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Five Folks We visited Kirby Park, where the Wilkes-Barre Cherry Blossom Festival will soon take place, and asked:

“HOW DO YOU PLAN TO SPEND THIS WEEKEND?” “I’m training for the (King’s College 5K) race right now.” Michael Rosengrant, 23, Wilkes-Barre

“I’ll be working out to get in shape to join the military. I have to be able to run two miles in 19 minutes.”

North Memorial Hwy., Sh Shavertown • 69 696-9700 2 N 29 th M th i lH S h t 6 96 9 97 700 70

Alicia Mitchum, 26, Larksville

“Working out with my sister.” Andrea Frederick 29, Larksville

“I’ll be taking a trip to upstate New York.” Yahaira Calderon, 36, Wilkes-Barre

“Going (to upstate New York) with Mommy.”

748551

PAGE 2

Jacqueline Soto, 16, Wilkes-Barre

GETTING INTO THE GUIDE

CONTACT US

All submissions must be received two weeks in advance of the pertinent event. E-mailed announcements via guide@timesleader.com are preferred, but announcements also can be faxed to 570-829-5537 or mailed to 15 North Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711. The Guide provides advance coverage and/or notice for events open to the public. Events open only to a specific group of people or after-the-fact announcements and photos are published in community news. All announcements must include a contact phone number and make note of any admission or ticket prices or note that an event is free. We cannot guarantee publication otherwise. We welcome listings photographs. First preference is given to e-mailed highres JPGs (300 dpi or above) submitted in compressed format to guide@timesleader.com. Color prints also can be submitted by U.S. mail, but we are unable to return them. Please identify all subjects in photographs.

FEATURES EDITOR Sandra Snyder 831-7383 ssnyder@timesleader.com

FEATURES STAFF

Mary Therese Biebel 829-7283 mbiebel@timesleader.com Sara Pokorny - 8297127 spokorny@timesleader.com LISTINGS Marian Melnyk guide@timesleader.com Fax: Attention: The Guide 829-5537

Advertise: To place a display ad - 829-7101


L

THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE

By MARY THERESE BIEBEL mbiebel@timesleader.com

ast year, if you remember, Kirby Park was more than soggy. Water was lapping at the base of the Martz Amphitheatre, heavy, carnival-type rides couldn’t be brought in, and organizers had to cancel the Wilkes-Barre Cherry Blossom Festival. “It was so sad,” remembered Lore Majikes, WilkesBarre event coordinator. gauge the audience and figure out what’s most likely to please them. “We try to be unpredictable,” Vern Jones said with a laugh. His wife said the couple loves the Cherry Blossom Festival. “The blossoms are beautiful (when they’re still around); it’s a family-friendly atmosphere; it gets people out of the house and brings them together. It’s winwin,” Diane Jones said. “We’re really looking forward to it.” “We try to showcase a lot of different genres, something for everyone,” Majikes said, pointing out the concerts will include polkas, rock-’n’-roll covers and more. “All the bands are local and tend to have their local following.” On Saturday, representatives of about 15 dance companies will have their turn – offering ballet, modern dance, Irish dance, Middle Eastern dancing and more. A group from the Dance Theatre of Wilkes-Barre last week rehearsed a piece teacher Gina Malsky patterned after Cirque du Soleil performances. “I’d like to be an acrobat,” Jessi Mendoza, 16, of Dallas told a reporter. “I’d like to walk a tight rope,” said Julie Mazaleski, 11, of Duryea. That’s if they could join a circus. Their spirited dance sequence may be the next best thing. Performances at the WilkesBarre Cherry Blossom Festival will take place rain or shine, Majikes said, explaining seating is available under a tent. The inflatable plastic balls

IF YOU GO What: Wilkes-Barre Cherry Blossom Festival Where: Kirby Park When: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday Saturday performers: Arabesque Academy of Dancing, Ballet Northeast, The Conservatory of Dance, Dance Contours, Dance Theatre of Wilkes-Barre, David Blight School of Dance, Encore School of Dance, Fusia Dance Co., Haifa & Izdihaar Belly dancers, Kerry Dancers, PA Dance Vision, Scranton Dance Center, Symmetry Dance Co., Turi Studio of Dance and Without Walls Dance Co. Sunday performers: 11 a.m.: John Stevens Doubleshot (Polka)

Wendy and Chris Turcotte of Kingston plan to display will be one interesting new addition this year. They had envisioned offering rides down the levee to people who would be securely harnessed inside but learned the Department of Agriculture so far has not approved the devices for use in Pennsylvania. So they’ll just bring the balls so people can see them. ••• On May 5 and 6, cherry-blossom action swings a few miles upriver, where the West Pittston Cherry Blossom Festival is planned for Susquehanna Ave-

Noon: Windfall 1 p.m.: Mother Nature’s Sons 2 p.m.: Wilkes Civic Band with Wyoming Valley West High School Band 3 p.m.: K8 4 p.m.: Nowhere Slow 5 p.m.: Robb Brown 6 p.m.: Farmer’s Daughter ••• What: West Pittston Cherry Blossom Festival Where: Susquehanna Avenue at Fireman’s Memorial Bridge When: Noon to 7 p.m. May 5 and noon to 6 p.m. May 6 Parade: Noon May 5 Little Miss Cherry Blossom Contest: 1 p.m. May 5 West Pittston Idol Contest: 5:30 p.m. May 5

nue, near the Firefighters Memorial Bridge. The 41st annual West Pittston Cherry Blossom Parade begins at noon May 5, and any individual or group interested in participating may contact Ralph Salerno at sal602@hotmail.com or 780-0231. The Little Miss Cherry Blossom Festival pageant, open to greater Pittston girls 4 to 8, is set for 1 p.m. Saturday. To register, contact Gina Malsky at 332-7817. Another way to show off your talent in West Pittston is to take part in the West Pittston Idol contest, set for 5:30 p.m. Saturday. Singers 5 and older are invited to participate.

PAGE 3

This year should be different. Though we did experience heavy rainfall earlier this week – and it may have washed the last clinging blossoms from Kirby Park’s ornamental cherry trees – the area is actually in a rain deficit. And the forecast is for a mostly rain-free Saturday and Sunday. So children should be able to ride the ponies and the giant slide and have their faces painted. Families will be able to look at – though not ride inside – large plastic balls that are capable of giving people a head-overheels trip down the levee. And Saturday will be devoted to dance performances, a.k.a. “Pirouettes in the Park,” while Sunday will be devoted to “Music in the Park.” “We’ve got some phenomenal outdoor music in store, with kind of a reggae feel,” said Robb Brown of Wilkes-Barre, whose band will perform at 5 p.m. Sunday. “We’ve got that spring vibe in the air. It’s the gateway to summer.” Also celebrating the season will be the band Farmer’s Daughter, which plans to bring “a lot of the new, modern country” music, starting at 6 p.m. Sunday. “We’ll probably do ‘Old Alabama’ by Brad Paisley, ‘Save A Horse, Ride A Cowboy,’ songs from Rascal Flatts and some Sugarland songs, also some of the older stuff like Johnny Cash,” said George Pegula of Olyphant. Vern and Diane Jones of Pittston, the duo known as Windfall, said they will choose from their wide repertoire after they

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Julia Randazzo, Lauren Gardner, Jessi Mendoza, Julie Mazaleski and Morgan Novakovich rehearse for this year’s ‘Pirouettes in the Park’ portion of Wilkes-Barre’s Cherry Blossom Festival.


THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE

EVENTS

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THIS WEEK: APRIL 27 T O M AY 3 , 2 0 1 2 AACA Car Cruise, sponsored by the Northeastern Pennsylvania Regional AACA Car Club with food, entertainment, games and prizes. Public Square, WilkesBarre. Tonight at 6 with awards at 9. 309-2367. Paddlemania Fundraiser, with vendors, food, games and more. Sponsored by the Plymouth Public Library at the American Legion, 33 Center Ave., Plymouth. 6 to 9 tonight. $5. 7794775. Bullied, a screening of the documentary followed by a discussion on bullying. Tunkhannock Area High School, 120 W. Tioga St. 7 tonight. Free. 836-8223. Renaissance Jamboree, the annual street fair with craft booths, food, games and entertainment. Main Street, Bloomsburg. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. 784-2522. Money Smart Week @ Your Library, a program with Kara Zoeller of Saving by Design who discusses using coupons and other tips to save money on groceries. Osterhout Free Library, 71 S. Franklin St., WilkesBarre. 10 a.m. Saturday. Free. 823-0156. Holistic and Psychic Fair, with massage therapy, reiki, aura imaging and more. Hilton Garden Inn, 242 Highland Park Blvd., Wilkes-Barre Township. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. $3. Knit and Crochet Group, all ages. Osterhout Free Library, 71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. 10:30 a.m. to noon. Saturday. Free. 823-0156. Spring Festival and Art Walk, with games, rock climbing, dunk tank, moon bounce, international food, tricky trays, crafters, art walk and entertainment by the Tune Bandits, the Emerald Isle Step Dancers and All That Dancin’ along with the MMI Chorus, String Orchestra and Drama Club. MMI Preparatory School, 154 Centre St., Freeland. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. 455-3533.

PAGE 4

Night at the Races, sponsored by the Holy Name Society. Saints Peter and Paul Church, 13 Hudson Road, Plains Township. Saturday with doors at 6 p.m. and post time at 7 p.m. $5 includes buffet. 829-3822. Relay for Life Bingo, with PamSee EVENTS, Page 5

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BEST BET OK, all you dog owners. It’s about time your pet had some time in the limelight. Misericordia University in Dallas will have its 2nd annual M.U.T.T.S. Dog Show on Saturday where some lucky dog will walk away with the honors. Bring your pooch to the outdoor Wells Fargo Amphitheater on campus at 1 p.m. for registration (all dogs will be accepted), followed by the show at 2 p.m. The $10 fee benefits Blue Chip Animal Refuge. Or you can bring an animal-related supply donation and pay $5. 674-6400.

EVENTS

Continued from page 4

pered Chef and Vera Bradley prizes. Presented by the Greater Hazleton Health Alliance at Immaculate conception Parish Hall, Fern and South streets, Freeland. Sunday with doors at noon and games at 1 p.m. $20 advance, $25 at door. 501-4787. Art Auction and Wine Tasting. Mount Airy Casino Resort, 44 Woodland Road, Mount Pocono. 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday. $35 includes an Italian buffet and a $15 casino cash certificate. Sponsored by Northeastern Pennsylvania UNICO chapters. 829-3681 or 708-1994.

Party, sponsored by St. John the Evangelist church. With a light lunch and prizes including cash awards. The former Seton Catholic High School cafeteria, Church Street, Pittston. 2 p.m. Sunday. $5. 654-3936. Evening of Fine Food and Wine, the annual fundraiser with a silent auction and signature dishes from Carmen’s at the Radisson, Fire and Ice on Toby Creek, the Hilton Scranton, Patsel’s and the French Manor including wines and desserts. Scranton Cultural Center, 420 N. Washington Ave., Scranton. 5:30 p.m. Sunday. $85. 344-1111.

