Issuu on Google+


2

GOLackawanna

Sunday, November 6, 2011

ON THE COVER / JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTOS

3 NEWS NEWS

Page 4 – Commissioners to approve borrowing plan

BRAD LANPHEAR PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Page 6 – Knife-wielding robber allegedly had drug habit

Dunmore players celebrate a third quarter score that capped an undefeated regular season. STORY: Page 21

Page 8 – Convicted sex offender charged again Page 9 – Audubon plans cost up to $17.2M

12 ARTS Page 12 – Prep Players return to ’Oz’ Page 14 – Writers join Saturday showcase Page 16 – OPINION: Forget ’Skyfall’ criticisms

18 SPORTS Page 20 – Sweep of soccer titles Page 21 – Week 9 and 10 football results Page 23 – Pacers continue to run wild Page 26 – HC runner takes bronze in state cross country

ARTS

OUR TEAM GO Lackawanna Editor Christopher J. Hughes 558-0113 chughes@golackawanna.com General Manager Paul Andrews – 558-0845 pandrews@golackawanna.com Reporter/Photographer Rich Howells – 558-0483 rhowells@golackawanna.com Advertising Representative Karen Fiscus – 970-7291 kfiscus@timesleader.com

Obituaries – 558-0113 News Tips 558-0113 news@golackawanna.com Missed Paper – 829-5000 Classified 1-800-273-7130 Advertising – 829-7101 Subscriptions – 1-800-252-5603 Hours of Operation 9a.m. – 6p.m.; M-F; 210 Wyoming Avenue, Scranton 18503

SPORTS

This ‘Govember,’ support local news Last year, I swore to myself that I’d remember to participate in “No Shave November.” Now, I am, and for a cause close to me. Most “Movember” participants lay down their razor to raise awareness about prostate cancer and other diseases that affect men, according to us.movember.com. I’m calling my experiment “Govember,” in honor of the paper, and there’s an easy way to get involved, if you’re so inclined. I’m seeking new fans of our page on Facebook at facebook.com/golackawanna

BEHIND THE BYLINES CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES and new followers on Twitter for the @go_lackawanna account. If we get new fans and followers every day, I won’t shave the next morning. It’s that simple. One click of the mouse, and one more 24-hour period goes by without me shaving. Another click to share our pages with a friend, and it’s another five minutes off of my morning prep time. I’ve held up my end of the bargain since Tuesday, and

the full plot was hatched Wednesday. I suspect I’ll be sleeping on the couch by this coming Thursday. Is it silly? Absolutely, but that’s kind of the point. What we do here at Go Lackawanna each day and the approach that we take is so incredibly serious that this is a fun way to break the ice, bring people inside the walls of the office, and let them understand how much we love this job. People have speculated over the future of newspapers in this region, including ours, on an increased basis over the last week. I’m committed to this job, and my Govember campaign is just one way to show that to our

readers, existing fans, and new friends. I’ve said from the beginning that this is a campaign to support good journalism, but that means so many different things to so many important people. It’s the other side of the story or the story that’s never told at all. It’s the extra pieces of information that help you understand what’s happening around you. It’s what’s best for readers, both in their eyes and ours. Help us reach more people, and help me be almost unrecognizable at the next school board meeting I attend. While it’s all in good fun, I’m serious about all of the messages behind it. Are you?

CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES is on Day Six of Govember. Email him at chughes@golackawanna.com.

+(ISSN No. 0896-4084) USPS 499-710

Issue No. 2011-310 Newsroom

829-7242 jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com

Circulation

Jim McCabe – 829-5000 jmccabe@timesleader.com

Published weekly by: Impressions Media 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Periodicals postage paid at Scranton, PA Postmaster: Send address changes to Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Delivery Sunday 75¢ per week Mailed Subscriptions Sunday $1.00 per week in PA $3.05 per week outside PA


Sunday, November 6, 2011

GOLackawanna

PRESERVED ACREAGE

NORTH ABINGTON TOWNSHIP – Jack Sarnoski recognizes that the recently announced preservation of 17 more Sarnoski acres of land on his beef farm will bring added financial stability for his family, but that’s not the most important part. “The best part is knowing the land’s going to be preserved. I don’t think I’d want to be upstairs looking down in 100 years and see houses all over. Once you build on it, it’s gone. There’s no getting it back,” said Sarnoski, 64, of Sarnoski Hill Farm in North Abington Township. Sarnoski’s beef farm, purchased in 1987, was one of 19 farms that had a part of their land preserved through the Pennsylvania Agricultural Lands Preservation Board last month. The program, which he applied for in March, has kept 455,208 acres on 4,208 farms from being commercially developed over the last 23 years. For Sarnoski, it helps continue a family tradition that started when his father, John, operated a dairy farm.

The following total acres have been preserved by the Lackawanna County Agricultural Land Preservation Program since 1994: Benton Twp., 1,240 acres. Greenfield Twp., 1,213 acres. Jefferson Twp., 206 acres. Madison Twp., 364 acres. North Abington Twp., 320 acres. Scott Twp., 718 acres. Total, 4,061 acres. Source: Ellie Hyde, administrator, LCALPR.

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTOS / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Sarnoski Hill Farm raises beef cattle in North Abington Township.

“I was born and raised on a farm. Once that farming gets in your blood, you’re stuck,” he said. “We’ve always been farmers. It was a lot of hard work, but it was a good life.” He’s proud to now put his cows to pasture on the land named for his great-great-grandfather, John, one of the earliest settlers of Scott Township. “On the topographical map – I’m very proud of it – it says Sarnoski Hill. It goes all

the way from East Benton all the way to the state park,” Sarnoski said. While he loves the work that has him up at 4:30 a.m. to tend to his 100 head of beef cattle, he admits it’s not always the most profitable. “My accountant says every year, ‘What are you doing this for?’ It’s because I like doing it,” he said. He shares that love with his two daughters – Lainie, 12, and Lexie, 10. “Lainie’s a real outdoors person,”

Sarnoski said. “I think she’s the one that’s going to be in charge of the farm. “I’m leaving the farm to the girls, and I tell them every day, ‘Don’t sell the farm.’ Once you sell it, it’s gone. The money will be gone, the farm will be gone, and then you’ll wish you had it back for the rest of your life.” Locally, farmland preservation programs are coordinated through the Lackawanna County Agricultural Land Preservation Program and administrator Ellie Hyde, 62, of North Abington Township. Since taking over the preserva-

ARTS

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

NEWS

Part of Sarnoski Hill Farm recently preserved through state program

3

See FARM, Page 9

SPORTS


NEWS

4

GOLackawanna

Newest Commish candidates get their say Cordaro attorney emerges By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

ARTS

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

SPORTS

Sunday, November 6, 2011

SCRANTON – Ardmore attorney Peter Goldberger will represent former Lackawanna County Commissioner Robert Cordaro in his sentencing for public corruption and in his pending appeals, according to a notice of appearance filed Wednesday in the United States District Court in the Middle District of Pennsylvania. Had Cordaro’s new attorney not entered Cordaro an appearance by Nov. 3, his sentencing alongside fellow former commissioner A.J. Munchak would have been set for Nov. 14. The appearance gives Goldberger 60 days to file supplemental objections to a presentence investigation report dated Sept. 20. Prosecutors will have 14 days to respond, and sentencing will be held seven days later, pushing the sentencing for the corrupt commissioners presumably to Jan. 23, 2012. On Oct. 27, U.S. District Judge A. Richard Caputo allowed for the delay in the sentencing originally set for Oct. 31 when it was first announced that Cordaro would replace Atty. William Costopoulos as his legal counsel. Guilty verdicts on 18 of 33 counts against Cordaro and eight of 21counts against Munchak were handed down on June 21 after less than eight hours of deliberation that followed an 11-day trial.

SCRANTON – The League of Women Voters of Lackawanna County hosted a Lackawanna County Commissioners debate on Wednesday evening, allowing the four candidates for the three seats to discuss their plans to fix the deficit, bring jobs to the area, and control spending, among other topics. Moderated by LWV President Andrea Mulrine and held in the Moskovitz Auditorium in the DeNaples Center at the University of Scranton, the hour-and-ahalf debate was recorded by Electric City Television to be shown on Comcast Channel 19 as well as online at www.lwvlackawanna.org. Each candidate with his platform is listed alphabetically, by last name: • Republican Bill Jones was educated at Penn State in economics, statistics, and business law and has worked in career services at the University of Scranton, which he believes has given him insight into the difficulty of finding a job in the current economic climate. He has

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Candidates for Lackawanna County Commissioner, from left, Republican Bill Jones, Democrat and current commissioner Corey O’Brien, Republican Pat O’Malley, and Democrat Jim Wansacz discussed their visions for the county at Wednesday’s debate.

been “held accountable” as auditor of South Abington Township for the last four years and feels that more transparency and accountability in county government is needed. “We need to do things in front of the public. We need to approve things in front of the public…We have zero transparency in this government that we currently have…It’s got to stop,” Jones said. • Current Democratic Commissioner Corey O’Brien lobbied at the age of 18 to secure

federal funding for a community center in Dunmore and has since worked as a lawyer and in federal government. During his last four years as commissioner, he feels he has made “very difficult decisions” but has reduced expenditures by $17 million, cut the budget by $3 million, reduced workforce by 32 percent, and invested $4 million in parks and the arts. “We’ve worked hard, but the hard work isn’t over. We’ve just begun. We face great struggles and challenges in the county. We

need people with experience, people who are going to get it done,” O’Brien said. • Republican Patrick O’Malley has served as a Scranton School Director for 12 years and is currently Vice President of the Scranton School Board. During his tenure, he helped transform a blighted neighborhood by building Scranton High School, which brought business to that area, and he is involved in a local business and various charities. See CANDIDATES, Page 5

Vote on $21M county borrowing plan set for Nov. 9 By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON – The Lackawanna County Commissioners hope to pass their plan to borrow $21 million at their scheduled Nov. 9 meeting, according to a special meeting held Oct. 31. A first reading of the ordinance authorizing the general obligation note to cover unfunded debt through the end of the year was held Monday, and a second reading and passing is set for the next commissioners’ meeting, which falls just after the municipal election. The plan must be approved by the state after a 20-day review period, according to Attorney Brian P. Koscelansky of Stevens and Lee, the county’s bond counsel. The county could close on the loan by the start of December, Koscelansky said. The lack of concrete numbers, including an interest rate on the borrowing, drew criticism from Commissioner Bruce Smallacombe and a heated response from Commissioner Mike Washo. “The thing I think is a problem is that the public won’t have a chance to review anything other than the reading of the final ordinance,”

The plan must be approved by the state after a 20-day review period, according to Attorney Brian P. Koscelansky of Stevens and Lee, the county’s bond counsel. The county could close on the loan by the start of December, Koscelansky said. Smallacombe said. “We can’t pass anything without telling what it is… We’re required by law to furnish that information,” Washo replied. “No one in any way is trying to do anything to diminish the flow of information. We’d like to accelerate the flow of information. We just don’t have it now.” “This is something that we need to do to fund the remainder of the year and to move forward,” Commissioner Corey O’Brien added, echoing the Oct. 26 opinion of visiting Judge Peter O’Brien, who ruled that day in favor of the county’s petition to borrow up to $21

million. Koscelansky said he hoped to receive a letter from the bank outlining fees and interest prior to the Nov. 9 meeting. In other business: • The County of Lackawanna Transit System and Coordinated Transportation will consolidate services following a study conducted by the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation and unanimous approval by the commissioners. The “win-win” merger, according to COLTS Executive Director Robert Fiume, will be funded with up to $500,000 through PennDOT. Jennifer Honick, director of finance administration for COLTS, said the county could recognize “significant savings” of up to $700,000 annually from its current $1.3 million in expenses, including $400,000 in savings by the end of the fiscal year on June 30, 2012. • The county’s Children and Youth Services department will partner with United Neighborhood Centers to offer a permanent supportive housing program for homeless families with children following the unaniSee VOTE, Page 5


Sunday, November 6, 2011

GOLackawanna

5

Council suggests termination of DPW head Scranton

By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

ment because he respects the work of his employees, adding that Richardson was off the clock at the time. “If (Brazil authorized private use of the vehicle), he should be fired if that is determined to be the case,” Rogan said. Councilman Bob McGoff agreed that an investigation should be held, but felt that it was not council’s place to determine the consequences of Brazil’s actions. He was outvoted to send the letter 3-1 as Council President Janet Evans

was absent from council’s Nov. 1 meeting. “That’s the role of the mayor, to discipline workers, not the role of council. I think that is something that is separate and should be dealt with by the administration,” McGoff said. In June, Scranton Sewer Authority employee Paul Ludovici was fired after he allegedly used authority equipment to remove dirt at a West Scranton home as a private contractor after being given permission to utilize the equipment by an unconfirmed SSA supervisor.

New Scranton police CANDIDATES substation approved

By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

Continued from page 4

mous approval of a resolution. Children and Youth Casework Manager Jason Kavulich said the department will provide $25,000 to be matched with federal funding from the Department of Housing and Urban Development to create eight sites across the county for such families in apartments with paid utilities. The

month-to-month basis, pending the bid process completion, after unanimous approval. Five companies submitted bids on Oct. 6, and reviews of nutritional values and prices are still being conducted, according to the county’s Deputy Director for Purchasing Jim McLaine. • Commissioners joined with advocates from the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network to proclaim November as Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month in the county.

SCRANTON - A family of four was displaced by a second floor fire at1712 Capouse Ave., Scranton, on Tuesday night, according to the Scranton Fire Department and American Red Cross. Fire crews were called to the home at 9:02 p.m. for a structure fire that neighbors said sent flames shooting out of the second story window. Scranton Fire Department Assistant Chief Jim Floryshak said the fire was knocked down quickly with a “very aggressive interior attack.” There were at least two family members inside the home at the time of the fire, but all four residents were outside the home by the time crews arrived, according to Floryshak. No residents or fire crew members were injured Tuesday night Floryshak said the home suffered fire, heat, smoke, and water damage to the second and third floors, and the first floor suffered additional smoke and water damage. According to the Lackawanna County Assessor’s Officer database, the home was purchased by Boonlers and Nualprang Yotongyos in Nov. 2004. The local chapter of the American Red Cross was providing disaster relief services to the family, who appeared to have no local relatives, Floryshak said. Scranton Fire Chief Tom Davis said Friday that the cause of the blaze is still under investigation. While on scene, crews were called to a second possible structure fire on Brick Avenue. That report ended up being for an overheated furnace, Floryshak said.

SPORTS

VOTE

program, operating at about $9 per day, reduces the need for foster care at $25 per day. • A $50,045 contract with RF Design and Integration, Inc., Philadelphia, was unanimously approved via motion in order to comply with the federally mandated narrowbandingofpublicsafetyradios atthecounty911CenterinJessup. • The existing prison food service contract with Aramark Correctional Service, Inc., will be extended on a

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

ARTS

SCRANTON – City Council unanimously gave final approval to a lease agreement for a new Scranton Police Department substation on North Keyser Avenue. Donated to the department at a cost of $1 per year by Airline Petroleum Company of Dunmore, the 1,015 square foot space located at 1696 N. Keyser Ave., Unit #4 will be used “to promote crime prevention and community presence” and to bolster the Scranton Police Department’s ongoing “Be Part of the Solution” campaign, according to the legislation. Council Vice President Pat Rogan said no fixed cost was mentioned to run the substation, but he felt that it was “sorely needed” as a resident of West Scranton himself. “Just in the last few years, a lot of crime has occurred in West Side. If you drive down the streets, you can really see the difference,” Rogan said. “The lease for $1 per year is a steal. We need another way to crack down on crime.” Council also gave final approval to an extinguishment of the permanent easement for ingress and egress at the corner of Marion Street and New Ross Avenue and to annex these lands to be conveyed by the city to Ronald and Mary Ann Kitlas. Additionally, council accepted the recommendation of the Historical Architecture Review Board and approved new energy efficient windows and doors to be installed at the Central Fire Station, 518 Mulberry St., by Hemmler and Camayd Architects, 409 Lackawanna Ave.

they do have a job, about keeping their job. We have to get them back to work. For us, as county commissioners, what you’re going to see…is two guys that are going to lead, and it’s Continued from page 4 going to take leadership,” Wansacz said. While O’Brien and Wansacz asked voters to He believes he is statesman, not a politician, adding that he has no higher political aspira- choose them as a team, pushing a six-point jobs plan throughout the debate, Jones and tions. “Jobs, jobs, jobs – that’s what we need in O’Malley had separate plans for the county, Lackawanna County. The Casey Highway, with Jones relying heavily on criticism of O’Brien and the current adthose exits that go to noministration. where – in four years, “We’ve worked hard, “We need to stop with bothey’re going to go to somebut the hard work gus budgets. We’re borrowwhere. Those vacant buildings are going to be filled isn’t over. We’ve just ing $21 million and our bond rating has gone down. What with employees,” O’Malley begun. We face great companies are going to be said. moving in where taxes are • Democrat Jim Wansacz struggles and chalgoing up? Not many. We need touted his 10 years of experience as a state legislator, lenges in the county.” to stop with empty promwhich he believes has — Commissioner Corey O’Brien ises,” Jones said. O’Brien deflected the argutaught him what it takes to ments by saying that partisan compromise and “get things done.” He operated a successful small busi- politics must be put aside and that cooperaness at the age of 22 and doubled its size by tion is needed to get the county back on track. “A lot of venom. A lot of anger. This is what the age of 25. He said the job of county commissioner requires leadership and experience has brought gridlock to Washington and to and feels that working with the state and fed- Harrisburg. You’ve seen it right here spoke right before me,” O’Brien said. “Don’t be eral government is integral to the process. “(O’Brien and I) have a plan…People are fooled. People tell you I’m a bad guy. I’m not struggling out there. People are concerned if that bad.”

family displaced after fire

NEWS

SCRANTON – City Council Vice President Pat Rogan called for the firing of the city’s Department of Public Works director on Tuesday after learning that he authorized the use of a city-owned vehicle in a commercial driver’s license test last month from an article published Sunday in Go Lackawanna. Rogan asked his council colleagues for their approval to send a letter to Mayor Chris Doherty urging a full investiga-

tion into the matter. DPW employee Don Richardson drove the city’s flatbed trailer to the PennDOT Photo and Exam Center, 81 Keystone Industrial Park, Dunmore, on Sept. 20 to allow his son, Donny, to apply for a commercial driver’s license. A letter from City Controller Roseann Novembrino to council dated Oct. 11 and an Oct. 28 phone interview with DPW Director Jeff Brazil confirmed the incident. Brazil admitted that he authorized the use of city equip-


GOLackawanna

SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

POLICE BLOTTER

Laske was arraigned Oct. 29 on two counts of indecent assault and one count of simple assault. He was held for $5,000 bail, and a preliminary hearing is The following criminal complaints set for Nov. 7. were among those filed in Lackawanna • THEFT CHARGES were filed Oct. 20 County Court between Oct. 20 and Nov. 1. against Nicole Marra, 23, of Deacon All accounts are derivative of police Street, Scranton. Marra allegedly adaffidavits, and all charges are pending with respect to each suspect’s prelimina- mitted to for the theft of $6,450 in rings from her residence earlier this year. Her ry hearing. mother, Mary, claimed the 23-year-old had a heroin habit and refused rehab. BLAKELY • RECKLESS ENDANGERMENT CHARGES Ms. Marra and her boyfriend, Dane Zaikowski, 25, also of Deacon Street, were filed Nov. 1 against Shane Riallegedly sold the items at two local chard Warholick, 24, of Main Street, jewelers for about $600. Detective Blakely. Blakely Ptlm. Peter Petrucci saw Timothy Mayo was the arresting officer. Warholick, possibly wanted on a recent Marra was arraigned Oct. 31 on one arrest warrant, along Railroad Avenue in Peckville. As Petrucci checked for current count each of theft and receiving stolen criminal information, Warholick continued property. She was released on $5,000 to put his hands in his pockets. As police unsecured bail, and a preliminary hearing is set for Nov. 7. Zaikowski searched him, he placed his hand back pleaded guilty to one count of receiving into his left pocket, and an unopened stolen property at a preliminary hearing syringe stuck into Petrucci’s glove. on Oct. 18, according to court records. Warholick was arraigned Nov. 1 on • ASSAULT AND HARASSMENT charges of resisting arrest, reckless endangerment, and disorderly conduct. A CHARGES were file Oct. 29 against Kevin Michael Neyer, 19, of Gilbert preliminary hearing is set for Nov. 7. Road, Cheltenham. Neyer allegedly arrived at his girlfriend’s dorm room at SCRANTON the University of Scranton to confront • SUBSTANCE ABUSE CHARGES were her about not responding to his text filed Nov. 1 against Kyle Klucznick, messages from the night before. Neyer 37, of North Main Avenue, Scranton. began verbally arguing with the woman Klucznick was allegedly found passed out and allegedly grabbed her by the shirt in the passenger seat of his disabled “violently enough that her shirt was vehicle with two cans of Dust Destroyer torn completely from her body.” Unithat he purchased at the Dickson City versity of Scranton Officer Kipp Adcock Staples store. Store employees told was the arresting officer. police that Klucznick entered the shop Neyer was arraigned Oct. 29 with every few hours to buy the product. Dozens of containers of the product were simple assault, harassment, and disorderly conduct and held for $2,500 found in the vehicle, and Klucznick allegedly told police that “he was hooked bail. A preliminary hearing is set for on it.” Sgt. Michael Mayer was the arrest- Nov. 7. • TRESPASSING CHARGES were filed ing officer, and identical charges were Oct. 29 against Gregory Allen filed on Oct. 18 by Ptlm. Rocco Cipriano. Schack, 34, of South Everett Avenue, Klucznick was arraigned on the most Scranton. Schack was allegedly discovrecent charges of inhaling toxic substances on Nov. 1 and held for $5,000 bail. ered with cuts to his right pinky finger and forearm and blood on his face, A preliminary hearing is set for Nov. 7. According to court papers, a preliminary arms and pants while wearing religious hearing on the October charges is set for vestments in the 700 block of Hemlock Street near Nativity Church. Schack said Nov. 14. he work up in a church with no shirt on • INDECENT ASSAULT CHARGES were filed Oct. 29 against Joseph P. Laske, and took the vestments. Police discovered a broken window at the church and Sr., 47, of John Street, Pittston. Laske’s ex-wife allegedly asked with help remov- found blood throughout the building. Ptlm Lowell Stevens was the arresting ing an air conditioner during his visitation, and he replied that it would “cost officer. Schack was arraigned Oct. 29 on her,” suggesting intercourse. He later charges of criminal trespassing, criminal tried to take off his ex-wife’s underwear mischief, and theft, and he was held for and hit her in the face and neck when she refused. Ptlm. Paul Stafursky was the $5,000 bail. A preliminary hearing is set for Nov. 7. arresting officer.

