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New England scores early and often, and the Denver Broncos and Tim Tebow see season end.

The Times Leader timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE, PA

SPORTS SHOWCASE

PSU SCANDAL

SYRACUSE 78 PROV. 55 FLORIDA ST. 90 UNC 57

STATE COLLEGE — Joe Paterno sat in a wheelchair at the family kitchen table where he has eaten,prayedandarguedformore than a half-century. All around him family members were shouting at each other, yet he was whispering. Lung cancer has robbed him of the breath to say all that he wants to about the scandal he still struggles to comprehend, and which ended his career as head football coach at Penn State University. The words come like gusts. “I wanted to build up, not break down,” he said. Crowded around the table were

Of Sandusky, he says he thought his superiors would handle situation better than him

“So I … turned it over to some other people, people I thought would have a little more expertise than I did. It didn’t work out that way.” Joe Paterno On why he didn’t follow up more aggressively after 2002 incident

potatoes spun by, swirling as fast as the arguments. “If you go hungry, it’s your own fault,” Paterno likes to say. But Paterno, 85, could not eat. He sipped Pepsi over crushed ice from a cup. Once, it would have been bourbon. His hand showed a tremor, and a wig replaced his once-fine head of black hair. Paterno’s hope is that time will be his ally when it comes to judging what he built, versus what broke down. “I’m not 31 years old trying to prove something to anybody,” he said. “I know where I am.” This is where he is: wracked

his three voluble sons, Scott, Jay, David, daughter Mary Kay, and his wife of 50 years, Sue, all chattering at once. In the middle of the table a Lazy Susan loaded with trays of cornbread and mashed See PATERNO, Page 13A

JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST

Joe Paterno, wearing a wig as he has lost his hair because of chemotherapy, speaks to a reporter this week.

OUR AREA’S BINGE DRINKING

UCONN 67 N. DAME 53

A PROBLEM ON TAP

KENTUCKY 65 TENNESSEE 62 NHL

DEVILS 2 JETS 1

For 15 minutes, the game sputtered along with neither team reaching 20 points. King’s and Eastern were shooting a combined 25 percent from the floor. But the Monarchs would not only go on to beat the Eagles 74-66 Saturday, they hit their season scoring average in the process. Sports, 1C

By MARK GUYDISH mguydish@timesleader.com

INSIDE A NEWS: Local 3A Nation & World 5A Obituaries 10A B PEOPLE: Birthdays 9B C SPORTS: Scoreboard 2C Outdoors 12C D BUSINESS: Motley Fool 4D

F ETC.: Puzzles 2F Books 5F Travel 6F G CLASSIFIED

WEATHER Benjamin Antonik Sunny and cold. High 22. Low 12. Details, Page 14C

DON CAREY PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

Nicole Bohonko, a bartender at Lucky’s SportHouse in Wilkes-Barre Township, pours a beer Friday. Amid responsible drinking, the area has a problem with binge drinking, research indicates.

Northeast Pa. near the top

Drink servers have resource

SCRANTON – When he was 24, John Knowles said, he consumed a case of beer each night with the goal of getting blackout drunk, waking up and repeating the process daily. Editor’s note: The former restauThis is the first of rant and bar supply a two-part series salesman, who began exploring NEPA’s drinking at 13, said alhigh national cohol was easy to ranking in binge come by. But, he said, drinking. it also created more problems than the daily ones he was trying to escape. “They say that alcohol is a great solvent. It removes jobs, families, careers, and freedom. It certainly did all of those An order of drinks is ready at Lucky’s

By ANDREW M. SEDER aseder@timesleader.com

Binge drinking can occur in the privacy of one’s bedroom, at a house party or just about anywhere else. But it will be discouraged at bars and restaurants where employees have been trained to recognize and prevent it. Using the state-certified Responsible Alcohol Management Program, or RAMP, liquor license holders in the state are able to obtain training for staff members that deal with alcohol. The offering has been well used by the local restaurants owned by Dallas-based The Metz Group.

See BINGE, Page 14A

See SERVERS, Page 14A

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

SportHouse.

6

09815 10077

Book ‘Kids for Cash’ focuses on children

Former Philadelphia Inquirer reporter says impetus for book was plight of the children.

KING’S ON TOP

E VIEWS: Editorial 2E Forum 3E

$1.50

Paterno: ‘No inkling’ until 2002

By SALLY JENKINS The Washington Post

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

Pulitzer Prize-winning former Philadelphia Inquirer reporter William Ecenbarger was drawn into the Luzerne County corruption scandal by another person’s sudden illness. He quickly was so caught up in the drama he decided to write a book, which he expects to hit the stands this summer. “I was doing a little freelancing for the Inquirer, mainly feature stuff,” Ecenbarger recalled. “One night in October 2009 I got a call from the managing editor, who said someone in the Harrisburg Bureau fell ill and he needed somebody to cover a hearing. It was the first hearing of the Interbranch Commission on Juvenile Justice.” The commission was formed by the state Legislature to look into the causes of the scandal, which began in January when federal prosecutors accused thencounty Judges Mark Ciavarella and Michael Conahan of accepting $2.6 million in kickbacks from private individuals in exchange for actions from the bench that benefited private juvenile detention centers. “I vaguely knew the story,” Ecenbarger said. “I was living in Maine at the time it broke. But I didn’t really have a grip on it, so I tried to cram myself with all the info I could that night.” Children in middle While the saga had plenty of built-in drama – influential judges falling from grace, plea bargains struck, rejected and renegotiated, a climactic trial of Ciavarella that gripped the area for two weeks – Ecenbarger said the impetus for the book was the plight of the children caught in the middle. “It’s a great story, and to me there was a great point to be made See BOOK, Page 11A


K PAGE 2A

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

POLICE BLOTTER

10 Jenks Lane, and Patrick Evans, of Elizabeth Street, Pittston, will be charged with harassment after striking one WILKES-BARRE – City another in a domestic dispute police reported the following: Friday at Salmon’s residence. • Police are warning resi• Russell Meyers, 20, of dents of a possible telephone scam. A few residents reported North Main Street, was charged with retail theft Friday receiving calls from someone claiming to represent a reputa- afternoon after he stole items from the Rite Aid Pharmacy at ble agency such as a law firm, 155 E. Northampton St., police business or health insurance said. Store personnel provided company. The callers contactpolice a description of Meyers ed the residents with basic information such as name, date and he was apprehended on South Main Street shortly after of birth, and address but re2 p.m. Store personnel identiquest Social Security informafied him as the man who fled tion. the store without paying for To date there are no open the items. cases of fraud or identity theft • James C. Lehman, of Harelated to the calls. Police advised residents who suspect nover Township, caused a a fraudulent phone solicitation two-vehicle crash Friday afternoon when he ran a red light at to request a name and phone the intersection of Hazle Avenumber and return the call nue and Parrish Street, police before providing sensitive said. Lehman was traveling information. south on Hazle in a 2007 VolksAnyone who suspects he or wagen Rabbit around 2:20 p.m. she might have been a victim of identity theft or a telephone and struck a 2006 Dodge Dakoscam should contact city police ta driven by Kenneth C. Woods of Wilkes-Barre. Woods had a at 570 826-8114. green light and was traveling • Gerald Pender, 34, no address provided, was charged west on Parrish through the intersection. There were no with public drunkenness early Saturday morning after he was injuries and both vehicles were towed from the scene. escorted from the Hardware • David Thurston, 23, of Bar on South Main Street by Dougher Lane, was charged security personnel and argued with terroristic threats and with police. harassment for sending 214 • Alysia Ons reported Sattext messages to his half sister urday a package delivered by Theresa Velazquez of North the U.S. Postal Service was Pennsylvania Avenue between removed from her front porch Dec. 25 and Wednesday. at 74 Academy St. • Carl D. Yeager, 31, of Sugar DURYEA – Police reported Notch, was charged with drivthe following: ing under the influence Sat• Two people were charged urday. by police on allegations they Police said they stopped stole scrap metal. Yeager after he committed a Desirae J. Anselmi, 33, and traffic violation at 11:41 p.m. John G. Mattie, 45, both of Friday at the intersection of Exeter, were charged with Andover Street and Strauss defiant trespass and criminal Lane. Blood and breath tests found conspiracy to commit theft. Yeager’s blood alcohol content Anselmi was further charged with terroristic threats, and to be above the legal limit for Mattie was charged with aggradrivers of .08 percent, police vated assault, theft and receivsaid. He was released into the ing stolen property. custody of a sober adult. Anselmi and Mattie were • Cleatrice Dempsey, 49, of arraigned by District Judge Plains Township, was charged with driving under the influen- Joseph Carmody and released on $5,000 and $10,000 unce Saturday. secured bail, respectively. Police said they stopped According to police: Dempsey, who was driving A security guard at Airport without headlights, at 2:16 a.m. Sand and Gravel near Stephenat the intersection of Hazle Street and South Pennsylvania son Street spotted two people stealing scrap metal on ThursAvenue. Blood and breath tests found day. The security guard apDempsey’s blood alcohol content to be above the legal limit proached the two people, identified as Anselmi and Mattie, for drivers of .08 percent, police said. She was released into who claimed the company owner permitted them to take the custody of a sober adult. the scrap metal. • Megan Tarnalicki of Mattie attempted to drive Wilkes-Barre said Saturday away and accelerated his truck, someone removed her vehicle colliding into the security from Vine Street, where she guard’s vehicle, police said. left it running with the keys Police allege Anselmi threatinside. ened the security guard after • Donovan Arnold, 21, of she was arrested. Carey Avenue, was charged Preliminary hearings are with possession of a controlled scheduled on Jan. 18. substance on Saturday. • A house left vacant since Police said they stopped Arnold, who was driving errat- the September flood was burglarized. ically, at Scott Street and CoPolice said a man walking a nyngham Avenue at 12:58 a.m. dog noticed an open door to Saturday. Police said Arnold the vacant house in the 100 gave police a false ID and was block of Chittenden Street on found to be in possession of a Thursday. controlled substance. Copper pipes were stolen • Lauren Kravitz of State from the basement, police said. Street, Nanticoke, reported Anyone with information Friday the contents of her about the burglary and theft is purse were stolen after she asked to call Duryea police at accidentally left it in a shop457-1721 ext. 2. ping cart before leaving the Burlington Coat Factory store WEST PITTSTON – Two at 47 Spring St. brothers who told police they • Isabel Thomas of Lehigh were under the influence of Street reported Friday a gunbath salts were charged with shot damaged her window. stealing items from a shed. Police located a metal pellet Jeremy Asay, 25, and Jason between the two panes of her Asay, 26, both of Stanton window. Street, West Pittston, were • Carmen Inocente, 46, of charged with theft, criminal Madison Street, will be charged with harassment after conspiracy to commit theft, receiving stolen property, loihe cursed at a neighbor’s 9tering at night and criminal year-old son Friday. The boy trespass. Jeremy Asay was was near Inocente’s vehicle further charged with criminal looking for a cat that ran outmischief. side from his residence. They were arraigned Mon• Cassie Manganelli of day by District Judge Joseph Wilkes-Barre said Friday that someone entered 383 N. Wash- Carmody in West Pittston. Jeremy Asay remained jailed ington St. and removed a 47Friday at the Luzerne County inch flat screen television set. Correctional Facility for lack of • Joseph Cuellar of Arm$20,000 bail, and Jason Asay strong Street, Edwardsville, was released on $20,000 unreported Friday afternoon his secured bail. silver Pacific mountain bike Police allege Jeremy Asay was stolen from inside the broke a lock on a shed behind a lobby of 15 S. Main St. house on Stanton Street, and • David Wasnalis, 45, no known address, and Lynn Bell, the two brothers stole tools and model trains on Dec. 2. 52, of Grove Street, were arJason Asay claimed they were rested on public drunkenness under the influence of bath charges Friday afternoon after police responded to a report of salts at the time of the alleged a fight and found them intheft, according to the criminal toxicated in the area of 35 S. complaints. Franklin St. Preliminary hearings are • Mary Beth Salmon, 26, of scheduled on Jan. 18.

➛ timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

Scoring for a cause A day of fun and bowling targets autism, thanks to a concerned local student. By GERI GIBBONS Times Leader Correspondent

WILKES-BARRE – Sixteenyear-old Nate Sauers wore a big smile as he looked around at other bowlers on Saturday afternoon. He knew that they were taking part not just in a bit of weekend recreation, but in raising money for autism, a cause that he holds close to his heart. When Sauers’ graduation project gave him an opportunity to make a difference in his community, the Plains Township resident thought long and hard about what project he wanted to undertake. The Coughlin High School junior said that he decided to devote his time and energy to the Supporting Autism and Families Everywhere program. More than 55 area residents participated in the event. Many had family members afflicted with autism and said such events gave their families an opportunity to socialize with other families who had an understanding of the challenges of autism. Sandy Wazeter, Wilkes-Barre, a member of SAFE, said that the event was an opportunity to bowl with her son Gerard. She lauded Sauers for his efforts. Meg Lukaszewski, director of Children’s Services at Step by Step, also shared her enthusiasm for the event. "The event not only raised money for the SAFE program, but also raised awareness of autism in the community," said Lukaszewski, who also chairs the Luzerne County Autism Coalition. The event, which cost each bowler $20, with most of the money going directly to SAFE,

www.timesleader.com

Lottery summary Daily Number, Midday Sunday: 4-7-4 Monday: 4-4-9 Tuesday: 8-7-5 Wednesday: 8-0-1 Thursday: 8-5-7 (4-7-9, double draw) Friday: 0-6-9 Saturday: 9-2-0 Big Four, Midday Sunday: 7-8-5-8 Monday: 2-1-9-9 Tuesday: 7-5-9-8 Wednesday: 7-3-4-0 Thursday: 1-6-5-5 Friday: 6-8-0-2 Saturday: 0-2-9-3 Quinto, Midday Sunday: 5-0-0-9-3 Monday: 0-9-0-6-0 Tuesday: 9-9-0-5-2 Wednesday: 0-4-3-0-6 Thursday: 5-8-0-1-5 Friday: 7-2-1-6-3 Saturday: 2-1-9-7-9 Treasure Hunt Sunday: 09-12-22-23-28 Monday: 15-20-23-26-28 Tuesday: 02-08-15-20-23 Wednesday: 07-08-10-21-22 Thursday: 02-06-11-13-16 Friday: 02-09-16-18-20 Saturday: 01-17-24-26-28

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Nathan Searfoss, 11, takes part in a fundraiser called ‘Get a Strike for Autism’ at Chacko’s Family Bowling Center Saturday.

filled 11 lanes of the bowling alley and raised a sizable amount. The $20 included two hours of bowling, shoes, T-shirts and pizza. Sauers credits his mother, mother, Leslie, a therapeutic staff support worker at Step by Step, for inspiring him to make a difference. He said the chronic nature of the disorder makes it important to consistently support those who are affected by it and their families. Linda Fisher and her family, Wilkes-Barre, members of SAFE, attended and thoroughly enjoyed the event and the support that it showed for autistic children and their families. Her son Jared, who suffers

from autism and attends the Graham Academy in Luzerne, was all smiles has he enjoyed pizza. Daughters Melanie and Hayley also said they had a good time and they thought raising money for autism was a very worthwhile use of their time and energy. Autism is a complex development disability that affects social interaction and communication. Symptoms are identified on a spectrum and vary in nature and severity. SAFE attempts to support those who have autism and their families in the Wyoming Area. SAFE always welcomes new members and can be accessed at their website http://www.autismsafe.org.

CLICK: HANOVER AREA CHILI CONTEST

Daily Number, 7 p.m. Sunday: 6-8-7 Monday: 3-7-8 Tuesday: 1-4-9 Wednesday: 7-8-3 Thursday: 8-0-5 Friday: 6-1-2 Saturday: 9-5-7 Big Four, 7 p.m. Sunday: 8-6-4-1 Monday: 6-7-1-5 Tuesday: 9-5-0-4 Wednesday: 6-4-2-1 Thursday: 3-3-9-0 Friday: 8-6-2-8 Saturday: 0-1-6-8 Quinto, 7 p.m. Sunday: 9-3-6-3-0 Monday: 3-4-4-7-2 Tuesday: 0-9-8-3-5 Wednesday: 0-6-5-0-8 Thursday: 7-8-4-3-5 Friday: 2-5-8-6-8 Saturday: 9-5-8-1-2 Cash 5 Sunday: 01-09-20-24-35 Monday: 04-12-19-21-36 Tuesday: 02-19-25-30-42 Wednesday: 04-24-26-32-40 Thursday: 14-25-27-31-43 Friday: 03-06-09-15-42 Saturday: 04-09-13-16-29 Match 6 Lotto Monday: 11-15-17-26-27-34 Thursday: 12-15-17-24-34-41 Powerball Wednesday: 05-19-29-45-47 powerball: 25 powerplay: 02 Saturday: 10-30-36-38-41 powerball: 01 powerplay: 05 Mega Millions Tuesday: 04-10-16-38-48 Megaball: 34 Megaplier: 03 Friday: 10-27-28-37-51 Megaball: 19 Megaplier: 03

OBITUARIES

PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

Joe Dubinski, coordinator, left; judges Shannon Gorham, Colleen Hannagan, Dan Malloy, Dan Claherty, Steve Biernacki, Jen Turel and Dr. Kate Clemente.

Foersch, Mary Giordano, James Kerns, Charlotte Pianovich, Matushka Milewski, Josephine Quadro, Anthony Sr. Repotski, Elaine Shaw, Ruth Stull, Gladys Wasmanski, Mary Weksner, John Page 10A

BUILDING TRUST

Sean K. Reilly, left, and Nicholas Dubinski.

Front row, Karly Bennett, left; Shelby Monk, Genna Gorham and Alexa Jarboe; back row, Jake Finn, Renee Saraka and Lauren Richmond

The Times Leader strives to correct errors, clarify stories and update them promptly. Corrections will appear in this spot. If you have information to help us correct an inaccuracy or cover an issue more thoroughly, call the newsroom at 829-7242.

+(ISSN No. 0896-4084) USPS 499-710

Issue No. 2012-015 Newsroom

829-7242 jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com

Circulation

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Published daily by: Impressions Media 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Periodicals postage paid at Wilkes-Barre, PA and additional mailing offices Postmaster: Send address changes to Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711

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CMYK ➛ timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

I N

B R I E F

HARRISBURG

Environment award opens

State Rep. Sid Michaels Kavulich, D-Taylor, has announced that the state Department of Environmental Protection is now accepting applications for the 2012 Governor’s Environmental Excellence Award. The award is open to any Pennsylvania business, government agency, educational institution, individual or farm that has parKavulich ticipated in the development of a project that promotes environmental stewardship and economic development in the state. "This is a great opportunity to recognize innovators that are working on projects that provide environmental benefits throughout the Commonwealth," Kavulich said. Eligible projects include environmental technology innovation, clean energy innovation, pollution prevention and resource efficiency, community revitalization, environmental education or outreach, watershed stewardship, and mine safety, among others. According to DEP, the project must have been completed between Aug. 1, 2010, and July 31, 2011. Each candidate may submit only one application for a particular project; however, companies with multiple facilities may submit an application for each facility. Previously awarded projects are not eligible for this award, but past winners may submit applications for new projects for consideration. Additional information regarding guidelines and eligibility can be obtained by visiting www.depweb.state.pa.us/<http://www.depweb.state.pa.us/> and searching "Governor’s Environmental Excellence Award". The deadline to submit projects is 5 p.m. Jan. 30.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

LOCAL GREEN ENERGY

Keystone Automation builds components that could lower cost of panels to heat water

Local company aiding solar test

David Page of SWF Industrial and Mark McKinnie of Keystone Automation in Duryea watch as a mast is set on a base at the Flat Iron Building in Bethlehem on Saturday for solar panel testing.

market. In fact, Keystone Automation executives said it will likely be less efficient than most solar panels being manuTo see additional factured today. But bephotos, visit cause the dish is made www.times of polished aluminum, leader.com rather than glass, it would be much cheaper to produce than conventional solar panels. That could make the dish the first source of solar energy to be cost-competitive with fossil fuels without government subsidies. CEWA Technologies President and CEO J. Paul Eisenhuth said that when

By MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

BETHLEHEM – Workers on Saturday erected an experimental solar dish that a Duryea company is hoping will change the economics of green energy. The prototype solar concentrator dish was mounted on the roof of environmental consulting firm The Stone House Group’s building in downtown Bethlehem, Lehigh County. The collection dish itself, which measures about 21 feet in diameter, was constructed by CEWA Technologies Inc., of Bethlehem, while its 12-foot support structure and mast was designed and built by Keystone Automation of Duryea. The dish was not designed to be the most efficient solar collector on the See SOLAR, Page 4A

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Area members protest lockout at Cooper Tire & Rubber plant

By MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

Geisinger plans Kids Day

HARRISBURG

Distracted driving targeted

Pennsylvania high school students are invited to enter a PennDOT contest aimed at discouraging distracted driving. Students can submit a 30-second radio public service announcement, or PSA, and the winning announcement will be professionally produced and sent to the student’s local media market. To enter the contest, high school sophomores, juniors and seniors should submit recorded scripts in MP3 or MP4 format. Students may also submit written scripts. One finalist will be chosen from each of PennDOT’s 11 engineering districts. The winning students will be invited to travel to Harrisburg to have the PSA professionally recorded and then distributed to their local radio stations. Winning students from each PennDOT district will receive certificates and recorded copies of their PSAs.Entries may be submitted by email toRA-penndotpress@pa.gov<mailto:RA-penndotpress@pa.gov>. Students can also submit entries by mail to: PennDOT Press Office, c/o Erin Waters, 8th Floor-Keystone Building, 400 North St., Harrisburg, PA, 17120. Entries must be received or postmarked by March 23.Visit www.DriveSafePA.org<http:// www.DriveSafePA.org> for full contest rules.

Study focus is evacuees with pets

A University of Pennsylvania project will test the impact of a change in law for Hurricane Irene.

DANVILLE

Children’s Miracle Network at Geisinger invites individuals, groups and businesses to show they care for kids by taking part in Caring for Kids Day 2012. Caring for Kids Day is designed to raise awareness of Janet Weis Children’s Hospital pediatric services, not just in Danville, but in 32 counties in Pennsylvania and in more than 45 family practice sites with pediatric services. T-shirts are available in adult sizes small through XL for $15, 2XL through 3XL for $20, and child sizes small through large for $10. Proceeds from the shirt sales go to Children’s Miracle Network at Geisinger. Orders and payment must be received by March 16. For more information or to place your order, call 1-800-322-5437 or (570) 271-6188, or visit www.geisinger.org/ cmn. The funds raised by this event will help to provide pediatric equipment, programs and services at Janet Weis Children’s Hospital and throughout Geisinger Health System.

PAGE 3A●

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Demonstrators Michele Kessler, front, Kerri Gallagher, both of Mountain Top, and Patrick Marshall of Wilkes-Barre join United Steel Workers in protesting the lockout of workers by Cooper Tire Company on Saturday morning.

Unions support Ohio workers By MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE TWP. – Area unions withstood a chilly morning to stand in solidarity with workers at an Ohio factory Saturday. Gathering near the Pep Boys automotive center on Route 309, members of the United Steel Workers and other unions protested the continued lockout of USW workers from a Cooper Tire & Rubber Company plant in Findlay, Ohio. “The United Steel Workers have a history of standing up for all workers’ rights,” said Mike Saporito, principal of the local USW union. “We stand in solidarity with our brothers across the country, to draw attention to Cooper Tires bargaining unfairly.” More than 1000 union workers at the Ohio plant have been locked out

nesses; we love local of their jobs since November “Pretty businesses,” said Rox28 amidst ongoing contract much every anne Pauling of the negotiations. Northeast Pennsylvania Holding signs declaring major tire Area Labor Federation. “corporate greed at Cooper “Pretty much every maTire, flat out wrong” and store sells jor tire store sells Cooper erecting a 10-foot-tall inflata- Cooper Tires.” ble rat by the roadside, protesTires.” The United Steel Worktors Saturday accused the Roxanne Pauling ers were joined by local company of bargaining unfairNortheast members of the United ly and of replacing union Pennsylvania Area Food and Commercial workers who wanted to conLabor Federation Workers, International tinue working through negoLaborers, American Fedtiations with non-union temeration of State, County porary workers. Union representatives said they and Municipal Workers, Teamsters, chose to protest in front of Pep Boys Service Employees International because the store sells Cooper Tires Union, Communication Workers of and because of the visibility of the lo- America, Greater Wilkes-Barre Cencation, but pointed out that Pep Boys tral Labor Council and Carbon Counwas in no way a target of the protest. ty Central Labor Council. About 50 turned out for the protest. “We’re not being mean to local busi-

A week of events will mark the area’s mining history An art exhibit will begin a series of presentations over two counties. By JERRY LYNOTT jlynott@timesleader.com

it at Wilkes University on child labor and the inaugural MonsigCurran nor John J. Curran Memorial Lecture at King’s College. “This is our best program ever,” said Robert P. Wolensky, a Swoyersville native, who teaches at King’s and the University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point. As part of Mining History Week, he will join William

WILKES-BARRE – The region’s mining history will be the focus of a weeklong series of free lectures and events starting Tuesday at locations in Luzerne and Lackawanna counties. What began 14 years ago as a remembrance of the 12 miners who perished in the Knox Mine Disaster on Jan. 22, 1959 has expanded to include a photographic exhib- See MINING, Page 4A

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

•Tuesday, 12:30 – 8 p.m., Wilkes University, Sordoni Gallery, “Let Children be Children: Lewis Wickes Hine’s Crusade against Child Labor.” To March 11. • Tuesday, 7 p.m., Wilkes University, Lecture: Robert P. Wolensky, “The Anthracite Mining Industry during the Lewis Hine Years,” Room 166 Stark Learning Center. •Thursday, 7 p.m., King’s College, the Monsignor John J. Curran Memorial Lecture, Wolensky and William A. Hastie, “The Knox Mine Disaster: The Anthracite Mineworker and The Culture of Corruption,” Room 104, McGowan Business School. •Saturday 2:30 p.m., Anthracite Heritage Museum, Scran-

ton, Knox Mine Disaster, including George “Bucky” Mazur, survivor. • Jan. 22, 10 a.m., St. John the Evangelist Church, Annual Knox Mine Disaster Memorial Mass, William Street, Pittston. • 11:30 a.m., Knox Memorial Monument and PHMC Marker, service in front of the Baloga Funeral Home, Main Street, Port Griffith. • Noon, Walk to Knox Mine Disaster site, Port Griffith • Jan. 24, 7 p.m., Huber Breaker Preservation Society, Lecture: Attorney F. Charles Petrillo, “Last Shift: The End of Deep-Coal Mining in the Wyoming Valley 1959-1974,” Earth Conservancy Building, Main Street, Ashley.

PHILADELPHIA – If you were evacuated from your home when the remnants of Hurricane Irene struck Luzerne County last August, a group of university researchers wishes to hear from you. University of Pennsylvania psychology professor Melissa Hunt is conducting a study to assess the psychological impact of the storm on those who were evacuated to shelters, in particular those who own pets. According to Nick Rohrbaugh, an undergraduate psychology major at Penn and a research assistant on the project, the study is a follow-up to an earlier investigation by Hunt, which found that victims of Hurricane Katrina who had lost pets were more psychologically distressed than people who had lost their homes but had not lost a pet. That study in part led Congress to pass a law in 2006 requiring state and local emergency preparedness authorities to include S H A R E plans to accommodate Y O U R households with pets or S T O R Y service animals when To participate presenting evacuation in the Uniplans to the Federal versity of PennEmergency Manage- sylvania study ment Agency, Rohr- by filling out a survey, go to baugh said. surveymon“We’re trying to see if key.com/upthe changes have had an ennpetstudy. effect since Katrina,” Researchers Rohrbaugh said. “We’re are seeking also looking for more of responses from the effect of what its like residents of to have to evacuate to a any area who were evacuated shelter; so more of the during Hurripsychological aspects as cane Irene. well.” The researchers are asking anyone evacuated from their home because of Irene to fill out a survey online at surveymonkey.com/upennpetstudy. The survey consists of multiple choice questions and takes about 10 minutes to complete. Participants also can provide an email address and if they elect to be contacted may be asked to submit more detailed narrative responses by email. The survey will be available until at least March. “I just think that this is a good opportunity for people who were affected by this to kind of share their voice about what happened during the storm so that hopefully it can improve in the future,” Rohrbaugh said. A tropical storm at the time it hit Luzerne County in late August, Hurricane Irene prompted evacuations of homes near Solomon Creek in South Wilkes-Barre and near Huntsville Creek in Jackson Township. The storm also downed hundreds of trees and power lines and closed dozens of roadways. Though the devastation it wreaked locally was not as severe as that wrought by Tropical Storm Lee only days later, Irene’s impact was felt throughout the Northeast. It caused significant damages along the New Jersey and North Carolina coasts and in Vermont.


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SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

MINING

SOLAR

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Hastie in the Curran lecture entitled, “The Knox Mine Disaster: The Anthracite Mineworker and The Culture of Corruption,” at 7 p.m. Thursday in Room104 of the McGowan Business School. Wolensky described Curran as a champion of the miner. “He’s one of the most important people in anthracite history, certainly the most important clergyman,” said Wolensky. “We need to know who he is.” Curran, who was born in Carbondale, was founding pastor of Holy Savior parish in WilkesBarre. He played a key role in the Anthracite Strike of 1902, counseling John Mitchell, the leader of the United Mine Workers and President Teddy Roosevelt. More than a century has passed since the strike, but the Knox Mine Disaster is still fresh in the minds of many residents of the region. It’s “a good example of living history,” said Wolensky. The remaining survivor of the disaster, George “Bucky” Mazur, will participate in the annual program on the Knox Mine at 2:30 p.m. on Jan. 21 at the Anthracite Heritage Museum in Scranton. Hastie, of West Pittston, helped with the rescue of miners who escaped through an air shaft. “(The disaster) was the result of a corrupt coal company,” said Wolensky. The Knox Coal Co. illegally mined under the Susquehanna River, crossing the stop line to follow a vein of coal up toward the river bed, explained Wolensky. The river broke through, flooding the mine and essentially killing deep mining in the region, he added. “It didn’t die immediately,” said Wolensky. “It continued for a handful of years only because (the mining companies) were pumping their heads off.” Attorney F. Charles Petrillo will discuss the industry’s demise in the final lecture, entitled, “Last Shift: The End of Deep-Coal Mining in the Wyoming Valley 1959-1974.” It will be delivered at 7 p.m. on Jan. 24 in the Earth Conservancy Building in Ashley in front of the Huber Breaker.

installation and maintenance costs are spread over a 30-year life, the dish could produce electricity for about $2 per watt, or about the same cost as fossil fuels. Photovoltaic cell solar generators typically cost $6 to $8 per watt, Eisenhuth said, adding that repairing the new dish can be as simple as gluing a new sheet of polished aluminum on top. “One of the big criticisms of solar is that it’s not cost-effective versus others forms of energy generation,” Eisenhuth

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said. “We’ve always viewed our competition as not only the solar generators but other generators of energy.” The prototype dish will be used to heat water, not generate electricity, for the building, and will measure how well it reflects the suns rays. If it functions properly, it could be combined with technology designed by Dynalene Inc., of Whitehall Township, Lehigh County, which produces power by using reflected light to heat liquefied salt. Water run over the salt then produces steam to spin a turbine and produce electricity. As a manufacturer of key components for the device, Keystone Automation has high

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hopes going into the experiment. Principals for the Duryea-based automated equipment manufacturer, which employs about 25, said the dish could lead to expansion of its facilities and workforce if the dish goes into production. Keystone CEO Mike Duffy said numerous Fortune 100 companies are paying close attention to the experiment, and a major American corporation is considering building a power plant in the southwestern desert with 425 of the dishes if the device works well. “Four-hundred twenty-five of these would put us on the map, AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER and hire a lot of people and expand the building,” Duffy Three components made in Duryea for a solar project rest on a said. flat bed trailer, awaiting installation in Bethlehem.

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At least three dead and roughly 40 unaccounted for as cruise liner wrecks just off shore. Survivors describe ordeal as like ‘Titanic.’

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European downgrade defended by S&P

Action by Standard & Poor’s costs nine European countries their coveted AAA status. AP PHOTO

This beats traveling by broomstick

By ANGELA CHARLTON Associated Press

A group of skiers disguised as witches participate in the 30th ski downhill race at Belalp-Blatten, Southwestern Switzerland, Saturday. The downhill at Belalp is a fun event called ‘Hexenabfahrt’ (downhill of the witches) and many of the 1,500 participants race down the 12km-long slope in colorful costumes.

$4 billion casino is planned

Malaysian company’s plan to build a $4 billion convention center and A big-time casino on the outskirts of New York City could be the biggest shot fired yet in a tourism arms race that has seen a growing number of Eastern states embrace gambling as a way to lure visitors and drum up revenue. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced last week that he would work with the Genting Group, one of the world’s largest and most successful gambling companies, to transform the storied, but sleepy, Aqueduct horse track into a megaplex that would eventually include the nation’s largest convention center, 3,000 hotel rooms, and a major expansion of a casino that began operating at the site in October. The proposal came less than two months after once-puritanical Massachusetts passed a law allowing up to three resort casinos, plus a slot machine parlor, at locations around the state.

ANAHEIM, CALIF.

Suspect in killings

Investigators are “extremely confident” a man in their custody is responsible for all four recent killings of homeless men in Orange County, Anaheim Police Chief John Welter said Saturday, bringing an apparent end to a month of worry and fear among the homeless and those who help care for them. Investigators have tied the killings to Itzcoatl Ocampo, 23, of Yorba Linda, who was detained Friday night after a fourth homeless man was found slain in the parking lot of a fast-food restaurant, Welter said. Witnesses and bystanders at the crime scene chased Ocampo on foot, and he was captured by a police officer who was part of a perimeter set up in response to dozens of 911 calls and other reports. Three other homeless men have been found stabbed to death in north Orange County since mid-December, and a task force had been looking for the single suspect they believed was responsible for all three. CAIRO

Reform leader leaves race

Egypt’s reform leader Mohamed ElBaradei withdrew from the presidential race Saturday, saying a fair election is impossible under the military’s grip nearly a year after Hosni Mubarak’s ouster. Many fear that the ruling generals will push through a candidate of their own to preserve their power. The Nobel Peace laureate’s pullout is a slap to the military and the credibility of its plans for Egypt’s transition. He was seen as the most pro-revolution of the candidates and the strongest advocate of deep change in a country long under autocratic rule. His participation, therefore, gave a degree of legitimacy to the military-run election process. LAS VEGAS

New Miss America crowned

A 23-year-old beauty queen from Kenosha, Wis., has won the Miss America pageant in Las Vegas. Laura Kaeppeler won the pageant Saturday night after strutting in a white bikini and black beaded evening gown, singing opera and answering a question about whether beauty queens should declare their politics by saying Miss America represents everyone. Miss Oklahoma Betty Thompson came in second, while Miss New York Kaitlyn Monte placed third.

AP PHOTO

The luxury cruise ship Costa Concordia lays on its side after running aground near the tiny Tuscan island of Giglio, Italy, Saturday. The incident happened off the coast of Tuscany, sending water pouring in through a 160-foot gash in the hull.

Ship aground off Italy By NICOLE WINFIELD and FRANCES D’EMILIO Associated Press

PORTO SANTO STEFANO, Italy — Survivors who escaped a luxury cruise liner that ran aground and tipped over off Italy’s coast recounted a chaotic and terrifying evacuation through the ship’s upended hallways on Saturday. Three bodies were recovered from the sea after the Costa Concordia with 4,234 people aboard ran The captain of aground hundreds of yards off the tiny island the cruise of Giglio near the coast liner has been of Tuscany late Friday, detained while tearing a 160-foot gash he is investi- in its hull and sending in a rush of water. Some gated on 30 people were injured, allegations of at least two seriously. manslaughter Roughly 40 remained and abandon- unaccounted for. France said two of ing his ship. the victims were French; a Peruvian diplomat identified the third victim as Tomas Alberto Costilla Mendoza, 49, a crewman from Peru. Late Saturday, firefighters who had been searching the ship found two survivors, a honeymooning South Korean couple. A firefighter said the two, about 29 years old, were in good condition. The captain of the cruise liner has been detained while he is investigated on allegations of manslaughter and abandoning his ship. Experts wonder how Francesco Schettino, the 52-year-old captain with 11 years working for the ship’s owner, could hit so close to the island of Giglio given Italy’s well mapped sea lanes.

AP PHOTO

Survivors of the Costa Concordia arrive at the harbor, in Marseille, France, Saturday. At least three people died and roughly 40 were still unaccounted for.

Passengers described a scene reminiscent of “Titanic,” saying they escaped the ship by crawling along hallways, desperately trying to reach safety as the lights went out and plates and glasses crashed around them. Helicopters whisked some survivors to safety, others were rescued by private boats in the area, and witnesses said some people jumped from the ship into the dark, cold sea. At darkness, diving operations were suspended for the night, coast guard officials said. While only a small section of the submerged area was inspected, no signs of any survivors or victims were im-

mediately found, said Capt. Emilio Del Santos, of the port captain’s office in Livorno. Helicopter and sea searches continued, as did door-to-door searches in the non-submerged part of the ship. Passengers complained the crew failed to give instructions on how to evacuate and, once the emergency became clear, delayed lowering the lifeboats until the ship was listing too heavily for many of them to be released. Carnival Corp., which owns the cruise line the ship belongs to, didn’t address the allegations in a statement it issued.

Iraqi blast kills at least 53 Shiite pilgrims at sacred time Bloodshed between rival Muslim sects has risen since U.S. military withdrawal. By ADAM SCHRECK and NABIL AL-JURANI Associated Press

ZUBAIR, Iraq — A bomb tore through a procession of Shiite pilgrims heading toward a largely Sunni town in southern Iraq on Saturday, killing at least 53 people and wounding more than 130 in the latest sign of a power struggle between rival Muslim sects that has escalated since the American military withdrawal. Fears of bloodshed have ris-

en in recent weeks, with the U.S. no longer enjoying the leverage it once had to encourage the two sides to work together to rein in extremists. Most of the latest attacks appear to be aimed at Iraq’s majority Shiites, suggesting Sunni insurgents seeking to undermine the Shiite-dominated government are to blame. Saturday’s blast happened on the last of the 40 days of Arbaeen, when hundreds of thousands of Shiite pilgrims travel to the Iraqi city of Karbala and other holy sites. The end of Arbaeen is one of the most sacred times for Shiites, and public processions to commemorate it were banned under Saddam Hussein. Arbaeen marks the end of

Family members of Mansour Ahmed, 38, load his coffin onto a vehicle before burial in Najaf, 100 miles south of Baghdad, Iraq, Saturday. AP PHOTO

40 days of mourning following the anniversary of the death of Imam Hussein, a revered Shiite figure who is the grandson of the Prophet Muhammad. Pilgrims who cannot make it to Imam Hussein’s grave in the holy city of Karbala, south of Baghdad, often journey to

other sacred sites. The blast occurred near the town of Zubair as pilgrims marched from the nearby port city of Basra toward the Imam Ali shrine on the outskirts of the town, said Ayad al-Emarah, a spokesman for the governor of Basra province.

Marine video not likely to derail talks U.S. is trying to foster peace negotiations between Afghan government and the Taliban. By DEB RIECHMANN Associated Press

KABUL, Afghanistan — A 39second video purporting to show Marines urinating on dead bodies in Afghanistan is straining U.S.-Afghan relations but is not expected to undo months of work aimed at brokering peace with the Taliban. The images have not sparked widespread anti-U.S. protests and Afghan officials say one battlefield abuse cannot derail the peace process, which has gained momentum in recent months with news that the Taliban will open a political office in Qatar. U.S. military officials have sternly condemned the alleged acts of four Marines who appear to be desecrating the bodies of three men lying in the dirt. The U.S. is trying to foster peace talks between Afghan President Hamid Karzai’s government and the Taliban. Recent statements by senior U.S. and Taliban officials suggest the possibility of some trust-building measures in the near future, such as the opening of the Taliban office and the transfer of some Taliban detainees out of the U.S. prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

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PARIS — Amid a wave of criticism, Standard & Poor’s defended its decision to downgrade nine European countries and insisted Saturday that the region’s leaders aren’t doing enough to solve their debt crises. The prime minister of France, the biggest economy hit by the downgrade, vowed to press ahead with cost-cutting measures that opponents say will suffocate growth. The loss of its coveted AAA status wounded France’s self-image and market credibility just as it’s facing a new recession and presidential elections. The move Friday night may make it more expensive for struggling countries to borrow money, reduce debts and sustain growth. It also came just as crucial negotiations between the Greek government and its private creditors appeared close to collapse. Voices rose up Saturday against the power that ratings agencies wield. Critics of S&P have questioned its credibility and relevance before because it failed to foresee the collapse in the U.S. subprime mortgage market, which helped trigger the financial meltdown of 2008. The latest downgrade brought a downbeat end to a mildly encouraging week for Europe’s most debt-laden nations.


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O N T H E C A M PA I G N T R A I L

Rivals watching Romney

Donations mostly ran foundation

Former Sen. Rick Santorum’s fund to help needy helped his political allies even more. By CAROL D. LEONNIG The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — As Republicans gathered for their national convention in Philadelphia a decade ago, Rick Santorum, who was then an up-and-coming senator from Pennsylvania, launched a charity he said would improve the lives of low-income residents in his home state. "Wouldn’t it be a great thing to leave something positive behind other than a bunch of parties and a bunch of garbage?" Santorum told a local reporter. But homeless families and troubled children were not the biggest beneficiaries of "Operation Good Neighbor." Instead, the foundation spent most of its money to run itself, including hundreds of thousands of dollars in fees for fundraising, administration and office rental paid to Santorum’s political allies. The charity also had significant overlap with the senator’s campaigns and his work on Cap-

Other GOP presidential contenders try to prevent his victory in S.C. election. By CHARLES BABINGTON and THOMAS BEAUMONT Associated Press

CHARLESTON, S.C. — With a week left to halt Mitt Romney from AP PHOTO sweeping to a third straight victory, his GOP rivals are struggling in GOP presidential candidate, former Sen. Rick Santorum, arrives for a campaign event Saturday in Greenville, S.C. South Carolina for a theme, momentum and most crucially, one itol Hill. Among the leading do- Ken Berger, president of Charity strong challenger to consolidate nors to the foundation were Navigator, a national organizaconservatives’ misgivings about Pennsylvania development and tion that rates charitable groups, the front-runner. finance firms that had donated said of the group’s giving. "We The dynamics that lifted Romto his election efforts and had in- would tell donors to run ney to wins in Iowa and terests that Santorum had sup- with fear from this orgaNew Hampshire seem nization." ported in the Senate. to be working for him Santorum campaign Santorum, whose last-minute here, even though South surge in the Iowa caucuses has adviser John Brabender Carolina is often debrought new attention to his said the former senator ELECTION scribed as too evangelipresidential bid, portrays him- remains proud of the cal and culturally southself as a common man con- cause he championed. ern for his background. "Senator Santorum cerned about the gap between In some ways, the forthe nation’s rich and poor. But in was very committed to helping mer Massachusetts governor is the case of his charity, his efforts raise funds for Operation Good lucky, benefitting from a fractured ended up mostly helping his Neighbor and did so with the unopposition that has divided the anderstanding that those funds cadre of political friends. ti-Romney vote for months. In othBefore it folded in 2007, the would be used to help many orer ways he is benefiting from foundation raised $2.58 million, ganizations and families located shrewd and well-organized supwith 39 percent of that donated in urban areas of Pennsylvania," porters. He uses TV ads to shore up directly to groups helping the Brabender said. his weaknesses and to batter the riRobert Pratter, who had needy. By industry standards, vals he sees as most threatening. such philanthropic groups served on the charity’s board, In Iowa, the target was former should be donating nearly twice defended its management, sayHouse speaker Newt Gingrich, that, from 75 to 85 percent of ing its fundraising costs and paywho plummeted under the barments to staff and consultants their funds. rage. In South Carolina, it’s former "That’s exceptionally poor," were reasonable. Sen. Rick Santorum, a longtime

2012

champion of home-schooling, anti-abortion efforts and other social conservative causes. Santorum Romney nearly won the Iowa caucus, and some consider him the best bet for unifying the anti-Romney vote. But a private group that supports Romney is pounding Santorum in South Carolina with TV ads and mailings. So is Rep. Ron Paul, the libertarian-leaning candidate who helped attack Gingrich in Iowa. Paul’s ads are especially harsh. They vilify Santorum for pushing pork-barrel projects as a Pennsylvania senator, and they portray him as an insincere conservative.

A group of social conservative leaders meeting in Texas voted Saturday to recommend Santorum as the Romney alternative. But a portion of them preferred Gingrich, who denied Santorum a twothirds majority on their first headto-head ballot, said Tony Perkins, president of the Family Research Council. Perkins said the group’s actions did not constitute an endorsement, adding that some participants will remain Gingrich supporters. He declined to say how he voted. “Santorum was the preferred candidate by a significant majority,” former presidential candidate Gary Bauer told The Associated Press by telephone from Texas. “They were all looking for the best Reagan conservative,” he said. “It came down to things like, who do you most trust.”

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Keeping the arts alive is goal of ‘Follies’ Poor added his two children Students at W-B Academy are ulty members Jennifer Yale and “thoroughly enjoyed’ participaAmanda Sullick. required to perform each year Huntzinger, who has served as ting in the annual event. They in the stage plays. the director for 29 years, started work “countless hours,” beginBy RALPH NARDONE Times Leader Correspondent

DALLAS TWP. – Wilkes-Barre Academy Director Janice Huntzinger takes pride in the performances of her 200 students in the annual “Winter Follies.” “We’re keeping the arts alive,” she said on Saturday during the 13th annual edition of the shows held at Misericordia University. All students who attend the academy, from kindergarten to eighth grade, are required as part of their educational curriculum to perform each year in the follies, which include five stage plays. This year’s schedule includes a play titled “Tiki Tiki Tembo,” done by the kindergarten, a play titled “Aladdin” performed by the first and second grades, “Cinderella” by third and fourth, “Troy Story” by fifth and sixth, and finally, seventh and eighth grades’ “Like a Christmas Carol.” The plays were adapted by fac-

W-B man charged in gun incident

A preliminary hearing is set for Thursday in a dispute that took place on a street.

the annual event and enjoys seeing the “stellar” results of the students’ hard work. She added the benefits of the annual plays are immeasurable. “They learn great self-confidence and oratory skills,” she said. About 20 percent of the school’s graduates actually pursue future careers in the arts because of their experiences here each year, she said. “Drama is a part of the program at the academy,” she said, adding the follies “incorporates” learning and practice. “We feel teaching the arts is important in education,” she added. David Poor, a parent whose daughter, Jenna, and son, Jason, attend the academy and have done their share of performing, agrees. “It is a tremendous learning experience. The school is keeping up with the arts when the arts are leaving so many other schools,” he said.

PUBLIC RECORD Divorces sought and filed in the Luzerne County Prothonotary’s Office from Jan. 9 through 13, 2012: • Jean Mary Tupper, Dallas and Craig Allen Tupper, Dallas • Rita Carey-Nita, Shavertown and Leo Nita, Shavertown • Christopher G. Boris, Hazleton and Angelica M. Pena, Hazleton • Jennifer De Napoli Magnotta, Hanover Township and

ning to prepare each year as early as October, he added. He especially appreciates the camaraderie the program establishes with the students, faculty and families. “It brings the whole school together,” he added. Amanda Sullick, who taught music at the academy for three years and works closely with the children during preparation and performance time, said the involvement of the parents is key to the event’s success. They support them through the hard practices and show up in force each year to cheer them on, she said. Sullick added she sees definite improvements in the students’ learning and attitudes as they progress through the program. As show time approaches, they start enjoying performing, she added. Huntzinger thanked Misericordia University for helping put on this year’s show. She added stuBILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER dents from the university take part in the event production and Haley Sullick, center, is surrounded by Nathaniel Wren, left, Robert Decker, Logan Orlando, Mya help with the lighting and sound. Pyke and Brady Sholtis as first- and second-graders perform ’Aladdin’ on Saturday. Joseph Michael Magnotta, Mountain Top • Mark Slacktish, Monroe Township and Courtney Slacktish, Monroe Township • Jennifer L. Hensley, Conyngham and Jason M. Hensley, Conyngham • Daniel Morris, Laflin and Shelley Morris, Laflin • Daniel John McNulty, Wilkes-Barre and Kristen Nicole Gaydos, Wilkes-Barre • Nicole Lynn West, Swoyersville and Daniel Boyd West, Nanticoke • Edmund O. Sichler, Harveys Lake and Elizabeth Si-

• Donna Didgeon, West chler, Danbury, CT • John R. Petrick, Freeland Wyoming and Roy Didgeon Sr., West Wyoming and Ruth Petrick, Freeland • Deanne Fisk, Sweet Val• Pamela Welsh, Edwardsville and Sean Welsh, Wilkes- ley and Kris Fisk, Sweet Valley Barre Marriage license applica• Anna Krygier, Ross tions filed in the Luzerne Township and Michael KryCounty Register of Wills gier, Nanticoke Office from Jan. 9 through • Dixon Kitonyo, Wilkes13, 2012: Barre and Danielle Daylida, • Abdallah Arajdel and Larksville Lisa Monica Bednarski • Wayne F. Houseman, • Ryan David Macmillan Wilkes-Barre and Anita and Stephanie Dee Paul Houseman, Wilkes-Barre • Robinson Concepcion • Cinnamon Austin, West and Carlenne Hernandez Pittston and Dean Austin, • Jean Rony Montrose and Factoryville

Gicia St. Sauveur • Stephen R. Tattersall and Nicole C. Greiner • Ryan Michael Roberts and Dana Marie Luke • Samuel Martinez Azanza and Tianna Capasso • Jeffrey Allen Norcross and Lois Summa • Donald A. Brominski and Rebecca A. McCaffrey • Jonas Feliciano Nunez and Katherine Marlene Moldan • John Dixon and Sarah Seabridge • David Michael Hossage and Michelle Stacey

WILKES-BARRE – Police arrested a man Saturday on charges he fired a handgun during a domestic dispute on Dana Street. No one was injured. Sharron L. Johnson, 40, of 20 Public Square, was arraigned Saturday before District Judge David Barilla on misdemeanor charges of simple assault, reckless endangerment of another person and propulsion of missiles onto a roadway. According to police, at 9:36 (Sharron) a.m. Saturday, Johnson, who police were dispatched to Daaccording to na Street and police has no Hazle Avenue criminal reon a report of cord, was two men firing handguns at released by each other. (District When police arJudge Anrived at the corner the 9-1-1 drew) Barilla caller told powithout bail. lice the two men fled on Dana Street toward Park Avenue, one on foot and one in a black Mercedes-Benz. Police said they found Johnson in the Mercedes on Park Avenue near South Street and that Johnson waved police down and said “I’m the guy you’re looking for.” Johnson told police he had a gun in his jacket pocket, at which point he was placed in handcuffs and taken to police headquarters. Johnson told police he was driving Timothy Fairconatue, a man he was romantically involved with, to a friend’s house Saturday morning, police said. The two had been arguing since leaving Johnson’s residence at the Ramada Inn. During the argument, Johnson told police he pulled the car over on Dana Street and both men stepped out. Johnson said Fairconatue attempted to start a fight with him, at which point he fired the gun at the ground as a warning shot, according to police. Johnson, who according to police has no criminal record, was released by Barilla without bail. A preliminary hearing has been scheduled for Thursday at 10 a.m. in Central Court.

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Schools have budget woes

Gov. Corbett projects that school employee pension obligations will rise. By MARC LEVY Associated Press

HARRISBURG — A spike in pension obligations could hardly come at a worse time for Pennsylvania’s public schools. Gov. Tom Corbett, who has pledged to oppose any tax increase, will be proposing his second state budget on Feb. 7, and public school officials are worried about getting more bad news after working through the most difficult budget year in just about anyone’s memory. The Corbett administration is projecting that its school employee pension obligations will rise by $320 million next year — or more than 50 percent — after more than doubling in this fiscal year. Meanwhile, public schools are suffering through cuts of more than 10 percent to state aid. The cuts, approved by the Legislature and Corbett, fell most heavily on Pennsylvania’s poorest school districts, which officials argued get the most state aid. It seems that no one in the public school community expects Corbett to propose more money for public schools next year, and he may even seek another round of cuts in light of his administration’s projection of a year-end deficit and rising costs in other parts of the budget, such as Medicaid and debt service. Thomas Gentzel, executive director of the Pennsylvania School Boards Association, said Corbett administration officials have told him that they didn’t plan to cut public school aid again. “But the question is, what are they counting?” he said. If Corbett counts pension dollars as part of the state aid that helps keep the lights on and teachers in classrooms, then “there could be some significant cuts in major funding areas, although the overall funding may not be going down,” Gentzel said. Corbett’s top budget adviser, Charles Zogby, declined to comment. Rising pension obligations are being driven, in part, by lackluster investment performance on the money being paid into the system and a 2001 law under then-Gov. Tom Ridge that guaranteed 50 percent pension increases for most legislators and 25 percent increases for more than 300,000 state workers and teachers. There’s not a whole lot that can be done about it. The state constitution bars curtailing pension benefits for current or retired state employees and teachers. Meanwhile, a 14-month-old state law signed by then-Gov. Ed Rendell is designed to blunt the severity of the pension cost spike by deferring some payments past 2030. That means that pension obligations shared by the state and school districts will jump to 12.4 percent next year, rather than 29.7 percent — a difference of about $2 billion, according to the Public School Employees’ Retirement System. This year it is 8.7 percent, which still comes as something of a shock to school budgets after paying under 5 percent for much of the last decade and as little as 1.2 percent one year. School employees pay above 7 percent of salary, and have done so for much of the past decade. This year, school districts are absorbing the rising cost of pensions while weathering sluggish tax collections and the loss of about $850 million in state aid for instruction and operations. To balance budgets, districts are laying off staff, freezing wages, closing buildings, renegotiating con-

tracts, tapping reserves and using textbooks and computers longer. In the Brookville Area School District in northwestern Pennsylvania, district officials are projecting a $400,000 increase in pension costs next year — or almost 2 percent of this year’s anticipated revenue from tax collections and government aid — to split between the district and the state. That will be compounded by increases in costs for employee salaries and health insurance premiums, out-of-district placements and cyberschool tuition, business manager Jason Barnett said. This won’t be the last time school districts must wrestle with pension costs: The school

employees’ retirement system estimates that the cost to the state and school districts will triple in four years and then stay at that level until 2035. If there’s a silver lining, it’s that some school boards began saving for a spike in pension costs that they thought would be higher and come sooner. But because of the Legislature’s efforts to blunt the spike, some districts may have a little surplus cash to help absorb more losses in state aid next year. “The good thing is they have that cash to weather this storm a little bit,” said Jim Buckheit, the executive director of the Pennsylvania Association of School Administrators. “At least, many have it.”

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

MARY PEARL FOERSCH, 85, of Harding, passed away Friday, January 13, 2012 at home. Born May 12, 1926 in Pittston, she was the daughter of the late Peter and Maria Scalia Capitano. Mary was a member of St. Barbara’s Parish of Exeter. She was preceded in death by her husband, Edwin; grandson Donald Keithline; brothers and sisters. Surviving are her sons, Edwin and his wife Rozanne, Harding, Louis and Viola, Harding, and William; daughters, Mary Ann Foersch, Harding and Debra Marriott and her husband Ronald, Harding; grandchildren and great grandchildren. Funeral service will be held on Tuesday at 9 a.m. at Bednarski Funeral Home, 168 Wyoming Avenue, Wyoming. Interment will follow in Mount Olivet Cemetery, Carverton. Friends may call Monday 6 to 9 p.m. at the funeral home. ELAINE G. REPOTSKI, of Tilbury Terrace, West Nanticoke, passed away Friday, January 13, 2012, in Virginia Beach, Va. Complete obituary will be published in Tuesday’s newspapers. Arrangements are by the Grontkowski Funeral Home P.C., 51-53 W. Green Street, Nanticoke ANTHONY P. QUADRO SR., 78, of West Wyoming, passed away Saturday, January 14, 2012, in the Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center, Plains Township. Arrangements are pending from the Metcalfe and Shaver Funeral Home Inc., 504 Wyoming Avenue, Wyoming. JOSEPHINE MILEWSKI, 96, of Plains Township, died Saturday, January 14, 2012, in the Wesley Village Partridge-Tippett Nursing Facility, Jenkins Township. Funeral arrangements will be announced in Monday’s edition by the Yanaitis Funeral Home, Plains MRS. RUTH LOUISE SHAW, age 80, of Pierce Street, Plymouth, died Saturday morning, January 14, 2012. Funeral arrangements are pending from the William A. Reese Funeral Chapel, Plymouth. MATUSHKA JOANNA M. PIANOVICH, 86, of Archbald, has fallen asleep in the Lord on January14, 2012. Her husband is the Very Rev. Eugene Pianovich. Funeral arrangements are pending from the Simon S. Russin Funeral Home, 136 Maffett St., Plains Township.

James A. Giordano January 11, 2012 James A. Giordano, 93, of Jenkins Township, passed away Wednesday, January 11, 2012 in the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. Born in Pittston on June 26, 1918, he was the son of the late Russell and Crucida Guarino Giordano. He was a graduate of Wyoming High School, class of 1937, and served in the U.S. Marine Corps. He was a member of St. John the Evangelist Church, Pittston. He was the owner and operator of James Giordano Trucking. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by brothers, Charles, Samuel, Joseph and Michael Giordano; sisters, Rosalie Gelso and Sarah Greco. Surviving are his wife of 63 years, Grace Garubba Giordano; numerous nieces and nephews. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held on Tuesday, January 17, 2012 at 9:30 a.m. in St. John the Evangelist Church, William Street, Pittston. The family will receive friends and relatives in the church from 8:30 a.m. until the time of the Mass. Interment will be in Mount Olivet Cemetery, Carverton. Funeral arrangements are entrusted to the Peter J. Adonizio Funeral Home, 251 William Street, Pittston. Online condolences may be made at www.peterjadoniziofuneralhome.com.

John C. Weksner January 10, 2012

ohn C. Weksner, 91, formerly of Plains Township, died Tuesday, JJanuary 10, 2012, in the Manor

Care Facility, Sinking Springs, Pennsylvania. Born in the Hudson section of Plains, he was son to the late Joseph and Amelia Trycoski Wejkszner. He attended local schools and became a truck driver for Daley’s Trucking Company, Wilkes-Barre, until his retirement. John was preceded in death by his wife, Alberta Dworakowski, on April 27, 2007; brothers, Alexander and Joseph; sisters, Louise Weksner and Josephine Crudo; granddaughter, Trisha Marion, and son-in-law, Mark Marion. Surviving are a daughter, Carol Gober and husband Ronald, Reading; son, David and wife Debbie, Danville; grandchildren, Lisa Smith and husband David, Alburtis; Dana Weksner, Danville; Anthony Jon Narducci and wife Rachel, California; Michael Narducci, Arizona; and four great-grandchildren. A private funeral service was held at the convenience of the family. Funeral services were provided by the Yanaitis Funeral Home, Plains.

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Mrs. Gladys H. Stull January 13, 2012 Mrs. Gladys H. Stull, 83, of Larksville Mountain, passed away Friday, January 13, 2012 in St. Luke’s Villa in Hospice VNA Inpatient Unit. She was the widow of David Stull. Gladys was born August11,1928 in Larksville Mountain. She was the daughter of the late David Hill and Ruth Norris. She was a graduate of Larksville High School. Gladys was employed at the Social Security Operation Center, WilkesBarre. She was a devoted member

of the Outlet Free Methodist Church, Dallas. Her love of life was her granddaughter, Ann Stull. She also loved dogs, the NFL Football games, and was politically inclined. Surviving are her sons, Kenneth and David and his wife, Carol; her granddaughter, Ann; her brother, Albert Hill; and her sister, Bernice Dalizio; several nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be held Tuesday at 11 a.m. in the Edwards and Russin Funeral Home, 717 Main St., Edwardsville, with Pastor Matt Riley of the Outlet Free Methodist Church, Dallas, officiating. Family and friends may call Tuesday from 9:30 a.m. until service time. Interment will be private.

Charlotte Kerns January 12, 2012 harlotte Kerns, 85, passed away Thursday, January 12, 2012, at C Highland Manor, Exeter.

Born June 11, 1926, in York, Pa., she was the daughter of the late Horace and Catherine Site Strine. Charlotte graduated from William Penn High School, York. She was employed as a teacher’s aide in The Youth Development Center, Loyalville, Pa. She was a member of St. John’s Lutheran Church, Pittston. Besides her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband, the Rev. Russell Kerns, in 2008 and her son, Russell Kerns Jr., in 2011.

Surviving are sons, James, Harrisburg, and Clarence, West Pittston; daughters, Bonnie Hunter, Harrisburg, and Valerie Lynn Weaver, Wilkes-Barre; sister Jerildine Jones, York; four grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Services will be held at the KizisLokuta Funeral Home on Tuesday, January17, at10:30 a.m. with Pastor John Castellani officiating. Interment will be in Mountain View Cemetery, Harding. Friends may call at the Kizis-Lokuta Funeral Home, 134 Church St., Pittston, on Monday from 6 to 8 p.m.

Mary G. Wasmanski January 11, 2012 ary G. Wasmanski, 83, of Plains Township, passed away M Wednesday evening in the Golden

Living Center, East Mountain Drive, Plains Township, following an illness. Born in Dupont, on January 22, 1928, Mary was the daughter of the late Charles and Victoria Lentowski Elko. She had been a resident of Plains for most of her life and was a member of Ss. Peter and Paul Church, Plains. Mary was preceded in death by her loving husband of 57 years, John “Jack” “Westie,” on March 16, 2011 and a brother, Joseph Elko, on December 31, 2011.

Mary is survived by brothers, Edward Elko, Arlington, Texas; William Elko, Suscon; sister-in-law Theresa Elko, Dupont; several nieces and nephews. Mary’s funeral will be conducted on Monday at 9:30 a.m. from the Mark V. Yanaitis Funeral Home, 55 Stark Street, Plains Township, with a Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in Ss. Peter and Paul Church, Plains. Interment will follow in St. Mary Byzantine Catholic Cemetery, Plains Township. Friends may call at the funeral home on Monday from 8:30 a.m. to time of services. Online condolences or directions may be accessed at www.yanaitisfu-

FUNERALS BORDO – Bernard, funeral 9:30 a.m. Monday in the Louis V. Ciuccio Funeral Home, 145 Moosic Rd., Old Forge. Mass, 10 a.m. in the Prince of Peace Parish -- St. Mary’s Church, West Grace and Lawrence St., Old Forge. Friends may call 4 to 7 p.m. today. COLON – Max, blessing service 4 p.m. today in the Lokuta-Zawacki Funeral Home, 200 Wyoming Ave., Dupont. Friends may call from 3 to 4 p.m. DOUGHERTY – Joseph, funeral services, 10 a.m. Monday in the Sheldon Funeral Home, Main Street, Meshoppen. Mass of Christian Burial at 11 a.m. in Our Lady of Perpetual Help Catholic Church, in Meshoppen. Friends may call 2 to 5 p.m. today. Rosary will be recited at the funeral home at 4 p.m. Military services will be held at the Rought Hall Post 510 American Legion Social Hall, on Monday afternoon. A funeral luncheon will immediately follow the interment at 1 p.m. CUNNINGHAM – Mary, interment, 11 a.m. Monday in the Chapel at Maple Hill Cemetery, WilkesBarre. Friends may call 10:30 a.m. until time of service. DERONDE – Lois, funeral at 9:30 a.m. Monday in the Hugh B. Hughes & Son Inc., Funeral Home, 1044 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort. Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in St. Ann’s Chapel, Kingston. Friends may call 4 to 7 p.m. today in the funeral home. GARDZALLA – Imelda, Mass of Christian Burial at 10:30 a.m. Monday in St. John the Baptist Church, Larksville. Interment will be at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday at St. Stephen’s Chapel, Lehman. Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m. today in the S.J. Grontkowski Funeral Home, 530 W. Main St., Plymouth. GRANDA – Cathryn, funeral services at 9 a.m. Monday in the Nat & Gawlas Funeral Home, 89 Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in St. Ignatius Church, Kingston. Friends may call 2 to 4 p.m. today in the funeral home. KELLY – Edward, memorial Mass at 10 a.m. Thursday, January 19, 2012 in Holy Name/Saint Mary’s Church, 283 Shoemaker St., Swoyersville. KONNICK – Dorothy, funeral services at 11 a.m. Monday in the Curtis L. Swanson Funeral Home Inc., corner of Routes 29 and 118, Pikes Creek. Friends may call 10 to 11 a.m. prior to the service. LOZINAK – Dorothy, funeral services at 9:15 a.m. Thursday from the John V. Morris Funeral Home, 625 N. Main St., North Wilkes-

Barre. Funeral Mass at 10 a.m. in Exaltation of the Holy Cross Roman Catholic Church, 420 Main Road, Hanover Township. Friends may join her family for visitation and remembrances 2 to 4 p.m. today, 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday and 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday at Morris’ North Wilkes-Barre Chapel. Vigil services will be conducted during today’s visitation period. MITCHELL – John, Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. Monday in St. John the Evangelist Church, 35 William St., Pittston. The AM Vets Honor Guard of Dupont will provide military honors. PANEK – Robert, funeral services 10 a.m. Monday in the SolfanelliFiorillo Funeral Home Inc., 1030 N. Main Ave., Scranton. Friends may call 3 to 5 p.m. today. SHUMAN – Preston, visitation 1 to 2 p.m. Monday in the Emanuel Reformed Church of Mainville, 146 Church Rd., Bloomsburg. Funeral at 2 p.m. following the visitation hour at the church. TEETSEL – James Sr., memorial luncheon, 1 p.m. today in Meshoppen Rod and Gun Club. WEBB – David Sr., services 4 p.m. today in the Thomas P. Kearney Funeral Home Inc., 517 N. Main St., Old Forge. Friends may call 1 p.m. until services. WILK – Mark Sr., funeral services, 10 a.m. Tuesday in the George A. Strish Inc. Funeral Home, 105 N. Main St., Ashley. Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m. Monday.

OBITUARY POLICY The Times Leader publishes free obituaries, which have a 27-line limit, and paid obituaries, which can run with a photograph. A funeral home representative can call the obituary desk at (570) 829-7224, send a fax to (570) 829-5537 or e-mail to tlobits@timesleader.com. If you fax or e-mail, please call to confirm. Obituaries must be submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Obituaries must be sent by a funeral home or crematory, or must name who is handling arrangements, with address and phone number. We discourage handwritten notices; they incur a $15 typing fee.

