2 run that spanned the final minute of the first half and the first four minutes of the second to build a 43-31 lead after a free throw by Shoni Schimmel with 16:12 to play. The Cardinals led by 13 twice and were never threatened the rest of the way.

No 24 Rutgers 68, Providence 47 PROVIDENCE, R.I. — Khadijah Rushdan scored 21 points to lead No. 24 Rutgers past Providence 68-47 on Saturday, extending the Scarlet Knights’ winning streak against the Friars to 19 straight games. The Scarlet Knights (20-8, 9-6 Big East) were never really threatened in this one, leading by 16 points at the break and outscoring the Friars 31-26 in the second half to seal it.

No. 20 St. John’s 69, Villanova 49 NEW YORK — Da’Shena Stevens scored 21 points and No. 20 St. John’s won its seventh consecutive game, defeating Villanova 69-49 in a Big East game Saturday.

Gonzaga 77, BYU 60 SPOKANE, Wash. — No. 25 Gonzaga clinched its eighth straight West Coast Conference regular-season title and avenged a 30-point loss to BYU with a 77-60 victory over the Cougars on Saturday.

Ismail’s fate remains in the balance as his 506.25 score must test the waters of state competition. Because the PIAA carries one atlarge bid at the 3A level, Ismail’s score must outperform all nonqualifying divers in Pennsylvania to compete at Lewisburg. “That record was there for a very long, long time,” Jacobs said. “If that’s not enough, then I’ll be shocked. First of all, you don’t see a lot of over 500s in the state of Pennsylvania. That has to prove something that this kid would be viable. “The PIAA officials are going to go to bat for him. It’s a big deal to have a broken record.” On the girls’ side, Brush outmatched Zabresky, who chipped away at the Delaware Valley junior’s lead for much of the match. Brush held a seven-point lead going into the final dive but balked on an inward two somersault dive in the 11th, garnering low scores from the judges. Zabresky scored a 37.7 in her final dive for a 373.9 final score, falling short to Brush’s 378.85. “We knew it was going to come down probably to the last dive,” Delaware Valley coach Amanda Pope said. “We picked a big one for her, and it paid off. The multiplier was so great that it did what we needed it to do.” Zabresky erred on her reverse dive in the fifth – the low score placed her in an early hole to escape from. “She fell a little short on her reverse dive,” Jacobs said. “That’s one of her best dives but she looked over her shoulder and twisted it slightly. She didn’t score what she normally would. If she would have had those two things, it would have been a different story.” McGinley will present the medals to Vest and Ismail on Friday when the District 2-4 Class 3A swimming championships commence in Wilkes-Barre. Girls: 1. Kristiana Brush, Delaware Valley, 378.85; 2. Karina Zabresky, Wyoming Valley West, 373.9; 3. Kayla Jadush, Hazleton Area, 338.5; 4. Courtney Snyder, Williamsport, 316; 5. Quinn Gibbons, Abington Heights, 309.85; 6. Katie Frank, Williamsport, 309.35; 7. Nicole English, Williamsport, 291.8; 8. Annie Gromelski, Abington Heights, 274.65; 9. Morgan Sledzinski, Scranton, 267.8; 10. Marisa Gretz, Abington Heights, 266.75; 11. Brie Galvin, Scranton, 256.5 Boys: 1. Collin Vest, Wyoming Valley West, 534.4; 2. Ibrahim Ismail, Wyoming Valley West, 506.25; 3. Edward Kovac, Hazleton Area, 374.6; 4. Dan Jasinski, Abington Heights, 321; 5. Seth Hunter, Williamsport, 320.65; 6. Jake Welker, Delaware Valley, 275.75; 7. Ian Ultsh, Wyoming Valley West, 272.9; 8. Keith Tonte, Pittston Area, 270.45; 9. Scott Rafaiani, Scranton, 237.9; 10. Jaret Monteforte, Pittston Area, 233.5; 11. Tyler Sebastianelli, Abington Heights, 204.3

Freshman earns district title for Black Knights

WILKES-BARRE – A year ago, Lake-Lehman didn’t even have a diving program. On Saturday, it walked away with a district champion. Lake-Lehman freshman Matthew Edkins held off an upset bid by Holy Redeemer’s Mike Pahler to claim the District 2 Class 2A diving title at the Wyoming Valley Catholic Youth Center. Dallas’ Sarah Zerfoss claimed her third consecutive district diving title on the girls’ side with 412.05 points. Edkins jumpstarted the Black Knight diving program with his late win over Pahler. He overcame a 7.3-point deficit to start the penultimate round, nailing his final two dives to defeat Pahler by 8.2 points. “That was awesome,” Edkins said. “I was trying to relax and stay calm. He was so close.” Not one of the favorites at the district meet, Pahler achieved a 28-point lead in the sixth round, forcing Edkins into an uphill battle. The Holy Redeemer senior received mediocre scores in the first two of three finals dives, enabling Edkins to take the lead in the 10th round. Despite perfecting a 2.9-difficulty dive in the last round, Pahler fell short when Edkins amassed four 7s and a 7.5 score on a 2.8-difficulty inward two somersault dive to post a 448.2 total. “Well, the first two dives of the last round weren’t as good as I hoped it would be,” said Pahler, who set a school record with 440 points. “So it really came down to the very last dive. We both really

hit it on the last dive.” Pahler will join Edkins at the PIAA diving championships March 16-17 at Bucknell University. Zerfoss peppered the scoreboard with 8s en route to an early insurmountable lead. Hanover Area’s Ashlynn Heller placed second for the second consecutive year with 356 points. Both Zerfoss and Heller locked down automatic qualifying bids to the PIAAs in Lewisburg. The Dallas senior scored a 37 in her final dive to surpass the 400 mark with 412.05. “It’s really exciting,” Zerfoss said. “My coach set that as a goal for the last dives. So the fact I could break 400 is really exciting.” Zerfoss scored at least one 8 in four of her five required dives. “All of my required dives were really good,” she said. “I nailed them down, and I’m really happy I did.” Heller outlasted a pair of Holy Redeemer divers that contended for the second spot to PIAAs. Olivia Vitali and Kelsey Williams trailed with scores of 347.7 and 341.7, respectively. Entering finals, Heller led by a fraction of a point. A 37 score on the 10th round provided the Hanover Area sophomore with enough cushion to secure second.

Girls: 1. Sarah Zerfoss, Dallas, 412.05; 2. Ashlynn Heller, Hanover Area, 356; 3. Olivia Vitali, Holy Redeemer, 347.7; 4. Kelsey Williams, Holy Redeemer, 341.7; 5. Erica Luzetski, Dallas, 322.65; 6. Amanda O’Kane, Berwick, 300.2; 7. Kierstin Lasher, Wyoming Area, 295.7; 8. Jessica Kreidler, Holy Redeemer, 281.05; 9. Amanda Mathers, Lake-Lehman, 259.15; 10. Taylor Davies, Dallas, 259.05; 11. Katie Kolodzieski, Tunkhannock, 254.4; 12. Kendra Vanesko, Dallas, 252.75; 13. Julia Amorino, Elk Lake, 179.35 Boys: 1. Matthew Edkins, Lake-Lehman, 448.2; 2. Mike Pahler, Holy Redeemer, 440; 3. Patrick Madaya, Dallas, 386.6; 4. Dan Curtin, Berwick, 330.6; 5. Dustin Zeiler, Lake-Lehman, 310.65; 6. Mike Pacovsky, Wyoming Area, 298.6; 7. Mike Kozub, Meyers, 291.4; 8. Nick Rydzewski, Wyoming Area, 251.85; 9. Jesse Szwazt, Wyoming Area, 227.55


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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

DISTRICT 2 WRESTLING

PENGUINS

Rookie nearly topples Crunch Goalie Patrick Killeen comes in for the Penguins following an injury to Scott Munroe. By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE TWP.—With Brad Thiessen in Pittsburgh, starting goaltender Scott Munroe hobbling off the ice in the second period and the game scoreless, the Wilkes-Barre/ Scranton Penguins pinned their hopes for a win on a netminder who a total of 19 minutes of exCRUNCH perience in the American Hockey League. Rookie PaPENGUINS trick Killeen, 21, did manage to keep the Penguins in Saturday’s matchup against the Syracuse Crunch, but they couldn’t muster a win. The Crunch scored twice on Killeen in the second period to defeat the Penguins 2-1. The loss drops the Penguins to 32-17-2-5 and into second place in the East Division, two points behind the Norfolk Admirals, who defeated Hershey on Saturday. After an evenly-matched first period that saw both teams go scoreless, adversity struck the Penguins when Munroe exited the game with an injury three min-

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CHAMPS Continued from Page 1C

third straight District 2 Class 3A crown beating Wallenpaupack’s Chase Gallik, 7-3 in the finals. The Patriot senior held off a late rally by the Buckhorn’s freshman to claim the trifecta, an accomplishment not many in district history can claim. “I’m just happy I got to spend it with my family and they got to see me go out on a good note in my senior year,” Scarantino said. “It’s a huge accomplishment, not as huge as 100 wins I got throughout the season, but it’s huge.” Scarantino picked up his third title, but four other Wyoming Valley Conference wrestlers, in addition to Hammerstone, picked up their first district title. Hazleton Area freshman Larry Romanchik became the latest ninth-grader to win a gold medal, defeating top-seeded Bob Gray from Crestwood, 7-5 in the final. His teammate, Chad Hoffman, a returning state placewinner, pinned Delaware Valley’s Matt Wagner in 1:33 for his first title at 195. “I enjoyed it. I’ve been working for it and I finally got a district title, but the ultimate goal is to get back to states and get a medal and get on that state podium,” said Hoffman, who tallied three wins all by fall in the tournament. Coughlin’s Brad Emerick, who also claimed his first gold medal, followed in Hoffman’s steps with a first-period fall in the finals. Emerick, who extended his unbeaten mark to 36-0 this season, defeated Pittston Area’s Chris Wesolowski for the fourth time this season with the finals pin. Like Hoffman, Emerick also had all pins in the event, except his three were all in the first period. Hoffman went into the second period once. “I’ve been working for this all year and it’s real special for me,” Emerick said. “I just look to go out there on the mat and get off.” Romanchik trailed Gray 2-0 early, but scored five unanswered points to close out the first period and he never looked back. “I wasn’t expecting him to come out as hard as he did and it kind of woke me up, him coming out that hard,” Romanchik said. “I knew I couldn’t let that two points get to me early. I had to work my way back little by little.” Wyoming Valley West’s Derrick Simms (138 pounds) also became the newest district champion for the WVC. The junior, who entered the bracket as the No. 4 seed, won his

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

Penguins’ Ryan Craig (22) ties the game at 1 on a power play goal in the second period, scoring on Syracuse goalie Antero Niittmaki.

utes into the second period. Killeen entered the game for the Penguins, making only his first appearance of the season. Entering a scoreless game near the halfway point wasn’t an easy thing to do. “I don’t have a lot of experience in the American League and it’s always tough when you come in halfway through a game,” said Killeen, who has played in 33 games for Wheeling in the ECHL. “Anytime your going in it’s a little bit of nerves, but mostly excited. You want to pick up where (Munroe) left off and give the team a chance to win. Killeen did just that, but he got off to a rough start. On the first shot Killeen faced, Syracuse connected during a two-

on-one when Dan Sexton deposited a cross-ice pass into the far side of the net for a power play goal to make it 1-0. Killeen wasn’t rattled. “You can’t dwell on a goal like that. I was kind of aware that it would’ve been a tough save, but I had to move on and stay confident,” Killeen said. The Penguins tied it up minutes later when Ryan Craig swiped home a loose puck in front during a power play to make it 1-1. With eight seconds left in the period, Killeen had a shot skip over his leg to give Syracuse a 2-1 lead. The goal turned out to be the game-winner, and it’s one that Killeen would like to have back. “The second one was a tough

one,” he said. “I know it wasn’t great, and unfortunately it’s what cost us.” The Penguins and the soldout home crowd held their breath in the third period when Killeen was shaken up after making a series of saves during a scrum in the crease. If Killeen had to leave the game, head coach John Hynes said the team didn’t have an emergency goaltender to take his place. “Hopefully I could come up with something good,” Hynes said. “(Goaltender coach Mike) Bales is here. We’d have to get him on a PTO quick.” Despite a Syracuse defense that had been stingy all night, the Penguins generated a ton of pressure late in the third period, narrowly missing on a Jason Williams shot from the slot with three minutes left, followed by a Colin McDonald swipe at a loose puck near the post. Crunch goaltender Antero Niittymaki stayed cool in net to keep the Penguins off the board in the period and finished the game stopping 35 of 36 shots. After the game, head coach John Hynes didn’t have an update on Munroe’s status but said the team would be able to find another goaltender, if needed, by today’s 3 p.m. matchup against Norfolk. If Killeen gets the nod, he said he’s prepared to make his first AHL start. “It’s usually easier (to start). You know what’s coming,” he said. “I’m just going to be ready to go. I’ve been playing hockey my whole life. It’s nothing different. I just have to be ready for it.”

title knocking off Coughlin’s Frankie Mahmoud. He grabbed a takedown with just 16 seconds left in the match and didn’t let Mahmoud out at the end to clinch the win. The Spartan advanced to the final in one of the most exciting semifinals, defeating top-seeded Aaron Kennedy from Honesdale 11-10 in the final seconds. “I was just looking for whatever I could find,” Simms said about the final takedown versus Mahmoud. He then went on to praise his finals opponent. “I grew up with the kid and he’s a great athlete. He’s a tough kid and it was a tough finals match. He’s a hard worker and he really deserves some credit too.” Notes: Delaware Valley’s C.J. Palmer, who earned Outstanding Wrestler, joined the elite group of four-time District 2 champions with a 9-7 win over Valley West’s Kyle Krasavage. It was also his 150th career win and he’s just the second wrestler in Lackawanna League history to accomplish the four-time feat joining Scranton’s Dave Morgan…The Warriors FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER claimed their first District 2 title with 232 points, their last district Delaware Valley’s C.J. Palmer tries for a single leg take down on championship came in 1980 Kyle Krasavage of Wyoming Valley West in a 126-pound match. when they were part of District – Palmer (DV) tech fall Senuk (AH) 18-3, 170 – Garrett Zeiler (Wall) pinned Dan Stuckart 12. The 232 points also broke the 4:15;126Krasavage (WVW) tech fall Kennedy (Hon) (Scr) 2:31 182 – Tom Smulowitz (WVW) won by forfeit Class 3A record for most points 19-1,1325:54 – Palmer (DV) maj dec Carr (AH) 12-2; Lau195 – Ian Moran (WVW) maj dec Tyler Ohl (Ber) 13-5 scored in the tournament, break- bach (Ber) dec Bakradze (Scr) 4-0 138 – Simms (WVW) dec Kennedy (Hon) 11-10; 220 – Taylor Schermerhorn (Haz) pinned Patrick ing Coughlin’s previous record of Mahmoud (Cou) maj dec McNally (Scr) 13-4 Kearney (AH) 2:28 145 – Lussi (PA) dec Inguilli (Wall) 10-4; Hankin285 – Kameron Van Wert (WS) pinned Nick Maf218.5 in 1992. son (Cre) dec Markowitz (DV) 14-7 fei (DV) :39 District 2 Class 3A Championships

(at Hazleton Area) Outstanding Wrestler: C.J. Palmer, Delaware Valley Coach of the Year: Lou DeLauro and staff, Delaware Valley Jr. High Coach of the Year: Jim Hoffman, Hazleton Area WVC Sportsmanship Award: Jay Konigus, Crestwood LL Sportsmanship Award: Paul Fox, West Scranton Team Scores: 1. Delaware Valley (DV) 239; 2. Wyoming Valley West (WVW) 132; 3. Pittston Area (PA) 128; 3. Pittston Area (PA) 128; 4. Crestwood (Cre) 118; 5. Coughlin (Cou) 115.5; 6. Honesdale (Hon) 111; 7. Wallenpaupack (Wall) 105.5; 8. Scranton (Scr) 93; 9. Hazleton Area (Haz) 88; 10. Abington Heights (AH) 84; 11. West Scranton (WS) 75.5; 12. Berwick (Ber) 70; 13. Tunkhannock (Tun) 63

Finals

106 – Jamie Scarantino (PA) dec Chase Gallik (Wall) 7-3 113 – Larry Romanchik (Haz) dec Bob Gray (Cre) 7-5 120 – Tom Hendry (WS) dec Frank Carozza (DV) 3-0 126 – C.J. Palmer (DV) dec Kyle Krasavage (WVW) 9-7 132 – Jalen Palmer (DV) dec Kevin Laubach (Ber) 6-2 138 – Derrick Simms (WVW) dec Frankie Mahmoud (Cou) 4-3 145 – Kyle Hankinson (Cre) dec Angelo Lussi (PA) 8-3 152 – Matt Hammerstone (Cre) dec Michael Carr (AH) 11-6 160 – Mark Granahan (Scr) tech fall Zach Smith (Hon) 16-0, 3:28 170 – Marc Wagner (DV) dec Charlie Generotti (Tun) 5-3 182 – Martin Strenk (DV) dec Roger Legg (Cre) 4-2, OT 195 – Chad Hoffman (Haz) pinned Matt Wagner (DV) 1:33 220 – Victor Steffen (Wall) dec Jack Fagan (DV) 3-2 285 – Brad Emerick (Cou) pinned Chris Wesolowski (PA) 1:50

Semifinals

106 – Scarantino (PA) dec Hawkins (Cou) 6-0; Gallik (Wall) pinned Pascale (AH) 5:43 113 – Gray (Cre) pinned Koslower (DV) 3:04; Romanchik (Haz) dec Poray (Cou) 9-2 120 – Carozza (DV) pinned Ciprich (Cou) 2:38; Hendry (WS) dec Lutecki (PA) 7-4

152 – Carr (AH) default Kobrynich (WS); Hammerstone (Cre) tech fall Dwyer (WVW) 19-3, 5:55 160 – Granahan (Scr) tech fall Masteller (Ber) 16-1, 2:26; Smith (Hon) pinned Favaro (DV) 1:53 170 – Wagner (DV) dec Cowman (WVW) 9-2; Generotti (Tun) dec Zeiler (Wall) 3-1 182 – Strenk (DV) dec Olson (Cou) 6-1; Legg (Cre) pinned Wehrmann (Wall) 1:45 195 – Hoffman (Haz) pinned Baress (WS) 2:14; Wagner (DV) dec Wehrmann (Wall) 3-0 220 – Fagan (DV) pinned Kearney (AH) 1:41; Steffen (Wall) dec Schermerhorn (Haz) 4-0 285 – Emerick (Cou) pinned Drake (Tun) 1:41; Wesolowski (PA) dec Berardelli (AH) 3-1, OT

Third Place

106 – Greg Pascale (AH) dec Jake Lang (DV) 5-1 113 – Bill Poray (Cou) maj dec Richie Koslower (DV) 11-1 120 – Tyler Lutecki (PA) dec Ed Ciprich (Cou) 6-2 126 – Evan Kennedy (Hon) dec Dan Ritz (Cre) 3-0 132 – Matt Evans (Hon) dec Nathan Cheek (WVW) 8-4 138 – Aaron Kennedy (Hon) dec James McNally (Scr) 4-3 145 – Cody Cordes (WVW) default Pat Inguilli (Wall) 3:00 152 – Tim Russell (Hon) dec Shane McTiernan (Scr) 4-2 160 – Dan Favaro (DV) dec Sam Falcone (PA) 6-3 170 – Trey Cowman (WVW) dec Paul Cole (Cou) 5-3 182 – Pat Nallin (PA) pinned Ethan Wehrmann (Wall) 4:39 195 – Joe Barress (WS) dec Jared Wehrmann (Wall) 3-2 220 – Jake Jola (Ber) dec Brandon Baird (WVW) 2-1, 3OT 285 – Casey Drake (Tun) dec Dylan Berardelli (AH) 2-1, 3OT

Fifth Place

106 – Bobby Hawkins (Cou) pinned Stephfen Caple (WS) 2:18 113 – Dave Deleo (PA) dec James Fayocavitz (AH) 6-4, OT 120 – Peter Talanca (Ber) pinned Mike Pavlichko (Tun) 4:01 126 – Nick Senuk (AH) dec Josh Mussoline (Haz) 9-5 132 – Niyaz Bakradze (Scr) forfeit Matthew Carr (AH) 138 – Kevin Wesolowski (PA) forfeit Anthony Colletta (DV 145 – Lucas Markowitz (DV) dec Ben Siegel (Tun) 7-4 152 – Brian Dwyer (WVW) forfeit Jon Kobrynich (WS) 160 – Will Masteller (Ber) dec Andrew Brodginski (Cre) 7-3

Consolation Semifinals

106 – Lang (DV) tech fall Stonier (Tun) 16-0, 5:00; Caple (WS) dec Rutledge (Hon) 1-0 113 – Deleo (PA) dec Jennings (Scr) 7-5; Fayocavitz (AH) dec Tirko (WVW) 7-5 120 – Pavlichko (Tun) maj dec Egger (Wall) 10-2; Talanca (Ber) dec Vopava (Haz) 8-6, OT 126 – Ritz (Cre) dec Lovallo (Scr) 8-2; Mussoline (Haz) dec Kroptavich (WS) 6-0 132 – Cheek (WVW) dec Masters (Haz) 2-1; Evans (Hon) dec Smith (WS) 3-0 138 – Colletta (DV) pinned Slocum (AH) 3:34; Wesolowski (PA) dec Geroski (Cre) 4-2 145 – Siegel (Tun) dec Talanca (Ber) 4-3; Cordes (WVW) dec Lill (Hon) 4-2, OT 152 – Russel (Hon) pinned Wagner (DV) 2:29; McTiernan (Scr) maj dec Fredmund (Haz) 17-9 160 – Falcone (PA) dec Biesadesky (Haz) 3-2; Brodginski (Cre) dec Wright (Tun) 3-1 170 – Stuckart (Scr) pinned Dexter (Cre) 2:40; Cole (Cou) pinned Dailey (Hon) :59 182 – Nallin (PA) dec Carrasco (Tun) 2-0; Smulowitz (WVW) dec Borkowski (Hon) 6-4 195 – Ohl (Ber) dec Robbins (Scr) 4-3; Moran (WVW) pinned Quinn (Hon) 1:58 220 – Jola (Ber) dec Phillips (Cou) 2-1; Baird (WVW) dec Benson (Hon) 3-0 285 – Maffei (DV) dec Pajalich (Wall) 10-7; Van Wert (WS) pinned Kowalczyk (Hon) 2:42

Consolation Finals

106 – Lang (DV) maj dec Hawkins (Cou) 16-7; Pascale (AH) maj dec Caple (WS) 9-1 113 – Koslower (DV) pinned Deleo (PA) 1:25; Poray (Cou) tech fall Fayovavitz (AH) 15-0, 2:49; 120 – Ciprich (Cou) dec Pavlichko (Tun) 9-8; Lutecki (PA) dec Talanca (Ber) 9-4, OT 126 – Ritz (Cre) dec Senuk (AH) 5-2; Kennedy (Hon) dec Mussoline (Haz) 7-2 132 – Cheek (WVW) default Carr (AH); Evans (Hon) dec Bakradze (Scr) 4-2, OT 138 – Kennedy (Hon) pinned Colletta (DV) 3:51; McNally (Scr) dec Wesolowski (PA) 6-3 145 – Inguilli (Wall) dec Siegel (Tun) 11-8; Cordes (WVW) dec Markowitz (DV) 2-1, 2OT 152 – Russell (Hon) forfeit Kobrynich (WS); McTiernan (Scr) dec Dwyer (WVW) 5-3 160 – Falcone (PA) dec Masteller (Ber) 4-3; Favaro (DV) dec Brodginski (Cre) 4-3 170 – Cowman (WVW) pinned Stuckart (Scr) 1:58; Cole (Cou) dec Zeiler (Wall) 4-3 182 – Nallin (PA) forfeit; Wehrmann (Wall) pinned Smulowitz (WVW) 2:51 195 – Baress (WS) dec Ohl (Ber) 5-2; Wehrmann (Wall) pinned Moran (WVW) 2:45 220 – Jola (Ber) pinned Kearney (AH) 3:59; Baird (WVW) dec Schermerhorn (Haz) 6-3 285 – Drake (Tun) pinned Maffei (DV) 1:50; Berardelli (AH) dec Van Wert (WS) 6-1

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Meyers’ Vito Pasone, top, wrestles Lake-Lehman’s Jimmy Stuart on his way to win the District 2 Class 2A title in the 113-pound bout in Lehman Township on Saturday night.

Lake-Lehman wins Class 2A team title

Black Knights finish one point ahead of Dallas thanks to Hanover Area wrestler. By MATTHEW SHUTT For The Times Leader

like an absolute brawl” said Schutz. “It feels really good to get the win though. I’ve been training really hard and I’m going to be training ever harder to try my best to get a fourth. That’s a goal of mine and I really want to try and get after that next year, but, for now I’m going to focus on regionals.” Pasone’s win made him just the fourth wrestler in school history to take home a district title every year and just the twentythird in the entire district. “It’s a really nice feeling to be up there with the others who have done in from Meyers,” said Pasone. “Hopefully I can achieve as much as they did when it’s all over.” If the Pasone continues wrestling and winning in the style he did all weekend, he may have some more hardware to add soon enough. The senior won his three matches this weekend by technical fall and never by less than 15 points. As a result, Pasone also took home the tournaments Outstanding Wrestler award. “He wrestled solid, he really wrestled the way he wanted to,” said Meyers coach Ron Swingle, who was awarded Coach of the Year at the end of the tournament. “He was very prepared and that’s what I wanted to see from all the kids this weekend. We had a good tournament. We came in with eleven and seven are going on to next weekend. We just have to regroup and get ready for next weekend and I think we’ll be ready.” Of those moving on from Swingle’s squad is Darren Stucker, who scored a pin at 145, rounding out the list of local winners. Hanover Area’s Brad Glazenski, Meyers’ Justin Elick and Jeff Nealon, Dallas’ Zach Macosky and Kris Roccograndi and Nanticoke’s Pedro Bracero will all also be moving along to Williamsport for the Regional tournament after taking home second-place finishes.

LEHMAN TWP. – As Hanover Area’s Steve Radzwilla was turning Dallas’ Garrett Artsma onto his back during their match the cheers started to rise from the crowd, encouraging the Hawkeyes 185-pounder to finish Artsma. When the referee slapped the mat to signal a pin for Radzwilla, a minor frenzy broke out behind the scorers table – courtesy of wrestlers from Lake-Lehman. Artsma’s second-place finish ensured that Dallas would not overtake Lake-Lehman in points and, by a margin of one point, the Black Knights came away with the team title in the District 2 Class 2A wrestling tournament. “I didn’t even see the match,” said Lake-Lehman head coach Tom Williams. “I was watching it for a minute but then I had to go into the locker room for something and one of the kids came running in to tell me what had happened.” “I feel really good for the kids, though,” said Williams. “It’s been a bumpy road but the kids have worked hard. We’ve only been on the mats at practice two days out of the last fourteen, but, they never quit.” Lake-Lehman was pitted against Dallas in three matches coming into the final round of Saturday’s action, with each team having earned a separate, fourth match. Just getting to the point of needing Radzwilla’s win to make a difference meant that the Knights had to win all three of those matches. Jake Winters (138), Bryan Carter (152) and Nick Shelley (160) all won by decision for the Knights after Dallas’ Dominic DeGraba started the day with a win at106. Shelley’s win – which earned him a second district ti- Team Scores 1. Lake-Lehman 182.5; 2. Dallas 181.5; 3. tle – came against another for- Meyers 162.5; 4. Western Wayne 159; 5. Lackawanna Trail 118; 6. Wyoming Area 79; 7. Hanover mer district champion, the Area 78; 8. Valley View 77; 9. Nanticoke 68; 10. GAR 56; 11. Blue Ridge 53; 11. Elk Lake 53; 13 Mountaineers’ Bill Dixon. Scranton Prep 29; 14. Montrose 10.5 “I knew it was going to come down to conditioning, that it Championship Round was going to come down to that 106 – Dominic DeGraba (DAL) dec. Brad Gla(HAN) 12-0 third period but I just had to zenski 113 – Vito Pasone (MEY) tech. fall Jimmy Stuart (LL) 24-7 keep pushing myself,” said Shel120 – Zach Edwards (BR) dec. Justin Elick 5-4 ley. “This win today feels strict- (MEY) 126 – Austin Harry (LL) pinned Josh Allabaugh 5:18 ly awesome. It’s great to get this (NAN) 132 – Andy Schutz (WA) dec. Jeff Nealon (MEY) 10-4 win as a team.” 138 – Jake Winters (LL) dec. Zach Macosky At his match at 126 pounds, (DAL) 5-2 – Darren Stucker (MEY) pinned Manny Mithe Knights’ Austin Harry did ralih145 (WW) 3:46 152 –Bryan Carter (LL) dec. Kris Roccograndi his best to give his team a (DAL) 4-0 chance, pinning Nanticoke’s 8-4 160 – Nick Shelley (LL) dec. Bill Dixon (DAL) 170 – Marvess Rosiak (LT) Garrett Enslin Josh Allabaugh. (WW) 182 – Steve Radzwilla (HAN) Garrett Artsma “It’s the best feeling in the (DAL) world,” said Harry of winning 195 – Pedro Bracero (NAN) Conner Rosensweet (WW) his second district title in a row. 220 – Eric Laytos (LT) Matt Rosensweet (WW) 285 – Mike Gallantini (VV) Ben Lehman (LT) “I just stuck to my game plan and in the third period I think Consolation Finals (Allabaugh) just got a little tired 106 – Sean Bergold (MEY) pinned John Tomasurea (LL) 4:03 and I was able to get the pin.” 113 – A.J. Luton (GAR) dec. Klimovitch (DAL) While Harry and Shelley be- 7-4 120 – Carmen Mauriello (WA) dec. Patrick came repeat winners, some fel- Creedon (SP) 6-1 126 – Kashif Alston (MEY) pinned Matt Judge low Wyoming Valley Confer- (VV) 4:15 132 – Morgan Fuller (WW) pinned Billy Lee ence products also added to (LT) 3:33 138 – Tom Maby (BR) dec. Dominic Vitale (HA) their district title totals. 3-2 – Derrick Smith (EL) pinned Ryan Fillipiak Wyoming Area’s Andy Schutz (WA)1454:18 152 – Beau Fuller (WW) pinned Michael Cipiadded his third title with his win lewski (VV) 2:22 160 – Johntae Nelson (MEY) dec. Lucas Karat 132 over Meyers’ Jeff Nealon nick (WW) 7-6 and the Mohawks Vito Pasone 170 – Connor Martinez (DAL) dec. Jamaar (GAR) 3-2 took home his fourth district Taylor 182 – Caleb Darling (LT) dec. Troy Uhrin (VV) 5-3 crown with a 24-7 technical fall OT 195 – Ryan Monk (DAL) pinned Curt Barbacci (LL) 1:54 of the Knights’ Jimmy Stuart. 220 – Zac Faust (GAR) pinned Dillon Ropietski “It’s the third one and it never (HAN) 3:25 285 – Joseph Ingaglio (WW) dec. Carl Zielinski gets easier. Today’s match felt (WA) 2-0


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 PAGE 7C

BOSTON RED SOX

Manager Valentine bans alcohol in team’s clubhouse After last year’s revelations, only fried chicken remains available to players of the Olde Towne Team.

By JON KRAWCZYNSKI AP Baseball Writer

FORT MYERS, Fla. — There will be no drinking in the Boston Red Sox clubhouse this season. The team will ban alcohol in the clubhouse and on the last plane flight of road trips, new manager Bobby Valentine announced on Saturday. The move comes in the wake of last season’s September collapse in the AL East, a tailspin that included reports of Boston starting pitchers drinking beer in the clubhouse on their off-days rather

than supporting their teammates in the dugout. It’s one of a handful of new rules that Valentine is imposing in his first season as Red Sox manager, and he laid them out with team ownership by his side in a meeting Saturday morning before Boston’s first full-squad workout of the spring. “It’s just what I’ve always done, except for when I was in Texas, I guess,” Valentine said when asked why he banned booze. “I’m comfortable with it that way.” When asked how the players reacted to the news, Valentine said, “You mean like standing ovation or booing? I didn’t get either of those.” Veteran David Ortiz didn’t bat an eye. “We’re not here to drink. We’re here to

play baseball,” the slugger said. “This ain’t no bar. If you want to drink, drink at home.” Last season, the Red Sox went 7-20 in September and allowed their nine-game lead in the AL East to swirl down the drain. After manager Terry Francona’s team missed the playoffs, the Boston Globe reported that starting pitchers including Josh Beckett, John Lackey and Jon Lester spent some of their off-days drinking beer and eating fried chicken in the clubhouse during games. Both Beckett and Lester said last week that mistakes were made last season and both vowed it wouldn’t happen again. Valentine has made sure of that. Ever since taking over for Francona, who guided the Red Sox to two World

AP PHOTO

Red Sox manager Bobby Valentine speaks Feb. 19, in Fort Myers, Fla.