Sunday, November 6, 2011

Suspect had heroin habit

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON – A city resident charged for an alleged string of burglaries at knifepoint was feeding a heroin habit that he shared with his girlfriend, according to her interview with Scranton police following his arrest. Andrew Cleveland, 33, of Arnold Street, Scranton, was charged Oct. 31 in connection with at least two armed robberies last month after an off-duty officer and family members contacted Scranton police because they believed he was responsible. According to an affidavit: Cleveland allegedly approached the counter of a convenient store in the 800 block of Davis Street, Moosic, on Oct. 24 with a Little Debbie brownie and began counting out nickels to pay for the snack. He then brandished a steak knife and told the clerk that “he would cut her if she didn’t give up the money.” He then reached into the cash

PHOTO COURTESY SCRANTON POLICE

Family and friends told police they believed this convenient store robber to be Scranton resident Andrew Cleveland.

register, grabbed cash, and made the employee lift the register drawer so he could steal the money underneath it. On Oct. 26, Scranton police responded to a similar call at the Sunoco in the 1200 block of South Main Avenue. Cleveland matched the description given in the Oct. 24 incident. A suspect in two other robber-

ies in Dunmore on Oct. 21 and Oct. 24 also matched Cleveland. On off-duty police officer who is not named contacted Scranton Detective Michael Schultz on Oct. 29 reporting that family members believed Cleveland was responsible. Schultz spoke with Cleveland’s brother, Dan, See ROBBER, Page 8

Alleged heroin dealer had pot when arrested

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON – When serving a warrant last week, city police allegedly discovered marijuana in the bedroom of a suspected heroin dealer who sold drugs to an undercover officer three times in September. John E. Wolf, 20, of Block Street, Scranton, was charged in all with four counts of possession with the intent to deliver a controlled substance and one count each of criminal use of a communication facility, posses-

Many different sizes & options available - call for a FREE quote Like us on Facebook

sion of a controlled substance, and possession of drug paraphernalia. According to affidavits: Wolf, also known as Blaze, sold heroin to an undercover officer on Sept. 13, on Sept. 16 along Keyser Avenue, and on Sept. 27 on Main Avenue in North Scranton. Drug purchases were allegedly arranged through Wolf’s cell phone, and all suspected heroin purchased by police tested positive in preliminary results. When police traveled to his

Block Street home on Oct. 28 to serve a warrant on the September drug sales, he told police that he didn’t have any heroin in the home but led them to a bag of marijuana and a digital scale in his bedroom. Wolf allegedly admitted to selling marijuana and told officers that he previously sold heroin, “but I don’t anymore.” Wolf was arraigned Oct. 28 on all charges and held for a combined $70,000 bail. He waived a preliminary hearing set for Nov. 3.

721182

6


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011

Elect

PAGE 7

Patrick

O’Malley Lackawanna County Commissioner The only candidate who has the integrity and experience that we can trust. On Nov. 8th Vote for

Patrick

O’Malley

LACKAWANNA COUNTY COMMISSIONER Vote Tuesday, November 8th. Paid for by the committee to Elect Patrick O’Malley


GOLackawanna

Sunday, November 6, 2011

Sex offender faces new charges

SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON - A man convicted of indecent assault in 2002 and listed as a 10-year sexual offender on the Megan’s Law website allegedly assaulted a young girl, now 14, between 2007 and 2008. William Francis Groulx, 48, of Sanderson Avenue, Scranton, faces two counts of indecent assault of a person under the age of 13, and one count each of corruption of minors and unlawful contact with minors for the alleged assaults. According to an affidavit: The alleged victim was interviewed by the Children’s Advocacy Center in June where she alleged that one of her mother’s friends “had done things to her in the past,” beginning at age 10. Groulx allegedly assaulted the girl at his home on week-

ROBBER Continued from page 6

and sister, Kelly Kern, on Oct. 30, who both believed that surveillance photos released by police resembled their brother, Andrew. When police responded to his Arnold Avenue home, he sped away from police in a Chevrolet Trailblazer, abandoning the vehicle in a nearby yard and fleeing on foot. He was later taken into custody at the Waldorf Park and Tiki Bar in Scranton. During an interview with police, Andrew Cleveland admitted to using heroin on a daily basis and said he fled from police because he thought the detectives were drug dealers.

MEETING NOTICES BLAKELY • Council will hold a special meeting for general purposes on Wed., Nov. 9 at 6 p.m. at the Blakely Borough Building, 1439 Main St., Peckville. CLARKS SUMMIT • The Zoning Hearing Board will conduct a public hearing on Tues., Nov. 8 at 7 p.m. in Council Chambers, second floor, 304 S. State St., Clarks Summit, for the following matters: 2011-06: Request for Relief through Variance - Patrick and Nicole Mascia,

ends and “put his mouth all over” her body and touched her breasts and privates under her clothing. He also occasionally took the girl in the shower and asked her to touch his genitals, but she refused. During an intercepted phone conversation conducted in June, Groulx allegedly told the victim’s mother the he did bathe with her and warned her that the child would be taken away from her if she went to police. When police interviewed Groulx in August, he denied showering with the pre-teen girl and could not answer additional questions when confronted with evidence from the wiretap. Groulx was arraigned Oct. 27 and held for $20,000 bail. After waiving a Nov. 2 preliminary hearing, his bail was modified to $20,000 unsecured. He “denied any involvement in the robberies and asked for legal counsel.” Detectives later interviewed Courtney Green, who is in a relationship with Andrew Cleveland. She said she didn’t know about the robberies but suspected something when he “recently had large sums of money.” The pair had used heroin daily for the last several weeks, she said. Andrew Cleveland was on federal parole for bank robbery, according to Federal Parole Agent Keith Hearn. He was arraigned Oct. 31 on two counts of robbery and one count each of reckless endangerment, terroristic threats, and theft. He was held for $100,000 bail, and a preliminary hearing on the pending charges is set for Nov. 7. 429 Melrose Ave. 404.3 Part 1 Minimum Lot Size for 2 Family. DALTON • Council will conduct its regular meeting on Thurs., Nov. 10 at 7 p.m. at the Dalton Borough Volunteer Fire Hall, S. Turnpike Road, Dalton, regarding contemplated legislative action to enact an ordinance prohibiting onstreet parking on both sides of Church Street. DICKSON CITY • Borough council will meet Wed., Nov. 9 instead of Tues., Nov. 8. The meeting will be held at Administration Building., 801 Boulevard Ave., Dickson City. MOOSIC • Council will meet at 7 p.m. on Mon-

CITY, UNIONS BEGIN TALKS By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON – For the first time in several years, the mayor and city administration met privately with Scranton’s police and fire unions at 3 p.m. on Thursday in City Council Chambers to begin preliminary negotiations to settle a decade-long court battle over long-delayed arbitration awards. Representing police and fire department employees, Atty. Thomas Jennings stated after the meeting that this is the first “substantive” conversation he’s had with Mayor Chris Doherty in three-and-a-half years, though he felt the conference “went as expected.” “I didn’t anticipate that we were going to walk out of today with much. We’re both still calculating the damage. You’ve got to know what you’re dealing with before you discuss it, and we’re doing that right now,” Jennings said. “It’s progress in just the fact that we were sitting in the same room. It’s only happened once in a decade prior to this…We reiterated that we’re more than willing to work with the city. We’ve just got to understand what they intend to do. We understand that there’s a tiger by the tail.” Jennings, International Association of Fire Fighters Local 60 President and Scranton Fire Lt. Dave Gervasi, E.B. Jermyn Lodge No. 2 of the Fraternal Order of Police President and Scranton Detective Sgt. Bob Martin, and several other union representatives met with Doherty, City Solicitor Paul Kelly, Jr., Business Administrator Ryan McGowan, Asst. City Solicitor Gerald Butler, and Human Resources Director Gina McAn-

drew for only 30 minutes, but the groundwork was laid for future negotiations in that short time. “Each side told their viewpoint. It was like breaking the ice. We had a nice, pleasant conversation,” Doherty said. “We know we have to settle this, and this is the first step to doing it.” The 6-1 Pennsylvania Supreme Court ruling on Oct. 19 found that the distressed municipalities act, or Act 47, does not supersede the Policemen and Firemen Collective Bargaining Act, or Act 111, meaning that the city could no longer delay collective bargaining awards because of the city’s economic state. With the city already facing an estimated $6 million budget deficit this year in addition to other financial issues, the mayor has already warned that the decision could lead to layoffs, tax increases, and additional borrowing. “If he does what he’s proposing to do, with all the layoffs and

the 100 percent increase in taxes, that would basically destroy the city and we don’t want any part of that. But on the other hand, we have to talk,” Jennings said. “We clearly do not want to hurt the city. That is an unequivocal statement. On the other hand, we’ve been denied wages and benefits for 10 years now. Now there’s a point where they have to pay up. The question is, ‘How are we going to do it?’” While no one could offer any concrete numbers as to how much the city owes, Jennings estimated that it could be over $20 million. “We never do calculations of back pay until we win. We only started to do it since the decision came out,” he said. Gervasi said that when the unions meet again with the administration, he hopes to first tackle the “low-hanging fruit,” or the smaller issues now reversed by the court ruling, such

day, Nov. 7 at the Moosic Borough Building, 715 Main St., Moosic. NEWTON TOWNSHIP • The Board of Supervisors will hold a budget workshop at their next regularly scheduled work session on Wed., Nov. 9 at 7:30 p.m. at the municipal building, 1528 Newton Ransom Blvd., Clarks Summit. NORTH ABINGTON • The Board of Supervisors will meet Wed., Nov. 9 at 6 p.m. in the township building on Route 407to establish the 2012 Budget Plan. SCOTT TOWNSHIP • The Planning Commission will conduct a conditional use hearing on Wed., Nov. 9 at 7 p.m. to hear the

request of Corrin Ceccarelli to operate a salon and day spa from her residence located at 1213 Lakeland Dr. SCRANTON • The Scranton School Board will hold its regular board meeting on Wed., Nov. 9 at 7 :30 p.m. in the board room of the administration building, 425 N. Washington Ave., Scranton. • The Board of Zoning Appeals will meet Wed., Nov. 9 at 6 p.m. in council chambers at City Hall, 340 N. Washington Ave., on the following matters: 1.) N. E. PA SMSA Limited Partnership, d/b/a Verizon Wireless. Applicant is seeking a use variance for a rooftop, wireless telephone antenna at 499 Mulberry St., C-D Zone.

2.) Taconda Cortazzo and Associates, #600. Applicant seeks a use variance for a roof top off premise billboard at 101 Pittston Ave. C-N Zone. 3.) Luis Alvarez, 75 N. Thomas St., Kingston. Applicant seeks to restore a condemned multi family dwelling at 1415-17 N. Main Ave. C/N Zone.

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Union Atty. Thomas Jennings, left, speaks with police union President Bob Martin outside City Hall on Thursday.

See UNIONS, Page 9

ALL JUNK CARS & TRUCKS WANTED

Free Removal. Call Anytime. Highest Price Paid In Cash! 713561

8

V&G 570-574-1275


Sunday, November 6, 2011

Continued from page 3

tion program from prior director Bill Lange in 2003, Hyde estimates that she has doubled the amount of conserved areas in Lackawanna County to more than 4,000 acres. Hyde is currently working on applications for two other farm preservation grants – one each in Benton and Madison townships While the state program

UNIONS Continued from page 8

as the reinstitution of eliminated fire inspectors and the honoring of police contracts that guarantee 12 officers per shift. “If they comply with the award on these small things, that shows good faith to us. At that point, we’ll start getting into bigger things. If they don’t, they don’t; then it’s going to be a stalemate again. They’ll be forced in a couple months,” Gervasi said. “Cauterize the little wounds before you talk about doing the

was so low,” he said. “The preservation had to help a great majority of those farmers. If not, it gave their farms enough money so they didn’t have to sell it.” For Sarnoski, it’s provided a land that’s now preserved from commercial development. He likely wouldn’t change that for any amount. “I love getting up in the morning at dawn, sitting here, and looking for a deer out the window or turkeys coming out. I couldn’t think of living anywhere else. “My farm is really special to me.”

major surgery,” Jennings added. “One way or another, you’re going to pay, so why not get the labor out of it?” The Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development, which acts as the city’s Act 47 coordinator along with the Pennsylvania Economy League, filed an application for reconsideration and reargument on Wednesday with the state Supreme Court, but Jennings said this would not act as a stay and would not delay the unions’ talks with the administration. Thursday afternoon’s meeting may have been preliminary,

but Jennings believes one agreement was made by both sides – after years of appeals, the back-and-forth battle has finally come to a close. “This is the end. Everybody today agreed that this is the end. It’s over. They call it ‘supreme’ for a reason. It’s that simple,” Jennings said. “It’s a Supreme Court decision. You can’t go any higher,” Doherty said. “We agreed to meet in the future.” The unions are scheduled to meet with the administration again on Nov. 15, another step which Jennings called “incredibly significant.”

ARTS

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13

RUTH’S PLACE SHELTER

WALK-A-THON

“A Mile in Her Shoes”

722131

WHAT: A walk through downtown Wilkes-Barre WHEN: Sunday, Nov. 13, 1:00-3:00pm WHERE: Start at Public Square WHY: To educate and raise funds for the homeless HOW: Go to ruthsplace.com; or call 822-6817

SPORTS

SCRANTON – Repairs to the John G. Audubon Elementary School could cost anywhere from $3.7 million to more than $17,225,000, according to plans presented to Scranton School District board members during a work session held Wednesday, Nov. 2. William J. Byron presented plans on behalf of The Palumbo Group, the district’s construction firm, that explore options that range from remediating problems following the discovery of mold in Oct. 2010 to building a brand new facility on ground not yet owned by the district. Minimum repairs would cost $3.7 million; extensive upgrades and renovations could cost $8 million; demolition and new construction on the existing site would reach $12 million; and a new school that could combine the populations of Audubon, Prescott, and Whittier elementary schools “and other attendance areas” could hit $17,225,000 plus “soft costs” for land acquisition and associated costs, according to Byron. A final, low-cost option would move the 233 students enrolled at Audubon to Adams, Prescott, and Whittier elementary schools if they could handle the increased student population. Buildings and Grounds Committee Chair Bob Sheridan suggested the board take time to review the options presented Wednesday, and a decision would likely not be announced until December, at the earliest. Efforts to obtain a complete copy of the Palumbo report on Thursday were unsuccessful. In addition, the district must decide how and when it will remediate issues at West Scranton Intermediate School. Geo-Science Engineering representative Rich Scheller said that the floor of the school’s gymnasium is cracked due to the settling of ash beneath the building. An exterior wall has moved about four inches, Scheller also reported. It’s suggested that the district should drill beneath the floor during the summer of 2012 to

conduct compaction grouting to reduce the risk of future movement or settling, replace the floor slab, and place a wooden or suspended floor in the school at a total estimated cost of up to $500,000. In other business: • Whittier Principal Ann McDonough hopes to block off three streets – Grimes and Gallagher courts and Galvin Place surrounding the South Scranton elementary building for 30 minutes before and 20 minutes after the school day to ensure the safety of students walking to school or being dropped off by parents. More than 300 of the current 426 students enrolled walk or are driven to school by family, McDonough said. • Board members will discuss their intent to appeal a recent decision by the Pennsylvania Charter School Appeals Board that supports a charter school application in the Scranton and Abington Heights school districts by the Howard Gardner School for Discovery. Both district denied appeals • The district has lost more funding due to a 1.5 percent overall reduction on top of previous decreases. Title I lost an additional $54,269 on top of the original $51,484; Title II Part A originally lost $112,590 and recently lost another $10,322; and Title III, which had no original losses, now was cut by $2,687. Further Title I and II cuts could come in January when the state adjusts allocations for charter school enrollments. • New policies regarding criminal records could impact district personnel, according to solicitor Harry McGrath. Certain convictions that once excluded teachers for employment for a five-year period now exclude applicants permanently. Other misdemeanor offenses now preclude employees for 10 years instead of five, and others now result in a three-year disqualification where there was none previously. The new guidelines are effect retroactively. “It could result in suspensions or terminations as a result of conduct that, heretofore, had not affected their employment,” McGrath said.

FARM

works to slow the loss of farmland to non-agricultural uses, it also helps those farms continue to operate and, in some cases, expand. Sarnoski used the money from the prior preservation of close to 80 acres in the early 2000s to buy the 17 acres that were most recently preserved. At an appraised rate of $2,436 per acre, the new preservation brought more than $41,000 to Sarnoski Hill Farm. “It helps out a lot. A lot of farmers would have maybe lost their land, especially dairy farmers because the price of milk

NEWS

Audubon price tag could surpass $17.2M By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

9

GOLackawanna


10

GOLackawanna

Sunday, November 6, 2011

SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

Think Thanksgiving discounts

Once again, it’s the time of year to start earning rewards toward a free or low-cost turkey at your favorite grocery stores. Earning the necessary points can get very stressful since each store offers different ways to earn. While the offers may vary, the goals are all the same: to encourage store loyalty of shoppers prior to the holiday season. For the best results, choose one store to shop at for the next four weeks. There are typically three ways to earn rewards towards your turkey. The first is to collect “points” by buying participating items. Giant Food Stores is offering a free turkey with 400 rewards points or gas extra rewards. Through Nov. 26, earn one extra reward point for every dollar you spend with your bonus card. Free turkey certificates can be redeemed between Nov. 13 and Nov. 26.You can track points online or at the bottom of your receipt. Once you receive 400 points, a free turkey certificate will print at the register. The advantage of shopping at Giant during this promotion is that they sometimes offer rewards on items purchased rather than the amount of money spent in each transaction. When shopping, you should use check for coupons on products listed in each promotion and buy items that have a long shelf life. ShopRite also offers a deal when you spend $300 or more from now until Nov. 24 to earn a free turkey, ham, turkey breast, kosher chicken, lasagna or tofurky. Shur Save Markets are offering a similar promotion, but you earn vouchers towards turkey rewards. Spend $300 and get $5 certificate, spend $350 and get a $10 certificate, spend $500 for a $15 certificate, or spend $600 to get a $25 certificate. This promotion ends a bit early on Nov. 12. Rewards certificates can be redeemed between Nov. 13 and Nov. 24. When saving for Thanksgiving rewards, don’t buy items that you will never use. Keep in mind that a turkey is worth

DEAL DETECTIVE

Cutting card count 500 VINE

JENNA URBAN

TOP DEALS Giant Instant savings deal starts Sunday. Buy 10 participating items and save $5 instantly. Products include Smuckers jam and ice cream toppings; Pillsbury flour, cake mix, and readyto-spread frosting; and Hungry Jack pancake mix or syrup are among the options.

Walgreens Blistex revive and restore lip care, $1.99. Get $1.99 in Register Rewards. Healthifeet foot cream, $10. Submit $10 mail-in rebate in the November coupon book.

CVS Jif peanut butter or Smuckers jam, two for $5. Get $3 in Extra Care Bucks, and use $1 off two Smuckers coupon from Red Plum on Nov. 6.

Rite Aid Arm and Hammer deodorant, two for $4. Get $3 in +Up Rewards when you buy two. 7-Up two liter, three for $3.99. Get $2 in rewards.

about $20, so spending $300 or $600 on items that you would normally not purchase is not a good deal. Another great tip is to purchase larger items like cleaning supplies, brooms, baking pans or even toys at these stores as a way to earn rewards. Finally, make sure that you read the fine print and know the store’s coupon policy before planning your shopping trip. If you are not interested in savings toward a turkey, there are some coupons and rebates that you may want to print now before they are gone. Coupons.com has two Butterball coupons for $2 and $3 off. You can also save $5 by mail when you buy one Butterball frozen or fresh whole turkey with coupons at www.butterball.com/ savings. JENNA URBAN, the Go Lackawanna Deal Detective, is the mother of three children in Dunmore. Visit the Deal Detective blog at golackawanna.com and bucktownbargains.com for more savings.

Plastic cards are everywhere these days. Debit cards, grocery store discount cards, driver’s licenses, credit cards - the list is endless. Most people have to carry two wallets just to ensure they have the proper card at any given time. At the Albright Memorial Library, this kind of inconvenience is a thing of the past. Thanks to a grant from the Praxair Foundation, the library has installed a new self-service kiosk called the Library Payment Center. It is no longer necessary to carry a special printing card in addition to a library card. The Library Payment Center allows you to credit money to your library card by using a credit or debit card, cash, or coins. Your library card can then be used to make photocopies, reserve a PC, make print-outs, and as always, check out materials. In addition, fines can also be paid at the Library Payment Center. “We have always been a bit ahead of the curve. We stopped using coin-operated photocopiers in the 1990s and went to a card system. That worked well for many years but it requires people to carry two cards,” said Scott Thomas, the library’s head of information technologies and technical services. “People don’t want to carry multiple cards and many prefer self-service. Also, many people

COMMUNITY CALENDAR NEPA Blogger meet-up, Sun., Nov. 6, 6-11 p.m., Metro Bar and Grill, 1174 Memorial Highway, Dallas. Info: http://nepablogs.blogspot.com. Greater Scranton Chapter of Penn State Alumni Association meeting, Wed., Nov. 9, 7:30 p.m., Sherbine Lounge, Penn State Worthington-Scranton Campus. Info: Christine DeAlba, (570) 466-4898. ‘Why Nations Fail: Origins of

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Library staff member Michele Phillips assists a patron in using the librarys new automated payment center.

no longer bring cash so payment by credit card makes sense,” added Michele Legate, grants development and reference librarian. The library’s computer reservation system was also replaced as part of the project. Due to the number of people who use the 28 public computers - over 61,000 uses in 2010 the library uses software to assign computers to library patrons and to manage the time so everyone gets a chance to use a computer. “This new system is more advanced than the one it replaced. It can sense how busy it is and alter the length of sessions accordingly,” Thomas said. Prints and photocopies are $0.25 per page for black and

white copies and $0.75 for color. Proof of Lackawanna County residency is required for a library card, but out of town visitors can purchase a guest pass for $1 to use the public computers. The Library Payment Center is located on the second floor in the reference area. “Our goal is to make the library card as valuable as we possibly can for those that carry it, and this is all part of that.” Thomas said. Public computers are available in the Reference Department, free of charge. If you don’t have a library card, come in and sign up for one today.

