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THE GUIDE

A GUIDE TO THE GUIDE CHAMPION POOLS & SPAS 79 East Main St. Wilkes-Barre, Pa 18705 (MINERS MILLS)

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CONTACT US FEATURES EDITOR

Sara Pokorny - 829-7127 spokorny@timesleader.com

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GETTING INTO THE GUIDE

Bake Sale & Entertainment

MeadowsNursing&RehabilitationCenter 4 East Center Hill Rd. • Dallas 675-8600 ext. 195 or 115

Joyce Birk, 55, Mountain Top

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All submissions must be received two weeks in advance of the pertinent event. E-mailed announcements via guide@timesleader.com are preferred, but announcements also can be faxed to 570-829-5537 or mailed to 15 North Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711. The Guide provides advance coverage and/or notice for events open to the public. Events open only to a specific group of people or after-the-fact announcements and photos are published in community news. All announcements must include a contact phone number

and make note of any admission or ticket prices or note that an event is free. We cannot guarantee publication otherwise. We welcome listings photographs. First preference is given to e-mailed high-res JPGs (300 dpi or above) submitted in compressed format to guide@timesleader.com. Color prints also can be submitted by U.S. mail, but we are unable to return them. Please identify all subjects in photographs.


JASON RIEDMILLER FILE PHOTO/THE TIMES LEADER

CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK FILE PHOTO/THE TIMES LEADER

Patricia Kim and her father, Daniel Kim, of Dallas, found the perfect vegetables at the Back Mountain Library last year.

By SARA POKORNY spokorny@timesleader.com

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hat if you could grab a meal, most of the ingredients for the next one and get your face painted, all on your lunch hour? OK, maybe those who work should skip the face paint, but the rest is still possible now that the season of summer markets is upon us. From Scranton to Hazleton, well-known gathering spots in the region soon will be dotted with outdoor markets throughout the week, bringing shoppers a plethora of produce, handmade crafts, baked goods and popular festival food. In addition to the longstanding markets – and doesn’t everyone have a favorite? – this summer will bring a new option: The Mohegan Sun Arena’s Outdoor Summer Marketplace will be open on Tuesdays, starting next week, in the arena parking lot in Wilkes-Barre Township. “Our venue provides a great location that is easily accessible and has ample parking,” Steve Poremba, director of sales and marketing, said. “We are looking for local vendors who have quality products to offer to the community. We are seeking vendors that offer fresh produce, arts-and-craft items, novelty products and concessions.” One of the biggest draws with local markets is the fresh and local produce. As a farmer, Steve Dunn relies on such markets for income. Though he has a stand to sell fruit and vegetables from his Ringgold farm, he finds more benefit in going to markets weekly. This year he’ll participate in the Mohegan Marketplace and the Wilkes-Barre Farmers Market on Public Square. “It’s a place for people to go and find you every single week,” he said. “We definitely have a lot of

Kait Burrier, left, and Mikaela Maria of Clarks Summit spent an afternoon shopping at the Scranton Farmers Market last summer.

IF YOU GO • Mohegan Sun Arena Outdoor Summer Marketplace, 255 Highland Park Blvd., Wilkes-Barre Township. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays from June 19 to Sept. 4. • Wilkes-Barre Farmers Market, Wilkes-Barre’s Public Square. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursdays from June 28 to Oct. 11. • Back Mountain Market, Back Mountain Memorial Library, 96 Huntsville Road, Dallas. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays from July 14 to Oct. 6. • Hazleton Farmers Market, 20 W. Broad St., Hazleton. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays from July 9 to the fall season. • Pittston Market, 35 Broad St., Pittston. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays from July to November. • Cooperative Farmers Market of Scranton, 900 Barring Avenue (off Providence Road and Albright Avenue). Noon to 7 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from July to November.

long-standing customers that I can remember from when I was a kid working the stand. They’ve been buying from us for 30, 40 years, and they know just where to go.” Dunn sells apples, peaches, plums, nectarines, cherries, pears, cantaloupes, cucumbers, pickles, zucchini, sweet corn and tomatoes. “It’s a busy time for us. I’ve never taken a vacation from June until November because of it. The rule is that, during those months, you don’t get married and you don’t die,” Dunn joked. Farmers Markets these days teem with more than the bounty of farms, however. Take the Back Mountain Market, which is somewhat of a food fest. “Of course we have produce from farmers, but we’ve had things like cheese stands and soup vendors and tables of baked goods,” library director

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PETE G. WILCOX FILE PHOTO/THE TIMES LEADER

A bounty of fresh-cut flowers makes for a colorful display on Kessler’s Farm’s table at the Farmers Market on Public Square last year.

Martha Butler said. “People like the fact that they know where everything is coming from, that it’s right in their backyard.” Hot days in the outdoors are certainly a friend to Paul Vinton of Hanover Township, who runs Uncle Paul’s Snowballs and will set up shop at the Mohegan Marketplace. “Now, it’s not a snow cone,” he’s quick to explain. “A snow ball is shaved ice. A snow cone is crushed. Ours is much better on the palate.” Uncle Paul’s touts 25 different flavors, but the most popular is a flavor that seems to stick around long after it’s eaten. “The kids just know it as blue,” Vinton said with a laugh. “Not blue raspberry, blue. It’s what turns your lips and tongue colors.” Uncle Paul’s also sells Hershey’s Ice Cream. Marie Sulcoki provides a different type of item to buy at markets where she sets up shop: face art. She’s run Just Plain Crazy Face Art out of Nanticoke for the past nine years, and summer is the time she anticipates most. “There are some families who come to us that we’ve kind of watched their kids grow up over the years because we see them each time we’re out at public events,” she said. Just Plain Crazy provides children with all types of face art, the most popular for girls being butterflies and kittens, while the boys lean toward superheroes, dragons and pirates. Some looks are even full-face, transforming little ones into animals such as tigers or dragons. No matter what the paint job, Sulcoki said, she and her fellow face-painters find joy in their work. “When you show that child the mirror, and they get to see what they look like, and you see the smile on their face, well, that’s the best part of our job.”

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THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE

Cancer fight calls ‘heroes’ to track This relay involves friendly competition By SARA POKORNY spokorny@timesleader.com

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ighteen years ago, Carol Marino’s routine mammogram came back just fine. It wasn’t until the Wilkes-Barre Township resident had a check-up with her gynecologist weeks later that a lump was found in her breast and, after testing, it was determined she had breast cancer. • “It was certainly a hard time for me,” she said, “but today I feel great.”

At 60 years old, Marino has donated by Planet Fitness. The Road to Recovery Rally gone through treatment, had a mastectomy and reconstruct- will involve team-made vehiive surgery and is now cancer- cles in a boxcar-style race. free and using her experience Committee members anticito help others. She’s part of the pate a Batmobile may make an American Cancer Society pro- appearance this year. “The event is designed to gram Reach to Recovery, through which she helps other promote the recovery program in which volunteers will give women facing breast cancer. “They have a lot of the same rides to appointments to any concerns and fears that I did, cancer patient who may need so I know how they feel,” she them,” Relay chair Russell Keeler said. “We said. hope to get some Marino has been IF YOU GO volunteers to a participant for What: Relay for Life of come down and the past 12 years in Wyoming Valley the American Can- When: 10 a.m. Saturday to 10 give their time to drive the van.” cer Society’s siga.m. Sunday. Survivors ceremony begins about 4 The Survivors nature event, Rep.m. Luminaria takes Ceremony is a lay for Life, the place at dusk. big part of Relay. Wyoming Valley Where: King’s College Becelebrates edition of which tzler Fields, Highland Park It those who are will take place all Boulevard, Wilkes-Barre winning their day Saturday into Township More info: 570-562-9749 battle with canSunday. cer. Participants The Relay is not can be spotted a running event but simply a 24-hour period in by their purple shirts. “People come to that cerewhich teams walk around the track at King’s College’s Be- mony and look to see if their tzler Fields in Wilkes-Barre. buddy from previous years is One member from each of the there,” Marino said. “It’s an on40 teams participating this going thing, a camaraderie year must be present on the thing, an unspoken bond that cancer survivors have with track at all times. This year’s event theme is each other.” Another highlighted event “Be A Hero, Bring Hope, Save Lives,” and a superhero theme for the day is the Luminaria, has been chosen for many of for which people buy and decothe smaller events that will rate a bagged candle in honor or memory of a family member take place at Relay. The Hero Olympics will offer or friend. During the ceremoseveral activities teams can ny, the purchasers light the participate in to win points. candles, which remain lighted The team with the most points until they burn themselves out. “It’s truly amazing to see,” will receive an extra $1,000 toward its overall total, money Marino said. “Every bag is a

PETE G. WILCOX/TIMES LEADER FILE PHOTO

Jane Jeffery of Wyoming makes laps around the track behind Crestwood High School during last May’s Relay For Life event.

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Bags are decorated and lighted in honor or memory of cancer patients for the annual Luminaria ceremony.

story; I tear up just thinking about it.” Relay grows each year. “Last year we raised a net total of over $108,000, and our goal was $106,000,” Relay for Life regional manager Desiree Thorne said. “This year the goal is around $134,000.” The local office of the American Cancer Society is the Wyoming Valley Unit at 712 S. Keyser Ave. in Taylor. Thorne expects the goal will be reached, especially considering the American Cancer Society’s annual Duck Derby has been revamped and made a post-Relay fundraiser.

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A group of cancer survivors begins the walk during last year’s Relay for Life.

The Duck Derby, an event run by the Webbed Walkers Relay team, will take place July 21 at the park of the Coal Street complex in Wilkes-Barre. Tickets will cost $5 per duck or $25 for a flock of six ducks. The grand prize for the event is $1,000. In previous years, ducks were tossed into the Susquehanna River, but low water levels created the need to deter-

mine winners raffle-style. This year, Thorne said, ducks will be tossed into a large kiddie pool, and honorary chair Rocky from KRZ Radio will dive in and choose the winners. The event will take place from noon until 3 p.m., with the raffle at 2 p.m. Mailers have been sent to past duck purchasers. To purchase a duck for the first time, call 570-562-9749 to request a mailer.


Restaurant Review

Authentic Mexican surely sizzles

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ne of the ways you might know for sure that you’re dining at an “authentic Mexican” restaurant is by the number of not-so-familiar items you see on the menu. Salchipapa. Tinga. Al pastor. Caldo 7 Mares. Mole de olla. The first is an appetizer, and it’s basically french fries topped with hot dog meat. We passed but will admit to some intrigue. The next two – tinga and al pastor – aren’t so unusual at all. They’re just meat choices for a variety of Mexican dishes we’re all used to seeing: tacos, quesadillas, tostadas, etc. Tinga is a kind of stewed chicken, and al pastore is “shepherd’s style” spit-grilled meat, often pork, a popular Mexican street food. And those last two? Well, those are apparently quite something, and they must be because they’re soups that ticket at $13.50 and $11 respectively and are only made on weekends. Some have called the Caldo, or 7 Seas Soup, “fear factor” soup. Google image it, and you’ll see why. (One ingredient is octopus.) The Molla de olla, on the other hand, is simply spicy beef soup, its most unfamiliar ingredient a kind of squash called chayote. Alas, our visit to Margarita Azul in Wilkes-Barre, a spiffed-up building that once housed the popular Tony Perugino’s, came on a weeknight, so there would be no fear factor for us. With more conservative eaters/read-

IF YOU GO What: Margarita Azul Mexican Restaurant and Lounge Where: 91 Parrish St., Wilkes-Barre Call: 570-829-0303 Credit cards? No Wheelchair accessible? Two small steps at main entrance Hours: 4 p.m.-11p.m. Tuesday to Thursday; noon-midnight Friday and Saturday; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sundays.

