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THE GUIDE

A GUIDE TO THE GUIDE • Family Law

• Criminal Law

• Real Estate Law • Estate Law

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(Divorce, Custody, Support)

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Five Folks Tomorrow is National Hot Dog Day. (And you can get a free one on the lawn of the Osterhout Free Library in Wilkes-Barre from noon until 12:30.) In honor of the day, we asked the question:

“What’s the best way to eat a hot dog?” “I fry some onions and add Coca-Cola to caramelize them. That’s my special thing.” Jay Albers, 38, White Haven Owner, Jay’s Dog House, on Public Square

“This is a buffalo sausage with chipotle (from Jay’s Dog House.) It has a nice kick to it, and the sweet mustard sauce is pretty good, too.

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PAGE 2

GETTING INTO THE GUIDE All submissions must be received two weeks in advance of the pertinent event. E-mailed announcements via guide@timesleader.com are preferred, but announcements also can be faxed to 570-8295537 or mailed to 15 North Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711. The Guide provides advance coverage and/or notice for events open to the public. Events open only to a specific group of people or after-thefact announcements and photos are published in community news. All announcements must

include a contact phone number and make note of any admission or ticket prices or note that an event is free. We cannot guarantee publication otherwise. We welcome listings photographs. First preference is given to e-mailed high-res JPGs (300 dpi or above) submitted in compressed format to guide@timesleader.com. Color prints also can be submitted by U.S. mail, but we are unable to return them. Please identify all subjects in photographs.

CONTACT US FEATURES EDITOR Sandra Snyder - 831-7383 ssnyder@timesleader.com

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Mary Therese Biebel - 829-7283 mbiebel@timesleader.com Sara Pokorny - 829-7127 spokorny@timesleader.com LISTINGS Marian Melnyk guide@timesleader.com Fax: Attention: The Guide 829-5537 Advertise: To place a display ad - 829-7101


THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE

Tiny railcars jump out of history and onto local tracks

COURTESY PHOTO

One railcar owner decorated his vehicle to resemble the protagonist of a series of children’s books, ‘Thomas the Tank Engine.’

‘Speeders’ zip into Berwick By MARY THERESE BIEBEL mbiebel@timesleader.com

T

he Susquehanna Riverlands in Salem Township will host an antique car show of sorts tomorrow, but don’t expect Studebakers, Thunderbirds or Model T’s.

IF YOU GO What: Motorized railcars display Who: North American Railcar Operators Association When: noon to 2 p.m. Saturday Where: Susquehanna Riverlands, 634 Salem Blvd., Berwick More info: 866-832-4474

community relations manager Joe Scopelliti said. He expects they’ll be painted in a rainbow of colors and, in some cases, decorated in very interesting styles. “One guy made his up to look like Thomas the Tank Engine,” Remensnyder agreed, recalling past events. “He calls it ‘Thomas the Rail Car.’ I don’t know if he’s coming this year, but kids love that.” While some of the speeders can drive in reverse, others have to be

turned around. Turning them to face the opposite direction isn’t as difficult as you might think, even for one person, thanks to the handles on the side and the principles of physics. “It’s like a wheelbarrow,” Remensnyder said. “Mine weighs a little over 1,300 pounds, and it’s not too hard to turn around. If you get a 5- or 6-year-old kid standing on the front bumper to counterweight it, it makes it a lot easier.” Riding along the railroad tracks – something the speeders arrange in advance, with permission – is a fun way to travel and offers an unusual perspective. “You see things you don’t ordinarily see,” he said. “Farmland. Old canals. It’s nice. Except most towns put their sewage treatment plants by the river so you see them, too.”

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Members of the North American Railcar Operators Association will bring and display their “speeders,” motorized railcars that were used in bygone days to repair and maintain railroad tracks. “I don’t know how they got their name,” railcar enthusiast George Remensnyder said in a telephone interview. “They generally go anywhere from 20 to 24 miles per hour. You can

get them going a little faster.” Remensnyder, 64, of Beech Haven, bought his speeder years ago from a former railroad employee in Ohio and painted it red and silver, “the color scheme of the Santa Fe Railroad.” “They’re getting scarce to buy,” he said. “You can check the websites.” Remensnyder enjoys the rare occasions when he drives his speeder along the tracks for events. Tomorrow’s convoy of speeders will travel 86 miles round trip from Northumberland to Berwick along the North Shore Railroad. On Sunday, he’ll take part in another run, a 50-mile roundtrip along the Shamokin Valley Railroad between Sunbury and Mount Carmel Junction. Tomorrow, about 30 enthusiasts are likely to bring their speeders to the Susquehanna Riverlands, PPL


THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE Grounds, Route 487 and Mendenhall Lane, Benton. Today through Sunday, 5 to 10 p.m. 925-6536 or bentonrodeo.com.

Events T H I S W E E K : J U LY 1 5 T O 2 1 , 2 0 11 Lycoming County Fair, the 141st annual agricultural fair with Double Figure 8 Racing Championships, demolition derbies, Bull Riding Invitational, the Dale Wheeland Memorial Tractor Pull and 4x4 truck pull. Entertainers include Aaron Kelly of “American Idol”(Tuesday) and Ryan Pelton’s Tribute to Elvis Presley (Wednesday). Fairgrounds, 300 E. Lycoming St., Hughesville. Today through July 23, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. 584-2197 or lycomingfair.com. In the Mood with the Morrisons, celebrating the ’40s and ’50s in honor of Gordon and Kate Morrison who owned Laceyville’s “Oldest House” and protected the 18th-century museum from modernization. With a live jazz concert tonight at 6:30 and displays on fashions and art through Sunday. Also: a classic auto road tour visits on Sunday morning. The Oldest House, Main Street, Laceyville. Today, 1 to 8 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 869-1426. Our Lady of Mount Carmel Bazaar, with homemade food, an indoor flea market, handmade quilt raffle and entertainment by the New York Times Band (tonight), 40-lb. Head (Saturday) and the Jeanne Zano Band (Sunday). Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church, 2011 Route 29, Hunlock Creek. Tonight and Saturday, 5 to 11 p.m.; Sunday, 3 to 9 p.m. 477-5040.

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Our Lady of Mount Carmel/St. Rocco Summer Picnic, with Italian specialties, games, theme baskets and entertainment by Flaxy Morgan (tonight), Three Imaginary Boys (Saturday) and the Cadillacs (Sunday). Parish Grounds, 237 William St., Pittston. Tonight and Saturday, 5 to 11 p.m.; Sunday, 5 to 10 p.m. 6546902. Benton Rodeo and Frontier Days Celebration, the 27th annual Championship Rodeo and Bull-aRama. With bareback and saddle bronc riding, steer wrestling, cowgirls barrel racing, brahma bull riding, calf and team roping, Fun Horse Show, Kids Mutton Bustin and more. Rodeo

Best Bet

St. Nicholas Bazaar, with world fare, games, theme baskets, Green Thumb, bingo, Giant Flea Market and entertainment by the Ray Suda Orchestra (tonight) and Cactus Jack (Saturday). St. Nicholas Church, 226 S. Washington St., Wilkes-Barre. Tonight and Saturday, 5:30 to 11 p.m. 823-7736. Fire Company Bazaar, with a firefighters parade (Saturday at 5 p.m.), new-merchandise auction (Sunday), games, rides, food, silent basket auction, Pat Ward’s Magic Show and DJ music nightly. Mountaintop Hose Company No. 1, Route 437, Mountain Top. Tonight, 5:30 to 10:30; Saturday, 5 to 10:30 p.m.; Sunday, 4 to 10:30 p.m. 715-7750. Big Tent Bazaar, with homemade food, theme baskets, raffles, games and entertainment by Souled Out (tonight), Jeanne Zano Band and RSO (Saturday) and the Blennd (Sunday). Exaltation of the Holy Cross Church, 420 Main Road, Hanover Township. Tonight, 6 to 11; Saturday and Sunday, 5 p.m. to midnight. 823-6242. Annual Summer Picnic, sponsored by St. Mary’s and Saints Peter and Paul churches. With games, homemade quilts, a Grand Raffle and entertainment by New Standard (tonight) and the Hometown Boyz (Saturday). St. Mary’s School, Hawthorne and Spring streets, Avoca. Tonight and Saturday, 6 to 11 p.m. 457-3412. Cruise Night, with the Villa Capri Cruisers. Steamtown Mall, 300 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. Tonight, 6 to 9. All vehicles welcome. 344-2014. Back Mountain Farmers Market, with local produce, gourmet food and bakery items. Back Mountain Memorial Library, 96 Huntsville Road, Dallas. Saturdays through Oct. 8, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 675-1182. Audubon Art & Craft Festival, the 26th annual event with a wildlife fine-art sale, nature films, live animal presentations, children’s activities, demonstrations by craft persons and presentations on area state parks and forest lands. Wallenpaupack School Complex, Route 6, Hawley. Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. $5. 484-256-4485 or audubonfestival.com. Work Your Wellness! A half-hour workshop on food groups, serving sizes and nutritional needs,

p.m. 823-0156. Car Show, with the Hi-Lites Motor Club. With food, music, raffles and door prizes. All vehicles welcome. Twist and Shake, Routes 29 and 118, Pikes Creek. Saturday, 5 to 8 p.m. 477-2477 or 574-7470. Holy Name of Jesus Bazaar, with homemade food, tricky trays, bingo, Grand Raffle and entertainment by John Stevens Doubleshot (Saturday), Soundworks (Sunday afternoon) and the Shannon Marsyada Trio (Sunday night). Transfiguration Church, 213 W. Green St., West Hazleton. Saturday, 5 to 10 p.m.; Sunday, noon to 9 p.m. 454-3933.

Eckley Miners Village will pay tribute to America’s fighting forces Saturday and Sunday from the Civil War right through the Iraq/Afghanistan conflicts. On hand will be the 517th Parachute Regimental Combat Team, deployed in pup tents and ready to explain and demonstrate its gear. The Pennsylvania National Guard Marksmanship Training Unit, dressed as snipers in ghillie suits, will display modern weapons, and the Rolling Angels for the Armed Forces will show how you can support past, present and future troops. Other attractions include a tin miniatures show with dioramas of the Civil War and World War II, an exhibit on PolishAmericans and lots of summer festival foods. The village is off Route 940, 10 miles east of Hazleton. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day, and admission is $6 adults and $4 children. Call 636-2070 for more info. followed by a walk around the borough. West Pittston Library, 200 Exeter Ave., West Pittston. Saturday, 10 to 11:30 a.m. $5. 654-9847. Historic Walk of Wilkes-Barre, to learn about some of the historic buildings in the downtown area of River and Franklin streets. Meet at the Osterhout Free Library, 71 S. Franklin St., WilkesBarre. Saturday at 10:30 a.m. 821-1959. ‘Build the Sanctuary’ Ride and Show, the 5th annual event for motorcycles, classic cars and trucks with vendors, door prizes, raffles and live music by Long Time Comin’. Saturday with registration 10:30 a.m. at Schoch Harley-Davidson, 4300 Manor Drive, Snydersville followed by a two-hour ride at noon, ending at the West End Fire Hall in Brodheadsville. $20 includes ride, food and drink. Proceeds benefit Camp Papillon Pet Adoption and Rescue Sanctuary. 993-7500. Train Excursion, from Scranton to the restored 1908 Tobyhanna Railroad Station with a stop at Gouldsboro. Steamtown National Historic Site, 300 Cliff St., Scranton. Saturday, departing at 11 a.m. with an approximate return at 3

p.m. $34, $29 seniors, $22 children. 340-5204 or nps.gov/stea. Escape from Wyoming, a livinghistory American Revolutionary War re-enactment with three main battles staged by the 24th Connecticut Militia Regiment. Hitchcock Road, Mount Cobb. Saturday with battles at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m.; Sunday at 1 p.m. Free but parking is $5. 613-9234 or 24thcmr.org. Pocono Wurst Festival, with a variety of wursts, wieners, kielbasa, pierogies and craft brews along with entertainment by the Jimmy Sturr Orchestra, John Stanky & the Coal Miners, Walt Groller Orchestra, the Schwarzenegger Connection, the Austrian Boys and Joe Stanky & the Cadets. Also: a huge inflatable Bavarian Slide, juggling, face painting, magic shows, Hot Dog Races and more. Shawnee Mountain Ski Area, 61 Hollow Road, Shawnee on Delaware. Saturday, noon to 7 p.m.; Sunday, noon to 6 p.m. $15, $24 two days. Advance ticket discounts. 421-7231. National Hot Dog Day with hot dogs served on the lawn while supplies last. Osterhout Free Library, 71 S. Franklin St., WilkesBarre. Saturday, noon to 12:30

Martial Arts Super Sport, 12 bouts of mixed martial arts with a Championship Fight between Wilkes-Barre native and undefeated featherweight champion Jimy “The Kid” Hettes vs. current Ring of Combat featherweight champion Jacob Kirwan. Mohegan Sun Arena, 255 Highland Park Blvd., Wilkes-Barre Township. Saturday at 6:30 p.m. $80, $60, $45, $35. 800-7453000. Forty Fort Meeting House Tours, guided tours of the historic 1807 church. 20 River St., in the Forty Fort Cemetery. Sundays through Sept. 25, 1 to 3 p.m. $2, $1 children. 287-5214. Nathan Denison House Tours, guided tours of the historic 1790 house by costumed docents. 35 Denison St., Forty Fort. Sundays through September 25, 1 to 4 p.m. $4, $2 children. 451-1551. Board Game Night. Bring one of your own or select one from the library’s collection. Osterhout Free Library, 71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. Mondays through July 25, 6:30 to 8 p.m. All ages welcome. 823-0156. Fire Company Bazaar, with games, firefighters parade, fireworks, festival food and entertainment by Flaxy Morgan (Friday), Hillbilly Deluxe (Saturday) and the Jeanne Zano Band (Sunday). Germania Hose Company, 430 Foote Ave., Duryea. Tuesday through Thursday, 5 to 11 p.m. Continues July 22, 5 p.m. to midnight; July 23, 3 p.m. to midnight; July 24, 3 to 11 p.m. 840-7387. Summer Film Series: “Get Low” (2009), about a real-life legend 1930s Tennessee hermit (Robert Duvall) who threw his own rollicking funeral party while he was still alive. F.M. Kirby Center, Public Square, Wilkes-Barre. Wednesday at 1 p.m. ($4) and See EVENTS, Page 7


Cheers!