Power, Poverty and Prosperity,’ Wed., Nov. 9, 7:30 p.m., McIlhenny Ballroom, DeNaples Center, University of Scranton. Cost: Free. Info: (570) 941-7475. ‘Ask the Doctor: Questions about Lupus,’ Thurs., Nov. 10, 6 p.m., The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine St., Scranton. Panel includes rheumatologist Eugene Grady, MD, cardiologist Matthew Stopper, MD and ophthalmologist Randall Pearis, MD, FACS. Info: (570) 558-2008 or 1-888-995-8787. Christmas Bazaar, Fri. and Sat., Nov. 11 and 12, 11 a.m.-7 p.m., and Sun., Nov. 13, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., St. John’s Russian Orthodox Ca-

thedral, Hill Street, Mayfield. Info: Joan Zaleski, (570) 2546882 or (570) 906-4520. ‘The Courage to Transcend: A True Source of Resiliency and Strength,’ lecture by Matthew Sanford, Sat., Nov. 12, 7 p.m., Mellow Theater, Lackawanna College, 501 Vine St., Scranton. Presented by the Sgt. Jan Argonish Ride. Event preceded by meet-and-greet with Sanford from 5-6:30 p.m. Cost: Free to all veterans, first responders, and their friends and family; $5 donation for meet-and-greet. Seating is limited. Info: www.jansride.com, (570) 9551455.

‘500 VINE’ focuses on local library events and services. Find it biweekly in Go Lackawanna.


Sunday, November 6, 2011

NEWS BRIEFS

- CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES / GO LACKAWANNA Group charged in new bath salts case A Wilkes-Barre couple was indicted by a federal grand jury and three others were charged on Wednesday with the illegal distribution of bath salts. Peter J. Smith, U.S. Attorney for the Middle District of Pennsylvania, said that the charges stem from a multijurisdictional investigation that targeted the illegal sale of ephedrine and 3,4-methylendioxyprovalerone, commonly referred to as “MDPV” or “bath salts.” The indictment charges Pritesh Patel and Kekulben Patel with conspiracy, distribution of ephedrine knowing of its wrongful use, and money laundering. Pritesh Patel is also charged with conspiracy to distribute MDPV. Also charged and arrested Wednesday were Nora Riley, 43; Naishad Patel, 29; and Dipika Patel, 27; all of WilkesBarre. Criminal complaints allege that Riley distributed and conspired with Pritesh Patel to distribute MDPV. Dipika and Naishad Patel, husband and wife, are charged with distributing and conspiring to distribute MDPV from their store, Noxen Food Mart, in Wyoming County. - STEVE MOCARSKY / THE TIMES LEADER

SPORTS

Local joblessness rate still top in state For the first time since April, the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in the Scranton/ Wilkes-Barre metropolitan area declined, dropping by onetenth of a percentage point to 9.7 percent in September. The Wilkes-Barre/Scranton region had the highest unemployment rate in Pennsylvania, registering the only rate at or above 9 percent. But the region bucked the overall state trend in September. The state’s unemployment rate increased one-tenth of a percentage point to 8.3 percent, while the nation’s rate remained unchanged at 9.1 percent. - ANDREW M. SEDER / THE TIMES LEADER

ARTS

Charges dismissed in Power Ranger robbery Charges against Thomas Joseph Crimi, 19, in the alleged theft of fast food inside a South Scranton eatery while wearing a Power Rangers costume were dismissed Nov.1 after the arresting officer failed to appear in court, according to court officials. Crimi, 19, of Cherry Hill Road, Nazareth, originally faced robbery and related charges for allegedly stealing $7.49 in McDonald’s food purchased by Joseph Bingham as an employee passed it to him on Oct. 25. According to an affidavit, Bingham followed Crimi and gave police turn-by-turn directions to his car as it fled into downtown Scranton. The red Power Ranger costume and matching white boots were found inside his vehicle when he was stopped by Scranton Ptlm. Robert Olecki.

11

NEWS

Blake: Redistricting plan is ‘power grab’ State Sen. John Blake said the redistricting plan proposed by the Legislative Reapportionment Commission Monday “is a statewide power grab that offends the sensibilities of a significant portion of the Pennsylvania electorate.” Blake, D-Archbald, Lackawanna County, represents the 22nd Senatorial District. He said Wednesday that he didn’t expect a dramatic change in his district, but he no longer represents parts of Monroe County and he has picked up most municipalities in the Wyoming Area School District – towns that had been represented by Sen. John Yudichak, D-Plymouth Township. “I’m somewhat surprised by the reapportionment plan due to the marginal population change that occurred in the district over the past 10 years,” Blake said. “As a member of the Senate Democratic Caucus, I take great exception to the implications and motives of the Republican approved draft redistricting plan as it raises serious Constitutional and voting rights questions.” - BILL O ’ BOYLE / THE TIMES LEADER

GOLackawanna


12

GOLackawanna

Sunday, November 6, 2011

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

IF YOU GO

CRANTON - In her 30-year career at Scranton Prep, Drama Director Ann S. Moyles, a Dunmore native and Olyphant resident, has already taken her students on two trips to the Emerald City. This weekend, she takes her third.

WHAT: ‘The Wizard of Oz,’ presented by the Prep Players. WHERE: Bellarmine Theatre, Scranton Prep, 1000 Wyoming Ave., Scranton. WHEN: Fri. and Sat., Nov. 11, 12, 18, and 19, 7:30 p.m.; Sun., Nov. 13 and 20, 2 p.m. Pre-show event for children with storybook characters begins 30 minutes before curtain. COST: $10, general; $8, students; $6, children 12 and under. INFO: (570) 941-PREP.

S

The Scranton Prep Players will travel down the yellow brick road with a couple of tra-la-las from Nov. 11-13 and 18-20 in the St. Robert Bellarmine Theatre at Prep, 1000 Wyoming Ave., Scranton. “Each time I’ve done it, we’ve improved it, and we’re attempting to do the same thing with this show by making it better than the last,” Moyles said, noting their previous production of “The Wizard of Oz” in 2004. After three dramatic fall productions in the last three years including “A Man for All Seasons” in 2010, “it was time for something light,” Moyles said. Students couldn’t have been happier, as the revelation of “Oz” as the 2011 show was met with “a lot of screaming and happiness,” sophomore Caitlin Dermody,16, of Elmhurst, said. Dermody portrays Glinda the Good Witch in Prep’s production. Recreating such an iconic film on stage comes with some heavy expectations.

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Scranton Prep senior Aleni Mackarey, right, is attacked by a flying monkey played by Cooper Shotto during rehearsal for the school’s upcoming production of ’The Wizard of Oz.’

“What people have to understand is this isn’t the movie, it’s a play. However, I’m doing the movie,” Moyles quipped. “That’s what people come and expect to see.” “I remember thinking, ‘How are we going to do this?’ Gradually, it just came together, and it’s going to be awesome,” said senior Joe McGrath, 17, of Scranton. Bringing such fantastic scenes to life has provided even more fun for some of the actors involved. “I watched the movie a lot as a

kid. It’s really fun to be able to put on the play and be a character that I was actually afraid of,” said McGrath, who will play Professor Marvel and the Wizard of Oz. “When he was up on the screen and screaming at everyone, it used to scare me so much. “It’s going to be interesting. It hasn’t really sunk in that I’m going to be playing him.” Special effects, like the Wizard’s menacing, disembodied head are recreated with some

“stage magic,” McGrath said, and students have been hard at work perfecting costumes, sets, and the like. “We have so many different people that put in even more work than we do most of the time,” said senior Chris Boland, 18, of Dallas, the Cowardly Lion in Prep’s performance. One hundred fifty students form the cast and crew this fall, Moyles said. For Dorothy – Prep senior Aleni Mackarey, 18, of Clarks

Combined with education and experience requirements, a candidate for CFP® certification must pass the rigorous CFP® exam, which is given three times each year throughout the United States. Mr. Bucci successfully completed the July 2011 exam given at Villanova University.

DON’T BOOK YOUR HOLIDAY PARTY UNTIL YOU TALK TO US!

DISTINCTIVE CATERING AVAILABLE FOR ALL TYPES OF EVENTS, INCLUDING FULL THANKSGIVING FEAST TO GO!

CALL PAT GREENFIELD AT 570-654-9120

Summit – it’s a chance to also revisit a costume she’s donned before. “This has always been my favorite movie. I dressed up like Dorothy for five years for Halloween. I love the song ‘Somewhere Over the Rainbow,’ and I’m excited to let other kids see it,” she said. Students have worked to interpret the characters as their own while holding to the film roles that they’ll be based off of, but perhaps more importantly, they’re building lasting friendships. “What the audience gets to see is so fantastic, but what we get out of it is so much more,” Dermody said. “We’re building a family here.” Friday and Saturday evening performances, as well as Sunday matinees, are preceded by a brief event full of storybook characters for children to interact with. Those events begin 30 minutes before curtain.

BUCCI RECEIVES CERTIFICATION Robert J. Bucci, principal of Bucci Financial Services, has been notified by the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, Inc. that he has successfully completed the requirements and has attained his CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNERTM certification.

The ten hour exam, given over two days, tests a candidate’s competency in 89 different topic areas. The planning areas covered by these topics include General Principals

721489 720382

SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

A whimsical return to ‘Oz’

B UCCI

of Financial Planning, Insurance Planning and Risk Management, Employee Benefits Planning, Investment Planning, Income Tax Planning, Retirement Planning and Estate Planning. Bucci Financial Services is a comprehensive financial planning practice located at 517 Pierce Street, Kingston. Any person with financial questions, or who wishes to schedule a complimentary consultation, can contact Bucci Financial Services directly at (570) 288-8704, or visit www.buccifinancial.com. Securities offered through Triad Advisors, Inc.: Member FINRA /SIPC Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certification marks CFP®, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNERTM and federally registered CFP (with flame design) in the U.S.

F INANCIAL 517 Pierce Street Kingston • 288-8704 S ERVICES www.buccifinancial.com

Building a Better Future.


Sunday, November 6, 2011

VISUAL ARTS

Send your arts event listings to news@golackawanna.com, fax information to (570) 5580854, or call (570) 558-0113.

Scranton Cultural Center, 420 N. Washington Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 346-7369, www.scrantonculturalcenter.org. ‘Up and Coming Comedy,’ with Keith Barany and Anthony Acquaviva, music by Nobody Fancy, Sat., Nov. 12, music at 7 p.m., comedy at 8 p.m. Mature content, 21+ to drink. Cost: $16.

NEWS

CONCERTS

Keystone College, One College Green, La Plume. Info: (570) 945-8000, www.keystone.edu. 198th Army Concert Band, Thurs., Nov. 10, 7 p.m., Brooks Theatre. Cost: Free. New Visions Studio and Gallery, 201 Vine St., Scranton. Info: (610) 636-9684, www.newvisionsstudio.com. Acoustic showcase, featuring Sarah Yzkanin, Danny Jackowitz, Doghouse Charlie, Patrick McGlynn, Katie Kelly, Terry Childers, and Dave Tomaine, Fri., Nov. 18, 6-11 p.m.

ARTS

THEATER

Actors Circle at Providence Playhouse, 1256 Providence Rd, Scranton Info: (570) 342-9707, www.actorscircle.org. ‘A Christmas Story’ staged reading, Nov. 17-20. Music Box Dinner Playhouse, 196 Hughes St, Swoyersville. Info: (570) 283-2195 or 800698-PLAY. ‘Irving Berlin’s White Christmas,’ Sat. to Sun., Nov. 26-27, Thurs. to Sun., Dec. 1-4, 8-11, and 15-18, Thurs.-Sat. at 8 p.m., Sun. at 3 p.m.

WRITING/POETRY

New Visions Studio and Gallery, 201 Vine St., Scranton. Info: (610) 636-9684, www.newvisionsstudio.com. Writers showcase, with readings from Brian Fanelli, Dawn Leas, Jason Lucarelli, Tom Borthwick, Alexis Czencz Belluzzi, Amye Archer, Steve Keating, and Norma Bernstock, Sat., Nov. 12, 7-10 p.m. Cost: Free. The Vintage Theater, 119 Penn Avenue, Scranton. Info: (570) 589-0271, www.scrantonsvintagetheater.com. Writer’s critique group, Sat., 12-2 p.m. Bring work samples. Cost: Free, donations encouraged. Open microphone night, last Thursday of each month, registration at 6:30 p.m., event at 7 p.m.

SPORTS

AFA Gallery, 514 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. Gallery hours: Thurs.-Sat., 12-5 p.m. Info: (570) 969-1040, www.artistsforart.com. Life Drawing sessions, Mon., 7-9 p.m. Call Phil for info, (570) 561-7817. Drawing Socials, Sun., 6-9 p.m. Cost: $5, $2 students. Art Council of the Abingtons, Clarks Summit Info: artscota2@aol.com. Second Friday art walk, Fri., Nov. 11. ArtWorks Gallery, 502 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. Fall gallery hours: Tues.-Fri., 11 a.m-5 p.m.; Sat., 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; or by appointment. Info: (570) 207-1815, www.artworksnepa.com. ‘Samhain: A Celebration of the Arts,’ works by Jenn Bell, Peter Hoffer, Paul Neilsen, and Ted Sokolowski, opening reception, exhibit continues to Nov. 26. ‘Botanical Illustration Made Easy,’ with Everhart Museum, Tues., Nov. 15, 6-8 p.m. Cost: $35. Everhart Museum, 1901 Mulberry St., Scranton. Cost: $5 adults; $3 students/ seniors, $2 children 6-12, members free. Info: (570) 346-7186, www.everhartmuseum.org. ‘Buds, Blooms & Berries: Plants in Science, Culture & Art,’ through Dec. 31 in the Maslow Galleries. Linder Gallery, Keystone College, One College Green, La Plume. Info: (570) 945-8335, www.keystone.edu. ‘The Pros and Cons of Unitized Construction,’ works of Vaughn Randall, exhibit continues through Dec. 2. New Visions Studio and Gallery, 201 Vine St., Scranton. Gallery hours: Tues.–Sun., 12-6 p.m. Info: (610) 636-9684, www.newvisionsstudio.com. ‘Off the Wall,’ works of Heather Murphy, Lolita Nogan, Erica Simon, and Michael Swanson, exhibit continues through Nov. 27. STAR Gallery, Mall at Steamtown, 300 Lackawanna Ave. Info: (570) 969-2537 or (570) 343-3048. Ceramic sculpture and the Children’s Art Corner. Call Tom Gates, (570) 877-3261. Drawing and painting classes. Call Karen Mahalik, (570) 383-1220. Private Photoshop classes. Call Gerry Stankiewicz, (570) 7099203. Traveling show ‘PA Route 6 Artisan Trail Traveling Exhibit,’ Ben-Mar Restaurant, Cozy Corner Café, and Carbondale YMCA, exhibit continues through Nov. 19. Info: gallery@carbondalechamber.org, (570) 282-1690.

HAVE AN EVENT?

721175

ARTS CALENDAR

13

GOLackawanna


14

GOLackawanna

Sunday, November 6, 2011

Writers find a home

SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

L

ocal visual artists are featured quite prominently in art galleries and businesses throughout downtown Scranton, particularly on First Fridays, but writers are often left without such venues to demonstrate their talents.

New Visions Studio and Gallery, 201 Vine St., Scranton, and a diverse group of wordsmiths are looking to change that with a free Writers Showcase featuring live readings of poetry, fiction, and non-fiction on Sat., Nov. 12, at 7 p.m. The published authors, who will have their work available for sale, include hosts Brian Fanelli and Jason Lucarelli along with Dawn Leas, Tom Borthwick, Alexis Czencz Belluzzi, Amye Archer, Steve Keating, and Norma Bernstock. Fanelli, a poet, met Lucarelli, a short fiction writer, at a writers’ workshop at The Vintage Theater in Scranton two years ago and recently discussed the idea of a local reading series. “I wanted to approach other writers who are living as writers and publishing chapbooks and stuff just to get into sort of a community here. I know that people here are struggling to do it the same as I am, so I wanted to search them out, get them together in a room, and just share what we’re doing,” Lucarelli explained. “I think poetry is especially exciting to hear in a live environment. One of the key elements of poetry is its musicality, and to hear that live, sometimes it’s more exciting than when it’s on the page…I think that the same is true for the other genres of writing, too,” Fanelli added. Fanelli, 27, a writing instructor at Keystone College and author of “Front Man,” believes that readings are not only an entertaining way to promote their craft, but often an essential one. “I think it’s important to organize readings and also to showcase different writers in the area, to let people know that we do have a fairly vibrant writing community around here,” he enthused. “You also can’t be a writer without reading other writers. I

CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES PHOTO COURTESY PHOTO

Local authors unite Saturday for a showcase at New Visions.

think, with poetry especially, the more writers you read and the more different forms you look at and try, the better your writing is going to be.” In that spirit, the event should prove to be educational for both the listeners and the participants. Lucarelli, 24, who is pursuing a master’s degree in creative writing at Vermont College of Fine Arts, has participated in student readings and found that listening to others has helped him choose his own pieces as well as see into his own future as a fiction writer. “Once I’m done with this degree and I try to get published out there, I’ll have to get up and go on the road and read these things, and I’ll have to be conscious of the pieces that I pick to read aloud to people. I’m looking at it as more of a support group. Yes, I want to hear these other people read and what they’re working on, but I also want to take a look at what they do with their outside lives day to day and how they support this. “For me, it’s still an extracurricular activity, so how are they supporting this with their day jobs or whatever they do?” he questioned. The hosts made a conscious decision to include a wide variety of writers reading from a mixture of genres to provide “something for everyone.” “When it’s onstage like that,

IF YOU GO WHAT: Writers Showcase with live readings of poetry, fiction, and non-fiction WHERE: New Visions Studio and Gallery, 201 Vine St., Scranton WHEN: Sat., Nov. 12 at 7 p.m. COST: Free

it’s a lot more engaging. You’re automatically sort of taken along if it’s a good performance. In terms of the whole local art scene in Scranton, when you go out and see people perform this, hopefully you do get attached to one of the artists,” Lucarelli said. “Even if you don’t like poetry, fiction, or non-fiction, come out to the reading because sometimes it is a little more exciting to hear the word performed and read aloud,” Fanelli added. While the event is a first for New Visions, co-owners Adam Weitzenkorn and Melanie Boisseau said that it’s just the type of event they’re been looking forward to holding since their Scranton opening in May. “We haven’t done any kind of poetry or writing events yet. We want to get all forms of art here,” Weitzenkorn said. “Writing is another creative outlet that needs to be expressed and viewed, so hopefully people will come and see that. I think they will.”

Early ed programs lauded By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON – Local supporters of early childhood education took time Thursday morning to share their concerns about possible cuts to such programs before reading to one of the prekindergarten classes as John Adams Elementary School. “When you look at slashing budgets and ending programs that absolutely protect communities, save lives, and give kids hope, it’s really a no brainer,” Lackawanna County First Assistant District Attorney Gene Talerico said. Peter Danchak, northeast regional president of PNC Bank, said today’s school children are

tomorrow’s customers and employees. “We want to see them get off to a great start,” he said. Advocates are concerned that U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Zionsville, and the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction will cutfunding to early childhood education programs. “Our message is that he reject further cuts to the federal discretionary budget over the next 10year period that would jeopardize the investments in highquality early childhood education,” said Bruce Clash, state director of Fight Crime: Invest in Kids. Toomey’s office did not return a request for comment.

For the celebrations that mean the most to you.

You want your special event to be perfect and so do we. So whether you’re planning a business gathering, reunion, anniversary or other celebration, let us put it all together for you with exceptional menus, professional service and beautifully appointed banquet rooms. Wedding Packages from $29. Call today to learn about our satisfaction guarantee and how we can make your next event perfectly memorable.

GIFT CERTIFICATES for the Holidays

CALL 570-970-2628

Financing Available

Lackawanna County First Assistant District Attorney Gene Talerico, left, and PNC Bank Northeast Region President Pete Danchak read ‘Officer Buckle and Gloria’ to students at John Adams Elementary School on Thursday.

441 Moyallen Street, W-B, PA 18702 WWW.RJMARINESALES.COM

100 Adams Avenue, Scranton, PA 18503 scranton.hilton.com 570.343.3000 • 570.343.8415 (fax)


Sunday, November 6, 2011

GOLackawanna

15

NEWS ARTS SPORTS


ARTS

NEWS

16

GOLackawanna

Sunday, November 6, 2011

A license to kill ‘Skyfall’ criticism Whether you enjoy the series or not, there’s one thing I think we can all admit that the James Bond films do well: evoke quite an emotional response from the Internet. And by “emotional response,” I mean “high-pitched whining.” Every time a new Bond film is announced by MGM, it seems that a whole slew of “fans” come out of the woodwork to criticize it. People seemed mostly pleased when it was revealed last week that Javier Bardem, best known as the brutal villain in “No Country for Old Men,” would be playing the nemesis of returning Bond actor Daniel Craig in the 23rd movie in the series. As soon as its title was released, the prattling began. “‘Skyfall’? What are they thinking with a dumb name like that?” “It sounds like those cheesy old Bond movies. This is going to suck.” “I judge things as harshly as I was judged in high school! I mean…I’m boycotting this garbage!”