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

Margarita Azul is turning out authentic Mexican cuisine at 91 Parrish St. in Wilkes-Barre.

ers in mind, we might have gone middle of the road anyway. Which is to say not completely ordinary but not over the top either. The $10 chimichanga here fit that bill, seeing as it boasted chocolate sauce atop the traditional flour tortilla filled with chicken, beans and rice. By chocolate sauce, I don’t mean something sweet and syrupy, of course. This was more like a molé sauce, which is the umbrella term for an often dissimilar collection of Mexican coverings. Some are made with cocoa or dark chocolate, as this one was. If you ask me, it’s a take-it-or-leave-it-proposition, and I was happy to take it,

but will caution you: If anything, at least in my opinion, many molé sauces can come off a tad bitter. In other words, don’t go expecting a Mexican sundae or anything. This sauce was quite rich and abundant atop an absolutely huge chimi that proved enough for the night’s dinner and a substantial lunch the next day. My guest chose the mix fajitas ($12), a sizzling plate of beef, chicken and shrimp topped with grilled onions and bell peppers. Sizzling is the operative word, and she was sure to ask in advance if the plate would indeed perform that way. This comes from having been disappointed at

some Mexican chains that gloss over the sizzle and plate frustratingly quiet fajitas. Here, the smoke was pouring off the active dish, and that was certainly a good thing. “Just like it should be,” my guest said, rating the dish topnotch. She, too, had plenty to take home for lunch. So, yes, we were in the presence of real Mexican, and we were liking it. A lot. But check this out: You don’t have to go all in to enjoy a meal here. The short appetizers list also includes mozzarella sticks with marinara sauce (five for $5.50), which were large, crispy and piping hot. The sauce was more brown than red, extremely thin yet quite tasty. I called it Mexican marinara but could just be making things up here. The other apps choices are fries with cheese, chicken tenders with fries and the previously mentioned salchipapa. (I’m interested for next time. Sort of.) And, oh yes, you can get wings

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here, which means these people are smart enough to cover their bases. Your choices will be mild, hot, garlic butter or barbecue. A 12-piece order is $7.50, and a 50piece bucket is $28.50. We didn’t try any but will say they sure smelled good. In fact, the scent tripped us up outside the restaurant. Was this really a Mexican place we were entering? Once inside, there was no question. Even the music was Mexican, which is always a nice touch. The only thing missing, especially given the sign on the siding here? A good old-fashioned margarita. And Mexican beer on tap. You can get bottled Corona, Corona Familiar (a bit richer), Dos Equis and Modelo (which owns Corona and which some say is better). But no margaritas that we could see. A suggestion for the future? In the meantime, seekers of the non-alcoholic have some interesting choices, too, including milkshakes in chocolate, vanilla, strawberry, banana and even mamey, a very pink tropical fruit. Now you don’t see that every day. For that reason alone, we suggest a visit. Stop by and try something truly different. Or play it safe and have some old favorites the way they are meant to be served. Did we mention the fajitas sizzle? Times Leader food critics remain anonymous.

Cheers!

Free beer this season at Damenti’s By SARA POKORNY spokorny@timesleader.com

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There is one minor drawback – well, depending on whom you ask. “Because the beer is so cold there’s no head or all that white foam on it,” McDonald said. “But hey, I don’t even like that stuff. It gets stuck to my lips.” For now only Coors and Coors Light will be offered at belowfreezing temperatures, but McDonald plans to switch the kegs out eventually with other types of beer. The best part about the icecold brew is that McDonald is offering a free first beer for each

PETE G. WILCOX/TIMES LEADER FILE PHOTO

The sand bar, which includes indoor and outdoor seating, is behind Damenti’s Restaurant in Butler Township.

guest all summer long. This is just part of a bigger plan he has to use the sand bar as a way to keep people entertained. “I don’t want people on their cell phones here,” he said. “You sit down at a bar, and seven out of the 14 people there will be on this device. It’s like, ‘Jeez, just talk to the guy you’re sitting next to.’ ”

Older film shorts will be shown nightly, with free popcorn. There will be open-mic nights, acoustic sets and a karaoke machine. McDonald is building musical instruments that customers can play, and certain seating areas will be dedicated to games, such as a Battleship table and a chess and checkers table.

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oors and Coors Light have been touting some of the coldest beer out there: bottles and cans with cold-activated colored mountains to let drinkers know when the liquid is chilly enough. For Damenti’s Restaurant owner Kevin McDonald, the way to chill a beer is much simpler. “I’m throwing the kegs in the freezer,” he said. Damenti’s is recognized for its outside ice bar during the winter, but in summer it becomes a sand

bar. Still, McDonald needs a place to keep all the ice and ice figures, and he recently decided to throw kegs of Coors and Coors Light into the mix. “Everybody puts beer in the fridge and turns the temperature down as low as it can go, but I’m skipping all that and going right for the freezer. I’m surrounding the kegs with big ice blocks so that I can serve beer at 30 degrees or colder.” But will that cause the beer itself to freeze? “I’ve been told that it freezes at 27 degrees, so we’ll see.”


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EVENTS

store and blacksmithing shop plus artisans and food. Eckley Miners Village, Highland Road, off Route 940, Eckley. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. $6, $5.50 seniors, $4 children. 636-2070.

BEST BET

T H I S W E E K : J U N E 15 TO 21, 2012 Firwood Festival, the annual event with food, games, crafts, basket auction, a boutique and live entertainment by the Stone Cats Duo (tonight) and DJ Get Up and Dance (Saturday). Firwood United Methodist Church, 399 Old River Road, Wilkes-Barre. 6 to 10 tonight and Saturday. 823-7721. Summer Festival, with nightly music, large Chinese auction, Lottery Alley, bingo, flea market and entertainment by the Kerry Dancers. St. Leo/Holy Rosary Church, 33 Manhattan St., Ashley. 6 to 11 tonight and Saturday. 825-6669. Rattlesnake Roundup, annual fundraiser with hunt and display of rattlesnakes, rides, games, vendors, crafts, food, a firefighters’ parade on Saturday and fireworks on Sunday. Noxen Volunteer Fire Company, 101 Stull Road. 6 to 11 tonight; 1 p.m. to midnight Saturday; 1 to 10 p.m. Sunday. 298-2061.

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Car Cruise, with the Villa Capri Cruisers. All vehicles welcome. The Mall at Steamtown, 300 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. 6 to 9 tonight. 344-2014.

There’s a special birthday celebration happening on the West Side starting Wednesday, when the tree-lined borough of Forty Fort turns the big 125. Everyone’s invited to join in the five-day party with carnival rides, games, vendors, the opening of a time capsule on Thursday evening and the burying of a new one at noon Sunday, a Saturday parade and fireworks. Adding to the festivities will be the sounds of the Tommy Guns Band (Thursday) Blennd and M80 (Friday), 40 lb. Head and Short and Poor (Saturday) and Just Us (Sunday). It all happens at the Luzerne County Soccer Fields, off Wyoming Avenue. Hours are 5 to 10 p.m. Wednesday; 5 to 11 p.m. Thursday and Friday (June 22); noon to 9 p.m. June 23 and noon to 5 p.m. June 24. For more details, call 287-8586 or check out fortyfort125.com.

Stock Dog Trials, the 31st annual Pennsylvania State Championship for border collies with more than 200 dogs competing in driving and gathering sheep. With food, Sunday Mass and eye clinic for dogs. Spectators welcome. Sheepy Hollow Farm, 1594 Sheepy Hollow Road, off Greenwood Street, Hop Bottom. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday through Tuesday. 289-4733. Poker Run. Compete for the best cards while on a motorcycle ride

from Wapwallopen to Mountain Top. With food, basket raffle, instant bingo and entertainment by DJ Bernie Maslowski (noon to 5 p.m.) and Whiskey ’n Woods (6 to 10 p.m.). Dorrance Township Volunteer Fire Department, 402 St. John’s Road, Wapwallopen. Saturday with registration 9 to 11 a.m. $15, $25 per couple includes breakfast at the Dorrance Inn and a T-shirt. 709-1080. Patch Town Days, the annual celebration of the anthracite

coal region with a Model A car show, the Eckley Players, the Breaker Boys and Kent Courtney of the History Channel; entertainment by the Emerald Isle Step Dancers and St. John’s United Church of Christ Choir. Also: re-creations of a cobbler shop, seamstress shop, company

Summer Garden Party. Gardenrelated activities, tips, talks and tours, food made from herbs and vegetables, children’s activities, a watercolor workshop, Civil War encampment and two seatings for a Garden Tea party with an etiquette talk. Quiet Valley Living Historical Farm, 1000 Turkey Hill Road, Stroudsburg. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. $10, $5 children. 992-6161 or quietvalley.org. World-Wide Knit in Public Day. Join knitters around the world for a global event. Osterhout Free Library, 71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. 10:30 a.m. to noon Saturday. Free. 821-1959. Downtown Scranton Walking Tour, highlighting classic architecture in the Gothic District. Sponsored by the Lackawanna Historical Society. Meet at Washington Avenue and Vine Street. 11 a.m. Saturday. 344-3841. See EVENTS, Page 17


Notes on Music

Capturing spirit through song

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By SARA POKORNY spokorny@timesleader.com

iggy Marley would like to get just one message across with his fourth studio album, “Wild and Free.” “Truth, mon, just speak the truth,” he said in a recent phone interview.

Truth is something Marley has always promoted, as well as a relaxed way of living and the need for people to realize that music shouldn’t be about the business but the sound itself. He’ll bring his newest set of tracks to the Mount Laurel Performing Arts Center in the Poconos tonight. The son of famed reggae artist Bob Marley is a five-time Grammy-winning musician, but his

Jamaican reggae-pop musician Ziggy Marley will perform at the Mount Laurel Performing Arts Center in Tamiment tonight.

skills go far beyond that. He’s also an actor, artist, activist and humanitarian. So just what is his method of staying balanced? “Take deep breaths,” he said. “For me it’s easy, just remaining calm and accepting life, really. You’ve got to roll with it instead of trying to fight it; flow with life.”

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Ashley’s Attik covers a plethora of songs but loves to focus on the metal. From left: Chris Granza, P.J. McHugh, Angel Silvestro, Greg Salitis and J.T. Osborne.

His thought process comes from his life experiences, which also shape his music. “I get a lot of inspiration from my spiritualities, things that are invisible, ideas that there’s more to life than the physical.” Much of this has to do with

Marley’s father, who influenced him personally and musically. “The experience that I had with him growing up had a lot to do with the way I think about things,” Marley said. “It had a lot to do with me wanting to know more, more than what I saw or

experienced when I was with him. He’s a catalyst for me to go further. As an artist, his songwriting style was one I liked, and I took from him the understanding that music, it’s more than money; See MUSIC, Page 8

Music with a mission By SARA POKORNY spokorny@timesleader.com

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Tunkhannock native and Nashville recording artist Erica Leigh will help raise money for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society of Eastern Pennsylvania.

Coy Taylor is a country singer who will come straight out of Nashville to participate in the Concert for a Cure this weekend.

ced by country artists such as Waylon Jennings, Johnny Paycheck and Brooks and Dunn, but he also has many rock influences, such as The Eagles. Despite the fall release of his album, he’s already working on new material. “Touring has really helped me determine what my fans like and don’t like, so it’ll be easier for me to put out a record that will really reach the audience throughout

the entire thing.” Taylor is excited to not only be visiting Northeastern Pennsylvania but to help Leigh’s cause. “Being in the music business, really the main reason you want to do music is you want to help people,” he said, “and this is just another way to do that. The event has really taken on a huge life. So many people are on board to help. We want it to turn into an annual thing.”