Taste of the Parish, with samplings of more than 40 food items along with a themed basket raffle. St. Ignatius Loyola Church, 339 N. Maple Ave., Kingston. 1:15 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. $10, $5 youths. 288-4664.

Mixologists for Miracles, a celebrity-bartender event with Mayor Chris Doherty of Scranton, Bryan Thompson of 105 FM The River, Dave Kuharchick and Monica Madeja of WBRE-TV and more. State Street Grill, 114 S. State St., Clarks Summit. 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Monday. All tips benefit the Children’s Miracle Network. 271-6188.

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Barre. 9:30 a.m. Tuesdays through May 15. 823-0156. One Book Every Young Child, a reading of “Stop Snoring, Bernard!” by Zachariah O’Hora along with activities and crafts. West Pittston Library, 200 Exeter Ave. 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Free. Signup: 654-9847.

THIS WEEK: APRIL 2 7 T O M AY 3 , 2 0 1 2 Salamanders: Fun for Kids, a story and talk on salamanders with Rebecca Lesko of the Endless Mountains Nature Center. Wild Birds Unlimited, Dallas Shopping Center, Route 309, Dallas. 10 a.m. Saturday. Free. 675-9900. Healthy Kids Day at the Y, with information tables, healthy snack-making, gardening, swimming, games, fitness classes, the Wilkes-Barre Fire Department’s Fire Safety Smoke House and more. Wilkes-Barre Family YMCA, 40 W. Northampton St., Wilkes-Barre. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Free. 823-2191. Save Your Pennies. Stop by to make your own piggy bank to help you start saving. Osterhout Free Library, 71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. Saturday from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. or 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. Signup: 823-0156. El Dia de los Ninos, a bilingual storytime with songs, games, crafts and finger-plays in English and Spanish. Osterhout Free Library, 71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. 10:30 a.m. Monday. 823-0156. Early Explorers, museum-based learning in literature, arts and natural sciences for ages 3 to 5. Everhart Museum, 1901 Mulberry St., Nay Aug Park, Scranton. Mondays through Nov. 12 at 1 p.m. Free. 346-7186. Barbie on the Fashion Runway. Bring your favorite Barbie doll

THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE

Bryan Thompson, Laurel Radzieski, Rich Ryczak and Doreen Schottman star in ‘The Mouse’s Marriage.’

BEST BET The Dietrich Theater in Tunkhannock will offer another delightful children’s presentation, ‘The Mouse’s Marriage,’ this weekend. In this Japanese folk tale, a sweet young mouse couple are deeply in love. But the girl’s father insists that she marry only the ‘strongest, smartest, best husband in the world.’ Find out how the clever girl proves she knows the best match of all. Shows are at 10 a.m. today and 11 a.m. Saturday. Free. 9961500.

for a fashion show along with crafts, raffles and refreshments. Hoyt Library, 284 Wyoming Ave., Kingston. 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. Monday. For kindergarten to sixth grade. 287-2013. Books and Babies, story time for ages 1 to 3. Osterhout Free Library, 71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-

Stop Snoring Bernard, a reading of the book by Zachariah O’Hora along with games, crafts and fun activities. Osterhout Free Library, 71 S. Franklin St., WilkesBarre. 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. 823-0156.

FUTURE Father/Daughter Weekend, with campfires, an ice cream social, fishing, canoeing, arts and crafts, archery, hiking, rock climbing, high ropes and zipline. YMCA Camp Kresge, 382 Camp Kresge Lane, White Haven. May 4-6 or 11-13. Check in 5 p.m. Friday and check out 11 a.m. Sunday. $185 per parent/child includes cabin accommodations and all meals. 823-2191 or campkresge.com. Lights, Camera, Legos! A Lego competition for ages 5 to 14 with teams vying to complete a building task and a Lego Stop Action Film. No knowledge of filmmaking required. Moose Exchange, 203 W. Main St., Bloomsburg. 6 to 9 p.m. May 4. Register online at boxoflight.org. $15 per team of two to three members. 764-2388. Free Children’s Movie, a screening of “The Jungle Book” with free popcorn and soda. Dietrich Theater, 60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. 11 a.m. May 5. 9961500.

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THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE

OUTDOORS THIS WEEK: APRIL 27 T O M AY 3 , 2 0 1 2 Bird Watching Walk. Bring binoculars and a field guide. Endless Mountains Nature Center, 1309 Vosburg Road, Tunkhannock. 8 to 11 a.m. today. Free. 836-3835. Do It for the Kids, the 20th annual Walk-a-Thon sponsored by the Wyoming Valley Children’s Association, 1133 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort. Saturday with registration at 9 a.m., Walk-a-Thon at 10 a.m. and awards and post-walk celebration at 10:45 a.m. With games, food and music. 714-1246. Spring into Action Park Cleanup. Nescopeck State Park, 1137 Honey Hole Road, Drums. 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. Signup: 4032006.

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343-5144. State Gamelands 57 Hike, nine moderate miles with the Susquehanna Trailers Hiking Club. Meet at the First National Bank, Routes 118 and 29, Pikes Creek. 10:45 a.m. Sunday. Free. 477-

2210. Moonlight Walk and Run, to benefit the Children’s Advocacy Center of Northeastern PennSee OUTDOORS, Page 7

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THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE

By MARY THERESE BIEBEL mbiebel@timesleader.com

W

ith hearty shouts of “Woo!” “Yeah!” and “All right!” three endurance athletes set off running on the Boulder Field Trail. Fresh from splashing through a stream at Hickory Run State Park near White Haven, they’d just heard how the Boulder Field Trail becomes steadily rockier, and they were excited about tackling that next. “Bring it!” Shan Egan Evans, 42, shouted as he and his teammates Michele Dougherty, 41, and Kate Solomon, 40, dashed up an incline and out of sight. “It was great,” Dougherty reported after the excursion, explaining the trio did not abandon their exercise that Wednesday despite a sudden April sleet. Why do these athletes push themselves so hard? Ha! Because a morning run over rocks and through sleet is a gentle stroll compared with the Tough Mudder, an 11mile obstacle event set for tomorrow and Sunday at Pocono Manor, near Mount Pocono. Among the obstacles Evans, Solomon, Dougherty and the rest of their 12-member team will face there are the “Spider Web,” in which they’ll climb over two cargo nets; the “Creek Crusade,” in which they’ll slosh through waist-high sludge; and the “Log Bog Jog,” in which they’ll climb over or crawl under fallen logs in a swampy area. Dougherty, a veteran of two previous Tough Mudders, dreads jumping from a 15foot platform and swimming through an icy pond for “Walk the Plank.” But, she said, taking part in a “Tough Mudder” is all about working through fears. It’s also about teamwork and camaraderie, said Evans, a professional musician – and son, incidentally, of the famous ’60s rock-’n’-roll singer Chubby Checker and his

OUTDOORS Continued from page 6

sylvania. With children’s activities, educational tables and DJ music. Nay Aug Park, Scranton. Sunday with a Family Festival at 3 p.m., Kids Fun Run at 5 p.m., 5K and 10K Walk at 5:30 p.m. and 5K and 10K Run at 6 p.m. with Awards Ceremony at 7:15 p.m. Register at active.com. 969-7313. Waterfall Hike, a 1.5-hour hike on fairly level terrain, sponsored by the Pocono Avian Research Center. Meet at the CVS Pharmacy, 958 Route 390, Cresco. 7 p.m. Sunday. $10. 595-8620.

wife, Dutch beauty queen Catharina Lod- many cities around the world – or the “Dirty ders. Evans has made a hobby out of train- Girl Mud Run,” an all-female event set for ing for such events. May 5 in Scranton. He co-leads a team whose members hail But Tough Mudder participants – includmostly from Southeastern Pennsylvania, ing Dougherty, who works in the insurance and he says he’s not a really fast runner. But industry, and Solomon, who is a flight atas one of the stronger people, he can boost tendant – like to believe they’re in “the other teammates over toughest event on the walls. planet.” “I’ll be that anchor IF YOU GO “There’s a spot a few guy,” he said. “That What: Tough Mudder miles into the Mud means I’m usually the When: Saturday and Sunday; waves Run,” Evans said, last one over.” “where a sign says ‘If start about 8 a.m. The Tough Mudder Where: Pocono Manor, but all parking you were on a Warrior website explains the enDash, you’d be finished is at Pocono Raceway, 1234 Long durance events are the now.’ ” Pond Road, Long Pond brainchild of Will Dean, Spectator tickets: $40 at the event Fees range from $90 a former counterterror- More info: toughmudder.com to $200 for participants ism agent for the British and $20 to $40 for specgovernment. They’re tators, depending how held in several countries and, the website re- soon you sign up. Several hundred athletes ports, have raised $2 million to support the expect to take part this weekend, and more Wounded Warrior Project. will attend a second event May 12-13. You might compare a Tough Mudder to A Tough Mudder isn’t a race, Evans exthe “Warrior Dash” – an event also held in plained, but a mental and physical chal-

na Environmental Institute, 10 Moffat Drive, Covington Township. 6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. $5. Signup: 842-1506. Tannersville Bog Walks, 2.5-hour guided walks through the northern boreal bog. Meet at the Monroe County Environmental Education Center, 8050 Running Valley Road, Stroudsburg. 1 p.m. Wednesdays through June 6. $5. Reservations: 629-3061. Bird Identification for Beginners, a presentation on size and shape, habitat, color and patterns, and behavior. Tunkhannock Public Library, 220 W. Tioga St. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday. Free. 836-3835. Keystone Active Zone Passport, a free program that encourages

people to get outside and active at more than 30 local parks, trails and events in Luzerne County. Earn awards and prizes by exploring the county and logging your discoveries through Sept. 30. Join anytime by registering at KAZpassport.com or call 823-2191.

FUTURE Spring Bird Walk, a trek through the 400-acre preserve to spot spring migrants. Meet in the parking lot at the Florence Shelly Wetlands Preserve, Route 171 and Stack Road, Thompson. 6 a.m. May 5. 879-4244. Birding at Frances Slocum State Park, a leisurely walk to seek out songbirds. Meet in the parking lot of the Environmental Educa-

Michele Dougherty, Shan Egan Evans and Kate Solomon make their way down steep, rocky terrain.

lenge that promotes working together to solve problems. “Michele (Dougherty) is a perfect example,” Evans said, explaining she was worried she’d feel claustrophobic in a narrow tunnel. He went first and told her to follow. “I talked her in. I said, ‘Don’t look at anything but my shoes.’ She made it through because I led the way.” As the team overcomes such obstacles as running past burning hay bales, perhaps with shirts over their faces to cut down on the smoke inhalation, a sense of “pure exhilaration” kicks in, Evans said. “We can do this now,” Solomon said. “We are healthy and injury-free. We might not always be able to do this, but since we can, we do, and it makes us feel alive.”

tion Center and boat rental, 565 Mount Olivet Road, Kingston Township. 8:30 a.m. May 5. Free. 675-9900. Salt Springs Roadside Cleanup. All supplies provided. Salt Springs State Park, Silver Creek Road, off Route 29, Franklin Forks. 9 a.m. May 5. 967-7275. Walk to Cure Diabetes, a 3.5-mile trail walk. Meet at the Pump ’n’ Pantry in Montrose. May 5 with registration at 9:30 a.m. and walk at 10 a.m. 289-4062 or walktocurejuvenilediabetes.org. Plant Swap. Bring native plants, vegetable seedlings or indoor plants to trade. Nescopeck State Park, 1137 Honey Hole Road, Drums. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 5. 403-2006.