RICH HOWELLS The Bond franchise means much more to me than a kneejerk reaction, however, as it was the first film series I ever watched as a kid. Whenever there’s a marathon on TV, you better believe I’m stuck to the couch for its duration, despite owning the DVD box sets. The recurring lines and drink orders becomes obvious, but one thing that I think has made this series stick is its ability to change. Changing lead actors has been the kiss of death for many franchises, yet this one has thrived with rotating Bonds and one-off bad guys. When audiences wanted overthe-top action, they got “Moonraker” and “Octopussy.” When they wanted serious and brooding, they got “Casino Royale.” While many consider this the first reboot of the series, they forget that Pierce Brosnan’s 1995 introduction to the role, “GoldenEye,” was meant as a reboot as

Daniel Craig returns as James Bond in ’Skyfall’.

well, following a five-year gap in Bond flicks. Like Bonds before him, Daniel Craig’s secret agent is a reflection of his own time. He’s a fullfledged reboot, severing most of the tenuous strings tied to the other Bonds, and he shows more emotion than his predecessors ever dared exercise. He’s not as slick or as polished, being new to the job, but he’s not afraid to get a little more roughed up or fall in love much harder. What does all this have to do with “Skyfall”? One of the hallmarks of the franchise is its science fiction elements, usually

presented in the form of impossibly destructive weapons. While this added to their campiness, it also made them memorable; if every double agent and war criminal just pulled a regular gun on our hero, what would be the fun in that? This title alone seems to hearken back to those times, but I doubt the producers will allow things to get very goofy in this new continuity. The plot, as told so far, is that MI6 is under a direct attack, with M’s past coming back to haunt her, again letting the interesting members of Bond’s supporting cast shine

after decades of little development. Hiring serious actors such as Bardem, Albert Finney, Ralph Fiennes, and Ben Whishaw to join this installment also demonstrates which direction they’re going. Assumingly, Skyfall will be the name of some giant death ray or grand world-domination plot, but with “American Beauty” and “Road to Perdition” director Sam Mendes on board, I think it will be handled with more style than people are initially giving it credit for. These same people complained that “Quantum of Solace” was too deep a title, yet “Skyfall” is now too light for these armchair critics. I think we need to stop questioning, “What’s in a name?” and start considering, “What else is involved here?” Quite a bit to like, it seems. For this longtime fan, it’s time to simply wait until its 2012 release. If I can make one small request, however, it would be this – give us a gadget this time. Just one. If there’s one man who’s ever been on the cutting edge of modernity more than James, it’s certainly Q.

Precisely the style, quality, comfort and value you want!

The Right Choice SINCE 1984

SPORTS

INFINITE IMPROBABILITY

PLUS A FREE FIREPLACE & DECK

$200,000* Carlton

$211,000* Wilshire

$253,450*

3 Bedrooms including fabulous master suite with whirlpool tub & walk-in-closet

4 comfortable bedrooms with expansive master suite

5 bedrooms with grand master suite

Large great room with vaulted ceiling

Breakfast nook & formal dining room

Formal living & dining rooms

Spacious family room & formal living room

Covered porch

Plenty of closet & storage space

Large family room

Covered porch Full basement

Full basement

Full basement

Central air & heat, water & sewer plus permits included. We’ll build on your lot or ours!

www.precisionhomespa.com buyers, subject to change without notice. Ask for details.

800-562-3587

Open Monday-Saturday 9 to 5, Sunday afternoon by appointment. 2 1/2 miles N. of Rt. 940 on Rt. 196 in Mt. Pocono

® 10 Year New Home Warranty

Member Northeastern and Central PA

NORTH AMERICAN WARHORSE

1000 Dunham Drive Dunmore, PA www.nawarhorse.com 570.346.2453 (BIKE)


PAGE 17

721814

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011


ARTS

NEWS

18

GOLackawanna

Sunday, November 6, 2011

Injury hinders Ceresko’s golf game

The only thing that slowed Ellen Ceresko this fall was an injury. Ceresko (North Pocono), a sophomore with the Penn State women’s golf team, kicked off the season by shooting 77, 75, and 74 for a 226 total in the Cougar Classic at the College of Charleston. She had 75-75— 150 at the Cardinal Cup in Louisville, Ky., and then posted rounds of 78 and 72 for a 150 total to tie for 11th at the Nittany Lion Invitational at State College. The 72 was her best college round beating a 73 she fired last season as a freshman on the way to leading the team in scoring average (78.3). Unfortunately, Ceresko had to sit out the final tournament of the fall as she battled a tendonitis injury. “Ellen improved tremendously since she stepped onto the team in the fall of 2010,” coach Denise St. Pierre said. “She worked very hard and made some changes to her swing this summer that helped improve her consistency.”

ON CAMPUS

Tennis Association Tournament in Baltimore.

just about every defensive category.

BILL ARSENAULT

NCAAS FOR PETERS Senior Brian Peters and his Johns Hopkins football team have already clinched a berth in the upcoming NCAA Division III Tournament. The unbeaten Blue Jays won their first seven Centennial Conference games and beat the two teams that are tied for second with two games remaining and that assures them of competing for a national title. Peters (Abington Heights) is a starter on the defensive line. The 6-foot-3, 240-pounder has 21 tackles through the first eight games of the season. “Brian is one of the captains chosen by his peers,” associate head coach and defensive coordinator Frank Colaprete said. “He’s one of the hardest working players on the team and is willing to do whatever it takes to help the team win.” Peters has played both defensive end and tackle, the Blue Jays leading the conference in

COLDWATER ON COURSE Sophomore Connor Coldwater (Abington Heights) is a key performer for the Ohio University men’s golf team. Coldwater wrapped up the fall season by posting a 157 (75 and 82) at the Dayton Flyer Invitational. Prior to that, he posted a 220 at the Bearcat Invitational in Cincinnati with rounds of 73, 66 and 81. The 66 was the best score in the second round and tied for the low score in a field of 83 golfers. “Connor is getting better. He just needs more tournament experience,” coach Bob Cooley said. “He has proven he can go low - the 66 at Cincinnati - but followed that up with an 81. He has very good fundamentals and should only get better with hard work this winter. He should be in the starting lineup this spring.” The Bobcats open the spring season with the Mid-Atlantic Conference Match Play from Feb. 13-14 in Dade City, Fla..

The coach feels that Ceresko has a drive inside her that is tough to teach. “That is who she is and it allows her to compete at a high level,” St. Pierre said. “Her outside coach (Mary Zierke) has helped her improve in all aspects of playing the game.” The Nittany Lions open spring play at the Lady Puerto Rico Classic Feb. 19-21 in San Juan.

COURTESY PENN STATE ATHLETICS

A tendonitis injury kept Ellen Ceresko from a final fall tournament.

“Jeff is a hard worker both in the class room and on the tennis courts,” coach Rick McClure said. “He is working on his consistency from the baseline in singles play while attempting to construct each point to end with a volley at the net. He is a good competitor whose concentration and hustle during every point makes him a tough opponent to play against.” The Greyhounds open spring play Feb. 4-5 in a United States

DeSANTO HELPS GREYHOUNDS Sophomore Jeff DeSanto (Scranton Prep) is a member of the Loyola, Md., men’s tennis team. In his best effort of the fall, he posted a 1-1 record in D Flight singles and won his quarterfinal match in B Flight Doubles at the Mount St. Mary’s Invitational before rain forced cancellation of the tourney.

CRYSTAL

THE NEW HOME OF THE

VISION CENTER www.crystalvisioncenter.com 69

$

SPORTS

129

$

Premium Complete Package

Deluxe Complete Package

SAVE $176.00

SAVE $196.00

SAVE $216.00

Includes Eye Exam & 2 Pairs of Eyeglasses *2 Frames Up to $49 each or $49 Off Any Frame *2 Pairs SV Plastic Lenses --FT28 Bifocals Add $29 per pair---Progressives Add $89 per pair-*2 Hard Shell Case *Eye Exam-Refraction, Glaucoma Test, Cataract Screening, Color Test, Depth Perception Eye Health (Dilation if necessary)

Includes Eye Exam & 2 Pairs of Eyeglasses *2 Frames Up to $89 each or $89 Off Any Frame *2 Pairs SV Plastic Lenses --FT28 Bifocals Add $29 per pair---Progressives Add $89 per pair-*2 Hard Shell Case *Eye Exam-Refraction, Glaucoma Test, Cataract Screening, Color Test, Depth Perception Eye Health (Dilation if necessary)

Includes Eye Exam & 2 Pairs of Eyeglasses *2 Frames Up to $129 each or $129Off Any Frame *2 Pairs SV Plastic Lenses --FT28 Bifocals Add $29 per pair---Progressives Add $89 per pair-*2 Hard Shell Case *Eye Exam-Refraction, Glaucoma Test, Cataract Screening, Color Test, Depth Perception Eye Health (Dilation if necessary)

$

*1 Frame Up to $49 or $49 off any frame *1 pair of SV Plastic Lenses --FT28 Bifocals Add $29 per pair---Progressives Add $89 per pair-*1 Hard Shell Case

29

Outside prescriptions are accepted and guaranteed – a Crystal Vision Center Exclusive

SCRANTON Dr. Marc Pensak, Dr. Frank Kleinsorge & Associates Keyser Ave. (Across from Keyser Oak Plaza) 961-1400

Includes: Eye Exam, Fitting, Follow-up, 2 Boxes Contacts (B&L 38), Sunglasses (plano), Care Kit & Hard Case

Varilux Comfort Progressive $ Lenses Premium No Line Bifocals Add per pair to any package, includes plastic lenses

WILKESBARRE Dr. Shelley Eskin, Dr. Frank Gazda, Dr. Frank Kleinsorge & Associates 602 Carey Ave. 826-1700

99

$

189

BASIC Complete Package

Already have a prescription?

SAFETY EYEGLASS PROGRAMS We Accept Most Vision Insurances and All Optical Discount Programs. Now Accepting Care Credit

NEW! Contacts - Glasses - Eye Exam Packages!

NEW EYEGLASS PACKAGES! $

ESSILOR

169

upgrade to packages

WYOMING Dr. Lew Lisses Midway Shopping Center 288-7471

129

159

$

$

Includes: Eye Exam, Fitting, Follow-up, 2 Boxes Contacts (B&L 38), 1 Complete Pair of Eyeglasses

(Frame up to $49 or $49 off any frame & Single Vision plastic lenses),

Sunglasses (plano)

Brand

Includes: Eye Exam, Fitting, Follow-up, 4 Boxes Contacts (B&L 38), 1 Complete Pair of Eyeglasses

(Frame up to $49 or $49 off any frame & Single Vision plastic lenses),

Sunglasses (plano), Care Kit & Hard Case

Price per box Add per box to package

B & L Soflens 38 Acuvue Oasys Ciba Air Optix Ciba O2 Optix Encore Premium Freshlook Colors Acuvue Colors Avaira Purevision B & L daily disposable (90 pack)

12.50 30.00 $ 35.00 $ 25.00 $ 21.50 $ 35.00 $ 35.00 $ 27.00 $ 39.00 $ 35.00 $ $

No Charge $ 17.50 $ 22.50 $ 12.50 $ 7.50 $ 22.50 $ 22.50 $ 11.50 $ 26.50 $ 22.50

Some restrictions could apply. See an Optician for Details

DALLAS Dr. Megan Wesnak Rt. 309 Country Club Shopping Center 675-8888

TUNKHANNOCK Dr. Mark Pensak & Associates Route 6 Next to Wisnosky Jeweler 836-3700


PAGE 19

722113

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011


20

GOLackawanna

Sunday, November 6, 2011

SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

DISTRICT 2 CHAMPIONSHIPS ROUNDUP

Local teams sweep District 2 soccer titles By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

SCRANTON – Abington Heights, Scranton Prep and Mountain View swept District 2 soccer championships, winning both the boys’ and girls’ titles in their respective classifications. Abington Heights won the Class AAA titles, Scranton Prep Class AA and Mountain View Class A. BOYS’ SOCCER Abington Heights, Mountain View and Scranton Prep finished 1-2-3 in the final Lackawanna League Division 1 standings then separated into their different classifications for the playoffs and each won titles. Their combined efforts represented the first time since 2005 that the league swept all the district boys’ soccer titles. Kevin Elwell scored two second-half goals Wednesday night to break a tie and lead Abington Heights to a 3-1 victory over Williamsport in the District 2-4 Class AAA Regional at Scranton Memorial Stadium. Tommy Steinbach scored for the Lackawanna League Division 1 champion Comets with 13:47 left in the half, but Williamsport answered just 2:26 later. “In the first half, I don’t know if we were a little bit nervous, but our touch on the ball was not as strong at times,” Abington Heights coach Steve Klingman said. Abington Heights reached the final with Monday’s 4-0 shutout of Tunkhannock. Mark Fetter scored the game’s only goal while Colin Moretti, Connor Fitzsimmons and Josh Huggard combined to keep Dallas off the scoreboard Thursday night as Scranton Prep captured the District 2 Class AA title with a 1-0 victory at Wilkes University. Fetter scored midway through the first half off an assist by Raymond Hassey. Moretti started in goal and made eight saves before leaving the game with an injury with 2:45 left. Connor Fitzsimmons moved from the field to take over in goal and had to make two saves.

The Mountaineers had Fitzsimmons out of the goal on a play with 1:10 left, but Huggard sprinted back and made a sliding kick to knock the ball away about two feet before it got to the goal line. “They slipped through our defense and my number-one concern was just get it away from my net and make sure we come out of here district champs,” Huggard said. Previously unbeaten Dallas pressured Scranton Prep throughout the second half, compiling a 12-2 shot advantage. “The final 40 was really intense, they took it to us and we knew they would,” Scranton Prep coach Sean Curry said. Scranton Prep needed overtime to get to the final when it edged Lake-Lehman, 2-1, in Tuesday’s semifinals. Fitzsimmons scored the game-winner in the 10th minute of overtime and Brian O’Donnell also scored for Scranton Prep. Colby Thomas had four goals and an assist in the second half Thursday night at Scranton Memorial Stadium to rally Mountain View to a 6-3 victory over Holy Cross in the District 2 Class A final. Aaron Matis of Holy Cross scored the game’s first two goals and the Crusaders still led, 2-1, at halftime. Unbeaten Lackawanna Division 2 champion Holy Cross beat Forest City and Mountain View beat Wyoming Seminary, both by 4-0 scores, in Monday’s semifinals. GIRLS’ SOCCER Katrina Helcoski scored with 19:18 remaining Thursday night to give unbeaten Abington Heights a 2-1 victory over Pottsville in the District 2-4-11 Class AAA Regional championship game at Dunmore. Abington Heights controlled play throughout the first half and Alex Chapman gave the Lady Comets the lead by scoring with 9:10 left. Pottsville’s Kyra Bullino tied the game with 23:25 left. Scranton Prep used another See DISTRICT 2, Page 26

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Katrina Helcoski celebrates her tiebreaking goal with Paige Eisenlohr and Emma Black.

F & S Supply Company 860 Enterprise St. Dickson City, PA 18519 1-800-675-0900 www.fssupplycompany.com


Sunday, November 6, 2011

GOLackawanna

21

Bucks go undefeated with shutout

BRADLEY LANPHEAR PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Teammates celebrate Daiqwon Buckley’s (1) third quarter touchdown, sealing Dunmore’s undefeated season.

Rinaldi repeatedly put himself in position to make his interceptions Friday as Dunmore completed its second perfect regular season in the last three years. The 10-0 records came after Riverside spoiled 9-0 starts by Dunmore in both the 2007 and 2008 seasons. After the first interception – to end the game’s first possession – Dunmore needed just four plays to open the scoring. Austin Seamon continued to turn out more than 10 yards per carry with the help of his 88-yard touchdown sprint that propelled him to a 15-carry, 178-yard effort. Boland added the first of his four extra points for a 7-0 lead with 6:16 left in the first quarter.

The Bucks scored on their first three possessions for a 21-0 halftime lead. Daiqwon Buckley ran 10 yards to cap a 15-play, 64yard drive that carried into the second quarter. Rinaldi made his second interception and caught a pass from Jordan Dempsey for 33 yards on the next play. Seamon ran three times for 25 yards then Chris Yurechko completed the five-play scoring drive with a 5-yard touchdown 6:40 before halftime. The next two interceptions turned away Riverside threats before halftime. Buckley’s 5-yard run, one play after a 26-yard Dempsey-to-Rinaldi pass, completed the scoring with 4:20 left in the third quarter.

OFFENSIVE STATISTICS Tom Lapinski was Dunmore’s second-leading rusher with 43 yards on seven carries. Dempsey hit two of three passes for 59 yards. Rinaldi had both catches. Hakeem Lincoln led Riverside with 48 yards on 13 carries. Nicholas Dranchak ran seven times for 34 yards and was 9-for-22 passing for 67 yards with four of the interceptions. Dave Sweetman had three catches for 22 yards. DEFENSIVE STATISTICS Tom Dailey led Dunmore with 11 tackles and four assists. Coviello had four tackles and three assists in addition to breaking up a pass. Matt Smolskis had three tackles and an assist while rushing the passer into four incompletions and interceptions. Mark Donaghey led Riverside with seven tackles and two assists.

LACKAWANNA FOOTBALL CONFERENCE ROUNDUP Staff reports

DIVISION 3

Colin Carey ran for three touchdowns and Jordan Sekol set up a pair of secondhalf scores to lift Old Forge to its third

Division 3 title in the last four years. Susquehanna turned back two Old Forge scoring threats inside the 10 and another inside the 20, but Sekol made sure the Blue Devils had more chances. Sekol’s interception return to the 17 set up Carey’s 1-yard run for a 15-7 lead in the third quarter. When Susquehanna stopped Old Forge on downs at the 4 with the game tied at 15-15, the Blue Devils kept the Sabers pinned and forced a punt, which Sekol blocked to put the Blue Devils at the 3. Carey scored on the next play with 10:23 remaining. Old Forge also turned away Susquehanna inside the 20 three times. The Blue Devils finished 5-0 in the division and will take an 8-2 record into the District 2 Class A playoffs. After the first goal-line stand, Old Forge

sacked Sean Stanley in the end zone for a safety and 2-0 lead. The Sabers came back with a 7-yard touchdown run by Jesse Pruitt on thirdand-goal late in the first quarter. Carey ran 23 yards for the first of his three touchdowns late in the half for an 8-7 lead. Susquehanna forced the 15-15 tie with 2:49 left in the third when Sean Stanley passed 12 yards to Austin Cowperthwait for the touchdown then ran for the two-pointer. In Friday’s other game, Mid Valley shut out Montrose, 43-0, to clinch a spot in the District 2 Class AA playoffs. The Spartans finished second in the division at 4-1 and improved to 6-4 after starting 0-2. See FOOTBALL, Page 23

Delays no problem for county teams By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

Scranton Prep, Old Forge and Mid Valley came up with wins that were worth waiting for in Lackawanna Football Conference games that were postponed by the snow that hit the area October 29. Scranton Prep and Mid Valley moved themselves into playoff position heading into the final weekend of the regular season. Old Forge, which had already clinched a playoff berth, clinched at least a tie for the LFC Division 1 title and improved its chances of hosting a first-round District 2 Class A playoff game. • Result: Scranton Prep 18, Delaware Valley 15. Change: Game was moved back one day to Oct. 30 at Memorial Stadium. Highlight: Marshall Kupinski broke a 58yard run with 1:54 remaining to add to Scranton Prep’s 12-7 lead and lead the Cavaliers to their third straight win by four points or less. Key stat: Scranton Prep quarterbacks Griff DiBileo, who played the first half, and Tom Timlin, who played the second half, each hit at least 70 percent while combining to go 17-for-23 passing. • Result: Old Forge 40, Holy Cross 14. Change: Game was pushed back twice to Monday at St. Anthony’s Playground in Dunmore. Highlight: After Holy Cross moved in front 2:01 into the game, Old Forge scored the last 30 points of the first half. Key stat: Louis Febbo ran for 16 points on two touchdowns (85 and 9 yards) and a pair of two-point conversions during the 23-point second quarter. • Result: Mid Valley 18, Susquehanna 12. Change: Moved back two days to Monday in Susquehanna. Highlight: Martin Walsh went 6-for-8 passing for 114 yards and two touchdowns in the second half to bring the Spartans from behind. Key stat: Over the final 27:34, Mid Valley had statistical advantages of 12-2 in first downs, 92-9 in rushing yards, 134-44 in passing yards and 226-53 in total offense.

SPORTS

Old Forge claimed one division title outright while Valley View and Scranton shared another with home-field victories Friday night in Lackawanna Football Conference regular-season finales. Old Forge used a 22-15 win over Susquehanna to win Division 3. Valley View routed North Pocono, 48-7, while Scranton rallied past Abington Heights, 19-10, to finish as co-champions of Division 1. Scranton joined Mid Valley and Lakeland in producing wins that were also important to district playoff hopes.

BILL TARUTIS / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Old Forge defensive back Jake Manetti, right, grabs the jersey of Holy Cross quarterback Robert Heyen as he runs out-of-bounds on Monday.

ARTS

TAYLOR – John Rinaldi did more than just pile up the outrageous numbers of five total interceptions and four in the first half Friday night. Rinaldi made the interceptions where they were needed most – and did it with style – while helping Dunmore to a 28-0 shutout of Riverside that completed an unbeaten regular season and nailed down sole possession of the Lackawanna Football Conference Division 2 championship for the Bucks. The junior defensive back made two interceptions in the end zone and another at the 1. He went up high for two of the interceptions, getting his foot down inbounds at the same time on one of them, pulled in one while on his back after originally tipping the ball and grabbing another after it was tipped by Corey Coviello. The shutout was the fourth of the season and second straight by the Bucks. “We’ve been getting constant pressure on the quarterbacks at all times,” said Rinaldi, who had just one interception in the first nine games. “We’ve been stopping the run all year and the other defensive backs have been making interceptions.”

NEWS

TEAM STATISTICS Dunmore led in first downs, 17-9; rushing yards, 288-84; and total offense, 347-151. Officially, the Bucks lost yardage on just three of 48 running plays and that included a kneel down and a fumbled shot-gun snap.

By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011

300903

PAGE 22


Sunday, November 6, 2011

GOLackawanna

LOCAL COLLEGE SPORTS RECAP

GL ONLINE

For daily roundups of local college sports, see www.golackawanna.com/ sports.

TOP STORY

WEATHER ALTERATIONS Attempts were made to get events in even in several inches of snow Oct. 29. Keystone scored twice in the final seven minutes, including Viktor Kallas’ second goal of the game, to reach the CSAC playoffs with a 3-2 men’s soccer victory

FOOTBALL

MORE PLAYOFFS Shane Quinn, a junior from Abington Heights, scored the game-winning goal as time expired in the first half to lift Marywood over Rosemont College, 3-1, in the CSAC men’s soccer semifinals. The Pacers played at Neumann in Saturday’s final. Sydney Parker and Samantha Russo each had a goal and an assist Wednesday when top-seeded Scranton advanced to the Landmark Conference women’s soccer final with a 3-0 win over Moravian University. Scranton held Moravian to three shots to reach Saturday’s final against Catholic. Cabrini College upset top-seeded Marywood, 3-2, in the CSAC women’s soccer semifinals Wednesday. Centenary College shut out Baptist Bible, 6-0, in the quarterfinals Tuesday. Rosemont College eliminated Keystone College, 4-1, in the CSAC men’s quarterfinals Tuesday. Keystone finished 59-1. Drew rallied to defeat Scranton, 2-1, in overtime Wednesday in the Landmark field hockey semifinals. The Royal finished 12-6. Moravian beat Scranton, three games to two, in the Landmark women’s volley-

ball quarterfinals Wednesday. Marywood and Baptist Bible each won home matches Tuesday in the CSAC women’s volleyball quarterfinals, then were eliminated with losses in Thursday’s semifinals. Marywood downed Philadelphia Biblical University and BBC topped Centenary College, three games to one. Neumann edged Marywood in five games while Cabrini College swept BBC in three games.