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rica Leigh was 8 years old when her sister Tammi, then 23, got her leukemia diagnosis. About two years later, Leigh lost her sister to the blood disease. “It was scary,” she said. “At the time she was married, had a great job, and was just living a normal life. It was also scary that so much was unknown to me about blood cancer.” Leigh’s family’s encounter with cancer didn’t end there. A mere year later another of Leigh’s older sisters learned she had Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Fortunately, Melissa Ann Vitek beat the disease and is cancer-free now, but what happened has left such a mark on Leigh that she’s on a mission to raise as much awareness about both diseases as possible. The Tunkhannock native and Nashville resident has put together Concert for a Cure to benefit the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society of Eastern Pennsylva-

nia, an event that will take place know if they really mean it,” at the Wyoming County Fair- Leigh said with a laugh. “In this grounds tomorrow. case, we had the attention of reps, Leigh was part of a singing which was incredible.” competition at the fair years ago, The opening act for the night winning the chance to open for will be The Infinity, a popular locountry star Lorrie Morgan. cal band from the 1980s that reFrom there she made connec- united a few years ago. All of the tions and made her way to Nash- band’s original members will perville in September 2009. form, including Ron Reeves, who She has since put was married to out a collection of IF YOU GO Tammi at the recordings titled What: Concert for a Cure time of her “Love Is” and is death. with Erica Leigh, Coy Taysharpening her The main act lor and opening act The songwriting skills for the night will Infinity and carving her Where: Wyoming County be emerging Fairgrounds, Route 6, niche as an artist in country star Coy Meshoppen the country-music Taylor, who reWhen: 7 p.m. tomorrow market. cently released The event is free, but donaShe recently his first album, tions are encouraged. wrote a song, “Big“Bigger Than ger Better Love,” Life.” Taylor which she pitched to Martina brings a sound that’s a little more McBride, Carrie Underwood, than country to the table. Lee Ann Womack and Sara “I try to keep to my country Evans. roots, but I really like to get the “You can write a song, play it crowd energized with a rocking for someone and have them say, sound,” he said. ‘Oh yeah, that’s good’ but never Taylor said he has been influen-


Continued from page 7

it’s a service to humanity.” ••• Ashley’s Attik is ready to light up Runco’s in Olyphant tomorrow night with hard-hitting renditions of music from the likes of Judas Priest, Kiss and Flyleaf. The Scranton-based band, made up of Angel Silvestro, 27, on lead vocals and acoustic guitars, J.T. Osborne, 31, on lead and rhythm guitars, Chris Granza, 41, on bass and vocals, P.J. McHugh, 37, on drums and percussion, and Greg Salitis, 44, on lead and rhythm guitars, has been rocking since fall of 2008, though the members haven’t always been the same. McHugh, Granza and Osborne are the original members, with Salitis joining in September and Silvestro taking up the lead in February. “We’ve been through a couple line-up changes, but I think this group, by far, is the best,” McHugh said. “It’s no offense to anyone that’s ever been in the band. Some people just had dif-

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ferent musical influences or directions they wanted to go in. We all seem to be on the same page.” The group will cover almost any song from the ’80s, ’90s and now but tends to focus on hair metal. “It’s timeless,” McHugh said. “There are girls in their 20s and women in their 40s and 50s dancing at our shows because this type of music just never gets old.” Not only is it timeless, it’s fun to play. “We always have a good time when we’re up there,” Silvestro said, “and when we have a good time, the crowd does.”

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T H I S W E E K : J U N E 15 TO 21, 2012 Breakfree, Christian music. Ekklesia Christian Coffeehouse, River of Life Fellowship Church, 22 Outlet Road, Lehman Township. Tonight with dinner at 6, concert at 7 and open mic at 9. Free. 717-503-7363. 7 Bridges, the Eagles tribute band. Penn’s Peak, 325 Maury Road, Jim Thorpe. 8 tonight. $22. 866-605-7325. Paul Thorn Band, the bluesy roots ensemble. Mauch Chunk Opera House, 14 W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe. 8:30 tonight. $23. 325-0249. Wrestle & Rock II, a concert with bands Silhouette Lies, Eye on Attraction, Faceless Shadows and Humanity Remains with members dressed as their favorite childhood wrestlers. Also: wrestling video games and merchandise. New Visions Studio & Gallery, 201 Vine St.,

BEST BET Head north to Honesdale on Saturday for a tasty mix of sounds at the all-day Roots and Rhythm Music and Arts Festival. The free street fair – now in its seventh year – will spotlight the ‘roots and roll’ of the Nouveaux Honkies, precise family-style harmonies by the Sweetback Sisters, a gritty tribute to the heroes of R&B by the Duke Robillard Band and toe-tapping bluegrass from Vermont’s Banjo Dan and the Mid-nite Plowboys. Downtown bands play from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. with the music moving The Duke Robillard Band will headline the Honesto Central Park at 1:15 p.m. and continuing into the night. Shop- dale Roots and Rhythm Music and Arts Festival. pers can browse the Artists’ Row along Main Street for creative jewelry, paintings and other creations. For the complete schedule, log onto honesdalerootsandrhythm.com. Scranton. Saturday with doors at 7 p.m. and music at 7:30. $7. Dress as a wrestler. 878-3970. Young Christian Soloists, with Kendall Mosley (age 15) and Matt Evans (age 18). Two Marys Christian Coffee House, Salvation Army, 17 S. Pennsylvania Ave., Wilkes-Barre. 7 to 9 p.m.

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THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE

FUTURE CONCERTS

3rd Degree Trio, the local pop-rock band in a concert on the outdoor patio at Red Robin Restaurant, 2020 Wilkes-Barre Township Marketplace, Wilkes-Barre Township. 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday. Free. 208-1776. Party on the Patio, with Unchained paying tribute to the music of Van Halen. Mohegan

A Musical Tribute to Les Paul and Mary Ford, spotlighting the popular 1950s duo with musicians Tom Doyle and Sandy Cory. The Bookhouse, Eastern Monroe Public Library, 1002 N. Ninth St., Stroudsburg. 7 p.m. June 22. Free but donations accepted. 421-0800. See CONCERTS, Page 19

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S TA G E T H I S W E E K : J U N E 15 TO 21, 2012 The Best of the Best, a gala revue celebrating the 30th anniversary of the Joan Harris Dancers with routines from the past 30 years, including “Reflections: A Walk Down Memory Lane” and dances in the style of the Broadway show “Chicago.” F.M. Kirby Center, WilkesBarre. 6:30 tonight; 1 and 6 p.m. Saturday. $20. 287-7977. Playroom, one-act plays by regional authors, all set in a kitchen. Presented by Gaslight Theatre Company at the King’s College Theater, Administration Building, 133 N. River St., Wilkes-Barre. 7 tonight and Saturday. $10, $8 students and seniors. 824-8266.

COURTESY PHOTO

The cast of ‘Nunsense 2; the Second Coming’ includes, from left: Erin Eichfeld as Sister Amnesia, Jamie Price as Mother Superior, Angel Berlane as Sister Hubert, Katie Owens as Sister Leo and Rianna Daughtry Smith as Sister Robert Anne.

Habit-forming fare

Summer stock at Nuangola Grove starts with ‘Nunsense

I

TIMES LEADER STAFF

PAGE 10

f you’re a fan of the Little Sisters of Hoboken, rejoice and sing alleluia. “Nunsense 2: The Second Coming” will be presented at the Nuangola Grove tonight through June 24, the first of three professional summer-stock productions scheduled for this season.

The show is “a hilariously funny musical,” said director Michael Marone, a Hazleton native who recently established Cutting Edge Productions. Marone, former artistic director of the Pennsylvania Theatre of Performing Arts in Hazleton, will serve as executive producer of Theatre at the Grove after six seasons with PTPA. “It was just time for something new,” Marone says. “I have always had a connection with the Grove ever since I was lucky enough to be part of ‘Comedy Tonight,’ the first show produced there when the theatre reopened in 2007.” The 2012 Summer Season will

include a variety of genres in the hopes of finding something for everyone to enjoy. After the “Nunsense 2” run, the season will continue with productions of the farce “No Sex Please, We’re British” Aug. 3-12 and conclude with “My Way: A Musical Tribute to Frank Sinatra” Sept. 7-16. The Grove Theatre, at 5177 Nuangola Road, has a rich history. It opened in 1934 as a professional summer-stock theater and was one of only a few professional playhouses at the time. Many famous actors have appeared on stage at Nuangola, including Peter Mark, Imogene Coca, Sid Caesar and Kirk Douglas.

IF YOU GO What: ‘Nunsense 2: The Second Coming’ When: 8 tonight and Saturday evening, 3 p.m. Sunday, 8 p.m. June 22-23 and 3 p.m. June 24 Where: Nuangola Grove, 5177 Nuangola Road, Nuangola. More info: 868-3582 or GroveTickets@frontier.com

The theater then became a church for more than 50 years before it was converted back to a theater in 2007. “We are hoping to provide audiences in 2012 with something truly special,” Marone said, adding the performances will be cabaret style with seating at tables and BYOB. Tickets for musicals are $20 and $18 for plays. A season pass also is available for $50 each. Reservations for both individual tickets and season passes are being taken now. Reservations can be made by calling 868-3582 or emailing GroveTickets@frontier.com.

The Sensuous Senator, comedy about a senator running for president on a morality platform who finds himself in compromising situations. The Factory, School and Apple streets, Nuremberg. 7:30 tonight and Saturday; 4 p.m. Sunday. Dinner 90 minutes before show. $25, $10 show only. Reservations: 384-4851.

FUTURE Don’t Mention My Name, Fred Carmichael’s comic mystery about the adventures of a man suffering from temporary amnesia. Performed by the Nuremberg Community Players at the Towers Bar & Restaurant, 1478 Tomhicken Road, Fern Glen. 6:30 p.m. June 22-23. $20 includes dinner. Reservations: 384-4407. Fiddler on the Roof, the Broadway musical set in a small

Emily Coolbaugh, Anna James, Rebecca Schnable and Sarah Piontkowski are among the Joan Harris Dancers in ‘The Best of the Best’ this weekend at the F.M. Kirby Center in Wilkes-Barre. Jewish village. Performed by the Music Box Youth Players, ages 8 to 20. Music Box Playhouse, 196 Hughes St., Swoyersville. 7 p.m. June 22; 2 and 7 p.m. June 23; 2 p.m. June 24. $14. 283-2195. The Pirates of Penzance, Gilbert and Sullivan comic operetta with swashbuckling pirates, fair damsels and Keystone Kops. Presented by the Pennsylvania Lyric Opera at the Cecilia Cohen Recital Hall, East Stroudsburg University. 7:30 p.m. June 22-23; 3 p.m. June 24. $20, $15 seniors and students, $5 children. 328-5864. Poe in the Park: Much of Madness. Five actors use music and movement to bring to life the stories and poems of Edgar Allan Poe, including “The Raven,” “The Cask of Amontillado,” “Annabel Lee,” “The Masque of the Red Death” and “The Tell-Tale Heart.” Lazybrook Park, Tunkhannock. Bring a blanket or chair. 7 p.m. June 23. Free. 996-1500.

EXHIBITS T H I S W E E K : J U N E 15 TO 21, 2012 Passion, photographs by Teri Moore. Through Aug. 3 with an artist’s discussion 6 to 8 tonight. Widmann Gallery, Sheehy-Farmer Campus Center, King’s College, Wilkes-Barre. 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. 208-5900. Alumni and Community: Selections from the Permanent Collection, including works by Jon Carsman, John Sloan, Niccolo Cortiglia, George Luks, Herbert Simon and Richard Fuller. Opens Saturday and continues through Aug. 5 at the Sordoni Art Gallery, Stark Learning Center, 150 S. River St., Wilkes University, WilkesBarre. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays; noon to 4 p.m. Sun-

This photograph of jazz artist Nate Birkey is among the works in ‘The Musicians’ by Rolfe Ross, on exhibit at CameraWork Gallery in Scranton through June. days. 408-4325. Henry Melchior Muhlenberg: Patriarch of the North American Lutheran Church, a See EXHIBITS, Page 11


a.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays through Thursdays; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays; 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. 674-6250.