Restaurant Review

THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE

By SARA POKORNY spokorny@timesleader.com

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

This is the farmhouse that will say you’ve arrived at Shadyrill Farm Cafe & Bakery in Dallas. You’ll enjoy your meal inside the nearby barn.

BARN OR BISTRO? Shadyrill Farm offers a bit of both

I

f ever a simple lunch on a Sunday afternoon were more worth a bit of a road trip through the woods, I don’t remember it.

IF YOU GO What: Shadyrill Farm Café & Bakery Where: 315 Loyalville Road, Dallas Call: (570)-477-2202 Credit cards? Yes Handicapped accessible? Yes Hours: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Thursday through Sunday Other: Gift shop on site; baked goods, frozen and packaged food, bottled jellies and relishes and fresh herbs for sale on site.

inside some open farmhouse cabinetry just out of view. Onto sandwiches, which fall into four basic categories here: classics, served cold and eight ways; wraps, cold and six ways; hot, nine ways; and paninis, hot and five ways. Add to these six salads, a lunch trio (garden salad,

soup and breadsticks), a kids menu and even a flatbread white pizza with Vermont cheddar, red onion, fresh tomatoes and basil pesto sauce, served with salad, and I challenge you to find anything missing. The creations seem to hit all the bases. They start with Boar’s Head meats (the premier name in the deli world) and play with everything from turkey, ham, pastrami, porketta and chicken (even hot and Parmesan style) to olive tapenade, roasted red peppers, bacon, hummus and that sweet, now-in-season basil. We three adults were fairly torn but decided quickly. See RESTAURANT, Page 6

SARA POKORNY/THE TIMES LEADER

Karina’s Martini, served at Karina’s Retreat in Hughestown, is the perfect fruitinfused sipper.

PAGE 5

From the moment we arrived in front of the white farmhouse with the pretty paned windows that delivered such a gracious welcome, everything just oozed local charm. That the very air was redolent of basil as we were leaving, impressed and cheerful, was just a seal on the deal. A mental note was quickly made of an excellent reason to return to Shadyrill Farm: If you buy basil here, a staffer will pick it fresh from the garden and pack it into a cup for you. How utterly delightful.

Every bit as delightful were the simple but filling lunches turned out inside the woody and spacious, big-barn headquarters. Think soups, salads and sandwiches offered so many ways your head will spin, in a dizzying, dazzling way, of course. A cup of creamy chicken, mushroom and Parmesan soup to start things off was all we needed to know we were in for something delicious. The soup itself was sizzling hot, with each ingredient, most especially the sweet, fat and crunchy corn, fighting for individual attention as the freshest pick right off the farm. Even the serveware was special: a pastel-colored crock inside a different pastel-colored catch bowl you could almost imagine stacked enchantingly

Some martinis are so special, and so tasty, they deserve much more than the typical triangular glass. Such is the case with Karina’s Martini, a featured drink at Karina’s Retreat in Hughestown. Karina Singer, owner of Karina’s Retreat, is the creator of the only drink on her martini menu that’s served in a Champagne glass. “I’m a big fan of Grand Marnier,” she said. “I wanted something that put that and another favorite of mine, Champagne, together.” Singer uses Freixenet Cordon Negro Extra Dry sparkling wine. “A dry Champagne will lessen the sweetness in the martini,” Singer said. “In this case you need that because all of the sweetness comes from the fruits.” She uses sparkling-wine splits, or quarter-size bottles, to ensure the bubbly in each martini has perfect carbonation. “Champagne will lose its carbonation after being open for a day,” Singer said. “It’s better to use the small bottles instead of opening a large one and risking not using it all, then losing the carbonation.” The fruits used are freshsqueezed lime and orange. The drink also contains cranberry juice, vodka and Grand Marnier, an orange liqueur. While the fruit taste certainly comes through, so does the presence of alcohol. It’s not overpowering, but if you like to actually taste the booze you’re drinking and not have it glossed over with sweetness, this is the perfect combination. The volume of a Champagne glass is a bit less than that of a martini glass, but that doesn’t mean you’ll be missing out with Karina’s Martini. Each drink comes with what Singer calls a side car, or mini carafe, so every ounce of liquid from the martini shaker can be enjoyed. ••• KARINA’S MARTINI Served at: Karina’s Retreat, 295 Parsonage St., Hughestown Price: $6.25, $4.25 on Thursday martini nights Recipe: 1 shot vodka 1 shot Grand Marnier Cranberry juice Freixenet Cordon Negro Extra Dry sparkling wine Juice of lime Juice of orange Shake together, pour into Champagne flute. Garnish with orange and lime.


THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE

RESTAURANT

PAGE 6

Continued from page 5

A BBQ beef and cheddar hot sandwich ($9.95) was the first pick: thinly sliced roast beef, cheddar, bacon, onions and barbecue sauce grilled on wonderfully crunchy homemade flatbread. This was a little messy, thanks to the barbecue sauce, but a lot impressive. The flatbread, with obvious grill marks, was a crusty standout. Next up was a Hot Italian (also $9.95): capicola, Genoa salami, pepperoni, Provolone, red onions, sweet peppers, tomato and Italian vinaigrette all on the same flatbread. A guest was mesmerized and took care to point out that she ate half not because it wasn’t worthy but because it was so generous. Plus, she also had her eye on a dessert. (More on that later.) Choice No. 3 came from the panini menu: a Turkey Caesar BLT Panini ($8.95), with turkey breast, Provolone, bacon, tomato, lettuce and cheesy Caesar dressing, again, grilled on the signature flatbread. Our taster lauded the choice of Provolone over American and praised the delectable flavor of the dressing. Two side dishes deserve special shout-outs here, and I tell you because I’m told I must. Each sandwich was accompanied by a side of coleslaw or potato salad, and preferring neither (because I have renounced mayonnaise) I offered mine to my two guests, who, as a result, got a serving and a half apiece. You should know these two are aficionados of both slaw and potato salad, and they found the entries here simply among the best available, if not THE best available, locally. I’d like to tell you why, but even they couldn’t exactly say. Not too heavy, not too loose, I was told. Not overly mayo’d either. Apparently, coleslaws and potato salads can be judged instantaneously, at first bite, and these both raced to the top of the pack. The similarly pleased will be happy to know both are sold to go. You want to impress friends at a picnic? Come here first, I dutifully report. Now, I’d like to tell you we had a child in tow because his presence made my meal even a smidge better. From the kids menu, he ordered a grilled cheese, and it was easily one of the most beautiful grilled cheeses I’d ever seen, on thick, homemade bread, oozing

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

Don’t let that ‘closed’ sign scare you. Thursdays through Sundays, the barn at Shadyrill Farm, which houses the bakery and café, is most welcoming of visitors.

cheese and sporting actual grill marks. No pan-fried “grilled” cheese here. Imagine my delight when he offered a bite. My only complaint: No grilled cheese on the adult menu. I’d have loved a four-cheese variety teeming with basil. But worth noting is the staff here is more than accommodating of small folks. Our young eater actually asked for his grilled cheese with “a side of turkey” and was kindly obliged. After explaining that no, he didn’t wish for turkey on his grilled cheese, he was given a cup of thinly sliced, fresh deli turkey, which he enjoyed with abandon. Applesauce or potato chips and a cute cup of Sunset ice cream were his included accompaniments. She who enjoyed only a half sandwich also sampled dessert for us: a slice of pineapple chiffon pie, which was the weekly feature. It looked all kinds of lovely, topped generously with fluffy white cream, and she quickly raved. As for me, I had my dessert at home: a reduced-price coffee cake, marked down to $2 on the day-old table, that tasted every bit as moist and fresh as if it had been offered brand-new at $4.50, which is still a nice price. I can only imagine what the first-run tasted like. Hey, another reason to revisit. We arrived not terribly long after noon, and the bakery table was fairly picked over. So the getting might be best early. But we did manage to score some take-home pierogies, available here in at least seven varieties, including buffalo chicken. Yes, buffalo chicken pierogies. Just one more happy surprise brought to us by one of the happiest little places we’ve encountered of late. Oh, what a happy summer day. Times Leader food critics remain anonymous.

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2011


EVENTS

Continued from page 4

7:30 p.m. ($6). 826-1100. Finance Your Future! A series for teens and their parents on “Budgeting and Credit.” Osterhout Free Library, 71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. Wednesday, 4 to 6 p.m. Sign up at 821-1959. The Heritage of King’s College, a guided walk to explore the campus, focusing on its collection of historic buildings, gardens, monuments and memorials. Meet at the Wilkes-Barre Family YMCA, 40 W. Northampton St., Wilkes-Barre. Wednesday at 6 p.m. Free. 823-2191. Free Financial Course: Roth and Roth Conversions: Does It Make Sense for You? West Pittston Library, 200 Exeter Ave., West Pittston. Wednesday at 6 p.m. Reservations: 654-9847.

Farmers Market, with locally grown produce, festival foods, crafts, homemade breads and pastries and lunchtime entertainment by Farmer’s Daughter. Public Square, Wilkes-Barre. Thursday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 2084292.

FUTURE St. Barbara Bazaar, with Italian foods and entertainment by Eddie and the Dreamers (Friday), the Jeanne Zano Band (Saturday) and Flaxy Morgan (Sunday). St. Anthony of Padua Church, 28 Memorial St., Exeter. July 22-23, 5:30 to 11 p.m.; July 24, 5 to 11 p.m. 655-8952. Work Your Wellness! A half-hour workshop on menu planning, followed by a walk around the borough. West Pittston Library, 200 Exeter Ave., West Pittston. July 23, 10 to 11:30 a.m. $5. 6549847. Saturday Yoga Clinic, a free ses-

sion with Jennifer Ciarimboli of Balance Yoga. Millennium Circle, River Common Park, North River Street, Wilkes-Barre. July 23; Aug. 6 and 20; Sept. 3 and 17; Oct. 1 at 10 a.m. 574-3240. Knitting and Crocheting. Bring your projects and join other knitters. All ages. Osterhout Free Library, 71 S. Franklin St., WilkesBarre. July 23, Aug. 6 and 20, 10:30 a.m. to noon. 821-1959. Train Excursion, from Scranton to Moscow, a two-hour round trip to this small Pocono town with a stopover at its restored 1904 train station. Steamtown National Historic Site, 300 Cliff St., Scranton. July 23; Aug. 6, 13 and 20 at 11 a.m.; Sept. 3 and 4 at 1 p.m. $24, $22 seniors, $17 children. 340-5204 or nps.gov/stea. Soap Making Class, a session on making old-fashioned bars of soap. Hillside Farms, 65 Hillside Road, Trucksville. July 23, 1 to 3 p.m. Age 7 and older. $6. 696-

4500. Celebrate Our River Day, with environmental activities, a nature walk, plein-air painters, a presentation about Frances Slocum, a River Float and live music by the Sadie Green Sales Jugband, bluegrass group Coaltown Rounders and the George Wesley Band. Riverside Park, Tunkhannock. July 23, 3 to 8 p.m. Free. 996-1500. Win, Place, Show, a fundraiser for the Wyoming Valley Children’s Association with 16 live harness races, buffet dinner, cocktails and entertainment by local entertainer Kriki. Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs, 1280 Route 315, Plains Township. July 23 with doors at 5:30 p.m. and post time at 6:30 p.m. $50 ballroom, $10 patio. 714-1246. Civil War Twilight Tour, of an 18th-century PennsylvaniaGerman farm offering a glimpse of the homefront during the war.

Quiet Valley Living Historical Farm, 1000 Turkey Hill Road, Stroudsburg. July 23, 6 to 8:30 p.m. $10, $5 children. 991-6161.

THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE

Harveys Lake Fire Company Dance, with music by Eddie Day & the Original Star Fires along with Tom Slick & the Greaseslappers. Irem Temple County Club Pavilion, 397 Country Club Road, Dallas. July 23, 8 p.m. to midnight. $25 includes beer, pizza and hot dogs. Cash bar available. 639-1398. Show Your Passion Through Your Fashion, a fashion show and luncheon to benefit Candy’s Place, a center for cancer wellness. Woodlands Inn & Resort, 1073 Route 315, Plains. July 24, 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. $25. 714-8800. July Dance, with music by Gary D & Company. VFW Post 283, 257 Wyoming Ave., Kingston. July 24, 6 to 9 p.m. $10. 288-2360.

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Concerts

with the John Andrews Band. Nay Aug Park Bandstand, 1901 Mulberry St., Scranton. Sunday at 2 p.m. 348-4186.

Noontime Concert Series, with music by Brandon Quinn. Courthouse Square in downtown Scranton. Today at noon. 963-6800.

Music in the Forest, with bluegrass and folk group the Young Geezers. Carriage House, Lacawac Sanctuary, off Ledgedale Road near Lake Wallenpaupack. Sunday at 7 p.m. $8. 689-9494.

T H I S W E E K : J U LY 1 5 T O 2 1 , 2 0 11

Catholic Underground, a Eucharistic Holy Hour followed by Los Angeles beatbox artist Paul J. Kim. St. Gabriel’s Church, 122 S. Wyoming St., Hazleton. Tonight at 7. Donation. 403-3094. Performing Arts Institute Concert, with the Wind Ensemble and Jazz Ensemble. Buckingham Performing Arts Center, 201 N. Sprague Ave., Kingston. Tonight at 8. Free. 270-2160. Anna Maria Mendieta, the harpist who combines “the romance of the harp with the passion of the tango.” Wildflower Music Festival, Dorflinger-Suydam Wildlife Sanctuary, Route 6 and Elizabeth Street, White Mills. Saturday at 6 p.m. Bring a lawn chair or blanket. $22, $11 students. 253-5500. Enigma Variations, Edward Elgar’s piece performed by the Wyoming Seminary Performing Arts Institute’s Masterworks Chorale, Chamber Orchestra, Institute Chorus and Symphony Orchestra joined by organist Mark Laubach. St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 35 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. Saturday at 8 p.m. Free. 270-2160. The Janks, the young Los Angeles-based new-retro band. Mauch Chunk Opera House, 14 W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe. Saturday at 8:30 p.m. $18. 325-0249.