WEEKLY AWARDS Scranton’s Alicia Tamboia was named Landmark Player of the Week in field hockey after posting back-to-back, twogoal games. Carolyn Gillespie of Scranton was named Landmark Female Swimmer of the Week for the fifth time in her career after helping Scranton improve to 3-0. Marywood women’s volleyball player Rachel Tollett and men’s soccer player Christian Lawlor were named to the CSAC Honor Roll. Keystone made women’s cross country runner Shelley Kratzer and men’s soccer player Viktor Kallas its Athletes of the Week. Scranton’s Athlete of the Week award went to cross country runner Jason Bohenek, a senior from Holy Cross.

TOP EVENTS Gretchen Kempf scored twice Monday when Scranton played its way into the Landmark field hockey playoffs with a 3-1 win over Juniata College. Kallas scored twice and assisted the other goal in a playoff-clinching, 3-2 victory over Cabrini College. Keystone ended its season 0-11 in the CSAC and 3-17 overall when it lost the women’s volleyball finale to Cabrini College, 25-10, 25-17, 25-20. Brittany Nelson had16 points and12 rebounds in her college debut as Lackawanna College opened the women’s basketball season Thursday with a 47-43 victory over host Northampton Community College. - Compiled by Tom Robinson

SATURDAY SCORES

DIVISION 1

NAJFL championships set

Two Lackawanna Trail teams won games in a Northern Area Junior Football League playoff tripleheader at Western Wayne Tuesday. Lackawanna Trail shut out Carbondale, 28-0, in an A game and Western Pens hope to stay Wayne, 7-0, in a B game. undefeated Carbondale defeated Abington The Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins took one of only two American Hockey North, 33-27, in triple overtime in C. The results set the schedule for League unbeaten road records into today’s set of championship games at Saturday night’s game in Binghamton. Lackawanna Trail, beginning at noon. The Penguins improved to 5-0-0-0 Carbondale plays Monroe for the C on the road with last weekend’s 5-3 win title, followed by Lackawanna Trail in Rochester and 4-1 victory in Managainst Monroe in B and Lackawanna chester. Trail against Abington South in A. Brad Thiessen, last season’s AHL Goaltender of the Year, went into the Snow delays All County weekend with wins in his last four showdown starts. During that stretch, he had a The All County Conference Junior shutout, a 1.25 goals against average Football League championships were and a .952 save percentage. pushed back one week because of last weekend’s snow. Steamers basketball The championships begin today at games set noon. The Premier Basketball League North Pocono will meet Pocono announced that its Scranton franchise Mountain in the C opener, followed by will open the 2012 league schedule. The Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Steamers Wallenpaupack and Pocono Mountain in B and Taylor and Olyphant in A. will be at the Rochester RazorSharks

left in the half gave Scranton the lead for good, 12-10. Pabst ran 1 yard for a touchdown with 8:56 left. Valley View (9-1 overall) matched Scranton at 6-1 in the division by destroying North Pocono. The Cougars clinched their first regularseason title since 1995 by opening a 48-0 lead in the first half. In Friday’s other game, Delaware Valley ended a three-game losing streak with a 35-3 victory that knocked rival Wallenpaupack out of the Class AAAA playoffs. The win gave the Warriors (7-3) a shot at the postseason, pending the final tabulation of playoff points.

DIVISION 2

District 2 of the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association approved the eligibility of Scranton basketball player Andrew Moran during its October meeting. Moran was the second-leading scorer at Holy Cross last season before transferring to Scranton for this school year. This is the second straight year that Scranton’s program has added a player who started at one of the Lackawanna League’s private schools. Last year, Karlon Quiller returned to the Scranton School District after spending one season with Scranton Prep.

Lakeland played its way into the District 2 Class AA playoffs by breaking out of a slump with a 30-20 victory over Western

Wayne. The Chiefs (5-5) had lost three straight and four of its previous five. Tyler Brady recovered a fumble in the end zone and ran for another score to help Lakeland to a 23-6 halftime lead. Alex Filarsky pulled in a 2-yard pass from Kyle Kiehart for the other first-half score. Western Wayne tried to rally, but Ryan Nichols added a second-half touchdown to help Lakeland lock up the win. In another game, Honesdale routed Carbondale, 41-7, to close the season on a threegame winning streak after going three entire seasons without a divisional victory. Kevin Miller threw four touchdowns passes, including two to Jon Gillow, and Nick Hessling ran for two scores for the Hornets. Carbondale tied the game on a 12-yard touchdown run by quarterback Joe Gigliotti with 3:46 left in the first quarter, but Honesdale needed just 1:11 to go ahead to stay on a 63-yard Miller-to-Maleik Torres pass.

SPORTS

Tom Timlin’s touchdown pass to Pat Fricke with 26.6 seconds remaining allowed Scranton Prep to gain entry into the District 2 Class AAA playoffs with a Continued from page 21 22-16 victory over West Scranton Saturday afternoon. The Cavaliers never led until the touchdown pass in the final minute and a J.J. Fives Scranton also continued its large surge. two-point conversion run. The Knights won their sixth straight In Saturday’s other game, Jeremy Greenley ran for since falling to Valley View in the division two touchdowns to lead Lackawanna Trail past opener to dip to 1-3 overall. Although offiHoly Cross, 35-7, for a spot in the District 2 Class cial word was not available at press time, A playoffs. the win appeared to vault Scranton into the District 2-4-11 Class AAAA Regional. Joe McCarthy ran for two first-half touchdowns, erasing deficits each time, and Eric Pabst added a score in the fourth in front, 6-3, on McCarthy’s 58-yard run with 22.4 seconds left in the quarter. quarter. The Comets went right back down the Abington Heights (1-6, 3-7) opened the scoring on a 30-yard field goal by Brandon field to score on Quinn Karam’s 7-yard run for a 10-6 lead with 6:09 left in the half. Pacyna with 1:21 left in the first quarter. McCarthy’s 3-yard run with 28.4 seconds Scranton responded in a hurry, moving

Northeast MMA has announced that Cage Fight 9, a Mixed Martial Arts card, is scheduled for Nov. 25 at 7 p.m. at the Lackawanna College Student Union, formerly the Scranton CYC. Gemilaye Adkins of Philadelphia is scheduled to face Kris McCray of Washington, D.C. in the main event. West Scranton’s Dave Morgan is scheduled to meet New York’s Evan Velez and Exeter’s Rex Harris will take on Allentown’s John Doyle in professional fights. Wyoming’s Steve Mytych, Mike Bannon and John Flock are also scheduled to appear in professional bouts. Pittston’s Gary Peters will take on Hazleton’s Dave Spadell Jr. in a Cage Fight Series Welterweight amateur title fight. Ticket prices are set at $75, $50, $40 and $35. More information is available at www.pacagefight.com/ events.

PIAA approves Moran’s eligibility

ARTS

Marywood University moved up to fifth in the Mideast Region in the latest U.S. Track & Field and Cross Country Coaches Association (USTFCCCA) rankings after winning the Colonial States Athletic Conference women’s title Oct. 29 at Keystone College. The Pacers, who will compete next in the NCAA Regionals Nov. 12 at DeSales University in Center Valley, placed seven runners in the top 11 in snowy conditions. Sophomores Diana D’Achille and Elizabeth Schwab were followed by junior Stephanie Bender as Marywood took the second through fourth spots in the 82runner field over the 6000-meter course. Marywood outscored Gwynedd-Mercy College, 22-46. Keystone was fifth and Baptist Bible College sixth out of 11 teams. Marywood placed five runners on the first-team CSAC all-stars with top-seven finishes. Kelsey Dunn was sixth and Katie Sylvester seventh. Gwynedd-Mercy won the men’s title with a perfect score of 15 by sweeping the top five spots. Marywood took second for the third straight year with 51 points. Brian Lewis, a junior from West Scranton, was sixth out of 68 runners to become a first-team, all-star. Keystone’s Justin Clarke, a freshman from Lackawanna Trail, was ninth and Jeremy Stonier 13th to make the second team. The host Giants were third and Baptist Bible sixth out of nine teams.

over Cabrini College. A tree fell on the Lehigh University course during the event, forcing alterations in the Landmark Conference Cross Country Championships. The men ran a course of an undetermined length when it was changed from its original 8000 meters. The women’s race, first set for 6000 meters, went on without official timing. The Scranton men finished third in the team standings with Chris Wasnetsky and Jason Bohenek finishing third and fifth to land first-team, all-star honors. Marywood scored four first-half goals and clinched the top seed in the CSAC women’s soccer playoffs with a 4-0 win over Rosemont College in a game that was halted with 19:56 left because of snow.

Cage Fight 9 at former CYC

Dec. 31, 2011. The Steamers are scheduled to make their home debut Jan. 6 against Rochester.

NEWS

Pacers’ rank jumps ahead

SPORTS BRIEFS

23


PAGE 24

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011

TO ADVERTISE IN THE DINING GUIDE CALL:

Paul Andrews - 558.0845 • Judy Comerford - 687.1796 • Karen Fiscus - 829.7291

Specializing In Italian American Cuisine

1/2 OFF Entree

Catering is available in private • Receive a FREE dinner on your birthday (call for details.) party room. Call today for Buy one entree at regular price, get second entree of equal or pricing and details. • Hours are flexible to lesser value, for 1/2 off with this coupon. On and Off-site catering accomodate private parties. Not valid with other offers. Coupon must be presented prior to ordering. for all occasions. Accepts: Expires:11-22-11

984 E. Drinker Street • Dunmore • 570.348.0188 Open 7 Days a Week Mon-Thurs 11am - 10pm Fri & Sat 11am - 11pm Sunday 3pm - 9pm


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011

PAGE 25

TABLE TALK

Biagio A. Dente, CEC,AAC, HOF Blaise Alan Dente, CCC, HAAC

Raw garlic’s harsh flavor comes from a compound called “allicin”, which forms as soon as the clove’s cells are ruptured and continues to build as it sits.

Book Your Holiday Party Now!

655-0801

DENTE’S

www.dentescatering.com

Catering & Tent Rental

JOIN US AT OUR SCRANTON LOCATION THURSDAYS FROM 5PM TO ? FOR HAPPY HOUR. $1.00 OFF ANY SANDWICH 715 N. STATE STREET, CLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.MYCANGIANOS.COM 570-586-4896 FAX: 586-0573 400 SPRUCE STREET, SCRANTON • 570-207-2667

CREEK SIDE GROVE

WWW.MYCANGIANOSCREEKSIDEGROVE.COM CATERING • GIFT BASKETS • GOURMET ITALIAN SPECIALITIES • DINNERS • DELI • DESSERTS • PASTRIES & MORE!

The Real Deal...

FREE Regular Size Fry

with purchase of steak & soda

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

Sunday-Thursday 11am-10pm Friday & Saturday 11am-Midnight 532 MOOSIC STREET, SCRANTON, PA

570-341-5100

Specializing In Italian American Cuisine Catering is available • Receive a FREE in private party dinner on your Buy one entree at regular price, birthday (call for room. Call today for get second entree of equal or details.) lesser value, for 1/2 off with pricing and details. this coupon. • Hours are flexible On and Off-site Not valid with other offers. Coupon to accomodate must be presented prior to ordering. catering for all Expires: 11-22-11 private parties. occasions.

1/2 OFF Entree

984 E. Drinker Street • Dunmore 570.348.0188 Open 7 Days a Week Mon-Thurs 11am - 10pm Fri & Sat 11am - 11pm Sunday 3pm - 9pm Accepts:

BREAKFAST AND LUNCH OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK MON-SAT 6:30AM - 4PM SUNDAY 7:00AM - 3PM

A FAMILY RESTAURANT

108 S. State St., Clarks Summit • 587.4677 Serving Breakfast and Lunch From 6am - 3pm Mon.-Sat. and Breakfast Sunday 7am - 2pm

The Summit Diner Staff would like to thank you for allowing us to serve you and hope to serve you again in the future.

To Advertise in the

300 SPRUCE ST SCRANTON 570-871-4137

• Eat in or Take out • Breakfast Served All Day • Catering Available • Featuring Boar’s Head products www.downtowndeliandeatery.com

Call Paul Andrews 558-0845 Judy Comerford 687-1796 Karen Fiscus 829-7291


26

GOLackawanna

Sunday, November 6, 2011

PIAA CHAMPIONSHIPS

Galassi gets state bronze

ARTS

NEWS

By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

Rico Galassi of Holy Cross finished the 3.1-mile Hershey Parkview Course in 16:26 Saturday to finish third in Class AA boys at the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association Championships. Holy Redeemer was third and Blue Ridge 13th in the team standings. Brandon Murray of Dunmore finished 40th out of 285 runners. Other Lackawanna County finishers were: Lakeland’s Mark Arzie 78th; Holy Cross’ Antonio Hastie 107th; Dunmore’s Todd Davenport 149th; Mid Valley’s Jason Sansky 150th; Mid Valley’s Mike Petcavage 178th; and Lakeland’s Paul Szustakowski, 206th. Sean Burke of Abington Heights and Aaron Wilkinson of Valley View also earned state medals that go with top-25 finishes. Burke was 12th in Class AAA boys with the best time of the day by a county runner, finishing in 16:23. Wilkinson earned his third state medal by taking 19th. All three county girls placed in the top 50 out of 285 in the Class AAA. Scranton Prep sophomore Tessa Barrett finished 32nd in 19:32. North Pocono freshman Kate Lewis placed 42nd while Taylor Ross of Abington Heights was 48th. Mid Valley freshman Nicole Kobylanski was 83rd out of

284 in Class AA girls where she was the only county qualifier. Lackawanna League champion Elk Lake came within three points of repeating its state title, falling to St. Basil Academy, 72-75. Holy Redeemer was fourth and two girls each from the two District 2 team entries earned state medals with top 25 finishes. Rachel Sowinski was fifth and Marissa Durako eighth for Holy Redeemer. Elk Lake’s Maria Trowbridge and Jenny Vanetten were 11th and 15th. GIRLS’ TENNIS Scranton Prep’s Kendra Croker and the Abington Heights doubles team of Courtney Ostrowski and Alexa Abdalla each won matches to reach the quarterfinals before being eliminated Friday at the Hershey Racquet Club. Croker was involved in a pair of 6-0, 6-0 matches in Class AA singles. She beat District 10 champion Amy Orr of St. Marys, then lost to District 3 champion Julia Casselbury of Lancaster Country Day. Ostrowski-Abdalla competed in Class AAA doubles where they defeated the District 10 championship team of Maggie Erven and Larissa Chen from Erie McDowell, 6-3, 6-3. They were eliminated by District 7 champions Stephanie Smith and Sara Komer of Peters Township, 6-1, 6-1.

SPORTS

DISTRICT 2 Continued from page 20

strong effort from goalkeeper Paige Bolus to capture the District 2 Class AA title Tuesday night with a 3-0 shutout of Western Wayne. The shutout was the ninth in 15 games for the Classics, who are 13-2 with their only two losses coming to Abington Heights. Kelly Purdy scored the game-winning goal 8:23 into the second overtime Thursday night to lift Mountain View to a 2-1 victory over Forest City in the District 2 Class A championship game. Jenny Molenko assisted on both goals for Mountain View, the Lackawanna

Trio puts on a show SCRANTON – Kevin Elwell had one step with which to work. It was all he needed. As he glided to his left, nearly 25 yards from the goal in a tied championship soccer game, Elwell pivoted and fired a bullet. The high shot on goal was struck with such force that it went off the goalie’s outstretched hands and into the net just below the crossbar. Abington Heights was ahead, 2-1, with 27:51 left Wednesday night on its way to the District 2-4 Class AAA Regional championship with a 3-1 victory over Williamsport. “Elwell crushed it,” Abington Heights coach Steve Klingman said. “What a shot.” The two-goal margin was created when Elwell again came up with the ball in scoring range. This time, there was no step of space as he worked from 17 yards out just beyond the right post. Elwell countered the high drive into the upper middle of the net. He maneuvered just enough to get off a shot that he

League Division 2 champion. Her pass set up Sarah Police for the tying goal with 11:01 left in regulation. Forest City opened the scoring with 30:10 left when Meagan Goben sent a shot off the right post then knocked in her own rebound. Kara Zorby had 16 saves for the Lady Foresters. GIRLS’ VOLLEYBALL Lackawanna Trail captured a championship while North Pocono and Dunmore each advanced to title matches before losing. All three titles were decided in threegame sweeps. Holy Redeemer topped Dunmore, 2514, 25-15, 25-15, Thursday night at Dallas in a Class AA championship match that

KEEPING SCORE TOM ROBINSON kept on the ground the entire way, placing it to the short side and tucking the ball just inside the right post with 14:40 left. “Kevin came up with a couple of goals,” Klingman said. “He’s been tough all year. He has 17 or 18 on the year. He’s scored in 13 of our 16 matches.” Two of the Lackawanna League’s other potent scorers took the stage as Scranton Memorial Stadium was turned into a soccer venue for a few days this week. Aaron Matis of Holy Cross and Colby Thomas of Mountain View matched dynamic efforts a night later in the District 2 Class A championship before a raucous crowd that was among the largest ever to view a soccer game in Lackawanna County. Mountain View, the secondplace team in Division 1 of the Lackawanna League and the defending district champion, began the night with a very cautious approach, primarily because of the abilities of Matis, the league’s leading scorer. The Eagles limited Matis’ space and touches, yet the unbeaten LFC Division 2 champion Crusaders found themselves with a 2-0 lead late in the half on two spectacular scores by their leading threat. Matis split two defenders and got inside of 10 yards before simply touching the ball softly

featured unbeaten league champions. The title was the sixth straight for Holy Redeemer. “We were ready for their hitting, but weren’t expecting so many tips,” Dunmore coach Sue Dempsey said. “We were planning to convert a lot of tips ourselves, but that’s what they did and we never really adjusted.” Allie Griswold had 20 kills and four blocks for the Royals. Courtney Murray led Dunmore with 14 kills and two blocks. Jillian Korgeski added seven kills and two blocks. Kimberly Dempsey had 14 assists. Dunmore used sweeps over Meyers and Tunkhannock to reach the championship match. Delaware Valley downed North Pocono, 25-16, 25-20, 25-23, in the Class AAA

to the right post for a 1-0 lead with 19:25 left in the half. A little more than three minutes later, Matis worked around the Eagles to get within seven yards, then fired a shot off the crossbar and down into the net. The league’s highest-scoring team put Division 1’s top scoring team in a position where it needed to open up its attack a bit. Mountain View got within a goal by halftime, then Thomas took over with four goals and an assist in the second half to lift the Eagles to a 6-3 victory. Thomas scored from 12 yards out on the left side with 35:46 left to tie the game, then controlled a Gary Smith throw-in before making a spin move eight yards from the goal 1:49 later for the go-ahead score. After Thomas set up Zeb Cross for the score that created a two-goal Mountain View lead, Holy Cross moved back within one in the final eight minutes. Thomas ran through two defenders to get to a loose ball 10 yards out and restore the twogoal margin. To top it all off, Thomas stole the ball 40-plus yards from the goal on the right sideline and took it around a defender all the way to the goal that put an end to the Holy Cross title hopes. At the same time, he put a cap on three special performances by three special players who came through with soccer on the area’s biggest athletic stage during its district championship week.

match at Marywood University Wednesday. Taylor Braunagel led Delaware Valley with 12 kills. Delaware Valley swept Abington Heights and North Pocono needed four games to get past Wyoming Valley West in Monday’s semifinals. Kelly Bray had eight kills and Alyssa Strausser six for North Pocono. Nicole Malec had 17 assists, Alyssa Hamel eight digs and Miranda Miras seven service points. Lackawanna Trail posted the most dominant of the district title wins, quickly dispatching Mountain View, 25-8, 2514, 25-11, Wednesday night at Marywood. The Lady Lions also handled MMI Prep, 25-11, 25-5, 25-18, at home in Monday’s semifinals.


PAGE 27

722011

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011

721850

PAGE 28


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011

FAMILY CIRCUS

PAGE 29

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

STONE SOUP

THE ARGYLE SWEATER DRABBLE

CLASSIC PEANUTS


PAGE 30

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011

MARKETPLACE golackawanna.com

100 Announcements 200 Auctions

300 Personal Services 400 Automotive

500 Employment 600 Financial

700 Merchandise 800 Pets & Animals

900 Real Estate 1000 Service Directory

To place a Classified ad: Call 1-800-273-7130 Email: classifieds@golackawanna.com 150 Special Notices

100 ANNOUNCEMENTS 110

Lost

ALL JUNK CAR & TRUCKS WANTED Highest Prices Paid!!! FREE REMOVAL Call Vito & Ginos Anytime 288-8995

PAYING $500 MINIMUM DRIVEN IN

ALSO PAYING TOP $$$

for heavy equipment, backhoes, dump trucks, bull dozers HAPPY TRAILS TRUCK SALES 570-760-2035 542-2277 6am to 8pm Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

310

150 Special Notices

ESTATE PLANNING /ADMINISTRATION

ADOPTION

Attorney Services

Real Estate & Civil Litigation Attorney Ron Wilson 570-822-2345 Free Bankruptcy Consultation Payment plans. Carol Baltimore 570-822-1959

Autos under $5000

CADILLAC `94 DEVILLE SEDAN

Full size 4 wheel drive trucks

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

Adoring couple longs to adopt newborn. Secure endless love awaits your baby. Kelly and Joe 800-551-3297 Expenses Paid

409

406

ATVs/Dune Buggies

HAWK 2011 UTILITY ATV

NEW!! Full size adult ATV. Strong 4 stroke motor. CVT fully automatic transmission with reverse. Electric start. Front & rear luggage racks. Long travel suspension. Disc brakes. Dual stage head lights. Perfect for hunters & trail riders alike. BRAND NEW & READY TO RIDE. $1,695 takes it away. 386-334-7448 Wilkes-Barre Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

94,000 miles, automatic, front wheel drive, 4 door, air conditioning, air bags, all power, cruise control, leather interior, $3,300. 570-394-9004

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified! 412 Autos for Sale

AUDI `05 A6

3.2 Quattro AT6. Auto tiptronic 6 speed. Black with black leather. Garage kept. Fully loaded, gps, cold weather package. 78K miles. Carfax report included. $15,900.