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State Dems see 3-way AG race

for the endorsement in The party fails to agree on a that race. nominee for attorney general, In his pitch to comleading to a scramble. mittee members meetBy MARC LEVY Associated Press

STATE COLLEGE — A threeway race for the Democratic nomination for Pennsylvania’s attorney general is set for the spring primary, as Democrats try to capture an office controlled by Republicans ever since it became an elected office more than three decades ago. The Democratic State Committee on Saturday was unable to settle on a single candidate, splitting their votes among former Lackawanna County prosecutor Kathleen Kane, former Philadelphia prosecutor Dan McCaffery and former U.S. Rep. Patrick Murphy of Bucks County. The party did, however, endorse re-election bids by U.S. Sen. Bob Casey and state Treasurer Rob McCord, as well as state Rep. Eugene DePasquale in his bid for state auditor general. Primary elections are April 24. Murphy touted his edge in the balloting — he easily won the most votes in both rounds — although he fell short of the twothirds majority of votes by state committee members required

COURT BRIEFS NANTICOKE – A man accused by Plymouth police of selling illegal drugs from a residence on High Street waived his right to a preliminary hearing before District Judge Donald Whittaker on Wednesday. Andrew Pope, 33, waived a single count of possession with intent to deliver a controlled substance to Luzerne County. Police withdrew 40 other counts of possession with intent to deliver a controlled substance, 41 counts of delivery of a controlled substance and a single count of possession of marijuana against Pope. Pope was charged after police searched his residence and allegedly found cocaine and heroin on Oct. 24, according to the criminal complaint. KINGSTON – A man accused by Edwardsville police of injuring an officer with a syringe waived his right to a preliminary hearing before District Judge Paul Roberts on Wednesday. Theodore J. Simko, 25, of Harding, waived charges of driving under the influence of a controlled substance, simple assault, possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia and criminal conspiracy to Luzerne County Court. Police allege an officer was stuck with a syringe inside Simko’s vehicle during a traffic stop on U.S. Route 11 on June 18, according to the criminal complaint. WILKES-BARRE – A man accused by city police of possessing jewelry stolen from a residence waived his right to a preliminary hearing in WilkesBarre Central Court on Wednesday. Joseph Jackiel, 55, address listed as homeless, waived a single count of receiving stolen property to Luzerne County Court. Police allege Jackiel was in possession of jewelry that was stolen from a residence on McLean Street on Oct. 17, according to the criminal complaint. WILKES-BARRE – Charges of aggravated assault, simple assault and reckless endangerment were dismissed against Erik Leiva-Merino, 33, during a preliminary hearing in WilkesBarre Central Court on Wednes-

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four years. “I really believe this is our best chance to take the office of attorney general if, and only ing in various groups ELECTION if, we’ve got the right in the morning, he recandidate,” he told minded them that he Young Democrats. is the only candidate Republicans are expected to in the race who has won an election, even when Republicans endorse Cumberland County District Attorney David Freed spent millions to beat him. “There’s only one of us that for attorney general. McCaffery, the brother of state has ever won a campaign before, there’s only one of us that has Supreme Court Justice Seamus been vetted,” Murphy told McCaffery, ran for Philadelphia district attorney in 2009 but finYoung Democrats. Kane said after the vote that ished second to Seth Williams in the lack of an endorsement a five-way Democratic primary. Kane, 45, left her post as a depshowed the strength of her candidacy, despite never running for uty district attorney in late 2007 to work on Hillary Clinton’s camoffice. “I didn’t spend my time in poli- paign for president. Since then tics, I was in the courtroom most she has done pro bono legal of the time,” she said. “So for me work, she said. Murphy, 38, served two terms to come in and hold my own and then to have an open primary, I in the U.S. House of Representathink that is a testament to my tives before he was defeated by Republican Mike Fitzpatrick in candidacy.” McCaffery said the vote 2010. Murphy ran for Congress showed that he’d made great after spending five years as a milstrides in winning over commit- itary lawyer in the Army Judge tee members outside of Philadel- Advocate General Corps, trying phia. The Army veteran told cases in federal, military and forcommittee members that he is eign courts. Incumbent Attorney General the only candidate with the courtroom experience and law en- Linda Kelly is finishing the term forcement background to go toe- of now-Gov. Tom Corbett, which to-toe with the “cookie cutter” ends a year from now, and has law-and-order Republican candi- said she would not seek a full dates who win the office every four-year term.

2012

day. City police had accused Leiva-Merino, of Wyoming Street, Wilkes-Barre, with stabbing two people at a house on Birch Street on Nov. 6, according to the criminal complaint. HANOVER TWP. – A man accused by township police of possessing cocaine during a traffic stop waived his right to a preliminary hearing before District Judge Joseph Halesey on Tuesday. Ruben Juan Carmona, 20, address unknown, waived charges of possession of a controlled substance, driving without a license and careless driving to Luzerne County Court. Police allege Carmona had bags of cocaine hidden in his shoe during a traffic stop on the Sans Souci Parkway on Dec. 21, according to the criminal complaint. Carmona told police he is a native of Mexico.

KINGSTON – A man accused by Edwardsville police of setting a fire to his residence waived his right to a preliminary hearing before District Judge Paul Roberts on Tuesday. Joseph Edward Lech, 53, of Thomas Street, waived three counts of reckless endangerment, two counts each of arson and simple assault and a single count of criminal mischief to Luzerne County Court. Police allege Lech set a fire inside his residence during an argument with his girlfriend and her daughter on Oct. 18, according to the criminal complaint.

WILKES-BARRE – A man charged with setting four vehicles on fire and taking items from other vehicles was sentenced Friday to time already served in prison. Kenneth Hicks, 31, of Sheridan Street, Wilkes-Barre, was sentenced on charges of reckless burning and theft from a motor vehicle by Luzerne CounPLAINS TWP. – William ty Judge David Lupas after Samuel Charles, 48, of Dallas, waived a single count of defiant pleaded guilty to the crimes. Lupas sentenced Hicks to 12 trespass to Luzerne County months, less one day to 24 Court. Charles was accused by town- months, less two days in county prison and gave Hicks two ship police of trespassing on years, two months credit for property owned by Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs casino on time already served. Lupas said Hicks will be Jan. 5, according to the criminal immediately paroled having complaint. Charles waived the charge to already served the maximum sentence. Hicks was remanded county court during a prelimito the State Correctional Innary hearing before District Judge Diana Malast on Tuesday. stitution at Retreat, where he is serving a four-to-eight-year state sentence. WILKES-BARRE – A man Police allege Hicks rumaccused by city police of striking a pedestrian and fleeing the maged through and set fires to a GMC van in the area of 88 scene waived his right to a Elizabeth St., a 1989 Plymouth preliminary hearing in WilkesReliant in the area of 250 Carey Barre Central Court on TuesAve., a 1995 Buick Regal in the day. Morris Thomas Capute, 34, of area of 294 Carey Ave., and a 2001 Saturn in the area of 31 East Washington Street, NantiCarlisle St. at around 2 a.m. on coke, waived charges of accidents involving injury to pedes- June 29, 2009. Police said vehicles parked on Monroe and trian and driving with a susCarlisle streets were rummaged pended license to Luzerne County Court. Police withdrew through at about the same time. a second count of accidents involving injury against Capute. In Loving Memory Police allege Capute struck JOHN “ONJAY” JOSEPH Joseph Giordano, 44, of WilkesAugust 17, 1923 - January 12, 2011 Barre, at South Pennsylvania Boulevard and South Main Street on Nov. 4 and fled the scene, according to the criminal complaint. Giordano suffered severe head injuries and remains in a medical facility in Lackawanna County.

On behalf of the

BIROSIK/KIMMEL FAMILIES we would like to express our appreciation to everyone who visited and sent their condolences, thoughts and prayers for our beloved wife and mother Elaine Birosik. GOD BLESS.

God saw you getting tired, The cure was not to be. He wrapped you in His loving arms, And whispered “Come to Me.” You tried so hard to stay with us, Your fight was not in vain. God took you to His loving home, And freed you from your pain. A golden heart stopped beating, Two working hands at rest. God broke our hearts to prove to us, HE ONLY TAKES THE BEST. Sadly Missed by His Loving Family


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

Making everyday life funny

Comedian Jerry Seinfeld’s routine poked fun at coffee, cell phones and marriage.

Fans hurry into the FM. Kirby Center Friday for the Jerry Seinfeld show, where the comedian performed two sold-out shows.

R E V I E W By BRAD PATTON Times Leader Correspondent

WILKES-BARRE – Mere moments after the opening act wrapped up, comedian Jerry Seinfeld bounded onto the stage of the F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts on Friday for the first of two sold-out shows. His hair may be a little shorter than it was in his sitcom heyday of nearly 15 years ago, but everything else about the now 57-yearold comic was pretty much the same. He still talks about everyday things like coffee, cell phones and marriage – you know, nothing – and ends nearly every sentence in that high-pitched voice. And he is still one of the funniest people around. As Seinfeld took the stage, one of the roughly 1,800 in attendance yelled out “Happy Birthday!” “Whose birthday is it?” the comedian asked. When told it was his, he asked where the audience member got that information. “The radio,” the man replied. “Well, it is not my birthday, I am still 57 years old, and the radio is stupid,” the comedian replied, and he was off and running. He then said how great it was to be in Wilkes-Barre and congratulated the audience members for making it to the theater on time, despite the day’s many

BOOK Continued from Page 1A

about the denial of kids’ rights, the rush to lock people up. It’s a very important underlying theme: In our rush to lock people up, we’re doing more harm than good,” Ecenbarger said. “To send a kid away for shoplifting or for putting a parody on Myspace or for smoking a joint doesn’t make a lot of sense for the welfare of the kid.” Ecenbarger said he talked to about 40 children, including Lisa Spencer, who became part of a 2004 investigative series by The Times Leader into Ciavarella’s sentencing record as juvenile court judge. Spencer had been charged with “terroristic threats” as a 16-yearold at Crestwood High School when she jokingly wrote a note threatening to bring a pistol to school, even though she had no access to a pistol. Ciavarella’s punishment Spencer – then Lisa Scarborough, she has since married – was sentenced to a juvenile camp with no time limit. And though she ultimately was freed quickly on the advice of camp counselors and had her record expunged along with thou-

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issues. “We made it, we are now ‘out’ – that’s what we do to convince ourselves our lives don’t suck,” he said. “That’s why I’m here; I had nothing to do either.” He then talked about the fine line between things that are great and things that suck, his fondness for the Pop Tart, coffee, prescription drugs, phones, Facebook and Twitter. “I remember a time when people used to be embarrassed if they tweeted,” he said. “Now, they’re proud of it.” One of his best lines compared what men want from women to what they want from underwear. “We want a little bit of support and a little bit of freedom.” He ended his routine with comments about marriage, becoming a father and golf, which is an acronym for “Get Out Leave Family,” he quipped. After a standing ovation and a very brief exit, Seinfeld came back out for a quick question-andanswer session with the audience. The first question had something to do with the puffy shirt

from a famous episode of his TV show. Then a man yelled out, “Tell us your favorite joke of all time.” “What do you think I have been doing up here for the last hour and a half?” Seinfeld shot back. “What do you think, I’m saving it for Scranton?” He ended the Q&A with a story about running into actor Wayne Knight in a New York City diner before treating the audience with a “Hello, Newman.” Seinfeld’s longtime friend, comedian Larry Miller (who originally auditioned for the role of George Costanza and played the doorman of Mr. Pitt’s building in a season six episode), opened the show with a fast-paced and witty 20 minutes, touching on marriage, Little League and New Year’s resolutions. A second sold-out performance was scheduled to begin at 9:30. The next shows at the Kirby Center will be country singer Darius Rucker on Friday and comedian Kathleen Madigan on Jan. 27.

The cover of the book about the juvenile scandal by reporter William Ecenbarger.

they landed in front of Ciavarella, they would have gone away. A lot of these things are just things that kids do,” he said. The children may be the most important part of the book, but Ecenbarger conceded Ciavarella’s trial is probably “the best part of the book.” Aside from having the built-in drama of a prominent court case, the testimony provided numerous high points, including testimony by Ciavarella during which he admitted crimes for which he hadn’t even been charged, and the playing of conversations between Ciavarella, Conahan and attorney Robert Powell – then co-owner of the detention facilities – recorded when Powell wore a wire.

sands of others adjudicated by Ciavarella, the incident came back to haunt her last year when she and her husband tried to join the Peace Corps. The application was flagged because of the juvenile record. She eventually did get into the Corps and is serving in Africa. “She’s a very important part of the book,” Ecenbarger said. Generally, the children he talked to – most are adults now, Ecenbarger noted – “seemed to want to put it all behind them. There is a lot of anger. There were some kids who were practically unaffected, and there were kids who were seriously and probably permanently damaged by it.” Ecenbarger, 72, recounted the mischief his own children got into. “I have two kids, both in their 40s, and they did things when they were growing up that, had

Interviews declined Ecenbarger said he sought interviews with Powell and the two judges, but they declined. Ciavarella is serving a 28-year sentence following his conviction. While he admitted wrongdoing – including trying to hide the money he received, he adamantly denied he ever took money in exchange for sending kids to the private detention facility, bitterly rejecting the short-hand label often used on the case: “Kids for Cash.” Ecenbarger remains either undeterred or unconvinced. The working title of his book: “Kids for Cash.”

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CMYK SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

THE TIMES LEADER

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CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

PATERNO Continued from Page 1A

by radiation and chemotherapy, in a wheelchair with a broken pelvis, and “shocked and saddened” as he struggles to explain a breakdown of devastating proportions. Jerry Sandusky, his former assistant coach at Penn State from1969 to 1999, is charged with more than 50 counts of sexually abusing young boys over a 15-year period. He maintains his innocence. If Sandusky is guilty, “I’m sick about it,” Paterno said. “I don’t know the answer … ” How Sandusky, 67, allegedly evaded detection by state child services, university administrators, teachers, parents, donors and Paterno himself, remains an open question. “I wish I knew,” Paterno said. “I don’t know the answer to that. It’s hard.” Almost as difficult for Paterno to answer is the question of why, after receiving a report in 2002 that Sandusky had abused a boy in the shower of Penn State’s Lasch Football Building, and forwarding it to his superiors, he didn’t follow up more aggressively. “I didn’t know exactly how to handle it and I was afraid to do something that might jeopardize what the university procedure was,” he said. “So I backed away and turned it over to some other people, people I thought would have a little more expertise than I did. It didn’t work out that way.” Former athletic director Tim Curley and school vice president Gary Schultz face charges of perjury and failing to report suspected child abuse, based on their inaction. They have pleaded innocent. Though he is not charged with a crime, Penn State president Graham Spanier was fired on Nov. 9, along with Paterno. Paterno is accused of no wrongdoing, and in fact authorities have said he fulfilled his legal obligations by reporting to his superiors. Nevertheless, the university Board of Trustees summarily dismissed him with a late-night phone call four days after Sandusky’s arrest. At about 10 p.m., Paterno and Sue were getting ready for bed when the doorbell rang. An assistant athletic director was at the door, and wordlessly handed Sue a slip of paper. There was nothing on it but the name of the vice chairman of trustees, John Surma, with a phone number. They stood frozen by the bedside in their nightclothes. Paterno dialed the number. Surma told Paterno, “In the best interests of the university, you are terminated.” Paterno hung up and repeated the words to his wife. She grabbed the phone and redialed. “After 61 years he deserved better,” she snapped. “He deserved better.” The firing provoked a riot on campus that night. Image: Monument or prig To Penn State students, Paterno was less a person than a beloved monument. He had arrived at a “cow college” in1950 as an assistant coach armed with a flathead haircut, a Brooklyn accent and a degree from Brown. As the head coach from 1966 on, he struck an austerely iconic pose, managing to be both fierce and bookish, with his black cleats and his thick black-framed glasses. To his rivals, he was a holier-thanthou prig who intimated he was more principled than they were. Under his leadership, Penn State football became a kind of gross national product as he won more games than any other coach in history, yet regularly posted

high graduation rates — his team was ranked No.1 academically out of the top 25 football teams in 2009 and 2011 by the New America Foundation’s Academic Bowl Championship Series. The “cow college” grew into a public research university with $4.6 billion in revenue and buildings as large as airplane hangars. Beaver Stadium was enlarged six times during his tenure. But after 61 years on the campus, Paterno cleared out his office in the space of one day. It was an end he was unprepared for. Yet it came with the realization that as the face of the university, people assign him greater responsibility than other officials. “Whether it’s fair I don’t know, but they do it,” he said. “You would think I ran the show here.” Over two separate conversations on Thursday and Friday, Paterno discussed his career and his actions relating to Sandusky. His attorney Wick Sollers of the Washington law firm King & Spalding, and a communications adviser, Dan McGinn of TMG Strategies, monitored the conversations, in part to be sure Paterno was lucid, since he has experienced fogginess from his chemo treatments, one of which he underwent the day before the first interview. Since the scandal broke, Paterno has been largely silent while dealing with his health issues, despite scathing criticism that included accusations that he protected Sandusky and wielded more power in the cloistered community known as Happy Valley than the university president. Eager to defend record Paterno was initially reluctant to speak because “I wanted everybody to settle down,” he said. But he is so eager to defend his record that he insisted on continuing the interview from his bedside Friday morning, though ill. He was hospitalized for observation later in the day due to complications from the chemo but, according to the family, had improved by Saturday morning. Mostly he sat in his wheelchair covered by a blanket, surrounded by pictures of his children and grandchildren, in the modest stone-and-plate-glass home he bought for $9,000 in 1966. The home, and the fact that his address and phone are still listed in the State College phone book, have oft been cited as evidence of his regular-Joe values. A good deal of what he earned has gone back to the university, in the form of donations. “My father said about money, You have to have some. But you don’t have to have all of it. Just be honest with yourself.’” He displays only a few mementos of his football career, jumbled in a glass case in a dark corner of his old study, a small, woody space. Most of the items in the case are personal souvenirs. Tucked in one corner is a card that says, “This marriage is interrupted for football season.” There are game balls, the most prominent one from Oct. 29, 2011, when the Nittany Lions defeated Illinois, 10-7, to make Paterno the winningest coach in the annals of major college football, with 409 victories. Sandusky was arrested just a week later. What Penn State officials knew about Sandusky and when is the subject of no fewer than five formal investigations. They range from state Attorney General Linda Kelly’s criminal investigation of Sandusky, to an NCAA inquiry, to Penn State’s in-house inquiry led by former FBI director Louis J. Freeh. The best-case scenario is that the institutional leaders were guilty of blindness, and an unfeel-

JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST

Joe Paterno says his relationship with Jerry Sandusky was ‘professional, not social. He was a lot younger than me.’

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ing self-absorption. The worst case is a criminal cover-up to protect a wealthy university’s reputation. Paterno’s side of story This is Paterno’s own account: On a Saturday morning in 2002, an upset young assistant coach named Mike McQueary knocked on Paterno’s door to tell him he had witnessed a shocking scene in the Penn State football building showers. Until that moment, Paterno said, he had “no inkling” that Sandusky might be a sexual deviant. By then Sandusky was a former employee, with whom Paterno had little to do. Although Sandusky had been his close coaching associate and helped fashion Penn State defenses for three decades, their relationship was “professional, not social,” as Paterno described it. “He was a lot younger than me.” Sandusky had been out of the proJOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST gram for three years, and in fact, Paterno said he cannot recall the At their home in State College, Pa., Sue Paterno, left, Joe Paterno’s wife of 50 years, says of the last time he had seen or spoken to manner in which Joe was fired from Penn State: ‘After 61 years he deserved better.’ Sandusky. Sandusky retired in 1999, about 10, who had his hands of Freedom was withdrawn. of his players made Academic allBut Joe Paterno is not the vic- American, the third-highest total shortly after Penn State made the against the shower wall. At the Alamo Bowl. The timing was cu- preliminary hearing for Curley tim here, he reminds you. among institutions playing at the “You know, I’m not as con- championship level. rious. Paterno’s understanding and Schultz on Dec. 16, McQuewas that Sandusky took early re- ary said he had been reluctant to cerned about me,” he said. He loved his work. “They were tirement on his recommendation go into similar “great detail about “What’s happened to me has been all days I looked forward to,” he after Paterno told him frankly sexual acts” with Paterno, out of great. I got five great kids. Seven- said. His philosophy was simple. that he would not become his suc- respect for the coach, who was 75 teen great grandchildren. I’ve had “My thing was play as hard as you a wonderful experience here at can, don’t be stupid, pay attention cessor. The state was offering 30- at the time. Schultz and Curley have main- Penn State. I don’t want to walk to details, and have enough guts year employees a handsome buyout, and Paterno believed tained that McQueary failed to away from this thing bitter. I want in the clutch that you’re not afraid Sandusky should take it. Paterno impart the seriousness of what he to be helpful.” to make a play,” he said. “Some The Paternos say they think things I thought were important was frustrated that Sandusky saw to them as well. They never spent so much time working on told police about the allegation, about the real potential victims for a young man to know.” his youth foundation, The Sec- instead informing Sandusky he every time they look at their own Early on, Paterno vowed that ond Mile, that he was not availa- could no longer bring children to children. “I got three boys and he would try to never lose perble to help in recruiting and other university facilities. Prosecutors two girls,” Paterno said. “It’s sick- spective. In 1968 he said: “We’re coaching duties. Authorities now say Sandusky continued to abuse ening.” His knee-jerk response is trying to win football games, to go back to Flatbush. “Violence don’t misunderstand that. But I say Sandusky used Second Mile boys for six more years. Paterno has said, “In hindsight, is not the way to handle it,” he don’t want it to ruin our lives if we to meet and groom his alleged vicsaid. “But for me, I’d get a bunch lose. I don’t want us ever to beI wish I had done more.” tims. Paterno’s portrait of himself is of guys and say let’s go punch come the kind of place where an “He came to see me and we talked a little about his career,” Pater- of an old-world man profoundly somebody in the nose.” Sue Pa- 8-2 season is a tragedy.” no said. “I said, you know, Jerry, confused by what McQueary told terno is more blunt. “If someone Asked if he succeeded in keepyou want to be head coach, you him, and who was hesitant to touched my child, there wouldn’t ing the vow, he says today: “I make follow-up calls be a trial, I would have killed stayed on the track I wanted to can’t do as much because he did not them,” she said. “That would be stay on. … Whether you want to as you’re doing “… I wanted to want to be seen as my attitude, because you have de- call that a legacy, or whatever you with the other optrying to exert any stroyed someone for life.” eration. I said this make sure I knew want to call it.” She sighed. “It’s a bad scene for influence for or job takes so much what I was doing. What comes next? against Sandusky. “I this happy valley.” detail, and for you The Sandusky investigation didn’t know which to think you can And then I called These are the things Paterno way to go,” he said. has torn apart a cloistered town- would prefer to reminisce about. go off and get in- my superiors and I “And rather than get and-gown community where ev- Instead, he is tying up the loose volved in funsaid, ‘Hey, we got a in there and make a eryone knows everyone — in- ends of the abrupt end to his cadraising and a lot cluding Sandusky. Old friends reer. There are mounds of mail to mistake …” of things like that. problem, I think. He reiterated that cannot talk to each other because deal with, 12,000 letters (his … I said you can’t Would you guys McQueary was un- criminal trials are imminent. Re- grandchildren counted them). do both, that’s basically what I told look into it?’ Cause clear with him about cently Sue went to the funeral of Former Penn State running back him.” I didn’t know, you the nature of what Tim Curley’s mother. The Pater- Franco Harris, the Pittsburgh he saw — and added nos have known John Surma for Steelers Hall of Famer, checks in Paterno insists that even if McQue- years — Paterno recruited his regularly and is leading a furious he was complete- know. We never ary had been more brother. Underneath the tension campaign to depose the Board of ly unaware of a had, until that graphic, he’s not is the complicated knowledge Trustees for their handling of the 1998 police invessure he would have that if Sandusky is guilty, he was scandal and Paterno’s dismissal. tigation into a re- point, 58 years I as good at seducing the adults as Paterno tries to play peacemaker, comprehended it. port from a Sec- think, I had never “You know, he he was the children. ond Mile mother although he admits his first reacdidn’t want to get that Sandusky had to deal with tion was, “Raise hell.” There are specific,” Paterno Hopes consciousness raised had inappropri- something like still details to work out with the said. “And to be ately touched her If nothing else, the Paternos school, because he remains a tenthat. And I didn’t frank with you, I say, perhaps the Sandusky case ured professor. On Jan. 2 the unison in a shower. don’t know that it will raise consciousness in other versity sent him a retirement letThe inquiry end- feel adequate.” would have done communities the way it has been ter. ed when the local Joe Paterno prosecutor de“Right now I’m trying to figure On contacting superiors any good, because I raised in theirs. “We are going to clined to bring about 2002 incident never heard of, of, become a more aware society,” out what I’m gonna do,” he said. rape and a man. So I Sue said. “Maybe we will look for “Cause I don’t want to sit around charges. “You just did what I clues.” She wonders what signs on my backside all day.” He grins know it wasn’t like it was something everybody thought was best. I talked to peo- she missed all those years. and there is a light behind his in the building knew about,” Pa- ple that I thought would be, if “I had no clue,” she said. “I glasses. “If I’m gonna do that I’ll terno said. “Nobody knew about there was a problem, that would thought doctors looked for child be a newspaper reporter.” be following up on it.” it.” Nevertheless, sitting is mostly abuse in a hospital, in a bruise or Paterno declined to judge something.” what he does, surrounded by the 2002 visit from McQueary Sandusky, or his other Penn State It remains to be seen, barring photographs that have accrued Paterno contends that igno- colleagues. “I think we got to wait any new revelations, whether on the walls for almost a half-cenrance was the context with which and see what happens,” he said. there will be a reappraisal of Pa- tury. His father, Angelo, studying he heard McQueary’s disturbing “The courts are taking care of it, terno’s life and record at Penn late at a kitchen table to become a story in 2002. McQueary, sitting the legal system is taking care of State. Eventually, his family court clerk, impressing on him at Paterno’s kitchen table, told it.” hopes, there will be healing and the open-endedness of learning. According to Sollers, the attor- forgiveness in the community, him that he had been at the footHis mother, when he called to ball building late the evening be- ney, Paterno has no legal expo- and the outlines of the man they tell her that he was finally ready to fore when he heard noises com- sure in the Sandusky case. Pater- insist Paterno is, and not the mon- wed at 34, to a young woman he no has cooperated fully with the ument or monumental target, had met, of course, in the library. ing from the shower. “He was very upset and I said investigation, and has “met on will re-emerge: A modest, decent, Sue Paterno, now 75, tends to why, and he was very reluctant to multiple occasions voluntarily” fundamentally devoted coach Paterno gently, ushering him get into it,” Paterno said. “He told with representatives from the at- who always loved books more from kitchen table to bedroom me what he saw, and I said, what? torney general’s office, Sollers than money. and back again, clasping his hand He said it, well, looked like inap- said. “In my judgment Coach PaHis starting salary was just when it trembles. “Speak up,” Sue propriate, or fondling, I’m not terno has no legal liability in this $20,000. In 2008 his salary of tells him. Paterno smiles and quite sure exactly how he put it. I matter. In fact, he acted complete- $1.03 million was still fractional rasps, “Ordinarily she tells me to said you did what you had to do. ly appropriately in reporting the compared to peers, some of shut up.” It’s my job now to figure out what only allegation he received to his whom now make $4 million. Every little while, Sue pulls a we want to do. So I sat around. It superiors and had every expectaPaterno’s record is not perfect, picture from a wall and shows it to was a Saturday. Waited till Sun- tion that the allegation would be of course. Anyone who won on his Paterno or shares it with one of day because I wanted to make investigated thoroughly.” scale has an ungenerous compet- his many visitors. They are invarsure I knew what I was doing. And itive streak and nascent ego. His iably photos of children, of sons then I called my superiors and I Paterno: I’m not a victim love for higher learning could tip and daughters and grandchilPaterno has felt smaller reper- over into superiority. He could dren. The children are captured said, ‘Hey, we got a problem, I think. Would you guys look into cussions. in time and they are all beautiful. show a temper. His son Scott says Paterno has it?’ Cause I didn’t know, you His football program was not These are the images the Paterknow. We never had, until that been “shunned” by many in the immune to the problems of big- nos cling to, through all the levels point, 58 years I think, I had never university, though he did hear time college athletics. An ESPN of distortion, the press maelhad to deal with something like from current Penn State Presi- inquiry found that from 2002 to strom, the impending trials, the that. And I didn’t feel adequate.” dent Rodney Erickson last week 2007, 46 Penn State football play- grotesqueries described on witAt that point, Paterno set up a when he made a $100,000 dona- ers faced criminal charges. But he ness stands. Whenever someone meeting for McQueary and Curl- tion to the school. His name has liked working with problem cases in her family loses their emotioney, the athletic director, and been removed from trophies. The and turning them around. al way, and sits at the kitchen taSchultz, who oversaw university Maxwell Football Club of PhilaThe 2007 team had 19 players ble weeping, Sue shows them a police. McQueary has testified delphia has discontinued its Jo- who earned Academic all-Big Ten photograph of unspoiled familial that he gave both men a far more seph V. Paterno Award, which honors. “The bigger the problem innocence. graphic description of what he was to be given to coaches who the guy was, the more I enjoyed it “Look at this picture,” she tells witnessed, which he believed to made a positive impact. A nomi- when we had success,” he said. them. “This is who we are. And no be Sandusky sodomizing a boy of nation for the Presidential Medal Over the course of his career, 47 one can take us from us.”


CMYK PAGE 14A

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

shows how binge drinking touches every aspect of society. In fact, whether speaking geographically, economically or demographically, the recent study has Continued from Page 1A shown that the least prevalent things in my life,” Knowles re- binge drinkers sometimes consumed more often or more heavicalled. “I had just gotten involved in a ly when they did partake. On average, 23.2 percent of car accident and got arrested for driving under the influence,” he men and 11.4 percent of women said. “My wife was fed up, and my binge drink. Locally, Knowles said many young womfather came to me one en in their early 20s acday and said, ‘You don’t tively seek treatment drink like everybody and could soon comelse.’ He wasn’t the first prise 40 percent of person to say that, eithose seeking recovery. ther.” CDC data show peoTwenty-seven years ple age 18 to 34 are the ago, after meeting with a most prevalent binge family friend who was in “You have drinkers, but those age recovery, Knowles him65 and up reported that self underwent treat- some of they binge drank more ment and became sober. the finest often per month – about Now, at age 51, the 5.5 times versus 4.5 on Scranton resident serves treatment as the administrative di- facilities in average – than anyone younger. rector for Clearbrook Binge drinking was Treatment Centers, an al- the world most prevalent in peocohol and chemical de- in Northple earning $75,000 or pendency treatment famore, but those earning cility with main offices in eastern Wilkes-Barre and Shick- Pennsylva- $25,000 or less drank about 1.3 more drinks shinny and satellite officper binge. Similarly, es throughout the region. nia.” Since age 25, he’s kept John Knowles people with some coleducation are an active role in the treatClearbrook lege Center among the most prevament community, somelent drinkers, although thing he said helps mainthose with less than a tain his own success. He’s also seen numerous people high school diploma drank more come through the doors of Clear- often and more heavily, consumbrook and other facilities that ing 9.3 drinks during their 5.5 he’s worked at in Pennsylvania binges per month. and New Hampshire. Because of his experience, Local excess Binge drinking does not constiKnowles wasn’t surprised by data released last week by the Centers tute a chemical dependency on for Disease Control and Preven- alcohol, but Knowles said it certainly is a stage in the disease. tion. In Northeastern Pennsylvania, Drinking in NEPA drinking is supported both culThe CDC’s Behavioral Risk turally and socially, he said. “In this area, you stop after Factor Surveillance System data, gathered through randomly work, you stop at the corner bar, dialed telephone surveys, shows you take a walk at the end of the that residents of a metropolitan night, and five 10-ounce beers is statistical area comprised of nothing,” he said. That culture began with EuLackawanna, Luzerne, and Wyoming counties binge drink at ropean immigrants hired to work the fourth-highest rate in the na- in the area’s anthracite coal mines, he said. tion. Today, an urban area coupled The region also has the highest binge drinking percentage in with a large population of college students compounds the probPennsylvania. The CDC classifies binge lem. But the area is just as accepting drinking as men having five or more drinks, or women having of the other side of the issue. “While we may have a very four or more alcoholic beverages, high incidence (of drinking), in a single occasion. Extrapolated nationwide, 38 we’ve also got a fairly acceptable million adults – one in six in the culture of recovery,” Knowles United States – self-reported that said. “You have one of the finest they binge drank in a 30-day peri- drug treatment court systems in od in 2010 when surveyed, but the world here in Lackawanna that number might not be com- County. You have some of the finest treatment facilities in the plete. “We know this to be a substan- world in Northeastern Pennsyltial underestimate of what actual vania. You have both ends of the binge drinking is because people spectrum.” tend to underreport their drinking behavior,” said Dr. Robert IDing, curbing the problem Knowles said he was lucky to Brewer, alcohol program lead at the CDC’s National Center for have a strong support system Chronic Disease Prevention and that helped him recognize and treat his alcohol dependency in Health Promotion. The CDC has compared self-re- the 1980s. Some, because of geports to alcohol sales and found netic disposition or other unconthat data captured only 30 per- trollable factors, aren’t so fortucent of presumed consumption. nate. “Ten to 12 percent of the pop“This is a big problem that we’re underestimating,” Brewer ulation will have a problem with alcohol, no matter what, whether said. they binge drink or not. That reWidespread issue ally hasn’t changed a lot over the The data in the CDC report last 50 years,” he said. “Ten per-

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Those include Lucky’s SportHouse, T.G.I. Friday’s, Ruth’s Chris Steak House and Wolfgang Puck Express. Cheryl McCann, the company’s vice president of human resources, noted, “The safety of our employees and guests is of the utmost importance to us, and we feel that training sessions like RAMP help us to meet those goals.” McCann said the company trains all

BINGING QUICK FACTS On average, binge drinkers binge four times per month

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Scranton/Wilkes-Barre

21.4%

Pittsburgh

Binge drinkers average eight drinks per binge

17.8%

PA/Ohio region

16.5%

Philadelphia

=

Income group with the most binge drinkers: greater than $75,000 per year

Income group that consumes most drinks per binge: less than $25,000 per year

=

14.7%

Allentown

LIQUOR

13.7% 0%

LIQUOR

LIQUOR

LIQUOR

5%

10%

15%

Age group that binges most often: 65 and up

Age group with most binge drinkers: 18-34

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

cent will also never have a problem. It’s the 80 percent who are the at-risk factor. That’s the To see additional concern.” photos, visit Knowles sugwww.times gests that individleader.com uals who feel they or a loved one may be drinking too much conduct a simple test. “We tell people to try not to drink for a sustained period of time. Try not to drink for 30 or 90 days. If that becomes a problem for you, there’s a good chance you have an issue,” he said. Alcoholism also can be diagnosed through a series of questions in the Diagnostic Statistical

bartenders and managers on responsible alcohol management. RAMP was established as a voluntary program by the state in 2001 but the liquor law was amended in 2006 to require any licensee that has been found guilty of sales to minors or visibly intoxicated persons to comply with RAMP for a period of up to one year. State Liquor Control Board spokeswoman Stacey Witalec said the LCB makes license holders aware of the responsibilities of holding a license and makes clear they have a duty to their community to make sure customers know when to say when.

90 80 70 60 40 30 20 10

Mark Guydish/The Times Leader

20%

25%

Scranton/Wilkes-Barre: Luzerne, Lackawanna and Wyoming counties Pittsburgh: Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver, Butler, Fayette, Washington and Westmoreland counties PA/Ohio: Mercer, Pa., and Mahoning and Trumbull counties in Ohio Philadelphia: Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery and Philadelphia counties Allentown: Carbon, Lehigh, Northampton counties in Pa., and Warren County in N.J. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Mark Guydish/The Times Leader

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Ore. Idaho

8

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Minn.

3

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Nev. Colo.

Kan.

Maine

Vt.

Iowa

Pa. Ohio

Ind.

W.Va.

Mo.

Mass.

N.Y.

Mich.

Ill.

Utah

Calif.

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Ky.

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Manual or a CAGE questionnaire commonly used to screen for the disease. 1 Some measures toward pre2 venting alcohol abuse – the national implementation of a 0.08 blood alcohol limit for drivers and zero tolerance for drinking 1 Kapaa, Hawaii 20.5% 23% 6 Bridgeport, Conn. and driving among underage 2 Key West, Fla. 20.4% 23% 7 Akron, Ohio youth, for example – have helped to start addressing the issue. 20.2% 3 Lincoln, Neb. 8 Norfolk, Neb. 22.7% “I think the fact that we have 4 Scranton/Wilkes-Barre 20.1% 21.4% 9 Boston, Mass. made progress in that area is certainly laudable. What our find5 Worcester, Mass. 10 Virginia Beach, Va. 19.9% 21.2% ings emphasize is that we have a Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Mark Guydish/The Times Leader lot more work to do to actually address binge drinking, the patThe Community Preventive its on the hours that alcohol is tern of consumption that is by far most strongly associated with al- Services Task Force further rec- sold and avoiding further privaticohol impaired driving,” Brewer ommends limiting the density of zation of government-operated said. alcohol outlets, maintaining lim- or contracted liquor stores. N.C.

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According to its 2010-11 fiscal year report, nearly 28,000 owners, managers and servers were trained in RAMP and $3.3 million was committed to alcohol education. While behind-the-scenes training works, some establishments employ clear measures right outside the door. Places like the Hardware Bar in downtown Wilkes-Barre hire off-duty Wilkes-Barre police officers to man the doors and send the message that they’re close by if things get out of control. Police Chief Gerry Dessoye said that drinking leads to increased crime and that since the bars have opened down-

town, more manpower has been designated for that area and more arrests have been made. He said in addition to obvious violations like public drunkenness and driving under the influence, he’s also noticed an increase in vandalism, assaults and disorderly conduct. “When you have bars and college kids, you do have that,” he said, noting that the increase in criminal activity since the bars opened a few years ago was “not totally unexpected.” When binge drinking goes too far, some abusers wind up seeing Sam Saylor.

The emergency room doctor at Geisinger Wyoming Valley in Plains Township said alcohol related injuries and ailments “are a big portion of the amount of people that we see.” And he said “weekends are when the situation is exacerbated.” He said while alcoholism has longterm negative effects on the body, binge drinking has more short-term impacts that could lead to death, including issues with blood sugar, blood pressure and breathing. And of course there’s impairment that could make operating machinery or vehicles dangerous, he added.

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730967

SERVERS

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Drinking is a part of the area’s historic culture going back to the coal mining days, one expert says. A large college-age population makes matters worse. Help for binge drinkers is readily available, however.

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“People don’t think he can necessarily accomplish a lot. Physically he really can’t, but mentally it’s overdrive. He’s got more between his ears than anyone I know. He really enjoys proving people wrong.”

TOM MOONEY OUT ON A LIMB

Birth, death records more readily available

Tim Wambach, aide and friend of Mike Berkson

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Mike Berkson, right, laughs with his aide, champion, and sidekick Tim Wambach, as they are driven to Mike’s dental appointment by his father Denis in Glenview, Ill. Wambach and Berkson have teamed up to create a stage show titled ‘Handicap This’ to dispel myths about cerebral palsy and disabilities, encouraging others to overcome obstacles.

Man with cerebral palsy, aide take story on the road By SHARON COHEN AP National Writer

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KOKIE, Ill. — In the hushed darkness of a crowded theater, the spotlight finds a young man in a wheelchair at center stage, his hands clenched, his head tilted, his motionless body leaning to one side. His first words are a declaration, uttered with a sense of urgency. “I have,” he says, “cerebral palsy.” A second man bounds out stage left, introduces himself and adds: “... And I don’t.”

So begins a one-of-a-kind reality show starring Mike Berkson, a sharp-witted, movie-obsessed 22-year-old college student, and Tim Wambach, his aide, champion and sidekick on and off over the last decade. They’re on stage this night to celebrate their friendship, reminisce about shared experiences (the good, bad and unforgettable) and offer theater-goers what they call life lessons about perseverance. It’s familiar territory for Berkson, who has learned (with Wambach’s help) to finds laughs from the awkward stares of strangers, cope with a body where he can control just a single finger and fend off those darkest of days when he wants to end it all.

It’s a story heavy on unvarnished truths and light on political correctness (“gimp” is in, “challenged” is out). It’s a story designed to motivate, educate and inspire. But most of all, it’s a buddy story. ••• They bonded about 10 years ago in a suburban Chicago food court mall when Tim Wambach, recently hired to help a young Mike as his aide in elementary school, took him on their first solo adventure. Mike wanted to eat at Taco Bell. Fine, thought Wambach, not realizing that feeding a crumbling-gooey concoction See DECLARATION, Page 11B

MEET JOE SHERIDAN

J CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

oe Sheridan is an actor, director and set designer for the Little Theater and Kiss Theater in Wilkes-Barre. He has been a cake decorator and from 1997 to 2007 owned floral shops called the Clay Pot with locations in Larksville and Forty Fort. Joe is also a retired substitute teacher who taught at Wilkes-Barre Vocational Technical School and Luzerne Community College. Sheridan, 58, is a graduate of Central Catholic High School and Misericordia University where he received a degree in special education and early childhood. He and his partner of 20 years, Judy Fried, have two Tsitzu dogs named Dori, 9, and Butch, 1. They adopted Butch on Christmas Eve after he was rescued while wandering the streets. They live in Kingston.

Your life’s endeavors over the years are probably as diverse as the characters you have portrayed when acting. How did you get involved in the dramatic arts? “When I was a sophomore in high school I was very shy. A friend of mine asked me to come out and audition for ‘The Mouse That Roared.’ I got a pretty big part, the Sultan of Bashir, and things kind of took off from there.” So you pursued acting in college as well? “Not originally. I attended Kings College and when I transferred to Misericordia I needed credits in public speaking.

The theater director there, Rusty Anderson, gave me an independent study and had me tryout for a role in ‘Alice in Wonderland.’ I got the part of the Mad Hatter. I enjoyed that so I also auditioned for a part in ‘Little Mary Sunshine’ and won the part of Captain Big Jim Warrington.”

crowd behind a glass window. I actually got the job but did not take it due to some of the time constraints and logistics.”

When you graduated college what did you do? “I started out substitute teaching at WilkesBarre Vo-tech but was not able to get full time. I also taught floral You mentioned that you were a decorating at LCCC. Students and cake decorator. “I did it in college faculty there would ask me where for a bit and when I chaperoned a or how I would get certain ideas class of mine on a field trip to for floral arrangements, so in 1977 Disney World I was persuaded to I opened floral shops called The audition as a performing cake Clay Pot in Larksville and Forty decorator. They were hiring some- Fort. At the same time I opened one who would decorate cakes the stores I was offered full time while hamming it up in front of a at Vo-tech as an intermediate life

skills teacher and I took it. I worked both jobs for two years but it became too much so I settled on the flower shops.” During that time after college what were some of your most memorable moments? “Many of my memories revolve around the theater. I got to do summer stock in Connecticut and I met some celebrities while attending Broadway plays in New York. Locally, I acted in several commercials ranging from Quik Joe to Rainbow Jewelers ads. I was the priest offering to buy the couple’s gold See SHERIDAN, Page 11B

ennsylvania has taken a step toward making birth and death records more readily available to genealogists and other members of the public. But, according to a records activist group, that step is not quite far enough. Starting in about mid-February, birth certificates 105 years old and more as well as death certificates 50 years old and more will be open to the public, but with some limits. You will have to visit the Pennsylvania Archives in Harrisburg and search on a computer there or be a subscriber to Ancestry.com, which is digitizing the records. The new law, signed by Gov. Tom Corbett in December, will replace the current system, under which for all those birth and death records it is necessary to submit a postal mail request, or visit a state Vital Records office, give the date and place of death and pay a fee. Genealogists, of course, are the heaviest users of birth and death records, and they have long found the process for obtaining them difficult and time-consuming — particularly since the state maintains no index. While the Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania in its newsletter hailed the reform as “an early Christmas gift to Pennsylvania genealogists,” the group People for Better Pennsylvania Historical Records Access” is more cautious. That group, headed by Tim Gruber, calls the new law a step forward but believes that the older birth and death records should be maintained by the Pennsylvania Archives, placed online and indexed to make finding a name as easy as possible from any computer. “With these records in a database and using a search engine it would be possible to search all of these records in a way that is light years away from manually checking every county year by year and manually retrieving each record,” the group says on its website. Gruber asks genealogists and others to contact the governor’s office and urge this next step. Incidentally, Pennsylvania did not require birth and death certificates until 1906, and so barely two years’ worth of birth records will be available. Pre-1962 death records will be available. That availability, of course, will increase over time. Resources: “The Historical Record,” a fascinating multi-volume collection of Northeastern Pennsylvania history and lore from a century and more ago, is being digitized by the Northeast Pennsylvania Genealogical Society. Ten volumes have been completed, but the society has not been able to find volumes two, four and 12. Anyone who has them is asked to contact this column at the address below. The project is a worthy one, because the few existing copies of these old books are faded and crumbling. They are largely articles run between the 1880s and the early 1900s in the old Wilkes-Barre Record and Record of the Times newspapers. They were compiled by Dr. Frederick Johnson, an avid local historian and owner of the papers. News Notes: Hats off to U.S. Rep. Tom Marino, R-Lycoming Twp., for joining the Library of Congress project to record war veterans’ stories. Those recordings, according to a recent Times Leader article, will be posted online at Youtube and the Library of Congress website. Anyone in the area who’s interested in genealogy should support the effort by the Luzerne County Historical Society to double its membership and increase its storage space for records. The society’s Bishop Library, a Victorian-era home, cannot accommodate much more in the way of books and other records, and expansion is heavily dependent upon membership. The Historical Society has long been a go-to institution for family research.

Tom Mooney is a Times Leader genealogy columnist. Reach him at tmooney2@ptd.net.


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DEAN’S LIST Misericordia University Misericordia University recently announced the Dean’s List for the fall 2011 semester. Local students on the Dean’s List: Sabrina Alles, Dallas; Ambria Andrasi, Shickshinny; Jennifer Ardoline, Courtdale; Christopher Arnone, Wyoming; Krista Artim, West Wyoming; Sarah Ashford, Wapwallopen; Amanda Austin, Mountain Top; Rachael Ayers, Monroe Township; David Baker, Luzerne; Jillian Balberchak, West Pittston; Carrie Balla, Harveys Lake; Robert Barna, Dallas; Jacqueline Barna, Mehoopany; James Barna, Nanticoke; Dawna Barna, Wapwallopen; Catherine Becker, Shickshinny; James Begin, Wilkes-Barre; Justin Behrens, Mountain Top; Stephanie Bellino, Kingston; Stewart Bender, Kingston; Kathleena Besermin, Dallas; Matthew Bevan, Dallas; Sean Bieski, Forty Fort; Jean Birmer-May, Hunlock Creek; Hannah Biskup, Wapwallopen; Emily Bittner, Dallas; Katherine Blanchard, Shavertown; Ashley Blazaskie, Shavertown; Lisa Bolton, Trucksville; Abigail Bomboy, Dallas; Tracy Bonk, WilkesBarre; David Booth, Exeter; Lauren Bowalick, Nanticoke; Sandra Briggs, Nescopeck; Patti Brodginski, Mountain Top; Maria Brogna, Pittston; Brittani Brown, Hanover Township; Christopher Brozena, Larksville; Dino Brunetti, Mountain Top; Trish Burgess, Dallas; Anthony Calvello, Weatherly; Donna Canino, Edwardsville; Michelle Carey, Plains; Kylie Carroll, Wilkes-Barre; Amanda Casem, Mountain Top; Leah Casey, Luzerne; James Cerulli, Larksville; Kayla Chappell, Hunlock Creek; Beatriz Chavez, Wilkes-Barre; Peter Chesney, Hanover Township; Sarah Church, West Wyoming; Laura Ciarmatori, Mountain Top; Libro Ciarmatori, Hanover Township; Marisa Clarke, Hanover Township; Bridget Clarke, Pittston; Misty Cook, Dallas; Andrew Corbett, Forty Fort; Barbara Cotter, Wyoming; Kristopher Coughlin, Harveys Lake; Tara Coughlin, Harveys Lake; Laura Crilley, Mountain Top; Jessica Cupano, Luzerne; Andria Dalley, Forty Fort; Rebecca Darling, Shavertown; Karen Delay, Mountain Top; Sandra Delgado, W. Hazleton; Nathan Delmar, Shavertown; Kristen Denion, Freeland; Brianne Derhammer, Kingston; Stephanie Do, Edwardsville; Nichole Donnelly, Wapwallopen; David Dorbad, Exeter; Karen Downs, Dallas; Michele Drago, Larksville; Shaelynn Dragon, Inkerman; Alison Drozdowski, Wilkes-Barre; Lucinda Drumheller, Benton; April Dulsky, Dallas; Jillian Dunn, Ashley; Jillian Edwards, Kingston; Bethany Empfield, Shavertown; Tara Engel, Larksville; Alicia English, Dallas; Paul Evans, Larksville; Cael Evans, Nanticoke; Erin Evans, Kingston; Marisa Ferenchick, Duryea; Nathan Finn, Wilkes-Barre; Nicole Flaherty, Hanover; Carla Flippen, Wilkes-Barre; Joshua Ford, Harveys Lake; Kellie Frazier, Hanover Township; Nicole Frederick, Dallas; Kristi Gabriele, Plains; James Galliford, Wilkes-Barre; Arthur Gialanella, Kingston; Ellen Gibbons, Ashley; Emily Ginocchetti, Wilkes-Barre; Holly Goncheroski, Wilkes-Barre; Thomas Gottstein, Drums; Marley Gozick, Plains; Sara Gravine, West Wyoming; Auraleah Grega, Wapwallopen; Lauren Griffin, Swoyersville; Elizabeth Gromelski, Duryea; Stephanie Gronchick, Hunlock Creek; Bridget Guarnieri, Pittston; Mary Gulotta, Trucksville; Theodore Gumina, Swoyersville; Diane Hady, White Haven; Danielle Harding, Swoyersville; Amy Hartman, Dallas; Kelli Harvey, Dallas; Rachel Hasay, Shickshinny; Donald Havard, Mountain Top; Kearston Healey, Avoca; Jacob Hebda, Dallas; Brenda Heck, Nanticoke; Michael Henahan, Mountain Top; Lisa Hill, Shickshinny; Timothy Hoban, Exeter; Ellen Hoffman, Kingston; Brian Hogan, Sugar Notch; Kelly Hooper, West Pittston; Hilary Hoover, Trucksville; Lori Horvath, Mountain Top; Eileen Houghtlin, Duryea; Michael Hubley, Shickshinny; Autumn Hughes, Larksville; Jody Hummel, Sweet Valley; Kathleen Jenkins, Dallas; Stephen Jenkins, WilkesBarre; Rebecca Jenkins, WilkesBarre; Brian Johnson, Harleigh; Joshua Jones, Wilkes-Barre; Leah Kaiser, Dallas; Carolyn Kaminski, Kingston; Nicole Kazmerick, Exeter; Courtney Keiter, Kingston; Michelle Kelleher, Mountain Top; Megan Kennedy, Plymouth; Bryan Kennedy, Plymouth; Kenslie Kerestes, Dallas; Dana Kinter, Lehman; Kimberly Kishel, Pittston; Brittany Kneal, Shavertown; Michael Kolody, Pittston; Kateri Kopicki, Kingston; Joseph Korea, Duryea; Tiffany Kott, W. Hazleton; Jeff Kowalek, Nanticoke; Josh Krall, West Pittston; Joseph Kreitzer, Plymouth; Scott Kresge, Wilkes-Barre; Katie Kugler, Wyoming; Kaitlyn Lane, Nanticoke; Jennifer Langan, Mountain Top; Ann Lavelle, Avoca; Taylor Lawler, Harveys Lake; Candace Levanavage, Pittston; Alison Lloyd, Forty Fort; Nicholas Lombard, Shavertown; Leigh Loughran, Kingston; Lesly Louis, Nanticoke; Brittany Lovette, Beach Haven; Anthony Lubinski, Harveys Lake; Maria

Maas, Dallas; Kelsey Maas, Dallas; Sarah Magula, Hazleton; Mellisa Makos, Nanticoke; Purity Manundu, Wilkes-Barre; Chelse Martin, Exeter; Kayla Matlowski, Kingston; Lisa Matriccino, W. Hazleton; Thomas May, Plymouth; Chadwick May, Hunlock Creek; Mark Mazur, Hanover Township; Joseph Mccann, Plains; Alyssa McEntee, Dallas; Melissa McFadden, Luzerne; Brittany McKeown, Kingston; Brianna McLaughlin, Dallas; Travis Mcroy, West Wyoming; Sarah Mellas, Mountain Top; Louise Menendez, Wilkes-Barre; Mary Michael, Sugar Loaf; Victoria Mihal, Wyoming; Brianna Mikolaichik, Exeter; Kevin Miller, Pittston; Michelle Minegar, Hughestown; Abbey Mitchell, Hughestown; Kelsey Mizenko, Kingston; Nicole Monahan, West Wyoming; Tamra Morris, Shavertown; Catherine Moss, Shavertown; Kathleen Moyer, Dallas; Terrence Murgallis, Wilkes-Barre; Kevin Murphy, West Pittston; Christian Myers, Pittston; Kimberly Neary, Huntington Mills; Denise Nerozzi, Dallas; Teddy Newton, White Haven; Nicole Nilsson, Wilkes-Barre; Cara Nolan, Shavertown; Megan Novak, Nescopeck; Sarah Nowalis, Forty Fort; Paula Ochs, Sugar Loaf; Courtney O’Meara, Wilkes-Barre; Marina Orrson, Shavertown; Sandra Osorio, Wilkes-Barre; Michael Padden, Mountain Top; Maia Painter, Dallas; Susan Panaway, Hanover Township; Andrea Pandya, Hanover Township; Colleen Pane, Sugarloaf; Elizabeth Papciak, Wilkes-Barre; Kristin Parsons, Wapwallopen; Debra Passarella, Pittston; Brei Patience, West Pittston; Christelle Patrice, Ashley; Marissa Patton, Harveys Lake; Lauren Paulshock, Freeland; Jacqueline Pearson, Dallas; Amanda Perlock, Pittston; Amanda Pernot, Dupont; Stacey Perrins, Dupont; Melissa Petrillo, Hanover Township; Paul Pierson, Glen Lyon; Donna Piontkowski, Nanticoke; Amelia Poplawski, Wilkes-Barre; Tina Potzner, Drums; Stephanie Pugh, Nanticoke; Timothy Quinn, Hazleton; Thomas Redenski, Nanticoke; Jennifer Reese, Forty Fort; Holly Reese, Nanticoke; Rachael Richards, Nanticoke; Laura Rinehimer, Hanover Township; Rachel Rinkus, Drums; Alexandra Rishkofski, Shavertown; Brittney Rosencrans, Hunlock Creek; Rebecca Rosengrant, Dallas; Erin Rother, Forty Fort; Caitlin Rowe, Ashley; Evelyn Rowles, Dallas; Susan Ruotolo, Noxen; Alyssa Rush, Pittston; Joseph Sakavage, Wilkes-Barre; Erik Sandstrom, Harveys Lake; Ashley Scaffido, Swoyersville; Ashley Schartzer, Nescopeck; Andrea Schiappa, Dallas; Kristin Schraeder, Glen Lyon; Jennifer Sciandra, Harding; Rose Scott, Harveys Lake; Hannah Seely, Benton; Gayle Sekel, Harding; Luann Senchak, Dallas; Cara Sepcoski, Bear Creek Township; Katelyn Serino, Shavertown; Danielle Shaver, Trucksville; Lisa Sheckler, Nanticoke; Rita Shock, Kingston; Matthew Shonk, Larksville; Justin Shuleski, Duryea; Noel Sidorek, Dallas; Suzanne Sikora, Sweet Valley; Christi Skiro, Hanover Township; Rachel Smith, Hanover Township; Melissa Smith, Harding; Tyler Smith, Drums; Alayna Snyder, WilkesBarre; Tia Spagnuolo, Wyoming; Kendra Spears, Trucksville; Suzanne Spengler, Dallas; Amy Spess, Shavertown; Catherine Stanski, Dallas; Brian Stecker, Drums; Rebecca Stesney, Shavertown; Rachel Stitt, Nescopeck; Ryan Stowinsky, White Haven; Joslyn Stucker, Luzerne; Elizabeth Stuscavage, Wyoming; Kimberly Suchoski, Wilkes-Barre; Lindsay Sutkowski, Pittston; Amanda Sutton, Kingston; Michael Szumski, Pittston; Marialena Tencza, Wilkes-Barre; Stephanie Thomas, Wilkes-Barre; Courtney Thomas, Dallas; Alyssa Timinski, West Pittston; Cassie Tirpak, Shavertown; Amanda Tomaselli, Trucksville; Rhonda Tronsue, Sweet Valley; Brian Tupper, Wilkes-Barre; Joshua Turner, Mountain Top; Kayla Turonis, Pittston; Ann Turse, Drums; Alyssa Urbanski, Nanticoke; Meghan Vargas, Dallas; Alexis Vaskas, Dallas; Justine Vedro, Wilkes-Barre; Megan Velehoski, Duryea; Brittany Vetrini, Shickshinny; Caitlin Vitale, West Pittston; Paula Walker, Pittston; Corinne Walker, Parsons; Marcia Walsh, Sweet Valley; Kimberly Walsh, Laflin; Daniel Warakomski, Nanticoke; Joshua Wargo, Nanticoke; Patricia Warkevicz, Trucksville; Philip Wascavage, Mountain Top; Caitlynn Watkins, Pittston; Shana Weinstock, Dallas; Callie Whitesell, Hunlock Creek; Kristin Whitmire, Sybertsville; Matthew Wielgopolski, Wilkes-Barre; Maura Williams, West Pittston; Barbara Williams, Forty Fort; Shawna Williams, Edwardsville; Brittni Williamson, Sweet Valley; Jennifer Windt, Wapwallopen; Lauren Wysocki, Harding; Joan Yamrick, Dallas; Frank Yamrick, Dallas; Sandy Yanchick, Noxen; Ashley Yankanich, Conyngham; Sarah Yanoski, Drums; Scott Yarmel, Luzerne; Charles Yavorski, Shavertown; Gina Yocum, Hazleton; Marian Yoder, Nescopeck; Kara Yozwiak, Larksville; Joanne Yuhas, Wilkes-Barre; Darnetta Yusko, Plymouth; Jessica Zaborny, Exeter; Jane Zak, Kingston; Tina Zannetti, Bear Creek Township; Frank Ziegler, III, Trucksville; Emily Zielinski, Dupont; Bradley Zurla, Wyoming.