David Bixler, the renowned jazz saxophonist joined by the Faculty Jazz All-Stars of Wyoming Seminary’s Performing Arts Institute. River Common Amphitheater, South River Street, Wilkes-Barre. Sunday at 7 p.m. Free. 270-2160. Summer Concerts at the Pavilion, with classic music from the ’50s to the ’70s by the Legends. Irem Temple Country Club, 397 Country Club Road, Dallas. Sunday at 8 p.m. 675-4653. Old Time Is Still A-Flying: The New Torch Bearers of Classic Jazz, traditional 1920-30s jazz and swing with Dan Levinson and His New Millennium All Stars. An “Under the Stars” concert on the campus of Misericordia University, 301 Lake St., Dallas. Monday at 8 p.m. $15, $8 lawn. 674-6719. Performing Arts Institute Concert, a counselor solo and chamber recital. Great Hall of Wyoming Seminary, 228 Wyoming Ave., Kingston. Monday at 8 p.m. Free. 270-2160. Clockwise, the South African duo of violinist Mark Uys and harpist Jacqueline Kerrod. Great Hall of Wyoming Seminary, 228 Wyoming Ave., Kingston. Tuesday at 8 p.m. Free. 270-2160.

Fern Hall Backyard Blues Bash, an outdoor music festival with Teddy Young & the Aces, Matt Bennick & the Blues Mind, Clarence Spady Blues Band, Friars Point Band with Chris London, and Steve Guyger & the Excellos. Also: a pig roast and barbecue mainstays. Bring a lawn chair. Fern Hall Inn, Route 247, Crystal Lake. Sunday, noon to 9 p.m. $25 advance, $30 day of show. 222-3676.

Performing Arts Institute Concert, a student solo and chamber recital. Great Hall of Wyoming Seminary, 228 Wyoming Ave., Kingston. Wednesday at 8 p.m. Free. 270-2160.

Summer Concerts in the Park,

See CONCERTS, Page 9

Jam in the Park, with local poprock bands Nowhere Slow, Suze and indie-pop trio the Balloon Corp. River Common Amphitheater,

PAGE 8

Best Bet Rapper Lil Wayne, released from jail in November, is back on tour and ready to party. His summer entourage arrives Tuesday at the Toyota Pavilion on Montage Mountain in Scranton with guest rapper Rick Ross, pop-soul singer Keri Hilson and the Los Angeles collective Far East Movement. Lil Wayne (alias Dwayne Michael Carter Jr.) hit his creative stride with the top-selling album “Tha Carter III” in 2008 and pronounced himself the greatest rapper alive. Is he as good as he claims? Check out the show, which starts at 7 p.m. Tickets are available at livenation.com.

By SARA POKORNY spokorny@timesleader.com

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he winners of Colorado’s coveted Telluride Bluegrass Festival band competition, Greensky Bluegrass, will perform at 8 tonight at the Mauch Chunk Opera House in Jim Thorpe. The five-piece group from Michigan creates original songs that retain the familiarity of old-school bluegrass. The band is made up of Anders Beck on dobro (or resophonic guitar), Michael Bont on banjo, Dave Bruzza on guitar, Mike Devol on upright bass and Paul Hoffman on mandolin. The band’s name, which consists of opposites “green sky” and “blue grass,” is a reflection of the type of music it plays. “Along with the tradition of bluegrass, we all have lots of different musical influences that we bring to the table,” Bruzza said in a press release, “and we somehow wanted to reflect that in our name.” During a performance, the audience can expect to hear Greensky originals as well as selections from the Talking Heads, Jimi Hendrix, The Grateful Dead or Bob Marley, all with a bluegrass twist. ••• When Lil Wayne comes around, it’s almost always with an entourage. The Toyota Pavilion at Montage Mountain will see his best grouping of friends yet, as the famed

IF YOU GO What: Greensky Bluegrass When: 8 tonight Where: Mauch Chunk Opera House, 14 West Broadway, Jim Thorpe Tickets: $18 ••• What: Lil Wayne with Rick Ross, Keri Hilson, Far East Movement, and Lloyd When: 7 p.m. Tuesday Where: Toyota Pavilion at Montage Mountain, 1000 Montage Mountain Road, Scranton Tickets: $25 to $125 ••• What: Rob Zombie and Slayer’s “Hell on Earth” tour When: 7 p.m. Wednesday Where: Sovereign Center, 700 Penn St., Reading Tickets: $29.50 to $44.50

rapper hits the stage Tuesday with Rick Ross, Keri Hilson, Far East Movement and Lloyd as part of his nationwide tour. Lil Wayne, who has been rapping since he was 9 years old, has eight albums under his belt, with the ninth, “Tha Carter IV,” set for release Aug. 29. The highly anticipated album reportedly boasts Cee-Lo, Busta Rhymes and John Legend on tracks. See MUSIC, Page 9


THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE C O N C E RT S Continued from page 8

South River Street, Wilkes-Barre. Thursday at 6:30 p.m. Free. Israeli Scouts Tzofim Friendship Caravan, a performance by the emissaries for Israel who share their lives through song, dance and stories. Jewish Community Center, 60 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre. Thursday at 7 p.m. Free. Preceded by an optional dinner ($3) at 5:45 p.m. 824-4646. Party on the Patio, with Unforgettable Fire paying tribute to the band U2. Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs, 1280 Route 315, Plains Township. Thursday at 7 p.m. Free. 831-2100. Sweet, a reformed version of the British band led by Steve Priest (“Fox on the Run”). Penn’s Peak, 326 Maury Road, Jim Thorpe. Thursday at 8 p.m. 866-605-7325.

FUTURE CONCERTS Brad Paisley, the CMA Entertainer of the Year’s “Wetter & Wilder World Tour” with guests Blake Shelton and Jerrod Niemann along with emerging country stars Brent Eldredge, Edens Edge and Sunny Sweeney. Also: the Water World Plaza full of water-themed activities, including a fishing simulator, dunking booth, Slip ’n Slide and other water games. Toyota Pavilion, 1000 Montage Mountain Road, Scranton. July 22 at 4 p.m. with music at 5 p.m. $74, $34. Tickets at livenation.com.

MUSIC Continued from page 8

Performing Arts Institute Concert, with the Masterworks Chorale, the Chamber Orchestra, the Institute Chorus and the Symphony Orchestra. Great Hall, 228 Wyoming Ave., Kingston. July 22 at 8 p.m. Free. 270-2160. Mary Wilson of the Supremes, one of the original founding members of the popular Motown trio. An “Under the Stars” concert on the campus of Misericordia University, 301 Lake St., Dallas. July 23 at 8 p.m. $30, $20 lawn. Complemented by an exhibit of 50 distinctive gowns worn by the pop stars along with various memorabilia. Opens July 22 with a reception with the singer 5 to 8 p.m. $40. 674-6719.

headline sets at every show. Slayer will draw on its 30-year catalogue for the set list, and Zombie should hold nothing back as he plays hits spanning the length of his solo career, which started in 1998. The tour has another show in Pennsylvania on July 23 at Stage AE in Pittsburgh. ••• Pop is the name of the game at this week’s Jam in the Park, with local pop-rock bands Nowhere Slow and Suze and indie-pop group the Balloon Corp. The free show will take place at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at the River Common Amphitheater on South River Street in Wilkes-Barre. ••• Misericordia University in Dallas will play host to “Old Time is Still A-Flying: The New Torch Bearers of Classic Jazz,” an “Under the Stars” concert, at 8 p.m. Monday. The concert will offer traditional 1920-30s jazz and swing music with Dan Levinson and His New Millennium All Stars. Tickets are $15 and $8 for lawn.

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This will be his first album out since “Tha Carter III,” a collection that has sold more than 3 million copies, making it 2008’s best-selling album. Ross is another seasoned rapper who is widely recognized for songs “The Boss,” with T-Pain, and “Here I Am,” with Nelly and Avery Storm, off his second studio album, “Trilla.” Hilson’s latest hit, “Pretty Girl Rock,” can be heard on the radio, as well as Far East Movement’s “Like a G6” and Lloyd’s “Get it Shawty.” ••• The Sovereign Center in Reading will experience “Hell on Earth” on Wednesday when metal icons Slayer and Rob Zombie open the tour as co-headliners. This will be the first time the two acts have toured together since Ozzfest in 1999. Both Zombie and Slayer will present full

The South African music duo Clockwise (Mark Uys and Jacqueline Kerrod) will perform Tuesday at Wyoming Seminary’s Great Hall in Kingston.


Kids

related to ducks along with snacks. For ages 4 to 8. Nuangola Library, 5150 Nuangola Road, Nuangola. Wednesdays through Aug. 3 at 10 a.m. $1. Register at 868-5962.

T H I S W E E K : J U LY 1 5 T O 2 1 , 2 0 11 Disney’s Alice in Wonderland Jr., madcap adventures with the White Rabbit, Dodo Bird, a bubble-blowing Caterpillar and the Queen of Hearts. Shawnee Playhouse, 1 River Road, Shawnee-on-Delaware. Today and Thursday at 10 a.m. Continues July 23, 27, 29; Aug. 4, 6, 10, 12, 18, 20, 24, 26 at 10 a.m. $10. 421-5093. The Rockin’ Tale of Snow White, a musical takeoff on the classic fairy tale with added characters and comedic twists. Performed by the Take the Stage Players on the lawn of the Back Mountain Memorial Library, 96 Huntsville Road, Dallas. Tonight and Saturday at 6 p.m. $5, $3 children benefits the library. 690-5439. School House Rock Live! Upbeat, toe-tapping music based on the Emmy-winning educational cartoon series. Shawnee Playhouse, 1 River Road, Shawneeon-Delaware. Saturday and Wednesday at 10 a.m. Continues with 10 a.m. shows on July 22, 28, 30; Aug. 3, 5, 11, 13, 17, 19, 25, 27. $10. 421-5093. Songs & Games for Tots, with Bill Frye and his “supercharged” guitar. Dietrich Theater, 60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. Saturday at 11 a.m. Free. 996-1500. Storytime with children’s author Angela DeMuro who reads from her three Land of MU Birds books “I Already Knew I Love YOU!” “Goodnight My Little MU” and “Rosie the Rainbow MU.” Outrageous, Midtown Village Plaza, 41 S. Main St., WilkesBarre. Saturday at 11 a.m. 2087805.

Angela DeMuro has debuted the third book in the Land of MU series, ‘Rosie the Rainbow MU.’ She’ll read from it at Outrageous in Wilkes-Barre’s Midtown Village at 11 a.m. tomorrow. Early Explorers, museum-based learning in theater arts for ages 3 to 5. Everhart Museum, 1901 Mulberry St., Nay Aug Park, Scranton. Monday at 1 p.m. Free. Registration: 346-7186. Hogwash! A reading of Karma Wilson’s rhyming book about some mischievous pigs with a penchant for things muddy. Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Arena Hub Plaza, Wilkes-Barre Township. Tuesday at 10 a.m.; Thursday at 6:30 p.m. 829-4210. Wilderness Survival Skills. Learn the basics of wilderness survival including first aid, survival shelters, fire-starting and preparing campfires, outdoor cooking, identifying edible and poisonous plants, animal tracking, emergency fishing skills and basic canoeing. For ages 12 to 17. Ricketts Glen State Park, 695 Route 487, Benton. Wednesday and Thursday, 9 a.m. to noon; Friday (July 22), 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Registration: 477-7780. Just Ducky, stories and crafts

Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, presented by the Junior Players and Little Hams of the Whipple Performing Arts Studio, 20 Village Center, Tunkhannock. Wednesday through Fridayat 7 p.m.; July 23 at 2 and 7 p.m. $10. 8366986. American Girl Club. Bring your doll and join other American Girl enthusiasts. Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Arena Hub Plaza, Wilkes-Barre Township. Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. 829-4210. Backyard Birds and Kids. Learn to identify five backyard birds, then make a peanut-butter treat to take home and hang for the birds. Wild Birds Unlimited, Dallas Shopping Center, Route 309, Dallas. Thursday at 10 a.m. $3. Registration: 675-9900. Early Explorers, museum-based learning in visual arts for ages 3 to 5. Everhart Museum, 1901 Mulberry St., Nay Aug Park, Scranton. Thursday at 1 p.m. Free. Registration: 346-7186.

FUTURE Meet Frances Slocum, a history program for ages 5 to 10 with costumed persons of the past, crafts, games, hands-on activities and storytelling. Swetland Homestead, 885 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming. July 23, 10 to 11:30 a.m. $5. Reservations: 823-6244.

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Sea Biscuit, the little yellow dog visits a storytime session at Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Arena Hub Plaza, Wilkes-Barre Township. July 23 at 11 a.m. 829-4210.

If you’re a kid who likes history, head to the Swetland Homestead in Wyoming for a special program on “Colonial Kids,” the second in a series running Saturdays through July. Costumed persons of the past will acquaint you with the lives and times of your Colonial counterparts through crafts, games, hands-on activities and storytelling. The fun is geared for ages 5 to 10 and will take place at 885 Wyoming Ave. in Wyoming from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday. Make your reservations at 823-6244. Cost is $5. 299580

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Best Bet


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THE GUIDE

Second part of ‘Hallows’ has heart and soul to spare By COLIN COVERT Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

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IF YOU GO What: “Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows — Part 2” Starring: Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint, Ralph Fiennes and Alan Rickman Directed by: David Yates Running time: 130 minutes ★★★★

fragments of his malignant soul. How the school has changed from the joyous theme park of old. Dementors float above the courtyard, their tattered shrouds trailing like jellyfish tentacles. Students march in prison-camp formation. Overseeing it all from a high window is Voldemort’s ally, Prof. Snape (Alan Rickman, delivering each line of dia-

log as if savoring a plum). His expression is stoic but ... could that be a flicker of regret? The story has an epic war-movie feel, as Voldemort’s army strikes back against Harry’s student and staff rebellion. Director David Yates keeps the ebb and flow of combat clear; for all its blitzkreig energy, the battle never feels incoherent. What distinguishes this from other summer shrapnel-fests is the way it follows individuals we care about through the conflict. Second fiddles Neville Longbottom (Matthew Lewis) and Prof. McGonagall (Maggie Smith) step forward to play pivotal roles. The power bolts, spells and inSee HALLOWS, Page 13

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ith its haunted vistas, clanking battles, inspired effects, heroism, treachery, fragile alliances and moral ambiguity, the blockbuster finale of the Harry Potter saga achieves a supernatural splendor. The series has sputtered here and there over the past decade, losing its focus and tempo, but this climax is a triumph of spectacle and well-earned sentiment.