Series titles in eight seasons and had a reputation as a laid-back manager, Valentine has stressed personal responsibility and accountability with his players. “Each manager has his own style,” team president Larry Lucchino said. “It

MLB ROUNDUP

WA S H I N G T O N N AT I O N A L S

Broadway Bryce? At 19, Harper figures he is ready for prime time above his locker, seizVIERA, Fla. — Bryce Haring the per knew this was coming. chance to let When he arrived at the clubthis brash house for Washington’s first rookie know full-squad workout of spring he’d gone a training, his teammates sent little too far. Harper him a not-so-subtle message. Not that Above his locker, the name- Harper took it that way. Heck, plate said, “Joe Namath, No. someone put an even cruder 12.” term on the nameplate during Hmmm, Broadway Bryce? his first year in the minors, “That works,” the outfielder where he rubbed plenty of said with a sly smile. people the wrong way. Say this about Harper: Didn’t bother him then. There’s no lack of confidence. Doesn’t bother him now. “I talked to him when he “I don’t really care,” Harper was 15,” said Nationals mansaid Saturday, standing at the ager Davey Johnson. “He was locker after the first full-squad cocky then — and he’s cocky workout of spring training, his now.” actual name and number back Harper is all of 19 these in place above his head. “This days, still cruising through life is going to be going on for a without the least bit of doubt while. It’s part of the game. he’s going to be baseball’s It’s part of that initiation kind next big star. He’s already of thing. It’s all good to me.” been on the cover of Sports Yep, it’s all good to Harper, Illustrated. He picked No. 34 who had the audacity to think for his Nationals uniform he could make the team a because those two numbers year ago, who saw nothing add up to 7, which not so ludicrous about making the coincidentally was worn by jump from the Scenic West Hall of Famer Mickey Mantle. Athletic Conference to big He banters with fans on the leagues. Internet (”Rise and grind!! Now, even though his pro First real day! Excited to get experience consists of a mere going! Why not?” he tweeted 109 games, none of it spent Saturday), has a tattoo with above the Double-A level, his name and favorite Bible Harper arrived this spring verse (Luke 1:37, “For with more determined than ever to God, nothing shall be imposbe wearing a Nationals unisible”) plastered across his form when he breaks camp. right ribcage, and wears his “I want to make that decihair in a pseudo-Mohawk. sion hard for them,” he said. A few weeks ago, Harper let “I don’t want to be in the it be known he wants to be a minor leagues. That’s always cultural icon such as Joe Nabeen me. Everybody knows math. You know, a guy who that. I want to be up in the big wins the big game, speaks his leagues — and I want to stay mind, makes commercials, there.” enjoys the nightlife. Naturally, Harper has always been in a someone doctored the name hurry. To become eligible for

worked for Tito very well, his style. “Bobby has his own style that was born of 20-plus years as a manager in the big leagues and in Japan. He’s got his own philosophies and I think he’ll organize a camp consistent with that. Will there be differences? You bet there will be differences because they’re different managers and different coaching staffs.” Valentine played down the changes, saying there was nothing groundbreaking in his philosophy, which tells the players “not to embarrass themselves or the team, the community, their teammates, themselves. I don’t think that’s a new rule. That’s a long-standing rule of life.” Beckett, Lester and Lackey were not available for comment after Valentine made the announcement.

Lee gets some side work due to injury The Associated Press

CLEARWATER, Fla. — Cliff Lee will work in a side bullpen session Sunday when Philadelphia’s pitchers throw to hitters for the first time in camp. Lee is nursing a minor abdominal injury. He’s expected to step back into line with the rest of the star-studded pitching staff in the coming week. Although Lee has had abdominal injuries that have led to trips to the disabled list in the past, including two springs ago while with Seattle, he shrugged off his current pain as “just a precautionary deal.” “It’s similar to the ab strains I’ve had in the past,” Lee said. “Basically the early stages of that in the past I tried to power through it. I’m trying to be smarter with it now and keep it a small issue.” Lee similarly had a minor blip on his early spring training radar a year ago, when he complained of a minor strained muscle in his left side. But the left-hander didn’t miss any time in the exhibition or regular season schedule and finished his first full season in Philadelphia 17-8 with a 2.40 ERA and a major league-best six shutouts.

By PAUL NEWBERRY AP National Writer

AP PHOTO

Bryce Harper, a Washington Nationals prospect, attends the team’s first official full-squad workout Saturday in Viera, Fla.

baseball’s amateur draft at age 12. Naturally, he was picked 17, he took the GED after his No. 1 by the Nationals in 2010, sophomore year of high signing a contract for just a school, not long after he’d been on the cover of SI touted shade under $10 million. (He recently used some of the as the “Chosen One.” Passed money to purchase a home for the test with flying colors, of his mother.) When Harper course. reported to camp the next Then it was on to the Colspring, he saw no reason why lege of Southern Nevada, he couldn’t start right away. mainly because it was a school that used wooden bats Washington decided some time in the minors was the in conference play instead of more prudent path, shipping aluminum. In 66 games, he him off to the not-so-primesmashed 31 homers. The time Sally League. school’s previous record was

Milwaukee Brewers PHOENIX — With an equipment bag slung over his left shoulder, Ryan Braun went back to work with the Milwaukee Brewers. The NL MVP had his 50game suspension for a positive drug test overturned earlier this week. On Saturday, he and his teammates held their first full-squad practice in spring training. The workout was welcomed relief for Braun, who was emotional on Friday as he vehemently defended his innocence following his exoneration by an arbitrator. On his way out to a back practice field, Braun passed fans who yelled “Atta

boy, MVP” and “Keep your head up.” Braun smiled and said thank you. The BrewLee ers weren’t sure if they would start the season with Braun, who failed a drug test given to him following a playoff game in October.

St. Louis Cardinals JUPITER, Fla. — Jason Motte has already gotten a public vote of confidence from his manager. Motte, who played a prominent role in the Cardinals’ run to the 2011 World Series title, never could get former manager Tony La Russa to acknowledge his role as the closer. La Russa’s intention was to avoid heaping undue pressure on Motte. New manager Mike Matheny believes it’s time for hard throwing right-hander to seize the role, and said that Motte was his closer. Oakland A’s PHOENIX — Oakland infielder Scott Sizemore sprained his left knee during fielding drills Saturday, the first day of full squad workouts. Sizemore was scheduled to undergo an MRI exam to determine the extent of the injury. The Athletics open the season on March 28 against Seattle in Tokyo, and it was uncertain whether Sizemore would be ready by then. Minnesota Twins FORT MYERS, Fla. — Joel Zumaya’s comeback bid with the Minnesota Twins took a worrisome turn Saturday when the reliever ended a throwing session early because of discomfort in his right elbow. Twins general manager Terry Ryan says Zumaya will have an MRI exam Sunday.

A R O U N D T H E L E A G U E NATIONALS

NEW YORK YANKEES

PHILLIES

3B Zimmerman wants to stay

A-Rod to Lin: Need a new roommate?

The Associated Press

Landry Fields’ couch — only because his brother’s place, TAMPA, Fla. — Alex Rodri- where Lin had been staying, was unavailable. guez has an interesting offer Of course, now that his for Jeremy Lin: Need a new contract is guaranteed for the roommate? rest of the season, Lin has “If he’s still looking for a found his own apartment. place to crash, maybe he can “Linsanity. Wow. crash at my apartment,” the What a run,” Rodriguez New York Yankees star said. said. “You look at the “Imagine the tabloids then.” Giants, you look at A day after arriving at spring training, Rodriguez said Linsanity and there’s been so many great Saturday he feels healthy and gave a lot of credit to a special things happening in treatment suggested by anoth- New York. “The great thing er NBA star, Kobe Bryant. But it didn’t take long before about Linsanity is that, it kind of reminds A-Rod, like almost everyone you of how fun the else these days, was talking game should be,” he addabout the sudden success of ed. “For some of us that Lin, the New York Knicks have been playing for a long point guard who spent the time, it makes you realize night before his breakout how much fun the game is.” game sleeping on teammate

Slugger Howard facing a ‘setback’

VIERA, Fla. — Ryan Zimmerman and the Washington Nationals are looking to stay together for the long haul. Both sides were working Saturday to agree on a lucrative new contract that would keep the star third baseman with the Nationals beyond the last two years on his current deal. The main sticking point was Zimmerman’s desire for a no-trade clause, or at least some assurance that he wouldn’t be dealt by the only team he’s played for in the big leagues. Zimmerman wanted to get the deal done by Saturday, when the Nationals held their first fullsquad workout. But, from the perspective of general manager Mike Rizzo, there was some wiggle room in the player’s deadline. Zimmerman has two seasons

The Associated Press

AP PHOTO

Nationals third baseman Ryan Zimmerman fields a ground ball Saturday in Viera, Fla.

left on a $45 million, five-year contract. He didn’t want talks to drag on through spring training or into the season, worried his contract situation would become a distraction to a team that has some top prospects and expects to make great strides in the NL East.

New York Yankees’ Alex Rodriguez

The Associated Press

CLEARWATER, Fla. — Injured Phillies star Ryan Howard is leaving Philadelphia’s spring training camp for a few days to visit the doctor who did the surgery on his torn left Achilles tendon. Phillies manager Charlie Manuel called it “a little setback.” Phillies general manager Ruben AmaHoward ro Jr. said it was a “routine checkup.” Howard is likely to return to camp on Wednesday. He’s been taking batting practice and doing light fielding drills and jogging. It’s still uncertain whether Howard will be ready for opening day.


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

C L ASS 2 A B OYS BAS K E T BA L L

Vikings stun Grenadiers in OT GAR’s early lead evaporates as Riverside earns a trip to the District 2 semifinals. By JOHN ERZAR jerzar@timesleader.com

SCRANTON – The improbable shouldn’t have happened. At least that’s what GAR coach Paul Brown believed as he stood in the locker room hallway at Scranton High School on Saturday afternoon. But it did. And so did overtime. And so did the end of his Grenadiers’ impressive season. Riverside forced overtime with an incredible shot at the buzzer, then scored the game-winner with nine seconds left in the extra period to defeat GAR 42-40 in a District 2 Class 2A quarterfinal game. Riverside (21-3) moves to Wednesday’s semifinals and will play Holy Cross (21-4). GAR

(20-3) saw its season end in the round of eight for the third time in four seasons. Before Jason Vishnesky’s basket tied the game at 37 at the end of regulation, GAR missed the back end and front end of oneand-one foul shot situations. “We were in a position where it wouldn’t have mattered if they made that shot,” Brown said. “All we had to do was be up three, up four and it doesn’t matter. We had opportunities to put points on the board and we didn’t take advantage of them.” The latter one-and-one came with six seconds left. Riverside’s Jerry Kincel, the school’s all-time leading scorer who had a rough afternoon from the field, got the ball down the right sideline and passed to Vishnesky. Vishnesky drove at an angle to the basket, stumbled and barely got the ball high enough as he fell to the court. His shot touched the glass and went in. “I thought about getting the

foul to be honest,” Vishnesky said. “I didn’t think it would go in.” Overtime ended less spectacularly for Riverside and more painfully for GAR, which pulled to a 40-40 tie on Shaliek Powell’s inside basket with 22 seconds left. Riverside worked the clock down before Connor Mailen scored inside with nine seconds remaining. With no timeouts, GAR rushed down court, but the Vikings clogged up things on the left side of the backcourt. The result was reserve guard Zach Ellis having to take a desperation, off-balance three-point heave from well beyond the arc. The ball hit off the left front of the rim and bounced away. GAR held Kincel to 3-of-15 from the field, with Isaiah Francis the main defender in the man-toman defense. However, Nico Munley came up with some clutch threes in the first half,

C L ASS 2 A B OYS BAS K E T BA L L

Early run is Hawkeyes undoing

By JOHN ERZAR jerzar@timesleader.com

SCRANTON – Hanover Area finally got over that imaginary hump it attempted to climb most of Saturday afternoon. But like so many times prior, whenever the Hawkeyes got near or to the top, Lakeland found a way to knock them backward. Lakeland’s Eric Grabowski nailed a three-pointer early in the fourth quarter, erasing Hanover Area’s only lead of the game, as the Chiefs went on to a 72-58 victory in a District 2 Class 2A quarterfinal game at Lackawanna College. Lakeland (18-8) moves to the semifinals Wednesday, where it will play Meyers (22-2) at a site and time to be announced. Hanover Area ended its season at 10-12. The Hawkeyes spent the final three quarters trying to make amends for a disastrous opening eight minutes. Lakeland ripped off a 10-0 run to end the first quarter, taking a 22-9 lead. From there, the chase was on. Behind the driving of guard Jeorge Colon and third-quarter outburst by forward ShaQuille Rolle, Hanover Area finally overtook Lakeland in the fourth quarter. Rolle’s three-pointer with 6:55 to play gave the Hawkeyes a 57-55 lead. The advantage lasted exactly 17 seconds. Grabowski, who finished with a game-high 22 points, tossed in a three-pointer from the right wing. Tyler Brady followed with two free throws, boosting the Chiefs’ lead to 59-55. Hanover Area got within 59-57 on Martin Steve’s rebound basket,

JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Lakeland’s Kyle Kiehart (30) and Hanover Area’s ShaQuille Rolle look up at a potential rebound during Saturday’s game.

but Lakeland finished off the Haw- back, zipping through the lane keyes by closing the game with a consistently for most of his 15 13-1 run. points. Lakeland 72, Hanover Area 58 After a slow first half, Rolle finHANOVER AREA (58): Colon 5 3-5 15, Rolle 7 1-3 17, Barber 5 2-5 14, Everetts 2 0-1 4, Steve 4 0-0 ished off strongly. He recorded a 8, Kerestes 0 0-0 0, Wickiser 0 0-0 0, Marcincavage 0, George 0 0-0 0. Totals 23 6-14 58. double-double with a team-high 0 0-0LAKELAND (72): Grabowski 7 6-8 22, Brady 2 3-4 7, Kiehart 7 4-5 19, Filarsky 5 0-0 14, Streifsky 2 17 points to go with a team-high 0-0 4, Rojenches 1 0-0 2, Nichols 1 0-0 3, Tolerico 0 14 rebounds. Freshman Jacob 1-2 1, Piatt 0 0-0 0, Bruke 0 0-0 0, Morgan 0 0-0 0. Totals 25 14-19 72. Barber played one of his best Hanover Area............................... 9 22 19 8 — 58 Lakeland ....................................... 22 13 17 20 — 72 games of the season, scoring 14 3-Point Field Goals— HA 6 (Colon 2, Rolle 2, Bar2); LAK 8 (Grabowski 2, Kiehart, Filarsky 4, Niand adding 10 boards. Colon pro- ber chols). vided the impetus for the come-

LOCAL ROUNDUP

Seminary wins two titles, places second at national tourney The Times Leader staff

Dom Malone (126) and Eric Morris (170) won championships to lead Wyoming Seminary to a second-place team finish at the National Prep Wrestling Tournament. Danny Boychuck (106), Tyler Fraley (132), Conor Wasson (182), A.J. Vizcarrondo (220) and Michael Johnson (285) were all runners-up.

MOHAWKS Continued from Page 1C

Mohawk fans to their feet. Dunmore point guard John Rinaldi quickly calmed the opposing crowd when he drove the lane and pulled up for a 10-foot jumper to cut the deficit to one. The game remained close with just under two minutes to go and Meyers leading 10-9. The tandem of Krawczeniuk and Eugene Lewis would take over the rest of the period. Lewis began an 8-0 run with a slashing drive to the basket to extend the lead to 12-9. After a Dunmore turnover, Krawczeniuk found Le-

Ty White placed fourth at 138 while Logan May (113) finished in fifth. Matt Doggett came in eighth at 195.

D 2 GIRLS BASKETBALL MMI Prep 34, Blue Ridge 29

SCRANTON –Maria Carrato scored a team-high eight points to lead MMI Prep to a 34-29 overtime victory in its District 2 Class A quarterfinal matchup wis streaking to the hoop and made a perfect pass that Lewis would lay in with 1:30 to go. Moore scooped up the ball on a busted play the next series down the floor and drove to the hoop to make it 16-9. Krawczeniuk closed the scoring as he drove down the middle of the lane and put the Mohawks up 18-9 at the end of the quarter. Meyers continued its offensive onslaught in the second quarter, and put the breaks on any attempts Dunmore made to get back in the game. “It all starts with defense,” Toole said. “Alex (Pape), Ryan, and Fabian (Smith) were able to stop Dunmore’s big three of Matt Clarke, John Rinaldi, and Jordan

against Blue Ridge. Kristen Purcell and Hayle Shearer each followed with six points for the Preppers.

MMI PREP (34): Purcell 3 0-4 6, Stanziola 2 1-2 5, Carrato 3 2-3 8, Shearer 3 0-0 6, Karchner 2 0-0 4, Lara 1 1-2 3, Ferry 1 0-0 2. Totals 15 4-11 34. BLUE RIDGE (29): Rupakus 3 1-2 7, Warren 2 0-0 4, Whitney 1 1-2 3, Bayle 0 0-0 0, Furch 1 7-12 10, Bennett 1 2-6 5, Radakovich 0 0-0 0. Totals 8 11-30 29. MMI Prep...................................................... 4 6 9 8 7 34 Blue Ridge.................................................... 7 5 6 9 2 29 3-Point Field Goals— BR 2 (Furch, Bennett)

Dempsey with great man-to-man defense.” The man-to-man defense held the Bucks to just four points in the second quarter as Krawczeneiuk continued to nail threepointers. His fifth of the game came with 3:22 left in the half and put the Mohawks up 29-13. Moore followed that barrage with a powerful dunk on the next trip down the floor. Meyers finished the half on a 9-0 run and led 35-13 heading into the locker room. The Mohawks picked up where they left off to open the third quarter. Smith knocked down two jumpers, one a threepointer, and Meyers broke the game wide open as it bolted to a

while Mailen scored the Vikings’ two field goals in overtime. “Recently, teams have been really focusing on Jerry and other players have to step up,” Riverside coach Mike Morgan said. “Munley really did in the beginning by hitting threes and that’s what teams do when their main man is struggling.” Darrell Crawford, GAR’s leading scorer during the season, had just four points, all in the first half. Christian Skrepenak, a 6foot-10, 340-pound junior, was a menace at both ends of the court, but cooled off offensively in the second half and overtime. Five of his 10 points came in the opening quarter. He finished a rebound shy of a double-double. Riverside 42, GAR 40 OT GAR (40): Francis 5 1-4 11, Crawford 2 0-2 4, Sharpe 2 0-0 4, Powell 3 4-7 10, Skrepenak 4 2-3 10, Ellis 0 1-2 1, Dempsey 0 0-0 0. Totals 16 8-10 40. RIVERSIDE (42): Vishnesky 3 2-2 9, Mailen 3 1-3 7, Munley 3 0-0 9, King 2 1-2 6, J.Kincel 3 5-13 11, R.Kincel 0 0-0 0. Totals 14 9-20 42. GAR ............................................. 13 6 9 9 3 — 40 Riverside ..................................... 9 10 8 10 5 — 42 3-Point Field Goals— RIV 5 (Vishnesky, Munley 3, King); GAR, none.

JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

GAR’s Darrell Crawford shoots a layup on a fast break Saturday.

MEN Continued from Page 1C

Freedom Conference championship at the Anderson Center. It was the 12th straight win for the Cougars (21-5), capping off what was likely the most successful day in the history of Misericordia athletics, following the women’s team’s victory in their own championship game. Both squads are headed to the NCAA tournament for the first time and will learn their opening opponent and venue on Monday afternoon. For Woodruff, who was a player at Misericordia when Wilkes and coach Jerry Rickrode were playing in the Final Four, the win carried some adding meaning. “I said to Jerry that it’s great to win it. The fact that we had to go through them is extra special because I grew up watching Wilkes win championships,” Woodruff said. “He’s a tremendous coach and I have a lot of respect for their program. “So to beat them in this game, it really just means we’ve emerged as a program. We can put a banner up just like everybody else now, and that’s really been the one missing piece. I’m so proud to be a Misericordia alum and to be the coach of this team.” Likewise, Rickrode had laudatory words for the Cougars when he met Woodruff at midcourt after the game. “The better team won the game,” Wilkes coach Jerry Rickrode said. “You were the better team in the second half of the season. You went on an 11-game winning streak, and you were the better team. “And that’s what it came down to, to be honest.” But it was Wilkes (17-9) that was the better team in the first half, stifling Eichhorst and building a 27-24 lead at the break. Little went right for the Colonels after that, as the Cougars blew them away with a 45-15 performance in the final 20 minutes. Wilkes, which had scored 103 points in an overtime win in the semifinals, was held to its lowest output of the season. For the second time this week, it was Slanovec who ignited the Cougars from long range. On Saturday the senior guard opened the second half by bank-

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

The ball sails over the heads of Wilkes’ Paul Huch (30) and Misericordia’s Ethan Eichhorst (23) during Saturday’s game.

ing home a three-pointer to tie the game, giving a slight shrug of his shoulders on his way back down the court. That triggered a 20-3 run for the Cougars, who shot 6-of-12 from behind the arc in the second half. They never trailed again. “Whatever it takes,” Slanovec said. “Yeah, that kind of got us going. We’ve been a second-half team the past couple weeks. … Today we were really able to come out and set the tone for the first couple minutes of the second half.” “Yeah, he banks it in, but if you don’t lose him (on defense), he doesn’t get to shoot it,” Rickrode said. “Even if you bank it in, if you’re a shooter, that’s going to get you going. And then they hit a couple more – bang, bang. “And they made some adjustments in the second half. As soon as we threw down into the post, they doubled it … and we made some errors out of it. It was a good move by them defensively to do that. That was a really good adjustment.” Slanovec (11points) and Wilkes center Kendall Hinze (game-high

40-13 lead. Krawczeniuk capped Meyers 68, Dunmore 39 (39): Rinaldi 3 0-2 9, Dempsey 1 the run with a layup and later hit 0-0 DUNMORE 8, Clark 4 0-0 8, Cordaro 0 2-2 5, Mundt 2 1-2 5, 2 0-0 4. Totals 12 3-8 39. a jumper that put a close to his Pichiarello MEYERS (68): Krawczeniuk 4 1-1 24, Lewis 6 game-high 24-point perform- 3-4 15, Moore 6 1-2 13, Smith 3 1-3 10, Szafran 1 0-2 2, Steward 2 0-0 4. Totals 22 6-12 68. ance. He had 20 in the first half. “Ryan made things easy for us tonight,” Toole said. “He had a monstrous game.” Moore finished the third quarter with a hard drive to the basket that gave Meyers a 57-27 lead. Continued from Page 1C Moore put the finishing touches on the game as he slammed He did it Saturday at Scanhome back-to-back dunks on sucdlon Gym, where an excellent cessive plays that put Meyers up King’s College team was previ61-39 with 5:30 remaining in the ously unbeaten on its home contest. floor. And he did it by coaching Dunmore was led by Rinaldi, hard from the opening tip to the who netted nine points, followed final horn, the signal his Couby Clark and Dempsey, who had gars were heading to the NCAAs eight points each. with a 64-54 victory.

TICKET

21 points) both passed 1,000 points for their careers in the game. Junior forward Steve Artzerounian led the Cougars with a double-double, finishing with 18 points and 10 rebounds, earning tournament MVP honors for his efforts this week. Eichhorst and Greene added 11 and 10 points, respectively. Hinze was the only scorer in double figures for Wilkes. “I think the kids believed,” Woodruff said. “They’ve all made shots in their life. It was just a matter of time. “They believe in what we do, they believe in each other. And they just keep playing.” WILKES (42): Wilson 3-14 1-2 7, Mullins 1-5 2-4 4, Huch 0-5 5-7 5, Hartman 1-3 0-0 3, Hinze 9-10 3-6 21, Breznitsky 0-2 0-0 0, Thomas 0-1 0-0 0, Blish 0-0 0-0 0, Sharpe 0-0 0-0 0, Eagles 0-0 0-0 0, Richardson 0-0 0-0 0, Wilkins 0-0 0-0 0, Sheldon 1-1 0-1 2, Strause 0-0 0-2. Totals 15-41 11-22 42. MISERICORDIA (69): Greene 2-9 4-4 10, Undersinger 1-3 0-0 2, Artzerounian 8-13 2-2 18, Eichhorst 4-11 1-1 11, Slanovec 4-6 0-0 11, Busacca 1-7 3-4 5, Reilly 1-1 0-0 2, Bieski 2-5 0-0 4, Melville 0-1 0-0 0, Sergio 0-0 0-0 0, Donohue 0-0 0-0 0, Ware 0-0 0-0 0, Stone 1-1 0-0 2, Yaich 0-0 0-0 0, Evans 1-1 2-2 4. Totals 25-58 12-13 69. Halftime— Wilkes, 27-24 3-point field goals— WU 1-9 (Hartman 1-2, Wilson 0-1, Huch 0-1, Breznitsky 0-1, Thomas 0-1, Mullins 0-3); MU 7-18 (Slanovec 3-4, Eichhorst 2-3, Greene 2-7, Undersinger 0-2, Busacca 0-2)

Dunmore....................................... 9 4 14 12 — 39 Meyers ..........................................18 17 22 11 — 68 3-Point Field Goals— DUN 4 (Dempsey 2, Cordaro, Rinaldi); MEY 6 (Krawczeniuk 5, Smith)

“I’m taking a lot of ribbing,” Martin smiled. “I’m going to my first NCAA tournament. Coaching the girls team.” No matter what team Martin touches, the journey always starts with the same principle. You don’t find the top without reaching for it. Paul Sokoloski is a Times Leader sports columnist. You may reach him at 970-7109 or email him at psokoloski@timesleader.com.


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CLASS 3A GIRLS BASKETBALL

CLASS 3A GIRLS BASKETBALL

Dallas dances past Redeemer

Patriots eliminated by Scranton Prep

Dunbar scores all of her 26 points after halftime as Mountaineers win in OT.

After slow start, big third quarter by Classics proves to be the difference.

By JOHN MEDEIROS jmedeiros@timesleader.com

YATESVILLE – It was a finish so amazing, it had them doing “The Dougie” at midcourt. Holy Redeemer led throughout its District 2 Class 3A girls basketball quarterfinal. Except at the end. Dallas trailed by 13 points in the second half and its leading scorer, Ashley Dunbar, had not yet scored. Then Dunbar took over the game, matching her season best with 26 points in the final 17 minutes as the Mountaineers rallied for a 62-56 victory Saturday at Pittston Area. “Zero. Yeah, zero,” Dunbar said of her first half scoring. “I had my mind set going into the second half that I had to go in. I looked for a lane, protected the ball and went inside.” And she scored. A lot. But Dallas (14-7) nearly threw away its chance at overtime. With nine seconds in regulation, Alexis Lewis made two free throws to give the Royals a 50-48 lead. Dunbar took the inbounds pass and raced the length of the court, making a layup to tie the game. Except that a timeout was called by Dallas coach Kelly Johnson with 4.9 seconds on the clock. “Are you kidding me? I wanted to throw up,” Johnson said. “They’re all looking at me in the huddle. I didn’t think it would be that easy for Ashley to get to the basket. I wanted to draw up a play. I never imagined she’d get to the basket that easily.” Coming out of the huddle, the Mountaineers worked the ball to Dunbar, who tried to penetrate along the baseline. She was double teamed by the Royals and pulled up short. The defense overpursued, leaving Dunbar a suddenly open 8-foot jumper as the buzzer sounded. Dallas did not lead in the game until Katy Comitz’s free throw with 3:07 left in overtime gave the Mountaineers a 53-52 advantage. Dunbar then set up Tanner Englehart for a layup with an entry pass and Comitz (seven points, eight rebounds) sank two more from the line to give Dallas the lead for good, 57-54 with 1:49 in overtime. “Everyone stepped up in this game, especially in the overtime,” Dunbar said. “We really wanted to

WOMEN Continued from Page 1C

By MATT PAGE For The Times Leader

Prep scored 13 points, including a three-pointer with two seconds left by Maura Byrne. “We finally got a few shots to drop,” Macciacco said. The Classics clung to the lead as they exchanged baskets with the Patriots in the fourth quarter. Pittston Area had its chance as it was down by two with less than a minute left. But a gametying layup rattled in and then out before being grabbed by Prep. “I thought we played hard,” said Pittston Area coach Kathy Healey. “A couple of breaks didn’t go our way and we had a couple of shots at the end to tie it.” Pittston Area’s Mia Hopkins was the game’s leading scorer with 16. Olivia Burke scored eight of her team high 12 points in the second half for Prep. “All the credit to them,” Macciacco said of his team. “They did a heck of a job.”

COVINGTON TWP. – Heading into the locker room down three after shooting 5 for 25 in the first half, things didn’t look too good for the Scranton Prep Classics. And to top it off, their leading scorer, Tricia Byrne, was done for the game with a wrist injury. However, the Classics hit six field goals in the third quarter to gain a lead and then sank five free throws to ice the game as they defeated Pittston Area 4036 in the first round of the PIAA District 2 Class 3A playoffs on Saturday afternoon. “In the second half, without my leading scorer in the game, I give them an A-plus,” Prep coach Ross Macciacco said of his team’s effort. “We weren’t shooting the ball well, but they never gave up, they never gave Scranton Prep 40, Pittston Area 36 up.” PITTSTON AREA (36): ): Barber 4 0-0 9, The pace was slow as the Waleski 1 0-0 2, Mitchell 1 0-0 2, Rabender 1 0-0 2, O’Neill 2 1-2 5, Hopkins 5 6-13 16. Totals 14 7-15 Classics took a 9-8 lead into the 36. PREP (40): Genko 2 3-4 7, Burke second quarter where they were 3 6-6SCRANTON 12, M. Byrne 3 0-4 7, T. Byrne 3 0-1 7, Philbin outscored by the Patriots 10-6. 2 0-0 5, Pritchyk 1 0-0 2. Totals 14 9-15 40. Pittston Area............................... 8 10 5 13 — 36 The third quarter seemed to be Scranton Prep ............................ 9 6 13 12 — 40 3-Point Field Goals— PA 1 (Barber); SCR 3 (M. heading in the same direction as Byrne, T. Byrne, Philbin) the previous two quarters, but DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Alyssa Palko of Holy Redeemer, right, shoots over Sara Flaherty of Dallas during a District 2 Class 3A game Saturday.

complete the comeback.” But the star was Dunbar, who admitted she was “hesitating” on offense in the first half. Averaging 12.2 points per game, she went scoreless for the first 18 minutes until making two free throws for Dallas’ first points of the third quarter. Those shots cut the Royals’ lead to 29-18. They also ignited the Mountaineers. Maggie Michael, filling in for an injured Sara Flaherty, made a basket and Englehart (11 points, 11 rebounds) had a stickback. Dallas went on a 14-6 run, making it a one-possession game. “Maggie’s just a sophomore and she rebounds the ball beautifully,” Johnson said. “She stepped into some huge shoes for us. Missal, Comitz, they’re both sophomores, too, and they had huge plays for us. And Jess Hiscox hit those two free throws

to seal the deal.” Dunbar opened the fourth quarter with a steal – one of 10 in the game – and breakaway basket. She made free throws, going 12-of-14 from the line in the game, and carved lanes through the Redeemer defense for driving layups. She had 15 of Dallas’ 18 fourth-quarter points. “Oh, God, I’ve been practicing those,” said Dunbar, who was averaging 61 percent from the line coming into the game. “With the way we struggled at the beginning of the season, to shoot like this at the end, I couldn’t be any prouder,” Johnson said of her team’s effort at the line. Lewis would have been the star of the night if the Royals (14-8) had advanced. She had 24 points, 18 in the second half, and 15 rebounds. Paige Makowski had 13 points and nine rebounds,

and Julia Wignot paced the Royals with five assists. But Redeemer was 9-of-26 from the line, including 6-of-20 in the second half. So instead, Dunbar, who also had six rebounds and five assists, was the star. And Hiscox danced. “Jess promised us that if we won, she’d ‘Dougie’ at the center circle,” Dunbar said. “We win again, and next week we’re all gonna dance.” Dallas faces Honesdale, a 6143 winner over Crestwood on Saturday, in the district semifinals Wednesday.

string together an offensive run.” A whistle-filled second half saw plenty of trips to the foul line, but King’s was unable to take advantage, shooting 17-of-26 from the stripe in the half and 22-of-36 for the game. King’s shot 29 percent from the floor (14-of-48). The Cougars had plenty to do with that. With the two top defenses in the conference squaring off, scoring was down and mistakes were up. Misericordia led 30-21 at halftime with each team committing 12 turnovers. The teams combined for 39 in the game. From a 21-21 tie, the Cougars held King’s scoreless for the final 6:15 of the first half. “I thought we did a tremendous job defensively,” Misericordia in-

terim coach Dave Martin said. “I thought we played hard. … I think it comes down to us being focused. We really dug in and did what we had to do.” For King’s, senior co-captains Paige Carlin (17 points) and Brittany Muscatell (12) led the way. Misericordia senior Christine Marks scored 15 points and added a game-high 11 rebounds as the Cougars won the battle on the boards 38-24. Sophomore Lauren Smicherko chipped in with some valuable minutes off the bench, scoring seven of her nine points in the first half. The Cougars are 8-3 since Martin took over as coach, and the school’s athletic director will now lead them into the big dance. “Other people have made more

of it for me than it is. But it is thrilling to be going to the NCAAs with this group,” Martin said. “It’s really about the girls. They’ve dealt with some adversity this year and they’ve overcame it.”

count. “We’ve come together so much (as a team),” said junior guard Tyann McDaniel, who led the Cougars with 15 points and was named tournament MVP. “We have our motto, ‘One team, one dream,’ and we finally accomplished that. We stuck with that the whole year.” Misericordia – the only team to beat King’s in league play in the regular season – became the first team to beat the Lady Monarchs at home in more than a year, snapping a streak of 15 games. Now the Cougars will wait for Monday afternoon to find out their opening round opponent and venue when the bracket is released. King’s (22-5) will be waiting for that same announcement to see if the team did enough to earn an atlarge invitation to the tournament. All season long King’s had excelled in pulling out close wins late in games, including a seasonsaving shot with two seconds left to beat Eastern in the semifinals. But on Saturday the Cougars carved out a nine-point lead at the half and never allowed the Lady Monarchs to pull closer than six the rest of the way. “We were hoping, but (the big shots) just never came,” King’s coach Brian Donoghue said. “I thought our aggressiveness was BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER great. We got to the rim a lot in the second half, we got to the foul line Misericordia’s Jesse Robinson, front, beats King’s College’s a lot, but yet we were never able to Molly Dahl to the basket Saturday afternoon.

Dallas 62, Holy Redeemer 56 DALLAS (62): Dunbar 7 12-14 26, Englehart 3 6-8 11, Szatkowski 3 0-1 6, Hiscox 1 2-2 4, Missal 2 0-0 4, Comitz 1 5-6 7, Michael 1 0-0 2, Flaherty 1 0-0 2. Totals 19 24-32 62. HOLY REDEEMER (56): Wignot 1 1-2 3, Makowski 6 1-11 13, Warnagiris 1 1-4 3, Murray 2 0-0 6, Altemose 1 0-0 3, Slavoski 0 0-0 0, Frascella 0 0-0 0, Wilson 0 0-0 0, Evans 1 0-0 2, Platko 0 2-2 2, Lewis 10 4-7 24. Totals 22 9-26 56. Dallas....................................... 9 7 16 18 12 — 62 Holy Redeemer ......................17 9 11 13 6 — 56 3-Point Field Goals— HR 3 (Murray 2, Altemose).