Memorial Pet Walk, with a balloon release, Chinese auction, basket raffle, psychic readings, flea market, vendors, pets for adoption and food booths. Nay Aug Park, Scranton. May 5 with registration at noon. 457-1625. Astronomy Day. Observe the heavens with the Lackawanna Astronomical Society. Telescope setups at the Thomas G. Cupillari Observatory, Route 107 and Hack Road, Fleetville. 7 p.m. May 5. Free. 586-0789. Spencer Martin Memorial Bike Ride, a 30-mile ride through the Back Mountain to raise money for Habitat for Humanity. May 6. Register at 7 a.m. and ride at 8 a.m. Begins at Penn State Wilkes-Barre, off Old Route 115, Lehman Township. 820-8002.

PAGE 7

Fungus, Moss and Lichens Walk, an identification walk with naturalist Deanna Lickey. Lackawan-

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

Michele Dougherty, Kate Solomon and Shan Egan Evans run through a creek in Hickory Run State Park as part of their training for the Tough Mudder.


THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE

EXHIBITS

Fridays. 842-1506.

THIS WEEK: APRIL 27 T O M AY 3 , 2 0 1 2 Planted on Paper, botanical illustrations by Sue Hand. Opens tonight with a reception 4 to 6 and an Artist’s Talk at 5. Through July 30 at the Wyoming County Courthouse Art Gallery, 1 Courthouse Square, Tunkhannock. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. 675-5094. The Titanic Memorabilia Exhibit: plates, photocopies of 1912 newspapers, blueprints, books, games and more plus paintings by Ali Woods Wilson and Ben Jackson. Through Monday with reception 5 to 8 tonight. Dietrich Theater, 60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. Open during movies. 996-1500. Ike Design Group, rustic and imag-

‘The Storm,’ a photograph by Jessica Krzywicki, is among the works at the 24th annual King’s College Student Exhibition through May 4 at the Widmann Gallery in Wilkes-Barre. inative handcrafted works, including lighting, furniture and home accessories using reclaimed barn wood, tin, pallet wood and more. Opens tonight with a reception 5 to 7. Through June 7 at the Lackawanna Environmental Institute, 10 Moffat Drive, Covington Township. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays through

Meeting of the Art Waters, an exhibit of photographs by a group of New York City artists. Opens Saturday with a reception 4 to 8 p.m. Through June 30 at the T.W. Shoemaker Art Gallery, 312 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming. Hours by appointment. meetingoftheartwaters.com.

CLOSING SOON Senior Exhibition, by Keystone College art students. Through Saturday at Artists for Art Gallery, 514 Lackawanna Ave., and Artworks Gallery, 503 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. 969-1040.

Main St., Wilkes-Barre. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 823-0518. Retrospective Exhibit, by noted ceramist William Tersteeg and 20 of his former students. Through Sunday at the Linder Gallery, Keystone College, La

Plume. 945-8335. Essence of Form, recent paintings by Nina Davidowitz plus clay and wood works by Skip Sensbach. Through Sunday at the Pauly See EXHIBITS, Page 9

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EXHIBITS Continued from page 8

Friedman Art Gallery, Misericordia University, 301 Lake St., Dallas. Also: “Leigh Pawling: Botanical Impressions – An Installation of Contrasting Images” in the adjacent MacDonald Gallery. 674-6250. Thursday Morning Painters, group exhibit including graphite

renderings of local churches, miniature paintings, watercolor landscapes and florals. Through Monday at Citizens Bank, Wyoming Avenue and Welles Street, Forty Fort. 288-7538. New Season – New Works, a group show by apprentices and alumni of the Ani Art Academies Waichulis. Through Monday at Mainstreet Galleries, 370 Pierce St., Kingston. 287-5589.

various media by Marywood University students. Through Tuesday at Marquis Art Gallery, 515 Center St., Scranton. 3443313. Student Exhibition, in drawing,

sculpture and mass communications. Through May 4. Widmann Gallery, King’s College, Wilkes-Barre. 208-5900, ext. 5328. The Visiting Nurse Association of

The Joan Harris Centre Proudly Presents

Corciev

Student Invitational Exhibit,

BEST BET The Speech-Language and Hearing Center at Misericordia University in Dallas invites all to view the colorful and inventive works in ‘Exceptional Art – Exceptional Artists,’ an exhibit by the students from the Verve Vertu Art Center of the Deutsch Institute. These individ‘Inspired Dreams’ uals with disabilities are displaying their creby Patty Spellman. ations at a special reception from 5 to 8 p.m. Thursday. Stop buy and share some wine, cheese and fine food, meet the artists and tour the cutting-edge clinical facility on the second floor of the College of Health Sciences Building. 674-8255.

Scranton: One Hundred Years, chronicling the work of the Lackawanna County organization. Through May 4 at the Hope Horn Gallery, Hyland Hall, University of Scranton. 941-4214.

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THE GUIDE Restaurant Review

Uptown II tantalizes tastebuds P

erhaps our favorite thing about the reincarnation of the circa-1970s to 1990s Uptown as Uptown II is it seems like such a perfect middle ground in a perfect location almost in the heart of downtown Wilkes-Barre. By middle ground, we mean, yes, it is a bar – or rather has a bar, a large, inviting, square one – and, yes, there is often live entertainment, but, no, you won’t have to shout across the table if you expect your friends or your date to hear what’s on your mind. And while on the weekends you’ll likely find a pretty good crowd, you won’t be standing wall to wall and waiting 20 minutes for a drink. Pardon the Goldilocks sneaking in here, but Uptown II offers a social setting that’s just right, especially for men and women of a certain age, but we won’t dare say what that age is. (The kids might get jealous or suspicious, after all, and we’re not advocating for a change in atmosphere, physical or otherwise. We also love the white lights and the little patio that adds just enough sparkle to River Street in the evening.) The newest news at Uptown II these days is a fairly new chef, one Jeff Piazza, formerly of Gelpiaz in Kingston. He has some specialties, from what we can see, and they lean Italian, though chicken, two filet dishes and seafood occupy plenty

IF YOU GO

What: Uptown II Where: 216 North River St., Courthouse Square Towers, WilkesBarre Call: 570-208-2899 Credit cards? Yes Wheelchair accessible? Yes On the Web: www.uptown2.com

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Uptown II, inside Courthouse Square Towers in Wilkes-Barre, offers an attractive outdoor seating area, complete with white bulbs to light the night.

of menu real estate. It so happened that we happened in on “Pasta Night,” where any noodle dish went for a reasonable $9.95. We took advantage of that special and took care to try a house special as well but not before checking out some tempting appetizers, of course. Steamed clams ($7/dozen) were not necessarily remarkable, but they were a perfect size and tender, too. They arrived hot, and the butter was drawn, which is key. Meatballs a la Ricotta ($7 for two of the homemade variety, but

we received three – yay us) were something special. The meatballs themselves were monstrous and flavorful, the red sauce had personality aplenty, and the sweet, grainy Ricotta melted over the entire dish almost like a second sauce. A definite orderagain. Salads also were special, even the basic tossed, with a shout-out going to homemade honey balsamic dressing and a nice mixture of fresh field greens. After fretting over whether to order Veal Sorrentino, tempting

Cheers!

Crisp cider is best on the rocks

PAGE 10

By SARA POKORNY spokorny@timesleader.com

Cider is a refreshing drink for fall, often associated with hayrides and changing leaves, but throw a little alcohol in the mix and you have a new libation entirely, one enjoyable year-round. Hard cider has gained popularity in the States over the years but has always been a tradition in Ireland and the United Kingdom. Now Beer Boys in Wilkes-Barre is serving Magners Irish Cider, the only Irish cider in the United States. The use of cider dates to the

14th century, when children were baptized in it, given it was deemed cleaner than water. Cider was used as a form of payment to farmers in the 18th century and was once said to be the cure for upset stomach, rheumatic disease and various other ailments. Though Magners serves none of these purposes today, it provides a crisp drink made using methods originating in 1935,

when production began in Ireland. The brewery uses 17 varieties of apples and lets the cider ferment in oak vats for up to two years to ensure a quality taste. The cider tastes dry but redapple sweet, carbonation is light, and, its creator says, it’s best sipped over ice. ••• MAGNERS IRISH CIDER Served by: Beer Boys, 176 N. Washington St., Wilkes-Barre Price: $4 Type: Cider Alcohol by volume: 4.5 percent

as it was with its requisite eggplant plus prosciutto, fresh mozzarella and pomodoro sauce, or a more standard steak, my guest settled instead on a nightly special that tweaked a chef specialty, which is Chicken Champagne: breast of chicken sauteed with jumbo lump crab meat, tomato, spinach and a Champagne and cream sauce. He got all of this but subbed veal for the chicken and was so content he momentarily didn’t even realize he was eating veal. The king crab meat was so large, the first impression was that this was a seafood dish. When he did hit veal, however, he found the portion more than generous and pounded to thin tenderness, enough to satisfy and then some. Steamed broccoli and dressed-up mashed potatoes accompanied, with neither receiving complaints. I chose the pasta route after hearing the homemade vodka sauce was quite the crowd-pleaser. Over a hearty portion of homemade cheese ravioli, it more than held its own, only missing the ex-

EVENTS Continued from page 5

Earth Week Lecture, with William Brady, president and CEO of Mascoma Corporation, a renewable fuels company in Massachusetts. DeNaples Campus Center, 900 Mulberry St., University of Scranton. 6 p.m. Monday. Free. 941-7520.

cellence mark because it was served lukewarm. Still, I appreciated the texture especially, neither chunky nor smooth but happily in-between. One dessert seemed enough, so a blueberry-banana cheesecake it was. My guest noted it had a heavier texture than he preferred and didn’t have an ultrafresh taste. He also deemed it a bit dry and clumpy but nonetheless devoured it. The crumb or two left on the plate indicated obvious forgiveness. You know what that means, right? A second visit is surely in order. Service was professional and pleasant, our server was patient and conversational, and the small crowd on a weeknight seemed content, possibly representing the regulars who know all the secrets. In retrospect, we should have asked them about the bar menu, which we bypassed but with regrets. It’s a good one, boasting homemade mozzarella sticks, hand-cut fries with bacon and cheese, homemade potato pancakes, Angus burgers (full size and slider), wings, bites and cheesesteaks, and even edamame with sea salt, a pleasantly healthy little offset to all those guilty pleasures that seem to come with special twists. Can you think of a better reason to return? Times Leader food critics remain anonymous.

Thursday from the Dietrich Theater, 60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. $110 includes all but the dinner. Reservations: 996-1500. Renaissance Faire, with carnival booths, Renaissance costumes, music and dance. Monarch Court, King’s College Campus, Wilkes-Barre. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday. 208-5957.