“Potter” is the anti-“Transformers,” high adventure with heart and soul to spare. Daniel Radcliffe has matured into a solid actor, impressive in tense scenes of deadly combat and quiet moments of subtle, shifting emotion. He puts those skills to good use in Harry’s showdown with Lord Voldemort, the snake-faced tyrant who killed Harry’s parents and aims to crush the world beneath his heel. With Hermione (Emma Watson, her iron-jawed self-confidence draining away) and Ron (Rupert Grint, whose befuddled expression suits his overwhelmed character) Harry returns to Hogwarts to find and destroy the remaining Horcruxes, the containers in which Voldemort has hidden


THE GUIDE PAGE 12

THE GUIDE

New to DVD This week’s DVD releases are a mixed bag of animation, comedy and horror. ••• “RANGO,” GRADE A: A chameleon (voiced by Johnny Depp) comes to the rescue of a small town when he’s lost in the desert. Director Gore Verbinski’s first venture into animation is a rootin’ tootin’ good time. It combines the cheesiness of spaghetti Westerns with the offbeat attitude of “Blazing Saddles” and delivers it all in a spectacular computer-generated form. You must see “Rango.” Verbinski finds the perfect blend of slapstick humor and interesting characters to entertain both young and old. “INSIDIOUS,” GRADE C-: A family discovers that dark spirits have possessed their son. Patrick Wilson stars. A good way to make a horror film scary is to keep the story so grounded in what’s familiar it creates shivers, such as “The Blair Witch Project” or “Paranormal Activity.” “Insidious” starts out with such an approach, but then writer Leigh Whannell and director James Wan load the film with so many horror film cliches — including a very predictable ending — the effort collapses. “ARTHUR,” GRADE F: A slacker must choose between an arranged marriage or life without money. Russell Brand and Helen Mirren star. There’s not enough liquor on the planet to obliterate the memory of this film. This feeble remake is not just repugnant for its lack of humor, amateurish acting and lead-footed pacing, but it’s also an insult to the memory of Dudley Moore, who starred in the 1981 version. ••• ALSO NEW ON DVD TUESDAY: ••• “ROBOT CHICKEN STAR WARS: EPISODE III:” Seth Green’s satirical look at the sci-fi classic. “AGATHA CHRISTIE’S POIROT: THE MOVIE COLLECTION:” Includes three mysteries that premiered on PBS’s “Masterpiece Mystery!”

By ROGER MOORE The Orlando Sentinel

“W

innie the Pooh,” Disney’s latest film revival of A.A. Milne’s “willy, nilly, silly old bear,” is longer on charm than on laughs. But it’s a treat for children making their first trek to the multiplex and for parents and grandparents with fond memories of the “Hundred Acre Wood.” This “Pooh” is a musical homage to the 1960s Pooh short films, adding new songs (by “Book of Mormon” composer Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez) and a lovely revival of the “Winnie the Pooh” title tune, winsomely sung by Zooey Deschanel. And if the animation doesn’t have quite the hand-colored warmth of those older cel-animated classics, it more than does justice to the world’s favorite “tubby little cubby all stuffed with fluff.” Co-writer/directors Stephen J. Anderson and Don Hall, with the help of five other credited screenwriters, emphasize Pooh’s literary roots, making Winnie work his way through paragraphs and pages of words — literal words that collapse into piles of letters at Pooh’s bidding. “Is there honey in this paragraph?” There had better be, because “I am a

Movie Amy

Call me crazy, but I’m obsessed with the idea of finding "lost classics." I live to discover awesome movies that almost nobody’s heard of, like the trio of under-the-radar treats described below. If you have your own hidden gems and want to share, send me an email at movieamy@aol.com. ••• “SO GOES MY LOVE” (1946, Warner Archive, unrated, $25): Even though this delicious dramedy is set at the turn of the century, there’s something bracingly modern about the back-

bear of very little brain, and long words bother me,” he sighs. Voice actor Jim Cummings does a great impersonation of the late Sterling Holloway, the original Pooh, as well as Paul Winchell, the original voice of Tigger. The story is as simple as any Pooh picture. The bear is out of honey “and a Pooh bear takes care of his tummy.” But Pooh also has “a very important thing to do.” Sad old Eeyore (Bud Luckey) has lost his tail and the manic Rabbit (Tom Kenny) and verbose Owl (Craig Ferguson) make various plans and proposals for rounding up a replacement. Eeyore is all about the puns. A balloon as a substitute tail? “I’m still up in the air about it.” There’s a lovely little chalkboard animation interlude, some mild moments of alarm as Owl misreads “Back Soon” on Christopher Robin’s note as “Backson,” a beast that must have kidnapped the little boy who usually solves their problems for them. And Pooh sings, especially when he hallucinates about his favorite treat — “Everything is Honey.” It’s a funnier, more sophisticated and more nostalgic trip to the woods than “Pooh’s Heffalump Movie” or the most recent Tigger and Piglet pictures. The mess-

and-forth between an oddball inventor (Don Ameche) and his tarttongued wife (Myrna Loy). Don’t let the dopey title scare you off, “So Goes My Love” goes down easy. ••• “SOMETHING WILD” (1986, Criterion, R, $30) A stockbroker (Jeff Daniels) lunching in Greenwich Village gets taken for a ride, literally and figuratively, when he hooks up with a kook named Lulu (Melanie Griffith.) After comic interludes in North Jersey and Central Pennsylvania, “Something Wild” goes back

IF YOU GO What: “Winnie The Pooh” Starring: Jim Cummings (Winnie the Pooh, Tigger); Craig Ferguson (Owl); John Cleese (narrator); Kristen Anderson-Lopez (Kanga) Directed by: Stephen J. Anderson, Don Hall Running time: 67 minutes (including the short cartoon “The Ballad of Nessie”) Rated: G ★★★

ages sink in about childish forgetfulness and putting the needs of others ahead of your own honey lust. Mainly, though, it’s nice to see that Disney wants to introduce tykes to the magic of going to the movies with family fare this gentle and warm. As always, “Pooh” stars in a very short movie, the idea being that like his youngest fans, he doesn’t have the attention span to carry a full-length feature. But this “Winnie the Pooh” is augmented by a delightful 2-D animated short, “The Ballad of Nessie,” a fanciful version of how the Loch Ness Monster came to create Loch Ness. “Nessie” is narrated in Dr. Seussstyle rhymes by Scottish comic Billy Connolly.

ments.

to Long Island for a rush of violence that finds the mismatched couple fighting for their lives against a very angry ex-con (Ray Liotta). You might feel disappointed by the shift from adorable comedy to bloody thriller, but director Jonathan Demme knows how to upset the applecart at just the right mo-

••• “THE SQUARE” (2010, Sony, R, $25): A wife (Claire Van Der Boom) who’s been cheating on her thug of a husband decides that she and her new boyfriend (David Roberts) should help themselves to hubby’s satchel of cash before riding off into the sunset. Of course, nothing goes according to plan in this riveting film noir from Australia’s Nash Edgerton. This one plays for keeps. Amy Longsdorf also profiles celebrities for the Sunday Etc. section of The Times Leader.


Still Showing

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THE GUIDE

BAD TEACHER — Cameron Diaz needs a boob job, and a rich husband, therefore she teaches. R for sexual content, nudity, language and drug use. 89 minutes. ★★ 1/2 BRIDESMAIDS – Kristin Wiig comes undone as maid of honor for her best friend’s up-market wedding. R for strong sexuality and language. 124 minutes. ★★★ 1/2

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By CARRIE RICKEY The Philadelphia Inquirer

oday is the end of an era. Some, like Warner Bros. executive Dan Fellman, compare the finality of “Harry Potter” to the breakup of the Beatles. The eighth and presumably final film based on the phenom that has sold 450 million books and almost a billion movie tickets opening in theaters from Lahore to Los Angeles marks twilight in the Potterverse. “It’s a little melancholy,” observes Johanna Winant, a doctoral student in literature at the University of Chicago, who grew up in Mount Airy inhaling the seven books that vividly detail seven years in the life of the orphaned wizard who avenges his parents’ deaths. Not only the fans of J.K. Rowling’s hero are experiencing withdrawal. For film execs and book publishers, educators and costume merchants, e-tailers and neighborhood booksellers, the pangs are as acute. Nearly as universal as Harry’s appeal is admiration for his cultural impact. Harry Potter has broken publishing and box-office records, boosted adolescent reading, erased the line between young-adult and adult fiction,

HALLOWS Continued from page 11

and had a steroidal impact on the profits of Amazon.com. “It’s the highest-grossing franchise in the history of the motionpicture industry,” Fellman says. “Usually, the law of diminishing returns applies to movie franchises,” says Paul Dergarabedian, analyst at Hollywood.com, who notes that from the first Harry film, in 2001, to the seventh, in 2010, box office has been consistently strong. “No other series has had a trajectory like this.” “I don’t think it’s possible to overstate the effects of Harry Potter on reading and on publishing,” says Diane Roback, children’s book editor at Publishers Weekly. “In terms of number of books sold, anticipation for new volumes in the series, getting children to read, getting adults to read books for children, and creating a cultural phenomenon, it is unmatched.” Harry struck a chord felt around the world. Nearly everyone agrees that Rowling, the welfare mom who wrote the first Potter book in an unheated apartment in Edinburgh, Scotland, while caring for her infant daughter, created characters and settings more notable for their emotional than their economic impact. Harry and Co. grew up, it seemed, in real time, mirroring readers’ and moviegoers’ own developmental stages.

bank is a riotous image of a corrupt financial firm’s collapse. Near the climax, Harry’s mentor Albus Dumbledore (Michael Gambon) returns in a vision to advise the young wizard that words are potent forms of enchantment, rich with the power to hurt or heal. Here the secret of the series is revealed. If the Potter franchise had been cooked up in a studio pitch meeting with story-

Winant reflects, “For my younger brother’s micro-generation, who were 10 when the first book came out, the cosmology of Harry Potter is the most important thing. And that’s because in 2001, our country went to war against a shadowy evil.” “I wonder if Harry Potter would have been quite so important without al-Qaeda, which, like Voldemort, smeared itself across the sky in smoke,” she says. The first of the movies was released two months after the twin towers fell, and the last comes out two months after Osama bin Laden was slain. Is this really the end of Harry Potter? “One hears J.K. Rowling is writing a prequel,” says a reliable Hollywood source, “with Volume 1 about Harry’s parents, their meeting and love, and Volume 2 about the birth of Harry and the killing by Voldemort.” “We know she’s working on a project, but she hasn’t discussed it with us,” Fellman says. “We like that rumor.”

boards and visual-effects demos, it could never become the generation-defining phenomenon that it is. It captured the imagination of an era like no cultural event since Beatlemania because it stands on a solid million-word foundation created by J.K. Rowling. She put story and character front and center, and when they’re succeeding, the Potter films do, too. For all the movies’ dazzle and

flash and Hippogriffs, the characters are more vivid than the special effects. It is our emotional involvement with the three-dimensional heroes and villains, sidekicks and background players that draws us back time after time. The final chapter ends with an epilogue that puts a lump in your throat and makes you want to watch them all again from the beginning. That’s the definition of a classic.

GREEN LANTERN — Ryan Reynolds doesn’t have much to work with as he flies around in a skintight green suit and zaps stuff with his super-power ring. PG-13 for intense sci-fi violence and action. 114 minutes. ★ 1/2 HORRIBLE BOSSES — This is wildly, brazenly stupid — but also, you know, fun. It’s about three guys who hate their jobs and want to kill their bosses. Who among us hasn’t pondered such a plan? R for crude and sexual content, pervasive language and some drug material. 98 minutes. ★★★ LARRY CROWNE — Even the combined, blinding brilliance of Tom Hanks and Julia Roberts cannot salvage the corny, contrived script. Hanks, as Larry, undergoes a major life change when he finds himself downsized out of his job at a behemoth superstore. PG-13 for brief strong language and some sexual content. 98 minutes. ★ 1/2 MIDNIGHT IN PARIS — Woody Allen has found the right time and place with this, his lightest, funniest and most-satisfying movie in a long time, a pastry-light romantic fantasy. PG-13 for some sexual references and smoking. 94 minutes. ★★★ MONTE CARLO — The French Riviera gets taken over by teenyboppers, notably Disney Channel star and pop singer Selena Gomez. PG for brief mild language. 108 minutes. ★★ MR. POPPER’S PENGUINS — Mark Waters has turned a charming children’s book into a movie with its own charm, thanks largely to Jim Carrey’s deft, funny performance. PG for mild rude humor and some language. 95 minutes. ★★ 1/2 SUPER 8 — J.J. Abrams has crafted a loving, meticulously detailed homage to Steven Spielberg, but it never feels like a rip-off. PG-13 for intense sci-fi action and violence, language and some drug use. 112 minutes. ★★★ TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON — Michael Bay serves up another loud, long, bruising and wearisome onslaught of giant, shape-shifting robots. In 3-D. PG-13 for intense sci-fi action violence, mayhem and destruction, and for language, sexuality and innuendo. 154 minutes. ★ 1/2 ZOOKEEPER – Kevin James plays Griffin, a staffer at Boston’s Franklin Park Zoo trying to woo the gorgeous, shallow Stephanie (Leslie Bibb). The animals speak up to help him get the girl. PG for some rude and suggestive humor and language. 102 minutes. ★

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visibility cloaks are beautifully realized, absurd yet persuasive. The brutish ogres and giant tarantulas Voldemort unleashes in the final battle inspire genuine shivers of fear. And there are witty miracles; the dragon demolition of Gringott’s goblin

CARS 2 — Pixar’s second try at “Cars” is shiny, colorful and pretty, which should keep the young ones happy. G. 106 minutes. ★ 1/2


THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE

Buys T H I S W E E K : J U LY 1 5 T O 2 1 , 2 0 11

PAGE 14

Community Yard Sale and bake sale. Huntsville United Methodist Church, 2355 Huntsville Road, Shavertown. Saturday, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Vendors welcome at $10 per space. 477-3748.