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HONOR ROLL James M. Coughlin High School James M. Coughlin High School recently announced the Honor Roll for the first quarter. Grade 12: Highest Honors: Cara Answini, Danyelle Barrow, Rosa Bartoletti, Brittany Bella, Sara Blazejewski, Logan Carroll, Dena Casterline, James Chmiola, Christopher Cinti, Marcus Cobb, Shahara Davis, Marina Dunsavage, Kayla Eaton, Jeremy Evanko, Shelby Flaherty, Clifford Francis, Kayla Franckiewicz, Kyle Graham, Devin Green, Andrea Grillini, Dominick Gulius, Dannah Hayward, Scott Hoffman, Eric Klemchak, Joseph Kubicki, Trystin Lamereaux, Summer Lentini, Jason Lepore, Coreen Lingle, David Long, Elizabeth Long, Hannah Lukatchik, McKenzie McDonough, Ian Mercado, Liana Meshko, Stephanie Milewski, Marissa Miller, Matthew Miraglia, Alyssa Monaghan, Kaitlyn Mondulick, Kallista Myers, Bailey Novak, Ivy Nulton, Tina Olson, Jeremy Ozark, Anthony Panaway, Joseph Parsnik, Kara Pawloski, Heather Pilcavage, Richard Poplawski, Ashley Ray, Berenice Rodriguez, Amanda Sax, Paul Scull, Cayla Sebastian, Kirby Silliboy, Aldrin Soriano, Gregory Stankiewicz, Brooke Stepanski, Kaitlin Sypniewski, Ryan Sypniewski, Alexandra Szoke, Allison Townsend, Phillip Trout, Jessica Walsh, Madison Zamsky, Stephanie Zedolik. High Honors: Lynn Aguilar, Zuhey Aguilar, Bridget Amigon, Jordan Answini, Taylor Balucha, Julie Barry, Sabrina Bella, Ashley Bevan, Gerdwine Bourdeau, Katie Brislin, Brittany Bullock, Kyle Cunningham, Micheal Czerniakowski, Brandon Darius, Devon Davis, Karen Degante, Michelle Diaz, Clint Donovan, Ialik Etheridge, Laura Evans, Grace Fazzi, Justin Francis, Heather Gaydos, Emilie Gurdock, Jawanna Harper, Eric Heffers, Thomas Himlin, Julie Hughes, Michael Iorio, Jasvir Jacobs-Singh, Tyheem Jenkins, Kevin Kandrac, John Karazia, Sierra Kelley, Jacob Kruika, Nhi Le, Marissa Lercara, Jenna Lutchko, Amber Lynn Mahalick, Cara Martin, Zachery McNeill, Russell Monroe, Leonard Montgomery, Eric Murray, Stephanie Nace, Erica Nanni, Linda ObandoWilson, Allison Peck, Matthew Phillips, Sierra Pinkney-Williams, Jesse Ragugini, Kaitlyn Rakowski, Robert Reilley, Kaushal Savalia, Karalee Schneikart, Ashley Simonson, John Skursky, Jordan Sod, Sally Sosa, Joshua Stankinas, Nicole Tirpak, Troy Vannucchi, Joseph Vera, Edward Walsh, Caitlin Ward, Victoria Wilde, Kevin Zingaretti. Honors: Brandon Adkins, Siomara Amigon, Michael Avery, Jessica Bella, Carla Clarke, Joseph

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Concepcion, Kevin Dering, Andres Diaz, Thomas Donato, Nicolis Evans, Danielle Georgetti, Kailie Gobbler, Eryn Harvey, Brittany Holzman, Lindsey Humanik, Rebecca Hunter, Robin Jackson, Ian Jeremiah-Nieves, Makila Kellman, Karlie Kennedy, James Kuchinski, Frank Mahmoud, Jurika Martinez, Christian McAtee, Peter Nanni, John Olson, Maximo Ramos, Jason Ross, Gregory Serafin, Paige Stanley, Clint Thompson, Jacob Waxmonsky, Adam Zawatsky. Grade 1 1: Highest Honors: Samuel Andrews, Cindy Anusiewicz, Hunter Bednarczyk, Kaitlyn Benczkowski, Andrey Boris, Frank Brandolino, Spoorthy Challa, Maria Cinti, Shannon Daly, Julia Demellier, Steven Dobbs, Zachary Evans, Shamus Gartley, Dominique Gurns, Shelby Hess, David Hontz, Madysen Jones, Mackenzie Keats, Michaela Keats, Shelby Kresge, Summer Kubicki, Joseph Lanning, Michael Lewandowski, Sara Long, Hailley Malenovitch, Justin Malinowski, Lorianne Masi, Samantha Maywald, Monika Missal, Matthew Moorhead, Julia Moskel, Cassidy Moyer, Justin Okun, Mykela Pacurariu, Seth Perrin, Jordan Phillips, Lauren Popple, Dylan Robbins, Nathan Sauers, Danyelle Schweit, Nicholas Scupski, Nathan Sienkiewicz, Casey Silvi, Jessica Sims, Felicia Solovey, Alvin Soriano, Raizy Sosa, Sergey Svintozelsky, Aaron Tohme, Haley Waslasky Caitlin Wood, Catherine Yankowski. High Honors: Danielle Adcock, Brittany Albert, Marcia Archibold, Jessica Brzenchek, Amy Cherinko, Edward Ciprich, Kayleen Collum, Tayler Cook, Giana Cruz, Nicholas Davi, Emily Domanski, Christopher Domiano, Rebecca Elmy, Bradley Emerick, Brooke Evans, Kimberly Flores, Bohdan Gines, Tyler Hardy, Jocelyn Hillman, Adam Hutz, Rachel Javorka, Joseph Jordan, Kayla Kelly, Skylar Kopeck, Jennifer Kowalczyk, Breanne Lloyd, Donavan Mackey, Shawn Maiers, Jacqueline Marroquin, Elizabeth Martin, Aaliyah Massey, Jared Melton, Mark Miraglia Jr., Emily Motsko, Joshua Moules, Derek Nowak, Austin Popish, David Price III, Dejuana Pyatt, Joseph Ramos, Mitchell Rivera, Jessica Ross, Paige Tedik, Joseph Tona, Caitlin Vukovich, Sara Walkowiak, Collin Ward, Sarah Welles. Honors: Aaron Andrews, Roberto Camarillo, William Engle III, Joshua Featherman, Connor Flaherty, Kyle Grego, Neil Haczewski, Amanda Hart, Ronald Head, Stacie Howell, Corey Keen, Joseph Kenzakoski, Stephen Kosek, Michael Lozada, Patrick Malone, Zachary Mamola, Malik McDonald, Michael McGraw, Theodore Mykulyn, Isaiah Owens, Alexander Perez, Michael Post, Elizabeth Rosencrans, Alexander Scheuermann, Morgan Sheplock, Luke Slenzak, Jennifer Sosa, Cassandra Vukovich, Joshua Walker,

HONOR ROLL Wyoming Valley West High School Erin Keating, principal, Wyoming Valley West High School, recently announced the following students who have attained Honor Roll status for the first quarter. Grade 12: Honors with Distinction: Evan Amendola, Kaitlin Gorgol, Hannah Goyne, Tyler Hostetler, Kelcie Hromisin, Jason Klus, Sean Sedor, Jocelyn Sickler, Ryan Yashinski, Veronica Zimmerman. High Honors: Jennifer Benesky, Gabriella Bonavitacola, Jennifer Booth, Kristen Cirilo, Emily Coolbaugh, Sabrina Cunningham, Adam Dibuo, Yanting Dong, Taylor Dougalas, Brian Dwyer, Donald Engel, Dylan Feldman, Kayleigh Fishe, Tyler Gates, Maxwell Greenberg, Adin Greenwald, Derick Haigh, Kevin Harris, Ryan Hettes, Benjamin Holschuh, Jacob Honoosic, Theresa Hornick, Nicole Hunsinger, Shelby Jackloski, Michael Jorda, Michael Kilheeney, Melissa Klass, Ryan Kozich, Alexandra Lecce, Jaime Levitski, Malissa Lucas, Clara Lynch, Kaitlyn Mazur, Abriel McCann, James McCann, Anna McNatt, Adam Meriesky, Emile Mirzoevs, Laith Mubayed, John Muench, Tessa Narins, William Newhart, Matthew Novak, Russell Pacovsky, Gia Panagakos, Billy Parsons, Quincy Patrick, Kyle Phillips, Mallory Pinkowski, Sarah Piontkowski, John Plucenik, David Rasmus, Taylor Reilly, Emily Rittinger, Amanda Sabol, Juliet Schmid, Carrie Sedeski, Stephanie Serafin, Alexander Severns, Kaitlyn Smicherko, Logan Stratton, Alec Taren, Eric Thornton, Brittany Tirado, Trisha Tomasko, Sebastian Van Dunk, Maria Villano, Jeffrey Walters, Gabrielle Williams, Katherine Willis, Shawn Wolfe, Courtney Wychock, Anthony Zambetti, Tara Zdancewicz, Lucas Zelinsky. Honors: Jocelyn Amico, Kyle Andrews, Joseph Baran, Rebecca Barber, David Bealla, Cynthia Beard, Samantha Bekanich, Allyson Bezek, Jeremy Biagiotti, Patricia Bienick, Brittney Birosak, John Brennan, Shane Britt, Kalie Brown, Jenelle Bruno, Tashawn Bunch, Danny Bytheway, Laura Campas, Brittany Chabala, Antoinette Chiazza, Brianna Chihany, Brittney Chihany, Efrem Christoforatos, Francesca Colella, Christopher Coleman, Tyler Cox, Alexis Crawford, Irene Dudeck, Stephanie Fisher, Dylan Flayhart, Paine Fleisher, Erica Gavenonis, Samantha Gober, Brenden Goff, Rebecca Gryskewicz, Ashley Grywalski, Kerrie Hapeman, Nathan Harbaugh, Derick Hartman, Tiffani Heil, Nicole Henderson, Alex Himlin, Ryan Hoinski, Chrystal Horace, Olivia Huk, Zachary Hunter, Alexandria Jamilowski, Christopher Jaworski, Lauren Jenkins, Matthew Kanor, Abdulla Kazimi, Anthony King, Keith Konze, Mitchell Kotarski, Alexis Krashnak, Rebecca Kraynak, Thomas Kuren Jr, Bryanna Latona, Samantha Lavelle, Kyle Lewis, Megan Lloyd, Alexa Lopez, Quinten Maggio, Mark Makowski, Benedict Mariano, Shane McIntire, Cheyenne Metzger, Monica Morgan, Gregory Moser, Timothy Mudlock, Elizabeth Mulaski, Michael Novak, Nikhil Patel, Danielle Patterson, Matthew Perugino, Matthew Pieszala, Eric Pollick, Andrew Prynn, Ashley Punt, Morgan Raskiewicz, Michael Robins, Caitlynn Roper, Sadie Roth, Hali Santiago, Ronald Serafin, Sean Simmons, Brandon Smith, Thomas Smulowitz, Miranda Sromovski, Kirsten Stayer, Sarah Strish, Cody Swan, Cody Taylor, Virginia Taylor, Tyler Temarantz, Dimitris Theodorelos, Gerald Thomas, Scott Thomas, Bethany Toney, Steven Urbanski, Jillian Usefara, Janel Vnuk, Adam Wallitsch, David Walsh, Tasha Williams, Zachary Wood, Alexa Yankosky, Kevin Yozviak, Jessica Zafia. Grade 1 1: Honors with Distinction: Maura Anistranski, Joseph Butkiewicz, Brittany De Armitt, Nicole Delevan, Patrick Endler, Brian Hromisin, Matthew Labashosky, Thomas Missal, Kyle Monto, Amy Paddock, Alexandria Plant, Kirk Reichart, Michael Rock, Mitchell Rock,

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Morgan Wanyo, Yi Nuo Wu, Melissa Yakabovich, Amber Zendzion. Grade 10: Highest Honors: Alex Anderson, Nicolas Bishop, Yuriy Boris, Ruben Bourdeau, Alexandra Bukeavich, Kyra Castano, Lauren Castellana, Alexander Cerep, Valerie Davi, Christopher Dennis, Marc Donato, Emily Dupak, Alizabeth Ellsworth, Dhalia Espinoza, Joseph Gayoski, Adam Giovanelli, Collin Gozick, Lauren Gryskevicz, Abagail Gutierrez, Nandi Harrington, April Haupt, Corey Hauser, Caroline Hayduk, Sarah Jarnot, Anthony Khalife, Sommer Kosko, William Kozub, Daulton Lentini, Charles Long, Kyle Lupas, Benjamin Manarski, David Marriggi, Kyle McGrady, Jessica Miorelli, Kimberly Nestorick, Keighlyn Oliver, Yamileth Orduna, Michael Osmanski, David Parsnik, Nima Patel, Timothy Pilch, Thomas Pistack, Evan Popple, William Poray, Ilham Priyambodo, Jennifer Reynoso, Jessica Reynoso, Sarah Riviello, Angeline Rubasky, Bridget Ryan, Barry Schiel, Dana Schneider, Jada Smith, Alia Sod, Alexandria Soller, Saray Sosa, Kayla Stachokus, Kelly Tlatenchi, Caitlin Walsh, Michael Wozniak, Stephen Zedolik. High Honors: Scott Alexis, Molly Andress, Courtney Answini, Troy Bankus, Katlyn Barber, Jessica Benczkowski, Austin Brzozowski, Dalton Buck, Charles Capinas, Erin Chmiola, Noel Clark, Katelyn Colleran, Kaitlyn Coskey, Kimberly Curet, Ryan Decinti, Elizabeth Dohman, Brooke Dunlap, Jacob Farr, Marisa Gribble, Arianne Grilli, Courtney Hafner, Samantha Hardy, Farid Hernandez, Daniel James, Caitlin Jaworski, Kelsi Jenkins, John Jones, Richard Kenzakoski, Erica Kline, Natasha Kostak, Stephanie Lauer, Khang Le, Kimberly Lozada, Anthony Malacari, Dalton McHenry, Kelvin Mejia, Tristan Mercado, Jeremy Miller, Megan Mosley, Erin O’Day, Emily Richards, Max Rodriguez, Allison Rorick, Marissa Ross, Daniel Sales, Tyler Schweit, Anthony Serpico, David Sterba, Julie Suchocki, Rebecca Svab, Steven Tlatenchi, Kaitlyn Tredinnick, Abigail Viola, Lucia Walkowiak, Destiny Warnagiris, Kenneth Werkheiser, Eric Williams, Tiffany Young. Honors: Eric Adamczyk, Amanda Benczkowski, Denise Castillo Jr, Bradley Dunn, Bobby Ent, Matthew Esser, Nora Fazzi, Erin Flanagan, Elijah Foster, Masatah Graham, Carolin Gutierrez, Anait Guzman, Sharif Hasan, Megan Hughes, Tyron Johnson, Maggie Jones, Lisa Joyce, Meghan Krumsky, John Lacomy, Emilee Lester, Jessica Luton, Michael Malloy, Jade Matusick, Miranda McLaughlin, Paul Meehan, Stephanie Moyer, Christina Nash, Jesenia Nava, Allison Novak, Dominique Oko, Martin Oley, Brandon Olshefski, Matthew Parry, Kaitlyn Pearage, Joshua Reilly, Kayla Sakowski, Jeremiah Scutt, Jonathan Sims,

Tasha Saint-Louis, Christa Talpash, David Yunkunis. High Honors: Jossalyn Albert, Shannon Ariel, Benjamin Becker, Cheyenne Billings, Michelle Butler, David Chacke, Kelly Cloak, Alyssa Conner, Lydia Ellsworth, Briana Fedorko, Daniel Flaherty, Robert Freeman II, Kaitlin Fulton, Stephanie Gerosky, Brittney Gould, Nathan Gurtis, Morgan Hanadel, Cory Himlin, Desiree Holena, Jaquelyn Jacobosky, Amanda Klass, Brandilyn Kultys, Michael Leonard, Jacob Lovern, Samantha Lukasavage, Meg Markwith, Christopher McCue, Julia Mericle, Alexandra Miller, Ashley Miller, Kaitlyn Miller, Steven Miller, James Murray, Michael Narvid, Joseph Pechulis, Kendle Peters, Nicole Piazza, Damian Pierontoni, Cayla Pipan, Michael Polk, Anna Rittenhouse, Devin Ryman, Jessica Seabridge, Evan Sedor, Patrick Snyder, Nicole Sott, Erika Stefanides, Meghan Tanner, Sarah Walton, Joshua Williams, Ryan Wisniewski, Victoria Yamrus. Honors: Melissa Acosta, Briana Balbuena, Alysha Barber, Morgan Bell, Victor Bodnar, Kayla Bond, Leonardo Brennan, Corey Callacki, Nicole Chipego, Trey Cowman, Marissa Culver, Danielle Cunningham, Sauni Davenport, Samantha Derr, Casey Dolan, Alec Dupras, Jacob Elko, Jacob Elko, Jacquelyn Favata, Marie Foose, Katrina Fuller, Gabriele Gadomski, Kyle Gaffney, Brett Good, Kyle Gregory, Cassidy Heid, Nicholas Hogan, Zackary Holena, Kyle Homnack, Samantha Hornick, Amanda Huber, Kendra Innocenti, Robert Jacobs, Matthew Jones, Tyler Karasinski, Erika Karnoski, Nicholas Kinney, Carissa Kopenis, Adrian Kozemko, Jessica Kozich, Kyle Krasavage, Ian Labar, Elena Lagoski, Ziyao Lin, Jessica Loyack, Luke Lukas, Joseph Maldonado, Nicole Malesky, Student Name, Kayla Martinez, Jeffrey Maxwell, Amanda May, Joshua Mazurek, Shanell McCollum, Erica Naugle, Christopher Nixon, Mineyris Novas, Ryan Pacovsky, Gillian Pajor, Liliya Palashchuk, Gabriella Panzitta, Aleah Pelier, Kelly Phillips, Madeline Powell, Stephen Roccograndi, Marisa Romanowski, Alan Sakosky, Miah Salgado, Kevin Saunders, Catherine Savakinas, Kayla Scull, Kelcie Senchak, Austin Severns, Brandon Sharp, Lily Shemo, Michael Shields, Brittany Sikorski, Stephen Sims, Brittany Snell, Christopher Spellman, Richard Stayer, Cody Swainbank, Robert Symons Jr, Michael Troth, Tyler Troth, Krystal Van Dunk, Collin Vest, Nicholas Vitanovec, Gianna Webby, James Williams, Lawrence Williams, Donald Wychock Jr., Zachary Yaglowski, Alexandru Yaroshenko, Jessica Young, Megan Ziller. Grade 10: Honors with Distinction: Joseph Dal Santo, Nina Desilva, Kayla Gensel, Elizabeth Hoffman, Ross Le Soine, Lauren Lupinski, On Yoo Park, Janki Patel, Brandon Reyes, Troy Yashinski. High Honors: Jeffrey Austin, Michael Baur Jr., Meitar Bendavid, Christopher Bloom, Amber Brezna, Joseph Cirilo Jr, Tara Crawford, Salena Diaz, Angelika Dzieza, Erica Eck, Kyle Gitkos, Danielle Grega, Andrew Guarilia, Heejee Jung, Joshua Kaplowitz, Sommer Lawson, Timothy Libman, Summer McDonnell, Imani Mullings, Kathryn Musto, Brian Novitski, Savannah Piazza, Christopher Potoski, Travis Roper, Casondra Smicherko, Brett Swaboski, Emily Tyler, Jessica Wall, Madeleine Wood, Chandler Yakimowicz, Rebecca Zaneski. Honors: Deangelo Aboutanos, Moussa Abuelhawa, Allison Amendola, Patrick Antall, Steven Austin Jr, Zackary Bregman, Francis Brodi, Mark Burridge, John Butchko, Casey Buzin, Trudi Casier, Nathan Cheek, Casey Clark, Amelia Collins, Dale Cunningham, Raymond Davis, Michaeline Delarche, Leanne Dellarte, Thomas Dempsey, James Donovan, Tiffany Dyanick, Raymond Ercolani, Miriam Finkelstein, David Franks, Alyssa Fuller, Morgan Fulton, Brianna Gaylets, Joshua Gaylord, John Gibbons III, Saabir Gibson, Patrick Gill, Andrew Greenwald, Derek Heffelfinger, Joshua Hewitt, Olivia Hoffman, Timothy Holmes, Judith Isbel, Jonathan Jagozinski,

Kimberly Sosa, Dylan Spillers, Nykia Taylor, Joseph Tlucek, Heather Tompkins, Anthony Vaimaona, Rebecca Wilk, David Wodarczyk, Alexander Worosilla, Sarah Zbierski. Grade 9: Highest Honors: Nathaniela Bourdeau, Bailey Brannigan, Matthew Bruns, Desiree Buck, Dylan Clewell, Rowan Connelly, Sarah DeBiasi, Kelsey Eovitch, Adam Ercolani, Kelsey Gabriele, Jennifer Goodrich, Jeremy Grivensky, Emily Hall, Robert Hawkins, Travis Keil, Jacqueline Kline, Thomas Kozerski, Kourtney Kukowski, Katharine Lanning, Christine Lapsansky, Holly Lloyd, Kayla Losito, Michael Malacari, Caitlyn McAtee, Morgan McKenna, Joseph Miraglia, Morgan Novakovich, Carly Ray, Carlos Rodulfo, Adam Sadvary, David Sadvary, Isabel Sanchez, Morgan Sidorowicz, Catherine Silveri, Rachael Supinski, Kyle Swingle, Cory Vanchure, Olivia Vogue, Victoria Vogue, Victoria Walter, Frank Wojtash, Michael Yanchuck. High Honors: Shawn Austin, Kristen Bailey, Lauren Bailey, Patrick Barrow, Melissa Bartkus, Teagan Bigelow, Shelby Bizub, Daniel Blazejewski, Mauri Bohan, Megan Bruns, Baylee Bukeavich, Bianca Bullock, Brandon Butry, Kassandra Cebula, Nicole Ciprich, Damian Clark, Amber Colleran, Ryan Corcoran, Kayla Cunningham, Timothy Elick, Jeremy Francis, Carmen Garcia, Lee Gustinucci, Jessica Harvey, Lauren Hoffman, Jeffrey Hughes, Chloe Hutter, Jesse Jimenez, Alexander Kane, Caitlyn King, Rachel Kollar, Justin Kuna, Volodymyr Kunderevych, Alana Lathrop, Megan Lercara, Madisen Leslie, Heather Lloyd, Kaitlyn Lukashewski, Rachael Luton, Tiffany Mayhue, Cody McCord, Joseph McCrone, James McGettigan, Kelly McGraw, Hassanah McLendon, Gabrielle McNeill, Daren Miller, Thomas Mitchell, Zachary Mykulyn, Bethany Paulukonis, Nicholas Peterlin, Amber Reese, Kimberly Rivera, Kyle Schneikart, Rebecca Scott, Edward Slavish, Zoey Spak, Nicholas Stavinski, Robert Sudnick, Grace Weed. Honors: Alexis Amigon, Enrique Amigon, Kath ryn Askew, Tyler Bonick, Michael Buscemi, Brandon Catone, Scott Christian, John Elick, Damian Farrell, Eric Florek, Rhaelynn Froncek, Cristian Gamboa, Ryan Gorki, Zackery Hinkle, Mikayla Hoskins, Christopher Huertero, Ryan Jackson, Brenden Jones, Tyler Layton, Carianna Makowski, Lee McCracken, Dominique Miraglia, Da’mon Murray Jr, Sarah Pawluk, Carlos Perdomo, Valerie Perez, Heather Reed, Domonic Riviello, Norah Rosencrans, Melanie Santiago, Christopher Sebia, Steven Shaffer, Kelly Smith, Logan Thomas, Rikki Todd, Philip Torres, Tyler Uravage, Marquel White, Brett Williams, Brianna Wondoloski, Adam Wylie.

Charles Jones, Elizabeth Koch, Angela Kryger, Joseph Kulick, Patrick Kuren, Abby Lewis, Morgan Lewis, Katherine Lipski, Brandy Loskie, Michael Lucas, Emily Luff, Kevin MacAvoy, Michael May, Evan Mccue, Alexander McGee, Sean McQueen, Daniel Miller, Morgan Miller, Ian Moran, Roberto Ortiz, Curtis Paff, Carmen Pane, Sean Patton, Melissa Payavis, Nicole Piro, Jason Proski, Gordon Rasmus, Sheri Roche, David Roebuck, Jeremy Sabecky, Jake Schell, Kyle Schimmel, Brian Scibek, Danielle Shaw, Kelsey Sholtis, Seth Stelma, Michael Stowell, Shane Sturr, Brittney Thompson, Alex Tirko, Ethan Tooley, Alexa Webby, Charlette Wilde, Rachelle Woodard, Andrew Yuhas, Benjamin Yuscavage, Breanna Zafia, Zachary Zelinsky. Grade 9: Honors with Distinction: Eric Acosta, Mark Baron, April Bonoski, Madeleine Dwyer, Julie Green, Brian Grodzki, Lauren Hannagan, Tara Judge, Ashlyn Narins, Kara Ann Romanowski, Daniel Taren, Hayley Tigue, Julianna Turnbach, Morgan Wheeler. High Honors: Arika Bartusek, Abigail Baur, Elizabeth Berry, Lauren Bezek, Kira Bidding, Dylan Bowman, Benjamin Brubaker, Kayley Carey, David Casterline Jr., Alexandria Chaban, Joley Chen, Emily Coslett, Kaitlyn Coslett, Julia Crossin, Devin Cwalina, Brady Davison, Dylan De Armitt, Allison Detwiler, Moyra Dieso, Nicholas Elko, James Fender, Samantha Finney, Sydney Fry, Sean Gavin, Haley Gayoski, Lacey Good-Wright, Maxon Goodrich, Emily Greskewicz, Paige Haigh, Emily Harden, Caitlin Hargrave, Ashlee Harry, Paige Heckman, Dillon Hector, Janelle Husted, Kristin Innocenti, Erika Jenkins, Madison Kachinko, Abigail Kane, Samuel Kornfeld, Jared Kozich, Amanda Krashnak, Hollis Langley, Nikolas Lecce, Bethany Lindsey, Keith Lowe, Christopher Lupole, Kaitlynn Matys, Keefe McDougal, Hunter McGrane, Laura Monto, Syrah Musto, Emily Nice, Keirstin Novitski, Alyssa O’Boyle, Erica Oakschunas, Mitchell Pisarz, Jordan Pocono, Jason Radginski, Timothy Reams, Rebecca Ritsick, Sophie Rittenhouse, Emily Rossmell, Matthew Ruger, Contessa Salgado, Jessica Savage, Jonathan Schwartz, Susan Simmons, Elizabeth Slusser, Zachery Specht, Tye Sutphen, Carly Thomas, Stephen Via, Brooke Weiss, Megan Wiernusz, Nathan Williams, James Wright, Francis Yuhas, Logan Zavada. Honors: Abraheem Abdelqader, Malak Abuelhawa, Santino Alunni, Steven Appenzeller, Jyllian Barchi, Michael Bodnar, Corrine Bonnerwith, Shane Borisuck, Jermichael Bunch, Aleesha Bunting, Mia Cain, Milan Caprari, Naseim Case, Brianna Centeno, Robert Chaparro, Devon Dante, Kelsey Decker, Haley Edwards, Jarod Elko, Ashlyn Finnegan, Joseph Gavenonis, Kameron Grant, William Gregory, Caeleigh Griffiths, Alyssa Gross, John Gruver, Taylor Gugliotti, Kady Gurtis, Sabrina Hamersley, Collin Hanson, Ashlyn Heid, Abigail Hudock, Kylie Hughes, Jabriah Ingram, Andrew Iorio, Marianna Ismail, Kalli Jenkins, Kevin Johnson, Jeremey Jumper, Scott Karcheski, Kaitlin Kennerly, Andrew Kerrigan, Bryanna Kovaleski, Jeremy Kozich, Kyle Krushinski, Evan Kryger, Ithaca Kurtinitis, Vinny Le, Zachary Lesko, Dana Lukasavage, Amanda Maier, Joshua Maniscalco, Arianna Martin, Damian Masloski, Joshua Mays, Alexis McDaniels, Shania McDermott, Brianna Miller, Evelyn Nadeak, Ryan Nork, Thomas Norton, Samantha Ogin, Landis Ostroski, John Pepas, Reilly Peters, Christopher Pollick, Toni Prynn, Jason Ravert, Matthew Reilley, Tyler Reynolds, David Richards, Britany Richardson, Anthony Ruiz, Bailey Ryneski, Abdoulaye Sanyang, Alexandra Schappert, Sabrina Scott, Alyssa Shaver, Brooke Shoemaker, Blake Snyder, Myranda Stark, Dominic Steiner-Butchko, Ryan Stewart, Amanda Strish, Brianna Thomas, Matthew Totten, Ian Ultsh, Taylor Urbanski, Julia Usefara, Alexa Vargo, Timothy Walters, Sean Webb, Heather Yeninas, Edward Zawatski.


CMYK

Wyoming Seminary Middle School William Davis, interim dean of Wyoming Seminary Middle School, recently announced the Academic High Honor Roll and Academic Honor Roll for the first trimester of the 2011-2012 academic year. Grade 6: High Honor Roll: Bobby Austin, Riley Calpin, Julia Gabriel, Lillian Hornung, Eli Idec, Faizan Khalid, Richard Kraus, Duncan Lumia, Meghna Melkote, Daniel Paglia, Kiran Sharma, Emily Sims, Gabrielle Snyder, Samuel Sweitzer and Mia Zaloga. Honor Roll: Samantha Banks, Arianna Bufalino, Naomi Dressler, Vincenzo Gaudino, Rylee Gavlick, Justin Glowacki, Henry Lynett, Kaitlyn Metz, Olivia Meuser, Avani Pugazhendhi, Ryan Straub and Levi SundayLefkowitz.

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C O N S TR U C TIO N C O . PA012959

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517 Pierce Street, Pierce Plaza, Kingston

Mundy sponsors student for adventure camp The Wyoming Valley Montessori School (WVMS) in Kingston received a visit from State Representative Phyllis Mundy, who sponsored a student from the Catherine McAuley House to attend a recent Adventure Camp at the school. Activities for the week included rafting, horseback riding and hiking. From left: Sarah Killian, camp director, WVMS; Mundy; and Dennis J. Puhalla, head of school, WVMS.

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Grade 7: High Honor Roll: Max Crispin, Dominick Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Alessandro, Garrett Gagliardi, Andrew Kim, Michael Kim, Grace Leahy, Reeya Lele, Nicole Lukesh, Erica Manson, Connor McGowan, David Nape, Gabriel Pascal, Katherine Romanowski, Andrew Schukraft, Julien Simons and Alexis Sokach. Honor Roll: Avery Conyngham, Erica Fletcher, Alexandra Geyfman, Liam Gilroy, Noah Hammerman, Lorraine Johnson, Taylor Kazimi, Belle Reznak, Gabriella Soper, Spencer Stirewalt, Abigail Straub, Connor Switzer and Dominic Wright. Grade 8: High Honor Roll: Dominique DiLeo, Gokulan Gnanendran, Gabrielle Grossman, Jody Karg, Elijah Miller, Sujay Murthy, Stefan Olsen, Emily Peairs, Jacob Ridilla, Megha Sarada, Courtney Sminkey, Kira Zack and Alexandra Zaloga. Honor Roll: Andrew Alday, Garrett Boyd, Dominique Coslett, Alexander Grosek, Richard Hughes, Jake Kolessar, Elizabeth Kulick, Marissa Lacomis, Jacqueline Meuser, Megan Obeid, Katherine Paglia, Leana Pande and Kevin Platt.

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The 39th Annual March For Life in Washington will be held on Monday, January 23, 2012. Reservations and sponsor donations for the bus trip can be made now. For more information, call Pro Life Center at 826-1819. The cost is $40 for Adults or $20 for students. If you cannot attend yourself, please consider donating for someone who can go. Thank you. When sending payment, please include your phone number and indicate â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bus Reservationâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sponsorâ&#x20AC;?. Our mailing address is: PHL, 31 Hanover Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702. Pro-Life Center 31 Hanover St. Wilkes-Barre - 826-1819

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CMYK PAGE 4B

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

OUT-OF-TOWN DEANS’ LISTS Cazenovia College, Cazenovia, N.Y.

Kimberly Konnick, Dallas.

Clarion University, Clarion

Scott Berkes, Berwick; Jacqueline Rushkowski, Larksville; Holly Arcure, Mountain Top; Kristina Papa, Mountain Top; Elizabeth Lipski, Shavertown; and Kylie Cox, Plymouth.

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Seaman, Honesdale; Matthew Setzer, Berwick; Emily Jones, Hunlock Creek; Andrew Novak, Hunlock Creek; Michael Yalch, Nanticoke; Rebbeka Migneco, White Haven; Eric Wendoloski, Laflin; Nicole Stochla, Larksville; Marissa Incitti, Mountain Top; and Brian Lada, Mountain Top.

The University of New Haven, West Haven, Conn.

Polish Room Committee hosts Wigilia Dinner

Jeremy Wizeman, Sugarloaf; Amanda Brooking, Wapwallopen; Amal Salahedin, Forty Fort; Nathan Albrecht, Shavertown; and Dominique Stasulli, Shenandoah.

Lebanon Valley College, Annville York College of Pennsylvania, York

Connor McDonald, Benton; Miranda Moyer, Shamokin; Bryttani Craigle, Hazle Township; Lauren Baran, Beaver Meadows; Ashley Ferrari, Conyngham; Alyssa Slusser, Berwick; Sheryl Ann Klus, West Wyoming; Matthew Mankiewicz, Shenandoah; Maria Kolonsky, Shenandoah; Walter Choplick, Shenandoah; Alyssa Keich, Tamaqua; Steven Christ, Tamaqua; Lauren Ward, Tamaqua.

Messiah College, Grantham

Meghann Miller, Berwick; Keri Hall, Nanticoke; and John Snyder, Wilkes-Barre.

Millersville University, Millersville

Aaron Castricone, Hazleton; Chelsea Hoffman, Beaver Meadows; Jennifer Drogalis, Drifton; Megan Buzanowicz, Sugarloaf; Katrina Wagner, Sugarloaf; Lindsey Bayly, Honesdale; Alex

Megan Phillips, Shamokin; Katlin Warg, Sugarloaf; Amy McNelis, Larksville; Jeffrey Buratti, Hanover Township; Michael Brennan, Nuangola; Christopher Williams, Mountain Top; Heather Dachiu, Shenandoah; Christopher Mhley, Hazleton; and Deanna Goach, Hazleton.

St. Jude School staff take part in Advent Angel program

OUT-OF-TOWN HONOR ROLL

Members of the St. Jude School faculty and staff participated in an Advent Angel activity. Forms with participants’ names with their likes and dislikes are mixed together in a basket and everyone selects one. Small gifts are secretly delivered throughout the Advent season. A special celebration is held during the fourth week in Advent, where everyone discovers the identity of their Advent Angel. Participants, from left, first row, are Kristina Ambrulavage, Mary Ann Crofchick, Anita Legge and Rose Lee Bednarz. Second row: Marilyn Baran, Olivia Kopinski, Jeanne Rossi, Carol Brady, Jane Cosgrove, Linda Lawler, Brenda Kolojejchick, Mary Jean Stephens, Mary Ann Ostrowski, Ann Manganiello and Linda Brittain. Also participating were Kitty Lutz, Kathy Madden and Anna Pauline.

Kent School, Kent, Conn. Melissa Flack, Dallas.

The Wilkes University Polish Room Committee recently held its second annual Wigilia Dinner at the Frank and Dorothea Henry Student Center, Wilkes University campus. Traditional Polish Wigilia foods were sampled, oplatek was shared, St. Nicholas made a surprise visit and everyone sang Christmas songs in both Polish and English. Chairperson for the event was Audrey Brozena. Also on the committee were Bernardine Sweeney, co-chairperson; Theresa Sabol and Marie Amico, decorations; Fran Macy and Marie Voitek, reservations; Joyce Latoski, publicity; Helen Grebski, adviser; Bernadine Tarasek; Delphine Bienick; and Jean Levandowski. Leading the singing, from left, are Alice Kwiatkowski and Joanne Rygiel.

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Family Services makes donation to library

Misericordia receives tax-credit check

Family Service Association (FSA) has taken the theme of ‘From One Family to Another’ as its focus for 2012. In keeping with that mission, employees decided to make a donation of $300 to the West Pittston Library, which was a victim of the flooding in September, instead of exchanging Christmas gifts with each other this year. Cathy Hoover Mericle, a senior licensed clinician, and Rosemary Gallagher, director of Luzerne County Children and Youth Contract Casework Services for the agency, co-chaired the project. At the check presentation, from left: Michael Zimmerman, executive director, FSA; Maria Jiunta Heck, circulation coordinator, West Pittston Library; Gallagher; Hoover Mericle; Tony Orlando, chief financial officer, FSA; and Anne Bramblett Barr, director, West Pittston Library.

Frontier Communications recently presented Misericordia University with a check through funds made available by the Pennsylvania Educational Improvement Tax Credit (EITC) program. The funding is utilized by the university’s Speech-Language and Hearing Center to provide innovative educational programs for public school students in kindergarten through third grade. Some of the funding is also used by the clinical center to purchase cutting edge equipment. At the check presentation, from left: Glen Tellis, professor and chair of speech-language pathology; Frank Joanlanne, vice president and general manager, Pennsylvania, Frontier Communications; Amanda Tomaselli, speech-language-pathology student, Trucksville; and Michael A. MacDowell, president, Misericordia University.

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Triangle Club holds Christmas party for children The Miners-Mills Triangle Club recently held its annual children’s Christmas party. The children sang Christmas carols, accompanied on the guitar by Jack Smith, and were entertained by the magic of Bill Dickson. The children were treated to refreshments donated by Schiel’s Market, Wise Foods and the Triangle Club. They received a present from Santa, a gift bag and an individual photo on Santa’s lap. Members may pick up the photos at the Triangle Club. Some of the participants, from left, first row: Lilley Rodriguez; Erynn Barancho; Kallie O’Donnell; Jacob Stevens and Amiah Wade on Santa’s lap; Madison Kresge, elf; and Jake Matoski. Second row: David O’Donnell; William Herbert, chairman; Jo Ann Wade; Stanley Zenda; and Dave Smith.

King’s students travel for spring study

Solomon/Plains Junior High School students raise funds for Marines Corps Toys For Tots campaign Faculty, staff, students and administration at Solomon/Plains Junior High School recently presented a check to the U.S. Marines Corps for its Toys For Tots campaign. In addition to a monetary donation, the school also collected toys. At the check presentation, from left, first row, are Mikey Koury, Josh Gartley, Robert Anstett, Brandon Keiper, Kyra Wozniak, Philip Guliano, Zach Banaszek and Jacob Khalife. Second row: Brian Fischer, activities director; Meredith Falchek, faculty member; Marie Correll, assistant activities director; Joseph Banaszek, Toys for Tots representative; Brenda Banaszek, faculty member; Hank Banaszek, Toys for Tots representative; Jared Meehan, faculty member; John Woloski, principal; and Belinda Tabron, assistant principal.

Four King’s College students will study abroad for academic credit during the spring semester. Tanya Cheeseman, a junior majoring in biology with a minor in mathematics, has been awarded a full-tuition scholarship through the Irish-American Scholars Program to study at the University of Ulster in Coleraine, Northern Ireland. Michael Daly, a junior majoring in marketing, will study at City University in London, England, through Arcadia University College of Global Studies. Christopher Lewandowski, a junior majoring in criminal justice, will study at John Cabot University in Rome, Italy, through the King’s CollegeJohn Cabot University Partnership Program. Samantha Phelan, a junior majoring in neuroscience and psychology, has been awarded a full-tuition scholarship through the Irish-American Scholars Program to study at Queen’s University in Belfast, Northern Ireland. For more information on the Study Abroad Program, contact Mollie Farmer, director, at 208-5986. Program participants, from left, first row, are Cheeseman and Phelan. Second row: Farmer, Daly and Lewandowski.

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

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Rock, Rohland

Martin, Hampton

Compton, Mahaffey

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terry Michael Mahaffey and Cassandra Marie Compton, together with their families, announce their engagement and upcoming marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Raymond Compton, Clifford, and the late Roxanne Brooks. She is the granddaughter of Ann and Raymond Compton, Clifford. Cassandra is a 2005 graduate of Mountain View High School and a 2006 graduate of La Universidad Catolica de Culiacan, Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico. She earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology from King’s College. She is employed as an autism program manager at Keystone Community Resources. The prospective groom is the son of the V. Rev. S. David Mahaffey and the late Matuska Karen Mahaffey, Bethlehem. He is the grandson of Anna Meterko and the late Michael Meterko, Cherry Tree, and the late Sterry and Sara Mahaffey, Mahaffey, Pa. Sterry is a 2000 graduate of Old Forge High School and a 2005 graduate of Penn State University, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in business retail management. He is employed as a quality assurance monitor for the Commission on Economic Opportunity. The couple will exchange vows on May 5, 2012, at St. Nicholas Russian Orthodox Church, Bethlehem, Pa., with the groom’s father performing the ceremony.

Cunningham, Gower

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elsey Gower and Brendan Cunningham, together with their families, announce their engagement and upcoming wedding. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Cheri Gower and Jack Kelly, Kingston, and the late Mark Gower, Forty Fort. She is the granddaughter of Judith Margavage, Forty Fort; the late Dean Brown Sr.; the late Donald and Jean Gower; and the late Libby Getz. The prospective groom is the son of Barbara and Joseph Cunningham Sr., Plains Township. He is the grandson of Mary Richardson, Plains Township; the late Robert Richardson; Marie Cunningham, WilkesBarre; and the late Joseph Cunningham. Kelsey is a 2008 graduate of James M. Coughlin High School, WilkesBarre, and is pursuing a degree in rehabilitation and human services with a minor in psychology at the Pennsylvania State University. She is employed at Petco and Callao Café and Market in State College. Brendan is a 2007 graduate of James M. Coughlin High School, Wilkes-Barre, and is pursuing a degree in sports medicine at the Pennsylvania State University. He is employed at Penn State Golf Courses in State College. The couple will exchange wedding vows Nov. 17, 2013.

icole M. Martin and Charles H. Hampton Jr., together with their N families, announce their engagement

and upcoming marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of James and Loretta Martin, Larksville. The prospective groom is the son of Charles Hampton Sr. and Anne Marie Hampton, Kingston. Nicole is a 2004 graduate of Wyoming Valley West High School and earned a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing from Misericordia University. She is employed at WilkesBarre General Hospital as a registered nurse in the Intensive Care Unit and Emergency Department. Charles is a 2001 graduate of Wyoming Valley West High School and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology from Wilkes University. He is employed by Dynamic Educational Systems Incorporated as an outreach and admissions counselor for the United States Department of Labor’s Job Corp. Program The couple will exchange vows in the presence of family and friends on Sept. 28, 2012, at All Saints Parish in Plymouth.

www.timesleader.com

indsay M. Rock and Shaun Rohland, together with their families, are L excited to announce their engagement

Mead, Danowski nnouncement is made of the engagement and upcoming A wedding of Andrea Mead, Washington, D.C., to Will Danowski, Harrisburg, Pa. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Betsy Mead and the late Gary Mead, Elmhurst. She is the granddaughter of Minnie Mead, Scranton. She is a graduate of North Pocono High School, Moscow. She earned a bachelor’s degree in English and political science from Temple University, Philadelphia, and a master’s degree in government administration from the University of Pennsylvania. She works for the Obama Administration in Washington, D.C. as press secretary for the United States Trade Representative in the Executive Office of the President. The prospective groom is the son of Bill and Theresa Danowski, Wilkes-Barre. He is a graduate of G.A.R. Memorial High School. He earned a bachelor’s degree in political science from King’s College, Wilkes-Barre, and, after serving for six years under Governor Rendell, now serves as Legislative Liaison for the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board in Harrisburg, Pa. The couple will exchange vows at a May 2012 wedding in Scranton, Pa.

and upcoming marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of David and Karen Rock, Harding. She is the granddaughter of Roy and Peggy Thomas, Harding, and Josephine Rock and the late Bernard Rock, Larksville. The prospective groom is the son of Michael and Donna Rohland, Duryea. He is the grandson of the late Walter and Alice Rohland, Pittston, and the late Donald and Mildred Nyhart, Duryea. Lindsay is a 1999 graduate of Wyoming Area High School. She earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Penn State University in 2003. She is employed as the managing editor of Northeast Editing, Inc., Jenkins Township. Shaun is a 2000 graduate of Pittston Area High School. He earned a bachelor’s degree in history from King’s College in 2004 and a master’s of education degree from King’s College in 2011. He is employed by Hazleton Area School District as an ESL teacher. The couple will exchange wedding vows on June 23, 2012, at Mt. Zion United Methodist Church, Harding.

Brittain, Salley r. and Mrs. Edward Chisolm Salley Jr., Johns Island, S.C., announce the M engagement and approaching marriage

Petrowski, McDade r. and Mrs. Kevin Fox, Harding, Pa., are proud to announce the M engagement and approaching wed-

Wasko, Ferrucci r. and Mrs. Frank Putruele, UtM ica, N.Y., along with Stephen Ferrucci, Verona, N.Y., are pleased to

announce the engagement of their daughter, Shannon Leigh Ferrucci, to Raymond Robert Wasko Jr., son of Raymond and Anne Wasko, Pittston, Pa. The bride-to-be is the granddaughter of Caroline Baptiste and the late Joseph Baptiste and Angeline Ferrucci and the late Richard Ferrucci. The prospective groom is the grandson of the late Angela Volpe Agolino and Ettore Agolino and the late Mary Wasko and Edward Wasko. Shannon is a 2003 graduate of Notre Dame High School and a 2007 summa cum laude graduate of LeMoyne College, where she earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in criminology. In 2009 Shannon earned a Master of Science degree in applied intelligence from Mercyhurst College and is employed by Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. Raymond is a 1999 graduate of Wyoming Area High School and a 2002 magna cum laude graduate of Kutztown University, where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in psychology. In 2005 Raymond earned a Master of Arts degree in political science from Villanova University and in 2009 he earned a Master of Science degree in applied intelligence from Mercyhurst College. Raymond is employed by the Department of Defense. The happy couple resides in Rockville, Md., and will wed on Oct. 13, 2012, in Utica, N.Y.

Long, Krauson ary Blair Long and Michael Anthony Krauson, together with M their families, announce their engagement and approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Blair E. and Mary Ann Long, Slocum Township. She is the granddaughter of the late Stanley and Frances Narsavage, Pittston, and the late Wilson and Florence Long, Penn Hills. She is a 2001 graduate of Bishop Hoban High School and a 2005 graduate of King’s College, where she completed her Bachelor of Science degree in biology. She earned her Doctorate of Optometry at Salus University’s Pennsylvania College of Optometry in 2009 and is a commissioned officer with the U.S. Navy Medical Service Corps serving naval and marine bases in Beaufort, S.C. The prospective groom is the son of Daniel and Rosemary Krauson, Shenandoah. He is the grandson of the late Edward and Frances Krauson and the late Andrew and Mary Cohoat, all of Shenandoah. He is a 2000 graduate of Cardinal Brennan High School and a 2004 and 2010 graduate of College Misericordia, where he earned his Bachelor of Science degree in business administration and Master of Business Administration degree. He is employed as a compliance specialist by Cigna HealthCare. The couple will be united in marriage on April 28, 2012, at the Chapel of Christ the King, on the campus of King’s College, Wilkes-Barre.

ding of their daughter, Sherrie Lee Fox Petrowski, to Jason Thomas McDade. The bride-to-be from Harding, Pa., is a 2011 graduate of McCann School of Business & Technology with an associate’s degree in professional massage therapy. She is employed as an independently contracted massage therapist. The prospective groom from Lehman, Pa., is a 2000 graduate of Luzerne County Community College and is employed as a registered nurse in the OR/Cardiac Unit at WilkesBarre General Hospital. The two will be united in marriage on April 21, 2012, immediately followed by a honeymoon cruise to Florida and the Bahamas.

Parente, Polishan arla Parente and Robert Polishan, together with their families, are M happy to announce their engagement

and upcoming wedding. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Mary and Charles Parente, Harveys Lake, and the proud mother of Marina and Samara. The prospective groom is the son of Gloria and Paul Polishan, Scranton. The couple will be married with their toes in the sand on June 27, 2012, at the Atlantis Resort in the Bahamas.

Gromelski, Quinn dmund Gromelski and Kathleen Quinn, together with their famE ilies, announce their engagement and upcoming marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Joseph and Gloria Quinn, Hardyston, N.J. She is the granddaughter of the late Patrick and Francis Quinn, Vernon, N.J., and the late Angelina Woeller, Toms River, N.J. The prospective groom is the son of Edmund and Annette Gromelski, Duryea. He is the grandson of Edmund and Claire Gromelski, Duryea; Theresa Maria, Pittston; and the late Cataldo Maria. The bride-to-be is a 2002 graduate of High Point Regional High School, Sussex, N.J. She is a 2006 graduate of East Stroudsburg University. She is employed as a dental assistant at Troynacki Dental Group. The prospective groom is a 2002 graduate of Pittston Area High School. He is a 2010 graduate of Wilkes University Nesbitt School of Pharmacy, where he earned a Doctorate in Pharmacy. He is employed as a pharmacist at Walgreens. The couple will exchange vows on April 21, 2012, at Nativity of Our Lord Church, Duryea.

of their daughter, Dr. Laura Virginia Salley, to Dr. Kevin George Brittain, son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Brittain Jr., Mountain Top, Pa. Dr. Salley earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in chemistry from Hollins University, Roanoke, Va., and a Doctorate of Pharmacy degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, N.C. The bride-to-be is employed as a pharmacist for Kmart in Columbia, S.C. Dr. Brittain earned a Doctorate of Pharmacy degree from the Wilkes-University Nesbitt School of Pharmacy in Wilkes-Barre, Pa. The prospective groom is a Board Certified Pharmacotherapy Specialist and is employed as the pharmacy information manager at the William Jennings Bryan Dorn Veterans Administration Medical Center, Columbia, S.C. The couple will exchange vows at the Cotton Dock of the Boone Hall Plantation in Mount Pleasant, S.C.

Salwoski, Santey obin Salwoski and Frank Santey, together with their families, anR nounce their engagement and upcoming wedding. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Richard Achuff, Wilkes-Barre, and the late Beverly Achuff. The prospective groom is the son of Frank and Judy Santey, Sugar Notch. The couple will exchange vows in the presence of family and friends in May 2012.

SOCIAL PAGE GUIDELINES The Times Leader allows you to decide how your wedding notice reads, with a few caveats. Wedding announcements run in Sunday’s People section, with black-and-white photos, free of charge. Articles must be limited to 220 words, and we reserve the right to edit announcements that exceed that word count. Announcements

must be typed or submitted via www.timesleader.com. (Click on the "people" tab, then “weddings” and follow the instructions from there.) Submissions must include a daytime contact phone number and must be received within 10 months of the wedding date. We do not run first-year anniversary announcements or announcements of weddings that took place more than a year ago. (Wedding

photographers often can supply you with a black-and-white proof in advance of other album photographs.) All other social announcements must be typed and include a daytime contact phone number. Announcements of births at local hospitals are submitted by hospitals and published on Sundays.

Out-of-town announcements with local connections also are accepted. Photos are only accepted with baptism, dedication or other religious-ceremony announcements but not birth announcements. Engagement announcements must be submitted at least one month before the wedding date to guarantee publication and must include the wedding date. We

cannot publish engagement announcements once the wedding has taken place. Anniversary photographs are published free of charge at the 10th wedding anniversary and subsequent five-year milestones. Other anniversaries will be published, as space allows, without photographs.

Drop off articles at the Times Leader or mail to: The Times Leader People Section 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Questions can be directed to Kathy Sweetra at 829-7250 or e-mailed to people@timesleader.com.


CMYK ➛

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BIRTHS Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center Galli, Angela and Michael Kasisky, Pittston, a son, Dec. 15. Bendick, Jodianne and Nick Faulkner, Sweet Valley, a son, Dec. 15. Kizer, Brittany, Edwardsville, a son, Dec. 15. Snyder-Shemo, Nancy and David Shemo, Wyoming, a son, Dec. 16. Wagner, Anna and Jeremy, Montrose, a son, Dec. 16. Pimentel, Danelly and Lelvin Mejia, Hazleton, a son, Dec. 18.

Shock, Drevenak

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arina R. Shock and James P. Drevenak, together with their families, announce their engagement and their approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of James and Elizabeth Shock, Sugar Notch. She is the granddaughter of James Shock and the late Sylvia Shock and Mary Brink and the late Leo Brink, all of Nanticoke. The prospective groom is the son of Mary Drevenak and the late Andrew Drevenak, Wilkes-Barre. He is the grandson of the late Andrew and Anna Drevenak and the late Robert and Veronica Dalton. The bride-to-be is a graduate of Hanover Area Jr.-Sr. High School. She graduated from Wilkes University in 2006 with a bachelor’s degree in elementary education and a minor in history. She is employed by Step by Step Inc as a therapeutic staff support. The prospective groom is a graduate of Meyers High School. He is employed by Trion Industries. The couple will exchange vows June 16, 2012, with a reception to be held at Via Appia, Taylor.

Barber, Kane Kane and Stephen Barber A lison were united in the sacrament of

marriage Oct. 21, 2011, at The Waterfront, by the Rev. Joseph Adams. The bride is the daughter of Dave and Sandy Kane, Forty Fort. She is the granddaughter of Joseph Palsha, Hanover Township. The groom is the son of Steve and Sophie Barber, Pittston Township. He is the grandson of Joseph and Barbara Barber, Kingston; Becky Egan, Yatesville; and the late Don Egan. The bride was given away in marriage by her father. She chose best friend, Sarah Lispi, as her matron of honor. Bridesmaids were Mary Beth Pacchioni and Allison Barber, sisters of the groom, and Allison Zekoski, Kristin Ermak, Karleigh Bowen, Janelle Nemetz and Maribeth Brozena, all friends of the bride. The groom chose Derek DeSanto as his best man. Groomsmen were Mike Kane, brother of the bride; Dave Pacchioni, brother-in-law; Matthew Egan and Ryan Darbenzio, cousins of the groom; and John Laboranti, Tim Dent and Shawn McQueen, all friends of the groom. A bridal shower was hosted by the mother of the bride and bridesmaids at the home of the bride’s parents. The parents of the groom hosted a rehearsal dinner at their home. The bride is a 2003 graduate of Wyoming Valley West High School and earned a bachelor’s degree in elementary and early childhood education and a master’s certificate in ESL from King’s College in 2007 and 2010. She is employed by Kingsway Learning Center, a private special education high school in Moorsetown, N.J., and The Drenk Behavioral Health Agency, Hainseport, N.J., as the lead tutor. The groom is a 2004 graduate of Pittston Area High School and enlisted in the United States Air Force in 2006. He earned his CCAF degree in criminal justice and is pursuing his bachelor’s degree in homeland security through Rutgers University. The couple is stationed at McGuire Air Force Base in New Jersey.

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elly Ann Bray and Darren G. Snyder were united in the sacrament of marriage on April 30, 2011, at St. Nicholas Church, Wilkes-Barre. The Rev. Alfred J. Vito celebrated the Nuptial Mass and double-ring ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Robert and Rosemary Bray, Nanticoke. She is the granddaughter of Dorothy Bray and the late H. Robert Bray, Nanticoke, and the late Francis and Genevieve Pikul, Wilkes-Barre Township. The groom is the son of Dr. Leonard Snyder, Wilkes-Barre, and the late Marilyn K. Snyder. He is the grandson of the late Alexander and Teresa Snyder and the late Fred and Nan Krackenfels, all of Wilkes-Barre. Given in marriage by her father, the bride chose her best friend, Holly Williams, as maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Kimberly Bray and Holly Bray, sisters of the bride; Mary Snyder Coolican, Nancy Snyder Shemo and Kathleen Snyder Kinne, sisters of the groom; and Maureen Collins, Amy Allen, Lynn Nichols Anderson, Catherine Yankovich, Kelly Wolfe Neher and Jacquelyn Pollard, friends of the couple. Junior bridesmaid was Megan Coolican, goddaughter and niece of the groom. Flower girl was Skylar Kinne, niece of the groom. The groom chose his brother, Christopher Snyder, as best man. Groomsmen were Josh Somma, cousin of the groom; and Joseph Jendrzejewski, Stephen Miller, Matthew Cosgrove, Michael Burke, Roger Anderson, Michael Spencer, Michael Chmarney, Brian Finnerty, John Harkins and Rob Neher, friends of the couple. Junior groomsman was Patrick Sgarlat, son of the bride. Ring bearer was Alexander Snyder, son of the couple. The bridal party was escorted into the church by bagpiper, Christopher Lynch. Mes Amis Strings performed violin and cello selections, accompanied by vocalist Alyssa Staron. C.J. Snyder, Matthew Snyder and Jason Snyder, nephews of the groom, were the altar servers. James and Deborah Carey, godparents of the bride, and Julia and Jacquelyn Snyder, nieces of the groom, presented the offertory gifts. Scripture readings were given by Keith Bray, uncle of the bride; Rebecca O’Haire, friend of the bride; and Lauren Snyder and Kelly Coolican, nieces of the groom. Shelley Centini, friend of the couple, was the greeter. An evening cocktail hour and reception were held at the Highlands at Newberry Estates, Dallas. The bride honored her attendants at a bridal tea at Sugar’s Tearoom, Kingston. The bride was honored at a shower given by her mother at the Wyoming Valley Country Club, Hanover Township. Father and stepmother of the groom hosted a rehearsal dinner at the Frederick Stegmaier Mansion, Wilkes-Barre. Kelly is a 1998 graduate of Bishop Hoban High School and a 2002 magna cum laude graduate of King’s College with a Bachelor of Arts degree in environmental studies and political science. She earned a Juris Doctorate degree with a certificate in environmental law from the Pace University School of Law in 2005. She is employed as an associate with the Dyller Law Firm, WilkesBarre. Darren is a 1994 graduate of Bishop Hoban High School and a 1998 graduate of King’s College with a Bachelor of Science degree in economics. He is the broker/ owner of Marilyn K. Snyder Real Estate, Inc., with offices located in Dallas and Wilkes-Barre. The couple honeymooned in Athens, Mykonos and Santorini, Greece. They reside in WilkesBarre.

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ayce L. Neyhard and Mark J. Voitek were united in marriage on June 25, 2011, at the Inn of the Abingtons, Dalton, by the Rev. James Stevenson. The bride is the daughter of Rob and Sandy Neyhard, Forty Fort. The groom is the son of Mark and Kathy Voitek, Swoyersville. The bride was given in marriage by her father and chose her friend and college roommate, Monica Demshick, as maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Carolyn Jablonowski, friend and college roommate; Ashley London, longtime high school friend; and Kaitlin Gorgol, niece of the bride. Madison Hawk, niece of the bride, was a junior bridesmaid. The groom chose Thaddeus (Ted) Voitek, brother of the groom, as his best man. Groomsmen were Eric Huff, Matt Bordy, Anthony Cefalo, all close friends of the groom, and Matarr Hankey, nephew of the bride. The bride was honored with a bridal shower by the mother of the bride and groom and her attendants in the Tiffany Room at the Ramada Inn, Wilkes-Barre. A rehearsal dinner was hosted by the parents of the groom at the Inn of the Abingtons. An evening cocktail hour and reception were held at the Inn of the Abingtons. The bride is a 2005 graduate of Wyoming Valley West High School. She earned a Bachelor of Science degree in secondary education in chemistry from East Stroudsburg University in 2009. She is employed by Wyoming Valley West School District as a substitute teacher and by Dunkin Donuts. The groom is a 2005 graduate of Wyoming Valley West High School. He earned an associate’s degree in business management from Luzerne County Community College in 2007. He is employed by Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs. The couple honeymooned in Las Vegas, Nev. They reside in Forty Fort with their dog, Jake.

Toole, Buck ara A. Toole and Edward J. Buck II were united in marriage on S Sept. 4, 2011, at Annunciation Greek

Orthodox Church, Scranton, by the Rev. Konstantine Elfankious. The bride is the daughter of Robert W. Toole and Lisa Feola Toole, Scranton. The bride chose her sister, Melissa Toole, as her maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Alexandra Toole, Scranton, sister of the bride; Alexus Rapp and Ashley Lynn, Shamokin, sisters of the groom; and Kristin Riley, Emily Chiaro, Jennifer Chase, Sharon Granahan and Kelly Marion, Scranton, friends of the bride. The flower girls were Gabriella and Peyton Rapp, Shamokin, nieces of the groom. The groom is the son of Catherine Buck, Paxinos. He chose his good friend, E.J. Bailey, Shamokin, as his best man. Groomsmen were John Toole, Scranton, brother of the bride; Gary Steich, Honesdale; Jim Schaffer, Marc Romanelli, Barry and Ryan Stoud, Shamokin, Erik Stahlnecker, Mountain Top, and Brian Walter, Dickson City, friends of the groom. Preceding the nuptials, an engagement party celebrating the couple was held at the Banshee, Scranton. The bride was honored at a bridal shower, hosted by her bridesmaids at the mother of the bride’s home in Scranton. A rehearsal dinner was held at Amadeous’ Restaurant, Moosic. An evening wedding reception was held to celebrate the special occasion at Colarusso’s banquet hall in Moosic. The bride is a graduate of Scranton High School and the groom is a graduate of Shamokin Area High School. The bride and groom both earned their bachelor’s degrees at Wilkes University. The groom graduated with a major in political science and a minor in history and is employed by the Pocono Mountain School District. The bride graduated with a bachelor’s degree in business administration and also earned her Master of Business Administration degree at Wilkes University. She is employed in the Finance Department at Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs. The couple honeymooned in St. Lucia. They reside in Plains Township.

Hutson, Rachel and Mark White, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, Dec. 18. Mitchell, Deanna and Francisco Gonzalez, Brodheadsville, a son, Dec. 18. Quinn, April and John Jr., Warrior Run, a son, Dec. 19. Brace, Alyssa and Jeremy, Springville, a daughter, Dec. 19. Moore, Tiffany and David Foote, Nanticoke, a daughter, Dec. 20. Walters, Deanne and Troy Kendricks, Wilkes-Barre, a son, Dec. 20. Kowalczyk, Breanna and Jemel Morris, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, Dec. 21. Lee, Lisa and Jonathan Nipitella, Nanticoke a son, Dec. 21. Crisman, Nicole and Erik, Harveys Lake, a daughter, Dec. 21. Argot, Jill and Zachery Storat, Lehighton, a daughter, Dec. 21. Bennett, Danielle and Nathan Lee, Dallas, a son, Dec. 21. Whalen, Kimberly and Michael Gross, Pocono Lake, a daughter, Dec. 21. Murray, Paula and Thomas Paratore, Kingston, a son, Dec. 21. McClain, Katherine and Matthew Smith, Tunkhannock, a daughter, Dec. 22. Hunsinger, Shawnay and Eric Mitchell, Montrose, a daughter, Dec. 22. Jumper, Ashley and George Labarr, Dallas, a daughter, Dec. 23. Cramer, Amy and Matthew, Nanticoke, a daughter, Dec. 24. Dones, Giovanna and Jimmy Rodriguez, Pocono Pines, a son, Dec. 23. Zagata, Felicia and Joshua Palmer, West Nicholson, a daughter, Dec. 23. McGraw, Stephanie and Keith Konze Jr., Plymouth, a daughter, Dec. 24. Sours, Sarah and Stephen, Mountain Top, a son, Dec. 26. Orrson, Heather and Christopher, Trucksville, a son, Dec. 27. Harrison, Amanda and James Zardus, Wilkes-Barre, a son, Dec. 27. Ali, Cortnei and Robert, White Haven, a daughter, Dec. 28. Brenner, Jessica and Shawn Ashton, Hanover Township, a daughter, Dec. 28. Shotwell, Jessica and Joseph Lemon, Kingston, a son, Dec. 28. O’Rourke, Brandy and Douglas Harrison, Mehoopany, a daughter, Dec. 29. Delazio, Alicia and Bryant Clark, West Pittston, a son, Dec. 29. Dawes, Annmarie and Harry, Tunkhannock, a son, Dec. 29. Federici, Janet and Marc, Forty Fort, a son, Dec. 29. Brasche, Sara and Kyle Wilbur, Montrose, a daughter, Dec. 30. Dudek, Tina and Richard, Jenkins Township, a son, Dec. 30. Baker, Lisa and Lenny Stefanovich Jr., Ashley, a son, Dec. 31. Ondish, Stephanie and Charles Griffen Jr., Wilkes-Barre, a son, Dec. 31.

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enjamin and Viola Sabol, Nanticoke, will celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary on Jan. 19, 2012. They are the parents of Cora Wolfe and her husband, Bob, Nanticoke, and Debbie Evanko and her husband, Jim, Mountain Top. They are the grandparents of Jim Evanko, Robin Wolfe and Chris Wolfe and his wife, Lisa. Their family will celebrate their joy with a family dinner.

Luzerne County 4-H members compete at Horse Show Luzerne County 4-H horse members participated in the 52nd annual Pennsylvania State 4-H Horse Show held at the State Farm Show Complex in Harrisburg. To be eligible for the show, members must advance through qualifying competitions at county, regional and district levels. Participating in 4-H performance classes were Tyler Linde, Kingston, State Champion in Hunter Seat Equitation over fences, senior, and third in Working Hunter Horses; Kathryn Barilla, Dallas, second in Working Hunter Ponies and fifth in Hunter Seat Equitation over fences, junior; Maggie Fraley, White Haven, third in Working Hunter Ponies; Devin Fine, Sweet Valley, fourth in Pleasure Horse Driving; Thomas Boyle, Shavertown, seventh in Open Trail Horses, senior; Hannah Corcoran, Dallas, seventh in Hunter Seat Equitation on the flat, senior; Kaitlin Ingram, Dallas, 10th in Working Hunter Horses; Lindsay Jayne, Dallas; Kristen Boyle, Shavertown; Sela Fine, Sweet Valley; Megan Lee, Noxen; Corey Osborn, Shavertown; and Jaclyn Hodle, Dallas. In 4-H horse production classes, Julie Salansky, Dallas, placed fifth in Miniature Horses Two Year Old Fillies. The 4-H youth program is administered through Penn State Cooperative Extension. For more information on 4-H Youth Development Programs in Luzerne County, contact Donna Grey at 825-1701, 602-0600, or 1-888-825-1701. State Champion winner Tyler Linde is shown with her horse.

Dievert, Stephanie and Duane, Mountain Top, a daughter, Jan. 1. Gifford, Veronica and Thomas Otto, Carbondale, a son, Jan. 1. Kahler, Jessica, Dunmore, a son, Jan. 1.

Nesbitt Women’s & Children’s Center at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital Kenyon, Kaylee and Joshua Sweet, Dupont, a son, Dec. 25. Bolton, Tara and Christopher Simonson, Media, a son, Dec. 28. Zippo, Rebecca E. and Gerard K., Glen Lyon, a son, Dec. 28. Shuella, Mary and Joseph, Larksville, a son, Dec. 29. O’Boyle, Deanna and Adam Hunsinger, Tunkhannock, a son, Dec. 29. Kapish, Holly and T.J., Mountain Top, a daughter, Dec. 30. Foust, Jennifer and John Barker, Edwardsville, a daughter, Dec. 31. Miletto, Caitlin and Johnathan R. Poplaski, Weatherly, a daughter, Jan. 2.

OUT-OF-TOWN BIRTHS Geisinger Medical Center, Danville Rosario, Celina Marie and Ryan Victor Robles, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, Dec. 28. Grandparents are Rachel Rosario and Veronica Robles, both of Wilkes-Barre.


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Plains Township welcomes new firefighters The Plains Township Board of Commissioners introduced two new members of the Plains Township Fire Department at a meeting on Dec. 12. At the meeting, from left, first row: Ron Filippini, commissioner, chairman; Lawrence Long, firefighter; Curtis Nocera, firefighter; Mark Ritsick, deputy chief; and Carl Baker, chief. Second row: Rob Sax, commissioner; Brigid O’Connor, commissioner, vice chairperson and fire commissioner; Joseph Spagnuolo, commissioner; and Stephen Menn, solicitor.

Third Avenue students collect food for Salvation Army Third Avenue Elementary School recently participated in a canned food drive contest benefiting the Salvation Army. Stephanie Grover’s third-grade class donated 253 canned goods and won the contest. The class celebrated with a pizza party. At the party, from left, first row, are Isabelle Bernard, Jack Gorham, Bintou Sylla, Courtney May, Jared Haines, Stanley Motyka and Grant Stanton. Second row: Dalton Skasko, Kaitlyn Lupole, Ashley Wheeler, Christian Michak, Ryan Stevens, Julian Galchefski and Dameon Badger. Third row: Jasmine, Izabella Kapitula-Janosky, Sydney Rush, Cole Gorham, Ricky Zhang, Izabella Barber and Adam Hudock.

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CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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NAMES AND FACES

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

Christian W. Sorge Peter J. Lubinski Peter Joseph Lubinski, son of Melissa and Pete Lubinski, is celebrating his ninth birthday today, Jan. 15. Peter is a grandson of Jean and Joseph Zaborney, Wilkes-Barre; Karen Rome, Dallas; and Walter Lubinski, Sweet Valley. He has two brothers, Nicholas James, 7, and Bryce Robert, 1.

Gabrielle Novitski Gabrielle Novitski, daughter of Frank and Kelly Novitski, Kingston, is celebrating her fourth birthday today, Jan. 15. Gabrielle is a granddaughter of Joseph and Jane Novitski, Plymouth, and the late George and Vera O’Brien, Mahanoy City.

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Christian William Sorge, son of Ashley Caruthers and William Sorge, Minnersville, celebrated his sixth birthday Jan. 13. Christian is a grandson of Susan M. Hughes, WilkesBarre, and Lorraine Gurlavage, Minnersville. He has a brother, Julian, 4.

Continuing education students receive production management certificates Penn State Wilkes-Barre recently awarded production management certificates to students who completed the Continuing Education program. The program prepares students for exams to become certified production and inventory managers. At the presentation, from left: Janet Rosenbaum, assistant director of continuing education; Sandee Newhart, manager of planning, Bridon American, Scranton; Mike Fahringer, planner, Bridon American, Berwick; Ray Rerick, outage scheduler, PPL, Mountain Top; Earl Jones, planner, Bridon American, West Pittston; Bill Loftus, accountant, Bridon American, Trucksville; Karen Palmer, controller, Bridon American, Lake Ariel; and Ed Daveski, continuing education instructor.

IN BRIEF LEHMAN: Penn State WilkesBarre is holding a Financial Aid Night 6:30 p.m. Wednesday in Room 101 of the Bell Atlantic Center for Technology. Student aid representatives will be available to provide an overview of the types of financial aid, the application process and timetable and how to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. Advanced registration is required and can be made online at wb.psu.edu/admissions; by phone at 570-675-9238; or by email at wbadmissions@psu.edu. LUZERNE COUNTY: The Polish National Alliance of District VII is seeking eighth-grade student members to participate in the annual Spelling Bee that will take place in February. All secretaries are asked to check their membership for eighth-grade students who are eligible to participate and contact Michael Matiko at 457-4209 with the names.

Chuck’s Auction Service supports CEO, Toys for Tots programs Chuck’s Auction Service recently held its 2011 Benefit Tree Program. Donations for the tree were collected during the last several sales of the year. Chuck’s Auction Service sustained severe flood damage in September and the business reopened two weeks before the Benefit Tree Program. Even with this severe setback, Chuck’s Auction Service and its customers gave generously this year. CEO’s People Helping People program and the U.S. Marine Corps Toys for Tots campaign each received $4,000 to help families and children that were in need this holiday season. The Christmas tree was also given to a needy family. At the gift presentation, from left: Charmayne Medvec; Linda Lewis, Chuck’s Auction Service; Dave Ritter, CEO; Corporal Eric Kolp; Corporal Juan Torres; Don ‘Santa’ Gross; Marlena Mohyla; Mike Presnal; and Jared Morris.

Alexandra Baran, a junior at MMI Preparatory School, was recently honored in two photography competitions. Baran, the Baran daughter of Richard and Maxine Baran, Sugarloaf, was selected as the winner of the Emerging Photographer photo feed, sponsored by Photo District News magazine, an award-winning magazine for professional photographers that delivers news, analysis, interviews and portfolios. Baran’s win will be announced in the spring issue of Emerging Photographer and she will be featured in a story about her work in the Fall 2012 issue of the magazine. She will also receive a camera from Sony. Baran has also had a photograph selected for the Drexel Photography High School Contest Exhibition for the second year in a row. Her photo, “Wrench,” will be part of the exhibition at Drexel’s photography gallery in Philadelphia from Feb. 4 to March 2. The photo was selected from among thousands of entries. Baran studies art at MMI under the direction of art teacher Lisa Ferry. Kayla Karchner, a junior at MMI Preparatory School, was recently notified that her painting, “Trapped,” will be published in a color anthology Karchner book, “Celebrating Art.” The book is published by CelebratingArt.com, which was established to reward student artists and to showcase their art. The organization also sponsors art contests and works with art teachers to create a permanent record of the best entries from school art programs. Karchner, the daughter of Charles and Cheryl Karchner, West Hazleton, is a student of art teacher Lisa Ferry at MMI.

MEETINGS Monday

Katrina Shannon Katrina Shannon, daughter of Amanda Minegar and Steve Shannon, Hughestown, is celebrating her eighth birthday today, Jan. 15. Katrina is a granddaughter of JoAnn Minegar and the late John Minegar, Hughestown, and Rosalie Shannon and the late Robert Shannon, Pittston. She has a brother, Tyler Szumski, 13.

WHITE HAVEN: The drug awareness group, Branden’s Heart, 6 p.m. at the United Methodist Church, Buffalo Street. All are welcome.

Tuesday EDWARDSVILLE: Meyers High School Class of 1961, 1 p.m. at Grotto Pizza, Gateway Shopping Center. All class members, family and friends are invited.

Wednesday WHITE HAVEN: A new crimewatch awareness group, 6 p.m. at the Fireman’s Social Club. Any interested parties are invited.