MISERICORDIA (64): Robinson 1-5 4-8 7, McDaniel 6-11 0-0 15, Seely 3-6 2-2 8, Drayton 3-8 2-4 8, Marks 3-5 9-12 15, Sileo 0-1 0-0 0, Kessler 1-1 0-0 2, Smicherko 3-4 2-2 9. Totals 20-41 19-28. KING'S (54): Simcox 3-10 0-0 6, Muscatell 3-3 5-6 12, Michaels 1-13 6-10 8, Atchison 0-3 4-10 4, Manning 2-3 0-0 4, Magan 1-1 0-0 3, Davies 0-1 0-0 0, Dahl 0-2 0-0 0, Carlin 4-11 7-10 17, Malloy 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 14-48 22-36 54. Halftime— Misericordia, 30-21 3-point field goals— MU 5-14 (McDaniel 3-8, Smicherko 1-2, Robinson 1-3, Drayton 0-1); KC 421 (Carlin 2-5, Muscatell 1-1, Magan 1-1, Manning 0-1, Davies 0-1, Dahl 0-1, Atchison 0-2, Simcox 0-4, Michaels 0-5)

SHOT Continued from Page 1C

Trailing 42-39, Sammy Gow made a free throw with eight seconds left in overtime for Nanticoke. The guard missed her second shot, and Brittany Sugalski and Valley View’s Caroline Mancuso both tried to corral the rebound. Officials called a jump ball with 4.2 seconds on the clock. “We actually wanted to run a play to get two (points),” Nanticoke coach Alan Yendrzeiwski said. “But we ran the play for the three, and that was just a great shot. Think about it … she misses that and our season is over.” Gow inbounded the ball from the baseline to Schinski, who had backed away from a stack of teammates along the lane. After uncharacteristic turnovers in the waning moments of regulation and the final minute of OT, Schinski showed poise beyond

CLASS 3A GIRLS BASKETBALL

Crestwood feels sting of Honesdale’s defense

Hornets’ relentless pressure proves too much as Comets are ousted from playoffs. By MATT PAGE For The Times Leader

stormed back to take a 15 -11 advantage into the second quarter. The second quarter is when Honesdale started to pull away as Katie Miller hit a three-pointer at the buzzer to give the Hornets a 30-21 lead at halftime. Honesdale’s press allowed it to get out and run, and at one point the Hornets held a 23point lead. A late 7-0 run in the third by the Comets cut the deficit to 47-31, but they wouldn’t get much closer than that. Entering the final quarter with a 16-point lead, Honesdale was able to spread the floor, chew clock and work the ball around until it could get a good look. Crestwood was just unable to muster a comeback as Honesdale would answer every Comets score with one of its own. An 8-2 run in the final 4:22 put the stamp on a Honesdale victory. “It was more or less a let down,” Walker said. “I am a little disappointed.”

COVINGTON TWP. – The Crestwood Comets had gone over it all week – press break. They knew Honesdale was going to apply full-court pressure the whole game, and they were ready for it. “We had probably the best practice of the whole year yesterday,” said Crestwood coach Isiah Walker. “It was a phenomenal practice and to come out here and play like we did I was shell shocked. We’ve gone over press break the last week and shot selection and it still didn’t work to our favor. It happens.” Crestwood may have been ready but it didn’t execute as Honesdale used an active full court press to force the Comets into turning the ball over 21 times en route to a 61-43 victory Honesdale 61, Crestwood 43 CRESTWOOD (43): Kendra 0 0-2 0, Lutz 1 on Saturday afternoon in the 0-0 2, Andrews 2 1-2 5, Mazzoni 1 0-0 2, Rutkowski 1 0-0 2, Gegaris 4 0-0 12, Cronauer 0 0-0 0, quarterfinals of the PIAA Dis- Wojnar 1 0-0 3, Meyers 5 2-4 12, Jesikiewicz 0 1-2 1, Hislap 2 0-0 4. Totals 17 4-10 43. trict 2 Class 3A playoffs. HONESDALE (61): Martin 6 2-2 14, Birmelin 5 2-2 Miller 8 3-5 20, Johannes 4 0-0 8, Rickard 2 “Too many turnovers too 2-4 12, 7. Totals 25 9-13 61. quick,” Walker said. Crestwood ................................ 11 10 10 12 — 43 ................................ 15 15 17 14 — 61 Crestwood raced out to a Honesdale 3-Point Field Goals— CRE 5 (Gegaris 4,Wojnar); HON 2 (Miller, Rickard) quick 7-0 lead, but Honesdale her years. The junior released a shot that she knew was true the second it left her hands. “Sam just threw me the perfect pass,” Schinski said. “It had been a very tough game. But we just set up the right play and executed it.” Nanticoke struggled with foul troubles throughout the game, with post players Katie Wolfe and Alex Holl both getting three fouls in the first half. Both had fouled out by the midpoint of overtime. “When you’re not shooting well and your bigs are in foul trouble all game, it’s tough,” Yendrzeiwski said. “You have to give Valley View a ton of credit. They played a great game. But we had a couple of kids step up when we needed.” There were nine lead changes and four ties. Nanticoke was just 4-of-19 from the floor in the first half, but used its defense to stay in the game. Alex Brassington had two steals, and Sugalski and

Gow each one in the final two minutes of regulation. Sugalski had another steal with less than 30 seconds remaining in overtime to thwart Valley View, which held a 41-39 at the time. “We did get a little frustrated,” Schinski said of the team’s offensive woes. “But we did play great defense (forcing 28 turnovers). Defense is our thing. We just try to get into passing lanes. We ended up pulling it all together at the end.” Nanticoke advances to play Scranton Prep, a 40-36 winner over Pittston Area on Saturday, in the district semifinals Wednesday. The winner advances to the state tournament. Nanticoke 43, Valley View 42

VALLEY VIEW (42): Stafarsky 0 0-0 0, Aniska 1 2-4 4, M. Mecca 1 2-3 4, McElroy 0 0-2 0, Bartkowski 3 0-0 8, B. Mecca 1 2-4 4, Mancuso 4 5-5 13, Cholish 0 1-2 1, Palko 4 0-1 8. Totals 14 12-21 42. NANTICOKE (43): Higgins 0 2-2 2, Brassington 2 0-2 5, Sugalski 0 2-2 2, Wolfe 2 3-5 7, Schinski 4 2-4 13, Yalch 0 0-0 0, Gow 3 1-2 10, Holl 1 2-2 4. Totals 12 12-19 43. Valley View.................................... 9 9 6 18 — 42 Nanticoke....................................... 6 10 13 14 — 43 3-Point Field Goals— VV 2 (Bartkowski 2); NAN 7 (Schinski 3, Gow 3, Brassington).


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THE TIMES LEADER

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GOLF

McIlroy, Westwood to face off in Match Play semis The pair has a history going back to when they were under the same management.

By DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer

MARANA, Ariz. — Rory McIlroy was walking down the stairs toward the driving range when he passed Lee Westwood and gave him the same message he had delivered earlier Saturday in the Match Play Championship. “See you in the morning,” McIlroy said with a big smile. “Just like I told you.” In 14 years of this fickle tournament, there has never been a semifinal match so compelling. McIlroy had another surge on the back nine to put away Bae Sang-moon, 3 and 2. Moments later, Westwood finished off Mar-

tin Laird by the same margin, setting up a Sunday showdown with more at stake than just a spot in the championship match. If either McIlroy or Westwood goes on to win the Match Play Championship, they would go to No. 1 in the world. “I think with both of us being up there in the world, and both of us with the possibility of going to No. 1, it gives the match definitely an extra little bit of spice,” McIlroy said. The duel was not lacking spice in the first place. They were stablemates at International Sports Management until some testy exchanges last year. Shortly after McIlroy shot 80 in the final round of the Masters to blow a four-shot lead, Westwood got under his skin by saying the 22-year-old from Northern Ire-

land “has a pull hook in his bag under pressure.” But it was McIlroy who was the first to win a major, setting records at Congressional on his way to an eight-shot win in the U.S. Open. Later in the year, when McIlroy left Chubby Chandler at ISM, Westwood tweeted that it was a bizarre move. McIlroy quickly un-followed Westwood and Chandler on Twitter. Both players say their relationship is no different than with other golfers. They don’t spend as much time together, understandable because they no longer have the same manager. “There’s nothing strained about the relationship between the two of us. It’s still the same as it was,” Westwood said. “Rory said to me before I went out, ‘See you tomorrow morning.’ And then today again there, he said,

AP PHOTO

Rory McIlroy hits out of a bunker on the 13th fairway while playing Bae Sang-moon during the Match Play Championship.

‘See, told you.’ That’s the trouble with high anticipation for the fiwith kids nowadays. They think nal day. The championship match is at they’re always right, don’t they?” A dull day in the desert ended high noon. The McIlroy-West-

NHL ROUNDUP

LOCAL ROUNDUP

Malkin in the middle of Pens’ eruption The Associated Press

PITTSBURGH — Evgeni Malkin had his ninth career hat trick, Jordan Staal added two goals and the Pittsburgh Penguins won for the fifth time in seven games by routing the Tampa Bay Lightning 8-1 Saturday. Chris Kunitz, Matt Cooke and Pascal Dupuis also scored and Marc-Andre Fleury made 34 saves for Pittsburgh, which has won eight of nine home games and leapfrogged the New Jersey Devils in the crowded middle of the Eastern Conference playoffrace pack. Malkin added an assist, taking over the NHL scoring lead with Tampa Bay’s Steven Stamkos, who had tied him with 11 points in his previous four games. Stamkos was held scoreless. Rangers 3, Sabres 2, OT NEW YORK — Ryan Callahan scored his 100th NHL goal 2:59 into overtime, and the New York Rangers snapped a rare losing streak with a 3-2 victory over the Buffalo Sabres on Saturday night. Callahan took a pass from defenseman Ryan McDonagh and broke in alone. He flipped a shot over goalie Ryan Miller’s shoulder for his career-best 24th goal of the season. New York was 0-1-1 in its previous two games, its first losing streak since mid-December. Blues 3, Jets 2, SO WINNIPEG, Manitoba — David Perron scored the winning goal in the shootout to lift the St. Louis Blues to a 3-2 victory over the Winnipeg Jets on Saturday. Perron moved in on Chris Mason in the fourth round and roofed a backhander, ruining the Jets’ rally from a two-goal deficit. Coyotes 3, Oilers 1 EDMONTON, Alberta — Mike Smith stopped 21 shots for his 10th straight victory and

wood duel gets under way as the sun begins to climb over the high desert. “I think it’s the match that most people wanted, and definitely the match that I wanted,” McIlroy said. The other semifinal match Sunday morning features Hunter Mahan and Mark Wilson, assuring an American will make it to the final for the first time since Tiger Woods won in 2008. Mahan played the shortest quarterfinal match in the 14-year history of the event by beating Matt Kuchar, 6 and 5. Wilson, gaining more respect the deeper he goes in the bracket, had an easy time in his 4-and-3 win over Peter Hanson of Sweden. The 18-hole championship match will start about an hour after the semifinals.

Wilkes-Barre defeated in PSUAC final The Times Leader staff

MONT ALTO—Despite an 11-point performance from Jacob Bronder, Penn State Wilkes-Barre fell to Penn State DuBois by a final score of 75-68 in the PSUAC Championship game on Saturday. Jared James contributed with eight points for PSU Wilkes. For PSU DuBois, Chris Dickison tallied a game-high 22 points. Woody Mitchell followed with 19 while Jovan Brown added 13.

MEN’S BASEBALL Cougars split

Misericordia (3-1) split a doubleheader at Rutgers-Newark, dropping game one 7-6 before taking the nightcap by the final score of 15-2. Kenny Durling had a two-run homer in the first game while Bubba Jasinski and Mike Impellittiere both had doubles. Ryan Cacchioli contributed with a triple. Durling had two doubles and drove in four runs in the second game. Jasinski smacked a homer and drove in two. AP PHOTO

The Penguins’ Evgeni Malkin (71) celebrates his third goal of the game with teammate Eric Tangradi during the third period of Saturday’s game against the Tampa Bay Lightning in Pittsburgh.

the streaking Phoenix Coyotes beat the Edmonton Oilers 3-1 on Saturday to move into sole possession of first place in the Pacific Division. Oliver Ekman-Larsson, Ray Whitney and Shane Doan scored for the Coyotes, who won their fifth straight to jump two points ahead of San Jose. The Sharks play at Nashville Saturday night. Capitals 4, Maple Leafs 2 TORONTO — Alexander Semin and Jeff Halpern scored, and Alex Ovechkin picked up a pair of assists to lead the Washington Capitals to a 4-2 win over the Toronto Maple Leafs

on Saturday night. Marcus Johansson and Keith Aucoin also scored for the Capitals, who carried a 4-0 lead into the final period. Michael Neuvirth had 28 saves for Washington. Avalanche 4, Red Wings 3 DETROIT — Just like that, the Detroit Red Wings have a losing streak at home. After winning 23 straight at Joe Louis Arena, the Red Wings have now lost two in a row on home ice, falling 4-3 to the Colorado Avalanche on Saturday night. The Red Wings hadn’t been beaten in regu-

lation in Detroit since Nov. 3. Their winning streak was snapped Thursday night with a shootout loss to Vancouver. Bruins 5, Senators 3 OTTAWA — Patrice Bergeron had two goals and an assist to lead the Boston Bruins past the Ottawa Senators 5-3 on Saturday night. David Krejci, Carter Camper and Brad Marchand had the other goals for Boston (3720-3), which moved five points ahead of the Senators in the Northeast Division with three games in hand. Tim Thomas stopped 27

shots to extend his unbeaten streak at Scotiabank Place to nine games. Panthers 3, Hurricanes 2, SO RALEIGH, N.C. — Stephen Weiss scored the winning goal in the third round of the shootout, lifting the Florida Panthers to a 3-2 comeback win over the Carolina Panthers on Saturday night. Wojtek Wolski, obtained in a trade from the New York Rangers earlier Saturday, scored the tying goal for Florida with 1:47 left in the third period after Tomas Fleischmann cut the Panthers’ deficit to 2-1 at 13:58.

INDIANAPOLIS — The NFL combine is all about looking toward the future, but Penn State products have spent much of their time with the media looking back on their tumultuous last season. “Everything got overshadowed,” said defensive tackle Devon Still, a likely firstround pick in April’s draft. “When it first happened it was hard to believe just because it snuck up on us. Seeing Coach (Joe) Paterno fired and then a couple months later seeing him pass away, it was hard on us.” Defensive end Jack Crawford said it was difficult for some of the team to embrace their TicketCity Bowl bid at the end of the season.

Lenny Fox netted two goals for King’s before the team allowed four fourth quarter goals and dropped its season opener to Neumann. Kevin Sweeney, Kieran McMahon and A.J. Bungert each added a goal. Neumann was paced by Mark Consolo with three goals and Ryan O’Kane scored two.

WOMEN’S LACROSSE

King’s 21, Hood College 8

Chelsea Manes and Amanda Harney each scored six goals to power King’s to a season-opening victory over host Hood College. Krystina Villarreal added five goals and three assists while Mariah Masciarelli contributed with four goals for King’s.

MEN’S TRACK & FIELD Joe Ardo broke a school record in the shot put with a throw of 46’6” and placed seventh as Misericordia finished ninth at the Middle Atlantic Conference Indoor Championships. Sean Vitale finished fourth in the triple jump with a distance of 53’3-¾” while the 4x800 relay made up of Kyle Suponcic, Jarret Higley, Johnny Gibbons and Dave McLean finished fourth (8:22.30).

PSU situation is popular topic at combine By JONATHAN TAMARI The Philadelphia Inquirer

Neumann 9, King’s 5

Misericordia at MAC Championships

NFL

Former Nittany Lions are queried by media at annual prospects workout.

MEN’S LACROSSE

“A lot of people on the team I don’t think were into going to a bowl game because they felt like we got cheated in the bowl selection,” said Crawford, who went to St. Augustine Prep in Atlantic City. “Once we formed together we just didn’t have everybody buy into it, and that was part of the problem.” The Nittany Lions lost to Houston 3014. Soon after, Paterno died, capping a stunning turn of events that began with child sexual abuse charges against longtime Penn State assistant Jerry Sandusky. Still left his training in Miami to attend Penn State’s memorial for his iconic coach. He swapped stories with a long line of Nittany Lions. “What I experienced playing under Joe Paterno, people that played back in the ’60s, and the ’70s and the ’80s, they all had similar stories, so that just shows you that he remained the same coach the whole

time through,” Still said. “He’s the reason why I am who I am today. Being under his program, it helped me grow as a person and it helped me grow as a football player.” While the bowl game was disappointing, Crawford spoke proudly about the way the team came together for their first game after Paterno’s firing. “We knew what he wanted. It was sad, the whole program suffered. At the end of the day we could only play football, that was our job, we had to go out there and play the best game we could and that’s what we did,” he said. Penn State lost 1714 to Nebraska in an emotional game. “It was a tough game. We made it a tough game because we put everything into it.” Crawford isn’t sure if the changes the football team has seen will be fully felt until the start of next season, when a new staff takes over from the beginning. “From my ex-teammates I heard it’s a lot

WOMEN’S TRACK & FIELD Misericordia places fourth

AP PHOTO

PSU lineman Johnnie Troutman runs the 40-yard dash at the NFL scouting combine in Indianapolis Saturday.

different (under new coach Bill O’Brien so I’m excited to see what happens.”

Stacey Perrins finished third, broke a school record and qualified for ECAC’s in the 60m dash with a time of 8.02 and Jill Dunn finished third and set a school record in the 60m hurdles with a time of 9.30 as Misericordia finished fourth at the MAC Championships. Kelsey Cameron won the 800m in a time of 2:24.23 and the 4x800 relay of Cameron, Bridget Comiskey, Marina Orrson and Rachael Harding found the top of the podium with a time of 10:01.54.


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 PAGE 11C

NASCAR

AP PHOTO

James Buescher celebrates in victory lane after winning the Nationwide series race Saturday in Daytona Beach, Fla.

Daytona full of surprises Plenty of wrecks and unknown winners during preliminary events leading to today’s 500.

By JENNA FRYER AP Auto Racing Writer

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — Only six of 43 cars made it unscathed to the finish line of the Nationwide Series opener at Daytona International Speedway. James Buescher was not driving one of those clean cars. Still, he managed to dodge and weave his way through an 11-car AP PHOTO accident on the last lap of Saturday’s race, stealing the victory Crew members push Danica Patrick’s car to the garage area after and setting the stage for what’s a crash during the Nationwide series race Saturday in Daytona. expected to be a wild Daytona was hooked by defending Nation- the top 10.” 500. Buescher joined unknown wide champion Ricky Stenhouse Danica Patrick, meanwhile, John King, winner of Friday Jr. The contact sent Kyle Busch started from the pole but was night’s Truck Series opener, as straight into the wall. wrecked 49 laps into the race “I don’t even know where to when JR Motorsports teammate surprise winners this weekend at Daytona. Both came from no- start. I don’t even know what Cole Whitt ran into the back of where to win crash-marred races. happened,” Kyle Busch said. “I her while bump-drafting. Her car Elliott Sadler, runner-up to thought we had the race won. spun into the wall and back down Then those guys were the track. Although she returned Buescher on Saturday, coming on the top, the damaged Chevrolet to the said Sunday’s race will and I thought, ‘We’ll track late, she finished 38th in the be much of the same. UP NEXT see where we settled first race of what will be her first “It’s the Daytona 500. DAYTONA in here.’ When they all full season in the Nationwide SeIt’s a once in a lifetime 500 crashed up high, I was ries. race to be involved in TV: Noon, clear. I shot as low as I and try to win, and I today. FOX-56 “Well, we were just doing big could, and somebody pack racing and went down into think guys are going to tagged me in the back three, got a little tap, got a little go for it when it’s showtime,” Sadler said. “I think guys and hooked me dead right. It was bit sideways, saved it, and then will be patient the first part of the a really, really hard hit, and there just got hit again and couldn’t race, test their cars, just like you were a few more after that. It save it. You guys saw the rest saw today. When it gets time to seemed like they kept coming. from there,” she said. “I swore when they all went up go, crazy things happen.” Brad Keselowski and Sadler, Buescher was in 11th place as high. I was the leader for a secwho finished second and third, he rounded the final turn and ond, and I’m like, “I won this both said they feel safe going into made his way through a massive thing. I won this thing.”’ Sunday’s race. But it was Buescher, who went pack of spinning race cars. Keselowski said NASCAR is in “They all piled up in front of low — so low he crossed the yela difficult position of giving fans me, and we made it through,” low out-of-bounds line, but NASBuescher said. “It’s hard to de- CAR said it’s allowed when avoid- what they want in restrictor-plate scribe the feeling when you make ing an accident — to skirt the racing and making it a safe event. “I feel like we walk a line in this it through the wreck and you’re cars and take the checkered flag. sport between daredevils and the only guy. You don’t see any- Buescher’s win was his first in body in front of you coming to the NASCAR and came a day after chess players,” he said. “When checkered flag. It’s pretty incred- King’s victory in his eighth career we come to Daytona and a track like this, we’re maybe more on start. ible.” Buescher, driver for Turner the daredevil side of the line. And It was a mess behind him. The accident, the third multi- Motorsports, was listed in two of then we go other places where I’d car wreck in the waning laps, ap- the eight caution periods, and say we’re more on the chess-playpeared to start as the tandem of said he was just trying to get a er side of the line.” “Ideally, we’d like to just walk Tony Stewart and Sadler charged top-10 finish at the end. “Got down to the end, after we straight down the line all the to the top of the track to make a three-wide pack among the lead- beat all the fenders off of it, beat time. But from a standpoint of ers. Kurt Busch was leading on ‘em back out, didn’t have any- the sport and the health of it, I the bottom of the track with body that wanted to draft with think not a lot of people watch younger brother, Kyle, pushing, us,” he said. “I was just trying to chess matches, and I’ve never and Kurt Busch seemed to start do everything I could to stay in seen one televised.” sliding up the surface in an attempt to block the huge run on the outside. Joey Logano was being pushed through the middle by defending G3 Boats - A Great Catch Daytona 500 winner Trevor INSTANT REBATES Bayne, and all four cars drifted Mark Your Calender For higher into Stewart, winner of Our Open House Weekend the last four Nationwide openers April 29, 30, & 31 here, who was pinched into the wall. That triggered a chain-reacR.J. MARINE SALES INC. tion crash that had many worried 441 MOYALLEN ST. 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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012

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OUTDOORS The Pennsylvania Game Commision is finding ways to regenerate natural spaces and improve them for native animals

TOM VENESKY OUTDOORS

Fishing, boat topics are open for discussion

S

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Mike Beahm, a land management officer with the Pennsylvania Game Commission, discusses a prescribed burn that will take place on State Game Lands 119 to encourage regrowth of native grasses.

Blazing a new future By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

BEAR CREEK TWP. -- Pennsylvania Game Commission land management officer Mike Beahm drove his truck through several habitat improvement projects on State Game Lands 119 and marveled at the potential. Nearby, Jerry Greeley of WilkesBarre was busy realizing that potential as he watched his beagle, Jake, chase a rabbit through a maze of brushpiles and slashings that Beahm’s food and cover crew had recently created. Beahm admits that the habitat on SGL 119 in Bear Creek and Dennison townships is still a work in progress, but Greeley said that progress is already occurring. “For someone who likes to hunt rabbits and small game, the Game Commission did me a huge favor,” Greeley said as he loaded his beagle into his truck at the parking lot near Francis Walter Dam. “I never thought I’d be hunting rabbits up here, and I’m seeing more grouse and turkey, too. It’s good right now, but it’s going to get better.” That’s because the PGC has several ambitious habitat improvement projects either underway or scheduled for the area. Across from the entrance to Francis Walter, much of SGL 119 resembles a vast, barren landscape created when the U.S. Army Corps stripped the land for fill to build the dam decades ago. A mix of hardwood forest, and stands of scotch pine and white birch, surround the open expanse, and deeper into SGL 119 are thick tangles of scrub oak, or barrens habitat. It’s a pretty diverse place, but one that can be improved to benefit wildlife and hunters. Beahm has a plan to do just that, and it involves a bit of fire and a machine called a Hydro-Axe. This year, the agency will conduct several habitat improvement projects on game lands throughout the region.

TIMBER HARVEST

B A R R E N S H A B I TAT

Mike Beahm said he is often approached by hunters wanting to know why the Game Commission doesn’t conduct more timber harvests on game lands. When conditions are right, cutting mature timber is an effective way to encourage regeneration, he said, but it’s a practice that could backfire in areas. “You need to have quality soil before you can do a timber sale in an area, or you’re not going to get anything to grow back,” Beahm said. “If I don’t see the potential for regeneration, I’m very hesitant to conduct a timber sale in that area.”

The barrens habitats in northeastern Pennsylvania are important areas for a number of threatened and endangered species, in addition to providing valuable food and cover for deer, grouse and other game. With an increase in manpower, the ability to conduct prescribed burns and new equipment such as the Hydro-Axe, the Pennsylvania Game Commission can improve barrens habitats and keep them thriving. “We want to set the clock back on some of these areas,” said Pete Sussenbach, land management supervisor for the PGC’s Northeast Region. “We’re already seeing increases in deer activity in these areas the first year after we conduct a burn. “I suspect in the next couple years we’ll see dramatic increases in both deer and small game activity in the areas where we do work.”

In some places, thanks to the mild winter, work has already begun. On SGL 119, Beahm and his crew were able to utilize the agency-owned Hydro-Axe – which resembles a log skidder equipped with a rotary head with two-inch thick blades capable of cutting and dicing trees up to 10-inches in diameter. This winter, the machine was used to slash through a section of woods adjoining a meadow area near the dam. With the exception of several mature oak trees, the Hydro-Axe slashed through everything in sight, leaving behind a tangled mess that will regenerate this spring into an early successional forest. “It will provide a good heavy cover and food source for deer, grouse and rabbit, and even attract pheasants that are flushed from the grassy areas during hunting season,” Beahm said. “The machine makes a mess of things, which is what you want. I’m hoping this area will come back so thick that you can’t walk through it by the end of summer.” Along the edge of the meadow, scotch pines and birch trees were cut. The tops will be used for brush piles for rabbits, Beahm said, while the birch will be allowed to regenerate. “The birch are dormant right now, so the roots are full of energy needed to shoot up new growth, creating additional browse for deer,” he said. While the Hydro-Axe and chainsaws were the tools of choice for the trees, fire will be used to transform the barren meadow.

Beahm said 26 acres of the grassland are targeted for a prescribed burn this spring. The fire will eliminate the thick thatch on the ground that has prevented plantings of native, warm season grasses from germinating. After the flames have passed, Beahm said the existing native grasses such as big bluestem, little bluestem, Indian grass and switchgrass will flourish, providing food and cover for rabbit, pheasant and turkey. “The native grasses have a real deep root system which allows them to survive the fire,” Beahm said, adding additional plantings will help augment the regrowth. “We want to create a bowl here, with tall grassland and cover along the edge. That will really help hold the pheasants that are released here.” In the interior of Game Lands 119 in Dennison Township, the Hydro-Axe was used to slash more than 50 acres of thick scrub oak. The cut areas will be part of a 150-acre prescribed burn this summer. Scrub oaks make up unique and somewhat rare habitat called barrens. The cutting from the Hydro-Axe won’t kill them and the fire will only help, Beahm said. “We’re losing barrens habitat because it’s getting shaded out by taller hardwoods. They’re an important ecosystem that a lot of threatened species rely on, such as the goldenwinger warbler,” he said. Conducting a prescribed burn in a barrens habitat isn’t as simple as striking a match. The thick cover is loaded

with leaf litter, creating the potential for an inferno if safety steps aren’t taken. That’s where the Hydro-Axe comes in. The machine slashes the trees into small chips and shreds, reducing the fuel load and lowering flame heights to a manageable two to four feet. The burn is also conducted in late summer, when the surrounding woods are green and not as flammable. Finally, 12-foot wide paths, or fire breaks, are cleared around every prescribed burn area to reduce the chance of fire escaping into other areas. Later, the fire breaks will be planted with clover to create wildlife food strips. “Fire gives us an option for habitat improvement when you can’t cut timber or do much else to an area,” Beahm said. “We have a lot of things happening here, and I’m chomping at the bit to get this work done. There’s a ton of potential here.”

OUTOORS NOTES The Western Pocono Chapter of Trout Unlimited will host two expert speakers at its upcoming monthly meetings. On Tuesday, March 20, author Dwight Landis will give a presentation on fly fishing for native wild brown trout in mountain streams. On Tuesday, April 17, Ken Undercoffer, president of the Pa. Council of Trout Unlimited, will discuss the history of brook trout in Pennsylvania and the threats they face in many coldwater streams. Both meetings begin at 7 p.m., and will be held at the Lehigh Gap Nature Center, 8844 Pa. Route 873 in Slatington. For more information, call 610-760-8889. The Factoryville Sportsmen’s Club will hold its regular monthly meeting Wednesday Feb. 29, at 7:30 p.m., in the clubhouse. Membership secretary Martin Reynolds reminds the membership that unpaid dues are now in a penalty phase. The spring "Super Gun" tickets, as well as raffle tickets for the Henry Rifle package, will be available.

The 11th Annual J&B Sportsmen’s Indoor Antique Fishing and Hunting Flea Market will be held Saturday, March 24, at the Clarion Hotel, 300 Meadow Ave. in Scranton. The event runs from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., and admission is $4 for adults. Children under 12 are free. An 8 a.m. early bird admission is available for $10. For more information and vendor registration, call Bob Kester at 587-4427 or 587-0214, or visit www.jandbfishhuntshow.com. The 9th Annual Sportsman’s Beast Feast, sponsored by the Men’s Ministry of the Christian and Missionary Alliance, will be held Saturday, March 24, at 6 p.m., at the Christian and Missionary Alliance Church, 317 Luzerne Ave. in West Pittston. The event features a buffet of wild game as well as some domestic offerings. The speaker will be sportsman Steve Diehl of Harrisburg. A veteran hunter for more than 25 years, Diehl will share adventures of hunting across the

nation. The event is free and open to the public. Reservations are required and can be made by calling the church office at 654-2500 by Monday, March 19. The Pennsylvania Game Commission reported that Hunter-Trapper Education courses are filling up. To register for a course, visit the Game Commission’s website (www.pgc.state.pa.us), and click on the “Hunter Education Classes” icon in the center of the homepage. From here, you can elect to take either the basic “Hunter-Trapper Education” course, which is a 10-hour course held on two or more days; or the “Hunter-Trapper Education Independent Study” course, which is a homestudy course followed by a one-day, four-hour classroom review and test. After determining which course format best fits your schedule, you can register online. The Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission will hold a basic boating course

Saturday, March 10, at Nescopeck State Park from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. There is no fee for the course and participants can earn a Boating Safety Education Certificate, which is required for all operators of personal watercraft, regardless of age, and for boat operators born after Jan. 1, 1982, who operate motorboats of more than 25 horsepower. For more information or to register, call 477-2206. Nescopeck State Park will host the following events in March (for more information or to register, call 4032006): Saturday, March 3 – Junior Bird Club: Middle Creek Wildlife; 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, March 3 – Adult Learning Series: Mammal Identification; 6-8 p.m. Sunday, March 4 – Maple Sugaring: From the Tree to Your Table; 1-3:30 p.m. Saturday, March 10 – Basic Boating Course; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, March 31 – Signs of Spring: Wood Frog Trail Hike; 1-2:30 p.m.

tate Rep. Gerald Mullery is bringing officials from the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission to town next week for a public meeting with anglers and boaters. The forum will give anglers a chance to voice their concerns directly to the source. The agency will have an opportunity to let anglers and boaters know what’s going on and what’s coming up. “My office gets questions all the time from anglers and boaters,” Mullery said. “Instead of passing the buck, we wanted to bring the experts here to answer questions directly and give the public an opportunity to have a face-to-face discussion.” There’s going to be a lot to talk I F YO U G O about. The meeting will PFBC executive be held on Thursdirector John A. day, March 1, at 7 Arway, commisp.m., in the Crestsioner Norm Gavwood High School lick, who repreAuditorium in sents the Northeast Wright Township. Region and Mullery, who serves as Democratic secretary of the House Game and Fisheries Committee, will serve as the panel for the forum. With spring right around the corner and the preseason stockings for the opening day of trout set to begin in a few weeks, the timing of the forum couldn’t be better. I called Gavlick for a sneak preview at some of the topics that could come up, and the list is long and varied. Here’s a brief synopsis: • The new life jacket law takes effect on Nov. 1. It requires anyone in a canoe, kayak or boat less than 16 feet in length to wear a life jacket from Nov. 1 to April 30. • Legislation is in the works that will increase the penalties for fishing violations, according to Gavlick. “We don’t think there’s enough of a deterrent now,” he said. “Some of the penalties haven’t been increased in 20 or 30 years.” • Legislation that would allow the agency to implement new license packages. Gavlick said it won’t raise license fees, but rather give the PFBC more options when it comes to license packages. • An overview on trout stocking changes that are being considered. • The agency hopes to gain $1 million from a Marcellus impact fee that will be used to hire an additional class of waterways conservation officers to deal solely with gas drilling issues. Gavlick said 10-15 WCOs could be added. • There is talk to construct a new control tower at the Francis Walter Dam that will allow more cold water to be released into the Lehigh River throughout the summer. More studies are needed, Gavlick said, but if such a tower can be constructed, cold water could be released as far as 25 miles downriver. “That would create a tremendous tailwater fishery that would rival the fisheries out west,” Gavlick said. “We need studies to determine if the economic impact will exceed the cost, and we hope that to be the case.” • The possibility of requiring canoes, kayaks and non-powered boats to be registered. Those are just some of the topics that could come up for discussion Thursday night, not to mention the smallmouth bass fishery on the Susquehanna River and the reintroduction of shad to the river. “This is an opportunity to address these things with the public and gain their input,” Gavlick said. “We do take it into consideration when we make a decision.” Mullery organized a similar meeting last October with Pennsylvania Game Commission officials, and he hopes to make the meetings an annual event. The meetings are a great idea – one that ensures that hunters, anglers and boaters have a voice.