8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. $10 per table. 864-2401. Noxen Day Town-Wide Yard Sale, with items at the Noxen School, Clothes Closet and Library. Food and desserts by the Noxen Lutheran Ladies Association. Saturday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 298-2052.

FUTURE

Flea Market, with food available. Bloomingdale Grange, Grange Hall Road, Bloomingdale. Saturday, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. $5 per table. 2567610.

Yard Sale and Flea Market, with lunch and refreshments available. Mount Zion United Methodist Church, Mount Zion Road, Harding. July 30, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. $10 per table. 388-2265 or 388-2600.

Community Yard Sale. Town Hill United Methodist Church, 417 Town Hill Road, Shickshinny. Saturday,

St. Paul’s Auction, with quilts, antiques, furniture and household goods along with entertainment

and food. St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, Route 118, Dallas. Aug. 6 at 9 a.m. with bidding at 1 p.m. 6753859.

ANNOUNCEMENTS Autumn Festival. Applications are being accepted for vendors for this event at Lake-Lehman High School on Oct. 15, 1 to 6 p.m. $20 per vendor. Information at 262-6725 or autumnfestival.webs.com. Funfest Garage Sale. Applications are available on a first-come-firstserved basis for the 20-space sale during Funfest weekend Sept. 10 and 11 in Hazleton. Spaces are 5-by-10, but you must provide your own tables and chairs. Information at 455-1509 or funfestpa.org.

HER OL D ’S BA O G O 5 0 % O F F LR EA D Y R ED U CED PR ICES FA R M M A R KET

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Table games, poker get graded SLOTS PAYOUTS

PLAINS TOWNSHIP – Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs reached the one-year anniversary of the addition of table games to the casino earlier this week. While table-game play in the main casino looks quite similar to opening day, poker has been the subject of many changes. The updates in the room over the course of the year have brought out many positives, but some areas still could be addressed as the poker operation looks to grow, including the hosting of its biggest tournament to date at the end of the month. Here’s a report card for the Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs poker room at the end of one year: ••• ADAPTABILITY: Management has made clear its willingness to adjust. That is evident each month with tweaks to the tournament schedules and formats. There is no way to please all the players, but the changes are often an accurate read of what the majority would find interesting. The flexibility in the operation, run by poker manager Art Blanda, has often led to jumps in tournament entries. A+ ••• VARIETY: The biggest limitations come from the players. Supervisors and podium workers are willing to make extra announcements to try to get new games going if there is enough interest from players to support a different game or stakes. B ••• RAKE: There are better values to be found for cash game play in some parts of the country, but the room gets credit for staying even with or below its most direct competition in the amount it takes from each pot of cash games. B••• TOURNAMENT VALUE: Overall, the amount of tournament entry money that goes to prize money compared with what goes elsewhere (house fees, dealer tips, etc.) is better than a lot of casinos. The tournaments are less of a value in terms of prize money now that a dealer add-on of $5 per player is a virtual given. They are, however, more

For the week of June 27-July 3: NOTE: Fiscal year ended 6/30. Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs Wagers Week: $59,693,900.78 Fiscal year just completed: $2,868,369,372.63 Fiscal year to date: $32,037,248.15 Payouts Week: $53,824,301.70 Fiscal year just completed: $2,581,183,839.04 Fiscal year to date: $28,892,134.52 Mount Airy Casino & Resort Wagers Week: $44,431,388.72 Fiscal year just completed: $1,997,425,010.93 Fiscal year to date: $26,898,491.74 Payouts Week: $40,221,894.67 Fiscal year just completed: $1,809,671,050.60 Fiscal year to date: $24,314,814.53 SOURCE: PENNSYLVANIA GAMING CONTROL BOARD

DON CAREY FILE PHOTO/THE TIMES LEADER

Poker tournaments pack in the crowds at Mohegan Sun .

of a value in terms of chips in play and how long they are likely to last. B ••• COMP RATE: If the room had 10 competitors in the same city, the comps players could earn would be much better. Without that competition, players are rewarded less for their play than in the longer-established operations. C••• DEALERS The job of a dealer is multifaceted. Dealers serve as the host, administrators and referees of the individual games running at their table. ••• CUSTOMER SERVICE: The dealing staff generally makes an effort to be cordial to players, who do not always return the courtesy. A••• TECHNICAL SKILL: The combination of skills needed, including a strong sense of math to make quick decisions that keep the game moving, is often overlooked. A staff that featured many trained for this job as their first assignment in the industry has shown steady improvement in those areas. B ••• GAME CONTROL: Staff members vary from strong to weak when it comes time to deal with difficulties, such as players who make constant mistakes or intentionally try to push rules to the limit. Too many remain unwill-

ing to enforce some of the game’s stricter rules and/or are naïve enough to think it is being too nitpicky to do so. Those who excuse rules violations over the fear of it impacting the tips they work for do an injustice to the players who play by the book. C••• OPERATIONS ••• RULINGS: Floor personnel are often called to deal with trouble. Their response time is usually immediate. They are faced with the most difficult decisions, sometimes armed with misinformation as players try to present their case. Inconsistency in enforcement is a problem at times, but again an area that is improving, particularly in cash play. B••• PODIUM WITH DOTTIE: The best example of customer service comes when regulars emerge from the escalator to be greeted by Dottie Malloy, who already knows what games they play and immediately lets them know of their options. The management of the reservation list, an early problem area in the room, is best run when Malloy is at the controls on busy evenings. A+ ••• PODIUM WITHOUT DOTTIE: Although improving, having other staffers, primarily dealers, rotate through the podium between their regular assignments, does not work as well in managing the “list” during busy times. Seats are getting “stolen” away

and remained unfilled less often. C+ ••• AMENITIES Outside the game itself, several small factors can make a trip to the room more or less enjoyable. ••• TELEVISIONS: The many flat screens are well-placed, and the staff is willing to adjust the options – generally a choice of sporting events and ESPN’s Sports Center – to accommodate requests from players in particular areas of the room. A ••• CLEANLINESS: The room is usually kept neat. A••• FOOD: The selection from a small snack bar in the adjacent room is lacking in variety and quality. Some of the in-house restaurants will deliver if the player makes the contact. The best fastfood option for many players has become a short walk to the horse racing area. C ••• DRINK SERVICE: Servers can seem to have disappeared when shift changes are not well coordinated, but otherwise a steady cycle of waitresses alternates in taking and delivering orders. Again,

based on the treatment and commentary they are sometimes subjected to, the demeanor of the staff is commendable. B ••• RESTROOMS: The men’s room needs to be cleaned better and more often to keep up to the standards of the rest of the casino. Although women clearly make up the distinct minority in the room, the longer walk they have borders on a competitive disadvantage in tournament situations. C ••• TOURNAMENT STRUCTURE: With the exception of turbo events, which do not yet fit the intent of the format, the structures are excellent, giving as much chance for skill to emerge as reasonably possible. When the most frequent complaint is too much play and too long to sort out the best players, a room is doing something right. A••• SCOREBOARD: Some night staffing combinations are slow to update remaining players and, in turn, the average chip stack. Otherwise, it is generally more up-todate than most casinos, therefore providing a quality service to players. B+ ••• PAYOUTS: Players usually collect for the bubble, finding a way on their own to pay one more. Some players want less paid or more structures that keep close to a strict 10 percent in the money, rather than top five or top nine that make it in most events. The bottom line, however, is that the structures provide a logical combination of a sufficient chance to make the money and a big enough reward at the top end. A••• CONSISTENCY: Rulings and enforcement change from dealer to dealer, table to table and shift to shift. Examples include one dealer scooping up cards from empty seats the moment the button is dealt to – as stated in the rules – then five minutes later a different dealer leaving the cards out while watching for a player to walk across the room and play the hand. Cell-phone use is closely monitored in the day and often ignored at night. B

PAGE 15

By TOM ROBINSON For The Times Leader

THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE


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THE GUIDE

Despite rainy summer, River Common keeps things festive By MARY THERESE BIEBEL mbiebel@timesleader.com

I

PAGE 16

n one corner, popcorn volunteers Dan Pritchard and Johnny Espinoza kept busy shoveling golden gallons of donated kernels into single-serving bags. In another, Jessica Hendler helped her friends Ashley Farrow and Jennifer Simonik spread a table with treats from their business, “Let ’em Eat Cupcakes.” Key lime and banana split were flavors of the night. The popcorn was free; the cupcakes – some of them vegan – were $2. Whatever movie-goers chose, they wouldn’t go hungry as they settled in for a downtown Wilkes-Barre showing of 1987’s “Dragnet” starring Dan Aykroyd and Tom Hanks. The price of the movie was right, too. It was free – which was perfect for Melanie Shepherd, 31, and Matt Rogers, 33, of Kingston, who brought 6-month-old Thomas to what would be his first away-fromhome movie – as long as he didn’t become cranky. “We don’t have to feel bad if the baby gets restless and we have to leave,” Rogers said. The only wrinkle of the evening seemed to be the rain. The free movie was a River Common event, scheduled to be shown outdoors on July 8 in the River Common Amphitheater. When skies clouded and raindrops fell – an oh-so-frequent occurrence this year, with the Wilkes-Barre area recording precipitation more than eight inches

Dan Pritchard, left, and Johnny Espinoza fill up bags of popcorn before the showing of ‘Dragnet’ as part of the River Common entertainment series. The popcorn was donated by Movies 14.

Matt Rogers of Kingston checks out the vegan cupcakes displayed by Ashley Farrow of Sweet Valley and Jessica Hendler of Luzerne before the showing of ‘Dragnet.’

above average – Director of River Common Programming Karl Borton decided to move the showing indoors to the nearby Downtown Arts Building on North Franklin Street. He set up a sign at the riverfront, made an announcement on Facebook, had the inflatable screen set up inside Downtown Arts and watched a handful of people show up instead of the 500 he had hoped would attend. It would have been better out-

side, one of the early arrivals noted. “You have that nice river background,” Ryan Rutledge, 25, of Kingston said. Hendler, 26, of Luzerne, agreed the outdoor amphitheater is an ideal spot for a movie, based on her experience watching “E.T.” a few weeks ago. “It was awesome,” she said. “Everybody could see (because of the tiered seating.) A lot of people brought lawn chairs, people

brought children, and it was very informal. “I love old movies,” Hendler continued, “and I like it when they’re cheap. Ten dollars is more than I want to spend to sit inside and not socialize.” At the outdoor venue, she said, she enjoyed mingling before “E.T.” started. She also enjoyed being older – and therefore less frightened – by that particular movie than she was when it debuted in 1982. “I was terrified,” she said with a laugh. “I watched it through a blanket when I was a kid.” The recent showing of “E.T.” had been rescheduled from an earlier date – when it rained, said Espinoza, 21, a Wilkes University student who is interning with Borton. Future movies scheduled for the River Common include “Field of Dreams” on July 22, “Aladdin” on Aug. 5 and “Batman” starring Adam West on Aug. 19. Concerts scheduled for the River Common include Classic Jazz on the River at 7 p.m. Sunday, the music of Nowhere Slow, SUZE and Balloon Corps at 6:30 p.m. July 21 and the music of Leroy Justice and Lemongelli at 7 p.m. July 23. A tent will be set up so the concerts can be held rain or shine, Borton said. As for the movies, he’s thinking it will be better to reschedule them in case of rain rather than to move them indoors. “We didn’t get much of a crowd (last week),” he conceded. Still, some movie-goers didn’t mind last week’s change of venue. “I’m always looking for something to do,” said Paulette Patton, who lives in downtown WilkesBarre. She was happy to bring her husband, Lowell Patton, to the indoor flick and said she’s looking forward to more visits to the River Common. “I love it,” she said. “It’s beautiful.”


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THE GUIDE

IF YOU GO

S. JOHN WILKIN PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

ABOVE: Director of River Common Programming Karl Borton introduces ‘Dragnet’ inside the Downtown Arts building. The movie would have been shown outdoors on an inflatable screen, but rain drove it inside. LEFT: Paulette and Lowell Patton settle in with their popcorn before the show. BELOW: Movie-goers prepare to watch ‘Dragnet,’ starring Dan Aykroyd and Tom Hanks.

The River Common schedule of concerts, movies and free classes includes: Classic Jazz on the River, 7 p.m. Sunday Jam in the Park: Nowhere Slow, SUZE and Balloon Corps, 6:30 p.m. Thursday Movie Spotlight: “Field of Dreams,” 8 p.m. July 22 Yoga class with Jennifer Ciarimboli, 10 a.m. July 23 Jam in the Park: Leroy Justice and Lemongelli , 7 p.m. July 23 Movie Spotlight: “Aladdin,” 8 p.m. Aug. 5 African dance class, 6:30 p.m. Aug. 17 Movie Spotlight: “Batman,” (1966 version) 8 p.m. Aug. 19

PAGE 17


THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE

Reads T H I S W E E K E N D : J U LY 1 5 T O 2 1 , 2 0 11

T H I S W E E K : J U LY 1 5 T O 2 1 , 2 0 11

The Gathering, the fifth annual literary conference with former U.S. Poet Laureate and Pulitzer Prize winner Ted Kooser, novelist Craig Nova, children’s writer Susan Cooper, nonfiction writer Sarah Rossbach, architects Peter Bohlin and Witold Rybczynski and poets Karen Blomain and Craig Czury. With lectures, panels, films, music and workshops on the event’s theme “Physical and Metaphysical Home: Memory, Grace and Structure.” Keystone College, La Plume. Today, 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Saturday, 7 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Sunday, 7 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. 945-8510. For schedule of events, see gathering.keystone.edu.