EXHIBITS

Continued from page 10

traveling exhibit detailing his life and legacy, shown in conjunction with the church’s 100th anniversary. St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, 316 S. Mountain Blvd., Mountain Top. Noon to 5 p.m. Sunday through June 24. 4746616.

High Definition Art, paintings, jewelry and fiber art by the artists of Studio AtA (Abilities thru Art). Through June 29 at Mainstreet Galleries, 370 Pierce St., Kingston. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Fridays; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays. 287-5589.

ONGOING EXHIBITS Sight Specific, acrylic, oil and watercolor paintings by Austin Burke; surreal photography by Shane McGeehan and Laurie Otto; and carved stone bowls by Mark Zander. Through Saturday at New Visions Studio & Gallery, 201 Vine St., Scranton. Noon to 6 p.m. Tuesdays through Sundays. 878-3970. Titanic: Explore the Legend and 100 Years of History, period photographs and documents curated by students from Marywood University’s Public History Program. Through June 24 at the Everhart Museum, 1901 Mulberry St., Nay Aug Park, Scranton. Noon to 4 p.m. Mondays, Thursdays and Fridays; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays; noon to 5 p.m. Sundays. 346-7186. Annual Student Exhibit, graphics, photography, paintings and portfolios. Through June 28 at the Schulman Gallery, Luzerne

Pennsylvania En Plein Air Society. Through June at the Glenburn Township Building, 54 Waterford Road, Dalton. 9541489.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

‘My Red Balloon,’ a pastel-andgraphite work by Erika Baez, is among the works displayed in the group exhibit ‘In the Details’ through July 7 at Marquis Art and Frame in Wilkes-Barre. County Community College, 1333 S. Prospect St., Nanticoke. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. 740-0727. The Impact and History of Nursing Education in Luzerne County 1887-2012, a multimedia exhibit. Through June 29 at the Pauly Friedman Art Gallery, Insalaco Hall, Misericordia University, 301 Lake St., Dallas. 10

Hazleton Art League Bus Trip to the Finger Lakes Wine Festival in Watkins Glen, N.Y. Leaves at 7 a.m. July 15 from the Genetti Hotel, Route 309, Hazleton, and returns at approximately 8 p.m. $85, $70 members includes a wine taster’s guide and glass. Reservations: 650-6429.

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10:25AM, 1:25PM, 4:25PM, 7:15PM, 10:05PM

DARK SHADOWS (DIGITAL) (PG-13)

11:00AM, 1:40PM, (4:15PM DOES NOT PLAY ON MONDAY, JUNE 18), (7:00PM DOES NOT PLAY ON MONDAY, JUNE 18 OR THURSDAY, JUNE 21) 9:40PM

DICTATOR, THE (DIGITAL) (R) 10:40 PM

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (3D) (PG)

11:30AM, 12:05PM, 1:50PM, 2:25PM, 4:10PM, 4:45PM, 6:30PM, 7:05PM, 8:50PM, 9:25PM

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (DIGITAL) (PG)

10:20AM, 10:55AM, 12:40PM, 1:15PM, 3:00PM, 3:35PM, 5:20PM, 5:55PM, 7:45PM, 8:15PM, 10:10PM

MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (3D) (PG-13) 11:20AM, 2:30PM, 5:45PM, 8:55PM

MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (DIGITAL) (PG-13)

1:00PM, (4:10PM, 7:20PM, DOES NOT PLAY ON WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20), 10:30PM

MEN IN BLACK 3 (3D) (PG-13)

10:50AM, 1:55PM, 4:40PM, 7:30PM, 10:25PM

MEN IN BLACK 3 (DIGITAL) (PG-13)

12:10PM, (1:05PM, DOES NOT PLAY ON WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20), 2:55PM, (3:50PM, DOES NOT PLAY ON WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20), 5:30PM, (6:40PM, DOES NOT PLAY ON WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20), 8:25PM, (9:20PM, DOES NOT PLAY ON WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20)

PROMETHEUS (3D) (R)

12:30PM, 3:35PM, 6:35PM, 9:35PM

PROMETHEUS (DIGITAL) (R)

11:35AM, 2:35PM, 5:35PM, 8:35PM

ROCK OF AGES (DIGITAL) (PG-13)

10:55AM, 12:20PM, 1:45PM, 3:10PM, 4:35PM, 6:05PM, 7:25PM, 8:50PM, 10:15PM

SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (DIGITAL) (PG-13)

11:40AM, 1:10PM, 2:40PM, 4:05PM, 5:40PM, 7:10PM, 8:40PM, 10:20PM

THAT’S MY BOY (DIGITAL) (R)

11:10AM, 12:35PM, 2:00PM, 3:25PM, 4:50PM, 6:15PM, 7:40PM, 9:05PM, 10:30PM

NO PASSES

You must be 17 with ID or accompanied by a parent to attend R rated features. Children under 6 may not attend R rated features after 6pm

the Dietrich Theater Tioga St., Tunkhannock WEEK OF 6/15/12 - 6/21/12

ROCK OF AGES (PG13)

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FRI. 7:00, 9:10 SAT. 1:30 (2D)4:00, 7:00, 9:10 SUN. 1:30 (2D), 4:00, 7:00 MON., TUES., THURS. 1:30, 7:00 WED. 1:30 (2D), 7:00

PROMETHEUS 3D (R) FRI. 7:10, 9:45 SAT. 1:20 (2D), 4:20, 7:10, 9:45 SUN. 1:20 (2D), 4:20, 7:10 MON., TUES., THURS. 1:20, 7:10 WED. 1:20 (2D), 7:10 SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG13) FRI. 6:45, 9:25 SAT. 1:10, 4:10, 6:45, 9:25 SUN. 1:10, 4:10, 6:45 MON., TUES., THURS. 1:10, 6:45 WED. 1:10

836.1022 www.dietrichtheater.com

PAGE 11

517 Pierce Street • Kingston • 283-3354

THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE


THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE

By COLIN COVERT Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

L

PAGE 12

owbrow comedy goes subterranean in “That’s My Boy,” a product of the Adam Sandler movie factory unpolluted by a trace of ambition or wit. This film forgets that good comedy is rarely dumb, it just plays dumb. Sandler, treading water in a sea of bodily fluids, retarded sexuality and antisocial behavior, makes you yearn for the rib-tickling sophistication of “Ernest Goes to Camp.” The

IF YOU GO What: “That’s My Boy” ★ Starring: Adam Sandler, Andy Samberg Directed by: Sean Anders Rated: R for crude sexual content throughout, nudity, pervasive language and some drug use

movie should be buried in a time capsule to teach future generations what to avoid. The deluxe-stupid script positions Sandler as Donny, See BOY, Page 13

IF YOU GO

long enough to let the picture, built around overthe-top tunes by Foreignost movie mu- What: “Rock Of Ages” ★★ er, Bon Jovi, Journey and sicals, even in Starring: Tom Cruise, Julianne Hough, Diego Boneta, Catherine the age of Zeta-Jones, Alec Baldwin, Russell others, pay off. It’s enough to make “Glee,” still Brand, Mary J. Blige, Malin Akeryou “stop believin’.” face that awkman Tom Cruise, as burntward moment when some- Directed by: Adam Shankman out rocker Stacee Jaxx, body – say her name is “Sher- Running time: 123 minutes will do his best Axl Rose rie Christian” – riding a Grey- Rated: PG-13 for sexual content, suggestive dancing, some heavy impression – bare-chesthound, bursts into “Sister drinking and language ed belting, waving a Christian” by Night Ranger, mike-stand bedecked in andtherestofthebusburstsin scarves – or Diego Boneta, aspiring metal singto join her for the chorus. Audiences today titter at that. But you mea- er, will tear into Foreigner’s “Jukebox Hero,” or Alec Baldwin and Russell Brand and the rest of sure the movie by how quickly we get over it. “Rock of Ages,” the big-screen version of the the cast blast “I Love Rock ’n’ Roll,” and direcjukebox musical set to ’80s “hair metal” an- tor Alan Shankman (“Hairspray”) will go for thems and ballads, never does. The all-star cast somecheaplaughandutterlyundercutthemois game, but the filmmakers can’t stop winking and mocking the mockable music and the era See ROCK, Page 13

By ROGER MOORE McClatchy-Tribune News Service

M


STILL SHOWING tures certainly are pretty, but the filmmakers apparently are unwilling to risk the slightest lapse of audience attention, so they put the movie on fastforward and let centripetal force hurtle viewers along from start to finish. PG for some mild action and rude humor. 92 mins. ★★ MEN IN BLACK 3 – We’re all too old for this — the shtick itself has gotten old, and it has not aged well. Fifteen years since the zippy original and a decade since the sub-par sequel, we now have a third “Men in Black” movie that no one seems to have been clamoring for except maybe Barry Sonnenfeld, the director of all three. PG-13 for sci-fi action violence and brief suggestive content. 105 mins. ★ 1/2 PROMETHEUS — Nothing could possibly satisfy the fervent expectation that has built for this sorta-prequel to the genredefining “Alien,” Ridley Scott’s return to science fiction for the first time in 30 years, but “Prometheus” comes close. Strikingly beautiful, expertly paced, vividly detailed and scary as hell, it holds you in its grip for its entirety and doesn’t let go. R for sci-fi violence, including some intense images, and brief language. 123 mins. ★★★ SNOW WHITE & THE HUNTSMAN — Rupert Sanders’ revisionist take on the classic Brothers Grimm fable upends expectations of traditional gender roles while simultaneously embracing what a fairy tale should be. It’s dark and dangerous, vicious and violent. And yet the performances — notably from Kristen Stewart as the title character — don’t always live up to the visionary promise. PG-13 for intense violence and action and brief sensuality. 125 mins. ★★★

ROCK

famed “Bourbon Room” and prepares to launch a solo career. Sherrie, a new waitress and would-be singer (Julianne Hough), and bartender-guitarist Drew (Boneta) dream of living the rock-god life he leads. You will be amazed at the actors who take on singing, often for the first time on screen (Baldwin, MalinAkermanasasexyRollingStone reporter, Paul Giamatti as Stacee’s sleazy manager) and don’t embarrass themselves. Cruise, in particular, is a demented delight to watch, all jewel-encrusted dragon’s head codpiece, buttless chaps and selfserious drunken swagger. But the songs, with a few excep-

Continued from page 12 rock

ment. Maybe the music, the fashion, the whole rapacious testosterone vibe of that spandex, eye-shadow, poodle-haired era is laughable. But it’s one thing to poke fun at something, quite another to attack it withuttercontempt.That’sthefeel here. “Rock of Ages,” which discards quite a bit of the book of the stage musical it’s based on, swirls around Jaxx, who staggers on stage for his farewell show at the Sunset Strip’s

The roaring ’20s Years before he co-wrote “Citizen Kane,” Wilkes-Barre-reared screenwriter Herman Mankiewicz spent many an elegant evening at San Simeon with newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst and his longtime mistress, Marion Davies. Is it any wonder that when Hearst got a look at “Kane” with its less-than-flattering portrayal of himself and Davies he was infuriated to the point of setting out to destroy the movie? What particularly peeved Hearst was the depiction of Davies as Susan Alexander, a talentless nincompoop. All along, Mankiewicz’s co-writer – and “Kane” director – Orson Welles

insisted that Davies was not the inspiration for the Alexander character. He even wrote an introduction to Davies’ memoirs in hopes of setting the record straight. Which brings us to “Show People” (1928, Warner Archive, unrated, $20), an altogether charming silent comedy that proves, once and for all, that Davies was a delightful comic actress with looks and talent to spare. Davies stars as a kid from Georgia who moves to Hollywood with dreams of being another Garbo but winds up scoring in comedies instead. The satire is surprisingly so-

Amy Longsdorf writes about DVDs with local connections.