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 PAGE 13C

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#18501, Alloys, L eatherS eats, P . W in d ow s, K eyless En try

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CH ECK OU T OU R FU L L IN VEN TOR Y AT

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CMYK PAGE 14C

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012

W

E

A

T

H

E

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THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

NATIONAL FORECAST Mostly sunny

38° 20°

50° 33°

47° 28°

50° 27°

THURSDAY Mostly cloudy, flurries

WEDNESDAY Clouds and rain

TUESDAY Partly sunny

MONDAY Mostly sunny

FRIDAY

45° 39°

47° 27°

REGIONAL FORECAST Syracuse 29/22

Today’s high/ Tonight’s low

Heating Degree Days*

Yesterday Month to date Year to date Last year to date Normal year to date

38/33 39/22 67 in 1930 -3 in 1914 29 758 3732 4602 4487

Poughkeepsie 41/22

The Finger Lakes

Highs: 24-34. Lows: 21-33. Partly to mostly sunny.

Wilkes-Barre 35/27 New York City 46/36

Brandywine Valley

Highs: 40-47. Lows: 28-33. Mostly sunny.

*Index of fuel consumption, how far the day’s mean temperature was below 65 degrees.

Precipitation

Yesterday Month to date Normal month to date Year to date Normal year to date

Sun and Moon

Sunrise 6:43a 6:42a Moonrise Today 8:34a Tomorrow 9:06a

Delmarva/Ocean City

Highs: 45-47. Lows: 28-37. Mostly sunny skies today.

trace 0.81” 1.82” 2.71” 4.19” Sunset 5:50p 5:51p Moonset 10:50p 11:48p

Susquehanna Stage Wilkes-Barre 3.03 Towanda 2.19 Lehigh Bethlehem 3.07 Delaware Port Jervis 3.20 First

Full

Chg. Fld. Stg 0.19 22.0 0.37 21.0 0.75

16.0

0.10

18.0

Last

New

Forecasts, graphs and data ©2012

Weather Central, LP For more weather information go to:

www.timesleader.com National Weather Service

607-729-1597

60/32

38/33

46/36

48/33

60/41

66/51

75/50

65/56 80/74

80/69 34/33

City

Yesterday

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Buffalo Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Las Vegas Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis

18/7/.00 70/34/.20 44/38/.00 45/38/.00 32/28/.02 55/36/.00 27/20/.00 34/28/.01 63/35/.00 64/21/.00 31/28/.01 79/68/.00 59/49/.00 33/24/.00 73/43/.00 60/54/.00 86/69/.00 31/22/.00 28/10/.00

City

Yesterday

Amsterdam Baghdad Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Dublin Frankfurt Hong Kong Jerusalem London

48/36/.00 64/45/.01 37/16/.00 46/37/.08 84/68/.00 48/37/.00 57/43/.00 66/59/.00 63/50/.00 54/43/.00

Today Tomorrow 34/25/sn 60/41/s 47/34/s 38/28/s 34/33/pc 53/31/s 45/32/pc 38/33/pc 66/51/pc 44/23/pc 38/33/pc 80/69/r 65/56/c 52/32/s 67/47/s 60/50/s 80/74/c 43/29/pc 39/21/c

ALMANAC Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Int’l Airport River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.

45/32

60/50

The Jersey Shore

Reading 45/27

Today Tomorrow

44/23

34/25

Atlantic City 46/31

Yesterday Average Record High Record Low

54/42

Highs: 34-41. Lows: 24-27. Mostly sunny today.

Philadelphia 46/33

Temperatures

39/21

50° 30°

Highs: 43-46. Lows: 30-34. Mostly sunny, breezy at times.

Pottsville 41/28

Harrisburg 42/29

35/11

The Poconos

Albany 35/22

Towanda 36/26

State College 38/27

44/33

TODAY’S SUMMARY

Binghamton 34/26

Scranton 34/25

SATURDAY Clouds and rain

Partly sunny

Feb. 29 March 8 March 14 March 22

Find the car you want from home.

34/19/sn 62/46/c 57/37/s 47/34/pc 42/29/pc 61/40/pc 42/31/pc 44/30/s 62/58/sh 44/29/c 40/27/s 81/68/s 69/61/sh 52/33/s 57/38/pc 56/43/pc 82/74/sh 38/28/pc 30/23/pc

City

Yesterday

Myrtle Beach Nashville New Orleans Norfolk Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Ore. St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, DC

57/45/.00 50/28/.00 58/51/.00 53/44/.00 63/26/.00 35/16/.00 71/61/.00 79/52/.00 33/27/.01 43/37/.15 43/28/.00 53/34/.00 55/42/.00 63/54/.00 56/45/.00 43/38/.00 73/62/.00 77/45/.00 47/35/.00

WORLD CITIES

Today Tomorrow 50/38/c 68/42/s 34/15/pc 39/33/pc 79/60/s 53/48/sh 49/37/c 68/62/sh 58/42/pc 57/45/c

49/46/c 72/43/s 42/31/pc 47/40/c 82/68/s 56/45/sh 51/40/c 66/61/sh 60/43/s 58/47/c

City

Yesterday

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Paris Rio de Janeiro Riyadh Rome San Juan Tokyo Warsaw

70/50/.00 34/25/.00 30/25/.00 52/46/.00 93/75/.00 84/52/.00 61/34/.00 85/73/.00 50/39/.00 43/36/.08

Today Tomorrow 54/43/pc 60/38/s 63/52/c 48/32/s 64/44/pc 50/23/s 72/61/r 81/49/s 42/30/pc 46/32/rs 61/39/s 41/32/pc 65/54/c 65/53/s 55/41/pc 44/33/rs 71/62/r 79/50/s 48/33/s

61/49/sh 64/43/pc 68/61/sh 60/43/s 60/51/sh 41/35/c 79/63/sh 71/43/pc 52/29/pc 46/34/pc 57/38/pc 46/31/sn 69/60/t 55/49/pc 54/41/pc 45/38/pc 82/65/sh 71/43/s 58/38/s

Today Tomorrow 73/45/pc 19/18/s 28/19/sf 54/41/c 94/75/s 68/46/s 56/41/pc 81/74/pc 50/38/c 34/28/sf

73/49/s 34/30/sf 29/20/c 54/47/c 93/74/s 71/47/s 60/40/pc 81/73/pc 44/33/pc 34/23/pc

Above-average temperatures will continue to warm up our area as we head into next week. Winds will start to die down this afternoon, and skies will turn mostly clear as we reach our high of 38. On Monday, it will be breezy with partly cloudy skies and temperatures will be around 50! Partly cloudy skies will continue into Tuesday, but then turn mostly cloudy as rain showers approach. Wednesday will be a rainy day with temperatures around 50. Flurries may stick around until Thursday morning, then turn to light rain showers. It will clear out Friday. Rain returns to our region on Saturday. - Michelle Rotella

Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snow flurries, i-ice.

m timesleaderautos.com

196600

TODAY

NATIONAL FORECAST: Scattered precipitation will extend from the coastal Northwest to the Great Lakes today. Look for showers along the coast, turning to snowfall near the Cascades. Scattered snowfall will extend across the northern Intermountain West, northern Plains, and Upper Midwest. Meanwhile, a warm front draped across Florida will bring rain to the entire Peninsula.


CMYK

BUSINESS

SECTION

timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

BUSINESS LOCAL

Educating entrepreneurs, Chapter 2

Johnson will launch TV network

Y

By GREG BRAXTON AND MEG JAMES Los Angeles Times

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Builder David Balent points out a pull-out cutting board in the kitchen of a West Pittston home he is restoring. In a down housing market, many residential builders have had to take on renovations or commercial projects to stay in business.

REBUILDING their business

I

By MATT HUGHES

mhughes@timesleader.com

t isn’t easy being a homebuilder these days.• Construction of new homes fell off sharply four years ago, and though there are indications the market for new homes may have be-

gun crawling back, the number of homes sold in America last year amounted to less than half the total five years earlier. • In this area, some home builders said they’re seeking ways to trim costs and are looking to other sectors of the contracting industry to make ends meet. Nationally, housing starts hit a 50- large in Northeastern Pennsylvania as year low in 2009, when construction it did in other regions of the country, began on 554,000 residential structur- so the pain of its burst wasn’t felt as es, 445,000 of which were single-fam- drastically by builders here as elseily homes, according to U.S. Census where, but local homebuilders and contractors are still in a crunch, said Data. In 2011, construction was begun on Ron Piccolotti, president of Pride Builders, Inc. of Swoyersville 609,000 housing units in the and 2010-2011 president of the United States, 430,000 of INSIDE: Building Industry Association which were single-family Building of Northeastern Pennsylvania. homes. Industry According to census data, That’s better, but nowhere Association building permits for 358 resinear the market of five years gears up for dential structures were issued earlier. In 2007, work started Home Expo in 2010 — the latest year in on more than 1.3 million resiPage 2D which county-level data is dences, over a million of available — of which 357 were which were single-family homes, and in 2005, those figures were for single-family homes. That’s better 2.06 million and 1.7 for single-family than 2009, when the numbers were 301 total and 293 single-family, but well behomes; a 30-year high. Average sale prices also declined. low numbers from a few years earlier. According to census data the average In 2007, 668 permits were issued, 650 sales price of new single-family homes for single family homes, and in 2006, sold in 2010 was $272,900, down from 784 were issued, 768 for single-family $270,900 in 2009, $292,600 in 2008 homes. and $313,600 in 2007. The housing bubble didn’t swell so See REBUILDING, Page 2D

New Turkey Hill, Target among retailers offering great deals THERE’S A NEW Turkey Hill in Plains Township and you can walk away from there with freebies and great deals this opening week. On Friday and Saturday from 4 to 6 p.m., the store at 15 Maffett St. will feature product samples, giveaways and awesome sales such as three halfgallons of Turkey Hill iced tea for $3 and buy-one, get-one-free, fresh-baked, personal-size pizza. Customers who visit by March 23 also can register for a chance to win a $500 Turkey Hill gift card. There is no need to wait until Friday for this deal: Target has price cuts on select Fisher Price merchandise through mid-March, including the popular Laugh & Learn Puppy. On sale for $17.09, make the deal even

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012

RON BARTIZEK

MCT PHOTO

Magic Johnson has come a long way since his announcement on Nov. 7, 1991 that he was HIV-positive.

LOS ANGELES — More than 20 years after he last played pro basketball, former Los Angeles Lakers star Magic Johnson is ready for a whole new game: running his own TV network. The Hall of Famer, who has become a successful business mogul, is preparing to launch Aspire, a 24-hour channel with a focus on what Johnson called positive, uplifting images of African-Americans. The basic cable outlet will join other channels targeting black viewers, such as BET and TV One, and will offer opportunities for blacks who have struggled to find work in mainstream Hollywood. “This is so exciting for me, I’m pinching myself,” Johnson said in a phone interview. “This The Hall of is big for myself, for the Famer, who African-American comhas become a munity and the AfricanAmerican creative comsuccessful business mo- munity. I wanted a vehicle to show positive imgul, is prepar- ages and to have stories ing to launch written, produced and directed by AfricanAspire. Americans for our community. Aspire — that’s how I’ve been leading my life.” Aspire’s mix will include film, TV, music and comedy, with a combination of acquired projects and original programming. “There will some performing arts and shows about faith,” Johnson said. Johnson’s entry into the television arena comes courtesy of communications giant Comcast Corp. as part of its agreement with the FCC and Department of Justice to diversify the cable landscape. Comcast agreed last year to launch 10 new independently owned cable channels, with most backed by African-Americans and Latinos, by 2018. Johnson’s channel is scheduled to be the first. Comcast’s obligation to support minority-owned channels came after a bruising yearlong federal review of the Philadelphia cable company’s acquisition of NBCUniversal, which includes the NBC broadcast network, NBC television stations, Universal Studios, Universal Pictures, cable channels USA, Bravo, Syfy, MSNBC and CNBC and Spanish-language broadcaster Telemundo. With Aspire, which is scheduled for a June 30 launch, Johnson becomes the second A-list celebrity to launch a network in the last two years. Oprah Winfrey established OWN: The Oprah Winfrey Network as a vehicle for her philosophy of inspiration and personal empowerment. But OWN has struggled ever since its January 2011 launch, failing to develop any shows or projects that have attracted large audiences. Johnson is aware of the risks: “We’ll learn from those who have gone before us. We understand the landscape, and we will run a sound business.”

D

ANDREW M. SEDER STEALS & DEALS better when you go to coupons.com and select toys. There you’ll find a page of Fisher Price coupons including $5 off the puppy, making what is typically a $22.99 product yours for $12.09. Today is the last day to take advantage of the awesome Prevacid 24hour rebate offer. Details can be found at prevacid24hr.com/pdfs/Prevacid_2012_rebate.pdf, but the most important thing is that you must buy two 42-pill packs of Prevacid 24-hour today in order to get a full rebate, up to $29, for one of the boxes. It’s essentially a buy-one, get-one-free offer but you’ll need to do a little extra legwork. While you must buy the items today,

you have until March 5 to get the rebate request postmarked. Here’s another rebate offer that has a short shelf life: Pay $35 for a Symantec Norton Antivirus 2012 3-User edition and get a $35 prepaid Visa gift card in the mail when you fill out the rebate form and follow the directions found here: images10.newegg.com/uploadfilesfornewegg/rebate/SH/Symantec32-408-372Feb21Feb2712cd12.pdf. You must buy the product today or tomorrow on the website newegg.com. Go here to start the process: www.newegg.com/Store/SubCategory.aspx?SubCategory=377&name=Software-Security. Last Tuesday might have been Fat Tuesday but there’s no reason you couldn’t enjoy a bag of donuts for free today, too. Head to Smokey Bones with this coupon: dl.dropbox.com/u/14723413/

SMOKEY%20BONES/ SMB120028_Donuts_ECoupons_02%5B1%5D.jpg and get a free bag of donuts with the purchase of an entrée. On Wednesday, get a free cookie with any purchase at your local Subway. Plenty of good inserts in today’s Times Leader but one of them can be really useful if you’re looking for office supplies. There’s a brown paper bag that you can take to Office Max and fill up. Get 20 percent off a majority of items in the store as long as you can fit it in the bag. Some items, like cases of printing paper and furniture, also will be 20 percent off. Sale and clearance items are included. Andrew M. Seder, a Times Leader staff writer, can be reached at 570-829-7269. Follow him on Twitter @TLAndrewSeder

ou can teach some of the skills needed to be an entrepreneur, but experience is still the best teacher. That was the conclusion I drew during a conversation last week with Jeffrey Alves, the new dean of the Jay S. Sidhu School of Business and Leadership at Wilkes University. And he should know; after five years at Babson College spent developing and teaching the first degree programs in entrepreneurial studies, Alves realized, “While I’d grown up in that environment, I’d never actually worked in it. It hit me after about three Alves years I didn’t know what I was talking about.” So he took a leave of absence to go into the private sector, and was involved in the launch of five companies over the next 15 years. And what did he learn? For one thing, that being an entrepreneur is a full-time job and then some. “You can’t leave your business alone. If you don’t have a passion for what you’re doing you shouldn’t be there.” He also saw that entrepreneurs, particularly during the startup phase, are true multi-taskers — because they must be. The experience led Alves to conclude that students can benefit from an introduction to some of the tools entrepreneurs use, or from role playing. But in the end, “to me being entrepreneur is more about an attitude and a way of thinking. “Can you create another Bill Gates? No.” Of course it’s wrong to think only of Microsoft or Richard Branson’s Virgin empire when talking about entrepreneurs. Most are less interested in becoming billionaires than they are in assuring themselves of a steady income doing something they enjoy. Alves is heartened to sense that attitude in many students. “I’m really excited because the young people I’m seeing now are much better prepared to be entrepreneurs.” Why? “Most are local, most have figured out their grandparents’ advice (to get a stable job with a big company) doesn’t work. Their method of communication is much more diversified. “They learn differently they interact differently and have an attitude that if they can define something they can control it.” That makes them willing to take risks, not recklessly but thoughtfully, Alves has observed. And entrepreneurs, even small ones, collectively have a large impact. When I mentioned an article in last Sunday’s business section that downplayed the job-creating power of small business, Alves countered that there’s strength in numbers. Those millions of shops and service providers are just as important to the nation’s economic health as large corporations that are as likely to be cutting more jobs as adding them these days. I hadn’t thought of it that way. But particularly at times when good jobs are hard to come by, more people are likely to start businesses, and that keeps them productive, while enlarging the market for the vendors that serve them. Still, a few wildly successful startups like Google deserve the headlines they get. Alves says less than 2 percent of businesses grow at 20 percent or more for a five-year period. “They’re the ones that generate 75-80 percent of jobs” and bring innovations to market, he said. But he knows from experience how rare that is. “Going in you never know if you’re going to get there,” he said, citing one company he led, which grew at 20 percent, then “stalled out.” Even so, there are now 40 jobs that otherwise may not have existed.

Ron Bartizek, Times Leader business editor, may be reached at rbartizek@timesleader.com or 570-970-7157.


CMYK PAGE 2D

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012

B

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CORPORATE LADDER

HONORS & AWARDS

MISERICORDIA UNIVERSITY Katherine M. Totino, Dallas, has been named grants and gift research manager in the department of Corporate, Government, and Foundation Relations. Totino graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor’s degree in political science from King’s College.

Totino

Beemer

Arthur

Evans

Morra

TMG HEALTH Matthew Malcom, Shavertown, joined the company as director of regulatory affairs, quality assurance and plan management. He holds a master’s degree in organizational management and a bachelor’s degree in business management from Misericordia University.

QUANDEL ENTERPRISES INC.

The Scranton office of the construction firm announces these new hires: Ronda L. Beemer, NCIDQ, business developer. Beemer has a bachelor’s degree from Marywood University.

Glen Arthur, project estimator. He has more than 28 years of estimating experience. Hilary A. Evans, assistant controller. Evans has a Bachelor of Arts in business administration with an emphasis in accounting from Mansfield University.

REBUILDING Continued from Page 1D

“A lot of builders went out of business,” Piccolotti said. “A lot of guys just got in over their heads; a lot of guys were stuck holding spec houses.” Several local builders said that even if the market won’t return to bubble-era levels the worst has likely passed, and now the biggest challenge to their businesses has come from conservative home lending by banks. Financing a challenge “I don’t know how many houses I’ve lost because they couldn’t get the money; you have to be super clean anymore,” said Randy Rushton, owner of South Valley Custom Homes in Nanticoke. “Three or four have gotten right up to being ready to sign and they lost the loan. That’s a shocker to the people, you know.” Piccolotti said buyers with credit scores below 740 face an uphill battle in getting a home loan. “Unfortunately, there’s a lot of good people who had some issues with their jobs or lost their jobs; who didn’t have perfect credit,” Piccolotti said. “And I’m not talking four or five hundred, I’m talking low to high six hundreds, and these days the banks just won’t do it.” Statistics seem to back up Rushton’s observations. According to U.S. Census data, 58 percent of new single-family homes sold in 2010 were financed by a conventional loan. The proportion was 62 percent in 2009 and 74 percent in 2008. The proportion of government-backed home loans, meanwhile, has grown. The proportion of new homes financed by a Federal Housing Administration-insured loan was 25 percent in 2010, 24 percent in 2009, and 16 percent in 2008, Census data show. Builders also blamed rising living costs and employment uncertainty for the market slowdown. Employment uncertainty has

Rice

Smeltzer

Steven J. Morra, senior project manager. He has a Bachelor of Science degree in industrial technology, construction option, from Central Connecticut State University in New Britain, Conn. and a master’s degree in business administration from Penn State University. Karl F. Rice, senior estimator. Rice has a Bachelor of Science degree in chemical engineering from Penn State University and a Bachelor of Arts in liberal arts from Juniata College. Jason Smeltzer, project superintendent. He is a graduate of Penn College of Technology with a Bachelor of Science in Building Construction Management. Jeffrey A. Mohn, Jr., project

left renters hesitant to buy and made banks more hesitant to lend. Fuel costs have cut into the paychecks of homeowners and potential homebuyers, leaving them with less each month to devote to mortgage payments or to save for a down payment. Those fuel costs also raise construction expenses for builders and contractors. David Balent, owner of Exeter-based Balent Construction, Co., said the price of roof shingles, which contain petroleum products, has risen from about $35 to over $100 per100-squarefoot sheet in two years, and Rushton said the cost of foundation excavation and other jobs requiring heavy equipment also is up. “They’re talking $5 a gallon coming up, and that will be the height of our season,” Rushton said. “Some excavating companies I know use five or six thousand (dollars) a month on fuel.” Balent said the price of fuel has forced his company to consider ways to cut back. He now plans ahead to find the most efficient route before sending crews to work at multiple construction sites, and has implemented other cost-saving measures like high efficiency lighting and oil recycling. The crunch has forced some builders to expand into alternative, sometimes unfamiliar markets. Residential homebuilders have begun taking on renovation work or commercial projects, and contractors specializing in one building trade have begun branching out, Piccolotti said. “If you were taking on a certain job like siding, (now) you’re taking on a roofing job if you could,” Piccolotti said. “Basically you’re doing whatever you can do to stay alive.” Balent said he has been doing more and more remodeling and repair jobs, and that homeowners seeking work often request the bare minimum. “Homeowners are doing the very minimal in what they need for repairs,” Balent said. “They’re very cost and budget conscious.”

Mohn

Achampong

engineer. He has a Bachelor of Science in structural design and construction engineering technology from Penn State University. Anthony Achampong, project engineer. He has a Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering from Penn State University and a Certificate in Project Management from ABC.

DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL CENTER Margaret O’Shea Caplan has joined as director for the medical center. She earned a liberal arts degree in 1981 from Virginia Polytechnical Institute, Blacksburg, Va. and a master’s degree from Catholic Uni-

O’Shea Caplan

versity, Washington, D.C.

MORTGAGE NETWORK INC. Thomas Burke, Dunmore, has joined the Whitehall office as loan officer. A graduate of Kutztown University, he holds a Bachelor of Science in business administration with a concentration in economics. The Times Leader publishes announcements of business promotions, hirings and other noteworthy events on Sundays. Photographs may be included as space allows. Submit an announcement by email to tlbusiness@timesleader.com, by mail to 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711; or by fax to 829-5537. Photos in jpeg format may be attached to e-mails.

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Builder David Balent stands in the foyer of a flood-damaged West Pittston home he is restoring. In a down market, many residential builders have had to take on renovations or commercial projects to stay in business.

Flood not a big help William De Angelo, co-owner of DeAngelo Construction in Wilkes-Barre, said his company began shifting towards commercial construction prior to the housing bubble, and now specializes in commercial work because that’s where the business is. The company also manages rental properties to keep income flowing in slow times. “You need a secondary income,” De Angelo said. “If you solely depend on residential construction that would be a heck of a ride.” De Angelo added his company saves overhead by performing work other builders would subcontract. “When I was a kid every builder put the tools on; nowadays nobody puts the tools on – that’s our advantage,” De Angelo said. “My office is in my house. My mother gets involved; my wife gets involved. Family. We don’t have secretaries; we don’t have a foreman. It’s all us.” Some contractors may have hoped repairing damage caused by the September flooding would offer some relief in the market, but homebuilders said the flood’s impact on the industry was lessened by competition from contractors from outside the area, some working illegally, and by the challenges homeowners faced in securing funding through flood insurance. Contractors said five month later some flood victims are still waiting on insurance payouts.

“They’re doing the bare minimum that they can by themselves, because they don’t have the money to pay for the professionals to come in,” Balent said. “There’s people that I know that have their house gutted out, and they have heat and power but that’s it, and they’re just sitting there, or doing it a little at a time.” But even in the leanest of times there is opportunity, and the chance to pursue a longheld dream to build homes is what led South Valley Custom Homes owner Randy Rushton to buck the economic trend and open a home construction firm in the worst of market conditions. Rushton’s company builds homes constructed of pre-fabricated panels assembled on site. He started the company in 2008 after running a paint store and working with contractors for more than 20 years. Rushton said he has built six homes since 2009, all pre-ordered and around 2,000 square feet in size. Though those homes might not have been as large as he would have liked, he feels his company is holding its own. “I feel that we’re doing what we need to do to keep ourselves going here and I feel it’s going to get better,” Rushton said. “From our first home show (this year) we got 18 original leads. I find that it’s mostly the younger people. They’re working and they don’t know what the real crunch is. They’re ready to build homes.”

Home shows are a critical resource for many builders By MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

The Building Industry Association of Northeastern Pennsylvania is gearing up for its annual Home Expo, a trade show bringing together about 100 local builders, contractors and building product suppliers with thousands of potential customers. Always an important networking tool, home shows have become an even more critical resource for builders in the current economy. “Most of my leads come from the home shows in the area,” said Randy Rushton, owner of South Valley Custom Homes in Nanticoke. “From the last show I have four po-

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

IF YOU GO

show is an important promotional event for the building What: Building Industry Associtrades and an opportunity to ation of Northeastern Pennsylvabuild consensus and awareness nia Home Expo among local companies of Where: 109th Field Artillery issues impacting the building Armory, 280 Market St., WilkesBarre industry. When: Friday, 4-9 p.m.; Saturday, But mostly, it’s a chance to 10 a.m.-7 p.m. and Sunday 10 meet potential clients, and the a.m.-4 p.m. association is offering a numAdmission: $3 regular admisber of supplemental events sion; $2 with a non-perishable and activities in hopes of drawfood item, to be donated to the Commission on Economic Oppor- ing a larger crowd. There will be a charity auctunity tion of home and yard items built by students at area vocatential good leads, so out of tional schools, a free electronthose four I hope to get at ics recycling collection in the least one home.” parking lot and – new this year Don Casterline, emeritus with a separate entry fee – a director of the local Building Saturday wine-tasting event. Industry Association and an The association has also organizer of the expo, said the added a children’s area to the

expo, which on Saturday will include a magic show and a visit from Ronald McDonald and other characters. The SPCA will have animals available for adoption, local Girl Scouts will sell cookies and food will be available for purchase. One change in the expo this year is the inclusion of a growing number of companies specializing in remodeling – a sign of economic conditions, Casterline said. “We’ve seen more participation of the remodelers,” Casterline said. “Because of the economy; because the homebuilding industry is down substantially, so consequently those builders have turned to remodeling.”

Edward Ciarimboli, partner in the law firm of Fellerman & Ciarimboli, was named to the National Trial Lawyers: Top Forty Under Forty. Membership is by invitation and is extended exclusively to those individuals who exemplify superior qualifications, trial results, and leadership as a young lawyer younger than the age of 40. Attorneys Robert W. Munley, Marion Munley and J. Christopher Munley, Munley, Munley & Cartwright, P.C., were recently selected by their peers for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America 2012. Inclusion is based on a peer-review survey in which more than 41,000 attorneys cast almost 3.9 million votes on the

Ciarimboli

Robert W. Munley

Marion Munley

J. Christopher Munley

legal abilities of other lawyers in their practice areas.

Submit announcements of business honors and awards to Business Awards by email to tlbusiness@timesleader.com; by mail to 15 N. Main St., WilkesBarre, PA 18711-0250; or by fax to (570) 829-5537. Photos in jpg format may be attached to email.

BUSINESS AGENDA LANDLORDS HELPING LANDLORDS: Tuesday, 7:30 p.m., Ramada Inn, Public Square, Wilkes-Barre. Magistrate Paul Roberts will discuss landlord/ tenant legal relationships. Refreshments will be served. $10 at the door or dues of $60 yearly to Wyoming Valley Real Estate Investors Association. Call 2406475 or email benjamin_corby@hotmail.com for more information. WOMEN’S NETWORKING MIXER: Tuesday, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Bobby’s of New York, 2 E. Butler Drive, Drums. Open to all businesswomen in Greater Hazleton. Complimentary hors d’oevures and cash bar, door prizes. $5 for Greater Hazleton Chamber members; nonmembers $7. Reservations required; call 455-1509, email jferry@hazletonchamber.org or online at www.hazletonchamber.org. EMPLOYEE BENEFITS SEMINAR: Friday, 8:30 a.m., Mea’s restaurant, 8 W. Broad St., Hazleton. Presentation on the Bright Choices Exchange offered for Chamber of Commerce members with 2-50 employees. Free, continental breakfast served. Call 1-800-3773539 to reserve or for more information.

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS SEMINAR: March 7, 8:30 a.m., Woodlands Inn & Resort, Highway 315, Plains Township. Presentation on the Bright Choices Exchange offered for Chamber of Commerce members with 2-50 employees. Free, continental breakfast served. Call 1-800-377-3539 to reserve or for more information. BUY A BUSINESS SEMINAR: March 13, 1 1:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Hampton Inn, Route 6, Tunkhannock. Led by Gary Casey, SCORE volunteer. Covers topics involved in buying or starting a small business. Free. To register, call 836-7755 or email maureen@wycc.com. WYOMING COUNTY CHAMBER LUNCHEON: March 14, noon, The Fireplace restaurant, Route 6, Tunkhannock. Dave Sweeley, area manager for Southwestern Energy, will speak. The company has a local office in Tunkhannock. Free for chamber members; others $10 each. Reserve by calling 8367755 or by e-mailing Robin at Robin@wyccc.com. Send announcements of upcoming events by email to tlbusiness@timesleader.com; by mail to Business Agenda, Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 1871 1 or by fax to 829-5537. Include a contact phone number and email address. The submission deadline is Wednesday for publication on Sunday.

OFFICE COACH

Weigh pros and cons before switching jobs Q: I’m having trouble deciding whether to change jobs. For a number of years, I have worked for a small local company. I can walk to work and go home for lunch, which is a great lifestyle benefit. The pay is fair, but there is no room for advancement, and the business owners are greedy, arrogant people. After looking for other opportunities, I have finally found a position that interests me. This job would provide a better compensation package and more career potential, but the downside is that I would have to travel 30 percent of the time. I’m hesitant about leaving my current job, but I also think a change might be healthy. My crystal ball just isn’t working, so I would welcome any suggestions.

need to take a leap of faith and choose the path that appears headed toward the most desirable future.

Q: Our company has a large number of Indian employees who bring lunch from home, heat it in the microwave and eat at their desks. Unfortunately, the smell is very pungent and lingers in the air for at least half an hour. I have tried spraying air freshener, but that didn’t help. When I commented on the smell, a few people accused me of being racist, but that is not true. I like my co-workers. I just think eating smelly food in close quarters is inconsiderate. Should I discuss this problem with human resources or just shut up and live with it? A: The issue of food smells is difficult to address, because few A: Choosing between two alternatives with different bene- odors are universally offensive. For example, many people defits inevitably creates a psychospise the smell of microwave logical dilemma. Selecting one popcorn, while others don’t means giving up the advantages of the other, so people often have mind it at all. The same is true of fish, gasoline and that air fresha hard time with these choices. On a small scale, it’s like deciding ener you were using. In India, many might consider the aroma whether to have the creamy of an American hamburger dischocolate cake or the sensible tasteful. fruit plate for dessert. Either In this situation, however, the way, you gain something and you practical question is whether lose something. other lunching locations are To help structure your deciavailable. If your office has a sion-making, try this simple decent break room, the HR manexercise. First, make a compreager might reasonably implehensive list of all the factors important to you in a job, such as ment a “no eating at your desk” pay, interesting work, competent policy for all employees. But if desktop dining is the only almanagement, etc. Give added weight to any that are especially ternative to eating out, I’m afraid you will simply have to adjust. critical. For each position, rate these factors on a 1-to-5 scale, then compare the scores. Marie G. McIntyre is a workplace Viewing the ratings side-bycoach and the author of “Secrets to side should give you a better idea Winning at Office Politics.” Send in of how these two jobs stack up. questions and get free coaching tips Ultimately, however, you will at http://www.yourofficecoach.com.


CMYK SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 PAGE 3D

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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 PAGE 5D

MarketPulse June 8 2009

-5% Citigroup

-64% AIG

+1% Cisco

+33% Travelers

+14% Kraft Foods

Sept.22 2008

GM (worthless)

THANKS FOR LEAVING The Dow Jones industrial average is close to its highest level since May 2008, but part of the reason is that AIG is no longer in the mix. Dow Jones Indexes booted the bailed out insurer from its measure of blue-chip stocks in September 2008, after the stock plunged to $34 from $203 in three days. Since the switch, AIG has lost about 64 percent. Kraft, the stock that replaced AIG in the Dow 30, has climbed 14 percent. In 2009, Citigroup and General Motors were dumped from the average. GM subsequently filed for bankruptcy protection, which wiped out its stock.

Change since switch Hello (In the Dow 30) Goodybe (Out of the Dow 30)

EVAPORATING RECOVERY Natural gas looked like it may be set for a rebound earlier this month. It had climbed 4.6 percent, just one day after rising 5.9 percent. It was the first time since June 2010 that gas rose more than 4 percent in two straight days. But the recovery proved fleeting. Gas fell again last week, further cementing its steep slide since peaking in 2008. Too much supply is available and it’s overwhelming demand. In July 2008, gas was above $13 per 1,000 cubic feet. Now, it’s around $2.55.

INFLATION PROTECTION Oil is back above $100 per barrel and financial analysts say $4 gasoline will arrive by this summer. So it’s natural to wonder which stocks do best when prices are rising. Researchers from Columbia University, AXA Investment Managers and asset manager Amundi looked at returns of all stocks in the S&P 500, going back to 1989. They found that oil and gas stocks rise with inflation. That’s no surprise because they benefit from higher prices for the oil that they sell. But the researchers also said that technology stocks tend to do well. That’s because tech companies can charge premium prices when they bring innovative products to market.