Nunsense 2: The Second Coming, a musical comedy about the singing Little Sisters of Hoboken. Shawnee Playhouse, 1 River Road, Shawnee-on-Delaware. Today and Wednesday at 2 p.m. Continues through Sept. 4 with 8 p.m. shows on July 30; Aug. 13, 17, 20; and 2 p.m. matinees on July 24, 27, 29; Aug. 4, 7, 11, 17, 26, 31; Sept. 1, 4. $28, $15 children. 421-5093.

Book Signing with children’s author and illustrator Angela DeMuro, who is celebrating the release of her third Land of MU Birds book “Rosie the Rainbow MU.” Also: an exhibit of mini illustrations from her book series. Outrageous, Midtown Village Plaza, 41 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre. Tonight at 6. 2087805. Poetry Reading, with Wyoming Valley native Angela Alaimo O’Donnell, author of the poetry volume “Moving House” and American Catholic Studies teacher at Fordham University. Arts SEEN Gallery, 21 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre. Tonight at 8. Free. 970-2787. Book Signing, with Ian O’Connor, author of “The Captain: The Journey of Derek Jeter,” about the baseball legend who played for the Yankees. Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Arena Hub Plaza, Wilkes-Barre Township. Saturday at 1 p.m. 829-4210. Dickens Book Group, a discussion of chapters 5 to 7 of “Nicholas Nickleby.” Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Arena Hub Plaza, WilkesBarre Township. Tuesday at 7 p.m. 829-4210.

FUTURE Book Signing, with Richard A. Singer Jr., author of “Now: Embracing the Present Moment: Eastern Wisdom for Your Soul,” a collection of meditations for everyday enlightenment. Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Arena Hub Plaza, Wilkes-Barre Township. July 22 at 7 p.m. 829-4210. Summer Family Book Discussion of “The Giver” by Lois Lowry. Osterhout Free Library, 71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. July 28 at 6 p.m. Free. 821-1959.

NEW RELEASES Hard Spell, the first volume in a new series of gritty supernatural urban crimes set in Scranton by Northeastern Pennsylvania native Justin Gustainis. Published by Angry Robot and on sale July 26 at angryrobotbooks.com.

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Stage

Kristopher Kotch, a Kingston resident and exercise physiologist, has recently contributed to a newly released fitness e-Book “Strength and Fitness for a Lifetime: How We Train Now.” Geared toward over-35-year-olds, the book shows how to exercise as you age. Available at premierepersonalfitness.com.

13, a musical about young Evan Goldman coping with turning 13 and the stresses of moving from New York City to Indiana when his parents divorce. Performed by the Limelight Players at the Phoenix Performing Arts Centre, 409 Main St., Duryea. Tonight and Saturday at 7 p.m.; Sunday at 1 p.m. $10. 991-1817. Urinetown, a musical comedy about a town facing a serious water shortage, resulting in a ban on toilets. Presented by KISS (Kids Innovating Stage & Sound) Theatre Company, 58 Wyoming Valley Mall, Wilkes-Barre Township. Through July 24: Fridays and Saturdays at 7 p.m.; Sundays at 2 p.m. 829-1901. River’s Edge: The Story of Shawnee, memorable music of the past 100 years to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the historic Shawnee Inn. Shawnee Playhouse, 1 River Road, Shawnee-on-Delaware. Tonight at 8; Saturday at 2 p.m. Continues through Sept. 2 with 8 p.m. shows on July 22, 29; Aug. 5, 12, 19, 26; Sept. 2, and 2 p.m. matinees on July 23; Aug. 6, 13, 20. $18. 4215093. The Cat, the Sun and the Mirror, a musical for all ages about a cat who comes to the rescue when the sun disappears. Presented by Teatro Benefito at Canteen 900, 900 Rutter Ave., Forty Fort. Saturday at 4:30 p.m. $12, $6 children. Benefits the Wyoming Valley Children’s Association. 338-2547. Annie, the Tony Award-winning Broadway smash about the spunky orphan who escapes her hard-knock life, foils some fortune hunters and finds a family of her own. Shawnee Playhouse, 1 River Road, Shawnee-

Some kisses may be stolen in the musical ’13,’ which wraps up this weekend at the Phoenix Performing Arts Centre in Duryea. on-Delaware. Saturday and Wednesday at 8 p.m. Continues through Aug. 27 with 8 p.m. shows on July 27; Aug. 3, 6, 10, 27; and 2 p.m. matinees on July 22, 31; Aug. 3, 12, 14, 19, 24-25. $28, $15 children. 421-5093. Sisters of Swing: The Story of the Andrews Sisters, a musical about the female singing group from its early days on the road through its meteoric rise as recording stars. Shawnee Playhouse, 1 River Road, Shawnee-on-Delaware. Sunday and Thursday at 2 p.m. Continues through Sept. 3 with 2 p.m. matinees on July 26, 28; Aug. 5, 10, 18, 21, 28; Sept. 2; and 8 p.m. shows on Aug. 24 and Sept. 3. $28, $15 children. 421-5093. Tosca, Puccini’s classic opera with Karita Mattila as the passionate title character who lives for art and love. Shown in high definition in a Live from the Met Encore Presentation at Cinemark, 40 Glenmaura National Blvd., Moosic. Wednesday at 1 and 6:30 p.m. $!5. 961-5943. The Landlover: A Pirate Musical, the annual summer family show about pirates

leaving their ship to search on land for their captain’s lost prized possession. Presented by the Bloomsburg Theatre Ensemble at the Alvina Krause Theatre, 226 Center St., Bloomsburg. Opens Thursday and continues through July 31: Tuesdays and Wednesdays at 1 p.m.; Thursdays at 1 and 7:30 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m.; Sundays at 3 p.m. $13, $7 children. 784-8181.

FUTURE Performing Arts Institute, a production by the Dance Company of the summer music program at Wyoming Seminary. With special guest Carrie Ellmore-Tallitsch, a member of the Martha Graham Dance Company. Buckingham Performing Arts Center, 201 N. Sprague Ave., Kingston. July 24 at 3 p.m. Free. 270-2160.

AUDITIONS Auditions for Actors Circle’s September production of “The Ladies of the Camellias.” Providence Playhouse, 1256 Providence Road, Scranton. Sunday and Monday at 7 p.m. 575-2223.

Best Bet If you’re old enough to remember the songs of the Four Aces and the Four Freshmen, you can reminisce along with the close-harmony groups in “Forever Plaid,” the musical opening tonight at the Grove Theatre in Nuangola. The Plaids are a guy group of the 1950s who are killed in a bus crash but are allowed to return to Earth to fulfill their dream of making a recording. The show runs through July 24 with performances at 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 3 p.m. Sundays. Reserve your tickets at 868-3582.

T.J. Major, Kevin Holbert, Kyle Segarra and Dave Baker star in ‘Forever Plaid.’


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2011

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PAGE 19

huntsman to take her into the woods and kill her. The huntsman doesn’t want to Forget Sleepy, Dopey and Hapmurder the girl, but he knows he py. “The Rockin’ Tale of Snow could get into trouble if he disWhite” has dwarves, and they do obeys the queen. That part of the storyline congo off to work as miners with picks and lanterns. But these seven hip- tains a moral lesson, Metz said. “The huntsman goes through hoppers are a modern group of this song, and he has a compadres. Just listen ‘good conscience’ and to their names: Pip, IF YOU GO a ‘bad conscience’ on Zip, Kip, Chip, Flip, What: ‘The Rockin’ either side of him, Tip and Big Mike. Tale of Snow White’ dressed like an angel No, Big Mike is not Who: Take the Stage and a devil. He has to tall. He wouldn’t be a Players go through the decidwarf if he were, When: 6 tonight and sion making, and he would he? “He’s just 6 p.m. Saturday does spare her life, obgot a big voice,” ex- Where: Outdoors at viously. It’s about beplained Chris Metz of the Back Mountain Memorial Library, ing able to make deciDallas, who is direct- Huntsville Road, sions, doing the right ing a young cast from Dallas. thing even if that may Take the Stage Center Tickets: $5, $3. Probe detrimental to for the Performing ceeds benefit the yourself.” Arts in the musical, Back Mountain MeThe cast also inset for today and Sat- morial Library. More info: 690-5439 urday at the Back or www.takethestage- cludes a chorus of bats, whom you might Mountain Memorial pac.com not remember from Library. The characters include Snow the Brothers Grimm version. White who, as you might expect, They’re back-up singers for the is “very young and gentle and evil queen when she’s casting her sweet and kind and naïve.” Some spells. “It helps create a creepy atof her friends are a skunk, a bird, a mosphere,” the director said. The script for “The Rockin’ Tale bunny and a sheep. Of course, she becomes friends with the of Snow White” comes from a company called Pioneer Drama, dwarves, too. That’s after she leaves the pal- with book by Barbara Lennon, ace, after the jealous queen tries music by Bill Francoeur and lyrics to get rid of her by ordering a by both.

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Outdoors T H I S W E E K : J U LY 1 5 T O 2 1 , 2 0 11

Best Bet

Frog Frenzy, a catch-and-release afternoon at the ponds. Pocono Environmental Education Center, Brisco Mountain and Emery roads, Dingmans Ferry. Saturday, 9 a.m. to noon. $5. 828-2319 or peec.org. Nature Walk, two miles on the new Wetland Trail along Wallenpaupack Creek. Meet at the PPL Environmental Education Center, Route 6, Hawley. Saturday at 10 a.m. Free. 343-5144. Ladies of the Lake Kayaking, a cruise around the lake for experienced paddlers. Frances Slocum State Park, 565 Mount Olivet Road, Kingston Township. Saturday at 2 p.m. Register: 696-9105. Sssnakes All Around, learning about snakes with live specimens from the Carbon County Environmental Education Center. Campground Amphitheater, Frances Slocum State Park, 565 Mount Olivet Road, Kingston Township. Saturday at 7 p.m. 696-3525. Frances Slocum State Park Hike, four easy miles with the Susquehanna Trailers, followed by blueberry picking at Smith’s Farm and a cookout. Meet at the park office, 565 Mount Olivet Road, Kingston Township. Sunday at 12:45 p.m. 696-3501. Geocaching Hunt. PPL Susquehanna Riverlands, 634 Salem Blvd., Berwick. Sunday at 1:30 p.m. Free. 343-5144.

Saturday, July 16th

r i a F h c t a W Swiss Favorite & Our Rides

This is Noah’s Trail at the Endless Mountains Nature Center.

See the forest through a forester’s eyes as Jim Kessler explores the trails of the Endless Mountains Nature Center in Tunkhannock. He’ll help hikers identify trees by leaves, bark and fruit and examine mushrooms, ferns and damage caused by deer. Meet at the Nature Center on Vosburg Road, off Route 6, at 1 p.m. for the two-hour walk. Sturdy shoes and water are recommended. Cost is $8 and registration is requested at 836-3835. Introduction to Canoeing on Pickerel Pond. Beginners welcome; instructions included. Pocono Environmental Education Center, Brisco Mountain and Emery roads,

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Caroline Banas, Claire Sheen, Cassy Silveri, Gina Davis and Brielle Brace are collaborating on the exhibit ‘Girls, Girls, Girls’ at King’s College’s Widmann Gallery in Wilkes-Barre through Aug. 26.

Exhibits T H I S W E E K : J U LY 1 5 T O 2 1 , 2 0 11 Tiles of Life and the Indigo Creatures, ceramic tiles by Sandra Trocki and pen-and-ink by Billy Brandenburg. Opens tonight with a reception from 5 to 7:30 and and music by Brandspankinstu. Through Aug. 15 at the Wyoming Valley Art League Gallery, 47 N. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mountain Top Photo Club Exhibit, annual members show. Opens tonight with a reception 5 to 8. Through Aug. 17 at Arts YOUniverse, 47 N. Franklin St., WilkesBarre. Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

ONGOING EXHIBITS With Bullets Singing All Around Me, regional stories of the Civil War. Through Sunday at the Everhart Museum, 1901 Mulberry St., Nay Aug Park, Scranton. Friday, noon to 4 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. $5, $3 seniors, $2 children. Medic in Action: Caring for the Wounded, an exhibit on military medical personnel from NEPA. Through Sunday at the Everhart Museum. Girls, Girls, Girls, works by local middle-school students Caroline

’Steps,’ a watercolor by Cassy Silveri, is one of the works on display in the five-artist exhibit ‘Girls, Girls, Girls’ at King’s College’s Widmann Gallery in Wilkes-Barre through Aug. 26. Banas, Brielle Brace, Gina Davis, Claire Sheen and Cassy Silveri. Through Aug. 26 with a Gallery Talk July 22, 6 to 8 p.m. Widmann Gallery, King’s College, WilkesBarre. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. See EXHIBITS, Page 28

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Marquis Art & Frame opens a new exhibit tonight at WilkesBarre’s Third Friday Art Walk with three artists collaborating on “Manipulation Art Reality.” Steve Braun creates multidimensional tile pieces, Amber Summers offers fabric sculpture and bright abstract acrylic paintings, and David Saxton’s style is a cross between pop art and street art. Tonight’s reception runs from 5 to 8 with the show continuing through Sept. 3. The gallery is at 122 S. Main St., and hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Information at 823-0518.


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I

f you haven’t been to a bazaar yet this season, you’re missing out. Last weekend, your choices were all over the local map, and this weekend is no exception. Our photographer landed at Holy Trinity Church in Swoyersville, known especially for its homemade ethnic food. If you need a day, or three, off from cooking, you can check out an array of bazaars again this weekend: • Our Lady of Mount Carmel in Hunlock Creek and Our Lady of Mount Carmel/St. Rocco in Pittston as well as Exaltation of the Holy Cross in Hanover Township and the Mountain Top Hose Company (tonight through Sunday) • St. Nicholas in Wilkes-Barre and St. Mary and St. Peter & Paul in Avoca (tonight and tomorrow) • Holy Name of Jesus at Transfiguration Church in West Hazleton (Saturday and Sunday) • And finally, the bazaar at the Germania Hose Company in Duryea runs not only this weekend but Tuesday through Sunday of next week. For addresses and details, see the Events listings in this publication. Happy eating, and happy winning. S. JOHN WILKIN PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

1. Bob and Lois Mlinar dance to the polka beats. 2. Joe Davis picks out a duck from the everpopular duck pond. 3. Connor Mahalek seems to enjoy his pizza. 4. Debbie Wiedlick, Fred Weidlick and Josh Toolan try the ball toss as John Strish looks on. 5. One of the hottest spots to hang at Holy Trinity’s bazaar was the food tent.