NEW

deals with high-profile problems that range from keeping the client list of a Washington, D.C., madam under wraps to a scandal surrounding the president. Her tactics are cold, calculated and effective. “EPISODES: THE FIRST SEASON,” GRADE C-PLUS: This Showtime comedy looks at what happens when a popular British series is transformed into an American sitcom. The show goes from classy to trashy, especially with Matt LeBlanc, who plays himself, cast in the lead. “GCB: THE COMPLETE FIRST SEASON,” GRADE B-MINUS: The ABC series, based on the book “Good Christian Bitches” by Kim Gatlin, looks at what happens when the former “it girl” (Leslie Bibb) returns home to Dallas 18 years after graduation to live with her mom (Annie Potts). Miriam Shor plays tough

CEO Cricket Caruth-Reilly, while Kristin Chenoweth is the top diva in town, Carlene Cockburn. “GCB” starts strong but becomes more of a cartoon with each episode. ••• ALSO COMING TO DVD THIS WEEK: ••• “Good Deeds”: A businessman (Tyler Perry) changes after he offers to do a good deed. “Spider-Man”: The film, plus “Spider-Man 2” and “SpiderMan 3,” debut on Blu-ray. “The Tribe”: An unknown virus leaves the children of the world without adults. “Thin Ice”: Greg Kinnear stars as a small-time insurance agent looking for a way to jump-start his business. “Accident”: A professional hit man kills his victims by trapping them in well-crafted accidents.

ON

DVD

This week’s new DVD selections include a famous detective and three strong TV series: ••• “SHERLOCK HOLMES: A GAME OF SHADOWS,” GRADE BMINUS: Sherlock Holmes (Robert Downey Jr.) and Watson (Jude Law) battle Professor James Moriarty (Jared Harris). What makes the sequel better than the original is the inclusion of Holmes’ chief nemesis, Moriarty, and the replacement of wimpish Rachel McAdams with the robust Noomi Rapace. Both characters are intriguing enough to help gloss over Guy Ritchie’s directing quirks. “SCANDAL: THE COMPLETE FIRST SEASON,” GRADE B-PLUS: Kerry Washington stars as Olivia Pope, a fixer who

tions, lack the urgency of the original renditions. The leads (Hough and Boneta) are so bland and thinvoiced they seem out of step with 1987, even if they’re exactly what we get from pop stars in our Autotune era. You will be stunned at how legspreadinglycrude(fittingtheMTV of the times, and the music) a PG-13 movie can be. Miami was nicely dressed down for a film fantasy version of Sunset Strip in the ’80s – vulgar leather and neon and sports cars and muggers. But seriously, Brother Shankman, what’s the point of making “I Love Rock ’n’ Roll: The Musical,” if you don’t?

BOY Continued from page 12

a washed-up minor celebrity who rocketed to national fame when he impregnated his redhot math teacher at age 13. Now he’s a beer-bloated, middle-age child-man who needs his successful adult son’s financial help to avoid a prison sentence for tax evasion. The boy (Andy Samberg), whom he christened Han Solo, changed his name to Todd and severed all ties for reasons that should be obvious. On Todd’s

phisticated, co-star William Haines is a great foil for Davies, and the laughter-is-good-foryour-soul message pre-dates “Sullivan’s Travels” by nearly 15 years. Ironically, Mankiewicz’s “Citizen Kane” isn’t the only way to connect the dots between the Hearsts and NEPA. In the mid-’70s, William Randolph Hearst’s granddaughter Patty Hearst spent nearly a year hiding out in a farmhouse north of Scranton, less than 40 miles from where Mankiewicz once lived.

wedding weekend, Donny re-enters his life, wreaking havoc at every turn. If this summary is unpleasant, I assure you the film is a lot more fun to read about than to endure. It is about as funny as watching an obese stripper eating an omelet while upside down on her dance pole. Which they actually show. The mix of hackery and self-regard on display here is amazing. The film is the work of professionals who have the resources to make a well-constructed comedy. They simply don’t respect their audiences, or their craft, enough to make the effort.

PAGE 13

THE AVENGERS – After a series of summer blockbusters that individually introduced Iron Man, The Incredible Hulk, Thor and Captain America, all these characters come together alongside several other friends and foes. PG-13 for intense sci-fi violence, action and a mild drug reference. 143 mins. ★★★ 1/2 THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL – In theory, seeing Judi Dench, Maggie Smith, Tom Wilkinson and Bill Nighy share the screen should be a delight. In reality, this seriocomic romp merely has its moments but more often feels heavy-handed, sappy and overlong. Sure, it’ll seem warm and crowd-pleasing but probably only to crowds of a certain age, who may relate to these characters who find themselves in flux in their twilight. PG-13 for sexual content and language. 122 mins. ★★ DARK SHADOWS — Tim Burton and Johnny Depp are snuggled in their comfort zone in this horror-comedy, their weakest collaboration by far. PG-13 for comic horror violence, sexuality, drug use, language and smoking. 116 mins. ★ 1/2 THE DICTATOR – Sacha Baron Cohen goes deep — and deeply funny — into character as a North African despot who doesn’t think twice about ordering up the deaths of those who disagree with him. Leading a life of extravagant power, Aladeen meets a militant vegan from Brooklyn (Anna Faris) and experiences a disorienting change of heart. 83 mins. R for sex, nudity, profanity, cartoon violence and adult themes. ★★★ MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED — A cute story about zoo animals running off to join the circus becomes overwhelmed by a blur of color and animated acrobatics. The pic-

Movie Amy

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CELEBRITY Q&A BY R.D. HELDENFELS

JUMBLE

UNIVERSAL SUDOKU

BY MICHAEL ARGIRION & JEFF KNUREK

Steve Valentine was on ‘Harry’s Law’ Q. On the May 6 episode of “Harry’s Law,” one of the people they were defending was a very nice-looking, tall, “English” man. He looked so familiar, but I couldn’t place him. Who was he and what have I seen him on? A. That was actor Steve Valentine. You may remember him as Dr. Nigel Townsend on “Crossing Jordan,” the 2001-07 NBC drama starring Jill Hennessy. His extensive credits also include acting in the series “I’m in the Band” and hosting the reality show “Estate of Panic.” Born in Scotland, he has also worked as a DJ, standup comic and magician. Q. I am a big “Herbie” fan. Can you please tell me if there will be anymore “Herbie” movies?

PREVIOUS DAY’S SOLUTION

A. I am guessing that you are referring to “Herbie the Love Bug,” the Volkswagen that starred in an array of movie and TV ventures. I do not know of plans for a new production but would not rule one out considering how long the screen history is and how much Disney likes to revisit projects. This project began with “The Love Bug” with Dean Jones in 1969, then stretched through “Herbie Rides Again” (1974), “Herbie Goes to Monte Carlo” (1977), “Herbie Goes Bananas” (1980), a short-lived “Herbie the Love Bug” TV series in 1982, a TV-movie version of “The Love Bug” and, most recently, “Herbie: Fully Loaded” (2005). Do you have a question or comment for the mailbag? Write to me at rheldenfels@thebeaconjournal.com or by regular mail to the Akron Beacon Journal, 44 E. Exchange St., Akron, OH 44309.

HOROSCOPE BY HOLIDAY MATHIS

PAGE 14

ARIES (March 21-April 19). The symbols

of success are not the success itself — which consists of effort, experience, failure and recovery. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Having strong, intimate relationships with your loved ones is the most important thing to you now, though life doesn’t seem to be structured in support of that effort. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). You’ll be in the mood to be close with your favorite people. Someone you love and trust will share your dreams.

CRYPTOQUOTE

ON THE WEB For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com

CANCER (June 22-July 22). Yes, the

whole world is crazy, but your part of it is exceptionally bananas now. Hopefully, this validation will empower you to laugh at the improbability of your scene. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). You have a way of disengaging yourself from the role you are playing. It’s a defense mechanism that will serve you well now. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Maybe the good you do today will be forgotten tomorrow, but that matters little to you. You do good for goodness’ sake — and because it makes your life more meaningful. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). What a relationship could use right now is a ritual, something special you do with the other person that anchors your connection.

SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). You know how

having quiet time to pursue a hobby or interest or just to relax can be a complete luxury. Take on a responsibility in order to give another person a break. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). Why do you always get stuck with the argumentative people? It’s because you compassionately recognize their need to feel important and in control. You use what you know to defuse their sting. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Try to assume the best in others, even though you’ll probably have to remind them what they agreed to do for you. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). Help will make your load lighter, and people will like feeling that they’ve contributed to

your world. So ask for input from your friends and trusted colleagues, and use that input as much as possible. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). A lot of problems exist because people are reluctant to stand up and speak out against what’s clearly wrong. You’re not one to complain, but calling attention to what needs changing isn’t complaining. TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (June 15). You have a kind word for all you meet in the next three weeks, which starts a cycle of good karma that ripples on. August brings liberation. Your commitment to a job is so remarkable that you’ll be applauded and awarded in September. Libra and Aries people adore you. Your lucky numbers are: 4, 24, 21, 39 and 19.


Mother is crushed when girl of her dreams dumps her son Dear Abby: My son and his wonderful — or so I thought — girlfriend, just broke up. OK, she dumped him. Out of the blue, with no warning, she slept with another guy and the next day she told my son it was over. I am devastated! This is a girl I LOVED. He hadn’t proposed yet, but my son wanted to marry her. She was going to be my daughter-in-law, the mother of my grandchildren.

DEAR ABBY ADVICE Now I don’t know who has cried more, me or my son. I know it’s none of my business and I have to let these two kids work it out for themselves if there is anything salvageable. But Abby, I’m hurting too. I’m so tired of people telling me I have “no right” to have an opinion about this, much less express it. I don’t want to call her yet, but maybe someday I’d

like to just say I’m sorry this happened. I’m disappointed and would like to say goodbye. I can’t believe I’m never going to see her again. If somehow, by the grace of God, they can put this back together, I will forever keep my mouth shut, but in the meantime, I’m just sitting here ... — A Broken-Hearted Mom Dear Mom: Clearly you are hurting, and I’m sorry for it. But young love can be unpredictable, and it’s obvious that

GOREN BRIDGE

your son’s girlfriend wasn’t ready for the kind of future you have fantasized about. If you’re smart you will start thinking about this with your head rather than your heart. While what happened is extremely disappointing it could have been worse. She could have been married to your son and the mother of your grandchildren when she slept with another man and decided to bolt. Be grateful she wasn’t. What teens need to know about sex, drugs, AIDS and

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THE GUIDE

getting along with peers and parents is in “What Every Teen Should Know.” Send your name and mailing address, plus check or money order for $7 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby, Teen Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Shipping and handling are included in the price.) To receive a collection of Abby’s most memorable — and most frequently requested — poems and essays, send a business-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $3.95 ($4.50 in Canada) to: Dear Abby’s “Keepers,” P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included.)