Natural gas

per 1,000 cubic feet

$15 $11.97

10 $2.55 5

0

‘08

’09

‘10

’11

‘12

AP

Betting on banks

The case for

InsiderQ&A

Stephen Jones

Tom Villalta

What they do: Run Jones Villalta Opportunity (JFOVX), a mutual fund that ranks in the top 2 percent of all large-cap value funds for three-year returns What they suggest: Get interested in stocks when they’re hated What they own: The fund has big stakes in Citigroup, Goldman Sachs, Bank of America and other banks

Stephen Jones and Tom Villalta aren’t afraid to go against the conventional wisdom. They began buying big bank stocks in 2010, when most investors were dumping them. The investments have paid off this year, and their mutual fund has already returned 14 percent in less than two months. What drew you to banks ? Villalta: You cannot find a more disparaged or unliked group with as much angst being directed toward it, whether it be from politicians or individuals from the Street. You’re seeing this reflected in shareholder meetings and, from the political standpoint, with regulations that are being enacted. Jones: I can remember I made a television appearance, it was probably early 2010, and I commented on how much we liked the big money center banks and how undervalued we thought they were. It was humorous to us the number of disparaging comments made about me personally simply because I thought they were a good value. I’m on the board of a bank, and it’s a wonderful business model when the cost of money is as low as it is, and they’re able to lend it out at higher rates. But isn’t demand for loans weak? Villalta: Our thesis with regard to banks isn’t predicated on significant loan growth of any kind. It is a valuation play. Strictly on a valuation basis, with no growth attached to them, they should be trading at a higher rate. What do you mean by valuation? Villalta: They look cheap on a book value basis. They should be trading at book value, (which is how much accountants say a company is worth if its liabilities are subtracted from its assets. Many banks are instead trading below their book values). When we saw banks falling in summer, early fall of 2010, we were very actively buying more shares of pretty much all the financials that we own. Have you made money on your Bank of America investment? Villalta: We’ve made money on all of our financial positions within the portfolio. I continue to believe that this group is among the least risky of the groups that we have. There’s a need for lending. There’s a need for investment businesses. It’s a very competitive environment, which we like. When you have businesses where the implied expectations are very low, the risk comes down significantly. Whoa, banks are less risky? Villalta: I think you could make a case that a company like Apple is an undervalued stock. But if you take a look at its operating margins that are 50 percent higher than its competitors, that worries me. There’s a lot of room to chip away at the competitive advantages they have. Answers edited for content and clarity. AP

dull stocks

Investors thinking of buying Facebook stock this spring may want to consider less exciting options — a truck leasing company, perhaps, or a manufacturer of ball bearings. Thursday Since the stock market peaked on Company Ticker close Oct. 9, 2007, Ryder System, which rents CVR Partners* moving trucks, has returned 24 percent, UAN $27.48 (nitrogen fertilizer) counting dividends. Timken, the ball Timken bearing company, 55 percent. Staid old 53.12 (ball bearings, components) TKR Johnson & Johnson has returned 13 Ryder System R 52.97 percent counting dividends. (commercial truck rentals) Google, the last stock debut to get Johnson & Johnson JNJ 65.10 Facebook-level attention, is up sharply (healthcare products) since 2004. But measured from the market S&P 500 peak, it's down 1.5 percent. And it doesn’t pay a dividend. The lesson? When it comes to hot stocks, losses may persist if you buy at the top and can’t make up ground with dividends. For a taste of the danger of buying stocks in the spotlight, check out last year's Internet stock debuts, like Groupon, Pandora and Angie’s List. Investors who got in before the stocks started trading have done OK. But that's mostly reserved for pension funds, mutual funds and hedge funds. And after sharp climbs on the first day, most have fallen. Those looking for a big payoff should have stuck with the boring, not the bedazzling. CVR Partners, which sells nitrogen fertilizer to farmers, is up 66 percent since it went public last April. Its lucky shareholders also get dividends. CVR is expected to pay $2 a share over the next year, or 8 percent of its stock price even after the big run-up. Source: FactSet Total returns through Feb. 23

Mortgage rates inch up The average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage rose to 3.95 percent last week from 3.87 percent, but it’s still well below where it was a year ago, 4.95 percent. Mortgage rates are low because they track Treasury yields. The Fed plans to keep short-term rates low until late 2014, and longer-term yields have stayed low because economic growth has been slow and inflation has been moderate.

InterestRates

Total return since market peak

Div. yield

66.2%

8.6%

54.8

1.7

24.2

2.2

12.8

3.5

-4.5

Money market mutual funds

PRIME FED Taxable—national avg RATE FUNDS Selected Daily Govt Fund/Cl D FRIDAY 3.25 .13 Tax-exempt—national avg 6 MO AGO 3.25 .13 BMO Tax Free MMF/Class Y 1 YR AGO 3.25 .13

2.0

2.11 3.84 3.36 4.58 7.16 1.08

-0.02 -0.03 -0.06 0.01 -0.20 0.00

FRIDAY YIELD

1WK

0.09 0.20 0.13 0.31 0.89

0.01 0.01 0.02 0.02 0.03

s s s s s

s s s s t

-0.03 -0.07 -0.02 -0.40 -1.29

0.13 0.30 0.16 0.82 2.31

0.07 0.01 0.16 0.71

10-year T-Note 1.98 30-year T-Bond 3.10 Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.

-0.02 -0.05

s s

s -1.45 s -1.43

3.57 4.66

1.72 2.72

Broad market Lehman Triple-A corporate Moody’s Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman Municipal Bond Buyer U.S. high yield Barclays Treasury Barclays

TREASURYS 3-month T-Bill 1-year T-Bill 6-month T-Bill 2-year T-Note 5-year T-Note

52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN RANK %RTN LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD

Air Products

APD

72.26 8

98.01

91.94

-0.12

-0.1

s

s

7.9 +3.74

2

5.5

16

2.5

Amer Water Works

AWK

25.39 0

34.67

33.92

0.10

0.3

s

s

6.5 +28.62

1 22.8a

19

2.7

Amerigas Part LP

APU

36.76 8

50.10

46.21

0.21

0.5

s

s

0.7 +2.17

3 13.1

26

6.6

Aqua America Inc

WTR

19.28 8

23.44

22.55

0.41

1.9

s

s

2.3 +3.94

2

1.5

23

2.9

Arch Dan Mid

ADM

23.69 6

38.02

31.96

0.61

1.9

s

s

11.7—10.43 3

-0.2

14

2.2

AutoZone Inc

AZO

247.36 0 361.98 359.80

Bank of America

BAC

Bk of NY Mellon

BK

Bon Ton Store

BONT

CVS Caremark Corp

-0.41

-0.1

s

s

10.7 +42.07

1 22.4

18

...

4.92 4

14.70

7.88

-0.14

-1.7

s

s

41.7—43.31 5 -24.9

...

0.5

17.10 4

31.45

21.67

-0.34

-1.5

s

s

8.8—26.35 4 -10.2

11

2.4

2.23 2

17.24

4.79

-0.07

-1.4

s

s

42.1—68.12 5 -36.0

...

4.2

CVS

31.30 0

45.00

44.07

-0.20

-0.5

s

s

17

1.5

Cigna Corp

CI

38.79 5

52.95

45.09

0.16

0.4

t

CocaCola

KO

61.29 8

71.77

69.00

-0.05

-0.1

s

8.1 +37.21

1

7.1

s

7.4 +8.67

2

-1.1

9

0.1

s

-1.4 +10.96

2 10.3

19

3.0

Comcast Corp A

CMCSA 19.19 0

29.83

29.19

0.02

0.1

s

s

23.1 +18.85

1

2.2

19

2.2

Community Bk Sys

CBU

21.67 9

28.95

27.71

-0.52

-1.8

s

s

-0.3 +16.42

1

7.5

14

3.8

Community Hlth Sys

CYH

14.61 4

42.50

25.11

4.38

21.1

s

s

43.9—33.66 4

-8.4

11

...

Entercom Comm

ETM

4.61 4

13.63

7.40

-0.08

-1.1

t

s

20.3—42.05 5 -20.6

7

...

Fairchild Semicond

FCS

10.25 5

21.02

14.91

-0.97

-6.1

s

s

23.8—16.09 4

-4.8

13

...

-9.9—34.98 4

Frontier Comm

FTR

Genpact Ltd

G

Harte Hanks Inc Heinz

3.81 2

9.55

4.64

-0.14

-2.9

s

t

13.09 6

18.16

16.11

0.37

2.4

s

s

HHS

7.00 4

13.24

9.27

-0.13

-1.4

t

s

HNZ

46.99 9

55.00

53.43

-1.04

-1.9

s

s

-1.1 +11.60

2

5.6

Hershey Company

HSY

49.88 9

62.38

61.11

0.63

1.0

t

s

-1.1 +19.60

1

Kraft Foods

KFT

30.43 9

39.06

37.88

-0.13

-0.3

t

s

1.4 +22.84

1

Lowes Cos

LOW

18.07 9

28.46

27.16

-0.52

-1.9

s

s

7.0 +10.27

-9.0

27

8.6

1 25.8a

21

1.1

2.0—22.43 4 -17.2

13

3.7

17

3.6

4.8

22

2.5

5.5

19

3.1

2

-3.6

19

2.1

90.76

7.8 +17.16

M&T Bank

MTB

66.40 7

81.77

-1.15

-1.4

s

s

7.1 —4.29

3

-5.1

13

3.4

McDonalds Corp

MCD

72.89 0 102.22 100.32

0.33

0.3

s

s

0.0 +36.75

1 19.1

19

2.8

NBT Bncp

NBTB

17.05 8

24.10

22.54

-0.16

-0.7

t

s

1.9 +4.85

2

1.6

13

3.5

Nexstar Bdcstg Grp

NXST

5.30 7

10.28

8.41

0.02

0.2

s

s

7.3 +34.56

1

1.8

...

...

PNC Financial

PNC

42.70 8

64.37

59.38

-1.76

-2.9

s

s

3.0 —.64

3

-2.4

11

2.4

PPL Corp

PPL

24.10 8

30.27

28.85

0.38

1.3

s

s

-1.9 +21.63

1

-1.1

11

5.0

Penna REIT

PEI

6.50 7

17.34

13.32

-0.33

-2.4

s

s

27.6

3 -15.1

...

4.5

PepsiCo

PEP

58.50 4

71.89

63.31

0.63

1.0

t

s

-4.6 +3.66

2

2.2

16

3.3

Philip Morris Intl

PM

60.45 0

82.77

83.02

1.28

1.6

s

s

5.8 +37.81

1 37.4a

17

3.7

Procter & Gamble

PG

57.56 0

67.72

66.71

1.80

2.8

s

s

0.0 +9.14

2

3.1

17

3.1

Prudential Fncl

PRU

42.45 8

66.94

61.09

-0.30

-0.5

s

s

21.9 —2.30

3

-6.5

8

2.4

SLM Corp

SLM

10.91 9

17.11

16.19

0.05

0.3

s

s

20.8 +13.49

2 -17.4

14

3.1

23.7

-.43

SLM Corp flt pfB

SLMBP 39.00 5

60.00

48.25

0.47

1.0

s

s

Southn Union Co

SUG

26.83 0

44.65

44.01

0.10

0.2

s

s

4.5 +65.77

TJX Cos

TJX

23.92 0

36.33

35.97

1.10

3.2

s

s

UGI Corp

UGI

24.07 5

33.53

28.69

1.13

4.1

s

s

Verizon Comm

VZ

32.28 8

40.48

38.14

-0.32

-0.8

s

WalMart Strs

WMT

48.31 8

62.63

58.79

-3.69

-5.9

Weis Mkts

WMK

36.52 9

44.22

42.84

-0.79

-1.8

...

0.0

...

9.6

9.5

22

1.4

11.4 +45.08

1 21.3

19

1.1

-2.4 —5.32

3

4.2

16

3.6

s

-4.9 +12.75

2

5.6

45

5.2

t

s

-1.6 +15.67

1

5.4

13

2.5

r

s

7.3 +15.47

1

2.6

15

2.8

1

Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quarters. Rank classifies a stock’s performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).

Stock Screener

Financial analysts have high expectations for many energy stocks. It’s not surprising that analysts anticipate that Halliburton, which helps companies pull crude from the ground, and other companies in the oil and gas industry will do well. They’re benefiting from the return in crude’s price to above $100 per barrel. But analysts expect big gains even for several coal stocks, following a disappointing year of returns for the industry. This screen shows energy companies in the S&P 500 index where analysts are forecasting at least a 25 percent rise over the next 12 months. Atop the list are coal stocks, which have struggled on worries that power plants will switch from coal as their fuel to natural gas. The plunging price of gas since 2008 has made it cheap. Consol Energy, for example, fell 25 percent last year when the index was flat. But Credit Suisse nevertheless expects Consol to rise over the next year on stronger demand for coal from steel factories around the world, among other factors. Data through Feb. 22

t t t t t s

t s t t t s

COMPANY

TICKER

CLOSE

52-WK HIGH LOW

-0.97 -1.36 -0.66 -1.01 0.36 -1.16

3.18 5.29 4.11 5.72 10.15 2.43

CHANGE 1MO 3MO 1YR

TICKER

FRIDAY NAV

WK CHG

American Funds BalA m ABALX American Funds BondA m ABNDX American Funds CapIncBuA m CAIBX American Funds CpWldGrIA m CWGIX American Funds EurPacGrA m AEPGX American Funds FnInvA m ANCFX American Funds GrthAmA m AGTHX American Funds IncAmerA m AMECX American Funds InvCoAmA m AIVSX American Funds NewPerspA m ANWPX American Funds WAMutInvA m AWSHX BlackRock GlobAlcA m MDLOX BlackRock GlobAlcI MALOX Dodge & Cox Income DODIX Dodge & Cox IntlStk DODFX Dodge & Cox Stock DODGX Fidelity Contra FCNTX Fidelity GrowCo FDGRX Fidelity LowPriStk d FLPSX Fidelity Spartan 500IdxInv FUSEX FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m FKINX FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m FCISX FrankTemp-Mutual Euro Z MEURX FrankTemp-Templeton GlBond A mTPINX FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAdv TGBAX Harbor IntlInstl d HAINX Oakmark EqIncI OAKBX PIMCO AllAssetI PAAIX PIMCO ComRlRStI PCRIX PIMCO LowDrIs PTLDX PIMCO TotRetA m PTTAX PIMCO TotRetAdm b PTRAX PIMCO TotRetIs PTTRX PIMCO TotRetrnD b PTTDX Permanent Portfolio PRPFX T Rowe Price EqtyInc PRFDX T Rowe Price GrowStk PRGFX T Rowe Price HiYield d PRHYX T Rowe Price MidCpGr RPMGX T Rowe Price NewIncome PRCIX Vanguard 500Adml VFIAX Vanguard 500Inv VFINX Vanguard GNMAAdml VFIJX Vanguard InstIdxI VINIX Vanguard InstPlus VIIIX Vanguard InstTStPl VITPX Vanguard MuIntAdml VWIUX Vanguard STGradeAd VFSUX Vanguard Tgtet2025 VTTVX Vanguard TotBdAdml VBTLX Vanguard TotBdInst VBTIX Vanguard TotIntl d VGTSX Vanguard TotStIAdm VTSAX Vanguard TotStIIns VITSX Vanguard TotStIdx VTSMX Vanguard WellsIAdm VWIAX Vanguard Welltn VWELX Vanguard WelltnAdm VWENX Vanguard WndsrII VWNFX Wells Fargo AstAlllcA f EAAFX

19.40 12.69 51.31 35.42 39.63 38.77 32.17 17.46 29.45 29.22 30.03 19.67 19.76 13.65 33.20 112.56 74.48 93.85 40.13 48.47 2.17 2.19 20.60 13.25 13.21 60.65 29.09 12.30 7.12 10.41 11.10 11.10 11.10 11.10 49.72 25.01 36.08 6.77 58.75 9.75 126.16 126.14 11.06 125.34 125.35 31.10 14.25 10.74 13.24 11.03 11.03 14.79 34.36 34.36 34.34 57.18 33.16 57.28 27.86 12.54

+.06 +.02 +.41 +.35 +.46 +.24 +.13 +.08 +.09 +.31 +.11 +.13 +.13 +.04 +.41 -.50 +.73 +1.11 +.05 +.17 +.01 +.01 +.03 +.05 +.05 +.97 +.17 +.08 +.20 +.01 +.01 +.01 +.01 +.64 -.05 +.41 +.05 +.20 +.02 +.46 +.46 -.01 +.46 +.46 +.10 -.03 +.01 +.06 +.02 +.02 +.19 +.10 +.10 +.10 +.17 +.08 +.13 -.02 +.06

4WK

2.05 3.72 3.33 4.54 6.61 0.93

52-WK HIGH LOW

RETURN/RANK 1YR 5YR

+3.1 +1.3 +3.8 +5.6 +6.6 +4.4 +5.8 +2.6 +4.1 +6.1 +2.9 +4.1 +4.1 +1.6 +6.5 +3.9 +6.5 +8.2 +6.2 +4.1 +2.4 +2.4 +5.0 +3.1 +3.1 +7.5 +4.4 +3.6 +5.6 +.9 +1.6 +1.6 +1.7 +1.6 +3.6 +3.3 +7.5 +2.9 +5.5 +1.2 +4.1 +4.1 +.3 +4.1 +4.1 +4.5 +.9 +.7 +3.9 +.9 +.9 +6.6 +4.5 +4.5 +4.5 +1.8 +2.4 +2.5 +3.6 +2.9

+7.2/A +7.8/B +6.4/A +.4/C -3.4/B +3.3/D +3.1/D +6.9/A +3.6/D +1.1/C +9.3/A +2.4/C +2.7/C +6.6/D -5.8/C +1.3/D +7.3/B +11.8/A +8.9/A +6.7/B +3.0/E +2.4/E -3.8/C +4.9/C +5.2/C +1.0/A +5.5/B +7.9/A -.9/B +2.7/B +6.0/D +6.2/D +6.5/D +6.1/D +8.2/A +3.4/C +8.3/B +5.5/C +4.6/C +7.4/C +6.8/B +6.7/B +7.9/B +6.8/B +6.8/B +6.7/B +11.2/B +2.9/B +5.0/B +8.4/A +8.4/A -4.3/C +6.6/B +6.6/B +6.5/B +11.0/A +6.6/A +6.7/A +6.1/B +4.8/

+3.3/B +3.7/E +1.3/C +.4/B +.2/A +1.5/A +1.1/D +2.1/C +.4/C +2.3/A +.7/B +4.8/B +5.0/B +6.7/B -2.0/A -2.8/D +4.0/B +6.4/A +3.5/A +.9/B +3.1/D +2.6/D /A +10.6/A +10.9/A +1.3/A +5.2/A +6.6/A +3.1/A +5.4/A +8.0/A +8.2/A +8.5/A +8.2/A +9.2/A +.1/B +3.0/B +7.1/A +6.4/A +6.7/B +1.0/B +.9/B +6.8/A +1.0/B +1.0/B +1.6/A +5.3/B +4.5/B +2.2/A +6.4/B +6.5/B -2.0/B +1.5/A +1.5/A +1.4/B +6.4/A +4.2/A +4.4/A -.4/B +2.8/

Rank: Fund’s letter grade compared with others in the same performance group; an A indicates fund performed in the top 20 percent; an E, in the bottom 20 percent.

Energy stocks expected to rise 30 percent

SOURCE: FactSet

CHANGE 1MO 3MO 1YR

MutualFunds

Ber ernar n d Condon • AP Bernard

LocalStocks TICKER

0.01 0.06 $ 1,000 min (800) 236-3863

1WK

GROUP, FUND

COMPANY

0.01 0.17 $ 10,000 min (800) 243-1575

FRIDAY YIELD

U.S. BOND INDEXES

* began trading April 8, 2011

MIN INVEST PHONE

YIELD

AVG. TARGET PRICE

EXPECTED P/E RATIO GAIN OVER DIVIDEND BASED ON NEXT 12 MOS. YIELD LAST 12 MOS.

Alpha Natural Resources

ANR

$19.49

$30.13

55%

0.0%

43

Consol Energy

CNX

35.77

51.52

44

1.4

13

QEP Resources

QEP

31.57

43.96

39

0.2

23

Peabody Energy

BTU

35.80

48.98

37

1.0

10

Newfield Exploration

NFX

36.88

49.86

35

0.0

9

Halliburton

HAL

38.24

51.15

34

0.9

12

Cabot Oil & Gas

COG

35.04

45.13

29

0.2

60

Baker Hughes

BHI

52.36

65.88

26

1.2

13

EQT

EQT

52.62

65.97

25

1.6

17

Denbury Resources

DNR

19.64

24.59

25

0.0

16

p p p q

Dow industrials

+0.3% WEEKLY

Nasdaq

+0.4% WEEKLY

LARGE-CAP

S&P 500

+0.3% WEEKLY

SMALL-CAP

Russell 2000

-0.2% WEEKLY

p p

+2.6%

p p

+5.2%

p p

+3.8%

p p

+3.5%

MO +6.3%

YTD MO +13.8%

YTD MO +8.6%

YTD

MO +11.6%

YTD


CMYK âž›

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012

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-Y STOCKS HAVE DIVIDEND yields ranging from less than  PERCENT TO MORE THAN  PERCENT 7HATS A GOOD NUMBER 3HOULD ) SELL THE LOW YIELD ONES AND BUY MORE OF THE HIGH YIELD ONES ˆ M.E., Vail, Colo. )T MAY SEEM THAT THE HIGHER the yield, the better, as it MEANS YOULL COLLECT MORE MONEY FROM YOUR INVESTMENT "UT COM PANIES WITH LOW OR NO DIVIDEND payments can also be terrific HOLDINGS 4HEY MAY HAVE MORE PRESSING USES FOR THEIR EXCESS CASH than paying it out to shareholders. &OR EXAMPLE IF THEY PLOW IT BACK into the company to help it grow, shareholders can also benefit. Meanwhile, among firms that DO PAY DIVIDENDS CHECK OUT JUST HOW QUICKLY THAT DIVIDEND HAS BEEN GROWING !  PERCENT YIELD CAN BE MORE ATTRACTIVE THAN A  percent one — if the company has HIKED ITS DIVIDEND BY AN ANNUAL AVERAGE OF  PERCENT IN RECENT YEARS )F SO YOU MIGHT EXPECT THAT DIVIDEND TO QUADRUPLE OVER A decade, while the latter one, if it GROWS AT JUST  PERCENT ON AVERAGE

MAY NOT EVEN DOUBLE Consider that while both (OME $EPOT AND !FLAC RECENTLY HAD YIELDS OF  PERCENT (OME $EPOTS FIVE YEAR AVERAGE DIVI dend growth rate is 5 percent, AND !FLACS IS  PERCENT /UR NEWSLETTERS HAVE RECOMMENDED both companies.) To see our list of recomMENDED DIVIDEND PAYING stocks, try our “Motley Fool )NCOME )NVESTORv NEWSLETTER FOR FREE

at fool.com/shop/newsletters. *** (OW CAN ) LEARN WHEN VARIOUS COMPANIES EARNINGS REPORTS WILL BE RELEASED ˆ S.C., Saratoga Springs, N.Y. You can always call the comPANY ITSELF !SK FOR THE INVES TOR RELATIONS DEPARTMENT /NLINE

CLICK OVER TO biz.yahoo.com/ research/earncal/today.html, TYPE IN THE FIRMS TICKER SYMBOL

and presto — earnings date info.

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major online brokerages (such as E-Trade, TD Ameritrade, Schwab, Fidelity, etc.) offer customers access to a range of Wall Street reports on loads of stocks. Learn more about choosing the best brokerage at broker.fool.com. s )NDUSTRY INFORMATION 2ESEARCH an industry at websites such as these: virtualpet.com/industry/ rdindex2.htm, bls.gov/iag, and valuationresources.com/ IndustryReport.htm. Simple Google searches can help, too. s (ISTORICAL 0% RATIOS AND OTHER measures. Look these up at sites such as morningstar.com. (ISTORICAL NUMBERS CAN BE VERY HANDY )F A COMPANY YOURE EXAMIN ING HAS A 0% OF  FOR EXAMPLE

AND YOU SEE THAT OVER THE PAST FIVE YEARS ITS 0% HAS USUALLY BEEN around 30, then you might be lookING AT AN ATTRACTIVE PRICE RIGHT NOW (Do more digging, though, to make SURE THE COMPANY ISNT FACING SOME current tough challenges.) s !RTICLES IN CURRENT ISSUES AND ARCHIVES OF FINANCIAL PERIODICALS SUCH as The Wall Street Journal and Fortune. You can read many online for FREE AND YOUR LOCAL NEWSPAPERS BUSI NESS SECTION CAN BE INFORMATIVE TOO

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.ETFLIXS 7ILD 2IDE

! WHILE BACK ) FELL INTO THE whole idea of penny stocks, and ) PUT A LARGE AMOUNT OF MY CASH INTO ONE STOCK )T ENDED UP GOING BANKRUPT AND ) LOST AROUND FOUR GRAND ) SULKED FOR A LONG TIME )T WAS A GOOD LEARNING EXPERIENCE

THOUGH ) REALIZED THAT YOU CANT REALLY EXPECT TO MAKE HUGE PROFITS OVERNIGHT ) GOT INTO PEN nies in the first place by INVESTING IN COMPANIES such as Citigroup, when they were trading for peanuts after THE CREDIT BUBBLE BURST ) MADE GOOD MONEY ON THEIR RECOVERIES — J.G., Mankato, Minn. The Fool Responds: #ITIGROUPS stock price did plunge below a dollar, but with its gobs of assets and money-making businesses, it WAS NEVER A CLASSIC PENNY STOCK The typical penny stock is tied to A RISKY AND UNPROVEN COMPANY

and its stock price is easily manipulated by hypesters who promise FAST HUGE GAINS )TS USUALLY BEST TO AVOID ANY STOCK TRADING FOR LESS than $5 per share. You also made a big mistake by putting many of your eggs in that ONE PENNY STOCK BASKET $IVERSIFI cation can spread out risks.

3HARES OF STREAMING MOVIE PRO VIDER .ETFLIX .ASDAQ .&,8 GOT A STANDING OVATION FROM INVESTORS AFTER THE COMPANY DELIVERED STELLAR FOURTH QUARTER RESULTS 7HAT A RIDE ITS BEEN FOR .ETFLIX SHAREHOLDERS &IRST .ETFLIX WAS THE HOTTEST THING SINCE VOLCANO LAVA Then it tried to shake things up and split off its DVD business, and suddenly the stock was colder than an arctic glacier. Now, as the company ONCE AGAIN IS CONVINCING THE MARKET THAT ITS GROWTH STORY IS FAR FROM OVER

THE SHARES HAVE BEEN ADVANCING )N ITS FOURTH QUARTER .ETFLIX MAN aged $0.73 in per-share earnings on  MILLION IN REVENUE !NALYSTS WERE EXPECTING EARNINGS PER SHARE to come in at just $0.55. More important, the company said that it FINISHED THE QUARTER WITH MORE THAN  MILLION TOTAL GLOBAL SUBSCRIB ers, suggesting that the subscriber DEFECTIONS MAY SIMPLY HAVE BEEN A blip. Domestic subscribers were up  PERCENT YEAR OVER YEAR (AS THE COMPANY FULLY ADDRESSED concerns about encroaching compeTITION FROM (ULU AND !MAZONCOM Not yet. Will its international push END UP PAYING OFF 4HAT REMAINS to be seen. The stock is not without risks, BUT ITS MORE OF A BARGAIN THAN IT was last year, when it traded at far higher prices. Still, anyone buying NOW BETTER BE PREPARED FOR VOLATIL ity. (The Motley Fool owns shares OF !MAZONCOM /UR NEWSLETTER SERVICES HAVE RECOMMENDED BOTH !MAZONCOM AND .ETFLIX

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PAGE 6D


CMYK

VIEWS

SECTION

timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

E

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012

KEVIN BLAUM IN THE ARENA

Cartwright vs. Holden: Perfect storm THE CALM before the storm, tranquility before a quake, the serenity pre-tsunami or a placid lead-up to the April 24 Pennsylvania primary, call it what you will. It’s been eerily quiet since members of the state Legislature botched their once-in-a decade responsibility to redraw Pennsylvania’s legislative and congressional districts. The constitutional dictates of reapportionment require that districts have roughly the same number of inhabitants (one person, one vote), be compact and contiguous (not elongated or gerrymandered) and that they not needlessly divide (dilute) counties and municipalities to achieve political goals. The Legislature’s unimaginative effort to reconfigure state House and Senate districts was unveiled on Dec. 12 and fell far short of the minimal creativity necessary for public acceptance and grudging approval of the state Supreme Court. However, pundits still believed the lopsided map sketched by the crayonpacking, GOP-controlled state Legislature (via a 3-2 Republican reapportionment commission) would eventually be upheld by our (4-3) Republican state Supreme Court. Yet, so obnoxiously sprawling were so many districts, in and out of Luzerne County, that the court rejected the flagrantly partisan plan and sent legislatiors back to the drawing board. This unusual action by the court occurred on Jan. 25 when Chief Justice Ron Castille, a decorated Marine and former district attorney, joined three Democrats on the court to say, “Enough.” Districts will remain as they lay. Sadly, no such tribunal has intervened to halt the even more egregious map, perpetrated by the same Legislature, outlining Pennsylvania’s remaining 18 congressional districts. Gone without a peep are the two influential urban congressional districts firmly planted in Luzerne and Lackawanna counties that for decades dominated at home and in D.C., to the lasting benefit of Northeastern Pennsylvania. The new boundaries of the venerable 10th and 11th districts move farther west and south, to within a few miles of Maryland, cynically unloading thousands of democratic voters to salvage the reelection chances of U.S. Rep. Lou Barletta, R-Hazleton. A similar play against Northeastern Pennsylvania was perpetrated in 2001 when last congressional lines were drawn. Local legislators stood up, spoke out and stopped it. They placed region above party and protected the 10th and the 11th districts. But, ohhh, it’s so quiet now. Regional voters, orphaned by the partisan shift of the 11th congressional district, stretch from Carbondale, Scranton and Moosic in Lackawanna County, through Pittston, Plains Township and Wilkes-Barre in Luzerne, to the municipalities of Tobyhanna and Tunkhannock in surrounding counties. These electoral orphans, thousands of them, are filler to merely round out the 17th Congressional District that included everything from Schuylkill County south to the city of Harrisburg and Dauphin County – the Republican parts of which have now been transferred into the 11th – to save the likes of Barletta. The 17th District is represented by Democratic Congressman Tim Holden of St. Clair in Schuylkill County. Interested observers surmised that the abandoned voters in Northeastern Pennsylvania, without a district to call home, would naturally fall in line, accept the incumbent and for the first time in history do without an influential member of Congress from here. The leadership vacuum in Northeastern Pennsylvania, which allowed tens of thousands of our people to be summarily left on the cutting room floor of redistricting, begs to be filled. That vacuum of leadership has now prompted talented Democrat Matt Cartwright of Moosic, on the Luzerne-Lackawanna county line, to announce his candidacy for the Democratic nomination for Congress in the 17th congressional district. It’s Cartwright vs. Holden. Here it comes. Hold on to your hats; I feel a perfect storm in the air.

By CALVIN WOODWARD and TOM KRISHER

Associated Press

W

ASHINGTON — Michigan has become squirm central for Republican presidential candidates who are trying to explain their opposition to the auto bailout before the big primary in the home of automakers. Their tale is terribly tangled, and President Barack Obama isn’t telling it straight either.

Obama, in taking credit, and Republicans, in assigning blame, have ignored one driving force behind the love-it-or-hate-it bailout: George W. Bush in the waning days of his presidency. Moreover, GOP rivals Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum would have people believe the United Auto Workers union runs General Motors and the government “gave” it away, neither true. The issue is a particularly nettlesome one for Romney, Detroit-born son of a Michigan governor and au-

to company chief executive. His provocatively headlined 2008 article, “Let Detroit Go Bankrupt,” has made for tortured explanations in the campaign for the Feb. 28 primary — though the prescription he preached back then is not wholly at odds with what the government finally did. Then again, Romney is hardly out on a Republican limb. Santorum opposes the bailout on similar See BAILOUT, Page 6E

Obama

Romney

Santorum

Gingrich

MCT ILLUSTRATION

For baby boomers, it’s a new generation of ‘work til you drop’ By JOHN ROGERS Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — When Paula Symons joined the U.S. workforce in 1972, typewriters in her office clacked nonstop, people answered the telephones and the hot new technology revolutionizing communication was the fax machine. Symons, fresh out of college, entered this brave new world thinking she’d do pretty much whatherparents’generationdid: Work for just one or two companies over about 45 years before bidding farewell to co-workers at a retirement party and heading

off into her sunset years with a pension. Forty years into that run, the 60-year-old communications specialist for a Wisconsin-based insurance company has worked more than a half-dozen jobs. She’s been laid off, downsized and seen the pension disappear with only a few thousand dollars accrued when it was frozen. So, five years from the age when people once retired, she laughs when she describes her future plans. “I’ll probably just work until I drop,” she says, a sentiment expressed, with varying degrees of

humor, by numerous members of her age group. Like 78 million other U.S. Baby Boomers, Symons and her husband had the misfortune of approaching retirement age at a time when stock market crashes diminished their 401 (k) nest eggs, companies began eliminating defined benefit pensions in record numbers and previously unimagined technical advances all but eliminated entire job descriptions from travel agent to toworkforfarlessandstillableto ed. Now when you’re looking for telephone operator. At the same time, companies connect to the U.S. market in real a job you’re competing in a world began moving other jobs over- time. “The paradigm has truly shift- See BOOMERS, Page 6E seas,tobefilledbypeoplewilling


K PAGE 2E

➛ S E R V I N G T H E P U B L I C T R U S T S I N C E 18 81

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012

Editorial

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

OUR OPINION: DOUBLE BILLING

Add oversight to court docket

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HE LUZERNE Coun- docket and also to pursue the ty court, which this ongoing goal of restoring pubyear so desperately lic trust and confidence in our wanted to show a new court system.” Last week’s disclosure dashface, instead finds its face dripes any budding confidence. ping with egg. This court, hobbled by the The humiliation stems from the revelation that gross over- fallout from prior employees’ payments were made to King- judicial corruption and chicanston attorney Angela Stevens, ery, has no doubt made many as first reported in Friday’s edi- improvements to its policies tion of The Times Leader. The and procedures. Yet much reattorney double-billed the mains to accomplish. Consider, for instance, that county on dozens of occasions the latest billin 2011 for travel ing fiasco was fees, according to an Inadequate processes analysis of 469 in- must be identified and not detected internally. Rathvoices. er, this newspaBy their own ad- corrected. Oversight per’s veteran mission, the county must be improved. reporter Terrie judge who authoMorgan-Berized the payments, Tina Polachek Gartley, and oth- secker brought it to the judges’ ers never checked the accuracy attentions. Attorney Stevens last week of Stevens’ bills. sent an email stating, “My ofUuuuuuuuugh! Only a month ago, Court of fice will work with the county Common Pleas President to rectify the error.” Her law Judge Thomas F. Burke Jr. partner indicated the firm will drafted a letter to area newspa- review its billing methods. An outside agency certainly pers in which he cautioned the incoming county council mem- should investigate the matter, bers against significantly cut- too. Meanwhile, as it moves forting court funding, lest they damage the court’s ability to do ward, Luzerne County’s court its constitutionally mandated cannot make excuses. It has a job. The letter made reference full complement of judges. It to the court’s continuing “effort has the cash for operations. Inadequate processes must toward cost containment.” Burke also wrote that the be identified and corrected. court staff, including six newly Oversight must be improved. elected judges who joined the Overspending halted. At long last, restore full order bench in January, were diligently working to “maintain its busy to this court and county.