Credit Union opens student branch at WVW

Middle school recognizes spelling bee champ

Wyoming Valley West Community Federal Credit Union recently held a ribbon cutting ceremony for a new student branch located in the Wyoming Valley West High School. The new branch is an educational initiative between the credit union and the school district that will also feature a classroom financial literacy project. At the ceremony, from left: Irvin DeRemer, director of elementary education, WVW School District; Ronald Jeffery, president, WVW Credit Union; Erin Keating, principal, WVW High School; David Tosh, director of secondary education, WVW School District; and Paul Appel, chief executive officer, WVW Credit Union.

The 30th Annual Jane M. Stitzer Spelling Bee was recently held at the Dallas Middle School. Twenty-eight contestants earned the right to compete by winning a preliminary spelling bee in English class. Janelle Sherman, an eighth-grade student from Mrs. Andrews’ English class, clinched the winning position. She will compete in the Times Leader/Scripps NEPA Regional Spelling Bee on March 3 at The Woodlands Inn and Resort, Plains Township. Eighth-grade student Dana Litchkowski from Mrs. Razavi’s English class was the runner up. From left: Barb Wesneski, spelling bee pronouncer; Jonelle Cavill, spelling bee organizer; Sherman; Litchkowski; and Thomas Duffy, principal.

GUIDELINES

Children’s birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge Photographs and information must be received two full weeks before your child’s birthday. To ensure accurate publication, your information must

be typed or computer-generated. Include your child’s name, age and birthday, parents’, grandparents’ and great-grandparents’ names and their towns

of residence, any siblings and their ages. Don’t forget to include a daytime contact phone number. We cannot return photos

submitted for publication in community news, including birthday photos, occasions photos and all publicity photos. Please do not submit precious

or original professional photographs that require return because such photos can become damaged, or occasionally lost, in the production process.

Send to: Times Leader Birthdays, 15 North Main St., WilkesBarre, PA 18711-0250.


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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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AP PHOTO

Mike Berkson, center, is fed by Tim Wambach, as they have lunch with Mike’s father Denis.

you see Mike as Mike and not in a wheelchair,” Wambach says, and the audience — about 650 people this night — “immediately knows Mike is intelligent and funny.” Berkson insists he can mine laughs from the most painful situations and he has plenty of material, having endured about 12 surgeries, including having two 18 -inch rods implanted in his spine so his organs won’t be crushed. As part of the show, Berkson offers a Top 9 tongue-in-cheek list of advantages of living with cerebral palsy. Among them: Never wear out a pair of shoes. Always have a place to sit. And one that seems funny, but is uncomfortably true — lower expectations. Sometimes, though, there are those rare people who see him for what he is. One eighth grade history teacher, for instance, helped Berkson by rigging a light at the top of a pole, attaching it to the back of his wheelchair and installing a button on the arm rest. Berkson was able to answer questions in class by using his left index finger — the only one he can control — to press down and turn on the light. This night, Berkson demonstrates, concentrating intently, knowing that maneuvering his finger into the proper position is a monumental achievement. Watching in a front row is Denis Berkson, his teary-eyed father. “I’m pulling for him,” he says “I’m rooting for him. I don’t want him to be disappointed.” He isn’t. When Berkson turns on the light, the audience erupts in applause On stage, Mike Berkson looks

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••• Those are happy memories to savor. The story of their 10-year friendship also has a raw side — for both men. That moment is recreated as they recall the anguishing day in Berkson’s freshman year when he told Wambach that his total dependence on others — he needs help eating, dressing, even scratching his head — made him so depressed, he wanted to commit suicide. “I’m so sick of it, I want to kill myself, but I can’t,” he says in the scene. Wambach — now 37 — then reveals that as a 20-year old, he dropped out of college after suffering bouts of depression that made him feel the same way, but gradually he worked his way through them. Wambach says it’s his way of showing that everyone has problems. After the show, Wambach explains that Berkson also told him if he could harm himself, then of course, he wouldn’t want to because he wouldn’t be in the same situation. “We both stopped, looked at each other and started laughing,” Wambach recalls. “Here’s a body that won’t allow him to anything, but it saves him from himself.” And yet Berkson says he sometimes still feels that way and believes it’s important to address it in their show. “I don’t think of depression as being private,” he says. “There’s nothing about me that’s private.” Berkson’s father, Denis, says those disclosures hurt.

“To hear my son still has those thoughts was terribly sad for me,” he says. “Part of me wanted to yell and scream. But the more I thought about it, the more I realize that everybody’s life is their own.” That’s where Wambach’s friendship helps. “In my situation, it’s hard to figure out what’s genuine and what’s not,” Berkson says. “I know Tim’s genuine. ... He helps me see the good in things. Sometimes it’s as simple as making me laugh when I’m sick or in pain.” There’s a different reward for Wambach. “What I get out of the friendship ... is helping Mike see things he wouldn’t necessarily see or do things he wouldn’t necessarily do,” he says. “And the show took an idea that we had and turned into something that’s opening people’s eyes.” ••• They’ve dubbed themselves two men and a wheelchair, but their show is really about the journey of a disabled kid with enormous smarts who grows up — and the friend who has helped him navigate along the way. Still, Berkson says Wambach can only do so much to make life easier. “I’ve come to terms with the big stuff that I’ll never be able to do but I have yet to come to terms with the daily everyday things I can’t do,” he says. “When I wake up in the morning, I know it’s going to be somewhat difficult. I know I’m going to get from point A to point B, but what unforeseen obstacles are going to arise?” Berkson’s preferred retreat

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jewelry during the wedding ceremony. It was very humorous. I take great pride in my work as a set designer as well. I have worked on sets for King’s College, Wyoming Seminary, Crestwood, Western Wayne, Kiss Theater and Little Theater to name a few. I love the way sets add layers and details to a venue or performance. I have to say my most memorable role as an actor was when I played David in the play ‘David and Lisa.’ It was the most challenging as I played the part of a man with deep emotional problems.” If someone were to buy you a TV series or movie on DVD for a gift, what would you like them to get for you? “Any of the NCIS or CSI type of shows. I hate reality television. Any old black and white classic movies would be welcome, as well as the original version of ‘Little Shop of Horrors’ and anything with Betty Davis or Marilyn Monroe. First car you ever owned? “1963 white Ford Falcon with blue interior and ball fringe. I paid $175.00 for it and sold it three years later for $350.00.” Favorite food? “I like to cook. I mainly like down-home cooking, maybe chicken. I’m basically a meat and potatoes person.” You said you have been involved with the Little Theater here in Wilkes-Barre for more than 30 years which is in its 89th season. What do we have to look forward to from you and the theater? “We already opened the season with ‘Into the Woods,’ which I directed. Now we are preparing for the opening of ‘Forever Plaid’ on January 21 which I am also at the helm for.” John Gordon writes about area people for the Meet feature. Reach him at 970-7229.

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to a 12-year-old who can’t use his arms or hands wouldn’t be easy. Soon, there were tortilla bits on Mike’s torso, lettuce in his lap, cheese in places where there shouldn’t be cheese. Wambach was horrified. Mike broke the ice. “There’s no need to cry over spilled Taco Bell,” he assured his exasperated helper. “It was quick-witted, boom, out of the box,” Wambach recalls. “I was hooked.” (The scene, substituting yellow Post-It notes as food, is replicated in their show.) It was the start of an enduring friendship that has transformed Wambach from aide to unofficial member of the Berkson family. “We think of Tim as our lot-older brother,” says David Berkson, Mike’s identical twin, who is able-bodied. Mike, born two minutes after David, was briefly deprived of oxygen and diagnosed with cerebral palsy, a disorder that affects body movements and coordination. He was not expected to talk, but talk he does — albeit with some difficulty — about everything. His words sometimes sputter out in a spray, so he jokingly warns the audience: “People in rows A through J: I apologize in advance” and if that’s not good enough, he adds with a gleeful grin, ‘Duck!”’ Berkson and Wambach say they came up with the idea for their show — “Handicap This!” — to dispel myths about cerebral palsy and disabilities and encourage others to overcome obstacles. But there are personal reasons, too: The show satisfies Berkson’s yearning to be a motivational speaker. And it gives a voice to someone who often is ignored. “People don’t think he can necessarily accomplish a lot,” Wambach says. “Physically he really can’t, but mentally it’s overdrive. He’s got more between his ears than anyone I know. He really enjoys proving people wrong.” Berkson compares himself to a blind person whose other senses become sharper. “My mental state is not better or stronger, but it just fires a little quicker or goes a little faster than the average person,” he says. Or as he tells the audience: “My body is in a wheelchair, my mind is not.” That’s clear from the get-go in their 80-minute show. “Within the first 60 seconds,

from frustration is the movies — at least one a day at home (“Pulp Fiction” is a favorite) and at least one a week at the theater, often with Wambach at his side. Once, while recovering from spinal surgery, Berkson left the hospital on a gurney and his father and uncle rolled him down Michigan Avenue, potholes and all, so he wouldn’t miss a movie he wanted to see. “It’s escapism,” Berkson explains. “It also gives me a common ground to do something with people and to talk about something with people that has nothing to do with my disability.” He knows some folks like films they can identify with, but he’s the opposite. “I want movies to make me forget how I’m feeling,” he says. ••• They’ve performed at middle and high schools, on college campuses and for the public. They’re now trying to find a sponsor for a national college tour Their fans include Carl Ratner, an associate professor of voice at Western Michigan University, who attended an earlier show. “It broke down walls,” he says. “It wasn’t so much the intellectual content. It was the emotional connection with Mike and Tim. I think you go through life and you see people and you just think that perhaps it’s better to stay in my little group and they stay in their little group. This show made it clear how we’re all losing by not connecting with all different kinds of people.” Their show is part of a larger partnership they have that includes a foundation that helps others with disabilities. Wambach also has written a short book chronicling their experiences. He says he knows one day he’ll move on, have his own family and do something else but expects Mike will always be in his life and their show, for now, will go on. “I don’t see any end to our friendship,”’ he says. “We’ll be forever linked. I’ve kind of accepted that this is our wave and we’re going to ride it as long as we can and wherever it takes us.”

PAGE 11B

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CMYK SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

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CMYK

SPORTS

SECTION

timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

PAUL SOKOLOSKI

PENGUINS

Family enjoys Street’s big day

Baby Pens collect three shorthanded goals in victory at St. John’s on Saturday.

OPINION

SAN FRANCISCO

49ERS

NEW ORLEANS

SAINTS

36

NEW ENGLAND

45

DENVER

10

PATRIOTS

32

BRONCOS

BRADYMANIA

By BRENDAN McCARTHY For The Times Leader

ST. JOHN’S, Newfoundland — Ben Street had Saturday, Jan. 14, 2012 circled on his calendar ever since the AHL schedule was released. But in all his nervous, excited anticipation, he never dreamed this is how it would turn out. Street scored on a penalty shot and then set up Bryan PENGUINS Lerg for one of two WilkesBarre/Scranton shorthanded ICECAPS goals in the span of 21 seconds in the third period as the Penguins won their sixth straight road game, defeating the St. John’s IceCaps 6-4 Saturday night. Street is from Coquitlan, B.C., but both his parents are natives of St. John’s, meaning he had dozens of relatives in the stands of Mile One Centre for the Penguins’ first-ever game against the IceCaps. The Penguins actually finished the night with three shorthanded goals. Street’s fell into that category since his penalty shot came

6 4

AP PHOTO

New England Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski, left, celebrates his 19-yard touchdown reception with quarterback Tom Brady during the first half Saturday in Foxborough, Mass.

See STREET, Page 8C

Pats’ QB tosses 6 TDs in rout of Broncos

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

By By BARRY WILNER AP Pro Football Writer

Eastern gets swept away by Monarchs Kyle Stackhouse has a double-double and a 16-1 run propels the King’s men to win. By DEREK LEVARSE dlevarse@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE — For 15 minutes, the game sputtered along with neither team reaching 20 points. King’s and Eastern were shooting a combined 25 percent from the KING’S floor. But the Monarchs would not only go on to EASTERN beat the Eagles 74-66 Saturday, they hit their season scoring average in the process. Down 18-13 and time ticking down in the first half, the Monarchs suddenly erupted, going on a 16-1 run in the final few minutes to take a 10-point lead into halftime.

74

66

C

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — Tom Brady’s way of dealing with Tebowmania was to silence it with a record-shattering performance. Brady threw six touchdown passes, five in the first half, putting the New England Patriots into the AFC championship game after roughing up Tim

Tebow and the Denver Broncos 45-10 Saturday night. The Patriots (14-3), winners of nine straight games, will host either Baltimore or Houston next Sunday for a spot in the Super Bowl. Saturday night’s romp snapped a threegame postseason losing streak, two of those at Gillette Stadium, and lifted the Patriots to the verge of their fifth Su-

per Bowl appearance in 11 seasons. They’ve won three of those. From the first snap, this was a mismatch. The Patriots were not going to make the same mistakes the Steelers made against this team. A nation transfixed by Tebow’s play, if not his principles, tuned in Saturday to see if he had more heroics in store for

Brady and company. He had nothing left as the Patriots made this must-see TV only for those who live in New England. With New England up 42-7, the fans began their derisive Teeee-bow chants. On the next play, the Broncos quarterback was sacked for an 11-yard loss See PATRIOTS, Page 6C

Legendary comeback for Niners Saints fall on late touchdown pass By JANIE McCAULEY AP Sports Writer

SAN FRANCISCO — What a way to celebrate the 30-year anniversary of “The Catch.” Joe Montana to Dwight Clark then. Alex Smith to Vernon Davis now. Smith completed a 14-yard touchdown pass to Davis with 9 seconds left just after Drew Brees had put the high-powered Saints ahead, and resurgent San Francisco capitalized on five New Orleans turnovers for a thrilling 36-32 playoff victory Saturday. “This is big for us,” Davis said. “It’s history. It’s legendary.” Smith ran for a 28-yard TD with 2:11 left and threw another scoring pass to Davis in the first quarter. Coach Jim Har-

baugh’s NFC West champions (14-3) proved that a hard-hitting, stingy defense can still win in the modern, wide-open NFL by holding off one of league’s most dynamic offenses. Brees completed a 66-yard touchdown pass to Jimmy GraSee NINERS, Page 6C

San Francisco 49ers tight end Vernon Davis (85) celebrates with tight end Justin Peelle (81) after a touchdown.

BETWEEN A COUPLE groups of kids tossing baseballs and on a field strewn with golf balls, Alec Norton focused purely on football. No obstacle was going to stand in his way this time. His is a story of perseverance and preparation, about staying committed even when you fail. His rallying cry is the old adage, ‘if at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.’ That type of determination took Norton so far, he landed all the way down in Baltimore for today’s AFC playoff game between the Ravens and Houston Texans. But Norton had a playoff battle of his own to worry about.

He never quit The 13-year-old son of Todd and Sherri Norton of Nanticoke finished third in the boys division for 12- and 13-year olds of the Punt, Pass and Kick national finals, held Saturday at the Ravens practice facility. “It’s pretty good I got this far,” Alec Norton said. It’s even better that he didn’t quit. He has some kicking skills, developed when he played soccer for a few years, and was a two-way lineman, as well as the punter and kicker, for his Nanticoke youth football team. “He’s played baseball, always pitched,” Todd Norton said. “He could throw the ball from the center field fence to home plate. He’s a good athlete.” But the NFL’s Punt, Pass and Kick competition rates accuracy as well as distance. And Alec Norton had to work at it, which is why he’s been on the busy indoor field of the Wyoming Valley Sports Dome twice a week lately, practicing for the national finals. He wasn’t a natural like Berwick’s amazing Olivia Seely, who won her second Philadelphia Eagles team competition to earn her first trip to nationals Saturday in the girls 14-15 group. Alec Norton’s path to the finals began with frustration. He gave this competition a shot at the local level a couple years ago, and didn’t come close to winning. But he didn’t lose his desire. Norton came back to the local round as a 12-year-old last year, and although he fared a bit better than the first time, he didn’t make it out of that preliminary competition. But those first two experiences in the competition made him hungrier, if not more steely. “I just like football,” said Alec Norton, who stands 5-foot-9, and weighs 175 pounds. “I was getting better at kicking and punting over the years.” He got so good, Alec Norton not only captured the crown at the local level, he won the next two stages of the Punt, Pass and Kick competition. He came out on top at a regional event in Allentown and again at a national semifinal event held at the See PUNTING, Page 9C

See MONARCHS, Page 9C

LIVE High School Basketball Tune into Service Electric’s Ch. 2 • Mon. Jan. 16th: Girls Basketball Meyers @ Wyoming Seminary - 7:15pm • Tues. Jan. 17th: Boys Basketball Northwest @ Hanover - 7:15pm For a complete schedule go to www.sectv.com

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

L O C A L C A L E N D A R This Week's Events MONDAY, JAN. 16 GIRLS BASKETBALL Berwick at Dallas, 7:15 p.m. Hanover Area at Northwest, 7:15 p.m. Hazleton Area at Wyoming Valley West, 7:15 p.m. Holy Redeemer at Pittston Area, 7:15 p.m. Meyers at Wyoming Seminary, 7:15 p.m. MMI Prep at Lake-Lehman, 7:15 p.m. Nanticoke at GAR, 7:15 p.m. Wyoming Area at Coughlin, 7:15 p.m. HS WRESTLING (all matches 7 p.m.) GAR at Wyoming Area Hazleton Area at Crestwood MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL PSU Hazleton at PSU Mont Alto, 8 p.m. WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL PSU Mont Alto at PSU Hazleton, 6 p.m. Misericordia at PSU Wilkes-Barre, 6 p.m. King’s at Keystone, 7 p.m. TUESDAY, JAN. 17 BOYS BASKETBALL Coughlin at Wyoming Area, 7:15 p.m. Dallas at Berwick, 7:15 p.m. GAR at Nanticoke, 7:15 p.m. Pittston Area at Holy Redeemer, 7:15 p.m. Tunkhannock at Crestwood, 7:15 p.m. Lake-Lehman at MMI Prep, 7:15 p.m. Wyoming Seminary at Meyers, 7:15 p.m. Wyoming Valley West at Hazleton Area, 7:15 p.m. HS RIFLE Emmaus at Berwick, 4 p.m. HS SWIMMING Berwick at Holy Redeemer, 4 p.m. Wyoming Seminary at Dallas, 4:30 p.m. Lake Lehman at Hazleton Area, 4:30 p.m. West Scranton at Abington Heights, 4:30 p.m. Elk Lake at Valley View, 4:30 p.m. Tunkhannock at Delaware Valley, 4:30 p.m. Scranton Prep at Scranton, 4:30 p.m. HS WRESTLING Berwick at Coughlin, 7 p.m. MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL Luzerne CCC at Bucks, 8 p.m. WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL Luzerne CCC at Bucks, 6 p.m. WEDNESDAY, JAN. 18 GIRLS BASKETBALL GAR at Wyoming Seminary, 7:15 p.m. MMI Prep at Hanover Area, 7:15 p.m. Northwest at Lake-Lehman, 7:15 p.m. HS SWIMMING Wyoming Area at Dunmore, 4 p.m. Pittston Area at Nanticoke, 4 p.m. Meyers at Coughlin, 4:30 p.m. HS WRESTLING (all matches 7 p.m.) Hazleton Area at Berwick Coughlin at Tunkhannock Lake-Lehman at Nanticoke Wyoming Area at Meyers Crestwood at Wyoming Valley West Dallas at GAR MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL DeSales at Misericordia, 8 p.m. PSU Hazleton at PSU Wilkes-Barre, 8 p.m. Wilkes at King’s, 8 p.m. WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL DeSales at Misericordia, 6 p.m. Wilkes at King’s, 6 p.m. PSU Hazleton at PSU Wilkes-Barre, 6 p.m. COLLEGE SWIMMING Lycoming at King’s (at Wilkes-Barre CYC), 6 p.m. FDU-Florham at King’s (at Wilkes-Barre CYC), 6 p.m. THURSDAY, JAN. 19 BOYS BASKETBALL Hanover Area at MMI Prep, 7:15 p.m. Nanticoke at Meyers, 7:15 p.m. Lake-Lehman at Northwest, 7:15 p.m. Wyoming Seminary at GAR, 7:15 p.m. GIRLS BASKETBALL Coughlin at Dallas, 7:15 p.m. Hazleton Area at Berwick, 7:15 p.m. Meyers at Nanticoke, 7:15 p.m. Tunkhannock at Holy Redeemer, 7:15 p.m. Wyoming Valley West at Pittston Area, 7:15 p.m. HS RIFLE Berwick at Liberty, 4 p.m. HS WRESTLING Nanticoke at Hanover Area, 7 p.m. HS SWIMMING High Point Regional at Delaware Valley, 4:30 p.m. MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL Luzerne CCC at Philadelphia, 8 p.m. WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL Luzerne CCC at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. COLLEGE WRESTLING King’s at Muhlenburg, 7:30 p.m. FRIDAY, JAN. 20 BOYS BASKETBALL Berwick at Hazleton Area, 7:15 p.m. Dallas at Coughlin, 7:15 p.m. Crestwood at Wyoming Area, 7:15 p.m. Holy Redeemer at Tunkhannock, 7:15 p.m. Pittston Area at Wyoming Valley West, 7:15 p.m. GIRLS BASKETBALL Meyers at GAR, 7:15 p.m. Northwest at MMI Prep, 7:15 p.m. Wyoming Seminary at Lake-Lehman, 7:15 p.m. HS BOWLING Hazleton Area at Reading, 3 p.m. HS SWIMMING Ray Wills Invitational at Wyoming Valley West, 6 p.m. HS WRESTLING Berwick, Dallas at Richland Tournament, 10 a.m. Coughlin, Nanticoke, Wyoming Valley West at Lackawanna Trail Tournament Wyoming Seminary at Boston/Northfield Duals MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL Elizabethtown at Wilkes, 8 p.m. PSU DuBois at PSU Wilkes-Barre, 8 p.m. WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL PSU DuBois at PSU Wilkes-Barre, 6 p.m. COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD Misericordia at Ursinus, 3 p.m. COLLEGE WRESTLING King’s at York (Pa.), 7 p.m. SATURDAY, JAN. 21 BOYS BASKETBALL Susquehanna at Berwick, 2:15 p.m. Holy Redeemer at Hunter College H.S., noon Nanticoke at Hanover Area, 7:15 p.m. GAR at Meyers, 7:15 p.m. Lake-Lehman at Wyoming Seminary, 7:15 p.m. GIRLS BASKETBALL Abington Heights at Wyoming Valley West, 2:30 p.m. Hanover Area at Nanticoke, 7:15 p.m. Scranton Prep at Dallas, 7:15 p.m. HS SWIMMING Ray Wills Invitational at Wyoming Valley West, 9:30 a.m. Hazleton Area at Parkland, 10 a.m. Scranton at East Stroudsburg North, 11 a.m. HS WRESTLING Berwick, Dallas at Richland Tournament, 9 a.m. Coughlin, Nanticoke at Lackawanna Trail Tournament Wyoming Seminary at Boston/Northfield Duals Lake-Lehman at South Williamsport Tournament Hazleton Area at Bellefonte Duals MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL PSU Wilkes-Barre at Penn College, 3 p.m. PSU Hazleton at PSU DuBois, 3 p.m. Delaware Valley at Misericordia, 3 p.m. FDU-Florham at Wilkes, 3 p.m. King’s at Manhattanville, 3 p.m. DeVry at Luzerne CCC, 3 p.m. WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL Delaware Valley at Misericordia, 1 p.m. FDU-Florham at Wilkes, 1 p.m. King’s at Manhattanville, 1 p.m. PSU DuBois at PSU Hazleton, 1 p.m. PSU Wilkes-Barre at Penn College, 1 p.m. COLLEGE SWIMMING Albright at King’s, 1 p.m. Scranton at Misericordia, 1 p.m. COLLEGE WRESTLING Wilkes at Messiah Open, 10 a.m.

T R A N S A C T I O N S BASEBALL American League KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Agreed to terms with 3B Kevin Kouzmanoff on a minor league contract.

BASKETBALL

National Basketball Association GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS — Signed C Earl Barron.

HOCKEY

National Hockey League BOSTON BRUINS — Reassigned F Yannick Riendeau from Reading (ECHL) to Providence (AHL). COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS — Claimed LW Colton Gillies off waivers from Minnesota. NASHVILLE PREDATORS — Recalled F Chris Mueller from Milwaukee (AHL). Placed F Jerred Smithson on injured reserve, retroactive to Jan. 7. PHOENIX COYOTES — Recalled D Chris Summers from Portland (AHL). TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING — Reassigned D Charles Landry from Norfolk (AHL) to Florida (ECHL). WINNIPEG JETS — Recalled D Paul Postma from St. John’s (AHL). ECHL ECHL — Suspended Cincinnati F Justin Vaive two games and fined him an undisclosed amount for his actions during Friday’s game against Kalamazoo.

COLLEGE

BUCKNELL — Announced the resignation of women’s basketball coach Kathy Fedorjaka. Promoted women’s assistant basketball coach Bill Broderick to interim head coach.

B O X I N G Fight Schedule Jan. 21 At Philadelphia (NBCSP), Eddie Chambers vs. Sergei Liakhovich, 10, heavyweights; Gabriel Rosado vs. Jesus Soto-Karass, 10, junior middleweights. At Guadalajara, Mexico, Miguel Vazquez vs. Ameth Diaz, 12, for Vazquez’s IBF lightweight title. Jan. 27 At Northern Quest Casino, Airway Heights, Wash. (ESPN), Ruslan Provodnikov vs. David Torres, 10, junior welterweights; Ji-Hoon Kim vs. Alisher Rahimov, 10, lightweights. Jan. 28 At Turning Stone, Verona, N.Y., Brian Minto vs. To-

ny Grano, 10, NABF heavyweight title eliminator. At Springfield, Mo., Cory Spinks vs. Sechew Powell, 12, IBF junior middleweight title eliminator. Feb. 3 At Las Vegas (ESPN2), Yordanis Despaigne vs. Edison Miranda, 10, light heavyweights. Feb. 4 At Frankfurt, Germany, Yoan Pablo Hernandez vs. Steve Cunningham, 12, for Hernandez’s IBF cruiserweight title; Enad Licina vs. Alexander Alexeev, 12, for the vacant European cruiserweight title; Eduard Gutknecht vs. Vyacheslav Uzelkov, 12, for Gutknecht’s European light heavyweight title.

W H A T ’ S

O N

T V

9 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Joburg Open, final round, at Johannesburg (same-day tape) 7 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Sony Open, final round, at Honolulu

MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Noon MSG — Georgetown at St. John’s 4 p.m. BTN — Minnesota at Penn State WQMY, YES — Georgia Tech at Maryland 4:30 p.m. CBS — Indiana at Ohio St. 6 p.m. BTN — Nebraska at Wisconsin 7 p.m. CSN, PLUS — Washington State at Washington 9 p.m. ROOT — UCLA at Southern California

MOTORSPORTS

1:30 a.m. NBCSP — Dakar Rally, final stage, Pisco to Lima, Peru (delayed tape)

NBA

9 p.m. ESPN — Phoenix at San Antonio

NFL

1 p.m. CBS — Houston at Baltimore 4:30 p.m. FOX — N.Y. Giants at Green Bay

NHL

1 p.m. ROOT — Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay 7 p.m. NBCSP — N.Y. Rangers at Montreal

PREP BASKETBALL

4 p.m. ESPN — Brewster (N.H.) vs. Tilton School (N.H.), at Springfield, Mass.

TENNIS

6:30 p.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, first round, at Melbourne, Australia 3 a.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, first round, at Melbourne, Australia

WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Noon BTN — Minnesota at Michigan 12:30 p.m. FSN — Kansas at Missouri CSN, PLUS — Kansas at Missouri 2 p.m. ESPN2 — Temple at Dayton BTN — Iowa at Purdue 2:30 p.m. CSN — Baylor at Texas 4 p.m. ESPN2 — Ohio St. at Michigan St. 4:30 p.m. ROOT — California at Utah

MEN'S COLLEGE HOCKEY

9 p.m. BTN — Michigan at Ohio State

S C H O O L

H.S. BOYS BASKETBALL Wyoming Valley Conference Division W L 4 0 3 1 2 2 2 2 0 4 Division Division II................................. W L Dallas......................................... 3 1 Holy Redeemer ........................ 3 1 Tunkhannock............................ 2 2 Berwick...................................... 1 3 Wyoming Area.......................... 0 4 Division Division III................................ W L GAR ........................................... 4 0 Meyers ....................................... 4 0 Wyoming Seminary ................. 2 2 Hanover Area ........................... 2 2 Nanticoke .................................. 2 2 Northwest .................................. 2 3 Lake-Lehman ........................... 1 3 MMI Prep .................................. 0 5

Division I .................................. Wyoming Valley West ............. Hazleton Area .......................... Pittston Area ............................. Crestwood ................................. Coughlin ....................................

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O

Overall W L 6 6 9 3 9 3 5 8 3 10 Overall W L 7 4 5 7 8 5 3 9 1 11 Overall W L 12 0 10 2 5 4 4 8 4 8 4 9 6 6 2 10

Tuesday's games Coughlin at Wyoming Area, 7:15 p.m. Dallas at Berwick, 7:15 p.m. GAR at Nanticoke, 7:15 p.m. Pittston Area at Holy Redeemer, 7:15 p.m. Tunkhannock at Crestwood, 7:15 p.m. Lake-Lehman at MMI Prep, 7:15 p.m. Wyoming Seminary at Meyers, 7:15 p.m. Wyoming Valley West at Hazleton Area, 7:15 p.m.

L U G E Luge World Cup At Oberhof, Germany Men Doubles 1. Toni Eggert and Sascha Benecken, Germany, 1:23.544. 2. Tobias Wendl and Tobias Arlt, Germany, 1:23.775. 3. Andreas and Wolfgang Linger, Austria, 1:24.199. 4. Peter Penz and Georg Fischler, Austria, 1:24.321. 5. Christian Oberstolz and Patrick Gruber, Italy, 1:24.464. 6. Matthew Mortensen and Preston Griffall, United States, 1:24.468. 7. Ronny Pietrasik and Christian Weise, Germany, 1:24.542. 8. Christian Niccum and Jayson Terdiman, Berwick, Pa. United States, 1:24.747. 9. Michail Kuzmich and Stanislav Mikheev, Russia, 1:24.795. 10. Hans Peter Fischnaller and Patrick Schwienbacher, Italy, 1:24.804. World Cup Standings (After five of nine events) 1. Andreas and Wolfgang Linger, Austria, 410. 2. Tobias Wendl and Tobias Arlt, Germany, 395. 3. Toni Eggert and Sascha Benecken, Germany, 355. 4. Peter Penz and Georg Fischler, Austria, 331. 5. Vladislav Yuzhakov and Vladimir Makhnutin, Russia, 239. 6. Christian Oberstolz and Patrick Gruber, Italy, 207. 7. Ivan Nevmerzhitskiy and Vladimir Prokhorov, Russia, 202. 8. Ronny Pietrasik and Christian Weise, Germany, 192. 9. Tristan Walker and Justin Snith, Canada, 190. 10. Christian Niccum and Jayson Terdiman, Berwick, Pa. United States, 173. Also 11. Matthew Mortensen and Preston Griffall, United States, 171. 24. Shane Hook and Zachary Clark, United States, 42. 26. Jake Hyrns and Andrew Sherk, United States, 24. Women 1. Natalie Geisenberger, Germany, 1 minute, 24.443 seconds. 2. Tatjana Huefner, Germany, 1:24.690. 3. Anke Wischnewski, Germany, 1:25.107. 4. Alex Gough, Canada, 1:25.168. 5. Corinna Martini, Germany, 1:25.301. 6. Erin Hamlin, United States, 1:25.657. 7. Alexandra Rodionova, Russia, 1:25.679. 8. Kate Hansen, United States, 1:25.722. 9. Nina Reithmayer, Austria, 1:25.828. 10. Ekaterina Baturina, Russia, 1:25.913. Also 11. Emily Sweeney, United States, 1:25.961. World Cup Standings (After five of nine events) 1. Tatjana Huefner, Germany, 455 points. 2. Natalie Geisenberger, Germany, 395. 3. Alex Gough, Canada, 360. 4. Anke Wischnewski, Germany, 320. 5. Corinna Martini, Germany, 272. 6. Tatiana Ivanova, Russia, 240. 7. Erin Hamlin, United States, 205. 8. Nina Reithmayer, Austria, 192. 9. Alexandra Rodionova, Russia, 170. 10. Arianne Jones, Canada, 168. Also 21. Kate Hansen, United States, 88. 23. Ashley Walden, United States, 71. 24. Emily Sweeney, United States, 66.

R

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S

THE TIMES LEADER

BULLETIN BOARD

AMERICA’S LINE

CAMPS

By Roxy Roxborough

Electric City Baseball & Softball Academy Winter Hitting League for baseball & softball players will be held at Connell Park beginning on February 5. Each session meets for four consecutive Sundays. Cost is $125 per player. More information: 570-878-8483 or www.electriccitybaseball.com.

CIRCULAR REPORT: On the NBA board, the Suns - Spurs circle is for Phoenix guard Steve Nash (questionable). NFL Favorite

Points

Underdog

AFC Divisional Playoff

GOLF

H I G H

S

RAVENS

7.5

Texans

7.5

Giants

NFC Divisional Playoff PACKERS

NBA Favorite

Points

Underdog

PISTONS

4.5

Warriors

NUGGETS

10

Jazz

SPURS

NL

Suns

College Basketball Favorite

Points

OHIO ST

12

Underdog Indiana

Georgetown

5.5

ST. JOHN’S

Northern Iowa

8.5

BRADLEY

BUTLER

8.5

Youngstown St

VALPARAISO

PK

Cleveland St

MISSOURI ST

10

Evansville

DENVER

15.5

W Kentucky

MARYLAND

2.5

Georgia Tech

Minnesota

1.5

PENN ST

Duke

7.5

CLEMSON

WISCONSIN

15.5

Nebraska

WASHINGTON

8.5

Washington St

CREIGHTON

15

So Illinois

Wichita St

7

INDIANA ST

DRAKE

2

Illinois St

Ucla

1.5

SO CAL

IONA

12

Loyola-MD

H O C K E Y

B A S K E T B A L L

National Hockey League

National Basketball Association

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA N.Y. Rangers............... 42 28 10 4 60 121 86 Philadelphia ................ 42 26 12 4 56 142 124 New Jersey ................. 44 25 17 2 52 121 125 Pittsburgh .................... 43 22 17 4 48 128 113 N.Y. Islanders.............. 42 16 20 6 38 102 131 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston.......................... 41 28 12 1 57 150 81 Ottawa .......................... 46 25 15 6 56 146 146 Toronto ........................ 44 22 17 5 49 137 137 Buffalo.......................... 44 19 20 5 43 112 129 Montreal....................... 44 16 20 8 40 112 122 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Florida .......................... 43 21 14 8 50 110 120 Washington ................. 42 23 17 2 48 123 123 Winnipeg...................... 44 20 19 5 45 113 128 Carolina ....................... 46 16 23 7 39 122 152 Tampa Bay................... 43 17 22 4 38 118 150 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Chicago........................ 45 26 13 6 58 146 130 Detroit .......................... 44 28 15 1 57 141 103 St. Louis....................... 43 25 12 6 56 112 92 Nashville ...................... 43 24 15 4 52 118 117 Columbus .................... 44 12 27 5 29 106 147 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver ................... 45 28 14 3 59 147 110 Minnesota.................... 44 22 16 6 50 103 110 Colorado ...................... 46 24 20 2 50 119 128 Calgary ........................ 45 21 19 5 47 110 127 Edmonton .................... 43 16 23 4 36 112 126 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA San Jose ...................... 41 25 11 5 55 120 95 Los Angeles ................ 44 21 15 8 50 97 100 Dallas ........................... 43 24 18 1 49 120 125 Phoenix........................ 45 20 18 7 47 114 118 Anaheim ...................... 43 14 22 7 35 109 136 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Friday's Games Washington 4, Tampa Bay 3 Columbus 4, Phoenix 3 Buffalo 3, Toronto 2 Pittsburgh 4, Florida 1 Anaheim 5, Edmonton 0 Saturday's Games Ottawa 3, Montreal 2, SO Detroit 3, Chicago 2, OT Colorado 2, Dallas 1 New Jersey 2, Winnipeg 1 N.Y. Rangers 3, Toronto 0 N.Y. Islanders 4, Buffalo 2 Carolina 4, Boston 2 San Jose 2, Columbus 1 Minnesota at St. Louis, late Philadelphia at Nashville, late Los Angeles at Calgary, late Today's Games Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m. Carolina at Washington, 5 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Montreal, 7 p.m. San Jose at Chicago, 7 p.m. Los Angeles at Edmonton, 8 p.m. Anaheim at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Monday's Games Nashville at N.Y. Islanders, 1 p.m. Colorado at Phoenix, 4 p.m. Winnipeg at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m. Boston at Florida, 7:30 p.m. Buffalo at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Dallas at St. Louis, 7:30 p.m.

American Hockey League

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA St. John’s .............. 37 22 10 4 1 49 130 112 Manchester ........... 40 21 17 0 2 44 104 108 Worcester.............. 36 18 11 3 4 43 99 93 Portland ................. 38 17 16 2 3 39 101 123 Providence............ 40 16 20 1 3 36 86 115 East Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Hershey ................. 39 24 8 4 3 55 150 114 Norfolk ................... 39 23 13 1 2 49 138 108 Penguins.............. 38 21 12 1 4 47 117 111 Syracuse ............... 36 17 15 3 1 38 118 117 Binghamton........... 41 16 23 1 1 34 106 128 Northeast Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Connecticut........... 39 19 14 2 4 44 120 118 Adirondack............ 37 20 15 1 1 42 110 105 Albany .................... 37 16 13 5 3 40 90 113 Bridgeport ............. 39 18 17 3 1 40 110 117 Springfield ............. 37 18 16 1 2 39 111 109 WESTERN CONFERENCE Midwest Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Chicago ................. 37 21 12 1 3 46 108 97 Charlotte................ 39 21 14 2 2 46 106 103 Milwaukee ............. 34 20 13 0 1 41 105 89 Peoria .................... 39 19 17 2 1 41 117 111 Rockford................ 38 14 20 1 3 32 117 140 North Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Toronto .................. 40 21 14 3 2 47 110 101 Rochester.............. 38 17 13 5 3 42 109 111 Grand Rapids........ 36 15 14 4 3 37 110 116 Hamilton ................ 37 16 16 1 4 37 91 110 Lake Erie ............... 37 16 19 1 1 34 87 101 West Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Oklahoma City...... 38 23 10 2 3 51 111 89 Houston ................. 38 21 8 2 7 51 107 97 Abbotsford ............ 37 23 11 3 0 49 98 87 Texas ..................... 36 17 16 1 2 37 110 111 San Antonio .......... 37 17 18 2 0 36 85 107 NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point for an overtime or shootout loss. Saturday's Games Penguiuns 6, St. John’s 4 Syracuse 3, Albany 2, SO Springfield 4, Portland 2 Bridgeport 3, Providence 2 Adirondack 5, Manchester 3 Hershey 6, Binghamton 4 Norfolk 4, Connecticut 2 Rochester 3, Hamilton 1 Lake Erie at Chicago, 8 p.m. Texas at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. Abbotsford at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Houston at Peoria, 8 p.m. Rockford at San Antonio, 8 p.m. Today's Games Lake Erie at Milwaukee, 2 p.m. Penguins at St. John’s, 2:30 p.m. Syracuse at Worcester, 3 p.m. Providence at Springfield, 3 p.m. Portland at Manchester, 3 p.m. Toronto at Hamilton, 3 p.m. Grand Rapids at Charlotte, 3 p.m. Binghamton at Bridgeport, 3 p.m. Abbotsford at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. Monday's Games Adirondack at Albany, 2 p.m. Texas at Rockford, 2:05 p.m. Abbotsford at San Antonio, 5 p.m.

S O C C E R Premier League England Team GP W D L Manchester City .............. 20 15 3 2 Manchester United.......... 21 15 3 3 Tottenham........................ 21 14 4 3 Chelsea ............................ 21 12 4 5 Arsenal ............................. 20 11 3 6 Liverpool........................... 21 9 8 4 Newcastle ........................ 20 9 6 5 Stoke................................. 21 8 6 7 Norwich ............................ 21 7 7 7 Everton ............................. 21 7 4 10 Sunderland....................... 21 6 6 9 Aston Villa ........................ 21 5 9 7 Swansea........................... 20 5 8 7 Fulham.............................. 21 5 8 8 West Bromwich Albion ... 21 6 4 11 Wolverhampton............... 21 4 6 11 Blackburn ......................... 21 4 5 12 Queens Park Rangers.... 20 4 5 11 Bolton ............................... 21 5 1 15 Wigan................................ 20 3 6 11 Premier League Aston Villa 1, Everton 1 Blackburn 3, Fulham 1 Chelsea 1, Sunderland 0 Liverpool 0, Stoke 0 Manchester United 3, Bolton 0 Tottenham 1, Wolverhampton 1 West Bromwich Albion 1, Norwich 2

GF 56 52 39 40 36 24 29 22 32 21 27 23 20 23 20 23 32 19 25 18

GA 16 20 21 25 28 18 25 31 36 25 24 27 23 29 30 37 44 35 46 41

Pts 48 48 46 40 36 35 33 30 28 25 24 24 23 23 22 18 17 17 16 15

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct Philadelphia...................... 9 3 .750 New York .......................... 6 5 .545 Boston ............................... 4 7 .364 Toronto.............................. 4 9 .308 New Jersey....................... 3 9 .250 Southeast Division W L Pct Orlando ........................... 8 3 .727 Atlanta ............................. 9 4 .692 Miami............................... 8 4 .667 Charlotte ......................... 3 10 .231 Washington .................... 1 11 .083 Central Division W L Pct Chicago ............................ 12 2 .857 Indiana.............................. 9 3 .750 Cleveland ......................... 5 6 .455 Milwaukee ........................ 4 7 .364 Detroit ............................... 3 9 .250 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct San Antonio ...................... 8 4 .667 Dallas ................................ 7 5 .583 Memphis ........................... 4 6 .400 Houston............................. 4 7 .364 New Orleans..................... 3 8 .273 Northwest Division W L Pct Oklahoma City................. 10 2 .833 Denver.............................. 8 4 .667 Portland ............................ 7 4 .636 Utah .................................. 6 4 .600 Minnesota ........................ 4 8 .333 Pacific Division W L Pct L.A. Lakers ....................... 9 4 .692 L.A. Clippers..................... 5 3 .625 Phoenix ............................. 4 7 .364 Sacramento ...................... 4 8 .333 Golden State..................... 3 8 .273 Friday's Games Detroit 98, Charlotte 81 Indiana 95, Toronto 90 Philadelphia 120, Washington 89 Houston 103, Sacramento 89 Minnesota 87, New Orleans 80 Chicago 88, Boston 79 Dallas 102, Milwaukee 76 San Antonio 99, Portland 83 New Jersey 110, Phoenix 103 L.A. Lakers 97, Cleveland 92 Denver 117, Miami 104 Saturday's Games Atlanta 93, Minnesota 91 Charlotte 112, Golden State 100 Indiana 97, Boston 83 Philadelphia 103, Washington 90 Chicago 77, Toronto 64 Portland at Houston, late New York at Oklahoma City, late New Orleans at Memphis, late New Jersey at Utah, late Sacramento at Dallas, late L.A. Lakers at L.A. Clippers, late Today's Games Golden State at Detroit, 6 p.m. Utah at Denver, 8 p.m. Phoenix at San Antonio, 9 p.m. Monday's Games Chicago at Memphis, 1 p.m. Orlando at New York, 1 p.m. Cleveland at Charlotte, 2 p.m. Houston at Washington, 2 p.m. Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 2 p.m. Portland at New Orleans, 3 p.m. New Jersey at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m. Toronto at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Sacramento at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Oklahoma City at Boston, 8 p.m. Dallas at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.

GB — 21⁄2 41⁄2 51⁄2 6 GB — — 1 ⁄2 6 71⁄2 GB — 2 51⁄2 61⁄2 8 GB — 1 3 31⁄2 1 4 ⁄2 GB — 2 21⁄2 3 6 GB — 11⁄2 4 41⁄2 5

F O O T B A L L NFL Playoff Glace Wild-card Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 7 Houston 31, Cincinnati 10 New Orleans 45, Detroit 28 Sunday, Jan. 8 New York Giants 24, Atlanta 2 Denver 29, Pittsburgh 23, OT Divisional Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 14 San Francisco 36, New Orleans 32 Denver at New England, late Sunday, Jan. 15 Houston at Baltimore, 1 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Green Bay, 4:30 p.m. Conference Championships Sunday, Jan. 22 San Francisco vs. N.Y. Giants-Green Bay winner, TBA Denver-New England winner vs. Houston-Baltimore winner, TBA Pro Bowl Sunday, Jan. 29 At Honolulu NFC vs. AFC, 7 p.m. Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 5 At Indianapolis NFC vs. AFC, 6:20 p.m.

C O L L E G E NCAA Men's Basketball Saturday's Scores EAST Albany (NY) 76, Maine 75 American U. 67, Holy Cross 54 Army 75, Navy 62 Bentley 64, St. Rose 60 Boston College 61, Virginia Tech 59 Boston U. 61, Stony Brook 55 Brooklyn 77, Hunter 64 Bucknell 79, Lafayette 65 Cortland St. 82, New Paltz 55 Dartmouth 83, Longwood 67 Duquesne 78, Rhode Island 71 Edinboro 92, Lock Haven 70 Farmingdale 66, Russell Sage 51 Hartwick 87, Utica 81 Harvard 69, George Washington 48 Hobart 73, St. Lawrence 56 Indiana (Pa.) 70, Clarion 65 Keuka 82, Gallaudet 66 LIU 106, Monmouth (NJ) 86 Lebanon Valley 71, Alvernia 64 Lehigh 78, Colgate 56 Manhattan 72, Siena 53 Millersville 89, West Chester 83 Montclair St. 72, Rutgers-Camden 53 Mount St. Mary’s 64, Bryant 60 Muhlenberg 79, Gettysburg 70 NJIT 95, Cobleskill 57 Nazareth 89, Elmira 36 New Hampshire 72, Vermont 65 Northeastern 64, William & Mary 50 Penn 64, Cornell 52 Princeton 62, Columbia 58 Richard Stockton 55, NJ City 48 Robert Morris 70, Sacred Heart 67 S. New Hampshire 65, New Haven 59 Scranton 67, Merchant Marine 55 St. Francis (NY) 62, Fairleigh Dickinson 51 St. Francis (Pa.) 74, Quinnipiac 71 Staten Island 70, Baruch 69 Susquehanna 77, Goucher 74 Syracuse 78, Providence 55 UMass 71, Saint Joseph’s 62 Ursinus 63, McDaniel 51 VCU 68, Delaware 55 Wagner 67, CCSU 58 Washington (Md.) 78, Franklin & Marshall 74 West Virginia 84, Rutgers 60 William Paterson 67, Kean 56 Wilmington (Del.) 73, Holy Family 66 Yale 68, Brown 64 SOUTHWEST Baylor 106, Oklahoma St. 65 Oklahoma 82, Kansas St. 73

REGISTRATION/TRYOUTS Ashley Hanover Girls Babe Ruth Softball will be holding its sign-ups for the 2012 season for all girls ages 6-16 atthe following dates and times: Jan. 18, Ashley Fireman’s Hall, Ashley, 6-8 p.m.; Jan. 21, Hanover Memorial Elementary Center, Lee Park, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Jan. 22, LCCC gymnasium, 3 p.m.-5 p.m.; Jan. 25, Ashley Fireman’s Hall, 6-8 p.m.; Jan. 28, Hanover Memorial, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Jan. 29, LCCC gymnasium, 3-5 p.m. Cost is $45 per player with discounts given to 2 or more players. Therewillalso be a mandatory fundraiser.Ten lottery calendar tickets (15 for family) or a $35 buyout ($50 per family).New playersmust bring a copy of their birth certificate. Avoca Basketball League will register interested Kindergarten through Sixth Grade Boys and Girls in the Avoca Community Center located at 800 Main Street today from 7-8 p.m.; Wednesday from 7-8 p.m. and Sunday Jan. 22 from 7-8 p.m. For further ABL information, interested players can e mail stanwaleski@yahoo.com. Back Mountain Youth Lacrosse announces sign-ups for boys and girls in grades K-8. Register at Take The Arts Studio at 5 Dug Road in Shavertown on Sun. Jan 21 from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Kingston/Forty Fort Little League will hold registrations for all baseball and softball divisions on Tuesday, Jan. 24th from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Kingston VFW across the street from Thomas’s Market. A copy of a birth certificate for all new players and copies of three proofs of residency dated between 2/1/11 and 1/31/12 are required. Interested managers and coaches should bring a copy of a driver’s license and must apply at this registration. Visit www.eteamz.com/kbsi for registration and medical release forms, fees, and fundraising information. For any additional questions call 570-331-4817 or 570-714-4035. Hanover Area Little League will be holding registration for the 2012 season on Jan. 31 from 6-8 p.m.; Feb. 13 from 6-8 p.m.; and Feb. 25 from 10 a.m. to noon in Hanover Area High School cafeteria. All children residing in Warrior Run, Sugar Notch and Hanover Township (excluding Preston & Newtown) ages 4-16 as of April 30 are eligible to play. Registration costs are $45 per player (ages 4-12) or $75 per family of two or more. Cost for ages 13-16 is $65 per player. All new players are required to bring a copy of their birth certificate for age verification purposes. Any questions please email hanoverareall@yahoo.com Nanticoke Area Little League sign up dates will be today from noon to 7 p.m. at the Ed Center gym. They will also be held Jan. 28-29, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Ed Center gym, and Feb. 11-12, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Newport Twp. Firehouse, and Feb. 25-26, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Ed Center cafeteria. All new and returning players must bring a copy of their birth certificate and three proofs of residency. Residents of Nanticoke, Newport Twp. and Plymouth Twp. are eligible. Go to www.nanticokelittleleague.com for more information or call Wade at 7351089 or Dave at 262-5970. South Valley Girls Fastpitch will hold its final day of registration on Wednesday, January 18 from 7 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. in the Nanticoke Elementary Center Gym. Cost is $40 for the first child, $5 for each additional child. For more information please contact Steve at 417-7217, Jay at 239-6779 or Ed at 417-1119. West Side Little League (Luzerne, Courtdale, Pringle, Edwardsville, Larksville) will be holding a registration on Saturday, Jan. 28 from

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10 a.m. to noon at the Luzerne Borough Building on Academy Street. Tree proofs of residency are needed. All information can be found at www.newwestsidelittleleague.org. Wilkes-Barre Heights Baseball will be holding signups today from 2-4 p.m. at Stanton Lanes Bowling Alley. All children ages 4-12 living in the Wilkes-Barre Area School District and surrounding areas are eligible to register. Please bring a copy of their birth certificate and a copy of contact information. Cost is $30 for one child, $60 for two children, and $15 for any sibling after two. Any questions, call Gerrie at 235-6060 or Mandy at 817-4638. MEETINGS Dallas Softball Booster Club will be meeting Wednesday, Jan. 18 at 7:30 p.m. at Grotto Pizza at Harvey’s Lake. Plans for the upcoming softball season and fundraisers will be discussed. Parents of students in grades 7-12 are urged to attend. For more information, call Brent at 739-1126 or Bill at 498-5991. District 2 Wrestling Coaches’ Association will hold its annual meeting today at noon at the Tunkhannock Fire Hall. All head wrestling coaches and assistants are urged to attend. Coaches can contact president Phil Lipski at pjlipski@comcast.net. Hanover Area Quarterback Club will be holding a meeting Wednesday at 7 p.m. at Bar 11 in Hanover Township.All parents are encouraged to attend. Hughestown Sports Club will meet this Sunday at Granteed’s Tavern, 247 Parsonage St., Hughestown. The meeting begins at 2:30 p.m., limited number of season tickets available. Anyone interested can attend the meeting or contact any club member. Pittston Junior Patriots will meet today at Fahey’s Riverfront located on 137 Main Street in Pittston. Parents and coaches are encouraged to attend. If anyone has football equipment of cheerleading uniforms, they can return them the day of the meeting. West Pittston Little League announces that registration for the 2012 season will be held on the following dates: Thurs. Jan. 19, 6-8 p.m.; Sat. Jan. 21, 9 a.m.-noon; Thurs. Jan. 26, 6-8 p.m.; Sat. Jan. 28, 9 a.m.-noon; Sun. Jan 29, 1-4 p.m. All registrations will be held at the West Pittston Little League practice facility. All fees are due at time of registration. All participants must bring a birth certificate, medical information and three current proofs of residency (driver’s license, insurance id cards, utility bills). Wyoming Area Diamond Club will hold a meeting to discuss the upcoming Baseball season on Wednesday, January 18th at 7pm at the high school in Room 129. All parents of players in grades 7 through 12 who participate in the baseball program are welcome to attend. UPCOMING EVENTS Misericordia Baseball will host a hot stove session on Friday Feb. 24, 7-9 p.m. Hitting and pitching presentations followed by Q&A and open discussion. Light refreshments provided. All are welcome; RSVP by 2/22 to abennett@misericordia.edu. GAR Annual Football Awards Banquet will be held Sunday, Jan. 15 in the school cafeteria. Banquet starts at 1 p.m., doors open at noon. Tickets are $10 for adults, $5 for children ages 7-12, free admission for children ages 6 and under. Price includes awards ceremony, buffet meal and refreshments. There will also be a theme basket raffle. For advanced ticket purchase, call 829-0569. Limited number of tickets available at the door. The Lady Patriot Basketball Booster Club is having a Parent & Friends Night Out at the Red Mill on Friday, Jan. 27th from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. The team coaches will be the guest bartenders. There will be chances to win gift baskets, a 50/50 raffle, and tickets will be sold to win a 32 inch flat screen. Tickets for the TV are $5 each or 3 for $10.

Bulletin Board items will not be accepted over the telephone. Items may be faxed to 831-7319, emailed to tlsports@timesleader.com or dropped off at the Times Leader or mailed to Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main St., WilkesBarre, PA 18711-0250.

Southern U. 69, Ark.-Pine Bluff 68 Texas A&M 67, Texas Tech 54 Texas St. 82, McNeese St. 73 Texas-Arlington 91, Lamar 82 UALR 63, Arkansas St. 62 UTSA 59, Stephen F. Austin 52 MIDWEST Adrian 78, Olivet 49 Akron 68, Ohio 63 Ashland 96, Ohio Dominican 86 Augsburg 65, St. Mary’s (Minn.) 61 Augustana (SD) 63, Wayne (Neb.) 49 Aurora 65, Maranatha Baptist 52 Bemidji St. 100, Concordia (St.P.) 77 Briar Cliff 71, Nebraska-Omaha 69 Carroll (Wis.) 109, Grinnell 106 Cent. Missouri 64, Missouri Western 48 Cincinnati 82, Villanova 78 Concordia (Wis.) 82, Milwaukee Engineering 61 Cornerstone 101, Concordia (Mich.) 80 Davenport 66, Aquinas 61 Dayton 79, La Salle 75 E. Michigan 51, Ball St. 48 Edgewood 61, Rockford 60 Ferris St. 74, Northwood (Mich.) 69 Green Bay 57, Wright St. 56 Gustavus 86, Macalester 70 Hamline 77, Bethel (Minn.) 71 Hillsdale 60, Grand Valley St. 50 Hope 88, Kalamazoo 67 Huntington 59, Taylor 47 Ill.-Chicago 58, Loyola of Chicago 51 Indiana Tech 69, Siena Heights 61 Indiana-East 101, St. Louis Pharmacy 71 Iowa 75, Michigan 59 Kansas 82, Iowa St. 73 Kent St. 92, Bowling Green 87 Lake Forest 67, Beloit 62 Lakeland 97, Northland Baptist 67 Lawrence 67, Monmouth (Ill.) 63 Lourdes 70, Michigan-Dearborn 67 Madonna 75, Northwestern Ohio 69 Marquette 62, Pittsburgh 57

Miami (Ohio) 52, Buffalo 51 Milwaukee 84, Detroit 74 Missouri 84, Texas 73 Mount Marty 69, Doane 66 N. Dakota St. 82, South Dakota 59 N. Illinois 74, Cent. Michigan 66 N. Michigan 63, Lake Superior St. 55 NW Missouri St. 78, SW Baptist 55 Northwestern 81, Michigan St. 74 Oakland 96, IPFW 86 Oral Roberts 81, IUPUI 71 Quincy 68, Wis.-Parkside 59 Ripon 82, Illinois College 72 St. Thomas (Minn.) 76, Concordia (Moor.) 62 Tiffin 71, Lake Erie 66 Trine 70, Albion 54 UConn 67, Notre Dame 53 Upper Iowa 61, Minn.-Crookston 48 W. Michigan 74, Toledo 52 Xavier 77, St. Bonaventure 64 FAR WEST Air Force 74, Boise St. 59 Arizona St. 76, Oregon St. 66 BYU 95, Santa Clara 78 Gonzaga 62, Loyola Marymount 58 Long Beach St. 76, Pacific 66 N. Colorado 71, E. Washington 70 New Mexico 72, Wyoming 62 Oregon 59, Arizona 57 San Diego St. 69, UNLV 67 San Francisco 78, Pepperdine 63 Stanford 84, Colorado 64 SOUTH Coastal Carolina 81, Presbyterian 63 Drexel 79, UNC Wilmington 57 Florida 79, South Carolina 65 Florida Gulf Coast 84, Lipscomb 80, OT Florida St. 90, North Carolina 57 George Mason 89, James Madison 83 Kentucky 65, Tennessee 62 Louisville 76, DePaul 59 Richmond 76, Temple 65


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

➛ WWW.TIMESLEADER.COM/SPORTS

PAGE 3C

PENGUINS SUNDAY LAST FIVE GAMES

Jan. 4 Norfolk L, 5-1

Jan. 6 Rochester W, 4-3

Jan. 7 Syracuse L, 4-3

NEXT FIVE GAMES

Jan. 10 at Norfolk W, 3-2

Saturday at St. John’s W, 6-4

Today at St. John’s 2:30 p.m.

Jan. 20 Manchester 7:05 p.m.

Jan. 21 Syracuse 7:05 p.m.

Jan. 22 at Syracuse 3 p.m.

Jan. 25 Providence 7:05 p.m.

The life of a professional hockey player can make sabbath rites difficult to maintain. The Penguins have created an opportunity to continue developing their spirituality.

Keeping the faith

By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Former Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguin Nick Johnson has landed a full-time NHL job with the Minnesota Wild.

Former Pen having a Wild time in NHL Winger Nick Johnson has landed a regular gig among the forward corps for Minnesota. By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

Halfway into his first full NHL season, Minnesota Wild winger Nick Johnson admits he often thinks about his days as a Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguin. Particularly his first season with the club in 2008-09, when Johnson was trying to find his way as a rookie in the AHL. It’s similar to how Johnson felt at the start of this season, after Minnesota claimed him off waivers from Pittsburgh. “It did seem a lot like my first year, with the uncertainty, learning the league and not knowing what to expect,” Johnson said from his hotel room in Chicago on Wednesday as the Wild prepared to take on the Blackhawks on Thursday. “Halfway through the year I found a line, developed some chemistry and just stayed with it.” Johnson appeared in 169 games with the Penguins from 2008-11. After being placed on waivers by Pittsburgh during training camp, Johnson has established himself as an NHL regular with Minnesota, posting five goals and 10 assists in his first 40 games. “It feels like September was only yesterday and at the same time it’s so far away,” Johnson said, adding that his first NHL season is similar to his time in Wilkes-Barre. With the Penguins, Johnson broke in on the third line as a grinder and eventually progressed to top-six winger who was relied upon to put up points. In Minnesota, Johnson is entrenched as a third line winger for head coach Mike Yeo, another former Penguin, but is also versatile enough to play on the team’s top line. He found himself in that spot for the Jan. 10 game against San Jose, taking the place of winger Devin Setoguchi, who sat out the contest. Johnson responded with a goal, but said he didn’t expect to remain on the top line. “That was a rare thing,” he said. “But my season here has been a lot like my time in WilkesBarre. They can use me wherever.” The first half of Johnson’s season has been an eventful one as he establishes himself in the NHL. He scored a game-winning goal against Anaheim on Dec. 4, ranks seventh on the team in scoring and even fought Calgary Flames captain Jarome Iginla on Nov. 8. “I’ve been having fun and it’s a good fit for me here,” Johnson said. Despite playing in the Western Conference, Johnson does manage to keep in touch with some of his former Wilkes-Barre/Scranton teammates. When the New York Islanders came to town last month, Johnson met former Penguin Tim Wallace for dinner. He also keeps in touch with Ben Lovejoy and Corey Potter, who landed a fulltime job with Edmonton. “You always have that bond with guys you used to play with in Wilkes-Barre,” Johnson said. “You say hello during warm-ups or even under your breath when you line up at the faceoff circle. I have a lot of good memories from my time in Wilkes-Barre and made a lot of friends I’m still connected with.”

The hallway outside of the Penguins locker room at the Ice Rink at Coal Street is a pretty raucous place. After practice, players gather in the hallway for an additional workout of tossing medicine balls against the wall, creating a constant thud as each ball smacks the concrete. But on the other side of the wall, in Locker Room 3, a more serene scene takes place. It’s there that a handful of Penguins meet once a week for a chapel session. The session is led by Paul Golden, who is director of seminary admissions at Baptist Bible College in Clarks Summit and a chaplain with Hockey Ministries International. The 20-minute sessions are non-denominational and open to any player. “It’s a good opportunity once a week to have a break from hockey and get spiritually recharged,” Golden said. “This season we’re studying the life of Joseph, who, like a professional athlete, also had a lot of ups and downs.” Golden, who is not paid by the team and volunteers his time, said the chapel sessions are a chance for players to participate in a Bible study, ask questions and just talk about the challenges they face in their lives and careers. “They’re professional athletes, but they’re not immune from the things that any of us face,” he said. “Life still comes at them.” Those who attend the chapel sessions include goaltender Brad Thiessen, and forwards Ben Street and Eric Tangradi, who is currently on recall to Pittsburgh. Thiessen coordinates each chapel session with Golden based on the team’s practice schedule. Church was a big part of Thiessen’s life while he was growing up in Aldergrove, British Columbia. Being able to continue practicing his faith while he builds his pro hockey career is an important element to Thiessen. “For me, having faith is definitely something I hold on to,” he said. “With our lifestyle of being on the road traveling and playing games on Sundays, sometimes it’s tough to make that a priority. “When Paul gives up his time to come out for us and have a devotion or service, it means a lot.” Golden said the

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Paul Golden, director of seminary admissions at Baptist Bible College, runs a chapel program for the Penguins.

HMI NOW 35 Hockey Ministries International was founded in 1977 and has been active in every level of the game. HMI offers its non-denominational chapel program to teams to provide a spiritual resource for players. Attendance is voluntary and chapels are held after practice on nongame days. Golden said the chapel consists of an inspirational talk, a prayer and discussion of any topics or questions the players may have. Golden is a chaplain with HMI’s Northeast Division, which has volunteer chaplains for 26 AHL teams. To learn more, visit www.hockeyministriesnortheast.org.

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins goaltender Brad Thiessen was instrumental in establishing a chapel program for the team. Players can attend a voluntary session once a week after practice.

weekly chapel sessions offer a temporary break from a hockey season that can grind on for almost nine months. Just as the players work to develop their games every day, it’s also important to develop spiritually as well, he said. That’s what attracted Tangradi to the program. The Philadelphia native grew up in Catholic schools, spent a year at Wyoming Seminary which was founded by the Methodist Church, and participated in the Hockey Ministries program while playing junior hockey in Belleville, Ontario. When Golden implemented the program in Wilkes-Barre last season, Tangradi jumped at the opportunity. “There are a lot of ups and downs during the season and it can become very stressful,”

Tangradi said. “When I can go into chapel and have a conversation about something other than hockey, it helps me to deal with the stresses of the season. It’s always nice to go back and rely on something other than hockey to keep you strong.” Unlike Thiessen and Tangradi, Street didn’t attend church that much while growing up in Coquitlam, B.C. But Street said his faith is strong, and the weekly chapel services offer another perspective on life and a brief respite from the pressures of being a pro hockey player. “It kind of brings you back to neutral,” Street said. “Sometimes during the season, your emotions are a roller coaster ride. You need to take a step back and look at the big picture. Sometimes you just

W H E E L I N G WAT C H Zack Torquato had a goal and an assist to lead the Nailers past Toledo 3-2 on Wednesday. Last Sunday, Chris Barton

posted two goals and an assist as the Nailers beat Greenville 5-3. Barton leads the team in goals (19) and points (35).

need that other perspective.” The big picture, which includes life after hockey, is an important component of Golden’s talks. Keeping in touch with their spiritual side goes hand-in-hand with their development as a player and as people away from the rink – a facet that head coach John Hynes has stressed numerous times. “These guys are young and looking at the here and now,” Golden said. “I tell them there’s more to life than hockey. Hockey’s here now, but in the long run your spiri-

tual faith is what’s going to sustain you for your entire life.” Tangradi agreed, and said the Hockey Ministries helped him as a young player adjust to being on his own for the first time. “When you can get with some of your teammates and talk about your faith, it’s something that will last longer than your hockey career,” Tangradi said. “We’re proud that the organization lets us do this throughout the season.” The weekly chapel services also help the players grasp how fortunate they are to play

pro hockey and appreciate the position they’re in. “We’re pretty lucky to make a living playing hockey. We have gifts and you want to make the most of your gifts,” Street said. “Sometimes you get too caught up in the game that you don’t realize you play to the gifts that you’ve been given. It helps me as a hockey player and it makes you a better person as well.” While the players turn to Golden for a spiritual lift when times are tough, they also let him know about the positives as well. When Colin McDonald was called up by Pittsburgh on Jan. 6, he sent Golden a text to share the good news. Last season, Pittsburgh center Joe Vitale texted Golden to let him know that he had been recalled from Wilkes-Barre/Scranton and again a week later when he scored his first NHL goal. “They’re a good group of guys and I really enjoy seeing them succeed,” Golden said. And the players enjoy the spiritual lesson that Golden brings every week. “When Paul comes in, the stability is there. It’s a constant in your life,” Street said. “You know what you’re going to talk about, you know there’s going to be a lesson. It’s stabilizing for everyone.”