CROSSWORD

WITH OMAR SHARIF & TANNAH HIRSCH

HOW TO CONTACT: PAGE 15

Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 Celebrity Questions: TV Week, The Dallas Morning News, Communications Center, PO Box 655237, Dallas, TX 75265


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Always Always Colbert Daily Show (7:54) (:25) Workahol- (:27) Gabriel Iglesias: I’m The Half (:31) The COM Sunny Sunny Report Tosh.0 Tosh.0 ics Tosh.0 Not Fat Hour (N) Half Hour SportsNite Phillies MLB Baseball Philadelphia Phillies at Toronto Blue Jays. From Rogers SportsNite (N) (Live) DNL StateCS (N) Pregame Centre in Toronto. (N Subject to Blackout) (Live) (CC) Rewind Union USCCB Alter Chris- Daily Mass The Holy Solemnity Global Rosary Relay for WE Gift of God Course in Women of CTV Spring tus Rosary of Priests BELIEVE Saints Grace (5:00) Deadliest Catch Deadliest Catch (CC) Deadliest Catch (N) Deadly Seas “Gulf of Flying Wild Alaska (N) Deadly Seas “Gulf of DSC (CC) (TV14) (TV14) (CC) Alaska” (TVPG) (CC) (TVPG) Alaska” (TVPG) Good Luck Jessie (CC) A.N.T. Jessie (N) Good Luck Let It Shine (‘12) Tyler James Williams. Pre- (9:55) A.N.T. Shake It Charlie (TVG) Farm (TVG) miere. A friend of a teenage songwriter takes Gravity DSY Farm (TVG) Up! (CC) (CC) (TVG) Charlie Falls credit for his lyrics. (CC) (TVG) Eastwood The Soup E! News (N) Sex and Sex and Sex and Sex and Fashion Police (N) Chelsea E! News E! the City the City the City the City (TV14) Lately (5:00) 2012 U.S. Open Golf Championship Second Round. From the Olympic Club in San Fran- SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN cisco. (N) (Live) (CC) (CC) (CC) (5:00) College Baseball NCAA World Series, SportsCenter (N) (Live) College Baseball NCAA World Series, Game 2 -- Arizona vs. Florida ESPN2 Game 1 -- Stony Brook vs. UCLA. (CC) State. From Omaha, Neb. (N) (Live) (CC) The Princess Diaries (G, ‘01) ›› Julie Andrews, Anne The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement (G, ‘04) The 700 Club (CC) FAM Hathaway, Hector Elizondo. (TVG) ›› Anne Hathaway, Julie Andrews. 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eastfair.com.

EVENTS Continued from page 6

Great Tastes of Pennsylvania, the 22nd annual wine-and-food festival with three stages of musical entertainment, wineries from throughout the state, tastings and seminars, food vendors and a souvenir wine glass. Split Rock Resort, 1 Lake Drive, Lake Harmony. Noon to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Age 21 and older. 800-255-7625. Hi-Lites Motor Club Car Cruise, with food, music and prizes. Wegmans, 226 Highland Park Blvd., Wilkes-Barre Township. 5 to 8 p.m. Saturday (Rain date: Sunday). 477-2477. Free Dinner and a Movie, summer picnic foods and a showing of the film “Courageous,” about four law-enforcement officers facing the challenge of fatherhood. Forty Fort United Methodist Church, 26 Yeager Ave. Saturday with dinner at 5 p.m. and movie at 6 p.m. Free but tickets required. 287-3840. Father’s Day Car Show, 18th annual event open to all vehicles. NSRA Safety Inspections available. Nay Aug Park, Scranton. 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. 344-2014. Forty Fort Meeting House Tours, guided walks through the historic 1807 church, the area’s oldest religious edifice, with box pews, elevated pulpit and hand-carved columns. 20 River St., in the Forty Fort Cemetery. 1 to 3 p.m.

More than 200 border collies will compete in the Pennsylvania State Championship Stock Dog Trials tomorrow through Tuesday at Sheepy Hollow Farm in Hop Bottom. Sundays through Sept. 23 plus July 4. $2, $1 children. 287-5214. Denison House Tours, guided tours of the restored 1790 home of early settler Nathan Denison, 35 Denison St., Forty Fort. 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays through Sept. 30. $4, $2 children. 288-5531. The Northeast Fair. Agriculture, horticulture, home arts and gardening in more than 1500 competitions plus concerts, festival foods and amusement rides. Special events include a championship Double Figure 8 Auto Race and both Compact and Full-Size Demolition Derbies. Performers include Elvis tribute artist Shawn Klush, Start Making Sense (a Talking Heads tribute), bluegrass band Cabinet, Jam Stampede (Grateful Dead tribute) and the Cast of Beatlemania. Fairgrounds, Suscon Road, off Route 315, Pittston Township. 5 to 11 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday. 9 a.m. to 11 p.m. June 22; 1 to 11:15 p.m. June 23; 1 to 10:30 p.m. June 24. $9 (unlimited rides), $6. 654-2503 or north-

Summer Film Series: “A Separation,” the 2012 Oscar winner for Best Foreign Language Film about a married couple deciding whether to move from Iran to improve the life of their child or stay to care for a parent with Alzheimer’s disease. F.M. Kirby Center, Wilkes-Barre. 1 and 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. $6, $4 (matinee); $3 students. 826-1100. Mansions and Millionaires, an architectural walk to learn about downtown mansions and the families who built them, led by Tony Brooks, executive director of the Luzerne County Historical Society. Meet at the Wilkes-Barre Family YMCA, 40 W. Northampton St., Wilkes-Barre. 6 p.m. Wednesday. Free. 823-2191. Summer Palooza, a fundraiser for the Pittston YMCA with food, drink and music by Good 2 Go. The Open Space, 73 S. Main St., Pittston. 6 to 10 p.m. Wednesday. $35. Reservations: 655-2255. Summer Solstice Celebration, with energy clearing, labyrinth walk, meditation, music and refreshments. Self-Discovery Wellness Arts Center, 200 Lake Ave., Montrose. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday. $10. 278-9256. Meet and Greet the Maestro, a cocktail reception fundraiser for the Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic with Lawrence Loh. Scranton Cultural Center, 420 N. Washington Ave., Scranton. 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday. $25. 344-1111

Gate of Heaven Bazaar, with games, children’s activities and entertainment by the Step Praise Band (Thursday), Gina Major Dance Company (Friday), the Emerald Isle Step Dancers and the Catholic Rock Band (Saturday). Gate of Heaven Church, 40 Machell Ave., Dallas. 5 to 10 p.m. Thursday and Friday (June 22); 6 to 10 p.m. June 23. 675-2121.

FUTURE Palm Reading, a presentation on palm lines. Osterhout Free Library, 71 S. Franklin St., WilkesBarre. 3 to 4:30 p.m. June 22. Free. Register: 821-1959. Wyoming Valley Riverfest, the annual three-day celebration. Kicks off June 22 with a short paddle from West Pittston to Wilkes-Barre and festivities at Millennium Circle Portal, including live music, Dragon Boat display, free family fishing, mural painting and more. Continues June 23 with a river sojourn from Harding to Wilkes-Barre at 8 a.m. and a festival noon to 5 p.m. at Nesbitt Park with live animals, guided hikes, exhibits, children’s activities and music. Also: a car show and concert by Flashback at Millennium Circle 6 to 9 p.m. Sunday’s sojourn is from Wilkes-Barre to Hunlock Creek at 8 a.m. followed by Dragon Boat Racing 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Details at 825-1701 or riverfrontparks.org. BlogCon Launch Party, to announce a website for Northeastern Pennsylvania’s first blogging conference on Sept. 29, designed

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Dancing with the NEPA Stars. Local celebrities put their moves to the test when they face off in a first-round dance competition. Grand Ballroom, Scranton Cultural Center, 420 N. Washington Ave., Scranton. 5:30 p.m. June 22. $16 includes drinks and light fare. 344-1111. What’s Happening to Our Planet? A talk on climate change by science educator Nicholas M. Guydosh of the Kopernik Observatory & Science Center. Followed by a reception and discussion. Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Wyoming Valley, Church and Mount Olivet roads, Wyoming. 7 p.m. June 22. Donation. 972-7856. Tobyhanna Army Depot Open House, with the U.S. Army Golden Knights parachute team, tours of the communications, avionics, satellite and radar systems; equipment displays, car show, Humvee rides, climbing wall, music, children’s carnival and food vendors. June 23 beginning with a 5K run at 8:30 a.m. and concluding with a Military Parade at 4 p.m. 615-7308.

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PAGE 17

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for those interested in marketing, social media and communicating online. With free appetizers, door prizes and giveaways. Hosted by the Luzerne County Community College Computer Club at the River Grille, 670 N. River St., Plains Township. 5 to 7 p.m. June 22. Free but $5 donation suggested. 262-9644.

THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE


760895

PAGE 18

THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE


READS THIS WEEK: JUNE 15 TO 21, 2012 Book Signing, with former governor Ed Rendell, author of “A Nation of Wusses: How America’s Leaders Lost the Guts to Make Us Great.” Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Arena Hub Plaza, Wilkes-Barre Township. 7 tonight. 829-4210. Book Signing, with Gene Gomolka, author of “Coal Cracker’s Son,” a historical novel set

in Nanticoke during the Depression. Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Arena Hub Plaza, Wilkes-Barre Township. Noon Saturday. 829-4210. Book Discussion, of “The Hunger Games” by Suzanne Collins. Limited copies available for $2. Osterhout Free Library, 71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. 6:30 p.m. Thursday. Registration: 821-1959. Book Signing with Bernie Bernwall, author of “What Wouldn’t Jesus Do?” about how America has lost its presence as a world leader since the Roe v

Wade decision. Holiday Inn Express, 1265 Commerce Blvd., Dickson City. 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday. 888-361-9473.

C O N C E RT S

Continued from page 9

Book Discussion, of “Fifty Shades of Grey” by E.L. James. Wyoming Free Library, 358 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming. Noon June 23. 693-1364.

Youth Night, a concert by teenage artists Matt Evans and LeeAnn Lemperle. Voice of Hope Christian Coffeehouse, St. John’s Evangelical Lutheran Church, 231 State St., Nanticoke. 7 to 9 p.m. June 22. Free. 735-1760.

Book Discussion, of “50 Shades of Grey” by E.L. James. Light refreshments. Osterhout Free Library, 71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. 6:30 p.m. June 26. Registration: 821-1959.

Leon Redbone, the gravelly baritonevoiced singer-songwriter and his trio blending comedy and skilled instrumentals. Mauch Chunk Opera House, 14 W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe.

FUTURE

8 p.m. June 22. $33. 325-0249.

THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE

Music in the Forest, with the duo Burden on Society performing blues, rock, reggae and oldies. Lacawac Sanctuary, 94 Sanctuary Road, Lake Ariel. June 23 with food and refreshments at 6 p.m. and concert at 7 p.m. $8. Reservations: 689-9494. The Legacy of Michael Jackson. Lane Lassiter re-creates the music and moves of the late pop-rock star. Sherman Theater, 524 Main St., Stroudsburg. 7 p.m. June 23. $23.95. 420-2808.

Congratulate Your Favorite Graduate in The Times Leader Graduate keepsake ake edition Saturday, July 7, 2012. These schools will be featured:

Coughlin Crestwood Dallas GAR Greater Nanticoke Area Hanover Area Hazleton Area

Marie Springs Wyoming Area

Holy Redeemer Lake-Lehman LIU 18 Meyers MMI Preparatory School Northwest Area Pittston Area

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Congratulations We’re proud of you and your accomplishments

Name ____________________________________________________ Address __________________________________________________ City ____________________________ State ____ ZIP _____________ Phone ___________________________ Your Message ______________________________________________

Drop off or mail this form with a photo of your favorite grad along with a personal message of congratulations. Neatly print the grad’s name and school along with the name and phone number of the person submitting the ad on the back of your photo. Include a selfaddressed, stamped envelope to have your photo returned or pick it up at our office after July 1, 2011.