QUOTE OF THE DAY “We made it clear. You are on your honor under penalty of law.” Tina Polachek Gartley The Luzerne County judge explained last week why she had signed court orders approving payments to Kingston attorney Angela Stevens without checking the accuracy of those payment requests. Records show Stevens double-billed the county on dozens of occasions in 2011.

OTHER OPINION: SOCIAL TRENDS

Teen pregnancy on the decline

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EW DATA ON teenage sexual activity suggests important advances in reducing pregnancies and persuading youths to wait longer before they have sex. The Guttmacher Institute, a leading tracker of pregnancy data, says teen pregnancy rates are at their lowest point since 1972 and have declined 42 percent since the peak year of 1990. While the national debate has intensified over federal vs. church doctrine on contraception, most of us can agree on the need for teens to wait until adulthood to become parents. Disagreement continues over educating teens: strict abstinence vs. protected sex. In the real world, however, teens need to hear both messages – at home and in the classroom – if the downward trend in pregnancies is to continue. Data from Guttmacher and other studies indicate that young people – from across racial and ethnic backgrounds – are increasingly getting the message about abstinence and contraception. The national 2008 pregnancy rate, the most recent available, was 67.8 per

1,000 females ages 15 to 19. The national teen abortion rate also dropped to 17.8 per 1,000 females, its lowest rate since 1972. The teen abortion rate marks a 59 percent decline from the peak year of 1988. Still, 31 percent of teen pregnancies ended in abortion in 2008, according to the Guttmacher report. Teenage girls who become parents typically find their life course permanently altered for the worse, while taxpayers ultimately absorb the higher costs of supporting them and their children. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, about a fourth of teen mothers go on welfare within three years of the child’s birth. Children of teen parents have high prospects of growing up in poverty and repeating the cycle. No matter how you look at it, teen pregnancy is a situation to be avoided. So it’s in everyone’s interest to ensure the numbers continue their downward trajectory with a consistent message to teens about the potentially life-altering consequences they face.

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Editorial Board PRASHANT SHITUT President and Interim CEO/Impressions Media MARK E. JONES JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ Vice President/Executive Editor Editorial Page Editor

Don’t count on pundits or history to predict GOP race IT SOMETIMES feels as if the struggle for the Republican presidential nomination has been going on forever, but if you measure the campaign by the number of delegates chosen so far, we’re only about 10 percent done. Much has been made about how the outcome is still far from certain despite what seems like a blizzard of primaries and caucuses, but that’s not unusual. Four years ago, Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton waged a struggle for the Democratic presidential nomination that didn’t end until June 3. Still, it’s worth pausing at this point in the race to consider a few of the lessons we’ve learned so far. Don’t listen to the pundits. At the beginning of this year’s campaign, many political reporters and analysts (including me) listed the leading contenders for the nomination as Mitt Romney, Tim Pawlenty, Michele Bachmann and Rick Perry. Only one of those four is still in the race. Hardly anyone predicted that Rick Santorum and Newt Gingrich would turn out to be serious contenders. This year, the GOP establishment isn’t calling the shots. In earlier elections, Republicans tended to settle early on an established candidate who had endorsements from party elders and who was considered “next in line.” That system gave us Bob Dole in 1996, George W. Bush in 2000 and John McCain in 2008. This year’s establishment candidate is Romney, but he’s having a notably difficult time taming the insur-

COMMENTARY DOYLE MCMANUS gent mood of most of his party’s voters. Historical “rules” are often bogus. Early this year, pundits often pointed out that no modern candidate had ever won the Republican nomination without first winning the South Carolina primary. I’m betting that Gingrich, who won South Carolina by a big margin, will not be the party’s nominee, although, in view of Lesson 1 above, you should believe that forecast at your own risk. It’s worth keeping Lesson 3 in mind as we look forward to the general election, too. Another “rule” is that an incumbent president has never won re-election when the unemployment rate is higher than 7.2 percent. (That was the rate when Ronald Reagan won his second term in 1984.) In November, the unemployment rate is almost certain to be close to 8 percent, which would appear to doom President Obama. But already prognosticators are looking for an out in case the “rule” doesn’t hold this year. More important, they’re saying, might be whether voters feel the economy is improving. By that measure, Obama’s chances look much better. A CBS/New York Times poll released this month found that more voters think the economy is improving than think it is worsening, a sharp reversal from the pessimism that dominated the public mood last year.

The thing about election truisms is that they hold only until they don’t. After this year, South Carolina probably won’t figure strongly into the common wisdom about primaries. But you can be certain that some other piece of political wisdom will replace it, and that we’ll be looking to Florida or Michigan or Ohio as the next oracle state. More isn’t necessarily better, at least when it comes to debates. Wednesday’s GOP debate in Arizona was the 20th of the campaign. Never before have we seen so many debates in such a concentrated period – six in January alone. Veteran campaign managers from both political parties have been quietly meeting over the last few weeks to try to organize a more orderly debate calendar, and less of a free-for-all, for the 2016 campaign. Money is the mother’s milk of politics, an old lesson in a new form. The most important man in the Republican race today might be Sheldon Adelson, the Las Vegas casino tycoon who has bankrolled Gingrich’s ostensibly independent “super PAC.” In a campaign run under the old rules, with limits on donations, Gingrich would have to either drop out of the race at this point or go deeply into debt to stay competitive. This year, if Adelson and his family continue their support – which at last accounting stood at $11 million, with hints that more could soon follow – the former speaker of the House can stay in the race no matter what the voters say. Doyle McManus is a columnist for The Los Angeles Times. Readers may send him email at doyle.mcmanus@latimes.com.

New-housing construction taking an upward turn THE LONG downward slide in housing construction might be coming to an end. While the rate of new building remains well below pre-recession levels, construction permits for new housing increased slowly, but steadily, most of last year. Not only is the housing market improving, it also is changing, with fewer singlefamily homes being built, but more apartment buildings. Prior to the housing collapse, five to six times more single-family homes were built annually than apartment buildings. Today the ratio is about three to one. If the trend continues, the housing market might be taking a radically different, high-rise shape. Housing has been a major drag on the economy since it collapsed. From early 2006, when the market was at its peak, to June 2009, when the recession officially ended, the pace of housing construction fell to a quarter of its previous rate. In 2009, the number of new single-family homes completed dropped from an annual high of 1.9 million in 2006 to a half million. For all housing units, including singlefamily and multi-unit dwellings, such as apartment buildings, the fall was similarly dramatic – from 2.2 million to 0.8 million. Trends in housing construction are reflected by the interplay between new building permits and completed housing units. The number of permits issued approximates the number of new homes planned for the future. But not all permits lead to completed houses. Even in the best of

COMMENTARY POLINA VLASENKO times, some buildings never get started, while construction on others is delayed. When a housing market is booming, the number of permits is slightly above the number of units completed each month. This indicates confidence in future demand for new homes. The picture is different in a crisis. From mid-2006 to the end of 2009, applications for building permits dropped precipitously. Since some construction already was under way when housing collapsed, it made sense to complete many of those buildings. As a result, the number of permits issued fell below the number of housing units completed. This is a sign that builders are cutting back on planned construction, a symptom of an oversupply in the market. The slide in home building moderated at the end of the recession, but it has not yet recovered. Now the tide seems to be turning. As of the end of last year, the number of housing units completed no longer exceeds the number of permits issued. Builders are applying for new permits and completing projects at about the same rate. This rate is much lower today than it was prior to the recession, but we are no longer in crisis mode. Housing construction finally has started to add to the overall growth in output – another sign of normalcy. New residential investment contributed positively, if mod-

estly, to economic growth during the last three quarters of 2011. We have not seen growth of this kind since 2005. Most of the increase in housing permits came from the construction of new apartment buildings. The number of new permits for multi-unit structures has doubled since mid-2009, and permits exceed completions by a healthy margin. Nevertheless, apartments, like single-family homes, are still being built at a lower rate than prior to the recession, with about 150,000 multiunit buildings completed last year, compared to 280,000 units in 2006. By contrast, the much larger singlefamily segment of the housing market still hasn’t stabilized much. The number of new permits for single-family homes has stayed virtually constant since mid-2009, and the number of homes completed still slightly exceeds permits. This implies that builders are planning to build even fewer houses than they’re building now. Part of the reason is the large number of single-family homes already on the market. In December 2011, 2.1 million single-family homes were for sale – only slightly fewer than the 2.2 million available during the boom year of 2005. Back then, business was brisk. The demand today is much lower. Housing construction might have turned the corner, but the new road appears headed for a high-rise apartment complex, not a neighborhood of neatly trimmed lawns. Polina Vlasenko is a research fellow at the American Institute for Economic Research, 250 Division St., Great Barrington, MA 01230; website: www.aier.org.


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Santorum falls victim to his own imprudence YOU’VE likely heard by now that the presidential election might pivot on the unlikely “controversy” of

birth control. This is the latest trope to evolve from a campaign that already is two years too long. A conspiracy-minded person might imagine that this faux battle over reproductive rights was designed to distract from other more pressing concerns and to demonize – or would that be angelize? – Republicans who, we’re also told, want to turn back the clock to the 1950s. But such a theory would require that Democrats be shrewder than is humanly possible, no? The Obama administration might have wished to provide insurance coverage for contraception – a wish broadly embraced by most Americans – but the president couldn’t have predicted how the Catholic bishops would react, or that entire swaths of religious Americans would band together to oppose him. He was just lucky. What manna to have the nation riveted on birth control in these economically challenging times. What lucre to have women on his side against those timewarped white guys who want to keep their women pregnant and confined to quarters. What a cherry on top that the two Republican front-runners look like they just stepped out of a large TV cabinet, circa 1957 – slicked-back hair and sweater vest provided by central casting. The problem, as with so many convenient narratives, is that it ain’t quite so. The leading role in this narrative is Rick Santorum, the surger in chief, who is now being characterized as a Neanderthal throwback for his personal belief that man should not interfere in the natural cycle of life, no matter how inconvenient the results. This includes not only opposition to abortion and embryonic stem-cell research, but also to artificial birth control. Mitt Romney, though he falls into the pro-life camp on the first two issues, has expressed views on contraception that any 21st-century Epicurus could embrace: “It’s (contraception’s) working just fine. Just leave it alone.” It is easy to pound Santorum, and no one makes it easier than Santorum himself. Never mind that he invokes Satan, claiming that the “Father of Lies” has his sights on the United States, as Santorum did in 2008 at Ave Maria University in Florida. He has never met a question he wouldn’t answer or a combatant he wouldn’t engage. Thus, when a reporter asks whether he thinks states should be able

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COMMENTARY KATHLEEN PARKER to ban birth control, Santorum says yes, but ... HEADLINE!!! “Santorum says states should be able to ban birth control!!!” Except that’s not what he meant, nor is it what he intends. Santorum was expressing a legal opinion, and his answer was within the context of whether states have any regulatory jurisdiction over the question. Otherwise, he has said repeatedly that he does not support banning contraceptives and that he would oppose any such efforts. Moreover, as a U.S. senator, Santorum voted to fund contraception through two international health programs that he aggressively pushed – the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. Contraception was incorporated as part of prevention. This should come as no surprise if one understands Santorum’s worldview. Everything stems from his allegiance to the Catholic Church’s teachings that every human life has equal value and dignity. The church’s objection to birth control is based on concerns that sex without consequences would lead to men reducing women “to being a mere instrument for the satisfaction of (their) own desires,” as well as abuse of power by public authorities and a false sense of autonomy. Within that framework, everything Santorum says and does makes sense, even if one doesn’t agree. When he says that he doesn’t think the government should fund prenatal testing because it leads to abortion, this is emotional Santorum, father of a disabled child and another who died hours after a premature birth. In both instances, many doctors would have recommended abortion, but Santorum believes that those lives, no matter how challenging, have intrinsic value. Though Santorum’s views are certainly controversial, his biggest problem isn’t that he is out of step with mainstream America. His biggest problem is that he lacks prudence in picking his battles and his words. The American people are loath to elect a preacher or a prophet to lead them out of the desert of unemployment. And they are justified in worrying how such imprudence might translate in areas of far graver concern than whether Santorum doesn’t personally practice birth control. Kathleen Parker’s email address is kathleenparker@washpost.com.

W hen the way forward becomes unclear, let instinct be your guide.

It’s sad when celebrity deaths are hot topics WHITNEY Houston is finally at peace. Which is far different than how she was treated for the six days after she died. During that time, Houston was hailed as an amazing performer. She was also dissected, analyzed, criticized and scrutinized by a steady parade of former addicts, therapists, doctors – even political commentators such as Bill O’Reilly, who claimed to have said “a prayer” when he heard about Houston dying, then proceeded to scream to the country, “Whitney Houston killed herself!” Every news program, talk show, radio station and blog weighed in on Houston, it seemed. And every five seconds, some “expert” opinion was offered. What most of these people had in common – besides an unhealthy need to jump in front of a microphone – is that they didn’t know Houston personally. Maybe they met her a few times. Maybe they had a conversation. Maybe not even that. It didn’t stop them from telling national TV audiences what she must have been thinking, or what motivated her alleged early drinks at a

COMMENTARY MITCH ALBOM hotel or why she wound up dead in a bathtub at age 48. I don’t know about you, but when my time comes, I really don’t want anyone I didn’t call family explaining my demise. Don’t we all deserve that? Apparently not when you are well-known in this country. Instead you get actor Daniel Baldwin (one question: Why?) telling CNN: “I don’t think she was applying herself and taking action in order to maintain her sobriety.” You get former addict and Motley Crue bassist Nikki Sixx, who admitted he didn’t know Houston, criticizing her doctors. You get O’Reilly, who told a Fox morning program: “This is ridiculous. Whitney Houston killed herself. ... You don’t spend $100 million on (drugs) not wanting to kill yourself. So why aren’t we telling the truth to young people in America?” Well, first of all, many addicts, despite their troubles, don’t want to kill themselves. Secondly, what truth are we not telling young people in America? For goodness’ sake. We’ve had entertainers dying as a result of substance abuse for as long as anyone in this

country can remember. Consider a brief list of names: Judy Garland, Billie Holiday, Marilyn Monroe, Dinah Washington, Lenny Bruce, Jim Morrison, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Elvis Presley, Kurt Cobain, John Belushi, Michael Jackson, Amy Winehouse. What truth are we not telling young people? If you don’t know that alcohol and drugs can lead to death by this point, you are simply choosing not to pay attention. On the other hand, we might want to check our own addiction – to jumping to conclusions while wringing every last drop out of famous people’s misfortune. The official coroner’s report on Houston won’t be available for weeks. Do you think anyone in this business would wait for that? Weeks? They’ll be on to something else by then. The time to strike was now! So talk show bookers frantically dialed self-help authors or performers with drug experience, not because they cared about Whitney Houston, but because she was a hot topic. So was the debate over whether hers was a worthy death. Many argued over New Jersey’s decision to fly flags at half-staff for Houston. Did anyone consider, before spewing all this vitriol, that a woman perished here? Sure, it

Here’s what I think about Whitney Houston – not that it matters. I think a young woman died, and it’s heartbreaking. And I hope those who love her – and truly knew her – can find comfort. Everything else is beside the point. might have been related to drugs and alcohol. But how many less famous Americans die every day due to what they drank, the foods they ate, what they smoked or the stress they kept piling on their bodies? Substance abuse didn’t begin with the woman who sang “I Will Always Love You.” Here’s what I think about Whitney Houston – not that it matters. I think a young woman died, and it’s heartbreaking. And I hope those who love her – and truly knew her – can find comfort. Everything else is beside the point. The truth is, in the media business, it’s amazing how often we claim to be caring about the welfare of others, when we are really just serving our own purpose. Mitch Albom is a columnist for the Detroit Free Press. Readers may write to him at: Detroit Free Press, 600 W. Fort St., Detroit, MI 48226, or via email at malbom@freepress.com.

LETTERS FROM READERS

Generous givers help spread cheer

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e appreciate the community’s response to the needs of others during the holiday season. Even in the midst of an economic downturn and ongoing recovery from a recent flood, the Wyoming Valley was again very generous. Without the help of donors and volunteers, we couldn’t have spread so much holiday cheer. Volunteers gave more than 7,000 hours to The Salvation Army. They took applications for toys and food in October. They collected and packed “Angel Tree” and Marine Corps Toys for Tots gifts for children. Businesses and organizations adopted families and purchased gifts and food. Residents of the Kirby Family House for homeless families enjoyed gifts and parties sponsored by the Wilkes-Barre Kiwanis Club, Wilkes University’s Zebra Communi-

MOUNTAIN LAURELS Mountain Laurels is a regular series of letters from readers conveying thanks to individuals or groups for their support, help or kindness.

cations club as well as other groups. Volunteers visited 2,500 people in local care facilities, offering cheer and companionship. Volunteers also rang bells at the kettles helping us reach our Red Kettle Campaign goal! Because of so many donors and volunteers, 1,043 families received food vouchers (up from 978 in 2010, 865 in 2009, 750 in 2008 and 650 in 2007) for their Christmas dinners; 1,836 children received Christmas gifts; and a total of 3,793 people were served. This community’s residents should be commended for their desire to help make the holiday season a wonderful time for someone in need, even while they, too, might be struggling. Together, we have made a difference. May God bless you

for caring about others! Capt. Doug Richwine and Capt. Patty Richwine Corps commanding officers The Salvation Army Wilkes-Barre

A kind deed helps restore his spirits

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his story involves an unbelievable act of kindness. I was at church and a woman with whom I am acquainted because I’m familiar with her children slid into the seat next to me. She handed me an envelope. She said someone wanted me to have it, then she left. After the service, I read the handwritten letter. It said: Dear Dan, I lost my son in 1976. I still feel the pain. With God’s help you will

move on, in time. Please take this small token and take your wife out to dinner; you could both use a NIGHT OUT. There were two $50 bills in the envelope. The letter was not signed. Although a trespassing summons recently filed against me was, in my opinion, the worst of humanity, this lifted my spirits about people and how kind they can be. Dan Madry Wright Township

Sorvinos grateful for film’s support

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ith the first screening of our film, “The Trouble with Cali,” at the Sedona International Film Festival in Arizona last week, we wanted to extend our sincere thanks to our friends in Scranton and all of Lackawanna County for your support and patience. While it took longer than we had hoped to finish “Cali,” we are pleased with the way it

turned out and look forward to audience response. We are planning to screen the film in Scranton in the near future. Meanwhile, we will continue to vigorously market “The Trouble with Cali.”

ough beefing about the alleged proposed tax increase to fund the full-time police force, wake up and see the value in it. Again, thank you to all who came to our aid. Joe Middleton and Molly Middleton Laflin

Amanda, Michael, Mira and Paul Sorvino

Response to fire prompt in Laflin

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e offer our heartfelt gratitude to the three branches of the Laflin emergency services operation. We recently had a fire at our residence; fortunately it turned out to be only minor. The quick response of emergency organizations was a blessing. Their professionalism was superb. After they said things were under control and out, they stayed awhile and continued to make sure that we were all right and not in need of further assistance. To those people in the bor-

Reader praises Paterno column

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f an award exists for a newspaper staff member who composes a masterpiece of truth, compassion and grace with integrity, Bill O’Boyle’s column (“Paterno: Penn State to the end”) deserves it! Writing such as this not only should make the board of trustees’ heads hang in shame, but also should be placed in the archives of humanity. Bill, I wish I could shake your hand. Dr. A.P. Sindoni Dallas


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LETTERS FROM READERS

Ruling penalizes first responders

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n October 2011, Pennsylvania dealt a significant blow to the rights of all first responders. In Williams v. GEICO, the state Supreme Court ruled that the insurance giant GEICO (which is owned by Warren Buffet’s Berkshire Hathaway) does not have to pay underinsured motorist benefits to an injured police officer. Trooper Robert Williams of the Pennsylvania State Police was permanently injured while working. The defendant who caused Officer Williams’ injuries carried only minimal insurance coverage (the minimal limit in Pennsylvania is $15,000). The police cruiser that Williams drove, which is owned by the state police, did not carry underinsured motorist benefits, which are benefits designed to pay for damages when the defendant does not have enough insurance. Williams then sought underinsured motorist benefits on his personal automobile insurance policy with GEICO. GEICO insured Williams for a significant period of time before his collision and collected premiums from him every month for underinsured motorist benefits. However, when Williams submitted his claim, GEICO denied it relying on what is called the “regular use” exclusion. Very simply, GEICO and nearly all insurance companies have a provision stating that if there is a motor vehicle that you “regularly use” but which is

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not insured under the policy, there is no coverage. GEICO contended – and the Supreme Court agreed – that Williams’ cruiser fit into this exclusion. What the ruling effectively did is leave all first responders without any underinsured motorist coverage on their personal automobile policies in the event they are injured. Police cruisers, fire trucks and ambulances would all fall under the “regular use” exclusion, according to the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. Even if the first responder used a different cruiser, fire truck or ambulance every day, the “regular use” exclusion still would apply. This ruling can, and will, have a devastating effect on the lives of thousands of first responders across the state. The Supreme Court disregarded the argument that first responders should be viewed in a special classification for underinsured motorist benefits. These brave men and women take extraordinary risks in protecting and helping people, which both the insurance industry and the Supreme Court apparently do not feel is important. The Legislature is now the only hope for these men and

women. Please call, write or email your state legislator and urge him or her to craft legislation that does away with the “regular use” exclusion for first responders. The job these men and women do is simply too vital to be disregarded by insurance giants such as GEICO! Ed Ciarimboli Kingston

Want birth control? Then pay for it

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here are several points to consider in the recent birth control blowup. Having the right to buy something does not give anyone the right to compel other people to pay for it. As an example, most Americans have the right to buy firearms. But we cannot tell our employers to pay for the firearms, through insurance or other means. How offended would practicing Orthodox Jews or Muslims be if we forced them to provide pork in the cafeteria because an employee there was not orthodox? And now, for Obama’s new fig leaf: Religious institutions will

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hen I was 3, I believed in the American dream. Forty-nine years later, I still do. When President Obama said in his most recent State of the Union address that our economy needs to make more products stamped “Made in the USA,” I knew he was looking out for folks such as me. Instead of an economy based on outsourcing, the president proposed creating more good jobs right here, so our small businesses and their workers can again produce goods the rest of the world buys. When I was 3, my grandmother first took me with her to vote. She explained to me: “If you believe in the basic American promise and if you work hard, you can do well enough to buy a home, eat good food, send your kids to college and put something away to retire one day.” Back in the day, that was

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not be required to cover contraceptives in their insurance policies, but the insurance company must provide it anyway. What type of idiocy is this? Who is paying the premium for this insurance? So who is really paying for the contraception? It should also be noted that Catholicism is not the only religion that is opposed to abortion and contraception. Many of the comments that I have seen on the Internet pretend that all religious opposition only comes from Catholic, and those comments serve to expose the anti-Catholic bias of the writers. If you don’t want to work for an employer who won’t pay for your contraceptives, then you don’t have to; get another job. Or if you like that employer so much, pay for your own contraceptives. Contraceptives are much cheaper than cigarettes (which are bought by the individual who wants them). If you want a doctor without morals or scruples, look around until you find one. You might want to be careful what you ask for. The best example of a doctor without scruples recently is Kermit Gosnell. If you don’t know who he is, conduct a Google search for him. The Catholic Church is the largest provider of health care to HIV-positive patients over

true. We used to make things in this country. However, times have changed. In the last 30 years middle-class Americans saw hard work stop paying dividends in our communities. This didn’t happen overnight. Good jobs and manufacturing began leaving our shores, and companies were actually rewarded with tax breaks for doing it. Time and time again everyone in Northeastern Pennsylvania has seen this. However, with this administration and President Obama leading the way, I see the light at the end of this tunnel. President Obama made the decisive call to rescue America’s carmakers from going under water. He saved an icon of American manufacturing and 1.4 million jobs up and down the supply chain. We have come a long way in the last three years. After losing 8 million jobs in the recession, the private sector has added 3.2 million jobs over 22 consecutive months of growth. As the president reminded us, the work does not stop here. He’s getting tough on trade enforcement so American companies can compete on an even footing. These are important steps. We need to continue to move forward, united. Roxanne Pauline Taylor

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Shale exploration holds promise for Pennsylvania and the country IN RECENT years there has been a movement by many people to “think globally, act locally” in regard to preserving our planet by acting in a responsible fashion in our own backyards. The theory goes that if the majority of us act on this sensible advice, it will make a world of difference for the environment and for future generations. We in Northeastern Pennsylvania have the opportunity to do just that by helping to provide the nation with an energy source that has one-third of the carbon footprint of coal and about half that of oil. Natural gas is clean-burning and can provide power for electrical generators, bus and truck fleets and, eventually, automobiles. With an estimated 50-year supply of natural gas about 5,000 feet beneath much of our region, we can help the country become less dependent on foreign oil. These pockets of natural gas also offer economic development opportunities that have not been seen in our region for years. Clearly, those people with gas reserves on their land are the first to benefit. Many of them have

might occur in the future. Most major and reputable energy companies build some of these future costs into their calculations for doing business. That is the only way they can survive major cleanup costs in mitigation that occasionally, but inevitably, occur. Perhaps greater assurances are needed. In the shorter run, reasonable state taxes and fees levied upon the natural gas and oil industries can help this situation in several ways. Fees and taxes can be used to establish a fund that will be available for environmental cleanup operations if it becomes necessary. Secondly, additional revenue from these taxes and fees also can support the repairs and expansion of roadways, bridges and other infrastructure that are impacted naturally by the exploration and transportation process in the counties where exploration is taking place and in neighboring areas that are similarly impacted by the process. Fees and taxes, which invariably are passed along to the consumer, also serve another purpose – they raise the price of natural gas, thereby reducing the demand for it. This factor alone tends to conserve energy and makes the price of alternative energy sources more attractive.

It is important that Pennsylvania’s taxes and fees be imposed in a manner that allows the producers in our state to remain competitive with gas companies in other states. If these fees and taxes become onerous, the gas-related companies and the enterprises that support them will move their operations to other states. Northeastern Pennsylvania can provide a source of energy that is not only cleaner, but also provides some domestic security for more than 300 million Americans. We should commit ourselves to the careful and thoughtfully regulated recovery and transportation of natural gas, while at the same time insisting that all involved in the extraction process share the risk. When added to the work that reputable companies are undertaking to upgrade local roads and restore the drilling terrain to its previous state, these policies and procedures will help to ensure that our region and our country benefit from a clean-burning energy source for half a century. We can indeed think globally, and both act and benefit locally. Michael A. MacDowell is president of Misericordia University in Dallas Township.

LETTERS FROM READERS

n regard to the Susan G. Komen Foundation’s reversal of its decision to de-fund Planned Parenthood: According to Planned Parenthood’s website, the organization does not provide mammograms, biopsies or ultrasounds. It only provides clinical breast exams, and it makes referrals for these other services as needed. Komen’s money would be spent more wisely by giving grants to non-abortion medical centers where all necessary medical resources would be available. The money could be held and used on an asneeded basis for those women

just a blob of tissue, as abortion facilities apparently would like women to believe. From conception, it is a human being made by God. Despite the current law, no one has “the right” to destroy that.

SEND US YOUR OPINION Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification. Letters should be no more than 250 words. We reserve the right to edit and limit writers to one published letter every 30 days. • Email: mailbag@timesleader.com • Fax: 570-829-5537 • Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., WilkesBarre, PA 1871 1

without insurance or for those who cannot afford the services. The Komen Foundation says that the money given to Planned Parenthood is to be strictly used for breast cancer screenings and education. This is a problem, because it frees up other Planned Parenthood money that can then be used to further its abortion business, which is its biggest money maker.

Sherrie Contardi Lehman Township

In a Feb. 8 letter to the editor, Sue Haas defends Komen’s decision to re-fund Planned Parenthood. She writes of “the power of women” and the threat to their reproductive rights. Women certainly need rights, but when it involves taking the life of another human being, it is called murder. In the earliest stages of pregnancy, a perfectly formed human body can be seen on an ultrasound. It’s not

Website offers info on charities

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n a recent letter to the editor, the writer suggested learning how your donation to a charity is used. There is a valuable source online called Charity Navigator.

Just go to its website: www.charitynavigator.org. It will give you all you need to know about most any charity in the United States. Disposable income is becoming a scarce commodity. We should use it wisely even when supporting those in need. Wes Eustice Lakeland, Fla.

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hy is Wilkes-Barre Township Mayor Carl Kuren still seemingly defending John Yuknavich, who pleaded

guilty to simple assault? Where is the amended code of conduct for employees from years ago, therefore making new policy moot? Assistant fire chief Jim Youkoski goes to work with the public works department every day, then responds to a fire if necessary. Why can’t Yuknavich? In my opinion, Kuren is the most dysfunctional mayor Wilkes-Barre Township has ever had. Voters, your big mistake was not electing John “Red” Bryan for mayor. I’ll bet you wish he was now, don’t you? Joseph Naperkowski Wilkes-Barre

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our beautiful region must be maintained is how to ensure that extraction of natural gas does not harm the very environment we seek to conserve. MICHAEL A. The fact of the matter is that no enerMACDOWELL gy source is without risk. The extraction and transportation of petroleumbased products from the earth always operated family farms for generations has presented problems to those living with little wealth to show for their close to the source of that energy. The efforts. These residents deserve the BP oil spill and the Exxon Valdez are opportunities that gas leases bring. catastrophic reminders of this fact, as It is not only the lease holders, though, that benefit from the economic were the nuclear accidents at the Fukushima Daiichi reactors in Japan and boost of natural gas exploration. Small businesses are springing up throughout the incidents at Chernobyl in Ukraine the Northeast to serve not only the gas and Pennsylvania’s Three Mile Island. The risk calculus with which any indusindustry directly, but also the many needs that a growing regional economy trialized society must cope presents difficult choices. requires. Fencing firms, automobile How do we ensure that our region service facilities, retail operations and will be minimally exposed to risk from other professionals, such as accountants, have witnessed significant growth the growth of natural gas extraction and its various spin-offs? That is the in the gas region and will continue to $64,000 question. In the long run, the do so. Local college graduates now are answer lies in rethinking our energy able to find good-paying jobs and remain here rather than seek employment policy. The United States and most states, including Pennsylvania, have elsewhere. made a political, economic and social Of course, those who think locally must also be concerned with the impact decision to keep the price of energy drilling and transportation will have on below its real cost. The price we pay for energy today does not take into considour environment. The immediate coneration the cost to the environment that cern for those of us who believe that


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grounds. A look at some of the persistent claims about the bailout and how they compare with the facts: ••• ROMNEY: “If General Motors, Ford and Chrysler get the bailout that their chief executives asked for yesterday, you can kiss the American automotive industry goodbye. It won’t go overnight, but its demise will be virtually guaranteed.” — Nov. 18, 2008, New York Times op-ed article. SANTORUM: “If they’d have gone through the orderly bankruptcy process, gone through a structured bankruptcy, they’d have come out in the same place, only we would have kept the integrity of the bankruptcy process without the government putting its fingers into it.” — June13 New Hampshire debate. THE FACTS: No one can know what would have happened absent the bailout. But it’s a distinctly minority view that the private sector, raked then by the financial crisis, would have nursed Detroit back to health without a massive infusion of federal aid. In late 2008, banks weren’t making many loans, much less to companies that were out of cash. The Bush administration moved fast because it saw no time to let an orderly bankruptcy unfold, even if banks had the money and the will to steer automakers through the process. Romney’s grim prognosis, before GM and Chrysler took the

BOOMERS Continued from Page 1E

wherethecompetitionisn’tjustthe guydownthestreet,buttheguysitting in a cafe in Hong Kong or Mumbai,” says Bill Vick, a Dallasbased executive recruiter who started BoomersNextStep.com in an effort to help Baby Boomers who want to stay in the workforce. Not only has the paradigm shifted, but as it has the generation whose mantra used to be, “Don’t

aid, is in stark contrast with the turnaround that followed. Last week GM reported a record profit for 2011, two years after the company’s near-collapse, and said 47,500 union workers will get $7,000 profit-sharing checks, the most ever. Despite the bold headline — now making headlines of its own — Romney laid out some nuanced ideas. He called for the government to guarantee post-bankruptcy financing and to back up warranties so people would not be afraid to buy cars from the fragile companies. And he proposed a fivefold increase in federal research spending on energy. ••• OBAMA: “On the day I took office, our auto industry was on the verge of collapse. Some even said we should let it die. With a million jobs at stake, I refused to let that happen. In exchange for help, we demanded responsibility. We got workers and automakers to settle their differences. We got the industry to retool and restructure. Today, General Motors is back on top as the world’s No. 1 automaker. Chrysler has grown faster in the U.S. than any major car company. Ford is investing billions in U.S. plants and factories. And together, the entire industry added nearly 160,000 jobs. We bet on American workers. We bet on American ingenuity. And tonight, the American auto industry is back.” — Jan. 24 State of the Union speech. THE FACTS: Lost in Obama’s victory lap was the fact that Bush passed him the baton. Pushing against a reluctant Congress, Bush steered $17.4 biltrust anyone over 30,” finds itself now being looked on with distrust by younger Generation X managerswhoquestionwhetherboomers havethehigh-techskillsoreventhe stamina to do what needs to be done. “I always have the feeling that I have to prove my value all the time. That I’m not some old relic who doesn’t understand social media or can’t learn some new technique,” saysSymons,whoisactiveonTwitter, Facebook, loves every new time-saving software app that comes down the pike and laughs at

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lion in emergency loans to GM and Chrysler in his final weeks in office, on condition they shrink debt, negotiate wage and benefit cuts with workers and submit plans to achieve “long-term viability, international competitiveness and energy efficiency.” The new Obama administration followed with more than $60 billion in aid, more expansive requirements and hands-on management of the crisis. With hundreds of thousands of jobs at stake, ideology took a back seat. “Sometimes circumstances get in the way of philosophy,” Bush said in a speech this month. “I didn’t want there to be 21 percent unemployment.” Steven Rattner, who led Obama’s auto task force, credited Bush with giving his team “a little breathing room” to restructure the companies and for providing a framework of “expected sacrifices that paved the way for our demands for give-ups from the stakeholders.” Obama’s account of the automakers’ recovery is true enough but skips key points. For one, “we” had nothing to do with Ford, which declined a bailout and climbed back on its own. Second, viewers of the speech might not know that Chrysler is an Italian-owned company now. At most, some were willing to take that risk by having automakers try to restructure in bankruptcy without a bailout. It’s a course few believed would work in 2008. But bankruptcy is intended as a second chance, not an execution. It’s the path Obama followed, though with massive federal aid that sweetened the odds. the idea of ever sending another fax. “Ahh, that’s just so archaic,” she says. Meanwhile, as companies have downsized, boomers have been hurt to some degree by their own sheer numbers, says Ed Lawler of the University of Southern California’s Marshall School of Business. The oldest ones, Lawler says, aren’t retiring, and more and more the youngest members of the generation ahead of them aren’t either. It’s no longer uncommon, he says, for people to work until 70.