BMWSilver, `01 X5fully 4.4i.

loaded, tan leather interior. 1 owner. 103k miles. $8,999 or best offer. Call 570-814-3666

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

BMW `07 328xi

CHEVROLET `88 MONTE CARLO SS V8, automatic,

Leather. Heated seats. DVD Player. $12,450

Black with black interior. Heated seats. Back up & navigation systems. New tires & brakes. Sunroof. Garage kept. Many extras! 46,000 Miles. Asking $20,500. 570-825-8888 or 626-297-0155 Call Anytime!

BMW `99 M3

Convertible with Hard Top. AM/FM. 6 disc CD. 117 K miles. Stage 2 Dinan suspension. Cross drilled rotors. Cold air intake. All maintenance records available. $13,000 OBO. 570-466-2630

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

BUICK `01 CENTURY

4 door. 6 Cylinder. Power windows & locks. 55K. Looks & runs well. $4,800. DEALER 570-868-3914

51,267 miles, MUST SELL $3,900 (570) 760-0511

CHEVY ‘01 CAVALIER

4 door. Automatic. 58K. Runs & looks well! $4,295. DEALER 570-868-3914

To place your ad call...829-7130

CHEVY ‘05 MALIBU CLASSIC

Low miles. Cruise. Auto. $8,888

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

Find the perfect friend.

Collect Cash. Not Dust. Sell it in The Times Leader Classified section.

The Classified section at timesleader.com

CHEVY ‘11 MALIBU LT Moonroof. 7K miles. $17,990

Call 829-7130 to place your ad.

BUICK `05 LESABRE Garage kept. 1 owner. Local driving, very good condition. 53,500 miles. Asking $9,700 (570) 457-6414 leave message

CHRYSLER ‘08 SEBRING

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

ONLY ONL NLY NL L ONE N LE LLEADER. LEA E DER D . timesleader.com

Call 829-7130 to place an ad. ONLY ONL NLY L ONE N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER. timesleader.com


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011

PAGE 31

The Greater Scranton Board of REALTORS®, Inc.

Open House Directory 12-1:30PM

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6TH 12-1:30PM

$379,000

8 Landmark Drive, Mt. Cobb

$139,900

12-2PM

$169,900

12-1:30PM

$179,900

Coldwell Banker Town & Country Properties

Coldwell Banker Town & Country Properties

10 Waterford Village Dr., Dalton

515 Leach St., South Abington

Dir: From downtown Clarks Summit, State St (Rts 6&11), left on Winola Rd, make slight right just after Gerrity’s Market on Grand Ave, up hill, to corner of Hallstead & Grand Ave, sign. MLS#11-4649

Dir: Route 6 & 11 north to traffic light in Glenburn, bear right onto Waverly Road. Go to the top of the hill and make a right onto Waterford Road. Townhouses on left-end unit #10-see sign. MLS#11-4890

Dir: From Route 6 & 11 Chinchilla, Turn Up Shady Lane Road, Just After Tunnel Left Turn On Bailey St., Stay To Your Right Follow Bailey To The Top. Property At Top Of Hill In Front Of You. MLS#11-2508

12:30-2PM

1-3PM

1-2:30PM

404 Grand Ave., Clarks Summit

$135,000

621 Center St., Throop

$119,000

528 Emmett St., Scranton

Prudential Preferred Properties

$144,000

404 Summit Ave., Clarks Summit

Coldwell Banker Town & Country Properties Dir: From Scranton take 380 East to to interstate 84 go to Exit 8 (MT Cobb) take Route 348 East for 1.3 miles. Mack Estate on left see CB sign. MLS#11-3753

Nasser Real Estate Coldwell Banker Town & Country Properties Dir: From Dunmore, take O’Neil Hwy to Dir: West Lackawanna Ave to S. 7th Ave, Throop, road becomes Cypress St, conmake left onto Emmett St, house on left. tinue to left on Center, home on right (sign). MLS#11-1922 MLS#11-4485

Prudential Preferred Properties Dir: Do not use GPS, Winola Road to top of hill, right onto Earl, go 2 blocks turn right onto Summit, house on left about 1 block! MLS#11-4685

1-2:30PM

1-3PM

Visit timesleader.com & Click “Buy A Home” to see the most up to date list of Open Houses

$234,500

77 Franklin Ave., Tunkhannock

$252,900

173 Ryan Hill Road, Lake Ariel

Coldwell Banker Town & Country Properties Dir: Exit 8 Rte 84 to Rte 348E, four miles to Dir: Rt. 6 Tunkhannock through town. Left left on Maplewood Rd, one and one half miles onto Franklin off of E. Tioga Street. House is bear rt on Fernwood Rd to rt on Ryan Hill Rd, on left. MLS#11-4829 top of hill, sign on left. MLS#11-2248 Coldwell Banker Town & Country Properties

3-4:30PM

$235,000

19 Oakford Glen, Waverly Twp.

Coldwell Banker Town & Country Properties Dir: N.Abington Rd. to Oakford Road.Go appprox.1/3 mile. Right at Stone Wall that says:’’Oakford Glen/Oakford Woods’’ Sign. First Left to 19 Oakford Glen. MLS#11-4722


PAGE 32 412 Autos for Sale

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011 412 Autos for Sale

CROSSROAD MOTORS 570-825-7988

700 Sans Souci Highway WE SELL FOR LESS!! ‘09 DODGE CALIBER SXT 2.0 Automatic, 24k Factory Warranty! $12,599 ‘08 SUBARU Special Edition 42k, 5 speed, AWD. Factory warranty. $13,799 ‘08 CHRYSLER SEBRING CONVERTIBLE 4 cylinder, 40k $11,799 ‘08 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 4x4, Regular Cab, 63K, Factory Warranty $13,699 ‘08 CHEVY IMPALA LS 4 door, only 37K! 5 Yr. 100K factory warranty $12,199 ‘08 CHEVY IMPALA LS 60k. Factory warranty. $10,299 ‘05 HONDA CRV EX One owner, just traded, 65k $13,399 ‘01 LINCOLN TOWN CAR Executive 74K $5,899 ‘08 CHEVY IMPALA LS Only 18K! One Owner - Estate Sale. $14,799 ‘10 Dodge Caravan SXT 32K. Silver-Black. Power slides. Factory warranty. $17,999 ‘05 Suzuki Verona LX 64K. Factory warranty. $5,699 TITLE TAGS FULL NOTARY SERVICE 6 M ONTH WARRANTY

DODGE `97 CARAVAN 139,000 miles, new

brakes, runs well, body is fair. $1,275. 570-603-0252

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

EAGLE `95 TALON Only 97,000 Miles.

Full custom body kit, dark green metallic with gray interior. Dual exhaust, 4 coil over adjustable struts. All new brakes, air intake kit, strut brakes, custom seats, custom white gauges, 2 pillar gauges, new stereo, alarm, custom side view mirrors. 4 cylinder automatic, runs excellent. $8,500. Call 570-876-1355 or 570-504-8540 (evenings)

FORD ‘02 MUSTANG

GTRedCONVERTIBLE with black

top. 6,500 miles. One Owner. Excellent Condition. $17,500 570-760-5833

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

FORD ‘06 MUSTANG

GT CONVERT. One owner. Extra clean. Only 15K miles. $18,880

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

HONDA `07 ACCORD

V6 EXL. 77K miles. 1 owner with maintenance records. Slate blue with leather interior. Sunroof. Asking $12,500. Call 570-239-2556

HYUNDAI `02 ELANTRA 129,995 miles,

manual, 4 door, anti-lock brakes, air conditioning, air bags, power locks, power windows, power mirrors, CD player, leather interior, sun roof, rear windshield wiper, tinted windows, GREAT ON GAS. REDUCED $3,000. 570-654-8469

HYUNDAI ‘10 ELANTRA GLS

Only 8,200 miles! 1 Owner. $15,995

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

JAGUAR `00 S TYPE

4 door sedan. Like new condition. Brilliant blue exterior with beige hides. Car is fully equipped with navigation system, V-8, automatic, climate control AC, alarm system, AM/FM 6 disc CD, garage door opener. 42,000 original miles. $9,500 Call (570) 288-6009

412 Autos for Sale

JAGUAR ‘94 XJS CONVERTIBLE

Mint Condition Magnolia red, with palomino beige leather interior. A cream puff inside & out. 4 new tires and services. Florida car. $14,900. 570-885-1512

JEEP `04 WRANGLER 4” lift, 33” BFG

base KM2, 5 speed, excellent condition, 46,200 miles. $12,500. OBO. Call 570-592-1829

LEXUS `98 LS 400 Excellent condition,

garage kept, 1 owner. Must see. Low mileage, 90K. Leather interior. All power. GPS navigation, moon roof, cd changer. Loaded. $9,000 or best offer. 570-706-6156

412 Autos for Sale

MERCEDES-BENZ `95 SL 500 Convertible, with removable hard top, dark Blue, camel interior, Summer Driving Only, Garage Kept. Very Good Condition, No Accidents. Classy Car.

New Price!

$5,000 or trade for SUV or other. 570-388-6669

412 Autos for Sale

SAAB `06 93

A E R O s p o r t . Leather interior. Heated seats. Sunroof. Good condition. $8,000. Serious inquiries only. Call 570-760-8264

SUBURU ‘06 LEGACY GT LIMITED SEDAN

4 door, black, approximately 76,000 miles. 2.5 liter engine, auto. asking $12,000. 570-510-3077

SUBURU ‘06 LEGACY GT LIMITED SEDAN

4 door, black, approximately 76,000 miles. 2.5 liter engine, auto. asking $12,000. 570-510-3077

TOYOTA 07 CAMRY LE Low miles. One owner. $13,880

PONTIAC 04 SUNFIRE 2 door. Automatic.

42K. Sunroof. Power windows. AC. Runs & looks great! $5,495. DEALER 570-868-3914

PORSCHE `85 944

Low mileage, 110,000 miles, 5 speed, 2 door, antilock brakes, air conditioning, power windows, power mirrors, AM/FM radio, CD changer, leather interior, rear defroster, tinted windows, custom wheels, $8,000. (570) 817-1803

ROWLANDS

Mountainside Auto, Inc. Used car sales. 1157 S. Main Rd. Dorrance 570-868-3914

VOLVO `05 S40 T5 AWD, 6 speed manual, power windows & locks, Moonroof. Premium sound with 6 disk changer, heated leather seats, climate control. 98k miles. $8900. (570) 498-0439

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE $49,000

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

TOYOTA ‘09 COROLLA S Auto. 4 Cylinder. $16,450

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

FORD ‘76 THUNDERBIRD

All original $12,000

MERCEDES ‘76 450 SL $24,000

MERCEDES ‘29

Kit Car $9,000 (570) 655-4884 hell-of-adeal.com

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

DESOTO CUSTOM ‘49 4 DOOR SEDAN

TOYOTA ‘10 PRIUS

Save at the pumps! $19,555

OLDSMOBILE ‘01 ALERO 4 door. V6. 68K. Sunroof. Power windows & locks. Cruise. Looks & runs well. $4,295. DEALER 570-868-3914

412 Autos for Sale

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

VOLKSWAGEN `04 Beetle - Convertible

GREAT ON GAS! Blue. AM/FM cassette. Air. Automatic. Power roof, windows, locks & doors. Boot cover for top. 22k. Excellent condition. Garage kept. Newly Reduced $14,000 570-479-7664 Leave Message

VOLKSWAGEN ‘00 BEETLE 2.0 automatic, air 67k miles $6400. 570-466-0999

3 on the tree with fluid drive. This All American Classic Icon runs like a top at 55MPH. Kin to Chrysler, Dodge, Plymouth, Imperial Desoto, built in the American Midwest, after WWII, in a plant that once produced B29 Bombers. In it’s original antiquity condition, with original shop & parts manuals, she’s beautifully detailed and ready for auction in Sin City. Spent her entire life in Arizona and New Mexico, never saw a day of rain or rust. Only $19,995. To test drive, by appointment only, Contact Tony at 570-899-2121 or penntech84th@ gmail.com

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

FORD `52 COUNTRY SEDAN CUSTOM LINE

STATION WAGON V8, automatic, 8 passenger, 3rd seat, good condition, 2nd owner. REDUCED TO $6,500. 570-579-3517 570-455-6589

FORD SALEEN ‘04 281 SC Coupe

1,000 miles documented #380 Highly collectable. $28,500 570-472-1854

MAZDA `88 RX-7

CONVERTIBLE 1 owner, garage kept, 65k original miles, black with grey leather interior, all original & never seen snow. $7,995. Call 570-237-5119

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

MERCEDES 1975

Good interior & interior. Runs great! New tires. Many new parts. Moving, Must Sell. $2,300 or best offer 570-693-3263 Ask for Paul

MERCEDES-BENZ `73 450SL with Convertible

removable hard top, power windows, AM /FM radio with cassette player, CD player, automatic, 4 new tires. Champagne exterior; Italian red leather interior inside. Garage kept, excellent condition. $28,000. Call 825-6272

OLDSMOBILE `68 DELMONT

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

OLDSMOBILE ‘53 98 SEDAN 72K original miles.

Rocket V8 motor. Hydromatic transmission. Mechanically sound. Antique tags. Excellent Driver. Must see to appreciate! Asking $7,200 Or best offer. (570) 855-3040

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

424

Boat Parts/ Supplies

LADDER, folding boat ladder, 3 steps, excellent condition, $20. Call 570-328-5611

427

Commercial Trucks & Equipment

CHEVY ‘08 3500 HD DUMP TRUCK 2WD, automatic.

Only 12,000 miles. Vehicle in like new condition. $19,000. 570-288-4322

GMC SIERRA ‘98 3500 4WD Stake Side,

350 V8, Auto. 75,000 miles on current engine. 12' wood bed, body, tires, interior good. Excellent running condition. New generator, starter, battery. Just tuned and inspected. $6,900. Call 570-656-1080

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130 439

Motorcycles

439

Motorcycles

DAELIM 2006

150 CCs. 4,700 miles. 70 MPG. New battery & tires. $1,500; negotiable. Call 570-288-1246 or 570-328-6897

HARLEY 2011 HERITAGE SOFTTAIL

Black. 1,800 miles. ABS brakes. Security System Package. $16,000 firm. SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY 570-704-6023

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130 HARLEY DAVIDSON `03

100th Anniversary Edition Deuce. Garage kept. 1 owner. 1900 miles. Tons of chrome. $38,000 invested. A must see. Asking $18,000. OBO 570-706-6156

439

Motorcycles

KAWASAKI ‘05

NINJA 500R. 3300 miles. Orange. Garage kept. His & hers helmets. Must sell. $2400 570-760-3599 570-825-3711

YAMAHA ‘97 ROYALSTAR 1300

12,000 miles. With windshield. Runs excellent. Many extras including gunfighter seat, leather bags, extra pipes. New tires & battery. Asking $4,000 firm. (570) 814-1548

Find the perfect friend. The Classified section at timesleader.com

Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONL NLY NL L ONE N LE L LEA E DER D . ONLY LEADER.

Must Sell! Appraised for $9,200 • All original

45,000 miles • 350 Rocket engine • Fender skirts • Always garaged Will sell for $6,000 Serious inquires only 570690-0727

timesleader.com

‘96 HONDA American Classic

Edition. 1100 cc. 1 owner, under 20,000 miles. Yellow and white, extra chrome, VNH exhaust, bags, lights, MC jack, battery tender, helmets. Asking $3500 570-288-7618

BMW ‘07 K1200 GT

Low mileage. Many extras. Clean. $9,000 (570) 646-2645

442 RVs & Campers

CHEROKEE ‘10

Travel trailer. 39 ft., 4 slide outs, 3 bedrooms, 2 bath rooms, microwave, awning, tinted windows, Brand new. Have no pets or smokers. Much more!!!!! $33,000 (cell) 682-888-2880


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011 442 RVs & Campers

451

EQUIPMENT/BOBCAT TRAILER

Brand new 2010 tandem axle, 4 wheel electric brakes, 20’ long total, 7 x 16 wood deck, fold up ramps with knees, removable fenders for oversized loads, powder coat paint for rust protection, 2 5/16 hitch coupler, tongue jack, side pockets, brake away switch, battery, 7 pole RV plugs, title & more!! Priced for quick sale. $2,595 386-334-7448 Wilkes-Barre

To place your ad call...829-7130

PACE ‘99 ARROW VISION

Ford V10. Excellent condition. 8,700 miles. 1 slide out. 2 awnings. 2 colored TVs, generator, back up camera, 2 air conditioners, microwave/convection oven, side by side refrigerator with ice maker, washer/dryer, queen size bed. $37,900 negotiable (570) 288-4826 (570) 690-1464

442 RVs & Campers

SUNLINE SOLARIS `91

25’ travel trailer A/C. Bunk beds. New fridge & hot water heater. Excellent condition. $3,900. 570-466-4995

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

468

Auto Parts

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

451

PAGE 33 Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

HONDA 06 CRV SE Leather & Moonroof. $15,872

BUICK `05 RENDEZVOUS BARGAIN!!

AWD, Fully loaded, 1 owner, 22,000 miles. Small 6 cylinder. New inspection. Like new, inside & out. $13,000. (570) 540-0975

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! 451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

CHEVY ‘10 EQUINOX LT

Moonroof. Alloys. 1 Owner. $23,777

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

Toplaceyour adcalDODGEl. .8‘0729-7130 RAM 4 W.D. HEMI engine. Full bed. 1500. Extended cab. Excellent condition. 49,6128 miles. $19,000 570-954-3650

FORD 03 RANGER $7,900

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

468

Auto Parts

BUYING JUNK VEHICLES $300 AND UP

$125 EXTRA IF DRIVEN, DRAGGED OR PUSHED IN!

NOBODY Pays More 570-760-2035

Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm • Happy Trails!

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

HONDA ‘09 CRV LX AWD. 1 owner. $18,940

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! HYUNDAI ‘06 SANTE FE LTD

Leather. Moonroof. One owner. $14,580

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

JEEP `02 GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO

Triple black, economical 6 cylinder. 4x4 select drive. CD, remote door opener, power windows & locks, cruise, tilt wheel. 108k highway miles. Garage kept. Super clean inside and out. No rust. Sale price $6,895. Scranton. Trade in’s accepted. 570-466-2771

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130 JEEP `03 LIBERTY

SPORT. Rare. 5 speed. 23 MPG. 102K highway miles. Silver with black interior. Immaculate condition, inside and out. Garage kept. No rust, maintenance records included. 4wd, all power. $6,900 or best offer, trades will be considered. Call 570-575-0518

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

JEEP `04 CHEROKEE 135,000 miles, automatic, four wheel drive, $6,500. (570) 237-6979

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

522

Education/ Training

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

522

Education/ Training

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

JEEP ‘07 GRAND CHEROKEE

4WD & Alloys. $16,995

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130 451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

JEEP 08 COMPASS

4 WD. Auto. CD. $13,992

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

SUZUKI `07 XL-7 56,000 miles,

automatic, all-wheel drive, 4 door, air conditioning, all power, CD player, leather interior, tinted windows, custom wheels, $13,000 Call 570-829-8753 Before 5:00 p.m.

VOLVO `08 XC90

Fully loaded, moon roof, leather, heated seats, electric locks, excellent condition. New tires, new brakes and rotors. 52,000 miles highway $26,500/ best offer. 570-779-4325 570-417-2010 till 5

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130 468

Auto Parts

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

MERCURY `07 MARINER One owner. Luxury

4x4. garage kept. Showroom condition, fully loaded, every option 34,000 miles. GREAT DEAL $14,500 (570)825-5847

MITSUBISHI ‘05 ENDEAVOR LS

4WD. One owner. $12,850

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted Highest Prices Paid In CA$H

FREE PICKUP

570-574-1275

503

Accounting/ Finance

ENTRY LEVEL ACCOUNTANT

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

NISSAN ‘08 ROGUE S AWD. Auto $17,990

Assistant Teachers We are looking for qualified, dedicated individuals to join the Head Start Team – Part Time Assistant Teachers are needed. Please visit our website at www.lchs.hsweb.org for details. Classroom Substitute positions are also available at all sites in Luzerne and Wyoming Counties. Applicants must possess current PA State Police Criminal Clearance, FBI Fingerprints and Child Abuse History Clearance; Send Resume/Cover letter and 3 Written Letters of Reference to LCHS, ATTN: Human Resources, PO Box 540, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703-0540. Email LCHSHumanResources@hsweb.org; Fax #570-829-6580. E.O.E. M/F/V/H. NO PHONE CALLS

451

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

RANGE ROVER ‘07 SPORT

Supercharged 59,000 miles, fully loaded. Impeccable service record. $36,000 570-283-1130

Immediate opening for an Entry Level Accountant with a flooring company in the Hazleton area. The candidate must have a BS in Accounting, strong organizational skills, self-starter. Duties include a variety of accounting functions, including AP processing and assisting in prep and analysis of financial statements. Must be proficient in Microsoft Excel. Excellent benefits and competitive salary based on qualifications. Please send resume and salary requirements to: Attention: HR Dept. Box 667 Hazleton, PA 18201 Fax: 570-450-0231 email: donna. reimold@forbo.com

503

Accounting/ Finance

CREDIT MANAGER

Local growing manufacturer in need of Credit Manager. Responsibilities include researching new accounts, establishing credit limits, credit approval, monitoring credit risk, customer collections. Microsoft Excel, Word, and AS400 skills required. A comprehensive benefit package which includes medical, dental, life, 401K available. Send resume to: c/o The Times Leader Box 2815 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

Over 47,000

people cite the The Times Leader as their primary source for shopping information. *2008 Pulse Research

What Do You Have To Sell Today?