Just for the Record. Bring your vinyl records to share and discuss. Osterhout Free Library, 71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. 6 p.m. Monday. 823-0156.

Education for Justice Film, a screening of “Inside Islam: What a Billion Muslims Really Think,” followed by a discussion. Brennan Hall, University of Scranton. 7 p.m. Thursday. Free. 941-4051.

Philadelphia Art and History Trip, a day trip to the Philadelphia Museum of Art for an audio tour of “Van Gogh Up Close,” a 1.25mile walk around the historic section and dinner at the 1773 City Tavern. Departs 8 a.m.

Cinco de Mayo Celebration, with free food samples, music, entertainment and customs unique to Mexico. Luzerne County Community College’s Hazleton Center, 100 W. Broad St. 2 to 4 p.m. Thursday. Free. 740-0753.


READS

BUYS

THIS WEEK: A P R I L 2 7 T O M AY 3, 2012

THIS WEEK: APRIL 27 T O M AY 3 , 2 0 1 2

Book Sale, at the newly opened Used Book Store, next door to the Wyoming Free Library, 358 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. 6931364. Women Writers, a discussion of favorite female authors. Osterhout Free Library, 71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. Free. Registration: 821-1959. Reading, by poet and writer Joelle Biele (“White Summer”). McDade Center for the Performing Arts, Monroe Avenue, University of Scranton. 8 p.m. Wednesday. Free. 941-7619.

Huntsville Road, Shavertown. 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. $10 per space. 477-3748.

Spring Rummage Sale. Dallas United Methodist Church, 4 Parsonage St. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. today; 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. 675-7525. Annual Flea Market. Trucksville United Methodist Church, 40 Knob Hill Road. 5:30 to 8:30 tonight; 8 a.m. to noon Saturday. 696-3897. Flea Market, with antique-car show. Franklin Township Volunteer Fire Company, 329 Orange Road, Dallas. Saturday with flea market at 7 a.m. and car show 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. $10 per vehicle registration. 333-0557 or 690-3985. Community Yard Sale. Huntsville United Methodist Church, 2355

Attic Treasures Sale. St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, 418 Berwick St., White Haven. 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. 443-9424.

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See BUYS, Page 21

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THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE STILL SHOWING 21 JUMP STREET — Rowdy, raunchy big-screen update of the TV show. R for sexual content, language, drugs, teen drinking and violence. 109 mins. ★★ 1/2 AMERICAN REUNION – Meet the horny kids from “American Pie” 13 years later. R for crude/sexual content, nudity, language, brief drug use, teen drinking. 105 mins. ★ 1/2 THE CABIN IN THE WOODS — A daring thriller about five friends away for a weekend. R for bloody horror, violence and gore, language, drugs and sexuality/nudity. 95 mins. ★★★ 1/2 CHIMPANZEE – Our primate relatives grapple with dominance, family organization, competition and altruism. Just like us. G. 78 mins. ★★★ DR. SEUSS’ THE LORAX – Charming 3-D rendering of enviro-activism. PG for mild language. 86 mins. ★★★ 1/2 THE HUNGER GAMES An earnest, plodding thumbsucker based on Suzanne Collins’ sci-fi novel. PG-13 for violence, gore, adult themes. 142 mins. ★★ LOCKOUT — A circa-2079 hulking, orbiting jail puts its prisoners in “stasis,” or a deep sleep. PG-13 for intense violence/action and language, including sexual references. 95 mins. ★★ MIRROR MIRROR — Julia Roberts stars in her first truly

villainous role as the evil Queen. PG for fantasy action and mild rude humor. 106 mins. ★★ THE LUCKY ONE – A stoic, sensitive man falls for a beautiful but wounded woman. Based on one of Nicholas Sparks’ overripe romance novels. PG-13 for sexual content, violence. 101 mins. ★★ THE THREE STOOGES — A little nyuk-nyuk-nyuk goes a long way in Peter and Bobby Farrelly’s homage to the slapstick trio. PG for slapstick action violence and rude and suggestive humor, including language. 91 mins. ★★ THINK LIKE A MAN – Steve Harvey’s best-seller “Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Man” serves as the launching pad for four intertwined couples stories. PG-13 for sexuality, crude humor and brief drug use. 122 mins. ★★ 1/2 TITANIC IN 3-D — The romantic first half of this blockbuster film remains more emotionally compelling, while the disastrous second half has become even more visually dazzling. PG-13 for disaster peril and violence, nudity, sensuality and brief language. 195 mins. ★★★ WRATH OF THE TITANS — Ralph Fiennes and Liam Neeson bound around together as brothers, the gods Hades and Zeus. PG-13 for intense fantasy violence and action. 99 mins. ★★

PAGE 12

‘Raven’ a witty thrill By ROGER MOORE McClatchy-Tribune News Service

IF YOU GO

The image of Edgar Allan Poe passed down to us is that of a dour, pale and morbid drunkard, a poet haunted by lovers who died in his arms. But he also was a playful wordsmith, an eviscerating critic. That’s the Poe of “The Raven,” a fanciful, witty and suspenseful revision of his last days that is more entertaining than it has any right to be. John Cusack gives America’s first great suffering artist an intellectual’s goatee, a cape and swagger. He may be broke, but he is famous, he insists. He has invented detective fiction and the suspense thriller. Stories such as “The Pit and the Pendulum,” “The Cask of Amontillado” and “The Tell-tale Heart” have ensured his legend, and that poem about the black bird comes to mind every time we see such birds in the dingy skies above 1840s Baltimore (actually, Budapest and Belgrade). Then people start dying. A

What: “The Raven” ★★★ Starring: John Cusack, Alice Eve, Brendan Gleeson, Luke Evans Directed by: James McTeigue Running time: 111 mins. Rated: R for bloody violence and grisly images

pit-and-pendulum murder here, a victim possibly walled up in a sewer there. Somebody is imitating the deaths in Poe’s fiction, and Detective Fields is “in dire need of your un-wholesome expertise.” Not that Poe can be of much help. Until the killer ups the ante and Poe is trapped in a ticking-clock thriller of his own invention. Cusack, in the most dashing role of his career, is a delight, manic one moment, overwhelmed by regret in the next. Dread and foreboding hang over the film, and the script is fun, especially for Poe fans, who might be tempted to cast a jaundiced eye on this endeavor.

‘Pirates’ has some swag By ROGER MOORE McClatchy-Tribune News Service

There’s an inviolable law of animated films: The more “names” you have in the voice cast, the weaker you know your film is. A pirate picture too late to the party to have much in the way of fresh gags, “The Pirates! Band of Misfits” is stuffed with name voice actors, from Hugh Grant to Salma Hayek. All of them sat in a recording booth and struggled to find funny things to say or funny ways to say not-so-funny things. Amusing in small doses, “Pirates” is the first film from Aardman to suffer a serious shortage of sight gags, the first where the whimsy feels forced. Hugh Grant’s Pirate Captain (that’s his name) is all stutter and “glittering eyes and glorious beard.” As a pirate, he’s something

IF YOU GO

What: “The Pirates! Band Of Misfits” ★★ 1/2 Starring: The voices of Hugh Grant, Salma Hayek, Jeremy Piven, Martin Freeman, Anton Yelchin and Brendan Gleeson Directed by: Peter Lord and Jeff Newitt Running time: 88 minutes Rated: PG for mild action, rude humor and some language

of a bust, even though his crew adores him. He figures he’s due for the “Pirate of the Year” award, but he’s always come up short in booty and pillaging. Then, in 1837, he captures Charles Darwin (David Tennant), a scientist who craves fame as much as The Pirate Captain. And Darwin recognizes the Captain’s pet “parrot,” Polly, as something altogether more amazing: the last Dodo bird.

He talks The Pirate Captain into sailing to Britain, under the nose of pirate-hating Queen Victoria (Imelda Staunton), where Darwin hopes to present the bird to The Royal Society, whose entryway is marked “Playing God since 1807.” So you have pirates roughly 120 years after their heyday and a scheming Darwin paired with his evolved chimp pal, a “Man Pan Zee,” he calls him. You have other See PIRATES, Page 15

Action movie plays it ‘Safe’ By ROGER MOORE McClatchy-Tribune News Service

IF YOU GO

A slow-building, B-movie thriller, “Safe” is nothing new for Jason Statham. A girl needs his protection from assorted gangs of bad men, and the dialogue crackles with flinty one-liners. “Don’t lose sleep. He had it coming,” he tells bystanders after killing a boatload of bad guys. His bald skull and perma-stubbled face lean into the camera, bristling at the bit, ready to get on with the serious citywide buttwhipping he’s about to lay on the Russian and Chinese mobs and New York cops on the take. We meet Mei (Catherine Chan), who is in a Russian mobster’s office. He wants something from this 11-year-old. A number.

What: “Safe” ★★ 1/2 Starring: Jason Statham, Catherine Chang, Robert John Burke, James Hong Directed by: Boaz Yakin Running time: 94 minutes Rated: R for strong violence, language

NEW

ON

DVD

DVD releases that sing big, walk tall and go deep hit stores this week: ••• “CAMELOT,” GRADE A: The 45th anniversary of the film version of the Tony Award-winning stage production from Lerner and Loewe is being marked with the release of a special Blu-ray that includes 36 pages of photos, trivia and more. The wonderful musical, directed by Joshua Logan, based on T.H. White’s “The Once and Future King,” looks at the lives

He says he’ll subject her to “one of those tortures you people are so famous for.” Nobody in “Safe” is politically correct. And nobody thinks anything of menacing a little girl. Flash back to a year before, when Mei was in a Chinese school correcting her teacher’s math. A Chinese mobster (James Hong, reliably evil) needs her as and loves of those during the reign of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table. It’s a tale of honor, betrayal and duty. “THE WALKING TALL TRILOGY,” GRADE B-MINUS: The new Blu-ray set includes “Walking Tall,” “Walking Tall Part 2” and “Final Chapter: Walking Tall.” They all tell the story of Tennessee sheriff Buford Pusser (Joe Don Baker), who not only walked tall but carried a big stick. He survived several assassination attempts to dish out a brutal justice to clean up his town. ••• Also new on DVD this week:

his courier. Writer-director Boaz Yakin keeps us off balance, spending much of the film’s first half hour following Mei, winning sympathy for her plight. Shipped to America, in the care of a murderous adoptive dad (Reggie Lee), she’s had to learn “business” the hard way — witnessing torture, murder and corruption. Then, there’s mixed-martialarts cage fighter Luke (Statham), a man who has just crippled an opponent in a fight Luke was supposed to throw. The Russian gamblers plan elaborate punishment. They kill his pregnant wife and turn him loose, promising to murder anyone he gets See SAFE, Page 15

“Titanic”: British miniseries starring Toby Jones offers multiple looks at the historic sinking. “The Innkeepers”: Two employees look into the haunted past of the hotel where they work. Sara Paxton stars. “Young Goethe in Love”: German poet Johann Wolfgang Goethe finds his inspiration. “Contraband” A man (Mark Wahlberg) must return to the life he left to protect his family. “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy”: Alec Guinness stars in John le Carre’s classic Cold War spy drama.