CMYK PAGE 4C

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

THE TIMES LEADER

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PAGE 5C

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL

No. 1 Syracuse crushes Friars The Associated Press

SYRACUSE, N.Y. — Dion Waiters had 12 points, seven coming during a decisive firsthalf run, Scoop Jardine added 10 points and nine assists, and top-ranked Syracuse beat undermanned Providence 78-55 on Saturday night to remain unbeaten. The victory for the Orange (19-0, 6-0 Big East) matches the school record for wins to start a season, set in 1999-2000. Syracuse will try to break the mark Monday night at home against Pittsburgh. The Panthers (11-7, 0-5) are the only winless team in the Big East after a 62-57 loss on Saturday at No. 25 Marquette — their sixth straight setback. The win also was the 875th for Syracuse coach Jim Boeheim, moving him within one of Adolph Rupp for fourth place all-time in Division I. Kris Joseph led Syracuse with 13 points, seldom-used Mookie Jones had 10, and C.J. Fair added nine. Kadeem Batts led Providence with 13 points, LaDontae Henton had 12 points on 5-of-16 shooting and Gerard Coleman had 11 points on 4-of-14 from the field. Syracuse has led every game at halftime. The closest games the Orange have had were a 69-63 triumph over Stanford at Madison Square Garden in the NIT Season Tip-off in late November and a 72-68 win over then-No. 10 Florida at home on AP PHOTO Dec. 2, five days after associate head coach Bernie Fine was Syracuse’s C.J. Fair has his shot rejected by Providence’s Bilal Dixson, right, and Brice Kofane durfired amid allegations of sexual ing the first half Saturday in Syracuse, N.Y. abuse. despite not having leading who takes all his shots close to Bears (17-0, 4-0 Big 12), who No. 17 Connecticut 67, scorer Kyle Kuric. the basket, entered the game extended their school-record Notre Dame 53 leading the nation in shooting at winning streak to 17 games. No. 15 Murray State 82, Freshman Quincy Miller had 21 76.8 percent. SOUTH BEND, Ind. — ShaTennessee Tech 74 points with three 3-pointers. bazz Napier scored 16 points No. 10 Kansas 82, MURRAY, Ky. — Donte Poole and freshman Andre DrumIowa State 73 Northwestern 81, scored a career-high 28 points mond had 10 points and 13 and grabbed eight rebounds to LAWRENCE, Kan. — Tyshrebounds to lead No. 17 Connec- No. 6 Michigan St. 74 lead unbeaten No. 15 Murray awn Taylor scored 22 of his EVANSTON, Ill. — John ticut to a victory over Notre State to its 18th straight victory. career-high 28 points after halfShurna scored 22 points and Dame, snapping the Fighting Northwestern beat No. 6 Michi- time, and No. 10 Kansas used a Irish’s 29-game home winning Oklahoma 82, game-changing second-half run gan State, ending the Spartans’ streak. No. 18 Kansas St. 73 to knock off Iowa State. 15-game winning streak No. 2 Kentucky 65, NORMAN, Okla. — Andrew Drew Crawford added 20 No. 22 San Diego State 69, Tennessee 62 Fitzgerald scored 21 points to points and Davide Curletti, No. 12 UNLV 67 lead four Oklahoma players in KNOXVILLE, Tenn. — Darius making his first start of the double figures and the Sooners SAN DIEGO — Jamaal Franseason, had a season-high 17 for Miller made two free throws got their first Big 12 win under the Wildcats (12-5, 2-3 Big Ten), klin made an off-balance layup and Michael Kidd-Gilchrist coach Lon Kruger, a victory with three-tenths of a second who rebounded from a tough added another in the final 20 over No. 18 Kansas State. overtime loss at Michigan three left to give No. 22 San Diego seconds and No. 2 Kentucky State a thrilling victory over No. days ago. beat Tennessee. No. 20 Mississippi State 56, Michigan State (15-3, 4-1) lost 12 UNLV in a marquee MounThe Wildcats (17-1, 3-0 SouthAlabama 52 tain West Conference opener. for the first time since it was eastern Conference), who STARKVILLE, Miss. — Arbeaten by Duke in Madison trailed by as many eight points Iowa 75, No. 13 Michigan 59 nett Moultrie had 25 points and Square Garden on Nov. 15. in the second half, took a 62-54 13 rebounds, and No. 20 MisIOWA CITY, Iowa — Senior lead with 53 seconds to go. No. 9 Missouri 84, Texas 73 sissippi State rallied in the final guard Matt Gatens scored 19 No. 4 Baylor 106, minutes to beat Alabama. points and Iowa beat No. 13 COLUMBIA, Mo. — Phil Oklahoma St. 65 Pressey had 18 points, including Michigan. No. 25 Marquette 62, seven straight to get No. 9 MisWACO, Texas — Perry Jones Pittsburgh 57 No. 14 Louisville 76, souri out of trouble in the secIII had 19 points and 12 reMILWAUKEE — Darius Johnbounds and No. 4 Baylor stayed ond half of a victory over Texas. DePaul 59 son-Odom scored 18 points and LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Russ Ricardo Ratliffe made his first undefeated with a victory over Jae Crowder added 15 to help Smith scored 25 points, Chris eight shots and had 21 points Oklahoma State. No. 25 Marquette beat PittsSmith added 20 and No. 14 and Marcus Denmon had 18 Pierre Jackson scored 18 burgh for the Panthers’ sixth Louisville got back on the right points and 11 rebounds for the points and made five of the season-high 15 3-pointers by the Tigers (16-1, 3-1 Big 12). Ratliffe, track with a victory over DePaul straight loss.

AP PHOTO

Florida State’s Michael Snaer gets a shot off past the defense of North Carolina’s Jackson Simmons during the second half.

Seminoles trounce No. 3 Tar Heels

North Carolina suffers its worst loss in Roy Williams era against Florida State. By BRENT KALLESTAD Associated Press Writer

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Deividas Dulkys’ childhood dream came true Saturday. And you couldn’t blame him if he might have believed it had been a dream. The senior Florida State guard scored a career-high 32 points and was 8 of 10 from 3point range to key the Seminoles’ 90-57 victory over No. 3 North Carolina that snapped a nine-game winning streak and was the Tar Heels’ worst loss under coach Roy Williams. “Every little kid has a dream when you’re playing on a big stage like I did today,” Dulkys said. “I guess today was my day.” And that was an understatement. Dulkys, a native of Lithuania whose previous career-high was 22 points, was 12 of 14 from the field overall and added four steals and a blocked shot. His eight 3s were a Florida State record in Atlantic Coast Conference play. “We tried to keep him from scoring if we could but he just kept getting so open and our guys were running into screens,” Williams said. “It was a great performance shooting the basketball.” It was an unexpected turnabout for a Florida State team that lost 79-59 at Clemson just a week ago and came into Saturday’s game with the poorest 3point shooting mark in the conference at 30.2 percent.

But behind Dulkys, the Seminoles hit 12 of 27 from long distance while the Tar Heels were simply off while playing on the road for the first time in six weeks. North Carolina made only 9 of 20 free throws and were beaten 43-35 on the boards despite Tyler Zeller’s 14 rebounds. North Carolina had not been beaten on the boards in its previous seven games. Micahel Snaer added 17 points and Okaro White contributed 12 points and 10 rebounds for the Seminoles. Dulkys said he made 28 straight from beyond the 3-point arc while warming up earlier in the day with the help of two student managers who took care of rebounding the shots. “He shoots this well every day in practice,” Florida State coach Leonard Hamilton said. “He’s had a difficult time transferring that to the game. Sometimes when he misses that first shot, he gets a little tight.” The Seminoles (11-6, 2-1) started the second half on a 30-8 run to take a 66-36 lead en route to handing North Carolina its most lopsided conference loss since a 96-56 defeat at Maryland in 2003, the season before Williams took over. Harrison Barnes scored15 points and Zeller added 14 for North Carolina (15-3, 2-1), which finished 4 of 21 from 3-point range. Williams took his team — except for five walk-ons who finished the game — from the court with14.2 seconds left in expectation of the court-storming by the Florida State fans. “We just tried to be cautious,” Williams explained. “It’s been shown that’s it not always been safe in some scenarios.”

WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Rutgers pulls out overtime triumph against Cards; Irish, Huskies win The Associated Press

PISCATAWAY, N.J. — Erica Wheeler scored 23 points, including an off-balance 3-pointer with the shot clock running out in overtime, and No. 8 Rutgers beat 16th-ranked Louisville 71-68 on Saturday. Trailing 68-67, Wheeler corraled the rebound off a miss from Khadijah Rushdan and dribbled out to the 3-point line. She barely recognized the shot clock was down to its last tick before turning around and connecting with 1:12 left in the extra period. The Scarlet Knights (15-2, 4-0 Big East) forced a shot clock violation on the other end. After Monique Oliver’s lay-in rolled off the rim with 13 seconds left, Louisville had one last chance to tie it, but Bria Smith’s drive came up short and Rushdan seal the win with a free throw with 1.2 seconds left. Freshman Shawnta’ Dyer led the Cardinals (14-4, 3-2) with a season-high 16

points. No. 2 Notre Dame 76, Cincinnati 50 CINCINNATI — Natalie Novosel scored 21 points Saturday, and point guard Skylar Diggins steadied Notre Dame’s balanced offense with 11 assists, leading the Fighting Irish to a victory over Cincinnati. Notre Dame (17-1, 5-0 Big East) has won 19 straight games against teams from Ohio since 1993. No. 3 Connecticut 72, Villanova 49 VILLANOVA — Tiffany Hayes scored 14 of her 22 points in the second half to lead No. 3 Connecticut to a win over Villanova. Rachel Roberts scored 16 points for the Wildcats, who got within five points when two baskets by Emily Leer made it 41-36, but Connecticut (14-2 overall, 4-1 Big East) answered

sin-Green Bay to a victory over Detroit. Lydia Bauer added 16 points and Julie Wojta finished with 15 points and eight rebounds to help the Phoenix (15-0, 5-0 Horizon League) post a school-record 35th straight regular-season victory. Sarah Eichler had 13 points.

by scoring 12 of the next 15 points to retake control of the game. No. 4 Stanford 80, Colorado 54 BOULDER, Colo. — Joslyn Tinkle matched her career high with 20 points and No. 4 Stanford routed Colorado. Toni Kokenis and Chiney Ogwumike added 19 points each for Stanford (15-1, 6-0 Pac-12), which won its 12th in a row since its only loss of the season to Connecticut 68-58 on Nov. 21. Brittany Wilson and Jen Reese both scored 10 points for Colorado (13-3, 2-3), which was 11-0 before beginning league play.

The ball gets away as Louisville’s Becky Burke (11) collides with Rutgers’ Monique Oliver (34) and Khadijah Rushdan, center, during the second half Saturday in Piscataway, N.J.

Kansas State 62, No. 10 Texas Tech 61 LUBBOCK, Texas — Jalana Childs scored 23 points to lead Kansas State to a win over No. 10 Texas Tech, handing the Lady Raiders their second loss

in a row. Childs scored seven of the Wildcats’ last nine points to erase Texas Tech’s 58-53 lead. She hit two free throws with 1:43 to put Kansas State (13-3, 4-0) up for the first time since

AP PHOTO

43-40 earlier in the half. No. 14 Wis.-Green Bay 68, Detroit 59 DETROIT — Adrian Ritchie scored 20 points to lead unbeaten and 14th-ranked Wiscon-

Saint Mary’s 66, No. 23 Gonzaga 63 SPOKANE, Wash. — Alex Carbonel scored 18 points and Saint Mary’s made four free throws in the last 25 seconds to beat No. 23 Gonzaga, ending the Bulldogs’ West Coast Conference winning streak at 34 games. Down eight with 1:27 to play, Gonzaga reeled off seven quick points before the Gaels’ Danielle Mauldin made two free throws with 23 seconds left. After Katelan Redmon’s basket made it 64-63 with 8.7 seconds to go, Jasmine Smith made two free throws with 8.3 remaining.


CMYK PAGE 6C

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

THE TIMES LEADER

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NFL SUNDAY N F C D I V I S I O N A L P L AYO F F

Packing on the points a must Giants, Packers should be ready to score early, often to reach conference title game. By CHRIS JENKINS AP Sports Writer

GREEN BAY, Wis. — Going into Sunday’s NFC divisional playoff game against the New York Giants, Aaron Rodgers and the Green Bay Packers are best known for all the fireworks they’ve produced on offense. That’s a good thing for the Super Bowl champions, because they’ve been remarkably vulnerable on defense. All season, the Packers have been giving up yards in big chunks and bailing themselves out by forcing turnUP NEXT overs. And GIANTS at while the GiPACKERS ants might hope TV: 4:30 p.m., to slow the today. FOX-56 game down by OPENING establishing the LINE: Packers run and keeping by 9 LAST MEETRodgers on the ING: Packers sideline, the last beat Giants meeting be38-35, Dec. 4, tween the two 2011 teams — a 3835 victory by the Packers on a last-second field goal Dec. 4 — could mean Sunday is shaping up as another fastpaced game that comes down to the last possession. With Eli Manning and the offense on a role, the Giants like their chances this time around. “I think if we get into a shootout like we did last time, I think we will be OK,” wide receiver Victor Cruz said. “But it will have to come down to who has the last touch.” Meanwhile, the Packers’ defense is looking to hit the reset button in the playoffs. “This is a fresh start for us to right all our wrongs,” defensive lineman Ryan Pickett said. “We’re excited about it. It’s the same group that did it last year, the same team, so we know it’s there to do it. You just have to do it. Time is running out. This is oneand-done, so we have to get it done.” Manning can draw on the Gi-

AP PHOTO

Denver Broncos quarterback Tim Tebow reaches back to pass during the first half of Saturday’s divisional playoff game.

PATRIOTS Continued from Page 1C

AP PHOTO

Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers (12) slides to avoid being tackled during the second quarter against the New York Giants on Dec. 4.

ants’ victory in a frigid NFC championship game at Lambeau Field four years ago, but he doesn’t think that experience is relevant. “It’s a new year, a new team, new players going against a new team,” Manning said. “It’s just a matter of guys executing, guys knowing the game plan, going in there, looking forward to the opportunity that’s ahead of us, getting excited about it and have the attitude that we’re going to go in there and play great football.” They’ll likely have their chances.

Green Bay’s defense gave up more yards than any other team this season, an average of 411.6 per game. Packers coaches and players shrug off that statistic, pointing out that their ball-hawking defense has been able to come up with enough turnovers and stops in critical situations to help the team go 15-1. What’s more troubling than the yards is the number of big plays. According to STATS LLC, the Packers gave up 80 plays of 20plus yards this season — thirdmost in the league this season,

and 26 more big plays than they gave up last season. The Packers have been better in the second half of the season, giving up 25 big plays in the past eight games, according to STATS. They’re certain to be tested by Manning, a talented group of wide receivers and a running game that finally seems to be playing up to its potential. “One thing about Eli, he’s having I think his best year,” Packers defensive coordinator Dom Capers said. “The guy’s been very accurate throwing the deep ball.”

A F C D I V I S I O N A L P L AYO F F

Ravens aim to remain perfect at home

The Texans face a significant challenge in the first road playoff game in team history. By DAVID GINSBURG AP Sports Writer

BALTIMORE — The Baltimore Ravens were perfect at home during the regular season and a .500 team on the road, which explains why they were so desperate to host at least one playoff game this month. There are many theories as to why the Ravens are so much better at home. Familiarity with their surroundings? Check. The noise generated by their 71,000 supportive fans? Absolutely. The Sportexe synthetic turf at M&T Bank Stadium? Say what? According to Houston Texans coach Gary Kubiak, whose team faces Baltimore on Sunday in the second round of the AFC playoffs, the Ravens will have the advantage of playing before a boisterous home crowd and on a field that’s seemingly custom-made for Pro Bowl running back Ray Rice. “First off, the noise obviously is tough. But they get even better on that turf,” Kubiak said. “To me, they get even quicker coming off the edges and setting the edges

UP NEXT TEXANS at RAVENS TV: 1 p.m., today. CBS-22 OPENING LINE: Ravens by 71⁄2 LAST MEETING: Ravens beat Texans 29-14, Oct. 19, 2011

and what they do, so that makes them even more difficult. I think Ray, as great a player as he is, he even gets a step better on that turf running the ball.” Kubiak speaks from experience. He watched Rice run for 101 yards in October, helping Baltimore roll to a 29-14 home win over the Texans. But while Rice has proven to be effective at home or on the road, on grass or on artificial turf, the Ravens (12-4) are unquestionably more dominant in Baltimore. And that is one big reason why the Ravens believe this playoff run will be more successful than the three that preceded it. Baltimore is the only NFL team to reach the playoffs in each of the last four seasons. In the previous three, however, the Ravens advanced as a wild-card and did not

AP PHOTO

Houston Texans guard Wade Smith, foreground, leaps toward a ball fumbled by the Texans in the end zone Oct. 16 in Baltimore.

get to play at home. They won a game in each postseason appearance, but on every occasion the strain of repeatedly playing on the road proved too difficult to overcome. Now, coming off a bye and playing in a venue where they went 8-0 during the regular season, the AFC North champions are confident that home-field advantage will be a big factor in their bid to defeat the Texans (11-6) and earn a berth in the conference title game. “I don’t care who you are, I don’t care how good you are, it’s hard to win on the road,” Baltimore mid-

dle linebacker Ray Lewis said. “For us to work as hard as we did, get 12 wins, do the things we were supposed to do, and now get this home playoff game, we have positioned ourselves to be in the right place. Now we have to go finish it.” The Texans know the positives of playing at home after dismissing Cincinnati 31-10 last week at Reliant Stadium. On Sunday, rookie quarterback T.J. Yates must try to communicate with his offense while virtually every fan in the house is screaming ‘Defense!’ or something far more obscene.

— one of five sacks for New England’s 31st-ranked defense. And so ended one of the season’s most exciting story lines — one that began when Denver was 1-4 and made Tebow a starter. The one-time third-stringer promptly won six in a row and seven of eight, with a string of stunning comebacks. That surge ended with a 41-23 home loss to New England, and the Broncos dropped their next two, backing into the AFC West title. But they rebounded nicely in their first playoff game since the 2005 season with the longest overtime touchdown in playoff history, an 80-yard catch and run by Demaryius Thomas against the Pittsburgh Steelers. Like everyone else on the Broncos’ offense, Thomas was invisible against the Patriots. Denver couldn’t cover or tackle All-Pro tight end Rob Gronkowski, who tied a postseason mark with three touchdown catches, all in the opening half. Brady toyed with the Broncos (9-9), throwing more TD passes than Tebow had completions (three) in the first 30 minutes. His sixth TD was to his other tight end, Aaron Hernandez, as Brady tied Steve Young and Daryle Lamonica for the most in a

NINERS Continued from Page 1C

ham with1:37 left and the Saints seemed poised to rally from a17point deficit when Smith and Davis delivered once more. San Francisco triumphed in its first playoff game in nine years and will move on to face the New York Giants or defending champion Green Bay Packers, who play Sunday. A win by the Giants would give the 49ers the home field. Brees came up big down the stretch just as he did throughout a record-setting season, also hitting Darren Sproles for a 44-yard TD with 4:02 remaining — one of Sproles’ 15 catches for 119 yards. The 49ers also showed that defense can still dominate in the days of big passers like Brees. With Donte Whitner bringing the bruising hits and Dashon Goldson, Patrick Willis and their defensive mates pressuring Brees and forcing turnovers from every angle, surprising San Francisco is a win away from returning to the Super Bowl for the first time since capturing the proud franchise’s fifth championship after the 1994 season. Brees, whose team was coming off consecutive 600-yard games, completed 40 of 63 passes for 462 yards and four touchdowns and was sacked three times. He also threw two interceptions, his first in the postseason in five years, and New Orleans (14-4) fell short again in its quest to get back to the Super Bowl after winning it all two years ago. The Saints are still searching for the first postseason road victory in franchise history after falling to 0-5. How far these 49ers have come since that 24-3 trouncing they took back in August at the

postseason game. The two-time league MVP threw for 5,235 yards during the season, second in NFL history to Drew Brees’ 5,476 in 2011. He looked ready to get that much against the Broncos as he moved to third place in career touchdown passes in the playoffs with 36, trailing Joe Montana (45) and Brett Favre (44). Brady was 26 for 34 for 363 yards and Gronkowski made 10 catches for 145 yards as the Patriots gained 509 yards in all. In stark contrast, Tebow was 9 for 26 for 136 yards. The Broncos won the coin toss and elected to defer. Bad idea: They never were in the game after that. Brady hit his first eight passes for 79 yards and two touchdowns. Offensive coordinator Bill O’Brien, who’s leaving to become Penn State’s coach once the Patriots are done, threw in a wrinkle by using Hernandez as a running back. On one of those plays, Hernandez broke free down the left sideline for a 43yard gain, the team’s longest run this season. But with the ball in his hands and a 14-0 lead, Brady momentarily stumbled. His throw over the middle for Julian Edelman sailed directly to safety Quinton Carter, whose weaving return set up Denver at the New England 24. Willis McGahee scored on a 5yard run. Superdome in the teams’ exhibition opener. Now, Harbaugh’s “Who’s got it better than us? Nobody!” group is drawing comparisons to the good ol’ days of Montana, Jerry Rice, Ronnie Lott and Steve Young. And of course, Dwight Clark, who came through with “The Catch” to beat Dallas in the NFC title game on Jan. 10, 1982. All-Pro David Akers, the Niners’ most experienced playoff veteran whose 44 field goals set a single-season record, kicked three more when it mattered most — from 25, 41 and 37 yards. The underdog 49ers made the big plays on both sides of the ball and on special teams. They also had a towel-waving sellout crowd of 69,732 behind them at Candlestick Park on a beautiful sunny winter day in the Bay Area. It was 62 degrees at kickoff. Who Dat? It’s the Saints headed home to the Big Easy emptyhanded. A year ago, New Orleans came out West and suffered a stunning loss to the 7-9 Seattle Seahawks in the NFC wild-card round. The Saints had lost five fumbles all season, then gave three away Saturday against San Francisco’s opportunistic defense that pressured all day. Harbaugh’s theme “don’t overcook it,” rang true as the 49ers relied on what got them here — perhaps the league’s best defense and special teams. Smith, the 2005 No. 1 overall draft pick booed so often his first six seasons, hit Davis on a 49-yard touchdown pass in the first quarter and then Michael Crabtree on a 4-yard TD strike as the 49ers jumped out to a quick 17-0 lead. He finished 24 for 42 for 299 yards with a 103.2 passer rating, showing the world he might be an elite quarterback after all in his breakout season.


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NHL ROUNDUP

MLB

COLLEGE SPORTS

Stipend suspended by board’s decision

Fielder in talks with Rangers

Recruits who signed letters of intent in November will still receive the extra money.

The Associated Press

ARLINGTON, Texas — Texas Rangers president Nolan Ryan publicly acknowledged Saturday that the AL champions have had talks with free agent slugger Prince Fielder. Ryan described the discussions as “very preliminary.” Rangers officials, including Ryan, had an initial session Friday with Fielder and his agent Scott Boras. “We met (with Fielder and Boras) to try to get a true feel for where they are at this point in time in his free agency to try to see if we thought there might be something there that works for the Texas Rangers,” Ryan said. “It was very preliminary, and it’s very early in any type of negotiation process to even say if there’s anything that’s going to come of that or not.” Ryan, who didn’t elaborate further, was responding during a question-and-answer session with fans at the team’s annual winter FanFest. The meeting with Fielder, the 27-year-old first baseman, came at the same time Texas is in the closing stages of their 30-day negotiating window with Japanese pitcher Yu Darvish. It was unclear if the Rangers would be willing or able to sign both players to contracts. The Rangers last month bid a record $51.7 million under the posting system just to win the right to negotiate with the 25year-old Darvish. Their negotiating period ends Wednesday at 5 p.m. The Rangers pay the posting fee only if they sign the 6-foot-5 pitcher. Ryan, the Hall of Fame pitcher, on Saturday reiterated his optimism that the Rangers will get Darvish signed. Ryan has said he was impressed by his first meeting with Darvish, who visited Texas last week before returning home to Japan. Fielder made $15.55 million last season with Milwaukee, including a $50,000 bonus for starting the All-Star game, after signing a record single-year deal for an arbitration-eligible player last January. He hit .299 with 38 homers and 120 RBIs as the Brewers won the NL Central for their first division title since 1982, when they were still in the AL. A first-round pick by the Brewers in 2002, Fielder became the youngest player in big league history to hit 50 homers in a season when he did it in 2007, and he’s appeared in all but one of Milwaukee’s games over the last three years. Castro charged CHICAGO — Cubs chairman Tom Ricketts hopes the sexual assault allegation against AllStar shortstop Starlin Castro gets settled soon. Ricketts had little to say Saturday at the Cubs Convention other than “we all hope it gets resolved as quickly as possible.” The 21-year-old Castro released a statement Friday saying he has cooperated with authorities investigating an allegation that he sexually assaulted a woman last fall. He has not been charged with a crime, and police have declined comment. His attorneys have said the allegations are baseless and a report surfaced that Castro had spoken with authorities this week after he returned to the United States. Kouzmanoff joins Royals KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Third baseman Kevin Kouzmanoff and the Kansas City Royals have agreed to terms on a minor league contract that includes an invitation to spring training. The team announced the deal Saturday. Terms were not disclosed. Kouzmanoff hit .235 with seven homers and 33 RBIs in 73 games for Oakland and Colorado last season. He’s a career .255 hitter over six seasons that included stops in Cleveland and San Diego.

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AP PHOTO

New Jersey Devils’ Kurtis Foster celebrates his goal against the Winnipeg Jets on Saturday. The Devils won 2-1.

Devils ground the Jets The Associated Press

WINNIPEG, Manitoba — Kurtis Foster and Patrik Elias scored in a 2:58 span midway through the third period to lift the New Jersey Devils past the Winnipeg Jets, 2-1 on Saturday. Foster tied it at 9:45, and Elias gave the Devils the lead at 12:43 with his 16th goal of the season. Martin Brodeur made 22 saves to help the Devils improve to 25-17-2. They have won four of their last six games. Andrew Ladd scored his 15th goal of the season for Winnipeg. Predators 4, Flyers 2 NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Pekka Rinne made 36 saves and Nick Spaling scored the game-winner as the Nashville Predators beat the Philadelphia Flyers 4-2 Saturday night. Martin Erat, Sergei Kostitsyn and Mike Fisher also scored for Nashville, which won its fourth straight. Rookie Sean Couturier and Wayne Simmonds had Philadelphia’s goals as the Flyers snapped a two-game win streak. Rangers 3, Maple Leafs 0 TORONTO — New York backup Martin Biron made 20 saves, and the Rangers bounced back from a streakbusting loss to beat the Toronto Maple Leafs 3-0 on Saturday night. After a lackluster 3-0 home loss to Ottawa on Thursday that broke a five-game winning streak, the NHL-leading Rangers (28-10-4) got goals from grinders Mike Rupp, Brian Boyle and Derek Stepan and

earned their 11th victory in 13 games. Hurricanes 4, Bruins 2 RALEIGH, N.C. — Jay Harrison scored the winning goal with 1:30 remaining for the Carolina Hurricanes, who rallied for a 4-2 victory over the Boston Bruins on Saturday night. Justin Faulk, Eric Staal and Patrick Dwyer also scored, and Cam Ward made 33 saves for the Hurricanes, who have won all three meetings between these teams this season. Carolina is 5-1-1 in its last seven home games. Islanders 4, Sabres 2 UNIONDALE, N.Y. — Evgeni Nabokov earned his 300th NHL win after Michael Grabner scored the go-ahead goal with three minutes left, and the New York Islanders beat the Buffalo Sabres 4-2 on Saturday night. Grabner’s 12th goal of the season, on a rebound in front in goalie Jhonas Enroth, gave the Islanders (16-20-6) their fourth win in five home games. The 36-year-old Nabokov made 23 saves to become the 26th NHL goalie with 300 wins. Avalanche 2, Stars 1 DALLAS — Paul Stastny scored the tiebeaking goal on a power play at 10:35 of the third period to help the Colorado Avalanche beat the Dallas Stars 2-1 on Saturday. Stastny deflected teammate Erik Johnson’s shot past goalie Kari Lehtonen 13 seconds after Dallas’ Steve Ott went to the penalty box for hooking. David Jones also scored, and Jean-Sebastien Giguere stop-

ped 21 shots for the Avalanche. Colorado rebounded from a 3-2 overtime loss in Nashville on Thursday night that dropped them to 0-2-1 in their last three. They are 10-3-1 in their last 14. Red Wings 3, Blackhawks 2, OT DETROIT — Todd Bertuzzi scored his second goal Saturday at 4:21 in overtime, lifting the Detroit Red Wings to a 3-2 win over the Chicago Blackhawks. Detroit has won 14 straight at home to match a franchise record set in 1965. Chicago’s Jonathan Toews forced overtime with 51.7 seconds left in the third period, picking up his 23rd goal of the season. Sharks 2, Blue Jackets 1 COLUMBUS, Ohio — Patrick Marleau scored off a rebound with 2:57 left to lead the San Jose Sharks to a 2-1 victory over the Columbus Blue Jackets on Saturday night, extending the Sharks’ point streak to eight games. Ryan Clowe also had a goal for the Sharks, who are 6-0-1 in the new year and 6-0-2 in their last eight. Senators 3, Canadiens 2, SO MONTREAL — Daniel Alfredsson scored on Ottawa’s third shootout attempt and the Senators extended their winning streak to four with a 3-2 win over the Montreal Canadiens on Saturday night. Craig Anderson, who got his first shutout of the season Thursday night at the New York Rangers, was perfect after making 33 saves in regulation and overtime.

membership for another 60-day comment period. Opponents would then have a second chance to force an override vote, possibly delaying the legislation even longer — certainly not the pace By MICHAEL MAROT Emmert expected when he startAP Sports Writer ed pushing for swift changes in INDIANAPOLIS — The August. The delay will cause at least NCAA Division I Board of Directors still believes scholarship lim- one immediate discrepancy between college athletes. its should be expanded. Recruits who signed national It just wants time to work out letters-of-intent in November the details. In a surprise move Saturday, will be able to collect the money the board delayed implementa- they were promised. Those who tion of a $2,000 expense allow- sign in February and April will ance, opting instead to ask the not get that money, said David working group to make a modi- Berst, the NCAA’s vice president for governance in Dified proposal in April. vision I. “What I heard was “The point is The board sent a the board’s resolve clearer message on with the concept (of to make sure another hot-button isthe miscellaneous ex- we respond to sue, multi-year scholpense allowance) and arships. Previously, moving forward with the memberscholarships were reit, but giving us a ship’s connewed on an annual chance to work out basis. Under the curconcerns of the im- cern.We just rent legislation, athplementation,” said want to make would be able to Middle Tennessee sure we get it letes keep the full value of State President Sidtheir scholarship for ney McPhee, who right.” the length of their elichairs the subcomMark Emmert gibility and not have mittee that made recNCAA president the scholarship taken ommendations Sataway based solely on urday. athletic performance. Essentially, the Those decisions are being board heeded membership’s advice to slow things down rather made conference-by-conference, than continuing to charge full too. While 82 schools asked the steam ahead. Supporters insist that the 14-4 board to reconsider the rule, it’s vote wasn’t an outright rejection of unlikely to go away. The board voted unanimously to back the the philosophy. The complaints began pouring original proposal, sending the in almost as soon as conferences legislation to the full memberwere given the option of providing ship for an up-or-down online an additional $2,000 toward the vote in February. It takes a fivefull cost of attendance, money that eighths majority of 355 votes covers expenses beyond tuition, (221.9 votes) to reject it. Just blocks from the NCAA room and board, books and fees. The rule was approved by the headquarters, members rejected board in October. By late Decem- proposed scholarship reductions ber, 160 schools had signed onto in football and women’s basketoverride legislation, enough oppo- ball, a measure the head of the sition to force suspension of the Women’s Basketball Coaches Asrule and reconsideration Saturday. sociation passionately argued Schools had three primary con- against Friday in front of 400 Divicerns: Title IX compliance, how sion I delegates. The board put a moratorium, for the stipend would apply to sports that use partial scholarships and up to 10 years, on adding games in when the rule would go into effect. any sport and agreed to study the NCAA President Mark Emmert way basketball games are counted. supported clarifying the language It also approved a one-year moraon Title IX and partial scholar- torium on new legislation other than what comes out of those in ships. But less than 24 hours after ath- the pipeline or emergency legislaletic directors from Missouri and tion. It approved legislation to exCalifornia argued publicly for a delay to avoid busting budgets, pand the definition of agents to inthe board took their side instead clude parents, closing the soof making the expected move called Cam Newton Loophole, and and adopting the modified pro- a new summer basketball model that will give coaches more time to posal. “The point is to make sure we work with players who are enrespond to the membership’s rolled in summer school. The board tabled a measure concerns,” Emmert said on the final day of the NCAA’s annual con- aimed at reducing non-coaching vention. “We just want to make staffs in football to 12 and men’s basketball to six, asking that subsure we get it right.” If a new proposal passes in committee to make a stronger April, it would go back to the proposal in April, too.

NBA ROUNDUP

Surging 76ers summon up a victory against the Wizards fourth straight loss. Paul George and Darren Collison each scored 17 points and Roy Hibbert added 11 points and nine rebounds for the Pacers (9-3), who won their third straight.

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Lou Williams scored 24 points and Andre Iguodala added a seasonhigh 23 to lift the Philadelphia 76ers to a 103-90 victory over the Washington Wizards on Saturday night. Thaddeus Young tied his season high with 18 points and Jrue Holiday scored 13 for the 76ers, who have won eight of their last nine games. Washington’s JaVale McGee scored a season-high 23 points and tied his career high with 18 rebounds. McGee made his first eight shots from the floor and finished 11 of 13. Nick Young also scored a season-high 27 points. Thunder 104, Knicks 92 OKLAHOMA CITY — Kevin Durant scored 28 points, James Harden added 24 off the bench and the Oklahoma City Thunder raced past the New York Knicks 104-92 on Saturday night for their sixth straight win.

Bobcats 112, Warriors 100 CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Rookie Kemba Walker made the most of his first NBA start, scoring a career-high 23 points to lift the Charlotte Bobcats to a 112-100 victory over the Golden State Warriors on Saturday night. AP PHOTO

Wizards center JaVale McGee (34) battles for the ball against 76ers forward Elton Brand (42) on Saturday in Washington.

Russell Westbrook was on his way to his sixth career tripledouble with 21 points, eight rebounds and eight assists before coach Scott Brooks pulled his All-Stars with Oklahoma City leading by 30 points and nearly 3 minutes left in the

third quarter. Pacers 97, Celtics 83 INDIANAPOLIS — Danny Granger scored 21 points to lead the Indiana Pacers to a 97-83 victory over Boston on Saturday night, the Celtics’

Hawks 93, Timberwolves 91 ATLANTA — Joe Johnson scored 25 points, Ivan Johnson hit the clinching free throws with 4.6 seconds remaining and the Atlanta Hawks rallied from from 18 points down to beat the Minnesota Timberwolves 93-91 on Saturday night. Kevin Love missed a potential game-tying jump shot at the buzzer, but finished with 30 points and 13 rebounds for

Minnesota, which was trying to win consecutive road games for the first time since last Feb. 7-8 at New Orleans and Houston. Bulls 77, Raptors 64 CHICAGO — Derrick Rose had 18 points and 11 assists, leading the Chicago Bulls to a 77-64 victory over the Toronto Raptors on Saturday night. Grizzlies 108, Hornets 99 MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Rudy Gay scored 23 points, Marc Gasol added 20 points and 11 rebounds and the Memphis Grizzlies beat the New Orleans Hornets 108-99 Saturday night. Rockets 107, Trail Blazers 105, OT HOUSTON — Kyle Lowry scored a season-high 33 points, Kevin Martin hit four free throws in the final seconds of overtime and the Houston Rockets beat the Portland Trail Blazers 107-105 on Saturday night.


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LOCAL ROUNDUP

Mazonkey powers Rangers’ rally to topple Preppers The Times Leader staff

SHICKSHINNY – Northwest overcame a 16-4 first-quarter deficit to post a 37-30 victory over MMI Prep in Wyoming Valley Conference Division 3 boys basketball action. The Rangers outscored the Preppers 22-9 in the second half. Northwest’s Devon Mazonkey led all scorers with 16 points. Christian Foley added eight points. Aaron Kollar contributed nine points for the Preppers. MMI PREP (30): Gera 2 2-2 6, Kollar 3 1-1 9, Rogers 3 0-0 7, Van Hoekelen 0 0-0 0, TJ Weaver 1 0-0 2, Charlie Karchner 2 0-0 4, RJ Kupsho 1 0-0 2. Totals: 12 3-3 30. NORTHWEST (37): Mazonkey 7 2-4 16, Foley 3 2-3 8, Nelson 0 0-0 0, Tomko 1 0-0 3, Sirak 1 0-0 2, Maul 0 0-0 0, Meninger 1 0-0 3, Cragle 2 1-2 5.

Totals: 15 5-9 37. MMI Prep...................................... 16 5 7 2 — 30 Northwest ..................................... 4 11 12 10 — 37 3-Point Field Goals— MMI 3 (Kollar 2, Rogers), NW 2 (Meninger, Tomko)

GIRLS BASKETBALL Hazleton Area 46, Williamsport 32

Keanna Schoennagle chipped in 16 points and five rebounds to propel Hazleton Area to a victory. The Cougars’ Alyssa Sitch joined Schoennagle in double figures with 14 points in the road win. Rachel Fatherly paced the Millionaires with 16 points. HAZLETON AREA (46): Bono 1 2-2 5, Schoennagle 6 12-2 16, Wolk 0 0-0 0, Sitch 7 0-0 14, Pfiel 1 1-2 3, Woznick 0 0-0 0, Matz 0 0-2 0, Bachman 3 0-0 6, Ciccozzi 0 0-0 0, Zamonas 1 0-0

2. Totals: 19 5-8 46. WILLIAMSPORT (32): Littles 1 0-0 3, Evans 1 7-8 9, Porter 0 0-0 0, Southard 0 0-0 0, Whaley 0 0-0 0, Thomas 1 0-0 3, Erb 0 0-0 0, Fatherly 5 6-6 17. Totals: 8 13-14 32. Hazleton Area ................................ 11 16 11 8 — 46 Williamsport.................................... 9 6 8 9 — 32 3-Point Field Goals— HAZ 3 (Schoennagle 2, Bono); WIL 3 (Littles, Thomas, Fatherly)

Lakeland 47, Wyoming Seminary 32

Mandy Jadick pitched in 14 points to lead the Chiefs to a win over the Blue Knights. Bridget McMullen paced Wyoming Seminary with 12 points.

WYOMING SEMINARY (32): Neare 2 0-0 6, Gabriel 1 0-2 2, Karg 2 0-0 4, Davis 0 0-0 0, Henry 4 0-1 8, McMullen 3 6-7 12, Stemrich 0 0-0 0. Totals: 12 6-10 32 LAKELAND (47): Kraky 4 0-1 8, Tuffy 1 1-2 3, Walden 3 0-0 6, Steier 4 0-0 9, Dawitt 1 0-0 2, Prudente 2 0-0 5, Jadick 5 4-7 14. Totals: 20 5-10 47

Wyoming Seminary......................... 12 9 2 9 — 32 Lakeland............................................ 18 13 9 7 — 47 3-Point Field Goals— SEM 2 (Neare 2); LAK 2 (Prudente, Steier)

Weatherly 61, MMI Prep 33

Alicia Panzarella netted 22 points for Weatherly in a nonconference win over MMI Prep. Maria Carrato led the Preppers with 16 points.

MMI PREP (33): Stanziola 2 1-1 5, Carrato 7 0-0 16, Shearer 4 0-0 8, Karchner 2 0-2 4, L. Purcell 0 0-0 0, K. Purcell 0 0-0 0. Totals: 15 1-5 33. WEATHERLY (61): J. Dougherty 5 1-2 12, E. Dougherty 2 0-0 4, Adamczyk 1 0-2 2, Panzarella 9 1-2 22, Polchin 4 0-0 8, Boyarski 2 1-2 5, Galca 3 0-1 7, Parker 0 1-2 1, Bizarre 0 0-0 0. Totals: 26 4-11 61 MMI Prep ........................................ 8 8 6 11 — 33 Weatherly........................................ 15 19 3 24 — 61

3-Point Field Goals— MMI 2 (Carrato 2); WEA 6 (J. Dougherty, Panzarella 3, Bizarre).

HIGH SCHOOL WRESTLING

MIXED MARTIAL ARTS

scheduled to fight on the card.

Northeast MMA scheduled PA Cage Fight 10 for Feb. 10 at The Woodlands in Plains Township. Jason McLean and Justin Hickey are scheduled to meet in the main event of the Mixed Martial Arts card. Joe Fye, a Kingston fighter, will make his professional debut in another of the three pro fights on the card. Seth Haines from WilkesBarre, Joseph Rivas from Hanover Township and Kris Gratalo, a Williamsport resident originally from Pittston, are also

PREMIER LEAGUE

MMA set for The Woodlands

Ali celebrates 70th birthday in style By BRUCE SCHREINER Associated Press Writer

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Trey Cowman (top) of Wyoming Valley West works on pinning Pat Nallin of Pittston Area during their 182-pound match Saturday.

Valley West takes control early By JOSH HORTON For The Times Leader

YATESVILLE -- Pittston Area wrestling coach James Woodall was very impressed with Wyoming Valley West at the Wyoming Valley Conference tournament. The Spartans continued to impress when they beat the Patriots 40-30 on Saturday night. “I was really surprised with how a couple of their guys stepped up at the WVC Tournament,” Woodall said. “They had a good lineup tonight and wrestled very well.” Wyoming Valley West wasted no time getting heated up as they took an early 18-0 advantage. Cody Cordes started the match with a 7-3 decision over Pittston Area’s Frank Ardo in the 152-pound bout. “We bumped Cody up to 152,” Wyoming Valley West head coach Steve Barber said. “It was really nice to start the match with a win

STREET Continued from Page 1C

with the Pens killing a penalty at 16:40 of the second period. "My heart started racing pretty good when he pointed to centre ice," said Street, recalling the moment when referee Tim Mayer made the call. The penalty shot came after Street, on a clear breakaway, got a shot away at St. John’s goalie David Aebischer and even had an opportunity for a rebound. But Mayer — much to the disdain of the IceCaps and their faithful — ruled Street had been impeded when slashed by the stick of backchecking St. John’s defenseman

Vinny Simpson scored 32 points, dished out 10 assists and helped the Scranton/WilkesBarre Steamers overcome an off-shooting night at the foul line to defeat the Dayton Air Strikers in Scranton on Friday night in Premier Basketball League play. Darrion Griffin added 16 points and six assists in the win. Rob Robinson had 14 points and 10 rebounds. Commons added 12 points, Nemanja Jokic 11 and Tyler Bullock 10.

BOXING

Legend of the ring was a three-time heavyweight champion during his career.

The Spartans score the first 18 points of the match to down Pittston Area by 10.

Steamers 107, Dayton 97

and Cody really gave us some momentum.” The momentum Cordes created carried into the next three weights. Brian Dwyer earned a forfeit win over Justin Wilk giving the Spartans a 9-0 advantage. Wilk has been battling injuries all season and threw in the towel at the 3:27 mark of the match. Tom Snolowitz gave the Spartans a 12-0 lead when he defeated Sam Falcone in the 170-pound bout. Snolowitz’s victory was far from a blowout as the two went toe-to-toe for six minutes. With the match knotted at zero in the third period, Snolowitz earned a takedown and two backpoints to take a 4-0 advantage with just 30 seconds remaining in the match. Falcone refused to quit, earning two points for a reverse and a third point for an escape with eight seconds remaining. The late surge from Falcone would not be enough as Snolowitz held on for the 4-3 victory. Cowman capped off the Spartans early dominance by pinning Pat Nallin at 182 pounds. Eric Danaher put the Patriots

on the board in the 195-pound bout. Danaher fell to an early 4-0 deficit after Allan Sukowski earned a takedown and two backpoints. While trailing 9-7, Danaher earned a reversal and gained great position on Sukowski earning the pin at the 1:58 mark of the match and cutting the Wyoming Valley West lead to 18-6. John Minich brought the Patriots to within 18-9 by earning a 11-9 decision over Brandon Baird in the 220-pound bout. Minich jumped to an early 9-3 lead, but Baird cut the lead to 9-7 and eventually 10-9. Baird was allowing the escape point in hopes of earning twopoint takedowns. Baird allowed another escape point to give Minich an 11-9 lead late in the third period. Minich hung on to earn the decision. Chris Wesolowski wasted no time adding the Patriots total when he pinned Theodore Evans just 44 seconds into the heavyweight match. Scarantino got the Patriots their six points back when he pinned Alex Tirco with 4.8 seconds remaining in the first peri-

od. The Patriots came all the way back to tie it at 24-24 after Tyler Lutecki earned the 7-5 decision in the 120-pound match over Travis Roper. The score wouldn’t stay tied for long as Kyle Krasavage pinned Dan Gambini just 55 seconds into the 126-pound bout to give the Spartans a 30-24 lead with just three matches remaining. Nathan Cheek pinned Donnie Parhan at the 3:18 mark of the 132-pound bout. Derrick Simms sealed the deal for the Spartans with a 17-5 major decision over Kevin Wesolowski. “I thought everyone wrestled well and we did a good job,” Barber said. “Any time you come into Pittston and win it is a good thing and now we are back in the hunt after losing to Coughlin.”

Jason DeSantis, a former Penguin. "I was so tired from the penalty kill, but thankfully, they (the IceCaps) argued for a while and I was able to catch my breath, then lucky enough to have it go in," said Street, who scored on his forehand after a deke of Aebischer. He’s sure he had aunts, uncles, cousins cheering, but didn’t hear them. "I couldn’t hear them over all the boos," he said smiling. Lerg — who had the game’s opening goal — and Penguins captain Ryan Craig each scored twice as the Penguins (21-12-1-4) registered its AHL-best 15 road win. Defenseman Joey Mormima,

just returned to action after missing five games with an injury, scored the winning goal at 12:19 of the third. Both Lerg’s second goal and Mormina’s came with the Penguins killing off a Cody Chupp minor. If Lerg’s goal disappointed the packed Mile One crowd of 6,287, then Mormina’s sent the fans into a full state of shock. It had seemed that the Atlantic Division-leading IceCaps (22-10-4-1) had the momentum, what with Chupp’s boarding penalty coming just a couple of minutes after Ben Maxwell had tied it for St. John’s. The IceCaps did climb back to within one when Jason Gregoire scored at 14:34 of the final frame,

but goalie Brad Thiessen and a stiff Penguins defense held up the rest of way, with Craig paying insurance premiums with his empty-net tally. Thiessen finished with 23 saves, including a stop of a Carl Klingberg penalty-shot attempt just 10 seconds before Maxwell’s tally. That one was also awarded after the stick of a defenseman — this time the Penguins’ Mormina — caught a player skating in on a breakaway attempt. "It was an interesting game in a sense, with the two penalty shots and the way the goals were scored," said Wilkes-Barre coach John Hynes, who thought Mayer made the right call in both cases. "Coming in, we had a lot of respect for St. John’s. We expected

106 -- (WVW) James Wright (WVW) by forfeit; 113 -- Jamie Scarantino (PA) pinned Alex Tirco, 1:56; 120 -- Tyler Lutecki (PA) dec. Travis Roper, 7-5; 126 -- Kyle Krasavage (WVW) pinned Dan Gambini, :55; 132 -- Nathan Cheek (WVW) pinned Donnie Parhan, 3:18; 138 -- Derrick Simms (WVW) maj. dec. Kevin Wesolowski, 17-5; 145 -- Angelo Lussi (PA) pinned Troy Yashinski, :15; 152 -- Cody Cordes (WVW) dec. Frank Ardo, 7-3; 160 -- Brian Dwyer (WVW) by forfeit over Justin Wilk, 3:27; 170 -Tom Snolowitz (WVW) dec. Sam Falcone, 4-3; 182 -- Trey Cowman (WVW) pinned Pat Nallin, 3:13; 195 -- Eric Danaher (PA) pinned Allen Sukosky 1:58; 220 -- John Minich (PA) dec. Brandon Baird, 11-9; 285 -Kevin Wesolowski (PA) pinned Theodore Evans, :44.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Muhammad Ali soaked in familiar cheers and chants along with a rendition of “Happy Birthday” on Saturday night as friends and admirers celebrated the boxing champ’s coming 70th birthday at a party in his Kentucky hometown. As party-goers mingled in a lobby of the Muhammad Ali Center before the party, Ali walked slowly to a second-floor balcony overlooking them. The crowd immediately began to clap, then broke into chants of “Ali! Ali!” followed by singing as Ali watched for about two minutes. The three-time world heavyweight champion, who is battling Parkinson’s disease, leaned against a rail and raised his right hand to wave to the crowd. Ali walked on his own but was at times assisted by his wife, Lonnie, and his sister-inlaw. After the brief appearance, Ali went to his party. Former heavyweight champion Lennox Lewis said his boyhood idol is “still the greatest.” “I feel so proud and honored that we’re able to show our feelings and show our support for him,” Lewis said. Lewis said Ali’s strength and influence extended far beyond the boxing ring in his humanitarian efforts. “What he’s done outside the ring — just the bravery, the poise, the feeling, the sacrifice,” Lewis said “... He’s truly a great man.” The guest list numbered 350 for the private party, which doubled as a $1,000-per-person fundraiser for the Ali Center, the six-year-old cultural and education complex designed to be a legacy to his social activism. The six-story center also retraces Ali’s career, including his epic bouts against Joe Frazier, George Foreman and Sonny Liston. Guests paid tribute to Ali beforehand. “The reason I loved him is bea competitive game and that’s what we got." Kenndal McArdle and Brett Festerling had the other goals for St. John’s, which gets an almost immediate chance to bounce back; the two teams meet again this afternoon at Mile One. Notes Penguins scratches included Boris Valabik, Nick Petersen, Ryan Schnell, Kevin Veilleux, Alexandre Picard, Peter Merth and Steve McIntyre, who has been assigned to Wilkes-Barre by Pittsburgh but won’t join the AHL team until Monday ... The IceCaps are the farm team of the NHL’s Winnipeg Jets, and represent the league’s first presence in the Newfoundland capital since

cause of his confidence,” University of Kentucky men’s basketball coach John Calipari said. “He would talk and then back it up. He had great courage and who had more fun than him?” The guest list also included Ali’s trainer Angelo Dundee and three American hikers who were imprisoned in Iran. Ali, perhaps the most prominent U.S. Muslim, lobbied for their release. John Mellencamp headlined the entertainment. Ali turns 70 on Tuesday, and the party in his hometown is the first of five planned in the next few months. Not long after Ali’s dramatic appearance on the balcony, the crowd began filing into a banquet hall for the party, which was closed to the public and reporters. The self-proclaimed “Greatest of All Time” remains one of the world’s most recognizable figures, even though he’s been largely absent from the public eye recently as he fights Parkinson’s disease. Lonnie Ali said Friday that her husband has mixed feelings about the landmark birthday. “He’s glad he’s here to turn 70, but he wants to be reassured he doesn’t look 70,” she said. Born Cassius Marcellus Clay Jr. on Jan. 17, 1942, Ali took up boxing at age 12, when his bike was stolen and he wanted to find and whip the culprit. The boy was introduced to Joe Martin, a police officer who coached boxing at a local gym. Ali’s brother, 68-year-old Rahaman Ali, recalled on Saturday night that the champ was cheerful and happy as a youngster. “As a little boy he (said) he would be the world’s greatest fighter and be a great man,” he said. Ali flourished in the ring, becoming a top amateur and Olympic gold medalist. He made his professional debut in Louisville and arranged for a local children’s hospital to receive proceeds from the fight. Lewis said Ali ranks as the greatest of heavyweights, and he was inspired by Ali’s fights. “I used to get mad if I didn’t see the Ali shuffle,” Lewis said. “So I was always watching him, expecting some type of antic.”

the Maple Leafs moved their farm team from St. John’s to Toronto, where they became the Marlies, in 2005. Penguins 6, St. John’s 4 Penguins...................................................... 1 2 3 — 6 St. John’s..................................................... 1 1 2 — 4 1st Period: 1, St. John’s, McArdle 4 (Clark, Murray), 13:12. 2, Penguins, Lerg 13 (Thompson, McDonald), 14:55 (PP). Penalties-Street Wbs (holding), 5:51; Kulda Stj (high-sticking), 13:25; Wild Wbs (holding), 18:08. 2nd Period: 3, Penguins, Craig 4 (Sill), 7:55. 4, St. John’s, Festerling 3 (King), 9:39. 5, Penguins, Street 13 16:40 (SH PS). Penalties-served by Wbs (bench minor - too many men), 2:56; Kulda Stj (tripping), 12:32; Rust Wbs (hooking), 15:58. 3rd Period: 6, St. John’s, Maxwell 2 (Gregoire, Machacek), 8:33. 7, Penguins, Lerg 14 (Street), 11:58 (SH). 8, Penguins, Mormina 4 (Lerg), 12:19 (SH). 9, St. John’s, Gregoire 3 (Festerling, Maxwell), 14:34. 10, Penguins, Craig 5 19:08 (EN). PenaltiesChupp Wbs (boarding), 10:52; DeFazio Wbs (fighting), 10:52; Machacek Stj (fighting), 10:52. Shots on Goal: Penguins 10-5-9-24. St. John’s 7-10-10-27; Power Play Opportunities: Penguins 1 / 2; St. John’s 0 / 5. Goalies: Penguins, Thiessen 14-10-2 (27 shots-23 saves). St. John’s, Aebischer 11-5-1 (23 shots-18 saves). A: 6,287; Referees: Tim Mayer (19).Linesmen-Joe Maynard (24), Todd Horwood (34).


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EASTERN (66): Donatoni 1-8 0-0 2, Soaries 2-8 3-4 7, Whipple 2-8 3-4 7, Nelson 10-15 2-3 24, Kaiser 4-7 5-7 13, Bertolino 0-0 0-0 0, Connor 0-0 0-0 0, Singer 0-0 0-0 0, Brown 0-0 0-0 0, Parenti 1-6 0-0 2, Stowers 0-4 1-2 1, Werth 4-5 0-0 8, Malloy 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 25-63 14-20 66. KING'S (74): Stackhouse 5-10 5-6 15, Hammonds 2-8 8-9 12, O’Shea 5-6 2-4 12, Winder 8-16 3-4 20, Reisig 0-2 0-0 0, Fiorino 3-7 0-0 8, Caffrey 0-2 0-0 0, Womack 0-2 0-0 0, Foster 2-3 2-2 7, Horan 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 25-57 20-25 34. Halftime— King’s, 29-19 3-point field goals— EU 2-18 (Nelson 2-4, Soaries 0-1, Stowers 0-1, Werth 0-1, Parenti 0-4, Donatoni 0-7); KC 4-20 (Fiorino 2-6, Foster 1-2, Winder 1-4, O’Shea 0-1, Reisig 0-1, Caffrey 0-1, Hammonds 0-5)

Lady Monarchs take over first King’s resumed league play this week with confidence. Now the Lady Monarchs are looking to stake their claim as the Freedom Conference’s top team. The Lady Monarchs capped off an impressive week with a 70-55 win over Eastern on Saturday at Scandlon Gymnasium, holding the Eagles a full 20 points below their season average. By knocking off both DeSales and Eastern, King’s (11-3, 4-0) is now alone atop the conference standings as the last unbeaten squad. “I don’t know if it was making a statement, but it was a big week,” coach Brian Donoghue said. “Two really quality opponents … it was good for us. It really was.” The Eagles (11-3, 3-1) came to Wilkes-Barre having won five

Olivia Seely and Alec Norton shine at Punt, Pass and Kick national finals in Baltimore. By PAUL SOKOLOSKI psokoloski@timesleader.com

FRED ADAMS/PHOTOS FOR THE TIMES LEADER

King’s Tim O’Shea has the ball knocked away by a Eastern defender Saturday during their Freedom Conference matchup.

straight and nine of their last 10 while leading the Freedom Conference in scoring (75.8 ppg). But the Lady Monarchs’ defensive pressure created 12 steals and 23 Eastern turnovers just three days after forcing 32 turnovers in the win at DeSales, the four-time defending league champion. “We’ve been pretty consistent defensively for a couple months now – probably since about Thanksgiving,” Donoghue said. “We’ve limited our opposition’s touches, which is probably the biggest thing. We’ve picked our spots defensively and we’ve done a real nice job.” Celia Rader topped King’s with 18 points on 6-of-10 shooting off the bench. Katlin Michaels scored 15, including 13 in the second half to help the Lady Monarchs pull away. Michaels and Samantha Simcox (10 points, 11 rebounds) had three steals apiece. Eagles freshman Meghan Nowak, the league scoring leader (21.2 ppg), finished with 18 points for Eastern. Division III All-American Shante Jones added 13 points. EASTERN (55): Lincoln 2-5 0-0 6, Roland 2-7 2-2 6, Jones 6-13 1-3 13, Wileczek 0-0 0-0 0, Nowak 8-14 2-2 18, DiDomenico 0-1 0-0 0, Boreman 2-10 0-0 5, Dougherty 2-5 2-4 7. Totals 22-55 7-11 55. KING'S (70): Simcox 4-10 2-2 10, Muscatell 2-6 2-2 6, Michaels 6-11 3-4 15, Atchison 2-7 2-2 6, Manning 4-12 1-3 10, Rader 6-10 3-3 18, Davies 0-0 1-2 1, Carlin 0-3 4-4 4. Totals 24-59 18-22 70. Halftime— King’s, 29-25 3-point field goals— EU 4-17 (Lincoln 2-4, Dougherty 1-3, Boreman 1-8, Jones 0-1, Nowak 0-1); KC 4-16 (Rader 3-5, Manning 1-2, Carlin 0-1, Muscatell 0-2, Simcox 0-3, Atchison 0-3)

COLLEGE ROUNDUP Wilkes 68, Manhattanville 62 Kendall Hinze scored a gamehigh 24 points as Wilkes remained perfect in Freedom Conference play. Hinze was perfect from the floor, hitting all seven of his shot attempts and went 10-for-12 from the foul line on way to his gamehigh 24 points. Jourdon Wilson followed with 15 points and Paul Huch joined in double figures with 13 points and four rebounds. Wilkes (11-3, 4-0 Freedom) continued to shoot the ball well from the field, finishing 46 percent. FDU-Florham 70, Misericordia 61

King’s Celia Rader goes to the basket as Eastern’s Lori Wileczek defends.

Ethan Eichhorst led Misericordia with 15 points and seven rebounds. Joe Busacca added 14 points. Steve Artzerounian had nine points and six rebounds, and Jeff Slanovec added nine points. Women’s Basketball Manhattanville 80, Wilkes 53 Wilkes’ Megan Kazmerski poured in a career-high 27 points and grabbed eight rebounds. Kazmerski was the lone Lady Colonel to reach double figures, shooting 9-for-16 from the field and 4-for-7 from behind the arc. Elena Stambone and Chelsea Brown added six points each. Misericordia 65, FDU-Florham 49 Tyann McDaniel led four players in double figures with 17 points to lead Misericordia. Christine Marks had 15 points and 10 rebounds for the Cougars. Hannah Seely and Jesse Robinson added 14 and 13 points, respectively. Women’s Swimming Misericordia 143, Albright 119 Brittany Luzik set a school record in the 100 butterfly to lead Misericordia to its first dual meet win over Albright. Luzik added a win in the 200

fly and teamed with Bree Grzech, Kiana Ramirez and Chelsea Mixon to close the meet with a pool record victory in the free relay. Grzech won the 100 back and 200 back. King’s 66, Arcadia 54 The Monarchs’ Patricia Manning won the 200 breaststroke with a time of 2:47.16 and also captured the 200 individual medley at 2:26.39. Caroline Fitch won the 1,000freestyle with a time of 12:04.83. King’s men lost to Messiah by a 75-46 score. Men’s Swimming Albright 156, Misericordia 106 Adam Grzech was a triple-winner for the Cougars (5-2), and Brad Thomas added two wins. Doug Ranson won the 100 breast and finished second in the 200 breast. Wrestling Lycoming 22, King’s 15 The Monarchs’ Mike Laporta posted a pin at 141, and Chris Mazzocchi tallied a 6-3 decision at 149. Peter Dwyer closed out the meet with a 3-0 decision for the Monarchs. King’s wrestled without allAmerican Mike Reilly at 184pounds and was forced to forfeit at 197.

WORLD CUP SKIING

Healthy Vonn finishes 2nd in downhill; cheers on Broncos By ANDREW DAMPF AP Sports Writer

CORTINA D’AMPEZZO, Italy — A healthy Lindsey Vonn was feeling like her old self, skiing well and getting ready for football. She finished second to Italy’s Daniela Merighetti on Saturday in a World Cup downhill that was so windy she knew she couldn’t have done any better. Vonn then got prepared for an early wake-up call before Sunday’s super-G, setting her alarm at 4 a.m. to cheer on Tim Tebow and the Denver Broncos in the NFL playoffs. Last weekend in Bad Kleinkircheim, Austria, Vonn struggled with a stomach illness and uncharacteristically missed the podium in two speed races. This performance marked a complete turnaround. “I felt great again, my energy is back to normal and I’m able to do

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MONARCHS “It was just so flat,” King’s coach J.P. Andrejko said. “Offensively, there was just no sense of urgency or anything. It was just a weird vibe for the first 15 minutes. “And then, all of the sudden, the last three minutes … it was nothing spectacular, it was just boom-boom-boom-boom and we made some shots.” It carried over into the second half as the Monarchs (8-7, 3-1 Freedom) shot 55.6 percent in the final 20 minutes, never allowing the Eagles to pull closer than four points. When Eastern (9-4, 2-2) cut the King’s lead to 55-51 and then 6359 in the final five minutes, it was senior guard Kyle Stackhouse who came through with a pair of clutch shots. The latter came at the 1:24 mark and drew a foul for a three-point play. Stackhouse finished with a double-double (15 points, 12 rebounds) while adding three assists and three steals. “I thought he played a great floor game,” Andrejko said. “The first half, the rebounding and all that was great – he just wasn’t scoring. But in the second half all of the sudden he started getting the ball, getting to the basket. I thought he was really excellent that second half.” Andrejko also had praise for freshman Keyton Winder, who kept the Monarchs afloat during the listless start to the game and finished with a team-high 20 points. The recent Meyers grad has started all six games after the semester break and is on a run as one of the Monarchs’ top scorers. “He is playing with so much more confidence than he did early in the year,” Andrejko said. “All of the young guys are.” That includes another freshman starter in Tim O’Shea, who added 12 points along with sophomore Kyle Hammonds.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

what I want on my skis and that’s definitely not the feeling I had on my skis last week,” Vonn said. Merighetti, meanwhile, was skiing with a broken left thumb but completed the Olympia delle Tofane course in 1 minute, 33.17 seconds for her long-awaited first victory, which came before her home fans in one of the season’s biggest downhills. Vonn finished 0.21 seconds behind and defending overall champion Maria Hoefl-Riesch of Germany was third, 0.40 back. Nicknamed “Dada,” the 30year-old Merighetti made her World Cup debut 11 years ago and had gone 164 races without a win. Her only other top-three finish was a second-place result in a giant slalom in Are, Sweden, nine years ago. She has also had three fourth-place finishes. “I’m dedicating this win to myself. I never changed my equipment, I’ve always just kept look-

ing forward and plowing ahead,” said Merighetti, who has used Salomon skis her entire career. “This is my life.” On a clear and sunny day and the snow in perfect condition, shifting winds picked up just as the top-ranked skiers started between Nos. 16 and 22. Merighetti feared bad luck when she drew the No.13 bib during the draw on Friday the 13th, but her run was virtually flawless. At the finish, as fans celebrated the home victory, Vonn shrugged as if to say she couldn’t have done any better. “It was a solid run, I didn’t really make any mistakes,” Vonn said. “Today you needed to ski well but also have a bit of luck with the wind. It was constantly changing and right out of the start I got some really bad wind and it was swirling and I couldn’t really see the first gate.”

Vonn has a history of strong skiing in Cortina, where she has five victories and 11 previous topthree results. “But when you have conditions like this in any event you could be last — easily,” Vonn said. “So you have to be happy when you’re on the podium and I definitely am.” Vonn increased her lead in the overall and downhill standings. With wins worth 100 points each, she’s 244 points ahead of Austrian slalom specialist Marlies Schild in the overall standings and 127 points in front of Austria’s Elisabeth Goergl in the downhill rankings. “Last year I was second in the overall by three points, so every point counts,” Vonn said. It was a strong day for the U.S. team with Stacey Cook sixth, Julia Mancuso ninth, Laurenne Ross 18th and Leanne Smith 30th.

It’s hard for Olivia Seely to say she saved her best for last. But the Berwick freshman will always remember her last run in the NFL Punt, Pass and Kick competition as the best. In her final year of eligibility, Seely finished third in the girls 14- and 15-year-old division Saturday and Nanticoke’s Alec Norton matched that finish in the boys 12-13 category on the 50th anniversary of the NFL Punt, Pass and Kick national finals. “I accomplished a lot,” Seely, 15, said. “This is my last year. “I finally made it.” The proof of that came in the form of an everlasting momento – a helmet designating a third-place finish in the Punt, Pass and Kick national championships that both she and Norton received. Each finalist scored on the best of two tries allotted in each area of the competition during the finals, held at the Baltimore Ravens practice facility. The scores were determined by calculating distance and accuracy of each competitor’s kicks, punts and throws. It was the first trip to the national finals for both Norton and Seely. “It felt good,” Seely, 15, said. “It would have been better to finish first, but it was good.” Not quite as good as she’d hoped, though. Seely, who won the local competition of Punt, Pass and Kick for four straight years

and captured her second straight Philadelphia Eagles team championship of the competition Seely last month, said she wasn’t particularly pleased with her performance in any portion of the event. “Not today,” said Seely, the daughter of Keith and Lisa Seely of Berwick. “I wasn’t really disappointed. I just think I could have done better.” Norton also felt something was lacking from his game – the strongest part of it. “The kicking part,” Norton said. “Usually, that’s my best thing. I didn’t do as good as I usually do.” But the 13-year-old son of Todd and Sherri Norton of Nanticoke picked up enough points in the other categories to finish third among four competitors in his age group. “I think I did better (in punting and passing) than I did in Philly,” Norton said. “He did very well,” said Todd Norton, who spent the past couple weeks helping his son prepare for nationals. “His punting and his passing definitely picked up. He put a good kick out there, but he could have done a lot better than that one kick. The competition was even with him and the other three boys in his age group. He did the best he could have done.” While Seely didn’t feel she was at her best, she did feel a sense of triumph. “Before we competed, they said 500,000 kids competed (across the country) this year,” Seely said. “It was nice to be among the top four.”