Deadline: Wednesday, June 20 at 4:00 p.m.

_________________________________________________________ School Name ______________________________________________

Please check your ad size:

❒ 2” x 2.75”: $15

❒ 4” x 1.75”: $20

❒ 4” x 2.75”: $25

The Times Leader Classifieds – Call 829-7130 or Toll free 1-800-273-7130

timesleader.com

PAGE 19

Enjoy your college experience, Mom and Dad

Send to: The Times Leader Grads, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711

759282

Congratulations Marie I’m so proud of you Uncle Walter

Congratulations & Good luck at Penn State! Love, Mom and Dad


THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE

KIDS T H I S W E E K : J U N E 15 TO 21, 2012 Father/Son Weekend, with campfires, an ice cream social, fishing, canoeing, arts and crafts, archery, hiking, rock climbing, high ropes and zipline. YMCA Camp Kresge, 382 Camp Kresge Lane, White Haven. With check in at 5 tonight and check out at 11 a.m. Sunday. $185 per parent/child includes cabin accommodations and all meals. 823-2191 or campkresge.com. Very Fairy Princess Story Time, a reading of “The Very Fairy Princess: Here Comes the Flower Girl!” Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Arena Hub Plaza, Wilkes-Barre Township. 11 a.m. Saturday. 829-4210. Early Readers Story Hour, with reading aloud, songs and crafts. Back Mountain Memorial Library, 96 Huntsville Road, Dallas. 9:45 a.m. Mondays through Aug. 6. Registration: 675-1182. All About Eggs, a program for ages 4 and 5 on birds, butterflies and turtles using various games and activities. Visitors Center, Ricketts Glen State Park, 695 Route 487, Benton. 10 a.m. to noon Monday and Tuesday. 477-7780.

BUYS T H I S W E E K : J U N E 15 TO 21, 2012 Flea Market, with a lunch menu. Bloomingdale Grange, Grange Hall Road, Bloomingdale. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. $5 per table rental. 256-7610.

PAGE 20

Market on the Pond, the annual outdoor craft show with odds and ends, plants, books, raffles, homemade baked goods and a hot lunch menu. Meadows Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, 4 E. Center Hill Road, Dallas. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. 675-8600. Library Book Sale, more than 16 categories of books along with DVDs, tapes, records, CDs and audio books. On the lawn of the Osterhout Library, 71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Friday (June

Early Explorers, museum-based learning in literature, arts and natural sciences for ages 3 to 5. Everhart Museum, 1901 Mulberry St., Nay Aug Park, Scranton. Mondays through Nov. 12 at 1 p.m. Free. 346-7186. Story Hour, with songs and finger plays for ages 3 to 5. Back Mountain Memorial Library, 96 Huntsville Road, Dallas. 9:30 a.m. Tuesdays through Aug. 7. Registration: 675-1182.

FUTURE The Gift of the Wali Dad, a children’s theater presentation about a Pakistani man trying to give away money abut always receiving more in return. Dietrich Theater, 60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. 10 a.m. June 22; 11 a.m. June 23. Free. 996-1500. All About Eggs, a program for ages 6 to 8 on birds, butterflies and turtles using games and activities. Visitors Center, Ricketts Glen State Park, 695 Route 487, Benton. 9:30 a.m. to noon. June 25 and 26. 477-7780. How to Train Your Dragon, a live-action spectacular based on the hit movie with high-flying, fire-breathing dragons, Viking warriors, world-class circus artists and acrobats. Mohegan Sun Arena, 255 Highland Park Blvd., Wilkes-Barre Township. 7 p.m. June 27-29; 11 a.m., 3 and 7 p.m. June 30; 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. July 1. $29.50 to $79.50. 9707600 or ticketmaster.com.

22); 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Wednesday; 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday; 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 23 (Bag Day). 8230156. Outdoor Summer Marketplace, with fresh produce, concessions, baked goods, jewelry, collectibles, novelties and more. Mohegan Sun Arena, 255 Highland Park Blvd., Wilkes-Barre Township. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Sept. 4. 970-7600.

FUTURE Craft Show. Wyoming Hose Company #1, 33 E. Eighth St., Wyoming. 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 23. Vendors welcome. 693-1371. Summer Antique Market, with more than 50 high-quality dealers offering furniture, primitives, glass, toys, jewelry and more. Village Green, Eagles Mere. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 7. 525-3370.

OUTDOORS T H I S W E E K : J U N E 15 TO 21, 2012 BioBlitz, a 24-hour biological survey of the 48-acre Josie Porter Farm Open Space Property in Stroud Township. Be a citizen scientist and count the species of plants and animals on the preserve. Sponsored by the Monroe County Environmental Education Center, 8050 Running Valley Road, Stroudsburg. Begins at 3 p.m. today and ends 3 p.m. on Saturday. Register at 629-3061. Heritage Explorer Bike Tour and Festival, the third annual noncompetitive event to raise funds for the Lackawanna River Heritage Trail. Choose an out-andback route of 5, 11, 22 or 44 miles from Mellow Park in Peckville. Saturday with the 44-mile ride departing at 8 a.m. and the others leaving at half-hour intervals. Followed by a free community festival with food, vendors, raffle baskets, exhibits and live music by the Merchants of Groove Blues Reunion, folkrock group Don Shappelle & the Pickups and Jason O. 963-6730, ext. 8200 or heritageexplorer.org. PurpleStride, a 5K run and onemile walk to raise funds for the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network with children’s activities, music and refreshments. Kirby Park, Wilkes-Barre. Saturday with registration at 8 a.m. and event at 10 a.m. Register at purplestride.org. Morning Bird Walk. Meet at the wooden bridge by the park office, Nescopeck State Park, 1137 Honey Hole Road, Drums. 8 to 10 a.m. Saturday. Registration: 403-2006. Kayak the Susquehanna, a threehour river trip from Harding to West Pittston to learn about stream ecology and wildlife with biologist Garrett Barr of King’s College. Meet at the West Pittston Library, 200 Exeter Ave., West Pittston. 8:30 a.m. on Saturday to carpool to Harding and be on the river by 10 a.m. $45 single kayak; $65 tandem; $15 without rental. Registration: 654-9847.

BEST BET Near the turn of the century, the lumbering town of Ricketts had a school, church, recreational building, a doctor, general store and railroad station. Today it’s a ghost town with bits and pieces of the houses and buildings now partially buried beneath the fields near Ricketts Glen State Park in Benton. On Saturday evening, environmental educator Judy Adamic will take visitors on a Ghost Town Walk to remember the glory days and tell stories about its history. Meet at the Visitors Center at 7:30 p.m. Details at 477-7780.

254-9895. Turtle Walk and Talk, about local species of turtles and their history. Meet in the gravel parking lot at the bottom of Campground Road. Frances Slocum State Park, 565 Mount Olivet Road, Kingston Township. 2 to 3 p.m. Saturday. 696-9105. Natural Symbols of Pennsylvania. Campground Amphitheater, Frances Slocum State Park, 565 Mount Olivet Road, Kingston Township. 7 to 8 p.m. Saturday. 696-9105. Wilkes-Barre Duathlon, a threemile run and 16-mile bike race through the city beginning on Public Square and continuing to Kirby and Nesbitt parks and throughout South Wilkes-Barre and Hanover Township. 7:30 a.m. Sunday. $65. Online applications at wbduathlon.com or 823-2191. Breakneck Ridge Hike, eight difficult miles with the Susquehanna Trailers Hiking Club. Meet at the Park and Ride, Route 315 and Oak Street, Dupont. Bring lunch and water. 7:45 a.m. Sunday. Free. 825-7200.

Birding at Frances Slocum State Park, a leisurely walk to seek out songbirds. Meet in the parking lot of the Environmental Education Center and boat rental, 565 Mount Olivet Road, Kingston Township. 8:30 a.m. Saturday. Free. 675-9900.

Tannersville Bog Walks, 2.5-hour walks through the northern boreal bog. Meet at the Monroe County Environmental Education Center, 8050 Running Valley Road, Stroudsburg. 10 a.m. Wednesdays through Sept. 5. $5. Reservations: 629-3061.

Nature Walk, with the Lackawanna Audubon Society on a private property in Susquehanna County. Meet at Bingham’s Family Restaurant, 6092 Route 92, Kingsley. 9 a.m. Saturday.

The Potential of Living Willow Structures in the Landscape, an illustrated lecture on livingwillow sculptures by artist Bonnie Gale. Dietrich Theater, 60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. 7 p.m.

Wednesday. Free. 996-1500. Keystone Active Zone Passport, a free program that encourages people to get outside and active at more than 30 local parks, trails and events in Luzerne County. Earn awards and prizes by exploring the county and logging your discoveries through Sept. 30. Join anytime by registering at KAZpassport.com or call 823-2191.

FUTURE Birds of a Feather Run/Walk Together, the annual 5K event sponsored by the Greater Wyoming Valley Audubon Society. Walk the picturesque back roads of Penn State WilkesBarre’s campus, off Old Route 115, Lehman. June 23 with registration at 8 a.m. and event at 9 a.m. $20, $15. 362-8727. Butterfly Walk, explore different species and their unique adaptations. Pocono Environmental Education Center, Brisco Mountain and Emery roads, Dingmans Ferry. 10 a.m. to noon June 23. $5. 828-2319. Kettle Creek Family Campout, with fishing, hiking, outdoor games and campfire foods. Monroe County Environmental Education Center, 8050 Running Valley Road, Stroudsburg. From 1 p.m. June 23 to 11 a.m. June 24. $30, $20 children includes tents and food. Reservations: 629-3061. Incredible Insects! A talk and display of insects including moths and butterflies. Ricketts See OUTDOORS, Page 21


Continued from page 20

Glen State Park, 695 Route 487, Benton. 7 p.m. June 23. 4777780. Orchid Bog Walk, a guided talk and walk to seek out the globally rare orchids at the Valmont Bog

Delaware Water Gap Hike, 8.5 moderate miles with the Susquehanna Trailers Hiking Club. Meet

at the Sears Automotive parking lot, Wyoming Valley Mall, WilkesBarre Township. Bring lunch and water. 9:45 a.m. June 24. Free. 457-0527. Outdoor Sunday Meditation. Salt Springs State Park, Silver Creek Road, off Route 29, Franklin Forks. 1 p.m. June 24. 967-7275. Home Made

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759126

O UTDOOR S

Sanctuary in Hazleton with Bob Sprague of the International Native Orchid Conference. Sponsored by the North Branch Land Trust at 9 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. June 24. $10. Registration: 6965545.

THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE

for individuals to bazaars

The Potato Shack

27 Wilson Street, Larksville

288-1584

Get The Benefits You Deserve!

Social Security Disability

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Tues, Thur, Fri, Sat 10-5, Sun 11-5

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PAGE 21

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THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE

Randy’s Bar–B–Q

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& Burger Joint

C O N S TR U C TIO N C O . PA012959

THE BES T RO O FIN G S ID IN G W IN D O W S & C ARPEN TRY

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with French Fries, Cole Slaw and Hush Puppies

with Mashed Potatoes and Roll

SOUTHERN FRIED CATFISH $7.95

PIGGY PLATTER $7.95

FRIDAY DJ BERNIE & DONNY SATURDAY NIGHT NIGHT KARAOKE 9PM-1AM

KARL METZGER 9PM-1AM

AT THE CORNER OF E. NORTHAMPTON AND HILLSIDE ST., WILKES-BARRE • 829-9779 NEVER A COVER! • KITCHEN HOURS: SUN 1-8, WED-SAT 5-9

MARTIN O’MALIA GREENHOUSES 747 North Main Street, Hilldale (Plains Twp.) CUSTOMER APPRECIATION DAYS JUNE 15 THRU 17 — FRI. TO SUN. ONLY ZONAL GERANIUMS $1.00 EACH

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LUCAS FARMS Farmers Market Vouchers Accepted Here!!