Find a newcar online at

timesleader.com

ONLY ONL NLY L ONE N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

506 Administrative/ Clerical

EXECUTIVE ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT A Luzerne County based organization is seeking an Executive Administrative Assistant. This position performs administrative duties and completes special projects for upper management. Responsible for arranging travel, coordinating social and professional functions and managing calendars. The candidate must be proficient with Microsoft Excel and Power Point. Must demonstrate exceptional reasoning and organizational skills, and possess a professional demeanor at all times. Bachelors Degree is preferred, 3 to 5 years of prior experience is required. The Company offers a competitive salary and comprehensive benefits package including medical, life insurance, disability, paid vacation and 401(k). Send resume to: c/o The Times Leader BOX 2825 15. N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONLY LEADER. ONL NL N L ONE LY N L LEA LE E DER D . timesleader.com

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!


PAGE 34

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011 Building/ Construction/ Skilled Trades

WELDERS/FABRICATORS & METAL FINISHERS

Karnel Inc. is a small, rapidly growing, custom metal fabrication shop in Clarks Summit, PA. We currently have openings for welders/fabricators and metal finishers. Welders must be experienced in TIG of thin stainless steel and also be capable of MIG and flux core on aluminum and carbon. Welder must also possess basic math & mechanical skills along with being able to read blueprints. Metal finisher must be capable of polishing, grinding, & finishing stainless & aluminum. Karnel offers a competitive salary & benefits. Eligible personnel may submit applications in person at 17 Skyline Drive East, Chinchilla, PA or by submitting a resume via email to karnel@karnel.com with employment entered as subject.

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! 533

Installation/ Maintenance/ Repair

ELECTRICIAN/ MACHINIST

Must Have Own Tools. Responsibilities Include Maintenance and Repair of Production Equipment, Electrical, Welding, And Fabrication.

WAREHOUSE/FORKLIFT OPERATOR FREEZER/HI REACH OPERATOR

Nardone Bros. Baking Co. 420 New Commerce Blvd., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706 Fax resume to 570-823-2581 Attn: Mario Nardone

542

Logistics/ Transportation

CLASS B CDL DRIVER

To drive Tri Axle Dump Truck. At least 4 years experience. Full time. Call 570-237-1734 or 570-760-7896

542

Logistics/ Transportation

ATTENTION DRIVERS

2012 DAY CABS WISE FOODS, INC. Seeks CDL Class A 2 YEAR OTR verifiable experience • Home daily • Distributor based network • EXCELLENT per mile pay • Unloading, drop off & pick-up pay • Expense advance • Paid delay times • 24 hour dispatch coverage • Excellent on site fleet maintenance Contact Joan at 800-438-9473 ext 4120

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

SHIPPING / RECEIVING INVENTORY COORDINATOR

Responsible for freezer shipping/ receiving. Minimum 1 year inventory or logistics experience. Nardone Bros. Baking Co. 420 New Commerce Blvd., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706 Fax Resume 570-823-2581 Attn: Mario Nardone

542

Logistics/ Transportation

TRANSPORTATION MANAGER:

USAgain Textile Recycling Looking for a Transportation Manager to handle the daily field operation. Responsibilities: handle route drivers, route efficiency, route accuracy, hire drivers, train drivers and do routes when needed. More information please call 570-270-2670

545

548 Medical/Health

HOME HEALTH REGISTERED NURSE

Looking for a growing, local company where your nursing care is appreciated? CareGivers America has two Full Time RN Case Manager positions (Lackawanna & Monroe Counties) open for which we’ll give you the tools (company car/laptop/cell phone) so that you can take care of your patients. Strong assessment skills required. Home Health & OASIS experience preferred. Resumes to rjacobs@caregivers america.com.

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

Collect Cash. Not Dust. Sell it in The Times Leader Classified section.

LONG TERM CARE POSITIONS

LITTLE FLOWER MANOR • Director of

Admissions – RN to facilitate & coordinate the admission process, including admission documentation; current PA nursing license, 3 years experience & work ing knowledge of LTC regulations, admissions & dis charge procedures. • Director of Staff Development – RN to plan, organize, develop & direct staff edu cational/ orienta tion programs & employee health; current PA nursing license; 2 years experience. • Receptionist – 8-4 Mon-Fri. clerical/ computer skills required; 3 years experience in health care setting. • LPN – 3-11 & 11-7 Full Time • RN Supervisor – Full Time Float 3-11/11-7 between Little Flower Manor & St. Luke’s Villa. Flexible schedule & significant sign-on bonus based on experience. • C.N.A. – 3-11/11-7 Full and Part Time • Resident Asst. for Personal Care – part time all shifts • Cook, Dietary Aide and Porter – per diem AM/PM shifts between Little Flower Manor & St. Luke’s Villa. St. Luke’s Villa • C.N.A. – part time all shifts Apply: LITTLE FLOWER MANOR 200 S. Meade St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702 pmelski@lfmstr.com Fax: 570-408-9760 EOE

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

Marketing/ Product

MARKETING/SALES

Full Time, Part Time experienced Marketing/Salespersons. Identify and connect with senior executives, open doors and arrange meetings. Must have excellent phone skills. Fax Resume to: (866)969-0690 Email to: CMCNortheast@ verizon.net

548 Medical/Health

Call 829-7130 to place an ad. ONLY ONL NLY ONE N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

551

Other

WASH BAY ATTENDANT

Day Shift 7am to 3:30pm. Good Pay, Benefits, steady work. Apply in person ONLY Calex 58 Pittston Ave Pittston PA see Ray Redmon

554

Production/ Operations

MANUFACTURING MACHINE OPERATORS / PRODUCTION $9/HR.TO

START

60-90 day evaluation with $ increase $ based on YOUR performance, attendance etc. Benefit Package includes: Medical, Dental, Vision, Life Insurance, Vacation, Holiday pay PLUS. Full-time 12 hour shifts on alternating 3 & 4 day work weeks. Every other weekend a must. Previous manufacturing experience preferred. Some heavy lifting. Accepting applications at AEP INDUSTRIES, INC. 20 Elmwood Ave Crestwood Industrial Park Mountaintop, PA 18707 EOE We are a drug free workplace.

554

Production/ Operations

566

Sales/Retail/ Business Development

SALES OPPORTUNITY

MANUFACTURING MACHINE OPERATORS / PRODUCTION $9/HR.TO

START

60-90 day evaluation with $ increase $ based on YOUR performance, attendance etc. Benefit Package includes: Medical, Dental, Vision, Life Insurance, Vacation, Holiday pay PLUS. Full-time 12 hour shifts on alternating 3 & 4 day work weeks. Every other weekend a must. Previous manufacturing experience preferred. Some heavy lifting. Accepting applications at AEP INDUSTRIES, INC. 20 Elmwood Ave Crestwood Industrial Park Mountaintop, PA 18707 EOE We are a drug free workplace.

DelBaso Ford is now accepting applications for Sales Positions. We are looking for an energetic, self-motivated individual to join our award winning organization. Apply in person to: 249 Market Street Kingston Email: PatandDans @aol.com or Call 570-288-4501

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

SALESPERSON

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

Folding Carton plant located in Northwest New Jersey, about an hour away from Scranton/ Wilkes-Barre area, is seeking a salesperson with established accounts. Salary plus incentives based on accounts offered. Fax resume to 973300-9377, email: info@pioneerink.com or call 973-300-9300

542

542

542

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Logistics/ Transportation

Logistics/ Transportation

Logistics/ Transportation

573

Warehouse

ASSISTANT WAREHOUSE SUPERVISOR Evening Shift Mon-

day-Thursday. Plant seeking candidate with strong leadership, organization and communication skills. Will work hands-on to direct and manage staff for busy high volume Logistics department. Must have previous supervisory experience in a warehouse facility including all function of shipping/receiving/ inventory, union and ISO experience a plus. Computer literate, ability to multi-task, meet deadlines, attention to detail a must. Ability to work Tueasy-Saturday or SundayThursday a must. F/T with competitive wage and benefits. Qualified candidates please forward resume WITH SALARY REQUIREMENTS a must to: AEP Industries, Inc. Attn: Human Resources 20 Elmwood Ave. Mountaintop, PA 18707 Fax (570) 474-9257 email: Bozinkom@ aepinc.com We are a drug-free workplace EOE

542

Logistics/ Transportation

SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS WANTED • FREE CDL LICENSING • ALL CLEARANCES PD. BY ROHRER BUS • BONUS PROGRAMS • LIMITED HEALTH BENEFITS

CONTACT SHAWN @ ROHRER BUS SERVICE PHONE: 570-586-0175 Email: ahsup@epix.net

719764

509

PAGE 35


PAGE 36

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011 708

600 FINANCIAL 610

Business Opportunities

JAN-PRO

Commercial Cleaning Of Northeastern PA

Concerned about your future? BE YOUR OWN BOSS Work Full or Part time. Accounts available NOW throughout Luzerne & Lackawanna counties. We guarantee $5,000 to $200,000 in annual billing. Investment Required. We’re ready – are you? For more info call 570-824-5774 Jan-Pro.com

630 Money To Loan “We can erase your bad credit 100% GUARANTEED.” Attorneys for the Federal Trade Commission say they’ve never seen a legitimate credit repair operation. No one can legally remove accurate and timely information from your credit report. It’s a process that starts with you and involves time and a conscious effort to pay your debts. Learn about managing credit and debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

Antiques & Collectibles

WALL MIRRORS 4 antique wall mirrors. Must take all. $100. 570-779-1342 YEARBOOKS: Coughlin H.S. 26, 28, 32, 34, 43-44, 46, 49, 51-55, 61, 62, 63, 67, 86-88, 94; GAR H.S. 34-37, 42-47, 55-56, 61, 72-73, 80, 84, 05, 06, Meyers H.S.: 60, 74-77, Wyoming Valley West H.S. 6869, 71, 73, 78, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 90, 93; Old Forge H.S. 66, 72, 74; Kingston H.S. 38-45, 49, 64; Plymouth H.S. 2933, 35, 37, 38-39, 46-48, 53-55, Hanover H.S. 5152, 54; Berwick H.S. 52-53, 56-58, 60, 67, 68-69; Lehman H.S. 55, 73-76, 78, 80; Westmoreland H.S. 52-54; Nanticoke Area H.S. 76; Luzerne H.S. 51-52, 56-57; West Pittston H.S. Annual 26-28, 31-32, 54, 59-60, 66; Bishop Hoban H.S. 72-75, 80, 81; West Side Central Catholic H.S. 65, 7176, 80, 81, 84; Pittston H.S. 63; St. Mary’s H.S. 29; Northwest H.S. 73, 76, 77, 78; Lake Lehman H.S. 74, 76, 78 Marymount H.S. 61, 62, 63, 64 Call 570-825-4721

710

Appliances

HESS trucks in boxes, 1998 $22. 2000 $20. 2010 $25. 1 wall clock, key wound, works but stops $75. 570-735-1589 MICROWAVE OVEN 1 white GE Monogram Spacemaker under cabinet JVM152H. Purchased 1990, good, clean condition. Includes mounting bracket & manual. $50. 570-825-6900 MICROWAVE Sharp 1200 watts $20. 570-823-3781 or 570-831-5505

700 MERCHANDISE 702

Air Conditioners

AIR CONDITIONER $30. 570-779-1215

708

Antiques & Collectibles

NAUTICAL themed decoration, 15 large wooden sailing ship models, 6 medium /small ship models, model sea birds, sailor figures, assortment of lightboxes, paintings, plaques, large boat shaped coffee table with oars 4.5’x 2’w, wooden steering wheel, wooden steering wheel with gauges, standing boat shaped shelving unit, 5’tlx18”w, . 1 captain statue, ship floats & more. $200. 823-7957

REFRIGERATOR almost new Frigidaire, white 29 1/2” W, freezer on top, pickup in Exeter, $275. 570-362-2766 SAUSAGE STUFFER/Lem. Stainless steel, 5 pound capacity, new in box. $100 570-655-6588 TRASH compactor Sears Kenmore $50. Maytag Neptune front loader washer, high efficiency, $300. Maytag Neptune front load gas dryer. $400. 287-4939

To place your ad call...829-7130 WASHER & DRYER Maytag $350. Small chest freezer $75. 570-328-4913 WASHER & DRYER new, white, electric, used only several times. moving mist sell $400 cash for both. 466-8314

710

Appliances

726

Clothing

WASHER & electric dryer, Kenmore apartment style stacked $125. 570-239-6586

BOOTS Skechers twinkle toe, chocolate, girls size 1 & 2, new in box $30. each.570-696-4020

712

COAT new black long, never worn, Faux collar $60. Gorgeous. 570-287-6279

Baby Items

BABY WALKER Safety 1st Disney music & lights, $25. Graco infant car seat, holds infant 530 pounds 2 bases. $40. 570-735-6527 CHILD CARRIER Kelty Kids FC 3.0 blue for on and off trail. like new! $150 570-333-0470 INFANT CARRIER Kelty Kids Wallaby blue, new $25. 570-288-7905 PACK N PLAY $10. Graco $10. 570-288-7273

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130 TRAVEL SYSTEM Graco stroller/car seat, car seat base $70 Co-Sleeper Bassinet $55. F.P. motions glider $40 Zanzibar theme vibrating chair $25 570-288-1054

716

Building Materials

BATHTUB wall surround with bath $200. 696-3368 LIGHTS emergency power failure light, 2 lights on each unit, hang & plug in $39. each. 570-636-3151 PATIO BLOCKS approximately 500 used blocks with edging. Reasonable. Under $500. 654-0907 PATIO DOOR. Sliding. Includes screen and storm door. Complete with frame and hardware. Very good condition. Both units. $300 570-868-6505

STEEL BUILDINGS

Reduced Factory Inventory 36x58 – Reg $20,300 Now $16,930 48x96 – Reg $42,400 Now $36,200 570-504-1560 Source# 063

720

Cemetery Plots/Lots

MEMORIAL SHRINE CEMETERY 6 Plots Available

May be Separated Rose Lawn Section $450 each 570-654-1596

MEMORIAL SHRINE

LOTS FOR SALE 6 lots available at Memorial Shrine Cemetery. $2,400. Call 717-774-1520 SERIOUS INQUIRES ONLY

PURSE, Gucci, tote style, excellent condition $335. 570-288-4451 UGGS girls size 2, short chestnut. $75. 570-474-0753

730

Computer Equipment & Software

FOR SALE: APPLE MAC

loaded with photo and editing software. Adobe Illustrator CS2/Adobe Photoshop CS2/ Final Cut Pro HD/ Dreamweaver 8/ $500. 570-814-5626

To place your ad call...829-7130 732

Exercise Equipment

BICYCLE: Miami Sun 3-wheel, great condition $225. 570-239-6586 EXERCISE EQUIPM E N T: P i l a t e s Bench with arm attachments & dvd $125; Mini trampoline $20; Various Exercise tapes & small equipment $5$10; Stationary bike, older, free! Call 570-817-7254 STEPPER: TunTuri, Digital readout and instruction book. Excellent condition. $20. 570-696-1703

742

Furnaces & Heaters

HEATER. Propane gas, with 30’ copper tubing. $100 or best offer. 570-287-9946 STOVE vintage coal Frigidaire $299. 570-696-3368

744

Furniture & Accessories

BATHROOM STAND small, white 2 shelves, bottom drawer $25. Broyhill solid oak coffee table, glass top, matching end table $50. Solid oak entertainment center $150. Small, country style table with painted amish figures on top $25. 570-474-1648 BED, single twin, double dresser, night stand $50. 570-674-5553 BEDROOM SUITE, Contemporary, walnut color, full size bed, dresser, chest of drawers, 2 night stands. $500. 570-328-4913

744

Furniture & Accessories

DEN FURNITURE, Sofa, 3 Tables, Ottoman, Chair, $400. Rocker, $100. 570-675-5046 after 6 p.m. DINING ROOM SET antique Jade, Table, 6 chairs, china cabinet, server $395. Maple bed & matching dresser with mirror $175. Maple platform rocker $25. Maple microwave server/ stand $45. Maple desk $45. Coffee table, dark wood, ) $45. 2 end tables, dark wood $45. Maple dresser with mirror $75. Beige large lamp $35. Sewing Cabinet $25. Telephone bench $20. Brass floor lamp $45. Small metal desk & chair $25. 570-587-3795 570-457-2832. DINING room table, Oblong, excellent condition 4 chairs, leaf extension $200. 570-696-3988 END TABLES 2 oak $20. TV 13” color, new $25. Rock & swivel rocker, blue plaid $35. 331-4708

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130 ENTERTAINMENT CENTER 56wx71h, glass doors, 2 lights, $225. 570-735-5482

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Parker House, solid oak 58”w, 50”h, 21”d, 32” RCA TV and Panasonic stereo system. $400 or best offer for all. 570-262-3967 ENTERTAINMENT center, 3 pieces, 2 end pieces are 24” W, center piece 43” W, 6’ 3”T, 90% oak, very good condition, paid $1000 sell $350. 542-4666

FURNISH FOR LESS

* NELSON * * FURNITURE * * WAREHOUSE * Recliners from $299 Lift Chairs from $699 New and Used Living Room Dinettes, Bedroom 210 Division St Kingston Call 570-288-3607 LAMPS (2) parlor stand up, grey metal & black. $25 each. 570-740-1246 LAMPS 2 solid brass, never used $100. 822-9697 MIRROR, full length standing, very good cond. $25.00 Bed, queen size, comes with 2 nightstands, very good condition $395. Room divider, oriental design, black with painted murals on 1 side and otherwise oriental stonework. $200. 570-288-4451

744

Furniture & Accessories

PATIO FURNITURE & TABLES aluminum/ vinyl, yellow with green trim glider, rocker & chair, 1 coffee glass top table, 2 glass top end tables $200. 570-287-4939

SOFA gold, 2 years old, excellent condition $135. 5 x 7 area rug, flower pattern $30. 570-287-7379 SOFA, Broyhill, Floral. Like new. $190. 570-740-1392 STOOLS: 24” black wooden ladderback natural seat from JCPenney - sold as set of 3 $75. 570-333-0470 TABLE, formica top, 5 chairs good condition. circa ‘50’s $50. 570-388-6863 WALL UNIT 3 sections, $100. 570-287-0183 WASHER Whirlpool duet front load 7 years old, not working Model GHW9 100LW1 $50. 570-696-5610 WING CHAIR beautiful $30. 570-779-1215

746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets

754

Machinery & Equipment

SNOW THROWER MTD 21” single stage, excellent condition $175. call 570-693-2129 SNOWBLOWER Craftsman, 22” 5 HP self-propelled, electric start. $225 570-457-7854

756

Medical Equipment

PERFIT INCONTINENCEUNDERWEAR Size X-L.14 per package $5. each. 288-9940 POWER WHEELCHAIR. Activecare Catalina model 2 years old, like new, originally $4k $900. 570-474-9906 POWERCHAIR/ Invacare Pronto M51. Excellent condition, used only two months, leather seat depth and width 18” $600. 570-655-6588 SCOOTER/Pride Rivo, blue, excellent condition, used once, vehicle lift attachment included. Front and rear baskets, battery included. $1,800. Call 570-885-1960 WHEELCHAIR Electric, Jazzy 1107, excellent condition, needs new battery. Please call for details. $1,000. OBO 570-690-3478

758 Miscellaneous

DICKSON CITY

358 Main Street Saturday & Sunday 9am - 6pm Entire contents of large home. Basement, patio & back yard. Antiques, vintage, retro, collectibles & modern. Furniture, China, Crystal. Pictures, lighting & jewelry. Small appliances. Cookwear, flatware, kitchen utensils. Bedding, curtains, draperies & seasonal items. Clothing with tags and petite - small to 1 x. Linens & much more!

752 Landscaping & Gardening JOHN DEERE 1968 tractor 112 in good condition, all papers $500. OBO. 570-287-5745

754

ACTIVITY TABLE Nilo multi-use with removable mat $50 Candy Molds, assorted, 30+., some new. $18. 570-287-4531 ANTIQUE SHOWCASE 141”Lx24”W. Broken glass on one end, top but still nice. All the glass in front & shelving is good. Need to move it soon. FREE. 570-408-5173 BEDLINER: 89 Chevy S10 truck bedliner, standard 6’ cab $25. battery charger 6/12 volt, 2/6 amp, new $30. Chevy small block headers with gaskets $20 each. Large frameless mirror 36”x42” $50. 570-740-1246

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

758 Miscellaneous CANES & WALKING STICKS over 30 available. $4- $5 each. CHRISTMAS ITEMS & HOUSEHOLD ITEMS over 200 available, includes Christmas lights, trees, ornaments, flowers, vases, lamps, baskets, nic nacs also 4 piece luggage. Samsonite belt massager. All for $65 570-735-2081. CHRISTMAS ITEMS quality gifts ideal for your Christmas fair or holiday bazaar. valued over $400. yours for $100. 8233030 ask for Bob Sr. 9:30am until 9pm CLOTHING men’s large & x-large, boys size 8 navy blue suit, boys 18 size 18 tan suit, red lace formal dress size 2, glassware 1/2 off, novels, German text books, baskets. 822-5560 COVER for 6’ pickup box, good condition $40. 570-655-0546

FREE AD POLICY

The Times Leader will accept ads for used private party merchandise only for items totaling $1,000 or less. All items must be priced and state how many of each item. Your name address, email and phone number must be included. No ads for ticket sales accepted. Pet ads accepted if FREE ad must state FREE. One Submission per month per household. You may place your ad online at timesleader.com, or email to classifieds@ timesleader.com or fax to 570-831-7312 or mail to Classified Free Ads: 15 N. Main Street, WilkesBarre, PA. Sorry no phone calls. GAME TABLE: half moon, mahagony, lid spins open to reveal full game table. Hotel sterling bridge tallies still in side! $475. 570.406.4092 GRILL. Charcoal, Blackbarrel type. Top lifts, 24x35 grill space. $20. 570-333-4827

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

570-735-1487

WE PAY THE MOST IN CASH

BUYING 11am to 11pm

Machinery & Equipment

SNOW BLOWER Lawn Boy, 3 HP, reconditioned, EZ to start. $125. MTF snow blower 4.5 HP, electric start, new rubber on the blades$145. 570-239-6586

39 Prospect St • Nanticoke


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011 758 Miscellaneous

776 Sporting Goods

MAILBOX Lake Lehman airbrushed mailbox. $60. 570-477-1269

RECUMBENT BIKE 1 Fitness Quest EDGE Model 491pr programmable. Purchased 2002. Very good condition. Includes manual $75. 570-825-6900

SNOW PLOW for cars/vans Solotec $150. Rice Cooker 16 cup $3. Ice skates ladies size 6 $5. Jazz sneakers size 6.5 $5. 570-696-3368 SNOW TIRES 4 185/ 65/R15, excellent condition. $300. 570-696-1450 STEAM CLEANER/ FLOOR, brand new in box $75. 570-740-1392 TIRES-225/70/R16 All season, very good condition. $80 570-855-3113 WARMER Creators brand, inside slide doors front & back, 2 racks, $750. 570-636-3151

762

Musical Instruments

ORGAN Wurlizer 500 series with bench, needs minor tuneup. $350 OBO. 570-417-6597 PIANO: Console near mint condition with matching bench, just tuned. $500. 474-6362

766

Office Equipment

OFFICE EQUIPMENT. 4 desks with returns, $50 each. Copier, $50, file cabinets, 4 drawer, $20, paper cutter, $10, Desk chairs, $10. 570-690-3840 before 6PM PRINTER Lexmark X5100 all-in-one printer/scanner/copi er. Uses b&w & color cartridges. $20. 675-4237

776 Sporting Goods BIKES. Girls, 15 speed 26” All-terrain, Boys, 18 speed 26” Multi-terrain Stone Mtn. Bike. $65. for both. 570-333-4827 EVERLAST HEAVY BAG, 100 pound, canvas, great condition $80. 570-474-0753 Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

GUN CABINET holds 10 guns, all wood, glass doors with lock, like new $200. 570-655-0546 NORDIC TRACK CX 1055 lift compatinle with incline ramp, 19 workout programs, HR monitor, 18” stride, hardly used. paid over $1000 sell for $499. OBO. 570-417-6597 PROFORM exercise bike with EKGrip pulse $100. Rifle Case for quad, mounted $50. 570-823-3781 or 570-831- 5505

778

Stereos/ Accessories

SUBWOOFERS: 2 12” JL audio with sub box and Pioneer 500 mono power amp paid $250 or best offer. 6 months old. 570-825-6318

780

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

VITO’S & GINO’S Wanted: Junk Cars & Trucks Highest Prices Paid!!