-- McClatchy-Tribune Information Services


THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE

By CHRISTY LEMIRE AP Movie Critic

T

he documentary “Bully” is essential to see, whether you’re a parent or a kid, whether you’ve been on the giving or receiving end of cruelty. But it’s also frustrating to watch, because while the stories included here are undeniably moving, they’re not exactly told in the most artful way.

One bland dramedy By ROGER MOORE McClatchy-Tribune News Service

IF YOU GO What: “The Five-Year Engagement” ★ 1/2 Starring: Jason Segel, Emily Blunt, Chris Pratt, Jacki Weaver, David Paymer Directed by: Nicholas Stoller Running time: 124 minutes Rated: R for sexual content, language throughout

feeling. Emily Blunt and Segel are Violet and Tom, young lovers in San Francisco planning a wedding. Until she gets a fellowship to study and work at the University of Michigan, in that “Water Winter Wonderland” better suited for wolverines than big-city folk. He gives up his job as sous chef at a trendy restaurant, and the wedding, a big wedding, is postponed. He’s resigned to it and supportive. She’s distracted, even after the pep talk with her ditzy sister (Alison Brie, a stitch). Much of the comedy here is

built around the funk that Tom goes through far away from his dream life in his dream city and his dream job. He gets a little too into hunting, becomes a little too fond of dining on deer and dons Ted Nugent facial hair. His first faculty cocktail party in Ann Arbor tells him all he needs to know. He mentions he’s a chef, and all anybody can think of to ask is if he saw the Pixar cartoon “Ratatouille.” Violet is spending too much time at the office, running psychological experiments with her “bad decisions” specialist mentor (Rhys Ifans, funny enough) and judging Tom by what she’s learning. And the wedding plans keep tumbling backward. Any chef knows that the more you add to the soup, the more watered down you make it. Whatever spicy moments it manages, “The Five-Year Engagement” is still just broth — weak broth — in the end.

IF YOU GO What: “Bully” ★★ 1/2 Directed by: Lee Hirsch Running time: 94 minutes Rated: Not rated but contains some violence and disturbing situations involving kids and teens and some language AP PHOTO

Alex Libby

PAGE 13

The Five-Year Engagement” plays like a five-episode, R-rated story arc from “How I Met Your Mother.” With more profanity and more explicit sex. And considerably less drinking. And no Neil Patrick Harris. Jason Segel, co-star of both the TV show and the movie, and his “Forgetting Sarah Marshall” team, feed us two hours-plus of recycled gags from the show (e.g. Segel’s “Big Foot” impersonation) and bits that might have been in the sitcom but were too expensive for it. They layer the soundtrack with music by Van Morrison, whose love songs are used so often in the movies that they’re collected on a CD, “Van Morrison Goes to the Movies” (which apparently Segel, co-writer and director Nicholas Stoller and I all own). All that adds up to is an occasionally engaging romantic dramedy that never blows away that “Where have I seen this before?”

Director Lee Hirsch’s film grows repetitive and seems longer than its relatively brief running time. It bounces with no rhyme or reason between a handful of students across the country who’ve suffered from bullying. Still, if “Bully” does nothing more than provide the impetus for a dialogue, it succeeds. Hirsch spent a year with about a half-dozen families with children who’ve been bullied at school — teased, abused, humiliated and ostracized — behavior adults too often sweep aside with the cliche that kids will be kids. Among them are David and Tina Long of Murray County, Ga., whose17-year-old son, Tyler, hanged himself. Tina bravely shows the closet where the family found him, in his bedroom since turned into an office, and the death has turned the Longs’ quiet suburban life into a crusade for awareness. Among the movie’s other stories is 12-year-old Alex, a scrawny kid from Sioux City, Iowa. His parents acknowledge he’s a bit weird, but as his mom points out, he’d be the most devoted friend to anyone who would accept him. Hirsch’s camera captures Alex’s grueling daily school-bus ride as big, mean kids use him as their punching bag. In conservative Tuttle, Okla., 16-year-old Kelby has been shunned since she came out as a lesbian, as have her parents. She finds a small circle of friends who accept her as she is, including a girlfriend, but she feels discouraged when she can’t open up more minds and hearts. Her parents’ evolution is inspiring. These are just some of the stories Hirsch shares in “Bully.” Any one of them might have served as its own complete film. This is especially true of a tale that comes toward the end: that of Kirk and Laura Smalley, whose 11-year-old son, Ty, took his own life because of bullying. These are admittedly simple, small-town folks, with longtime family roots in the area who are forced to re-examine everything that defines them in a teary haze. Kirk’s honesty and purity of emotion are haunting, and our time with this family is tantalizingly brief.


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C O N C E RT S

student art exhibit at 6 p.m. and concert at 7 p.m. $5, $3 students and seniors. 829-2424.

THIS WEEK: APRIL 27 T O M AY 3 , 2 0 1 2 The Jacobs Brothers, the gospelmusic trio. Noxen Bible Baptist Church, 3604 Route 29, Noxen. 7 tonight. Donation. 298-2030.

Fun with Harmony, the 34th annual concert by the Endless

Mountains Barbershop Chorus. With guest quartet Anything Goes and jazz pianist Rick Pedro. Tunkhannock Area High School, 120 W. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. 7 p.m. Saturday. $9 advance, $12 at

the door. 335-3379. Cantores Christi Regis, a choral concert of classical, contempoSee CONCERTS, Page 21

Members of the King’s College choral group Cantores Christi Regis rehearse for the spring concert set for tomorrow at the Campus Ministry Center in Wilkes-Barre.

B.L.E.S.T., a Christian-music concert. Voice of Hope Christian Coffeehouse, St. John’s Evangelical Lutheran Church, 231 State St., Nanticoke. 7 to 9 tonight. Free. 735-1760. Bob Weir, the former Grateful Dead musician in an intimate solo acoustic show. F.M. Kirby Center, Wilkes-Barre. 8 tonight. $49.50, $34.50. 826-1100.

Start Making Sense, a seven-piece Talking Heads tribute band. Mauch Chunk Opera House, 14 W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe. 8 tonight. $18. 325-0249.

Aaron Tippin, the baritone-voiced country-music singer (“You’ve Got to Stand for Something”). Penn’s Peak, 325 Maury Road, Jim Thorpe. 8 tonight. $30, $25. 866-605-7325.

Choral Concert, a student performance of sacred, American folk, ethnic, patriotic, Broadway and pop selections. Holy Redeemer High School, 159 S. Pennsylvania Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Saturday and Sunday with a

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Notes on Music

Top 40 gets touch of metal

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Lipstyk picks up the beat with eclectic members

By SARA POKORNY spokorny@timesleader.com

D

irty, sexy rock-’n’-roll. Local cover band Lipstyk delivers this and more as it lends its own hard-edged sound to classic and Top 40 tunes. “We take everything and make it a little heavier,” vocalist and keyboard player Kate Mangan, 30, of Exeter said. “We do it just so that it’s still accessible yet has a nice, unique vibe to it.” Mangan is joined by bassist and vocalist Tony Garuba, 53, of Pittston, drummer Chris Bubblo, 39, of Harding and Eric Fusco, 26, of Exeter, who tackles the guitar. The band has more than 100 years’ combined experience. Garuba, spot-on in his AC/DC and Ozzy Osbourne renditions, played in bands such as Onyx and Bare Knuckle and was always into heavy metal. Bubblo’s passion for hard rock and his ability to produce driving beats adds an edge, as does Fusco’s guitar versatility. The band covers all sorts of songs, from The Beatles’ “Come Together” and Jefferson Airplane’s “White Rabbit” to Out-

IF YOU GO What: Lipstyk When: 6 to 9 tonight Where: Naked Grape, 15 N. River St., Plains Township SUBMITTED PHOTO

field’s ’80s hit “Your Love” and the grunge sounds of Nirvana. Mangan, with a musical-theater background, tends to look at herself as the odd woman out. “I trained classically both vocally and on piano, so moving into rock was a big stretch for me, but I love it,” she said. Mangan said she has become accustomed to “angry chick rock” and is partial to Alanis Morissette and Adele. Lipstyk has been on the scene for a year now and finds itself with a loyal fan following. “We try to rotate as many songs as possible but always stick to the favorites that people want to hear,” Mangan said. “We’ve come to find that people are looking for that Lady Gaga or that Adele with the harder edge.” Lipstyk strips off its edge, though, when it cuts down to

SUBMITTED PHOTO

The Temptations are one of five headlining acts so far for the summer concert season at the Mountain Laurel Pocono Mountains Performing Arts Center.

three members for an acoustic set. “Things are so pure,” Mangan said. “You can hear every single note, every single tone and how our voices blend. I think our acoustic is as good or even better as the hard-rocking set.” All the members have full-time jobs and are just happy they can set aside time for that little extra. “To be able to fulfill that part of us outside of our jobs is really a key thing,” Mangan said. “We just want to give everyone a good time when they come to see us,” Mangan said.

Lipstyk infuses a rock edge into its entire repertoire, aiming to pump up the crowd. From left: Tony Garuba, Kate Mangan, Chris Bubblo and Eric Fusco.

••• Summer concert series announcements are rolling in, and the Mountain Laurel Pocono Mountains Performing Arts Center, or The Mount, has slated its first five acts for the season. The season kicks off June 8 with The Guess Who, with tickets ranging from $37.50 to 67.50. That show will be followed by a double bill of Robert Cray and Little Feat on June 9, with tickets ranging from $45.50 to $75.50. Ziggy Marley will perform June 15, with prices ranging from $42.50 to $72.50. Motown band The Temptations will take the stage July 22, with tickets ranging from $32.50 to $62.50. The

The kinder, gentler requiem SAFE IF YOU GO

As a lyric soprano who knows her way around a requiem, Laura Choi Stuart is familiar with the segments about “nature quaking” and “heaven and earth in ashes burning” that composers like Verdi and Mozart included. “The ‘Dies Irae’ is just flat-out terrifying, about the wrath of God and fires of hell,” she said. But Brahms is different. He’s the composer, after all, who’s famous for the tender strains of his lullaby. When he wrote his German Requiem in the late 1860s, he left out the scary parts about the Day of Judgment in favor of a gentler approach. “His requiem is designed to comfort the living,” said Stuart, who will be a guest artist when the Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic presents its final Masterworks concert of the season tonight in Scranton. “It speaks to the heart.”

What: Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic season finale When: 8 tonight Where: Scranton Cultural Center, 420 N. Washington Ave., Scranton More info: 341-1568

Stuart

Thomas

Stuart is the soprano soloist, and Robert Gardner is the baritone soloist. Also playing a major role will be a 140-voice choir made up of singers from the Wilkes University and Marywood University choruses as well as the Choral Society of Northeast Pennsylvania. “This is a piece that relies on an excellent chorus as much as an excellent orchestra,” conductor Lawrence Loh said. As for the singers, they feel privileged to take part, said choirmaster Steven Thomas, who teaches music at Wilkes. “It’s one of the most beautiful things ever written,” Thomas

said. “Brahms knew how to write for the voice. It’s challenging for the singers, but he knows how to get the choir to sound the way he wants it to sound. It’s so expressive, so exciting in some points and so heartbreaking in other points. It’s got such an emotional range. It’s just gorgeous.” The requiem, written not in Latin but in the German vernacular of Brahms and his original audience, is “one of the iconic masterpieces of Western culture,” Thomas said. “For me, as a teacher. I’m so excited my students are going to be part of this performance. I can’t wait.”