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THE TIMES LEADER

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012

No idle moments for Scotty By JON BREAM Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

Down memory lane with a legendary figure from our comic history By MARY THERESE BIEBEL mbiebel@timesleader.com

Fisher

IF YOU GO

See CARTOONIST, Page 4F

AMANDA HRYCYNA/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

What: “The Life and Work of Ham Fisher” dinner and talk When: 6 p.m. Wednesday Where: Westmoreland Club, 59 S. Franklin St., WilkesBarre Tickets: $75 More info: 823-6244

Look up “palooka” in Webster’s dictionary and you’ll see it means “a clumsy or oafish fellow, especially an inept athlete.” Listen to Marlon Brando’s character in the iconic movie “On the Waterfront” as he complains about his “one-way ticket to Palookaville,” and you know he considers himself a loser. But if you think about the heavyweight champion who starred for more than 50 years in a comic strip created by Wilkes-Barre native Hammond Edward “Ham” Fisher, you’ll realize he’s a nobler, heroic kind of Palooka, one who also was a sort of everyday Joe. The legendary Palooka, and his creator, will be commemorated during a “Stars of the Valley” dinner and talk on “The Life and Work of Ham Fisher,” set for 6 p.m. Wednesday at the Westmoreland Club in Wilkes-Barre. The event is sponsored by the Luzerne

MINNEAPOLIS — Scotty McCreery had just come home from school with an assignment: write essays for college applications. Wait a minute. Isn’t he the reigning American Idol? Isn’t he about to go on tour with Brad Paisley? The high-school senior plans to be on campus in the fall. Last month, he was putting the finishing touches on applications for four or five schools. He’s committed to his career but determined to go to college part time, too. “College is important to me. Education is important to me. You never know how far “One of my your job can sayings from take you,” said McCreery, my baseball who plans to days is ‘Go big study marketing or commuor go home.’” nications — — Scotty McCreery something that will help in his profession. “Being aggressive is something that needs to happen,” McCreery said from his family home in Garner, N.C., just south of Raleigh. “Even when I was on the show, I remember talking to the producers saying that I want my album to come out quickly because I don’t want the people forgetting about me. I’m going to work my tail off. “One of my sayings from my baseball days is ‘Go big or go home.’ We want to go big. Right now, we’re just trying to get out there and make sure people know we’re still around.” The people have certainly responded. McCreery’s album, “Clear as Day,” established two records: the first country newcomer and the youngest male to debut at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 chart. “That was something different,” McCreery said in his typically modest, aw-shucks way. “I was extremely humbled by it, but we were ecstatic. When I heard the news, I was running all around the house.” Neither of McCreery’s singles — “I Love You This Big” and “The Trouble With Girls” — has set country radio on fire, but he’s selling albums like a big-name star. In fact, he’s outselling the latest by “Idol” hitmakers Kelly Clarkson and Chris Daughtry. Of course, not everybody has warmed to the languid Southern crooner with the strikingly deep voice, Mad-magazine face and goofy eyebrow-raising gestures. Entertainment Weekly magazine named “Clear as Day” one of the five worst albums of 2011. “Is that so?” McCreery said the day after the magazine came out. “There you go. You can’t win ’em all. Maybe they’re R&B fans or something. You can’t please everybody.” He let the high-profile cheap shot roll off him like NFL quarterback Drew Brees dodging would-be sackers. He’s heard the cracks about looking like Mad mascot Alfred E. Neuman since he was a kid. It’s See SCOTTY, Page 4F

Pick a hot date off the shelves at the Pittston Library By SARA POKORNY spokorny@timesleader.com

Any date would be so much easier without any nervousness or awkward silences. Without the waiting afterward for a phone call or the fretting over what to wear for a dinner out. The Pittston Memorial Library knows this and is trying to make the process easier still, offering the opportunity for a date in which any and all judgments are passed by you and in which you (and only you) determine wheth-

er or not love might be in the air. The library, you might have guessed, is inviting readers to have “A Blind Date with a Book.” “We want people to explore new authors and subjects,” Patricia Joyce of children’s services at the library said. “Some people say, ‘Oh, I only read fiction,’ yet they never gave a non-fiction book a chance.” Library staffers have filled a basket, kept at the front desk, with several books wrapped in newspaper and available for

checkout. All you have to do is take a chance. Will your mystery date charm you? Intrigue you? Maybe even make you cry? The books are selected at random from library shelves and cover fiction, non-fiction and youngadult genres, so anything is possible. “We had a woman that was waiting here for her bus decide to randomly pick one up and check it out,” Joyce said. “Well, she started reading it

while she was here and fell in love with it. She grabbed a coffee and sat down and just kept reading.” Patrons can try for a “love connection” until April 10, which is in National Library Week. Each selection can be taken out for up to three weeks. Upon return, the reader can fill out the “Rate Your Date” slip, which not only allows them to say what they will about it (on a scale from “Train Wreck” to “Time of Your Life”) but to enter a drawing for a Barnes & Noble

IF YOU GO

What: Pittston Memorial Library Where: 47 Broad St., Pittston Call: 570-654-9565

gift certificate, which will be awarded during National Library Week. The idea stemmed from something Joyce saw on social-networking site Pinterest. If this go-round is a success, she said, the library hopes to do other similar events in the future and get children involved as well.

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Winnie Williams and Patricia Joyce of the Pittston Memorial Library show off the ‘blind dates’ patron can take home.


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HOROSCOPE

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE

2/26/12

BONUS PUZZLE The Sunday Crossword

"COIF IT UP" James Sajdak

KENKEN

1. Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1 through 4. 2. The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called cages, must combine using the given operation (in any order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners. 3. Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the top-left corner.

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Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis

JUMBLE

ARIES (March 21-April 19). You’ll feel the elasticity of time. It’s almost as though your internal clock is set to a counting system different from the one dictated by the clock on the wall. For this reason, being punctual will take extra effort. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You may feel that your labor output exceeds your job benefits. This will be especially true if you don’t even have a job. The rigors of your familial role are sometimes thankless, which makes self-appreciation necessary. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Usually you project your personality in such a way as to give others a solid idea of who you are. You’ll benefit from a more private approach now. Making yourself a bit of a mystery will serve you well. CANCER (June 22-July 22). It is a rare gift to be able to see yourself as others see you. You possess this gift. The honest people around you help, too. You’ll enjoy ease in relating to others and will create a healthy interpersonal dynamic. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). You can’t force things to happen, and yet your attention makes a huge difference in the way things develop. So stay alert to the subtle changes taking place around you, and let others know that you’re watching. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). It will be your pleasure to stave off the creeping malaise that threatens your domestic scene. Proactive attention does the trick. The work you do to make your home beautiful is especially important. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). The first answer that comes to mind may not be the correct one. Be willing to go through the entire problem-solving process, which will include some experimentation. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Your live-and-let-live attitude makes you attractive to others, and they’ll be generous with you, too. There will be a happy balance between what you expect out of your relationships and what you actually receive. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). Keep your cool in the midst of upheaval. You may actually enjoy the flurry of activity around you precisely because you don’t get caught up in it. Instead of taking risks, hold off until a storm blows over. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). You are a pillar of stability. You sometimes forget that in order to continue to withstand the pressures of day-to-day living, you need love. Hugs and praise are important factors in your well-being. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You are inclined to be intolerant of your own mistakes. Where others are concerned, you’re more lenient. Treat yourself with the same gentleness you extend to others. Nothing good comes of being too hard on yourself. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). Share what you’re doing with others and, perhaps more importantly, what you’d like to be doing. Friends will connect you with your next amazing opportunity. TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (Feb. 26). You’ll feel loved this year. Your sense of humor and self-assurance draw expressive people into your world. Family bonds strengthen through March. You’ll feel driven to share your skills through the next 10 weeks, and in teaching others, you’ll build a lasting legacy. Income grows through July. Cancer and Pisces people adore you. Your lucky numbers are: 10, 5, 24, 13 and 19.

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WONDERWORD

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PREVIOUS DAY’S SOLUTION

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ADVICE

Parents disapprove of student’s career choice Dear Abby: I’m a sophomore at a religious university that is well regarded in both secular and religious circles. I came here to become a doctor because the pre-med program has an outstanding acceptance rate to medical school. However, in my third quarter I took a religious studies course and fell in love with the department. I’d like to pursue a career in this field, perhaps as a professor. I have an excellent GPA and am working three jobs. My problem is that my parents are not supportive. They think I’m being impractical and will end up working in a fast-food restaurant for the rest of my life. I thought they’d be thrilled I have taken such an interest in our faith. Becoming a doctor no longer interests me. How can I convince them that I can major in religious studies and not live in poverty? — Rebel in California

PREVIOUS SUNDAY’S SOLUTION

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Bonus Puzzle Bonus Puzzle

Dear Rebel: You shouldn’t pursue a career in medicine unless your heart is in it. Unless you plan to take a vow of poverty, a career in religion doesn’t mean you’ll end up living hand-to-mouth. While money is important, it’s more important that you devote your life to something that gives you emotional gratification.

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Dear Abby: As a divorced dad, I’m hoping you’ll address a problem I have encountered in trying to co-parent my children. My daughters are often invited to parties and sleepovers, which sometimes happen during my parenting time, as well as during my ex-wife’s parenting time. The invitations to these events, however, are almost always sent to my ex-wife. Aside from the problems that have occurred because the information wasn’t forwarded to me in a timely manner, I think it’s sexist for invitations to be sent only

to the mother. It reinforces the notion that a woman’s role is to raise children, and a father can’t be an active parent. Would you please remind your readers that the most appropriate way of inviting a child who has two households is to send the invitation to BOTH parents? — Modern Dad in Roswell, Ga. Dear Modern Dad: I think you have delivered that message clearly. However, make a point of discussing with your ex-wife what activities may have been scheduled for your daughters while they’re with you. That way they won’t miss out on anything. Dear Abby: I was recently diagnosed with a cancerous tumor on my tongue that has made it extremely difficult and painful to talk. The problem is I don’t know how to handle encounters with strangers in public places — i.e., grocery stores, libraries, etc. I have always been polite and courteous, but now I can do no more than nod. What would you suggest? — Suddenly Silenced in Florida Dear Suddenly Silenced: Make eye contact with the people you would normally greet verbally and give them a smile as you are already doing. If someone tries to engage you in conversation, point to your throat, shake you head “no,” and mouth the words “can’t talk.” If you feel further explanation is necessary, have cards printed that state, “I am unable to speak.” That way, no one should take offense. Abby shares more than 100 of her favorite recipes in two booklets: “Abby’s Favorite Recipes” and “More Favorite Recipes by Dear Abby.” Send your name and mailing address, plus check or money order for $14 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby, Cookbooklet Set, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Shipping and handling are included in the price.)

To receive a collection of Abby’s most memorable — and most frequently requested — poems and essays, send a businesssized, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $3.95 ($4.50 in Canada) to: Dear Abby’s “Keepers,” P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included.)

Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 2/26


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012

Continued from Page 1F

County Historical Society. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I always thought of Joe Palooka as symbolic of this area,â&#x20AC;? said semi-retired local broadcaster David DeCosmo, who will speak during the event. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a pullyourself-up-by-your-bootstraps, never-say-die sort of fellow, strong in the face of adversity.â&#x20AC;? During the stripâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1930-1984 history, Palooka faced more than his share of adversity. Falsely charged with desertion from the French Foreign Legion during the 1930s, he was sentenced to death by firing squad yet spared in the storyline by the timely intervention of Franklin Delano Roosevelt himself. Back on this side of the Atlantic, Palooka calmly turned down the offer of a lucrative boxing match in Havana. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I got other plans,â&#x20AC;? he said, indicating he would enlist in the Army and help defeat the Fascists. By 1940 the boxer was on a troopship, sparring a bit when his opponent fell overboard. Plucky Palooka dove into the ocean for a rescue and ended up on top of a U-boat, where he single-handedly dispatched the officers as they emerged, one by one. In his private life, too, there were challenges, as when Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s girlfriend Ann Howe, suffering from amnesia after a plane crash, almost married a doctor in Colorado. Of course Ann, who had been serving as a World War II nurse, didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t marry the doctor, but Joe. She also appeared in the comic strip as a beautiful heiress, one with â&#x20AC;&#x153;society friendsâ&#x20AC;? who mocked Palooka for his healthy habits. At least one newspaper writer praised the character for drinking milk and refusing to smoke â&#x20AC;&#x153;coffin nails,â&#x20AC;? even when he was ridiculed.

SCOTTY Continued from Page 1F

no big deal. Never mind his ears â&#x20AC;&#x201D; what really stands out about McCreery is his poise, his maturity. On â&#x20AC;&#x153;American Idol,â&#x20AC;? he exhibited the confidence and charisma of someone twice his age. He credits baseball. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My dad pitched in college, and he raised me on the pitcherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mound,â&#x20AC;? McCreery reflected. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the pitcher, all eyes are on you â&#x20AC;&#x201D; everybody in the stands and the team is depending on you. Being on stage and having all eyes on me, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of a transition from baseball to the stage for me.â&#x20AC;? Although heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s writing songs, McCreery didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t contribute any material to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Clear as Day.â&#x20AC;? Working with producer Mark Bright (Underwood, Luke Bryan, Reba McEntire), he picked pieces by such Nashville stalwarts as Craig Wiseman, Rhett Akins and Chris Tompkins. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nothing about drinking or cheating, though. McCreery, who turned 18 in October, stuck with age-appropriate material â&#x20AC;&#x201D; singing about writing a girlâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s number on his hand, living in a small town and appreciating the demands on his mom. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Going into the song-picking process, we all thought it was going to be a bigger challenge than it really was,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They had to be songs I could relate to. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think there was one song on there that when I recorded it, I had to fake it or make something up in my mind to really believe it. All the songs speak to my life. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve only had one serious girlfriend,â&#x20AC;? he said matter-of-factly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And it was a 13-year-old serious relationship, so it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t too much. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve kind of been flying solo for the last few years. But

heartbreak is heartbreak, whether youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re 18 or whether youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re 40.â&#x20AC;? Soft-spoken but thoughtful, McCreery is intent on enjoying his senior year at Garner Magnet High School. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My friends donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t treat me any different,â&#x20AC;? he said. And he made sure that this leg of the Paisley tour would be done before baseball begins. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll pitch if the North Carolina High School Athletic Association approves of his regimen of attending some classes and being tutored by his mother, a certified high school teacher, on the road. If he had his choice of being the American Idol or the winning pitcher in the final game of the World Series, McCreery would opt for vocal champ. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Baseball is something Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve enjoyed doing, but singing has been a passion for me since I was little,â&#x20AC;? said McCreery, who sang the national anthem at the first game of the 2011 World Series. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is what I want to do, be out there with the music and the guitar, making art.â&#x20AC;? However, there was no grand plan. He went to Milwaukee for the â&#x20AC;&#x153;American Idolâ&#x20AC;? audition on a whim. And now heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s taking it all in stride. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to have to go out there and work hard and show them that I deserve to be here,â&#x20AC;? he said.

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newspapers. The final strip was published in November 1984 and depicted Joe, Ann and their two children bidding farewell to a crowd. They were heading back to WilkesBarre, where Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parents still lived. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What can I say â&#x20AC;Ś except I love you all! Goodbye â&#x20AC;Ś for now!â&#x20AC;? Joe Palooka calls in the penultimate frame. The last frame shows Palookaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s manager, Knobby Walsh, saying â&#x20AC;&#x153;Goodbye, Joey, Baby!!â&#x20AC;? as a tear rolls from his eye. The Joe Palooka character spawned comic books, movies and a 10-foot, 20,000 pound limestone statue in Oolitic, Ind., as well as the local monument. Fisherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s body of work included not only the creation of Palooka but a humorous history of Wyoming Valley that appeared in local newspapers in the 1920s and a

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THE TIMES LEADER

Max Bartikowsky treasures some â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Little Maxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; comics that were based on the image he presented as a youth. CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER Mr. Peanut advertisement that showed Christopher Columbus Max Bartikowsky shows off a comic book that features â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Little happy to find peanuts in the New Max,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; a character created by Ham Fisher and based on a young Max Bartikowsky. World.

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After the couple wed, Joe and Ann lived in West Wokkington, Ohio, but never forgot Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wilkes-Barre roots. Various Wilkes-Barre residents appeared in the strip, among the most notable a young Max Bartikowsky. Bartikowsky, who grew up to own the downtown jewelry store that bears his name, as a child had an alter-ego known as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Little Max.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We lived across the street from Ham Fisher on South Franklin Street,â&#x20AC;? Bartikowsky recalled. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was a youngster, probably 5 or 6 years old, and he used to see me. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d step into my fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shoes and walk around the neighborhood with floppy hats and big shoes.â&#x20AC;? In the strip, Little Max wore oversize clothes and didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t speak. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He had a halo over his head, and that would show what he was thinking,â&#x20AC;? Bartikowsky said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was so young, I probably didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t talk.â&#x20AC;? Other area residents represented in the comic strip were DeCosmo himself, who was news director for WMJW radio at the time along with former Sunday Independent reporter Fred Ney, John Cicero of West Side Monument Co. and Sam Greenberg of Arrow Steel. The men were subtly mentioned in the strip as organizers of a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Miss 1776â&#x20AC;? pageant, which was already part of the storyline Fisherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s successor Tony DiPreta had conceived. DiPreta inserted the menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s names and images into the strip in 1976 as thanks for their efforts to replace the Joe Palooka monument along Route 309 between Mountain Top and Wilkes-Barre, after the original bronze marker had been stolen. Fisher was born in WilkesBarre in 1900 and began working for the Wilkes-Barre Record in 1920. He convinced the McNaught Syndicate to carry Joe Palooka in 1930, and at its height the comic strip appeared in more than 900

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BOOKS

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AVIATION Continued from Page 6F

on my flights doing the exact same thing,” Rubiano said. A free domestic coach ticket can be had for 25,000 miles. But that’s not the goal. People in this group would rather shell out the $300 for the ticket and save for a big reward like flying first class to Asia for 125,000 miles, a ticket that normally sells for more than $10,000. Once you start gaming the system, the miles rack up fast. Those on the MegaDo trip have a lifetime average of 1.6 million miles — earned through flying and credit cards — with American alone. The man with the most: Michael Joyce, 61, from Forest Park, Ill. His lifetime total is more than 44.4 million. (The top AAdvantage member has 77.6 million miles but wasn’t on this trip. Accumulating millions of miles involves not just frequent flights but also bonuses and miles received through credit card purchases.) For eight years, Joyce, a former computer systems analyst, commuted between New York and Chicago. In 1994, he bought a lifetime unlimitedtravel pass for $500,000 and now hops around the world for fun. Less than a third of the miles he generates are actually flown. The rest come from various bonuses. Joyce donates

By CAROLYN KELLOGG Los Angeles Times

“The American Way of Eating: Undercover at Walmart, Applebee’s, Farm Fields and the Dinner Table” by Tracie McMillan, Scribner ($25)

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eaders curious about food have been able to deepen their knowledge exponentially over the last decade. They know how bad fast food is (thanks to Eric Schlosser), understand the complexities of food production (thanks to Michael Pollan), and know how hard it is to work in a kitchen (thanks to Bill Bryson). There are shelves upon shelves of books about how, why and what we eat by restaurateurs, farmers, chefs and even moonlighting novelists.

Add to the mix Tracie McMillan, who found employment at the bottom of our nation’s food chain and wrote about it in “The American Way of Eating: Undercover at Walmart, Applebee’s, Farm Fields and the Dinner Table.” It’s like a foodie version of Barbara Ehrenreich’s “Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting by in America.” McMillan is an award-winning journalist whose work has focused on poverty. A white woman in her 30s with a college degree, McMillan is an unusual figure looking for work in the fields of California’s Central Valley. When asked, she makes vague allusions to wanting to leave problems behind, be outside and stay away from people. But it takes her a while to be in the position of asking for a job. “I’ve driven up and down the highway looking for onion crews to no avail, hindered by, in descending order, my ignorance of what an onion field looks like, how many people might be on a crew, and basic local geography,” she writes. Though she wields vast knowledge about the conditions faced by agricultural workers, she serves as an everywoman, an understandable lens on an unseen world. In this way, the book is vital. She has

the writing skills to bear witness, the research background to provide context, and the courage to take on the task. It is a constructed challenge: For each effort — farms in California, WalMarts in Michigan, Applebee’s in New York — she serves a two-month stint. She begins her project with a month’s savings, and when her car’s radiator fails, or a check amount is less than expected, like many other Americans she taps a credit card to make ends meet. Each section begins by outlining how much she earned producing food and how much she spent on what she ate. In the fields, she spent 25 percent of her $10,588 annualized salary; at Wal-Mart, 17.2 percent of $11,487; at Applebee’s, 13.5 percent of $12,845. What those numbers don’t reveal is how much she depended on the kindness of strangers. McMillan gets hired to pick grapes, sort peaches and harvest garlic. She lands her first job with the help of a sympathetic neighbor, who brings her along when the work is scarce in a mini-business of selling breakfast to other workers (McMillan provides the soda). Acquaintances share surplus food from the fields. A woman unloads a bounty from the throwaway bins at Trader Joe’s, including bread that a ravenous McMillan devours. A Michigan landlord stocks the kitchen and rewards on-time rent with pizza; in two houses where she rents rooms, the landlords regularly feed her home-cooked meals. The fact that these actions are recorded but seem to go unrewarded by her — even after McMillan returns to her “real” life — becomes one of the increasingly uncomfortable elements of the book. These are, after all, the types of families for whom it makes sense to displace a teenage son from his bedroom for the $300 McMillan will pay that month; how can she rapturously write of the seafood soup without offering to stock the fridge once in a while? Perhaps these transactions happened but were too intimate to be recorded. This is the other ele-

ment that is missing: intimacy. McMillan is excellent at describing the surface of things — where to stand to sort just-picked peaches, how many training videos a new Wal-Mart staffer will watch — but more often than not, she omits the feel of things. If her muscles hurt after that first day in the fields, if she was bored stocking shelves all night, we don’t know it. The U.S. food system is large and complex, and McMillan’s efforts to tell macro and micro stories never cohere into a complete picture. What she can give us that no one else can is her experience on the line. Tragically, that includes a sexual assault that happened, she writes, after the celebration of her last night at Applebee’s, where she had enjoyed the work (it was not a work colleague). Related in less than two pages, that experience may explain some of McMillan’s unwillingness to get too close, to reveal too much about what she was feeling during the project. There is some insight here, about danger and vulnerability, about power and poverty, about what it takes to feed ourselves in a way that is good from the inside-out and top to bottom. But I’m not entirely sure what it is; McMillan isn’t either.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 PAGE 5F

Slave-era novel an empowering narrative

By KENDAL WEAVER For The Associated Press

“The Healing” (Nan A. Talese/Doubleday), by Jonathan Odell.

S

et in the darkest heart of plantation-era slavery, “The Healing” is a remarkable rite-of-passage novel with an unforgettable character, a forceful medicine woman named Polly Shine. She arrives in the life of Granada, a black slave girl who was robbed of her mother as a baby and is struggling to find her racial place and identity on a sprawling Mississippi Delta plantation in the decade leading up to the Civil War. Her personal journey takes fearsome turns in the hands of Polly Shine. With this backdrop, the book might run the risk of being stereotypical Southern slave epoch fiction. Set mostly in 1860, it includes an arrogant white plantation owner, Master Ben, and his mad, grief-stricken wife, Mistress Amanda, who live in a mansion with their young son, Little Lord, and a trained monkey named Daniel Webster. But it transcends any cliches of the genre with its captivating, at times almost lyrical, prose; its firm grasp of history; vivid scenes; and vital, fully realized people, particularly the slaves with their many shades of color and modes of survival — none more so than Polly Shine and Granada. Old but still spry, Polly is a commanding presence, a midwife with mystical healing powers and potions drawn from roots, leaves, berries and bark. She is “reddish brown with pointed cheekbones and amber eyes,” has bird feathers sticking out from her braids and wears “a ponderous necklace made of gleaming white shells.” Polly sees Granada, who is approaching her 13th birthday, as a possible successor. But Granada, taken as a newborn to be raised as a surrogate daughter for the unstable Mistress Amanda, prefers the privileges of the mansion, unaware how fleeting they will be. This is Southern fictional turf tilled by many others, and it is fair to ask why the novel’s author, Jonathan Odell, chose to bring it dramatically to life once again. A Mississippi native who is white, Odell grew up amid the rigid racial injustices and cruelties of Jim Crow. After a career as a business consultant, he settled in Minnesota and, according to his note to readers, set out “to write novels focusing on the racial divide” after immersing himself in oral histories, slave narratives, interviews, books and courthouse files. His first novel, “The View From Delphi,” is set in Mississippi before the modern civil rights era. He dug back deeper into history for “The Healing.” “If you want to destroy a people, destroy their story,” he says in the note. “If you want to empower a people, give them a narrative to share.” “The Healing” is just such a narrative.

miles to his church and gives flights to friends who can’t afford vacations. He also bid 453,000 miles to secure a seat on the MegaDo. (The MegaDo also raised more than $65,000 for charity, auctioning off items like a Qantas deck of cards, British Airways pajamas, model airplanes, fluorescent yellow rain suits worn by American’s ground crew, two free tickets to Europe and 60,000 American miles.) Teddy bears, bunk beds and playing ticket agent As with every good vacation, there was a chance to get souvenirs. There was a stop at the Boeing store in Seattle — yes, there’s really a Boeing gift shop. It’s just south of downtown, steps away from the runway at Boeing Field. The group rushed in and stocked up on yellow 787 ties, aviator teddy bears, Boeing Christmas ornaments, garment belts fashioned out of airplane seatbelts and T-shirts saying: “If it’s not Boeing, I’m not going.” But the real mementos were the photos. Most tourists snap shots in front of the pyramids, Machu Picchu or the Taj Mahal. At Los Angeles International Airport, this group pressed up against a chain-link fence to take photos of a Cathay Pacific 777 nose to nose with a Qantas A380. There was something sexy about the way the two giant planes faced each other. Once onboard, like kids set free on a

Eric Mueller of Los Angeles, Ca., jumps off an emergency exit slide.

playground, the passengers climbed into the cockpit, spread out in plush first class beds and crawled into the hidden bunk beds where crews nap during long trans-Pacific flights. Moments later, photos were on Facebook. But what else would you expect from folks who, during a tour of an elite checkin area, were excited to play airline ticket agent? “If I could strap wings to my back, I would,” said Harry Livingston, 56, a former Navy flight surgeon, recreational pilot and emergency room doctor from

AP PHOTOS

Lou Pizzarello participates in a water aircraft landing emergency exercise at the American Airlines training facility in Fort Worth, Texas.

New Rochelle, N.Y. Even the most mundane parts of flying excited this group. American chose to premier its new safety video on the flight. There were wild cheers and screams as it ran. People recorded it with their iPhones and chanted “play it again” when it finished. It turned out that one flight attendant working the trip was also featured in the

video. She was treated like a movie star. When the video was over, the passengers did what star-struck fans do: they asked for her autograph — on seatback safety cards. Then they fastened their seatbelts, returned tray tables and seatbacks to the upright and locked position, and prepared to take off ... yet again.


CMYK PAGE 6F

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

The ultimate fly-geek fantasy Aviation camp gives avid flyers a behind-the-scenes experience

A

By SCOTT MAYEROWITZ The Associated Press

BOARD AMERICAN AIRLINES FLIGHT 9454 — Eric Mueller’s vacation started when his plane filled with smoke. Soon, people slid down an emergency chute, inflated life vests and climbed into a raft. Mueller loved every minute of it. Most days he runs a book-review website. But on this day he was living out a fantasy at American Airlines’ flight attendant academy, practicing evacuation procedures most people hope to never use.

Eric Mueller of Los Angeles, Calif., laughs as he evacuates a cabin filling with smoke during a simulated emergency exercise.

With that status he gets: another year of upgrades, free liquor, waived bag frees, the ability to skip security lines and double miles on all his flights. Compare that to the folks in the back who get ... well, there’s a reason some in the industry refer to coach passengers as “self-loading freight.” “There were numerous folks See AVIATION, Page 5F

Lou Pizzarello, front, is followed by Randy Petersen at the American Airlines training facility in Fort Worth, Texas.

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Along the way, there was plenty of bragging about mileage runs — cheap flights taken only to accumulate enough miles to qualify for elite status. Michael Rubiano, a Silicon Valley product manager did six such roundtrips to Chicago over eight days last month. He would catch a flight after work, sleep on the way to Chicago, immediately turn around and sleep on the flight home. Rubiano, 41, then showered in the San Francisco lounge, changed clothes and went to work only to repeat the trip eight hours later. Each of his six tickets cost him less than $200 and, thanks to some bonus offers, earned him 11,076 miles on American to be used later for a dream vacation. All told, that gave him 66,456 miles and put him over the top in his annual quest to re-qualify for the airline’s top elite status.

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Mileage mania For those who don’t travel frequently or play the mileage game, it can be daunting to understand the appeal of the programs. It’s not just about free trips for this group. It’s a hobby — some would say obsession — similar to collecting stamps or brewing your own beer. “Everybody has an interest. My neighbor polishes his 1967 Cadillac every other day,” said Tommy Danielson, 40, the director of sales at a telecommunications company. The Chicago resident organized the trip, called a MegaDo — frequent flier lingo for a large group of people meeting up to talk miles. It was the fourth such adventure Danielson has put together since 2009.

AP PHOTOS

Members of the Megado frequent fliers group float in a circle during a water aircraft landing emergency exercise. In the ultimate field trip for aviation geeks, 160 frequent fliers chartered an American Airlines jet and hopped across the country visiting aviation-industry spots.

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opulent hotels in faraway lands — all paid for with frequent flier miles. These travelers don’t just love to fly; they are obsessed with collecting frequent flier miles at the cheapest possible cost. The fliers, who ranged in age from 20 to 81 and hailed from as far away as Chile, India and Italy, know the ins and outs of the programs better than anybody else and share pointers in online travel forums such as MilePoint. One tip: prevent miles from expiring with a tiny online purchase at Target, Macy’s, iTunes or another retailer that’s part of the airline’s shopping portal. Such expertise led American Airlines and several other travel companies to help set up the trip and use it to pick the brains of these veteran fliers. They wanted to know what these travelers like and hate about the loyalty programs. Airlines need to keep their most-frequent customers happy. The top 20 percent of American’s customers generate about 70 percent of its revenue. That’s why Suzanne Rubin, the new president of the American’s frequent flier program — AAdvantage — hopped on the plane, along with other executives, for what she called a “crash course in customer research.”