Televisions/ Accessories

TELEVISION, 24” Daewood. In excellent condition. $25 OBO. 570-696-1703

PAGE 37

784

Tools

WHEELBARROW 1 Kobalt industrial. size rubber hand grips $50. 2 5500lb industrial sized pallet jacks $225. each 2 industrial 2’x4’ push carts $25 each. Take all for $500. 357-2403

786 Toys & Games GAME TABLE: Harvard Standing game table 8 games in all. 50L x 30W x 32H $125. 696-3988 HESS TRUCKS set of Hess trucks from 1990-2008 $450. + 11 extras at $20. each. In boxes never opened. 570 825 3688 TV TEDDY 6 videos $18. 570-696-3368

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified! ZHU ZHU pets giant hamster city playset $75. F.P. twin time dollhouse with furniture $60. 570-696-4020

788

Stereo/TV/ Electronics

GPS: Garmin Model #200W, 4x3” screen. Few years old. Complete with auto charger & suction mount. $40. 570-825-3784

792

Video Equipment

VCR Sharp 4 head, hi-fi stereo $10. 570-823-3781 or 570-831-5505 VHS TAPES 100, mostly new $75. 570-740-1392

PAWS TO CONSIDER.... ENHANCE YOUR PET CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE Call 829-7130

PICKUP

Place your pet ad and provide us your email address

288-8995

800 PETS & ANIMALS 810

Dogs

FREE

TELEVISION: GE. 28” works good, needs remote $80. 570-740-1246 TV Sharp 27”, remote $100. 8233781 or 831-5505

815

Cats

CAT free to good home, grey male, 1 year old, gentle & loveable, all shots, neutered. 561-5336 CATS (2) free 1 female, 1 male, neutered. About 4/5 months, litter trained, likes dogs. 570-829-4930

Find that new job.

The Times Leader Classified section.

This will create a seller account online and login information will be emailed to you from gadzoo.com “The World of Pets Unleashed” You can then use your account to enhance your online ad. Post up to 6 captioned photos of your pet Expand your text to include more information, include your contact information such as e-mail, address phone number and or website.

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

ALASKAN MALAMUTE AKC Registered.

White female. 7 months old. Call 570-510-6428

CHOW PUPPIES

Call 829-7130 to place an employment ad. ONL NLY ONE N LE LEA L E DER. ONLY LEADER. timesleader.com

CATS: 2 long haired 1 with red. Must stay indoors, adopt seperately. 851-0436 KITTENS. Free to good home 6 weeks old, litter trained. 570-735-2243 KITTENS: FREE 1 Tiger, 2 orange/ white, 1 white / black, 1 orange tabby. 309-4573

Sweet, affectionate, loving puppies. First shots & papers. $650/each. 570-655-3189

IRISH SETTERS

906 Homes for Sale

900 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 906 Homes for Sale Having trouble paying your mortgage? Falling behind on your payments? You may get mail from people who promise to forestall your foreclosure for a fee in advance. Report them to the Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency. Call 1-877FTC-HELP or click on ftc.gov. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

LAFLIN TOWNHOUSE FOR SALE BY OWNER 105 Haverford Drive

Move right into this 3 bedroom 1.5 bath townhouse with many recent updates including new bath room /kitchen and finished basement. $131,900 Call 570-903-6308

PLAINS

KEYSTONE SECTION 9 Ridgewood Road

TOTAL BEAUTY 1 ACRE- PRIVACY Beautiful ranch 2

bedrooms, 1 bath, attic for storage, washer, dryer & 2 air conditioners included. New Roof & Furnace Furnished or unfurnished. Low Taxes! New price $118,500

Shopping for a new apartment? 570-885-1512 Classified lets Shopping for a you compare costs new apartment? without hassle Classified lets or worry! you compare costs Get moving without hassle with classified!

BERWICK

FOR SALE BY OWNER 50% below Market Value. Fixer upper. Not in flood zone. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. Corner lot. $46,500. (570) 394-9537

or worry! Get moving with classified!

WANAMIE

Newport Twp East Main Street Handyman Special Double Block Two 2 story, 3-bedroom units each with attic, cellar, bath and pantry. Large 4 car garage. Upper and lower floors. As is for $25,000. Call 570-379-2645

915 Manufactured Homes

HARVEYS LAKE

2 BEDROOM 1.5 BATH 36 CEDAR ST. BUILT IN 1996, cape cod, 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, single car attached garage, eat-in kitchen, office/study, family room, utility room, electric heat, central air, finished basement, 0.18 ACRES, deck. This property has rights to a private lake association. (Lakeview Terrace Dock)

ASHLEY PARK

Laurel Run & San Souci Parks, Like new, several to choose from, Financing &Warranty, MobileOneSales.net Call (570)250-2890

SPRINGBROOK

2 bedroom. Clean. Needs no work. Remodeled throughout. Owner financing. $14,000. 570-851-6128 or 610-767-9456

SHIBA INU PUPPIES

Cute as a fox! ACA reg. $400. Also, Alaskan Malmute Puppies, $450. 570-477-3398

Apartments/ Unfurnished

FORTY FORT

AMERICA REALTY RENTALS “ALL UNITS MANAGED”

VARIOUS LOCATIONS Call for availability 1-2 bedrooms, all modern. • Employment/ Application Required • No Pets/ Smoking • Leases • Very Clean Standards 288-1422

Apartments/ Unfurnished

DALLAS

 Large 3 bedroom 2nd floor. No pets. Off street parking. Call Joe 570-881-2517

Apartments/ Unfurnished

Attractive / quiet neighborhood near Kingston Pool. Charming 2 bedrooms + sunroom, oak kitchen, dishwasher, fridge, disposal, washer/ dryer, a/c, basement, garage. Water & Sewer included. No pets. $575 + gas/electric, security, references & lease. 570-466-8041 KINGSTON

EATON TERRACE

317 N. Maple Ave. Large Two story, 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath, Central Heat & Air, washer/dryer in unit, parking. $840 + utilities & 1 month security 570-262-6947

KINGSTON

Page Avenue 2 bedroom, living room, dining room, off street parking. $450 + utilities. Call 570-752-6399

NANTICOKE

FORTY FORT

Newly renovated, great neighborhood. 2nd floor. Non smoking. Oak floors, new carpet in master bedroom. new windows, 4 paddle fans, bath with shower. Stove & fridge, dishwasher. Off street parking, coin- op laundry. $575 + gas, electric & water. References required, no pets 570-779-4609 or 570-407-3991

HANOVER TOWNSHIP

Great location, 1 bedroom apartment in residential area, all utilities included. $600/month + security. 908-482-0335

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

2 bedroom, 1st floor. Large eat in kitchen, fridge, electric stove, large living room, w/w carpeting, master bedroom with custom built in furniture. Ample closet space. Front/back porches, off street parking, laundry room available. No dogs, smoking, water, sewer, garbage paid. $550/mo + gas, electric, security, lease, credit, background check. (570) 696-3596

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

NANTICOKE

HANOVER TWP

941

941

KINGSTON

Rear Lee Park Ave. 3 bedroom. OSP, References and security required. $600/month 917-225-9961 Mike

Beautiful puppies, AKC registered. $300. Call 570-746-3637

SUNDAY NOV. 6TH 1:00 TO 4:00 $165,000 Call (570)814-1580 after 8:00 a.m. to set an appointment or email RY3_RYE35@ HOTMAIL.COM.

941

KINGSTON

42 Third Avenue 2nd floor, newly remodeled 2 bedroom, 1 bath, fridge & stove included. Washer/dryer hookup. $550 + security. Water & sewer included. No pets. 570-417-2919

347 Hanover St. 1 bedroom, 1st floor, wall to wall carpet, eat-in kitchen with appliances, washer & dryer hookup, porch & shared yard. $400/mo + utilities & security. New energy efficient gas furnace. Call 570-814-1356

NANTICOKE

603 Hanover St 2nd floor, 1 bedroom. No pets. $500 + security, utilities & lease. Photos available. Call 570-542-5330


PAGE 38

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011

V isitus 24/ 7 a twww.v a lleyc hev ro let .c o m TH E W E SE L L M O R E TH A N P R E -O W N E D CH E V Y’ S

TO P D O L L A R FO R TRA DE -I N S

SA S SA A LL EE

C ars • Trucks • R V’s • M otorcycles • A TV’s • C om m ercial

W E SE L L AL L M AK E S & M O D E L S!

2004 CH EV Y AV EO 5 DO O R

2005 CH EV RO LET U PLAND ER

M inivan

O N LY 50K M ILES

2004 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER LT 4x4 LEATH ER

2009 H YUND AI ELANTRA

SED AN

ONE O W N ER

LO W M ILES

O N LY 35K M ILES

ONE O W N ER

# Z 2 5 0 1,1.6 L D O H C,P o wer Seat,Cl o th Seat Trim , Fro nt B u ck et Seats,R ear D efo gger

$

5 995* ,

2010 H YUND AI SO NATA

G LS

# Z 2 5 3 6 A ,A T,A /C,CD ,P W,P D L,Tractio n Co ntro l

$

12 900* ,

2005 CHEVY EQ UINO X LT AW D SU N RO O F

# Z 2 5 3 1A ,Q u ad Seating,7 P assenger, D VD P l ay er,Service by Val l ey Chevy

$

11 999* ,

2003 CHEVY SILVERAD O 1500 4W D Reg. Cab

# 113 4 8 A ,Vo rtec 4 8 0 0 ,V8 ,SFI ,4 Speed, A u to m atic,A ir Co nditio ning,D el u x e Chro m ed Fro nt B u m per,A M /FM Stereo

$

12 999* ,

2006 H YUND AI TUSCO N Lim ited AW D

# 12 0 5 9 A ,A Tw/ O D ,A /C,Leather,Two To ne, P o wer O ptio ns,H eated Seats,Lo w M il es

$

11 999* ,

2005 CH EV RO LET EQ U INO X LT AW D

$

11 999* ,

2009 FO RD FU SIO N SE

SU N RO O F

SU N RO O F

# 12 13 9 A ,A l u m inu m W heel s,D eep Tinted G l ass, Key l essEntry,P o wer Seat

$

# 12 0 2 9 A ,4 Cy l .,A T,A /C,A M /FM /CD ,XM ,P W, P. Lo ck ,P. M irro rs,Su nro o f

12 999* ,

2008 H O ND A CIV IC EX CO UPE LO W M ILES

# 12 0 15 B ,A u to .,A ir,Key l essEntry,6 D isc CD , R ear Spo il er,18 ”A l l o y s,Lo w M il es

$

13 887* ,

2007 FO RD R ANG ER XLT EXTEND ED CAB 4X4

ONE O W N ER

SU N RO O F

LEATH ER

# 12 0 3 8 A ,V6 ,A T,A /C,Su nro o f,Leather, Lu ggage R ack Cro ssbars,Cru ise,P o wer O ptio ns

$

13 999* ,

2009 CH RYSLER TO W N & CO U NTRY

# Z 2 5 2 8 A ,A u to m atic,Leather,H eated Seats, Stereo CD & Cassette,Key l essEntry

$

15 750* ,

2007 FO RD F-150

XL Ext Cab 4x4

# 12 14 3 A ,4 Cy l .,A u to m atic,A ir Co nditio ning,P W,P D L, Til t,Cru ise,NA VIG A TIO N,Spo il er,A l l o y W heel s

$

15 985* ,

2002 CHEVY SILVERAD O 2500HD 4x4 w / Plow

O N LY 45K M ILES

ONE O W N ER

# 119 9 2 A ,A u to m atic,A ir Co nditio ning,A M /FM Stereo w/CD ,B edl iner,R u nning B o ards

$

15 987* ,

2009 TO YO TA TACO M A 4x4 Reg Cab O N LY 14K M ILES

STO W -N -G O

# Z 2 5 3 8 A ,7 P assenger,R ear A /C & H eat,CD , P o wer R ear Vent W indo ws,Q u ad Seating,3 8 K M il es

$

16 750* ,

2007 H YU ND AI V ERACRU Z

# 112 16 A ,4 .6 L V8 A u to m atic w/ O verdrive,A ir,Til t W heel ,A M /FM Stereo ,B edl iner,To w P ack age,?? M il es

$

16 999* ,

2006 CHEVY CO LO RAD O LT 4W D Crew Cab Z71

G LS AW D

# 12 0 6 4 A ,Lo calTrade,1 O wner,6 .0 L V8 H D A u to Trans,Fisher 8 ’P l o w,Lo w M il es

$

16 999* ,

2010 CHRYSLER TO W N & CO UNTRY TO URING

# 119 8 4 A ,To nneau Co ver,Lo calTrade,1 O wner,Sl iding R ear W indo w,B rand New O ff-R o ad Tires,R A R E TR U CK!

$

18 499* ,

2006 FO RD F150 Extended Cab 4x4

STO W -N -G O

ONE O W N ER

O N LY 37K M ILES LEATH ER

# 12 0 5 6 A ,3 rd R o w Se ating,7 P asse nge r, H e ate d Se ats,M P 3 ,SU NR O O F,P o we r Se at, Ke y l e ssEntry,Lo calTrade ,1 O wne r

$

18 999* ,

# 119 9 7A ,Vo rtec 3 5 0 0 A u to .,A /C,Su nro o f, 6 D isc CD ,P W,P D L,A u to Lo ck ,R ear D ifferential

$

18 999* ,

# Z 2 5 2 6 ,Sto w-N-G o Seats,H eated Leather Seats, Fro nt & R ear D VD ,M y G ig R adio ,B ack u p Cam era, P o wer Sl iding D o o rs,P wr. Tail gate,Lo w M il es

$

19 950* ,

# 110 4 1B ,5 .4 L V8 A u to ,P W,P D L,Tinted G l ass,ShiftO n the fl y 4 x 4 ,18 ”Chro m e W heel s,XLTChro m e P k g,B edl iner,Sl iding R ear W indo w,To w P k g,

$

19 999* ,

*Prices plus tax & tags. Prior use daily rental on select vehicles. Select pictures for illustration purposes only. Not responsible for typographical errors.

•1-800-444-7172 V A L L E Y 821-2772 601 K IDDE R S TRE E T, W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A CH E V RO L E T K E N

W A L L A CE ’ S

Mon.-Thurs. 8:30-8:00pm; Fri. 8:30-7:00pm; Sat. 8:30-5:00pm

EXIT 170B OFF I-81 TO EXIT 1. BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH LIGHT. JUST BELOW WYOMING VALLEY MALL.


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011

PAGE 39


PAGE 40

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011

K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N

T H A N K S T O Y O U

2012 2 012 N NISSAN ISSAN ALTIMA ALTIMA 2.5S 2.5S

2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN R ROGUE OGUE S A AWD WD

STK#N 20680 M O D EL# 22211 M SR P $23,905

S TK #N 20533 M O D EL# 13112 V IN # 404067, 403451 M S R P $23,820

20

A T THIS

$

4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PD L , Cru is e, T ilt , F lo o r M a t s

B U Y FO R

19 ,4 9 5

*

$

OR

L EAS E FO R

15 9

*

P ER M O. P lu s Ta x.

* $159 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 24 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea rw / $1697.88 d o w n + $504.12 in fee = $2,202 to ta l d u e a t d elivery; Res id u a l= $15,721.20; $350 NM AC L ea s e Ca s h in clu d ed . S a le p rice p lu s ta x in clu d es $1,250 Nis s a n Reb a te & $500 NM AC Ca p tive Ca s h. S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d e $1000 Nis s a n Reb a te. M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1.

2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN MURANO MURANO

$

2 0 ,9 9 5 W / $ 10 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE

*

OR P lu s Ta x.

$

L EAS E FO R

19 9

*

P ER M O. P lu s Ta x.

* $199 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea rw / $2300.08 d o w n + $601.92 in fee = $2,902 to ta l d u e a td elivery; Res id u a l= $12,669.60; S a le p rice p lu s ta x in clu d es $1,000 Nis s a n Reb a te. S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d e $1000 Nis s a n Reb a te. M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1.

2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN M MAXIMA AXIMA S SEDAN SEDAN

CROSS C ROSS CABRIOLET CABRIOLET C CONVERTIBLE ONVERTIBLE

STK#N 20839 M O D EL# 27011 M SR P $48,020

B U Y FO R

STK#N 19800 M O D EL# 16111 M SR P $31,910

3

TO CHOOS E

B U Y FO R

$

4 0 ,9 9 5

*

$

B U Y FO R

2 6 ,8 9 5

W / $ 2 5 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE

*

OR

$

P lu s Ta x.

L EAS E FO R

2 4 9 P ER M O. P lu s Ta x.

T TH H AA NN KK Y O U T H Y O U N O R TH EA ST A N D C EN TR A L PA For M aking U s The:

*

* $249 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea rw / $3202 d o w n ; Res id u a l= $16,274.10; M u s t q u a lify tier1. $1800 N M AC L ea s e Ca s h in clu d ed . S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $2,500 N is s a n Reb a te.

*S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs . In clu d es $2000 N is s a n Reb a te.

W E

S C AN H ERE FO R S ERVIC E S PEC IAL S

A R E

N N ISSA N D EA LER 1 U M B 299 299 E R

#

IN PEN N SY LV A N IA ** **BA SED O N N ISSA N SA LES V O LU M E TO TA L FO R O C T.2011

2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN P PATHFINDER ATHFINDER S 4X4 4X4 STK#N 20841 M O D EL# 25011 M SR P $31,580

$

2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN MURANO MURANO S A AWD WD

STK#20706 M O D EL# 23211 M SR P $32,130

B U Y FO R

2 7,9 9 5

*

OR

$

W / $ 2 0 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE

L EAS E FO R

*

P ER M O.

$

P lu s Ta x.

* $299 Per m o n t h p lu s t a x. 39 m o n t h lea s e; 12,000 m iles p er yea r; Res id u a l= $13,895.20; M u s tq u a lif y T ier 1. $2,499 D u e & Reg f ees = $2702 t o t a l. In clu d es $3000 L ea s e Ca s h. S a le p rice p lu s t a x& t a gs in clu d es $2,000 N is s a n Reb a t e.

K

N

& inc ent ives

#1 N

E N

*

P ER M O. P lu s Ta x.

* $299 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $15,101.10; M u s t q u a lify T ier1. $1557.88 D o w n p lu s $644.12 in fees = 2202.00 to ta l d u e a td elivery. L ea s e in clu d es $1375 N M AC L ea s e Ca s h. S a le Price + ta x & ta gs in clu d es $2500 N is s a n Reb a te.

2012 2 012 N NISSAN ISSAN F FRONTIER RONTIER KC KC SV SV 4X4 4X4

B U Y FO R

*

$

*S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs . In clu d es $4250 N is s a n Reb a te & $1350 Va lu e T ru ck Bo n u s Ca s h.

Th e

$

V6, Au to , 4x4, A/ C, Cru is e, T ilt, Allo y W heels , K eyles s

2 7,9 9 5

A ll r eb a t es

OR

L EAS E FO R

STK#N 21104 M O D EL# 31412 M SR P $26,645

8 Cyl, Au to , PW , PL , A/ C, Cru is e, S p la s h Gu a rd s , Bed lin er

$

2 6 ,8 9 5

*

W / $ 2 5 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE

2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN T TITAN ITAN C CREW REW C CAB AB S SV V 4 4X4 X4 STK#N 20874 M O D EL# 36411 M SR P $37,470

B U Y FO R

2 2 ,4 9 5

*

OR

$

L EAS E FO R

De a le rin

P O L L O CK

S

A

N

N

*

2 2 9 P ER M O. P lu s Ta x.

*$229 Per m o n t h p lu s t a x. 39 m o n t h lea s e; 12,000 m iles p er yea r; Res id u a l= $16,253.45; M u s tq u a lif y T ier 1. $1999 D u e a td elivery p lu s Reg F ees = $2202. S a le Price + t a x& t a gs in clu d es $2500 N is s a n Reb a t e.

* Ta x a nd Ta g a d d it io na l. Pr io rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib le fo rTypo gr a phic a l Er r o r s . a pplied . * *0 % A PR in lieu o f r eb a t es . As k fo rd et a ils . * * As perN is s a n M o nt hly Sa les V o lu m e R epo rta s

is s a n

IS

B U Y FO R

o f O c t2 0 11.

.E. PA

1- 8 6 6 - 70 4 - 0 6 72

229 M U N DY S TRE E T W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .

w w w .ke n polloc kn is s a n .c om

1


Go Lackawanna 11-06-2011