Continued from page 12 safe

close to. It’s a promise we see them keep. Mei slips free of her captors but only temporarily. When Luke sees her he finds a purpose: keep her “Safe.” What we have here is basically an American “Transporter,” with Statham caught up in the most jaw-dropping, quick-cut fights. He plows through Rus-

PIRATES Continued from page 12

scientists, hoping to win acclaim with everything from airships to a Rubik’s Cube. You have competing pirates, all swagger and swordplay. What you don’t have is a lot of laughs. The Pirate Captain amusingly attacks all manner of

sians on the subway, Chinese gangsters in a casino and cops in between. Mei speaks the fractured English of an 11-year-old learning English as a second language: “Now you know everything. Happiness for you?” The dialogue and the characters are better than the plot. And the fights are better than even the one-liners. Statham never phones it in, though his roles can seem one long version of the same guy: haunted and hunted, in need of a shave. un-lucrative prey — a ghost ship, aschool“fieldtrip”ship,aplague ship (changed from a leper ship after leprosy-advocacy groups complained). Most of which amounts to a grin, a chuckle. Those of us who love Aardman will appreciate the gorgeous attention to detail, made a bit sharper by 3-D. But “Pirates” still plays like a fussy film made by fussy little fussbudgets.

PAGE 15

By MARY THERESE BIEBEL mbiebel@timesleader.com

Rock ’N’ Blues Fest will roll into town Aug. 19, with Johnny Winter, Edgar Winter, Leslie West, Rick Derringer and Kim Simmonds. Tickets are $45.50 to $75.50 and available at www.mountlaurelpac.com. ••• Tickets for co-headliners and rock legends Chicago and The Doobie Brothers will go on sale at 10 this morning for the Aug. 24 show at Toyota Pavilion at Montage Mountain in Scranton. Each band will perform individual sets, then team up for a grand-finale encore. Tickets are available at LiveNation.com, the Toyota Pavilion Box Office, or by calling 800-7453000.


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THE GUIDE

Plucky ballet that rocks

S TA G E THIS WEEK: APRIL 2 7 T O M AY 3 , 2 0 1 2 Once Upon a Mattress, the Broadway musical based on the fairy tale “The Princess and the Pea.” Lake-Lehman High School, 1128 Old Route 115, Lehman Township. 7:30 tonight and Saturday; 2:30 p.m. Sunday. $10, $7. 675-1761. Rent, the Tony Award and Pulitzer Prize-winning Broadway musical about a group of struggling artists on New York’s Lower East Side. Performed by Phoenix Theatrics (ages 14 to 19) at the Phoenix Performing Arts Centre, 409 Main St., Duryea. Through May 6: 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays; 2 p.m. Sundays. $12. Proceeds benefit in part the Red Cross HIV/AIDS Awareness and Prevention. AIDS advocate Ryann Richardson addresses the audience at tonight’s performance. Reservations: 4573589. A Year with Frog and Toad, the Broadway musical about the friendship between the two amphibians. University of Scranton Players, McDade Center for Literary and Performing Arts, University of Scranton. 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. Tuesday; 10 a.m. Wednesday. Continues 8 p.m. May 4-5; 2 p.m. May 6. 941-4318. Urban Beats Dance Show, a performance by the hip-hop dance club. McIlhenny Ballroom, DeNaples Campus Center, 900 Mulberry St., University of Scranton. 7 p.m.

By MARY THERESE BIEBEL mbiebel@timesleader.com

Ryan Engle and Cate McDonald star in ‘All Shook Up.’

BEST BET William Shakespeare and Elvis Presley might seem like strange bedfellows, but the musical ‘All Shook Up’ successfully combines the Bard’s tale ‘Twelfth Night’ with the early rock of the King and comes up with a bit of retro fun. The show, now in its final weekend at the Music Box Dinner Playhouse in Swoyersville, follows the exploits of a guitar-playing roustabout who shakes up a small Midwestern town. Showtimes are 8 tonight and Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday. An optional dinner is served 90 minutes before curtain. Get your tickets at 283-2195. Saturday. Free. 941-5441. Seussical, the musical trip through the best-loved stories of Dr. Seuss. Presented by Theatreworks USA at the Alice Wiltsie Performing Arts Center, 700 N. Wyoming St., Hazleton. 7 p.m. Saturday. $12, $7 students. 455-1508. In the Next Room, Sarah Ruhl’s See STAGE, Page 17

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n her role as Princess Joan, 15-year-old Anna James of Jackson Township dances through a forest, holding a lantern aloft as she searches for her kidnapped little sister. Along the way she meets gypsies whose belts jingle with coins and eccentric villagers who surround her, waving their walking sticks. There are peddlers, too, their baskets filled with colorful fruit. Princess Joan is hungry, and the peddlers tease her with a pear. Will she accept it? Will she take a bite? Will something strange happen if she does? “Oh, something will happen,” choreographer Elisabeth Harris predicted as she watched a rehearsal of “Corsiev: The Grieving Wood,” an original rock-fusion ballet the Joan Harris Dancers will present this weekend at Meyers High School. It turns out the pear is drugged, and soon Princess Joan will tumble, woozy and confused, to the ground. The gypsies will steal her lantern and magic dust – tools she needs to help find her sister – and give them to

SUBMITTED PHOTO

The Joan Harris Dancers’ production of ‘Corsiev’ will showcase scores of talented performers.

IF YOU GO What: ‘Corsiev: The Grieving Wood’ Who: Nearly 500 dancers from Harris Conservatory for the Arts Where: Meyers High School, Carey Avenue, Wilkes-Barre When: 1 and 5 p.m. Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday Tickets: $14 in advance More info: 287-7977 or 718-0673

the brooding Queen Clava. “I’m not evil,” Maria Dutt of Kingston, who portrays the queen, said during a rehearsal break. “I’m mourning my own

lost daughter.” But Queen Clava does use dark magic, especially in a battle with a sorceress, danced by Amanda Sedor, 17, of Wyoming, who aims to protect the princess. The show, aided by the music of Mozart, Lizst and Wagner in Act I and symphonic treatments of the music of Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin in Acts II and III, began as a creation by author Kenton Harris, who first staged it in Florida in 1988. This latest incarnation includes choreography updated by See CORSIEV, Page 17


S TA G E

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THE GUIDE

Continued from page 16

comedy about a doctor administering experimental treatments on Victorian women. Adult subject matter. Bloomsburg Theatre Ensemble, Alvina Krause Theatre, 226 Center St., Bloomsburg. Opens Thursday and continues through May 20: 7:30 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays; 3 p.m. Sundays. $25, $20 seniors, $12 students. 784-8181 or bte.org.

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Steel Magnolias, comedy-drama about the tribulations of six Louisiana women and the bond they form to support each other. Performed by the Pennsylvania Theatre of Performing Arts at the J.J. Ferrara Center 212 W. Broad St., Hazleton. May 4 to 13: 7 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays; 3 p.m. Sundays. Dinner served 90 minutes before curtain. $16; $32 with dinner. 454-5451.

CORSIEV Continued from page 16

Kenton’s sisters-in-law Elisabeth and Jennifer Harris, who are both teachers at the Harris Conservatory for the Arts in Luzerne. “Corsiev” incorporates ballet and modern-dance sequences to tell the story of a plucky heroine who faces her fears. Princess Joan is “terrified at first,” said James, who dances the role, “but she keeps going and

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doesn’t quit.” Eventually the princess will find her little sister, who is danced by Caroline Conrad of Dallas, and the story ends with compassion for all the characters, even Queen Clava. But we can’t give all the secrets away. “Corsiev: The Grieving Wood”

will be performed at 1 and 5 p.m. Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday at Meyers High School, with many cast members alternating so more than 500 dance students have a chance to participate. More than 90 dancers tried out for the principal roles, Harris Conservatory manager Jim Harris said.

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PAGE 17

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THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE

CELEBRITY Q&A BY R.D. HELDENFELS

JUMBLE

UNIVERSAL SUDOKU

BY MICHAEL ARGIRION & JEFF KNUREK

Fan wants to know about David Tutera Q. I so admire David Tutera. Can you tell me about him? He has to be amazingly wealthy: his own show, dress and jewelry lines. He seems to be a very nice person. A. Here’s part of the official biography of the events planner and “My Fair Wedding” star: “Tutera’s grandfather, a successful florist, first noticed his grandson’s artistic ability at an early age and encouraged David to pursue his destiny. At age 19, with the sound advice of his grandfather, David opened his own events planning business. Today, David Tutera presides over an award winning company built from experience, dedication and Tutera’s natural talent for transforming the ordinary into the extraordinary. His name has become synonymous with style, elegance, creativity and vision.” He grew up in Port Chester, N.Y., and tried acting in high school and college before taking “a detour,” as he told the New York Times in 1998. “I opened a little shop in Larchmont, near the movie theater, selling gifts and balloons, and one day when I had the window all glitzed up in black and silver with plumes and glitter, a woman waiting on the movie line saw my window display and asked me if I could create a similar look for her son’s bar mitzvah. That party got me started in an industry I didn’t even know existed.” He and his longtime partner, Ryan Jurica, had a civil union in Vermont in 2003. You can read more about his businesses and activities at www.davidtutera.com. Do you have a question or comment for the mailbag? Write to me at rheldenfels@thebeaconjournal.com or by regular mail to the Akron Beacon Journal, 44 E. Exchange St., Akron, OH 44309.

HOROSCOPE BY HOLIDAY MATHIS

PAGE 18

ARIES (March 21-April 19). Today brings a

thrill of experiencing what you couldn’t have anticipated. Your favorite music will transport your mind to a beautiful place. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You are finding a new sense of identity apart from your family role. You accept that your family did their best for you. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). When your sign mate Walt Whitman wrote that there “will never be any more perfection than there is now,” he was talking about the “now” in which you are reading this.

PREVIOUS DAY’S SOLUTION

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ON THE WEB For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com

CANCER (June 22-July 22). Righteousness

doesn’t solve anything and instead promotes a sense of inequality. That’s why you’ll focus on yourself. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). You’ll be playing a social game of sorts. Some will take it far more seriously than you do, and this gives you an advantage. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). You’ll be brimming with cool, novel ideas for creating fun times with your loved ones. Of course, until you try them out, you can’t tell just how cool they are. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Like a silk cloth dropped from a monument, life reveals itself with a degree of pomp and circumstance. You’ll enjoy the way events will be framed in a certain context.

SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). You recognize

the sound of a soul’s cry, and it won’t be heard with your ears but with your heart. You’ll be in tune. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). Usually, your actions are motivated by many different factors at once. What you do today will be motivated by a sense of duty. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). If you know what it’s like to love a certain person and not have that love returned, then you also understand that it is the kind of loss from which great art springs. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You’re a true friend and a stellar partner, which you’ll prove with today’s approach to relationships.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). You’ll plan

your day intelligently in the hope that less time will be wasted in mindless activities and useless chatter. Your forethought works brilliantly to keep you moving along your path. TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (April 27). You’ll break big goals down into small chunks and get to work in May. June puts a new person in your life, and you’ll be creatively inspired because of this influence. August is your chance to trade up on a big-ticket item. With great emotional maturity, you’ll lead the way for loved ones in September. Virgo and Pisces people adore you. Your lucky numbers are: 20, 4, 17, 39 and 18.


Facebook thank-yous are no substitute for individual notes Dear Abby: I attended a baby shower for a dear high school friend and his wife. The day after the shower, she posted a slideshow on Facebook titled “Thanks for All Our Gifts” with a picture of each gift and who gave it. She has had numerous miscarriages and held this shower at five months, knowing the baby is not yet at a viable stage. While I feel sympathy for her and especially for her husband,

DEAR ABBY ADVICE I think this is a bid for attention. I am disgusted at how she seems to be bragging about her haul, yet prepping everyone to give her an outpouring of support if there is another loss. Who does this? I am ... — Speechless In North Carolina Dear Speechless: Most baby showers are given four to six

weeks before the mother’s due date. However, it’s possible that your friend’s wife had hers at five months because she’s excited that her pregnancy seems to be progressing well and she’s thinking positively about the outcome. As to her method of thanking everyone for the gifts, she may never have been taught that individual thank-you notes should have been sent to each guest. Because it is clear that you are closer to the husband than the wife, perhaps you should tip him off that it’s still

GOREN BRIDGE

not too late for them to do the right thing and suggest he help her with them. Dear Abby: My child’s best friend has a parent who is constantly late (to the tune of hours, not minutes). I understand that the child is not at fault, but my child’s feelings are hurt. How do I help this parent to understand that disappointing my child through poor time management is not acceptable to our family without hurting both children? — Watching the Clock

THE GUIDE

THE GUIDE

Dear Clock Watcher: If you haven’t told the parent that it is hurtful when your child is kept waiting for hours for a play date, you should. And if that doesn’t bring the desired result, your child should be encouraged to move on to some other activity and/or another companion. To receive a collection of Abby’s most memorable — and most frequently requested — poems and essays, send a business-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $3.95 ($4.50 in Canada) to: Dear Abby’s “Keepers,” P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included.)

CROSSWORD

WITH OMAR SHARIF & TANNAH HIRSCH

HOW TO CONTACT: PAGE 19

Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 Celebrity Questions: TV Week, The Dallas Morning News, Communications Center, PO Box 655237, Dallas, TX 75265


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World News Dragnet Dragnet (TVPG) (TVPG) News Evening News Eyewitn Nightly News News 30 Rock Family Guy (TV14) (CC) The Rifle- The Rifleman man PBS NewsHour (N) (CC) The People’s Court (N) (CC) (TVPG) Two and Two and Half Men Half Men Cold Case (CC) (TVPG)

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Newswatch 16 Father Knows News

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Shark Tank (N) (CC) Primetime: What Would 20/20 (CC) (TVPG) News (:35) Night0 (TVPG) You Do? line Bachelor Bachelor LeaveLeaveNewsSeinfeld Burns & Burns &  Father Father Beaver Beaver watch 16 (TVPG) Allen Allen Undercover Boss (N) CSI: NY “Sláinte” (N) Blue Bloods “Working News at 11 Letterman 6 (CC) (CC) (TV14) Girls” (TV14) Who Do You Think You Grimm “Leave It to Dateline NBC (N) (CC) Eyewitn Jay Leno < Are? (TVPG) Beavers” (N) (TV14) News Nikita “Shadow Walker” Supernatural (N) (CC) Excused TMZ (N) Extra (N) Always F (N) (TV14) (TV14) (TVPG) (TVPG) (TVPG) Sunny Mary T. Dick Van Bob The Odd Cheers HoneyTwilight Perry n Moore Dyke Newhart Couple (TVPG) mooners Zone Mason World War II in HD Art in the Twenty-First Story of the LackaNightly Charlie L Colour (CC) (TVPG) Century (N) wanna Business Rose (N) The Doctors (N) (CC) Monk (CC) (TVPG) Monk (CC) (TVPG) True Hollywood Story Friends Old ChrisU (TVPG) (CC) (TVG) (TV14) tine Big Bang Big Bang The Finder “The Inheri- Fringe “Worlds Apart” News First News Love-Ray- How I Met X Theory Theory tance” (TVPG) (N) (TV14) Ten 10:30 mond Cold Case (CC) (TVPG) Cold Case (CC) (TVPG) Cold Case “Offender” Cold Case (CC) (TV14) Flashpoint “Perfect ∞ (CC) (TV14) Storm” (CC) (TV14) News Evening Entertain- The Insider Undercover Boss (N) CSI: NY “Sláinte” (N) Blue Bloods “Working News Letterman # News ment (N) (CC) (CC) (TV14) Girls” (TV14) King of How I Met How I Met King of Monk (CC) (TVPG) Monk (CC) (TVPG) The 10 (:35) The (:05) TMZ (:35) ) Queens Queens News Office (N) Excused Family Guy Family Guy Two and Two and Nikita “Shadow Walker” Supernatural (N) (CC) PIX News at Ten Jodi Seinfeld Seinfeld + (CC) (CC) Half Men Half Men (N) (TV14) (TV14) Applegate. (N) (TVPG) (TVPG) Two and Two and Big Bang Big Bang Monk (CC) (TVPG) Monk (CC) (TVPG) Phl17 Friends 30 Rock 30 Rock 1 Half Men Half Men Theory Theory News (TVPG) (TV14) (TV14) Red Dawn (5:30) (PG-13, ‘84) ›› Patrick Speed (R, ‘94) ››› Keanu Reeves. A transit bus is wired The Beach (R, ‘00) ›› Leonardo AMC Swayze, C. Thomas Howell. (CC) to explode if it drops below 50 mph. (CC) DiCaprio. (CC) Whale Wars (CC) Whale Wars (CC) Whale Wars: Operation Whale Wars: Viking Frozen Planet “Sum- Whale Wars: Viking AP (TV14) (TVPG) Bluefin Shores (N) (TVPG) mer” (TVPG) Shores (TVPG) Storage Wars (CC) Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage ARTS (TVPG) Wars Wars Wars Wars Wars Wars Wars Wars Wars Wars Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report (N) The Celebrity Apprentice Making puppets and Sonicsgate: Requiem Mad Money CNBC performing a show. (TVPG) for a Team John King, USA (N) Erin Burnett OutFront Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront CNN (N) (N) (CC) (N) (CC) Daily Show Colbert Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Always Always South Park The Goods: Live Hard. Sell Hard. (R, ‘09) South Park COM Report (TV14) (TV14) Sunny Sunny ›› Jeremy Piven. (CC) SportsNite Phillies MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs at Philadelphia Phillies. From Citizens SportsNite (CC) DNL StateCS Pregame Bank Park in Philadelphia. (N) (Live) Rewind Union Church- Church Daily Mass The Holy Life on the Rock (TVG) Catholicism WE Love Is a Choice (TVG) Course in Women of CTV Poor Orders Rosary BELIEVE Saints Grace Dual Survival “Bitten” Dual Survival “Out of Deadliest Catch (CC) Deadliest Catch (CC) American Guns (CC) Deadliest Catch (CC) DSC (CC) (TVPG) Africa” (TVPG) (TV14) (TV14) (TV14) (TV14) A.N.T. Fish Hooks A.N.T. Austin & Good Luck A.N.T. Good Luck Jessie (CC) Austin & Jessie (N) Phineas Shake It Farm (TVG) Farm (TVG) (TVG) Ally (CC) (CC) (TVG) and Ferb (N) (TVG) Farm (TVG) Ally (CC) Charlie DSY Up! (CC) Charlie (TVG) (N) (TVG) (TVG) (TVG) Khloe & The Soup E! News (N) Fashion Star (TVPG) Kate & Will Kate & Will Fashion Police (N) Chelsea E! News E! Lamar (TV14) Lately SportsCenter Special: 2012 NFL Draft From New York. (N) (Live) (CC) SportsCenESPN On the Clock ter SportsCenter (N) (Live) CountNASCAR Racing Nationwide Series: Virginia 529 College Boxing Denis Grachev vs. Ismayl Sillakh. From ESPN2 (CC) down Savings 250. (N) (Live) Austin, Texas. (N) (Live) (CC) Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest (PG-13, ‘06) ›› The 700 Club Dustin FAM the Black Pearl (5:00) ››› Johnny Depp, Orlando Bloom, Keira Knightley. Ellerman. (TVG) Diners, Diners, Best Thing Best Thing Diners, Diners, Diners, Diners, Diners, Diners, Diners, Diners, FOOD Drive Drive Drive Drive Drive Drive Drive Drive Drive Drive Special Report With FOX Report With The O’Reilly Factor Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van The O’Reilly Factor FNC Bret Baier (N) Shepard Smith (N) (CC) Susteren (CC) Little House on the Little House on the Little House on the Little House on the Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier HALL Prairie (CC) (TVPG) Prairie (CC) (TVG) Prairie (CC) (TVPG) Prairie (CC) (TVPG) (TVPG) (TVPG) (TVPG) (TVG) Brad Meltzer’s American Pickers (CC) American Pickers (CC) Titanic at 100: Mystery Solved (CC) (TVPG) (:01) Modern Marvels HIST Decoded (CC) (TVPG) (TVPG) (TVPG) (CC) (TVPG) Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters CelebCelebHGTV On HGTV On House Hunters Hunters Hunters H&G Int’l Int’l Int’l Int’l Home Home the Set the Set Hunters Int’l Int’l Int’l America’s Most America’s Most America’s Most America’s Most America’s Most America’s Most LIF Wanted (TV14) Wanted (TV14) Wanted (TV14) Wanted (N) (TV14) Wanted (TV14) Wanted (TV14) Jersey Shore (CC) Jersey Shore (CC) Jersey Shore (CC) Jersey Shore (CC) Fame (PG, ‘09) ›› Asher Book, Kristy Flores, MTV (TV14) (TV14) (TV14) (TV14) Paul Iacono. Premiere. Victorious Victorious Sponge- Fred Legend- Legend- George George George George Friends Friends NICK Bob Korra Korra Lopez Lopez Lopez Lopez (TV14) (TV14) At Play in the Fields of the Lord (4:00) (R, Midnight Express (R, ‘78) ››› Brad Davis, Randy Midnight Express (10:45) (R, OVAT ‘91) ››› Tom Berenger. (CC) Quaid, John Hurt. ‘78) ››› Brad Davis. NASCAR Racing SPEED Pass Time Dumbest Dumbest Dumbest Dumbest Drive! Mobil 1 Trackside At... (N) (Live) SPD Center Stuff Stuff Stuff Stuff The Grid Gangland “Road War- Coming to America (R, ‘88) ››› Eddie Murphy, Arsenio Coming to America (R, ‘88) ››› Eddie Murphy, Arsenio SPIKE riors” (TV14) Hall, John Amos. Premiere. (CC) Hall, John Amos. (CC) My Bloody ValenTotal Blackout WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) (CC) Dream Machines Total Blackout SYFY tine (5:00) ›› King of King of Seinfeld Seinfeld House of House of House of House of Catch Me if You Can (PG-13, ‘02) ››› TBS Queens Queens (TVPG) (TVPG) Payne Payne Payne Payne Leonardo DiCaprio, Tom Hanks. (CC) D.O.A. The Strip (‘51) ›› Mickey Stage Door (‘37) ››› Katharine It All Came True (9:45) (‘40) ›› Ann Sheri- Million $ TCM (5:00) Rooney. (CC) Hepburn. dan, Humphrey Bogart. (CC) Baby Four Weddings (CC) My Big Fat Gypsy Say Yes: Say Yes: Say Yes: Say Yes: My Big Fat Gypsy Say Yes: Say Yes: TLC (TVPG) Wedding (TVPG) Bride Bride Bride Bride Wedding (TVPG) Bride Bride Law & Order “Flaw” Law & Order “PreLaw & Order (CC) Blade: Trinity (R, ‘04) ›› Wesley Snipes, The Last Samurai TNT (TV14) cious” (TVPG) (TV14) Kris Kristofferson. (CC) (R, ‘03) ››› (CC) Level Up World of Advent. NinjaGo: Cartoon Planet (TVG) King of the King of the American American Family Guy Family Guy TOON (TVPG) Gumball Time Masters Hill Hill Dad Dad (CC) (CC) Ghost Adventures (CC) Ghost Adventures (CC) Ghost Adventures (CC) Ghost Adventures (N) The Dead Files (N) (CC) Ghost Adventures (CC) TRAV (TVPG) (TVPG) (TVPG) (CC) (TVPG) (TVPG) (TV14) (:13) M*A*S*H “The (6:52) (:24) Home Home Love-Ray- Love-Ray- Love-Ray- Love-Ray- Love-Ray- Love-RayTVLD Incubator” (TVPG) M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Improve. Improve. mond mond mond mond mond mond In Plain Sight “Sacrifi- Suits “Play the Man” Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Fairly Legal (N) (CC) USA Victims Unit Victims Unit Victims Unit (TVPG) cial Lam” (TVPG) (CC) (TVPG)