HIGH SCHOOL WRESTLING

Sem tops at Eastern Classic The Times Leader staff

LIBERTY, N.Y. – The Wyoming Seminary wrestling team topped a field of 101 schools at the Eastern States Classic, finishing first in the team standings and claiming five individual championships Saturday. After leading the event after the first day by placing all 13 wrestlers through to the semifinals, the Blue Knights earned 12 medals on the second and final day to win the overall title. Evan Botwin (120 pounds), Dom Malone (126), Eric Morris (170), A.J. Vizcarrando (220) and Michael Johnson (285) were at the forefront, each winning their respective weight classes. The other medalists for Seminary were Danny Boychuck (fourth at 99 pounds), Ty White (fifth, 138), Conor Wasson (fifth, 182), Jack Walsh (eighth, 145), Kohl Fulk (eighth, 152), Ryan McMullan (eighth, 160) and Matt Doggett (eighth, 195). A total of 580 wrestlers from 101 schools in four states competed in the event, which is in its 10th year. Lake-Lehman sweeps Elk Lake tournament Zeb McMillan garnered three

PUNTING Continued from Page 1C

NovaCare Complex – the practice field of the Philadelphia Eagles. “I’m proud of him,” his dad said. That victory earned Norton a seat at Lincoln Financial Field the next day. That’s when he not only cheered from up close as his Eagles played the New England Patriots, but had an NFL crowd clapping for him during an in-game Punt, Pass and Kick

pins and a major decision to lead Lake-Lehman to four dual victories over at the Elk Lake tournament. Lake-Lehman secured wins over GAR, Scranton Prep, Sayre and Blue Ridge. Jake Winters and Austin Harry each picked up four wins for the Black Knights. GAR’s Zachary Faust notched a win at the 285 weight, pinning Dustin Jones in 4:29. Scranton Prep’s Patrick Creedon recorded a pin in 23 seconds. Lake-Lehman 62, GAR 12

106: John Tomasura (LL) won by forfeit; 113: Jimmy Stuart (LL) dec. Anthony Luton, 7-5; 120: Steven Bardo (LL) won by forfeit; 126: Zeb McMillian (LL) pinned Devin Reese, 1:08; 132: Austin Harry (LL) pinned Joe O’Day, 1:17; 145: Jake Winters (LL) major dec. Rashaun Mathis, 15-0; 152: Robert Wright (LL) pinned Korey Welkey, 2:27; 160: Joshua Winters (LL) won by forfeit; 170: Nicholas Shelley (LL) pinned Jamaar Taylor, 2:43; 182: Derek Dragon (LL) pinned Vincent Phan, 1:17; 195: Curtis Barbacci (LL) won by forfeit; 220: GAR won by forfeit; 285: Zachary Faust (GAR) pinned Dustin Jones, 4:29

Lake-Lehman 54, Scranton Prep 21

106: John Tomasura (LL) won by forfeit; 113: Jimmy Stuart (LL) won by forfeit; 120: Patrick Creedon (SP) pinned Steven Bardo, :23; 126: Zeb McMillian (LL) pinned William Smith, 1:13; 132: Austin Harry (LL) pinned Christopher Schoen, 1:02; 138: Jake Winters (LL) pinned Nathan GelbDyller, 1:43; 145: Griffith Walters (SP) won by forfeit; 152: Robert Wright (LL) pinned Matt Posly, 1:01; 160: Kenny Sebastianelli (SP) dec. Joshua Winters, 8-5; 170: Nicholas Shelley (LL) pinned Michael Wiercinski, 1:05; 182: Ryan Rudelavage (SP) major dec. Derek Dragon, 14-6; 195: Brady Butler (LL) dec. Chad Ryan, 10-5; 220: Curtis Barbacci (LL) pinned Joe Amendola, 3:17; 285: Jamie Aldirch (LL) dec. Shane Farrell, 3-0

exhibition. It’s when Alec Norton realized that dedication and desire really do pay off. “This year, I was at the top of my age group,” he said. “I thought I would have a pretty good shot to win the local one. “I never imagined I’d go to the national finals.” He’s proof that anything’s possible if you don’t stop believing dreams do come true. Paul Sokoloski is a Times Leader sports columnist. You may reach him at 970-7109 or email him at psokoloski@timesleader.com.


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NASCAR

Fast fix found for tandem racing Testing found cars roaring around the track at Daytona posting near-record speeds.

By JENNA FRYER AP Auto Racing Writer

Terdiman, Niccum eighth in Germany

The Berwick native and his teammate remain in the top-10 at season’s midpoint. The Associated Press

OBERHOF, Germany — Toni Eggert and Sascha Benecken of Germany won their first World Cup race by taking the men’s doubles luge on their home track Saturday. Germans Tobias Wendl and Tobias Arlt were 0.231 seconds behind. Austria’s two-time Olympic champions Andreas and Wolfgang Linger were third, 0.655 seconds behind the winners. The top Americans were Matthew Mortensen and Preston Griffall in sixth place, and Christian Niccum and Berwick’s Jayson Terdiman in eighth. “The track in Oberhof is a bit rough, but that’s its character,” Eggert said. “Even though everyone knows about it, we managed to make up for our lack in experience by having home advantage. It was a top-class event but we were optimistic about our prospects.”

The Lingers still lead the season standings after five of nine races. The Austrians have 410 points, with Wendl and Arlt close at 395. Eggert and Benecken are third with 355. Terdiman and Niccum remain the top U.S. team in the season standings with 173 points, good for 10th in the world. Olympic bronze medalist Natalie Geisenberger led a 1-2-3 German sweep for the first time this season in the women’s World Cup. Geisenberger set a track record in the second run of 42.050 seconds to win in a combined 1:24.443, leaving world champion Tatjana Huefner 0.247 seconds behind. Anke Wischnewski was third, 0.664 seconds back. For the United States, Erin Hamlin was sixth and Kate Hansen was eighth. “Oberhof and I don’t have the best history,” Hamlin said in a release. “This week, the sled felt good here right off the bat. I was glad to have that feeling back.” Huefner still leads overall World Cup standings, 60 points ahead of Geisenberger.

AP PHOTO

Dale Earnhardt Jr. steers his car with his crew to his garage during NASCAR testing at Daytona International Speedway on Friday in Daytona Beach, Fla.

to swap positions every few laps, and that maneuver added an element of danger because separating slowed the two cars dramatically. NASCAR Chairman Brian France vowed to move away from the two-car tandems in November, and a series of aerodynamic rules changes have done just that. NASCAR also banned driver-todriver communications over their scanners. It’s all part of a continuous process, that could go all the way up to race day. NASCAR has changed specifications during each of the first two days of testing, and officials summoned the drivers to a Friday meeting during the lunch break to strongly urge them to pack race during the afternoon session. Based on the data gleaned from the two drafting sessions, NASCAR made yet another series of technical changes that will be applied Saturday in the final day of testing. Last year, NASCAR made changes during actual Speedweeks in an effort to break up the tandems. More changes were made before the other three re-

strictor-plate races on the schedule, too. Earlier Friday, NASCAR President Mike Helton indicated speeds will likely be much different when teams return for the Daytona 500. “(Speed) is one of those things that we have to kind of monitor,” Helton said. “It is a test, so we may be a little bit more lenient at a test than we would be on race week-

end. But we’ll see how everything settles out and what kind of rules package we come back with ... 204 is OK for a test. “But we’ll have to take back everything we learn and then make a decision after that.” But Sprint Cup Series director John Darby said after the drafting sessions that the final product will likely be right around the 200 mph mark.

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AP PHOTO

Christian Niccum and Berwick’s Jayson Terdiman speed down the track during the first run of the men’s doubles Saturday.

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — NASCAR is making gains toward breaking up the two-car tandem racing that has taken over at Daytona and Talladega, but the fix sent speeds soaring over 200 mph Friday in a test session. Kurt Busch posted the fastest lap of the day at 206.058 mph, but was being pushed around Daytona International Speedway in a twocar tandem by Regan Smith. Kyle Busch was clocked at 205.813 while pack racing. NASCAR has traditionally shied away from the 200 mph mark, and four-time series champion Jeff Gordon said he approached series officials about the speeds because he was certain the cars would be slowed. He said he was surprised when NASCAR indicated it was comfortable over 200 mph. “It’s embedded in our minds we can’t go out there over 200 mph in race conditions,” he said. “Somehow it’s become accepted and I think that’s a good thing. It’s very comfortable. It’s extremely comfortable.” But it’s unclear what the racing will actually look like when the season opens with the Daytona 500 — NASCAR’s version of the Super Bowl — on Feb. 26. Fans are clear that they want pack racing at Daytona and Talladega, NASCAR’s two biggest and fastest tracks. Drivers figured out about three years ago that hooking up in two-car tandems was the fastest way around the track, and the style evolved so quickly, NASCAR couldn’t stop it. The end result was a two-car hookup in which the trailing driver was pushing the lead car around the track. Only one spotter worked for both cars, as the pushing driver was unable to see anything ahead. Overheating issues forced the cars

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RUNNING

Numbers play role in cardiac issues

There are simply more runners, not more runners who have heart attacks. By MALCOLM RITTER AP Science Writer

NEW YORK — It’s dramatic news when a marathon runner collapses with no pulse. Now a big study finds such calamities are rare and usually due to a pre-existing heart problem. The study also found such incidents are increasing as more runners try to go the distance. "You hear about this more and more," said Dr. Aaron Baggish, senior author of the study Baggish, who runs a program for athletes with heart issues at Massachusetts General Hospital, and co-authors present their analysis in Thursday’s issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The study covers 10.9 million runners who participated in marathons or half-marathons in the United States from 2000 to 2010. By scouring media reports and checking with medical staff of races, the researchers identified 59 cases of cardiac arrest, where a runner became unconscious with no pulse during the race or within an hour of finishing. Cardiac arrest is when the heart stops because of a heart attack, a rhythm problem or other disorder. Forty-two of the runners died. The overall figures translate to 1 cardiac arrest per 184,000 participants and 1 death per 259,000 participants, the researchers said.

150 Special Notices

533

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CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

ER CA S AM E RI CA ’

N EW EW

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PAGE 11C●

A LTER V E LTER N ATI ATI

YOU CA N’T M ISS W ITH P RICES LIK E TH IS! S P EC IA L FL EET P U R C H A S E

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CMYK PAGE 12C

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

THE TIMES LEADER

➛ WWW.TIMESLEADER.COM/SPORTS

www.timesleader.com

OUTDOORS Outdoors activities are being altered or postponed as the usual conditions of the season – cold, snow and ice -- are lacking.

TOM VENESKY OUTDOORS

License issue one that should not disappear

I

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

A thin sheet of ice covered Frances Slocum Lake last week. A mild start to winter has kept ice anglers off of area lakes and has impacted other outdoor activities.

Where’s our winter? By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

There’s something missing from the winter landscape that could impact ice anglers, coyote hunters and snowshoe hikers, to name a few. Snow and ice. A mild start to the winter – one that has carried over into the middle of January -- is forcing hunters, anglers and hikers to change the way they do things, or not even do them at all. The snowshoe cross-county ski loaner program at Nescopeck State Park was scheduled to run on certain weekends in January and February, but the required 6 inches of snow has yet to blanket the ground. The dilemma has forced Department of Conservation and Natural Resources staff to change its plans. For example, last weekend’s introductory snowshoeing course was moved indoors where the 14 participants were still able to learn the history behind snowshoes and how to properly wear them. Carly Hitzfeld, environmental education specialist at the park, said the lack of snow, if it persists, won’t cancel any of the upcoming programs that are scheduled, but it may alter them. Snowshoe hikes, she said, will simply be changed to regular hikes if enough snow doesn’t fall in the next few weeks. And a search for animal tracks in the snow scheduled for Feb. 5 at Hickory Run State Park will go on, with or without the white stuff, Hitzfeld said. “If there’s no snow, we’ll look for other signs, such as old nests, buck rubs and tracks in the mud,” she said. “We still want to offer programs for our visitors who

HUNTS WILL GO ON Though a lack of snow will make it tough to see and track coyotes, two area hunts will go on as planned. Huntington Mills United Sportsmen will hold their 10th annual Coyote Hunt on Friday-Sunday, Jan. 20-22. Weigh-in will be at the clubhouse on 251 Waterton Road in Huntington Mills. The hunt begins Friday, Jan. 20 at 12:01 a.m. Weigh-in times are Friday and Saturday (Jan. 20 and 21) 6-10 p.m., and Sunday, Jan. 22 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. A $1,000 grand prize will be awarded for heaviest coyote and second place will be $500. There will also be a smallest coyote pool, gun raffle and 50/50 drawing. A breakfast buffet will be served Jan. 22 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The entry fee is $25 and must be in by Jan. 18. Entries can be mailed to United Sportsmen Camp 271, P.O. Box 85, Huntington Mills, Pa., 18622, or emailed to huntingtonmillsunitedsportsmen@yahoo.com. For more information, call 256-3933 or 683-5472. The Northeast Regional Coyote Hunt sponsored by District 9 of the PA Trappers Association, will be held Feb. 3-5. A $2,000 grand prize will be awarded for the heaviest coyote, a $250 prize is offered for the heaviest coyote turned in each day and $100 will be awarded for all coyotes turned in during the hunt. Coyotes taken in Bradford, Susquehanna, Wayne, Wyoming, Lackawanna, Pike, Luzerne and Sullivan counties during the three-day hunt are eligible. Coyotes must be taken by legal hunting methods only, and not with traps or cable restraints. Weigh-in will be held at the Triton Hose Co. in Tunkhannock from noon to 8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sunday. A weigh-in dinner will be held for all entrants Sunday from 1-3 p.m. A $25 entry fee, which includes the dinner, is due by Jan. 21. After Jan. 21 the fee is $30 and entries will not be accepted after Feb. 1 at 10 p.m. For more information, call 942-6895 or 679-2318, or email price@nep.net. Include “coyote hunt information” in the subject.

want to get outside, so the majority of them we can adapt to the existing weather conditions.” Hunters interested in signing up for one of the coyote hunts held each winter in the area may have a tougher time bagging a canine if snow doesn’t blanket the ground. The Huntington Mills United Sportsmen scheduled their annual coyote hunt for the weekend of Jan. 20. Club president Gene Dodge said the lack of snow definitely puts hunters competing for a $1,000 top prize at a greater disadvantage against the keen coyote. “I’ve talked to guys hunting

with dogs in Sweet Valley and they said it’s very tough to see the coyotes that the dogs chase because there’s no snow,” Dodge said. “It’s also tough because you can’t find a track to put the dogs on and get them started. “When there’s no snow on the ground, fewer coyotes are killed.” A look back at past hunts the club has held during the last 10 years proves Dodge’s point. In 2006, heavy rain and wind resulted in only two coyotes being harvested during the hunt. The next year, with a coating of snow on the ground, 12 coyotes were taken.

Even last year’s hunt – also with a light snowfall -- produced 13 coyotes. “The ideal condition for the hunt is a snowfall at night. That means hunters can find fresh tracks in the morning,” Dodge said. Snow isn’t the only missing element of winter that is having an impact on outdoor activities. Ice is the other. An ice fishing derby scheduled for today at Lake Jean was canceled earlier this week – even after it was postponed from Jan. 8 -- due to a lack of safe ice. The Nanticoke Conservation Club has an ice fishing derby scheduled for Feb. 4 on the lake at Frances Slocum State Park, and club members are anxious for some cold temperatures soon. Club president Gary Gronkowski said the club has had to cancel just one tournament in the last 17 years. He’s hoping there won’t be a second. “We’re still hoping to have the derby, but we need some nights with temperatures in the teens,” Gronkowski said. “It is a little late this year, considering last season I was ice fishing by mid-December.” Club member Ted Katra spent last weekend searching for safe ice on the ponds and lakes to the north in Wyoming County. The big lakes, Katra said, were a no-go while some of the small farm ponds in shady areas did have 4 inches of ice to venture out on. “I’d be very cautious on the ice right now and drill test holes every few feet on my way out,” Katra said. “Four inches of ice, I’m comfortable. When it’s 3 inches, you better take your nerve pills. “Right now I’d stay away from the big lakes. It’s just been unseasonably warm for much of the winter.”

DCNR PROGRAMS Carly Hitzfeld said most of the winter programs scheduled for Nescopeck and Hickory Run state parks will go on with or without snow. Here’s a look at what the DCNR staff has scheduled (for more information call 403-2006): Thursday, Jan. 19 – Snowshoe Stroll along the Lehigh; 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Jan. 28 – Owl Prowl; 6-8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 4 – Winterfest 2012 at Hickory Run State Park; 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 5 – Animal Tracking on Snowshoes at Hickory Run State Park; 1-3 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 7 – Full Moon Snowshoe Hike; 7-8:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 18 – Bird Feeding Basics; 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 18-19 – Great Backyard Bird Count; 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

I C E F I S H I N G S L AT E While today’s ice fishing derby at Lake Jean was canceled, there are two more still scheduled. A derby will be held on Jan. 22 at Long Pond in Wayne County. Email Christopher Jones at bigbuck326@aol.com for more information. Also, the Nanticoke Conservation Club will hold its annual ice fishing derby on Feb. 4 at Frances Slocum State Park. The derby runs from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Weigh-in is from 12:30-1 p.m. and registration begins at 7 a.m. in the Environmental Education Building. Adults (16 and older) are $10, and children ages 9 and younger are free. Cash prizes for heaviest fish are in the following categories: bass, perch, trout, crappie, bluegill and pickerel. An ice fishing clinic will also be offered for all ages. For more information, contact the club at nanticokeconservationclub@msn.com or visit nanticokeconservationclub.com.

OUTDOORS NOTES The second annual All-Outdoors Hunting and Fishing Expo will be held Jan. 19-22 at the Kingston Armory on Market Street. Times are: Thursday – 3-9 p.m.; Friday – noon to 7 p.m.; Saturday – 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Sunday – 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tickets are $7 for adults and $3 for children. The expo will feature vendors, outfitters, calls and equipment,

games, prizes and seminars on hunting, fishing, trapping and the outdoors. Featured speaker will be national TV host Babe Winkelman. For more information, call 709-8378. The Falls Lions Club will host its annual venison/wild game dinner Sunday, Jan. 29, from 2-4 p.m. at Ardee’s Foodrinkery in Falls. For more information, call 388-2337.

The Northeastern Pennsylvania Chapter of the Ruffed Grouse Society will host its fourth annual winter dinner Saturday, Jan. 21, at the Farmers Inn, 1597 Hillside Road in Shavertown. A social hour will begin at 6 p.m. and dinner will be served at 7 p.m. The buffet style dinner is open to the public at a cost of $22 for adults

and $18 for children ages 5-16. Youngsters under age 5 are free. While this is not a typical RGS fundraiser, there will be a few raffle items available to help make this a fun event. All guests are asked to bring a gender-free wrapped gift. For more information or tickets, call Brian Clark at 983-9918.

don’t like to belabor an issue, but in this case I can’t help it. The more I think about the move to abolish the requirement to display hunting, furtaking and fishing licenses, the clearer it becomes that the idea doesn’t make a lot of sense. I’m not sure where the sudden demand to do away with the license display requirement came from, but I do know it’s an issue that highlights just how different the Pennsylvania Game Commission and Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission truly are. Especially when it comes to law enforcement. Beginning with the 2012 hunting season, hunting licenses will no longer need to be displayed. Hunters can carry their license in their wallet or they can still display it on their back. When a Wildlife Conservation Officer checks a hunter next season, a glance at the back of his or her jacket will no longer suffice. The WCO will have to approach each hunter and ask them to take out their wallet to show their hunting license and another form of identification. It’s a bit inconvenient for both parties, but it’s nothing compared to what anglers and Waterways Conservation Officers could experience if the PFBC also does away with the display requirement. The PFBC board has discussed the idea and it could come up for a vote this year. If the Fish and Boat Commission does away with the display requirement, it could create a burden on both anglers and officers. Check and release No longer can WCOs scan the crowded banks of a stream on the first day of trout season to make sure everyone is wearing a license. Without having to display a license, WCOs will have to approach each angler and ask them to pull out their wallet. That means putting down rod and reel, stepping away from that valuable spot along the stream and digging out a wallet. Unlike a Game Commission WCO who deals with groups of hunters, a PFBC officer faces throngs of anglers all at once, depending on the season. That’s why the display requirement was actually a law enforcement tool -- it allowed WCOs to check large groups of anglers with relative ease, simply by scanning the area to see if anyone wasn’t wearing a license. But do away with the display requirement, and it could create a needless hassle for all parties involved. I really don’t believe that anglers on the first day of trout season or those lining the banks of the Lake Erie tributaries fishing for steelhead will appreciate being interrupted to pull out their wallet and prove they have a valid license. And what about the WCOs? Will they now have to approach every angler they see, no matter how many are lined up along a stream or lake, and spend valuable time making each one pull out their wallet and show a valid license? How about those officers in plain clothes who blend in with anglers while they watch for violations? How can they ask someone to pull out their license without blowing their cover in the process? Those who support doing away with the display requirement contend it’s a burden to pin a license on the back of a coat or vest. It could be easily lost, they argue. But what’s the bigger burden? Pinning a license on a coat or having to stop what you’re doing, putting down your rifle or fishing pole and digging out your wallet? Even if the PFBC decides to do away with the display requirement, I’ll still pin my fishing license to my vest or hat. Same thing with my hunting license. After all, it’s less burdensome to pin it on my coat than dig it out of my wallet.


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

TENNIS

Lendl is lured back by Murray project By CAROLINE CHEESE AP Sports Writer

MELBOURNE, Australia — Ivan Lendl rejected up to 10 offers in the 18 months before he was finally lured back to the tennis scene by the prospect of turning Andy Murray into a Grand Slam winner. The eight-time major champion agreed in December to start coaching Murray, the 24-year-old Scot who has lost in three Grand Slam finals. Since retiring in1994, Lendl has spent much of his time on the golf course, and didn’t play another tennis match in public until a 2010 exhibition. He told the British media it was “unlikely” he would have returned to tennis for any player other than Murray. “I’ve had between seven and 10 inquiries over the last 18 months, some more serious than others, but none was considered by me,” the 51-year-old Lendl said. “I see a guy who wants to win, a guy who wants to work hard. “Obviously, I see the parallels between his career and my career

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and I want his career to end up like mine.” Murray hasn’t won a set in his three Grand Slam finals, including the last two title matches at the Australian Open, which begins Monday. In his first major tournament since appointing Lendl, the fourth-seeded Murray will open against American teenager Ryan Harrison. Lendl lost in four Grand Slam finals before winning the 1984 French Open at the age of 24, the same age as Murray is now. Lendl won seven more Grand Slam titles in a career spanning 16 years, although he never won Wimbledon despite twice reaching the final. “We have been through similar things, things I went through, he likes to work hard I like to work hard,” Lendl said. “I also admire his guts for hiring me because he had to know it would create a lot of interest. “It would have been very easy

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just to hire someone, just another coach, and not get a high-profile person.” Beyond the dedication to hard work, Lendl, often portrayed as a dour character during his playing career, said he and Murray had something else in common. “Obviously, I really enjoy Andy’s sense of humor. Hopefully he enjoys mine,” said Lendl, who joined Murray for the first time last weekend at the Brisbane International. “We’ve had good laughs. I think it’s important that it’s not only work but fun as well.” But Lendl said he was not underestimating the size of Murray’s task in winning a Grand Slam title during a particularly strong era for men’s tennis. “Between Roger Federer with 16, Rafa Nadal with10 and Djokovic with four, it’s very difficult to win majors,” Lendl said. “It makes it a much more difficult task for Andy.”

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NATIONAL FORECAST Sunny and cold

WEDNESDAY

22° 12°

MONDAY

33° 27°

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

Light snow

Partly sunny

32° 18°

35° 20°

REGIONAL FORECAST

Heating Degree Days*

Yesterday Month to date Year to date Last year to date Normal year to date

29/21 33/18 69 in 1932 -10 in 1914

Poughkeepsie 23/9

40 460 2396 2927 2910

New York City 28/21

*Index of fuel consumption, how far the day’s mean temperature was below 65 degrees.

Sun and Moon

Sunrise 7:27a 7:27a Moonrise Today none Tomorrow 12:31a Today Tomorrow

The Finger Lakes

Highs: 11-21. Lows: 6-21. Partly to mostly sunny skies.

Wilkes-Barre 22/15

Yesterday Month to date Normal month to date Year to date Normal year to date

51/32

Brandywine Valley

Highs: 29-32. Lows: 17-22. Mostly sunny skies.

Delmarva/Ocean City

Highs: 34-38. Lows: 19-29. Mostly sunny skies today.

Sunset 4:59p 5:00p Moonset 10:38a 11:13a

River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday. Susquehanna Stage Wilkes-Barre 8.97 Towanda 5.78 Lehigh Bethlehem 3.07 Delaware Port Jervis 4.30 Last

New

Chg. Fld. Stg 3.97 22.0 0.48 21.0 0.75

16.0

0.08

18.0

First

Jan. 16 Jan. 23 Jan. 30

Full

Forecasts, graphs and data ©2012

Weather Central, LP For more weather information go to:

www.timesleader.com National Weather Service

607-729-1597

70/59

78/69 10/-2

City

Yesterday

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Buffalo Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Las Vegas Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis

6/-7/.00 39/26/.00 37/25/.00 34/28/.00 22/11/.01 47/21/.00 19/15/.00 22/19/.00 66/32/.00 59/19/.00 25/22/.08 77/61/.00 63/31/.00 25/16/.00 59/34/.00 71/50/.00 65/54/.00 21/15/.01 20/5/.03

City

Yesterday

Amsterdam Baghdad Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Dublin Frankfurt Hong Kong Jerusalem London

45/32/.00 64/39/.00 41/14/.00 39/30/.00 84/57/.00 45/27/.00 43/32/.00 66/61/.00 54/43/.04 43/28/.00

Today Tomorrow 11/-3/s 51/32/s 33/26/s 23/15/s 21/21/pc 50/28/s 32/29/pc 28/27/pc 65/55/pc 58/29/s 28/24/pc 78/69/r 65/61/sh 34/29/pc 63/43/pc 62/49/c 70/59/pc 33/31/pc 36/21/pc

ALMANAC Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Int’l Airport trace 0.66” 1.03” 0.66” 1.03”

65/55

66/45

65/61

Atlantic City 34/21

Yesterday Average Record High Record Low

59/40

62/49

The Jersey Shore

Precipitation

34/25

58/29

11/-3

Philadelphia 32/22

Temperatures

53/40

The Poconos

Reading 29/16

Harrisburg 31/18

28/21

32/29

40° 25°

Highs: 32-35. Lows: 17-24. Sunny skies and breezy at times.

Pottsville 24/14

36/21 28/24

Albany 20/7

Towanda 21/11

State College 26/17

33/4

Mostly cloudy, a shower

TODAY’S SUMMARY

Binghamton 17/11

Scranton 21/14

39/33

Highs: 21-26. Lows: 11-15. Mostly sunny.

Syracuse 16/12

Today’s high/ Tonight’s low

45° 31°

32° 14°

THURSDAY

Partly cloudy, a flurry

Rain and snow

Partly to mostly cloudy

NATIONAL FORECAST: A low pressure system working its way across the Northwest will be responsible for scattered snow showers from the northern Pacific Coast to the Intermountain West today. Snow showers will be a possibility for portions of the Great Lakes as well. Meanwhile, high pressure building across the Atlantic Coast will promote sunny skies for much of the eastern United States.

Feb. 7

Find the car you want from home.

15/-3/s 54/45/pc 41/36/sh 34/30/pc 41/37/sh 53/40/pc 40/32/rs 40/39/sh 72/48/c 39/11/c 38/36/sh 80/69/s 75/63/c 42/41/sh 57/39/pc 60/45/s 74/63/pc 36/25/c 24/7/c

City

Yesterday

Myrtle Beach Nashville New Orleans Norfolk Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Ore. St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, DC

48/30/.00 51/20/.00 65/32/.00 44/31/.00 58/29/.00 45/24/.00 57/40/.00 72/43/.00 23/18/.01 45/33/.13 35/13/.00 42/16/.00 63/30/.00 66/46/.00 56/40/.00 40/36/.16 57/43/.00 70/38/.00 39/27/.00

WORLD CITIES

Today Tomorrow 42/29/pc 61/39/s 39/19/pc 36/30/pc 90/66/s 43/36/c 36/29/pc 66/58/sh 54/40/s 43/34/pc

39/28/pc 63/40/s 40/20/c 37/31/rs 93/70/s 44/35/pc 37/30/rs 62/59/sh 51/39/s 44/33/s

City

Yesterday

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Paris Rio de Janeiro Riyadh Rome San Juan Tokyo Warsaw

70/46/.00 14/0/.00 30/27/.00 43/30/.00 95/81/.00 63/46/.00 57/43/.00 83/73/.03 45/39/.00 32/28/.13

Today Tomorrow 53/32/s 47/35/s 62/53/s 40/24/s 64/48/pc 54/27/s 64/48/s 67/46/c 25/21/pc 38/30/sn 48/39/s 49/31/pc 67/60/c 63/49/c 53/38/pc 39/33/rs 67/46/s 69/45/pc 34/25/s

56/47/s 54/50/sh 72/58/c 48/38/s 70/32/pc 33/14/pc 72/54/pc 66/44/pc 41/37/sh 37/32/rs 54/42/sh 28/16/pc 76/57/pc 60/45/s 51/38/pc 40/35/rs 74/53/s 64/40/pc 42/37/sh

Today Tomorrow 70/44/pc 8/1/s 24/20/sn 39/29/pc 93/74/pc 64/46/s 56/37/pc 83/73/sh 47/35/pc 31/25/pc

Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snow flurries, i-ice.

75/45/pc 25/22/c 25/19/sn 40/28/s 92/75/c 66/43/s 55/36/s 82/72/sh 45/33/c 30/26/c

Our cold wintry January weather is back for this week! The temperatures are going to get very cold around the region, so make sure you bundle up! Plenty of sunshine is in the forecast for today, but it will be cold. Partly cloudy skies will turn mostly cloudy on Monday. The chance of an icy mix is possible overnight. On Tuesday, we will see the warmest temperature of the week, but we will have rain showers with cloudy skies. Morning flurries will stick around on Wednesday, then clear out. A clipper may pass through on Thursday and drop one to three inches of snow around the region. Partly sunny skies will return on Friday. - Michelle Rotella

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

Oh Canada! For investements look north

By MARK JEWELL AP Personal Finance Writer

BOSTON — Building a truly diversified portfolio means going global. Many advisers suggest investors supplement their U.S. investments with stocks and bonds from fast-growing nations like China and Brazil. Growth prospects are grim in Europe, but there may be bargains to be found in the continent’s depressed markets. But it can be easy to overlook opportunities much closer to home. Think Canada. Many foreign stock mutual funds focus on developed markets in other areas of the world,

but overlook our northern neighbor. Instead foreign diversified funds may include investments from heavily indebted nations. That’s too bad, because the Canadian stock market has long been one of the world’s top performers. The lone U.S. mutual fund specializing in Canadian stocks, Fidelity Canada (FICDX), has earned its investors an average annualized return of 12.2 percent over the last 10 years. By comparison, funds tracking the Standard & Poor’s 500 index averaged about 3 percent a year. Fidelity Canada’s fiveyear record ranks first among more

than 100 of its foreign large-growth fund peers, according to Morningstar. Bond investors may also be missing out on an opportunity to the north. Although, 10-year government bonds in Canada and 10-year Treasury notes in the U.S. both offer yields of around 1.9 percent, the risks to achieve that return are arguably much smaller with Canada’s bonds. Canadian leaders have proved more fiscally adept than their counterparts in Washington, where partisan dysfunction has left the U.S. government With grimm growth prospects in See CANADA, Page 2D

Europe, opportunities in Canada may be a good bet.

Private equity’s past shadows Romney’s future

BUSINESS LOCAL

Higher prices for booze? Blame vendors

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By WALTER HAMILTON Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Three days after a private equity firm bought the San Diego UnionTribune in mid-2009, it did what private equity firms frequently do: It cut a lot of jobs. The cost savings from the 192 layoffs announced that day, and 150 or so others over the next year, helped Platinum Equity more than triRomney ple its money when it sold the newspaper in November. It wasn’t nearly so rosy for people thrown out of work in a punishing economy. That’s life in the private equity world, where layoffs are part of the playbook that elite investment firms use to squeeze cash out of struggling companies. And it is exactly what Republican presidential primary candidates are zeroing in on against front-runner Mitt Romney. The former Massachusetts governor has been portrayed by rivals such as Newt Gingrich as a “vulture capitalist” while he was leader of private equity shop Bain Capital. Romney says he was a job creator. The truth lurks somewhere between those extremes. “There is a lot of misinformation being spread, purely for political purposes and on both sides of the aisle,” Steve Judge, interim chief executive of the Private Equity Growth Capital Council, said in a statement. The private equity industry has historically made money through a formula of buying troubled companies, restructuring them through layoffs and other cost-saving moves, then reselling them. The most famous example is the $25 billion buyout of RJR Nabisco in 1988. The saga of that ill-fated deal was chronicled in a bestselling book, “Barbarians at the Gate,” and an HBO movie depicting pinstriped titans battling for the company with little regard for

RON BARTIZEK

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See ROMNEY, Page 2D

By TIM BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

T.LOUIS,Mo.—Walletsmaysoonbegoingthewayoftypewriters,payphonesand videocassette recorders. Oh,they’llstillbeagreatplacetocarryphotos,receiptsandoddslipsofpaper,but technology forecasters say we’ll soon be reaching for cellphones when it’s time to pay or be paid. It’s a dream that Kevin Stock is ready to live. For nearly a year, Stock, of St. Louis, has been carrying around a small white plastic device he can attach to his phone at a moment’s notice, creating his very own credit card terminal. All he needs is someone willing to play along. “I’ve looked for opportunities, for sure,” Stock said. “But I haven’t been too successful.” So far, the only taker has been his roommate. Once a month they tally up their bills and Stock collects what he is owed through a swipe of his roommate’s credit card. And while Stock has been able to travel no further down the mobile payment path, industry

See SQUARE, Page 2D

Jim McKelvey, Co-Founder-Instructor for Third Degree Glass Factory presents the Square, a new electronic payment system developed by Twitter founder and St. Louis native Jack Dorsey.

WB Penguins star, McDonald’s team up for a good cause WHEN I WAS a kid growing up in Philadelphia, a highlight was when my dad would take me to a local video rental store or sporting goods outlet to stand in line for hours waiting to shake hands with a sports star, snap a picture and have him sign a ball, jersey or trading card. I remember meeting players I watched on television and guys my dad watched in person in the 1960s who played at Franklin Field or Connie Mack Stadium. Why do I mention these fond recollections of my youth? Well, because it’s rare anymore to see professional athletes willing to meet with the community for free, to sign an autograph,

ANDREW M. SEDER

player who will appear during those hours. I hope he is able to make an impression on the kids that he meets on Tuesday like so many athletes STEALS & DEALS made on me as a kid. chat about their career or pose for a OK, back to the Steals & Deals so picture. Sure, if you want to pay big many of you are used to. bucks for a private meet and greet you Both Price Chopper and Shur Save can do it. Or buy season tickets for the supermarkets have coupon doublers in player’s team. this week’s circulars. So my heart was filled with joy Price Chopper has two of them and when I saw the bright orange signs at does not require a minimum purchase. the McDonald’s at 150 E. NorthampShur Save has five but requires a $25 ton St., Wilkes-Barre announcing that purchase to use them. a member of the Wilkes-Barre/ScranI say try to use all seven. Never let ton Penguins would be stopping by to doublers go to waste. meet with fans. Here’s one suggestion: Take the Hurray for McDonald’s. Hurray for coupon for $1 off two boxes of Jolly the Holy Redeemer hockey club that Time microwave popcorn to Shur will receive 20 percent of the sales Save where the items are buy-one, between 5 and 8 p.m. on Tuesday. And get-one-free. You’ll get two boxes for hurray for Alex Grant, the Penguins next to nothing.

Price Chopper also has Glade Décor Scents holders or refills on sale for $2.50. There’s a $1 off coupon that, doubled, will allow you to nab one of them for 50 cents. No doubler needed for this diaper deal. Price Chopper has Huggies and Goodnights on sale for $8 and there’s a $1.50 off Huggies coupon and a $2 off Goodnites coupon in today’s Times Leader. And I’ll finish off this column with a greeting card deal at CVS. Buy three American Greetings cards and get $3 in Extra Bucks back on your receipt. Those 99 cent cards sound mighty attractive now, don’t they? Andrew M. Seder, a Times Leader staff writer, may be reached at 570-829-7269. Follow him on Twitter @TLAndrewSeder

e should be thankful every supplier of liquor and wine to state stores didn’t ask for more money. That’s one conclusion to draw from the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board’s explanation for price hikes scheduled to take place on 313 items over the next two months. In announcing the increases, the three-person board said it was acquiescing to requests from vendors, who are being paid the same as they were 18 months ago. “Over the course of the last few years, we have all seen the costs of goods and services increase exponentially across all industries and the beverage alcohol industry is not immune to those increases,” said a board spokeswoman. Really? I was under the impression that until very recently slack demand was forcing individual businesses to ONLINE tighten their belts, rein in costs and To see the interesting hold back on price 55-page PLCB increases. To its “Retail Year in credit the PLCB did Review,” go to: a good job of that in http:// its last fiscal year, tlgets.me/36g spending just 2.1 percent more on operating expenses while bringing in 4 percent higher revenue. But the real issue is not whether makers of bourbon and Bordeaux need to be paid more, it’s whether the PLCB needs to pass on the increases, along with its usual markup that runs as high as 125 percent on a 1 liter bottle of Master of Mixes Bloody Mary mix. The extra dollar that will cost isn’t likely to break anyone’s budget, but when you get to the high-priced stuff, there’s a meaningful difference. A bottle of Robert Mondavi cabernet sauvignon, for example, will cost $49.99 on Feb. 1, up by a ten-spot. The increase maintains the state’s 61 percent markup, so each bottle sold will bring an extra $3.78 gross profit. Those who can afford $359.99 for a bottle of Hennessey Cognac Paradis may not balk at the new $599.99 price, and maybe they’ll feel warm inside at the thought of contributing $57.67 more to support state government. And don’t forget that the sales tax will be higher as well; in this case by $14.40. So, here’s how it really works; the more the state pays wholesale, as long as it adds a typical 60 percent markup, the LCB gets that much more income and sales tax coffers swell by the added 6 percent on the increase. The agency says raising these prices will add $3.9 million to its annual profit and $2 million in tax revenue. Perhaps the thinking is to make so much money that Gov. Tom Corbett and others who want to privatize the system think twice in a year when other revenues are coming in below plan. As logical as that may seem to the PLCB, the hikes — and lame explanation — are likely to anger consumers, leading legislators to line up in favor of axing this government monopoly. This might work; Corbett seems determined to continue a free ride for gas drillers, and every penny the state can take from consumers’ wallets helps. But that’s another column. For this one, the point is that the present noncompetitive marketplace means we can’t look for better prices or selection at another store, unless we take our business out of state. I’m pretty sure it’s illegal to suggest that, so consider the previous statement as fantasy, just like expecting the PLCB to put consumers’ interests ahead of its own. Ron Bartizek, Times Leader business editor, may be reached at rbartizek@timesleader.com or 570-970-7157.


CMYK PAGE 2D

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

CORPORATE LADDER TOBYHANNA FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Sean Jelen has been named chief executive officer. Jelen is a veteran of the financial services industry serving most recently as chief operating officer at Palisades Federal Credit Union in Pearl River, NY. He completed his undergraduate studies at St. Francis College as well as his graduate studies at Boston University.

TMG Health Caressa Dempsey, Dunmore, has been promoted to claims manager. She is responsible for the management, oversight and monitoring of claims operations for Medicare Advantage Plans. She joined TMG Health in 2005 and is based in the company’s Scranton Data Center. Holly Liss, Scranton, was promoted to enrollment operations manager, responsible for management, oversight and monitoring of enrollment operations for prescription drug plans. Joining TMG Health in 2005 she is based in the company’s National Operations Center, Dunmore. Pat Czyzyk, Scranton, was promoted to manager of workforce management and financial reporting, overseeing financial reporting initiatives and the processes that ensure workforce productivity and efficiency. She joined TMG Health earlier this year as a senior financial analyst and is based in the company’s National Operations Center, Dunmore.

FIDELITY BANK Candace A. Behensky has been named retail branch manager for the bank’s Keystone Industrial Park office. Behensky’s banking and finance experience includes TD Bank and M & T Bank, both in New York, as well as positions with Liberty Mutual and Barclays. Behensky is licensed in Behensky property, casualty, life insurance and securities. She is a member of the Dunmore Rotary, the NEPA Chapter of SCORE and a graduate of SUNY Orange Community College, New York. The Times Leader publishes announcements of business promotions, hirings and other noteworthy events on Sundays. Photographs may be included as space allows. Submit an announcement by e-mail to tlbusiness@timesleader.com, by mail to 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711; or by fax to 829-5537. Photos in jpeg format may be attached to e-mails.

HONORS & AWARDS Thomas M. Maheady, P.E., the Industrial and Energy Market Sector Leader for Borton-Lawson, Wilkes Barre, has been featured in the December 201 1 issue of PE Magazine with an article entitled “PEPP Merit Award Winners Share Important Lessons.” Mr. Maheady Maheady was awarded the Professional Engineers in Private Practice Merit Award for his significant contributions to PEPP and the National Society of Professional Engineers. Lori Gordon was named Top Housing Consultant for 201 1 at Fine Line Homes. She led all housing consultants in sales volume. The Hazleton office of Fine Line Homes earned the Top Performing Office of the Year award for Gordon 201 1. The award is based on sales goals, number of homes started and sales volume.

CANADA Continued from Page 1D

owing roughly as much as the nation’s economy produces in a year. In contrast, Canada owes less than half the value of its economic output. Canada’s fiscal strength and political stability are key reasons why one top U.S. multisector bond fund holds about 9 percent of its portfolio in Canadian government bonds, while avoiding U.S. Treasurys. “Canada is very much in a sweet spot now,” says Elaine Stokes, a co-manager of Loo-

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OFFICE COACH

Employee’s life choices are not co-worker’s problem ROMNEY

By MARIE G. MCINTYRE McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Q: The owner of our company has hired several of my friends, based on my recommendation. He trusts my judgment because I have been with him ever since he started the business 10 years ago. The last person I recommended was “Angela,” a woman whom I have known for 15 years. Unfortunately, after Angela was hired, I learned that her husband recently left her because she drinks every night until she passes out. I have not shared this information with the owner, since it doesn’t seem job-related. However, I am find-

ing it increasingly difficult to watch Angela misrepresent herself at the office. Angela talks constantly about what a hard life she has, so management gives her special consideration even though she doesn’t do a very good job. In reality, her friends have given up trying to help her because she habitually lies to everyone. Given her tendency to lie, I’m afraid Angela might start spreading false rumors about me at work, which could cause the owner to stop trusting me. I am also tired of her stealing my parking space. What should I do about this woman? A: The parking issue is easy, so let’s start with that one. If you

have an officially designated space, you should simply inform Angela that she is not allowed to park there. However, if this spot is “yours” only by habit or history, then anyone arriving before you has an equal right to occupy it. Your anxiety about damaging rumors seems premature, given that nothing has actually happened. Based on your description, Angela is an incompetent, lying alcoholic, while you are a respected employee with a 10year track record. Her ability to harm you would therefore seem to be quite limited. In my experience, chronic liars are soon discovered and seldom be-

lieved. Finally, regarding the “special consideration” that Angela receives from management, the key question is whether these privileges interfere with your own productivity. If so, ask your immediate supervisor for help in correcting the situation. But if not, then you might as well accept the fact that Angela’s life choices and work habits are really not your problem.

Marie G. McIntyre is a workplace coach and the author of “Secrets to Winning at Office Politics.” Send in questions and get free coaching tips at http://www.yourofficecoach.com.

Gadget Watch: ATM turns your old phone into cash By PETER SVENSSON AP Technology Writer

LAS VEGAS — The International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas was all about the latest smartphones, tablet computers and other devices. But whatabouttheoldgadgets?Don’t they get any love? Actually, one machine at the show is designed to help recycle gadgets, giving old phones a fitting end or a better home. Drop your phone into the EcoATM, and the machine will pay you what it believes the handset is worth. The cupboard-sized machine has a large touch screen

and a big metal “mouth” where you can place your old phone or MP3 player. It takes pictures of the device to figure out what kind of shape it’s in. Then, you choose one of the machine’s many cables to connect your device. The machine will figure out if the device’s internals are working. When its analysis is complete, it gives you a quote on the spot, based on what a network of hundreds of electronics-recycling companies are willing to pay for it. If you accept, it spits out cash. In a demonstration by EcoATM founder Bill Bowles, it said a Verizon iPhone 4 was worth $221.

An older phone might not be worth reselling, but the machine will take it anyway, and give you a dollar. The company will melt down the phone in an environmentally friendly fashion to extract the precious metals from it. WHY IT’S HOT: It’s tough to recycleoldelectronics.Collection bins are few and far between, though some electronics stores accept items for recycling. You can sell newer phones on eBay, but it’s a bit of a hassle. THE UPSHOT: A fast way to dealwitholdelectronicsthatkeeps your conscience clean and might give you a bit of extra money.

SQUARE Continued from Page 1D

experts say it’s only a matter of time — most say it’s several years out — before we witness a radical shift in the way we exchange cash. “I don’t think it’s going to go away overnight or in the next year. But mobile payments is where it’s headed,” said Trevor Dryer, head of product management, mobile payments and point-of-sale for financial software maker Intuit. Already, the financial sector is crawling with companies hoping to carve out a piece of a market that sees billions upon billions of dollars changing hands every year in the form of cash. Much of that exchanging is done by choice, with some people simply preferring to deal in cash or checks. But there’s also the fact that small businesses often find it too expensive to maintain a merchant account — required to accept credit card payments. Getting around that was the inspiration behind the Square device carried by Stock. Square, whose founders include Twitter inventor Jack Dorsey, offers credit card processing services to pretty much anyone with the right smartphone — most iPhones and Android-based phones. The service is easy to use. An application links your phone and bank account, while the small card reader (the company gives them away) plugs into the earplug jack. From there, you just need someone willing to hand you a credit card and sign the screen with their finger. A day or so later, the money shows up in your bank account, minus a 2.75 percent fee. The 2-year-old firm has shipped more than 800,000 card readers and is now processing

BUSINESS AGENDA HOW TO BUILD YOUR BUSINESS BY SPEAKING: Thursday, noon-2 p.m., Hilton Scranton Hotel & Conference Center. Luncheon and workshop of the National Association of Women Business Owners. Marketing strategist Denise Hedgesis will speak on attracting clients through public speaking. $20 if pre-registered, $35 at the door. To reserve or for more information, call Kim Wentworth, 430-8062 or Laurie Cadden,

mis Sayles Bond (LSBRX), which Morningstar currently gives a gold-medal rating. Stokes views the U.S. Treasury market as “scarier” than Canada’s government debt market. She cites Treasury market volatility, in part because of steps the Federal Reserve has taken to prop up the economy, and uncertainty over the Fed’s next moves. Then there was last summer’s downgrade by Standard & Poor’s, which cut the U.S. government’s credit rating to AA+ from the top rating, AAA. Canada remains AAA. Stokes sees plenty of other reasons to like Canada:

MCT PHOTO

Jim McKelvey, co-founder-instructor for Third Degree Glass Factory presents the Square, a new electronic payment system developed by Twitter founder and St. Louis native Jack Dorsey. McKelvey and Dorsey have partnered on the development of the Square.

$2 billion in payments annually. But while that sounds like a lot of money, keep in mind that the nation rings up $2 trillion annually in credit card charges. Square is proving popular with a wide range of users, including musicians, massage therapists, restaurants and craft fair vendors. “Right now, there are 26 million small businesses (in the nation) that only accept cash. It’s a huge market,” said spokeswoman Lindsay Wiese. Similar to Square is Intuit’s GoPayment system, which also uses a card reader to send money either to a bank account or a prepaid credit card. Intuit’s mobile division is processing some $5 billion a year in credit card charges, said Dryer, the company’s mobile payments chief.

357-8399. BUILDING INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION DINNER: Saturday, The Waterfront, Plains Township. Warren Peter, Pennsylvania Builders Association 2012 president, will present the installation of officers and directors of the Building Industry Association of Northeastern Pennsylvania. Shawn Prohaska of Invisible Fence of NEPA/No-Burn of NEPA is the 2012 BIA president. Call 2873331 for information or reservations. RED CARPET BREAKFAST: Jan.

• The economic recovery from the recession has been more rapid in Canada than in the U.S. Canada’s unemployment rate is 7.5 percent, a percentage point below the U.S. • Canada’s outlook is improving because the U.S. recovery is gaining momentum, with unemployment at its lowest level in nearly three years. The nations’ fortunes are strongly linked because Canada is the largest trade partner of the U.S. It sends more than 70 percent of its exports across its southern border. Says Stokes: “As the U.S. goes, so goes Canada.” • She likes the long-term outlook for energy and materi-

THE DOWNSIDE: The EcoATM’s quote probably won’t match what you can get for your item on eBay. On the other hand, you avoid eBay’s seller fees. You havetophysicallygototheATM.It’s a big machine, about twice the size of a regular drugstore ATM. It has a lot of complicated moving parts, and could be prone to breakage. AVAILABILITY: There are about 50 of them deployed right now, mostly in grocery stores and malls in California. The San Diego-based company behind the machine says it plans to have about 500 out at the end of this year, spreading eastward.

And while it started as a way to offer contractors, plumbers and electricians an easy way to take credit cards, the company loves to point out that Girl Scouts use the devices while hawking their cookies door to door. “They are probably using their parents’ phones,” Dryer said. “But it’s a testament to how simple this product is that 9-year-old girls are using it.” Other systems have looked for ways to remove the physical credit card from the equation. Among them are those using what’s known as near field communication, or NFC. Basically, it lets two devices exchange money when they come into contact with each other. The technology is at the heart of MasterCard’s PayPass system, in which users tap their credit cards against a PayPass terminal to complete a purchase. In recent years, MasterCard has teamed with Google and several phone and financial services firms to create Google Wallet. Phones equipped with the technology can be used much like credit cards — they make payments simply by tapping them against an NFC terminal. Several phone developers have included NFC in their devices, with BlackBerry and Nokia making plans to do so. Google’s Android-based devices have it, though the payment service suffered a blow recently when Verizon Wireless blocked its use in the new Galaxy Nexus phone. Verizon is part of a consortium called ISIS that is developing its own payment system. While MasterCard sees potential in the technology — and the speed with which these trends can catch on — the company isn’t ready to sing the death of plastic. There are, after all, some advantages in having that physical card, said James Anderson, group head of mobile for MasterCard. Among them, he said: “The batteries don’t go flat.”

25, 7:45-9 a.m., Mea’s Restaurant, downtown Hazleton. Speaker will be Hazleton mayor Joseph Yannuzzi. Hazleton Chamber members $15, nonmembers $20. Register online at www.hazletonchamber.org, call 455-1509 or email jferry@hazletonchamber.org. OSHA EXCAVATING & TRENCHING TRAINING: Jan. 25, 9 a.m.-3:30p.m., Greater Hazleton Chamber office, 20 W. Broad St., Hazleton. Learn important safety guidelines enforced by OSHA, in order to maintain a safer work environment $79 per person, $39

als producers, which make up about half the market value of Canada’s major stock index, the S&P/TSX Composite. Canada has a wealth of oil, natural gas, minerals and agricultural staples, and boasts companies such as oil and gas producer Suncor Energy and gold miner Barrick Gold. Global demand for those commodities has been rising because of strong economic growth in emerging markets like China. It’s a trend that’s expected to continue, making Canada an attractive investing option. However, slower short-term growth prospects in emerging markets hurt commodities demand last

each additional person from the same company, includes lunch and materials. Reservations required, online at www.hazletonchamber.org, call 455-1509 or email jferry@hazletonchamber.org. WOMEN’S NETWORKING LUNCHEON: Jan. 31, noon-1 p.m., Best Western Genetti Inn & Suites, 1341 N. Church St., Hazleton. Hazleton Chamber members $16, nonmembers $21, includes buffet lunch. Reservations required, online at www.hazletonchamber.org, call 455-1509 or email jferry@hazletonchamber.org.

year. That’s a key reason why the Canadian stock market fell 11 percent last year. Despite those selling points, mutual fund investors have relatively few options to invest in Canada. Besides the Fidelity Canada mutual fund, five exchange-traded funds track segments of Canada’s stock market. A sixth ETF, recently launched by PIMCO, invests in Canadian bonds. The biggest is iShares MSCI Canada Index (EWC), with $4.6 billion in assets. There’s plenty of emerging competition, however. Five of the Canada ETFs have been launched within the past two years.

Continued from Page 1D

the rank and file. Private equity’s roots lie in the leveraged-buyout craze of the 1980s junk-bond era. LBO firms gobbled up their prey using massive amounts of debt — a burden that strapped many companies and later led to their collapse. Other firms engaged in controversial financial practices, such as paying themselves special dividends, in which they reaped big profits as workers got the boot. Beyond the job issue, the industry is embroiled in a highprofile dispute over taxes. The earnings of private equity firms are often taxed at the 15 percent rate that applies to capital gains. But critics, including President Barack Obama, say profits should be categorized as ordinary income, for which the top rate is 35 percent. “The industry just has had a bad reputation, sometimes deservedly,” said Mario Giannini, chief executive of Hamilton Lane, which manages private equity investments for institutional clients. On the campaign trail, Romney regularly touts his record running Bain Capital as proof that he has the experience and know-how to create jobs in a sputtering economy. He says the firm helped generate a net 100,000 jobs in his 15-year career there. The private equity issue has struck a particular chord in South Carolina, where many jobs have been lost to corporate downsizing and overseas outsourcing. The state holds its presidential primary Saturday. All of this comes at a time of elevated public antipathy toward Wall Street, manifested in the “Occupy” protests around the country — a fact that isn’t lost on private equity managers. Some say the negative reputation is undeserved. Layoffs are often necessary, they say, to make troubled companies more efficient or to prevent them from collapsing into bankruptcy. The image “is totally unfair. It’s totally false,” said Peter Rose, a spokesman for private equity titan Blackstone Group. “Private equity creates value by growing companies and improving them and selling them for more than they paid. The flip-and-strip is a myth.” Private equity firms say they have evolved and today focus as much on expanding promising companies as on downsizing troubled ones. “That’s what happened in those times,” Judge said. “That’s not what happens today.” Private equity executives agree that the industry’s goal is to turn a profit, but they say job creation is a natural byproduct. “You may need to initially retrench, but if you’re going to actually create value over the long term you have to grow, and growing means adding employees,” said John Danhakl, managing partner at Leonard Green & Partners, a large private equity firm in Los Angeles. A comprehensive study of 3,200 private equity deals over a 25-year period found that private equity is neither a big job creator nor a big job destroyer. In the first five years of private equity ownership, job losses at existing facilities of private equity-owned companies were 6 percent higher than at comparable companies. But private equity companies created more jobs at new facilities. The overall result was net job losses of less than 1 percent. The end result, said Dartmouth’s Blaydon, is that troubled companies undergo wrenching changes regardless of who owns them. “There will be some people who are better off, but there will inevitably be some who will not be better off,” Blaydon said. “That is what goes on with any firm, whether it’s financed by private equity or a company adapting to changing competitive conditions all on its own.”


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

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MarketPulse BABY BUST The weak economy means people are waiting to have babies. That’s bad news for retailers who

Number of U.S. births

The number of U.S. births has dropped since the last recession began in December 2007. 4.3 million 4.2 4.1 4.0 3.9

‘00 ’01 ‘02 ’03 ‘04 ’05 ‘06 ’07 ‘08 ’09 ‘10

Source: Centers for Disease Control

sell children’s clothing and toys. To put it in business-speak: Fewer customers are in the pipeline. Just 4 million babies were born in the U.S. in 2010, the most recent data from the Centers for Disease Control says. That’s down 3.4 percent from the 2000-09 average. There is one bright spot for investors of Carter’s (CRI) and other children’s retailers, Citi analysts say. In 2010, 40 percent of births were first children, about the same as earlier years. Firstborns tend to mean a flurry of clothes and gear purchases, unlike second- and third-borns who tend to get hand-me-downs.

FLYING HIGHER Last year was discouraging for airline investors. A weak economy hurt demand for flights. The industry’s on-time performance worsened for the first time in four years. And American Airlines’ parent AMR filed for bankruptcy in November. But here’s a surprise: The industry is still in line to report an overall profit for the

SLIMMER OFFERINGS Stock markets around the world were volatile last year, and that hurt companies looking to sell stock publicly for the first time. Around the world, 1,285 companies sold stock in initial public offerings in 2011 and raised a total of $168.1 billion, according to Dealogic. The number of deals fell 13 percent from a year earlier, and the total value of the deals sank 40 percent. More companies withdrew or postponed plans to go public in 2011 than in any year since 2008.

year. Deutsche Bank analyst Michael Linenberg expects overall net income of $2.1 billion, just the fourth annual profit since 2001. But Linenberg says shares of Delta, US Airways and United look cheaper relative to their revenue than they did in 2008, when airlines were losing money.

Global IPOs

through the first nine days of the year. This year is young, but the pace of IPOs is already slower than last year.

11

10

6

5

0

2011

2012

Source: Dealogic

AP

Bullish on Bonds

Bond fund manager John Carlson entered 2011 believing that investors in the globe’s emerging markets were getting complacent about growth prospects in countries such as China and Brazil. So the manager of Fidelity New Markets Income became more cautious. Carlson cut his fund’s holdings in emerging markets corporate bonds from 17 percent of the portfolio to 5 percent, and raised his stake in government debt. He nearly eliminated bonds denominated in local currencies, instead favoring those priced in U.S. dollars. His moves paid off, as emerging markets growth prospects dimmed, and the dollar strengthened against other currencies. Fidelity New Markets Income returned nearly 8 percent in 2011, in the top 1 percent of its category. This month, Morningstar honored Carlson as Fixed-Income Fund Manager of the Year, for 2011. Here’s Carlson’s take on what to look for in 2012.

InsiderQ&A

Carlson

Do you expect your 2011 strategy will continue to work well? Yes, and I think the outlook remains somewhat bullish for bonds, particularly in the emerging markets. In developed markets like the U.S. and Europe, we continue to have monetary policies designed to stimulate growth. But we still have high unemployment, and pressures from U.S. consumers cutting back debt, and from government austerity in Europe. But in emerging markets, some countries have tightened monetary policies to control inflation risk. But now that some of those economies are growing more slowly, inflation is less of a risk, so there’s room for countries to cut interest rates further.

Yields, mortgage rates fall

Dow Dogs Pay Dividends

InterestRates

The stocks known as the Dogs of the Dow barked 500’s 2.1 percent. loudly the last two years. And they may be a good In 2010, the Dogs had a return of 21 percent. The Dow investment for 2012. had a return of 14 percent and the S&P 500, 15 percent. The Dogs are the 10 stocks with the highest dividend The strategy can work even better if you buy just the yields in the Dow Jones industrial average. A stock often five highest-yielding Dogs. The Small Dogs, as they’re has a high yield because its price has fallen. known, had a return of nearly 20 percent in 2011 and Some investing pros recommend a strategy that this pack has a strong record of beating the market. focuses on the Dogs. The Dogs have done particularly well in the last couple of DOGS OF THE DOW This is how it years. Long-term the 10 Dogs of the Dow have had an average works: YIELD RETURN* return of 13 percent since 1973. The five Small Dogs have Buy the Dogs at done better: 15 percent. AT&T: 5.9 % 13.4% the start of the year. Dow Verizon: 5.2 14.6 At the end of the S&P 500 Merck: 4.4 15.7 30% year, sell the ones Ten Dow Dogs Pfizer: 3.7 24.9 Five Dow Dogs whose yields have GE: 3.6 4.8 fallen out of the top 20 10 (usually because DuPont: 3.5 1.2 their prices have J&J: 3.3 7.5 10 risen), and replace Intel: 3.3 22.2 them with newer P&G: 3.2 3.7 Dogs. You’re buying 0 Kraft: 3.1 24.3 2010 blue chips that are 2011 2009 *Last 12 months out of favor and may have room to rise. They’ve surpassed the S&P 500 seven of 12 times In 2011, the Dogs of the Dow had a return of 17 since 2000 and 24 of the last 39 years. percent, including dividends. In the group were Although the Dogs don’t always beat the indexes, household names like AT&T, Kraft and Intel. That was betting on big, dividend-paying companies in general, better than the Dow’s return of 8 percent, and the S&P and the Dogs in particular, can pay off in volatile times.

Money market mutual funds

PRIME FED Taxable—national avg RATE FUNDS Fidelity Select Money Market FRIDAY 3.25 .13 Tax-exempt—national avg 6 MO AGO 3.25 .13 BMO Tax Free MMF/Class Y 1 YR AGO 3.25 .13

-0.08 -0.01 -0.11 -0.18 -0.15 -0.06

FRIDAY YIELD

1WK

0.03 0.13 0.05 0.22 0.79

0.01 -0.01 0.01 -0.04 -0.07

s t s t t

s t s t t

-0.11 -0.14 -0.11 -0.35 -1.11

0.15 0.33 0.18 0.83 2.39

0.07 0.01 0.16 0.78

10-year T-Note 1.87 30-year T-Bond 2.91 Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.

-0.09 -0.11

s s

t -1.43 t -1.58

3.72 4.77

1.72 2.72

TREASURYS 3-month T-Bill 1-year T-Bill 6-month T-Bill 2-year T-Note 5-year T-Note

Air Products

APD

72.26 7

98.01

89.91

3.59

4.2

s

s

5.5 +3.79

2

6.8

16

2.6

Amer Water Works

AWK

25.27 9

32.78

31.93

0.03

0.1

s

s

0.2 +27.84

1 19.8a

18

2.9

Amerigas Part LP

APU

36.76 3

51.50

41.18

-3.50

-7.8

t

t -10.3—11.74 3

Aqua America Inc

WTR

19.28 5

23.79

21.26

-0.19

-0.9

t

t

Arch Dan Mid

ADM

23.69 4

38.02

29.17

0.10

0.3

s

AutoZone Inc

AZO

246.26 0 343.90 344.44

6.40

1.9

Bank of America

BAC

4.92 2

11.7

18

7.2

3

1.6

22

3.1

s

2.0—10.25 3

0.6

9

2.4

s

s

6.0 +36.72

1 22.6

17

...

7.0

s

s

18.9—54.98 5 -26.6

...

0.6 2.4

15.31

6.61

0.43

17.10 3

32.50

21.45

1.00

4.9

s

s

-9.4

10

2.23 1

17.49

3.02

0.36

13.5

t

t -10.4—72.00 5 -37.5

...

6.6

0.69

1.7

s

s

7.7—30.69 4

BK

Bon Ton Store

BONT

CVS Caremark Corp

CVS

31.30 0

42.40

42.15

Cigna Corp

CI

38.79 5

52.95

45.61

2.00

4.6

s

CocaCola

KO

61.29 6

71.77

66.99

-1.94

-2.8

t

Comcast Corp A

CMCSA 19.19 8

27.16

25.38

0.70

2.8

Community Bk Sys

CBU

21.67 0

28.91

28.24

-0.17

Community Hlth Sys

CYH

14.61 1

42.50

16.70

-1.61

Entercom Comm

ETM

4.61 4

13.63

7.43

0.46

Fairchild Semicond

FCS

10.25 3

21.02

12.92

Frontier Comm

FTR

4.79 1

9.84

5.09

Genpact Ltd

G

13.09 3

18.16

14.50

-0.02

-0.1

Can these policies help emerging markets countries return to the more rapid growth they were seeing a couple years ago? Long-term, the emerging markets growth story remains intact. But in the short-term it will be slower growth. Most of these countries aren’t heavily indebted, and they have good demographics that favor growth.

Harte Hanks Inc

HHS

7.00 4

13.74

9.23

0.32

3.6

Heinz

HNZ

46.99 8

55.00

52.72

-0.30

-0.6

t

s

-2.4 +11.91

1

5.8

17

3.6

Hershey Company

HSY

46.54 0

62.38

61.48

0.79

1.3

s

s

-0.5 +26.20

1

6.0

23

2.2

Kraft Foods

KFT

30.21 0

38.27

37.77

0.22

0.6

s

s

1.1 +23.82

1

3.9

21

3.1

Lowes Cos

LOW

18.07 9

27.45

26.32

-0.02

-0.1

s

s

3.7 +9.25

2

-3.2

19

2.1

91.05

Your fund has big stakes in government bonds issued by Latin American countries. Why do you like Latin America? Commodities are a big part of the economy for many of these countries, and they’ve really taken advantage of the boom in commodity prices over recent years, and the lower interest rate environment globally. And they have institutionalized many of their democratic processes, and created independent central banks. They’ve reduced debt levels, and have good demographics, with balanced trade, and robust domestic economies. Over the past decade or two, they’ve really put their houses in order, and that will serve them well during troubled times.

3.4 +22.35

1

6.5

17

1.5

s

8.6 +15.48

1

1.0

10

0.1

t

-4.3 +8.63

2

9.1

12

2.8

s

s

7.0 +14.60

1

-1.9

18

1.8

-0.6

s

s

1.6 +8.30

2

6.9

14

3.7

-8.8

t

t

-4.3—55.80 5 -14.3

6

...

6.6

s

s

20.8—27.58 4 -19.3

7

...

0.73

6.0

s

t

7.3—22.91 4

-6.6

9

...

-0.01

-0.3

s

t

-1.1—38.02 4

-7.3

t

t

-3.0 —4.54

t

s

34 14.7

3 16.8a

19

1.2

1.5—27.21 4 -17.5

13

3.5

M&T Bank

MTB

66.40 7

82.34

2.89

3.6

s

s

7.9 —1.30

2

-4.4

12

3.4

McDonalds Corp

MCD

72.14 0 101.59 100.35

-0.25

-0.2

s

s

0.0 +41.57

1 20.1

20

2.8

NBT Bncp

NBTB

17.05 8

24.98

23.14

0.83

3.7

s

s

4.6 —1.07

2

1.8

14

3.5

Nexstar Bdcstg Grp

NXST

4.59 7

10.28

8.54

0.19

2.3

s

t

8.9 +46.99

1 10.1

...