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“I look at the safety card. It’s not supposed to be a comic book of things you want to try, but it all just looks cool,” said Mueller, 40, of Los Angeles. There are people who grew up wanting to be Mickey Mantle. They go to Yankees fantasy camp. Others dream of playing Carnegie Hall. They join the summer orchestra at the shore. Then there are aviation geeks like Mueller. People like him — and there are more than you think — charter a commercial airliner and hop across the country visiting the Meccas of the aviation world. The most recent journey had 160 people paying up to $1,699 for a seat and access to spots normally off limits: Boeing’s sprawling 737 factory, American’s mission control-like operations center and the cockpit of the world’s largest passenger jet. Tickets sold out in 17 minutes. “This is sort of the ultimate airplane nerd event,” Mueller said. Most people board a plane to escape to a tropical beach, see the Eiffel Tower or visit their family. For this group, the journey isn’t just half the fun. It’s the whole point. They can differentiate between Boeing and Airbus jets just by looking at their tails. They know that on even-numbered flights, meals are served first from the front left of the cabin, while on odd-numbered flights, it’s the back right. “Usually in your life, you’re the only one who knows this stuff,” said Gabriel Leigh, 28, a filmmaker and writer from Hong Kong. The camaraderie was part of the trip’s appeal. Sure, it was really cool to walk inside the first 747 ever built. But it was also fun to gulp down gin and tonics midair with other guys — three out of four passengers were male — who have the same passion for flying. How much fun? Well, American stocked the plane with four times the liquor of a normal flight. In each row, stories were swapped of amazing meals and


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ESTATE NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT Letters of Administration have been granted in the Estate of Florence D. Legault late of Fairview Township, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, who died on January 15, 2011. All persons indebted to said estate are required to make payment and those having claims or demands to present same, without delay, to the Executor, John B. Legault c/o his attorney, Mosca Law Offices, 345 Pierce Street, Kingston PA 18704-3702 Thomas J. Mosca, Esquire MOSCA LAW OFFICES 345 Pierce Street Kingston, PA 18704 570-288-7917 LEGAL NOTICE Friday, February 24, 2012 Luzerne County Board of Tax Assessment Appeals will meet in a special session on the following dates: February 29, 2012, March 6, 2012, March 8, 2012, March 13, 2012, March 20, 2012, March 22, 2012 March 28, 2012. The purpose for the meeting is for property taxpayer’s appeals on property assessments. The hearings will be conducted from 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. in the Luzerne County Assessors Office, lower level, Luzerne County Courthouse, 200 North River Street, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. BOARD OF TAX ASSESSMENT APPEALS Neil J Allen Chairman Donald E Warren Vice-Chair Patrick P Musto Secretary

mpeznowski@ timesleader.com

INVITATION FOR BIDS The Municipality of Kingston will accept sealed bids at the Kingston Municipal Building, 500 Wyoming Avenue, Kingston, Pennsylvania, until 10:00 a.m. on Friday, March 16, 2012 for the following. LAWN & TURF MAINTENANCE FOR VARIOUS MUNICIPAL PROPERTIES. Bids will be opened at 10:00 a.m. on March 16, 2012. Bid specifications are available at the Municipal Secretary’s Office, 500 Wyoming Avenue, Kingston, Pennsylvania, Monday through Friday, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. A certified check or bid bond for ten percent (10%) of the bid must accompany each bid. The Contractor must ensure that his employees and applicants are not discriminated against because of their race, color, religion, national origin, sex, handicap, or family status. (Executive Order 11246, as amended). Bids must be clearly labeled on the envelope as to the item being bid and should be addressed to Paul Keating, Administrator, Kingston Municipal Building, 500 Wyoming Avenue, Kingston, Pennsylvania, 18704-3681. The Municipality of Kingston reserves the right to accept or reject any bids and to waive technical irregularities in any bid. The successful bidder shall anticipate a Notice of Award within ten (10) to forty-five (45) days from the bid opening date. Paul Keating Municipal Administrator

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CELEBRITY CRUISE LINE’S Newest Ship

SILHOUETTE

Sailing TRANS ATLANTIC from Bayonne, NJ 13 nights April 22, 2012 to May 5, 2012 Visit ports in PORTUGAL, ITALY, SPAIN & FRANCE only $1,024. per person based on two sharing one inside cabin Airfare is not included & is additional 300 Market St., Kingston, Pa 18704 570-288-TRiP (288-8747)

Anytime 574-1275

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

PAYING $500 MINIMUM DRIVEN IN

Full size 4 wheel drive trucks

ALSO PAYING TOP $$$

for heavy equipment, backhoes, dump trucks, bull dozers HAPPY TRAILS TRUCK SALES 570-760-2035 542-2277 6am to 8pm

WORK WANTED

Experienced in homecare. I will work in your home taking care of your loved one. Personal care, meal preparation & light housekeeping provided. References, background check also provided. Salary negotiable. 570-836-9726 or cell 570-594-4165

406

ATVs/Dune Buggies

HONDA`09 REKON TRX 250CC/Electric shift. Like New. REDUCED $3,650. (570) 814-2554

409

Autos under $5000

CHEVY ‘00

Cavalier Z24 Black 2 door, 134,000 miles. Runs great, has new water pump. Needs tires & A/C switch. Asking $1500 570-233-2117

DODGE `02 NEON

SXT. 4 door. Automatic. Yellow with black interior. Power windows & locks. FWD. $3,500. Call 570-709-5677 or 570-819-3140

LEO’S AUTO SALES 92 Butler St Wilkes-Barre, PA 570-825-8253

‘97 FORD ESCORT

4 door, 4 cyl, auto. 119K miles. $2,150

‘00 HYUNDAI ELANTRA WAGON 4 cyl ,auto, $1,950

Current Inspection On All Vehicles DEALER

GMC ‘99 YUKON

310

Attorney Services

BANKRUPTCY

FREE CONSULT

Guaranteed Low Fees Payment Plan! Colleen Metroka 570-592-4796 Bankruptcy $595 Guaranteed Low Fees www.BkyLaw.net Atty Kurlancheek 825-5252 W-B DIVORCE No Fault $295 divorce295.com Atty. Kurlancheek 800-324-9748 W-B Free Bankruptcy Consultation Payment plans. Carol Baltimore 570-822-1959 SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY Free Consultation. Contact Atty. Sherry Dalessandro 570-823-9006

360

Instruction & Training

EARN COLLEGE DEGREE ONLINE. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV Certified. Call 888-2203984. www.CenturaOnline.com

380

Travel

380

Travel

Motorcycle for sale? Let them see it here in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

CAMEO HOUSE BUS TOURS

SUNDAY IN PHILADELPHIA MARCH 11, 2012 Brunch @ The Waterworks, a National Historic Landmark Van Gogh Exhibit @ Philadelphia Museum of Art For more details call

570-655-3420 Anne.Cameo @verizon.net

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

ACME AUTO SALES

CHEVROLET `04 CORVETTE COUPE Torch red with

CROSSROAD MOTORS

343-1959

Call V&G

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

412 Autos for Sale

4 WD, 115,600 mi. runs 100%, fully loaded. Vehicle comes complete w/power wheel chair lift in rear. $3400 OBO 570-299-5920

412 Autos for Sale

AUDI `01 A6 QUATTRO

123,000 miles, 4.2 liter V8, 300hp, silver with black leather,heated steering wheel, new run flat tires, 17” rims, 22 mpg, German mechanic owned. $6,495. OBO. 570-822-6785

AUDI `04 A6 QUATTRO

3.0 V6. Silver. New tires & brakes. 130k highway miles. Leather interior. Heated Seats. $7,500 or best offer. 570-905-5544

AUDI `05 A4 1.8T

Cabriolet Convertible S-Line. 52K miles. Auto. All options. Silver. Leather interior. New tires. Must sell. $17,500 or best offer 570-954-6060

BEN’S AUTO SALES RT 309 W-B Twp. Near Wegman’s 570-822-7359

09 ESCAPE XLT $11,495 10 Suzuki sx4 $11,995 09Journey SE $12,495 07 RANGER 4CYL $6,995 04 XL7 4X4 $8,995 10 FUSION SEL $13,995 Full Notary Service Tags & Title Transfers

BMWSilver, `01 X5fully 4.4i.

loaded, tan leather interior. 1 owner. 103k miles. $8,999 or best offer. Call 570-814-3666

BMW `04 325i

Automatic. Dark blue with black interior. Showroom condition. 20,000 original miles. Garage kept. $14,900 (570) 814-8106

BMW `99 M3with Convertible

Hard Top. AM/FM. 6 disc CD. 117 K miles. Stage 2 Dinan suspension. Cross drilled rotors. Cold air intake. All maintenance records available. $11,500 OBO. 570-466-2630

CADILLAC ‘08 CTS EXTRA CLEAN & SHARP! $20,900 WARRANTY MAFFEI AUTO SALES 570-288-6227

1009 Penn Ave Scranton 18509 Across from Scranton Prep

GOOD CREDIT, BAD CREDIT, NO CREDIT Call Our Auto Credit Hot Line to get Pre-approved for a Car Loan!

800-825-1609

www.acmecarsales.net 11

AUDI S5 CONV.

08

Sprint blue, black / brown leather int., navigation, 3 spd auto turbo, AWD CHEVY IMPALA LS SILVER CHRYSLER SEBRING

09 4 door, alloys, seafoam blue. 07 BUICK LUCERNE CXL, silver, grey leather 07 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS, navy blue, auto, alloys 06 VW PASSAT 3.6 silver, black leather, sunroof, 66k miles 06 MERCURY MILAN PREMIER, mint green, V6, alloys 06 DODGE STRATUS SXT, red 05 VW NEW JETTA gray, auto, 4 cyl 04 NISSAN MAXIMA LS silver, auto, sunroof 03 DODGE STRATUS SE Red 03 AUDI S8 QUATTRO, mid blue/light grey leather, navigation, AWD 01 VOLVO V70 STATION WAGON, blue/grey, leather, AWD 99 CHEVY CONCORDE Gold 98 MAZDA MILLENIA green

black and red interior. 9,700 miles, auto, HUD, removable glass roof, polished wheels, memory package, Bose stereo and twilight lighting, factory body moldings, traction control, ABS, Garage kept - Like New. $25,900 (570) 609-5282

CHEVROLET `08 IMPALA Excellent condition, new tires, 4 door, all power, 34,000 miles. $13,500. 570-836-1673

CHEVROLET ‘06 CORVETTE CONVERTIBLE

Silver beauty, 1 Owner, Museum quality. 5,900 miles, 6 speed. All possible options including Navigation, Power top. New, paid $62,000 Must sell REDUCED! $39,500 FIRM 570-299-9370

CHEVY ‘07 IMPALA LS Only 40k miles $12,880

SUVS, VANS, TRUCKS, 4 X4’s

07 07

SRX silver, 3rd seat, navigation, AWD CADILLAC

HYUNDAI TUSCON

grey, 6 cyl., AWD 07 Chrysler Aspen LTD, silver, 3rd seat, 4x4 07 DODGE DURANGO SLT, blue, 3rd seat 4x4 07 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT, blue grey leather, 7 pax mini van 06 BUICK RANIER CXL burgundy & grey, leather, sunroof, AWD 06 PONTIAC TURRANT black/black leather, sunroof, AWD 06 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN ES, red, 4 dr, entrtnmt cntr, 7 pass mini van 05 FORD ESCAPE XLT Silver V6, 4x4 05 HYUNDAI SANTAFE silver, V6, AWD 05 FORD EXPLORER XLT blue, 3rd seat, 4x4 05 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB CAB SPORT, blue, auto, 4x4 truck 04 JEEP GRAND

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

CHEVY ‘08 IMPALA LT Alloys, CD player power seat $9900

BMW ‘98 740 IL White with beige

leather interior. New tires, sunroof, heated seats. 5 cd player 106,000 miles. Excellent condition. $5,300. OBO 570-451-3259 570-604-0053

CADILLAC `05 SRX

All wheel drive, traction control, 3.6 L V-6, power sunroof, autostick, leather interior, auto car starter, factory installed 6 CD disc changer, all power, memory seat. 39,000 miles. $21,000 570-453-2771

CADILLAC ‘00 DTS Tan, satellite

radio, leather, moon roof, loaded excellent condition. 136k miles. $4,995.

570-814-2809

CHEVY ‘04 IMPALA

Power everything, air, am/fm cd, excellent condition. $6000 570-654-4901

‘11 DODGE DAKOTA CREW 4x4, Bighorn 6 cyl., 14k, factory warranty. $22,200 ‘11 NISSAN ROGUE S 4WD, 18k Factory Warranty. $19,599 ‘11 HYUNDAI ELANTRA 3950 miles. Factory Warranty. New Condition. $17,499 ‘10 Dodge Nitro SE 21k alloys, cruise, tint, factory warranty $18,699 ‘10 DODGE CARAVAN SXT 32K. SilverBlack. Power slides. Factory warranty. $16,599 ‘09 J EEP L IBERY LIMITED Power sunroof. Only 18K. Factory Warranty. $19,299 ‘09 DODGE CALIBER SXT 2.0 Automatic, 24k Factory Warranty! $11,499 ‘08 CHEVY IMPALA LS Only 18K! One Owner - Estate Sale. Factory Warranty. $11,999 ‘08 SUBARU Special Edition 42K. 5 speed. AWD. Factory warranty. $12,599 ‘08 CHEVY IMPALA LS 4 door, only 37K! 5 Yr. 100K factory warranty $11,199 ‘05 HONDA CRV EX One owner. Just traded. 65K. $12,799 ‘06 FORD FREESTAR Rear air, 62k $8099 ‘01 LINCOLN TOWN CAR Executive 74K $5,599 ‘00 CHEVY MALIBU LS leather, 98k $3,7990 TITLE TAGS FULL NOTARY SERVICE 6 M ONTH WARRANTY

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

CHEVY ‘09 COBALT LS 1 Owner, Cd & Cruise, PW, PL $10,590

CHEROKEE LTD

4X4 Black/black leather, sunroof 04 FORD FREESTAR, blue, 4 door, 7 passenger mini van 04 MERCURY MOUNTAINEER, black, black leather, 3rd seat, AWD 04 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE OVERLAND graphite grey, 2 tone leather, sunroof, 4x4 03 FORD EXPLORER SPORT TRAC XLT, 4 door, green, tan, leather, 4x4 03 FORD WINDSTAR LX green 4 door, 7 pax mini van 02 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER LS white, auto 4x4 02 FORD F150 XLT Reg. Cab Truck, red, 6 cyl. auto, 4x4 02 NISSAN PATHFINDER SE, Sage, sun roof, autop, 4x4 02 CHEVY 2500 HD reg. cab. pickup truck, green, auto, 4x4 01 CHEVY BLAZER black, 4 door 01 FORD RANGER XLT X-CAB, red, auto,V6, 4x4 00 CHEVY BLAZER LT black & brown, brown leather 4x4 99 ISUZI VEHIACROSS black, auto, 2 door AWD 98 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO SE, silver, V6, 4x4 96 CHEVY BLAZER, black 4x4 89 CHEVY 1500, 4X4 TRUCK

570-825-7988

700 Sans Souci Highway WE SELL FOR LESS!!

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

CHEVY ‘09 IMPALA

LTZ, Grey, leather, heated seats, sunroof. Bluetooth, AM/FM, CD, Bose speakers. 35,000 miles. 18 mo. warranty remaining. $17,000 OBO After 4pm call 570-430-3041

FORD ‘02 MUSTANG

GT CONVERTIBLE

Red with black top. 6,500 miles. One Owner. Excellent Condition. $17,500 570-760-5833

HONDA `09 CIVIC LX-S Excellent condition

inside & out. Garage kept. Regularly serviced by dealer, records available. Option include alloy wheels, decklid spoiler, sport seats, interior accent lighting (blue), Nose mask and custom cut floor mats. Dark grey with black interior. 56K highway miles. REDUCED! $13,300. Call 570-709-4695

HONDA ‘03 ACCORD EX Leather, moonroof $10,750

SEBRING CONVERTIBLE

DODGE ‘07 CALIBER

AWD, Alloys, PW & PL, 1 Owner $12,950

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

EAGLE `95 TALON Only 97,000 Miles.

Full custom body kit, dark green metallic with gray interior. Dual exhaust, 4 coil over adjustable struts. All new brakes, air intake kit, strut brakes, custom seats, custom white gauges, 2 pillar gauges, new stereo, alarm, custom side view mirrors. 4 cylinder automatic, runs excellent. $8,500. Call 570-876-1355 or 570-504-8540 (evenings)

FORD `08 ESCAPE

XLT. 56,800 miles. Grey metallic with grey cloth interior. 2WD. Auto. Power windows & locks. Dual air bags. A/C. Alloy Wheels. Excellent condition. $14,500 Trades Welcome 570-328-5497

FORD `95 TAURUS 99K, V-6, runs

good, new brakes. Good tires, all power. $1,700 570-714-5386

SATURN ‘07 ION2

Newly inspected, good condition. Dealer price $7500. Asking $5500. 570-574-6880

VITO’S & GINO’S Wanted: WANTED ALL JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & HEAVY EQUIPMENT DUMPTRUCKS BULLDOZERS BACKHOES

Highest Prices Paid!! FREE PICKUP

288-8995

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

HONDA ‘05 CIVIC COUPE 4 cylinder, auto

Gas $aver! $9,450 WARRANTY MAFFEI AUTO SALES 570-288-6227

HONDA ‘08 ACCORD

4 door, EXL with navigation system. 4 cyl, silver w/ black interior. Satellite radio, 6CD changer, heated leather seats, high, highway miles. Well maintained. Monthly service record available. Call Bob. 570-479-0195

SCION `06 XA

67,000 miles, power windows & locks, great gas mileage. $8,200/OBO 570-606-5634

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

HYUNDAI ‘00 ACCENT 4 cylinder. 5 speed. Sharp economy car! $2,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

HYUNDAI ‘11 SONATA GLS, 1 Owner, only 11k miles $18,800

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

JAGUAR `00 S TYPE

4 door sedan. Like new condition. Brilliant blue exterior with beige hides. Car is fully equipped with navigation system, V-8, automatic, climate control AC, alarm system, AM/FM 6 disc CD, garage door opener. 42,000 original miles. $9,000 Call (570) 288-6009

LEXUS `98 LS 400 Excellent condition,

garage kept, 1 owner. Must see. Low mileage, 90K. Leather interior. All power. GPS navigation, moon roof, cd changer. Loaded. $9,000 or best offer. 570-706-6156

LINCOLN ‘05 TOWN CAR 39K miles. Looks & runs perfect! $13,500 WARRANTY MAFFEI AUTO SALES 570-288-6227

ALL JUNK CARS! CA$H PAID

570-301-3602

FREE CONSULT

Guaranteed Low Fees Payment Plan! Colleen Metroka 570-592-4796 Bankruptcy $595 Guaranteed Low Fees www.BkyLaw.net Atty Kurlancheek 825-5252 W-B

SUBARU `05 FORESTER

9999999

FORD ‘04 EXPEDITION 4 door, black with tan leather, loaded with options, 144k miles. $7899 FORD ‘04 Taurus 4 door, white with gray interior, loaded, 145k miles $4500 DODGE ‘00 1500 V8 magnum, black, runs great $3995 LINCOLN ‘00 Towncar, 4 door, leather interior, 117k miles $3995 CADILLAC ‘99 50th Gold Anniversary Sedan Deville. Red with tan leather, loaded. $3995 MERCURY ‘96 GRAND MARQUIS 4 door, gold with tan cloth intertior, only 50k miles. Loaded. Must See! $4200

9999999

570-955-5792

White with gray leather interior, 17” custom chrome wheels, 4 new tires, new breaks front & rear. Full tune-up, oil change & filters done. Body and interior are perfect. Car has all the options. 133,850 miles. Original price: $140,000 new. This is the diplomat version. No rust or dings on this car Garage kept. Sell for $9,500. Call: 570-876-1355 or 570-504-8540 Evenings

Excellent condition. Priced to sell! $6,195. 570-594-3975

SUBARU ‘10 IMPREZA OUTBACK SPORT

33,000 miles, new inspection & tires. 5 speed wagon. Balance of 6 year, 100,000 mile warranty and tire and wheel insurance. $19,000 OBO 570-814-9400

TOYOTA `07 AVALON 48,000 miles, one

owner, garage kept, excellent condition. $15,500. 570-474-9076

TOYOTA ‘00 SOLARA SE SUPER CLEAN All power, new

tires, new back brakes. 125,000 miles. $6,400 negotiable. 570-417-8353

TOYOTA ‘02 CAMRY SE 1 Owner, only 38k miles $10,920

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

PORSCHE `01 BOXSTER S Biarritz white, con-

vertible,new $58,000, 3.2 liter, 6 cylinder, 250HP. Loaded with all the extra options. Less than 15,000 miles. $21,000 570-586-0401

TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT 112K miles. Blue, 5

speed. Air, power windows/locks, CD/cassette, Keyless entry, sunroof, new battery. Car drives and has current PA inspection. Slight rust on corner of passenger door. Clutch slips on hard acceleration. This is why its thousands less than Blue Book value. $6,500 OBO. Make an offer! Call 570-592-1629

TOYOTA ‘09 COROLLA S Auto. 4 Cylinder. $12,880

SAAB 9.3 ‘99

5 speed convertible. 130,000 miles Runs excellent, everything works, 25 mpg. Like new, recently inspected, new tires. Dependable, fun & economical transportation. $3,250. 570-639-1121 or 570-430-1095

SAAB 900`98 Low mileage, 25

mpg, 5 speed convertible. Perfect shape, everything works. New stereo, recent inspection, good tires. Very dependable, no rust FUN IN THE SUN! $3,950 570-639-1121 or 570-430-1095

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

VOLKSWAGEN `04 Beetle - Convertible

GREAT ON GAS! Blue. AM/FM cassette. Air. Automatic. Power roof, windows, locks & doors. Boot cover for top. 22k. Excellent condition. Garage kept. Newly Reduced $14,000 570-479-7664 Leave Message

AUTO SERVICE

Selling your Camper? Place an ad and find a new owner. 570-829-7130

DIRECTORY

MAZDA ‘02 626LX

Sedan, auto, power windows & locks, CD, 4 cylinder. 122,000 miles. Good on gas. $3,000. 570-472-2634

468

PONTIAC `96 FIREBIRD 105,000 miles,

auto-matic,, black with grey interior, new inspection. $4,000, OBO. 570-706-6565

310

460 AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE DIRECTORY Auto Parts

CALL US! TO JUNK YOUR CAR

BEST PRICES IN THE AREA CA$H ON THE $POT, Free Anytime Pickup 570-301-3602

472

Attorney Services

DIVORCE No Fault $295 divorce295.com Atty. Kurlancheek 800-324-9748 W-B Free Bankruptcy Consultation Payment plans. Carol Baltimore 570-822-1959 SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY Free Consultation. Contact Atty. Sherry Dalessandro 570-823-9006

Auto Parts

570-301-3602

468

Call 829-7130 To Place Your Ad BANKRUPTCY

MARZAK MOTORS

601 Green Ridge St, Scranton

One Owner Bluetooth - Smart Key $10,900

Don’t Keep Your Practice a Secret!

Attorney Services

412 Autos for Sale

NISSAN ‘07 SENTRA SE

LAW DIRECTORY

310

412 Autos for Sale

MERCEDES `92 500 SEL

WANTED!

CHRYSLER ‘04 Silver, 2nd owner clean title. Very clean inside & outside. Auto, Power mirrors, windows. CD player, cruise, central console heated power mirrors. 69,000 miles. $5500. 570-991-5558

412 Autos for Sale

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted Highest Prices Paid In CA$H

FREE PICKUP

570-574-1275

Purebred Animals? Sell them here with a classified ad! 570-829-7130

Auto Services

$ WANTED JUNK $ VEHICLES LISPI TOWING We pick up 822-0995

WANTED Good Used Cars & Trucks. Highest Prices Paid!!! Call V&G Anytime 574-1275

WANTED

Cars & Full Size Trucks. For prices... Lamoreaux Auto Parts 477-2562


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 PAGE 3G

K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N

TH E NUM BER 1 NISSAN DEAL ER IN TH E NE AND C ENTRAL PA REGIO N** 2012 N IS S A N A L TIM A SA VE 20% 2.5S S E DA N

S C AN H ERE FO R S ERVIC E S PEC IAL S

STK#N 20603 M O D EL# 13112 M SR P $23,820

2012 N IS S A N ROGUE ILA B LE @ TH IS P R IC E! S V A W D 18 SA9 AVEVA $3,000 O FF M SR P ! STK#N 21224 M O D EL# 22412 M SR P $26,415

4 Cyl, CVT , Ba ck-Up Ca m era , Blu eto o th, Allo ys , Po w erS ea t, PW , PDL , Rea r T in ted Gla s s a n d M u ch M o re!

$

$

B U Y FO R

18 ,9 9 5

W / $ 15 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE & $ 75 0 N M AC C A P TIV E C A S H

2 3 ,4 15

*

OR

W / $750 N IS S AN R EB ATE

$

L EAS E FOR *

219

*

OR

$

L EAS E FOR *

179 P ER M O.

24 M O NTH L EA SE

2012 N IS S A N A L TIM A COUP E 2.5S 32 M P G

STK#N 21002 M O D EL# 15112 M SR P $25,450

HW Y

4 Cyl, CVT , A/C, AM /F M /CD, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, Blu eto o th, M u ch M o re!

P lu s Ta x.

$

B U Y FO R

2 1,9 9 5

W / $150 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE

O FFER S END 2/29/12

V-6, CVT , L T D E d t. W heels , M o o n ro o f, A/C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, M u ch M o re!

*

*

OR

E E H L W OF

349

$

STK#N 21472 M O D EL# 23212 M SR P $32,525

B U Y FOR

27,495

*

W / $15 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $5 0 0 N IS S AN P R ES ID EN T’S D AY B O N U S CAS H

OR

*

P ER M O.

$

P lu s Ta x.

L EAS E FOR

*

28 9 P ER M O. P lu s Ta x.

*$289 Perm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $17,238.25; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $2,325 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2,522.50. In clu d es $725 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te a n d $500 Nis s a n Pres id en t’s Da y Bo n u s Ca s h.

0FIN AN CIN% G* AVAIL APABRL E

0FIN AN CIN% G AVAILAPABRL E *

2011 N IS S A N P A THFIN DE R S IL V E R E DT. 4X4

2012 N IS S A N FRON TIE R K IN G CA B 4X4 S V

You rPen n sylva n ia M ASSIV E IN V EN TO RY!

10 KING C A B S A VA ILA B LE! 6 SP EEDS & A U TO M A TIC S!

3 A VA ILA B LE @ TH IS P R IC E! SA VE O VER $7000 O FF M SR P !

V-6, Au to m a tic, L ea ther, Hea ted S ea ts , Allo ys , PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, Pro Pkg, a n d M u ch M o re!!

$

P lu s Ta x.

V-6, CVT , A/C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, S p la s h Gu a rd s & F lo o rM a ts !

*$349 Perm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $16,666.30; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $2,000 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2,197.50. $1000 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te.

STK#N 21021 M O D EL# 25411 M SR P $39,150

229 P ER M O.

6 A VA ILA B LE @ TH IS P R IC E!

OR

$

*

2012 N IS S A N M URA N O S A W D

W / $150 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE

LEAS E FOR

$

L EAS E FOR

*$229 Perm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $13,743; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $2,000 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2,197.50.

DEAL D EA L S

SA VE $5000 O FF M SR P O N A LL 2012 M A XIM A ’S

28 ,735

C A LL M R .G R EEN FO R DETA ILS

P lu s Ta x.

L IM ITE D E DITION

$

IS H ER E NO W !

P ER M O.

2012 N IS S A N M A XIM A 3.5S

B U Y FOR

NISSA N LEA F

*$179 PerM o n th p lu s ta x, 24 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $15,244.80; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $2,000 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery $2,197.50. $850 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed .

*$219 Perm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p er yea r; Res id u a l= $15,320.70; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier 1; $2,000 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2,197.50. $1000 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed .

STK#N 21283 M O D EL# 16112 M SR P $33,735

32 M P G HW Y

4 Cyl, CVT , A/C, AM /F M /CD, Pu s h Bu tto n S ta rt, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt& M u ch M o re!

26 M P G HW Y

B U Y FO R

A LL NEW A LL ELEC TR IC

O R M O R E O N A LL 2012 A LTIM A S!

B U Y FOR

31,995

*

OR

W / $2 5 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE

$

LEAS E FOR

38 9

*

P ER M O. P lu s Ta x.

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JUS T A RRIV E D!

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STK#N 21331 M O D EL# 31412 M SR P $29,015

A V A IL A BL E IN S TOCK

300 M ore Ca rs, Tru ck s, V a n s& SUV s To Ch oose From !

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PAGE 4G SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 412 Autos for Sale

439

Motorcycles

VOLKSWAGEN `09 HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘05 SCREAMING EAGLE BEETLE Excellent condition, V-ROD 20,000 miles, all Orange & Black.

power, sun roof, kayak and bike rack included. $14,900. 570-864-2300

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

CADILLAC `77original COUPE 70,000

miles. Leather interior. Excellent condition. $2,500. Call 570-282-4272 or 570-877-2385

CHEVROLET `’57 BEL AIR 2 door, hardtop, im-

maculate, full restoration, white with red interior $48,500 570-237-0968

CHEVROLET `76 PICKUP 4 CYLINDER Very Good Condition! $5,500. 570-362-3626 Ask for Lee

Chrysler ‘68 New Yorker

Sedan. 440 Engine. Power Steering & brakes. 34,500 original miles. Always garaged. Reduced to $5995 Firm. 883-4443

DESOTO CUSTOM ‘49 4 DOOR SEDAN

3 on the tree with fluid drive. This All American Classic Icon runs like a top at 55MPH. Kin to Chrysler, Dodge, Plymouth, Imperial Desoto, built in the American Midwest, after WWII, in a plant that once produced B29 Bombers. In it’s original antiquity condition, with original shop & parts manuals, she’s beautifully detailed and ready for auction in Sin City. Spent her entire life in Arizona and New Mexico, never saw a day of rain or rust. Only $19,995. To test drive, by appointment only, Contact Tony at 570-899-2121 or penntech84th@ gmail.com

FORD SALEEN ‘04 281 SC Coupe

1,000 miles documented #380 Highly collectable. $28,500 570-472-1854

MAZDA `88 RX-7 CONVERTIBLE

1 owner, garage kept, 65k original miles, black with grey leather interior, all original & never seen snow. $7,995. Call 570-237-5119

MAZDA `88 RX-7

Used as a show bike. Never abused. 480 miles. Excellent condition. Asking $13,500 or best offer. 570-876-4034

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘05 V-ROD VRSCA

Blue pearl, excellent condition, 3,100 miles, factory alarm with extras. $10,500. or best offer. Tony 570-237-1631

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘08 FLHTCU. Ultra

classic, mint condition. white & black pearls. 6,500 miles. Reduced to $17,500 Call Bill 570-262-7627

YAMAHA ‘97 ROYALSTAR 1300

12,000 miles. With windshield. Runs excellent. Many extras including gunfighter seat, leather bags, extra pipes. New tires & battery. Asking $4,000 firm. (570) 814-1548

442 RVs & Campers

Super Lite Fifth Wheel. LCD/DVD flat screen TV, fireplace, heated mattress, ceiling fan, Hide-a-Bed sofa, outside speakers & grill, 2 sliders, aluminum wheels, , awning, microwave oven, tinted safety glass windows, fridge & many accessories & options. Excellent condition, $22,500. 570-868-6986 WINNEBAGO ‘02 ADVENTURER 35 Foot, double slides, V-10 Ford. Central air, full awnings, one owner, pet & smoke free. Excellent condition and low mileage. $68,000. Call 570-594-6496

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

BUICK `05 RENDEZVOUS BARGAIN!!

AWD, Fully loaded, 1 owner, 22,000 miles. Small 6 cylinder. New inspection. Like new, inside & out. $13,000. (570) 540-0975 Buick `06 Rainier CXL BURGUNDY & GREY, LEATHER SUNROOF, AWD

ACME AUTO SALES 343-1959

1009 Penn Ave Scranton 18509 Across from Scranton Prep

Cadillac `07 Escalade, pearl white, black leather, 3rd seat, 4x4 (570) 343-1959

BMW 2010 K1300S

Only 460 miles! Has all bells & whistles. Heated grips, 12 volt outlet, traction control, ride adjustment on the fly. Black with lite gray and red trim. comes with BMW cover, battery tender, black blue tooth helmet with FM stereo and black leather riding gloves (like new). paid $20,500. Sell for

$15,000 FIRM.

Call 570-262-0914 Leave message.

Call Our Auto Credit Hot Line to get Pre-approved for a Car Loan!

800-825-1609

www.acmecarsales.net

ACME AUTO SALES 343-1959

1009 Penn Ave Scranton 18509 Across from Scranton Prep

GOOD CREDIT, BAD CREDIT, NO CREDIT Call Our Auto Credit Hot Line to get Pre-approved for a Car Loan!

800-825-1609

www.acmecarsales.net

CHEVY `00 SILVERADO

1500. 4x4. 8’ box. Auto. A/C. 121K miles. $5,995. 570-332-1121

CHEVY `10 SILVERADO HARLEY 2011 4 Door Crew Cab 4 wheel drive. HERITAGE SOFTTAIL LTZ. Excellent condition, Black. 1,800 miles. ABS brakes. Security System Package. $16,000 firm. SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY 570-704-6023

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

CHEVY ‘05 SILVERADO

2WD. Extra cab. Highway miles. Like new! $6,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

CHEVY ‘10 EQUINOX LT

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 Electra Glide, Ultra Classic, many chrome accessories, 13k miles, Metallic Emerald Green. Garage kept, like new condition. Includes Harley cover. $12,900 570-718-6769 570-709-4937

4.0-ATM, 4WD, 128,000 miles, full power, minor body & mechanical work needed for state inspection. Recent radiator & battery. $2,500. OBO. 570-239-8376

To place your ad Call Toll Free 1-800-427-8649

JEEP ‘04 GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO 4x4. Auto. 6 cylinder. $8,995 WARRANTY MAFFEI AUTO SALES 570-288-6227

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

CHEVY 99 SILVERADO 4X4 Auto. V8. Bargain

price! $3,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

JEEP ‘07 Grand Cherokee

1 owner, alloys, PW & PL $17,490

low mileage. $35,500. Call 570-655-2689

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

CHEVY ‘03 SILVERADO

4x4. Extra clean. Local new truck trade! $5,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

KIA ‘10 SOUL

1 owner, moonroof, alloys $15,990

451

Luxury people mover! 87,300 well maintained miles. This like-new van has third row seating, power side & rear doors. Economical V6 drivetrain and all available options. Priced for quick sale $6,295. Generous trade-in allowances will be given on this top-of-the-line vehicle. Call Fran 570-466-2771 Scranton

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

CHRYSLER ‘02 TOWN & COUNTRY V6. Like new!

4WD. SR5. TRD. V-6. $10,880

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

TOYOTA ‘07 YARIS

GREAT MPG’S, AUTO, CD $7995

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

457 Wanted to Buy Auto WANTED

Good Used Cars & Trucks. Highest Prices Paid!!! Call V&G

MERCURY `03 MOUNTAINEER

AWD. Third row seating. Economical 6 cylinder automatic. Fully loaded with all available options. 93k pampered miles. Garage kept. Safety / emissions inspected and ready to go. Sale priced at $8,995. Trade-ins accepted. Tag & title processing available with purchase. Call Fran for an appointment to see this outstanding SUV. 570-466-2771 Scranton

NISSAN `04 PATHFINDER FORD ‘02 ESCAPE ARMADA 4WD V6 Excellent condition.

FORD ‘02 EXPLORER

Red, XLT, Original non-smoking owner, garaged, synthetic oil since new, excellent in and out. New tires and battery. 90,000 miles. $7,500 (570) 403-3016

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD ‘02 F150 Extra Cab. 6

Cylinder, 5 speed. Air. 2WD. $4,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD ‘06 ESCAPE XLT

4x4. Sunroof. Like new. $6,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

FORD ‘08 ESCAPE XLT

Leather, alloys & moonroof $17,800 PW & PL $17,490

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

HONDA ‘09 CRV LX AWD. 1 owner. $16,900

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

Too many options to list. Runs & looks excellent. $10,995 570-655-6132 or 570-466-8824

RANGE ROVER ‘07 SPORT Supercharged

59,000 miles, fully loaded. Impeccable service record. $36,000 570-283-1130

610

Business Opportunities

daily. Full kitchen. A-1 location. Owner has other interests. Serious inquiries only. Call 570-357-0926

Do you need more space? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way to clean out your closets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

630 Money To Loan “We can erase your bad credit 100% GUARANTEED.” Attorneys for the Federal Trade Commission say they’ve never seen a legitimate credit repair operation. No one can legally remove accurate and timely information from your credit report. It’s a process that starts with you and involves time and a conscious effort to pay your debts. Learn about managing credit and debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

700 MERCHANDISE 708

Antiques & Collectibles

Business Opportunities

TAX REFUND COMING?

INVEST IN YOURSELF WITH JAN – PRO Quote from current Franchisee, “I started with a small investment & I have grown my business over 600%. It definitely changed my life and I would recommend Jan-Pro.” * Guaranteed Clients * Steady Income * Insurance & Bonding * Training & Ongoing Support * Low Start Up Costs * Accounts available throughout WilkesBarre & Scranton

570-824-5774

Jan-Pro.com

LIQUOR LICENSE and equipment for

sale. Luzerne Co. By appointment only 570-824-3223 LIQUOR LICENSE FOR SALE. Luzerne County. $23,000. 570-574-7363