Continued from page 14

rary, sacred and secular music. Campus Ministry Center, King’s College, Wilkes-Barre. 7:30 p.m. Saturday. Free. 208-6044. Acoustic Showcase, with local band members in the solo spotlight including Daniel Rosler (A Fire with Friends), Ed Cuozzo (A Social State), Rafiel Pimentel (Silhouette Lies), Patrick McGlynn (Blinded Passenger) and Danny Jackowitz. New Visions Studio & Gallery, 201 Vine St., Scranton. 7:30 p.m. Saturday. $6. 878-3970. Marywood University Orchestra, performing Antonin Dvorak’s folk-inspired “Czech Suite,” Aaron Copland’s “Quiet City” and Haydn’s Symphony No. 104 (“The London”). Sette LaVerghetta Center, 2300 Adams Ave., Scranton. 7:30 p.m. Saturday. Free. 348-6211.

BUYS

Continued from page 11

of Scranton. 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday; noon to 4 p.m. Sunday. 941-40778. Spring Craft Show and Flea Market, with a lunch menu. United Methodist Church, 376 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. 693-0905.

Wishbone Ash, progressive rock led by guitarist Andy Powell. Mauch Chunk Opera House, 14 W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe. 8 p.m. Saturday. $28. 325-0249. 88 Keys & 24 Songs, recitals in piano, voice and violin presented by the Northeast Music Teachers Association. F.M. Kirby Center, Public Square, Wilkes-Barre. Sunday with concerts at 11 a.m., 1,

OPEN DAILY 6 A.M.-9 P.M.

Breakfast Served All Day

Celebrating 25 Years

Homemade Lunch & Dinner Specials Homemade Desserts

6 Miles from Dallas Center on Rt 118

3 and 5 p.m. $13. 826-1100.

Shavertown United Methodist Church, 163 N. Pioneer Ave., Shavertown. 7 p.m. Sunday. Donation. 675-3616.

Thomas Pandolfi, a Gershwin piano concert. Mauch Chunk Opera House, 14 W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe. 5 p.m. Sunday. $23, $20. 325-0249.

Wind, Jazz and Percussion Ensembles, a concert by the Wyoming Seminary music groups. Buckingham Performing Arts Center, North Sprague Avenue, Kingston. 7 p.m. Tuesday. Free. 270-2192.

Songs for All Seasons, congregational singing of favorite hymns with organ, bells and special guest tenor Gideon Gaitano.

verbrook Pub & Grille Friday & Saturday Specials

Grilled 16 oz. T-Bone Steak

Topped With Sauteed Exotic Mushrooms Served With White Cheddar Mashed Potatoes & Vegetable

675-1110

Pan Seared Diver Scallops With A White Bean And Truffle Pureé And Roasted Asparagus

259 Overbrook Road • Dallas, PA 18612 Phone: 570-675-2727 • www.overbrookpub.com Mon., Tues. & Wed. Open For Dinner Only 4-10 • Thurs.-Sun. 12 Noon-Close

750479 748145 749191

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World Premiere Composition Series, the 29th annual event with the University of Scranton Concert Band and Concert Choir and guest composers/conductors tuba player Sam Pilafian and trumpeter Joseph Boga. Houlihan-McLean Center, Jefferson Avenue and Mulberry Street, Scranton. 7:30 p.m. Saturday. Free. 941-7624.

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THE GUIDE

Lakeside Skillet Open Daily 7am - 9pm

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER SPECIALS

Mother’s Day is May 13 MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS NOW! GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE! 639-3474 Just 4 Miles From Dallas

Pole 279 • Lakeside Drive • Harveys Lake

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$8.95

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AT THE CORNER OF E. NORTHAMPTON AND HILLSIDE ST., WILKES-BARRE • 829-9779 NEVER A COVER! • KITCHEN HOURS: SUN 8-1, WED-SAT 5-9

Craft and Flea Market, with lunch and a Welsh-cookie sale. Eastern Star Building, 15 Foster St., Dallas. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. 675-4893. House, Garden and Gift Show, the 20th annual event with 30 vendors and a lunch menu with gourmet desserts. Waverly Community House, 1115 N. Abington Road, Waverly. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday; 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. $6. 586-8191. Women’s Clothing Sale, with coats, dresses, shoes and accessories. Sponsored by the West Pittston Women’s Club at the West Pittston United Methodist Church, 408 Wyoming Ave. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. $5 and under. 654-7691. Rummage Sale. Washington Square Apartments, 163 S. Washington St., Wilkes-Barre. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday; 10 a.m. to noon May 4. 823-0127.

PAGE 21

Spring Rummage Sale, and mini boutique. St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 35 S. Franklin St., WilkesBarre. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday; 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday (Bag Day). 288-1968.


WHOLE EARTHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S 7TH ANNUAL HOLISTIC & PSYCHIC FAIR Hilton Garden Inn 242 Highland Park Blvd., â&#x20AC;˘ Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702 Sat. April 28th, 10am-6pm & Sun. April 29th, 10am-5pm Admission: $3.00, Kids 12 & under FREE

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Many Fine Holistic & New Age Vendors, Reiki & Massage Therapy, Kirilain Photography, Bee Pollin Products, Gemstones, Sea Goat & BK, Mt. Jewelry, Readers & Mediums. Saturday at 1:00pm, Rev. Rose Moyer Medium will host her gallery â&#x20AC;&#x153;Talk To Your Love Oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Who Passedâ&#x20AC;?. Sunday at 1:00pm, Medium Diane Whitmore will present her lecture titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s All About Loveâ&#x20AC;?.

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served with two sides

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Whether your mom fancies lobster bisque, rosemary crusted lamb or stuffed sole Florentine, sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll love this exquisite lunch with her family at the Irem Clubhouse.

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May 13, 2012 Served 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM

PAGE 22

anc ncak akkes es, Ba B Baco aco con n, SSausage, ausa au sage sa ge, ge Our Buffet Includes Scrambled Eggs, Pancakes, Bacon, Home Fries, MufďŹ ns, Bagels, Butter, Cream Cheese, Jelly, Fresh Fruit, Mixed Greens Tossed with Vegetables & a Citrus Dressing, Chicken Francaise, Penne w/Vodka Sauce, Baked Ham w/Pineapple, Rolls w/Butter. Includes Coffee, Tea, Soft Drinks, Cranberry juice & Orange juice.

$28.00 Per Person Inclusive Children (Under 12) $14.00 Per Person Inclusive Please call (570) 824-8885, Ext. 3 for reservations by May 7, 2012. 880 Kidder St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702

CLUBHOUSE Includes tax & service charge

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Chicken Francaise $16.95

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Make your reservations today for Mother’s Day!! Please inquire about our private dining room for any and all occasions. Costello’s has a NEW Bar/Drink menu offering many new Specialty Drinks and also Bar Food!

HAPPY HOUR: Sunday-Friday 4pm - 6pm.

65 W. Hollenback Ave | Wilkes-Barre, PA

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Fresh Carved Oven Roasted Turkey With Herb Stuffing, Seafood Newburg,Top Sirloin Of Beef With Portabella Mushroom Sauce, Sauteed Chicken Tenderloin With Lemon White Wine Butter Sauce, Fresh Smoked Country Ham With Mandarin Orange Glace, Real Mashed Potatoes With Turkey Gravy, Fresh Candied Maple GlazedYams,WinterVegetables Medley, Chicken Noodle Soup, Salad Station,Tossed Caesar Salad, Potato Salad, Cole Slaw, Pasta Salad, Dessert Station, Cakes, Pies, Puddings, Cookies. $

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PAGE 23

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THE GUIDE

Creative American Cooking

Mother’s Day Dinner at AT

*FRIDAY & SATURDAY*

STEAMED CLAMS CHICKEN PARM ALFREDO BLACK & BLEU STRIP STEAK CAPTAIN’S PLATTER “RATTLESNAKE” PORK CHOPS PIG PEN CHEF’S SALAD GREAT HOMEMADE DESSERTS

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Suggesting Reservations for Large Parties

822-4474

www.haystacksrestaurant.com

on Northampt orner ofinE.Wilkes-Barre at the Csi . St & Hill de

L WEEKLY SPECIA

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“Voice Of Hope Christian Coffee House”

PAGE 24

St. John’s Evangelical Lutheran Church, 231 State Street, Nanticoke, is pleased to announce the new “Voice of Hope Christian Coffeehouse”. The coffeehouse will be held on the fourth Friday of every month, from 7:00 to 9:00 pm, in the church basement. Each coffeehouse will feature performances by Christian singers and recording artists through Making a Difference Ministries. Music will be broadcast on St. John’s HOPE radio, WVHO 94.5 FM.lp. Refreshments will be served. Contact Pastor North at 570-735-1760 or email: revdeb615@yahoo.com for more information. The First Coffeehouse will be this Friday, April 27th; “Step by Step” opening for “B.L.E.S.T.”, featuring singers/songwriters and local recording artists. Admission is free and the Coffeehouse is open to the public.


The Guide 04-27-2012