...

PNC Financial

PNC

42.70 9

65.19

61.73

2.17

3.6

s

s

7.0 +3.27

2

-1.6

10

2.3

PPL Corp

PPL

24.10 7

30.27

28.09

-0.43

-1.5

t

t

-4.5 +14.61

1

-0.1

11

5.0

Penna REIT

PEI

6.50 5

17.34

11.53

0.78

7.3

s

s

10.4 —8.04

3 -15.0

...

5.2

PepsiCo

PEP

58.50 5

71.89

64.40

-0.99

-1.5

t

s

-2.9 —.72

2

2.5

16

3.2

Philip Morris Intl

PM

55.85 9

79.96

77.32

0.24

0.3

s

s

-1.5 +41.84

1 26.2a

16

4.0

Procter & Gamble

PG

57.56 9

67.72

65.81

-0.55

-0.8

s

s

-1.3 +3.65

2

2.7

17

3.2

Prudential Fncl

PRU

42.45 6

67.52

55.25

2.52

4.8

s

s

10.2 —7.02

3

-7.2

7

2.6

SLM Corp

SLM

10.91 5

17.11

13.64

-0.14

-1.0

s

s

1.8 —1.06

2 -21.9

14

2.9

SLM Corp flt pfB

SLMBP 39.00 1

60.00

40.97

1.47

3.7

s

t

5.1

...

0.0

Southn Union Co

SUG

24.92 0

44.65

42.70

0.30

0.7

s

s

1.4 +64.45

1 10.7

21

1.4

TJX Cos

TJX

45.26 0

66.95

65.15

-1.31

-2.0

s

s

0.9 +44.71

1 17.7

19

1.2

UGI Corp

UGI

24.07 5

33.53

27.87

-0.61

-2.1

t

s

-5.2—10.91 3

3.0

14

3.7

Verizon Comm

VZ

32.28 9

40.48

38.92

0.59

1.5

s

s

-3.0 +14.23

1

6.6

16

5.1

WalMart Strs

WMT

48.31 9

61.06

59.54

0.54

0.9

s

s

-0.4 +11.33

1

6.3

14

2.5

Weis Mkts

WMK

36.52 8

42.20

40.60

0.61

1.5

s

s

1.7 +6.84

2

2.1

16

... 11.3

3.0

Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quarters. Rank classifies a stock’s performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).

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CLOSE

$22.94

52-WK LOW

$17.69

52-WK HIGH

$27.06

-0.7%

DIVIDEND YIELD

2.1%

American Funds BalA m ABALX American Funds BondA m ABNDX American Funds CapIncBuA m CAIBX American Funds CpWldGrIA m CWGIX American Funds EurPacGrA m AEPGX American Funds FnInvA m ANCFX American Funds GrthAmA m AGTHX American Funds IncAmerA m AMECX American Funds InvCoAmA m AIVSX American Funds NewPerspA m ANWPX American Funds WAMutInvA m AWSHX BlackRock GlobAlcA m MDLOX BlackRock GlobAlcC m MCLOX BlackRock GlobAlcI MALOX Dodge & Cox Income DODIX Dodge & Cox IntlStk DODFX Dodge & Cox Stock DODGX Fidelity Contra FCNTX Fidelity GrowCo FDGRX Fidelity LowPriStk d FLPSX Fidelity Spartan 500IdxInv FUSEX FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m FKINX FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m FCISX FrankTemp-Mutual Euro Z MEURX FrankTemp-Templeton GlBond A mTPINX FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAdv TGBAX Harbor IntlInstl d HAINX Oakmark EqIncI OAKBX PIMCO AllAssetI PAAIX PIMCO LowDrIs PTLDX PIMCO TotRetA m PTTAX PIMCO TotRetAdm b PTRAX PIMCO TotRetIs PTTRX PIMCO TotRetrnD b PTTDX Permanent Portfolio PRPFX T Rowe Price EqtyInc PRFDX T Rowe Price GrowStk PRGFX T Rowe Price HiYield d PRHYX T Rowe Price MidCpGr RPMGX T Rowe Price NewIncome PRCIX Vanguard 500Adml VFIAX Vanguard 500Inv VFINX Vanguard GNMAAdml VFIJX Vanguard InstIdxI VINIX Vanguard InstPlus VIIIX Vanguard InstTStPl VITPX Vanguard MuIntAdml VWIUX Vanguard STGradeAd VFSUX Vanguard Tgtet2025 VTTVX Vanguard TotBdAdml VBTLX Vanguard TotBdInst VBTIX Vanguard TotIntl d VGTSX Vanguard TotStIAdm VTSAX Vanguard TotStIIns VITSX Vanguard TotStIdx VTSMX Vanguard WellsIAdm VWIAX Vanguard Welltn VWELX Vanguard WelltnAdm VWENX Vanguard WndsrII VWNFX Wells Fargo AstAlllcA f EAAFX

18.60 12.59 49.08 32.59 35.62 36.43 29.74 16.87 27.81 26.72 28.88 18.53 17.26 18.61 13.43 29.46 105.32 68.75 84.41 36.70 45.65 2.11 2.13 19.09 12.59 12.56 53.72 27.29 11.70 10.36 10.99 10.99 10.99 10.99 47.07 23.78 32.87 6.56 54.36 9.70 118.79 118.78 11.10 118.01 118.02 29.12 14.23 10.67 12.50 11.03 11.03 13.27 32.18 32.18 32.17 55.94 31.95 55.18 26.47 11.95

+.14 +.05 +.10 +.32 +.43 +.49 +.42 +.08 +.23 +.27 +.15 +.16 +.14 +.16 +.10 +.24 +1.53 +.29 +1.67 +.45 +.41

p

PRICE-EARNINGS RATIO (BASED ON NEXT 12 MOS.)

14

FedEx

FDX

90.37

64.07

98.66

-5.5

0.6

1.3

16

UNP

109.73

77.73

112.52

10.8

2.2

1.2

17

UPS

UPS

74.16

60.74

77.00

2.6

2.8

1.3

18

Data through Jan. 13

-0.81 -1.12 -0.34 -1.23 0.77 -1.03

3.29 5.31 4.22 5.95 10.15 2.46

+.07 +.13 +.13 +.89 +.08 +.10 +.05 +.09 +.09 +.09 +.09 +.43 +.32 +.48 +.02 +.78 +.03 +1.06 +1.05 +.02 +1.05 +1.05 +.32 +.15 +.02 +.12 +.05 +.05 +.16 +.36 +.35 +.36 +.30 +.28 +.48 +.30 -.01

4WK

2.15 3.73 3.36 4.63 6.61 0.96

52-WK HIGH LOW

RETURN/RANK 1YR 5YR

+4.1 +.9 +2.5 +4.3 +3.4 +5.9 +5.2 +3.7 +5.4 +4.2 +5.0 +3.0 +2.9 +3.0 +1.6 +2.9 +6.7 +3.4 +5.2 +4.9 +5.4 +3.5 +3.4 +2.9 +2.2 +2.3 +4.8 +2.7 +2.4 +1.0 +2.0 +2.0 +2.0 +2.0 +1.7 +6.5 +4.8 +2.5 +5.6 +.9 +5.4 +5.3 +.6 +5.4 +5.4 +5.7 +2.4 +.6 +3.9 +.8 +.8 +3.5 +5.7 +5.7 +5.7 +2.7 +4.4 +4.4 +5.9 +1.3

+4.5/A +6.7/C +2.3/A -7.4/C -13.5/B -.5/C -3.2/D +5.4/A -.6/C -6.4/B +7.6/A -2.8/C -3.5/C -2.5/B +5.5/D -16.8/D -3.2/D -.2/B +.5/B +1.1/A +2.5/A +1.9/C +1.4/D -10.0/A -1.0/E -.8/E -10.4/A +.4/C +3.1/A +2.0/B +4.6/E +4.8/E +5.0/D +4.7/E +4.5/A +.3/C -.2/B +3.1/C -1.0/B +6.4/C +2.5/A +2.4/A +8.1/A +2.5/A +2.6/A +1.7/B +12.5/B +2.2/B /A +8.0/A +8.0/A -14.3/C +1.7/B +1.7/B +1.5/B +10.0/A +4.4/A +4.5/A +2.9/B +.4/

+2.7/A +3.7/E +.9/C -.6/B -1.1/A +1.1/A -.1/D +1.8/C -.4/C +1.1/A +.4/B +4.1/B +3.3/B +4.4/B +6.5/B -3.3/A -3.6/E +2.7/A +4.3/A +2.5/B /B +3.1/C +2.5/D -.6/A +9.6/A +9.9/A -.2/A +4.5/A +6.1/A +5.4/A +7.9/A +8.1/A +8.4/A +8.0/A +8.9/A -.4/B +1.3/C +6.7/B +5.6/A +6.7/B +.1/B /B +7.0/A +.1/B +.1/B +.7/A +5.4/B +4.4/B +1.5/A +6.6/B +6.6/B -3.1/B +.6/B +.7/A +.5/B +6.3/A +3.9/A +4.0/A -.8/B +2.4/

Rank: Fund’s letter grade compared with others in the same performance group; an A indicates fund performed in the top 20 percent; an E, in the bottom 20 percent.

AVG. BROKER RATING*

1.3

52-WK HIGH LOW

CHANGE 1MO 3MO 1YR

WK CHG

Union Pacific

SOURCE: FactSet

t t t t t t

FRIDAY NAV

1.51 month’s worth a decade ago. Retail inventories are at a 45-year low, 13 percent below their average from 2000 to 2008, Goldman Sachs analysts say. If inventories just come back to normal levels, several companies could benefit. This screen from Goldman Sachs shows four of them. UPS and FedEx would ship more goods as warehouses restock their shelves. So would CSX and Union Pacific, which are railroad operators. 1-YR STOCK CHANGE

t r t t t s

TICKER

Searching for re-stocking stuffers

Inventory levels keep getting lower across the country. It makes sense: The economy is uncertain, and companies aren’t sure how strong sales will be. They don’t want to get stuck with a lot of unsold merchandise, so they keep inventories relatively low. Retailers had about 1.32 month’s worth of supplies in inventory during November, at the current sales pace, according to government figures. That is down from 1.36 month’s worth a year earlier and from

CHANGE 1MO 3MO 1YR

MutualFunds

52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN RANK %RTN LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD

-3.6 —5.32

0.01 0.08 $ 1,000 min (800) 236-3863

2.19 3.90 3.68 4.63 7.95 0.99

Broad market Lehman Triple-A corporate Moody’s Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman Municipal Bond Buyer U.S. high yield Barclays Treasury Barclays

LocalStocks TICKER

0.01 0.12 $ 2,500 min (800) 544-6666

1WK

GROUP, FUND

COMPANY

MIN INVEST PHONE

YIELD

FRIDAY YIELD

U.S. BOND INDEXES

Bk of NY Mellon

Some investors see emerging markets as a safe haven from Europe’s debt crisis. Do you agree? Not really. We’re all in this together, to some degree, in the global economy. In the emerging markets, there are strong trade links to Europe. It’s a large destination for Chinese exports, and Asian exports in general. A big recession in Europe would mean less trade for Asia. And Europe’s banking system is strongly linked to Eastern Europe and Latin America.

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell below 1.9 percent last week. That means less income for investors who buy Treasurys, but it also pulls rates down further on various consumer loans. The average rate on the 30-year fixed mortgage dropped to 3.89 percent last week, for example. That’s lower than the record of 3.91 percent set three weeks ago, according to Freddie Mac.

p p p

Dow industrials

+0.5%

WEEKLY

Nasdaq

+1.4% WEEKLY

LARGE-CAP

S&P 500

+0.9%

WEEKLY

SMALL-CAP

Russell 2000

+1.9%

WEEKLY

p p

+4.7%

p p

+6.1%

p p

+5.7%

p p

+5.8%

MO +1.7%

YTD MO +4.1%

YTD MO +2.5%

YTD

MO +3.1%

YTD


CMYK PAGE 4D

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

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THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com


CMYK

VIEWS

SECTION

timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

E

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

KEVIN BLAUM IN THE ARENA

A true fighter in every sense of the word MIAMI BEACH was the focus of everyone’s attention. Once the ball dropped in Times Square, ringing in the new year and signaling the merciful end to one we’d sooner forget, our conversations at school, and in The Times Leader sports pages at home, were packed with anticipation of the upcoming bout at Convention Hall in sunny Florida. Here in the Wyoming Valley it was bitter cold. As we walked to school that Tuesday morning, temperatures hovered in the low single digits. A typical February in Northeastern Pennsylvania it was not, nor anywhere in America. “Our rock band” had arrived in New York on Feb. 7 at the former Idlewild Airport, renamed “JFK” on Christmas Eve. The band performed live, before our very eyes, on “The Ed Sullivan Show” two days later. The Beatles would headline for Sullivan the next two Sundays as well. A set of three songs, two by John Lennon, pre-recorded during their first Sullivan appearance on Feb. 9, was aired on Feb. 23, two days before the muchheralded heavyweight title fight in Miami Beach. Charles “Sonny” Liston would defend his title against “our” brash, young, 1960 Olympic gold-medal winner Cassius Clay, from Louisville, Ky. A week earlier, the Beatles’ second Sullivan appearance was live, but from Miami Beach. There they visited and frolicked famously with the young heavyweight challenger training for his imminent confrontation with the most feared fighter in the world. It was scheduled for Tuesday, Feb. 25, 1964, 95 days after the assassination of “our” president. If you’re 60 now, you were 12 then. Sonny Liston, 31, was the “unbeatable foe.” A few sports writers would not cover the fight they believed too lopsided. Some feared Clay, 22, and an 8-to-1 underdog, would be seriously injured by the punishing champion whom many boxers refused to fight. Boxing was big. I remember gathering around a living-room radio trying to bring in a signal from the ABC broadcast. Much of the nation did the same. “Cassius is sticking his nose right into Liston’s face and standing on his tiptoes to make that inch and a half look like three. It’s psychological warfare. They’ve had the referee’s instructions; now let’s turn it over to Les Keiter.” “Thank you, Howard Cosell, and good evening sports fans across the land. Now the questions will be answered. Liston in the white trunks with a black stripe, Clay an inch and a half taller, in white trunks with a red stripe. Clay to our left, Liston to our right, the heavyweight championship of the world. If this goes past the first round there will be surprises already.” No one gave the young upstart a chance, and many hoped he’d “get his.” He was not Jack Dempsey, Rocky Marciano or Floyd Patterson. But the young Olympian was “ours,” and he and a generation would come of age together. Liston did not answer the bell for round 7, and the rest is the remarkable life of Muhammad Ali, who became “a worldwide symbol of hope and possibility.” Consistent with the message of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., whose birth and national holiday we celebrate on Monday, Ali devoted himself to humanitarian service, inspiring millions of people around the globe. He and Dr. King marched together for improved housing in Ali’s hometown of Louisville only months before we learned of Dr. King’s assassination — April 4, 1968. He was 39. That evening U.S. Senator and presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy, 42, made the announcement of King’s death to a large crowd gathered in Indianapolis. Awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2005 … Muhammad Ali will be 70 on Tuesday. Happy birthday. You’re still the greatest. Kevin Blaum’s column on government, life and politics appears every Sunday. Contact him at kblaum@timesleader.com.

YMCA employee Caitlin Dwinal instructs a physical education class at Brookdale Elementary School in Parkland, Wash.

Second-grader Jessica Raybun plays goalie during a soccer game at Brookdale Elementary School.

Miles Scearce, from left, Gavin Kingsbury and Ben Hash pretend to be statues while playing museum tag.

EXERCISING CONCERN

MCT PHOTOS

Caitlin Dwinal, an employee of the YMCA of Pierce and Kitsap counties, instructs a physical education class to second-graders at Brookdale Elementary School in Parkland, Wash.

Worries mount over lack of physical education in schools By ROB HOTAKAINEN McClatchy Newspapers

W

ASHINGTON — With public schools cutting back on spending for physical education, some members of Congress want to intervene, worried that the nation’s schools are churning out too many fat kids. The cutbacks are happening across the country. In Washington state, the Franklin Pierce school district in the Tacoma suburb of Parkland discovered that it could save a quarter-million dollars by reassigning its seven physical education teachers to different positions.

And in New York, a city audit found that only 6 percent of the city’s schools came anywhere near to offering the required two hours of physical education, or PE, for elementary-age children each week. “It’s obviously a clear problem,” said Rep. Adam Smith, D-Wash. “Childhood obesity is spiking, and actually our overall health is to some degree declining.” When Congress considers overhauling its federal education law early this year, Smith and a bipartisan group of 84 other House members want to include language that would pressure schools to offer more PE: Their idea is to force school officials to issue yearly reports on how much time students engage in physical activity, making it easier for the public to compare schools.

“Most schools offer physical education and health, but now we want to keep track of that,” Smith said. He said schools would be offered “a broad encouragement to say, ‘Hey, we ought to be paying attention to physical health.’” It’s all part of a plan to try to fight an alarming increase in childhood obesity. Recent studies have shown that 17 percent of the nation’s 6- to 19-year-olds are obese, and that more than a third are overweight. Those rates have about doubled in the past three decades. The plan will face opposition from many Republicans, who argue that curriculum decisions should be left to the states and local school boards. When the House Education and the Workforce Committee last year sugSee PHYS ED, Page 6E

Did Gingrich shirk military duty?

Editor’s note: This is part of an occasional look at assertions by political figures and how well they adhere to the facts. By PAULINE JELINEK Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The ghosts of the Vietnam War are stirring again as GOP presidential candidates fight for position in the primary elections. Vietnam veteran Ron Paul has called Newt Gingrich a “chicken hawk,” asserting in last week’s GOP candidates’ debate that Gingrich shirked military service and so shouldn’t have the power to send others to war. A review of government records finds no evidence that Gingrich dodged any legal responsibilities as a draft-age young man in the 1960s. Paul was drafted, but Gingrich wasn’t, apparently the result of changing draft regulations. Here’s the testy exchange the two had when the subject came up Saturday: PAUL: “I think people who don’t serve when they could and they get three or four or even five deferments ... they have no right to send our kids off to war.” He added: “I’m trying to stop the wars, but at

“The fact is, I never asked for deferment.” Newt Gingrich

least, you know, I went when they called me up.” GINGRICH: “The fact is, I never asked for deferment. I was married with a child. It was never a question.” PAUL: “When I was drafted, I was married and had two kids, and I went.” THE FACTS: It’s true that Paul was a husband and father when he served as an active-duty Air Force doctor from 19631965. He turned18 in1953, finished medical school in 1961 and was drafted in 1962 under a law that said fathers had to serve unless their induction would cause their dependents extreme hardship. But the draft was changed the following year, giving all fathers a pass without having to prove hardship. Gingrich registered for the draft when he turned 18 in 1961and was contacted by his draft board to fill out a general-information questionnaire in mid-1963. Upon reviewing the

AP PHOTO

The ghosts of the Vietnam War are rearing their heads as GOP presidential candidates fight for position in the primary elections. Vietnam veteran Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas has called former House Speaker Newt Gingrich a ‘chicken hawk,’ asserting in a recent GOP candidate debate that Gingrich shirked military service himself and shouldn’t have the power to send others to war. Gingrich answered that he simply ‘wasn’t eligible’ to go.

“I wasn’t eligible for the draft,” Ginquestionnaire, the board gave him a deferment on the basis of having a child, Se- grich said in Saturday’s exchange, relective Service System officials said peating for emphasis: “I wasn’t eligible Tuesday after reviewing ledgers from the See SHIRK, Page 6E era.


K PAGE 2E

➛ S E R V I N G T H E P U B L I C T R U S T S I N C E 18 81

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

Editorial

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

OUR OPINION: COUNTY COUNCIL

Fresh air flows from open doors

Y

OUR NEW government setup in Luzerne County, featuring an 11-person council, might prove spectacular or only second-rate. But here’s the encouraging news: At least so far, you get to see it in action – warts and all. During public sessions this month, the council’s members are revisiting a $121.7 million budget approved late last year by the outgoing commissioner trio, openly debating savings strategies and discussing numbers. No closed-door sessions here, followed by the hasty presentation of a seemingly preapproved spending plan. Likewise, the council plans in January to publicly interview applicants for slots on three Luzerne County boards, including its newly created ethics board. Again, no closeddoor affair; you and other area residents are invited – indeed, encouraged – to take a frontrow seat during these interviews Jan. 18 and 23 at the Emergency Management Agency building on Water Street. The start time is 6 p.m. Rather than rare treat, this sort of access is what you should expect from your county government. It’s what you should demand. Ditto for your national, state and local governments. School boards, too. When it comes to government matters, all but a small fraction of subjects should be

C O N TA C T C O U N C I L ❏ To contact a Luzerne County Council member by phone, call interim clerk Colette Check at 825-1634. ❏ Send an email to all 11 council members using this address: LCCM@luzernecounty.org ❏ Find individual email addresses for each council member at this web address: www.luzernecounty.org/county/ luzerne-county-council

aired, argued and amended in public. Too often, though, the powers that be arrive at decisions behind the scenes with scant opportunity for public input, then use meetings as a platform to simply present the all-but-finished product. The Luzerne County Council’s members appear to be doing democracy in proper fashion: drawn-out, sometimes inconvenient, sometimes wartridden, but ultimately in county residents’ best interests. Praise them for it; hold them to it. Attend the council’s work sessions and its regular meetings. Ensure that its members, as was promised during their respective campaigns, remain accessible throughout their tenures. Send emails with your ideas and concerns to one, or all, or make a telephone call. It’s your county; it’s your government. And if it fails to perform as it should, it’s partly your fault.

QUOTE OF THE DAY “This could be one of the biggest political events in history for Wilkes-Barre.” Lou Jasikoff The chairman of Pennsylvania’s Libertarian Party announced last week that its 2012 statewide convention will take place in Wilkes-Barre. The conventioneers are scheduled to gather in the city the weekend before Pennsylvania’s primaries on April 24.

OTHER OPINION: NATURAL GAS

Why is counting wells so tricky?

T

HOSE WHO TRACK the growth of the Marcellus natural gas industry in Pennsylvania are being handcuffed by the inability of the state Department of Environmental Protection to provide accurate data. The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette launched a website to monitor the state’s gas industry, including information about how much gas is being produced by each well. The newspaper discovered that when its reporters began to download information about production, it was getting information about wells that other DEP sources did not even indicate exist. In all, the newspaper found evidence of 495 wells that are pumping gas from the ground but do not show up in lists of drilled wells. The newspaper also discovered that there are 182 wells producing gas that do not show up on lists of sites where permits have been issued. The contradictory data stymied efforts by legislative staffers who were trying to calculate how much revenue would be generated by taxing the gas industry. The sloppy bookkeeping by

the Department of Environmental Protection stokes lingering skepticism among those in Pennsylvania who worry that the ties between government and the gas industry are too close. The skepticism is being expressed in the form of awardwinning documentaries, pickets and petition, including one circulated by two Sunbury area pastors. They have obtained the signatures of 50 other faith leaders, expressing opposition to the expanded use of the fracking process in the Susquehanna River Basin. In Dimock, residents say fracking contributed to methane contamination of their wells. The gas company provided treatment systems for some residents and trucked water to residents for a period. Eleven families are still fighting for water. The state government has a credibility problem that can be solved only by improved performance. The benefits of the industry should not blind us to the need for vigilant and effective oversight. Keeping an accurate count of working wells shouldn’t be impossible. The Daily Item, Sunbury

Even well-known brands find what free market does best TO THOSE with a sweet tooth, the news that Hostess Brands Inc. – maker of Twinkies, HoHos and other convenience store delicacies – has filed for bankruptcy must be especially sour. Hostess, which employs 19,000 workers in 49 states, has more than $860 million in debt, faces high labor expenses, rising ingredient costs and a decrease in sales, CBS News and the Associated Press report. It’s been only two years since it emerged from its previous bankruptcy. Then there’s another great American corporate icon on the ropes: Eastman Kodak Co. News came out recently that the 131-year-old film company is preparing a bankruptcy filing if it fails to sell 1,100 digital-imaging patents. Kodak is about to run out of cash and “was reporting a third-quarter loss of $222 million – its ninth quarterly loss in three years,” the AP writes. Its troubles? The company has lost 95 percent of its value in the rise of digital and the fall of film, along with increased competition. Certainly if Hostess or Kodak goes down, job losses will follow, causing ripple effects throughout the economy. Those job losses are truly lamentable. But in the free-market system, companies come and go, the strong survive, and good products, efficient management and meeting consumer demand are rewarded. Yet that system is under attack from the

make it in the free market? Unfortunately, “fairness” is a word that takes on a new meaning in a crony capitalist society. Under the rules of this game, those with the best friends MIKE BROWNFIELD in power reap the benefits, while all others are stuck playing by the rules they set. In the case of Kodak, it appears that the inside and the outside. From the outside, the company is trying to play within the rules of Occupy Wall Street movement has assailed the capitalist system, simplifying its structure corporate America and profits, decrying ineqand cutting its costs – without cutting jobs. uities and crucifying capitalism. Unions are The market responded favorably to the new shouting down corporate executives for not sharing enough profits with their workers, and business plan with shares going up by 45 percent. private equity firms are under attack because That’s how the system is supposed to work. under our system, companies can, in fact, go Kodak didn’t get a bailout, and it’s doing what out of business. In short, “success” and “profits” and “capital- it can to change its business model, make a profit and stay afloat. It isn’t relying on nostalism” have become pejoratives. gia or good will, political favors or taxpayer From the inside, the free market is under bailouts. attack from a government that is picking winAs for Hostess, should the company go ners and losers and deciding which companies bankrupt if it can’t compete? Yes, even if it should and should not survive. The Obama administration has singled out “green energy” leaves a bad taste in some people’s mouths. The consequences of poor business decisions as a “winner,” doling out millions to compaencourage companies to make the right decinies such as Solyndra because, in its view, producing solar energy is the “right” move for sions so they can grow and prosper. That grows wealth, creates new jobs and America – even if those companies can’t stand moves the economy forward – what the freeon their own two feet. Likewise, when General Motors and Chrys- market capitalist system does best. ler stood before Congress and begged for a bailout, they argued that they needed taxpayer Mike Brownfield is assistant director of strategic relief. The Detroit automakers found a friend communications at The Heritage Foundation. in Washington, receiving bailouts under two Readers may write to the author in care of The administrations. Heritage Foundation, 214 Massachusetts Ave. NE, Does it seem fair that Solyndra and GM Washington, D.C. 20002; Web site: www.heritreceive taxpayer funding when they can’t age.org.

COMMENTARY

Mideast replete with stories, places to watch in 2012 THE EVENTS of 2011 – featuring Arab upheavals that no one expected – should serve as a warning against New Year’s predictions. But given our unsettled times, which offer unending grist for a foreign-affairs columnist, I can certainly list the stories I’ll be watching in 2012. The struggle for human dignity, in the Mideast and elsewhere. The outcome of the Arab revolts remains unknown, with bloodshed ongoing and few signs that democracy is budding. Yet underlying the 2011 protests was a deep yearning for dignity by populations that had previously accepted authoritarian rule. Young Arabs had been made aware by the forces of globalization of their right to better treatment; they were no longer willing to be treated like cattle. This new consciousness has penetrated not only less developed countries such as Egypt and Syria, but also wealthier countries such as Russia, where recent, amazing demonstrations took place against the rule of pseudotsar Vladimir Putin. Even if mass protests don’t produce better governance at first, this new awareness can’t be reversed. I want to watch where it leads. Which raises the question: Whither Islamism? “Moderate” Islamists already have topped lists in elections in Tunisia, Egypt

tration desperately needs political cover for its planned 2014 troop drawdown. The Taliban recently has agreed to open a political office in the small Persian Gulf TRUDY RUBIN state of Qatar. Yet it’s unclear whether it wants reconciliation or only a boost toward and Morocco. They are poised to take pow- retaking control of the country. Many Afghans believe the Taliban will use talks to er in Libya and would do well in Syrian buy time until the Americans leave. elections if the Assad government fell. And no talks can succeed without support So a big story to watch in 2012 is whether from Pakistan, which gives haven and sup“moderate” Islamists keep their pledges to port to most of the Taliban leaders. Yet respect the rights of religious minorities, seculars and women, and how they relate to relations between Pakistan and the United hard-line Islamist parties that oppose those States have never been worse. Which brings me to the story that really rights. I’ll also be watching to see whether Islamist parties maintain their stated policy gives me shivers: Will Pakistan implode in of nonviolence toward their own people and 2012? The Pakistani military aids and abets the most vicious Afghan and Pakistani other states, including Israel. All bets are off if 2012 brings us war in the Islamist militants because they are seen as a weapon against India. Gulf. Neither the United States nor Iran – Yet these same militants are destroying nor Israel – wants such a war, despite sharp the social fabric of Pakistan, a country with disputes over Iran’s nuclear program. Yet more than 100 nuclear weapons. They paranoia in Tehran and fears in Jerusalem threaten Afghanistan, they seriously threatcould produce 2012’s biggest story: an Isen U.S. interests and they train terrorists to raeli strike on Iran that further destabilizes the region and drags the United States into attack our homeland. Most terrifying, they have penetrated Pakistan’s military and the conflict. As retaliation for tough sancsociety. Meantime, the military snarls at tions, Iran already is undermining U.S. U.S. officials and deludes itself that China interests in Iraq and Afghanistan. Ah, yes, Afghanistan. There, the story I’ll can take America’s place as its closest ally. watch is whether talks with the Taliban produce anything more than a dead end. It Trudy Rubin is a columnist for the Philadelphia has long since become clear that no military Inquirer. Readers may write to her at: Philadelphia victory is possible there, and everyone talks Inquirer, P.O. Box 8263, Philadelphia, PA 19101, or by email at trubin@phillynews.com. about a political solution. The adminis-

COMMENTARY

Editorial Board PRASHANT SHITUT

PRASHANT SHITUT President and Interim CEO/Impressions Media JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ Vice President/Executive Editor

MARK E. JONES Editorial Page Editor

President and Interim CEO/Impressions Media JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ Vice President/Executive Editor

RICHARD DEHAVEN Vice President/Circulation

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A primary surprise: The Ron Paul factor THERE ARE two stories coming out of New Hampshire. The big story is Mitt Romney. The bigger one is

Ron Paul. Romney won a major victory with nearly 40 percent of the vote, 16 points ahead of No. 2. The split among his challengers made the outcome even more decisive. Rick Santorum and Newt Gingrich were diminished by distant, lower-tier finishes. Rick Perry got less than 1 percent. And Jon Huntsman, who staked everything on New Hampshire, came in a weak third with less than half of Romney’s vote. He practically moved to the state – and then received exactly one-sixth of the vote in a six-man contest. Where does he go from here? But the bigger winner was Ron Paul. He got 21 percent in Iowa, 23 in New Hampshire, the only candidate other than Romney to do well with two very different electorates, one more evangelical and socially conservative, the other more moderate and fiscally conservative. Paul commands a strong, energetic, highly committed following. And he is unlike any of the other candidates. They’re out to win. He admits he doesn’t see himself in the Oval Office. They’re one-time, selfcontained enterprises aiming for the White House. Paul is out there to build a movement that will long outlive this campaign. Paul is less a candidate than a “cause,” to cite his electionnight New Hampshire speech. Which is why that speech was the only one by a losing candidate that was sincerely, almost giddily joyous. The other candidates had to pretend they were happy with their results. Paul was genuinely delighted with his, because, after a quarter-century in the wilderness, he’s within reach of putting his cherished cause on the map. Libertarianism will have gone from the fringes – those hopeless, pathetic third-party runs – to a position of prominence in a major party. Look at him now. He’s getting prime-time air, interviews everywhere and, most important, respect for defeating every Republican candidate but one. His goal is to make himself leader of the opposition – within the Republican Party. He is Jesse Jackson of the 1980s, who represented a solid, African-American, liberal-activist constituency to which, he insisted, attention had to be paid by the Democratic Party. Or Pat Buchanan (briefly) in 1992, who demanded – and gained – on behalf of social conservatives a significant role at a convention that was supposed to be a simple coronation of the moderate George H.W.

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COMMENTARY CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER Bush. No one remembers Bush’s 1992 acceptance speech. Everyone remembers Buchanan’s fiery and disastrous culture-war address. At the Democratic conventions, Jackson’s platform demands and speeches drew massive attention, often overshadowing his party’s blander nominees. Paul won’t quit before the Republican convention in Tampa. He probably will not do well in South Carolina or Florida, but with volunteers even in the more neglected caucus states, he will be relentlessly collecting delegates until Tampa. His goal is to have the second-most delegates, a position of leverage from which to influence the platform and demand a primetime speaking slot – before deigning to support the nominee at the end. The early days of the convention, otherwise devoid of drama, could very well be all about Paul. The Democratic convention will be a tightly scripted TV extravaganza extolling the Prince and his wise and kindly rule. The Republican convention could conceivably feature a major address by Paul calling for the abolition of the Fed, FEMA and the CIA; American withdrawal from everywhere; acquiescence to the Iranian bomb – and perhaps even Paul’s opposition to a border fence lest it be used to keep Americans in. Not exactly the steady, measured, reassuring message a Republican convention might wish to convey. For libertarianism, however, it would be a historic moment: mainstream recognition at last. Put aside your own view of libertarianism or of Paul himself. I see libertarianism as an important critique of the Leviathan state, not a governing philosophy. As for Paul himself, I find him a principled, somewhat wacky, highly engaging eccentric. But regardless of my feelings or yours, the plain fact is that Paul is nurturing his movement toward visibility and legitimacy. Paul is 76. He knows he’ll never enter the promised land. But he’s clearing the path for son Rand, his better placed (Senate versus House), more moderate, more articulate successor. And it matters not whether you find amusement in libertarians practicing dynastic succession. What Paul already has wrought is a signal achievement, the biggest story yet of this presidential campaign. Charles Krauthammer’s email address is letters@charleskrauthammer.com.

of the game won’t allow anyone or anything, least of all a little bit of snow, to suspend their hoop dreams. Play on! L overs

Hey, Tea Party: Romney should be your guy DEAR TEA Party Movement, For the last few months, the world has been fascinated by your frenzied search for a presidential candidate who is not Mitt Romney. Because you found the man inauthentic, you buoyed up a string of antiMitts – Michele Bachmann, Rick Perry, Herman Cain, Newt Gingrich. But they were buffoons all, preposterous figures about whom you rightfully changed your minds as soon as you got to know them. It was quite a spectacle, your quest for the non-Romney, and we all know why you undertook it. In ways that matter, Romney is clearly a problem for you. His views on abortion, for example, change with the winds. Ditto, gay rights. He designed the Massachusetts health insurance system that was the model for “Obamacare.” And he’s even said that he approved of the TARP bank bailout, the abomination that helped ignite the tea party uprising in the first place. Still, my advice to you idealists of the right is this: Get over it. Not for sellout reasons, like Romney has the best chance of beating President Obama. No. You should get behind him because, in a certain paradoxical way, he might turn out to be the truest to the spirit of your movement of all the candidates. If nothing else, you in the tea

hate. Banks get bailouts for the simple reason that they want bailouts and have the power to insist on them – the same circumTHOMAS FRANK stances that got them deregulated in wave after wave in the 1980s, ’90s and ’00s. party movement have spent the In this sense, Romney, who is last three years teaching Amerloud and proud when it comes to icans that we are in a battle for the need for further deregulation, the very soul of capitalism. And actually has been more consistent here comes Romney, the soul of than you. He’s the gimme candiAmerican capitalism in the flesh. date of 2012, so he should really Look back over his career as a be your guy. predator drone at Bain Capital: You say Romney is an unprinciIsn’t it the exact sort of backpled faker. Fair enough – he is. ground you always insist politicHe’s so plastic he’s almost aniians ought to have as you wave matronic. your copy of “Atlas Shrugged” in I know, I know: For almost the air?It’s true that Romney said three years now you’ve dazzled that the bank bailouts of 2008-09 the world with your proclamawere necessary, while you regard tions that we’re being dragged them as a mortal sin against into “tyranny,” that the country is free-market principles. But you being “destroyed,” that America shouldn’t hold this against him. Any study of bank history reveals needs to be “saved” – and now here comes Mitt, with his fondthat free-marketeers have no ness for workaday compromise, problem doling out, or grabbing for, government money when the ruining your carefully contrived atmosphere of panic. chips are down. But give the man credit: He has After all, President Herbert tried. He’s no stranger to the core Hoover himself distributed bank tea party myth of the noble busibailouts in the early years of the nessman persecuted by big govDepression. Ronald Reagan’s administration rescued Continen- ernment. Indeed, at the Conservatal Illinois from what was then the tive Political Action Conference in largest bank failure in our history. 2009, he opened his talk this way: “I gotta get through this speech The reason they did these before federal officials come here things should be as obvious as it and arrest me for practicing capis simple: “free market” always italism.” has been a high-minded way of With Romney, a centimilliosaying “gimme,” and when the naire venture capitalist, carrying heat rises, the “market” is invaryour banner in 2012, you will iably replaced by more direct finally get to submit your capmethods, such as demanding bailouts from the government you sized vision of social class to the

COMMENTARY

He’s no stranger to the core tea party myth of the noble businessman persecuted by big government. verdict of the people. You will get to explain your peculiar conviction that the way to react to a gigantic slump brought on by frenzied finance is to further unshackle Wall Street. You will get to go into battle for the job creators, which is what all capitalists are, right? (OK, maybe not the guys at Bain Capital, the particular outfit where Romney made his pile, but the theory is all that really matters, isn’t it?) Social issues be damned! Romney will ensure that we get the one thing that this country can’t do without on its path to hell: further deregulation of Wall Street. The nation’s all-powerful elitist socialists will, of course, disagree, and you’ll have a field day, raging and weeping at the way they are going to set out to persecute this noble, wealth-creating soul. Pity the billionaire: It will be a powerful rallying cry for 2012. Yours in petulant individualism, Tom Thomas Frank’s most recent book is “Pity the Billionaire: The Hard-Times Swindle and the Unlikely Comeback of the Right.” He is the “Easy Chair” columnist for Harper’s Magazine and founding editor of “The Baffler.” A longer version of this piece can be found at tomdispatch.com.

LETTERS FROM READERS

Geisinger lauded for tobacco policy

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e at the American Lung Association in Pennsylvania were pleased to learn of Geisinger Health System’s decision to consider the health and wellness of its employees and implement a tobacco-free hiring policy. Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death in the nation. In Pennsylvania, it is responsible for 20,000 yearly adult deaths, $519 billion in health care costs and $4.73 billion in productivity losses. A major cause of emphysema, lung cancer, chronic bronchitis and coronary heart disease, the threat of tobacco cannot be understated. A tobacco-free workplace results in many benefits, including savings in medical and workplace costs, but ultimately healthier employees. As we continue to advocate for tobacco control and pre-

MOUNTAIN LAURELS Mountain Laurels is a regular series of letters from readers conveying thanks to individuals or groups for their support, help or kindness.

vention through funding, comprehensive clean indoor air legislation and adequate and accessible cessation coverage, policies such as those recently implemented by Geisinger Health System help to reduce the devastating toll of tobacco. Deb Brown President and CEO American Lung Association of the Mid-Atlantic Harrisburg

UPS a proud ally of U.S. Marines

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his note is to publicly thank everyone who contributed to the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve’s “Toys for Tots” campaign this Christmas season.

This was the seventh year that our business has had the privilege of teaming with the Marine Corps for this event. During these challenging economic times the generosity of the people in this community never ceases to amaze me. The UPS Store at the Midway Shopping Center in Wyoming also took part in the Marine Corps’ literacy program, in which every dollar collected results in the purchase of a book for needy children. The combined value of contributions exceeded $3,000 from this location alone! Thank you and happy new year to all. John Minetola Owner The UPS Store Midway Shopping Center Wyoming

Larksville Lions thanked for gift

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e thank the Larksville Lions Club for the gift of a holiday fruit basket that we received during the holiday C. Mazur Plymouth

Former player honors Van Rose

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t is a very sad time in the Wyoming Valley sports world with the passing of The Times Leader sports journalist Van Rose. I had the honor of knowing Mr. Rose through his coverage of high school girls’ basketball, and I was deeply saddened to learn of his death. As a former high school basketball player at James M. Coughlin High School in Wilkes-Barre, our paths cross-

ed frequently as Mr. Rose covered numerous girls’ basketball games and was a visible individual in the gym during games. He was a reporter who truly loved his job, and that always showed in the quality of work he created. Mr. Rose was undeniably devoted to girls’ basketball. He was enthusiastic and seemingly knew everything and everyone in the basketball world. He was often seen speaking to players, coaches, officials and supporters. It always was my pleasure to be interviewed by Mr. Rose, who had a knack for making you feel very important and at ease. I always respected him and enjoyed his interviews. I often marveled at his knowledge of basketball, but it was his knowledge of the individual players that always commanded even more respect. He made a serious business of identifying and telling a story about any basketball game that he covered in a factual and interesting way.

He also made that game come alive to the readers and presented many facts of which the fans were unaware. He had a passion for basketball and he was able to complement it with his skill of writing. He was professionally superb and always was pleasant to those people he interviewed, while he worked tirelessly to bring some practice of equality to the sport that he loved. I express my heartfelt condolences to his family, friends and co-workers. Mr. Rose was a remarkable man and he certainly made a positive difference in the lives of many people. Behind his serious exterior was a warm and genuine man who always was at the top of his game. His contributions to the sports world will not be forgotten. He was a true journalist and, in my eyes, a basketball legend. Lauren McGinley Wilkes-Barre


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Lesson remains after 25 years: Humans are a part of the economy THE UNITED States Conference of Catholic Bishops published in 1986 the pastoral letter “Economic Justice for All: Catholic Social Teaching and the U.S. Economy,” which synthesized the view of the national economy and its role in American society. Essentially, the bishops outlined how the economy should exist for the people – not people for the economy – and that all people have a corresponding duty to work and to contribute to our society. More than 25 years later, the message of the pastoral letter rings loudly today in the form of Tea Party activists and the throngs participating in the Occupy Wall Street and other national movements. In each instance, the general feeling of demonstrators is that the economy is failing the people. The key concern of 1986 is the same in 2012: Is our economic system serving society well, especially the poor? Economic decisions must be judged as to whether civil and political rights are being met alongside the right to the necessities of life. That’s why the pastoral letter merits another look.

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TIMOTHY F. KEARNEY AND THOMAS SWEETZ In developing their thinking further in the 1996 update, “A Catholic Framework for Economic Life,” the bishops took the position that “In economic life, free markets have both clear advantages and limits; government has essential responsibilities and limitations; voluntary groups have irreplaceable roles, but cannot substitute for the proper working of the market and the just policies of the state.” Their straightforward idea is that the economy works for society only when the public and private sectors work together to promote prosperity and social justice for all. Free markets are very good at allocating scarce resources and assessing value. Ever more efficient asset generation is what defines economic growth;

do what is legal, but rather: Do what is ethical and moral. Our lives are entwined with our occupations at both the material and spiritual levels. To reduce every inch of economic life to nothing more than whatever market principles call for is to deny the human aspect of the economy. In short, the concerns of the pastoral letter are still with us today. High unemployment, foreclosures and our ever-growing debt remain obstacles to full participation in the country’s economic life. We need all of the institutions of our society – government, the private sector and social service agencies – to address these issues in a manner that is fiscally responsible and beneficial for all, while maintaining a moral and social aspect to the decisions being made. Timothy F. Kearney is an assistant professor of business at Misericordia University in Dallas Township. He can be reached at tkearney@misericordia.edu. Thomas Sweetz is an adjunct professor of business. He can be reached at tsweetz@misericordia.edu.

LETTERS FROM READERS

On HHS freezes: Enough is enough

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in short, doing more with less. Howev- healthy economy. Excessive debt levels impinge on er, growth only happens if there is a growth in two key ways. High debt prosperity-oriented framework under which to operate. Government policies levels make it difficult to undertake important infrastructure investments on taxation, regulation, protection of that require long-term financing. property rights and public finance set What’s more, high debt levels generate that framework. Mindless asset generpressure for higher taxes to avoid the ation is not an end to itself. Indeed, the Catholic bishops remind necessary restructuring of fiscal spending priorities. These two constraints us that the economy should be mearetard growth and make debt control sured by how the less fortunate are doing. This dimension puts the respon- even more difficult, kicking off the debt death spiral on display in Greece. sibility on the government to balance Catholic social justice teaches that the need to promote economic growth while at the same time maintaining the the private sector has responsibilities good working order of the social insur- beyond the narrow objective of maximizing profits. Rather, as the bishops’ ance system. 1996 updated stated: “workers, owners, This backdrop begs the question: What is the social, moral and economic managers, stockholders and consumers are moral agents in economic life. By responsibility to help the poor in a country? This question goes straight to our choices, initiative, creativity and investment, we enhance or diminish the heart of the political turbulence economic opportunity, community life globally brought about by the debt and social justice.” crises. It is the responsibility of the This is an important call to duty. government to maintain the financial Mere participation in the marketplace integrity of safety net programs. High and paying taxes is not a full economic deficits and excessive debt levels are a life. The exhortation is not merely to threat to the social safety net and a

am alarmed by the Corbett administration’s freeze on state funding for health and human services. This “freeze” eliminates services to hurting people while our elected officials continue political gamesmanship and inaction on alternative solutions to a temporary shortfall. This “crisis” flows from political and ideological tactics employed last spring as part of the budget deal. Revenue expectations for the year were spread more heavily over the first six months, instead of evenly over the entire 12, creating an early bleak picture of state finances as we head into the 2012-2013 budget debate. The administration also agreed to a budget that relied on cost savings far in excess of what the budget

secretary, whom I deeply respect, said could be achieved. We are likely to end the year with a surplus for the second consecutive year. And we need it for the people in every Pennsylvania community who rely on a little support to continue working, caring for an elderly parent or escaping the devastating impacts of violence. This is the fifth year of cuts to health and human services, at a time when more people need them. We cannot afford further cuts. I agree with Sen. Joe Scarnati that solutions to the state’s problems exist, and they require compromise and action by everyone. Pennsylvanians who need health and human services already have compromised greatly over the past decade of cutbacks. The Legislature and governor should enact the revenue opportunities available and maintain the safety

net of state-funded local services. Peg Dierkers Executive director Pennsylvania Coalition Against Domestic Violence Harrisburg

GOP neglects our most vulnerable

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t would appear that Gov. Tom Corbett, with the approval and consent of the Republican majority in the state House and Senate, has abdicated responsibility yet again in 2012, as was the case in 2011. The Republicans are choosing to support corporate welfare, all while claiming fiscal responsibility at the expense of those most vulnerable: our seniors, our children and our disabled Pennsylvanians. This goes on while the Marcellus Shale natural gas industry continues to avoid paying its

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fair share, which has cost Pennsylvanians nearly $300 million in lost revenue, and the “Delaware loophole” is still alive and well, allowing Pennsylvania corporations to use Delaware as a tax haven. This further exacerbates a problem in Lackawanna County, where residents and taxpayers, who are unfortunately experiencing the highest rate of unemployment in the state, bear the burden of a politically motivated shell game that has shifted responsibility for funding human services, education and senior programs to local school districts and municipalities. The move results in significant increases in taxes not only for Scrantonians, but for all Lackawanna County residents. This is not based on budget realities, economics or even common sense, but solely on political ideology. I am committed to working with my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to correct

these inequities and reprioritize the budget to make it fair for hardworking Pennsylvanians – a budget that will focus on education, human services and an environmental policy that protects our state and helps to create jobs. State Rep. Kevin Murphy Scranton

Atheist does not equal ‘bad person’

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eligion is one topic on which the people of this world are never going to agree. How the world is today, I find myself standing up for atheists more than I should have to. Before I go further, I would like to point out that my religious views are completely irrelevant in this letter. It does not matter if I am Catholic, Jewish, Muslim or even undecided. My opinion on this topic would remain unchanged.

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Some people think that just because a person is an atheist, he or she does not have morals. Just because someone does not believe in a superior being does not mean she is not going to do the right thing. I know very religious people who refrain from doing the wrong thing only because of their constant fear of going to hell. Isn’t the whole point of morals to do the right thing because you know it is right – and not because you know there will be a reward in the end? Atheists are not bad people. Don’t get me wrong, some will be. But they aren’t bad because they are atheists. People need to stop judging others by considering what kind of person they might be based entirely on their beliefs. Instead, judge them on their interests and values.

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CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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LETTERS FROM READERS

Health system snuffs out rights

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am so outraged at Geisinger Health System and its policy banning people who smoke from getting jobs there. And why is it now that we hear of it? There are a lot of issues that I foresee coming from opening this can of worms. But first, let me ask this: Has anyone told them we are not a communist country? Yes, I smoke. No, I don’t work for Geisinger. But what about those people who do? Are they going to be fired for their addiction? Or is Geisinger going to invest the time, effort and cost to help them? Yes, smoking is a health risk. I’m just so sick of people picking on us for it! I smoke in my house and car. I ask if it’s OK before I light up in front of others; if not, then I don’t. I don’t smoke if I’m out walking. I do take others’ considerations seriously. Yet what about our rights? The Fifth Amendment of the Constitution provides that no person can be deprived of life, liberty or property without process of law. The TaftHartley Act of 1947 forbids employers from discriminating against an employee. Take a stand! I might not work there, but I will do what I can to help you and others take a stand! Aggie Barberio Wilkes-Barre

Compromise key to a better 2012

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am writing to ask our public figures, as we enter the new year, to consider what their responsibilities are to their communities, state and country. Their first priority should be to govern in a way that ensures we receive the most effective, efficient government possible. The challenge to doing that is charting a

SEND US YOUR OPINION Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification. Letters should be no more than 250 words. We reserve the right to edit and limit writers to one published letter every 30 days. • Email: mailbag@timesleader.com • Fax: 570-829-5537 • Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., WilkesBarre, PA 1871 1

course, and programs, that will make such government achievable. The difficulty today is we have divided parties whose beliefs often conflict. The result is we end up in situations in which crucial decisions can’t be reached by appointed deadlines. Each side has principles leading to certain approaches, such as decreasing taxes or providing more program support to people in need. Unfortunately, the separation between the various groups philosophically is so large, necessary decisions are not being made. I believe the largest roadblock to getting our government working well is the absence of respect and tolerance in Washington, Harrisburg and Luzerne County. The result is the “other guys” are the bad guys, and they have to be defeated. This leads to the worst of results: win-lose. Someone wins and someone loses, and that’s that. But governing is not the Super Bowl or World Series. The idea is not that there must be winners and losers. True leadership in the national (or state or local) sense needs to find solutions that work for all. Compromise and creativity need to be given a chance. But to get to that point each of us needs to realize that opposing groups, just as much as we do, want the best results in our government. We need to respect each other’s desires and principles, and be tolerant of their efforts to put them into law. And we must agree to negotiate to arrive at decisions that can accommodate both sides.

The United States would not have become the power it is today except that the large states and small states came to recognize each other’s concerns and established a Senate, in which each state has two senators, and a House, in which representatives are elected based on population This spirit of compromise has made the nation great, and it is time the spirit of compromise, tolerance and respect return to our capitals. There are answers to our problems. We just need to work them out. America deserves nothing less.

Luzerne County and the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection to monitor the recycling efforts of the local municipalities. • Based upon the total tonnage recycled by Plymouth each year, the borough council is able to pursue a state recycling performance grant. The grant funding can be used for a variety of public projects. The grant funds help the council to avoid an increase in property taxes! • Recycling helps lower trash disposal costs. • And most of all, recycling is essential to preserving our environment while conserving our natural resources. Recycling helps to promote the development of alternative fuel sources and helps to reduce the landfill space required for waste disposal. John Z. Thomas Code enforcement officer Plymouth

Heed Jefferson’s Recycling reports fearful words aid wallets, Earth T George E. Kauffman III Sugarloaf Township

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lymouth is required each year to submit to Luzerne County a report of recycling activities within the borough. This includes the total tonnage of materials recycled through Plymouth’s recycling program, as well as materials recycled by private businesses operating within the borough. Borough council previously has adopted an ordinance that requires businesses to report their recycling activity to the borough on an annual basis. Forms to report recycling activity have been sent. They must be completed and returned to the borough administration office by Feb. 3. Please contact me with any questions at 779-1011. The completion of the report is important for several reasons: • The information contained in the report is used by

he freedoms Americans once held dear are being thrown under the carpet! Organizations that don’t believe in truth and real love for people are changing the rules that our great nation fought so hard to achieve! Let’s go back to one of our patriots whose biography is outstanding. Thomas Jefferson was a great intellectual and strong believer in the rights of individuals. He believed that if Americans would follow a certain criteria, our country would thrive. “The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against the tyranny in government,” he said. It starts with limited gun control. Do you realize how many Jews, Christians, mentally challenged people, socalled unproductive citizens, highly educated people and others were slaughtered because they couldn’t protect

themselves? The same sinister minds seemingly are at work in America today. Is this what Thomas Jefferson surmised could happen? Jefferson also stated, “To compel a man to subsidize with taxes the propagation of ideas which he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical.” Why is our tax money supplying funds for abortions here and around the world? Around the inside of the Jefferson Memorial in Washington, D.C., are the immortal words of Thomas Jefferson. “I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just, that his justice cannot sleep forever.” We need to pray for truthful, honest, moral candidates to turn America back to “the land of the free and the home of the brave!” Maria Landue McAdoo

Moral politicians can save America

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eople of Northeastern Pennsylvania must recognize and support politicians with moral certitude. Voting for someone because of ethnic or party affiliation diminishes one’s moral values. Political expediency is the ruination of America. We should respect the unborn and the living. Family values come from valuing families. Rick Santorum and Tim Holden would make an honest attempt to modify, transform, enrich and reconstruct morals and ethics in government. Santorum, a Republican candidate for the presidency, and Holden, a Democratic congressman, are Christian men with outstanding characters, having the fortitude to change the political structure toward the common good of society. Both would avoid political hypocrisy and treat everyone with respect, sub-

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mitting to God-given authority. As a member of the American Independent Party who ran for Luzerne County Council, my platform was based on this slogan: “Principles over politics.” Therefore my criterion is to support individuals who will be guided by biblical principles and the moral laws of God. Santorum and Holden fit this criterion. They are viable candidates. Charles Hatchko Jenkins Township

Baby in a womb is quite capable

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n the United States, there are approximately 1.36 million abortions each year. That’s 1.36 million lives that could have been saved. How much does it take to become a murderer? One abortion. Many people debate that life doesn’t begin until a baby is born. But the facts are inevitable. At four weeks from conception, a baby’s eyes, ears and respiratory system begins to form. A baby’s brainwaves can be detected at six weeks from conception. At eight weeks, a baby’s heartbeat can be detected by ultrasonic stethoscope. By nine weeks all the structures necessary for pain sensation are functioning. Also by nine weeks from conception, a baby is able to bend his or her fingers around an object in his or her hand. By 11 weeks from conception, the baby is breathing fluid steadily and continues to do so until birth. And 16 weeks from conception, a baby is capable of hearing his or her mother’s heartbeat and external noises, such as music. If that is not life, what is? Everyone deserves life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. No matter what the circumstance. Amber Baab Fairview Township

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gested changes to the federal education law known as No Child Left Behind, Republicans proposed scrapping 43 school programs, including the Carol M. White Physical Education Program, which gives PE grants to local school districts. Many Republicans on the panel said that giving money to the schools to promote PE was an inappropriate role for the federal government. But the program survived and in December, Congress signed off on $78.8 million in grants for 2012. Currently, only five states — Illinois, Iowa, Massachusetts, New Mexico and Vermont — require physical education every year from kindergarten through 12th grade. And no federal law requires PE to be offered. Last year, Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell vetoed a bill that would have required the state’s public schools to teach PE in elementary and middle schools, calling the measure an unfunded mandate. Forty-eight states have their own standards for physical education, but only two-thirds of them require local districts to comply with them, according to a 2010 report by the National Association for Sport and Physical Education, known as NASPE. The report, called “Shape of the Nation,” said that nearly twothirds of all high school students are not getting enough exercise, with more than a third of them

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for the draft.” Strictly speaking, it’s true that fathers were not eligible to be drafted at that time — just as students got deferments and were not eligible to be compelled into the armed forces then. That doesn’t mean Gingrich couldn’t serve; he could have joined the military voluntarily. It only means the government couldn’t

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Currently, only five states — Illinois, Iowa, Massachusetts, New Mexico and Vermont — require physical education every year from kindergarten through 12th grade. And no federal law requires PE to be offered. watching television for at least three hours a day. NASPE, along with many health organizations, recommends that students exercise for at least an hour every day. And the group suggests that schools provide at least 150 minutes per week of PE for elementary-age children and 225 minutes for middle and high school students. Alabama is the only state that’s complying with the recommendations. Rep. Joe Baca, D-Calif., is sponsoring a bill that would put NAPSE’s recommendations into law. If Congress doesn’t act, he said, obesity-related costs could hit $1 trillion a year by 2030 and could “literally bankrupt our nation.” After the October audit in New York, City Comptroller John Liu said that the city’s Department of Education “is failing gym.” His audit of 31 elementary schools found none complying with a requirement that they offer at least 120 minutes a week of physical education for students in kindergarten through sixth grade. Members of Congress are offering many different plans in an attempt to get kids exercising more. The FIT Kids Act co-sponsored by Smith — short for the Fitness Integrated with Teaching Kids Act — would measure schools on how they’re progress-

ing in comparison to national standards. And it would pay for research to examine the link between children’s health and their academic achievement. The bill is sponsored by Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, and Rep. Ron Kind, DWis. Rep. Marcia Fudge, D-Ohio, is sponsoring a bill that would give grants to schools to help them build or repair athletic facilities. And Rep. Kevin Brady, R-Texas, has introduced the PHIT Act, short for the Personal Health Investment Today Act, which would allow for the deduction or pre-tax use of $2,000 a year for families to pay for expenses related to sports, fitness and other physical activities. A group of 250 retired generals and admirals has joined the cause, as well, arguing that about a quarter of all young Americans weigh too much to join the military. The group, a nonprofit organization called Mission: Readiness, is worried that too many schools have eliminated physical education and aren’t serving enough healthy lunches. It wants Congress to reconsider its November decision to allow school cafeterias to continue serving pizza and French fries, when lawmakers rejected a plan by the Obama administration that would have limited servings of starchy vegetables and tomato paste.

conscript him. In a 1985 interview with The Wall Street Journal, Gingrich said: “Given everything I believe in, a large part of me thinks I should have gone over.” Then, he added: “Part of the question I had to ask myself was what difference I would have made.” As for Paul’s feelings on who should be in a position to send troops to war, it’s hardly a new sentiment. But the number of veterans who eventually found their way to Congress or the White House or as other national lead-

ers also has shifted with changing American times. The reality today is that less than1percent of Americans serve in the all-volunteer armed forces built after the draft was ended. That has meant a greatly diminished pool of veterans available to run for political office and far fewer serving in Congress than in the past. Upcoming budget cuts will shrink the force further. Over the nation’s history, about two-thirds of presidents have served in the military in some capacity.

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SECTION F SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

Scot Bruce portrays Elvis during the early part of his career.

Darius Rucker, originally of Hootie and the Blowfish fame, is now a charismatic country-music personality.

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ELVIS BIRTHDAY BUFFET Where: Genetti’s in Hazleton Cost: $20. $12 for students More info: 8610510

Mike Albert portrays Elvis from the ‘60s and ‘70s, when he performed in Las Vegas acts.

Prehistoric show helps family viewing evolve By GREG BRAXTON Los Angeles Times

LOSANGELES—“TerraNova”hasexhumed the Cretaceous period, but can it also help resurrect another block of time that would seem equally challenging to revive — the family viewing hour? The heavily promoted prime-time show, dubbed internally at Fox as “Little House on the Prairie With Dinosaurs,” is an eco-action-adventure series built around a family of five that travels back 85 million years to give humans a second chance at caring for Earth. The ratings havebeensolidfortheshow,whichcounts Steven Spielberg and former News Corp. President Peter Chernin among its many executive producers, but so far are hardly enough to prompt a wave of copycat family-friendly scripted programming. Instead, much of the fall-season buzz has centered on the parade of wise-cracking women as with “2 Broke Girls,” “New Girl” and “Whitney” or lackluster revamps of distinctive favorites such as the now-canceled “Charlie’s Angels” and the

“The notion that families are sitting in the living room and watching the same show together is more and more scarce.”

Brad Adgate Analyst for Horizon Media in New York

struggling “Prime Suspect.” Gone are the days in prime-time TV when shows like “The Cosby Show,” “Home Improvement,” “7th Heaven” or “The Bernie Mac Show”unabashedlycourtedafamilyaudience. Indeed, with the notable exception of “Terra Nova” and a handful of other programs, scripted shows in prime-time about families — for families — are on the verge of being as out of place as a T. Rex in the current Cenozoic era. The scarcity largely reflects societal and pop-culture See FAMILY, Page 4F

’Terra Nova’ follows an ordinary family on an incredible journey back in time to prehistoric Earth as part of an experiment to save the human race.

After Hootie, a whole new kettle of fish By JOSEPH HUDAK For The Times Leader

Darius Rucker likes to tell a story about the time he realized he had cultivated an entirely new fan base, one that didn’t know him primarily for his work as frontman of Grammy-winning rootsrock band Hootie and the Blowfish. No, this is an audience — and a young one at that —who sees the South Carolina native solely as the hit-making country singer he’s become today. “I remember one time we were playing a show and there were these two girls who were probably 13 or 14 years old. They were just crazy about the country songs and were singing along,” Rucker recalls. “But then we played (the Hootie hit) ‘Let Her Cry,’ and they sat down in their chairs and looked at each other like, ‘What’s this?’ IF YOU GO I’ll never forget it.” And with that, he Who: Darius Rucker erupts into laughter, When: 8 p.m. an enveloping guf- Friday faw from one of mu- Where: F.M. Kirby sic’s most gregarious Center, Wilkespersonalities. On Barre Friday night, he’ll Tickets: $92, $62, $52 showcase that cha- Call: 570-826risma, as well as his 1100 distinct voice, when he performs at the F.M. Kirby Center in Wilkes-Barre. The concert is a rare theater show for the 45-year-old, who has spent the past few summers playing amphitheaters with his country pals Brad Paisley and Rascal Flatts. Later this month, he’ll return to the big rooms when he joins the Lady Antebellum arena tour. “(The theater shows) are good because a lot of people who have seen me with Brad or Flatts can come out and see a different show,” says Rucker, who has five No. 1 singles to pepper throughout his set: “Don’t Think I Don’t Think About It,” “Alright,” “It Won’t Be like This for Long,” “Come Back Song” and his most recent No. 1, “This.” The success of his first single, 2008’s “Don’t Think I Don’t Think About It,” landed him not only atop the charts but also in country music’s history books — Rucker became only the third black artist to have a No.1 hit in the format. The other two? The inimitable Charley Pride and the legendary Ray Charles. And, as opposed to his achievements with Hootie, this success is all his own. As such, it resonates more fully for the solo artist. “The whole thing feels different. Hootie is such a band, and the four of us were so equal in everything we did,” Rucker says. “But this, this is all on me. “I was surprised to get my (record) deal,” he continues. “I thought, ‘I’ll get to make a record, and maybe they’ll let me make another one.’ But being able to make a third and having some success with the other two is pretty cool.” He unleashes another of those big laughs. “I feel like I’ve evolved into right where I’m supposed to be.” Still, for all his country cred, Rucker says he won’t deprive fans, especially those who came of age in the ’90s, of some Hootie and the Blowfish nostalgia. “I’d be ripping people off if I didn’t play the Hootie stuff,” he says. “I like people to hear the songs they want to hear. When they come to see you, they have that one song in mind that they sure hope you play, and I make sure we See RUCKER, Page 6F


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HOROSCOPE

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE

1/15/12

BONUS PUZZLE "STOUT AND THIN"

Peter A. Collins

DIAGRAMLESS

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The Sunday Crossword

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis

CRYPTOGRAMS

ARIES (March 21-April 19). This isn’t the first time that others have tried to shift their responsibilities to you and your experience has made you wise. You can’t be tricked into doing anything you don’t want to do. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You’ll gather the facts and then carefully think things through. It’s perfectly acceptable not to make a move at all. Better to be sure than to rush into a situation that will be difficult to get out of. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Be careful not to be so focused on your mission that you miss what else is happening around you. The scenery will be pretty great, and you’ll enjoy watching people be themselves in different settings. CANCER (June 22-July 22). Your relationships are the most important to you. The action necessary to pursue your goals may not seem like a top priority as you do what’s necessary to take care of your loved ones. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). You may behave modestly because you don’t want or need much attention on certain aspects of your life. However understated you may be, there will still be great curiosity and interest. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). You’re very independent now. People want to help you, but you may not receive the assistance because you want the satisfaction of knowing you did it all by yourself. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Just when you think things are running smoothly, family brings the kind of complications that make you laugh. What really matters is just being pleasantly together. The rest is icing on the cake. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Someone needs you to listen carefully and without distraction to what he or she wants to express. To give a high quality of attention is to show your love and respect. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). The half man, half horse creature that represents your sign could be either wild or civil, depending on the circumstances and his mood. You’ll express both of these sides of your nature. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). There is nothing to be gained from selfpunishment. If you haven’t behaved in the way you wanted to, make a new choice and move on. Give yourself more chances to get it right. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). Good luck sometimes goes masquerading as bad luck. Though you believe the fortunes will favor you, you wisely don’t presume to know exactly how. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). You won’t mind the heavy responsibilities of the day as long as it looks like you’re going somewhere. Even minimal progress is something. Let every piece of evidence count. TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (Jan. 15). You’ll be extremely good at picking out the person in the room who will benefit the most from knowing you and vice versa. Success depends on following through with contacts. Romantic relationships bring luck in February. Invest in March. April brings a windfall. Family additions will be featured in June. Sagittarius and Virgo adore you. Your lucky numbers are: 20, 1, 24, 38 and 4.