PAGE 23


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CELEBRITY Q&A BY R.D. HELDENFELS

JUMBLE

UNIVERSAL SUDOKU

BY MICHAEL ARGIRION & JEFF KNUREK

Sequels in the works for 2012 Q. Can you check your crystal ball and see if there will be any new “Star Trek,” “James Bond” and “Superman” movies in the future? A. Yes to all three. Although the 23rd official Bond film has long been delayed, it is now reportedly being prepared — with Daniel Craig returning as Bond. Director J.J. Abrams has also dropped hints about a sequel to his 2009 “Star Trek.” And “Man of Steel,” the latest Superman movie (with Henry Cavill in the title role and Zack Snyder directing), is in the works. This could make for a busy holiday season in 2012, since the movies are set for November and December of next year.

PREVIOUS DAY’S SOLUTION

Q. I just watched the season finale of “Army Wives.” Does this mean that there will be no more of the show? Really have enjoyed it. Would hate to see it go.

CRYPTOQUOTE

A. While the season finale of “Army Wives” certainly looked like a farewell, with the show’s military base scheduled to be shut down and the characters scattering, the Lifetime series has been renewed for another season. There was a blink-and-you’llmiss-it teaser for the next run at the end of the season finale.

Do you have a question or comment for the mailbag? Write to me at rheldenfels@thebeaconjournal.com or by regular mail to the Akron Beacon Journal, 44 E. Exchange St., Akron, OH 44309.

HOROSCOPE BY HOLIDAY MATHIS

PAGE 24

ARIES (March 21-April 19). You will con-

front many obstacles to your success. That you are willing to do so head-on is your main strength. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). An unexpected snafu takes up more time than you had planned. There is a litany of dissatisfactions and frustrations that you could blame this on, and yet you rise above it. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). You could chase many dreams at once, but your lack of detectable progress would probably frustrate you.

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CANCER (June 22-July 22). You are not as

reactive to the goings on around you as others seem to be. You learn what you need to know, and you see the process as the means to an end. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Avoiding obligations is actually a good tactic now, since it’s likely that you feel more obligated than is appropriate. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). When the others around you are nervous, you feel it, too. You want to do something to alleviate the feeling, but the best thing you could do is experience it for all it has to teach you and then let it pass. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). The quest for perfection is self-defeating. Strive to be more in touch with your human frailty

and fallibility instead. This connects you with the compassion inside you and brings about your comfort and joy. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Your selfworth is not determined by the acceptance of those around you, although it is only human to be influenced by such external cues. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). You have more gumption than you did yesterday, but don’t let that influence you when it’s time to make a promise. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Social ups and downs are inevitable, and today such fluctuations are not to be taken too personally. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You are a master at reading people now. You’ll

detect the nuances of other people’s attitudes, and you’ll note what you observe. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). No matter how close a relationship is, you are still two people, and you need a degree of separateness and the freedom to explore autonomously. TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (July 15). You will detach from unhealthy preoccupations and center your life on what truly makes you happy. You’ll work out stress through physical fitness and sports, and you’ll love your new shape. Exciting business happens in September. A relationship becomes a main event in October. November brings a windfall. Pisces and Virgo people adore you. Your lucky numbers are: 40, 1, 22, 49 and 38.


Aunt’s trepidation shouldn’t ruin teen’s trip of a lifetime Dear Abby: My 13-year-old daughter, “Alisa,” has earned a scholarship to participate in a month-long summer language program in Turkey. As soon as my sister “June” found out I was allowing Alisa to attend, she called me a moron. June is terrified my daughter will be a victim of terrorists, a plane crash, kidnapping or worse. Alisa has consistently proven she is trustworthy and respon-

DEAR ABBY ADVICE sible. After some research I determined the country and the program are safe. Alisa will be traveling with a small group of students and three adult chaperones who are native to the host country. Our mother was afraid of everything, and I don’t want to pass that kind of irrational fear on to Alisa after she worked so hard to earn a once-in-a-

lifetime opportunity that could shape the course of her life. Am I really a poor parent for allowing my child to travel halfway around the world? — Stunned Sister in Little Rock Dear Stunned Sister: A poor parent? Not at all. You would be one if you caved in to your sister’s emotional blackmail. Taking this trip is a privilege your daughter worked hard for, and seeing firsthand that there is a world filled with interest-

GOREN BRIDGE

ing, good people will open her mind to opportunities and possibilities that few people her age are able to experience. Dear Abby: My wife uses her hands to push her food around her dinner plate and onto her fork or spoon. Every once in a while I feel compelled to ask her to stop using her hands to eat. When I do she says I’m “rude” to even take notice of how she eats and mention it. Am I rude? — Minded My Manners in New Jersey

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Dear Minded Your Manners: According to Emily Post: “If a piece of food keeps eluding your fork, don’t push it onto the tines with your finger. Instead, use a piece of bread or your knife as a pusher.” (Italics are mine.) Share this with your wife and the situation may improve. To receive a collection of Abby’s most memorable — and most frequently requested — poems and essays, send a business-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $3.95 ($4.50 in Canada) to: Dear Abby’s “Keepers,” P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included.)

CROSSWORD

WITH OMAR SHARIF & TANNAH HIRSCH

HOW TO CONTACT: PAGE 25

Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 Celebrity Questions: TV Week, The Dallas Morning News, Communications Center, PO Box 655237, Dallas, TX 75265


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THE GUIDE

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PAGE 26

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FOUR-STAR MOVIES SATURDAY

10:00 a.m. (AMC) Shane An ex-gunfighter sides with Wyoming homesteaders against a ruthless cattle baron. 11:00 a.m. (LIFE) Identity Theft: The Michelle Brown Story A young woman faces a nightmarish battle to restore her good name after a stranger steals her identity and racks up a massive debt. (HDTV) 12:45 p.m. (AMC) The Searchers A Confederate veteran and his partCherokee partner search five years for a kidnapped girl. (HDTV) 1:30 p.m. (TCM) The Ox-Bow Incident Walter Van Tilburg Clark’s novel inspires an account of a lynch mob that seeks revenge for a rancher’s murder. 3:00 p.m. (TCM) Topkapi Lovers recruit amateurs to steal a dagger from the palace museum in Istanbul. 11:00 p.m. (LIFE) Identity Theft: The Michelle Brown Story A young woman faces a nightmarish battle

to restore her good name after a stranger steals her identity and racks up a massive debt. (HDTV)

SUNDAY

4:00 p.m. (TCM) The Apartment A corporate climber, whose boss and others use his apartment for hankypanky, aids a young woman. 2:00 a.m. (TCM) Mon Oncle d’Amerique Two men and a woman act out a French scientist’s theory of behavior.

TUESDAY

7:40 a.m. (CIN) Dances With Wolves Costner’s epic vision of the American frontier as seen through the eyes of a 19th-century U.S. Cavalry officer. (HDTV)

WEDNESDAY

7:00 a.m. (CIN) Platoon Two sergeants and a private join others lost in war along the 1967 Cambodian border. (HDTV)

8:30 a.m. (TCM) Miracle on 34th Street An adwoman’s lawyer boyfriend tries to prove that Macy’s Santa Claus is the real thing. 10:15 p.m. (TCM) Madame Bovary A woman’s unquenchable thirst for romance ultimately proves to be her undoing. Based on Gustave Flaubert’s novel. 4:15 a.m. (TCM) Far From the Madding Crowd An English farmer, soldier and aristocrat court a rural Victorian beauty.

THURSDAY

2:00 p.m. (TCM) The Four Feathers An English officer fights in the Sudan after receiving white feathers of cowardice from friends. 9:00 p.m. (DISN) WALL-E Animated. After years of tidying up an Earth devoid of humanity, a robot janitor meets a mechanical scout and chases her across the galaxy. (HDTV)

TV TALK Today

Back on the butcher block By SANDRA SNYDER ssnyder@timesleader.com

Let the reign of terror begin anew. In the flurry of food-centric TV that has taken over the airwaves of late, none quite compares to the top-rated “Hell’s Kitchen” on FOX, starring our beloved grouchy Scotsman Gordon Ramsay and a band of his would-be head chefs at whatever will be his next great restaurant. Say what you will about Ramsay – he’s acerbic, intolerable, fake – maybe even the best, most unrecognized actor on the small screen today? – but those who step into his kitchen have proven they have enough of their own mouthy attitude and moxie to at least keep things interesting, phony or not, in the back-and-forth while the food and fur fly. Thanks to a previous run on “Hell’s Kitchen” by Hazleton’s Jen Yemola, who not only lived to tell the tale but almost made it all the way (third place in the third season), we know the FOX hit can’t be all that scripted (or maybe we would have gotten Yemola to spill by now). As contestants go and have gone on “HK,” Yemola represents one of the most well-groomed, softspoken and professional of all, in our humble opinion. She never threw any punches, or

pans, nor did she ever to attempt to get all up in the big man’s grill in a made-forTV moment. The worst she Ramsay ever did, poor girl, was “bin” (a.k.a. trash) some spaghetti, rinse it in boiling water and then try to reuse it. Hilton Scranton sous chef Maria Torrisi also had a run on the show but lasted only into the fifth episode of the seventh season, so we didn’t get to know her as well. Perhaps it worked out for the best? Season 7 winner Holly Ugalde, it’s been reported, ultimately was denied her promised head-chef job at the Savoy Grill in London. Ramsay’s side reportedly said it was a visa issue, while her side alleged it was pretty much a set-up and the real head chef was hired before she even won the show. So what will Season 9, which beings at 8 p.m. EST Tuesday, bring? Who knows? Keep in mind, this is, after all, a reality show, and we all know that means plenty of it won’t exactly be, um, real. Are there better choices on a Tuesday night? Of course. But, hey, you might pick up a cooking tip or two for tuning in.

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foods. (TVPG) 11 a.m. 0 “The View” Seth Green; marriage counseling; national ice cream month. (N) 2 p.m. # 6 “The Talk” Actress Rita Moreno; actor Jonathon Schaech. (N) (TV14) 3 p.m. X “Rachael Ray” Tips for brides; reality-TV star Vanessa Minnillo discusses her upcoming wedding. (TVPG) 3:30 p.m. 6 “Swift Justice With Nancy Grace” A car owner sues a mechanic because the vehicle burst into flames after a repair. (TVG) 4 p.m. X “The Doctors” Facts and figures for leading a healthy life; jump-starting the metabolism. (TVPG) 4 p.m. < “The Oprah Winfrey Show” Financial adviser Suze Orman helps mother of octuplets Nadya Suleman, who says she is destitute. (TVPG)

Tonight 6 p.m. F “Extra” (N) (TVPG) 6 p.m. (FNC) “Special Report With Brit Hume With Bret Baier” (N) 7 p.m. 6 “The Insider” “Harry Potter”; “Winnie the Pooh” movie. (N) (TVPG) 7 p.m. L “State of Pennsylvania” 7 p.m. (FNC) “The FOX Report With Shepard Smith” (N) 7:30 p.m. 6 “Entertainment Tonight” Final installment of the “Harry Potter ...” movie series. (N) (TVPG) 8 p.m. (44.2) “Washington Week” (N) 8 p.m. (CNN) “In the Arena” 11:35 p.m. # 6 “Late Show With David Letterman” Radio host Howard Stern; Naughty by Nature performs. (TVPG) 11:35 p.m. < “The Tonight Show With Jay Leno” Bryan Cranston; Nancy Grace; Shaggy performs. (N) (TV14)

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PAGE 27

7 a.m. # 6 “The Early Show” (N) 7 a.m. X “Morning News with Webster and Nancy” 7 a.m. 0 “Good Morning America” Brad Paisley performs; wild water-park rides. (N) 7 a.m. < “Today” Ryan Seacrest; Chris Brown performs; real estate; hair-color trends; Montreal. (N) 8 a.m. X “Better” Chris O’Donnell; Mario López; a sandals giveaway; biking for fitness; avoiding fat. (TVPG) 9 a.m. 0 “Live With Regis and Kelly” Actress Lisa Kudrow; actor Tom Felton; chef Scott Conant. (N) (TVPG) 10 a.m. 0 “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” Actress Minnie Driver; actress Sarah Hyland. (TVG) 10 a.m. U “The Doctors” Viewers’ health questions; healthy on-the-go

Watch This

300622

Daily grid contains updated information

THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE


THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE

HBO dominates Emmy nominations

By SUSAN KING and RENE LYNCH Los Angeles Times

EXHIBITS Continued from page 21

Fidos and Footwear, photographs of dogs at their owners’ feet. Through July 30 at Mainstreet Galleries, 370 Pierce St., Kingston. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Bridal Treasures, antique wedding dresses/bridal memorabilia. Through July 31 at Dietrich Theater, 60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock.

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newcomers Louis C.K. for “Louie” and Johnny Galecki for “The Big Bang Theory,” and last year’s winner, Jim Parsons, also for “The Big Bang Theory.” Louis C.K. also earned a nomination for the editing of his comedy series. Also vying for lead comedy actress are Tina Fey for “30 Rock,” Melissa McCarthy for “Mike & Molly” and Amy Poehler for “Parks & Recreation.” Though the Emmys are criticized for doling out honors to the same old faces and shows year after year, five of the 12 nominated comedy and drama series are first-time nominees. Two octogenarians and Emmy favorites, Betty White and Cloris Leachman, earned nominations. White received her 17th nomination for supporting actress in a comedy series, for “Hot in Cleveland,” and Leachman got her 22nd nomination in the same category for “Raising Hope.” Jane Lynch, who won supporting actress in a comedy for “Glee” last year, is hosting the ceremony, which will air Sept. 18 on Fox.

20-plus works by John Sloan, Carl Sprinchorn, Niccolo Cortiglia, John Singer Sargent and Jon Carsman. Through Aug. 7 at the Sordoni Art Gallery, Wilkes University, WilkesBarre. Friday and Sunday, noon to 4:30; Saturday, 11 a.m.-4:30.

St., Wilkes-Barre. Tuesday through Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. 823-6244.