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PAGE 22

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89¢ 69¢ 89¢ 79¢ 69¢ $ 29 1 6/$ 00 1 $ 29 1 29¢ $ 19 1 2/

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Wholesale & Retail One Location Only

DIRECTIONS: Take N. Main Street from light in Plains, go up hill approx. 1 1/2 mile to Hilldale baseball diamond. From Wyoming, over 8th St. Bridge, right at light over tracks, make 1st left, straight at stop sign.

(570) 207-3627 Like us on facebook for more specials see menu at menusnepa.com/randysbbq.html

R E S TA U R A N T 920 Schechter Dr (across from Wal-Mart) Wilkes-Barre • 570-822-3116

Open Fri. & Sat. 9AM-6PM Sunday 9AM-4 PM

824-0490

Happy Father’s Day!

$

99 9 99

3 Course Di D Dinner i 1. Choose You Starter 2. Choose Your Entree 3. Choose Your Dessert

from We will be closed on Sunday, 6/17 to give our Dads the day off! Celebrate with us Fri., 6/15 or Sat.,6/16!

Lunch: Mon. - Fri. 11:30am to 2:00pm Dinner: Tues. - Sat. 5:00pm to Closing

283-6260 www.vanderlyns.com 239 Schuyler Ave. Kingston, PA

Buy A $30 Gift Card, And Get A Box Of Chocolates For $1

18th GATE OF HEAVEN

Parish Bazaar 40 Machell Avenue, Dallas THURS., FRI., SAT. JUNE 21-22-23

Over 60 of the most “Beautiful Gift Baskets” in the Valley! Large indoor children’s area! Accessories Boutique Plant & Garden Booth Book Nook Cash Bingo ~ Game ‘Wheels” Take a chance on a Quilt! Ice Cream ~ Lemonade Home made baked goods Funnel Cakes Potato Pancakes Pierogi ~ Haluski ~ Porketta Gourmet Coffee Corner and more! Family friendly atmosphere and children’s game area Face Painting Ping Pong Basket & Cash Drawings On Grounds Sat 23rd

THURSDAY Kids Talent Show FREE Kid’s Basket Raffle UMC Step by Step Praise Band Mini Dog Show FRIDAY Rob the Juggler Magic of Bill Dickson Gina Major Singers David Blight Dancers Mary Baker Guitarist and Story Teller SATURDAY Martial Arts Demo Emerald Isle Irish Step Dancers Music & Dance by Changing Habits The Back Mountain Catholic Rock Band

For Full Lineup of Entertainment Go To www.gohchurch.org


KNOW WHY STEAK AND LOBSTER DINNERS COST FIFTY BUCKS? SERVED WITH CHOICE OF POTATO & VEGETABLE & FRESH BAKED BREAD

6 oz. COLD WATER LOBSTER TAIL AND 6 oz. FILET MIGNON

Based On 40 Sq. Yds.

OPEN DAILY 5PM • 675-0804

Murder Mystery

June 24th and July 8th

Audience Participation VOTED #1 SHOW IN LUZERNE COUNTY

Sunday Brunch

10.95

$

Over 24 Homemade Items

PIANO BAR!

DAILY DINNER SPECIALS Dining Room Open Daily 5PM

FRI. & SAT. - MIKE BACK with Piano & Vocals Classic Rock

HAPPY HOUR 9-11PM

...casual dining with a difference!

NEITHER DO WE.

COOPER’S STEAK AND LOBSTER PLATTER

29.99

$

WHILE SUPPLIES LAST

3 ROOMS $589 PLUSH CARPET

Weekend Features

• INSTALLED WITH PAD • FREE ESTIMATES

MARKET ST., NANTICOKE

Call (570) 436-1500

ELLISON CARPET ee ay Fr aw y La

Father’s Day Celebration

Financing Available

6” Top rail, 8” Upright, 52” Deep

Includes: 1 H. P. Pump, Filter, Ladder, Heavy Ladder, Vac Kit, Leaf Skimmer

Risotto Chicken Carbonara $15.95

3” Tabs

OUTDOOR CABANA Open Daily

A mouth watering 12 - 14 oz. cut of Prime Rib served with a side of Au jus, and a choice of two sides.

WATERFRONT 304 KENNEDY BLVD. PITTSTON • 654-6883

Chicken & Biscuits $10.95

Sunday Special

Look At This!!!

25 Lb. Chlorine Reg. $89.00

Crab Encrusted Marinated Flat Iron $17.95 Prime Rib $19.95

Pool

Blowout

Aquasport Above Grounds 15’ – $1595 18’ – $1895 24’ – $2395

Seasoned grilled chicken, bacon, and peas in a parmesan cheese sauce tossed in a creamy Arborio rice saute. Costello’s own house marinated 8 oz. Flat Iron Steak cooked to perfection and finished with our crabmeat stuffing and splashed with a light Herb Butter.

THE GUIDE

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Only

$

6999

In Ground & Above Ground Liner Sale – Call For Estimates – Save Now

Any Size Any Style Any Shape

Our famous home-style Chicken & Biscuits served with mashed potatoes and gravy. Mmmm...what a way to go!

Now Taking Reservations For Father’s Day Please inquire about our private dining room for any and all occasions. Costello’s has a NEW Bar/Drink menu offering many new Specialty Drinks and also Bar Food!

HAPPY HOUR: Sunday-Friday 4pm - 6pm.

Gateway Shopping Center, Edwardsville (570) 714-7777 WWW.COSTELLOS.INFO

Sun. 11am-4pm Mon.-Fri 10am-6pm Sat. 10am-4pm

Making a Difference Ministries along w/ St. John’s Lutheran Church, Nanticoke

Present:

“The Voice of Hope Christian Coffee House” Friday, June 22, 2012 • 7:00 to 9:00 P.M. The ‘Voice of Hope Christian Coffee House’ will present ‘Young Artist Night’ with music by Matt Evans and LeeAnn Lemperle, singers/songwriters. Music and refreshments will be provided from 7:00– 9:00 PM and admission is free. The Coffeehouse is located at St. John’s Lutheran Church, 231 E. State Street, Nanticoke, PA 18634. Music will be broadcasted live on WVHO Station 94.5 FM. For info contact Pastor Debra North at 570-735-1760 or email: pastor_debby@yahoo. com. Visit our church website: http://nanticokelutheran.org/ for more details and directions. The ‘Voice of Hope Christian Coffee House’ will be held every fourth Friday of the month. Pictured are left, LeeAnn Lemperle and right, Matt Evans PAGE 23

The Coffeehouse is open to the public and everyone is welcome. Bring a friend !!!


Shadyrill Farm, Café & Bakery

FATHER’S DAY

Treat Dad to lunch at Shadyrill farm. After you give Dad another shirt and tie, see him really smile when you treat him to a Delicious lunch. Reservations Appreciated.

We offer an old fashioned Rueben, Pastrami on Rye, Roast Beef & Swiss and many more

(Check website for menu www.shadyrillfarm.com) Our sandwiches are made with premium Boar’s Head meats and cheeses on our own homemade bread with homemade soup, salads and dessert

Hours: Thurs.-Sun. 10 AM-5 PM • Serving Lunch Until 4 PM

315 Loyalville Rd., Dallas • Directions: From Rte. 415 Dallas, Take Rt. 118 West 5 Miles, Turn Right Onto Loyalville Rd. Go 1.5 Miles

570.477.2202 • www.shadyrillfarm.com

PIZZA PERFECT

BUFFET BREAKFAST

Restaurant & Catering

*FATHER’S DAY WEEKEND* *RESERVATIONS NOT NEEDED* *SLICED BEEF SHORT RIB* *CARIBBEAN PORK* *CRAB STUFFED HADDOCK* *PARM CRUSTED CHICKEN* *ANGUS STRIP STEAKS* *SERVING BREAKFAST ‘TIL 1:00 P.M.*

822-4474

www.haystacksrestaurant.com

Kunkle Fire Company

Tickets

Kunkle Fire Co. Social Hall on Kunkle Road

Available At the Door For Info Call

675-3334

Adults 7 Children $4

BOTH LOCATIONS OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK AT 11AM

Mon. - Thurs. 4pm to 10pm Fri 11am to 11pm • Sat. 12:30pm to 11pm Sun. 2pm to 10pm

LUNCH SPECIAL

9

$ 95

with Choice of Any Appetizer

PARTY SPECIALS

5 or More Large 16” Pizza 7 Each $ 95 5 or More 12 Cut Sicilian Pizza 8 Each $ 95 $ 95 3ft Sub 29 6ft Sub 54 $ 95 Chicken Tender Platter 34 $

Wilkes-Barre Area 20 E. Northampton St.

PAGE 24

825-5166

Mountain Top Area Route 309

474-6669

Kingston Area

Delivery Only Forty Fort, Swoyersville, Wyoming, Exeter

288-3687

Kingston, Edwardsville • 825-5166

Dallas

Nanticoke Area

674-7777

735-8290

Country Club Plaza

Delivery Only

ANY REGULAR SIZE FRIES

COUPON VALID AT BOTH LOCATIONS EXP. 6/30/12 1 COUPON PER CUSTOMER PER DAY. VALID WITH ANY PURCHASE.

COUPON VALID AT BOTH LOCATIONS EXP. 6/30/12 1 COUPON PER CUSTOMER PER DAY. VALID WITH ANY PURCHASE.

ANY REGULAR SIZE FRIES

ANY REGULAR SIZE FRIES

COUPON VALID AT BOTH LOCATIONS EXP. 6/30/12 1 COUPON PER CUSTOMER PER DAY. VALID WITH ANY PURCHASE.

COUPON VALID AT BOTH LOCATIONS EXP. 6/30/12 1 COUPON PER CUSTOMER PER DAY. VALID WITH ANY PURCHASE.

FREE FREE

532 MOOSIC ST., SCRANTON (570) 341-5100 761 WYOMING AVE., KINGSTON (570) 287-2750

Pizza, Wings & Subs

Medium 12” Pizza or 6 Cuts Sicilian Pizza

ANY REGULAR SIZE FRIES

FREE FREE

SAME ORIGINAL RECIPE, HAND MADE, HAND BAKED

696-2100

AT THE

$

PIZZA • WINGS AND MORE!

16 Carverton Road Trucksville

Sunday, June 17th S 8:00 - 1:00 PM

95

Wyoming/Pittston Area 187 Wyoming Ave.

613-9191 • 655-3987 Pittston, W. Pittston, Wyoming, Jenkins Twp., Laflin, Exeter

Plains Area 825-5082 (Delivery Only) 655-3987

WEEKEND SPECIALS

Served With Soup or Salad, Potato & Vegetable

Prime Rib (12 oz)................................................................... $15.65 Delmonico Steak (12 oz.)...................................................... $15.65 London Broil.......................................................................... $11.75 Broiled Seafood Mix (Haddock, Shrimp, Scallops) .............. $13.75 Stuffed Shrimp....................................................................... $13.45 Salmon Teriyaki..................................................................... $12.45 Potato Crusted Haddock........................................................ $12.25 Pecan Crusted Tilapia............................................................ $10.95 Sauteed Chicken (Francaise, Scampi or Marsala) ................ $12.50 Roast Turkey Breast ............................................................... $10.95

Full Menu Available • Serving Wine, Beer & Cocktails

WEST SIDE MALL • EDWARDSVILLE • 288-6609 Open Daily 7 AM - 11 PM

752813

THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE


The Guide 06-15-2012