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UNIVERSAL SUDOKU

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WONDERWORD

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By David Ouellet

PREVIOUS DAY’S SOLUTION

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DEAR ABBY ADVICE

Man busy in retirement gets no respect from wife Dear Abby: I retired two years ago at age 50 after working for 30 years. My wife and I are financially secure and I’m enjoying every day of my retirement. However, my wife — who is younger — won’t be eligible to retire from her job for another five years. She is becoming more and more abrasive toward me. I suspect it’s because she’s jealous of my retirement status. She constantly accuses me of being lazy. Abby, I don’t sit around all day. In addition to doing the yard work, house upkeep, and repair and maintaining our cars, I do all the grocery shopping, help with the laundry, dishes, general cleanup and take care of our pets. Despite all this, my wife still bemoans my sleeping late in the morning (9 a.m.) and not going to a regular job like she does. I’m still young enough to get another job. Should I go back to work until she retires? — Should Be Happy in Tampa

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Dear Should Be Happy: That’s not a bad idea, but don’t start looking until your wife has told you plainly why she has become “abrasive.” Wouldn’t it be interesting if all she wanted was for you

MINUTE MAZE

JUMBLE

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New York Times

Cryptograms 1. A deft thief was caught with rubies hidden in his cabin. He was cruising near Ketchikan, Alaska. He was charged as an icebergler. 2. Crime does not pay, brayed the robber. Lovely! Does that mean I have a criminal position? 3. In legal terminology, now and then we run into glaring redundancies - such as criminal lawyer! 4. Criminals can now get educated and even receive actual diplomas. The most well-established is the proverbial "third degree." 1/15

HOW TO CONTACT: Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069

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to have a cup of coffee with her in the morning? It would be a shame if you went back to work only to realize that something else was causing her change in attitude. You deserve to know what’s going on because you do not appear to be lazy — quite the contrary. Dear Abby: My grandmother recently bought me a plane ticket to go visit her. In the airport on the way back home, the flight was overbooked and I agreed to be bumped to another flight in exchange for a free ticket to be used or given to someone else within a year. My mother says the free ticket belongs to my grandmother because she paid for it. I say I should use it for myself because it is compensation for the lost time and trouble of switching flights. What do you think? — Minnesota Traveler Dear Traveler: Your mother has a point. Offer the ticket to your grandmother. If you’re lucky, she’ll tell you to keep and enjoy it. If she doesn’t, at least you’ll know you did the right thing. To receive a collection of Abby’s most memorable — and most frequently requested — poems and essays, send a business-sized, selfaddressed envelope, plus check or money order for $3.95 ($4.50 in Canada) to: Dear Abby’s “Keepers,” P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included.)

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012 percent to 67 percent, according to statistics from the U.S. Census Bureau. Meanwhile, the family-viewing-hour policy, born from protests about the rising tide of sex and violence on TV in the early1970s, was scrapped by the courts within a couple of years, leaving the networks to pledge their best effort in maintaining suitable family programming in that prime-time hour. The dearth of family programming today also can be traced to a longstanding tension between the major networks and the creative community, which has gravitated toward darker and edgier material, particularly as cable became more of a force in Hollywood, said TV historian Tim Brooks. As shows have confronted more mature content, such as on HBO’s mobster-filled “Boardwalk Empire” or AMC’s meth-dealing chemistry teacher in “Breaking Bad,” adults have followed. And even current series that would seem family-friendly — “Modern Family,” “Glee” and Tim Allen’s new “Last Man Standing” — juggle often sexually charged themes and language that many deem inappropriate for children. “It’s like someone put red pepper flakes in the Jell-O pudding,” said Bill Cosby, the former Jell-O promoter and star of “The Cosby Show,” whose success brought a flood of new family programming in the 1980s. One of the few veteran primetime series that appears specifically targeted for families is ABC’s “The Middle,” starring Patricia Heaton. The critically acclaimed show about a lower-middle-class

FAMILY Continued from Page 1F

shifts over the past decades, but critics decry the conspicuous absence of scripted family shows, especially in a seemingly boundless programming universe. “It’s very difficult to program a show with broad-based family appeal,” said Brad Adgate, an analyst for Horizon Media in New York. “The notion that families are sitting in the living room and watchingthesameshowtogetherismore and more scarce. Shows have become so niche and hyper-targeted, soit’sjusthardtoputonashowthat will appeal to all age groups and genders.” Part of the reason families don’t sit passively before the almighty television anymore is that the digital age has produced so many entertainment alternatives — iPods, video games, social media, not to mention an explosion of diverse programming on cable. As the TV audience has scattered, programming has become more targeted to the individual viewer, not groups. Also, the family unit itself has markedly changed since the mid-1970s, when the Federal Communications Commission pressured the top three networks to institute a “family viewing hour” from8to9p.m.(ET).Overthepast four decades — as divorce and single parenthood climbed sharply — the percentage of children younger than 18 living in a two-parent household slid from roughly 85

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Midwestern family has been a decentratingsperformer—lastweek it drew 8.8 million viewers, which put it in 36th place. Brooks said there has been an evolution away from the scripted shows to reality programming such as “American Idol,” which are now being touted as family fare: “It’s the latest wave of reality that is filling the void. You see mostly clean-cut kids trying very hard. And audiences don’t really make a distinction between a scripted show and a reality show.” But even those reality shows contain moments that might raise the ire of some parents. The pilot of Fox’s “The X Factor” featured a contestant who removed his pants during his performance, which disgusted judge Paula Abdul so much she left the arena (the man’s offending parts on the show were covered up). The issue of family-friendly scripted television is particularly troublingtoMelissaHenson,director of communications for the Parents Television Council, a Los Angeles-based watchdog group that mostrecentlycalledforaboycottof NBC’s “The Playboy Club,” recently canceled. Pointing to films such as “Dolphin Tale,” “Real Steel” and Disney’s re-release of “The Lion King” in 3-D, Henson was vexed over television’s apparent lack of choices for families.

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“Not everyone has the luxury of taking their kids to the movies,” she said. “Being able to find something at home that families can watch at home is very important. There is a real hunger for programs like that. I wish Hollywood would be less worried about being edgy and more focused on stories and characters instead of controversy,” she added. That appetite was a prime motivator in prompting Fox to develop “Terra Nova,” said Terence Carter, Fox’s senior vice president, drama development. “Filling that need was absolutely part of our programming and development,” Carter said. “Before theseason,alloftheexecutivestalk about what might work. We looked at the negative space on TV and saw a real void there. ‘American Idol’ is one of the last great family shows, and we wanted to reclaim that in the scripted field. The arena we targeted was family adventure, as opposed to a family soap, which might skew much older.” “Terra Nova” was designed like a filmthatwouldplay“onthebiggest TV in the house” and hopefully would inspire the family to watch as a unit, he added. “We wanted to reclaim that attention from theatrical venues,” Carter said. “It’s an opportunity to get those eyeballs back.”

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You must be 17 with ID or accompanied by a parent to attend R rated features. Children under 6 may not attend R rated features after 6pm

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BEST SELLERS & Maxine Paetro. Little, Brown, $27.99 2. Love in a Nutshell. Janet Evanovich & Dorien Kelly. St. Martin’s, $27.99 3. Death Comes to Pemberley. P.D. James. Knopf, $25.95 4. 77 Shadow Street. Dean Koontz. Bantam, $28 5. 1 1/22/63. Stephen King. Scribner, $35 6. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest. Stieg Larsson. Knopf, $27.95 7. Locked On. Tom Clancy with Mark Greaney. Putnam, $28.95 8. The Litigators. John Grisham. Doubleday, $28.95 9. The Best of Me. Nicholas Sparks. Grand Central, $25.99 10. Kill Alex Cross. James Patterson. Little, Brown, $28.99

MASS MARKET 1. The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. Stieg Larsson. Vintage, $7.99 2. The Girl Who Played with Fire. Stieg Larsson. Vintage, $9.99 3. Spirit Bound. Christine Feehan. Jove, $7.99 4. A Game of Thrones. George R.R. Martin. Bantam, $8.99 5. The Jefferson Key. Steve Berry. Ballantine, $9.99 6. Whispers in the Dark. Maya Banks. Berkley, $7.99 7. Hidden Summit. Robyn Carr. Mira, $7.99 8. On Lavender Lane. JoAnn Ross. Signet, $7.99 9. You... Again. Debbie Macomber. Mira, $7.99 10. A Clash of Kings. George R.R. Martin. Bantam, $8.99 TRADE 1. The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. Stieg Larsson. Vintage, $15.95 2. The Help. Kathryn Stockett. Berkley, $16 3. Extremely Loud and Incredbly Close. Jonathan Safran Foer. Mariner, $14.95 4. Bossypants. Tina Fey. Back Bay/ Reagan Arthur, $15.95 5. Heaven Is for Real. Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent. Thomas Nelson, $16.99 6. The Girl Who Played with Fire. Stieg Larsson. Vintage, $15.95 7. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. Rebecca Skloot. Broadway, $16 8. The Tiger’s Wife. Tea Obreht. Random House, $15 9. The Zombie Survival Guide. Max Brooks. Three Rivers, $13.95 10. A Discovery of Witches. Deborah Harkness. Penguin, $16

PAGE 5F

KING

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

Continued from Page 1F

Loss, love mingle in the Southwest canyons By KENDAL WEAVER

For The Associated Press

“Come in and Cover Me,” (Riverhead Books), by Gin Phillips:

R

en Taylor, the appealing, soul-searching character at the heart of this novel, is an archaeologist of some renown in the canyons of the New Mexico desert. She has uncovered an extraordinary set of

exotic ceramic pottery of a 12th-century artist of the Mimbres, a long-

vanished tribe of Native Americans; now she wants to flesh out the artist’s puzzling story. With the help of a colleague and would-be lover, Silas Cooper, she begins to do so. But she will need something more to show the way — ghostly visitations by the prehistoric artist herself, named Lynay, as well as by an older Mimbres woman, Non. For Ren, these encounters with the dead have a precedent. Her brother Scott, who died at 17 in a car accident when she was 12, has been making playful, song-filled visits with her for years. With a sure hand, the book’s author, Gin Phillips, weaves this strand of the supernatural through a compelling modern story of love and loss. “Come in and Cover Me” is Phillips’ second novel. Her first, “The Well and the Mine,” was set in a Depression-era town in her native Alabama. Published in 2008, it had an introduction by Alabama author and actress Fannie Flagg and made Phillips a new writer of promise. Relocating her fictional terrain to the sweeping vistas of the Southwest, Phillips has mined scholarly archaeological research to bring historical texture to her latest novel and

give life to the intriguing Mimbres people and culture. Set in 2009, when Ren is 37 and enamored of the slightly older Silas, the story ranges far beyond the dust of an archaeological dig with its tedious scrapings, screenings and brushings. Amid the canyon outcroppings, romance is in the air. When Ren and Silas first meet at a remote site, their sleeping quarters — a bunkhouse with two bedrooms and a shared bath — opens the door to intimacy. The story also moves back and forth in time, as Ren’s memories, both touching and wrenching, reflect on her once-happy family and how it was shattered by her brother’s death. Silas, too, recalls memorable events from his youth, some of them hair-raising, that have shaped him into a self-reliant man. But it is the emotionally scarred and at times mystical Ren who drives the narrative. She is not just searching for answers to the puzzling life story of the prehistoric artist whose hands shaped lovely bowls. There’s the puzzle of her own life as well.

newly renovated Alice C. Wiltsie Performing Arts Center, in the former Hazleton High School, which has been lovingly known for years as “the castle.” The show comes on the heels of Elvis’ January birthday. “Of course, we have to celebrate Elvis’ birthday,” said Cindy Garren, executive director of the arts center. “I’ve seen this show a couple of times. (It’s played to sold-out audiences in Stroudsburg and Lancaster.) It’s a great, great family show. A lot of people will bring their 10-, 11- and 12-yearold kids. The kids have fun. People show up dressed in Elvis outfits. “These guys are not campy,” Garren said of Scot Bruce and Mike Albert, who portray Elvis at different stages in his career. “They do it seriously.” “We don’t do Elvis in first person,” said Albert, who portrays the more mature Elvis, from the Las Vegas days. “It’s a true tribute. We are fans, just like the people out in the audience. We’re not trying to be somebody we’re not. We are entertainers. “Elvis is our vehicle, and that’s a fine car to drive.” Recent weeks have seen an abundance of Elvis shows at regional venues from Penn’s Peak in Jim Thorpe to Grace Episcopal Church in Kingston to Fernwood Resort in Bushkill. Why is he still so popular, more than 30 years after his death? “My opinion is the songs are just that good,” said Bruce, who portrays the younger Elvis from the rockabilly days. “Most of the songs I do were recorded more than 50 years ago, but they’re just as catchy and just as relevant as when folks heard them on the radio for the first time. “Each generation, once they find out about this great music, that’s what keeps it going,” Bruce continued. “I play at Disneyland. It never ceases to amaze me. I see 4-year-olds who know all the words to ‘Hound Dog’ and ‘Don’t Be Cruel.’ ” “Elvis was one of a kind, a brilliant entertainer,” Bruce said. “The way he delivered the songs was unique. The music really infected him … the rhythm and the beat. He was very expressive. He moved the way the spirit of rock-’n’-roll moved him.” Does Bruce deliver the songs with the same hip-swiveling style? “That’s something I have to work on,” he said. “It’s a work in progress. I wouldn’t presume to say I have it mastered.” It’s important to remember Elvis’ musical talents spanned genres other than rock-’n’-roll, said Albert, who admires Elvis’ renditions of “How Great Thou Art” and “The American Trilogy,” which includes “The Battle Hymn of the Republic.” “The three times he won a Grammy, it was always for gospel music,” Albert said. “I think that was because he was a believer.” After the Jan. 22 concert, audience members can head over to Genetti’s on Route 309 for the Elvis Birthday Buffet, which will include the Southern specialties Presley liked to eat as well as a birthday cake. Albert and Bruce will meet and greet the guests, and an Elvis trivia contest will take place. “Really, when you think about it, Elvis was probably the first worldwide pop artist,” performing arts center director Garren said. “I’ve been on Google looking at Elvis fan clubs. They have them in Scotland. They have them in Australia.”


CMYK PAGE 6F

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

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THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

Plan to travel this year? Five family-friendly ideas By LYNN O’ROURKE HAYES The Dallas Morning News

AP PHOTOS

The sun sets behind cacti in McDowell Mountain Regional Park in Fountain Hills, Ariz. Exploring the desert at night is a stark contrast to the heat and blue skies of daytime.

DESERT AFTER DARK Exploring Sonoran Desert at night is solemn experience By CHARMAINE NORONHA

P

Associated Press

HOENIX — “Everything in the Sonoran Desert either sticks, stings, bites or eats meat. There are quite a few things you don’t want to touch, and in the dark

it’s harder to discern between safe and scary,” said tour guide Bruce Leadbetter as he

geared up to lead a night hike of McDowell Mountain Regional Park in Fountain Hills, northeast of Phoenix. nix). Jeep tours from Arizona Territorial Adventures — www.arizonaterritorialadventures.com/ — offer expeditions June-October to see the moonrise over the rugged desert terrain (www.arizonaterritorialadventures.com, $80); other times of year, the company offers daytime desert trips. The nighttime treks from 360 Adventures are arranged upon request, year-round, at $200 for the first person, $80 each additional person and, for a group of six or more, a flat for $80 each (www.360-adventures.com/). Then there are the local culinary adventures. Hole-in-the-Wall is a Phoenix smokehouse with a great view that offers barbecue fare grilled on its vintage outdoor smoker and barbecue pit. The chicken is finger-lickin’ good and the cornbread moist (www.squawpeakhilton.com/ dining/hole-in-the-wall). The restaurant’s backyard feast for two is $23 a person at the Pointe Hilton Squaw Peak Resort, 7677 N. 16th St. In Phoenix’s cool Roosevelt Row neighborhood, try Barrio Cafe at 2814 N.16th St., decorated with Day of the Dead artwork

Interpretive ranger Amy Burnett holds a Sonoran desert toad during a tour of the McDowell Mountain Regional Park in Fountain Hills, Ariz.

(barriocafe.com/). Its exceptional Mexican fare by award-winning chef Silvana Salcido Esparza includes shrimp tacos, pomegranate-infused guacamole, stuffed peppers and sweet-potato mash; menu prices range $10-$26. For a fun if kitschy Western atmosphere, Greasewood Flat, a one-time stagecoach stop in Scottsdale from the 1880s, hosts country-music nights with live bands on weekends with line dancing in the outdoor eating area (www.greasewoodflat.net, 27375 N. Alma School Parkway). Also in Scottsdale, The Mission offers good martinis and mojitos, plus Latin cuisine (www.themissionaz.com/, 3815 N. Brown Ave.).

RUCKER Continued from Page 1F

do.” At a Grammy-sponsored showcase in New York City last month, Rucker wowed an enthusiastic crowd with stories and songs, including all those Hootie hits and a party-hearty cover of Steve Miller’s “The Joker.” A fan of classic country, the singer-songwriter also has been known to interpret Hank Williams Jr.’s “Family Tradition” and, at a recent celebration of country music at the White House, duetted on Townes Van Zandt’s “Pancho and Lefty” with Kris Kristofferson. “I got to play for pretty much every living president,” Rucker says, amazed. “It’s a crazy thing to say.”

BROADWAY SHOW BUS TRIPS

The fact that the Hootie material blends so seamlessly with the more twangy fare from Rucker’s first two Nashville albums, “Learn to Live” and “Charleston, SC 1966,” shouldn’t come as much of a surprise. If “Let Her Cry,” “Only Wanna Be with You” or “Hold My Hand” were released today, they’d fit right in on the more pop-oriented country radio. Yet Rucker is looking toward the future. He’s already plotting his third country album, which he hopes to record in his hometown of Charleston, S.C. “I love Nashville, but it’s one of those things where Charleston has a different feel. It’s where I’m from,” the father of three says. “And my wife would love for me to be home.” Sure, a new fan base is great, but there’s no place like a home base.

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cactus lived up to its name. For the most part, though, exploring the Sonoran on that moonlit night was an almost solemn experience and a stark contrast to the heat and blue skies of a daytime trip. In the evening, the sinking sun beams a fiery light over the mustard-red buttes, spires and mesas, and you gradually adjust to the calm of the cool air and dark and quiet landscape with dilated pupils and a heightened awareness. Depending on the time of year, lizards, toads and other nocturnal creatures also may be spotted. In addition to privately arranged expeditions like the one offered by 360 Adventures, McDowell Mountain Regional Park offers public monthly moonlit tours led by interpretive ranger Amy Burnett for just $6 a carload (www.maricopa.gov/parks/ mcdowell/). Other ways of exploring the desert include hot-air balloon rides from Hot Air Expeditions — www.hotairexpeditions.com — with desert launches for sunrise trips daily throughout the year and sunset trips November-March ($175 per person or $195 with hotel pickup in Phoe-

733466

The cautionary note was not necessarily comforting as I headed into the vastness of the desert after dark with a dozen other hikers. Nothing but the moon illuminated the shapes and shadows of barren trees, wiry plants and cacti. But then, like a sign from above, the near pitch black was ablaze with streams of bright white lights as meteoroid after meteoroid shot through the sky for what seemed like minutes. The natural fireworks were a prelude to several hours of darkness on a hike that mixed the mystical beauty of the desert at night with the humorous warnings from our guide, a former Marine and coowner of an outdoor adventure company called 360 Adventures. For example: “If you get lost, look for barrel cactus, they tend to always lean south.” But don’t get too close. Pointing at the “jumping cactus,” (also known as the cholla cactus), which looks like the pale lovechild of a cactus and a pine tree, Leadbetter warned that the species will pierce your skin with its sharp needles if you even just slightly brush against them. Moments later, someone in the group yelped as the jumping

What are your travel plans for 2012? Here are five ideas for your family to consider: 1. Travel to learn. More families are using their time away together to learn about themselves, other cultures and the changing nature of our global society. Consider a language imMC TI LL mersion program, a culUS TR AT tural exchange or IO N volunteer vacation. Learn about climate change in the far corners of the earth or ancient Contact: cruisecompete.com rituals in the deep reaches of 4. Consider train travel. Ride the South American jungles. Contact: crossculturalsolu- the rails with the kids and entions.org; spanishcontact.com; joy the scenery and a mode of transportation that recalls earthwatch.org 2. Book a packaged trip. The days gone by. From Harry Potcost of flights and hotel stays ter’s Hogwarts Express to Amcould rise as much as 5 percent trak’s landscape-rich Califorin 2012. Families can compen- nia Zephyr, travel by train alsate by choosing a travel pack- lows the family to sit back, reunwind and enjoy age that combines rooms, lax, flights and even car rentals. compelling vistas without the Taking advantage of negotiat- worries of traffic jams, driver ed and bundled rates can make fatigue, fast-food breaks or a trip to your chosen destina- concern about road conditions. Contact: amtrak.com;westtion more affordable and simcoastrailways.co.uk/ pler to book. 5. Embrace winter sports. Contact: expedia.com;travPerhaps this is the year to exelocity.com; travelzoo.com 3. Take a cruise. Cruise lines pand your winter sports expelure families aboard by offer- riences. Lace up the skates, ing sporting activities, food strap on the snowshoes, learn choices, original entertain- how mushers round up their ment and shore excursions de- sled dogs or consider an ice signed for everyone. From rock climb. Go downhill, crosswalls and wave pools to teen country, into the back-country night clubs and giant movie and then warm up in a steamscreens, kids and their parents ing hot spring. Skate-ski to will find plenty to smile about dinner served in a yurt or ride on a cruise. Newer ships pro- a horse-drawn sleigh that’s vide cabin configurations that headed to a cozy cabin where include room for families of six you and your family can savor or more via family suites, supper served fireside. Contact: bigsky.com;sunvalsleeping alcoves, fold-outs and ley.com adjoining rooms.

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18,998*

$

* 1.99% Based on 60 months. Must be approved under program guidelines. Tax & Tags Additional. Artwork for illustration purposes only. Not responsible for typographical errors. * See Salesperson for complete details.

AT Ken Pollock

www.kenpollocksuzuki.com

Hours M-F 9-8pm Sat 9-5pm

RTE I-81 • PITTSTON

731430 731430

PRE-OWNED 1-800-223-1111 CLOSE TO EVERYWHERE KEN SUPER CENTER WE’RE EASY TO FIND JUST OFF EXIT 175 POLLOCK 339 HWY 315, PITTSTON, PA

SCAN HERE FOR MORE INFO


PAGE 2G 135

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

Legals/ Public Notices

LEGAL NOTICE DEADLINES Saturday 12:30 on Friday Sunday 4:00 pm on Friday Monday 4:30 pm on Friday

150 Special Notices

PAYING $500 MINIMUM DRIVEN IN

Full size 4 wheel drive trucks

ALSO PAYING TOP $$$

for heavy equipment, backhoes, dump trucks, bull dozers HAPPY TRAILS TRUCK SALES 570-760-2035 542-2277 6am to 8pm

409

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Autos under $5000

CADILLAC `94 DEVILLE SEDAN

94,000 miles, automatic, front wheel drive, 4 door, air conditioning, air bags, all power, cruise control, leather interior, $3,300. 570-394-9004

Tuesday 4:00 pm on Monday Wednesday 4:00 pm on Tuesday Thursday 4:00 pm on Wednesday Friday 4:00 pm on Thursday Holidays call for deadlines You may email your notices to

WORK WANTED

experienced in home care. I will work in your home taking care of your loved one. Personal care, meal preparation and light housekeeping provided. References, background check also provided. Salary negotiable. 570-8369726 or (cell) 570-594-4165

mpeznowski@ timesleader.com

or mail to The Times Leader 15 N. Main Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711

150 Special Notices ADOPT:

Adoring couple longs to adopt a newborn. Giving secure life & endless love. Kelly & Peter 1-866-627-2220 Expenses Paid

Chocolate, Oysters & Roses at Genetti’s Valentines Event Feb. 10th call 820-8505 bridezella.net

DO YOU ENJOY PREGNANCY ?

Would you like the emotional reward of helping an infertile couple reach their dream of becoming parents? Consider being a surrogate. All fees allowable by law will be paid. Call Central Pennsylvania Attorney, Denise Bierly, at 814-237-7900

ALL JUNK CAR & TRUCKS WANTED Highest Prices Paid!!! FREE REMOVAL Call V&G Anytime 288-8995

Attorney Services

AFFORDABLE FEES Divorce DUI Adoption BANKRUPTCY debt relief agency helping people file bankruptcy IRS Tax Disputes Attorney Marjorie Barlow 570-344-6543

BANKRUPTCY

FREE CONSULT

Guaranteed Low Fees Payment Plan! Colleen Metroka 570-592-4796 Bankruptcy $595 Guaranteed Low Fees www.BkyLaw.net Atty Kurlancheek 825-5252 W-B DIVORCE No Fault $295 divorce295.com Atty. Kurlancheek 800-324-9748 W-B

SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY Free Consultation. Contact Atty. Sherry Dalessandro 570-823-9006

330

Child Care

CHILD DAYCARE available in my West Pittston home M-F available Jan 30th Contact 239-0265

360

Instruction & Training

EARN COLLEGE DEGREE ONLINE. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-2203984 www. CenturaOnline.com

ATVs/Dune Buggies

HONDA`09 REKON

Feels like a Katana day. Spicey yellowtail. Shrimp shumi. Scallop roll. The best restraunt in NEPA.

TRX 250CC/Electric shift. Like New. REDUCED $3,650. (570) 814-2554

TOMAHAWK`10

CHEVY ‘08 COBALT LS

CHRYSLER ‘04

CROSSROAD MOTORS

FORD `94 THUNDERBIRD Red coupe, auto,

Near Wegman’s 570-822-7359

09 JOURNEY SE $12,995 10 Malibu LS $11,495 10 Fusion SEL $14,995 09 ESCAPE XLT $11,995 10 SUZUKI SX4 $12,495 10COBALT SPORTY $9,995 Full Notary Service Tags & Title Transfers

BUICK `04 CENTURY

Well equipped. Power locks & windows. Auto. A/C. Excellent condition. 64k miles. Asking $6,200. Call 570-829-0886

570-436-5336 5 5 5 5 5 5

4 door. 4 cylinder. Auto. FWD. $2,850

Jeep ‘00 Cherokee 4 door. 4x4. $3,995

2 door. 6 cylinder. Auto. 112K 4x4. New tires. $2,150 Current Inspection On All Vehicles DEALER

PONTIAC ‘00 GRAND AM White. 4 door. 4

cylinder. Auto. AM/FM/CD. 155,000 miles. Extra snow tires on rims. New brake and inspection. Runs very good! $2,500 570-466-7427

WE BUY CARS Highest prices paid for good cars

Eastern Auto

570-779-9999 412 Autos for Sale

ACURA 06 TSX Leather. Moonroof. $9,880

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

AUDI `01 A6 QUATTRO

123,000 miles, 4.2 liter V8, 300hp, silver with black leather,heated steering wheel, new run flat tires, 17” rims, 22 mpg, German mechanic owned. $6,495. OBO. 570-822-6785

AUDI `04 A6 QUATTRO 3.0 V6. Silver. New tires & brakes. 130k highway miles. Leather interior. Heated Seats. $7,500 or best offer. 570-905-5544

AUDI `05 A4 1.8T

Cabriolet Convertible S-Line. 52K miles. Auto. All options. Silver. Leather interior. New tires. Must sell. $17,500 or best offer 570-954-6060

White with beige leather interior. New tires, sunroof, heated seats. 5 cd player 106,000 miles. Excellent condition. $5,300. OBO 570-451-3259 570-604-0053

ATV, 110 CC. Brand New Tomahawk Kids Quad. Only $695 takes it away! 386-334-7448 Wilkes-Barre

Pontiac ‘98 Grand Am G 2 door $2,495 Cadillac ‘98 Sedan DeVille $3,499 Chevy ‘92 Caprice low miles $1,999

CADILLAC `05 SRX All wheel drive,

traction control, 3.6 L V-6, power sunroof, autostick, leather interior, auto car starter, factory installed 6 CD disc changer, all power, memory seat. 39,000 miles. $21,000 570-453-2771

CHEVROLET `03 IMPALA 97,000 miles,

468

468

Auto Parts

Harry’s U Pull It

AS ALWAYS ****HIGHEST PRICES***** PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED VEHICLES!!! DRIVE IN PRICES Call for Details (570) 459-9901 Vehicles must be COMPLETE !!

Plus Enter to Win $500.00 Cash!! DRAWING TO BE HELD DECEMBER 31 www.wegotused.com

AFFORDABLE FEES Divorce DUI Adoption BANKRUPTCY debt relief agency helping people file bankruptcy IRS Tax Disputes Attorney Marjorie Barlow 570-344-6543

BANKRUPTCY

FREE CONSULT

Guaranteed Low Fees Payment Plan! Colleen Metroka 570-592-4796 Bankruptcy $595 Guaranteed Low Fees www.BkyLaw.net Atty Kurlancheek 825-5252 W-B

Lots of extras including leather & factory remote start. $10,999

KELLY

875 W. Market St. Kingston, PA. 570-287-2243

Selling your Camper? Place an ad and find a new owner. 570-829-7130

CHEVY ‘11 MALIBU LT Moonroof. 7K miles. $15,880

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

CHEVY ‘95 ASTRO

MARK III CONVERSION VAN. Hightop. 93K. 7 passenger. TV/VCP/Stereo. Loaded. Great condition. $3,495 (570) 574-2199

CHRYSLER `04 SEBRING LXI CONVERTIBLE

Low miles - 54,000. V6. FWD. Leather interior. Great shape. A/C. CD. All power. $7,200. Negotiable (570) 760-1005

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

CHEVROLET `08 IMPALA Excellent condition,

6 cylinder, 4x4, power steering and brakes, Air, 90,000 miles, inspected. $3,000. 570-477-5146

CHEVROLET ‘06 CORVETTE CONVERTIBLE

Silver beauty, 1 Owner, Museum quality. 4,900 miles, 6 speed. All possible options including Navigation, Power top. New, paid $62,000 Must sell $45,900 570-299-9370

310

DIVORCE No Fault $295 divorce295.com Atty. Kurlancheek 800-324-9748 W-B ESTATE PLANNING /ADMINISTRATION

Real Estate & Civil Litigation Attorney Ron Wilson 570-822-2345 Free Bankruptcy Consultation Payment plans. Carol Baltimore 570-822-1959 SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY Free Consultation. Contact Atty. Sherry Dalessandro 570-823-9006

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

DODGE `02 NEON

SXT. 4 door. Automatic. Yellow with black interior. Power windows & locks. FWD. $3,500. Call 570-709-5677 or 570-819-3140

EAGLE `95 TALON

Only 97,000 Miles. Full custom body kit, dark green metallic with gray interior. Dual exhaust, 4 coil over adjustable struts. All new brakes, air intake kit, strut brakes, custom seats, custom white gauges, 2 pillar gauges, new stereo, alarm, custom side view mirrors. 4 cylinder automatic, runs excellent. $8,500. Call 570-876-1355 or 570-504-8540 (evenings)

FORD `07 MUSTANG CONVERTIBLE

34K. V6. 17” wheels. Shaker. 6 disc. Satellite. Mileage computer. New winter tires. Power seat/leather. $16,750. (570) 474-0943

‘10 Dodge Caravan SXT 32K. Silver-Black. Power slides. Factory warranty. $17,199 ‘09 Jeep Libery Limited Power sunroof. Only 18K. Factory Warranty. $19,699 ‘09 DODGE CALIBER SXT 2.0 Automatic, 24k Factory Warranty! $11,899 ‘08 CHEVY IMPALA LS Only 18K! One Owner - Estate Sale. Factory Warranty. $11,999 ‘08 SUBARU Special Edition 42k, 5 speed, AWD. Factory warranty. $13,099 ‘08 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 4x4, Regular Cab, 63K, Factory Warranty $13,099 ‘08 CHEVY IMPALA LS 4 door, only 37K! 5 Yr. 100K factory warranty $11,499 ‘08 CHEVY IMPALA LS 60k. Factory warranty. $9,499 ‘05 HONDA CRV EX One owner, just traded, 65K. $12,699 ‘05 Suzuki Verona LX Auto. 64K. Factory warranty. $5,299 ‘01 LINCOLN TOWN CAR Executive 74K $5,799 TITLE TAGS FULL NOTARY SERVICE 6 M ONTH WARRANTY

FORD `08 ESCAPE XLT. 56,800 miles.

Grey metallic with grey cloth interior. 2WD. Auto. Power windows & locks. Dual air bags. A/C. Alloy Wheels. Excellent condition. $14,500 Trades Welcome 570-328-5497

To place your ad Call Toll Free 1-800-427-8649

FORD ‘02 MUSTANG

GTRedCONVERTIBLE with black

135 470

Auto Repair

Legals/ Public Notices

412 Autos for Sale

LEXUS 03 ES300

Well equipped, including leather.

rear wheel drive, air, power windows, locks & seats, alloy wheels, security alarm, V6. 69,000 original miles. Very clean, no rust, non-smoker’s car. $3,100. 570-675-3857

875 W. Market St. Kingston, PA. 570-287-2243

HONDA 07 FIT Auto. 4 door.

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

Keyless entry. Hatchback. $10,999

KELLY

875 W. Market St. Kingston, PA. 570-287-2243

VITO’S & GINO’S Wanted: Junk Cars & Trucks Highest Prices Paid!!

KELLY

WANTED!

ALL JUNK CARS! CA$H PAID

570-301-3602

150 Special Notices

LEXUS `98 LS 400

135

Legals/ Public Notices

9999999

570-955-5792

150 Special Notices

570-779-2288 WEEKEND SPECIAL $13.49 for a large plain pie & a dozen of wings Dine in only. Valid Saturday Sunday. One coupon per party/table. Present coupon upon ordering.

JAGUAR `00 S TYPE

Excellent condition, garage kept, 1 owner. Must see. Low mileage, 90K. Leather interior. All power. GPS navigation, moon roof, cd changer. Loaded. $9,000 or best offer. 570-706-6156

9999999

CHEVY ‘05 AVEO, 4 door, silver, auto, 79k miles $3,995 CHRYSLER ‘04 SEBRING TOURING, silver, 4 door, auto, 139k miles, loaded $3,995 FORD ‘04 TARUS SE, 4 door, white/gray cloth interior, all power options $ FORD ‘03 WINDSTAR, green exterior, tan cloth interior, power options, front/rear A/C-heat $3,995 DODGE ‘00 DURANGO, black/tan, 4 door, 4x4, 3rd seat, loaded, 146k miles $3,995 LINCOLN ‘00 TOWNCAR, leather interior, 4 door, loaded with options $3,995

375 W Main St, Plymouth, PA 18651

288-8995

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

MARZAK MOTORS

601 Green Ridge St, Scranton

Octagon Family Restaurant

FREE PICKUP

4 door sedan. Like new condition. Brilliant blue exterior with beige hides. Car is fully equipped with navigation system, V-8, automatic, climate control AC, alarm system, AM/FM 6 disc CD, garage door opener. 42,000 original miles. $9,000 Call (570) 288-6009

412 Autos for Sale

Home of the Original ‘O-Bar’ Pizza

ALZHEIMER'S & STROKE RESEARCH

We are trying to find a new way to help those with dementia or stroke work to maintain or improve their language and cognitive skills while decreasing negative emotions. You may be eligible to participate if you have memory problems or speech/language problems as a result of dementia or stroke. Participation is free to those who qualify and involves: Five weeks of twice a week speech-language/memory therapy during which language and emotional state is monitored for changes. All participant information is strictly confidential. For more information, please contact: Hunter Manasco, PhD, Department of SpeechLanguage Pathology, (570) 674-8108 or mmanasco@misericordia.edu This study has been approved by Misericordia University Institutional Review Board and meets ethical standards for research with human participants.

135

Legals/ Public Notices

135

Legals/ Public Notices

LEGAL NOTICE Advertisement for Bid

460 AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE DIRECTORY 468

Auto Parts

Contractors are invited to submit SEALED BIDS for the bidding of the Project to Renovate and Reconstruct North Penn High School and Renovate Blossburg Elementary School for the Southern Tioga School district. BIDS ARE INVITED ON A LUMP SUM BASIS FOR THE FOLLOWING CONTRACT: OWNER: Frank Buggiotti HEAD MECHANIC: Howard Balbach The Auto Lodge is a local family run business based on quality workmanship & honest business practices.

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted Highest Prices Paid In CA$H

FREE PICKUP

570-574-1275

570-301-3602

CALL US! TO JUNK YOUR CAR

BEST PRICES IN THE AREA CA$H ON THE $POT, Free Anytime Pickup 570-301-3602

Attorney Services

Leather. Heated seats. DVD Player. $11,880

570-825-7988

700 Sans Souci Highway WE SELL FOR LESS!!

top. 6,500 miles. One Owner. Excellent Condition. $17,500 570-760-5833

new tires, 4 door, all power, 34,000 miles. $13,995. 570-836-1673

CHEVROLET `98 BLAZER 5 speed standard,

CHRYSLER ‘08 SEBRING

DIRECTORY

CHEVROLET `04 CORVETTE COUPE Torch red with

black and red interior. 9,700 miles, auto, HUD, removable glass roof, polished wheels, memory package, Bose stereo and twilight lighting, factory body moldings, traction control, ABS, Garage kept - Like New. $25,900 (570) 609-5282

SEBRING CONVERTIBLE

Silver, 2nd owner clean title. Very clean inside & outside. Auto, Power mirrors, windows. CD player, cruise, central console heated power mirrors. 69,000 miles. $5900. 570-991-5558

AUTO SERVICE

$3,300. 570-592-4522 570-592-4994

Don’t Keep Your Practice a Secret!

Attorney Services

CHEVY 08 MALIBU LT

Dodge ‘00 Grand Caravan $3,495

LAW DIRECTORY

310

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

Rt 309 S

Ford ‘02 Tarus SW $2,995

95 CHEVY BLAZER

Auto. CD Player. $9,440

C&L AUTO MOTORS INC 804 S. Church St.,

Call 829-7130 To Place Your Ad

THANK YOU to all the men at Cole Muffler, Edwardsville, especially Jeff & Justin, for helping me the way they did. They were excellent. Linda Stashak

Auto Parts

BEN’S AUTO SALES RT 309 W-B Twp.

Wilkes-Barre, PA 570-825-8253

BMW ‘98 740 IL

406

412 Autos for Sale

LEO’S AUTO SALES 92 Butler St

ESTATE PLANNING /ADMINISTRATION

Free Bankruptcy Consultation Payment plans. Carol Baltimore 570-822-1959

412 Autos for Sale

Land Rover ‘03 Discovery 4x4 $7,999

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

Real Estate & Civil Litigation Attorney Ron Wilson 570-822-2345

412 Autos for Sale

VW ‘04 Jetta GLI 6 speed $12,900

$1,500

310

412 Autos for Sale

speed. Sharp economy car! $2,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

97 4WD. FORD EXPEDITION 4 door.

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

MONTY SAYS

HYUNDAI ‘00 ACCENT 4 cylinder. 5

04 DODGE NEON

or fax to 570-831-7312

For additional information or questions regarding legal notices you may call Marti Peznowski at 570-970-7371 or 570-829-7130

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

412 Autos for Sale

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? Ayard orgaragesale in classified is thebestway tocleanoutyourclosets! You���re in bussiness with classified!

The Auto Lodge provides all automotive needs for all types of vehicles. Š Š Š Š Š

Inspections/ Emissions Tires Tune Ups Brakes General Maintenance

We gladly welcome back our old clients & warmly welcome new ones!! 570-270-0777 570-760-3714

1350 NORTH RIVER ST

RICK’S BODY SHOP INSURANCE ESTIMATES COLLISION REPAIRS FOREIGN & DOMESTIC

Phone 570-823-2211 Fax: 570-824-0553

105 West Saylor Ave Plains, PA 18702

472

Auto Services

$ WANTED JUNK $ VEHICLES LISPI TOWING We pick up 822-0995

VITO’S & GINO’S Like New Tires $15 & UP! Like New Batteries $20 & UP! Carry Out Price 288-8995

WANTED

Cars & Full Size Trucks. For prices... Lamoreaux Auto Parts 477-2562

Contract Contract Contract Contract Contract Contract Contract

1..........................................................General Trades Construction 2..........................................................Roofing Construction 3..........................................................Food Service Construction 4..........................................................Plumbing Construction 5..........................................................Fire Protection Construction 6..........................................................HVAC Construction 7..........................................................Electrical Construction

Sealed bid proposals for construction of the Renovate and Reconstruct North Penn High School and Renovate Blossburg Elementary School will be received by the Southern Tioga School District, 241 Main Street, Blossburg, PA 16912 until 2:00 pm, Tuesday, February 7, 2012, C/O Mr. Keith Yarger, Superintendent. Faxed bids will not be accepted. No award of the contract will be made at the bid opening. A Pre-bid conference and site walk will be held. Bidders will meet at the North Penn High School Auditorium, located at 300 Morris Street, Blossburg, PA 16912, on Monday, January 16, 2012 at 10:00 am. A brief meeting will be held, followed by an optional site visit. Additional Site visits will be held on January 19, 2012 and February 2, 2012 starting at 1:30 pm. Bidder’s proposals must be accompanied by a certified check, certified bank treasurer’s check, bank cashier’s check, or bid bond in the form included with the bidding documents. A satisfactory corporate surety shall provide security in an amount equal to 10% of the base bid together with the aggregate sum of all additive alternates. The surety shall name as payee or obligee the Southern Tioga School District. Notice is hereby given that the Renovate and Reconstruct North Penn High School and Renovate Blossburg Elementary School for which construction proposals are being solicited hereby is a Construction Project constituting public works and is subject to applicable provisions of the Pennsylvania Human Relations Act, the Pennsylvania Prevailing Wage and other applicable Acts. All proposals shall be irrevocable for sixty (60) days after bid opening date, unless delayed due to required approvals of another governmental agency, sale of bonds, or the award of a grant or grants, in which case bids shall be irrevocable for one hundred twenty (120) days. The Owner reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to waive any or all informalities, defects, errors, omissions, mistakes or irregularities in proposals, to reject any or all proposals or parts thereof and to make awards as may be deemed in it’s best interest. PRIME CONTRACTORS can obtain a compact disk with the Contract Documents by contacting Fran Theis, Reynolds Construction Management, 3300 North Third Street, Harrisburg PA 17110 by email at ftheis@reynoldsconstruction.com or fax (717) 238-9410. A non-refundable deposit of $100 is required. Checks are to be made payable to Reynolds Construction Management. In addition to the check for non-refundable deposit, the Bidders shall include a non-refundable check, in the amount of $40.00, made payable to Reynolds Construction Management to cover the cost of shipping and handling, or shall provide the Construction Manager with their Federal Express or UPS account number. Faxed questions should be directed to: Quad3, Attn: Lynn Duszak at 1-570-829-3732 or emailed at lduszak@quad3.com. Questions submitted within four (4) working days prior to the bid date may not get answered. Bids will be opened and read aloud shortly after 2:00 pm, Tuesday, February 7, 2012 in the High School Auditorium. Construction Documents are available for review at the following locations: Mid-Atlantic Builders Exchange 2501 North Front Street Harrisburg, PA 17110 Ph. 717-234-3255 Fx. 717-234-3316

Reading Builder’s Exchange 222 North Kenhorst Blvd. Reading, PA 19607 Ph 610-775-1421 Fx 610-696-1256

Associated Builders and Contractors Assoc. Reynolds Construction Management, Inc. Rapho Business Park, 3300 North Third Street 135 Shellyland Road Harrisburg, PA 17110 Manheim, PA 17545 Ph 717-238-5737 Ph 717-653-8106 Fx 717-238-9410 Fx 717-653-6431 Quad3 37 North Washington Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701 Ph 570-829-4200 Fx 570-829-3732

North Eastern Contractors Association (NEPCA) 1075 Oak Street, Suite 3 Pittston, PA 18640 Ph 570-655-5905 Fx 570-655-5960

McGraw Hill Dodge 600 Waterfront Drive Suite 200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 Ph 866-222-5073 Fx 866-222-5076 Drawings, specifications and addenda may also be viewed on-line and downloaded (free of charge) at https://www.ebidexchange.com/reynoldscm by all Prime Bidders as well as their subcontractors and vendors. New users should click on the New Registration button and fill in all of the required information to obtain access to the bid documents. Access to the plans should be granted within two (2) business days. All bidders are advised that they use these documents contained on this webs site at their own risk and are expected to check periodically for any addenda or revisions that may be posted.


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012 PAGE 3G

K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N 2012 S C AN H ERE FO R S ERVIC E S PEC IAL S

NO W TA KING R ESER VA TIO NS FO R TH E A LL NEW A LL

ELEC TR IC NISSA N LEA F

HAS ARRIVED !

TH E Y EA R M AY H AVE C H A N G ED B U T TH E D EA LS K EEP O N

ROLLING ROLLING 2012 N 2012 NISSAN ISSAN V VERSA ERSA 1 1.8S .8S

STK#N 21327 M O D EL# 11412 M SR P $17,190

2012 N 2012 NISSAN ISSAN S SENTRA ENTRA 2.0SL 2.0SL

HATCHBACK HATCHBACK

STK#N 20792 M O D EL# 12312 M SR P $22,860

3

A VA IL A B L E A T TH IS P R IC E

$

B U Y FO R

15 ,9 9 5

*

W / $5 0 0 N M AC AP R R EB ATE AN D G ET 1.9 % FO R 6 0 M O N TH S

A VA IL A B L E A T TH IS P R IC E

OR

$

L EAS E FOR

169

*

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P ER M O. 18 ,9 9 5 $

*

W / $10 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $5 0 0 N M AC CAS H

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OR

$

L EAS E FOR

199

*

P ER M O. P lu s Ta x.

*$199 PerM o n th, 39 M o n th L ea s e, 12K PerY ea r. Res id u a l= $13,030.20; m u s t b e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h D o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity. Plu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l @ d elivery= $2202.50

2012 N 2012 NISSAN ISSAN A ALTIMA LTIMA 2 2.5S .5S SEDAN SEDAN

2011 N 2011 NISSAN ISSAN M MAXIMA AXIMA S SV VS SPORT PORT SDN SDN STK#N 20831 M O D EL# 16211 M SR P $37,825

O VER 30 A VA IL A B L E A T TH IS P R IC E

B U Y FO R

19 ,0 5 6

*

W / $15 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $75 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H

OR

$

L EAS E FOR

199

*

2011 N 2011 NISSAN ISSAN 370Z 370Z C COUPE OUPE

P ER M O. 3 0 ,8 2 5 W / $2 5 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $5 0 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H

P lu s Ta x.

$

STK#N 21073 M O D EL# 22211 M SR P $23,905 4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s

M U ST BE SEEN!

3 4 ,5 8 0

$

*

319

P ER M O. P lu s Ta x.

SA VE $3000 O FF M SR P !

B U Y FO R

2 0 ,9 0 5

*

W / $ 15 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE *S a le Price p lu s ta x a n d ta gs .

2011 N 2011 NISSAN ISSAN M MURANO URANO S A AWD WD 3

$

*

L A ST 2011 ROGUE A VA IL A B L E!

*S a le Price p lu s ta x a n d ta gs .

STK#N 20706 M O D EL# 23211 M SR P $32,130

OR

L EAS E FOR

2011 N 2011 NISSAN ISSAN R ROGUE OGUE S A AWD WD

W/ W/ SPORT SPORT PKG PKG

B U Y FO R

*

*$319 PerM o n th, 39 M o n th L ea s e, 12K PerY ea r. Res id u a l= $18,156; m u s t b e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h D o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity. Plu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l @ d elivery= $2202.50. $2300 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a te In clu d ed .

L A ST 2011 Z W ITH C U STO M INTER IO R !

V6, 6 S p eed , S p o rtPkg, Cu s to m L ea ther, Hea ted S ea ts , Cu s to m Hea d lin er, Am a zin g On e OfA K in d Z!!!

SA VE $7000 O FF M SR P !

B U Y FO R

$

*$199 PerM o n th, 39 M o n th L ea s e, 12K PerY ea r. Res id u a l= $12,862.80; m u s t b e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h D o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity. Plu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l @ d elivery= $2202.50. $825 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a te In clu d ed .

STK#N 20833 M O D EL# 41161 M SR P $38,580

L A ST 2011 M A XIM A

V6, CVT , S p o rtPkg, L ea ther, M o o n ro o f, Bo s e, Allo ys , F lo o r M a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s , M u ch M o re!

4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, 20% F lo o rM a ts & O FF! S p la s h Gu a rd s

2011 N 2011 NISSAN ISSAN P PATHFINDER ATHFINDER S SV V4 4X4 X4 STK#N 21000 M O D EL# 25211 M SR P $34,930

A T TH IS P R IC E! LA ST O NES!

V6, AW D, CVT , PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts , S p la s h Gu a rd s , & M u ch M o re!

$

L EA TH ER , M O O NR O O F & NA VIG A TIO N

*$169 PerM o n th, 39 M o n th L ea s e, 12K PerY ea r. Res id u a l= $9282.60; m u s t b e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h D o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity. Plu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l @ d elivery= $2202.50

STK#N 20558 M O D EL# 13112 M SR P $23,820

$

5

4 Cyl, CVT , Na viga tio n , Au d io Pkg, L ea ther, S p cl Va lu e Pkg, F lo o r M a ts , S p la s h Gu a rd s a n d M u ch M o re!

4 Cyl, Au to , A/ C, Plu s Pkg, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts , Ca rgo Orga n izer, M u ch M o re!

!

SA VE $6000 O R M O R E O N A L L 2011 P A TH FINDER S!

V6, Au to , A/ C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, Allo ys , F lo o rM a ts & T ru n k M a t

B U Y FO R

2 5 ,9 9 5 OR $ *

W / $2 5 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $5 0 0 N M AC CAS H

L EAS E FOR

299

*

$

P ER M O.

B U Y FO R

2 8 ,9 3 0

W / $2 5 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE

P lu s Ta x.

*$299 PerM o n th, 39 M o n th L ea s e, 12K PerY ea r. Res id u a l= $14,779.80; m u s t b e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h D o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity. Plu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l @ d elivery= $2202.50. $1700 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a te In clu d ed .

*

OR

$

L EAS E FOR

329

*

P ER M O. P lu s Ta x.

*$199 PerM o n th, 39 M o n th L ea s e, 12K PerY ea r. Res id u a l= $14,670.60; m u s t b e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h D o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity. Plu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l @ d elivery= $2202.50. $3300 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a te In clu d ed .

SEN SATIO N AL SAVIN G S O N ALL 2012’S!

*Ta x a nd Ta g a d d itio na l. Prio rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib le fo rTypo gra phic a l Erro rs . All reb a tes & inc entives a pplied . **0 % APR in lieu o f reb a tes . As k fo rd eta ils . **As perN is s a n M o nthly Sa les V o lu m e R epo rta s o f O c t2 0 11. All Pric es b a s ed o n im m ed ia te d elivery in s to c k vehic le o nly. All o ffers ex pire 1/3 1/12 .

Th e

#1 N

K E N

N

is s a n

De a le rin

P O L L O CK

IS S A

N

N

.E. PA

1-8 66-70 4-0 672

229 M U N DY S TRE E T W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .

w w w .ke n polloc kn is s a n .c om

®


PAGE 4G

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

w w w .Tun kA utoM a rt.c om G ood Friends A re H ard To Find! Like U s Follow U s

C O N N EC T W ITH U S: w w w.

Tun kA utoM a rt.com 2 2012 012 DODGE RAM 1500 S T K #1173023 SLT CREW CAB 4X4 M S RP $22,650

2 0 1 2 DODGE JOURNEY SXT AWD S tk#1247005

3RD RO W S E A T RE M O TE S TA RT A L L W H E E L DRIV E

S T K # 1286025 M S RP $38,735 $1,000 Weekend Bonus Ends 1/18

L E A S E FOR A S L OW A S

$259

P E R M O.

36 M O N TH S

Price in clu d es

Scan for Savings on Service!

N

OW

A

S

L OW

A

S

$25,800 $ 25, 800*

N N O OW W L L O OW W

$1,000 R eb a te, $1,000 Co n qu es t/ L o ya lty

Pa ym e n tis plu s ta x. Am o u n td u e @ d e live ry is $3 ,495 d o w n plu s re gis tra tio n f e e s w hic h in c lu d e s $750 Ac qu is itio n Fe e a n d $100 Do c Fe e , 10,000 m ile s / ye a r , $3 ,000 Le a s e C a s h Re b a te a n d $1,000 Le a s e o rC o n qu e s tRe b a te is u s e d in pa ym e n tc a lc u la tio n s

A A S S A A S S

5.7-Li ter V 8 H em i ,C l as s IV

$1,000 Weekend Bonus Ends 1/18

2 2012 012 DODGE RAM 1500 S T K #1173023 BIG HORN QUAD CAB 4X4 M S RP $22,650

NEW 2011 CHRYSLER 200 S

3 .7-Lite rV 6, Au to m a tic , Fo g La m ps , De e p Tin tS u n s c re e n G la s s , C D/M P3 S iriu s X M S a te llite Ra d io , Bla c k S id e Ro o f Ra ils L E A S E FO R A S L O W

$187

P E R M O.

A S

P E R M O.

36 M

N OW

O N TH S

Pa ym e n tis plu s ta x. Am o u n td u e @ d e live ry is $3 ,495 d o w n plu s re gis tra tio n f e e s w hic h in c lu d e s $750 Ac qu is itio n Fe e a n d $100 Do c Fe e , 10,000 m ile s / ye a r , $4,000 Le a s e C a s h Re b a te a n d $1,000 Le a s e o r C o n qu e s tRe b a te is u s e d in pa ym e n tc a lc u la tio n s

A S

L OW

A S

$22,077 $ 22,077* Pric e in c lu d e s $3 ,000 Re b a te a n d $1,000 W e e ke n d Bo n u s , $1,000 Re tu rn in g Le s s e e

P rem ium C loth, 40/20/40 B enc h S eat, P rotec tion G roup, C old W eather G roup, H eav y D uty S now P low P rep P ac k age, 6-S peed A utom atic , 6.7L C um m ins D ies el, P w r H eat Trailer Tow , M irrors w / Lam ps , R oof-M ounted C learanc e Lam ps , U C onnec t V oic e C om m and w /B luetooth,

Inc l udes $2500 R ebate, $1000 R eturni ng Leas ee, $500 M i l i tary, $1000 C om m erc i alR ebate, $1000 Trade A s s i s tanc e

N N O OW W L L O OW W

A A S S A A S S

* $38,415 $ $3 38 8, ,4 41 15 5*

6.7L C um m ins Turbo D ies elEngine, H eav y D uty S now P low P rep P ac k age, Lim ited-S lip D ifferentialR ear A x le, R oof-M ounted C learanc e Lam ps , U C onnec t V oic e C om m and w / B luetooth, R em ote S tart S y s tem

A S L OW

A S

2 2012 012 DODGE GRAND S T K #1173023 CARAVAN SE M S RP $22,650

$21,900

* $41,912 $ $4 41 1, ,9 91 12 2*

S T K # 1286004

*

S T K # 1281003 M S RP $21,830

NEW 2011 DODGE CALIBER EXPRESS

N N O OW W L L O OW W

S T K # 1220048 M S RP $24,395

Inc ludes $1000 Ev ent Leas es , $500 M ilitary

2 2012 0 1 2 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING P O W E R A DJU S TA BL E P E DA L S !

ON L Y 2 L E FT!

N OW A S L OW A S

N N O OW W L L O OW W

A A S S A A S S

* $21,965 $ $2 21 1, ,9 96 65 5*

3.6-Liter V 6, A ir C onditioning, S irius X M S atellite, U C onnec t V oic e C om m and w ith B luetooth Inc l udes $1,000 R eturni ng Leas e R ebate

2 2012 012 JEEP WRANGLER S T K #1173023 UNLIMITED M S RP $22,650

L E A S E FOR A S L OW A S

$239

P E R M O.

$13,985*

36 M O N TH S

N OW

Pa ym e n tis plu s ta x. Am o u n td u e @ d e live ry is $3 ,495 d o w n plu s re gis tra tio n f e e s w hic h in c lu d e s $750 Ac qu is itio n Fe e a n d $100 Do c Fe e , 10,000 m ile s / ye a r , $2,500 Le a s e C a s h Re b a te a n d $1,000 Le a s e o rC o n qu e s tRe b a te is u s e d in pa ym e n tc a lc u la tio n s

Inc ludes $500 M ilitary,$1,000 R eturning Leas ee

S T K # 1220061 M S RP $27,080

N N O OW W L L O OW W

A A S S A A S S

$24,780 $ $2 24 4, ,7 78 80 0

Inc l udes $1,000 R eturni ng Les s e, M

i l i ary $500

2 2012 012 Dodge Challenger R/T AWD S T K # 1248001 M S RP $38,520

A S A S

$33,482 $ 33, 482

5.7-Liter V 8 H EM I, A utom atic , Leather S eats , P ow er S unroof, A W D S uper Trac k P ak

Inc ludes $1,500 R ebate, $1000 Les s ee

2 2012 012 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 4x4 S T K # 1223008 M S RP $43,375 $1,000 Weekend Bonus Ends 1/18

N OW A S L OW A S

N N O OW W L L O OW W

$18,861*

$1,000 Weekend Bonus Ends 1/18

L E A S E FOR A S L OW A S

$359 Price in clu d es

$37,053 37,053 $

Includes $1,000 R ebate,$1000 Lessee,$1,000 W eekend Bonus

OW

A

S

L OW

A

S

$35,200 $ 35,200*

36 M O N TH S

$1,000 R eb a te a n d

$1,000 Co n qu es t/ L o ya lty

Pa ym e n tis plu s t a x. Am o u n td u e @ d e live ry is $3 ,495 d o w n plu s re gis t ra t io n w hic h in c lu d e s $750 Ac qu is it io n Fe e a n d $100 D o c Fe e , 10,000 m ile s / ye a r , $3 ,750 Le a s e C a s h Re b a t e a n d $1,000 Le a s e o r C o n qu e s tRe b a t e is u s e d in pa ym e n tc a lc u la t io n s

2 0 1 2 DODGE CHARGER SXT

S tk#1241001 31 M P G HW Y 8-S P E E D A U TO M A TIC! RE A R BO DY S P O IL E R! K E YL E S S -N -G O FO G L A M P S

$22,892

*

L E A S E FO R A S L O W

$249

N

36 M O N TH S

Price in clu d es

OW

A S

L OW

A S

$24,400 $ 24,400*

A S

P E R M O.

$2,000 R eb a te a n d

$1,000 L o ya lty/ Co n qu es tR eb a te

Pa ym e n tis plu s ta x. Am o u n td u e @ d e live ry is $3 ,495 d o w n plu s re gis tra tio n f e e s w hic h in c lu d e s $750 Ac qu is itio n Fe e a n d $100 Do c Fe e , 10,000 m ile s / ye a r , $1,000 Le a s e C a s h Re b a te a n d $1,000 Le a s e o rC o n qu e s tRe b a te is u s e d in pa ym e n tc a lc u la tio n s

2 0 1 2 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE Weekend LAREDO 4X4 $1,000 Bonus Ends 1/18

2 0 1 2 JEEP COMPASS LATITUDE 4X4

S tk#1223047 M S RP - $30,415

36 M ON THS

N

P E R M O.

R eturning lessee $1,000,M ilitary $500

$229

eek end B onus

N A V IG A TIO N BL IN D S P O T DE TE CTIO N !

S tk#1287007

LA S T P A TRIO T IN S TO CK

P E R M O.

* $19,278 $ $1 19 9, ,2 27 78 8*

A A S S A A S S

2 0 1 2 DODGE DURANGO L E A TH E R! CREW AWD S U N RO O F!

S tk#1174066 M S RP -$26,120

**

Pric e in c lu d e s $1,000 Re b a te , $1,000 C o n qu e s t/ Lo ya lty a n d $750 M in iva n Ow n e rLo ya lty

Inc l udes $500 R ebate, $1000 R eturni ng Leas es , $1,000 W

NEW 2011 JEEP PATRIOT LATITUDE 4x4

L E A S E FOR A S L OW A S

$24,759 $ 24,759*

A utom atic , Prem ium C loth Buc k et Seats , Pow er V alue G roup, A ir C onditioning, U C onnec t V oic e C om m and w /Bluetooth

3.6L,U connect w ith V oice C om m and Pow er W indow s & Pow er Locks,M p3,Sirius XM Satellite R adio

S tk#1255015 M S RP - $24,700

U -CO N N E CT V O ICE CO M M A N D W / BL U E TO O TH ! FO G L A M P S !

3.6-Liter V 6 5-Speed A utom atic , Leather Seats , C om m and V iew D ual-Pane Panoram ic Sunroof, H eated Steering W heelw ith A udio C ontrols , Pow er Liftgate, G PS N av igation w ith V oic e C om m and, Park V iew R ear Bac k U p C am era, R em ote Start Sy s tem , R ain-Sens itiv e W inds hield W ipers , H eated Seats , C D /D V D /M P3/ H D D /N A V , G arm in N av igation Sy s tem , 6.5-Inc h Touc h-Sc reen D is play, U c onnec t V oic e C om m and w ith Bluetooth, Fog Lam ps , Bi-Xenon H eadlam ps w ith A uto Lev eling Sy s tem , D edic ated D ay tim e R unning H eadlam ps

A S

$1,000 Weekend Bonus Ends 1/18

O N L Y 2 2011 A V E N G E RS L E FT!

N OW A S L OW A S

L OW

S T K # 1274001 M S RP $22,400

A utoStic k A utom atic Trans m is s ion,U c onnec t V oic e C om m and w ith Bluetooth,U SB Port for M obile D ev ic es ,A uto-D im m ing R earv iew M irror w ith,M ic rophone,Pow er door loc k s ,pow er w indow s ,H eated s eats , Pow er 6-W ay D riv er Seat,C D /D V D /M P3,Sirius XM Satellite R adio

ALL WHEEL DRIVE

A S

2012 2012 JEEP PATRIOT S T K #1173023 4X4 SPORT M S RP $22,650

Includes $500 A lly Bonus C ash,$1000 R eturning Lessee,$500 M ilitary

3.6 Liter, B lac k 3 P iec e H ardtop w ith S torage B ag

N OW L OW

NEW 2011 DODGE AVENGER MAINSTREET

N OW A S L OW A S

S tk#1257009

S IRIU S XM S A TE L L ITE RA DIO ! P O W E R L IFTG A TE !

Pow er W indow s ,Pow er Loc k s ,C D /M P3 & Sirius XM Satellite R adio

S tk#1182009 M S RP - $24,950

S E V E RA L N E W CO L O RS

* $19,900 $ $1 19 9, ,9 90 00 0*

A A S S A A S S

C l oth Low -B ac k B uc k et S eats , 6-S peed A utom ati c Trans m i ssi on, 3.6L V 6, Fl ex i bl e FuelV ehi cl e

S tk#1161007 M S RP - $18,130*

Inc ludes $2,500 R ebate, $500 S now P low B onus , $1,000 R eturning Les s ee

2 2012 012 JEEP WRANGLER S T K #1173023 SPORT 4X4 M S RP $22,650

* $28,907 $ $2 28 8, ,9 90 07 7*

A A S S A A S S

5.7L V 8 H em i, R em ote S tart and S ec urity G roup, U C onnec t V oic e C om m and w / B luetooth

N OW

SAVE OVER $10,000

2 2012 012 DODGE RAM 2500 SLT S T K #1173023 REGULAR CAB M S RP $22,650 4X4

N N O OW W L L O OW W

Inc l udes $1,000 W eek end B onus , $2,500 R ebate, $2,500 R am S LT B onus , $1,000 R eturni ng Les s ee

S T K # 1286007 M S RP $52,700

A A S S A A S S

$1,000 Weekend Bonus Ends 1/18

V -6 6S P E E D A UTOM A TIC

2 2012 012 DODGE RAM 2500 SLT S T K #1173023 CREW CAB M S RP $22,650 4X4

N N O OW W L L O OW W

S T K # 1286055 M S RP $37,640

S tk#1173016

M S RP - $27,285

2 L E FT

R ec ei v er H i tc h

Inc l udes $1,000 W eek end B onus , $2,500 R ebate, $2,500 R am S LT B onus , $1,000 R eturni ng Les s ee

2 2012 012 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4 S tk#1234010 M S RP - $26,915

* $29,860 $ $2 29 9, ,8 86 60 0*

RE M O TE S TA RT & U -CO N N E CT

N OW

A S

L OW

A S

$26, 947 $26,947

L E A S E FOR A S L OW A S

*

Price In clu d es $1,000 Reb a te & $1,000 W eek en d Bo n u s , $1,000 Retu rn in g L es s ee Pa ym e n tis plu s ta x. Am o u n td u e @ d e live ry is $3 495 d o w n plu s re gis tra tio n fe e s w hic h in c lu d e s $750 a c qu is itio n fe e s a n d $100 d o c fe e . 10000 m ile s /ye a r. $1000 le a s e c a s h re b a te a n d $1000 le a s e o rc o n qu e s tre b a te is u s e d in pa ym e n tc a lc u la tio n s .

N OW

A S L OW

A S

$157** $ $20,900 20,900* 36 M O N TH S

PER M O.

Price in clu d es $500 Reb a te a n d $1000 L ea s e L o ya lty/ Co n qu es tCa s h.

Pa ym e n tis plu s ta x. Am o u n td u e @ d e live ry is $3 ,495 d o w n plu s re gis tra tio n fe e s w hic h in c lu d e s $750 Ac qu is itio n Fe e a n d $100 Do c Fe e , 10,000 m ile s / ye a r, $2,500 Le a s e C a s h Re b a te a n d $1,000 Le a s e / C o n qu e s tRe b a te is u s e d in pa ym e n tc a lc u la tio n s

Ta x, Do c u m e n ta tio n Fe e a n d Re gis tra tio n Fe e s a re e xtra . C hrys le rG ro u p re ta in s the rightto c ha n ge in c e n tive s / re b a te s w itho u tprio rn o tic e . le a s e Bo n u s Re b a te is fo re ligib le c u s to m e rs c u rre n tly le a s in g a C hrys le rG ro u p V e hic le o rre tu rn in g fro m a C hrys le r G ro u p V e hic le Le a s e , Re s tric tio n s Apply. M ilita ry Re b a te s a re fo rM ilita ry M e m b e rs c u rre n tly s e rvin g o rre tire d M ilita ry M e m b e rs w ith 20 ye a rs o f prio rs e rvic e . Re b a te s a re in lie u o f lo w fin a n c e o ptio n s s u c h a s 0% Ally (e xc e pto n s e le c tm o d e ls s e e s a le s c o n s u lta n t). All prio rs a le s / o ffe rs e xc lu d e d . All re b a te s ha ve b e e n a pplie d to pric e s . All s u b je c tto prio rs a le s . Pho to s o f ve hic le s a re fo rillu s tra tio n pu rpo s e s o n ly. *De d u c tio n s fro m tra d e in a llo w a n c e w ill b e m a d e fo re qu ipm e n tfa ilu re , b o d y/ in te rio rd a m a ge , re c o n d itio n in g c o s ts a n d e xc e s s m ile a ge . Exp. Da te 1/ 21/ 2012.