Thousands Are Sailing: The Irish in Luzerne County. Through Aug. 20 at the Luzerne County Historical Society Museum, 69 S. Franklin U CO

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PAGE 28

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Empire” and “Friday Night Lights.” Best-comedy-series nominations went to “Glee,” “Modern Family,” “Parks & Recreation,” “The Office” and “30 Rock.” One surprise: “The Big Bang Theory” finally earned its way into this category after four seasons. “Glee’s” 12 nominations, a drop from 19 last year, reflected a bit of a sophomore slump. Joining Hall for best actor in drama series are Steve Buscemi for “Boardwalk Empire,” Kyle Chandler for “Friday Night Lights,” Hugh Laurie for “House,” Jon Hamm for “Mad Men” and Timothy Olyphant for “Justified.” Best-actress nominees in a drama series are Kathy Bates for “Harry’s Law,” Connie Britton for “Friday Night Lights,” Mireille Enos in “The Killing,” Jean Marsh for “Upstairs / Downstairs,” Julianna Margulies for “The Good Wife” and Elizabeth Moss for “Mad Men.” Other lead actors nominated in a comedy series are Alec Baldwin for “30 Rock,” Steve Carell for his final season on “The Office,”

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LOS ANGELES — HBO dominated the nominations Thursday for the 63rd Primetime Emmy Awards, earning a stunning 104 nods, including honors for its two freshmen series, “Game of Thrones” and “Boardwalk Empire,” as well as the acclaimed miniseries “Mildred Pierce” and the TV movies “Cinema Verite” and “Too Big to Fail,” about the nation’s banking crisis. “Mildred Pierce” earned the most nominations, a staggering 21 nods including best miniseries, best actress (Kate Winslet) and best director (Todd Haynes). There wasn’t a close second. CBS had 50 nominations and NBC 46. But Showtime also scored with a best-series nomination for “Dexter” and a nod for its star, Michael C. Hall. Also performing well: Edie Falco of “Nurse Jackie,” Laura Linney of “The Big C” and Matt LeBlanc of “Episodes.” The series with the most nominations were “Mad Men” with 19, “Boardwalk Empire” with 18, “Modern Family” with 17 and “Game of Thrones” with 13. Nominated for best drama series are “Mad Men,” which has won this top prize three years in a row, “Dexter,” “The Good Wife,” “Game of Thrones,” “Boardwalk


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944 Shoemaker Ave • WestWyoming • 570-613-9222

CHECKERBOARD INN SPECIALS Sauteed Shrimp Veal Ossobucco Grevetsi Ravioli

shrimp, spinach & tomatoes in w/ wild mushrooms in Alfredo sauce aSauteed burgundy wine and garlic butter sauce served with a tossed salad served with 2 sides Pizza Special - Chicken Dinner Pizza - Large Only Back Room Available For Parties • Catering Off Premises Available See all our specials at www.checkerboardinn.com

Carverton Road, Trucksville • 696-1648

verbrook Pub & Grille

Friday & Saturday Specials

Bacon Wrapped Meatloaf

Now Open 7 Days A Week Mon & Tues 4 - 10pm

served with mashed potatoes & vegetable Wed - Sat 12 - 10pm • Sun 12 - 9pm

Pan Seared Barramundi

w/ lemongrass & shitake mushroom sauce Now Featuring Daily Specials! served w/ basmati rice & sauteed OFF SITE CATERING NOW AVAILABLE baby spinach

259 Overbrook Road • Dallas, PA 18612 Phone: 570-675-2727 • www.overbrookpub.com

...casual dining with a difference!

Weekend Features Eggplant Parmesan $12.95

Fleshly sliced Eggplant hand dipped and lightly dusted with Italian Bread crumbs then topped with our marinara sauce and melted mozzarella cheese. Served with choice of two sides.

Cajun Grilled Pork Chop $13.95

gwensalon.com

A Pork Chop lightly dusted with our own Cajun Seasoning and grilled to perfection. Served with a choice of two sides.

NAUGLES BLUEBERRIES

Costello’s N.Y. Strip grilled to perfection and topped with 4 succulent sauteed shrimp. Finished with a light Herb Butter and served with two sides.

Loyalville Rd. (Off Route 118)

$1.20 per pound

PAGE 30

Tipsy Turtle Owen Street Pub Every Sunday from 5-10

Bring Containers Hours: Mon., Tues., & Thurs. 8am to 12pm • 4pm to 8pm Saturday 8am to 2pm

477-5215

117 3001 300117

THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE

New York Strip and Shrimp $22.95

Sunday Special

Chicken and Biscuits $10.95 Our famous home-style Chicken & Biscuits served with mashed potatoes and gravy Mmmm..what a way to go!

Inquire about our private dining room for any occasion HAPPY HOUR

Come relax in our lounge while you enjoy 1/2 price drinks Sunday - Thursday 4pm - 6pm.

Gateway Shopping Center, Edwardsville (570) 714-7777 WWW.COSTELLOS.INFO


CURRYS DONUTS

PIZZA PERFECT 16 Carverton Road, Trucksville

1 - 12 oz. 3 DONUTS COFFEE & FOR -ORDONUT

$1.00

$1.00

SAME ORIGINAL RECIPE, HAND MADE, HAND BAKED

at participating locations with this coupon. 1 coupon per customer

Expires 8/31/11

PIZZA • WINGS • AND MORE!

ENTERTAINMENT

696-2100

SkyBox Sports Bar (822-6600)

Mon.-Wed. 4-10PM • Thurs 4-11 • Fri 11-11 • Sat. 12:30-11 • Sun. 2-10

Live Entertainment During Happy Hour, Fridays 5-7

M O U N TAIN TO P H O SE CO.N O.1

@ Grotto Pizza Outside the Wyoming Valley Mall

FRI. 9-1

DJ’s SALTY & P.M. SAT. 9-1

SOULED OUT OAK ST • PITTSTON TWP. 654-1112 Home Made

POTATO PANCAKES Al so

B atter Sal es

for individuals to bazaars

Tonite HAT TRICK DUO

Grand Slam Sports Bar (639-3278)

Family Fun • D.J. Music Nightly Saturday @ 5 p.m. - FIREFIG H TER’S PARADE Saturday @ 7 p.m. - PAT W ARD M AG IC SH O W Sunday @ 5 p.m. - N EW M ERCH AN DISE AU CTIO N BAZAAR OPENS: Friday at 5:30 p.m. Saturday at 5 p.m. and Sunday at 4 p.m. Location: Hose Company Grounds Just over the top of the Mountain at Rt. 437.

@ Grotto Pizza Harveys Lake Tonite 8:30 SOUL www.grottopizzapa.com

The Potato Shack 288-1584

TH E CH U R CH O F O U R LA D Y O F M O U N T C A R M EL R O U T E 29,LA K E SILK W O R T H

Creative American Cooking **THIS WEEKEND**

BRUSCHETTA CHICKEN & SHRIMP Over Linguine Pasta STEAK CORDON BLEU With Ham, Swiss & Mornay Sauce CHICKEN PRIMAVERA Over Penne Style Pasta PORK CHOPS MILANESE With Yukon Gold Mashed Potatoes “GREAT HOMEMADE DESSERTS”

822-4474

Su m m er Fest 2011 JU LY 15-16-17

THE BIG TENT BAZAAR

FESTIVITIES HELD AT PARISH GROUNDS 420 MAIN RD., HANOVER TWP.

FRIDAY AT 6:00PM - SATURDAY 5:00PM (SATURDAY MASS 4:00PM) SUNDAY 5:00PM

FR ID A Y JU LY 15 O PEN :5 to 11:30 p.m .

FOOD & FUN FOR ALL AGES

A Variety of Homemade Foods including: • Piggies • Pierogi • Potato Pancakes • Clam Chowder • Funnel Cakes & Fried Oreos will be featured. Ample Seating, Rain or Shine, and No Wait With Our Pancake Express Deluxe Games for all Ages, Theme Baskets, Raffle, and ATM

FRIDAY - Souled Out • SATURDAY - The Jeanne Zano Band & RSO • SUNDAY - The Blennd

SA TU R D AY JU LY 16 O PEN :5 to 11:30 p.m .

ONLY BAZAAR WITH A TIKI BAR HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS FRI. 7/15 SAT. 7/16 SUN. 7/17

40LB.HE AD

HAPPY HOUR 6-8PM SPECIAL: BUD LIGHT LIME

SU N D AY JU LY 17 O PEN :3 till9:00 p.m .

Jeanne Zano Band

1

$ 00

DRAFT

HAPPY HOUR 5-7PM LANDSHARK

1 $ 00 3

$ 00

DRAFT CAPTAIN N’ COKE

HAPPY HOUR 5-7PM SHOCK TOP

1 $ 00 3

$ 00

DRAFT SEE PICKS

For Information Call 570-823-6242 http://exaltationoftheholycross.net

PAGE 31

Visit our retail location to purchase our Pizza items. 123 Hazle Street, Wilkes-Barre Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat 9am-3pm

THE EXALTATION OF THE HOLY CROSS ANNOUNCES

R A IN O R SH IN E -EV ERY TH IN G U N D ER CO V ER LA R G E IN D O O R FLEA M A R K ET D ELICIO U S FO O D H O M EM A D E PIER O G IES, PIG G IES & M O R E,G A M ES,EN TER TA IN M EN T

298066

Since 1941, Nardone Bros. has been bringing nutritious, high quality products to you and your family.

Visit our website www.MTHC1.com For complete list of Auction Items

JULY 15TH - 16TH - 17TH

New Y ork Tim es Band 24 Cut Box • 12 Cut Box French Bread Pizza 3 Slices Per Pack

38th AN N U AL BAZAAR JU LY 15th,16th & 17th

27 Wilson Street, Larksville O pen Fri . 11:30-9:00 S at. & S un. 4:00-9:00

THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE

®


THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE

ALL JUNK CARS & TRUCKS WANTED

COOPER’S CABANA

Free Removal. Call Anytime. Highest Price Paid In Cash! 278723

Thursday: KARAOKE 7PM Friday: FAKE UNCLE JACK Saturday: TRAVELING WILKES-BARREANS Sunday: J2

V&G 570-574-1275

Pete’s

$2 DRAFTS ALL NIGHT • $3 CABANA SHOTS $3 CABANA MARGARITAS

Place

Experience Our Healthy Lebanese Cuisine

• Fattoush Salad • Spinach Salad • Falafel Wrap • Grape Leaves • Veggie Platter • Beef Gyro

285828 296820

35 E. South St. • Wilkes-Barre (570) 820-7172 • Open Mon.-Fri. 10 am - 6 pm

JULY SPECIAL

EA CKAGE F CHOOSE ANY PACKAGE FOR NY P AC OR $49! LIME LI LIM EP PACK PACKAGE AC ACK C AGE G Targeted Massage Polish Change ni Faci efre eshe Re Min ac al aci a ((Re s er) r)) Mini-Facial (Refresher)

LEMON LEM EMON EM MON O PAC PACKAGE CK KA KAG A Under Arm Wax Bikini Wax

MANGO M MA MAN AN AN NG GO G OP PA PAC PACKAGE ACKAG AC CK KA KAG KAGE A AG AGE GE Closing Treatment with Finish

COCONUT COC C OCONU OC O CO ONU NUT P NUT NU PACK PACKAGE ACK AC A CKAGE A AG Paraffin & Polish (Hands & Feet) Eye & Lip Treatment

365 65 Wy W Wyoming yom y omin ing g Av Ave Ave. e •K Kingston in ing ngsto ton n 714-1670 Open 7 Days a Week www.jmadisonwellnessonline.com

651 Wyoming Ave. • Kingston 283-4322 • 283-4323

Order an X-Large 18” Pizza for the price of a LARGE for

Save $2!

Tax & Toppings Extra

Cannot be combined with any other offer. One coupon per visit. Expires 7-21-11

PITTSTON

654-6883 COOPERSCABANA.COM

299948 9948 488 299948 2999 2 29 9999 999 99 448

St. Barbara’s Parish – Grounds of St. Anthony’s Church 28 Memorial Street Exeter, PA 18643 (570) 654-2103

ANNUAL SUMMER BAZAAR JULY 22, 23, 24

Fri. & Sat. (5:30-11pm) • Sun. (5-11pm)

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT EACH EVENING

FRIDAY: “EDDIE & THE DREAMERS” (7-11pm) SATURDAY: “JEANNE ZANO BAND” (7-11pm) SUNDAY: “FLAXY MORGAN” (7-11pm)

SPECIAL WEEKLY RIED CATFISH F N AW SOUTHERFRIES, HUSH PUPPIES AND COLE SL SERVED W/ FRENCH $7.95

CIAL CHEF SPEICO STEAK N O M AW 8 OZ DELKED POTATO AND COLE SL BA SERVED WITH $7.95 PLATTER SANDWICH FRIED FISHWITH FRENCH FRIES SERVED LAW $4.95 AND COLES

OPEN -8PM KITCHEN URS. 5 SUN. - TH . 5-9PM AT S FRI.

ENGE! COOK CHAHLL Y Z A R ATTER. C PL R U IC TAKE O EYE STEAK SANDW NE HOUR. O IB TEN IN 6LB. R FREE IF EAAL LENGERS. FOR L CHAL T IR SH TEE FR

295968

On the Waterfront 304 Kennedy Blvd.

995

$

Join us in the Parish Center for an Indoor Flea Market. You can find something for everyone.

PAGE 32

Delicious Foods that draw people from near and far:

• Homemade Tripe • Porketta Sandwiches • Red/White Pizza • Pizza Fritta • Potato Pancakes • Clam Chowder • Pierogies • Sausage and Peppers • Foods from the grill • Funnel Cake • Ice Cream...

CHILDREN’S GAMES! RIDES! BINGO!

R E S TA U R A N T

920 Schechter Dr (across from Wal-Mart) Wilkes-Barre • 570-822-3116

Planning A Graduation Party? Our Catering Menu is perfect for all occasions. Pick up one of our combinations or create-your-own.

Order online at BobEvans.com, by Smart Phone or call us in advance to place your order and arrange a pick-up time so it is right and ready when you arrive.


The Guide 07-15-2011